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, -

i?<ro - 03

AREA WAGE SURVEY
Albany—Schenectady—Troy, New York, Metropolitan Area
September 1975
Bulletin 1850-63

DOCUMENT COLLECTION

FEB 26 1976
Dayton & Montgomery Co.
Public Library

FEB 1 9 76



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
_
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Preface
This bulletin provides results of a September 1975 survey of occupational earnings
and supplementary wage benefits in the Albany—
Schenectady—
Troy, New York, Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Area (Albany, Montgomery, Rensselaer, Saratoga, and Schenectady
Counties, N .Y.). The survey was made as part of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' annual
area wage survey program. The program is designed to yield data for individual metro­
politan areas, as well as national and regional estimates for all Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Areas in the United States, excluding Alaska and Hawaii.
A major consideration in the area wage survey program is the need to describe the
level and movement of wages in a variety of labor markets, through the analysis of (1) the
level and distribution of wages by occupation, and (2) the movement of wages by occupational
category and skill level. The program develops information that may be used for many
purposes, including wage and salary administration, collective bargaining, and assistance
in determining plant location. Survey results also are used by the U.S. Department of
Labor to make wage determinations under the Service Contract Act of 1965.
Currently, 83 areas are included in the program. (See list of areas on inside back
cover.) In each area, occupational earnings data are collected annually. Information on
establishment practices and supplementary wage benefits is obtained every third year.
Each year after all individual area wage surveys have been completed, two summary
bulletins are issued. The first brings together data for each metropolitan area surveyed. The
second summary bulletin presents national and regional estimates, projected from individual
metropolitan area data.
The Albany-Schenectady-Troy survey was conducted by the Bureau's regional office
in New York, N .Y., under the general direction of Alvin I, Margulis, Assistant Regional
Commissioner for Operations. The survey could not have been accomplished without the
cooperation of the many firms whose wage and salary data provided the basis for the sta­
tistical information in this bulletin. The Bureau wishes to express sincere appreciation
for the cooperation received.

Note:
Also available for the city of Schenectady are listings of union wage rates for seven
selected building trades. Free copies of these are available from the Bureau's regional
offices. (See back cover for addresses.)

AREA WAGE SURVEY

v

Bulletin 1 8 5 0 -6 3
January 1976

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

Albany—Schenectady—
Troy, New York, Metropolitan Area, September 1975
CONTENTS

Page

Introduction

.

2

T able s :
A. Earnings:
A - l . Weekly earnings of office workers_________________________
3
A -2 . Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers------------5
A -3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex----------------------------------------------------- 6
A-4. Hourly earnings of maintenance and powerplant workers_____________________________________________________________ 7
A -5. Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement workers------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 8
A -6.
Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement workers, by sex______ 10
A - 7.
Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected occupational groups, adjusted for employment shifts_
B. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
B -l.
Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and clerks___________________________________________________
B -2 .
Late shift pay provisions for full-time manufacturing plant workers_______________________________________________
B -3 .
Scheduled weekly hours and days of full-time first-shift workers____________________________
B-4 .
Annual paid holidays for full-time workers__________________________________________________________________________
B-4a. Identification of major paid holidays for full-time workers______________________________________
B -5 .
Paid vacation provisions for full-time workers___________________________________________________ ,___________________
B -6 .
Health, insurance, and pension plan provisions for full-time workers______________________________________________
Appendix A.
Appendix B.




12
13
14
15
16
17
20

Scope and method of survey___________________________________________________________________________________________ 22
Occupational descriptions__ ____
25

F or sa le b y th e S u p erin ten d en t o f D o cu m e n ts , U .S . G o v e r n m e n t P rinting O f f i c e , W a sh in g ton , D . C . 2 0 4 0 2 , GPO B ookstores, o r
BLS R e g io n a l O ffic e s listed o n b a c k c o v e r .

P rice $ 1 . 2 0.

M a k e c h e c k s p a y a b le t o S u p erin ten d en t o f D o cu m e n ts .

Introduction
This area is 1 of 83 in which the U.S. Department of Labor's
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings and
related benefits on an areawide basis. In this area, data were obtained
by personal visits of Bureau field economists to representative estab­
lishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transpor­
tation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major industry
groups excluded from these studies are government operations and the
construction and extractive industries. Establishments having fewer than
a prescribed number of workers are omitted because of insufficient
employment in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are provided
for each of the broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.
A-series tables
Tables A - 1 through A-6 provide estimates of straight-time
hourly or weekly earnings for workers in occupations common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupations
were selected from the following categories: (a) Office clerical, (b) pro­
fessional and technical, (c) maintenance and powerplant, and (d) custodial
and material movement. In the 31 largest survey areas, tables A -la
through A -6a provide similar data for establishments employing 500
workers or more.
Following the occupational wage tables is table A - 7 which
provides percent changes in average earnings of office clerical work­
ers, electronic data processing workers, industrial nurses, skilled




maintenance workers, and unskilled plant workers. This measure of
wage trends eliminates changes in average earnings caused by employ­
ment shifts among establishments as well as turnover of establishments
included in survey samples. Where possible, data are presented for all
industries, manufacturing, and nonmanufacturing. Appendix A discusses
this wage trend measure.
B-series tables
The B-series tables present information on minimum entrance
salaries for office workers; late-shift pay provisions and practices for
plant workers in manufacturing; and data separately for plant and office
workers on scheduled weekly hours and days of first-shift workers; paid
holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans.
Appendixes
This bulletin has two appendixes. Appendix A describes the
methods and concepts used in the area wage survey program. It provides
information on the scope of the area survey and information on the area's
industrial composition in manufacturing. It also provides information
on labor-management agreement coverage. Appendix B provides job
descriptions used by Bureau field economists to classify workers in
occupations for which straight-time earnings information is presented.

A. Earnings
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of

Average
weekly
hours1
[standard)

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—
4

4

$

$
95

Mean *

Median *

Middle ranged

85

85

O c c u p a t io n and in d u s t r y d i v is i o n

80
and
u n d er

90

95

100

90

%
100

*
n o

$
120

130

S
140

150

160

s
>
17 j

*

$
180

S
190

200

5
21 0

$
2 20

*
230

V o

*2 60

280
and

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

1°0

190___ 200

210 ___ 220___ 230___240

260

280

ALL WORKERS

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS.
CLASS 8 ----------------------------------------------

34

39.5

$
1 3 3 .5 0

$
1 1 2 .0 0

$
$
Il2 .00 -1 6u .5 o

“

“

“

“

2

16

1

”

3

3

7

2

-

-

-

-

-

“

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ~
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

282
101
161

39.0
39.5
39.0

1 7 8 .5 0
171.00
183.00

167.50
167.50
175.00

l 5 o . 0 0 -2 0 9 .5 0
1 44 .00-177.00
1 50 .00 -2 09 .50

*

_
-

.
”

_
“
“

“

-

2
2
-

10
5
5

64
21
43

26
10
16

58
34
24

12
5
7

15
6
9

8
2
6

45
1
44

6
5
1

3
_
3

19
7
12

9
9

5
3
2

*

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS b —
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

398
111
287

38.5
39.0
38.5

145.00
143.50
145.50

137.00
138.00
135.00

118.00-167.00
1 16 .50-158.50
1 24 .00 -1 67 .00

9
9

8
8

5
5

15
3
12

14
9
5

50
18
32

45
13
32

60
13
47

22
11
11

57
26
31

36
6
30

?4
24

7
3
4

24
4
20

-

2
1
1

3
1
2

12
1~

3
1
2

2
2
-

-

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS 8 ----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

64
42

38.5
37.5

129.00
118.50

133.00
119.00

1 14.50-152.50
1 00.50-133.00

_

10
10

-

-

“

-

-

4
4

11
10

2
2

10
8

4
4

22
3

1
1

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS C ----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

161
141

38.5
38.0

112.50
108.00

107.00
105.00

9 9.00-127.50
9 9.00-115.00

-

-

-

-

19
19

28
28

46
46

18
17

18
17

9
9

21
3

2
2

CLERKS, ORDER ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

129
100

40.0
39.5

150.00
144.50

150.00
135.00

1 12.00-186.00
ll2 .0 0 -1 8 o .0 0

-

16
16

8
8

-

-

5
5

14
10

4
3

6
5

4
2

19
-

13
11

11
11

-

-

-

-

12
12

_

-

17
17

_

-

-

-

CLERKS, PAYROLL -----------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------

34
28

38.0
38.5

149.50
148.50

149.50
137.50

l24 .0li-1 5 B .ofl
120.50-162.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

1
1

-

-

3
3

_

-

2
2

_

-

9
3

-

-

2
2

_

-

6
6

_

-

9
9

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A «
NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

279
140

40.0
39.5

164.50
168.00

1 63 *50
163.50

140.00-163.50
1 30 .50 -1 94 .00

_

_

-

_

24
21

39
20

22
17

6
4

131
34

2
i

7
4

3
2

11
4

1
-

4
4

-

27
27

-

-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS b —
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

213
44
169

39.0
40.0
38.5

143.00
148.50
141.50

138.50
142.00
135.00

117.5C -172.00
124.00-17-J.50
1 10.00-172.00

-

.

-

-

-

-

*

MESSENGERS ----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S -----------------

126
83
28

38.5
38.0
38.5

141.50
142.50
177.50

144.00
137.50
181.30

1 18 .50-153.00
11 3.0 0 -1 7 6 .0 0
1 58 .00 -1 93 .50

-

-

_
-

-

-

SECRETARIES --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S -----------------

1,301
52 7
85

39.5
39.0
38.0

183.50
185.00
228.50

180.90
180.00
236.50

1 73 .50-187.30
1 68.00-201.50
2 1 0 . 5 0 - 2 4 2 . SO

_
-

_
-

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

no
37

39.0
38.0

201.50
201.00

201.50
201.50

2 0 1 .50 -2 01 .30
1 98.00-212.30

SECRETARIES, CLASS B -------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ---------------------

34 3
77

40.0
39.5

193.00
205.00

187.50
187.50

1 87 .50 -1 87 .50
1 87.50-207.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S -----------------

63 9
290
52

40.0
39.5
38.0

180.50
184.00
223.50

173.50
180.00
218.50

1 73 .50 -1 80 .00
1 68 .50 -1 86 .00
2 10 .50 -2 42 .00

-

-

-

-

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

2 09
86
123

39.0
39.5
38.5

168.50
168.00
169.00

158.50
160.00
154.00

142.50-194.00
1 46.50-185.50
1 40 .00 -1 96 .00

-

-

-

-

“

“

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

280
73
20 7

38.5

155.50

153.00

1 30 .00 -1 76 .00

_

-

_

38.0

157.00

144.00

'3 0 .0 0 -1 8 1 .0 0

”

”

S ee fo o t n o t e s at en d o f t a b l e s .




-

-

_
-

“

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

_
-

-

5
5

29
2
27

21
1
20

26
12
14

29
1
28

25
12
13

6
1
5

17
4
13

14
4
10

26
5
21

12
12

2
2
-

1
1

_
-

-

"

21
15
-

12
12
-

10
9

5
4

42
12
6

6
3
2

3
2
2

n
10
4

1
1
1

6
6
6

7
7
7

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

2
2
”

•
-

-

_
-

-

21
18

48
33

53
37

81
58
4

346
69

4 32
139
9

44
29
1

102
23
1

67
43
17

23
14
8

19
16
13

27
21
17

15
14
13

i
-

1

i
-

7
5

71
8

10
9

3
1

1

2
1

4
4

3

2
1

28 2
39

11
9

14
10

7

5
1

1
1

15
14

-

3
2

132
89
8

15
9
i

9
1
1

29
23
17

12
10
8

4
2
-

9
6
6

11
10
10

-

n
5
6

8
4
4

21
10
11

3
1
2

13
13

1
1
*

20
11

9
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

1
1

4
4

19
18

59
50
1

332
6*
-

-

18
3
15

19
9
10

44
15
29

25
15
10

18
10
8

n

-

-

-

-

7
4

17
6
11

5

32

13
1
12

14
11
3

2b

1

4

_

31

14

18

22

1

4

“

31

14

2

3
2
2

-

2

22

64
13
51

51

5

24
2
22

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number

O ccu p a tion a n d in d u s t r y d i v is i o n

of
workers

$

Average
weekly
hours 1
(standard)

80
Mean 2

Median t

Middle range

$

s
85

$
T —
95
lo o
90

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f —
1 -------- 'S $
S
S - $
S
4
$
S
$
140
180
150
160
170
190
130
110
120
2 00
210

5
220

S '
2 30

S

4
240

i
2 60

and
u n d er
85

2 80
and

9 ? ___ 2§_

n o

120

130

140

150

160

170

-

-

8
8

8
6

32
23

37
18

32
28

2 23
74

10
10

2
2

1
1
-

9

6
3
3

8
7
1

4
1
3

23
22
1

_

15
15

12
12

5

1
1

5

23
19
4

2
1
1

4
3
1

4
3
1

IQQ.

180

190

2 00

2 10___2 2 0

over

2 30

2 40

5
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

1
1

-

260

2 50

ALL WORKERSCONTINUED

$
STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR —
NONMANUFACTUfiING ------SWITCH80AR0 OPERATORS
MANUFACTURING --------NONMANUFACTURING SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ----------------------- --------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS.
GENERAL ------------------------------------------------

429
2 28

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1 6 3 .5 0
1 6 3 .5 0

167.50
167.50

157 .50 -1 68 .00
1 5 5 .50 -1 73 .50

-

-

-

-

“

-

80
36
44

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

1 4 2 .0 0
1 5 9 .5 0
1 2 7 .5 0

145.00
167.50
122.00

10P .5 0-16 f .50
145 .00 -1 67 .50
95.0 0-14 6.0 0

-

-

8
-

-

8

107
57

1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 6 .5 0
1 1 4 .0 0

115.00
122.00
105.00

9 6 .0 0-12 8.5 0
9 6 .0 0-14 2.0 0
8 4 .0 0-12 5.0 0

18

7
7
"

-

SO

3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 7 .0

32

3 7 .0

1 4 0 .5 0

125.00

119 .00 -1 43 .00

3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 6 1 .5 0
1 5 9 .0 0

163.50
161.50

1 6 1 .50 -1 67 .50
1 3 p .0 0-168.00

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

122.00
1 2 3 .5 0

117.50
117.00
118.50

1 0 6 .00 -1 26 .50
1 1 3 .50 -1 26 .50
1 0 4 .00 -1 27 .00

T Y P IS T S , CLASS A —
NONMANUFACTURING

200

T Y P IS T S , CLASS H —
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING

221

See fo o t n o t e s at en d o f t a b le s .




80

48
173

1 22 .00

-

-

18

-

-

“

9

-

-

-

-

-

13

10

1

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

3
2

2
2

25
20

7
4

11
11

135
24

_
-

.
-

-

11

56
2
54

65
27
38

41
8
33

10
4
6

13
4
9

7
1
6

10
2
8

-

-

11

55
42

5
3

20
19

4
3

-

-

1
1
“

1
1
“

6
6

1
1

9
3
6

1
1

1
1
”

2
2

•
-

2

-

-

6

-

2

8
6

3
3

4
4

-

-

-

6

-

_

_

2

*

6

-

-

P

-

_

“

-

_
“

-

-

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

Weekly earnings 1

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f —

(standard)
Number
of
work,,,

O c c u p a tio n and in d u s t r y d i v is i o n

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard'

130
Mean ^

Middle range *

Median *

s

a
.

S

140

5

s
150

160

$

S

i

$

$

s

$

$

S

i.

J

S

1

*

"5— “
360

170

180

190

200

210

2 20

2 30

240

2 50

2 60

2 70

2 80

2 90

3 00

320

340

LBO

190

200

2 10

2 20___ 230

240

2 50

_2 b 0

27 0

28q

2 90

3 00

3 20

340

360 o v e r

42
16

3

29
25

1

3

-

2

1

-

-

1

3

3

and
u n d er

and

14(1

150

160

ITU

2

1
1

6

7

ALL WORKERS
COMPUTER OPERATORS,

CLASS b ---------------

1 02
63

$
$
l b o . 5 0 -2 0 0 .0 0
1 8 0 .5 0 -2 0 0 .0 0

$
1 9 0 .5 0
1 8 9 .5 0

$
1 8 7 .5 0
1 9 6 .5 0

2 9 4 .5 0

39.1)
3 8 .5

1.9 J . 0(1 ? 8 4 . 0 ’ '- 2 9 4 . 5 u

-

5

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
40

1

-

-

1

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
45
26

3 8 .5

2 5 0 .0 0

20

a.

1
1

0 0 -2 5 8 .0 0

DRAFTERS, CLASS A:
4 0 .0
101

10 r
o o V*
j .t>

'1 6 .0 0

c-u J.0 0

NURSES.

INDUSTRIAL

(REGISTERED)

S ee fo o t n o t e s at en d o f t a b le s .




------

35

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

6

u lL .O O
lflA c;*
i nr . ,-n
1 c * jo

Ar
*+0.0

66
37

:

1

2 6 5 .0 0
2 2 0 .5 0

1

14

2 2 o .5 0 -2 9 7 .3 0

2 1 5 .0 0

2 1 5 .0 0 -2 3 2 .5 0

19

13

_

-

_

1

2

2

1
1

1

13
11

Zc
5

5

2
1

1

_
1

F“
t-b

1
1

11
1

.

-

Table A-3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex,
in Albany—Schenectady—Troy, N.Y., September 1975
Averm|e
(mean4 )

Average
(mcaa2 )

S ex , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s t r y d iv is io n

Number

of
woiken

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

Weekly
hours ‘
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

MEN
S7

$
39 # 5 2 G 9 .5 0

52
35

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

92
27
65

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

S ex , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s t r y d iv is io n

of
woikea

ACCOUNTING.

CLASS B ----------------

MESSENGERS -------------------------- - ------- “ — —

— -

n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g

4 0 .0

1 4 3 .0 0
1 4 7 .5 0
1 4 1 .5 0

1 4 1 .0 0

3 8 .5

1 4 2 .5 0

1 4 3 .5 0

39 5

1 8 3 .5 0
1 8 4 .5 0
2 2 8 .5 0

1 8 3 .0 0
1 8 3 .5 0

1*

110
37

WOMEN

34

MANUFACTURING

3 9 .5

225
78
147

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 7 1 .0 0
1 6 2 .5 0
1 7 5 .5 0

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

— —
— —

M
ANUF ACT UR ING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

NONMANUF ACTURING — — — — — — — —
— — — — — — —

62
42

3 8 .5
3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0

638

1 1 2 .5 0
1 0 8 .0 0

-

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

4 0 .0
36 •0

28

1 15

39 T5

80

107

1 2 2 .0 0
1 2 2 .0 0

3 9 .5

1 9 1 .0 0

1 5 5 .5 0
1 5 0 .5 0
1 5 7 .0 0

70
35

ciUo 1uiu ^ ^ V vL n
17

2 9 7 .0 0

M ™

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
IrU 1
ww M J U ™
w
r-

34

3 8 ,0

2 4 5 .5 0

a

203

00

1 "V

/A n
*

2 6 7 .0 0

30

4 0 .0

2 1 9 .0 0

1 3 8 .5 0

1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 6 .5 0
1 1 4 .0 0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

NURSES,

See fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le s .




1 5 9 .0 0

3 8 .0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN

120.00

SWITCHBOARO OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

r.

3 8 .5

2 21
48

3 8 .0

_ T

3 9 . u 1 6 3 .5 0
1 6 3 .j 0

3 8 . n 1 4 5 .5 0
3 8 . 5 1 4 3 .5 0
1 5 8 .5 0
1 5 6 .0 0

$
32

1 8 0 .5 0
1 8 3 .5 0
2 2 3 .0 0

r-

32
26

Weakly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINF OPERATORS,

1 9 3 .0 0
2 0 5 .0 0

1 6 3 .5 0
1 6 7 .0 0
1 6 9 .0 0

1 2 8 .5 0
118 .5(1

161
141

of
workers

2 0 1 .5 0
36 0 2 0 1 .0 0

1 3 9 .0 0
1 3 7 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0

78

CLASS B — — — — — — —
— — —
— —

NONMANUF ACTUR ING — — — — —
— — — —

3 9 .0

1 3 3 .5 0

3 46
94
252

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASb A -------MANUFACTURING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - NONM ANUF ACT UR ING — — — — — —

CLERKS* FIL E*

3 9.0

4 0 .0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS.
CLASS B

S ex , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s t r y d i v is i o n

Weekly
earnings 2
(standard)

Number

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED

if

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

Weekly
hour* 2
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED
210

CLERKS.

Average
(mean4 )

Number

E a r n in g s da ta in ta b le A - 3 r e la t e o n ly t o w o r k e r s w h o se s e x
id e n t ific a t io n w a s p r o v id e d b y th e e s t a b lis h m e n t .
E a rn in g s data in
t a b le s A - l and A - 2 , on th e o t h e r hand, r e la t e to a ll w o r k e r s in an
o c c u p a t io n .
(S ee a p p e n d ix A f o r p u b lic a t io n c r it e r ia .)

INDUSTRIAL

(REGISTERED)

------

Hourly earnings

of
workers

Mean 2 Median2

Middle range 2

■—
J
$
3 .9 0 4 .0 0

3 --------T
3"
$
1 --------3 --------3 ~
3 -------- $
4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 80 5 .0 0 5 . 20 5 40 5 .6 0 5 . 80 6 .0 0

■
f'
o
o

O cc u p a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f—
T -------- $
3 .7 0 3 .6 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

-

12

18
i3
5

*
3 -------- $
6 . 2 0 6 .4 0 6 . 6 o

S
6 .8 o

*
f.oo

3 ------- 5
4,
3—
7 .2 0 7 .4 0 7 .6 0 7 .8 0

fe.BQ 7 .0 0

7.2(1

7 . 4 f t 7 .6 0

and
under
3 .3 0

3 .9 0

5 . 00 5 .2 0

5 , 40

5 60

5 .8 0

2

9

14

4

4

-

2

1

5

-

-

-

4
4
"

3
2
1

2
2

12
1
11

48
43
5

8
8
-

3
2
1

3
3

9
9

6
6

-

174
152

4
4

20
20

-

31
24

6 , M . 6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .0 0

ALL WORKERS
$
6 .1 2

$
5 .1 0

$
4 .6 5 -

$
5 .3 8

1

4

-

-

NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

BO
B5
25

5 .3 A

5 .2 0

4 .7 7 -

6 .5 5

-

4

-

-

CARPENTERS. MAINTENANCE -----------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUEACTURING --------------------------------

121
69
52

6 .1 A
5 .7 C
6 .7 3

5 .7 0
b « 64
7 .4 9

5 .6 4 5 .6 4 5 .5 5 -

7 .4 9
5 .7 0
7 .4 9

-

-

_
-

.
-

ELECTRICIAN S, MAINTENANCE ------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

311
2B6

5 .8 3
5 .8 3

5 .6 4
5 ,6 4

5 # 6 4 - 6 .1 4
5 . 6 4 - 6 .1 4

-

-

_

/

/

BOILER TENDERS -------------------------------------------

91
79

as

5 .0 7

• uo

^i

_

-

-

~

10
10

18
18

C

f£

-

2
2
-

-

“

_
-

-

1
1
-

->• 9

T
10

17

-

-

6

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

4

6

-

2

-

*

-

-

-

2
2
-

2
2
-

1
1

-

-

_
-

-

-

2
2
-

29
29

_

13
13

9
9

-

-

13
13

_

37
37

1

n

4 19
366

5 .9 5
5 .8 3

5* 64
5# 64

5 . 6 4 - 6 .4 1
5 . 6 4 - 6 .1 4

-

-

_

_

-

“

-

-

6
6

24
24

6
6

18
18

12
12

15
15

13
1

184
184

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUEACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S ----------------------------

2 75
7A
201
152

6 .3 1
5 .A 6
6 .6 2
6 .3 1

6 .5 8
5 .1 2
6 .6 7
7 .0 8

5 . 5 1 - 7 .1 4
5 . 1 2 - 6 .0 9
6 . 1 0 - 7 .1 4
6 . 4 2 - 7 .1 6

-

-

-

8
8
-

1
1
-

2
2
-

-

30
24
6
1

9
5
4
-

-

*

8
6
2
2

9
3
6

-

5
5
-

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE -------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

2'JB
155

5 .7 6
5 .7 8

5 .6 7
5 .9 6

5 .1 6 5 .1 6 -

6 .4 ]
6 .4 ]

-

30
30

“

59
59

-

-

-

12
1

7
5

9
9

MILLWRIGHTS -------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

12S
1J6

5 . BA
5 .9 0

S •64
5 .6 4

5 . 5 1 - 6 .3 o
5 . 2 3 - 6 .6 4

-

15
15

_

.

