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CTlON

AR EA WAGE SURVEY
T h e C h a rlo tte , N o rth C aro lin a , M e tro p o lita n A re a ,
Ja n u a ry 1971

B u lle tin 1 6 8 5 -4 8
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

/ Bureau of Labor Statistics

BUREAU

OF

LABOR

S T A T IS T IC S

R E G IO N A L

O F F IC E S

ALASKA




Region I
1603-A Federal Building
G overnm ent Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)

Region II

Region V
219 South Dearborn St.
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)

Region VI

341 Ninth Ave., Rm. 1025
New Y o rk , N .Y . 10001
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions V II and V III w ill be serviced by Kansas C ity.
Regions IX and X w ill be serviced by San Francisco.

Region 1 1
1
406 Penn Square B uilding
1317 F ilb e rtS t.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
A tla n ta , Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Regions V II and V III
Federal O ffice Building
911 W alnut S t., 10th F loo r
Kansas C ity , Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

U.S. DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR




J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner

AR EA WAGE SURVEY
T h e C h arlo tte, N o rth C aro lin a , M e tro p o lita n A re a ,
J a n u a ry 1971

B u lletin 1 6 8 5 -4 8
April 1971

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 — Price 3 0 cents




P re fa c e

C o n te n ts
Page

The Bureau of Labor Statistics program of annual
occupational wage surveys in metropolitan areas is de­
signed to provide data on occupational earnings, and estab­
lishment practices and supplementary wage provisions. It
yields detailed data by selected industry division for each
of the areas studied, for geographic regions, and for the
United States. A major consideration in the program is
the need for greater insight into (1) the movement of wages
by occupational category and skill level, and (2) the struc­
ture and level of wages among areas and industry divisions.

Introduction________________________________________________________________
Wage trends for selected occupational groups-----------------------------------------

At the end of each survey, an individual area bul­
letin presents the survey results. After completion of all
of the individual area bulletins for a round of surveys, two
summary bulletins are issued. The first brings data for
each of the metropolitan areas studied into one bulletin.
The second presents information which has been projected
from individual metropolitan area data to relate to geo­
graphic regions and the United States.

A. Occupational earnings:
A - l . Office occupations—
men and women________________________
A - 2. Professional and technical occupations—
men and
women---------------------------------------------------------------------------------A -3 . Office, professional, and technical occupations—
men and women combined-------------------------------------------------A -4 . Maintenance and powerplant occupations---------------------------A -5 . Custodial and material movement occupations------------------

9
10
11

Ninety areas currently are included in the pro­
gram. In each area, information on occupational earnings
is collected annually and on establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions biennially.

Appendix. Occupational descriptions-------------------------------------------------------

14

This bulletin presents results of the survey in
Charlotte, N .C ., in January 1971. The Standard Metro­
politan Statistical Area, as defined by the Bureau of the
Budget through January 1968, consists of Mecklenburg
and Union Counties. This study was conducted by the
Bureau's regional office in Atlanta, Ga., under the general
direction of Donald M. Cruse, Assistant Regional Director
for Operations.




1
4

T ables:
1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and
number studied------------------------------------------------------------------------------2. Indexes of standard weekly salaries and straight-time
hourly earnings for selected occupational groups, and
percents of increase for selected periods----------------------------------

NOTE: Similar tabulations are available for other
areas. (See inside back cover.)
Union scales, indicative of prevailing pay levels in
the Charlotte area, are also available for building con­
struction; printing; local-transit operating employees; and
local truckdrivers and helpers.

3
5
6
8




In tro d u c tio n
either (l) employment in the occupation is too small to provide enough
data to merit presentation, or (2) there is possibility of disclosure
of individual establishment data. Earnings data not shown separately
for industry divisions are included in all industries combined data,
where shown. Likewise, data are included in the overall classification
when a subclassification of secretaries or truckdrivers is not shown
or information to subclassify is not available.

This area is 1 of 90 in which the U.S. Department of Labor's
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings
and related benefits on an areawide b a sis.1
This bulletin presents current occupational employment and
earnings information obtained largely by mail from the establishments
visited by Bureau field economists in the last previous survey for
occupations reported in that earlier study. Personal visits were made
to nonrespondents and to those respondents reporting unusual changes
since the previous survey.

Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for
full-time workers, i.e ., those hired to work a regular weekly schedule
in the given occupational classification. Earnings data exclude pre­
mium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-of-living
allowances and incentive earnings are included. Where weekly hours
are reported, as for office clerical occupations, reference is to the
standard workweek (rounded to the nearest half hour) for which em ­
ployees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay
for overtime at regular and/or premium rates). Average weekly earn­
ings for these occupations have been rounded to the nearest half dollar.

In each area, data are obtained from representative estab­
lishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; trans­
portation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade;
retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major
industry groups excluded from these studies are government opera­
tions and the construction and extractive industries. Establishments
having fewer than a prescribed number of workers are omitted because
they tend to furnish insufficient employment in the occupations studied
to warrant inclusion. Separate tabulations are provided for each of
the broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.

These surveys measure the level of occupational earnings in
an area at a particular time. Comparisons of individual occupational
averages over time may not reflect expected wage changes. The
averages for individual jobs are affected by changes in wages and
employment patterns. For example, proportions of workers employed
by high- or low-wage firms may change or high-wage workers may
advance to better jobs and be replaced by new workers at lower rates.
Such shifts in employment could decrease an occupational average even
though most establishments in an area increase wages during the year.
Trends in earnings of occupational groups, shown in table 2, are better
indicators of wage trends than individual jobs within the groups.

These surveys are conducted on a sample basis because of
the unnecessary cost involved in surveying all establishments. To
obtain optimum accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of
large than of small establishments is studied. In combining the data,
however, all establishments are given their appropriate weight. E s ­
timates based on the establishments studied are presented, therefore,
as relating to all establishments in the industry grouping and area,
except for those below the minimum size studied.
Occupations and Earnings
The occupations selected for study are common to a variety
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries, and are of the
following types: (l) Office clerical; (2) professional and technical;
(3) maintenance and powerplant; and (4) custodial and material move­
ment. Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job
descriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job. The occupations selected for study
are listed and described in the appendix. The earnings data following
the job titles are for all industries combined. Earnings data for some
of the occupations listed and described, or for some industry divisions
within occupations, are not presented in the A -se rie s tables, because
1
Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New York
Department of Labor. These areas are Binghamton (New York portion only); Rochester (office occu­
pations only); Syracuse; and Utica— Rome. In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies
in 77 areas at the request of the Wage and Hour Division of the U. S. Department of Labor.




The averages presented reflect composite, areawide esti­
mates.
Industries and establishments differ in pay level and job
staffing and, thus, contribute differently to the estimates for each job.
The pay relationship obtainable from the averages may fail to reflect
accurately the wage spread or differential maintained among jobs in
individual establishments. Similarly, differences in average pay levels
for men and women in any of the selected occupations should not be
assumed to reflect differences in pay treatment of the sexes within
individual establishments. Other possible factors which may con­
tribute to differences in pay for men and women include: Differences
in progression within established rate ranges, since only the actual
State
rates paid incumbents are collected; and differences in specific duties
performed, although the workers are classified appropriately within
the same survey job description. Job descriptions used in classifying

1

2

employees in these surveys are usually more generalized than those
used in individual establishments and allow for minor differences
among establishments in the specific duties performed.
Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all
establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actu­
ally surveyed. Because of differences in occupational structure among
establishments, the estimates of occupational employment obtained from
the sample of establishments studied serve only to indicate the relative
importance of the jobs studied. These differences in occupational
structure do not affect materially the accuracy of the earnings data.




Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Tabulations on selected establishment practices and supple­
mentary wage provisions (B -series tables) are not presented in this
bulletin.
Information for these tabulations is collected biennially.
These tabulations on minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced
women office workers; shift differentials; scheduled weekly hours;
paid holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension
plans are presented (in the B -series tables) in previous bulletins for
this area.

T a b le 1.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts an d w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u rv e y a n d

n u m b e r s tu d ie d in C h a rlo tte , N .C .,1

by m a jo r in d u s try d iv is io n ,2 J a n u a ry 1971
M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b lis h m e n ts in s c o p e
o f study

In d u s tr y d iv is io n

N u m b e r o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts
W ith in s c o p e o f s tu d y 4

W ithin s c o p e
o f stu d y 3

Studied

Studied
N u m b er

P ercen t

A ll d i v i s i o n s . _______________ __________________

_

489

142

90, 342

100

4 7 , 822

M a n u f a c t u r in g ______________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g __________________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and
o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s 5 ________________________
W h o le s a le t r a d e 6 ______________________________
R e t a il t r a d e 6____________________________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e 6 _______
S e r v i c e s 6 7----------------------------------------------------------

50

172
317

57
85

3 6 ,7 5 0
5 3 ,5 9 2

41
59

1 8 ,8 4 5
28, 977

50
50
50
50
50

53
98
75
42
49

21
18
19
12
15

1 5 ,1 0 2
1 0 ,3 8 5
1 5 .2 5 2
7, 867
4 ,9 8 6

17
11
17
9
5

1 0 ,6 3 6
3, 040
8 ,4 4 0
4 , 955
1 ,9 0 6

.................................„
1 T h e C h a r lo tte S tan d ard M e t r o p o lit a n S t a t is tic a l A r e a , as d e fin e d b y th e B u re a u o f th e B u d get th ro u g h J a n u a ry 1968, c o n s i s t s o f M e c k le n b u r g
and U n ion C o u n t ie s .
T h e " w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s tu d y " e s t im a t e s sh ow n in th is ta b le p r o v id e a r e a s o n a b ly a c c u r a t e d e s c r ip t i o n o f th e s i z e and
c o m p o s it io n o f th e l a b o r f o r c e in c lu d e d in th e s u r v e y .
T h e e s t im a t e s a r e not in te n d e d , h o w e v e r , t o s e r v e as a b a s is o f c o m p a r is o n w ith o th e r
e m p lo y m e n t in d e x e s f o r th e a r e a t o m e a s u r e e m p lo y m e n t t r e n d s o r l e v e ls s in c e (1) plan n in g o f w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u ir e s th e u s e o f e s t a b lis h m e n t data
c o m p ile d c o n s id e r a b ly in a d v a n c e o f th e p a y r o ll p e r i o d stu d ie d , and (2) s m a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m the s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .
2 T h e 1967 e d itio n o f th e S tan d ard I n d u s tr ia l C l a s s i fi c a t io n M anual w a s u s e d in c la s s i f y in g e s t a b lis h m e n t s b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n .
3 In c lu d e s a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t at o r a b o v e th e m in im u m lim it a t io n .
A ll o u tle ts (w ith in th e a r e a ) o f c o m p a n ie s in su ch
in d u s t r ie s as t r a d e , fin a n c e , auto r e p a ir s e r v i c e , and m o t io n p ic t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s i d e r e d as 1 e s t a b lis h m e n t .
4 In c lu d e s a ll w o r k e r s in a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t (w ith in th e a r e a ) at o r a b o v e th e m in im u m lim it a t io n .
5 A b b r e v ia te d t o " p u b lic u t i li t ie s " in th e A - s e r i e s t a b l e s . T a x ic a b s and s e r v i c e s in c id e n ta l t o w a te r t r a n s p o r t a t io n w e r e e x c lu d e d .
6 T h is in d u s t r y d iv is io n i s r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t im a t e s f o r " a l l in d u s t r ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g " in th e S e r ie s A t a b le s . S e p a ra te p r e s e n t a t io n
o f data f o r th is d iv is io n i s not m a d e f o r o n e o r m o r e o f th e f o llo w in g r e a s o n s : (1 ) E m p lo y m e n t in th e d iv is io n is t o o s m a ll t o p r o v id e enough data
t o m e r it s e p a r a t e stu d y , (2) th e s a m p le w a s not d e s ig n e d in it ia lly to p e r m it s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n , (3) r e s p o n s e w a s in s u ffic ie n t o r in a d eq u a te t o
p e r m it s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n , and (4) t h e r e i s p o s s i b il i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t data.
7 H o te ls and m o t e ls ; la u n d r ie s and o t h e r p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u t o m o b ile r e p a i r , r e n t a l, and p a r k in g ; m o t io n p ic t u r e s ;
n o n p r o fit m e m b e r s h ip o r g a n iz a t io n s (e x c lu d in g r e li g i o u s and c h a r ita b le o r g a n iz a t io n s ); and e n g in e e r in g and a r c h it e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .




M o r e than t w o - f if t h s o f the w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y in th e C h a r lo tte a r e a
w e r e e m p lo y e d in m a n u fa c tu r in g f ir m s . T h e f o llo w in g p r e s e n t s th e m a j o r in d u s tr y g r o u p s
and s p e c i f i c in d u s t r ie s as a p e r c e n t o f a ll m a n u fa c tu r in g :
In d u s try g r o u p s
28
F o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ------- 13
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l — 10
C h e m ic a ls and a llie d
p r o d u c t s -------------------------------------- 8
A p p a r e l and o th e r t e x t ile
p r o d u c t s -------------------------------------- 7
P r in tin g and p u b lis h in g -------------- 7
F a b r ic a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s _____ 5

S p e c if ic in d u s t r ie s
___ 12
P l a s t i c s m a t e r ia ls and
s y n t h e t i c s --------- ------------— . . . . 5
W e a vin g m i l l s , c o t t o n ______ . . . . 5

T h is in fo r m a t io n i s b a s e d on e s t im a t e s o f to t a l e m p lo y m e n t d e r iv e d f r o m u n iv e r s e
P r o p o r t io n s in v a r io u s in d u s tr y d iv is io n s m a y
m a t e r ia ls c o m p ile d p r i o r t o a ctu a l s u r v e y .
d iff e r f r o m p r o p o r t io n s b a s e d on the r e s u lt s o f th e s u r v e y as sh ow n in ta b le 1 a b o v e .

