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AREA WAGE SURVEY
Burlington, V e rm o n t Area,
Decem ber 1972
Bulletin 1775-28




U S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
of Labor Statistics




P re fa c e
This bulletin provides results of a December 1972 survey of occupa­
tional earnings and supplementary wage benefits in the Burlington, Vermont,
area (Burlington, Essex Junction, South Burlington, and Winooski in Chittenden
County). The survey was made as part of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' annual
area wage survey program .
The program is designed to yield data for indi­
vidual metropolitan areas, as well as national and regional estimates for all
Standard Metropolitan A reas in the United States, excluding Alaska and Hawaii,
(as defined by the U .S . Office of Management and Budget through November 1971).
A major consideration in the area wage survey program is the need to
describe the level and movement of wages in a variety of labor markets, through
the analysis of (1) the level and distribution of wages by occupation, and (2) the
movement of wages by occupational category and skill level. The program de­
velops information that may be used for many purposes, including wage and
salary administration, collective bargaining, and assistance in determining plant
location. Survey results also are used by the U .S . Department of Labor to make
wage determinations under the Service Contract Act of 1965.
Currently, 96 areas are included in the program .
(See list of areas
on inside back cover.) In each area, occupational earnings data are collected
annually. Information on establishment practices and supplementary wage bene­
fits, collected every second year in the past, is now obtained every third year.
Each year after all individual area wage surveys have been completed,
two summary bulletins are issued.
The first brings together data for each
metropolitan area surveyed. The second summary bulletin presents national and
regional estimates, projected from individual metropolitan area data.
The Burlington survey was conducted by the Bureau's regional office
in Boston, M ass. , under the general direction of Paul V. Mulkern, Assistant
Regional Director for Operations. The survey could not have been accomplished
without the cooperation of the many firm s whose wage and salary data provided
the basis for the statistical information in this bulletin.
The Bureau wishes
to express sincere appreciation for the cooperation received.

Note:
Also available for the Burlington area are listings of union wage rates
for seven selected building trades. Free copies of these are available from the
Bureau's regional offices.
(See back cover for addresses.)

AREA WAGE SURVEY

Bulletin 1775-28
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R , Peter J. Brennan, Secretary

M arch 1973

B U R EA U OF LABOR S TA TIS TIC S, Ben Burdetsky, Deputy Commissioner

Burlington, Vermont Area, December 1972
CONTENTS
Pag*
2 Introduction

Tables:
1.

Establishments and w orkers within scope of survey and number studied

A.

Occupational earnings:
A - 1,
Office occupations: Weekly earnings
A -2 .
P rofessio n al and technical occupations: Weekly earnings
A - 3.
O ffice, profession al, and technical occupations: A verage weekly earnings, by sex
A - 4.
Maintenance and powerplant occupations: Hourly earnings
A - 5.
Custodial and m aterial movement occupations: Hourly earnings
A -6 .
Maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and m aterial handling occupations: A verage hourly earnings, by sex

B.

5

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
B -l.
Minimum entrance salaries for women officew orkers
B -2 .
Shift differentials
B -3 .
Scheduled weekly hours and days
B -4 .
Annual paid holidays
B -4 a. Identification of m ajor paid holidays
B -5 .
Paid vacations
B -6 .
Health, insurance, and pension plans

6
7
7

8
9

10
11

12
13
14
15
16
18

21 Appendix,

Occupational descriptions




For sale by tha Suparintandant of Documents, U.S. Govtmmtnt Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402

1

In tro d u c tio n
This a rea is 1 of 96 in which the U.S. Department o f L a b o r 's
Bureau o f L a b or Statistics conducts surveys o f occupational earnings
and re la te d benefits on an areaw ide b a s is . 1 In this a rea, data w e r e
obtained by p erson al vis its o f Bureau fie ld econom ists to r e p r e s e n t a ­
tiv e establishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing;
transportatio n, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale
trade; r e t a il trade; finance, insurance, and re a l estate; and s e r v ic e s .
M a jo r industry groups excluded fr o m these studies a re governm ent
operations and the construction and ex tra c tiv e industries. E s ta b lis h ­
ments having fe w e r than a p r e s c r ib e d number o f w o rk e rs arc omitted
because of insufficient em ploym ent in the occupations studied. Sepa­
rate tabulations a re provided for each of the broad industry divisions
which m e e t publication c r it e r ia .

the A - s e r i e s tables, because either (1) em ploym ent in the occupation
is too sm all to provid e enough data to m e r i t presentation, o r (2) there
is p os s ib ility of d is c lo s u re of individual establishment data. Earnings
data not shown separately fo r industry div isions are included in all
industries combined data, where shown. L ik e w is e , data are included
in the o v e r a l l cla s s ific a tio n when a subclassification of e lectro n ics
technicians, s e c r e t a r ie s , o r tru c k d riv e rs is not shown o r info rm atio n
to subclassify is not available.
Occupational employment and earnin gs data are shown for
fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s , i.e ., those hired to w ork a r e g u la r weekly schedule.
Earnings data exclude prem ium pay for o v e r t im e and for work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are e x ­
cluded, but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g allowances and incentive earnings are in­
cluded. Where w eek ly hours are reported, as fo r o ffic e c l e r ic a l occu­
pations, r e fe r e n c e is to the standard w orkw eek (rounded to the nearest
half hour) fo r which em ployees r e c e iv e their re g u la r straigh t-tim e
s a la r ie s (e x clu sive of pay for o v e r t im e at re g u la r and/or prem iu m
r a tes).
A v e r a g e w eek ly earnings fo r these occupations are rounded
to the n earest half d olla r.

Th ese surveys are conducted on a sample basis. The s a m ­
pling p roced u res involve detailed stratification of all establishments
within the scope o f an individual a rea survey by industry and number
of e m p lo y e e s . F r o m this stratified universe a probability sample is
sele cted, with each establishment having a p red e te rm in e d chance of
selectio n. T o obtain optimum accu racy at m inim um cost, a g r e a t e r
proportion o f la r g e than small establishments is selected. When data
a re combin ed, each establishment is weighted accordin g to its p rob a ­
b ility o f s e lection , so that unbiased estim ates are generated. F o r e x ­
am ple , if one out of four establishments is selected, it is given a
weight of four to rep resen t i t s e lf plus th ree others. An alternate of the
same o r ig in a l probability is chosen in the same in d u s tr y -s iz e c l a s s i f i ­
cation i f data are not available fo r the o rig in a l sample m e m b e r .
If

These surveys m ea su re the le v e l o f occupational earnings in
an a rea at a pa rticu la r tim e. Com parisons of individual occupational
a v e ra g e s o v e r tim e m ay not r e fle c t expected wage changes. The a v e r ­
ages fo r individual jobs are affected by changes in wages and e m p lo y ­
ment patterns.
F o r example, proportions o f w o rk e rs em plo yed by
high- o r lo w -w a g e f ir m s m ay change o r high-wage w o rk e rs m ay ad­
vance to better jobs and be replaced by new w o rk e rs at lo w e r rates.
Such shifts in em ploym ent could d ecrea se an occupational average
even though m ost establishments in an a rea in crease wages during
the y e a r . Trends in earnings of occupational groups, shown in table 2,
a re better indicators of wage trends than individual jobs within the
g ro u p s .

no s ui t ab l e subst i t ut e i s a v a i l a b l e , a d d i t i o n a l we i g h t is a s s i g n e d to a

sample m e m b e r that is s im ila r to the m is s in g unit.
Occupations and Earnings
The occupations s e lected fo r study are common to a v a r ie t y
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries, and are o f the
follow in g types:
(1) O ffic e c le r i c a l ; (2) p rofession a l and technical;
(3) maintenance and powerplant; and (4) custodial and m a t e r ia l m o v e ­
ment.
Occupational cla s s ific a tio n is based on a uniform set of job
descriptions desig ned to take account o f interestablishm ent variation
in duties within the same job. The occupations sele cted fo r study are
listed and d e s c rib e d in the appendix. Unless o th erw ise indicated, the
earnings data fo llow in g the job titles are fo r all industries combined.
Earnings data fo r some o f the occupations listed and d e scrib ed , or
fo r som e industry divisions within occupations, are not presented in
1
Included in the 96 areas are 10 studies conducted by die Bureau under contract. These
are Austin, T e x .; Binghamton, N .Y . (New York portion only); Durham, N. C. ; Fort Lauderdale—
Hollywood and West Palm Beach, F la .; Huntsville, A la .; Lexington, K y .; Poughkeepsie—Kingston—
Newburgh, N .Y . ; Rochester, N .Y . (office occupations only); Syracuse, N .Y . ; and Utica—Rome, N.Y.
In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies in approximately 70 areas at the request
of the Employment Standards Administration of the U. S. Department of Labor.




A v e r a g e earnings r e fle c t com posite, areaw ide estim ates. In­
dustries and establishments d iffe r in pay le v e l and job staffing, and
thus contribute d iffe re n tly to the estim ates fo r each job. Pay a v e r ­
ages m ay fail to r e fle c t accu rately the wage d iffe re n tia l among jobs in
individual establishments.
A v e r a g e pay l e v e ls fo r men and wom en in sele cted occupa­
tions should not be assumed to r e fle c t d iffe re n c e s in pay of the sexes
within individual establishments.
F a c to rs which m a y contribute to
d iffe re n c e s include p r o g r e s s io n within established rate ranges, since
areas only the rates paid incumbents are co llected, and p erfo rm a n ce of spe­
c ific duties within the g en eral su rvey job d e scrip tion s. Job d e s c r i p ­
tions used to c la s s ify em ployees in these su rveys usually are m o r e
g e n e ra liz e d than those used in individual establishments and a llow f o r
m in or d iffe r e n c e s among establishments in s p ecific duties p e r fo r m e d .

2

3
Occupational em ploym ent estim ates r ep resen t the total in all
establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actu­
ally su rveyed. Because occupational structures among establishments
differ, e stim a tes o f occupational em ployment obtained fr o m the sample
of establishments studied s e r v e only to indicate the r e la tiv e im p o r ­
tance of the jobs studied. T h ese d iffe re n c e s in occupational structure
do not affect m a t e r i a l l y the a ccu ra cy o f the earnings data.

Establishment P r a c t i c e s and Supplementary Wage P r o v is io n s
Info rm atio n is p resented (in the B - s e r i e s tables) on selected
establishment p ra c tic e s and supplementary wage provision s fo r plantw o rk ers and o f f i c e w o r k e r s . Data for industry divisions not presented
sep arately a r e included in the estim ates for " a l l in d u s trie s ." A d m in ­
is tr a tiv e , executive, and p ro fe s s io n a l em p lo y e e s , and construction
w o rk e rs who a re u tilized as a separate w ork fo rc e are excluded.
"P la n t w o r k e r s " include workin g fo r e m e n and all nonsupervisory w o r k ­
ers (including leadm en and tra in e e s ) engaged in nonoffice func­
tions.
" O f f i c e w o r k e r s " include workin g s u p erviso rs and nonsuper­
v i s o r y w o r k e r s p e r fo r m in g c l e r i c a l o r related functions.
C a fe te r ia
w o r k e r s and routemen are excluded in manufacturing industries, but
included in nonmanufacturing industries.
Minim um entrance s a la rie s for women o ffic e w o r k e r s
only to the establishments v isited .
(See table B - l . )
Because
optimum sampling techniques used and the p robability that la rg e
lishments are m o r e lik e ly than sm all establishments to have
entrance rates above the s u b clerica l le v e l, the table is m o r e
sentative o f p o lic ie s in m ediu m and la rg e establishments.

relate
of the
estab­
fo rm a l
repre­

Shift d ifferen tia l data are lim ited to plantworkers in manu­
facturing industries. (See table B - 2 .) This inform ation is presented
in t e rm s of (1) establishment p o l i c y 2 for total plantworker e m p lo y ­
ment, and (2) e ffe c tiv e p ra ctice for w o r k e r s actually em ployed on the
sp ecified shift at the tim e of the survey.
In establishments having
v a r ie d d iffe re n tia ls , the amount applying to a m a jo r it y is used; if no
amount applies to a m a jo rity , the cla s s ific a tio n " o t h e r " is used. In e s ­
tablishments having some la te -s h ift hours paid at normal rates, a d i f ­
fe re n c e is r e c o rd e d only i f it applies to a m a jo r it y of the shift hours.
The scheduled w eekly hours and days o f a m a jo r it y of the
f i r s t - s h i f t w o rk e rs in an establishment a re tabulated as applying to
all of the pla ntworkers or o f fic e w o r k e r s of that establishment. (See
table B -3 .) Scheduled w eekly hours and days are those which a m a ­
j o r i t y of fu ll-tim e em p loyees are expected to work, whether they are
paid s tra ig h t-tim e or o v e r tim e rates.
2
An establishment is considered as having a policy if it met
tions: (1) Operated late shifts at the time of the survey, or (2) had formal
shifts. An establishment was considered as having formal provisions if it (1)
during the 12 months before the survey, or (2) had provisions in written form




P a i d h o l i d a y s ; pai d v a c a t i o n s ; and heal t h, i n s u r a n c e , and p e n ­
si on pl ans a r e t r e a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l l y on the b a s i s that t h e s e a r e a p p l i ­
c a b l e to al l p l a n t w o r k e r s o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s i f a m a j o r i t y o f such w o r k ­
e r s a r e e l i g i b l e o r m a y e v e n t u a l l y q u a l i f y f o r the p r a c t i c e s l i s t e d .
( Se e t a b l e s B - 4 t h r o ug h B - 6 . ) Sums o f i nd i v i d ua l i t e m s in t a b l e s B - 2
t h r o ug h B - 6 m a y not e q ua l t o t al s b e c a u s e o f roundi ng.
Dat a on pai d ho l i d a y s a r e l i m i t e d to h o l i d a y s g r a n t e d annu­
a l l y on a f o r m a l b a s i s ; i . e . , (1) a r e p r o v i d e d f o r in w r i t t e n f o r m , o r
(2) a r e e s t a b l i s h e d by c u s t o m .
( Se e t ab l e B - 4 . ) H o l i d a y s o r d i n a r i l y
g r a n t e d a r e i nc l ud e d e v e n though t hey m a y . f al l on a n o n wo r k d a y and
the w o r k e r i s not g r a n t e d a not he r day of f .
T h e f i r s t p a r t o f the pai d
h o l i d a y s t a b l e p r e s e n t s the n u m b e r o f wh o l e and ha l f h o l i d a y s a c t ua l l y
granted.
T h e s e c o nd p ar t c o m b i n e s w h o l e and ha l f h o l i d a y s to s ho w
t o t al h o l i d a y t i m e .
T a b l e B - 4 a r e p o r t s the i n c i d e n c e o f the m o s t
c o m m o n pai d h o l i d a y s .
T h e s u m m a r y o f v a c a t i o n plans is a s t a t i s t i c a l m e a s u r e of
v a c a t i o n p r o v i s i o n s r a t h e r than a m e a s u r e of the p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s
a c t u a l l y r e c e i v i n g s p e c i f i c be ne f i t s . ( Se e t abl e B - 5 . ) P r o v i s i o n s appl y
to al l p l a n t w o r k e r s o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s in an e s t a b l i s h m e n t r e g a r d l e s s
o f l ength o f s e r v i c e .
P a y m e n t s on o t h e r than a t i m e b a s i s a r e c o n ­
v e r t e d to a t i m e p e r i o d ; f o r e x a m p l e , 2 p e r c e n t o f annual e a r n i ng s
a r e c o n s i d e r e d e q u i v a l e n t to 1 w e e k s ' pay. Onl y bas i c plans a r e i n ­
c l uded.
E s t i m a t e s e x c l u d e v a c a t i o n bonuses, v a c a t i o n - s a v i n g s pl ans,
and " e x t e n d e d " o r " s a b b a t i c a l " b e ne f i t s beyond basi c plans.
Such
p r o v i s i o n s a r e t y p i c a l in the s t e e l , a l u mi n u m, and can i nd us t r i e s .
He a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , and p e ns i o n plans f o r whi ch the e m p l o y e r
pay s at l e a s t a p a r t o f the c o s t i ncl ude t h os e (1) u n d e r wr i t t e n by a
c o m m e r c i a l i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n y o r no npr of i t o r g a n i z a t i o n , (2) p r o v i d e d
t hrough a union fund, o r (3) pai d d i r e c t l y by the e m p l o y e r out o f c u r ­
rent o p e r a t i n g funds o r f r o m a fund set a s i d e f or this p u r p o s e . ( See
t abl e B - 6 . ) An e s t a b l i s h m e n t is c o n s i d e r e d to have such a plan i f the
m a j o r i t y o f e m p l o y e e s a r e c o v e r e d under the plan e v e n if l es s than a
m a j o r i t y e l e c t to p a r t i c i p a t e b e c a u s e e m p l o y e e s a r e r e q u i r e d to c o n ­
t r i b ut e t o w a r d the c o s t o f the plan.
Excluded ar e l e ga l ly r eq ui re d
pl ans, such as w o r k m e n ' s c o m p e n s a t i o n , s o c i a l s e c u r i t y , and r a i l r o a d
retirement.
S i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e is l i m i t e d to that type o f i n ­
s u r a nc e under whi ch p r e d e t e r m i n e d c ash p a y me n t s a r e m a d e d i r e c t l y
to the i n s u r e d dur i ng t e m p o r a r y i l l n e s s o r a c c i d e n t d i s a b i l i t y . I n f o r ­
m a t i o n is p r e s e n t e d f o r all such plans to whi ch the e m p l o y e r c o n ­
t r i b u t e s . H o w e v e r , in N e w Y o r k and N e w J e r s e y , whi ch have e nac t e d
t e m p o r a r y d i s a b i l i t y i n s ur a n c e l aws r e q u i r i n g e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t i o n s , 3
pl ans a r e i ncl uded onl y i f the e m p l o y e r (1) c on t r i b u t e s m o r e than is
l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d , o r (2) p r o v i d e s the e m p l o y e e with b e ne f i t s whi ch e x ­
c e e d the r e q u i r e m e n t s o f the l aw. T a b ul a t i o ns of pai d si c k l e a v e pl ans

either of the following condi­
provisions covering late
! The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island do not require em ployer
had operated late shifts
for operating late shifts.
contributions.