15
15

17
-

29
29

2
2

10
10

5
5

-

PAINTERS. MAINTENANCE ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

76
66

5 .A 1
5 .4 1

5 .1 6
5 .1 6

5 .1 6 5 .1 6 -

5 .9 2
5 .9 9

_

_

38
38

8

_

1

6
5

6
6

5
5

c
2

P IP E F IT T E R S , MAINTENANCE --------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

2 47
211

5 . BA
5 .8 7

5 .6 5
5 .6 5

5 .6 5 5 .6 5 -

-

I
1

9
9

1
1

-

155
119

8
8

20
20

-

31
31

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

A1
29

S . 86
5 .3 3

6 .0 2
5 # 64

5 .6 4 5 .6 4 -

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

12
12

1
1

16
6

S e e fo o t n o t e s at en d o f t a b l e s .




-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

1
1

3
3

6 .0 3
6 .1 4

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

*

9
9

6 .1 4
6 .1 4

-

_

-

-

-

5
5

*

-

-

2
*

A"
<

M ACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE ----------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

-

“

31
31

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

'

-

23
23

i
i

25
5
20
14

26
_
26
26

21
7
14
-

55
-

1
1

-

38
S
33
28

6
6
-

16
16

53
53

34
34

-

1
-

4

_
-

1
1

_
23
23

_
-

33
1

55
51

12
12
12

16
16
16

-

-

2
2
-

1
1
1

-

-

-

«
-

-

-

8
6

-

1
1

*

11
11

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

_
-

-

_

_
-

-

-

-

3
3

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

Table A-5. Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement workers in Albany—
Schenectady—Troy, N.Y., September 1975
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f ----

Hourly earnings3
S
2 .1 0

4
2 .4 0

2 .2 o

2 .3 o

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2.4-fl- 2 ,6 9

499
499

64
64

4 .5 8

-

-

O ccu p a tion and in d u s tr y d iv is io n
Mean 2 Median2

Middle range 2

%

S

s

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

4
S
3 20 3 .4 0

$
3 .60

t
3 .8 o

S
4 .0 0

?»8 Q

3 ,0 0

3 ,2 0

3 40 3 .6 0

3 8Q 4 .0 0

4 ,2 9

s

s

s—

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

H----7 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 ,2 9

7 .6 0

-

-

1
1
“

%
4 .6 0

<
b
5 .0 0

5 .2 0

*
5 .6 0

%
6 .0 0

. 4 0 4 • 60 4 _8jJ_ 5 . 0 0

5 .2 0

5 .6

8 .0 0

s
S
4 .2 0 4 .4 0

4
4 60

and
u n d er
a

ALL WORKERS
$

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING
GUARDSS
MANUFACTURING------------------------------ --—

$

871
177
694

2 .8 3
4 .4 8
2 .4 1

2 .1 3
4 .4 9
2 .1 3

$
2 . 1 3 - 3 .4 3
4 . 4 9 - 4 .5 ,°,
2 .1 3 - 2 .2 5

147

4 .6 1

4 .4 9

4 .4 9 -

$

8
H

12
12

24
24

21
8
13

14
5

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

13
5
8

8
8

2
2
”

2
2

5

8

2

2

11
9
2

1 25
91
34

15
4
11

2
4

17
12
5

16
16
“

4
4
“

*

4
4
”

9

87

1

2

12

10

4

*

4

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

”

-

16
16
-

.
-

15
15

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

6

w a tch m en :

MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

30

3 .8 3

3 .0 0

2 .d 7 -

4 .7 6

-

-

-

-

-

8

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

3

-

-

6

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS —
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S --------------------------

1*026
569
457
123

3 .7 5
4 .0 0
3 .4 4
4 .7 6

4 .0 6
4 .1 5
2 .7 5
4 .8 8

2 .7 5 3 .5 7 £•654 .7 4 -

4 .3 3
4 .1 7
4*74
4 .9 )

1
1

25
15

27
5

47
31
16
3

17
13
4

79
71

36
18
18

5
4

2 74
251
23

19
19
-

18
b

23
13

-

-

-

12

62
48
14
14

56

22

177
177

21

10

50
16
34

7

86
46
40
19

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING ------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------MONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

489
2 79

4 .4 8
4 .7 1
4 .1 8

4 .7 8
4 .9 2
4 .7 8

3 .6 0 4 .2 3 2 .3 0 -

5 .7 n
5 .7 ,i
5 .8 7

37
37

19
16
3

3
3
-

70

n
11

22

61

21
2)

9

-

22

53
49
4

12
2

210

10

-

ORDER FILLERS -------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

580
152
428

3 .6 9
4 .4 8
3 .4 1

3 .7 1
4 .2 3
2 .4 0

2 .2 0 3 .7 1 2 .1 0 -

5 .1 6
5 .7 i
5 .1 6

3
3

2

26
26

4?
42

2

-

12
10

2

54
54
-

PACKERS, SHIPPING ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

179
115

3 .b 0
4 .2 2

4 .2 6
4 .2 6

2 .3 0 4 .2 4 -

8
8

73
73

7

in
1C

-

RECEIVING CLERKS ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

101

12

1
1

4

38
63

4 .5 3
4 .2 9
4 .6 7

-

SHIPPING CLERKS --------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

1 08
62
46

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS --------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

8

13

-

-

-

6
6

18

12

20

18

-

8

-

12

12

-

128

32

48

24

17

4

128

32

48

24

17

4

4 .3 1
4 .3 3

32
-

-

16
-

9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 .6 8
4 .3 9
5 .3 1

3 .7 9 - 5 .3 ?
3 .7 9 - 4 .6 8
2 . 8 8 - 5 .3 6

-

_

_

8

-

8

10

4 .8 5
4 .5 3
5 .2 8

4 .9 0
4 .1 6
5 .3 0

3 .8 7 - 5 .3 °
3 .7 4 - 4 .8 4
5 .2 7 - 5 .5 3

_
-

-

62
56

4 .4 5
4 .5 0

4 .5 3
A . 58

3 .6 5 - 4 .6 3
4 .2 5 - 4 .6 3

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

TRUCKDRIVERS ---------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING------------ ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S --------------------------

1 ,5 1 9
186
1 ,3 3 3
6 70

6 .0 9
4 .8 7
6 .2 6
6 .9 1

6 .6 6

4 .6 9
6 .6 7
7 .1 4

5 .2
4 .3
5 .3
6 .6

-

7 .1 3
5 .7 n
7 .1 4
7 .1 4

-

-

-

2

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING A TONS) -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

2 66
31
235

5 .5 9
4 .7 9
5 .6 9

5 .3 2
4 .6 9
5 .3 2

5 .3 2 3 .7 9 5 .3 2 -

7 .1 4
5 .6 6
7 .1 4

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS
TRAILER TYPE) ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

5 97
574

6 .5 7
6 .6 1

6 .6 7
6 .6 7

6 .6 6 6 .6 6 -

6 .9 ?
6 .9 2

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS
OTHER THAN TRAILER T Y P E ):
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

47

5 .5 6

5 .7 0

4 .9 9 -

6 .0 ?

See fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le s .




1

2

-

12

5
3

32
30

1

-

-

2

2

1

6

11

55
49

6

-

11

6

6

11
11

6
6

-

-

10

6
9
2
7

8

6

-

_

-

2

11

*

-

_
-

2
-

.

_

2

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

2
2

1

26
26
”

-

7
7
*

12

4

-

-

11

2

-

3

26
8
18

-

“

-

-

2
-

_

-

-

_

_

6

-

-

-

.

12

2
-

3

2

15

1
2

3

2

2

3

2

2

_

_

11

6

9
8

2

*

_

.

_

*

_

1

1
1

17
16
1

3

12

-

2

54
54

10

116
59
57

_
-

2

1 08
39
69

-

-

-

“

7
7
2
2

32

4

5
4

-

1

-

9
9
~

7

2

4
4

3

“

10
10

5
5

17
17

-

-

37
35
2

10

46
18
28
3

28
20
b
6

9
3
4
2

"

6
5

-

1
1

2

2
-

“

1

2

“

_

_

_

26
6
20

17
7

4

46
6

40
“

_

13

_

-

”

“

_
-

-

“

12
12

*

-

2
1

-

-

323
322
224

470
470
402

25
25
25

“

•

70
70

-

10

31

-

10

25

11

25

11

9
9

1
1

-

3 69
8
361

74
30
44

25
25

1

9

“

1

•

-

“

1

"

132

8

_

-

6

8

-

*

126

4
4

32
32

35
35

13

322
322

1 49
1 49

25
25

6

2

14

12

-

-

-

6

6

-

-

_
“

Middle range 2

S
>
2 .4 0

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

%
3 .0 0

S
3 .2 0

5
3 .4 0

W
3 .6 0

$
3 .8 0

$
4 .0 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4

41

4

and
u n d er
2 .2 0

£

Median2

i
2 .3 0

$
4 .6 o

4
4 .8 ,1

s
5 .0 0

$
5 .2 0

4
5 .6 0

jfc
6 .0 0

5
6 .4 0

6 .8 0

1 ----7 .2 0

4 .8 Q

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5*60

6 .0 0

6 .4 c

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

1

Mean 2

4
2 .2 0

I

O cc u p a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

|$
2 .1 0

ro
o

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f ---

Hourly earnings3
Number
of
workers

4 .4 0 4 .6 0

ALL WORKEk S—
CONTINUED

2 17
136

4 .6 8
5 .4 3

$
4 .9 7
4 .3 1
5 .4 2

$
$
4 .3 1 - 5 .4 ?
4 .0 0 “ 4 .9 7
5 . 2 5 - 5 .7 4

41
41

4 .6 3
4 .6 3

4 .6 3

4 . 3 1 - 4 .6 1
4 . 3 1 - 4 .8 1

$

n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g

TRUCKERS,

POWER

64
57

17
17

27
27

9

83

53

fn

36

24

258

24

16

253

13
1

(OTHER THAN

/
i

Se*» fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le s .




il

14
14
4

4 .9 6

3 .9 3 - 5^73
5 .2 0 - 5 .3 ?

4

25
20

13
13

15
8

8
8

5
3
2

11
7
4

3
5
3

3

in

1

14

Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement
workers, by sex, in Albany—Schenectady—Troy, N.Y., September 1975
Number

S e x , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

of
workers

m a in te n a n c e

and

Average
(mean2 )
hourly
earnings3

Number Average
(mean2)
of
hourly
woikeis
earnings3

MEN
•
P

8 45
171

80
55

Number

S ex , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s t r y d iv is io n

of
woricers

Average
(mean *)
hourly
earnings3

CUSTODIAL ANU MATERIAL MOVEMENl
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN

po w erplan t

OCCUPATIONS -

S e x , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s t r y d iv is io n

*
4 .4 8
2 .4 1

GUARDS!
69
52

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2

TO

w atch m en:

JJ
T
JANITORS,

PORTERS,

AND CLEANERS ------

822

3 .9 0

235

3 .8 3
TRUCK0RIVERS* HEAVY

(OVER 4 TONS,

7 a?
4*91

„

,t

5 .8 3
273

MECHANICS,

4/

' *70

c

5 .5 6

AUTOMOTIVE
97

6 .3 1
403
6 .6 2
6 .8 1
TRUCKERS, POWER (OTHER THAN
2 08

125
106
.

T.▼ r»
» -i

5 .7 6

5 .8 4
5 .9 0

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT

2 47
211
SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —

4 .9 4

4 .7 3
7b
66
5 .b 4

41
29

5 .8 6
5 .8 3

46
*

/ c
7 .5 5
4 * c0

r*
2*91
JANITORS* PORTtRS*

S e e fo o t n o t e s at en d o f t a b le s .




E a r n in g s da ta in ta b le A - 6 re la t e o n ly to w o r k e r s w h o s e s e x
id e n t if ic a t io n w a s p r o v id e d b y the e s t a b lis h m e n t .
E a rn in g s da ta in
t a b le s A - 4 and A - 5 , on the o t h e r hand, r e la t e t o a ll w o r k e r s in an
o c c u p a t io n .
(S ee a p p e n d ix A f o r p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .)

AND CLEANERS ------

2 04

3 .1 8




Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected
occupational groups, adjusted for employment shifts, in Albany—
Schenectady—Troy, N.Y., for selected periods
In d u s try and o cc u p a t io n a l
g ro u p

M a r c h 1972
to
M a r c h 1973

M a r c h 1973
to
M a r c h 1974

M a r c h 1974 t o S e p t e m b e r 1975
1 8 -m o n th i n c r e a s e

1 2 -m o n th in c r e a s e

A l l in d u s t r ie s :
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m e n and w o m e n )____________________
E l e c t r o n i c da ta p r o c e s s in g (m en and w o m e n ) _____
In d u s t r ia l n u r s e s (m e n and w o m e n ) _________________
S k ille d m a in te n a n ce t r a d e s (m e n )___________________
U n s k ille d plant w o r k e r s (m e n )_______________________

6 .3
*
5 -4
6 .4
8 .5

7 .3
*
7 .3
6.1
8.1

8.6
**
9.3
7 .7
9 .8

5.7
**
6.1
5.1
6 .4

M a n u fa ctu r in g :
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m en and w o m e n ).....................................
E l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w o m e n ) _____
In d u s t r ia l n u r s e s (m en and w om en )
___________ _
S k ille d m a in te n a n ce t r a d e s (m e n )__ _____ ___________
U n s k ille d pla n t w o r k e r s (m e n )_______________________

**
*
5 .7
5 .9
8.2

**
*
7 .0
6 .0
8 .9

**
**
10.2
7 .7
10.9

**
+*
6.7
5.1
7 .1

N on m a n u fa c tu rin g :
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m en and w o m e n ) ................................
E l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w o m e n ) _____
In d u s t r ia l n u r s e s (m en and w om en ) ..............................
S k ille d m a in te n a n ce t r a d e s (m e n )__________________ _
U n sk ille d plant w o r k e r s (m e n )_______________________

6 .3
*
**
**
8 .8

7 .0
*
**
**
7 .3

9.4
**
**
**
7 .6

6 .2

*
**

D ata n ot a v a ila b le .
Data do n ot m e e t p u b lica tio n c r i t e r i a .

NOTE: The percent in cre a s e s presen ted in this table are based on changes in average
hourly earnings fo r establishm ents reporting the trend jo b s in both the current and previous
year (matched establishm ents). They are not affected by changes in average earnings
resulting fro m em ploym ent shifts among establishm ents o r tu rnover of establishm ents
included in survey sam ples. The p ercent in c re a s e s , how ever, are still affected by fa cto rs
other than wage in c re a s e s . H irings, la y o ffs , and turnover m ay affect an establishm ent
average fo r an occupation when w ork ers are paid under plans providing a range o f wage rates
fo r individual jo b s. In pe rio d s of in cre a se d hirin g , fo r exam ple, new em ployees enter at the
bottom of the range, depressing the average without a change in wage rates.
T h e s e w age t r e n d s a r e not lin k e d to the w a g e in d e x e s p r e v io u s l y p u b lis h e d f o r th is
a r e a b e c a u s e the w a g e in d e x e s m e a s u r e d ch a n g e s in a r e a a v e r a g e s , w h e r e a s th e s e w age
tre n d s m e a s u r e ch a n g e s in m a tc h e d e s t a b lis h m e n t a v e r a g e s .
O th er c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f t h e s e
w a g e tre n d s w h ich d i f f e r f r o m the d is c o n t in u e d in d e x e s in clu d e (1) e a rn in g s data o f o f f i c e
c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and in d u s t r ia l n u r s e s a r e c o n v e r t e d to an h o u r ly b a s i s , (2) t r e n d e s t im a t e s
a r e p r o v id e d fo r n o n m a n u fa ctu r in g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , w h e re p o s s i b l e , and (3) t r e n d e s t im a t e s
a r e p r o v id e d fo r e l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g j o b s .

F o r a m ore detailed descrip tion Of the m ethod used to com pute these wage tre n d s, see
"Im proving Area Wage Survey In d e x e s ," Monthly L abor R ev ie w . January 1973, pp. 52-57.

**
**
5 .0

B. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
Table B-1. Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and clerks in Albany—
Schenectady—Troy, N.Y., September 1975
O th er in e x p e r i e n c e d c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s 5

I n e x p e r ie n c e d t y p is t s

M in im u m w e e k ly s t r a i g h t - t im e s a l a r y 4

B a s e d on s ta n d a rd w e e k ly h o u r s 6 o f—

A ll
in d u s t r ie s
A ll
s c h e d u le s

ESTABLISHMENTS S T U D IE D -----------------------

128

45

ESTABLISHMENTS HAVING A SPECIFIED
MINIMUM ----------------------------------------------------------

38
-

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

$ 9 2 .5 0
$9 5 .0 0
$ 9 7 .5 0

AND UNDER $ 9 5 . 0 0 --------------------and u n d er * 9 7 . 5 0 --------------------AND UNDER $ 1 0 0 . 0 0 -------------------

$ 1 0 0 .0 0
$ 1 0 5 .0 0
$ 1 1 0 .0 0
$ 1 1 5 .0 0
$ 1 2 0 .0 0
$ 1 2 5 .0 0
$ 1 3 0 .0 0
$ 1 3 5 .0 0
$ 1 4 0 .0 0
$ 1 4 5 .0 0
$ 1 5 0 .0 0
$ 1 5 5 .0 0
$ 1 6 0 .0 0
$ 1 6 5 .0 0
$ 1 7 0 .0 0
$ 1 7 5 .0 0
$ 1 8 0 .0 0
$ 1 8 5 .0 0
$ 1 9 0 .0 0
$ 1 9 5 .0 0
$ 2 0 0 .0 0

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

AND
AND
AND
AND

s
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
5

XXX

-13

8

25

13

1
3
1

3
1

1
2
1
2
1

1
1
“

_
l
l
l
l
l

1
1
1
1
2
1
1
-

1
1
1
1
-

5
1
I
1
1
1
4
2
1

3
1
2
-

1

2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1

21

11

XXX

10

ESTABLISHMENTS WHICH DID NUT EMPLOY
WORKERS IN THIS CATEGORY ---------------------

69

21

XXX

48

AND
AND
AND
AND




2

-

A ll
s c h e d u le s

37 */2

83

ESTABLISHMENTS HAVING NO SPECIFIED
MINIMUM ----------------------------------------------------------

and

“
2
-

40

B a s e d on s ta n d a rd w e e k ly h o u r s 6 o f—

A ll

XXX

1

and

$ 1 0 5 .0 0
$ 1 1 0 .0 0
$ 1 1 5 .0 0
$ 1 2 0 .0 0
$ 1 2 5 .0 0
$ 1 3 0 .0 0
$ 1 3 5 .0 o
$ 1 4 0 .0 0
$ 1 4 5 .0 0
$ 1 5 0 .0 0
$ 1 5 5 .0 0
$ 1 6 0 .0 0
$ 1 6 5 .0 0
$ 1 7 0 .0 0
$ 1 7 5 .0 0
$ 1 8 0 .0 0
$ 1 8 5 .0 0
$ 1 9 0 .0 0
$ 1 9 5 .0 0
$ 2 0 0 .0 0
$ 2 0 5 .0 0

1
3
1
5
2

A ll
s c h e d u le s

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

AND
AND
AND
AMD
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 8 0 .0 0
$ 8 2 .5 0
* 8 5 .0 0
$ 8 7 .5 0
$ 9 0 .0 0

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 7 7 .5 0
$ 3 0 .0 0
$ 3 2 .5 0
$ 3 5 .0 0
$ 3 7 .5 0

40

N on m a n u fa c tu rin g

M a n u fa ctu r in g

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

M a n u fa ctu rin g

XXX

n

-

40

A ll
s c h e d u le s

40

37 V2

128

45

XXX

83

XXX

XXX

49

16

11

33

15

14

3
1
3
3
1
6
1

1
1
2
1

1
2
1

3
1
3
2
4
“

1
1

2
1
3
1
2
-

6
1
2
1
3
2
2
4
5
I

1
1

1
-

5
2
1
1
1
2
4
1
1

3

1
-

1
2
I
1
2
1

1

-

1
-

“

1
1
“

1
I
”

2
1
■2
•“

I
1
1
1
1
“
1
-

2
1
2
2

-

*

1
I
1
“

XXX

XXX

35

13

XXX

22

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

44

16

XXX

28

XXX

XXX




(A ll f u l l- t im e m a n u fa ctu rin g pla n t w o r k e r s = 100 p e r c e n t )
W o r k e r s on la te sh ifts

A ll w o rk e r s 7
Item
S e co n d sh ift

T h ir d s h ift

S e co n d sh ift

T h ir d sh ift

IN ESTABLISHMENTS WITH LATE SHIFT PROVISIONS ----------

8 9 .3

7 9 .2

2 0 .8

9 .7

WITH NO PAY DIFFERENTIAL FOR LATE SHIFT WORK---------WITH PAY DIFFERENTIAL FOR LATE SHIFT WORK ----------------UNIFORM CENTS-PER-HOUR DIFFERENTIAL ------------------------UNIFORM PERCENTAGE DIFFERENTIAL ---------------------------------OTHER DIFFERENTIAL --------------------------------------------------------------

6 .2
8 3 .1
3 7 .2
4 2 .9
3 .0

7 9 .2
3 5 .5
4 2 .2
1 .5

1 .2
1 9 .6
8 .2
1 1 .3
.1

9 .7
3 .8
5 .9
(8 )

1 4 .A
9 .7

1 9 .9
1 0 .2

1 3 .7
9 .6

2 0 .1
1 0 .0

PERCENT OF WORKERS

AVERAGE PAY DIFFERENTIAL
JNIFORM CENTS-PFR-HOUR DIFFERENTIAL -----------------------------UNIFORM PERCENTAGE DIFFERENTIAL -------------------------------------PERCENT OF WORKERS BY TYPE AND
AMOUNT OF PAY DIFFERENTIAL
UNIFORM CENTS-PER-HOUR«
7 AND UNDER 8 CENTS -----------------------------------------------------9 CENTS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------10 CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------12 CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------13 CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------1A CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------15 CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------16 CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------17 AND UNDER 18 CENTS ------------------------------------------------18 CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------20 CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------21 CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------24 CENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------29 ANO UNDER 30 CENTS ------------------------------------------------30 AND UNDER 31 CENTS ------------------------------------------------32 CENTS -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 .0
1 .9
5 .3
5 .6
5 .0
2 .7
4 .5
1 .9
2 .8
-

4 .8
.7
-

1 .1
-

-

3 .5
-

1 1 .0
1 .1
5 .8
3 .6
.6
1 .9
1 .2
4 .4

.3
.4
1 .3
1 .4
1 .1
.6
1 .2
.1
.7

-

•4
-

.1
-

1 .3
.1
.6
.3
(8 )
.1
.1
.6
.3

-

.8
.1
-

UNIFORM PERCENTAGE:
5 PERCE N T---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------10 PERCENT ------------------------------------------------------------------------15 PERCENT -------------------------------------------------------------------------

2 .4
4 0 .5
-

4 0 .3
2 .0

*9
1 0 .4
-

5 .9
-

OTHER DIFFERENTIAL -------------------------------------------------------------------

3 .0

1 .5

.1

(81

S ee fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le s .

Table B-3. Scheduled weekly hours and days of full-time first-shift workers in Albany—
Schenectady—Troy, N.Y., September 1975
Plant w o rk e rs
Item

A ll industries

M anufacturing

O ffic e w ork ers

Nonm anufacturing

P u blic utilities

All industries

M anufacturing

Nonm anufacturing

P u b lic u tilities

PERCENT OF WORKERS BY SCHEDULED
WEEKLY HOURS AND DAYS
ALL FULL-TIME WORKERS ----------------------30 HOURS-S DAYS ------------------------------------------32 HOURS — ----------------------- -----------------------------A DAYS -------------------------------------------------------5 D A Y S ---------- ? ------------------------------------------3 2 1 / 2 HOURS-5 DAYS ---------------------------------3 5 HOURS-5 DAYS ------------------------------------------3 6 1 / 4 HOURS-5 DAYS ---------------------------------37 1 / 2 HOURS-5 DAYS ---------------------------------38 HOUPS-5 DAYS ------------------------------------------38 3 / 4 HOURS-5 D A Y S ---------------------------------39 1 /1 0 HOURS-5 DAYS ----------------------------40 HOURS-5 D A Y S --------------- -----------------------4 5 HOURS-5 DAYS --------------------------------------4 8 hours -6 Days ---------------------------------------

_

......
1
1
(9 )
1

-

5
1
8

1
81
(9)
2

100

2
2
4
2
3
-

2
86

1

100
2
(9)
(9)
6
15

74
1
2

1QQ

100

100

100

(9 )
(9 )
2
4
(9)
38
3
(9)
1
51

-

1
1
3
5

100

-

-

96
4

-

1
1
11

-

1
2
84

-

52
5
(9)

*
3
73
-

-

-

35

24

-

-

*

-

-

“

“

4 0 .2

38.6

3 9.6

3 8 .1

3 8 .0

AVERAGE SCHEDULED
WEEKLY HOURS
ALL WEEKLY WORK SCHEDULES -------------------

See footnote at end o f tablee.