W age

T ren d s

fo r S e le c te d

Presented in table 2 are indexes and percentages of change
in average salaries of office clerical workers and industrial nurses,
and in average earnings of selected plant worker groups. The indexes
are a measure of wages at a given time, expressed as a percent of
wages during the base period. Subtracting 100 from the index yields
the percentage change in wages from the base period to the date of
the index.
The percentages of change or increase relate to wage
changes between the indicated dates. Annual rates of increase, where
shown, reflect the amount of increase for 1 2 months when the time
period between surveys was other than 12 months. These computations
were based on the assumption that wages increased at a constant rate
between surveys. These estimates are measures of change in aver­
ages for the area; they are not intended to measure average pay
changes in the establishments in the area.

O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s

shows the percentage change. The index is the product of multiplying
the base year relative ( 1 0 0 ) by the relative for the next succeeding
year and continuing to multiply (compound) each year's relative by the
previous year's index.
For office clerical workers and industrial nurses, the wage
trends relate to regular weekly salaries for the normal workweek,
exclusive of earnings for overtime.
For plant worker groups, they
measure changes in average straight-time hourly earnings, excluding
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts. The percentages are based on data for selected key occu­
pations and include most of the numerically important jobs within
each group.
Limitations of Data

Method of Computing
The indexes and percentages of change, as measures of
change in area averages, are influenced by: ( 1 ) general salary and
wage changes, ( 2 ) merit or other increases in pay received by indi­
vidual workers while in the same job, and (3) changes in average
wages due to changes in the labor force resulting from labor turn­
over, force expansions, force reductions, and changes in the propor­
tions of workers employed by establishments with different pay levels.
Changes in the labor force can cause increases or decreases in the
occupational averages without actual wage changes. It is conceivable
that even though all establishments in an area gave wage increases,
average wages may have declined because lower-paying establishments
entered the area or expanded their work forces.
Similarly, wages
may have remained relatively constant, yet the averages for an area
may have risen considerably because higher-paying establishments
entered the area.

Each of the following key occupations within an occupational
group was assigned a constant weight based on its proportionate em ­
ployment in the occupational group:
O ffice c le r ic a l (m en and w om en ): O ffic e c le r ic a l (m e n and w o m e n )— S k ille d m aintenance (m en ):
Carpenters
Continued
B ook keepin g-m a ch in e
E lectricians
Secretaries
operators, class B
M achinists
Stenographers, general
Clerics, accou n tin g, classes
M echanics
A and B
Stenographers, senior
M echanics (a u to m o tiv e )
S w itchboard operators, classes
Clerics, f il e , classes
Painters
A and B
A , B, and C
P ipefitters
T a b u la tin g -m a ch in e operators,
Clerics, order
T o o l and die makers
class B
Clerics, payroll
Typists, classes A and B
C om p tom eter operators
U nskilled plant (m en ):
K eypunch operators, classes
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
A and B
Industrial nurses (m e n and w om en ):
Laborers, m aterial handling
Nurses, industrial (registered)
O ffic e boys and girls

The use of constant employment weights eliminates the effect
of changes in the proportion of workers represented in each job in­
cluded in the data.
The percentages of change reflect only changes
in average pay for straight-time hours. They are not influenced by
changes in standard work schedules, as such, or by premium pay
for overtime.
Where necessary, data were adjusted to remove from
the indexes and percentages of change any significant effect caused
by changes in the scope of the survey.

The average ^(mean) earnings for each occupation were multi­
plied by the occupational weight, and the products for all occupations
in the group were totaled.
The aggregates for 2 consecutive years
were related by dividing the aggregate for the later year by the aggre­
gate for the earlier year. The resultant relative, less 100 percent,




4

T a b le

2.

In d e x e s

o f s ta n d a r d

w e e k ly s a la r ie s a n d s t r a ig h t -tim e h o u rly e a r n in g s f o r s e le c te d o ccu p atio n al g ro u p s in

C h a rlo tte , N .C ., M a r c h 1 9 7 0 a n d J a n u a r y 1 9 7 1 , an d p e rc e n ts o f in c re a s e fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s
A l l in d u s t r ie s
P e r io d

O ff ic e
c le r ic a l
(m e n and
w om en)

I n d u s tr ia l
nu rses
(m e n and
w om en)

M a n u fa c tu r in g

S k ille d
m a in te n a n c e
tra d es
(m en )

U n s k ille d
p la n t
w ork ers
(m en )

O ff ic e
c le r ic a l
(m e n and
w om en)

In d u s t r ia l
n urses
(m e n and
w o m en )

S k ille d
m a in te n a n c e
tra d e s
(m en )

U n s k ille d
pla n t
w ork ers
(m en )

(!)

119. 5
128. 6

124. 7
1 3 2 .4

(!)

123. 8
159. 3

130. 0
172. 1

In d e x e s ( A p r i l 1967=100)
M a r c h 1 9 7 0 ___________________________________________
J a n u a r y 1 9 7 1 _________________________________________

118. 7
125. 8

(!)

(*)

119. 1
130. 9

118. 3
125. 5

115. 9
1 2 1 .7

C
)

In d e x e s ( A p r i l 1961=100)
A p r i l 196 7 ____________________________________________
J a n u a r y 1 9 7 1 ---------------------------------------------------------------

124. 2
156. 3

(*)
C)

128. 9
168. 8

132. 1
165. 9

1 2 1 .8
148. 3

(*)

P e r c e n ts o f in c r e a s e
A p r i l I9 6 0 to A p r i l 1 9 6 1 ----------------------------------------A p r i l 1961 t o A p r i l 1 9 6 2 -----------------------------------------A p r i l 1962 to A p r i l 1 9 6 3 -----------------------------------------A p r i l 1963 to A p r i l 1 9 6 4 -----------------------------------------A p r i l 1964 to A p r i l 1 9 6 5 -----------------------------------------A p r i l 1965 to A p r i l 1 9 6 6 ----------------------------------------A p r i l 1966 to A p r i l 1 9 6 7 ----------------------------------------A p r i l 1967 to A p r i l 1 9 6 8 -----------------------------------------A p r i l 1968 to M a r c h 1969:
1 1 -m o n t h i n c r e a s e ----------------------------------------------A n n u al r a t e o f i n c r e a s e ------------------------------------M a r c h 1969 to M a r c h 1 9 7 0 ------------------------------------M a r c h 1970 to J a n u a r y 1971:
1 0 -m o n t h i n c r e a s e ----------------------------------------------A n n u a l r a t e o f i n c r e a s e -------------------------------------




2.
3.
2.
3.
3.
4.
4.
6.

6
4
8
2
6
7
4
3

0
C
)

()
0
(>
()
()
(*)

6. 1
6. 7

(')

5. 2

0

6. 0
7. 2

(*)
(*)

0

()
(>
()

3. 0
3. 7
1. 8

8. 0

2. 6
3 .4
3. 0
4. 2
3. 3
1. 6
4. 5
5. 8

(>
)
C)

7. 4
5. 9

2 .9
5. 2
1. 6
4. 9
3 .9
3. 5
7 .9
8. 8

5. 8
6. 3

4. 6
5. 0

(!)

6 .9
7. 6

6. 7
7. 3

6. 2

3. 6

4. 7

(*)

5. 6

7. 5

9. 9
12. 0

6. 1
7 .4

5. 0
6. 0

(!)

7. 6
9. 2

6. 2

4.
7.
3.
2.
3.
1.
6.
6.

1
9
8
5
7
9
3
2

5. 6
6. 1

2.
3.
.
5.
5.
6.

7
6
4
8
0
6

7 .2

n

(*)

1 D ata d o n o t m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .

NOTE:
M o s t p r e v i o u s l y p u b lis h e d in d e x e s to r the C h a r lo t t e a r e a u s e d A p r i l 1961 as the b a s e
p e r io d .
T h e y c a n b e c o n v e r t e d to the new b a s e p e r i o d b y d iv id in g th e m b y the c o r r e s p o n d i n g in d e x
n u m b e r s f o r A p r i l 1967 o n the A p r i l 1961 b a s e p e r i o d as sh o w n in the t a b le .
(T h e r e s u l t s h o u ld b e
m u lt ip lie d b y 1 0 0 .)

(!)
(>
(*)

7.5

6

A.

O ccupational earnings

T a b le A -1 .

O f f ic e o c c u p a tio n s —m e n a n d w o m e n

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area ba sis by industry division , C h arlotte, N .C ., January 1971)
Weekly earnings *
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

Number
of
woritere

Average
weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Number of w ork ers re ce ivin g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings of—
$

$
60
Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range

65

s
70

$

i

75

80

$
85

$
90

%

95

$

s

%

100

105

110

$
115

$
120

$
125

s
130

$
135

$

%

190

150

$
160

180

70

75

80

_

65

$
170

and

170

180

over

_

3
3

6
6

and
under

-

-

85

90

95

100

105

no

115

120

125

130

19
19

-

1

135

190

150

160

M
EN
CLASS B --------

25

o
o
9-

$
$
$
$
1 1 8 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 1 1 .0 0 - 1 3 3 .0 0

CLERKS, 0R0ER ------------------------NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

215
215

9 0 .0
9 0 .0

1 2 0 .0 0 1 1 9 .5 0 1 0 6 .5 0 - 1 3 2 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0 1 1 9 .5 0 1 0 6 .5 0 - 1 3 2 .5 0

OF FICE B O V S --------------------------NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

68
55

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

TYPISTS, CLASS B --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------PUBLIC UTIL IT IE S ---------------

50
50
50

9 0 .0
9 0 .0
9 0 .0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING,

3

8 8 . 5 0 - 9 7 .5 0
8 9 . 5 0 - 9 8 .0 0

-

1 2 3 .0 0 1 2 9 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 - 1 3 2 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0 1 2 9 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 - 1 3 2 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0 1 2 9 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 - 1 3 2 .0 0

-

9 2 .0 0
9 2 .0 0

9 3 .5 0
9 9 .0 0

l

1

_

33
33

97
97

25

-

3
3

25

25
25

3
3

-

8

2

2

9

2

25
25

3
3

28
28

_

_

2

-

2
1

5

4

21
16

22
20

3
3

1
1

-

3

9
7

_

4

-

-

-

-

_

_

6
6
6

4
4

-

2
2
2

16
16
16

4
4
4

15
15
15

_
-

3
3
3

_

_

-

-

-

_
-

4

3

3

3

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

5

3
3

-

5
-

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

WOMEN

55

B O OK KE EP IN G- MA CH IN E OP ERATORS,
CL AS S A -------------------------

30

9 6 .0 0

9 9 .5 0

9 1 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0

4

1

-

-

-

27

5

10

9 0 .0

8 8 .5 0

8 5 .0 0

8 2 .0 0 - 1 0 0 .5 0

i

2

i

25

-

11

1

8

1 1 9 .0 0 1 1 6 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

2

8 9 .5 0
8 7 .0 0
9 9 .0 0

8 2 . 0 0 - 9 9 .5 0
7 9 .0 0 - 9 9 .0 0
8 2 .5 0 - 1 0 0 .0 0

-

3
3

21
9
12

27
2
25

18
10
6

9
2
7

28
2
26

18
4
19

1 2 0 .5 0 1 2 1 .0 0
1 1 1 .5 0 1 1 6 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0 1 2 3 .5 0

1 0 7 .0 0 - 1 3 5 .0 0
9 9 .0 0 - 1 2 6 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 9 0 .0 0

_

4

i

10
10
-

8
4
4

2
1
1

19
7
7

*
o
O

56

BILLERS, MACHINE (B OO KKEEPING
MACHINE) ------------------------

O
o
*

BILLERS, MA CH IN E (BILLING
MACHINE) ------------------------

1 2 0 .0 0

B O O K KE EP IN G- MA CH IN E OPERATORS,
CL AS S B ------------------------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

135
29
106

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

9 0 .0 0
8 7 .5 0
9 1 .0 0

CLERKS, AC COUNTING, CLASS A -------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

231
71
160

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

791
111
680

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

9 6 .5 0
9 9 .5 0
9 6 .5 0

9 3 .0 0
9 9 .0 0
9 3 .0 0

8 5 .0 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0
8 6 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0
8 5 .0 0 - 1 1 0 .5 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B --------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

183
178

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 5 .0 0
8 5 .0 0

8 2 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

7 7 .5 0 - 9 9 .0 0
7 7 . 0 0 - 9 9 .5 0

CLERKS, FILE, CL AS S C --------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG ------------------

233
229

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

7 6 .0 0
7 5 .5 0

7 3 .5 0
7 3 .5 0

CLERKS, ORDER ------------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

1 46
38

9 0 .0
3 9 .5

9 5 .0 0
9 0 .0 0

CLERKS, PAYROLL ---------------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S ---------------

190
82
108
27

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 0 9 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0
1 1 3 .5 0

KEYP UN CH OPERATORS, CLASS A
M A N U FA CT UR IN G -----------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG --------

292
69
178

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 0 5 .5 0 1 0 9 .5 0
9 9 .5 0 - 1 1 3 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 0 .5 0
9 5 .5 0 -1 0 6 .0 0
1 0 7 .5 0 1 0 6 .5 0 1 0 1 .0 0 - 1 1 9 .0 0

