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T A B L E OF CONTENTS.

Report of Mr. Walker on the Finances and Warehousing
tem
Dec.,
Report of Mr. Walker on the Finances
Dec.,
Report of Mr. Young in regard to an error in the Report
of 1847
Jan.,
Report of Mr. Walker on the Finances
Dec.,
Report of Mr. Walker on the Warehousing System. -Feb.,




Sys1846
1847

176
119

1848
1848
1849

275
279
343

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
DECEMBER, 1847.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, December 8, 1847.

In obedience to law, the foUowingxeport is respectfully submitted: .
The receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30,1847,
were—
.
,
'
,
Fromcustoms
' : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,747,864 66
From public lands
2,498,355 20
From miscellaneous sources
100,570 51
From avails, of Treasury notes and loans
2.5,679,199 45
Total receipts
<
•. $52,025,989 82
Add'balance in the Treasury July 1, 1 8 4 6 . . , . . . . . . . . .
9,126,439 08
Totalmeans
>
.. $61,152,428 90
The expenditures during same fiscal year were . . . . . . 59,451,177 ^5
Leaving balance in the Treasury July 1, 1847, o f . . . . $1,701,251 25
As appears indetail by accompanying statement A.
The estimated receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year endingJune 30, 1848, are—
From custoiiisylst quarter, by actual returns.
$11,106,257 41
From customs,.for 2d, 3d, and 4th quarters, as estimated 19,893,742 59
Flom sales ofpublic lands.
Frdm miscellaneous sources
Total r e c e i p t s . . . . . :
- From -avails o.f Treasury notes and loans.

$31,000,000 00
3,500,0.00 00
400,000 00
$34,900,000 00
6,285,294 55

• •'
• $41,185,294 55
Add balance in the Treasury July 1, 1847 . _ . . . . . . . . 1,701,251 25
Total means, as e s t i m a t e d . . . . . . . . . . .



$42,886,545 80

120

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

EXPENDITURES, VIZ :

The actual expenditures for the first
quarter ending September 30, 1847,
were
.,
. . . . . . . . . . . . ..V^ $16,469,19469
As appears in detail by accompanying
statement B.
The estimated expenditures for the
public service during the other three :
^
quarters—frora October 1, 1847, to
June 30, 1848, are—
Civil list, foreign intercourse, and miscellaneous
.........V...-4 ..: 5,486,180 42
Army proper, including volunteers . ^. 19,080,865 5 8 '
^
Fortifications, ordnance, arming militia, &c. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . . . .
2,036,446 50
Indian department . . . . . . . . i . .
.
1,720,660 26
Perisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,063,523 66
Naval e s t a b l i s h m e n t . . . . . . r . . . . . . . . . . 10,241^,072 17 ;'
Interest on publie debt and Treasury^
notes
.:.....
2,250,577 18 .
Treasury notes outstanding, and payable when p r e s e n t e d . . . . . . .
267,139 31
-:
— . — - — 58,M5j6B0 07
Excess .of expenditures over means July 1, 1848

$15,729,114 27

The estimated receipts, means, and expenditures sfor the fiscal year
conimencing July 1, 1848, and eriding June 30, 1849, are-^
^j
RECEIPTS, V I Z :

From c u s t o m s . . . . . . . . .
...
.
.
. . . . $32,000,000 00
From sales of public l a n d s . ; . . . , . , - . . . . . . . . . . ^ . . : . ^.
3,0005000l\ 00
From miscellaneous sources . . . . . . , . . . . . . , . - , . . . ; . : - .
100,o6o\00
Total f e v e n u e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35^100,000 b a
Dleduct deficit July 1 , 1 8 4 8 . . . . . . . , . . . . . ; . . . . . . . . . \ 15^729,114 27\
: •^•.•- .':• ..•'••"•"

'

'•'

$19,170,885.^73'

EXPENDITURES.

The expenditures during the same period, as estimated by the several
Departrnents of Slate, Treasury, War, Navy, and Postmaster General,
are^—^

.'.

•

.

.

.

-

•

"

.

•

•^"

'

:•:

. , . ' , • - •

The balances of former appropriations, which will be • . • fi. ' .^
• required to ^be expended iri this year . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,475,210 77
Permanent and indefinite appropriations
..
..
4,587,577 82
Specific appropriations asked for this year . . . . . . . . _ .49,582,153 13




" $55,644,941'72

1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

This sumJs composed ofthe following particulars:
Civil list, foreign intercourse, and miscellaneous
Army proper, volunteeirs, and Military Acadeniy
Fortifications, ordnance, arming militia, &Ci . . ' . . ,
.'
Perisions
................
Indian departmeht
.'..........,
Naval estabhshment
-.......,.
Interest on pubhc debt and Treasury
ri'btes.....:....

121
$5,613,061
32,007,028
2,045,169
1,694,318926,401
10,905,558
2,453,402

52
42
90
84
81
55
68

^
$55,644,941 72
Deduct* rrieans remaining applicable to-service of fiscal
year ending June 30, 1849 . . . . . . . . . . -.
19,370,885 73
Excess'of expenditures oVer means July 1, 1849

.. $36,274,055 99

It will, be perceived that if the war is continued until the ] st of. July
next, and no additional reveriue provided by Congress, nor ariy sums
received frorii riiilitary Goiitributioris iri Mexico, there would be a deficit
in the Treasury oh that day of $15,729,114 27". For the reasons hereafter stated, urider the operatioiD? of the coristitutional Treasury, it will
riot be necessary hereafter to retain iri the Treas.ury, to rneet the wants
ofthe Government, and afford a constant supply for all their enlarged
operations to the mint and branch mints, a sum exceeding $3,000,OQO.
Adding this to the deficit in the Treasury on the 1st of July next, it
makes the sum of $18,729,114 27 to be supplied during that period; to
meet which, if the expenditures authorized and estimated should take
place prior to that date, a loan for that sum _would be required if no
additional revenue was derived from any source whatever. It is believed,
however, that if Congress would adopt;the following measures, which
are recommended to their favoi:a.ble consideration,- additional revenue to
the amount of $4,500,000 per annum might be realized. First: from a
duty on tea arid cofFee of 25 per cent, ad valorem, $3,000,000 per arinum;
from the reductiori and graduation iri the price of the public lands,
$1,000,000 per annum; and from the extension of the preemptiori privilege to every hona fide settler on our unsurveyed lands, whenever the
Indian title m a y b e extinguished, $500,000 per arinum. Should these
measures be adopted by Congress, the loan might bei^educed to a sum
not exceeding, at the most, $17,000,000. , In estimating the loan at
$17^000,000, allowance is made for the fact that these measures for
additional revehue could 'not all go into effect so as to produce the full
amount during the time intervenirig between the present period and the
1st July next* After that date, it is not doubted that they would produce
the full amount of ^4,500,000 per annum.
'
^- .^
The President of the United States has, howeyer, directed contributions to be levied in Mexico iri every form that may be sanctioned by the
law of natioris. These contributions consist, first, m diminishing the
estirnated expenditures, by obtaining as far as practicable supplies for
the army in Mexico; second, by duties upon imports, as a military contribution; third, by enforcirig the Mexican duty upon exports; fourth, by
directing the seizure arid appropriation to the support of the war and the



122

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

Army of all the internal revenues of Mexico, .except transit-duties, whether
assessed by the General Government of Mexico, or by any department,
city, or town.thereof. By the acts of September 2, .1789, and the.10th
ofMay; 1800, it is the duty of i h i s Department to report to Congress
estimates of the probable amount that will be derived from all sources
combined, in order that no larger loan may be. asked or effected than
would be requisite after deducting the amount thus estimated. . The sum
to be realized from these military contributions will depend upon future
contingencies. If our armies were withdrawn from the capital and ports
of Mexico, nothing would be received frorri such contributions. If they
were withdrawn from the capital, retaining the ports, no safe transit
being open for imports into the interior, and to the rich and populous
portion ofthe country, including the mining region, a very small revenue,
would be derived from this source, as shown by past experience^—probably not exceeding $1,000,000 per annum. If, however, the ports at
present occupied by our forces be retained, and all the rest seized or
blockaded, so as to prevent the carrying of imports into the interior
through any other ports than those held by our forces; if the roads were
then opened irito the interior, through the city of Mexico and the miriing
region, a n d l h e route of commerce across the isthmus reridered secure,
it is my conviction that the revenue from all these sour'ces above specified
ought not to be less, so far as the duties on exports and. imports are con- '
cerned, than has heretofore been collected by the Goverriment of Mexico.
I have not been able to obtain any reliable statement of the amount of
duties realized in Mexico upon exports; if, however, it were fairly collected upon all the exports of specie from Mexico, it would probably not,
amount to less than; $1,000,000 per annum. It is not known,, however,
that so large a sum, as realized from this duty, was ever recorded in
the custom-house returns of Mexico." Under- these, circumstances, it.is
extremely difficult to estimate the amount of .duties which could be
derived from this-source; but they ought not to fall below $500,000 per
annum. The receipts from duty on imports collected by Mexico.have
varied from $6,000,000 to $12,000,000 per'annum^; and Ithink it ought
not to beless, with the ports and .interior and roads inour possession,'
and rendered secui'e for expdrts and imports. There are many reasons
why it ought to be greater,. The. present duties are framed, so as to
yield the largest revenue; wHereas the Mexican tariff was in the highest
degree protective and prohibitory, the duties, even when the goods were
admitted, being generally a.dverse to revenue. There were also sixty
articles the importation of which was prohibited altogether; among
which were sugar, rice, cotton,: boots and half-boots, coffee, nails of all
kinds, leather of most kinds, flour, cottori yarn and thread, soap of all
kinds, common earthenware, lard, molasses, timber pf all kinds, saddles
of all kinds, cottori goods or textures,/chiefly such as are made in the
United States, pork, fresh or salted, smoked orv cured, woolen dr cotton
blankets or counterpanes, shoes and slippers, wheat, and grain of a:ll
kinds. The admission of the prohibited goods at reasonable rates,.the
change of the protective into revenue duties, and the abolition of the
heavy transit charges, rnust, of course, increase imports and revenue, and >
greatly enlarge our trade-with Mexico, bringing back specie in,return for



1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

123

•our goods imported there. No nation, in; proportion to its wealth, can
afford to import more than Mexico;, because-her - great staple export,
being specie, is sought by-all nations, in exchange for their goods imported there. .Under our brave officers, the money will not be lost, as
it was to a great extent, by peculation, under the Mexican Government;
andthe lower duties will, to a great extent,, prevent" smuggling. The
duties also being collected onlhe goods imported from one Mexican port
into another will be-ari addition to the amount exacted by the Mexican
Government.
'
, . v • .
On the whole, I cannot believe that,, under the'circumstances and
condition df things above suggested as the .most favorable to augment
these contributions, the duties on imports, with all the ports, the roads,
and Interior in our military possession, would • be less than they were
under the Government of Mexico, especially under the guarantee already
-given, that in .any treaty of peace it will, as announced, be provided that
the goods imported, should neither be confiscated nor subjected to any
new duty by Mexico.
• '
'
The internal revenue collected by the Mexican Government, as well
as departments, was about $13,000,000 per annum. I do not believe,
however, that any very large portion of this revenue could be collected
under our military system ;,,.and I have no sufficient data upon which to
base any reliable estimate as to. these sources .'of revienue. Under these
circumstances,.it is impossible to name any precise, :sum as ..that which
probably would-be derived from military contributions in Mexico. The
more complete, however, the possession of the country by our troops, '
the larger would be the revenue.
. Thus much. I. have thought it incumbent on me to say; and without
being able to fix any precise sum, it is my conviction that the revenues
that may be derived from .these various sources in Mexico would be very
considerable, .and augmenting from time to time..
, "
• In view, however, of the uncertainty, ofthe amount of these contributions at present,, and the delay in carrying them into effect, if the measures proposed for augmenting the reyenue, by duties upon tea and coffee,
the reduction of the pric'e of the public lands, and the extension of the
preemption privilege,'should not be adopted by Congress, I recommend
that authority be granted to negotiate a:loan for the.sum of $18,500,000
upon the terms aiithorized by the act of 28th January last. Should l h e
war be continued until the 1st July, 1849, an ;additional loa.n-amounting to $20,500,000 would be necessary, if no additional revenues be
granted by Congress, and no contributions were levied in Mexico. As it
is believed, however, that a considerable sum must -be -derived from these
contributions, no further loan beyond the amourit of $18,500,000 is asked
at this period; and itis believed that this" sum is all that will be required
in,all probability until the meeting of Congress in December, 1848. "It
is possible, .however,, that a .further loan for a sum not. exceeding
$6-,000,0.0.0 may be requhed before that time. Should this be the case,
there will be ample time to cominunicate the information to Congress
and ask a further provisiori for that ariiount.
< •
A duty of twenty-five per cent, ad valorem on tea and coffee is.again
respectfully recommended.. By reference to table RR 1 and RR 2, it



124

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

appears that the aggregate value of our imports of tea arid coffee is prdgressirig; and that the impost suggested would probably yield an arinual
revenue of $3,000,000—^reducing theloan, aiding the credit and firiances
ofthe Goverriment, and, with our dther resources, securing prompt payriient to our gallant Army and Navy, v^ho are vindicating the. rights,
sustaining the honor, and elevating the character of our country. The
experience of lhe last year'proves that no additional reveriue, or none
exceeding a few thousand dollars, could be obtained from any augment'^
ation of duties upon the dutiable imports. No such augmentation is
recommerided; and scarcely any revenue could be derived from the few
remaining articles on the free list, exclusive of tea arid coffee. It is a
sourid rule, when coritracting a public debt, to provide at the time
such revenue as will be adequate for the prompt payment ofthe interest
and the gradual but certairi extinguishment of the principal of the debt.
So long as this rule is pursued, there is rio danger of any alarming, accumulation ofpublic debt, ndr any apprehension tha:t the public credit will
be impaired or embarrassed. To refuse the tax at this lime, would be
to accumulate a large debt, with an augrnenting' amount of interest, and
with no certain means provided for the hquidation of such engagements^
The credit of nations is best maintained when for all their obligations
adequate provision is made at the time; and there is danger that increaseing debts, without any additional revenue, raight expose our .finances to
great hazard.
Diminishing expenses being orie- of the best means of improving the
finances, the charges df collecting the revenue from customs have beeri
carefully examined, and every retrenchment made compatible with the
pubhc iriterest* The saving thus effected, notwithstanding the vast
increase of busiriess, will amount, it is believed, to nearly $500,000 per
annum; ndt by reducing wages or reasonable compensation, but by
dispensing with every officer or- agerit not absdlutely required; for the
public service; by curtailing the expenses of the revenue inarine; by
introducing a more rigid and perfect system.df accountability; by classifying the expenditures, and arranging them iri tables, under distinct
heads; and above aU, by subjectirig them to the samechecks^ urider the
supervision ofthe accounting officers of the Treasury, as apply to appropriations-made by law, in regard to which. Congress will, no doubt, be.
guided by that wise and enlightened economy vso important at this tirrie
to the rhaintenance of the public credit. "
-]
- .
The recommendations in. my first as well as my second annual report,
of the reduction of the price.of the pubhc lands in favor of settlers.and
cultivators, together with the lemdval of onerous restrictions tipon the
preemption laws, are agairi respectfully presented td the consideratidn
df Congress. Sales at the reduced price, it is thought, should be confined
to settlers and cultivators, in. limited quantities, sufficient for farms and
plantations, and the preemption privilege, extended to every bona fide
settler, and embrace all lands, whethei: surveyed or urisurveyed, to which
the Indian title iriay be extinguished. The ' lands remaining subject to
entry at private sale, on t h e l s t of this mdnth, were 152^101,001 acres;
and the unsurveyed lands to which the Indian title has beeri.ex:tihguished,
71,048,214 acres, per. table Z. The adoption .of these two measures,



1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

125

for the reasons stated iri my .previous reports, would augment the revenue
$1,500,000 per annum, operating as they would,- on 223,149,215 acres.
It would at .the. same time increase the wages of labor, by enabling a
much.larger nurnber of the working classes to purchase farms at the
Idw price, whilst it would at the same time augment the wealth and
power of the whole country.
When the public lands have been, offered a long time for a price they
will not bring, the failure to reduce the price is equivalent in its effects
to an enactrnent by Congress that these lands shall not be sold and
settled for an unlimited peribd. The easels still stronger as to unsurveyed lands; there being an act., of Congress forbidding their sale or
settlement, and denouncing as criminals and trespassers the American
pioneers who would desire to enter in advance into the wilderness, cover it
with farms and towns, with the church and the school-house, extend over
it the blessings of our free institutions,^ and enlarge by the axe and the
plough the cultivated area of the American Union.
Should the system proposed'be now adopted, the surveyed as well as
the unsurveyed lands opened to preemption, and the Indian title extinguished within the coming year, or that which succeeds it; in addition
to Iowa and Wisconsin, we shouid soon have two new States, Minnesota
and .Itasca, in the great valley of the West, adjoining Wisconsin and
Iowa. Instead'of draining the old States.of their population, the graduation and preemption system will,, in a series of years, increase their
prosperity, by giving them customers in the West, who will carry to them
their products, and receive their imports or fabrics in exchange, increasing
the transportation upon our railroads and canals, and augmenting our
foreign as well as coastwise tonnage. The distribution of the proceeds
of. the sales of these larids is prevented^ for at least twenty years, by the
• act of 2Bth January, 1847, setting apart, and pledging, these proceeds
"to the e.xtinguishment of the public debt. So far, also, as distribution
may have been advocated, with a view to favor a protective tariff, it is
riow proved that a tariff for revenue not only yields a larger income than
. the protective systeno^y^butalso advances more rapidly, in a series of years,
the. prosperity of the^ihanufacturers, by the augmentation of their foreign
arid domestic, market. Every reason, therefore, which has heretofore
opposed the removal of all restrictions, from the preemption system, or
the reduction and graduation of the price of the public lands, having
ceased to exist, it is. hoped that these.measures may receive, during the
present session, the fayorable consideration of Congress.
The mineral lands were transferred by Congress to this Department
by acts of 1st. and 3d March, 18.47. After obtaining all the information
in niy power, the law was carried into effect bythe appointment by me
of Doctor G. T. Jackson, of Boston, to make the geological survey of
the Lalte Superior land, district, in Michigan, arid of Doctor D. D. Owen,
of IndianaL, to m.ake a similar survey of the Chippewa distriet, in Wiscdnsin. and northerri Iowa. The appointment of agent to collect the
rents, &c., by those acts, was conferred by me upon Colonel D. R. McNaiir, of Kentucky, with whom was, associated General E. J. Roberts,
of Michigan, as assistant, Copies of the instructions which were given
by me, in.April last, to Messrs. Jackson and Owen, as well as to



126

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

Mr. McNair, the agerit, and General Roberts,' his assistant,' are hereto
annexed; and these four gentlemen have all zealously performed their
duties. It will be perceived^ that the iristructions given by this Department to .Messrs. Jackson and Owen, contemplate a complete geologieal
and topographical description of this great region, together with the
barometrical and hydroriietrical observations, and a series of observations,
on the dip and. intensity of the needle, ^as iritimately connected \^ith the
geological and mineralogical character of the country, and as leading
to results interesting to the cause of general science. Froni the preliminary reports alreadj^- made by Doctdrs Jackson and Owen, this, Department feels well assured that both those gentlemen will fully sustain that
high reputation for perilous and laborious exploration of new regions, as
well as fbr high scientific attainriients, which induced this. Department,
to confer those appointments upon them. It was riiy pleasirig duty to
dh-ect all .the geological arid mineralogical specimens obtained,, in conformity with the act of 10th August, 1846, establishing the'.Smithsonian
Institution, to be deposited, with a view to their transfer to Professor
Joseph Henry, the secretary thereof, whose great discoveries have
contributed so large and important an addition to the cause df science,
conferred so much honor on this, his riative country, and, attracted -the
admhation and applause of the distinguished men engaged in scientific
pursuits in every portion of the globe. The cduntry being' surveyed
abounds in mineral* wealth, and especially in copper; and when the
mines shall become the property of individuals, and the adjacent lands
settled and cultivated, Sd as to unite their cheaper subsistence with more
abundant labor, it is believed that this great region, occupying .a positiori
nearly central between the Atlantic and the Pacific, rriust becorrie an .
important portion of our cduntry. Much time and labor were devoted
to the'preparation of these instructions, calling to my aid the very able
and efficient Commissioner of the Gerieral Land Office, to whom'the
subject was then transferred by me, retaiining. only the supervisory
power required by law.
^
B y l h e a c t o f t h e l l t h of February, 1847, a bounty in land was.
designed by Congress for the benefitof the brave men who are vindicating abroad the'rights, and maintainirig the honor, of their country. .• By
the proviso to that act the sale of these claims is prohibited until a warrant or.certificate has issued, indicating, as is believed, the benevolent
intention of Congress td secure homes to pur soldiers and volunteers.
It is deeply to be regretted, however, that the intentions of Cdngress.in
this respect are to be defeated by sales of these warrants or certificates '
at a great sacrifice, which will'be obviated to a very great exterit for the
future, by further restrictions:by .Congress upon these .assigrinient's,.and
especially by forbidding the sale uritil the patent "shall have issued; If
this is not done but very few of these brave meri, wheri their toil and
perils shaU have terminated, will have retained the right to .the homes
intended,for them by the-benevolent policy of Congress. With a view,
as far as-practicable, to induce the soldiers and voliinteers to retain their
rights, it.was decided.by this Department, after a-.conference with the
Secretary of War, who. concurred in this opinion,'that, if the soldier or
volunteer become a preemptdr,'he might use his warrant or certificate in



1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

127

purchase of the lands upon vifhich he had settled, but that no assignee
or purchaser could thus use such warrant or certificate in payment of
any lands that had not been offered at pubhc sale. Under this decision
the warrarit or certificate is of metre value to the soldier and volunteer
than to the purchaser; and there is an additional motive to retain the
warrant or certificate. Instructions have also been issued by this Department to the various registers and receivers of land offices that they
cannot become the purchasers of these warrants or certificates, or any
other land scrip; nor must they become agents for the sale, .depqsite, or
exchange of the same, but confine themselves, as far as these warrants
or certificates are concerned, exclusively to receiving the same, when
offered for location, as prescribed by law.
The public revenue would be augmented, and aju^st and liberal policy
adopted, if the settlers upon • the lands within the prescribed limits of
the Milwaukie and Rock river canal were permitted td purchase their
settlements at the usual minimum price per acre; and such modification
of the existing law, for the benefit of these meritorious settlers, as well
as with a view to augment the revenue, is recommended to the favorable
consideration of Congress.
The recommendation contained in my last report for the establishment
of ports, of entry in Oregon, and the extension there of our revenue laws,
is again respectfuUy presented to the consideratiori of Congress, together
with donations of farms to settlers and emigrants, and the.grant of a
school section in the centre of every quarter of a township, which would
bring the school-house within a poirit not exceeding a mile and a half in
distance from the most remote inhabitarit of such quarter township.
This measure, as regards the additional school sections, would be highly
beneficial in all the new States and Territories. Iri Oregon, as a general
rule, the lands are much less valuable than those in the great vaUey of
the W e s t ; and important as it is to all our great interests, and especially as connected with our commerce with Asia and the western coast
of America, that Oregon should be rapidly settled with a large population, these measures would be attended with the most happy results.
Such a system, whilst it would strengthen the attachment to the Union
of the inhabitants of that distant region, would rapidly augment its settlement and population, and bring back in large revenues through the
custom-house an ample return to the Government for the adoption of a
policy so just and liberal.
Table D contains'a full statement of all theTreasury notes paid under
the act of the 10th of August last, amounting, on the first ofthe present
month, to the sum of $33,067 06.
Table E exhibits the amountof the public debt and interest paid from
1st December, 1846, to 1st December, 1847, including the reimbursement of Treasury notes under acts prior to act of 22d July, 1846, under
act of 22d July, 1846, and under act of 28th January, 1847', amounting
in principal to the surn of $9,046,511 85, and in interest to $1,433,850 29.
Table F , hereto annexed, shows the public debt-due on the 1st December, 1847, $45,659,659 40; the amount of the debt due on the 4th
March, 1845, $17,788,799 62, leaving the balance, being the debt
incurred since the 4th March, 1845, $27,870,859 78. ' The same table



138

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

exhibits the reduction bf the debt due on the 4th March,. 1845, by payments made since that date, to $16,476,010 75.
Table G exhibits the amount available on the 1st October, 1847, bf
the loans of 1846 and 1847, being of the loan of 1846, then/ayailable,
$1,648,900 55, and of the loan of 1847, $4,636,394, and dfnhe aggregate of both, $6,285,294 "55.
, . •
Table H shdws the amount available on the 1st Decerriber, 1847, of
the loans of 1846 and 1847, being of the former then available,
$902,950 55, and of the latter, $3,299,878, and of the aggregate of
both, $4,202,828 55. •
Table I exhibits a statement of Treasury notes under act of 22d
.July, 1846, issued in exchange for specie deposited in .1847, amounting,
to $965,750.
Table K exhibits .a statemerit of six per cent. Treasury notes, issued
in exchange for specie deposited to the credit of the Treasurer of
the United States, urider act of 28th January, 1847, aniounting to
$15,469,800.
Table L exhibits the amount of Treasury notes issued ^ at 5,2-5 per
cent, interest, in exchange for specie, under act of 28th January, .1847,
amounting to $471,000..
"
'
Table M exhibits. the reimbursement of Treasury notes inonthly,
from 1st December, 1846, to ISL December, 1847, amounting to
$8,971,791 66.
Table F F gives the items in detail of the debt of the United.States
due on the 4th of March, 1845.
Tshle N shows,, the transfers made to New Orleans, in specie, from
the 1st January, 1847, to the 1st December, 1847, being $8,616,517 30.
Table X gives the amount of Treasury notes paid in for pubhc lands
during the 4th quarter of 1846, and the 1st, 2d, and 3d quarters of 1847.
Table K K exhibits the amount of Treasury notes paid in for duties
from 1st December, 1846, to 1st December, 1847, including the amount
of $101,850, paid into the custom-houses iri April last, at par, being the
month in which the loan for $18,000,000 was negotiated.;. from which
Congress will observe the gradual appreciation of these notes in the
market, and their partial discontinuance for a short time, in revenue pa}^ments, and subsequent renewal of the payments of Tre.asury notes for
duties.
Table P exhibits separately the monthly issrie of Treasury notes from
1st Januaiy, 1847, to the 30th November, 1847, inclusive, under the acts
of July 22, .1846, and of 28th January, 1847r—being, under the former
act $2,794,100, and under the latter $17,762,950, a n d i n the aggregate
of both $20,557,050.
Table Q exhibits the yearly payments, on account of the priiicipal and
interest of lhe public debt from 1791, to 1847, both inclusiye, amounting
in the whole to the sum of $483,800,498 79.
This table is the recorded evidence of the will and the abihty of the
American Union to discharge all^ its obligations, the amount of debt riow
due being $45,659j659 40—--a sum less than one-tenth of the amount of
principal and interest of the public debt .which we have already paid.
These payments were made with.uniform punctuality, and Cdmmencing



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with heavy amounts at periods when our population was greatly less than
one-fifth of its present numbers, and when its ability to meet its engagements was even in. a smaller proportion.
•
It is impossible for any American citizen to regard this-evidence of the
honor and good faith of his country with any other feelings than those of
pride and satisfaction. In war and in peace our country has maintained
her honor unsullied, and- resolved, through 'every sacrifice of blood- and
treasure, that it must and shall be preserved.
-. The constitutional Treasury went into effect on the 1st of January
last; and the business of the Government urider this act, during the last
eleven months, has been conducted in specie; ofwhich, as appears by
table U, there was received during the last eleven months, for loans, cus- .
toms, lands, and. miscellaneous collections, the sum of. $48,667,886 18
in specie, and the sum of $48,226,516 31 during the same eleven months
disbursed in specie.
In New York (see table Y) during the month of August last
$3,340,706 48 in-specie was received b}^ the collector of that port, and
in the last eleven months b}^ him in specie $18,615,422 26.' During the
same month of .August there was deposited (see table GG) the sum of
$5,795,720 92 with the assistant treasurer of that city,^and transferred
from, or disbursed by, that officer. The'receipts and disbursements of
the Government in sj)ecie, during the last eleven months, have amounted
together to the sum of $96,894,402 49; and not a dollar has been lost to
the Treasury, nor any injury inflicted upon anj^ branch of commerce or
business. The constitutional Treasur}^ has been tried during a period
ofwar, when it was necessary to negotiate very large loans, when our
expenditures were being increased, and when transfers unprecedented
in amount were required to distant points for disbursement. Duririg the
last eleven months the Government has received, transferred, and disbursed more specie than during the whole aggregate period of fifty-seven
years preceding—-since the adoption of the Constitution. To render the
system still more safe, useful, an.d econoniical;- to define more clearly
the ppwers of the Department, and especially to render more secure
^ the public mone}' in the hands of disbursing agents," the amendments
*
suggested in my last annual report, (including the establishment of a
branch mint at New York,) and which received the sanction ofthe House
of Representatives during the last session, are agairi recommended to
the favorable consideration of Congress. During the year ending 30th
June, 1847, our imports of specie were $24,121,289, (see table T,) rriost
ofwhich under former systems, must have gone into the banks, to have
been made the basis of issues of their paper to the additional aiDount of
fifty or sixty ^millions of dohars. Such an expansion, during the last
spring and summer, accompanied by still higher prices, and fbllowed by
a greater fall, and by bankruptcies in England to an extent heretofore
unknown, finding our banks and credit greatly expanded, and reacting
.uponlhis expansion, would have produced a revulsion here exceeding
any. that has heretofore occurred in the country. A general suspension
of the banks would proba:bly have resulted; depressing the wages of
labor and prices of property and-products; affecting irijuriously the operations and credit even ofthe most.solvent, and producing extensive bankVoL. VI.—9.




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[1847.

ruptcies. From ihis revulsion we have been saved b y t h e constitutional
Treasury, by which the specie imported, instead of being coWerted into
bank issue's, has been made to circulate directly to a great extent as a
currency among the people—having been recoined here during the last
eleyen months by the new orders of this Department under the act of
Oth February, 1793, and the zealous cooperation ofthe able and efficient
head of the mint at Philadelphia, to the unprecedented extent of
$20,758,048 12;.and there are thousands of our citizens now solvent
and prosperous, who have been saved from ruin by the wholesome
operation of the constitutional Treasury. ' The banks that so unwisely
opposed the system have been rescued, probably, from another ^suspension; their stockholders, depositors, and note-holders, from severe losses;
and the cpuntry and Government fromlhe ruinous effects of a depreciated
paper currency. If the union of the Government with l h e banks had
continued, and their suspension and the depreciation of their paper
occurred during the war, requiring large specie disbursements, which
suspended banks could not furnish, consequences the most disastrous to
the honor and the interests ofthe country must have ensued. The Gov-^
ernment is now disconnected from banks, and yet its stock and notes
are at par, although we have been constrained to contract heavy loans,
and to keep larger armies in the field than at any former period. But
during the last war, when the Government was connected with banks,
its six per cent, stock ,and Treasury notes were depreciated twenty-five
per cerit., payable in bank paper twenty per cent., below pax; thus
amounting to a loss of forty-five cents in every dollar upon the operations
of the Government. In my first annual report to Congress, on the 3d
of December,, 1845, in recommending the adoption of the constitutional
Treasury, the foliowing^observations were made:
''Nor will it be useful to establish a constitutional Treasury if it is to
'receive or disburse the paper of banks."
" If paper, in whatever fbrm or from whatever source it may issue,
' should be introduced as a circulation by the constitutional Treasury, it
' would precisely to that extent diminish its use as a means of circula' ting gold and silver."
During and be.fore the commencement ofthe last session of Congress,
it was thought by many that this measure could not operate successfully
during war,, and that large loans could not be negotiated if the payments
were required in specie. The Department, however, adhered' to the
recommendations of its first report, believing that the Government would
be rendered stronger by the divorce; and that, if the Treasury should
resort to.banks to negotiate its loans or supply its revenue, both, if
the-war continued, would be involved, as-they were inihe war of 1812, .
in one common ruin. During the months of "June, July, and August
last, (per table N,) the sum of $6,000,000 , was transferred from the
assistant treasurer of New York for necessary disbursement al New Orleans and in Mexico. Heretofore, the pubhc money being deposited
with the banks, and loaned out to their customers, when such enormous
transfers were made, a contraction o f t h e banks with ruinous losses,
must have ensued; but the money ofthe Government is now transferred
from New York to New Orleans, and: scarcely affects business or the



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money market, because the trarisactions of the Government are disconnected from those of the banks. When the Government formerly
received and disbursed only the paper of banks, whenever a revulsion
and numerous bankruptcies occurred in England, the}^; universally reacted upon our periloiis paper system, so as to create a pressure in our
money market, a large and sudden contraction of the paper currency, a
ca:lling in of heavy loans by the banks, and, as a consequence, many
failures and most frequent suspensions of specie payments. Now, for
the first time in our history, although failures in England of the most
unprecedented magnitude have occurred, including banks and bankers,
yet our banks and credit are sound and stable, and the business of the
country is still prosperous and progressive.
Nothing is more injurious to all classes, but especially to our manufacturers, than the expansions, contractions,, and fluctuations of the bank
paper system, vibrating with every considerable change of the public
moneys held by them as depositories. This perilous and seductive bank
paper system opens temporarily and beyond the wants of the country,
a market here for foreign imports, not in exchange for exports, but for
credit;, the redemption of which drains the country of its specie, contracts the paper currency, forces, at a sacrifice, the sale of domestic
fabrics, and depresses the industry of the whole country. Domestic
ma:nufactures require for their permanent and successful operation the
basis of specie, checking vibrations a:nd inflations of the paper system,,
confining our imports to the wants of the country, and preventing the
temporary purchase of foreign goods fbr credit, and not for exports,
which always results in disturbance of the money market and in injury
to the country. If our manufacturers desire great advantages from the
• hdme market, it must be abundantly and permanently supplied with a
large specie circulatipn, which alone can sustain that market for a niimber of years, and prevent those calamities which must follow an inflated
paper currency. A home market for our manufactures, when based
upon specie and low duties, is solid, permanent, and augmenting; but
when founded upon paper credits, it is inflated one year only to be depressed the next, or some succeeding year—thus depriving the rnanufacturer of any well-assured and permanent domestic rnarket. The bank
deposite year, (1836,) when we were importing grairi, contrasted .with
1847:—the year of divorce of the Government from banks—exhibits the
delusive inflation of the one,with its succeeding disasters, and the solid
prosperity of the other; resisting thus far, to a great extent, the revulsion
in England, and proving the. good effects of the union of low duties and
the specie-receiying and specie-circulating constitutional Treasury.
I renew my former recommendation for the establishment of a branch
of the mint of the United States at the city of New York. Duringthe
last eleven months, commencing on the 1st ofJanuary last, the ainount
of coin actua.lly paid in to the assistant treasurer at that city was (as per
table. H H ) $29,904,744 19, nearly all of which was in foreign coin—a
large portiori ofwhich', as far aspracticable^ was.transferred and recoined
into our own coin at the mint at Philadelphia. The whole of that foreign
coin, however, ought to have been at once recoined at the.city where it
was. received, and, in addition, the large amount of coiri and bullion



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[1847.

which is constantly arriving there, and does not. find its way into the
office of the assistant treasurer, but, as foreign coin, is deposited with
the banks, and never becomes a circulation to any great extent among
the community, all which \vould also be-at once converted into American :coin, without Ipss or delay, if a branch of the mint were located at
the great emporium ofthe commerce of the Union. . :
;,.._
Under the salutary provisions df the constitutional Treasury law,' the
experience of this year has proved that a sum inot exceeding $3,000,000
is all that need be retained in the Treasury as a surplus to meet the
wants of Government, or to supply the rnint and branch mints with an
abundant and sufficient sum for coinage, thus saving, in this way,, the
interest,dn $1,000,000 to our couritryc The treasurer of the mint at
Philadelphia, and ofthe branch mint at New Orieans, are also assistant
treasurers, to -and from whom transfers of specie (nearly all ofwhich is
received in foreign .coiri) can be made under the provisions" ofthe constitutional Treas.ury. Urider the act of 9th February, 1793, providing for
the recoinage ofldreign coin,at the mint, instructions were issued by me
to carry that act fully into effect. Under "these orders, transfers are
made ofthe foreign coin to the mint and branch mints for recoinage, and
the amount coined since the 1st January last, up to the 1st December,
was $20,758,048 12, of which the sum of $3,085,953 SO .was. coiried
in the month of Noyember, 1847; and if this should be continued fdr the
present month, it would make the coinage of the first yeai' ofthe constitutional Treasury $2-3,844,001 92.
' • Table R exhibits the yearly coiimge from 1793 to 1st December, 1847,
amounting in the.whole to $143,238,370 54; showing that the amount
coined this year would be about one-sixth of the aggregate coined in the
fifty-five years from the first coinage in 1793 to the close of the present
year. .
^
. - •
' Table S gives the coinage each month this year from.the 1st January
to the 30th November.
Most of this coinage has been,, by converting foreign gold coins, which
will not circulate among our people, into American gold coiri, which is now
going into much more general circulation; and during the ensuing year
it is expected that the coinage of specie from. the silver that must be
brought in from Mexico, in exchange for our imports there, as also for
l h e new issue of Treasury notes now asked from Congress as constituting a part ofthe loan recommended,will, it is believed, greatly augment
the coinage of silver during the ensuing year.
Under the export duty upon specie now existing in Mexico, it is believed
that when the new Ti'easury notes now asked for shall be issued, they
may be sold, it is to be hoped, to a considerable extent, on account of
the Government, for specie, at a premium in Mexico; and as the Government funds will not be subject to the export duty, the specie niay be
liroughtinto the cduritry bythis Department, in exchange for these notes,
and recoined at the mint in New Orleans into Americari coin..
It has been seen thatthe amount of foreign coin, or bulliori, coined
this year at.our mint and branch mints, urider the new orders of this
Department, estimating December the same as November, would, be
$23,844,001 92; at which rate we would soon supply our own peop.le



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SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

133

with our own coin, and in time, also, with our augmenting commerce,
Americanize, to a great extent, the. coin of the world; and thus introduce
our simple and beautiful decimal currency gradually throughout all riations,"
substituting it .fpr the complex system' of pounds, shillings, and pence, or
of doubloons, ducats, and rupees, which retards business and complicates
accounts. •,
Heretofore, the world has supplied us with foreign coin, which will
not circulate among our people, because df its extreme complexity; but
now our own coiri is flowing into the channels of our d wri circulation, and
must soon begin to diffuse itself into other natioris for their benefit as well
as our own. The three things which most concern the progress of the
wealth of the world, are free trade, and uniformity in coinage and in
weights arid measures. Coins, as weights and measures, for the benefit
of all nations, ought- to be uniform throughout the world; and if our
decimal systerri of cdinage should be more simple and perfect than that
of any other natiori, it dught to be, and ultimately, will be, adopted, and
lead, as far as practicable, to the introduction of the decimal system of
weights and measures, or at least its simplification, so that ultimately the
coin and the weights and measures may be simple and uniform throughout the world.
Table T shows the imports and. exports of specie for the fiscal years
ending 30th June, 1846, and 30th June, 1847; being for 1846 an import
of $3,777,732, and the export $3,481,417, leaving the gainof specie that
year $296,315; and in 1847, the specie imported-was $24,121,2'89, and
the export $1,845,119, leaving the specie gairied in 1847, $22,2.76,170.
Table U shows the amount receiyed in specie frpm all sources—-customs, lands,. miscellaneous, and loaris, from 1st January, 1847, to 1st
December, 1847, being .$48,667,886 18, and the amount of disbursements in specie during the same period, $48,226,516 3 1 ; showing the
aggregate ofreceipts and disbursements in. specie during thefirst eleven
months of t h e ' n e w system,, $96,894,402'49^ and proving that the
Department has beeri enabled, during the last eleven months, to circulate
by disbursements among the people the sum of $48,226,516-31, under
the specie-receiving and specie-circulating constitutional Treasury.
Annexed are tables (marked 1 and 2)' showing the market value, as
also the actual sales of Treasury notes and •United-'. States stock in the
market at New York and New Orleans, from the prices current of thdse
cities, from December 1, 1846, to December 1, 1847; as also a table
(KK) showing, the amount of Treasury notes received each month in
payment for duties-—$2,029,900 in the whole froni 1st December, 1846,
to 1st December, 1847 ; from which Congress may judge ofthe probable
rate at which another loan can be effected. These tahles show how
much these stocks and notes have fluctuated, being at a rate occasionally
below par, for a long time a t ' par, subsequently seyeral per cent, above
par, and again, upon the 1st of the present month, at par in New York
and New Orleans. These notes (per table KK) were paid in for public
dues during every month from 1st December, 1846, to 1st December,
1847, to the amount of $2,029,900'; and during April, 1847—the month
in which the loan for them was negotiated at a premium—they were
paid in fdr customs to the amount of $101,850. They, are now being




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[1847.

used, to some extent, in payments to the Governirient, and may be
regarded as at paj. The total amount ofthe Treasurynotes advertised
was $18,000,000, and the ainount of the bids, as exhibited in table 3,
hereto annexed, $57,722,983.; of which the sum of $2,839,800 was bid
for at par, and" $54,883,183 above par. The notes were assigned to the
highest bidders, at rates varying from one-eighth of one per cent, to two
per cent, above par—all the lower bids being, of course, rejected; and
the table last above mentioned wiU exhibit fully and in detail the cdurse
pursued on that occasion. The law conferred the power td have
exchanged all these notes fbr specie, without advertisement, with any one,
at or above par; but, in hopes of obtaining a premium fbr the loan in
whole or in part, bids were invited for the ainount of $18,000,000.
Annexed is a copy of 'the advertisement for this loan, (marked 5,)
dated Oth of February, 1847, having been issued during the session of
Congress, and extensively published throughout the Union, from the 9th
of February to the 10th of April, 1847. The remainder of the loan
beyond the amount advertised was exchanged at par,'partly for inoney
to be deposited without charge at New Orleans, where the wants ofthe
Government were great, and the rest paid out chiefly in Treasury notes,
at par to the Smithsonian Institution, also to other creditors of the Government ; the notes at that time being generally at par, and the wants
of the Government requiring the use of. the money before it could be
obtained upon the advertisement. On the 22d October, 1846, (as per
printed notice hereto annexed, marked 4,)-the Department.advertised
for the exchange of $3,000,000 of Treasury notes at par for deposites of
specie with the assistant treasurers. For a considerable time but very
few of such deposites were made, or Treasury notes thus takeri; and
from this long delay, and continued reluctance upon the part o f t h e community in taking these Treasury notes at par, although at any time
after the 28th of January last they were convertible into the twenty
years' six per cent, stock at par, many of the notes heretofbre offered at
par not having been taken at the date of my advertisement ofthe Oth of
February last, serious doubts were entertained whether the whdle of the
new loan could be taken at or above par. It had been usual heretofore
with my predecessors, in advertising for loans, to emit no sum to any
individual under $25,000; but, with a view to insure the largest possible
subscription, and at the best rates, and to diffuse the loan as far as practicable throughout all classes df the community, bids were authorized to
be received by the advertisement as low as the lowest denomination of
Treasury notes permitted by law—namely, fifty dollars. It was the
duty of lhe Department to accept nothing but specie—being the first
loan ever negotiated in specie from the foundation of the Government
down to that date, and the first loan, .except that of last fall, ever thus
negotiated at or above par during a period of wa.r. The magnitude of
the loan, the fluctuations below par of the previous stock and notes, the
untried, arid, to many, ala'rming restraining operation of the constitu-"
tional Treasury, the heavy expenditures of the war, and the requireinent
of all the payments from-time to time in specie, were deemed by many
as insupei'able obstacles to the negotiation ofthe whole ofthe loan at or
above par. But, under-the salutary provisions df the coristitutional




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Treasury, the credit of the Governinent was in truth enhance^d by
receiving and disbursing nothing but coin; thus placing all its transactions upon a basis more sound and entitled to higher credit than when
it held no specie, had no money in its own possession, and none even,
in the banks to pay its creditors but bank paper. Then, it was dependent
upon the credit of the banks, and was subjected to every fluctuation
which affected their credit. Now, it stands upon the basis of specie, so
as to be above all suspicion of discredit, whilst by its demand for coin
for revenue payments it sustains- not only its own credit,^but renders
more safe the credit and currency and business ofthe whole Union.
By the act of Congress of 3d March, 1845, this Department was
authorized to select a plan fbr the erection of a custom-house in the city
of New. Orleans. By the act of 3d March, 1847, the sum of $100;000
was appropriated towards the erection of the custom-house, on the custom-house square, or so much thereof as could be procured by the
Department. After some delay, I was enabled to obtain a cession from
the first municipality of New Orleans ofthe whole of this square, which
niunificent donation to the Governinent has been estimated as of nearly
the value of $500,000. Commissioners have been appointed to aid in
carrying the law into effect, and instructions issued to them, a copy of
which is hereto annexed. Much time was occupied and great attention
bestowed in examining the various plans and estimates submitted. As
a custom-house is designed exclusively for the transaction of business,
everything calculated merely for ornament or display was rejected, and
that plan selected which united good taste with the greatest ecoiiomy
and the largest and best accommodations.
In a building of such magnitude and importance, it appeared to me
necessary, befbre expending any part of the appropriation, to procure
the best talents that could be obtained to direct the construction of the
work; and I have, it is believed, succeeded in securing the services of
a gentleman of high scientific attainments and great practical experience. Upon my application to the War Department, Major William
TurnbriU, of the Topogmphical Corps, will, it is hoped, be detailed for
this work. The great aqueduct across the Potomac, at Georgetown,
admitted both in Europe and in this country to be one of the greatest
works of .the age, was constructed under the direction of this gentleman;
and wherever he is known, the greatest confidence is reposed in his
talents and worth, and especially in his judicious and economical expenditure of the public jnoney. Further estimates arid specifications will
be submitted to Corigress at the earliest practicable period. The
thanks of this Departrnent have been already tendered to the first municipality of New Oiieans for the munificent donation ofthe entire customhouse square made by them to the Government. In other cities where
custom-houses have been erected^ large sums were paid by the Government, merely for the ground; but here, the best site in New Orleans,
covering an entire square, has been bestowed as a gift;- and this fact,
together with the great and growing commerce of New Orleans, the
iricreased and increasing" revenues collected there, being the. depot of
the greatest and richest valley- of the, globe, and destined to surpass in
, business, wealth, and population, nearly every other city, renders it just



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[1847.

and proper that a building commensurate with the future growth and
progress of New Orleans should be erected, and that it should be placed
upon an equal footing with other cities where Congress have paid for both
the ground and the building; and it will be the anxious desire of this
Department, with the sanction of Congress, to make the building a
model of usefulness and economy. The action of the Department as to
the erection of other custom-houses authorized by Congress, wilf be
made the subject o f a special report at an early period of the session.
This Department has proceeded, aided-by the Fifth Auditor of the
Treasury and the Chief of the Topographical Bureau, to carry into effect
the act ofthe 3d ofMarch, 1847, requiring the Secretary of the Treasui;y
to cause certairi hght-houses and-other public works to.be erected, as
well as to execute the other duty devolved upon the Department in
regard to the light-house establishment. If we would extend our foreign
and coastwise trade, and riiake our country^ the depot of universal commerce, our coast as well as lakes must be well lighted, and the coastsurvey must ascertain and give accurate, minute, and faithful charts of
a.11 the points accessible to cominerce. In my report to Congress of the
5th August, 1846, our light-house system was fuhy discussed, £ coin-^
parison instituted between it and the European system, and the refracting
or lenticular apparatus strongly recominended to the adoption of Congress. At the same time the Department suggested the organization of
a board, attended with no expense, consisting of the Fifth Auditor, the
Superintendent bf the Coast Survey, two officers ofthe Navy, an officer
of the Engineers, as also of the Topographical Corps, who would combine the infbrmation possessed by no one individual as regards our coast
and navigation, the location and construction of the houses, the proper
apparatus to he employed in lighting, as well as to the administrative
duties appertaining td the system. As the safety of life as well as property is involved in the improvement of our light-house system,'the. drganization of this board is respectfully recominended to the consideration of
Congress.
The survey of the coast of the United States under the superintendence of Professor A. D. .Bache, has made great and rapid progress,
having been carried during the past year into eighteen States on • the
Atlantic arid Gulf of Mexico, including Maine on the northeast, and
Texas on the southwest. The publication of the results has also kept
•pace with the extension of the field work. ,The plan develoi3ed by the
superintendent, in successive annual reports, for -the execution of this
work, and the estimates, have received the approval of this Department.'
The sums asked for are believed to be the smallest consistent with the
due progress of this great work. The introduction df steam vessels in
the hydrographic will tend greatly to exped.itc .that branch of the coast
survey.
Annexed is a table marked L L , containing the value and description of
foreign goods, in warehouse, at the close of the last'quarter, in the several
ports ofthe Union. By the^ warehousing act this Department is required
to make such regulations from time tolime as m a y b e necessary to give
full effect to the law, and to report to each succeeding. session of Congress such. regulations. Those heretofbre made under the large and



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continuous discretionary powers granted by this.act to the Department,
were reported to Congress a t t h e last session. After examining-the
practical working ofthe system under these regulations, it seemed to me
susceptible of improvement;. and as it was entirely new here, I proceeded
to collect inforination in regard to i t i n those countries where it had been,
for so many years, in full and successful operation. Accordingly Messrs.
C. C. Waiden and D. P . Barhydt, ofthe New York custom-house, were
sent by me to Europe last August, under specific and detailed instructions (a copy of which is annexed) to investigate the operation' of the
systein in Great Britain and elsewhere in Europe, and report to me the
results. The warehousing system as it exists in Great Britain, as also in
France and Belgium, was investigated by them—the fullest information
being kindly affbrded to them by the gentlemen connected with those
establishments abroad, and especially in Great Britain.. All the details
were obtained by them and communicated in an able and voluminous
report to me, with an apperidix covering several volumes of general as
well as specific and detailed information, together with all the forms for
the transaction df business, arid the most full and minute information as
to the mode of conducting the samd. The system was found to be the
most perfect in Great Britairi, where it had long been in successful operation and cherished by all parties, whether for or against protection.
It is one of the priricipal means by which Great Britain has built up her:
commerce arid navigation, extended the mari^et for her,fabrics, and placed
under her contrdl for so many years: the exchanges and trade o f t h e
world. She has thus made London the great depot where not only all
her own fabrics could be purchased, but also assorted' cargoes of the
products and fabrics of all other nations. According to the report of
these gentlemen, the value of the goods of all kinds in warehouse in
Great Britain is $387,200^000. The buildings, docks, and structures
erected under free competition, almost exclusively by private enterprise,
for the convenient storage ofthese goods in London, are estimated lo have
cost $40,000,000. Great as was the importance attached by this De-^
partment to the introduction here of the warehousing system, and earnest
as was the recommendatipn for it in my first annual report, the results,
as ascertained in England, surpass my highest expectations. There it
is regarded by their intelligent mariufacturers as among the most important ineans of bringing customers to their own doors to purchase assorted
cargoes, including their own manufactures.
It is thus Great Britain seeks, for the products of aUher industry, the
markets of the world; and this is what we must do, if we would compete with her successfully for those markets for the products of aU our
industry, including inanufactures. The report of Messrs. Waiden and
Barhydt has been very recently made to me, and is herewith communicated to Congress, retaining for reference the voluminous appendices in
the Department, subject, however, at all tiines, to the call of Congress.
At the earliest practicable period I will make such further regulations
as are authorized by the powers delegated to me by the fifth section of
the' warehousing act, and. will report the same to Congress. The American manufacturer, the farmer and planter, in enlarged markets at home
and abroad, and in the sale of their products and fabrics to complete



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[1847.

