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z
Area
Wage
Survey

:
'w ~

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Cincinnati, Ohio— Kentucky—
Indiana, Metropolitan Area
July 1979

Preface
This bulletin p rovides resu lts o f a July 1979 survey of occu ­
pational earnings and supplem entary wage benefits in the Cincinnati, Ohio—
Kentucky—
Indiana, Standard M etropolitan S tatistical A re a .
The survey was
made as part o f the Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics' annual area wage survey
program . It was conducted by the Bureau's regio n a l o ffic e in Chicago, 111.,
under the gen eral d irection o f Lois L . O r r , A ssistan t R egion al Com m issioner
for Operations. The survey could not have been accom plished without the
cooperation o f the many firm s whose wage and salary data provided the
basis for the sta tistica l inform ation in this bulletin. The Bureau wishes to
express sin cere appreciation for the cooperation re c e iv e d .
M a teria l in this publication is in the public domain and may be
reproduced without p erm ission o f the F e d e ra l Governm ent. P le a s e cred it
the Bureau o f Labor Statistics and cite the name and number o f this
publication.

Note:
Reports on occupational earnings and supplem entary wage benefits
are available fo r the hotels and m otels (M ay 1978) and laundry and dry
cleaning (July 1979) industries. A lso available are listin gs o f union wage
rates for building trad es, printing trad es, lo c a l-tra n s it operating em ployees,
local tru ck d rivers and h elp ers, and g ro c e ry store em p loyees. F re e copies
o f these are available fro m the B ureau's regio n a l o ffic e s . (See back cover
for a d d resses.)




Area
Wage
Survey
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary

Cincinnati, Ohio— Kentucky
Indiana, Metropolitan Area
July 1979
Contents

Page

Page

Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood
Commissioner
Introduction----------------------------------------------------2

Tables— Continued

October 1979
Tables:

Bulletin 2050- 28

For sale by the Superintendent of
Documents. U.S. Government Printing Of­
fice. Washington, D.C. 20402, GPO
Bookstores, or BLS
 Regional Offices listed
on back cover. Price $2.00. Make checks
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ of Documents.
payable to Superintendent

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Earnings, all establishments:
Weekly earnings of office workers
A - l.
A -2.
Weekly earnings of professional
and technical workers
A-3.
A verage weekly earnings of
office, professional, and
technical w orkers, by sex____________
A -4. Hourly earnings of maintenance,
toolroom, and powerplant
w ork ers__
_ _
_
A-5.
Hourly earnings of m aterial
movement and custodial w o rk e rs _____
A verage hourly earnings of
A-6.
maintenance, toolroom, pow erplant, m aterial movement, and
custodial w orkers, by se x ____________
A-7.
Percent increases in average
hourly earnings fo r selected
occupational groups ..
_
A -8.
A verage pay relationships
within establishments
for w hite-collar
workers .......... ............. ...................
A verage pay relationships
A-9.
within establishments
for blue-collar

3
6
8

Earnings, large establishments—
Continued
A-13. Hourly earnings of maintenance,
toolroom, and powerplant
w orkers
.......... . . .
A-14. Hourly earnings of m aterial
movement and custodial
workers ........... .....
....... .......
A -15. A verage hourly earnings of
maintenance, toolroom, powerplant, m aterial movement, and
c u sto d ial w o r k e r s ,

by sex

?i
- 22

---- 23

10
11

13
14

Establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions:
Minimum entrance salaries for
B -l.
inexperienced typists and clerks__ -----24
B-2.
Late-shift pay provisions for
full-tim e manufacturing
p r o d u c t io n and r e l a te d w o r k e r s
-----25
B-3.
Scheduled weekly hours and days of
....
fu ll-tim e first-sh ift w orkers_
B-4.
Annual paid holidays for full-tim e
workers
__ _ __ __
- 27
B-5.
Paid vacation provisions for

15

fu ll-tim e w o rk e rs

B-6.
B-7.
16

Earnings, large establishments:
A-10. Weekly earnings of office w o rk ers_____ 17
A - l l . Weekly earnings of professional
and technical w orkers_________________ 19
A -12, Average weekly earnings of
office, professional, and
technical workers, by sex ____________ 20

2ft

Health, insurance, and pension
plans for full-tim e w o rk ers ______ -----31
L ife insurance plans for
full-tim e workers
1?

Appendix A. Scope and method of survey_____ -----35
Appendix B. Occupational descriptions______ -----40

Introduction

This a re a is 1 o f 72 in which the U.S. D epartm ent o f L a b o r 's
Bureau o f L ab or S tatistics conducts su rveys of occupational earnings and
rela ted benefits.
(See lis t o f a rea s on inside back c o v e r .) In each area,
earnings data fo r selected occupations (A - s e r ie s tab les) a re c o llected
annually.
Inform ation on establishm ent p ra c tic e s and supplem entary w age
benefits (B - s e r ie s tables) is obtained e v e r y th ird yea r.

W here possib le, data a re presented fo r a ll indu stries and fo r manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing separately.
Data a re not p resen ted fo r sk illed m a in ­
tenance w ork ers in nonmanufacturing because the number of w o rk ers e m ­
ployed in this occupational group in nonmanufacturing is too sm a ll to w arran t
separate presentation.
This table p rovid es a m easu re of w age trends a fte r
elim ination of changes in a v e ra g e earnings caused by em ploym ent shifts
among establishm ents as w e ll as tu rn over o f establishm ents included in
su rvey sam ples.
F o r further d eta ils, see appendix A .

Each y e a r a fte r a ll individual a rea w age su rveys have been c o m ­
pleted, two su m m ary bulletins a re issued.
The fir s t brings togeth er data
fo r each m etrop olitan a re a su rveyed; the second presents national and r e ­
gional estim a tes, p ro jected fro m individual m etrop olita n a rea data, fo r a ll
Standard M etrop olita n S ta tistica l A re a s in the United States, excluding A laska
and Hawaii.

Tables A - 8 and A - 9 p rovid e fo r the f ir s t tim e m easu res of a vera g e
pay relationships within establishm ents.
T h ese m easu res m ay d iffe r co n sid ­
era b ly fr o m the pay relationships of o v e r a ll a v e ra g e s published in tables
A - l through A - 6. See appendix A fo r d etails.

A m a jo r con sid eration in the a rea w age su rvey p ro g ra m is the need
to d escrib e the le v e l and m ovem en t o f w ages in a v a r ie ty o f lab or m a rk ets,
through the an alysis o f ( 1) the le v e l and distrib u tion o f w ages by occupation,
and ( 2) the m ovem ent o f w ages by occupational c a te g o ry and sk ill le v e l.
The p ro g ra m develops in form ation that m ay be used fo r many purposes,
including w age and s a la ry ad m in istration , c o lle c tiv e bargaining, and a s ­
sistance in d eterm in in g plant location. S u rvey resu lts also a re used by the
U.S. D epartm ent o f L a b o r to m ake wage determ inations under the S e rv ic e
Contract A c t o f 1965.

B - s e r ie s tables
Th e B -s e r ie s tables presen t in form a tion on m inim um entrance
s a la rie s fo r inexperienced typists and c le rk s ; la te -s h ift pay provision s and
p ra ctices fo r production and re la te d w o rk e rs in m anufacturing; and data
sep arately fo r production and re la te d w o rk e rs and o ffic e w o rk e rs on sch ed ­
uled w eek ly hours and days of fir s t - s h ift w o rk e rs ; paid holidays; paid v a c a ­
tions; health, insurance, and pension plans; and m o re d eta iled in form ation
on life insurance plans.

A - s e r ie s tables
Appendixes
T ab les A - l through A -6 p ro vid e estim ates of s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly
or hourly earnings fo r w o rk ers in occupations com m on to a v a r ie ty o f
m anufacturing and nonmanufacturing in du stries.
The occupations a re defined
in appendix B.
F o r the 31 la r g e s t su rvey a re a s , tables A -1 0 through A -1 5
provid e s im ila r data fo r establishm ents em ploying 500 w o rk ers or m ore.

Appendix A describ es the methods and concepts used in the a rea
w age su rvey program .
It p rovid es in form a tion on the scope of the area
su rvey, the a re a 's industrial com p osition in m anufacturing, and la b o r m anagement agreem ent coverage.

T a b le A -7 provid es p ercen t changes in a v e ra g e hourly earnings of
o ffic e c le r ic a l w o rk e rs , e le c tro n ic data p ro cessin g w o rk e rs , indu strial
nurses, s k ille d m aintenance trad es w o rk e rs , and unskilled plant w o rk ers.




Appendix B p rovides job d escrip tion s used by Bureau fie ld r e p r e ­
sentatives to c la s s ify w ork ers by occupation.

2

Earnings: Ail establishments
Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
^^W e e k l^ ar ain ^ ^ ^ ™
(standard)
O c c u p a tio n and in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
woiken

Average
weekly
hours1
( standard)

Mean 2

Mediu2

NUMBER

Middle range 2

110

OF

UC RKE RS

R ECEIVIN G

S T R A I G H T - T IME

140

150

160

180

2C0

220

240

260

2 80

300

320

34tf

360

380

40 0

420

440

460

130

140

150

16 C

1 80

200

220

240

260

280

3 00

320

340

360

380

400

4 20

440

4 60

480

94
37
57

281
123
158

332
131

309
187

59
36
23

12
10
2

17

21

6

-

9
5
4
3

10
6

8

79
61
18
7

17

12 2

203
131
72

134

96

18

449
262
187
31

222

8

491
260
231
15

318

201

_

_

11

16

34

22

4

1

1

4

5

21

14

10

-

2

-

6

10
6

i
-

-

13

8

27
13
14

15

-

23
14
9

5

4

1

i

1

i

4
4

8

54
24
30

51

117
62
55

64
39
25

47

42

72

28

11

22

10

36
25

28

11

2
2

31

39

18

11

7

2
1
1

i
i

36

8
6
2

“

“

128
52
76

118
80
38
4

147
69
78
9

94
77
17

79
72
7

22

27
15

5
4

1

-

12

1

1
1

-

-

12
12

i
i
-

_

2
2

9
9
-

-

31

-

-

-

-

1
1

10
8
2

11

1

2

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

2
1
1

_

9

5
5

-

2

-

-

-

_

1

1
1

2
2

1
1

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

25
19

37
15

1

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

22
22

1
1

2
2

15
15

-

22
6
6

22
22
22

1
1
1

~

“

_
~

-

_
-

~

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
2 8 .5
3 9 .5

$224.50
2 44.50

$228.00
2 38.00

22 2 . 0 0

211.00

2 64.00

2 54.00

S E C R E T A R I E S . C L A S S A ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................

169
96
72

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

2 71.00
2 68.50
2 74.00

2 61.00
25 4.0 0
2 66.00

227.002 2 1 . 002 3 3 . 00-

292.50
290.00
293.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N C N N A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................

564
259
305

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
2 8 .5

2 47.50
2 57.50
2 39.00

232.50
23 0.5 0
234.00

2 0 5.0 0 -

292.00
310.00
280.00

_

_

2

_

2 1 1 , 00 -

-

-

-

-

-

2

S E C R E T A R I E S . C L A S S C ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

1.00 A

3 9 .0
2 9 .0
3 8 .5
4 0 .0

243.00
2 52.50
227.50
296.00

243.00
251.00
225.00
293.50

2 0 0 . 00 -

279.00
299.00
265.00
342.50

_

2

2

12

25

597
MO 7
46

-

-

-

-

8

2

2

12

-

-

S E C R E T A R I E S . C L A S S D ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

881
525
356

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

2 18.50
2 32.00
1 9 8.5 0

215.00
23 2.5 0
201.50

193.0 0 213 . 0 0 179.00-

243.50
259.00

_

-

_

6

-

~

202.0 0

-

-

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S E ..................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

106
89

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 96.00
1 95.00

173.00
1 6 9.0 0

1 6 1 .5 0 1 6 1 .5 0 -

238.00
238.00

-

-

-

S T E N O G R A P H E R S ...........................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................
P U B L I C U TT L I T I E S .....................................

771
557
214
152

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

212.00

20 4.0 0

228.00

-

8

2 09.50

2 2 2. 00

-

22 2 . 0 0

2 0 2. 0 0
212.00

245.00

25 5.5 0

1 8 0.5 0 1 8 1.0 0 1 6 8 .0 0 2 0 7.0 0 -

2 63.00
269.00

S T E N O G R A P H E R S . S E N I O R ...............................
MANUF A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

322
257

3 9 .5
2 9 .0
4 0 .0

2 25.00
2 25.00
2 25.50

216.00
2 15.00
250.50

204.002 0 5.0 0 1 8 3.0 0 -

244.50
236.00
263.00

2 0 4.0 0
220.50
2 47.00

1 8 9.0 0
207.50
216.00

1 7 5.0 0 1 5 6.5 0 2 0 0 . 00-

214.50
260.00
332.00

2

66
8

2 0 8.0 0 1 9 0.0 0 2 6 0.5 0 -

S T E N O G R A P H E R S . G E N E R A L ............................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

148
104

2 8 .5
2 9 .5
4 0 .0

T R A N S C R I B I N G - M A C H I N E T Y P I S T S ..................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

147
76
71

3 8 .5
2 9 .0
3 8 .0

1 76.50
1 96.50
1 5 5.5 0

1 7 2.5 0
1 97.50
1 51.00

1 5 1 .5 0 1 6 5.0 0 1 4 1 .5 0 -

200 . 5Q
216.00
173.00

T Y P I S T S ............................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

1 ,08 0
299
781
69

3 9 .0
2 8 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

163.50
186.50
1 5 5 . CO
1 9 4.0 0

1 5 5.5 0
185.00
1 5 0.0 0
17 7.5 0

1 3 6.0 0 16 4.0 0 136.001 5 1.0 0 -

180.50
206.00
168.00
228.00

469

2 9 .0

18 1.0 0

175.00

156.00-

T YPISTS.

CLASS

A .............................................

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

324
42

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 7 1.5 0

200.00

16 8.5 0
1 77.50

15 0.0 0 1 7 0.5 0 -

4

31
-

4

31

-

2

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

17

48

40

11 0

-

-

109
30
79

229
104
125

168
127
41

107
7

97
92
5

5

2
1

34
31

-

_

-

-

-

-

75
74

48
37

_

2

-

3

1
“

11
10

44
4
40
40

57
56

34
32

35

-

70
40

27

_

13
13

5
5

42
35

8

21

115
96
19
3

147
129
18

6

209
157
52
45

15
4

21
12

134
126

8

8

-

4

-

-

-

_

9

-

-

-

-

6

-

~

-

-

-

8
8

9

100
8

-

-

4

30
16
4

12

-

8
8

4

5

6

7
-

17

6

7

16

32
15
17

24

-

37

77

167

1

6

6

1

12
6

1

2
14
9

20
12
8

21
21

12
12

14

“

-

213
40
173
4

190
53
137
24

145
91
54
5

52
32

20
2

55
39
16

95

51

49
4

20
2

21

21

11
6
2

2
2

4

-

-

-

8

2
2

3

2
1
1
_
-

_
-

2
2

“
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

32

18

10

71

161

“

“

12

197.00

-

20

18

16

83

133

1 85.00

-

20

18

12

81

101

3

8

-

2

75
44
39

11

36

4

-

100

126
9
3

3

1 14
17
97
4

212.00

32

134
63
71
4

6

9

102

77
46
31

30
14
16
4

2

11

85
28
57

21

S ee foo tn o tes at end o f ta b le s .




OF —

COLLARS)

130

2.83 9
1 ,588
1 .251
159

1 9 6.0 0 -

(IN

120

.................................................................
MANUF A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

$ 1 9 7 . 0 0 —5 2 6 6 . 0 0
2 1 1 . 00- 2 7 2 . 5 0
1 8 5 .0 0 - 253.50
2 1 4 .0 0 - 305.00

EARNINGS

AND
UNDER

120

s e c r e t a r ie s

MEEKLY

23

9

2

41
15

2

9

-

2

8
8

-

-

8
4
4

1
1

1

_

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

5
-

3

_

2

_

-

5
5

2
1
1

-

5
5

8
6
2
1

-

2
2

-

-

8

7

1

2

_

2

_

_

_

_

11
6

2
2

1

“

1
1

i
i

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979— Continued
"""^Veekl^Tarnlng^^™
(standard)
Number
of
wotken

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard

NUMBER

110

CF

WORKERS

R E CE IVIN G

STRAIGHT -T IM E

WEEKLY

EARNINGS

( IN

DOLLARS)

OF—

Mean 2

Median 2

Middle range

2

120

130

190

15 C

160

130

200

220

290

260

2 80

200

220

290

260

280

9 00

920

990

960

120

O ccu pation and in d u s try d iv is io n

130

190

150

160

180

200

220

290

260

280

2 00

220

290

260

280

900

920

990

960

9S0

37

57

199

98

19

2

6

9
-

193

36

-

12

-

1

1

3
2

1
1

9

-

12
1
1

X.
-

51

l
-

-

36

13
85

60
55
5

1

6

1 3C
38
92
9

57

1

191
39
107
9

109

67

5
9

7

_

_

1
66
8

33
25

9

10

60
35
25

8

2

1
1

7
7

1
6
6

-

96
9
37

36
5
31

99

1
1

1
1

1
1

95
25
70

68

18
-

AND
UNDER

T Y P I S T S — CONTINUED
T Y P I S T S * C L A S S 8 .............................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

S ll

F I L E C L E R K S ................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G . . .............................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

586
185

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
9 0 .0

t 15 0.5 0
172.00
193.00
189.50

$199.00
169.00
138.00
151.00

37

3 8 .5
. 3 9 .5
3 8 .5
9 0 .0

195.50
155.00
191.00
197.00

1 39.50
150.00
1 35.00
189.00

1 2 5.0 0 1 3 8.0 0 1 2 3.0 0 190.00-

151.50
1 71.50
1 99.00
237.50

F I L E C L E R K S * C L A S S B ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

269
7<
t
195

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 99.00
1 58.50
1 38.50

199.00
1 55.50
1 90.00

128.001 5 0.0 0 123.00-

1 51.50
1 71.50
1 51.50

22

F I L E C L E R K S * C L A S S C ................. ................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

279
89
190
31

3 8 .5
9 0 .0
3 7 .5
9 0 .0

139.00
193.50
137.00
1 78.00

133.00
150.00
130.50
190.00

123.001 2 2 . 001 2 3 .0 0 1 3 8 .5 0 -

1 50.00
1 50.00
13 6.0 0
236.00

26

M E S S E N GE RS ...................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

193
77
116

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

153.50
150.50
1 56.00

151.00
1 53.00
151.00

1 3 2.5 0 1 2 6.0 0 1 3 3.0 0 -

16 5.0 0
171.50
159.50

11
9

2

S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S .....................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

9<l
59

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

195.00
186.00

1 8 2.00
169.00

1 5 5 .0 0 1 5 3 .0 0 -

2 35.50
19 9.5 0

1
1

OPERATORr e c e p t i o n i s t s ........................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

<(93
235
208
25

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
9 0 .0

168.00
165.50
170.50
2 05.50

156.00
160.00
1 52.00
1 60.00

1 9 0.0 0 1 3 5.0 0 190.00138.50-

183.50
189.00
180.00
297.50

-

-

ORDER C L E R K S .............................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

780
531
299

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

198.00
1 85.50
225.00

192.00
180.00
225.00

1 6 2.0 0 1 6 0.0 0 170.00-

226.00

92
92

260.00

ORDER C L E R K S * C L A S S A ...............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

309
138

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

232.00

235.00

2 0 0 . 00-

210.00

20 0 .0 0

1 9 2.0 0 -

260.00
290.00

ORDER C L E R K S * C L A S S B ...............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

971
393
78

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

176.00
17 6.5 0
171.00

1 70.00
170.00
166.00

1 5 5.0 0 15 0.0 0 161.50-

200.00
202 .00

92
H2

1 80.00

-

A C C O U N T I N G C L E R K S ................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

2 .0 93
1 .050
1 .093

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
9 0 .0

185.00
193.50
17 6.5 0
22 9.0 0

1 79.50
1 80.00
168.00
291.00

1 5 2.0 0 1 6 0.0 0 197.501 8 5.0 0 -

209.50

a
l
7

151
<(57
27

<101

$ 1 3 5 . 0 0 —$ 1 6 0 . 0 0
1 5 2 .0 0 - 186.00
1 3 1 .0 0 - 151.00
1 3 5 .0 0 - 291.00

98

6
92
-

-

22
6
20

99
9

1
98

109
67
92

21

-

9

69
27
92

38
25
13

6

39
35
-

1C

9

2

-

12
6
6

_

-

9

-

19
9
5

-

7
_

9
_

7
7

9
4

2

2

-

-

2

3

_

•

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

_

2

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

_

_

2

1

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

-

2
2

_

_

_
-

5
63
9

18

19
7

55

12

3C
9

12

28
18

19

21

12

93

10

5
5

7
9

1

13
9

19
17

11

3

6

6

19

_

_

-

9

1

-

-

10

-

-

28

56
91
15

57
16
91

73
53

60
36
29

1

_
_
_

8

“

9

-

-

2
1
1
1

5

20

20

-

87
28
59
9

9

-

1

32
32

55
59

179

-

9
-

112

197
197

22

i
i

1

-

1

67

20
8
22

97
3

-

71
25
26

6
6

9

39
59
30

-

99

_

-

3

-

5

59
59

65

2

21

27
5

6
6

97

5

12
12

28

“

96
29
133
38
95

77
97
30

83

2_3
3.3

11
11

a

88

3

937
257
230

331
173
153
19

183
39
99

121

66

61
60
20

99
17
5

26

8

3

2

2
1
1

S W IT C H B O A R D

95

210.00

22 0.0 0
193.50
286.00

21
7

1

i

-

-

50
99

1

i

-

1

96
91
55

176
55

176
87
89
9

219
75
199
13

121
9

S e e foo tn o te s at end o f t a b le s .




32
32

4

1

27
7

-

6

37

11
26

2
2
_
-

129
90
29
3

76
99

-

_

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

2

1

_

_

3

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

2

i
i

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

59

16

17

19

-

28
16

11

12

10

1
1

5
5

*»
9

3

“

“

12

~

-

4
9

-

_

~
-

_

-

-

~

-

~

-

-

-

Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979— Continued
NUMBER

(standard)
Num ber
of
workers

A verage
w eekly
hours1
(standard)

110

OF

WORKERS

R E CE IVIN G

S T R A I G H T - T IM E

WEEKLY

EAR NIN GS

(IN

DOLLARS)

OF—

ACCOUNTING

M ean 2

M edian 2

M iddle range

2

120

130

180

150

160

180

200

220

2 80

260

2 80

300

320

380

360

380

80 0

820

880

860

120

O ccu p a tion and in d u s try d iv is io n

130

180

150

160

1 8C

200

220

280

260

280

3 00

320

380

360

380

8 00

82 0

880

860

880

-

12

21

17

89

-

-

12

78
52
26

39
5

87
32
15
5

83
38
9
5

18
9
5
5

13
9
4

-

8

12
10
2
2

-

8

98
38
60
5

1
1

21
8

183
53
90

8
8

12

105
27
73
~

72
3_3

-

1
88
8

-

-

-

-

-

8
1

88

155
55
IOC

130
78
56
9

382
230
152

138

35

86

2

_

_

_

_

_

_

38

2
2

8

86

19
17

11

120
68
6

89
28

4
-

-

2

-

-

-

5C
38

58
36

12

22

44
30
18

89
37

192

881
130
261
37

305
168
137
81

67
33
38
7

201

83

11

57
188

183
89
98

151
71
80
5

2 80
123
117
37

162
119
83
33

ANO
UNDER

C LE RKS— C ONT INUE D

A C C O U N T I N G C L E R K S . C L A S S A ..................
MANUF A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N N A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

7G9
315
858
87

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
8 0 .0

$2 10 .5 0
23 7.5 0
191.50
2 80.00

$199.00
2 30.00
188.00
2 50.00

A C C O U N T I N G C L E R K S . C L A S S B ..................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

1 » 32 A
735
588

88

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
8 0 .0

1 7 0.5 0
175.00
165.00
2 18.00

165.00
170.00
1 6 0.0 0
2 3 8.5 0

1 8 8.0 0 15 0.0 0 1 3 8 .0 0 1 5 1.0 0 -

1 87.50
1 88.00
179.50
283.50

825
298
127

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

2 05.50

20 0.0 0

212.00
189.50

2 08.50
18 8.0 0

1 6 0.0 0 16 6.5 0 158.00-

239.50
280.00
201.50

-

2

-

27
9
18

E N T R Y O P E R A T O R S ...........................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

1 .85 7
G5 7
800
161

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
8 0 .0

1 76.00
178.50
178.00
2 1 5.0 0

1 6 9.0 0
1 70.00
1 6 8.0 0
196.00

152.0 0 1 5 5.0 0 1 5 0.0 0 1 7 9.5 0 -

189.00
193.50
187.50
251.00

15

81
7
38

119
58

1 2C
52

65
-

68

K E Y E N T R Y O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S A ............
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................

588
238
386

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 8 2.0 0
189.00
17 7.0 0

177.50
175.00
17 7.5 0

161.0015 7.0 0 1 6 1.0 0 -

19 8.0 0

15
15

3

82
31

27

K E Y E N T R Y O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S B ............
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .................... .. .............

873
819
858
150

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
8 0 .0

172.00
173.00
171.50
21 5.0 0

1 68.00
1 65.00
162.00
199.00

1 5 0 .0 0 1 5 3.5 0 1 8 0.0 0 1 7 6.0 0 -

18 6.0 0
1 88.50
182.00
250.50

_

38

-

38

P A Y R O L L C L E R K S .........................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
KEY

$ 1 6 8 . 0 0 —$ 2 8 1 . 5 0
1 9 6 .0 0 - 2 76.00
1 5 6 .0 0 - 215.00
1 9 8 .0 0 - 291.50

200.0 0
190.00

7

81
83

-

-

-

_

3

~

i

11
11

15

3

11
77
23
58

8

S e e fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le s .




5

5
“
159
75

88
8

-

6
21
93

86
87

101
91
5
81
30

1

-

39

8

21

1

3

15

"

88

43
38
5

58
87

18
18

11

2

58

37

26

20
23
28
13

11
7

21
33
18
35
16
19
19
5
18
18

8

10

29
26

16
16

7

2

6
6

5

-

30

20

6

4
16
16

28
28

4
7
7

-

-

10

4

5

7
3

8
-

8
1

8

8

12
2
10
9

2
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

1
1

-

_

_

3

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

3
3

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

~
-

-

-

-

~

2
2

3

_

_

_

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

7

2

“

5
5

3

8

3

7

2
1

5

_

8

9
9

1
1

-

-

-

7

10
1

_

-

-

1

1

_

-

-

7

-

_

2
2

1
1
3

_
-

4
4
4

_
-

2

-

-

_

Table A-2. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
^"weeklyTear nings^™

NUMBER

O ccu pation and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

A v erage
w e e k ly
hours1
(standard'

M ean 2

M edian 2

M iddle range 2

OF

WORKERS

120

(standard)
Number
of
wodcers

190

160

180

200

220

290

260

280

300

320

390

360

380

900

920

990

960

980

50 0-

ANO
UNDER
190

160

1 80

200

220

290

260

280

300

320

390

3 60

380

900

920

990

960

980

500

520

-

9
-

20

29

99

20

32
15
17

69
17
97

9

7
7

61

95
17
28

2

-

63
25
38

10

9
16

10

32

56
17
39

25

12

28

72
29
93

81

13
7

1

9

28

23

6

-

-

-

-

3

19

35
7
28

7

1
6

6
6

7

56
9
97

1

-

58
15
93

29

-

2
1

12

-

19
E
13

38

“

12
2
10

20
9
16

56
29
27

53
15
38

90
13
27

13
9
9

23
5
18

10 1

80

58

91
60

28
52

13
95

99
15
39

23
7
16

32
3

COMP UT ER S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( 3 U S I N E S S ) ................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

SIO
193
917

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

i 38 1 .0 0
382.00
380.50

$379.50
3 79.50
385.00

COMPUTER S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) , C L A S S A .................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

265
69
196

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

9 3 7.5 0
9 3 0.0 0
99 0.5 0

933.00
918.00
995.00

9 1 2.0 0 3 9 6.0 0 91 2.0 0 -

9 61.00
9 50.50
9 61.00

COMPUTER S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S B ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

29 9
IOC
199

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

35 5.0 0
372.50
39 3.5 0

395.50
353.00
39 5.5 0

3 2 8.0 0 3 3 3.5 0 3 2 0 .0 0 -

376.00
909.00
365.00

752

30 5.0 0
3 0 9.0 0
3 0 5.5 0

302.00
307.50
3 0 0.0 0

2 5 3.5 0 26 2.0 0 250.00-

3 95.00
331.00
350.00

-

-

$ 3 3 1 . 0 0 —$ 9 3 2 . 0 0
3 3 3 .5 0 - 9 28.50
3 3 0 .0 0 - 9 39.50

-

3 2 1.0 0 3 2 9.5 0 -

9 01.50
9 03.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
C L A S S B ...................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

379
133
296

3 9 .0
9 0 .0
3 8 .5

30 6.5 0
30 3.5 0
308.00

3 08.00
303.00
315.00

2 7 0.0 0 2 8 2.0 0 2 6 5.0 0 -

336.00
3 25.50
392.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
C L A S S C...................................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

1 91
156

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

297.00
25 1.5 0

295.00
25 0.0 0

2 1 0 . 00 225.00-

288.00
288.00

-

COMP UT ER O P E R A T O R S .............................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ....................................

706
313
393

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
9 0 .0

29 0.5 0
298.00
2 3 9.5 0
319.00

227.00
29 0.0 0
218.50
269.00

198.00219.00188.002 6 3.0 0 -

269.00
268.50
269.00
9 15.50

13

COMPUTER O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S A ...............
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

162

2 9 3.0 0
27 6.5 0
3 09.50

263.00
250.00
2 9 5.0 0

225.002 5 0.0 0 2 2 1 .0 0 -

3 99.50
285.50
907.00

-

99

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

COMPUTER O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B ................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ........................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............................................

288
139
199

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

25 1.0 0
26 9.0 0
2 39.50

291.50
250.00
2 28.50

2 1 8.0 0 227.5020 0.0 0 -

276.00
2 89.00
269.00

-

COMPUTER O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S C ...............
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

256
106
150

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

19 5.5 0
209.00
1 8 6.0 0

192.00

1 6 7.0 0 1 8 8.5 0 1 6 1.5 0 -

219.00
227.50
2 03.50

13

end

of

-

9

15

9

15

-

DOLLARS)

-

-

1

7

1

1
6

57

27

105

99

11

20

11

35

16

85

38

103
28
75

9
9

11
10

15
19

7
5

23
13

19
13

30

17

22

11

26

57
18
39

39
7
32

19
7

12

5
5

u

-

67

26
7
19

20
97
“

-

-

-

23

3

7
7

8
8

3
3

1
1

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

28

6
2

1
1

_

-

2
2

9

-

-

29

6
22

12
1
11

29
26

8
6

12
11

9

1

-

2

8

-

-

“

3

20
9
16

-

2
2

-

-

-

10

99
27

9

16

22

81
39
92

10
1C

90

15

12
12

39
39

13
13

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

57
95

-

21

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

82
28
59
9

126
97
79

96
52
99

89
69
15

19
7
7

21

19

7

9

23

3

-

1

3

3

-

-

-

2

"

2

7
7

i
i
-

-

12

2
2

_

7
19
7

8
8

11

39
19
15

“

76
28
98
28

9
9

19

25
19

32
30

9

7

13

6

7

-

11

2

2

19

3

12
2
10

5

7

6S
20

37

57

22

21

7
5

19
7
7

_

-

-

-

8

12
9

18
7

20

35
25

8

11

99

17

10

35

55
16
39

60
39

11

39
18
16

17
19
3

10

21

38
27

6

28

36

“

13

10

38

99

-

-

20

520
ANO
OVER

12
8

-

26
7
19

OF—

17
3
19

5
5

13

2
-

-

tables.




(IN

“

-

“

365.00
365.00

at

EARNINGS

22

363.00
361.00

footnotes

-

WEEKLY

2

3 8 .5
3 8 .0

See

ST RAI GHT --T IM E

-

-

182
139

189.50

-

-

COMPUTER P ROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
C L A S S A ..................................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

210.00

-

~

591

68

-

-

-

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

88

-

-

-

COMP UT ER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) . . . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

211

R ECEIVIN G

10

16
5

1
1

2

3

“

~

-

”

3

2
21
21

-

-

-

-

-

2

3

23

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2

2
21

-

7

3

i
i

-

6

5
5

-

-

“

6
6

2
2

5

_

_

3

-

-

-

-

3

2
2

-

-

5

“

“

-

1
1

_

i
i

_

7

3

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

~

“

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table A-2. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979— Continued
^^WeeMyTarnln^^^™
(standard)
Number
of
woiken

O ccu p a tion and in d u s try d iv is io n

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

Median2

220

240

260

2 80

300

320

340

360

380

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

3 00

3 20

340

360

380

400

12

87
75

109

AND
OVER

101
8

52
43
9

20
20

14
14

349.50
354.00

-

-

-

-

-

6

23

~

11

28
26

31
28

15
13

34
31

44
35

19
19

14
14

238.00248.00-

314.00
314.50

-

_

12

16

10

42
32

36
36

61
54

60
59

48
47

61
60

75
70

8
8

1
1

240.00
240.00

-

4

48
40

_

_

_

6

87
70

_

“

65
38

8

“

29
13

19

225.50

2 0 0.0 0 2 1 0.0 0 -

6

-

-

~

-

-

187.50

176.50-

203.00

-

8

15

36

26

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

259.00
254.50

25 0.0 0
237.00

184.00175.00-

345.50
342.50

4
4

25
25

31
31

28

26

14

16

10

4

21
21

6
6

69
57

13

22

9
5

8

22

6
6

254.00

210.00

17 2.5 0 -

340.00

-

6

23

13

3

1

-

2

-

2

6

24

7

301.50
3 03.50

291.00
291.00

2 7 0.5 0 2 7 4.0 0 -

335.00
335.50

-

-

-

-

4

2
2

14
13

20

19
19

10

11

9

9

5
5

2
2

D R A F T E R S . C L A S S B ..........................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

422
379

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

272.00
277.50

270.00
2 7 8.0 0

D R A F T E R S . C L A S S C ..........................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

289
173

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 18.50
2 25.00

22 0 . 0 0

D ..........................................