See footnotes at end of tablei




_

6
6

-

3

19

5

3

3

5

3

3

29
3
26

11
4
7

29
8
16

30
11
19

16
3
13

20
6
19

13
6
7

23
2
21

11
1
10

24

50
5
95

10
10

18

17
3
19

3

5
19

88
7
81

4
-

3

5
5

7
7

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

i

6
5
1

_

-

16
1
15

27
8
19

155
19
191

109
17
92

139
21
118

82
10
72

99
20
29

15
15

13
13

35
33

55
53

8
7

12
12

2

28
28

7 1 .5 0 - 7 9 .0 0
7 1 . 5 0 - 7 9 .0 0

16
16

138
136

26
26

32
32

8
8

4
4

7
7

9 9 .0 0
8 8 .5 0

8 7 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0
8 6 .0 0 - 9 7 .0 0

_

_

11

2

17
6

55
5

19

-

91
19

2

-

6
6

1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0

9 0 .5 0 - 1 1 9 .5 0
9 1 .0 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0
9 1 .0 0 - 1 1 6 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0

17
10
7
1

27
10
17
1

13
5

21
11
10
"

22

22

12
10

19

6

8

2

4

15
9

10
7

15
7

66

30
7

-

2
2

_

2

_

-

-

-

-

2
-

_

_

_

2

-

-

-

-

”

-

2

3

8

2

8

2

36
16
20

-

~

18
3
3

-

4

i
i

“

~

2

17
49

23

21

91
4
37

20
5
15

2

2

“

15
5
10

5
3

18
1
17

8
1
7
4

1

-

-

~

1

i
1

-

-

3

-

2

_

_

-

2

3

*

7
5

*

3

2

1

-

3

3

2

1

“

3

“

7
T a b le A -1 .

O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — m e n a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area b asis by industry div isio n , C h arlotte, N .C ., January 1971)
Number o f w ork ers re ceivin g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings of—
1

Average
weekly

Sex, occupation, and industry division

75

t ~

80

»

~

85

90

95

i

i
100

$
105

$

l

no

115

$

120

$

125

i
130

r$
135

I
140

(standard)

W EN OM

CONTINUED

f

~ i

160

170

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

$
9 5 .0 0
9 0 .5 0
9 6 .5 0
9 8 .5 0

$
9 4 .0 0
9 0 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0

8 2 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

8 1 .5 0
8 0 .5 0

$
$
8 6 .0 0 1 0 3 .0 0
8 1 . 0 0 - 9 5 .0 0
8 7 .5 0 1 0 4 .0 0
8 7 .5 0 1 1 0 .0 0
7 4 .5 0 - 9 0 .5 0
7 4 . 5 0 - 8 6 .5 0

180
and

80

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

t
150

and
under
85

90

95

100

105

no

115

120

125

24
18
6
1

47
10
37
15

47
11
36
7

57
20
37
4

41
7
34
10

43
2
41
12

u

11
-

16
5
11

2
2
~

9

32
2
30
18

9
9

13
12

6
4

8
i

1
1

1
1

4
4

1
1

24

45
11
34

105
34
71

123
61
62
3

114
34
80
3

106
31
15
11

119
45
74
11

130
52
78
9

83
33
50
10

81
51
30
10

73
10
63
12

80
40
40
16

-

-

2

1

2

1

6
6
-

1
1

-

7
3
4

9
3
6

4
4

3
2
1

130

135

140

1
1

*

150

180 over

160

170

~

1
~
1

-

-

66
21
45
17

39
9
30
15

21
12
9
6

10
10
3

13
6
7

10
3
7

5
4
i

10
2
8

2
2

-

OFFICE GIRLS ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

46

3 8 .5
3 8 .5

SECRETARIES---------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

1 ,2 5 9
461
798
129

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 1 9 .5 0 1 1 8 .0 0 1 0 4 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 0 4 .5 0 1 1 9 .0 0 1 1 7 .0 0 1 0 4 .0 0 1 3 7 .0 0 1 3 7 .0 0 1 2 1 .0 0 -

1 3 3 .5 0
1 3 3 .0 0
1 3 4 .5 0
1 5 4 .5 0

5
5
-

24
~

35
12
23
3

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

73
30
43

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 4 1 .5 0
1 3 7 .5 0
1 4 4 .0 0

1 4 2 .0 0 1 2 6 .0 0 1 4 1 .0 0 1 2 1 .0 0 1 4 3 .0 0 1 2 8 .5 0 -

1 5 9 .5 0
1 5 9 .0 0
1 7 0 .0 0

_

_

_

-

-

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

242
87
155
41

3 9 .0 1 3 0 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 2 7 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 3 2 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 4 7 .0 0

1 3 4 .0 0 1 1 9 .0 0 1 3 1 .0 0 1 1 2 .5 0 1 3 6 .0 0 1 2 1 .5 0 1 4 8 .5 0 1 3 9 .5 0 -

1 4 5 .5 0
1 4 3 .0 0
1 4 8 .5 0
1 5 9 .0 0

~
~

_

5
1
4

~
-

9
5
4

13
7
6

13
7
6

6
4
4

15
6
9
2

28
7
21
-

16
4
12
-

19
14
5
3

29
1
28
6

46
24
22
12

24
7
17
9

17

_

-

17
9

-

“

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------- ------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

30 5
101
204
35

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 9 .0 0
1 1 6 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0
1 3 7 .0 0

1 1 6 .5 0 1 0 6 .0 0 1 1 7 .5 0 1 0 3 .5 0 1 1 6 .0 0 1 0 7 .5 0 1 3 4 .0 0 1 2 5 .0 0 -

1 2 5 .5 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 5 6 .0 0

5
5
-

13

8
2
6
-

14
6
8
-

29
15
14
2

31
12
19
-

35
1
34
3

52
17
35
2

38
15
23
2

18
9
9
6

13
6
7
4

8
1
7
3

9

9

9

4
5
2

i
8
6

9
4

5
5

13

2
2
“

7
7
1

SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

634
243
391

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 2 6 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0 1 1 1 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0 1 1 7 .5 0 1 1 6 .5 0 1 0 2 .5 0 1 3 0 .5 0
1 1 0 .5 0 1 0 8 .5 0
9 8 . 5 0 - 1 2 3 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0 1 2 0 .5 0 113. 0 0 - 1 3 3 .5 0

_
-

11
11
-

28
9
19
3

37
9
28
-

82
23
59
-

78
39
39
L

69
15
54
2

57
20
37
8

51
21
30
7

57
27
30
7

40
17
23
3

44
31
13
3

32
6
26
3

11
6
5
2

23
10
13
2

7
5
2
1

6
5
1
1

1
1
“

5

-

-

P U B L IC

U T IL IT IE S

-----------------------------------

1 0 5 .0 0
1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0
1 1 1 .0 0

9 6 .5 0 9 4 .5 0 9 7 .0 0 9 8 .5 0 -

1 1 3 .5 0
1 0 8 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0

2
1
1
1

24
2
22
12

16
2
14
4

24
10
14
13

36
6
30
7

54
8
46
18

45
23
22
8

54
5
49
40

18
18
9

12
12
9

12

4
4
4

5
5

n
n
“

-

-

12
9

~

“

1 1 7 .5 0 1 1 0 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0 1 1 6 .0 0

9 6 .0 0 9 7 .0 0 -

1 3 4 .0 0
1 3 6 .5 0

3
3

7
6

10
9

22
15

31
29

7

17
11

5
5

22
22

7
7

12
12

3
3

14
14

6
6

4
4

5
5

2
2

16
16

9 2 .0 0 -

1 2 0 .0 0

2

i

2

5

3

3

1

1

2

5

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
“

16
16

3

1
1

6
6

-

_

_

1
1

-

-

-

1
1

-

~

-

-

3

11
9

29
12
17

17
8
9

18
4
14

31

11
9
2

24
2
22

-

6

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

45
6
39

27
16
11

~

6

1

2
2

11
6

20
11

61
46

23
23

19
19

3

2

4

b

36
8
28
9

8

8
4
4
-

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

261
139

3 9 .0 1 0 5 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 0 0 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 0 6 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 0 7 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

193
172

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

SWITCHBOARO OPERATORS, CLASS A ------3 8 .5
3 8 .5

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B ------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

9 1 .5 0
9 2 .5 0

8 9 .0 0
8 9 .5 0

8 4 . 5 0 - 9 8 .5 0
8 6 . 0 0 - 9 9 .0 0

5
-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

211
67
144

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

9 7 .0 0
9 5 .5 0
9 8 .0 0

9 6 .0 0
9 4 .0 0
9 8 .0 0

8 6 .0 0 8 8 .0 0 8 4 .5 0 -

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL --------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

145
116

3 9 .0
3 9 .C

9 4 .0 0
9 5 .5 0

9 3 . 50
9 4 .5 0

9 0 . 5 0 - 9 8 .5 0
9 1 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0

1 0 8 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0

TYPISTS, CLASS A -----------------------------------

63

3 8 .0

9 1 .0 0

8 9 .5 0

8 3 .5 0 - 9 8 .5 0

TYPISTS, CLASS B ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

298
71
227
41

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0

9 1 .0 0
9 0 .0 0
9 1 .0 0
9 9 .0 0

8 8 .0 0
8 7 . 50
8 8 .5 0
9 4 .5 0

8 2 .5 0 1 0 0 .0 0
8 3 .0 0 1 0 1 .0 0
8 2 . 5 0 - 9 9 .5 0
8 7 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0

See footnotes at end of tables,




-

-

8

11

14

13

3

29
3
26
~

69
18
51
9

72
22
50
4

31
4
27
9

15
~
15
-

3

8

23

3

7
1

_

2
2

_

3
3

~

1
1

_

-

14

4

4

-

14
2

4
4

4
4

-

-

-

_

_

-

"

"

_

-

_

~

~

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

_
~

8

T a b le A - 2 .

P r o fe s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s —m e n a n d w o m e n

(A verage stra ig h t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area basis by industry d iv isio n , C h arlotte, N. C. , January 1971)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of
woikeis

Average
weekly
hours 1
(standard)

N um ber o f w ork ers re ceivin g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings of—

«

5

*

$

Mean2

Median2

Middle range2

Under 100
*
and
100 under

110 120

________110

Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

“S

t

%

*

$

$

$

»

*

$

$

s

i

*

i

i

130

l* 8

150

160

170

180

190

288

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

290

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

and

120 130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

2
1

5
2

10
7

3
3

5
3

12
11

ii
ii

3
3

ii
i

i
i

1
1

15
15

2
2

2
2

8
8

1

_

1
1

3
1
2

8
4
4

5
1
4

17
2
15

7
3
4

13
8
5

6
2
4

6
1
5

6
2

15
15

9
8

12
12

5
5

4
4

i
i

2
2
2

_

_

-

10
-

7
2

2
1

3
3

7
5

3
2

3
3

5
3

3
1

1

27

12

4

2

-

-

-

—

290 oyer

MN
E
COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A ------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

64
44

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

$
$
$
$
1 6 2 .0 0 1 6 4 .0 0 1 3 9 .5 0 - 1 8 2 .0 0
1 6 1 .0 0 1 6 4 .0 0 1 4 5 .5 0 - 1 7 6 .0 0

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B ------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

75
67

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 3 5 .0 0
1 3 5 .5 0

1 3 3 .5 0 1 1 9 .5 0 - 1 4 7 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0 1 1 9 .0 0 - 1 4 7 .5 0

2
2

-

19
18

15
9

11
11

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C

1 1 6 .5 0

1 1 9 .0 0 1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 2 2 .5 0

1

9

11

13

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

~

-------------------

36

3 9 .5

COMPUTER PR0GRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A -------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

75
26
49

3 9 .5 2 2 4 .0 0 2 2 1 .5 0 2 0 5 .0 0 - 2 4 1 .5 0
3 8 .0 2 1 5 .5 0 2 2 4 .0 0 1 9 3 .5 0 - 2 3 4 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 2 8 .5 0 2 2 0 .0 0 2 1 5 .0 0 - 2 4 9 .0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

82
72

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 9 0 .0 0
1 9 2 .5 0

1 9 6 .5 0 1 6 2 .0 0 - 2 1 3 .5 0
1 9 8 .5 0 1 6 4 .0 0 - 2 1 5 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C -------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------------------------------

36
35
32

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A -------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

69
37
45
27

3 9 .0 2 3 2 .0 0 2 2 3 .5 0 2 0 1 .0 0 - 2 5 9 .0 0
3 9 .5 2 1 1 .0 0 2 1 2 .5 0 192. 5 0 -2 3 5 .0 0

_

_

~

“

~

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

1
1

1

4
3

2
2

4
1

-

6
5

3
3

3 9 .0 2 6 9 .0 0 2 7 7 .0 0 2 3 2 .5 0 - 3 0 5 .5 0
3 9 .5 2 7 5 .0 0 2 7 7 .5 0 2 6 0 .5 0 - 2 9 6 .5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

-

-

1 7 3 .0 0
1 7 4 .5 0
1 7 9 .0 0

1 7 6 .5 0 1 6 6 .0 0 - 1 8 8 .0 0
1 7 6 .5 0 1 6 6 .5 0 - 1 8 8 .5 0
1 7 7 .5 0 1 6 8 .0 0 - l 8 9 .5 0

-

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

1
1
1

3
3
3

-

-

-

-

8
8
7

10
10
10

4
4
4

1
1

-

-

5
5
5

6
5

4
4

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A --------------------------------

105

3 9 .0

1 9 1 .5 0

1 7 9 .0 0 - 2 0 8 .5 0

-

-

-

-

2

4

3

5

14

22

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B -------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

177
46
131

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 5 4 .5 0 1 5 2 .5 0 1 3 5 .5 0 - 1 7 5 .0 0
1 3 1 .5 0 1 2 6 .5 0 1 2 1 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .5 0
1 6 2 .5 0 1 6 2 .5 0 1 4 4 .5 0 - 1 8 1 .0 0

_

_

26

12

29

-

2

3

-

4

10

26

17
1
16

13

-

23
11
12

22

-

14
7
7

22

13

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C --------------------------------

98

3 9 .0

1 2 6 .5 0

8

19

12

17

17

15

1

3 9 .5 2 1 2 .5 0 2 1 5 .0 0 2 1 1 .0 0 - 2 2 9 .0 0

-

-

-

2
2

3
1
2

1
1

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

~

“

1 9 2 .0 0

1 2 8 .0 0 1 0 8 .5 0 - 1 4 1 .0 0

22

10

3

*
W ork ers w ere distributed as fo llo w s:
** W ork ers w ere distributed as fo llo w s:
See footn otes at end o f tables.