assortments, will derive the greatest advantage from the system; whilst
the merchant and those concerned in navigation will find an increased
business and augmenting profits; • property in our warehousing cities will
be rendered more valuable, and every branch of industry stimulated and
improved. A. cominercial nation without warehousing accommodations
is like a merchant without a store-house; and no nation can enter upon
the field of fair and open competition with other countries without such
a system.
The new tariff has now been in operation more than twelve' months,
and has greatly augmented the revenue and prosperity of the country.
The net revenue from duties (see table NN) during the twelve months
ending the 1st of December, 1847, under the new tariff, is $31,500,000;
Being $8,528,596 more than was received during the twelve inonths.preceding, under the tariffof 1842. The net revenue ofthe first quarter of
the-first fiscal year-, under the new tariff, was'$ll,106,257 4 1 ; whilst in
the same quarter of the preceding year, under the tariff of 1842, the net
revenue was only $6,153,826 58. If the revenue for the three remaining quarters should equal in the average the first, then the net revenue
from duties, during the first fiscal year of the riew tariff', would be
$44,425,029 64. If, however, the comparison is founded on all the
quarterly returns for forty-eight years, (as far back as given quarteiiy in
the Treasury records,) and the same proportion for the several quarters
applied to the first quarter of this year, it would make its net revenue
$40,388,045, (per table C.) Although the net revenue from duties
already receiy.ed, being $15,506,257 41 during the five months of this
fiscal year, would seem to indicate its probable amount as not less than
$35,000,000, yet it is estimated at $31,000,000 for the fiscal year eriding
the 30th of June, 1848, and $32,000,000 for the succeeding year, in view
ofthe possible effects of the revulsion in Great Britain. Although our
prosperity is ascribed by some to the famine there, as though Providence
had made the advance of one country to depend upon the calamities of
another, yet it is certairi that dur trade with Great Britain must be
greater in a series of years, when prosperity would enable her to buy
more from us, (and especially cottouj) and at better prices, and sell us
more in exchange, accompanied by an augmentation of revenue. •
In my report of the 22d of July," 1846, it was shown that the annual
value of our products exceeds three thousand milhons of dollars. Our
population doubles once in every twenty-three years, and our products
quadruple in the same period—that being the time within which a, sum,
compounding itself quarter-yearly, at six per cent, interest, will be quadrupled—asis sustained here bythe actual results. ' Of this three thousand
millions ofdollars, only about $150,000,000 w.as exported abroad, leaving $2,850,000,000 used at home; of which, at least, $500,000,000 is
annually interchanged between the" several States ofthe Union. Under
this system, the larger the area,.and the greater the variet}^ of chmate,
soil, and products, the.more extensive is^ the commerce which must exist
between the States, and the greater the value of the Union. • We see .
then, here, under the system of free trade ainong the States ofthe Union,
an interchange of products of the annual value of at least $500,000,000
among our twenty-one milhons of pedple; w.hilstthe total amount of our



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139

exchanges, including imports and exports with all the world besides, (containing a population of a thousand mihions,) was last year $305,194,260;
being an increase since the new tariff', over the preceding year, of
$70,014,647; yet the exchanges between our States, consisting of a population of twenty-one. millions, being ofthe yearly value of $500,000,000,
inakes such exchange of our own country equal to $23 8 1 per individual,
annuaUy, of our own products, and reduces the exchange of our own
and foreign products, (our imports and exports corisidered as $300,000,000
with all the rest ofthe world,) to the annual value of thirty cents to each
individual; that is, one person of the Union receives and exchanges,
annually,-of our own products, as much as seventy-nine persons of other
countries. Were, this exchange with foreign countries extended to ninety
cents each, it would bring our imports and exports up to $900,000,000
per annum, and raise our annual revenue from duties to a sum exceeding
$90,000,000. An addition of thuty cents each to the consumption of
our products exchanged from State to State by our own people, would
furnish an increased market of the value only of $6,300,000; whereas,
an increase of thirty cents each, by a system of liberal exchanges with
the people of all the world, would give us a market fbr an additional
value of $300,000,000 per annum of our exports. Such an addition
cannot occur by refusing to receive in exchange the products of other
nations, and demanding the $300,000,000 per annum in specie, which
could never be supplied. But, by receiving foreign prpducts at low
duties in exchange for our exports, such an augmentation might take
place. The only obstacles to such exchanges are- the duties and the
freights. But the freight from New Oiieans to Boston differs but little
from that between Liverpool and Boston; and the freight from many
points in the interior is greater than from England to the United States.
Thus the ayerage freight from the Ohio river to Baltimore is greater than
from the same place to Liverpool, yet the annual exchange of products
between the Ohio and Baltirnore exceeds by many millions that between
Baltimore and Liverpool. . The Canadas and adjacent provinces uj)on
our borders, with a population less than two millions, exchange imports
and exports with us less in amount than the State of Connecticut, with
a population of 300,000; showing that, if these provinces were united
with us by free trade, our annual exchanges with' them would rise to
$40,000,000. It is not the freight, then, that created the chief obstacle -•
to the interchange of products between ourselves and foreign countries,
but the dutie.s. When we reflect, also, that the exchange of products •
depends ' chiefly upon diversity, which is greater between our owri
country and the rest of the world, than between the different States of
the Union, under a system of reciprocal free trade with a:ll the world,
the augmentation arising from greater diversity of products would equal
the diminution caused by fieight. Thus the southern Sta.tes exchange
no cotton with each other, nor the western States flour, nor the manufac. turing States like fahrics.. Diversity of products is essential to exchanges;
and if England and America were united by absolute free trade, the
reciprocal exchanges between them would soon far exceed the whole
foreign commerce df both; a.rid with reciprocal free trade with all nations,
our own countr}?-, with its' preeminent advantages, would measure its



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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

annual trade in impoits and exports by thousands of millipns ofdollars.
^
In my last annual report, and that which preceded it, it was proved
that the horrie market was wholly inadequate for our vast agricultural
products. We ha.ve long had, for grain and provisions, the undivided
markets of our own people. But these are not sufficient; and in a
single year we have, with abundance of food retained at home, supplied
the world with an addition at once during the last yearj as shown by
table AA, of $41,332,282 in value oJf breadstuffs and provisions, bringing,
the value exported that year up to $65,906,273. Our manufacturers
could riot have consumed this surplus, or their non-consuming machiries,
which are substituted in their workshops for the labor of man. If the
energy of our own people can add $41,332,282 to the export and.supply
of our breadstuffs and provisions in a single year, what could they not
add to such products if they enjoyed free of duty .the markets of the
world? By table BB, it appears that the augmentation of our domestic
exports, exclusive of specie, last year, compared with the preceding,
was $48,856,802, or upwards of 48 per cent.; and at the same rate per
cent, per annum of aiigmentation, would amount in 1849, per table CC,
to $329,959,993, or much greater than the domestic. export from State
to State. (See tables from 7 to 12, inclusive.) The future percentage
of increase may not be so great; but our capacity for such increased
production is proved to exist, and that we could furnish these exports
far "above the domestic demand, if they could be exchanged free of duty
in the ports of all nations.
The energetic American freeman can and does perform far more
effective labor in a day than what is called by the restrictionists the
pauper labor of Europe; and, therefore, the employer here can pay
more for a day's toil to our wdrkingmen. Measured by the day, the
wages here may be higher than in Europe; but measured by the work
done on that day, there is but little difference. And when all our capitalists (as some already have) shall find it to be their true interest, in
addition to the, wages paid to the American workman, to aUow him
voluntarily, because it augments the profits of capital, a fair interest in
those profits, and,elevate him to the rank of a partner in the concern,
we may then defy all competition. This is the same principle, illustrated
by uniform experience, proving that he who rents, his farm, builds his
house, sails his ships, or conducts any other business upon shares,
realizes the largest return, and that he who works by the job produces
more in the same time than the. laborer whose wages are paid by the
day. The skill, energy, and industry, the interest and pride in success,
the vigilance and perseverance that will be manifested by our intelligent
workingmen under such a system, will far more than refund to capital
such reasonable participation in its profits, and enable such American
establishments to. supply all the nations ofthe world. The introduction
of this system will be voluntary, because it is most just and berieficial
to all paities. It is the*participation of all pur people in the Gdvernment,.
that is one great cause of our prosperity; and the participation of our
workingmen in the profits of our industriaLl establishmerits would exhibit
sirpilar results. Our whale and other fisheries present strong evidences




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141

of the success attending American industry, where our intelligent freemen—the workingmen of the concern, stimulated by a just participation
in the profits—have driven from the most distant seas the whale-ships
of most other nations, and nearly monopolized this pursuit. The intelligent workingmen of our country are far better prepared for the adoption
of this truly republican systein than Ihose of any other nation; and this
elevation of the toiling millions of America to a just participation in the
profits of that capital which is made, fruitful oni}?- by their industry, will
yet enjoy as great a triumph as that unfettered trade and untaxed and
unrestricted labor with which it ought to be, and certainly yet will be,
proudly associated. Urider this system, the laboring men, whilst they^
receive the full wages heretdfore allowed them, would also participate^^
to a reasonable extent, in the profits, as an addition to their wages, and
a most powerful and certain stimulus to. render their Jabor more productive, and thus increase, for the benefit of all concerned,.the capitahst
jand workingman, the profits of the establishment. What is called the
pauper labor of Europe, is already inferior to our labor, but would be
rendered still more, powerless to compete with us when labor here
participated with capital in. the profits. When we reflect. that the
working freemen of the Uriion m u s t constitute the great mass of the
people whose votes will control the Government, and direct the policy
of the nation, the superior comfort, education, intelligence, and infbrma,tion necessarily resulting to them from this improvement of our social
system, are important to the successful progress and perpetuity of our
free institutions, and must be grateful to every republican patriot and
lover of mankind. Whilst all have derived great benefits from the new
system, it is labor that has realized the largest reward. It was contended by the advocates of protection that it enhanced the wages of
labor, and that low duties would reduce wages here to the rate allowed
to. what they call the pauper labor of Europe. On the contraiy, the
opponents of high' tariffs insisted that labor, left to- seek freely the
markets ofthe world, would find for its products the best prices, and,
as a consequence, the highest reward for the labor by which the)?- were
produced.
The duties have been reduced, and yet wages have
advanced, and are higher now than under any protective tariff'. There
are many more workingmen, concerned in other pursuits than in manufactures, and with much less machinery as a substitute for labor; and
^by depressing agriculture, commerce, a:nd navigation—by restricting their
business arid the markets for their products—the wages of those engaged
in such pursuits are reduced; many workmen also lose emplo3mient;
and, competing for work in ma.nufactures, the wages of all are diminished.
It is not/Only the reduced duties that have produced these happy
results, but the-mode of reduction—the substitution of ad! valorem for unequal and oppressive minimum and specific duties. The higher duty
was thus alwaj^s irnposedj.by the very nature ofthe duty, upon the articles of the. lowest value, consumed by the poor, and the lower duty
assessed upon the articles of higher value, used by the more wealthy,
often operating as a duty of 10, 20, or 30 per cent, upon the high-priced
goods, and of 100, or 200 per cent, ad valorem upon articles of lower



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[1847.

price. Neaiiy the entire burden of the tariff was thus thrown upon
labor, by whose wages, chiefly, the cheaper articles were purchased,
whilst capital, with whose^ profits the more costly goods were bought,
was almost exempt from the tax. It never would haye been tolerated
to have iinposed a duty of 10, 20, or 30 per cent., by name, upon costly
articles, and 100 or 200 per cent, upon cheaper fabrics, when the ad
valorem x'diles woxAd have exhibited" the injustice and inequality of the
duty; but it was accomplished by minimum and specific duties, which
assessed a higher duty, in proportion to value, upon the cheaper articles,
and the lower dut}^ upon similar articles more costly in price, thus
imposing the higher duty upon labor and the wa.ges of labor as effectually
as though the tax-gatherer had coUected from the workingman a third
or fburth of his wages every day, whilst capital was comparatively exempt
from taxation. oSuch is the systein which has beeri overthrown b y the
substitution of the reduced ad valorem,, operating" the reverse of the
former system, in favor of the; poor and the wages of labor, as far as any
tariff can so operate, and, as we see, even with lower duties collecting a
larger revenue.. A tax in proportion to the value of imports or property
must always be more productive than one which is the reverse of that
rule, or which disregards it altogether. Thus, if we impose a tax of
ten doUars each upon all houses, it must produce less revenue than the
ad valorem tax in proportion to value, because the former.tax would fall
most heavily upon the poor, who are least able to bear it, and more .
lightly upon the wealthy, who had greater ineans of payment;.. and thereby
revenue would be diminished. Thus, if the tax of ten dollars were
imposed alike on the cabin and the costly dwelling, it would bring less
revenue than if the same rate ad valorem, beginning with the lowest, at
the rate of ten dollars, were assessed in proportion to value upon all
houses. Indeed,-the tax upon the cabin might be reduced to a dollar,
or say one per cent., and applied ad valorein to all dweUings, and it
would yield a larger revenue than the anti-ad valorem specific tax of
ten dollars updn all houses, irrespective of their value, which is no more
unjust or unequal than the same minimum or specific duties upon hats,
caps, boots, shoes, &c., and hke articles of import, without regard to
cheir value. The ad valorein duty incorporates itself inseparably with
the exact value of the article, and collects the tax in exact proportion to
the value—the form, which of all others, must yield the largest revenue.
Perhaps the most perfect model ofan anti-ad valorein tariff was that
of New Mexico, by which a. duty of $500 was imposed ori each wagon
load of goods introduced there, wholly irrespective ofthe value.
The great argument fbr protection is, that by diminishing imports the
balance of trade is turned iii our favor, bringing specie into the country.
The anti-protectionists^ contend that commerce is chiefly but an exchange
of imports for exports, and that in diminishing imports we will necessarily decrease exports in quantity or price, or both; that if we purchase
more imports we will sell more exports in exchange, and at a better price ;
and that, if commerce is profitable, we should have a larger balance of
trade in our favor, and usuaUy larg;er irriports of specie; and that the
profits of commerce, in the increased exchange of our own for foreign
products, augment the wealth of the nation. The four protective tariffs



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143

were enacted in 1816,1824, 1828, and 1842. The compromise act intervened from March, 1833, until after the 30th of August, 1842, and the
r-^yenue tariffof 1846 went into operation last year. Let us now look at
t\ :; effect of high and low tariffs upon the gain of specie during these
pt iods, from 1821, being the earliest date to which the records of the
Treasury go back on this subject. From the beginning of 1821 until the
commenceinent of 1833, and from the 30th Septeinber, 1842, until 1st'
Juty, 1846, our excess ofthe imports of specie over the exports was
$12,660,312, being an average annual gain of $791,216, in specie, during
these sixteen years of high tariffs, whilst the excess of specie during the
eleven years ofthe compromise act of 1833, and low tariff of 1846, was
$68,507,630, and the average annual gain of specie, $6,227,967. Omitting
the tariffs of 1842 and 1846, and comparing the ten years of comparatively
low duties, from 1833 to 1842, with the twelve years under protective
tariffs, from 1821 to 1832, we find under the latter an actual loss of
specie, to" the country, by the excess of the exports of specie over the
imports, of $3,851,652, as the result of protection, and a gain duiing the
succeeding ten years of comparatively low duties, of $46,294,090, or at
the rate, per annuin, of $4,629,409, and in the single year under the new
tariff, .a gain of $22,213,550, thus exhibiting a uniform gain of-specie in
the years of low as compared with high duties. The protective theory,
founded upon this assumed balance of trade and gain of specie under
high tariffs, is disproved by the results, and it is shown by the experience^
here of more than a fourth of a century, even as to specie, that it accumulates most rapidly by the gains of trade, under a liberal commercial
policy. Let us now see under the same cycles of free trade and protection, whether it is true, as contended, that our domestic exports are ndt
diminished by the restrictive system.
The records of the Treasury do not go back beyond 1821, as regards
our domestic exports exclusive of specie. W e must, therefore, make
the comparisori from that date. From 1821 to 1832, both inclusive,
under high duties, the aggregate of our exports of domestic produce,
exclusive of specie, was $653,157,527, or at the rate of $54,429,794
per annum. From 30th September, 1842, to^ 30th June, 1846, $377,391,500, or at the rate of $94,347,875 per annuin, inaking a total aggregate, during these sixteen years of high duties, of $1,030,549,027, or at
the rate of $64,409,314 per annum. During the compromise act, from
1833 tp30th September, 1842, the total of these exports was $956,168,288,
or at the rate of $95,616,828 per annum; and in the year ending 30th
June, 1847, $150,574,844, making, in the eleven years of Idw duties, an
aggregate of $1,106,743,132,'or at the rate of $100,613,012, being an
average gain under low as compared with high duties, of domestic
exports, exclusive of specie, of $36,203,698 per annuin, and excluding
altogether the last year, a gain of $31,207,514 per annum under low as
compared with high duties.
Having thus shown, both as to specie and domestic exports, the great
gain in years of low as cdmpared with high duties, let us now compare
the low duty and high duty cycles as to our tonnage,' foreign and coastwise.
'
Duiing the eighteen years of low duties, from 1789 to 1807, (see tables



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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

MM and SS,) our tonnage increased at the rate of 2-9 41-lOOthsper cent,
per annum; 1832 to 18,42, at the rate of 4 53-lOOths per cent, per annum;
and from 1846 to 1847, 10 81-lOOths per c e n t in a single year. Such
has been the uniform high rate of increase of our tonnage during every
period of low duties. Now, under high, tariffs, from 1816 to 1832, our
tonnage increa:sed 0 30-lOOths per cent., being less than one-third of one
per cent, per annum; and from 1842 to 1846, at the rate of 5 61-lOOths
per cent, per annum. If it is said that the increase from 1789 to 1807
was occasioned, to someextent, by the war between France and Engiand,
the table which is taken. from the records of the Treasury shows that,
from 1789 to the close of 1792, immediately preceding that war, which
was declared early in 1793j our tonnage increased at the high rate of
60 16-lOOths per cent, per annum, when France and England were at
peace, before the era of steam navigation, and before the acquisition of
Louisiana and the addition ofthe great Mississippi and the Mexican gulf
to the navigable waters of the Union, and when our flag was unknown
on the great lakes.of the Northwest. The great increase is unifbrm at
all times under low duties, and depressed under high duties, during the
whole period of 58years, from 1789 to 1847.
„
It is urged, however, that although our foreign commerce may have
decreased, yet the home maii?:et has augmented in a ratio morethan,
equivalent to the loss of our fbreign trade. If this w'ere so, it would be
exhibited in the augmentation of our coastwise trade, embracing our
lakfes and coasts, as well as rivers; the coastwise tonnage, of course,
augmenting in the riumber of vessels, with the goods to be transported
between .the States. By reference to the same tables, it appears that our
coastwise tonnage increased,- from 1789 to 1807, at the rate of 22 71lOOths per cent, per annum; from 1789 to 1792,. at the rate of 25 23lOOths per cent, per annuin; from 1832 to 1842, at the rate of 6 9-lOOths
per cent, per annum; .and in the single year, from 1846 to 1847, 13 15lOOths per cent. Such was the great and uniform increase of our coastwise tonnage under low duties. Now, under high duties, the increase,
from 1816 to 1832, was at the rate of 1 50-lOOths per cerit. per annum,
and, from 1842 to 1846, 6 45-lOOths per cent, per annum. Thus we
see an immerise increase, under low as bompai'ed with high duties, ofthe
coastwise tonnage; proving that the paralysis of foreign, commerce,
resulting from the restrictive system affects injurious^ the home market
and the trade between the Stktes, and furnishing a demonstrative - proof
that, whether we look at home or abroad, we .progress more rapidly
under a liberal commercial policy. As the foreign tonnage rose under
low duties, (as the tables prove,) so did the cpastwise; and as the foreign
tonnage declined, so also didthe coastwise tonnage; and during the high
^duties from 1816 to 1832, whilst the fpreign tonnage actually decreased
at the rate of 0 88-lOOths per cent, per annum, the coastwise tonnage
only increased at the rate o f l 50-lOOths per cent, per annum. Yet
during that period the increase of the coastwise trade ought to have been
imrnense, including, as it did, the era of the introduction of steam riavigation, to a vast extent, upon the rivers of the West, as also upon the
.lakes ofthe Northwest, and the opening ofthe great canal of New York.
It is said the famine in Ireland was the sole cause of onr late large



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145

export of breadstuffs and provisions. Now, from 1790, these values
are not given so as to be stated in amounts; but the quantities are, and
these prove that, even omitting the last year altogether, and comparing
the low duty periods, from 1790 to 1807, and from 1833 to 1842, with
the years of protection, from 1817 to 1832, and from 1842 to 1846, the
average export of breadstuffs and provisions was much larger in the
years of low as compared with high duties, especially considering the
difference of population.
As a still more conclusive proof that the export of breadstuffs and
provisions was much greater under low than high duties, it appears by
table DD, that our total export of cotton from 1790 to 1807, both inclusive, was of the value of $81,074,843, and during the same period our
export of domestic produce, exclusive of cotton, was $530,411,134,
making our exports of domestic produce, exclusive of cotton, at the rate,
from 1790 to 1807, of $29,467,285, which, it will.be perceived at once,
vastly exceeds the average annual exports of domestic produce, exclusive
of cotton, under years of high duties.
Indeed, the tables of the Treasury clearly prove that, whether we look
at imports or exports, the revenue, the gain of specie, the tonnage, coastwise or foreign, the coinage of the mint, or the export of breadstuffs and
provisions, the balance is largely in favor of the low duty periods.
The Department has thus reviewed the books of the Treasury, and
presented the results, constituting the record of a nation's history from
the formation of the Government down to the present period, in condemnation of the protective policy. These records show, as to imports
and exports, revenue, the gain of specie, the tonnage, foreign and coastwise, the rate of increase, in each and all of these cases, is greater under
low than high duties. These records are not arguments merely, but
ascertained results, amounting to mathematical proof, that the nation's
advance in wealth is most rapid under low duties, thus sustaining the
views of those great philosophical writers, unconnected with party, who,
both in Europe and America, have uniformly maintained the same
position. Comparing the first twelve months, ending the 1st of December, 1847, under the new tariff, with preceding years, we find proofs of
ncreased prosperity. The revenue has largely augmented; so, also,
ave the imports and exports and tonnage; our imports of specie; our
linage at the mint; our agricultural and mineral products; our com3rce and navigation; the business upon our lakes, rivers, and coastIse; upon our railroads and canals; whilst in every direction manufacies are being established or enlarged, and new manufacturing towns
1 cities are springing into existence. Even the revulsion in England,
ch always produces such disasters to all our great interests, including
on, this year, with the famine combined, affects nothing thus far,
Spared with former years, but the great staple of cotton. Instead of
.an, we find prosperity, the manufacturers receiving fair profits, and the
workingmen augmented wages and employment. Coal and iron are in
greater demand, and bringing better prices, than before the repeal of the
tariff of 1842. Yet they can derive no portion of their augmented price
rom that famine abroad to which is attributed by some all our existing
>rosperity, but which famine, in fact, is causing a temporary drain of
VOL. V I . — 1 0 .




146

REPORTS OF THE

[1847.

specie to England, not to pay balances, but because bills are discredited,
which has for the time depressed the price of cotton, and which is the
only brief check at this period to our advancing prosperity. If, as is
truly the case, our wealth is connected with the mines, the forest, and
fisheries, our agriculture, commerce, manufactures, and navigation are
more prosperous, and, above all, wages are augmented—why should we
change the existing system ? The predictions of its failure. have themselves failed. The new tariff is no longer an experiment; the problem
is solved, and experience proves that the new system yields more revenue,
enhances wages, and advances more rapidly the public prosperity. In
the midst of all this success, why put in jeopardy, by any change,
the nation's revenue and welfare? When free trade is advancing
so rapidly throughout the world, shall we retrograde, and invite Great
Britain to reenact her corn laws, and drive again from her ports our
breadstuffs and provisions? And now, when, under our successful example, the ports of Europe are most probably about being more widely
opened to all our exports, shall we check the advancing spirit of the age,
and extinguish the dawning light of commercial freedom? Everywhere
nations are being aroused upon this subject; their statesmen are resisting
the interested classes, and exposing the injury and injustice of shackles
upon trade, and will soon enroll the names of other countries on the great
international league of commercial freedom for the benefit of mankind.
It was our own country and her public functionaries who proclaimed
these great truths before they had received the sanction of other nations.
Our great movement was felt in British councils, was quoted as a precedent in the halls of British legislation; there, American free trade documents were recorded among their archives, and our doctrines approved,
and example followed, by the repeal of the British corn laws, and the
reduction or repeal of other duties upon our exports. Indeed, it has been
conceded by some of our own most distinguished protectionists, that the
promulgation of free trade doctrines in the American official documents
of 1845, certainly accelerated, if, indeed, it did not actually insure, the
repeal of the British corn laws. With such results already from our
efforts, we have every motive to persevere until the free trade doctrines
of Great Britain and America, the two great nations of kindred blood
and language, shall open their ports and disenthrall the commerce of thr
world. What may we not hope from our efforts with other nations,
they have succeeded in Great Britain? That country, so long the bi
wark of protection, applying it by a sliding scale upon the masses of h
people down to the utmost point of human endurance, has at lenr
overcome the errors of ages. One of her own great statesmen, the m
able and efficient champion of the protective policy, at length lifts
eyes to the light of truth, and with that moral firmness and intrepir
which is the highest evidence of real greatness, abandons the cherisL
policy of his life, only because he found it to be injurious to his country
and unites in the support of commercial freedom, with his truly illustrious but untitled countryman, who has earned for himself the highest
of all earthly distinctions—that of benefactor of his country and oi
mankind.
France, Russia, Germany, Austria, Italy, Prussia, Switzerland, Hoi


1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

147

land, and Belgium, Denmark and Sweden, and even China, have mdved,
or are vibratirigin preparing to move, in favor of the same great principle; arid ifour own country and Great Britain adhere to their present
enlightened policy, the rest of the wprld must lose their commerce, or
adopt, as they will, our example.
Pennsylvania, surpassingly rich in coal and iron, and but a year since
so uriariimous for protection, has tried low duties. Her coal'and iron
pour forth their treasures in increasing abundance; her breadstuffs and
provisions find a better .and rriore abundant market; her agriculture,
commerce, her manufactures and, navigation, her mines, farriiers, and
merchants and seamen, manufacturers and mechanics, and above all,
her toUing workmen, with enhanced wages, and every pursuit pf industry blessed with increased prosperity, rise up in favo.r of the new and
more liberal-commercial policy; and her people, by a majpiity unprecederited, largest in the counties where her coal and iron do most eibound,"
recaU their former verdict in favor of protection, and Pennsylvania becorries the very Keystone of the arch of commercial freedom, which must
span the hemisphere we inhabit, and unite the interests of mankind.
Nations cannot grow rich by destroying or restricting, their commerce;
and if the restriction is gopd, the prohibition must be better. ' Commerce
is .an exchange of products; specie often adjusting balances, but constitutirig so inconsiderable a part of the value of products and property, that
but a sinall portion of sales can be fbr specie, but iriust be in exchange for
.'Other products.. The attempt, then, by a high tariff'to make large sales,
for any length of time, for the specie of other nations, is impracticable,
and must diininish the,quantity and price of exports. As specie sales,
for long periods or to a great extent, are impossible, that nation which,
from the suirplus products ofits own labor, at the best price, purchases at
the lowest rate the largest quantity of the products of the labor of the
world, progresses in wealth most rapidly. Thus, if one nation, by high
duties, should forbid its citizens purchasing any ofthe products of other
nations, except at a greatly advanced price, or should restrict the exchange
of the products of its own labor for the products of the labor of other
nations, such restricting nation would certainly receive less of the comforts or necessaries of life in exchange for the products of its own labor,
and in this manner (the wages of labor being connected with the value of
its products) depress wages. If there were three nations, thefirst raising
breadstuffs, the second sugar, and the third cotton, and the first restricted the exchange of its breadstuffs for the sugar of the second and the
cotton of lhe third, it would certainly get .less sugar and cotton in
exchange for its breadstuffs than other nations which encourage free,
exchanges.- Labor, then, untaxed and unrestricted in all its exchanges
and markets,-will certainly receive in exchange a larger airiount of the
products of labor, and. consequently accurnulate wealth more rapidly
than when labor is restricted in its products to a single market,.abandoning the profits of the exchanges with other nations. It is thus clear
that a ta:x or restrictidn on commerce is a restriction or tax updn labor.
And it will soon become an axiomatic truth that all tariffs are a tax upon
labor and wages. One of the most common errors is to compare our
imports, exclusive of specie, with our domestic, exports, exclusive of



148

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

specie; and if there are more such imports than e:5^ports in ariy.dne year,
such balarice of trade is set down as so much lost by foreign: Coriimerce
to. the nation; A. single fact proves th.e faUaey ofthis positiori.- Froni
"1790 tp the present peiiod, our iinports, exclusive of specie, have exceeded our domestic exports, exclusive pf specie, several hundred milhons of
dollars." Yet dur wealth has increased with a rapidity "uripre:cederited.
The theory is, therefdre,'disproved by the' facts,-Eirid the:reasdns are
db vious, of which the fdllbwirig are ariiong .the inost. pfromirierit: The
.products, of dur whale fisheries, extracted by our hardy searrieri frorri the.
pceair, and .riiost cleariy one df the greatest products of American
iridustry, when imported here, are, iricluded.in the list of our foreigri
irnports, and go to swell, several .millions, of dollars every year, this
'alleged unfavorable ba;lance. The * earnings of freight in "fdi^ign cpm'^ merce, by our crews 'arid vessels, .are ribt brought intd the accourit,* or
often against: us, when hivested iri foreigii.hiiports.: The-profits of
exchangirig our'inipdi^ts of, or sales of, for.eign products, do riot appear
in the balarice; or if so, to a very limited extent, pr dften against us.
Thus an American mercharit ships from Bostdn.a ca:rgo' df ice during the
winter, valued at that time, as ari: export, a:t a: very "sinall surii: -He sends
it to Calcutta, and seUs it at ari, advaiice, perhaps, of a thousa:nd .per cent.
The-proceeds he • inay invest there in the purchase of godds,. which he
can bring to Liverpool and pdssibly.seU at a.prpfit of 20 or 30 percent.,
a n d l h e agg.regate profits realized at Calcutta:and Liverpool he takes
home iri specie or:imports, or i n . a b i U d f exchange, which he probably
sells here at a premiuiii for reriiittance. • Yet these, prpfits may even
appear as an unfavorable balance under.the "head of iraports. Upon the
same fallacious theory, if instead of purchasing inillions of foreign .-fabrics
from the prdfits of foreign comnierce, such valuable foreign, articles were
presented gratuitdusly to the Americaii merchant, and brdught by hirri into
the couritry, they would swell this alleged unfavbraible balance of trade.
To s.um.up^ the:result, as proved by the' tables' of the Treasury, it
a.ppears that if the augiiientatiori was in the same ratio "as during the last
fiscal year, since the repeal df the tariff of 1842, our doinestic exports in
1849 would exceed those of any other nation, and our impprts iri 1851,
our specie iri 1850, our tonriage in 1851; arid if our revenue 'augmented in
the same ratio in. succeedirig years, as in the year endirig-ori the 1st
December, 1847, compared, with the preceding year,, our reyenue frdm
duties in 1854 would exceed that of any.other nation fromthe sa:riie soui;ce.
Itis not contended, great as the future augrrientation may be a s l o impprts
and exports, tonnage, specie, .a:rid revenue,, that the advarice will be Ss
rapid.as it was this year, when vvith the shackles'stricken frdm cbmmerce., we bounded forward at such a wonderful rate of progress.. But,
that the increase, under low duties iri .a series of years will be^regular,
rapid, and progressive, is not ddubted. Before' the repeal of ^ the Biitish
corn laws, the argument here for high duties, vvas as a riieasure. of retahation, by closing our markets against British fabrics, to forc.^ her tp open
her ports to pur breadstuffs and pro visions." Well, she has thusoperied
lier ports freely, arid irivites the: exchange; and- yet itis still cdntended
that we dught tblveep out her fabrics by high duties, and of course
induce her to reestablish her corn laws. •




1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

149

This is a new cpmmercial era, and there are many causes combining,
at this time to augment trade ampng nations: the reduction or repeal
of duties, the construction of railroads and canals to bring the products
and fabrics of all. nations from the interior to the seaboard, with ocean
steamers, in addition, to sailing vessels, tp^ facilitate and hasten the
exchange; and,, with China, containing nearly one-third of the population
of the globe, brought at least within the ra:nge df liberal exchanges at
low duties. Our canals .and railroads, bringing, our own products and
fabrics from .the interior to the seaboard, pr lakes and river-s ofthe West,
the points of distributipn for; domestic-consumption, .as well as for'shipment
in exchange for the fabrics of other nations,: are of great and increasing
importance. Without these roads arid canals, there are very many.points
where coal, and lime and iron, and other materials, could ndt be brought
together for profitable use in the samb establishment. There are many
farms and manufactoiies whose products and fabrics could never have
found a market, and the coai and irori of Perinsylvariia and of other States
must have reniairied almost a useless treasure. This, in itself, is. a great
change in f^vor of our doriiestic industry, and is a far better protection
to all the products and fabrics of American labor than any restriction
which m a y b e imposed, by high tariffs,; and, in truth, dispenses even with,
the pretext for any such policy which, vvhen. the internal comrriunicatioii
has brought pur own products or fabiics upon the seaboard, would, arrest
their exchange there for the productions of the world. The doctrine
that we cannot encounter foreign cargoes in fair and open competition is
as erroneous and injurious to the. national character as were the fears of
some in 1.812, that our-gallant Navy must be retained within our ports
and harbors under the protection of their forts and prdnance, and dare
not venture upon the ocean to meet on equal terms, gun.for gun and man
for man, thenayies of the vvorld. If pur country is inferior, and cannot
meet at home and abroad upon equal terins the products and fabiics of
other nations, it is time that we should prepare tp do sd.
Protection.may exclude rival fabrics, and shrink from the encounter,
but we can only assume the ppsition. of ari equal, trying our strength
under free trade or low duties. . This we have done, arid succeeded, and
have.thereby placed our own industry upon that solid basis, which fears
no Competition. ..
W e knew.not our own strength uritU it had been tried by low duties,
and proved that protection is unnecessary. We are not inferior to othernations in the arts or sciences, in war .or in peace, upon the ocean or the
land, in agriculture, commerce, manufactures, or. navigation. We have
the raw inaterial in greater abundance and. at a lower price, cheaper
subsistence, mdre mineral wealth, more. fertUe lands, yielding from a
better soik and warmer sun more to the. acre, and greater, variety of products, with exemption from cosdy. government and oppressive internal
taxations^—-at least equal skill, enterprise, industry, energy, perseverance,
and inveritive genius. , Our workhig freemen more vigorous and intelligent, arid performing in a day more effective labor, with better and freer
institutipris, and.with public, and individual prosperity and capital augmenting in a greater ratio, than any: other nation. We require no protectipn, because our iridustry and prosperity reppse upon the immovable



150

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847,

basis of supeiior advantages, and advancing as we are more rapidly
than any other natipn in' all the elements of wealth and power, our
exports, iinports, tonnage, and specie, as has been already proved, will"
soon exceed those of any other-country, and the piices be regulated at
the creditor city of New York. Restrictions upon the commerce of
the Union are especially restrictions upon her commerce, and have
impeded her advance towards her destiny, predicted. in my last
report, as the ceritre and emporium of the commerce of the-world.
For that high position she possesses more natural advantages and
greater elements of augmenting .wealth and business than any other
city. .Let us remove the obstructions which high tariffs haye-erected
around her magnificent harbor; let her have free scope to^ develope
her ti'anscenderit natural advantages, and she must become the depot
of universal cominerce, where international balance-sheets will be adjusted, and assorted .products and fabrics of all nations interchanged;
the great regulator of piices current, and the barometer ofthe exchanges
of the world. The time is approaching when a bill upon New York will
bring a.higher premiuin than a bill updn any other cit}^ and when the
tribute of millions of dollars paid by us to other nations upon exchange
shall'be paid by them to us, and flow into our great cominercial emporium. Whilst New York must contain a large population, as well as
New Oiieans, the principal depot of the mighty West, and many other
cities, they will all be sm.aU indeed compared with the masses of the
people of the Union, who will go on augmenting in a. corresponding
ratio, still leavirig an iinmense majority of the riation engaged in agiicultural pursuits, and supplying with their products not only our own market,
but those of other nations in an ever-increasing ratio by reciprocal exchanges under free trade or low duty. Although it must gratify all our
pepple that an American city should become, the centre of universal
cominerce, the advantages will not be limited to that place, but aU the
people and cities and States of the Union will feel the favorable effect
of this gr^Ccit revolution. Every brarich of our industry will be enlarged
and invigorated; and fbreign cities, having ceased to control our commerce or currency, will no longer sink at their pleasure and with their
reyulsions, as heretofore, and as they now do, the price qfour products.
Other Atlantic cities may not be a? great as New York, yet they will aU
be greater when the emporium of iniversal comrnerce shall be here than
they would have been with any foreign city occupying that commanding position. This destiny we can never accomplish if commerce is
restricted here,, and our iridustry, nstead of seeking for its products and
fabiics the markets of more than a thousand mUlions of people, retires
within, our home market,, confined'to twent3''-one inillions of people, and
surrenders without ari eflbrt the markets and commerce of the world.
A liberal cominercial policy, is essential to the frilfillmerit of this . great
destiny of New York and of the Union, but above and beyond all, the
Union itself, the free trade Union, its perpetuity and onward progress in
area,' wealth, and population, are necessaiy to the accomplishment of
these grand results. Uponthis point sectional fanatics, few in number,
at home, and despots abroad concurring with them, rnay hope or menace,
but the American Union is a moral and ^physical, a political and com


1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

151

mercial necessity, and never can or will be dissolved. As w e i r might
we attempt to decompose the great element of nature- which holds
together the planets, suns, and systems of the universe, as hope to sever
the. links of mighty lakes and rivers, of ever-extending telegraphs, railroads and canals, of free trade, of intercourse, of interest, of love and
affection, of the glories of the past, the present, and the future, which
must forever bind together: the Ameiican Union.' Indeed when we look
updn the" American Revolution, the framing of our Constitution, the
addition of Louisiana, Florida, Texas, arid Oregon, our ever-extending
area, products, and population, our triumphs in war and peace, we must
be blind to the past, and close our eyes upon the fulfilhng realities of the
future, if we cannot perceive and gratefully acknowledge that a higher
than any earthly power still guards and directs our destiny, impels us
onward, and has selected our great and happy country as a "model and
ultimate centre of attraction for aU the nations of the world.
•^
R. J. W A L K E R , Secretaiy pfi the Treasury.
Hon.

ROBERT C . W I N T H R O P ,

.

V

.

Spealcer ofi the House ofi Representatives,

Statement ofi Duties, .Revenues, and Public Expenditures, during the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1847, agreeably to ivarrants issued, exclusive ofi trust
fiunds.
The receipts into the Treasury during-the fiscal year ending June 30,
1847, were as follows:
From customs,-viz:
,
' ;
During the quarter ending September 30,
1846.
. . . . . . : . . . . $6,153,826 58
During the quaiter eriding December 31,
. 1846
3,641,192 22^
During the quarter ending March 31,1847, 6,319,041 48
During the quarter ending June 30,1847, 7,633,804 38
.. .. . .
$23,747,864 66
From sales of public lands.
.2,498,355 20
From misceUanedus and incidental s o u r c e s . . . . . . . . . . . 100,570 51
Totalreceipts, exclusiveof loans and Treasurynotes.. 26,3.46,790 37
Avails of Treasuiy notes issued .,under
'
^
act of July 22, 1846, after deducting
$1,931,000, which were funded under ..
act of January 28, 1 8 4 7 . . . . . . . . . . . 5,506,800 00
Avails of Treasury notes issued under .
act of January 28,1847, after deduct- ing $1,221,850, which were funded
under thesaid a c t . . . _ . .
11,149,300 00
Availsdfloanunderactof July 22,1846, 4,888,149 45
.



152

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

Avails of loan under act df January 28,
•
' ' .
1847, .after deducting $40,350;which.
were fimded. i . . . . . .
$4,134,950^00 '•
--:-.
. — $ 2 5 , 6 7 9 , 1 9 9 45
•
52,025,989 '82
Balance in the Treasury July 1, 1 8 4 6 . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . ^ 9,126,439^ 08
• Total means : . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . ^ . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . .$61,152,428 90
The expenditures for thefiscal^year ending June.30, 1847, exclusive
of trust funds,^were, viz':
'
, '
'
CIVIL L I S T .

Legislature......:..... . . - . . > . i^fi.,.
$974,324 14
Executive,.......-........--...-.....'.
875,718 80
'
'^^
Judiciary.......................
" 571,377 88
Governments in the Territories of l h e
United States
36,987 98 ^
Surveyors and their clerks
56,380 75
Officers ofthe mint and b r a n c h e s . . .
43,725 00
Commissioner of Public B u i l d i n g s , . . . .
1,994 44
Secretary to sign patents for public lands,
1,500 00
Total civU list.
......_......,
-~
$2,562,008 99
FOREIGN INTERCOURSE.

Salaries of Ministers...
Salaries of Secretaries of Legation
Salaries of Charges d'Affaires............
Salary of Minister Resident to T u r k e y . .
Salary of dragoman to Turkey, and contingencies
Contingent expenses of all the missions
abroad
Outfits of Ministers: and Charges. d'Affaires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ^ . . . . . . . : . ' . . : . . : '
. Commissioner and/Secretaiy to reside in
China......
......"..,
Outstariding claims of missions to. China '
Certain diplomatic services,.(B.E..Green)
Renewal of diplomatic intercourse with
Mexicd...
.....,.../...........
Commissioner to Sandwich Islands., - , .
Contirigent expenses of foreign intercourse
Salary of consul at London . . . . . . ; . . . . .
Clerk hire, office rent, &c., to consul, at
London......
Rehef and protection of Ainerican seamen .
Intercourse with Barbary Powers. > . . . . •
Interpreters, guards, and other expenses
of consulates in the Turkish domiriidns. ^



.

62,944 26
14,046 80
58,713,29
8,&Q0 Q
O .
:
2,000 00
.,..._.
35,36.5 95
56,750-00
11,250 00
.6,079 47
•
3,000 00 . '•
'

4;5tf0
6,41717,SQ9
'2,OOQ

Q
Q
. ; . ;^
12 ••. ^'
80 • : ; ,;.
:
Qft
,
\ • . ? ,
2,800-00
'
;87,37Q 9 ^ /
9^
;6,3Q0 OQ : . :
. .
' 2,329 .00 •

1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

153

Salary of consuls at Syria and Palestine.
$1,997 27
Payments to French seamen killed pr
wounded at T o u l o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50Q 00,
Payments under Oth article of treaty with
S p a i n . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 440 00
Total foreign i n t e r c o u r s e . . . . . . ..:''...'-, -... > .$301,113: 95
MISCELLANEOUS.*

\

Surveys of pubhc lands
145,013 45 .
Support and maintenan,ce of light-houses
5Q1,018 49
Building light-houses
, . 7,099 37
Marine hospital e s t a b l i s h m e n t . . . . . . . . . .
123,257 42
Building marine hpspitals -:
.......
7,058 72
Building custom-houses
64,0,62 36.^
Pubhc buildings in Washington, D. C. ..
38,067 57
Statues for east front of the Capitol . . .
: 7,.5Q0 00
Support and maintenance; of the penitentiary of District of C o l u m b i a . . . . . . . . .
12,719 02
Furniture for the^President's House. - - - 1,.162 96
Relief of the several corporate cities of
'
.
the District of Columbia
\
...
117,471 62
Auxiliary watch for the city ofWashington
6,776 6 1 Support of insane paupers in the District',
ofColumbia..'....
>
....:
5,770 45
.
Pa:tent
fimd............
l
...._._.
: 44,280 91 Distribution of the sales^of public lands.
' 11,181 36 :
Payinents to Maine and Massachusetts > .
fbr expenses incurred in protecting the
heretofore disputed territoiy on the
northeastern frontier of the United,.
States
;:..
. . . . . . . , . . . 19,805 32
Survey of the coast of the UnitedStates. _ 111,000 00 .
Mint establishment...................,._._
. 89,972 97 .
Three per cent, to the State of Illinois... :
17,200; 9 5 ;
Three per cent, to the State of Ohio.. .r. :
65,749 09 Five per cent, to the State of Florida....
975 80 '.
Five per cent, to the State of Michigan...
1,262 48.
Five per cent, td the State of Arkarisas\
. 870; 62
Debentures and other charges . ^............, . 430,668 00
Additional compensation to officers of the '
customs:..
.'
10,697 68
Payment ofhorses, &c., l o s t . . . . . . . . . . . .
18,424 71
Repayments for lands erroneously Sdld.-_.„
23,335 12 ,
Refunding p.urchase money for lands soldin the Greensburg land district, Louisi--' .
."
ana....
..^.....l
.,/,-..,
6,876 54 .
Expenses incident to loans and Treasuiy
n o t e s . . . .1
26,184 34
Results and account df the Exploring Expedition
.,:... a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v . . . . . 25,252 4 0 •



154

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

Preparing indices to the manuscript papers of Washington,. &c
$2,000 OQ
Payment of books ordered by Congress. • 107,871 27
Supplying any deficiency in the regular
revenues from posta.ges
. . . - 225,000 00 ,
Postages charged to the Executive Departments or bureaus thereof, and both
Houses of Congress, &c
,...
311,298 99
Additionalcompensation to the judges of ^
Missouii, & c . . .
'
".
'.
4,000 00 ,
Proposed edition of the laws and treaties
•
of the United States
..........'
10,500 00
/
." ^
Reliefof sundiy individuals
120,070 14
Expenses of the Smithsonian Institution,
per act August 10, 1846
..V..
257,584 07
Pay^ment of certain certificates
4,250 28
Documentary History ofthe United States
25,215 00
Refunding duties under protest. ' Act. ' • . March .3,1839.
560,48'3. 37 ^
Discriminating tonnage duties. Act Au-'
• ,
•
gust 3, 1846 . . . . . . . :
2,801 29
Excess of duties paid upon wines of •
Portugal. Act of August 10, 1846 . .
2,604 38
Refunding duties on coffee .from the Neth- '
•
•,
erlands. Act August 3, 1846
...
41,323 79
Refunding duties under act May 8, 1846.
48,137 44
Refunding duties exacted on imported •
' ,
foreign merchandise. Act August 8,
'
1846..:..
.......
32,204 47
Refunding duties cdUected under act
August 30, 1842.
^....
• 3,266 -:92
Refunding duties under the tariff act of
'
1842..
:..........:..
1,318 20 ' fiExpenses of mirier aliand service . . .
7,500;00
Boundary line between the United States •
and the Biitish Provinces, &c
'. . . '
26,000 00
.
Salaries of assistant treasurers and clerks,
.under actof August 6, 1 8 4 6 . . : . . . . . : ' "
11,102 6 1 . •
Contingencies under said a c t . . .
•....
5,000 00
-" ^
Compensation of special agents to exam-•
ine accounts and money in the hands
,.
.. of the several depositaries
......
•. 1 , 9 0 0 0 0
Miscellaneous iteins . . . . .
......
- 5,565 49
.^ •
Plans and drawings made by the officers "
of topographical service, under resolu'
.^ ^
tion of Senate
-.
...:.....
4,988 00
...
•—^
$3,762,732 04
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE AVAR DEPARTMENT, VIZ :

Army proper . . . j , . . . . . . .



.^

. . . - 17,880,842 -91 -

"

1847.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY,

155

Mihtaiy Academy
$124,339 21
Fortifications and other works of defence.
932,962 • 08
Armories; arsenals, and munitions df
war....
:...........'.....
1,617,21628
Hai'bors, roads, rivers, &c.
36,117 67
.
Surveys
38,12141
Pensions
1,726,785 71
Indian department
1,228,280: 40
Claims ofthe State of Virgiriia . . . . . . .
23,160 08
Arming and equipping the m i l i t i a , . . . . .
162,597 55
Payments to volunteers and militia of
States and Territories
1,.368,709 40 •
Mexican hostilities
16,001,226 42
Relief of individuals, and miscellaneous:
141,247 50
• Total under War Department
—
$41,281,606 62
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE NAVY D E P A R T M E N T / VIZ :

Pay and subsistence, including medicine,
&c.....;.^
2,516,573 97
Increase, repairs, ordnance, and equipment
". 1,298 503 33
Contingentexpenses
467,995 00
" Navy-yards
691,844 18
Navy hospitals and asylums.. — .
28,477 14
Magazines.
'.
' 1,447 33
Pensions.
115,008 .69
Mexican hostilities
2,364,291 61
Rehef of individuals, and miscellaneous.^
169,607 83
Marinecorps.
........
. 277,884 60
Totalunder Navy D e p a r t m e n t . . . . —
7,931,633 68
PUBLIC DEBT, VIZ :

Paying the old pubhc debt.
8,081 69
Interest on the pubhc debt
1,059,039 82 ,
Interest on Mexican indemnity
7,147 20
Redemption of Joan of 1841.-..
...
3,000 00
Rejdemption of Treasury notes, deducting $3,193,200, which were funded
under the act of Januaiy 28, 1847.-.'. 2,361,397 07
Interest on Treasury notes.
53,027 70
Redemption of Treasury notes pmioined,
including' interest
30,388 89Total pubhc debt.
—
3,522,082 37
Total expenditures

.:.

-...

Balance in the Treasury July 1, 1847
TREASURY

$59,451,177 65

-. . . . . .$1,701,251 25

DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 1, 1847.



DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

,

156

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

Statement ofi Duties, Revenues, and Public Experiditures fior the first quarter ofi
the fiscal year j firom.1st July to SOth September, 1817, agreeably to.warrants issued, exclusive ofi trust fiunds.
^ ^

RECEIPTS.

.,....:..

From customs.. . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . : ; . . . .$11,106,257 41,
From sales of public l a n d s . . . . . . . . . . .
.....
896,883 47
From iniscellaneous and incidental s o u r c e s . . . . : . . . . . .
58,5SS 47
From avails of Treasury notes issued under act of 22d "
Jufy, 1 8 4 6 . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $250,006 ;
From avails of Tre.asury notes issued under "
- ,
act of 28th Ja:nuary, 1 8 4 7 . . . . . . " . . , . . . . . . 4,225,800 :
From avails of loan of 22d July, 1846 . . . . . 111,000 .•'
From avails of loan of 28th January, 1847'.. 2,328,278
. — — — 6 , 9 1 5 , 0 7 8 00
' :

\ $18,976,752 35
EXPENDITURES.

Civil list, miscellaneoris, and foreign intercourse.
$1,116,680 44
Army proper, &c. . . . . . . . . .
8,7.17,5'83 60
Fortifications, ordnance," arming militia, &c. . .
.....
577,980 67
Indian departmerit
.......'
691*,795 05
Pensions."..".....
................
583,332 36
Naval establishment."....'... . . . . . . . . . . •2,384,8.05 A5
Redeinption of Treasuiy ndtes, and i n t e r e s t . . . . . ....... 2,385,329 63
Redemption of 3 per eent. s t o c k . . . . .
.,
257 04"
Reimbursement of registered debt
..1.
234 17
Interest bn the public- debt..
11196 28
$16,469,194 69
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

^

-•„;

^,

'•"

REGISTER'S OFFICE, December 1, 1847. .

J ) A m E V GRAilAU, Register,
•

'

f

•

•

:

•

'

-

^

'

.

.

.

.

.

•

.

-

•

.

•

'

.

-

•

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S OFFICE, December 1,1847.

By a calculation, predicated on the aggregate amdunt of payments
from customs during the third quarters ofthe last forty-eight years, compared with the aggregate arnount of payments during the sarrie years,
^the payinents during the quarter ending on the 36th September, 1847,^
would, should the proportipn be the same for the reriiaining three quarters, make the net rdvenue for the fiscal year.ending bn the 30th June,
1848, $40,388,045.
.' " .
DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.



1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

157

D.
.Statement ofi all Treasury Notes paid under the provisions ofi the act ofi Congress approved 10th August, 1846, which had been stolen and put into
circulation, and not cancelled.
Date.

To whom paid.

Amount.

1846.

Sept'ber 15
23
23
25
26
" • 28
October 7
9
22
22
22
Nov'ber 7
10
10
10
18
18
18
19
24
27
28
28
28
30
Dec'ber 3
10
15
16

Martiri, Pleasants & C o - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

N.'Wright . . . . . . . . . . . . ^......... . 'fi..'..
Bank of Baltimore...
.....,.:,...
j . G. Gregoiy^& Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
James McMaster.. . - . . . = . . . . . . .
. . .'.^.
Union Bankj Providence, R. 1. . . . . . . . .
Amzi Hathaway.
:
..1
Bank pf Pennsjlvania
—
Philadelphia Saving Fund Society . . . . .
Phoenix .Mutual Insurance Co., Philad'a .
Delaware Insurance Company, Philad'a .
B.ank.of Dela.ware County
Andrew C. Craig
....
State Bank, Newark
.
Louisville Savings Institution
.......
August- Belmont
James M. Franciscus
............
Eneas Smith
.
....
R. H. & G. M. BaUey
Bank of America
E. W . Clark & Brothers
'..
Swain, Abel & Simmons
John D. WiUiams
Moses Wood
,..
John B. Dana
Prime, Ward & King-.
.Bank of Virginia
St. John, Power & Co
Bank of New York
.