86

3 9 .5

18 8.5 0

E L E C T R O N I C S T E C H N I C I A N S ...............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

276
227

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

87

4 0 .0

end

200

76
73
3

2 7 5.0 0 2 9 0.0 0 -

at

180

12

320.00
322.00

foo tn o tes

160

107
92
15

316.00
3 23.00

See

140

132
105
27

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

3

30

2

of tables.




DOLLARS I

129
106
23

217
180

98
89

(IN

143
106
37

D R A F T E R S . C L A S S A ..........................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

R E G I S T E R E D I N D U S T R I A L N U R S E S ..................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

EARNINGS

85
62
23

211.00

B.

WEEKLY

119
69
50

$247.50
258.00

2 2 0. 0 0

CLASS

S T R A I G H T - T IME

9

$2 53 .0 0
26 1.5 0

T E C H N IC IA N S .

R E CE IVIN G

-

$ 2 0 5 . 5 0 —$ 3 0 0 . 0 0
2 1 2 .0 0 - 308.50
1 7 9 .5 0 - 250.00

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

ELECTRONICS

WORKERS

AND
UN0ER
140

Middle range 2

1.090
874
21G

CLAS S

OF

120
Mean 2

D R A F T E R S .........................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................

DRAFTERS.

NUMBER

7

8

18

-

6

_
_

6
5

Table A-3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex,
Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
Ayem e.
(m e a n * )

O ccupation ,

sex,

3 and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

of
workers

OFFICE

OCCUPATIONS
MEN

W eek ly
hour*
(standard)

W eek ly
earning!1
(standard)

A v e ra ge
(m e a n 2 )

A verage
(m e a n 2 )

Number

O ccupation ,

sex,

3 and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

W eekly
hours1
(standard)

W eekly
earnings1
(standard)

O ccupation ,

3 and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

W eek ly
hours*
(standard)

W eek ly
earnings1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— C O N T I N U E D

O FFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— C O N T I N U E D

-

sex.

Number
of
workers

560

39 • 5
32 • 5

k l 8 0 .00
180.00
1 79.50

11*4

3 9 .5

201.50
1 98.50

368
78

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 2 .0

174.50
175.00
171.00

3 2 .0
3 9 .5

182.00
190.00
174.00

4 0 .0

225.50

3 9 .0

2 06.00

3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0

188.00
235.00

-, # r
*
3S• 5

2*4*4.00
223.00

195

3 2 .5
3 2 .5

147
103

* 40.0

2 03.50
219.50
246.00

147

215.00
230.00

225.00
225.50

3 8 .5

176.50

2 4 9.5 0

188

4 0.0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE

82
55

T Y P I S T S .................

2 3 9.5 0
214.00

io e

4 0 .0

OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN

, „

183 . 0 0
192.00

3 9 .5

66
3 9 .0
3 C .0
3 8 .5

162
96

3 8 .5

235.00
2*4*4.50
222.50
264.00

324
42

171.50

1 *0 0 *4
597
**0 7

3 2 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

2*43 . 0 0
253.50
227.50
2 9 6.0 0

881
525
356

3 2 .0
3 2 .0

2 18.50
23 2.0 0
198.50

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

3 2 .5
3^.0
3 8 .5
3 9 .5

4 0 .0

.

PU R I TP

I I TTI T T T F S . - . .............................

268

'9

0

1*4 7

50

1 5 8.5 0
1 38.00

194

1*229
680

20 2 . 0 0
2 07.00
190.50

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

3 9 .0
3 2 .5

1 93.50

4 0 .0
K EY

ENTRY

OP E RA TO R S *

CLA SS

A ............

K EY

ENTRY

OPERATORS.

CLA SS

B ............

00

3 2 .0

176.00
178.00
174.00
215.50
1 81.00
187.00
177.00

1*43.50
190
3“1

2 1 2.5 0
209.50
2 2 1.5 0

3 7 .5
40 . 0

172.50
172.50
1 72.00
2 15.50

1 54.50
1 95.00
1 86.00

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN
COMP UT ER

168

00

2 05.50

S e e foo tn o tes at end o f tab le s .




b

399

196.00
195 .0 0

770
557
213

class

1*45 00
155.00

179

106
82

,

«4C . 0

3 9 .0

cle r k s

MANUFACTURING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

169.50
1 73.50
1 6*4 .5 0
2 18.00

3 9 .5

ACCOUNTI NG

1*49 50
17 2.0 0
1 42.00

453

247.50
257.50
239.00

1 86.50
1 54.50
183 • j 0

4 0 .0

583
3 2 .0
3 2 .5
3 8 .5

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............................. .. • ..............

00
202 .0 0

60 7
271.00
26 8.5 0

56 *
4
259
305

A ...............

CLASS

181

469

1 .58 8
1 .23 0

.

„

1

-

2 t 81 8

c if r k s

7^

777
OFFICE

npnFr

8

SYSTEMS

ANALYSTS
387.50
389.50
3 86.50

Table A-3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex,
Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979— Continued
Average
(mean*)
O ccu pation ,

s e x , 3 and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
worker!

Week hr
hours
(standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

C OMP UT ER

C O MP UT E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) — C ONT INUED
SYST EMS

O ccupation ,

sex,

3 and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Weekly
hours1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN— C O N T I N U E D

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN— C O N T I N U E D

COMP UT ER

Average
(mean2 )
Number
of
workers

OP ERA TO RS

-

» * >
O ccu pation ,

sex.

3 an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND
OCCUPATIONS C OMP UT E R

CONTINUE D

SYSTEMS

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

50
78

3 9 .5
3 8 .5

277.50
28A.OO

C OMP UT ER

Weekly
hours r
(standard)

ANALYSTS

SYSTEMS

113

3 9.0

200

3 8 .5

3A 1.50
C OMP UT ER O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S B ...............
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

B ..................................

196

3 9 .0

165

3 9 .5

265.00

82
83

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

285.00
2A5.50

COMP UT ER

CLASS

176
65

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

193.00
212.50
181.50

C OMP UT E R

PROGRAMMERS

(B U S IN E S S ).

P ROGRAMMERS

C OMP UT ER

(B U S IN E S S )....

PR OGRA MME RS

552
165
-87

3 8 .5
AC . 0

1.012

A0 . 0
A0 . 0
A0 . 0

25 5.0 0
261.50
225.00

C OMP UT ER

P ROGRAMMERS

(B U SIN E S S).

C O M P UT E R

PROGRAMMERS

(B U S IN E S S )....

O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S C ...............
....................... ..........................

31A .50
3 1 2 . 5 0 d r a f t e r s ........................................................................
m a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................................
" I '"''0
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

83 9
173

2 99.00

3 3 .0
C O M P UT E R O P E R A T O R S .............................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ....................................

(B U S IN E S S ).
186

237

231.50

3 9 .0
3 9.0

237.00
229.50

<40 .0

HOC
265

2 78.00

10*4

231.50
259
166

PR OGRA MME RS

*40 . 0
AO . 0

220•50
226.00

2 76
22 7

311.50
C OMP UT E R

*40 . 0

25*4.5 0

201.50

(B U S IN E S S ).

102

262.00

228.00
R E G IS T E R E D

ELECTRONICS
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

S ee foo tn o tes at end o f tables




279.00
280.00

359.00
m a n u f a c t u r in g

C O MP U T E R

*351.00
358.00

ANALYSTS

* 43 0 .0 0

(B U S IN E S S ).

Weakly
earnings1
(standard)

TE C H N IC A L
WOMEN

( B U S I N E S S ) ................................................................

ANALYSTS

Number
of
worker!

197
272
28

2 9 .5
2 9 .0
AC . 0

2 5 9 . CO
230.50
3 A 1 .00

TE C H N IC IA N S .

CLA SS

E.

87

*40 . 0

INDUSTRIAL

N U R S E S ..................

92

3 9 .5

3 03.00
3 05.50

Table A-4. Hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
Hourly earnings 4
Number
of
workers

O ccupation and in d u s try d iv is io n

Mean 2

Median^

NUMBER

Middle range

OF

5.00
AND
UNDER
5 . 0 0 UNDER
5.20

2

WORKERS

R E CE IVIN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E

9.00

9 .40

9.8010 .2 0 1 0 .6 0 1 1 .0 0 1 1 .4011 .8012 .

6.00 6.20

6 .60

7 .00

7 .40

5.40

5 .60

5 .80

6 .0 0

6. 2C 6 .6 0

7 .00

7.40

7.80

8 .20

8.60

9 .00

9.40

9 .8 01 0 .2 0 1 0 .6 0 1 1

2 0 1 2 . 60

2
2

5
4

18
17

2
2

26
9

7
7

13
13

4
4

9
9

17
13

1

-

1
1

1

-

~

~

22
22

_

9

2
2

84
83

156
156

57
57

55
55

95
90

45
32

30
29

34
34

160
160

-

2

5
5

134

-

“

2
2

“

2
2

1

_

18

3

16

5
5

-

-

-

6
6

-

11

2
2

-

1

19
19

2

12

7
7

23

-

28
28

_

-

2
2

_

-

4
4

10
10

21
21

45
45

47
31

4
4

40
40

50
50

40
40

40
40

_

-

-

-

30
29

66
66

146
146

113
113

332
332

204
204

10
10

161
155

4
4

-

-

11
11

145
145

9
4
5
4

17
17
-

30
30
-

10 1

25
-

92

-

2

25
23

72
71

64
31
32
23

350
37
313
313

-

-

58
34
24
24

6
6

55
55

126
126

-

-

-

-

895
86 <
i

8.72
8.72

8 .52
8 .36

7 .7 5 7 .7 5 -

1 0 .0 5
1 0 .0 5

M A I N T E N A N C E P A I N T E R S .......................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

135
l i t

8 .10

7.56
7.94

7 .1 7 7 .4 9 -

9 .30
9.30

2

_

1

8 .27

-

-

-

M A I N T E N A N C E M A C H I N I S T S ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

33 G
320

8.29
8 .31

8.60
8 .67

7 .5 2 7 .5 2 -

9 .10
9 .32

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

15
15

-

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS ( M A C H I N E R Y ) . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

1 ? 462
1 • 43 2

7.97

8 .15
8 .15

7 .2 7 7 .2 7 -

8 .50
8 .50

_
-

30
13

-

8 .0 1

48
48

94
94

58
52

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

. 0 0 1 1 . 4 0 1 1 . 8 0 1 2 . 20

8 . 20

5.80

M A I N T E N A N C E E L E C T R I C I A N S ............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

_

20
2C
_
-

133

21

“

“
-

3

-

-

-

“

2
2

~

2
2

6
6

MECHANICS

( MOTOR V E H I C L E S ) ...............................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G . . .............................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ....................................

821
273
548
471

9 .31
8.38
9.77
9 .94

9 .89
8 .38
1 0 .2 5
1 0 .2 8

8 .6 3 6 .9 4 9 .4 8 9 .4 9 -

1 0 .2 8
9 .69
1 0 .2 8
1 0 .2 8

M A I N T E N A N C E P I P E F I T T E R S ...............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

496
496

8 .92
8.92

8 .70
8 .70

7 .8 3 7 .8 3 -

W O R K E R S ....

53

8.86

7„. 9 8

M I L L W R I G H T S ...............................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

372
372

9.27
9.27

MAINTENA NCE
P U B L IC

T R AD ES H E L P E R S .......................
U T I L I T I E S .....................................

172
41

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS ( T O O L R O O M ) . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

-

2
2

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19
19
-

52
52
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

2
2

40
40

58
58

56
56

89
89

39
39

25
25

-

-

-

-

1

2

7

18

3

-

2

-

-

20

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

22
22

-

-

-

-

58

-

-

-

201
201

-

-

12
12

_

-

10
10

_

-

39
39

_

-

27
27

58

-

3
3

-

-

2

_

2

5

1C

6

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
20

_

1

10
2

_

-

8
8

07

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

95
95

139
139

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

_

-

49
49

_

-

4
4

_

-

29
29

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

11
11

11
11

19
19

178
178

4

-

-

-

4

-

4
4

-

-

168
168

-

-

56
56

_

-

1
1

_

-

5
5

_

-

_

_

20

10

24

-

22

10
10

2

9
9

23
23

10
10

-

3

34
34

-

-

52
44

-

-

40
40

-

-

6
2

7

_

13

7
7

1
1

_

32
28

14
14

17
16

2
1

46
42

26
26

_

-

14
14

-

_

-

-

1

-

1
1

-

1 0 .4 0
1 0 .4 0

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

7 .8 3 -

1 0 .4 3

-

-

-

-

1 0 .4 0
1 0 .4 0

8 .36 8 .36 -

1 0 .4 3
1 0 .4 3

_

_

-

-

-

7.14
7 .80

7 .27
7 .90

6 .7 4 6 .7 4 -

7.27
9 .98

13
*9

2
-

-

445
445

8.42
8.42

7.83
7.83

7 .7 5 7 .7 5 -

1 0 .4 9
1 0 .4 9

_

_

_

-

-

~

TOOL AND D I E M A K E R S ..........................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

457
457

9.19
9 .19

8 .72
8 .72

8 .6 4 8 .6 4 -

1 0 .6 6
1 0 .6 6

-

_

_

-

-

-

S T A T I O N A R Y E N G I N E E R S .......................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

244

8 .39
8 .73

8.56
8 .56

7 .5 5 8 .1 3 -

8.95
9 .06

2

_

_

_

201

-

-

-

B O I L E R T E N D E R S .......................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G .................................... .............

181
169

7 .86
7 .89

8 .32
8 .32

6 .7 8 6 .83 -

8.83
8.83

i
i

_

1

*

OF—

8 .60

5.60

$ 8 .5 4
8 .70

SH EET-M ET AL

W orkers

See

DOLLARS)

5 .40

$ 8 .8 1
8 .78

MAINTENANCE

(IN

5.20

107
82

MAINTENA NCE

E ARNINGS

7.80

M A I N T E N A N C E C A R P E N T E R S ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

$ 8 • 0 2 —$ 1 0 . 0 8
7 . 5 7 - 1 0 .0 8

HOURLY

were

footnotes

at

d istrib u ted as

follow s:

8 under

$ 4.40;

an d

1 at

$ 4.60 to

12

$4 .8 0 .

end o f tables.




10

26
75

20

6
6

12 2
122

-

“

"

“
-

Table A-5. Hourly earnings of material movement and custodial workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
Hourly earnings

O c c u p a tion and in d u s tr y d i v is io n

Number
of
workers

Mean 2

T R U C K O R I V E R S .............................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

2.G 56
806
1.850
889

$ 8 .2 5
7 .86
8 .59
1 0 .1 5

T R U C K O R I V E R S . L I G H T T R U C K ....................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

380
309

7.87
7 .89

T R U C K D R I V E R S . MEDIUM T R U C K ..................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

5 50
275
275

T R U C K D R I V E R S . H E A V Y T R U C K ....................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G .......................... ........................

NUMBER

Median2

2 .90
AND
UNDER
3.00

$ 8 .7 5
7.50

10 .1 2

Middle range 2

$ 6 • 2 7 —$ 1 0 . 2 8
8.75
6 .27 6 .1 5 - 1 0 .2 8
1 0 .2 8 - 1 0 .2 8

26
-

OF

WORKERS

5 .00

5.80

5 .80

6.20

.60

.00

7 .80

. 80

8 .2 0

8 .60

9.00

9 . 8U 9 . 8 0 1 0

3.20

3.80

3 .80

8 .2 0

8 .60

5.00

5 .80

5 .30

6.20

6 .60

.00

.80

.80

. 20

8 .60

9 .00

9.80

9 .8010

33
16

75
87
28

81
73

73
53

131

98

8

21
110

811
169
282

13

23
198

188
128
16

102

-

28
28
-

221

-

67
9
58

155

-

-

1

-

~

“

-

-

3 .58 -

-

-

_

_

_

8 .8 6

7 .90
7 .81
7.97

7.23
8 .75

6 .157 .2 3-

8.75
8.75

10 .12

8.80 -

7.66
1 0 .1 6
1 0 .2 8

6 . 86-

1 0 .2 8
8 .23
1 0 .2 8
1 0 .2 8

6 .81
6 .55
6 .27

6 .27
6 .27

357

7.80

211

8 .2 2

T R U C K D R I V E R S . T RAC T O R - T R A I L E R . . . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

1 .18 5
236
909
592

9.21
7.88
9 .56
1 0 .2 6

S H I P P E R S .........................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

295
285

5 .88
5.83

6.01
6. Cl

8.85 -

R E C E I V E R S ......................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

530
820

110

5 .98
6 .13
5.88

6 .32
6 .32
5.05

5 .50 6.07 8 .59 -

6.00

S H I P P E R S AND R E C E I V E R S ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

199
198

6.68
6.65

6 .53
6 .53

5 .75 5 .7 5-

7 .63
7 .63

WA RE H OU S EM EN .............................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

1.086
619
827

6.08

6. 00
6.20

6 .05
6 .29
5 .80

5 .3 75 .255 .3 7-

6 .62
6 .62
7.88

-

“

ORDER F I L L E R S ...........................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

785
551

5.86
5.98

5.85
5.85

8.70 8 .52 -

6 .09

_

_

6.20

“

S H I P P I N G P A C K E R S ...................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

1.38 9
1 .29 5

5 .30
5.30

5.19
5 .19

5.19 5.19 -

5.60
5 .60

2
2

F O R K L I F T O P E R A T O R S .............................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

See

footnotes

at

end

of

8

58
58

8 . 866 .0 58 . 86-

8

8

_

8
8

-

7

-

5

~

“

1

“

“

16
16

19
19

97
97

2
2

18
18

81
81

“

*
129

-

8

-

158

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
11

_

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

~
-

-

_
-

2
2

9
9

63
63

8
8

18
18

1

-

2

66

1C

~

-

-

35
31

s

-

6 .92
6 .92

6
6

_

6 .36
6.36

-

-

-

1

2

_

_

-

_

-

~

-

-

-

_

-

-

30
30

_

-

-

20
20

158
-

2

_

8

-

”

69
-

12
12

68
68

-

38
38
38
37

70
70

285
3

6

5
5

165

8 26

25

282

6

165
165

28
802
802

“
25
25

“
“

2
2

-

3

-

-

-

~

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

-

-

-

-

89
89

29
23

39
3
31

38
32

66

8

80
26

1
1

2

287
288
3

21
21

-

83
83

“

20

235
31
158

82
82

7
7

~

89
89

89
76
13

193
189

85
18

78
38

~

10 1
68

8

27

88

99
33

13
13

18
18

5
5

598
597

258
257

285
179

7
7

81
81

-

77
55

131
118
13
“

87
77
1C

239
226
13

87
81

255
250
5

66
66

79
71

260
2 60
-

“

~

-

32
32

18 C
16 9

155
153

186
133
3

101

5 .89 5.89 7.85 -

7.85
7 .82
1 0 .2 3

-

_

1

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

22
“

“

1

2

11

11

2

6

99

2

2
“

8
8

-

2
2

8

2
-

8
8

8

66
66

90

10
10

-

-

i
7
-

11
88

-

“

86

219
83
176

-

10
10

35
30

6.50
6 .30
7 .85

1

-

10

88
88

58
81

-

10

-

83

88
88

38

-

97
96

-

-

-

121

82
82

1
1

3

70
51

8 .50
7.28
1 0 .2 3
1 0 .2 3

1
1

3

96
93

8 .65 5 .02 3 .7 21 0 .2 3 -

2
2

-

“

28

99

-

“

85
23

20

-

-

23

21

1 57
1 57

“

26
28

-

7

~

“

6
2

-

158
158

25
25

169

-

“
87

-

38
38

2C

-

“

25
25

-

-

1

“

-

87

-

69

1

25

22
22

-

5
5

675
28
651
622

209
32
177
177

1
12

26
26

”
-

31
17

86
86

AND
CVER

. 2 0 1 0 . 6 0 1 1 .00

22
12

58
5
53

tables.




28
28

7

38
27

-

6 .08

8 .2 2

-

2

18
18

-

1 0 .2 3
1 0 .2 3

6 .70

-

-

6.88

210

-

20
10

22
1

-

6 .09
7.55
1 0 .2 3

6.86

158

-

-

2.278

1 .93 7
1 .72 7

1

23
16
7

9
9

1.666

6.01

.2010 . 6 0 1 1 . 0 0
_

1 0 .2 8

608
322

OF—

OOLLARSJ

8 .60

26

_

(IN

8 .2 0

26
26

8 .8 5-

E ARNINGS

3.80

8 . 00-

8 .80 1 0 .1 6 -

HOUR LY

3.80

1 0 .2 8
1 0 .2 8

1 0 .2 8

STRAIG H T-TIM E

3.20

3.00

7.97

M A T E R I A L H A N D L I N G L A B O R E R S .......................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

R E CE IVIN G

2
-

8
8

“

-

"

11

5
5

95
65

-

-

“

"

~

_

_

-

-

8

81

-

-

-

8
-

-

383
383

85
85

176
176

1
1

136
119
17

~

-

2
2

80
80

-

-

"

“

-

-

-

3 22
322
322

-

-

115
-

60
60

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

157
157
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

“

273
273

98
98

-

10
1C

-

163
189
18

78
60
18

115

1
1

“

“
~

81

~

-

_

“

"

15
*
15

-

"

“

-

“

-

”

Table A-5. Hourly earnings of material movement and custodial workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979— Continued
Hourly earnings *

NUMBER

Number

O ccu p a tion and in d u s tr y d iv i s i o n

POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS
( O T H E R THAN F O R K L I F T ) ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

362
281

G U A R D S .............................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

1 .660
176
1 .18 4

G U A R D S . C L A S S B ................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

1 .627
447
1 .18 0

J A N I T O R S . P O R T E R S . AND C L E A N E R S . . . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

5.428
1.954

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

188

Mean 2

$ 6 .5 6
6.07
3.99

M ed ian 2

$ 5 .5 4
5 .54

M idd le range 2

$ 5 .5 4 5 .5 4 -

$

5.00

5 .40

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

7 .40

7 .80

8 .2 0

8.60

9 .00

9 .40

3 .20

3.40

2 .80

4 .20

4.60

5 .00

5 .40

5 .80

6.20

6 .60

7.00

7 .40

7 .80

8 .2 0

8 .60

9 .00

9 .40

9 .8 0 1 0 .20 1 0 .60 1 1 .00

-

-

32
32

4

12
12

146
146

72
72

77

-

“

~

497

101

84

2

-

66

508

495

101

18

8

508
-

497

10 1

84

2

-

66

56
48

495

101

18

86

243
13

5 08
-

6.10
2 .12

508

4.21
6 .04

3.12
5 .97

2 .90 5.2 5-

5.56

2403

474

6.88

22

-

23 71

86

474

230
4

63
55

4

30
14
16

18
16

18
16

8

30
14
16

2

158
133

2 24
98

120

25

5

See footnotes at end of tables.




9 .80 1 0 .20 1 0 .60 1 1 .00
AND
OVER

8 .0 1
7 .82

3.10
5.73

OF—

4 .60

3.91
7 .82
3 .05

2 .90 4 .5 5 -

DOLLARS)

4 .20

2 .97 4 .05 2 .90 -

2 .90
5 .30

(IN

3 .80

3 . CO
6 .09
3 .00

3.19
5 .42

E ARNINGS

3.40

4 .08
7 .82
2 .05

3 .94

HOURLY

3.20

2 .97 4 .11 2 .90 -

3.13

STRAIGHT -T IM E

.00

3

3.00
6 .09
3 . CO

6.12

RECEIVING

-

2 .90
AND
UNDER
3.00

of
workers

WORKERS

OF

12

126
51

2

93
27

20

21

2
2

1
1

7

11

11

28
28
-

16

44
39

49
40

38
27

28
28

5

5

9

11

296
250

172
141

453
451

47
15
32
28

16
5

21

46
39

46
39

51
40

38
27

4

31
24

2

12
12
24

22
2
2
-

24
24

36
36

27
27

24
24

36
36

27
27

-

151
148

24
19

3
3

29
29

35
35

“

2
343
329
14

“

5
5

-

5

1
4
4

29
29

35
35

237
231

-

6

-

—

—

_

~
-

“
-

~

~
— r

—

“
—

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

~
—

4

-

-

-

-

—

“

-

2

“

Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, powerplant, material movement,
and custodial workers, by sex, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
O ccu p ation ,

s e x , 3 and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

M A I N T E N A N C E . T OOL ROOM.
POWERPLANT OC CUP AT IONS -

Number
of
workers

Average
(m ean2 )
hourly
earnings4

AND
MEN

O ccupation ,

s e x , 3 an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

A verage
( m ean2 )
hourly
earnings4

10 7
82
894
8 63

8.72
8.72

M A I N T E N A N C E P A I N T E R S ......................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ........................................................

133

112

8 .09
8.26

M A I N T E N A N C E M A C H I N I S T S .....................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ........................................................

33 G
320

3 and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

A verage
(m ean 2 )
hourly
earnings4

$8.8 1
8.78

M A I N T E N A N C E E L E C T R I C I A N S ............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ........................................................

sex,

M A T E R I A L MOVEMENT AND C U S T O D I A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN— C O N T I N U E D

M A T E R I A L MOVEMENT AND C U S T O D I A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN

M A I N T E N A N C E C A R P E N T E R S .................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

O ccupation ,

8.29
8 .31

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

1 f 843
842

8.58
10 . 1 5

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

6.08

1 ,15 2

302

280

3 .12
3.93

MAINTE NA NC E MECHANICS ( M A C H I N E R Y ) . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ........................................................

1 » 462
1 .432

7 .97

1,148
T R U C K ......................

357

7 .40

211
1,145

82 1
272
548
4 71

9 .31
8 .38
9.77
9 .94

M A I N T E N A N C E P I P E F I T T E R S ...............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

496
49G

8 .92
8 .92

53

8.86

MAINTENANCE

SH E E T -M E T AL

W O R K E R S ....

4 .94

1 0 .2 6

PU B LIC
MAINTE NA NC E MECHANICS
( M OT OR V E H I C L E S ) ...............................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ........................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G .........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ....................................

AND

5.63

9 .21

592

PORTERS,

141

8 .2 2

TRAC T O R - T R A I L E R . . . .

JAN ITO R S,

3 .11

98

HE A VY

TRUCKDRIVERS.

8 .0 1

TRUCKDRIVERS.

CLEANERS Z

U T I L I T I E S .........................................

O CCU PAT IO NS

-

WOMEN

187
r e c e iv e r s

:

68
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

352
9G

6 .24

139
198

6 64

372
372

5 .27
5 .27

MAINTENANCE
P UB LIC

T R AD E S H E L P E R S ......................
U T I L I T I E S ....................................

172
41

7 .14
7.8C

M A C H IN E -T O O L OPERATORS (T O O L R O O M ) . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

445
445

a . 42
8 .42

T OO L AND D I E M A K E R S .........................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

4 5G
456

9 .19
9 .19

243

201

8 .40
8.73

B O I L E R T E N D E R S . . . . ............................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

181
1 G9

5 .27
5 .30

111
111

6 .25
6.25
5.55
5.55

453

S T A T I O N A R Y E N G I N E E R S ......................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

93 2
911

412

4.81
4 .99

95

M I L L W R I G H T S ...............................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

179
98

7 .89

MATERIAL

HAN DLING

L A B O R E R S .......................

52
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

384

5 .02

5 .29
5.02

M ATERIAL

HAN DLIN G

L A B O R E R S .......................

2 ,15 5

6.50

4.81
F O R K L I F T O P E R A T O R S .............................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

1,842

6.93
6.77

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

210

8 .22

See footnotes at end of tables.




13

Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected occupational groups,
Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., for selected periods
Industry and occupational group 5

F e b ru a ry 1972 F e b ru a ry 1973
to
to
F e b ru a ry 1973 F e b ru a ry 1974

F e b ru a ry 1974
to
F e b ru a ry 1975

F e b ru a ry 1975 to
M arch 1976
13-month
Annual rate
in crea se
of in crea se

M arch 1976 to
July 1977
16-month
Annual rate
in crea se
of in c re a s e

July 1977
to
July 1978

July 1978
to
July 1979

A ll in du stries:
O ffic e c l e r i c a l ____________________________
E le c tro n ic data p roce ssin g _____________
_
_
In du strial nurses
_ ___ __ _ _ .
S k illed m aintenance trades
U n skilled plant w o r k e r s _________________

5.2
( 6)
4.5
6.0
5.8

6.7
( 6)
7.2
7.3
7.6

9.1
10.1
10.4
10.2
11.7

8.8
7.4
10.7
8.7
10.4

8.1
6.8
9.8
8.0
9.6

9.1
9.6
10.3
12.6
11.7

6.8
7.1
7.6
9.3
8.7

6.9
7.2
8.7
8.2
9.1

8.5
7.5
8.9
9.5
8.2

M an ufactu ring:
O ffic e c l e r i c a l ____________________________
E lec tro n ic data p ro ce ssin g _____________
In du strial nurses ________________________
S k illed m aintenance trades
U n skilled plant w ork ers _________________

5.3
( 6)
4.6
5.5
6.1

7.0
( 6)
7.6
7.1
8.1

8.9
9.5
11.0
10.6
10.6

9.3
7.2
11.2
8.9
9.9

8.6
6.6
10.3
8.2
9.1

9.9
( 6)
11.2
12.2
11.9

7.3
( 6)
8.3
9.0
8.8

7.4
( 6)
8.4
8.1
8.3

7.9
6.8
9.1
9.6
7.7

Nonm anufacturing:
O ffic e c l e r i c a l ____________________________
E le c tro n ic data p r o c e s s in g _____________
In du strial nurses ________________________
U n skilled plant w ork ers _________________

5.1
( 6)
( 6)
5.2

5.9
( 6)
( 6)
6.7

9.4
10.7
( 6)
14.2

8.4
7.6
( 6)
11.4

7.7
7.0
(6)
10.5

8.4
9.7
( 6)
11.4

6.2
7.2
( 6)
8.4

6.3
6.6
( 6)
10.6

9.2
7.8
( 6)
9.2

See footnotes at end o f tables.

NOTE:
d escrip tio n .

A re v is e d
T h e r e fo r e ,




d es crip tio n fo r com puter o p era to rs is being introduced in this a rea in 1979. Th e re v is e d d escrip tio n is not co n s id ere d eq u ivalen t to the p revio u s
the earnings o f com puter o p era to rs a re not used in computing p ercen t in crea se s fo r the elec tro n ic data p ro ce ssin g group.

14

Table A-8. Average pay relationships within establishments for white-collar occupations
Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
O ffic e c le r ic a l occupation being com pared—
O ccu p a tion w h ich equals

100

Class A

S E C R E T A R I E S » C L A S S A ..........................
S E C R E T A R I E S . C L A S S B..........................
s e c r e t a r ie s ,
class
C..........................
S E C R E T A R I E S . C L A S S D ..........................
S E C R E T A R I E S . C L A S S E ..........................
S T E N O G R A P H E R S . S E N I O R .......................
S T E N O G R A P H E R S . G E N E R A L ....................
T RANS CRIBIN G -NAC H IN E T Y P I S T S . .
T Y P I S T S . C L A S S A .....................................
T Y P I S T S . C L A S S B .....................................
F I L E C L E R K S . C L A S S B ..........................
F I L E C L E R K S . C L A S S C ..........................
M E S S E N G E R S .....................................................
S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S .......................
SWITCHBOARD O P E RA TO R R E C E P T I O N I S T S ..........................................
ORDER C L E R K S . C L A S S A .......................
ORDER C L E R K S . C L A S S B .......................
AC COU NTIN G C L E R K S . C LASS A . . . .
AC CO UNT ING C L E R K S . CLASS B . . . .
P A Y R O L L C L E R K S ..........................................
KEY E NT R Y O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S A . .
KEY E NT RY O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S B . .

Class B

Class C

Tran­
scribingmachine
General
typists

Stenographers

Secretaries

Class D

Class E

Senior

Typists

F ile clerks
Messengets

Class A

Class B

Class B

Class C

Switch­
board
operators

Switch­
board
operatorrecep­
tionists

Order clerks

Accounting clerks

K ey entry operators
Payroll
clerks

Class A

Class B

Class A

Class B

Class A

Class B

100
120

100

100
100

129
191
172
(G )
(G )
191
17G
1G2
1 91
175
208
208
159

119
128
137
199
155
195
139
169
160
162
172
132
133

155
131
1G 7
151
172
138
1G5
187

111
1 31
115
192
118
139
152

100
119
1 39
131
139
132
139
1 53
197
155
1 58
117
1 29
97
127
108
128
109

12 1
1 90

100
(6)
lie
( 6)

112
120
13 3
1 39
199
138
1 09
11 9
( 6)
10 9
95
11 9
95
109
12 7

100
(G)
107
105
119
129
( 6)
( 6)

120
93

112
(G)
105
89
98
92
109
103

100
( 6)
( 6)
(G )

139
(G )
C G)
131
93
109
( 6)
t G)
81

101
86
98
115

100
(G )
95

112

100
10 1
11 0

100

119
107

120

119
(G )

117
95

126
125
117
130
80

108
77
te>
73
97
76

99
(G )
109
89

86
109

100
10G

100

111
100

100
92
82

100

82

115
116
87

109
(G )
(6 )
89

99
79
89
75

85
(G )
78
71

83
(G )
81
75

112

111

88

86

86

87
(6)
80
71
85

85
97
113

89
98
115

7G
78
99

89
81
96

71
69
82

113

81

68
77
89

100
(
(

6)
6)

(6 )

93
109
95
99
117

100
100

75
90
82

131
91
191
10G
118
161

102
88
107
118

100
80
108
89
89
109

100
130
10 5
117
123

100
86
99

100
112

102

126

P r o fe s s io n a l and tech nical occupation being com pared—
Computer systems
analysts (business)
Class A

C O MP UT E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S A ..........................
C O MP UT E R S Y S T E H S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) > C L A S S B ..........................
C OMP UT E R P ROGRAMMERS
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S A ..........................
C OMP UT E R PROGRAMMERS
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S B ..........................
C OMP UT E R P ROGRAMMERS
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S C ..........................
C O MP UT E R O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S A . . .
C O MP UT E R O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S B . . .
C O MP UT E R O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S C . . .
D R A F T E R S . C L A S S A ..................................
D R A F T E R S . C L A S S B ..................................
D R A F T E R S . C L A S S C ..................................
D R A F T E R S . C L A S S D ..................................
ELECTRONICS T E C H N IC IA N S .
C L A S S B ...........................................................
R E G IS TE R E D I N D U S T R I A L N U R S E S . .