3 at $290 to $ 300; 17 at $ 300 to $ 320; and 4 at $ 320 to $340.
3 at $290 to $ 300; and 7 at $ 300 to $320.

2

2

'
-

4
4

2
2

8
8

5
4

7
6
2

*2 4
**10
4

3

~

-

-

-

3

x8

3

W EN
OM
COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------------------------------

_

-

9

28

_

1

1
-

-

-

]

-

14

3

2

3

-

1

-

9
T a b le A - 3 .

O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s —m en and w o m e n c o m b in e d

(A verage stra igh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an are a b a s is by industry division , Charlotte, N. C . , January 1971)
Average

O ccupation and industry d ivision

Number
of
workers

Average

Weekly
Weekly
hours l
earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OF FI CE OC CUPATIONS

Number
of

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

O

55

*
O

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) --------------------------------------------------

*
o

56

$
9 6 .0 0

o

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) --------------------------------------------------

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A ---------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------------

O ccupation and industry division

SECRETARIES -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------------------

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS 1 ,25 9

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

$
1 1 9 .5 0
120.00
1 1 9.00

8 8 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------------------MANUFACT LRING-------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

461
798
129

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

73
30

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 3 7.00
141.50
137.50
144.00

4 0 .0

121.50

27

4 0 .0

135
29

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

106

3 9 .5

9 0 .0 0
8 7 .5 0
9 1 .0 0

333
87

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

128.00
117.00

246

3 9 .5

131.50

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

816
117
699

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

9 7 .0 0
9 5 .5 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

184
179

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 5 .0 0
8 5 .0 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

233
229

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

7 6 .0 0
7 5 .5 0

CLEk KS, order -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

361
38
323

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

109.50
9 0 .0 0
1 1 2.00

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

197
83
114
30
242
64
178

3
3
3
3

9
9
9
9

.5
.5
.0
.5

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTII I T I E S -------------------------

322
78
244
76

3
3
3
3

OFFICE BOYS AND GIRLS ------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

129
28
101

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

See footn otes at end o f tables,




3 9 .5

242
155

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

41

3 9 .5

305

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

119.00
1 1 6.50

204

3 9 .0

1 2 0.00

35

3 9 .0

1 3 7.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS D ----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

634
243
391

3 9 .0

1
1
1
1

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

321
58

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

CONTINUED
3 8 .0

$
9 1 .0 0

3 9 .0

9 5 .5 0

TYPISTS, CLASS A -------------------------------

63

TYPISTS, CLASS B ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------

348
71

3 9 .5

9 0 .0 0

277
91

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

9 7 .0 0
112.00

70

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 6 1.00

1 3 2.50
147.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS C
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING ---PUBLIC UTILITIES

Weekly
hour, 1
(stand, rtf)

120.00

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

CLERKS, PAYROLL-------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

43

SECRETARIES, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING ---PUBLIC UTILITIES ■

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -------

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ---------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

34

O ccupation and industry division

9
9
9
9

.5
.0
.5
.0

9 7 .5 0

105.50
102.00
108.50
1 1 8.50
105.50
100.00

87

101

43

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 3 0.50
127.00

1
1
1
2

3.00
7.50
0.50
1.50

1 0 5.50
100.00

5
0
6
8

.0
.5
.5
.5

0
0
0
0

8 7 .5 0
8 7 .0 0
8 7 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A ---NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

48

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B ---NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

80

3 9 .0

70

3 9 .0

1 3 3.50
1 3 4.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C ----

38

3 9 .5

1 1 6.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ---------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

103
30
73

3 9 .5
3 8 .0
4 0 .0

220.50
2 1 3.00
2 2 4.00

104

3 9 .5

92

3 9 .5

1 8 7.00
1 8 9.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

49
48

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

173.50
174.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ---------------------.NONMANUFACTURING--------------------

74
37

3 9 .0

265.50

3 9 .5

275.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

47
29

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

2 3 1.00
210.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

1 6 1.00

3 9 .0

1 0 7 . OG
108.00

193

3 9 .5

1 1 7.50

172

3 9 .5

120.00

26

3 8 .5

103.00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B ------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

53
46

3 8 .5
3 8 .5

9 1 .5 0
9 2 .5 0

SWITCHBOARO OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

211
67
144

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

9 7 .0 0
9 5 .5 0
9 8 .0 0

29

3 9 .0

111.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A ----------------------

111

3 9 .0

190.50

1 0 5.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ---------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

186
50
136

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 5 4.00
132.50
162.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

104
81

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

126.00
128.50

263
141

107.50
9
9
9
9

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ---------------------------------------------------TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS C ----------------------------------------------------

35

3 9 .0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL --------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING — -------------------------

145
116

3 9 .0

9 4 .0 0

3 9 .0

9 5 .5 0

10

T a b le A - 4 .

M a in te n a n c e a n d p o w e r p la n t o c c u p a tio n s

(A verage stra igh t-tim e h ou rly earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area b asis by industry div isio n , C harlotte, N .C ., January 197 1
1
Number of w ork ers re ce iv in g straigh t-tim e h ou rly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

Under 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0
1
and
2 . 3 0 under

S ex, occupation, and industry division

3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0

2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3 .6 0

CA RP EN TE RS t M A IN TE NA NC E ------------

27

$
3 .1 7

$
3 .0 9

$
$
2 . 8 3 - 3 .5 8

-

_

-

1

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

EL ECTRICIANS, MA IN TE NA NC E --------M A NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------

42
40

3 .5 5
3 .5 5

3 .3 5
3 .2 5

3 . 0 8 - 3 .9 1
3 . 0 8 - 3 .9 4

-

HELPERS, MA IN TE NA NC E TRADES ------NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S --------------

121
82
76

3 .2 7
3 .6 3
3 .6 5

2 .8 9
3 .2 5
3 .6 5

2 . 5 3 - 4 .6 2
2 . 7 2 - 4 .6 5
2 . 6 3 - 4 .6 5

16
-

2
2
2

7
7
7

16
10
10

4
-

MACHINISTS, M A IN TE NA NC E -----------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------

28
28

3 .5 0
3 .5 0

3 .6 3
3 .6 3

3 . 1 9 - 3 .8 2
3 . 1 9 - 3 .8 2

_

_

_

_

_

MECHANICS, AU TO MO TI VE
(MAINTENANCE) ----------------------M A NU FA CT UR IN G -------------------NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------PUBLIC UTIL IT IE S --------------

350
36
314
290

4 .0 6
3 .2 2
4 . 16
4 .2 0

3 .9 5
3 .2 5
4 .3 5
4 .3 9

3 .3 5 2 .9 8 3 .4 0 3 .5 2 -

MECHANICS, MA IN TE NA NC E ------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------

179
157

3 .4 8
3 .4 4

3 .5 7
3 .5 3

3 . 1 6 - 3 .7 6
3 . 1 4 - 3 .7 4

See footn otes at end of tables.




4 .9 2
3 .6 4
4 .9 3
4 .9 3

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1
“

_

-

“

“

4
4
-

_
-

1
“

-

-

i

3

-

4

3

1

-

1

-

-

~

13
13

7
7

i
i

1
1

3
3

3
1

3
3

4
4

-

-

-

-

3
3

6
-

6
6
6

6
6
2

i
i
i

-

-

-

-

2
1
-

-

-

1
1
-

1
1
1

1
1
l

_

_

6
6

3
3

-

2
2

1
1

2
2

4
4

8
8

_

“

26
26
22

5

4

2

_
-

_

_

-

“

15
9
9

1
1
1
_

2
2
2
2
2
2

3 .7 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0

2

~

4
4

10
7
3
3

13
3
10
6

4
1
3
3

38
7
31
25

27
27
27

3
1
2
*

15
15
14

26
12
14
14

6
6
6

15
15

8
8

8
8

17
17

10
10

10
10

6
5

17
12

15
15

45
42

4
-

2
—

-

over

■

-

-

-

4
4

~
~

36
36
36

“

-

_

-

-

—

-

4
1
3
3

25
25
18

21
21
21

15
15
15

18
9

4
4

-

-

-

~

—

—

101
101
101

6
6
6
-

'

11
T a b le

A -5 .

C u s to d ia l

and

m a te ria l

m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Charlotte, N .C ., January 1971)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
$
$
$
$
7
ft
>
t
i
7
t

Hourly earnings3

i

*

i

i

1. 7 0

1.80

l 90 2 . 0 0

2.10

2.20

2 . 3 0 2. A O 2 . 5 0

2.60

2 80

3. 0 0

3 . AO

3.60

3.80

A . 00 A . 20 A. AO A . 60 A . 80

1.70

Sex, occupation, and industry division

i

1.60

1.80

1 . 9 0 2 00 2 . 1 0

2.20

2.30

2. AO

2.80

3 00

3 . 2 0 3. A O 3 . 6 0

3.80

A . 00

A . 20 A . A O

A6

398
18
3R0

2
2
~

20
6
1A

12
12

Under
and
$
1 .60 und e r

*

2.50

2.60

3 20

*

t

»

T

A . 60 A . 80 5 . 0 0

MEN
GU AR DS AND WATC HM EN ----------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WA TCHMEN
M A N U FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

630
85
5A5

$
1.87
1.97

1.86

$
1.77
1.9A
1.76

$
1.731.821.72-

$
1.86
2.10
1.80

~
A6

51
19
32

35
1A
21

18
1A

4

5

5

20

1A

4

~

“

5

5

20

1A

A

33
26

58
2

AA
23

12

2

1

4
A
-

16
-

“

80

1.97

1.93

1.81- 2.1A

-

-

18

19

1A

9

2

6

12

1,058
369

1.97
2.06

1.92
2.0A

1.71- 2.19
1.87- 2.31

1
“

2A9
11

151
55

108
AO

95
72

107
16

88
71

52
10

5A
A3

72

2.33

2.39

2.23- 2.57

-

3

-

6

l

4

-

16

7

4

21

10

LABORERS, MA TERIAL HA ND L I N G -------M A NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S ---------------

1.28A
337
9A7
517

2.69
2.2A
2.85
3.08

2.53
2.18
2.58
3.10

2.061.8A2.152.51-

-

10
10
-

58
53
5
5

101
50
51
AO

96
37
59
25

87
9
78
28

10 A
12
92

55
1A
A1
8

31
5
26
16

57
39
18
1

136
3
133
111

131
96
35
21

5A
5A
"

98
9
89
8A

ORDER
F I L L E R S -----------------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

A59
39
A20

2.70
2.51
2.72

2.55
2.A9
2.55

2.29- 2.95
2.27- 2.73
2.29- 2.97

_

3

12

3

59
11
A8

6

3

-

63

58
18
AO

53

52

25
8
17

63

12

AO
1
39

52

3

4
1
3

53

6

3

PACKERS, SH IPPING -------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

218
99

2.10

1.96
2.33

1.8A- 2.29
1.97- 2.85

-

22

62
1A

30
16

18
4

6

20
1A

6
6

10
10

6
6

4
4

4
A

21
21

RE CEIVING CL ER KS --------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

1A1
35
106

2.97
2.82
3.02

2.88

_

-

8

-

4

-

3

2.86

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

*

4

7
1
6

-

-

2
2
-

ii

2.92

2.61- 3.A5
2.66- 2.99
2.26- 3.66

25
12
13

27
13
1A

4
4
“

SHIPPING CLERKS ---------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

70
27
A3

3.13
2.96
3.2A

3.08
2.98
3.09

2.70- 3.28
2.69- 3.2A
2.70- 3.8A

_

-

_

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17
2
15

11
10
1

-

-

7
6
1

-

-

19
8
11

SHIPPING AND RECE IV IN G C L E R K S ----MANU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

70
33

2.8A

2.A6- 3.15
2.95- 3.28

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

5
5

_

13
2

12
1

11
11

8
8

_

3.09

2.91
3.16

~

6
6

“

TRUCKL'RIVERS ------------------------MANU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UTIL IT IE S ---------------

1.8A2
293
1.5A9
835

3. AO
2.80
3.52
A . 15

3.28
3.02
3.A8
A . 81

2.5A2.562.5A3.AA-

51
2
49
1A

82
20
62
“

1A1
1A
127
86

98
32
66
44

16A
127
37

5A
36
18
3

1A5
2
1 A3
132

5A
5A
21

62
62
12

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEA NE RS --M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG
PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S ---------------

N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G

-----------------------------------------

2. 39

3. 1A
2.71
3.6A
3.76

A.50
3.08
A. 82
A . 85

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1-1/2 TONS) ----------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

239
228

2.57
2.58

2.50
2.51

2.1 A- 2.8A
2.15- 2.89

TRUCKORIVERS, MEDIUM (1-1/2 TO
AND INCLUDING A TONS) ----------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------

592
569
A56

3.A5
3.A9
3.69

3.A3
3.A3
3.A7

2.75- A.A7
2.76- A . 80
2.85- A . 82

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER A TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) --------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UTIL IT IE S ---------------

692
125
567
370

A . 05
2.85
A . 31
A. 75

A.A1

A . 81
A. 8 A

3.352.56A. 12A . 81-

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER A TONS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) --------

167

2.87

3.0A

2.58- 3.07

See footnotes at end of tables.