4
are lim ite d to fo r m a l plans 4 which provide full pay o r a p roportion o f
the w o r k e r 's pay during absence fr o m work because o f illn e s s . Sepa­
rate tabulations are presented accordin g to (1) plans which p ro vid e full
pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans which p rovid e either partial
pay o r a waiting period. In addition to the presentation o f proportions
of w o rk e rs provided sickness and accident insurance or paid sick
le a v e , an unduplicated total is shown of w o r k e r s who r e c e i v e either
o r both types of benefits.

the end of the disability, a m axim um age, o r e l ig ib ilit y fo r r e t i r e ­
ment benefits. Full o r partial payments a re alm ost always reduced by
social secu rity, w ork m en 's compensation, and p riv a te pension benefits
payable to the disabled em ployee.

M a jo r m e d ic a l insurance plans p rotect em p lo y e e s fr o m s ic k ­
ness and inju ry expenses beyond the c o v e r a g e of basic hospitalization,
m e d ic a l, and surgic al plans. T y p ic a l features of m a jo r m e d ic a l plans
are (1) a "d ed u ctib le" (e.g., $50) paid by the insured b e fo r e benefits
L o n g - t e r m disability insurance plans provide payments to
begin; (2) a coinsurance feature requ irin g the insured to pay a portion
to tally disabled em ployees upon the expiration of their paid sick leave
(e .g ., 20 percent) of certain expenses; and (3) stated d o lla r m axim um
and/or sickness and accident insurance, o r after a p red eterm in ed
benefits (e .g., $ 10, 000 a y e a r ). M e d ica l insurance p r o vid es complete
p erio d of d isa b ility (typ ica lly 6 months).
Payments are made until
o r p artial payment o f d o c to r s ' fe e s . Dental insurance usually c o v e rs
4
An establishment is considered as having a formal plan if it established at least the minimum fillings, extractions, and X - r a y s . Excluded are plans which c o v e r only
o r a l s u r g e r y o r accident damage. R e tire m e n t pension plans provide
number of days of sick leave available to each employee. Such a plan need not be written, but
payments fo r the rem a in d er o f the w o r k e r 's life .
informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, are excluded.




5

T a b le 1. E s ta b lis h m e n ts an d w o rk e rs w ith in s c o p e o f s u rv e y an d n u m b e r s tu d ie d in B u rlin g to n , V t.,1 by m a jo r in d u s try d iv is io n ,2 D e c e m b e r 1 9 7 2
Num ber o f establishm ents

Industry d ivision

M inim um
em ploym ent
in esta b lis h ­
ments in scope
o f study

W ork ers in establishm ents
W ithin scope o f study

W ithin scope
o f stu dy3

Studied
T o t a l4

Studied

Plant
Num ber

A l l d iv is io n s ------------------------------------------M an ufactu ring_____________________________________
Nonm anufacturing _________ ____________________
T ran sp o rta tion , com m unication, and
oth er public u t ilit ie s 5________________________
W h o lesa le tra d e______ ______________________
R e ta il t r a d e ____________________________________
Fin ance, in su rance, and re a l estate_________
S e rv ic e s 8_______________________________________

.

O ffic e

P e rc e n t

T o t a l4

55

54

11,662

100

6,453

1,950

11,596

-

16
39

16
38

7,208
4,454

62
38

3, 874
2, 579

853
1, 097

7, 208
4,388

50
50
50
50
50

5
3
20
5
6

5
3
19
5
6

1, 177
114
1,840
845
478

10
1
16
7
4

50

682
(!)
(!)
(!)
(6)

251
(‘ )
()
(!)
( 6)

1, 177
114
1, 774
845
478

1 Th e Burlington a re a consists o f B u rlington , E ss ex Junction, South Bu rlington, and W inooski in Chittenden County. Th e "w o r k e rs within scope of study" estim ates shown in this table
p ro vid e a reason ably a ccu rate d escrip tio n o f the s iz e and com position o f the la b o r fo r c e inclu ded in the su rvey.
The estim ates a re not intended, h o w eve r, to s e rv e as a basis o f com parison
w ith other em ploym ent indexes fo r the a rea to m easu re em ploym en t tren ds o r le v e ls sin ce (1) planning o f w a ge su rveys re q u ires the use of establish m ent data co m piled co n sidera bly in advance
o f the p a y r o ll p erio d studied, and (2) sm a ll establish m ents a re excluded fr o m the scope o f the su rvey.
2 Th e 1967 edition o f the Standard In du stria l C la s s ific a tio n Manual was used in cla s s ify in g establish m ents by in du stry d ivision .
3 Includes a ll establish m ents with to ta l em ploym en t at o r above the m inim u m lim ita tion . A l l outlets (within the a re a ) o f com panies in such in du stries as tra d e, fin ance, auto re p a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion p ictu re th eaters a re con sid ered as 1 establish m ent.
4 Includes ex ecu tive, p r o fe s s io n a l, and oth er w o r k e r s exclu ded fr o m the sep arate plant and o ffic e c a te g o rie s .
5 A b b revia ted to "p u b lic u t ilitie s " in the A - and B - s e r ie s ta b les. T a x ica b s and s e r v ic e s in ciden tal to w a te r tran sportation w e re excluded.
4 T h is industry d ivis ion is re p resen ted in estim ates fo r " a l l in d u stries" and "nonm anufacturing" in the S e rie s A ta b le s , and fo r " a l l in d u s trie s " in the S e rie s B tables. Separate presentation of
data fo r this d ivis ion is not m ade fo r one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g reason s: (1) Em ploym en t in the division is too sm a ll to p ro vid e enough data to m e r it sep arate study, (2) the sample was not
design ed in itia lly to p erm it sep ara te presen tation , (3) resp o n se w as in su fficien t o r inadequate to p erm it sep ara te p resen tation , and (4) th e re is p o s s ib ility o f d is c lo s u re o f individual establishm ent data.
7 W o rk e rs fr o m this en tire in du stry d ivis ion a re re p res en ted in estim ates fo r " a ll in d u s trie s " and "non m anu factu rin g" in the S e rie s A ta b les, but fr o m the re a l estate portion only in estim ates
fo r " a ll in d u s trie s " in the S e rie s B ta b les. Separate presen tation o f data fo r this d ivis ion is not m ade fo r one o r m o re o f the reason s given in footnote 6 above.
* H otels and m o tels; laundries and other p erso n a l s e r v ic e s ; business s e r v ic e s ; autom obile re p a ir , ren ta l, and parking; m otion p ictu re s; n on profit m em bersh ip o rgan izations (excluding re ligio u s
and ch a rita ble orga n izatio n s); and en gin eerin g and a rc h ite c tu ra l s e r v ic e s .

La b o r-m a n a gem en t a greem en t co vera g e

In d u stria l com position in m anufacturing
A lm o s t tw o -th ird s o f the w o rk e rs within scope o f the su rvey in the Burlington a rea
w e r e em ployed in m anufacturing fir m s . Th e fo llo w in g presen ts the m a jo r in du stry groups
and s p e c ific in du stries as a percen t of a ll m anufacturing:
Industry groups
E le c tr ic a l equipment and
su p p lie s _________________________ 52
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _____26
P rin tin g and pu blish in g________ 6

S p e c ific in du stries
E le c tro n ic components
and a c c e s s o r ie s _______________ 52
Guns, h o w itz e rs , and

m o rta rs _____________________ 26

T h is in form a tion is based on estim a tes o f to ta l em ploym en t d eriv e d fr o m u n iverse
m a te r ia ls com p iled p r io r to actu al su rvey.
P r o p o rtio n s in va rio u s industry d ivision s m ay
d iffe r fr o m prop o rtio n s based on the re su lts o f the su rvey as shown in ta b le 1 above.




Th e fo llo w in g tabulation shows the percen t o f plan tw orkers and o ffic e w o rk e rs
em ployed in establish m ents in which a contract o r contracts c o vered a m a jo rity o f the w o rk ers
in the re s p e c tiv e c a te g o rie s , Bu rlington, V t., D ecem ber 1972:
P la n tw o rk e rs
A l l in d u stries___________________
M an ufactu ring__________________
Pu b lic u t ilit ie s __________________

O ffic ew o rk ers

31
39
61

68

9

A n establish m ent is co n sid ered to have a contract co verin g a ll plan tw orkers o r
o ffic e w o rk e rs i f a m a jo rity of such w o rk e rs a re c o v e r e d by a labor-m an agem ent a greem en t.
T h e r e fo r e , a ll oth er pla n tw orkers o r o ffic e w o rk e rs a re em ployed in establishm ents that eith er
do not have lab o r-m a n a gem en t con tracts in e ffe c t, o r have contracts that apply to fe w e r than
h a lf o f th e ir p la n tw orkers o r o ffic e w o rk e rs . E stim ates a re not n e c e s s a r ily rep res en ta tive
o f the extent to w hich a ll w o r k e r s in the a rea m ay be c o v e re d by the p rovision s of
lab o r-m a n a gem en t a greem e n ts, because sm a ll establish m ents a re excluded and the in du strial
scope o f the su rv ey is lim ited .

6

A. O c c u p a tio n a l earnings
T a b l e A -1 . O f f i c e o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k l y e a r n in g s
(A verage straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings of w orkers in selected occupations by industry division, Burlington, Vt., D ecember 1972)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of

Number of w orkers receiving straight-tim e weekly earnings of—
$

Average
weekly
Mean ^

(standard

Median 2

A

$

70

75

*

80

A

t

85

90

A
95

*

100

$

105

*

no

A

*

115

120

•

»

125

130

$

*

*

160

150

160

*

170

A

»

180

190

A

200

and
under

Middle ranged

75

210
and

80

85

90

95

100

105

no

115

120

125

1

1

13Q

160

150

160

170

180

190

1

21

210 over

1

11

200

HEN AND WOMEN COMBINED
B O O K K E E P I N G - N A C H I NE OPERATORS,

$

$

$

$

9C*30
l

1

2

3B*5 136*50 111*50

CLASS B
26

3t I s

8

87.00-

108.00

97.00 106.00
97.50 106.00

38. 5
38.0

MESSENGERS (OFFICE BOYS AND GIRLS)-

*

97.50

76.0079.00-

116.00 2
111.00

19bT oO

1

135.00-172.00

180
7?

iba

i t -

*

2

-

1

-

*

1

1

43

_

12

21

22

nn

0

39 0 175 50
39.5 192.00 200*00
27
N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG

39 0 163 00
60.0 185.50 187.50 171.0038.0 12 7 . -»0 130.00 1 1 6. 00 -

__

SECRETARIES. CLASS

**3

205.00
139.00

1
20

133.00 112.00-139.00

37.5
Si c l a s s

39 5 lie oo 117 50
39.5 106.50 107.50

b

N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG
SW IT CH BO AR O OPERATOR -REC EP TI ON IS TS -

8

99 .0 0- 11 6. 00

92.00

86.00- 96.50

92.50

39.5
i

20
ITriJlii

u L * jj

D

N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG

*
**

W orkers w ere distributed as follow s:
W orkers w ere distributed as follow s:

See footnotes at end of tables.




n

g

l

1
-

-

2

1

6

-

-

-

-

-q

19 5
128 50
39.5 133.00 129.00
38.5 105.50 100.00
37.5 103.00 100.00

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

i

i

w

11
1
85 .0 0- 13 7. 50

1

1 at $230 to $240; 1 at $240 to $250; and 1 at $250 to $260.
3 at $210 to $220; 1 at $230 to $240; and 1 at $240 to $250.

1

i

-

-

-

-

-

7
T a b l e A - 2 . P r o f e s s i o n a l a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a t i o n s : W e e k l y e a r n i n g s
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Burlington, Vt. , D e c e m b e r 1972)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of

I

Average
weekly
hours*
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

109

i

110

»

115

*

120

i

125

I

f

130

135

i

140

s

145

i

150

i

155

I

1*0

T

1*5

i

TF

$

170

ITS

-

under
110

•

180

1H

120

125

IBP

135

2
-

160

2

143

3
-

5

150

ISS

160

1

2

1

US

170

175

IIP

190
-

190

»----i----i--- i—
20 0
-

200

210
-

210

220

220

230 over

MEN AN0 WOMEN COMBINED
$

C O MP UT ER OP ERATORS, CLASS 0
N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG ---

39.5 144.00 143.00 132.50-162.50
38.0 130.00 132.50 11 4.00-144.00

C O MP UT ER PR0GRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CL AS S B —
MA NU FA CT UR IN G —

39.5 190.00 185.00 16 5. 00 40.0 195.00 18T.50 16 4. 00 -

DRAFTSMEN, CL AS S B
MA NU FA CT UR IN G —

1
1

1
1

2

40.0 1T8.00 IT T.50 16 T.50-1BT.50
40.0 1TB.00 ITT.50 16T . 50-1ST.50

2

2

2

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

1

3

1

-

202.50
215.00

See footnotes at end of tables.

T a b le A -3 .

O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s :

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s , by sex

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Burlington, Vt. , D e c e m b e r 1972)
A ve rage

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly
hours *
(standard)

of
workers

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - MEN

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of

Weekly
(standard)

Weekly
earnings *
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WO ME N— CONTINUED

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours*
(standard)

Weekly
earnings*
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WO ME N— CONTINUED

*
U LN

$

*

BO OK KE EP IN G- MA CH IN E U r C n A 1UK3f
(
r

N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG

39.5

96.50
96.^0
2T

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS

30

C L E R K S « PAYROLL

w

25

i i t on

38.5 125.50 CO MPUTER PR0GRAMERS,
37.5 114.00

136.00

L6

40.0

KEYP UN CH OPERATORS,

CLASS

KEYP UN CH OPERATORS, CLASS
NONMANUF AC TU RI NG

8

3 *

101.50

3 .5 106.50
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR -R EC EP TI ON IS TS -

180
NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG

See footnote at end of tables.




C0 HPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS 6
nunnRPiur m l ■uiuni>

38 0 155 00

39.5 152.00
161.50
125.50
39 5

8
26

39.5

92.50

37 3 129.50
39.5 133.00

178.00
PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

230
and

T a b le A -4 .

M a in t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p la n t o c c u p a tio n s : H o u r ly e a r n in g s

(Average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Burlington, Vt., D e c e m b e r 1972)
Hourly earnings3

Mean2 Median*

Middle range 1

o

$

o

$

V*

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
woik.r.

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
t
»
i
t
t
i
*
i
i
*
«
»
•
*
t
1
i
t
6
*
i
3.60 3.90 4.00 4. 10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50 4.60 4.70 4.80 4.90 5.00 3.10 5.20 5.30 5.40 5.50 5.60 5.70 5.60

and
under

and

3. 70 3.80 3.50 4.00 4, 10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50 4.60 4.70 4.60 4.90 3,00 5,10 5,20 5f3® 5,4? ?t?0 3. 60 3.70 5.60 over

HEN AND WO ME N COMBINED
$
*.32
4.32

$
*•36

$
$
4. 16 - 4.64
4.16- 4.64

4.02
4.02

3.99

3.853.85- 4^36

12

4.60

4.73

4.33- 4.66

AO

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS. TOOLROOM —

5.13

5.16

*•93- S.*7

I*
1*

1

-

-

2

2

6

"

1

2

2

MECHANICS. AUTOMOTIVE
1

1Util* HSU v afc SM IL H v

See footnotes at end of tables.




10

18
16

3

*

2

3
*

3

*
*

9

T a b le A - 5 . C u s to d ia l a n d m a te ria l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s : H o u r ly e a rn in g s
(A verage straight-tim e hourly earnings of w orkers in selected occupations by industry division, Burlington, Vt., D ecem ber 1972)
Number o f w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings o

Hourly earnings

Occupation and industry division

1

Number
of

i

1.60 1.70

Mean 2

Median2

Middle range 2

i

i

s

i

$

i

$

i

s

I

i

i

i

$

1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.60 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2. 90 3.00 3. 10

—
1--- i-- S--- i--- S--- 1--- 1
3.20

3.60 3.60 3. 8 0 6.00 6. 20 6.60

and
under

and

1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2,10 2,20 2,30 2.6Q 2. ? Q 2.6P 2.70 2.80 2,90 3.QQ 3 . 1 0 3 . 2 0 3.60 3.60 3.80 6. 0 0 6.20 6. 60 o ver

HEN AN0 WOMEN COMBINED
$

$ 69

$

$ _

SSWUr Av 1W 1Ml
JANITORS. PORTERS. AND CLEANERS --SASvr AC 1M R A Ml

8
8

17
136

2.26

2.17

2.02- 2.56

5

8

13

-

35

9

23

1

6

9

6

5

1

6

1

11

-

i

-

-

-

-

LAIIUI1LI1w v SA 1L A 1A L 1lAAIrL 1liw
AAAUI AC VMR A Rw
2.67- 3.38
2»6T* 3.38

AAAUF AC 1MR AMM
AAMlf At IMR A Ml
^AAIIIAPRJV ACI UR AAll

1

1

1

J
J

3.39

•••Irr AAll LLCKA)

J

1*11

i
3.59

2.69- 3.79

1

1

2

1

i

VAIA.AIR 1 VlAo
TRUCKORIVERS. MEDIUM (1-1/2 TO
AAil AACLUU A AC A 1UN j f
^A^^RAIAJI AC 1 1All
1AUCALA#f . UA LA 11 UAALA * If
AAMIr AM 1MR A All

*

A ll w orkers w ere at $5.60 to $5.80.

See footn otes at end o f tab les.