Class B

Computer programmers (business)
Class A

Class B

Computer operators

Class C

Class A

Class B

Drafters

Electronics

Class C

Class A

Class B

Class C

Class D

class B

Registered
industrial
nurses

100
127

100

128

105

100

197

120

121

100

186
178
187
232
193
175
187
( 6)

139
197
198
182
118
197
163
( 6)

159
196
196
201
105
( 6)
( 6)
( 6)

126
122
128
165
109
119
130
(6 >

100
110
102
192
(6)
(6)
(6)
(6)

100
120
191
99
129
139
(6)

100
130
89
96
117
(6)

100
71
80
102
(6)

100
123
193
(6)

100
123
150

100
116

100

156
152

191
136

(6)
115

(6 )
106

(6)
87

(6 )
105

72
91

( 6)
75

128
110

117
91

(6)
76

( 6)
67

100
113

100

See footnote at end o f tables.

NOTE:
T a b les A -8 and A -9 p resen t the average pay re latio n s h ip betw een p a irs o f occupations within establish m en ts. F o r exa m p le, a value o f 122 in dicates the earnings fo r the
occupation d ir e c tly above in the heading are 22 percen t g r e a te r than earn in gs fo r the occupation d ir e c tly to the le ft in the stub. S im ila rly , a value o f 85 in dicates earnings fo r the
occu pation in the heading a re 15 percen t below earnings fo r the occupation in the stub.
See appendix A fo r m ethod o f computation.




15

Table A-9. Average pay relationships within establishments for blue-collar occupations
Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
M aintenance, to o lro o m , and pow erplant occupation being com pared—
O ccup ation w h ich equals

100

Mechanics
Carpenters

Electricians

Painters

Machinists

Pipefitters
Machinery

M A I N T E N A N C E C A R P E N T E R S ....................
M A I N T E N A N C E E L E C T R I C I A N S ...............
M A I N T E N A N C E P A I N T E R S ..........................
M A I NT E N A N C E M A C H I N I S T S ....................
MAINTENANCE MECHANICS
( M A C H I N E R Y ) ...............................................
MAINTENANCE MECHANICS
( MOTOR V E H I C L E S ) ..................................
M A I N T E N A N C E P I P E F I T T E R S ..................
MAINTENANCE S H E E T -M ET AL
WORKERS..........................................................
M I L L W R I G H T S ..................................................
MAINTENANCE TRADES H E L P E R S . . . .
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS
( T O O L R O O M ) ..................................................
TOOL AND D I E M A K E R S ............................
S T A T I O N A R Y E N G I N E E R S ..........................
b o il e r
t e n d e r s ..........................................

Sheet-metal
workers

Millwrights

Trades helpers

Motor vehicles

Machine-tool
operators
(toolroom)

Tool and
die makers

Stationary
engineers

Boiler tenders

100
98

100

102

107
99

100

98

9G

100

99

10 1

99

105

100

98
99

102
10 1

95
96

101
10 2

102
10 1

100
99

100

99

101
10 1
121

98
(G )

(G )
(G )
(G )

(G )
(G )
(G )

(G )
98
123

100
100

(G )
(G )

99
99
97
103

99
95
98
103

100
(G )
(S )
91
99
10 9

120

100
100

(G )
91
99

100

(G )
(G )
99

10G

100

105

102

95

(G )

100
(G )
(G )

100
(G )

100

99
93
97

(G )
(G )
99
(G )

80
(G )
(G )
80

102

100
93
98
105

100
109

100

112

108

100

M a te ria l m ovem en t and cu stodial occupation being com pared—
Truckdrivers
Shippers
Light truck

T R U C K D R I V E R S . L I G H T T R U C K ............
TRUCKD R I V E R S » MEDIUM T R U C K . . . .
T R U C K D R I V E R S . H EAVY T R U C K ............
TRUCKDRIVERS. T R A C T 0 R - T R A IL E R .
S H I P P E R S ..........................................................
R E C E I V E R S ........................................................
S H I P P E R S AND R E C E I V E R S ....................
WAREHOUSEMEN...............................................
ORDER F I L L E R S .............................................
S H I P P I N G P A C K E R S .....................................
M AT ERIAL HAN DLIN G L A B O R E R S . . . .
f o r k l if t
o p e r a t o r s ...............................
power- truck
operators
( O T H E R THAN F O R K L I F T ) ....................
G U A R D S . C L A S S B .......................................
J A N I T O R S . P O R T E R S . AND
C L E A N E R S ........................................................

Medium truck

Heavy truck

Receivers

Shippers and
receivers

W arehouse men

Order fillers

Shipping packers

Tractor-trailer

Material
handling
laborers

Forklift operators

Power-truck
operators
(other than
forklift)

Guards, class B

Janitors, porters
and cleaners

100
100
( 6)

(G )
(G )
(G )
(G )
113
16)

(G )
107
1 19
(G )

120

121

123
( G)
115
105

118
(G )

100
(G )

100

120

130

100

111

99
(G )
8G
107

109

(G )
(G )
127
( G)
(G )
(G )
108

( 6)
113

97
131

116

120

122

(G )

112
130
(G )

111

100
100

(G )
91

100
99
95
109
99

100

102

(G )
(G )
(G )
139
103

102
105
106

103

100

102

98
96

112
122

109
99

95

100

(G )
(G )

(6 )

(6 )
10 1

( 6)
(G )

(G )
109

(G )
107

(6 )

95

(G )

( 6)
105

(G )

100

(G )
109

137

100

159

120

111

11 0

117

119

108

109

103

109

117

103

98

100
100

100

See footn ote at end of tables.

NOTE:
T a b les A -8 and A - 9 presen t the a v e ra g e pay relatio n sh ip betw een p a irs o f occupations w ithin establish m ents. F o r exam ple, a value of 122 in d ica tes that earn in gs fo r the occu pation d ir e c t ly
above in the heading a re 22 percen t g r e a te r than earnings fo r the occupation d ir e c t ly to the le ft in the stub. S im ila r ly , a value of 85 in dicates earn in gs fo r the occu pation in the heading a re 15 p ercen t
below earnings fo r the occupation in the stub.
See appendix A fo r method o f computation.




16

Earnings: Large establishments
Table A-10. Weekly earnings of office workers, large establishments, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
Weekly earnings^™
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

NUMBER

110
Mean*

Median 2

Middle range a

R E CE IVIN G

2 C0

2 20

290

260

2 80

300

320

390

360

3 80

9 00

920

990

960

130

190

1 5C

16 C

180

2 C0

220

290

260

280

3 00

320

390

360

3 80

900

92 0

990

960

980

398

15

11

2
2

2

10

97

236
178
58

111

102

67
61

57
36

96

30

6

21

9

12
10
2

9
5
9

10
6

136

2 61
185
76

132

71
129

21 2

35

299
183
106

157

12

1C

136
56
80

200

-

2

“

2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

10

18

13

15

15

-

-

1

1

9

8

2

-

-

2

-

_

15
3

19

96

30

37

39

28

28

28

-

6
8

12

7
23

11

11

10

25

21

2
2

39

26

23

18

2

7

2
1
1

2
2

12

8
6
2

1
1

-

96
23
23

16
3
13

92
29
63

106

100

66

93
57

87
57
30

22

77
9

1
1

22

22
1
21

55
19
91

69
16
53

120

97
92
5

10
8
2

IS
9
1C

82
69
13
3

132
119
18

36
4
32
32

-

77

12C

8

29 5.5 0

280.00

25 0.5 0 -

3 09.00

-

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

223
191
182

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

2 70.00
2 99.00
251.50

267.00
291.00
299.00

2 2 3.5 0 2 5 2.0 0 2 1 7.0 0 -

313.00
336.00
287.50

-

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

772
992
280

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

2 50.50
2 65.50
2 29.00

297.00
266.50

2 0 8.0 0 2 2 3.0 0 190.00-

291.50
301.50
295.00

-

220.00

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S D ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

G9G
988
178

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

2 27.00
2 39.00
1 99.50

226.00
237.00
186.00

2 0 9.0 0 2 1 9.5 0 1 6 8.0 0 -

255.50
259.50
206.00

-

-

-

6

S T E N O G R A P H E R S ...........................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

669

3 9 .0

2 17.50

_

6

2

8

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
9 0 .0

21 3.0 0
2 30.00
299.50

1 8 5.5 0 18 5.5 0 1 8 9.0 0 20 7.5 0 -

232.00

990
179'
126

205.00
205.00
216.00
255.50

223.00
263.00
269.00

-

-

368

3 8 .5

20 9.0 0

191.50

1 7 8.0 0 -

215.50

-

12 2
88

3 9 .5
9 0 .0

2 28.50
259.00

212.00

255.50
390.50

-

216.00

17 8.5 0 20 7.5 0 -

T Y P I S T S .................

86

3 8 .5

177.00

172.50

1 5 2.5 0 -

1 9 5.0 0

-

T Y P I S T S ...........................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

679
189
990
59

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
9 0 .0

16 0.5 0
1 8 6.5 0
1 50.50
1 91.50

1 51.50
185.00
191.50
1 77.50

1 3 6.0 0 158.001 3 1.0 0 170.50-

175.00
206.00
163.00
196.00

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S A .............................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

279
160

2 8 .5
3 9 .0

18 3.5 0
1 6 9.0 0

1 77.50
1 70.00

1 6 5.0 0 1 9 5.0 0 -

1 98.50
1 77.50

-

TYPISTS,

-

-

-

-

2
_

-

-

2

-

-

2
_

_

-

-

6

-

-

38
16

100

207
157
50
95

68
68

93
32

75
99
39

12

2

8

-

“

6
6

2
2

8
8

-

“

“

1C
7
9

5

9
3

2

5

9

2C

19

16

13

19

63

190

6

6

57

139

96
29
72
4

130
33
97
29

92
29

28
23

18

89
13
71

66

1

5

5
2

-

20
20

18
18

8
8

1C

95
72

55

27

19

8

6

8

6

900

3 9 .0

1 9 1.5 0
1 51.00
1 3 6.0 0

1 3 1 . D O197.D O 1 3 1 .00-

19

93

122

76

86

35

11

1 67.50
1 51.50

18

37

116

13
63

22

3 9 .0

1 99.50
1 5 8.5 0
1 9 1.5 0

1 52.50

70
330

10
25

5

F I L E C L E R K S ................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

275
89

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

15 2.5 0
1 70.50

1 97.00
1 72.00

13 0.5 0 1 6 2.0 0 -

1 71.50
188.50

16

95
4

33

51

93

5

1

1

98
35

26
25

M E S S E N G E R S ...................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

165
63

2 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 58.50
1 57.00
159.50

1 53.00
1 53.00
15 1.0 0

1 9 0.0 0 1 9 0.0 0 190.00-

1 67.00
1 71.50
1 59.50

13
7

28
9
19

19
7

12

28
13

19
9

12

91

10

5

6

_
-

6

See footnotes at end o f tables.




192
127
15

95
25

6

B.............................................

102

90

“

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

CLAS S

OF —

180

3 8 .5

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE

DOLLARS)

160

90

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , G E N E R A L ............................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................

(IN

150

A ..................................

CLASS

EARNINGS

190

*29 5.00
255.00
2 2 8 . CO

SECRETARIES,

WEEKLY

130

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

22 0.00

STRAIGHT -T IM E

120

1 ,99 8
1,298
750

S E C R E T A R I E S ................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

* 2 0 8 .5 0 - *275.00
2 1 9 .5 0 - 285.00
1 8 9 . 5 0 - 256.00

WORKERS

AND
UNDER

120

*238.00
250.00

OF

17

69

53

107
7

11
10

91
69

86

~
~

33

9

-

3

“
-

_

1

31

27
15

9
4

9
9

2

12

“

“

9
9

5
5

-

i
i

-

3

-

-

-

-

2

“

3
3

25
19

37
15

i
-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

22
22

i
i

-

-

-

~
-

~

-

-

22
6
6

22
22
22

i
i
i

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

79
72
7

“

-

9
9

1

-

3

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

2

9

10
6

7

1

6
1

-

3
2
1
1

-

3

-

3
3

1

-

1
-

-

1

29

_

-

22
2

1
1

2

9
9

“

19

8

7

5

2

2

1

1
1

1

5

3

-

-

i

“

_
-

1

3
-

3
3

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

2

5

2

-

5
9

2
2

-

2

2

3

_

_

1
1

-

-

-

-

2

3

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

2

Table A-10. Weekly earnings of office workers, large establishments, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979— Continued
^^^eekl^Tar nlng^ ^™
(standard)
O ccu pation and in d u s try d iv is io n

Number
of
worker!

Average
weekly
hours *
(standard

NUMBER

11 0
Mean

2

Median 2

SWITCHBOARD

OPERATORS

78

ORDER

CLAS S

$ 1 5 2 . 0 0 - $257

380

400

420

440

460

130

140

150

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

3 00

320

340

360

380

400

420

440

460

480

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

1

1

6

7

11

36

54
28

76

121

20

25

54
13
41

26

56

56
65

4
-

17
-

5
-

41

192.00

1 8 C .00-

2 1 7 . 50

-

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1 9 6 . 50
21 <t. 50
1 7 4 . 50

186.50
208.00
165.00

155.00176.001 4 5 . DO-

2 2 6 . 00
2 4 5 . 50
1 9 5 . 50

8
1

3 8 .5
2 9 .5
3 8 .0

2 1 7 . CO
2 6 3 . CO
1 8 1 . 50

205.00
2 53.00
170.00

1 6 5 .0 0 226.00155.00-

2 6 1 . 00
2 9 3 . 50
1 9 9 . 00

2 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 8 3 . CO
1 9 2 . 00
1 6 6 . 50

1 79.00
187.00
151.50

14 7.0 0 160.0 0 13 5.0 0 -

2 1 2 . 00
2 1 9 . 00

8
1

1 8 8 . 50

7

00
00
00

244.
248.
205.

KEY

909

2 9 .0
3 9 .5
2 9 .0
<*0 .0

1 76.00
1 84.00
1 68.00

155.00-

2 5<1
555
<8
*

179.
194.
170.
224.

1 9 3 . 00
2 0 0 . 50
1 8 3 . 00
2 5 5 . 00

B ............

360

-

179.001 9 7.0 0 160.00-

CLAS S

340

11

207.00
2 27.00
1 75.00

KEY E N T R Y O P E R A T O R S
MANUF A C T U R I N G ............
NONM ANUFACTURING..

320

14
14

2 1 7 . 50
2 3 2 . 50
1 8 6 . CO

A ............

300

4

2 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

CLASS

2 80

7

135
65

KEY E N T R Y O P E R A T O R S
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............
NONM ANUFACTURING..

260

1

1 9 5 . 50

202.00

2 40

6
6

3 9 .0

1 6 3.5 0 150.001 9 0 .5 0 -

220

1

CO
CO

50
CO
50
CO

200

-

00

2 41
250

P A Y R O L L C L E R K S ..................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............
NO NMANUFACTURING..
ENTRY O P E R A T O R S . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............
NONM ANUFACTURING..
PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S

180

1

219

18C.O O 181.5 0 -

<*71
303
168

B

7

_
-

11

1

8

4

17

5

4C

32

11
21

37
13
24

49
28

35
19
16

75
49
26

21

1

_

2

_

-

i

-

-

2

-

15
-

39

59
7
52

21

15

7
32

-

-

-

-

27
76
5

2
2

15
4

23

20

6

9

-

11

17

11

36
, 4
32

44

2

36
15

41

21

83
18
6E

399
128
2 71

2 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 9 0 . CO
2 1 3 . 00
1 7 9 . CO

181.00
1 98.00
179.50

167.501 7 7.0 0 167.5 0 -

20 0 . 50

15

2 3 2 . 50
1 9 3 . 50

-

510
226
28<t

2 9 .0
3 9 .5
2 8 .5

1 7 2 . CO
1 8 3 . CO
1 6 3 . CO

1 65.50
182.50
156.00

151.0 0 161.50139.0 0 -

1 8 4 . 50
1 9 5 . 00
1 7 0 . 00

15

_
-

8

46
7
39

See footnotes at end o f tables.




OF—

160

-

172.50-

199.50
213.50

200

ACCOUNTING C LE R K S . CLASS
MANUF A C T U R I N G ............
NON M AN LF A CT UR ING. .

DOLLARS)

15C

_

1 96.00

2 0 8 . 50
2 1 6 . 50

317
138
179

A

(IN

140

-

2 0 2 . 00

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

34 7

ACCOUNTING C LE R K S. C LA S S
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............
NONM AN UF AC TUR ING. .

EARNINGS

130

7

3 9 .5

441

WEEKLY

120

5

788

ACCOUNTING C L E R K S . . . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............
NONM AN UF AC TUR ING. .

ST RAI GHT --T IM E

1

105

e ............

RECEIVING

00

60

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............
CLERKS.

$202 00 $ 1 9 3 . 5 0

146
113

C L E R K S .......................

ORDER

2 9 .0

WORKERS

AND
UNDER

Middle range *

120

S W I T C H BO A RD O P E R A T O R R E C E P T I O N I S T S ..................

OF

18

18
7

11

8

14

_

_

3

_

_

9

2

1

1

-

-

1

-

44
14

27
27

8
8

20
20

8
8

6
6

3

i

-

-

3

i

~

“

”

39

20

6

11

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

126
70
56

91
62
29

55
52
3

63
45
18

41
28
13

20

14

4
4

1
1

-

-

11

10
10

-

16
4

14
13

3

1

-

“

41
4
37

35

15
14

2-2

13

12

10

27

30
19

12
1

9
3

9

10
10

4

1
1

1

-

-

85

7
4

2
2

4
4

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

66
19

21

~

“

”
-

-

-

1

6

11

40
38

30
18

11

2

12

2

3

23
17

6

8
7

4
4

5
4

5
5

1
1

3

5

3

1
1

6

1

1

-

1

-

“

-

-

20
8
12

13

6
2

8

8
7

2
2

3
3

-

7

6
2

1
1

“

3

8

31

36

24

12

22

21

11
59

103

19

14

3

29
24
5

255
82
173
5

210

61

42

115
95
13

33
28
3

21
21
2

106
16
90

108
28
80

20
21

41

149

102

20

66

87
15

13
7

35
16
19

9

10
3

3

2

6
6

5

-

7

7
5

13

2

7

6

7
4

3

4

3

2
1
1
4

1
3

3
5
4

1

1

7

2
2

“

-

-

-

-

-

“

“
-

-

-

-

”

-

-

-

~
~

-

4
4

-

-

14

9

-

-

56
41
15

1
2

83

6

15

15

3

38

6

~
-

2
2

3

-

-

-

-

3

1

-

_

4

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

“

Table A-11. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, large establishments, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
Weekly earning*^
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
worker*

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

NUMBER

OF

WORKERS

RECEIVING

STRAIGHT -TIM E

Median2

Middle range 2

COLLARS)

OF—

180

160

180

20C

220

280

260

280

300

320

380

360

380

800

820

88 0

860

830

5 C0

160

180

200

22C

280

260

280

300

320

380

3 60

380

800

820

8 80

86 0

8 80

500

520

2

1

7

13

25

22
10

21
2

6
8

7
7

19

20

2

6

2

_

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1396.00
3 9 7 . CO

$802.50
279.50

C OMP UT ER S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) t C L A S S A ..................................

182

3 9 .0

8 2 5 . CO

829.00

8 1 0.0 0 -

8 66.50

-

-

-

C O MP UT E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) • C L A S S B ..................................

188

3 9 .5

35 3.5 0

3 80.00

3 2 2.0 0 -

379.50

-

-

-

-

-

2

75

306.50
3 22.50

297.50
212.50

25 0.0 0 28 2.0 0 -

255.00
260.50

-

-

-

15

1(8

3 9 .0
8 0 .0

38
3

13
3

127

3 9 .0

362.50

3 65.00

2 0 3.0 0 -

< 4 02. 00

-

-

-

-

288
98

3 9 .0
8 0 .0

3 05.50
2 13.50

3 08.00
3 10.50

2 6 5.0 0 2 8 6.5 0 -

3 35.00
3 20.00

5

17
3

8

31

~

6

879
193
288

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

2 89.00
2 57.50
2 82.50

2 38.00
2 81.00
229.00

1 9 8.0 0 20 8.0 0 18 8.0 0 -

272.00
285.50
269.00

52
19
33

70
38
36

112

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

3 17.50
2 28.50

305.50
3 22.50

2 5 1.0 0 2 8 8.5 0 -

298.50
8 21.50

11
11

12

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

2 59.50
2 78.50
2 8 6 . CO

258.00
2 58.50
257.50

22 8.0 0 23 2.5 0 2 2 2 . 00-

275.00
311.00
269.00

_

12
1
11

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

199.50
2 12.50
1 9 2 . CO

1 95.50
2 08.00
1 8 8.0 0

17 2.0 0 1 9 0.0 0 16 5.5 0 -

219.50
223.00
211.50

1

19

120

1

D R A F T E R S .....................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............

509
876

8 0 .0
8 0 .0

2 77.50
2 76.00

27 0.5 0
2 69.00

23 7.5 0 23 6.0 0 -

221.00

-

3 20.00

-

2
2

D R A F T E R S . CLAS S A . . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............

159
186

8 0 .0
8 0 .0

325.00
3 23.50

22 0. 0 0
2 2 2. 00

2 9 8.0 0 29 1.5 0 -

3 53.50
358.00

-

-

D R A F T E R S . CLAS S B . . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............

217
208

8 0 .0
8 0 .0

277.50
276.50

270.00
2 68.50

2 5 0.5 0 25 0.0 0 -

309.00
206.50

_

_

_

-

-

-

DRAFTERS.

116

8 0 .0

2 26.50

2 29.50

2 1 1 . 00-

280.00

-

-

6

98
89

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

201.50
2 03.50

2 91.00
2 91.00

2 7 0.5 0 2 7 8.0 0 -

235.00
235.50

_

-

-

$ 2 8 0 .5 0 - $881.50
2 8 2 .0 0 - 8 81.00

18

2

83

31

20

12

10

58
7

39

8

22
21

30

1

8

8

-

-

-

-

2

17

17

83

23

1

7

10

18

83

28

16

8

11

7

8

2

1

30
18

38

55
28

51

30
13

36
15

10

28

27

21

81
19

7

3

6

12
1

2
2

1
1

-

11

15

7

<
4

11

22

9

21

8

12

-

1

_

2

19
5

37
27

39
19

37
18

19
7

18
7

-

2
2

-

-

-

83
30
13

65
17

12

17
7

17

8
8

-

2
2

2
2

-

i
i

-

88

28
9
15

-

11
2

9
3

12
10

5

2

32
15
17

23
15

86
11

11
6

8

35

10

“

“

520
ANC
OVER

-

“

-

-

-

-

6

(B U S IN E S S ).

31

_

2
2

(B U S IN E S S ),

C OMP UT E R P ROGRAMMERS
C L A S S B ...............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............

( IN

AND
UNDER
180

352
117

C O MP U TE R PR OGRA MME RS
C L A S S A ...............................

EAR NIN GS

120
Mean 2

C O MP UT E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) .................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............

C O M P UT E R P ROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) . . . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............

WEEKLY

C O M P UT E R O P E R A T O R S . . . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............
NONM ANUFACTURING...
C O MP U TE R O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S
N ONMANUFACTURING.. .

A ...............

C OMP UT E R O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............
N ONMANUFACTURING.. .

B ...............

C O MP U TE R O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............
NONMANUFACTURING. . .

C ...............

CLAS S

c

78
176

88
92

.. .

R E G I S T E R E D I N D U S T R I A L N U R S E S ..................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............

191
71

-

-

-

1

19

82

-

2

1

17

11
21

-

-

-

86
“

“

7

2
-

8

_

_

10

5

~

2

8
1
2

7
7

11

5

5

-

2
2

2
2

7
5

10

6
6

2
2

_

_

7

-

_

_

2
2

2
2

_

_

_

5

2

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
5

12

2

19

23

2
21

-

-

-

-

23

_

_

_

i

_

21

-

-

-

-

-

_

8
8

18
7

~

11

28
7

56

26
18

1
1

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

21

35

11

12

3

10

i
i

_

-

1
1

_

21

29
18

9

2
17

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

19
18

38
38

68
68

88

86

38

85

62
58

87
38

20
20

5
5

<
4

32

65
61

88

9

8

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

11
11

16
16

19
18

13
13

38
31

39
30

19
19

5
5

2
2

1
1

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

10

50

21
20

8
8

1
1

_

_

_

-

2
2

_

32

28
23

_

88

82
82

22

1C

22
22

-

-

-

-

-

22

82

23

6

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

18
13

20

19
19

10

11

_

2
2

3
2

_

_

_

_

9

2
2

6

9

5
5

_

-

-

-

See footn otes at end of ta b les.




78
28

<
4

19

_

13
-

<
4

6

18

_

5

_
-

-

Table A-12. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex.
large establishments, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
A v erage
(m e an 2 )

s e x , 3 an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

O ccu pation ,

OFFICE

OCCUPATIONS
MEN

of
worker*

W eek hr
hour!
(standard)

W eek ly
earnings1
(standard)

O ccupation ,

sex,

3 an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
worker!

W eekly
hours1
(standard]

OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN

84

3 9 .5

$1 61 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD

O ccupation ,

sex.

3 an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

W eek ly
bouts*
(standard]

W eek ly
earnings1
(standard)

3 9 .0
4 0 .0

$315.50
326.00

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN— C O N T I N U E D
C OMP UT E R

OPE RATO R -

PR OGRA MME RS

(B U S IN E S S )....

$ 202 .00

GO
OFFICE

W eekly
earning!1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— C O N T I N U E D

-

M E S S E N G E R S ....................................... ...........................

A v e ra ge
(m e a n 2 )

Average
(m e an 2 )

Number

324
119

-

S E C R E T A R I E S ................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

ORDER
1 .97 7

3 9 .0

C L E R K S .............................................................

124
91

39 .0

201.50
209.00

C OMP UT ER

P R OG RA MM ER S

(B U S IN E S S ).
376.00

96

24 5.5 0
195.50

104
229.00

729
CLAS S

A ..................................

90

3 8 .5

29 5.5 0

182

3 3 .0

2 5 1.5 0

117

3 17.00

3 00.50

396

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

4 0 .0

3 9 .0

77
SECRETARIES#

232.50

215

SECRETARIES.

CLAS S

C ..................................

772

3 9 .0

252.50

2 5 0.5 0
2 9 .5

280

84
SECRETARIES.

CLAS S

D ..................................

GAS

2 64.50

224.00
3 9 .0

2 38.50

227.00
3 5 .5

195.00
184.50

4 0 .0

277.00

4 0 .0

327.50

19G

40 . 0

277.00

151

3 8 .5

286.00

3 8 .5
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

59

3 9.0

188.00
443
1 92.50

4 0 .0

24 9.0 0

3 G7
87

3 8 .5
4C.0

208.50
2 5 3.0 0

88

2 8 .5

1 77.00

22G .00
S T E N O G R A P H E R S . G E N E R A L ............................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S .....................................
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE

T T P I S T S .................

2S 8

179.00
P R O F E S S I O N A L AND
OCCUPATIONS -

M A N U F A C T U R I N G .......................................... . . .
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

184
4 89

3 6 .5
2 9 .0

186.50
150.50

T Y P I S T S . C L A S S A .............................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

2 74
ISO

3 8 .5
3 9 .0

18 3.5 0
1 G 9 .00

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ....................... ..........................

70

2 8 .5

1G2.50

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN

C OMP UT ER

SYSTEMS

C OM PU TE R

275

PR OGRA MME RS

COMP UT ER

T E C H N IC A L
WOMEN

ANALYSTS

(B U S IN E S S )....

P R OG RA MM ER S

(B U S IN E S S ).
76

299.00

158.50
108

398.00

154

436.00

71
m an u fa c t u r in g

..................................................

83

M E S S E N G E R S ...................................................................

81

SWITCHCOARD

7

3 9 .5

170.50

3 8 .5

8

SYSTEMS

ANALYSTS

40
R E G IS TE R E D

U S

See footn otes at end o f tables.




277.50

ANALYSTS

2 0 2. 0 0

COMP UT ER
O P E R A T O R S . . . . . .......................

SYSTEMS

0

15 5.5 0

3 2 .0

COMP UT ER

20

3 9 .5

360.00

IND U STRIAL

N U R S E S ..................

92
83

3 9 .5

303.00
305.50

Table A-13. Hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant workers, large establishments,
Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
Hourly earnings *

O ccu p ation and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

Mean 2

NUMBER

M ed ian 2

5.00
UNDER
AND
5 . 0 0 UNDER
5.20

M iddle range 2

WORKERS

R E CE IVIN G

7 .00

7 .90

7.80

8 . 20 8 . 6 0

9 .00

9 .90

5 .90

5.60

5 .80

6.00

6.20

6.60

7 .00

7 .90

7 .80

8 .2 0

8.60

9.00

9 .90

9 .80 1 0 .2 0 1 0 .6 0 1 1

1
1

5

18
17

3

7
7

13
13

9
9

9
9

17
13

1

3

26
9

1

9

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

73
72

89
83

156
156

95
95

55
55

95
90

93
30

30
29

39
39

160
1 60

_

2
2

3

2
2

28
28

2

19
19

2
2

5
5

_

2

_

-

6
6

23

2

21

-

-

-

-

-

95
45

97
31

9
4

30
30

50
50

22
22

90
40

_

_

-

-

-

259
259

99
99

10
10

155
155

_

_

-

-

11
11

195
195

9

_
-

28

23
_

7
4

212

_

37
175

_

2
2

8.92
8.92

8 .81
8 .81

7 .83 7 .83 -

1 0 .5 8
1 0 .5 8

M A I N T E N A N C E P A I N T E R S .......................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

126

11 0

8.19
8.28

7 .56
7.90

7 .237.99 -

9 .35
9 .35

M A I N T E N A N C E M A C H I N I S T S ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

255
229

8.60
8.64

8 .8 6
8 .8 6

7 .837.75 -

9 .27
9.51

-

M A IN T E N A N C E MECHANICS ( M A C H I N E R Y ) . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

739
716

8.81
8.90

8 .2 0

9.30
9 .37

-

8 .35

8.15 8 .15-

9.50
8.62

10 .1 0

1 0 .2 8
9 .69
1 0 .2 8

9 .17 6.99 1 0 .0 9 -

1 0 .2 8
1 0 .9 0
1 0 .2 8

-

U T I L I T I E S .....................................

903
190
237

-

1

-

M A I N T E N A N C E P I P E F I T T E R S ...............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

996
996

8.92
8 .92

8 .70
8.70

7.83 7 .83 -

1 0 .9 0
1 0 .9 0

-

-

-

MAINTENANCE

H E L P E R S .......................

156

7.32

7 .27

7 .27 -

7.27

5

2

3

T OOL AND D I E M A K E R S ......................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..............................................

437
907

9.99
9.99

8.72
8.72

8 .71 8 .71 -

1 0 .6 6
1 0 .6 6

-

-

-

S T A T I O N A R Y E N G I N E E R S ....................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..............................................

170
160

8.72
8.80

8.58
8 .65

8 .09 8 .09 -

9.59
1 0 .0 2

-

-

-

-

B O I L E R T E N D E R S ...................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..............................................

196
139

8.09
8.08

8.32
8 .32

6 .97 7 .11 -

8 .93
8.96

1
1

-

-

-

PU B LIC

T R AD ES

-

-

_

s

2

-

1

-

1

-

-

17

-

2
2

5
5
19

3

16

12

1

11
3

-

-

-

4
4

10
10

-

-

-

i

-

“

~

0 0 1 1 . 9 0 1 1 . 8 0 1 2 . 20

6 .60

798
767

_

OF —

6.20

M A I N T E N A N C E E L E C T R I C I A N S ............................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

1

DOLLARS)

6 .00

-

“

(IN

5 .80

$ 8 .5 9
8 .70

_

EARNINGS

5.60

$ 8 .8 1
8.78

-

HOURLY

5 .90

107
82

-

STRAIGHT-TIM E

5 .20

M A I N T E N A N C E C A R P E N T E R S ..................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

M AIN T E N A N C E MECHANICS
( MO T OR V E H I C L E S ) ................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...................................................

$ 8 .0 2 -$ 1 0 .0 8
7 .5 7 - 1 0 .0 8

OF

“

~

-

i

50
50

~

~

1

3

-

3

-

3
89
89

5

2
3

5
5

9 .8 01 0 .2 01 0 .6 01 1 .

. 0 0 1 1 . 9 0 1 1 . 8 0 1 2 . 2 0 1 2 . 60

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

2
2

6
6

_

_
-

-

i
-

-

9
"

-

4
-

-

1
2

23

3

69
31
33

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

90
90

58
58

56
56

89
89

39
39

25
25

6
6

55
55

126
126

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

93

-

10

-

-

-

-

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

21
21

1
1

11
11

178
178

_

168

19

-

168

9
9

-

-

-

1
“

2
“

29
22

6

90
90

16
19

26
26

23
23

10
10

-

-

-

-

-

32
28

19

17
16

3

28
28

26
26

-

-

-

2

5

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

-

-

“

~

-

9
9

1
1

19

3

i

19

_

_

-

-

9
9

10
10

3

9

_

3
6
6

9

19
19

_
"

See footnotes at end o f ta b les.