2.88

A . 8A
3.32
A . 85
A . 87

-

"

_

9

~

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

“

"

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

~

_

17
2
15
“

46
15
31

3

69
31
58

-

n

81
9
72
3

89
2
87
~

13
11

11
11

2A
23

31
25

22
22

4
A

4
A

16
16

7
4

8
6

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

11
5
6

18
15
3

_

_

_

_

10

15

-

3

i
L
13

53
1
52
”

_
”
15
1A

~

17
17

13
11
8

52
52

4‘
A

"

3

3

6

-

-

-

-

20
20

3

3

6

11

-

_

_

12

_

11

6

-

8
6

20
18

122
116
86

52
A8
44

10
7
3

26
26

i

_

-

“

_
“
5
~

A8
1A
3A

111

_

_

_

3

_

_

_

17

-

-

9A

•

23
-

17
-

-

-

9A
9A

-

50

-

28

_

-

-

_

-

50

-

28

-

~

~

~

9
2

13

-

1A

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

13

3
1
2

1A

11

-

-

-

_

16

~

112
112
8A

23

13

-

2

_

2
_

“

“

-

13
_

-

_

-

-

“

“

“

8

AO

_

8

-

“

AO
AO

“

A59
A59
A59

_

109
109
21

_

_

_

4
A
A

_
-

1A6
1A6
1A6

313

5
5

_

_

”

~

36
36

13
13
3

132
132
132

27
27
21

12
12
12

36
36

13
2
11

27

1A

36

_

~

-

-

-

-

-

27

1A

89
21

8

36
36

_

_

_

_

12

_

-

~

“

8
8

-

_

~
89

8

313
313
-

-

12

T a b le

A~5.

C u s to d ia l

and

m a te ria l

m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ied on an a r e a basis b y industry division, Charlotte, N. C , , J a n u a r y 1971)




13

F o o tn o te s

1 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t th e w o r k w e e k f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e o f p a y f o r o v e r t i m e at
r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , a nd th e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k l y h o u r s .
2 T h e m e a n i s c o m p u t e d f o r e a c h j o b b y t o t a l i n g th e e a r n i n g s o f a l l w o r k e r s a n d d i v i d i n g b y t h e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s . T h e m e d i a n d e s i g n a t e s
p o s i t i o n — h a l f o f th e e m p l o y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e th a n th e r a t e s h o w n ; h a l f r e c e i v e l e s s th a n t h e r a t e s h o w n . T h e m i d d l e r a n g e i s d e f i n e d b y
2 r a t e s o f p a y ; a f o u r t h o f th e w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s th a n t h e l o w e r o f t h e s e r a t e s a n d a f o u r t h e a r n m o r e th a n th e h i g h e r r a t e .
3 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la te sh ifts.




Appendix.

Occupational Descriptions

The prim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to a s s is t its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations w orkers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangem ents from establishment to establishment and
from area to area .
This perm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representing com parable job content.
Because of this emphasis on
interestablishm ent and interarea com parability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in
individual establishm ents or those prepared for other purposes.
In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field econom ists are instructed
to exclude working sup ervisors; apprentices; learn ers; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, p a rt-tim e, tem porary, and probationary w orkers.

O F F IC E
B IL LE R .

C LER K ,

MACHINE

Prepares statem ents, b ills , and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or electro matic typewriter.
May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform other
clerical work incidental to billing operations. For wage study purposes, b ille r s , m achine, are
classified by type of m achine, as follow s:

C lass A . In an established filing system containing a number of varied subject matter
file s , cla s s ifie s and indexes file m aterial such as correspondence, reports, technical docu­
m ents, etc. May also file this m aterial. May keep records of various types in conjunction
with the file s .
May lead a sm all group of lower level file clerk s.

B iller, machine (billing m achine). U ses a special billing machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
F ish er, Burroughs, e tc ., which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills
and invoices from cu stom ers' purchase o rd ers, internally prepared ord ers, shipping m em o­
randums, etc. U sually involves application of predeterm ined discounts and shipping charges,
and entry of n e cessary extensions, which m ay or m ay not be computed on the billing machine,
and totals which are autom atically accumulated by m achine. The operation usually involves
a large number of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold
m achine.
B iller, machine (bookkeeping m achine). U ses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand, Elliott
F ish er, Remington Rand, e tc ., which m ay or m ay not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare
cu sto m ers' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. G enerally involves the sim ulta­
neous entry of figures on cu sto m ers' ledger record. The machine autom atically accum ulates
figures on a number of vertical columns and com putes, and usually prints autom atically the
debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. W orks from uniform
and standard types of sales and credit slip s.

B OO KKEEPING-M ACH INE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott F ish er, Sundstrand, Burroughs,
National Cash R egister, with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business
transactions.
C lass A .
Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic
bookkeeping principles, and fam iliarity with the structure of the particular accounting system
used. Determ ines proper records and distribution of debit and credit item s to be used in each
phase of the work.
May prepare consolidated rep orts, balance sheets, and other records
by hand.
C lass B. Keeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, cu stom ers' accounts (not including a sim ple type of billing described under b ille r,
m achine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or a s s is t
in preparation of trial balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.
C LER K ,

ACCOUNTING

C lass A . Under general direction of a bookkeeper or accountant, has responsibility for
keeping one or m ore sections of a complete set of books or records relating to one phase
of an establishm ent's business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing subsidiary
ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable; examining and coding
invoices or vouchers with proper accounting distribution; and requires judgment and exp eri­
ence in making proper assignations and allocations. May a s s is t in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal en tries; and m ay direct class B accounting clerk s.

C lass B. Sorts, codes, and file s unclassified m aterial by simple (subject matter) head­
ings ~or~partly classified m aterial by finer subheadings. Prepares simple related index and
c ro s s -re fe re n c e aids. A s requested, locates clearly identified m aterial in files and forwards
m aterial.
May perform related clerical tasks required to maintain and service file s.

C lass C . P erform s routine filing of m aterial that has already been classified or which
is easily classified in a simple serial classification system (e .g ., alphabetical, chronological,
or num erical). A s requested, locates readily available m aterial in files and forwards m a­
terial; and m ay fill out withdrawal charge. P erform s simple clerical and manual tasks re ­
quired to maintain and service file s .

C LER K ,

ORDER

R eceives cu sto m ers' orders for m aterial or m erchandise by m ail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the follow ing: Quoting prices to cu stom ers; making out an order
sheet listing the item s to make up the order; checking prices and quantities of item s on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be filled. May check with credit
department to determ ine credit rating of cu stom er, acknowledge receipt of orders from cu stom ers,
follow up orders to see that they have been filled , keep file of orders received, and check shipping
invoices with original ord ers.

C LE R K ,

P A YR O LL

Computes wages of company em ployees and enters the necessary data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve: Calculating w orkers' earnings based on time or production records; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such as w orker's name, working
days, tim e, rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and
a s s is t paym aster in making up and distributing pay envelopes.
May use a calculating machine.

C O M P TO M ETE R OPERATOR
P rim ary duty is to operate a Com ptom eter to perform m athematical computations. This
job is not to be confused with that of statistical or other type of clerk, which m ay involve f r e ­
quent use of a Com ptom eter but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to performance of
other duties.

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR

C la ss A . Operates a num erical an d/or alphabetical or combination keypunch machine to
transcribe data from various source documents to keypunch tabulating cards. Perform s same
tasks as lower level keypunch operator but, in addition, work requires application of coding
skills and the making of some determ inations, for exam ple, locates on the source document
the item s to be punched; extracts information from several documents; and searches for and
interprets information on the document to determine information to be punched. May train
inexperienced operators.

C lass B. Under supervision, perform s one or m ore routine accounting operations such
as posting simple journal vouchers or accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in
voucher reg isters; reconciling bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by
general ledgers, or posting sim ple cost accounting data. This job does not require a knowl­
edge of accounting and bookkeeping principles but is found in offices in which the m ore routine
accounting work is subdivided on a functional basis among several w orkers.




FILE

14

15
KEYPUNCH

O P E R A T O R — C o n t in u e d

C lass B.
Under close supervision or following specific procedures or instructions,
transcribes data from source documents to punched card s.
Operates a num erical and/or
alphabetical or combination keypunch machine to keypunch tabulating card s. May verify cards.
Working from various standardized source docum ents, follows specified sequences which have
been coded or prescribed in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting
of data to be punched. Problem s arising from erroneous item s or codes, m issin g information,
etc ., are referred to supervisor.

SE CR E TAR Y— Continued
d. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in a ll, over 5, 000 p e rson s; or
e.
Secretary to the head of a large and important organizational segment (e .g ., a middle
management supervisor of an organizational segment often involving as many as several
hundred persons) of a company that em ploys, in all, over 25, 000 p erson s.
C lass C

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
P erform s various routine duties such as running errands, operating minor office m a­
chines such as sealers or m a ile rs , opening and distributing m ail, and other minor clerical work.

SE CR E TAR Y
Assigned as personal secreta ry, norm ally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the d a y-to-d a y work activities of the supervisor. Works fa irly inde­
pendently receiving a minim um of detailed supervision and guidance. P erform s varied clerical
and secreta ria l duties, usually including m ost of the follow ing: (a) R eceives telephone ca lls,
personal c a lle rs, and incoming m ail, answers routine inquiries, and routes the technical inquiries
to the proper persons; (b) establish es, m aintains, and revises the sup ervisor's file s ; (c) maintains
the su p ervisor's calendar and makes appointments as instructed; (d) relays m essage s from super­
visor to subordinates; (e) review s correspondence, m em orandum s, and reports prepared by others
for the sup ervisor's signature to assure procedural and typographic accuracy; and (f) perform s
stenographic and typing work.
May also perform other clerical and secretarial tasks of comparable nature and difficulty.
The work typically requires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
program s, and procedures related to the work of the supervisor.
Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled "s e c r e t a r y " p o ssess the above ch aracteristics. Exam ples
of positions which are excluded from the definition are as follow s: (a) Positions which do not m eet
the "p e rso n a l" secreta ry concept described above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in secretarial
type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a group of professional, technical,
or managerial persons; (d) secreta ry positions in which the duties are either substantially m ore
routine or substantially m ore com plex and responsible than those characterized in the definition;
and (e) assistant type positions which involve m ore difficult or m ore responsible technical, admin­
istrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical duties which are not typical of secretarial work.
NOTE: The term "corporate o f f i c e r ," used in the level definitions following, refers to
those officials who have a significant corporate-w ide policymaking role with regard to major
company activities. The title "v ic e p re s id e n t," though norm ally indicative of this role, does not
in all cases identify such positions. Vice presidents whose prim ary responsibility is to act per­
sonally on individual cases or transactions (e .g ., approve or deny individual loan or credit actions;
administer individual trust accounts; directly supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be
"corporate o ffic e r s" for purposes of applying the following level definitions.
C lass A

all,

a. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
over 100 but few er than 5 ,0 0 0 p e rson s; or

b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 5, 000 but fewer than 25, 000 p e rson s; or
c. Secretary to the head (im m ediately below the corporate officer level) of a m ajor
segment or subsidiary of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 2 5 ,0 0 0 p erson s.
C lass B

all,

a. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
fewer than 100 p e rson s; or

b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 100 but fewer than 5 ,0 0 0 p e rson s; or
c. Secretary to the head (im m ediately below the officer level) over either a m ajor
corporate-w ide functional activity (e .g ., m arketing, resea rch , operations, industrial re la tions, etc.^ or~a m ajor geographic or organizational segment (e .g ., a regional headquarters;
a m ajor division) of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 5 ,0 0 0 but fewer than 2 5 ,0 0 0
em ployees; or




a.
S ecretary to an executive or m anagerial person whose responsibility is not equivalent
to one of the specific level situations in the definition for class B, but whose subordinate staff
norm ally numbers at least several dozen em ployees and is usually divided into organizational
segm ents which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In som e com panies, this level includes
a wide range of organizational echelons; in oth ers, only one or two; o£
b. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in all, few er than 5, 000 p e rson s.
C lass D
a.
S ecretary to the supervisor or head of a sm all organizational unit (e .g ., fewer than
about 25 or 30 person s); jor
b. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional em ployee, adm inistra­
tive o fficer, or assistant, skilled technician or expert.
(NO TE;
Many companies assign
stenographers, rather than secreta ries as described above, to this level of supervisory or
nonsupervisory w orker.)
STENOGRAPHER,

G EN ER AL

P rim ary duty is to take dictation involving a norm al routine vocabulary from one or m ore
persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine; and transcribe dictation. May
also type from written copy. May maintain file s , keep sim ple reco rd s, or perform other relatively
routine clerical tasks.
May operate from a stenographic pool. Does not include transcribingmachine work. (See transcribing-m achine op erator.)

STENOGRAPHER,

SENIOR

P rim ary duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary
such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research from one or m ore persons either in short­
hand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from written
copy.
May also set up and maintain file s , keep reco rd s, etc.
OR
P erform s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and responsi­
bility than stenographers, general as evidenced by the following: Work requires high degree of
stenographic speed and accuracy; and a thorough working knowledge of general business and office
procedures and of the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures, file s,
workflow, etc.
U ses this knowledge in perform ing stenographic duties and responsible clerical
tasks such a s , maintaining followup file s ; assem bling m aterial for rep orts, m em orandum s, letters,
e tc.; composing simple letters from general instructions; reading and routing incoming m ail; and
answering routine questions, etc. Does not include transcribing-m achine work.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATO R
C lass A . O perates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office calls. P e rfo rm s full telephone information service or handles
com plex ca lls , such as conference, collect, o verseas, or sim ilar c a lls, either in addition to
doing routine work as described for switchboard operator, class B, or as a fu ll-tim e
assignm ent. ( "F u l l " telephone information service occurs when the establishm ent has varied
functions that are not readily understandable for telephone information purposes, e .g ., because
of overlapping or interrelated functions, and consequently present frequent problem s as to
which extensions are appropriate for calls.)
C lass B . O perates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office ca lls. M ay handle routine long distance calls and record tolls.
M ay perform lim ited telephone information service. ("L im ite d " telephone information service
occurs if the functions of the establishm ent serviced are readily understandable for telephone
information purposes, or if the requests are routine, e .g ., giving extension numbers when
specific names are furnished, or if com plex calls are referred to another operator.)