21

4*55

3*13
3*^0

3*Tt

m

j
1
l

1

■

-

10




T a b l e A - 6 . M a i n t e n a n c e , p o w e r p la n t , c u s to d ia l, a n d m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g
o c c u p a t io n s : A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , b y s e x
(A v e r a g e stra ig h t-tim e h ourly earnings o f w ork ers in sele cted occupations by in du stry d iv is io n ,
B u rlington , V t. , D ecem b er 1972)

Number
Sex, occupation, and industry division

of
workers

Average
(mean2)
hourly
earnings3

Average
(mean2)
hourly
workers earnings3
Number

Sex, occupation, an d industry division

M A I N T E N A N C E AND P O W L R P L A N T
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN

of

C U S T O D I A L AND M A T E R I A L H A N D L I N G
OCCUPATIONS - ME N — CONTINUED

1.32

$
L Aw U R LA i f

R A I LA AA L

n A R IIL 1 R V

3.12

R A W II M b I U K A K b
R A U l l a Al A

1

A

•A

R A A Al 1 L AIM All# 1
—

L A tA lf

J H I, •

AA lb

RECEIVING C L E R K S ------------------- ---

i*

3.18

NONMANUFACTURING ------- ------ -----

7

3.11

MANUFACTURING ----------------------

14
11

3.48
3.54

TRUCKORIVERS -------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE

58
15

4.68
3.36

21

4.55

AR A i N T L N A N w tA

R A U w rA L T U R 1 Rv

C U S T U O I A L AND M A TE RI AL H A N D L I N G
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN
•w A R U J

MAH#

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM (1-1/2 TO

VIA 1 L n R C R

R A R U r A t , 1 U K A A lb

NONMANUFACTURING -----------------JANITORS, PORTERS, ANO C L E A N E R S --- -

See footnotes at end o f tables

113

2.30

11

B.

E s t a b lis h m e n t p ra c tic e s and s u p p le m e n ta r y w a g e p ro v is io n s

T a b l e B - 1 . M in im u m e n t r a n c e s a la r ie s f o r w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s
(D istrib u tio n o f establishm ents studied in a ll in du stries and in industry d ivision s by m inim um entrance s a la ry fo r sele cted c a tego rie s
o f in exp erien ced wom en o ffic e w o r k e r s , B u rlington , V t. , D e ce m b er 1972)
In experienced typists
Manufacturing
Minimum w eekly stra ig h t-tim e s a la r y 4

-----------------------------------

Manufacturing

Based on standard w eekly h ou rs6 o f—

A ll
industries

A ll
schedules

E stablish m ents studied-------

Other in exp erien ced c le r ic a l w ork ers 5
Nonmanufacturing
A ll
industries

A ll
schedules

40

XXX

54

16

XXX

38

8

3

2

5

2

2

A ll
schedules

40

Nonmanufacturing

Based on standard w eekly h ou rs6 o f—

54

16

3

13

A ll
schedules

40

XXX

38

XXX

3

2

40

3

10
1
3

i

1

3
1

i

1
1

i

1
1

1
1

1
1

1

6

40

10

1

3

3

1

1

1

1
1

1

1

1

1

1

26

3

1
10

15

3

16

Establishm ents which did not em ploy w ork ers

S e e fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le s .




XXX

30

XXX

XXX

12

XXX

12




T a b le B -2 . S h ift d iffe re n tia ls
( L a t e -8 h i ft p a y p r o v is io n s f o r m a n u fa c tu rin g p la n t w o r k e r s b y ty p e and a m o u n t o f p a y d if f e r e n t i a l .
B u r lin g t o n , V t . , D e c e m b e r 1972)

(A l l p la n tw orkers in m anufacturing » 100 p ercen t)
P e r c e n t o f m anufacturing p lan tw orkers—
L a te -s h ift pay p rovis ion

In establishm ents having p ro vis io n s 7
fo r la te shifts
Second shift

T h ird o r other
shift

75.8

A ctu a lly w orking on late shifts

Second shift

14.2

T h ird o r other
shift

T o ta l —---------------------------------------------------

90.8

N o pay d iffe re n tia l fo r w ork on late s h ift — ----

3.9

P a y d iffe r e n tia l fo r w ork on la te s h ift ---------- —

86.9

75.8

12.5

3.5

17. 3

6. 1

1.9

.7

1. 0
.8
(• )
*

_
.7

2. 8

_

3.5

1.7

T y p e and amount o f d iffe re n tia l:
U n iform cents (p e r h o u r )----------------------10
15
25
30

cen ts-------------------------------------------cen ts— _______ ________________________
cents-------------------------------------------cen ts--------------------------------------------

U n iform p e r c e n ta g e -----------------------------7 p e r c e n t________________________________
7 l/z p ercen t--------------------------------------10 p e rcen t________________________________

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b le s .

9.9
4. 1
1. 3
2. 0

6. 1
-

-

69.6

69.6

10. 7

.6
2.7
66.4

.6

. 1
.2
10.4

-

22. 3
46.8

-

-

-

1. 7
1. 1

13

T a b le B -3 . S c h e d u le d w e e k ly hours and days
(P e r c e n t o f pla n tw o rk ere and o ffic e w o rk e re in a ll in d u stries and in in du stry d ivis io n s by scheduled w eek ly hours and days
o f fir s t - s h ift w o r k e r s , B u rlington , V t., D ece m b er 1972)

Office w o rk er s

P la n tw o rk e rs
W eekly hours and days

A ll w o r k e r s ________________________________

35 hours— 5 days ----_--------------- ---------------36 hours— 5 days_________________________________
37Vi hours— 5 days______________________________
40 hours— 5 days_________________________________
41 Vz hours— 5 d a ys............... ................................
44 h o u rs__________________________________________
5 d a y s _______________________________ ___ ____
5 Vz d a y s _______________________________________
45 hours— 5 days_________________________________
48 hours— 6 days_______________________________ —
50 hours
__________________ __________________
5 V2 d a y s -------------------------------------------------6 d a y s ______________________________ —-------------

See footn ote at end o f tables.




A l l industries

Manufacturing

100

100

4
1
83
3
2
1
1
1
2
4
3
1

4
89
1
1
-

5
5

P u b lic u tilitie s

A l l industries

100

100

76

1
16
9
73

Manufacturing

100

3
(’ )
97

24
-

n

(’ )
-

“
*
-

P u b lic u tilities

100

68
32
"
-

“

14

T a b le B -4 . A n n u a l paid h olidays
(P e r c e n t o f p la n t w o r k e r s and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s tr ie s and in in d u s try d iv is io n s b y n u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s , B u r lin g t o n , V t . , D e c e m b e r 1972)

Plantw orkers
Item

All in dustries

Manufacturing

O fficew orkers
Public utilities

All industries

Manufacturing

Public utilities

A ll w orkers- ----- --------------------- -----

100

100

100

100

100

100

W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid h o lid ay s----------------------------------------W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid h o lid ay s----- ---- ----- —
-------------------

96

100

100

100

100

100

4

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
2
2
13
8
19
3
8
33
2
6
1

4
1
24
5
10
53
3

_
3
1
4
1
30
60
1

_
_

Number of days
2 h o lid ay s___________________________________
3 h o lid a y s__ _
_ _____
_ _ ----- __ ____
4 holidays -____- _- _ — - _____
5 h o lid a y s----------------------------------------------6 h o lid a y s-------- — ----------------—
- _
_
7 h o lid a y s___ . _________________ __________ _
8 holidays - - — --- — --- -8 holidays plus 1 h alf day---------------------------9 h o lid a y s______ ___ ________ 10 h olidays___ ___ ___________________________
10 holidays plus 2 half d ay s------------------------11 holidays---------------------------------------------12 holidays----------------------------------------------

_

_
-

24
-

8
8
-

-

52
8

3
56
66
71
95
96

8
61
69
76
76
76
76

100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100

-

_
c>
C>
CM
3
1
7
CM
31
38
CM
16
2

-

16
-

*

68
16

1
61
92
93
97
97
100
100
100
100
100

16
84
84
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

Total holiday tim e 10
12 d ay s____ ._—,------ —
_____________________ __
11 days or m o re--------------------------------------10 days or m o re--- -------- ------ ---- — .............
9 days or m o r e ---------------------------------------8 Vz days or m o re-------------------------------------8 days or m o r e ----------------------------------------7 days or m o r e ---------------------------------------6 days or m o r e ---------------------------------------5 days or m o r e ---------------------------------------4 days or m o r e ---------------------------------------3 days or m o r e ---------------------------------------2 days or m o r e ______________________________

See footnotes at end of tables




1
8
41
48
51
71
79
91
93
95
95
96

2
18
56
87
87
95
96
99
99
99
100
100

15

T a b le B -4 a .

Id e n t if ic a t io n o f m a j o r p a id h o lid a y s

(Percent of plantworkers and officew orkers in a ll industries and in industry divisions by paid h olidays, Burlington, Vt. , D ecem ber 1972)
O ffic e w o rk e rs

P la n tw or ke r s
H oliday
A l l industries

M anufacturing

Pu b lic u tilitie s

A ll industries

Manufacturing

Pu blic u tilities

A ll w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

N e w Y e a r 's D a y -------------------------------------------L in c o ln 's B irth d a y----------------------------------------W ashington's B irthday-----------------------------------Tow n M eetin g D a y ----------------------------------------Good F r id a y ----- — — --------------- -------M e m o r ia l Day — — ____________ __________
Fou rth o f July-----------------------------------------------B attle o f Bennington--------------------------------------F a ir D ay-------------------------------------------------------L a b o r D ay__________________________________________
Columbus D ay-----------------------------------------------Veteran s D ay------------------------------------------------Thanksgiving D a y _________________________________
Day a fter Th anksgivin g----------------------------------C h ristm as E ve , h alf day-------------------------------C h ristm as D ay_____________________________________
F lo a tin g h oliday, 1 d a y 1 -------------------------------2
F lo a tin g h oliday, 2 d a y s 12-----------------------------F lo a tin g h oliday, 4 d a y s 12-----------------------------E m p lo y ee's b irth d a y ______________________________

96
6
20
1
9
93
95
6
3
93
13
16
94
25
5
95
14
2
28
8

100

100
61
76
8

99
33
47
2
4
99
99
18
P)
99
48
50
99
18
1
99
1
16
24
1

100

100
84
100
16

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b le s .




-

14
1
15
100
100
-

5
100
8
7
100
42
8
100
23

-

100
100
61
100
76
76
100
-

100
-

-

-

47

-

8

-

5
(’ )
9
100
100
-

1
100
2
6
100
41
2
100
2
27
55

-

100
100
84
100
100
100
100
-

100
-

-

16

T a b le B -5 . P a id va c a tio n s
(P e r c e n t o f p la n t w o r k e r s and o ff i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u s tr y d iv is io n s b y v a c a tio n p a y p r o v is io n s , B u r lin g to n , V t ., D e c e m b e r 1972)

P la n tw o rk ers

O ffic e w o rk e r s

Vacation p o lic y
A l l industries

A ll w o r k e r s ____________________________ ______

M anufacturing

P u b lic u tilities

A l l industries

Manufacturing

P u b lic u tilitie s

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
97
3

100
96
4

100
100

100
100

100
100
-

100
100
“

1

"

“

"

2
40
6

4
56
-

_
8
52

66
9

66
(’ )

_
16
68

42
2
54
1

31
4
65
-

32
61
8

6
94
(’ )

4
96
-

94
4

9
5
81
3
1

4
7
85
4
*

92
8

2
1
97
n
(’ )

2
1
97
-

96
4

1
5
89
2
1
1

1
7
88
4
-

92
8
-

(’ }
1
98
-

<’ )
1
98
-

96
4
-

5
90
2
1
1

7
89
4
-

92
8

(’ >
1
99
-

1
99
*
*

96
4
-

2
54
5
37
1

2
37
9
52
"

-

(*>
i
71
29
(’ )

Method o f paym ent
W ork ers in establish m ents p rovid in g
paid va cation s___________________________________
L e n g th -o f-tim e pa ym en t_________________
P ercen ta g e paym ent. - __________________
W ork ers in establish m ents p rovid in g
no paid va ca tion s.__
________ ________ ——

"

Amount o f vacation p a y 1
5
A ft e r 6 months o f s e r v ic e
Under 1 w eek____________________ ________________
1 w eek .___________________________________________
2 w e e k s ... . . ________________________________________
A ft e r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
1 week______________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s __ ___ ___ _____________
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
3 w e e k s __________________________________________

2

A ft e r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek______________________ _____________________
O v e r 1 and under 2 w e e k s ----------------------------2 w e e k s _________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ____________________________________________
A ft e r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 week______________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ----------------------------3 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _______________________

*

n

(* )

A ft e r 4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 week______________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _____________________
2 w e e k s _________________________ ________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 weeks ____ _____________ _____________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _______________________

(!)
(’ )

A ft e r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek_______ ___________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _______________________
S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le s .




92
8

1
36
63

96
4
“

17

T a b le B -5 . P a id v a c a tio n s -----C o n tin u e d
( P e r c e n t o f p la n t w o r k e r s and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u s tr y d iv is io n s b y v a c a tio n p a y p r o v is io n s , B u r lin g to n , V t., D e c e m b e r 1972)

O ffic e w o rk e rs

P la n tw o rk e rs
Vacation p o lic y

A l l in du stries

Manufacturing

Pu b lic u tilitie s

A l l industries

Manufacturing

P u blic u tilities

Amount o f vacation p a y 11— Continued
A ft e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e

1 w eek_____________________________________________
2 w e e k s _________ ________________________________
O v e r 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ______________________ _____ _______________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _____ _________________
4 w e e k s _____________ ____ ___ ______________________

_
14
7
73
3
3

_
7
11
78
4
-

-

_
96
4

.
14
5
75
3
3

7
8
82
4
"

92
8

(’ )
4
1
95
( 9)
1

_
2
2
96
"

96
4

13
26
9
52

_
6
13
13
68

76
24

(’ )
2
45
1
51

_
1
14
3
83

78
22

_
13
9
6
70
2

_
6
8
8
77
2

92
8

(’ )
2
4
1
91
1

_
1
5
3
90
1

96
4

»
13
7
6
33
41

_

_

6
6
8
30

-

_
40

( 9)
2
3
1

1
4
3

_
_

51

60

92
-

8

(’ )
4
2
93
(’ )
1

_
2
4
94
-

A ft e r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 week...... ............................................. ................
2 w e e k s _______________________ ___________________
O v e r 2 and under 3 w e e k s ..----------- ----- --------3 w e e k s ....... .................. ....... ............................... .
O v e r 3 and under 4 w e e k s ______________________
4 w e e k s ______________ __________ ______ _______ ____

-

A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 week.......... ..................... ............................. .........
2 w e e k s ___________________________________________
3 w e e k s _________________________ ____ . .. ...
. .
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w e e k s _____________ ____ ___________ ______________
A ft e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek_____________________________________________
2 w e e k s ________________________________________ —
3 w e e k s ________________________________ _________
O v e r 3 and under 4 w e e k s ----------------.. ...
4 w e e k s ________________________________________ _ .
5 w e e k s ____________________ _______ _____________ .

-

-

A ft e r 25 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek__________________________________________ _
2 weeks .. .............. ................. .
..................
3 w e e k s ____________________ ______ ______ _______ _
O v e r 3 and under 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w e e k s ___________________________
5 w e e k s ______________________ .

53
41

_
31
62

28
72

M axim um vacation a v a ila b le *
1 w eek .......... ................................................ .........

.

2 w eeks .................... .......... . .. .. . . . . .
___
3 w e e k s _____________________ _____________________
O v e r 3 and under 4 w e e k s ............ ...................
4 w e e k s --------------------- ----------------- --------5 w e e k s --------- ------------------ ----- ----------------------

13
7
6

*

19

56

E stim ates o f p rov is ion s fo r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e are iden tical.

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le s .




_
6
6

8
10
71

_
16

84

(’ )
2
3
1
40
54

_
1
4
3
4
89

.

_
_
18
82

18

T a b le B -6 .

H e a lth , insurance, and pension plans

(P e r c e n t of pLantworkers and o ffic e w o rk e rs in a ll in d u stries and in industry d ivision s em p loy ed in establish m en ts p rovid in g
health, in su rance, o r pension b en efits, B u rlington , V t ., D ece m b er 1972)
P la n tw o rk e rs
T y p e o f b en efit and
financing 1
4

A l l in du stries

Manufacturing

O ffic e w o rk e rs
P u b lic u tilitie s

A l l industries

Manufacturing

P u b lic u tilities

100

A l l w o r k e r s ___________________ _____________

100

100

100

100

100

W o rk e rs in establish m ents p rovid in g at
lea st 1 o f the ben efits shown below ___________

99

100

100

99

100

100

95
74

100
91

100
61

99
64

99
94

100
71

51
40

38
34

76
61

55
37

43
37

90
71

L if e insurance______
__ _____________
Non co n trib u to ry plans_____________________
A cc id e n ta l death and dism em b erm en t
in su ra n c e -------------------------------------- ------ —
N on con tribu tory plans_____ .. ___________
Sickness and accident in su rance or
sick le a v e o r both 15_________________________

88

100

100

83

97

100

Sickness and accident in su ra n c e-----------N o n con tribu tory plans__________________
Sick le a v e (fu ll pay and no
w a itin g p e r io d )___________________________
Sick le a v e (p a rtia l pay or
w a itin g p e r io d )_____________________ ____

46
35

53
48

40
40

49
31

43
40

28
28

48

53

68

67

87

88

24

6

“

10

L o n g -te r m d is a b ility in su ra n c e____________—
N on con tribu tory plans_____________________
H o sp ita liza tio n in su ra n c e____________________
N on con tribu tory plans_____________________
S u rgica l in su ra n c e__________ __________
N on con tribu tory plans_____________ -_____
M ed ica l insurance_____________________________
N on con tribu tory plans_____________________
M a jo r m e d ic a l insurance_____________________
N on con tribu tory plans_____________________
Dental in su rance________________ ____________
Non con trib u tory plans_____________________
R etirem en t pen sio n ____________ — _________
N on con tribu tory plans_____________________

29
28

48

41
40

96

100

100
92
100

57
55
100
97
100
97
100
97
100

.
100

100

99

96

3
3
98
70

100
100

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




10

74
96
74
94

74
95
74
7

5
84
64

47
94

100
94
100
94
98

94
93

72

92

100
92
100
92
8
8

100
100

99

65
99
65

95
65
99
66

3
2
97
76

96

100
96

100
96

2
2

19

F o o tn o te s
A l l of these standard footnotes m ay not apply to this bulletin.