21

~

Table A-14. Hourly earnings of material movement and custodial workers, large establishments,
Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
Hourly earnings

O ccupation and in d u s try d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

Mean 2

Median2

4

NUMBER

Middle range

2

OF

WORKERS

R E CE IVIN G

1 .10

1 .30

5.20

5 .60

6. 00

6 . 10

6 .80

7 .20

7 .60

8.0 0

8 .10

8.80

9.20

3 .20

3.10

3.60

3 .80

1.00

1.10

1 .80

5

.20

5 .60

6. 00

6.10

6 . 80

7 .20

7 .60

8 .0 0

8 .10

8 .80

9 .20

9.60 1 0

3

* 8 . 1 9 —* 1 0 . 2 8
6 .9 1 9.61
8 .8 0 - 1 0 .2 8
1 0 .2 8 - 1 0 .2 8

1.00

10

-

1
2
1

9

53
23
30

11

~

1
1

27

~

20

13

69
59

11
11

3

21 1
11

-

1

10
10

-

16
16
-

-

203

-

5
5
-

-

-

-

-

2 03

-

2

-

10 .1 1

383

9.31

8.80

8.80 -

1 0 .2 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

S H I P P E R S ...............................................................

59

7.31

7.28

6 .26 -

8.17

-

-

-

-

-

R E C E I V E R S .............................................................

35<t

6 .39

6 .36

6 .3

2-

6 .50

-

-

-

WAREHOUSEMEN.....................................................

315

6 .28

6 .09

5 .88 -

6 .98

-

-

-

ORDER F I L L E R S ..................................................

302

6.98

6 .96

5.1C -

8.17

-

H A N D L I N 6 L A B O R E R S ...............

1.38*1
985

7 .50

6 .08 6 . 01-

8 .6 8

-

6 .91

7.25
7 .02

8 .50

7 .13
7 .16

7 .05
7.05

6 .23 6 .23 -

8.67
8.67

-

1
_

3

1.222
1 .2 0 6

G UA R D S .....................................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

793
352

1.83
6 .91

3 .10

G U A R D S . C L A S S B .......................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

761
323

1.77
6 .95

3.05

J A N I T O R S . P O R T E R S . AND C L E A N E R S .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ............................

2 .3 0 1
1 .3 1 0
150

5.16
6 .50
5.11

6.68
6.68
5 .52

6.66
1 .S 0

10

2

1

9

8

11
19

-

-

1

1

-

1

2

1

4

-

21

-

22

18

-

-

6

8

226

72

2

7

4

-

10

-

2

-

-

-

91

57

23

35

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

15

31

15

17

17

-

23

-

5

-

95

-

56

112

11

7

138

132
130

10
10

30

65

187
182

11

1

85
85

12

212
21 2

22
22

-

2

-

1

7

20

298
298

72
72

38
38

207
207

_

_

2

196
193

-

-

268
268

ICO
ICO

17
13

66

11

1

55

32

17
16

26
26

31
31

8
8

62
62

66

11

1

25

31
31

8

62
62

132
132

2 .90 5 .88 -

6.12

328

71

3

8 .30

-

2 .90 5 .81 1 .39 -

6.66

592
-

7

5

10

6

2

37

6
3

8
6

19
18

7

5

10

6

2

37

17
13

i i
5

25
16

67
25
33

91
52
31

61

111

2 86

12

103
29

2 61

“
32

51

6
1

18

26
25

1

22

13

21

-

1

79

71

25

-

9

11

328

126

10

21
20

6 .62
8 .30

5
3

-

13

2 .90 5 .88 -

-

25
25

-

18
29

8
6

25
-

36 5
56
309
309

-

9

6
2

.0010 .10 1 0 .8 0

-

13

“

.0010 .10

1

3

-

9 .6010

8

3

See footnotes at end o f tables.




-

2

-

12

3

7.22
5 .33

2

7
7

-

-

122
-

1
1

3

6
1

“

F O R K L I F T O P E R A T O R S .....................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

OF----

3 .80

TRACTO R -TR AILE R .

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

DOLLARS)

3 .60

*8.9 0
7.11
1 0 .2 8
1 0 .2 8

MATERIAL

(IN

3 .10

*9.05
7.99
9.16

TRUCKDRIVERS.

EAR NIN GS

3 .20

816
228
588
355

T R U C K D R I V E R S ....................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G .................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ............................

HOURLY

S T R A I G H T - T IME

3 .00

-

2.90
AND
UNDER
3 .00

55

32

“

21

26
26

131
129

1 77
1 77

161
161

101

8

93

6
2

8

8
101
99

2

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

10

-

-

10

_

_

291
-

_

10
_
-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_
-

-

-

-

_

_

2

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

2




Table A-15. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom
powerplant, material movement, and custodial workers, by sex,
large establishments, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
Occupation ,

s e x , 3 an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

A verage
(m e a n 2 )
hourly
earnings4

O ccupation ,

M A I N T E N A N C E , T OOLR OOM, AND
P O WE R P L A N T O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN
M AI NT ENA NC E

sex,

3 and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

A verage
(m e a n * )
hourly
earnings 4

M A T E R I A L MOVEMENT AND C U S T O D I A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN

C A R P E N T E R S ... .............................
82

8.78

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

76G

8.92

M A I N T E N A N C E P A I N T E R S .......................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

1 2A

8.18

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

229

8. 6 A

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..........................................

TRUCKDRIVERS,

T RAC T O R - T R A I L E R . . . .

581
3A 8
383

9.A5

10 .1 1
9.31

G• A2
WA R EHOUS E ME N .............................................................

S .50

U T I L I T I E S .....................................

237

A9 6

G.9 3

768

A .7

739

A . 69

10 . 1 0

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

895

8 .81

403

G .15

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

73 A
71 G

288

8.92

MAINTENA NC E

M E CH AN I CS

MAINTENA NC E

M ECHAN ICS

PUBLIC

(M A C H IN E R Y )..

F O R K L I F T O P E R A T O R S .............................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
G U A R D S .............................................................................
MANUF A C T U R I N G ....................... ..........................
GUAR DS,

TOOL

AND

DIE

M A K E R S ..........................................

AD G
406

9 . A A JAN ITO R S,
O.4 4

CLA SS

PORTERS,

PUBLIC
S T A T I O N A R Y E N G I N E E R S .......................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

169
160

8 .73
8 .80

B O I L E R T E N D E R S .......................................................
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................

1 AG
139

B ...............................................

AND

6

C LE A N E R S....

1 ,709

U T I L I T I E S .....................................

103

5.2 A

58A
19G
A7

A . 15
G.O A
A . 81

5 .50

8 .DA
8 .08

M A T E R I A L MOVEMENT AND C U S T O D I A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - WOMEN
J A N I T O R S , P O R T E R S , AND C L E A N E R S . . . .
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ....................................

See footnotes at end of tables.

23

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
Table B-1. Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and clerks, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
Other in ex p erien ced c le r ic a l w o rk e rs

In ex p erien ced typ ists
M inim um w eek ly s tra ig h t-tim e s a la r y 7

E S T A B L IS H M E N T S

A ll
schedules

A ll
schedules

Nonm anufacturing

M anufacturing

Nonm anufacturing

M anufacturing
A ll
in du stries

3 7 ‘/2

A ll
industries

A ll
schedules

37*/2

A ll
schedules

37 V2

ST UDIE D

E S T A B L IS H M E N T S H A V IN G A S P E C I F I E D
M I N I M U M ----------------------------------------------------$105.00
$110.00
$115.00
$120.00
$125.00
$130.00
$135.00
$140.00
$145.00
$150.00
$155.00
$160.00
$165.00
$170.00
$175.00
$180.00
$185.00
$190.00
$195.00
$200.00
$205.00
$210.00
$215.00
$220.00
$225.00
$230.00
$235.00
$240.00
$245.00
$250.00
$255.00
$260.00
$265.00
$270.00
$275.00
$280.00

AND
AND
AND
AND
AN0
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AN0
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER $ 1 1 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 1 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 2 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 2 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 3 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 3 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 4 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 4 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 5 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 5 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 6 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 6 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 7 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 7 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 8 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 8 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 9 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 1 9 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 0 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 0 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 1 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 1 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 2 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 2 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 3 0 . 0 0
UN0ER $ 2 3 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 4 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 4 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 5 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 5 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 6 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 6 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 7 0 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 7 5 . 0 0
UNDER $ 2 8 0 . 0 0
O V E R ------------------

E S T A B L I S H M E N T S H A V I N G NO S P E C I F I E D
M I N I M U M ------------------------------------------------------E S T A B L I S H M E N T S W HI C H D I D NOT E MPL OY
WORKERS I N T H I S C A TE GO R Y --------------------

1
3
4
4

2

1

47

20

XXX

27

XXX

XXX

1

1
2

2

36

XXX

65

XXX

XXX

50

1

76

101

24

2

2

1

See footn otes at end of tables.




1

2

1

1
1

1
2

1

1
1
1
2

1

1

4

1
1
1

2

2
2

4

1

4

2

1

1

6

XXX
12

XXX

XXX

XXX

44

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX




Table B-2. Late-shift pay provisions for full-time manufacturing production
and related workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
manufacturing production and re lated w orke jrs=_100_j3ercent)
A ll w orkers

W o r k e r s on la te shifts

9

Item
Second shift

PERCENT
IN

E S T A B LIS H M E N T S

WITH

OF

A VE RA GE

PAY

Second shift

T h ird

shift

WORKERS

LATE-SH IFT

PRO V ISIO N S

W I T H NO P A Y D I F F E R E N T I A L FOR L A T E - S H I F T WORK
W I T H P A Y D I F F E R E N T I A L FOR L A T E - S H I F T WORK —
U N I F O R M C E N T S - P E R - H O U R D I F F E R E N T I A L ------------U N I F OR M P E R C E N T A G E D I F F E R E N T I A L ---------------------OTHER D I F F E R E N T I A L --------------------------------------------------

UNIFORM
UNIFORM

T h ir d shift

92 . 4

8 5 .9

2 3*9

1 C .1

92
63
26
2

.4
.7
.3
.5

8 5 .9
5 8 .4
1 9 .2

2 3 .9
1 6 .2
6.9

1 0 .1

8 .1

.8

22 .6
7 .6

2 8 .7
1 0 .4

22.2

7.7

1.6
•8

D IFF E RE N TIA L

C E N T S - P E R - H O U R D I F F E R E N T I A L ----------------P E R C E N T A G E D I F F E R E N T I A L --------------------------

7.2

2 4 .5
1 0 .3

P E R C E N T OF WORKERS BY T Y F E AND
AMOUNT OF P A Y D I F F E R E N T I A L
UNIFORM c e n t s - p e r - h o u r :
9 C EN T S ---------------------------10 C E N T S -------------------------12 AND UNDER 1 2 C EN TS
12 C E N T S -------------------------15 C E N T S -------------------------I B C E N T S -------------------------17 AND UNDER 18 C EN T S
18 C E N T S -------------------------19 C E N T S -------------------------2D C E N T S -------------------------21 C E N T S -------------------------22 C E N T S -------------------------24 AND UNDER 25 C EN T S
25 C E N T S -------------------------2G C E N T S -------------------------29 C E N T S -------------------------30 C E N T S -------------------------C E N T S -------------------------C E N T S -------------------------C E N T S -------------------------AND UNDER 3 9 C EN T S
40 C E N T S -------------------------45 C E N T S -------------------------46 C E N T S -------------------------70 C E N T S --------------------------

2 .5

6 .2
5 .4
2 .3
13 . 9
.5
.4

:
PAY

2.0

1 .2

8 .0

-

•5
8.9
.3
.4
-

6 .9
•8
-

1 .0

-

2.6
-

5 .3

9 .6
1 .3
1 .9
1 .4
-

2.7
-

1 .2
1 .2

1.2

-

1. 0

1 .3

2.5

-

7.9
1.3
4.4

.6
1.8

-

1.1

1.3
.4

-

2.8
.2
.1
•2

.5
-

.8
1.3

.1

-

1 .4

.9

.2

.1

-

( ID )

.8
2 .0

.2
-

.7
.5
.4

1 .4
-

*2
.2
-

.1
.3
(

•2

-

1.2

-

-

4

UNIFORM p e r c e n t a g e :
5 P E R C E N T -------7 P E R C E N T --------8 P E R C E N T --------10 P E R C E N T -----15 P E R C E N T -----other

-

1.9
4.8

i .i

_

3.8

.8

12 .2
-

.8
13 . 3

1.1

-

-

.1
2 .0

16. D

(

-

1 C)
.1
1CI
.5
.3

_
(

1 C)
-

1 .4

.1

2.2

d if f e r e n t ia l

FUL L
PLUS

D A Y 'S

FOR

REOUCED

HOURS

P E R C E N T ----------------------------------------

2.0

See footnotes at end o f tables.

25

7 .3

.5

.5

Table B-3. Scheduled weekly hours and days of full-time first-shift workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
P r o d u c t i o n an d r e l a t e d w o r k e r s

O ffice w o rk ers

Item
A l l in d u s trie s

P E R C E N T OF WORKERS BY
WEEKLY HOURS AND

M a n u fa ctu rin g

N onm an u factu ring

P u b lic utilities

A l l in d u s trie s

-----------------------

100

100

100

ICO

1

_

2

-

FU LL-TIM E

WORKERS

20
22
25
35
36
36
37
37
38
38
38
40

44
45
46
48
50

55

N on m an u factu rin g

P u b lic u tilities

SCH EDULE D
D AY S

HOURS— 5 D A Y S ------------------------------------------HOURS—5 D A Y S ------------------------------------------HOURS— 5 D A Y S ------------------------------------------HOURS— 5 D A Y S ------------------------------------------HOURS—5 D AY S ------------------------------------------1 / 4 HOURS— 5 D A Y S ---------------------------------H O U R S - 5 D AY S ------------------------------------------1 / 2 H O U R S - 5 D AY S ---------------------------------1 / 2 H O U R S - 5 DA Y S ---------------------------------3 / 4 H O UR S- 5 D A Y S ---------------------------------8 / 1 0 H O U R S - 5 DA Y S -------------------------------H O U R S ---------------------------------------------------------A D A Y S ------------ ------------------------------------------5 D A Y S -------------------------------------------------------5 1 / 2 D AY S ----------------------------------------------4 2 H O U R S ---------------------------------------------------------5 D A Y S --------------------------------------------------------

AL L

M a n u fa ctu rin g

5 1 / 2 D AY S ----------------------------------------------H O U R S - 5 1 / 2 D AY S ---------------------------------H O U R S - 5 D A Y S ------------------------------------------H O U R S - 5 D A Y S ------------------------------------------H 0 U R 5 - 6 D A Y S ------------------------------------------HOURS ---------------------------------------------------------5 D AY S -------------------------------------------------------6 D A Y S -------------------------------------------------------H O U R S - 5 1 / 2 D AY S ----------------------------------

(

11)
1
1
2

100

100

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
1

1

(

_

11)

3
-

-

-

2

-

4
23

6

2

18

7
27
-

(11 )
2
-

2

80
-

58
-

97
-

68
( 11)

80

58
(11 )

97
-

11)
11)

(11 )

89

2

2
1
2

“

1

“
5
”

(
(

1
2

(
(
(

2
i
i
i
( i i >
i
i

(1

1)
73

“
91

73

91

_

~

7

2
4

1

1
1

1
1

3 9 .7

-

-

-

1

11)
11)

-

)
)

1)

-

1

“

4 0 .2

2

11)
1
1
68

~
(11 )
83
( 11)
83
~

11)
1

1

-

1

(

(

_

~
“
“

1
88

100

_
-

( i n

4

100

-

(11
(11

-

(11 )
“

“

3 8 .9

39.9

A VE R AG E SCHEDULED
WEEKLY HOURS
ALL

WEEKLY

WORK

S C H E DU LE S

---------------------

4 0 .0

4 0 .6

See footnotes at end o f tables.




26

3 9 .2

3 9 .5

Table B-4. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
O ffice w o rk ers

P r o d u c t i o n and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s

Ite m
A ll industries

PE RC ENT

IN

N o n m an u factu rin g

100

100

P u b lic u tilities

A ll industries

100

100

E S T A B L I S H M E N T S NOT P R O V I D I N G
P A I D H O L I D A Y S -------------------------------------E STAB LISHM EN TS P R O V ID IN G
P A I D H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------------

2

-

8

-

98

100

9G

IO C

9.7

11 .1

7 .3

10 .2

F U LL-TIM E

AVERAGE

NUMBER

F OR WORKERS
PROVIDING

M an u fa ctu rin g

N onm anu/acturing

Public utilities

WOR KE RS
------------------

ALL
IN

OF

M a n u fa ctu rin g

WORKERS

OF

PAID

100

100

100

ICO

11)

-

11)

_

99

100

99

ICC

9.5

(
........... _

10 .0

9 .2

9.8

(

HOLIDAYS

I N E STAB LISHM EN TS
H O L I D A Y S ------------------

P E R C E N T OF WOR KE RS BY NUMBER
OF P A I D H O L I D A Y S P R O V I D E D

1
2
2

1
2
3
5
6

H O L I D A Y -------------------H O L I D A Y S -----------------H O L I D A Y S -----------------H O L I D A Y S -----------------H O L I D A Y S -----------------P L U S 1 HALF DAY P L U S 2 HALF DAYS
7 H O L I D A Y S -----------------P L U S 1 HALF DAY P LUS 2 HALF DAYS
8 H O L I D A Y S -----------------P LU S 1 HALF DAY P LU S 2 H AL F DAYS
9 H O L I D A Y S -----------------P LU S 2 HALF DAYS
10 H O L I D A Y S ---------------P LU S 2 HALF DAYS
11 H O L I D A Y S ---------------12 H O L I D A Y S ---------------13 H O L I D A Y S ---------------H O L I D A Y S ---------------m
2D H O L I D A Y S ---------------P E R C E N T OF WOR KE RS
P A I D H O L I D A Y T IM E

(

11)
10
1
G

11)
11)
12
1
(11)

(
(

G

-

2
6

-

-

5

-

1

-

2
~

2
-

(
(

7

1
(11 )
8

2

19

5
-

11
11)
11)
20
-

-

5

1

-

2

11)
2
2
2

-

(

2

ii
i
i
13
(11)
39

11)
10

_

_

-

25

12

89

1

1

—

-

27

1

1

G
-

27
-

-

-

98
9G
98
93
33
82
77
77
G5

100
100
100
100

2
2
1
11

-

11)
1
(11 )
(

-

8

-

18
4
i
i
7

27

11)
11)
11)
5

( i d

i
1G

(

(
(
(

(

2

11)
3
5

-

3
5
-

6

8

15
(

7

11)

2
1
20

5
-

-

2
(i d
81

38

2
3
-

(11 )

51
-

5
5

1
22

1
12
8
8
1

1
21
2
1

1

99
99
99
99
95
98
91
89
75
78
61

100
100
100
100

99
99
99
99
98
92
89

9

BY T O T A L
P R O V I D E D 12

2 D A Y S OR MORE ------3
5
G
G
7
7

D A Y S OR MORE ------D A Y S OR MORE ------D A Y S OR MORE ------1 / 2 D A Y S OR MORE
D A Y S OR MORE ------1 / 2 D A Y S OR MORE
8 D AY S OR MORE ------8 1 / 2 D A Y S OR MORE
9 C A Y S OR MORE ------1 0 D A Y S OR MORE ----1 1 D A Y S OR MORE ----1 2 C A Y S OR MORE ----1 3 D A Y S OR MORE ----1 8 D A Y S OR M O R E ----2 0 D A Y S ----------------------

See footn otes at end of tables,




95
95
93
93

68

86
88

58
31
13
9

80
85
17
18

8

12
11

7

98

100

88

IOC ,
IO C

83
81
G2
GO
89
89
29
29
19
7
G
-

100
97
96
96
96
93
93
77
28
27

21

96
96
98
98
78
78
75
38

88
72
70
89

9
5

12

1

1

11
6
1
1

~

~

“

9

ICC

100
IOC

100
97
93
93
93
79
79
78
23

22
“

Table B-5. Paid vacation provisions for full-time workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
P r o d u c t i o n and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s

O ffice w o rk e rs

Item
A l l in du stries

PERCENT
ALL

M an u fa ctu rin g

N o n m an u factu rin g

P u b lic u tilities

P u b lic u tilities

A l l in d u s trie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g

N onm an ufacturing

100

100

IOC

ICO

11)

(11 )

_

OF WORKERS

FU LL-TIM E

WORKERS

---------------

E S T A B L I S H M E N T S NOT P R O V I D I N G
P A I D V A C A T I O N S --------------------------------I N E S T A B L IS H M E N T S P R O V ID I N G
P A I D V A C A T I O N S --------------------------------L E N G T H - O F - T I M E P A Y M E N T ------------P E RC E N T A G E P A Y M E N T ---------------------OTHER P A Y M E N T ---------------------------------

100

ICO

A

100

100

-

IN

AMOUNT

OF

PAID

VAC ATION

AFTER:

Y EA R OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK -----------------------1 WEEK ------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS
2 WEEKS ----------------------------------3 WEEKS -----------------------------------

2 Y E A R S OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK -----------------------1 WEEK ------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS
2 WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS
3
3

a

WEEKS -----------------------------------

Y E A R S OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK -----------------------1 WEEK ------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS
2 WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS
3 WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS
A W E E K S ----------------------------------years
of
s e r v ic e :
UNDER 1 WEEK -----------------------1 WEEK ------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS
2 WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS
3 WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS

A

100

11)

(

99
87

100
8A

11
1

15

7
28

10

2

3A

19

29

2
1

2
2

1

1

2

“

i

2

_

_

(11 )

_

60

67

2

2

36

27

19
~
76

2

“

1

2

17
(11 )
82

26

33
i

5A
15
31

( i n
18
( 11)
80

_

82
2

29
A
83

28
5

35
1)
58

60

2

12

96
93
A

99
9A
5

99

1

1

1

2

_

1
1

(

(

1

68
11 i
2

55

(

26

2

11)
2
2

93
( 11)

“

2
.

78

12
2

1
A
7A
17

2

2
2

73
18

2

2

2

-

-

1

2
83
15

90
A

2
1
1

-

9
1)
8A

2

(
(

i n i

i

78
13

(

11)
11)
1

-

A

2

6
11)

~

87

(

83
15
-

2

2
(i d
-

W E E K S -----------------------------------

See footn otes at end of tables.




(

99
87

99
99

12
1

(11 )
(11 )

5
55
A

55

(

ICC
99
11 )

13

G MONTHS OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK -----------------------1 WEEK ------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS
2 WEEKS ----------------------------------1

-

1

28

(
(

11)
11)
1
90
4

2
1
1

_
3
3
85
7

_
-

2
79
9
5

1

2
79
9
5

1
1

1
73

“

(11 )
1
(11 )
99
(11 )

(
(

11)
11)
99

1
“
_

(11 )
(11 )

-

-

-

99

99

(11 )
(11 )

1
1

-

51
3

2
(11 )

1
-

(11 )
(11 )

_

-

-

99
(11 )
(11 )

99

-

1
-

Table B-5. Paid vacation provisions for full-time workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979— Continued
O ffice w o rk ers

P r o d u c t i o n an d r e l a t e d w o r k e r s

Ite m
A ll industries

AMOUNT OF P A I D
CONT INUE D
5

10

VAC ATION

AFTER

15

20

N on m an u factu rin g

P u b lic u tilities

-

4
65
3
19

-

Y E A R S OF S E R V I C E I
UNDER 1 WEEK ---------------------------------1 WEEK ----------------------------------------------2 WEEKS --------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS ------3 WEEKS --------------------------------------------4 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------

2
59
13
25

Y EA R S OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK ---------------------------------1 WEEK ----------------------------------------------2 WEEKS --------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS ------2 WEEKS --------------------------------------------OVE R 2 AND UNDER 4 WEEKS ------4 WEEKS --------------------------------------------5 WEEKS --------------------------------------------Y E A R S OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK ---------------------------------1 WEEK ----------------------------------------------2 WEEKS --------------------------------------------3 WEEKS --------------------------------------------OV E R 3 AND UNDER 4 WEEKS ------4 WEEKS --------------------------------------------OVER 4 AND UNDER 5 WEEKS ------5 WEEKS --------------------------------------------Y E A RS OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK ---------------------------------1 WEEK ----------------------------------------------2 WEEKS --------------------------------------------3 WEEKS --------------------------------------------4 WEEKS --------------------------------------------OVER 4 AND UNDER 5 WEEKS ------5 WEEKS --------------------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER 6 WEEKS ------6 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------

55
15
29

(
(

11)
11)
60
14
24

84
15

2

1

Y E A R S OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK ----------------------------------

2

_

7

5

10

_

1

2

-

(
(

11)
11)

1
-

4

M an uf a c t u r ing

N onm an ufacturing

5

8

~

1

73

1

2

1

2

9

15

-

4

-

5

6

1

2
68

-

-

73

82

10
6

15
9

82
15

i

(
(

1

2

2

4

-

6

-

47

1

2
22
2

51

60

37

1
1

-

2
2

-

4

-

2
11

6

-

16
49
i
26

1
1

2

50

48

-

P u b lic utilities

27
15

2

4
i
80

2
12
1

1
21

(1 1 )
(11 )

~

6
1

4
92
(11 )
4

_

(11 )
(11 )
1

11)
11)
2
40

2

-

4
34

2
8

4

_

( i d
( i d

-

70

—

1C

12
2

29

1
-

72

1
26

1
(11)
(1 1 )
1

~

45

31
~

50

72

—

"

_

-

16

1

2
11

12
2
1

1
8

88
2
8

71

51

2

25
46

1
90

-

(
(

_

C ll)

2
1

11)
11)

_

-

78

25

—

24
-

8

1

5

-

-

82

2

2

67

22
22
2

6
1

5

-

4
38

(11 )
(11 )

84
15

i

72

~

52

1

69
15

78

10

S ee footn otes at end o f tables.




A ll industries

13 -

1 WEEK ----------------------------------------------2 WEEKS --------------------------------------------OVE R 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS ------2 WEEKS --------------------------------------------OV E R 2 AND UNDER 4 WEEKS ------4 WEEKS --------------------------------------------5 WEEKS --------------------------------------------12

M an u fa ctu rin g

-

4
9
64

52
(

2
1

1

13
75

5

_
-

1
2
68

-

ID

18

1
1

62

11)
1

(11 )
(11 )
1

—

14

1

(

29

11)

1

Table B-5. Paid vacation provisions for full-time workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979— Continued
O ffice w o rk ers

P r o d u c t i o n and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s
Item
A l l in d u s trie s

AMOUNT OF P A I D
CONTINUED
25

30

VAC ATION

A F T E R 13

Y E A RS OF S E R V I C E :
UNCER 1 WEEK ------------------------1 WEEK -------------------------------------2 WEEKS -----------------------------------3 WEEKS -----------------------------------9 WEEKS -----------------------------------OVER 9 AND UNDER 5 WEEKS
5 WEEKS -----------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER 6 WEEKS
6 WEEKS -----------------------------------OVER 6 AND UNDER 7 WEEKS
7 WEEKS -----------------------------------Y EA RS OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK ------------------------1 WEEK -------------------------------------2 WEEKS ----------------------------------3 WEEKS ----------------------------------q WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER q AND UNDER 5 WEEKS
5 WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER 6 WEEKS
6 WEEKS ----------------------------------7 WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER 7 AND UNDER 8 WEEKS

MAXIMUM V A C A T I O N A V A I L A B L E :
UNDER 1 WEEK -------------------------1 WEEK --------------------------------------2 WEEKS ------------------------------------3 WEEKS ------------------------------------q WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER q AND UNDER 5 WEEKS
5 WEEKS ----------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER G WEEKS
G WEEKS ----------------------------------7
WEEKS ---------------------------------OVER 7 AND UNDER 8 WEEKS

M an u fa ctu rin g

N o n m an u factu rin g

P u b lic u tilities

2

-

q
G
25
23

-

M anu fa ctu rin g

N onm an ufacturing

P u b lic u tilities

-

3

2
10

(
(

-

3

11)
11)
2
11

-

(
(

q

8

11)
11)
1

36

2

-

5
-

39

1
qs

50

35

7G

1

-

12

7

2
1

39
-

5

39
( 11)
7

13
92
~
39
(11 )

10

q

11)

-

11)

-

_

-

-

2q

4
G
25
23

42

96

3G

78

1
12
( 11)

-

2
1

12

19
( 11 )

11)

-

“

”

~

_

_

15
2G

(

_

2
2
iq
23

2

28

(

_
-

2
7

-

(

iq

7

22

22
2

l
39

1
1G

( 11)

2

-

25

( 11)

( i n
m i

q
G
28

i n )
( i i )
l
13
33

11)

35
-

(

13

23

-

2
10

2

31

q

92
(

_

3
3
—
78

12

2
1

q

( 11)

-

(
(

11)
11)
2
1C
30
-

33
m i
1G

q

1
2
1C
7C

1
17

-

_
-

1
2
3
7C

1
17

2

_
-

q
G
27
—
28
31

( i i i
i n )
l
13
33
-

q
( n

8
)

q
-

-

1

30

qb

11)

-

-

1

3G

3

-

_

3

4
G
25
23
—

91

q

See footnotes at end of tables.




A ll ind ustries

2

_
-

1
2
a
—

7C

1
17
-

Table B-6. Health, insurance, and pension plans for full-time workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
P r o d u c t i o n and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s

O ffice w o rk ers

Item
A l l in d u s trie s

PERCENT

OF

M an u fa ctu rin g

N onm an u factu ring

P u b lic utilities

A ll industries

M a n u fa ctu rin g

N onm an ufacturing

P u b lic u tilities

WO RK ER S
-------------

100

100

100

ICO

100

100

ID 0

100

I N E S T A B L I S H M E N T S P R O V I D I N G AT
L E A S T ONE OF THE B E N E F I T S
SHOWN 3 E L 0 W 14--------------------------------------

97

99

92

100

99

99

99

100

L I F E I N S U R A N C E ----------------------------------N O N C O N T R I B U T O R Y P L A N S ----------------

89
78

93
80

83
75

10 D

99

74

86

98
79

99
91

ICC
80

A C C I D E N T A L D EAT H AND
D I SM E M B E R M E N T I N S U R A N C E ------------N O N C O N T R I B U T O R Y P L A N S ---------------

75
G6

30
70

67
58

95
70

87
75

91
74

84
75

94
74

SICKNESS
OR S I C K

84

92

71

92

93

9Q

95

92

75

89
78

52
45

64
62

68

68

57

78
57

60
56

63
62

17

16

19

18

63

61

64

29

17

50

15

6

23

50

ALL

F U L L -T IM E

WORKERS

AND A C C I D E N T I N S U R A N C E
L E A V E OR B O T H 1 5 ---------------

S I C K N E S S AND A C C I D E N T
I N S U R A N C E ---------------------------------------N O N C O N T R I B U T O R Y P L A N S ----------S I C K L E A V E ( F U L L P A Y AND NO
W A I T I N G P E R I O D ) -------------------------S I C K L E A V E ( P A R T I A L P A Y OR
W A I T I N G F E R I O D ) --------------------------

11

7

LONG-TERM D I S A B I L I T Y
I N S U R A N C E -------------------------------------------N O N C O N T R I B U T O R Y P L A N S ---------------

27

22

28
24

24
18

63
63

51
42

45
33

57
49

63
62

H O S P I T A L I Z A T I O N I N S U R A N C E ----------N O N C O N T R I E U T O R Y P L A N S ---------------

95
76

99
82

89
67

99
74

99
63

99
72

98
55

95
75

S U R G I C A L I N S U R A N C E -------------------------N O N C O N T R I E U T O R Y P L A N S ---------------

95
74

99
82

89
62

99
74

99
62

99
72

98
55

95
75

MEDICAL I N S U R A N C E
NONC ONTR IB UTOR Y

93
73

97
79

88
62

99
74

97
62

98
70

97
55

95
75

-----------------------------

80
61

84

68

72
50

99
74

95
61

95
65

96
58

69

D E N T A L I N S U R A N C E ------------------------------N O N C O N T R I E U T O R Y P L A N S ---------------

34
31

36
33

31
27

69
69

28
24

36
29

21
20

69
69

R E T I R E M E N T P E N S I O N -------------------------N O N C O N T R I B U T O R Y P L A N S ---------------

84
75

94

67
58

91
89

90
77

94
78

87
76

96
94

---------------------------P L A N S ---------------

MAJOR M E D I C A L I N S U R A N C E
NONC ONT R IB UT OR Y P L A N S

See footn otes at end o f tables.