16
S W IT C H B O A R D

O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E

In a d d i t io n t o p e r f o r m i n g d u t i e s o f o p e r a t o r o n a s i n g l e - p o s i t i o n o r m o n i t o r - t y p e s w i t c h ­
b o a r d , a c ts a s r e c e p t io n is t and m a y a ls o ty p e o r p e r f o r m r o u tin e c l e r i c a l w o r k as p a rt o f r e g u la r
d u tie s .
T h is t y p in g o r c l e r i c a l w o r k m a y t a k e th e m a j o r p a r t o f t h is w o r k e r 's t i m e w h il e at
s w itc h b o a r d .

O P E R A T O R ---- C o n t in u e d

C la s s C .
O p e r a t e s s i m p l e t a b u la t in g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t i n g m a c h in e s s u c h a s th e
s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c i n g p u n c h , c o l l a t o r , e t c . , w it h s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s .
M a y in c lu d e s i m p l e
w ir in g fr o m d ia g r a m s and s o m e filin g w o r k .
T h e w o r k t y p ic a lly in v o lv e s p o r t io n s o f a w o r k
u n it , f o r e x a m p l e , in d iv i d u a l s o r t i n g o r c o l l a t i n g r u n s o r r e p e t i t i v e o p e r a t i o n s .
T R A N S C R I B I N G -M A C H I N E

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E

OPERATOR,

GENERAL

OPERATOR

C la s s A .
O p e r a t e s a v a r i e t y o f t a b u la t in g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e s , t y p i c a l l y
i n c lu d in g s u c h m a c h i n e s a s t h e t a b u l a t o r ,
c a l c u l a t o r , i n t e r p r e t e r , c o l l a t o r , arid o t h e r s .
P e r f o r m s c o m p l e t e r e p o r t i n g a s s i g n m e n t s w it h o u t c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n , a n d p e r f o r m s d i f f i c u l t
w ir in g a s r e q u ir e d .
T h e c o m p l e t e r e p o r t i n g a n d t a b u la t in g a s s i g n m e n t s t y p i c a l l y in v o l v e a
v a r i e t y o f lo n g a n d c o m p l e x r e p o r t s w h i c h o f t e n a r e o f i r r e g u l a r o r n o n r e c u r r i n g t y p e r e ­
q u i r i n g s o m e p la n n in g a n d s e q u e n c i n g o f s t e p s t o b e t a k e n . A s a m o r e e x p e r i e n c e d o p e r a t o r ,
i s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e d in t r a i n i n g n e w o p e r a t o r s in m a c h in e o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t i a l l y t r a i n e d
o p e r a t o r s in w i r i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s a n d o p e r a t i n g s e q u e n c e s o f lo n g a n d c o m p l e x r e p o r t s .
D o e s n o t i n c lu d e w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s p e r f o r m i n g t a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t i o n s a n d d a y - t o d a y s u p e r v is io n o f th e w o r k and p r o d u c t io n o f a g r o u p o f ta b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s .

C l a s s B . O p e r a t e s m o r e d i f f i c u l t t a b u l a t i n g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e s s u c h a s th e
t a b u l a t o r a n d c a l c u l a t o r , in a d d i t io n t o th e s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c e r , a n d c o l l a t o r .
T h is w o r k is
p e r f o r m e d u n d e r s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s a n d m a y i n c lu d e t h e p e r f o r m a n c e o f s o m e w i r i n g f r o m
d ia g r a m s . T h e w o r k t y p ic a lly in v o lv e s , f o r e x a m p le , ta b u la tio n s
in v o lv in g
a r e p e t it iv e
a c c o u n tin g e x e r c i s e , a c o m p le t e bu t s m a ll ta b u la tin g s tu d y , o r p a r t s o f a lo n g e r and m o r e
c o m p l e x r e p o r t . S u c h r e p o r t s a n d s t u d ie s a r e u s u a l l y o f a r e c u r r i n g n a t u r e w h e r e th e p r o ­
c e d u r e s a r e w e ll e s t a b lis h e d .
M a y a l s o in c lu d e t h e t r a i n i n g o f n e w e m p l o y e e s in th e b a s i c
o p e r a t io n o f th e m a c h in e .

P r i m a r y d u ty is t o t r a n s c r i b e d i c t a t i o n in v o l v i n g a n o r m a l
tr a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e r e c o r d s .
M a y a ls o ty p e fr o m w r it te n c o p y and
W o r k e r s t r a n s c r ib in g d ic t a t io n in v o lv in g a v a r ie d t e c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia liz e d
b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s o n s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h a r e n o t i n c lu d e d . A w o r k e r w h o
h a n d o r b y S t e n o t y p e o r s i m i l a r m a c h in e is c l a s s i f i e d a s a s t e n o g r a p h e r ,

ro u tin e v o c a b u la r y fr o m
do s im p le c l e r i c a l w o rk .
v o c a b u la r y su c h a s le g a l
t a k e s d i c t a t i o n in s h o r t ­
g e n e r a l.

T Y P IS T
U s e s a t y p e w r i t e r t o m a k e c o p i e s o f v a r i o u s m a t e r i a l o r t o m a k e ou t b i l l s a f t e r c a l c u l a ­
t io n s h a v e b e e n m a d e b y a n o t h e r p e r s o n . M a y in c lu d e t y p i n g o f s t e n c i l s , m a t s , o r s i m i l a r m a t e ­
r i a l s f o r u s e in d u p li c a t in g p r o c e s s e s .
M a y d o c l e r i c a l w o r k i n v o l v i n g li t t l e s p e c i a l t r a in i n g , s u c h
a s k e e p in g s i m p l e r e c o r d s , f i l i n g r e c o r d s a n d r e p o r t s , o r s o r t i n g a n d d i s t r i b u t i n g in c o m in g m a i l .
C la s s A .
P e r f o r m s o n e o r m o r e o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : T y p in g m a t e r i a l in f i n a l f o r m w h e n it
in v o lv e s c o m b in in g m a te r ia l f r o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s o r r e s p o n s ib ilit y f o r c o r r e c t s p e llin g ,
s y l l a b i c a t i o n , p u n c t u a t io n , e t c . , o f t e c h n i c a l o r u n u s u a l w o r d s o r f o r e i g n la n g u a g e m a t e r i a l ;
a n d p la n n in g la y o u t a n d t y p i n g o f c o m p l i c a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l t a b l e s t o m a in t a in u n i f o r m i t y a n d
b a l a n c e in s p a c i n g .
M a y t y p e r o u t i n e f o r m l e t t e r s v a r y i n g d e t a i l s t o s u it c i r c u m s t a n c e s .
C l a s s B . P e r f o r m s o n e o r m o r e o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : C o p y t y p in g f r o m r o u g h o r c l e a r d r a f t s ;
r o u t i n e t y p in g o f f o r m s , in s u r a n c e p o l i c i e s , e t c . ; a n d s e t t in g up s i m p l e s t a n d a r d t a b u l a t i o n s ,
o r c o p y in g m o r e c o m p l e x t a b l e s a l r e a d y s e t u p a n d s p a c e d p r o p e r l y .

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
COM PUTER O PERATO R

COM PUTER PROGRAM ER,

M onitors and operates the control console of a digital computer to p ro cess data according
to operating instructions, usually prepared by a program er. W ork includes m ost of the following:
Studies instructions to determ ine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
item s (tape re e ls, card s, e tc.); switches n e cessary auxiliary equipment into circu it, and starts
and operates com puter; m akes adjustments to computer to correct operating problem s and m eet
special conditions; review s e rro rs made during operation and determ ines cause or refers problem
to supervisor or program er; and maintains operating reco rds. May test and a ssist in correcting
program .

Converts statements of business problem s, typically prepared by a system s analyst, into
a sequence of detailed instructions which are required to solve the problem s by automatic data
processing equipment.
Working from charts or diagram s, the program er develops the p recise
instructions which, when entered into the computer system in coded language, cause the manipu­
lation of data to achieve desired resu lts. Work involves m ost of the following: Applies knowledge
of computer capabilities, m athem atics, logic employed by com puters, and particular subject matter
involved to analyze charts and diagram s of the problem to be program ed.
Develops sequence
of program steps, w rites detailed flow charts to show order in which data w ill be processed ;
converts these charts to coded instructions for machine to follow; tests and corrects program s;
prepares instructions for operating personnel during production run; analyzes, review s, and alters
program s to increase operating efficiency or adapt to new requirem ents; maintains records of
program development and revisions. (NO TE: W orkers perform ing both system s analysis and p ro­
graming should be classified as system s analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)

F or wage study purposes,

computer operators are cla ssified as follow s:

C lass A . O perates independently, or under only general direction, a computer running
program s with m ost of the following ch aracteristics; New program s are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requirem ents are of critical importance to m inim ize downtime; the
program s are of com plex design so that identification of e rro r source often requires a working
knowledge of the total program , and alternate program s m ay not be available.
May give
direction and guidance to lower level operators.
C lass B . O perates independently, or under only general direction, a computer running
program s with m ost of the following ch aracteristics: M ost of the program s are established
production runs, typically run on a regularly recurring b a sis; there is little or no testing
of new program s required; alternate program s are provided in case original program needs
m ajor change or cannot be corrected within a reasonable tim e. In common erro r situations,
diagnoses cause and takes corrective action. This usually involves applying previously p ro ­
gram ed corrective steps, or using standard correction techniques.

B U S IN E S S

Does not include em ployees prim arily responsible for the management or supervision of
other electronic data processing (EDP) em ployees, or program ers prim arily concerned with
scientific a n d /o r engineering problem s.
For wage study purposes,

program ers are classified as follow s:

C lass A . W orks independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s which
require competence in all phases of program ing concepts and practices. Working from dia­
gram s and charts which identify the nature of desired resu lts, m ajor processing steps to be
accom plished, and the relationships between various steps of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of program ing actions needed to efficiently utilize the computer system
in achieving desired end products.

OR
Operates under direct supervision a computer running program s or segm ents of program s
with the ch aracteristics described for c la ss A. May a ssist a higher level operator by inde­
pendently perform ing le s s difficult tasks assigned, and perform ing difficult tasks following
detailed instructions and with frequent review of operations perform ed.
C lass C . W orks on routine program s under close supervision.
Is expected to develop
working knowledge of the computer equipment used and ability to detect problem s involved in
running routine program s. U sually has received som e form al training in computer operation.
May a ssist higher level operator on com plex p rogram s.




At this level, program ing is difficult because computer equipment m ust be organized to
produce several interrelated but diverse products from numerous and diverse data elem ents.
A wide variety and extensive number of internal processing actions must occur. This requires
such actions as development of common operations which can be reused, establishm ent of
linkage points between operations, adjustments to data when program requirem ents exceed
computer storage capacity, and substantial manipulation and resequencing of data elem ents
to form a highly integrated program .
May provide functional direction to lower level program ers who are assigned to a ssist.

17
COM PUTER PR O G R AM E R ,

BUSINESS— Continued

COM PUTER SYSTEM S A N A L Y S T ,

C lass B . W orks independently or under only general direction on relatively sim ple
pro gram s, or on sim ple segm ents of com plex pro gram s. P rogram s (or segments) usually
p ro cess inform ation to produce data in two or three varied sequences or form ats. Reports
and listings are produced by refining, adapting, arraying, or making m inor additions to or
deletions from input data which are readily available.
While numerous records m ay be
p ro cessed , the data have been refined in prior actions so that the accuracy and sequencing
of data can be tested by using a few routine checks.
Typically, the program deals with
routine record-keeping type operations.

OR
W orks on a segment of a com plex data processing schem e or system , as described for
class A. W orks independently on routine assignm ents and receives instruction and guidance
on com plex assignm ents. Work is reviewed for accuracy of judgment, compliance with in­
structions, and to insure proper alinement with the overall system .

OR

C lass C . W orks under im m ediate supervision, carrying out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. Assign m ents are designed to develop and expand practical experience
in the application of procedures and skills required for system s analysis work. For example,
m ay a s s is t a higher level system s analyst by preparing the detailed specifications required
by pro gram ers from information developed by the higher level analyst.

W orks on com plex program s (as described for cla ss A) under close direction of a higher
level program er or sup ervisor.
May a s s is t higher level program er by independently p e r ­
form ing le s s difficult tasks assigned, and perform ing m ore difficult tasks under fa irly close
direction.
May guide or instruct low er level pro gram ers.

DRAFTSM AN

C la ss C . M akes practical applications of program ing practices and concepts usually
learned in form al training cou rses. A ssignm ents are designed to develop competence in the
application of standard procedures to routine problem s. R eceives close supervision on new
aspects of assignm ents; and work is reviewed to verify its accuracy and conform ance with
required procedures.

C O M PUTER SYSTEM S A N A L Y S T ,

C lass A . Plans the graphic presentation of com plex item s having distinctive design
features that differ significantly from established drafting precedents. W orks in close sup­
port with the design originator, and m ay recom mend m inor design changes.
Analyzes the
effect of each change on the details of form , function, and positional relationships of com ­
ponents and parts.
W orks with a m inim um of supervisory assistance.
Completed work is
reviewed by design originator for consistency with prior engineering determ inations.
May
either prepare drawings, or direct their preparation by lower level draftsm en.

