View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

^

a

:

/9< 7& - o ? # ’

Area Wage Survey
Canton, Ohio, Metropolitan Area, May 1976
Bulletin 1900-28
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Preface
T h is b u lle tin p r o v id e s r e s u lt s o f a M a y 1976
s u r v e y o f o c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s in the C a n ton , O h io ,
S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a t is t ic a l A r e a ( C a r r o l l and
S ta rk C o u n t ie s , O h io ).
T h e s u r v e y w a s m a d e as
p a r t o f th e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s ' a nn ual a r e a
w a g e s u r v e y p r o g r a m , w h ic h is d e s ig n e d to y ie ld
d a ta f o r in d iv id u a l m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s a s w e ll as
n a t io n a l and r e g io n a l e s t im a t e s f o r a ll S ta n d a rd
M e t r o p o lit a n S t a t is t ic a l A r e a s in the U n ited S ta te s ,
e x c lu d in g A la s k a and H a w a ii.
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in th e a r e a w a g e
s u r v e y p r o g r a m is th e n e e d to d e s c r i b e th e l e v e l and
m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s in a v a r ie t y o f l a b o r m a r k e t s ,
th ro u g h th e a n a ly s is o f (1 ) th e l e v e l and d is t r ib u t io n
o f w a g e s b y o c c u p a t io n , and (2 ) the m o v e m e n t o f
w a g e s b y o c c u p a t io n a l c a t e g o r y and s k ill l e v e l . T h e
p r o g r a m d e v e lo p s in fo r m a t io n that m a y be u s e d f o r
m a n y p u r p o s e s , in c lu d in g w a g e and s a la r y a d m in ­
is t r a t io n , c o l l e c t i v e b a r g a in in g , and a s s i s t a n c e in
d e t e r m in in g p la n t l o c a t io n . S u r v e y r e s u lt s a ls o a r e
u s e d b y the U .S . D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r to m a k e
w a g e d e t e r m in a t io n s u n d e r the S e r v ic e C o n t r a c t A c t
o f 1965.




C u r r e n t ly , 84 a r e a s a r e in c lu d e d in the p r o ­
g r a m . (S ee l i s t o f a r e a s on in s id e b a c k c o v e r . ) In
e a c h a r e a , o c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s da ta a r e c o l l e c t e d
a n n u a lly .
I n fo r m a t io n on e s t a b lis h m e n t p r a c t i c e s
and s u p p le m e n t a r y w a g e b e n e fit s is o b ta in e d e v e r y
t h ir d y e a r .
E a c h y e a r a ft e r a ll in d iv id u a l a r e a w a g e
s u r v e y s h a v e b e e n c o m p le t e d , tw o s u m m a r y b u lle tin s
a r e i s s u e d . T h e f i r s t b r in g s t o g e t h e r d a ta f o r e a c h
m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s u r v e y e d ; th e s e c o n d p r e s e n t s
n a t io n a l and r e g io n a l e s t im a t e s , p r o je c t e d f r o m in d i­
v id u a l m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a d a ta .
T h e C a n ton s u r v e y w a s c o n d u c te d b y the
B u r e a u 's r e g io n a l o f f i c e in C h ic a g o , 111., u n d e r the
g e n e r a l d ir e c t i o n o f L o is L . O r r , A s s is t a n t R e g io n a l
C o m m i s s i o n e r f o r O p e r a t io n s .
T h e s u r v e y c o u ld n o t
h a v e b e e n a c c o m p lis h e d w ith o u t th e c o o p e r a t io n o f
th e m a n y f i r m s w h o s e w a g e a nd s a la r y da ta p r o v id e d
th e b a s is f o r th e s t a t is t ic a l' in fo r m a t io n in th is
b u lle t in .
T h e B u re a u w is h e s to e x p r e s s s i n c e r e
a p p r e c ia t io n f o r the c o o p e r a t io n r e c e i v e d .

Bulletin 1900-28

Area W age Survey:
Canton, Ohio,

August 1976

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, W. J. Usery, Jr., Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

Metropolitan Area
M ay 1976

Contents

Page

In tro d u ctio n __________________________________________

2

Page
A p p e n d ix A .
A p p e n d ix B .

S c o p e and m e th o d o f s u r v e y ________
O c c u p a tio n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s ___________

11
14

T a b le s :
A.

E a rn in g s :
A - l . W e e k ly e a rn in g s o f o f f i c e w o r k e r s . . .
A - 2 . W e e k ly e a rn in g s o f p r o f e s s io n a l
and t e c h n ic a l w o r k e r s _______________
A - 3 . A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f o f f i c e ,
p r o f e s s io n a l, and t e c h n ic a l
w o r k e r s , b y s e x _____________________
A - 4 . H o u r ly e a rn in g s o f m a in te n a n c e ,
t o o l r o o m , and p o w e rp la n t
w o r k e r s ._______________________________
A - 5 . H o u r ly e a rn in g s o f m a t e r ia l
m o v e m e n t and c u s t o d ia l
w o r k e r s ________________________________
A - 6 . A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f
m a in ten a n ce-, t o o l r o o m , p o w e r p la n t, m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t, and
c u s t o d ia l w o r k e r s , b y s e x ___________
A - l . P e r c e n t in c r e a s e s in a v e r a g e
h o u r ly e a rn in g s f o r s e le c t e d
o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p s , a d ju ste d
f o r e m p lo y m e n t s h i f t s ________________




3
5

6

7

8

9

10

1

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D. C. 20402, GPO Bookstores, or BLS Regional
Offices listed on back cover. Price 55 cents. Make checks payable to
Superintendent of Documents.




Introduction
T h is a r e a is 1 o f 84 in w h ic h th e U .S.
D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r 's B u re a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s
c o n d u c ts s u r v e y s o f o c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s and r e ­
la t e d b e n e fit s .
In th is a r e a , d a ta w e r e o b ta in e d b y
a c o m b in a t io n o f p e r s o n a l v i s i t , m a il q u e s t io n n a ir e ,
a n d te le p h o n e in t e r v ie w .
R e p r e s e n t a t iv e e s t a b lis h ­
m e n ts w ith in s ix b r o a d in d u s t r y d iv is io n s w e r e c o n ­
ta c t e d :
M a n u fa c tu r in g ; t r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a ­
tio n ,
and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s ; w h o le s a le t r a d e ;
T e t a il t r a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ;
and s e r v ic e s .
M a jo r in d u s t r y g r o u p s e x c lu d e d f r o m
t h e s e s tu d ie s a r e g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t io n s and the
c o n s t r u c t io n and e x t r a c t iv e in d u s t r ie s .
E s t a b lis h ­
m e n ts h av in g f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f
w o r k e r s a r e o m itt e d b e c a u s e o f in s u f fic ie n t e m p lo y ­
m e n t in th e o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d .
S e p a r a te ta b u la ­
t io n s a r e p r o v id e d f o r e a c h o f the b r o a d in d u s t r y
d iv is io n s w h ic h m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .

( c ) m a in te n a n c e , t o o l r o o m , and p o w e r p la n t , and (d)
m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t and c u s t o d ia l.
In th e 31 l a r g e s t
s u r v e y a r e a s , ta b le s A - l a th r o u g h A - 6 a p r o v id e
s i m i l a r data f o r e s t a b lis h m e n t s e m p lo y in g 500 w o r k ­
e rs or m ore.
T a b le A - 7 p r o v id e s p e r c e n t ch a n g e s in a v ­
e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s ,
e l e c t r o n i c d a ta p r o c e s s i n g
w o r k e r s , in d u s t r ia l
n u rses,
s k ille d m a in te n a n c e t r a d e s w o r k e r s , and
u n s k ille d p la n t w o r k e r s .
W h e r e p o s s i b l e , da ta a r e
p r e s e n t e d f o r a ll in d u s t r ie s , m a n u fa c tu r in g , and
n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g .
T h is ta b le p r o v id e s a m e a s u r e o f
w a g e tr e n d s a ft e r e lim in a t io n o f c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e
e a r n in g s c a u s e d b y e m p lo y m e n t s h ift s a m o n g e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t s a s w e ll a s t u r n o v e r o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s in ­
c lu d e d in s u r v e y s a m p le s .
F o r fu r t h e r d e t a ils , s e e
a p p e n d ix A .
A p p e n d ix e s

A - s e r i e s ta b le s
A p p e n d ix A d e s c r i b e s the m e th o d s a nd c o n ­
c e p t s u s e d in the a r e a w a g e s u r v e y p r o g r a m and
p r o v id e s in fo r m a t io n on th e s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .

T a b le s A - 1 th r o u g h A - 6 p r o v id e e s t im a t e s
o f s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly o r h o u r ly e a r n in g s f o r w o r k ­
e r s in o c c u p a t io n s c o m m o n to a v a r ie t y o f m a n u ­
f a c t u r in g and n o n m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s .
O ccu pa­
tio n s w e r e s e l e c t e d f r o m the fo llo w in g c a t e g o r i e s :
(a ) O f fic e c l e r i c a l , (b) p r o f e s s i o n a l an d t e c h n ic a l,

A p p e n d ix B p r o v id e s jo b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d
b y B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m is t s to c l a s s i f y w o r k e r s b y
o c c u p a t io n .

2

A.

E a rn in g s

T a b le A -1.

W e e k ly e a rn in g s o f o ffic e w o rk e rs in C a n to n , O h io , M a y 1 9 7 6
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Number of w orkers receiving straight-tim e weekly earnings of—
s

s

$

3

all

Number
of
workeis

S

$

$

s

1

1

S

s

90

95

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

i7o

leu

19o

200

210

220

240

260

28 0

300

"5--320

90

Occupation and industry division

Average
weekly
hours*
[standard)

95

100.

HO

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

20 0

21 0

220

240

26 0

280

30 0

320

340

-

-

3
3

8
8

19
4
15

30
14
16

33
14
19

41
19
22

41
30
11

32
20
12

29
23
6

13
6
5

31
25
6

23
13
10

19
9
10

32
17
15

17
13
4

4
3
1
1

3
3
-

3
3
-

1
1
-

10
10

1
*

3
3

1

1
1

3
3

5
5

2
1

2
1

•

.

-

*

-

-

•

1
1

85
Mean *

Median*

Middle range*

and
under

workers

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

38 2
21 9
163

39.5
40 . 0
39.5

$
17 3 . 0 0
1 6 1 . SO
16 1. 00

$
16 5. 50
17 4 . 0 0
14 9 . 5 0

$
$
140.50-201.50
153.00-204.00
129.00-198.00

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S A --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

30
25

39 . 5
40 . 0

18 4 . 0 0
18 2 . 5 0

1 7 6. 50
17 5 . 0 0

155.50-211.50
155.50-211.50

•

•

•

•

*

-

-

1
1

1

-

*

-

-

SECRETARIES,

C L A S S B --------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

76
54

39 . 5
40 . 0

17 5. 00
18 3. 50

1 6 7. 00
1 7 4. 50

144.50-196.50
1 4 5 . 0 0 - 2 0 2 . SO

-

•

-

1

-

-

*

1
1

3
1

6
4

21
12

1
1

7
4

6
5

2
“

13
12

3
3

1
1

4
3

5
5

1
1

*

-

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

131
71
60

39.5
39 . 5
39.5

19 0. 00
19 9. 50
17 9 . 0 0

18 8. 50
19 2. 50
17 5. 50

158.00-226.00
166.50-227.00
138.00-224.00

-

-

*

1
1

5
5

4
•
4

11
3
8

7
3
4

8
7
1

16
10
6

8
6
2

7
5
2

13
10
3

5
3
2

8
3
5

20
7
13

9
6
3

3
2
1

3
3
-

3
3
-

-

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S 0 --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

144
69
75

39 .5
39 . 5
39 . 5

15 4 . 0 0
16 1. 00
14 7 . 0 0

15 0. 00
15 6. 00
1 3 9. 00

124.00-177.50
135.00-178.50
120.00-166.00

.
-

-

6

23
13
10

15
6
9

12
4
8

21
12
9

8
6
2

12
9
3

4
2
2

12
4
8

5
•
5

6
6
-

1
1
-

•

-

-

•
-

•

-

13
3
10

3
3

-

3
3

-

-

102
46
56

40 . 0
40 . 0
40 . 0

15 9. 00
15 2. 50
16 4. 00

1 4 5. 00
14 4. 50
14 5. 00

132.0r-176.50
119.00-168.00
1 3 9 . 5 0 - 1 9 2 . SO

.
-

-

3
2
1

10
9
1

7
3
4

13
2
11

20
5
15

8
4
4

10
7
3

3
3

2
-

1
1

-

2

6
6

-

-

2

6
1
5

8

m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------

-

2

-

8

•
-

•
*

•
-

-

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , S E N I O R ------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

147
98
49

39 . 5
39 .5
39 .5

15 7.00
14 9. 50
17 2. 00

15 7. 50
1 4 0. 00
1 7 3. 00

125.5P-178.50
123.50-174.00
167.00-189.50

•

•

-

12
12
-

13
12
1

6
6
-

8
4
4

29
9
20

12
7
5

9
6
3

3
3

1
1

7
3
4

2

-

•

“

18
18
-

-

-

25
17
8

.

-

-

-

*

-

-

C L A S S A ----------------------

36

40.0

17 5. 00

1 6 7. 00

141.00-215.50

-

-

-

2

1

2

2

6

4

3

2

-

-

-

6

8

-

-

-

-

-

C L A S S B ---------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

81
63

39 . 5
40 . 0

13 1. 00
12 4. 50

1 2 3. 50
1 1 8. 00

112.50-137.00
107.00-131.00

17
17

15
11

16
13

2
-

1
-

_

4
4

-

-

-

-

*

2
-

-

-

3
-

2

-

14
13

-

-

5
5

-

*

*

*

*

-

-

-

s e c r e t a r i e s ----------------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

STENOGRAPHERS,

TYPISTS,

G E N E R A L ---------------

TYPISTS,

-

6
3
3

*
2
2

C L A S S B -----------------

27

39 . 5

14 0.00

1 2 3. 00

115.00-181.00

-

-

1

2

10

3

2

-

-

2

S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B ---n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------

32
27

38 . 5
38 .0

12 9.50
12 5. 00

11 2. 00
1 1 2. 00

100.00-148,50
100.00-146.50

•

_

-

2
2

10
10

6
5

2
-

2
2

3
3

1
1

1
*

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSm a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

96
81

39 .5
39 . 5

13 8. 50
14 2.00

1 3 6. 50
1 3 7. 00

121.0C-150.00
126.5C-151.50

.

-

4

-

8
*

3

-

1

4

23
23

24
22

10
9

7
7

1
1

10
10

2
“

-

-

-

10

14

14

1

-

-

12

-

_

12
12

14
8

21
17

17
5

14
8

6

4

18
9
9

12

6

7
7
-

19
19
-

i*
13
1

FILE CLERKS,

*

38 . 5

13 1. 00

1 2 1. 00

112.00-160.00

210
151
59

39 . 5
40.0
39 . 5

18 0,50
19 2. 50
14 9. 00

1 7 3. 00
18 3. 00
1 3 8. 00

1 3 5 . O P - 2 1 4 . 00
148.00-226.50
110.00-151.50

A C C O U N T I N G C L E R K S , C L A S S B --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

24 9
141
108

39 .5
40 . 0
39.0

14 6.00
16 1.50
12 5.50

13 2. 50
14 5. 00
12 1. 00

117.5C-168.00
127.50-186.00
114.00-134.50

8

•

5

12

44

-

6

9

13
10

17
14

-

6

10
34

30
22

8

4
1

48
23
25

22

-

8

13

3

3

10
5
5

39
29

39 . 5
39 .5

12 0.50
11 0.00

1 1 6. 00
11 2. 00

108.50-141.50
102.00-116.00

1
1

2
2

7
7

17
17

1
1

1
1

4

4

2

-

B O OK KE EP IN G- MA CH IN E OPERATORS,
C L A S S B --------------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------

-

•
-

Se e footnotes at end of tables.




3

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

A C C O U N T I N G C L E R K S , C L A S S A --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

O R D E R C L E R K S ---------------------------

-

2

-

•

-

-

-

.

*

*

*

1
*

“

*

-

3

_

-

-

3

1
1

-

*

*

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

o

13
12
1

6

11
11
*

3

1

16
15
1

12
12
*

6

1

3

-

3

-

4
4

*

*

*

-

-

-

b
i

1

5

3

6

12
12
“

-

-

6

-

_

*
-

-

*

*

-

-

-

17
n

4

-

4

*

*

-

-

-

*
*

*

“

-

-

*

*

-

T a b le A -1.

