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ANNUAL R E P O R T

OF THE

SECRETAIY OF THE TEEASURY
ON THE

STATE OF THE FINANCES

FOR

THE

irEA.Tl 1881.

WASHINGTON:
GOVEENMENT P R I N T I N G




1881.

OFFICE,




A so
ou

TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page...
Ill

I . — R E P O R T OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY

Tables accompanying the report

--

3^

I I . — R E P O R T S OF T R E A S U R Y OFFICERS:

Auditor, First
Auditor, Second
Auditor, Third
Auditor, Fourth
Anditor, Fifth
Auditor, Sixth
Commissioner of Customs
Commissioner of Internal Reyenue
Comptroller, First
„
Comptroller, Second
Comptroller of the Currency
Director of the Mint
Liabilities to Indian tribes
Register
Treasurer of the United States




:
,

-

-

351
363>
377
393405.
413^
343
6332S
337"
I83»
253
627
471
41^




&c

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, ^

Document IS.0. 187.
Secretary.

HEPOUT
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

Washington.^ JD. (7., December 5, 1881.
SIR : I have the honor to submit the foUowing reiiort:
The ordinary revenues from all sources for the fiscal year euded
June 30, 1881, were—.
From customs"
$198,159,676 02
From internal revenue.
135, 264, 385 51
From sales of public lands
2,201,863 17
From tax on circulation and deposits of national
banks
8,116,115 72
From repayment of interest by Pacific Eailway Companies.:
^
810,833 80
From sinking-fund for Pacific 1^ ail way Companies..
805,180 54
From customs' fees, fines, penalties, &c
-^.
1,225, 514 SQ
From fees—consular, letters-patent, and lands
2,244,983 98
From proceeds of sales of Grovernment property
262,174 00
From profits on coinage.
3, 468, 485 61
From revenues of the District of Columbia
2,016,199 23
From miscellaneous sources
6,206, 880 13 _
Total ordinary receipts

360, 782, 292 57

The ordinary expenditures for the same period were—
For civil expenses
$17,941,177
For foreign intercourse
v
1,093,954
For Indians
6, 514,161
For pensions
50', 059,279
For tlie military establi shment,. in eluding river and
harbor imiirovements, and arsenals
40, 466, 460
For the naval establishment, including vessels, machinery, and improvements at navy-yards
15, 686, 671
For iniscellaneous expenditares, including public
buildings, light-houses, and collecting the revenue.
41, 837, 280
For expenditures on account of the District of Columbia
3, 543, 912
For interest on the public debt,
82, 508, 741
For preinium on bonds purchased
=
1, 061,248

19
92
09
62
55
66
57
03
18
78

Total ordinary expenditures

260, 712, 887 59

Leaving a surplus revenue of
Which was applied as follows:
To the redemption of—
Bonds for the sinking-fund
Fractional currency for the sinking-fund
Loan of February, 1861
..,

$100;, 069, 404 98

I




74,371,200 00
109,001 05
7, 418, 000 00

IV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Ten-forties of 1864
. Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of 1864
Five-twenties of 1865
Consols of 1865
•
Consols of 1867
Consols of 1868
,
Texan indemnity stock
Old demand, compound-interest, and other notes
And to the increase of cash in the Treasury

$2, 016,150 00
18,300 00.
3, 400 00
37, 300 00
143,150 00
959,150 00
337, 400 00,
1,000 00
18,330 00
14, 637, 023 93
100, 069, 404 98

. The requirements of the sinking-fund for the last fiscal year, including a balance of $49,817,128.78, not provided for up to the close of the
previous year, amounted to $90,786,064.02. Tbere was applied thereto
from the redemption of bonds and fractional currenc}^, as shown in
the above statement, the sum of $74,480,201.05, leaving a deficit of
$16,305,873.47. It is estimated that the requirements of the fund for
the present fiscal year, including the balance from last year, will
amount to $59,634,856.50. The amount of bonds redeemed during the
months of Jul3^, August, September, and October of the present year
is in excess ofthe requirements of the, sinking-fund for the entire year
by the sum of $6,176,593.50. The surplus revenues, however, which
may hereafter accrue during the year, will be applied to the purchase
or redemption of the public debt, as contemplated in section 2 of the
act approved March 3, 1881, (21 Stats., p. 457.)
Compared with the previous fiscal year, the receipts for 1881 have
increased $29,352,901.10, in the following items: In custoins revenue,
$11,637,611.42; in internal revenue, $11,255,011.59; in sales of pubhc
lands, $1,185,356.57; in tax on circulation and deposits of national
banks, $1,101,144.28; in proceedsof sales of Indian lands, $1,055,202.40;
in deposits by individuals for surveying public lands, $1,329,588.85; in
fees on letters-patent, $50,415.84; in profits on coinage, $676,298.83; in
revenues of the District of Columbia, $206,729.53; and in raiscellaneous
items, $855,541.79. There was a decrease of $2,097,219.51, as follows:
In repayment of interest by Pacific Eailway Companies, $896,533.38";
in interest and premium on Indian trust-fund stocks, $631,595.76; in
registers'and receivers' fees, $154,798.29; and.in unenumerated items,
$414,292.08; making a net increase in the receipts, from all sources, of
$27,255,681.59.
The expenditures show a decrease over the previous year of
$21,700,800.39, as follows: In the Interior Department, (pensions,)
$6,717,894.82; in iiremium on bonds purchased, $1,734,071.64; and in




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

V

the interest on public debt, $13,248,833.93. There was an increase of
$14,770,730.20, as follows: In the War Department, $2,349,544.33j
in the Navy Department, $2,149,686.92; in the Interior Department,
(Indians,) $568,704; and in the civil and miscellaneous, $9,702,794.95—
making a net decrease in the expenditures of $6,930,070.19.
FISCAL YEAR 1882.

For the present fiscal year the revenue, actual and estimated, is as
follows:
For the quarter For the remainended Septem- ing three quarber 30,1881.
ters of tbe year.

Source.

From customs
From internal revenue
:
From sales of public lauds
From tax on circulation and deposits of national
banks
From repayment of interest by Pacitic Railway
Companies
From customs' fees, fines, penalties, &c
F.rom fees—consular, letters-patent, and lands
From proceeds of sales of Government proiDcrty..
From profits on coinage
From revenues of the District of Columbia
From miscellaneous sources
Total receipts-

:. .

Actual.

Estimated.

$59,184,469 15
37,575,502 22
948,368 19

1155,81.5,530 85
117,424,497 78
1,551,631 81

4,307,988 86

3,692,011 14

'^ 59,999 49
421,811 62
639,180 08
66,363 58
809,317 80
158,445 95
4,009,596 15

1,440,000 51
928,188 38
1,810,819 92
183,636 42
2, 440, 682 20
1,641,554 05
4,890, 403 85

108,181,043 09

291,818,956 91

The expenditures for the same period, actual and. estimated, are—
For the quarter For the remainended Septem- ing three quar. ber 30,1881.
ters of the year,

Source.
/

•

•

Actual.

For civil and miscellaneous expenses, including
public buildings, light-houses, and collecting
112,252,053 71
the revenue
.
.
2,Oil,984 70
For ludians
... .
17,220,122 12
For pensions
For military establishment, including fortifica-.
tions, river and harbor improvements, and ar13,517,184 11
senals
For naval establishment, including vessels and
4,646,969 78
machinery, and improvements at n a v y - y a r d s . . .
For expenditures on account of the District of
1,131, 476 04
Columbia
24,271, 948 93
For interest on the pubhc debt
Total ordinary expenditures

i




75,051,739 39

Estimated.

$47,247,946 29
4,288,015 30
52,779,877 88
30,982,815 89
^ 10,853, 030 22
2,368,523 96
46,428,051 07
194,948,260 61

VI

• REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Total receipts, actual and estimated
^Total expenditures, actual and estimated

$400, 000, 000 00
270, 000,000 00

Estimated ainount due the sinking-fund.

130,000,000 00
59, 634,856 50

Leaving a balance of

70,365,143 50

FISCAL YEAR 1883.

The revenues of the fiscal year ending June 30,1883, estimated upon
the basis of existing laws, will be—
From customs
$215, 000, 000 00
From internal revenue
155, 000, 000 00
From sales of public lands
2, 500, 000 00
From tax on circulation and deposits of national
banks
^:
8, 000, 000 00
From repayment of interest by.Pacific Eailway Companies. / .
..:...
1, 500, 000 00
From customs' fees, fines, penalties, &c
1, 350, 000 00'
From fees—consular, letters-patent, and lands
!
2,450, 000 0()
From proceeds of sales of Government propert}^
' 250,000 00 <
From profits on coinage 3, 250,000 00
From revenues of the District of Columbia
1, 800, 000 00
From miscellaneous sources
8, 900, 000 00
Total estimated ordinary receipts

400, 000,000 00

The estimates of expenditures for the sameperiod, received from the
several Executive Departments, are as foUows:
Legislative
Executive
Judicial
Foreign intercourse
»
Military estabhshment
Naval establishment
Indian affairs
Pensions
Public works:
Treasury Department. : . . :
War Department-. Navy Department
Interior Department
Post-Office Department.
Department of Agriculture
Department of Justice
Postal service
Miscellaneous
District of Columbia




:
•

$3,282,000
11, 479, 506
'2,829,938
386,900
8, 000
43, 730
1,500

$2, 993,455
16,291, 367
403,200
1, 315, 055
29,509, 524
o 17,249,148
5, 841, 713
100, 000, 000

92
73
00
00
17
46
91
00

J 8, 031, 574
920, 077
18,141, 851
3^ 562, 599

03
95
95
31

00
03
00
00
00
00
00

-.

I

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Permanent annual appropriations:
Interest on the public debt
$65,000,000
Sinking-fund
.. V
45, 611, 714
Eefunding—customs, internal revenue, lands, &c
7,514,100
Collecting revenues from customs.. 5, 500,000
Miscellaneous
- - 2,577,125

VII

00
22
00
00
00
$126, 202,939, 22

Total estimated expenditures, including sinking-fund
340, 462,507 65
Or, an estimated surplus of

$59,537,492 35

Excluding the sinking-fund, the estimated expenditures will be
$294,850,793.43, showing a surplus of $105,149,206.57.
The foregoing estimates of expenditures for the fiscal year 1883 are
$56,069,257.60 in excess of those submitted last year, as follows:
Increase—
Legislative
\
Executive proper
Department of State
Treasury Department
War Department
Navy Department
Interior Department
Department of Agriculture
Decrease—
Post-Office Department
Department of Justice

$389,285 05
11, 736 00
53, 520 00
1, 699, 332 * 69
914,221 37
4,132, 634 40
51,586,130 04
160,260 00
^
$58,947,119 55

-

2, 648,261 95
229, 600 00
;

Net increase

2, 877, 861 95
56,069,257 60

The estimates of this Department are submitted as made up by the
<Jfficers in charge of the public duties to which they respectively pertain, and while exceeding those of last year by the sum of $1,699,332.69,
they are in excess of the appropriations made for the Department at
the last session of Congress only to the extent of $608.55.
PUBLIC MONEYS.

The monetary transactions of the Governinent have been conducted
through the offices of the United States Treasurer, nine assistant
treasurers, one depositary, and one hundred and thirty-tvro nationalbank depositaries.

i




VIII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE TREASURY.

The receipts of the Government, amounting during the fiscal year
as shown by warrants, to $474,532,826.57, were deposited as follows:
In independent-treasury offices
$343,80Q, 718 83
In national-bank depositaries
130, 732,107 74
The quarter! 3^ examinations of indepen dent-treasury offices required
by law have been duly made, and in addition thereto the offices have
been subjected to special examinations by officers of this Departmento
As far as known there have been no losses to the Government by public officers engaged either in the receipt, safe-keeping, or disburse
ment of the public inoneys.
By act of Congress, approved March 3, .1857, .public disbursing
officers were required to place all funds intrusted to them for disbursement, on deposit w^ith a public depositary, and to draw for them
only in favor of the persons to whom payment was to be made.
The provisions of this law.remained unchanged until the act.of June
14,'1866, reproduced as section 3620, Eevised Statutes, was passed,
removing the restrictions as to the method of drawing checks. By an
act approved February 27, 1877, that section was so amended as to reenact the provisions of the act of March 3,1857, concerning disbursing
officers' checks, which the Department had found iinpracticable to
enforce. The attention of Congress has been called to this matter in the
annual reports of the Secretary for years 1857, 1858, and 1878, fully
explaining the impracticability of enforcing the law according to the
letter as it now stands, and it is recommended that it be so amended
that payment may be made and checks drawn under regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury.
NATIONAL BANKS.

The ^ report of the Comptroller of the Currency contains full information in reference to the affairs of the national banks, ft shows
that on October 1 of the iiresent year there were a-^ greater number of banks in operation than at any previous time, the number being
2,132. Their returns show that they had on that day an aggregate
capital of $463,821,985; surplus, $128,140,617; individual deposits,
$1,070,997,531; loans, $1,169,022,303; and specie, $114,334,736. The
aggregate circulation, $360,344,250, as well as the amount of loans and
individual deposits, was much larger than at any time since the organization of the system.
The corporate existence of 396 banks will expire previously to February 25, 1883. The Comptroller recommends that an act be passed authorizing any national bank, at any time within two 3'ears prior to the




i

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

IX

expiration of its corporate exis^tence, to extend its period (pf succession
by amending its articles of association by the votes of shareholders
owning two-thirds of the capital of the association, if such association, upon an exaniination of its affairs, shall be found to be in a
satisfactory condition. The law provides that the Comptroller shall
issue his certificate authorizing any banking association to commence
business, if it shall conform in all respects to the legal requirements.
The banks may, therefore, underthe present law, continue their existence, and. in the absence of prohibitory legislation, many of them undoubtedly will, on ,the expiration of their corporate existence, organize
new associations, and obtain from the Comptroller authority to continue business. The iiassage, however, of an act directly authorizing
an extension of the coriiorate existence of the banks, would in many
instances save much labor, and avoid the distribution of the iiresent
large surplus fund among the shareholders, which would result from
liquidation. The passage of a bill authorizing such a renewal of their
charters is recommended.
The Comptroller gives official information in tabulated form of the
proportion of coin, paper money, and checks used by the national banks,
in their business, in each State and xirincipal city. Eeturns have been
obtained from the banks showing their total receipts upon two different
dates. The total receipts of 1,966 banks on June 30, last, were
$284,714,016, and of 2,132 banks on September 17, $295,233,779.
Upon this latter date the receipts were composed of $4,078,044 in gold
coin, $500,302 in silyer coin, and $13,026,571 in paper money, the remainder, amounting to $277,628,862, being in checks and drafts, including $6,593,337 of clearing-house certificates. The proportion of papermoney and coin was 5.9 per cent., and of checks and drafts 94.1 per
cent. The receipts of 48 banks in the city of New York were
$165,000,000, and the total percentage of coin and paper money was
1.2 percent, only, and of checks and drafts 98.8 per cent. The receiiits
of 237 banks in sixteen reserve cities, including New York, were
$243,115,594, and the proportion of checks and drafts was 96.7 per
cent. The banks elsewhere reported receipts amounting to $52,118,185,
in which the proportion of checks and drafts was 81.7 per cent.
These returns show how small an amount of money actually enters into
large transactions, and how much its use has been superseded by the
machinery of banking, with its modern system of checks, bills of^ex
change, and clearing-houses.
Full statistics are given in regard to the taxation of the banks, from
which it seems that the amount of taxes .paid, both by the Natibnal


http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
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Federal
Reserve Bank of St. Louis

X

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

and State banks, to the Federal Government during the last year,
has been greater than in any previous year, the total amount collected being $8,493,552 from the former, and $3,762,208 fromthe latter.
The taxes collected by the States have also increased, and the
amounts assessed are alleged to be disproportioned to the amount collected upon other moneyed capital. In another part of this report suggestion is made as to a reduction of the taxes upon these institutions.
• United States five and six per cent, bonds, amounting to $245,601,050,
held by the nationalbanks, have been extended with interest at 3^ per
cent., and it is estimated that the net interest at the current market
value, upon all the bonds held by them, does not exceed that rate.
RESERVE.

Previously to -the resumption of specie-payments, a reserve was
accumulated in the Treasury by the sale of $95,500,000 of bonds,
and by the retention of an additional amountof about $40,000,000
from surplus revenues. The policy pursued by this Department, as
repeatedly, announced to Congress, has been to retain as reserve
for the redemption of United States notes, about 40 jier cent, of the
notes outstanding, and in addition thereto to have sufficient money in
the Treasury to meet all other demand obligations outstanding. This
policy has been adhered to as rigidly as practicable. The reserve has
never fallen below 36 per cent., nor been above 45 per cent, of outstanding notes. The silver certificates issued are payable only in
silver coin, and the gold received for these certificates is now available
for resumiition purposes. There is now in the Treasurer's cash about
$25,000,000 of fractional silver coin having only a limited legal-tender
value, and not available for resumption purposes. The remainder of
this reserve consists chiefly of gold coiu. It is generally conceded
that, for safe banking, a reserve of 40 iier cent, to meet current
obligations is necessary. The Government, by the issue, of its notes,
payable on demand, and its obligation to .meet them when presented, is in a position analogous to that of banking, and should
, therefore act upon principles found to be sound and safe in that business.
SILVER CERTIFICATESo

The Department has issued silver certificates at the several subtreasury offices, upon a deposit of gold coin in like amount with the
assistant treasurer at New York, and through this means certificates
have been issued for nearly all the silver held by the Treasury. These
certificates amount to about $66,000,000, and are now outstanding.




I

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XI

About $34,000,000 of silver dollars are now in circulation. The total
result of this silver coinage is to increase the currency of the country
to the extent of about $100,000,000, and to require the Treasurer of the
United States to hold the silver coin in which the certificates are payable. ^
On November 1,1881, the Department held in its cash about $7,000,000
of the certificates, and about $250,000 of the coin for which certificates had not been issued.
^
The act of February 28,1878, requiring the issue of silver certificates
upon the deposit of standard silver dollars was a part of the policy of
the Governinent to maintain the standard of the silver dollar at^or near
the value of the standard gold dollar. The same act provided that
such certificates should be receivable '' for customs, taxes, and all public
dues."
The liberal purchase of bullion and coinage of silver dollars by this
Government, and the receipt of them by it for iiublic dues, has failed to
raise the price of silver bullion to any great extent in the markets of
the world.
„
^
As is said elsewhere herein, the circulation of some sixty-six millions of
silver certificates seems an inexpedient addition to the paper currency.
They are made a legal-ten'der for the purposes named, yet have for their
basis about eighty-eight per cent, only of their nominal value. There is
no promise from the Goyernment to make good the difference between
their actual and nominal value.
There need be no apprehension of a too limited paper circulation.
The national banks are ready to issue their notes in such quantity as
the laws of trade dema^nd, and as security therefor the Government
will hold an equivalent in its own bonds.
The embarrassments which are certain to follow from the endeavor
to maintain several standards of value, in the form of paper currency,
are too obvious to need discussion.
It is recommended, therefore, that measures be taken for a repeal of
the act requiring the issue of such certificates, and the early retirement
of them from circulation.
GOLD CERTIFICATES.

Immediately preceding resumption, the issue of certificates upon
deposits of gold was discontinued. I t w a s feared that parties might
present legal-tender notes based upon a 40 per cent, reserve, obtain
the gold therefor, and immediately deposit it for the certificates for
whioh, by law, the Department was required to hold 100 per cent.
Though often requested, the Department has ever since refused to




XII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

make any further issue of these certificates. By consent of the Comptroller of the Currency, these certificates are allowed to form a part of
thC'lawful reser^^e of national banks, much of wliich reserve is now in
gold coin. Should the certificates be issued, they would at once take
the place of this coin, and the.Treasury would hold the coin instead of
the banks. In view of any possible demand for the redemption in coin
of legal-tender notes, the issue of these certificates is very objectionable.
RETIREMENT OF NATIONAL-BANK NOTES. .

Under existing law, any national bank can at any time, upon a deposit
of legal-ten der notes or coin with the Treasurer of the United States,
Avithdraw the bonds held as security therefor, and leave the Treasury
to redeem an equal amount of its notes. This privilege was given to
the banks, evidently for the purpose of securing a proper elasticity of
the currency; and in view of the rapid payment of the public debt, it
would seem that this privilege is necessary for the purpose of facilitating the redemption of bonds held by the banks; but should many of
the banks, through apprehension of adverse legislation, or from any
other cause, desire to retire their circulation, the deposit of such an
amount of money with the Treasurer might cause a serious and sudden
contraction of the currency and grave embarrassments in business.
That the apprehension of such action is not groundless is shown by
what took place on the passage of the three per cent, refunding bill by
Congress at its last session. If it is thought advisable Congress can
enact that national banks be prohibited from retiring their currency,
except on a previous notice of intention so* to do; the length of that
notice to be fixed by law.
LEG^AL-TENDER NOTES.

This Department has little to add to Avhat has been said in former
reports from it on the subject of the notes known as legal-tender notes.
That they are convenient and safe for the community is without doubt.
That it is for the profit of the Government to continue them is also
without doubt. Yet there is one consideration that should have notice,
and that is, Avhether the Government can continue to claim for them the
quality of being a legal-tender for debts. This Department understands
that the constitutionality of niaking them a solvent of contracts Avas
found ih the exigencies of the Governnient raised by the civil Avar.
Whether now, that that Avar has sometime since ceased, and the Government has resumed payment of its debts in gold and silver coin, notes of
the United States shall be maintained as currency Avitli the legaltender qualit}", is a question worthy of attention.




I

REPORT CF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XIII

FRACTIONAL PAPER CURRENCY.
Of the $15,000,000 of fractional paper currency outstanding, only
about $80,000 has been redeeined this year, and this amount is likely
to groAY less each succeeding year. I t is suggested that Congress
authorize the Department to drop this amount from, any statement of
public debt hereafter issued, and make a permanent appropriation for the
redemption of such small amount of notes as may hereafter be presented. In this connection, attention is called to the fact that of the
public debt that matured before the year 1860, there remains outstanding and unpaid the sum of about $100,000. It is suggested that authority may Avell be giA^en to treat this amount in the same manner.
PAYMENT OF UNITED STATES BONDS IN G-OLD.

The gold dollar at the standard weight of 25.8 grains is by law the
unit of value, while the standard silver dollar by this standard is now
worth about eighty-eight cents.
Although the act of July 14, 1870, proAades for the issue of United
States bonds, '^redeemable in coin of the present standard value,"
Avhereby Avere included both gold and silver coin of that A-alue, yet as by
the act of February 12, 1873, the further coinage of silver dollars was
prohibited, and the Eevised Statutes declared gold coin only tobe legal
tender for sums exceeding five dollars, equity, if not strict construction
of laAV, requires that the holders of such bonds should receiA^e payment
thereof in gold or its equiA^alent,
By act of February 28, 1878, silver dollars of the standard Aveight
and fineness Avere ageiin made a legal tender at the nominal A-alue for
all debts and dues, public and private, except Avhere otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract.
Between the adoption ofthe EcAased Statutes, June 22,1874, and 1878,
sih-er coin Avas not a tender in payment of United States bonds, and it
might fairly be regarded, especially by foreign holders Avho had acquired
bonds during this interval, as a breach of fViith, if bond-creditors Avere
compelled to receiA^e payment in a coin worth in the markets of the
Avorld but eighty-eight per cent, of our own standard of value.
?
This GoA^ernment is abundantly able to discharge all its obligations
at home and abroad in money which is CA^erywhere accepted as a true
standard of value.
STANDARD SILVER DOLLARS.

As required by the act of February 28, 1878, the Departnient has
^ caused to be coined into standard silver dollars each month, at least
$2,000,000 in A-alue of bullion of that metal.




XIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Constant efforts haA^e been made to glA^e circulation to this coin, the
expense of transferring it to^all points where it was called for having
been paid by the GoA^ernment.
Only about thirty-four millions are now in circulation, leaving more
than sixty-six millions in the A^aults, and there is no apparent reason Avhy its circulation should rapidly increase.
The sih-er question is iuA^olved in some embarrassments. The monetary conference, to which a commission was sent the past year, after
elaborate discifssion, reached no conclusion, except to adjourn to meet
again for a further discussion next April. Whether a renewal at the
present time of the consideration of the subject by it is hkely to lead
to an3^ practical or acceptable results, seems doubtful. That most of
the European nations have a deep interest in a proper adjustment
ofthe ratio between gold and silver coinage, if not deeper than the
United States, admits of no doubt. We furnish the Avorld with the
largest portion of both gold and silver, and our exports command the
best money of the world, as they CA^er should do and A^dll, unless
we bind ourseh^es to accept of a poorer. We need not appear an}'where as suppUcants when Ave clearly may be the controllers. Some of
the European nations, whose concurrent action is necessary to any result that is sought, do not yet appear ready to accept bi-nietalism, and
when ready they may ask for a ratio that it AAill be inconvenient for
us to adopt, and reduce the ratio of silver below the standard of our
coinage, while the market or intrinsic A'alue of sih-er indicates the.propriety of a considerably increased ratio. That an agreement of the
principal nations of Europe with us, for the larger use of silver coinage
would furnish a larger market for silver, and to that extent increase its
value, is certain, but the excess of it over the supply for that purpose
would onty command the price of a commodity on the market. Therefore, the fixing of any ratio is a matter of extreme delicacy to be full}'considered.
The most potential means of bringing about any concert of action
among different nations, Avould appear to be for the United States to
suspend, for the present, the further coinage of silver dollars. This is
the decided opinion, in both France and America, of the highest
authorities on bi-metalism, and of those Avho wish to bring silver into
general use and raise its A-alue; and it is believed that a cessation of
coinage would, at a A^er}^ early day, bring ^bout a satisfactory consideration of the Avhole subject among the chief commercial nations.
The silver question, obA^iously, is one that demands the early attention of our laAV-makers, or the subject may drift beyond our control




i

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XV

unless control is retained at a great sacrifice. A continuance of the
monthly addition to our silver coinage Avill soon leaA^^e us no choice but
that of an exclusive silver coinage, and tend to reduce us to a i)lace in
the cominercial AvOrld among the minor and less civilized nations.
I t may be assumed that a people as enterprising and progressive as
that of the United States, holding a leading position among nations,
' will not consent to the total abandonment of the use of gold as one of
the metals to be employed as money, and we cannot consent to be
placed in the A^-ery awkward position of paying for all that we buy
abroad upon a gold standard, and selling all that we have to sell on a
silver standard.
It is, therefore, recommended that the provision for the coinage of a
fixed amount each month be repealed, and the Secretary be authorized
to coin only so much as will be necessary to supply the demand.
The effect of storing large amounts of silver coin in the Treasury
A^aults, with the present laAV requiring, the issue of silver certificates, is
to furnish a paper currency not payable in gold or its equivalent. This
policy is open to most of the objections that can be urged against the
increase of United States notes or of gold certificates, and to the additional objection that it furnishes a currency depreciated, from the A^ery
nature of the basis on which it rests—that is, silver coin of a debased
A-alue as compared with gold coin.
There is no objection to supplying, fully a demand for silver dollars
for actual use at home and in some few foreign markets, but so long as
generall3^, in the markets of the world, they are of less value than the
gold dollar, Avhich is our legal standard of value, they must be regarded
as subsidiary coin. I t is believed that the amount in circnlation will be
steadily increased, but not so fast as to require, for some months, or
perhaps years, any addition to the ainount already coined.
In answer to inquiry, it is Avell to say that what are the profits on
the coinage is shown from year to year by the report of the Eegister
of the Treasuiy. The receipt of them into the Treasury is acknowledged in the item of miscellaneous receipts, and they are put to the
same uses as any other receipts into the Treasury, that is, to the pay-.
ment of the expenses or debts of GoA^ernment.
CUSTOMS.

i

^

Therevenue from customs for the past fiscal year Avas $198,159,676.02,
an increase of $11,637,611.42 over that of the preceding year.
Of the amount collected, $138,908,562.39 was collected at the port
of New York, leaAing $59,251,113.63 as the amount collected at all
the other ports of the country.




XVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Of the total amouiit, $47,977,137.63 AA^as collected on sugar, melado, and
molasses; $27,285,624.78 on wool and its manufactures; $21,462,534.34
on iron and steel, and manufactures thereof; $19,038,665.81 on manufactures of silk; $10,825,115.21 on manufactures of cotton; and
$6,469,643.04 on wines and spirits; making a total revenue from the
articles specified, of $133,058,720.81.
The expenses of collection for the past year were $6,419,345.20, an
increase over the preceding year of $387,410.04. While there was an
increase in the rcA^enue from customs OA^er the preceding year of over
eleven and a half millions of dollars, the gross A-alue of the imports,
including free goods, decreased OA'er tAventy-five millions of dollars.
The most marked decrease was in the value of unmanufactured wool,
$14,023,682, and in that of scrap and pig-iron, $12,810,671. There was,
on the other hand, an increase in the A-alue of sugar imported, of
$7,427,474; on steel-rails, of $4,345,521; on barley, $2,154,204; and on
steel in ingots, bars, &c., $1,620,046.
The'exports, as contrasted with the imports during the last fiscal
year, (1881,) are as follows:
'
Exports of domestic merchandise
.Exports of foreign merchandise

$SS3, 925, 947
18, 451, 399

Total-. Imports of merchandise
Excess of exports OArer imports of merchandise- .
Aggregate of exports and imports- - -

902, 377, 346
612, 664, 628
.

259, 712, 718
1, 545, 041, 974

Compared Avith the previous year, there Avas an increase of $66,738,688
in the A-alue of exports of merchandise, and a decrease of $25,290,118
in the A-alue of imports. The annual average of the excess of imports
of merchandise over exports, thereof, for ten years prcAnous to Juue 30,
1873, Avas $104,706,922; but for the last six years there has been an excess ofexports over imports ofmerchandise ainounting to $1,180,668,105—
an annual aA-erage of $196,778,017. The specie A'-alue of the exports of
domestic merchandise has increased from $376,616,473 in 1870, to
$883,925,947 in 1881, an increase of $507,309,474, or 135 per cent.
The imports of merchandise have increased from $435,958,408 in 1870,
to $642,664,628 in 1881, an increase of $206,706,220, or 47 per cent.
During each year from 1862 to 1879, inclusive, the exports of specie exceeded the imports thereof. The largest excess of such exports over imports was reached during the year 1864, when it amounted to $92,280,929.
But during the"year ended June 30, 1880, the imports of coin and bul-




i

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XVII

lion exceeded the exports thereof by $75,891,391; aud during t^e last
fiscal year the excess of imports over exports Avas $91,168,650.
A rcAasion of the tariff seems necessary to meet the condition of
many branches of trade. That condition has materially changed since
the enactment of the tariff* of 1864, Avhich formed the basis of the
present tariff* as to most of the articles imported. The specific duties
imposed by that act, for instance, on iron and steel in their various
forms, had then a proper relation to the ad valorem duties imposed on
the articles manufactured from those metals; but by a large reduction in the values, especially of the cruder forms of iron and steel,
the specific duty imposed thereon now amounts, in many cases, to an
ad .valorem duty of over 100 per cent.; while the ad valorem duties
on manufactured articles have not been changed. The growing de^ niands of trade haA^e led, also, to the importation of iron and steel
in forms and under designations not. enumerated in the tariff, and
the great disproportion between the specific and ad valorem duties is
a constant stimulus to iniporters to try to bring the merchandise
under the ad valorem rate. This produces uncertainty, appeals from
the action of collectors, and litigation, which prove embarrassing ^to
business interests as well as to the GoA^ernment; and vi^hat is instanced as the case with iron and steel will be found to be the case
Avith other articles. An equalization of the tariff, and a simplification
of some of its details, are needed. How far such revision shall involve
a reduction of the tariff* is a question for Congress to decide.
In what manner that revision shall be initiated is also Avithin the
province of Congress to determine. The method of a commission
which has been proposed has some features that commend it. A commission made up of leading representatives of the manufactures, agriculture, and. commerce ofthe. country—experts in the subject-matters
dealt Avith by a tariff—sitting as a board without hampering formalities, and intent upon one subject to the consideration of Avhich the
members would bring requisite and ready knoAvledge and experience,
should be able to frame a tariff* law that would equalize its burdens
and its benefits, and give a reasonable degree of satisfaction to the
varied interests aff'ected by it. I t is sometimes objected that to wait i
for the passage of a law creating a commission, and for the organization of it, and for the result of its deliberations, would delay the
action of Congress too long. It is.to be considered whether there
might not be such limitations of time put upon the life of the commission as would preclude such a result. I t i s conceded that the interests
that a tariff^ affects are so numerous and so diverse that extensiA^e and
F

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Federal
Reserve Bank of St. Louis

XVIII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

minute knowledge is needed to treat the subject fairly and comprehensively. Is it not, therefore, worthy of consideration Avhether the
country cannot afford the proper length of time for a skilful, judicious,
and complete framing of a bill 1 Should exigencies exist or arise calling
for immediate legislation upon particular matters, they could be treated
specifically for the time, while awaiting the complete"and comprehensive system.
. Attention is iuAdted to the report of this Department for 1880, in
regard to a repeal of the discriminating duties imposed by section
2501 of the Eevised Statutes, especially on tea and coffee produced in
the possessions of the Netherlands, and the recommendation therein
contained is renewed.
REDUCTION OF TAXES.

I t is a matter of gratulation that the business of the country so
thrives as to endure the onerous taxation that is upon it, and yet grow
in volume, and apparently in profits, and yield to the Government a
surplus over its needs. The result upon the public revenue is to embarrass this Department in disposing of the surplus in lawful way, and
with regard to economy. While it is asserted that there is stringency
in the money market, and that the business community is in straits,
the call of this Department for inillions of bonds is slowly heeded,
and its offer to purchase bonds is not in full accepted. There is
another Avay in which to dispose of the surplus, namely, to enter the
markets and buy bonds at the current rates. Calculations of experts
show that, at the premium that now rules upon the four and four-anda-half per cent, bonds, this could not be done without a loss to the
Treasury, which it is of doubtful propriety to make. And it is almost
certain that an announcement of a purpose so to do would enhance the
market value of those bonds. MeauAvhile the daily receipts from the
community by the Treasury continue, the surplus over its needs increases, and money lies idle. I t seems that the plan most just, for
giAdng relief, is to reduce taxation, and thereby diminish receipts and
surplus.
The rapid reduction of the public debt and the increase of the' surplus
in the Treasury present the question to Congress whether there should
not be a reduction in the taxation now put upon the people. It is estimated that, if the present ratio of receipt and expenditure is kept up, the
pubhc debt, now existing, may be paid in the next ten years. In view of
the large sum that has been paid by the present generation upon that
debt, and of the lieaA^ taxation that now bears upon the industries and
business of the country, it seems just and proper that another generation




i

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XIX

should meet a portion of the debt, and that the burdens now laid upon the
eountry should be lightened. I t is to be considered, too, whether the
seeming affluence of the Treasury does not provoke to expenditure
larger in amount than a wise economy would permit, and upon objects
that would not meet with favor in a pinched or moderate condition of
the Federal Exchequer. In some quarters there is already talk of an
overflowing Treasury, and projects are piit forth for lavish expenditure,
not only to the furtherance of public works of doubtful legitimacy and
expediency, but in aid of enterprises no more than quaM public in
character. Can'^ a Government be justly said to have an overflowing
Treasury Avhen there is an outstanding debt against it greater than it
could pay if lawfully presented, and Avhen its means of payment in the
future must be taken from its denizens by burdensome taxation*? And
is it a beneficial exercise of gOA^ernmental power to raise money by taxation in greater sums than the lawful demands upon the Government
require, when those demands are of themselves a heavy burden upon
the industry and business of the country?
Other considerations have been presented; such as that if the pubhc
debt be fully paid and all Government bonds retired, the best and
safest basis for the national-bank system Avill be gone, and t^hat a desirable mode of investment for saAdngs banks, trust companies, and fidur
ciary representatives will be taken away, and that the return of the
large sums paid to the holders of bonds, to seek reinvestment through
other channels, will disturb the business of the country. It is doubtful
whether, in a government like ours, not designed for a paternal one,
these will be held as sufficient reasons for keeping on foot a large
public debt, requiring for the management of it, and for the collection
of the revenue'to meet the interest upon it, many officials and large
expense.
It is proper to say that there is a formidable matter to be weighed
on the other hand. The Commissioner of Pensions, it is understood,
makes known the need of large sums to meet the arrearages of pensions on claims allowed and likely to be allowed by him. Ete puts the
figures at $235,000,000. Besides this, he has furnished to this Department an estimate, based upon, the facts found in the records of his
office, which gives these data:
^
,
Number of claims filed to November 1, 1881,.
789, 063
Number of claims admitted to November 1, 1881
450,949
Number of claims pending to November 1, 1881
265,575
Number of claims rejected and abandoned to November 1,1881. 72, .539




' 789, 063

XX

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Number
Number
acts
Number
Number

of claims pending entitled to benefits of arrears acts. 227, 040>
of claims pending NOT entitled to benefits of arreaj.^s
^
:
35,596
of old war claims (not entitled) pending
1, 631
of 1812 war claims (not entitled) pending
1, 308
265,575

He estimates that the average A-alue on the first day of January^
1884, ofeach claimed alloAved out ofthe class of 227,040, aboA^e sliOAvn^
will be $1,350, and that the probable alloAvances out of that class will
be 193,000.
This Department is not aAvare of any other matter that Avill materially increase the needful expenditures of the Government.
I t is, then, for Congress to determine Avhether there shall be a reduction of the revenues derived from taxation. If it shall, it will be important to know how it may be effected. A statement of the receipts
from internal revenue shows theni to be $135,264,385.51 for the year
that ended June 30, 1881, and that was in excess of the preceding
year by $11,255,011.59; a large part of this was fro.m spirits, tobacco^
and fermented liquors. The tax on those articles is a tax on appetite
or indulgences, legitimate subjects of taxation when taxation is needful. A reduction of that tax is not recommended. Other objects
from Avhich internal rcA^enue is derived are the stamps on bank-checks
and matches. The former is a tax on business, somewhat irritating-^
and hampering in its nature. The latter is a tax on an article of hourly
and necessary consumption by all classes. It is urged by some that
the abolition of the stamp-tax on matches Avould not reduce the price of
the article to the consumer. That contention does not seem Avell
founded, when the cost of the stamp is in so large a ratio to the cost
ofthe article stamped, and Avhen the economy of purchasing stanips in
large quantities giA^es to capital an advantage in the manufacture of
the article. There is also the duty derived from proprietary stamps.
An abolition of the revenue from these three sources would be an equal
lessening of burdens. The tax on the deposits in national banks and
upon their capital, in the judgment of the Department, may, with
propriety and justice, be lessened, if not entirely removed, whenever
it is determined that the public rcA^enue exceeds the public needs
The tax on circulation is diff'erent in its nature. I t is a tax on a franchise of profit to the favored grantee, and upon a subject, in the
furnishing of which to the national banks, the Government is at an
expense. There seems to be a reason that, Avhile taxation is the ineans
of meeting governmental expenses, this tax should not be among the




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASUEY,

XXI

first to be takeii off. There are other minor sources of internal revenue
that might be given up, keeping that from spirits, fermented liquors,
and tobacco.'
The other source of revenue where a reduction may be made is the
customs. I t already appears that the revenue from customs for the
year ended June 30, 1881, was $198,159,676.02, being an increase of
$11,637,611.42 over the preceding year.
While it is a principle that taxation for the expenses of Government, to be just, should bear on all alike and equaUy, it must also be
one that Avhen the aggregate of taxation is to be lessened, the reduction should be made in such ways that all will be relieved alike and
equally. Hence, it is assumed that if Congress does determine on a
decrease of the rcA^enue, it will seek that end, as well through a revision of the existing tariff laws as through ah abolition or abatement of
the internal revenue. This Department does not venture, at this time,
to point out wherein the wisdom of Congress may find places in the
tariff* laws for its exercise in rcAdsion and reduction. In another part
of this report somewhat is said upon the mode of making a revision of
those laws. If the mode of a commission to experts should be adopted,
and delay in the final adoption of a revised tariff law should be anticipated, it may be well for Congress to consider what is to be done in
the meantime with the surplus rcA^enue that is likely to accrue unless
prevented by the payment of arrearages of pensions.
TRIAL OF CUSTOMS CASES,
On the 1st of July, 1881, 2,376 suits against collectors of customs,
nearly all for the refund of cnstoms duties, were pending in the United
States courts of New York. The delay in the trial of these cases
heightens the expense ofthe litigation, and puts off the final determination of the rights in controversy, and also increases the number ,of
the suits that are brought. I t sometimes happens that before a test
case can be brought to trial and decided in the Supreme Court, importers are compelled to commence hundreds of suits in order to preserve their rights. If these cases are put up on the calendar, it is done
at the expense and inconA^^enience of private htigants. The only
remedy appears to be the establishment of anew tribunal for the trial
of customs cases, or their transfer to some existing tribunal like the
Court of Claims. The Department has issued a circular to experts,
asking their Adews as to the best mode of meeting this difficulty, and it
may submit, in a special communication to Congress, some raore
definite views upon the subject.




[

XXII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
CLAIMS.

The claims against the Government, presented to this Department,
often involve important disputed questions of law or fact, which require for their correct decision the taking of depositions and the crossexamination of witnesses, and sometimes of the parties themselves.
For this no provision is made by law. Authority from Congress to
refer any such claims as the Secretary may think proper to the Court
^of Claims, would give to the claimants and to the Government a
proper judicial trial and judgment; Avhicli w^ould not only do justice
to the parties but prevent re-examinations which are now urged upon
every change of Departmental officers.
I t is believed that a proper statute of limitations upon claims would
promote the substantial ends of justice. The reasons for such a statute in the case of claims against the GOA^ernment, such as the death of
witnesses, and the loss of paper evidence, and the policy of putting
an end to controversies, are obvious and too familiar to need more
than a suggestion. On the other hand, in the prosecution of demand^
by the United States, great hardships to private^ parties are often occasioned. This is especially the case Avh ere those sued are sureties
and there has been neglect and delay on the part of the governmental
agents in adjusting accounts and making demand for alleged balances.
SUGAR.

The duties collected upon sugar, molasses, and melado during the
past fiscal year amount td $47,977,137, or nearly one-quarter of the
whole ainount of our revenues from customs. The difficulties attending the collection of these duties haA^e largely occupied the attention of
committees of Congress during several past sessions. The Dutch
standard of color, as applied to the apparent color of imported sugars^
is no longer a test of their saccharine strength or value for refining
purposes. Imputing this fact to artificial coloring used for the purpose
of affecting the rate of duties, this Department has claimed the right
to look beyond the apparent color, and to classify the invoices according to the true color which they would show Avithout that artificial
treatment. The importers, claiming sometimes that their sugars are not
in any sense artificially colored, and sometimes that they have the right to
have them classified by their color, according to the Dutch standard,
whether artificially colored before being imported or not, haA^^e brought
many suits to recover duties alleged to have been illegally exacted. A
test suit, recently tried in New York, is pending in the Supreme
Qoiirt, and is expected to give some aid in the true construction of the .




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XXIII

law upon the point whether the Department has a right to regard
anything but the apparent color of the sugar at the time of importation. Whatever may be the decision of this question, the fact remains
that, either by artificially coloring or by changes in the process of
manufacturing, sugars of the highest saccharine strength and value
have been for some years imported, which appear to be of the lowest
grade of color, and are, therefore, claimed to be entitled to entry at the
lowest rate of duties.
The amount in controA^ersy in the suits referred to, claimed by the
importers to haA^e been overpaid upon sugars imported during the last
fiscal year, by reason of classification above their apparent color, is
$708,810.99, Avhile the amount of duties collected by the classification
of sugars at the increased rate during the same year is $1,857,324.10;
so that the Government has gained during that timie, by the higher
classification of sugar, $1,148,513.11, as to Avhich there is no controversy.
The Dutch standard was adopted undoubtedly upon the theory that
color substantially represented A-alue, and the intention, no doubt, was
to impose duties upon sugar substantially ad valorem. The attention
of Congress is earnestly invited to the subject, so that while the producers bf sugar in this country are fairly treated, importers may be
relicA^ed from the embarrassments attending the present method of
classification.
'
INTERNAL REVENUE.

From the various sources of taxation under the internal-revenue
laAVS, the receipts for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881, were as
follows:
From^ spirits
:
From tobacco
„
From fermented hquors
From banks and bankers
From adhesive stamps
From penalties
From collections not,otherwise proAdded for
Total

-.

$67,153,974
42,854,991
13!, 700,241
31, 762,208
1,375,255
' 231,078
152,162

88
31
21
07
72
21
90

135,229, 912 30

The increase of the revenue from spirits during the last fiscal year was
$5,968,466.09; the increase from tobacco in its various forms of manufacture for the same period, $3,984,851.23; the increase from fermented
liquors was $870,438.37; the increase of revenue from taxes on banks
and bankers was $411,222.79; the total increase of internal revenue
from all sources was $11,019,454.50.




XXIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

CONTINUANCE OF SIX PER CENT. AND FIVE PER CENT. BONDS A.T
3^ PER CENT.
In the last annual report the attention of Congress Avas invited to
a portion of the interest-bearing debt becoming redeemable on or before
July 1, 1881, as follows:
•
Title of loan.
Loan July and August; 1361
Loan of 1863, (1881's)
•Funded Loan of 1881

Rate.

Redeemable.

6 per cent . June 30,1881
6 per c e n t . June 30,1881
5 per cent - May 1,1881

Amount.
$14.5,786,500
.57,787,250
469,651,050

Eecommendation was made for authority to refund into Treasury
notes or bonds bearing a lower rate of interest such portion of these
bonds as should reraain unredeemed at maturity.
Congress adjourned on the 3d of March, the bill for refunding these
amounts haAdng failed to become a laAv. On March 1 there remained
outstanding of these bonds the folloAving amounts:
Title of loan.
Loan of July and Augnst, 1861 Loan of 1863 . - - - . .
Funded Loan of 1881 . .

Rate.

Redeemable.

6 per cent - June 30,1881
6 per cent - June 30,1881
5 per c e n t . May . 1,1881

Amount.
$144,339,900
57,216,100
469, 320,650

Included in these amounts were $29,479,300 of five per cent, bonds
which had been purchased, or called for rederaption but not matured,
and $5,887,950 of six per cent, bonds in process of redemption for the
sinking-fund, leaving to be proAdded for, of the five per cent, bonds,
$439,841,350, and of the six per cent, bonds, $196,378,600.
The financial condition of the Government at that time, and the
policy pursued by my immediate predecessor in dealing with these
bonds, are set forth in his letter of August 8, 1881, to the American
.Bankers' Association, as follows:
^^It may be stated, however, that when I entered upon the duties of
my present position, in March last, I found that of the bonded indebtedness of the Government there were of five per cent, bonds, redeemable at the option of the Government after May 1, 1881, the amount of
$469,320,650, of which the amount of $146,101,900 was represented by
coupon bonds; and of six per cent, bonds redeemable at the option of
the GoA^ernment after July 1, 1881, the amount of $202,266,550, of
which $45,391,000 Avere represented by coupon bonds.
'^ Only the coupons for the quarterly interest falling due on May 1,




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,

XXV

1881, remained upon the coupon five per cents, and none upon the
coupon six per cents, the next semi-annual interest on which would fall
due on July 1, 1881.
^^ The refunding act, by which it was proposed to retire all of these
bonds, and to issue therefor bouds bearing a lower rate of interest,
with several years to run before the Government had the option of
payment, after haAdng received much consideration by Congress dui;ing
the last session, had failed to become a law; and the only resources of
the GoA^ernment to meet the maturing obligations were the surplus
rcA^enues, and the amount of $104,652,200 four per cent, bonds, being
a part of those authorized by the acts of July 14, 1870, and January
20, 1871, and remaining unissued.
" These resources w-ere not sufficient to proAdde for all the maturing
bonds, and, owing to the length of time which such four percent, bonds
had to run before inaturit}", it was not deemed adAdsable to issue more
of the loan, if such issue could well be avoided.
*^ While there was no imperatiA^e necessity for proAdding for the registered bonds of the maturing loans, some plan was needed to meet the
intei'est payments on the coupon bonds, and there seemed to be no
practicable method of meeting these payments without considerable
expense to the GoA^ernment, as Avell as to the holders of the bonds.
'^Finally, to meet the demands of public creditors, and at the same
time to avoid the calling of an extra session of Congress, which seemed
to be the only other alternative, the plan was matured which has been
put into operation, and has proA^ed successful.
'^ Under this plan, on April 11, there Avas called for absolute payment
on July 1, 1881, the small loan of $688,200, bearing 6 per ceut. interest,
and knoAvn as the Oregon-War Debt, and at the same time, for payment on the sam'e date, the six per cent, loans, acts of July 17 and
August 5, 1861, amounting to $140,544,650, and act of March 3, 1863,
amounting to $55,145,750; but to the holders of the bonds of the tAVO
latter loans permission was giA'en to have their bonds continued at the
pleasure of the Government, with interest at the rate of 3^ per centum
per annum, proAdded they should so request, and the bonds should be
receiA^ed by the Treasury for that purpose on or before the 10th day
of May, 1881; and in case of coupon bonds, registered stock of the
same loan should be issued therefor.
'' The six per cent, bonds to be continued were promptly received in
a large amount, and new registered ones issued therefor, Avith the fact
of their continuance stamped upon their face ; but it Avas subsequently
deemed advisable to extend the time for the receipt of the old bonds
to May 20, 1881.
^^It was also found that foreign holders of the six. per cent, bonds
were inclined to dispose of their in Arrestments rather than to send them
to the Treasury for exchange; and the immediate payment of so many
bonds abroad being likely to cause a drain of coin from this country,
and to disturb business, an agency for the exchange of the bonds in
London Avas established.
'^ This plan for continuing the sixes has proved entirely satisfactory,
there having been presented in due time fbr continuance, at 3J per
cent, interest, the amount of $178,055,150, leaving to be paid off from
the surplus revenues $24,211,400, for which the Treasury had ample
resources.. .
. ^' Having succeeded in dispovsing of the six per cents, on May 12,




XXVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,

the Department gave notice that the coupon five per cent, bonds of
the loan of July 14, 1870, and January 20, 1871, Avould be paid on
August 12, 1881, with a hke priAdlege of continuing the bonds at 3^
per cent, to such of the holders as might present them for that purpose
• on or before July 1, 1881; and at the same time the Treasury off'ered.
to receiA^e, for continuance, in like manner, any of the uncalled regis,tered bonds of th^t loan to an amount not exceeding $250,000,000, the
remainder of the loan being reseiA^ed with a vicAv of its paj-ment from
the "surplus rcA^enues.
" The continued three-and-a-half per cent, bonds haAdng a market
price slightly aboA^e par, the five per cents in question were rapidly
presented, and ifc became necessary to extend somewhat the limit fixed
for the amount of registered bonds to be accepted for continuance.
^' On July 1, a notice for the payment, on October 1, 1881, of the
' registered fives not continued Avas given, and the resources of the
Treasury Avill be ample to meet their payment..
gp

gp

gp

gJ;

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^

'' By this plan the'Department has been not only relicA^ed from the
embarrassment of providing for the payment of the coupon interest,
but has reduced all the six and &ve per cent, loans of the Government
to a loan payable at the option of the Govefnment, and bearing
interest at only 3J per cent, per annum; and this, with the trifling
expense to the GoA^ernment of preparing the UCAV registered bonds,
and of paying the' actual expenses of the London agency, at whichonlv three persons have been employed for a few Aveeks, issuing about
$44,500,000 of the continued bonds."
*
# •
#
#
«
#
*
It Avill be observed that at no time were calls made for bonds in
excess of the ability of the Department to meet the payments therefor
had the bonds called been presented for redeihption instead of for continuance.
In conducting these operations, expenses Avere incurred for paper and
for printing the new bonds to an amount estimated not to exceed $6,000,
and there was paid for all other expenses, including those of the London
agency, $4,499.08.
Under this arrangement, in addition to the six per cent, bonds continued, as stated in the letter, there were continued of the fiA^e per
cent, bonds $401,504,900; of which ainount $108,494,500 were coupon
bonds, leaAdng to be paid from the surplus revenue $10,151,950 of
coupon bonds, with interest to August 12, 1881, and $28,184,500 of registered bonds, with interest to October 1,^ 1881, which transactions
^ were not completed when the above letter was Avritten.
The annual saving in interest through the continuance of these
bonds is as follows:
On the 6 per cent, bonds, continued at 3Jper cent;
$4,451,378 75
On the 5 per cent, bonds, continued at 3 J per cent
6,022,573 50
Total




'

10,473,952 25

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
REDEMPTIONS.

XXVII
'

I t was also stated in the last annual report that there would become
payable on December 31, 1880, the loan of February 8, 1861, amounting to $13,414,000, and on July 1, 1881, the Oregon-War Debt, araounting to $711,800, both of which loans bore interest at the rate of 6 per
cent. Previous to the maturity of these loans public notice was given
to the holders that the bonds would be paid at the respective dates of
maturity, and that interest would cease thereafter. All the bonds
presented have been paid from the surplus revenues of the Gov
ernment.
/
In addition to these amounts there have been purchased or called
for redemption, and interest has ceased upon, during the year ending November 1, 1880, bonds in the following amounts:
Bonds bearing interest at 6 per cent
Bonds bearing interest at 5 per cent.
Bonds bearing interest at 3 J per cent., (continued sixes) .
Total. .

$25,518,600
68,146,150
16,179,100
109,843,850

making a total of bonds redeemed, or on which interest ceased during,
the year, of $123,969,650.
The following statement shows the changes in the interest-bearing
debt, and the saving of interest thereon, by the continuance and payment of bonds during the year ending November 1, 1881:
Amount.

Rate.

|178,055,150
401,504,900
39,644,400
68,146,150
16,179,100

6 per cent 5 per c e n t .
6 per cent 5 per cent .
3-^ per cent-

Continued
Continued
Redeemed
Redeemed
Redeemed

Total annual saving in interest-

Disposition.

^Yearly saving.

at 3^ per centat 3-^ per cent.
or interest ceased.
or interest ceasedor interest ceased.

|4,451,378 75
6,022,573 50
2,378,664 00
3,407,307 50
566,268 50
.16,826,192 25

making the annual interest-charge on the debt, November 1, 1881,
,962,245.25.
On the 1st of November there remained outstanding of bonds bearing
3J per cent, interest, payable at the pleasure of the GoA^ernmeiit after
proper notice, $563,380,950, included in which were $12,035,500 called
bonds not matured; If the excess of rcA^enues over expenditures
should continue as during the past year, its application to the payment
of these bonds can be made at .the discretion of the Secretary, and to




XXVIII REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
t h a t extent the GoA^ernment will be relieved from the necessity of
paying any premium in th<p consequent redemption of its bonded debt.
I t is not improbable that the subject of the funding of the public debt
in bonds bearing a rate of interest less than that of any yet issued
will be considered by Congress during the present session. When that
subject is taken uji, it is respectfully suggested that it should be borne
In mind that the bonds noAv outstanding, knoAvn as the extended sixes
and fives, on interest,at the rate of 3J per cent., possess a quality seldom found in a debt Against a Government. That quality is in the
power that the Government has to call them in for pa;\Tnent at any
time, or to postpone payment of them for years. This is a A-aluable
privilege to the GoA'-ernment, and it is to be considered whether it Avill
be wise to give it up. The possession of it enables the GoA^ernment .
to accommodate the payment of that portion of the public debt to the
varying state of the public means. It would be difficult,' probably, to
market a loan at a low rate of interest which should be redeemable at
the pleasure of the Government. Indeed, one of the requisites of a
loan proposed at a low rate is, that it be issued for a long term, and
made irredeemable until the expiration thereof. The reason is on the
surface. A debt at a low rate is not likely tb be sought for, save by
those wishing permanent .investments, as public institutions, trustees,
guardians, and other fiduciary holders of funds, or wealthy persons
with whom safety, stability, permanence, and regularity of income are
of more importance than.a high rate of return. It is also to be considered that the gain that would accrue to the Governinent from a small ^
reduction of the rate of interest is, to some extent, lost in the expenses
necessarily attendant on the making of a new loan. It is a part of
the information that the Department has from men engaged in financial operations that a new loan at 3 per cent, would be taken up if it
was by its condition irredeemable saA^e at a long term. Emphasis is put
by them on this condition. None haA^e placed the term at less than ten
years. Most have piit it at twenty. Some have suggested a term of
forty years, with an option in the GoA^ernment to pay at the end of ten.
For these reasons this Department makes no recomraendation of
legislation for the refunding of the bonds now outstanding bearing
interest at 3J per Centura. I t does recoraraend that if a new loan at a
lower rate is offered, there be given to the bonds a long term of payment.
PACIFIC-RAILROAD

SINKINa-FUND.