514 96
514 88
1,133 21
210 28
514 88
108 28
53 75
2,580 61
108 00
• 595 21
540 50
108 40
641 40
227 12
108 10
542 00
1,544 63
542 00
1,569 80
3,186 65
536 00
540 05
1,129 06

Richard Valentine
Bank of New Brunswick, N. J
Hutchings & Company..John Bevans
Minot TirreU
John E. Da}?:
Edwin G. Booth ,
American Irisurance Co., New York.
Levering & Clifton
Peter Outcutt,

539 80
162 03
514 88
536 00
569 60
1,609 90
540 50
536 00
540 44
542 00

1847.

January 7
15
16
29
Feb'ary 13
16
18
19
19
March 26

Sl,139 23
564 05




514 96
1,080 38

545 05
1,544 63

R E P O R T S OF T H E

158

[1847.

D—Contmued.
Date.

To whom paid,

Amount.

1847.

.....:.
30 Johnston & Lee
15 Bank ofthe Northern Liberties, Philada..
17 Franklin Bank, Cincinnati
21 Paddock & Van Vleck
22 Charles F . Fisher.
October 6 ' Bank of State of Missouri
,..
7 Horace Bean & Co
7 James Bedford
^
1...
7 Chaiies Whittemore
21 George Treadwell
.- - r"- - -

March
AprU

$540
108
540
163
107
2,194
• 162
216
51
53

05,
26
05
62
69
60
15
11
49
82

$33,067 06
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 1, 1847.




DANIEL GRARAM, Register,

1847.]

159

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.
,

E.

Statement of the amount of the Public Debt paid from the 1st December,^.S4:Q,
tOithe 1st December, 184:7.
Amount*

Old funded and unfunded debt 1
. $11,720 19
60,000 00
Debts ofthe corporate cities of Distiict of Columbia .
Reiinbursement of Treasury notes under acts prior to
act of 22d July, 1846
"
143,441 66
Reimbursement of Treasury notes under act of 22d
July, 1846
....'....
'.....
6,0n,300 00
Reimburseinent of Treasury notes per act of: 28th.
Januaiy, 1847
i
.2,817,050 00
Redemption of the loan of 1841
3,000 0 0 /
$9,046,511 85.

Statement ofi the ampunt ofi Literest on the Public Debt paidfirorn1st December,
1816, to 1st Decernber, 1847. • •
Amount.

Interest upon the public debt
Interest upon Treasury notes
:—
Interest on debts of the several corporations in the
Distiict of Columbia

$1,072,682 59
305,921 52 1
.55,246 18
$1,433,850^ 29

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December




1, 1847..
V A M E L GRAHAM, Register,

REPORTS OF THE

160

-[1847.

F.
Statement of the Public Debt.
Amount of debt due 1st December, 1 8 4 7 . . . . . . . . . - .•- $45,659,659 40
Amount of debt due 4th Marehvl845, pisr statement F F * 17,788,799 62
Balance, being addition to the debt incurred since 4th
March, 1845
•
$27,870,859 78
Amount.

Total.

The present debt consists of the
followirig items, viz":
The principal and interest of the old
funded and unfunded d e b t . . . . . . . ::$1'22,288 53
Treasury notes issued duringthe war.
4,317 44
of 1 8 1 2 , . . .
.,..:.,...
4,-320 09
Certificates of Mississippi stock . . . . . :' •
Debt of the corporate cities of the
, 1,080,000 00
District of Columbia
8,343,886 03
Loan of 1842, at 6. per cent
6,604,231 35
Loan of 1843, at 5 per cent.
Outstanding Treasuiy notes of 1837
to 1 8 4 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2 3 9 , 7 8 9 31
x\mount of these notes
funded under the act
of Jariuary 28,3 8 4 7 . . 77,178 00
316,967 31
*$16,476,G10 75
Loan of 1846, at-6 per cent. . . : . : . . Loan of 1847, at 6-per cent., (after
deducting the riotes furided which
were is'sued prior to 1 - 8 4 5 ) . . . . . .
Five per cent, stock issued in paymerit ofthe fo.urth and fifth instalments ofthe Mexican indemnity..
Military bounty land stock, at 6 per
cent., per act of Feb. 1 1 , 1 8 4 7 . : .
Outstanding Treasui-y notes- per act
of 22d July, 1 8 4 6 ^ . ' . . . . ^ . . .
Outstanding Treasury notes per act
of 28th Januaiy, 1847

4,999,149 45
9,173,772 00
.. 301,952 20
• 84,525 G
O
984,750 00
13,639,500 00
29,183,648 65
$45,659,659 40

•

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, .

REGISTER'S OFFICE, December 1, 1847.

DANIEL GRAHAM, Regi^er.
*This sum of $17,788,799 62 was reduced by payments made since the 4th of March, 1845,
to $16,476,010 75.
.



1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

161

G.
Amount available on the 1st October, 1847, ofij the Loans ofi 1846 and 1847.
Of the loan of 1846—loan of.
$10,000,000
Stock issued in 1846
$4,999,149. 45
Stock issued in 1847
2,096,100 00 .
Treasury no.tes outstand- !
•
i n g : . . . : , . . . . : . . . . . . 1,255,850 00
: :
8,351,099
;
:
^ ' .
Of the loan of 1847—loan of.
$23,000,000
Stock issued
$4,339,856 00
Notes outstanding
14,023,750 00
18,363,606

00

.
'
45
—$1,648,900 55
00
00
—

4,636,394 00
$6,285,294 55

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 1, 1847.

DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

Amount amilableon the 1st December, 1847, ofitJie Loam ofi 1816 and 1847,
Of the loan of 1846—loan of. :
Stock issued iri 1846. . . .$4,999,149
Stock issued in 1 8 4 7 . . . : 3,113,150
Notes outstanding
984,750
.
_
^•
Of the loan of 1847—loan of
Stock issued
.$6,060,622
Notes outstanding...
13,639,500
_

$10,000,000 00
,
45
00
00
9,097,049 45
—
$902,950 55
.$23,000,000 00
00
00 '
19,700,122 00
^
'
3,299,878 00'
$4,202,828^ 55:^

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 1, 1847.

 L — 1 1 .
VOL. V


DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

Gi

Stateriient ofi Treasury Notes, un^er act ofi July 22, 1846, issued in exchangefiorspecie; deposited in 1847.
Certificate.

6,8
69
70
71
73
74
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83

m

Pate.

By whoni.

January 5
.8
;
14
16
18
:
19
19
20
^
20
22
26
27
29
30
Febr uary 2
3
6
11

85
86
'87
88
90
91
92

93
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/

13
15
12

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Richard Sniith, cashier
Corcoran & Riggs . . . .
,
do.
^ ....
do.
' ....
do.
do.
do. do.
do.
....
.C. K. G a r d n e r . . . . . . . . .
Corcoran,& Riggs .
Joseph P . iyioore . . . . .
Richard ;Smith, cashier
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . .
do.
....
do.
....
John Thompson.. . . * . . .
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . .
do.
' ..-,.
-J. R. H a g n e r , . . . . . . .
John D, M c C r a i e . . . ! . .
John F . L e e . . . .
..
J a m e s Lee - , . - . . . . . .

Wh.ere deposited.

Treasury of the U. States.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
. .
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
New York
_,
Treasury United States . .
do.
do.
do.
do.
New York
,.».».

Interest 5 2-5 percent.
. Amount.

$1,000
2,000
2,000
6,000
. 4,000
4,000
6,700
2,400
5,000
2,900
11,000
40,000
6,000
5,000
' 20,000
13,;000
16,000
10,000
18,000
1,000
4,000
5,750
50,000

95
96
97

loo;
101
102
103
105:
106
107;
108
109

j

'
' '•
'..
'.
'
^
«
'

18
13
22
18
24
1818
25

«

24

March
1"
Feb'ary 18May
31




Washington Hunt
J. C. Douglass, Vashier.
Washiiigtoh H u n t . . " . V.
Beebe, Eudlow '& Co. .,
John T h o m ' p s o n . . . . . ' . .
Beebe, Xudlbw & Co. .'
John Ji Palmer . I .
.
Washingtoh B u n t ' . . . . .
John Thompson^ - . - . . .
; Washing:tori'Hunt ".1.1. '.iBeebe, Ludlow & Cb:".
i w . W. W o o d w o r t h . . .

do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.,
do.
do.
do.
do.

1

60,000
10,000
50,000
^ 100,000
^ 8,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
12,000

OD.

%
'—':

m

.. 5o,:ooo

o
w

965,750

1

60^000
250,000
•'•

•

••.

.,-.•'

H.
^

m

i4;

pi
W
>

CD

a
pi

><

Gi-

K.

Gi

Statement ofi Treasury Notes, dtsix per cent., issued in exchange fior money deposited to the credit ofi the Treasurer ofi the United
States, under the act ofi January 28, 1847.
Certificate.

Date.

1
Feb'ary 18
John F . Colin
2
.John W", Davis
3
Cullen Sawtelle
1
Jas.H.Relfe
4
" .
6
M. Morgan
5
"
15
6
"
23
Jacob S. Yost. 7
John H . Crozier
8
M. Morgan
''
15
9
17
do.
. 10
"
26
Asbury Dickins
.
''
15
11
M. Morgan
:
12 '
17
do
^ 13
:.• • ' ' , - i s
r '- /do.
M.:.-.i::..:.:::::::.;
14
March • 1 • Hezelviah "Williams.
•2
15
John D: M c C r a t e . . . ' , : : . . . . . . ' . . 1 . ,
16
C. &. R. for Chas.Goodyeaf...V.".17
'^
3
C. & R . for A. C . N i v e n . . . . . . . . . .
18
F e b ' a r y l 6 ."M. M o r g a n ' . . . ' : . . " . . ' . J..'
'.".'..
19
do.
-.,............. „..... ^
a
17
20
J. D. M c C r a t e . . . : . . . . " . . . . . V . . " . .
March 4
ii
I
21
James Thompson . _ 1 . . . ' . " . " . . ' . . " . . .
3
22
-C. &.R.foi-two M . c . . . . . . • . : ; : . .

23
Jas. J. M c K a y . . . . ' . . . . ' . . . fi.fi J^


Where deposited.

By whom deposited.

Treasury United States
do.
do.
do.
New York.
Treasury United States
do.
New^ York
do
Treasury United States
New York.
do
do.

Amount.

.
•

•.

'.'...;.;.;...•.,.;..":....;...

Treasury United States
do, ^
."do.
• ^ ...\"..V
do.
;.^.....'.'.
New York . . . . . . .
:
......".
do.
.
-. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Treasurv United States. . . . . . . . . . .
do."
:•::..:..;..
•fio. .
do.

• • • ; . . • . . . ' ; . . • . .

$2,000
4,000
700
1,000
160,000
1,400
2,500
500,000
50,000
10,000
150,000
25,000
25,000
2,000
2,000
2,500
2,500
50,000
40,000
400
•
500
4,500
5Q0

o

00.
SI

24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31,32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49'
50
51
52
53
54

3
5
4
6

ii
ii

11
13
12
16
18

ii
ii

19
20
19
22
24
25
27
29
26
31




C. & R. for 2 M. C.
Reuben C h a p m a n . .
C. & R . for2 M . C .
Asbury Dickins . . .
C . & R . for2 M . C .
do.
1 M.C.:..
do.
4 M.- C . . . .
do.
1 M. C . . . .
do.
M.Morgan.
do.
do. .
do.
2 M.C...
do.
M. Morgari.
do.
1 M.C...
do.
M. Morgan.
do.
2 M. C . . .
R..H. Gillet for 1 M; "C
C . & R . for M.Morgan..
J . W.Miller
......
C & R . for 2 M. C. . . .
do.
1 M.C
do.
M.Morgan.
J. E . M h l a r d . . : . . . . . .
A. R. Corbin
\\
C. & R. for 1 M. C . . .
do.
do.
y..
M. Morgan..
Isaac C Sheldon.
.
do.
......
C & R. for M. Morgan.
C & R. for 1 M. C

do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do*
do. .
do.
• do.

^

: •

do.
" -'
do.
dor
do.
do.
do.
do.
New Y o r k . . . ,
Treasuiy United States
do.
do.
do.

• •

do.
"
do.
do.
"
New York
Treasury United States
do.
do.
do.

5,000
1,000
5,000
2,700
4,500
2^000
10,000
2,500
15,500
15,000
5,000
35^000
2,500
10,000
5,000
2,500
6,500
2,000
5,000'
2,500
10,000
2,500
1,000
: 1,500
2,500
20,000
1,200
1,300
10,000
2,500

K—Coritinued.
Certificate.

.55
56
..57
58
59
60
61
:62
.63
64
^65
66
67
68
69
70
.71
72 '•
•73
•.74 ,
•75 :

Date.

• By whom ^deposited.

March:30 ; M. Morgan.... .\ . . . . . . . . ' :
do.
...............:..
" 31 i
do.. : . . . - . . . . . . . . . . .
April 1 ;
'
3 ' . C . & R . for.Mr. Morgan..,
' 10
do
do, V.,
' 13
Jas. Pennoyer . . : . . . . . . .
T.&:G.: P a r k e r . . . . . . . : . .
* 13 : R. Smith, cashiier.
Anthony Best.:.......-.:....,
' :14 ; Cave J o h n s o n . . , . . : . . . . . . . ,
i
,
i
-Barbara Reily..f.....
..
W . B. J a c k s o r i . . . - . - . . . . . . ,
( .
1
C &rR. for Morgari.
,
'
9 1 M. Morgan .,•-'. ...-.-.•..... ^.
' 1 5 I Corcoran & Riggs. . . . . . . .
do.
;..
,
'
i
' :14 ' G. M. Hutton...-..:. .=..:..,
John^ White ..;.
John::Richai;dgon,: Pt. . . . ^
' 15 ; Arthur E . W h i t e . .
...
' 16 'Corcoran & R i g g s . . . .
.

' u:

•7.6 1

.77 ;
78 
79
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/

"''

'

-..Gi
> Gi

16

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

'• ••

dOi-' •

• . . - . .

/M.;Morgan.-.. ..•.:,.....;.._..,
^ Isaac 'Osborrie . . . '
.
,
- John Albree......
_ .

Where deposited.

Amount.

New York
do.
.......:...
do.
y
Treasury United S t a t e s . . .
do. .
...
do.
do.
.
do.
do.
do.
do.
..,
do.
do.
NewYork.;..
.. ^...
Phila:delphia
Treasury United S t a t e s . .
Baltimore .
Treasury United S t a t e s . .
Philadelphia
,,
New York..
. . .^
...
Treasury United States . .
New York.
-,-.
do.

do.
Boston

••.. —

- -.

o:

$100,000
100,000
5'0,00"0
7,500
10,000
16,000
20,000
6^,230
-300
2,500
1,000
- 5,000
10,000
100,000
20,000
5,000
10,000
5,000
200^000
5,000
5,000
200,000
75,000
S,Q0O
20;000

80
81.
• 82.
83
84
,85
86'
87
88
8990
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
.98
99'
100
101
102:
10^
104
105
106
107
108
109

''

[

1
•
\

Corcoran & R i g g s . . . . ^ .;•
.'
do.
...
" 16' J. W a r d & Co. for C . & R .
" 19 Corcoran & Riggs. .
John Thonipson
«
16
John A. Dix
........'
ii
M. Morgan
L . J. White
' ' • VT
— .
" 1 - Paul & Brown
. 5
" 19 Richard Sriiith, cashier
...
" 20 Corcorari: & R i g g s . . . . .
W.- H . - E n g h s h . . . . ' . . .
L . Bonriefoux, p r e s i d e r i t . . . . . . . —
•<'•
1 7
...
.
." 21 Corcoran & Riggs
/..
" 21 Thomas D. Harris . ' . . . .
B. L. Jackson & Brother
"20
ii
1 Samuel M. Leiper
is Isaac Southgate.
^... — . —
" 20' John Thompsori. J .
•
Corcoran & Riggs
^.'
do.
" 21 '
Henry White
" 15
" 21
•
Corcoran & Riggs'
"• 22'
do.
do.
.
...-.
" 1-9
» 20
do.
..
» 23 Elisha Riggs.,
" 22
Corcoran & Riggs . —
do.
..................
« 23 1

"

;
i
I
1

:

w \ Israel Coheri




1

New York.:
Treasury Uriited States.
Baltirildre.: ^ .i.;.. ^. ^. .-^ ^.
New York
..........
Treasury Uriited Staites.
New York
......."..
do.
do.do.
Charlestdri . . . —
NewYork.
Treaisury Uriited States..
.da.

•

..

New Y o r k . . . . . — .
Treasury United States,
do.
do;
Philadelphia
Boston^
.' — - . -New York - . •.. .• ^'... J- . . .
Boston : . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Treasuiy United States .
New York:
'.......
Boston-. Baltiiriore ..-.- ^ j . ^ j . . . .
New York
do
do.
Boston
-— .-- NewYork,-

25,000
10,000
10,000'
200,000
10,000
15,000
2,500
55,000
10,000
12,000
50,000
15,000
500
10,000
30,000
500
5'0005,000
2,00015,000
30,000
100,000
10,400'
40,000'
100,000'
50,000
49,300
50,000
30,000
100,000

K—Continued.
00

Certificate.

110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133

134

By whom deposited.

Date.

April 26
ii24
ii
22
a
ii
ii

May
April
ii
ii

May
April
a

23
29
1
24
26
29
3
22
23

May 3
April 23
ii

May
"
a

.

1
4
1
4

"
5
Aprih 20
" 22



Robert S . W o o d . . .
Corcoran & Rififs^s'.
•''

do.

Roger S. Moore.
... .
Corcoran.& Riggs
J. E.Millard, by C . & R .
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . . . .
do.
H . H . Reed.
W.L.Owen
John T h b r r i p s o n . . . . . 1. .
Thomas B e n t o n . — . - . Corcoran & Riggs.
do.
..
do.
do.
.....
do..
.....
do.
.....
do.
.....
do.
:
do.
.1 -...
do.
......
do.
......
B . L Jackson & Brother
do.

Where deposited.

Treasury United S t a t e s .
Boston...:....-.--...
New Y o r k . . . . . . , \ - - . ' . .
Boston
.-.'-.
New Y o r k . . - . . . . . - - - . .
Treasury United States.
Boston
do.
...............
New York.
do.
-..
do
Boston .-. - 1 , : , - New York.
.
do.
.............
do.
:...
Boston — :
Philadelphia:
...
do.
.....
do.
..........
New York.
^...
Philadelphia. —
do.
......:..:
Treasury United Sta:tes:
do.
.
do.

Amount.

• $1,800
30,000
50,000
25,OQ0
100,000
2,500
50,000
175,000
10,000
10,000
15,000
5,000
100,000
50,000
50,000
45,00Q
50,000
10,000
25,000
250,000
25,000
25,000
80,000
5,000
5,000

135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158

159
160
161
162
163
164

* 29
'
May 6
a
7
''
8
" 10
11
10
11
(( 7
(( 1 1
12
a

7

' 12
'
ii

''
5
. ''.
8
'' 13
u
"

14
15

ii

5
" 15
April 26
May
5

''




15

Lot NeweU
:
John Thompson ...
Corcoran & Riggs..
do.
Ehsha Riggs . .

Andrew I. Chester.
Hiram.S. G o f f . . . . .
Corcoran & Riggs..
John T h o m p s o n . . :
Ehsha Riggs . :
Corcoran & Riggs.,
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
' .
do.

•

.

. do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
-'' for M o r g a n " .
John White . .
Corcoran & Riggs.
do.
C . & R . for Morgan
Isaiah Silver
Corcoran & Riggs.
do.

NewYork
do.
.:...
Philadelphia.
Treasury United States.
Boston
New York-^.:
1
do.
,
Treasury United States .
New York
..:.-..:.
do.
....:....:..
do.
............
do.
.........^..
Baltirriore..... ^ . . .
Boston . - . - . . . - . . . . . .
Philadelphia
.-.. .
do.
--.--...do.
..........
do.
..........
do.
....:...:.
Baltimore.....
....'.
Philadelphia . .• — ,
do.
. -^. Treasury Uriited States.
do.
do.
.
New York. . . . . .
.
Treasury United States..
N e w York.
N e w Orleans
N e w York

.........

1,000
15,000
20,600
4,000
100,000
10,000
10,00Q
20,000
15,000
50,000
80,000
200,000
15,000
100,000
15,000
10,000
20,000
20,000
32,000
10,000
25,000
26,000
20,000
5,000
15,000
70,000
14,000
6,000
100,000
50,000

K—^Coritinued.
Certificate.

165 .

Date. .

May

166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
187

187
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/

"
"
»
"
"
«
"
"
«
«

"
«
"
»
"
»

By whom deposited-..

Corcoran & Riggs.
do.
-.
do.
.............
do.
.......:.....
A. R. Corbin
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . . . . . . .
M. Morgan
5
do.
.J
...
19
John Thompson.
..-.:...-..
17
M. Morgan
21
Corcoran & Riggs for *' Morga:n "
19
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . . . . . . . . .
'
do.
22
do.
.............
do.
...
......
do.
-...
do.
25
C & R. for J . S. P h e l p s . . . . . . . .
24
M. Morgan
. . . . 1 .^
- • do.
..... -^—
28
C; & R.-for ' ' M o r g a n " . . . . . . . . .
Corcoran & R i g g s . .
.......
18
do.
— ....
..
19'
do. ^
...
..:..
.^22
do.
.............
17
15
5
15

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

o
Where deposited.-

New York.
.-.
do. " . . .
do.
...........^
New Orleans
NewYork......

do

:

do. ; . . . . .
New Orleans
New York
do.
Treasury Uriited States.
Baltimore..
.."
Charlestori . .
:.
PhUadelphia. . . : . . . . : . '
do.
-...--.
dci,
.........:
do.
... 1......
Treasury Uriited States.
New Y o r k . . . . . . . . .
do;
............
Treasu'ry Uriited States.
Philadelphia.^ .• ^ . . . -. ^ . .
Charlestdri, S. C . . 1 1 .

do,
do.

.....
.....

Amount;

$50,000
50,000
200,00'0
150,000
17,000
50,000
200,000
250,000
15,000
50,000
15,000
20,000.
4,000
120,000
50,00050,000
50,000
2,000
100,000
200,000
10,000
16,400
2,404 06
1,294 94
349 09

187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
.213
214
215
216

" 29
April 24
June 1
"
4
-"
2
"
5
u .g
ii

April 26
June 8
9
10
1
11
14
15
16
17
1-8
April §6
June 18
19
21
23




do.
............
R. S. Burrows
...".-.
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . .
.....
do.
............
do.
do.
............
do.
,.
J d h n B. Blake
H . W . Heaton
..
.....
Corcoran & Riggs
do.
..
.......
do.
L.
do.
............
do.
John Thompson
......
do.
—
Corcoran & Riggs.
do
John White
Corcoran.& Riggs."
Elisha Riggs
— .
Corcoran & Riggs.
do.
Chaiies D e w e y .
.
Corcoran & Riggs
I.
do.
Elisha Riggs . . . . .
Corcoran & Riggs.
John Thompson
Corcoran & Riggs
..

Treasury United States
Ne\v York
Treasury United States.
do.
Charleston .
.......
Treasury "United States
db.^
do.
Boston .'.
Philadelphia..........
do.
..........
Treasury United States
St. Louis
J.
Treasury United States
New York.
do.
............
Philadelphia
Treasury United States
do.
New York
do.
............
Treasury United States
do.
New York
Philadelphia.-..:.... —
Treasury United States.
NewYork.-...
...
do
do.
Treasury United States

1,751 91
20,000
i7i500
45,700
700
15,800
io,QOd
4/000
3,Q0Q
25,000
25;QOO

30,OQQ
5,000
5,QO0
25,000
20,0QQ
15,000
1,500
5,000
500,000
50,000
7,500
20,000
3,000
50,000
18,000
100,000
200,000
15,000
24,000

K—Continued.
Certificate.
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241


Date.
June 24
" 17
'' 18

'' 26
a 17
*' 19
a 17
*'
''
"

28
26
23
26
July 7
6
Aprh 29 ,
July 10

12
June 10



By whom deposited.

Where deposited.

Corcoran & Riggs
Elisha Riggs
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . . . .
do.
do.
......
do.^
do.
......
do
do.
. ...
do
do.
......
Charles Knapp
do.
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . . . .
do.
'do.
John Thompsori . . . . . . .
Calvin P . FuUer . . . . . . .
C & R. for J. S. Phelps.
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . . . ' .
Elisha Riggs
....
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . . . .
do.
......
do.
......
do.
......

Treasury United States
New York.
Philadelphia.
do.
. -—
do.
.do.
Treasuiy United States
do.
New York
do.
............
do.
............
Philadelphia.....
.
* do.'
Charleston
.
do,
...........
Treasury United States
New Y o r k . . . . . . . . . . . .
do.
:
Treasury United States
do. .
New Y o r k . . . . . '
."..
do.
-do'.
............
do.
......"..:...
do.

Amount.
$57,500
50,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
35,000
6,500
500,000
250,000
400,000 .
100,000
1,000
9,000
2,750
500
54,000
25,000
3,000
12,000
13,000
100,000
250,000
100,000
400,000
250,000

242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271

July
. ii

a

''
June
July

''
Aug.

14
15
16
13
15
19
19
20
22
27
27
30
4

5
6
9
10
12
13
6
4
17
5
10
17
19
12




John Thompson. . .
John White
.',
Corcoran & Riggs'.
Elisha Riggs.
.
Corcoran & Riggs.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
John Thompson...
Corcoran & Riggs.
do.
dd.
Elisha Riggs
do.
....:
do.
......
Corcoran & Riggs.
do.
do.
_^
do.^
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
. do.
John Thompson .
Corcoran & Riggs,
do.

do.
Treasury United States
Philadelphia
New Y o r k . . . . . . . . .
Chaiieston
PhUadelphia
New York . . . . . . - - - . . .
Philadelphia
Chaiieston
Treasury United States
New YorkPhiladelphia.
NewYork'............
do.
............
do.
.."..........
^ do
—
do.
do.
do.
............
Treasury United States
do.

•'

New York ..:_
St. Louis -— .
New York
Treasury United States .
New York
do
do.
Treasury United States
St. Louis

15,000
5,000
10,00i) •
100,000

1
•

^
00

^

il—i

200
10,000
300,000
10,000

500
1,000
20,000
5,000
200,000
200,000
100,000
100,000
100,000
200,000
100,000
' 2,000
5,000
200,000
10,000
300,000
3,000
100,000
100,000
20,000
30,000
15,000

w
H

O
P5
^

^
O
"^
H

K
w
H

p>
U2

3
t^
M
CO

K-^-Continued.
Certificate.

Date.

By whom deposited.

Corcoran & Riggs...
272
Aug.. 14
273
14
do.
.:.
274
24
do.
• ...
275
24 John Thompson . . . .
276
26
Corcoran & Riggs . . .
277.
27
John Thompson
278
27
Corcoran & R i g g s . . .
279
28
do.
280
30
do.
281
27
do.
282.
31
do.
28.3.
27
do.
284.
Sept. 2
do.
285;
6
do.
28a
7.
do.
'287:
8
do.
288
10.
do.
289.
4
do.
290.
10
do.
291
13.
do.
292.
• 7.
do.
293:.
13.
do.
294.
14
do.
...
295;
14 John T h o m p s o n . . . . .
' Corcoran & Riggs.".,
8
Digitized for296
FRASER


Where deposited.

St. Louis
• do.

............

Philadelphia
New York.
.
...
Treasury.United States.
New York.
do,
............
Treasury United States
New York.
Philadelphia..
..
do.
........J.

Charleston . . . . . 1 . . . . .
do. ^v.;.;:.•.;.;:.;.;
Treasury United States
do.
do.
do.
St. L ouis,
PhiladelphiaTreasury United States
St. Louis
Philadelphia.
Treasury United States
New Y o r k . . . . . . . " . '.V..
St. L o u i s . . - - - . . . . . . . .

Amount.

$3,000
20,000
35,000.
20,000
20,000
20,000
100,000
12,000
100,000
10,000
10,000
250
350
5,000
6,000
10,000
12,000
50,000
15,000
1,000
10,0005,000
2,500
15,000
40j000

w
o
GQ

CD

297
S98
299
300
3Qi

302
803
§04
305
306
3Q7
308
309
310
311
312
^13
114
315
3i6
317

sis
319
320

Mi
322
323
324
325
326

a
• ''
a
''
"
Sept.
''
"

17
18
17
16
21
22
23
24
ii
21
a
23
25
ii
24
ii
27
27
28
30
24
27
27
28
Oct.
5
6
t. 30
Oct.
8
9
14
15
15
16
12




John Thompson...,
Corcoran & Riggs.
•

'

^

do.

' '

.

do,
do.
do,
do.

do.

I

do.
John Thornpson...
Corcoran .& Riggs .
do. ^
.
John Thonipson...
Corcoran & Riggs.

dol
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
dp,
dp.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
John Thompson

:

-

New Yprk
.. ^....
..
Treasury United States . . . .
PhUadelphia
Charlestori, S* C . . . . . . . . . .
PhUadelphia
Treasury United States
' / ^ dp.
Philadelphia - . . . . . . . . . . .
Charles tori, S, jG. . . . . . . . .
New York.
Treasury United S t a t e s . . .
paltimpre... ^ . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nev^ Y o r k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Baltimore:.....,.;.........
Treasury United S t a t e s . . .
do.St. Louis
Philadelphia............
St. Louis
do.
...............
Treasury Unite.d S t a t e s . . .
do.
...
St. Louis .
. . . . . . ^....
Treasuiy United S t a t e s . . .
do. *
. do.
do.
do.
do.
New York

15,000
2,000
5,000
50Q
7,0Q0
3,000
10,000
10,000
500
20,000
10,000
50,000
10,000
50,000
6,000
1,000
30,000
5,000
10,000
30,000
6,000
12,00Q
30,000
3,0Q0
1,000
2,000
10,000
5,000
10,000
10,000

K—-.Continued.
Gi

Certificate.

327
328
A 329
B 329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
* 348
S19a
349
Digitized for 350
FRASER

By whom deposited." • • - '

Date.

Oct.

14
18
Aug. 27
Oct. 16
*
* 21
18
21
22
*'
23
''
23
^'
26
''
26
''
27
''
28
29
"
30
28
Nov.
1
2
2
<'
1
5
5
6



Where deposited. '

Corcoran & Riggs
do.
.....
do.
...............
John Thompson. - . - . , . - . . . . . . . . . .
do.
..--.-.Corcoran & Riggs.
.--.-.do.
do
do.
do.
do
....
do.
..;..;.........
do
do
do
do.
....:
....".
do.
do.
do
do
John Thompson
. . . . . ^....-.,.
Corcoran & Riggs . . . ^ . . .
.....
do.
John Thompson.: _ . .
...
...;..
Corcoran & R i g g s . . . . . i . . . . . . . . .
v.«.vy.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Amount.

Charleston
Treasuiy United States...»
New York.
do
do
Chaiieston
— .
Treasur}^ United States
do.
do.
"
• do.
do.
Philadelphia ..
Treasury United States
Baltimore
Treasuiy United States. — . . . . . .
do.
Charleston
Treasury United States
do.
Baltimore.
1 .......
New York
Treasurv United States
..." .
do.
.............
New York
Treasuiy.United States

$500
20,000
300,000
10,000
10,000
500
10,000
1,000
1,000
10,000
1,000
18,000
12,000
30,000
6,000
16,000
500
1,000
1,000
10,000
15,000
5,000
1,000
12,000
800

^O

351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380

6
8
8
8
10
11
11
10
12
13
15
12
16
17
17
17
17
15
15
18
19
19
19
20
19
19
20
20
22
2Q




I

do.

- do.
do.
do.
,
Elisha Riggs:
do.
.....
Corcoran & Riggs,
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do:
do.
. .
do.
do.
^
do.
do.
do
. do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
'
do,
John T h o m p s o n . .
Corcoran & Riggs.
do.
do.

Philadelphia
Treasuiy United States.
do.
Baltimore
Treasury United States .
do.
do.
Baltimore .
,.
Treasury United States .,
do.
do.
Philadelphia —
Treasuiy United States.
do.
do.
. .,
Baltimore,
Philadelphia
Charleston
, . do.
.........:.
Treasury United States ..
do.
,.. do.
Philadelphia
Treasury United States . .
Baltimore
do
New York
Baltimore.
Treasuiy United States..
Chaiieston
0

10,000
3,500
5,000
15,000
10,000
20,000
15,500
10,000
13,000
5,000
3,500
7,000
1,000
5,000
6,000
20,000
10,000
6,000
200
2,500
6,000
38,000
20,000
20,000
20,000
40,000
3,000
18,000
9,000
5,000

K—Continued.
00

Certificate.

381
382
383
384
385
386
387a
3876
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396

By whom deposited.

Date.

Nov. 12
22
22
22
24
24
24
26
26
26

27
27
27
29
29
24
30




Corcoran & Riggs ,
do.
- do.
John Thompson-.
Elisha Riggs
Corcoran & Riggs.
do.
do.
John Thompson...
Ehsha Riggs
do
Corcoran & Riggs
do.
John Thompson...
do.
do.
Corcoran & Riggs.

Where deposited.

St. Louis
Philadelphia —
do.
,
NewYork
Treasuiy United States.
Philadelphia
Treasury United States.
NewYork
do
Treasury United States.
Philadelphia
,
NewYork
do
do.
...
Treasury United States.

Amount.

$27,000
10,000
16,000
5,000
10,000
20,000
6,000
1,000
5,000
50,000
10,000
2,500
16,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
4,000

^
O

o
^
^

K
H

15,469,800

00

Statement ofi Treasury Notes issued at 5 2-5 per cent, interest, in exchange fior Specie, under act ofi January 28, 1847.
Certificate.

1
2
3
4

By whom deposited.

Date.

1847.
Feb. 18
Mar.
3
Feb. 18
May 31

. Where deposited.

Amount.

I.1J
1

m
W
George Newbold, President
Washington Hunt.
.......
D. Thompson, President
W. W. Woodworth
'

New York
do.
do
do.
-.-....-..

$250,000 J
71,000
100,000
50,000

^

$471,000

o
pi

w
t>
pi

o

The foregoing statements respecting Treasury notes are, to the best of my knowledge and belief, correct.
W . SELDEN, Treasurer United States,
D E C E M B E R 6,

1847.

pi
RECAPITULATION.
Under act of July 22,1846, at 5 2-5 per cent
Under act of January 28, 1847, at 5 2-5 per cent.^
Under act of January 28, 1847, at 6^per cent




•.

>
„

/.

'

$965,750 00
471,000 00
15,469,800 00
'

$16,906,550 00

pi
K|

REPORTS^OF T H E

180
.'

,'"•

;

M

.

.

[1847.

•
•

Reimbursement of Treasury Notes, monthlyfifirom December 1, 1816, to December l,il847.
December^^
. . . $487,350 OO
January.
176,050 00
February..'
...
379,750 00
March
: . . . . . . . 1,753,797 83
AprU
735,250 00:
May
:.
704,565'83
June .
^. . ; . . . . . .
702,750. 00
TREASUIIY

July
.....1,078,128
August
1,053,850
September
. . . . 139,050
October.....
1,067,100
November.
694,150
3,97i;791

00
00
00
00
00

66

DEPARTkENT,

REG-ISTER'S O F F I C E , December 1, •1847-.

'DANIEL 'GRAHAM, Register.

List ofi Trarisfier Drafits ordered by the Secretciry ofi the Treasury infiavorofi
the Assistant Treasurer ofi the United- States at New Orleans^firomJamiary
1 to December 1, 1847, inchisive.
Date.
1847.
April 19

Amount.

No.

584
585^
586
587'
588
29 590
591
592
593
594
595
596
597
598
599
600
601'
May 28 613
June 3 614
615
u 14 618
'* 21 624
625
July 21 634
Aug. 6. 637
" 20 639
Oct. 25 650
Nov. 3 '668
'* 13 687

On Chesapeake Bknk, Balti'more, Maryland.
Do.
do.
'do. Do.
do.
do.
..,.;
-..
Do.
do.
do.
Do..
do.
do. •
,.
Oh Bank of Middletown, Pennsylvania.
Do.
do. "
do. i . . . . . . ; . . . .
•..
Do.
do.
do.
Dodo.
do. . . . . . . ' . . ; :
Do,
do.
do. ; . . . . . .
Do.
do.
do. ; . . . . . . . .
On Bank of Washington, District of Colurnbia..".;
^oW";Patriotic Bank, Washington, District of Columbia....
Oh Corcoran & Riggs, Washington, D. C, i..-.
Do.
do.
do.
.....o.i
Do.
do.
ido.
.... i i . . . . . . . . . .
On Canal and :panking Company, New Orleans,Xouisiana.
On assistant treasurer of United States, Philadelphia, P a . .
: 0 ^ assistant treasurer of United jStates, Neiv'York, N . Y.
On a'ssistant treasurer of United IStates, PhiladelJDhia, P a . .
On assistant treasurer of United'States, NeW-York, N . Y .
Do.
do,
"do.
Oh assistant treasurer of United :States,. Philadelphia, P a . .
On assistant treasurer bf UriitediStates, New York, N . Y.
On assistant treasurer of Uriited States, Charleston, S . C .
On assistant treasurer-of United 'States, New York, IN". Y.
On assistant treasurer of Uhited States," Charleston,- Si C . .
Do.
do.
"do.
On Canal and Banking Conipany, New Orleans, L a , . . . . .

pOiOOO 00'
id^OOO. 00
2o;ooo 00

20,000 00
30,556 29
5,000 00
5,000 00
5,000 00
SjOOO 00

10=000 00
15,525 79
r,B94 61
6-477 92
20,000 00
20,000 00
26^^96 34
-953 15
1,000,000 00
500^00 00
50d;000 00

1,000,000 00
500/000 00
500,000 00
2,000|)00 00
299,778 24
2.000,000 00
5o;()oo 00
50^000 00
4;634 96
5,616,517 30

TREASURER'S OFFICE, December 6, 1847.



W . SELDEN, Treasurer'United States.

1847.]..

SECRETARY OF THE... TREASURY.
P.

.181

'

Statement ofi Treasury Notes issued monthly, firom January I t o November 30,
1817, inclusive-.
Months.

Under the act of
July 22, 1846.

January
February
March..
....
April.
...-.
May............
June...........

$1,254,100
1,240,000
50,000:
250,000:

Jufy. ^ . . . . . . . . .
August-........
September-.....
Oetober........
November.
$2,794,100,

Under the act of
Jan, 28, 1847-.

$3,158,750
562,600.
2,591,050:
3,255,800.
2^802,950:
1,683,700
2:, 135,250^
406,850
5:75:,500
590,500
$17,762,950

Total.

$1,254,100
4,398,750
612,600
2,591,050
3,505,800
2,802,950
1,683,700
2,135,250
406,850
575,500
' 590,500
$20,557,050

TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

REGISTBR^S OFFICB, December T, 1817,




DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

182

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

Q.
Table of Payments made annually on account of the interest a n i principal of.
the public debt, from the ith of March, 1789, to the 1st day of December,
1847.
Years.

From March 4,
1789, to December 31,
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
* 1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820

Payments.

Years.

Payments.

From December
31,1820, to De$5,287,949 50
cemb'r31,1821
$8,367,093 62
7,263,665 99
1822
7,848,949 12
. 5,819,505 29
1823
5,530,016.41
5,801,578 09 1
,.1824 . 16,568,393 76
6,084,411 61
1825 , 12,095,344.78
5,835,846 44
- 1826 .11,041,082 19
5,792,421 82
1827
10,003,668 39
3,990,294 14
. 1828
12,163,438 07
4,596,876 78
1829 . . 12,383,867 78
4,578,369 95
1830
11,355,748 22
7,291,707 04
1831
16,174,378 221
9,539,004 76
1832
17,840,309 29
7,256,159 43
1833
1,543,543 38
8,171,787 45
1834
6,176,565 19
7,369,889 79
1835
58,191 28
8,989,884 61
1836
6,307,720 10
1837
21,822 91
10,260,245 35
1838
5,605,720 27
6,452,554 16 '
1839
11,117,987 42
8,008,904 46
1840
4,086,613 70
8,009,204 05
1841
5,600,689 74
4,449,622 45
1842
8,575,539 94
11,108,123 44 To June 30,1843
861,696 55
7,900,543 94 '
1844
12,991,902 84
12,628,922 ,35 '
1845
8,595,039 10
24,871,062 93 1 •
1846
1,213,823 31
25,423,036 12
1847
6,722,021 39
21,296,201 62 LFrom June
7,703,926 29
30 to De: 8,628,494 28
cember 1, 1847
2,539,237 69
$483,800,498 79

TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 6, 1847.




DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

1847.]

.183

R.
Coinage of the Mint of the United States in the several years from its establishment in 1792, and including the coinage of the Branch Mints from the
, commencement of their operations in 1838.
Years.

1793 )
1794 }
1795 )
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800....
1801
1802
1803
1804....
1805
1806
1807
'
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
..
1814..
1815
1816...
1817.....
1818
!
1819
1820

Years. •

Amount coined.

1821
1822
1823
192,129 40 1824.
125,524 29 1825
545,698 00 1826
645,906 68 1827
571,335 40 1828
510,956 37 1829
516,075 83 1830
370,698 53 1831
371,827 94 1832
. 333,239 48 1833
801,084 00 1834
1,044,595 96 1835
982,055 00 1836
884,752 53 1837.
1,155,868 50 1838
1,108,740 95 1839
1,115,219 50 1840
1,102,271 50 1841
642,535 80 1842...
20,483 00 1843
56,785 57 1844
647,267 50 1845
1,345,064 50 1846
1,425,325 00 1847
1,864,786 20
$453,541 80

Amount coined.

- $1,018,977 45
915,509 89
967,975 00
1,858,297 00
1,735,894 00
2,110,679 25
3,024,342 32
1,741,381 24
2,306,875 50
3,155,620 00
3,923,473 00
3,401,055 00
3,765,710 00
7,388,423 00
:..
5,668,667 00
7,764,900 00
3,299,898 00'
4,206,540 00
:.
3,576,467 61
3,426,632 50
2,240,321 17
4,190,754 40
11,967,830 70
7,687,767 52
5,668,595 54
6,633,965 50
•20,758,048 12
$143,238,370 54

*As far as exhibited by reports received to 6th December, 1847, inclusive.
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 6,




1847.

DANIEL GRAHAM, Register,

184

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

s..
Coinage ofi the Mints ofi the' United States firom the 1st-ofi Decemher, 1846^
to the 1st ofi December, 1817, and monthly firom the 1st ofi' January, 1847,
to the 1st ofi December, 1847.
From the 1st ofi December, 1846,. to the 1st ofi December, 1847. .
In the month of December, 1846
$677,743 00
From the 1st of January to the 1st of December, 1847. .20,758,048 12
21,435,791 V2

Coinage ofi the Mints monthlyfiromthe 1st ofi January to the 1st ofi December,
1847.
In the month of January
February
March
AprU . May
June
July
August
September
October
November

.

:
-...
.....:...-.....

$535,050 52
815,191 36
2,676,328 69
873,165 99
1,364,173 61
1,942,312 50
3,543,945 44
1,804,043 44
2,699;305- 01
1,418,577 76
3,085,953 80
20,758,048- 12

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
REGISTER'S O F F I C E , D'ecember 6, 1847.
DANIEC

^

'

G R A H A M . Register.

NOTE.—The amount for November is made from returns from, tha
mints received at the Treasury to the 6th December, 1847, inclusive.




1847-.J^

SECRETARY'OF THE TREASURY.

185

Theincrease of gold and. silver imported into the United States during
the fiscal year eriding on the 30th.of June,. 1847,. as compared v^ith.the
year 1846, was $21,979,855, being 7,417 73-100 per cent.
Total import ofgold and silver. Total export ofgold and silver. Excess of imports.

1846..
1847..

$3,777,732
24,121,289-

$3,481,417
1,845,119

$296,315
22,276,170

TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

REGISTER'S OFFICE, December 1, 1817.

DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

•• U .
Amount received in specie from all sources, customs, lands, miscellaneous, and loans from 1st January to 1st December, 1847,
$48,667=,886 18.
Amount of disbursements in specie from 1st January to 1st December,
1847, $48,226,516 31.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S OFFICE, Deoember 1, 1847.




DANIEL GRAHAM, Register,

186

[1847.

R E P O R T S OF T H E
1.

Prices ofi United States Treasury Notes and StocJcs at New YorJcfiromDecember 1, 1816, to December 1, 1847; according to reports ofi rates in Shipping
and Commercial List and Journal ofi Cominerce,
5pr cent. Treas- 5 2r5thspr cent. U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6
ury notes. Treasurynotes. percent., 1856. percent., 1862. per cent., 1867.

Date.
1846.

Dec.

1
2-

-

-

-

3
4

_

—

„

•

'

5

'

'

102, (coupons off)

100

"

••

7
8
9

_

10

~

11
12
14
15
16 !
17
18

-

19
21
22
23
24
26
28
29

_
-

-

30
31

-

-

102
100
99J @ 9 9 |
(for the
opening.)
101, (inter"
est off)
98^ @ 100,
(interest off)
98J
99
.
»
lOOf, (interest off)
101@101i
98f
101

"
-

-98f @ 99
98J
1
98f

„

''
•

-

-

-

-

•

•

-

„

"
*
.'
-.

847.

Jan.

1
2
4 1
5
6
7
8 •
9

-

1

i
•

-

1




^-

|.

.
lOli
100f@ 101
-

"
-

98i § 98^ _

1

1

-

1

1847.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

187

1—Continued.
Date.

Gpr cent. Treas- 5 2-5ths pr cent. U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6
ury notes. Treasury notes. percent., 1856. percent., 1862. per cent. 1867.

1847.

Jan. 11
12
13
14
15
16
18
19
20
21
22
23
25
26
27
28
29
30
Feb. 1
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
11
12
13
15
16
17
18
19
20
22
23
24
25
26
27
Mar. 1
.2

_
:
-

- -•
_
-

98J
_
97^ ® 98
97J
97 J .
98
98
98 @ 99
97^ @ 98i
.
99i @ 9 9 |
99i
100
_
-

101
^-

•-

„

_
lOOj

1

:
-

-^

-

-

101
lOlJ
101

102
lOlf
102f

-

.lOlf
-.
- .
.. -

lOlJ
lOOJ® 101^
101
101
101 .
/
103
,
IOU '
loii
lOlJ
-

104
103
• 103
.
-

~
.
.
102
102
- .
102
-




_

^
^
-

s

[1847-.

REPORTS OF THE

188

1—Continued.
6pr cent. Treas- 5 2-5.ths pr cent. U. S. stocks 6 U.S.-stocks 6 U. S. stocks,. 6
ury notes. Treasury notes.l percent-., 1856. per cent-., 1862. per cent., 186'7.

Date,
1847.

j

Mar.

3
lOlJ'
102
4
5 i
-"^
6
8 lOlf@ 101^
' ^ i lOlf
10 1
11
lOli
12 lOlf@ 102
13
' lOlf
15
16
17
,
18
19
20.
22
28
lOlf.
100^
24
. 25
lOlf
100f@100^
26 1
27
29
30
1011
-.
31
April 1 "
2
-.
101
3
5
101
6 101@101i
7
101
'
8 101@101^
9
101
lOli
10
1
12
lOlf
13 101J@101t
14
15
16 102J@103 102@102i
17
103i
19
103i
- '
20
103J
21
1031
103J
22 11031 @ 103 J
1




-

•

lOli
-. ,
101^
lOlJ
101^
•

-

•

-

..
"
lOlf
lOlf
101f@102
103
lOlf
102
101|@102
lOlf
lOlf
. lOlf
101f@102
'
.103
"
"
:
j
"
'- •
104@104i
- ' «
103|@103f
•

-

1

"
-

103@ 103^1
101^
-

"

"

'
. -"
*
" •

•--

1

'"

•

• ' " • '

'

:- •: .
•

-

, 1847,]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

189

1—Continued.
©ate. '

6,prcent. Treas- 5-2-5thsprcent. U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6
'ury notes. , Treasurynotes. percent., 1^56. per cent., 1862. percent., 1867.

1847.

April 23 l 0 3 i @ 1 0 3 j
24
26
103i
27
103J
28
29 103J@103f
103f
30
Ma-ijr 1
103J
104i
3
4 " 104i

_
_
103i
-

6 104S@104t
104f
7
104|
8
1041
10
104f
11
1041
12
13 1041@105
14 105 @105J
.106
15
17
18
19
20 105|@105J
21
22 1054@1053
24 1054® 105 J
.25" 105|@105f
105f
.
26
•27" I05^@105t
•28
. 29
105J
31
105f
June 1
'2,
105f,
3
105f
'4
5
105f
7
1051
8
106
9
10
11
106
12 106i@106t •

_
104^
-




105
-•
104f
~
_
- ..
104 @ 105
_
- '
106
~
"
1054
106
.,
l(56i
107
-

"
_
_
_
105i
_
«,
-

»
107

-

„ .
„

-

\

~
-

104| .
«
104i

•

•

_

' _
~
_
_

•

_
•

•

-

•

_

-

•

_
~
107
^
io7;j
_
_
-

_
_
~

_
_
104i
-

_
-

^
105i
-

•

_

-

•

_
_
_
. _
_
•_
.-..
107-J
. ..
-_
._
104i
_
,._
_
_
_
-

"

•

[1847.

REPORTS OF THE

190

1—Continued.
Date.

6 pr cent. Treas- 5 2-5ths pr cent. U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6
ury notes. Treasury notes. percent., 1856. percent., 1862. percent., 1867

1847.

June 14 106f@106J
15
106i
16
106f
17
106i
18 106J§1065
19
21
107
22
107J
23
107i
24
107^
25
107^
26 107@107^
28
107
29
-.
30
1074
July 1
1074
2
107J
• 3
108
5
.*
' 6
107|
7
8
107J
9
10 1065@107J
12 106|@107
13 106J@107
14
1064
15
1064
16
17
106
. 19
105|
20
1051
21 1051@ 105J
22
106^
23
106
24 105J@106
26
1051
'
27
28
/29
_
30 105J@1064
31 106@106^
105i
Aug. 2
3
106



-

•

ut

•

-

1054
105
106
.
1064
1064
106
^
- .
•
"
•^

105i
-

106
'
106^
•=•'

»
r*
1064
1054
106
.1.

. 1054
' 1054
1054
A

•

^
"
1074
-.
108J

-

.
0

I
1

106J
105f@106
106
106
106
105f
106
106® 106 J
106
1064
106J
106J
1064 1

1847.]

^

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

191

1—Continued.
r)ntp

Ualc,

6 pr cent. Treas- 5 2-5ths perct. U. S.stocks,.6 U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6
ury notes. Treasury notes. per cent., 1856 per cent., 1862.per cent., 1867.

1847.

Aug. 4
5
6
7
9
10
11
12
13
14
16
17
18
19
20
21
23
24
25
26
27
28
30
31
Sept. 1
2
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
•' 21
22
23

-

-

1054

-

1064

-

-

105
-

105^
-

106
105

104|@104J
104t@104f
104i
103J@103f
1034 ®103f
104
1034® 103^
103^® 104
103f
104
104
103i-@104
103f
103J
103J
1034® 103 J
1034
1034
'
103
102f '

-102J
^«

105J
"
..
^ .
-

-

102J ® 1 0 2 |
102t
102f@104
104@104i
104@104|1034® 103^
1034® 103 J
1031
1034 ®103J
104
1044 ®104i
104J@104J
104@104i
104^® 1044

_
-

...
-




-

-

*
1044
104
104
104
.
-

104
1044

•

f.

»
1054
105 „
1054
1034
*
*
104f
104J
104
_
105
104J
104J
105
• 1054
.

[1847.