W e e k ly e a rn in g s o f o ffic e w o rk e rs in C a n to n , O h io , M a y 1 9 7 6 — C o n tin u e d
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

s

s

$

Number of w orkers receiving straight-tim e weekly earnings of—
S
" "5
S
$
$
S
$
S
S
S
S

$

S

S

" V

1

S

S

workeis

90

95

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

240

260

280

300

320

90

Occupation and industry division

95

100

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

22p, . 240

260

280

300

320

340

1
1

-

1
1

•

12
12

•

•

-

3
3

6

-

6

-

-

8
5

10
6

3
3

3
3

4
2

.

•

•

*

1
1

*

-

2
2

-

•

-

-

•

-

13
13

-

-

-

-

85
Mean *

Median *

Middle range*

and
under

ALL W O R K E R S —
continued
$

$

12 2 . 0 0

11 6. 00

106.00-133.00

*

8

10

17

4

3

*

12

1 8 7. 50
i 9 5. 50

16 0 . 0 0
17 5. 50

136.50-265.50
147.50-265.50

.

_

-

-

*

2
2

6
3

9
5

6
6

7
6

3
3

7
7

1

-

1
1

40 . 0
40 . 0

16 9 . 5 0
16 7. 50

1 6 4. 00
1 6 3. 00

129.50-201.P0
125.50-202.00

-

•

-

*

17
13

4
3

9
7

“

5
4

6
3

3

“

3
3

3

*

l
l

2

39 . 5
39 . 5

13 5 . 0 0
14 9 . 0 0
12 2. 50

12 2 . 0 0
13 5. 50

109.50-141.50
120.00-162.00

-

-

1
1

38
4

28
12

25
16

20
10

14
7

3

3

4

2

2

2

2

1

1

P A Y P O L L C L E R K S ---------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------

65
57

40 . 0
40 .0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS. CLASS A
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------

80
56

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS b
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G — -------

153
71

o

54

-m a c h i n e

o

B I L L E R S ----

billing

$

$

See footnotes at end of tables.




4

1

-

-

T a b le A -2 .

W e e k ly e a rn in g s o f p ro fe s s io n al and te c h n ic a l w o rk e rs in C a n to n , O h io , M a y 19 7 6
W e e k l y e a r n in g s

1

N um ber of w ork ers

(sta n d a rd )
N um ber

Occupation and industry division

of
w orkers

S

s

h ou rs1
M ean 2

(standard)

M e d ia n

^

M id d le r a n g e 2

$

I

%

5

s

r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—

$

s

n o

120

13 0

140

15 0

160

18 0

200

120

13 0

140

150

16 0

180

200

220

S

s

100

S

$

$

$

t

$

$

i

S

220

24 j

260

280

300

320

340

360

300

400

420

240

26u

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

420

440

3

90

w e e k ly

s

4

6

12

13

10

and
under

100

n o

$
o

21

$

$

311.50

288.00

274.50-364.00

©

systems analysts
(B US IN ES S) . c l a s s e ) -----

o

ALL WORKERS
computer

289.50

279.00

257.00-309.00

221.50

$

55

>*

C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M M E R S ( B US IN ES S) ,
C L A S S R ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------

53
37

40.0
40.0

211.00

218.50
216.50

198.00-231.00
195.50-230.00

-

-

•

*

-

-

3

1
1

10
8

11

11

2

1
1

COMPUTER OPERATORS,

41

40.0

223.00

207.50

184.00-283.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

3

10

5

3

4

1

CLASS A

o

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS),
C L A S S A -----------------------------

3

3

2

1

1

-

_

1

1

m

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

.

7

1

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

•

_

-

-

-

*

*

5
5

17
17

2

*

8
8

9

-

“

-

-

.

•

•

-

-

-

9
9

19
19

16

•

1
1

14
9

“

-

-

“

-

-

-

2
2

2

2

7

7

29

-

9
9

-

-

-

2

1

3

1

10

8

1

-

-

-

-

•

3
3

9
9

7
7

-

-

l

-

3

DRAFTERS. CLASS A
MANUFACTURING -

103
91

40.0
40.0

270.50
270.00

267.50
262.50

243.50-304.50
234.50-308.50

-

-

-

-

*

"

DRAFTERS, CLASS 0
MANUFACTURING -

127
103

40.0
40.0

239.50
238.00

243.50
242.00

212.00-273.50
191.00-275.00

•

-

_

-

-

DRAFTERS, CLASS C
MANUFACTURING -

100

40.0
40.0

193.00
191.50

194.03
194.00

178.00-211.00
149.50-235.50

•

.

-

170.50

171.50

160.00-193.00

229.00
227.50

222.50

195.00-265.50
194.50-265.50

O

4

1

-

1

o

2

9

-

138.00-145.00

See footnotes at end of tables.




7

1

156.50-200.00

138.00

221.00

-

3

184.00

145.50

40.0
40.0

“

2

106.50

40.0

26

4

4

40.0

33

44
43

2

5

31

CLASS C

REGISTERED INDUSTRIAL NURSES
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

5

-

4

CLASS b

COMPUTER OPERATORS,

DRAFTER-TPACERS

16

1

17

COMPUTER OPERATORS,

49

14

-

1

5

2

1
1

6

•

1

6

12
25
4

1

IP

1/

20

12
6

11
10

20

21

23

4
4

11

22

18

8
8

10
10

7
7

2

12

2

12

20

1
1

•

9

*

1

2
2

T a b le A - 3 .

A v e ra g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f o ffic e , p ro fessio n al, and te c h n ic a l w o rk e rs , by sex,

in C a n to n , O h io , M a y 1 9 7 6
A vera ge

A v era g e

Sex,

3

occupation, and industry division

of

W e e k ly

OFFICE

OCCUPATIONS

-

h ou rs1

Sex, 3 occupation, an d industry division

v L A ji

MEN

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED

39.5

h o u rs *

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

e a r n in g s ^

of

W e e k ly

(s ta n d a rd )

w orkers

W e e k ly

h o u rs 1

e a r n in g s 1

[sta n d a rd )

(s ta n d a rd )

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED

-

A

44

W e e k ly

W e e k ly
(s ta n d a rd )

(s ta n d a rd )

$
f

of
w orkers

e a r n in g s 1

[s ta n d a rd )

A vvU w ri | JN u

N um ber

N um ber
W e e k ly

w o ik e n

A vera ge
(m e a n 2 )

(m e a n 2 )

(m e a n 2 )
N um ber

I_— $

254.50

13 1

•0

$
135.00

0
82

OFFICE

OCCUPATIONS

-

WOMEN
32

382

39.5

163

-------------------------------------------------------------------

OPERATORS,

CLASS

vL Aj b

182.50

76

U

138.50

OCCUPATIONS

v

L l .K i ' 1

“

-

MEN

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS
CLASS A

(BUSINESS),

COMPUTER

" " " "

(BUSINESS)9

48

, , ,

175.00

ACCOUNTING

C L E “ KSt

CLASS

A

H AnU r A v 1U K l i ’ U
1 L «? ?

129.5°

39e5

25
h

-----------

173.00

U K U tK

3 t v n u 1A

B

38.5

39*5

SWITCHBOARD
SECRETARIES

" "

M A n U r A w 1 U K 1 IN
U

PROGRAMMERS

"■

" "

M A ~ U r A w •U K 1 1 u
“

j t w N t 1A K 1 1

j

f

1 AH 1 L «j t

wLA

v

j j

L Aj j

U

131
71
60

J *"

144
69
75

U

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

108

154.00|
161.00
147.00

39.0

39
29

199.50
179.00

39.5
39.5

125.50

1L R 5

9

wL

As*

122.00
172.50
180.00

79
55

169.50
167.50

PROFESSIONAL
1U K ir»U m m m mm- 1 ■

■

■

149.50
172.00|

K t w l3 1L K tU

28

See

fo o tn o te s




at

end

40.0

m

120.50
110.00

55
47

- :___ .
164.00

n A r iU r A w

A

OPERATORS.

54
102

D K A f1

91
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE
CLASS B - "

AND

ilN U w j 1 K 1 A L

TECHNICAL

N U n it

j

""
42

162.50

o f ta b le s .

6

40.0

228.50

T a b le A - 4 .

H o u rly e a rn in g s o f m a in te n a n c e , to o lro o m , and p o w e rp la n t w o rk e rs in C a n to n , O h io , M a y 1 9 7 6
N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings *

- 1 - 1- 1-- 1
Mean2

Un d e r

Median2

S

3.70

5

4.20 4.40

5

5

s

s

s

$

s

$

s

I

S

S

1------- 5------- 1------

4.60

5

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.40

6.60

6.80

7.00

7.20

7.60

8.00

5.00

5.20

5.40

7.60

8.00

8.40

-

1
1

1
1

3.80

3.90

4.00

3,90

4.00

4.20

4.4Q

4,60

4.80

-

3.70

Occupation an d industry division

S

-

*

-

-

•

an d
under
3,aq

5,60

5.80

6.80

7.00

7.

20

6.00

6.20

6.40

6,60

14
4

2
2

-

“

-

5
5

4

-

4

6
6

8
8

13
13

24
18

37
37

-

16
16

29
17

12
12

32
32

76
76

60
60

“

-

-

5
5

2
2

23
23

1
1

57
57

•

82
82

60
60

110

13
1
12
12

13
13

-

•

-

-

15
15

91
91

•

•

29
29

ALL W O R K E R S
$

$

$

$

----------------------

44
34

6 .8 7
7 .1 0

7 .0 0
7 .5 8

6 .0 8 6 .1 1 -

7 .9 8
7 .9 8

*

m a i n t e n a n c e e l e c t r i c i a n s -----------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

390
372

6 .7 3
6 .7 3

6 .8 2
6 .8 2

5 .9 6 5 .9 1 -

7 .8 6
7 .8 6

-

-

4
4

*

19
19

5
5

11
11

•

*

m a c h i n i s t s --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

137
137

6 •88
6 .8 8

7 .4 7
7 .4 7

5 .7 2 5 .7 2 -

8 .0 1
8 .0 1

•

•

•

-

.

•

*

*

-

*

*

-

16
16

2
2

M A I N T E N A N C E M E C H A N I C S ( M AC HI NE RY ) M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

614
614

6 .6 5
6 .6 5

6 .5 8
6 .5 8

5 .5 7 5 .5 7 -

7 .9 8
7 .9 8

•

2
2

3
3

2
2

8
8

2
2

2
2

1
1

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS
(M OTOR V E H I C L E S ) --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------

170
73
97
80

5 .9 9

5
5
5
5

6
6
6
6

-

-

8
8

1
1

-

-

6 .0 0

5
6
5
5

9

6 .0 0
5 .9 8

-

-

*

-

M A I N T E N A N C E P I P E F I T T E R S ------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

181
171

7 .0 9
7 .1 4

7 .8 5
7 .8 5

6 .1 4 6 .2 1 -

7 .9 8
7 .9 8

•

_

-

-

_

-

*

*

*

*

*

*

77
77

6 .5 9
6 .5 9

6 .0 3
6 .0 3

5 .6 4 5 .6 4 -

7 .8 5
7 .8 5

3

DI E M A K E R S -----------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

252
252

6 .5 8
6 .5 8

6 .5 1
6 .5 1

6 .2 6 6 .2 6 -

7 .1 5
7 .1 5

5
5

S T A T I O N A R Y e n g i n e e r s ----------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

86
84

7 .1 9
7 .2 2

8 .0 1
8 .0 1

6 .0 8 6 .3 2 -

8 .0 1
8 .0 1

B O I L E R T E N D E R S ------------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

44

5 .7 3

44

5. 7 3

5 .5 9
5 .5 9

5 .3 4 5 .3 4 -

6 .8 4
6 .8 4

MAINTENANCE CARPENTERS ----------manufacturing

maintenance

.9 0
.1 9
.7 5
.7 5

.5
.4
.7
.7

5
0
5
5

-

.3
.4
.3
.3

6
9
6
6

I
M I L L W R I G H T S ----------------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------TOOL a n d

•

-

"t

•

_

13
13

19
19

2
2

5
5

6
6

12
12

1
1

21
21

65
65

57
57

27
27

17
17

16
16

55
55

47
47

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

19
14
5
3

35
2
33
33

16
3
13
2

29
14

-

6
2
4

5
2

-

15
15

12
8
4
4

-

1
1

20
20

1
1

1
8
8

3
3

1
1

“

9
9

1
1

10

-

-

_

3

“
16
16

-

6
6

3
3

3
3

13

26
26

1
1

47
47

1
1

9
9

.

2
2

11
11

1
1

*5

13

5

13

4
4

7

W o r k e r s w e r e at $3.40 to $3.50.




7

36
36

.
•

-

-

-

-

10
7

4
4

•

-

-

39
39

8
8

6

-

-

-

-

-

39
39

81
81

10
10

1
1

_

9
7

-

4
4

-

9
9

-

*

-

8
8

9
9

See footnotes at end of tables.

14

•

6

8
8
'

*

_

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

5

-

5
5
5

n o

-

22
22
45
45

T a b le A - 5 .

H o u rly e a rn in g s o f m a te ria l m o v e m e n t and c u s to d ia l w o rk e rs in C a n to n , O h io , M a y 1 9 7 6
Hourly earnings *

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Occupation and industry division

Mean2

ALL W O R K E R S
69 5

$

Median*

$

Middle range *

$
$
5 . 3 9 - 6. 4 0

MMi'llJr nU 1UK A■>

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------

288

5 .4 0

5 ,0 (}

$ , 20

5 ,4 0

5

55
50
5

17
7
10

25
21
4

S

S

S

S

S

S

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

S
3 .2 0

S

2 .6 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 . 00

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

s
4 .8 0

U n d e r arrH
s
under
2 .4 0
2 .5 0 2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 . 20

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 ,8 0

-

-

-

-

30
6
24

2
2

-

8
8

13
13

*

-

21
10
11

6. 10

6. 1 1

5 . 5 0 - 7. 2 1

2
2

-

-

*

“

-

-

-

•

-

“

*

-

-

-

*

•

-

*

19 2

6.39

.

•

“

“

“

6.39
5.78

24

-

-

1
1

6
6

1
1

*

.

2
2
2
2

4
4

6 . 3 9 - 6. 4 0

5 . 6 0 - 7. 21
4 . 8 0 - 6. 4 0

'**

*

*

2
1
1
2
1

_

4
4

T R U C K D R I V E R S ♦ HEAVY TRUCK

1 --------- T ------7 .0 0 7 .4 0

6 .2 0

6 . 60

6 <20

6 .6 0

7 . 09

7 ,4 Q

over

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

52
11
41

224
222
2

4

126
126

-

-

-

-

*

*

•

_

•

*

*

1

126

*

10
6

*

3
3

6
6

1
1

2
2

5
4

4
4

161
161

12
2
10

3
3
*

85
44
41

35
4
31

57
55
2

*

*

-

7
7

_
-

33
33

-

114
53
61

13
8
9
9

-

.

,en

3
1

-

•

-

-

-

1

126

•

2o

-

4

-

19

6

-

■
*

8

1 MAN 1KAILCn|

-

1 -----------r

5 .8 0

13

( v 1n tK

-

-

2
2

HEAVY TRUCK
5. 6 7

T

and

•

36 3
152

%
5 .2 0

S

-

T

S

5 . 00

i

2
-

TRUCKDRIVERS*

T

1 ---------- S
2 .4 0 2 .5 0

Number
of

11
11

4
4

12
12

•
-

12
12

6
5

3
3

-

11
6

7
7

7
7

8
8

*

6
6

3
1

1
1

*

4
3

16
16

1

•
-

•

-

2
2

3

-

4
4

“

“

•
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

7
7

55

manufacturing

------------------ ------- -------------

63
40

5! 13

6

•

-

2

-

~

^ a

------------------------------------------------

101

5. 0 8

5.34
6. 11

3 . 8 2 - 6. 11

✓ 1 tr~
_
*

-

-

*

*

-

-

-

-

-

•
-

-

6
6

4.35 - 5.69

6

280

5.13

5.08

53 2

4 . 3 5 - 5. 8 0

6

-

-

6

M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------- --------------

6

9

.