3 9 .5

3 9 .6

3 9 .3

P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o rk e r s

Ite m
A ll in d u a trle*

M a n u fa ctu rin g

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

A ll in d u s t r ie s

M a n u fa ctu r in g

N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

WORKERS ------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

IN ESTABLISHMENTS NOT PROVIDING
PAID HOLIDAYS ------------------------------------------IN ESTABLISHMENTS PROVIDING
PAID HOLIDAYS --------------------------------------------

1

-

3

-

.

_

99

100

97

100

100

100

100

100

9 .0

9 .5

8 .4

1 0 .7

1 0 .0

9 .5

1 0 .2

1 1 .0

PERCENT OF WORKERS
ALL

f u l l - t im e

•

AVERAGE NUMBER OF PAID HOLIDAYS
FOR WORKERS IN ESTABLISHMENTS
PROVIDING HOLIDAYS -------------------------------PERCENT OF WORKERS BY NUMBER
OF PAID HOLIDAYS PROVIDED10
5 HOLIDAYS ------------------------------------------------------6 HOLIDAYS ------------------------------------------------------PLUS 2 HALF DAYS ----------------------------------7 HOLIDAYS ------------------------------------------------------B HOLIDAYS ------------------------------------------------------PLUS 1 HALF DAY ------------------------------------PLUS 2 HALF DAYS ----------------------------------9 HOLIDAYS ------------------------------------------------------PLUS 2 HALF DAYS ----------------------------------PLUS 3 HALF DAYS ----------------------------------10 HOLIDAYS ---------------------------------------------------11 HOLIDAYS ----------------------------------------------------12 HOLIDAYS ----------------------------------------------------PLUS 1 HALF DAY ------------------------------------13 HOLIDAYS ---------------------------------------------------1A HOLIDAYS ---------------------------------------------------15 HOLIDAYS ---------------------------------------------------16 H O L ID A Y S ------------------------------------- ---------------

5
5

3
15
(9 )
6
10
5
7
2
34
11
(9 )
2
(9 )
1
1
-

4
6
4
54
9

99
96
81
75
64
52
16
16
5
5
3
2
1

100
95
90
87
81
72
14
14
4
4
4
4
2

3
5

“
2
2
-

.
28
1
8
17
“
6
8
10
12
1
5
1
-

•
8
9
26
32
4
21
-

*

-

97
97
69
60
44
29
19
19
7
6
1
-

100
100
100
100
92
83
57
57
25
21

(9 )
8
(9 )
3
5
(9 )
1
6
(9 )
2
31
34
2
3

1
4
7
8
1
2
5
1
59
10

•

•

1
2

2
-

100
99
91
88
83
74
43
41
7
6
3
3
3
2

100
99
95
88
78
72
12
12
2
2
2
2
2

11
1
1
3
(9 )
9
2
17
46
3
4
_
•
.

_
1

14

9
50
(9 )
25
•
-

3

-

100
100
89
88
85
75
58
56
10
7
3
3
3
3

100
100
100
100
99
85
75
75
25
25
-

PERCENT OF WORKERS BY TOTAL
PAID HOLIDAY TIME PROVIDED11
5 DAYS OR MORE ---------------------------------------------6 DAYS OR MORE ---------------------------------------------7 DAYS OR MORE ---------------------------------------------8 DAYS OR MORE ---------------------------------------------9 DAYS OR MORE ---------------------------------------------10 DAYS OR MORE -------------------------------------------10 1 / 2 DAYS OR MORE ----------------------------------11 DAYS OR MORE -------------------------------------------12 DAYS OR MORE -------------------------------------------12 1 / 2 DAYS OR MORE ----------------------------------13 DAYS OR MORE -------------------------------------------14 DAYS OR MORE -------------------------------------------15 DAYS OR MORE -------------------------------------------16 DAYS -------------------------------------------------------------




-

•
-

O ffic e w o rk e r s

P la n t w o r k e r s
I t e m 10

A l l in d u s t r ie s

M a n u fa ctu r in g

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

A ll in d u s tr ie s

M anuf a c tu r ing

N on m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

P ercen t o f w ork ers
A l l fu l l- t im e w o r k e r s -------------------------------

L in c o ln 's B ir t h d a y _____________________________
W a s h in g to n 's B i r t h d a y _________________________
G o o d F r i d a y ------------- ---- ------------------------------------E a s t e r M o n d a y ---------- --------- - — — -------------------M e m o r ia l D a y __________ - . . . ____ . . ............ .
F o u rth o f J u ly ——_— ■_______________ ____ — —
F r id a y b e f o r e L a b o r D ay---------------------------------L a b o r D a y ------------------------------------ ----------------------C olu m b u s D a y — —
—
V e t e r a n s D a y ____________________________________
E le c t io n D a y .____________________________________
T h a n k sg iv in g D ay
D ay a ft e r T h a n k sg iv in g
C h r is tm a s E v e — _ __ _
C h r is t m a s E v e , h a lf day
C h r is tm a s D ay —
C h r is tm a s —N ew Y e a r 's h o lid a y p e r i o d 12 ——
N ew Y e a r 's E v e
N ew Y e a r 's E v e , h a lf day
______________ — -----F lo a tin g h o lid a y , 1 d a y
F lo a tin g h o lid a y , 2 d a y s 13------------------------------F lo a tin g h o lid a y , 3 d a y s 13 _ . . . . . ____________
F lo a tin g h o lid a y , 5 d a y s 13
E m p lo y e e 's b ir t h d a y ____________________________
E m p lo y e e 's a n n iv e r s a r y - P e r s o n a l h o lid a y , 2 d a y s ----- ----

See footnotes at end o f tables.




100
98
4
41
2.9
3
99
95
98
9
15
32
98
44
33
10
98
2
6
7
8
6
1
V
20
2
(’ )

100
98
50
33
4
100
93
98
4
6
46
100
65
58
8
100
3
11
7
4
7
(9 )
~
15
(9 )

100

100

97
9
30
23
1
97
97
“
97
16
26
14
96
19
3
12
96
1
7
11
5
3
3
25
4

100
33
85
57
100
100
100
53
81
40
100
47
21
100
2
2
3
2
26
-

, 100
98
25
65
20
'9)
lu o
99
2
99
38
39
50
99
44
24
6
98
3
3
1
10
10
(9 )
3
6
d

2

100

100

100

99
“
54
28

97
38
70
16
(*)
100
100
3
100
57
56
52
99
30
7
7
97
(9 )
1
10
9
(9 )

100
51
97
48
~
i0 0
100
100
75
95
51
100
35
25
100
(9 )

100
98
“
98
(9 )
5
46
100
72
56
4
100
8
9
3
11
11
1
“
7
"
r)

6
(9 )

3
1
(9 )
“
25
■

P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffice w o rk e r s

Ite m
M a n u fa ctu r in g

N on m a n u fa ctu rin g

100

100

100

100

(9 )

-

(9 )

-

99
93
7

100
88
12

99
99
*

6
19
d

10
9
a
-

<9 )
30
6

A ll in d u s t r ie s

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

A ll in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa ctu r in g

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

PERCENT OF WORKERS
ALL FULL-TIME WORKERS -----------------------IN ESTABLISHMENTS NOT PROVIDING
PAID VACATIONS ----------------------------------------IN ESTARLISHMFNTS PROVIDING
PAID VACATIONS ----------------------------------------LENGTh - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t --------------------PERCENTAGE PAYMENT ------------------------------

100

100

100

100
100
-

100
lo o

100
100

100

-

1
A2
17
7
2
(9 )

2
3A
10

(9 )
A7
20
11
3

100

AMOUNT OF PAID VACATION A F T E R :14

ft MONTHS OF SERVICE:
UNDER 1 WEEK --------------------------------------1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UHOFR 2 WEEKS ------------2 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 2 ANO UNDER 3 WEEKS -----------3 W E E K S-------------------------------------------------

•

"

1 YEAR OF SERVICE:
l WEEK ---------------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS -----------2 W E E K S-------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----------3 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------5 WEEKS --------------------------------------------------

6A
4
29
1
2
*

7A
6
lb
2
3
*

52
1
46
i
*

? YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER ? WEEKS -----------2 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 2 ANO UNDER 3 W E tK S -----------3 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------5 WEEKS --------------------------------------------------

17
S
73
2
4
-

26
9
58
i
6
"

b
92
2
1

3 YEARS OF SERV IC E:
1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEtKS -----------2 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS ------------3 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----------S WEEKS --------------------------------------------------

6
4
80
5
5
-

8
7
71
6
8
-

A
92
3
1
“

A YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS -----------2 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----------3 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 3 ANO UNDER A WEtKS -----------5 WEEKS --------------------------------------------------

6
4
80
5
5
-




36
21
-

39
2
59
“

e
(9 )
83
A
3
2

6
1
86
7

-

2
(9 )
88
(9 )
8
2

A
1
87

2
(9 )
8A
1
7
4
2

3
(9 )
77
1
20
_

-

2

-

(9 )
BA
1
7
4
2

3
(9 )
77
1
20

-

98
2
-

-

-

98
2
-

-

b

7
71
6
8
-

4
92
3
1
-

.
(9 )

98
2
-

-

9
-

-

52
26

-

9
(9 )
81
6
i
3

20
(9 )
79

-

2
88
(9 )
7
3

1
_
88
(9 )
1
6
3

1
88
(9 )
i
6
3

99
(9 )
-

_
99
(9 )
_
-

_
_
99
(9 )

~

P la n t w o r k e r s
Item
A ll In d u s trie s

M a n u fa ctu r in g

O ffic e w o rk e r s

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

A ll in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa c tu r in g

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b l ic u t ilit ie s

1
50
21
21
4
1
2

1
23
A3
31
-

1
63
10
17
6
.
3

.
98
(9 )
1
-

(9 )
A
2
82
2
8
(9 )
2

1
2
89
1
7
.

5
2
78
3
9
(9 )
3

2
97
(9 )
1
-

(9 )
A
2
75
2
15
(9 )
2

1
2

AMOUNT OF PAID VACATION AFTER14 CONTINUED
5 YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----------3 WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----------A WEEKS ------------------------------------------------5 WEEKS --------------------------------------------------

2
57
26
11
(9 )
3
*

3
39
A3
10
b
"

2
80
b
13
1
-

96
2
2
.
-

*

-

10 YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEtKS -----------3 WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----------A WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WEEKS -----------5 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------

2
10
1
77
A
6
(9 )
-

3
9
2
7A
6
7
-

12
(9 )
82
1
5
1
-

.

12 YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----------3 WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----------A WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WEEKS ----------5 WEEKS --------------------------------------------------

2
9
1
75
A
8
(9 )
-

3
9
2
70
6
11

15 YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 W EEK---------------- ---------------------------------2 WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 wEEKS -----------3 WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----------A WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WEEKS -----------5 W EEKS------------------------- ----------------------20 YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS ------------------------------------------------OVER 2 ANO UNDER 3 WEEKS -----------3 W EEKS-------------- ---------- -------- ------ -------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----------A W EEKS-----------------* -----------------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WEEKS -----------5 W F F K S---------------- ---------------------------------




96
2
2
-

2
-

-

-

-

_

.
96
2
2
-

-

10
(9 )
82
1
5
1
-

2
7
1
3A
3
52
1
*

3
7
2
15
b
67
-

6
(9 )
58
3A
1

.
_
-

(9 )
3

1
2

62
36
2
-

A3
2
50
(9 )
2

18
1
77

2
6
1
15
1
6A
2
10

3
7
2
6
1
65
2
13

.
_
85
2
13

(9 )
2

1
?

20

8

26

71
(9 )
7

76
1
12

68
(9 )
A

(9 )
25
62
1
7

-

78
1
18
-

1

•
.

5
2
7A
3
13
(9 )
3

98
(9 )
1

A

_

55
3
35
(9 )
3

71

-

29
(9 )

_
2

98
(9 )
i

P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o rk e r s

Item
A ll in d u s tr ie s

AMOUNT OF PAID VACATION AFTER14
CONTINUED

M a n u fa ctu rin g

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

A ll in d u s t r ie s

M a n u fa ctu r in g

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

<9)
2
12
36
2
46
(9 )
“
1

1
2
8
24
63
1
2

2
14
43
3
38
(9 )
“

3
(9 )
96
-

1
2
8
•
24
-

2
•
14
43
3
38
(9 )
(9 )
-

-

25 YEARS OF SERVICEl
1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----------3 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----------4 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 4 AND UNDER 5 WEEKS -----------5 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER 6 WEEKS -----------6 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------7 WEEKS --------------------------------------------------

2
6
1
10
1
27
1
47
2
2
1

3
7
2
4
1
17
1
55
2
4
3

“
4
(9 )
17
«
39
1
3d
1
•

4
2
94
-

YE4RS OF SERV IC E:
I WEEK --------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEtKS -----------3 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER 4 WEEKS — — 4 W E E K S-------------------------------------------------OVER 4 AND UNDER 5 WEEKS -----------5 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER 6 WEEKS -----------6 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------7 WEEKS --------------------------------------------------

2
6
1
10
1
27
1
45
2
3
4

3
7
2
4
l
’ 7
1
52
2
3
7

4
(9 )
17
39
1
3b
1
2
*

.
2
2
95
•
1
-

(9 )
2
*
12
36
2
44
(9 )
2
1

MAXIMUM VACATION AVAILABLE:
1 WEEK ---------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS --------------------------7 ---------------------OVER 2 AND UNOER 3 WEEKS -----------3 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER 4 WEEKS -----------4 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 4 AND UNOER 5 WEe KS -----------5 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER 6 WEtKS -----------6 WEEKS -------------------------------------------------7 WEEKS --------------------------------------------------

2
6
1
10
1
27
1
45
2
3
4

3
7
2
4
i
17
1
52
2
3
7

4
(9 )
17
39
1
36
1
a

•
.
2
2
95
-

(9 )
2
.
12
36
(9 )
45
(9 )
2
1

30

Sec fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le s .




1

56
1
7
2

1
2
8
24
56
1
7
2

*

.
2
14
43
(9 )
40
(9 )
(9 )

•
•
.
3
(9 )
97
(9 )

•
•
•
•
•
3
(9 )
97
(9 )

O ffic e w o r k e r s

P la n t w o r k e r s
Item
A l l in d u s t r ie s

M a n u fa ctu r in g

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b l ic u t ilit ie s

A ll in d u s tr ie s

100

10U

100

100

100

M a n u fa c tu r in g

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b l ic u t ilit ie s

PERCENT OF WORKERS
100

100

99

99

100

98
77

99
92

100
75

93
78

73
66

99
75

85

96

80

87

37
38

51
50

76
78

38
38

29
29

81

28

71

88

68

87

15

9

31

3

1

3

(9 )

7
6

9
7

5
8

-

-

28
23

16
15

38
27

HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE --------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS -------------------------

98
80

97
88

90
76

100
97

98
88

99
86

98
83

100
99

SURGICAL INSURANCE -----------------------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS -------------------------

98
80

97
88

90
76

100
97

98
68

99
86

98
83

100
99

MEDICAL INSURANCE --------------------------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS -------------------------

93
80

97
84

89
76

100
97

98
88

99
86

98
83

100
99

MAJOR MEDICAL INSURANCE ------------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS -------------------------

79
67

79
67

80
66

96
98

93
78

88
75

96
80

100
99

DENTAL INSURANCE ----------------------------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS -------------------------

80
38

58
58

23
19

19
19

38
35

57
50

27
27

8
4

RETIREMENT PENSION ------------------------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS -------------------------

81
48

90
88

70
52

73
73

93
66

95
83

92
77

77
77

ALL FULL-TIME WORKERS ----------------------IN ESTABLISHMENTS PROVIDING AT
LEAST ONE OF THE BENEFITS
SHOWN RELOW1 5 ------------------------------------------------

9H

97

99

100

99

LIFE INSURANCE --------------------------------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS -------------------------

92
80

90
80

98
80

100
76

99
87

ACCIDENTAL DEATH AND
DISMEMBERMENT INSURANCE ----------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS --------------------------

78
67

83
78

70
59

95
72

80
69

SICKNESS ANO ACCIDENT INSURANCE
OR SICK LEAVE OR BOTH1 6 --------------------------

75

84

65

68

57
52

78
68

36
32

44

87

12

LONG-TERM D ISA B ILIT Y
INSURANCE -----------------------------------------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS -------------------------

SICKNESS ANO ACCIDENT
INSURANCE -------------------------------------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS --------------------SICK LEAVE (FULL PAY AND NO
WAITING PERIOD) -----------------------------------SICK LEAVE (PARTIAL PAY OR
WAITING PERIOD) ----------------------------------

See fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le s .




lo o

Footnotes
All of these standard footnotes may not apply to this bulletin.

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime
at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all workers and dividing by the number of workers.
The median
designates position— half of the employees surveyed receive more and half receive less than the rate shown. The middle range is defined
by two rates of pay; a fourth of the workers earn less than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn more than the higher rate.
3 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
4 These salaries relate to formally established minimum starting (hiring) regular straight-time salaries that are paid for standard
workweeks.
5 Excludes workers in subclerical jobs such as messenger.
6 Data are presented for all standard workweeks combined, and for the most common standard workweeks reported.
7 Includes all plant workers in establishments currently operating late shifts, and establishments whose formal provisions cover late
shifts, even though the establishments were not currently operating late shifts.
8 Less than 0.05 percent.
9 Less than 0.5 percent.
1 For purposes of this study, pay for a Sunday in December, negotiated in the automobile industry, is not treated as a paid holiday.
0
1 A ll combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for example, the proportion of workers receiving
1
a total of 9 days includes those with 9 full days and no half days, 8 full days and 2 half days, 7 full days and 4 half days, and so on.
Proportions then were cumulated.
12 A Christmas—
New Year holiday period is an unbroken series of holidays which includes Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's
Eve, and New Y ear's Day.
Such a holiday period is common in the automobile, aerospace, and farm implement industries.
1 "Floating" holidays vary from year to year according to employer or employee choice.
3
1 Includes payments other than "length of tim e ," such as percentage of annual earnings or flat-sum payments, converted to an
4
equivalent time basis; for example, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 week's pay. Periods of service are chosen arbitrarily
and do not necessarily reflect individual provisions for progression; for example, changes in proportions at 10 years include changes between
5 and 10 years. Estimates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 weeks' pay after 10 years includes those eligible for
at least 3 weeks' pay after fewer years of service.
1 Estimates listed after type of benefit are for all plans for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer. "Noncontributory
5
plans" include only those financed entirely by the employer. Excluded are legally required plans, such as workmen's compensation, social
security, and railroad retirement.
1 Unduplicated total of workers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below. Sick leave plans are
6
limited to those which definitely establish at least the minimum number of days' pay that each employee can expect. Informal sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.




Appendix A
A rea wage and rela ted benefit* data are obtained by p erson al v is its of Bureau fie ld re p re se n t­
atives at 3 -y e a r in terv als. 1 In each o f the intervening y e a r s , inform ation on em ploym ent and
occupational earnings is c o lle c t e d by a com bination o f p erson al v isit, m ail questionnaire, and te le ­
phone interview from establishm ents participating in the previou s survey.

w o rk e rs m ay advance to better jo b s and be r e p la ce d by new w o rk e rs at low er rates. Such shifts in
em ploym ent could d e cre a s e an occupational average even though m ost establishm ents in an area
in cre a s e wages during the y e a r. Trends in earnings - of occu pation al grou ps, shown in table A -7 ,
are better indicators of wage trends than individual jo b s within the groups.

In each o f the 83 2 areas cu rren tly su rveyed, data are obtained fro m representative e stab­
lishm ents within six b roa d industry d iv isio n s: M anufacturing; tran sportation , com m u nication, and other
public utilities; w holesale trade; retail tra d e ; fin a n ce, in su ran ce, and re a l estate; and s e r v ic e s . M ajor
industry groups excluded fro m these studies are governm ent operations and the con stru ction and
extractive in du stries. E stablishm ents having fe w e r than a p r e s c r ib e d num ber o f w o rk e rs are om itted
because of insufficien t em ploym ent in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are p rovided fo r
each of the broad industry divisions w hich m eet publication c r ite r ia .

Average earnings r e fle ct co m p o site , areaw ide estim a tes. Industries and establishm ents d iffer
in pay le v e l and jo b staffing, and thus contribu te differen tly to the estim ates fo r each jo b .
Pay
averages m ay fail to r e fle ct accurately the wage d ifferen tia l am ong jo b s in individual establishm ents.

These surveys are conducted on a sam ple b a s is . The sam pling p ro ce d u re s involve detailed
stratification of all establishm ents within the scope o f an individual area survey by industry and num ber
of em ployees. F r o m this stratified universe 4 probab ility sam ple is s e le cte d , with each establishm ent
having a p redeterm ined chance of selection . T o obtain optim um a ccu ra cy at m inim um c o s t, a g reater
proportion of la rge than sm all establishm ents is s e le cte d . When data are com bin ed, each establishm ent
is weighted accordin g to its probab ility o f se le ctio n , so that unbiased estim ates are generated. F o r
exam ple, if one out of fou r establishm ents is s e le cte d , it is given a weight of fou r to represen t its e lf
plus three others. An alternate of the sam e o rig in a l probab ility is chosen in the sam e in d u stry -siz e
cla ssifica tion if data are not available fo r the o rig in a l sam ple m e m b e r. If no suitable substitute is
available, additional weight is assigned to a sam ple m e m b e r that is s im ila r to the m issin g unit.
Occupations and Earnings
O ccupations selected fo r study are com m on to a va rie ty of m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing
industries, and are of the follow ing types: (1) O ffice c le r ic a l; (2) p r o fe s sio n a l and tech n ica l; (3)
maintenance and pow erplant; and (4) cu stod ial and m a te ria l m ovem ent. O ccupational c la s sific a tio n is
based oh a uniform set of jo b de scrip tio n s designed to take account o f interestablishm ent variation
in duties within the sam e jo b . O ccupations se le cte d fo r study are lis te d and d e s crib e d in appendix B.
U nless otherw ise indicated, the earnings data follow ing the jo b titles are fo r all indu stries com bined.
Earnings data fo r som e of the occupations lis te d and d e s c r ib e d , o r fo r som e industry division s within
occupations, are not p resen ted in the A -s e r ie s ta b le s , becau se eith er (1) em ploym ent in the occupation
is too sm all to provide enough data to m e rit p resentation, o r (2 ) there is p o s s ib ility of d is c lo s u r e of
individual establishm ent data. Separate m e n 's and w om en 's earnings data are not presen ted whcr. the
num ber of w ork ers not Identified by s e x is 20 p ercent o r m o r e of the m en o r w om en identified in an
occupation. Earnings data not shown separately fo r industry divisions are included in all industries
com bined data, w here shown. L ik e w ise , data are included in the o v e r a ll c la s sifica tio n when a sub­
cla ssifica tion o f e le ctr o n ic s tech n ician s, s e c r e ta r ie s , o r tru ck d riv e rs is not shown o r inform ation to
su bclassify is not available.
O ccupational em ploym ent and earnings data are shown fo r fu ll-tim e w o rk e rs , i .e . , those h ired
to w ork a regular w eekly schedule. Earnings data exclude p rem iu m pay fo r o v ertim e and fo r w ork on
w eekends, holid ays, and late shifts. Nonproduction bonu ses are excluded, but c o s t -o f-liv in g allow ances
and incentive bonuses are included. W eekly h ours fo r o ffic e c le r ic a l and p ro fe s sio n a l and technical
occupations r e fe r to the standard w orkw eek (rounded to the n earest h alf hour) fo r w hich em ployees
re ce iv e regular straigh t-tim e sa la rie s (e xclu sive of pay fo r o v ertim e at regular a n d /o r p rem iu m rates).
Average Weekly earnings fo r these occupations are rounded to the n earest half dolla r.
These surveys m easu re the le v e l o f occupational earnings in an area at a p a rticu la r tim e.
C om parisons o f individual occupational averages o v e r tim e m ay not re fle c t expected wage changes.
The averages fo r individual jo b s are affected by changes in w ages and em ploym ent patterns. F o r
exam ple, proportion s o f w ork e rs em ployed by h igh - o r low -w a ge fir m s m ay change, o r high-w age
1 Pcnonol villa wen on n 2-year cycle before July 1972.
2 Included In the 83 anal a n 13 itudlei conducted by the Bureau under contract. Theie areal are Akron, Ohio; Auitln, Tex.; Binghamton,
N.Y. —Pa.; Birmingham, A la .; Fort Lauderdale—
Hollywood and Welt Palm Beach—Boca Raton, Fla.; Lexington—Fayette, K y .; Melbourne—Tituiville—
Cocoa, Fla. j Norfolk—
Virginia Beach—
Portimouth and Newport Newi—
Hampton, Va. —N .C .; Poughkecpiie—Klngiton—Newburgh, N.Y. | Raleigh—
Durham, N .C .j Syncuie, N .Y .; Utica—Rome, N .Y .; and Weitcheiter County, N.Y. In addition, the Burnau conduca more limited ana itudlei
in approximately 70 areal at the rnqueit of the Employment Standard! Adminlttmtlon of the U. S. Department of Labor.