The third section of the act approved May 7,1878, provides—
^^ That there shall be established in the Treasury of the United
States a sinking-fund, which shall be invested by the Secretary of the



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XXIX

Treasury in bonds of the United States; and the semi-annual incomethereof shall be in like manner from time to time invested, and the
same shall accumulate and be disposed of as herei^iafter mentioned
And in making such. iiiA^estments the Secretary shall prefer the five per
centum bonds of the United States, unless, for good reason appearing^
to him, and w^hich he shall report to Congress, he shall ,at any time
deera it advisable to iuA^est in other bonds of the United States. All
the bonds belonging to said fund shall, as fast as they shall be obtained^
be So staraped as to show that they belong to said fund, and that they
are not good in the hands of other holders than the Secretary of theTreasury until they shall have been endorsed by him, and publicly disposed of pursuant to this act."
The Secretary of the Treasury has, upon several occasions, recomraended to Congress.^ nfodification of the terras of this act, so as to
perrait the investraent of the fund in the first-mortgage thirty-year
bonds ofthe Union Pacific Eailroad Corapany, and of the Central Pacific Eailroad Corapany, authorized by section 10 of the act of Congress
©f July 2, 1864, chapter 216, and section 1 of the act of Congress of
March 3,1865, chapter 88, or in any interest-bearing bonds of the
United States.
The ninth section of the sinking-fund act referred to provides that
all sums required to be paid into the fund are made a lien upon all the
property and franchises of the roads, ''subject to* any lawfully prior
and permanent mortgage. Men, or claim thereon." These bonds being^
thus payable from the sinking-fund, they Avould seem to be the best
investraent which noAv offers, and especially so in AdcAv of the low rate
of interest now realized from investment in United States bonds.
Should Congress, hoAvever, not deem it desirable to authorize such investment, the Secretary Avould suggest that the amounts withheld
from the respective railroad companies on account of the fund, should
be credited semi-annually on the books of the Ti'easury Department^
with interest at the rate of 5 per centum per annum. This method
of treating the matter wUl obviate the necessity of purchasing bonds,.
Avhich frequently cannot be done without the payment of a large premium, and Avill realize to the companies a rate corresponding more
nearly Avith that which they would receive were the amounts invested
in first-mortgage bonds of their respectiA^e roads.
CONTINUED TRUST-FUND BONDS.

Included in the amount of five per cent, bonds, continuedat 3J percent.^
are $451,350 held by the Secretary of the Treasury as part of the sinking-fund for the Pacific Eailroads, under the act of May 7, 1878, and
$52,000 held in trust forthe South Carohna school-fund, act of March 3^




XXX

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

1873. The continuance of these bonds at 3J per cent, was deemed a
better investment than their sale and reinvestment in other United
States bonds.
BUREAU OF E N G R A V m a AND PRINTING.

During the year the Bureau of Engraving and Printing has added
to its valuable stock of machinery five new steam-power plate-printing
presses. These presses have now been in operation several months,
with satisfactory results, and it is confidently expected that the slow
and laborious process of plate-printing on hand-presses will, to a great
extent, be superseded by the use of the more rapid and economical
poAver-press.
^
DISTINCTIVE PAPER.

The use of the silk-threaded, fibre paper fpr the printing of notes,
certificates, checks, and other obligations, including registered bonds,
has been continued during the year with results such as warrant the
further use of it. Since July 1,1881, all pension-checks for the Department of the Interior have been printed upon tfeis paper. Tables accompanying the report will show the disposition made of the 22,231,000
sheets manufactured for the Department since its adoption in 1879.
The distinctive' features of the paper, combmed with its superior
quality, have afforded complete protection to the securities of the Government, the paper not having been successfully counterfeited.
There have also been received since July 1,1880, 37,880,518 sheets of
distinctive paper for printing United States internal-revenue stamps.
COUNT, EXAMINATION, AND DESTRUCTION OF REDEEMED SECURITIES.

During the fiscal year there have been received by this office for
final count and destruction redeeraed United States legal-tender
notes, national currency, and raiscellaneous securities araounting to
$310,139,416.14. The United States legal-tender notes, national ciu:rency. United States bonds, and other obligations rautilated in process
of printing, and over-due coupons and unissued notes received for destruction, araounted to $49,412,119.82—raaking an aggregate of securities counted, cancelled, and destroyed during the fiscal year of
$359,551,535.96, the details of Avhich are set forth in the tables accompanying the report.
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF CATTLE.
The number of hving horned cattle exported, chiefly to England, in
theyear ended June 30, 1881, was 185^,707, valued at $14,304,103, being
an excess over the previous year of 2,951 in number, and $959,908 m
value, and almost $6,000,000 in value above the year 1879.




REPORT OF THE SECEETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XXXI

These shipments to England niight be vastly increased, should the
order of the Privy Council of Great Britain be rescinded, vt^hich requires
that all Araerican cattle be slaughtered within ten days after arrival
at the port of entry. This order was raade to prevent the introduction
into that country, frora this, of the disease known as pleuro-pneumonia.
The demand in England for imported meat is so iraperative that it is not
doubted that this order will be rescinded whenever the British government is satisfied that our cattle may be sold, driven through, and fattened in that country without danger from the disease mentioned.
The rescission of the order w^ould allow the exportation frora this
country of store-cattle in great numbers to be fed and fattened on
English soil, while at present only animals fitted for iraraediate slaughter
ean be exported there.
A t the last session of Congress a sraall appropriation was made to
be expended under the direction of the Secretary of the Treasury to
investigate the question as to the existence of the disease in this country, preparatory to the protection of the great routes of transportatioii of
€attle from the West to the sea-coast for exportation. .A. coraraission
of three persons has been appointed to raake the investigation, and a
report to the Secretary will be subraitted to Congress early in the session.
I t may be assumed that this report will show that contagious pleuropneumonia has never existed in this, country west of the Allegheny
Mountains, while it undoubtedly does exist in certain portions of NCAV
York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware, and Maryland. It is
believed that its introduction into the great cattle-ranches of the West
would be a national calamity, and the attention of Congress is earnestly called to the subject, so that proper measures niay be adopted
to prcA^ent its introduction into healthy districts, and to cause its extirpation in such as are infected. The attention of Congress is also called
to the necessity of more direct legislation authorizing quarantining of
iraported cattle and for proAdding places for the quara.ntine thereof,
^nd for the expenses attendant thereon.
LIFE-SAVINa SERVICE.

The annual report of the Life-Saving Service shows excellent results
of the operations of this beneficent institution.
The number of stations in comraission during the year was one hundred and eighty-three. The reports of the district officers show that
two hundred and fifty disasters to vessels occurred within the field of
station operations. There were eighteen hundred and eighty persons
on board these vessels, of whom eighteen hundred and fifty-four were




XXXII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

saved, twenty-six only being lost. Four hundred and seven shipwrecked persons Avere succored at the stations, to Avhom one thousand
and sixty days' relief in the aggregate was afforded. The estimated
value of property involved in these disasters was $4,054,752, of which
$2,828,680 was saved, and $1,226,07!^ lost. The number of vessels
totally lost Avas sixty:Six.
Of the neAV stations authorized by law, three on Lake Huron have
been completed, and are now in commission, and tAvo others at Cape
Fear, North Carolina, and one at Boiinas Bay, California, Avill be in
operation during the Avinter.
The serAdce has been greatly embarrassed by the resignation of a
number of keepers of stations on account of insufficient pay. Others
have only been induced to remain in the hope of an increase in their
compensation by Congress at its present session. The professional experience 'of these men makes their ser Alices A-aluable. In many cases
men of equal quahfication could not be found to fill their places, and
some vacancies have occurred which it has been impossible to fill at
all. The district officers represent that the resignations next season
Avin be general unless the rate of pay, Avhich is now only $400 per annura, is raised. I t is obvious that this service should not be allowed
to retrograde, and the attention of Congress is earnestly invited to the
necessity of making such provision as will retain the requisite professional capacity in these important positions.
It is also necessary to make provision for increasing the compensation of the district superintendents, w^hich is too IOAV, being but $1,000
per annum, except in the tAVO largest districts, where it is only $1,500.
These officers give large bonds, ranging from $20,000 to $50,000 in
amount, and are charged with grave duties which occupy all their
time, and the proper discharge of which involves the efficient conduct
of the service in their respectiA^e districts.
The general superintendent, in his annual report, urges other measures for the improA^ement of the service Avhich merit attention. °
PUBLIC BUILDINGS.
The appropriations for the construction of public buildings during
the past fiscal year Avere such as to permit the prosecution of work
during the year AAdthont interruption, and the Supervising Architect
reports the progress on the various works as generally satisfactory.
REVENUE MARINE.
The Aressels of this service now number 36, comprising 5 sailingvessels and 31 propelled wholly or in part by steam. There are employed, at the present time, to man this fleet 198 officers and 794 men.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XXXIII

The Eevenue Marine has been actively employed, during the past
year, in protecting the customs revenue and assisting distressed
vessels, as will appear by the following exhibit:
Aggregate number of miles cruised
:
282,027
Number of vessels boarded and exarained.
29,101
Number of vessels seized or reported for violating the law.
3,163
Number of vessels Avrecked or in distress a s s i s t e d . . . . .
148
Number of persons rescued from drowning
:..
141 .
Estimated value of vessels and their cargoes imperilled
assisted
$2, 766, 882 00
Expenses of the service for the year
:
$846, 791 99
The Eevenue Marine has rendered important aid to other branches
of the public service, especially to the Light-House Establishment, the
Commission of Fish and Fisheries, and the Life-Saving Service. The
revenue-steamer "Perry," in September, performed valuable and timely
service in conveying supplies to the sufferers by forest fires in Michigan.
Under the law providing for the use of revenne-vessels for protecting the interests of the Government on the seal islands and' seaotter hunting-groundSj and enforcing the provisions of law in Alaska
generally, the revenue-steamers'' Cor\vin " and '' Eush," under competent
comraanders, haA^e cruised extensively during the past season in the
waters washing our most northerly possessions. The '^ Corwin," under
Captain Hooper, has plied principally in the extreme north, following the
iUicit traffickers in breech-loading arms and liqnors into their retreats
in the Arctic Ocean, while continuing the search begun last year for the
missing whalers, "Mount Wollaston" and "Yigilant" and the Arcticexploring steamer " Jeannette." In pursuing this search, Captain Hooper
landed upon and thoroughly explored Herald Island in July, and in
August landed Avith an exploring party upon the south eas t coast of Wrangel Land. Captain Hooper expresses the conclusion, based upon his
cruising of the past two seasons, that the missing whalers referred to
are hopelessly lost, and that the "Jeannette," in 1879, passed to the
northward Avithout stopping at any place in the Arctic Ocean, and that
her movements in the extreme polar regions have been subsequently
largely controlled by the movements of the ice; that this vessel is not
likely to return by the way of Behring Sea; and that, if any action is
taken for her rehef, it should be done promptly, and a vessel dispatched
to the Arctic waters, on the eastern coast of this continent, carrying
sledge parties to prosecute the search for the people of the exploring
steamer, I commend the subject to the attention of Congress.
The cruising of the " Eush " has been effectual in guarding the waters
of Southern Alaska and the Aleutian chain from the incursions of
F
III




XXXIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

vessels unlawfully engaged in the killing of seals and other fur-bearing
aniraals.
The presence of one or raore vessels in Alaskan waters naraed is
deemed necessary for the protection of the Government interests there,
but the revenue-cutters now available are not adapted for the long
voyages required in the work. I t is accordingly recommended that
provision be made for the construction of a revenue-vessel specially
adapted for Alaskan service.
In the last annual report recomraendation Avas made for an appropriation for two new vessels, at a cost of $75,000 each, to take the place of
two upon the Atlantic coast that were in need of extensive repairs.
Congress, howcA^er, provided for one only. The reasons then existing
for the appropriation apply with still stronger force at the present time,
the A^essel to be replaced having becorae alraost entirely unseaworthy.
The recoramendation is therefore renewed. It is also recomraended
that an appropriation be raade for the construction of a new hull and the
alteration of the steara-raachinery of the revenue-stearaer "Perry,"
noAv stationed on Lake Erie, a board of survey haAdng reported
the vessel as unfit for duty in her present condition. To make these
repairs and construct the new vessel, the sura of $150,000 has been included in the estiraates.
The service is seriously erabarrassed by the large and constantly increasing nuraber of officers who, through old age or physical disability,
have become unequal to the performance of duty. The number of
officers in the Eevenue Marine is limited by law to one of each grade
for a vessel, and the active list is reduced by so many as are unfit for
duty, there being no provision for retiring the disabled. The active
list is still further reduced by details made for duty in connection with
the Life-Saving SerAdce, under the act of June 18, 1878. The work of
the service consequently devolves on a smaller number of officers than
the law contemplates, or safety and efficient management justify. Besides,, the retention of the permanently incapacitated bars the way to
promotion of the junior officers, thus removing from the serAdce a valuable incentive to improveraent. To remedy these evils a system for
the retirement of officers, who have in the line of duty become permanently disabled, is desirable. It has also been urged that proAdsion
be made for extending the benefits of the pension laws to the ofticers
and seamen of the Eevenue Marine. Under existing statutes they are
entitled to a pension only when they haA^e been wounded or otherwise
disabled in the line of duty while co-operating with the Navy. In
view of the constant actiAdty required of thera, in tirae of peace as well
as of war, and of the hazard involved in their service, their cruising



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XXXV

being mostly upon the shallow waters and dangerous courses near the
coast, subjecting them during the inclement winter season to extreme
hardships and dangers, their claira to pensions seems to be well founded.
Upon these grounds the attention of Congress is iuAdted to the recommendations heretofore made by my predecessors in of&ce, for the
establishment of a retired list, and the extension of th e pension laws
to the Eevenue-Marine Service.
ALASKA.

The experience of the past year has shown more strongly than ever
' the necessity of establishing some simple form of government for the
protection of persons and property ui the Territory of Alaska;, and it
is recommended that Congress, at the approaching session, take action
on the subject.
The Alaska Commercial Company has taken, during the past year,
the full number of seals allowed under its lease, namely, one hundred
thousand,
MARINE-HOSPITAL SERVICE.

The Supervising Surgeon-General reports that during the past year
32,613 patients received rehef from the Marine-Hospital Service, of
whom 12,449 were treated in the hospitals, and 20,164 at the different
dispensaries; that 309,596 days' rehef in hospital were furnished, and a
considerable amount expended for surgical appliances for out-patients.
Seventeen incurable patients have been furnished transportafion to
their own homes. The officers of the service have examined 4,384
/ /

.

•

pilots for color-blindness, and have made physical examinations of 57
seamen of the Light-House and Merchant Services, and 44 officers,
cadets, and applicants for appointraent as cadets, and 305 searaen of
the Eevenue-Marine Service.
Section 4569 of the EcAdsed Statutes requires certain vessels to carry
a medicine-chest, but as it does not specify what should be contained
therein, a book prepared by the Supervising Surgeon-General, giving
the necessary information, has been published by the Department^
and is now issued to those concerned.
The receipts from all sources were $386,059.81, and the net expenditures $400,404.46. It is beheved that the receipts will be largely
increased during the present fiscal year, as a result of the special
iuA^estigations now in progress.
Notwithstanding the great increase in the number of patients, the
expenditures are not greater than last year, and the per capita cost has
been reduced from $16.18, as stated in the last report, to $12.27.
The hospitals are generally in better condition now than at any pre-




XXXVI

R E P O R T ' O F T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

vious time. -The temporary hospital at Bedloe's Island, at the port of
New York, has received such furniture and appliances as were necessary, but little has been done in the way of repairing the buildings, or
enlarging them to meet the needs of the service, Congress' having as
yet given no authority for their transfer from the War to the Treasury
Department. I t seeras that the city of New York, with its extensive
commerce, and large numbers of men engaged in the merchant-marine
service, should have a more permanent arrangement for the care of
sick and disabled seamen than that which is now provided. ,
The attention of Congress is again invited to the necessity for some
legislation concerning the unclaimed effects of seamen dying in marine
hospitals. There is now in the Treasury as a special deposit, to the
credit of the Secretary, $2,125.51 from this source. It is recomraended
that Congress authorize the sale of such unclaimed effects, and that
the proceeds, together with the unclaimed money now on hand, be
placed to the credit of the marine-hospital fund.
The recommendations of my predecessors, and, of the Supervising
Surgeon-General, concerning statutory provision for th6 appointment
, of medical officers, for the compulsory physical examination of seamen,
as preliminary to shipment, the establishment of a " Snug Harbor," and
a re-enactment of the law proAdding for the investment of surplus
funds, are concurred in, and respectfully comraended to the favorable
consideration of Congress.
STEAMBOAT INSPECTION.

The folloAving table shows the operations of this office during the
past year:
Tahle showing the nuniber of steam-vessels inspected, their aggi-egate tonnage, and the officet^s
licensed for the several divisions of navigation, during the fiscal year ended June 30.
1881.
Divisions.

Pacific coast
Atlantic coast
Western rivers ..'.
Northern lakes
»
Gulf coast

Steamers.

. .

Total

.~.

Tonnage.

Officers
licensed.

287
2,154
909
1,058
371

102,712.60
552,393.76
190,033. 36
269,086. 67
89,776.71

1,081
7,065
4,334
3,437
1,881

4,779

1,204,003.10

17,798

Recapitulation.
Total number of vessels inspected
Total tonnage of vessels inspected
Total number of offi.cers licensed




4,779
1,204,003.10
..
17,798

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY. XXXVII
Showing an increase over the preceding year as follows:
Increase in number of vessels
, 243
Increase in tonnage
82,195.05
Increase in number of licensed officers
1,137
Beceipts.
Eeceipts from inspection of steam-vessels
$167, 629 21
Eeceipts from sales of licenses
139,925 00
Total
Expenditures.
Salaries of inspectors and clerks
Travelling and miscellaneous expenses
Total
Total receipts from all sources
Total expenditures Balance of receipts unexpended

307,554 21
$180,931 18
37, 651 08
218,582 26
$307,554 21
218,582 26
88,971 95

The total number of accidents to steam-vessels during the year,
resulting in loss of life, was:
Explosions
-•
19
Fire
3
Collisions.'.
7
Snags, wrecks, a;nd sinking
8
Total

37

Total numher of lives lost hy accidents from various causes during the fiscal
year ended June 30,1881.
Explosions
43
Fire
^
11
Colhsions
30
Snags, wrecks, and sinking
150
Accidental droAvning
29
Miscellaneous casualties
5
Total liA^es lost

268

Under the head of "snags, wrecks, and sinking" are included the
disasters to the steamers " City of Yery Cruz" and "Alpena," wrecked
by hurricanes, whereby 128 hA^es were lost. These vessels were fully
equipped according to law, and the accidents were from causes wholly
beyond any precautions that could haA^e been taken b y t h e SteamboatInspection Service.
The Supervising Inspector-General, in his annual report, suggests
several amendments to the steamboat laws, and calls special attention
to the increasing accumulation of funds exacted by way of tax upon
licensed officers for the support of this service, shoAving a surplus in




XXXVIII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

the past year of $88,971.95, and an aggregate surplus now in the
Treasury of $649,320.35.
These subjects are commended to the consideration of Congress.
COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.

The total tonnage of vessels of the United States at the close of the
fiscal year 1881, as shown by the records of the Eegister of the Treasury,
was 4,057,734 tons; of this amount 1,335,586 tons were comprised in
2,326 vessels registered for the foreign trade, and 2,722,148 tons in
21,739 Aressels enrolled and licensed for the coasting trade and fisheries.
There has been a decrease of 17,224 tons in vessels employed in the
fbreign trade, and an increase of 6,924 tons in such as were engaged in
the domestic trade.
The following table exhibits the nuinber of vessels built and documented during the last fiscal year, with their tohnage:
^' —
Number.

Tons,
Sailing-vessels
Steam-vessels
Canal-boats

.

"Rarffes

v

Tbtal

493
444
57
114

. 1,108-

81,209
118, 070
-10,189
70,988
280,456

As the larger part of the canal-boats and barges now built in the
country are not documented, it is presumed that the above numbers
represent but a small proportion of the vessels of those classes which
were built.
TRADE IN AMERICAN AND FOREIGN BOTTOMS.

The total tonnage of vessels entered from foreign countries was
15,251,329 tons during 1880, and 15,630,541 tons during the year ended
June 30, 1881, shoAving an increase of 379,212 tons, or about two and
one-half per cent. The American tonnage entered in the foreign trade
exhibits a decrease of 221,020 tons, or scA^en per cent., while the foreign tonnage shows an increase of 600,232 tons, or about f^iSfe per cent.
The tonnage in these cases is computed on the basis of the number
of entries of vessels and hot on the number of vessels, and is limited
to the seaboard ports.
Of the raerchandise brought in at seaboard, lake, and riA^^er ports
during the year, an amount of the value of $133,631,146 was imported
in American vessels, and $491,840,269 in foreign. Of the exports of
merchandise, an amount of the value of $116,955,324 Avas shipped hi
American, and $777,162,714 in foreign vessels. Of the combined imports and exports of merchandise, 16 per cent, only of the totalvalue




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XXXIX

was conveyed in American vessels; and the amount of transportation
to and from our ports in our own vessels has fallen off one per cent.
in the fiscal year 1881 as compared with that of 1880.
COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY.
The work of the surA^ey of the coast, and the geodetic operations in
the interior, have been advanced during the year'as effectively as the
means appropriated would permit.
On the Atlantic slope, or Eastern DiAdsion, the work has been in
progress on the coasts of Maine, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey,
Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Yirginia, Florida, Louisiana, and
Mississippi, including the Mississippi riA^er to Memphis; the coast of
Texas; and in the interior of the States of New Hampshire, Yermont,
New York, PennsylA-ania, New Jersey, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee,
Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and Wisconsin. On the Pacific slope, or
Western DiAdsion, the detailed survey has been in progress in iraportant parts of the coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington Territory. The extension of the triangulation of the interior has been in
progress in Cahfornia, Nevada, and Colorado. Surveys and examinations of important localities have also been made in Alaska Territory.
The publication of maps and charts, the Coast Pilot, and tide-tables
has kept pace with the progress of field operations.
The officer in charge of the survey asks attention to the increasing
demands for information which that work is intended to supply, corresponding with the steady development of the country. With a view to
the most advantageous employment of the parties engaged in the
AAddely-separated localities in which the work is nowin progress, he recommends an increase of appropriations over the amounts granted for
the past few years. This recommendation only proposes to raise the
appropriation to an amount from which it was reduced at a time of
great comraercial depression. It is for Congress to determine whether
the importance of the work calls for the increase in appropriation.
DISTRICT OF COLIBIBIA.

The net expenditures on account of the District of Columbia for the
fiscal year 1881 were $3,543,912.03. The revenues deposited in the
Treasury for the same period were $2,016,199.23.
From July 1,1880, to July 1,1881, the bonded indebtedness has been
reduced by operation of the sinking-fund $254,573.33, and the annual
interest-charge upon the District debt has been reduced $12,816.66.
Since the offices of the commissioners of the sinking-fund of the District
of Columbia were abolished and their duties and powers transferred to
the Treasurer of the United States by the act Congress of June 11,1878,




XL

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

the principal of the funded debt has been reduced $938,900, and the
annual interest-charge has been reduced $55,792.62.
NATIONAL BOARD OF HEALTH.

During the past year the board has continued its investigations inta
matters affecting the public health, and has collected much valuable
information bearing upon sanitary questions. Under the provisions
of the act approA^ed June 2, 1879, entitled '^An act to prevent the
introduction of contagious and infectious diseases into the United
States," the board has completed a temporary refuge station at Ship
Island, Mississippi, maintained a service of inspection on the Mis-.
sissippi river, a temporary refuge station on Blackbeard Island, off the
coast of Georgia, and a hospital-boat at Norfolk, Yirginia, in readiness
for use in case of emergencj^ Happily no epidemic of yellow-fever
has invaded the country during the past year; and that the board has
rendered efficient service in compassing this result, and estabhshed
the utility of its refuge stations, is abundantly shown in the number of
infected vessels effectually treated during the past suminer. Eight
vessels with yellow-fever patients on board liaA^e been sent by local
health authorities to its stations—four to the station on Ship Island
and four to the station on Blackbeard Island; and it is a matter of congratulation that no cases of fcA^er occurred on board either of the Aressels after they Avere released, or in Sbnj of the ports at which they
subsequently touched. But for this timely assistance on the part of
fche Government a serious epidemic raight haA^e occurred, iuA^olAdng
far greater loss to the country than the expenses incurred by the board.
The total expenditures of the board during the past year w^ere
$164,989.46. As required by law, the expenditures have been raade upon
estiraates submitted by the board and approA^ed by the Secretary of the
Treasury; and while a liberal construction has been placed upon the laws
in pro Adding the board with funds for carrying out the purposes of the
several acts defining its duties, a strict accountability has been maintained by the accounting officers of the Department in relation to its
disbursements.
In vicAv of the Avant of proper facilities on the part of local health
authorities on the South Atlantic and Gulf coasts for effectually protecting the country against the introduction of contagious or infectious
diseases, the attention of Congress is respectfully called to the subject
of proAdding the additional temporary refuge stations suggested by
the board in its annual report.
The several reports of the heads of offices and bureaus are herewith
resnectfullv transmitted.
CHAS. J. FOLGEE.
^
^
Secretary.
To the S P E A K E R OF THE H O U S E OF EEPRESENTATIVES.




TABLES ACCOMPANYIM THE EEPORT..

lv







REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

3

T A K I . E A.—STATEMENT of the NET BECEIPTS (hy warrants) during the fiscal
year ended June 30,1881.
CUSTOMS.
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

September 30,1880
December 31,1880...
March 31,1881
June 30.1881

$56, 395,143 44
42,241,041 09
48, 747, 010 97
50,776,480 52

$198,159, 676 02

SALES OP PUBLIC LANDS.
Quarter ended September 30,1880
Quarter ended December 31,1880
Quarter ended March 31,1881
Quarterended June 30,1881-.

434,590 66
608, 936 86
542,486 28
615,849 37

.'
.-.•.

:.\

:

2, 201, 863 Irj

INTERN^AL REVENUE.
Quarterended
Quarter ended
Quarter ended
Quarter ended

September 30,1880
December 31,1880
Ma.rch 31,1881
June 30,1881

32,496,422
34,695,803
30,020,086
38,052,074

•..-

38
77
29
07

135, 264, 885 51

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

TAX ON CIECULATIOIS^ DEPOSITS, ETC., OF NATIONAL BANKS.
ended September 30,1880
3,933,346 37
ended December 3], 1880
5,523 94
ended March 31,1881
4,164,281 83
ended June 30,1881
12,963 58

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

EEPAYMENT OF INTEREST BY PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANIES.
ended September 30,1880
211, 402 76
ended December 31.1880
225,752 17
ended March 31,1881
192,412 26
ended June 30; 1881
181,266 61

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

CUSTOMS FEES, FINES, PENALTIES, AND FORFEITURES.
ended September 30,1880
351,870 95
ended December 31,1880
377, 395 06
ended March 31,1881
375, 009 37
ended June 30,1881
428,793 69

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

FEES, CONSULAR, LETTERS PATENT, AND LAND.
Septeraber 30,1880
542, 064 23
December 31,1880
'
472, 682 72
March 31,1881
563,753 04
June 30,1881
666,483 99

8,116,115 72

810, 833 80

1, 533, 069 07
ended
ended
ended
ended

2, 244, 983 98 .

PROCEEDS OF SALES OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY.
Quarterended
Quarter ended
Quarter euded
Quarter ended

September 30,1880
December 31,1880
March 31,1881
June 30,1881

56,311 23
78,139 93
52,429 94
75,292 90
262,174 00
PROFITS ON COINAGE.

Quarterended
Quarter ended
Quarter ended
Quarter ended

985,882
447, 691
1,050,392
984,519
•
REVENUES OF DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
Quarterended September 30,1880
^
265,872
Quarter ended December 31.1880
:
1,095,117
Quarter ended March 31,1881
318,666
Quarter ended June 30,1881
336,542

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended
"^

September 30,1880
December 31,1880
March 31,1881
June 30,1881

September 30,1880
Deceuiber 31,1880
March 31,1881
June 30,1881

Total ordinary receipts
Cash in Treasury June 30,1880
Total




MISCELLANEOUS.
,

.

-.

46
45
44
26
3,468,485 61
65
68
89
01

2,216, 332 79
1,446, 260 71
1,148, 039 58
1,893,873 38
r—

2, 016,199 23

6,704,506 4S
360, 782,292 57
203,838,419 53
564,620,712 19

4

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

T A B I i E Mo—STATEMENT of the N E T DISBUBSEMENTS {hy warrants) during
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881.
Congress
Executive
Judiciary
Government of Territories
Subtreasuries
Public land offices
Inspection of steam vessels
Mint and assay offices

CIVIL.
,...'...,
.'

$5,082,046
6,878,442
4,347,531
224, 288
333, 609
678, 559
218, 582
178,117

•

11
70
15
58
22
25
28
90

Total'civil*

$17,941,177 19
FOREIGN INTERCOURSE.

Diplomatic salariea
Consular salaries
i
Contingencies of consulates
Rescuing American seamen from shipwreck
American and Sijanish Claims Commission
Contingent expenses of foreign missions
Shipping and discharging seamen
Prisons for American convicts
Expenses under the neutrality act
American and Chinese Commission
American and French Commission.
International Bimetallic Commission
Publication of commercial and consular reports
Contingent and miscellaneous

'.

:

Total foreign intercourse

273,432 90
428, 594 19
164,949 93
5, 946 59
8, 691 56
48, l&O 58
3, 659 93
19, 010 03
3,100 00
29,769 73
34,120 32
37, 043 16
12, 079 78
25, 376 22

:....

Mint establishment
1,091,349 03
' CoastSurvey
^i..:
556,369 83
Light-House Establishment
1,997, 694 64
Building and repairs of light-houses
644, 974 35
Refunding excess of deposits for unascertained duties
3, 663, 254 24
Revenue-cutter service^
839, 914 77
Life-saving service
-469, 018 60
Custom-houses, court-houses, post-offices, &o
2,919,185 80
Furniture, fuel, «fec., for public buildings under Treasury Department..
736, 005 93
Repairs and preservation of buildings under Treasury Department
198, 698 16
Collecting customs revenue
'
6,383,288 10
Debenture anddrawbacks under customs laws
1,722,192 86
Marine-Hospital Establishment
400, 404 47
Compensation in lieu of moieties
32, 509 73
Assessing and collecting internal revenue
4, 327,793 24
Punishing violations of internal-revenue laws
67,416 30
In; ornal-revenue stamps, papers and dies
476, 323 15
Refunding duties erroneously or illegally collected
29,191 97
Internal-revenue allowances and drawbacks
35,654 27
Redemption of internal-revenue stamps
27, 775 78
Deficiencies ..of revenue of Post-Office Department
—
3, 895, 638 66
Expenses national currency
166, 578 14
Sui)pressing counterfeiting and fraud
75, 288 57
Contingent expenses, Independent Treasury
72, 378 03
Survey of public lands
236,266 37
Repayment for lands erroneously sold
39,174 46
Five per cent, fund, &c., to States
.-.
.^...
264,907 88
Payments under relief acts
.\. 94, 308 70
Postage
141, 111-12
Purchase and management of Louisville and Portland Canal
422, 970 00
Vaults, safes, and locks for public buildings
49, 243 82
Indemnity for swamp lands
:
16, 003 19
Propagation, &c., of lood-fishes
:..
137,190 91
Collecting statistics relating to commerce
^
8, 798 93
Geoloo-ical survey of Territories
».
' 149, 395 62
Deposits by individuals for surveys of public lands
.'
861, 066 94
Sinking fund of Pacific Railroads...
1
" 972,803 84
Education of the blind
5,275 00
Transportation of United States securities
'.
11,129 38
National Board of Health
*
192,634 15
Expenses of Tenth Census
^..:
3,564,432 31
Improvement of Yellowstone National Park
*..
14, 969 76
Payment of judgments, Court of Claims
310,459 36
M.ail transportation. Pacific Railroads
1,092,103 46
Departmentof Agriculture...
:
<...:....
218,222 53
Patent Office
"..
.•
"J
96, 099 48
Expenses of Bureau of Engraving and Printing.
379,559 23
Smithsonian Institution
121, 583 88
Completion of Washington Monument
;'.. ' 170,147 85
Public buildings and grounds in Washington
260,032 32
Annual repaiis of the Cai)itol
59,700 00
Improving and lighting Ca.pitol grounds
92,960 97
State, War, and Navy Departments' buUding
301,231 02
Columbian Institute for Deaf and Dumb
61, 000 00
Government Hospital for the Insane
;.
174,224 49
Freedmen's H o s p i t a l . .
?......:.
.....*.....
41,800 00




1,093,954 92

MISCELLANEOUS.

/

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

5

T A B I . I : M.—STATEMENT of the N E T DISBUBSEMENTS (hy warrants) during
the fiscal year ended June 30, 18t^l—Coutinued.
MISCELLANEOUS-Continued.
Howard University
Support and treatment of transient paupers
Redemption of District of Columbia securities
Refunding taxes. District of Columbia
:
Water fund, District of Columbia
•
Employment of the poor in the District of Columbia
Repairing Pennsylvania avenue, act July 19,1876
Expenses of District of Columbia
,
Washington Aqueduct
1
.'
Charitable institutions
Statue of Gen. Daniel Morgan
Transportation of silver coin
Reproducing plats of surveys of public lands
Rocky Mountain locusts
Survey private land claims
Claims for swamp lands
1
Depredations on public timber
Miscellaneous
:
:

$10, 000 00
15, 000 00
17,130 60
5,147 86
110,110 65
20, 289 92
1, 522 65
3, 341, 613 20
• 3, 890 13
198,408 70
20, 000 00
21, 749 51
31, 500 00
25, 002 80
23, 041 32
11, 756 55
32,865 03
102,458 59

Total miscellaneous.

,/-

$45, 381,192 60
INTERIOR DEPARTMENT.

Indians
Pensions

6,514,161,09
50, 059, 279 62

Total Interior Department.

56, 573, 440 71
MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT.

Pay Department
12,542,793 48
Commissary Department
2, 233, 239 76
Quartermaster's Department
10, 353, 028 90
Medical Department
'.
741,330 24
Ordnance Department
1, 522, 952 42
Military Academy
93, 589 18
Improving rivers and harbors
8, 518, 673 78
Survey of Territories west of the one hundredth meridian
15, 000 00
Contingencies
36, 547 75
Expenses of recruiting
71,198 41
Signal Service
385, 447 91
Expenses of military convicts
-.
65, 344 50
Publishing the official records of the rebellion
70, 995 22
Support of National Horae for Disabled Volunteers
1, 033, 560 S3
Support of Soldiers' Horae
:
87, 242 92
Horses and other property lost in service
107, 791 13
Payments under relief acts
79, 702 42
Constniction of military posts, roads, &c
369,474 31
Fortifications
".
245, 780 27
M:iscellaneous
96, 721 94
National cemeteries
182,136 71
Fifty per cent. a.rrears of Army transportation due certain railroads...
66, 513 40
Construction of military telegraphs
74, 953 15
Bounty to soldiers, act July 28,1866
88,192 58
Transportation, Army and su]iplies, Pacific Railroads
-.
139, 223 68
Survey of Northern and Northwestern lakes
•..
56, 758 04
Bounty to volunteers
328, 034 70
Refunding to States expen ses incurred
^..
156,187 45
Claims for quartermasters' stores
359, 780 11
Claims of loyal citizens
344, 259 36
Total military establishment

40, 466,460 55

NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT.
Pay and contingencies of the N a v y .
Marine Corps
.'
"
Naval Academy
'
IvTavigation
Oi'dnance
Equipment and Recruiting
•
Yards and Docks
Medicine and Surgery
Construction and Repair
.,
Provisions and Clothing
.'
Stea,m-Engineering
•
Miscelliineous
„
Total Naval establishment
Interest on the public debt

i

7,230,183 81
778, 546 65
187, 111 37
217,0.32 76
369, 744 30
927, 225 69
1,154, 403 88
10,366 96
978, 706 70
1,877, 284 70
l!. Ill, 208 72
752,856 12
15,686,671 66
82,508,741 18

Total net ordinary expenditures
Premium on redemption of loans
Redemption of the public debt

259, 651, 638 81
1, 061, 248 78
51,401,801 05

Total expenditures
Cash in Treasury Jun« 30,1881
Total

312,114,688 64
252,506,023 46
564,620,712 10




'.

*

6

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

T A B I ^ E C — S T A T E M E N T of tlie ISSUE and B E D E M P T I O N of LOANS and
TBEASUBY JSOTES (ly warrants) for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881.
Issues.
Texan indemnity stock, act of September 9, 1850
•
Loan of February, 1861, act of February 8 1861
Oregon war debt, act of March 2,1861.
Seven-thirties of 1861, act of July 17,
1861
Loan of July and August, 1861, acts
of July 17 and August 5, 1861
Old demand notes, acts of July 17 and
August 5, 1861, and July 12,1862...
Five-twenties of 1862, act of February 25 1862
'.
Legal-tender notes, acts of Februarv
25 and July 11,1862, January 7 and
March 3, 1863
$54, 545, 334 00
Fractional currency, acts of July 17,
1862, March 3, 1863, and June 30,
1864
:^
Coin certificates, actof March 3,1863.
One year notes of 1863, act of March
3, i863
Two year notes of 1863, act of March
3 1863
Compound interest notes, acts of
March 3' 1863 and June 30 1864
Loan of 1863, act of March 3,1863, and
June 30,1864
Ten-forties of 1864, act of March 3,
1864 .
Five-twenties of March, 1864, act of
March 3, 1864
Five-twenties of June, 1864, act of
June 30 1864
Seven-thirties of 1864 and 1865, acts
of June 30, 1864, and March 3,1865..
Five-twenties of 1865, act of March
3, 1865
Consols of 1865, act of March 3,1865..
Consols of 1867 act of March 3 1865
Consols of 1868. act.of March 3,1865..
Funded loan or 1881, acts of July 14,
1870, January 20,1871, and Janiiary
14, 1875..-..'
Funded loan of 1907, acts of July 14,
1870, January 20, 1871, and Janiiary
14 1875 .
678,200 00
Certificates of deposit, act of June
8, 1872
:
17, 615, 000 00
Silver certificates, act of February
28, 1878
.'
40, 912, 000 00
Refunding certificates, act of February 26 1879
Total

113,750,534 00

Redemptions.

$1, 000 00

Excess of
redemptions.

Excess of
issues.

.

$1, 000 00

15,193, 000 00
54, 250 00

15,193 000 00
54,250 00

300 00

300 00

16, 712,450 00

16, 712, 450 00

440 00
21,300 00

440 00

"

21,300 00

54, 545, 334 00
109, 001 05
2, 221, 680 00

109, 001'05
2, 221, 680 00

2, .000 00

2,000 00

500 00

500 00

12, 340 00

12 340 00

7, 057,100 00.

7, 057,100 00

1

2, 016,150 00

2, 016,150 00

3, 400 00

3 400 00

2, 750 00

2,750 00

37, 300 00
143,150 00
959,150 00
337, 400 00

37, 300 00
143,150 00
959 150 00
337,400 00

42, 769,400 00

42, 7G9, 400 00
$678, 200 00

20,155, 000 00
2,119,740 00

2, 540, 000 00
38,792,260 00

678, 200 00
165,152, 335 05

678 200 00
39, 470, 460 00

90, 872, 261 05

Excess of redemptions .
Excess of issues

90, 872 261 05
39,470,460 00

Net excess of redemptions charged
ih receipts and expenditures

61,401,801 05




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASERY,

7

T A B I . E m.—STATEMENT of the NET BECEIPTS and DISBUBSEMENTS (hy
warrants) for the quarter ended Septemher ZOy 1S81.
RECEIPTS.
Customs
o
Sales of public lands
Internal revenue
.•-.-.*
Tax on circulation, deposits, &c., oi: national banks
Repayment of interest by Pacifio Railroad Companies
Customs fees, fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Consular, letters patent, homestead, &c., fees
Proceeds of sales of government property
Profits on coinage
Miscellaneous
Totalnet ordinary receipts
Balance in the Treasury June 30, 1881

...o
o.

-

-

J

,.. $59,184,469 15
948,368 19
37, 575, 502 22
.»
4,307,988 86
59, 999 49
421,811 62
639,180 08
66,363 58
" 809,317 80
.4,168,042 10
108,^181,043 09
252, 506, 023 46

1

Total

360,687,066 55

DISBURSEMENTS.
Customs
Internalrevenue.
Diplomatic service.
Judiciary
Interior "(civil)
Treasury proper
Quarterly salaries

4,369,836 80
1,046,393 55
336, 532 76
674,005 13
1,428,375 23
5, 395,156 04
133,230 24

:

Total civil and miscellaneous
Indians
Pensions
Militarv Establishment
Naval Establishment
Interest on public debt

13,383,529 75
2,011,984 70
17,220,122 12
13,517,184 11
4,646, 969 78
24,271,948 93

»
Redemption ofthe public debt
Balance in Treasury, Septeuiber 30, 1881
Total

-




75, 051, 739 39
34, 318, 332 30
251,316,994 86
=a-. =

„ . . . o . . = oc.

„»».- = . - .

360,687,066 55

8

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

T A B I . E '^.—STATEMENT of OUTSTANDING PBINCIPAL of the PUBLIC
DEBT of the UNITED STATES on the 1st of January ofeach year from 1791 to 1843,
inclusive, and on the Ist of July of each year from 1844 <oJ881, inclusive.
Tear.
Jan. 1,1791.
1792.
1793 .
1794 .
1795.
1796 .
1797.
1798.
1799.
1800.
1801.
1802.
1803.
1804.
1805.
1806.
1807.
1808 .
1809.
1810.
1811.
1812.
1813.
1814 .
1815.
1816.
1817.
1818.
1819.
1820.
1821".
1822.
1823.
1824 .
1825.
1826.
1827 .
1828 .
1829 .
1830.
1831.
1832.
1833.
1834.
1835.
1836.
1837.
1838.
1839.
1840.
1841.
1842.
1843.
July 1,1843.
1844.
1845.
1846.
1847.
1848.
1849.
1850.
1851.
1852.
1853.
1854.
1855.
1856.
1857.
1858.
1859.
1860 .
1861.
1862).
1863.
1864.
1865.
1866.
1867.
1868.




Amoimt.
$75,463,1,476 52
77.227, 924 66
80,352,I, 634 04
• 78,427,
•, 404 77
80,747, 587 39
83,762,1,172 07
82,064, 479 33
79.228,1, 529 12
78,408,!, 669 77
82, 976,294 35
83, 038,050 80
80,712,!, 632 25
77,054, 686 30
86,427, 120 88
82,312, 150 50
75,723, 270 66
69,218, 398 64
65,196, 317 97
57, 023,192 09
53,173, 217 52
48,005, 587 76
45,209, 737 90
55, 962,827 57
81, 487,846 24
99, 833,660 15
127,334, 933 74
. 123,491,965 16
103,466, 633 83
95,529, 648 28
91, 015,566 15
89, 987,427 66
93, 546,676 98
90,875, 877 28
90, 269,777 77
83, 788,432 71
81, 054,059 99 •
73, 987,357 29
67,475, 043 87
58,421, 413 67
48,565, 406 50
39,123, 191 68
24, 322,235 18
7, 001,698 83
4,760, 082 08
37, 733 05
37, 513 05
336, 957 83
8, 308,124 07
10,434, 221 14
3, 573,343 82
5,250, 875 54
13, 594,480 73
20, 601,226 28
32, V42,922 00
23,461, 652 50
15, 925,303 01
15, 550,202 97
38, 826,534 77
47, 044,862 23
63,061, 858 69
63,452, 773 55
68, 304,796 02
66,199, 341 71
59, 803,117 70
• 42,242,222 42
35, 586,956 56
31, 972,537 90
28,699, 831 85
44, 911,881 03
58,496, 837 88
64, 842,287 88
90, 580,873 72
524,176, 412 13
119,772, 138 63
815,784, 370 57
680,647, 869 74
773,236, 173 69
678,126, 103 87
611,687, 851 19

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

9

•TABILE IS,.—STATEMENT of OUTSTANDING PBINCIPAL of the PUBLIC'
DEBT, ^-c—Contmued.
Amonnt.

Tear.

Julyl, 1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

".
.
„„
.
„
-

-

'.

..

$2,588,452,213 94
2,480,672,427 81
2, 353,211,332 32
2, 253,251,328 78
*2, 234,482, 993 20
*2, 251, 690,468 43
*2, 232,284, 531 95
*2,180, 395,067 15
*2, 205, 301, 392 10
*2,256, 205,892 53
*2, 349, 567,482 04
*2,120; 415,370 63
*2, 069, 013, 569 58

*In the amount here stated as the outstanding principal of the public debt are included the certificates of deposit outstanding on the 30th of June, issued under act of June 8, 1872, for which a like
amount in United States notes was on special deposit tn the Treasury for their redemption, and added
to the cash balance in the Treasury. These certificates, as a-matter of accounts, are treated as a part
ofthe public debt, but, being ofiset by notes held on deposit for their redemption, should properly be
deducted from the principal of the public debt in making comparison with former yea,rs.

STATEMENT of the PUBLIC DEBT, including ACCBUED INTEBEST thereon, less
cash in the Treasury on the 1st day of July ofeach year, from July 1, 1869, tOi Julyl, 1881,
compiled from the published monthly debt-statements of those dates.
Tears.
Jnlyl, 1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1870
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

Oatstanding prin- Accrued intercipal.
est.
*$2, 597,722,983 37 $47, 447,310
*2, 601, 675,127 83
50, 607,556
2, 353, 211,332 32 45, 036,766
2, 253,251,328 78
41, 705,813
2,234,482, 993 20
42, 356,652
2,251,690, 468 43
38, 939,087
2, 232, 284,531 95
38, 647,556
2,180, 395,067 15
38, 514,004
2, 205, 301,392 10 40, 882,791
2, 256, 205,892 53
30,404, 551
2, 349, 567,482 04
30, 792,351
2,120,415, 370 63
22, 845,547
2, 069, 013,569 58
20, 948,657

79
52
23
27
82
47
19
54
89
37
34
59
75

Cash in the
Treasury.

Debt less cash in
the Treasury.

$156,167, 813 58 $2,489, 002,480 58
265, 924,084 61 2, 386, 358, 599 74
106,217, 263 65
2, 292, 030, 834 90
103,470, 798 43 2,191, 486, 343 62
129, 020,932 45 2,147, 818, 713 57
147, 541,314 74 2,143, 088,241 16
142, 243,361 82
2,128, 688,726 32
119,469, 726 70
2, 099, 439, 344 99
186, 025,960 73 2, 060, 158,223 26
256,823, 612 08
2, 035, 786, 831 82
353,152, 577 01 2, 027, 207, 256 37
201, 088,622 88
1, 942, 172, 295 34249, 363,415 35
1, 840, 598,811 98

*~It will be noticed that there is a difference in the amounts represented by these two statements as
the principal of the debt July 1, 1869, and July 1, 1870. This difierence is explained thus: In the principal ofthe debt as shown by the monthly delit-statements of these dates, the bonds purchased for the
sinking-fund and paid for from money in the Treasury, were included as a part of the outstanding debt
and were also treated in the cash as a cash item, or asset, for the reason that at that time there was no
authority or law for deducting thera from the outstanding debt. Congress, by the sixth section of the
act of July 14, 1870, directed that these bonds should be canceled and destroyed and deducted from the
amonnt of each class of the outstanding debt to which they respectively belonged, and such deductions
were accordingly made on the books of the department and in the table of the debt in the annual report.




T A B I . E W.—ANALYSIS of ihe P B I N C I P A L of the F U B L I C D E B T of the UNITED STATES, fr(m July 1, 1856, to July 1, 1881.
Tear.
1856
1857
1858
1859
I860
1861
1862
=
1863
1864
1865
1865—Ang. 31
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874...-..,
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880.01881

3 per centa.
-

-

4^ per cents.

«..

$57,926,116 57
105,629, 385 30
77, 547, 696 07
90,496, 930 74
618,127 98
121, 341, 879 62
17,737, 025 68
801, 361 23

»-»

o
„
„




4 per cents.

i

o

$64, 000,000 00
66,125, 000 00
59, 550, 000 00
45,885, 000 00
678, 000 00
24, 665, 000 00
678, 000 00
14, 000, 000 00
678, 000 00
14, 000, 000 00
678, 000 00
14.000, 000 00
678, 000 00
14, 000, 000 00
14, 000, 000 00
14,000, 000 00 ""98,"856,"000'66'
14, 000, 000 00
741, 522, 000 00
739, 347,800 00
... .14, 000, 000 00
14, 000, 000 00
739, 347, 800 00

$140,
240,
250,
250,
250,

000, 000
000, 000
000, 000
000, 000
000, 000

00
00
00
00
00

[Continued on next page.]

5 per cents.
$3,632, 000 00
3,489,000 00
23, 538, 000 00
37,127, 800 00
43,476, 300 00
33, 022, 200 00
30,483, 000 00
30,483, 000 00
300,213,480 00
245, 709,420 63
269,175,727 65
201, 982r665 01
198, 533,435 01
221, 586,185 01
221, 588, 300 00
221, 588, 300 00
274, 236,450 00
414, 567, 300 00
^14, 567, 300 00
510, 628, 050 00
607,132,750 00
711, 685, 800 00
703, 266, 650 00
703, 266, 650 00
508,440,350 00
484,864, 900 00
439, 841, 350 00

6 per cents.

7 3-10 per cents.

Total interestbearing debt.

"
$28,130, 761 77
$31,702,761 77
24, 971, 958 93
28,460, 958 93
21,162, 838 11
44,700, 838 11
O
21,162, 938 11
58, 290, 738 11
21,164, 538 11
64, 640, 838 11
57, 358, 673 95
90, 380, 873 95
w
154, 313, 225 01 $i22, 582,485 34
365, 304, 826 92
431, 444, 813 83
139,974,435 34
707. 531 634 47
842, 882,652 09
139, 286,935 34 1, 359, 930, 763 50 o
1, 213,495,169 90
671, 610, 397 02 2, 221, 311, 918 29
1, 281, 736,439 33
830, 000, 000 00 2, 381, 530, 294 96
1,195, 546,041 02 813,460, 621 95 2, 332,331, 207 60 w
1, 543,452,080 02 488, 344, 846 95 2, 248, 067, 387 66
1, 878, 303, 984 50
37, 397,196 95 2,202, 088,727 69
1, 874, 347,222 39
• 2,162,060, 522 39 Ul
1,765, 317, 422 39
2, 046,455,728 39
1, 613, 897, 300 00
1, 934, 696,750 00
1, 374, 883,800 00
1, 814, 794,100 00
1, 281, 238, 650 00
1, 710,483, 950 00
1, 213, 624,700 00
1, 738,930,750 00
1,100, 865, 550 00
1, 722,676,300 00 o
984, 999, 650 00
1, 710,685,450 00
854, 621, 850 00
1, 711,888, 500 00
738, 619,000 00'
1, 794, 735, 650 00
283, 681, 350 00
1, 797, 643,700 00
235, 780,400 00
1,723,993,100 00
1, 639,567,750 00
196, 378, 600 00

o
H
H
>•
OQ

3

TABI-E

W.—ANALYSIS qf the PBINCIPAL of the PUBLIC DEBT of ihe UNITED STATES, #c.—Continued.

Tear.

i85e-nruiy 1 a...
1857.
1858.
1859
I860....
,
1861.............
1862...
,
1863
1864
1865
/ 1 8 6 5 — A u g u s t 31
1 8 6 6 — J u l y l ....
1867.
1868.. „•.....
1869
1870...;
,..
1871...
1872
1873
1874..
1875...
1876
1877....
1878.....
1879.....
1880....
1881...
,

Debt on which in- Debt bearing no Outstanding prin- Cashin the Treas- Total debt, less cash Annual interest
terest has ceased.
interest
cipal.
ury July 1.
in Treasury.
charge.
$209, 776 13
238, 872 92
211, 042 92
20'6, 099 77
201, 449 77
199, 999 77
280, 195 21
473, 048 16
416, 335 86
1, 245,771 20
1, 503,020 09
935, 092 05
li 840,615 01
1,197, 340 89
5,260, 181 00
3, 708,641 00
- 1, 948,902 26
7, 926,797 26
51, 929, 710 26
3, 216,590 26
11,425, 820 26
3, 902,420 26
16, 648, 860 26
5, 594,560 26
37, 015, 630 26
7, 621,455 26
6, 723,865 26

$158,591,390 00
411, 767, 456 00
455, 437, 271 21
458, 090,180 25
461, 616, 311 51
439, 969, 874 04
428, 218,101 20
408,401,782 61
421,131, 510 55
430, 508, 064 42
416, 565, 680 06
430, 530, 43i 52
472, 069, 332 94
509, 543,128 17
498,182,411 69
465,807,196 89
476, 764, 031 84
455, 875, 682 27
410, 835,^41 78
388, 800, 815 37
422, 721, 954 32

$31, 972,537
28, 699,831
44,911, 881
58, 496,837
•64,842, 287
90, 580,873
524,176, 412
1.119, 772,138
1, 815, 784,370
2, 680, 647,869
2, 844, 649,626
2, 773, 236,173
2. 678,126,103
2,611,687, 851
2, 588,452,213
2,480, 672,427
2,353,211, 332
2, 253, 251,328
2, 234,482,993
2,251, 690,468
2, 232, 284,531
2,180, 395,067
2,205,301, 392
2, 256, 205,892
2,245,495, 072
2.120, 415,370
2, 069, 013,

90
85
03
88
88
72
13
63
57
74
56
69
87
19
94
81
32
78
20
43
95
15
10
53
04
63

$21, 006,584 89
18, 701,210"'09
7, Oil,689 31
5,091, 603 69
4, 877,885 87
2, 862,212 92
18, 863,659 96
8,421, 401 22
106, 332,093 53
5,832, 012 98
88, 218,055 13
137, 200,009 85
169,974, 892 18
130, 834,437 96
155, 680, 340 85
149, 502, 471 60
106, 217,203 65
103,470, 798 43
. 129; 020,932 45
147, 541, 314 74
142, 243,361 82
119, 469,726 70
186, 025, 960 73
256, 823, 612 08
249, 080,167 01
201, 088,622 88
249, 363, 415 35

$10, 965,953
9, 998,621
37, 900,191
53,405, 234
59, 964,40?
87, 718,660
505, 312,752
1, 111, 350,737
1, 709,452,277
2, 674, 815,856
2,756,431, 571
2, 636, 036,163
2, 508,151,211
2, 480, 853,413
2,432, 771,873
2, 331,169,956
2, 246, 994,068
2,149, 780,530
2,105,462, OOO
2,104,149, 153
2, 090, 041,170
2, 060, 925,340
2, 019, 275,431
1, 999, 382,280
1,996,414, 905
1, 919, 326,747
1, 819, 650,154

01
76
72
19
01
80
17
41
04
76
43
84
69
23
09
21
67
SS75
69
13
45
37
45
03
75

23

$1, 869, 445 70
1, 672, 767 53
2,446, 670 28
3,126, 166 28
3,443, 687 29
5, 092, 630 43
22,048, 509 59
41, 854, 148 01
78, 853, 487 24
137,742, 617 43
150,977, 697 87
146,068, 196 29
138, 892, 451 39
128,459, 598 14
125, 523, 998 34
118,784, 960 34
111, 949, S30 50
103, 988, 463 00
98, 049, 804 00
98, 796, 004 50
96,855, 690 90
95,104, 269 00
, 93,160, 643 50
94,654, 472 50
83,773, 778 50
79, 633, 981 00
75, 018, 695 50

NOTE 1.—The annual interest cljiarge is computed upon the aniount cf outstanding principal at the close of the fiscal year, and is exclusive of interest charge on Pacific
Railway bonds.
,
NOTE 2.—The figures for July 1, 1879, were made up, assuming pending funding operations to have been completed.
NOTE 3.—The temporary loan, per act of J u l y 11, 1862, is included in the 4 per cents, from 1862 to 1868, inclusive, with the exception of the amount outstanding for Angust
31, 1865, this being the date at which the public debt reached its highest point. This loan bore interest from 4 per cent, to 6 per cent., and was redeemable on ten days' notice
after thirty days; but being constantly changing, it Ivas been considered more equitable to include the whole amount outstanding as bearing 4 per cent, interest on an average
for the year.
_
NOTE 4.-r-Iii the recent monthly statements of the public debt, the interest accrued has been added to the principal, making the net debt larger in that amount than the
amonnt herein stated for each yeax.