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-tim e salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime
at regular and/or prem ium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all w orkers and dividing by the number of. w ork ers. The median
designates position— half of the employees surveyed receive m ore than the rate shown; half receive less than the rate shown. The middle
range is defined by 2 rates of pay; a fourth of the w orkers earn less than the low er of these rates and a fourth earn m ore than the higher rate.
3 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
4 These salaries relate to form ally established minimum starting (hiring) regular straight-tim e salaries that are paid for standard
workweeks.
5 Excludes w orkers in subclerical jobs such as m essenger.
6 Data are presented for a ll standard workweeks combined, and for the most common standard workweeks reported.
7 Includes all plantworkers in establishments currently operating late shifts, and establishments whose form al provisions cover late
shifts, even though the establishments w ere not currently operating late shifts.
8 L ess than 0.05 percent.
9 L ess than 0.5 percent.
1 A ll combinations of full and h ilf days that add to the same amount are combined; for example, the proportion of w orkers receiving a
0
total of 9 days includes those with 9 full days and no half days, 8 full days and 2 half days, 7 full days and 4 half days, and so on. Proportions
then w ere cumulated.
1 These days are provided as part of a Christm as—
1
New Y ear holiday period which typically begins with Christm as Eve and ends with
New Y e a r 's Day. Such a holiday period is common in the automobile, aerospace, and farm implement industries. Because of y e a r-to -y e a r
variation in the number of workdays during the period, pay for a Sunday in Decem ber, frequently re fe rre d to as a "bonus holiday," may be
provided to equalize each y e a r's total holiday pay.
1 "F loatin g" holidays vary from year to year according to employer or employee choice.
2
1 Includes payments other than "length of t im e ," such as percentage of annual earnings or flat-su m payments, converted to an equivalent
3
time basis; for example, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 w eek's pay. Periods of service are chosen a rb itrarily and do not
necessarily reflect individual provisions for progression; for example, changes in proportions at 10 years include changes between 5 and 10
years. Estim ates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 w eek s' pay after 10 years includes those eligible for at least 3
w eek s' pay after few er years of service.
1 Estimates listed after type of benefit are for a ll plans for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer. "Noncontributory
4
plan s" include only those financed entirely by the em ployer. Excluded are legally required plans, such as workm en's compensation, social
security, and railroad retirem ent.
1 Unduplicated total of w orkers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below. Sick leave plans are
5
limited to those which definitely establish at least the minimum number of days' pay that each employee can expect. Informal sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.







.

•

-•

' i

■

' '
...

.

- •

;

A p p e n d ix . O c c u p a t io n a l D e s c r ip t io n s
The p r im a ry purpose o f p rep a rin g job d escrip tio n s fo r the B u reau's w age su rveys is to a s s is t its fie ld staff in c la s s ify in g into appropriate
occupations w ork ers who a re em ployed under a v a rie ty o f p a y ro ll title s and d iffe re n t w ork arran gem en ts fro m establishm ent to establishm ent and
fro m a rea to a rea . Th is p erm its the grouping o f occupational wage ra tes re p res en tin g com parable jo b content. Because o f this em phasis on
in terestablish m en t and in te ra re a co m p a ra b ility o f occupational content, the Bu reau's jo b d escrip tio n s m ay d iffe r sig n ific a n tly fro m those in use in
individual establishm ents o r those p rep a red fo r oth er pu rposes. In applying these jo b d escrip tio n s, the Bu reau's fie ld econ om ists a re in stru cted
to exclude w orking su p e rv is o rs ; apprentices; le a rn e r s ; beginn ers; tra in e e s ; and handicapped, p a rt-tim e , tem p o ra ry , and p robation ary w o rk e rs .

O F F IC E
C L E R K , A C C O U N TIN G — Continued

B IL L E R , M A C H IN E
P r e p a re s statem ents, b ills , and in voic es on a m achine oth er than an o rd in a ry o r e le c tr o m a tic ty p e w r ite r. M ay also keep re c o rd s as to b illin gs o r shipping ch a rges o r p e rfo rm other
clerical w ork incidental to b illin g opera tio n s. F o r w age study purposes, b ille r s , m achine, a re
classified by type o f m achine, as fo llo w s:
B ille r , machine (b illin g m a ch in e). Uses a sp ecia l b illin g m achine (com bin ation typing
and adding m achine) to p rep a re b ills and in vo ic es fro m cu sto m ers' purchase o rd e r s , in te r ­
n ally p rep a red o rd e r s , shipping m em orandum s, etc. U su ally in volv es application o f p r e ­
determ in ed discounts and shipping ch arges and en try o f n ecess a ry exten sion s, which m ay o r
m ay not be computed on the b illin g m achine, and tota ls which a re a u tom a tica lly accum ulated
by m achine. The operation usually in volv es a la rg e num ber o f carbon co pies o f the b ill being
p rep a red and is often done on a fanfold m achine.
B ille r , m achine (bookkeeping m a ch in e). U ses a bookkeeping m achine (with o r without
a ty p e w r ite r keyboard) to p rep a re cu sto m ers' b ills as part o f the accounts re c e iv a b le o p e ra ­
tion . G en era lly in volves the simultaneous en try o f fig u re s on cu sto m ers' le d g e r re c o r d . The
machine a u tom atically accum ulates fig u res on a num ber o f v e r tic a l columns and computes
and usually prints a u tom atically the debit o r c re d it balances. Does not in vo lv e a knowl­
edge o f bookkeeping.
W orks fro m uniform and standard types o f sales and c re d it slips.
B O O K K E E P IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
O perates a bookkeeping machine (with o r without a ty p e w r ite r keyboard) to keep a re c o rd
o f business tran saction s.
C lass A . Keeps a set o f re co rd s re q u irin g a knowledge o f and ex p erien ce in basic
bookkeeping p rin c ip le s , and fa m ilia r it y with the stru ctu re o f the p a rticu la r accounting system
used. D eterm in es p rop e r re c o rd s and distribu tion o f debit and cred it item s to be used in each
phase o f the w ork. M ay p rep a re consolidated re p o rts , balance sheets, and oth er re cord s
by hand.
C laqe B. Keeps a re c o rd o f one o r m o re phases o r section s o f a set o f re co rd s usually
re q u irin g little knowledge o f basic bookkeeping. Phases o r sections include accounts payable,
p a y ro ll, cu sto m ers' accounts (not including a sim ple type o f b illin g d es crib e d under b ille r ,
m ach in e), co st distribu tion , expense distribu tion , in ven to ry con trol, etc. M ay check or a ssist
in p rep a ra tion o f tr ia l balances and p rep a re control sheets fo r the accounting departm ent.

C L E R K , A C C O U N TIN G
P e r fo r m s one o r m o re accounting c le r ic a l tasks such as posting to re g is te r s and led g e rs ;

reconciling bank accounts; v e r ify in g the internal consistency, com pleteness, and m ath em atical
accuracy o f accounting documents; assignin g p re s c rib e d accounting distribu tion codes; exam ining
aad verifying fo r c le r ic a l a ccu racy va rio u s types o f re p o rts , lis ts , calcu lation s, posting, etc.;
or preparing sim ple o r a ssistin g in prep a rin g m o re co m plicated journal vou chers. M ay w ork
in either a manual o r automated accounting system .
The w ork re q u ire s a know ledge o f c le r ic a l methods and o ffic e p ra c tic e s and p rocedu res
which relates to the c le r ic a l p ro ce ssin g and re co rd in g o f tran saction s and accounting in form ation .
With experience, the w o rk er ty p ic a lly becom es fa m ilia r with the bookkeeping and accounting term s
mud procedures used in the assigned w ork, but is not re qu ired to have a knowledge o f the fo rm al
principles of bookkeeping and accounting.




P o sitio n s a re c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis o f the fo llow in g definitions.
C la ss A . Under gen era l su pervision, p e rfo rm s accounting c le r ic a l operations which
re q u ire the application o f ex p erien c e and judgm ent, fo r exam ple, c le r ic a lly p rocessin g c o m ­
plica ted o r n on rep etitive accounting tran saction s, sele ctin g among a substantial v a r ie ty o f
p r e s c r ib e d accounting codes and c la s s ific a tio n s , o r tra cin g tran saction s through p reviou s
accounting actions to determ in e sourpe o f d is c rep a n cies. M ay be a ssisted by one o r m o re
cla ss B accounting c le r k s .
C lass B . Under clo se su p ervision , fo llow in g detailed instructions and standardized p r o ­
ced u res, p e rfo rm s one o r m o re routine accounting c le r ic a l o pera tion s, such as posting to
le d g e rs , card s, o r w orksh eets w h ere iden tifica tion o f item s and location s o f postings a re
c le a r ly indicated; checking accu ra cy and com pleteness o f standardized and re p e titiv e re c o rd s
o r accounting documents; and coding documents using a few p re s c rib e d accounting codes.
C L E R K , F IL E
F ile s , c la s s ifie s , and r e tr ie v e s m a te r ia l in an establish ed filin g system . M ay p e r fo rm
c le r ic a l and manual tasks requ ired to m aintain file s . P o sition s a re c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the
basis o f the fo llo w in g definitions.
C lass A . C la s s ifie s and indexes file m a te r ia l such as correspon d en ce, re p o rts , tech ­
n ical docum ents, etc., in an establish ed filin g system containing a number o f v a rie d subject
m a tter file s . M ay also file this m a te r ia l. M ay keep re c o rd s o f variou s types in conjunction
with the file s . M ay lead a sm all group o f lo w e r le v e l file c le r k s .
C lass B . S orts, codes, and file s
ings o r p a rtly c la s s ifie d m a te r ia l by
c r o s s - r e fe r e n c e aids. A s requ ested,
w ards m a te r ia l. M ay p e r fo rm re la ted

u n classified m a te r ia l by sim ple (su bject m a tter) head­
fin e r subheadings. P r e p a re s sim ple related in dex and
locates c le a r ly iden tified m a te ria l in file s and f o r ­
c le r ic a l tasks requ ired to m aintain and s e r v ic e file s .

C la ss C . P e r fo r m s routine filin g o f m a te r ia l that has a lrea d y been c la s s ifie d o r which
is e a s ily c la s s ifie d in a sim ple s e r ia l cla s s ific a tio n system (e .g ., alphabetical, ch ro n o lo gica l,
o r n u m eric a l). A s requ ested, lo ca tes re a d ily ava ila b le m a te r ia l in file s and fo rw a rd s m a ­
te r ia l; and m ay f i l l out w ithdraw al ch arge. M ay p e r fo rm sim ple c le r ic a l and manual tasks
re q u ired to m aintain and s e r v ic e file s .
C L E R K , ORDER
R e c e iv e s cu sto m ers' o rd e rs fo r m a te r ia l o r m erch andise by m a il, phone, or p erso n a lly.
Duties in volve any com bination o f the fo llo w in g : Quoting p rices to cu stom ers; making out an o rd e r
sheet listin g the item s to m ake up the o rd e r ; checking p ric e s and quantities o f item s on o rd e r
sheet; and distribu tin g o rd e r sheets to re s p e c tiv e departm ents to be fille d . M ay check with cred it
departm ent to determ in e c re d it rating o ( cu stom er, acknowledge re ceip t o f o rd e rs fro m cu sto m ers,
fo llo w up o rd e rs to see that they have been fille d , keep file o f o rd e rs re c e iv e d , and check shipping
in voic es with o rig in a l o rd e r s .
CLERK, PA Y R O L L
Computes w ages o f company em p loyees and en ters the n ecess a ry data on the p a y ro ll
sheets. Duties in volve: Calculating w o r k e r s ' earnings based on tim e o r production re c o rd s ; and
posting calcu lated data on p a y ro ll sheet, showing in form ation such as w o r k e r 's name, w orking
days, tim e, ra te, deductions fo r in su rance, and total w ages due. M ay make out paychecks and
a ssist paym aster in making up and distribu tin g pay en velopes. M ay use a calcu lating m achine.

N O T E : Since the la st su rv ey in this a re a , the Bureau has (1) discontinued c o llectin g data fo r C om p tom eter o p era to rs, (2) changed
ele c tro n ic s technicians cla s s ific a tio n fr o m a sin gle le v e l to a three le v e l job, and (3) begun c o llectin g data fo r w arehousem en.

21

22
K EYPU N C H O PER ATO R

S E C R E T A R Y — Continued

O perates a keypunch m achine to re c o r d
tabulating cards o r on tape.

o r v e r ify

alphabetic

and/or n um eric

data on

P o sition s a re c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis o f the fo llo w in g d efin ition s.
C la ss A . W ork re q u ire s the application o f e x p erien c e and judgm ent in s ele ctin g p r o c e ­
dures to be fo llo w ed and in sea rch in g fo r , in te rp retin g , sele ctin g , o r coding item s to be
keypunched fr o m a v a rie ty o f sou rce documents. On o cca sio n m ay also p e r fo rm som e routine
keypunch w ork.
M ay tra in in exp erien ced keypunch o p e ra to rs .

N O T E : The te rm "c o rp o ra te o ffic e r , " used in the le v e l d efinitions fo llow in g, r e fe r s to
those o ffic ia ls who have a significan t co rp o ra te -w id e p olicym akin g r o le with re g a rd to m a jo r
com pany a c tiv itie s . The title " v ic e p r e s id e n t," though n o rm a lly in d ica tive o f this ro le , does not
in a ll cases id en tify such position s. V ice presiden ts whose p r im a ry re s p o n s ib ility is to act p e r ­
sonally on individual cases o r tran saction s (e .g ., approve o r deny individual loan o r c re d it actions;
a d m in ister individual tru st accounts; d ir e c tly su p ervise a c le r ic a l sta ff) a re not co n sidered to be
"c o rp o ra te o ffic e r s " fo r purposes o f applying the fo llo w in g le v e l d efin itio n s .
C la ss A

a ll,
C la ss B . W ork is routine and re p e titiv e . Under c lo s e su p ervision o r fo llow in g sp e c ific
p roced u res o r in stru ction s, w orks fr o m va rio u s stand ardized sou rce documents which have
been coded, and fo llo w s sp e c ifie d p roced u res which have been p re s c rib e d in d eta il and re q u ire
little o r no s ele ctin g , codin g, o r in te rp retin g o f data to be re cord ed . R e fe rs to s u p erviso r
prob lem s a ris in g fr o m erro n eo u s item s o r codes o r m is s in g in form ation .

1. S e c re ta ry to the chairm an o f the board o r p resid en t o f a com pany that em ploys, in
o v e r 100 but fe w e r than 5,000 p erso n s; o r

2. S e c re ta ry to a co rp o ra te o ffic e r (oth er than the ch airm an o f the board o r p residen t)
o f a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 5,000 but fe w e r than 25,000 p e rs o n s : o r
3. S e c re ta ry to the head, im m ed ia tely below the c o rp o ra te o ffic e r le v e l,
segm ent o r su bsid iary o f a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 25,000 p ers o n s .

o f a m a jo r

C la ss B

M ESSENGER (O ffic e Boy o r G irl)

1. S e c re ta ry to the chairm an o f the board o r presid en t o f a com pany that em ploys, in
fe w e r than 100 p e rs o n s ; o r

P e r fo r m s va rio u s routine duties such as running erra n d s, operatin g m in o r o ffic e m a ­
chines such as s e a le r s o r m a ile r s , opening and distribu tin g m a il, and other m in o r c le r ic a l w ork.
Exclude position s that re q u ire opera tion o f a m o to r v e h ic le as a significan t duty.

a ll,

SECRETARY

3. S e c re ta ry to the head, im m ed ia tely below the o ffic e r le v e l, o v e r eith er a m a jo r
co rp o ra te -w id e functional a c tiv ity (e .g ., m a rk etin g, re sea rch , opera tio n s, in du strial r e la ­
tion s, etc .) o r a m a jo r geograph ic o r o rga n izatio n a l segm ent (e .g ., a re gio n a l headquarters;
a m a jo r d ivision ) o f a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 5,000 but fe w e r than 25,000
em p lo y e e s ; or

A ssig n ed as p erso n a l s e c re ta ry , n o rm a lly to one in dividu al. M aintains a clo se and highly
resp o n siv e relatio n sh ip to the d a y -to -d a y w ork o f the su p e rv is o r. W orks fa ir ly independently r e ­
ceiv in g a m inim um o f d eta iled su p ervisio n and guidance. P e r fo r m s v a rie d c le r ic a l and s e c r e ta r ia l
duties, usually including m ost o f the fo llo w in g :
a. R e c e iv e s telephone c a lls , perso n a l c a lle r s , and in com ing m a il,
in q u ires, and rou tes tech n ical in q u iries to the p ro p e r p erson s;

a nsw ers

b.

E sta b lish es, m ain tain s,

c.

R ela y s m e ssa g es fr o m su p e rv is o r to subordinates;

4. S e c re ta ry to the head o f an individual plant, fa c to ry , etc. (o r oth er equ ivalent le v e l
of official) that employs, in all, over 5,000 p e r s o n s ; or
5. S e c re ta ry to the head o f a la rg e and im portan t o rga n izatio n a l segm en t (e .g ., a m iddle
m anagem ent s u p erviso r o f an orga n ization a l segm ent often in volv in g as m any as s e v e ra l
hundred p erso n s) o r a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 25,000 p e r s o n s .