Average pay le v e ls fo r men and w om en in s e le cte d occupations should not be assum ed to
r e fle c t d ifferen ces in pay of the sexes within individual establish m en ts. F a cto r s w hich m ay contribute
to d iffe re n ce s include p r o g r e s s io n within establish ed rate ran ges, sin ce only the rates paid incum bents
are c o lle c te d , and p erform an ce of s p e c ific duties within the gen era l su rvey job d es c r ip tio n s . Job
d e scrip tio n s used to c la s s ify em ployees in these su rveys usually are m ore g en era lized than those used
in individual establishm ents and allow fo r m in or d iffe re n ce s among establishm ent* 'in s p e c ific
duties perform ed.
O ccupational em ploym ent estim ates re p resen t the total in all establishm ents within the scope
of the study and not the num ber actually surveyed. B ecau se occupational stru ctu res among e s ta b lis h ­
m ents d iffe r , estim ates of occupational em ploym ent obtained fro m the sam ple o f establishm ents studied
se rve only to indicate the relative im p ortan ce o f the jo b s studied. T h ese d iffe r e n c e s in occupational
structu re do not affect m aterially the a ccu ra cy of the earnings data.
W age tren ds for s elected occupational groups
The
Annual rates
span betw een
in cre a s e d at

percents o f change in table A -7 relate to wage changes betw een the in dica ted dates.
of In cre a se , w here shown, r e fle c t the amount of in c re a s e fo r 12 m onths when the tim e
surveys was other than 12 m onths. Annual rates are b ased on the assum ption that w ages
a constant rate between su rveys.

O ccupations used to compute wage trends, are:
O ffice c le r ic a l (men and w om en ):
B ookkeeping-m achine op e ra to rs,
cla s s B
C le rk s, accounting, cla s se s A and B
C le rk s, file , c la s s e s A, B, and C
C le rk s, order
C le rk s, p ayroll
Keypunch o p e ra to rs , cla s se s A and S
M essengers
S e cre ta rie s
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Tabulating-m achine o p era tors,
cla ss B
T yp ists, c la s s e s A and B
E lectron ic data pro ce ssin g
(men and w om en):
Com puter o p e ra to rs , c la s s e s A, B, and C
Com puter p ro g ra m m e rs, c la s s e s A , B,
and C

E le c tr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g (men
and w om en)— Continued
C om pu ter system s analysts, c la s s e s A,
B, and C
Industrial n u rses (men and w om en ):
N u rses, in du stria l (re g is te r e d )
Skilled m aintenance (m en ):
C a rp en ters
E le c tr ic ia n s
M achini sts
M echanics
M ech an ics (autom otive)
P a inters
P ip efitters
T o o l and die m ak ers
U nskilled plant (m en ):
J a n itors , p o r t e r s , and cle a n e rs
L a b o r e r s , m a te ria l handling

P ercen t changes fo r individual areas in the p r o g r a m are com puted as fo llo w s :
1. Each occupation is assigned a w eight ba sed on its proportion ate em ploym ent in the se le cte d
group of occupations in the base y ear.
2. These weights are used to com pute group a v era g es. E ach occu p a tion 's average (mean)
earnings is m ultiplied by its weight. The p rod u cts are tota led to obtain a group average.
3. The ratio of group averages fo r 2 con secu tiv e y e a r s is com puted by dividing the average
fo r the current y ear by the average fo r the e a r lie r y e a r . The resu lts— e x p r e s s e d as a percen t— le s s 100
is the p ercent change.

E stablishm ent p r a c tic e s and supplem entary wage provision s
The B -a e r le a tablea p rovid e in form ation on eatabliahment practicaa and aupplem entary wage
proviaiona fo r fu ll-tim e plant and o ffic e w ork era . "Plant w o rk e ra " include w orking forem en and all
n ona upervia ory w ork era (including leadm en and train eea) engaged in n onoffice functiona. C afeteria
w ork era and routem en are exclu ded fr o m m anufacturing, but included in nonm anufacturing induatriea,
"O ffic e w o rk e ra " include w orking aup erviaora and nonauperviaory w orkera p erform in g c le r ic a l or
rela ted functiona. A d m in iatrative, e x e cu tiv e , profeaaion al, and p art-tim e em ployeea are excluded.
P a rt-tim e em ployeea are thoae h ired to w ork a achedule calling regularly fo r fe w e r w eekly houra than
the establish m en t's achedule fo r fu ll-tim e em ployeea in the aame general type of w ork . The
determ ination ia baaed on the e m p lo y e r 'a distinction between the two groupa which m ay take into
account not only d iffe r e n c e s in w ork achedulea but d ifferen cea in pay and benefita.
M inim um entrance sala rie a fo r o ffic e w orkera relate only to the eatabliahmenta viaited, (See
table B - l . ) B ecauae of the optim um sam pling techniques used and the probab ility that large
establishm ents are m o r e lik ely than sm all establishm ents to have form al entrance rates above the
a u b cle r ic a l le v e l, the table is m o re representative o f p o licie s in m edium and large establishm ents.
Shift differen tia l data are lim ite d to fu ll-tim e plant w orkera in manufacturing induatriea. (See
table B -2 .) T h is Inform ation is p resen ted in te rm s of (1) establishm ent policy 3 fo r total plant w ork er
em ploym ent, and ( 2 ) effe c tiv e p r a c tic e fo r w ork ers em ployed on the specified ahift at the tim e of the
su rvey. In establishm ents having v a rie d diffe re n tia la , the amount applying to a m a jo rity ia uaed. In
establishm ents having som e la te -s h ift hours paid at norm al ra tes, a differential ia re c o rd e d only i f it
applies to a m a jority of the shift h ours. A second (evening) shift ends work at or near midnight. A
th ird (night) shift starts w ork at or near midnight.
The scheduled w eekly houra and days of a m ajority of the fir s t-s h ift w o rk e rs in an e sta b lish ­
m ent are tabulated as applying to all fu ll-tim e plant or o ffice w orkera of that establishm ent. (See
table B -3 .) Scheduled w eekly houra and days are thoae .which a m ajority of fu ll-tim e em ployees are
expected to w ork fo r atraigh t-tim e o r o v ertim e •rates.
Paid h olid ays; paid va ca tion s; and health, insurance, and pension plana are treated statistically
as applying t o a ll fu ll-tim e plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs if a m ajority of auch w ork ers are e lig ib le o r m ay
eventually qualify fo r the p r a c tic e a lis te d . (See tablea B -4 through B - 6.) Sums of individual item s in
tables B -2 through B -5 m ay not equal totals because of rounding,
Data on paid holid ays are lim ited to holidays granted annually on a fo rm a l b a s is , which (1)
are p rovided fo r in w ritten fo rm , o r (2) are established by custom . (See table B -4 .) H olidays
o rd in a rily granted are included even though they may fall on a nonworkday and the w ork er is not
granted another day off. The fir s t part o f the paid holidays table presents the num ber of w hole and
h alf holidays actually granted. The se co n d part com bin es whole and half holidays to show total holiday
t im e . T able B -4 a rep orts the in cid e n ce of the m oat com m on paid holidays.

The sum m ary o f vacation plana is a sta tistica l m easu re o f vacation proviaiona rather than a
m easu re of the p roportion of fu ll-tim e w ork era actually receiv in g a p e cific benefita. (See table B -5 .)
P r o v is io n s apply to all plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs in an eatabliahm ent reg a rd les s of length of s e r v ic e .
Paym ents on other than a tim e basia are co n verted to a tim e p eriod ; fo r exam ple, ? percent of
annual earninga are co n s id e r e d equivalent to 1 w e e k 's pay. Only b a s ic plans are included. E stim ates
exclude vacation b on u ses, va ca tio n -sa vin gs plans, and "exten ded" o r "S abb atical" benefits beyond ba sic
plans. Such proviaiona are ty p ica l in the s te e l, alum inum , and can induatriea.
Health, in su ran ce, and penaion plans fo r w hich the em p loy er pays at least a part of the cost
include thoae ( 1 ) underw ritten by a c o m m e r c ia l insurance com pany o r nonprofit organization, ( 2 )
p rovid ed through a union fund, o r (3) paid d ir e ctly fey the em p loy er out of current operating funds or
fro m a fund set aside fo r this pu rp ose. (See table B - 6 .) An eatabliahm ent ia con sid ered to have
auch a plan if the m ajo rity o f e m p loyees are c o v e r e d even though lea s than a m ajority participate
under the plan becau se em ployeea are re q u ired to contribute tow a rd the cost. Excluded are
leg a lly requ ired plana, such as w o rk m e n 's com pensation, s o c ia l s ecu rity , and railroad retirem ent.
Sickneas and accident in su ran ce ia lim ited to that type o f insurance under which predeterm ined
cash paym ents are m ade d ir e ctly to the in su red during tem p ora ry illn es s or accident disability.
Inform ation is presen ted fo r all such plans to w hich the em p loyer contribu tes. H ow ever, in New
Y o rk and New J e r s e y , w hich have enacted te m p ora ry disability insurance laws requiring em ployer
con tribu tion s , 4 plans are included only if the em p loy er ( 1 ) contribu tes m ore than is legally required,
o r (2) p rovid es the em ployee with benefits w hich e x c e e d the requirem en ts o f the law. Tabulations of
paid sick leave plans are lim ite d to fo rm a l p la n s ’ w hich provide fu ll pay or a p roportion of the
w o r k e r 's pay during absence fr o m w ork b ecau se o f illn e s s . Separate tabulations are presented
accord in g to ( 1 ) plans w hich p rovid e fu ll pay and no waiting p e rio d , and ( 2 ) plans which provide either
p artial pay o r a waiting p e rio d . In addition to the presentation of p rop ortion s o f w ork ers provided
sick neas and accident insurance o r paid sick le a v e , an unduplicated total is shown of w ork ers who
r e c e iv e eith er o r both types of ben efits.
Long te r m disability in su ran ce plans provide paym ents to totally disabled em ployees upon the
expiration of their paid sick leave a n d /o r sick n ess and accident in su ran ce, or after a predeterm ined
p e rio d o f disability (typically 6 m onths). Paym ents are m ade until the end of the disability, a
m axim um age, or e lig ib ility fo r re tirem en t b e n efits. Fu ll o r partial payments are alm ost always
reduced by s o c ia l s e cu rity , w o rk m e n 's com pen sation , and p rivate pensions benefits payable to the
disabled em ployee.
M a jo r m e d ica l in su ran ce plans p ro te ct em p loyees fro m sick n ess and injury expenses beyond
the cov e ra g e of b a s ic hospitalization , m e d ica l, and s u rg ica l plans. T y p ica l features o f m a jor m edical
plans are ( 1 ) a "d e d u ctib le " (e .g ., $ 5 0 ) paid by the in su red b e fo r e benefits begin; ( 2 ) a coinsurance
feature requiring the insured to pay a p ortion (e .g ., 20 p ercen t) of certain expenses; and ( 3 ) stated
d olla r m axim um benefits (e .g ., $ 10,000 a y e a r ). M edica l insurance p rovides com plete o r partial
payment o f d o c t o r s ' fe e s . Dental in su ran ce usually c o v e r s fillin g s , ex tra ction s , and X -r a y s . Excluded
are plans w hich c o v e r only o r a l s u rge ry or accident dam age. Retirem ent pension plans provide
paym ents fo r the rem ain der o f the w o r k e r 's life .

3
An establishment w u considered as having a policy If It met either of the following conditions: (1) Operated late .-Lifts at the time of the 4 The temporary disability lew* in California end Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.
survey, or (2) had formal provisions covering late shifts. An establishment was considered as having formal provisions if it (1) had operated late
s An establishment is considered as having a formal plan If It established at least the minimum number of days sick leave available to each
shifts during the 12 months before the survey, or (2) had provisions in written form to operate late shifts.
employee. Such a plan need not be written; but informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, are excluded.




Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied in Albany—
Schenectady—Troy, ISI.Y.,1 September 1975
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s

N u m b e r o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s
M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b l is h ­
m e n ts in s c o p e
o f stu d y

In d u s try d i v i s i o n 2

W ithin s c o p e o f stu d y
W ith in s c o p e
o f stu d y 5

Stu died
T o ta l4

Stu died
N u m b er

ALL

d iv is io n s

F u ll-t im e
o ffic e w o rk e rs

T o t a l4

478

1 26

1 1 7 ,3 1 5

100

6 1 ,7 9 1

1 8 ,0 6 5

7 8 ,6 9 5

SO
-

167
311

45
83

5 2 ,7 8 4
6 4 ,5 3 1

45
55

3 4 ,0 3 4
2 7 ,7 5 7

6 ,0 9 5
1 1 ,9 7 0

4 0 ,2 5 7
3 8 ,4 3 8

50
SO
50
50
50

38
49
103
A7
70

14
23

1 1 ,6 7 9
6 ,2 0 5
2 1 ,0 6 2
1 4 ,0 0 1
1 1 ,3 8 4

-------------------------------------------------------------

MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g --------------------------------------------------------------TRANSPORTATION COMMUNICATION* AND
OTHER PUBLIC U T I L IT IE S 5 ----------------------------------------w h o l e s a l e TRADE
---------------------------------------------------------RETAIL TRADE
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------FINANCE, INSURANCE, ANO REAL ESTATE
SERVICES* --------------------------------------------------------------------------

P ercen t

F u ll-t im e
p la n t w o r k e r s

10
11
25

10
5
18

12
10

6 ,8 5 6
<6 >
<6 >
<7 >
<6 >

2 ,0 7 3
<6 >
<6 >
<
<6 >

1 0 ,0 8 3
2 ,4 4 3
1 0 ,6 7 8
9 ,1 9 3
6 ,0 4 1

6

1 T h e A lb a n y -S c h e n e c t a d y — r o y S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a t is t ic a l A r e a , as d e fin e d b y the O f f i c e o f M a n a g em en t and B u d get th rou g h F e b r u a r y 1 974, c o n s is t s o f A lb a n y , M o n t g o m e r y , R e n s s e l a e r ,
T
S a ra to g a , and S c h e n e c t a d y C o u n t ie s . T h e " w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s t u d y " e s t im a t e s sh ow n in th is ta b le p r o v id e a r e a s o n a b ly a c c u r a t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f th e s i z e and c o m p o s i t i o n o f th e la b o r f o r c e in c lu d e d
in the s u r v e y . E s t im a t e s a r e n o t in te n d e d , h o w e v e r , f o r c o m p a r is o n w ith o t h e r e m p lo y m e n t in d e x e s to m e a s u r e e m p lo y m e n t t r e n d s o r l e v e l s s i n c e (1 ) p la n n in g o f w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s e s t a b lis h m e n t
da ta c o m p ile d c o n s id e r a b l y in a d v a n c e o f the p a y r o l l p e r io d stu d ie d , and (2 ) s m a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s a r e e x c lu d e d fr o m the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .
2 T h e 1967 e d it io n o f th e S ta n d a rd I n d u s t r ia l C l a s s if ic a t i o n M a n u a l w a s u s e d t o c l a s s i f y e s t a b lis h m e n t s b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n .
3 In c lu d e s a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t at o r a b o v e th e m in im u m li m it a t io n . A l l o u tle ts (w ith in the a r e a ) o f c o m p a n ie s in in d u s t r ie s s u c h a s t r a d e , fin a n c e , a u to r e p a i r s e r v i c e , and
m o t io n p ic t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s id e r e d a s 1 e s t a b lis h m e n t .
4 In c lu d e s e x e c u t i v e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , p a r t - t i m e , and o t h e r w o r k e r s e x c lu d e d f r o m the s e p a r a t e p la n t and o f f i c e c a t e g o r i e s .
5 A b b r e v ia t e d t o " p u b lic u t i l i t i e s " in the A - and B - s e r i e s t a b l e s .
T a x ic a b s and s e r v i c e s in c id e n t a l to w a te r t r a n s p o r t a t io n w e r e e x c lu d e d .
T h e m a jo r l o c a l and s u r b u r b a n t r a n s i t s y s t e m is
g o v e r n m e n t a lly ow n ed and o p e r a t e d and is e x c lu d e d b y d e fin it io n f r o m the s c o p e o f th e stu d y .
6 T h is d i v is i o n is r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t im a t e s f o r " a l l in d u s t r ie s " and " n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g " in the A - s e r i e s t a b le s , and f o r " a l l i n d u s t r ie s " in th e B - s e r i e s t a b l e s .
S e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n o f da ta is
n o t m a d e fo r on e o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g r e a s o n s :
(1 ) E m p lo y m e n t i s t o o s m a ll to p r o v id e en ou g h da ta t o m e r it s e p a r a t e stu d y, (2 ) the s a m p le w a s n o t d e s ig n e d in it ia l ly t o p e r m it s e p a r a t e
p r e s e n t a t io n , (3 ) r e s p o n s e w a s in s u ff ic i e n t o r in a d e q u a te t o p e r m it s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n , and (4 ) t h e r e is p o s s ib i li t y o f d i s c lo s u r e o f in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t d a ta .
7 W o r k e r s f r o m th is e n t ir e d i v is i o n a r e r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t im a t e s f o r " a l l in d u s t r ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g " in the A - s e r i e s t a b le s , but f r o m the r e a l e s t a t e p o r t io n o n ly in e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l
i n d u s t r ie s " in the B - s e r i e s t a b le s .
S e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n o f da ta is n ot m a d e f o r on e o r m o r e o f the r e a s o n s g iv en in fo o tn o te 6.
8 H o te ls and m o t e ls ; la u n d r ie s and o t h e r p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u t o m o b ile r e p a i r , r e n t a l, and p a rk in g ; m o t io n p i c t u r e s ; n o n p r o fit m e m b e r s h i p o r g a n iz a t io n s (e x c lu d in g r e l ig i o u s
and c h a r it a b le o r g a n iz a t io n s ); and e n g in e e r in g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .

I n d u s t r ia l c o m p o s i t i o n in m a n u fa ctu rin g
O v e r o n e - h a l f o f the w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y in the A lb a n y — c h e n e c ta d y —
S
T r o y a r e a w e r e in m a n u fa ctu rin g f i r m s . T h e fo llo w in g p r e s e n t s the m a jo r in d u s t r y g r o u p s
and s p e c i f i c in d u s t r ie s a s a p e r c e n t o f a ll m a n u fa c t u r in g :
S p e c if ic in d u s t r ie s

I n d u s try g r o u p s
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l — 4 0
S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s
p r o d u c t s __ _____________
8
A p p a r e l and o t h e r t e x t ile
F o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ______
T e x t ile m i l l p r o d u c t s ____________
P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s _______
P r in tin g and p u b lis h in g __________
C h e m ic a ls and a llie d
p r o d u c t s ___ ____

E n g in e s and t u r b in e s
........................38
M i s c e ll a n e o u s n o n m e t a llic m in e r a l
p r o d u c t s _____________________________ 7

7
7
6
6
5

T h is in fo r m a t io n i s b a s e d on e s t im a t e s o f t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t d e r iv e d f r o m u n iv e r s e
m a t e r ia ls c o m p ile d b e fo r e a c t u a l s u r v e y .
P r o p o r t io n s in v a r io u s in d u s t r y d iv is io n s m a y
d i f f e r f r o m p r o p o r t io n s b a s e d on th e r e s u lt s o f the s u r v e y a s sh ow n in the a p p e n d ix t a b le .




L a b o r-m a n a g e m e n t a g re e m e n t c o v e r a g e
T h e fo llo w in g ta b u la tion sh o w s th e p e r c e n t o f f u l l - t i m e p la n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s
e m p lo y e d in e s t a b lis h m e n t s in w h ic h a u n io n c o n t r a c t o r c o n t r a c t s c o v e r e d a m a jo r i t y o f
the w o r k e r s in the r e s p e c t i v e c a t e g o r i e s , A lb a n y — c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N .Y ., S e p t e m b e r 1 975:
S
P la n t w o r k e r s
A l l in d u s t r ie s
.....
M a n u fa c t u r in g ________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ___________
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s ___________

O ffice w o rk e r s

68
85
48
99

25
15
30
95

A n e s t a b lis h m e n t is c o n s id e r e d t o h a v e a c o n t r a c t c o v e r i n g a ll p la n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s
i f a m a jo r it y o f s u c h w o r k e r s a r e c o v e r e d b y a l a b o r -m a n a g e m e n t a g r e e m e n t .
T h e r e fo r e ,
a ll oth e r pla n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s a r e e m p lo y e d in e s t a b lis h m e n t s that e it h e r d o n ot h a v e
la b o r -m a n a g e m e n t c o n t r a c t s in e f f e c t , o r h a v e c o n t r a c t s th a t a p p ly t o fe w e r than h a lf o f
t h e ir plant o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s . E s t im a t e s a r e n o t n e c e s s a r i l y r e p r e s e n t a t i v e o f th e e x te n t
t o w h ich a ll w o r k e r s in the area, m a y b e c o v e r e d b y th e p r o v is i o n s o f la b o r -m a n a g e m e n t
a g r e e m e n t s , b e c a u s e s m a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s a r e e x c lu d e d and th e in d u s t r ia l s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y
i s lim it e d .

Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions
The p rim a ry purpose of preparing job de scrip tio n s fo r the B u reau's wage surveys is to a ssist its fie ld staff in cla ssify in g into appropriate
occupations w o rk e rs who are em ployed under a v ariety of p a y ro ll tit le s 'a n d different w ork arrangem ents fro m establishm ent to establishm ent and
fr o m are a to area. This perm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representin g com parable jo b content. B ecau se o f this em phasis on
in terestab lish m en t and intera rea com parability o f occupational content, the B u rea u's jo b d escrip tion s m ay d iffe r significantly fro m those in use in
individual establishm ents or those prepared fo r other p u rp o se s. In applying these jo b d e s crip tio n s , the B u rea u's fie ld e con om ists are instructed
to exclu de w orking s u p e rv iso rs; apprentices; le a r n e r s ; begin n ers; tra in e e s; and handicapped, p a r t-tim e , te m p o ra ry , and probationary w o rk e rs .

OFFICE
B IL L E R , MACHINE

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING

P rep a res statem ents, b ills , and in v o ice s on a m achine other than an ord in ary o r e le ctro m a tic
ty p ew riter. May also keep r e c o r d s as to billin gs or shipping charges or p e rfo rm other c le r ic a l w ork
inciden tal to b illin g operation s. F o r wage study pu rp oses, b ille r s , m achine, are cla s s ifie d by type of
m ach in e, as fo llo w s :

P e r fo r m s one or m o re accounting c le r ic a l tasks such as posting to reg isters and led gers;
recon cilin g bank accounts; verifyin g the internal c o n s isten cy , com p leten ess, and m athem atical accu racy
of accounting docum ents; assigning p r e s c r ib e d accounting distribution c o d e s ; examining and verifying
fo r c le r ic a l a ccu ra cy variou s types of r e p o r ts , lis t s , ca lcu lation s, posting, e t c .; or preparing sim ple or
assisting in preparing m ore com p lica ted journal vou ch ers. May w ork in eith er a manual or automated
accounting system .