O

w
O

w
QQ

o

O

w
fej'
H
tei
Ul

I

12

REPORT OF T H E SECRETART O F T H E

TREASURT.

T A B I . E i^.—STATEMENT of B E C E I P T S of UNITED STATES from March 4,1789,

i
(S

Balance in the
Treasury at
commencement of year.

Customs.

Intemal revenue.

Directtax.

Public lands.

Miscellaneous.

1791
$4, 399,473 09
$10,478 10
1792 '***$978,*90.5"75'
3,443, 070 85 '""$208,'942" si'
9,918 65
783,444 51
1793
4,255, 306 56
337,705 70
21,410 88
'1794
753,661 69
4, 801, 065 28
274,089 62
53, 277 97
1,151, 924 17
337, 755 36
1795
28,317 97
5, 588, 461 26
516,442 61
475, 289 60
1796
6,567 987 94
1,169,415 98
$4,"836"i3'
575, 491 45
1797
888, 995 42
7, 549, 649 65
399,139 29
83, 540 60
1, 021, 899 04
1798
7,106, 061 93
58,192 81
644, 357 95
11, 963 11
1799
617,451 43
6. 610, 449 31
779,136 44
86,187 56
2,101, 867 77
9, 080, 932 73
809, 396 55 •*$734,'223'97"
152, 712 10
1800
443'75
1801
2, 023, 311 99
10, 750,778 93
1, 048, 033 43
534, 343 38
345, 649 15
167, 726 06
1802
8, 295, 391 00
12, 438, 235 74
621, 898 89
206, 565 44
1, 500, 505 86
188, 628 02
1803
5, 020, 697 64
10,479, 417 61 / 215.179 69
71, 879 20
131, 945 44 .
165, 675 69
1804
4, 825, 811 60
11, 098, 565 33
50, 941 29
50,198 44
139, 075 53
487, 526 79
1805
4, 037, 005 20
12, 936, 487 04
21, 747 15
21, 882 91
540,193 80
40, 382 30
1806
3, 999, 388 99
14, 667, 698 17
20,101 45
55, 703 86
51,121 86
765, 245 73
1807
4, 538,123 80
15, 845, 521 61
13,051 40
34, 732 56
466,103 27
38, 550 42
1808
9, 643, 850 07
IQ, 363, 550 58
8,190 23
19,159 21
647, 939 06
21, 822 85
1809
9, 941, 809 96
7, 257, 506 62
4, 034 29
7, 517 31
442, 252 33
62,162 57
1810
3, 848, 056 78
8, 583, 309 31
7,430 63
12,448 68
84, 476 84
696, 548 82
2, 672, 276 57
13,313, 222 73
2, 295 95
7, 6G6 66
59, 211 22
1811
1, 040, 237 .53
1812
3, 502, 305 80
8, 958, 777 53
4, 903 06
859 22
710,427 78
126,165 17
1813
3, 862, 217 41
13, 224, 623 25
4, 755 04
3,805 52
835, 655 14
271,571 00
1814
5,196, 542 00
5, 998, 772 08
1, 662, 984 82 2, 219,497 36
164, 399 81
1,135,971 09
1815
1, 727, 848 63
7, 282, 942 22
4,678,059 07 2,162, 673 41
' 285, 282 84
1, 287, 959 28
1816
13,106, 592 88
36, 306, 874 88
5,124, 708 31 4,253, 635 09
273, 782 35
1,717, 985 03
1817
22, 033, 519 19 • 26, 283, 348 49 2,678,100 77 1,834,187 04
109,761 08
1, 991, 226 06
1818
14, 989,465 48
17,176, 385 00
955, 270 20
264,333 36
2, 606, 564 77
57, 617 71
1819
1,478, 526 74
20,283, 608 76
229, 593 63
83, 650 78
57, 098 42
3, 274,422 78
1820
2, 079, 992 38
15, 005, 612 15
106, 260 53
•31, 586 82
1, 035, 871 61
.61,338 44
1821
1,198, 461 21
13, 004, 447 15
69, 027 63
29, 349 05
1, 212, 966 46
152, 589 43
1822
1,681,592 24
17, 589, 701 94
67, 665 71
20, 901 56
452, 957 19
1, 803, 581 54
1823
4,^237, 427 55
19, 088, 433 44
34, 242 17
10, 337 71
141,129 84
916, 523 10
1824
9,463, 922 81
17, 878, 325 71
34, 663 37
6, 201 96
127, 603 60
984, 418 15
1825
1, 946, 597 13
20, 098, 713 45
25, 771 35
2, 330 85
130,451 81
1, 216, 090 56
1828
5, 201, 650 43
23, 341, 331 77
21, 589 93
6, 638 76 • 1, 393, 785 09
94,588 66
1827
6, 358, 686 18
19, 712, 283 29
19,885 68
2, 626 90
1, 315, 722 83
1, 495, 845 26
1828
6, 668,286 10
23, 205, .'>23 64
17, 451 54
2, 218 81
1, 018, 308 75
65,126 49
1829
5, 972,435 81
22, 681, 965 91
14,502 74
11, 335 05
112, 648 55
1, 517,175 13
5, 755, 704 79
21, 922, 391 39 ^
12,160 62
16, 980 59
1830
73,227 77
2, 329, 356 14
1831
6, 014, 539 75
24, 224,441 77
6, 933 51
10, 506 01
584,124 05
3, 210, 815 48
1832
4, 502, 914 45
28, 405, 237 24
11, 630 65
6,791 13
270, 410 61
2, 623, 381 03
1833
2, Oil. 777 .55
29,032, 508 91
2,759 00
394 12
3, 967, 682 55
470, 096 67
1834
11, 702, 905 31
16, 214, 957 15
4,196 09
19 80
4, 857, 600 69
480, 812 32
1&35
8, 892, 858 42
19,391, 310 59
10,459 48
4, 263 33 14, 757, 600 75
759, 972 13
1836
26, 749, 803 96
23,409, 940 53
370 00
728 79
24,877,179 86
2, 245, 902 23
1837
46, 708,436 00
11,109, 290 39
5, 493 84
1, 687 70
6, 776, 236 52
7, 001,444 59
37, 327, 252 69
16,158, 800 36
6,410, 348 45
1808
2,467 27
3,730,945 66
2, 553 32
1839
36, 891,196 94
23,137, 924 81
755*22'
979, 989 86
7, 361, 576 40
13,499, 502 17
2, 567,112 28
1840
33,157,503 68
1, 682 25
3,411, 818 63
8, 261 36
1841
29, 963,163 46
14,487,216 74
1, 004, 054 75
1, 365, 627 42
1842
28, 685, 111 08
18,187, 908 76
495 00
'451,995 97
1, 335, 797 52
7, 046,843 91
1843* 30, 521, 979 44
103 25
285, 895 92
898,158 18
26,183, 570 94
39,186, 284 74
1,777 34
1844
2, 059, 939 80
1, 075,419 70
36, 742, 829 62
3, 517 12
27, 528,112 70
1845
2, 077, 022 30
361,453 68
36,194, 274 81
1846
26,712, 667 87
2, 897 26
2,694,452 48
289,950 13
23,747, 864 66
1847
38, 261, 959 65
375 00
2,498, 355 20
220, 808 30
31,757,070 96
3,328, 642 56
33,079, 276 43
1848
375 00
612, 610 09
29,416, 612 45
1849
28, 346,738 82
685, 379 13
1, 688, 959 55'
32, 827, 082 69
39,668,686 42
1850
1,859,894.25
2, 064, 308 21
49, 017, 567 92
35,871,753 31
1851
2, 852, 305 30
1,185,166 11
47, 339, 326 62
1852
40,158,353 25
2, 043, 239 58
464, 249 40
58, 931, 865 52
43, 338, 860 02
1; 667,084 99
988, 081 17
1853
64, 224,190 27
8,470,798 39
50, 261, 901 09
1854
1,105, 352 74
1855
48, 591, 073 41
53, 025, 794 21
827, 731 40
11,497,049 07
47,777,672 13
64, 022, 863 50
1,116,190 81
1856
8, 917, 644 93
63,875,905 05
1857' 49,108, 229 80
3,829, 486 64
1, 259, 920 88
46, 802, 855 00
1858
41, 789, 620 96
1,352, 029 13
3, 513, 715 87
1859
35,113, 334 22
49, 565,824 38
1, 756, 687 30 1,454, 596 24
33,193, 248 60
53,187, 511 87
1860
1, 778, 557 71 1, 088, 530 25
32, 979, 530 78
39, 582, 125 64
1861
1, 023, 515 31
870, 658 54
1862
30, 963, 857 83
49, 056,397 62
152, 203 77
915,327 97
*i,'795,'33i'73'
1863
46, 965, 304 87
69, 059,642 40 "37," 640,'787*95' 1,485,103 61
3,741,794 38
167, 617 17
1804
36,523, 046 13
102, 316,152 99 109, 741,134 10
475, 648 96
588,333 29
30, 291, 701 86
1865 134,433,738 44
84,928,260 60 •209,464,215 25 1,200,573 03
996, 553 31 25,441, 556 00




* Per the half-year from Jan

REPORT OF THE SECRETART OF THE TREASURY,

> 13

to June 30, 1881, hy calendar years to 1843 and hy fiscal years (ended June 30) Jrom that time.

Dividends.

$8,028
•38,500
303,472
160, 000
160, 000
80, 960
79,920
71, 040
71, 040
88, 800
39, 960

Net ordinary
receipts.

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

202, 426 30
525, 000 00
675, 000 00
1, 000,000 00
105, 000 00
297, 500 00
350, 000 00
350, 000 00
367, 500 00
402, 500 00
420, 000 00
455, 000 00
490, 000 00
490, 000 00
490, 000 00
490, 000 00
474, 985 00
234, 349 50
606, 480 82
292, 674 67

Interest.

Premiums.

Eeceipts from
l o a n s a n d Gross receipts.
Treasury
notes.

391 34
951 19
960 31
5,102, 498 45
923 14
1, 797,272 01
904 87
4, 007,950 78
534 59 $4, 800 00
3, 396,424 00
529 65 42,800 00
320, 000 00
780 99
70, 000 00
495 80 78, 675 00
200, 000 00
813 31
5, 000,000 00
749 10
1, 565,229 24
330 95 "io," i25'66
793 95
097 63
307 38
693 20
931 07
019 26
661x93
473 12
214 28
2,750, 000 00
634 09
132 76
12, 837,900 00
409 95
300 00
26,184, 135 00.
625 16
85 79
23, 377,826 00
916 82 11, 541 74
$32,107 64 35,220, 671 40
985 66 68, 665 16
9,425, 084 91
686 09
049 74 267, 819 14
466, 723 45
171 04
412 62
8,353 00
374 37
2, 291 00
669 55
824 13
40, 000 00
3,
000,
379 72
324 00
5, 000,
427 94
606 26
212 79
5, 000, 000 00
858 02
5,000, 000 00
434 21
363 96
629 23
627 38
116 51
820 82
450 66
426 25
935 55
087 10
796 08
153 04
2, 992, 989 15
501 74
12, 716, 820 86
749 61
3,857, 276 21
115 33
5, 589, 547 51
160 27
13, 659, 317 38
197 25
14,808, 735 64
001 26
71,700 83 12,479,708 36
707 78
1,877,181 35
666
60
105 80
967 74
403 16
872.399 45
28,365 91
699 21
256,700 00
37, 080 00
077 50
588,750 00
487, 065 48
888 88
045, 950 00
10,
550
00
039 33
4,264 92
203.400 00
815 60
46, 300 00
031 68
16,350 00
22 50
341 40
' 2, 001 67
574 68
800 00
699 24
200 00
312 57
3, 900 00
365 96
23, 717,.300 00
107 92
709, 357 72 28, 287, 500 00
599 83
10, 008 00 20, 776, 800 00
299 49
33, 630 90 41, 861, 709 74
261 09
68,400 00 929, 692,460 50
945 51
971 20
602,345 44 776, 682,361 57
1^8 19
21,174,101 011,128,873, 945 36,1,
11,683,446 891,472,224,740 85il,

uary 1, to June 30, 1843.




342
458
195
855
758
329
780
170
813
978
455
793
097
307
693
931
019
661.
473
214
634
032
844'
536
237
421
592
936
665
493
703
427
666
212
838
434
363
629
,627
116
820
450
426
935
087
796
142
382
025
662
477
932
410
555
105
967
168
479
892
388
704
115
404
343
374
899
212
665
965
407
640
121
652
017
845

Unavailable.

$1, 889 50

68,288 33
1,458,782 98
37,469 2fl
11,188 00
28,251 90

'36,"666'6o

103,301 37

15,408 34
11,110 81
6,000 01
9,210 40
6,095 11

14

REPORT OF THE SECRETART OF THE TREASURT.
T A B I ^ E e^.—STATEMENT of the BECEIPTS of the UNITED

1

Balance in the
Treasury at

commencement of year.

1866 $33,938,657 89
1867 160,817, 099 73
1868
,1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
187Q
1880
1881

198, 076, 537 09
158, 936, 082 87
183,781, 985 76
177, 604,116 51
138,019,122 15
134, 666, 001 85
159, 293, 673 41
178, 833, 339 54
172,804,061 32
149, 909, 377 21
214,887,645 88
286, 591,453 88
386, 832, 588 65
231, 940, 064 44

Customs.

$179, 046,651 58
176,417,810 88
164,464, 599 56
180, 048,426 63
194, 538, 374 44
206,270,408 05
216, 370, 286 77
188, 089, 522 70
163,103, 833 69
157,167, 722 35
148, 071, 984 61
130, 956,493 07
130,170, 680 20
137, 250, 047 70
186, 522, 064 60
198,159, 676 02

Intemal revenue. Direct tax.

$309, 226,813 42 $1, 974,754 12
266, 027, 537 43 4,200,233 70

Public lands. Miscellaneons.

$665,031 03 $29, 036, 314 23
1,163,575 76 15, 037,522 15

1,348, 715 41 17,745,403 59
191,087, 589 41 1,788,145 85
158, 350,460 86
765, 685 61 4, 020, 344 34 13, 997, 338 65
184, 899, 756 49 , 229,102 88 3, 350,481 76 12, 942,118 30
143, 098,153 63 . 680, 355 37 2, 388, 646 68 22, 093, 541 21
2, 575,714 19 15,106, 051 23
130, 642,177 72
113, 729, 314 14
315, 254 51 2, 882, 312 38 17,161, 270 05
, 1,852,428 93 32, 575, 043 32
102,409, 784 90
1,413, 640 17 15,431, 915 31
110, 007,493 58
116, 700, 732 03
93, 798 80 1,129,466 95 24, 070, 602 31
118,630,407 83
976, 253 68 30,437, 487 42
110, 581, 624 74
1, 079, 743 37 15, 614, 728 09
113, 561, 610 58
924,781 06 20, 585,697 49
124, 009, 373 92
1, 016, 506 60 21, 978,525 01 |
30 85
135, 264, 385 51
1, 516 89 2, 201, 863 17 25,154, 850 98

4, 637,123,102 42 2, 807, 357, 366 2827, 650, 273 47 207, 766,182 58 438, 583, 211 00 1
,i




* Amounts heretofore credited to the Treasurer as

15

REPORT OF THE SECRETART OF THE TREASURY.
STATES from March 4, 1789, to June 30, 1881, ^c—Contmued.

i:

ordinary Interest.
DlTidonds. Ket
receipts.

1866
1867

$519,949,564 38
462,846,679 92

1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1876
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

376,434,453 82
357,188,256 09
395,959,833 87
374,431,104 94
364,394,229 91
322,177, 673 78
299,941, 090 84
284, 020,771 41
290, 066, 584 70
281, 000, 642 00
257,446,776 40
272,322,136 83
333,626, 500 98
360,782, 292 57

/

Premiums.

Receipts from
l o a n s a n d Groas receipts.. UnavailTreasnry
able.
notes.

$38,083,055 68 $712,851,553 05 $1,278,884,173 11 $172,094 29
27,787,330 35 640,426^910 29 1,131,060,920 56 721,827 93
29,203,629 50
13,755,491 12
15, 295,643 76
8,892,839 95
9,412,637 65
11,560, 530 89
5, 037,665 22
3.979.279 69
4.029.280 68
405,776 68
317,102 30
1,505,047 63
110 00

2,675,918 19
625, 111, 433 20 1,030,749,516 52
609,621,828 27 *2,070 73
238,678,081 06
285,474,496 00 696,729, 9/3 63
268,768, 623 47 652,092,468 36 *3,396 18
305, 047,054 00 679,153, 921 56 *18,228 35
214,931, 017 00 548, 669,221 67 *3, 047 80
439,272,535 46 744,251,291 52
12,691 40
387, 971, 556 00 675,971, 607 10
691, 551, 673 28
397,455, 808 00
630,278,167 68
348,871,749 00
404, 581, 201 00 662,345,079 70
792,807, 643 00 1,066,634,827 46
211, 814,103 00 545,340,713 98
113, 750, 534 00 474, 532,826 57

.... •- ^'•

•

•

,

$9,720,13629 8,128,200,272 04 485,224 45 204,259, 220 83 10,711,044,241 84 19, 043,988,959 16 2, 661,866 53
-

-i

unavailable, and since recovered and charged to his acconnt.




16

REPORT OF THE SECRETART OF THE TREASURY.

T A15I.E M..—STATEMENT of EXPENDITUBES of UNITED STATESfrom Mar. 4i

War.

Tear.

1791..
1792..
1793..
1794..
1795..
1796..
1797..
1798..
1799..
1800..
1801..
1802..
1803..
1804..
1805..
1806..
1807..
1808..
1809..
1810..
1811..
1812..
1813..
1814..
1815..
1816...
1817..
1818.,
1819..
1820..
1821..
1822..
1823..
1824-.
1825..
1826..
1827..
1828..
1829..
1830..
1831..
1832..
1853..
1834..
1835..
1836..
1837..
1838..
1839..
1840...
1841..
1842..
1843*.
1844..
1«45..
1846..
1847..
1848..
1849..
1850..
1851..
1852..
1853-.
1854..
1855..
1856..
1857..
1858..
1859..
1860..
1861..
1862..
1868..
1864..

$632,804
1,100, 702
1,130, 249
2, 639.097
2,480,910
1,260,263
1, 039,402
2, 009, 522
2, 466, 946
2, 560, 878
1, 672, 944
1,179,148
822, 055
875,423
712,781
1, 224, 355
1,288,685
2, 900, 834
3, 345,772
2,294, 323
2, 032, 828
11, 817, 798
19, 652, 013
20, 350, 806
14,794, 294
16, 012, 096
8, 004, 236
5, 622,715
6, 506, 300
2, 630, 392
4,461, 291
3, 111, 981
3, 096, 924
3, 340, 939
3,659,914
3, 943,194
3,948, 977
4,145, 544
4, 724,291
4,767,128
4, 841,835
5,446, 034
6, 704, 019
5,696,189
5,759,156
11,747, 345
13,682,730
12,897,224
8, 916, 995
7, 095,267
8,801, 610
6,610,438
2,908,671
5,218,183
5,746,291
10,413,370
35, 840, 030
27,688,334
14,558,473
9, 687, 024
12,161,965
8, 521, 506
9,910,498
11,722, 282
14, 648,074
16, 963,160
19,159,150
25,679,121
23,154, 720
10,472,202
23, 001, 530
389,173, 562
603,314, 411
690,391,048




Navy.

$61, 408 97
410, 562 03
274, 784 04
382, 631 89
1, 381,347 76
2,858, 081 84
3,448, 716 03
2, 111,424 00
915, 561 87
1, 215,230 53
1,189, 832 75
1, 597,600 00
1,649, 641 44
1,722, 064 47
1. 884,067 80
2,427, 758 80
1, 654,244 20
1, 965,566 39
3,959, 365 15
6,446, 600 10
7, 311,290 60
8, 660,000 25
3, 908,278 30
3, 314,598 49
2, 953,695 00
3,847, 640 42
4, 387,990 00
3, 319,243 06
2, 224,458 98
2, 503,765 83
2,904, 581 66
3,049, 083 86
4,218, 902 45
4, 263,877 45
3, 918,786 44
3,308, 745 47
3,239,428 63
3,856, 183 07
3, 956,370 29
3,901, 356 75
3,956, 260 42
3,864, 939 06
5, 807,718 23
6,646, 914 53
6,131,580 53
6,182,294 25
6,113,896 89
6, 001,076 97
8, 397,242 95
3, 727,711 53
6, 498,199 11
6, 297,177 89
6,455, 013 92
7, 900,635 76
9,408, 476 02
9,786, 705 92
7,904, 724 66
8,880, 581 38
8,918, 842 10
11, 067,789 53
10,790, 096 32
13,327, 095 11
14, 074,834 04
12,651, 694 61
14,053, 264 64
14, 690,927 90
11, 514,649 83
12,387, 156 52
42, 640,353 09
63, 261,235 31
85,704, 063 74

ludians.

$27, 000 00
13, 648 85
27, 282 83
13, 042 46
23, 475 68
113, 563 98
62, 396 58
16, 470 09
20, 302 19
31 22
000 00
000
00
94;
60, 000-00
500
00
116,
196, 500 00
234, 200 00
205, 425 00
213, 575 00
337, 503 84
177, 625 00
151, 875 00
277, 845 00
167, 358 28
167, 394 86
530, 750 00
274, 512 16
319, 463 71
505, 704 27
463, 181 39
315, 750 01
477, 005 44
575, 007 41
380, 781 82
429, 987 90
724, 106 44
743, 447 83
750, 624 88
705, 084 24
576, 344 74
622, 262 47
930, 738 04
1, 352,419 75
1, 802,980 93
1, 003,953 20
1,706, 444 48
5, 037,022 88
4,348, 036 19
5,504, 191 34
2, 528,917 28
2, 331,794 86
2, 514,837 12
1,199, 099 68
578, 371 00
1,256, 532 39
1, 539,351 35
1,027, 693 64
1,430, 411 30
1,252, 296 81
1,374, 161 55
1, 663,591 47
2, 829,801 77
3, 043,676 04
3,880, 494 12
. 1, 550,339 55
2,772, 990 78
2,644, 263 97
4, 354,418 87
4, 978,266 18
3,490, 534 53
2, 991,12154
2,865, 481 17
2,327, 948 37
3,152, 032 70
2,629i 975 97

Pensions.

$175,813
109,243
.80,087
81, 399
68, 673
100, 843
92, 256
104, 845
95,444
64,130
73, 533
85,440
62,902
80, 092
81, 854
81, 875
70, 500
82, 576
87, 833
83, 744
75, 043
91,402
86,989
90,164
69, 656
188,804
297, 374
890,719
2,415,939
3,208, 376
242, 817
1, 948,199
1,780, 588
1,499, 326
1, 308, 810
1, 556, 593
976,138
850,573
949, 594
1, 363,297
1,170,665
1,184,422
4,689,152
3,364,286
1,954,711
2,882,797
2, 672,162
2,156, 057
3,142,760
2, 603, 562
2,388,434
. 1, 378, 931
839, 041
2,032, 008
2,400,788
1,811, 097
1,744,883
1, 227,496
1,328,867
1, 866,886
2, 293,377
2,401,858
1, 756,306
1, 232,665
1,477, 612
1,296, 229
1, 310,380
1, 219, 768
1,222,222
1,100,802
1,034, 599
852,170
1,078,513
4,985,473,

Miscellaneons.

$1,083,-971 61
4,672,664 38
511,451 01
750, 350 74
1,378,920.66
801,847 68
1, 259,422 62
1,139, 524 94
1, 039, 391 68
1, 337,613 22
1,114, 768 45
1, 462, 929 40
1,842, 635 76
2,191, 009 48
3, 768, 598 75
2,890,137 01
1, 697,897 51
-1,423, 285 61
1,215,803 79
1,101,144 98
1, 367, 291 40
1,683,088 21
1,729,435 61
2,208, 029 70
2, 898, 870 47
2,989, 741 17
3, 518, 936 76
3, 835, 839 51
3,067, 211 41
2, 592, 021 94
2, 223,121 54
1, 967, 996 24
2, 022, 093 99
7,155, 308 81
2, 748, 544 89
2, 600,177 79
2, 713,476 58
3, 676, 052 64
3, 082,234 65
3, 237, 416 04
3, 064, 646 10
4, 577,141 45
5,716, 245 93
4,404,728 95
4,229, 698 63
5, 393,279 72
9,893,370 27
7,160,664 76
5,725, 990 89
5, 995,398 96
6,490, 881 45
6, 775, 624 61
3, 202,713 00
5,645,183 - '
5, 911,760 98
6, 711, 283 89
6,885, 608 35
5, 650,851 25
12, 885,334 24
16,043, 763 36
17,888,992 18
17,504,171 45
17, 463, 068 01
26,672,144 68
24, 090,425 43
31,794,038 87
28,565,498 77
26,400,016 42
23,797,644 40
27,'977,978 30
23,327,287 69
21,385,862 69
23,198,382 37
27,572,216 87

* For the half year from Joa*

REPORT OF THE SECRETART OF THE TREASURT.

17

1789, to June 30, 1881, hy cal. years to 1843 and hy fiscal years (ended June 30) from that time.

Ket ordinary ex- Premiums.
penditures.

$1,919, 589 52
5,896, 258 47
1, 749,070 73
3, 545,299 00
4, 362,541 72
2, 551,303 15
2, 836,110 52
' 4, U.51,710 42
6, 480,166 72
7, 411,369 97
4, 981,669 90
3, 737,079 91
4, 002,824 24
4, 452,858 91
6, 357,234 62
6, 080,209 36
4, 984,572 89
6, 504,338 85
7,414, 672 14
5, 311,082 28
5, 592,604 86
17, 829,498 70
28,082, 396 92
30,127, 686 38
26, 953,571 00
23, 373,432 58
15,454, 609 92
13, 808,673 78
16, 300,273 44
13,134, 530 57
10, 723.479 07
9, 827.643 51
9, 784,154 59
1.5, 330,144 71
11,490, 459 94
13, 062,316 27
12, 053,095 65
13, 296,041 45
12, 641,210 40
13, 229,533 33
13, 864,067 90
16, 516,388 77
22, 713,755 11
18.425, 417 25
17, 514,950 28
30, 868,164 04
37, 243,214 24
33, 849,718 08
.26,496, 948 73
24,139, 920 11
26,190, 840 29
24, 361,336 59
11, 256,508 60
20, 650,108 01
21, 895,369 61
$18,231 43
26, 418,459 59
53, 801,569 37
45, 227,454 77
89, 933,542 61
82, 865 81
37,105, 990 09
44, 054,717 66
69,713 19
40, 389,954 56
170, 063 42
44, 078,156 35
420, 498 64
51, 967,528 42 2, 877, 818 69
56, 310,197 72 872, 047 39
66, 772,527 64 385, 372 90
66, 041,143 70 363, 572 39
72, 330,437 17
574. 443
66, 355,950 07
60, 050,754 71
62,616, 055 78
456, 379,896 81
694, 004,575 56
811, 283,676 14
nary 1, to J u n e 30, 1843.

2 P



Interest.

Public debt.

$1,177,863 03
$699, 984 23
2,373,611 28
693, 050 25
2, 097,859 17 ' 2,633,048 07
2,752, 523 04
2,743, 771 13
2, 947,059 06
2, 841,639 37
3, 239,347 68
2, 577,126 01
3,172, 516 73
2,617, 250 12
2, 955,875 90
976, 032 09
2, 815,651 41
1, 706,578 84
3, 402,601 04
1,138, 503 11
4.411, 830 06
2,879, 876 98
5, 294,235 24
4, 239,172 IG
462
36
3, 949,
3, 306,697 07
4,185, 048 74
3, 977,200 07
114
22
2, 057,
4, 583,960 63
5, 572,018 64
3, 368,968 26
578
48
2, 938,141 62
3, 369,
7, 701,288 96
2, 557,074 23
2, 866,074 90
3, 586,479 26
3,163, 671 09
4, 835,241 12
5,414, 564 43
2, 585,435 57
2,451, 272 57
1, 998,349 88
3, 599,455 22
7, 508,G68 22
3, 307,304 90
4, 593,239 04
5,990, 090 24
6, 038,832 11
7, 822,923 34
17,048, 139 59
20, 886,753 57
4, 536,282 55
lOi086, 247 59
6, 209,954 03
2,492, 195 73
5, 211,730 56
3,477, 489 96
5,151,004 32
3,241, 019 83
5,126,073. 79
5,172,788 79
2, 676,160 33
4, 922,475 40
607, 541 01
4, 943,557 93
11, 624,835 83
4, 366,757 40
7, 728,587 38
3, 975,.542 95
7,065, 539 24
3, 486.071 51
6, 517,596 88
3, 098,800 GO
9, 064,637 47
843
23
2, 542,
9, 860,304 77
1, 912,574 93
9,443, 173 29
1, 373,748 74
14,
800,629 48
561 50
17, 067,747 79
772, 79G 87
1, 239,746 51
303, 152 98
202, 863 08
5, 974,412 21
328 20
57,

Gross expenditures.

11,
11,
12,
13,
111

12,
13,
15,
11,
16,
13,
13,
13,
22.
39,
38,
39,
48,
40,
35,
24,
21,
19,
17,
15,
31,
23,
24,
22,
25,
25,
24,
30,
34,
24,
24,
17,
30.
37,
21, 822 91
30,
5,590, 723-79
14, 996 48
37,
10,718, 153 53
399, 833 89
28,
3, 912.015 02
174, 598
31,
5,
315,
712
19
977
55
284,
32,
7,801, 990 09
773, 549 85
12,
3;i8, 012 64
523, 583 91
33,
11,158. 450 71
1, 833,452 13
30,
7,
530,
349
49
458
18
1, 040,
27,
371, 100 04
842, 723 27
60,
5, GOO,067 65
1,119, 214 72
60,
13, 036,922 54
2, 300,765 88
56,
478
54
535
78
12, 804,
3, 565,
44,
3, G56,335 14
3, 782,393 03
48,
912
71
700
75
3, 696,
G54,
46,
2,152, 293 05
• 4, 000,297 80
54,
3, 665,832 74
6, 412,574 01
75,
17, 556,896 95
3, 070,926 69
60,
065
86
464
99
6, 662,
2, 314,
72,
3, 614,618 66
1, 953,822 37
71,
3, 276,606 05
1, 593,265 23
82,
7, 505,250 82
1, G52,055 67
83,
043
15
649
70
2, 637,
14, 6S5,
77,
3,144, 120 94
13, 854,250 00
85,
18,737, 100 oo'
4, 034,157 30
565,
13,190, 344 84 • 96,097,322 09
899,
635
07;
700
62
24,729,
181,081,
1, 295,
53, 685,421 69 430, 572,014 03

Balance
In
Treasury at
t h e e n d of
t h e year.
$973, 905 75
783, 444 51
753, 061 69
1,151, 924 17
516, 442 61
888, 995 42
1, 021,899 04
617, 451 43
!, 101,8G7 77
!, 623,311 99
I, 295,391 00
S 020,697 64
:, 825,811 60
., 037,005 2i)
\ 999, 388 99
, 538,123 80
I, 643,850 07
•, 941,809 nr,
050 78
672, 276 57
305
80
502,
802, 217 41
542
00
196,
727, 848 03
592
88
lOG,
033, 519 19
989, 465 48
478, 526 74
079, 992 38
198, 461 21
681, 592 24
237, 427 55
463, 922 81
946, 597 13
201, 6.50 43
358, 686 18
0G8, 286 10
972, 435 81
75.5, 704 79
014, 539 J.>
502, 914 4.-)
Oil, 777 55
702, 905 31
892, 8.'38 42 .
749, 803 90
708, 436 00
327, 252 r;i)
891, 19G 91
157, 503 M
9G3, 1G3 4 4
685, 111 08
521, 079 4 \
180, 284 74
742, 82V) GJ
194, 374 81
201, 959 05
079, 276 43
416, 612 45
827, 082 69
871, 7.53 31
158, 853 25
338, 800 02
201, 901 09
591, 073 41
777, 672 13
108, 229 80
802, 855 00
113, 334 22
193, 248 60
979, 530 78
963, 857 83.
965, 304 87
523, 040 13
433, 738 44

18

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
TABI.1E m.—STATEMENT of the EXPENDITUBES of the UNITED

War.

Tear.

ISTavy.

$1, 030, 690, 400 06 ^122„617,434 07
283,154, 676 06 43, 285, 662 00

1865
1860

Indians.

Pensions.

Miscellaneous.

$5, 059, 360 71 $16, 347, 621 34 $42, 989, 383 10
3, 295, 729 32 15, 605, 549 88 40,613,114 17

3, 568, 638, 312 28 717,551,816 39 103, 369, 211 42 119, 607, 656 01 643,604,„554 33
*3, 621, 780 07
*77, 992 17
*53, 286 61
*9, 737 87
*718, 769 52
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

3, 572, 260, 092 35
95, 224, .415 63
123, 246, 648 62
78, 501. 990 61
57, 655, 675 40
35, 799, 991 82
35. 372,157 20
. ...
. 46, 323,138 31
42,
313, 927 22
,
41,120, 645 98
••. 38, 070, 888 64
37, 082, 735 90
32,154,147 85
40, 425, 660 73
38,116, 916 22
40, 466, 460 55
.-

717, 629, 808 56 103,422, 498 03
31, 034, Oil 04
4, 642, 531 77
25, 775, 502 72
4,100, 682 32
7, 042, 923 06
20, 000, 757 97
21, 780, 229 87
3, 407. 938 15
19, 431, 027 21
7, 426, 997 44
21, 249, 809 99
7,061,728 82
23, 526, 256 79
7, 951, 704 88
30, 932, 587 42
6, 692, 462 09
21, 497, 626 27
8, 384, 656 82
18, 963, 309 82
5, 966, 558 17
14, 959, 935 36
5, 277, 007 22
• 17, 305, 301 37 4, 629, 280 28
15,125,126.84
5, 206,109 08
13, 536. 984 74
5, 945, 457 09
15, 686, 671 66
6, 514,161 09

119, 617, 393 88 644, 323, 323
20, 936, 551 71 51,110, 223
23, 782, 386 78 53, 009, 867
28, 476, 621 78 56,474, 061
28, 340, 202 17 53, 237, 461
34, 443, 894 88 60, 481, 916
28, 533, 402 76 60, 9S4, 757
29, 359, 426 86 73, 328,110
29, 038, 414 66 85,141, 593
29, 456, 216 22 71, 070, 702
28, 257, 395 69 73, 599, 661
27, 963, 752 27 58, 926, 532
27,137, OIS 08• 53,177, 703
35,121, 482 39 65, 741, 555
56, 777, 174 44 54, 713, 529
50, 059, 279 62 64, 416, 324

85
72
67
53
56
23
42
06
61
98
04
53
57
49
76
71

4, 354,135,493 031,028,494,947 63 193, 672, 696 31 597, 300,615 191, 579,737, 325 73
* Outstanding ,
l^OTE.-^This statement is made from warrants paid by the Treasurer up to J u n e 30, 1866. The outance in the Treasury J u n e 30. 1881, as shown by this statement, includes the.amount deposited with




I

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

19

STATES from March 4, 1789, to June 30, 1881, ^-c—Continned.
•

N e t o r d i n a r y exTear.
penditures.

1865
1866

1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1^873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

Premiums.

$1, 217, 704,199 28 $1, 717, 900 11
385, 954, 731 43
58, 476 51

Interest.

Public debt.

Gross expendituies.

Balance
in
Treasnry at
t h e e n d oi
t h e year.

$77, 395, 090 30 $609,616,141 08 $1, 906, 433, 331 37$33, 933. 0.57 89
133, 067, 624 91 620, 263, 249 10 1,139, 344;-081 95 165, 301, 054 70

5,152, 771, 550 43 7, 611, 003 56
*4, 481, 566 24

502, 689, 519 27 2, 374, 677.103 12
*2, 888 48
"'•100 31

8, 037, 749,170 38
M, 484, 555 03 *4,"484, 555 03

5,157, 253,116 07 7, 611, 003 56
202, 947, 733 8710, 813, 349 38
229, 915, 088 11 7, 001,151 04
190, 496, 354 95 1, 674. 680 05
164, 421,.507 15 15, 990, 555 60
157, 583, 827 58 9,016,794 74
153, 201, 856.19 6, 958, 266 70
180, 488, 636 90 5,105. 919 99
194,118, 985 00 1, 395, 073 55
171, 529, 848 27
164, 857, 813 36
144, 209, 963 28
134, 463, 452 15
161, 619, 934 53
169, 090, 062 25 '2,'795, 320"42
1.77,142, 8v)7 63 1, 061, 248 78

502, 692, 407 75 2, 374, 677, 203 43
143,781,591 91 735, 536, 980 1.1
140, 424, 045 71 692, 549, 685 88
130, 6:)4, 242 80 201,912,718 31
129,235,498 00 393, 2.54, 282 13
125, 570, 565 93 399, 503. 670 05
117, 357, 839 72 405, 007, 307 54
104, 750, 088 44 233, 699, 352 58
107,119,815 21 422, 065, 060 23
103, 093, 544 57 407, 377, 492 48
100, 243, 271 23 449, 345, 272 80
97,124, 511 58 323, 965, 424 05
102, 500, 874 65 3.53, 670, 944 90
105,327.949 00 099, 445, 809 16
95, 7.57, .575 11 432, 590. 280 41
82, 508, 741 18 165,152, 335 05

8, 042, 233, 731 41160, 817, 099 73
1, 093, 079, 655 27198, 076, 537 09
1, 069, 889, 970 74 158, 936, 082 87
584, 777, 990 11 183, 781, 985 76
702, 907, 842 88 177, 604,116 51
691, 680, 858 90 138; 01.9,122 15
682, 525, 270 21 134, 666, 001 85
524, 044, 597 91 1.59, 293, 073 41
724, 698, 933 99 178, 833, 339 54
682, 000, 885 32172 804. OGl 32
714,446,357 39 149, 909, 377 21
565, 299, 898 91 214 887 645 88
590,641,271 70 2S6, 591, 453 "88
966, 393, 692 69 386, 832, 588 65
700, 233, 238 19231; 940, 004 44
425, 865, 222 64 280, 607, CG8 37

7,753,341,077 89 09,429, 303 87 2,188,189,162 79 8, 749, 759, 819 71 18, 760, 719, 424 26

•

warrants.
standina: warrants are then added, and the statement is by warrants issued from that date,
the Stafces $28 101 644.91




The bal

T A B L E l.-^STATE MENT showing the CONDITION of the SINKING-FUND from iis insHtution i?i May, 1869, to and including June 30,. 1881.
Du. .
July

T H E SECRETART OF T H E TREASURT I N ACCOUNT W I T H SINEING-FUND.
1,1808

J u n o 30,1809

T o ^ of 1 p e r c e n t , on t h e p r i n c i p a l of t h e p u b l i c d e b t ,
b e i n g for t h e t h r e e m o n t h s from A p r i l 1 t o J u n e 30,
1808
,
T o i n t e r e s t on $8,691,000, b e i n g a m o u n t of p r i n c i p a l of
p u b l i c d e b t p u r c h a s e d d u r i n g fiscal y e a r 1869 on t h i s
account
Balance to n e w account

J u n e 30,1869
$6, 529, 219 03

CR.

B y a m o u n t of p r i n c i p a l p u r c h a s e d , $8,691,000, i n c l u d i n g
$1,000 donation, e s t i m a t e d in gold
B y a c c r u e d i n t e r e s t o n t h e a m o u n t of p u r c h a s e s i n 1869.

IN:)

o

$7,201,437 30
136, 31)2 56

Ij

o
w

196, 590 00
672, 020 23
7,397,829.86

7, 397,829 86

H
O

July

1,1869

J u n e 30,1870

T o 1 p e r c e n t , o n t h e p r i n c i p a l of t h e p u b l i c d e b t o n
J u n e 30, 1809. $2,588,452,213.94
T o i n t e r e s t o n $8,691,000, a m o u n t of r e d e m p t i o n i n 1869..
T o i n t e r e s t on $28,151,900, a m o u n t of p r i n c i p a l of p u b l i c
d e b t p u r c h a s e d d u r i n g fiscal y e a r 1870 on t h i s a c c o u n t .

25, 884, 522 14
521, 460 00

J u l y 1,1869
J u n e 30,1870

1, 254, 897 00

B y b a l a n c e from l a s t y e a r
B y a m o u n t o f p r i n c i p a l p u r c h a s e d , $28,151,900, e s t i m a t e d
i n gold
B y a c c r u e d i n t e r e s t o n a c c o u n t of p u r c h a s e s in 1 8 7 0 . . .
By balance to n e w account.

672, 020 23
25, 893,143 57
351, 003 54
744, 711 80

27, 660, 879 14

27, 660, 879 14

W
m
W

o
w

H
July

1,1870

J n n e 30,1871

T o b a l a n c e from l a s t y e a r
T o 1 p e r c e n t , on t h e p r i n c i p a l of t h e p u b l i c d e b t on
. J u n e 30, 1870, $2,480,672,427.81
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1869, $8,691,000
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1870, $28,151,900
T o i n t e r e s t on $29,936,250, a m o u n t of p r i n c i p a l of p u b l i c
d e b t p u r c h a s e d d u r i n g fiscal y e a r 1871 on t h i s a c c o u n t .

J u n e 30,1871
24, 800, 724 28
521,400 00
1, 689,114 00

>•

B y a m o u n t of p r i n c i p a l p u r c h a s e d , $29,936,250, e s t i m a t e d
i n gold
B y a c c r u e d i n t e r e s t o n a c c o u n t of p u r c h a s e s i n 1871 . . .
By balance to n e w account
:

28, 094, 017 73
367, 782 63
257,474 32

1, 557, 264 60
29, 319, 274 58

29, 319, 274 58

o
H
W
ft

H
July

1,1871

J n n e 30.1872

T o b a l a n c e from l a s t y e a r
.\
T o 1 pel- cent, o n t h e p r i n c i p a l of t h e p u b l i c d e b t o n
J u n e 30, 1871, $2,353,211,332.32
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n bf 1869, $8,691,000
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1870, $28,151,900
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1871, $29,936,250
T o i n t e r e s t ou r e d e m p t i o n of $32,618,450, a m o u n t of
p r i n c i p a l of p u b l i c tlebt p u r c h a s e d d u r i n g fiscal y e a r
1872 on t h i s a c c o u n t
T o b a l a n c e to n e w a c c o u n t




257,474 32
23, 532,113
521, 400
1,689,114
1, 790,175

32
00
00
00

J u n e 30,1872

B y a m o u n t of p r i n c i p a l p u r c h a s e d , $32,618,450, e s t i m a t e d
in gold
B y a c c r u e d i n t e r e s t o n a c c o u n t of p u r c h a s e s i n 1872 . . .

W
32, 248, 645 ^22
430, 908 38

2, 059, 325 50
2,823,891 46
32, 679, 553 60

I

32, 679, 553 CO .

U}

July 1,1872 To 1 per ceut. on the princip.al of tho public debt on
June 30, 1872, $2,253,251,328.78
June 30,1873 To interest on redemption of 1869, $8,691,000
To interest on redemption of 1870, .$28,151,900
To interest on redemption of 1871, $29,930,250
To interest on redemption of 1872, $32,618,450
To interest on redemption of $28,078,000, amount of
principal of public debt purchased during fiscal year
1873 on this account
To balance to new account.

Jidy

1,1872 By balance from last year
By amountof principalpurchased, $28,078,000, estimated
in gold
,
By accrued interest on account of purchases in 1873..

22, 632, 513 29 Juno 30,1873
521,460,00
1, 689,114 00
1, 796,175 00
1, 957,107 00

2, 823, 891 46
28, 457, 502 83
392,385 45

1,725, 881 50
1,451, 588 95

Tl
O

31, 673, 839 74

31, 673, 839 74

O

^
H
1,1873 To 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt on
June 30, 1873, $2,234,482,993.20
J u n e 30,1874 To interest on redemption of 1869, $8,691,000
To interest on redemption of 1870, $28,151,900
To interest on redemption of 1871, $29,936,250
To interest on redemption of 1872, $32,618,450
To interest on redemption of 1873, $28,678,000
To mterest on redemption of $12,936,450, amount of
principal of public debt purchased during fiscal year
1874 ori this account

Jnly

July 1,1873 By balance from last year
By amount of principal purchased, $12,936,450, estimated
in gold
'..
By accrued interest on account of purchases in 1874...
By balance

22, 344, 829 93 June 30,1874
521, 460 00
1, 089,114 00
1, 796,175 00
1, 957,107 00
1,720, 680 00




12, 872, 850 74
222, 586 28
16, 305,421 96

22, 616, 904 68
521,460 00
1, 689,114 00
1, 798,175 00
1, 957,107 00
1, 720, 680 00
770, 087 00

30,852,447 93

J u n e 30,1875 By amount of principal redeemed, estimated in goid..
By accrued interest on account of redemption in 1875.
By balance
,
.».

w
ft
o
M
H
{>
W
Kj

823, 082 00
30, 852,447 93

July 1,1874 To 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt on
June 30, 1874, $2,251,690,408.43
-.
J u n e 30,1875 To interest on redemption of 1869, $8,691,000
To interest on redemption of 1870, $28,151,900
To interest on redemption of 1871, $29,938,250
To interest on redemption of 1872, $32,618,450
To interest on redemption of 1873, $28,678,000
To interest on redemption of 1874, $12,936,450
To interest on redemption of $25,170,400, amount of
principal of public debt " p a i d " during fiscal year
1876 on this account
-

1,451, 588 95

O

25.170, 400 00
• 363, 061 66
5, 996, 039 62

d

541,973 60,
31, 519, 501 18

31,519,50118

.to

T A B I L . E 1,—STATEMENT slwwing tlw CONDITION of the SIN KING ~FU.^!D, cJ-c—Continued.
T H E S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E T R E A S U R T I N ACCOUNT W I T H

DR.

July

1,1875

J u n e 30,1870

T o 1 p e r c e n t , o n i h e p r i n c i p a l of t h e p u b l i c d e b t o n
J u n e 30, 1875, $2 232,284,531.95
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1809, $8,691,000
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1870, $28,151,900
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1871, $29,936,250
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1872, $32,618,450
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1873, $28,678,000
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1874, $12,936,450
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1875, $25,170,400
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of $32,183,488.09, a m o u n t of
p r i n c i p a l of p u b l i c d e b t " p a i d " d u r i n g fiscal y e a r
1876 on t h i s a c c o u n t

' J u n e 30,1876
$22,322,845
521,460
1.689,114
1,796,175
1, 957,107
1, 720, 680
776, 087
1, 510, 224

32
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

SINKING-FUND.

By
By
By
By
By
By

amount
accrued
amount
amount
amount
balance

of p r i n c i p a l r e d e e m e d , e s t i m a t e d in gold .
i n t e r e s t on a c c o u n t of r e d e m p t i o n i n 187G
of fractional c u i x e n c y r e d e e m e d
of l e g a l - t e n d e r s r e d e e m e d
of certificates of i n d e b t e d n e s s r e d e e m e d . .

1.1870

J u n e 30,1877

T o 1 p e r c e n t , on t h e p r i n c i p a l of t h e p u b l i c d e b t o n
J u n e 30, 1876, $2,180,395,007.15
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1869, $8,691,000
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1870, $26,151,900
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1871, $29,936,250
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1872, $32,618,450
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1873, $28,678,000
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1874, $12,930,450..'
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1875, $25,170,400
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1876, $32,183,488.09
T o i n t e r e s t ou r e d e m p t i o n of $24,498,919.05, a m o u n t of
p r i n c i p a l of p u b l i c d e b t " p a i d " d u r i n g fiscal y e a r
1877 on t h i s a c c o u n t

By
By
By
By
By

amount
accrued
amount
amount
balance

of p r i n c i p a l r e d e e m e d , e s t i m a t e d iu gold .
i n t e r e s t o n a c c o u n t of r e d e m p t i o n in 1877
of f r a c t i o n a l c u r r e n c y r e d e e m e d
,.
of l e g a l - t e n d e r s r e d e e m e d
.,

21,803,950
521,460
1, 689,114
1, 796,175
• 1, 957,107
1, 720, 680
776, 087
1, 510, 224
1, 931, 009

67
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
28




447, 500
5, 770
14,043,458
10, 007, 9.52
9, 225,146

00
52
05
00
63

H.
O
H
O

92
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
28
00

35,429,001 80

U2

o
H

?d
Hi

O
33, 729, 833 20
Juae30,1878

22, 053, 013
521,400
1, 689,114
1,796,175
1, 957,107
1, 720, 680
770, 087
1, 510, 224
1, 931, 009
1,409, 934

w

Kl

24, 026 25

1,1877

T o 1 p e r c e n t , o n t h e p r i n c i p a l of t h e p u b l i c d e b t on
J u n e 30, 1877, $2,205,301,392.10
'.
.
J u n e 30,1878 T o i n t e r e s t on. r e d e m p t i o n of 1869, $8,691,000
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1870, $28,151,900
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1871, $29,930,250
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1872, $32,018,450
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1873, $28,678,000
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1874, $12,936,450
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1875, $25,170,400
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1876, $32,183,488.09
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1877, $24,498,910.05
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of $17,012,634.57, a m o u n t of
p r i n c i p a l of p u b l i c d e b t " p a i d " d u r i n g fiscal y e a r
1878 o n t h i s a c c o u n t

00
91
09
00
00
82

33,584,775 82.
J u n e 30,1877

33, 729, 833 20
July

$18,444, 050
257,517
7, 062,142
5, 999, 296
078, 000
1,143, 709

to

1, 291, 083 50
33, 584,775 82

July

DO
Ca.

By
By
By
By
By

a m o u n t of p r i n c i p a l r e d e e m e d , e s t i m a t e d i n gold .
acci-ued i n t e r e s t on a c c o u n t of r e d e m p t i o n in 1878
a m o u n t of fractional c u r r e n c y r e d e e m e d
a m o u n t of l e g a l - t e n d e r s r e d e e m e d
balance

73, 9.^.0 00
809 92
3, 855, 308 57
13, 083, 310 00
18, 415, 557 31

35, 429, OOi 80

July

1,1878

J u n e 30,1879

T o 1 p e r cent, on t h e p r i n c i p a i of t h e p u b l i c d e b t on
J u n e 50, 1878 $2,250,205,892.53.
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1809, $8,691,000
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1870, $28,151,900
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1871, $29,930,250
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1872, $32,018,450
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1873, $28,678,000
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1874, $12,930,450
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1875, $25,170,400
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1876, $32,183,488.09
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1877, $24,498,910.05...
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1878, $17,012,034.67
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of $723,662.99, a m o u n t of
p r i n c i p a l of p u b l i c d e b t " p a i d " d u r u i g fiscal y e a r
1879 on t h i s a c c o u n t

J u n o 30,1879
22, 562, 058
521, 460
1, 689, 114
1, 796, 175
1, 957, 107
1, 720, 680
776, 087
1, 510, 224
1, 931, 009
1,469, 934
1, 020, 758

93
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
28
60
07

By
By
By
By

a m o u n t of p r i n c i p a l r e d e e m e d , e s t i m a t e d in gold . .
a c c r u e d i n t e r e s t on a c c o u n t of r e d e m p t i o n in 1879 .
a r n o u n t of f r a c t i o n a l c u r r e n c y redeeme^d
balance

1,1879

J u n e 30,1880

T o 1 p e r c e n t , o n t h e p r i n c i p a l of t h e p u b l i c d e b t
J u n e 30, 1879, $2,349,567,482.04
T o b a l a n c e from fiscal y e a r 1874
$10, 305, 421
T o b a l a n c e from fiscal y e a r 1875
5, 996, 039
T o b a l a n c e from fiscal y e a r 1876
1,143, 769
T o b a l a n c e from fiscal y e a r 1877
9, 225,146
T o b a l a n c e from fiscal y e a r 1 8 7 8 . . : . . . . 18,415, 557
T o b a l a n c e from fiscal y e a r 1879
36, 231, 632

on
23, 495, 674 82
96.
62
82
63
31
87

T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1809, $8,691,000
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p U o n of 1870, $28,151,000.
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1871, $20,030,250
T o i u t e r e o t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1872, $32,018,450
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1873, $28,678,000
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of 1874, $12,936,450
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1875, $25,170,400
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1876, $32,183,488.09
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1877, $24,498,910.05..
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1878, $17,012,634.57
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1879, $723,662.99
T o i n t e r e s t o n r e d e m p t i o n of $73,904,617.41, a m o u n t of
p r i n c i p a l of p u b l i c d e b t p a i d " d u r i n g fiscal y e a r
1880 o n t h i s a c c o u n t




00
77
99
87

o

996 75
36, 955, 604 03

July

18, 500
308
705,162
16,231, 632

87, 317, 508
521, 460
1, 689, 114
1, 796, 175
1, 957, 107
1, 720, 680
776, 087
1,510, 224
1, 931, 009
1, 469, 934
1, 020, 758
43, 419

36, 955, 604 63
J u n e 30,1880

By
By
By
By
By

amount
accrued
amount
amount
balance

of p r i n c i p a l r e d e e m e d i n 1880
i n t e r e s t on a c c o u n t of r e d e m p t i o n i n 1880
of p r e m i u m p a i d
of f r a c t i o n a l c u r r e n c y r e d e e m e d

73, 652, 900
935, 951
2, 795, 320
251,717
49,817,128

00
00
42
41
78

fel

a
H

>

21
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
28
60
07
78

O

w
W
H

2, 203, 806 45
U2

127,-453,018 21

127,463,018 21

Q
K;

to

1.—STATEMENT showing the COi\DITION of the SINKING-FUND, ^•o,-^CQniiuuiid,
THE SECRETART OF THE TREASURY I N ACCOUNT W I T H THE SlNB:iis^G='FUND,

DR.

July

1,1880

J i m e 30,1881

T o b a l a n c e from l a s t y e a r ..'.
- $49, 817,128 78 June 30,1881 B y a m o u n t
T o 1 p e r c e n t , on t h e p r i n c i p a l of t h e p u b l i c d e b t on
Bv accrued
J u n e 30,1880, $2,120,415,370.63
21,204,153 71
By amount
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1869,$8,691,000
\.,,
521, 460 00
:^y a m o u n t
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1870, $28,151,900
1, 689,114 00
By balance
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1871, $29,936,250
1, 796,175 00
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1872, $82,618,450
1, 957,107 00
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1873, .$28,678,000
1, 720, 680 00
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1874, $12,936,450
776, 087 00
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1875, $25,170,400
• 1, 510, 234 00
1, 931, 009 38
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1870, $32,183,488.09
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e r a p t i o n of 1877, $24,498,910.05
1, 469, 934 60
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1878, $17.012,034.57
1, 020,758 07
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1879, $723,602.99
,
43, 419 78
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d e m p t i o n of 1880, $73,904,617.41
4,101, 702 04
T o i n t e r e s t on r e d o m p t i o n of $74,480,351.05, a m o u n t of
p r i n c i p a l of p u b l i c d e b t " p a i d " d u r i n g fiscal y e a r
1881 on t h i s a c c o u n t
2, 935, 731 65




92,554,744 91

of p r i n c i p a l r e d e e m o d i n 1881.. r
i n t e r e s t on a c c o u n t of r e d e m p t i o n i n 1881
of p r e m i u m p a i d . . . . "
of f r a c t i o n a l c u r r e n c y r e d e e m e d
,
, . , , , , - , , , , , , , , . , — » = = , . . , = ..

to
Ca.
$74, 371, 200
707, 421
1, 001, 248
109, 001
16, 305, 873

00
01
78
05
47

O
H
O

u>
a
92, 554, 744 91
H
Pi
Kj

O

H

Cl

T A B L E JL.—STATEMENT showing the ANNUAL APPBOPBIATIONS made hy CONGBESS for EACH FISCAL YEAB from 1874 to 1882,
inclusive, together with the COIN VALUE of such APPBOPBIATIONS computed upon ihe average price of gold for each year in question.
3d session 45th
3d s e s s i o n 42d 1st session 43d 2d session 43d 1st session 44th 2d session 44th 1st a n d 2d sesC o n g r e s s , 2d session 46th
sions 45th
Congress.
Congress.
Congress.
Congress.
Congress.
and 1st sesC ongress.
C
o
n
g
r
e
s
s
.
Fiscal y e a r
Fiscal y e a r
Fi.scal y e a r
Fiscal y e a r
Fiscal y e a r
sion 46th ConFiscal y e a r
Fiscal y e a r
1874.
1875.
1876.
1878.
1877.
gress. Fiscal
1881.
1879.
y e a r 1880.