BUSINESS

C lass B . P e rfo rm s nonroutine and com plex drafting assignm ents that require the appli­
cation of m ost of the standardized drawing techniques regularly used.
Duties typically in­
volve such work as: P repares working drawings of subassem blies with irregu lar shapes,
multiple functions, and p re cise positional relationships between components; prepares arch i­
tectural drawings for construction of a building including detail drawings of foundations, wall
sections, floor plans, and roof. U ses accepted form ulas and manuals in making necessary
computations to determ ine quantities of m aterials to be used, load capacities, strengths,
s tr e s s e s , etc.
R eceives initial instructions, requirem ents, and advice from supervisor.
Completed work is checked for technical adequacy.

Analyzes business problem s to form ulate procedures for solving them by use of electronic
data processing equipment. D evelops a com plete description of a ll specifications needed to enable
p ro gram ers to prepare required digital computer pro gram s. Work involves m ost of the following;
A n alyzes su b ject-m atter operations to be automated and identifies conditions and criteria required
to achieve satisfactory re su lts; specifies number and types of reco rd s, file s , and documents to
be used; outlines actions to be perform ed by personnel and com puters in sufficient detail for
presentation to m anagement and for program ing (typically this involves preparation of work and
data flow ch arts); coordinates the development of test problem s and participates in tria l runs of
new and revised sy ste m s; and recom m ends equipment changes to obtain m ore effective overall
operations. (N O T E: W ork ers perform ing both system s analysis and program ing should be c la s ­
sified as system s analysts if this is the skill used to determ ine their pay.)

C lass C . P rep ares detail drawings of single units or parts for engineering, construction,
manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types of drawings prepared include isom etric projections
(depicting three dim insions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning of
components and convey needed information. Consolidates details from a number of sources
and adjusts or transposes scale as required.
Suggested methods of approach, applicable
precedents, and advice on source m aterials are given with initial assignm ents. Instructions
are le ss com plete when assignm ents recu r. W ork m ay be spot-checked during p ro gress.

Does not include em ployees p rim arily responsible for the management or supervision of
other electronic data processing (EDP) em ployees, or system s analysts p rim arily concerned with
scientific or engineering problem s.
For wage study purposes,

system s analysts are classified as follow s:

C lass A . W orks independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s
involving all phases of system s an alysis. P roblem s are com plex because of diverse sources
of input data and m u ltip le-u se requirem ents of output data. (For exam ple, develops an inte­
grated production scheduling, inventory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis record in
which every item of each type is automatically p ro cessed through the full system of records
and appropriate followup actions are initiated by the com puter.) Confers with persons con­
cerned to determ ine the data processing problem s and advises su b ject-m atter personnel on
the im plications of new or revised system s of data processing operations.
M akes reco m ­
m endations, if needed, for approval of m ajor system s installations or changes and for
obtaining equipment.
May provide functional
as sist.

direction to low er level system s analysts who are assigned to

C lass B . W orks independently or under only general direction on problem s that are
relatively uncomplicated to analyze, plan, program , and operate. P roblem s are of lim ited
com plexity because sources of input data are homogeneous and the output data are closely
related.
(For exam ple, develops system s for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank,

D R A FT SM A N - TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing cloth or paper over
drawings and tracing with pen or pencil.
(Does not include tracing lim ited to plans prim arily
consisting of straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation .)
an d/or
P repares sim ple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized item s.
during p ro g ress.

M AINTENANCE

P e rform s the carpentry duties n e cessary to construct and maintain in good repair building
woodwork and equipment such as bins, crib s, counters, benches, partitions, doors, flo o rs , sta irs,
casings, and trim made of wood in an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following: Planning
and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, m odels, or verbal instructions using a variety




W ork is clo sely supervised

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (Registered)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general m edical direction to ill or
injured em ployees or other persons who becom e ill or suffer an accident on the p re m ises of a
factory or other establishm ent. Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of em ployees1 injuries; keeping records
of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or other purposes; assisting in
physical examinations and health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and c a rr y ­
ing out program s involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment,
or other activities affecting the health, w elfare, and safety of all personnel.

M A IN T E N A N C E A N D
CAR PE N TER ,

BUSINESS— Continued

maintaining accounts receivable in a retail establishm ent, or maintaining inventory accounts
in a manufacturing or. w holesale establishm ent.) Confers with persons concerned to determine
the data processing problem s and advises subject-m atter personnel on the im plications of the
data processing system s to be applied.

POW ERPLANT

C A R P E N T E R , M AINTENANCE— Continued
of carp enter's handtools, portable power tools, and standard m easuring instrum ents; making
standard shop computations relating to dim ensions of work; and selecting m aterials n ecessary
for the work. In general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

18
E L E C T R IC IA N ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

M ECH AN IC,

P e rform s a variety of electrical trade functions such as the installation, maintenance,
or repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric energy in an
establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of
electrical equipment such as gen erators, tra n sfo rm e rs, sw itchboards, con trollers, circuit break­
e r s , m o to rs, heating units, conduit sy ste m s, or other tran sm ission equipment; working from
blueprints, drawings, layouts, or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the
electrical system or equipment; working standard computations relating to load requirem ents of
wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of electrician 's handtools and m easuring ahd
testing instrum ents. In general, the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded train­
ing and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and m ay also supervise the operation of stationary engines and
equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the establishm ent in which employed with power,
heat, refrigeration , or air-conditioning.
Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment
such as steam engines, air co m p re sso rs, gen erators, m otors, turbines, ventilating and re fr ig ­
erating equipment, steam boilers and b o ile r-fe d water pumps; making equipment rep airs; and
keeping a record of operation of m achinery, tem perature, and fuel consumption. May also su­
pervise these operations. Head or chief engineers in establishm ents employing m ore than one
engineer are excluded.
FIR EM A N . STATION AR Y BOILER
F ire s stationary boilers to furnish the establishm ent in which employed with heat, power,
or steam . Feeds fuels to fire by hand or operates a mechanical stoker, or gas or oil burner;
and checks water and safety valves. M ay clean, oil, or a ssist in repairing boilerroom equipment.
H E L P E R , M AIN TENANCE TRADES
A s s is t s one or m ore w orkers in the skilled maintenance trad e s, by perform ing specific
or general duties of le s s e r sk ill, such as keeping a worker supplied with m aterials and tools;
cleaning .working area, machine, and equipment; assistin g journeyman by holding m aterials or
tools; and perform ing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeym an.
The kind of work the
helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade: In som e trades the helper is con­
fined to supplying, lifting, and holding m aterials and tools and cleaning working area s; and in
others he is perm itted to p erform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are
also perform ed by w orkers on a fu ll-tim e b a sis.
M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A TO R ,

TOOLROOM

Specializes in the operation of one or m ore types of machine to o ls, such as jig b o r ers,
cylindrical or surface grind ers, engine lathes, or m illing m achines, in the construction of
m achine-shop tools, gages, jig s , fixtures, or d ies. Work involves m ost of the following: Plan­
ning and perform ing difficult machining operations; processing item s requiring complicated setups
or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of precision m easuring instrum ents; selecting feed s,
speeds, tooling, and operation sequence; and making n ecessary adjustments during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dim ensions. May be required to recognize when tools need d r e s s ­
ing, to d ress tools, and to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating o ils . F or c r o s s ­
industry wage study purposes, m achine-tool operators, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing shops
are excluded from this classification.
MACHINIST, M AINTENANCE
Produces replacem ent parts and new parts in making repairs of m etal parts of m echan­
ical equipment operated in an establishm ent. W ork involves m ost of the following: Interpreting
written instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m a­
chinist's handtools and precision m easuring instrum ents; setting up and operating standard machine
tools; shaping of metal parts to close toleran ces; making standard shop computations relating to
dimensions of w ork, tooling, feed s, and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties
of the common m etals; selecting standard m a teria ls, pa rts, and equipment required for his work;
and fitting and assem bling parts into m echanical equipment. In general, the m achinist's work
norm ally requires a rounded training in m achine-shop practice usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

M E C H A N IC ,

A U T O M O T IV E

(M a in te n a n ce )

Repairs autom obiles, bu ses, m otortrucks, and tractors of an establishm ent. Work in­
volves m ost of the following: Examining automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
disassem bling equipment and perform ing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as
w renches, gages, d r ills , or specialized equipment in disassem bling or fitting parts; replacing
broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassem bling and installing




AU TOM O TIVE (Maintenance)---- Continued

the various assem b lies in the vehicle and making necessary adjustments; and alining w heels,
adjusting brakes and lights, or tightening body bolts.
In general, the work of the automotive
mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al appren­
ticeship or equivalent training and experience.
M ECH AN IC, M AINTENANCE
Repairs m achinery or m echanical equipment of an establishm ent.
Work involves most
of the following: Examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
dismantling or partly dismantling machines and perform ing repairs that m ainly involve the use
of handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items obtained
from stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a machine shop or sending of the
machine to a machine shop for m ajor rep airs; preparing written specifications for m ajor repairs
or for the production of parts ordered from machine shop; reassem bling m achines; and making
all n ecessary adjustments for operation. In general, the work of a maintenance mechanic r e ­
quires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience. Excluded from this classification are w orkers whose prim ary
duties involve setting up or adjusting m achines.
MILLW RIGHT
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dism antles and installs machines or
heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout are required. Work involves most of the fo l­
lowing: Planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using
a variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations relating to s tr e s s e s ,
strength of m aterials, and centers of gravity; alining and balancing of equipment; selecting stand­
ard tools, equipment, and parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order power
transm ission equipment such as drives and speed reducers.
In general, the m illw right's work
norm ally requires a rounded training and experience in the trade acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
OILER
Lu bricates, with oil or g rea se, the moving parts
equipment of an establishm ent.

or wearing surfaces

of mechanical

PA IN T ER , M AINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates w alls, woodwork, and fixtures of an establishment. Work in­
volves the following: Knowledge of surface peculiarities and types of paint required for different
applications; preparing surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler
in nail holes and in terstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush. May m ix colors, o ils,
white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency.
In general, the
work of the maintenance painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
P IP E F IT T E R ,

M AINTENANCE

Installs or repairs w ater, steam , gas, or other types of pipe and pipefittings in an
establishm ent. W ork involves m ost of the following:
Laying out of work and measuring to lo ­
cate position of pipe from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe
to correct lengths with chisel and hamm er or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machine; thread­
ing pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or pow er-driven m achines; assem bling
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating
to p re ssu res, flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard tests to determine whether
finished pipes m eet specifications. In general, the work of the maintenance pipefitter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. W orkers prim arily engaged in installing and repairing building sanita­
tion or heating system s are excluded.
PL U M B ER ,

M AIN TE N A N C E

Keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order. Work involves: Knowledge
of sanitary codes regarding installation of vents and traps in plumbing system ; installing or r e ­
pairing pipes and fixtures; and opening clogged drains with a plunger or p lu m b er's snake. In
general, the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
S H E E T -M E T A L W ORKER, M AINTENANCE
F a bricates, in stalls, and maintains in good repair the sheet-m etal equipment and fix ­
tures (such as machine guards, grease pans, shelves, lock ers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts,
m etal roofing) of an establishm ent.
Work involves m ost of the following: Planning and laying
out all types of sheet-m etal maintenance work from blueprints, m odels, or other specifications;
setting up and operating all available types of sheet-m etal working machines; using a variety of

19
S H E E T -M E T A L W ORKER,

M AINTENANCE---- Continued

TOOL AND DIE MAKER— Continued

handtools in cutting, bending, form ing, shaping, fitting, and assem bling; and installing sheetmetal articles as required. In general, the work of the maintenance sh eet-m etal worker requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.
TO O L AND DIE MAKER
(Die m aker; jig m aker; tool m aker; fixture m aker; gage maker)
Constructs and repairs m achine-shop tools, gages, jig s , fixtures or dies for forgings,
punching, and other m etal-form in g work.
Work involves m ost of the following: Planning and
laying out of work from m odels, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifications;

using a variety of tool and die m aker's handtools and precision measuring instruments; under­
standing of the working properties of common m etals and alloys; setting up and operating of
machine tools and related equipment; making n ecessary shop computations relating to dimensions
of work, speeds, feeds, and tooling of machines; heat-treating of metal parts during fabrication
as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities; working to close tolerances;
fitting and assem bling of parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances; and selecting appropriate
m aterials, tools, and p ro cesses. In general, the tool and die m aker's work requires a rounded
training in m achine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship
or equivalent training and experience.
v
For cross-in d u stry wage study purposes, tool and die makers in tool and die jobbing
shops are excluded from this classification.

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
GUARD AND W ATCHM AN
Guard. P e rfo rm s routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour, maintaining
ord er, using arm s or force where n ecessary.
Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate
and check on identity of em ployees and other persons entering.
Watchman. Makes rounds of prem ises periodically in protecting property against fire,
theft, and illeg al entry.
JANITOR,

P O R TE R , OR CLEANER

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares m erchandise for shipment, or receives and is responsible for incoming ship­
ments of merchandise or other m aterials. Shipping work involves: A knowledge of shipping
procedures, practices, routes, available means of transportation, and rate; and preparing r e c ­
ords of the goods shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges, and
keeping a file of shipping records. May direct or a ssist in preparing the merchandise for ship­
ment. Receiving work involves: Verifying or directing others in verifying the correctness of
shipments against bills of lading, invoices, or other records; checking for shortages and rejecting
damaged goods; routing m erchandise or m aterials to proper departments; and maintaining n eces­
sary records and file s.