M aintains the s u p e r v is o r's calen dar and m akes appointm ents as instru cted;

d.

routine

2. S e c re ta r y to a co rp o ra te o ffic e r (oth er than the ch airm an o f the board o r presid en t)
o f a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 100 but fe w e r than 5,000 p e r s o n s ; o r

and r e v is e s the s u p e r v is o r's file s ;
C la ss C

e. R ev iew s co rresp o n d en ce, m em orandum s, and re p o rts prep a red
s u p e r v is o r's signatu re to a ssu re p ro ce d u ra l and typogra ph ic accu racy;
f.

by oth ers fo r the

1, S e c re ta ry to an execu tive o r m a n a gerial person whose re s p o n s ib ility is not equivalent
to one o f the sp e c ific le v e l situations in the defin ition fo r cla ss B, but whose orga n ization a l
unit n o rm a lly num bers at lea st sev e ra l dozen em p loyees and is u su ally d ivid ed into o rg a n iz a ­
tional segm ents which a re often, in turn, fu rth er subdivided. In som e com pan ies, this le v e l
includes a w ide range o f o rga n izatio n a l echelons; in o th ers, on ly one o r tw o; or
2. S e c re ta r y to the head o f an individual plant, fa c to ry , etc. (o r oth er equivalent le v e l
o f o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in a ll, fe w e r than 5,000 p e r s o n s .

P e r fo r m s stenographic and typing w ork.

M ay also p e r fo rm oth er c le r ic a l and s e c r e t a r ia l tasks o f com parab le nature and d ifficu lty .
The w ork ty p ic a lly re q u ire s know ledge o f o ffic e routine and understanding o f the orga n ization ,
p r o g ra m s , and p roced u res re la ted to the w ork o f the su p e rv is o r.

Exclusions
Not a ll position s that a re title d " s e c r e t a r y " p osses s the above c h a ra c te ris tic s .
o f position s which a re excluded fr o m the defin ition a re as fo llo w s :

Exam ples

C la ss D "
1. S e c re ta r y to the su p erviso r o r head o f a s m a ll o rga n izatio n a l unit (e .g ., fe w e r than
about 25 o r 30 perso n s); o r
2. S e c re ta ry to a n on su pervisory sta ff sp e cia list, p ro fe ssio n a l em p loy ee, a d m in istra ­
tiv e o ffic e r , o r assistan t, sk ille d technician o r ex p ert.
(N O T E : Many com panies assign
sten ogra ph ers, ra th er than s e c re ta rie s as d es crib e d above, to this le v e l o f s u p erviso ry o r
n on su p erviso ry w o r k e r .)
S TE N O G R A P H E R

a.

P o sition s

b.

S tenographers not fu lly tra in ed in s e c r e ta r ia l type duties;

which do not m eet the

"p e r s o n a l"

s e c re ta ry

concept d e s crib e d

above;

c. S tenographers se rv in g as o ffic e a ssistan ts to a group o f p ro fe ssio n a l, tech n ical, or
m a n a geria l persons;
d. S e c re ta r y position s in which the duties a re eith er substantially m o re routine o r
substantially m o re com p lex and resp o n sib le than those ch a ra c te riz e d in the definition;

P r im a r y duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to tra n s c rib e the dictation . M ay
also type fro m w ritten copy. M ay o p era te fro m a stenographic pool. M ay o cca sio n a lly tra n s c rib e
from vo ic e re cord in gs ( if p r im a ry duty is tra n scrib in g fr o m re c o rd in g s , see T ra n scrib in g-M a ch in e
O p era to r, G en era l).
N O T E : This job is distinguished fr o m that o f a s e c re ta ry in that a s e c r e ta r y n o rm a lly
w orks in a confiden tial relation sh ip with only one m an ager o r ex ecu tive and p e r fo rm s m o r e
resp o n sib le and d is c re tio n a ry tasks as d e s crib e d in the s e c r e ta r y job defin ition .
S tenographer, G en eral

e. A ssista n t type position s which in volve m o re d ifficu lt o r m o re resp o n sib le tech ­
n ica l, a d m in istra tive, su p e rv is o ry , o r s p e c ia lize d c le r ic a l duties which a re not typ ic a l o f
s e c r e t a r ia l w ork.




D ictation in volv es a n orm al routine vocabu lary. M ay m aintain file s , keep sim ple re c o r d s ,
o r p e rfo rm oth er r e la t iv e ly routine c le r ic a l tasks.

23
S T E N O G R A P H E R — C o n tin u ed

T A B U L A T I N G - M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R (E l e c t r i c A c c o u n tin g M a c h in e O p e r a t o r )— C on tin u ed

S tenograp her, S enior

P o sition s a re c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis o f the fo llow in g definitions.

D ictation in vo lv es a v a rie d tech n ical o r s p e c ia lize d voca bu la ry such as in le g a l b rie fs
o r re p orts on sc ie n tific re sea rch . M ay also set up and m aintain file s , keep r e c o r d s , etc.
OR
P e r fo r m s stenographic duties re q u irin g sig n ific a n tly g r e a te r independence and resp o n ­
s ib ility than sten ograph er, ge n era l, as evidenced by the fo llow in g:
W ork re q u ires a high
d eg ree o f stenographic speed and a ccu racy; a thorough w orkin g know ledge o f gen era l business
and o ffic e procedu re; and o f the s p e c ific business o p era tio n s, orga n izatio n , p o lic ie s , p r o c e ­
du res, file s , w ork flo w , etc.
U ses this know ledge in p e rfo rm in g sten ograph ic duties and
responsib le c le r ic a l tasks such as m aintaining follow u p file s ; a ssem blin g m a te r ia l fo r re p o rts,
m em orandum s, and le tte rs ; com posing sim p le le tte r s fr o m gen era l in stru ction s; read ing and
routing incom ing m a il; and answ erin g routine qu estion s, etc.
S W ITC H B O AR D O P E R A T O R
C la ss A . O perates a sin gle- o r m u ltiple-p osition telephone sw itchboard handling incom ing,
outgoing, intraplant o r o ffic e c a lls . P e r fo r m s fu ll telephone in form a tion s e r v ic e o r handles
com p lex c a lls , such as con feren ce, c o lle c t, o v e rs e a s , o r s im ila r c a lls , eith er in addition to
doing routine w ork as d es crib e d fo r sw itchboard o p e ra to r, class B, o r as a fu ll-tim e
assignm ent. ( " F u l l " telephone in form a tion s e r v ic e o ccu rs when the establish m ent has v a rie d
functions that a re not re a d ily understandable fo r telephone in form ation pu rposes, e .g ., because
o f overla p p in g o r in te rre la te d functions, and consequently presen t frequent prob lem s as to
which extensions a re a ppropria te fo r c a lls .)
C la ss B . O perates a single- o r m u ltiple-p osition telephone sw itchboard handling incom ing,
outgoing, intraplant o r o ffic e c a lls . M ay handle routine long distance c a lls and re c o r d to lls .
M ay p e r fo rm lim ite d telephone in form ation s e r v ic e . (" L im it e d " telephone in form a tion s e r v ic e
o ccu rs i f the functions o f the establishm ent s e r v ic e d a re re a d ily understandable fo r telephone
in form ation pu rposes, o r i f the requ ests a re routine, e .g ., giving extension num bers when
sp e c ific names a re furnished, o r i f co m p lex c a lls a re r e fe r r e d to another o p e ra to r.)
T h ese cla ssifica tio n s do not include sw itchboard o p era to rs in telephone com panies who
a ssist cu stom ers in placing ca lls.
S W ITC H B O AR D O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
In addition to p erfo rm in g duties o f o p era to r on a s in gle-p o sitio n o r m o n ito r-ty p e sw itch ­
board, acts as recep tio n ist and m ay also type o r p e rfo rm routine c le r ic a l w ork as part o f regu la r
duties. Th is typing o r c le r ic a l w ork m ay take the m a jo r pa rt o f this w o r k e r 's tim e w hile at
sw itchboard.
T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R (E le c tr ic A ccounting M achine O p era to r)
O perates one o r a v a rie ty o f m achines such as the tabu lator, ca lcu la tor, c o lla to r, in te r ­
p r e te r , s o rte r , reprodu cing punch, etc. Excluded fro m this defin ition a re w orkin g s u p erviso rs.
A ls o excluded a re o p era to rs o f elec tro n ic d ig ita l com pu ters, even though they m ay also o pera te
E A M equipment.

C la ss A . P e r fo r m s com plete rep ortin g and tabulating assignm ents including devisin g
d ifficu lt con trol panel w irin g under gen era l su pervision. A ssignm ents ty p ic a lly in vo lv e a
v a r ie ty o f long and com p lex re p o rts which often a re ir r e g u la r o r n on recu rrin g, requ irin g
som e planning o f the nature and sequencing o f operations, and the use o f a v a rie ty o f m a ­
chines. Is ty p ic a lly in volved in tra in in g new o p era to rs in machine operations o r tra in in g
lo w e r le v e l o p era to rs in w irin g fr o m d ia gra m s and in the operatin g sequences o f long and
com p lex re p o rts .
Does not include position s in which w irin g re sp o n sib ility is lim ited to
s ele ctio n and in sertio n o f p r e w ire d boards.
C la ss B . P e r fo r m s w ork a cco rd in g to establish ed procedu res and under s p e cific in ­
stru ctions. A ssignm ents ty p ic a lly in vo lv e com p lete but routine and re c u rrin g reports o r parts
o f la r g e r and m o re com p lex re p o rts . O perates m o re d ifficu lt tabulating o r e le c tr ic a l a c ­
counting m achines such as the tabu lator and ca lcu la tor, in addition to the sim p ler m achines
used by c la ss C o p era to rs. M ay be re q u ired to do som e w irin g fr o m d iagram s. M ay tra in
new em p loy ees in basic machine operations.
C la ss C . Under sp e cific in stru ction s, op era tes sim ple tabulating o r e le c tr ic a l accounting
m achines such as the s o rte r , in te rp r e te r, reprodu cing punch, c o lla to r, etc. A ssignm ents
ty p ic a lly in vo lv e portions o f a w ork unit, fo r exam ple, individual sortin g o r collatin g runs,
o r re p e titiv e o p era tio n s. M ay p e r fo rm sim ple w irin g fro m d ia gra m s, and do some filin g w ork.
T R A N S C R IB IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R , G E N E R A L
P r im a r y duty is to tra n s c rib e dictation in volvin g a n orm al routine vocabu lary fro m
tra n scrib in g -m a ch in e re c o rd s . M ay also type fr o m w ritten copy and do sim ple c le r ic a l w ork.
W ork ers tra n scrib in g dictation in volvin g a v a rie d tech nical o r s p e cia lize d vocabu lary such as
le g a l b r ie fs o r re p o rts on sc ie n tific re s e a rc h a re not included. A w o rk er who takes dictation
in shorthand o r by Stenotype o r s im ila r m achine is c la s s ifie d as a sten ograph er.
T Y P IS T
U ses a ty p e w r ite r to m ake co pies o f variou s m a te r ia ls o r to m ake out b ills a fter c a lcu la ­
tions have been m ade by another perso n . M ay include typing o f sten cils, m ats, o r s im ila r m a te ­
ria ls fo r use in duplicating p r o c e s s e s . M ay do c le r ic a l w ork in volvin g little specia l training, such
as keeping sim ple re c o r d s , filin g re c o rd s and re p o rts, o r sortin g and distribu tin g incom ing m a il.
C la ss A . P e r fo r m s one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g : Typing m a teria l in final fo rm when
it in vo lv es com bining m a te r ia l fro m s e v e ra l sou rces; o r re sp o n sib ility fo r c o rr e c t spelling,
syllab ica tio n , punctuation, etc,, o f tech nical o r unusual w ords o r fo reig n language m a te ­
ria l; o r planning layout and typing o f com plicated sta tistica l tables to m aintain u n iform ity
and balance in spacing. May type routine fo rm le tte rs , va ryin g d etails to suit circu m stan ces.
C la ss B . P e r fo r m s one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g : Copy typing from rough o r c le a r
d ra fts ; o r routine typing o f fo rm s , insurance p o lic ie s , etc.; o r setting up sim ple standard
tabulations; o r copying m o re com plex tables a lrea d y set up and spaced p ro p e rly .

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R — Continued

C O M PU TER O PERATO R
M o n ito rs and op era tes the control console o f a digita l com puter to p ro ce ss data accordin g
to o p era tin g in stru ction s, usually prepared by a p r o g ra m e r . W ork includes m o st of the fo llo w in g :
Studies in stru ction s to determ in e equipment setup and o pera tion s; loads equipment with requ ired
item s (tape r e e ls , card s, e tc .); sw itches n ecess a ry a u x ilia ry equipment into c irc u it, and starts
and o p era tes com puter; m akes adjustments to com puter to c o r r e c t operatin g problem s and m eet
sp e cia l conditions; re view s e r r o r s m ade during operation and d eterm in es cause o r r e fe r s problem
to su p e rv is o r o r p ro g ra m er; and m aintains o peratin g re c o r d s . M ay test and a ssist in co rre c tin g
p ro g ra m .
F o r wage study pu rposes,

com puter o p era to rs a re c la s s ifie d as fo llow s:

C lass A . Operates independently, o r under only gen era l direction , a com puter running
p ro g ra m s with m ost o f the fo llow in g c h a ra c te ris tic s :
New p rog ra m s a re frequ en tly tested
and introduced; scheduling requ irem en ts a re o f c r itic a l im portan ce to m in im ize downtim e;
the p ro g ra m s a re o f com plex design so that id en tifica tion o f e r r o r sou rce often re q u ires a
w orking knowledge o f the total p ro g ra m , and altern ate p ro g ra m s m ay not be a va ila b le. May
giv e d irectio n and guidance to lo w e r le v e l o p era to rs.
C lass B. O perates independently, o r under only gen era l d irection , a com puter running
p rog ra m s with m ost o f the fo llow in g c h a ra c te ris tic s : M ost o f the p rog ra m s a re established
production runs, ty p ic a lly run on a re g u la rly re c u rrin g basis; there is little o r no testin g




o f new p ro g ra m s requ ired ; a ltern a te p rog ra m s a re p rovid ed in case o rigin a l program needs
m a jo r change o r cannot be c o rr e c te d within a reasonable tim e. In comm on e r r o r situ a­
tion s, diagnoses cause and takes c o r r e c tiv e action. This usually in volv es applying p revio u s ly
p rog ra m ed c o r r e c t iv e steps, o r using standard c o rre c tio n techniques.
OR
O perates under d ir e c t su p ervisio n a com puter running p rog ra m s o r segm ents o f p rog ra m s
with the c h a ra c te ris tic s d escrib ed fo r cla ss A . M ay a ssist a h igh er le v e l o p era to r by in de­
pendently p erfo rm in g less d ifficu lt tasks assigned, and p erfo rm in g d ifficu lt tasks fo llow in g
detailed in stru ction s and with frequent re v ie w of operations p erfo rm e d .
C lass C . W orks on routine p rog ra m s under clo se su pervision. Is expected to d evelop
w orking know ledge o f the com puter equipment used and a b ility to detect problem s in volved in
running routine p ro g ra m s . U sually has re c e iv e d some fo rm a l train in g in com puter operation.
M ay a ssist h igher le v e l o p era to r on com plex p rog ra m s.
C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M E R , BUSINESS
C on verts statem ents o f business p rob le m s, ty p ic a lly p rep a red by a system s analyst, into
a sequence o f deta iled in stru ction s which a re re qu ired to so lve the prob lem s by automatic data
p ro ce ssin g equipment. W orking fro m charts o r d ia gra m s, the p r o g ra m e r develop s the p r e c is e in ­
structions which, when en tered into the com puter system in coded language, cause the m anipulation