REPORTS, OF THE

192,

:1—^Gontinued.
.•5-2r5ths perct. .US. Stocks, 6; U . S . stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6
.,, 6 pr cent. Treasury motes. Treasurynotes; per cent., 1856. ier cent., 1862. per cent., 1867.

Date.
1847.

Sept, .24
• 25
104:27 103f ^ 1 0 4
28
- .
104*
•29
-30
O c t . l 103@103J
2 102f@102^
-4 1 0 l | @ 1 0 l |
loif ® l o i i
6 101@ 1014
-•7
101@10l|1
. 8 :101iioi|
9 ioij@ioi4
-11 lOlf @ 1 0 l |
•12
lOlf
13 1
ioi4@ioif
14 i o i 4 @ i o i i
15
16
lOlf
18
1014
.-19
20
1014
21 101@1014
-22
101^
,23 101@101i
25
101^
101* :
-26
-27
101
-28
•-29
101
-30
101
Nov, 1
101
2 100J@101
3 100^^101
4 1001^(^101
5
101
6 100|@100J
8 100i@100f '•
9
10 100|@100J
,
11 1004(^1001 _
12 100 @1004 1
13
100
•

"

•

>

-

1
-




•

'

~

•

-

..

- .
"

• •

•

"

•

-•
- .
-

.

- ..
- .
_
- -. .
- ,;
- .
"
_

-

i

-

••'.

1

~
~
-

•

"

•

-

~
"

'

,
103

•

102f
- .
- .
102f
-

- '•
-"

- .
lOlf
lOli
.. ..
_,
- •

• •

- ...
, .- ..
1021
- .
102

"
- .
- .
- •
- .
_
- ,
- .
-

•

-

'

.

-

- ...
-

-

^

•

105i
1054
a:05i
104^
1034

•

-*
- '
•- "
"

-

-102
-

•

-

103
•

-

^
'
•1034
103
.• 103*
103*
103*
. ~
•'
102*@103
103
• .1021
•

•

• . ' •

;•

102*
- '
1024
1

1847,]

SECRETARY p F ,THE .TREASURY.

.193

I—Continued.
6pr cent. Treas- 5 2-5ths per ct. U. S. stocks, 6 U. S. stocks, 6 U . S . stocks, 6
.ury n.o tes, ._.Treasurynotes. per cent.,1156. per cent.,. 18^2. per cent., 18jB7.

Date.
1847.

Nov. is-

100
,100
le.
'17,'
-,
is 99|@99*
19 ' 99U@ 99f
, 20
,.-22.

M
M.

-

-

^:m
:m

..
-

~aw)* :

'26" 1.004® 100*
27" .100 @ 100*
.-29, "^ mi
'30 99*@ 100
'IiOO
Dec. 1

•

- , :>

•

-

-

100
-.
100
ioo
*
"
- . . ..,. iop*,@ippf
"
"
' 19?*
.102
•

.

-

•

~
'. .102
-

:

•

-'
, 103
-

NOTES.
Treasury notes are usually sold with interest pjf; that is to say, the purchaser pays so much
for the.amount of iDrinbipal" stated:in the note, and then the interest which- nfiaiy have accrued to
the day..of _^sale. •' .
'
'
.
•
'/
• ^
Stocks,'oh the contrary, are (except within a short time of the payment of dividends) usually
sold with the mfemi on; that is tb~ say, the purchaser gives one^Wund sum for the principal
stated in the:certificate, and.for theinterest whi'ch may have accrued^o the day-of sale.
These facts will; serve to: explain some apparent discrepancies in the price's of stocks and
Treasur^'notes.• "' ' • •
•
-^
i •_

VOL. iri.—13.




[1847.

R E P O R T S OF T H E

194

—Prices of Treasury Notes-at New Orleans, from December.!, 1846, to
December 1, 1847, according to quotations inthe Picayune and Courier.
Price.

Date

\

1847.

1846.

•Dec'r

1
4
8
14
18
22
29

i discount.
Do.'
^ to J discount.
Par to i discount.
4 to i discount.
Do.
Do.

1847

Jan'y

1
•

2

5
7
•

Price.

Date.

1

8

12]
13
14
16
19
23
24
27
28
30
31.
Febr'y 2
3
4
5
6
7
. 9
11
13
14
16
17
18
19
20
24
25
26
28

March

2 ' i to 14: discount.
3 1 to 1 discount.
Do.
. 4
5
Do.
6 J discount.
9 Par td i discount—^in
good demand.
' l O 1 Par to J disc't—scarce.
11
Do. .
12
Do. . .
13 Par to i discount.
14
Do.
16
Do. .•
17 ! Par to 4 discount.
• 18
Do.
20
.; Do.
21 Par to i discount.
23 Par to 4 discount.
24
Do.
26 Par to i discount.
27 Par to 1 discounts
!
28 Par to ^ discount..
Par to f discount.
.
1
^•'•
April
1. Par—scarce.
. 2 Par to J premium.
6 Pax.
7. Par.
9 Par.
10- P a r . •
.

4 to J discount.
4 to f discount.
4 to J discount.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Par to 4 discount.
Par to J discount.
Par ito 4 discount.
Do.
Do. .
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do..
Do.
4 to ^ discount.
4 to 1 discount.
Do.
Do.
Doi
J to 1 discount.
f to 1 discount.
j to 1 discount.
Do.
f to 1 discount.
i discount; improving.
Par to f discount.
J to 1 discount.
4 to J discount.
1 1 to 1 discount.
1-




•

11

Par.

•

•

13 Par.
• .
14 Par.
.15 1 4 to f discount.
• 1 ^ Par to 4 discount.
18
Do.
20
Do._
21 Par to i discount.
23 Par.
24 Par.
25 Par.
27 Par.
28 J to 1 premium.
29
Do.

nHSB

.

1

1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY. .

195

2.^~Prices of Treasury Notes ai New Orleans—Continued.
Price.

Date.
•

.

••

.

Price.

1847.

1847.

April 30
.-May 1
4
•

Date.

5

6
7
•••8
^9
11
-12
13
14
IS16
.19
: 21
22
.'•.. 25
26
27
28
29
30
June
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
10
11
12
13
16
17
19
22
24.
2§
26
27
30
July
1

* to f premium.
* premium...
Par to * premium.
Par to f premium.
Par to * premium.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
1 to 2 premium.
Do.
Do.
Do.
1* to 2 premium.
1 to 1* premium.
2 to 2* premiurn.
Do.
Do.
Do.
2 to 2 | premium.
2 to 2* premium.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
.
2* to 3 premium.
3 to 4 premium.
Do.
3 to 34 premium.
3 to 4 premium.
Dp.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do,
Do.
3 to 4* premium.
Do.
Do.




July

2
3
4
6

9
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
21
22
23
25
27
28
29
30
31
Aug. 3
4
5
6
10
11
12
13
17
18
19
20
21
22
24'
25
26
27
28
29

3 to 4* premium.
3 to-4 premium.
4* to. 5. premium.
Do.
Do.
Do.
5 premium.
Do.
. Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
3 to 4 prernium.
Do. ;
5 to 5* premium.
Do.
.Do.
.
3* to 4 premium.
Do.
3 to 4 premium.
Do.
Da.
4 to 4* premium.
Do.; very scarce.
3 to 4 premium.
Do.
3 to 3* premium.
3 premium. ^
3 to 3* premium.
Do.
2* to 3 premium.
Do.
3 to 3* premium.
2* premium.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Par to 1 premium.
Do.
Par.
2 tp 2* premium.

:,1^6
#

-llEPOHTS

•

'

.

•

'

OF'^TK^
•

.

•

• •
,

.

•

•

•

.

•

•

^2r-^J>ricer^•Trefik^ftfN
-. D a t e .

• •

'•

Price.

Date..

•' • • ".

- •'
.
1847 .
1847.
Aug. = 31- -2^ to'-^*^pfemmm;; •
•
Oct. 15 Par.
Sept.
i
17 .-Par. •
M'9V - P a r ,
- W • 4l'prermum.
3 3-to- 3 * preitiiurp.."
• •?20; ' P a r . ;
5 2=1:6^2* prerhmm.
-••2^3- ' • P a r .
Do.
7 •
2 4 Par.
27 • Par;
-Do..' • • .
8
28 P'ar-I
. D o . • ••••
9
10
30 Par.
•Do-.
• ••• •
11 14'to 3 premium, ' .
31 Parv
• Do.
12
Nov. -3'-- ^.Par.
Par;
• • 4
- 14
•'-• D o .
••'..
.. i
W&x.
15
-•
Do. ' '
^
16
6 Pari
Do.
17
Do.
/' .
•'.7 , Par.
•IS- -'Par t o ' l preriiium.
I
. - 9 ; - rParv
•
•
19 P a r .
f. • . -'-lb- •Par.
.: 21:. •'Pdr.
, ; . • 1 '. ai- - Par. •
'
12 Par-.
22 Par- to 1 premium'.
• •.
•
1 3
Par.
23
• 14 Par.
- 2 4 ' ' P a r to- 2" premium.
28 - ^ t o — premium.
• 16- Par'.
•29 " P a r . ' • • •
-'19^ • ^ P a r . ' • :
Par-.
30 Par.
•, •
•
2 0
^21 Par.
Oct.
1 •Pair.
• 22 Par.
• • 2-"Par.
24 Par.
.
3 ^Par;.
.
• • 25
Par.
-5•:
26
Par.
7 Pai-.
2 7 . •Par.
• P ' a r , ' •.'
•
' '
i •Far.^
. - 2 8 • > Par.
9
3 0 •-Par.;
13 ' P a r . ' •
•
•
Dec. 1 Par.
'.
14 Par.
• .

^

. 1

—

•

'

1

^

.

•

•

.

.

.

•

^

•




•

.

: . :

Price..

•
^

'

^

1847;] j
• ' •

-SECRETARY' Q R 'KJEc TREASURY.
^

\

.' ' ' [

197

X .

Exhibit ofi the^amp.^^it.cfi Treasury-^.N-otes. receyvedfifrom sales ofi Vublic, Lands
dming; the-fiourthgudrter ofi. i;846, and ihe:fi7-§t,.second, and third quarters
ofi 1817, as^uppeaz^ firom returm made, t^
^^
A-mouht received
in 4thc% 184a

Amount rece.ived Amount received" Amount received •.:• Aggregate.. .
ill .1st qr. 1847..: .. iiTt.;2d.<ij;...^ 1.8.4.7... .-in 3d qr.; 1847. •

$10,350.;. . -

• t9,750:

:$i2,o§p--' ; ' .fiiSSOr; I $34,O00-

GENERAL LAND OFFICE,. DecemSer 8,

•.. •

•

;•'

.-.

1847.

RICHA§gQ^M. YOUNG,^

Stcttement.ofi amount.ofi Specie and..ofi:TreasuTy.Nptes.received-:at-: the customhotise, New.York,firom? Jammry.!^^^
-

.

-

:

.

•

.

'

.

..

-

1
"

.'••

. • ; :

.

\^

.

.

.

Treasury Notes,

Sfiecie.

. .

To.tal.

January
. :. $81,0,444.02, : $615,601 8 6 ' $1,426,045. 8 8 '
February. . . . . . . . . < 1,41'7;,584 41 .^.;•. 83,985 74
1,501,570 15:
1,851 '85
1,654,066 91
Marcli
. . . . . . . ' • 1,652,216 06; ^ '•
April:
:
.: i: 2,109,936 29 ' r ^ i,2ooro;o V 2,111,136 29
M:ay-.:.H,. -,. . . . . . . . . . ; l,48Si,658 69.
. 50 00 i 1,482,708 6a
-•
i 1,4^4,549 47
June . . .
. . . . " . t 1,464,549 47
J u l y . . . . • . . . : . . ; . . . . ; 2,062,981 11
- 2,062,981 11
3',340,70:6 '48
August^ — - - - - - V ; 3,340,7'06. 48
2,101,447 33.
September.. - . . . . .^ 1-2,101,447:33:
1,242,323 91
October - - .^> . ' . . , . : 1,242,323 91
94,455; 1;L
1,025,030. 60
Nby-em.ber . . . • . „ . . . ;- • 930,57.5,, 49,: [
-

•

? . . • ' • " ' • ' . '

'

F 18,615,422 26

"•

:•

T '

797,144 .A6 .. 19,412,566 82

CuSTOM-HoUiSE, NE\\f YoRK,
-, •
^.
C.QLLECTOR.'^s OFFICE, December 1, 1847.
^ . W. L A W R E N C E .




Z.-Statemsnt showing thenumber of acres of Land suhject to entry at pivate sale in each State <md ' ^ ' f i P f i ^ J T ^ ^ f i ^ Z
vroclainied to be offered in the-sTrrins; of 1QA:S; the number of acres surveyed ami not proclaimed or offered; the number oJ acres in
p ^ l l c Z f i b l T I ^ f i m rLnb^. i f acres to which thelndian title has been extinguished, rermining unsurveyed, exclusive of
those in procefsof being surveyed; and the totals, to'1st December, 1S11.
Amount to. which the
Amount subject to en- Amount proclaimed to Amount surveyed and Amount in process pf Indian title has been
be offered in • spring not proclaimed or
extinguishd, remainbeing surveyed.
-try at private sale.
of 1848.
,.
offered.
ing unsurveyed.

State or Territory

Ohio

,

•Michigan

Iowa

,

A r k a n s a s . . . . . . . . ^..
Mississippi
Florida
. Total...;.....

' Acres.
867,887
4,087,322
14,570,867
16,246,729
.25,504,057
6,650,358
6,783,473
11,580,118 .
'. 25;142,515
11,832,006
16,732,955 12,102,714 .
152,101,001

Acre's.
None. •
721,272 °
None.
None.
0568,648
556,478
1,857,063
257,137
1,338,189
12,891
None.:
454,50.7
5,766,185

Acres.
None.
1,070
.(a) 2,523,591
(6)27,975
(d) 182,297
• None.
(c) 771,842
•(/i) 931,631
(e) 339,278
None.
(/) 89,825 .
• {g) 257,229
5,124,738

Acres.
None.
None.
300,000
None.
650,000
1,500,000
1,730,000
' 325,000
1,200,000
•None.
None.
.1,650,000

71,048,214

Northwestern Territory, east ofthe Rocky Mountains j and west of the Mississippi, exclus
Northwestern Territory, west ofthe Rocky Mountains, extending, to the 49th degree of lioi'tV> l a t i t u d e
[NOTE.—^The nature and extent ofthe Indian claims to these lands are unknown to this office.]

-

.. Acres.
867,887
4,809,664
•
27,822,846 •
16,274,704
1
' 29,585,859
'
40,324,903
. 13,522,999 ^
21,159,591
28,340,622
11,844,897
16,856,906
29,984,260
241,395,138

'

pi
O
H.

ffi

478,549,708
218,536,320

J..... v.....

Total

00

.Totals.

Acres.
None.
. . None.
10,428,388 '
None.2,680,857
31,-618,067.
2,3.80,621
. 8,065,705
. 320,640
None.
34,126
15,519,810

7,355,000

'CO

.

697,086,028
132,295,680

NoTEs.-j-(a) All in the northfern peninsula and'copper region, '(ft) Small detached tracts, (c) Part situated in the disputed territory, and suspended surveys.
•(d) Situated in Current riyer, copper region,.and Glamorgan grant, (e) Situated in Glamorgan and De Bastrop grants. ' ( / ) South pf 31st degree of latitude, r ^
surveys incomplete, (g-) Suspended surveys. (A) In^Dauterive and De Bastrop claims, and suspended surveys.
,.,
OO
GENERAL LAND OFFICE,



l?ecm&er 7-, 1847..

. . R I C H A R D M.YQ-UNG, Commiisiower.

,^

1847.]

199

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
AA*.

Statement ofthe value ofi Breadstufs and Provisions exported during thefiscal
• years ending on the ^Oth. J.une, 1846 cind 1847.
In 1 8 4 6 . : . . . " .

.Breadstuffs.
.Provisions

I n 1847.

$19,627,020
'4,946,971
-$24,573,991

: . . . .Breadstuffs $57,533,'661
Provisions : 8,372,612
-$65,906,273

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, .
REGISTER'S OFFICE,

<

December 1, .1847.

BB.
Statement ofi the Imports and Exports in the years ending on the SOth June, 1846
and 1817, ^ •••' . • . . " •
Exclusive of specie.

1846.^
Imports ^ - Foreign exports....

Specie.

$117,914,065
7,865,206

$3,777,732
3,481,417'

110,048,859.

Total.

$121,691,797
. 11,346,623
110,345,174

$122,424,349
6,166,039

. $24,121,289
1,845,119

$146,545,638
•8,011,158

116,258,310

.1847.'
Imports . . . . . . . . .
Foreign exports

296,315

22,276,170

. 138,534,-480

$423,851
62,620

$102,141,893
150,637,464

Domestic exports. ;
1846
1847

.-

$101,718,042^
• 150,574,844

.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 1, 1847.



DANIEL GRAHAM, Register,

R E P O R T S OF T H E

200

[1847!

Statemeiit showing .what:fihe^ Domestic Expofifpfi.the UnitM'StateSy exctusvve^
ofi gold and silver,'would''b6 on tM 30^% ofi June, 181^, .ifi'-dtring'each pfi
the-three years succeeding the .last fiscal year ^ the percentage ofi augmentation
werethe sanifCIS duriiig thelast fiscal yedf^^ ,
TKe increase of ^domestiG exporis.of the United States, exclusive of gold
. and silver, .on the,30th;of 4UnQ,. 1847, as compared withlhe- year 184.6,
' was $48.,S5!^()2~^)eing' 4§:oSij6 p e r cent: . . .
*
Domestic, exports
exclusive of sJDecie. •Per .cent. 48.0316. •Domestic exports.

Years..

June 30—
• 1846 . $101,718,042
. • •• • • • i 8 4 7 ' •150,574;844
. •$;72,323,506 $222.,898,35Q
•
1848 • • 222,898,350 '..r07'061^643'
329,959,993
1849-• : 329,959,993. • 158,485,063: . 488,445,056 •

T R E A S U R Y DEPAiEiTMENT,..

/ . : . . . . : .

.

'

Years.

'1848-;
•' 1849 '
1850 1

•

i^EGiSTER'sOFFjI^B; .Pe^^^

.

; ; .




:

DANIEL GRkB^KM, Register,

7 .—^Statement ofi Commerce, Revenue,^ and Population ofi the United States firom 1790 to 1847.

Years.

'1790

im..:...

1792y......
1793^.....
1794^
..
1795i.....;..
1796^,;.,;
1797^..,.,^.,
1798.-....'.v.17i99i . > . . . .
1800......,
1§01-.•.-..;..
18G'2* •....-.,
1^03....-.'..
1804>.....
1805;-..^.•.•.

ifeoe:...-...
1B07; . . . . . .
•1^17>-...^.
I8i8v....'.
1619.....V-.

1820
1821......
1822......
1823
1824
,
1825
1826
..
•1827-.
1828



Total imports.-

. $23,000,000
29,20O.,O0O,
3l,5()0,O!dd
• •31,100,000;.
•34,6,00,00.0,
69,75:6,,268,
81»43^,igi
7'5,379,406
68',55i,7:Qq
. 79,069,148
9l-,252,76a
111,363,511
^ 76,333,333
^
64,6'6;6;,6:66(,
-85,000,000.
]2d560d,d00'
129,410,000'
.138^5QQ,00d,
99.,25d,dOQ
l2l,75d,()Dd
•87,i25,dO0 •
74,'45(),do:o
62,585,72483,241,541
77,579,267
. 80,549,00796,340,075
84,974,477
7.9.,484,06a.
88,509,824

Imports consumed in Domestic produce ex- Foreign liherchandise
the United States, ported, exclusive of exported^ exclusive
of specie."
exclusive of specie. specie.- * '

$22,460,844
28,687,959,
29,746.,9d2;
2"8',99D,'428:• 2^,a73;7^6^,
6l,26!6,.79;a
5i5,i36,16^
35,55l;7dd;
• S(5,546„i:48;
-^52,121,891.
• 64,720,790'
: 40,558o3§2'
51,0'72,59i
48,76.8,4;03;.
67,42d,,98i
69,126,764
7g,856'j44^ •
• 79,-891,931.
•102,323,304
67,959,317 '
56,441,971
43-,696i405-.
• 68,395;673 .
• 51,310,736.
53,846;567
66,395,722:
57,652,-577
54,901,108.
- .66,975,505

$19,666,000
18,50q,000.
19,0dd,9.QQ.i
2^,o;od,oQo:
26;50o„ood,;
39;500,000'
4dV76.4,0a7:
29,850,206:
2S,527,097• •3;3;i42,522:
3i:,84Q;i9d3, •
47',47^;,2d4:
36,708,189'
42,205,961.
' 4i;,46.7,'477'
4'2,387:,002
. 4i;,253:,727;
48",6.99;592
6a,3i3;50d
-.•'73,854;437
50;976,83S
. 51,683,640
43,671,8&449,874,079
47,155,408
50,649,500,.
66,94.4,7.45.
52,449,855
57,8.78.,117.
49,976,632

'•$539,156
• 512,041,
= 1,753,098;
2;, 109,5.72.!^
6,526,233:
•^;48ia,472
26;;30d,000!
2T,dd0,ood33;ddo;o0d:;
45.;523,00d"
3i9-13&;g77'.
46;,642,721
35V774,971l
. 13,5.94;072;
• 36:,23i,59t
53,179,019
.6ti,283,236:
. 59,643,5f|8;: i9;,35'8',06.9
19^426,696'
.19;, 165,683
18",008,029
10,824,429-11,47.6,022
21,170,635
18,322,605;
23,7.93,588.
20,440,934
16,431,830.
.14,044,578'

00

Total exports.

$20,205,156
19,0.12,041.
2d;^53:,d98'
2&,ld9;57si;'
3^;026;233:^
47* 9^9;472.' •
6^]d6^;o9r
• •56:,85d,:206'
6h527,Q97'
78!,665,5.22- •
• 7d;971,78Q94,il5;925.'
7;2;483U6d^ •
55;'8ao;d33.
.77;699;074'
95,566,021
101,536,963;
. 108,343,150.
87,67i^,i569'
93,281,133.
• 70.,142,5a'
69,691,669
64,9'74,382.
72,1(50,281
74,6.99,030
75,986,657.
99,535,388
77,595,322
82,324,827
72,264,686

. Statement ofi Commerce, Revenue, and Population-^Contirmed.

• Years.

1829....:...;
..^.......
1830.....;.'.;-..
.•.:...;
1831.^ .-..^w..^..:'.^^......v.....
1832.....;...w............
1833................-..^........:....
1834.-....-..
..-.>...;..
1835............. i..:.-.........:..,
1836. . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . .
1837.................^.
....:.
1838.-..-.....
.v.....~
.,
1839.-.
1840.V...
1841...............................
1842, (to September30)....-...-......
1842, (to December.31, 3 months)'..
1843, (Jan. I t o June 30, 6 months).
1844..:^.
....^...:..:
1845.........
1846...........
:........
"....
1847.....




Total Imports.

$74,492,527
•70,876;920
103,191,124
101,029,266
108,118,311
126,521,332
149,895,742
189,980,0"35
140,989,217
113,717,404
162,092,132
107,141,519
127,946,177
100,162,087
• 21,584,599
43^169,200
108,435,035
117,254,564
121,691,797
146,545,638

Imports consunied in Domestic produce ex- Foreign merchandise
the United States, ported, exclusive of exported, exclusive
exclusive of-specie.
specie.
of specie.

$54,741,571
• 49,575,099
82,808,110
75,327,688
83,470,067
86;973,147
122,007,974
158,811,392
113,3i0,571
. .'86,552,598
145,870,816
86,250,335
114,776,309
87,996,318
12,431,376
24,862,753
.96,390,548
105,599,541
110,048,859
116,258,310

$55,087,307
. 58,524,878
59,218,583
61,726,529
. 69,950,856
80,62"3-,662
100,459,481
106,570,942
94,280,895
95,560.880
101,625,533
111,660,561
103,636,236
91,799,242
25,895,451
'51,790,903
99 ,'531,774
98,455,330
101,718,042
150,574,844

$12,347,344
13,145,857
13,077,069
19,794,074
17,577,876'
21,636,553
14,756,321
17,767,762
17,162,232
9,417,690
10,626,140
12,008,371
•. 8,181,235
8,078,753
1,713,112
3,426,223
(5,214,058
7,584,781
. 7,865,206
6,166,039

o

Total Exports.

$72,358,671
73,849,508
81,310,583
87,176,943
• 90,140,433
104-,33.6,973
121,693,577
128,663,040
117,419,376
108,486,616
121,028,416
132,085,946
121,851,803
104,691,534
28,115,493
56,230,987
111,200,046
114,646,606
113;488,516
158,648,622

o
w
O

GO

•Statement ofi Commerce, Revenue, and Population—Continiied.

Years.

1790........ i
;
..........
1791.................................
1792......
.1793.......;.......;.;....
1794:...;.;................;..........
1795
;;....;.
1796........
- 1797
• 1798-.-.V.;:..;
;..;......'.v
1799..;.....;............;...;.......
• 1800...;................:...•..:•...•...
1801.;;.;...;.........;...•.....'..;...
1802.:..;.:.
v.....
. 1803. ; ; . ; - . . • . . . . - . ; . .
........;.;.. "
•1804..-../:..........;....;...•......-;.
1805.;.;
..V..;.'
;'....:..
1806........-............;;....;.......
1807......;..
1817...;;...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1818
. . . . ; . . . :..-......".. ; . . . . . 1819....
....;..;......;.....;..
1820
1821
•.
1822
1823
1824.
1825
;
1826
1827
:..
1828....



Imports of specie.

.

•

-

•

'

Exports, of specie,.
including American
coin.

. -

•

-. .
"_ , •
•.«

.

_
•

,

,

..
.
_
• _. •
-

_

•

•

_
"
-. .
•

.

_

• •

_

._ .
. _
•
. _
-

_

•

•

$8,064,890
3,369,846
5,097,896
8,379,835
6,150,765
6,880,966
8,151,130
7,489,741

_

.

..
'-"
•

_

-

$10,478,059
10,810,180
• 6,372,987
7,014,552
• 8,797,055
4,704,533
8,014,880
8,243,476

Net revenue. .

$4,399,473 09
3,443,070 85
4,255,306 56
.4,801,065-28
. 5,588,461 26
6,567,987 94
7,549,649 65
7,106,061 93
6,610,449 31
9,080,932 73
10,750,778 93
12,438,235 74
10,479,417 61
. 11,098,565-33
12,936,487 04
14,667,698 17
15,845,521 61
26,283,348^49
• 17,176,385 00
20,283,608 76 •
15,005,612 15
13,004,447 15
17,589,761 94
19,088,438 44
17,878,325 71
20,098,718 45
-23,341,2.31 77
19,712,283 29
23,205,523 64

00

Tonnage.

47*8,377
502,146
5*64,457
520,764
628,618
. .747,965
831,899
'876,913
[
. 898,328 •
939,409
972,492
947,492' 892,104
949,172, •
1,042,404
1,140,368
1,208,736
1,268,548
1,399,912
- 1,225,185
l,260j751
1,280,167
1,298,958'» •
1,324,699
1,336,566
1,389,163
1,423,112
1,534,191
1,620,608
1,741,392

Population.

3,921,326

5,319,762
fl

9,654,596

Statement ofi Commerce, Reverme, and-Population—Contiaued.

Years.

1829.
1830.1831.
1832.^
1833.
1834.
1835.
1836:1837:
1838.
1839.
• 1840;
1841.
1842, (to September 3 0 ) . : : . . . ; . ' . . ; .
1842, (to December 31, 3 months).'.'
.1843, (Jan.'i to June 30, .6 months).
1844.
•1845.
1846.'
' 1847.

Imports of specie.

$7,-403,612
8,155,964
7,305,945
• 5,907,504
7,070,368
17,911,632
13,1^1,447
13,400,881 •
10,516,414
17,747,116
5,595,176
•8,882,813
4,988,633
•4,087,016
7,440,112
14,880,223
5,830,429
4,070;242
3,777,732
24,121,289

Exports of specie, including A merican
coin. •

$4,924,020
2,178,773
'. 9,014,93i
5,656,340
2,611,701
• 2-,076,758
6,477,775
• 4,324,336
5,976,249 '
3,508,046
8,776,743
8,417,014
10,034,332
- 4,813,539
506,930
1,013,861
5,454,214
8,606,495
3,905,268
1,907,739

TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T , R E G I S T E R ' S O F F I C E , December 8,




Net revenue.

$22,681,965 91
21,922;391 39
24,224,441 77
28,465,237 24
29,d32,508 91
16,214,957 15
• 19,391,310 59
23",4d9,9'40 '53
11,169,290 39
i6a58;800 36
23,137,924 81
13,499,502 17
14,487>2l6 74
14,260;77d-95
• 3,927,137 81
•7,046,843 91
26,183,570 94
27,528,112 70
•2^,712-,66.7 87
23i747ia64 ;66

10

Tonnage.

1,260,7981,191,776
1,267,847
l;439,450
.l,'606,i5i
l,758,9dj.
1,824,940
1,882,103
1,8B6,656
1,995,640.
2,096,479.
2,180,764;
2;i30,744'
2,092,391
2.174,862,.
2,158,603'
2,280,0,95 •
2,417,d:d2
5,5'62,085
2i839:,046,

Populatio'n*

12,866,520. •

•

.

o
•H3.

17,069,453
•

^

1847.

DANIEL GRAHAM, Register,
GO

8 . — ^ statement exhiUting the amoiirii ofi Duties' which accriied, but not received, oil the list df December, 1816, 1st ofi Noveinber ^
and Ist. ofi^ JJlepember^ 1847; the Gross Receipts firom customs during the nionths ofi November,-1816 and 1.847 ;• the value ofi^ %
Domestic Exports {exclusive ofi coin and bullion), during the years ending on the 1st ofi December, 1846 and 1847; and also ^
the value ofi .CdiTv^and Bullion imported during the periods last mentioned.
' '
'
"
.

Duties which accrued,.but not received-

Gross receipts from
•customs.-

Value of doniestic exports;(:ex- Coin and Bullion imported
cliisiveof coin and-bullion) during the years ending—
during the years .ehding-r-

Districts.
On thelst of On the 1st of On the 1st of In-No vem'December, November, vD'ecember, ber, 1846... In Nov^ember, 1847.
1847. '•
lS47..1846.
Passamaquoddy''?.,
Machias
Penobsc^ot;.......
Bangor
Saco...'
Portland
Portsmouth.....;.
V.ermont
Newburyport....
Gloucester....; ,-.
Salem.... -.
Marblehead
Boston.,
Plymouth, Mass.
Fall River.
New Bedford. i . .
Edgartown.Nantucket
Providence
Bristol
Newport
•.,.




$2,.034 86

$1,115 62
2,052 59

$927 18

6,765 00

On the 1st of
•December,
1846. '^

On the'.lst of On the Istof On the 1st of*
' December, Deceinber,
•Deceinber,'
1847".- .
• • 1847.1846.

$13,552.00
10,275 00

$29,006 00

.o
->
O
^

•

3,986 00
•487,71

$154 25
176 2.8

$222 13

••ffl
...8,214 00
...2,532 00
657,'437 do
. 215 "86
8,036 20
,612,61^ do
$8,^16 00
663 66
1,239 43,
.
: 4,634 00 . .1,893.00 • ;$285 00
.
671 18
1,404.00
2,200-00
287,692. .00 70-,7dd d d 120,029 dd
231,005 00
^^
639 36
• 108 48 4,019 85
1,763 19
280-00
1 ;373 0.0
. '287 00
•54,258 00
121 00
53,235-00
>
3,292 '69 • 4,503 38
23 ,198 22
723,346 00
15,328 85
921,323 00 . 30,797 00
• 77,983 do . W
. 3,026 46 •• 41 82 .: :29 00
69 40
••
1,294 00
3,1.60 00
334 ,187^39
.228,624 51 .166,098'47 324,083 06' 6,640,857. 00 ^206,245 do '78^9,475 dd 12,814;736* 00
p^
202 95 193,449-46
3 ,554 00
• .548 00
27 74
27 74
293,469 00
. 1,790 58
6,350.00
262,595 00
' .6,026 00
- -7,765 00
93 34
..190 44
• 184 80
3,496 81
• 86,341 00
'22,021 00
184 80
974 39
1,607 31
i07;72g Od •18,867 dd
418 20
3,382 44
46,555 00
- l,-700 00
3,195 16
90,086 00
•187 28
16,703 00
15,067 00
13,684 00
182 00
1,752 19

'^.Returns from thefee ports not received w°hen the statement was formed,

•o

Statement exhibiting the amount ofi Duties, ^c.—Continued.
Gi

Duties which accrued, but not received-

Gross receipts from
customs.

Value of domestic exports (ex- Coin and Builion imported
clusive, of coin and bullion) during the years ending—
during the years ending— ..

Districts.
On the 1st of On the 1st of On the 1st of In NovemDecember, November,
December,
ber, 1846..
1846. ,
1847.
1847.
New London.
New Haven
Fairfield
,
Stonington..........,
Oswegatchie*..........
Champlain*—.......
Sackett's Harbor......
Oswego*.........'...-..
Genesee
Niagara
Buffalo..
Sag Harbor
-...
NewYork.......
Newark
Philadelphia
Delaware
Baltimore
;..
Georgetown, D. C .
Alexandria.
Norfolk..............
Tappahannock
Cherrystone........
Richmond^
Petersburg.........
Wilmington, N.C.*..




$1,365 70|

$4,289 56

$1,018 50

.$482 00
536 47

. 86 771

48 47
377 721
946 62
856,752 25

639,428 80| . 758,546 do

485,547 20

132,515 66

169,610 31

184,411 46

58,622 60

60,449 O i
O
624 681
• 2,784-44
5,036 301

60,449
624
2,784
• 3,759

10,522
519
484
5,830

36,761
261
4,374
4,020

00
94
63
90'

00
68|
44
10|

72
52
96
62

In November, 1847.

On the 1st of
December,
1846.

On the 1st of
Decemberj
1847.

On the 1st bf On the 1st of
Decemb.er,
December,
1846. • .
1847. ' f i

$437 77

$587,064 00
38,442 00
60,210 00

$34,854 00
492,048 .00
22,843 00
100,581 00

~$55-,56i 0.0

148 90J

56,877 00

38,814 00

88,943 00

$4,700
37,150

68,127 00

167,073 do'
456,627 00
274,768 00
2,251 62
160,818 00!
147,012-00
16,522 00
59,199 O l
O
1,025,030 60 30,099,068 O l 47,968,862 00 762,679 OO' 3,732,382
O
18,428 00|
126,617 16 4,448,799 00 8,623,143
• 96,511 O l
O
256,001
•3,849 00
133,663 00|
250,595 00'
. 30,000 00 6,544,449 001 9,843;760 001 177,367 00
170,112
128,054 ool
98,713 00
io 50
13,094 00
12,531
1,037,094 00
800,474 00
2,702 30
37,275 00
54,295
463,665 O l 2,199,468 00
O
34,150 00
64,067 ^00
.1,212 00
1,660 00
1,800 00
1,800 00
'197,690 00

96,053 ool
.00

*Returns'from these ports not received when the statement was foi-med.

Newbern*..........,
Washington*
Plymouth'...".......
Beaufort.............
Camden
Georgetown, S. C.'l.
Charleston*.........
Savannah..
•...
St. Mary's,-Ga..;...
Key W e s t . . ; . . . . . . ,
Appalachicola
Mobile
New Orleans
Texas
".....
St. L o u i s . . . ;
Louisville............
Cincinnati...........
Cuyahoga........ i.
Sandusky..;
-.
D.etroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chicago
Total..

00

70.71

206 95
26 79

228 94
1,649 46
49,353 66

324 57
558 05
151,287 13

77 49

14,460
3,714
11,903
37,420

00
00
00
00

6,144
8,050
13,655
16,338

00
00
00
00

3,650 00

76,181 37
16,337 08
407 81
169 60

2,053 90
85,000 00
.4,301 81
169 60

164 00

1,185,757 53 1,344,166 10

827
.•73
•1,827
677
4
534

20
80
00
94
00
57

5,435,789 00
10,251,379 00
68,192,478 00

00
00
00
00

7,063 00
2,975-00
16,975 00
5,600 00

; 85,820 00

3,746,434 00
13,263 17 9,697,176 00
250,000 00 55,133,355 00

8,367
•3,500
9,706
8,000

CO

1,289 85
• 782 45
5,998 50
625 00
34 40
1,043 41
195" 73

462,885
24,414
187,588
16,684

800 00
61,343 00
199,948 00
767,334 00 1,523^720.00

370,000 00
109,331 00
200,518.00
79,770 00

00
00
00
00

.O
St

o

895,791 80 1,819,259 62 122,317,939 .00 166,-496,120 00 3,468,430 00 24,153,242 00

* Returns from-these ports notreceived when this statement was formed.
TREASURY DEPAR;TMENT, R E G I S T E R ' S O F F I C E ,




I?ecem5er 8, 1847. '

DANIEL Q^KUhM., Register.

o

•208

R E P O R T S 1&F/THE S E C R E T A I Y

.-—A statement exhibiting the value ofi Foreign. Merchandise imported and
reexported annually,:firom the ijear 17.90 to 1817,:inclusive, omitting firom
1808 to 1816, both inclusive, as a.period during which the commexce^fifi the
United-States was interrupted:fiy the embargo, non-intercourse, war, and the
continuance ofi the war duties.}iintil the 30th pfifilune,. 1.816; and, also, the
amount which remained fior .conswjiption annually during the sameperiod.
' Value of Fpreign Merchandise.
Years, ending;^Impo.rted.
September 30, 1790

•.

,...

1791
...
1792....:..;.:.
1793...
1794....
1795
;...
1796.....
1797
1798.
1799.
1800...........
1801
;...
1802.
1803
:..
1804....•...•...
1805.
1806..'
1807
:..
..
. 1817
'..:...
1818..
;..
. 1819...
1820
:..
• i82i:
1822....•.....'.
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
:.
• 1829.'...-...:..
1830..
1831
..
'.
1832...
1833
1834..........
1835
..::.
1836
1837...........
1838
1839....
.1840.,
1841.
1842...........

9 months—to 30th June, 1843
Year—to 30th June, 1844. '...
1845....
1846......
• 1847.'...

. $23,000,000
29,200,000
31,500,000
•: 31,100,000
•; 34,600,000
r 69,756,268
.^•:81;436,164
•• 75;379,406
68,551,700
79,069,148
-91,252,768
111,363311
'^•76>333-333
.' 64,666,'666
"85,OO0,OOd
120,600,000
.129,410,000
•l38-500,d00
::; 99,250,000
12r,750,d00
• 87,125,000
74,450,000
. 62,585,724
83,241,511
77,579,267
^ 80,-549,007
96,340,075
84,974,477
.79,484.,d6.8
.88,509,824
74,492,527
, .70,876,920
103,191,124
101,029,266
108,118,311
126,521,332
;:i49,895,742
il89,980:,035
140,989,217
113,717,404
162,092,.132
.107,141,519
•127i946,177
•'100a62,d87
: 643753/?:99
'1085435,035
•117,254^56:4
• 121^691 j 9 7
' 146-,545;638.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, KEGISTER'S OFFICE, Decem&er 8, 1847.




Consumed.

Eeexported.
.: $539,156
.'"'-512,041
1,753,098
i:2,109;572
: 6:,'526;233
.r8;489,472
:;26,30d;ooo'

. 27,doo,dao

.:33.5000,000
" 45,523,000
39,130,877
:"46,642,721
.^35,774,971
a3,594;072
36,231,597
' 53,179,019
60,283,236
•59,643,558
-19,358,069
• 19,426,696
• 19,165,683
• 18,008,029
.21,302,488
'.-22,286,202
-27,543,622
25,337 jl57
.32,590,643
24,539;612
23,403,136
.: 21,595,017
, 16,658,478
: 14,387,479
' 20,033,526
^ 24,039,-4t3
19,822,735
.23,312,811
"20,504,495
: •21,746,360
:.2i;854,962
12,452,795
17,494,525
.18,190,312
. 15,499,081'1
•11,721,538^
\ 6,552^707 I
11,484:,867'
15,346;830
;il,3;46,623.|
- 8;011,158
'

."

$^2,460,844
28,687,959
. 29,746,902
;.28,99^,428
• .28,073,767
•61j266,796
;55,136,164
48,379,406
35,551,700
. 33,546,148
-52,121,891
'64,720,790
-.40,558,362
51,072,594
48,768,403
67,420,981
-69^126,764
"78,856,442
79,891,931
102,323,304
67,959,317
56,441,971
- -41,283,236
•60,955,309
50,035,645
-55,211,850
-63,749,432
6a,434,865
.56,0.80,932
66,914,807
57,834,049
.56,489,441
83,157,598
76,989,793
88,295,576
103,208,521
•129,391,247
168,233,675
' 119,134,255
101,264,609
' 144,597,607
88,951,207
112,447,096
; 88,440,549
58,201,092
'"96,950,168
101,907,734
110,345,174
- 138,534:^480

. •

. DANIEL GRAHAM, i2e^.is^^..

1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

209

10.—A statement exhibiting the value ofi Domestic Produce and Foreign Mer- chandise exported annually, firom the year 1790 tq 1847, inclusive, omitting
•firom1808^0 1816,.both inclusive, as a period during whioh the commerce
ofi the. United States was interrupted by the embargo, non-intercourse, war,
andthe continuance ofi the war duties untilthe SOth ofi June, 1816.
Value of exports.
Years ending-

September 30, 1790.
1791.
1792.
1793.
1794.
1795.
1796.
1797.
1798.
'
.1799.
1800.
. 1801.
.1802,'
1803.
1804.
1805.
1806.
. 1807.
1817.
1818.
1819.
1820.
1821.
1822.
1823.
1824.
1825.
1826.
1827.,
1828.
1829..
1830.
1831.
1832.
1833.
1834.
1835.,
1836..
^
1837.,
; . 1838.,
1839.,
1840..
. 184L,
*1842,,
9 months-.^to June 30, 1843...
12 months—to June 30, 1 8 4 4 . . . . .
,

1845....
1846..:...
1847.
*The exports for the quarter—say from June
30 to September 30,1842.....:..
Making the year—say from June 30, 1842, to
June 30,1843

Domestic produce, &c.

Foreign merchandise.

$19,666,000
18,500,000
19,000,000
24,000,000
26,500,000
39,,500,000
40,764,097
29,850,206
28,527;097
33,142,522
31,840,903
47,473,204
"36,708,189
. 42,205,961
41,467,477
42,387,002
41,253,727
48,699,592
68,313,500
73,854,437
50,976,838
51,683,640
43,671,894
49,874,079
47,155,408
50,649,500.
66,944,745
53,055,710
58,921,691
50,669-,669
. 50,700,193
59,462,029
. -61,27.7,057
. 70,317,698
81,024,162
101,189,082
106,916,680
95,564,414'96,033,821
103,533,891
113,895,634
106,382,722
92,969,996
77,793,783
99,715,179
99,299,776
102,141,893
150,637,464

$539,156
512,031
1,753,098
•2,109,.572
6,526,233
8,489,-472
26,300,000
27,000,000
33,000,000
45,523,000
39,130,877
46,642,721
35,774,971
13,,594,072
36,231,597
53,179,019
60,283,236
59,643,.558
19,.358,069
19,426,696
19,165,683
18,008,029
21,302,488
22,286,202
27,543,622
25,337,157
32,590,643
24,.539,612
23,403,136
21,595,017
16,658,478
14,387,479
20,0,33,526
24,0.39,473
19,822,735
23,312,811
20,504,495
21,746,360
21,854,962
12,4.52,795
17,494,525
18,190,312
15,469,081
11,721,538
6,552,697
11,484,867
15,346',830
11,346,623
8,011,158

15,101,835

2,361,839

17,436,674

8,914,536

101,810,154

. 63,137,470

92,895,618

Total.

$20,205,156
19,012,041
20,7.53,098
26,109,572
33,026,233
47,989,472
67,064,097
56,850,206
61,527,097
"78,665,522
70,971,780
94,115,925
72,483,160
55,800,033
77,699,074
95,566,021
101,536,963
108,343,150
87,671,569
93,281,133
70,142,521
69,691,669
64,974,.382
72,160,281
74,699,030
75,986,657
99,535,388
77,595,322
82,324,827
72,264,686
72,358,671
.73,849,50881,310,583
87,176,943
90,140,433
104,336,973
121,693,577
128,663,040
117,419,.376
108,486,616
121,028,416
132,085,946
121,851,803
104,691,534
84,346,480
111,200,046
114,646,606
113,488,516
158,648,622

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, REGISTER'S OFFICE, Decembers, 1847.

V O L . VI.—14.



DANIEL GRAHAM, Register..

11.- "A stcttement exhibiting the value ofi Exports a/iid Imports {exclusive ofi coin and hdlion) annually, firom 1821 to 1847,
inclusive; and also, the excess ofi exportation over importation, and ofi importation over exportation.
Value ofexports.
Value of imports.

Years endingDomestic produce.
September 30,1821
1822
1823
1824..........
1825
1826..........
1827..........
1828.-..
1829
1830..........
1831...
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
:..
1838
...:
1839.....
18,40
1841
1842
9 months—to June 30, 1843.
.12 months—to Jime 30, 1844.
1845.
1846.
1847.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, REGISTER'S OFFICE, Decemher 8,




Foreign merchandise.

671,894
874,079
49,1
47, 155,408
50, 649,500
66 944,745
52, 449-,855
57, 878,117
49, 976,632
55 087,307
- 58, 524,878
59 218,583
61 726,529
69 950,856
80 623,662
100 459,481
106 570,942
94, 280,895
95,, 560,880
101, 625,533
111 660,561
103, 636,236
. 91,799,242
77,1 686,354
99 531,774
98, 455,330
101 718,042
150, 574,844

$10,824,429
11,476,022
21,170,635
18,322,605
23,793,588
. 20,440,934
16,431,830
14,044,578
12,347,344
13,145,857
13,077,069
19,794,074
17,577,876
21,636,553
14,756,321
17,767,762
17,162,232
9,417,690
10,626,140
12,008,371
8,181,235
• 8,078,753
5,139,335
6,214,058
7,584,781
7,865,206
6,166,039

1847.

Total.

$54,496,323
$54,520,834
61,350,101
79,871,695
68,326,043
72,481,371
68,972,105
72,169,172
90,738,333
90,189,310
72,890,789
78,093,511
74,309,947
71,332,938
64,021,210
81,020,083
67,434,651
67,088,915
71,670,735
. 62,720,956
72,295,652=1
95,885,179 :|
81,520,603
95,121,762;
87,528,732
101,047,943
102,260,215
108,609,700
115,215,802
136,764,295
124,338,704
176,579,154
111,443,127
130,472,803
104,978,570
95,970,288
102,251,673
156,496,956
" 123,668,932
98,258,706
111,817,471
122,957,544
. 99,877,995
96,075,071
42,433,464
82,825,689
105,745,8.32
102,604,606
113,184,322
106,040,111
117,914,065
109,583,248
122,424,349
156,740,883

Exportatipn
over importation.

$549,023
2,977,009
345,736
8,949,779

Importation
overe'xpor-

$24,511
' 18,-521,594
4,155,328
3,197,067
5,202,722
16,998,873
23,589,527
13,601,159
13,519,211
6,349,485
21,548,493
52,240,450
19,029,676

9,008,282
25,410,226
3^802,924
40,392,225
3,141,226
34,316,534

54,245,283
11,140,073

7,144,211
,8,330,817

DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

o

1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

211

12.
A statement exhibiting the amount ofi Coin and Bullion imported and exported
anmially, firom 1821 to 1847, inchisive; and, also, the amount ofi importation over exportation, and ofi exportation over importation, durhig the same
years.
COIN AND BULLION.

Excess of

Years ending—^
Exported.

Imported.
Importation over
exportation.

Sept. 30,'21 I $10,478,059 ^
'' 1822 10,810,180
* 1823
^
6,372,987
* 1.824
^
7,014,552 .
''
1825
8,797,055
*
* 1826
4,704,533
^* •18'27 . 8,014,880•*' 1828
8,243,476 •
^'
1829
4,924,020
* 1830
^
2,178,773
^' 1831
9,014,931
< 1832
^
5,656,340
''
1833
2,611,701
*' 1834
2,076,758
* 1835
«
6,477,775 '
^* 1836
4,324,336
"
1837
5,976,249
« • 1838
*
3,508,046
* 1839
«
8,776,-743. "
1840
8,417,014
''
1841 10,034,332
"
1842
4,813,539
9 months, to
June 30, '43
1,520,791
Year, to—
5,454,214
June 30, '44
"
1845
8,606,495
'* 1846
3,905,268
u #1847
1,907,739

$8,064,890
3,369,846
5,097,896
8,379,835
6,150,765
6,880,966
8,151,130
7,489,741
7,403,612
8,155,964
7,305,945
5,907,504
7,070,368
17,911,632
13,131,447
13,400,881
10,516,414
17,747,116
-5,595,176
8,882,813
4,988,633
4,087,016

.»
,.

..•

-T

$1,365,283
2,176,433
, 136,250
2,479,592
5,977,191
'251,164
4,458,667
•15,834,874
6,653,672
9,076,545
4,540,165
14,239,070 ,
465,799
^

22,320,335

376,215
22,213,550

$2,413,169
7,440,334
1,275,091
2,646,290
753,735
1,708,986
- •
3,181,567
_
5,045,699
726,523

20,799,544

5,830,429
4,070,242
3,777,732
24,121,289

Exportation over
importation'.

4,536,253
127,536

* Including $62,620 of American coin.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 8,



1847.

DANIEL GRKnAM,,Register,

R E P O R T S OF T H E

212

[1847.

DD.
Statemmt shoaving the value of Cotton and of other Domestic Produce exported
:
•
from 1790 to 1807.
,
Value of cotton exported. Other domestic produce.

Years.

1790
'
1791
1792
1793......
1794
1795
1796......
1797
1798......
1799......
1800
1801......
1802
1803.
1804..
1805......
1806
1807......

$58,000
52,000
41,428
. 160,000
550,000
2,281,250
2,226,500
1,292,000
3,639,999
, 4,180,000
4,984,000
9,196,000
5,225,000
7,809.000
7,620,000
9,276,666
8,250,000
14,233,000
^

81,074,843

Total exports.

$19,608,000
18,448,000
18,958,572
23,840,000
25,950,000
37,218,750
38,537,597
28,558,206
. 24,887,098
28,962,522
26,856,903
38,277,204
31,483,189
34,396,961 '
^33,847,477
33,110,336
33,003,727
34,466,592
I

$19,666,000
18,500,000
19,000,000
24,000,000
.26,500,000
39,500,000
40,764,097
29,850,206
28,527,097
33,142,522
31,840,903
47,473,204 1
^ 36,708,189
'
42,205,961
41,467,477
42,387,002
41,253,727
48,699,592

530,411,134

611,485,977

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 1, 1847.

^




DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

1847.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY,
•FF.

0

,

( ,

•

.

.

.

.

213

•

.

"

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

'

-

•

Statement ofi the Debt ofi the United States on the 1th March, 1845.
Of the principal and interest of the old funded and
unfunded debt.
Treasury.notes issued during the war of 1812
Certificates bf the Mississippi s t o c k . . ,
Debt ofthe corporate cities of the District ofColumbia.
Outstanding Treasury notes of the issues of 1837 to
1843
.........
Loan of 1841, at 6 per cent., (interest ceased 31st December, 1844).
..;
Loan of 1842, at'6 per cent'.
Loan of 1843, at 5 per c e n t . .
..

$176,450
4,317
4,320
1,200,000

55
44
09
00

1,244,779 22
210,814 94
8,343,886 03
6,604,231 35
17,788,799 62

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S OFFICE, December 1, 1847.

DANIEL GRAHAM, Register, '

GG.
.TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES, December 6, 1847.
The aggregate amount deposited in specie with the Assistant Treasurer of the United States, at New York,.to the credit of the Treasurer
ofthe United States, in August, 1847, was $5,795,720 92.
W. SELDEN,
'
Treasurer ofi the United States,

HH.
UNITED STATES ASSISTANT TREASURER'S O F F I C E ,

'

..

'.

.'

N E W YORK, December 2, 1847.