86

94

Table B-7. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979
P r o d u c t i o n and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s
A l l in d u stries

Item
A ll
plans

N on con trib u tory
p l a n s 16

16

O ffice w ork ers

M a n u fa ctu rin g
A ll
plans

16

A l l in du stries

N oncontributory
p l a n s 16

A ll
plans

16

M an u fa ctu rin g

N on con trib u tory
p l a n s 16

A ll
plans

16

N on co n trib u tory
p l a n s 16

t
TYPE

OF
OF

P L A N AND AMOUNT
INSURANCE

A L L F U L L - T I M E WORKERS ARE P R O V I D E D THE SAME
F L A T - S U M D O L L A R A M O UN T :
P E R C E N T OF A L L F U L L - T I M E W O R K E R S 17 ------------------------AMOUNT OF I N S U R A N C E P R O V I D E D : 18
M E A N --------------------------------------------------------------------M E D I A N ----------------------------------------------------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------M I D D L E R ANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) -----------------------

AMOUNT OF I N S U R A N C E I S B AS ED ON A S CHE DUL E
WHICH I N D I C A T E S A S P E C I F I E D D O L L A R AMOUNT OF
I N S U R A N C E F O R A S P E C I F I E D L E N G T H OF S E R V I C E :
P E RC E N T OF A L L F U L L - T I M E W O R K E R S 17 ------------------------AMOUNT OF I N S U R A N C E P R O V I D E O 18 A F T E R :
6 MONTHS OF S E R V I C E :
M E A N --------------------------------------------------------------------M E D I A N ----------------------------------------------------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------M I D DL E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------1 YEA R OF S E R V I C E :
M E A N --------------------------------------------------------------------M E D I A N ----------------------------------------------------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------5 Y E A RS OF S E R V I C E :
M E A N --------------------------------------------------------------------M E D I A N ----------------------------------------------------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------1 0 Y E A R S OF S E R V I C E :
M E A N --------------------------------------------------------------------M E D I A N ----------------------------------------------------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------2 0 Y E A RS OF S E R V I C E :
M E A N --------------------------------------------------------------------M E D I A N ----------------------------------------------------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) -----------------------

See

foo tn o tes

at

end

of

53

5G
$ 6 ,6 0 0
$8.
$2,

$ 6 , 00 0
000 - 1 0 ,0 0 0
000 - 1 1 , 0 0 0

$ 6 .7 0 0
$" 1 ,
$2,

$ G ,000
000 - 1 0 .0 0 0
000 - 1 1 . 0 0 0

52
$ 7 ,5 0 0
$ 7 ,000
$ 5 ,0 0 0 - 1 0 ,0 00
$<t , 0 0 0 - 1 2 ,000

$ 7 ,7 0 0
$ 7 ,5 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0
$ 8 , 000 - 1 2 .0 0 0

28
$ G » 800
$ 6,00 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 - 9.000
$ 3 ,0 0 0 -1 2 .0 0 0

22
$ 6 ,9 0 0
$ 8 ,0 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 - 9.000
$ 3 ,0 0 0 -1 2 ,0 0 0

30
$ 7 ,9 0 0
$ 7 ,0 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 -1 2 .0 0 0

2G
$ 7 .8 0 0
$ 7 ,5 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 -1 2 .0 0 0

2

2

9

( 6)
(G )
( 6)
( 6)

(G )
(G )
( 6)
(G )

(G )
(G )
(G )
(G )

(G
(G
(G
(G

)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)

$3 ,3 0 0
(G )
(G )
(G )

$ 3 ,3 0 0
(G )
(G )
(G )

(6)
(G )
(G )
(G )

(G )
(6 )
(G )
(G )

(G )

$ 8 ,1 0 0
(G )
(G )
(G )

$ 8 ,10 0
(G )
(G )
(G )

(G )
(G )
(G )
(G )

(G
(G
(G
(G

)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)

8

2

(G )
(G )
(G )
(G )

2

(G )
( 6)
(G )
(G )

2

(G )
(G )
(G )
(G )

3

(G )
(G )

(6 >
(G )

$ 3 ,7 0 0
(G )
(6 )
(G )

$ 3 ,7 0 0
(E )
( 6)
(G )

(6 )
(6)
(G )
(G )

(G
(G
(G
(G

$ G , 9 00
(G )
(G )
(G )

$ 6 ,9 0 0
(G )
(G )
(G )

(G )
(G )
(G )
(6)

(6 )
(6 )
(G )

$1 0,5 0 0
(G )
(G )
(G )

$10,500
(6)
(G )
(G )

(G )
(6 )
(6)
(G )

(G
(G
(G
(G

)
)
)
)

$ 1 2 ,2 0 0
(G )
(G )
(G )

$ 12 ,2 0 0
(G )
(G )
(G )

(G )
(G )
(G )
(G )

(G
(G
(G
(G

$1 0,7 0 0
(G )
(G )
(G )

$10,700
(G )
( 6)
(G )

(G )
(G )
(G )
(G )

(G )
(G )
(G )
(6 )

$12,900
(G )
(G )
(6)

$12,900
(G )
(G )
(G )

(G )
(6)
(G )
(G )

(G )
(G )
(G )
(6 )

tables.




89

32

Table B-7. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1979— Continued
P r o d u c t i o n and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s
A l l in du stries

Item
A ll
plans

16

O ffice w o rk e rs

M a n u fa ctu rin g

N on con trib u tory
p l a n s 16

A ll
plans

16

A l l industries

N on con trib u tory
p l a n s 16

A ll
plans

16

M an u fa ctu rin g

N oncontributory
p l a n s 16

A ll
plans

16

N oncontributory
p l a n s 16

TYP E OF PL A N AN D AM O U N T
OF I N S U R A N C E - C O N T I N U E D
A M O U N T OF I N S U R A N C E IS B A S E D ON A S C H E D U L E
WHI C H I N D I C A T E S A S P E C I F I E D D O L L A R AM OUNT OF
I N S U R A N C E F O R A S P E C I F I E D A M O U N T OF EA RN IN GS :
P E R C E N T OF A L L F U L L - T I M E W O R K E R S 17----------AM O U N T OF I N S U R A N C E P R O V I D E D 18IF:
AN N U A L E A R N I N G S ARE $5 , 0 0 0 :
M E A N ------------------------------------M E D I A N ---------------------------------MI D D L E R A NG E ( 5D P E R C E N T ) --------KI D D L E R A NG E (80 P E R C E N T ) --------A N N U A L E A R N I N G S ARE $ 1 G » 0 0 0 :
M E A N ------------------------------------M E D I A N ---------------------------------M I D D L E R A NG E (50 P E R C E N T ) ---------MI D D L E R A NG E (80 F E R C E N T ) ---------ANN U AL E A R N I N G S ARE $ 1 5 , 0 0 0 :
M E A N ------------------------------------M E D I A N ---------------------------------KI D D L E RAN G E (50 P E R C E N T ) ---------K I D D L E R A NG E (80 P E R C E N T ) ---------AN N U A L E A R N I N G S ARE $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 :
M E A N ------------------------------------M E D I A N ---------------------------------M I D D L E R A NG E (50 P E R C E N T ) ---------M I D D L E R A NG E (80 P E R C E N T ) ---------A M O U N T OF I N S U R A N C E IS E X P R E S S E D AS A F A C T O R OF
AN N U A L E A R N I N G S : 19
P E R C E N T OF A L L F U L L - T I M E W O R K E R S 17-----------factor

of

annual

earnings

used

to

IS

13

22

22

15

12

12

24

$ 9 ,7 0 0
$ 11,000
$ 8 . 000 - 1 2 . OOO
$ 6 ,0 0 0 -1 2 .5 0 0

$ 9 ,7 0 0
$ 11,0 00
$ 6 .0 0 0 -1 2 .5 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 -1 2 .5 0 0

$ S .900
$11 ,0 0 0
$ 8 ,0 0 0 -1 2.5 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 -1 2.5 0 0

$10,400
$ 11,0 00
$ 9 ,5 0 0 -1 2 .5 0 0
$ 5 .0 0 0 -1 2.5 0 0

$ 7 ,4 0 0
$ 7 ,0 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 - 9.000
$ 4 ,0 0 0 -1 2.0 0 0

$ 5 ,7 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 - 6.000
$ 4 ,0 0 0 - 7,500

$ 7 ,0 0 0
$7 ,0 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 - 8.000
$ 5 ,0 0 0 -1 0 ,0 0 0

$ 5 ,5 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0
$ 5 , CCO— 5 . 0 0 0
$ 5 ,0 0 0 - 7.5CD

SlttCO O
$12,500
$ 1 1,5 0 0 -14 .0 0 0
$ 1 0 . 000 - 22.000

$ 12,800
$ 11,500
$11.0 0 0 -12 .5 0 0
$ 1 0 , 000 - 20. 000

$12 * 7 0 0
$1 2,5 0 0
$ 1 1.5 0 0 -14 .0 0 0
$ 1 0 .0 0 0 -14 .0 0 0

$ llfS C O
$11,500
$ 1 0,7 0 0 -12 .5 0 0
$ 1 0,0 0 0 -12 .5 0 0

$12 tOOO
$ 11,0 0 0
$ 1 0,0 0 0 -16 .0 0 0
$ 1 0 . 0 0 0 - 1 8 . OOO

$10*500
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
$ 1 0 , 000 - 1 1 , 0 0 0
$ 4 ,0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0

$12*100
$14,000
$ 1 0,000-14,000
$ 1 0,000-18.000

$10,900
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
$ 1 0 , 000 - 10 .0 0 0
$ 1 0,000-16.000

$18,300
$16,500
$16,5 0 0 -17 .0 0 0
$ 1 5,0 0 0 -30 .0 0 0

$17,700
$16,500
$ 1 6,0 0 0 -16 .5 0 0
$ 1 5,000-30.000

$1 6,7 0 0
$16,500
$ 1 6,5 0 0 -17 .0 0 0
$ 1 5,0 0 0 -17 .0 0 0

$15,700
$16,500
$ 1 5,5 0 0 -16 .5 0 0
$ 1 5,0 0 0 -16 .5 0 0

$17,300
$1 6,0 0 0
$ 1 5,0 0 0 -18 .0 0 0
$ 1 0,0 0 0 -30 ,0 0 0

$1 5,3 0 0
$15,000
$ 1 5,000-16.000
$ 5 ,0 0 0 -2 4 ,0 0 0

$ 17,500
$17,000
$15,0 0 0 -17 .0 0 0
$ 1 3,000-30,000

$15,400
$15,000
$15,0 0 0 -15 .0 0 0
$14,5 0 0 -20 .0 0 0

$ 23,500
$ 22 ,00 0
$ 2 1 . 0 0 0 - 2 2 . OOO
$ 1 6,7 0 0 -40 .0 0 0

$23,100
$ 22 ,00 0
$ 2 1 , 000 - 2 2 .0 0 0
$ 1 6,700-30.000

$2 1,6 0 0
$ 2 2 ,0 0 0
$ 2 2 , 000 - 2 2 , 0 0 0
$ 1 6,7 0 0 -22 ,0 0 0

$2 0,3 0 0
$22,000
$ 2 0 . COO— 2 2 . 0 0 0
$1 6,7 0 0 -22 .0 0 0

$2 1,8 0 0
$ 20, 000
$ 1 8,0 0 0 -21 .0 0 0
$ 1 0,0 0 0 -40 .0 0 0

$2 0,9 0 0
$ 20, 000
$ 2 0 , 000 - 2 1 ,0 0 0
$ 7 ,5 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0

$ 2 2 ,2 00
$ 20,000
$ 2 0 , 000 - 20 ,00 0
$ 1 3,000-36.000

$20,500
$ 20,00 0
$ 2 0 , 000- 20.000
$19,0 0 0 -30 .0 0 0

11

9

14

11

51

50

40

38

calculate

AM O U N T

OF I N S U R A N C E : 18
M E A N -------------------------------------M E D I A N ----------------------------------KI D D L E RAN G E (50 F E R C E N T ) ---------MI D D L E R A NG E (80 P E R C E N T ) ---------P E R C E N T OF AL L F U L L - T I M E W O R K E R S CO VE RE D BY
PLA NS NOT S P E C I F Y I N G A M A X I M U M AM OU NT OF
I N S U R A N C E ---------------------------------------P E R C E N T OF A L L F U L L - T I M E W O R K E R S CO VE RE D BY
PLA N S S P E C I F Y I N G A M A X I M U M A M O U N T OF
I N S U R A N C E ---------------------------------------S P E C I F I E D M A X I M U M A M O U N T OF I N S U R A N C E : 18
M E A N -------------------------------------ME D I A N -----------------------------------K I D D L E R A NG E (50 P E R C E N T ) ----------M I D D L E R A NG E (80 P E R C E N T ) ----------AM O U N T OF I N S U R A N C E
OF p l a n :
percent

of

all

IS B A SE D
full

-time

ON S O ME OT HE R
workers

See footnotes at end of tables,




1.68
2 . GO

1 . 00 - 2.00
1 . 00- 2.0 0

1 .75

2 .0 0
1 .5 0 -2 .0 0
1 . 00 - 2 .0 0

10

8

1
$79.500
$ 5 0 . COO
$50,0 0 0 -13 0 .0 00
$5 0,0 0 0 -13 0 .0 00

1.82

2. 0 0
2 . 00 - 2 . 0 0
1 , 0 G—2 . 0 0

1 .94

2.00
2 . 0 0 - 2 . DC
2 . 00 - 2 .0 0

13

1 .0 0 -2 .5 0

1 .0 0 -2 .5 0

1
(6)
(6)
(6)
(6)

1

1

(6
(6
(6
(6

)
)
)
)

2.0 0

1 .82
2 .CC
1 .5 0 -2 .0 0
1 .5 0 -2 .0 0

31

30

16

17
$8 2,3 0 0
$7 0,0 0 0
$4 0.0 0 0 -10 0 .0 00
$4 0.0 0 0 -20 0 ,0 00

1.81
1 . 5 0 - 2 .00
1 .0 0 -2 .5 0

22

34

1

1

1 .70

2 .0 0
1 . 00 - 2 .0 0

11

6)
6)
(6 )
( 6)
(
(

1 .70

2.00
1 . 00 - 2. 0 0

9

7

$8 3,2 0 0
$7 5,0 0 0
$ 4 0.0 0 0 -10 0 .0 00
$40,0 0 0 -20 0 .0 00

$113,500
$130,000
$50,0 0 0 -13 0 ,0 00
$ 5 0 . 0 0 G —2 0 0 . 0 C D

$124,600
$130,000
$ 7 0,000-200.000
$50,0 0 0 -20 0 .0 00

11)

-

-

TYPE

17-----------

1

1

(

11)

(

Footnotes

Some of these standard footnotes m ay not apply to this bulletin.

1
Standard hours r e fle c t the w orkw eek fo r which em ployees r e c e iv e
th eir regu la r stra ig h t-tim e s a la rie s (ex clu sive o f pay fo r o v e rtim e at r e g ­
ular and/or prem iu m r a te s ), and the earnings correspon d to these w eekly
hours.
2
The mean is computed fo r each job by totalin g the earnings o f
a ll w ork ers and dividing by the number o f w o rk e rs .
The m edian d e s ig ­
nates position— h alf o f the w o rk ers r e c e iv e the same or m o re and h alf r e ­
ceiv e the same or less than the rate shown. The m iddle range is defined
by two rates o f pay; a fourth o f the w o rk e rs earn the same or le s s than
the low er o f these rates and a fourth earn the same or m o re than the
higher rate.
3
E arnings data re la te only to w o rk e rs whose sex iden tification was
p rovided by the establishm ent.
4
Excludes prem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on weekends,
holidays, and late shifts.
5
E stim ates fo r period s ending p r io r to 1976 re la te to men only for
sk illed m aintenance and unskilled plant w o rk e rs . A ll other estim ates r e ­
late to men and women.
6
Data do not m eet publication c r it e r ia or data not available.
7
F o r m a lly established m inim um regu la r s tra ig h t-tim e h irin g s a l­
a rie s that a re paid fo r standard w orkw eeks.
Data are p resen ted fo r a ll
standard w orkw eeks com bined, and fo r the m ost common standard w o rk ­
weeks rep orted .
8
Excludes w o rk ers in s u b c le ric a l jobs such as m essen ger.
9
Includes a ll production and re la te d w o rk ers in establishm ents
cu rrently operating late sh ifts, and establishm ents whose fo rm a l provision s
cover late sh ifts, even though the establishm ents w e re not cu rren tly
operating late shifts.
10 L e s s than 0.05 percen t.
11
L e s s than 0.5 percen t.
12 A ll com binations o f fu ll and h alf days that add to the same amount;
fo r exam ple, the proportion o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g a tota l o f 10 days
includes those with 10 fu ll days and no half days, 9 fu ll days and 2
h alf days, 8 fu ll days and 4 h a lf days, and so on. P ro p o rtio n s then
w e re cumulated.




1 Includes payments other than "len gth o f t im e , " such as percen tage
3
o f annual earnings or flat-su m paym ents, con verted to an equivalent tim e
b asis; for exam ple, 2 percent of annual earnings was con sidered as 1 w eek 's
pay. P e rio d s o f s e rv ic e are chosen a r b itr a r ily and do not n e c e s s a rily r e fle c t
individual provision s for p rogression ; fo r exam p le, changes in proportion s
at 10 y e a rs include changes between b and 10 y e a rs . E stim ates are cum ula­
tiv e . Thus, the proportion e lig ib le for at lea st 3 w e e k s ' pay after 10 yea rs
includes those elig ib le for at least 3 w ee k s ' pay after fe w e r y e a rs o f s e r v ic e .
1 E stim ates listed after type o f b en efit are fo r a ll plans fo r which
4
at lea st a part of the cost is borne by the e m p lo y er.
"N on con trib u tory
plans" include only those financed e n tire ly by the e m p lo y er. Excluded are
le g a lly req u ired plans, such as w o rk e rs ' d is a b ility com pensation, s o c ia l s e ­
cu rity, and ra ilro a d retirem en t.
1 Unduplicated total o f w ork ers r e c e iv in g sick le a v e or sickness and
5
accident insurance shown separately b elow . Sick le a v e plans are lim ite d to
those which defin itely establish at least the m inim um number o f days' pay
that each em ployee can expect. In form a l sick lea ve allow ances d eterm in ed
on an individual basis are excluded.
1 E stim ates under " A l l plans" re la te to a ll plans fo r which at least
6
a part o f the cost is borne by the em p lo y e r. E stim ates under "N o n co n trib ­
utory plan s" include only those financed e n tire ly by the e m p lo y er.
3 F o r " A ll in d u s trie s ," all fu ll-tim e production and re la te d w o rk ers
7
or o ffic e w ork ers equal 100 percent.
F o r "M a n u fa c tu rin g ," a ll fu ll-tim e
production and related w ork ers or o ffic e w o rk e rs in m anufacturing equal 100
percent.
1
8 The mean amount is computed by m u ltiplyin g the number o f
w o rk ers provided insurance by the amount o f insurance p rovid ed , totaling
the products, and dividing the sum by the number o f w o rk e rs . The m edian
indicates that half o f the w ork ers are p ro vid ed an amount equal to or s m a lle r
and half an amount equal to or la r g e r than the amount shown. M iddle
range (50 percent)— a fourth o f the w o rk e rs are p ro vid ed an amount equal to
or less than the sm a ller amount and a fourth are p ro vid ed an amount equal
to or m ore than the la rg e r amount. M iddle range (80 p ercen t)— 10 percen t of
the w o rk ers are provided an amount equal to or le s s than the s m a lle r
amount and 10 percent are p rovided an amount equal to or m o re than the
la r g e r amount.
1 A factor o f annual earnings is the number by which annual earnings
9
are m u ltiplied to determ ine the amount o f insurance p rovid ed . F o r exam ple,
a factor o f 2 indicates that for annual earnings of $ 10,000 the amount o f
insurance provided is $ 20, 000.

Appendix A.
Scope and Method
of Survey
In each o f the 72 1 areas cu rren tly surveyed, the Bureau obtains
w ages and rela ted ben efits data fro m represen tative establishm ents within
six broad industry d ivision s: Manufacturing; transportation, com m unication,
and oth er public u tilitie s ; w h olesale trade; re ta il trade; finance, insurance,
and re a l estate; and s e r v ic e s . Governm ent operations and the construction
and e x tra c tiv e in du stries are excluded. Establishm ents having fe w e r than a
p r e s c r ib e d num ber o f w o rk e rs are also excluded because o f in su fficient
em ploym ent in the occupations studied. Appendix table 1 shows the number
o f establishm ents and w o rk e rs estim ated to be within the scope of this
su rvey , as w e ll as the num ber actually studied.
Bureau fie ld re p resen ta tives obtain data by person al v is its at 3 -y e a r
in te rv a ls . In each o f the two in tervening y e a rs , inform ation on em ploym ent
and occupational earn in gs only is co llected by a com bination of person al
v is it, m a il qu estion n aire, and telephone in terview fro m establishm ents
p a rticip a tin g in the p reviou s su rvey.

A sam ple o f the establishm ents in the scope o f the su rvey is
s e le c te d fo r study p r io r to each personal v is it survey.
This sam ple, less
establish m en ts which go out o f business o r are no lon ger within the industrial
scope o f the s u rv e y , is retain ed fo r the follow in g two annual su rveys. In
m ost ca s e s , establish m en ts new to the area are not con sidered in the scope
o f the su rvey until the selectio n of a sam ple fo r a p erson a l v is it su rvey.
The sam pling p roced u res in volve detailed s tra tifica tio n o f all
establish m en ts within the scope o f an individual area su rvey by industry
and num ber o f em p lo y e e s .
F ro m this s tra tified universe a p rob ab ility
sam ple is s e le c te d , w ith each establishm ent having a p red eterm in ed chance
o f s electio n .
T o obtain optim um accuracy at m inim um cost, a g re a te r
p ro p o rtio n o f la r g e than sm a ll establishm ents is selected. When data are
com bined, each establish m en t is w eighted according to its p rob ab ility o f
s e le c tio n so that unbiased estim ates are generated.
F o r exam ple, i f one
out o f fou r establish m en ts is s elected , it is given a weight o f 4 to rep resen t
it s e lf plus th ree o th ers.
An alternate o f the same o rig in a l p rob a b ility is
chosen in the sam e in d u s try -s iz e cla ssifica tio n if data are not available
fr o m the o r ig in a l sam ple m em b er. If no suitable substitute is availab le,
additional w eight is assigned to a sam ple m em ber that is s im ila r to the
m is s in g unit.

Included in the 72 areas are 2 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract.
These areas are
Akron, Ohio and Poughkeepsie—
Kingston-Newburgh, N. Y .
In addition, the Bureau conducts more limited
area studies in approximately 100 areas at the request of the Employment Standards Administration of the
U. S. Department of Labor.




Occupations and earnings
Occupations selected fo r study are common to a va riety of manufac­
turing and nonmanufacturing in d u stries, and are of the follow ing types: ( 1)
O ffice c le ric a l; ( 2) p ro fession a l and technical; (3) maintenance, toolroom ,
and powerplant; and (41 m a te ria l m ovem ent and custodial. Occupational
c la ssifica tio n is based on a uniform set o f job descriptions designed to take
account o f interestablishm ent va ria tion in duties within the same job.
Occupations selected fo r study are listed and described in appendix B.
Unless oth erw ise indicated, the earnings data follow ing the job titles
are fo r all industries combined. Earnings data fo r some of the occupations
listed and d escrib ed , o r fo r some industry divisions within the scope of the
su rvey, are not presented in the A - s e r ie s tables because either (1) em ploy­
ment in the occupation is too sm all to p rovide enough data to m erit p resen ­
tation, o r ( 2) th ere is p o ssib ility of disclosu re of individual establishment
data. Separate m en's and w om en's earnings data are not presented when the
number o f w ork ers not iden tified by sex is 20 percent o r m ore of the men
o r women iden tified in an occupation. Earnings data not shown separately
fo r industry divisions are included in data fo r all industries combined.
L ik e w is e , fo r occupations with m ore tnan one le v e l, data are included in
the o v e r a ll c la ssifica tio n when a su bclassification is not shown or inform ation
to su bclassify is not available.
Occupational em ploym ent and earnings data are shown fo r fu ll-tim e
w o rk e rs , i.e ., those h ired to w ork a regu lar w eekly schedule. Earnings
data exclude p rem iu m pay fo r o vertim e and fo r w ork on weekends, holidays,
and late shifts.
Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-o f-livin g
allow ances and incentive bonuses are included. W eekly hours fo r office
c le r ic a l and p ro fessio n a l and technical occupations re fe r to the standard
w orkw eek (rounded to the n earest half hour) fo r which em ployees receive
regu la r stra igh t-tim e sa la ries (exclu sive of pay fo r overtim e at regular
and/or prem ium ra te s ). A v e ra g e w eekly earnings fo r these occupations
are rounded to the n earest half d olla r. V e rtic a l lines within the distribution
o f w o rk ers on som e A -ta b les indicate a change in the size of the class
in terva ls.
These su rveys m easu re the le v e l o f occupational earnings in an area
at a p a rticu la r tim e . Com parisons of individual occupational averages over
tim e m ay not re fle c t expected wage changes. The averages fo r individual
jobs are affected by changes in wages and em ploym ent patterns. F o r example,
proportions of w o rk ers em ployed by high- o r low -w age firm s may change,
o r high-w age w o rk ers m ay advance to b etter jobs and be replaced by new
w o rk ers at lo w e r rates. Such shifts in em ploym ent could decrease an
occupational average even though m ost establishm ents in an area increase
wages during the y e a r. Changes in earnings of occupational groups, shown in
table A - 7, are b etter in dicators of wage trends than are earnings changes fo r
individual jobs within the groups.

A v e ra g e earnings re fle c t com p osite, a reaw id e estim ates. Industries
and establishm ents d iffe r in pay le v e l and job staffin g, and thus contribute
d ifferen tly to the estim ates fo r each job.
P ay a vera ges m ay fa il to r e fle c t
accu rately the w age d iffe re n tia l among jobs in individual establishm ents.

Skilled maintenanc
Continued
Mechanics (m otor veh icle)
P ip e fitte rs
T o o l and die m akers

A v e ra g e pay le v e ls fo r men and wom en in selected occupations
should not be assum ed to r e fle c t d iffe re n c e s in pay o f the sexes within
individual establishm ents. F a c to rs which m ay contribute to d ifferen ces
include p ro g re s s io n within establish ed rate ranges (on ly the rates paid
incumbents a re collected ) and p erfo rm a n ce of sp ecific duties within the
gen eral su rvey job d escrip tio n s. Job d escrip tion s used to c la s s ify em ployees
in these su rveys usually a re m o re g e n e ra lize d than those used in individual
establishm ents and a llow fo r m in or d iffe re n c e s among establishm ents in
sp ecific duties p e rfo rm e d .

U n skilled plant
Jan itors, p o rte rs , and
clea n ers
M a te ria l handling la b o re rs

Percen t changes fo r individual areas in the p ro gra m a re computed
as fo llo w s :
1. A v e ra g e earnings a re computed fo r each occupation fo r
the 2 years being com pared.
The a vera g es a re d erived
from earnings in those establishm ents which a re in the
survey both years; it is assum ed that em ploym ent
rem ains unchanged.

Occupational em ploym ent estim ates rep resen t the tota l in a ll e s ta b ­
lishm ents within the scope o f the study and not the number actually surveyed.
Because occupational stru ctu res among establishm ents d iffe r , estim ates o f
occupational em ploym ent obtained fro m the sam ple o f establishm ents studied
serve only to indicate the r e la tiv e im portance o f the jobs studied.
These
d ifferen ces in occupational stru ctu re do not a ffect m a te ria lly the accu racy of
the earnings data.

2.

Each occupation is assigned a weight based on its
proportionate em ploym ent in the occupational group in
the base year.

3.

These weights are used to compute group a v e ra g e s .
Each occupation's a vera ge earnings (com puted in step 1)
is m ultiplied by its w eight.
The products a re totaled
to obtain a group average.

4.

The ratio o f group averages fo r 2 consecu tive years is
computed by dividing the a v e ra g e fo r the cu rrent year
by the avera ge fo r the e a r lie r y e a r.
The result—
expressed as a percent— le s s 100 is the percen t change.

Wage trends fo r selected occupational groups
The p ercen t in crea ses p resen ted in tab le A -7 a re based on changes
in a vera ge hourly earnings o f men and wom en in establishm ents rep ortin g
the trend jobs in both the cu rrent and p reviou s y e a r (matched establishm ents).
The data a re adjusted to rem o ve the effect on a vera ge earnings of e m p lo y ­
ment shifts among establishm ents and tu rn o ver of establishm ents included
in survey sam ples.
The percen t in c re a s e s , h ow ever, are s till affected by
factors other than w age in c re a s e s . H irin g s , la y o ffs , and tu rn over may
affect an establishm ent a vera g e fo r an occupation when w o rk e rs a re paid
under plans provid in g a range o f w age rates fo r individual iobs. In p eriod s
o f in creased h irin g, fo r exam ple, new em p loyees m ay enter at the bottom
of the range, d ep ressin g the a v e ra g e without a change in w age rates.

F o r a m ore detailed d escrip tion o f the method used to compute
these w age trends
see "Im p rovin g A re a W age Survey In d e x e s ," M onthly
L ab or R e v ie w , January 1973, pp. 52-57.
A v e r a g e pay relationships within establishm ents
R ela tive m easu res of occupational pay a re presen ted in table A -8
fo r w h ite -c o lla r occupations and in table A -9 fo r b lu e -c o lla r occupations.
Th ese re la tiv e values re fle c t d iffe re n c e s in pay between occupations within
individual establishm ents. R ela tive pay values a re computed by dividing an
establishm ent's avera ge earnings fo r an occupation being com pared by the
a vera g e fo r another occupation (designated as 100) and m ultiplying the
quotient by 100. F o r exam ple, if ja n itors in a fir m a vera g e $ 4 an hour and
fo r k lift operators $5, fo rk lift o p era tors have a r e la tiv e pay value o f 125
com pared with ja n itors. ($5 -j- $4 = 1.25 x 100 = 125.)
In com bining the
re la tiv e s of the individual establishm ents to a r r iv e at an o v e r a ll a v e ra g e ,
each establishm ent is considered to have as many r e la tiv e s as it has
w eighted w ork ers in the two jobs being com pared.

The percen t changes re la te to w age changes between the indicated
dates. When the tim e span between su rveys is other than 12 months, annual
rates a re also shown. (It is assum ed that .wages in crea se at a constant
rate between su rveys.)
Occupations used to compute w age trends are:
O ffic e c le r ic a l

E le c tro n ic data p ro cessin g 2

S e c re ta rie s
S ten ograph ers, sen ior
Sten ograph ers, g en era l
T y p is ts , c la s s e s A and B
F ile c le r k s , cla s s e s A ,
B, and C
M e ssen g ers
Switchboard o p era to rs
O rd e r c le r k s , cla sses
A and B
Accounting c le rk s ,
cla s s e s A and B
P a y r o ll c le rk s
K ey en try o p e ra to rs ,
cla sses A and B

C om puter system s analysts,
c la s s e s A , B, and C
Com puter p ro g ra m m e rs ,
c la s s e s A , B, and C

P a y relationships based on o v e r a ll a v e ra g e s m ay d iffe r con siderably
because o f the varying contribution of high- and lo w -w a g e establishm ents to
the a v e ra g e s . F o r exam ple, the o v e r a ll a v e ra g e hou rly earnings fo r fo r k lift
o p era to rs m ay be 50 percent m o re than the a v e ra g e fo r jan itors because the
a vera g e fo r fo rk lift op erators m ay be stro n gly influenced by earnings in
high -w age establishm ents w hile the a v e ra g e fo r jan itors m ay be strongly
influenced by earnings in low -w age establishm ents.
In such a case, the
in tra-establish m en t relationship w ill indicate a much s m a lle r d ifferen ce in
earnings.

In du strial nurses
R e g is te re d industrial
nurses
S killed m aintenance
C arpen ters
E le c tric ia n s
P a in ters
M achinists
M echanics (machinery"'

Establishm ent practices and supplem entary w age p ro visio n s
The incidence o f selected establishm ent p ra c tic e s and supplem entary
wage provision s is studied fo r fu ll-tim e production and rela ted w o rk ers and
o ffic e w o rk e rs .
Production and rela ted w o rk e rs (r e fe r r e d to h e re a fte r as
production w ork ers) include w orking su p e rv is o rs and a ll n on su pervisory

2 The earnings of computer operators are not included in the wage trend computation for this group.
A revised job description is being introduced in this survey which is not equivalent to the previous description.




36

w o rk e rs (including group
lea d ers and tra in ees) engaged in fab ricatin g,
p ro cessin g, assem b lin g, inspection, rec e iv in g , storage, handling, pack­
ing, w arehousing, shipping,
maintenance, re p a ir, ja n ito ria l and guard s e r ­
v ic e s , product d evelopm en t, a u xilia ry production fo r plant's own use
(e .g ., pow erplan t), and recordkeepin g and other s e rv ic e s c lo s e ly a s s o c i­
ated with the above production operations. (C a fe te ria and route w ork ers
a re excluded in m anufacturing industries but included in nonmanufacturing
in d u stries.) In finance and insurance, no w orkers a re con sidered to be
production w o rk e rs . O ffic e w o rk ers include working su pervisors and a ll nons u p e rv is o ry w o rk e rs (including lead w ork ers and tra in e e s ) p erform in g
c le r ic a l o r rela ted o ffic e
functions in such departments as accounting,
a d vertisin g , purchasing, co lle c tio n , cred it, finance, le g a l, p a y ro ll, personnel,
sa le s , in du strial re la tio n s , public relation s, executive, or transportation.
A d m in is tra tiv e , execu tive, p ro fession a l, and p a rt-tim e em ployees as w e ll
as construction w o rk e rs u tilize d as separate w ork fo rces are excluded fro m
both the production and o ffic e w ork er ca tegories.

w ritten fo rm o r established by custom ). Holidays
in a p a rticu la r y e a r they fa ll on a nonworkday
granted another day off. P a id personal holiday
the automobile and related indu stries, are included

M inim um entrance s a la ries (table B - l ) . Minimum entrance s a la ries
fo r o ffic e w o rk e rs re la te only to the establishm ents visited .
Because of the
optim um sam pling techniques used and the probability that la rg e estab lish ­
ments a re m o re lik e ly than sm all establishm ents to have fo rm a l entrance
rates above the s u b c le ric a l le v e l, the table is m ore rep resen ta tive of p olicies
in m edium and la rg e establishm ents. (The " X 's " shown under standard
w eek ly hours indicate that no m eaningful totals are applicable.)

F o r tabulating vacation pay granted, all p rovision s are expressed
on a tim e basis. Vacation pay calculated on other than a tim e basis is
converted to its equivalent tim e p eriod. Two percent o f annual earnings,
fo r exam ple, is tabulated as 1 w eek's vacation pay.