3d s e s s i o n 46th
Congress.
Fiscal y e a r
1882.

T o s u p p l y deficiencies for
t h e s e r v i c e of t h e v a r i o u s
b r a n c h e s of t h e g o v e m F o r legislative, executive,
a n d j u d i c i a l e x p e n s e s of
the government
F o r s u n d r y civil e x p e n s e s
of the- g o v e r n m e n t
F o r s u p p o r t of t h e A r m y . . .
F o r t h e naval service
F o r t h e I n d i a n service
For rivers and harbors . . . . .
F o r forts a n d fortifications
F o r s u p p o r t of M i l i t a r y
A cadem y
F o r s e r v i c e of Post-Office
Department
F o r i n v a l i d a n d o t h e r pensions
...
...
F o r consular and diplomatic
service

hj

O
P6
H

O
$11,143,239 96

$4, 053, 812 39

$2, 387, 372 38

18,170, 441 18

20,758%55 50

16, 038, 699 49

16, 057, 020 82

32,173, 257 90
31,796,008 81
22, 275, 707 65
5, 505, 218, 90
7, 352, 900 00
1, 899, 000 00

26, 924, 746
27, 788, 500
20, 813, 946
5, 538, 274
5, 228, 000
904, 000

29,459,853
27, 933, 83017, 001, 306
5, 425, 627
0,048,517
850, 000

15, 895, 005
27, 021, 807
12,741,790
4, 567, 017
5.015,000
315, 000

344, 317 56

88
00
70
87
00
00

339, 835 00

02
00
90
OO
50
00

304, 740 00

$834,095 00

$2, 547,180 31
15,7.50,774-05

17, 079, 256 19
58
90
90 "13,'539,'93-2 90
63
4, 827, 665 69
00
00
275, 000 00

290, 065 00

286, 604 00

$15,213,259-21

$4, 633, 824 55

$6,118, 085 10

$5,110, 862 39

15, 868, 694 50

16,136. 230 31

10, 785, 308 93

18,132, 897 61

24, 968, 5-9
51, 279, 079
14,153,431
4, 734, 875
8, 322, 700
275, 000

17, 034, 868
26, 797, 300
14,028,408
4,713,478
9, 577, 494
275, 000

24,216,136
26, 425, 800
14, 405, 797
4, 657, 262
8, 976, 500
550, 000

23, 701, 008
26, 687, 800
14, 566, 037
4, .587, 800
11 451,300
575, 000

08
39
70
72
00
00

292,805^00

56
00
95
58
01
00

319, 547 33

90
00
70
72
00
00

316, 234 28

59
00
55
80
00
00

6, 496, 602 00

7,175, 542 00

8, 376, 205 00

.5, 927, 498 00

2, 939, 725 00

4, 222, 274 72

5, 872, 37G 10

3, 883, 420 00'

2,152, 258 00

29, 980, 000 00

30, 000, 000 00

29, 533, 500 00

28, 533, 000 00

29, 371, 574 00

56, 233, 200 00

41, 644, 000 00

08, •;;82, 300 68

1, 311, 359 00
3, 342, 047 80

3, 404, 804 00
2, 108, 040 86

1, 374, 985 00
1,853,804 52

1,188, 797 50
4.134.691 93

1,140, 747 50
1, 425, 091 49

1, 087, 535 CO
2, 22G, 390 29

1, 097, 735 00
5, 085,123 77

1 ,,180, 335 00
4, 959, 332 01

1,191,435 00
1,128, 000 15

88, 356, 983 13 | 172, 010, 809 21

162, 404, 647 76

154, l i s , 212 04

177, 889, 214 14

100

100

100

171,072,775 59 | 1G'"?. 404. 047 76 1 154. 118.212 64

177, 889, 2 U 14

155,017,758 20 j 147,714,940 81 | 124,122,010 92

»^
H
W

o
H

>

322,435 37

30, 480, 000 00

172, 290, 700 82

Total

Pt
tei

O

Pi
Coin v a l u e of one
paper currency

dollar
..

89.3

88.8

87.8

92.7

97.6

Coin v a l u e of a m o u n t ap] )ropriated

153, 855, 595 83

137, 655, 769 28

129, 093, 718 03

115, 061,104 12

86, 236, 415 53




99.8

Ul

Pi

to
C7X

TABI^E

IJ.—STATEMENT showing the PUBCHASE of BONDS on accouni of fhe SINKING-FUND during each fiscal year from'its insiiiuiion iii
May, 1869, to and including June 30, 1881.

Tear ended—

Principal redeemed.

cost i
Premium paid. Net
currency.

Net cost esti- Interest d u e A c c r u e d i n t e r at close of
est paid in
mated in gold.
fiscal year.
coin.

B a l a n c e - o f interest due at
c l o s e o f fiscal
year.

J U N E 30, 1869.
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
. F i v e - tw enties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

of
of
of
of

1862
M a r c b , 1864
J u n e , 1864
1865

."

Total

8, 691, 000 00

of
of
of
of

1862 ,
M a r c h , 1864
J u n e , 1864
1865

Total...

2
hJ
O
H

$1, 621, 000 00
70, 000 00
1, 051,000 00
465, 000 00
461, 000 00
4, 718, 000 00
305, 000 00

$253, 822 84
11,725 00
161, 946 45
74, 909 00
73, 730 80
749, 208 08
49, 442 50
1,374,850 67

$1, 874, 822 84 $1, 349, 970 02
57, 552 82
81, 725 00
873, 205 61
1, 212, 940 45
387, 566 28
539, 969 00
387,903 26
534, 736 80
5, 467, 208 08 3, 948, 586 11
256, 653 20
354, 442 50

$16,210 CO
^ 700 00
10, 510 00
4, 650 00
13,830 00
141, 540 00
9,150 00

$7, 384
218
1, 470
2, 683
429
116, 032
8,173

7, 201, 437 30

196, 590 00

130, 392 56

10, 065, 850 67

60
63
42
54
Oi35
98

$8, 825
481
9, 039
1, 966
13,400
25, 507
970

40
37
58
46
90
G5
02

60,197 44

O

>^
W

m
QO

O

J U N E 30, 1870.
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

to

3, 542, 050 00
85, 000 00
3, 971, 400 00
2,790,250 00
11, 532,150 00
5, 882, 550 00
348, 500 00
28,151,900 00

493, 479 42
4, 035, 529 42 3, 263, 099 51
15, 742 87
75, 658 54
100,742 87
506,189 91
4, 477, 589 91 3, 647, 028 29
361, 735 43
2, 606, 636 20
3,151,985 43
, 454, 778 37 12. 980, 928 37 10,681,736 97
861, 7G3 73
6, 744, 313 73 5, 309, 810 90
53, 363 95
401, 863 95
308, 573 16
3, 747, 053 68 31, 898, 953 68 25, 893,143 57

160, 919 50
5, 350 00
105, 834 00
105, 257 50
495,421 50
302, 734 50
19, 380 00
1,254, 897 00

45, 994
1, 080
49, 946
37,113
145, 518
66, 111
5, 238

"

49
99
00
53
29
51
73

114, 925
4, 269
115, 888
68,143
349, 903
236, 622
14,141

.01
01
00
97
21
99
27

Pi

o
H

351, 003 54

903, §93 46

w

36, 657 80
.388 35
51, 703 46
92, 259 58
109, 455 28
70, 745 93
572 13

109. 317 20
851 05
149, 671 54
239,673-92
412, 661 72
274, 782 07
2, 523 87

a

J U N E 30, 1871.
Five-twenties
Five-twen ties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Con.sols, 1865
Consols, 1867
. Consols, 1868

of
of
of
of

1862
M a r c h , 1864
J u n e , 1864
1865

Total




2, 792, 950 00
29, 500 00
3, 907, 350 00
6, 7G8, 600 00
10, 222, 200 00
6,103, 050 00
52, 600 00
29, 936, 250 00

227,
2,
340,
574,
850,
541,
4,

607
277
529
923
949
559
784

56
20
03
00
79
41
01

2, 542, 631 20

3, 020, 557 56 2, 680, 209 05
31, 777 20 ~
28, 590 88
4, 307, 879 63 3, 847,182 42
7, 343, 523 00 6,525,231 42
11,073,149 79
9,762,387 78
6, 644, 609 41 5, 800, G18 37
57, 384 01
49,797 81
32, 478, 8S1 20 28, 694, 017 73

145, 975 00
1, 240 00
201, 375 00
331, 933 50
522,117 00
351, 528 00
3,096 00
1, 557, 264 50

367, 782 53

1,189,481 97

CO

Kj

J U N E 30, 1872.
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

of
of
of
of

1802
March, 1864
June, 1864
1865

Total

6,417, 850 00
127,100 00
3, 604, 650 00
3,635,200 00
11, 788, 900 00
6, 958, 900 00
85, 850 00

7§4, 055 21
7,181,905 21
6, 345, 391 98
14, 959 03
142, 059 03
126,123 46
438, 656 16
4. 043, 306 16 3, 573, 223 63
436, 838 70
4, 072, 038 70 3, 594, 747 85
1, 436, 989 46 13, 225, 889 46 11, 660,785 89
833, 600 15
7, 792, 500 15 6,863,777 3995, 801 63
84, 595 02
9, 951 63

427, 849 00
8, 894 00
246,001 50
24G, 502 00
707, 334 00
417, 534 00
5,151 00

32, 618, 450 00

3, 935, 050 34 36, 553, 500 34 32, 248, 045 22

2, 059, 325 50

7.5,179 43
1, 338 70
57, 449 80
37, 817 37
149, 248 21
108, 487 .92
1,386 95
430,908 38

352, 669 57
7, 555 30
188, 551 70
208, 744 63
558, 085 79
309, 040 08
3, 764 05
1, 628,417 12

o

pi
H

J U N E 30, 1873.
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

of
of
of
of

1802
March, 1864
June, 1864
1865

Total

O
7,137,100 00
50, 000 00
3,741,150 00
1, 959, 850 00
10, 708, 250 00
4,402,100 00
019, 550 00

925, 783 87
7, 372 50
480, 684 37
250, 635 93
1,371,187 17
553, 010 89
81, 983 44

28, 678, 000 00

3, 671, 258 17 32, 349, 258 17 28,457,502 83

8, 062, 883 87
7, 089, 542 58
57, 372 50
49, 780 91
4, 221, 834 37 3, 715, 211 22
2, 210, 485 93
1, 943, 488 93
12,139, 437 17 10, 668, 617 09
4, 955, 710 89 4, 373, 781 76
701, 533 44
617,140 34

431,450 50
3, 500 00
223, 270 50
120, 266 50
646, 095 00
264,126 00
37,173 00

101, 960 57
813 70
42, 210 40
23, 744 47
145, 069 34
09, 032 51
8, 948 40

1, 725, 881 50

392, 385 45

1,415, 391 05
2, 012, 051 32
1, 241, 571 09
3, 374, 934 42
4, 029, 975 86
798, 920 40

99, 519 00
141, 438 50
87,307 50
203, 019 00
243, OGO 00
48,138 00

31,743 95
48, 013 40
29, 348 19
40, 489 33
55, 976 97
11, 014 38

67, 775 05
93,425 04
57, 959 31
157,129 67
187, 083 03
37,123 62

14, 331, 523 55 12, 872, 850 74

823, 082 00

222, 586 28

600, 495 72

541,973 50

353, 001 50

188, 911 94

329, 489 93
2,686 30
181, 054 04
90, 522 03
501, 025 GO
194,493 49
28, 224 60
1,333,496 05

J U N E 30, 1874.
Five-twenties of 1802
Five-twenties of Jnne, 1864
Five-twenties of 1865
Consols, 1865Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868
Total

H
W
CO

.O
Pi
H

>

1, 421, 700 00
2, 020, 550 00
1, 247, 250 00
3, 393, 650 00
4, 051, 000 00
802, 300 00
12, 936, 450 00

161, 219 79
218, 457 39
135,577 95
300, 964 62
• 432, 348 18
86,505 62
1, 395,073 55

1, 582, 919 79
2, 239, 007 39
1,382,827 95
3, 754, 614 62
4, 483, 348 18
888, 805 62

Pi
Kj

O
W

J U N E 30, 1875.
25,170, 400 00

Five-twenties of 1862.

25,170, 400 00

Pi
QO

a

J U N E 30, 1876.
Five-twenties of 1802...-.
Five-twenties of June, 1864 .
Five-twenties of 1865
Total.




pi
5, 785, 200 00
10, 869, 600 00
1, 789, 25U 00

5,785,200 00
10, 809, 600 00
1, 789, 250 00

404, 964 00
700, 872 00
125, 247 50

54, 745 72
171, 966 33
30, 805 8e

18,444, 050 00

18, 444, 050 00

1, 291, 083 50

257, 517 91

350, 218 28
588, 905 67
94,441 64

Kj.

1, 033, 505 59

to
^3

TABI^E

IJ.—STATEMENTshouiug ihe PUBCHASE of BONDS on account of the SINKING-FUND, ^c—Continued.

to
OC

I

Principal redeemed.

Year endedJ U N E 30, 1877.
Five-t wenties of 1802
Fi ve-twenties of June, 1804
Five-twenties of 1865
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Total.

Premium paid.

Net cost in
currency.

Net cost estimated in gold

$81,200 00
178, 900 00
180, 350 00
6, 050 00
1, 000 00

S81,200 00
i78, 900 00
180, 350 00
0, 050 00
1, 000 00

$4, 352 25
9, 943 50
9, 519 00
181 50
30 00

$1,181 G7
1, 323 GO
3,141 08
108 97
21 20

$3,170 58
8, G19 90
6, 377 92
72 53
•" GO

447,500 00

447, 500 00

24, 020 25

5,776 52

18, 249 73

00
00
00
00
00
00

17,900 00
15, 900 00
2,350 00
23, 600 00
5,700 00
-8,500 00

966 00
834 00
129 00
1,410 00
342 00
510 00

192
78
40
273
134

73, 950 00

73, 950 00

4,197 00

2, 650 00
3,150 00
1, 850 00
1,700 00
9, 050 00
100 00

2, 650 00
3,150 00
1, 850 00
1,700 00
9, 050 00
100 00

18, 500 00

18, 500 00

J U N E 30, 1878.

Five-twenties of 1802
Five-twentie's of June, 1804
Five-twen ties of 1865
Consols, 1.865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

17, 900
15, 900
2, 350
23, 000
5, 700
8, 500

Total.

of inInterest d u e Accrued inter- Balance
terest due at
at close of
est paid in
close of fiscal
fiscal year.
coin.
year.

65
41
92
35
76

773
755
88
,142
207
420

35
59
08
65
24
17

J U N E 30, 1879.

Five-twenties df 1862
Five-twenties of June, 1864
Five-twenties of 1865
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1807
Consols, 1868
Total.

-JU-NE-30,-1880Five-twenties of 1862.
Five-twenties of June, 1864
Five-twenties of 1865
Ten-forties of 1864
Loau of February, 1861
Loan of July and August, 1861.
Loan of MarCh^ 1863
Oregon war debt
Fundedloanof 1881
,
Funded loan of 1907
Total




100 00
100 00
250 00
676, 050 00
2,837,000 00
$74,161 95
32, 064, 250 00 1, 376, 085 04
12, 797,150 00 ~ 549, 035 18
202, 550 00
8, 273 02
23, 575, 450 00
662, 200 97
1, 500, 000 00
125, 558 2G
•

73,652,900 00

2,795,320 42

100 00
100 00
250 00
676, 050 00
911,101 95
440, 335 04
340,185 18
210, 823 02
237, 656 97
625, 558 26
70,448,220 42

165
94
85
102
543
6

75
50
50
00
00
00

990 75

40
18
41
41
106
56

35
53
22
49
62
00

308 77

4 00
4 00
14 50
28,108 75
85,110 00
1,105, 807 50
484, 747 50
U, 787 50
415,1G2 70
15, 000 00

07
49
5 85
12, 872 05
47,540 20
518,148 79
213,179 29
. 3, GG2 56
130, 349 30
10,191 74

2, 203, 800 45

935, 951 GO

125
75
44
60
376
5

40
97
28
51
38
44

O
Pi
H
O

QO

o
pi
H
t>
Pi

687 98
3 33
3 61
8 65
15, 296 10
37, 509 80
647, 658 71
271, 568 21
6,124 94
284, 813 34
4, 808 26
1, 207, 854 85

QO

a
Kj

J U N E 30, 1881,
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e , 1864*
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865*
F i v e - t w e n t i e s ' of 1862
L o a n of F e b r u a r y , 1861
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861
L o a n of M a r c h , 1863
Oregon w a r debt
F u n d e d loan of 1881 . . ,
'

Total

:

Grand total ^




,
*

.. ^

50
100
3, 000
7, 775, 000
16, 712, 450
7, 057,100
,54, 250
42, 769,400

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

51,277 58
488, 876 11
199, 514 62
1,408-65
320,171 82

74, 371, 350 00

1, 061, 248 78

333,190,700 00

20, 522, 486 81 $167, 677, 967 61

7,
17.
7,
43,

50 00
IdO-OO
3, 000 00
826, 277 58
201, 326 11
256, 614 62
'55, 658 65
089, 571 82

3
7
210
402, 390
1, 002, 747
361,315
2, 584
1,100, 474

50
00
00
00
00
50
50
15

^
160,
200,
83,
203,

1
80
072
043
330
551
342

74
22
88
95
51
11
94

3
5
129
302, 317
802, 703
277, 984
2, 033
843,131

25
26
78
12
05
99
39
21

75,432, 598 78

2, 935, 731 05

707, 423 60

2, 228, 308 05

331, 462, 876 59

14, 618, 855 60

4,161, 908 62

10,456, 946 98

hj
O
Pi

O
*'Eedeeme(i i n 1886 a n d n o t p r e v i o u s l y r e p o r t e d .

QO

O

>
O

w
H
t=J

a
K^

T A B t < E M . — S T A T E M E N T shoiving the PUBCHASES of BONDS on account of the SINKING-FUND, from Novemher, 1.- 79, to Octoher 31,1881.
Date
of p u r chase.

T i t l e of loan.

Authorizing act.

Eate,

W h e n redeemable.

W h e n payable.

Interest payable.

A m o u n t purchased.

N e t premiu m paid.

Accrued interest paid.

-:j3

•o

TotaL

Pi

w

1879.
N o v . 8 Oregon w a r d e b t
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
8 L o a n o f 1863 (1881s) . . .
D e o . 6 Oregon- w a r <' s b t
6 L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
6 L o a n of 1803 (1881s) . . .
1880.
J a n . 7 Oregon w a r d e b t
7 L o a n of Jal^^ a n d A u g . ,
18G1.
7 L o a n of 18G3 (1881s) . . .
7 F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .
F e b . 11 L o a n of F e b . , 1801
11 Oregon w a r d e b t
11 L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1801.
11 L o a n o f 1863 (1881s) . . .
11 F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .
18 L o a n o f . F e b . , 1861
18 O r e g o n w a r d e b t
18 L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
18 L o a n of 1863 (1881s) . . .
18 F u n d e d l o a n o f 1 8 8 1 . . .
25 L o a n o f - F e b . , 1861
25 Oregon w a r d e b t
..
25 L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
186L
L o a n of 1863 (1881s) . .
Mar.
L o a n of F e b . , 1861
Oregon w a r debt
L o a u of J u l y a n d A u g .
1861.
L o a u of 1863 (1881s) . .
Loan of F e b . , 1861
for FRASER
Fuuded l o a n o f 1881..

Digitized


M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

P r . ct.
6
July
6 J u n e 30,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

6 .....do
6
July
6 J u n e 30,1881

1,1881 J a n . a n d J u l y .
do
1,1881

do

M a r c h 3,1863
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

hj

-do .
do .
-do.

July

1,1881

.do.
-do .

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20, 1871. .
F e b . 8,1801
M a r c h 2,1801
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

.....do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20, 1871.
F e b . 8,1861
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

-do .
Feb., May, Aug.,
Nov.
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
do
J u l y 1,1881
J u n e 30,1881
do

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20, 1871.
F e b . 8,1861
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 6,1861.

- . . . d o .— - . .
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
F e b . 8,1861.
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.
M a r c h 3,1863
Feb. 8,1861..:
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20. 1871.

.do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
J u l y 1,1881
do
J u n e 30,1881
do
do

May

$4, 642 13
257,158 74

$2, 629 87
145, 789 26

$128,472 00
7,118, 748 00

3, 213, 000 00
2, 500 00
80, 200 00

123, 062 25
93 00
2, 983 32

09, 717 75
05 75
2,109 38

3, 405, 780 00
2, G58 75
85, 292 70

O

5, 509,12

3, 895 23

157,504 35

H

.do .

J u n e 30,1881

1,1881

J u n e 30,1881

-do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov,
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
J u l y 1,1881 . . . . . . d o
^.-

do
D e c . 31,1880
J u l y 1,1881
J u n e 30,1881
do.^

May'' i^ i'8*8i'

and

Dec. 31,1880

-do
.do
-do
-do

.
.
.
.

-do .
.do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.

o

$121, 200 00
0, 715, 800 00

pi

^.

7, 000 00
"2, 007, 000 00

288 05
82, 555 24

8 05
.2,310 10

7,296 10
2, 092,465 34

1, 040, 400 00
1, 945, 000 00

42, 791 39
47, 300 09

1,197 17
17, 851 41

1, 084, 388 56
2, 010,157 50

o

180, 000 00
27, 000 00
4, 075, 800 00

5, 651 02
1, 241 33
217, 018 52

1,2.53 58
181 97
31, 513 60

192, 904 60
28, 423 30
4, 924, 932 12

.H

1, 508, 750 00
5, 070, 450 00

70, 899 74
160, 872 38

1, 589, 818 32
10,108 58
6, 954 18 5, 244,276 66

57, 000 00
7, 000 00
399, 950 00

1, 810 75
338 52
. 19, 323 46

449 75
55 23
3,155 76

59, 260 50
7, 393 75
422, 429 22

125, 050 00
. 411, 000 00

6, 056 02
14, 007 80

986 71
957 13

132, 092 73
425, 904 93

154, 000 00
2, 550 00
1, 518,. GOO 00

4, 059 28
121 46
72, 592 01

1, 392 32
23 05
13, 729 78

100,051 60
2, G94 51
1, 004, 921 79

325,150
14, 000
0, 500
1, 538, 450

00
00
00
00

15, 497 14
- 417 32
315 02
74, 273 01

2, 939 70
142 08
GG 25
15, 079 50

343, .580
14,500
0,881
1, 628,-403

957, 050 00
718, 000 00
1, 282, 000 00

46, 227 02
20, 509 10
37, 274 37

QQ

\>

Pi

^

O
H

w
w

Pi

84
00
87
17

9, 754 06 1,013,031 08
740, 053 00
8,143 90
6, 673 43 1, 325, 947 80

Ul

a
-pi
«1-

M a r . 17
17
17
17
24
24
24
24
24
31
31
31
31
Apr. 7
7
7
7
7
14
14
14
14
21
21
•

21
21
28
28
28
28

May

5
5
5
5
5

Oregon w a r d e b t
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n o f 1803 (1881s) . . .
F u n d e d loan of 1 8 8 1 . - L o a n of F e b . , 1861 . . . .
Oregon w a r debt
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n of 1863 (1881s)...
F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881...
Loanof
L o a n of
1861.
L o a n of
Funded

F e b . , 1861 . . .
J u l y aud A u g
1863 (1881s)..
loan of 1 8 8 1 . .

L o a n of F e b . , 1861
Oregon w a r d e b t
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
1861.
L o a n of 1863 (1881s)...
F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .
L o a n of F e b . , 1861
Oregon w a r debt
L o a n of J u l y a n d Aujr.,
1861.L o a n o f 1863 (1881s) . .
L o a n o f Feb., 1861. . . .
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n o f 1863 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . . .
F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881...
Loanof
L o a n of
. 1861.
L o a n of
Funded

F e b . , 1861
J u l y and Aug.,
1863 (1881s).-.
loan of 1 8 8 1 . . .

L o a n o f Feb,, 1 8 6 1 . . . .
Oregon w a r debt
L o a n of J u l v a n d A u g .
1861.
L o a n o f 1863 (1881s).-.
F u n d e d loan of 1 8 8 1 . . .
L o a n of F e b . , 1861 .




M a r c h 2,1861
-'..
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

July

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
F e b . 8,1861
M a r c h 2,1801
J u l y 17 a u d A u g . 5,1801.

do . . . . . .
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1803
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
F e b . 8, .1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

...do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14. 1870, a n d J a n .
20, 1871.
F e b . 8,1861
,
M a r c h 2,1861 . . . . .
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

...do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
Feb.8,1861
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y l 7 a n d A u g . 5,1861
M a r c h 3,1863
Feb.8,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

1,1881

J u n e 30,1881

D e c . 31,1880
J u l y 1,1881
J u n e 30,1881

D e c . 31,:
J u n e 30,1881

Deo. 31,1880
J u l y 1,1881
J u n e 30,1881

Jan. and J u l y .
do

6, 000 00
925, 450 -00

247 54
38,705 55

74 96
11, 561 80

0, 322 50
975, 777 35

.do
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
J a n . and J u l y
do
do

30.5, 550 00
703, 000 00

12,799 67
19, 278 97

3, 817 28
4, 703 43

322,160 95
786, 982 40

80, 000 00
500 00
1, 355, 400 00

2, 050 24
19 98
53, 599 39

1,1.73 36
6 82
18, 492 84

357, 300 00
200, 800 00

14,170 02
4, 781 94

4,874 91
1, 430 36

376, 344 93
207, 012 30

30, 000 00
1, 497,150 00

722 60
01,143 34

443 83
22,149 61

31, IGO 43
1, 580, 442 95

377, 350 00
3, 095, 500 00

15, 427 95
77,502 26

5, 582 72
25, 018 44

398, 360 67
3,198, 020 70

20, 000 00
5, 000 00
551,150 00

495 99
213 27
23, 875 25

318 91
79 73
8, 788 19

20, 814 90
5, 293 00
583, 813 44

. - - . do
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
J a n . and J u l y
do
do
Feb., May, A u g
Nov.
J a n . and J u l y . . .
do
do

and

. . . do
Feb., May, A u g
Nov.
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y . - do
J n l y 1,1881
J u n e 30,1881
do
:...
.- do
D e c . 31,1880

9.192 28
19, 748 67

3, 389 .14
6,430 92

220, 000 00
5, 800 00
973,700 00

5, 430 91
243 70
40, 989 60

3, 701 09
99 16
16, 646 27

300, 500 00
217, 000 00
093, 900 00

12, 650 45
5, 203 78
28, 954 06

5,137 32
3, 959 52
12, 661 30

23,100 00
2, 060 000 00

958 24
52 977 90

421 49
22, 641 10

24, 479 73
2,141, 619 00

273, 000 00
1, 214, 200 00

6, 937 28
53, 822 08

5, 295 47
23, 552 19

285, 232 75
1, 291, 574 27

do
Feb., Mayi-Aug
Nov.
J a n . a n d J u l y . -.
do
. . . . do

304, 200 00
1,148, GOO 00

16, 078 85
33, 664 20

7, 064 48
13, 088 80

387,343 33
1,195, 353 00

20, 000 00
000 00
1, 318, 600 00

507 04
26 60
58, 781 45

410 96
Id 32
27, 094 46

20, 918 00
638 92
1, 404, 475 91

do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
Jau. and July

. 710,800 00
950, 000 00

32, 034 45
20, 787 98

14, 605 45
520 52

757, 439 90
977, 308 50

327, 000 00

8, 209 02

7, 095 45

342, 304 47

-do .
do .
-do .

do
Feb., May, A u g
Nov.
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y . . .
..-.-..do
J u n e 30,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J i i l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
Feb.8,1861
'
July"17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

. . . do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,-1871.
Feb.8,1861
,
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

do
M a y 1,1881.

M a r c h 3,1863
.'..
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
Feb.8,1861

...do. .
May IjlSSl

D e c . 31,1880
J u l y 1,1881
J u n e 30,1881

D e c . 31,1880

89,223 60
526 80
1, 427, 492 23

212, 550 00
711, 300 00

...do
M a y 1,1881

J u n e 30,1881

-

and

225,131 42
737,479 59
229,192 00
6,142 86
1, 031, 335 87
318, 287 77
226.163 30
. 735, 515 36;

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T A B L . E M.—STATEMENT showing the PUBCHASES of BONDS on account of the SINKING-FUND, ^c—Cootinurd.

CO

to
Date
of p u r chase.

M a y 12
12
12

T i t l e of loan.

Authorizing act.

Eate. W h e n r e deemable.

L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n of 1863 (18818)...
F u n d e d loan of 1 8 8 1 . . .

J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

P r . ct.
6 J u n e 30,1881

L o a n of F e b . , 1861 . . Oregon w a r d e b t
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n o f 1863 (1881s)-.F u n d e d loan of 1 8 8 1 . . -

26
June 2
2
2

.

L o a n of J u l y a r d A u g . ,
186L
L o a n of 1863 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . . .
F u n d e d loan of 1 8 8 1 . . L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n o f 1863 (1881s) .F u n d e d loan of 1 8 8 1 - . .

2

Consols of 1907 .

9
9
9

L o a n of F e b . , 1861 - - . .
Oregon w a r d e b t
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n o f 1863 (1881s)-.L o a n of F e b . , 1861 - - . L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n o f 1863 (1881s)-.F u n d e d loan of 1881. - -

9
16
16
16
16
23
23
23
23
23

Loanof Feb.. 1861...Oregon w a r d e b t
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n of 1863 (1881s).-.
F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881-..


30 L o a n of F e b . , 1801 

Interest payable.

Jan. and J u l y .

.do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
J u l y 1,1881
do
J u n e 30,1881
do

M a r c h 3,1863 . ;
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
Feb.8,18ei
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

....do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1803
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
26,187L
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

....do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863 . - .
J u l y 14, 1870, a u d J a n .
20,1871.
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

-...do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,187L
do

...do
M a y 1,1881

F e b . 8,1861
:M a r c h 2,1861
' . -.
J u l y l 7 a n d A u g . 5,1801.

W h e n payable.

J u n e 30,1881

J u n e 30,1881

July

1,1907
D e c . 31,1880
J u l y 1,1881

J u n e 30,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
Feb.8,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

....do

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,187L
Feb.8,1861
M a r c h 2,1801
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

.-..do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
-.
J u l v 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
Feb.8,1861

...do
•^May 1,1881

D e c . 31,1880
J u n e 30,1881

Dec. 31,1880
J u l y 1,1881
J u n e 30,1881

Doc.

31,1880

A m o u n t nur- N e t premichased.
u m paid.

A c c r u e d interest paid.

Total.

$1,126,150 00

$49, 770 31

124,435 87

$1,200,356 18

244, 850 00
1, 302, 000 00

10, 835 83
36, 577 63

5, 312 89
1, 901 87

260, 998 72
1, 340,539 50

000 00
6, H.OO 00,
1, 314, 550 00

1. 514 04
289 62
60, 088 48

1,370 96
143 95
30, 036 56

62, 885 00
6, 733 57
1, 404,675 04
1, 040,625 76
660, 435 75

-do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
Jan. and July

979, 150 00
640, 000 00

45,102 87
18,857 06

22, 372 89
1, 578 09

622, 800 00

28, 957 60

14, 947 20

666, 704 80

-do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
Jan. and July

327, 200 00
2, 050, 000 00

15, 212 40
01, 241 88

7, 852 80
7, 020 62

350, 205 20
2,118,262 50

1,109, 550 00

48, 069 82

27, 905 94

1,185, 525 76

.do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
Jan., AprU, J u l y , and
Oct. ,
Jan. and July
.do
do

373, 150 00
17, 300 00

16,162 03
407 92

9, 384 96
75 84

1, 500,

125, 558 20

398, 696 99
17, 843 76
1, 635,750 00

244, 000 00
700 00
1, 352, 250 00

5, 513 20
30 03
57, 750 89

35, 566 00

255, 930 80
748 44
1,445, 566 95

403, 050 00
108, 000 00
580, 250 00

17, 279 65
2, 304 29
24, 222 07

10, 000 76
2, 964 81
15, 929 07

430, 930 41
113, 269 10
620, 401 14

-do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
Jan. and J u l y
do . . . i
do

194, 750 00
1,117, 000 00

8,133 07
29, 065 86

- 5, 346 29
7, 038 64

208, 229 36
1,153, 104 50

103, 000 00
3, 900 00
688, 550 00

2,226 03
102 17
29, 091 63

2,946 07
111 54
19, 694 41

108, 172 10
4, 173 71
737, 336 04

.do .
Feb., May, A u g . , and
Nov.
Jan. and J u l y

405, 050 00
799, 500 00

17,147 83
21,793 40

11, .585 52
5, 804 58

433, 783 35
827, 098 04

-do .
do .
-do .

6, 417 54
18 41

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621 82

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"30
30

30
30
OO

^
-"

J u l y 28
28
28
28
28
Ang. 4
4
11
11
11
11
11
18
18
18
18
18
25
25
25
25
25
Sept. 1
1
1
8

Oregon w a r debt
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
186L
L o a n o f 1863 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . . .
F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881 . .
L o a n of F e b . , 1861
Oiegon w a r debt
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
1801.
L o a n of 1803 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . . .
F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .
L o a n o f F e b . , 1861
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
1861.
L o a n of 1863 (1881s)...
L o a n o f F e b . , 1861
Oregon war debt
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
1861.
L o a n of 1863 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . . .
F u n d e d l o a t i of 1.881...
L o a n o f F e b . , 1861
Oregon w a r debt
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
1861.
L o a n of 1863 (1881s). - .
Fundedloanof 1881...
L o a n of F e b . , 1861
Oregon w a r d e b t - . . . . .
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
186L
L o a n o f 1863 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . . .
F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .
L o a n of
L o a n of
1861.
L o a n of
Funded

F e b . , 1861
J u l y and Aug.
1863 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . . .
l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .

Oregon w a r d e b t . .
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . .
18G1.
L o a n of 1863 (1881s) - . .
F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881.'-.
L o a n of F e b . , 1861
Oregon w a r debt




M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

July

1,18811

J u n e 30,1881

do
J a n . and J u l y .

M a r c h 3,1863 . ,
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
F e b . 8,1801
M a r c h 2,1801
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

.--.do
?:
M a y 1,1881

J u n e 30,1881

do

M a r c h 3,1863
,
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
F e b . 8,1801.J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

.-..do
M a y 1,1881

......do
Feb., ^

M a r c h 3,1863
F e b . 8 , 1861
M a r c b 2,1861
,
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

:-..do.

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
F e b . 8, 1801
,
M a r c h 2,1801
Julyl7andAug.5,18Gl.

.--.do
M a y 1,1881

.do
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
J u l y 1,1881
do - . . . .
J u n e 30,1881
do

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
26,187L ^
Feb. 8,1801.-..,
M a r c h 2,1861
Julyl7andAug.5,1861.

----do.
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
'....
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
Feb.8.1801
J u l y 17 a n d A u g , 5,1861.

.:..do ..--...
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
^....
J u l y 14, 187 0, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

.--.do
M a y 1,1881

Ma.rch 3,1863 .'
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
Feb.8,1861
M a r o h 2,1861

--.do
M a y 1,1881

-do.
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
J u l y 1,1881
do
i...

Aug., and

D e c . 31,1880

Nov. "
J a n . and J u l y
do

D e c . 31,1880
J u l y 1,1881

.do .
.do.
-do .
-do.

J u n e 30,1881

157, 854 90

96, 350 00
735, 350 00

4, 094 31.
21, 047 73

2, 866 74
6, 043 96

103, 311 05
762, 441 69

432, 000 00
6, 250 00
658, 500 00

7, 756 55
244 81
25, 986 33

1, 917 35
• 27 74
2, 922 64

441,673 90
6, 522 55
687, 408 97

308, 250 00
595, 000 00

12, 206 85
14,801 65

1, 368 12
7,172 60

321, 824 97
610, 974 25

90, 000 00
1, 811, 800 00

1, 729 05
73,183 48

536 55
10,126 16

98, 265 60
1, 895,109 64

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619, 420
115, 750
10, 408
754, 728

576, 300 00
1, 080, 000 00

23, 314 18
27,543 02

3, 884 10
1, 479 48

603, 498 28
1,109,022 50

59,000 00
650 00
330, 500 00

979 97
26 07
13, 236 17

5 12
2,607 79

' 65,750 00
2, 044,100 00

2, 629 17
51,182 51

4, 760 28

84, 000 00
• 1, 000 00
1, 789,100 00

533 57
38 96
69, 695 67

307 38
9 04
16,175 44

34, 840 95
1, 048 00
1, 874, 971 11

.do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
Jan. and July
do
,

492, 000 00
183, 900 00

19,159 38
4, 494 43

4, 448 22
604 60

515, 607 60
188, 999 03

970, 000 00
512, 800 00

14, 539 72
19, 285 50

9, 947 IS 1, 000, 486 90
6, 226 34
537, 311 84 • fej

.do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
1,1881 J a n . a n d J u l y
do

120, 200 00
891, 000 00

4, 520 51
20, 980 09

1, 225 05
3, 783 71

125, 945 56
915, 769 80

Ul

10, 000 00
985, 900 00

355 58
35, 095 97

113 42
n , 182 50

10, 469 00
1, 032,178 53

K

827, 600 00
070, 500 00

29, 482 78
14, 832 34

9, 387 04
3, 521 51

800, 469 82
694, 853 85

193, 000 00
1, 500 00

2,243 43
50 11

2,411 17
18 74

197,65/ GO
1, 508 85

D e c . 31,1880

July

17 85
4,364 81

3, 309 80
701 59
67 40
4,857 34

.do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
J u l y 1,1881
do
J u n e 30,1881
do

J u n e 30,1881

25 65
6, 200 09

23, 910 51
1, 988 41
400 60
29,171 12

J u n e 30,1881

J u n e 30,1881

643 50

600 00
146, 700 00

-do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
D e c . 31; 1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
J u l y 1,1881
do

592, 200
113, 000
10, 000
720, 700

00
00
00
00

465 53

518 78

31
00
00
46

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60, 445 50
681 19
346, 343 96
68, 897 95
2,100, 042 79

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T A B I . E m.—STATEMENT-showing the PUBCHASES of BONDS on accountof the SINKING-FUND, #o.—Continned.
Date
of p u r chase.

T i t l e of l o a n .

A u t h o r i z i n g act.

J u l y 17-and A u g . 5,1861.

15
15

L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n o f 1863 (1881s)..F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881...

22
22

L o a n o f Feb., 1861..-..
F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .

29
29

L o a n of
L o a n of
1861.
L o a n of
Funded

1880.
Sept.15

Oct.

6
6
6
6
13
13
13
13
20
20
20
20

F e b . , 1861
J u l y and Aug.,
1863 (1881s).. l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .

L o a n of F e b . , 1861
Oregon war debt
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a u of 1863 (188ls)--F u n d e d loan of 1 8 8 1 . . .
L o a n of F e b . , 1861
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a n of 1863 (1881s). - .
F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881...
L o a n of F e b . . 1861
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
1801.
L o a n o f 1803 (1881s) . .
F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881-..

27 L o a n o f F e b . , 1861
27 [ O r e g o n w a r d e b t
'27 L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g .
1801.
27 L o a n of 1863 (1881s). - .
Nov. 4 L o a n o f Feb., 1861.....
do
11
.12 ,
do
FRASER
13 ;
do

Digitized for


Eate.

W h e n redeemable.

W h e n pay• able.

CO

Amount purchased.

N e t premiu m paid.

A c c r u e d interest paid.

$435,950 00

$14, 281 10

$5, 446 39

$455, 677 49

do
Feb., May, A u g . and
Nov.
Dec. 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
Feb., May, Aug., and
M a y 1,1881
Nov.
Dec. 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
do
i
J u n e 30,1881

194, 050 00
1, 675, 500 00

. 0, 373 24
33, 508 95

2,424 29
10, 328 44

202, 847 53
1,719, 337 39

48, 000 00
2, 452, 000 'oo

564 90
49.103 07

654 90
17,466 33

49, 219 80
2, 518, 569 40

2, 000 00
1, 692, 500 00

19 81
51, 590 83

29 59
25, 039 70

2, 049 40
1, 769,130 53

do
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
J u l y 1,1881
do
'
do
J u n e 30,1881

264, 700 00
540, 800 00

8,172 26
9, 753 19

3, 916 10
4,370 84

276, 788 36
554, 924 03

Ul

140, 000 00
050 00
648, 800 00

1, 255 88
18 89
18, 911 51

2, 232 32
D
10 36
10, 345 23

143,488 20
079 25
678, 056 74

fej

-do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
Jan. and July
-do

218, 200 00
1, 492, 350 CO

6, 386 62
25, 331 34

3,479 22
13,492 49

228, 065 84
1,531,173 83

21, 000 00
418, 050 00

179 68
11, 874 34

359 02
7,146 94

21, 538 70
437, 071 28

81, 950 00
1, 979,000 00

2, 327 71
32.104 30

1, 401 01
19, 790 00

85, 678 72
2, 030, 894 30

29,000 00
1,123, 500 00

229"45
34, 081 56

529 15
20, 500 03

29. 758 60
1,178, 081 59

479,150 00
868, 350 00

14, 596 23
15, 483 20

8, 742 84
9, 516 18

502,489 07
893, 349 38

468, 000 00
1, 250 00
1, 446, 600 00

3, 689 44
38 48
43,823 63

9, 077 92
.
24 25
28, 060 12

480, 707 36
1, 312 73

17, 495
33
140
2, 736
100

11, 078
103
546
11,013
421

599, 724
5,137
25, 687
513, 750
19,522

..-.do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
..-..
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
F e b . 8,1801
M a r c h 2,1801
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

.---do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
,
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
F e b . 8,1801
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

..-.do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,187L
F e b : 8,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

.--.do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14. 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
Feb.8,1861
M a r c h 2,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861

.---do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863 .
Feb.8,1861....
do
do
do

. . \ do

Total.

fel

Pr.ct.
6 J u n e 30,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
F e b . 8,-1801
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,-1871.
Feb.8,1861
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861.

Interest payable.

J a n . and J u l y .

D e c . 31,1880
J u n e 30,1881

.40 .

D e c . 31,1880
J u n e 30,1881

Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
Jan. and J u l y
do

do
-Feb., M a y , A u g . , a n d
Nov,
Deo. 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
J u l y 1,1881 . . . - . - d o
J u n e 30,1881
do
D e c . 31,1880
....do
....do
...do

do
-do
-do
do
.do

.
.
.
.
.

571,150
5, 000
25, 000
500, 000
19, 000

00
00
00
00
00

86
94
93
30
86

75
.56
57
70
64

61
50
50
00
50

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do
.do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
dodo
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do.
do
do
do
......do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do - . . :
do
do
T.
do
do
do
.. ..do
do
:...
do
do
do
do
. .do
do
do
. . do
do
do
......
do
do

15
16 . . .
17
18
19
20
22 :
23
26
27
29
30

Dec- 1
1
2
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
21
22
23
24
27
28
29
30
31

...

.

do

do
do
do

'.

.•

i..

do

do
do
. . ..do
do
do
do .
do

:. '. . . . .

.....
do
1881.
Feb. 26 ' Fundedloanof 1881.... July 14, 1870, and Jan.
20,1871.
do
.
. ..
28
do
28 Loan of July and Aug., July 17 and Aug. 5,1861
1861.
do .. . .
'Mar. 1
do
1 Loan of 1863 (1881s) . . . - March 3,1863
1 Funded loan of 1881
July 14, 1870, and Jan.
20.1871.




G
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6

....do

do

do

do

do .
do
do
do
do
....do
do
do ..
do
....do
do .
-- do
do . . . . . . . . . do
do
....do
. . . do do
do
....do
do
....do
do
do
do . . .
....do
....do
do
do
....do
do
....do ....
do
^
-..-do
do
-...do
do
do
do
do
do
....do
do
do
do
....do
do
....do
do
do
do
....do
do
....do
do
do
do
....do
do
...do
do
do
do
....do
do
do
do
....do
do
....do . . . . . . .
do
. do
......do
....do

5

May 1,1881

6
6

do ,
J u n e 30,1881

6
6
5

do
- do . . . .
May 1,1881

....

:

„-.

12, 000 00
168, 000 00
58, 000 00
105, 000 00
187, 000 00
8, 000 00
5, 000 00
8, 000 00
12, 000 00
339,000 00
266, 000 00
103,000 00
138, 000 00
70, 000 00
198, 000 00
449, 000 00
180, 000 00
387, 000 00
409, 000 00
84, 000 00
126, 000 00
134, 000 00
101, 000 00
111, 000 00
54, 000 00
153, 000 00
199, 000 00
107, 000 00
12, 000 00'
14, 000 00
24, 000 00
5, 000 00
3,000.00
3, 000 00
30, 000 00
15, 000 -00
64, 000 00
4, 000 00
69, 000 00

59
808
269
471
808
33
19
29
38
1, 019
712
409
324
251
680
1, 408
559
1, 074
1, 225
205
287
284
197
180
78
198
225
161
9
6
7

75
95
75
06
20
26
14
31
06
33
37
74
21
96
12
46
13
86
50
68
81
07
50.
57
96
59
58
86
66
66
47
74

270 25
3, 811 05
1, 325 25
2, 416 44
4, 334 30
180 74
118 36
190 69
291 94
8, 303 17
6, 602 63
4, 072 76
3,470 79
1, 700 54
5, 012 38
11, 440 29
4, 615 87
10, 051 39
12, 258 25
2, 209 32
3, 334 09
3, 568 43
2, 706 25
3, 010 68
1,473 54
4, 200 16
5, 495 67
4, 639 39
335 34
"
395 84
682 53
143 01
86 25
86 25'
862 50
431 25
1, 840 00
115 00
1, 983 75

12, 330 00
172, 620 00
59, 595 00
107, 887 50
192,142 50
8, 220 00
5,137 50
8, 220 00
12, 330 00
348, 322 50
273,315 00
167, 482 50
141, 795 00
72,012 50
203,092 50
401, 908 75
185,175 00
398,126 25
482, 483 75
86, 415 00
129, 022 50
137,852 50
103, 903 75
114,191 25
55, C52 50
157, 398 75
204, 721 25
171, 801 25
12,345 00
14, 402 50
24, 090 00
5,143 76
3, 086 25
3, 086 25
30, 862 50
15,431 25
65, 840 00
4,115 00
70, 983 75

Feb., May, Aug., a n d
Nov.
do
Jan. and July

85, 000 00

291 10

85, 291 10

50, 000 00
3,000 00

184 93
28 60

50,184 93
3, 028 00

do
do
Feb., May, Aug., a n d
Nov.

10, 000 00
22, 000 00
43, 000 00

96 99
213 37
164 93

10, 096 99
22, 213 37
43,164 93

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T A B l i E M.—STATEMENT showing the PUBCHASES of BONDS on aecount of the SINKING-FUND, ^c—Continued.
Date
of p u r chase.

T i t l e of l o a n .

1881.
M a r . 2 L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
• 1861.
do
F e b . 25
25 L o a n o f 1863 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . - .
25 F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .
26
2«
26

L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
L o a u of 1863 (1881s) . . .
F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . . .

28

Authorizing act.

WTien redeemable.

W h e n payable.

P r . t.
J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861
6 J u n e 30,1881
do
:
M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
J u l y 17 a n d A u g : 5,^1861

6
6
5

Interest payable.

Jan. and J u l y .

108 61

11, 908 61

7, 950 00.
., 308, 300 00

73 16
4,480 41

8,023 16
1, 312, 780 41

16, 000 00

152 54

^16,152 54

7, 000 00
321, 500 00

66 73
1,189 10

7, 066 73
322,689 10

J u n e 30,1881

and

July
May

1,1881

.---do
July

-do.
Feb., May, Aug.,
Nov.
J u n e 30,1881, c o n t i n u e d . . . J a n . a n d J u l y

$504 93

11, 800 00

---do
M a y 1,1881

-do .
-do-

Total,

662,132 71
151, 860 06
2,890,070 38

.do.
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
do
do
1,1881 J a n . a n d J u l y
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
do
1,1881 J a n . a n d J u l y
do

..--do
M a y 1,1881

A c c r u e d interest paid.

5, 932 71
1, 360 66
9, 470 38

-do.
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
J a n . a n d J u l y .-

J u n e 30,1881

N e t premiu m paid..

$500 00
656, 200 00
150, 500 00
1, 880, 600 00

J u n e 30,1881

3^

A m o u n t purchased.

-do.
-do .
Feb., May, Aug., and
Nov.
Jan. and J u l y

.-..do.
....do
M a y 1,1881

.-.-do
M a y 1,1881

M a r c h 3,1863
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
J u l y 17 a n d A n g . 5,1861

L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . ,
1861.
28 L o a n o f 1863 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . . . . M a r c h S , 1863
28 F u n d e d l o a n of 1881. - - J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
do
do
Mar. 1
do
------do
2
4 Oregon w a r debt
M a r c h 2,1801
5 F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881.
J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
do
7
do.
9 Oregon w a r d e b t
M a r c h 2,1861
9 L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . , J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861
1861.
L o a n of 1863 (1881s) . . . M a r c h 3,1863
14 F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 - . . J u l y 14, 1870, a n d J a n .
20,1871.
Sept.27 L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . , J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861
1861.
27 L o a n of 1863{i ( 1 8 8 1 s ) - . . M a r c h 3,1863
i
Oct. 3 L o a n of J u l yy^and
A u g . , J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861
1861.
L o a n of 1863{ (1881s)--. M a r c h 3,1863.
10 L o a n of J u l y;^{a n d A u g . , J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861
1861.
L o a n of 1863I i ( 1 8 8 1 s ) . . . M a r c h 3,1863.
L o a n of J u l yy^ia n d "Aug., J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861
1861.




Eate.

115, 500
1,300
3, 000
3, 000

442
5
30
13

00
00
00
00

99
16
57
15

115, 942
1,305
3, 030
3, 013

99
16
57
15

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4 66
213 12
34,117 67

1,004 66
19, 772 62
3,165, 935 10

., 882, 900 00
500 00

20, 737 71
2 81

1, 924, 289 68
502 81

812, 000 00

6,851 94

818, 851 94

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05

1, 000 00
19, 350 00
I, 097, 750 00

$209 50
34, 007 43

...do .
...do .

.do.
-do .

-do .
.do .

., 102, 000 00
701, 950 00

9, 299 06
6,327 07

1, 111, 299 06
708, 277 07

.-do.
..do.

.do.
-do.

-do .
-do.

148,550 00
., 419, 000 00

1, 338 97
13,742 83

149, 888 97
1, 432,742 83

..-do.
...do.

.do.
.do.

-do .
.do.

298, 000 00
., 6^0, 750 00

2, 886 03
10, 888 33

300, 880 03
1, 647, 638 33

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24
24

L o a n of 1863 (1881s). - - . M a r c h 3,1863
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . , J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5,1861
1861.
L o a n o f 1863 ( 1 8 8 1 s ) - . . . M a r c h 3,1863

....do
....do

....do
....do

3h . . . . d o

...do

do
do
...

do

Total

201,550 00
1,142, 650 00

2, 087 27
12, 600 29

203, 637 27
1,155, 250 29

758,150 00

8, 360 38

766, 510 38

132, 813, 350 00

'

3,856,569 20 1, 565, 933 60 138, 235, 852 80

EECAPITULATION.
T i t l e of l o a n .

A u t h o r i z i n g act.

Eate.

W h e n redeemable.

W h e n payable.

. Interest payable.

P r . ct.
6
D e c . 31,1880 J a n . a n d J u l y
6
J u l y 1,1881
do
6
do
6
.
.
do
J u n e 30,1881
6
M a y do1,1881
F e b . , M a y , A u g . , arid
Nov. •
4
J u l y 1,1907
Jan., Apr., July, and
Oct.
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . , 1861. J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5 , 1 8 6 1 . . .
3^ J u n e 30,1881, c o n t i n u e d . . . J a n . a n d J u l y
do
do
-.L o a n of 1863 (1881s)
M a r c h 3,1863
do
3^
F e b 8 1861
L o a n of F e b . 1861
Ore"'on w a r d e b t
M a r c h 2 1861
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g . , 1861. J u l y 17 a n d A u g . 5 , 1 8 6 1 . . L o a n of 1863 (1881s)
M a r c h 3,1863
F u n d e d l o a n of 1881
J u l y 14,1870, a n d J a n . 20,
1871.
do
C o n s o l s of 1907

Total




A m o u n t purchased.

N e t premiu m paid.

$10, 612, 000
250, 800
48, 776, 700
19, 854, 250
43, 599, 000

$125,439
9, 681
1, 864, 961
748, 549
982, 378

00
00
00
00
00

1, 500, 000 00

53
67
15
80
79

125, 558 26

5, 706, 350 00
2, 508, 250 00
132, 813, 350 00

3, 856, 569 20

A c c r u e d interest paid.

$207, 613
4,114
718,192
290, 509
248, 929

TotaL

08 $10,945,052 61
67
270, 506 34
75 51, 359 853 90
79 20, 899, 309 59
40 44, 830, 308 19

10,191 74

1, 635, 750 00

56,410 46
23, 971 71

5,702, 760 46
2, 532, 221 71

1,565, 933 60 138,235, 852 80

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T A B L . E N.—STATEMENT of the OUTSTANDING P B I N C I P A L of the P U B L I C D E B T of the UNITED STATES, June 30, 1881.
Length of
loan.
OLD DEBT.

\

For detailed information in regard to the earlier loans embraced under
this head, see Finance Eeport for 1876.

oo

When redeem- Eate of in- atPrice
author- Amount issned. Amount outwhich Amount
able. terest.
standing.
ized.
sold.

On demand.

6 and 6 per
cent.

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Indefinite .

$57,665 00

o

82,525 35

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TEEASUEY NOTES P E I O E TO 1846.
Acts of October 12, 1837 (5 Statutes, 201); May 21, 1838 (5 Statutes, land 2 years 1 and 2 years j^jy of 1 t o 6
• 228); March 2,1839 (5 Statutes, 323); March 31,1840 (5 Statutes, 370);
fi'om date.
per cent.
February 15,1841 (5 Statutes, 411); January 31,1842 (5 Statutes, 469);
August 31,1842 (5 Statutes, 581); and March 3,1843 (5 Statutes, 614).

Par.

$51, 000,000 00

$47,002,900 00

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TEEASUEY NOTES OF 1846.

QO

A c t o f July 22,1846 (9 Statutes,. 39)

lyear

MEXICAN INDEMNITY.
Act of August 10, 1846 (9 Statutes, 94)

5 years

TEEASUEY NOTES OF 1847.

One year from xV of 1 to 5 | P a r .
date.
per cent.

10,000, 000 00

5 years from 5 p e r c e n t . . . P a r .
date.

320, 000 00

7,687,800 00

6, COO 00

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303,573 92

1,104 91

23, 000, 000 00 *26,122,100 00

950 00

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128,230,350 00

1,250 00

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A c t o f January 28,1847 (9 Statutes, 118)

l a n d 2 years. 1 and 2 years 6f and 6 per
from date.
cent.

LOAN OF 1847.
A c t o f January 28,1847 (9 Statutes, 118)

20 years...

January 1,1868 6 per cent... U to 2
percent,
prem'm.

Indefinite

A t the pleas- 6 per cent... Par
ure 01^^ t h e
govemment.

Indefinite.. ..

233,076 00

3,275 00

14 years...

January 1,1865| 5 per cent... P a r .

10, 000; 000 00

6,000, 000 00

20, 000 00

lyear

1 year
date.

Indefinite . - ..

62, 778, 900 00

1, 700 00

15 years..

January 1,18741 5 per cent... Average
prem'm
of3^V

20, 000, 000 00

20, 000, 000 00

8, 000 00

BOUNTY-LAND SCEIP.
Act of February 11,1847 (9 Statutes, 125)

Par.