24
CO M PUTER

P R O G R A M E R , B U S IN E S S — C o n tin u ed

o f data to a ch ieve d e s ire d re su lts . W ork in volv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g : A p p lies know ledge o f
com pu ter ca p a b ilitie s , m a th em a tics, lo g ic em ployed by com pu ters, and p a rticu la r subject m a tter
in volv ed to a nalyze charts and d ia gra m s o f the p rob le m to be p rogra m ed ; develop s sequence
o f p ro g ra m steps; w rite s d eta iled flo w charts to show o rd e r in which data w ill be p ro ce ssed ;
co n v erts these ch arts to coded in stru ction s fo r m achine to fo llo w ; tests and c o r r e c ts p ro g ra m s;
p re p a re s in stru ction s fo r operatin g person n el during production run; a n a lyzes, re v ie w s , and a lters
p ro g ra m s to in c re a s e o p era tin g e ffic ie n c y o r adapt to new requ irem en ts; m aintains re c o rd s o f
p ro g ra m develop m en t and re v is io n s . (N O T E : W ork ers p e r fo rm in g both system s a n alysis and p r o ­
gra m in g should be c la s s ifie d as system s analysts i f this is the s k ill used to d eterm in e th e ir pay.)
Does not include em p loy ees p r im a r ily re sp o n sib le fo r the m anagem ent o r su p ervisio n o f
other e le c tro n ic data p ro c e s s in g em p lo y ees, o r p r o g ra m e r s p r im a r ily concern ed with s cie n tific
and/or en gin eerin g p ro b le m s.
F o r w age study pu rp oses, p r o g ra m e r s a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:
C la ss A . W orks independently o r under only g e n era l d ir e c tio n on q om plex p rob le m s which
re q u ire com petence in a ll phases o f p rog ra m in g concepts and p r a c tic e s . W orking fr o m d ia ­
gra m s and ch arts which id en tify the nature o f d e s ire d re su lts , m a jo r p ro ce ssin g steps to be
a ccom plish ed , and the relatio n sh ip s between va rio u s steps o f the p rob lem solvin g routine;
plans the fu ll ran ge o f p ro g ra m in g action s needed to e ffic ie n tly u tilize the com puter system
in a ch ievin g d e s ire d end produ cts.
A t this le v e l, p ro g ra m in g is d iffic u lt because com puter equipment must be o rga n ized to
produce s e v e ra l in te rre la te d but d iv e rs e products fr o m num erous and d iv e rs e data elem en ts.
A w ide v a r ie ty and ex ten sive num ber o f in tern al p ro c e s s in g actions m ust o ccu r. Th is re q u ires
such actions as develop m en t o f com m on operations which can be reused, establish m ent o f
lin kage points betw een o p era tio n s, adjustm ents to data when p rog ra m requ irem en ts exceed
com pu ter sto ra ge ca pa city, and substantial m anipulation and resequ encing o f data elem en ts
to fo rm a h igh ly in tegra ted p ro g ra m .
M ay p ro vid e functional d ire c tio n to lo w e r le v e l p r o g ra m e r s who a re assigned to a ssist.
C la ss B . W orks independently o r under on ly ge n era l d irection on re la t iv e ly sim ple
p r o g ra m s , o r on sim p le segm en ts o f co m p lex p r o g ra m s .
P ro g ra m s (o r segm en ts) usually
p ro c e s s in form a tion to ' produce data in two o r th ree v a rie d sequences o r fo rm a ts . R ep orts
and listin g s a re produced by re fin in g, adapting, a rra y in g , o r making m in o r additions to o r
d eletion s fr o m input data which a re re a d ily a va ila b le.
W hile numerous re c o rd s m ay be
p ro c e s s e d , the data have been re fin e d in p r io r actions so that the a ccu ra cy and sequencing
o f data can be tested by using a fe w routine checks. T y p ic a lly , the p ro g ra m d eals with
routine re c o rd -k e e p in g type o p era tio n s.
OR
W orks on co m p le x p ro g ra m s (as d es c rib e d fo r cla ss A ) under clo se d ire c tio n o f a h igh er
le v e l p r o g ra m e r o r s u p e rv is o r. M a y a s s is t h igh er le v e l p ro g ra m e r by independently p e r ­
fo rm in g le s s d iffic u lt tasks a ssign ed , and p e r fo rm in g m o re d ifficu lt tasks under fa ir ly clo se
d irectio n .
M ay guide o r in stru ct lo w e r le v e l p r o g ra m e r s .
C la ss C . M akes p r a c tic a l applications o f p ro g ra m in g p ra c tic es and concepts usually
lea rn ed in fo rm a l tra in in g co u rs e s . A ssign m en ts a re design ed to develop com petence in the
a pplication o f standard p roce d u res to routine p ro b le m s. R e c e iv e s c lo s e su p ervision on new
aspects o f a ssignm ents; and w ork is re v ie w e d to v e r ify its a ccu racy and conform ance with
re q u ired p roce d u res.
C O M P U T E R S YSTEM S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS
A n a ly ze s business p rob le m s to fo rm u la te p roced u res fo r solvin g them by use o f ele c tro n ic
data p ro ce ssin g equipm ent. D evelops a co m p lete d es crip tio n o f a ll specifica tion s needed to enable
p r o g ra m e r s to p re p a re re q u ired d ig ita l com puter p ro g ra m s . W ork in volv es m o st of the fo llo w in g :
A n a ly ze s su b jec t-m a tter o pera tion s to be automated and id en tifie s conditions and c r ite r ia requ ired
to a ch ieve s a tis fa c to ry re su lts ; s p e c ifie s number and types o f re c o r d s , file s , and documents to
be used; outlines action s to be p e r fo rm e d by personn el and com puters in su fficien t detail fo r
presen tation to m anagem ent and fo r p ro g ra m in g (ty p ic a lly this in volves prep a ra tion o f w ork and
data flo w ch a rts); co ordin ates the develop m en t o f test p rob le m s and pa rticip ates in t r ia l runs o f
new and re v is e d sy stem s; and recom m en ds equipment changes to obtain m o re e ffe c tiv e o v e r a ll
opera tio n s. (N O T E : W ork ers p e rfo rm in g both system s a n alysis and progra m in g should be c la s ­
sifie d as system s analysts i f this is the s k ill used to d eterm in e th eir pay.)
Does not include em p loy ees p r im a r ily resp o n sib le fo r the m anagem ent o r su p ervision
o f oth er e le c tro n ic data p ro c e s s in g e m p lo y ees, o r system s analysts p r im a r ily concern ed with
s cie n tific o r en gin eerin g p rob lem s.
F o r w age study pu rp oses,

system s analysts a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:

C la ss A . W orks independently o r under only gen era l d irection on com plex prob lem s in ­
vo lv in g a ll phases o f system s a n a lysis. P ro b le m s a re com p lex because o f d iv e rs e sou rces o f
input data and m u ltip le-u se requ irem en ts o f output data. (F o r exam ple, develop s ar in tegrated
production scheduling, in ven to ry co n tro l, cost a n a ly sis, and sales analysis r e c o r d in which




CO M PU TER

SYSTEM S A N A L Y S T ,

B U S IN E S S — C o n tin u ed

e v e r y ite m o f each type is a u to m a tica lly p r o c e s s e d through the fu ll sy stem o f re c o rd s and
a p p rop ria te follow u p action s a re in itia ted by the com puter.) C o n fers with p erso n s concern ed to
d eterm in e the data p ro c e s s in g p rob le m s and a d vise s s u b jec t-m a tter p erso n n el on the im p lic a ­
tion s o f new o r re v is e d system s o f data p ro ce ssin g opera tio n s. M akes recom m en dation s, i f
needed, fo r a p p rova l o f m a jo r system s in stalla tion s o r changes and fo r obtaining equipm ent.
M ay p ro vid e fu nctional d ire c tio n to lo w e r
a ssist.

le v e l sy stem s analysts who a re assign ed to

C la ss B. W orks independently o r under only g e n era l d ir e c tio n on p rob le m s that a re
r e la t iv e ly u ncom plicated to ana lyze, plan, p ro g ra m , and o p era te. P ro b le m s a re o f lim ite d
c o m p le x ity because so u rces o f input data a re hom ogeneous and the output data a re c lo s e ly
re la ted .
(F o r exa m ple, develop s system s fo r m aintaining d e p o sito r accounts in a bank,
m aintaining accounts re c e iv a b le in a re ta il establish m ent, o r m ain tain in g in ven to ry accounts
in a m anufacturing o r w h o lesa le esta b lish m en t.) C o n fers with perso n s con cern ed to d eterm in e
the data p ro c e s s in g p rob lem s and a d vise s su b jec t-m a tter personn el on the im p lica tio n s o f the
data p r o c e s s in g system s to be applied.
OR
W orks on a segm en t o f a com p lex data p ro ce ssin g sch em e o r sy stem , as d e s crib e d fo r
c la ss A . W orks independently on routine assignm ents and re c e iv e s in stru ction and guidance
on co m p le x assign m en ts.
W ork is re v ie w e d fo r a ccu ra cy o f judgm ent, com plian ce with
in stru ction s, and to in su re p ro p e r alinem en t with the o v e r a ll sy stem .
C la ss C . W orks under im m ed ia te su p ervisio n , c a rr y in g out a n alyses as a ssigned , usually
o f a sin gle a c tiv ity .
A ssign m en ts a re design ed to d ev elop and expand p r a c tic a l e x p erien c e
in the application o f p roced u res and sk ills re q u ired fo r system s a n a ly sis w ork . F o r ex a m p le,
m ay a s s is t a h igh er le v e l system s analyst by p rep a rin g the d eta iled s p e cifica tio n s re q u ired
by p r o g ra m e r s fr o m in form a tion d evelop ed by the h igh er le v e l analyst.
D RAFTSM AN
C la ss A . Plan s the graphic p resen tation o f co m p lex item s having d istin ctive design
fea tu res that d iffe r s ig n ific a n tly fr o m esta b lish ed d raftin g p reced en ts. W orks in c lo s e sup­
p o rt with the design o rig in a to r , and m ay recom m en d m in o r design changes. A n a ly ze s the
e ffe c t o f each change on the deta ils o f fo rm , function, and p o sition a l relatio n sh ip s o f c o m ­
ponents and p a rts.
W orks with a m inim u m o f s u p e rv is o ry a ssista n ce.
C om p leted w ork is
re v ie w e d by design o rig in a to r fo r co n sisten cy with p r io r en gin eerin g determ in a tio n s. M ay
eith e r p re p a re draw in gs, o r d ir e c t th e ir p rep a ra tion by lo w e r le v e l d raftsm en .
C la ss B . P e r fo r m s nonroutine and co m p le x draftin g assignm ents that re q u ire the a p p li­
cation o f m o st o f the standardized draw in g techniques re g u la rly used.
Duties ty p ic a lly in ­
v o lv e such w ork as:
P r e p a re s w orkin g draw in gs o f su ba ssem b lies with ir r e g u la r shapes,
m u ltip le functions, and p r e c is e p o sition al relatio n sh ip s between com ponents; p rep a res a rc h i­
tectu ra l draw in gs fo r constru ction o f a building including d eta il draw in gs o f foundations, w all
sectio n s, flo o r plans, and ro o f. Uses accep ted fo rm u la s and manuals in m aking n ece s s a ry
com putations to determ in e qu antities o f m a te r ia ls to be used, load ca p a cities, strength s,
s tre s s e s , etc.
R e c e iv e s in itia l in stru ction s, req u irem en ts, and a d vice fr o m s u p erviso r.
C om p leted w ork is ch ecked fo r tech n ical adequacy.
C la ss C . P r e p a re s d eta il draw ings o f sin gle units o r parts fo r en gin eerin g , construction,
m anu facturing, o r re p a ir pu rp oses. Types o f draw in gs p re p a re d include is o m e tr ic p rojectio n s
(dep ictin g th ree dim ension s in accu rate sc a le ) and sectio n al view s to c la r ify position in g o f
com ponents and convey needed in form a tion . C on solid ates d eta ils fr o m a num ber o f sou rces
and adjusts o r tra n sposes sca le as re q u ired . Suggested m ethods o f approach, applicable
p reced en ts, and advice on sou rce m a te r ia ls a re given with in itia l a ssign m en ts. Instructions
a re less com plete when assignm ents re cu r.
W ork m a y be spot-ch eck ed during p r o g re s s .
D R A F T S M A N -T R A C E R
C opies plans and draw in gs p rep a red by oth ers by p lacin g tra c in g cloth o r pa per o v e r
draw in gs and tra c in g with pen o r p en cil. (D oes not include tra c in g lim ite d to plans p r im a r ily
co n sistin g o f straigh t lines and a la rg e sca le not re q u irin g c lo s e delin ea tion .)
AND /O R
P r e p a re s sim p le o r re p e titiv e draw in gs o f e a s ily v is u a liz e d item s .
during p r o g re s s .

W ork is c lo s e ly su p ervised

E L E C T R O N IC S T E C H N IC IA N
W orks on va rio u s types o f e le c tro n ic equipm ent and re la ted d e v ic e s by p e rfo rm in g one
o r a com bination o f the fo llo w in g : In sta llin g, m ain tain in g, re p a irin g , o verh au lin g, trou blesh ootin g,
m o d ify in g , constru cting, and testin g. W ork re q u ire s p r a c tic a l application o f tech nical know ledge
o f e le c tr o n ic s p rin c ip le s , a b ility to d eterm in e m alfu n ction s, and s k ill to put equipm ent in re q u ired
o p era tin g condition.

25
E L E C T R O N IC S

T E C H N IC IA N — C o n tin u ed

E L E C T R O N IC S

Th e equipment— con sistin g o f eith e r m any d iffe re n t kinds o f circu its o r m u ltiple re p etition
o f the sam e kind o f circu it— inclu des, but is not lim ited to, the fo llow in g: (a ) E le c tro n ic tra n s ­
m ittin g and re c e iv in g equipment (e .g ., ra d a r, radio, te le v is io n , telephone, sonar, n avigation al
a id s ), (b) d ig ita l and analog com pu ters, and (c ) in du strial and m e d ic a l m easu rin g and co n trollin g
equipment.
Th is c la s s ific a tio n exclu des re p a irm e n o f such standard elec tro n ic equipm ent as com m on
o ffic e m achines and household radio and t e le v is io n sets; production a ssem b lers and te s te r s ; w o rk ­
e r s whose p r im a ry duty is s e r v ic in g e le c tro n ic test instrum ents; technicians who have a d m in is­
tra tiv e o r su p e rv is o ry re s p o n sib ility ; and d raftsm en , d e s ig n ers, and p ro fe ssio n a l en gin eers.
P o sition s a re c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis o f the fo llow in g defin itio n s.
C lass A . A pplies advanced tech n ical know ledge to so lve unusually com p lex problem s
(i.e ., those that ty p ic a lly cannot be so lved s o le ly by re fe re n c e to m an u factu rers' manuals o r
s im ila r docum ents) in w orkin g on e le c tro n ic equipment. Exam ples o f such prob lem s include
loca tio n and den sity o f c ir c u itr y , e le c tr o -m a g n e tic radiation, iso la tin g m alfu n ction s, and
frequ ent en gin eerin g changes. W ork in vo lv es: A d eta iled understanding o f the in te rre la tio n ­
ships o f circu its ; e x e rc is in g independent judgm ent in p erfo rm in g such tasks as m aking circ u it
a n alyses, calcu lating w ave fo rm s , tra cin g relation sh ips in signal flow ; and re g u la rly using
co m p lex test instrum ents (e .g ., dual t ra c e o s c illo s c o p e s , Q - m e te rs , deviatio n m e te rs , pulse
g e n e ra to rs ).
W ork m ay be re v ie w e d by s u p erviso r (freq u e n tly an en gin eer o r d e s ig n e r) fo r ge n era l
com plian ce with accep ted p ra c tic es. M ay p rovid e tech nical guidance to lo w e r le v e l tech nician s.
C la ss B . A p p lies com p reh en sive tech n ical knowledge to so lve com p lex prob lem s (i.e . ,
those that ty p ic a lly can be so lved so le ly by p r o p e rly in te rp retin g m an u factu rers' manuals o r
s im ila r docum ents) in w orkin g on e le c tro n ic equipm ent. W ork in volv es: A fa m ilia r it y with
the in te rre la tio n s h ip s o f circu its ; and judgm ent in d eterm in in g w ork sequence and in sele ctin g
too ls and testin g instrum ents, usually le s s co m p lex than those used by the cla ss A technician.

T E C H N IC IA N — C o n tin u ed

R e c e iv e s tech n ical guidance, as re q u ired , fr o m s u p erviso r o r h igh er le v e l technician,
and w ork is re v ie w e d fo r s p e c ific com plian ce with accep ted p ra c tic e s and w ork assignm ents.
M ay p rovid e tech nical guidance to lo w e r le v e l tech nician s.
C lass C . A p p lies w orkin g tech n ical know ledge to p e r fo rm sim ple o r routine tasks in
w orkin g on e le c tro n ic equipm ent, fo llo w in g d eta iled In stru ctions which c o v e r v ir tu a lly a ll
p roce d u res.
W ork ty p ic a lly in vo lv es such tasks as: A s s is tin g h igh er le v e l technicians by
p e rfo rm in g such a c tiv itie s as re p la cin g com ponents, w irin g c ir c u its , and taking test readings;
re p a irin g sim ple e le c tro n ic equipm ent; and using to o ls and com m on te s t instrum ents (e .g .,
m u ltim e te rs , audio signal g e n e ra to rs , tube te s t e r s , o s c illo s c o p e s ). Is not requ ired to be
fa m ilia r with the in te rre la tio n s h ip s o f c ir c u its . Th is know ledge, h ow eve r, m ay be acqu ired
through assignm ents design ed to in c re a s e com petence (in clu ding c la s s r o o m training) so that
w o rk e r can advance to h igh er le v e l tech nician .
R e c e iv e s tech n ical guidance, as re q u ired , fr o m s u p erviso r o r h igh er le v e l technician.
W ork is ty p ic a lly spot checked, but is giv en d eta iled r e v ie w when new o r advanced assignm ents
a re in volved .

NURSE, IN D U S T R IA L (R e g is te re d )
A re g is te r e d nurse who g iv es nursing s e r v ic e under g e n era l m e d ica l d irectio n to i l l o r
in ju red em p loy ees o r other persons who b ecom e i l l o r su ffe r an accident on the p rem ise s o f a
fa c to ry o r oth er establish m ent. Duties in vo lv e a com bination o f the fo llo w in g : G ivin g fir s t aid
to the i l l o r in jured; attending to subsequent d ressin g o f em p lo y e e s ' in ju ries; keeping re co rd s
o f patients trea ted ; p rep a rin g accident re p orts fo r com pensation o r oth er pu rposes; a ssistin g in
p h ysical exam inations and health evaluations o f applicants and em p loy ees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing-out p rog ra m s in volvin g health education, accident preven tion , evaluation o f plant environm ent,
o r oth er a c tiv itie s a ffec tin g the health, w e lfa re , and sa fety o f a ll p erson n el. Nu rsing s u p erviso rs
o r head nurses in establish m ents em ployin g m o re than one n urse a re excluded.

M A IN T E N A N C E A N D P O W E R P L A N T
C A R P E N T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E

F IR E M A N , S T A T IO N A R Y B O IL E R

P e r fo r m s the ca rp en try duties n e c e s s a ry to constru ct and m aintain in good re p a ir build­
ing w oodw ork and equipment such as bins, c r ib s , cou nters, benches, p a rtitio n s, d o ors, flo o r s ,
s ta irs , ca sin gs, and tr im m ade o f wood in an establish m ent. W ork in volv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g :
Planning and layin g out o f w ork fr o m blu eprints, d raw in gs, m o d els , o r verb a l in stru ction s: using a
v a r ie ty o f c a rp e n te r's handtools, portable p o w er to o ls , and standard m easu rin g instrum ents; m ak­
in g standard shop computations re la tin g to dim ensions o f w ork; and selectin g m a te r ia ls n ece s s a ry
fo r the w ork. In gen era l, the w ork o f the m aintenance ca rp en ter re q u ires rounded tra in in g and
e x p erien c e usually acqu ired through a fo rm a l a pprenticeship o r equ ivalent tra in in g and e x p erien c e.

F ir e s sta tion a ry b o ile rs to fu rnish the establish m ent in which em ployed with heat, pow er,
o r steam . Feed s fu els to fi r e by hand o r o p era tes a m ech an ical sto k er, gas, o r o il burner; and
checks w a ter and s a fety v a lv e s .
M ay clean , o il, o r a ssist in re p a irin g b o ile rro o m equipment.