Shift d iffe re n tia ls — manufacturing (table B -2 ). Data w e re co llected
on p o lic ie s o f m anufacturing establishm ents regarding pay d iffe re n tia ls fo r
production w o rk e rs on late shifts. Establishm ents con sid ered as having
p o lic ie s a re those which ( 1) have provisions in w riting coverin g the operation
of late sh ifts, or ( 2) have operated late shifts at any tim e during the 12
months preced in g a su rvey.
When establishm ents have s e v e ra l d ifferen tia ls
which v a r y by job, the d iffe re n tia l applying to the m a jo rity of the production
w o rk e rs is reco rd ed .
When establishm ents have d ifferen tia ls which apply
only to c e rta in hours o f w ork , the d iffe re n tia l applying to the m a jo rity of
the shift hours is record ed .
F o r purposes of this study, a late shift is eith er a second (even in g)
shift which ends at or near midnight or a third (night) shift which starts at
or near midnight.
D iffe re n tia ls fo r second and th ird shifts are su m m arized sep arately
fo r ( 1) establish m en t p o lic ie s (an establishm ent's d ifferen tia ls a re weighted
by a ll production w o rk e rs in the establishm ent at the tim e of the su rvey)
and ( 2) e ffe c tiv e p ra c tic e s (an establishm ent's d ifferen tia ls a re w eighted by
production w o rk e rs em ployed on the sp ecified shift at the tim e of the su rvey).
Scheduled w e e k ly hours; paid holidays; paid vacations; and h ealth,
insurance^ and pension plans.
P ro visio n s which apply to a m a jo rity of the
production o r o ffic e w o rk e rs in an establishm ent are con sidered to apply to
a ll production o r o ffic e w o rk e rs in the establishm ent; a p ra ctice o r p ro visio n
is co n sid ered nonexistent when it applies to less than a m a jo rity.
H olidays;
vacation s; and health, insu rance, and pension plans are con sidered applicable
to em ployees cu rre n tly e lig ib le fo r the benefits as w e ll as to em ployees who
w ill even tu ally becom e e lig ib le .
Scheduled w e e k ly hours and days (table B -3). Scheduled w eek ly
hours and days r e fe r to the number of hours and days per w eek which fu ll­
tim e fir s t (d a y) shift w o rk e rs a re expected to work, whether paid fo r at
s tra ig h t-tim e or o v e rtim e rates.
P a id holidays (tab le B -4 ).
Holidays a re included i f w o rk ers who
a re not req u ired to w o rk a re paid fo r the tim e o ff and those req u ired to
w o rk r e c e iv e prem iu m pay o r com pensatory tim e off.
T h e y a re included
only i f they a re granted annually on a fo rm a l basis (p rovid ed fo r in




are included even though
and em ployees are not
plans, typically found in
as paid holidays.

Data are tabulated to show the percent of w orkers who (1) are
granted sp ecific numbers of whole and half holidays and (2) are granted
sp ecified amounts o f total holiday tim e (whole and half holidays are
aggregated).
P aid vacations (table B - 5 ). Establishm ents report their method of
calculating vacation pay (tim e basis, percent of annual earnings, flat-sum
payment, etc .) and the amount of vacation pay granted. Only basic form al
plans are reported. Vacation bonuses, vacation-savings plans, and "extended"
o r "sa b b a tica l" benefits beyond basic plans are excluded.

A ls o , provision s a fter each sp ecified length o f service are related
to a ll production o r o ffic e w ork ers in an establishm ent regard less of length of
s e rv ic e . Vacation plans com m only p rovide fo r a la r g e r amount of vacation
pay as s e rv ic e lengthens. Counts of production o r o ffic e workers by length
o f s e rv ic e w ere not obtained. The tabulations of vacation pay granted
presen t, th e re fo re , sta tistica l m easu res o f these provisions rather than
proportions of w ork ers actually receivin g sp ecific benefits.
Health, insurance, and pension plans (tables B -6 and B - 7 ). Health,
insurance, and pension plans include plans fo r which the em ployer pays
eith er all o r part of the cost. The cost may be (1) underwritten by a
com m ercia l insurance company o r nonprofit organization, ( 2) covered by a
union fund to which the em p loyer has contributed, o r (3) borne d irectly by
the em p loyer out of operating funds o r a fund set aside to cover the cost.
A plan is included even though a m a jo rity of the em ployees in an establish­
ment do not choose to p articipate in it because they are required to bear
part of its cost (provided the choice to participate is available or w ill
eventually becom e available to a m a jo rity ). L e g a lly required plans such as
so cia l secu rity, ra ilroa d retirem en t, w o r k e r s ' disab ility compensation, and
tem p ora ry disab ility insurance 3 are excluded.

3 Temporary disability insurance which provides benefits to covered workers disabled by injury or illness
which is not work-connected is mandatory under State laws in California, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode
Island. Establishment plans which meet only the legal requirements are excluded from these data, but those
under which (1 ) employers contribute more than is legally required or (2) benefits exceed those specified in the
State law are included.
In Rhode Island, benefits are paid out of a State fund to which only employees
contribute. In each of the other three States, benefits are paid either from a State fund or through a private plan.
State fund financing; In California, only employees contribute to the State fund; in New Jersey,
employees and employers contribute; in New York, employees contribute up to a specified maximum
and employers pay the difference between the employees' share and the total contribution required.
Private plan financing: In California and New Jersey, employees cannot be required to contribute
more than they would if they were covered by the State fund; in New York, employees can agree
to contribute more if the State rules that the additional contribution is commensurate with the
benefit provided.
Federal legislation ( Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act) provides temporary disability insurance benefits
to railroad workers for illness or injury, whether work-connected or not. The legislation requires that employers
bear the entire cost of die insurance.

L ife insurance includes fo rm a l plans p rovidin g indem nity (usually
through an insurance p o lic y ) in case o f death o f the co vered w o rk e r.
Inform ation is also p rovid ed in table B -7 on types o f life insurance plans
and the amount o f co vera ge iij a ll industries combined and in m anufacturing.
A ccid en ta l death and d ism em berm en t insurance is lim ited to plans
which provid e ben efit payments in case o f death o r loss o f lim b o r sight as a
d irect result o f an accident.
Sickness and accident insurance includes only those plans which
p rovide that p red eterm in ed cash payments be made d ire c tly to em ployees
who lose tim e fro m w ork because o f illn e s s o r in ju ry, e .g ., $ 50 a week
fo r up to 26 weeks o f d isab ility.
Sick le a v e plans are lim ited to fo rm a l p la n s 4 which provid e fo r
continuing an em p lo y e e 's pay during absence fro m w ork because of illn e s s .
Data collected distinguish between (1) plans which provid e full pay with no
waiting p erio d , and ( 2) plans which e ith e r p rovid e p a rtia l pay o r req u ire a
waiting p eriod .
L o n g -te rm d isa b ility insurance plans p rovid e payments to tota lly
disabled em p loyees upon the expiration o f th e ir paid sick leave and/or sic k ­
ness and accident insurance, o r a fte r a p red eterm in ed p erio d o f d isa b ility
(typ ically 6 m onths). Paym ents are m ade until the end of the d isa b ility, a
m axim um age, o r e lig ib ility fo r retirem en t b en efits. F u ll o r p a rtia l pay­
ments are alm ost always reduced by so c ia l secu rity, w o rk e rs ' disab ility
compensation, and p riva te pension benefits payable to the disabled em ployee.
H osp italization , su rg ica l, and m ed ica l insurance plans reported
in these surveys p rovid e fu ll o r p a rtia l payment fo r basic s e rv ic e s rendered.
H ospitalization insurance co vers hospital room and board and m ay co v e r
other hospital expenses. S u rgical insurance covers su rgeon s' fe e s . M ed ical
insurance co v e rs d o c to rs ' fees fo r hom e, o ffic e , o r hospital ca lls. Plans
re s tric te d to p o s t-o p e ra tiv e m ed ica l care o r a d o c to r's care fo r m in or
ailments at a w o rk e r's place o f em ploym ent are not con sidered to be
m ed ical insurance.
M a jo r m ed ica l insurance co vera ge applies to s e rv ic e s which go
beyond the basic s e rv ic e s co vered under h ospitalization , su rg ica l, and
m ed ical insurance. M a jo r m ed ica l insurance ty p ic a lly (1) req u ires that a
"d ed u ctib le" (e .g ., $50 ) be m et b e fo re benefits begin, ( 2) has a coinsurance
feature that req u ires the insured to pay a portion (e .g ., 20 p ercen t) of
certain expen ses, and (3) has a s p ecified d olla r m axim um o f benefits (e .g .,
$ 10, 000 a y e a r).
Dental insurance plans p ro vid e n orm al dental s e rv ic e b en efits,
usually fo r fillin g s , extra ctio n s, and X -r a y s . Plans which provid e benefits
only fo r o ra l su rg ery o r rep a irin g accident damage are not reported.
R etirem en t pension plans p rovid e fo r regu la r payments to the
r e tire e fo r life .
Included are d e fe rre d p ro fit-s h a rin g plans which p rovide
the option o f purchasing a life tim e annuity.
4 An establishment is considered as having a formal plan if it specifies at least the minimum number
of days of sick leave available to each employee.
Such a plan need not be written, but informal sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.




Labor-m anagem ent agreem ent coverage
The follow ing tabulation shows the p ercen t o f fu ll-tim e production
and o ffic e w orkers em ployed in establishm ents in the Cincinnati a rea in
which a union contract or contracts c o v e re d a m a jo rity of the w o rk ers in
the re s p e c tiv e catego ries, July 1979:
Production and
rela ted w o rk ers

O ffice w o rk ers

63
74
44
97

9
1
16
64

A ll industries______________
M anufacturing_________
Nonm anufacturing_____
Public u tilitie s _____

An establishm ent is considered to have a contract co verin g a ll
production or office w orkers if a m a jo rity o f such w o rk ers is c o vered by a
labor-m anagem ent agreem ent.
T h e re fo re , a ll other production or o ffic e
w ork ers are em ployed in establishm ents that eith er do not have la b o rm anagem ent contracts in effe c t, or have contracts that apply to fe w e r than
half o f their production or o ffic e w o rk e rs .
E stim ates are not n e c e s s a rily
rep resen ta tive of the extent to which a ll w o rk ers in the area m ay be
co vered by the p rovision s o f labor-m an agem en t agreem en ts, because sm a ll
establishm ents are excluded and the in d u strial scope o f the su rvey is lim ited .

Industrial com position in manufacturing
O ver half of the w orkers within the scope o f the su rvey in the
Cincinnati area w ere em ployed in m anufacturing fir m s .
The follow in g
presents the m ajor industries as a percen t o f a ll m anufacturing:
Transportation equipment----------------------------------------------------------M otor vehicles and equipm ent_____________________________________
A ir c r a ft and parts __________________________________________________
M achinery, except e le c t r ic a l__________________________________________
M etalw orking m a ch in ery___________________________________________
C hem icals and allied products ________________________________________
Soaps, cleaners, and to ilet g o o d s _________________________________
Food and kindred products ____________________________________________
F ab ricated m etal p ro d u c ts ____________________________________________
P rin tin g and publishing________________________________________________
E le c tric and electron ic equ ip m en t____________________________________

17
9
8
15
8
14
9
11
8
7
6

This inform ation is based on estim ates o f total em ploym ent d erived
fro m u niverse m aterials com piled b efo re actual su rvey. P ro p o rtio n s in
variou s industry divisions may d iffer fro m proportion s based on the resu lts
o f the survey as shown in appendix table 1.

Appendix table 1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied,
Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind.,1July 1979
W ork ers in establishm ents

Num ber of establish m ents

In du stry d iv is io n 2

M inimum
em ploym ent
in establish ­
ments in scope
of study

W ithin scope of study
W ithin scope
o f s tudy 3

Studied
Studied

T o t a l4
Num ber

ALL
ALL

INDUSTRY

Percen t

189

289.597

100

76

197.700
126.897

F u ll- tim e
production and
re la ted w o rk ers

F u ll-tim e
^ f f i c e w o rk ers

T o t a l4

ESTABLISHMENTS
DIVISIONS

-

1,112

LARGE

5D
-

928
679

50
50
50
50
50

69
128
259
89
129

_

--------------------------------------------------------------------nonmanufacturing
--------------------------------------------------------------T R A N S P O R T A T I O N . C O M M U N I C A T I O N , AND
OTHER P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 5 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------WHOL E S AL E T R ADE
R E T A I L T RADE
----------------------------------------------------------------F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E
-------------S E R V I C E S 7 -------------------------------------------------------------------------manufacturing

500

112

159,926

95.261

137.599

52
98

97,692
57,292

20,279
29,987

76.375
60.729

10

10,185

6 .1 61

(6 )
( 6 )

21.701
3.272
21.638
7.1 37
6.876

22

27.929
12.756
52,925
17.978
22,209

108

68

197,695

80.190

26,950

115.991

61
97

25
33

88.262
59.922

60
90

55.522
29,667

12,062

63,095
97.996

12

ii

18,702
2,018
29.022
9.196
5.985

12
1

7,152

9,916

29
12
22

16

5
19

( &

6
8

IM

(6

4)
(6 )

(

)

ESTABLISHMENTS

M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------------------------------T R A N S P O R T A T I O N , C O M M U N I C A T I O N , AND
OT HER P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 5 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------WHOL E S A L E T R ADE
R E T A I L T RADE
----------------------------------------------------------------F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E
-------------S E R V I C E S 7 --------------------------------------------------------------------------

-

500
500
500
500
500

3
19
9
9

3

9
5
5

1 Th e C in cin nati Standard M etrop o lita n S ta tistica l A r e a , as defined by the O ffic e o f M anagem ent
and Budget through F e b ru a ry 1974, consists of C lerm on t, H am ilton, and W a rre n Counties, Ohio;
B oon e, C a m p b ell, and Kenton C o u n ties, K y .; and D earb orn County, Ind.
The "w o r k e r s w ithin scope
o f study" e s tim a tes p r o v id e a re as on a b ly a ccu rate d escrip tio n of the s iz e and co m position o f the
la b o r fo r c e inclu ded in the su rv ey.
E stim ates a re not intended, h o w eve r, fo r co m p a rison with
o th er s ta tis tic a l s e r ie s to m easu re em ploym ent trends or le v e ls since ( 1 ) planning o f w age su rveys
re q u ir e s esta blish m en t data c o m p ile d co n sid era b ly in advance of the p a y r o ll p erio d studied, and ( 2 )
s m a ll establish m en ts a re exclu ded fr o m the scope o f the survey.
2 Th e 1972 ed itio n o f the Standard In du strial C la ss ifica tio n Manual was used to c la s s ify
esta blish m en ts by in d u stry division^
A l l governm ent operations a re exclu ded fr o m the scope of
the su rvey.
3 Includes a ll esta blish m en ts w ith total em ploym ent at o r above the m inim um lim ita tion .
A ll
outlets (w ith in the a r e a ) of com pan ies in indu stries such as trade, fin an ce, auto re p a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion p ictu re th e a te rs a re co n s id ere d as one establishm ent.




100

16
6

9

(6
( 6
(6
( 6

)
)
)
)

12,888

(6
(6
(6
(6

)
)
)
1

18.200
2.018
19.061
5.570
3.097

4 Includes execu tive, p ro fe s s io n a l, p a rt-tim e , season al, and other w ork ers excluded fr o m the
sep ara te production and o ffic e c a te g o rie s .
5 A b b re v ia te d to "p u b lic u tilitie s " in the A - and B - s e r ie s ta b les.
T a xicabs and s e r v ic e s
in ciden tal to w a ter tra n sp o rta tio n a re excluded.
The Cincinnati tra n sit sy stem is m u n icipally owned
and o p era ted and is exclu ded by definition fr o m the scope o f the study.
6 Separate data fo r this d ivis ion a re not presen ted in the A - and B - s e r ie s ta b les, but the
d ivis io n is re p res en ted in the " a l l in d u stries" and "nonm anu factu ring" estim ates.
7 H otels and m o te ls , lau ndries and oth er p erso n a l s e r v ic e s ; business s e rv ic e s ; autom obile
r e p a ir , re n ta l, and parking; m otion pictu res; nonprofit m em bersh ip orga n ization s (excluding re ligio u s
and ch a rita b le o rga n iza tio n s ); and en gin eering and a rc h itectu ra l s e r v ic e s .

39

Appendix B.
Occupational
Descriptions
The p rim a ry purpose o f preparing job descrip tion s fo r the
Bureau's w age su rveys is to a s s is t its fie ld rep resen ta tives in cla ssifyin g
into appropriate occupations w o rk ers who a re em ployed under a v a rie ty
o f p a y ro ll title s and d ifferen t w ork arrangem ents fr o m establishm ent
to establishm ent and fro m a r e a
to area.
Th is perm its grouping
occupational wage rates represen tin g com parable job content. Because
o f this em phasis on interestablishm ent and in te ra re a com parability
o f occupational content, the B ureau's job description s m ay d iffe r s ig ­
nifican tly fro m those in use in individual establishm ents o r those p r e ­
pared fo r other purposes. In applying these job d escrip tion s, the
Bureau's fie ld rep resen ta tives a re instructed to exclude w orking su per­
v is o rs ; apprentices; and p a rt-tim e , tem p o ra ry , and probation ary w o rk ers.
Handicapped w o rk ers whose earnings are reduced because o f th eir
handicap are also excluded. L e a rn e rs , b egin n ers, and tra in e e s , unless
s p e c ific a lly included in the job descrip tion , are excluded.

Office
SE C R E T A R Y — Continued

SECRETARY

Exclusions— Continued

A ssign ed as a p erson al s e c re ta ry , n orm a lly to one individual.
Maintains a close and highly resp on sive relation sh ip to the d ay-to-d ay a c tiv ­
itie s o f the su p e rv is o r. W orks fa ir ly independently re c e iv in g a m inim um of
detailed su p ervision and guidance. P e r fo r m s v a rie d c le r ic a l and s e c re ta r ia l
duties requ irin g a knowledge o f o ffic e routine and understanding o f the
organ ization , p ro g ra m s , and p roced u res rela ted to the w ork o f the su p erviso r.

a. Positions which do not m eet the
described above;

s e c re ta ry concept

b. Stenographers not fully train ed in s e c re ta r ia l-ty p e duties;
c. Stenographers servin g as o ffic e assistants
fession al, technical, o r m a n a geria l person s;
d.

E xclu sion s. N ot a ll positions that are title d " s e c r e t a r y " possess the
above c h a ra c te ris tic s .
Exam ples o f positions which a re excluded fro m the
definition a re as fo llo w s :




"p e rs o n a l"

A ssistan t-type positions which entail m o re d ifficu lt or m ore r e ­
sponsible technical, a d m in istra tive, o r su p e rv is o ry duties which
a re not typ ical of s e c re ta ria l w ork , e .g ., A d m in istra tive A s s is t ­
ant, or E xecutive Assistan t;

L is te d below a re s e v e r a l occupations fo r which re v is e d descriptions or titles are being introduced
in this su rvey:
Truckd r iv e r
Shipper and r e c e iv e r
(p revio u sly su rveyed
as shipping and
receivin g c le rk )
Guard

S e c re ta ry
K e y en try op erator
C om puter op erator
D ra fte r
Stationary engineer
B o ile r tender

The Bureau has discontinued co llectin g data fo r tabulating -m achine operator, bookkeeping-m achine
op erator, and machine b ille r . W ork ers p re v io u s ly c la s s ifie d as watchmen are now c la s s ifie d as guards
under the re v is e d d escription .

40

to a group o f p r o ­

SECRETARY— Continued

SECRETARY— Continued

Exclusions-— Continued

C la ssifica tio n by L e v e l— Continued

e. P o s itio n s which do not fit any o f the situations lis te d in the
section s b elow title d ''L e v e l o f S u p e rv is o r," e .g ., s e c re ta ry to the
p resid en t o f a company that em ploys, in all, o v e r 5,000 persons;
f.

T ra in e e s .

segm ent often involving as many as s e v e ra l hundred persons)
o f a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 25, 000 persons.
LS—4

C la s s ific a tio n by L e v e l
S e c r e ta r y jobs which m eet the req u ired ch a ra cteristics a re matched
at one o f fiv e le v e ls accord in g to (a ) the le v e l of the s e c r e ta r y 's su p ervisor
w ithin the com pany's organ ization al structure and, (b) the le v e l of the
s e c r e ta r y 's re s p o n s ib ility .
The tabulation follow ing the explanations of these
two fa c to rs in dicates the le v e l o f the s e c re ta ry fo r each com bination of the
fa c to rs .

a. S e c re ta ry to the chairm an of the board or president of a company
that em p loys, in a ll, o v e r 100 but fe w e r than 5,000 persons; or
b. S e c re ta ry to a corp ora te o ffic e r (oth er than the chairm an of
the board or p residen t) of a company that em ploys, in a ll,
o v e r 5,000 but fe w e r than 25,000 persons; or
c. S e c re ta ry to the head, im m ed ia tely below the corporate o ffic e r
le v e l, of a m ajor segm ent or su bsidiary of a company that
em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 25,000 persons.

L e v e l o f S e c re ta ry 's S u p e rv is o r (L S )
LS—1

a. S e c re ta ry to the s u p erviso r o r head of a sm all organ ization al
unit (e .g ., fe w e r than about 25 o r 30 person s); o r
b. S e c r e ta r y to a n on su pervisory staff s p ecia list, p ro fessio n a l
em p lo y e e , a d m in istra tive o ffic e r o r assistant, sk illed technician
o r ex p ert.
(N O T E : M a n y companies assign sten ograph ers,
ra th er than s e c r e ta r ie s as describ ed above, to this le v e l of
s u p e rv is o ry o r n on su p ervisory w o rk e r.)

LS—
2

a.

S e c re ta ry to an execu tive o r m an agerial person whose respon­
s ib ility is not equivalent to one o f the sp ecific le v e l situations in
the defin ition fo r LS—
3, but whose organ ization al unit n orm ally
num bers at le a s t s e v e r a l dozen em ployees and is usually divided
into org a n iza tio n a l segm ents which are often , in turn, fu rth er
subdivided. In som e com panies, this le v e l includes a wide range
o f org a n iza tio n a l echelons; in oth ers, only one o r two; or

b. S e c r e ta r y to the head o f an individual plant, fa c to ry , e tc ., (o r
oth er equ ivalen t le v e l o f o ffic ia l) that em p loys, in a ll, fe w e r
than 5,000 p erson s.
LS—
3

N O T E : The te rm "c o rp o ra te o ffic e r " used in the above LS d e f­
inition r e fe r s to those o ffic ia ls who have a significant corporatew ide p o lic y ­
making ro le with re g a rd to m ajor company a c tiv itie s .
The title " v ic e
p re s id e n t," though n orm a lly in dicative of this ro le , does not in a ll cases
id en tify such positions.
V ic e presidents whose p rim a ry resp on sib ility is to
act p erson a lly on individual cases or transactions (e .g ., approve or deny
individual loan o r c re d it actions; adm in ister individual trust accounts; d i­
r e c tly su p ervise a c le r ic a l sta ff) a re not con sidered to be "c o rp o ra te
o ffic e r s " fo r purposes o f applying the definition.
L e v e l of S e c re ta ry 's R esp on sib ility (L R )

This fa cto r evaluates the
the s e c re ta ry and the su p e rv is o r,
expected to e x e rc is e in itia tive and
at L R —1 o r L R — d escrib ed below
2

nature of the w ork relationship between
and the extent to which the s e c re ta ry is
judgment. S e c re ta rie s should be matched
accordin g to th eir le v e l of respon sibility.

a. S e c r e ta r y to the chairm an o f the board o r presid en t o f a company
that e m p lo y s, in a ll, fe w e r than 100 persons; o r

L R —1. P e r fo r m s v a rie d s e c r e ta r ia l duties including o r com parable
to m ost of the follow in g:

b. S e c re ta ry to a co rp ora te o ffic e r (other than chairm an o f the
board or p re s id e n t) o f a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 100
but fe w e r than 5, 000 persons; o r

a. A n sw ers telephones,
com ing m ail.

c. S e c r e ta r y to the head (im m ed iately below the o ffic e r le v e l) o v e r
e ith e r a m a jo r corp oratew id e functional a ctivity (e .g ., m arketin g,
re s e a rc h , o p era tio n s, indu strial relation s, e tc .) o r a m a jo r
geogra p h ic o r orga n iza tion a l segm ent (e .g ., a region al headquar­
t e r s ; a m a jo r d ivisio n ) o f a company that em p loys, in a ll,
o v e r 5,000 but fe w e r than 25,000 em ployees; o r
d. S e c re ta ry to the head o f
(o r oth er equ ivalent le v e l
o v e r 5,000 p erso n s; o r
e.




personal

c a lle r s ,

and

opens

b. A n sw ers telephone requests which have standard answ ers.
re p ly to requests by sending a fo rm le tte r.

in ­
May

c.

R eview s corresp on d en ce, m em oranda, and rep orts prepared by
others fo r the s u p e rv is o r's signature to ensure procedu ral and
typograph ical accuracy.

d.

Maintains s u p e rv is o r's
instructed.

e.

T yp e s ,

an individual plant, fa c to ry , etc.,
o f o ffic ia l) that em p loys, in a ll,

S e c r e ta r y to the head o f a la rg e and im portant organ ization al s e g ­
m ent (e .g ., a m id d le m anagement su p ervisor o f an organ ization al

greets

calendar

and

makes

appointments

takes and tra n scrib es dictation, and file s .

as

SECRETARY— Continued

STENOGRAPHER— Continued

LR—
2. P e rfo rm s duties d escrib ed under L R -1 and, in addition p e r ­
fo rm s tasks requ irin g g re a te r judgment, in itia tiv e , and knowledge
of o ffic e functions including o r com parable to m ost of the follow in g:
a. Screen s telephone and p erson al c a lle r s , determ ining which can
be handled by the s u p e rv is o r's subordinates o r other o ffic e s .
b.

A n sw ers requests which req u ire a detailed knowledge o f o f­
fic e p roced u res o r co llectio n o f inform ation fro m file s o r
oth er o ffic e s .
M ay sign routine correspondence in own or
s u p e rv is o r's name.

c.

C om piles o r assists in com piling p erio d ic reports on the basis
o f gen era l instructions.

d. Schedules ten tative appointments without p r io r clearan ce. A s ­
sem bles n e c e s s a ry background m a te ria l fo r scheduled m eetings.
M akes arrangem ents fo r m eetings and con feren ces.
e.

Explains s u p e rv is o r's requ irem en ts to oth er em ployees in super­
v is o r 's unit. (A ls o typ es, takes dictation, and file s .)

The follow in g tabulation shows the le v e l o f the s e c re ta ry fo r each
LS and L R combination:

L e v e l o f s e c r e ta r y 's
_____ s u p erviso r_____

Stenographer, G en eral. D ictation in volves a n orm al routine vocabu­
la ry . M ay maintain file s , keep sim ple re c o rd s , or p e rfo rm other r e la tiv e ly
routine c le r ic a l tasks.
TR A N S C R IB IN G -M A C H IN E T Y P IS T
P r im a r y duty is to type copy o f v o ic e reco rd ed dictation which does
not in volve v a rie d technical o r sp e c ia lize d vocabu lary such as that used in
le g a l b rie fs o r reports on scien tific resea rch . May also type fro m w ritten
copy. M ay maintain file s , keep sim ple re c o rd s , o r p e rfo rm other re la tiv e ly
routine c le r ic a l tasks.
(See Stenographer definition fo r w o rk ers in volved
with shorthand dictation.)

L e v e l o f s e c r e ta r y 's resp on sib ility
T Y P IS T
L R -1

LS—1.
LS—2.
L S -3.
LS—4.

OR
P e rfo rm s stenographic duties requ irin g sign ifican tly g r e a te r in ­
dependence and resp on sib ility than sten ograph er, gen era l, as evidenced by
the follow in g: W ork requ ires a high d eg ree o f stenographic speed and
accuracy; a thorough working knowledge o f g en era l business and o ffic e p r o ­
cedure; and of the sp ecific business operation s, organ ization , p o lic ie s ,
p roced u res, file s , w orkflow , etc. U ses this knowledge in p erfo rm in g steno­
graphic duties and responsible c le r ic a l tasks such as maintaining fo llo w ­
up file s ; assem bling m a teria l fo r re p o rts , m em oranda, and le tte rs ; com ­
posing sim ple letters fro m gen eral in stru ction s; reading and routing incom ing
m a il; and answering routine questions, etc.

C lass
C lass
C lass
C lass

LR—
2
E
D
C
B

Class
Class
Class
Class

D
C
B
A

S TE N O G R A P H E R
P r im a r y duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to tra n scrib e
the dictation. M ay also type fro m w ritten copy. M ay operate fro m a
stenographic pool. M ay occa sio n a lly tra n s c rib e fr o m v o ic e record in gs (if
p rim a ry duty is tra n scrib in g fro m re c o rd in g s , see T ra n scrib in g-M a ch in e
T y p is t).
N O T E : This job is distinguished fr o m that o f a s e c re ta ry in that a
s e c re ta ry n o rm a lly w orks in a confidential relation sh ip with only one m anager
o r execu tive and p e rfo rm s m o re respon sible and d is c re tio n a ry tasks as
d escrib ed in the s e c re ta ry job definition.

Uses a ty p e w rite r to make copies o f variou s m a te ria ls o r to make
out b ills a fte r calculations have been made by another person . M ay include
typing o f sten cils, m ats, o r s im ila r m a te ria ls fo r use in duplicating
p ro c e s s e s .
May do c le r ic a l work in volvin g little sp ecia l train in g, such
as keeping sim ple reco rd s, filin g re c o rd s and re p o rts , o r sortin g and
distributing incom ing m ail.
C lass A . P e rfo rm s one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g : Typing m a te ria l
in fin al fo rm when it in volves combining m a te ria l fr o m s e v e r a l sou rces; o r
resp o n sib ility fo r c o rre c t spellin g, sylla b ica tion , punctuation, e tc., o f te c h ­
n ica l o r unusual words o r fo reig n language m a te ria l; o r planning layout
and typing o f com plicated sta tistica l tables to m aintain u n iform ity and
balance in spacing. May type routine fo r m le tte r s , va ryin g details to suit
circu m stances.
Class B . P e rfo rm s one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g : Copy typing fro m
rough o r c le a r drafts; o r routine typing o f fo r m s , insurance p o lic ie s , etc.;
o r setting up sim ple standard tabulations; o r copying m ore com plex tables
alread y set up and spaced p ro p erly.
F IL E C L E R K

Stenographer, S en ior. D ictation in volves a v a rie d tech n ical or spec ia liz e d vocab u lary such as in le g a l b rie fs or rep orts on scie n tific resea rch .
M ay also set up and m aintain file s , keep re c o rd s , etc.




F ile s , c la s s ifie s , and re tr ie v e s m a te ria l in an establish ed filin g
system . M ay p e rfo rm c le ric a l and manual tasks req u ired to m aintain file s .
P o sition s are cla ssified into le v e ls on the basis o f the follow in g definitions.

F IL E CLERK— Continued

ORDER CLERK— Continued

C lass A . C la s s ifie s and indexes file m a teria l such as corresp on d ­
en ce, re p o rts , tech n ica l docum ents, etc., in an established filin g system
containing a num ber o f v a r ie d subject m atter file s . M ay also file this
m a te r ia l. M ay keep re c o rd s o f variou s types in conjunction with the file s .
M ay lea d a s m a ll group o f lo w e r le v e l file clerk s.

adequacy of in form ation record ed ; ascertaining cred it rating of custom er;
furnishing custom er with acknowledgem ent o f receip t of o rd er; follow ing-u p
to see that o rd e r is d e liv e re d by the sp ecified date o r to let custom er know
o f a delay in d e liv e ry ; m aintaining o rd e r file ; checking shipping invoice
against o rig in a l o rd e r.

C lass B . S o rts , codes, and file s unclassified m a te ria l by sim ple
(su bject m a tte r) headings o r p a rtly cla s s ifie d m a teria l by fin e r subheadings.
P r e p a r e s sim p le re la te d index and c r o s s -re fe re n c e aids. As requested,
lo ca tes c le a r ly id e n tifie d m a te ria l in file s and forw ards m a te ria l. M ay p e r ­
fo r m re la te d c le r ic a l tasks req u ired to m aintain and s e rv ic e file s .

Exclude w o rk ers paid on a com m ission basis o r whose duties include
any of the fo llo w in g : R eceivin g o rd ers fo r s e rv ic e s rath er than fo r m aterial
o r m erchandise; providin g custom ers with consultative advice using knowl­
edge gained fro m engineering or exten sive technical training; emphasizing
sellin g sk ills; handling m a te ria l o r m erchandise as an in tegral part of the job.

C lass C . P e r fo r m s routine filin g o f m a teria l that has already been
c la s s ifie d o r w hich is e a s ily c la s s ifie d in a sim ple s e r ia l c la ssifica tio n
s y s te m (e .g ., a lp h ab etical, ch ron ological, o r n u m erical).
As requested,
lo ca tes re a d ily a v a ila b le m a te ria l in file s and forw ards m a te ria l; and may
f i l l out w ith d raw al ch arge. M ay p e rfo rm sim ple c le ric a l and manual tasks
re q u ire d to m aintain and s e r v ic e file s .