4.44- 5.93

*

*

“

-

-

-

3
3
17

(O TH ER
99
4.99 - 6^77

5 . 0 8 - 6. 20

-

-

52 5
341

5.51
4.04

5.94
4*19

2.75- 4.84
3.95- 5.55

17
17
6
5
1

23
23

-

*

11
3
8

-

8

-

4

“

“

4

11
11

23
23

6
6

4
4

_

_
*

* p o r t e r s * and

cleaners

------

* W o r k e r s w e r e at $7.80 to $8.20.
** W o r k e r s w e r e at $2.30 to $2.40.
t
W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:




8

-

-

-

-

5

*

2

-

2

12

2

4

19

4

-

-

52

-

8

45
45

1
1

30
30

4
4

13
13

22
17
5

2
2

66
66

13

68
68

-

-

13

73
69

7
7

7
5

119
75

-

-

7
6

26
26

9
9

*

13
13

*

*

9
9

*

-

*

4
A

3
2

15
15

8
8

b
D

1
1

27
27

*

3
3

21
21

15

-

6

1

27

-

3

21

-

1

12
7
5

42
42
-

I f)
3

8
6

18
17

6
4

15

13

2

1

2

40
20
2o

8

37
37

-

24
9

35
35

D

*

3

6

7

29
29

-

•

12
12

*

-

17
6

-

20
20

60
60

*

-

1
1

11

7
7

-

-

34
33
1

3
3

8

*

-

8
7

13 at $2.20 to $2.30; and 76 at $2.30 to $2.40.

-

-

16
1

See footnotes at end of tables.

-

-

8
1

34

*

8

-

f8 9
1

6

*

-

88

janitors

2

-

-

-

GUARDS t

-

•

•

18

*

*

10
“

15

4 . 5 0 - 6. 20

139

120

8

20
4

.

-

**99

OPERATORS

11
11

.

9

-

*

POWFR-TRUCK

-

5
5

3.95- 5.76

5. 2 2

-

6
6

-

ORDER f i l l e r s

37

4
4

4.81- 5.26

-

W A R E H O U S E M E N --------------------------------------------------

•

10

6

5. 0 9

-

-

43
32
11
10

38
25
13
9

15
9

6
6

57
54
3

c

1
1

62

82

34
30
4
4

_

3
3

-

*

6
6
*

51
51

*

-

_

•

*

-

.

•
-

-

54

-

*

54

52
52

11
11

•

•
-

*

4
4

9
9

12
12

*1 0
10

37
37

7
7

•

»

*

•

37

7

-

-

2

28
26

2

2

10
10
-

1

2

*

-

-

•
•
*

•
-




T a b le A - 6 .

A v e ra g e hourly e a rn in g s o f m a in te n a n c e , to o lro o m ,

p o w e rp la n t, m a te ria l m o v e m e n t, and c u s to d ia l w o rk e rs .
by sex, in C a n to n , O h io , M a y 19 7 6
Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

A vera ge
(m e a n 2 )
hourly
earnings4

MA IN TE NA NC c, TOOLROOM, a n d
P O W f R P L A N T O C C U P A T I O N S - ME N

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

A verage
(m e a n * )
hourly
earnings 4

M A T E R I A L M O V E M E N T AN D C U S T O D I A L
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
$
TRUCKDRIVERS

- CONTINUED

TRUCKDRIVERS*
390

HEAVY

TR U C K

$
5. 1 7

6. 7 3
5 n x >*

i

jb

i, u r. k

r -

iu

1J r
6.
5. 1 0
/ /9

. . _________ , __
.

r ^
N O N M A N U E A C T u R I n G ------- -— - — - —

97
do

5.98
, ^

5. 20

6 .- > 8

POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS

(OTHER

5.73
-*•73

material

movement

and

G U AR DS :

custodial

O C C U P A T I O N S - ME N
JANITORS,

PORTERS,

AN D C L E A N E R S ---

36 4

A . 39
3. 08

M A T E R I A L M O V E M E N T AN D P U S T O D I A L
OC CUPATIONS - WOMEN

67

TRUCKDRIVERS.

H E A V Y TR U C K
JANITORS*

See footnotes at end of tables.

9

PORTERS*

AND C L E A N t R S ---

3. 26

T a b le A -7 .

P e rc e n t increases in a v e ra g e hourly e a rn in g s fo r selected

o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s, ad ju sted fo r e m p lo y m e n t s h ifts ,
in C a n to n , O h io , M a y 1976
Industry and occupational group
( m e n and w o m e n combined)

M a y 1972
to
M a y 1973

M a y 1973
to
M a y 1974

M a y 1974
to
M a y 1975

M a y 1975
to
M a y 1976

All industries:
Office clerical_____________________________________
Electronic data p r o c e s s i n g ______________ _______
Industrial n u r s e s _______ ____________ ____________ _
Skilled ma intenance trades ** .
. ___
______
Unskilled plant w o r k e r s * * _________________ . . .

5.3
*
5.9
5.3
6.6

8.2
*
8.2
8.6
10.1

11.9
11.4
14.1
13.0
12.9

9.7
8.8
9.0
11.1
8.9

Ma nu fa ct ur in g:
Office clerical_____________________________________
Electronic data p r o c e s s i n g _______________________
Industrial n u r s e s __________________________________
Skilled ma intenance trades * * ______ . ________
Unskilled plant w o r k e r s ** __________________ ___

4.3
*
5.6
5.1
5.8

7.7
*
8.4
8.7
11.3

13.3
***
14.1
13.3
14.2

10.3
***
8.8
11.3
9.2

***
*
***
***
5.9

***
sic**
***
***
7.0

***
***
***
***
8.1

Nonmanufacturing:
Office clerical_____________________________________
Electronic data processing ... ____ _______ _______
Industrial n u r s e s ____________________________ ___
Skilled ma in te na nc e trades * * ____________________
Unskilled plant w o r k e r s * * _. ____________________

*
**
***

ajofc*

*
***
***
8.9

Data not available.
Percent increases for periods ending prior to 1976 relate to m e n only.
Data do not m e e t publication criteria.

Footnotes
1 Standard hours reflect the w o r k w e e k for wh ic h e m p l o y e e s receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for over ti me at regular and/or p r e m i u m rates), and the earnings correspond
to these we ek ly hours.
2 T h e m e a n is c o m p u t e d for each job by totaling the earnings of all w o r k e r s and dividing by the n u m b e r of work er s. T h e m e d i a n designates position— half of the e m p l o y e e s surveyed receive m o r e
and half receive less than the rate shown. T h e middle range is defined by 2 rates of pay; a fourth of the w o r k e r s ea rn less than the lower of these rates and a fourth ea rn m o r e than the higher rate.
3 Earnings data relate only to w o r k e r s w h o s e sex identification w a s provided by the establishment.
* Excludes p r e m i u m pa y for ov ertime and for w o r k on week en ds , holidays, and late shifts.




10

Appendix A
A r e a w a g e an d r e la t e d b e n e f it s d a ta a r e o b ta in e d b y p e r s o n a l v i s i t s
o f B u r e a u f i e l d r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s at 3 - y e a r in t e r v a l s . * In e a c h o f th e i n t e r ­
1
v e n in g y e a r s , in fo r m a t io n on e m p lo y m e n t and o c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s i s c o l ­
l e c t e d b y a c o m b in a t io n o f p e r s o n a l v i s i t , m a i l q u e s t io n n a ir e , and t e le p h o n e
in t e r v i e w f r o m e s t a b lis h m e n t s p a r t ic ip a t in g in th e p r e v io u s s u r v e y .

d e s c r i b e d , o r f o r s o m e in d u s t r y d iv is io n s w ith in th e s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y , a r e
n ot p r e s e n t e d in th e A - s e r i e s t a b l e s , b e c a u s e e it h e r (1) e m p lo y m e n t in th e
o c c u p a t io n i s t o o s m a ll to p r o v id e e n o u g h da ta to m e r i t p r e s e n t a t io n , o r
(2 ) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t d a ta .
Sepa­
r a t e m e n 's and w o m e n 's e a r n in g s d a ta a r e n ot p r e s e n t e d w h en th e n u m b e r o f
w o r k e r s n ot id e n t ifie d b y s e x i s 20 p e r c e n t o r m o r e o f th e m e n o r w o m e n
id e n t i fie d in an o c c u p a t io n .
E a r n in g s d a ta n o t s h o w n s e p a r a t e ly f o r in d u s t r y
d iv is io n s a r e in c lu d e d in d a ta f o r a ll in d u s t r ie s
c o m b in e d .
L ik e w is e ,
d a ta a r e in c lu d e d in th e o v e r a l l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n w h e n a s u b c la s s i f i c a t i o n o f
e l e c t r o n i c s t e c h n i c i a n s , s e c r e t a r i e s , o r t r u c k d r i v e r s is n o t sh o w n o r i n f o r ­
m a t io n to s u b c l a s s i f y i s n o t a v a ila b le .

In e a c h o f th e 8 4 2 a r e a s c u r r e n t l y s u r v e y e d , d a ta a r e o b ta in e d f r o m
r e p r e s e n t a t iv e e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith in s i x b r o a d in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s :
M a n u fa c ­
t u r in g ; t r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ; w h o l e s a le
t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s .
M a jo r
in d u s t r y g r o u p s e x c lu d e d f r o m t h e s e s tu d ie s a r e g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t io n s and
th e c o n s t r u c t io n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r ie s .
E s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g f e w e r th an
a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e o m it t e d b e c a u s e o f i n s u f f ic ie n t e m p l o y ­
m e n t in th e o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d .
S e p a r a t e ta b u la tio n s a r e p r o v id e d f o r e a c h
o f th e b r o a d in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n s w h ic h m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .

O c c u p a t io n a l e m p lo y m e n t and e a r n in g s d a ta a r e show n f o r f u l l - t i m e
w o r k e r s , i . e . , t h o s e h ir e d t o w o r k a r e g u la r w e e k ly s c h e d u le .
E a r n in g s data
e x c lu d e p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and
la te s h if t s . N o n p r o d u c t io n b o n u s e s a r e e x c lu d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a llo w a n c e s
a n d in c e n t iv e b o n u s e s a r e in c lu d e d .
W e e k ly h o u r s f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l and
p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t io n s r e f e r t o th e s ta n d a rd w o r k w e e k
(r o u n d e d to th e n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r ) f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e r e g u la r
s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e o f p a y f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u la r a n d /o r
p r e m iu m r a t e s ) .
A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s f o r t h e s e o c c u p a t io n s a r e r o u n d e d
t o th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l l a r .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e c o n d u c t e d on a s a m p le b a s i s .
T h e s a m p lin g
p r o c e d u r e s in v o lv e d e t a ile d s t r a t if i c a t io n o f a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith in the
s c o p e o f an in d iv id u a l a r e a s u r v e y b y in d u s t r y and n u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s .
F r o m th is s t r a t ifi e d u n iv e r s e a p r o b a b ilit y s a m p le i s s e l e c t e d , w ith e a c h
e s t a b lis h m e n t h a v in g a p r e d e t e r m in e d c h a n c e o f s e l e c t i o n . T o o b ta in o p tim u m
a c c u r a c y at m in im u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t io n o f la r g e th a n s m a ll e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t s i s
s e le c t e d .
W hen d a ta a r e c o m b i n e d , e a c h e s t a b lis h m e n t is
w e ig h te d a c c o r d i n g t o it s p r o b a b ilit y o f s e l e c t i o n , s o th a t u n b ia s e d e s t im a t e s
a re g e n e ra te d .
F o r e x a m p le , i f o n e ou t o f f o u r e s t a b lis h m e n t s is s e l e c t e d ,
it i s g iv e n a w e ig h t o f f o u r to r e p r e s e n t i t s e l f p lu s t h r e e o t h e r s .
A n a lte r n a te
o f th e s a m e o r i g i n a l p r o b a b ilit y i s c h o s e n in th e s a m e i n d u s t r y - s i z e c l a s s i ­
f i c a t i o n i f d a ta a r e n ot a v a ila b le f r o m th e o r i g i n a l s a m p le m e m b e r .
If no
s u it a b le s u b s titu te i s a v a ila b le , a d d itio n a l w e ig h t is a s s i g n e d t o a s a m p le
m e m b e r th a t i s s i m i l a r to th e m i s s i n g u n it.

T h e s e s u r v e y s m e a s u r e th e l e v e l o f o c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s in an a r e a
at a p a r t i c u l a r t i m e .
C o m p a r is o n s o f in d iv id u a l o c c u p a t io n a l a v e r a g e s o v e r
t i m e m a y n o t r e f l e c t e x p e c t e d w a g e c h a n g e s . T h e a v e r a g e s f o r in d iv id u a l jo b s
a r e a f f e c t e d b y c h a n g e s in w a g e s and e m p lo y m e n t p a t t e r n s .
F o r e x a m p le ,
p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d b y h ig h - o r lo w - w a g e f i r m s m a y c h a n g e , o r
h ig h - w a g e w o r k e r s m a y a d v a n c e to b e t t e r j o b s and b e r e p la c e d b y n e w
w o r k e r s at lo w e r r a te s .
Su ch s h ift s in e m p lo y m e n t c o u ld d e c r e a s e an o c c u ­
p a t io n a l a v e r a g e e v e n th ou g h m o s t e s t a b lis h m e n t s in an a r e a in cre a "s e w a g e s
d u r in g th e y e a r .
C h a n g e s in e a r n in g s o f o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p s , sh o w n in t a b le
A - 7 , a r e b e t t e r in d i c a t o r s o f w a g e t r e n d s th an a r e e a r n in g s c h a n g e s f o r
in d iv id u a l j o b s w ith in th e g r o u p s .

O c c u p a t io n s and e a r n in g s
O c c u p a t io n s s e l e c t e d f o r stu d y a r e c o m m o n to a v a r ie t y o f m a n u f a c ­
t u r in g a nd n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g i n d u s t r ie s , and a r e o f the f o llo w in g t y p e s :
(1) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n ic a l; (3) m a in t e n a n c e , t o o l r o o m ,
and p o w e r p la n t ; and (4) m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t and c u s t o d ia l.
O c c u p a t io n a l
c l a s s i f i c a t i o n i s b a s e d on a u n ifo r m Set o f j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s ig n e d t o ta k e
a c c o u n t o f in t e r e s t a b lis h m e n t v a r ia t io n in d u tie s w ith in the s a m e j o b .
O ccu ­
p a t io n s s e l e c t e d f o r s tu d y a r e lis t e d and d e s c r i b e d in a p p e n d ix B .
U n le s s
o t h e r w is e in d ic a t e d , th e e a r n in g s d a ta f o llo w in g th e jo b t i t l e s a r e f o r a ll
i n d u s t r ie s c o m b i n e d .
E a r n in g s d a ta f o r s o m e o f th e o c c u p a t io n s lis t e d and

A v e r a g e e a r n in g s r e f l e c t c o m p o s i t e , a r e a w id e e s t im a t e s .
I n d u s t r ie s
and e s t a b lis h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l and j o b s t a ffin g , and th u s c o n t r ib u t e
d i f f e r e n t l y to th e e s t im a t e s f o r e a c h j o b .
P a y a v e r a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t
a c c u r a t e l y th e w a g e d i f f e r e n t i a l a m o n g j o b s in in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t s .
A v e r a g e p a y l e v e l s f o r m e n and w o m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s h o u ld
n o t b e a s s u m e d t o r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y o f th e s e x e s w ith in in d iv id u a l
e s t a b lis h m e n t s .
F a c t o r s w h ic h m a y c o n t r ib u t e t o d i f f e r e n c e s in c lu d e p r o ­
g r e s s i o n w ith in e s t a b lis h e d r a t e r a n g e s (o n ly th e r a t e s p a id in c u m b e n t s a r e
c o l l e c t e d ) and p e r f o r m a n c e o f s p e c i f i c d u tie s w ith in th e g e n e r a l s u r v e y jo b
d e s c r ip tio n s .
J o b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d t o c l a s s i f y e m p lo y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s
u s u a lly a r e m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d th an t h o s e u s e d in in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t s
a nd a llo w f o r m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s a m o n g e s t a b lis h m e n t s in s p e c i f i c d u tie s
p e r fo r m e d .

1 Personal visits were on a 2-year cy cle before July 1972.
2 Included in the 84 areas are 14 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract. These areas are
Akron, Ohio; Austin, T e x .; Binghamton, N .Y . — a .; Birmingham, A la .; Fort Lauderdale—
P
Hollywood and West
Palm Beach—
Boca Raton, F la .; Lexington—
Fayette, K y .; Melbourne—
Titusville—Cocoa, Fla.; Norfolk—
Virginia
Beach—
Portsmouth and Newport News—
Hampton, Va. — C .; Poughkeepsie—
N.
Kingston—
Newburgh, N. Y . ; Raleigh—
Durham, N. C . ; Stamford, Conn.; Syracuse, N .Y .; Utica—Rome, N .Y .; and Westchester County, N .Y .
In
addition, the Bureau conducts more limited area studies in approximately 70 areas at the request o f the
Employment Standards Administration of the U. S. Department o f Labor.