TEXAN INDEMNITY STOCK, .

23,000, 000 00

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A c t o f September 9,1850 (9 Statutes, 447)
TEEASUEY NOTES OF 1857.
Act of December 23,1857 (11 Statutes, 257)
LOAN OF 1858.
Actof J n n e 14,1858 (11 Statutes, 365)




'..

from 3 to 6 per
cent.

Par.

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LOAN OF 1860.
A c t o f J u n e 22,1860 (12 Statutes, 79)

January 1,1871 5 per cent... P a r t o
Ifik per
ct. pr'm.

21, 000, 000 00

, 7,022, 000 00

10, 000 00

10 or 20 years Dec. 31,1880... 6 per cent... (Av.)89.03

25, 000, 000 00

18,415, 000 00

385, 000 00

10 years.

LOAN OF FEBEUAEY, 1861 (1881s).
Act of February 8, 1861 (12 Statutes, 129)
TEEASUEY NOTES OF 1861.
Act ofMarch 2,1861 (12 Statutes, 178)-....
OEEGON W A E DEBT.
The act ofMarch 2, 1861 (12 Statutes, 198), appropriated $2,800,000 for
the payment of expenses incurred bythe Territories of Washington
and Oregon in the suppression of Indian hostilities in the years
1855 and 1850. Section 4 of the act authorized the payraent of these
claims in bonds redeemable in twenty years, with interest at 0 per
centum per annum.

60 days or 2 60 days or 2 6 per cent... P a r t o
years a f t e r
years.
liVtrPer
date.
ct.pr'm.
20 years.

July 1,1881.... 6 per cent... Par

Indefinite..

2, 800, 000 00

35, 364,450 00

1, 090, 850 00

3, 000 00

688, 200 .00

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20 years.

After June 30,
1881.

50,000,000
6per cent... P a r t . . . . 250,000, 000 00 :139,321,350

140,544,650 00

FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1862.

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Indefinite... On demand...

None

i. P a r . . „ .

60, 000, 000 00 *60,030, 000 00

60,535 00
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3 years

Aug. 19 and
Oct. 1,1804.

7^0 per cent. Av.pre. of Indefinite.

139, 999, 750 00

Acts of February 25,1862 (12 Statutes, 345), March 3,1864 (13 Statutes, 5 or 20years. May 1,1867 .
6 per cent... A-v.pre.of 515, 000, 000 00 514,771,600 00
13), and January 28,1865 (13 Statutes,r425).
tIncluding conversion of Treasury notes,
* Including reissues.
J $50,000,000 6 per cent, bonds issued at a discount of $5,338,768;09, being equivalent to par for 7 per cent, bonds authorized by the act.




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SEVEN-THIETIES OF 1861.
Act of July 17,1861 (12 Statutes, 259)

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OLD DEMAND-NOTES.
Acts of Julv 17, 1861 (12 Statutes, 259); August 5, 1861 (12 Statutes,
313); February 12, 1862 (12 Statutes, 338).

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LOAN OF J U L Y AND AUGUST, 1861 (1881s.)
The act of July 17, 1861 (12 Statutes, 259), authorized the issue of
$250,000,000 bonds with interest at not exceeding 7 per centuni per
annum, redeemable after twenty years. .The act of August 5, 1861
(12 Statutes, 313), authorized the issue of bonds, with interest at 6
per centum per annum, payable after twenty years from date, in
exchange for 7.30 notes issued under the act of July 17, 1801. None
of such bonds were to be issued for a sum less than $500, and the
wliole amount of them was not to exceed the whole amount of 7.30
notes issued under the above act of July 17. The amount issued in
exchange for 7.30s was $139,321,350.

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16,300 00

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372,100 00

T A B I . E N.—STATEMENT of the OUTSTANDING PBINCIPAL of the PUBLIC DEBT, <|'o.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

When redeemable.

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Eate of in- atPrice
authoroutwhich Amount
Amount issued. Amount
terest.
ized.
standing.
sold.

LEGAL-TENDEE NOTES.
The act of February 25,1802 (12 Statutes, 345), authorized the issue of Indefinite..
$150,000,000 United States notes, not bearing interest,pa.y able to bearer,
at theTreasury of the United States, and of such denominations, not
less than five dollars, a? the Secretary of the Treasury might deem
expedient, $50,000,000 to be applied to tbe redemption of demandnotes authorized by the act of July 17,1801; these notes to be alegal
tender in payment of all debts, public and private, within the United
States, except duties on imports and interest on the public debt, and.
to be exchangeable for six per cent. United States bonds. The act
of Jnly 11,1802 (12 Statutes, 532), authorized an additional issue of
$150,0(J0,000 of such denominations as the Secretary ofthe Treasury
might deem expedient, but no such note should be for a fractional
part of a dollar, and not more than $35,000,000 of a lower denomination -• ban five dollars : these notes to be a legal tender as before authorized. The act of March 3,1803 (12 Statutes, 710), authorized an
additional issue of $150,000,000 of such denominations, not less than
one dollar, as the Secretary of the Treasury raight presciibe; which
notes were made a legal teuder as before authorized. The same act
-' liraited the time in which Treasury notes might be exchanged for
United States bonds to July 1,1863. The am'ount of notes aiithorized by this act were to be in lieu of $100,000,000 authorized by the
resolution of January 17, 1803 (12 Statutes, 822).

On demand . . . None .

Par-

$450, 000, 000 00

$346, 681, 016 00

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TEMPOEAEY LOAN.

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Acts of Februarv 25,1862 (12 Statutes; 346), March 17,1862 (12 Statutes, Indefinite.,
370), July 11.1802 (12 Statutes, 532), and June 30,1804 (13 Statutes,
218).

After ten c
notice.

4, 5, and 6
per cent.

Par.

1 year after
date.

6 per cent.

Par.

160,000,000 00

$716,099,247 16

2, 960 00
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CEETIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS.
Acts of March 1,1802 (12 Statutes. 352), May 17,1862 (12 Statutes, 370),
V and March 3,1803 (12 Statutes, 710).
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1 year .

No limit .

561, 753, 241 65

4, 000 00

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FEACTIONAL CUEEENCY.
of July 17,1862 (12 Statutes, 592), March 3,1863 (12 Statutes,-711),
Digitized for.Acts
FRASER
and June 30,1864 (13 Statutes, 220).


Indefinite.

On presentation.

None .

Par.

50,000,000 00 *368, 720, 079 51

7,105, 953 32

LOAN OF 1863.
The act of March 3,1863 (12 Statutes, 709), authorized a loan of
$900,000,000, and the issue of bonds, with interest not exceeding 6
por centum per annum, and redeemable in not less than ten nor more
tban forty years, principal and interest payable in coin. The act of
June 30,1864 (13 Statutes, 219), repeals so niuch of the preceding act
as limits the authoritj^ thereunder to the current fiscal year, and
• also repeals the authority altogether except as relates to $75,000,000
of bonds already advertised for.

J u l y l , 1 8 8 L . - . 6 per cent... Average
premium of

17 years .

76,000, 000 00

75, 000, 000 00

55,145,750 00

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ONE-YEAE NOTES OF 1863.
A c t o f March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 710)

lyear

TWO-YEAE NOTES OF 1863.
A c t o f March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 7 1 0 ) . . . . .

,. 1 year after
date.

6 per cent... Par

400, 000, 000 00

2 years after
^ate.

6 per cent... Par

400,000, 000 00

2 years

GOLD-CEETIFICATES.
Actof March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 711)

»

44, 520, 000 00

166,480, 000 00

44,535 00

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35,450 00
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Indefinite... On demand . . . None

Par

5,782,920^00

Indefinite.

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COMPOUND-INTEEEST NOTES.
Acts of March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 710), and June 30,1864 (13 Statutes,
218).
TEN-FOETIES OF 1864.
/
A c t o f March 3, 1864 (13 Statutes, 13)

,

6 per cent,
compound.

Par

400,000,000 00

266,595,440 00

230,250 00

10 or 40 years. March 1,1874.. 6 per cent... Par to 7 200, 000,000 00
per c't
prem.

196,118,300 00

639,250 00

3 years

3 years from
date.

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FIVE-TWENTIES OF JUNE, 1864.
A c t o f June 30, 1864 (13 Statutes, 218).
SEYEN-THIETIES OF 1864 AND 1865.
Acts of June 30,1864 (13 Statutes, 218), January 28, 1865 (13 Statutes,
425), and March 3, 1865 (13 Statutes, 468).

5 or 20 years. Nov. 1,1869.

-I

3 years

Aug. 15,1867 ]
June 15,1868
July 15,1868:

6 per cent... Av. prem. 400,000,000 00
of 2 M \ -

125,561, 300 00

64,850 00
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7i%perc't. ^ Av. prem. > 800,000,000 00 829,992, 500 00
ofx§§^.

142,150 00
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NAYY PENSION FUND.
The act of July 1, 1864 (13 Statutes, 414), authorized the Secretary of Indefinite.
Indefinite.
- the Navy to invest in registered securities of the United States so
much of the Navy pension fund in the Treasury January 1 arid July
1 in each year as would not be required for the payment of naval
pensions.' Section 2 of the act of July 23,1868 (15 Statutes, 170), fixed
^ .the interest on this fund at 3 per centum per annum in lawful money,
and confined its use to the payment of naval pensions exclusively.
*Including reissnes.




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3 per cent- -. Par

Indefinite.

14,000, 000 00

14, 000, 000 00

.

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T A B I . E 1%,—STATEMENT of the OUTSTANDING P B I N C I P A L of the P U B L I C DEBT, #c.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

When redeemable.

Eate of interest.

Price
anthor- Amonnt issued. Amonnt outat which Amount
ized.
standing.
. sold.'

Acts of March 3, 1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12, 1866 (14 Statutes, 31).
CONSOLS OF 1865.

5 or 20 years. Nov 1,1870.... Oper cent... Av. prem, Indefinite.
of2x%%V

$203, 327, 250 00

$77,250 00

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Acts of March 3, 1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12, 1866 (14 Statutes, 31).
CONSOLS OF 1867.

5 or 20 years. July 1,1870... 6 per cent... Av. prem. Indefinite.
ofSfcVu-

332, 998, 950 00

469,250 00

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Acts ofMarch 3, 1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12, 1866 (14 Statutes, 31).
CONSOLS OF 1868.

5 or 20 years. July 1,1872... 6 per cent... Av. prem, Indefinite.
oflxfg^.

379, 618, 000 00

1, 371, 000 00

Acts of March 3, 1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12, 1866 "(i4 Statutes, 31).

5 or 20 years. July 1,1873... 6 per cent. .. Av. prem. Indefinite.
ofrMiy

FIYE-TWENTIES OF 1865.

h3

42, 539, 350 00

414,900 00

*85,155, 000 00

5,000 00

THEEE-PEE-CENT. CEETIFICATES.
Acts ofMarch 2,1867 (14 Statutes, 558), and July 25, 1868 (15 Statutes,
183).

Indefinite.

On demand . . . 3 per cent... P a r .

$75,000, 000 00

FIYE-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF 1881.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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10 years.

May 1,1881 . . . 6 per cent-.- P a r .

Indefinite.

17, 494,150 00

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(TO P A Y J. B. EADS.)

The act of March 3, 1875 (18 Statutes, 466), directs the Secretary of
the Treasury to issue bonds of the character and description set out
in the act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272), to James B. Eads or his
legal representatives in payment at par of the warrants of the Secretary of War for the construction of jetties and auxiliary works to
maintain a wide and deep channel between the South Pass of the

• Mississippi- Eiver and the Gulf of Mexico, unless Congiess shall
have previously provided for the payment of the same by the neceshttp://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
sary appropiiation of money.

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FIVE-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF 1881. (FOE SILYEE.)
The act of January 14, 1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from tirne. to time
in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of, at not less than par, in coin, either of the description of
bonds of the United States described in the act of July 14, 1870 (16
Statutes, 272), to the extent necessary for the redernption of fraction al'currency in silver coins of the denominations of ten, twentyfive, and fifty cents of standard value.

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10 years.

May 1,1881 . . . 5 per cent... P a r .

Indefinite.

500,000 00

FIYE-PEE-CENT: LOAN OF 1881.

(EEFUNDING.)

The act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272), authorizes the issue of
$200,000,000 at 5 per centum, principal and interest payable in coin
of the present standard value, at the pleasure of the United States
Government, after ten years; these bonds to be exempt from the
payment of all taxes or duties of the United States, as weU as'from
taxation in any form byor under State, municipal, or local authority.
Bonds and coupons payable at the Treasury of the United States.
This act not to authorize an increase of the bonded debt of the
United States. Bonds to be sold at not less than par in coin, and the
proceeds to be applied to the redemption of outstanding 5-20s, or to
be exchanged fqr said 5-20s, par for par. Payment of these bonds,
when due, to be made in order of dates and numbers, beginning with
each class last dated and numbered. Interest to cease at the end
»of three months from notice of intention to redeem. The act of January 20,1871 (16 Statutes, 399), increases theamonnt of 5 percents
to $500,000,000, provided the total amount of bonds issued shall not
exceed the amount originally authorized, and authorizes the interest
on any of these bonds to be paid quarterly.
The act'^of December 17,1873 (18 Statutes, 1), authorized the issue of an
equal amount of bonds of the loan of 1858, which the holders thereof
may, on or before February 1, 1874, elect to exchange for the bonds
of this loan.
FOUE-AND-ONE-HALF-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF 1891.
FUNDING.)

486,043, 000 00

442,095,500 00

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13,957, 000 00

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15 years

Sept. 1,1891... 4^ per cent.. Par

185, 000,000 00

185, 000, 000 00

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;> $1,600,000,000 00

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Tho act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272), authorizes the issue of
$1,000,000,000 at 4 per centum, payable in coin ofthe present standard
value, at the ijleasure of the United States Government, after thirty
years ; these bonds to be exempt from the payment of all taxes or
" duties of the United States, as well as from taxation tn any form by




May 1,1881 . . . 5 per cent... Par

(EE-

The act of J u l y 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272), authorizes the issue of
$300,000,000 at 4^ per centum, payable in coin of the present standard value, at the pleasure of the Dnited States Govemment, after
fifteen years; these bonds to be exempt from the payraent of all
taxes or duties of the United States, as well as from taxation in any
form by or under State, municipal, or local authority. 'Bonds and.
coupons payable at the Treasury of the United States. This act not
to authorize an increase of the bonded debt of the United States.
Bonds to be sold at not less than par in coin, and the proceeds to be
applied to the redemption of outstanding 5-20s, or to be exchanged
for said 5-20s, par for par. Payment of these bonds, when due, to
be made in order of dates and numbers, beginning with each class
last dated and numbered. Interest to cease at the end of three
months from notice of intention to redeem.
FOUE-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF 1907. (EEFUNDING.)

10/years

fd
30 years

July 1,1907... 4 per cent... P a r t o
one-half
per cent,
premium.
" Including reissues.

708,980,800 00

708,159,000 00

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TABI.E

"^.—STATEMENT

of the OUTSTANDING P B I N C I P A L of the P U B L I C DEBT, ^c.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

When redeemable.

Eate of interest.

Price
authorAmount ontat which Amount
Amonnt issued.
ized.
standing. .
sold.

W

or under State, municipal, or local authority. Bonds and coupons
payable at the Treasury of the United States. This act not to authorize an increase of the bonded debt of the United States. Bonds
to be sold at notless than par in coin, and the proceeds to be applied
to the redemption of outstanding 5-20s, or to be exchanged for said
5-20s, par for par. • Payment of these bonds, when due, to be made
in order of dates and numbers, beginning with each class last dated
and numbered. Interest to cease at the end of three months from
notice of intention to redeem. See Eefunding Certificates, page 36.

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FOUE-AND-ONE-HALF-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF 1891. (EESUMPTION.)
The act of January 14,1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary
of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from time to time in the
• Treasury uot otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of,
at not less than par, in coin, either of the description of bonds of
the United States described in the act of July 14,1870 (10 Statutes,
272), for the purpose of redeeming, on and after January 1,1879, in
coin, at the office of the assistant'treasurer of the United States in
New York, the outstanding United States legal-tender notes when
presented in suras of not less than fifty dollars.
FOUE-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF 1907.

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15 years.

Sept. 1,1891... 4J per cent. P a r t o Indefinite.,
one and
one-half I
per cent,
p r e m ium.

$65, 000, 000 00

$65, 000,000 00

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30 years.

July 1, 1907-.

4 per cent... P a r .

Indefinite-

30, 500,000 00

30,500,000 0,0

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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CEETIFICATES OF DEPOSIT.
The act of June 8, 1872 (17 Statutes, 336), authorizes the deposit of
United States notes without interest by banking associations in sums
not less than $10,000, and the issue of certificates therefor iu denominations of not less than $5,000; which certificates shall be payable

• on demand in United States notes at the x:)lace where the deposits
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
were made. I t provides that the notes so deposited in the Treasury

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(EESUMPTION.)

The act of January 14,1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary
of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from time to time in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of,
at not less than par, in coin, either of the description of bonds of
the United States described in the act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes,
272), for the purpose of redeeming, on and after January 1, 1879, in
coin, at the oifice of the assistant treasurer of the United States in
' New York, the outstanding United States legal-tender notes when
presented in sums of not less than fifty dollars.

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Indefinite.

On demand . . . None .

Par

,. No limit.

64,780,000 00

11,925,000 00

tificates issued therefor m a y b e held and counted by the national
banks as part of their legal reserve, and may be accepted in the settlement of clearing-house balances at the places where the deposits
therefor were made, and that the United States notes for which such
certificates were issued, or other United States notes of like amount,
shall be held as special deposits in the Treasury, and used only for
the redemption of such certificates.
SILYEE CEETIFICATES.

'

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"

The act of February 28, 1878 (20 Statutes, 26, sec. 3), provides that any
holder ofthe coin authorized by this act may deposit the same with
the Treasurer or any assistant treasurer of the United States, in
sums not less than ten dollars, and receive therefor certificates of not
less than ten dollars each, corresponding with the denominations of
the United States notes. The cotn deposited for or representing the
certificates shall be retained in the Treasury for the payment of the
same on demand. Said certificates shall be receivable for customs,
taxes, and all public dues, and, when so received, may be reissued.

Indefinite... On demand . . . None

P a r . . . . . No l i m i t . . . . . ,;•

- 51,166,530 00

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E,EFUNDING CEETIFICATES.
The act of February 26, 1879 (20 Statutes, 321), authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to issue, in exchange for lawful money of the
United States, certincates of deposit, of the denomination often dollars, bearing interest at the rate of four per centum per annum,.and
convertible at any time, with accrued interest, into the four per
centum bonds described in the refunding act; the money so received
to be applied only to the payment of the bonds bearing interest at
a rate not less than five per centum, in the mode prescribed by said
act.




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Indefinite... Convertible in- 4 per cent... P a r
to 4 per cent,
bonds.

No limit

40,012,750 00

688, 800 00

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2, 069, 013, 569 58

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Eailway companies.
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O n J a n u a r y 1,1876:
C e n t r a l Pacific
K a u s a s Pacific
U n i o n Pacific
C e n t r a l B r a n c h U n i o n Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
S i o u x C i t y a n d Pacific

On J u l y 1,1876:
C e n t r a l Pacific
K a n s a s Pacific
U n i o n Pacific
C e n t r a l B r a n c h U n i o n Pacific
" W e s t e m Pacific
S i o u x C i t y a n d Pacific

O n J a n u a r y 1,1877:
C e n t r a l Pacific
K a n s a s Pacific
U n i o n Pacific
C e n t r a l B r a n c h U n i o n Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux C i t y a n d Pacific
:




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$11, 804, 251
3,292,983
12, 701, 420
829, 808
781, 496
731, 553

27
09.
01
26
94
49

Balance due the
United States on
• interest account,
deducting repayments.

05

Eepayment of interest' by transportation of mails,
troops, (fee.

O . - ^ S T A T E M E N T of ZO-YEAB 6 P E B CENT. BONDS (interest payahle January and July) I S S U E D io the several P A C I F I C
B A I L W A Y COMPANIES under the acts oi July 1, 1862 (12 Statutes, 492), and July 2, 1864 (13 Statutes, 359).
Amount of interest
accrued and paid
to date, as iDcr pieceding statement.

TAUIiE

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$1,191,765 86
1, 440, 664 84
3, 943, 715 65
44, 408 05
9, 367 00
39, 005 96

$10,612,485 41
1, 852, 318 25
8, 757, 704 36
785, 400 21
772,129 94
092, 547 53

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30,141,513 06

6, 668, 927 36

- 23, 472, 585 70

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776, 553 60
189, 090 00
817, 095 30
48, 000 00
59,116 80
48, 849 60

12, 580, 804 87
3, 482, 073 09
13, .518, 515 37
877,'808 20
840, 613 74
780, 403 09

1, 231, 213 76
1,448, 327 39
4, 079, 704 77
44, 408 05
9, 307 00
39, 470 28

11, 349, 591 11
2, 033, 745 70
9, 438, 810 60
833,400 21
831,246 74
740:932 81

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30,141,513 06

1, 938; 705 36

32, 080, 218 42

6, 852, 491 25

25, 227, 727 17

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25, 885,120 00
6, 303, 000 00
27, 230, 512 00
1, 600, 000 00
1, 970, 560 00
1, 628, 320 00

12, 580, 804 87
3,482,073 09
13, 518, 515 37
877,808 26
840, 613 74
780, 403 09

776, 553 60
189, 090 00
817,095 36 .
- 48, 000 00
59,116 80
48, 849 60

13,357,358 47
3, 671,163 09
14, 335, 610 73
925, 808 26
899, 730 54
829, 252 09

1, 268, 672 12
1, 515, 718 49
4,126, 871 52
. 44, 408 05
9, 307 00
39, 440 28

12, 088, 686 35
2,155, 444 60
10, 208, 739 21
881,400 21
800, 363 54
789, 782 41

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04, 023, 512 00

32, 080, 218 42

1, 938, 705 36

34, 018, 923 78

7, 004, 507 40

27, 014, 416 32

$25, 885,120 00
0, 303, 000 00
27, 236, 512 00
1, 600, 000 00
1, 970, 560 00
1, 628, 320 00

$13, 027, 697 67
3,103, 893 09
11, 884, 324 65
781,808 26
722, 380 14
682, 703 89

$776, 553 60
189, 090 00
817, 095 36
48, 000 00
59,116 80
48, 849 60

64,623,512 00

28, 202, 807 70

1,938,705 30

25, 885,120 00
6, 303, 000 00
27, 236, 512 00
1, 000, 000 00
1, 970, 560 00
1, 028, 320 00

11,804, 251 27
3, 292, 983 09
12,701,420 0 1
829, 808 26
781, 490 94
731, 553 49

64, 623, 512 CO

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un July 1, i»r/:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
,
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific
,

25, 885,120 00
13, 357, 358 47
9, 303, 000 00 3. 671,163 09
27, 263, 512 00 14, 335, 610 73
1, 600, 000 00
925, 808 26
1, 970, 500 00
899, 730 54
1,628,320 00
829, 252 69

94, 623, 512 00
On January 1,1878:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union PacificWestern Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

On July 1,1878:
Central Pacifi c
Kansas Pacific
.1...
Union Pacific
• Central Branch Union Pacific
Westem Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

34, 018, 923 78

25, 885,120 00
14,133, 912 07
6, 303, 000 00
3, 860, 253 09
27, 236, 512 00 15,152, 700 09
1, 600, 000 00
973, 808 26
1, 970, 560 00
958, 847 34
1, 028, 320 00
878,102 29

2, 065, 324 01
* 1, 531, 680 06
4, 787, 041 67
58, 498 35
9, 367 00
62, 578 00

12, 068,588 06
2, 328,573 03
10, 365,664 42
915, 309 91
949; 480 34
815, 523 49

I 14

8, 514, 489 89

27, 443,139 25

776, 553 60
189, 090 00
817, 095 30
49, 000 00
59,116 80
48, 849 60

14, 910, 405 67
4, 049, 343 09
15, 969, 801 45
1,021, "808 26
1, 017, 964 14
926, 951 89

2,198, 960 71
1, 532, 450 07
5,134,103 84
62, 998 35
9, 367 00
68, 409 65

12, 711,504 96
2, 516,993 02
10, 835,697 61
958, 808 91
1, 008,597 14
858, 542 24

1, 938, 705 36

37, 896, 334 50

9, 006,189 62

28, 890,144 88

776, 553 00 14,133,912 07
189, 090 00
3, 860, 253 09
817,-095 36
15,152, 706 09
48, 000 00
973, 808 26
59,116 80
958, 847 34
48, 849 60 . . 878,102 29
1, 938, 705 ;

34, 957,1

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64, 623, 512 00

35, 957, 029 14

25, 885,120 00
6, 303, 000 00
27,236,512 00
1, 600, 000 00
1, 970, 500 00
1, 028, 320 00

14, 910, 465 67
4, 049, 343 09
15. 969, 801 45
1, 021, 808 26
1, 017, 964 14
926, 951 89

776, 553 00
189, 090 00
817, 095 36
48, 000 00
59,116 80
48, 849 60

15, 687, 019 27
4, 238, 433 09
16, 786, 896 81
1, 009, 808 26
1, 088, 080 94
975, 801 49

2, 343, 659 54
1, 532, 530 42
5, 852, 870 95
67, 498 35
• 9, 307 00
75, 517 99

13, 343, 359 73
2, 705, 902 67
10, 934, 025 86
1, 002, 309 91
1, 007, 713 94
900, 283 50

64, 623, 512 00^ 37, 896, 334 50

1, 938, 705 36

39, 835, 039 86

9, 881, 444 25

29, 953, 595 61

776, 553 60
189, 090 00
817, 095 36
48, 000 00
59,116 80
48, 849 60

16,463, 572 87
4, 427, 523 09
17, 603, 992 17
1,117, 808 26
1,136.197 74
1, 024, 651 09

2, 516, 742 86
1,744, 683 89
6,145, 214 86
71, 445 54
9, 367 00
83, 648 56

13, 946, 830- 01
2,682,829-20
11, 458, 777 31
1, 046, 362 72
1,126, 830 74
941, 002 53

1, 938, 705 36

41, 773, 745 22

10, 571,102 71

31, 202, 642 51

^

17,240,126 47
4, 616, 613 09
18,421, 087 53
1,165,808 20
1,195,314 54
1, 073, 500 69

2,771,419 23
2, 324, 910 55
7, 325, 466 49
73,142 73
9, 367 00
91,747 39

14, 468, 707 24
2, 291, 702 54
11, 095, 621 04
1, 092, 665 53
1,185, 947 54
981, 753 30

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On January 1,1879:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
y
Sioux Citj^ and Pacific J

On July 1,1879:
Central Pacific
,
Kansas Pacific...
,
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific




25, 885,120 00
6, 303, 000 00
27, 236, 512 00
1, 600, 000 00
1, 970, 500 00
1,628,320 00

15, 687, 019 27
4, 238, 433 09
10, 780, 896 81
1, 069, 808 20
i; 077, 080 94
975, 801 49

64, 623, 512 00

39, 835, 039 i

25, 885,120 00
0, 303, 000 00
27, 236, t)12 00
1, 600, 000 00
1, 970, 560 00
1, 028, 320 00

16, 463, 572 87
4, 427, 523 09
17, 603, 992 17
1,117, 808 26
1,136,197 74
1, 024, 651 09

776, 553 60
189, 090 00
817, 095 36
48, 000 00
59,110 80
48,849 60

64, 623, 512 00

41, 773, 745 22

1, 938, 705 36

43, 712,450 58

12, 590, 053 39

31,116, 397 19

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On January 1, 1880:
Central Pacific
.-. ' . . . .
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

Og

$25, 885,120 00 $17, 240,1'26 47
0, 303, 000 00 4,616,613 09
27, 236, 512 00 18, 421, 087 53
• 1, 600, 000 00 1,165, 808 26
1, 970, 560 00 1,195, 314 54
1, 628, 320 00 1, 073, 500 69
64, 623, 512 00 43, 712, 450 58

CM 1 1

H

Balance due the
United States on
interest account,
deducting repayments.

tl

00

Eepayment of interest by transportation of mails,
troops, &c.

Eailway companies.

Amount of interest
accrued and paid
to date, as per preceding statement.

T A B 1 . E O.—STATEMENT of ZO-YEAB 6 PEB CENT. BONDS, #c.—Continued.

$776, 553 60 $18, 016, 680 07 $3, 552,135 70 $14, 464, 544 37
2, 370,109 88
2,435, 593 21
189, 090 00 4, 805,703 09
817, 095 30 19, 238,182 89
7,421, 734 97 11,816,447 92
1,140, 665 53
1, 213, 808 26
48, 000 00
73,142 73
1, 224, 431 34
59,116 80
9, 307 00 1, 245, 064 34
1, 028, 366 38
1,122, 350 29
48, 849 60
93, 983 91
1, 938, 705 36 45, 651,155 94

13, 520, 474 19 32,130, 081 75

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On July 1,1880:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
-...,
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

25, 885,120 00 18, 016, 680 07
6, 303, 000 00 4, 805, 703 09
27, 236, 512 00 19, 238,182 89
1, 600, 000 00 1,213,808 26
1, 970, 560 00• 1, 254, 431 34
1, 028, 320 00 1,122, 350 29
64, 623, 512 00 45, 651,155 94

On January 1, 1881:
Central Pacific Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and.Pacific




257885,120 00
18, 793, 233 67
6, 303, 000 00 4, 994, 793 09
27, 230, 512 00 20, 055, 278 25
1, 600, 000 00 1, 261, 808 261, 970, 560 00 1, 313, 548 14
1, 628, 320 00 1,171,199 89

1 64, 023, 512 00

47, 589, 861 30

776, 553 60 18,793, 233 67
189, 090 00 4, 994, 793 09
817, 095 36 20, 055, 278 25
48, 000 00
1, 261, 808 26
59,116 80
1, 313, 548 14
48,849 60
1,171,199 89

3, 200, 389 64 15, 592, 844 03
2, 447, 397 28 2, 547, 395 81
7, 804, 484 37 12, 250, 793 88
O
47, 621 69
1, 214,186 57 - fej
9, 367 00 1, 304,181 14
1, 065,167 32
100, 032 57

1, 938, 705 36 47, 589, 861 30 13, 615, 292 55 33, 974, 568 75

776, 553 60 19,569,787 27
5,183, 883 09
189, 090 00
817, 095 36 20, 872, 373 61
48, 000 00
1, 309, 808 26
59,116 80
1, 372, 664 94
48, 849 60
1, 220, 049 49

3, 358, 026 85
2, 502, 724 32
7, 992, 936 82
74, 967 91
9, 367 00
114, 424 58

1, 938, 705 36 49, 528, 566 66 14, 052,447 48

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Ul
2, 681,158 77
12, 879, 436 79
1, 234, 840 35
1, 363, 297 94
1,105, 624 91
35, 476,119 18

Gn July 1, 1881:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
^
Central Branch Union Pacific
^ Western Pacific
»^ Sioux City and P f i o i ^ . . . - - . .




25, 885,120
6, 303,000
27, 236,512
1, GOO,000
1,970, 560
1, 028,320

00
00
00
00
00
00

64, 623, 512 00

19, 569, 787 27
' 5,183, 883 09
20, 872, 373 61
1, 309, 808 26
1, 372, 664 94
1, 220, 049 49
49,628,566 66

776, 553 60
189, 090 00
817, 095 36
48, 000 00
59,116 80
48, 849 60
1, 938, 705 36

20,346,340 87
5, 372, 973 09
21, 089, 408 97
1, 357, 808 26.
1, 431, 781 74
1, 268, 899 09

3, 496, 942 83
2, 565, 443 44
% 135, 878 56
93, 515 38
9, 367 00
124, 979 14

16, 849, 398
2, 807, 529
13, 553, 590
1, 264, 292
1,422, 414
1,143, 919

61,467,272 02

14,426,126 35

37,041,145 67

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T A B I i E ^ . — S T A T E M E N T showing the AMOUNT of NOTES, SILVEB CEBTIFICATES, and FBACTIONAL SILVEB COIN OUTSTANDI N G at the CLOSE of E A C H FISCAL YEAB from ISQO to 1881, inclusive.

state-bank
circulation.

ITationalbank circulation.

Demand
notes. ^

One and two Compoundyear notes
interest
Legal-tender
of 1803.
notes.
notes.
(See Note 3.) (See]Srote3.)

Silver certificates.

iFractional
currency,
paper.'

Fractional
currency,
silver.

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Total amount
in currency.

cS'P.cw-

Value of cnrrency in gold.

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(See Note 4.)

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I860.. $207,102, 477 00
1861-. 202,005, 767 00
1862-. 183, 792, 079 001
1863.. 238, 677, 218 OOl
1864-. 179,157, 717 00
1865.- 142, 919, 038 00
1866-19, 996,163 00
.1867..
4, 484, 112 00
1868..
3,163, 771 00
1869..
2, 558, 874 00
1870..
2, 222,793 00
1871..
1, 968,058 00
1872.1, 700,935 00
1873.1, 294,470 00
1874..
1, 009,021 00
1875.786, 844 00
1876-.
658, 938 00
1877-'.
521, 611 00
1878-.
426, 504 00
1879-.
352, 452 00
1880-.
299, 790 00
1881..
242, 967 00

$53,
235,
137,
479,
625,
762,
929,
766,
261,
664,
267,
981,
408,
998,
048,
514,
691,
505,
042,

000 00''$96, 620,000
019 75|'297, 767,114
999 25 431,178, 670
603 00 432, 687, 966
162 00|400, 619,206
432 00 371, 783,597
723 00 356, 000, 000
739 25 |356, 000,000
256 00 356, 000,000
505 50 |356, 000,000
296 251357, 500,000
967 50 350, 000, 000
732 50 382, 000, 000
107 .50|375, 771,580
917 50 369, 772, 284
962 60 359, 764, 332
297 50 346, 681, 016
470 00 |346, 681,016
975 00 346, 681,016
535 00 1346, 681,016

00|
00
879,475
84153, 471, 450
ool 42,338, 710
00
454, 230
00I
123, 630
00
555, 492
00
347. 772
00
248', 272
00
198, 572
00
167, 522
00
142,105
00
127, 625
00
113, 375
00
104, 705
00
95, 725
00
90,485
00
80,185
00
82, 485
00
79, 985

$15, 000, 000
|l93, 756,080
159, 012, 140
122, 394,480
28,161, 810
2, 871, 410
2,152, 910
768, 500
593, 520
479, 400
415, 210
367, 390
. 328,760
296, 630
274, 920
259, 090
242, 590
230, 250

$207, 102,477 00
202, 005, 767 00
333, 452, 079 00
649, 867, 282 75
$20,192, 450 00
833, 718, 984 34
22,894, 877 25
00
983, 318,685 761
25, 005, 828 761
00|
891, 904, 685 96
27, 070,876 961
00
826, 927,153 52
28, 307, 523 52
00
720, 412, 602 75
32, 626,951 75
00
693, 946, 056 61
32,114, 637 -36
00
700, 375, 899 481
00
39, 878,684 48
717, 875,751 06
00
40, 582, 874 50
738, 570,903 52
00
40, 855,835 27
750, 062,368 94
00
44, 799,365 44
781, 490,916 17
00
45, 881,295 67
773, 646, 728 69
00
42,129, 424 19
00
34,446, 595 39 $10, 926, 938 00 749, 303,473 89
00
20,403, 137 34 33,185,273 00 731, 379,542 84
00 $1, 402, 600 001 16, 547, 768 77 39,155, 633 00 729, 215, 508 27
00 2,466,950 00 15, 842, 005 78 39, 360, 529 00 734, 801, 994 78
00 12, 374, 270 00 *7, 214, 954 37 24, 061,449 00 735, 522, 956 37
00 51,166, 530 00 *7,105, 953 32 19, 974, 897 41 780, 584, 808 73

fel
$0 86. 6! 5288, 769,500 41
76 6 497. 798, 338 59
38.7 322, 649, 246 04
• 70 4 692, 256, 354 77
66.0 588, 657, 092 73
71.7 592, 906, 769 07
70.1 505, 009, 234 52
73.5 510, 050, 351 61
85 6 599, 521, 769 95
. 89.0 638, 909, 418 44
87. 51 640, 249, 540 58
86.4 648, 053, 886 76
91.01 711,150, 733 71
87.2 674, 619, 947 42
89.5 671, 773, 937 62
94.7 694, 375, 246 54
99.4 725, 083, 924 62
1 00 0 734, 801, 994 78
1 00.0 735, 522, 956 37
1 00 0 780, 584, 808 73

NOTE 1.—The amount of State and national bank circulation is compiled from the reports of the Comptroller of the Currency at the nearest dates obtainable to the end of
each, fiscal year; the other amounts are taken from the ofidcial printed reports of the Secretary of the Treasury.
*]SroTE 2.—Exclusive of $8,375,934, amount estimated as lost or destroyed, act June 21, 1879.
NOTE 3.—The one and two year notes of 1863, and the compound-interest notes, tliough having a legal-tender quality for their face-values, were in fact interest-bearing
securities, payable at certain times, as stated on the notes. They entered into circulation for but a Few days, if at aU, and stnce maturity, those presented have been converted
into other interest-bearing bonds, or paid for in cash, interest included..
.

NOTE 4.—The amount of fractional silver in circulation in 1860,1861, and 1862, cannot be stated. The amounts stated for 1876, and subsequent years, are the amonnts coined
and
issued
since
January,
1876.
To
these
amounts
should
be
added
the
amount
of
silver
previously
coined
which
has
come into circulation.
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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T A B 1 . E q,.—STATEMENT of UNITED STATES BONDS and other OBLIGATIONS B E C E I V E D and ISSUED hy the OFFICE of the SECB E T A B Y of the TBEASUBY, from July 1, 1880, to Octoher 31,1881.

Description.

E e c e i v e d for exchange a n d
transfer.

* Issued.

E e c e i v e d for con- E e c e i v e d for r e tinuance.
demption.

Total.
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T e x a n i n d e n m i t y s t o c k , a c t of S e p t e m b e r 9,1850
L o a n of F e b r u a r y , 1861, a c t of F e b r u a r y 8,1861
O r e g o n w a r d e b t , a c t of M a r c h 2,1861
'
,
S e v e n - t h t i ' t y n o t e s of 1861, a c t of J u l y 17,1861
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, a c t s df J u l v 17 a n d A u g u s t 5,1861
,
F i v e - t w e n t y b o n d s of 1862, a c t of F e b r u a r y 25,1862
Pacific E a i l r o a d b o n d s , a c t s of J u l y 1,1862, a n d J u l y 2,1864- -".
L o a n of 1863 (1881s), a c t of March"3,1863
Gold certificates, a c t of M a r c h 3,1863
,
T e n - f o r t y b o n d s of 1864, a c t of M a r c h 3,1864
:
F i v e - t w e n t y b o n d s of 1864, a c t of J u n e 30,1864
S e v e n - t h i r t y n o t e s of 1864-'65, a c t s of J u n e 30,1864, a n d M a r c h 3,1865-..-.
F i v e - t w e n t y b o n d s of 1865, a c t of .March 3,1865
-:'.?C o n s o l s of 1865, a c t of M a r c h 3,1865
Consols of 1867, act" of M a r c h 3,1865
C o n s o l s of 1868, a c t of M a r c h 3,1865
•,
^Funded loan of 1881, a c t s of J u l y 14,1870, a n d J a n u a r y 20,1871
F u n d e d l o a n of 1891, a c t s of J u l y 14,1870, a n d J a n u a r y 20,1871
-.
F u n d e d loan of 1907, a c t s of J u l y 14,1870, a n d J a n u a r y 20,1871
C e r t i f i c a t e s of deposit, a c t of J u n e 8,1872
'
,
3 ' J p e r cent, b o n d s , a c t s of J u l y 17 a n d A u g u s t 5,1861
3 | p e r cent, b o n d s , a c t of M a r c h 3,1863
3 | p e r c e n t , b o n d s , a c t s of J u l y 14,1870, a n d J a n u a r y 20,1871
,
Total-




$594,000 00
1, 200 00

$594, 000 00
1, 200 00

17, 758, 550 00

17, 758, 550 00

$127, 597, 200 00

7,466, 000 00
4, 945, 950 00

7, 466, 000 00
4, 945, 950 00

50,457, 950 00

90, 309, 800
44, 150, 600
178,990,900
19, 380, 000
152, 240, 700
61, 018', 000
479, 409, 250

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

1, 050, 324, 950 00

90, 309, 800 00
44,150, 600 00
178, 221, 350 00

4Ol,5Ci4,90O 00

00
00
00
00
00
00

11,169,250
2, 790, 680
2,120, 950
9, 600
3, 400
37, 500
186, 500
1,130, 850
380, 450
75, 763,150

00
00
00
oO
00
00
00
00
00
00

25, 435, 000 00
13, 070, 850 00
2, 508, 250 00

24, 643, 500 00
10, 560, 050 00
77, 964, 350 00
456, 615, 350 00

$1, 000
• 15,404, 000
599, 500
300
28,112,150
22, 700

579, 560, 050 00

179, 352, 080 00

000
16, 592,000
601, 900
300
191, 226,450
22, 700
14, 932,000
71, 519,100
2, 796,680
2,120, 950
9, 600
3, 400
37, 500
186, 500
1,130, 850
380, 450
657, 887,650
88, 301,200
357, 212,250
44, 815,000
190, 555,050
300
• 74, 086,
557, 433,600

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

2, 271, 852,430 00

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CQ

d

Ol

52

EEPORT OF THE SECEETARY OF THE TREASURY.

T A B I L E M.—STATEMENT of BEDEEMED UNITED STATES SECUBITIES
COUNT, EXAMINATION, and DESTBUCTION,
Denominations.
T i t l e of s e c u r i t y .

2s.

Is.

5s.

$15, 015 10
$21,418 40
U, S. notes, n e w 4 s s u e
$220, 679
180, 009 20
301, 654- 80 2, 024, 319
U . S. notes, series 1869
413, 416 00
U . S. notes, series 1874
'. 269, 307 00
12, 570, 597 00 |3, 476, 414 40 4, 700,741
U . S. notes, series 1875
3, 739, 055 50 2, 429, 248 00 3, 345,113
U . S. notes, series 1878
801,620 00
218, 539 00
U . S. notes, series 1880
272, 617
• Demand notes
170
One-year n o t e s of 1863
T w o - y e a r n o t e s of 1863
C o m p o u n d i n t e r e s t n o t e s of 1863.
C o m p o u n d i n t e r e s t n o t e s of 1864.
Silver certificates, series 1878 . . .
S i l v e r certific*ttes, s e r i e s 1880 . . .
E e f u n d i n g certificates
N a t i o n a l c u r r e n c y , n o t e s of
" f a i l e d " and " l i q u i d a t i n g "
banks
--- 21, 208 00
16,468 40
738, 060
National currency, redeemed
ll, 098, 752 00
and retired
774, 716 00 19, 614,273

20s.

10s.
50
$351, 262 00
00 .2, 980, 585 00

$366,326 00
2, 550,104 00

00
50
00
00

1,445, 910 00
1,749,270 00

1, 716, 759
1,777,720
260, 038
210
680

00
00
00
00
00

60 00
820 00

70 00
1^ 170 00
• 324, 580 00
155, 730 00
2; 985, 680 00

1, 440 00
302,'180 00
70, 600 00

325,928 00

192,120 00

00 13, 312, 677 00

7, 035, 546 00

50

8, 695, 564 40 7, 651, 875 00 30, 975, 973 50 24,193, 089 00 13,714, 376 00

Totals .
E e d e e m e d b o n d s , c o u p o n s , exchanges, and transfers
Eedeemed
internal - revenue
stamps

E e d e e m e d U n i t e d S t a t e s f r a c t i o n a l c n r r e n c y r e c e i v e d fdr d e s t r u c t i o n .

F i r s t issue
Second i s s u e
T h i r d issue
Fourth issue...'.
F o u r t h issue, second series
F o u r t h issue, t h i r d series
Fifth issue
Totals

-

*....

.:
.:
-

-

A g g r e g a t e of r e d e e m e d U n i t e d S t a t e s s e c u r i t i e s r e c e i v e d for d e s t r u c t i o n




'.

--

^
- **

,•,

63

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

BECEIVED ly the OFFICE of the SECBETABY of the TBEASUBY, for FINAL
during Hw fiscal year ended June ZO, 1881.
Denominations.
Total.
lOOs.

50s.

500s.

1,0008.

$70,300 00
$31, 500 00
$43, 000. 00$44, 000 00
570, 870 00 1, 069, 570 00 101, 500 00 4, 062, 000 00
1, 238, 770 00
2,149, 500 00
134, 045 00 1, 004, 090 00 2, 830, 000 00
318, 400 00
050, 550 00
235, 500 00 1, 303,000 00

6,000s.

$225,000 00

10,000s.

$200, 000 00

100 00

200 00
300 00
100 00
1, 950 00
154,450 00
2, 900 00

200 00
1,600 00
282,100 00
3, 200 00

56 750 00

53, 500 00

5, 000 00

2, 000 00

2, 998,100 00 4, 551, 300 00

500, 500 00

815, 000 00

1, 500 00
215; 000 OO

488, 000 00

5, 520, 835 00 7,686, 510 00 6, 070, 000 00 6, 713, 000 00

$1,163,501 00
13, 840, 612 00
4, 070, 993 00
17, 944, 5b7 00
15, 97^, 837 00
1, 552, 814 00
440 00
1, 800 00
300 00
370 00>
7, 660 00
1,766 310 00
232, 430 00
2 985 680 00
1,410, 034 90
50,700,864 00

225,000 00

200, 000 00
197,278, 650 00
1,100, 542 19

Denominations.

5c.

3c.

$85 63
105 54
55 16

$42 08

lOci
$162 20
211 43
847 09
4, 897 09

15c. >

$2, 044 22

15, 391 54
42 08
L-

-

246 33

1




21, 509 35

25c.
$303 42
325 58
1, 240 57
8, 260 69
37, 270 01

2, 044 22

47,400 27

60c.
$407 50
251 05
2, 009 20
1, 307 05
5, 798 50
9, 233 00
18, 692 50

958 75
893 60
4,194 10
10, 569 05
5, 798 50
9 233 00
71, 354 05

37, 758 80

======

310,139, 416 14

54

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

T A B J L I E ^ . — S T A T E M E N T of UNITED STATES SECUBITIES, MUTILATED
in P B I N T I N G , received hy the OFFICE, of the SECBETABY of the TBEASUBY
for F I N A L COUNT, EXAMINATION, AND DESTBUCTION during the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1881.
Title of security.

Total.

National currency, series of 1875
Notes, series of 1880
Silver certificates, series of 1880
- -.
Five-per-cent. registered bonds, funded loan of 1881'
Five-per-cent. registered bonds, funded loan of 1881, continued at 3^ per cent
Six-per-cent. registered •bonds
,
-Six-per-cent. registered bonds continued at 3§ per cent
(jurrency certificates, series of 1875
Overdue coupons cut from bonds bel>is:t» issue received from the Eegister of the
Treasury
Unissued national currency (from ComptroUer)
Aggregate destroyed

-

,

$11,666,760 00
917,440 00
959, 280 00
3, 200, 000 00
12, 589, 500 00
802, 500 00
8, 979, 500 00
2,430,000 00"
7, 554, 219 82
312, 920 00
49,412,119 82

T A B I . E T . — S T A T E M E N T QF DISTINCTIVE PAPEB—SILK-THBEADED,
FIBEB—received and delivered hy the OFFICE of the SECBETABY of the TBEASUBY from Septemher 9, 1879, to Octoher 31, 1881.
Number of
sheets.
Eeceived from manufacturer
Printed and delivered as notes, bonds, checks, &c
In process of printing
Partly printed and mutilated and-returned for destruction.
Balance onhand October 31, 1881
:

11, 913, 916^
1,251, 901
541, 041§
8,524,141

Number of
sheets.
22,231, 000

22,231, 000
T A B E . E ! V.—BETUBNS, hy JUDGMENTS, of the UNITED STATES COUBT of
CLAIMS, of PBOCEEDS of P B O P E B T Y S E I Z E D as CAPTUBED or ABANDONED under the act bf March 12, 1863, P A I D from July 1,1880, to June 30,1881.
Date.
August 5,1880
April 19,1881
June 29,1881

To whom paid.
George Patten
Benjamin B. (woodman -.
Edwaird J. Quigley
Total

---

Amount.

- --

$1,753 30
2, 902 50
350 66

'.

5, 006 46

T A B I i E W.—JUDGMENTS ofthe UNITED STATES COUBT of CLAIMS for
P B O C E E D S of P B O P E B T Y SEIZED as CAPTUBED or ABANDONED under the
act of March 12, 1863, B E N D E B E D , hut NOT P A I D , during the fiscal year ended
June ZO, 1881.
Date of judgment.
May 9,1881

Amount
awarded.

Name of claimant.
"W. Gt. Daniel, administrator of Micajah Johnston




.-

$2, 698 94

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
^

55

•

T A B I i J G W . — B E C E I P T S and DISBUBSEMENTS of UNITED STATES ASSISTANT TBEASUBEBS, and DESIGNATED DEPOSITABY at TUCSON, ABIZONA,
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881.
BALTIMOEE.
Balance June 30,1880

$4,280,551 86
RECEIPTS.

On account of customs'
On account of internal revenue
On account of currency redemption
On account of semi-annual duty
On accouut oi' certificates, act June 8, 1872
On account of Post-Office Department
On account of transfers
On account of patent fees ...
On account of disbursing officers
On account of interest, iii coin
Ori account of interest, in currency
On accountof miscellaneous
.

$3, 089,131 56
372, 872 49
622, 028 59
103, 5C4 23
2, 835, 000 00
307, 639 77 .
• 3,894,848 41
130 00
1, 876, 500 43
}
K^O rgg cn
3
" '
40, 317 16
— 13, 668, 629 14

*.
:

-'

.*

•

17,949,181 00
'

On account of
Onaccountof
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of

:

DISBURSEMENTS.

Treasury drafts
Post-Office drafts
disbursing accounts
cuirency rederaption
,
interest, in coin
interest, in. currency
transfers
-'
'.
certificates of- deposit, act June 8,1872;

3, 513, 925 75
237,555 33
2, 494, 522 86
622,208 59
1,170, 261 95
526, 596 50
2, 373, 905 00
3, 325, 000 00

Balance June 30,1881

14, 264, 035 98
3,685,145 02

BOSTON.
Balance June 30,1880

$9,815,294 38
RECEIPTS.

On account of
On accountof
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On accountof
On account of

custonis
internal revenue.
certificates, act June 8, 1872
Post Office Depaitment
transfers
patent fees
disbursing officers
interest, in coin
,
interest, in curi'ency
miscellaneous

:

,

$23, 093, 378 17
1,26.5,254 81
605, 000 00
1,153, 600 35
0, 619, 594 68
8, 351 10
16, 815, 054 60
?
. ^.^f. „ .„ 09
J
4, O_D, o<io G.J
1,419, 504 95
55, 006, 587 48
65, 421, 881 86

DISBURSEMENTS.

On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
Onaccountof

Treasury drafts
Post-Office drafts
disbursing accounts.interest, in coin
?
interest, in currency
5
transfers
certificates of deposit, act June 8,1872
fractional currency, minor coin, and silver, redeemed...
miscellaneous..

Balance June 30,1881




-,

14, 664,189 83
1,088,780 10
15,431, 710 17
1, OAQ oon PQ
J-^-^"«'^^" ^^
8, 878,714 10
990, 000 00
935, 826 09
10, 206 48
•
53, 807, 807 46
11,014,074 40.

56

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
W.—BECEIPTS and DISBUBSEMENTS, #c.—Continued.
CHICAGO.

Balance June 30,1880

$8,246,444 76
RECEIPTS.

On account of customs
On account of internal revenue
On account of sale of lands
On account o.i" rjertificates, act June 8,1872
On accoimt oi Post-Office Department
On account of transfers
On account -of patent fees
On a ccc-LDt of disbursing officers
On acco-int of redemption account
On account of interest, in currency
Onaccount of misceUaneous

$3,343,078 04
3,268, 005 26
425, 698 50
2,175", 000 00
1, 591, 309 52
14,199,510 79
10,738 00
10,016,643 08
1, 080 00
88, 242 00
156,588 84

: . . -.

35, 275, 900 63
43, 522, 345 39

DISBURSEMENTS.

On accountof
On account of
On accountof
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of

Treasury drafts
Post-Office di-afts
disbursing accounts
interest, in cui-rency
transfers
certificates of deposit, act June 8, 1872
redemption account

Balance June 30,1881

9,431,839 22
1, 614, 566 76
9,880,262 97
134, 313 00
10,538,768 68
2,250, 000 00
880 00

'.

33, 850, 630 63
9,671,714 70.

CINCINNATL
Balance June 30,1880

$2,879,818 07
RECEIPTS.

On account of
On account of
On account of
Ou account of
On account of
Onaccountof
Onaccountof
Onaccount of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of

customs
iuternal revenue
fractional currencjr for redemption
fractional silver coin for redemption
minor coins for redemption
certificates, act June 8,1872
Post-OfficeDepartment
transfers.-..
patent fees
disbursing officers
interest, in cotn
interest, in currency
miscellaneous

'.

$885,570 26
392, 281 44
1, 716 00
641, 430 00
42, 325 00
2,160,000 00
490,570 11
6,998,637 34
4,164 95
1,550, 069 01
2,302, G69 73
9,480 00.
279, 987 32

'

15, 664, 901 16
18, 544, 719 23DISBURSEMENTS.

Onaccountof
On accoimt of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of

Treasury drafts
Post-Oflice drafts
•.
disbursing accounts
minor coins redeemed
fractional silver coin redeemed
interest, in coin
interest, in cuixency
transfers
•
certificates of deposit, act June 8,1872
fractional currency redeemed

Balance June 30,1881




;.

.-

1

1,555,625 32
468, 269 78
1, 578, 385 47
42, 325 00
541, 430 00
2,302,429 70
9,480 00
7,774, 032 37
1, 795,000 00
1,716 00

16, 009, 293 64
2,475,425 59

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,

57

I ' A m i . l J "Wo—BECEIPTS and DISBUBSEMENTS, ^c—Continued.
."KEW OELEANS.
Balance J u n e 30,1880

$3,647,346 83
BECEIPTS.

On accountof
On account of
Onaccountof
On account of
Onaccountof
On account of
Onaccountof
On accountof
Onaccount of

cnstoms
,
internal revenue
sale of lands
Post-Office Department
transfers
patent fees
disbursingofficers
interest, in currency
miscellaneons

$3,127,801-74
927,021 96
45,792 56
629,283 10
13,034,692 30
720 00
5,687,166 83
5,372 00
159,589 16

.

,

23, 617,439 65
27,264,786 48

DISBURSEMENTS.

Onaccountof
On accountof
Onaccountof
On account of
On account of
On account of

Treasury drafts
Post-Office drafts
disbursing accounts
interest, in currency
transfers
fractional cnrrency redeemed

.

Balance June 30,1881.....

•

3,199,070
681,623
4,353,161
5, 372
14,117,864
1,900
:

37
94
17
00
59
00

o

22, 358, 992 07- ^
4,905,794 41

N E W YOEK.
Balance Jnne 30,1880..

;.,.»

.-

. . . $100,062,727 89

• RECEIPTS.

On acconnt of cnstoms
.'
On account of internal revenue
On account of certificates of deposit, act J u n e 8, 1872
On account of Post-Office Department
On account of transfers
On account of patent fees
On account of miscellaneous
On account of disbursing acconnts
On account of assay office
Onaccount of iaterest accounts

$143,581,714
2,854,125
3,430, 000
'.
8,366,817
186, 911,571
5,820
67,604,333
189, 675,104
90,120,133
61,878,650

32
43
00
00
11
55
14
14
10
65

754,428, 269 44
854,490i 997 33

DISBURSEMENTS.

On account of Treasury drafts
351,222,126 94
On account of Post-Office drafts
7,364,871 09
On account of disbursing accounts
190,344, 306 81
On account of assay office
..-.
93,964,216 12
On accoimt of interest accounts
61,904,057 84
On account of gold certificates, canceled and sent to Department
2,221, 680 00
On account of silver certificates, canceled and sent to Department
393,400 00
On account of certificates of deposit, act June 8,1872, canceled and sent
to Department
4,245,000 00
On account of fractional currency sent to Department
49, 000 00
On account of TJnited States bonds, account sinking fund, sent to Department
53, 274,525 12
On accoimt of United States bonds, account Pacific EaUroad sinking
fund, sent to Department
r
971,093 84
On account of LouisviUe and Portland Canal bonds, sent t o Department
.-.
395,000 ClO
Balance Jnne 30,1881




oo...

o

;

766, 349,277 76
88,141,719,57

58

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
T A B J L E W . — B E C E I P T S and DISBUBSEMENTS, cfc—Continued.
PHILADELPHIA.