S I R : In obedience to yours ofthe 29th ultimo, requesting a statement
of the amount of specie deposited in this office, in each month, from
January 1, 1847, to the close ofthe month of November, I make the following report viz v
January.
$764,104 91
February
3,476,822 89
Mai-ch
1,959,685 00
April
J........
....
3,679,597 47
May...
3,516,503 67
June!
3,623,401 05
July
V
. . . . 3,127,112 10



214

R E P O R T S OF T H E

August
September.
October : .
November

[1847.

•

.. 5,763,787 53;
,...'
2,119,412 06
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - : 1,253,361 68
620,955 83:
^

•

•

~

-

•

_

-

^

_

29,904,744 19

In addition to the jabove, there hasbeen received from the mint at
Philadelphia, as follows, viz: ^ ..
July....
$200,000
August..
..... /.,.
....
.
:......
400,000
September.
:
400,000
November.
^.
1,875,000
Your obedient servant,
W . C. BOUCK.
Hon.

R. J. W A L K E R ,

Secretary ofi the Treastiry ofi tlie UnitedStates,

KK.
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,
F I R S T AUDITOR'S O F F I C E , December 8, 1847.

SIR : I have the honor to submit the following statement ofthe amount
of Treasury notes received at this o.ffice on accountof customs during
each month, from the 1st December, 1846, to the 1st December, 1847,
viz:
1846, December.
.,
.'
^
$288,000
1847, January
,
694,150
February
519,500
March
,
142,750
April
,. 101,850
M ay
174,550
June ..,.-.;-. ^. ^ - . , . . . . . . . . . . - . . , . .,^ . . . ^ ^^. -.
250
July......................
23,400
August,,.,....-.
..,,....,..,.,-,..,....
,..,
13,450
. September. ..-...,.
. . , . . , , . . . . . . . , .^. . .650
October..:...,
,
.,........,,..
50
November . . . . . :
...........,/..,....
74,300
2,029,900
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your .obedient servant^,
, ..
.
WM. .G.Q.LLINS.
Hon;

R. J. W A L K E R ,

Secretary ofi the Treasury,



V

.

1847.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

215

No. 3.
Proposals for Loan o/~1847.
ACCEPTED BIDS.
Name.
Albertj Jacob.^
*..-.
Albree, John
Blake, John B
Bradley, W . C
.
Bank of North America, Philadelphia
Best, Anthony
^...................
Burrows, R . J.
Bank of Northern Liberties
BensOn, Alexander & Co
Bank of Metropolis..
Bayly, William F
Bank, New York State Stock Security
Corbin, Abel Rathburn.
Corcoran & Riggs..
Clapp, Asa
^.....
Clagett, E l i . . . . . . . . . . i .
...
Chester, Andrew J.
Cohen j I.
Dalrymple, W . F . . . . . i;.
Dunbar, Elou
'.....-..
Deweyj Charles
English, W . H
Fuller, Galvin P
,
Grigsby, Hugh B.
.^.
Goff, Hiram S.
-.
Hutton, G . M .
Heaton, H . W
Haseltine, Jno.
Harris, Thomas D
Haddock, Daniel, jr
Johnson, Cave
Ilsley, Isaac '.
Jackson,.B. L., & Brother
;.........
Jackson,.W. B
Jones, Philip D. Catesby
Knapp, Charles
Lane, Jesse
, Lambert & McKisnzie
....
Leiper, Samuel M. . . . . , .
,.
Mattocks, J o h n . . . . i
Mitchell &Mure.
Millard, J. Edmund,...
,...
Morrill, Mrs. Mary.
.'.V.
Moore, Roger S. . . . . . . . . . . . ,
,..........
Noyes, David P.
Newell, L
...;
..
Osborn, • s a a c
,..,..
O'Donnell, Columbus..
Owen, W . L.
,..;
Paul & Brown.
Poland, Jenkins & Co
Provident Institution for Saving for Salisbury and Amesbury
Potter, Barrett
Pennoyer, James..
Phelps, John S

Amount.

jf80,000
20,000
4,000
2,000
200,000

Premium.

3-10 per cent.
1

k
1

db;
do.

do.

1

do.
do.
do.
4-10
i
.
do.
do.
i
do.
\
do.
4
do.
k
do.
2
do.
S
i
do.
2-5
do.
do.
8-10
do.
1
do.
2
I
do.
do.
500 1
do.
3,000
do.
2
10,000 , L
do.
10,000
1 M O do.
10,000
do.
1'
3,000
do.
1
1
10,000
do.
500
do.
1
10,000
do.
2,500
do.
1
10,000
do.
1
i
15,000
do.
i
5,000
do.
3,000
1
do.
10,000
do.
i
3,000
do.
1
10,00.0
6-10
do.
300

. 20,000
28,000
55,000
100,000
3,000
10,000
17,000
18,000,000
16,000
60,000
10,000
25,000
20,00020,000
3,000

5,000
5,000
15,000.
2,500
1,500
25,000
10,000
1,000
3,000
10,000
10,000
12,000
. 2,500
15,000
2,000
16,000
14,000

1

n

i

u
1
1

6-10

1
1|
1
2

i

1
1
i
.

1
1

.
i

do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.

*From the award on this bid was first deducted the whole amount of all other bids at the
same, or at a higher.premium.



216

[1847.

REPORTS OF THE
No. 3-^Continued.
Amount.

Name.
Poincignor, E
;..-...
Parker, George & Thomas
;.
Riggs,E
Reily, Barbara
Rosengarter & Denis ..'
Reed, Hezekiah H ; . . . . :
Rogers, Evans
*.....:.
Phelps, Warren
Sears, Joshua.
Smith, Albert
.
Southgate, Isaac
Smith, Richard, (for sundry persons).,
Silver, Isaiah..
Silver, Isaiah
;....
Smith, Edwin & Thomas Burton . . . . .
Thompson, John
Trustees of the Philip Exeter Academy,
Thayer, Joseph H .
Vose, F.
Wood, Robert Serril]..
,
White, Henry
White, Arthur E.
Warren, J. W .
White, L . J .
White, L . J
White, L . J
White,L.J.
.;....
White, L . J
~
White, John
'
;

$6,000
20,000
1,650,000
1,000
.• 10,000
. .10,000
, 10,000
.1,500
15,000
. 1,000
. 2,000
. 16,250
3,000
3,000
9,000
500,000
10,000
2,500
1,000
. 1,800
. 15,000
. 5,000
10,000
. 3,000
3,000
. 2,000
1,000
1,000
.20,000

Preniium.
2

per cent.

5

do.

15-100 do.
i
do.
1
do.
do...
5

•

do.

i

do.

1

do.

i

i
1
3-10

do.

do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do:
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
. do.

21,291,350
REJECTED BIDS.
Alnut, James W
Burrows, R. I.
Barhydt, D. P.
Blake, John B.
.......;..
Bodmer, Henry, jr
Bradlee, Josiah
•.
•.....
Bull, G. W .
" ' ' • '
••
Brodhead, Richard
;........';...
Budd,J.B
Bank, New York State Stock Security
Barnard, Henry..
Bank, Piscataqua, Exchange... .'•.
.....'
Bank, State, at Charlestown.
Bishop, James.
^.
Bridge, M.
;
\..
Bank, Troy City...
Bank, Franklin, Washington, Pennsylvania
Bank, Savings, Buffalo
Clark, M . M
Chubb & Schenck
"...........•........
• Chubb & Schenck.
.:..........
Camman & Whitehouse
Cohen, I
-..'...
Cohen, I.
'
Cherry, William, jr
••••
Campbell, John 11
Denison, Marcus.



$10,000
.20,000

500

Par.

do.
do.

4,000
do.
5,000
do.
60,000
do.
5,0Q0
do.
4,000do.
1-10 per cent.
10,000
Par.
20,000
do. V
5,000
10,000
do.
35,000
do.
10,000
do.
6,100
do.
63,000
do.
•do.
10,000
' do.
5,000
20,000 .
do.
1-10 per cent.
412,000
Par.
30,000
140,000do.
10,000
do.
7-100 .per cent.
5,000
1,500.
Par. .
•' 3,000
do.
25,000
do.

1847.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

217

No. 3—Continued.
Name.
Dewey, J. Y
;•
;
Delafield, H. & W
•
Dowdney, John
Duhring, Henry
.;
Dohnert, John H .
..Euston, William
English, William H
;....
Fairfax, Henry, sr.
.-.
Gaiiagher, James G.
.".-...,
Good win,.Nathaniel
Goodwin, Jeremiah
;.....
Gardner, John
Harris, John S
•.
.....;.
Hutchinson, Hiram.
Hutchinson, Hiram, (for John Springs)..;
Hammond, David
.-...;
Homes, George.
Hubbard, Henry
•...:.Hamilton, John P. . . . . ; .
•.
Holbrook, S. A
Huger, Alfred.
••
Henshaiw, David.
Hamilton, John P.
;
Hooper, R. C.
:
-...'
Harrison, H . T .
:....
Ingoldsby, Felix.
...........
Insurance Company ofthe State of Pennsylvania. . . . . . . .
Insurance Company of South C a r o l i n a . . . . . . ; . . . . . . . -,.
Jones, Isaac, (as trustee)
•.•.......•
Jones, Isaac, (as executor)
....;.•.
Johnson, Ralph C
'
•.......,
Jackson, John
Kellogg, John.
-.•....
Kent, M. . , .
Loud, Jacob H .
;
-.
Looper, R . F
'.
Linebach, Charles F . , . . *
,...
Lovell, Warren.
.•
.•..
Lake, Joseph S. & Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . : ; . • . ; . . . . . . . . . . . . ,
Lake, Joseph S. & Co.
'.....
Lake, Joseph S. & Co
Lake, Joseph S. & Co
Lighthall, William
Langdon, James R
Martin & Co
Moye, Wyatt
"
•
Mims, Caswell
Mcintosh, George
McKenzie, Lewis
Newell, L.
,
Neely, John.
Openheim, H . W
,.;
•.
Otis, H . G .
Ohio Life Insurance and TrUst Company of New York..
O'Donnell, Columbus
•.
Patchin-, A. D
.,
Penn, Daniel
^
'.
Porter, M. K
.^
Phelps, Warren;
Paul & Brown
J
:
Phelps, Lancelot
Paul, Comgys
Purdy, Elijah F
•........,



Amount.
$3,000
5,000
4,000
• 5,000.
10,000
12,000
• 500
10,000
3,500
4,000
5,000
•,50,000
• 2,000 •
60,000
- -20,000
1,500
2,000
5,000
3.50,000
• 5,0.00
2,000
7,000,000
650,000
• 45,000
3,000
• 15,000
20,000
200,000
14,000
20,000
50,000
3,000
2,000^
5,000
28,000
3,000
400
6,100
100,000
100,000
200,000
100,000
1,000
8,000
30,000
40,000
. 4,000
75,000
10,000
1,000
400
2,000
10,000
600,000
20,000
50,000
8,000
1,000
500
5,000
1,000
10,000
800

Premium.
Par.
do. .
do.
do.^
do.
do..
do.
do.
do.
do.
MO per cent.
Par. •

do. •
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
1-10 per cent.
Par.
do;
1-16 per cent.
5 mills in $100.
Par.
do.
do.'
1-10 per cent.
Par.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
100.10for$100
100.7 for $100
100.5 for $100
Par.
do.
do. •
do.
do:
do.
dd.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
1-20 per cent.
Par.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
1-100 per cent.
?ar.

[1847.

REPORTS OF THE

218

No. 3-—Continued;
Amount.

Name.
Prait, E.,& Brother
.,
Prentis, Samuel.
,.
Reid, Thomas
Raymond, Edward A.
Riordan, James.
Rawlings, W . C.
Richardson, John.
•••••:
Richardson, John
!
Sears, Joshua
,
Steward, J o h n . . *
,
Scott, JohnM;
Smith, James
.,
Schroeder, Henry C. J.
,
Shattuch, George C.
Suydam, Lambert
,
Sanders, George N .
,
Travers, John
,
Tunis, John
Thayer, J. E., & Brother.
...-•.•,Ward, John, & M.Morgan
Winslow & Perkins, two-thirds of loan not absolutely sub
scribed for.. i
•Winslow & Perkins
,
Wright, William.
,..................
Wilkins, Jeremiah H
Waters, F . G., (trustee)
,
White, Arthur E.
White, J
White, L. J
Wolff, C
Wilson, G. B
,..'..............'..,
Wilkinson, J

Premium.

$20,000
4,000
10,000
50,000
500
10,000
20,000
20,000
15,000
2,000
2,500
20,000
2,000
15,000
40,000
1,000,000
8,000
5,000
36,500
J2,000,000

Par.
do. .
do. ,
do. .
do.
do.
1-10 per cent.
1-100 per cent
Par.
1-10 per cent.
do.
Par.
do.
do.
1-100 per cent.
Par.
do.
do.
do.
1-20 ofl pr.ct.

11,333,333
1,000,000
30,000
2,000
15,000
5,000
20,000
5,000
5,000
100,000
5,000

1-20 per cent.
do.
Par.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
.do.
do.

$36,431,633
RECAPITULATION.
Total amount bid
Above par.
At par.




.$57,722,983
..$54,883,183' '
"2,839,800.
—57,722,983

LL.

00

Table exhihiting the value ofi Imports remaining in wafehouse on the SOth ofi September, 1847.
I n the warehouses of—

00

OS

Species ofmerchandise.

o
2

si

o
-n
x
o
pq

a>

1

PQ

Baffffinff.




•

2
s

o
• 1

•

O

o

$249

_
^625
9,297

472

72,899

27,039

$4,071
5,047
2,754
11,662
1,357
1,224
1,725

411
277

_

1,464
2,025
2,918
1,590
6,956 $37,644
1,764
9,805
182,221
38,954
18,103
118
9,171

1,011
660
$125

$178
$3,050
1,261

4,648
515
638

103,640

129

1,598
2,165
77,858

166

614

1,713
884

-

-

1

Duties.

o

O

$5

-

^

>

fl

•

$1,644

Ale and norter
Beads.
B e a n s , vanilla
Beeswax
Brushes
Buckles
Buttons
Camlets of mohair
Clothing, ready-made
Coal
Cocoa
Corks
Cotton velvets and hosiery
cords, g i m p s , galloons, & c . . .
tamboured muslins
twist yarn and thread
manufactures not specified...
Cotton and worsted goods
Cotton and woolen goods
Drugs
Earthenware

•ed
0)

$1,644
'4,071
5,047
3,165
12,193
1,357
1,224
1,725
1,011
2,776
11,625
10,616
2,105
46,971
1,764
1,598
11,970
436,747
38,954
i8,103
1,831
37,874

P e r ct.
30
$493 20
20
814 20
30
1,514 10
20
633 00
20
2,438 60
30
407 10
30
367 20
25
431 25
25
252 75
30
832 80
30
3,487 50
10
1,061 6 0 ,
30
631 50
20
9,394 20
30
529 20
30
479 40
25
2,992 50
25
109,186 75
25
9,738 50
30
5,430 90
20
366 20
30
11,362 20

hh.—Tahle exhibiting the vakie ofi Imports remaining in warehouse—Continued.
•

'

o-

In the warehouses of—

•

5
Ifl'

Species" of merchandise.

^ -

o
pq




c
o

d
o

F e a t h e r s ' a n d flowers, a r t i f i c i a l . . . . : . .
F i s h , dried or smoked . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
mackerel....................
all other
F r u i t s , almonds and currants
raisins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F u r s , dressed, on the skin
G l a s s , cut, not specified
plain, not specified
plates, and frames for mirrors
.-.
G r a s s cloth
Gum Arabic...-.
G u n n y bags
H a t s and bonnets of s t r a w , g r a s s ,
chiTD. or D a l m e t t o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H a t s , of silk
'.
H e m p , unmanufactured
manufactures of, flems
sail duck
ravens duck
burlaps. i
cordage
twine.

CO

$5,070
44
3,825

$7,924
13,979
26,089

rS

1

1

o

•

6,071
1,404
2,490

cc
ai

$3,068

O

•258
14,311

610

PH

1

45

23,660

4,752
6,061
1,955
- 7,816
14,384
912

o

$358

$2,097

125

3,503-

18,138

1
o

4,964

1,444
241

720

-

Duties..

fl
T3
fl

$86

6,572
6,170
1,280
9,589
6,480

3,764

c
2

o

••

1

$5,156
7,968
23,327
26,089
6,617
9,934
' 1,280
9,589
6,480

Perct
30
20^
20
20
40
40
20
40
30

$1,546
1,593
• 4,665
5,217
2,646
3,973
256
3,835
1,944

80'
60
40
8.0
80
60
00
60
00

30
25
10
20

3,310
875
140
574

50
75
40
60

1

11,035
3,503
1,4042,873

30
11,824 50
39,415
30
72 30
241
30 !
5,441 40
18,138
950 40
4,752 • 20
20
1,334 20
6,671
20
391 00
1,955
20 . . 1,707 20
8,536.
14,384. 25
3,596 00
30
273.60
912

India rubber shoes
Indigo .'
5,584
Iron, manufactures of, notspe.cified..
1,696
wire.............
568
anvils
•'378
anchors and cables . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,761
hoop iron . . i . >
643
sheet iron..
8,385
ig iron
ar iron . , . . - . . . .
22,810
Jalap
!
Jewelry.
Linens
,.
12,380
Linen or flaxen thread
Linens, tamboured, <fec
%
Linen and cotton goods
Manufactures of metal, not specified
Medicinal preparations.
Molasses..
172,754
Musical instruments.
Needles
Oil, olive
linseed
2,666
essential........'.
palm
Opium,
2,626
Paper
3,489
Paints
-i
^....
Prussiate of potash
duinine
Rhubarb
Salt
243
Segars
Silks, tamboured or embroidered, &c.
Silks, manufactures of, not specified
i,020
Silks, sewing, hosiery, &c
raw
111
Silk and worsted goods
Silk and worsted shawls, and other
articles
Silk and cotton goods
Skins, dressed
249

E




•2,995

" -

8,237
1,273

-

:
-

-

744

'
.

-

.

2,362

-

- •
.
• :

_;887

58

. .
-

3,249
5,584
13,730
1,841

378
1,761

-

-

.
-

946
53,004
, 8,207
1,809
134,485
2,662

_

.
-

V

1,033

' "

-

-

2,655
12,663
1,255
15,369
2,776
- 1,229
1,358
2,603
2,804

-

537

4,097
1,86B
1,225
6,161
7,714
36,359
42,225
145,192
21,610
18,531
20,564
47,242
13,726

336

34,302

•
52,527
845 23,195
.539
- . • . _
.
.
3,623
3,388
575
1,359
.
28,603
14
- . .
.
8,128
446
7,872
.8,194
1,040
-.
1,005
- .
•
.
- •
- . • - 479
•

•

r

•

•

•

-

-

.

-

-

•

•

••

• 52,097
•
- • T .
752
.
.
^
-

643

'.

8,385

946
• 864

34,858
11,149
.
-

•

5,020 1
1
802
•

-

.

-

•r-"

112,013
8,207
1,809
223,432
2,662

539
2,655
12,663
1,255
282,089
3,351
1,229
2,717
5,269
2,804
11,149
3,163
36,189
1,882
1,225
6,161
7,714
5,263
46,487
50,097
155,446
22,615
18,642
20,564
47,242
13,726
1,064

30 1

15
•25

974 70
558 40
4,119 00
552 30
113 40
.528 30
192 90
2,515 50
283 80
33,603 90
1,641 40
- 542 70
44,686 . 0
4
532 40
161 70
663 75
3,798 90
376 50
84,626 70
670 20
245 80
815 10
1,053 80
841 20
1,114 90
632 60
10,856 70
376 40
245 00
1,232 20
1,542 80
1,052 60
18,594 80
15,029 10
38,861 50
6,784 50
2,796 30
5,141 00

30
25
20

14,172 60
3,431 50
• 212 80

10
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
20
30
•0
2
20
30
25
30
30
•30
20
20
30
20
30
10

20 1
30 1
20
20
20
20
20
40
30
25
30 1

LL.—-Table exhibiting the value ofi Imports remaining in warehouse—Continued.
In the warehouses of—

Species of merchandise.

fl

B

!2;

Duties.

O

P3

fl

CD

PL,

Straw plaits, braids, &c..
Steel, inanufactures of....
$8,473
shear and German.
-401
all other
.;..,.
7,749
Spirits—brandy.........
7,357
gin.....,.,
1,774
runi
,.
1,319
whisky.........
cordials . . . . . . . . . .
Spices—rmace.............
nutmegs.........
18,848
cinnamon.
cloves:..;
cassia
,..,..
pepper, black . . . . . . . , . . . . . 16,303
., pepper, red..
Sugar,' brown and c l a y e d . . . . . . . . . . . 106,211
Tin, ih plates and. sheets
7,8.73
Toys . . , . . . . . . . . > . . . . . . . . , . . . . , . .

Vermilion.........................
Wines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wool, iinmanufacture.d..,..,....,.,
Woolen cloths, and other manufac'.:'.;-. t u r e s . . ' . . . . . . . . . w . . . . . . . . . . ^
Woolen,flannels,and b a i z e s , , . . . . . . . .
blanketa.



5,9.76
20,991
2,150
4,632

o

PH

pii

O

$57,339
2,933
3,098
162,720
$23,698
27,883
3,543
9,042 $91,657
3,344
8,596
1,724
401
17,563
3,259
. 342
3,268
710
296,199 152,578
1,713
2,272
53,433

7,459

118i863
3,628
3,728

10,109
16,193
.933

$9,064

$530

$316
2,363

1,061
2,234
1,578
4,700

69,548

7,712

3,437

10,150
4,825'
8,897
983

22,137

12,574

1,534
28,437

1,020
326
616

$57,339
2,933
11,571
401
204,495
38,783
104,836
14,320
3,958
401
36,411
4,837
5,042
3,268
17,013
1,534
695,396
7,873
1,713
2,272
81,475
20,991

Per ct.
30
30
15
20
100
100
100
100
100
40
40
30
40
40
30
30
30
15
30
25
40
30

$17,201 70
879 90
1,735 65
80 20
204,495 00
38,783 00
104,836 GO
14,320 00
3,958 00
160 40
14,564 40
1,451 10
2,016 80
1,307 20
5,103 90
460 20
208,618 80
1,180 95
513 90
568 00
32,590 00
6,29.7 30

136,273
28,718
10,892.

30
25
20

40,881 90
7,179 50
2,178 40

carpeting
,,.;......
Worsted, manufactures of.
stuff goods.
Wood, unmanufactured.
dye, in s t i c k s . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Articles not enumerated, and not
exceeding in value $1000 each,
viz :
At 5 per cent.
At 10 per c e n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
At 15 per cent
At 20 per cert.
.
At 25 per cent.
,..... 1
At 30 per c e n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
At 40 per c e n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2,982

.

4,230

•

3,311
22,100
47,225
8,337

-

.
"

o

- -

4,058"

~

1,466

_

-

.

'

-

669

,

•

1,570

-

.1,428

687
5,512

291
6,579

215

-

-

_
_
,
_
-

_
>
-

,
.
-

. _

57,147

13,744

52,222

93,570

-

287
•

"

.~

,"

872

-

.298

-

1,188

•

-

676,756 1,873,254 509,365 128,184 214,516

993 30
7,524 60
12,820 75
1,667 40
284 80

687 _
6,313
291 10,209 .215 -

19 65
172 60
103 05
1,262 60
72 75
3,062 70
86 00

-

1,264,624 55

393

106

«
_
-

30
30
25
20
5

3,311
25,082
51,283
8,337
5,696

132

-

1,726

3,618,758

GO

o

o
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T , R E G I S T E R ' S O F F I C E , December 8,




1847.

DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

>

a

5

to
CO

224

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

No. 4.
October 22, 1846.
This Department will issue Treasury notes to the? amount of three
millions of dollars, bea.ring an iriterest of 5 2-5 per cent, per annum,.
payable to the order of persons or corporations making deposites therefor,
in specie, in sums not of less than one thousarid dollars, with either the
Treasurer of the United States, Assistant .Treasurer at Boston, NewYork, Charleston, or St. Louis, or Treasurers of the mint at .Philadelphia'
or New Orleans. The notes will bear even date with the date of
deposite.
• i
•
,
,R. J. W A L K E R , Secretary ofi.the Treasury*'
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

No. 5.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 9, 1847.

Sealed proposals will be received, until the ,10th day of April next,
inclusive, fbr a loan of eighteen millions of dollars, under the act of the
28th January, last, authorizing the issue of Treasury notes, &c., on
Treasury notes to be issued under said act, payable two years after lhe
date ofsaid notes, with interest, at the rate of six per cent, per annum,
payable semi-annually. The bids, in all cases, must be unconditional,
and without any reference to the supposed bids of others, or they ma}^
not be considered. The b.ids should state distinctly, in all ^ases, the
premium offered. No bids will be received below par.
To give an opportunity to all persons to participate in the investment
of funds inthese notes, which, on account of the privilege of funding,
may hereafter be materially enhanced in value,- bids will be received
fbr the lowest denomination of notes authorized by the law, as well as
for higher sums.
'
The Department reserves the right of fixing the periods when the
money must be paid, so as not to be required to anticipate.the wants of
the Government, or allow anj^ interest until the money is actually paid.
The money payable on the loan can be deposited with the Treasurer of
the United States, thei Treasurer of the mint at Philadelphia or .the
branch mint, at New Orleans, or with any ofthe Assistant Treasurers al
.Boston, New York, Charleston, or St. Louis.
, , /
R. J. W A L K E R , Secfeta.ry ofiihe Treasufy: .




1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

225

MM.
Comparative statement ofifioreign,cod-sting, dnd total Tonnage ofi the United
States, showing its increase and decrease in the several years mentioned.

Foreign.

Coastwise.
68,607
349,028

724,414
;

584.21 per cent,
or 32.48 per annum.

201,562
i,^6'8;548

280,421

123,893
1^89 1 18 years ;,.... S
"l . ' ' '848,307'

Increase

Total.

. 1,066,986

408.77 per cent.
or 22.71 per annum.

529.35 per cent.
or 29.41 per annum.

123,89.3
411,438

3 years,..,... 5
I

Increase

68,607
120,957

201,562
564,457

287,545

ml!

52,350

362,895

76.30 per-cent.
• 232.09 per ceht.
or 77.36 per annum. or 25.43 per annum.

J816J 16 y e a r s . . . . (
I

522^65
. 649,627

800,760 .
686,990
1J3,770

^
Decrease of....

127,462

686,990
975,359

649,627
1,045,753

288,369

}|ll!

' 396,126

41.97 per cent,
60.97 per cent.
or 4.19 per arinum. ' or 6.09 peranriuhi.

975,359
4years.... ( 1 , 1 3 0 , 2 8 6
[

1,045,753
1,315,577
269,824

154,927
. 15.88 per cent:
Increase . . . . . . . . . . . .
or 3.97 per annum.

,j8^1hyear

.
.

1,372,219
1,439,450
67,231

14.20 per cent,
Increase 24.41 per cent. Increase 4.89 per cent.
or 88.100 per annum. Increase 1.50 per ann. Increase 30.100 per an.

} 8 | | 10 y e a r s . . . . S
{

Increase . . . . . • * * . . .

180.50 per cent-,
or 60.16 per annum.

S
I

1,130,286
1,241,313
111,027
9.82 per cent.

Increase

'-'

25; 80 per cehtv
or 6.45 per annum.

1,439,450
2,092,391
652,941
4^-36 per cent,
or' 4.53 per annum.
2,092,391
2,562,084
4695693^
22.44 per cent,
or 5.61 per annum.

1,315,577
1,488,602

2,562,084
2,839,146

173,025

276,962

13.15 per cent.

10.811 per cent.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S OFFICE, December 1, 1847.

DANIEL- GRAHAM, Register,.
VOL. VI.—15.




226

R E P O R T S OF T H E

.[1847-

NN.
PAYMENTS I N T O T H E T R E A S U R Y .

A comparative statement showing the amount ofi Receipts firom Customs during
several lieriods, firom 1st December,. 1815, to 1st Decembef, 1847.
1st. From 1st December, 1845, to 1st December, 1846. .$22,971,403 10
From 1st December, 1846, to 1st December, 1847,
about
.- 31,500,000 00
2d. For the quarter ending 30th September, 1846
For the quarter ending 30th September, 1847
3d. For the months of October and November, 1 8 4 6 . . .
For the months of October and November, 1847,
a;bout

6,153,826 58
11,106,257 41
1,688,480^ 32
4,400,000 00

4th. From 1st December, 1846, to 30th June, 1 8 4 7 . . . . 15,905,557 76
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,
R E G I S T E R ' S O F F I C E , Decemberl,

1847.,
DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

PP.
Statement ofi the Imports, and ofifioreignand domestic Exports in the year ending
June 30, 1847.
Aggregate of imports
Amount reexported

$146,545,638
8,011,158

-

Retained in the country for consumption..
Of which the specie a:mounted to

i

$138,534,480

.$22,276,170

The exports consisted of—Domestic p r o d u c t i o n . . , . - . . . .$150,637,464
Foreign production
8,011,158
Total exports.
,
- .$158,648,622'
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
REGISTER'S O F F I C E , December 1,




1847.

DANIEL GRAHAM, Register,

1'847.]

227

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
R R _ N o . 1.

A stateinent exhibiting the quantityand value ofi Coffee consumed annually firo7n
1821 to 1847, and the amount ofi duty which accrued on the. same firom 1821
^0 1832, togethef with the rate ofi .duty per pound, and its equivalent ad
valorem, during the years which the article was subject to duty on importation.
Coffee consumed.
Years ending—

Rate
of
duty.

Duties.
Pounds.

Value.

•Equivalent ad
val 'rm
duty.

Cts. Per ct.

September 30,1821.
18221823-.
.,
•1824.
1825..
1826.
• 1827.
1828.
. N
•1829.
1830.
1.831.
1832.
1833.
1834.1835.
1836.
1837.
1838..
18391840.
1841.
1842.
9 mos. ending
June 30 , 184.3..
Year; endin g—
June 30 , 1844.
do. 1845.
do. 1846.
do. 1847.

11,886,063
18,515,271'
16,437,045
20,797,069
20,678,062
25,734,78428,354,197
39,156,733
33,049,695
38,363,687
.75,700,757
36,471,241
75,057,906
44,346,50591,753,002
77,647,300
76,044,071
82,872,633
99,872,517
86,297,761
109,200,247
107,383,567
.85,916,666
.
149,711,820
94,358,939
124,336,054.
150,332,992

$2,402,311 $594,303
•3,899,042 925,763
2,835,420 821,852
2,513,950 1,039,853
1,995,892 1,033,903
2,710,536 1,286,739
2,139,607 1,417,709
3,695,241 1,957,836
3,052,020 1,652,484
• 3,180,479. 1,918,184
5,796,139 1,514,015
.2,516,120 364,712
7,525,610
. 4,473,937
.
9,381,689
.
7,667,877
.
7,335,506
,
„
7,138,010
9,006,685
.
7,615,824
*
9,855,273
.
8,447,851
.
5,923,927
9,054,298
5-,380,532
7,802,894
8,653,473
—^ \

15
55
25
45
10
20
85
65
7S
35
14
41

5 24.74
5 ^3.74
5 28.98
5 41.36
5 51.80
5 47.47
5 66.26
5 • 52.98
5 54.14
5 60.31
•2 26.12
1 14.49
.
.
.
.
.
,
.
.
.

.
,
.

.

•'.

*
„

.
.
-

.

^
'
\

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

REGISTER'S OFFICE, 2?ecemSer 7, 1847.




DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

.[18.47.

•REPORTS OF T H E

228
' •

• R R ^ N o . ^.

A statement exhibiting the quantity and value ofi Teds consumed .annually
; fir.g?n 1821 to 1817, and the amount- ofi duty whicli accrued. on the same firom
1§21 to 1832, togethmi with the average rate ofi duty per poundiand its^
equivalent advalorem, during theyears which the.article was siibject to dtity
on importation.
-

'-"2

•

--

Teas consuirled.
> ..^7. •

T

Years ending—

Pounds.

Duties.

Value.

: a^cu (4-1

>o

<

g-

ll

|. S | .
^'S'S

Cents.

Sept 30, 1821-. ; 4,5,86,223 $1,080,264 . $1,442,367 13
•• • 1822>.^ i .§,305,'58S 1,160,579 1,637,83.5 02
. 1823 e,474,,934 1,547,695 2,000,75.4 60
-.;
1824 r 7,771,619 : 2,224,203 .2,587,949 13
.:
- 1825;. :. 7,173,740 2,246,794 2,405,355 02
: ...
• 1826 i, - 8,482,48.3 2,443,587 27911,18,8 17
1827 ; ,.3,070,885 • . 942,439 1,029,360 65
. 1828:; 6„289.,:58,1 1,771,993 2,138,45.7 54
1889; : 5,602,795 1,531,460 1,889,822 75.
•' . 1830. - - 6,873,091 1,5'32,211 2,287,364 68
- : ° . i m i • 4,65.6,681 . 1,057,328 1,478,496 22
• ^ 1832*. . 8,627,144 2,081,3.3;9 1,216,427 30
. 1833 12,927,043 „ •4,775,0.81
1834 13,193,553 5,122,275 ..
. • 1835 12,331,638 3,594,293
1836 14,484,784 4,472,342 - .- . . 1837 14,465,722 5,003,401
. 1838 11,978,744 . 2,559-,24e
1839 . 7,748,028 • 1,781,824
- - 1840 16,860,784 4,059,545
1841 10,772,087 3,0.75,332
. r.
1842 13,482,645 . 3,5-67,745
9 ms. ending
June 30, 1843 12,785,748 3,405,627
- •
Year ending—
June 30, 1844 13,054,327 3,152,225
do. 1845 17,162,550 4,809,621
r
do. 1846 16,891,020 3,983,3.37
do. 1847 14,221,910 . 3,200,056
~
.

.

•

...

- •

-

- .

-

•

-

.

-

•

-

Per cent.

31.45
30.87
30.09
33.03
33.53
34.32
•33.52
34.00
33.73
33.28
31.75
14.01
«
-.
-

133.52
141.12
129.27
116.35
107.05
119.13
109.22
120.68
123.40
149.28
136.80
58.44
^
•-

- '. -

•

•

-

-..

•

„

-

.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
.REGISTER'S 0;FFICE., December



7, 1847. •
DANIEL GRARAM, Register.

1847.].

229

S E C R E T A R Y OF TBE^ TREASURY.
.-•SS..

^ • '

,- . .

Statement showing what the Toni^dge ofi the Ufiited States would be on the
30th ofi June, 1857,- ifi dufing each ofi the ten years succeeding the last
fiiscal year, the percentage ofi augmentation wer^ the mme as during the last
^year,

•

-".'

•

.

The increiase. of the tohnage. of the. Uniied States on the 30th of Junev
1847, as compared with the year 1846, was 276,961 tons, being
10 81-100 per centi

Years.

T^iiriiiage.
'

•

Toniiage. -'.

Perceiitasie
10 81-10Oths;

Years.

-

June, 1 8 4 6 . . . . • 2,562,085
1847....
2^839,046
1848.....
3445,993
1849....
3,486^075
1850
3,863,920
1 8 5 1 . . . . . . 4,281,650
1852
4,744,386
1853
5,257,254
1854....
5,825,563
1865
6,455,306
. 1856
7,153,124
1857--...
7,926,377

'

^

'

^

.

.

:

•

. 306j947 ! 3',1.45,993
340,082. -: ; 3i486:,07§ .
.'- 377-,845 . 3,863,920
!
417,630
4,281,550
462,836
4,744,386
512,868
5,257,254
568,309
5,825,563
629,743
6,455,306
697,818
7,153,124
773,253
7,926,377
"•

1848 .
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857

•

•"

TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

REGISTER'S OFFICB, December 1, 1847.




DANIEL GRAHAM, Register.

1

230

REPORTS OF THE

[1847.

Circular to Collectors, and to Surveyors at ports acting as Collectors.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, December 1, 1847.

.

This Department having determined to submit to the prior supervision
ofthe accounting officers of the Treasury, the expenses of collecting the
revenue at the several ports, as well to facilitate the settlement of "these
accounts as to secure a more perfect accountability and the utmost
economy in every branch ofthis Department, consistent with the proper
performance ofthe duty, you wiU submit to the First Comptroller ofthe
Treasury estimates^ of the expenses of collecting the revenue at your
port for the quarter commencing on the 1st of April, 1848, and for each
succeeding quarter, classifying the estimated expenditures ^ under the
several heads, as per table annexed.
Although considerable time may be required to prepare these es.timates
in advance, it is believed that it will be a saving of time, in the aggre^
gate, throughoutthe year, prevent difficulties and delay in the adjustment
of your accounts, and greatly advance the pubhc interest.
' ..
The zeal which you have heretofore manifested in the discharge of
your public duties, induces the confident expectation that you will
cheerfully cooperate with'the Depstrtment in carrying these instructions
into effect. The estimate should be mailed so as to reach the Department at least one month in advance ofthe quarter.
R. J. W A h K E R , Secretary ofi the Treastiry,




FORM.

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232

RE.PORTS O F T H E

[1847.

CIRCULAR TO COLLECTORS OF THE CUSTOMS...
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 30, 1817.
. From the origin of tliis Government down to the present period, it is
believed that confidential services, with a view to .the protection of the
.revenue, have been rendered by agents and officers unknown as such to
the community, and especially to persons engaged in smuggling. To
deter persons from engaging in such frauds; upon the revenue, to detect
and punish the guilty, and to diminish, if not altogether prevent, smuggling, confidential services by confidential agents and; officers cannpt, it
is believed, be safely abolished..
In orderto retrench, however, all expenditures which, are not absolutely necessary,, and to prevent any possihle abuses growing out of this
system hereafter, the collectors of the customs are directed to carry into
immediate effect the following instructions:
.^ .
1st. To discontinue at once the employment of more than one confidential inspector at any one port of entry.
.
.' "
2d. To pay a per diem to such inspectors only- for such- day& as- they
may show to your satisfaction that they have, been actually engaged in
such confidential service..
3d. To require from them in each port,.respectively, weekly-reports
to the collector from whom they may have derived their appoihtment, in
which reports shbuld be communicated all their proceedings, and their
views and opinions as to the best means from time to time of detectingor preventing smuggling, of discovering and arresting the guilty, of
seizing the smuggled goods, and inflicting, all the penalties prescribed by
law.
4th. The whole compensation, both per diem and mileage, allowed to
any one inspector in any one year,, commencing on the 1st of •November,
1847, shall not exceed twelve hundred dollars.
A copy of this circular has been communicated to the First Auditor
and First Comptroller of the Treasury, in orde.r that, these instructions
ipay be carried- into effect b y them- in settling the future accounts of the
collectors.
R. J. W A h K E R , . Seaxtdry ofi the Treasury.

TRB_ASVRY J)E'PART!MiE.isiT, November 27, 1817.
Sealed proposals will be received until the ;fii-st Monday of February,
1848, at the office ofthe commissioners appointed for the erection ofthe
custom-house in the city of New Qii:eans,„f0r the folio wing. m.aterials:
18,500,000 of good hard burnt brick, the exact size to be mentioned,
more or less.
.
'
12,000 barrels of fresh lime, more on less.
7,000 barrels of hydraulic cement, more or less>.
55,000 barrels of sharp sand, more or less.
The above materials to be delivered on the levee, in New Orleans, as
neai' the site of the present custom-house ,as practicable^ and in such



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quantities as-, shall frorn time to time be required, in conformity withappropriations made by Congress. The proposals to be addressed to
Denis Prieur,. Alcee L a Branche, and. William M. Gwin,'commissioners
for the. erection of a custorn-house in New Orleans, endorsed, " Sealed
proposals for furiiishing materials for the erection of a custom-house at
NewOrleans.'' ,
".
Whe.n the-pro.p.psals are opened, by the commissioners, they will communicate copies, together with their plans and recommendations, for the
consideration of the Department.'
•'
The. communication of the commissioners wiU be addressed to the
First Comptrollerof the Treasury, who, together with the First Auditor
of the Treasury, being the-prpper officers connected with the customhouse- accounts, will give their views, in writing as to the proposals to the.
Department. . The. right of rejecting any bid is reserved.
.
Ample security-will be require.d ibr the faithful fulfilment of any contract entered: into for furnishing any ofthe before-mentioned materials..
: R, J,. fiMAh'KER.,-Secretary ofi the Treasury.

Circular to Registers: and Receivers ofi the several Land Offices ofi the Union.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT;, December 6,

1847.

. The registers and receivers in the several land offices in the Union,
cannot become depositaries or agents fbr the sale of the bounty land
warrants or certificates, or any other species of land scrip for location or
in payment of public lands. ' Their duty in relation, to. such warrants,
certificates, or scrip, is prescribed by the law, and is confined to their
reception or location as therein. designated. It, is expected that, these
instructions, will be faithfully observed, and it will be the duty of this
Department to report all violations of these, regulations, for. such action
.as may be deemed proper by the President of the Uriited States..
..R. J. W A L K E R , Secretary ofi the Treasury,

TREASURY. DEPARTMENT, November 22, 1847.
::; Enclosed i:S-a- copy, of the resolution, of lhe first municipality of the city of New Orleans-, heretofore transmitted by 5i'ou to me,
together with,a eopy.of my endorsement thereon accepting the: tender,
made by that municipality of the square of ground for a. custom-house. •
You will please, immediately-uppn the receipt of this- communica-tipn,
transmit to that municipality,.through the'ma,yor of the city, a copy of.
this letter to you, as: al-ao a copy of the resolutions- and; acceptance., here-with, forwarded,. . You will be pleased to tender to the first municipality,
through the mayor of the city,., the thanks, of this Department for the
munificent donationi which- the.y have made to the Government of the
United States-, of the. cuiStom-house square,, and assure them that noexertion:.wiUi be. wanting.on my part,, to render it.available to the extenl
GE;N:TLEMEN




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[1847.

of the -power conferred upon me by law to carry out the wishes of the
first municipahty, and augment the commerce pf New Orleans, the great
.and growing emporium ofthe valley ofthe Mississippi. This square of
. ground being the one preferred by Congress as well as by this Department, and the whole of it having been -given to the Government by the
first municipahty, it is my wish that the entire square shall be occupied
by a buUding. calculated ih every respect to fulfil the object of the law
and to advance the prosperity of your city. The square is large eriough
to embrace, under a single roof, a building which will accoramodate the
appraisers as well as the officers of the customs, and^'all their deputies,
clerks, and assistants, together.with the merchants and clerks who
transact business with the custom-house; and leave ample room fbr large
and convenient &e-proof warehouses for ^ the, storage df gpods imported
into New Orleans, whether designed for' consumptiori or, reexportation.
My views are in favor of erecting a.plain, substantial building, intended for, and adapted to, thetransaction of business, avoiding all unneces^
sary expense or ornament; simple and unostentatious in its character;
solid, safe, and convenient in every particular; free from all danger of
fire, or decay of meiterials; consulting good taste in the style of architecture, but avoiding everything calculated merely for display. The building, it must be remembered, is designed by the law exclusively for
transacting the business of Government and of merchants, in connection
with the foreign imports a,nd experts of New Orleans, including their
storage there; and as merchants, in building their own stores and counting-houses,' universally consult,^ in their erection, ecoriomy and utihty,
and not ornament or displaj?-, a most wholesome example is thereby
furnished to the Government in erecting buildings interided for siniilar
purposes. A building of an ostentatious or ornamental character, which,
would cover the whole square given to the Government,' would cost
several millipns of ..dollars, without adding in the least to the comfort,
convenience, or usefulness of the estabhshment, or augmenting, in any
way, the commerce pf New Oiieans. Indeed, such a building would be
less useful, inasmuch as a. laxge portion of the square given to the Gbvernment would necessarily be occupied by courts, steps,-porticoes,
and pillars; thus, to that extent, wasting the space intended fbr useful
purposes, rendering the entrance and. approach less accessible, obscuring the hght, and interrupting the ventilation of the building. • Whilst
such a huilding would thus be less useful than one of a plain, simple,
solid, and substantial character, consulting only good taste, vast sums of
money beyond what was requisite or necessary would be wasted in
worse than useless expenditures. It is. quite certain Congress'w.ould .
never make such an appropriation, especially at this time; and if a
costly and ornamental building" were to be selected, the Department
would be cpnstrained to confine itself to a small portion of the space
granted by the first municipahtj?", leaving the rest of the square, waste
and unoccupied, and sacrificing the business and commerce of your
great city to mere ostentation, and ornament.- Such a building as is
proposed to be erected b}^ this Department would largely and rapidly ^
augment your w^ealth and commerce, and fiirnish to your merchants and
citizens, from such increase of business,, greatly augmented means to



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improve your city in every respect, and indulge their taste whenever
they thought proper in ornamental architecture, applied to buildings not .
intended merely for the transaction of business.
Thebuilding proposed by the Department would be large and accessible, most convenient in every respect, well hghted and ventilated, and
uniting not only the appraisers' stores, but also fire-proof warehouses for
the storage of goods—all under the same rpof with the custom-house
itself; thus saving much time and expense in the transaction of business,
and affording unsurpassed facilities for its transaction.
The great .advantages of the warehousing bill are just beginning to
. develope themselves in the United States. This^is the system which has
contributed sp much to build up the business of England, and made her
ports marts for universal commerce. It is her great warehouses, in
which are- stored the products of every nation and of every climate,
including the fullest assortment of every commodity that is used or pnr-'
chased by man, that assembles at her ports the" merchants and commerce of the world.^ .Itis in this way that England has made herself the '
factor for the merchants of every portion of the globe, and amassed
thereby an aggregate of wealth unprecedented, which never could have
been secured by her own commerce, her imports pr .exports, or in any
other way than by rendering herself, under the warehousing system, the
storehouse of the world.' The same system-has at length been adopted
in this country; and, if properly arranged and conducted. New Orleans
cannot fail to derive from it an incalculable augmentation of wealth and.business. First in importance, in carrying out this system, is a great
pubhc-warehouse and store,, located near the vessels—the vehicles' of
commerce—and near the merchants, by whom it is conducted; and the
nearer j the better, to the custom-house and allthe officers and merchants
who. transact business there, necessarily connected with the warehouse.
It is fully believed that not even in London itself,- nor in any other part
ofthe world, will so many advantages be. combined for the transaction,
of business and the convenience of commerce, as will be united in the
building nbw proposed to be erected by the Department, under the
authority of Congress. Indeed, I do npt hesitate to record the opinion
that, within a very short time after the completion of such an establish-riient, the business of New Oiieans, as a depot of goods designed fbr
consumption and reexportation, will be nearly doubled. Havana* and
several other ports will nearly cease to be the depots for the supply of
Mexico and Southern America, and that business will be, to a great extent,,
concentrated at your port. The entire square.will fuUj^ accomplish all
these great purposes,' including convenient and fire-proof warehouses, all
under the same roof; and-ultimately it will all be required for purposes
connected ^ i t h the custom-house and comrrierce:' There is nothing in
the act of Congress authprizing! the selection of this square which confers
upon me any authority to erect a building for courts, or a post office,
upon it, t o the permanent embarrassment of commerce and business, as
connected with the custom-house.- This Department has no objection,
however, until the whole building, shall be needed for storage and custom-house purposes, to the use of aipartmerits in it for courts and a post
office. *
. . .



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[1847.

This Department would rejoice; if the donors of this square should
derive very great advantages from the splendid gift which' the.y. have
made to the Government, and it .fully believes that such will .be the result
from, carrying out its views as above expressed.
- .
.
The materials of such a building,-it seems to.me,, should be substantial a,nd well tried. The stone that is used shpuld be ofa character that
has been well tested by experience, and shown thereby to be most sblid
and enduring, and least liable, to .injury and disintegration from exposure
to the weather, or anycause. For this purpose! am, therefore, strongly
inclined to believe that the best granite is superior to any other storie
that can be pbtained.
- ' . .'
I. have carefally examined all the plans for the building whick were
transmitted to me, and must say that the plan of Mr. A. T. Wood, recom-^
mended by you, approaches more neaiiy my own-views than any :of the
others presented. It is* nearly the only one .of the original plans which
covers the whole ground, wasting-no part of the squai'e allotted for thebuilding. It is, in my opinion, the least expensive and more, fi'ee ftom
unnecessary ornament than any of the other plans, at the same time
combining all the advantages for business. .
^•
.•
The room requking mo.st light is. the apartment for the appraisers,
where the goods must all be closely .examined, their quantity,, texture,
and value ascertained, which, as regards'most imports-, arid especially
dry goods, need all the light that can be procured,; so as; to prevent fraudsupon the revenue, and secure a just and fair valuation. I deem, if very
important that the! building should be warmed, as proposed, by heated air, furriished by the same steam power which.performs the hoisting; and
can ca.rry water, by hose, throughout the building.- It seems to me thatj,
by devoting the thhd. story to the- storage of light and fine goodsj cutlery,
&c., and keeping that story free from dampness,- by the proper use.of
heated air, the. objection to New Oiieans as a^ place for storing: silks
and other goods, which are inju^red by dampness of the atmosphere' of
that city, may be obviated, a.nd.the commerce pf New Oiieans thereby
greatly increased.
'
>
*
..
I cannot top- strongly inipress upon you, gentlemen, the higfr arid,
responsible character of the duties..devplved uipon you..- This buildings
whose erection will be superintended by you; will-last for ages, arid any
want of skill in its con struction. woukl prove very injurious to yourselvesas well as tb the p.ublic interest.. A wise and judicious econoi-ny should,
be observed on all occasions,.as well in obta;ining the: materialsv as inconstructing every portion of the building; and more particular iristruev
tibns will hereafter be transmitteGl to you on tMs im-portant poiiit. '
In.the meantime itwill be proper for. you .to obtain from thefirst
municipality a formal deedtO: this; square of ground,'to- b^ executed
under the advice of the district attorney of the United^ States- at New".
Oiieans. You will please, also',, request him to certify that, the deed is"
in due- form of law, and: properly executed, together witk his opinion as
to the vaiidity of the; title,- -It is: necessary, also, that the -muriicipaility
should, accompany the de.ed, in the notarial.Jict, by the proper local cer>
tificate that, the square in question is, free from all judgments, •mbrtgag;es,
liens, or incumbrances whatsoever. The deed can recite, in a preambky



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the. purpose for which, the grant is made, in the language of the law and
bf the resolution of the first municipality; but in the body.of the deed
the grant .must be unconditional. It is true that all the title of the first
municipality is already conveyed by their resolutibiis' and my acceptance
thereof, oil behalf of the United States; but it is proper that a more full
and formal conveyance shall be executed. So soon as the deed is executed in the manner herein stated, you will please transmit a copy ofthe
notarial act to me, in prder that the same may be. duly and properly
accepted by this Department. -,
Veiy respectfully, your obedient servarit,
. ,•. • Ri 3 . W A h K W R , Secretary, ofi the Treasimj.
T o ' Messrs. D." P R I E U R , ALCEE L A ' BRANCHE, and- WM;.. M . G W I N ,
Commissioners, Sfc.
MuNiciPALiTt No. 1, >
Siuing ofi the 21th May, 1847. )
Members present: T h e hbnorable Joseph -Geuins, recorder and presi.dent of the council, Sec.; Messrs. bureau,. Barthe,. Crozart,; Duple'sses,
Derbes, Dupre,. Fabre, Gegnel, Gourdam,- H.agan,. Lanata, Pergnet,
Richardson, Ramos., vSlingerlaiid, and Shields.
The foliow;ing resolutions were finally adopted without objections:
Resolved, T h a t l h e square of-ground situate in this municipality. No. 1,
ofthe city ;of New Oiieans, bounded by the Ijcvee, Canal, Customhouse, and New Levee streets, on which the custom-hou.se ofthe United
States now stands, be, and the same is hereb}^, tendered to the United
VStates. fpr their use and employment forever.
Resolved,. That.the above, tender is made on the condition that the
United States shall erect, on said square', a new custom-house..
Resolved, That.,, shpuld this tender be accepted by the Secretary of the
Treasury, a deed, sliall then, be made h j this m.unici.palit}^ trEmsferring
said square to the United .States, and ceding the,title'pf the same to them
forever.
,
.Resolved, .That the Mayor of the city of New Orleans be, and he is
hereby, authprized to transfer, on. behalf of this municipality, before the
notary ofthis municipality, said square of ground to the United States
as soon as he shall have been adyertis'ed ofthe a>ccept:ance ofthis tender
by tke-Secretary of the Treasury.. •
Resolved:,, Tha.t the resolutions of .January 22d, 1845, tendering to the
United States a parcel of ground in. front of the above described square
be,, and the same are. hereby., repealed.
,
EMILE W I L T Z , &cmc^r2/.
OF N E W Oi^LEANS,. J w e 2, 1847.
. This: is-to certify that the fbregpijng .copy of resolutions passed at the
sitting ofthe council of•municipahty No. 1, on the 24th May, 1847, were
transmitted to-me.. Returned to .thecQuncil at their next sitting without
objections.
• A. D. GROSSMAN, Mayor.