11

O c c u p a t io n a l e m p lo y m e n t e s t im a t e s r e p r e s e n t th e t o t a l in a l l e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t s w ith in th e s c o p e o f th e stu d y and n o t th e n u m b e r a c t u a lly s u r v e y e d .
B e c a u s e o c c u p a t io n a l s t r u c t u r e s a m o n g e s t a b lis h m e n t s d i f f e r , e s t i m a t e s o f
o c c u p a t io n a l e m p lo y m e n t o b ta in e d f r o m th e s a m p le o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s s tu d ie d
s e r v e o n ly to in d ic a t e th e r e l a t i v e im p o r t a n c e o f th e jo b s s tu d ie d .
T h ese
d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t io n a l s t r u c t u r e d o n o t a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y th e a c c u r a c y o f
th e e a r n in g s d a ta .

W a g e t r e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p s

T h e p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e s p r e s e n t e d in t a b le A - 7 a r e b a s e d o n c h a n g e s
in a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s f o r e s t a b lis h m e n t s r e p o r t in g the t r e n d j o b s in b o th
th e c u r r e n t and p r e v i o u s y e a r ( m a t c h e d e s t a b lis h m e n t s ) .
T h e d a ta a r e
a d ju s t e d to r e m o v e th e e f f e c t s on a v e r a g e e a r n in g s o f e m p lo y m e n t s h ift s
a m o n g e s t a b lis h m e n t s and t u r n o v e r o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s in c lu d e d in s u r v e y
s a m p le s .
T h e p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e s , h o w e v e r , a r e s t i l l a ff e c t e d b y f a c t o r s
o t h e r th a n w a g e i n c r e a s e s .
H ir in g , l a y o f f s , a nd t u r n o v e r m a y a f f e c t an
e s t a b lis h m e n t a v e r a g e f o r an o c c u p a t io n w h en w o r k e r s a r e p a id u n d e r p la n s
p r o v id in g a r a n g e o f w a g e r a t e s f o r in d iv id u a l j o b s .
In p e r i o d s o f i n c r e a s e d
h ir in g , f o r e x a m p le , n e w e m p l o y e e s e n t e r at th e b o tt o m
o f th e r a n g e ,
d e p r e s s i n g th e a v e r a g e w ith o u t a ch a n g e in w a g e r a t e s .

E l e c t r o n i c da ta p r o c e s s i n g
(m e n and w o m e n ) :

S k ille d m a in t e n a n c e (m e n
a nd w o m e n ) :

C om p u ter sy ste m s
a n a ly s t s , c l a s s e s
A , B , and C
C om p u ter p r o g r a m m e r s ,
c l a s s e s A , B , and C
C om p u ter o p e r a to r s ,
c l a s s e s A , B , and C

C a rp e n te rs
E le c tr ic ia n s
P a in t e r s
M a c h in is t s
M e c h a n ic s (m a c h in e r y )
M e c h a n ic s ( m o t o r v e h ic le )
P ip e fitt e r s
T o o l and d ie m a k e r s

I n d u s t r ia l n u r s e s (m e n and
w o m e n ):
R e g i s t e r e d in d u s t r ia l
n u rses

U n s k ille d p la n t (m e n and
w o m e n ):
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and
c le a n e rs
M a t e r ia l h a n d lin g l a b o r e r s

P e r c e n t c h a n g e s f o r in d iv id u a l a r e a s in th e p r o g r a m
as fo llo w s :

are

O c c u p a t io n s u s e d t o c o m p u t e w a g e t r e n d s a r e :

O f f i c e c l e r i c a l (m e n a n d
w o m e n )!

O rd e r c le r k s
A c c o u n t in g c l e r k s ,
c l a s s e s A and B
B o o k k e e p i n g - m a c h in e
o p e r a to r s , c la s s B
P a y r o ll c le r k s
K eypu n ch o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s e s A and B
T a b u la tin g - m a c h ine
o p e r a to r s , c la s s B




T h e s e w e ig h t s a r e u s e d t o c o m p u t e g r o u p a v e r a g e s .
E a c h o c c u p a t i o n 's a v e r a g e (m e a n ) e a r n in g s i s m u lt ip lie d
b y it s w e ig h t.
T h e p r o d u c t s a r e t o t a le d t o o b ta in a
grou p a v e ra g e .

3.

T h e r a t i o o f g r o u p a v e r a g e s f o r 2 c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s is
c o m p u t e d b y d iv id in g th e a v e r a g e f o r th e c u r r e n t y e a r
b y th e a v e r a g e f o r th e e a r l i e r y e a r .
T h e re s u lt—
e x p r e s s e d a s a p e r c e n t — l e s s 100 i s th e p e r c e n t c h a n g e .

F o r a m o r e d e t a ile d d e s c r i p t i o n o f th e m e t h o d u s e d t o c o m p u t e t h e s e
w a g e t r e n d s , s e e " I m p r o v in g A r e a W a g e S u r v e y I n d e x e s , " M o n th ly L a b o r
R e v ie w , Ja n u a ry 1973, pp. 5 2 -5 7 .

O f f i c e c l e r i c a l (m e n and
w o m e n )— C on tin u e d

S e c r e ta r ie s
S ten ograp h ers, gen era l
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r
T y p is ts , c la s s e s
A a nd B
F ile c le r k s , c la s s e s A ,
B , and C
M essen gers
S w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s e s A and B

E a c h o c c u p a t io n i s a s s i g n e d a w e ig h t b a s e d o n it s p r o ­
p o r t io n a t e e m p lo y m e n t in th e o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p in th e
base y ea r.

2.
T h e p e r c e n t c h a n g e s r e la t e to w a g e c h a n g e s b e tw e e n th e in d ic a t e d
d a tes.
W h en th e t i m e sp a n b e tw e e n s u r v e y s i s o t h e r th a n 12 m o n t h s , a n n u a l
r a te s a r e sh ow n .
(It i s a s s u m e d th a t w a g e s i n c r e a s e at a c o n s t a n t r a te
b e tw e e n s u r v e y s .)

1.

co m p u te d

E s t a b lis h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s
T a b u la t io n s o n s e l e c t e d e s t a b lis h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n t a r y
w a g e p r o v i s i o n s ( B - s e r i e s t a b le s ) a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d in t h is b u lle t in . I n f o r ­
m a t io n f o r t h e s e t a b u la t io n s i s c o l l e c t e d at 3 - y e a r i n t e r v a l s . 1 T h e s e ta b u ­
la t io n s on m in im u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r i n e x p e r i e n c e d o f f i c e w o r k e r s ; s h ift
d i f f e r e n t i a l s ; s c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s and d a y s ; p a id h o lid a y s ; p a id v a c a t io n s ;
and h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , a nd p e n s io n p la n s a r e p r e s e n t e d (in th e B - s e r i e s t a b le s )
in p r e v i o u s b u lle t in s f o r t h is a r e a .
1 Personal visits were on a 2-year cycle before July 1972.

12

A p p e n d ix ta b le 1. E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o rk e rs w ith in scope o f survey and n u m b e r studied
in C a n to n , O h io ,1 M a y 1 9 7 6

Industry division 2

Minimum
employment
in establishm e n t s in scope
of study

W o r k e r s in establishments

N u m b e r of establishments

Within scope of study 4
Within scope
of study 3

Studied

Studied
Number

Percent

283

93

6 1 ,7 4 7

100

3 9 .6 9 2

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------- --------------- -- ---------- ---------- -------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------- -- -------------------------------------------------t r a n s p o r t a t io n ,
c o m m u n ic a t io n ,
ano

50
*

135
148

49
44

4 1 ,0 9 5
20*652

67
33

2 8 ,6 9 5
1 0 ,9 9 7

U T I L I T I E S 5 ------------------------------------------------TRAD E 6 -----------------------------------------------------------------------

50
50
50
50

17
23
78
14
16

4 ,9 5 7
1 ,7 9 6
9 ,2 3 1
2 ,8 1 5
1 ,8 5 3

3
15
5
3

ALL

other

D I V I S I O N S ------------ ---------- -- -----------------------------------------------

p u b l ic

W H O LESALE

R E T A I L TRAD E 6 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------F IN A N C E * IN S U R A N C E * ANO R E A L E S T A T E 6 -----------------S E R V IC E S

50

8
7
14

8
7

8

4 ,2 9 4
853
2 ,8 1 9
2 ,0 5 1
980

1 T h e Canton Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the Office of M a n a g e m e n t and Budget through F e b r u a r y 1974, consists of Carroll and Stark
Counties.
T h e " w or ke rs within scope of study" estimates s h o w n in this table provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor force
included in the survey. Es ti ma te s are not intended, ho wever, for c o m p a r i s o n with other e m p l o y m e n t indexes to m e a s u r e e m p l o y m e n t trends or levels since (1) planning
of w a g e surveys requires establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) small establishments are excluded f r o m the scope
of the survey.
2 T h e 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification M a n u a l w a s us ed in classifying establishments by industry division.
3 Includes all establishments with total e m p l o y m e n t at or above the m i n i m u m limitation. All outlets (within the area) of co m p a n i e s in industries such as trade,
finance, auto repair service, and mo ti on picture theaters are considered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes all w o r k e r s in all establishments with total e m p l o y m e n t (within the area) at or above the m i n i m u m limitation.
5 Abbreviated to "public utilities" in the A-series tables. Taxicabs and services incidental to wa te r transportation are excluded. T h e local-transit s y s t e m for the
city of Canton is municipally operated and is excluded by definition f r o m the scope of the study.
6 This division is represented in estimates for "all industries" and "nonmanufacturing" in the A-se ri es tables. Separate presentation of data is not m a d e for one
or m o r e of the following reasons: (1) E m p l o y m e n t is too small to provide enough data to merit separate study, (2) the s a m p l e w a s not designed initially to permit
separate presentation, (3) response w a s insufficient or inadequate to pe rm it separate presentation, and (4) there is possibility of disclosure of individual establishment data.
7 Hotels and motels; laundries and other personal services; business services; automobile repair, rental, and parking; mo tion pictures; nonprofit m e m b e r s h i p
organizations (excluding religious and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectural services.




NOTE:
Data in the A-se ri es tables and appendix table are representative of establishments employing 86
percent of the total e m p l o y m e n t and 80 percent of the manufacturing e m p l o y m e n t in scope of the survey.
The
balance of the e m p l o y m e n t w a s in establishments f r o m wh ic h data could not be obtained and wh ic h could not
appropriately be represented by other establishments.

13

Appendix B.

Occupational Descriptions

The prim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist
its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of
payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to
area.
This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the
Bureau's job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those
prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are
instructed to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learn ers; beginners; trainees; and handicapped,
p a rt-tim e, tem porary, and probationary w orkers.

OFFICE
SECRETARY

SECRETARY— Continued

Assigned as personal secretary, norm ally to one individual. Main­
tains a close and highly responsive relationship to the day-to-day work of the
supervisor. Works fairly independently receiving a minimum of detailed
supervision and guidance.
Perform s varied clerical and secretarial duties,
usually including m ost of the following:

May also perform other clerica l and secretarial tasks of comparable
nature and difficulty. The work typically requires knowledge of office routine
and understanding of the organization, program s, and procedures related to
the work of the supervisor.
Exclusions

a. Receives telephone c a lls, personal ca lle rs, and incoming m ail,
answers routine inquiries, and routes technical inquiries .to the proper
persons;
b.
c.
instructed;
d.

E stablishes, maintains,

Not all positions that are titled "s e c r e ta r y " possess the above-char­
a cteristics. Examples of positions which are excluded from the definition are
as follows:

and revises the supervisor's files;
a. Positions
described above;

Maintains the su pervisor's calendar and makes appointments as

b.

Relays m essages from supervisor to subordinates;

d. Secretary positions in which the duties are either substantially
m ore routine or substantially more complex and responsible than those char­
acterized in the definition;

P erform s stenographic and typing work.




Stenographers not fully trained in secretarial-type duties;

c. Stenographers serving as office assistants to a group of profes­
sional, technical, or m anagerial persons;

e. Reviews correspondence, memorandums, and reports prepared by
others for the supervisor's signature to assure procedural and typographic
accuracy;
f.

which do not meet the "p erso n a l" secretary concept

Beginning with calendar year 1$76 surveys, the Bureau has grouped occupations studied in its
area wage surveys into job fam ilies in order to present information on related occupations in sequence.
Job fam ilies have not been titled, however, since doing so might have added extraneous elements to the
job matching process.
The Bureau has also revised several occupational titles.
word order and are more descriptive of the survey jobs.

14

The titles m ore nearly reflect usual

S E C R E T A R Y — C o n tin u e d

S E C R E T A R Y —— o n tin u e d
C

Ej-clua ions— Continued

C lass C

e.
A ssistant-type positions which involve m ore difficult or more
1. Secretary to an executive or managerial person whose respon­
responsible technical, administrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical
sibility is not equivalent to one of the specific level situations in the definition
duties which are not typical of secretarial work.
for class B , but whose organizational unit norm ally numbers at least several
dozen employees and is usually divided into organizational segments which are
often, in turn, further subdivided. In some companies, this level -includes a
N OTE: The term "corporate officer, " used in the level definitions
wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; c r
u
following, refers to those officials who have a significant corporatewide
policymaking role with regard to m ajor company activities. The title "vice
2. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or
president, " though norm ally indicative of this role, does not in all cases
other equivalent level of official) that em ploys, in all,* fewer than 5,0 0 0
identify such positions. Vice presidents whose primary responsibility is to
persons.
act personally on individual cases or transactions (e .g ., approve or deny
individual loan or credit actions; administer individual trust accounts; directly
C lass D
supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be "corporate o ffic e r s" for
1. Secretary to the supervisor or head of a sm all organizational unit
purposes of applying the following level definitions.
(e .g ., fewer than about 25 or 30 persons); £ £
C lass A
1. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company
that em ploys, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5 ,0 0 0 persons; or

2. Secretary to a nonsupervisory s t a f f specialist, professional
em ployee, administrative officer, or assistant, skilled technician, or expert.
(NOTE: Many companies assign stenographers, rather than secretaries as
described above, to this level of supervisory or nonsupervisory worker.)
STENOGRAPHER

2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the
board or president) of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 but fewer
than 2 5 ,0 0 0 persons; or
3. Secretary to the head, immediately below the corporate officer
level, of a major segment or subsidiary of a company that em ploys, in all,
over 2 5 ,0 0 0 persons.
C lass B

Prim ary duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to transcribe
the dictation. May also type from written copy. May operate from a steno­
graphic pool.
May occasionally transcribe from voice recordings (if primary
duty is transcribing from recordings, see Transcribing-M achine Typist).
N O TE : This job is distinguished from that of a secretary in that a
secretary norm ally works in a confidential relationship with only one manager
or executive and perform s m ore responsible and discretionary tasks as
described in the secretary job definition.

1. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company
that em ploys, in all, fewer than 100 persons; or
2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the
board or president) of a company that em ploys, in all, over 100 but fewer
than 5 ,0 0 0 persons; or
3. Secretary to the head, immediately below the officer level, over
either a m ajor corporationwide functional activity (e .g ., marketing, research,
operations, industrial relations, etc.) £ r a major geographic or organizational
segment (e .g ., a regional headquarters; a m ajor division) of a company that
em ploys, in all, over 5 ,0 0 0 but fewer than 2 5 ,0 0 0 em ployees; or
4. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or
other equivalent level of official) that employs, in a ll, over 5, 000 persons; or
5. Secretary to the head of a large and important organizational
segment (e .g ., a middle management supervisor of an organizational segment
often involving as many as several hundred persons) or a company that
em ploys, in all, over 2 5 ,0 0 0 persons.




Stenographer, General
keep

Dictation involves a norm al routine vocabulary. May maintain files,
simple records, or perform other relatively routine clerical tasks.
Stenographer, Senior

Dictation involves a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such
as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research. May also set up and
maintain file s, keep records, etc.
OR
P erform s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater inde­
pendence and responsibility than stenographer, general as evidenced by the
following: Work requires a high degree of stenographic speed and accuracy;
a thorough working knowledge of general business and office procedure; and
of the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures, files,
workflow, etc.
Uses this knowledge in performing stenographic duties and
responsible clerical tasks such as maintaining followup files; assembling
m aterial for reports, memorandums, and letters; composing simple letters
from general instructions; reading and routing incoming m ail; and answering
routine questions, etc.