B ille r , m achine (billing m achine). U ses a special billing machine (com bination typing and
adding m achine) to prep a re b ills and in v o ice s fro m c u s to m e rs ' purchase o r d e r s , internally p repared
o r d e r s , shipping m em ora n du m s, etc. U sually involves application of predeterm ined discounts and
shipping ch a rg es and entry of n e c e s s a r y exten sion s, which may o r may not be com puted on the billing
m ach in e, and totals w hich are autom atically accum ulated by m achine. The operation usually involves a
la rg e num ber of carbon c op ies o f the b ill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold m achine.
B ille r , m achine (bookkeeping m ach in e). U ses a bookkeeping m achine (with o r without a
ty p ew riter keyboa rd ) to p rep are c u s t o m e r s ' b ills as part of the accounts re ce iva b le operation.
G enerally in volves the sim ultaneous entry of figu res on c u s to m e rs ' ledger re co rd . The m achine
autom atically accum ulates fig u re s on a num ber of v e r tic a l colum ns and com putes and usually prints
autom atically the debit o r cr e d it b a la n ce s. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. W orks fro m
u n iform and standard types of sales and cr e d it slips.

The w ork req u ire s a know ledge of c le r ic a l m ethods and o ffic e p r a c tic e s and procedu res which
rela tes to the c le r ic a l p r o c e s s in g and re co rd in g of tran saction s and accounting inform ation. With
e x p e rie n ce , the w ork er typ ically b e co m e s fa m ilia r with the bookkeeping and accounting term s and
p ro ce d u re s used in the assigned w ork , but is not requ ired to have a know ledge of the form al p rin ciples
of bookkeeping and accounting.
P o sition s are c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the b a sis of the follow ing definitions.
C lass A. Under gen eral su p ervision , p e r fo rm s accounting c le r ic a l operations which require
the application of exp erien ce and judgm ent, fo r exam ple, c le r ic a lly processin g com plicated or
nonrepetitive accounting tra n sa ctio n s, selectin g among a substantial variety of p re s crib e d accounting
cod es and c la s sific a tio n s , o r tra cin g tran saction s though previou s accounting actions to determ ine
s ou rce of d is c re p a n c ie s . May be a ssiste d by one o r m ore cla s s B accounting c lerk s .

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE O PER ATOR
O perates a bookkeeping m achine (with o r without a typew riter keyboard) to keep a r e c o r d of
b u sin ess tra n sa ction s.
C la ss A . K eeps a set o f r e c o r d s requiring a knowledge of and experience in b a s ic bookkeeping
p r in c ip le s , and fa m ilia rity with the stru ctu re of the particu lar accounting system used. D eterm ines
p ro p e r r e c o rd s and distribution o f debit and cre d it item s to be used in each phase o f the w ork. May
p rep a re con solida ted r e p o r ts , balance sh eets, and other re co rd s by hand.
C la s s B . K eeps a r e c o r d o f one o r m ore phases or section s of a set o f r e c o rd s usually
requiring little know ledge o f b a s ic bookkeepin g. Phases or sections include accounts payable, p a y ro ll,
cu stom ers* accounts (not including a sim p le type of billing d e scrib e d under b ille r , m achine), co st
d istribution, expense d istribution, inventory co n tro l, etc. May check or assist in preparation of tr ia l
balan ces and prepare c o n tro l sheets fo r the accounting department.

C lass B . Under c lo s e su p ervision , follow ing detailed instru ctions and standardized p roced u res,
p e r fo rm s one o r m o re routine accounting c le r ic a l operation s, such as posting to led g ers, ca rd s, or
w ork sheets w here identification of item s and loca tion s of postings are c le a rly indicated; checking
accu ra cy and com p leten ess o f standardized and repetitive r e c o rd s or accounting docum ents; and coding
docum ents using a few p r e s c r ib e d accounting c o d es .
CLERK, FILE
F ile s , c la s s ifie s , and r e trie v e s m a te ria l in an establish ed filing system . May p erform
c le r ic a l and manual tasks requ ired to maintain file s . P osition s are cla s s ifie d into lev els on the basis
of the follow ing definitions.
Class__A. C la s s ifie s and indexes file m a terial such as c o rresp on d en ce, reports, technical
docum ents, e t c ., in an establish ed filing system containing a num ber of varied subject m atter files.
May also file this m a terial. May keep r e c o rd s of variou s types in conjunction with the file s . May
lead a sm all group of lo w e r le v e l file c le r k s .

R ev ised occu pation al de scrip tio n s fo r switchboard op erator; sw itchboard o p e r a to r -r e c e p tio n ist; m a ch in e -to o l o p e ra to r, to o lr o o m ; and tool and die m aker are being introduced
this y ea r. They are the resu lt o f the B u reau's po licy o f perio d ica lly review ing area wage survey occupational d e scrip tio n s in o r d e r to take into account tech n olog ica l developm ents
and to c la r ify d escrip tio n s so that they are m ore readily understood and uniform ly in terp reted. Even though the re v ise d d e scrip tio n s r e fle c t b a s ic a lly the sam e occupations as previously
defined, som e rep ortin g changes m ay o ccu r because o f the re v isio n s.
The new single le v e l descrip tion fo r switchboard operator is not the equivalent of the two le v e ls p reviou sly defined.




SECRET ARY— C ontin ue d
C lass B . S orts , c o d e s , and file s u n cla ssifie d m a teria l by sim ple (subject m atter) headings
o r partly cla s s ifie d m a terial by fin e r subheadings. P r e p a re s sim p le related index and c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e
aids. As requested, loca tes c le a rly identified m a teria l in file s and forw ards m aterial. May p e r fo rm
related c le r ic a l tasks requ ired to m aintain and s e r v ic e file s .
C lass C . P e r fo r m s routine filin g o f m a te ria l that has already been cla s s ifie d o r w hich is
ea sily cla s s ifie d in a sim p le s e r ia l c la s sific a tio n system (e .g ., alphabetical, c h ro n o lo g ica l, or
num erical). As requested, lo ca te s read ily available m a te ria l in file s and forw ard s m a te ria l; and may
fill out withdrawal ch arge. May p e r fo rm sim ple c le r ic a l and manual tasks requ ired to maintain and
s erv ice files.
CLERK, ORDER
R e ceiv es custom ers* o r d e r s fo r m a te ria l o r m erch an dise by m a il, phone, o r person ally.
Duties involve any com bination o f the follow in g: Quoting p r ic e s to cu sto m e rs; making *ent an ord e r
sheet listing the item s to m ake up the o r d e r ; checking; p r ic e s and quantities o f item s on o r d e r sheet;
and distributing o r d e r sheets to re sp e ctiv e departm ents to be fille d . May check with cre d it departm ent
to determ ine cred it rating of cu s to m e r, acknow ledge re ceip t of o rd e rs fro m c u s to m e rs , follow up
ord ers to see that they have been fille d , keep file o f o rd e rs re ce iv e d , and check shipping in voices
with original o rd e rs .
CLERK, PA Y R O L L
Com putes w ages of com pany em ployees and enters the n e c e s s a r y data on the p a y ro ll sheets.
Duties involve: Calculating w orkers* earnings based on tim e o r production r e c o rd s ; and posting
calculated data on p a yroll sheet, showing inform ation such as w o rk e r's nam e, wdrking days, tim e ,
rate, deductions fo r in su ran ce, and total w ages due. May m ake out paychecks and a ssist paym aster
in making up and distributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating m achine.
KEYPUNCH O PERATOR
O perates a keypunch m achine to r e c o r d o r v e r ify alphabetic a n d /o r n u m eric data on tabulating
card s or on tape.
P osition s are c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the ba sis o f the follow ing definitions.

•Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled " s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s the above c h a r a c te r is tics .
position s which are excluded fro m the definition are as fo llo w s :

E xam ples of

a.

P ositions which do not m eet the " p e r s o n a l" s e c r e ta r y con cept d e s c r ib e d above;

b.

Stenographers not fully train ed in s e c r e ta r ia l type duties;

c. Stenographers
m an agerial persons;

serving

as

o ffic e

assistants

to

a group

of p r o fe s sio n a l, tech n ica l,

d. S ecretary positions in w hich the duties are eith er substantially m o r e
stantially m ore com plex and responsible than those c h a r a c te r iz e d in the definition;

or

routine o r sub­

e. Assistant type positions w hich in volve m o r e d ifficu lt o r m ore res p on s ib le tech n ica l,
adm inistrative, su p ervisory, or sp e cia liz e d c le r i c a l duties w hich are not ty p ica l o f s e c r e ta ria l
w ork.
NOTE: The te r m "co rp o ra te o f f i c e r ," used in the le v e l definitions follow in g, r e fe r s to those
o ffic ia ls who have a significant c o rp o ra te -w id e policym ak ing ro le with regard to m a jo r com pany
activ itie s.
The title " v ic e p r e s id e n t," though n orm a lly in dica tive o f this r o le , do^s not in all ca s e s
identify such positions. V ice presidents w hose p r im a ry r e sp on sib ility is to act p erson a lly on individual
ca s e s or transactions (e .g ., approve o r deny individual loan o r c r e d it action s; adm inister individual
trust accounts; directly supervise a c le r ic a l staff) are not c o n s id e r e d to be "c o rp o ra te o f fi c e r s " for
purposes o f applying the follow ing le v e l d efin ition s.
C lass A
1. S ecretary to the chairm an o f the b oa rd o r presiden t of a com pany that e m p loy s , in all,
o v e r 100 but few er than 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
2. Secretary to a co rp orate o ffic e r (oth er than the chairm an o f the board o r p resid en t) o f a
com pany that em ploys, in all, o ver 5, 000 but fe w er than 25, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
3. S ecretary to the head, im m ediately below the c o r p o r a te o ffic e r le v e l, o f a m a jo r segm ent
or subsidiary of a com pany that em ploys, in all, o v e r 25,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .

9

C lass A . W ork requ ires the application o f exp e rie n ce and judgm ent in selecting p ro ce d u re s
to be follow ed and in searching f o r , in terp reting, se le ctin g , o r coding item s to be keypunched fro m a
v ariety of sou rce docum ents. On o c c a s io n m ay also p e r fo rm som e routine keypunch w ork. May train
inexperienced keypunch operators.
C lass B . W ork is routine and rep etitive. Under c lo s e supervision o r follow ing sp e c ific
p rocedu res o r in stru ction s, w ork s fro m variou s standardized so u rce docum ents which have been cod ed ,
and follow s s p ecified p roced u re s which have been p r e s c r ib e d in detail and require little o r no se le ctin g ,
coding, or interpreting of data to be r e co rd e d . R efers to s u p e rv is o r problem s arising fro m erron eou s
item s or codes o r m issin g inform ation.
MESSENGER

C lass B
1. S ecretary to the chairm an of the b oa rd or presiden t of a com pany that e m p loy s , in all,
fe w e r than 100 p e r s o n s ; or
2. Secretary to a co rp orate o ffic e r (other than the chairm an of the board o r p resid en t) o f a
com pany that em ploys, in all, o ver 100 but fe w e r than 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
3. Secretary to the head, im m ediately below the o ffic e r le v e l, o v er eith er a m a jo r c o r p o r a te ­
w ide functional activity (e .g ., m arketing, r e s e a r c h , op era tion s, industrial rela tion s, e t c .) o r a m a jor
geograph ic or organizational segm ent (e .g ., a region a l h ead quarters; a m a jo r d iv ision ) of a com pany
that em p lo ys, in all, o ve r 5,000 but few er than 2 5 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s ; or

P e r fo r m s variou s routine duties such as running e rra n d s, operating m in or o ffice m achines
such as sea lers o r m a ile r s r. opening and distributing m a il, and other m in or c le r ic a l w ork. Exclude
positions that requ ire operation o f a m o to r v e h icle as a significant duty.

4. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, fa c to r y , etc. (or other equivalent le v e l of
o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in all, o ver 5,000 p e r s o n s ; o r

SECRETARY

5. Secretary to the head of a la rge and im portant organ ization al segm ent (e .g ., a m iddle
m anagem ent su pervisor of an organizational segm ent often involving as many as s e v e r a l hundred
p e rs o n s ) o r a company that e m ploys, in all, o v e r 25,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .

A ssigned as p erson al s e c r e ta ry , n o rm ally to one individual. M aintains a c lo s e and highly
responsive relationship to the d a y -to -d a y w ork of the su p e rv iso r. W orks fa irly independently
receiving a m inim um o f detailed Supervision and guidance. P e r fo r m s va rie d c le r ic a l and se c r e ta ria l
duties, usually including m ost o f the fo llo w in g :
a. R eceiv es telephone c a lls , p erson a l c a lle r s , and incom ing m a il, answ ers routine in qu ires,
and routes tech n ica l in qu iries to the p r o p e r pe rso n s;
b.

E sta b lish es, m aintains, and r e v ise s the s u p e r v is o r 's file s ;

c.

M aintains the s u p e r v is o r 's calendar and m akes appointments as instructed;

d.

Re lay 8 m e ssa g es fro m s u p e rv is o r to subordinates;

e. Review s co rre s p o n d e n ce , m em orandum s, and re p o rts prepared by others fo r the su p e r­
v is o r 's signature to a ssu re p ro ce d u ra l and typographic a ccu ra cy;
f.

P e r fo r m s stenographic and typing w ork.

May also p e r fo rm other c le r ic a l and s e c r e ta ria l tasks o f com parable nature and difficulty.
The work typically requ ires knowledge of o ffic e routine and underst sinding of the organization , p ro g ra m s ,
and p rocedures rela ted to the w ork of the su p e rv iso r.




C lass C
1. Secretary to an executive o r m an agerial p erson w hose r e sp on sib ility is not equivalent to
one of the sp e cific level situations in the definition fo r c la s s B, but w hose organ ization al unit
norm ally num bers at least s e v e ra l dozen e m p lo y ees and is usually divided into organization al segm ents
w hich are often, in turn, further subdivided. In som e com p a n ies, this le v e l includes a w ide range of
organizational echelons; in oth ers, only one o r tw o; _or
2. S ecretary to the head of an individual plant, fa c to r y , etc. (or other equivalent le v e l of
o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in all, few er than 5,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .
C lass D
1. S ecretary to the
about 25 o r 30 p erson s); or

su pervisor

o r head o f a ^m all organ ization al unit (e .g ., few er than

2. S ecretary to a non su p ervisory staff s p e c ia lis t, p r o fe s sio n a l e m p loy ee, adm inistrative
o ffic e r , o r assistant, skilled technician o r exp ert. (NOTE: Many com panies assign sten ograph ers,
rather than se cre ta rie s as d e scrib e d above, to this le v e l o f s u p e rv is o ry or n on su p erv isory w o rk e r.)

P rim a ry duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to transcribe the dictation. May also
type fro m w ritten cop y
May operate fr o m a stenographic pool. May occa sio n a lly tr a n s c r ib e fro m
v o ic e record in g s (if p r im a ry duty is tra n scrib in g fro m re co rd in g s, see T ra n scrib in g-M a ch in e
O p era tor, G eneral).

O perates one o r a va rie ty of m achines such as the tabulator, ca lcu la tor, c o lla to r, interp reter,
s o r t e r , reproducing punch, e tc. E xcluded fr o m this definition are w orking s u p erv is ors. A lso excluded
are op e ra to rs of e le ctr o n ic digital co m p u te rs, even though they m ay also operate EAM equipment.

NOTE: This jo b is distingu ished fro m that o f a s e c r e ta ry in that a s e c r e ta ry norm ally w ork s
in a confidential rela tion sh ip w ith only one m anager o r executive and p erform s m o r e resp on sible and
d iscretion a ry task s as d e s c r ib e d in the s e c r e ta ry jo b definition.

C lass A. P e r fo r m s com plete reporting and tabulating assignm ents including devising difficult
co n tro l panel w iring under general su pervision . A ssignm ents typ ica lly involve a variety of long and
com p lex re p o rts w hich often are irr e g u la r o r n o n recu rrin g , requiring som e planning of the nature and
sequencing o f operation s, and the use o f a va rie ty of m achines. Is ty p ica lly involved in training new
op erators in m achine operations o r training low er le v e l op era tors in wiring from diagram s and in
the operating sequences of long and co m p le x re p o rts . D oes not include positions in which wiring
resp on sib ility is lim ited to se lection and in sertion of p rew ired boa rd s.

Stenographer, G eneral
Dictation in volves a n o rm a l routine vocabulary.
o r p e r fo rm other r e la tiv ely routine c l e r i c a l tasks.

May maintain file s , keep sim ple r e c o r d s ,

Stenographer. Senior
D ictation in volves a v a r ie d tech n ica l ,o r sp e cia lize d vocabu lary such as in legal b r ie fs or
r e p o rts on s c ie n tific r e s e a r c h . May a ls o set up and maintain file s , keep r e c o r d s , etc.
OR
P e r fo r m s sten ograph ic duties requiring significantly gre a te r independence and re sp o n sib ility
than stenographer, g en era l, as e vid en ced by the follow ing: W ork re qu ires a high d egree o f stenographic
speed and a ccu ra cy ; a thorough w ork ing knowledge o f gen eral business and o ffic e p ro ce d u re ; and of
the s p e c ific b u sin ess op era tion s, o rgan isation , p o lic ie s , p ro ce d u re s , file s , w ork flow , e tc. U ses this
know ledge in p erform in g stenographic duties and re spon sible c le r ic a l tasks such as maintaining follow up
file s ; assem bling m a teria l fo r r e p o r t s , m em orandum s, and le tte r s ; com posing sim ple le tte rs fro m
g en era l in stru ction s; reading and routing incom ing m ail; and answering routine qu estion s, etc.
SWITCHBOARD O PER ATO R
O perates a telephone sw itch board o r con sole used with a private branch exchange (P B X )
sy stem to rela y in com in g , outgoing, and in tra -s y s te m ca lls . May provide inform ation to c a lle r s ,
r e c o r d and tran sm it m e s s a g e s , keep r e c o r d of cedis p laced and to ll charges. B e sid e s operating a
telephone sw itch board o r c o n s o le , m ay also type or p e r fo rm routine c le r ic a l w ork (typing o r routine
c le r i c a l w ork m ay occu py the m a jo r portion o f the w o rk e r's tim e, and is usually p e rfo rm e d w hile at
the sw itchboard o r c o n s o le ). C h ief o r lead operators in establishm ents em ploying m o r e than one
o p era tor are excluded. F o r ah o p e ra to r who also acts as a recep tion ist, see Sw itchboard O p eratorR eception ist.
SW ITCHBOARD O PE R A T O R -R E C E PT IO N IST
At a s in g le -p o s itio n telephone sw itchboard o r c o n s o le , acts both as an o p erator— see Sw itch­
b oa rd O perator— and as a r ecep tio n is t. R e ce p tio n ist's w ork involves such duties as greetin g v is it o r s ;
determ ining nature o f v i s it o r 's b u s in e s s and providing appropriate inform ation; r e fe rrin g v is it o r to
app ropriate p erson in the organ ization , o r contacting that person by telephone and arranging an
appointment; keeping a log o f v is it o r s .

P osition s are c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the ba sis of the follow ing definitions.

C lass B . P e r fo r m s w ork accordin g to e stablish ed p ro ce d u re s and under s p ecific instructions.
Assignm ents typ ically involve com plete but routine and recu rrin g rep orts o r parts of la rger and m ore
com p lex re p o rts . O perates m ore d ifficu lt tabulating o r e le c t r ic a l accounting m achines such as the
tabulator and c a lcu la to r, in addition to the sim p ler m achines used by cla s s C operators. May be
requ ired to do som e w iring fr o m diagram s. May train new em p loyees in b a sic m achine operations.
C lass C . Under s p e c ific in stru ction s, operates sim p le tabulating or ele ctr ic a l accounting
m achines such as the s o r t e r , in te rp re te r, reproducing punch, c o lla t o r , etc. Assignm ents typically
involve p ortion s of a w ork unit, fo r exam ple, individual sorting o r collating runs, or repetitive
operation s. May p e r fo rm sim ple w iring fro m d iagram s, and do som e filing work.
TRANSCRIBINGrMACHINE O PER ATO R , GENERAL,
P rim a ry duty is to tra n s crib e dictation involving a n orm a l routine vocabulary from tran­
scrib in g-m a ch in e r e c o rd s . May also type fr o m w ritten copy and do sim ple c le r ic a l w ork. W orkers
tra n scrib in g dictation involving a va rie d te ch n ica l or sp e c ia liz e d v ocabu lary such as legal b riefs or
rep orts on scie n tific r e s e a r c h are. not included. A w ork er who takes dictation in shorthand or by
Stenotype o r sim ila r m achine is c la s s ifie d as a stenographer.
TYPIST
U ses a typew riter to make co p ie s of v a riou s m aterials or to make out b ills after calculations
have been m ade by another p erson . May include typing of s te n cils , m ats, or sim ilar m aterials for
use in duplicating p r o c e s s e s . May do c le r ic a l w ork involving little sp e c ia l training, such as keeping
sim p le r e c o rd ^ , filing r e c o rd s and r e p o r ts , o r sorting and distributing incom ing m ail.
C lass A . P e r fo r m s one o r m o re o f the follow in g: Typing m a teria l in final form when it
involves com bining m a terial fro m s e v e ra l s o u r c e s ; o r r e sp on sib ility fo r c o r r e c t spelling, syllabication,
punctuation, e t c ., o f tech n ica l o r unusual w ord s o r foreign language m aterial; or planning layout and
typing of com p lica ted statistical tables to maintain uniform ity and balance in spacing. May type routine
fo rm le tte r s , varying details to suit c ircu m s ta n ce s .
C lass B . P e r fo r m s one o r m o re o f the follow in g: Copy typing fro m rough or c le a r drafts;
o r routine typing o f fo r m s , insurance p o lic ie s , etc; o r setting up sim ple standard tabulations; or
copying m o r e com plex tables already set u ^ and spaced p rop erly .

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COM PU TER O PER ATOR

CO M PU TER O PERATOR— Continued

M onitors and op era tes the c o n tr o l co n so le o f a digital com puter to p r o c e s s data acco rd in g to
operating in stru ction s, usually p re p a re d by a p ro gra m m e r. W ork includes m ost of the fo llo w in g :
Studies in stru ction s to determ ine equipm ent setup and operations; loads equipm ent With requ ired
item s (tape r e e ls , c a r d s , e t c .); sw itch es n e c e s s a r y auxiliary equipment into c ir c u it, and starts and
op erates com puter; m akes adjustm ents t o com puter to c o r r e c t operating p roblem s and m eet sp e cia l
con d ition s; review s e r r o r s m ade during operation and determ ines cause o r r e fe r s p ro b le m to
s u p e r v is o r o r p r o g r a m m e r ; and m aintains operating r e c o rd s . May test and a ssist in co r re c tin g
p rogra m .

C la ss B . O perates independently, o r under only gen eral d irection , a com puter running
p ro g ra m s with m ost of the follow ing c h a r a c te r is tic s : M ost of the p ro g ra m s are established production
runs, ty p ica lly run on a regu larly re cu rrin g b a s is ; there is little o r n o testing of new program s
requ ired; alternate p ro g ra m s are p rovided in c a s e orig in a l p ro g ra m n eeds m a jor change o r cannot be
c o r r e c t e d within a reasonably tim e . In com m on e r r o r situ ations, diagnoses cause and takes c o r re c tiv e
action. T h is usually involves applying p re v io u s ly p rogra m m ed c o r r e c t iv e steps, or using standard
c o r r e c tio n techniques.
OR

F o r wage study p u r p o s e s , com p u ter operators are cla s s ifie d as follow s:
C lass A . O perates independently, o r under only general d irection , a com puter running
p rog ra m s with m ost o f the follow in g c h a r a c te r is tics : New program s are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requ irem en ts are o f c r it ic a l im portan ce to m inim ize dow ntim e; the p rogram s
are o f com p lex design s o that iden tification o f e r r o r sou rce often requ ires a w orking know ledge o f the
total p r og ra m , and alternate p r o g r a m s m ay not be available. May give dire ctio n and guidance to
lo w e r le v e l op era tors.




O perates under d ire ct su pervision a com pu ter running p rog ra m s o r segm ents of p rogram s
with the c h a r a c te r is tics d e s c r ib e d fo r c la s s A. May a ssist a higher le v e l operator by independently
p erform in g le s s difficult tasks assigned, and p e rform in g d ifficu lt tasks follow ing detailed instructions
and with frequent review o f operations p e rfo rm e d .
C la ss C . W orks on routine p ro g ra m s under c lo s e su p ervision . Is expected to develop working
know ledge of the com puter equipm ent used and ability to detect p ro b le m s involved in running routine
p ro g r a m s . U sually has r e c e iv e d som e fo rm a l training in com pu ter op eration. May a ssist higher lev el
o p erator on co m p le x p ro g r a m s .