MAYORALTY

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REPORTS O F T H E

-

[1847.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, June 21, 1847.
The within tender of the square of ground in New Oiieans is hereby
accepted, as made by. municipality No. 1, of the city of New Oiieans
on behalf of the Government ofthe United States.
R. J. W A L K E R , Secretary ofi the Treasury,

4pn7 16;, 1847.
S I R : In virtue of authority vested in this Department by an act of
.Congress, approved the 3,d of March, 1847, entitled *'An act to create
an additional land distnct m the Territory of Wisconsiri, and for other
purposes," you are hereby appointed to make a geological examination
and survey ofthe lands embraced in the Chippewa land, district in the
Territory of Wisconsin.
.
• "
' '
^
The map hereto annexed represents, within the lines colored green,
the entire extent ofsaid land district..\ You will observe that this entire
district embraces all the lands within the Territory of Wisconsin, with
the boundary of the Mineral Point land district, and west of the river.
Wisconsin, and ofthe western boundary ofthe State, of Michigan.
The Indian title is extinguished to ^11 that portion bf this district
which is within the limits of the proposed State of Wisconsin, and i t i s
also extinguished within that portion of the district beyond the limits of
the State, designated on the map in greeri color, including' most of the
lands on the river St. C.roix. The object of this examination, as set forth
in the law, is to ascertain which ofthese larids contain copper, lead,, or
other valuable ores, that they may be offered for sale^ as: designated by •
that act, and the description of these lands may be giyen in the President's proclamation for the sale thereof, riamely: the number andiocalities of t h e mines known,- and probability of discovering others; the
quality of the ores ; the facility .of-working the" mines, and the means"
and expense of transporting their products to the principal.ma,rkets of
the United States. The result of .this examination is to .be. transmitted
tp the Commissioner: of the General Land Office, to enable him to com^
ply with the requirenients of t h e l a w .
•
. '"
The 4th section of the act requires that these miriefal lands shallbe
offered fbr sale in subdivisions bf quarter quarter sections. ''sYour observations, therefore, should be sufficiently miriute to enable the Government- to designate, as far as practicable, what mines, if any, exist in
each quarter q.uarter section. These'are indispensable requisites; but,
in addition, it is highly important that a series-of pbservations be made
onthe dip and interisity of the needle, as intimately connected with the
geological and mineralpgical cha.racter of that region of country, and as
hkely to lead to results interesting to the cause of general science.
Baxometrical observations should also he made of the principal elevations, with reference to the section arid township lines, that this branch
of the'topography of the country may. also be ascertained, referring to
Lake Superior as a basis. The width and" course of the streams, .'pra.irie
and timber larids, salt lakes,, &c., and character ofthe soil, are given in



TREASURY. D E P A R T M E N T ,

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the Hneal surveys. Hygrometric observations should also be inade where
practicable. A set of all geological and mineralogical specimens
obtained, should also be transmitted to the Commissioner of the General
Land Office, that they may be disposed of by him in cpnformity to the
-provisions of the 6th section of the act of the 10th of August, 1846,.
The" instruments for making' inagnetic observations, above described,
will be furnished you free of expense by the Secretary of the Smithsonian
Institution, and will be returned to him after the completion of the
survey.
.
You will first make a general reconnoissance of all. those portions of
the district, especially ofthe southern and. western agricultural portions
thereof, when, the township will be run off, that the lands may come
earliest into market. You will-make annotations on skeleton maps, and
by streams, arid provisional township hnes, showing the portion of the
district which is not likely to afford productive rninerals. You will
organize, so as .to commence bperations on the first of June, a corps of
reconnoissance, to consist of the fbllowing persons :^
I s i Your self as principal geologist;
. '
. • >
2d. One assistant geologist;
'
3d. Two sub-agents;
4th. Three assistants;
5th. One special sub-agent;
To- make a reconnoissance along and adjacent to the meridian hne
known as the fourth principal meridian, which is about being extended to
Lake Superior. The second, or smaller corps of reconnoissance, four^
in number, attached to the corps of lineal surveyors, should be organized to commence operations in the field on the first day of August;
each of which shall consist of .one sub-agent and one assistant. The
salaries of the principal corps wilLbe as foUows, namely: for the principal geologist, eight .dollars per day; the assistant geologist, six doUars
a day; the sub-agent, four dollars a day; and the assistants, twb doUars
a day. No charge for expenses of any kind will be allowed the assistant geologist, sub-agent, or assistant, beyond the per diem compensa?tion above designated, except the sums actually disbursed for necessary
travelling expenses from their home, to the-^poirit where their labors wiU
begin, and in returning home; and they will be expected to furnish their
own instruments, tents, camp eqiiipage,^'canoes, or other means of conweyance, provisions, &c., free of any expense to the Government. On the
first of Np vember, you will discharge all .the persons composing the.
principal, as "weU as the smaller corps, except one sub-agerit and one
assistant, whose compensation during the period when they, are not
enga..ged.in service in the field, but aiding only in operations in the laboratory, shall be, for the sub-agent three doUars a day, and one doUar a
day for the assistant. .
Duringthe seasonof operations in the field, you can employ whatever
number of packmen may be absolutely necessary tp carry provisions,
&c., for your several corps, at a compensation not exceeding one doUar
and • twenty-five cents a day, including their expenses. In addition to
the compensation of eight dollars a day, which will commence on the
first day ofMay next,.and which will be allowed to you during the year,



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.

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-

[1847,

there will be allowed the further sum of five hundred dollars per annurii,
vfor the use of your laboratory, chemical apparatus, acids, and other
re gents, mountain barometers, and other instruments in the field, travelling expenses, and all other incidentar expenses whatever.
The reconnoissance should be closed in time tp repbrt, as fast as the
townships axe run,off, whether there are such indications to render expedient further examination for minerals. If tp be examined, organize subcorps of two, namely: one sub-agent and one assistarit, ;to be attached
to the corps of lineal surveys; the townships -not,considered worthy of
examiriation fbr mineral lainds, shall be specially .reported at once to the
Coirimissibrier of the General Land Of&ce as-not mirieral lands. You
will judge from the reports of sub-corps attached" to township surveys,
^whether the indications justify mbre iriinute search. . If they db, then you
will continue the.sub-corps where the sectional lines are being run, noting
the mineral appeararice, mines, &c., in each quarter section. . If not, you
. will report the township as not mineral. When the"^^ub-cbrps'^re Organized, you will, with your corps, traverse .the districts, receiving reports,
dnecting operations, and carefully, noting the-.geological and mineralogical features of the country, including the veins .and -geoiogical formation, depth and thickness of strata, and every other .particular riecessary
to supply a complete geological chart of .the sections a.nd districts; and
making, from time to time, special reports to the General Land Office,
accompanied with township'plats exhibiting the'sections which axe not
mineral, so that they may be brought into market without delay. You
•will institute, in connectionwith Dr. Jackson, the ^geologist for Lake
Superior land district in Michigan, as. far as pra^cticable, a series of
simultanebus barometrical observations and levels. You will cause to
be collected by the geologicarcorps mineralogical and. geological specimens, accurately located, to .be forwarded, after analysis, with.your
final report, to the Commissioner of the General Land Office; and the
actual experise of transporting these specimens'will.be allowed. As
soon as your operations- in the field are brought to a close, you will,
after dismissing your sub-corps, except as befbre stEited, repair to your
laboratory, institute an analysis'of the-more iinportant specimens and
soils collected, and otherwise prepare materials for your final report,
which you will, malve at the close of the survey of the district.
You wiU also, at the close- .of the first year's operations,.furnish the .
Commissioner of the General Land Office charts of the districts so. far
as your operations" have extended.
The corps of lineal surveyors will be instructed to give all assistance
intheir power to the geological survey-j and t e admit the sub-corps to
their camps, chargiiig their proportion of expenses. In-your final report,
you wiU set forth the number and locality of the inines kriown, and probability of discovering others, the quality ofthe orps, the faeility bf'working the mines, and ineans arid expense of transporting their products to
the principal markets of the United States, together^^ with such other
observations as you may deem interestirig and lapprbpriate to the suhject.
.• • '^
•
'
You wUl accompany your final report by a geologicai ehairt of the
entire district, upon which j^-ou will lay down, by townships and sections,



1847.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY. ^

241

and, so far as practicable, by quarter quarter sections, that portion of
the district which you recommend to be kept back from sale as a min'eral reservation, describing the same by metes and bounds. Any one or
more ofthese sub-corps which can at any time be spared from the Chippewa land district, you will detail across the Mississippi into the Du
Buque land district in Iowa, so asto ascertain the presence of copper or
other valuable minerals in that, region pf country lying north ofthe
southern boundary of the /* neutral ground," as desigriated upon the
maps, and bordering upon the Mississippi river, commencing upon the
northern boundary of your former survey on the west side of the river;
the result ofwhich exploration. and survey you will include in your geological chart, describing.the localities by reference to inaterial objects as
far as may be.practicable. As the whole amount now appropriated and
available for your operations during the fiscal year ending the 30th June,
1847, is only twelve thousand two hundred and fifty dollars, j'-ou will
be careful that your whole experise.s, including your own salary.and the
salaries of all your assistants, should not exceed that amount.
I am, very respectfuUy, your obedient servant,
R. J. W A L K E R , Secretary ofi the Treasury.
P. S.^—You will forward to the General Land Office, in time to be
received there by the 1st of November next, a synopsis of your operations up to the time that report is made, with a general view of the
country explored, as to its mineralogical, geological, and agricultural
quahties, tiinber, &c., a statement of the expenses incurred up to that
time^.an'estiniate of the amount that will be required for your operations during the next sea-on, and the chaxacter and field of those operations, that the facts and estimates thus submitted may be embraced by
the Commissioner in his annual report. I am, sir, &c.,
R. J . W A L K E R , Secretary ofi the Treasury.
Dr. DAVID D . O W E N , Washington City.

TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T , ^ p 7 7 16, 1847.

S I R : In virtue of the authority vested in this Department by an act
of'Congress, approved 1st March, 1847, entitled "An act to estabhsh a
land office in the northern part of Michiga.n, and to provide for the sale
•of mineral lands in the State of Michigan," ybri are hereby appointed to*
make a geological examination and survey of the lands embraced in the.Xake Superior land district, in the State of Michigan.
The map .hereto annexed represents, within the lines colored green,
the entire extent of such land district. You will observe that this entu-e
district embraces all the lands within the northern peninsula of the State
of Michigan, to all of which the Indian title has been extinguished.
The object of this examination, as set forth in the law, is to ascertain
which of these lands co.ntain copper, lead, or other valuable ores, espe' cially that of cppper, that they may be offered for sale as designated by
' that act, and the description of these lands may be given in the President's proclamation for the sale thereof, namely: the number and
VOL. VI.—16.



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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

localities of the-mines known, and probability of discovering others;'
the. qua^lity of the ores; facility of working the mines, and the means
and expense of transporting their prodncts to the principal markets of
the United States. The result of this examination is to .be transmitted to the Commissioner, of the. GeneraL Land Office, to enable, him
to comply with the requirements-of the law. The 4th sectionof the act
requires that these mineral lands shall be offered for sale in sub-divisions
of quarter sections. Your observations th.ereof should be sufficieritly
minute to enable the Goverriment to designate, as far a s ; practicable,
what mines, if ariy, exist in each quarter sectiom /
. '
These are indispensable requisites;. but, in additiori, it is .highly important that a series of observations be made ori. the dip and intensity of
the magnetic needle, as intimately.connected, with the geological and
rnineralogical character of that region of country, and as likely to^lead
to results interesting to the cause of general science. Baroiiietricai. observations should also be made o f t h e principal elevations, with reference to the section and township lines, that this branch of the,topography
of the country may also be ascertained, referring to Lake Superior as
a basis. The width and course of streams, prairie and timber lands,
&c., and the character of the soil, a;re given in the. linea:! surveys. Hygrometrical observations should also be made, when practicable. A set
of all geological and mineralogical specimens obtained should also be
transmitted to the Coinmissioner of the General Land Office,, that they
may be disposed of by him in conforniity with the provisions of the 6th
section of the act of the 10th of August, 1846. ' The instrurnents for
making magnetic observations,, above described,, will be furnished by
this Department as soon as practicable, which you will return after the
completion of the survey,
You will employ the,necessary, corps of assistants to make a. general
reconnoissance bf the southern portion of your district, that the southern
boundary of the copper region may be established, andthose lands south
of that region which contain no ores, and are only valuable for agricultural purposes, may at once be designated and prepared for market.
The corps and assistant corps, under your own charge, will be engaged
in explbririg the valuable copper ranges.iri the northern part of the district and Isle Royal, and you will also reexamine, the portions ofthe
southern reconnoissance of the char-acter of-which, from the reports of
your assistants, you may have doubts. The southern boundary of the
copper region should be d'esignated, on. plats, as nearly as ^practicable,and with reference to township and sectional lines. . ^
Of the region east of Chocolate river you will make a general reeonnoissa-nce, unless the indications of-copper^ and .other yaluable. ores
should require a more particular examination. Where any portipn of
the region embraced in your districf is under lease, you-wiU make no
furthe-r examination than may be necessary to correct the entire surveys;
and, as far-as practicable, the "exainination of the.lands that are leased
should be last made.
You are authorized to call on-the- surveyor general a t Detrbit for. any '
copies or extracts of Dr. Houghtori's survey, or the other. geblogicaLsurveys inyour district,' of the field or other notes of those suryeys, "or for



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SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

243

any specimens collected in making them, which may be in his possession, or to which he may have access, and of any publications which
have been made of those surveys.
• The salaries of this corps wilLbe as follows, namely:
For the principal geologist, eight dollars per day.
„
For the assistant geologist, five dollars per day* .
For the sub-agerits, four dollars per day.
For the aLSsistants, two dollars per day.
For the hne surveyor, four dollars per day.
No charge for expenses of any kind will be allowed the a.ssistant
geologists, sub-agents, assistants of line surveyor, beyond the per diem
compensatibn above designated, except the sums.,actually disbursed for
necessary travelhng expenses from their homes to the points where their
labors begin, and in returning home; and they will be expected to furnish
their own instruments^ tents, camp, equipage, canoes, or otheir means of
conveyance-) provisipns, &c., free of expense to the Government.
If any tents, instruments, boats, or other materials required for travelling and observations in the wilderness, or on the lake^ reriiain as
Goverriment property at Copper harbor, the geologist is authorized to
take such of them as his party may need, and return them to that depot
at the close of his survey.
At the close of the field work, probably about the 1st of November",
you wiU discharge all the persons composing the field corps, excepting
one assistant and sub-agent, whom you may rieed in laboratory service-^
arid the pay of the assistant in the laboratbry shallbe three dollars per
day, and that of the sub-agent one dollar per day.
During the seasori of operations in the field you can employ any number, absolutely necessary^ of packmen, to carry provisions,-(Sec, for your
severai corps, at a compensation not exceeding one dollar and- twentyfive cents a day, including their expenses.
In addition to the coriipensation oT eight dollars per day, which wiU
commence on the fixst day of Ma.y next, and which v^ill be allowed to
you during the year, there w-Ul be allowed the further surii of five hundred dollars per annurii ,&r the use' of your laboratory, chemical apparatus, acids, and other reagents, mountain barometers,, and other instruments in. the field, travelling expenseSj and other incidental expenses.
The whole ainount appropriated and now available for this survey,
includirig your own salary, the pay of all your corps and incidental
expenses, is tw-elve thbusand five hundred doUars; arid you will not,
therefore, under any circumstances, eiceed that amount.
When a corps of linear suxveys are sent upon the survey bf Isle
Royal-, yori may send with therii such assistant geologist, sub-agent, and
boatmen, or packmen, as may be required for the reconnoissance of the
geological arid mineralogical character of that island, and may visit, in
person, those localities whibh they may indicate us of special ecoriomical
value on account of ores or metals which may be discovered;
You are also authorized to send such assistants or srib-agents as may
be required for the geological examination of the distriet now sectionizing by the linear surveyor; and,that officer wilLbe requested to .give



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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

them all necessary facilities for exploring the geology of the country he
may survey.
You will, from time to time, notify the Commissioner of the General
Land Office of such townships as you may deem to be unfit, for reservation on account of mineral contents, that they may be sold .without
delay; and also report to the mineral agent any mine or mines which
are in process of being worked; the particular localities of thbse mines,
and the names .of the persons for or by whom they are worked, with
such suggestions as may be proper as to the character and.value of the
ore raised..
You will institute, in connection with Dr. Owen, geologist of the
Wisconsin land district, as fa,r as practicable, a series of barometrica
observations and levels, taking the level of Lake Superior .as the base
from which your observations schall be calculated.
You will collect specimens of the dilferent rocks arid minerals of your
district, noting accurately their locatiorisLand forwaid. a set of them to
the Coinmissioner of the Land Office, reserving another set for analysis,
and will cominunicate the result of your examination in your finaL report.
The expense of transportation of these specimens will be allowed.
As soon as your operations in the field are brought to a close, you will,
after dismissing your sub-corps, except as befbre stated, repair to your
laboratory, institute an analysis of the more important specimens and
soils coUected, and otherwise prepare materials for your final report, and
which you will make out at the close of the survey of the district.
You will also, at the close of the first year's operations, furnish the
Commissioner of the General Land Office charts of the district so far
as your observations have extended. The corps of linear surveyors will
be instructed to give all assistance iri their power to the geological survey, and to adinit the sub-corps to their camps, charging their proportion of expenses.
.
•
'
In your final report you will set forth the number and locality of the
mines known, and probability of discovering others; the quality of the
ores; the facility of working the mines, and the means and expense of
transporting their products to the principal inarkets of the United States,
together with such other observations as you may deem interesting and
appropriate to the subject. You wilL accompany your final report'by a
geological chart of the. entire district, upbn which you will lay down the
townships, sections, and quarter-sections; so far as practicable that portion of the district which you recommend to be kept back from sale as
mineral reservations, describing the same by metes and bounds.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
R. J. W A h K E R , Secretary ofi the Treasury.
Dr.

CHARLES JACKSON,

Geologist, Washington City, D, C,

P . S.—^You will forward to the General Land Office, in time to be
received there by the 1st November next, a synopsis of your operations
up to the time that report is made,, with a general view of the country
explored, as to its mineralogical, geological, and .agricultural qualities,
timber, &c.; a statement of the expenses incurred up to that time; "an



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245

estimate of the amount that will be required for your operations during
the next season, and the character and field of those operations, that the
facts and estimates thus, submitted may be embraced in the Commissioner's next annual report.
R. J. W A L K E R .
April 16, 1847.
S I R : In virtue of the authority vested in this Department by the act
entitled '' An act to establish a land office in the northern part of Michigan, and to provide for the sale of mineral lands in the State of Michigan," approved 1st March, 1847; a.nd by the act entitled " A n act to
create an additional land district in the Territory of Wisconsin and for
other purposes," approved 3d March, 1847, you are hereby appointed
mineral agent for the districts established and created.by those laws.
You will repair immediately to^the region embraced by those districts,
and enter on your duties in accordance with the instructions herewith
enclosed. To aid in those duties. General E. J. Roberts has been
appointed your assistant, at a salary of twelve hundred dollars per
annum, coriimencing fi^om this day. He has been directed to report
himself to you for orders, arid you will give him the necessary instructions as to his duties, field of operations, &,c. You are also authorized
to employ a laborer, when necessary, at a compensation not exceedmg
one dollar and twenty-five cents per day, including his expenses. Your
own Scdary, which will also commence this day, will be fifteen hundred
dollars per annum; and your necessaxy expenses for travelling, &c., and
those o f your assistarit, will be allowed in the settlement of your
accounts.
I am, very respectfully, ypur obedient servant,
R. J. W A L K E R , Secretary, ofi the Treasury.
Colonel D. R. MCNAIR, Washington City,
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T , ^ p i / 1 6 , 1847.
.SIR: In virtue of the authority vested in this Department by the act
entitled *' An act to establish; a land office in the northern part of Michigan, and to provide for the sale of mineral lands in the State of Michigan,"
approved 1st March, 1847; and by the act entitled * An act to create
*
an additional land district in the Territory of Wisconsin and fbr other
purposes," approved 3d Mafch, 1847, you are hereby appointed assistant
mineral agent for the districts established and created by those laws.
You w;iU immediately report yoursejf.for duty to Colonel D. R. McNair,
who has been appointed the agent ofthis Department for those districts,
and receive your orders and instructions from him.
Your salary, which will comnience this day, will be twelve hundred
dollars p e r a u n u m ; and your travelling and. other necessary expenses
will also be paid.
Very respectfully, your obedierit servant,
R. J. WALKER-, Secretary ofi the Treasury,
General Ec J. ROBERTS, Washington City,



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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

In0.'uctions to examine certam Warehouse systems ofi Europe, with the Report
thereon,, and a Table ofi the accompanying Appendices.
GENTLEME'N: YOU will, with all convenient despatch, visit the warehouses of London, Liverpool, and Birkenhead, and procure the following
information at each place:
1st. The number bf such warehouses where foreign imports are stored,
and how far separated into^ distinct stores.
. -Sd. The description of goods thus stored, and hpw fax there are separate stores fox different descriptions of goods. •
3:d. A descriptio-n pf the stbres; hpw, and..of what materials built;
number of stores, and depth, and extent of cellars; how far they are
fire-proof, and to what extent erected on arche.s \yithout timber.; how
many .of them are immediately uppn the water, and how-many distant
therefrom,, and how far; the Convenience pf Ip.adirig and unloading goods
to and frorri thern; the depth of water at the docks br basins; the nature
and position of the hoisting appara;tus, whether by steam or otherwise.
4th. Whether the goods are in sured,. and how, and at what rates, and
the means used-to guard and protect the goods from combustipn, and
the building from fire and accident; how, and at what times fires are
permitted, or lights introduced, and in what manner.
.
5th. You will inquire particularly how far, and tp what extent, iron
has been introduced, either for roofs, rafters, joists, o;r otherwise, as well
as the material for flooring; the expense of such buildings; the in.surance,
if any, on such warehouses and the goods stored therein.
. '
6th. The location of custom-house, appraisers' stores, and warehouses.
7th. How, and for what terins, and at what rate of rent, the ware- •
houses are leased, and how far they are public or private warehouses,
and whether of both descriptioris;. how far mercharits axe permitted to
have the custody of their own goods, and especially of dry gpods, in
their own warehouses, and how far the Government has the" direction,
control, or supervision, of such goods or warehouses.
8th. The amount of goods stpred, giving the description, as far as
practicable, and the quantity .and character of each;. the rate of stora.ge;
the usual and the average period of storage; the length of time the gpods
are permitted to reriiain in the warehpuse without the payment of duties;
the distinction and separation in location, or otherwise, of wa,rehouses
designed for goods enter.ed fbr-cons,umption or for reex;portation.
9th. The mode of entering gopds at the^warehouse; copies of such
entries, and of all the forms used for entering goods ; how far subdivided
intopa-xcels ; the fbrm bf certificate given tb the person who has entered
goods-in the warehouse; copies pf such certificates, and how; they are
used as a pledge for obtaining nioney; and at what rate of interest loans
are made on such certificates, compared with other securities at the time;
whether endorsers are required in such cases; whether such loans, are
made by the Bank of England,'^or by any particular clas.s of bankers or
brokers upon such certificates, and the aggregate of such loans, as far
as practicable.
10th. The aggregate of goods-warehoused at each of these places,
and in what number of stores, and of what dimensions. The difference,



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SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

247

if any, between the form of entering for consumption and reexportation,
together with the character of the proof required in order to obtain a
drawback of duties; as also removal of cargoes from port to port coastwise, or by railroads or canals to the interior, and copies of all bonds
given for duties or otherwise, in connection with warehoused goods;
how far the bonds are entirely dispensed with where the goods are
deppsited in public warehouses, and whether the duties are exacted if
the goods should be consumed b y fire in such \yarehouses, or destroyed
on the way to or from them.
llth.. A fuU description of the books kept at such warehouses, and
by. what numbex.and character of clerks and other officers, and how the
labpr is performed, including truckage, drayage, loading and unloading:
shipment.and exhibition of goods, whether by sarnple or otherwise, and
how and to what extent nierchants using such stores have countinghouses only, and in what, manner inerchants and their clerks are admit- "
^
ted into, such stbres, and'how far they are .permitted, to have access to
the goods.12th. A full description ofthe officiaL names arid duties of all persons
transacting the public business in such warehouses, with compensation
paid each.
13th. The hours withiii which the warehouses are kept open, their
connection with the water used fpr extinguishing fire, and what articles
are considered combustible or perishable and excluded from warehouses,
and .how or where the combustible or perishable articles are kept, and
for what length of time. •
,
14th. The actual expense of warehousing goods and of keeping them
.in warehouse,, distinguishing the different kinds of goods, as dry goods,
hardware, grpceries,;wines, .liquprs, &c., and what portipn ofthe imports
are not warehoused at all either in public or piivate warehouses, under
any supervision or control of the Governnient, and how the free gopds
are warehoused, as also goods.that are unclaimed.,, together with the disposition of the same;, as alsp goods that have paid the duties after the
payment has been made.
15th. Hpw far the warehouses are separated into distinct stores, and
the character of the walls and separation so as to prevent the extending
of a fire from; one to the, other; as also the location with a view to air,
ventilation, access, light, &c.
16th. How far marine or other railways are used for placing goods in
the warehouses, and the length of time occupied in warehousing cargoes
of goods, as; well as in shipping them from the warehouses, together with
the delay on this, acco unt and detention of vessels, and what portion of
the time of a vessel is. taken up in depositing and receiving goods from
such warehouses.; and how far and.for,what time, and at what place and
under what guards, a yessel is.permitted to be used as a warehouse.
17th, If on arrival at a second port the goods are warehoused, the
forms required, and the necessary certificate for cancelling bond at first
port.. If a,gain shipped, the variation in the preceding fbrms,. if any.
. 18th. .Goods exported, .whether under the custody of an officer; and
the draymen, porters, &c., whether under the sole control of the Goverriin.erit>,.
.



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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

19th. Packages in bad order, hbw repaired, repacked, &c., and how
far the merchant is allowed the control and supervision of such labor.
Whether liquors, grain in bags, sugar, &cc., can have the description of
packages altered, and how. Liquors, how transported to secure the
article from adulteration; if cased, by whom—^merchant or Goverriment.
.
20th. Penalties to guard against violation of warehbuse laws. Are
securities required from storekeepers or those having custody of goods ?
if so, amount of such security, &c.
-21st. Guards a.gainst burglary, thefts, &c.; checks on the storekeepers
so as to truly ascertain the disposition of goods entrusted to their custody,
the manner of keeping^their accounts, how often examined to test their
correctness, and by whom; how an exa.inination is made of the goods
on hand, and how often; the forms of their accounts; the expenses of
storage, &c.; how paid and to whom, and system used to secure accountability in the collecting agents; fees for bonds, certificates, and orders
for receipts and delivery, their amount, and how collected; the different
forms for the receipt and delivery pf merchandise, and difference, if
any, for consumption, export, or interior transit.
22d. How and under what restrictions goods are transported by railways and canals; guards against frauds, burglary, &c.; whether, if an
exaniination of the goods has been made at the first port of entry, a
second examination is required at the place of consumption; the form of
certificate required to accompany such goods, and whether duty is
assessed at the first port, or on arrival at place of consumption, and
when,and where paid.
23d. At whose risk the goods are during such transit; whether duties
are exacted if the goods are destroyed by fire or other accidents of navigation or travel, and who bears such loss.
24th. What deductions, if any, are made fbr ieaka,ge, wasting, &c.,
during transit or on the voyage of importation, and under what restrictions leakage or loss by weight is made a part of damage caused by
stress of weather.
25th. What security is requ.ned against the change or adulteration of
goods in transit from one district to another.
26th. What returns, statistical or otherwise, and statements are made,
and how often, and at what offices reports ofthe business done are made
up; get forms of these returns, &c.
'
27th. What data these returns axe made from, how they come to the.
office where they are used in making up the statement; if subject to
alteratiori iri any manner thereafter.
28th. If these data have any connection with the certificate or warrant »
issued as representative of the goods; on what data that certificate is
issued. You wiUalso ma.ke all such further iriquiries as you may deem
useful in connection with the warehouse system, or our foreign conimerce,
and suggest such improvements as you may deem-advisable. It is not
in the power of this Department to allow you any extra compensation
for these services, but your actual expenses will be paid, including indispensable clerk hire, and an amount not exceeding one hundred dollars,
as you may find necessary for the purchase of books to aid you in your



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SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

249

labors, which bobks you-will bring on- to the Treasury Department at
Washington.
You will be expected to report in writing, together or separately, or
both, the result bf ypur inquiries to this Departinent, on or before the
20th of October next, and to come on at the same time to Washington
city, for consultation with this Department.
Your expenditures must be as economical as is consistent with the
proper discharge of your duties.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
R. J. W A L K E R , Secretary ofi the Treasury.
Mx. C. C. WALDEN and Mr; D. P. BARHYDT,

July 2^, 1817.

. .

\

July 31, 1847.
If Messrs. Barhydt'and Waiden can certainly reach here by the 30th
October, their exaniination of the warehouse- systeni may be extended
to Havre,; France.
. '
.
R. J. W A L K E R , Secretary ofi the Treasury^
N E W YORK,

WASHINGTON CITY, November 29,

1847.

The undersigned, in compliance with the preceding instructions, dated
29th and 31st July last, sailed from Boston on the 1st of August; visited
the several ports of London, Liverpool, Birkenhead, Antwerp, and
Havre; and, returning, left Liverpool on the 5th of October, reaching
the United States on the 19th of the same month.
From the short time given for the investigation of the different warehousing systems, it was impossible to enter fully into all the minutiae of
detail at all the ports, as contemplated in the instructions.
As the forms were most in harmony with our system, attention was
particularly drawri to a thorough examination into the nianner of collecting
the revenue at the different English ports named, and the duties of the
respective officers connected therewith. To the warehousing of dutiable
merchandise was especia.lly devoted the time arid attention necessary to
an understanding of the system in all its details. A system involving
the security of so vast an ainount of inerchandise, and one which, as
there practised, while it furnishes the most ample security to the revenue,
affords increased facilities to conimerce, and giving that nation almost a
xnoriopoly of the carrying tradeof the world^ would seem to realize the
happiest effort of the conimercial genius of Great Biitain.
At Antwerp and Havre such general information as time permitted
was collected, and will be found embodied inthe report and appendices.
. The replies to the interrogatories contained in the instructions have
been placed in the numerical order in which they are there stated, that
beirig the most convenient for reference.
1. In Great Britain, the business of warehousing is left entirely to
individual enterprise; the commissioners of customs, in whom the man


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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

agement of the collection of-the revenue is vested, under the control of
the Lords of the Treasury, stating generally the description of stores,
fastenings, &c., which they consider requisite for the purpose, and all
such stores eligibly situated are by them admitted to be bbn-ded warehouses, placed under the joint lock of the customs and storehouse proprietors, and are free for the storage of dutiable goods. .
From the great rise and fall of the tide, it is almost impossible for
vessels to discharge at open piers -in a tide-^way, as^with ,us. This has
led to the construction of artificial basins, with tide-gates, by incorporated
companies.,, as in London.,, and by their town trustees, as in Liverpool
and Birkenhead, for the purpose, of giving, greater facility and despatch
to business. In London these docks belong to three companies with large
capital, viz: the East and West India, London, and St. ^Katharine's
Dock Coinpanies, whose business it is to furnish labor for the discharge
and loading of vessels, to store the goods, and perform all labor connected
therewith. They have constructed arpund their docks pr basins large
warehouses, entirety fire-prpof, with cellars fitted for storage of every
description of merchandise, and with every facility for sampling and
arranging the goods, and for public sales.
These advantages of situation give, to these companies almost a
monopoly of the business; they storing free as well as dutiable merchandise. The Government further facilitates them b5rplacingin each
dock a corps of officers, to do the custom-house business connected
therewith. .- These docks being somewhat distant from the seal'of business, the
companies provide, in addition, large warehouses in-the city, to which
they transport any merchandise-required,, without extra charge to the
owner. And generaUy, from their large means, they are enabled to
grant greater facilities than individuals. Their warrant or receipt for
merchandise, for the same reason, is as current as any other security in
the market, and loans are made on them at the lowest rates of interest..
At Liverpool and Birkenhead the ownership of the docks is in the
hands of the city or town authorities, who/select a portion of their number, who, with a like nuinber selected by inerchants paying dock dueSj
constitute the bbard for the management ofthe docks. In Liverpool the
basins have, with but one exceptipn, only sheds for the temporary protection of goods from the weather while loading or discharging;.the merchandise being stored in private bonded Warehouses in different parts of
the city. The exception referred to is the Albert dock, which has large
warehouses attached, after the London plan, and which has but lately
been completed. The docks at Birkenhead are not yet finished; they
are to have warehouses attached, which will;be made bonded stores.
Owing to some difficulties of title, the work has been, delayed, but wiU
probably soon be completed; when-so, the Birkenhead docks will probably not be inferior to any s.imilar establishments in existerice.
Plans ofthe docks at the different ports are annexed. . See appendices
A, B, C, K 2, and W. . ^
= ^
-• . •
The warehouses at the different basins, are b.uiltr as will be seen by
reference to the map, in large stacks,.subdivided, into, stores convenient
for the storage of different descriptions of gpbds,. coritaining sample



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251

rooms, &c., the communications between the different subdivisions beings
closed at night fpr. security against fire. ' There is also, in each port a store attached to the custom-house, design
nated as the Queen's warehouse,.to which all goods that m a y b e seized
for violation of law, unclainied passengers' luggage, and surplus stores
of ships, are sent; but this store is not used for warehousing merchandise.
, 2. The articles thus stored consist chiefly of foreign imports paying
the higher rates of duties, and those bulky articles paying low duties on
which the expense of frequent removals bears heavily. Separate stores
ai'e generally provided for sugar,-molasses, tobaCcb,. teas, silks., cinna-r
mon, indigo, and coffee, or - parts of different stores so constructed as to
be most convenient for storage of these articles, security against combustion, gaining easy access.^ sampling, &c., keeping in view the greatest
economy of lakor. Goods, prohibited for home consumptibn are permitr
ted by law to be warehoused, such goods being marked "prohibited,"
and kept .separate from those entering into consumption.
The refining of sugar being allowed in bond, the comniissioners ofthe
customs have power to make sugar-refining houses bonded warehouses
for such refining..
The practice of ma,kiiig frequent changes iri packages of goods, under
the permission of the commissioners of the customs, creates a necessity
for enlarged storage roonii. ^
For the arrangements for storing different descriptions of goods in the
East and West India-docks, London, see appendix W .
3. The warehouses in the East and West Iridia and London docks in
London, are constructed in a substantial and fire-proof manner, the roofs
of slate or tile, and the doors and.windows of iron. The lower floors
are generally of stone, on arches sustained by pillars of.stone or irori;
the upper floors are of wood, sustained by wooden pillars.' The stores
inthese docks are of different dates'of construction, the more modern
ones embracing the most approyed modes of building at the time. See
appendix W.
.
In the St. Katharine's dock the stores, having been more recently built,
are generally of a better description, the lower stories being on arches
supported by iron pillars, and the floors ofthe second story of iron plates.
Underneath all are cellars fox the storage of liquors, with arched roofs,
supported by iron or stone, columns. These cellars are of immense
extent, and, in the.London dock alone, comprising twenty-two acreso
The floors are fitted with iron skids for the stowage of the casks, and
their easy movement from one part to another.
On the piers in these docks are also constructed sheds for the protection of merchandise while discharging and loading, and for custom-house
examination. These sheds are supported generally by iron columns,
and in some instances have iron roofs, and railwa,ys laid through thera
for the more convenient removal of merchandise by hand trucks.
The other bonded., warehouses are private stores offire-p>roofconstruction, withiri which no offices or counting-ropriis are allowed,, huilt to
comply with the circular of the commissioners of customs, as per appendix L.
:
'



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[1847.

The stores in the Albert dock, Liverpool, (the only dock having warehouses at that port,) the undersigned think the most perfect in every
respect which they visited, being built entirely of stone and iron, no wood
whatever entering into their construction. They are built around, the
basin, five stories in height; the floors are of tile, laid on arches throughput, supported by iron and stone columns, the space between the bricks
and tile being filled with concrete. The walls are three feet in thickness
at the first story, diniinishing to eighteen inches at the roof^—the. latter
being of tile, and the party walls rising four feet above it: The second
floor projects, as iuc St. Katharine's dock, to the water's edge, with, a
hatchway in the intervening space between the water and the'main
building,; goods are thus by cranes taken from thevessel and placed
within reach ofthe hoisting apparatus. The height of this ceiling being
increased to admit the working of the crane under it, the pillars are
notched tp admit of temporary floors being laid, preventing the waste pf
room that would otherwise take place.
The private wa.rehouses at Liverpool are of the same construction,
generally, as in London; the transient sheds referred'to in No. 1, axe
built of brick, with tile or slate roofs.
The warehouses at Birkenhead are in progress of construction; for
particulars of which, see appendix C.
The hoisting apparatus at all the docks in England was the ordinary
crane to hoist from the vessel, and, in some instances, to raise and lower
from and to the vaults; but the general plan in the stores was by the
ordinary wheel and fall, in general use in this country.
The depth of water in the Liverpool docks will be seen by reference
to appendix B ; in the London dock, appendix A; in the St. Katherine's,
D ; in the Birkenhead, C; and in the East and West India dock, Loudon, W.
For descriptions ofthese docks more in detail, and.for full particulars
concerning location and construction of warehouses, capacity of stores,
&c., see appendices A, B, C, D, K l , K 2 , and W.
..
4. In the private warehbuses, neither lights nor fire are permitted by
the custonis; but in their docks, the regulation of the matter is left to
the dock companies; In their warehouses it is strictly forbidden; but it
is permitted in the offices and on board the vessels laying in the docks,
under close restrictions. "No lucifer matches, or other articles o f a n
inflammable nature, are permitted to be housed;" neither are pitch,.tar,
rosin, gunpowder, lucifers, turpentine, woolen rags or waste, or cotton
waste, hay or straw, aUbwed to be landed in the docks. Should any
h a y or straw, pitch, tar, rosin, or turpentine', be brought in for ship
stores, the articles may be put on board, but must not be lodged on the
qua.ys. In'the vaults lamps are permitted. In each dock there is a day
and night police always on duty, and a certain number bf their servants
are drilled to work the fire-engines belonging to the compan3^ The
organization is complete and perfect, and every means used, as will be
seen by reference to their regulations, to guard against and extinguish
fires; tools are at hand to scuttle vessels, ifit be necessary, and they are
subject to the most severe regulations whilst in dock; this severity being
absolutely requisite, as a fire, occurring at low tide and once obtainirig



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SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

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the mastery, could not be checked till all the shipping were destroyed
or sunk.
The Goyernment not being warehouse proprietors in any way, the
question of insurance lies solely between the importer and store owner.
The superior construction of the stores in the docks, and the known vigilance exercised by those companies, makes the rates^ of insurance on
goods deposited there less than when in other stores. For ordinar}^
merchandise in private bonded stores the rates average 37^ cents fbr
,$100, while in the docks i t i s stated, as, will be seen by reference to
appendices D and W, to be from 7J to 12J cents per $100. As far as
could be ascertained, the general custom wa.s to insure. For further
particulars, as .'regards the prevention and extinguishing of fires, see
appendices A, K 2, K 3, and W.
5. In the dock warehouses originally constructed, iron was not used
as a material for building, being only used in some cases for ,braces to
strengthen; but in those more lately built it has entered to some extent
into^'the construction for rafters,, joists, and flooring; fbr pillars it has
been more generally used; the St. Katharine's dock in London, and the
Albert dock at Liverpool, using iron pillars filled iri with brick as the
support, in -most cases, to the second floor. The London Dock Company have also used it to a consideraHe extent fbr pillars in the last
.vaults constructed. The sheds on the dock piers at London are generally supported by iron columns, as previously mentioned; and the
intention is. hereafter to increase its use, experience having demonstrated,
from the use rriade ofit in constructing the large railway stations, tha,t it
is the lightest and best material for large sheds and roofs. The flooring
in the warehouses is usually made with reference to the character ofthe
goods to be stored; where a smooth surface is very requisite fbr the
preservation ofthe article, iron has been somewhat used. Inthe Albert
docks, before mentioned as combining the most modern improvements,
tile has been used, laid on concrete made perfectly smooth, for sugax
and molasses; such a floor, or one of stone slabs, being considered the
best, the drainage requiring it to be frequently scraped and cleaned.
The buildings are .kept insured by the proprietors, the rate being from
one-sixth to two-sixths sterling per cent. The merchandise is general^
insured; see No. 4.
It is difficult to ascertain the cost pf the different docks, they having
been constructed at different periods. The cost ofthe Albert dock was
£318,000.
6. The custom-houses in London and Liverpool axe near the wharves,
and in the vicinity of the principal jiortion of the warehouses. Appraisers'
stores are not known, the appraisement of goods being made by the
landing officer at the time of their landing.
7. The storage of inerchandise in bond in England, as stated in No. 1,
is entirely a private business, the Government ha.ving no interest in any
stores or warehouses, except in the store known as the Queen's warehouse, appropriated solely to the storage of seized goods, stores, or Crown
property, and with the single further exception of tobacco warehouses.
This article being subject to the yery enormous duty of 95. per pound
on manufactured, and 3^. per pound on unmanufactured, and thus offer


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^

[1847.

ing great temptations for frauds, as a riieasure of safety the Governnient
have hired buildings in the docks of London, and some equally safe
places in other ports, under the sole control and the Custody of their own
officers. Experience has demonstrated, however, that the .property
would be equally .safe under the usual restrictions; and we were
inforiried that thCoCommissioners ofthe custoins contemplated placing.it
on the same footing as other goods.
On the arrival ofa vessel, the consignee of diex cargo may select any.
bonded warehouse for its storage. The charges for such storage ,and
labor-being a inatter of bargain betweeri tbe parties, competition insures
the lowest prices, and thus enables bonded goods tp be stored a t t h e
lowest rates. Mercharits consequently prefer havirig theix goods in bond,
and so common is the custom,, that, as a general rule, the stock bf dutiable foreigri iinports in. Great Britain, except those quantities-withdrawn
for retail, may be ascertained by the quantity in bond on Custoni-house.,
books.
The bonded stores are under joirit lock of the customs 'and the warehouse proprietor, the importerj unless he be at the same time the; store
owner, having rio custody; the store is under the charge of a custonis
officer kiiown as a locker, who receiyes, deliyers-, and keeps account of,
all goods coming in or going.from the store-.
•
•
The warehouse proprietor is allowed at any time during business
hours to have access to any goods stored bri the premises?, but thegoods
cannot be in, ariy way changed from their originail character without the
previous permission of the commissioners of customs; they may, hov^^ever, be changed from warehouse to warebouse, and from orie port to
another, without payment of duty, under the formalities hereinafter, set
forth.
•
'
• 8. The amount of goods in bond in the different .warehouses it was
impossible to ascertain with any degree of correctness; but, when the
capacity ofthe stores ofthe dock companies, and the large numb'er of
other stores used for that purpose, aire considered, it must necessarily
be veiy great. The capacity of the Warehouses in and-cprinected with
the docks in London may be estimated at 600,000 tons. Many free
goods being stored by these companies, the dutiable quantity could not
be estimated.
For the rates of storage in Lonelbn dock's, see Appendix A.
For
do.
in Sti Katharine's,
*'
D. .
in Queen's waxehouse,
*'
M, page 337.
For
do.
in Albert's dock,
"
* B.
For
do.
in East and West Iridia,
*'
W;
For
do.
These rates are generally higher than in private stores, but the adyantages of greater security in storage, arid facUity of access to th'eprbpefty,
with cheaper insurance and gxeater despatch in business, cause them to
be generally preferred. A s a generar xulcj there is rib diminution of
rates of storage in consideration of the lerigth of time, except on-Wood
arid' on wines;
Goods are permitted to remain in bond three years, at the end.-, of
which tiriie the commissioiiers bf custonis have power to extend the
time; which is generally done from time to tinie,' uriless in cases^of



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255

deterioratiori of property. The surplus stores of a ship are not permitted
to remain in Queen's warehouse over one year, they being then sold for
charges and . duty. Dock companies have been given the power by
charter to sell any perishahle goods for charges in two months, and
other goods in twelve months, first paying to the customs the duty.
- There is no distinction or separation of goods designed for consumption or exportation, except in the case of goods prohibited fbr home
consumption and imported for exportation; such goods are marked '-prohibited," and stored separately. These goods, on landing, are genei^lly
placed in the most convenient situations for cxportatiou, but there are
no stores used expressly for that purpose; what are termed export sheds
in each dock being, used for the temporary receipt and examiriation of
goods before going on board the vesseL
9. The mode of entering goods for warehousing, is b y a n entry and
two copies; one copy for the collector, and one for the comptroller of
customs; the original entry, after. bond given, going to the warehousing depaxtment, where it is copied into the. landing officer's book.
These books are registered in this department before being issued to
the laiiGling officer.
The importer is not required to subdivide his entry into parcels^
unless the description of goods iinported xenders it riecessary. A separate
entry is made for differerit descriptions.of goods,.however, as sugars,
nutmegs, liquors, &c.
Separate lariding-books are-prepared at the custom-house for free,
dutiahle, and for warehouse goods, the warehbuse entry always giving
the store to which the goods are going. Into these books the particulars ofthe entry are copied, and the officer immediately underneath
makes his return, weighing, measuring, arid maridng such goods as require
it, and giving in his book a full and complete account of the goods.
On those for warehouse, he marks the initials of ship and master, the
time of import and weight, if necessary.
Liquors he causes- to be gauged, giving returns thereof, and of the
proof of each cask, entering every particular in his landing book. The
goods are then serit to their different destinations; the officer taking care
that those for warehouse go by proper persons, and designating the
route, if necessary. A ticket is sent with each load, and at the closeof
each day's busiriess, the landing officer's returii is examiried with the
account ofthe locker at the store, thus daily securing a correct delivery
of the goods. This landing book is not allowed to have any leaves
abstracted or calculations erased; every leaf is stamped and must be
accounted for*
• Great caxe is taken to make it contain a perfect description of the
goods, as it forms the basis bf all the warehouse accounts.
For particulars of the practice in detail, and for the forms of all
descriptioris of entries -and landing-book, see appendices E, G, F, and W .
T h e certificate issued or givento the person who enters goods in
warehouse, is issued b y t h e party whb receives them on storage. As
such, it is considered as-evidence of propertyj and is furthex secured by
act of Parliament,- securing the holder of such certificate in the perfect
ownership of the nierchandise; fbr which, see appendix B, page 536.



256

.

R E P O R T S OF T H E

.[1847.

its value, however, depends, in a great degree upon the character
and reputation of the party issuing it. Consequently those issued by
the dock companies of London are entitled to the highest credit. Loans
are made on such certificates by all banks and bankers, and not by s.nj
particular class, at the cnrrent inarket rates for the best securities, and
they ra.nk generally as among the best in the market. No endorsers are
required. The aggregate ainount of such loans it was impossible to
ascertain. For forms of such, certificates, see appendices A arid E.
. .1^. The aggregate amount of goods warehoused at each of the ports
visited, it was impossible to ascertain with correctness. For the amount
warehoused during the year h j the East and West India Dock Company
see appendix W . . The amountof value bf merchandise in wa.rehouse in
Great Britain is estimated at $387,200,000; stored at London, in docks
and piivate Warehouses, costing, as near as- could be ascertained
$40,000,000.
The entire number pf stores and warehouses, and their dimensions, it
was also impossible, from want of time and facilities, to estimate, a,nd no
recorded account could be found. Of the three great docks at London
before mentioned, however, the dimensions appear in appendices A, D,
and W.
Different forms are used in entering goods fpr consumption and reexportation, as per appendices E, G, and W. In cases of reexportation of
goods, a bond in double the amount of dut}^, with one surety, is required
fbr their delivery at the foreign port ^of destination, and thej^ are carried
to be shipped under the care of a proper officer of the customs, and by
such ways as he shall authorize; otherwise they are forfeited. An entiy
for export may be dispensed with—a certificate of bond having been
given being sufficibrit authorit}?- for the warehouse keeper to deliver for
shipment. Goods, after entry and landing, may be entered and shipped
for reexportation without actual lodging in warehouse, being considered
as constructively warehoused; and the account taken for the rewarehousing may serve as the account for delivering the goods for payment
of duties or for shipping.
'
In cases of transportation of gx3ods from port to port, coastwise, by
railway, or otherwise, twelve hours' notice in writing ofthe intention to
remove must be given to the warehousing officer. Entry is made, and
bond fbr deliyery a t t h e port of destination is given in double the amount
of duty, w,ith one surety, specifying the mode of conveyance and time
allowed for the transit. By land carriage, this is, in stage coaches ox railways, seven days; any other description of wheel carriage, fourteen days;
by inland navigation, one inonth; coastwise, in steam vessels, fourteen
days; in sailing yessels, not exceeding two months. On presentation ofa
certificate that bond with security has been given, the warehouse keeper
may deliver the goods for removal the same as if an entry had been made
and passed for the same, he endorsing the delivery on the certificate. .
The officers, upon satisfying themselves that the packages are in the
same state as when imported, may permit them .to removed without
being reweighed. , Each package is to be rnarked with its contents when
practicable.
In cases of the deposite of transported goods in warehouses, for which



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257

security is required, but fbr which the proprietor has not giveri bond, the
removal bond remains in force until a prbpiietor of the Warehbuse, or
purchaser of the goods, gives fresh bond.
When riecessaiy, the officers at the port of arrival may call upon the
consignees ofthe goods to pass the proper eritries for the same.
Upon entry being made and(! bond taken for the removal of goods, k
letter of advice, containirig an account of all particulars, statirig mode of
conveyance, time allowed for transportatiori, marks, numbers, and
description of pa;ckages, contents, quantity, and quality, is transmitted
from the port of renioval to the port of destinatipn. Arid from the port
of EuiivaL, after entry made, is transmitted to the port of rbriibval a certified accourit ofthe goods as they find them. Which is noted iri the bobks
at the port of removal. If all is correct, the bond is discharged. If the
goods do not arrive by the sarrie conveyance nariied in the letter of
advice, the fact is stated in the certificate.
The bond fbr rewarehousing of the goods ma;y be given either at the
port of renioval or of destinatibn. If it be giveri at the port of. destination, a certificate thereof is, at the time of entering the gbods for transportation, produced at the port of removal.
If the time allowed for re moval, which is according to the Coriveyance,
as befbre stated, has elapsed without adyice having been receiyed. at the
port of reinoval of the arrival of the goods at the port of destiriation,
the officers ofthe last-named port axe called on for an explaLiiatiori ofthe
cause; and,if the riierch'andise is not yet afrived, the rriatter is forthwith
represented to the boardbf eommissibners of the custbms for directions.
For copies of all borids, letter 'of advice; certificates, arid foriris, generally given in connectio,n with warehoused goods j arid deta;il"s of practice,
see appendices G, E, F , and W. The conimissioners of the custonis,
in appointing w^arehouses for the receptiori of dutiable goods, require
general bond, with two sureties, from the prbprietbrs thereof, .whether
individuals or companies, for the full duties of importation on all such
goods as shall at any time be warehoused therein, of for their due
exportatibn.
.
If the proprietor .be riot willing^to give such security, the difierent importers are required to give bond upon their several importatibns in
double the ainount of duty, with one surety. The system of general
bond (it possessing many advantages) prevails in practice.
If goods are destroyed or lost by any unavoidable accident, either on
shipbbar-d Or in landing ox shipping-, or in receiving into, or deliveririg
from, warehouse, or whilst iri warehouse, the duties are rerriitted.
When goods deposited in warehouse, for Which gerieral bond has not
been given by the proprietor, but special bond by theirripbrter, are sold,
the importer's bond niay be given up, and that of the purchaser takeri
in lieu.
Goods are not received back into warehouse after deliyery therefrom.
11. The warehouse companies were the only sources frbin which any
inforriiation in answer to this question could be derived. (See arppendices K l , K2, A, D, and W, where a full description of the books,, and
the number and character ofthe clerks and other officers, is .;given.) The
labor is performed,by the warehouse proprietors; and from thai source
VOL. VI.—17.