(Sweeper; charwoman; janitress)
F or wage study purposes, w orkers are classified as follows:
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and w ashroom s, or
p re m ises of an office, apartment house, or com m ercial or other establishm ent. Duties involve
a combination of the following: Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing
chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing m etal fixtures
or trim m in gs; providing supplies and minor maintenance serv ice s; and cleaning lavatories, show­
e r s , and restroo m s. W orkers who specialize in window washing are excluded.
LABO R ER , M A T E R IA L HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper; w are­
houseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a w arehouse, manufacturing plant, store, or other establishment
whose duties involve one or m ore of the following: Loading and unloading various m aterials and
merchandise on or from freight c a rs , trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing m aterials or m erchandise in proper storage location; and transporting m aterials or
m erchandise by handtruck, car, or wheelbarrow. Longshorem en, who load and unload ships are
excluded.
ORDER FILLER
(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
F ills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored merchandise in accord­
ance with specifications on sales slip s, cu sto m ers' ord ers, or other instructions. M ay, inaddition
to filling orders and indicating item s filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing ord ers, requi­
sition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other related duties.

Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk

TRUCKDRIVER
D rives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport m aterials, m erchandise,
equipment, or men between various types of establishm ents such as: Manufacturing plants, freight
depots, w arehouses, wholesale and retail establishm ents, or between retail establishm ents and
cu sto m e rs' houses or places of business. May also load or unload truck with or without helpers,
make minor mechanical rep airs, and keep truck in good working order.
Driver - salesm en and
ove r-th e -ro ad drivers are excluded.
F or wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and type of equipment,
as follow s:
(T ra cto r-tra iler should be rated on the basis of trailer capacity.)
Truckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under IV2 tons)
Truckdriver, medium (IV 2 to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)

TRUCKER,

POWER

PA CK E R, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them in shipping con­
tainers, the specific operations perform ed being dependent upon the type, size , and number of
units to be packed, the type of container em ployed, and method of shipment. Work requires the
placing of items in shipping containers and m ay involve one or m ore of the following: Knowl­
edge of various items of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size
of container; inserting enclosures in container; using excelsior or other m aterial to prevent
breakage or damage; closing and sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying
data on container. Packers who also make wooden boxes or crates are excluded.




Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-pow ered truck or tractor to
transport goods and m aterials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other
establishm ent.

For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of truck, as follows:
T rucker, power (forklift)
T rucker, power (other than forklift)

A vailab le O n

Request-

The following areas are surveyed periodically for use in administering the Service Contract Act of 1965.
available at no cost while supplies last from any of the BLS regional offices shown on the inside front cover.

Abilene, Tex.
Alaska
Albany, Ga.
Alexandria, La.
Alpena, Standish, and Tawas City, Mich.
Amarillo, Tex.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Asheville, N.C.
Atlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.—
S.C.
Austin, T ex.
Bakersfield, Calif.
Baton Rouge, La.
Billings, Mont.
Biloxi, Gulfport, and Pascagoula, Miss.
Bridgeport, Norwalk, and Stamford, Conn.
Charleston, S.C.
Cheyenne, Wyo.
Clarksville, Term., and Hopkinsville, Ky.
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ga.—
Ala.
Crane, Ind.
Decatur, 111.
Dothan, Ala.
Duluth—
Superior, Minn.—
Wis.
Durham, N.C.
El Paso, Tex.
Eugene, Oreg.
Fargo—
Moorhead, N. Dak.—
Minn.
Fayetteville, N.C.
Fitchburg-^Leominster, Mass.
Fort Smith, Ark.—
Okla.
Frederick—
Hagerstown, M d.-P a.-W . Va.
Great Falls, Mont.
Greensborcr-Winston Salem—
High Point, N.C.
Harrisburg, Pa.
Hartford, Conn.
Huntsville, Ala.

Copies of public release

Knoxville, Tenn.
Laredo, Tex.
Las Vegas, Nev.
Lexington, Ky.
Lower Eastern Shore, Md.-Va.
Lynchburg, Va.
Macon, Ga.
Madison, Wis.
Marquette, Escanaba, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich
Meridian, Miss.
Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean and Somerset
Cos., N.J.
Mobile, Ala., and Pensacola, Fla.
Montgomery, Ala.
Nashville, Tenn.
New London—
Groton—
Norwich, Conn.
Northeastern Maine
Ogden, Utah
Orlando, Fla.
Oxnard—
Ventura, Calif.
Panama City, Fla.
Pine Bluff, Ark.
Portsmouth, N.H.—
Maine—
Mass.
Pueblo, Colo.
Reno, Nev.
Sacramento, Calif.
Salina, Kans.
Salinas—
Monterey, Calif.
Santa Barbara, Calif.
Shreveport, La.
Springfield-Chicopee—
Holyoke, Mass.—
Conn.
Stockton, Calif.
Tacoma, Wash.
Topeka, Kans.
Tucson, Ariz.
Valdosta, Ga.
Vallejcr-Napa, Calif.
Wichita Falls, Tex.
Wilmington, Del.—
N.J.—
Md.

The eleventh annual report on salaries for accountants, auditors, chief accountants, attorneys, job analysts, directors of personnel,
buyers, chemists, engineers, engineering technicians, draftsmen, and clerical employees. Order as BLS Bulletin 1693, National
Survey of Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical Pay, June 1970, $1.00 a copy, from the Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or any of its regional sales offices.




☆ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:

1971 0-432^68(34)

A rea W ag e

Surveys

A list of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A directory of area wage studies including more limited studies conducted at the
request of the Wage and hour Division of the Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins may be purchased from the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or from any of the BLS regional sales offices shown on the inside front cover.

Area
Akron, Ohio, July 1970-----------------------------------------------Albany—
Schenectady—
Troy, N .Y., Feb. 1970__________
Albuquerque, N. M ex., Mar. 19701___________________
Allentown—
Bethlehem—
Easton, Pa.—
N.J., May 1970 1_
Atlanta. Ga., May 1970 1 ______________________________
Baltimore, Md., Aug. 1970 1 __________________________
BeaumontrPort Arthur—
Orange, Tex., May 1970____
Binghamton, N.Y., July 1970_________________________
Birmingham, Ala., Mar. 1970________________________
Boise City, Idaho, Nov. 1970 1 ----------------------------------Boston, M ass., Aug. 1970 1 ___________________________
Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 1970 1 ____________________________
Burlington, Vt., Mar. 1970-----------------------------------------Canton, Ohio, May 1970 1 _____________________________
Charleston, W. Va., Apr. 1970 1 --------------------------------Charlotte, N.C., Jan. 1971____________________________
Chattanooga, Tenn.—
Ga., Sept. 1970 1 ________________
Chicago, 111., June 1970---------------------------------------------Cincinnati, Ohio^-Ky.—Ind., Feb. 1970________________
Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1970 1 _________________________
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1970 1 __________________________
Dallas, Tex., Oct. 1970 1 _____________________________
Davenport—
Rock Island—
Moline, Iowa—
111.,
Feb. 1971____________________________________________
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1970 1 ____________________________
Denver, Colo., Dec. 1970-------------------------------------------Des Moines, Iowa, May 1970 1 _______________________
Detroit, Mich., Feb. 1970____________________________
Fort Worth, Tex., Oct. 1970 1 ________________________
Green Bay, W is., July 1970 1 -------------------------------------Greenville, S.C., May 1970___________________________
Houston, Tex., Apr. 1970_____________________________
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1970 1 ________________________
Jackson, M iss., Jan. 1971 1 ___________________________
Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 19701 _______________________
Kansas City, Mo.-Kans., Sept. 1970 1 ________________
Lawrence—
Haverhill, Mass.—
N.H., June 1970 1 ---------Little Rock—
North Little Rock, Ark., July 1970 1 ____
Los Angeles—
Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa AnaGarden Grove, Calif., Mar. 1970___________________
Louisville, Ky.—
Ind., Nov. 1970_______________________
Lubbock, Tex., Mar. 1970 1 _________________ _________
Manchester, N.H., July 1970 1 _______________________
Memphis, Tenn.—
Ark., Nov. 1970_____________________
Miami, Fla., Nov. 1970 1 ______________________________
Midland and Odessa, Tex., Jan. 1971_________________
Milwaukee, W is., May 1970 1 _________________________
Minneapolis— Paul, Minn., Jan. 1971_______________
St.
l

Bulletin number
and price
1660-88,
1660-51,
1660-55,
1660-83,
1660-76,
1685-18,
1660-84,
1685-6,
1660-57,
1685-21,
16 85-11,
1685-43,
1660-53,
1660-81,
1660-68,
1685-48,
1685-10,
1660-90,
1660-49,
1685-28,
1685-33,
1685-22,

30 cents
30 cents
35 cents
35 cents
50 cents
50 cents
30 cents
30 cents
30 cents
35 cents
50 cents
50 cents
25 cents
35 cents
35 cents
30 cents
35 cents
60 cents
35 cents
50 cents
40 cents
50 cents

1685-51,
1685-45,
1685-41,
1660-73,
1660-58,
1685-25,
1685-4,
1660-79,
1660-67,
1685-31,
1685-39,
1685-37,
1685-16,
1660-82,
1685-1,

30 cents
40 cents
35 cents
35 cents
35 cents
35 cents
35 cents
30 cents
35 cents
40 cents
35 cents
35 cents
45 cents
35 cents
35 cents

1660-64,
1685-27,
1660-50,
1685-2,
1685-30,
1685-29,
1685-40,
1660-74,
1685-44,

45 cents
30 cents
35 cents
35 cents
30 cents
40 cents
30 cents
50 cents
40 cents

Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




Area
Muskegon—
Muskegon Heights, Mich., June 1970*____
Newark and Jersey City, N.J., Jan. 1971_____________
New Haven, Conn., Jan. 1971__________________________
New Orleans, La., Jan. 1971 1________________________
New York, N.Y., Apr. 1970 1__________________________
Norfolk—
Portsmouth and Newport News—
Hampton, Va., Jan. 1971 1 ---------------------------------------Oklahoma City, Okla., July 1970______________________
Omaha, Nebr.-Iowa, Sept. 1970 1 _____________________
Pater son—
Clifton—
Passaic, N.J., June 1970 1_________
Philadelphia, Pa.—
N.J., Nov. 1970____________________
Phoenix, Ariz., Mar. 1970 1---------------------------------------Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 1971 1---------------------------------------Portland, Maine, Nov. 1970___________________________
Portland, Oreg.-Wash., May 1970 1__________________
Providence—
Pawtucket—
Warwick, R.I.— ass.,
M
May 1970----------------------------------- -------------------------------Raleigh, N.C., Aug. 19701____________________________
Richmond, Va., Mar. 19701__________________________
Rochester, N.Y. (office occupations only),
Aug. 1970_____________________________________________
Rockford, 111., May 1970 1 ____________________________
St. Louis, Mo.—
111., Mar. 1970________________________
Salt Lake City, Utah, Nov. 1970 1_____________________
San Antonio, Tex., May 1970__________________________
San Bernardino—
Riverside—
Ontario, Calif.,
Dec. 1970 1___________________________________________
San Diego, Calif., Nov. 1970__________________________
San Francisco—
Oakland, Calif., Oct. 1970-----------------San Jose, Calif., Aug. 1970___________________________
Savannah, Ga., May 1970 1____________________________
Scranton, Pa., July 1970 1_____________________________
Seattle—
Everett, Wash., Jan. 1970____________________
Sioux Falls, S. Dak., Dec. 1970 1 _____________________
South Bend, Ind., Mar. 1970 1_________________________
Spokane, Wash., June 1970 1 _________________________
Syracuse, N .Y., July 1970____________________________
Tampar-St. Petersburg, Fla., Nov. 1970------------------ —
Toledo, Ohio-Mich., Feb. 1970_______________________
Trenton, N.J., Sept. 1970 1 ___________________________
Utica-Rome, N .Y., July 1970_________________________
Washington, D.C.—
Md.—
Va., Sept. 1969 1--------------------Waterbury, Conn., Mar. 1970 1_______________________
Waterloo, Iowa, Nov. 1970 1__________________________
Wichita, Kans., Apr. 1970 1 __________________________
Worcester, M ass., May 1970 1 _______________________
York, Pa., Feb. 1971__________________________________
Youngstown—
Warren, Ohio, Nov. 1970-------------------------

Bulletin number
and price
1660-85,
1685-47,
1685-35,
1685-36,
1660-89,

35cents
40cents
30cents
40cents
75cents

1685-46,
1685-5,
1685-14,
1660-87,
1685-34,
1660-70.
1685-49,
1685-19,
1660-77,

35cents
30cents
35cents
45cents
50cents
35cents
50cents
30cents
40cents

1660-72,
1685-12,
1660-65,

30cents
35cents
40cents

1685-7,
1660-75,
1660-66,
1685-26,
1660-71,

30cents
35cents
40cents
35cents
30cents

1685-42,
1685-20,
1685-23,
1685-13,
1660-80,
1685-3,
1660-52,
1685-38,
1660-62,
1660-86,
1685-8,
1685- 17,
1660-56,
1685- 15,
1685-9,
1660-19,
1660-54,
1685-32,
1660-69,
1660-78,
1685-50,
1685-24,

40cents
30cents
40cents
30cents
35cents
35cents
30cents
35cents
35cents
35cents
30cents
30 cents
30cents
35cents
30cents
50cents
35cents
35cents
35cents
35cents
30cents
30cents

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W A SHING TO N, D.C.

20212

O F F IC IA L BUSINESS
PE N A LTY FOR P R IV A TE USE, $300




POSTAGE A N D FEES PAID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
FIRST CLASS MAIL

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