Converts statem ents o f b u sin ess p r o b le m s , ty p ica lly p re p a re d by a system s analyst, into a
sequence of detailed in stru ction s w hich are re q u ire d to solve the pro b le m s by autom atic data p r o c e s s in g
equipment. W orking fr o m charts o f dia gra m s, the p ro g ra m m e r develops the p r e c is e in stru ction s w hich,
when entered into the com puter system in cod ed language, cau se the m anipulation o f data to achieve
d esired resu lts. W ork in volves m ost o f the follow in g: A pplies knowledge of com puter ca p a b ilitie s,
m athem atics, lo g ic em ployed by co m p u te rs, and p a rticu la r su bject m atter involved to analyze charts
and diagram s of the p ro b le m to be program m ed ; develops sequence of p ro g ra m steps; w rites detailed
flow charts to show o r d e r in w hich data w ill be p r o c e s s e d ; con verts these charts to cod ed instru ctions
fo r m achine to follow ; te s ts and c o r r e c t s p ro g ra m s ; p re p a re s in stru ction s fo r operating p erson n el
during production run; an a lyzes, re v ie w s , and alters p ro g ra m s to in cre a se operating e ffic ie n cy o r
adapt to new requ irem en ts; m aintains r e c o rd s o f p ro gra m developm ent and re v isio n s . (NOTE: W ork ers
perform ing both system s analysis and program m in g shbuld be c la s s ifie d as system s analysts i f this is
the sk ill used to determ ine th eir pay.)
Does not include em p loyees p r im a rily resp o n sib le fo r the m anagem ent o r supervision o f other
e le ctro n ic data p r o c e s s in g em p lo y e e s , o r p ro g ra m m e rs p rim a rily co n ce rn e d with s c ie n tific a n d /o r
engineering p rob lem s.
F or wage study p u rp o s e s , p r o g r a m m e r s are c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:
C lass A . W orks independently o r under only gen era l d irection on co m p le x p roblem s w hich
require com petence in all phases o f program m in g concepts and p r a c tic e s . W orking fro m diagram s
and charts w hich identify the nature o f d e s ir e d re s u lts , m a jo r p r o c e s s in g steps to be a ccom p lish ed ,
and the relationships betw een va rio u s steps o f the p ro b le m solving routine; plans the full range
o f program m ing action s needed to e fficie n tly utilize the com puter system in achieving d e sire d
end products.
At this le v e l, program m in g is d ifficu lt b ecau se com puter equipment m ust be organ ized to
produce s ev era l in terrela ted but d iv e rs e p rod u cts fro m num erous and d iverse data elem en ts. A wide
v ariety and extensive num ber o f intern al p r o c e s s in g actions m ust o c c u r . T h is req u ire s such actions as
developm ent o f com m on operation s w hich can be re u se d , establishm ent o f linkage points between
operations, adjustm ents to data when p r o g r a m requirem en ts e x ce e d com pu ter storage capacity, and
substantial m anipulation and resequencing o f data elem en ts to fo r m a highly integrated p ro g ra m .
May provide functional d ire ctio n to lo w e r le v e l p ro g ra m m e rs who are

C lass A. W orks independently o r under only g en era l d irection an com p lex p rob lem s involving
all phases o f system analysis. P roblem s are co m p le x b eca u se of d iv e r s e s o u r c e s o f input data and
m u ltip le -u se requirem ents of output data. (F o r exam ple, develops an integrated production scheduling,
inventory co n tro l, c o s t analysis, and sales analysis r e c o r d in w hich ev ery item o f each type is
autom atically p r o c e s s e d through the full system o f r e c o r d s and ap p ropriate follow up action s are initiated
by the com p u ter.) C on fers with person s co n ce rn e d to d eterm ine the data p r o c e s s in g p ro b le m s and
advises su bject-m atter person n el on the im p lica tion s o f new o r r e v is e d system s o f data p r o c e s s in g
operation s. Makes recom m endations, if needed, fo r approval o f m a jo r system s installations o r changes
and fo r obtaining equipment.
M ay provide functional direction to lo w e r le v e l system s analysts who are a ssign ed to assist.
C lass B . W orks independently o r Under only gen era l d irection on p roblem s that are rela tively
uncom plicated to analyze, plan, p ro gra m , and op era te. P ro b le m s are of lim ited com p lex ity becau se
s o u rce s of input data are hom ogeneous and the output data are c lo s e ly related . (F o r exam ple, develops
system s fo r maintaining depositor accounts in a bank, m aintaining accounts re ce iv a b le in a retail
establishm ent, o r m aintaining inventory accounts in a m anufacturing o r w holesale establish m en t.)
C on fers with person s con cern ed to determ ine the data p r o c e s s in g p ro b le m s and a dvises s u b je c tm atter personnel on the im p lication s o f the data p r o c e s s in g sy stem s to be applied.
OR
W orks pn a segm ent of a com plex data p r o c e s s in g sch em e o r s y s tem , as d e s c r ib e d fo r c la s s A.
W orks independently on routine assignm ents and r e c e iv e s in stru ction and guidance on com p lex
assignm ents. W ork is review ed fo r a ccu racy o f judgm ent, com p lia n ce with in stru ction s, and to insure
p ro p e r alignment with the o v e ra ll system .
C lass C . W orks under im m ediate su p erv ision , c a rry in g out ana lyses as assign ed , usually
of a single activity. Assignm ents are designed to develop and expand p r a c tic a l ex p e r ie n c e in the
application of p roced u res and sk ills requ ired fo r system s analysis w ork . F o r exam ple, m ay a ssist a
higher le v e l system s analyst by preparing the d etailed s p e cifica tio n s req u ired by p r o g r a m m e r s fro m
inform ation developed by the higher le v e l analyst.

assigned to a ssist.

C lass B . W orks independently o r under only general dire ctio n on rela tively sim p le p ro g r a m s ,
o r on sim ple segm ents o f com p le x p ro g ra m s . P ro g ra m s (o r segm ents) usually p r o c e s s inform ation to
produce data in two or three v a rie d sequ en ces o r fo rm a ts. R ep orts and listin gs are p roduced by
refining, adapting, arrayin g, o r m aking m in o r additions to o r deletions fro m input data w hich are
readily available. W hile num erous r e c o r d s m ay be p r o c e s s e d , the data have been refin ed in p r io r
actions so that the a c c u r a c y and sequencing of data can be te ste d by using a few routine ch eck s.
T yp ica lly, the p rogra m deals with routine r e c o rd -k e e p in g type operations.
OR
W orks on com p lex p ro g ra m s (as d e s c r ib e d fo r c la s s A ) under c lo s e dire ctio n o f a higher
le v e l p rogra m m er o r su p e r v is o r . M ay a s s is t higher le v e l p ro g ra m m e r by independently p erform in g
le s s difficult tasks assign ed, and p e rfo rm in g m o re d ifficu lt tasks under fa ir ly c lo s e d irection .
May guide o r instru ct low er le v e l p ro g ra m m e rs.
C lass C. M akes p r a c tic a l applications o f program m in g p r a c tic e s and con cep ts usually learned
in form a l training c o u r s e s . A ssignm ents are designed to develop com peten ce in the application of
standard p roced u res to routine p ro b le m s . R e c e iv e s c lo s e su pervision on hew aspects o f assignm ents;
and w ork is review ed to v e r ify its a ccu ra cy and con form a n ce with requ ired p ro c e d u r e s .
COMPUTER SYSTEMS AN A LYST, BUSINESS
Analyzes b u sin ess p ro b le m s to form u late p ro ce d u re s fo r solving them by use o f e le ctr o n ic
data processin g equipm ent. D evelops a com p lete d escrip tion o f all spe cifica tio n s needed to enable
p rogra m m ers to prep a re requ ired digital com pu ter p r o g r a m s . W ork in volves m o st of the fo llo w in g:
Analyzes su b ject-m a tter operations to be autom ated and id en tifies conditions and c r it e r ia requ ired to
achieve sa tisfa ctory r esu lts; s p e c ifie s num ber and types o f r e c o r d s , file s , and docum ents to be used;
outlines actions to be p e r fo rm e d by pe rso n n e l and com puters in sufficient detail fo r presentation to
management and fo r program m in g (typically this in volves preparation of w ork and data flow ch a rts);
coordin ates the developm ent o f test p ro b le m s and participates in t r ia l runs o f new and re v ise d system s;
and reepm m ends equipm ent changes to obtain m o re e ffe ctiv e o v e r a ll operation s. (NOTE: W ork ers
p erform ing both system s analysis and program m in g should be c la s s ifie d as system s analysts if this is
the skill used to determ ine th eir p a y.)
Does not include em p loyees p r im a rily resp o n sib le fo r the m anagem ent o r su pervision of other
electron ic data p r o c e s s in g e m p lo y e e s , o r syste m s analysts p rim a rily c o n ce rn e d with s cie n tific or
engineering p rob lem s.




F o r wage study p u rp o se s, system s analysts are c la s s ifie d as follow s:

D RAFTE R
Class' A. Plans the graphic presentation o f com p lex item s having distin ctive design features
that d iffe r significantly fro m established drafting p reced en ts. W orks in c lo s e support w ith the design
o rig in a to r, and m ay recom m end minor, design ch anges. A n alyzes the e ffe c t o f ea ch change on the
details o f fo rm , function, and positional rela tion sh ips of com ponents and p a rts . W orks with a
m inim um o f su pervisory assista n ce. C om pleted w ork is review ed by design o rig in a tor fo r con sisten cy
with p r io r engineering determ inations. May eith er p rep a re draw in gs, o r d ir e ct th eir preparation by
low er le v e l drafters.
C lass B . P e rfo rm s nonroutine and co m p le x drafting assignm ents that requ ire the application
of m o st o f the standardized drawing techniques reg u la rly used. D uties ty p ica lly in volve such w ork as:
P re p a re s working draw ings of subassem blies with irr e g u la r sh ap es, m ultiple fu n ction s, and p r e c is e
p osition a l relationships between com ponents; p r e p a r e s a rch itectu ra l draw ings fo r con stru ction o f a
building including detail drawings of foundations, w all s e c tio n s , flo o r plans, and r o of. U ses accep ted
form u las and manuals in making n e c e s s a r y com putation s to determ in e quantities of m a teria ls to be
used, load cap acities, strengths, s t r e s s e s , e tc. R e c e iv e s in itia l in stru ction s, req u irem en ts, and
advice fr o m su p e rviso r. C om pleted w ork is ch eck ed fo r te c h n ica l adequacy.
C lass C . P re p a re s detail drawings o f single units o r p arts fo r en gin eerin g, c on stru ction ,
m anufacturing, o r rep air pu rp oses. T yp es of draw ings p re p a re d include is o m e t r ic p ro je ctio n s
(depicting three dim ensions in accurate s c a le ) and s ection a l view s to c la r ify positioning of com ponents
and con vey needed inform ation. C on solidates details fro m a n u m ber of s o u r c e s and adjusts or
tra n sp o se s scale as required. Suggested m ethods o f app roach , app licable p re ce d e n ts , and advice on
so u rce m aterials are given with initial assignm ents. In stru ction s are le s s com p lete when assignm ents
r e c u r . W ork m ay be sp o t-ch e ck e d during p r o g r e s s .
D R A F T E R -T R A C E R
Copies plans and draw ings p rep ared by others by placin g tra cin g cloth or paper o v e r draw ings
and tra cin g with pen o r pe n cil. (Does not in clu d e tr a c in g lim ite d to plans p r im a rily con sistin g of
straight lin es and a large sca le not requiring c lo s e delin eation .)
A N D /O R
P re p a re s sim ple o r repetitive draw ings o f e a s ily v is u a liz e d ite m s .
during p r o g r e s s .

W ork is c lo s e ly su p ervised

W o r k s on
c o m b in a t io n o f the
c o n s t r u c t i n g , and
p r i n c i p l e s , a b ility

v a r io u s ty p e s o f e l e c t r o n i c eq u ip m en t and r e la t e d d e v ic e s b y p e r fo r m i n g one o r a
fo l lo w i n g : I n s t a llin g , m a in ta in in g , r e p a ir in g , o v e r h a u lin g , t r o u b le s h o o t in g , m o d ify in g ,
t e s t in g .
W o r k r e q u i r e s p r a c t i c a l a p p lic a tio n o f t e c h n ic a l k n o w le d g e o f e le c t r o n i c s
t o d e t e r m in e m a lfu n c t io n s , and s k ill t o put eq u ip m en t in r e q u ir e d o p e r a t in g co n d it io n .

C la s s B . A p p lie s c o m p r e h e n s iv e t e c h n i c a l k n o w le d g e to s o lv e c o m p le x p r o b le m s ( i . e ., t h o se
t h a t . t y p ic a lly ca n b e s o lv e d s o l e ly b y p r o p e r ly in t e r p r e t in g m a n u fa c t u r e r s ' m a n u als o r s im ila r
d o c u m e n t s ) in w o r k in g on e le c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t. W o rk in v o l v e s : A f a m il ia r i t y with the in t e r r e la t io n ­
s h ip s o f c i r c u i t s ; and ju d g m e n t in d e te r m in in g w o r k s e q u e n c e and in s e le c t in g t o o ls and te stin g
in s t r u m e n t s , u s u a lly l e s s c o m p le x than t h o s e u s e d b y th e c l a s s A t e c h n ic ia n .

T h e eq u ip m en t— c o n s is t i n g o f e it h e r m a n y d iffe r e n t k in d s o f c ir c u it s o r m u lt ip le r e p e t it io n o f
th e s a m e kin d o f c i r c u i t — in c lu d e s , but is n ot lim it e d t o , the fo llo w in g :
(a ) E l e c t r o n i c tr a n s m it t in g
and r e c e iv in g e q u ip m e n t ( e . g . , r a d a r , r a d i o , t e le v i s io n , te le p h o n e , s o n a r , n a v ig a t io n a l a id s ), (b)
d ig it a l and a n a log c o m p u t e r s , and ( c ) in d u s t r ia l and m e d i c a l m e a s u r in g and c o n t r o ll in g e q u ip m e n t.

R e c e iv e s t e c h n i c a l g u id a n c e , as r e q u i r e d , f r o m s u p e r v is o r o r h ig h e r le v e l t e c h n ic ia n , and
w o r k i s r e v i e w e d f o r s p e c i f i c c o m p lia n c e w ith a c c e p t e d p r a c t i c e s and w o r k a s s ig n m e n ts . M ay p r o v id e
t e c h n i c a l g u id a n c e t o lo w e r le v e l t e c h n ic ia n s .

T h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n e x c l u d e s r e p a i r e r s o f su c h sta n d a rd e le c t r o n i c eq u ip m en t as c o m m o n o f f i c e
m a c h in e s and h o u s e h o ld r a d io and t e le v i s io n s e t s ; p r o d u c tio n a s s e m b le r s and t e s t e r s ; w o r k e r s w h o s e
p r im a r y duty is s e r v i c i n g e l e c t r o n i c t e s t in s t r u m e n t s ; te c h n ic ia n s who h a ve a d m in is t r a t iv e o r
s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s i b il it y ; and d r a f t e r s , d e s ig n e r s , and p r o fe s s io n a l e n g in e e r s .

G la s s C . A p p lie s w o rk in g t e c h n i c a l k n o w le d g e t o p e r f o r m s im p le o r rou tin e t a sk s in w ork in g
on e l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t, fo llo w in g d e t a ile d in s t r u c t io n s w h ic h c o v e r v ir t u a lly a ll p r o c e d u r e s .
W ork
t y p ic a lly in v o lv e s s u c h t a s k s a s: A s s is t in g h ig h e r le v e l t e c h n ic ia n s b y p e r fo r m in g su ch a c t iv it ie s as
r e p la c in g c o m p o n e n t s , w ir in g c i r c u i t s , and ta k in g t e s t r e a d in g s ; r e p a ir in g s im p le e le c t r o n i c eq u ip m en t;
and u sin g t o o ls and c o m m o n t e s t in s t r u m e n t s ( e . g . , m u lt i m e t e r s , a udio s ig n a l g e n e r a t o r s , tub e t e s t e r s ,
o s c i l l o s c o p e s ) . Is not r e q u ir e d t o b e fa m il ia r w ith th e in t e r r e la t io n s h ip s o f c i r c u it s . T h is k n o w le d g e ,
h o w e v e r , m a y b e a c q u ir e d th ro u g h a s s ig n m e n t s d e s ig n e d t o i n c r e a s e c o m p e t e n c e (in clu d in g c l a s s r o o m
t r a in in g ) s o that w o r k e r ca n a d v a n ce t o h ig h e r le v e l t e c h n ic ia n .

P o s it i o n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d in to l e v e l s

on the b a s is o f the fo llo w in g d e fin it io n s .

G la s s A .
A p p lie s a d v a n c e d t e c h n i c a l k n ow led g e t o s o lv e unu su ally c o m p le x p r o b l e m s ( i . e . ,
t h o s e that t y p i c a ll y ca n n o t b e s o l v e d s o l e l y b y
r e f e r e n c e t o m a n u fa c t u r e r s 1 m a n u a ls o r s i m il a r
d o c u m e n t s ) in w o rk in g on e l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t.
E x a m p le s o f su c h p r o b le m s in c lu d e lo c a t io n and
d e n s it y o f c i r c u i t r y , e l e c t r o - m a g n e t i c r a d ia tio n , is o la t in g m a lfu n c t io n s , and fr e q u e n t e n g in e e r in g
ch a n g es.
W ork in v o lv e s :
A d e t a ile d u n d e rsta n d in g o f the in te r r e la t io n s h ip s o f c i r c u i t s ; e x e r c i s i n g
in d e p e n d e n t ju d g m e n t in p e r fo r m i n g s u c h t a s k s as m a k in g c i r c u it a n a ly s e s , c a lc u la t in g w a v e f o r m s ,
t r a c i n g r e la t io n s h ip s in s ig n a l flo w ; and r e g u la r ly using c o m p le x t e s t in s tru m e n ts ( e . g . , du al t r a c e
o s c i l l o s c o p e s , Q - m e t e r s , d e v ia t io n m e t e r s , p u ls e g e n e r a t o r s ) .
W ork m ay be re v ie w e d b y
c o m p li a n c e w ith a c c e p t e d p r a c t i c e s .

s u p e r v is o r (fre q u e n tly an e n g in e e r o r d e s ig n e r ) fo r g e n e r a l
M a y p r o v id e t e c h n ic a l g u id a n c e to lo w e r le v e l t e c h n ic ia n s .

R e c e iv e s t e c h n ic a l g u id a n c e , as r e q u ir e d , f r o m s u p e r v is o r o r h ig h e r le v e l te c h n ic ia n . W ork
is t y p i c a ll y sp o t c h e c k e d , but is g iv e n d e t a ile d r e y ie w w hen n ew o r a d v a n c e d a s s ig n m e n ts a re in v o lv e d .
N U R SE , IN D U S T R IA L ( R e g i s t e r e d )
A r e g i s t e r e d n u r s e w h o g iv e s n u r s in g s e r v i c e u n d e r g e n e r a l m e d i c a l d ir e c t io n t o il l o r in ju r e d
e m p lo y e e s o r o t h e r p e r s o n s w h o b e c o m e i l l o r s u f fe r an a c c id e n t on th e p r e m is e s o f a fa c t o r y o r
o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t .
D u ties in v o lv e a c o m b in a t io n o f th e fo l lo w i n g : G iv in g f i r s t aid t o the i l l o r
in ju r e d ; atten din g t o su b se q u e n t d r e s s in g o f e m p l o y e e s ' i n ju r ie s ; k e e p in g r e c o r d s o f p a tien ts t r e a t e d ;
p r e p a r in g a c c id e n t r e p o r t s f o r c o m p e n s a t io n o r o t h e r p u r p o s e s ; a s s is t in g in p h y s ic a l e x a m in a tio n s and
h ea lth e v a lu a tio n s o f a p p lic a n ts and e m p l o y e e s ; and p la n n in g and c a r r y i n g out p r o g r a m s in v o lv in g health
e d u c a tio n , a c c id e n t p r e v e n t io n , e v a lu a tio n o f pla n t e n v ir o n m e n t , o r o t h e r a c t iv it ie s a ffe c tin g the h ea lth ,
w e lf a r e , and s a fe t y o f a ll p e r s o n n e l. N u rsin g s u p e r v is o r s o r h ea d n u r s e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s e m p lo y in g
m o r e than on e n u r s e a re e x c lu d e d .

M AINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
B O IL E R T E N D E R

H E L P E R , M A IN T E N A N C E T R A D E S

F i r e s s t a t io n a r y b o i l e r s t o fu r n is h th e e s t a b lis h m e n t in w h ic h e m p lo y e d w ith h e a t, p o w e r ,
o r stea m .
F e e d s fu e ls t o f i r e b y h a n d o r o p e r a t e s a m e c h a n ic a l s t o k e r , g a s , o r o il b u r n e r ; and
c h e c k s w a t e r and s a fe t y v a l v e s .
M a y c l e a n , o i l , o r a s s is t in r e p a irin g b o i l e r r o o m e q u ip m e n t.

'A s s i s t s one o r m o r e w o r k e r s in the s k ille d m a in te n a n ce t r a d e s , b y p e r fo r m in g s p e c i f i c o r
g e n e r a l d u tie s o f l e s s e r s k ill, s u c h as k e e p in g a w o r k e r su p p lie d w ith m a t e r ia ls and t o o ls ; cle a n in g
w o rk in g a r e a , m a c h in e , and e q u ip m e n t; a s s is t in g jo u r n e y m a n b y h o ld in g m a t e r ia ls o r t o o l s ; and
p e r fo r m i n g o t h e r u n s k ille d t a s k s as d i r e c t e d b y jo u r n e y m a n . T h e k in d o f w o r k the h e lp e r is p e r m it t e d
t o p e r f o r m v a r ie s f r o m t r a d e t o t r a d e :
In s o m e t r a d e s th e h e lp e r i s c o n f in e d to su p p ly in g , lift in g ,
and h o ld in g m a t e r ia ls and t o o l s , and c le a n in g w o rk in g a r e a s ; and in. o t h e r s he is p e r m it t e d t o p e r fo r m
s p e c i a l iz e d m a c h in e o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t s o f a t r a d e that a r e a ls o p e r fo r m e d by w o r k e r s on a
f u l l- t im e b a s is .

C A R P E N T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
P e r f o r m s th e c a r p e n t r y d u tie s n e c e s s a r y t o c o n s t r u c t and m a in ta in in g o o d r e p a i r b u ild in g
w o o d w o r k and e q u ip m e n t s u c h as b in s , c r i b s , c o u n t e r s , b e n c h e s , p a r t it io n s , d o o r s , f l o o r s , s t a ir s ,
c a s i n g s , and t r i m m a d e o f w o o d in an e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the f o l lo w i n g : P la n n in g
and la y in g out o f w o r k f r o m b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , m o d e l s , o r v e r b a l in s t r u c t io n s ; u sin g a v a r ie t y o f
c a r p e n t e r 's h a n d t o o ls , p o r t a b le p o w e r t o o l s , and sta n d a rd m e a s u r in g in s t r u m e n t s ; m a k in g sta n d a rd
s h o p c o m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g t o d i m e n s io n s o f w o r k ; and s e le c t in g m a t e r ia ls n e c e s s a r y f o r the w o r k . In
g e n e r a l, th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e c a r p e n t e r r e q u ir e s rou n d ed tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly
a c q u ir e d t h ro u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
E L E C T R I C I A N , M A IN T E N A N C E
P e r f o r m s a v a r ie t y o f e l e c t r i c a l t r a d e fu n c tio n s su ch as th e in s t a lla t io n , m a in t e n a n c e , o r
r e p a i r o f e q u ip m e n t f o r th e g e n e r a t io n , d i s t r ib u t io n , o r u tiliz a tio n o f e l e c t r i c e n e r g y in an e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l lo w i n g : I n s t a llin g o r r e p a ir in g any o f a v a r ie t y o f e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t
s u c h as g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , s w i t c h b o a r d s , c o n t r o l l e r s , c i r c u it b r e a k e r s , m o t o r s , h ea tin g u n its,
co n d u it s y s t e m s , o r o t h e r t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u ip m e n t; w o rk in g f r o m b lu e p r in ts , d r a w in g s , la y o u t s , o r
o t h e r s p e c i f ic a t i o n s ; lo c a t in g and d ia g n o s in g t r o u b le in the e l e c t r i c a l s y s t e m o r e q u ip m e n t; w o rk in g
s t a n d a r d co m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g t o lo a d r e q u ir e m e n t s o f w ir in g o r e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t; and u sin g a
v a r ie t y o f e l e c t r i c i a n 's h a n d t o o ls and m e a s u r in g and te s tin g in s t r u m e n t s . In g e n e r a l, th e w o r k o f the
m a in t e n a n c e e l e c t r i c i a n r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th ro u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
E N G IN E E R , S T A T IO N A R Y
O p e r a t e s and m a in t a in s and m a y a ls o s u p e r v is e the o p e r a t io n o f s t a t io n a r y e n g in e s and
e q u ip m e n t (m e c h a n ic a l o r e l e c t r i c a l ) t o su p p ly the e s t a b lis h m e n t in w h ic h e m p lo y e d w ith p o w e r , h e a t,
r e f r i g e r a t i o n , o r a i r - c o n d it i o n in g .
W o r k in v o l v e s :
O p e r a tin g and m a in ta in in g e q u ip m e n t s u c h as
s t e a m e n g in e s , a ir c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o t o r s , t u r b in e s , v e n tila tin g and r e f r i g e r a t i n g e q u ip m e n t,
s t e a m b o i l e r s and b o i l e r - f e d w a t e r p u m p s ; m a k in g eq u ip m en t r e p a i r s ; and k eep in g a r e c o r d o f o p e r a t io n
o f m a c h in e r y , t e m p e r a t u r e , and fu e l c o n s u m p t io n .
M a y a ls o s u p e r v is e t h e s e o p e r a t io n s .
H ea d o r
c h i e f e n g in e e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s e m p lo y in g m o r e than one e n g in e e r a r e e x clu d e d .