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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

and the storage their revenue is derived: the truckage, loading, and unloading, shipment, and exhibition of goods, &c., are all performed by
them.
Merchants are allowed to take certain quantities of goods free of duty
as samples, (see appendix N;) arid by such samples, or by comparison,
sales are made by brokers or by public sale.
•
Counting-rooms are not allowed in stores where goods are bonded—
the entire building being under the custonis lock. Importers, generally,
have no stores attached to theix counting-houses—depositing all their
consignments with the dock companies, .or other warehouses—they
or their authorized clerks being allowed access to their goods at any
time within business .hours, accompanied by an officex of the customs ;
or, if they have stores, they use them generally for free goods, preferring
to deposite them with known and established waxehouse proprietors, on
account ofthe value ofthe certificates of deposite or warrant, as a basis
for loans and a facility fbr sa.les.
12. The out-door officers, transacting the customs business connected
with warehousing, are the surveyor general, inspector general, landing
surveyors, and landing waiters and lockers;.in doors, the warehouse
comptroller, waxehouse keeper, warehouse registrar, and jecquer, arid
their respective clerks. For the duties of each officer, and all others
connected with the collection and security of the revenue, see appendix
O, Nos. 1 to 38!
, V
' From the evident disinclination on the part of gentlemen to answer the
inquiiies as to compensation, the undersigned fbrbbre to press the ques-r
tion. The compensation paid their officers and servants by the East
and West India Dock Conipany, however, is stated in appendix W.
' 13. The warehouses are kept open for the transaction of business from
8, a. m., to 4, p. m.', from 1st March tp 31st October ; and from 9, a. in*,
to 4, p. m., fbr the rest pfthe year. The same hours of attendance are
required froin the custonis officers attached thereto.
The water to extinguish fires is procured froixihydrants, a.iid fromthe
river ; the East and West India, the London, and St. Catharine docks,,
have each, in addition to the usual fire-engines belonging to, and kept
within the dock walls, a floating fire-engine kept in constant readiness,
which can at any moment be set to work, throwing water at the rate of
200 gallons per minute. (See a.ppendices A, K 2 , and W.) Naval stores,
gunpowder, hemp, flax, lucifer matches, acids, hay, and straw, woolen
and cotton rags or waste, and spirits, are considered combustible articles,
and none of them (see No. 4 of this report) arp allowed in the docks,'
except spirits, hemp, and flax.
The combustible articles excluded a.re stored in yards in the suburbs
of the city. No prohibition of warehousing is made of perishable goods;,
they are allowed to be warehoused, if desired—the watchfulness of the
wa.rehouse proprietors, in securing their storage by sale before the prpperty
becomes deteriorated in quality, securing the Government against loss.
14. The expense attending different descriptions of goods, it was
impossible to arriye at, (except so far as the rcites of storage* were concerned, as per the printed rates-in appendices A, B, D,) the cost
depending upon the deg.ree of labor required for sampling, &c.



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259

As a general rule, as has beeri before remarked, aU dutiable imports,
except small importations for retailers, are put in bond under customs
lock. This has arisen from the credit thus obtained for the duties; whilst
equal facihties, if not greater, are given for sale, either for consuniption
or exportation, with all the privileges of sampling, repacking, dividing
packages, sorting, &c., that an importer could have in his own store;
and, unless he should be in a large business, and compelled necessarily
to have warehouses attached to his counting-room, at a much cheaper
rate.
The business of storing bonded goods has been reduced to a s.ystem,
and has become as regular a business as any in Great BritEiin. The
consequence is great conipetition, the lowest ppssible rates, and every
facility for the importer to make what disposition-he may subsequently
choose of his property.:.
Free goods are stored in the dock warehouses", but^ in separate stores
•frbm dutiable goods; the custorris officer of course taking no cognizance
of them. Goods are allowed to remain" after the duty is paid, that
being a mere question of storage between the parties,-the Government
taking no further interest in their dispositiori.
The dock conipanies are allowed by law,to make a warehouse entry
for all.unclaimed goods, remaining unpermitted, forty-eight hours after a
vessel begins to discharge at their docks, they giving bonds for the duty;
they are allpwed to hold the same a given time, according to the description of goods, selling them for charges, freight, and duty. If goods
should remain unclaimed on board avessel not discharging at one ofthe
docks, the captain may, after fourteen days, send them to the Queen's
warehouse, to be sold at the expiration of three nionths, the proceeds,
aftex deducting duty, freight, and other charges, to be held for account
ofthe owners.
.'
15. The warehouses are constructed with party walls, separating the
floors in divisions, and double iron doors, arid stone -staircases. There
is a suitable space reserved between each stack, of warehouses.
The light and ventilation are perfect. The windows of each of the
warehouses are secured by shutters either wholly of or cased with iron.
The docks are separated from private buildings, by .a boundaxy waU, see
appendices K 2 , page 188, and W . The superintendent ofthe docks is
required daily, after the close of business, to visit every store and examine
whether the doors separating the stores and those separating the staircase
from each floor are closed, but not locked, and another officer visits the
stores each morning to see that the duty has been performed and to
report violations. .
16. In the new warehouses building at Birkenhead, a railway, connecting with the roads to Manchester, Birmingham, London, and other
principal places in Great Britain, has been Constructed so a,s to admit of
discharging or receiving goods immediately from the carriages into the
stores. Between each row of stores is an avenue on which are laid
three lines of rails, one passing close to the buildings on each side, and
a third in the centre to receive the carriages when loaded or discharged.
Immediately within the dock walls is a scale on the railway for weighing
the carriages, a plan of which is annexed in appendix C. Goods for any



R E P O R T S OF T H E

260

[1847

part of Great Biitain may thus, directly, upon passing the doors of the
warehouses,, be placed in eourse of transit without any further charge fbr
labor.
It is in contemplation, likewise, tb bring the Manchestex road into the
new dbcks now building in the northern part of LiverpboL At Antwerp,
the railway to Cologne, Paris, or Ostend, starts from the, entrepot, thus
affording great facihties for goods dtestined for Germany or France, and
also those to be shipped from those countries; goods passing through
Belgium are placed in a railway carriage in the Antwerp warehouse,
the customs lock is placed on it, arid the conductor of the railway delivers
it intact at the frontier to which it is destined, thus giving facilities and
despatch impossible witli any other mode of conveyance.
The time occupied in warehousirig caxgoes of goods depends gi^eatly
upon circumstances—as delays arising from discharging parts of the
cargo into lighters to go to other warehouses. Waiting fox ballast, and fbr
entries at the custom-house. The last-named cause is, hoWever, to a
certain exterit, pbviated, the dock companies having special power to
enter all goods unclaimed in forty-eight hours.
,. The celerity with which a .cargo may be landed arid warehoused, may
be judged: of by the following stateriient of. the time expended in. discharging goods by the St. Katharine's^ Dock Company—eight hours,
including half an hour for refreshments. (See ajDpendix D.)
• ^
Tallow, casks
,.
.
Flour, barrels. ,..
Cotton, bales
Hides,, dried'..
. -. ^ . . . . .
....
Sugar, bags . . . , . . .
.. i... ^...,
Sugar, Havana, chests .. - .
-•-..;
Sugar^ h h d s . . . . . . . . . ^ i - . . . . .
-.. .
Hemp:, bales. . \ .-.
,......,.....
Hemp, and
flax,.tons.'...
.....
Oil in casks anel b u t t s . . . , - - - - - , . - .
Brandy j puncheons., . - . - . . . . • - .
..
Wines,.pipes, hhds. and quarter casks..
Indigo, chests...;.... ^ ^ --..
Coffee, bags. — . - . . . . ' - . . ; . . . > . . ^.

Greatest despatch.

1,006
4,568
1,203
3,800
. 7,400
1,500
350
1,161 .
86
290
336
529 ^
1,131
5,450

Ordinary despatch.

550
2,000
. 500 V
2,500
3,000
550
250
500.
50
100 ..
200
250
450
2,000

See also E, of appenciix W , for time of the iEast and West. Iri dia Dock.
^ In shipping goods froni the. Warehouse, the goods are dehyered irito
the vessel as fast as the crew can stow them away.' The time, therefore,
is influenced by the activity, or otherwise^ ofthe captain and crew.
No such practice is perriiitted as usirig a'vessel as a"'warehousey-buf
goods having been landed and.examined may be considered as construe
tively warehoused, and exported, or transported in bond to ariother port.
Goods at such second port m a y b e entered at„once for consumption



1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

261

without actually going into store, being again considered as constructively warehoused. •
17. The rewaxehousing of merchandise at second port is done in the
same inanner as.at a port of importation, and entry made in same manner.
When the merchandise has been received in store, notice of its receipt
is forwarded to the port from whence received, which cancels the bond
given for the safe transit. (See No. 10 ofthis report.) If the goods are
again shipped, the fornis are repeated; no difference being made what-,
ever, whether the warehouse port be changed once or oftener.
The goods, "when rewarehoused, are held pn the terms bf the first
warehousing. The time of remaining is reckoned from the day of the
first warehousing, and the goods can remain in bond no longer than three
years from that date.
^
18. Goods exported in bond are shipped under control of a customs
officer, who designates the manner, route, and conveya,nce. The draymen and porters are not under the control of the Government, except
being licensed as such by the local authorities.
.
When goods are removed from one warehouse to anothex in the same
port, as may be done by permission being given by the comniissioners of
customs, they are accompanied by an officer.
19. The object of the British Government being to make their couritry
the entrepot of the world, the practice is to grant to inerchants warehousing goods the utmost facility consistent with the security of the
revenue. The description.and character of packages may be changed,
new packages substituted, &c., so as to suit the different fbreign markets.
All sorting, separating, repairing, and alterations that may be judged
necessaiy for the preservation, sale, shipment, or legal dispbsal of goods,
are permitted; apphcation having been first made to the commissioners
of the revenue, in whom the sole authority is vested to grant permission
for niaking such alterations.
These alterations,.and all necessary repairs, axe made under the supersvision ofan officer of the customs, and by the warehbuse proprietors, at
the expense ofthe owner ofthe goods, whb gives special directions as to
the nature of the operations. Such repairs as are necessary to put the
palckages in good order for stowage and safety being required at landing,
before they are placed in warehouse.
Sugar refiners may remove sugars and niolasses to premises under the
locks of the Crown? approved of by the-commissioners of customs, for
refining the same; giving bond to refine such sugars' and molasses, and '
, that the total of refined sugar, and the treacle produced by the process,
shail be duly exported or returned to a bonded warehouse within four
months.
And such sugar and molasses may be transported to. other ports, the
gross weight and tare being marked on the cask, and a sample transmitted to the port of destination, with the letter of advice.
Spirits and wines may be bottled for exportation as stores.
Brandy in warehouse may be added to wines in quantities not exceeding one to ten. In cases of diminution of quantities in packages of
spirits and wines, they ma.y be fiUed up from other packages of the
same, and the caisks so emptied may be Withdrawn from warehouse



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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

free of duty. Wine may be racked from the lees, and may be mixed
with other wine of the same description, all import brands being erased
from the casks, and the lees may be -destroyed without payment of duty
thereon. Separate "vaults axe appropriated for the bottling of spirits and
wines. In no case rum to be bottled or deposited before or'after bottling
in same warehouses as wines. In repacking, the excess of quantity may
be, if good, entered for consuinption; if worthless, destroyed, and the
quantities marked on the new packages, a,nd such is deeined the iiriported
package. No foreign casks, bottles, corks, or other material- are used^
except such as the goods were originally contairied in, without such articles having been entered and the duties paid thereon.
Damaged goods, cloths, &c., are allowed to be taken from warehouse's
and cleaned, pressed, &c.
Pongees and other white silks to be printed, d3^edj or cleansed; handkerchiefs'to be hemmed; also indigo, nutmegs, rhubarb,.&c., tobe sorted
and separated for repacking with reference to quality.
Rice or paddy may be cleaned in warehouse; copper and lead be
takeii to extract silver, the whole weight being returned or accounted
for..
Timber may be sawn in bond, four inches to be left at the end. Grain
may be taken from warehouse and kiln dried; grain in. bulk may'be put
in bags.
•
'
"
• Perishable and valuable goods may be landed from vessels in distress
inward or outwaid bound, and be removed for cleansing and. making
merchantable, bond being given for their return to a warehouse in three
months,
'
'
^
^
Spirits are vatted, the casks being emptied into vats vaxying in capacity from five thbrisand to fifteen thousand gallons. On. being returned
to the casks the letter V is cut in the head^ with numbers indicating the
various iniportations, combined in a certain vatting, of which the cask
forms, a part. Samples are previously taken from each package, two
froni each;" one is retained at the warehouse, and when a quantity is
accumulated these are mixed, returned into casks, ^nd sold for the Governmerit. The equivalent sample is retained-by the merchant, Governmeiit not collecting duties on his samples. On wines and spirits in
bottles being sampled, the amount taken must be returned and the bottles recorked. [See appendix M, pages 346 to 350.]
The dock warrant being the representative of the value ofthe spirits,
the credit of the dock company is pledged to express what the article is.
The vatting and the combination of .qualities are therefore indicated by
the characters cut upon the head of the cask.
Whilst permitting the mixing ofthe different qualities of liquors ofthe
same sort, no mixing of different kinds of spirits is allowed,, except when
to be expprted, save in the case of brandy and wine, before nained; and
in all cases^of yatting and mixing, the import marks are erased from the
cask.
, .
'
Upon any alterations being made in the packages, the warehouse proprietors require the warrants given therefor to be previously lodged with
them.
•
"
•.
The accumulations of sugar and molasses on the floors pf the ware-




1847.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

263

houses are periodically scraped and weighed, and an allowance of onethird of the quantity being made fbr dirt if .molasses, and of three-fourths
of sugar, the duty is cbllected on the remainder.
Brandy is permitted to be imported in small casks of ten and fifteen
gallons, and warehoused when intended for exportation to Mexico and
South America.
To guard against adulteration of wines and liquors in transit, samples
are taken, and the proof and quality stated in the letter of advice containing particulars. If, after arrival at the port of destinatipn and comparison with the letter of advice, adulteration is suspected, the samples
. are transmitted from the port bf reinoval, and a comparison is made
therewith. The casing of packages is not required.
20. The guards against violations of warehouse rules, or any misappropriation of the property, are the bond and the joint custody of the
Government and the warehouse proprietor. To insure the safety of the
property, laws have been passed (in warehousing act 8 and 9 V i c , chap.
91, sections 10, 11, 12, 13) securing to the importer at all tinies easy
access to his goods, and the immediate prbduction of the same when
required; also laying heavy penalties on the proprietors for any person
having access to the property except in presence of the locker or customs officer and for the proprietor, or any other person, assisting in any
way in fraudulently reriioving the same from the stores, or in subsequently concealing it, and making the proprietor liable for the duty on
goods so removed. Should the officer embezzle, waste, or spoil any of
the property committed to his custody,'he is deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and punished accordingly; and if such officer be prosecuted to
conviction by the importer, consignee, or proprietor of such nierchandise,
the Governnient repays the amount so embezzled, &c. [See same act,
chap. 91, sec. 47.]
'
No security is required from the lockers, it forming one-of the few exceptions to the general rule of requiring securities, and the exception is
grobably made from the fact that it is not in his power alone to embezzle
or waste the property under his caxe.
The different dock companies punish irregularity and disobedience of
their rules and regulations by their servants, with suspension forthe first
offence anddismissal for the secorid.
Inebriety or dishonesty is punished by peremptory discharge. For
further details bf checks and penalties, see appendices K 1 and K 2.
21. The guards against burglary and theft in the docks ofthe company depend chiefly upon the internal police; their stores being surrounded
by walls, and having officers statioried at each gate, the property becomes
yery secure against embezzlement. In the private warehouses due
regard is had to the fastenings required, as will be seen by reference to,
appendix L.
The goods stored with the dock companies are generally examined
only once in three years, though an examination of particular lots is more
frequently made. The great capitals of these coinpanies arid the admirable manner in which they conduct their business generally, together
with their vigilant police regulations, render the Governnient less exact
than with private stores. The officer (locker) in charge of the latter



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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847-

stpres keeps a daUy account of all receipts and deliveries, and also a
general storage ledger, showizig the paxty storing, the nature ofthe goods,
and the part of the buUding in which stored. He is under the daily
supervision of an officer termed a superintendent locker, whose duty it
is to visit .each store and see that these duties are propeiiy performed.
His receipt and dehvery book is also daily examined by the books of the
pfHcer discharging cargoes fox such store and by his orders for delivery.
These officers are, one in each year, transferred to another store, and
their account pf goods on hand is examined by their successor, who then
becomes responsible for the property.
T h e stprage and other charges are collected by the proprietor, and he
is entitled to hold prpperty after pa.yment of duty until such charges
have been paid. For the manner of keeping the books of the large
warehouse companies, as also of the offieers of the customs stationed in
the establishments, with all the forms for the receipt and delivery of
merchanclise, see appendices A, D, E, G, K, and W .
22. There are no restrictions uppn the removal or transportation of
gopd.s frpm one port to another, in bond.
Giving the gpods entirely into the eus.tpd.y of the bonder, at whpse
risk they are duiing transit, the Government relies upon the bond, letter
of a,.dvice, and sa.mples, for t.he secuiity pf the revenue. . "
If, on arrival at the secpnd port, the gopds are going immediately into
home consumption, no further 'examination is made, if contained in the
original packages as imported; and they need not be entered for rewarehousing, but an entry fpr consumption may at once be made; the duty
at a secpnd port being assessed in all cases upon the.quantity and value
fixed at the pprt of importation, subject to such allbwances as are hercrinaftex stated, in Np. 24; and -duties in all cases are assessed and paid
only when and where finally withdrawn for consumption.
The certificate accompanying the gopds is the letter of advice descrihed
in No. 10 of this report.
"
.
23. The good.s in course of transit are solely at the risk ofthe partieg
transporting; but, if lost by accident while on the way from one poxt to
another, the. duties are remitted in the same manner as if destroyed while
in warehouse; (See Nos. 10 and 24 of this' report.)
24. Goods paying specific duties receive, ahateriient of duties for d.amr
age; on vpyage of importation, provided iproof is given that the damage,
actually occurred on the yoyage before landing, and provided the claim
for abatement is made at the time of landing and examining the goods,
except on the follpwing articles: carithaiides, cocoa, coculus Indicus,
coffee, currants, figs, Guinea grains, ipecac, jalap, lemons, nux vomica,
ppiuni., oranges, pepper, raisins, rhubarb, sarsaparilla, senna, sugar, tea,
tobacco, wiries and spirits, and except on wrecked goods or those found
at sea, on which no allowance is made.
Cocoa, coffee, or pepper, may be abandoned in warehouse for duties,
the duty being- charged only on the quantity takeri. On, pepper twp per
cent, is allowed for wastage. . Cocoa, harns, coffee, cheese, currants, figs,
raisins, sugar, spirits and wines, .pay duties on actual quantities delivered.
No allowance, as a generaLrule, is made on pther gpods; but the comr
missioners pf the custoins have power to remit the duties on the whole



1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

265

or any portion of the goods lost or destroyed in the warehouses, and to
them appeal is made in all doubtful questions; the general practice
b.eing, as far as cpnldbe ascertained, to assess duties only on quantities
delivered, unless the deficiency was occasioned by fraud.
Deficiency in quantities on the voyage of importation is not a question
entertained by the customs; the duties, if specific, being levied only on
lhe quantities landed,, and the basis bf the ad valorem duties being the
valuation as landed.
Allowance is made for damage ox totail loss in transit,, but not for
deficiencies, as the goods pass out of the hands of the Government officers. In sbme extreme cases, however, the commissioners have made
allowances, upon the proof heing positive that the deficiency was the
result of accident.
25. The security against the adulteration pf goods in transit is in the
taking of a bond, the letter of advice containing particulars, the samples,
and the comparing of quantities and qualities and condition with the
letter of advice and samples, as hereinbefore stated in Nos. 10 and 19.
26. A return ofthe receipt, to, and dehveries into and from^ warehouse,
is made up quarterly by the comptroller of warehouse accounts, showing
the description of goods warelioused duririg the quarter, the couritries
whence imported, the quantities imported in British and foreigri ships,
and received coastwise, and the amount in warehouse at the commencement of the quarter; and showing the quantities delivered during the
quarter for consuinption, and the duties received thereon; the quantities
dehvered for exportation 'and transportation, and the quantities in warehouse at close of the quarter.
^
At the same time is also naade a return of the goods,, not the growth
or produce of the kingdoin, reexported therefrom; showing the species
of goods, the countries to which exported,'the quantities, in British ships,
and the declared value.
•
,
A monthly account is also made up at each wairehousing district, and
signed by the cbllector and comptroller of customs, showing the quantities of the principal articles of fbreign mercharidise imported; those
duty free, those warehoused, and those not warehoused; the quantities
delivered from warehouse for consumption.; the amountof duty received
thereon, and received on the goods enteredfor consumption direct, without going into warehouse.
A similar monthly account is made of the quantities of foreign merchandise exported, "showing those exported as merchandise, and those
shipped as stores.
Values are not expressed, except in the return of goods exported, first
named, which expresses the declared value. For the fornis of these
returns and statements, see appendices E and G.
27. The returns mentioned in No. 26 are compiled fi'om the record in
the books kept in the offices of the comptroller of warehouse accounts,
and of the warehouse keeper. The record is made in these books from
the landing books, which show the quantities actually received into
warehouse, as entered therein by the landing officers. The general particulars, of importer's name, vessel, article, and store to be housed in,
having been first entered in the warehouse keeper's registex from the



266

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

merchants' warehousing entry at its presentation, the quantities, and all
particulars in detail being entered after the completion of the landing, as
above stated. The entries recording the warehousing of goods in the
books of these pfficers are thus made complete, after all the weighing,
gauging, &c., is completed; these being done after the discharging of
the goods from the vessel, and before their deposite in warehouse. The
report of the landing officer, therefore, insures correctness in the data
received.
Incases ofthe merchandise going out of warehouse, the, record is
made inthe books of the offices above nained, from the withdrawal entry,
it having been first presented, and partially recorded in an entry or warrant book in the office of the warehouse keeper, and then passed through
the offices of the collector and comptroller of customs, for paying duty
if withdrawn for consumption, or giving bond if for expbrtation or
transportation.
A permit, issued from thpoffice ofthe warehouse keeper, and recorded
there and in that of the comptroller of warehouse accounts, authorizing
the locker to deliver the goods, is furriished. the merchant withdrawing;
for which permit he receipts, and it isxeturned by the locker to one of
the said offices, with his repbrt of alterations in quantities, &c., (if there
were any,) entered thereon; which returii of the locker is checked with
the entry, as at first recorded. It is then passed to the other of these
offices, and there^ likewise-;checked with.the recorded entry to withdraw.
,
.
>
The reportof the delivering officer, therefore, insures . correctness in
the data received respecting goods going out of warehouse, asthe report
of the landing officer insures it respecting gopds going into warehouse.
The books of the one being daily compared with those of the other of
these offices, no after-alteratibn occurs.
. ,28. The data upon which the record in the books and the statistical
and other returns are based, have no connection with the certificate or
warrant that iniporters receive as a representative of their goods in
warehouse. These documents are issued b y t h e coinpanies and individuals doing the storage business, and are based upon the record in
their books, showing their storage and possession of the goods.
In treating of the French and Belgian systems, the time that it was
found possible to devote to them not having admitted of caxrying the
investigation through the entire series in detail, (as before mentioned,)
the numerical order of the instructions is no longer observed, and a general review only of the prominent features of these systems has, been
attempted..
In France there are two systems of warehousing goods, termed the
real entrepot and the fiictitious. ' :
The .fictitious entrepot is established in the warehouses of private individuals, who keep the keys. . They enter into bonds, with security,
approved by the customs, to exhibit-the packages, in identical number
and sort, at every requisition of the inspectors, and either pay the duties
or reexport them within the space of one year; which time is almost
alwa,ys prolonged at the request of the Government. The raerchandise
admissible into the fictitious entiepot is colonial produce, paying low rates



1847.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

267

of duty—coals, cotton, wool, woods, &c. (See appendix H 2 , page 298,
vol. 1, and pages 6 and 7, vol. 2, for schedule.)
The real entrepot is established in fire-proof warehouses, owned by
private companies, &c., the customs having, a key, and guarding all
receipts and dehveries, and keeping accounts (as for fictitious entrepot)
with each depositor of the goods stored.
The collection of storage is made by the proprietors, who alone axe
responsible for any loss of goods, either h j burglary ,or fire—^the Government requiring rio security from the importer, considering their control all that is requisite. The time of storage is limited to three years;
but an extension of time is usually allowed to five, six, seven, eight, and.
even ten years, as the custbms regard the entrepot real as a continuation
of-the foreign soil. AIL handhng or alteration of the packages, either by
converting several into one, or by dividing it into smaUer ones, is prohibited in the fictitious, but.permitted in the real entrepot, the consent of
custoins being previously obtained, which requires the work to be done
under the supervisioii of an officer, andthat the accounts be altered to
agree with the new packages. All merchandise is admitted into the
real entrepot, including what is admitted into the fictitious. Samples
may be previously taken,-but upon condition of immediate' payment of
duties on them. The importer, on withdrawing his goods for consumption, can have them reexamined at his option; a,nd though by law the
duty is due upon the quantities entered in warehouse, without regaxd to
leakage ox wastage, still the Governinent remits .the duty on the deficit
wherever the local authorities certify that it does not proceed from, fraud.
This, however, is only granted when the entire lot is withdrawn.
When parts of an invoice are taken out, the duty is paid on the part'
taken, and the entire remainder of duty, as per inward entry, is to be
paid when the rest is withdrawn.
In the transportation of goods in' "bond, whether from entrepot real
or fictitious, or in case of export, security is always required. In the
first case a clearance is grarited, (see forriis annexect, in appendix H,)
in which are stated" the inaxks, nunibers, arid descriptions of packages,
.their' contents and weight. This accompanies the goods to their port of
destination; and the receipt of the goods, endorsed thereon, cancels the
security given. Penalties vary according, as there may be a deficit, or
excess, or difference, in the kind of nierchandise. Generally speaking it
is double the duty, or the value of the goods deficient, with a fine of 100
to 500 francs. / In- the second case, a nearly similar clearance is granted,
and the security cancelled on the production of a certificate of the goods
having been, shipped, and the vessel having sailed. The additiorial security is required, in land transit, of placing, without exception, a leaden
seal on the packages. (See appendix H 2 , page 292.)
The transit of goods may be suspended in the course of transportation,
and the duties paid at any office of custonis, or the goods rewarehoused.
No deficiencies are allowed on goods in fictitious entrepot, as they are
always at the free disposition of the owner. ^ If the owner should dispose of such goods without first paying the dut}'-, he subjects himself to
pay double duties, and a fine, in some cases, equal to double the value
of thegoods.



268

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

The warehouse system of Belgium has receritly undergone a general
revision, as will be seen by reference to appendix J 2.'
At Antwerp the waLrehouses of the firee entrepot are constructed of
brick, with wooden floors and pillars, and staircases. New stores axe
being added to the stack which compxises the free entrepot, in. order to
supply the increased demand of the port. They are built with every
convenience, as regards light, air, &c., and with great facilities for the
receipt and delivery of goodsi—the railway to Cologne, Paris, and Ostend
running through the entrepot, which adjoins, the dock. It is in contemplation to enclose the whole of these warehouses arid the dock within a
.wall, imitating-the construction of the docks of the London companies.
The cost of these wai'ehouses, including the new stores now' being
completed, is estimated at 4,000,000 francs. They were formerly the'
property jointly ofthe Government, the province and town of Antwerp,
and individuals. The Government has lately reimbursed the shareholders, and become sole proprietor of the free entrepot, it being under
the control of the finance department,
An administrative committee, appointed by the King, on the proposition of the Minister of Finance, com^posed of two officers of the customs,
two members of the chamber of commerce, and one of the municipal
authority, regulate the tariff of storage, the stowage, changes of packages, &c,, in the entrepot.
Private stores {p.articiddr entrepot)'may be used as warehouses when
the free entrepot is full, they being approved of by the customs authority
for that purpose. The goods stored'therein are held under joint lock of
their owner and of the custoins. (See appendix J 2, page 86.)
There is a third species of warehouse, styled fictitious entrepot, in
which the custody of the goods is confided entirely to the depositor. It
is subject at all times to be entered by the custoins officer, for examination of the merchandise and the condition of the fastenings. The stowage
is done under his-supervision.
..
The only kinds of merchandise admitted into this entrepot are coarse'
sugars, fruits of all kinds, provided they are packed in cases susceptible
of being plumbed, hides, oleaginous seeds, ashes, and guano. Fruits
are perriiitted to have their packages changed; and nierchandise, found
to be deteriorating, must be entered for consumption. Exarninations of
the goods in the different eritrepots are made annually.
Samples are not allowed to be renioved - from • any of the entrepots
without payment of the duties. Goo.ds may be withdrawn from any in
all quantities.
, - '
No allowances are made for deficiencies on withdrawal of goods from
warehouse, except on wiries and liquors.
Change of packages is allowed on goods in entrepot,fi^eepr particular.
Wines may be drawn off from the lees, and the duty on these remitted:
cases may be divided, and the goods culled, assorted, &c., those of the
same species, subject to different rates of duty, not being allowed to be
mixed, nor packages to be changed when the duty is based upon the
nature of the package. Permission must first be granted, after request
made in writing by the depositor.
Insurance is effected on nierchandise in free' entrepot, without distinc


1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

269 ^

tion of goods j at the rate of two francs per $1,000. When in particular
entrepot the rate is higher. No fires or lights ai'e allowed within eithexo
A receipt or certificate is giyen for goods in free or particular entrepot,
signed by the warehouse keeper, for form. of which see appendix J.
When the merchandise is sold, transfer is made on the books, the original receipt, accoinpanied by a transfer certificate, is returned, and anew
receipt is furnished to the purchaser, the transferring being entered on
the books from the transfer certificate. This officer keeps an accountof
all merchandise deposited in, and withdrawn from, warehouse. Accounts
are kept with the parties warehousing:. For form, see appendix J. For
goods on which ad valorem duties are charged, the values axe kept. This,
officer collects the storage chaxges from the depositorsi AU labor is performed by them, they sending the laborers to the entrepot, who do the
work under the supervision of the customsofficers. For a list of the books
and forms to be brought into use on 1st January, 1848, see appendix J2»
The time for which merchandise is permitted to remain in entrepot is
two years. Upon application being made to the King, which is referred
to the Minister of Financej the time is extended from term to teriii.
General bond is given, before goods are entered and placed in entrepot.
The bond is given when the'merchant or broker enters into the business
of importing gbods; Norie is given for particular inward entries, arid
none specially given fbr transportations or exportations, unless the general bond shall be deemed insufficient to cover. The bond being originally given by the party doing business at the custom-house. Who is
generally a commission broker, the nierchant owner may not have ariy
bond in the customs for the duties on his goods, the brbker's generai
bond, he being the importer, furnishing the security to Governriient for
importation, transportation, or '(exportation. No borid, therefore, is giyen
by the owners or lessees of stores, used for the purposes of particular or
fictitious entrepot.
The transit of merchandise is conducted generally in the same niariner
as in France. The account of particulars is sent "with the goods, arid,
after being vised at certain offices on the route designated therein, is
returned certified from the office of destination, or ofissue from the
country, as the Case may be. Packages are plumbed, the leads, however, not being affixed tp the separate packages when they can. With
equal security, be placed on the means of conveyance, as the hatches of
a vesselvthe doors of a. railway, carriage, &c. If transit be by railway,
a customs officer accoriipanies the merchandise to the office of destiriatiori or of issue, arid to him are confided samples of wines and liquors
in transit, duplicates being'retained at the office of removal.
The merchandise in transit is at the risk of the owner. If, hbWe'yer,
the injury bears no evidence of fraud, but is clearly the result of accident, the penalties imposed by the law are remitted, but the duties
exacted, unless the King remits them. Heavy penalties, in soirie Cases
equal to confiscation of the property, and a fine of double the duty, are
imposed for fraudulent mixtures, subtractions, &c,
Articles prohibited to importation for consumption are adrnitted to
entrepot for transit.
T h e laws concernirig the warehousing of merchandise in France arid



^ 270

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

Belgium, with full detaUs of the practice, and all the forms connected
with the entering of goods at the'custoins for warehouse, and withdrawal for consumption, transit, or exportation, willbe found ,in.appendices H, H i , J, J 1 , J 2 , J 3.
^
In replying to that portion of the instructioris directing such further
inquiries as might be deeined useful in connection with the warehousing
system, or our foreign comnierce, and the suggestion of such alterations
as might be deenied advisable, it is proper to state that the limited time
given prevented ariy investigation except .such as would naturally suggest themselyes in the prosecution of the preceding inquiiies.
Some proininent features, however, have presented themselves, in so
fa.vorable a light, that it would be. remiss not to.caU attention to them
here, and, befbre doing so, to generally recommend, for the consideraVtion of the Department, the incorporation into our systein of the better
features of the foreign systems, as. they may appear in the details^ set
forth in this report and the accompanying documents, so far as they may
befound, upori investigation, to be decided improvements; especially
as the revision of our system of warehousing, at this early sta.ge of its
growth, could be effected without injury tb existing interests,
The system^ of France and Belgium not affording so many points in
consonance with oux own methods as that of Great Britain, attention
has been more particularly directed to the imprbvements that inight be
afforded by that ofthe latter country.
While the English practice abounds with many unnecessary forms—
the consequence of alterations and improvements in an old systeni—there
is at the same time a perfect system of accountability running through
all the departments of the customs, with an admirable adaptation to the
general business of the cbuntry.
It is therefore respectfully recommended; tb the Department, that our
warehouse regulations be so amended as to secure the greatest sinipUcity pf details in connection with the entry, export, arid. interibr transit
of warehouse goods; that some general description of stores be adopted,
with certain necessaiy fastenings, &c., any ofwhich, eligibly situated for
business, may be, by; the collectors ofthe seyeral ports, under the direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, selected as bonded warehouses,
leaving the business of storage and labor entirely to the proprietors—the
Government lock and supervision ofthe Government bfficer constituting
the only variations from the brdinary business of storage. Give to "the
importer the right of selecting the store and making his own terms for
labor and storage, and to the warehouse business.would besecured that
vital element necessar}/- to its successful operation-^perfect freedom in
competition. It, then becomes the interest of every importer to place
his goods in bond; the real estate owner and mechanic are benefited by
the increased demand for warehouses; the regulations as to'buildings
issued b y t h e Gpvernment secure a better description of stores; fi'om
which results a consequent diminution of risk from'fire in our large
cities; and, finally, the interest of every class ofthe community becomes
identified with the success of the system.
It is also recoinmended that permission be grjanted to owners of
bonded goods to repair packages; to.repack goods in such quantities as



1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

271

may suit the maxkets for which destined; to dye and print silk; to clean
and restore goods, damaged on the voyage of importation; and, in short,
to grant every privilege that would not jeopardize the safety of the
revenue. And also to allow the importatiori in bond, for exportation, of
goods now prohibited—as, for instance, the packages in which brandies
are imported into Mexico and South Anierica containing from ten to
fifteen gallons, a size suitable for mule Ibads. These are prphibited by
our laws; whilst in England, though equally prohibited for consumption,
such packages are iniported for export to.those countries, and secure to
Biitish commerce an advantage our laws do not accord to us.
It is further recommended that there be granted to shipping the privilege they have in Great Britain—of taking what stores may be necessary for their intended voyage from warehouse without payment of duty,
To prevent frauds, a tabular statement has been prepared of the required
quantity for each man per diem of the different articles in general use,
and the ^number of days required for a voyage. On a ship's return the
overplus is deposited in warehouse, to be taken from thence as part of
the stores on the next voyage. And, also, generally to dispense with
the bond now required from importers, when the goods are placed in
the entire custody of the Governinent. In the English system a bond is
required for the reasoii that the owrier or those storing for, him have
joint custody; but there would seem no necessity for it when the owrier,
as in our bonded warehouses, is entirely excluded frorn any supervision
or control, directly or indirectly. In Fxance.it has been seeri that no
bond is required, .even on joint custody, it only being demanded by the
customs when the goods go out of their possession. T h e ' undersigned, in conclusion, would express through you their
grateful recollection of the attention and assistance;iri obtaining every
information connected with the subject of their inquiries received frbm
the Hon. George Bancroft; General R. Armstrong, consul at Liverpool;
Hon. Mr. McGregor, M. P . ; Horn Mr. Dawson, vice chairman commissioner of customs; and froni; Mr. Collin, Mr. Chandler, arid Sir John
Ha;ll, of the several dock companies in London.
To the customs officers generally in London and Liverpool, they feel
indebted for the disposition to afford every inforination connected with
their respective departnients, and particularly to W. S. Kendall, Esq.,
inspector general, London, for the zeal eviriced in furthering their views.
Tp the Hon. Richard Rush, Hon. Thomas Gt Clemson, the Ainerican
consulates and the customs authorities at Havre and Antwerp, their
thanks axe also due for the readiness evinced in furnishing every information desired.'
Claiming your indulgence for any errors that may be found, and in
the hope that the information collected and herewith respectfully submitted may prove serviceable to the Department in its effbrts to render
every facihty to our commercial interests, the undersigned have the
honor to subscribe themselves, .
With great respect, your obedient servants,
CHARLES C. WALDEN,
D. P . BARHYDT.
Hon. R. J. WA'LKBR,.Secretary ofi the Treasury,



272

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1847.

.LIST OF THE APPENDICES AGCOMPANYINa THE REPORT ON THE WARE.
HOUSE SYSTEMS OF ENGLAND,:FRANCE, AND BELGIUM.

A-^Loridori dock companies.—Replies to questioris put to therri"; forms
• for doirig business., 'and table of fates arid regulations.
iB—Liverpool docks.—Tablb bf rates arid' charges; act of incorpora.tiori, arid'rules and regulatioris of Albert dbck.
C-^—Biifenliead docks.—Act of incbrpbfatiori; riiap of the dbcks; descriptiori of buildings, arid plan of scales used.
D—St. Katharine's dock cbriipariies.—Replies to questioris addressed
them; list of their employees; fornis used iri th'eii:'business; table
of rates and charges, arid regulatioris coricerriirig lights arid fires.
E-^Liverpobl custbin-house.—Ilephes to questions; forms used in v^arelibuse'business, arid fbrrris of book's kept.
F—Londbn custorii-hbuse.—Warehbuse fbrriis, With',, explariatioris.
G-^"Custoiri-house at Lbridbri dbck.—Forms used iri Warehouse business; fbrriiis of bboks, and explariatibns iri rejply to" interrogatories-.
H-^—Havre custorii-horise.-^^Tari'ff'of charges, and forriis bf doing business
iri eiitrepot, with forms of bbbfcs, arid tfarislatiori of trarisit laws.
H 1—French code of custoiri-hbuse laXYs.
H 2—Coritinuatibri bfthe same.
J—Antwerp warehouse.^-—Fbiins arid collectibri of cbm'merciaLrates, &c.
J 1—.Belgian general law bf custonis arid excise.
j 2—.Belgiari revised warehbuse law arid regulatioris, with translations
thereof
J 3—Belgian law bf trarisit arid project of rieW laW of trarisit, with trarislatibn.
K-^Tabie of the average number of days required for fbreign voyages,
arid the necessairy stores for cbrisumptiori of crew per dieni.
NOTE.—These taibles are constructed upon a principle to meet every
probable duration of a voyage, by the simple operation of doubling and
trebling, &c. JEach computation has been made with em addition of 25
per cent, to guard against casualties.
K 1—-St. Katharine's dock code of instructions for in-door department.
K 2-^St. Katharine's dock companies' Code of instructibns for the out-door
departments.
K 3^—St. Katharine's dock companies' iristructioris.to the police department, with plan of dock, locatibn of engines,-&c.
K 4—Act of incorporation of the St. Katharine's dock coriipany.
L—Regulations prescribing the-buildings whicli may be used as bonded
warehouses under the warehouse act in Great Biitain. "
M—General orders: relating to the customs in Great B.ritain consolidated.
N-^Table of quantities allowed-to be drawn from waxehouse a&sa:mples
in Great Britain.
O 1 to 38—Thirty-eight numbers of instructibns for various officers of
the custoins in Grpat B.ritain.v
.
.
P—Customs laws of Great Britain.—lEdition of 1846.
Q—General orders and regulations of the board of customs of Great
Britain.
'
.
,



1847.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

273

R—Same from September, 1843, to January, 1847.
S—Instructions for collectors and comptrollers of customs at out-ports in
Great Britain.
T—Customs regulations of Great Britain for 1845, '46, and '47.
V—Reports on custom-house frauds in Great Britain, 1843i
W—^First and second part—^East and West India dock conipanies.—Replies to questions addressed them; forms used in their business,
complete; fornis of books kept, and of returns made; chart showing position of up-town warehouses, and general plan of docks
and warehouses, showing position of hoisting apparatus, &c.
X—Liverpool laws and regulations relating to dock and hght dues, and
schedule of dock rates.
'

VOL.
 VI.—is.


INDEX.

A.
A d valorem system of the tariff .of 1846, views in regard to
13, 282
Agricultural products, comparative view of the value of certain, according to the prices
they bore in the N e w Y o r k market in J u l y and December, 1846
50, 51
Alexandria city, the debts of—see District of Columbia.
American industry, views in 1847 on the effect of. . . ..
140
Appropriations, permanent and indefinite and specific, necessary^for 1847- 8 .=
3
for 1848-'9
120
for 1849-'50
....281
A r m y , estimates for the, for 1846—'7, . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
estimates .for. the, for 1847-'8
3, 120
estimates for the, for 1848-'9
...
121, 280
expenditures in 1845-'6
22
expenditures in 1846-'7
.24, 154
expenditures in 1847-'8
...
156, 315
expenditures in 1848-'9
.
., . 345
A r m y , in peace and in war, in Great Britain, Russia, France, Austria, Prussia, Russia and
T u r k e y , men composing.the
434, 435
Assistant Treasurer of the United States—
amount of specie deposited with the, in 1847
128, 130, 131, 213
amount of coin received and disbursed.at the office of the, from 1st J a n u a r y , 1847, to
30th November, 1848
213, 301, 336
m o n e y s advanced to the, in 1848, to purchase T r e a s u r y notes.
339
Atlantic Dock Company, for the construction of docks, bulkheads, &c., in the East river,
Brooklyn, the prospectus of the, & c . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . .
..
465
Austria, the national debt, yearly revenue, population and a r m y of
434
BBalance in the T r e a s u r y 1st J u l y , 1845
1, 19
1st J u l y , 1846
1, 2, 23, 119, 152
1st J u l y , 1847
119,155, 279, 315
1st J u l y , 1848.
279, 280, 317
Balances estimated to be in the T r e a s u r y —
1st J u l y , 1849
280
1st J u l y , 1850
281
Balances of former appropriations required to be expended—
for the service of 1847-'8.
3
for the service of 1848-'9
.,
,.
..
120
for the service of 1 8 4 9 - ' 5 0 . . . . .
280
Barclay, J o h n D., letter of, to the Secretary of the T r e a s u r y , pointing out a clerical error in
the annual report of December, 1847,,
278
Barley, the product and price of, in 1846.
.
10, 50, 51
Basin in N e w Y o r k city—see Piers.
in Brooklyn city—see Piers.
Beef, the price of, in 1846
51




666

INDEX..

Belgium, extracts from the customs laws of, and the regulations in regard to the warehouse
system of.
.
.. . ..
.v.
...........
..
• •• • • • .^U
Bids for the loans of 1847 and 1848, the accepted and rejected
215, 216, 325, 32b
Bonds, the form of, to be observed, &c.—see Warehousing system.
Bounty, on refined sugars and spirits and pickled fish, annually, from 1840 to' 1847
.. . . 408
Bounty land., views in 1847 in regard to the execution of the law of 1847, granting..
. . . . 126
Bounty land-warrants, scrip, &c., registers and receivers of the land dffices inhibited from
becoming depositaries or agents for the sale of, &c
.
••
Boston—see Wharfage.
Breadstuff's and provisions, the value of, exported during the fiscal years 1846 and 1847, and
views in regard to. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
•• . . - • 1 4 0 , 1 9 9
aggregate value of, exported each year from 1821 to 1848, inclusive'^ and views in regard t o . .
284,324
Brooklyn, piers at—see Piers.
Buffalo, the population, business, &c., o f . . . . . .
..,..... ....
..
- ..........
. 440
Bullion imported into the United States, in the calender, years of 1846 and 1847
. . . 20j
(See Com.)
C.
California, the condition of the public lands in
.
.....
311
the area of, in square miles and acres
335
the extension of the revenue system to.
..
. . . . . . . . . . . 340
Canada and the United States, a reciprocal free trade between, recommended in 1848.
, 296
Canal, grant from the lakes to the Atlantic, views in regard to'a project for a.
. - .436, 436
• ship, across the Isthmus of Darien, views on the feasibility of..
436, 437
Canals, the increased facilities to commerce b y the extension of.
• • • • 443
Chagres river, the- navigation- of the.
.....
.. . . . ..... - - .. . . . . i . 436.
Chickasaw cession, the quantity of land in the, and the average price realized in the sales. , 14
T r e a s u r y circular, and report, of the Commissioner of the, General
L a n d OMce in regard, to the lands in t h e . . . . . . . . . . .
.73, 74, 75
Civil, diplomatic,.and miscellaneous service—
estimates for 1846-'7
.
.. . 2
,3
estimates for 1847-'8
...
....
' on
121
estimates for 1-848-'9
••> 280
estimates for 1849-50. .
. . . . ..;..,.
...
-281
expenditures in-1845^6.
. . . . , . . . • ••• 19,
expenditures in 1846-'7.,
....
.. .24, 152
expenditures in 1847-'8..
..
..
156,315
expenditures in 1848-'9.
............................
..
...
318
Clearance, letter of, or accounts of particulars in regard to, the warehouse s y s t e m s . . . . . . . . . . 642
Coal, anthracite, brought to market in Pennsylvania in each year, from 1820 to 1833 inclusive.
,,
...
441
;
Coast of the United States, shore line of the coast, of the, and of th.e bays, sounds,, rivers,
and islands.connected with.it
. . . . ... .285, 341
shore line of the rivers, &c.,. of the. . . . . ....
••••• .285., 342
Coast survey, views in 1846 in regard to the progress of the.
18
views in 1847 on the progress of the.
....,••.•• — 136
views in 1848 on the progress of the. ...
. . . .. . 307
Coffee, the quantity and value of, consumed annually from 1821 to 1846, and the amount
of duty which accrued on. the same from 1821 to 1832, together with the duty per
pound, &c
..
... — . .
.. . . . .c - .,
c ,
..
..
26
statement of the quantity and value of, consumed annually from 1821 to 1847, the
amount of duty from 1821 to 1832, and the rate of duty per pound, &c., and
193 997
views on
-•
« . . . . . . . l ^ o , at*
h o w much revenue-a duty of twenty-five per cent, on the imports of, would yield..
4
a duty of twenty-five per cent, ad valorem, recommended in 1847, to increase the
revenue.
.. . - .121, 123
Coin and bullion imported into-the United States, in the several collection districts, in the
calender years of 1846 and 1847..
... ,
205
imported and exported annually from 1821 to 1847 inclusive, and the excess of the
imports over the-exports, and of the exports over the imports.
...
..
. 211
receipts and disbursements of, at the office of Assistant T r e a s u r e r from 1st J a n u a r y ,
1847, to 30th November, 1848.
.131, 213, 301, 336
Coinage of the M i n t s of the United States from 1793 to 1847
- ..
.132, 183
of the M i n t s of the United States from 1st December, 1846, to the 1st December,
1847, and monthly from the 1st of J a n u a r y , 1847, to 1st December, 1847
132,. 184
amount of, in 1846.
..
..
324
in 1847
..
•324
in 1848.
..
,
... •
32.4
from March 1, 1845, to November 1, 1 8 4 8 . . .
....
324, 335
views
132
 in 1847 in regard to the, &c..



INDEX.

667

Collectors and other officers of the customs—
circular of instructions to the, in f u r t h e r a n c e of the act of 1846, reducing the d u t y
on i m p o r t s . . ..
........
.........
,. .
52
instruction's-to the, u n d e r the l a w establishing the w a r e h o u s i n g s y s t e m , and f o r m s to
be observed in execution of that law.
...
. . . ; . . . . . .....
...
,76 to 118
instructions-to t h e , in 184-7, to s u b m i t - q u a r t e r l y estimates of the e x p e n s e of collecting
the r e v e n u e . . .
...
.. . ...
,
..
..
.
.. . ...
230
instructions to t h e , to retrench e x p e n s e s a n d reduce the n u m b e r of officers, &c..
. 232
instructions to the, in consequence of the a n n e x a t i o n of California, a n d in regard to t h e
extension of the revenue l a w s over California. .
. , ......
.-.
340
i n s t r u c t i o n s to, in 1849, under the act of 6th of A u g u s t , 1846,- establishing the wareh o u s i n g system-. . ,
.... ....
........
.
. . . . . . . 359
Jt
C o m m e r c e , revenue-and population of the United States, f r o m 1790 to 1 8 4 7 ..201, 203 208, 209
of N e w Y o r k city
,
.414,415,416,417
h o w m u c h benefited b y the tariff of 1 8 4 2 . . . .
.10,11
the effect of the tariff of 1846 on'
.....
...
.,
143, 284
C o m m e r c e o n ' t h e Pacific, the m e a n s of p r o m o t i n g , discussed-in-1848.
.
..
..
..
292
Commercial p o w e r and- resources : of the United States, views in r e g a r d to, a n d its ultimate
effect u p o n the commerce of other nations, . . . . .
..
.435,- 436, 437, 438, 439
C o m m i s s i o n , report of the, in 1849, appointed to e x a m i n e into the operation of the debenture l a w s .
,.
..
..
. ..
...
.
406
Constitutional T r e a s u r y — s e e Independent
Treasury.
C o n t r i b u t i o n s in M e x i c o , directed to be levied, and views in regard- to, in 1847
121
views in 1848 in r e g a r d to.
,
..
..
..
j
..
297
C o r n laws- of Great- Britain, h o w identical in principle with the principle of the tariff of 1842. 12
C o t t o n , the*product and-prices of, in 1846, a n d views in regard to.
.
.
1 0 , 50, 51
the value of,- and of other domestic p r o d u c e , exported annually f r o m 1790 to 1807,"
and views in regard t o . . . .
,
,
..
.. - 145, 212
Credit—see National credit,
^
C u r r e n c y , views in 1847 in regard to'fluctuations, & c . , i n t h e .
..
131
Customs,- receipts from,- estimated for and ascertained—
inl845-'6..<
.,
,
,. .
.......
,
•
..
1,19
in 1846-'7
,.
..-....,,„
;
2,24,119,151
in 1847-'8.
.....
. ,
.3,119,156,279,281,315
inl848-'9... ....
,
,..,,.
.
.
318
statement of the receipts f r o m , u n d e r the tariff of 1842, f r o m its commencement,
A u g u s t 30, to its termination, N o v e m b e r 30, 1846.
..
281, 320
receipts f r o m , under the tariff of 1846, f r o m J u l y 1, 1846, to September 30,
1848.
..
..
...
..
...
.281,320
estimated receipts f r o m — s e e Estimates.
a m o u n t of T r e a s u r y notes received for, in 1847..
,. . . ,,
..
..
....
.133, 214
gross receipts from,- in the several ports of the United States, i n / N o v e m b e r , 1846
and 1847
.,
,
.......
..
..
205
comparative statement s h o w i n g the a m o u n t of receipts f r o m , during the several
periods f r o m the 1st D e c e m b e r , 1845, to 1st December, 1847 .. .
...
..
226
circulars of instruction to the collectors and other officers of the, in f u r t h e r a n c e
of the act of 1846, reducing the d u t y on i m p o r t s
. . . . .,
,.
52
instructions to collectors a n d other officers of the—see Collectors.
C u s t o m - h o u s e at N e w Orleans—
views in regard to the projected, . , . . ...
,.
,,
135
the advertisement for proposals to •build a .
. .
..
....
..
..
232
T r e a s u r y circular, and other p a p e r s , in 1847, in regard to a site, and for the construction of a . ,
..
.,
,
.
.. 233
C u s t o m - h o u s e at Oswego, N e w Y o r k , entrances and clearances of vessels at, ,
...
440
C u s t o m - h o u s e s , f o r m s to be observed in e x e c u t i n g the law establishing the w a r e h o u s i n g
system.
.
..
.
.82 to 118, and 373 to 405, 359
f o r m s observed in the, of E u r o p e — s e e Warehouse systems of Europe.
C u s t o m - h o u s e officers, instructions to the—see Collectors;
the duties of, attached to the docks in L o n d o n ,
56]
D.
D e b e n t u r e l a w s , r e p o r t , in 1849, of the commission appointed to e x a m i n e into the operation
of the
. ....
..
..
. . ..
D e b e n t u r e s on foreign g o o d s , a n n u a l l y , f r o m 1840 to 1847 inclusive.
... . ..
D e b t — s e e National Debt.
Deficit in the m e a n s , 1st J u l y , 1847.
1st J u l y , 1848
120,
a m o u n t of, a p p r e h e n d e d in 1847
,
.,
.,
.....
Depositee of specie, in 1847, w i t h the A s s i s t a n t T r e a s u r e r of the United States at N e w
. York,
..
D i s b u r s i n g agents and officers of the G o v e r n m e n t — s e e Treasury
Circulars.