P osition s
definitions:

M E SSE N G E R
P e r fo r m s va rio u s routine duties such as running erra n d s, operating
m in o r o ffic e m achines such as s e a le rs o r m a ile r s , opening and distributing
m a il, and oth er m in o r c le r ic a l w ork. Exclude positions that req u ire operation
o f a m o to r v e h ic le as a sign ifican t duty.

are

c la s s ifie d

into

le v e ls

according to

the follow ing

Class A . Handles o rd e rs that in volve making judgments such as
choosing which s p e c ific product o r m a te ria l fro m the establishm ent's product
lines w ill satisfy the cu stom er's needs, o r determ ining the p rice to be quoted
when p ricin g in volves m ore than m e re ly r e fe rrin g to a p rice list o r making
some sim ple m athem atical calculations.
Class B . Handles o rd e rs involving item s which have readily iden­
tifie d uses and applications. M ay r e fe r to a catalog, m anufacturer's manual,
o r s im ila r document to insure that p ro p er item is supplied or to v e r ify
p ric e o f ord ered item .
A C C O U N TIN G C L E R K

S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R
O p era tes a telephone switchboard o r console used with a p riva te
branch exchange (P B X ) s y s te m to re la y incom ing, outgoing, and in tra system
c a lls .
M ay p ro v id e in fo rm a tio n to c a lle r s , re c o rd and tran sm it m essa ges,
keep r e c o r d o f ca lls placed and to ll charges. B esides operatin g a telephone
sw itch board o r c o n so le, m ay also type o r p e rfo rm routine c le r ic a l w ork
(typing o r routine c le r ic a l w ork m ay occupy the m a jor portion o f the w o r k e r 's
tim e , and is usually p e r fo r m e d w h ile at the switchboard o r con sole). C hief o r
lead o p e ra to rs in establish m en ts em ploying m ore than one o p era to r are
exclu ded. F o r an o p e ra to r who also acts as a recep tion ist, see Switchboard
Ope r ato r - R e ception i s t.
S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
A t a s in g le -p o s itio n telephone switchboard or con sole, acts both as
an o p e ra to r— see Sw itch board O p era to r— and as a recep tion ist. R ecep tio n ist's
w o rk in v o lv e s such duties as g re e tin g v is ito r s ; determ ining nature o f v is it o r 's
bu sin ess and p ro v id in g ap p rop riate inform ation; re fe r r in g v is ito r to appro­
p ria te p erso n in the o rg a n iza tio n o r contacting that person by telephone and
a rra n gin g an appointm ent; keeping a log o f v is ito r s .
ORDER CLERK
R e c e iv e s w ritte n o r v e r b a l cu stom ers' purchase o rd e rs fo r m a te ria l
o r m erch a n d ise fr o m cu stom ers o r sales people. W ork ty p ic a lly in volves
som e com bination o f the fo llo w in g duties: Quoting p ric e s ; determ in in g a v a ila ­
b ility o f o rd e re d ite m s and suggesting substitutes when n ec e s s a ry ; advising
ex p ected d e liv e r y date and m ethod o f d e liv e ry ; recordin g o r d e r and custom er
in form a tion on o r d e r sh eets; checking o rd e r sheets fo r accu racy and




P e r fo r m s one o r m o re accounting c le r ic a l tasks such as posting to
re g is te rs and le d g e rs ; recon cilin g bank accounts; v e rify in g the internal con­
sisten cy, com pleten ess, and m athem atical accuracy of accounting documents;
assigning p re s c rib e d accounting distribution codes; examining and v e rify in g
fo r c le r ic a l accuracy various types of rep o rts, lis ts , calculations, posting,
etc.; o r prep arin g sim ple o r assistin g in p reparin g m ore com plicated journal
vouchers. M ay w ork in e ith e r a manual o r automated accounting system .
The w ork req u ires a knowledge o f c le r ic a l methods and o ffic e
p ra ctices and procedu res which rela tes to the c le r ic a l processing and r e ­
cording o f transactions and accounting inform ation. With experien ce, the
w o rk e r ty p ic a lly becom es fa m ilia r with the bookkeeping and accounting term s
and procedu res used in the assigned w ork , but is not required to have a
knowledge o f the fo rm a l p rin cip les o f bookkeeping and accounting.
P o sition s
definitions:

are

c la s s ifie d

into le v e ls

on the basis of the follow ing

Class A . Under gen era l su pervision , p erfo rm s accounting c le ric a l
operations which req u ire the application o f exp erien ce and judgment, fo r
exam ple, c le r ic a lly p ro cessin g com plicated o r n on repetitive accounting tra n s ­
actions, selectin g among a substantial v a rie ty o f p re s c rib e d accounting codes
and c la s s ific a tio n s , o r tra cin g transactions through previous accounting
actions to determ in e source o f d iscrep an cies. May be assisted by one o r
m o re class B accounting clerk s.
Class B . Under close su pervision , follow in g detailed instructions
and standardized p ro ced u res, p e rfo rm s one o r m ore routine accounting
c le r ic a l op eration s, such as posting to le d g e rs , cards, or w orksheets

ACCOUNTING CLERK— Continued

COM PUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST, BUSINESS— Continued

where identification o f item s and locations o f postings are c le a r ly indicated;
checking accu racy and com pleteness of standardized and re p e titiv e record s
or accounting documents; and coding documents using a few p rescrib ed
accounting codes.

Does not include em ployees p r im a r ily respon sible fo r the man­
agem ent o r supervision of other e le c tro n ic data p ro cessin g em p loyees,
o r system s analysts p rim a rily concerned with scie n tific o r engineering
p rob lem s.

PAYR O LL CLERK
F o r wage study purposes, system s analysts are c la s s ifie d as follow s:

P e rfo rm s the c le r ic a l tasks n ecessa ry to process payrolls and to
maintain p a y ro ll rec o rd s .
W ork in volves m ost of the follow in g: P ro c e s s in g
w o rk e rs ' tim e or production reco rd s; adjusting w o rk e rs ' record s fo r changes
in wage ra tes, supplem entary ben efits, or tax deductions; editing p a y ro ll
listin gs against source rec o rd s ; tracin g and c o rrectin g e r r o r s in listin gs;
and assisting in preparation of p eriod ic sum m ary p a y ro ll rep orts. In a nonautomated p a y ro ll system , computes wages.
W ork m ay req u ire a p ra ctica l
knowledge of governm ental regu lations, company p a y ro ll p o licy, or the
computer system fo r processin g p a yrolls.

Class A . Works independently o r under only g en era l d irection on
com plex problem s involving a ll phases o f system s analysis. P ro b le m s are
com plex because o f d iverse sources o f input data and m u ltip le-u se re q u ire ­
ments of output data. (F o r exam ple, develops an in tegrated production
scheduling, inventory control, cost a n alysis, and sales analysis re c o rd in
which e v e ry item of each type is au tom atically p ro c e s s e d through the fu ll
system o f records and appropriate follow up actions are initiated by the
com pu ter.) Confers with persons concerned to determ in e the data processin g
prob lem s and advises su bject-m atter p erson n el on the im plication s o f new o r
re v is e d system s o f data processin g operation s. M akes recom m endations, i f
needed, fo r approval o f m ajor system s in stallation s o r changes and fo r
obtaining equipment.

KEY E N TR Y O PERATO R
O perates k eyb oa rd -con trolled data entry device such as keypunch
machine or k ey-op erated m agnetic tape or disk encoder to tran scrib e
data into a fo rm suitable fo r com puter p rocessin g.
W ork req u ires sk ill in
operating an alphanum eric keyboard and an understanding of tran scribin g
procedures and releva n t data entry equipment.
Position s a re
definitions:

M ay provide functional d irection to lo w e r
who are assigned to assist.

le v e l system s analysts

c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis of the follow ing
Class B . W orks independently o r under only g e n e ra l d irection on
prob lem s that are re la tiv e ly uncom plicated to an alyze, plan, p ro g ra m , and
operate. P rob lem s are o f lim ited com p lexity because sou rces o f input data
are homogeneous and the output data are c lo s e ly related .
(F o r exam ple,
develops system s fo r maintaining d ep ositor accounts in a bank, maintaining
accounts receivab le in a re ta il establishm ent, o r m aintaining inventory
accounts in a manufacturing or w h olesale establish m en t.)
C onfers with
persons concerned to determ ine the data p ro cessin g prob lem s and advises
su b ject-m atter personnel on the im plication s o f the data p ro cessin g system s
to be applied.

Class A.
W ork req u ires the application o f exp erien ce and judgment
in selectin g procedures to be fo llo w ed and in searching fo r , in terp retin g,
selectin g, or coding item s to be entered fro m a v a r ie ty of source documents.
On occasion m ay also p e rfo rm routine w ork as describ ed fo r class B.
N O TE : Excluded a re operators above class A using the key entry
controls to a ccess, read, and evaluate the substance o f sp ecific record s to
take substantive actions, or to make en tries requ irin g a s im ila r le v e l of
knowledge.
Class B. W ork is routine and rep etitive.
Under clo se su pervision
or follow ing sp ecific p rocedu res or detailed instru ctions, works fro m various
standardized source documents which have been coded and req u ire little or no
selectin g, coding, or in terp retin g of data to be entered. R e fe rs to su p ervisor
problem s a risin g fro m erroneous item s, codes, or m issing inform ation.

OR
W orks on a segment of a com plex data p ro cessin g schem e or
system , as described fo r class A. W orks independently on routine a ssign ­
ments and receives instruction and guidance on com plex assignm ents. W ork
is review ed fo r accuracy of judgment, com pliance w ith in stru ction s, and to
insure p ro p e r alignment with the o v e r a ll system .

Professional and Technical
C O M PU TE R SYSTEM S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS

C lass C. Works under im m ediate su p ervision , c a rry in g out analyses
as assigned, usually o f a single a c tiv ity .
A ssignm ents a re designed to
develop and expand p ra ctica l exp erien ce in the application o f p roced u res and
sk ills requ ired fo r system s analysis w ork. F o r exam ple, m ay a ssist a higher
le v e l system s analyst by preparing the detailed sp ecifica tion s requ ired by
p ro g ra m m e rs fro m inform ation d eveloped by the h igh er le v e l analyst.

A n alyzes business problem s to form u late procedures fo r solving
them by use of ele c tro n ic data p ro cessin g equipment. D evelops a com plete
description of a ll specification s needed to enable p ro gra m m ers to prep are
requ ired d igita l com puter p rogra m s.
W ork in volves m ost of the fo llo w in g :
A nalyzes su b ject-m atter operations to be automated and iden tifies conditions
and c r ite r ia requ ired to ach ieve s a tis fa c to ry resu lts; sp ecifies number and
types of re c o rd s , file s , and documents to be used; outlines actions to be
perform ed by personnel and com puters in su fficien t detail fo r presentation
to m anagement and fo r p rogram m in g (ty p ic a lly this in volves preparation of
w ork and data flo w ch arts); coordinates the developm ent of test problem s and
participates in tr ia l runs of new and re v is e d system s; and recom m ends
equipment changes to obtain m ore e ffe c tiv e o v e ra ll operations.
(N O TE :
W orkers p erform in g both system s analysis and program m ing should be
c la s s ifie d as system s analysts if this is the sk ill used to determ ine th eir pay.)




C O M P U T E R PR O G R AM M E R , BUSINESS
Converts statements of business p ro b le m s , ty p ic a lly p rep a red by a
system s analyst, into a sequence o f detailed instructions which are r e ­
qu ired to solve the problem s by autom atic data p ro cessin g equipment.
W orking fro m charts or diagram s, the p ro g ra m m e r develops the p r e ­
cise instructions which, when entered into the com puter system in coded

44

COMPUTER PROGRAM M ER, BUSINESS— Continued

COM PUTER PROGRAMMER, BUSINESS— Continued

language, cause the m anipulation of data to achieve desired results. W ork
in volves m ost o f the fo llo w in g : Applies knowledge of computer capa­
b ilitie s , m ath em atics, lo g ic em ployed by com puters, and p articu lar sub­
je c t m a tter in volved to analyze charts and diagram s of the problem to
be program m ed ; develops sequence of p rogram steps; w rites detailed flow
charts to show o rd e r in which data w ill be processed; converts these
charts to coded instructions fo r machine to follow; tests and c o rrects
p ro gra m s; p rep a res instructions fo r operating personnel during production
run; an alyzes, re v ie w s , and alters program s to in crease operating e f f i­
ciency or adapt to new requ irem ents; maintains records of p rogram d e­
velopm ent and re v is io n s . (N O TE : W orkers perform in g both system s anal­
ysis and p rogra m m in g should be cla ssified as systems analysts i f this is
the sk ill used to determ in e th eir pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim a rily responsible fo r the m an­
agement o r su pervision o f other electron ic data processin g em ployees,
o r p ro g ra m m e rs p r im a r ily concerned with scien tific and/or engineering
p roblem s.
F o r wage study purposes, program m ers are c la s s ifie d

as

follow s:

Class A . W orks independently o r under only gen eral d irection
on com plex problem s which require competence in all phases of p r o ­
gram m ing concepts and p ra ctices. W orking from diagram s and charts
which iden tify the nature o f desired resu lts,' m ajor processin g steps to
be accom plish ed, and the relationships between various steps of the p rob ­
lem solvin g routine; plans the fu ll range of program m ing actions needed
to e ffic ie n tly u tilize the com puter system in achieving d esired end products.
At this le v e l, program m in g is difficu lt because computer equip­
ment must be orga n ized to produce se v e ra l in terrelated but d iverse p rod ­
ucts fro m numerous and d iv e rs e data elem ents. A wide v a rie ty and e x ­
ten sive num ber of in tern al p rocessin g actions must occur.
This requ ires
such actions as developm ent of common operations which can be r e ­
used, establishm ent of linkage points between operations, adjustments to
data when p ro g ra m requ irem en ts exceed computer storage capacity, and
substantial m anipulation and resequencing of data elem ents to fo rm a
highly in tegrated p ro gra m .
M ay p rovid e functional direction to low er le v e l p rogra m m ers who
are assigned to assist.
Class B . W orks independently o r under only gen eral d irection on
re la tiv e ly sim ple p ro g ra m s , o r on sim ple segments of com plex p rogram s.
P ro g ra m s (o r segm en ts) usually p rocess inform ation to produce data in two
o r th ree v a rie d sequences o r form ats. Reports and listings are produced by
refin in g, adapting, a rra y in g , o r making m inor additions to o r deletions fro m
input data which are re a d ily available. W hile numerous record s m ay be
p ro cessed , the data have been refined in p rio r actions so that the accuracy
and sequencing o f data can be tested by using a few routine checks. T y p ic a lly ,
the p ro g ra m deals with routine recordkeeping operations.
OR
W orks on com plex program s (as described fo r class A ) under
close d irection o f a h igh er le v e l p ro g ra m m er or su p ervisor. M ay assist
h igh er le v e l p ro g ra m m e r by independently perform in g less d ifficu lt tasks
assigned, and p e rfo rm in g m o re difficu lt tasks under fa ir ly close direction.




May guide o r instruct lo w e r le v e l p ro g ra m m ers.
Class C . M akes p ra c tic a l applications o f program m ing practices
and concepts usually learn ed in fo rm a l training courses. Assignm ents
are designed to develop com petence in the application of standard p ro ­
cedures to routine p rob lem s.
R eceives close supervision on new aspects
o f assignm ents; and w ork is review ed to v e r ify its accuracy and conformance
with requ ired procedu res.
CO M PU TER O PE R ATO R
In accordance with operating instructions, m onitors and operates
the control console of a d igital com puter to process data. Executes runs by
eith er s e r ia l p rocessin g (p ro cesses one p rogra m at a tim e ) o r m u lti­
processin g (p ro cesses two or m ore p rogram s sim ultaneously). The follow ing
duties ch a ra cterize the w ork of a com puter operator:
- Studies
needed.

operating

- Loads equipment
paper, etc.).

instructions
with

to

requ ired

determ ine
item s

equipment

(tapes,

cards,

setup
disks,

- Switches n ecessa ry a u x illia ry equipment into system .
- Starts and operates computer.
- Responds to operating and com puter output instructions.
- R eview s e r r o r m essages and makes correctio n s during operation
or r e fe rs problem s.
- Maintains operating record .
M ay test-ru n new or m odified p rogram s. M ay a s s is t in m odifying
system s or p rogram s. The scope of this definition includes trainees working
to becom e fu lly qu alified com puter op erators, fu lly qualified computer
op erators, and lead operators providin g technical assistance to low er le v e l
operators. It excludes w ork ers who m onitor and operate rem ote term inals.
Class A . In addition to w ork assignm ents described fo r a class B
op erator (see below ) the w ork o f a class A o p era tor involves at least one
of the follow ing:
- D eviates fro m standard procedu res to avoid the loss of in fo r­
m ation o r to conserve com puter tim e even though the procedures
applied m a te ria lly a lte r the com puter unit's production plans.
- T ests new p r o g r a m s , applications, and procedu res.
- A dvises p ro gra m m ers
techniques.

and

su b ject-m atter

experts

on s e t u p

- A ssists in (1) m aintaining, m odifyin g, and developing operating
system s o r p ro gra m s; ( 2) developing operating instructions and
techniques to c o v e r prob lem situations; and/or (3) switching to
em ergen cy backup procedu res (such assistance requires a working
knowledge o f p ro g ra m language, com puter featu res, and softw are
s y s te m s ).
An o p era tor at this le v e l ty p ic a lly guides

lo w e r

le v e l operators.

COMPUTER O PER ATO R— Continued

COM PUTER DATA LIBRARIAN

Class B . In addition to established production runs, w ork assign ­
ments include runs in volvin g new p ro g ra m s, applications, and procedu res
(i.e ., situations which req u ire the o p era to r to adapt to a v a rie ty of p rob lem s).
At this le v e l, the o p era to r has the training and exp erien ce to w ork fa ir ly
independently in ca rry in g out m ost assignm ents. Assignm ents m ay requ ire
the op erator to se le c t fro m a v a rie ty o f standard setup and operating
proced u res. In responding to com puter output instructions o r e r r o r con­
ditions, applies standard operating o r c o r r e c tiv e p roced u res, but may
deviate fro m standard procedu res when standard p rocedu res fa il if deviation
does not m a te ria lly a lte r the com puter unit's production plans. R e fe rs the
p rob lem o r aborts the p ro g ra m when procedu res applied do not p rovide a
solution. M ay guide lo w e r le v e l o p era to rs.

Maintains lib r a r y of media (tapes, disks, card s, ca s s e tte s ) used
fo r autom atic data processin g applications.
The follow in g or s im ila r duties
c h a ra c te rize the w ork of a computer data lib ra ria n :
C la ssify in g , catalogin g,
and storin g media in accordance with a standardized system ; upon p rop er
requ ests, releasin g m edia fo r p rocessin g; m aintaining reco rd s of re le a s e s
and returns; inspecting returned m edia fo r dam age or e x c e s s iv e w ea r to
d eterm ine whether or not they need rep lacin g.
M ay p e rfo rm m in or re p a irs
to damaged tapes.

Class C . W ork assignm ents are lim ite d to established production
runs (i.e ., p rogra m s which presen t few operating p ro b lem s). Assignm ents
m ay consist p r im a r ily o f on -th e-job training (som etim es augmented by
cla ssro o m in stru ction ). When learn in g to run p ro gra m s, the su p erviso r o r a
higher le v e l o p era to r p rovid es detailed w ritten o r o ra l guidance to the
op erator b e fo re and during the run. A fte r the o p era to r has gained experien ce
with a p ro g ra m , h ow ever, the o p era to r w orks fa ir ly independently in
applying standard operating o r c o r r e c tiv e , procedu res in responding to
com puter output instructions o r e r r o r conditions, but r e fe rs problem s to a
higher le v e l o p e ra to r o r the s u p erviso r when standard procedu res fa il.

O perates p e rip h e ra l equipment w h i c h d ire c tly supports digital
com puter operation s. Such equipment is uniquely and s p e c ific a lly designed
fo r com puter application s, but need not be ph ysically o r e le c tro n ic a lly
connected to a com puter. P r in te r s , p lo tte rs , card read/punches, tape
rea d ers, tape units o r d riv e s , disk units o r d riv e s , and data display units
are exam ples o f such equipment.
The fo llow in g duties c h a ra c te rize the w ork o f a p erip h era l equipment
operator:
- Loading p rin ters and p lotters with c o rre c t paper; adjusting
controls fo r fo rm s , th ickn ess, tension, printing density, and
location ; and unloading hard copy.
- L a b ellin g tape r e e ls , disks, o r card decks.
- Checking labels and mounting and dismounting
re e ls o r disks on sp ec ifie d units o r d riv e s .

designated tape

- Setting controls which regulate operation of the equipment.
and e r r o r

indications and

- Exam ining tap es, card s, o r oth er m a te ria l fo r c re a s e s , te a rs ,
o r oth er d efects which could cause p ro cessin g p roblem s.
Th is cla s s ific a tio n excludes w o rk e rs (1) who m on itor and operate a
control console (see com puter o p e ra to r) o r a rem ote te rm in a l, o r ( 2) whose
duties are lim ite d to operating d e c o lla te rs , b u rsters, sep a ra to rs, o r s im ila r
equipment.




P e rfo rm s drafting w ork requ irin g knowledge and s k ill in drafting
methods, procedu res, and techniques.
P re p a re s drawings of stru ctu res,
m echanical and e le c tric a l equipment, piping and duct system s and other
s im ila r equipment, system s, and a ssem b lies.
U ses reco g n ized system s of
sym bols, legends, shadings, and lines having sp e c ific m eanings in draw ings.
Drawings a re used to communicate en gin eerin g ideas, designs, and in fo rm a ­
tion in support of engineering functions.
The follow ing a re excluded when they constitute the p rim a ry purpose
of the job:
-

Design w ork requ irin g the tech n ical knowledge,
to conceive or originate designs;

sk ill, and a b ility

- Illustrating w ork requiring a rtis tic a b ility ;
- W ork involving t h e
prep aration
arrangem ents, flo o r plans, etc.;

P E R IP H E R A L E Q U IP M E N T O P E R A T O R

- O b servin g panel lights fo r warnings
taking appropriate action.

D RAFTER

-

of

ch arts,

d ia gra m s,

room

Cartographic w ork involving the p rep aration of maps or plats
and related m a te r ia ls , and drawings o f g e o lo g ic a l stru ctu res; and

- S u p ervisory w ork involving the m anagem ent of a draftin g p ro g ra m
or the supervision of d ra fte rs .
Positions
definitions.

a re c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis o f the follow in g

Class A . W orks c lo s e ly with design o rig in a to rs , prep arin g drawings
of unusual^ com plex or orig in a l designs which re q u ire a high d e g re e of
p recision .
P e rfo rm s unusually d ifficu lt assignm ents requ irin g con sid erab le
in itia tiv e , resou rcefu ln ess, and drafting e x p e rtis e . A s s u re s that anticipated
problem s in manufacture, assem bly, in stallation , and operation a re reso lved
by the drawings produced.
E x e rc is e s independent judgment in selectin g and
in terp retin g data based on a knowledge of the design intent. Although working
p r im a r ily as a d ra fter, m ay occasion ally p e r fo r m en gin eerin g design w ork
in in terp retin g gen eral designs p rep ared by others o r in com pleting m issin g
design d etails. M ay p rovide advice and guidance to lo w e r le v e l d ra fters or
s e rv e as coordinator and planner fo r la rg e and com plex drafting p ro jects.
Class B. P re p a re s com plete sets of com p lex draw ings which
include m ultiple view s, detail draw ings, and a ssem b ly draw ings.
D raw ings
include com plex design features that re q u ire con sid erab le drafting s k ill to
v is u a lize and portray. Assignm ents re g u la rly re q u ire the use o f m ath em atical
form ulas to compute w eights, load c a p a cities, dim ensions, quantities of
m a te ria ls , etc. W orking fro m sketches and v e rb a l in form ation supplied by
an engineer or design er, d eterm ines the m ost ap p ropriate v ie w s , detail
draw ings, and supplem entary in form ation needed to com plete assignm ents.
S elects requ ired inform ation iro m preced en ts, m an u factu rers' ca ta logs, and
technical guides. Independently re s o lv e s m ost o f the problem s encountered.
S u p ervisor or designer m ay suggest methods o f approach or p ro vid e advice
on unusually difficu lt problem s.

D R A FTE R — Continued

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN— Continued

N O T E : Exclude d ra fte rs perform in g w ork of s im ila r d ifficu lty to
that d escrib ed at this le v e l but who p rovide support fo r a v a r ie ty of o rg a n i­
zations which have w id e ly d iffe rin g functions or requirem ents.

frequent engineering changes. W ork in vo lves: A detailed understanding of
the in terrelation sh ip s of circ u its ; ex e rc is in g independent judgment in p e r ­
form in g such tasks as making c irc u it an alyses, calculating wave fo rm s,
tracing relationships in signal flow ; and re g u la rly using com plex text in ­
struments (e .g ., dual tra c e o scillo s c o p e s , Q -m e te rs , deviation m eters,
pulse g en era tors).

C lass C . P r e p a re s various drawings o f parts and a ssem b lies,
including section al p r o file s , irre g u la r or re v e r s e cu rves, hidden lin e s , and
sm a ll or in tric a te details.
W ork requ ires use of m ost o f the conventional
draftin g techniques and a w orking knowledge of the term s and procedu res of
the industry.
F a m ilia r or recu rrin g w ork is assigned in gen era l te rm s ;
u n fa m ilia r assignm ents include inform ation on m ethods, proced u res, sources
of in form ation , and preced en ts to be follow ed. Sim ple revision s to existing
draw ings m ay be assign ed w ith a ve rb a l explanation of the d es ire d resu lts;
m o re com p lex re v is io n s a re produced fro m sketches which c le a r ly depict
the d e s ire d product.
C lass D . P r e p a r e s drawings of sim ple, e a s ily v is u a lize d parts or
equipment fr o m sketches o r m arked-up prints. Selects appropriate tem plates
and other equipm ent needed to com plete assignm ents.
Draw ings fit fa m ilia r
patterns and p resen t fe w tech n ical problem s. S u pervisor p rovides detailed
instru ctions on new assign m en ts, gives guidance when questions a r is e , and
re v ie w s com p leted w ork fo r accuracy.
Class E. W orking under close su pervision, tra ces or copies
fin ish ed d ra w in g s , making c le a r ly indicated revisio n s.
Uses appropriate
tem p lates to draw cu rved lin es. Assignm ents are designed to develop
in crea sin g s k ill in variou s d raftin g techniques. Work is spot-checked during
p ro g re s s and re v ie w e d upon com pletion.
N O T E : Exclude d r a f t e r s
perform in g elem en tary
r e c e iv in g train in g in the m ost basic drafting methods.

tasks

w hile

E L E C T R O N IC S T E C H N IC IA N
W orks on variou s types of electro n ic equipment and related devices
by p e rfo rm in g one o r a com bination of the follow ing: Installing, maintaining,
rep a irin g , overh au lin g, troubleshooting, m odifying, constructing, and testing.
W ork re q u ire s p ra c tic a l application of technical knowledge, of electron ics
p rin c ip le s , a b ility to d eterm in e m alfunctions, and skill to put equipment in
req u ired operatin g condition.
The equipment— consisting o f eith er many differen t kinds o f circu its
o r m u ltiple rep etition o f the same kind o f circu it— includes, but is not lim ited
to, the follow in g: (a) E le c tro n ic transm itting and receivin g equipment (e .g .,
rad ar, radio, te le v is io n , telephone, sonar, navigational aids), (b) d igita l and
analog com puters, and (c ) industrial and m ed ical m easuring and controlling
equipment.
This c la s s ific a tio n excludes re p a ire rs of such standard ele c tro n ic
equipment as com m on o ffic e m achines and household radio and te le v is io n
sets; production a ss e m b le rs and te s te rs ; w ork ers whose p rim a ry duty is
s e rv ic in g e le c tro n ic test instrum ents; technicians who have adm in istrative
o r su p e rv is o ry res p o n s ib ility ; and d ra fte rs , d esign ers, and p ro fessio n a l
en gin eers.
P o s itio n s
definitions:

are c la s s ifie d

into le v e ls on the basis of the follow ing

C lass A . A p p lies advanced technical knowledge to solve unusually
com plex p rob lem s (i.e ., those that ty p ic a lly cannot be solved so le ly by
re fe re n c e to m a n u fa ctu rers' manuals o r s im ila r documents) in w orking on
e le c tro n ic equipm ent.
E xam ples o f such problem s include location and
density of c ir c u itr y , e lectro m a g n etic radiation, isolating m alfunctions, and




W ork m ay be re v ie w e d by su p ervisor (frequ en tly an engineer or
d esign er) fo r gen era l com pliance with accepted practices. May provide
technical guidance to lo w e r le v e l technicians.
C lass B. A p p lies com preh en sive tech n ical knowledge to solve com ­
plex problem s (i.e ., those that ty p ic a lly can be solved so lely by p rop erly
in terp retin g m anu factu rers' manuals or s im ila r documents) in working on
e lectro n ic equipment. W ork in volves: A fa m ilia r ity with the in terrela tio n ­
ships o f circ u its ; and judgment in determ ining w ork sequence and in selecting
tools and testing instrum ents, usually less com plex that those used by the
class A technician.

R e c e iv e s technical guidance, as requ ired , fr o m su pervisor or higher
le v e l technician, and w ork is review ed fo r sp ecific com pliance with accepted
p ra ctices and w ork assignm ents. M ay p rovide technical guidance to lo w er
le v e l technicians.
C lass C. A pp lies w orking technical knowledge to p erfo rm sim ple or
routine tasks In w orking on electro n ic equipment, follow ing detailed in­
structions which c o v e r virtu a lly a ll p rocedu res. W ork ty p ica lly in volves such
tasks as: A s s is tin g higher le v e l technicians by p erform in g such a ctivities as
replacin g com ponents, w irin g c irc u its , and taking test readings; repairing
sim ple e lectro n ic equipment; and using tools and com m on test instruments
(e .g ., m u ltim eters, audio signal gen era to rs, tube te s te rs , oscilloscop es). Is
not req u ired to be fa m ilia r with the in terrelation sh ip s of circu its. This
knowledge, h ow ever, m ay be acquired through assignm ents designed to in ­
c re a s e com petence (including cla s s ro o m train in g) so that w ork er can advance
to h igher le v e l technician.
R e c e iv e s technical guidance, as req u ired , fro m su pervisor or higher
le v e l technician. W ork is ty p ica lly spot-checked, but is given detailed review
when new or advanced assignm ents are involved.
R E G ISTE R E D IN D U S T R IA L NURSE
A re g is te re d nurse giv e s nursing s e r v ic e under gen eral m edical
d irectio n to ill or injured em ployees or other persons who becom e ill or
su ffer an accident on the p rem ises of a fa c to ry o r other establishment.
Duties in volve a com bination o f the fo llo w in g : G iving f ir s t aid to the i l l or
injured; attending to subsequent d ressin g o f em p loyees' in ju ries; keeping
re c o rd s o f patients trea ted ; prep arin g accident rep o rts fo r compensation or
other purposes; assistin g in physical exam inations and health evaluations of
applicants and em p loyees; and planning and ca rry in g out p rogram s involving

REGISTERED INDUSTRTAE NURSE— Continued

MAINTENANCE MACHINIST— Continued

health education, accident p reven tion , evaluation o f plant en vironm ent, o r
other a c tiv itie s a ffectin g the health, w e lfa r e , and safety o f all personnel.
Nursing su p e rv is o rs o r head nurses in establishm ents em ploying m ore than
one nurse a re excluded.

m achine tools; shaping of m etal parts to clo s e to lera n ces; making standard
shop, computations relating to dim ensions of w ork , toolin g, feed s, and speeds
of m achining; knowledge of the w orking p ro p e rtie s o f the com m on m etals;
selectin g standard m a te ria ls , parts, and equipment requ ired fo r this work;
and fittin g and assem bling parts into m echanical equipment. In gen era l, the
m achinist's work n orm ally requ ires a rounded train in g in m achine-shop
p ra ctice usually acquired through a fo r m a l apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

Maintenance, Toolroom, and Powerplant
M A IN T E N A N C E C A R P E N T E R

M A IN T E N A N C E M ECH ANIC (M A C H IN E R Y )

P e r fo r m s the carp en try duties n e c e s s a ry to construct and m aintain
in good re p a ir building w oodw ork and equipment such as bins, c rib s , counters,
benches, p a rtitio n s, d o o rs, flo o r s , s ta irs , casin gs, and tr im made o f wood
in an establishm ent. W ork in vo lves m ost o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and
laying out o f w ork fr o m blu eprin ts, draw ings, m o d els, o r v e rb a l instru ctions;
using a v a r ie ty o f ca rp e n te r's handtools, p ortable p ow er to o ls , and standard
m easuring instru m ents; m aking standard shop computations relatin g to d i­
m ensions o f w ork ; and selectin g m a te ria ls n e c e s s a ry fo r the w ork. In gen ­
e r a l, the w ork o f the m aintenance carp en ter req u ires rounded training and
exp erien ce usually acqu ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r equivalent
train in g and ex p erien ce.

R epairs m achinery or m echanical equipm ent of an establishm ent.
W ork in volves m ost of the fo llo w in g : Exam ining m achines and m echanical
equipment to diagnose source of trou ble; dism antling or p a rtly dism antling
machines and p erform in g rep a irs that m ain ly in volve the use of handtools in
scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or d e fe c tiv e parts with item s
obtained fro m stock; orderin g the production of a replacem en t part by a
machine shop or sending the machine to a m achine shop fo r m a jor re p a irs ;
preparing w ritten specifications fo r m a jo r re p a irs or fo r the production of
parts ord ered fro m machine shops; rea ssem b lin g m achines; and making a ll
n ecessa ry adjustments fo r operation.
In g e n e ra l, the w ork o f a m ach in ery
maintenance mechanic requ ires rounded train in g and exp erien ce usually
acqu ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and e x ­
perien ce.
Excluded fro m this c la s s ific a tio n a re w o rk e rs whose p rim a ry
duties in volve setting up or adjusting m achines.

M A IN T E N A N C E E L E C T R IC IA N
P e r fo r m s a v a r ie ty o f e le c tr ic a l trade functions such as the in ­
stallation, m aintenance, o r re p a ir o f equipment fo r the gen eration , d is t r i­
bution, o r u tilization o f e le c t r ic en ergy in an establishm ent. W ork in volves
m ost o f the fo llo w in g : In stallin g o r rep a irin g any o f a v a r ie ty o f e le c tr ic a l
equipment such as g e n e ra to rs , tr a n s fo r m e r s , sw itch boards, c o n tro lle rs ,
circu it b re a k e rs , m o to rs , heating units, conduit System s, o r other tra n s ­
m ission equipm ent; w orkin g fro m b lu eprin ts, d raw in gs, layouts, o r other
sp ecifica tio n s; locatin g and diagnosing trou ble in the e le c t r ic a l system o r
equipment; w orkin g standard computations relatin g to load requ irem en ts of
w irin g o r e le c tr ic a l equipm ent; and using a v a r ie ty o f e le c tr ic ia n 's handtools
and m easuring and testin g instrum ents. In gen era l, the w ork o f the m ain­
tenance e le c tric ia n req u ires rounded train in g and ex p erien ce usually acquired
through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r equivalent train in g and ex p erien ce.