Balance June 30,1880

-

$18,413, G54 54

RECEH'TS.

On account of-customs
On accouut of internal-revenue stamps
On account of fractional currency fbr redemption
On account of fractional silA'-er coin for exchange.. - On account of semi-annual duty
On account of certificates, act'June 8, 1872
Onaccountof Post-Office JDepartment
On account of transfers
.On account of patent fees
On account of disbursing officers
On account ofeiuterest
On account of miscellaneous

$11,166,248 10
446, 310 19
10, 009 34
2,159, 600 00
. 507,183 86
5, 980', 000 00
...
1,265,349 97
12,412,678 10
4, 677 00
12,772, 803 46
• 966,699 00
674, 531 14

:

48,366,090 16
66, 779, 744 70

DISBURSEMENTS.

On account of Treasury draff^s
:
On account of Post-Office drafts
On account of disbursi^ng accounts
On accouut of fractional silver coin exchanged
On account of interest
On account of transfers
On account of certificates of deposit, act June 8,1872
On account of fractional currency redeemed

.=^,......

Balance June 30,1881 . . :

9,447,041 59
1, 271, 452 98
12, 030, 803 25
2,152, 900 00
5, 859, 577 62
13,105, 308 31
7, 370, 000 00
10, 009 34
•

:

51,247,093 09.
15,532,651 61

SAINT LOUIS.
Balance June 30, 1880

$3,375,848 10
RECEIPTS.

On account of customs
On account of internal revenue
On account of sale of lauds
'.
Ou account of certificates, act June 8, 1872
On account of Post-Oflice Department
On account of transfers
-•
On account of patent foes
On account of disbursing officers
On account of 5 per cent, rederaption fund.
On account of Treasurer United States, transfer account
On account of misceUaneous
-.

-.

'
.'

$2, 380, 274 99
875, 539 17
24, 268 85
1, 310, 000 00
1, 573, 254 61
11, 996,168 38
5,109 25
7, 765, 875 94
359, 246 87
1, 058, 000 00
99, 842 58
27, 447, 580 04

• DISBURSEMENTS.

On account of Treasury drafts
:
Onaccountof Post-Office drafts
•On account of disbursing accounts
1
:
,
On accouut of Treasurer United States, transfer account
On account of iuterest, in coin
On account of transfers
On account of certificates of deposit, act June 8, 1872
, On account of fractional currenoy redeemed
Balance Jime 30, 1881




•

7,713, 641 06
1,541,609 10
7, 873, 398 27
.
573, 313 20
823, 022 00
6, 785, 200 00
. 280, 000 00
1, 025 00
•
..;

25, 591, 208 €3
5,232,220 11

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

59

T A B I i E ^W.—BECEIPTS and DISBUBSEMENTS, ^c—Continued.
SAN FEANCISCO.
Balance June 30, 1880

".

*$25, 339, 625 14

RECEIPTS.

On accpunt of customs
On account of internal revenue
On account of sale of lands
.On account of standard silver dollars for silver certificates
On account of transfer, standard silver dollars
•On account of Post-Office Department
On account of transfers
On account of patent fees
On accouut of disbursing officers
On account of miscellaneous

$6,859,841 73
3, 586, 007 -l 3 •
286, 392 73
420, 000 00
707, 000 00
617, 360 20
10,138, 200 00
14,341 75
13, 533, 096 79
1,352,838 69

37,535,079 02
62, 874, 704 16

DISBURSEMENTS.

On account of Treasury drafts
On accountof Post-Ofiice drafts
On account of disbursing accounts
On account of bullion account
On account of interest, in coin
On account of transfers

•
'

1

:

8,272,103 75
578,533 57
11, 857,420 43
1,500,000 00
.356,497 92
8,907,625 00
—.

Balance June 30, 1^81

31, 472,186 67
31,402,517 49

TUCSON.
Balance June 30, 1880

$224,655 91
RECEIPTS.

On account of customs
On account of internalrevenue
On accouut of sale of lands
On account of Post-Oflice Department, surplus money-order fund
On account of transfers, drafts on assistant treasurers at New York
and San Francisco
:
On account of disbursing officers
*>
On account of Secretary's special deposit account
On account of deposits for credit to disbursing officers' accounts

$15,983 73
37,262 95
"8,182 39
82, 278 00
250° OOO 00
46,835 95
450 00
1, 509,428 92

1,950,421 94
2,175, 077 85

DISBURSEMENTS.

Onaccountof Treasury drafts
On account of disbursing accounts, checks paid
On account of Secretary's special deposit accountOn account of transfers

27,619 33
1,268, 635 14
50 00
645,840 79

Balance June 30, 1881
* The reserve fond, amonnting to $2,240,000, is included in this amount.




1, 942,145 26
232,932 59




REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF INTJRNAL REVENUE.




61




EEPOET
THE COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,
OFFICE OF.INTERNAL EEVENUE,

WasMngtonj Novemher 25, 1881.
S I R : Tbe receipts of internal revenue for the fiscal year 1879 were
$113,449,621.38; for the fiscal year 1880, $123,981,916.10 ; for the fiscal
year ended Jnne 30,1881, $135,229,912.30, and the receipts for the first
foar months of the present fiscal year have been $50,876,970.11, being
$7,081,722.85 in excess of the receipts for the corresponding months of
tlie last fiscal year. If this increase should be maintained during the
remaining eight months of the fiscal year, the receipts for 1882 will be
fully $157,000,000.
Following is a statement of the receipts of internal-revenue taxes from
the various objects of taxation during the past two fiscal years:
Increase.

Decrease.

SPIRITS.

Spirits from fruit
Spirit.s from grain, molasses, &c
Eectifiers ...'.
.•.-.
Liquor dealers
Miscellaneous
Total of spirits

$905, 201 75
55, 013, 917 43
172,. 004 60
4, 578, 810 57
515, 574 44

$1, 531, 075 83 $625, 874 08
60, 683, 051 73 5, 669,134 30
170,145 99
$1, 858 61
4;741, 111 89
162, 301 32
28, 589 44
486, 985 00

61,185, 508 79

67,153, 974 88 5, 968, 466 <

TOBACCO.

Cigars
Cigarettes

-

;.

Siiiiff

Tobacco, chewing and sraoking
Dealers iu leaf tobacco
Dealers in manufactured tobacco ..
Manufacturers of tobacco and cigar
Peddlers of tobacco
Miscellaneous
:
Total of tobacco

14, 200, 819 49 16, 095, 724 78 1, 888, 905 29
992, 981 22
277, 711 83
715, 269 39
689, 183 03
634, 609 34
54, 573 69
22, 833, 287 60 1, 663,133 20
21,170,1.54 40
70, 996 76
88, 329 10
1, 976, 071 55
111,649 1^
1, 864, 422 41
1.53,132 71
. 151, 442 57
28. 700 45
26, 258 13
8, 702 79
13, 045 67
4, 342 {

'. -

38, 870,140 08

42, 854, 991 31

"-.

12, 346, 077 20
201, 395 97
282, 329 61

13, 237, 700 63
. 19.5,308 .52
267, 232 06

Total of fermented liquors .. -

12, 829, 802 84

13, 700, 241 21

2, 510, 775 43
811,430 48
• 28, 773 37

2, 940, 906 64
811, 000 35
4, 295 08

11, 332 34
1, 690 14
2, 442 32

,984, 851 23

F E R M E N T E D LIQUORS.

Ale, beer, lager, and porter
Brewers' sjiecial tax
Dealers in malt liquors

6, 087 45
15, 097 55

BANKS AND BANKERS.

B a n k deposits
B a n k capital
B a n k circulation
Total of banks and bankers ..




3, 702, 208 07

436,131 21
430 13
24, 478 29
411, 222 79

63

64

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

1881. ;: '

1880.

Increase.

Decrease.

.

MISCELLANEOUS.
$2,162, 310 00
Bank checks
3, 237, .546 00
ITriction m a t c h e s
.-...
1, 733, 840 30
P a t e n t medicines, p e r f u m e r y , cosmetics, &c.
Penalties
^
383, 755 08
Collections n o t o t h e r w i s e p r o v i d e d for
228, 027 73

$2,253,411 20
3, 278, 580 62
1, 843, 263 90
231,078 21
152,162 90

$91,101 20
41. 034 62
109, 423 60

7, 745, 479 11

7, 758, 496 83

13, 017 72

T o t a l of m i s c e l l a n e o u s

-

Ago"regate r e c e i p t s

.. ..

^

$152, 676 87
75 864 83

123, 981, 910 10 135, 229, 912 30 11, 247, 996 20

The quantities of spirits, cigars, cigarettes, snuff, tobacco, and beer upoii which taxes were paid during this ijeriod, were as follows:
•
Spirits from fruit, 1880—1,005,781 gaUons; 1881—1,701,200 gaUons ; increase, 695,425.
Spirits from grain, &c., 1880—61,126,634 gallons; 1881—67,4'26,000 gallons- increase, 6,299,366.
IsTumber of cigars, 1880—2,367,803,248; 1881—2,682,620,797; increase, 314,817,549.
mimber of cigarettes, 1880—408,708,366; 1881—567,395,983 ; increase, 158,687,617.
Pounds of snuft; 1880—3,966,308; 1881—4, 307,394; increase, 341,086.
!
Pounds of tobacco, 1880—132,309,526; 1881—142,706,011; increase, 10,396,485.
Barrels of ale, beer, &c., 1880—13,347,110; 1881—14,311,028; increase, 963,918.
REDUCTION OF INTERNAL

TAXES.

The large increase in the receipts of the government and the great
reduction in the interest and priucipal of the public debt are causing
discussion as to the propriety of reducing the incoDie ofthe government
by lowering some of the taxes and dropping others altogether.
Attention is called to the recent action of the IsTational Distillers' Association, in favor of applying to Congress for a reduction ofthe tax on
distilled spirits. These tax-payers seem to think that the time has come
when a portion of the tax from their productions can be taken off, that
tax now amounting to 300 per cent, upon fine whiskies and 600 per
cent, upon ordinary spirits.
Whenever the wants of t h e government will allow a reduction of
internal taxation, my opinion is that it will be wise to confine these
taxes to distilled spirits, malt liquors, tobacco and its products, and to'
special taxes upon manufacturers and dealers in these articles, and to
fix the taxes at such rates as will yield the amount of revenue necessary
to be raised from these sources.
AMOUNTS C O L L E C T E D , BY DISTRICTS, AND COST OE COLLEGTION.

Immediately after the close of the past fiscal year an examination
was made of the accounts of the collectors of internal revenue, and it
was found that they had^accounted for all the public moneys which c,ame
to their hands. I am gratified to be able to state that during the past
five fiscal years $602,310,797.30 have been collected, and that the entire
amount has been paid into the Treasury without any loss to the government by defalcation.
The cost of collection for the past fiscal year, distributed among the
different items of appropriation, was as follows:
For salaries and expenses of collectors, inclading i^ay of depnty collectors, clerks, &c
'.
$1,898,103 43
For salaries and expenses of revenue agents, surveyors of distilleries,
gaugers, storekeepers, and miscellaneous expenses
2,365, 000 00
For stamps, paper, and dies
473,803 07
For expenses of detecting and punishing violations of internal revenue
• laws
1
63,789 98
For salaries of oflicers, clerks, and employ<Ss in tlie office of Commissioner of Internal Revenue
„
253,330 00
Total




o....

„...•

5,054,026 48

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

65

The entire expense for the past five years has been $21,979,002, being
three and sixty-four one hundredths per cent, upon the amount collected ; and in the disbursement of this money there has been no loss to
the government. This satisfactory result is due to the intelligence,
capacity, and fidelity of the officers and employes of the Internal Eevenue Service, to whom I desire to convey my appreciation of their laudable efforts to reach and maintain the highest standard of excellence.
Following is a statenient showing the aggregate collections in each
collection district, during the fiscal year 1881, with the names of the
several collectors:
Collection districts.
• First Alabama
Do
Second Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
First Calitbrnia
Fourth California
Colorado
First Connecticut
Second Connecticut...
Dakota
Delaware
Florida
Second G-eorgia
Third G-eorgia
Idaho
Do
First Illinois
Second Illinois
Third Illinois
Do
Do
Fourth niinois
Fifthlllinois
Seventh Ulinois
Eighth Illinois
Tliirteentli Illinois...•.
First Indiana
Fourth Indiana
Sixth Indiana
Seventh India.na
Tenth Indiana
Eleventh Indiana
Second loAva
Do
Third Iowa
Fourth^Iowa
Fifth Iowa
Kansas
Second Kentucky
Fifth Kentucky.:..-.Do
Sixth Kentucky
Do

•

Seventh Kentucky...
Eighth Kentucky
Ninth Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
v
Third Maryland
Fourth Maryland
Do
Third Massachusetts
Fifth Massachusetts..
Tenth Massacbusetts
First Micliigan
Third Michigan
Fourtb. Michigan
Sixth Michigan
First Minnesota
,
Second Minnesota
Mississippi
First Missouri
Second Missouri
Fourth Missouri
) Fifth Missouri

5F



Names of collectors.
Louis H. Mayer
Albion L. Morgan
James T. Eapier
Thomas Cordis
Edward Wheeler
William Higby
Amos L. Frost
James S. Wolfe
Joseph Selden
David F. HoUister . . . .
John L. Pennington...
James Mclntire
Dennis Eagan
Andrew Clarke
Edward C. Wade
Austin Savage
Konello W. Berry
Joel r>. Harvey
Lucien B. Crooker
Alfred M. Jones
A. H. Hershey,
Albert AVoodcock
John Tillson
Howard Knowles
John W. HiU
Jonathan MeiTiam. -..
Jonathan C. Willis
James C. A"^eatch
AViU Cumback
Frederick Baggs
Delos W. Minshall
G-eorge Moon
:.
John'F. Wildman
SewaU S. FarweU . . . . .
John W. Oreen
James E. Simpson
John Connell
Larapson P. Sherman.
John C. Carpenter
AVilliam A.. Stuart
James F. Buckner
AViUiam S. AVilson . . . .
AVinfield S. Holden.-..
JohnAV. F i n n e U . . . . . .
Armsted M. Swope . . .
William J. Landram . John E. Blaine
Morris Marks
Franklin J. Kollins
Robert M. Proud
Daniel C. Briice
Webster Bruce
Charles W. S l a c k . . . . .
Charles C. Dame
Edward K. T i n k e r . . . .
Luther S. Trowbridge
Harvey B. Rowlson...
Sluman.S. Bailey
Charles V. De Land ..
Andrew C. Smith
WiUiam Hickel
James Hill-.
^......
Isaac H. Sturgeon
Alonzo B. CarroU
Rynd E. Lawder
David H. Budlong

Aggregate collections.
$9,143 28
40, 287 09
75, 221 02
38, 008 21
132, 086 94
277, 931 88
335, 458 98
215, 051 06
283, 883 46
295, 800 56
48, 603 66
311,066 76
254, 889 51
266, 405 74
97, 727 74
13, 806 60
11, 993 57
905,157 69
247, 243 89
483, 092 53
41, 704 54
41, 608 57
203, 221 51
425,131 77
67, 884 77
407,226 90
962, 409 34
261, 752 57
399, 731 14
094, 927 90
253, 760' 27
174, 925 19
96,156 41
167, 240 11
88, 090 39
281, 317 03
168, 040 93
219, 081 92
239, 527 33
072,159 61
277,152'73
212, 519' 39
064, 451 74
120, 769 29
009, 848 31
216, 681 51
145, 579 63
760, 618 92
82,457 05
334, 864 22
25, Oil 82
123, 587 37
454, 636 28
857, 447 12
387, 597 80
223, 504 44
249,175 12
137, 251 82
177, 343 89
116,126 82
329, 013 51
96,122 19
543, 333 70
66, 451 05
388,170 56
145, 571 72

66

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
CoUection districts.

Sixth Missouri
Do
Montana
Nebra ska
-.
Nevada . ^
'
New Hampshire . . . 1
First New Jersey
Third New Jersey . - - Fifth New Jersey
New Mexico
First New Tork
.''
Second New Tork
Third New Tork :--..Eleventh New Tork
Twelfth New Tork
Fourteenth New Tork
Fifteenth New Tork
Twenty-first New Tork
Twenty-fourth New Tork :,. ^
Twenty-sixth New Tork
Twenty-eighth New Tork
Thirtieth New Tork.-:
.'
Second North. Carolina
Fourth North Carolina
. -.
Fifth North Carolina
Do
:
Sixth North Carolina
FirstOhio
Third Ohio
•
Fourth Ohio
Sixth Ohio
:.. Seventh Ohio
;.. Tenth Ohio
Eleventh Obio
Fifteenth Ohio
•.
Eighteenth Ohio
Oregon
First Peunsylvania:
Eiglith. Pennsylvania
Ninth Pennsylvania
-. Twelfth Pennsylvania . . - . . I . . .
Fourteenth Pennsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsylvania
Nineteenth Pennsylvania...:.
Twentieth Penn.sylvania
Twenty-second Pennsylvania.
Twen ty-third Pennsylvania.. Ilhode Island .
-"
South Carolina
:
Second Tennessee - . . - . .
Fifth Tennessee ..:.
Eighth Tennessee
First Texas
Third Texas
Fourtb Texas
;
-. .
Do
Utah
Vermont
"
Second Virginia
Tbird Vii-ginia
Fourtb Virginia
Fifth Virginia
Sixth Virginia
AVashington
First AV'^est Virginia
Second West Virginia . Do
'..
First AVisconsin
Second AVisconsin
-...
Third Wisconsin
Sixth AVisconsin
..-..-Wyoming

Aggre]^ate collections.

Names of collectors.
Robert T. Van Horn'
Philip Doppler
Thomas P. Fuller
:. -. J
Lorenzo Crounse
;
Frederick C. Lord
i
Andrew H. Toung
I
WUliam P. Tatem
:
Culver Barcalow
L
Robert B. Hathorn
•.
Gustavus A. Smith
'.
Rodney C. AVard
.-.
Marshall B. Blake
•
i.
Max AVeber
\.
Moses D. Stivers
;.
Jason M. Johnson ...^
.
Ralj)h T. Lathrop
i.
Thomas Stevenson
J.
James C. P. Kincaid
J.
John B. Strong
i.
Beniamin De Voe
: . . i.
Burt Van Horn
I.
Frederick BueU
'-..
Elihu A. White
•.
Isaac J. Toung
,..
AVilUam H. Wheeler
G-eorge B. Everitt
......
John'J. Mott
±.
Amor Smith, jr
Robert AViUiams, jr
I-.
Robert P. Kennedy
.\
-| -.
James Pursell
J. Charles C. AValcutt
•..
Clark AVaggoner
;..
Benjamin F. Coates
i..
Jewett Palmer
1 -.
AVorthy S. Streator
• -.
John C. Cartwright
'-James Ashworth
1.. Joseph T. Valentine
'...
Thomas A. AViley
|...
Edward H. Chase
Charles J. Bruner
-. .1...
Edward Scull
Cbarles M. Lynch
'. -.
James C. Brown
'...
Thomas W. Davis
John M. Sullivan
\...
Elisha H. Rhodes
J...
Ellery M. Brayton J...
James M. Melton
J...
William M. 'Woodcock
J
Robert F. Patterson ^
^ 1...
AViUiam H. Sinclair
j . . .
Benjamin C. Ludlow
Adam G-. Malloy
;
Theodore Hitclicox
,
Ovando J. Hollister
Charles S. Dana
[
James D. Brady
'
O.H. RusseU.;
William L. Feraald
J. Henry Rives
J
Beverly'B. Botts
j
James R. Hayden
J
Isaac H. Duval
George W. Brown
i -...
Francis H. Pierpont
I
Irving M. Bean
[.....
Henry Harnden
L
Charles A. Galloway
J
Hiram E. Kelley - - -'.
; .;
Edgar P. Snow!

'

.

023 16
40, 199 20
44, 881 67
962,-064 86
53, 421 41
309, 720 94
288, 810 32
326, 683 57
4, 258,182 42
47, 465 89
2, 959,673 223, 377,659 78
5, 757,541 95
208. 236 50
545, 007 54
600, 482 13
294, 733 58
326, 846 08
494, 109 45
316, 088 22
974, 838 32
1, 377,990 99
74. 432 35
850, 967 45
1, 015,329 53
36, 255 94
499, 455 08
12, 538,346 58
1, 800,871^17
513, 582 86
352, 210 02
594, 593 31
1, 089,503 12
1, 398,2.57 92
195, 871 89
806, 538 82
85, 004 14
2,.678, 845 83
622, 634 45
1, 278,820 81
370, 256 1 4
212, 589 65
211, 588 05
137, 259 .54
94, 909 7 7
1,'408, 472 82
653, 836 95
209, 079 27
135, 907 16
110, 174 68
922, 014 14
114, 574 82
101, 043 60
80, 784 41
29, 178 09
37, 629 51
43, 116 79
53, 145 83
943, 416 96
2, 076,473 46
1, 053,260 58 ,
1, 763,176 49
226, 778 26
32, 763 73
340, 793 62
104, 597 00
7, 205 71
2, 373,693 87
169, 982 52
229, 859 40
136, 559 22
18, 551 18

Total from collectors .Cashreceipts from sale of adhesive stamps.
From salaries (repealed tax)

127,851,634 66
7, 375, 255 72
3,021 92

Total receipts from all sources

135, 229, 912 ;




COMMISSIONER

OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

67

ESTIMATED EXPENSES FOR NEXT FISCAL T E A R .

I estimate the expenses ofthe Internal Eevenue Service for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1883, as follows :
For salaries and expenses of collectors
$2,100,000
For salaries and expenses of thirty-five revenue agents, for surveyors, for
^r
. fees and expenses of gaugers, for salaries of storekeepers, and for miscellaneous expenses
2, 400, 000
For dies, paper, and stamps
500, 000
For detecting and bringing to trial and punishment persons guilty of violating the internal revenne laws, including payment for informatioD and
detection
:
'.
75,000
For salaries of officers, clerks, and employ6s in the office of the Commissioner of Internal Revenne
.'
255,080
Total

:

5,330,080.

ENFORCEMENT OF THE LAWS.

I am glad to be able to report that there is a commendable disposition
on the part of the great body of tax-payers to yield a ready obedience to
the laws, and that the taxes are collected with the least possible friction.
In the collection districts where frauds in the manufacture and sale of
spirits and tobacco ha\^e been rife,, and where resistance to authority
has prevailed, there has been a manifest iniprovement jn public sentiment. While i t i s shown by a table on page 82 that during the past
sixteen months 859 illicit distilleries have been seized, and 1,510 illicit
distillers arrested, I am enabled to report that illicit distilling has, by
the actiA^e operations of the past five years, been reduced to a minimum,
and the illicit manufacture of toba;CCO has for the most pari: been.abandoned. The business of ^^blockading," so called, that is, the saleof
illicit whisky and tobacco from peddlers' wagons, has almost been suppressed. Bands of illicit distillers combined together in defiance of law
have been broken up, and forcible resistance to the ofiicers of the government, though it has not entirely ceased, is of much less ixequent occurrence than heretofore. The practice so long in vogue of law-breakers
resorting to the processes of the iState courts as a means of revenging
themselves upon the oflicers of the government for the enforcement of
the laws of the United States has been to a great extent discontinued.
Cordial relations now exist in most cases between the officers of the
United States charged with the enforcement of the internal revenue
laws, and the officers of the State gOA^ernments. This satisfactory condition of things has been brought about by a.just, firm, and conciliatory
enforcement of &e laws. As a result, a strong public sentiment has set
in against frauds upon the revenues of the government and in favor of
sustaining its authority. Eespectable citizens who in times past, though
opposed to these frauds, were not disposed to give information and aid
in their suppression, for fear of injury to their persons or property, now
take a bold stand against them, and in some districts good citizens have
formed committees to co-operate with the officers of the government in
the suppression of the illicit manufacture and traffic in whisky. By
maintaining a careful supervision over those districts where frauds have
hitherto prevailed, and having them regularly policed by deputy collectors, I believe that a relapse into the former condition of fraud, lawlessness, and bloodshed will be prevented.
The extraordinary expenses incident to the suppression of frauds upon
the revenue in the illicit manufacture and sale of whisky and tobacco
during the past five years, in the districts of second Alabama, Arkan


68

'

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

sas, second Georgia, third Georgia, fourth ISTorth Carolina, fifth North
Carolina, sixth North Carolina, South Carolina, second Tennessee, fifth
Tennessee, eighth Tennessee, and fifth Yirginia, where frauds on the
revenue have most prevailed, have been about $285,000. The net gains
are the establishment of the-supreniacy of the laws, and their comparatively' peaceful observance and enforcement, and an increase in the collection of internal revenue taxes in the districts named, as follows:
1879 over 1878, an increase of
1880 over 1878, an iucrease of
1881 over 1878, an increase of
Totalincrease
^,

'

"

^

$628,283
735, 418
1,220,285
2,583,986

PROTECTION OF R E V E N U E OFFICERS.

I again recommend additional legislatio^n for the protection of the lives
and persons of officers of the United States from the unlawful assaults
of those who resist their authority. There should be a law for the trial
and punishment in the courts of the United States of persons who kill qr
make assaults with intent to kill officers of the United States while engaged in the, perform ance of their lawful duties. At this time the only
offienses cognizable in the courts of the United States for acts of this
character are obstructing and conspiring to obstruct the enforcement of
the law, the punishment for which is entirely inadequ^ate to the many
heinous crimes* against the lives and persons of officers of the government which have been committed, within the past few years.
PENSIONS TO WIDOWS AND ORPHANS OF OFFICERS K I L L E D .

The struggle maintained for the past fiveyears for the%uppression of
illicit distilling has resulted in the killing of 28 and the Avounding of 64
officers and employes.
Amongst the number who lost their lives while enforcing the laws of
the United States against illicit distillers was Lieutenant Mclntire, ofthe
Second United States Infantry, who was killed in Georgia February 9,
1877. By reason of his being aii officer of the United States Army his
widow has been awarded a pension of $15 a month (the highest rate
allowed by law) and $2 a month for each of her five children. This is
eminently just and propei;.
On the 9th of August, 1878, Deputy Collector Cooper, of Knoxville,
Tenn., whilst co-operating with other officers in putting down armed resistance to the law, Avas shot and instantly killed, and on-the 20th of July
last Deputy Collector Thomas L. Brayton, of South Carolina, was killed
by an illicit distiller, under circumstances of peculiar atrocity. Each of
these officers left a wife and children bereft of their natural means of
support. Deputy Collectors Cooper and Brayton, equally with Lieutenant Mclntire, lost their lives in the service of the government and in
the effort to enforce its laws against armed resistance, but being in the
civil instead of in the military service of the government, the law makes
no provision for the relief of their widows and orphans. This distinction is not just, and I respectfully^ suggest the propriety of legislation
authorizing suitable pensions to be awarded to the widows and dependent
families of officers and employes killed in the enforcement of the law,
and directing proper provisious to be made for officers and employes
wounded or disabled in the service.
l' '-




COMMISSIONER OF ^INTERNAL REVENUE.

69

FIXED SALARIES FOR U. S. MARSHALS AND DISTRICT ATTORNEYS.
Wherever the rights of a citizen, in person or property are involved
it is better that an officer shall err by doing too little than by doing too
much. The best and most satisfactory work of an officer is performed
from a sense of duty. Where the pecuniary interests of the officer are
promoted by the oppression of the citizen there is great danger of abuse,
and a sj^stem' of laws which makes it the interest of an officer to thus
misuse his authority is wrong in principle, and will, by the permanent
temptation to evil, breed abuses even in long established and well ordered communities under the most careful system of administration. In
UCAV and remote settlements this practice, at times,-will be little better
than brigandage.
I regard the system of fees and allowances to marshals and district
attorneys as open to this objection. Their maximum compensation is
fixed by law and the orders of the Attorney-General, but the amount
actually received depends almost wholly upon the institution and prosecution of cases in court. While these officers are paid out of the Treasury in respect to cases in which the United States is a party, the compensation thus paid is for fees made, expenses incurred, and services
rendered,in connection with criminal and civil cases instituted in behalf
bf the United States. The district attorney is made the judge of the
propriety of commencing a criminal prosecution against a citizen on account of which he and the marshal AV ill receive pay from the government Avhether the party be guilty or iunocent. These officers m.^y prefer complaints against citizens, cause United Staites commissioners to
issue warrants, may arrest and examine the parties before the commissioner and the district attorney, marshal, guard, witnesses, and the
commissioner Ayill all get their fees from the goA^ernment even though
the xiarty arrested be discharged.
Instances haA^e been brought to my attention where numerous prosecutions haA^e been instituted for the most triAaal violations of law, and
the arrested parties taken long distances and subjected to great inconvenience and expense, not in the interest of the gOA^ernment, but apparently for no other reason than to make costs. I have consulted with a
number of prominent district attorneys and marshals, and they all concurred with me in condemning the system under which they are compensated for their services as one calculated to encourage abuses. It is
not to be Avondered at that abuses have grown up under such a system.
The wonder is that the abuses are not greater. A remedy Avill be found
by fixing by law the salaries of district attorneys and marshals, and
paying them as other officers from the Treasury, and authorizing the
Attorney-General to fix the salaries and traveling expenses of deputy
marshals in the same manner that the salaries and traveling expenses of
deputy collectors of internal rcA^enue are now fixed. This plan would
relieve these officers from all temptation to institute prosecutions for
petty and trivial violations of the revenue laws where no frajids, were
committed or intended.
THE CIVIL SERVICE.
The improvement of the civil serAace is a subject Avhich has received
much public attention, and will probably be considered by Congress during the coming session. I venture to offer a few suggestions which, I
trust, will not be regarded as out of place in this report.
„ There is unquestionably on every hand an earnest desire to have the



70

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

offices filled by persons who are honest, capable, and diligent, aiid to
have the business between the government and the people transacted
promptly, acceptably, and in a- thorough, business-like manner. The
chief point of discussion seems to be in respect to the manner of making
appointments to and remoyals from office. It is insisted by some that
the best civil service Avill be found in making it absolutely non-partisan 5
that is to say, that political considerations shall not enter into the ques, tion of applications for axipointment to office, nor into the exercise of the
Xiowers of ax>xiointment and removal.
It Avould seem axiomatic that the tenure of office and the powers of
axipointment and removal should agree Avith the genius of the government and the spirit ofthe people from whom all powers emanate.
Our gOA^ernments, State and National, are founded upon the elective
system. Originally, the constitutions of raany of the States m~ade xirovision for the legislatures to choose the judiciary. The growth of the
spirit of self-government in process of time changed most of these constitutions, so that to-day, in nearly all the States of the Union, the
judges are elected by the people for a tixed term of years. The wide
diffusion of education and knowledge amongst the people, the ease of
obtaining information of public affairs through the press, the constant
Xiarticipation in the affairs of government at the ballot-box and otherwise, and the imxiortant and stirring political cA^ents of the past twenty
years have so Avrought upon the peoxile of this country that they now
take more interest in public aff'airs than ever before, and the great mass
of educated and intelligent men competent to hold office are identified
with one or the other ot the xiolitical parties of the country. In fact, it
has come to be expected that every citizen of standing, and worthy of
consideration, will have definite xiolitical oxiinions and affiliations. This
being the case, it is obvious that there are not existing'ih'the country
men suitable for holding the public offices who are free from political
couAactions; so that, in xioint of fact, in selecting officers it is necessary
to choose from one or the other of the political parties of the country.
To give the country ;i gOA^ernment of the people, the principles influencing the exercise of the xiower of appointment should be in harmony
with the xii^inciples controlling the people in makiug choice of officers
through the elective franchise.
If this proposition be sound, it remains tobe ascertained by what rule
the people are governed when they come to cast their ballots for electiA^e
officers. In respect to the great majority of peoxile, th,e rule may be
safely stated t h u s : The elector demands that the candidate shall, be
honest and capable, and that he shall agree with him in his political
opinions. We give exxiression to our political convictions at the polls
by electing men to make and to enforce the laws who agree with us
Xiolitically. The princixile of agreement in political opinions is the great
test of voting for candidates from President to constable.
It is argued that the inferior officers and clerks employed b y t h e government,at the capital and throughout the country can perform their
duties satisfactorily, notAvithstanding their opinions differ from the
dominant political party, and the conclusion is di-awn that therefore
changes should not be made in these positions Avhere the persons are
found to be honest, capable, and diligent. To me it seems entirely improbable that such a rule will be adopted with the concurrence of the*
people, considering the fact t h a t t h e political complexion of the country
will be changed only after a great struggle ahicl elaborate discussion.
Such a change necessarily implies a deliberate opinion on the part of
the people that the party proclaimed as dominant is better fitted to ad


COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

71

minister the government than the party it is to supersede. The electors
who bring the party into power and the chief men who take office as the
result of the-election will no doubt entertain the opinion that men equally
honest and capable can be selected from their own party to fill the various offices of the gOA^ernment, and they will no doubt insist that to
insure a successful administration it is absolutely necessary to make
many changes. In fact the struggle at the polls was to change the
pohcy of the government by changing its officers.
Between the position on the one hand that no changes shall be made,
and on the other hand that all shall be changed, there would seem to
be a ground, at once reasonable and just, uxion which all might stand.
I t occurs to me that if the leading and confidential xiositions in each dexiartment and bureau were subject to change at any time, for reasons
satisfactory to the head _^of the department, and all the clerkships and
other employments Avere for terms of four years,, greater stability Avould
be given to ibhe service, sudden and SAveeping changes Avould be avoided,
and as these terms would be constantly expiring, the entire body of the
public service would be within the easy reach of public opinion.
FIXITY OF TENURE.
Fixity of tenure is recognized as a Avise limitation upon the xiower of
choosing officers by ballot. So, upon principle, the same limitation may
be applied to the axipointing xiower, with acceptability to the people, but
it is inconsistent with the genius of our government, and contrary to
the public sentiment of the people to have the great body of the officers
and einxiloy6s of the executive branch of the government to hold their
positions by a life tenure, or during good behavior. Such a system would
create a privileged class removed from the influences of popular sentiment, which in this country is a constantly operating force favorable to
honest, efficient administration. It would repress the laudable and honorable ambition of other citizens to serve the government in official
Xiositions and would manifestly tend to Aveaken the hold that our system
of popular government has upon the minds of the people.
I am of ^opinion that the highest type of civil administration can be
found by giving increased certainty to the official tenure by which
offices are now held, but leaA^ing them within the easy control of public
sentiment, so that the whole ofiicial body can be kept abreast with the
progressive oxiinions oi the people.
One of the most important changes to be made in the present system
is to xiiovide by law for a fixed tenure lor subordinate oflicers and clerks
appointed by the various heads of departments. Where an applicant
for appointment, whose indorsements as to character, standing, and
ha.bits are satisfactory, has passed a suitable examination, as now provided for by law, the axipointment should be on trial, say, for a period
of twelve months. At the end of this time if the axipointee has been
diligent in the xierformance of duty and has shown an aptitude for the
service, he should be appointed for a term of three years, anS. be eligible
for reappointmenti
EROMOTIONS, REMOVALS, AND RETIREMENTS.

,

The promotions^from grade to grade are necessarily slow. With the
great majority of cterks, therefore, in all the departments the hope of
promotion does not constitute a very powerful motive to excel. I t would
greatly tend to secure efficiency in the service tb provide that the reg


72

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

ular xiay of 10 per cent, of the clerks in each bureau might be increased
at the beginning of each fiscal year, say, 5 per cent, for marked, caxiacity, fidelity, and zeal in the discharge of duty, this increase to be
made upon'the certificate of the head of division, the chief clerk, and
the head ofthe bureau. Promotions should be made strictly upon merit, after a suitable examination, and upon the recommendation of the head
of the proper bureau.
The removals of clerks and employ(^s should be for dishonesty, incapacity, neglect of duty, insubordination, intemperance, immorality, or
inability, such disqualifications to be ascertained under suitable regular
tions prescribed by the head of the pi-oxier dexiartment.'
Heads of divisions and persons occuxiying confidential relations to the
heads of departments and bureaus should be subject to change for reasons satisfactory to the head ofthe department.
Persons retiring from the service uxion resignation or exxiiration of
term, without fault, should be given an honorable discharge. The removal from the service of persons rendered unfit by the infirmities of
years, or from other causes disconnected from misconduct, is at all times
an unpleasant duty to xi^rform, esxiecially when such officers or clerks
have rendered valuable services through a number of years and from
their meager salaries have been unable to lay by a competency for old
age. To mitigate the hardshixi of such cases and to insure a proper recognition of faithful service I would suggest the proxiriety of providing by
laAV that all subordinate officers, clerks, and employ6s retired, without
iault, by resignation, expiration of term, or inability after a service of four
years, shall be entitled to receiA^-e one month's xiay for each year and pro
rata for each fraction of a 3^ear of service rendered, such retiring pay to be
computed at the rate of xiay the xierson has received from time to time.
RECAPITULATION.

The adoption of this system would embody the following ideas:
1. The establishment of a term of office of four years for subordinate
officers, clerks, and emxilo3^6s.
2. Eequiring all applicants for appointment to be well indorsed as to
character, and to stand a xnoper examination as to attainments.
3. A temxiorary appointment for on6 year, on trial.
4. If found worthy, the temxiorary officer or clerk to be apxibinted for
three years, the balance of a regular term of four years.
5. The officer or clerk to be eligible for reappointment.
6. As a stimulus to the exercise of marked capacit^?^, fidelity, and zeal
in the service, the pay of 10 i:>eT cent, of the clerks of each bureau to
be increased 5 per cent, upon proper certificates at the commencement
of each fiscal year.
'
7. Promotions to be upon merit, ascertained by examination and certified to by the head of the bureau.
8. Causes for removal tb be dishonesty, incapacity, neglect of duty,
insubordination, intemperance, immorality, or inability.
9. Persons retiring, Avithout fault, to receive an hbhorable discharge.
10. Subordinate of&cers, clerks, and employes, retired, without fault,
after a service of four years, to receive retiring pay, equal to one month's
pay for each year and j;ro rata for each* fraction bf a year of serAdce. '
The principles suggested could readily be applied to the entire civil
serA'ice of the country.
\J^\
In respect to the question of retiring pay, I am satisfied that the great
majority of the persons to whom it would apply are solely dependent



, COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

73

upon their salaries for the support of themselves and families. Inquiry
in the Internal Eevenue Office shows the fact that the average number
of xiersons dexiendent uxion the salaries of clerks and emxiloyes is as
follows: Salaries of $1,800, $1,600, $1,400, $1,200, and $720, the aAwage
is four persons to each salary; salaries of $1,000, three persons; salaries
of $900, two persons; and salaries of $660, five persons to each salary.
I t is obvious from this statement that persons drawing salaries of $1,800
and less, will have but little left at the end of the year after supporting
their families. It Avill be readily understood that, with a knowledge of
such facts, the head of a bureau will be disposed to hesitate to recommend the discharge of persons who, after serving the government a number of years with fidelity, have become incapacitated for a proper performance of duty by old age. They thus become pensioners on the
gOA^ernment and are retained to the injury of the service. The x)i'oposed
proAdsion for retiring xiay, if adopted, would, as before stated, mitigate the
hardshixi of discharging such persons from the service, and would, in my
opinion, be a satisfactory solution of a difficult and delicate problem.
TERM OF OFFICE OF COLLECTORS.

In my annual report for the year ended June 30,1877,1 used the following language on the subject of tenure of office of collectors:
. I call your attention to the fact t h a t the law creating the office of collector of intern a ! revenue j&xes no tenure to the office. In my opinion it is altogether desirable that
the term of this pffice should he fixed at four years. I t often occurs t h a t Avhen a collector has served for a longer period than four years, constant efforts are being made
for his removal; and many officers, however well they may have discharged their
duties, feel, after a four years' service, uncertain as to the length of time they will be
retained in office. AVhere an officer is appointed for a term of four, years he has a right
to expect t h a t if he performs his duty diligently and faithfully he will not be disturbed
until his term expires, and this feeling of security I regard as an important element in
maintaining a good public service. From my limited observation in public life,. I
have come to the conclusion t h a t when it can reasonably be done there should be a
fixed tenure of all officers of the government.' I haA^e the honor to recommend t h a t a
law be passed fixing the tenure of office of all collectors of internal revenue hereafter
aj^pointed at a term of four years.

I noAv ren CAV my recomniendation in the hoxie that this subject Avill
receive the early and earnest attention Avhicli it demands. I t is an
anomaly in the creation of imxiortant executive offices to omit fixing
four years as the official term. By sections 769, 779, 2613, and 3830",
United States Eevised Statutes, the term of office of district attorneys,
marshals, collectors of customs, naval officers, surveyors, and xiostmasters is fixed at four years. The original act, from wliich some of these
sections are taken; Avas axiproved September 24,1789, and the rule thus
early adoxited has, I belicA^e, been maintained by subsequent legislation,
with the exception of the act of July 1, 1862, creating tlie Office of collector of internal revenue.
ADDITIONAL TAXES D U E FROM BANKS.

Last March certain facts came to the knowledge of the collector of
internal revenue at Chicago which led him to believe that one of the
banks of that city had failed to make full returns of its caxiital and
deposits for taxation. At the collector's request I sent a competent
rcA^enue agent to make an examination of the books of the bank, which
was done under the supervisiou'^of the collector, and it was found that
a large amount of taxes Avas due the gOA^ernment. The books of all the
banks in the city of Chicago making returns to this ofiice Avere also
examined, and in most cases it was found that errors had been made in
rendering their returns, though in a number of instances the amounts
iriA^olved were not large. In the case of certain foi:eign banks doing



74

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

business in that eitj, large amounts of taxes were found due on capital
brought into the United States and actually employed in the business
of banking.
The result of the examination in Chicago seemed to make it necessary
to scrutinize the returns of the bankers of other cities. I therefore
detailed a number of revenue agents to report to the collectors of inter, nal rcA^enue in the cities of Baltimore, Philadelxihia, New York, and
Boston, and the books of many of the banks were examined. A number of new and interesting questions of law arose uxion the application
of the statute to the varied and intricate business operations of bankers.
I t Avas found that Avhile the returns of some banks had been accurate
to the last cent the returns of others had been made with deductions as
to both capital and dexiosits which in the opinion of this office were not
admissible under the law.
Many bankers have submitted their books for examiuatibii Avithout
the necessity of invoking legal xiroceedings, and have shown a willingness that their entire liability for taxation shall be ascertained. Many
other bankers have agreed to carefullj^ examine their books and make
full statements under the decisions recently rendered by this office of
such additional taxes as they may be liable for, such statements to be
subject to the verification of officers of internal revenue. Other bankers,
questioning the right of internal-revenue officers to examine their books,
have refused to either produce them or to answer interrogatories in regard to their liability for additional taxes, There has been already ascertained to be due the sum of $722,705 from seventy banks in the cities
of Chicago, New York, Baltimore, Boston, and Philadelphia, a considerable portion of which has been collected and paid into the Treasury.
The other collectors have been instructed to examine the banks of their
respective districts in regard to their liability for additional taxes. I
am satisfied that large additional sums are due the governinent from
this source.
Considerable irritation has been felt by many of the bankers in
respect to the enforcement of the one hundred per cent, penalty imposed
for rendering a "• false or fraudulent return," it being contended that
the xienalty Avas intended to be enforced only when the return made was
wilfully false. A case in which this question was involved was recently
tried before the United States circuit court for the southern district of
New York, ''The German Savings Bank vs. Josexih Archbold, collector,"
and the court deci,ded that it is not a prerequisite to the addition of the
Xienalty that the return shall be wilfully false, but that if the return is
not in fact true the Commissioner is authorized to affix the penalty.
The exact language of the statute (E. S., section 3182) is '[ authorized
and requirecV^
This case has been appealed to the United States Supreme Court,
and at my request the Attorney-General has had it advanced on the
docket, and it is set doAvn for argument on the 20th of January next.
Pending the decision of the Suxireme Court uxion this point I have consented in several important cases that the collection of the one hundred
per cent, penalty already assessed shall be held itf abeyance to await
the decision of the court.
INDIVIDUAL STAMP FOR CIGARS.

::*

The collecting the tax on cigars by placing the stamp on each cigar,
instead of on the boxes as now provided by law, would afford the highest
probf of the payment of the tax, and Avould prevent the fraudulent
refilling of stamped boxes which is believed to be a great means of loss



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

75

to the gOAT^ernment. Yarious patented stamps and devices have received
the consideration of this office, the use of which at present seemed to be
impracticable by reason of the great expense of some, and the difficulty
in the prexiaration and handling of all of them. The frequent consideration of this subject, however, has brought me to the conclusion that the
system of stamping each cigar Avith a stamp xirepared for general use,
without reference to the number packed in the box, can be introduced at
an increase of nearly double the cost for xiaxier and primting. To comXiensate the cigar manufacturer for the expense of putting the stamp
on each cigar, a deduction of 5 xier cent, might be made upon the stamps
xmrchased which would coA^er the cost of apxilying the stamps to the
cigars. The material objection to the adoption of this plan would be
the rexiacking bf imported cigars. Such a system would in my opinion
materially add to the rcA^enue of the government, and I recommend that
the subject receive the careful consideration of Congress.
FRAUDS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF VINEGAR.
I again recommend the passage of a law either to prohibit the manufacture of vinegar by the alcoholic vaporizing process, xirovided for in
section 5 of the act of March 1, 1879, or requiring the supervision of a
storekeeper at each vinegar factory using the A^aporizing process, the
compensation of such storekeeper to be repaid to the government by
the vinegar manufacturer. Experience has shown tliat the act above
referred to opens the door to great frauds, and I am clearly ofthe oxiinion
that early legislation should be had upon this subject.
APPARENT OVERPRODUCTION OF SPIRITS.
In my l,^„sfeannual report under this heading I made the following
statement:
.
I take the liberty of calling especial attention of distillers and the trade to the fact
t h a t on the 1st July, 1879, there were on hand in distillery warehouses 19,212,000 gallons of spirits, which was au increase of about 5,000,000 of gallons over the stock on
hand at the same period of the previous year, and t h a t on the 1st day of November,
1880, the amount of spirits on hand was 32,640,000, being an inorease of 13,400,000
gallons over the amount on hand on the 1st of July, i879. The steady increase in the
number and capacity of distilleries in operation, suggests the probability of the continued enlargement of the stock on hand. I t has occurred to me t h a t this business
was on the eve of being overdone, and t h a t in the event of a recurrence ofthe' agitation for a reduction of the tax, the holders of these spirits would be in danger of loss.

The amount of distilled spirits in distillery warehouses on the 1st day
of November, 1881, was 67,442,186 gallons, an increase of 34,330,150
gallons OA^er last year. On page 158 Avill be found a table showing the
stock on hand by districts. The great bulk of these spirits is held in
the State of Kentucky, and they are chiefly what are known as " sour
mash" Avhiskies. The amount in warehouses on July 1, 1881, produced in the year 1879, was 3,138,360 gallons, the tax upon which will fall
due during the year 1882. It Avould seem probable that the high price
of grain and this immense stock on hand Avill cause a reduction in the
Xiroduct during the ensuing year, and the probability of the distillers
and owners of this stock having serious trouble in meeting their obligations to the government for the taxes as they fall due, will thereby be
greatly diminished. '
'^^^'
DISTILLERIES OF 100 BUSHELS AND UNDER.
Prior to January, 1881, all distilleries of the capacity of sixty bushels
a day and under were in charge of but one officer, who performed the



76

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

joint duties of storekeeper and gauger, and all distilleries above the
capacit}^ of sixty bushels AA^ere in charge of storekeepers and gaugers
as distinct officers. After consideration, I came to the conclusion that
it was desirable, as an economic measure, to raise the rate of capacity
of distilleries at which a storekeeper and gauger combined in one officer
could be emxiloyed from 60 to 100 bushels per day. On my recommendation to the honorable Secretary it Avas accordingly ordered that in all
distilleries of the capacity of 100 bushels per day and under, a combined storekeeper and gauger should be employed. The saving thus
effected cannot be exactly computed, but is believed to be in the neighborhood of $22,000 per annum.
REDUCTION OF PAY OF STOREKEEPER AND aAUGERS.

In April last I directed that the daily compensation of officers holding
the combined office of storekeeeper and gauger, and assianed to duty at
distilleries having a daily capacity of not exceeding twenty bushels of
grain, should be reduced from $4 dollars to $3 dollars per diem. This
change seemed to be demanded by reason of the disparity between the
amount of labor required of these officers and the pay receiA^ed.
Accordingly notice of the change in rate of pa;/, to take efiect on the
first ofthe month succeeding, was sent out to 634 officers assigned to the
same number of distilleries having the daily capacity aboA^e stated, and
situated in 46 collection districts, resulting in an immediate saAdng of
$634 daily, and a total saving during the remainder of the fiscal year
of nearly'$26,000.
Notwithstanding these measures of economy there was a deficiency
in the apxiroxiriation for the pay of storekeexiers and gaugers and miscellaneous expenses for the last fiscal year, of $65,000. I liaA^e.the honor
to recommend that this sum be appropriated at the earliest day xiracticable, so that these officers shall receive psij for their services. APPOINTMENTS OF STOREKEEPERS, GAUGERS^ &C.

On the 16th of July last the system of appointing storekeepers, gaugers
and other subordinate officers of the Internal Eevenue SerAdce, established by circular of date of June 30, 1880, was changed by the following order:
. .^
TinsASURA^ DEPARTMENT, O F F I C E OF THE SECRETARY,

Washington, D. C , July 16, 1881.
To Collectors of Iniernal Bevenue :
•
Hereafter, in recouimending persons for appointment to the office of storekeeper,
gauger, storekeeper and gauger, or inspector of tobacco, snuif, and cigars, collectors
of internal reveuue will require each person recommended to make an application in'
writing, addressed to the Secretary of the Treasury, stating his age, legal residence,
place of nativity, service in'the Army or Navy, if any, names of relatives, if any, in
the goverument service, and in what capacity employed ; experience in the duties of
the office for Avhich he applies; business in which engaged at date of aiDplication, and
interest which he proposes to retain therein should he be appointed.
.The application must be accompanied by testimonials as to character for sobriety,
industry, and business habits of the applicant, and will be inclosed in a letter addressed by the colle.ctor of the district to the Secretary of the. Treasury, and forwarded
to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, stating the necessity for the appointment,
and his personal knowledge as to the fitness of the applicant for the position.
If the appointmeiit will involve the dismissal of any person in the service, t h a t fact
should be stated by the collector, as well as the reasons why, in his'opinion, the dismissal should be made.
'*'
. Correspondence relative to the removals and resignations of incumbents should be
addressed to the Secretary of the Treasury through the Commissioner of Internal
Revenne.



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

77

All i:)apers relating to the appointment and removal of such officers (including copies
of reports of revenue agents) will be forwarded by the Commissioner of Internal
Revenue, with his recommendation in each case indorsed thereon, to the Secretary of
. the Treasury for action.
AVILLIAM AVINDOM,
Secretary.

The system established by this circular Avorks admirably. A beneficial effect upon the serAdce was felt immediately after its adoption, and
it is now found quite practicable to hold these officers to a proper accountability, and to establish amongst them a spirit of emulation similar
to that which prevails in other branches of the service.
GENERAL CONDITION OF THE SERVICE.

The condition of the service continues to improve, and the spirit of
emulation engendered by frequent inspections of officers, and reports
upon the various districts is unabated. Thorough discipline is enforced
in every branch, and cA^ery officer is held responsible for the faithful
performance of his duties.
EXAMINATION OF COLLECTORS' OFFICES.

The frequent examination of the accounts of collectors has been continued during the xiast year with most gratifying results. Increased
pride in the service is everywhere manifest, and complete uniformity in
the method of keeping accounts prcA^ails throughout the country. The
standard of excellence reached is A^ery commendable and refiects great
credit uxion the collectors and their subordinates.
Experience has shown that the most trusted xiersons having custody
of xmblic or private funds may yield to the temptation of converting
those funds to their individual use. The sense of wrong-doing prcA^ents
the perpetration of such acts by the majority of persons, but the constant danger of detection and exposure by careful examinations of accounts, made at irregular intervals, doubtless exerts a wholesome check
over those Avho might otherwise, perhaps, prove derelict.
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES.

In comxiliance with the provisions of the act of March 3,1881, making
appropriation for internal revenue, I submit th,e following detailed statement of the miscellaneous expenses for the service:
Express on public money to depositories
Stationery for internal-revenue officers
Internal-revenue Record for internal-re venue officers
Telegraphing
.:..
Compensation of United States attorneys in internal-revenue cases under
sections 827 and 838, Revised Statutes
Locks for distilleries
.r..
Hydrometers for use in gauging spirits
Gauging-rods for standard-test gauging, &c
Expenses of seizures and sales by collectors
Steel dies for numbering stills for fruit spirits
Traveling expenses of clerk's under special orders of the department.
Rent,of offices leased by the Secretary ofthe Treasury in New York City for
the collector of the second district
,. .•
Total




\....'.....

$6, 655
lo, 925
2,409
1, 312

37 ,
36
35
93

7,948
4,509
10,200
217
709
18
930

50
10
95
00
05
15
44

5,291 67

. : : . . . 54,127 87

\

78

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
EXPENSES OF COLLECTORS' OFFICES.

The expenses for compensation of collectors, deputy collectors, &c.,
per diem of storekeepers, and fees and expenses of gaugers in each collection district are shoAvn in the followiner statement:

Collection districts.

First Alabama
Second Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
First California
Fourtli California . . .
Colorado
First Connecticut . . .
Second Connecticut..
Dakota
DelaAvare
Florida
Second G-eor^ia
> Third Greorgia
Idaho
First Illinois
Second Illinois
Third Illinois
Fourth Illinois
Fifth niinois
Seventh Illinois
Eighth Illinois
Thirteenth Illinois..
First Indiana
Fourth Indiana
Sixth Indiana
Seventh Indiana
Tenth Indiana
Eleventh Indiana
Second Iowa
Third Iowa
Fourtli Iowa
Fifth Iowa
Kansas
Second Kentucky
Fifth Kentucky*
Sixth Kentucky
Seventh Kentucky
Eighth Kentucky ....
Ninth Kentucky-.....
Louisiana
Maine
Third Maryland
Fourth. Maryland
Third Massachusetts.
Fifth Massachusetts .
Tenth Massachusetts
First Michigan
Third Michigan
Fourth Michigan
Sixth Michigan
..
First Minnesota
Second Minnesota
Mississippi
First Missouri
Second Missouri
Fourth Missouri
Fifth Missouri
Sixth Missouri
,
Montana
Nehraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
First New Jersey
Third New Jersey ...
Fifth New Jersey
. New Mexico '.




[Compensation
of colle'ctors
and deputy
collectors and
office e x p e n ses.

P e r d i e m of Fees and travstorek eep. ers eling expenses
and storekeep- of grangers.
er gaugers.

880 33
546
615
608
508
654
084
213
671
809
649
205
745
204
005
481
814
796
674
738
121
211
857
846
781
338
778
890
516
937
193
783
814
148
122
829
478
998
198
640
089
729
487
562
547
009
851
374
702
549
525
285
354
518
071
808
156
435
828
Sll
267
923
318
527
536
207
284

95
15
60
44
00
25
23
99
84
28
27
07
01
53
08
88
72
89
33
25
81
82
45
08
92
32
23
29
94
70
15
41
85
94
67
76
76
35
71
99
36
42
88
34
08
41
78
66
89
39
85
00
75
46
04
00
60
43
50
51
00
76
00
00
01
45

$3,439 00
10, 504 00
20, 464 00
5, 008 00
1, 252 00
4, 076 00
1,136 00

$1, 304 19
718 62
234 78
895 75
20, 700 76
6,411 25
1,253 82
3, 665 96
2, 829 40
1, 459 14

37,665 00
2, 356 00
1, 252 00
30, 718 00
1, 252 00
4, 834'00
6, 344 00
49, 388 00

3, 950 70
2,018 70
324 54
47,162 36
455 42
2, 780 00
4, 534 48
45, 860 00

17, 824 00
3, 780 00
2,756 00
21, 556 00
7, 542 00
13, 672 00

11,038 72
3, 351 96
3,121 95
18, 390 23
4, 780 07
9, 688 34
985 34

587 00
5, 748 00
470 00
4, 096 00
2, 332 00
46, 742 00
162, 244 00
42,116 00
90, 700 00
35, 668 00
7, 229 00
112 00
17,124 00
13, 353 00
5, 840 00
9, 364 00
2, 504 CO

3, 414 53
1, 061 60
992 28
2, 862 69
1, 267 51
20, 784 86
53, 342 11
39, 759 89
23, 711 18
• 3, 777 73
2, 893 05
5, 709 82
27,765 51
593 00
10, 981 10
6, 346 85
2, 221 87
1, 491 37
50 56
529 65
2,187 08

11, 728 00
4, 970 00
6,969 00
2, 802 00
11, 639 00
7, 236 00.
1,460%
2, 000 00

27,144 04
883 65
84 47
97 45
2, 788 92
231 00
5, 994 28
160 57
1, 012 54
1, 572 36
3,130 57
2, 069 40
143 55

79

COMMISSIONER OF INTEENAL EEVENUE.