E L E C T R IC IA N , M A IN T E N A N C E
P e r fo r m s a v a r ie ty o f e le c tr ic a l tra d e functions such as the in stalla tion , m aintenance, o r
re p a ir o f equipm ent fo r the generation , distribu tion , o r u tiliza tio n o f e le c tr ic e n erg y in an esta b ­
lishment. W ork in volv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g : In stalling o r re p a irin g any o f a v a r ie ty o f e le c ­
tric al equipm ent such as g e n e ra to rs , tra n s fo rm e rs , sw itch boards, c o n tr o lle r s , c ir c u it b r e a k e r s ,
m otors, heating units, conduit sy stem s, o r oth er tra n sm iss io n equipment; w orkin g fr o m blu e­
prints, draw in gs, layouts, o r oth er sp e cifica tio n s; locatin g and diagnosing tro u b le in the e le c tr ic a l
system o r equipm ent; w orkin g standard computations re la tin g to load requ irem en ts o f w irin g o r
electrical equipm ent; and using a v a r ie ty o f e le c tr ic ia n 's handtools and m easu rin g and testin g
instruments. In g e n era l, the w ork o f the m aintenance e le c tr ic ia n re q u ires rounded tra in in g and
experience usually a cq u ired through a fo rm a l a pprenticeship o r equ ivalent tra in in g and ex p erien c e.

E N G IN E E R , S TATIO N AR Y
Operates and m aintains and m ay also su p ervise the operation o f sta tion a ry engines and
equipment (m ech a n ica l o r e le c tr ic a l) to supply the establishm ent in which em p loyed with pow er,
heat, refrigeration , o r a ir-co n d itio n in g . W ork in vo lv es: O perating and m aintaining equipment
such as steam en gin es, a ir c o m p r e s s o rs , g e n e ra to rs , m o to rs , tu rbin es, ven tila tin g and r e f r i g ­
erating equipment, steam b o ile rs and b o ile r - fe d w a ter pumps; making equipment re p a irs ; and
keeping a record of o p era tio n o f m a ch in ery , tem p era tu re, and fu el consum ption. M ay also su­
pervise these o peration s.
Head o r c h ie f en gin eers in establishm ents em ploying m o re than one
engineer are excluded.




H E L P E R , M A IN T E N A N C E TR A D E S
A s s is ts one o r m o re w o rk e rs in the s k ille d m aintenance tra d es , by p erfo rm in g sp e c ific
o r g e n era l duties o f le s s e r s k ill, such as keeping a w o rk er supplied with m a te ria ls and tools;
clean ing w orkin g a rea , m ach in e, and equipment; a ssistin g journeym an by holding m a te ria ls or
to o ls ; and p e rfo rm in g oth er u nskilled tasks as d ire c te d by journeym an. The kind o f w ork the
h elp er is p erm itted to p e r fo rm v a rie s fr o m trade to tra d e: In som e tra des the h elp er is confined
to supplying, liftin g , and holding m a te r ia ls and to o ls , and cleaning w orkin g a rea s; and in oth ers
he is p erm itted to p e r fo rm s p e c ia lize d m achine operations, o r parts o f a trade that a re also
p e r fo rm e d by w o rk e rs on a fu ll- tim e basis.

M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A T O R , T O O L R O O M
S p e cia lizes in the opera tion o f one o r m o re types o f machine to o ls, such as jig b o re r s ,
c y lin d ric a l o r su rface g r in d e rs , engine lathes, o r m illin g m ach in es, in the constru ction o f
m ach in e-sh op to o ls , ga g es, jig s , fix tu re s , o r d ies. W ork in vo lv es m o st o f the follow in g: Planning
and p erfo rm in g d iffic u lt m achining o p era tio n s; p ro c e s s in g item s requ irin g com plicated setups o r
a high d eg ree o f a ccu racy; using a v a r ie ty o f p r e c is io n m easu rin g instrum ents; sele ctin g fee d s,
speeds, too lin g, and opera tion sequence; and m aking n e c e s s a r y adjustments during operation
to a ch ieve re q u isite tole ra n c e s o r d im ension s. M ay be re qu ired to re c o g n iz e when too ls need
d ressin g, to d ress to o ls , and to s e le c t p ro p e r coo.lants and cutting and lu bricatin g o ils .
For
cro s s -in d u s try w age study pu rp oses, m a ch in e-to o l o p era to rs, to o lro o m , in too l and die jobbing
shops a re exclu ded fr o m this cla s s ific a tio n .
M A C H IN IS T , M A IN T E N A N C E
Produ ces rep la cem en t parts and new parts in m aking re p a irs o f m e ta l parts o f m echan ical
equipment operated in an establish m ent. W ork in vo lv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g : In terp retin g w ritten
instructions and sp e cifica tion s; planning and la yin g out o f w ork; using a v a r ie ty o f m a ch in ist's

26
M A C H IN IS T , M A IN T E N A N C E — Continued

P A IN T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E

handtools and p r e c is io n m easu rin g in stru m en ts; setting up and operatin g standard m achine too ls;
shaping o f m e ta l p a rts to c lo s e to le ra n c e s ; m aking standard shop computations re la tin g to dim en ­
sions o f w ork, too lin g, fe e d s , and speeds o f m achining; know ledge o f the w orkin g p r o p e rtie s o f
the com m on m e ta ls; sele ctin g standard m a te r ia ls , p a rts, and equipment re q u ired fo r his w ork;
and fittin g and a ssem b lin g parts into m ech an ical equipm ent. In ge n era l, the m a ch in ist's w ork
n o rm a lly re q u ire s a rounded tra in in g in m ach in e-sh op p r a c tic e usually a cq u ired through a fo rm a l
apprenticeship o r equ ivalen t tra in in g and e x p erien c e.

Pain ts and re d e c o ra te s w a lls , w oodw ork, and fix tu res o f an establish m ent. W ork in volv es
the fo llo w in g ; K n ow ledge o f su rface p e c u lia r itie s and types o f paint re q u ire d fo r d ifferen t app lica ­
tion s; p rep a rin g su rface fo r painting by re m o vin g old fin ish o r by p lacin g putty o r f i l l e r in nail
h oles and in te rs tic e s ; and applying paint with sp ra y gun o r brush. M ay m ix c o lo r s , o ils , white
lead, and o th er paint in gred ien ts to obtain p ro p e r c o lo r o r con sisten cy. In g e n era l, the w ork o f the
m aintenance pain ter re q u ire s rounded tra in in g and e x p erien c e usually acq u ired through a fo rm a l
a pprenticeship o r equ ivalen t tra in in g and ex p erien c e.
P I P E F I T T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E

M E C H A N IC , A U T O M O T IV E (M aintenance)
R ep a irs au tom obiles, buses, m o to rtru ck s, and t ra c to rs o f an establish m ent. W ork in ­
v o lv e s m o st o f the fo llo w in g : Exam ining autom otive equipm ent to diagnose sou rce o f tro u b le; d isassem blin g equipm ent and p e rfo rm in g re p a irs that in vo lv e the use o f such handtools as w ren ch es,
g a g es, d r ills , o r s p e c ia lize d equipment in d isa ss em b lin g o r fittin g parts; re p la cin g broken o r
d e fe c tiv e parts fr o m stock; grind ing and adjusting va lv e s ; re a s sem b lin g and in stallin g the va riou s
a s sem b lies in the v e h ic le and m aking n e c e s s a ry adjustm ents; and alining w h e e ls , adjusting brakes
and ligh ts, o r tightening body b olts. In g e n e ra l, the w ork o f the autom otive m echanic re q u ires
rounded tra in in g and e x p erien c e usually acq u ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r equ ivalent
tra in in g and e x p erien c e.
Th is c la s s ific a tio n does not include m echan ics who re p a ir cu sto m ers' v e h ic le s in auto­
m o b ile re p a ir shops.

M E C H A N IC , M A IN T E N A N C E
R ep a irs m a ch in ery o r m ech a n ica l equipm ent o f an establish m ent.
W ork in vo lv es m o st
o f the fo llo w in g ; Exam ining m achines and m echan ical equipm ent to diagnose sou rce o f trou ble;
dism antlin g o r p a rtly dism antlin g m achines and p e rfo rm in g re p a irs that m a in ly in vo lv e the use
o f handtools in scra p in g and fittin g pa rts; re p la cin g broken o r d efe c tiv e parts with item s obtained
fr o m stock; o rd e r in g the production o f a rep la cem en t p a rt by a machine shop o r sending o f the
m achine to a m ach in e shop fo r m a jo r r e p a irs ; p rep a rin g w ritten sp ecifica tion s fo r m a jo r re p a irs
o r fo r the produ ction o f parts o rd e r e d fr o m m achine shop; re a s sem b lin g m ach in es; and making
a ll n e c e s s a r y adjustm ents fo r operation . In g e n era l, the w ork o f a maintenance m echanic re q u ires
rounded tra in in g and e x p erien c e usually acqu ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r equivalent
tra in in g and ex p e rie n c e .
Excluded fr o m this c la s s ific a tio n a re w o rk ers whose p r im a ry duties
in vo lv e setting up o r adjusting m ach in es.

M IL L W R IG H T
In sta lls new m ach in es o r heavy equipm ent, and d ism antles and in stalls m achines o r heavy
equipm ent when changes in the plant layout a re requ ired . W ork in volv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g :
Planning and la yin g out o f the w ork; in te rp retin g blueprints o r other sp ecifica tion s; using a v a rie ty
o f handtools and rig g in g ; m aking standard shop com putations relatin g to s tre s s e s , strength o f
m a te r ia ls , and cen ters o f gra v ity ; alinin g and balancing o f equipment; s ele ctin g standard to o ls,
equipm ent, and parts to be used; and in stallin g and m aintaining in good o rd e r p ow er tra n sm iss ion
equipment such as d r iv e s and speed re d u cers . In ge n era l, the m illw rig h t's w ork n o rm a lly re q u ires
a rounded tra in in g and e x p erien c e in the tra d e acq u ired through a fo rm a l a pprenticeship o r
equ ivalent tra in in g and ex p erien c e.

In sta lls o r re p a irs w a te r, steam , gas, o r oth er types o f pipe and pip efittin gs in an
establish m ent. W ork in vo lv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g ; La yin g out o f w ork and m easu rin g to locate
position o f pipe fr o m draw in gs o r oth er w ritten s p e cifica tio n s; cutting va rio u s siz e s o f pipe to
c o r r e c t lengths with ch is e l and h am m er o r o xy acetylen e torch o r pip e-cu ttin g m ach in es; threadin g
pipe with stocks and d ies; bending pipe by h an d-driven o r p o w e r-d r iv e n m ach in es; a ssem blin g
pipe with couplings and fasten ing pipe to h angers; m aking standard shop com putations re la tin g to
p r e s s u re s , flo w , and s iz e o f pipe re q u ired ; and m aking standard te sts to d eterm in e w hether fin ­
ish ed pipes m e et sp e c ific a tio n s . In ge n e ra l, the w ork o f the m aintenance p ip e fitte r re q u ires
rounded tra in in g and e x p erien c e u su ally acq u ired through a fo r m a l a ppren ticesh ip o r equ ivalent
train in g and ex p e rie n c e . W o rk ers p r im a r ily engaged in in stallin g and re p a irin g building sanitation
o r heating sy stem s a re ex clu d ed .
S H E E T - M E T A L W O RKER, M A IN T E N A N C E
F a b r ic a te s , in sta lls , and m aintains in good re p a ir the sh e e t-m e ta l equipm ent and fix tu res
(such as m achine gu ards, g re a s e pans, sh elves , lo c k e r s , tanks, v e n tila to rs , chutes, ducts, m eta l
ro o fin g ) o f an establish m en t. W ork in volv es m ost o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and layin g out a ll
types o f sh eet-m e ta l m aintenance w ork fr o m blu eprints, m o d els , o r o th er sp e cifica tion s; setting
up and o p era tin g a ll a v a ila b le types o f sh eet-m e ta l w orkin g m ach in es; using a v a r ie ty o f handtools
in cutting, bending, fo rm in g , shaping, fittin g , and assem b lin g; and in s ta llin g sh eet-m e ta l a r tic le s
as re q u ired . In g e n e ra l, the w ork o f the m aintenance s h eet-m e ta l w o rk e r re q u ires rounded
tra in in g and e x p erien c e u su ally a cq u ired through a fo r m a l appren ticesh ip o r equ ivalent tra in in g
and e x p erien c e.
T O O L A N D D IE M A K E R
C on stru cts and re p a irs m a ch in e-sh op to o ls , ga g es, jig s , fix tu res o r dies fo r fo rg in g s ,
punching, and oth er m e ta l-fo rm in g w ork.
W ork in vo lv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and
la yin g out o f w ork fr o m m o d els , blu eprints, d raw in gs, o r oth er o r a l and w ritten sp ecifica tion s;
using a v a r ie ty o f to o l and d ie m a k e r's handtools and p r e c is io n m easu rin g instrum ents; under­
standing o f the w orkin g p r o p e rtie s o f com m on m e ta ls and a llo y s ; setting up and opera tin g o f
m achine too ls and re la ted equipment; m aking n e c e s s a ry shop com putations re la tin g to dim ensions
o f w ork, speeds, fee d s, and too lin g o f m ach in es; h e a t-trea tin g o f m e ta l parts during fa b rica tio n
as w e ll as o f fin ish ed too ls and dies to a ch ieve re qu ired q u a lities ; w orkin g to clo se to le ra n c es;
fittin g and assem b lin g o f parts to p r e s c r ib e d to le ra n c es and allow a n ces; and s ele ctin g a ppropria te
m a te r ia ls , to o ls , and p r o c e s s e s . In g e n era l, the too l and die m a k e r's w ork re q u ires a rounded
tra in in g in m a ch in e-sh op and to o lro o m p ra c tic e usually a cq u ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship
o r equ ivalen t tra in in g and e x p e rie n c e .
F o r cr o s s -in d u s tr y w age study pu rposes, to o l and die m a k e rs in to o l
shops a re exclu ded fr o m this cla s s ific a tio n .

and d ie jobbing

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
GU ARD A N D W A T C H M E N
Guard. P e r fo r m s routine p o lice duties, e ith er at fix ed post o r on tou r, m aintaining o rd e r ,
using a rm s o r fo r c e w here n e cess a ry . Includes gatem en who a re stationed at gate and check
on iden tity o f em p loyees and oth er persons en te rin g .
W atchm an. Makes rounds o f p re m is e s p e r io d ic a lly in p rotectin g p ro p e rty against fir e ,
theft, and ille g a l en try.

L A B O R E R , M A T E R IA L H A N D L IN G
A w o rk e r em ployed in a w areh ou se, m anufacturing plant, s to re , o r oth er establishm ent
whose duties in volv e one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g ; Loading and unloading va riou s m a te r ia ls and
m erch an dise on o r fr o m fr e ig h t c a rs , tru cks, o r oth er tra n sp o rtin g d e v ic e s ; unpacking, sh elvin g,
o r placin g m a te r ia ls o r m erch a n d ise in p rop e r sto ra ge location ; and tra n sp o rtin g m a te r ia ls o r
m erch a n dise by handtruck, ca r, o r w h e elb a rrow . Lon gsh orem en , who load and unload ships a re
excluded.

J A N IT O R , P O R T E R , OR C L E A N E R
ORD ER F IL L E R
Cleans and keeps in an o r d e r ly condition fa c to ry w orking area s and w ash room s, o r
p rem ise s o f an o ffic e , apartm ent house, o r c o m m e rc ia l o r other establish m ent. Duties in volve
a com bination o f the fo llo w in g : Sweeping, mopping o r scrubbing, and polish ing flo o r s ; rem ovin g
chips, tra sh , and oth er refu se; dusting equipm ent, fu rn itu re, o r fixtu res; polish ing m etal fix ­
tu res o r trim m in g s ; p rovid in g supplies and m in o r m aintenance s e r v ic e s ; and i leaning la v a to rie s ,
sh ow ers, and re s tro o m s . W ork ers who s p e c ia liz e in window washing a re excluded.




F ills shipping o r tra n s fe r o rd e r s fo r fin ish ed goods fr o m sto red m erch an dise in a c c o rd ­
ance with sp e cifica tion s on sales slip s , cu sto m ers' o rd e r s , o r oth er in stru ction s. May, in addition
to fillin g o rd e rs and indicating item s fille d o r om itted, keep re c o rd s o f outgoing o r d e r s , re q u i­
sition additional stock o r re p o rt short supplies to su p erviso r, and p e r fo rm oth er re la ted duties.

27
T R U C K D R IV E R — Continued

P A C K E R , S H IP P IN G
P r e p a re s fin ish ed products fo r shipment o r sto ra ge by placing them in shipping con­
ta in ers, the s p e c ific operations p e r fo rm e d being dependent upon the type, s iz e , and number
o f units to be packed, the type o f contain er em ployed, and m ethod o f shipment. W ork re q u ires
the p lacin g o f item s in shipping contain ers and m ay in vo lv e one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g :
Know ledge o f va rio u s item s o f stock in o rd e r to v e r ify content; selection o f a ppropria te type
and s iz e o f contain er; in sertin g en clo su res in contain er; using e x c e ls io r o r oth er m a te r ia l to
p reven t breakage o r dam age; c lo sin g and sea lin g contain er; and applying labels o r en terin g
iden tifyin g data on con tain er.
P a ck e rs who a lso m ake wooden boxes o r c ra tes a re exclu ded.

fo llo w s :

F o r wage study pu rposes, tru c k d riv e r s a re c la s s ifie d by s iz e and type o f equipment, as
(T r a c t o r - t r a ile r should be rated on the basis o f t r a ile r ca pa city.)
T r u c k d riv e r
T r u c k d riv e r,
T r u c k d riv e r,
T r u c k d riv e r,
T r u c k d riv e r,

(com bin ation o f siz e s lis te d sep a ra te ly)
ligh t (under IV 2 tons)
m edium (I V 2 to and including 4 tons)
heavy (o v e r 4 tons, t r a ile r type)
h eavy (o v e r 4 tons, oth er than t r a ile r type)

S H IP P IN G AND R E C E IV IN G C L E R K
T R U C K E R , PO W E R
P r e p a re s m erch an dise fo r shipment, o r r e c e iv e s and is re spon sib le fo r incom ing sh ip­
ments o f m erch an dise o r oth er m a t e r ia ls . Shipping w ork in v o lv e s : A knowledge o f shipping p r o ­
ced u res, p ra c tic e s , rou tes, a va ila b le m eans o f tra n sporta tion , and ra tes; and p rep a rin g re c o rd s
o f the goods shipped, m aking up b ills o f lading, posting w eight and shipping ch a rge s, and keeping
a file o f shipping re c o rd s .
M ay d ir e c t o r a s s is t in p rep a rin g the m erch an dise fo r shipment.
R ec e iv in g w ork in v o lv e s ; V e r ify in g o r d irectin g oth ers in v e r ify in g the c o rre c tn e s s o f shipments
against b ills o f lading, in v o ic e s , o r oth er re c o rd s ; checking fo r sh ortages and re je c tin g dam ­
aged goods; routing m erch an dise o r m a te r ia ls to p ro p e r departm ents; and m aintaining n ece s s a ry
re c o rd s and file s .
F o r wage study pu rp oses,

w o rk ers a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s :

R ec eivin g c le rk
Shipping c le rk
Shipping and re c e iv in g c le rk
T R U C K D R IV E R
D riv e s a tru ck within a city o r in du strial a rea to tra n sp o rt m a te r ia ls , m erch an dise,
equipm ent, o r m en between va riou s types o f establish m ents such as: Manufacturing plants, freigh t
depots, w areh ou ses, w holesa le and re ta il establish m en ts, o r betw een re ta il establish m ents and
c u sto m ers' houses o r pla ces o f business. M ay also load o r unload truck with o r without h elp ers,
m ake m in o r m echan ical r e p a irs , and keep truck in good w orking o rd e r .
D riv e r-s a le s m e n and
o v e r -th e -r o a d d r iv e r s a re excluded.