T R A N S C R I B I N G -M A C H I N E T Y P I S T

S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R

P rim ary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a norm al routine
vocabulary from transc'ribing-machine records. May also type from written
copy and do simple clerica l work. W orkers transcribing dictation involving
a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal briefs or reports
oh scientific research are not included* A worker who takes dictation in
shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine is classified as a stenographer.

C lass A . Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switch­
board handling incoming, outgoing, intraplant or office ca lls.
P erform s full
telephone information service or handles complex c a lls , such as conference,
collect, o versea s, or sim ilar c a lls, either in addition to doing routine work
as described for switchboard operator, cla ss B , or as a fu ll-tim e assignment.
( "F u l l " telephone information service occurs when the establishment has
varied functions that are not readily understandable for telephone information
purposes, e .g ., because of overlapping or interrelated functions, and conse­
quently present frequent problems as to which extensions are appropriate
for ca lls.)

T YPIST
U ses a typewriter .to- make copies of various m aterials or to make
out bills after calculations have been made by another person. May include
typing of sten cils, m ats, or sim ilar m aterials for use in duplicating pro­
cesses.
May do clerica l work involving little special training, such as
keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and distributing
incoming m ail.
C lass A . P erform s one or m ore of the following: Typing m aterial
in final form when it involves combining m aterial from several sources; or
responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication, punctuation, etc., of tech­
nical or unusual words or foreign language m aterial; or planning layout and
typing of complicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity and balance in
spacing. May type routine form letters, varying details to suit circum stances.
C lass
rough or clear
or setting up
already set up

B . P erform s one or m ore of the following: Copy typing from
drafts; or routine typing of fo rm s, insurance policies, etc.;
simple standard tabulations; or copying more complex tables
and spaced properly.

FILE CLERK
F ile s, c la ssifie s, and retrieves m aterial in an established filing
system .
May perform clerica l and manual tasks required to maintain file s.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
C lass A . C la ssifies and indexes file m aterial such as correspond­
ence, reports, technical documents, etc., in an established filing system
containing a number of varied subject matter files.
May also file this
m aterial.
May keep records of various types in conjunction with the file s.
May lead a sm all group of lower level file clerk s.
C lass B. Sorts, codes, and files unclassified m aterial by simple
(subject matter) headings or partly classified m aterial by finer subheadings.
Prepares simple related index and cro ss-re fe re n c e aids. A s requested,
locates clearly identified m aterial in files and forwards m aterial. May
perform related clerica l tasks required to maintain and service file s.
C lass C .
P erform s routine filing of m aterial that has already been
classified or which is easily classified in a simple serial classification
system (e .g ., alphabetical, chronological, or num erical). A s requested,
locates readily available m aterial in files and forwards m aterial; and may
fill out withdrawal charge. May perform simple clerica l and manual tasks
required to maintain and service file s.
MESSENGER
P erform s various routine duties such as running errands, operating
minor office machines such as sealers or m a ile rs, opening and distributing
m a il, and other minor clerica l work. Exclude positions that require operation
of a motor vehicle as a significant duty.




C lass B . Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switch­
board handling incoming, outgoing, intraplant or office ca lls. May handle
routine long distance calls and record to lls.
May perform limited telephone
information service.
("L im ite d " telephone information service occurs if the
functions of the establishment serviced are readily understandable for te le ­
phone information purposes, or if the requests are routine, e .g ., giving
extension numbers when specific names are furnished, or if complex calls
are referred to another operator,)
These classifications do not include switchboard operators in te le ­
phone companies who a ssist custom ers in placing ca lls.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
In addition to performing duties of operator on a single-position or
m onitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and may also type or perform
routine clerica l work as part of regular duties. This typing or clerica l work
may take the m ajor part of this w orker's tim e while at switchboard.
ORDER CLERK
Receives cu stom ers' orders for m aterial or merchandise by m a il,
phone, or personally. Duties involve any combination of the following;
Quoting prices to custom ers; making out an order sheet listing the item s to
make up the order; checking prices and quantities of item s on order sheet;
and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be filled. May
check with credit department to determine credit rating of custom er, atcknowledge receipt of orders from cu stom ers, follow up orders to see that they
have been filled, keep file of orders received, and check shipping invoices
with original ord ers.
ACCOUNTING CLERK
P erform s one or m ore accounting clerica l tasks such as posting to
registers and ledgers; reconciling bank accounts; verifying the internal con­
sistency, com pleteness, and mathem atical accuracy of accounting documents;
assigning prescribed accounting distribution codes; examining and verifying
for clerica l accuracy various types of reports, lis ts , calculations, posting,
etc.; or preparing simple or assisting in preparing m ore complicated journal
vouchers. May work in either a manual or automated accounting system .
The work requires a knowledge of clerica l methods and office prac­
tices and procedures which relates to the clerica l processing and recording
of transactions and accounting information.
With experience, the worker
typically becom es fam iliar with the bookkeeping and accounting term s and
procedures used in the assigned work, but is not required to have a knowledge
of the form al principles of bookkeeping and accounting.
Positions
definitions.

are

classified

into levels

on the basis of the following

A C C O U N T IN G C L E R K — C o n tin u e d

M A C H IN E B I L L E R — C o n tin u e d

C lass A . Under general supervision, perform s accounting clerical
operations which require the application of experience and judgment, for
example, clerically processing complicated or nonrepetitive accounting tran s­
actions, selecting among a substantial variety of prescribed accounting codes
and classification s, or tracing transactions through previous accounting
actions to determine source of discrepancies.
May be assisted by one or
m ore class B accounting clerks.

Bookkeeping-machine b iller. Uses a bookkeeping machine (with or
without a typewriter keyboard) to prepare custom ers' bills as part of the
accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simultaneous entry of
figures on cu stom ers' ledger record. The machine automatically accumulates
figures on a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints
automatically the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge
of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of sales and
credit slips.

C lass B. Under close supervision, following detailed instructions
and standardized procedures, perform s one or m ore routine accounting c le r ­
ical operations, such as posting to ledgers, cards, or worksheets where
identification of item s and locations of postings are clearly indicated; checking
accuracy and completeness of standardized and repetitive r e c o r d s or
accounting documents; and c o d i n g documents using a few prescribed
accounting codes.

P A YR O LL CLERK

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (with or without a typewriter key­
board) to keep a record of business transactions.
C lass A . Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles, and fam iliarity with the structure
of the particular accounting system used. Determines proper records and
distribution of debit and credit item s to be used in each phase of the work.
May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records by hand.
ClassB.
Keeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections of a
set of records usually requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases
or sections include accounts payable, payroll, cu stom ers' accounts (not
including a simple type of billing described under machine biller), cost d is­
tribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or assist
in preparation of trial balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting
department.

Computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary
data on the payroll sheets.
Duties involve: Calculating workers' earnings
based on time or production records; and posting calculated data on payroll
sheet, showing information such as w orker's name, working days, tim e, rate,
deductions for insurance, and total wages due.
May make out paychecks and
a ssist paymaster in making up and distributing pay envelopes. May use a
calculating machine.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Operates a keypunch machine to record or verify alphabetic and/or
numeric data on tabulating cards or on tape.
Positions
definitions.

are

classified

into

levels

on the basis of the following

C lass A . Work requires the application of experience and judgment
in selecting procedures to be followed and in searching for, interpreting,
selecting, or coding item s to be keypunched from a variety of source docu­
m ents.
On occasion may also perform some routine keypunch work. May
train inexperienced keypunch operators.
C lass B . Work is routine and repetitive.
Under close supervision
or following specific procedures or instructions, works from various- stan­
dardized source documents which have been coded, and follows specified
procedures which have been prescribed in detail and require little or no
selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. Refers to supervisor
problems arising from erroneous item s or codes or m issing information.

MACHINE BILLER
TABU LA TING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Prepares statements, b ills, and invoices on a machine other than an
ordinary or electromatic typewriter. May also .keep records as to billings
or shipping charges or perform other clerical work incidental to billing
operations. For wage study purposes, machine billers are classified by type
of machine, as follows:
Billing-machine b ille r . Uses a special billing machine (combination
typing and adding machine) to prepare bills and invoices from custom ers'
purchase o rd ers, internally prepared ord ers, shipping memorandums, etc.
Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and shipping charges
and entry of necessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on
the billing machine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by
machine.
The operation usually involves a large number of carbon copies
of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.




17

Operates one or a variety of machines such as the tabulator, calcu­
lator, collator, interpreter, sorter, reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from
this definition are working supervisors. A lso excluded are operators of
electronic digital com puters, even though they may also operate electric
accounting machine equipment.
Positions
definitions.

are

classified into

levels

on the basis of the following

C lass A . Perform s complete reporting and tabulating assignments
including devising difficult control panel wiring under general supervision.
Assignm ents typically involve a variety of long and complex reports which
often are irregular or nonrecurring, requiring some planning of the nature
and sequencing of operations, and the use of a variety of machines. Is

T A B U L A T I N G -M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R ---- C o n tin u e d

T A B U L A T I N G -M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R — C o n tin u e d

typically involved in training new operators in machine operations or training
lower level operators in wiring from diagrams and in the operating sequences
of long and complex reports. Does not include positions in which wiring
responsibility is limited to selection and insertion of prewired boards.

the tabulator and calculator, in addition to the sim pler machines used by
class C operators. May be required to do some wiring from diagram s.
May train new em ployees in basic machine operations.
Qlass C . Under specific instructions, operates simple tabulating
or electrical accounting machines such as the sorter, interpreter, reproducing
punch, collator, etc. Assignm ents typically involve portions of a work unit,
for example, individual sorting or collating runs, or repetitive operations.
May perform simple wiring from diagram s, and do some filing work.

C lass B . Perform s work according to established procedures and
under specific instructions. Assignments typically involve complete but rou­
tine and recurring reports or parts of larger and m ore complex reports.
Operates more difficult tabulating or electrical accounting machines such as

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COMPUTER SYSTEMS A N A LYST , BUSINESS

COMPUTER SYSTEMS A N A L Y ST , BUSINESS— Continued

Analyzes business problems to formulate procedures for solving
them by use of electronic data processing equipment. Develops a complete
description of all specifications needed to enable program m ers to prepare
required digital computer program s.
Work involves m ost of the following:
Analyzes subject-m atter operations to be automated and identifies conditions
and criteria required to achieve satisfactory resu lts; specifies number and
types of records, file s, and documents to be used; outlines actions to be
performed by personnel and computers in sufficient detail for presentation
to management and for programming (typically this involves preparation of
work and data flow charts); coordinates the development of test problems and
participates in tria l runs of new and revised system s; and recommends equip­
ment changes to obtain m ore effective overall operations.
(NOTE:
Workers
performing both system s analysis and programming should be classified as
system s analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)

develops system s for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank, maintaining
accounts receivable in a retail establishment, or maintaining inventory
accounts in a manufacturing or wholesale establishment.)
Confers with per­
sons concerned to determine the data processing problems and advises
subject-m atter personnel on the implications of the data processing system s
to be applied.
OR
Works on a segment of a complex data processing scheme or system ,
as described for cla ss A .
Works independently on routine assignments and
receives instruction and guidance on complex assignm ents.
Work is reviewed
for accuracy of judgment, compliance with instructions, and to insure proper
alignment with the overall system .
C lass C . Works under immediate supervision, carrying out analy­
ses as assigned, usually of a single activity. Assignm ents are designed to
develop and expand practical experience in the application of procedures and
skills required for system s analysis work. For example, may assist a-higher
level system s analyst by preparing the detailed specifications required by
program m ers from information developed by the higher level analyst.

Does not include em ployees prim arily responsible for the manage­
ment or supervision of other electronic data processing em ployees, or sy s­
tem s analysts prim arily concerned with scientific or engineering problem s.
For wage study purposes, system s analysts are classified as follow s:
C lass A . Works independently or under only general direction on
complex problems involving all phases of system analysis.
Problem s are
complex because of diverse sources of input data and m ultiple-use require­
ments of output data.
(For exam ple, develops an integrated production sched­
uling, inventory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis record in which
every item of each type is automatically processed through the full system
of records and appropriate followup actions are initiated by the computer.)
Confers with persons concerned to determine the data processing problems
and advises subject-m atter personnel on the implications of new or revised
system s of data processing operations. Makes recommendations, if needed,
for approval of m ajor system s installations or changes and for obtaining
equipment.
May provide functional direction to
who are assigned to a ssist.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMER, BUSINESS

lower level system s analysts

C lass B . Works independently or under only general direction on
problems that are relatively uncomplicated to analyze, plan, program , and
operate.
Problem s are of lim ited complexity because sources of input data
are homogeneous and the output data are closely related. (For example,




18

Converts statements of business problem s, typically prepared by a
system s analyst, into a sequence of detailed instructions which are required
to solve the problems by automatic data processing equipment. Working from
charts or diagram s, the program m er develops the precise instructions which,
when entered into the computer system in coded language, cause the manipu­
lation of data to achieve desired resu lts. Work involves m ost of the following:
Applies knowledge of computer capabilities, m athem atics, logic employed by
com puters, and particular subject matter involved to analyze charts and
diagram s of the problem to be programm ed; develops sequence of program
steps; writes detailed flow charts to show order in which data will be
processed; converts these charts to coded instructions for machine to follow;
tests and corrects program s; prepares instructions for operating personnel
during production run; analyzes, review s, and alters program s to increase
operating efficiency or adapt to new requirem ents; maintains records of
program development and revision s. (NOTE: W orkers performing both
system s analysis and programming should be classified as system s analysts
if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)

C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M M E R , BU SIN E SS— C o n tin u e d

COM PUTER OPERATOR

Does not include employees prim arily responsible for the manage­
ment or supervision of other electronic data processing em ployees, or p ro ­
gram m ers prim arily concerned with scientific and/or engineering problem s.

Monitors and operates the control console of a digital computer to
process data according to operating instructions, usually prepared by a pro­
gram m er. Work includes m ost of the following: Studies instructions to
determine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
item s (tape r e e ls, cards, etc.); switches n ecessary auxiliary equipment into
circuit, and starts and operates computer; makes adjustments to computer to
correct operating problems and meet special conditions; reviews errors made
during operation and determines cause or refers problem to supervisor or
program m er; and maintains operating records. May test and assist in
correcting program.

For wage study purposes, program m ers are classified as follow s:
C la ss A . Works independently or under only general direction on
complex problems which require competence in all phases of programming
concepts and practices.
Working from diagrams and charts which identify
the nature of desired resu lts, m ajor processing steps to be accomplished,
and the relationships between various steps of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of programming actions needed to efficiently utilize the
computer system in achieving desired end products.

At this level, programming is difficult because computer equipment
must be organized to produce several interrelated but diverse products from
numerous and diverse data elem ents. A wide variety and extensive number
of internal processing actions must occur.
This requires such actions as
development of common operations which can be reused, establishment of
linkage points between operations, adjustments to data when program require­
ments exceed computer storage capacity, and substantial manipulation and
resequencing of data elements to form a highly integrated program .

May provide functional direction to lower level program m ers who are
assigned to assist.
C lass B . Works independently or under only general direction on
relatively simple program s, or on simple segments of complex program s.
Program s (or segments) usually process information to produce data in two
or three varied sequences or form ats. Reports and listings are produced by
refining, adapting, arraying, or making minor additions to or deletions from
input data which are readily available. While numerous records may be
p rocessed, the data have been refined in prior actions so that the accuracy
and sequencing of data can be tested by using a few routine checks. Typically,
the program deals with routine recordkeeping operations.
OR
Works on complex programs (as described for class A) under close
direction of a higher level program m er or supervisor.
May a ssist higher
level program m er by independently performing less difficult tasks assigned,
and performing m ore difficult tasks under fairly close direction.
May guide or instruct lower level program m ers.
C lass C . Makes practical applications of programming practices
and concepts usually learned in form al training cou rses. Assignments are
designed to develop competence in the application of standard procedures to
routine problem s. Receives close supervision on new aspects of assignments;
and work is reviewed to verify its accuracy and conformance with required
procedures.