M A IN T E N A N C E M ECH ANIC (M O TO R V E H IC L E )
Repairs autom obiles, buses, m otortru ck s, and tra c to rs o f an estab ­
lishm ent.
W ork involves m ost of the fo llo w in g : Exam ining autom otive
equipment to diagnose source of trou b le; d isassem b lin g equipment and p e r ­
fo rm in g rep a irs that in volve the use o f such handtools as w ren ch es, gauges,
d r ills , or sp ecialized equipment in d isassem b lin g o r fittin g parts; replacing
broken or d efective parts fro m stock; grinding and adjusting v a lv e s ; r e ­
assem bling and installing the various a ssem b lies in the v e h ic le and making
n ecessa ry adjustments; and aligning w h eels, adjusting brakes and ligh ts, or
tightening body bolts. In gen eral, the w o rk o f the m otor v e h ic le m aintenance
m echainc requ ires rounded training and ex p erien ce usually acqu ired through
a fo rm a l apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and exp erien ce.
This cla ssifica tion d o e s not i n c l u d e
cu stom ers' veh icles in autom obile re p a ir shops.

M A IN T E N A N C E P A IN T E R
Paints and re d eco ra tes w a }ls , w oodw ork, and fixtu res o f an estab ­
lishm ent. W ork in volves the fo llo w in g : Know ledge o f su rface p ecu lia rities
and types o f paint req u ired fo r d ifferen t applications; p rep a rin g su rface fo r
painting by rem ovin g old fin ish o r by placing putty o r f i l l e r in n ail holes
and in te rs tic e s ; and applying paint with spray gun o r brush. M ay m ix c o lo rs ,
o ils , white lead, and oth er paint ingredients to obtain p ro p e r c o lo r o r con­
sistency. In ge n e ra l, the w ork o f the m aintenance p ain ter requ ires rounded
train in g and ex p erien ce usually acqu ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r
equivalent train in g and ex p erien ce.

who

re p a ir

M A IN T E N A N C E P IP E F IT T E R
Installs or rep a irs w ater, steam , gas, o r other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishm ent. W ork in vo lves m ost of the fo llo w in g : Laying
out w ork and m easuring to locate position of pipe fr o m drawings or other
w ritten specification s; cutting variou s size s of pipe to c o r r e c t lengths with
ch isel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cu tting m achines; threading
pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or p o w e r-d riv e n
m achines; assem bling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers;
making standard shop computations rela tin g to p re s s u re s , flo w , and size of
pipe req u ired ; and making standard tests to determ in e whether fin ish ed pipes
m eet specification s. In gen eral, the w o rk of the m aintenance p ip e fitte r
req u ires rounded training and exp erien ce usually acqu ired through a fo rm a l
apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and ex p erien ce.
W ork ers p r im a r ily
engaged in installing and rep a irin g building sanitation or heating system s
a re excluded.

M A IN T E N A N C E M A C H IN IST
P rod u ces replacem en t parts and new parts in m aking rep a irs o f
m etal parts o f m ech an ical equipment operated in an establishm ent. W ork in ­
vo lves m ost o f the fo llo w in g : In terp retin g w ritten instructions and s p e c ific a ­
tions; planning and laying out of w ork; using a v a r ie ty o f m ach in ist's handtools and p re c is io n m easu rin g instrum ents; setting up and operatin g standard




m echanics

48

M AIN TEN AN C E S H E E T -M E T A L WORKER

M ACH INE-TOO L OPERATOR (TOOLROOM)— Continued

F a b ric a te s , in s ta lls , and maintains in good re p a ir the sh eet-m etal
equipm ent and fix tu re s (such as machine guards, grea se pans, sh elves,
lo c k e r s , tanks, v e n tila to rs , chutes, ducts, m etal roofin g) o f an establishm ent.
W ork in volves m ost o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and laying out all types of
s h e e t-m e ta l m aintenance w ork fro m blueprints, m odels, o r other s p e c ific a ­
tion s; setting up and op era tin g a ll available types of sh eet-m eta l working
m achines; using a v a r ie ty o f handtools in cutting, bending, fo rm in g, shaping,
fittin g , and assem b lin g; and in stallin g sh eet-m eta l a rtic le s as requ ired. In
g e n e ra l, the w o rk o f the m aintenance sh eet-m etal w o rk er requ ires rounded
tra in in g and e x p erien ce usually acquired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r
equ ivalent train in g and ex p e rie n c e .

w ork of a m ach in e-tool operator (to o lro o m ) at the sk ill le v e l called fo r in
chis c la s s ific a tio n req u ires exten sive knowledge of m achine-shop and to o l­
room p ra ctice usually acqu ired through con siderable on-the-job training and
experien ce.

m il l w r ig h t

In stalls new m achines o r heavy equipment, and dism antles and
in sta lls m achines o r heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout are
req u ired . W ork in v o lv e s m ost o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and laying out w ork;
in terp retin g blu eprints o r oth er sp ecification s; using a v a r ie ty o f handtools
and rig g in g ; m aking standard shop computations relating to s tre s s e s , strength
o f m a te r ia ls , and cen ters o f g ra v ity ; aligning and balancing equipment;
selectin g standard to o ls , equipm ent, and parts to be used; and in stallin g and
m aintaining in good o r d e r pow er tran sm ission equipment such as d rives and
speed red u cers.
In g e n e ra l, the m illw rig h t's work n o rm a lly req u ires a
rounded tra in in g and ex p e rie n c e in the trade acquired through a fo rm a l
appren ticesh ip o r equ ivalen t train in g and exp erien ce.
M A IN T E N A N C E T R A D E S H E L P E R
A s s is ts one o r m ore w o rk ers in the sk illed maintenance tra d es, by
p e rfo rm in g s p e c ific o r g e n e ra l duties of le s s e r sk ill, such as keeping a
w o rk e r supplied with m a te ria ls and tools; cleaning working area , m achine,
and equipm ent; a ssistin g journeym an by holding m aterials o r tools; and
p e rfo rm in g oth er unskilled tasks as directed by journeym an. The kind o f
w ork the h elp er is p e rm itte d to p e rfo rm v a rie s from trade to trade: In
som e trad es the h elp er is confined to supplying, liftin g, and holding m a teria ls
and to o ls , and cleaning w ork in g areas; and in others he is perm itted to
p e r fo r m s p e c ia liz e d m achine operation s, o r parts of a trad e that are also
p e rfo rm e d by w o rk e rs on a fu ll-tim e basis.
M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A T O R (T O O LR O O M )
S p e c ia lize s in operatin g one or m ore than one type o f machine
to o l (e .g ., jig b o r e r , grinding m achine, engine lathe, m illin g machine) to
m achine m etal fo r use in m aking o r maintaining jig s , fix tu res, cutting to o ls ,
gau ges, o r m eta l dies o r m olds used in shaping o r form in g m etal o r
n on m etallic m a te r ia l (e .g ., p la s tic , p la s te r, rubber, gla ss). W ork ty p ica lly
in v o lv e s : Planning and p e rfo rm in g difficu lt machining operations which
req u ire com p licated setups o r a high d egree o f accuracy; setting up machine
to o l o r tools (e .g ., in s ta ll cutting tools and adjust guides, stops, working
ta b le s , and oth er con trols to handle the size of stock to be machined;
determ in e p ro p e r feed s, speeds, toolin g, and operation sequence o r select
those p re s c rib e d in d raw in gs, blueprints, o r layouts); using a v a rie ty o f
p re c is io n m easu rin g instrum ents; making n ecessary adjustments during
m achining operation to ach ieve requ isite dimensions to v e r y close to lera n ces.
M ay be requ ired to s e le c t p ro p e r coolants and cutting and lubricating o ils ,
to re c o g n ize when tools need d ressin g, and to dress tools. In gen era l, the




F o r cro s s -in d u s try wage study p u rp oses, this c la ssifica tio n does not
include m ach in e-tool op erators (to o lro o m ) em ployed in tool and die jobbing
shops.
T O O L AND DIE M A K E R
Constructs and rep a irs jig s , fix tu res, cutting tools, gauges, or
m etal dies or m olds used in shaping or form ing m etal or nonm etallic
m a te ria l (e .g ., p la stic, p la ster, rubber, g la ss).
W ork typ ically in v o lv e s :
Planning and laying out w ork accordin g to m odels, blueprints, drawings, or
other w ritten or o ra l sp ecification s; understanding the working p rop erties of
com m on m etals and a llo y s; selectin g appropriate m a teria ls, tools, and
p ro cesses requ ired to com plete task; making n ecessa ry shop computations;
setting up and operating various machine tools and rela ted equipment; using
variou s tool and die m a k er's handtools and p re c is io n m easuring instrum ents;
working to v e r y clo se tolera n ces; h eat-treatin g m etal parts and finished tools
and dies to ach ieve requ ired qu alities; fitting and assem bling parts to p r e ­
scrib ed toleran ces and allow ances.
In gen era l, the tool and die m aker's
w ork requ ires rounded training in m achine-shop and toolroom practice
usually acqu ired through fo rm a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experien ce.
F o r cros s -industry wage study p u rp oses, this c la ssifica tio n does not
include tool and die m akers who ( 1) a re em ployed in tool and die jobbing
shops or ( 2) produce fo rgin g dies (d ie sin kers).
S T A T IO N A R Y E N G IN E E R
O perates and maintains one or m ore system s which provide an
establishm ent with such s e rv ic e s as heat, air-con d ition in g (co o l, humidify,
dehum idify, filt e r , and circu la te a ir ), r e frig e ra tio n , steam or h igh -tem p era­
ture w a ter, or e le c tric ity .
Duties in volve:
Observing and interpreting
readings on gauges, m eters, and charts which re g is te r various aspects of
the system 's operation; adjusting controls to insure safe and efficien t op era ­
tion of the system and to m eet demands fo r the s e r v ic e provided; recordin g
in logs variou s aspects of the system 's operation; keeping the engines,
m ach in ery, and equipment of the system in good working order. May direct
and coordinate a c tiv itie s of other w ork ers (not stationary en gin eers) in p e r ­
form in g tasks d ir e c tly rela ted to operating and maintaining the system or
system s.
The c la s s ific a tio n excludes head or ch ief engineers in establishm ents
em ploying m ore than one en gin eer; w ork ers requ ired to be skilled in the
re p a ir of e lectro n ic con trol equipment; and w ork ers in establishments p ro ­
ducing e le c tr ic ity , steam , or heated or cooled a ir p rim a rily fo r sale.
B O IL E R TE N D E R
Tends one or m ore b o ile rs to produce steam o r high-tem perature
w ater fo r use in an establishm ent.
F ir e s b o ile r.
O bserves and interprets
readings on gauges, m e te rs , and charts which re g is te r various aspects of
b o ile r operation.
Adjusts con trols to insure safe and efficien t b o ile r op era ­
tion and to m eet demands fo r steam or h igh -tem peratu re water. May also

BOILER TENDER— Continued

SHIPPER AND RECEIVER— Continued

do one or m o re of the follow in g: M aintain a log in which various aspects
of b o ile r operation a re record ed ; clean, o il, make m inor rep a irs o r a ssist
in rep a irs to b o ile rro o m equipment; and, follow in g p re s c rib e d methods,
trea t b o ile r w ater with chem icals and analyze b o ile r w ater fo r such things
as acidity, cau sticity, and alkalinity.

rec e ip ts , or other reco rd s; checking- fo r dam aged goods; insuring that
goods are appropriately identified fo r routing to departm ents within the
establishm ent; preparing and keeping reco rd s of goods received .
F o r wage study purposes, w o rk ers a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:

The c la s s ific a tio n excludes w ork ers in establishm ents producting
e le c tric ity , steam , or heated o r cooled a ir p rim a r ily fo r sale.

Shipper
R e c e iv e r
Shipper and r e c e iv e r

Material Movement and Custodial

W AREHOUSEM AN
T R U C K D R IV E R
D riv e s a tru ck within a c ity or industrial area to tran sport
m a te ria ls , m erchandise, equipment, or w o rk ers between variou s types of
establishm ents such as: Manufacturing plants, freig h t depots, warehouses,
w holesale and re ta il establishm ents, or between re ta il establishm ents and
cu stom ers' houses or places of business.
M ay also load or unload truck
with or without h elp ers, make m in or m echanical re p a irs , and keep truck in
good w orking o rd er. Salesrou te and o v e r-th e -ro a d d riv e rs a re excluded.

A s directed, p erform s a v a r ie ty of warehousing duties which req u ire
an understanding of the establishm ent's stora ge plan.
W ork in volves m ost
of the fo llo w in g : V erify in g m a teria ls (o r m erch an d ise) against re c e iv in g
documents, noting and reporting d iscrep an cies and obvious dam ages; routing
m a teria ls to p rescrib ed storage location s; storin g, stacking, or p a lletizin g
m a teria ls in accordance with p re s c rib e d stora ge methods; rea rra n gin g and
taking inventory of stored m a te ria ls ; exam ining stored m a te ria ls and r e ­
porting d eterioration and damage; rem ovin g m a te ria l fro m storage and
preparing it for shipment. M ay operate hand or pow er trucks in perform in g
warehousing duties.

F o r wage study purposes, tru ck d rivers are c la s s ifie d by type and
rated capacity of truck, as fo llo w s:
T ru c k d riv e r, ligh t truck
(straigh t truck, under IV 2 tons, usually 4 w h eels)
T ru c k d riv e r, medium truck
(stra igh t truck, IV2 to 4 tons in clu sive, usually 6 w h eels)
T ru c k d riv e r, heavy truck
(stra igh t truck, over 4 tons, usually 10 w h eels)
T ru c k d riv e r, tr a c t o r - t r a ile r

Exclude w ork ers whose p rim a ry duties in volve shipping and r e ­
ceivin g w ork (see Shipper and R e c e iv e r and Shipping P a c k e r), o rd e r filling(see O rd er F ille r ), or operating pow er trucks (s e e P o w e r -T r u c k O perator).
ORDER F IL L E R
F ills shipping or tra n sfer o rd e rs fo r finished goods fro m stored
m erchandise in accordance with sp ecifica tion s on sales slip s , cu stom ers'
o rd e rs , o r other instructions. M ay, in addition to fillin g o rd ers and in ­
dicating item s fille d or om itted, keep record s of outgoing o rd e rs , requ isition
additional stock or rep ort short supplies to su p e rv is o r, and p e rfo rm other
rela ted duties.

S H IP P E R AN D R E C E IV E R
P e r fo r m s c le r ic a l and physical tasks in connection with shipping
goods of the establishm ent In which em ployed and re c e iv in g incom ing
shipments. In perform in g d ay-to-d ay, routine tasks, follow s established
guidelines.
In handling unusual nonroutine prob lem s, re c e iv e s sp ecific guid­
ance fro m su p ervisor or other o ffic ia ls .
M ay d ire c t and coordinate the
a ctivities of other w ork ers engaged in handling goods to be shipped or being
received .

S H IPPIN G PA C K E R
P rep a res finished products fo r shipment or storage by placing them
in shipping containers, the sp ecific operations p erfo rm ed being dependent
upon the type, s ize , and number o f units to be packed, the type o f container
em ployed, and method of shipment.
W ork re q u ire s the placing of item s in
shipping containers and m ay in volve one or m ore o f the fo llo w in g : Knowledge
of variou s item s of stock in ord er to v e r ify content; selection o f ap p ropriate
type and s ize of container; inserting enclosu res in container; using e x c e ls io r
or other m a teria l to prevent breakage or dam age; closin g and sealing
container; and applying labels or entering iden tifyin g data on container.
P a ck ers who also make wooden boxes or cra tes a re excluded.

Shippers ty p ic a lly a re respon sible fo r m ost of the follow in g:
V e rify in g that ord ers a re a ccu ra tely fille d by com paring item s and quantities
o f goods gathered fo r shipment against documents; insuring that shipments
a re p ro p e rly packaged, iden tified with shipping in form ation, and loaded into
transporting v e h ic le s ; preparing and keeping reco rd s of goods shipped, e.g.,
m anifests, b ills of lading.
R e c e iv e rs ty p ic a lly a re respon sible fo r m ost of the follow in g:
V erify in g the correctn ess of incom ing shipments by com paring item s and
quantities unloaded against b ills of lading, in vo ices, m an ifests, storage




50

M A T E R IA L HANDLING LABO RER

GU ARD— Continue d

A w o r k e r em p loyed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, s to re , o r
o th er establishm ent whose duties in volve one o r m ore o f the fo llo w in g :
Loading and unloading va riou s rtiaterials and m erchandise on o r fro m freig h t
c a rs , tru ck s, o r oth er tran sp ortin g devices; unpacking, sh elvin g, o r placing
m a te ria ls o r m erch an dise in p ro p er storage location; and tran sportin g
m a te ria ls o r m erch an d ise by handtruck, car, o r w h eelbarrow .
Longshore
w o rk e rs , who load and unload ships, are excluded.

Guards em ployed by establishm ents which p rovid e p rotective s e r ­
v ic e s on a contract basis are included in this occupation.
F o r w age study purposes, guards a re c la s s ifie d as follow s:
Class A . E n forces regulations designed to prevent breaches o f
secu rity. E x e rc is e s judgment and uses d iscretio n in dealing with e m e r ­
gencies and secu rity violation s encountered. D eterm ines whether fir s t
response should be to in tervene d ire c tly (asking fo r assistance when deem ed
n ec e s s a ry and tim e a llo w s ), to keep situation under su rveilla n ce, o r to r e ­
port situation so that it can be handled by appropriate authority. Duties
req u ire sp e c ia lize d train in g in methods and techniques o f protecting security
a rea s. Com m only, the guard is requ ired to dem onstrate continuing physical
fitn ess and p ro fic ie n c y with fire a rm s o r oth er sp ecia l weapons.

P O W E R -T R U C K O P E R A T O R
O p erates a m anually con trolled gasolin e- o r e le c tr ic -p o w e r e d truck
o r tr a c to r to tra n sp o rt goods and m a teria ls o f a ll kinds about a w arehou se,
m anufacturing plant, o r oth er establishm ent.

C lass B . C a rrie s out instructions p rim a r ily orien ted tow ard in ­
suring that em erg en cies and secu rity violation s are rea d ily discovered and
rep orted to appropriate authority. In terven es d ire c tly only in situations which
req u ire m in im al action to safeguard p ro p erty o r person s. Duties require
m in im al training.
C om m only, the guard is not requ ired to demonstrate
p h ysical fitn ess. M ay be arm ed, but g e n e ra lly is not requ ired to dem onstrate
p ro fic ie n c y in the use o f fir e a r m s o r sp ecia l weapons.

F o r w age study pu rp oses, w ork ers a re cla s s ifie d by type o f p o w ertru ck , as fo llo w s :
F o r k lift o p e ra to r
P o w e r -tr u c k o p e ra to r (oth er than fo r k lift )

J A N IT O R , P O R T E R , O R C L E A N E R
Cleans and keeps in am o r d e r ly condition fa c to ry working areas amd
w ash room s, o r p re m is e s o f am o ffic e , apartm ent house, o r com m ercial or
other establishm ent. Duties in volve a com bination o f the fo llo w in g: Sweeping,
mopping o r scrubbing, amd polishing flo o r s ; rem ovin g chips, trash, amd other
refu se; dusting equipment, fu rn itu re, o r fix tu res; polishing m etal fixtu res o r
trim m in g s; provid in g supplies amd m in or maintenamce s e rv ic e s ; amd cleaning,
la v a to rie s , show ers, amd re s tro o m s . W o rk ers who sp ecia lize in' window
washing are exclu ded.

G U AR D
P r o te c ts p ro p e rty fr o m theft o r dam age, or persons fro m hazards
o r in te rfe re n c e . Duties in vo lve servin g at a fixed post, making rounds on
foot o r by m o to r v e h ic le , o r esco rtin g persons o r p rop erty. M ay be deputized
to make a rr e s ts .
M ay also help v is ito rs and custom ers by answering
questions and g ivin g d irectio n s.




51

Service Contract
Act Surveys
The fo llo w in g a rea s a re s u r­
veyed p e rio d ic a lly fo r use in adm in ­
isterin g the S e r v ic e C on tract A c t
o f 1965. S u rvey resu lts a re pub­
lish ed in re le a s e s which a re a v a ila ­
ble, at no cost, w h ile supplies la st
fro m any of the BLS re g io n a l o ffic e s
shown on the back c o v e r.

A la sk a (sta tew id e)
Albany, Ga.
Albuquerque, N. M ex.
A le x a n d ria ^ L e e s v ille , La.
Alpena—
Standish—
Taw as C ity, M ich.
Ann A rb o r, M ich.
A s h e v ille , N.C.
Augusta, Ga.—
S.C.
Austin, Tex.
B a k ersfield , C a lif.
Baton Rouge, La.
B attle C reek , M ich.
B eau m on t-P ort A rth u r— range
O
and Lake C h a rle s , T e x .—La.
B iloxir-G ulfport and PascagoularM oss Poin t, M iss.
Binghamton, N. Y.
B irm ingham , A la .
Bloom ington— incennes, Ind.
V
B rem erton —
Shelton, Wash.
Brunswick, Ga.
C edar Rapids, Iowa
Champaign—
Urbana—
Rantoul, 111.
C harleston— orth C h arleston —
N
W a lterb oro, S.C.
C h arlotte— astonia, N.C.
G
C la rk s v ille -H o p k in s v ille , Term.—
Ky.
Colum bia—
Sum ter, S.C.
Columbus, Ga.— la .
A
Columbus, M is s .
Connecticut (sta tew id e)
D ecatur, 111.
Des M oines, Iowa
Dothan, A la.
D uluth-Superior, Minn.—W is.
E l P a so — la m o g o rd o —
A
Las C ru ces,
T e x .— M ex.
N.
Eugene— p rin gfield — ed ford , O reg.
S
M




F a y e tte v ille , N.C.
F o r t L au derdale— ollyw ood
H
and W est P a lm Beach—
Boca Raton, F la .
F o r t Smith, A r k .—
Okla.
F o r t Wayne, Ind.
Gadsden and Anniston, A la.
G oldsboro, N.C.
Grand Island— astings, N ebr.
H
Guam, T e r r it o r y of
H a rrisb u rg —Lebanon, Pa.
K n o x v ille , Tenn.
La C rosse—
Sparta, W is.
L a red o , T ex.
Las Vegas—Tonopah, Nev.
Lexington— a yette, Ky.
F
L im a, Ohio
L ittle Rock— orth L ittle Rock, A rk .
N
L o ra in — ly r ia , Ohio
E
L o w e r E a stern Shore, Md.—Va.—
Del.
M acon, Ga.
M adison, W is.
M aine (sta tew id e)
M an sfield , Ohio
M e A lle n -P h a r i^E din bu r g
and B ro w n s v ille — arlingen—
H
San Benito, Tex.
M erid ian , M iss.
M id d lesex, Monmouth, and
Ocean Counties, N. J.
M o b ile— en sacola—Panam a C ity,
P
A la .— la.
F
Montana (sta tew id e)
N a s h v ille —
Davidson, Tenn.
N ew B ern —
Jackson ville, N.C.
N ew H am pshire (statew id e)
N orth Dakota (statew id e)
N orth ern N ew Y o rk
N orth w est T exa s
Orlando, F la.
Oxnard— im i V a lley—Ventura, C a lif.
S
P e o r ia , 111.
Phoenix, A r iz .
P in e Bluff, A rk .
Pueblo, C olo.
P u e rto R ic o
R aleigh -D u rh am , N.C.
Reno, Nev.

R iv e rs id e —
San Bernardino—
Ontario, C alif.
Salina, Kans.
Salinas—
Seaside— onterey, C alif.
M
Sandusky, Ohio
Santa Barbara—
Santa M aria—
Lom poc, C alif.
Savannah, Ga.
Selm a, A la.
Sherm an-Denison, Tex.
S h reveport, La.
South Dakota (statew ide)
Southeastern Massachusetts
Southern Idaho
Southwest V irgin ia
Spokane, Wash.
S p rin gfield, 1 1
1.
Stockton, C alif.
Tacom a, Wash.
Tam pa—
St. P etersb u rg, Fla.
Topeka, Kans.
Tucson—
Douglas, A r iz .
Tulsa, Okla.
Upper Peninsula, Mich.
V a lle jo — a irfie ld —
F
Napa, C alif.
V erm on t (statew ide)
V irg in Islands of the U.S.
W aco and K illeen —
Tem p le, Tex.
W a terloo—
Cedar F a lls , Iowa
W est V irg in ia (statew ide)
W estern and Northern
M assachusetts
W ichita F a lls —
Lawton—
Altus,
T e x .—
Okla.
Yakim a—Richland—
Kennewick—
Pendleton, Wash.— reg.
O

A L S O A V A IL A B L E —
An annual re p o rt on s a la rie s fo r
accountants, auditors, ch ie f account­
ants, attorneys, job analysts, d ir e c ­
to rs o f personnel, buyers, chem ists,
en gin eers, en gin eerin g technicians,
d ra fte rs ,
a n d c le r ic a l em ployees
is ava ila b le.
O rd er as BLS B u lle ­
tin 2004, N ational Survey of P r o ­
fessio n a l, A d m in istra tive, Tech n ical
and C le r ic a l Pay, M arch 1978, $2.40
a copy, fr o m any of the BLS r e ­
gional sales o ffic e s shown on the
back c o v e r, o r fro m the Superin­
tendent o f Documents, U.S. G o v e rn ­
ment P rin tin g O ffice, Washington,
D.C. 20402.

Area Wage
Surveys
A lis t o f the la te s t bulletins available is presented below. Bulletins
m ay be purchased fr o m any o f the BLS region al o ffices shown on the back
c o v e r, or fr o m the Superintendent o f Documents, U.S. G overnm ent Prin tin g
O ffic e , Washington, D .C. 20402. Make checks payable to Superintendent of
Docum ents. A d ir e c to r y o f occupational wage surveys, co verin g the years
1970 through 1977, is a va ila b le on request.

A rea
A kron , Ohio, D ec. 1978 _______________________________________
A lban y—
Schenectady— r o y , N .Y ., Sept. 1978 1_______________
T
A n ah eim —
Santa Anar-Garden G rove,
C a lif., Oct. 19781 ____________________________________________
Atlanta, G a., M ay 1979________________________________________
B a ltim o re , M d ., Aug. 1978 1 __________________________________
B illin g s , Mont., July 1978____________________________________
B irm ingham , A la ., M ar. 1978________________________________
Boston, M ass., Aug. 19781___________________________________
B uffalo, N .Y ., Oct. 19781_____________________________________
Canton, Ohio, M ay 1978_______________________________________
Chattanooga, Tenn.—Ga., Sept. 1978 1________________________
C hicago, 111., M ay 1979________________________________________
C incinnati, Ohio—
Ky.—Ind., July 1979 1______________________
C levela n d , Ohio, Sept. 1978__________________________________
Colum bus, Ohio, Oct.
19781 ________________________________
Corpus C h ris ti, T e x .,
July 1978____________________________
D a lia s - F o r t W orth, T e x ., Oct. 1978 1
________________________
D avenport—R ock Island— olin e, Iowa—
M
111., Feb. 1979______
Dayton, Ohio, D ec. 1978 ______________________________________
Daytona Beach, F la ., Aug. 1978 _____________________________
D en ver— ou lder, C o lo ., D ec. 1978___________________________
B
D e tro it, M ich ., M ar. 1979 1__________________________________
F re s n o , C a lif., June
1979__________________________________
G a in e s v ille , F la ., Sept. 1978 ___________________ _____________
G a ry-H a m m o n d -E a st C hicago, Ind., Oct. 1979 1____________
G reen Bay, W is., July 1978 1 _________________________________
G reen sb o ro — in ston -S alem —
W
High Point,
N .C ., Aug. 1978_______________________________________________
G re e n v ille —
Spartanburg, S.C ., June 1978 ___________________
H a rtfo rd , Conn., M a r. 1979__________________________________
Houston, T e x ., A p r. 1979_____________________________________
H u n tsville, A la ., Feb. 1979___________________________________
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 19781 ________________________________
Jackson, M is s ., Jan. 1979 1__________________________________
Jack son ville, F la ., D ec. 1978 ________________________________
Kansas C ity, M o.— a n s ., Sept. 1978_________________________
K
L o s A n g e le s —Long Beach, C a lif., Oct. 1978 1_______________
L o u is v ille , Ky.—Ind., N ov. 1978______________________________
M em phis, Tenn.— rk .—M is s ., Nov. 1978 ____________________
A




B u lletin number
and p ric e *
2025-63, $1.00
2025-58, $1.20
2025-65, $1.30
2050-20, $1.30
2025-50, $1.50
2025-38, $1.00
2025-15, 80 cents
2025-43, $1.50
2025-71, $1.30
2025-22, 70 cents
2025-51, $1.20
2050-21, $1.75
2050-28, $2.00
2025-49, $1.30
2025-59, $1.50
2025-29, $1.00
2025-52, $1.50
2050-10, $1.00
2025-66, $1.00
20L25-48, $1.00
2025-68, $1.20
2050-7, $1.50
2050-25, $1.50
2025-45, $ 1.00
(To be surveyed)
2025-41, $1.20
2025-46,
2025-30,
2050-12,
2050-15,
2050-3,
2025-57,
2050-9,
2025-67,
2025-53,
2025-61,
2025-69,
2025-62,

$1.00
$1.00
$1.10
$1.30
$1.00
$1.50
$1.20
$1.00
$1.30
$1.50
$1.00
$1.00

A rea

Bulletin number
and p ric e *

M iam i, F la ., Oct. 1978 1
_______________________________________ 2025-60, $1.30
M ilwaukee, W is., A pr. 1979__________________________________
2050-8,
$1.30
M inneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn.—W is., Jan. 1979_______________ 2050-1,
$1.30
Nassau—
Suffolk, N. Y ., June 1978 1____________________________ 2025-33, $1.30
Newark, N .J ., Jan. 1979______________________________________ 2050-5, $1.30
New Orleans, La., Jan. 1979 1_______________________________ 2050-2, $1.30
New York, N .Y .-N .J ., M a y l9 7 8 1 ___________________________
2025-35, $1.50
Portsm outh, Va.—
N orfolk—V irg in ia Beach—
N.C., M ay 1979 1 _________________________________________ -— 2050-22, $1.75
N orfolk—V irg in ia Beach—
Portsm outh and
N ew p ort News—
Hampton, Va.— .C ., M ay 1978---------------- 2025-21, 80 cents
N
N ortheast Pennsylvania, Aug. 1978 --------------------------------- 2025-47, $1.00
Oklahoma C ity, O kla., Aug. 1978____________________________
2025-40, $1.00
Omaha, N eb r.—Iowa, Oct. 1978_______________________________ 2025-56, $1.00
P aterson — lifton — a ssa ic, N.J., June 1979_____________—
C
P
— 2050-26, $1.50
Philadelphia, P a .-N .J ., Nov. 1978 ___________________________ 2025-54, $1.30
Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 1979 1 __________________________________ 2050-11, $1.50
Portland, M aine, Dec. 19781 _________________________________ 2025-70, $1.20
Portland, O reg.—Wash., M ay 1979___________________________
2050-27, $1.75
Poughkeepsie, N. Y ., June 1978 1_____________________________
2025-37, $1.10
Poughkeepsie—
Kingston—
Newburgh,N .Y ., June 19781 _______ 2025-42, $1.20
'P ro v id e n c e — arwick—
W
Pawtucket, R .I.—
M ass., June 1978_____________________________________________ 2025-27, $1.40
2050-24, $1.50
Richmond, Va., June 1979____________________________________
St. Louis, M o.—
111., M ar. 1979 1 _____________________________
2050-13, $1.50
Sacram ento, C a lif., Dec. 1978 ______________________________ „ 2025-75, $1.00
Saginaw, M ich., Nov. 1978 ___________________________________
2025-64, $1.00
Salt Lake City-O gden, Utah, Nov. 19781 ____________________ 2025-72, $1.30
San Antonio, T ex., M ay 1979_________________________________
2050-17, $1.00
San D iego, C a lif., Nov. 1978__________________________________ 2025-73, $1.00
San F ra n c is c o —
Oakland, C a lif., M ar. 1979____________________ 2050-14, $1.20
San Jose, C a lif., M ar. 1979___________________________________ 2050-19, $1.10
Seattle— verett, Wash., Dec. 1978___________________________ 2025-74, $1.00
E
South Bend, Ind., Aug. 1978__________________________________
2025-44, $ 1.00
Toledo, Ohio— ich., M ay 1979_______________________________
M
2050-16, $1.10
Trenton, N.J., Sept. 1978 1___________________________________
2025-55, $1.20
Utica—Rom e, N .Y ., July 1978_________________________________ 2025-34, $ 1.00
Washington, D .C .-M d .-V a ., M ar. 1979______________________ 2050-4, $1.20
W ichita, Kans., A pr. 1979____________________________________
2050-18, $1.00
W o rc e s te r, M ass., A p r. 1979________________________________ 2050-23, $1.50
York, P a ., Feb. 1979_________________________________________
2050-6, $1.00

* Prices are determined by the Government Printing Office and are subject to change.
1 Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.

Postage and Fees Paid
U.S. Department of Labor

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212

Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300

Lab-441

Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional Offices
Region i

Region II

Region 11
1

Region IV

1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass 02203
Phone 223-6761 (Area Code 617)

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New Yor*, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 399-5406 (Area Code 212)

3535 Market Street,
P.0 Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 596-1154 (AreaCode215)

Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St., N.E.
Atlanta, Ga 30309
Phone 881-4418 (Area Code 404)

Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Delaware
District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia

Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee

Region V

Region VI

Regions VII and VIII

Regions IX and X

9th Floor, 230 S. Dearborn St.
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: 353-1880 (AreaCode312)

Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 767-69 71 (Area Code 214)

Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

450 Golden Gate Ave
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (AreaCode415)

Arkansas
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas

VII

VIII

IX

Iowa
Kansas
Missouri
Nebraska

Colorado
Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Utah

Arizona
California
Hawaii
Nevada

Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin




Wyoming

X
Alaska
Idaho
Oregon
Washington


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102