406
408
3
121
121
213

668

INDEX..

District of Columbia, payments, interest and principal, o n account of the debts of the cor r
porate cities of the.
28, 153, 159
outstanding debts of the corporate cities of the, in 1845
. . 28
outstanding debts of the corporate cities of the, in 1846
29
.. . . . . . . . 160
outstanding debts of the corporate cities of the, in 1847,
outstanding debts of the corporate cities' of the, in 1848
.
334
Dock Company-—see Atlantic Dock Company.
Docks, in England, statistics, &c., of the.
.424, 425, 426, 428, 429, 529, 561
slips, &c., in N e w York city, expenditure f o r . .
- 455
in Europe, report on the, and statistics^ &c., of the
..
- .505, 529
Domestic produce, the prices of, in 1846, and the value of, under the tariffs of 1842 and 1846,
and views in regard thereto.
..
..
10, 50, 51
exports of, in 1846 and 18.47
. . . . . . . . ,140,199
the value of the annual exports of, from 1790 to 1847 inclusive... ..
209
the value of the a n n u a l exports of, from 1821 to 1847 inclusive...
210
the value of cotton, and other domestic produce, exported annually from
1790 to 1807..
212
the, exported annually from 1821 to 1848 inclusive...
321
exports of, in 1847-'8, to the British e m p i r e . .
322
aggregate value of breadstuffs and provisions exported each y e a r , from
324
1821 to 1848 inclusive
f . <.
exports in the years 1846 and 1847, from the several collection districts of the
United States. .
205
exports.in 1847
.
226
exports in 1 8 4 8 . . .
...282
exports, views in 1847 on the
.
v
139, 143
exports, views in 1848 on t h e . .
.
282
Drafts—see Transfer drafts.
Drafts, T r e a s u r y , the law and regulations of the T r e a s u r y Department in 1846 in regard t o . 31
Drawbacks, report in 1849 in regard to
. . ...
• •
<
406
Duties of custom-house officers attached to the docks in L o n d o n , &c. . . . .
561
Duties, the amount of, collected in 1845-'6.
,
. . . . . . . o . . 19
. . . 2 4 , 151
in 1846-'7
..
in 1847-'8.
156, 315
in 1848-'9
...
318
collected in the ports of Baltimore, Philadelphia, and N e w Y o r k , under the tariff
of 1846
6
:
the annual and aggregate amount of, collected under the tariff of 1842
320
the amount collected under the tariff of 1846, from J u l y 1, 1846, to September 30,
1848.
. . . . . . . . . . 320
the amount of, collected on tea consumed from 1821 to 1832, the average rate of
duty per pound, and the equivalent ad valorem.
25
the amount of, collected on coffee consumed from 1821 to 1832, the average rate of
d u t y , and the equivalent ad valorem.
26
the amount of duty which accrued on merchandise imported in 1844, 1845, and
1846, the amount of, and the rate of duty per cent, ad valorem.
30
the amount of which accrued, but,not received, in all the collection districts of the
United States, on the 1st December, 1846, 1st N o v e m b e r , 1847, and 1st December, 1847
.J
205
the amount and rate of duty on the coffee and tea consumed annually from 1821
to 1832 inclusive, the period in which it was^subject to d u t y . . . . . . .
227, 228
list of articles imported in 1844, and the kind and rates of d u t y paid thereon, under
the act of 1842, and the rate of duty ad valorem. . .
.282, 322
views in 1846 as to a duty on the imports of tea and coffee..
.....
4
13
views in regard to the ad valorem system of the tariff of 1846. . .
a duty of 25 per cent, ad valorem on coffee recommended in 1847
121, 123
•views in 1847 in regard to the, to be derived from Mexico,
122
excesses of, &c.
...,
30
amount of T r e a s u r y notes paid in for, from 1st December, 1846, to 1st December,
1847...
128,214
the act of 30th J u l y , 1846, reducing the duty on imports, and the schedules and
T r e a s u r y instructions under i t . .
...
........
.52, 58 to 73
statistics of the, collected in L o n d o n . . . .
. 427
views in 1848 on the system of, under the tariffs of 1842 and 1846.
282, 283
E.
England, report on the warehouse system of—see Warehouse system.
E n t r y of merchandise under the warehousing law, the official forms to be observed in
the
.
82 to 118
E r r a t u m , report of the aicting Secretary of the T r e a s u r y , correcting an error in the estimates in the
.
275
 annual report of December, 1847



INDEX.

669
1

Estimates of receipts into the Treasury from all sources, arid of expenditures for all objects—
for 1846—'7
,,
...
2
f o r 1847-'8
.
3, 119
5
for 1848— 9
.
120, 279, 280
for 1849-'50
•
.. , .280, 281
views in 1846 in regard to the
. ..
4
clerical error in the, for the y e a r 1848, report o n , &c
•....,
275
E x c h a n g e j rate of, in L o n d o n in 1846. <..
....
51
E x e c u t i v e D e p a r t m e n t s , views on the organization of some of t h e .
312
E x p e n d i t u r e s of t h e G o v e r n m e n t for all objects, estimated for a n d ascertained , in aggregate
a n d in detail—
in 1845-'6
1,2,19
in 1 8 4 6 - 7
:2, 24, 119, 152
in 1847-'8
..
.3, 119, 120, 156, 279, 315
in 1848-'9
.....
,280,315,318
in 1849.
,
>.........
5
estimates of—see Estimates.
excess of, over m e a n s , 1st J u l y , 1847,
—
2
1st J u l y , 1848, (estimated)
3, 120
1st J u l y , 1849, (estimated).. . .
...
]21
E x p o r t s j of gold and silver from the United States, during the fiscal y e a r 1846-'7.
. . ..133, 185
the value of breadstuff's and provisions, exported in the fiscal y e a r s 1846 and 1847 140,
199
statement of the i m p o r t s a n d , foreign and domestic, during the fiscal-years 1846
and 1847
...
.. .,
.140, 199
domestic, of the United States, exclusive of specie, for the fiscal y e a r s 1846,1847,
1848, a n d 1849
v.
J 4 0 , 200
domestic produce and foreign m e r c h a n d i s e , separate a n d ' a g g r e g a t e , exported from
1790 to 1847
,
......
201,202
of specie, including A m e r i c a n coin, f r o m 1821 to 1847 inclusive...
203
the value of domestic, exclusive of coin and bullion, for the calender y e a r s of 1846
and 1847...
........
........
205
t h e value of the a n n u a l , of domestic p r o d u c e and- foreign m e r c h a n d i s e , f r o m 1790
to 1847.
209
the value of the a n n u a l , domestic produce and foreign merchandise, f r o m 1821 to
1847 inclusive, and also s h o w i n g the excess of i m p o r t s over e x p o r t s , and of
e x p o r t s over i m p o r t s . ,
. . . . .
.230
statement exhibiting the a m o u n t of coin and bullion imported and e x p o r t e d
a n n u a l l y , f r o m 1821 to 1847 inclusive, and the excess of imports over e x p o r t s ,
and of e x p o r t s over i m p o r t s .
,.
......
211
Jt
Statement s h o w i n g the value of cotton a n d of other domestic produce exported
a n n u a l l y f r o m 1790 to 1807
212
foreign and domestic, in 1847
. . . . ,, . ,
. 226
of domestic produce in 1848.
...
.
..
.. . , . . _ , ,
282
s t a t e m e n t s h o w i n g the domestic and foreign, exclusive of silver, a n n u a l l y , f r o m
1821 to 1848, inclusive
... . . .
321
domestic, to t h e British empire, exclusive of specie, for the fiscal y e a r 1847-'8.
322
o f b r e a d s t u f f s and provisions, each y e a r , f r o m 1821 to 1848 inclusive, the aggregate
value of
<
.
...
324
t h e value of the, of A m e r i c a n p r o d u c t s , and views in 1847 in regard t o . . . . . . . . 138
views in 1847 in regard to. .
...
. 1 4 1 , 1 4 2 , 1 4 3 , 1 4 4 , 145
views in 1848 in regard to the
282
E u r o p e , the w a r e h o u s e s y s t e m s of, report on—see Warehouse systems*
F
F i n a n c e s , in 1846-'7, report of M r . W a l k e r on the state of the
J
in 1847-'8, report of M r . W a l k e r on the state of the. .
.
119
in 1847-'8, report of M r , Y o u n g in regard to an error in the a n n u a l report on t h e . 275
in 1848-'9, report of M r , W a l k e r on the state of the
...
..279
views in 1847 as to the best m e a n s of i m p r o v i n g t h e . . ..
... . . . . . . .
124
F i s h , pickled, bounties o n , a n n u a l l y , f r o m 1840 to 1847 inclusive
. 408
F l o u r , the price of, in 1846
51
0............ .
F o r e i g n intercourse—
estimates f©r 1846-'7
„. B
'2
estimates for 1 8 4 7 - ' 8
. 3 , 120
estimates for 1848-'9
121, 280
estimates for 1849-'50
281
e x p e n d i t u r e s in l£S45-'6.
20
expenditures in 1 8 4 6 - ' 7 .
24, 152
e x p e n d i t u r e s in 1 8 4 7 - ' 8
156, 315
e x p e n d i t u r e s in 1 8 4 8 - ' 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . a
318




670

INDEX..

F o r m s , official, to be observed in the execution of the law establishing the warehousing
system.
• .. . . . . . . . . . .
.83 to 118, and 373 to 405
pursued jn executing .the warehouse systems of Europe... .515, 516, 518, 544, 546 to 664
Fortifications, &c., estimates for, for 1846-'7
.. .
..
..
.. . .... •• • • •
2
.estimates for, for 1 8 4 7 - ' 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
o, l^U
estimates for,.for 1848-'9. .
.. .....
.121,280
expenditures in 1 8 4 5 - ' 6 . . ..,.. . . . .
..
....
..
22
expenditures in J.8.46-'7
,...,
...
• - -24, J55
expenditures in 1847-'8.
.,
.. ....
........
.,156, 317
expenditures:inlS48-'9
. ... . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . 318
France, the national debt, yearly revenue, population, and the a r m y and navy of.-... ..
434
F r a u d s , how t h e y . m a y be committed,on the revenues, under the debenture .laws,
...
406
Free trade, views, in 18.47. in support of.
.. v
,.
•• •
139
-views in 18.48 in support of.....
;....
....... . . . . .
....
,a.reciprocal, between Canada and the United.States, recommended in 1848.
29b
Freights,,views in 1847 in regard to
- •• • 139
Frontier of the United States, the extent of the, in miles
...
• .^85, 441,
F u n d s available in the T r e a s u r y 1st October, 1848.
...
.... ..
319
G.
General L a n d Office, special report of-the-Commissioner Of the..
.(..
.....
75
Geological survey, of the lands embraced'in the Chippewa land district in the Territory of
Wisconsin, instructions from the T r e a s u r y Department to Dr. Owen
to make an examination and,
..
.......
..
125,238
of the lands embraced in the L a k e Superior land district, in the State of
Michigan, instructions from the T r e a s u r y Department to Dr Jackson
to make an examination and.,.,. .
125, 241
Geological surveys, the results of, in Pennsylvania,
440
Georgetown, the debts of—see Distinct of Columbia.
Gold and silver imported into the United States in 1846 : and,1847, and exported for the
same period.
- ..
...
•• • ••
- »•> •
• 185
Governments o f t h e principal nations, the. character, of, .and.the population of the.
...
4 62
Graduation, the estimated gain o f t h e , over the old system ofselling the public lands, .
75
views in 1846 in favor of. . . . . . . . . . ... ...
14
1
views in ;1847 in favor of.
..
.. -v »••
. . . . . . . . . . . 121
Great Britain, the national debt, annual,revenue, population, a r m y and navy of,
..
434
H.
H a r b o r s and rivers, the improvement of—
expenditures for, in 1845—'6. .
.. .
expenditures for, in 1846-'7.
..
••
expenditures for, in 1847—'8. . . ...
"V
H e m p , the price of, in 1846.
H o m e market, views in 1846 and 1847 in regard to a.,
.....
••
H u d s o n river, concerning an ice-boat to keep open the.navigation o f t h e .

22
-

•

"
••
51
' U > l ^ 1 ' i4U>
..,
439

I.
Independent treasury, circulars from the T r e a s u r y Department in 1846, to Government,
officers, in execution of the laws establishing the, and for the better
organization of the T r e a s u r y Department. . . .31, 35, 36, 37, 40, 41
-views in. 1846 in -regard to the, and the regulations under the law^
establishing the.i
.. ... - >.
..
....
••
..
6
views on the operations of the, in 1847
..
..
. . . . .129, 130
Indian corn, the product and price of, in 1846.,
..
10,50,51
Indian Department—
expenditures in.the,.in 1845-'6
••
•• • •• • - ^
expenditures in the, in. 1846-'7
.,
..
..
. . . . . ••
*
•••.•
.24,155
expenditures in the, in.1847-'8.
..
..
•• .
•
156,317
expenditures in the, in 1848—'9
..
318
Industry—rse'e American industry.
Interest on the,public debt—^see Public debt.
Imports, of merchandise, in 1844, 1845,.and 1846, the value, of,, and amounts of duty, &c..
"30
of gold and silver into the United States, for the fiscal year of 1846-'7, and .views
concerning.
.. ,. . . . .
- .••
- • « -- •
< ••
.129, 133, 185
.and exports, foreign and. domestic, during the.fiscal years J 8.46 and 1847.
.1.4.0, 199
total, and.imports consumed in the United States, from 1790 to 1847.. .201,,202, 203
.and. exports, of specie,.including American coin, from. 1821 to 1847 i n c l u s i v e . . . . , 203
.of coin and bullion.,, during .the. calendar years of 1846 and 1847.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
the value of, reexports, .and consumption of foreign merchandise, annually,*fro.m
.1790 to .1847 inclusive
.
. . . . 208
the value of the annual imports from 1831 to 18,47, an.d the excess of, .over exports. 210




INDEX.

671

Imports, statement of the amount of coin and bullion imported and exported annually, from
1821 to 1847; also showing the excess of the imports over the exports, and of
the exports over the imports. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
....
211
J(
table exhibiting the value and kinds of., remaining in warehouse in the several collection districts, on the 30th September, 1847
219
aggregate of, in 1847.
226
statement of the total, and the imports consumed in the Ignited States, exclusive of
specie, during each fiscal year from 1821 to 1848 inclusive; showing, also, the
domestic and foreign exports, tonnage, &c. ....
........
.. . . . . .. . . ,,
.321
act of 1846, to reduce the duty on, and T r e a s u r y regulations under it.
.52, 58 to 73
into N e w Y o r k city, and the .exports f r o m . . . . . . .
415 } 416
J,
;Tackson, Dr. Charles, instructions to, to m a k e a n examination and geological survey of the
lands embraced in the L a k e Superior land district, in the State.of Michigan
,.
241
L.
L a n d s , public, receipts from the .sales of the, &c,—see Public Lands.
statistics of—see Statistics.
in the landed States, the quantity, in square miles and acres
L a n d department, views in 1848 in regard to the. . . . . . .
'
Light-house system, views in 1846 in regard to the. . . ..
,, . . .
........
views in 1.847 in regard-to the, and the erection.of light-houses.
"
Liverpool docks, statistics of,
.
...
.426, '427
L o a n s , receipts into the T r e a s u r y under the act of 22d J u l y 1846, and J a n u a r y 28,1847, and'
,31st M a r c h , 1848 viz:
'

335
321
17
136
428

^JifMZ'
2, 119, 151
m
]lfQ-?Q
119,156,279
in 1848-'9..
...
.279,319,339
amount available on.the 1st October,.and 1st December, 1847, of the, of 1846 and'
1847 . ., . . . . ....
...
..
J 2 8 161
amount of, available to the T r e a s u r y , 1st October, 1 8 4 8 . . . . . . , , ,
.128' 319
loans .of 1841, estimate in 1846-'7 for the redemption of.
. . .,
'
2
payment on account of the, of .1841, in 1845-'6. ....
...
.....
..
28
in .1846-'7c
.155,159
list of the accepted, and list of the rejected bids for the loan of 1847
.215, 216
accepted and rejected bids for the, of 1848
....
.303 325' 326
and T r e a s u r y notes, receipts .into the T r e a s u r y annually from, from 1790 to ' 1848
inclusive..............,
....
.......
. . . . .303 332
view;s in 1846 in regard to a new
5 16
views in 1847.in regard to a.new, . .i
...
,,
,121 123
outstanding, in ,1845 and 1846, and % '8 of the loan of 1841
. , '
.28, 29
loan of 1842..
...
.29,160,334
loan of 1843
29, 1.60', 334
loan of 1 8 4 6 . . .
.160,334
loan of .1847. . . . - . . ,
160,334
loan of 1848.
. .
....
,,
334
advertisement for the United States loan of 1846.
....
...
.........
29
advertisement for the loan of 1847, and remarks in regard to.
134, 224
advertisement for the loan of 1 8 4 8 . . . . . . . .
..
...
.302'336
L o n d o n , statistics of the docks, shipping, trade and navigation of,.
..
...427,' 428
M,
M a r k e t s , the prices of agricultural products in N e w York in J u l y and December, 1846. .50, 51
the-prices of United States stock in N e w York-in 1846 and 1847,
133, I8f>
the prices of United States T r e a s u r y notes in N e w Orleans in 1846-'7.
,133' 194
M c N a i r , Col. D. R . , and E . J , Roberts appointed b y the Secretary of the T r e a s u r y mineral agents under the acts of the 1st and.3d M a r c h , 1847.
. .. . .,.,
. . . . . . ..
245
Merchandise, the value of, imported in.1-844, 1845, and 1846, paying d u t y , the amount of
duty which accrued on the-same, &c.
.,
'
.. . ..
30
the value and -species of foreign,,remaining in -warehouse on the 30th September,-and -views in 1847 in regard t h e r e t o . .
..
.....
136, 219
foreign, exported from 1790 to 1847 inclusive.;
. _.
..
' 201
the value of foreign, imported:and consumed in the United States, and reexported, annually, from 1790 to 1847, <
,
208
the value of annual-exports* of foreign, and of-domestic produce, from 1790 to
1847 inclusive. . . . .
...
209
the value of the annual exports and imports of foreign, from 1821 to 1847 inclusive. . . . .
,, 210
the value, of foreign 'and -domestic produce, exported annually from 1821 to
1848 inclusive.
321




672

INDEX..

Merchandise,debentures ori foreign, from 1840 to 1847 inclusive.
408
value of, warehoused in the ports of the United States,from August 6, 1846,
to September 30, 1,848.
\ ...
476
sent to the United States warehouses, unclaimed.
.
477
M e x i c o , contribution in, directed to be levied in 1847, and views in regard to, in 1847 and
1848. %
..121,297
the internal revenue of the Government of.
123
the tariff, of, and the trade with, discussed in. 1848
- 296
Mexican hostilities, expenditures on account of, in 1845-'6
.22, 23
in 1846-'7
155
in 1847-'8
317
in 1848-'9
381
Military contributions—see Mexico.
Military service, estimates for the,'for 1846—'7.. *
.
2
estimates for the j for 1847-'8
3, 120
estimates for the, for 1848-'9.;
121, 280
estimates for the, for 1849-'50
281
expenditures in 1845-*6.
• • 22
expenditures in 1846-'7 :
,
• 154
expenditures in 1847-'8/.
...156,317
r
Expenditures in 1848-'9. . * >.
..
.....
». • 318
Militia, arming the, estimates and expenditures for—see Military service.
Mineral lands, geological survey of thej ordered, &c., in 1847,
125
Mineral agents, Dr. C-. Jackson; 1 Colonel D. Ri M c N a i r and E> J, Roberts, appointed.
245
M i n t , branch, at N e w York city, views in 1847, in favor of the establishment of a. . . ,.131, 213
views in 1848 in favor of a
. ...
,
298
M i n t s , of the United States, circulars to the directors and superintendents of— see Treasury
circular.
statement of the coinage of the several, from the dates of their establishment to 1847
inclusive . . . . . .
* ................
183
coinage of the, from 1st December, 1846* to 1st December, 1847, and monthly, from
the 1st of J a n u a r y , 1847, to 1st December, 1847.
184
coinage at the, in the years 1846, 1847, and 1848.
324
statement of the deposits and coinage at the M i n t , from the 1st of M a r c h , 1845, to
the 30th November, 1848. ...
335
views in 1847 in regard to the operations of the.
. . . 132
Miscellaneous service—
estimates for 1846-'7,
2
estimates for 1847-'8.
. . -3, 119, 120
estimates for 1848-'9
.121, 279, 280
estimates for 1849-'50.
...
280, 281
expenditures in 1845-'6.
• . 20
expenditures in 1846-'7.
*..
-24,154
expenditures in 1847-'8
• • . • .156,'315
expenditures in 1848-'9
318
sources, receipts from—see Receipts.
Molasses, the price of, in 1846
• 51
N,
National credit, views in 1847 as to the best means of maintaining the.
; . . . . . . . . . 124
National debt of Great Britain, Russia, France, Austria, Prussia, and T u r k e y
434, 435
of the United States—see Public Debt.
Naval officers, T r e a s u r y circulars to—see Treasury circulars.
Naval service, including the Marine Corps—
estimates for the, for 1846-'7.
2
estimates for the, for 1847-'8.
3, 120
estimates for the, for 1848-'9
.. •
121, 280
estimates for the, for 1849-'50
- 281
expenditures for the, in 1845-'6
23
expenditures for the, in 1846-'7
*
*
.24, 155
expenditures for the, in 1847-'8
156, 317
expenditures for the, in 1848-'9
31.8
N a v y Department, expenditures under the direction of the—see Naval service.
N a v y of Great Britain, Russia, France, Prussia, and T u r k e y , the number of ships in the. .434,435
N e w Orleans—see Custom-house.
N e w Y o r k city, statistics of.
.413, 414, 415, 416, 417
the debt and means of, &c.
445
see Mint»
the policy of building piers at, discussed at length
435 to 451
conventions, plans, and estimates, and proceedings of public meetings, in
favor of erecting a pier and basin at..,.• • •«•
451




INDEX.

673

N e w Y o r k city, the: a n n u a l expenditure b y , from;1820 to 1835, in docks, slips, and b u l k h e a d s
table of the rates of t a x in the several w a r d s of.
.
the a m o u n t of revenues collected a t . . . . .
.'..'.'!!!
N e w . M e x i c o , . t h e area^of, i n s q u a r e miles a n d acres
! ! ! ! ' , . '

455
458
301
335

0.
Oaths; forms of, under the warehousing law
sq qa R7 04 inn ahq
O a t s , the p r o d u c t and price of, in 18467
'
10 50 51
O r d n a n c e , estimates' and e x p e n d i t u r e s for—see Military service
'
Oregon, t h e area of, in s q u a r e miles and acres
305
v
views in favor of the extension of the revenue laws" to".' ! . .
' i V 127
r e c o m m e n d a t i o n in 1847 t h a t donations of land' be given to "settlers in
' 107
t h e extension of the revenue l a w s to, & c , . . . . . .
' '
999
views in 1848 in r e g a r d to g r a n t s of land in, for school p u r p o s e s . ' . ' ! . ! ! ! ! ! ! \
310
Oswego—see Custom-house.
,.
r r
... . . . o i u
O w e n , D r D a v i d D , , instructions f r o m the T r e a s u r y D e p a r t m e n t to, to m a k e a geological
e x a m i n a t i o n and s u r v e y of the lands embraced in the C h i p p e w a land district, in W i s c o n Sln

'''

125,238

P.
Pacific ocean, t h e m e a n s of p r o m o t i n g commerce on the, discussed . . . . . .
P e n s i o n s , a r m y and n a v y , e x p e n d i t u r e s for t h e p a y m e n t of, in 1845-'6.
in 1846-'7

009
'V
22 2 3
! . . . . ' ! .'.24, 155

P e r m i t , form of, to land merchandise for w a r e h o u s i n g
..
*"" * * 1 5 6 , 3 g l
P i e r and basin in the. N o r t h river, report concerning the erection of a great," a n d a r g u m e n t s
'
in. f a v o r . o f .
,
409
?
c o m m u n i c a t i o n s s h o w i n g the cost, and proceedings of public* meeting in
f a v o r .of the erection of a
...
......
45-,
P i e r s a n d basin in the E a s t river, B r o o k l y n , prospectus of t h e ' A t l a n t i c ' D o c k C o m p a n y In '
regard, to .the erection of,,and .certificates in favor of, b y i n s u r a n c e companies of N e w
465
P o p u l a t i o n of .the .United States, f r o m 1790 to 1847, statement of the
'
a n n u a l l y , f r o m 1790 to 1848 inclusive, statement of t h e . . . . . . .
qnq 203
r*9
& c . , of N e w Y o r k city
4 1 2 4 1 3 414 ' 4 1 5 4 1 5
of .the world .and principal n a t i o n s of the w o r l d .
'
' 4 3 1 ' 439' aqa
P o r k , the prices o f „ i n 1846.
' 4<w»
bL
P u b l i c debt of t h e . U n i t e d States—
' "
''
a m o u n t of t h e , paid f r o m 4th M a r c h , 1845, to 1st D e c e m b e r , 1846
5 -98 127
a m o u n t of the, paid .from 1st December, 1846, to 1st D e c e m b e r , 1847
W
it*
principal and. interest paid on the old funded and u n f u n d e d , in 1 8 4 5 - ' 6 .
"
23 28
in 1 8 4 6 - 7 ; . . . ! ! ! ' ! ! ! 1 5 5 , 1 5 9
in 1847-'8
156, 1 5 9 , 3 1 7
in 1848-'9
318
interest paid on the loans of 1841, '2 and '3, in 1 8 4 5 - ' 6 .
90 9 0
'"J846-;7
^
|47- 8
in 1848-'9
interest p a i d . o n . t h e T r e a s u r y notes in 1 8 4 5 - ' 6 .

:i'i55,159
3,156,159,317
qiq
" " 2 3 og

• " ^ ' > 1 •
* •. ." ' . . " . . ' . ' . . . .155, 159
1 5 6
I n . . : . : : : : • : : : :
' 1 5 9 ' ^
expenditures.for. the redemption and r e i m b u r s e m e n t of T r e a s u r y notes—
i S E : : : : : : : : : : : : : ; : ; : : : ; ; ;
in 1848-'9
.J"
156, l o 9 ,
statement of t h e , 4th M a r c h , 1845
a 'or ' W Y o q
statement of the, 1st December, 1846.
o, ^o, w / ,
statement of the, 1st D e c e m b e r , 1847.
"'
* V97
statement of the, on t h e 1st October, 1=848
*°
statement of the, September 30, 1848
.....
statement of t h e , a n n u a l l y , f r o m 1790 to 1848 i n c l u s i v e . ! '
" ' qaq
principal and interest of the, paid a n n u a l l y , f r o m 1^90 to 1848, inclusive!!! ''
m
* i?' Z U i " l l y ' l 0 n 1 a C ^ ° u n t o f t h e i n t e # t a n d Principal of the, from' t h e
4th of M a r c h , 1789, to t h e 1st December, 1847, and views in regard to. . . . . . .128
the actual increase of the, since M a r c h 4, 1845
'
'
^ views m 1848 in regard t o ' t h e .
!.'!"*'
P u b l i c l a n d s , receipts f r o m the sales of, estimated for a n d ascertained—
in 1845-'6
,
in 1846—'7
' . V . 7 . ' / ' ' 2 24 119
S w K : : : ; : : : : : : : : : ; ; ; : :

Digitized for V o l . V I . — 4 2 .
FRASER


3

>

317
o}q
213
qqa
Q09
Vlt
18*
001
S
1Q.
151

3 1 8

674

INDEX..

Public lands, views in. 1846 in! regard to the. graduation and: reduction, of the p r i c e o f . - . . . . . . 14
views, in 1847 in favor, of:the graduation;, and reduction of-the price of.
121
........
14
the a m o u n t of,, subject to. sale.
the quantity ofJancU in the, Chickasaw; c e s s i o n . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14
h o w the revenue from, might be increased under the preemption system . . . .
15
a( graduation of the price of, recommended in 1 8 4 7 . . . . .
..
••• •
estimated' receipts from the sales of—see Estimates.
quantity of, subject to private •entry in December,. 1 8 4 7 . . . . . . . . . ........ . . . . . 1 2 4
unsurveyed, to which the.Indian title was extinguished 1 in 1847.....,.;........... 124
amount" ©f T r e a s u r y notes., received 3 for., in 1846-7....................,.,. ........128, 198
T r e a s u r y circular, and report of'the L a n d D^p.art|nent, f in.repu-cUo.the sales,
&c., of lands in the Chickasaw lands.,.'. . . . . V . 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73, 74, 75
statement showing the. estimated 1 g a i n . o f / t h e graduation over ; the. old' system
of selling the, & c .
• • 'Y™''"
the number of acres of, subject to entry at .private sale.in .each;State,and. T e r ritory, the number procMmed to be offered in the spring, of 1848,. the,
number surveyed and not proclaimed or offered, the number in process, the,
number to which the Indian title has been extinguished 3 , (fec.,,<fec., to the
1st December, 1847
•
-198
t h e . a i m in. square miles and quantity: in acres of, in the. Territories of-the
United .States,.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
in California, views:in 1848 in regard to
. . . 311
Public moneys, T r e a s u r y circulars and regulations in 1846 in regard to the safe-keeping
* of the, (fee.
•
-31> 3.5j. 36, 3?, 40.^ 41
views in ; 1847 in regard:to; the,keeping of the.,.
130
subject to. draft in November, and. December,. 1848
338
Public revenues—see Revenues.
Preemption laws.,.views.in regard to.the restrictions in the
15
' '
an extension of the, recommended in: 1847 to unsurv.eyed lands-,, and: 0 n
fayorable conditions.to.actual- settlers
......
121* 124
Prices cijrrerit in .New Y o r k of certain, agricultural products.... ...
.10, 50
1
of .United States.stock in N e w Y o r k in. 1846- '7.
186
of r United States, T r e a s u r y notes in N e w Orleans. ih: 1846- '7:.
194
Products. of agriculture—see Agricultural products..
American,, exports of, in. 1846. and: 1 8 4 7 * . . . . . . . . . . .. .
199
views in, 1847 on the,annual value.and,export, of, < f e c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
138
views in regard to the interchange of. . . . .
• » . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 139.
Prospectus of the AtlanticDock C o m p a n y , N e w Y o r k city, in.r.egard to the erection of docks,
bulkheads,,&c
...
465
Protective policy, views in 1846 against the...
••••"
:;
ViV
'
views in 1847 on the
142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147
argument in 1848 against a
285
Provisions exported—see Breadstuffs.
Prussia, t i e national debt, annual revenue, population, a r m y and navy of:
434
R.
.Receipts into the T r e a s u r y from all sources, as estimated for, and ascertained—
in 1845-'6
1,19,226
in 1 8 4 6 - ' 7 * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
.2, 24, 119, 151, 226, 320, 339
in 1847-'8
.......
.3, 156, 229, 279, 281, 315, 320, 339
in 1 8 4 $ - 1 ' 9 . , . . " . . , . . '
318, 320, 339
h o w much, they declined under the tariff of 1842.
-.j
... •
6
h o w increased under the tariff of 1846. t
6, 13
from sales of public lands-^-see Public. Lands.
from customs—see Customs.
from loans.—see Treasury Notes—see Loans.
•estimates of—see. Estimates.
views in 1847 on the operations of the. tariff.of 1846, and the, under, it
138> 226
f r o m customs in all the ports.of. t h e United StateSj severally, in-.November, of
1
1846 and, 1847.
......
205
v
from customs, comparative statement showing the.amount of* during several perir
ods, from 1st December, 1845, to 1st .December,. 1847-, and views-, in regard" t o . 138, 226
from customs, under the tariff of 1842, for the entire, period of its.existence.. .281, 320
under the tariff of 1846, the average monthly,.from J u l y 1, 1846, to September. 30,
1848.. . . . . . . .
. .. .
. .
-•
. . . . m , 320
of specie and T r e a s u r y notes aj.the cust.om r house., N e w Y o r k , in 1847-and 1848.. 324
into the T r e a s u r y , annually from°1790 to: 1848 inclusive of T r e a s u r y notes: and;
loans.........
• • • •.—
303, 332
from, the loan.of 1848. .
•• • • . • ••
339
views in 1.847 in.regard to t h e . a m o u n t o f , . t o be derived from M e x i c o .
123
Receivers—see Treasury CirciUars.




i M I
0

67S

m

I S ^ ^ '
^
^ ^ i S e r a n n u f U l y , , f r o m i i m t o 4 8 4 7 n n d « s w e , , t H ' e . v a l u ^ o f . . . , . 208
Registers and receiv.ersrof landroffi.Ges,:Treasury.circulars, to in 1846v;..,! <31*33^35*36 37 49
Treasury..circulars.to,:in, 1 8 4 7 . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . 233
inhibited in 1847 from, becoming depositaries ' or
agents for the.sale.of. b o u n t y land: w a r r a n t s v c e r t i f i Revenue, a n n u a ^ p f G ^
434
internal, of the M e x i c a n , Government..
.......
•
' 7
'
Revenue l a w s , , v i e w s in fav^r. of their, extension to O r e g o n , ! . " !
""" V " ' " "'*"
considerations in 1848 in regard to their extension^o.bVeVon, fc ' " '
*'
Treasury circular in:1848 in regard to:the:extension of. the,.avei'ihe'acquil
4
sitions.from M e x i c o .
..
...........
. ,
Revenuesj.estimated.and ascertained; amount-of the--" '
""" *
.v
f o r 1845-^6. ,
. . v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . w . . . .,
i-19.
for Tft47~'ft' • •
•
...
Z ^l;;:::;;;;;:;^:;:;'-:^
h0

^ieldUCh

* ^ y p ^ r

435
Too
900
Qifl

am

226

. . .V. . i y 24, i i 9 ; . i 5 1 J 2 2 6 , 3201 339
• •• • • -3>
279, a s i , 3 1 5 , 3 2 0 ; 3 3 ?

Venl'/on 'the i m p o r t s o F t i a a n d

w S

h o w m u c h t h e , declined u n d e r t h e ' t a r i f f o f 1 8 4 2 . * . . . . . ' .
" '
' ' " '
how. much, increased u n d e r the n e w tariff
•.
.
"
h
lands:
°system r e v e n u e f r o m
might." be. increased' u n d e r t h e preemption

^
t
5

m e a s u r e s recommended in 1847 to i n c r e a s e ' t h e ' ' . 1 ^ ' . ! !
" ' " " " "
laws of C o n g r e s s and regulations of the T r e a s u r y D e p a r t m e n t , ' pro'vidinV for the
safe-keeping, t r a n s f e r , and disbursement of the p u b l i c . . . 3 1 , 3 3 , 3 5 , 3 6 , 3 7 40 41 4Q
a m o u n t of revenue u n d e r the: tariff of 1842: d u r i n g its existence. \ .
' 281
reYenUe: UDder the tariffof; 1846
^ m S
' from J u l y , 1st-, 1846, t o S e p t e m b e r '
i t a ^ 1 6 r e v e n u ® » " c o m m e r c e , a n d population'o'f- t h e United S t a t e s , ' f r o m '
^
i/yuto-i-«474
.......
. 201 2 0 ?
- e n u e , an.nual, exclusive of Treasury; notes a n d l o a n s , f r o m 1790 to 1848 inclusubj.ect to draft in Nbve'mber'and December,'1*848; ".'.'.'.*.'.'.
* 3 0 3 ' qq?
views m.1847 on-the operations-of t h e tariff of 1846, and statement s h o w i n g 'the
b
amount-of, derived therefrom...ioo 00c
views.in 1848:on.the
.........
- ""
Rice, the product arid price* of, in 1846;,
"
l n' Vn
Rivers, i m p r o v e m e n t of— s e e Harbors..
'
'
R u s s i a , the n a t i o n a l debt, y e a r l y revenue, population, a n d a r m y and n a v v of
. . . 434
R y e , the:product a n d - p r i c e of, in 1846
...:
.50, 51
S.
S a m p l e s , the quantities allowed.to be d r a w n a s , in the custom-houses of E u r o p e . . .
1
568
School lands—see Oregon.
Settlers, r e c o m m e n d a t i o n i n . 1 8 4 7 . t h a t - t h e p r i c e of public l a n d s be reduced to actual,.
124
.. in Oregon, recommedation t h a t grants-of land be m a d e to. .. ..
Vi.^u ^iuiiw-ui ia.uu. LC IIlclUC LU.
»
f ^
i
. . . . . . . . . , . qV, QX/C i
, . 7z 97
S h o r e linn of the coast of. j.1.e_ United 1 S«t a t .e s . . . . . .
line
t h TT.. • .
.
n
9
1
of the rivers of the United States.-.
,..
" " 7
- - ' 341

285
Ship building, t h e cost and progress"of"
~
'
' 342
statement s h o w i n g the n u m b e r and, class-of" vessels 'built," and the' tonnaVe'thereof" in 4 4 1
each State and I erritory of t h e United States, in the y e a r 1834. .
442
S m u g g l i n g w o u l d become an organized system if the tariff of 1842 w e r e r e e n a c t e d . ' . . ' ! . ' ! ! ! 2 8 5
Spirits, refined, bounties paid a n n u a l l y . o n , from. 1840 to 1847 inclusive.
..
40ft
Specie, i m p o r t s and e x p o r t s , o f , in 1846 a n d . 1 8 4 7 . . . . . . . . .
" ' 1 3 3 Jg^
a m o u n t of, received from-all sources into the T r e a s u r y in 1847, and d i s b u r s e d ' 128 133 185
received at the c u s t o m - h o u s e , N e w Y o r k , f r o m J a n u a r y 1, to December. 1,184.7 ' 129' 197
i m p o r t s of, d u r i n g . t h e fiscal-years 1846:and 1847,
'
. . . . . . ' 1 3 3 199
imports a n d . e x p o r t s of, including A m e r i c a n coin,.from 1821 to 18*47 inriusiVe''
' 203
on deposit" in 1847 with the A s s i s t a n t T r e a s u r e r of the U n i t e d States in 1847"an'd
views in regard t o . - . . . . . . . . .
.... ,
1 9 q ' i q i 910
imports of, in 1847.
' \ 7 ' ' .V." .
' 226
for f u r t h e r statements of the imports, and e x p o r t s of—see Coin.
a m o u n t of, received at t h e custom-house, N e w York., in the years 1847 and 1848. 301 324
receipts and d i s b u r s e m e n t s of, in 1847 and 1 8 4 8 . .
qqq
Statistics of public lands
. . .". . ' . ' . ' . . ' • ! ' 1 9 8 3 3 5
,
of commerce, revenue,, a n d population of the United States ,' from'i.796 'to •.1847•.
201,

.
.
t .. . j
of the tonnage of.the United, States
of.population of the United S t a t e s .
of the public debt of the United.States..




..

.
.. ..

"

2 0 3 , 2 0 8 ; 209
225 229 442
'
'333
332

676

INDEX..

o
QQ2
Statistics of loans, Treasury notes, &c
• -- ••
• • ••• •
"
^
shore line of the coast and rivers, &c., o f t h e United States in miles
341, 34^
.of property, taxation, and population, & c „ of N e w York city commerce, tonnage,
duties,
- 413 > 4 1 4 ' 4 1 5 ' 4 1 6 > H I
o f t h e docks in England
-.. - ^
of shipping, trade, and navigation of London.
y A " ' 'Tqi I t o
of the population of the world, and o f t h e principal nations of the world
.431,
of .the debts, .revenue, population, army and navy of Great Britain, Russia,
France, Austria, Prussia, and T u r k e y .
,v
of ship building.
...
- " '
...
of expenditure by New York city for docks, slips, &c
^
Steam power, particulars in regard to.
.
^ ' 9q9
Steamships, additional, recommended in 1848 as a means to increase commerce in the P a c i f i c 2 V 2
Steam navigation to India and elsewhere, projects for.
.
- • • - 4 3b,
Stocks, United States, issued in 184C> and 1847, amount, &c., of.
-v. .... . ^
>• • • • w
prices of, at New York, from December 1,1846, to Dec. 1,1847 , 133,l«b
avails in 1847-'8 of, issued under the acts for funding Treasury notes 315
318
in 1848-'9.
334
issued per acts of 1846 and 1847
Sub-Treasury—see Independent Treasury.
Sugar, the price of, in 1846.
• • * • • • • • • • • • •• -.
••
4UC5
refined, bounties on, annually, from 1840 to 1847 inclusive..
Survey—see Geological Survey-^see Coast Survey.
Surveyors of ports—see Treasury Circulars.
T.
Tariff of 1842, receipts from customs during the existence of t h e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • - - 320
rate aiid kind of duty under the, on certain imports in 1844, reduced to an
J
ad valorem dutyc
. .
\ \"\
"
identical in principle with the corn laws of Great Britain, how
^ , 12
Tariff'act of 30th J u l y , 1846,.the, and the Treasury instructions, to collectors and other
officers of the customs in furtherance of the-..,
.52, 58 to 16
receipts from customs, from July 1, 1846, to-September 30,
1848.
..
.
- — ••
views in regard to the benefits of the. .
.8, J41
the increased value of agricultural products, and increase of
commerce, and increased revenue, under the.
.. ,10, 13
views in 1847 on the operations of the, and a statement of
receipts under the, compared with those under the act of
F
..
...138,226
1842
views in 1848 on the revenue collected under the, and the
benefits of the, as compared with its predecessor
282
Tariffs, high and low, the effect of, discussed in 1847
......
142
T»
Tariff t^nlintr rvf TT,i vftnp discussed in111 1 R48
policy of Europe fl 1 «/\ll S!<3Prl 1848
Tariff, a protective, the policy of a, argued against.
••
Tariff of Mexico, and trade with, views in 1848 in regard to.
T a x , the rates of, in the several wards of New York city
458
Taxatidn under the tariff systems, views in 1847 on.
.
. y y • •• •
141
Teas the quantity and value of, consumed annually, from 1821 to 1847,inclusive, and the
'
amount of duty which accrued on the same, from 1821 to 1832, the average rate of
duty per pound, and views on,
..
. ..
. . .
.25, 123, 228
how much revenue a duty of twenty-five per cent, on the imports of, would y i e l d . .
4
a duty of twenty-five per cent, ad valorem recommended, in 1847, to increase the
revenue
••.
•<••••
- •
..121, 123
T e x a s , the area of, in square miles and a c r e s . .
.
.......
... .
335
Territories of the United States, the aggregate areas of the, in square miles and acres,,
335
Tonnage of the United States, from 1790 to 184.7, inclusive, statement of the. . ,.,
.203, 204
comparative statement of the foreign, coasting, and total, for
various periods, &c..
, c.
. .143, 225
statement showing what the, would be on the 30th June,
1857, if during each of the ten years succeeding the fiscal
year of 1847 the per centage of augmentation were the
same. . . . . .
143, 229
the increase o f t h e , in 1847 over 1846..
229
employed annually, from 1821 to 1848 inclusive
.284, 321
&c., of New York city
. ..
...
.412, 413, 415, 416, 417
of London, annually, from 1790 to 1832
428
Trade—see Free trade.
.
Transfer drafts, ordered by the Secretary of the Treasury in favor of the Assistant Ireasurer of the United States at New Orleans, from January 1 to December 1, 1847, and
views in regard to
128, 130, 180




INDEX.

677

T r e a s u r y circulars to collectors, receivers, treasurers of the mints, and other officers of the
government, under the act of 1846 establishing the constitutional
treasury, the act for the better organization of the T r e a s u r y , &c., in
1846....
31, 33, 35, 36, 37-, 49
to custom-house officers, in furtherance of the act of 1846 reducing the
d u t y on imports, & c . . . .
.52 to 73
73
in 1846
in 1846, to the collectors, &c., giving instructions in regard to the execution of the law establishing the warehousing system,
. . , .76, 101, 368
in 1847, to the collectors, and surveyors of ports acting as collectors, in
regard to estimates, quarterly, of the expenses of collecting the revenue. 230
in 1847 . :,.
.230, 231, 232, 233, 237, 238, 239, 241, 244, 245
and advertisements, in 1848
—
.336, 340
in 1849,
...368
T r e a s u r y drafts, the law and regulations in regard to
31
v .
notices and views in regard to loans and the issue of T r e a s u r y notes
,.134, 224
see Transfer drafts.
T r e a s u r y of the United States, the state of the—see Finances.
funds available to the 1st October, 1848, from loans and
T r e a s u r y notes.
... .
..
319
the amount necessary to be retained in the, under the constitutional "treasury,
121
T r e a s u r y Department, laws for the better organization of the, and providing for the safekeeping and disbursement of the public revenue, and regulations in regard thereto, &c. 31,
33, 35, 36, 37, 41, 49
T r e a s u r y notes, receipts into the T r e a s u r y f r o m , under the act of 22d of J u l y , 1846, and
28th J a n u a r y , 1847—
in 1846—'7
2, 5, 24, 119, 151, 181, 315
in 1847-'8
119, 156, 279, 315, 338
in 1 8 4 8 - ' 9 .
279,318,338
avails in 1847-'8 of, stock issued in funding
.t
. . . 315
avails in 1848-'9 of, stock issued in f u n d i n g , . . Jt
... . . . . . .
.. . . . 318
expenditures in payment of interest on, and in the redemption and reimbursement of, in 1845-'6
'
5, 23, 28
in 1 8 4 6 - 7
2, 24, 127, 155, 159
in 1847-'8
127, 156, 159, .317, 302, 338
in 1848-'9 . .
318, 302, 338, 339
reimbursed monthly, from December 1, 1846, to December 1, 1847. . 128, 180
issued monthly, from the 1st J a n u a r y to November 30, 1847, under the
acts of J u l y 22, 1846, and 28th J a n u a r y , 1 8 4 7 , . .
,128, 181
issued under the acts of J u l y , 1846, and the 1st and 15th sections of the
act of 28th J a n u a r y , 1847
..
338
outstanding, of the various issues in '1845
.28, 29
outstanding, in 1846-'7
29
outstanding, 1st December, 1847
.160, 161
outstanding, 1st October, 1848.
...
334
paid, (and to whom paid,) under the provisions of the act of Congress of
10th of August, 1846, which had been stolen and put into circulation,
and not cancelled. .
...
27, 127, 155, 157, 317
the amount of, received on account of customs, in the F i r s t Auditor's
Office, from the 1st December, 1846, to 1st December, 1847 * .182; 133, 214
statement of the, under the act of 22d J u l y , 1846, issued in exchange for
specie, deposited in 1847, five per cent, interest. .
,128,162,179
statement of, at six per cent., issued in exchange for money deposited to
the credit of the Treasurer of the United States, under the act of J a n u a r y
28, 1847 . . . .
.128,164,179
statement of, issued at five per cent, interest, in exchange for specie, under
the act of 28 th J a n u a r y , 1847
. . . ..
.128,179
the prices of, in the N e w York market in 1846-'7 . . . . . . ..
133, 186
the prices of, in the N e w Orleans market in 1846-'7.
, „ . . .. . .133, 194
the amount of, received from the sales of the public lands the last quarter
of 1846 and the first three of 1847
128, 197
the amount of, received at the custom house at N e w Y o r k , from J a n u a r y
1 to December 1, 1847
128, 197
T r e a s u r y notice in 1846 in regard t o . .
. . . .133, 224
funds available in the T r e a s u r y , October 1, 1848, from, &c
. . . . . 319
amount of, received at the custom-house, N e w Y o r k , in the years 1847
and 1848
.301, 324
and loans, annual receipts into the T r e a s u r y from 1790 to 1848 inclusive,
303, 332
moneys advanced in 1848 to the Assistant Treasurers to purchase
302, 339




678

INDEX..

Treasurer, of the M i n t and Branch Mints—see Treasury Circulars.
T r e a s u r e r , United States—see Assistant Treasurer.
T u r k e y , the national debt, yearly revenue, population, a r m y and navy. of.

.434, 435

U,
United States, views in regard to the resources of the, in their rapid development

. . . . 438

VVessels, the building of—see Ship-building..
(See Mexican war.)
Volunteers, estimates, to p a y , in 1846-'7.
estimates to p a y , in 1847-'8
estimates to p a y , in 1848-'9
expenditures in payment of, in 1845-'6..
expenditures in payment of,"in 1846-'7
expenditures in payment of, in. 1 8 4 7 - ' 8 ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.>

3
3, 120
121
22
..
155
317

W
W a l k e r , R . J . , Secretary o f t h e T r e a s u r y , reports-of—see Finances—see Warehousing system.
W a r with M e x i c o , the expenditures for—see Mexican hostilities.
W a r Department, expenditures, &c., under the—see Military, service.
W a r e h o u s e system, instructions to the collectors and other officers of the customs in regard
to the execution of the law establishing t h e . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . 1 6 , 76
the law establishing the
...
...
,79, 359
forms under the law establishing t h e . . . .
82 to 118
forms-issued in 1849 under the law of 1846-establishing the
373 to 40&
table exhibiting the value and kinds of imports in store on the 30th
September, 1847, under the, and views in regard thereto.
i37, 219
16
views in 1846"in regard to the projected.
report of the Secretary o f t h e T r e a s u r y in 1849' on the
. 343
instructions and forms issued in 1849 to the collectors and other officers
of the customs, under the act of I846'to establish the
359
views of the Committee on W h a r v e s , in N e w Y o r k , of the
430
W a r e h o u s e systems of Europe—
views in 1847 in regard to the commission appointed to examine the.
137
instructions from the T r e a s u r y Department in 1847 to C. C . W a l d e n and D . P , Barh y d t , the commissioners to examine the, and their report thereon, comprehending
all the forms and rules observed in the custom-houses, &c., in the execution of the. 137,
246 to 273, and 477 to 664
W a r e h o u s e system of Belgium, extracts from the customs laws of Belgium, relating to the,
and the regulations of the
. . t ., •
,
572
W a r e h o u s e s in England, description of t h e . . .
529
value of goods in store in the.
137
W a r e h o u s e s , United States, the value and description of foreign merchandise in store on
the 30tli September, 1847
219
statement of the value of merchandise warehoused in the ports
of the United States, from August 6,1846, to September 30,
1848.
..... ......
476
goods sent to the, u n c l a i m e d . . . . . . . .
477
k
W e i g h t s and .measures, the progress in the standard of.
.... ......
309
W e s t e r n country, views concerning the population, commerce,.&c., of the
.. . . . 443
W h a l e fisheries, the increase of shipping in the
436
W h a r f a g e , the rates of, in Boston, Massachusetts, and the regulations in regard to
459
W h a r v e s , report, in 1836, of the Committee on, of the Board of Aldermen of the city of
409
N e w Y o r k , relative to the erection of a great pier in the N o r t h river
Washington city, the debt of—see District of Columbia.
W h e a t , the product and price of, in 1846
10, 50, 51
W o o l , the price of, in 1846.
..
51
Y
Young, McClintock, acting Secretary of the T r e a s u r y , his report, pointing out a clerical
error in the report of December, 1847. „,
275