For wage

study purposes, computer

operators

are

classified

as

follow s:
C lass A , Operates independently, or under only general direction,
a computer running program s with m ost of the following ch aracteristics:
New program s are frequently tested and introduced; scheduling requirements
are of critical importance to minim ize downtime; the programs are of
complex design so that identification of error source often requires a working
knowledge of the total program , and alternate programs may not be available.
May give direction and guidance to lower level operators.
C lass B . Operates independently, or under only general direction,
a computer running programs with most of the following characteristics:
Most of the program s are established production runs, typically run on a
regularly recurring b a sis; there is little or no testing of new programs
required; alternate program s are provided in case original program needs
m ajor change or cannot be corrected within a reasonably short tim e. In
common error situations, diagnoses cause and takes corrective action. This
usually involves applying previously programmed corrective steps, or using
standard correction techniques.
OR
Operates under direct supervision a computer running programs or
segments of program s with the characteristics described for class A . May
a ssist a higher level operator by independently performing less difficult tasks
assigned, and performing difficult tasks following detailed instructions and
with frequent review of operations performed.
expected
ability to
received
operator

C lass C . Works on routine programs under close supervision. Is
to develop working knowledge of the computer equipment used and
detect problems involved in running routine program s. Usually has
some form al training in computer operation. May assist higher level
on complex program s.

DRAFTER
C lass A . Plans the graphic presentation of complex item s having
distinctive design features that differ significantly from established drafting
precedents.
Works in close support with the design originator, and may
recommend minor design changes. Analyzes the effect of each change on the
details of form , function, and positional relationships of components and parts.
Works with a minimum of supervisory assistance. Completed work is
reviewed by design originator for consistency with prior engineering deter­
minations. May either prepare drawings or direct their preparation by lower
level drafters.

D R A F T E R — C o n tin u e d

E L E C T R O N IC S T E C H N IC IA N — C o n tin u e d

C lass B . P erform s nonroutine and complex drafting assignments
that require the application of m ost of the standardized drawing techniques
regularly used.
Duties typically involve such work a s:
Prepares working
drawings of subasserAblies with irregular shapes, multiple functions, and
precise positional relationships between components; prepares architectural
drawings for construction of a building including detail drawings of foun­
dations, wall sections, floor plans, and roof.
Uses accepted form ulas and
manuals in m a k i n g necessary computations to determine quantities of
m aterials to be used, load capacities, strengths, str e sse s, etc. Receives
initial instructions, requirem ents, and advice from supervisor. Completed
work is checked for technical adequacy.

This classification excludes repairers of such standard electronic
equipment as common office machines and household radio and television
sets; production assem blers and teste rs; workers whose primary duty is
servicing electronic test instruments; technicians who have administrative
or supervisory responsibility; and drafters, designers, and professional
engineers.

C lass C . Prepares detail drawings of single units or parts for
engineering, construction, manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types of
drawings prepared include isom etric projections (depicting three dimensions
in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning of components
and convey needed information. Consolidates details from a number of
sources and adjusts or transposes scale as required. Suggested methods of
approach, applicable precedents, and advice on source m aterials are given
with initial assignm ents. Instructions are less complete when' assignments
recur.
Work may be spot-checked during progress.

Positions
definitions.

are

classified into

levels

on the basis of the following

C lass A . Applies advanced technical knowledge to solve unusually
complex problems (i.e ., those that typically cannot be solved solely by r e fe r ­
ence to manufacturers' manuals or sim ilar documents) in working on e le c ­
tronic equipment.
Examples of such problems include location and density of
circuitry, electromagnetic radiation, isolating malfunctions, and frequent
engineering changes.
Work involves: A detailed under standing of the inter­
relationships of circuits^ exercising independent judgmeht in performing such
tasks as making circuit analyses, calculating wave fo rm s, tracing relation­
ships in signal flow; and regularly using complex test instruments (e .g ., dual
trace oscillo sco p es, Q -m e te r s, deviation m eters, pulse generators).

Work may be reviewed by supervisor (frequently an engineer or
designer) for general compliance with accepted practices.
May provide
technical guidance to lower level technicians.

D R A FT ER -TR A C E R
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing
cloth or paper over drawings and tracing with pen or pencil.
(Does not
include tracing limited to plans prim arily consisting of straight lines and a
large scale not requiring close delineation.)
AN D /O R
Prepares simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized item s.
Work is closely supervised during p ro gress.

C lass B . Applies comprehensive technical knowledge to solve com ­
plex problems (i.e ., those that typically can be solved solely by properly
interpreting m anufacturers' manuals or sim ilar documents) in working on
electronic equipment.
Work involves: A fam iliarity with the interrelation­
ships of circuits; and judgment in determining work sequence and in selecting
tools and testing instruments, usually le ss complex than those used by the
class A technician.
Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher
level technician, and work is reviewed for specific compliance with accepted
practices and work assignm ents. May provide technical guidance to lower
level technicians.

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

Works on various types of electronic equipment and related devices
by performing one or a combination of the following: Installing, maintaining,
repairing, overhauling, troubleshooting, modifying, constructing, and testing.
Work requires practical application of technical knowledge of electronics
principles, ability to determine malfunctions, and skill to put equipment in
required operating condition.
The equipment— consisting of either many different kinds of circuits
or multiple repetition of the same kind of circuit— includes, but is not limited
to, the following: (a) Electronic transmitting and receiving equipment (e .g .,
radar, radio, television, telephone, sonar, navigational aids), (b) digital and
analog computers, and (c) industrial and m edical measuring and controlling
equipment.




C lass C . Applies working technical knowledge to perform simple or
routine tasks in working on electronic equipment, following detailed instruc­
tions which cover virtually all procedures.
Work typically involves such
tasks a s: A ssisting higher level technicians by performing such activities as
replacing components, wiring circuits, and taking test readings; repairing
simple electronic equipment; and using tools and common test instruments
(e .g ., m u ltim eters, audio signal generators, tube te ste r s, oscilloscopes).
Is not required to be fam iliar with the interrelationships of circuits.
This
knowledge, however, may be acquired through assignments designed to
increase competence (including classroom training) so that worker can
advance to higher level technician.
Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher
level technician.
Work is typically spot checked, but is given detailed review
when new or advanced assignments are involved.

R E G I S T E R E D IN D U S T R IA L N U R SE

R E G IS T E R E D IN D U S T R IA L N U R SE — C o n tin u e d

A r e g i s t e r e d n u r s e w h o g iv e s n u r s in g s e r v i c e u n d e r g e n e r a l m e d i c a l
d i r e c t i o n to i l l o r in ju r e d e m p lo y e e s o r o t h e r p e r s o n s w h o b e c o m e i l l o r
s u f f e r an a c c id e n t on th e p r e m i s e s o f a f a c t o r y o r o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t .
D u tie s in v o lv e a c o m b in a t io n o f th e f o l l o w i n g ;
G iv in g f i r s t a id to th e i l l o r
i n ju r e d ; a tte n d in g to s u b s e q u e n t d r e s s i n g o f e m p l o y e e s ' i n j u r i e s ; k e e p in g
r e c o r d s o f p a t ie n t s t r e a t e d ; p r e p a r in g a c c id e n t r e p o r t s f o r c o m p e n s a t io n o r

o t h e r p u r p o s e s ; a s s i s t i n g in p h y s i c a l e x a m in a t io n s and h e a lth e v a lu a tio n s o f
a p p lic a n t s and e m p l o y e e s ; and p la n n in g and c a r r y i n g ou t p r o g r a m s in v o lv in g
h e a lth e d u c a t io n , a c c id e n t p r e v e n t io n , e v a lu a tio n o f p la n t e n v ir o n m e n t , o r
o t h e r a c t i v i t i e s a ff e c t in g th e h e a lt h , w e l f a r e , and s a fe t y o f a ll p e r s o n n e l.
N u r s in g s u p e r v i s o r s o r h e a d n u r s e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s e m p lo y in g m o r e th an
o n e n u r s e a r e e x c lu d e d .

MAINTENANCE, TOOLROOM, AND POWERPLANT
M A IN T E N A N C E C A R P E N T E R

M A IN T E N A N C E M A C H IN IS T

P e r f o r m s th e c a r p e n t r y d u tie s n e c e s s a r y to c o n s t r u c t and m a in ta in
in g o o d r e p a i r b u ild in g w o o d w o r k and e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s b in s , c r i b s , c o u n t e r s ,
b e n c h e s , p a r t it i o n s , d o o r s , f l o o r s , s t a i r s , c a s i n g s , and t r i m m a d e o f w o o d
in an e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o r k i n v o lv e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g ;
P la n n in g and
la y in g ou t o f w o r k f r o m b lu e p r in t s , d r a w iftg s , m o d e l s , o r v e r b a l i n s t r u c t io n s ;
u s in g a v a r i e t y o f c a r p e n t e r 's h a n d t o o ls , p o r t a b le p o w e r t o o l s , and s ta n d a r d
m e a s u r in g in s t r u m e n t s ; m a k in g s ta n d a r d s h o p c o m p u ta tio n s r e la t in g to d im e n ­
s io n s o f w o r k ; and s e le c t in g m a t e r i a l s n e c e s s a r y f o r th e w o r k .
In g e n e r a l,
th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e c a r p e n t e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g and e x p e r i ­
e n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g
and e x p e r i e n c e .

P r o d u c e s r e p la c e m e n t p a r t s and n e w p a r t s in m a k in g r e p a i r s o f
m e t a l p a r t s o f m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t e d in an e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o rk
in v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : I n t e r p r e t in g w r it t e n in s t r u c t io n s and s p e c i ­
f i c a t i o n s ; p la n n in g and la y in g ou t o f w o r k ; u s in g a v a r ie t y o f m a c h i n i s t 's
h a n d t o o ls and p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g in s t r u m e n t s ; s e tt in g up and o p e r a t in g
s ta n d a r d m a c h in e t o o l s ; sh a p in g o f m e t a l p a r t s to c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ; m a k in g
s ta n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g to d im e n s io n s o f w o r k , t o o l in g , f e e d s ,
a nd s p e e d s o f m a c h in in g ; k n o w le d g e o f th e w o r k in g p r o p e r t i e s o f th e c o m m o n
m e t a l s ; s e le c t in g s ta n d a r d m a t e r i a l s , p a r t s , and e q u ip m e n t r e q u ir e d f o r th is
w o r k ; and fitt in g and a s s e m b lin g p a r t s in to m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t. In g e n e r a l,
th e m a c h i n i s t 's w o r k n o r m a l l y r e q u i r e s a ro u n d e d tr a in in g in m a c h in e - s h o p
p r a c t i c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t
t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e .

M A IN T E N A N C E E L E C T R I C I A N
M A IN T E N A N C E M E C H A N IC (M a c h in e r y )
R e p a i r s m a c h in e r y o r m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t o f an e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
E x a m in in g m a c h in e s and m e c h a n ic a l
e q u ip m e n t to d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b le ; d is m a n t lin g o r p a r t ly d is m a n t lin g
m a c h in e s and p e r f o r m i n g r e p a i r s th a t m a in ly in v o lv e th e u s e o f h a n d to o ls in
s c r a p in g and fit t in g p a r t s ; r e p la c in g b r o k e n o r d e f e c t iv e p a r t s w ith it e m s
o b ta in e d f r o m s t o c k ; o r d e r i n g th e p r o d u c t io n o f a r e p la c e m e n t p a rt b y a
m a c h in e s h o p o r s e n d in g the. m a c h in e to a m a c h in e s h o p f o r m a j o r r e p a i r s ;
p r e p a r in g w r it t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s f o r m a j o r r e p a i r s o r f o r th e p r o d u c t io n o f
p a r t s o r d e r e d f r o m m a c h in e s h o p s ; r e a s s e m b l i n g m a c h in e s ; and m a k in g a ll
n e c e s s a r y a d ju s tm e n t s f o r o p e r a t io n .
In g e n e r a l, th e w o r k o f a m a c h in e r y
m a in t e n a n c e m e c h a n ic r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d tr a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e u s u a lly
a c q u ir e d th r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tr a in in g and e x p e r i ­
en ce.
E x c lu d e d f r o m t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n a r e w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y d u tie s
in v o lv e s e tt in g up o r a d ju s tin g m a c h in e s .

P e r f o r m s a v a r ie t y o f e l e c t r i c a l t r a d e fu n c t io n s s u ch a s th e i n s t a l ­
la t io n , m a in t e n a n c e , o r r e p a ir o f e q u ip m e n t f o r th e g e n e r a t io n , d is t r ib u t io n ,
o r u tiliz a t io n o f e l e c t r i c e n e r g y in an e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t
o f th e f o l l o w i n g : I n s t a llin g o r r e p a ir in g a n y o f a v a r ie t y o f e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip ­
m e n t s u c h a s g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , s w it c h b o a r d s , c o n t r o l l e r s , c i r c u i t
b r e a k e r s , m o t o r s , h e a tin g u n it s , co n d u it s y s t e m s , o r o t h e r t r a n s m i s s i o n
e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k in g f r o m b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , la y o u t s , o r o t h e r s p e c i f i ­
c a t i o n s ; lo c a t in g and d ia g n o s in g t r o u b le in th e e l e c t r i c a l s y s t e m o r e q u ip ­
m e n t ; w o r k in g s ta n d a r d c o m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g to lo a d r e q u ir e m e n t s o f w ir in g
o r e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t; and u s in g a v a r ie t y o f e l e c t r i c i a n 's h a n d t o o ls and
m e a s u r in g and t e s t in g in s t r u m e n t s .
In g e n e r a l, th e w o r k o f th e m a in te n a n c e
e l e c t r i c i a n r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th r o u g h
a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e .

M A IN T E N A N C E M E C H A N IC ( M o t o r V e h i c l e s )

M A IN T E N A N C E P A IN T E R

R e p a ir s a u t o m o b ile s , b u s e s , m o t o r t r u c k s , and t r a c t o r s o f an e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : E x a m in in g a u t o m o t iv e e q u ip ­
m e n t t o d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b l e ; d i s a s s e m b l i n g e q u ip m e n t and p e r f o r m in g
r e p a i r s th a t in v o lv e th e u s e o f s u ch h a n d t o o ls a s w r e n c h e s , g a u g e s , d r i l l s ,
o r s p e c i a l i z e d e q u ip m e n t in d is a s s e m b l i n g o r fitt in g p a r t s ; r e p la c in g b r o k e n
o r d e f e c t i v e p a r t s f r o m s t o c k ; g r in d in g and a d ju s tin g v a l v e s ; r e a s s e m b l i n g and
in s t a llin g th e v a r io u s a s s e m b l i e s in th e v e h i c l e and m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t ­
m e n t s ; and a lig n in g w h e e l s , a d ju s tin g b r a k e s and lig h t s , o r tig h te n in g b o d y
b o-lts.
In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m o t o r v e h i c l e m a in te n a n c e m e c h a n ic
r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e .

P a in ts and r e d e c o r a t e s w a l l s , w o o d w o r k , and f ix t u r e s o f an e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t .
W o r k in v o lv e s th e f o l l o w i n g : K n o w le d g e o f s u r f a c e p e c u l i a r i t i e s
and t y p e s o f p a in t r e q u ir e d f o r d if f e r e n t a p p lic a t io n s ; p r e p a r in g s u r f a c e f o r
p a in tin g b y r e m o v in g o ld f in is h o r b y p la c in g pu tty o r f i l l e r in n a il h o le s and
i n t e r s t i c e s ; and a p p ly in g p a in t w ith s p r a y gun o r b r u s h .
M ay m ix c o lo r s ,
o i l s , w h ite le a d , and o t h e r p a in t in g r e d ie n t s to o b ta in p r o p e r c o l o r o r
c o n s i s t e n c y . In g e n e r a l, th e w o r k o f th e m a in te n a n c e p a in t e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d
t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r
e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e .




21

M A IN T E N A N C E M E C H A N IC (M o t o r V e h i c l e s ) — C o n tin u e d

M A C H I N E -T O O L O P E R A T O R ( T o o l r o o m )

T h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n d o e s n o t in c lu d e m e c h a n ic s w h o r e p a ir c u s t o m e r s '
v e h i c l e s in a u t o m o b ile r e p a i r s h o p s .