O perates a m anually co n trolled gasolin e- o r e le c tric -p o w e re d tru ck o r tra c to r to tra n sport
goods and m a te r ia ls o f a ll kinds about a w arehouse, manufacturing plant, o r oth er establishm ent.
F o r w age study pu rposes, w o rk ers a re c la s s ifie d by type o f tru ck, as fo llo w s :
T ru c k e r, p o w er (fo r k lift)
T r u c k e r, p ow er (oth er than fo r k lift)

W AREH O U SEM AN
A s d irected , p e rfo rm s a v a rie ty o f w arehousing duties which re q u ire an understanding
o f the esta b lish m en t's stora ge plan. W ork in vo lv es m ost o f the fo llo w in g : V e rify in g m a te ria ls
(o r m erch a n d ise) against re c e iv in g docum ents, noting and rep ortin g d isc rep a n cies and obvious
dam ages; routing m a te r ia ls to p r e s c r ib e d sto ra ge location s; sto rin g, stacking, o r p a lletiz in g
m a te ria ls in accordan ce with p r e s c r ib e d sto ra ge m ethods; re a rra n gin g and taking in ven tory o f
stored m a te r ia ls ; exam ining sto red m a te r ia ls and re p ortin g d eterio ra tio n and damage; rem o vin g
m a te ria l fro m sto ra ge and p reparin g it fo r shipment.
May o pera te hand o r pow er trucks in
p erfo rm in g w arehousing duties.
Exclude w o rk ers whose p r im a ry duties in volve shipping and re c e iv in g w ork (see shipping
and re c e iv in g c le r k and packer, shipping), o rd e r fillin g (s e e o rd e r f il l e r ) , o r operating pow er
trucks (s e e tru c k e r, p o w er).

A v a ila b le O n R e q u e s t
The follow ing areas are surveyed p erio d ica lly for use in adm inistering the S ervice Contract A ct of 1965.
w ill be available at no cost while supplies last fro m any of the BLS region al o ffices shown on the back cover.
A lam ogordo—
Las C ru ces, N. M ex.
Alaska
A lban y, Ga.
A m a rillo , T ex.
A tlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.—
S.C.
B ak ersfield , C alif.
Baton Rouge, La.
B ilo x i, Gulfport, and Pascagoula, M iss.
B rid gep ort, N orw alk, and Stam ford, Conn.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Champaign—Urbana, 111.
Charleston, S.C.
C la rk s v ille , Tenn., and H opkinsville, Ky.
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ga—A la.
Corpus C h risti, T ex.
Crane, Ind.
Dothan, A la.
Duluth-Superior, Minn.— is.
W
E l Paso, T ex.
Eugene— pringfield, O reg.
S
Fargo— oorhead, N. Dak.—
M
Minn.
F a y e tte v ille , N. C.
Fitchburg— e o m in s te r, M ass.
L
F re d e ric k —
Hagerstown, M d —Pa^-W. Va.
F resn o, C alif.
Grand F ork s, N. Dak.
Grand Island— astin gs, N ebr.
H
Greenboro—
Winston Salem —
High Point, N .C .
H arrisb u rg, Pa.
K n oxville, Tenn.

Copies of public releases are or

La red o, Tex.
Las V egas, N ev.
Low er Eastern Shore, Md.—
Va.
M acon, Ga.
M arquette, Escanaba, Sault Ste.
M a rie , M ich.
M elbourne— itu s v ille —
T
Cocoa, F la.
(B reva rd Co.)
M eridian , M iss.
M iddlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, and Som erset
C os., N.J.
M ob ile, A la ., and Pensacola, Fla.
M ontgom ery, A la.
N ash ville, Tenn.
N ortheastern Maine
N orw ich—
Groton—
New London , Conn.
Ogden, Utah
Orlando, Fla.
Oxnard—
Sim i V a lley—
Ventura , C alif.
P anam a C ity , F la .
Maine—
Mass .
Portsm outh, N .H . —
P u e b lo , C olo.
R e no, N e v .
S a c r a m e n to , C a lif.
Santa B a r b a r a —
Santa M a r i a —L o m p o c , C a lif.
Sherm an —D e n i s o n , T e x .
S h r e v e p o r t , La.
S p r i n g f i e l d —C h ic o p e e — o ly o k e , M as s —Conn.
H
T o p e k a , Kans.
T u c s on , A r i z .
V a l l e j o —F a i r f i e l d —
Napa , C a lif.
W ilm in g to n , D e l —N . J —Md.
Y um a , A r i z .

R e p o r t s f o r the f o l l o w i n g s u r v e y s conducted in the p r i o r y e a r but since discontinue d a r e a ls o a v a i l a b l e :

Alpena, Standish, and Tawas City, M ic h.
A sh e v ille , N .C .
Austin, T e x .*
F o rt Smith, A r k —Okla.
Great F a lls , Mont.
*

Expanded to an a r e a w ag e s u r v e y in f i s c a l y e a r

1973.

L e x in gto n , K y . *
P in e Bluff, A r k .
Stockton, C a lif.
T a c o m a , Wash.
Wich ita F a l l s , T e x .
See inside back c o v e r .

The tw e lfth annual r e p o r t on s a l a r i e s f o r accoun tants, a u d ito rs , c h i e f accountan ts, a tt o r n e y s , job an a ly s ts , d i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l, b u y e r s , c h e m is t s ,
e n g i n e e r s , e n g in e e rin g te c h n ic ia n s , d r a ft s m e n , and c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s . O r d e r as B L S Bull etin 1742, N ation al S u rv e y of P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d m i n i s t r a t i v e ,
T e c h n i c a l , and C l e r i c a l P a y , June 1971, 75 cents a copy, f r o m any of the B L S r e g i o n a l s ale s o f f i c e s shown on the back c o v e r , or f r o m the
Superintendent o f Doc um ents , U.S. G o v e r n m en t P rin tin g O f f i c e , Washington, D .C., 20402.




☆ u .s.

G O V E R N M E N T

P R IN T IN G

O F F IC E :

1 9 7 3 —

7 4 6 - 1 8 8 / 6 1

A re a W a g e S u rveys
A lis t of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A d ire c to ry of area wage studies including m ore lim ited studies conducted at the
request of the Employment Standards Adm inistration of the Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins m ay be purchased from any of the BLS
regional sales o ffices shown on the back cover, or from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Governm ent P rin tin g O ffic e , Washington, D.C., 20402.
A rea
Akron, Ohio, July 1971 1_______ __ _______________________
Albany—
Schenectady—
Troy, N .Y ., Mar. 1972____ __ -___
Albuquerque, N. M ex., Mar. 1972 1-----------------------------Allentown—
Bethlehem—
Easton, Pa.—
N.J., May 1972 1 __
Atlanta, G a., May 1972 1----------------------------------------------Austin, Tex., Dec. 1972 1 (to be surveyed)
Baltimore, M d., Aug. 1971_________________________ _____
Beaumont—
Port Arthur—
Orange, Tex., May 1972______
Binghamton, N .Y., July 1972____________________________
Birmingham, Ala., Mar. 1972___________________________
Boise City, Idaho, Nov. 1971_____________________ ______
Boston, M ass., Aug. 1972 1
______________________________
Buffalo, N .Y., Oct. 1971_________________________________
Burlington, Vt., Dec. 1972 1 __ __ ______________ ____ ____
Canton, Ohio, May 1972 1________________________________
Charleston, W. V a ., Mar. 1972 1 ---------------------------------Charlotte, N.C., Jan. 1972 1 ------------------- --------------------Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., Sept. 1972 1 ------------ ---- ---- ---Chicago, 111., June 1972__________________________________
Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky.—
Ind.,, ^Feb. 1972--------------------------Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1972 1----------- --------- ------------------Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1971______________________________
Dallas, Tex., Oct. 1971________________________—----------Davenport—
Rock Island-Moline, Iowa—
111., Feb. 1972 1—
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1971 1 _______________________________
Denver, Colo., Dec. 1971 1------------------------------------------Des Moines, Iowa, May 1972 1 __________________________
Detroit, Mich., Feb. 1972_______________________________
Durham, N.C., Apr. 1972 1---------- --------— ----- --------------Fort Lauderdale—
Hollywood and West Palm
Beach, Fla., Apr. 1972 1 ........ ......... ...........................
Fort Worth, Tex., Oct. 1971_____________________________
Green Bay, W is., July 1972 1____ _______________________
Greenville, S.C., May 1972______________________________
Houston, Tex., Apr. 1972________________________________
Huntsville, A la ., Feb. 1972 1____________________________
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1971_____________________________
Jackson, M iss., Jan. 1972_______________________________
Jacksonville, F la ., Dec. 1971___________________________
Kansas City, Mo.-Kans., Sept. 1971----------------------------Lawrence—
Haverhill, Mass.—
N.H., June 1972 1______ __
Lexington, Ky., Nov. 1972 * (to be surveyed)
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Ark., July 1972 1--------Los Angeles—
Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa AnarGarden Grove, Calif., M ar. 1972------------------------------Louisville, Ky.—
Ind., Nov. 1971 1---------- ----------------------Lubbock, Tex., M ar. 1972 1_____________________________
Manchester, N.H., July 1972 1 ______________ _______ ____
Memphis, Tenn.— rk ., Nov. 1971 1
A
_______ _____
Miami, F la., Nov. 1971__________________________________
Midland and Odessa, Tex., JarG 1972 1 _________________
l

Bulletin number
and price
1685-87,
1725-49,
1725-59,
1725-87,
1725-77,

40
30
35
35
45

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1725-16,
1725-69,
1775-5,
1725-58,
1725-27,
1775-13,
1725-34,
1775-28,
1725-75,
1725-63,
1725-48,
1775-14,
1725-92,
1725-56,
1775-15,
1725-19,
1725-26,
1725-55,
1725-36,
1725-44,
1725-86,
1725-68,
1725-64,

35
30
45
30
30
75
45

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

35
35
35
55
70
35
75
30
35
35
35
35
35
40
30

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1725-74,
1725-21,
1775-1,
1725-66,
1725-79,
1725-50,
1725-23,
1725-38,
1725-39,
1725-18,
1725-81,

35
30
55
30
35
35
30
30
30
35
35

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1775-2,

55 cents

1725-76,
1725-29,
1725-57,
1775-8,
1725-40,
1725-28,
1725-37,

45
35
35
55
35
30
30

Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Area
Milwaukee, W is., May 1972 1_____________________________
Minneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn., J an. 1972 1 _______________
Muskegon—
Muskegon Heights, Mich., June 1972 1 ______
Newark and Jersey City, N.J., Jan. 1972 1 ______________
New Haven, Conn., J an. 1972 1___________________________
New Orleans, L a ., J an. 1972_____________________________
New York, N .Y ., Apr. 1972 1
_____________________________
N orfolk-Virginia Beach—
Portsmouth and
Newport News—
Hampton, Va., J an. 1972------------ ---- --Oklahoma City, Okla., July 1972________________________
Omaha, Nebr.—
Iowa, Sept. 1971 1----------------------------------Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic, N.J., June 1972 1 ___________
Philadelphia, P a .-N .J ., Nov. 1971 1-----------------------------Phoenix, A riz ., June 1972 1______________________________
Pittsburgh, P a ., J an. 1972-------------------------------------------Portland, Maine, Nov. 1971 1------------------------------------- --Portland, Oreg.— ash., May 1972 1 _______________ _____
W
Poughkeepsie—
Kingston—
Newburgh, N.Y.,

Bulletin number
and price
.45
50
35
50
35
30
50

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1725-42,
1775-6,
1725-13,
1725-88,
1725-62,
1825-94,
1725-46,
1725-22,
1725-89,

30
45
35
40
50
55
40
35
35

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1725-80,
Providence—
Warwick—
Pawtucket, R.I.— a ss.,
M
May 1972__________ ___ —__________________________________
Raleigh, N .C ., Aug. 1972----------------------------------------------Richmond, V a ., M ar. 1972 1 -----------------------------------------Riverside—
San Bernardino—
Ontario, Calif.,
Dec. 1971--------------------------------------------------------------------Rochester, N.Y. (office occupations only), July 1972---Rockford, 111., June 1972 1 _______________________________
St. Louis, Mo.—111., M ar. 1972___________________________
Salt Lake City, Utah, Nov. 1971------------------ _ _ _ ____----San Antonio, T ex., May 1972_____________________________
San Diego, C alif., Nov. 1971 1____________________________
Sam Francisco-Oakland, Calif., Oct. 1971 1 -----------------San Jose, C alif., Mar. 1972------------------------------------------Savannah, G a., May 1972 1-------------------------------------------Scranton, P a ., July 1972-----------------------------------------------Seattle—
Everett, W ash., J an. 1972---------------- ________----Sioux Falls, S. Dak., Dec. 1971------------------------------------South Bend, Ind., May 1972 1 ----------------------------------------Spokane, Wash., June 1972 1---------- ------------------------------Syracuse, N .Y ., July 1972________________________________
Tampat-St. Petersburg, Fla., Aug. 1972_________ — ----Toledo, Ohio—
Mich., Apr. 1972 1 ------------ ---------------------Trenton, N.J., Sept. 1972 1
_______________________________
Utica—
Rome, N .Y ., July 1972 ___________ ________________
Washington, D.C.—
Md.— a ., M ar. 1972 1 — — ---------------V
Waterbury, Conn., Mar. 1972 1 __________________________
Waterloo, Iowa, Nov. 1971_______________________________
Wichita, Kans., Apr. 1972 1______________________________
W orcester, M ass., May 1972 1___________________________
York, P a., Feb. 1972 1 ___________________________________
Youngstown—
Warren, Ohio, Nov. 1971 1 ------------------------

1725-83,
1725-45,
1725-85,
1725-52,
1725-41,
1725-35,
1725-90,

35 cents

1725-70,
1775-7,
1725-72,

30 cents
45 cents
35 cents

1725-43,
1775-4,
1725-84,
1725-61,
1725-24,
1725-67,
1725-32,
1725-33,
1725-65,
1725-73,
1775-10,
1725-47,
1725-30,
1725-60,
1725-91,
1775-11,
1775-9,
1725-78.
1775-12,
1775-3,
1725-93,
1725-53,
1725-20,
1725-82,
1725-71,
1725-54,
1725-51,

30
45
35
35
30
30
35
50
30
35
45
30
25
35
35
45
45
35
55
45
70
35
30
35
35
35
35

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cent 8
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

FIRST CLASS MAIL

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
W A S H IN G T O N , D.C. 20212
O F F IC IA L B U S I N E S S
P E N A L T Y F O R P R IV A T E U S E $300

P O S T A G E A N D F E E S P A ID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
LAB-441

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S
R e g io n 1
1603 J F K Federal B u ild in g
Governm ent Center
Boston, M a ss. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area C o d e 617)
C o n n e cticu t
M ain e
M a ssa c h u s e tts
New H am pshire
Rhod e Isla n d
Verm ont

R e g io n II

R e g io n V
8th Floor, 300 South W an ker Drive
C h ic a go , III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area C o d e 312)
Illin o is
In dia n a
M ic h ig a n
M in n e sota
O h io
W isc o n sin

R e g io n VI




1515 Bro ad w ay
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area C o d e 212)
New Jersey
New York
Puerto R ico
Virgin Isla n d s

1100 C o m m erce St. Rm. 6B7
D alla s, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3616 (Area C o d e 214)
A rk a n sa s
Lou isia n a
New M e x ico
O kla h om a
T e xas

R e g io n III
406 Penn Sq u a re B u ild in g
1317 Filbert St.
Philade lphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area C o d e 215)
Delaw are
District of C o lu m b ia
M aryland
Pen n sylvan ia
Virgin ia
W e st V irgin ia

R e g io n IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area C o d e
A la b a m a
Florida
G e o rg ia
Kentucky
M is s is s ip p i
North C a ro lin a
Sou th C a ro lin a
Te n n e sse e

R e g io n s V II and V I I I

R e g io n s IX and X
450 G o ld e n G ate Ave.
B o x 36017
S a n F ran cisco , Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area C o d e
IX
X
A rizon a
A la sk a
C a liforn ia
Ida h o
Haw aii
O re gon
N e v ad a
W a sh in gto n

Federal Office B u ild in g
911 W alnut St.,
K a n s a s City, M o. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area C o d e 816)
V II
V III
Iow a
C o lo ra d o
K ansas
M on tan a
M isso u ri
North D akota
N e b raska
South D akota
Utah
W yom ing