Collection districts.

Compensation
of collectors
a n d deputy
collectors
and office expenses.

First New York
Second New York
Third New York
Eleventh New York
Twelfth New York
Fourteenth New York
Fifteenth New York
Twenty-first New York
Twenty-fourth New York . . .
Twenty-sixth New York
Twenty-eighth New York
Thirtieth New York
Second North Carolina
Fourth North Carolina
Fifth North Carolina
Sixth North Carolina
First Ohio
Third Ohio
Fourth Ohio
Sixth Ohio
Seventh Ohio .*.
Tenth Ohio
Eleventh Ohio
Fifteenth Ohio
Eighteenth Ohio
Oregon
First Pennsylvania
Eighth Pennsylvania
Ninth Pennsylvania
Twelfth Pennsylvania
Fourteenth Pennsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsylvania
Nineteenth Pemisylvania
Twentieth Pennsylvania
Twenty-second Pennsylvania
Twenty-third Pennsylvania..
Khode Island
.Ai
South Carolina
Second Tennessee
Fifth Tennessee
Eighth Tennessee
First Texas
Third Texas
Fourth Texas
trtah.......'
Vermont
Second Virginia
Third Virginia
Fourth Virginia
Fifth Virginia
Sixth Virginia
Washington Territory . . .
First West Virginia
Second West Virginia . . . i . . .
First Wisconsin.
Second Wisconsin..:
Third Wisconsin
Sixth Wisconsin
Wyoming

931 39
74
92
45
84
16
17
56
17
16
20
39
18
69
34
35
29
52
15
9,
486
58
7,
269
85
12,
14, 780 27
12, 372 28
312 37
8, 739 14
20, 494 85
7, 073 96
42, 877 02
14, 905 75
17> 626 32
15, 245 83
10. 104 15
11, 504 98
6, 605 64
7, 543 76
21, 403 84
13, 180 76
9; 632 83
26, 648 14
12, 800 39
22, 926 13
9, 311 40
16, 597 98
11, 768 64
9, 209 00
6, 924 11
5, 086 43
23, 735 80
20, 643 43.
19, 582 33
26, 882 93
860 50
14, 331 51
5, 522 38
13, 645 34
7, 062 88
14, 954 35
8,
10, 932 35
7, 273 15
5,
18,103 43

37, 637
42, 724
10, ^019
14, 512
12, 783
8, 326
10, 286
11, 118
9, 505
17, 523
18, 730
15, 173
31, 458
24, 586
48, 417
30, 682
17, 342
323

Totar.

Per diem of Fees andtravstorekeepers
ehng expenand storeses of gangkeeper gaugers.
ers.

I 372 00

1, 284 00
3, 438 00
5, 648
3, 342
8, 813
80, 987
211, 437
43, 840
7, 782
3, 728
4, 332
3, 996
5, 608
4, 504
3, 652
5, 480

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

4, 452
5, 801
11, 21.8
3,109
14, 444
21, 985

00
00.
00
00
00
00

$11, 251 99
26, 627 90
4, 528 18
995 13
485 00
2, 806 75
698 08
1, 541 94
3, 435 02
359 43
4, 718 34
8, 415 23
1, 387- 95
2, 353 94
927 90
8, 470 03
84, 451 34 •
. 6, 422 05
2, 827 23
3,460 62
2, 640 47
5, 297 26
5, 470 89
77 70
3,118 90
1,101 80
34, 418 39
2,731 48
1, 694' -^4
2, 682 55
496 12
34 03
414 68

"3," 704'66'
• 36, 042 00

6, ISO 00
17,427 00
15, 414 00
66, 479 00
2,400 00
2, 038 00
702 00

1, 008 00
3, 826 00
28, 528 00
4, 876 00
11,148 00
1,140 00

15, 319 89
5, 979 15
677 77
1, 272 21
1, 801 64
12, 271 91
71 15
1, 848 62
301 66
89 61
1,172 62
131 05
4, 039 55
3, 021 36
573 40
3, 381 45
2, 761 46
•2,'521 "79
3, 205 93
12, 010 22
915 40
537 61

1, 411, 015 00

Becapitulation.
Salaries of collectors, &c..".
$1,898,103 43
Per diem of storekeepers
,
1,411,015 00
Fees and expenses of gaugers
765, 221 53
Add salaries and expenses of revenue agents, expenses for stamps, paper, and dies, salaries ot officers and clerks in office of the Commissioner, aud miscellaneous expenses, <fec
975, 662 32
Total




".

-....

5,050,002 28

80

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

SCALE OF SALARIES OF COLLECTORS.

The recommendations made for the salaries of collectors for the fiscal
year ending June 30,1882, are based upon an estimate of their probable
collections according to the following scale, with the qualification that
if the actual collections should vary from the amounts estimated the
salaries will be readjusted at the end of the fiscal year:
For collection of—
125,000 or l e s s . - . . 25,000 to 137,500—$12,500..
37,500 to 50,000— 12,500
50, 000 to 75,000— 25,000
.75, 000 to 100,000— 25,000.
100,000 to 125,000— 25,000
:.
125, 000 to 175, 0 0 0 — 50,000.:
175, 000 to 225,000— 50,000
225, 000 to 275, 0 0 0 — 50, 000........
275,000 to 325, 0 0 0 — 50,000
325, 000 to 375, 0 0 0 — 50,000
375, 000 to 425, 0 0 0 — 50, 000
425, 000 to 475, 0 0 0 — 50,000
475, 000 to 550, 0 0 0 — 75,000.
550, 000 to 625, 000— 75,000
625, 000 to'700, 000— 75,000
700, 000 to 775:000— 75,000

•

:
•.
-

| 2 , 000
2,125
2,250
2,375
2,500
2,625
2,750
2,8753,000
3,125
3,350
3, 375
.*.... 3,500
3,625
3,750
3,875
4,000

WORK OF REVENUE AGENTS.

Thirtj^-fiA^e revenue agents haA^e been employed during thepast 3^ear,
1 as chief of diAdsion in the office, 22 in charge of divisions, 5 employecl
in examining collectors' accounts, 4 assistant agents in chargeof divisions,
a u d i on special duty. One thousand three hundred and seventeen violations of law have been reported by revenue agents during the year,
^ve hundred and three persons haA^e been arrested on their inforination,
property to the value of $73,365.36 has been reported by thein for seizure, and unpaid taxes and penalties amounting to $495,035.43 have been,
reported by thein.
There has been expended from the appropriation for salaries and
expenses of revenue agents during the year as follows:
Aggregate salary of agents
$82,880 65
Aggregate amonnt for traveling expenses
41, 619 08
Stationery furnisiied agents
229 20
Transportation over Pacific Railroads nnder orders from Treasnry Department
1,757 88
Total

„ . . . 126,486 81

EXPENDITURES FOR THE DISCOVERY AND PUNISHMENT OF FRAUD.

In accordance with the provisions of the act makihg the appropriation,
the following detailed stateinent of expenditures from the appropriation'
for detecting and bringing to j:rial and punishment persons guilty of
violating the internal revenue laws is subinitted.
Amount expended through collectors of internal revenue in the employment of persons for the detection of frauds, and for inforination




COMMISSIONER

OF INTERNAL

81

REVENUE.

leading to. the discovery of frauds, and punishment of guilty persons, as
follows:
Name.
Buckner, J . F
Brayton, E. M
Brown, George W .
Blaine, J . E . . . . . . . .
Clark, A
Duval, I. H
Davis, T. W - ,
Eagan, D
Fernald, AV.L
Harvey, J. D?
Ludlow, B. C
Landram, AV. J..":.
Melton, J. M-i-.....
Marks, Morris
Mott, J . J . . . -^..:..
Patterson, R F
Proud, R. M...
Kapler, J. T . .
Bives, J . H
Stuart, W. A
AVoodcock, W. M . Wheeler, W. H . . . .
Wade, E. C
Wheeler, E
White, E. A
Wilson, AV. S .,
Young, I. J

District.

Amount.

Fifth Kentucky
South Carolina
Second West Virginia
Ninth Tennessee
Second G-eorgia
—
First West Virginia
Twenty-second Pennsylvania.
Florida
.Fourth Virginia
First Illinois
Third Texas
Eighth Kentucky
Second Tennessee
Louisiana
Sixth North Carolina
,
.Eifrhth Tennessee
Third Maryland
Second' Alabama
Fifth Virginia
Second Kentucky
Fifth Tennessee.'
Fifth North Carolina
Third Georgia
Arkansas ..'
Second North Carolina
Fifth Kentucky
Fourth North Carolina.

Total disbursed by collectors .

$536 00
1,123 00
129 27
599 65
2, 754 50
905 50
110 79
.485 70
293 65
200.00
127 00
1, 703 02
566 00
2 80
3,091 50
385 .75
15 00
747 25
1, 317 28
253 55
214 00
422 00
330 40
472 00°
100 00
95 00
304 00

20, 284 61

Amount expended for like purposes, through revenue agents, as follows:
Atkinson, George AV
Blocker, O . H
Brooks,A.H
Chapman,E.R.
Chapman, AV.H
Crane, A. M
Dowling, P. H
Eldridge, CAV
Grimeson,T.J
Kellogg, H
Kinney,T.J...
Latham, E
Meyer,Ferd
Packard, J . . . . .
Ranm,J..M
Somerville, AV
T r a d e , T.C
Trnmbnll,J.L
AVliitfield, S. A
AVebster, E . D
Wagner, J
Wilson, G.AV
Total disbursed by revenue a g e n t s - . . . .
Amount expended by collectors
Amount expended by revenue agents
ReAvards under Circular No. 99
Rewards under circular of Marcb 10,1875
Extra w o r k . . .
Miscellaneous
Total

..1

.,

-.-

,

--.....

$1,431
2,421
1,786
175
20
224
30
54
2,980
1,9.36
1,883
210
1,094
1,447
48
1,614
1,452
68
. . 2,841
4,341
, 492
687

92
99
63
35
00
10
00
57
34
99
85
00
51
30
50
78
29
00
99
47
65
25

27,244 48
|20,284.61
27,244 48
11,334 .34
150 00
4,645 80
130 75
63,789 98

The accounts for expenditures under this appropriation are rendered
monthly Avith an itemized statement, and in all cases supported by subA^ouchers duly sworn to. These accounts pass through all the account6 F



82

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

ing offices of the Treasury Department, and are filed in the ^Registers
Office.
OPERATIONS AGAINST I L L I C I T D I S T I L L E R S .

The following statement shows the number of illicit stills seized, persons arrested and officers and employes killed and wounded during the
last fiscal year, and from June 30 to ISTovember 1, 1881.
•
Officers a n d em•

Persons arrested.

Stills seized.

ployes killed
and wounded.

0
CO
©

Districts.

1

O

d

P
Second A l a b a m a
D i s t r i c t of A r k a n s a s . .
D i s t r i c t of F l o r i d a
.
Second G e o r g i a
Third Georgia
Seventh Indiana
Thirdlowa.. :.
Secoud K e n t u c k y
Fifth Kentucky"
.
Eightli Kentuclvy
Ninth Kentucky
Districtof Louisiana
Second Minnesota
:.
Fifth Missouri.
Sixth Missouri
Fourth Michigan
T w e l f t h N e w Y o r k ...-.
Twenty-first N e w York
Twenty-sixth N e w York
Fiftii N e w J e r s e y
Second N o r t h C a r o l i n a
F o u r t h N o r t h Carolina
. .
Fifth N o r t h Carolina
Sixth N o r t h Carolina
S e v e n t h Ohio
E i g h t e e n t h Ohio
Twenty-second Pennsylvania
D i s t r i c t of S o u t h C a r o l i n a
Second Tennessee
Fifth Tennessee
:
Eighth Tennessee ..
Third Texas
D i s t r i c t of V e r m o n t
F o u r t h Virginia
Fiftli Virginia
.
Sixth Virginia'.
".
F i r s t AVest V i r g i n i a
Second AVest Vii'ginia . . .
Washington Territory

•

m
17

".
!. -

11
192 • • ' " " i o '
19
2
1
2
2
33
3
14
1
45
1
10
2
2
2
2
1
1
1 "•"*i
1
1
2
23
53
215
1
1
2
24
19
27
3
1

i"
4
10
30

i2"

ii"
3'

9
16
5
2
1

Totals

756
/

2"
4

103

i

rt
Ha

.S ^
.'3

§

•

"0

•1.

P.

H

17 • 169
48
3
1
11 '"**"i6"
7
202
162
442
21
1
4
1
4
•4
2
36
35
35
15
5
46
33
12
80 " • " " 2 3 '
3
2
2
3
io'
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2 ' ' '3'
27
1
63
1
245
1
1
2
3
36
2
5'
137
19.
14
38
143
13
3
2
1
6
3
9
3'
18
7
57
4
5
15
13
2
1
1

217
3
17
604

859

6
70
5
33
103
3
1
12

1

•

2

i
3
1
1
1
1

i'

1,152

2

1

•5

i*

"*"""i'

I

• .a

3
7
151
156
2

2

*i
3

6
3
64
1

28
1

358

1,510

9

2

•

Number of persons killed during fiscal year ended J u n e 30, 1881—1.
" Number of persons kiUed from June 30 to Noveml)er 1, 1881—1.

The following table shows the number of illicit stills seized, persons
arrested operating the same, and casualties to officers and employes in
the suppression of illicit distillation during the last five fiscal years, and
from June 30 to ISTovember 1, 1881:

s t i l l s seized
Persons arrested
Officers a n d e m p l o y e s k i l l e d . . . . . .
Officers a n d e m p l o y e s w o u n d e d




J n n e 30 t o
November
1,188L

1877.

1878. • 1879.

1880.

1881.

^ 598
1,174
12
8

1,024 .1,319
1,976
2,924
10.
17
2*2

969
1,031

756
1,152

8'

\

103
358
1

Total.

4,769
8,615
28
64

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL

83

REVENUE.

ORDNANCE IN THE HANDS OF COLLECTORS.

©There is in the hands of collectors and others, for the enforcement
of the laws, the following-described ordnance, for which they are responsible :
CO
CJ

00

' i
. i

•D

District.

Name.

o

%

<o

fl

James T Kapier
Dennis Eagan
Andrew Clark
E. C Wade
Morris Marks
I. J . Young
Greorge B. Everitt
J . J. Mott
E. M. Brayton
J . M. Melton
W. M. AA^oodcock
p.. F . Patterson
J . H. Kives
T. H. Pierpont
Jacob Wagner, revenue
agent.
P . H. Dowling, revenue
agent.

Second Alabama
Florida
Second Georgia
Third Georo'ia
Louisiana
Fourth North Carolina
Fifth North Carolina
Sixth North Carolina
South Carolina
Second Tennessee
Fifth Tennessee
Eighth Tennessee
Fifth Virginia
c
Second AVest Virginia

0
Pi
®
bfl

Sit
S'fl

TS

1

f

i
tc

cs

rrt

0

1

0

Od

&

1
8

6
5
62
12
6
10 " " 2
11
2
11
13
10 .......
3
2
1
24
6
1
1

62
6
10
8

1

62

4

13

1

9

1
1

1

12

Total

8

194

88

6

1

85

5

OFFICIAL FORCE FOR FISCAL YEAR 1882.

The force connected with this bureau in the various districts through
out the United States is as follows:
One hundred and twenty-six collectors, who receive salaries as follows:
Thirty-one
Four
Four
One
Two
Three
Two
Three
Three
One

$4,500
4,375
...« 4,250
4,125
4,000
3,875
3,750
3,625
3,500
3,375

Five
Seven
Sixteen
Eight
Nine
Seven
Eleven
Tliree
Four
Two.

1

-

,

$3,250
3,125
3,000
2,875
2,750
2,625
2,500
2,375
2,250
2,000

There are also employed one thousand and thirty-five deputy collectors, who receive salaries and traA^eling expenses as follows:
One
Eighteen
Ten
Four
Forty-five
Thirty-eight
Ten
Seventy-five
Seventeen
Ninety-eight
Twenty-five




$2,100
2,000
1,900
1,850
1,800
1,700
1,650
1,600
1,550
1,500
1,450

Two hundred and thirty-nine
Twenty-two
One
Seventy-two
Thirteen
Ninety-three
Two
Twenty-two
Thirty-five
Eleven
Ono

$1, 400
1. 350
1,325
1,300
1,250
1,200
1,175
1,150
1,100
1,050
1,025

84

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Thirty-five
Five
:
Thirty-nine
Four....:
Ten
Three
One
Eleven
Thirteen
Two

$1,000
950
900
850
• 800
750
720
700
600
550

Eight
One
Twenty-four
Six
Eleven
Three
Three.
Three
One

'

.^.

$500
400
300
2§0
200
150
120
100
60

Also, one hundred and ninety-one clerks, messengers, and janitors,
who receiA^e salaries as folloAvs:
One clerk
Oneclerk
Five clerks
Seven clerks
Two clerks
Four c l e r k s - - . . - . . , . . . .
Twenty-six clerks
Eighteen clerks
.. Twenty clerks
Twenty-seven clerksEighteen clerks
Fonr clerks
Two clerks
Three clerks
Two clerks
Two clerks

,

$1,700
1,600
1,500
1,400
1,350
1,300
1,200
1,100
1,000
900
800
750
720
700
670,
625

Twelve clerks
Eight clerks
Three clerks
One clerk
Seven clerks
Two clerks
Three janitors
One janitor
One janitor
One janitor
Three messengers.
One messenger . . .
Two messengers . .
One messenger . . .
Two ]D or ter 8
..
One porter

500
400
350
300
200

:^oo
120
100
75
600
450
300
200
300
100

There are also employed 706 gaugers who receive fees not to exceed
$5 per diem 5' 1,074 storekeepers^and gaugers Avho receive not to exceed
$4 per diem; 644 storekeepers who receive not to exceed $4 per diem
(all of the foregoing officers are paid only Avhen actually employed), and
30 tobacco inspectors who receive fees to be paid bythe manufacturers.
Storekeepers and gaugers assigned to distilleries of a capacity not
exceeding twenty bushels receiA^e but $3 per diem.
CONDITION OF THE OFFICE.

The work of this office has been kept thoroughly in hand,,the ambition ofthe employes being to make a record entitling them to the commendation of their superiors. ]!:^othing has been left undone by the sev•eral heads of divisions and their subordinates to bring the service up to
that high standard of excellence which challenges commendation.
I desire to thank the officers, clerks, and employes of this bureau for
the cheerful alacrity with which they respond to every duty, and the
pride shown by them in their efforts to bring the service in this office to
highest perfection.
R E P O R T OF WORK P E R F O R M E D .

The following is a statement of the work performed by the different
divisions of the office during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881.
D I V I S I O N O F LAAV.

Offers in compromise briefed
Opinions prepared
•Otfers^in compromise acted updn
Reward claims acted upon
Railroad cases adjusted



,..

689
614
64»
378
19

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.
Orders for abatement of taxes issued
,.
Claims for abatement of taxes disposed of
Amount of abatement claims allowed (uncollectible)
Amount of abatement claims allowed (erroneous assessment)
Amonnt of a^batement clairas rejected (uncollectible)
Amount of abatement claims rejected (assessment claimed to be erroneous)
Claims for abatement of taxes retnrned for amendment
Claims for refunding of taxes disposed of
•
Amount of refuudinc^ claims allowed
"
Amouut of refunding claims rejected
.'
Clairas for refunding of taxes returned for amendment
Claims for abatement of taxes disposed of during four months ended
October 31,1881
Claims for abatement of taxes on hand November 1, 1881

85
561
3, 844
$948,743 36
233, 850 28
455,198 29
95, 876 13
987
274
$42,988 21
53, 629 18
122
1,217
447

DIVISION OF DISTILLED SPIRITS.

Returns and reports relating to distilled spirits examined and disposed
of
Returns and reports relating to fermented liquors examined and disposed of ,
'.
Computations of capacities of distilleries made, and data for assessment furnished
Locks examined and issued
Hydrometer sets, stems, cups, and thermometers tested and issued . .
Gauging rods examined and issued
Wantage rods examined and issued
-.

243,194
34,210

^

14,156
4,304
2,833
' 277
308

D I V I S I O N O F TOBACCO.

Reports relating to tobacco examined and disposed of
Reports relating to cigars examined and disposed of
Abatement and refunding claims audited

2, 810
-25,856
274

DIAHLSION O F STAMPS.

A-alue of stamps received from printer and counted
$149, 900, 300 10
Value of stamps counted and transmitted to Secretary of the Treasury for destruction
$1,088,693 57
Number of mail x>ackages of stamps sent from stamp vault
42, 774
Nnmber of express packages of stamps sent from stamp vault
2, 566
Number of coupon books forwarded to Fifth Auditor
25,110
Number of coupons received for credit and counted
40,332,140
Number of stubs examined
11,169,200
Number of reports examined and disposed of
38, .506
Amount of claims for redemption of stanips allowed
$28,476 45
Amount of claims for exchange of staraj)s alloAved
$36,718 54
Amount of claims for release of duplicate charges allowed
$77,950 82
D I A a ^ O N OF ASSESSMENTS.

Reports relating to assessments examined and disposed of
Reports relating to bonded accounts examined and disposed of
Reports and vouchers relative to exportations examined and disposed
of
Claims for drawback disj^osed of
DIVISION

444,956
664

OF ACCOUNTS.

AA'^eekly reports examined and disposed of ,
^.
Monthly reports examined and disposed of
Quarterly reports examined and disposed of
Miscellaueous accounts examined and disposed of.'.
Final 'accounts of collectors referred for settlement
Certificates of deposit recorded
'
Drafts mailed to collectors for expenses of ofiice
Drafts mailed to collectors for gangers' fees and expenses
Drafts mailed to collectors for transfer of special deposits
Drafts mailed to collectors for compromise ofiers returned
Collectors' monthly reports of taxes, &c., consolidated into yearly
statements
»



49,039
486, 864

4,956
21, 863
514
701
25
34, 643
1,527
7, 046
523
39
1,020

86

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
DIADSION O F R E V E N U E A G E N T S .

Rex>orts of revenue agents disposed of.
.,
Reports of collectors relative to illicit distilleries disposed of
Accounts of revenue agents examined
Miscellaneous expense accounts examined
Railroad and income cases examined and reported on
Transcripts of books of leaf-tobacco dealers examined and abstracted.
Quarterly returns of ordnance and ordnance stores in hands of collectors examined . . . .

2,103
320
827
289
33
3,118
r

55

DIVISION OF APPOINTMENTS, RECORDS, AND F I L E S .

Commissions of collectors recorded, collectors notified, and blank
bonds prepared
Bonds, of collectors recorded
:.—
Disbursing bonds recorded
Commissions of storekeepers, storekeepers and gaugers, gaugers and
tobacco inspectors recorded, and appointees notified
Bonds of storekeepers, storekeepers and gaugers, gangers and tobacco
insxiectors, examined
Rexiorts of inspecting officers on condition of collection districts examined and acted on
Reports of examining ofiicers on condition of collectors' offices examined and acted on
Pages of letters recorded...
Press copies of letters briefed, registered, and arranged for reference..
Pages of miscellaneous cox)ying
Letters for entire bureau received and registered
-. 1
.'...
Letters briefed and
filed...
;
Aggregate number of letters mailed by the bureau
Blank forms xirepared and issued
Blank books prepared and issued
J

22
25
22
917
838
51
384
27, 083
. 5 2 , 611
22,516
43,861
35,223
66,150
8,131, 830
13,446

SALARIES.

I have the honor to recommend that Congress appropriate for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883, the sum of $257,600, as salaries for the
following officers, clerks, and employes in this bureau:
One comnissioner, a t . . . . . .
One deputy comraissioner, at
Seven heads of division, at
One stenographer, at
Twenty-three clerks, class four, at
Twenty-six clerks, class three, at
Thirty-six clerks, class two, at
/
Twenty-one clerks, class one, at
Thirteen clerks, at
Fifty clerks, at
Three messengers, at
Four assist ant messengers, at
Ten laborers, at
An aggregate of one hundred and ninety-six persons.

,

$6,000
3,500
2,500
2, 000
1,800
1,600 ^
1, 400 "
1,200
1,000
900
840
720
660

An increase in the salary of the deputy commissioner, and of the five
heads of division, is recommended for the following reasons:
The law creating the office of dexiuty commissioner fixed his salary at
$3,500. The duties ofthe office are of great importance, and their faithful performance fully entitles the officer to that pay.
The law creating the office of head ol* division states that there shall
be seven heads of division, Avho shall receiA^e each a salary of $2,500.
The appropriations for the years ending June 30, 1878, Juue 30, 1879,
June 30, 1880, and June 30, 1881, allowed two heads of diAisiou at a
salary of $2,500 each, and five heads of division at a salary of $2,250



COMMISSIONER

OF INTERNAL

87

REVENUE.

each. There is no just ground for this discrimination; the officers fully
earn $2,5.00 each, and in my judgment should receive that amount.
An increase in the salary of the stenographer is recommended for the
reason that the law authorizing the appointment fixes the compensation
at $2,000, which is no more than a.just remuneration for the duties performed.
The force of messengers and laborers in this office is entirely inadequate for the increased work to be done. I therefore make a special
request that three messengers be added to the force.
An increase of $4,270 over the appropriation for the present year will
give the above named officers the salaries to which they are entitled
under the law, ^nd will provide for the necessary increase in the messenger force.
MANUFACTURE OF P A P E R .

During the fiscal year there has been manufactured by Messrs. S. D .
Warren & Co., of Boston, under the contract entered into May 24,1880,
600,000 pounds of paper for internal-revenue stamps. The prices paid
were for vegetable-sized paper l l j cents per pound, and for animal-sized
paper 12J cents per pound. An additional order has been given to the
above-named parties for 261,000 pounds under the same contract and at
same rates for the year ending June 30,1882. The paper furnished has
been satisfactory as to quality, and orders have been promptly executed.
PRODUCTION OF STAMPS.

During the last fiscal year all internal-revenue stamps have been produced by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, except stamps imprinted
upon bank checks, which are supplied by the Graphic Company of ISTew
York City, and stamps upon foil wrappers for tobacco, whi.ch are printed
by John J. Crooke & Co., ofthe aforesaid city, both under the superintendence of this office.
NUMBER AND VALUE OF STAMPS ISSUED,

During the fiscal year stamps were received by this office from the
printers, and issued to collectors, agents, and purchasers as folio AVS, viz:
Kind.

Number.

Value.

Stanips for distilled spirits, tax-i)aid
Stamps for distilled spiiits, other than tax-paid —

1, 367, 400
4,-798, 800

$71,^084,790 00
20, 600 00

Stamps for distilled spirits, aggregate
Stamps for tobacco aud snuff
,
Stamps for cigars and cigarettes
:
Stamps for fermented liquors and brewers' permits
Stamps for special taxes
!
Stamps for documents and proprietary articles

6,165, 200
246,163, 720
78, 070, 733
49, 618, 420
729, 570
331, 712, 680

71,105, 390 00
28, 993, 066 12
17, 033, 956 50
14, 63C, 225 00
9, 606, 850 00
4,165, 206 75

712, 460, 323

145, 534, 694 37

Total

All stamps delivered to this office by the Bureau of EngraAdng and
Printing were, on their receipt, counted, and their issue, as above, involved
the preparation of 45,340 packages, 42,774 of which were forwarded to
their destination by registered mail and 2,566 were forwarded by express.
The handling of this large number of stamps has been accomplished
without loss, either while in the hands of the printers, in the custody



88

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

of this office, or in the course of transmission. The officers of the Washin gton City ]iost-office are entitled to the thanivs of this office for the
prompt and faithful manner in which this large amountof registered
matter has been handled.
REDEMPTION OF STAMPS.

I renew the recommendation made in my last report, that that portion
of section 17 of the actof March 1,1879, which prohibits the redeiniition
of stamps unless the same are presented within three years after their
purchase frorn the government or a government agent for the sale of
stamps, be repealed.
MATCH STAMPS SOLD.

Amount of stamps sold to match manafactarers during the following
fiscal years, commissions not deducted :
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

. . . . . : ...•

•.
:

$2,849,524
2,982,275
3,064,574
3,3.57,251
3,561,300
3,606,437

00
00
00
00
00
62

SUITS ON MATCH BONDS.

Ofthe thirteen suits referred to in my last annual report as pending
against stamp agents and match manufacturers, on bonds, for the recovery of $117,413.01 due on the sale of stamps for the past five years,
there are ten remaining undisxiosed of, amounting to $107,877.20.
There haA^e been 24 persons, iirincipals and sureties on match manufacturers' bonds, proceeded against criminally for attemxiling to defraud
the government, five of whom have been convicted and are now in the
penitentiary.
ABSTRACT OF SEIZURES.

Seizures of property for violation of internal-rcA^enue laws during the
fiscal year encled June 30, 188i, were as follows:
30,714 gallons of distilled spirits, valued at
30,299 x'>ounds of tobacco, valued at
.902, 377 cigars, valued a t . . . . .
Miscellaneous property, valued at
Total

$25, 624
6,288
9,127
118,534
'.

37
69
58
69

159,575 33

ABSTRACT OF R E P O R T S OF DISTRICT ATTORNEYS.

The reports of district attorneys for the fiscal year 1881 of internalrevenue suits commenced, pending, and disposed of show that there
were pendiifg July 1, 1880, 7,417'Suits, of Avhich 6,053 AA^ere criminal
actions, 1,064 ciAdl actions, and 300 proceedings in rem. During the
fiscal year 1881, there Avere commenced 3,859 suits, 3,519 of AA^hich were
criminal suits, 279 civil suits, and 61 actions in rem. Of the total of
3,859 suits thus pending, 862 liaA^e been decided in faA^or of the United
States, Avith all costs paid, and 1,378 are reported as decided in favor
of the govern ment but neither judgment nor costs paid; 158 suits were
settled by compromise j 540 suits were decided against the United



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL

89

REVENUE.

States; 1,371 suits were dismissed, and 6,623 suits were pending.July
1,1881. Sentence has been suspended during good behaAaor in 331
criminal cases.
OFFERS IN COMPROMISE.

The following statement shows the number of ofiers received aud
accepted in compromise cases, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881,
with amount of tax, assessed penalty, and specitic penalty accepted, as
provided under section 3229 EcAdsed Statutes:
Compromise
offers—
O PI

Months.

a
July
August....
September.
October
November .
December..

$3, 454 88
2,163 34
20, 030 00
2, 517 80
491 50
8, 674 07

$1, 630 «3
765 50
710 00'
2, 803 53
1, 623 29
780 00

$5, 085 71
2, 937 17
20,740 00
5, 383 83
2,114 79
9,454 07

735 00
15 00
7,180 83
7,833 23
2 50
1,196 47
368 87
10 00
2, 350 42
3, 953 77
25 00
2, 275 27
31, 092 17
9, 731 91 14, 259 33
26, 498 50 • 12, 899 65 5, 558 56

7, 930 83
9, 032 20
2, 729 29
6, 254 04
55, 083 41
44, 956 71

$8 33

1881.

January...
February
March.
April.
May .
June.
Total.

633

572 107,813 13

22, 754 89

41,134 03

AVhole number of offers received
AVhole nnmber of offers accepted
is
Amount of tax accexited
..;:....
Amount of assessed penalty fixed by law
•_
Amount of specific xienalty, in lieu of fines, forfeitures, and penalties
• Total

171, 702 05

633
.
572
$107,813' 13
22,754 89
41,134 03
171,702 05

JUDGMENTS ON BONDS OF EX-COLLEOTORS.

The following list of suits against late collectors of internal revenue
or their sureties, in which judgments haA^e been rendered during the
last fiscal year, has been furnished through the courtesy of the Solicitor
of the Treasury:
United States 'ys. John T. Foster, late collector of internal rcA^enue
for the first collection district of Alabama, et al.; judgment for $9,372.98.
United States vs. Oscar A. Eice, late collector of internal rcA^enue
for the second collection district of Louisiana, et al. ; judgment for
$10,304.42.
United States vs. Orten S. Hayes, surety on the second bond of George
P. Peck, late collector of internal revenue for the second collection district
of North Carolina; judgment for $8,067.
United States vs. Charles W. Woollen, late collector of internal rcA^enue forthe third collection district of ISTorth Carolina, et a l . ; judgment
for $20,514.53.
United States vs. William P. Eichardson, late collector of internal
revenue for the fifteenth collection districtof Ohio, et al.; judgment for
$296.



90

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

United States vs. Peter A. Wilkinson, late collector of internal revenue for the third collection district of Tennessee, et al.; judgment for
$421.91.
United States vs. John IST. Camp, late collector of internal rcA^enue
for the first collection district of Texas, et al.; judgment for $11,226.24.
COMPROMISES A F T E R JUDGMENT.

The records of the Solicitor of the Treasury show that upon offers of
compromise after judgment in internal-revenue cases during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1881,. eleven offers were accepted, involving
$2,977.96; twenty offers were rejected, invohang $4,729 and costs, and
thirteen .offers are pending, involving $7,829.28 and costs.
COLLECTIONS FROM RAILROADS.

. The sum of $91,669.66, unpaid taxes accrued under former laws, has
been collected during the year from ten different railroad comxianies,
making an aggregate amount collected from this source in five years of
$585,810.77.
CO-OPERATION OF OFFICERS OF J U S T I C E .

1 take great pleasure in tendering the thanks of this office to the district attorneys and marshals, and their assistants and depu ties,, for the
promptness and regularity with which their reports have been made
and the correspondence with this office has been attended to, and esxiecially for their valuable aid in securing the enforcement of the laAvs.
The clerks of courts are also entitled to thanks for the promptness with
which they have made their reports.
R E C E I P T S FROM TOBACCO.

The total amount of collections from tobacco for the fiscal year ended
June 30,1881, was $42,854,991.31. This amount includes the collections
of internal-re Avenue taxes imposed upon imported manufactured tobacco,
snuff, and cigars, and the special taxes paid by manufacturers of tobacco,
snuff*, and cigars, and by dealers in leaf and manufactured tobacco, and
is more than the receipts from the same source for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1880, by $3,984,851.23.
TOBACCO AND S N U F F .

'

Manufactured tobacco, at 16 ceuts per pound
Manufactured tobacco, at 24 cents per pound
Snuff, taxed at 16 cents per pound

$22,, 832,.31Q 13
977 47
689,183 03

Total for the year ended J u n e 30, 1881
Total for t h e year ended J u n e 30, 1880

23,522,470 63
21,804,763 74

Increase of collections on tobacco and snuff

1,717,706 89

Of this increase, $1,663,133.20 was on chewing and smoking tobacco
and $54,573.69 on snuff*.




COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.,

91

CIGARS AND CIGARETTES.
Cigars taxed at $6 per thousand
Cigarettes taxed at $1.75 per thousand
Cigarettes taxed at $6 per thousand
Total collections for year ended June 30,1881
Total collections for year ended June 30,1880

$16,095,^4 78
992,927 22
54 00

:

,.

17,088,706 00
14,922,088. 88

Increase, in collections from cigars and cigarettes

2,166,617 12

OTHER COLLECTIONS.
Export stamps, year ended June 30, 1881

-.

$6, 852 40

Export stamps, year ended June :^0,1880

6,622 40

Increase in sale of export stamps

230 00

Dealers in manufactured tobacco, year ended J u n e 30, 1881

1,976, 071 55

Dealers in manufactured tobacco, year ended June 30, 1880

1,864, 422 41

Increase in collections from dealers in manufactured tobacco

111, 649 14

Sxiecial taxes, manufacturers of tobacco and cigars, in 1881

151,442 57

Special taxes, manufacturers of tobacco and cigars, in 1880

153,132 71

, Decrease in special taxes, manufacturers of tobacco and cigars . . .

1,690 14

Special taxes, peddlers of tobacco, year ended June 30, 1881

26,258 13

Special taxes, peddlers of tobacco, year ended June 30, 1880

28,700 45

Decrease in collections from peddlers of tobacco

2,442 32

Dealers in leaf tobacco, year ended June 30, 1881
Dealers in leaf tob,acco, year ended J u n e 30, 1880
Decrease in collections from dealers in leaf tobacco

„

83,190 03
90,409 49
7,219 46

PRODUCTION OF MANUFACTURED TOBACCO, CIGARS, ETC.

Adding to the several quantities of tobacco, snuff, and cigars remoA^ed
for consumption during the fiscal year ended June 30,1881, as computed
from the amount of revenue derived therefrom, the quantities removed
in bond for export, we have the following results, which show the entire
production for the last fiscal year: ,
Pounds.

Tobacco taxed at 16 cents per pound
Tobacco taxed at 24 cents per pound
Snuff taxed at 16 cents perpound
Total quantity removed for consumption
Tobacco and snuff removed for exxiortation

142,701,938
4,073
4,307,394
147,013,405
10,686,471

Total production of tobacco and snuff, 1881
Total production for year ended June 30, 1880

157,699,876
146,082,885

Increase of production




11,616,991

92

V

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
0 .

PRODUCTION OF CIGARS AND CIGARETTES.
0
Cigars, cheroots, &c., taxed at $6 x^er thousand
Cigarettes taxed at $1.75 per thousand
Cigarettes taxed at $6 ^QY thonsand
Cigars and cigarettes removed for export

Number. •
2,682, 620,797
567,386,983
• 9, 000
40,388,135

:

Total product for fiscal year 1 8 8 1 . . . .
Total product for fiscal year 1880

3,290,404,915
2,820,159,820

„

Increase during fiscal year 1881 of

470,245,095

Cigarettes weighing over three pounds per thousand have been generally reported by the manufacturers as cigars; hence the above nuinber,
9,000, does not represent the entire number of cigarettes of this class.
IMPORTED CIGARS.

The cigars imported during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881, as
given by the Bureau of Statistics—
Aggregate in quantity
Of this quantity there were exported
Leaving to be withdrawn for consumption

.•

Pounds.
618,503
77,252
541,251

Allowing 13^ pounds to the thousand as the weight of imported cigars, the
number would be
40,092,667
Number withdrawn, 1880
45,264,667
Decrease during fiscal year 1881 was
5,172,000
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT,OF COLLECTIONS FROM TOBACCO.

The largest collection of revenue from manufactured tobacco and snuff
made iu any one fiscal year was made during the fiscal year ended June
30, 1877, to wit, $28,148,767.90. The rates of tax then Avere, for all kinds
of manufactured chewing and smoking tobacco, 24 cents per pound, and
for snuff*, 32 cents per pound. Of the former, 112,722,055 pounds were
remoA^ed for consumption, and of the latter, 3,424,048 pounds.
During the last fiscal year the total quantity of mat.utactured tobacco,
including snuff, removed for consumption Avas 147,013,405 pounds, being
34,291,350 pounds more than for the year 1877. By reason of the reduced and uniform rate of tax, the collections upon tobacco and snuff*
for the last fiscal year fell below those of 1877 by the sum of $4,626,297.27.
The collections from cigars, cheroots, and cigarettes for the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1877, were $11,061,278.15, whilst for the last fiscal year
they aggregated $17,088,706, shoAving an increase of $6,027,427.85.
The total receipts from tobacco in all its sources for the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1877, were $41,106,546.92. This is the largest amount
collected on tobacco in any one year prior to the last, which shows an
increase over the year 1877 of $1,748,444.39.
It is easy to see from the foregoing statement and figures that the
large and increased collections for the last fiscal year are due mainly to
the remarkable increase in the production and consumption of cigars
and cigarettes, the rates of tax on which have remained undisturbed
since March, 1875.



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

93

COMPARATIAHE PERCENTAGE OF INCREASE.

The increase in the quantity of tobacco and snuff removed for consumption during the last fiscal year over that of the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1877, is found to be 26f per cent., while the increase of cigars
has been over 49 per cent., and of cigarettes over 280 per cent.
TOBACCO P R O D U C T . F O R THE LAST F I V E YEARS.

The following shows the annual product of manufactured tobacco,
snuff*, and cigars, for the last five fiscalyears:
Tohacco—including snuff.
1877.:
1878....
1879
18^0
1881.....

Pounds.
127,481,149
119,406,588
131,433,409
146,082,885
161,631,108

.„.„
\
-.

»

Cigars—including cigarettes.
Number.

1877
1878
1879
1880
1881....

-

1,958,:^91,488
2,082,356,362
2,276,534,081
2,820,159,820
3,307,650,345

--

NUMBER OF MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN TOBACCO.

The following exhibit shows the number of manufacturers of tobacco,
snuff*, and cigars; of dealers and peddlers of manufactured tobacco,
and of dealers in leaf tobacco who paid special tax as such during the
last fiscal year:
c
Manufacturers of tobacco and snuff
Manufacturers of cigars aud cigarettes
Dealers in manufactured tobacco
Peddlers of raanufactured t o b a c c o . . . .
Dealers in leaf tobacco

-

Total persons who paid special taxes

-

917
14,228
395,215
1, 424
3,993
415,777

L E A F TOBACCO.

The annexed tables show that during the calendar year 1880, the
number of pounds of leaf tobacco consumed in the manufacture of
tobacco, snuff', cigars, cheroots, and cigarettes, was as follows:
Pounds.

Manufactured into tobacco and snuff.
Made into cigars, cheroots, and cigarettes
Total leaf manufactured in 1880
Deduct imported leaf used
o
Total domestic leaf used in 1880

145,911, 394
61,183, 358
-

207,094,752
.6,764,530
„ . . . 200,330,222

The tabular statements made in the report of the Bureau of Statistics
for the fiscal year ended June 30,1881, show that the numberof pounds
of leaf tobacco exported during that year Avas 227,026,605.




94

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT showing the NUMBEB of CIGABS MANUFACTUBED in the UNITED
STATES during the calendar year 1880, and the QUANTITY of L E A P TOBACCO
used in their MANUFACTUBE, togeth&t^ with the NUMBEB of ACCOUNTS BEPOBTED on FOBM144.
N u m b e r of P o u n d s of
accounts
tobacco.

State.

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
Delaware
Florida
'.
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
ICansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
'.
Maryland
i
Massacbusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampsbire
New Jersey
N e w Mexico
NewYork
•...
Nortli Carolina
Ohio
Oregon.:
Pennsylvania
Ilhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
ITtah-...
Vermont
'.
,
Virginia
:...
Washington Territory
W e s t Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

33
4
IH
353
27
815
13
51
109
32
1, 021
458
301
110
246
176
52
784
523
539
99
3
580
65
2
49
732
1
3,998
27
1,678
10
4,008
80
17
33
56
2
23
141
3
121

N u m b e r of
cigars.

37, 693
5,675
27, 826
2, 749, 459
32. 812
574, 183
12, 675
116, 704
1, 059,188
69, 319
3,152, 501
1, 079, 723
681, 857
272, 531
728, 518
733, 734
104, 807
1, 826,180
1, 597, 434
1,761,213
335, 734
2,154
1, 252, 896
144, 815
515
64, 981
1,174, 218
873
21, 959, 781
38, 725
5,570,213
19, 866
10,778,611
•173,180
28, 824
45, 986
117, 324
6,433
59, 749
613, 994
5,416
661, 634
1, 503, 471
232

'1,294,500
249, 425
1, 240, 210
116,136,114
1,353,363
24, 678, 317
558, 050
5,133, 967
42, 439, 735
2, 788, 890
132, 622, 258
- 44, 544, 037
29, 282, 209
11, 337, 6ri0
31, 410, 607
29, 047, 595
4, 498, 343
72, 992, 969
65,661,726
72, 567, 520
14,101,857
47, 600
54, 640, 795
5, 786, 656
16,150
3, 056, 915
50, 090, 475
35, 350
821, 351, 885
1,959,780
243, 367, 530
784,250 .
489, 273, 088
7,813,695
1,130, 030
1, 909,106
4, 917,172
215,150
2, 269, 835
19, 378, 344
193, 760
34, 649, 955
62, 899, 096
9,200

Cigarettes rejjorted.
c

California
Florida
Illinois
Louisiana
Maryland
,
Massachusetts
Missouri . . i
New Hampshire
New Jersey
,.
NewYork
North Carolina
Ohio




•.
_..

,
.,
,

Number.

4,854,170
363,317
1,953,690
8,661,210
53,488,965
5,994,735
33,000
229,500
11,015,800
384,072,082
2,347,206
6,519,440

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REA-ENUE.

95
Number.

Pennsylvania^--.,-.'Texas
\
Virginia

2,230,390
158,900
52,259,440

'.........

RECAPITULATION.

Total
Total
Total
Total

number
number
number
number

of accounts reported
of cigars manufactured
of cigarettes manufactured
of pounds tobacco used




,
-.
,

17, 373
2,509,653,197
. v 532,718,995
61,183,358

96

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT of the N U M B E B of TOBACCO FACTOBIES in each ST ^TE, the
AGGBEGATE QUANTITIES of the different kinds of MANUFACTUBED TO
reports made io this office on FOBM No. 146, hy INTEBNAL B E V E N U E COL

L e a f t o b a c c o a n d o t h e r m a t e r i a l s u s e d i n m a n u f a c t u r i n g tobacco a n d
snuff.

' o5

States.
o

rs

- i '
CD

••
.

00

Arizona

'

.

Delaware
Illinois
Indiana
losva

...

Kentucky
Louisiana
Marylaud
Massachusetts.......
Micliig'an
.
....
Missouri
New Jersey
New York
N o r t h Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Texas
Vir<^inia
W e s t Virginia
Wisconsin
Total




cj

1

3

5
6
2
2
6
20
9
4
1
48
45
16
9
9
1
61
13
70
168
41
30
1
21
4
172
7
5

Pounds.
14, 858
98,418
101
1,139, 413
63,113
8, 314, 881
18, 120
278.-942
28,616
7, 544, 781^
2, 006, 564i
3, 054, 959§
324,1521
3, 284, 294
260
13, 515,782^
16, 910, 626
. 12, 780, 322^
12,78l,438i
9,170, 575^
2, 684, 974^
25. 325
371, 210
6. 618^
48, 428. 504^
64,152
3 noo. 3Q0

776

145, 911, 393J

ft

1
a
t/1

Pounds.
367
2,163
672
42

Pounds.

199
377, 349^
384, 859
13, 433
13,165 " " 3 , ' 6 0 3
240, 419
2,419
1, 046, 8S2§
26, 531
235, 915
'403,'il 5^'
721, 888
529, 844i
1, 900, 528
102,137
172, 630
1,294
, 486
284, 875
171, 887
42, 294
6, 290, 337

550
970, 735
11, 241

m
671,113
283, 479
84,143
89, 438
315, 322
26, 098
7,314
•5, 322

1

0
0

1

OJ

%

a
fe

0

Pounds.

Pounds.

Pounds.

2,375

8,268

35
06

78
1,897
1, 220, 899
1, 216^
7,118
107
1,130, 690
19, 500
44, 826^
2.5,717 '
227, 416
35
1, 730, 059
1, 876, 761^
823, 075
292, 288^
943, 385
35, 795
140
10,720^

390
3,198
1, 221, 381^
2,109
3,531
375
992, 601^
10, 407
80, 728 ^
' 36,906
444, 650

443, 993i
5,595
155,. 605 J
11, 284i
385, 010

1, 465, 048^
1, 723, 099^
1, 028, 234^
181, 230
1,460,690
46,112

501,534
679, 5061
683, 643^
180, OlOf
646, 147
24, 902

950
336, 359
547
15, 286

8, 957i

285J

2, 252, 563
127
139, 0791

1, 772, 013
463^
115, 707A

3, 080, 249 11,021,4281 11,109, 686i

5, 958, 9 3 4 |

52, 737
173, 696

2, 543, 655
215*
83, 4 5 8 |

COMMISSIONER

OF INTERNAL

97

REVENUE.

AGGBEGATE QUANTITIES of L E A F TOBACCO and other materials used, and the
BACCO produced duruig the calendar year ended Deceniber 31, 1880, as shown hi/ the
LECTOBS.
L e a f t o b a c c o a n d ofclier
m a t e r i a l s u s e d in m a n u facturing tobacco and
snuff.

T o b a c c o a u d snuff p r o d u c e d a n d iu p r o c e s s of p r o d u c t i o n .

i

a3
a
to

CO

fcb

rH"
CO

o

p .

o
6

8

o
s •
c/2

5H

Pounds.
10, 99.9

Poimds.

rt
'•/I

g
rt
H

o

•5
o
P.
"o
•H

O

Pounds.
5 106
1 355
284, 073
2 857
181, 554
2 97039, 727
1 210
340,140f
70,181§
557, 709J
129, 872'^
332, 860
'' 135
303, 842*
2, .3'53, 333"
836, 379-J
786, 428
542, 3491
144, 505
60
3 150
50
798, 316*
616"
97,149
7 815, 931

Poimds.
Pounds.
15, 225
116, 365
83, 949*
2,184
2, 872
1, 423, 996
55, 526
72, 214
5, 356,1264
12, 037, 283
22, 356A
38, 395^
361, 372
30, 308
23, 2 5 9 |
6,151, 817
10, 693,176i
32, 434
2,114, 666f
125, 368
5, 911, 447
362, 720
565, 705
4, 910,145
187
830
18, 590, 495i • 10,907,068i
12, 702, 375^
24, 548, a m
3, 733,183*
16, 765, 642t
6,405,5871
16, 211, 361*
4, 018, 632*
13,180, 6 0 6 |
134, 793^
3,135, 016*
18, 943
32, 839"
258,115
400, 939i
7,154-^
56,132, 664
39, 393, 9944
237, 461
17, 496
3, 651, 7741
191,187,9601

89, 806, 804

7F




Pounds.

1,738,758
10
29, 320
1, 209, 15 If
1, 223, 536
151, 388
110
2, 096,168
370, 890i
2,182, 551^
3, 955, 375
3, 631, 018g
74, 4401

2, 211
697, 253

307§
256
100
1,174,140
308
3, 003, 834i
21,326
11,157*
297 790*
2, 688-g795, 663^
150
220,125^
38, 7324
4,168, 741*
319, 4061
16, 919*
66, 263f
1, 863, 027" •
3,249, 935f
2, 421, 2091
5, 516, 3821
4, 379, .5665
3, 472, 230g1, 603, 7374

44, 435*
1, 530, 983*
125, 3 3 4 |
3, 266^
15, 050J
626, 763ti-

12, 302
7.127*
1, 275, 56i)|
191, 688^
2, 761, 849i

6, i334

1,473

3,513

Pounds.
1,110
9, 288
1,156
246, 008
1, 028*
193, 897
2, 502
24, 540
196, 592
• 57,810f
701, 816i
72,193
453, 937
135
317, 0564
2,174, 937*
811, 626*
1, 906, 397*
499, 0.54"
307, 334
17,169
924,157*
4, .5.33"
132, 766

Pounds.
12, 775
• 93 237-^
1, 7 1 9 |
1, 423,120
56, 862*
10, 313, 9413
36, 026
351 6501^

25, 948"
8, 353, 3 7 3 |
1, 572, 638i.
5, 466, 7 2 0 |
518, 206^
4, 413,132
322
14, 889, 386^
21, '012, 057^
14,141, 902§
12, 694, 817^
11, 635, 986*
2, 747, 0 0 8 |
18, 943
289,119
7,127'*
41, 602, 066i
- 213,717|
3, 595, 381^

i r 7 , 3 6 2 , 1 8 1 | 35, 283, 321^ 1 3, 977, 228^ 9, 057, 711-g- 155, 487, 2 4 6 |

t3

KUMBER 0]P gPECIAL^TAX PAYEl^g.

00

The following table sliows the number of persons who paid-special taxes in each State and Territory during the
special-tax year ended April 30, 1881. The amount of special taxes paid during the same period will be found on pages
151 to 157 of the tables accompanying this report:

a

1

states and Territories.

1

2
cS

1Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California .
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Io wa
Kansas
Kentucky
IiOuisiana
...
Maine
Marylaud
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
for NFRASER
ew Hampsbire

*

-.

3
5

-..
..... .

--

Digitized
,


99
6
16
5
17
1
100
11
6
3
58
29

'

:

•.

74
48
9
16
1
67
2
3
1

1
2,076
787
1,437
8, 658
2, 534
2, 653
535
639
487
2, 517
415
11, 524
5,199
4,313
1,132
3, 760
4, 687
820
4,836
7,279
4, 537
2, 510
1, 729
6, 430
765
929
955
923

fe
-^
O
r3

1
o

O

rt
a"
<Q

o

0 cc

8

8§

1

UH

0

1

rt

1 1
1
a
rt

51
33
32
270 " ' 1 9 '
"71
44
15
17
7
64
14
6
251
76
50
23
188
160
10
155
1
196
43
1
36
36
191
36
15
17
8

'""'i

*"""i*

^

971
373
222
85
165
1»^8
46
655
442
430
90.
2
4.59
44
1
52

0

a

8

1

11

P

3

rt

1
a
.a

OrH

nI t

CD
i-(
.
<D CD

p

6

.S rt

•

34
1
14
229
14^
277
4
31
102
33

+3

If

CM

• i

Cf-I

. rtrc$

0

hj

O
pi
H

0
CD

'0

3

.

O

©

2
27
3
77
1

1

1

7

8
56
64
5

5
. 11

844
39

177

- 105
48
13
1

24

90

4

1

6,1.55
1
10
972
9
5, 568
10, 611
8
4, .548
5,430 " " 4 "
1,186
2, 907 • " " 3 "
1, 837
8, 805 " " s
561
20
27,007
13,935
7
3
12, 537
6,325
1
6,992
52
5,987
70
,
4,825
9, 214 ""i.5"
9
14, 790
5
12, 811
5, 812
5, 8.50
14, 833 • " 7 8
923
3,042
1,119
2,537

1
24'
3'
24 ' " ' 2 6 4 '
33
3
20
18
12
3
3
5
1
1
4
16
129
85
64
23
132
12
25
4
26
15
9
30
36
10
69'
114
33
. 116
65
101
4
1
6617
1
22
2
25
38
22
8

19
6
11
243
62
237
6
4
35
36
2
300"
130
383
56
148
19
78
120
564
387
100
78
153
11
33
15
240

6
24
10
30
59
61
6
9
5
16
2
107
38
51
16
17
9
8
42
163
88
"30
13
61
11
12
3
3X

w
ft

o
Ul

New Jersey
N e w Mexico
New Tork
N o r t b Carolina .
Ohio..:
Oregon
Pennsylvania...
Bhodelsland ...
Soutb Carolina .
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
"Virginia
Washington
West Virgiuia..
Wisconsin
Wyoming
...
^, T o t a l .




1, 298

663
1

49
701
21
326
20
446
36
23
89
77
9
1
45
12
11
09

269
4
101
.7
242
" 6
1
7
6
1

170, 640

3,568
18
1, 250
9
3,204
70

15
21
^ 49
2

9

13

370
1.53 "'.'44'
16
362
18
260
51
1
1
35
151
13

1

80
215
43
32

1
1

1
41
3

13

428

32

201

104
334.
2

22
30

3
1

6
5

14, 383

3, 207

411

115

]

46

5

81
2
361
108
162

201
24
1
24
3

ii
10
29
1,520

57
6
301
2
168
46
338
6
3
2
20
15
28
12
221
11
2,474

511
7
2, 583
18
344
54
695
117
22
35
285
12
64
18
61
46
182

144
6
328
5
130
6
266
20
4
24
65
19
14
10
7
7
46

8,536

2, 034

O
O
Ul
Ul
HH

O
t^
ft
Pi

b
I—(

H
ft
Pi

"^
ft

<!^
ft

HUr?':Gi'S;On|

•€:•'•

NtJMSEK, OF DISTILLERIES REGISTERED AND OPERATE!).