S p e c i a l i z e s in th e o p e r a t io n o f o n e o r m o r e t y p e s o f m a c h in e t o o l s ,
s u c h a s j i g b o r e r s , c y l i n d r i c a l o r s u r f a c e g r i n d e r s ; e n g in e la t h e s ; o r m i llin g
m a c h in e s , in th e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f m a c h i n e - s h o p t o o l s , g a u g e s , j i g s , f i x t u r e s ,
o r d ie s .
W o r k in v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
P la n n in g and p e r f o r m i n g
d i f f i c u l t m a c h in in g o p e r a t i o n s ; p r o c e s s i n g i t e m s r e q u ir in g c o m p lic a t e d s e tu p s
o r a h ig h d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g i n s t r u ­
m e n t s ; s e l e c t i n g f e e d s , s p e e d s , t o o l in g , and o p e r a t io n s e q u e n c e ; and m a k in g
n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s d u r in g o p e r a t io n t o a c h ie v e r e q u is i t e t o l e r a n c e s o r
d im e n s i o n s .
M a y b e r e q u ir e d to r e c o g n i z e w h en t o o l s n e e d d r e s s i n g , t o
d r e s s t o o l s , and t o s e l e c t p r o p e r c o o la n t s and cu ttin g and lu b r ic a t in g o i l s .
F o r c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s , m a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s ( t o o l r o o m )
in t o o l and d ie jo b b in g s h o p s a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m th is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .

M A IN T E N A N C E P I P E F I T T E R
I n s t a lls o r r e p a i r s w a t e r , s t e a m , g a s , o r o t h e r t y p e s o f p ip e and
p ip e fit t in g s in an e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
L a y in g
ou t w o r k and m e a s u r in g to lo c a t e p o s it io n o f p ip e f r o m d r a w in g s o r o t h e r
w r it t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; c u ttin g v a r io u s s i z e s o f p ip e to c o r r e c t le n g th s w ith
c h i s e l and h a m m e r o r o x y a c e t y le n e t o r c h o r p ip e - c u t t in g m a c h in e s ; th r e a d in g
p ip e w ith s t o c k s and d i e s ; b e n d in g p ip e b y h a n d - d r i v e n o r p o w e r - d r i v e n
m a c h in e s ; a s s e m b lin g p ip e w ith c o u p lin g s and fa s t e n in g p ip e to h a n g e r s ;
m a k in g s ta n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g t o p r e s s u r e s , f lo w , and s iz e o f
p ip e r e q u ir e d ; and m a k in g s ta n d a r d t e s t s to d e t e r m i n e w h e t h e r f in is h e d p ip e s
m e e t s p e c ific a tio n s .
In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in te n a n c e p ip e f i t t e r
r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e .
W o rk e rs p r im a r ily
e n g a g e d in in s t a llin g and r e p a ir in g b u ild in g s a n it a tio n o r h e a tin g s y s t e m s
a r e e x c lu d e d .
M A IN T E N A N C E S H E E T - M E T A L W O R K E R
F a b r i c a t e s , i n s t a l l s , and m a in ta in s in g o o d r e p a ir th e s h e e t - m e t a l
e q u ip m e n t and f i x t u r e s ( s u c h a s m a c h in e g u a r d s , g r e a s e p a n s , s h e lv e s ,
l o c k e r s , ta n k s , v e n t i l a t o r s , c h u t e s , d u c t s , m e t a l r o o f in g ) o f an e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o r k i n v o lv e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
P la n n in g and la y in g ou t a l l t y p e s o f
s h e e t - m e t a l m a in t e n a n c e w o r k f r o m b lu e p r in t s , m o d e l s , o r o t h e r s p e c i f i ­
c a t i o n s ; s e tt in g up and o p e r a t in g a l l a v a ila b le t y p e s o f s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k in g
m a c h in e s ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f h a n d t o o ls in c u tt in g , b e n d in g , f o r m i n g , s h a p in g ,
fit t in g , and a s s e m b lin g ; a nd in s t a llin g s h e e t - m e t a l a r t i c l e s a s r e q u i r e d .
In
g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r r e q u i r e s ro u n d e d
t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r
e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e .
M IL L W R IG H T
I n s t a lls n e w m a c h in e s o r h e a v y e q u ip m e n t , and d is m a n t le s and
i n s t a lls m a c h in e s o r h e a v y e q u ip m e n t w h en c h a n g e s in th e p la n t la y o u t a r e
r e q u ir e d .
W o r k in v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : P la n n in g an d la y in g ou t
w o r k ; in t e r p r e t in g b lu e p r in t s o r o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f h a n d t o o l s and r ig g in g ; m a k in g s ta n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g to s t r e s s e s ,
s tr e n g t h o f m a t e r i a l s , and c e n t e r s o f g r a v it y ; a lig n in g and b a la n c in g e q u ip ­
m e n t ; s e le c t in g s ta n d a r d t o o l s , e q u ip m e n t , and p a r t s to b e u s e d ; and in s t a llin g
and m a in ta in in g in g o o d o r d e r p o w e r t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s d r i v e s
an d s p e e d r e d u c e r s .
In g e n e r a l, th e m i l l w r i g h t 's w o r k n o r m a lly r e q u i r e s a
r o u n d e d tr a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e in the t r a d e a c q u ir e d th r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tr a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e .
M A IN T E N A N C E T R A D E S H E L P E R
A s s i s t s o n e o r m o r e w o r k e r s in th e s k ille d m a in te n a n c e t r a d e s , b y
p e r f o r m i n g s p e c i f i c o r g e n e r a l d u t ie s o f l e s s e r s k i l l , s u ch a s k e e p in g a
w o r k e r s u p p lie d w ith m a t e r i a l s and t o o l s ; c le a n in g w o r k in g a r e a , m a c h in e ,
and e q u ip m e n t; a s s i s t i n g jo u r n e y m a n b y h o ld in g m a t e r i a l s o r t o o l s ; and p e r ­
f o r m in g o t h e r u n s k ille d t a s k s a s d i r e c t e d b y jo u r n e y m a n .
T h e k in d o f w o r k
th e h e lp e r i s p e r m it t e d t o p e r f o r m v a r i e s f r o m t r a d e to t r a d e :
In s o m e
t r a d e s th e h e lp e r i s c o n fin e d t o s u p p ly in g , lif t in g , and h o ld in g m a t e r i a l s and
t o o l s , and c le a n in g w o r k in g a r e a s ; and in o t h e r s he i s p e r m it t e d to p e r f o r m
s p e c i a l i z e d m a c h in e o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t s o f a t r a d e th a t a r e a ls o p e r f o r m e d
b y w o r k e r s on a f u l l - t i m e b a s i s .




T O O L A N D D IE M A K E R
C o n s t r u c t s and r e p a i r s m a c h i n e - s h o p t o o l s , g a u g e s , j i g s , f ix t u r e s
o r d i e s f o r f o r g i n g s , p u n c h in g , and o t h e r m e t a l - f o r m i n g w o r k .
W ork
in v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
P la n n in g and la y in g ou t w o r k a c c o r d i n g to
m o d e l s , b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , o r o t h e r o r a l and w r it t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; u s in g
a v a r i e t y o f t o o l and d ie m a k e r 's h a n d t o o ls and p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g i n s t r u ­
m e n t s ; u n d e r s t a n d in g o f th e w o r k in g p r o p e r t i e s o f c o m m o n m e t a ls and a l l o y s ;
s e tt in g up a nd o p e r a t in g o f m a c h in e t o o l s and r e la t e d e q u ip m e n t; m a k in g
n e c e s s a r y s h o p c o m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g t o d im e n s io n s o f w o r k , s p e e d s , f e e d s ,
an d t o o l in g o f m a c h in e s ; h e a t -t r e a t i n g o f m e t a l p a r t s d u r in g f a b r i c a t i o n a s
w e l l a s o f f in is h e d t o o l s and d ie s t o a c h ie v e r e q u i r e d q u a lit ie s ; w o r k in g to
c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ; fit t in g and a s s e m b lin g o f p a r t s to p r e s c r i b e d t o l e r a n c e s
a nd a l l o w a n c e s ; and s e l e c t i n g a p p r o p r ia t e m a t e r i a l s , t o o l s , and p r o c e s s e s .
In g e n e r a l , th e t o o l an d d ie m a k e r 's w o r k r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d tr a in in g in
m a c h in e -s h o p and t o o lr o o m
p r a c t i c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th ro u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r i e n c e .
F o r c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s , t o o l and d ie m a k e r s in
t o o l and d ie jo b b in g s h o p s a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m th is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .

S T A T I O N A R Y E N G IN E E R
O p e r a t e s a nd m a in ta in s and 'm a y a l s o s u p e r v i s e th e o p e r a t io n o f
s t a t io n a r y e n g in e s and e q u ip m e n t ( m e c h a n i c a l o r e l e c t r i c a l ) to s u p p ly the
e s t a b lis h m e n t in w h ic h e m p lo y e d w ith p o w e r , h e a t, r e f r i g e r a t i o n , o r a i r c o n d it io n in g .
W ork in v o lv e s :
O p e r a t in g an d m a in ta in in g e q u ip m e n t su ch a s
s t e a m e n g in e s , a i r c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o t o r s , t u r b in e s , v e n tila t in g
and r e f r i g e r a t i n g e q u ip m e n t , s t e a m b o i l e r s an d b o i l e r - f e d w a te r p u m p s ;
m a k in g e q u ip m e n t r e p a i r s ; and k e e p in g a r e c o r d o f o p e r a t io n o f m a c h in e r y ,
t e m p e r a t u r e , and f u e l c o n s u m p t io n .
M a y a l s o s u p e r v i s e t h e s e o p e r a t io n s .
H ea d o r c h i e f e n g in e e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s e m p lo y in g m o r e th a n o n e e n g in e e r
a r e e x c lu d e d .

B O IL E R T E N D E R
F ir e s
s t a t io n a r y b o i l e r s to f u r n is h th e e s t a b lis h m e n t in w h ic h
e m p lo y e d w ith h e a t , p o w e r , o r
ste a m .
F e e d s f u e l s to f i r e b y h an d o r
o p e r a t e s a m e c h a n i c a l s t o k e r , g a s , o r o i l b u r n e r ; and c h e c k s w a t e r and
s a fe t y v a l v e s .
M a y c l e a n , o i l , o r a s s i s t in r e p a ir in g b o i l e r r o o m e q u ip m e n t.

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
T R U C K D R IV E R

W A R E H O U S E M A N — C o n tin u e d

D r iv e s a t r u c k w ith in a c it y o r in d u s t r ia l a r e a to t r a n s p o r t m a t e ­
r i a l s , m e r c h a n d i s e , e q u ip m e n t, o r w o r k e r s b e tw e e n v a r io u s t y p e s o f e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t s s u ch a s :
M a n u fa c tu r in g p la n t s , fr e ig h t d e p o t s , w a r e h o u s e s , w h o l e ­
s a le and r e t a il e s t a b lis h m e n t s , o r b e tw e e n r e t a i l
e s t a b lis h m e n t s and
c u s t o m e r s ' h o u s e s o r p la c e s o f b u s in e s s . M a y a l s o lo a d o r u n lo a d t r u c k w ith
o r w ith o u t h e l p e r s , m a k e m i n o r m e c h a n ic a l r e p a i r s , and k e e p t r u c k in g o o d
w o r k i n g ord er.
S a le s -r o u t e
and o v e r - t h e - r o a d d r i v e r s
a re e x c lu d e d .

E x c lu d e w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y d u tie s in v o lv e sh ip p in g and r e c e i v i n g
w o r k ( s e e S h ip p in g and R e c e iv in g C le r k and S h ip p in g P a c k e r ) , o r d e r f illin g
( s e e O r d e r F i l l e r ) , o r o p e r a t in g p o w e r t r u c k s ( s e e P o w e r - T r u c k O p e r a t o r ) .

O R D E R F IL L E R
F i l l s s h ip p in g o r t r a n s f e r o r d e r s f o r f in is h e d g o o d s f r o m s t o r e d
m e r c h a n d is e in a c c o r d a n c e w ith s p e c i f i c a t i o n s on s a le s s l i p s , c u s t o m e r s '
o r d e r s , o r o th e r i n s t r u c t i o n s .
M a y , in a d d itio n to f illin g o r d e r s and in d i­
c a t in g it e m s f i l l e d o r o m it t e d , k e e p r e c o r d s o f o u tg o in g o r d e r s , r e q u is i t io n
a d d it io n a l s t o c k o r r e p o r t s h o r t s u p p lie s to s u p e r v i s o r , and p e r f o r m o th e r
r e la t e d d u t ie s .

F o r wage study p u r p o s e s , t r u c k d r i v e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d b y s iz e and
ty p e o f e q u ip m e n t, as f o l l o w s :
( T r a c t o r - t r a i l e r s h o u ld be r a te d on th e b a s is
o f t r a i l e r c a p a c it y .)
T r u c k d r iv e r ,
T r u c k d r iv e r ,
T r u c k d r iv e r ,
T r u c k d r iv e r ,

lig h t t r u c k (u n d e r IV 2 to n s )
m e d iu m t r u c k (1 V2 to and in c lu d in g 4 t o n s )
h e a v y t r u c k ( t r a i l e r ) ( o v e r 4 to n s )
h e a v y t r u c k (o t h e r th an t r a i l e r ) ( o v e r 4 t o n s )

S H IP P IN G P A C K E R
P r e p a r e s f in is h e d p r o d u c t s f o r s h ip m e n t o r s t o r a g e b y p la c in g th e m
in s h ip p in g c o n t a i n e r s , th e s p e c i f i c o p e r a t io n s p e r f o r m e d b e in g d e p e n d e n t upon
th e t y p e , s i z e , and n u m b e r o f u n its to b e p a c k e d , th e ty p e o f c o n t a in e r
e m p lo y e d , and m e t h o d o f s h ip m e n t.
W o r k r e q u i r e s th e p la c in g o f it e m s in
s h ip p in g c o n t a in e r s and m a y in v o lv e on e o r m o r e o f th e f o l l o w i n g : K n o w le d g e
o f v a r io u s it e m s o f s t o c k in o r d e r to v e r i f y c o n te n t; s e l e c t i o n o f a p p r o p r ia t e
ty p e and s iz e o f c o n t a in e r ; in s e r t in g e n c l o s u r e s in c o n t a in e r ; u s in g e x c e l s i o r
o r o t h e r m a t e r i a l to p r e v e n t b r e a k a g e o r d a m a g e ; c lo s i n g and s e a lin g c o n ­
t a in e r ; and a p p ly in g la b e ls o r e n t e r in g id e n tify in g d a ta on c o n t a in e r .
P ack ers
w h o a ls o m a k e w o o d e n b o x e s o r c r a t e s a r e e x c lu d e d .

S H IP P IN G A N D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K
P r e p a r e s m e r c h a n d is e f o r s h ip m e n t, o r r e c e i v e s and is r e s p o n s i b l e
f o r in c o m in g s h ip m e n ts o f m e r c h a n d is e o r o t h e r m a t e r i a l s .
S h ip p in g w o r k
in v o lv e s :
A k n o w le d g e o f sh ip p in g p r o c e d u r e s , p r a c t i c e s , r o u t e s , a v a ila b le
m e a n s o f t r a n s p o r t a t io n , and r a t e s ; and p r e p a r in g r e c o r d s o f th e g o o d s
s h ip p e d , m a k in g up b i l l s o f la d in g , p o s t in g w e ig h t and sh ip p in g c h a r g e s , and
k e e p in g a f ile o f s h ip p in g r e c o r d s .
M a y d i r e c t o r a s s i s t in p r e p a r in g th e
m e r c h a n d is e f o r s h ip m e n t.
R e c e iv in g w o r k i n v o l v e s :
V e r if y in g o r d ir e c t in g
o t h e r s in v e r if y in g th e c o r r e c t n e s s o f s h ip m e n ts a g a in s t b i l l s o f la d in g ,
i n v o i c e s , o r o t h e r r e c o r d s ; c h e c k in g f o r s h o r t a g e s and r e j e c t i n g d a m a g e d
g o o d s ; r o u tin g m e r c h a n d is e o r m a t e r i a l s to p r o p e r d e p a r t m e n t s ; and m a in ­
ta in in g n e c e s s a r y r e c o r d s and f i l e s .
F o r w age

stu d y p u r p o s e s ,

w ork ers

a re c la s s ifie d

M A T E R I A L H A N D L IN G L A B O R E R
A w o r k e r e m p lo y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c tu r in g p la n t, s t o r e , o r
o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t w h o s e d u tie s in v o lv e o n e o r m o r e o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
L o a d in g and u n lo a d in g v a r io u s m a t e r i a l s and m e r c h a n d is e on o r f r o m fr e ig h t
c a r s , t r u c k s , o r o t h e r t r a n s p o r t in g d e v i c e s ; u n p a c k in g , s h e lv in g , o r p la c in g
m a t e r i a l s o r m e r c h a n d is e in p r o p e r
s t o r a g e lo c a t io n ; and t r a n s p o r t in g
m a t e r i a l s o r m e r c h a n d is e b y h a n d tr u c k , c a r , o r w h e e l b a r r o w .
L on gshore
w o r k e r s , w h o lo a d and u n lo a d s h ip s , a r e e x c l u d e d .

as fo llo w s :

S h ip p in g c l e r k
R e c e iv in g c le r k
S h ip p in g and r e c e i v i n g c l e r k

W AREH OUSEM AN
P O W E R -T R U C K O P E R A T O R
A s d i r e c t e d , p e r f o r m s a v a r ie t y o f w a r e h o u s in g d u tie s w h ich r e q u ir e
an u n d e r s t a n d in g o f th e e s t a b lis h m e n t 's s t o r a g e p la n .
W o rk in v o lv e s m o s t
o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
V e r if y in g m a t e r ia ls ( o r m e r c h a n d is e ) a g a in s t r e c e iv in g
d o c u m e n t s , n o tin g and r e p o r t in g d i s c r e p a n c i e s and o b v io u s d a m a g e s ; r o u tin g
m a t e r i a l s to p r e s c r i b e d s t o r a g e lo c a t io n s ; s t o r i n g , s ta c k in g , o r p a lle t iz in g
m a t e r i a l s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith p r e s c r i b e d s t o r a g e m e t h o d s ; r e a r r a n g in g and
t a k i n g in v e n t o r y o f s t o r e d m a t e r i a l s ; e x a m in in g s t o r e d m a t e r i a l s and
r e p o r t in g d e t e r i o r a t i o n and d a m a g e ; r e m o v in g m a t e r i a l f r o m s t o r a g e and
p r e p a r in g it f o r s h ip m e n t.
M a y o p e r a t e hand o r p o w e r t r u c k s in p e r f o r m in g
w a r e h o u s in g d u tie s .