M A C H I N E -T O O L O P E R A T O R , T O O L R O O M
S p e c ia li z e s in o p e r a t in g on e o r m o r e than one t y p e o f m a c h in e t o o l ( e . g . , j i g b o r e r , g rin d in g
m a c h in e , e n g in e la t h e , m illin g m a c h in e ) t o m a c h in e m e t a l fo r u se in m a k in g o r m a in ta in in g j i g s ,
fi x t u r e s , cu ttin g t o o l s , g a u g e s , o r m e t a l d ie s o r m o ld s u s e d in sh a p in g o r fo r m in g m e t a l o r n o n m e t a llic
m a t e r ia l ( e . g . , p l a s t ic , p l a s t e r , r u b b e r , g la s s ) . W o rk t y p ic a lly i n v o l v e s : P la n n in g and p e r fo r m in g
d iff ic u lt m a c h in in g o p e r a t io n s w h ic h r e q u ir e c o m p li c a t e d se tu p s o r a h igh d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ; settin g
up m a c h in e t o o l o r t o o ls ( e . g . , in s t a ll cu ttin g t o o ls and a d ju st g u id e s , s t o p s , w o rk in g t a b le s , and o th e r
c o n t r o ls t o h a n dle th e s iz e o f s t o c k t o b e m a c h in e d ; d e t e r m in e p r o p e r f e e d s , s p e e d s , t o o lin g , and
o p e r a t io n s e q u e n c e o r s e l e c t t h o s e p r e s c r i b e d in d r a w in g s , b lu e p r in t s , o r la y o u t s ); usin g a v a r ie t y of
p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g in s t r u m e n t s ; m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s tm e n ts d u rin g m a ch in in g o p e r a tio n t o a ch ie v e
r e q u is it e d im e n s io n s t o v e r y c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s . M a y b e r e q u ir e d t o s e l e c t p r o p e r c o o la n ts and cutting
and lu b r ic a t in g o i l s , t o r e c o g n iz e w hen t o o ls n e e d d r e s s i n g , and t o d r e s s t o o l s . In g e n e r a l, the w o rk
o f a m a c h in e - t o o l o p e r a t o r , t o o l r o o m , at th e s k il l le v e l c a ll e d fo r in th is c l a s s i fic a t i o n r e q u ir e s
e x t e n s iv e k n o w le d g e o f m a c h in e -s h o p and t o o l r o o m p r a c t i c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th rou g h c o n s id e r a b le
o n - t h e - jo b tr a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s , t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n d o e s n ot
o p e r a t o r s , t o o l r o o m , e m p lo y e d in t o o l - a n d - d i e jo b b in g s h o p s .

in clu d e m a c h in e -t o o l

M A C H IN IS T , M A IN T E N A N C E
P r o d u c e s r e p la c e m e n t p a r t s and n ew p a r t s in m a k in g r e p a i r s o f m e t a l p a rts o f m e c h a n ic a l
eq u ip m e n t o p e r a t e d in an e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o rk i n v o l v e s m o s t o f the f o l lo w i n g : in te r p r e t in g w ritte n
in s t r u c t io n s and s p e c i f ic a t i o n s ; p la n n in g and la y in g out o f w o r k ; u sin g a v a r ie t y o f m a c h in is t 's h a n d tools
and p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g in s t r u m e n t s ; se ttin g up and o p e r a t in g s ta n d a rd m a c h in e t o o ls ; shaping o f m e ta l

p a rts to c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ; m a k in g s t a n d a r d sh o p c o m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g t o d im e n s io n s o f w o r k , t o o li n g ,
fe e d s , and s p e e d s o f m a c h in in g ; k n o w le d g e o f th e w o r k in g p r o p e r t ie s o f th e c o m m o n m e t a l s ; s e le c t in g
sta n d a rd m a t e r ia ls , p a r t s , and e q u ip m e n t r e q u i r e d f o r t h is w o r k ; and fittin g and a s s e m b lin g p a r t s in to
m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t.
In g e n e r a l, th e m a c h in is t 's w o r k n o r m a lly r e q u i r e s a ro u n d e d t r a in in g in
m a c h in e -s h o p p r a c t ic e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th ro u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tra in in g
and e x p e r ie n c e .

P a in ts and r e d e c o r a t e s w a lls , w o o d w o r k , and fi x t u r e s o f an e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k in v o lv e s th e
fo l lo w i n g : K n ow led ge o f s u r fa c e p e c u li a r it i e s and ty p e s o f pa in t r e q u i r e d f o r d iff e r e n t a p p lic a t io n s ;
p r e p a r in g s u r fa c e f o r pa in tin g b y r e m o v in g o ld fin is h o r b y p la c in g pu tty o r f i l l e r in n a il h o le s and
i n t e r s t i c e s ; and a pply in g paint w ith s p r a y gun o r b r u s h . M a y m ix c o l o r s , o i l s , w h ite le a d , and o th e r
p a in t in g r e d ie n ts t o ob ta in p r o p e r c o l o r o r c o n s is t e n c y .
In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f th e m a in te n a n ce
p a in t e r r e q u ir e s rou n d ed tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h ro u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r
e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

M E C H A N IC , A U T O M O T IV E (M a in te n a n c e )
P I P E F I T T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
R e p a ir s a u t o m o b ile s , b u s e s , m o t o r t r u c k s , and t r a c t o r s o f an e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o r k in v o lv e s
m o s t o f the fo l lo w i n g : E x a m in in g a u to m o tiv e eq u ip m e n t t o d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b le ; d is a s s e m b lin g
eq u ip m en t and p e r fo r m i n g r e p a i r s that in v o lv e th e u s e o f s u c h h a n d to o ls as w r e n c h e s , g a u g e s , d r i l l s ,
o r s p e c i a l iz e d e q u ip m e n t in d i s a s s e m b li n g or. fittin g p a r t s ; r e p la c in g b r o k e n ojr d e f e c t iv e p a r t s f r o m
s t o c k ; g rin d in g and a d ju stin g v a l v e s ; r e a s s e m b l in g and in s t a llin g th e v a r io u s a s s e m b li e s iif th e v e h ic le
and m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s ; and a lig n in g w h e e ls , a d ju stin g b r a k e s and lig h t s , o r tig h te n in g b o d y
b o lt s . In g e n e r a l, th e w o r k o f th e a u to m o tiv e m e c h a n ic r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly
a c q u ir e d th ro u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tr a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

T h is c l a s s i f ic a t i o n d o e s n ot in clu d e m e c h a n i c s w h o r e p a ir c u s t o m e r s ' v e h ic le s in a u to m o b ile
r e p a i r sh op s.

M E C H A N IC , M A IN T E N A N C E
R e p a ir s m a c h in e r y o r m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t o f an e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o rk in v o lv e s m o s t o f th e
fo llo w in g :
E x a m in in g m a c h in e s and m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t t o d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b le ; d ism a n tlin g
o r p a rtly d is m a n tlin g m a c h in e s and p e r fo r m i n g r e p a i r s that m a in ly in v o lv e the u s e o f h a n d to o ls in
s c r a p in g and fittin g p a r t s ; r e p la c in g b r o k e n o r d e f e c t iv e p a r t s w ith it e m s o b ta in e d f r o m s t o c k ; o r d e r in g
the p r o d u c tio n o f a r e p la c e m e n t p a r t b y a m a ch in e sh o p o r sen d in g o f th e m a ch in e t o a m a c h in e sh op
f o r m a jo r r e p a i r s ; p r e p a r in g w r itte n s p e c i fic a t i o n s f o r m a jo r r e p a i r s o r f o r th e p r o d u c t io n o f p a r t s
o r d e r e d f r o m m a ch in e s h o p s ; r e a s s e m b l in g m a c h in e s ; and m a k in g a ll n e c e s s a r y a d ju s tm e n ts fo r
o p e r a tio n . In g e n e r a l, th e w o r k o f a m a in te n a n ce m e c h a n ic r e q u ir e s ro u n d e d tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e
u su a lly a c q u ir e d th ro u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e . E x c lu d e d f r o m
th is c l a s s i fic a t i o n a r e w o r k e r s w h o « e p r im a r y d u tie s in v o lv e se ttin g up o r a d ju stin g m a c h in e s .

M IL L W R IG H T
I n s t a lls n ew m a c h in e s o r h e a v y e q u ip m e n t, and d is m a n t le s and in s t a lls m a c h in e s o r h e a v y
eq u ip m en t w hen ch a n g e s in th e pla n t la y ou t a r e r e q u ir e d .
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f th e fo l lo w i n g :
P lannin g and la y ip g out o f th e w o r k ; in te r p r e t in g b lu e p r in ts o r o t h e r s p e c i f ic a t i o n s ; u sin g a v a r ie t y o f
h a n d tools and r ig g in g ; m a k in g sta n d a rd sh o p c o m p u ta tio n s r e la t in g t o s t r e s s e s , s tr e n g th o f m a t e r ia ls ,
and c e n t e r s o f g r a v it y ; a lig n in g and- b a la n c in g o f e q u ip m e n t; s e le c t in g st a n d a r d t o o l s , e q u ip m e n t, and
p a rts to b e used;^ and in s t a llin g and m a in ta in in g in g o o d o r d e r p o w e r t r a n s m i s s i o n eq u ip m e n t su c h as
d r iv e s and s p e e d r e d u c e r s . In g e n e r a l, th e m il lw r ig h t 's w o r k n o r m a lly r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d t r a in in g and
e x p e r ie n c e in th e t r a d e a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

I n sta lls o r r e p a ir s w a t e r , s t e a m , g a s , o r o t h e r t y p e s o f p ip e and p i p e fit t in g s in an e s t a b l is h ­
m e n t.
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo l lo w i n g : L a y in g out o f w o r k and m e a s u r in g t o lo c a t e p o s it io n o f
p ip e f r o m d raw in gs o r o th e r w ritte n s p e c i f ic a t i o n s ; cu ttin g v a r io u s s i z e s o f p ip e t o c o r r e c t le n g th s
w ith c h i s e l and h a m m e r o r o x y a c e t y le n e t o r c h o r p ip e - c u t t in g m a c h in e s ; th re a d in g p ip e w ith s t o c k s and
d i e s ; b en d in g p ip e b y h a n d -d r iv e n o r •p o w e r - d r iv e n m a c h in e s ; a s s e m b lin g p ip e w ith c o u p lin g s and
fa s te n in g p ip e t o h a n g e r s ; m a k in g sta n d a rd sh o p c o m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g t o p r e s s u r e s , flo w , and s i z e o f
p ip e r e q u ir e d ; and m a k in g sta n d a rd t e s t s t o d e t e r m in e w h e t h e r fin is h e d p ip e s m e e t s p e c i f ic a t i o n s . In
g e n e r a l, th e w o r k o f the m a in te n a n ce p i p e f it t e r r e q u i r e s ro u n d e d tr a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly
a c q u ir e d th rou g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
W o r k e r s p r im a r i ly
e n g a g e d in in sta llin g and r e p a ir in g b u ild in g s a n ita tio n o r h e a tin g s y s t e m s a r e e x c l u d e d .
S H E E T -M E T A L W O R K E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
F a b r i c a t e s , in s t a l ls , and m a in ta in s in g o o d r e p a i r th e s h e e t - m e t a l e q u ip m e n t and fix t u r e s (s u ch
as m a c h in e g u a r d s , g r e a s e p a n s , s h e lv e s , l o c k e r s , t a n k s , v e n t il a t o r s , c h u te s , d u c t s , m e t a l r o o f in g )
o f an e s ta b lis h m e n t. W o rk in v o lv e s m o s t o f th e fo l lo w i n g : P la n n in g and la y in g out a ll t y p e s o f s h e e t m e t a l m a in te n a n ce w o r k f r o m b lu e p r in ts , m o d e l s , o r o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; se ttin g up and o p e r a t in g a ll
a v a ila b le ty p e s o f s h e e t - m e t a l w o rk in g m a c h in e s ; u sin g a v a r ie t y o f h a n d to o ls in cu t t in g , b e n d in g ,
f o r m in g , sh a pin g , fittin g , and a s s e m b lin g ; and in s t a llin g s h e e t - m e t a l a r t ic le s as r e q u i r e d . In g e n e r a l,
th e w o r k o f the m a in te n a n ce s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly
a c q u ir e d th rou g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g anci e x p e r ie n c e .
T O O L AN D DIE M A K E R
C o n s tru cts and r e p a i r s j i g s , fi x t u r e s , cu ttin g t o o l s , g a u g e s , o r m e t a l d ie s o r m o ld s u s e d in
sh a p in g o r fo r m in g m e t a l o r n o n -m e t a ll ic m a t e r ia l ( e . g . , p l a s t i c , p l a s t e r , r u b b e r , g la s s ) .
W ork
t y p i c a ll y in v o l v e s : P la n n in g and la y in g out w o r k a c c o r d i n g t o m o d e l s , b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , o r o t h e r
w r it te n o r o r a l s p e c i fic a t i o n s ; u n d ersta n d in g th e w o r k in g p r o p e r t i e s o f c o m m o n m e t a ls and a ll o y s ;
s e le c t in g a p p r o p r ia te m a t e r ia ls , t o o l s , and p r o c e s s e s r e q u i r e d t o c o m p le t e t a s k ; m a k in g n e c e s s a r y
'sh op co m p u ta tio n ; settin g up and o p e r a tin g v a r io u s m a c h in e t o o l s and r e la t e d e q u ip m e n t; u sin g v a r io u s
t o o l and d ie m a k e r 's h a n d to o ls and p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g in s t r u m e n t s ; w o r k in g t o v e r y c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ;
h e a t -t r e a t in g m e t a l p a rts and fin is h e d t o o l s and d ie s t o a c h ie v e r e q u i r e d q u a lit ie s ; fittin g and
a s s e m b lin g p a rts t o p r e s c r i b e d t o le r a n c e s and a llo w a n c e s .
In g e n e r a l, t o o l and d ie m a k e r 's w o r k
r e q u i r e s rou n d ed tra in in g in m a c h in e -s h o p and t o o l r o o m p r a c t i c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h f o r m a l
a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r eq u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w ag e study p u r p o s e s , th is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n d o e s n ot in c lu d e t o o l and d ie
m a k e r s w h o (1) a re e m p lo y e d in t o o l and d ie jo b b in g s h o p s o r (2 ) p r o d u c e f o r g i n g d i e s (d ie s in k e r s ).

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL M OVEMENT
G U A R D AN D W A T C H M E N

L A B O R E R , M A T E R IA L H A N D LIN G

G u ard.
P e r f o r m s r o u tin e p o l i c e d u tie s , e it h e r at fix e d p o s t o r on t o u r , m a in ta in in g o r d e r ,
usin g, a r m s o r f o r c e w h e r e n e c e s s a r y .
In c lu d e s g u a r d s w ho a r e sta tio n e d at g a te a n d c h e c k on
id en tity o f e m p lo y e e s and o t h e r p e r s o n s e n t e r in g .

A w o r k e r e m p lo y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c t u r in g p la n t, s t o r e , o r o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t w h o s e
d u tie s in v o lv e one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g : L o a d in g and u n lo a d in g v a r io u s m a t e r ia ls and m e r c h a n d is e
on o r f r o m fr e ig h t c a r s , t r u c k s , o r o t h e r t r a n s p o r t in g d e v i c e s ; u n p a ck in g , s h e lv in g , o r p la c in g
m a t e r ia ls o r m e r c h a n d is e in p r o p e r s t o r a g e l o c a t i o n ; and t r a n s p o r t in g m a t e r ia ls o r m e r c h a n d is e b y
h a n d tr u ck , c a r , o r w h e e lb a r r o w . L o n g s h o r e w o r k e r s , w ho lo a d and u n loa d s h ip s a r e e x c l u d e d .

W a tch m a n .
and il le g a l e n tr y .

M a k e s rou n d s o f p r e m is e s p e r io d ic a l ly in p r o t e c t in g p r o p e r t y a g a in st f i r e , th e ft,

J A N IT O R , P O R T E R , O R C L E A N E R

C le a n s and k e e p s in an o r d e r l y c o n d itio n f a c t o r y w o rk in g a r e a s and w a s h r o o m s , o r p r e m is e s
o f an o ffice ', a p a rtm en t h o u s e , o r c o m m e r c i a l o r o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t . D u ties in v o lv e a c o m b in a t io n o f
the fo llo w in g : S w e e p in g , m o p p in g o r s c r u b b in g , and p o lis h in g f l o o r s ; r e m o v in g c h ip s , t r a s h , and o th e r
r e fu s e ; d u stin g e q u ip m e n t, fu r n it u r e , o r f i x t u r e s ; p o lis h in g m e t a l fix t u r e s o r t r i m m in g s ; p r o v id in g
su p p lie s and m in o r m a in te n a n ce s e r v i c e s ; and c le a n in g la v a t o r ie s , s h o w e r s , and r e s t r o o m s . W o r k e r s
w h o s p e c i a l iz e in w in d ow w a s h in g a r e e x c lu d e d .




O R D E R F IL L E R
F il ls sh ipp in g o r t r a n s f e r o r d e r s f o r fin is h e d g o o d s f r o m s t o r e d m e r c h a n d is e in a c c o r d a n c e
w ith s p e c ific a t io n s on s a le s s l ip s , c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s , o r o t h e r in s t r u c t io n s .
M a y , in a d d itio n to
f i ll in g o r d e r s and in d ic a tin g it e m s fi ll e d o r o m it t e d , k e e p r e c o r d s o f o u tg o in g o r d e r s , r e q u is it io n
a d d itio n a l stock o r r e p o r t s h o r t su p p lie s t o s u p e r v i s o r , and p e r f o r m o t h e r r e la t e d d u tie s .
P A C K E R , SH IPPIN G
P r e p a r e s fin is h e d p r o d u c t s f o r sh ip m e n t o r s t o r a g e b y p la c in g t h e m in sh ip p in g c o n t a in e r s ,
th e s p e c i f i c o p e r a t io n s p e r fo r m e d b e in g d ep en d en t upon th e t y p e , s i z e , and n u m b e r o f un its t o b e
p a c k e d , th e type o f c o n t a in e r e m p lo y e d , and m e t h o d o f sh ip m e n t . W o r k r e q u i r e s th e p la c in g o f it e m s
in sh ip p in g co n t a in e r s and m a y in v o lv e on e o r m o r e o f th e fo l lo w i n g : K n o w le d g e o f v a r io u s it e m s o f

s t o c k in o r d e r t o v e r i f y c o n t e n t ; s e l e c t i o n o f a p p r o p r ia t e ty p e and s iz e o f c o n t a in e r ; in s e r t in g
e n c l o s u r e s in c o n t a in e r ; u sin g e x c e l s i o r o r o t h e r m a t e r ia l t o p r e v e n t b re a k a g e o r d a m a g e ; c l o s i n g and
s e a lin g c o n t a in e r ; and a p p ly in g la b e ls o r e n t e r in g id e n tify in g data on co n t a in e r . P a c k e r s w h o a ls o m a k e
w ooden b o x e s o r c r a t e s a re e x clu d e d .

fo l lo w s :

F o r w age

stu d y p u r p o s e s ,

w ork ers

a r e c l a s s i f i e d as fo llo w s :

R e c e iv in g c l e r k
S h ip p in g c l e r k
S h ip p in g and r e c e iv in g c l e r k

T R U C K D R IV E R
D r iv e s a t r u c k w ith in a c it y o r in d u s t r ia l a r e a t o t r a n s p o r t m a t e r ia ls , m e r c h a n d is e , e q u ip m e n t,
o r w o r k e r s b e tw e e n v a r io u s t y p e s o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s su ch a s : M a n u fa ctu rin g p la n tq , fr e ig h t d e p o t s ,
w a r e h o u s e s , w h o le s a le and r e t a il e s t a b l is h m e n t s , o r b e tw e e n r e t a il e s t a b lis h m e n t s and c u s t o m e r s '
h o u s e s o r p l a c e s o f b u s in e s s .
M a y a l s o lo a d o r u n load tr u c k w ith o r w ithout h e l p e r s , m a k e m in o r
m e c h a n i c a l r e p a i r s , and k e e p t r u c k in g o o d w o rk in g o r d e r .
S a le s - r o u t e and o v e r - t h e - r o a d d r i v e r s
a r e e x c lu d e d .




as

T r u c k d r i v e r (c o m b in a t io n o f s i z e s li s t e d s e p a r a t e l y )
T r u c k d r i v e r , lig h t (u n d e r l l/2 t o n s )
T r u c k d r i v e r , m e d iu m (IV 2 t o and in clu d in g 4 t o n s )
T r u c k d r iv e r , h eavy (o v e r 4 to n s , t r a ile r type)
T r u c k d r i v e r , h e a v y ( o v e r 4 t o n s , o t h e r than t r a i l e r t y p e )

S H IP P IN G AN D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K
P r e p a r e s m e r c h a n d is e f o r s h ip m e n t , o r r e c e i v e s and is r e s p o n s ib le f o r in c o m in g s h ip m e n ts
o f m e r c h a n d is e o r o t h e r m a t e r ia ls .
S h ip p in g w o r k i n v o l v e s : A k n ow led g e o f sh ip p in g p r o c e d u r e s ,
p r a c t i c e s , r o u t e s , a v a ila b le m e a n s o f t r a n s p o r t a t io n , and r a t e s ; and p r e p a r in g r e c o r d s o f th e g o o d s
s h ip p e d , m a k in g up b i l l s o f la d in g , p o s t in g w e ig h t and sh ip p in g c h a r g e s , and k e e p in g a fi le o f sh ip p in g
r e c o r d s . M a y d i r e c t o r a s s i s t in p r e p a r in g the m e r c h a n d is e f o r sh ip m en t. R e c e iv in g w o r k i n v o l v e s :
V e r ify i n g o r d ir e c t in g o t h e r s in v e r i fy in g th e c o r r e c t n e s s o f sh ip m e n ts a ga in st b il ls o f la d in g , i n v o i c e s ,
o r o t h e r r e c o r d s ; c h e c k in g f o r s h o r t a g e s and r e je c t in g d a m a g e d g o o d s ; ro u tin g m e r c h a n d is e o r
m a t e r ia ls t o p r o p e r d e p a r t m e n t s ; and m a in ta in in g n e c e s s a r y r e c o r d s and file s .

F o r w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s , t r u c k d r iv e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d b y s i z e and t y p e . o f e q u ip m e n t,
( T r a c t o r - t r a i l e r s h o u ld b e ra t e d on the b a s is o f t r a i l e r c a p a c i t y .)