O p e r a t e s a m a n u a lly c o n t r o l l e d g a s o l i n e - o r e l e c t r i c - p o w e r e d t r u c k
o r t r a c t o r t o t r a n s p o r t g o o d s and m a t e r i a l s o f a ll k in d s a b ou t a w a r e h o u s e ,
m a n u fa c t u r in g p la n t, o r o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t .

tru ck ,

F o r w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s
as fo llo w s :

are

c l a s s i f i e d b y ty p e o f p o w e r -

F o r k lift o p e r a to r
P o w e r - t r u c k o p e r a t o r ( o t h e r th a n f o r k lif t )

23

GUARD AND W ATCH M AN

J A N IT O R , P O R T E R , O R C L E A N E R

G u ard.
P e r f o r m s r o u tin e p o l i c e d u t ie s , e it h e r at f ix e d p o s t o r on
t o u r , m a in ta in in g o r d e r , u s in g a r m s o r f o r c e w h e r e n e c e s s a r y .
I n c lu d e s
g u a r d s w h o a r e s ta t io n e d at g a te and c h e c k on id e n t it y o f e m p lo y e e s and
o th e r p e r s o n s e n te r in g .

C le a n s an d k e e p s in an o r d e r l y c o n d it io n f a c t o r y w o r k in g a r e a s and
w a s h r o o m s , o r p r e m i s e s o f an o f f i c e , a p a r t m e n t h o u s e , o r c o m m e r c i a l
o r o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t .
D u tie s in v o lv e a c o m b in a t io n o f th e f o l l o w i n g ;
S w e e p in g , m o p p in g o r s c r u b b in g , and p o lis h in g f l o o r s ; r e m o v in g c h i p s , t r a s h ,
a nd o t h e r r e f u s e ; d u s tin g e q u ip m e n t, f u r n it u r e , o r f i x t u r e s ; p o lis h in g m e t a l
f i x t u r e s o r t r i m m i n g s ; p r o v id in g s u p p lie s and m i n o r m a in te n a n c e s e r v i c e s ;
a nd c le a n in g l a v a t o r i e s , s h o w e r s , and r e s t r o o m s .
W o rk e r s w ho s p e c ia liz e
in w in d o w w a s h in g a r e e x c l u d e d .

W a tch m a n .
M akes rou nd s o f p r e m is e s
p r o p e r t y a g a in s t f i r e , t h e ft , and i l l e g a l e n t r y .




p e r io d ic a lly

in

p r o t e c t in g

24

Area W age Surveys
A l i s t o f th e l a t e s t a v a i l a b l e b u ll e t in s o r b u ll e t in s u p p le m e n t s is p r e s e n t e d b e l o w .
A d ir e c to r y o f
S ta n d a rd s A d m in is t r a t io n o f th e D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r is a v a ila b le on r e q u e s t.
B u lle tin s m a y b e p u r c h a s e d
o b t a in e d w it h o u t c o s t , w h e r e in d ic a t e d , f r o m B L S r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s .

A rea

B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r ic e *

A k r o n , O h i o , D e c . 1 9 7 5 _________________________________________________________________________________
A l b a n y —S c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N . Y . , S e p t . 1 9 7 5 1__________________________________________________
A n a h e i m —S a n t a A n a —G a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , O c t . 1 9 7 5 * _____________________________________
A t l a n t a , G a . , M a y 1 9 7 6 _________________________________________________________________________________
A u s t i n , T e x . , D e c . 1 9 7 5 1 _____, ________________________________________________________________________
B a l t i m o r e , M d . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 * __________________________________________________________________________
B i l l i n g s , M o n t . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 _____________________________________________________________________________
B i n g h a m t o n , N . Y . —P a . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 ___________________________________________________________________

1 8 5 0 -8 0 , 45 cen ts
1 8 5 0 -6 3 , $ 1 .2 0
1 8 5 0 -7 5 , 85 ce n ts
1 8 5 0 -2 5 , $ 1 .0 0
1 8 5 0 - 8 3 , 75 c e n t s
1 8 5 0 -6 2 , $ 1 .3 0
1 8 5 0 -4 6 , 65 c e n ts
1 8 5 0 -5 0 , 65 c e n ts

B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , M a r . 1 9 7 6 * ______________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 1 , 9 5 c e n t s
B o s t o n , M a s s . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 * ___________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 8 , $ 1 . 5 0
B u f f a l o , N . Y . , O c t . 1 9 7 5 * ______________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 9 , 9 5 c e n t s
C a n t o n , O h i o , M a y 1 9 7 6 ________________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 8 , 5 5 c e n t s
C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n . - G a . , S e p t . 1 9 7 5 * _______________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 7 , 8 5 c e n t s
C h i c a g o , 111., M a y 1 9 7 5 _________________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 3 , 8 5 c e n t s
C i n c i n n a t i , O h i o - K y . —I n d . , M a r . 1 9 7 6 _____________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 7 , 7 5 c e n t s
C l e v e l a n d , O h i o , S e p t . 1 9 7 5 ___________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 4 , $ 1 . 3 0
C o l u m b u s , O h i o , O c t . 1 9 7 5 1 __________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 7 8 , 9 5 c e n t s
C o r p u s C h r i s t i , T e x . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 _____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 7 , 6 5 c e n t s
D a l l a s - F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , O c t . 1 9 7 5 1 _____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 9 , $ 1 . 5 0
D a v e n p o r t —R o c k I s l a n d —M o l i n e , I o w a —111., F e b . 1 9 7 6 ________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 5 , 5 5 c e n t s
D a y t o n , O h i o , D e c . 1 9 7 5 ________________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 7 3 , 4 5 c e n t s
D a y t o n a B e a c h , F l a . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 _____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 7 , 6 5 c e n t s
D e n v e r —B o u l d e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1 9 7 5 __________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 8 2 , 75 c e n t s
D e t r o i t , M i c h . , M a r . 1 9 7 6 * ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 5 , $ 1 . 2 5
F o r t L a u d e r d a l e —H o l l y w o o d a n d W e s t P a l m B e a c h —
B o c a R a t o n , F l a . , A p r . 1 9 7 6 ________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 0 , 5 5 c e n t s
F r e s n o , C a l i f . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 * ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 1 , $ 1 . 2 0
G a i n e s v i l l e , F l a . , S e p t . 1 9 7 5 _________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 7 , $ 1 . 1 0
G r e e n B a y , W i s . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 1 _________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 4 , 8 0 c e n t s
G r e e n s b o r o — i n s t o n - S a l e m —H ig h P o i n t , N . C . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 _________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 9 , 6 5 c e n t s
W
G r e e n v i l l e —S p a r t a n b u r g , S . C . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 ________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 2 , 6 5 c e n t s
H a r t f o r d , C o n n . , M a r . 1 9 7 6 ___________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 4 , 5 5 c e n t s
H o u s t o n , T e x . , A p r . 1 9 7 6 ______________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 6 , 8 5 c e n t s
H u n t s v i l l e , A l a . , F e b . 1 9 7 6 ___________________________________________________________________ . _______ 1 9 0 0 - 1 7 , 5 5 c e n t s
I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d . , O c t . 1 9 7 5 * _______________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 6 , 9 5 c e n t s
J a c k s o n , M i s s . , F e b . 1 9 7 6 _____________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 8 , 5 5 c e n t s
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , D e c . 1 9 7 5 _________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 8 1 , 4 5 c e n t s
K a n s a s C i t y , M o . —K a n s . , S e p t . 1 9 7 5 _______________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 5 , 8 0 c e n t s
L e x i n g t o n —F a y e t t e , K y . , N o v . 1 9 7 5 * _______________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 8 4 , 75 c e n t s
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h , C a l i f . , O c t . 1 9 7 5 * __________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 8 6 , $ 1 . 1 5
L o u i s v i l l e , K y . —I n d . , N o v . 1 9 7 5 _____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 7 9 , 4 5 c e n t s
M e l b o u r n e —T i t u s v i l l e —C o c o a , F l a . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 _________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 4 , 6 5 c e n t s
M e m p h i s , T e n n . —A r k . —M i s s . , N o v . 1 9 7 5 __________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 8 5 , 4 5 c e n t s

Prices are determ in ed by the Governm ent Printing O ffice and are su bject to chan ge.
Data on establishm ent p ra ctices ahd supplem entary w a g e provisions are also presented.
T o b e surveyed.




a r e a w a g e s t u d i e s in c l u d i n g m o r e l i m i t e d s t u d i e s c o n d u c t e d a t th e r e q u e s t o f th e E m p lo y m e n t
f r o m a n y o f t h e B L S r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s s h o w n o n the_ b a c k c o v e r .
B u lle tin s u p p le m e n ts m a y b e

A rea

B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r ic e *

M i a m i , F l a . , O c t . 1 9 7 5 __________________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 7 6 ,
M i l w a u k e e , W i s . , A p r . 1 9 7 6 __________________ - _______________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 2 ,
M i n n e a p o l i s —S t. P a u l , M i n n .—W i s . , J a n . 1 9 7 6 ___________________________________________________ 1 1 9 0 0 - 3 ,
N a s s a u —S u f f o l k , N . Y . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 1___________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 9 ,
N e w a r k , N . J . , J a n . 1 9 7 6 _________________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 0 ,
N e w O r l e a n s , L a . , J a n . 1 9 7 6 __________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 ,
N e w Y o r k , N . Y . - N . J . , M a y 1 9 7 5 1 ____________________________________________________ _____ _________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 5 ,
N o r f o l k —V i r g i n i a B e a c h —P o r t s m o u t h , V a . —N . C . , M a y 1 9 7 6 ' _______________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 7 ,
N o r f o l k —V i r g i n i a B e a c h —P o r t s m o u t h a n d N e w p o r t N e w s —
H a m p t o n , V a . —N . C . , M a y 1 9 7 5 _____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 0 ,
N o r t h e a s t P e n n s y l v a n i a , A u g . 1 9 7 5 _________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 2 ,
O k l a h o m a C i t y , O k l a . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 ____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 1 ,
O m a h a , N e b r . —I o w a , O c t . 1 9 7 5 _______________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 6 ,
P a t e r s o n —C l i f t o n —P a s s a i c , N . J . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 1 ____________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 8 ,
P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . —N . J . , N o v . 1 9 7 5 ________________________ __________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 5 ,
P i t t s b u r g h , P a . , J a n . 1 9 7 6 * ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 ,
P o r t l a n d , M a i n e , N o v . 1 9 7 5 _____________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 7 2 ,
P o r t l a n d , O r e g . —W a s h . , M a y 1 9 7 5 __________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 0 ,
P o u g h k e e p s i e , N . Y . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 1 _____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 7 0 ,
P o u g h k e e p s i e —K i n g s t o n —N e w b u r g h , N . Y . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 1 _______________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 8 ,
P r o v i d e n c e —W a r w i c k —P a w t u c k e t , R . I . —M a s s . , J u n e 1 0 7 5
___ _____________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 2 7 ,
R a l e i g h - D u r h a m , N . C . , F e b . 1 9 7 6 ___________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 8 ,
R i c h m o n d , V a . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 ______________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 1 ,
S t. L o u i s , M o . —111., M a r . 1 9 7 6 1 ______________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 9 ,
S a c r a m e n t o , C a l i f . , D e c . 1 9 7 5 ________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 8 7 ,
S a g i n a w , M i c h . , N o v . 1 9 7 5 ______________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 7 1 ,
S a l t L a k e C i t y —O g d e n , U t a h , N o v . 1 9 7 5 1 __________________________________ _______________________ 1 8 5 0 - 7 4 ,
S a n A n t o n i o , T e x . , M a y 1 9 7 6 ________________________________________________ :__________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 3 ,
S a n D i e g o , C a l i f . , N o v . 1 9 7 5___________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 7 7 ,
S a n F r a n c i s c o —O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , M a r . 1 9 7 6 ________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 9 ,
S a n J o s e , C a l i f . , M a r . 1 9 7 6 ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 3 ,
S e a t t l e —E v e r e t t , W a s h . , J a n . 1 9 7 6 __________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 6 ,
S o u t h B e n d , I n d . , M a r . 1 9 7 6 ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 5 ,
S t a m f o r d , C o n n . 1 2 _______________________________________________________________________________________
S y r a c u s e , N . Y . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 ______________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 3 ,
T o l e d o , O h i o —M i c h . , M a y 1 9 7 6 _______________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 4 ,
T r e n t o n , N . J . , S e p t . 1 9 7 5 1 _____________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 0 ,
U t i c a —R o m e , N . Y . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 1 _______________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 8 ,
W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . —M d .—V a . , M a r . 1 9 7 6 ___________________________________________ _________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 2 ,
W e s t c h e s t e r C o u n t y , N . Y . , M a y 1 9 7 5 * ____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 3 ,

95 ce n ts
85 c e n ts
95 c e n ts
$ 1 .0 0
85 c e n ts
75 cen ts
$ 1 .1 0
85 c e n ts
65 cen ts
65 ce n ts
65 ce n ts
$ 1 .1 0
80 c e n ts
85 c e n ts
$ 1 .1 5
45 ce n ts
75 ce n ts
65 ce n ts
75 ce n ts
75 ce n ts
55 cen ts
65 cen ts
$ 1 .2 5
45 cen ts
35 cen ts
75 ce n ts
65 cen ts
45 ce n ts
95 cen ts
65 cen ts
65 c e n ts
55 c e n ts
65 ce n ts
55 c e n ts
$ 1 .2 0
80 c e n ts
85 c e n ts
80 c e n t s

W i c h i t a , K a n s . , A p r . 1 9 7 6 ______________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 2 1 , 5 5
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , A p r . 1 9 7 6 __________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 1 6 , 5 5
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1 9 7 6 _____________________________________________________________________________________ 1 9 0 0 - 4 , 5 5

cen ts
cen ts
cen ts

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212

Postage and Fees Paid
U.S. Department of Labor
Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300

Lab-441

Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional Offices
Region I
Region II
1603 JFK Federal Building
Suite 3400
Government Center
1515 Broadway
Boston, Mass. 02203
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Region III
3535 Market Street,
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Cade 215)
Delaware
District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St., N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee

Region V
Region VI
Regions VII and VIII
Regions IX and X
9th Floor, 230 S. Dearborn St.
Second Floor
Federal Office Building
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Chicago, III. 60604
555 Griffin Square Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Box 36017
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code ■
Illinois
Indiana
VIII
Arkansas
VII
IX
X
Michigan
Alaska
Louisiana
Iowa
Colorado
Arizona
Minnesota
Montana
New Mexico
Kansas
California
Idaho
Ohio
Missouri
Hawaii
Oregon
Oklahoma
North Dakota
Nebraska
Nevada
Washington
Wisconsin
South Dakota
Texas
Utah
Wyoming