TRU C K E R, POW ER

goods

O p e r a t e s a m a n u a lly c o n t r o ll e d g a s o li n e - o r e l e c t r i c - p o w e r e d t r u c k o r t r a c t o r t o t r a n s p o r t
and m a t e r ia ls o f a ll k in d s abou t a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa ctu rin g p la n t, o r o th e r e s t a b lis h m e n t .
F o r w age

study p u r p o s e s ,

w ork ers

a r e c l a s s i f i e d b y ty p e o f t r u c k ,

as fo l lo w s :

T r u c k e r , p o w e r (f o r k l if t )
T r u c k e r , p o w e r (o t h e r than f o r k li f t )
W AREH OUSEM AN
A s d i r e c t e d , p e r f o r m s a v a r ie t y o f w a r e h o u s in g d u tie s w h ic h r e q u ir e an u n d ersta n d in g o f
th e e s t a b l is h m e n t 's s t o r a g e p la n . W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo l lo w i n g : V e r ify in g m a t e r ia ls (o r
m e r c h a n d is e ) a g a in st r e c e iv in g d o c u m e n t s , n o tin g and r e p o r t in g d i s c r e p a n c i e s and o b v io u s d a m a g e s ;
ro u tin g m a t e r ia ls t o p r e s c r i b e d s t o r a g e lo c a t i o n s ; s t o r in g , s t a c k in g , o r p a lle t iz in g m a t e r ia ls in
a c c o r d a n c e w ith p r e s c r i b e d s t o r a g e m e t h o d s ; r e a r r a n g in g and ta k in g in v e n t o r y o f s t o r e d m a t e r ia ls ;
e x a m in in g s t o r e d m a t e r ia ls and r e p o r t in g d e t e r io r a t io n and d a m a g e ; r e m o v in g m a t e r ia l fr o m s t o r a g e
and p r e p a r in g it f o r s h ip m e n t. M a y o p e r a t e hand o r p o w e r t r u c k s in p e r fo r m i n g w a r e h o u s in g d u ties.
E x c lu d e w o r k e r s w h o s e p r im a r y d u tie s in v o lv e sh ip p in g and r e c e iv in g w o rk (s e e sh ip p in g and
r e c e iv in g c l e r k and p a c k e r , s h ip p in g ), o r d e r fillin g (s e e o r d e r f i l l e r ) , o r o p e r a t in g p o w e r t r u c k s (s e e
t r u c k e r , p o w e r ).

Available On Request—
T h e fo llo w in g a r e a s a r e s u r v e y e d p e r i o d i c a l l y fo r u s e in a d m in is t e r in g th e S e r v i c e C o n t r a c t A c t o f 1965.
any o f th e B L S r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s sh ow n on the b a c k c o v e r .

A la s k a
A lb a n y , G a.
A lb u q u e r q u e , N. M ex .
A le x a n d r ia , L a.
A lp e n a , S ta n d ish , and T a w a s C it y , M ic h .
Ann A r b o r , M ich .
A s h e v i ll e , N .C .
A tla n tic C it y , N .J.
A u g u s ta , G a.—S .C .
B a k e r s f i e ld , C a lif.
B aton R o u g e , L a.
B a ttle C r e e k , M ich .
B ea u m on t—P o r t A r t h u r -O r a n g e , T e x .
B ilo x i— u lfp o r t and P a s c a g o u la , M i s s .
G
B o i s e C it y , Idaho
B r e m e r t o n , W a sh .
B r id g e p o r t , N o r w a lk , and S t a m fo r d , C on n .
B r u n s w ic k , G a.
B u r lin g t o n , V t.—N .Y .
Cape C od, M ass.
C e d a r R a p id s , Iow a
C h a m p a ig n —U rbana— a n to u l, 111.
R
C h a r le s t o n , S .C .
C h a r lo tte —G a s t o n ia , N .C .
C h e y e n n e , W y o.
C l a r k s v il le —H o p k in s v ille , T en n .—K y .
C o lo r a d o S p r in g s , C o lo .
C o lu m b ia , S .C .
C o lu m b u s , G a.— la .
A
C o lu m b u s , M i s s .
C r a n e , Ind.
D e c a t u r , 111.
D e s M o in e s , Iow a
D oth an , A la .
Duluth—S u p e r io r , M in n .—W is.
E l P a s o , T e x ., and A l a m o g o r d o - L a s C r u c e s , N. M e x .
E u g en e—S p r in g fie ld , O r e g .
F a y e t t e v il le , N .C .
F it c h b u r g —L e o m in s t e r , M a s s .
F o r t S m ith , A r k .—O k la .
F o r t W a yn e, Ind.
F r e d e r i c k — a g e r s t o w n , M d .— h a m b e r s b u r g , P a .—
H
C
M a r t in s b u r g , W . V a .
G a d sd e n and A n n is t o n , A la .
G o ld s b o r o , N .C .
G ra n d Isla n d —H a s tin g s , N e b r.
G r e a t F a l ls , M on t.
G uam , T e r r it o r y o f
H a r r is b u r g —L e b a n o n , P a .
H untington— s h la n d , W. V a .— y .— h io
A
K
O
K n o x v ille , T en n .
L a C r o s s e , W is.
L ared o, T ex.
L a s V e g a s , N ev.
L a w ton , O k la .
L im a , O h io
L it t le R o c k — orth L it t le R o c k , A r k .
N

C o p ie s o f p u b lic r e l e a s e s a r e o r w il l b e a v a ila b le at n o c o s t

w h ile

s u p p lie s la s t

fr o m

L o g a n s p o rt—P e r u , Ind.
L ora in —E l y r ia , O h io
L o w e r E a s t e r n S h o r e , M d.—V a .—D e l.
L y n c h b u rg , V a.
M a co n , G a.
M a d iso n , W is.
M a n s fie ld , O h io
M a rq u e tte , E s c a n a b a , Sault Ste. M a r i e , M ic h .
M c A lle n —P h a r r -E d in b u r g and B r o w n s v i ll e —
H a rlin g en —San B e n ito , T e x .
M e d fo rd — la m a th F a l ls — ra n ts P a s s , O r e g .
K
G
M e r id ia n , M is s .
M id d le s e x , M on m ou th , and O ce a n C o s ., N .J .
M o b ile and P e n s a c o la , A la .—F la .
M o n t g o m e r y , A la .
N a sh v ille —D a v id s o n , T en n .
New B ern—J a c k s o n v ille , N .C .
New L ondon—N o r w ic h , C on n .—R .I .
N orth D a k ota , State o f
O rla n d o , F la .
O xn ard— im i V a lle y —V en tu ra , C a li f.
S
P ana m a C it y , F la .
P a r k e r sb u rg —M a r ie tta , W. V a .— h io
O
P e o r i a , 111.
P h o e n ix , A r iz .
P ine B lu ff, A r k .
P o c a t e llo -I d a h o F a l ls , Idaho
P o r ts m o u th , N .H .—M ain e—M a s s .
P u e b lo , C o lo .
P u e rto R ic o
R e n o , N ev.
R ich la n d — en n ew ick —W alla W alla—
K
P e n d le to n , W ash.—O re g .
R iv e r s id e —San B e r n a r d in o — n t a r io , C a lif.
O
S a lina, K a n s .
S a lin as—S e a sid e —M o n t e r e y , C a lif.
Sandusky, O hio
Santa B a r b a r a —Santa M a ria —L o m p o c , C a lif.
Savannah, G a.
S e lm a , A la .
Sherm a n — e n is o n , T e x .
D
S h r e v e p o r t , L a.
Siou x F a l ls , S. D ak.
S pok an e, W ash.
S p r in g fie ld , 111.
S p r in g fie ld — h ic o p e e —H o ly o k e , M a s s .— on n .
C
C
S tock ton , C a lif.
T a c o m a , W a sh .
T am pa—St. P e t e r s b u r g , F la .
T o p e k a , K an s.
T u c s o n , A r iz .
T u ls a , O k la.
V a lle jo — a i r fi e ld —N apa, C a lif.
F
W a co and K ille e n —T e m p le , T e x .
W a te r lo o — e d a r F a l ls , Iow a
C
W est T e x a s P la in s
W ilm in g ton , D e l.—N .J .—M d.

A n annual r e p o r t on s a la r i e s f o r a c c o u n ta n t s , a u d i t o r s , c h i e f a c c o u n ta n t s , a t t o r n e y s , jo b a n a ly s t s , d i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l , b u y e r s , c h e m i s t s , e n g in e e r s , e n g in e e r in g t e c h n i c i a n s , d r a f t e r s , and
c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s is a v a ila b le .
O r d e r a s B L S B u lle tin 1 83 7, N a tio n a l S u r v e y o f P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d m in is t r a t iv e , T e c h n ic a l, and C l e r i c a l P a y , M a r c h 1 97 4, $ 1 .4 0 a c o p y , f r o m any o f th e B L S r e g i o n a l s a le s
o f f i c e s show n on the b a c k c o v e r , o r fr o m th e S u p e r in te n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s , U .S. G o v e r n m e n t P r in t in g O ffi c e , W a sh in gton , D .C . 2 04 02 .




Area Wage Surveys
A l i s t o f the la t e s t a v a ila b le b u lle t in s o r b u lle tin su p p le m e n ts is p r e s e n t e d b e lo w .
A d i r e c t o r y o f a r e a w a g e s tu d ie s in clu d in g m o r e lim it e d s tu d ie s c o n d u c t e d at the r e q u e s t o f the E m p lo y m e n t
S ta n d a rd s A d m in is t r a t io n o f th e D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r is a v a ila b le on r e q u e s t .
B u lle tin s m a y b e p u r c h a s e d f r o m any o f the B L S r e g io n a l o f f i c e s sh ow n on the b a c k c o v e r .
B u lle tin su p p lem en ts m a y be
o b t a in e d w ith o u t c o s t , w h e r e in d ic a t e d , f r o m B L S r e g io n a l o f f i c e s .

A rea

B u lle tin n u m b er
and p r ic e *

Akron, Ohio, D ec. 1974 ________________ _____________________________________________Suppl.
F re e
Albany—
Schenectady—T ro y , N .Y ., Sept. 1975 1 _________________________________ - -- 1850-63, $1.20
A lbuquerque, N. M ex., M ar. 1974 2 _________________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
Allentown—
Bethlehem —
Easton, Pa.— .J., M ay 1974 2 _________________________________ Suppl.
N
F re e
Anaheim—
Santa A n a-G arden G rov e , C a lif., O ct. 1 974 1 ____ ___________ ____________ 1850-9, 85 cents
Atlanta, G a „ May 19751 _____________________________________________________________ 1850-25, $1.00
Austin, T e x ., D ec. 1974 _____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
B a ltim ore, M d., Aug. 1975 1_________________________________________________________ 1850-62, $1.30
F re e
Beaum onts-Port Arthur— r ange, T e x ., May 1974 2 __________________________________ Suppl.
O
B illin gs, M ont., July 1975_____________________________________________________ —_____ 1850-46, 65 cents
Bingham ton, N . Y P a . , July 1975____________________________________________________ 1850-50, 65 cents
B irm in gham , A la., M ar. 1975____________________ ________________ _________________ __ Suppl.
F ree
B oston, M a s s ., Aug. 1975 1__________________________________________________________ 1850-58, $1.05
B u ffalo, N .Y ., O ct. 1974 _____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
Canton, O hio, M ay 1975 ______ _________________________________ ______________________ Suppl.
F re e
C h arleston , W. V a ., M ar. 1974 2 _________________ __ ____________________ __ _________ Suppl.
F re e
C h arlotte, N .C ., Jan. 1974 2 _________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
Chattanooga, T en n .-G a ., Sept. 1974 _______ _________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
C h icago, 111., M ay 1975 ________________________________ —__________________________ 1850-33, 85 cents
C incinnati, Ohio-K y*—
Ind., F eb . 1975 ___________ ___________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
C leveland, O hio, Sept. 19741 ________________________________________________________ 1850-17, $1.00
C olum bus, Ohip, O ct. 1974 ______________________ ______________________ ____________ Suppl.
F re e
_
C orpus C h ris ti, T e x ., July 1975____* ________—______ ____ __________________________ 1850-37, *65 cents
D allas-^Fort W orth, T ex ., O ct. 1975 _______________________________________________ 1850-59, $1.5 0
D a v en p ort-R ock Island— oline, Io w a -Ill., F e b . 1975 ____ ___________________________ Suppl.
M
F ree
Dayton, O hio, D e c. 1974 1_______________ ___________ ________ __________ _____________ 1850- 14, 80 cents
D aytona B each , F la ., Aug. 1975___________________ —_________________________________ 1850-47, 65 cents
Denver—B ou ld er, C o lo ., D e c. 19741 _____ ______________ _____________________________ 1850-15, 8 5 cents
D es M oin es, Iowa, May 1974 2 _______________ _______________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
D etroit, M ich ., M ar. 1975____ _______________________ _______________________________ 1850-22, 85 cents
F o r t L a u derdale-H ollyw ood and W est P a lm B each—
B oca Raton, F la ., A p r. 1975 1___________________________________ ____ _________ ____ 1850-26, 80 cents
F r e s n o , C a lif., June 1975 __________________________________________________________ 1850-61, $1 .2 0
G ain esv ille, F la ., Sept. 1975_________________ ___________________________ ___________ 1850-57, $1.10
G reen Bay, W is ., July 197 5 V____________________________________________ _______ ____ 1850-44, 80 cents
G re e n sb o ro -W ins ton- Salem —
High P oin t, N .C ., Aug. 1975______________________ ___ 1850-49, 65 cents
G reen v ille, S .C ., June 1975____________________ _____ _______________________________ 1850-42, 65 cents
H artford, Conn., M ar. 197 51 _____________________ ___________ __________ __________ __ 1850-28, 80 cents
H ouston, T ex ., A p r. 1975______________________ ____ _________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
H untsville, A la ., F eb . 1975 _____________________________ ____ ____ ______ ____________Suppl.
F re e
Indianapolis, Ind., O ct. 1974 ________________________________________ ____ __________ Suppl.
F ree
Jackson, M is s ., F eb . 1975_______________________________________________ __ _____ ___ Suppl.
F re e
Ja ck son v ille, F la ., D ec. 1974 ______________________________ ________________________ Suppl.
F re e
K ansas City, M o — an s., Sept. 1975_________________________________________________ 1850-55, 80 cents
K
L a w ren ce-H a v erh ill, M a s s .— .H ., June 1974 2 ___________________ _________________Suppl.
N
F re e
L exin gton -F a yette, K y., Nov. 1974 _____________________ _________ _______________ __ Suppl.
F ree.
L os A n geles—Long B each , C a lif., O ct. 1974 ______________ __ ______________________Suppl.
F re e
L o u is v ille, K y.—Ind., N ov. 197 41 _________________________________________ __________ 1850-12, 80 cents
Lubbock, T e x ., M ar. 1974 2 ____________________________________________ ______ _______ Suppl.
F ree
M e lb ou rn e-T itu s v ill e - C o c o a, F la ., Aug. 1975______________________ _______________ 1850-54, 65 cents
M em phis, Tenn.— rk.— is s ., N ov. 1974 _____ __ _______ ______________________ _____ Suppl.
A
M
F ree
M iam i, F la ., O ct. 1974 ____ _____________________________________________ ______ _____ Suppl.
F ree
*
1
2
3

Prices are determined by the Government Printing O ffice and are subject to change.
Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.
No longer surveyed.
T o be surveyed.




A rea

B u lle tin n u m b er
and p r ic e *

M idlan d and O d e s s a , T e x ., J a n . 1974 2 _____________ _______________________ _______________ Suppl.
F ree
M ilw a u k e e , W i s ., A p r . 1975 1______________________ _________ ______ __ _________ ___ _______ 1 8 5 0 -2 1 , 85 ce n ts
St. P a u l, M inn.—W i s ., J an 1975 1 ____________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -2 0 , $1.0 5
M in n e a p o lis —
M u s k e g o n -M u s k e g o n H e ig h ts , M ic h ., J u n e 1974 2 __ ___________________ __ _____________ _ Suppl.
F ree
N a ss a u —S u ffo lk , N .Y ., J une 1975 1__________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -3 9 , $ 1 .0 0
N e w a rk , N .J ., J a n . 1 9 7 5 1____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -1 8 , $ 1 .0 0
N e w a rk and J e r s e y C it y , N .J .. J a n . 1 9 7 4 2 ____________ ___________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
N ew H a v en , C o n n ., J a n . 1974 2 ___ ____________ ______________________________________________Suppl.
F ree
N ew O r le a n s , L a ., J a n . .1975 ___________________________________ ____________________________Suppl.
F ree
N ew Y o r k , N . Y .- N . J ., M a y 1975 1___________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -4 5 , $ 1 .1 0
N ew Y o r k and N a s s a u — u ffo lk , N .Y ., A p r . 1974 2 ________________________________________ Suppl.
S
F ree
N o r fo lk —V ir g in ia B e a c h —P o r t s m o u t h , V a ^ -N .C ., M a y 197 5 ____________________________ 1 8 5 0 -2 9 , 65 ce n ts
P
N o r fo lk —V ir g in ia B e a c h — o r t s m o u t h and N e w p o r t N e w s H a m p ton , V a . - N . C . , M a y 1975 ____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -3 0 , 65 c e n t s
N o r t h e a s t P e n n s y lv a n ia , A u g . 197 5 _________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -5 2 , 65 ce n ts
O k la h o m a C ity , O k la ., A u g . 1975___________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -5 1 , 65 ce n ts
O m a h a , N ebr*—Iow a , O c t . 1975——___________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -5 6 , $ 1 .1 0
P a te r s o n -C l if ton— a s s a i c , N .J ., J une 1975 1__________—_________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -3 8 , 80 ce n ts
P
F ree
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .—N . J . , N o v . 1974 _________________________________________________________ Suppl.
P h o e n ix , A r i z . , J une 1974 2 ______________________________ _______________________________ ___ Suppl.
F ree
P it t s b u r g h , P a ., J a n . 197 5 ________ ______________________ ___________________ —_______________ Suppl.
F ree
P o r t la n d , M a in e , N o v . 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________ __________________Suppl.
F ree
P o r t la n d , O r e g .—W a s h ., M a y 1975__________- ________ —____________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -4 0 , 75 ce n ts
P o u g h k e e p s ie , N . Y . 1 3 ___________________________________ ___ _________________________________
P o u g h k e e p s ie — in g s t o n -N e w b u r g h , N .Y ., J une 1974 ________ ___________________________Suppl.
K
F ree
P r o v id e n c e —W a rw ic k —P a w tu ck e t, R .I .—M a s s ., J une 1975 ______________________________ 1 8 5 0 -2 7 , 75 ce n ts
R a le ig h — u rh a m , N .C ., F e b . 1975 _____ ____ ________________________________________________S uppl.
D
F ree
R ic h m o n d , V a ., J une 1 975______________________ —___________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -4 1 , 65 ce n ts
R o c k fo r d , 111., J u n e 1974 2 ____ ______ ________________________________________________________Suppl.
F ree
St. L o u is , M o.—111., M a r . 1 97 5-___________________________________________________ _ ________Suppl.
_
F ree
S a c r a m e n t o , C a li f., D e c . 1 9 7 4 1 ____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -1 9 , 80 ce n ts
S a gin a w , M ic h ., N o v . 1 9 7 4 1__________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -1 6 , 75 ce n ts
S a lt L a k e C ity^-O gden, U tah, N o v . 1974 ___ ______________________________________________ _ Suppl.
F ree
San A n to n io , T e x . , M a y 1975 ________ _______________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -2 3 , 65 ce n ts
San D ie g o , C a li f ., N o v . 1974 1 ____________________ ___________________________ _______ _______ 1 8 5 0 -1 3 , 80 ce n ts
San F r a n c is c o - O a k la n d , C a li f., M a r . 11975 1__ ___________________________ ___ _____________ 1 8 5 0 -3 5 , $ 1 .0 0
San J o s e , C a li f ., M a r . J1975 1_______________ _____ _______ _______________________________ 1 8 5 0 -3 6 , 85 ce n ts
S avannah, G a ., M a y 1974 2 __ ___________________________________________ ____________________ Suppl.
F ree
S e a ttle — v e r e t t , W a s h ., J a n . 1975 __________.
E
__________ _____________________________ Suppl.
F ree
South B en d , In d ., M a r . 1975 _______________ ______________ ____________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
S p ok a n e, W a s h ., J u n e 1974 2 __ ______________________ __ ____________________________________Suppl.
F ree
S y r a c u s e , N .Y ., J u ly 1975____ ______ __________ ________ _____________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -4 3 , 65 ce n ts
T o le d o , O h io— i c h ., M a y 1975 1_____________________ _______________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -3 4 , 80 ce n ts
M
T r e n t o n , N .J ., S ep t. 1975 1___________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -6 0 , $ 1 .2 0
U t i c a - R o m e , N .Y ., J u ly 1975 1_______________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -4 8 , 80 ce n ts
W a sh in g to n , D .C r -M d < -V a ., M a r . 1 9 7 5 1_____ ______________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -3 1 , $ 1 .0 0
W a t e r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r . 1974 2 ____ ________________ ______________________ __________________Suppl.
F ree
W e s t c h e s t e r C o u n ty , N .Y ., M a y 1975 1___ _____________________ ______ ______ _____ _________ 1 8 5 0 -5 3 , 80 ce n ts
W ic h ita , K a n s ., A p r . 1 9 7 5 ___ ________________________________ _______________________________ Suppl.
F ree
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s ., M a y 1975 1 ___________________________________________________________ __ 1 8 5 0 -2 4 , 80 ce n ts
Y o r k , P a ., F e b . 1 9 7 5 1 _______________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -3 2 , 80 ce n ts
Y o u n g s to w n — a r r e n , O h io , N o v . 1973 2 ______________ _____________________ _______________ Suppl.
W
F ree

THIRD CLASS MAIL
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID

BUREAU OF LABOR S TA TIS TIC S
W A SH IN GTO N, D.C. 20212

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE $300

LAB - 441

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S
Region r

R e g io n II

1603 J F K F e d e ra l B u ild in g
G o v e rn m e n t C e n te r
B o sto n , Mass. 0 2203
P h o n e :2 23-6 76 1 (A re a C o d e 61 7)

S u ite 34 0 0
151 5 B ro a d w a y
N e w Y o rk , N .Y . 1 0 0 3 6
P h o n e :9 7 1 - 5 4 0 5 (A re a C o d e 21 2 )

C o n n e c tic u t
M aine
M assachusetts
N e w H a m p s h ire
R h o d e Isla n d
V e rm o n t

N e w Jersey
N ew Y o rk
P u e rto R ic o
V ir g in Island s

Region V
9 th F lo o r, 2 30 S. D e a rb o rn St.
C hicago, III. 606 04
P h o n e :3 53-1 8 8 0 (A re a C o d e 3 1 2 )
Illin o is
In d ia n a
M ich ig a n
M in n e so ta
O h io
DigitizedW iscon sin
for FRASER



R e g io n V I

R e g io n I II

R e g io n IV

P.O. B o x 133 0 9
P h ila d e lp h ia , Pa. 1 9 1 0 1
P h o n e : 5 9 6 1 1 5 4 (A re a C o d e 2 1 5 )
D e la w a re
D is tr ic t o f C o lu m b ia
M a ry la n d
P e n n s y lv a n ia
V irg in ia
W est V irg in ia

R e gion s V I I a n o V I I I

S u ite 540
1371 P eachtree St. M E .
A tla n ta , Ga. 30 309
P h o n e :5 26-541 8 (A re a C ode 4 0 4 )
A la b a m a
F lo rid a
G eorgia
K e n tu c k y
M ississippi
N o r th C a ro lin a
S o u th C a ro lin a
Tennessee
R e gion s IX a n d X

S e cond F lo o r
55 5 G r i f f in S q uare B u ild in g
D allas, T e x . 7 5 2 0 2
P h o n e : 749 -35 1 6 (A re a C o d e 2 1 4 )

F ed era l O ff ic e B u ild in g
911 W a ln u t S t , 15 th F lo o r
Kansas C ity , M o . 6 4 1 0 6
P h o n e :3 7 4 -2 4 8 1 (A re a C o d e 816 )

45 0 G o ld e n G ate Ave.
B o x 3 60 17
San F ra n c is c o , C a lif. 9 4 1 0 2
P h o n e :5 5 6 -4 6 7 8 (A re a C o d e 41 5)

L o u is ia n a
le w M e x ic o
O k la h o m a
T exas

V II
Io w a
Kansas
M is s o u ri
N e braska

IX
A riz o n a
C a lifo rn ia
H a w a ii
Nevada

V III
C o lo ra d o
M o n ta n a
N o rth D a k o ta
S o u th D a k o ta
U ta h
W y o m in g

X
A laska
Id a h o
O regon
W a s h in g to n