The following Statement shows the nuinber of distilleries registered aud operated during the fiscal year ended June
30,1881:

rQ

rt

• a
rt

Alabama
A.rk au sas '
Cal Ifornia
. .
Colorado
Conuecticut
Delaware
. .
Oeorgia
Idaho
Illiuois
.
Indiana
Iowa.
Kausas
ICen t u c k y
Louisiaua
Mavylfiud
Massachusetts
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
New Hampshire.
NewJersey
N e w Mexico
NeAV T o r k
N o r t h Carolina
Ohio
Oregon

•

8
12
4

-.

,.
..

"So

.o'
3
.rO

Pi

rt

ft
o

rt

"rt

Ci

"o
H

6
11
4

75
26
200

74
26
200

83
38
204

80
37
204

212
53
86

212
53
86

37
77
14
6
480

37
77
14
• 6
480

215
53
142
1
65
96
17

11
16

11
16

215
53
142
1
65
96
17
8
778
1
28
24

3
107

3
107

1
115
8'
82
938.
51
9

1
115
8
82
938
51
9

o

.
--

3

3

56
1
28
19
3
2
298
1
17
2

56
1
26
]9
3
2
292
1
17
2

29
2

28
2

.

1

1

. . .

7
502
45

7
460
44

-..
.
.

.
•.

.

.

.

..
:...
-.
.
. .
- ._

,

,.'.-.
.'.. •.

'.

..'.'..*
•

............
1

.

;




Number operated.

o
o

r^

c:

Number registered.

QJ

ci

"So

Number operated.

Nuraber registered.

^6
Slates and Territories.

Fruit.

Molasses.

Grain.

o
o

-

6

1

3
136
2
2
116
8
89
1,440
96
9

s

77^
X
28
24
3
135
2
9
116
89
1 398
95
9

ft

a

ft

Ul

Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Xennessee
.
Vermont
Virginia
VV e s t V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin

-^
..

.-.

......

..
:

Total

:..'.
. . . .

710
108

55
44
430
3
. 7
710
108

139
67
543
5
7
741
112
4

136
67
538
5
' 7
741
112
4

3,964

3,963

5,272

5 ^10

84
23
113
2

81
23
108
2

55
44
430
3

31
4
4

31
4
4

1,301

1, 240

7

7

O

o

NUMBER AND CAPACITT OF D I S T I L L E R I E S IN OPERATION AT T H E DEGMNNING OF EACH MONTH.

The following statement shows the number and capacity of grain and molasses distilleries in operation at the beginning of each month daring the fiscal year ended June 30,1881:
N u m b e r of distilleries.

C a p a c i t y of g r a i n distilleries.

o
ft
Pi
O

C a p a c i t y of m o l a s s e s distilleries.

Months.
H
ft
Pi

J»iy
A u g u s t . -.
September
October ...
November
December
January...
February .
M a r c h . -"...
April
May
June




477
374
372
4.56
.505
573
6.36
679
772 i
867 j

8;)0 I

781

Bushels.
89, 839
66, 040
69,013
89, 244
98, 469
112,214
128, 004
124,010
124,150
120, 822
116,122
. 114,224

Gallons.
338, 4.54
259,176
275, 364
348, 229
382, 253
431,.583485, 769
474, 215
473, 280
458, 297
4H8,165
• 433,006

Gallons.
11,352
9,1.53
8, 899
10, 241
. 9,926
9, 686
9, 247
7, 595
8, 402
• 6, 328
5,477
7,411

Gallons.
9,649
7,801
7, 564
8,705
8, 437
8, 332
7,568
6, 4.57
7,142
5,390
4. 658
6, 300

Gallons.
348,103
266,977
282, 928
356, 934
390, 690
439, 815
493, 637
480. 672
480; 422
463, 687
442, 823
439, 306

ft
Pi
ft
<
ft

d
ft

I

O

CAPACITIES OF GRAIN D I S T I L L E R I E S R E G I S T E R E D AND OPERATED.

O

STATEMENT showing the N U M B E B of GBAIN D I S T I L L E B I E S of different capacities BEGISTEBED and OPEBATED during the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1881, hy COLLECTION DISTBICTS.
D a i l y s p i r i t ca- D a i l y g r a i n cap a c i t y n o t exp a c i t y n o t exc e e d i n g 30 galceeding
5
lons.
bushels.

D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y g r a i n cap a c i t y exceedp a c i t y exceedl)acity exceed- p a c i t y exceed- p a c i t y exceed- D a i l y g r a i n cap a c i t y exceeding 5 bushels
i n g 20 b u s h e l s
i n g 10 b u s h e l s
i n g 60 b u s h e l s
i n g 100 b u s h i n g 500 b u s h a n d n o t exa n d n o t exa n d n o t exa n d n o t exels a n d n o t exc e e d i n g 10
els.
c e e d i n g 60
ceeding20
c e e d i n g 100
c e e d i n g 500
bushels.
bushels.
bushels.
bushels.
bushels.

Districts.
5

\
Alabama:
Second d i s t r i c t
Arkansas
Connecticut:
F i r s t district
Second district
California:
Firstdistrict
Georgia:
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Idaho
Illinois:
F i r s t disti'ict
Second district
Thirddistrict
F o u r t h district
Fifth district
E i g h t h district
Thirteenth district
Indiana:
First district
F o u r t h district
Sixth district
Seventh district
Eleventh district
Iowa:
Second d i s t r i c t .
Fiftbdistrict
Kansas.




1

"OT

To

<a

1

o
6
7

•.

1

1

CD

5
6

1

<o

•a

1

1

PH

5
6

4^
6

2
4

3
5

1

47
4

."

47
4

6
1

6
1

34
2

34
2

10

10

..

CO

PH

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

^

1

fc

S3

1

^

1

QJ

1

ro

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i

53

1

1

1

1

ft
1

1 ,

1

1

1

3

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
3
1

1
3
1

i

1

[
1

1

3

3

7

7

1
1
10
4

1
1
10
4

4
1
2

1
4
2

2
1

2
1

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1
1

"ft
O
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Ul

Kentucky:
9
1

9
1

1
47
7

1
42
7

2

2

Fiftbdistrict
Seventh district
Eighth district
Ninth district
Louisiana •
Maryland:
Third district
Fourth district
Massachusetts:

1

1

4
1

4
1

32
1

29
1

14
6

12
6

8
6
3
5
7
1

8
5
3
5
7
1

1
28
2
24
7

1
28
2
24

4

4

2

2

5

5

1
4

1
4

1

17
44
13
14

17
44
33
14

2
1

2
1

6

6
1
1
1

1
1

2
1

2

1

1

4
3
3

3
15
131
298

4
15
146
323

3
3

46

4

2

2

6

1

1

Ohio:
First district

12
96
309

1

12
87
286

4
3
47
15

3
3
41
15

9
1

7
1

3
1

3
1

EiP"lltPfilt.h fliafTi'^^

3

3

3

Pennsylvania:
Fiist district
Eio-hth district
Ninth district
Twelfth district
Fourteenth district
^ Sixteenth district
Twentieth district
wentv-second district

3

2
1
3
4
6

2
1
3
4
5

2
2
3
4
7
1
2
1

2
2
3
4
7
1

Fifteenth distriot

,

^

'

,

. . , , m , .

2
1

1

1

4

2

2

2

-. 2

2
1

2
1

2

2

1

1

9
1

9
1

1

1

2

2

2
3,

1

3
1

1

1

1

1"^

1

1

1
2

1
2

1
3
1
2
1
2

1
3
1
1
1
2

1
3

4
2

4
1

Sixth district
3

4
14
5
8
1

4

•^

Thii-tieth district
North Carolina:
Second district
Fourth district
Fifth district

4
14
5
8
1

1
2

Nebraska
New Jersey:
Third district
New Tork:
First district




4
17

"::::

,

Missouri:
First district
Fourth district
Fiftbdistrict

T wettty^hird disti'jgt

.1?

1
1
5

1
1
5

2

2

2
2

2
2

1
5

1
5

13

7
12

2
2
2
G

2
2
1
6

........

i
3

1

1

3

•

2
1

2
1

1

1

8
1

7

2

1

1

GAPACITIES OF GRAIN DISTILLERIES REGISTERED AND OPERATED—Continued.

O

STATEMENT showing ihe NVMBEB of GBAIN D I S T I L L E B I E S of different capacities B E G I S T E B E D and OPEBATED, #c.—Coutinued.
D a i l y s p i r i t ca- D a i l y g r a i n cap a c i t y n o t ex- p a c i t y n o t exc e e d i n g 30 galceeding
5
lous.
bushels.

D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y g r a i u ca- D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y g r a i n cap a c i t y exceedp a c i t y exceed- D a i l y g r a i n cap a c i t y exceedp a c i t y exceedp a c i t y exceedi n g 60 b u s h e l s
i n g ioo b u s h i n g 10 b u s h e l s
i n g 20 b u s b e l s
ing 5 bushels
p a c i t y exceeda n d n o t exels a n d n o t exa n d n o t exancl n o t exa n d n o t exi n g 500 b u s h c e e d i n g 100
c e e d i n g 500
c e e d i n g 20
c e e d i n g 60
c e e d i n g 10
els.
bushels.
bushels.
busliels.
bushels.
bushels.

Districts.

1

CO

o
O
South Carolina
Tennessee:
Second d i s t r i c t
Fifth district
Eighth distiict
Texas:
Third district .
Virginia:
Third district.
Fifth district . Sixth district
West Virginia:
Second- d i s t r i c t .
Wisconsin:
F i r s t district
Third district




i.

rd
CJ

rt
o

3D

o

O
JD

o
O

'So

PH

s
'3.

d

O

23

19

19

4

4

39
21
1

3321
1

14

10

21
6
1

20
6
1

2
2
15

2
2
15

1
2
2

1
2
2

1

1

11

11

3

3

1

1

2

2

1

1

.

1

1

1

3
O

"tc.

23

ri

C/J
O

CJ

ro

•

i

1
o

'to

ri

nrt

1

ci
a

'So

•

5-

.

4
31

-

4
31

'
1 --

7

1.

1

1

o

'A

1
1
1

Pi
ft

'
O
25 I
1 j

25
1

5

1 '

1

1

1

1

3

3

_...__..!
:::::::;'::::::::!::::::::::::::::
!
1
1
1

" " 5 1

5

i
1

5

. 1

ft
•

i

1

2'!
1

2

j

r
1

1

o
3
1

i

••

ft

3
i

i

1

!-.

1
1

Ul

GAPACITIES OF GRAIN D I S T I L L E R I E S R E G I S T E R E D AND OPERATED—Gontinued.
STATEMENT showing the NUMBEB of G B A I N D I S T I L L E B I E S of different capacities BEGISTEBED and OPEBATED during thefisccd year
ended June Z0,18S1, hy STATES and TEBBITOBIES.
D a i l y s p i r i t ca- D a i l y g r a i n cap a c i t y n o t expacity not ex
c e e d i n g 30 galceeding
5
lons.
bushels.
,

D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y grain, ca- D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y g r a i n ca- D a i l y g r a i n cap a c i t y exceed- D a i l y g i a i n capficity exceedp a c i t y exceedpacityexceedp a c i t y exceedi u g 20 b u s h e l s
i n g 100 b u s h p a c i t y exceedi n g 60 b u s h e l s
ing 5 bushels
i n g 10 b u s h e l s
a n d u o t exels and n o t exi n g 500 b u s h a n d n o t exa n d n o t exa n d n o t exc e e d i n g 60
c e e d i n g 500
els.
c e e d i n g 100
c e e d i n g 10
c e e d i n g 20
bushels.
bushels.
busbels.
bushels.
bushels.'

states and Territories.
ro

1

,

'Eb
o

Alabama
Arkansas.......
California
Greor'T^ia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kent ucky

-.

....

• 1

1

1

.2

o
p,
O

CO

6
7

5
6

51

51

1
1

1
1

o
"rt
o

§

A

7

7

'1

A

1

o
CD

ci

'.

&

. . .
. . . . . . .i

-

1
60

2

2

9

8

34

4
6

3
5

2
4

36

36

10

10

1
1

1
5

5

.

-

Wisconsin




.

. .

A

A

rt4
O •

1

1

1
2
1
3
1.

1
2
1
1
1

1
1

1
1

i

1

1
30

1
29

62

62

25

25

2

^^-> 2

5

5

5

5

1

1

4

3

10

10

10

10

3

3

447
6
15
23
55

417
19
14

19
10

i9
3
1

19
3
1

5
1

5
1

12
2
1

760

704

497

458

225

69
7.
22
4
28

62
7

22
4
27
12
2
1
213

•

1

r6
O

53

23

1

|

3

3

2
5.

I

23
7
3

23
7
3

1
90
1

1
90
1

32

32

• 4

4

2

2

4
7
17

1
4

1
4

35

35

26
1

5
1
2

5
1
2

5

7
1

26
1
4

5

7
1

1

1

3

3

143

46

46

140

138

147

145

2
2

1
3
1
9
12

5
7
18

153

Ul

O

1
1

8
7
23

1

m

O

1

1
1

10
7
24

1

ro

*3o
o
A

1
3
1
10
13

•

. .

1

25

488
6
16
23
61

385

11

V

.

.-

.
.
......

31

"^

. .

New Tork
Ohio
Pennsylvania

1
65

O

A

5
6

1

o

"So

53

.. .
. - --

Massachusetts

Texas
Vii'i^inia

f

•

•

o
o

2
2

3

3

13
3

13
3

95

95

Pi
O

ft
Pi

ft

<
ft

ft

o

MATERIALS r S E D FOR T H E PRODUCTION OF DISTILLED SPIRITS,

O

STATEMENT showing the QUANTITIES of GBAIN and OTHEB MATE B I ALS used for ihe PBODUCTION of D I S T I L L E D S P I B I T S during
tlie fiscal year ended June 30, 1881, hy COLLECTION DISTBICTS.
'Malt.

• Districts.
Alabama:
Second district
Arkansas
California:
Fii'st district
Connecticut:
First district
Second district
.
Georgia:
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
'.....
Idaho . . . . . . . . ..
Ulinois:
First district
Second district
'.
Third district
Fourth district
•Fifth d i s t r i c t
E i g h t h district
T h i r t e e n t h d i s t r i c t . .>
Indiana:
First district
F o u r t h district
•Sixth district
Seventh district
Eleventh district
Iowa:
Second district
Fifth district
Kansas
Kentucky:
Second district
Fifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district
E i g h t h district
Niuth district
Louisiana
Maryland:
Third district
: Fourth distiict




Bushels.
341
1,371

.'.

56, 009

Wheat.

Barley.

Bushels.

Bushels.

114, 972

114, 562

1,985
590
'

-

.^

Rye.

Corn.

Oats.

Mill-feed.

Molasses.

O t h e r materials.

Bushels.

Bushels.

Gallons.

Bushels.

Bushels.
4,608
16, 785

37, 934

149, 973

10, 548
4, 720

21, 951
4,188

34, 484
9,498

68, 620
.2, 585

80, 026
3,216
2, 475

11, 406
631
'110

74

179,194
493
27, 610
9,005
356, 211
77, 686
3,883

10. 930

3,349
79, 049
20,112
74, 217
82

159

18, 763
15, 024
1,124

1,482

114, 355
325, 275
101, 759
141, 071
24, 055
4,293
83

1,564
5,594
1,892
1, 043

48, 007
1, 302

45
61

52
254

860
67

408
50

110

Total.

Bushels.
321
. 564

337

2,291

366,177
720
32,149
18,115
424, 758
26, 625
1,761

2,193, 574
9, 500
313, 865
89, 238
4, 078, 805
954, 916
52, 989

707
73, 751
7,795
26, 843
64
16, 970
29, 325
729
56,
602,
270,
268,
31,
10,

856

51, 471

Bushels.
5,270
18, 720
474, 613

2, 788,106
10, 713
379, 664
118,375
4, 929. 909
1,142, 902
69, 378

37,219

1, 012

6, 040
1,421
69, 926
18, 343
845

596
209
65, 332
9,900

42, 409
839, 665
221,279
831, 673
670

48
1, 025
11, 949

1,200
105,917
16, 934
' 63, 776

47,876
1,098,684
268, 005
1, 008, 458
883

208, 442
245, 596
16, 513

2,938
5,147
16

3,633

2^52, 228
295, 092
19, 061

698
998
591
611
205
695
112

975, 975
2, 984, 218
1, 202, 943
1, 445, 612
163, 067
52, 978
1,414

478, 423
19, 574

66, 365
7,584

679

232
3,147
2,404

146
805

05

1,148, 592
3, 918, 493
1, 577,185
1, 856, 569
218, 377
71, 223
1, 609
595, 390
29, 386

Gallons.

51 471

Pi
ft
>TJ

opi
H

o
W
ft
ft

t-H

o
ft
m

Massachusetts:
Third district
Fifth district
Tenth distiict
Missouri:
First district
Second district
Fourth district
Fif th district
.-...
Sixth district
Nebraska
:
New Hampshire
New-Jersey:
Tliird district
New Tork:
First district
Twenty-first district
Twenty-fourth district
Thirtieth district
-•
North Caroliua:
Second district
Fourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district
Ohio:
First district
Third district
Fourth district
Sixth district
Seventh district
Tenth.district
^
Eleventh district
=
Fifteentli district
Eighteenth district
Pennsylvania:
First district."
Eighth district
Ninth district
Twelfth district
Fourteenth district
Sixteenth district
Twentieth district
Twenty-second district
Twenty-third district
South Carolina
Tennessee:
Second district
Fifth district
Eighth district
- - ••
Texas:
Third district




912, 91.4
1, 673, 994

912, 914
1, 673, 994

99
487'
18. 870

21, 410

18, 545

28, 634
437
1,447
453
3, 329
28, 933

539, 903
6,094
4,863
3,756
16, 973
374,1.14

19, 654

19,159

123,149
132
1, 735
60, 406

174, 325
25,126
192, 609

1, 626
7, .197

341,146
3,785
31, 562
290, 807

70
292
5, 893
36, 354

1, 399
4, 402
54, 332
147,131

317
46
56'

1,544
5, 422
66, 481
206, 877

261, 620
24, 677
3, 270
36, 497
14, 754
4, 742
9, 646
999
2,602

2, 448,169
295, 682
102, 482
73, 628
74, 634
120, 939
339, 304
1, 837
2, 329

41,258
35, 409
50
95
68
1,810

654, 257
6, 941
6,730
4,607
22, 072
460, 716

3
948
65, 271

9,842
1, 091
""44

75
405
375
23, 232
252, 340
25, 559
6, 056
4, 208
1"-, 720
S, 369
39, 194
127
391
870
421
045
92
383
038
243
447
882
452
562
001
120
329

6
829

511
1,604
1, 701
'i,"449

6,244
69
44

1, 226
20
477
644
804

210
13
1,696
"'20'

34
151

2, 076

104, 002
9,147
17. 021
1, 879
26, 224
26,153
3, 529
488, 301
236, 551
949
1,361
28. 530
'269

672

101
1,155
834
1, 263
178
115
1,900

194, 450
28, 557
10, 473
790
5, 286
11, 673
25, 602

485

297
6,654

124
31

289
144

Ul
Ul

O
ft
3

O
ft

\, 158, 730
376, 913
123, 544
123, 246
102, 578
149,110
413, 746
4,189
5,759
12.9, 985
l9, 905
35, 253
3,896
34, 391
36, 727
4, 276
702, 206
317, 720
15, 290

15, 007
329, 209
3, 874

17, 964
407, 801
4, 263

3, 775

4, 701

O

\=>
>—<.

48, 655

223

135,
33,
12,

O

65,271

ft
Si

>
6,654

ft
ft
ft

ft-

O

M A T E R I A L S USED F O R T H E PRODUCTION OF DISTILLED

SPIRITS—Gontinued.

O

OO

STATEMENT showing the QUANTITIES of GBAIN and OTHEB MATEBI ALS used for the PBODUCTION of D I S T I L L E D S P I B I T S during
ihe fiscal year ended June 30, 1881, hy COLLECTION DISTBICTS—Continued.
Districts.
Virginia:
Third district
Fifth district
Si'fth d i s t r i c t
W e s t Virginia:
Second district
Wisconsin:
F i r s t district
Third district




Malt.
Bushels.
19
154
2, 600

Wheat.

Barley.

Bushels.

. Bushels.

13, 2.58
16, 312
.229

1, 557
.94

Rye.

Corn.

Bushels.
120
2, 914
16, 809

Bushels'.
265
6,750
34, Oil

120, 971

836

34, 267
1,023

174, 024

Oats.

Mill-feed.

Molasses.

O t h e r materials. '

Bushels.

Bushels.

Gallons.

Bushels.

3

Total.
Bushels.
404
9. 818
53, 423
135, 065

2,643
11

231, 493
],423

2,690

Gallons.

ft
ft

o

1
o
ft
•fei

o

M A T E R I A L S USED F O R - T H E PRODUCTION OF D I S T I L L E D

SPIRITS—Gontinued.

STATEMENT showing the QUANTITIES of G B A I N and OTHEB MATEBI ALS used for the PBODUCTION of D I S T I L L E D S P I B I T S during ihe
fiscal year ended June 30, 1881, hy STATES and TEBBITOBIES.
States and Territories.

Malt.
Bushels.
. 341
1,371
56, 009
2, 575
12, 037
110
6.54, 082
176, 809
33,787
1,124
710, 808
83
49, 369
1,303
45,105
36, 041

Arkansas
California
Idaho
Illinois
Iowa
Louisiaua
Maryland
Massachusetts
Missouri
Nebraska

-

Wheat..

Barley.

Bushels.

. Bushels.

114, 972

114, 562

10, 930
1, 086
1, 482

306

10, 203

458

106
629
18, 870

Eye.

-Coin.

Bushels.
321
564
37, 934
15, 268

Bushels.
4,608
16, 785
149, 973
20,139
71, 205

74
870, 305
109,160
46, 295
729
1, 240, 798
112
497,"^997
21, 410
34, 300
28, 933

7, 692, 887
1, 935, 696
4.54, 038
16,513
6, 824, 793
1,414
73, 949
18, 545
571, 589
374,114

Oats.

Mill-feed.

Molasses.

Bushels.

Bushels.

Gallons.

856

337

133, 794
13, 022
8,085
16
2, 404

Other
raaterials.
Bushels.

51, 471

2,
77,
187,
3,

291
049
827
633
679
3, 379
951
2, 586, 908

7,'427'
1, 810

35, 557"
948

Total.
Bushels.
5, 270
. 18,720
474, 643
43, 982
83, 242
2, 475
9, 439, 047
2, 423, 906
547, 320
19, 061
8, 790, 439
1,609
624, 776
41, 258
. 694,607
460, 716

65. 271
New Tork!
N o r t h Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
South Caroliua
Tennessee. . . . . . . . . .
Texas.
Viro'inia
AVest Viririuia .
Wisconsin
Total




.

•

9, 842
77,880
29, 087
343,964
139, 421
1 45'^
39, 683
329
2, 773
13, 258
16, 541

2, 455,184

1,557

94

6.54
422
609
807
807
949
30,160
88
19, 843
120, 971
35, 290

180, 886

124, 095

4, 630, 800

1,135
835
0, 511
12, 310

........^ -.
185 . .
75

9
6, 357
233
2,076

19,
185,
-42,
358,
912,

19,1.59
392, G60
207, 264
3, 459, 004
218, 739
12, 889
348, 090
3, 775
41, 026
836
174, 024
23,109,114

1, 980
101
5, 565
588

8, 823
419
277,128
252

3

9, 820
434

3

2, 720 •
.177, 855

48, 655
667, 300
280,324
4, 457, 821
485
9 • 1,284,359
15, 290
430, 028
11
4,701
63, 645
135, 065
232, 916

1

6,654

2, 690
612, 736

51,471

2, 710, 307

505

31,291,175

^.
O
fei
ft
ft

2,586,908
65, 271

3
•

O

Gallons]

3
6, 654

fei
H
ft
ft
fei
f>
ft
ft
ft

<;^
ft
t^
ft
2 710 307*

•
The average yield i)er bushel of grain was 115, 609, 644
~ = , 3 . 694 gal. of spirits.
31,291,175

The avcT.age yield per gallon of molasses was -^—-^- :
" •'
^ '^
2,710,307

. 781 gal. of spirits.

o

110

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
QUANTITT OF SPIRITS R E C T I F I E D .

The followinc^ stateinent shows the number of proof-gallons of spirits
rectified in the IJnited States during the jesiv ended April 30, 1881, by
collection districts:
Alabama
Arizona
First district, CaUfornia...
Fourtb district, Califoruia.
Colorado
First district, Connecticnt.
Second district, Connecticut
Delaware
Second district, Georgia...
Third district, G e o r g i a . . . .
Idaho
First district, Hlinois
Second district, Illinois
Fourth district, I l l i n o i s . . . .
Fifth district, Illinois
Eighth district, I l l i n o i s . . . .
Thirteenth district, Illinois
.First district, Indiana
Fourth district, I n d i a n a . .
Sixth district, Indiana
Seventh district, I n d i a n a . .
Tenth district, Indiana
Third district, Iowa
Fourth district, Iowa
Kansas
. Second district, Kentucky .
Fifth district, Kentucky ..
Sixth district, Kentucky ..
Seventh
district,
Kentucky
Louisiana
Third district, Maryland ..
Fourth district, Maryland.
Third district, Massachusetts
Fifth district, Massachusetts
Tenth district, Massachusetts
.First district, M i c h i g a n . . . .
Fourth district, Michigau .
First district, Miunesota ..
Second district, Minuesota.
First district, Missouri . . . .
Fourth district, Missouri ..
Sixth district, Missouri . . .
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
First district. New Jersey .
Third district. New Jersey.
Fifth district. New Jersey.
New Mexico
First di strict. New Y o r k . . .
Second district. New Yorki
Third district. New York..




district. New
77,061.15 Eleventh
York
469.50
13,440.94
1^ 429, 810. 05 Fourteenth district, New
York
- 409,127.79
170, 425. 50
district, New
9.5, 671; 01 Fifteeuth
York
22,088.50
41, 317. 49
Twentv-iirst district. New
York
73,320.65
130,218.36
T weuty-f0 urth dis trict. New
30, 755
York
193,487.75
368,986. 50
136,940. 50 Twentv-sixth district. New
York
' 4,519
9,327
district,
4, 306, .595.72 Twenty-eighth
New York
382,847. 56
6,772.21
district. New
< 164, 341. 50 Thirtieth
York
716,610.37
674,568
Fourth district. North Caro14,209
lina
28,204. .50
51,333.50 Sixth district. North Carolina
62,514.50
27,287
First district, Ohio
10, 462, 402. 55
18,122
Third district, Ohio
48, 042. 50
25,724
19, 583
38,531. 50 Fourth district, Ohio
Seventh district, Ohio
39,697. 09
70,232
Tenth district, Ohio
304, 421'
69,339
Eleventh district, O h i o . . . .
24,175. 50
43,481
Eighteenth
district,
Ohio..
407,
073. 50
36,287.15
60,406
71, 272. 50 Oregon
district,
Pennsyl1, 335, 287. 22 First
vania . . . i - . . . . . . . .
8,827, 086. .38
4, 654,683. 22
Eighth district, Pennsyl'
vania
148,712.-51
1,525
Ninth district, Pennsyl996,865
A-ania
67,874
3,905, 990. 39
8,827.50 Twelfth district, Pennsylvania
.^
118,280
1,704,0.58.43 Fourteenth' distriot, Pennsylvania
,
9,208. 59
Nineteenth district, Penn35,633
sylvania
9, 726. 50
Twenty-second
district,
4,480
Pennsylvania
575,105. 08
234, 436
district,
22, 876.17 Twenty-third
Pennsylvania
25,783
9, 331. 32
28, m2.50
152, 432. 88 Rhode Island
19,949. 50
3, 430, 790. 87 South C a r o l i n a . . . . . . J
Fifth district, Tennessee..
167,705
268
First district, Texas
162,919
170, 682
9,544.27 Third district, Texas
, 6, 490
Utah
25, .569
102,378
Second district, Virginia..
225,678
7,079
359, 839. 50
3,761. 37 Third district, V i r g i n i a . . .
29, 462. 50 Sixth district, V i r g i u i a . . . . ° 76, 841. 50
118,264. 50 First district. West Virginia
74,298
1, .598. 50
1, 069, 036. 91 First district, Wisconsiu... 1,105, 054. 41
25,081
6,720,257. 21 Second district, Wisconsin.
648,291. 91 Third district, Wisconsin..
22,591
• Total

58,841,387.48

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL

Ill

REVENUE.

QUANTITY OF SPIRITS RECTIFIED—CONTINUED.

The following statement sliows the number of proof-gallons of spirits
rectified in the United States during the j^ear ended April 30,1881, byStates and Territories:
Alabama
Arizona
California *
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Missouri
Minnesota
Montana

„




77, 06L 15
13, 440.94
1,600,235. 55
95,671.01
• 17F, 535.85
30,755
505,927
9,327
5,217,819.93
179,896.50
112,820
36,287.15
6,062,767.94
996,865
3,914,817.89
1,744,201. 43
257,312.17
3,601,740.87
161,764.20
9,544.27

Nebraska
Nevada

102,378
7,079

NCAV Hampshire

NewJersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Oregon...„
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas.,
Utah
Virginia.
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Total

151,488.37
1,598.50
10,240, 057.1590,719
11,305,395.14
60,406
9,781,776. 0628,682.50
19,949.50
167,705
169,409
25,569 .
662,359
74,298
1,152,726.41
58,841,387.48-

STOGK F E D AT DISTILLEBIES.
A groAving industry in connection with, the distilling iuterests of the country is the feeding of cattle and hogs. The
following statistics, whicli have been collected for the first time, show the number of cattle, &c., fed iu connection with
grain distilleries dnring the past winter:

tN3

STATEMENT showing the numher of CATTLE and BOGS fed at B E G I S T E B E D G B A I N D I S T I L L E B I E S , with their AVEBAGE and TOTAL I N CBEASE in WEIGHT, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881, hy COLLECTION DISTBICTS.

ft

Di.stri cts.

Hemai-ks.

^

d <£ 3

^

^
Second Alabama
Arkansas
First CaliforniaFirst Connecticut...
Second Connecticut.,
Second Oeorgia
Third Georgia . . . . . . .
Idaho .
First Illinois
Second Illiuois..: - Third Illinois
Fourth Illinois
Fifth Ulinois
Eighth Illinois
Thirteenth Illinois.
First Indiana
Fourth Indiana . . . ;
Sixth ludiana
Seventh Indiana . . .
Second Iowa
Fifth Iowa
Kansas
Second Kentucky..
Fifth Kentucky.'...
Sixtli Kentucky
Seventh Kentiicky.

Eighth Kentucky'..



100
24

750. 00
350. 00

75, 000
8,400

102
4
372

164. 07
400. 00
1.50. 00

16. 736
1,600
55, 800

200. 00
200. 00
250. 00
220.14
214. 00
264. 00
400. 00
150. 00
218. .51
325. 00
202. 00
201. 00
200. 00

348,400
18, 800
225, 000
124, 380
450, 300
366, 992
141, 600
1,800
889, 801
298, 025
787, 396
303, 912
240, 020

199. +
186. 00
2,57. 78
2.59.00
200. 00

708, 800
2. 083,100
1,189,180
903, 480
224, 400

ft
ft
O
ft
H
O

100
1,035
3,369
11
2, 681
182
3U0

200. 00
107. 20
109. 50
300. 00
75.00
65.84
100. 00

20, 000
110, 975
369,122
3,300
201, 075
11, 984
30, 000

1,095
150
2, 234
371
1,152
3, 269
2, 020

175. 92
100. 00
149. 00
125. 00
• 93.00
183. 31
180. 00

192, 635
1,500
332. 866
46, 375
107,136
599, 242
363, 600

844
4, 238
5, 979
5,373
4,330
1, 655

78.04
72.-1115. +
96.58
127. 00
100. 00

65, 866
306, 940
"691, 625
518, 970
.549, 910
165, 500

95,
119,
369,
16,
4,
256,
11,
30,
1, 348,
18,
225,
317,
3, 451,
1, 699,
187,
108,
1, 489,
661,
787,
303,
240,
6.5,
1, 015,
2, 774,
1, 708,
1, 513.
389,

T h r e e distillers sell slop a n d feed c a t t l e for o t h e r s , b u t
keep uo data.

T w o distillers sell t h e i r s l o p .

ftft

o
ft
U2

One distiller sells h i s slop.

Ninth Kentucky
Thiid Maryland
Eourth Maryland
Tenth Massachusetts.
Fijst Missouri
^ Fourth Missouri
Hrj F i f t h M i s s o u r i
Sixth Missouri
Nebraska
First New Tork
T w e n t y - f o u r t h NCAV T o r k
Thirtieth New Tork
Second N o r t h Carolina
F o u r t h N o r t h Carolina
Fifth N o r t h Carolina
:.. .
Sixth N o r t h Carolina
FirstOhio
T h i r d Ohio
F o u r t h Ohio
S i x t h Ohio
S e v e n t h Ohio
T e n t h Ohio
E l e v e n t h Ohio
:
F i f t e e n t h Ohio
E i g h t e e n t h Ohio -•
Ninth Pennsylvania
Fourteenth Pennsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsylvania
Twenty-second Pennsylvania.
Twenty-third Pennsylvania...
South Carolina
Second T e n n e s s e e
*..
Fifth Tennessee
Third Texas
Fifth Yirginia
Sixth Yirginia
Second W e s t Y i r g i n i a
First Wisconsin
.




73
180

507. 53
327.77

5, 600

480

37, 050
59, 000

704
25

118. 30
300. 00

83, 290
7,500

525
1,029

53. 90.
60.00
69. 03

48, 244
31, 500
71, 035

66

28.78

1,900

150
247
1,914

300. 00
170. 72
291. 06

45, 000
42,170
557, 094

25
157
435
7,506
1,538
88
735
118
400
• 740

60.00
365. 00
131.-h
220. 00
216. 84
191. 00
300. 00
95.00
200. 00
250. 00

1,500
57, 305
. 57, 060
, 651, 320
333, 500
16, 808
220, 500
11, 210
80, 000
185, 000

125
40

202. 00
220.'00

25, 250
8,800

191
179
408
43
21
1,164

186. 28
200. 00
300. OC
489.476.19
.176. -f

35, 580
35, 800
122, 400
21, 050
1,600
204,880

22

250. 00

5,500

950

157. 50

149, 625

39, 360

140
450
3, 528
2,838
12, 416
798
. 328
250
1,525
2,540
4,412
56
138
875
600
1,633
7,290

39.28
50.63
179. 66
141.-h
122. 00
144. 36
180; 00
120. 00
98.80
72.30
106. 00
128. 00
126. +
116. 00
122.-f
94.95
126. 43

752
893
5,684
300
190
1,846
1,912
. 158

73.-^
56. 32
86.460.00
133.-F
83.75
39.+
140. 00

5,500
22, 785
633, 860
400, 855
., 514, 752
115, 200
59, 040
30, 000
150, 814
183, 656
467, 672
7,168
17, 485
101, 398
73, 475
155, 055
921, 750
•54, 902
50, 300
490, 059
18, 000
25, 350
154, 613
75,115
22,120

120,
66,

A l a r g e q u a n t i t y of slop sold.
D i s t i l l e r s seU tlieir slop.
Slops all sold.

45, 000
42, 170
557, 094
5, 500
24, 285
691, 165
457, 915
i, 166, 072
448, 700
7.5, 848
250, 500
162, 024
263, 656
652, .672
7, 168
42, 735
110, 198
73, 475
190, 635
957, 550
122, 400
75, 952
51, 900
694, 939
18, 000
30, 850
154, 613
75, 115
171, 745

21,635 c a t t l e fed i n t r a n s i t u a n d 822 h o g s fed, b u t no
d a t a as to w e i g h t could b e f u r n i s h e d .

O
O

One d i s t i l l e r sold all h i s slop, a n d all sell m o r e or l e s s .
One d i s t i l l e r fed s t o c k , b u t k e p t n o d a t a .

300 s h e e p fed, b u t n o d a t a a s t o w e i g h t .

Ul
Ul
H-l

O
ft
ft
•O
ft
i25
H

ft
ft

^

ft
ft
ft
<
ft
i^
ft
ft

OO

114

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STOGK FED AT DISTILLERIES—Gontinued.
STATEMENT showing the N U M B E B of CATTLE and HOGS fed at B E G I S T E B E D
GBAINDISTILLEBIES,withtheirAVEBAGEandTOTALINCBEASEin WEIGHT,
during the fiscal year ended June 30,1881, hy STA TES and TEB RITO RIES.

.a

o
a

r2

<o .
o ^
13 be

State.

al

a
^

Arkansas
California
Oeorgia
Idaho
. ...
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
......
.
Kentucky
Marvland
Massachnsetts
'
Missouri . . . . . . .
New Tork
North Carolina
Ohio
;
Pennsylvania . . . . .
South Carolina
Tennessee
Yirginia
West Yirginia
Yi'^isconsin
Total

•

>
<

o
H

100
24

750
350

75, 000
8,400

106
372

172-1150

18, 336
55, 800

29, 920
8,899
2, 712

223-f
222-1200

6, 675,472
1, 977, 022
543, 912

24, 219
73
180
66
2,311
617
11, 250
818
43
1,185

213-1507+
327+
28 +
278+
187+
224-f
247-1489-h
174-1-

'5,174,560
37, 050
59, 000
1,900
644, 264
115, 865
2, 523, 588
202,580
21, 050
206, 480

...

^.

22
950
83, 867

250
157-f

5, 500
149, 625
18,495.404

.s

o
a

1
li
1

<

100
1,035
3,369
11
2,863
300
3,850
6, 441.

200
107+
109+
300
744100
148+
166+.

844
22, 055
704
25
2,449

il:
• ' s

•

o
H
20, 000
110, 975
369,122
3,300
.213, 059
30, 000
573, 376
1, 069, 978

2, 545, 787
1, 251, 678
54, 902
540, 359
18, 000
179, 963
75,415
22,120

95, 000
119, 375
369 122
21, 633
268, 859
30, 000
• 7,248,848
3, 047, 000
543, 912
65, 866
7, 446, 865
120, 340
66, 500
152, 679
644, 264
1,178, 865
5, 069, 375
1 454,258
75, 952
746, 839
18 000
185, 463
75,115
171, 745

10, 720, 474

29, 215, 878

• 78-h
103 +
118-h
300

65, 866
2, 272, 305
83,290
7,500
150,779

"6,'956 " ' l 5 2 f
22, 463
113-110, 398
120+
752
73-16,577
82+
. 300
60
2,036
88-h
1,912
39+
158" 140

"i,*063,'obb"

95, 598

Iil

SUMMARY.
Number of cattle fed at registered grain distilleries in the TJnited States
Average increase in weiigbt of cattle
Total increase in weight of cattle
Number of hogs fed at registered grain distilleries in the United States
Average increase in weight of hogs
Total increase in weight of hogs
Total number of cattle and hogs fed
Average increase in weight of cattle and hogs
-.^
Total increase in weight of cattle and hogs
'




83, 867 .
220. 53-118, 495,404
'95, 598 •
..ijounds..
112.14-1do
10, 720, 474
179,465
pounds..
162.79-f
d o . . . . 29,215, 878
pounds..
do

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

115

OPERATION'S AT DISTILLERY WAREHOUSES.
The following table shows the quantity of distilled spirits in taxable
gallons, at 90 cents per gallon tax, placed iu distillery warehouses during th.e fiscal year ended June 30, 1880, the quantity withdrawn therefrom during the year, and the quantity remaining therein at the beginning and close of the year:
Taxable gallons.

Qnantity of distilled spirits actually remaining iu warehouse July 1,1880. 31, 363, 869
Quantity of distilled spirits not actually iu warehouse claimed to have
beeu lost by casualty
176, 563
Quantity of distilled spirits withdrawn fur exportation, proofs of landing
not received
22, 364,664
Quantity of distilled spirits withdrawn for transfer to manufacturing
warehouse, not yet received at warehonse
._
31, 724
Quantity of distihed spirits produced Ironi J u l y l , 1880,to J u n e 30,1881.. 117,728,150
Total...

.'

:.

171,664,970

Distilled spirits withdrawn tax-paid (iucluding deficiencies on export
bonds arid casualties disallowed)
^
67, 377,623
Distilled spirits exported, i^roofs of landing received
23,150, 434 .
Distilled spirits allowed for loss by casualty
.
'.
'..
»75,316
DistiHed spirits withdrawn for scientific purposes and for the use of the
United States
,
"
24,902
Distilled spirits allowed for loss by leakage or evaporation in warehouse.
811, 466
Distilled spirits allowed for loss by leakage in transporfarion for export..
90, 240
Distilled spirits withdrawn for transfer to,, and received at manufacturing
warehouse
:
171,668
Distilled spirits witbdrawn for exportation,,, proofs of landing not received
-.
15,045,619
Distilled spirits withdrawn for transfer to manufacturing warehouse, not
yet received at warehouse
65,516
Distilled spirits not actually iu warehouse, claimed to have beeu lost by
casualty
...'.
,
204,075
Distilled spirits actuaUy remaining in warehouse Jiiue 30, 1 8 8 1 . . . . . . . . . . . 64,648,111
Total

,.

171,664,970

The quantity of spirits, 64,648,111 gallons, actually remaining in warehouse June 30, 1881, is the quantity as shown by the original gauge of
each package.
The quantity of spirits withdrawn from distillery warehouses for
exportation during the year was 15,921,482 gallons.
Of the twenty-one tables immediately following, eight furnish detailed
statements of items given in aggregate in the preceding table, three
afibrd information as to production and movements of distilled spirits
during the first four months of the year ending June 30, 1882, the others
being chiefly comparative statements as to spirits in distillery warehouses, also those held by wholesale liquor dealers, and rectifiers^ &c.,
as follows:
The quantity, by districts, taxable gallons, and months of production
of the spirits (31,363,869 gallons) actually in warehouse July 1, 1880,
page 118.
The same quantity, by districts and by the difierent kinds, as known
to the trade, page 126.
The quantity of the dilferent kinds of spirits as known to the trade
(by districts and in aggregate for the fiscal je^r 1881, and in aggregate
only for the fiscal year 1880) produced, page 128.
The quantity of the different kinds, &c. (as in case of the spirits produced), of spirits withdrawn, upon payment of the tax, for export, for




116

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

scientific iiurposes, for the use of tlie United States, and for trausfer to
manufacturing warehouses, and the quantity lost by casualty, page 130.
The quantity of the different kinds of spirits withdrawn for export from
each district and in aggregate, for the years 1880 and 1881, {)ages 134,
135.
Increase and decrease of diff'erent kinds of spirits exported in 1881
as compared with, 1880, page 135.
Increase and decrease of different kinds of spirits tax-paid in 1881 as
compared with 1880, page 133.
Spirits lost by leakage in warehouse in 1880, page 142.
Spirits lost by leakage in warehouse in 1881, page 133.
Spirits lost by casualty during the year, with percentage on production, page 133.
The quantity of spirits withdrawn for export, by the different kinds,
by ports from which exported and by ports to which exiiorted, for the
fiscal year 1880, page 136.
The quantity of spirits withdrawn for export, by the different kinds,
by portS'from which exported and by porta to which, exported, for the
fiscal year 1881, i)age 138.
The quantity, by districts, taxable gallons, and months of production
of the spirits (64,648,111 gallons) actually in warehouse June 30, 1881,
page 144.
The same quantity, by districts, and by the different kinds known to
the trade, ijage 152.
The stock on hand, iiroduction, and movement of spirits for the fiscal
years 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880, and 1881, page 155.
The production and movement of spiiits during the first four months
of the fiscal year 1881, page 157.
The production and withdrawal of spirits during the first four months
of the fiscal year 1882, page 156.
.:Spirits withdrawn for export during the first four months of fiscal
year 1882, page 159.
Spirits withdrawn for export during first four mouths of last four fiscal
years, page 160.
Spirits in hands of wholesale liquor dealers and rectifiers October 1,
1880, and October 1, 1881, page 164.
Spiiits and tobacco removed iu bond for export during the past nine
fiscal years, page 154.
The quantity of each montii's product iu warehouse July 1,1880, withdrawn during the year ended June 30, 1881, page 141.
Spirits remaining in warehouse at close of each last thirteen fiscail
years, page 142.
Jncrease in different kinds of spirits in warehouse at end of the fiscal
je^ar 1881, as compared, with 1880, page 143.




COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

117

PRODUCTION OF SPIRITS D U R I N a THE YEAR.

The quantity of spirits (117,728,150 gallons) produced and deposited ,
in distillery warehouses during the fiscal year ended Juue 30, 1881,
exceeded the production of the previous year (90,355,270 gallons) by
27,372,880 gallons.
The increase in i)roduction for the fiscal year 1881 over the production for tlie fiscal year 1880 is distributed among the. different varieties
known to the trade as follows:
Increase in prodnction of—
Bonrbon whi.skv
Rye wbitiky...^
Alcohol
Gin
Pure or cologne spirits
Miscellaneons..

Gallons.
18,218,467
3,589,618
1,357,960
154,928
2,898,633
2,320,877

:....
'..:.
:.--.
.'

Total
Decrease in pr.>duction of—
Ram
High wines

28,540,483
Gallons.
320,795
846,808

^

1,167,603
Net increase




.,

27,372,880

SPIRITS IN WAREHOUSE J U N E 3 0 , 1 8 8 0 .
GO

TABLE showing hy DISTRICTS the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of SPIRITS in WAEEHOUSE Jime 30, 1880, with MONTH of
PBODUCTION.

District and State.

jSri8'?7. J"-.l«"Gallons.

Second iA.labania
A r k a n s a s .j
F i r s t California
Colorado
First Connecticnt
Second C o n n e c t i c u t
Second G e o r g i a ..Third Georgia
Idaho
.
F i r s t Illinois
Second I l l i n o i s
T h i r d Ulinois
F o u r t h Ulinois
Fifth Illinois . . .
Eio'hth Illinois -

Gallons.

J u l y , 1877.

August,
1877.

Septeraber,
1877.

October,
1877.

November,
1877.

December,
1877.

January,
1878.

February
1878.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Qallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

GaUons.

Gallons.

GaUons.

1

1
.

73

!
'

.
. . . .

"O
Pi
O
16f7

.

.

.

-.

1,251

43

First Indiana
Fourth Indiana
Sixth Indiana
Seventh Indiana

258

688
3,332

Fifth Kentucky.Sixth K e n t u c k y
Seventh Kentucky

Digitized


2 089
2,962

1,290

2, 079
552

34i

945

3,337
66, 286
3,739
10, 709
4,202

5,135
51, 905
16,902
16,456
2 009

1,132

Second I o w a
Fourth Iowa
FifthTowa
Kansas

Ninth Kentucky
Third Maryiand
Fourth Maryland
Tbird Massa.cbusetts
P l ftb Massa.f.busetts - - T e n t b Massfif.husetts
First Missouri
forSecond
FRASER
Missouri

1,502
810

2,080

1,210
52, 267
32,126
11, 594
2,437

44
5, 375
6,818
12, 936
652

92

3,138

2,319

3,356

450
776

10, 575
5,074
4,125
1,816

a

.
-

1,157
1, 667

3,451

268

977
233

w

1, 543.
134

3,472
616

1,512
288

226

Ui

Foiurth Missouri
Fifth Missouri
.,
Sixth Missouri
Nebraska
N e w Harapshire . . . i
First New York
:
T w e n t y - f i r s t NCAV Y o r k
Twenty-fourth New York
Thirtieth New York
Second N o r t b C a r o l i n a
F o u r t h N o r t h Carolina ...'.
Fifth N o r t h Carolina
Sixth N o r t h Carolina
F i r s t Ohio
T h i r d Obio
F o u r t h Ohio
S i x t h Ohio
. . .
S e v e n t h Ohio
T e n t h Ohio
E l e v e n t h Ohio
F i f t e e n t h Ohio
E i g h t e e n t h Ohio
First Pennsylvania
.^
Eighth Pennsylvania
Ninth Pennsylvania
Twelfth Pennsvlvania
Fourteenth Pennsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsvlvania
Twentieth Pennsylvania

1,501

256

3,159
.^..
87

68

.•

43

220

35
42

41

86

310
89
340

. ' 2i9
224
2,171
3,219

5,402

7,558

430

200

1,863
130

960

763

• 7,886

252
87
8 200
3 281
959
4,616

o
o
Ul
Ul
HH

<^

o

45

Pi

365
460

218
183
132
3,847

186

O

1,722

'.
i29
83

129
158

i,958

2,020

44

-

306
652

442
370

i,532

200
1 006

15, 030
361

17, 760
2, 953

517

2,723

4,550
462

" 2,iii
2, 310

11, 795
231

. 447

171

655
4, 438

H

pi

<!
656

86

404

210

87

8,098

111, 983

30, 719

" 4, 749

6,239

11, 887

24, 571

T o t a l s i n w a r e h o u s e J u n e 30,1879, p r o d u c e d
from M a r c h 1877 t o J u n e 1879
^
. . . . *1,103, 656

350, 848

96, 450

30, 933

43, 706

34, 313

-'82, 066




'

o

83
267

Tolais

607

866

7,705
Twentv-third Pennsvlvania
South Carolina
Second T e n n e s s e e
Fifth Tennessee
EifbthivTAiijiessec
Tlnrd Texas
FourthTexas
Tbird Virginia.
Fifth Virginia
S i x t h Vir""inia
Second W e s t V i r g i n i a
First Wisconsin
Third Wisconsin

360

278

741

1 819

48, 976

130, 313

149, 630

171,162

401, 479

498, 412

'

* Made np of the production of March, April, and May, 1877.
CD

S P I R I T S IN WAREHOUSE J U N E

30, I880^Continned.

TABLE showing hy DISTBICTS the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of S P I R I T S in WAREHOUSE June 30, 1880, with MONTH of BBODUCTION—Contiuned.
•

•T

.

-

•

'

-

District and State.

March,
1878.

A p r i l , 1878.

M a y , 1878.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.
184

Second A l a b a m a

J n n e 1878. J u l y , 1878.

GaUons.

GaUons.

Idaho. -

September,
1878,

October,
• 1878.

November,
1878.

Gallons.

Gallons.

GaUons.

Gallons.
180

86

46
F i r s t ^dilifornia
Coloradb*^'
F i r s t Gojinecticut
Second C o n n e c t i c u t
S e c o n d Georsria

August,
1878.

45

o

December,
1878.
Gallons.
657
125

373

...

"

,

o

J
•

Third Blinois
F o u r t h Illinois
Fifth niinois
•
E i g h t h Illinois
..
Thirteenth niinois
First Indiana
Fourth Indiana

. 43

87

2, 511
4,943

534
. 294

•

560
89

'

113

o

'"'
1,089
1,207

538
736

697

1,966

.

w

•

.

-' 2,045
185
- - 2, 685

.

5, 083

•

4, 984

7,572

968

942

Eleventh Indiana
Second I o w a
.
Fifth Iowa
Kausas
Second K e n t u c k y . . .
Fifth K e n t u c k y
Sixth K e n t u c k y
Eiohth Kentuckv
Ninth Kentucky
Third Maryiand . . .
Fourth Maryland
Third Massachusetts •
F i f t b Af a s s a c h u s e t t s
.
Tenth Massachusetts
First Missouri....
Second M i s s o u r i
FRASER
o a r t h MissQuri

Digitized for


—

:

...,.

...

..—

a

1,234
4,939
64, 326
18,198
30, 984
8, 051
!)73
968

Ul

' . .
6,365
.96,059
29, 424
. 58, 359
. 20, 204.
1,464
12,161
2,712

9,484
103,505
25,. 479
51,110
8, 962
1,082
. 20,538
4,093

2,655
35, 677
31,806
.22,720
515
.87
9,452
3,073

11, 655
4,538
18, 563
4,408
577

1, 022
627
4,301

2,902
2, 217
2,405

1,350
7,431
535
2, 248

11, 079

4,318
417

10, 038
40

9,484
56, 002
4,953
6,849
128
11, 003

593
. ...

^....

272
773

325
1,202

279
2,214

19, 225
103, 939
22, 936
31, 575
2,999
I I'-'5
17 958
1,873
207
2,288

427
47

246

F i t t h Missouri
Sixth Missouri
_
Nebraska
New Hampshire
First New York
T wenty-first N e w Y o r k
Twent^'^-fourth N e w Y o r k
Thirtieth New York
Second N o r t h Carolina
..
..
F o u r t h N o r t h Carolina
Fifth N o r t h Carolina
Sixth North Carolina
F i r s t Ohio
T h i r d Ohio
F o u r t h Ohio
S i x t h Ohio
S e v e n t h Ohio
..
T e n t h Ohio
^ . .
E l e v e n t h Ohio
.
F i f t e e n t h Ohio
.
^
E i g h t e e n t h Ohio
First.Pennsylvania
Eighth Pennsylvania •
Twelfth Pennsylvania
Fourteenth Pennsvlvania
Sixteenth Pennsylvania
Twentieth Pennsylvania
Twenty-second Pennsylvania
Twenty-third Pennsylvania
South Carolina

2,963
.

3,847
4, 033

2,057

279
1,142

7,842
36

459
635
5,416

612
1,109
16, 862
131
701
23,117
41
384

.
302
86
2,010
.
6, 517

.

44
. 133
331
504
616
2,197
1,417

.

176
417

44
.360
-21
205
1,908

3,619
1,105
1, 545.
1,717

.

115
.

194
5, 361

716
1,692

346

-^ •

. i , 998

12, 613

569

. . -4, 563

^

'."is:
2,366
271
39

...

87
2, 251

.

.

15, 409
6, 503
. -

• 46
596

10, 206

1, 674

4,348

2,166
41
3,362

465

601
605
1,103
17,646
5, 432

989
178
930
9, 850
4,759

'.
.

F i f t b TP,TH1P.!9SP.P. . . . ^ . . . • .

Eighth Tennessee
Third Texas
Fourth Texas
T h i r d VWginia
F i f t h Virsrinia
S i x t h . Vij:'«"inia
Second West Virginia
First Wisconsin
Third Wisconsin....

182.

176
12, 262
4,950
404

960
6,245 " ' " " 9 , ' i 6 7

183
5,311
258
1,164
212
1,031
14,163
1,582
5,466

.

169
976
1, 845
87

. 145

i,42i

732
679

.

925

9,348
.
37
5,270

518
.

14,736.

5, 892

, 243
1,698
2,170
.. 219

703
...
975
1,061
.24, 032.
14, 390

8,029
1,097
352
1,988
^ 1,475
2,270
38, 858
20,106

38
.9, 707 """."'14,'ooi"

165
11,766
1,090
2,541
2, 074
1,218
29, 482
24,155

m
>-<
O

O

Pi

Pi
..

..
46
1,849
..

163
• 1, 874

165
2, 076

..

ft

498

d
td

390

"

Totals

179, 436

265, 779

308,136

146. 321

73, 276

43, 255

35, 607

79, 875

198, 865

352, 989

T o t a l s i n w a r e h o u s e J u n e 30, 1879, p r o d u c e d
from M a r c h , 1877, t o J u n e , 1879

649,042

888, 379

846, 344

521,126

240, 363

127, 294

122, 474

266, 487

490, 549

947, 705




Ul

18, 580

t

•-

o
o

.
to

SPIRITS IN WAREHOUSE JuNE 30, 1880—Continued.
TABLE showing, hy DISTBICTS, the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of S P I B I T S I N WAEEHOUSE June 30, 1880, with MONTH of
PBODUCTION—Continned.
'
\January,
1879.'

District and State.

F e b r u a r y , M a r c h , 1879. A p r i l , 1879.
1879.

GaUons.
556
140
700

-Second A^labama
Arka]fi.4aS
F i r s t California
Colorad^^"''^
First Connecticut
Second Connecticut
SecondGeorgia
T h i r d Georgia
Ida,ho
-

GaUons.
233
1,088

Gallons.

Gallons.

627

M a y , 1879. J u n e , 1879. J u l y , 1879.

Gallons. ;

Gallons.

Gallons.

IU

136

128

1,189

303

152

August,
1879.

Septeraber,
1879.

October,
1879.

Gallons.,

Gallons.

Gallons.
38

13,139
^744 . ^

Pi

o

158
43

491
407

T b i r d Illinois

2, 659

2,113
795

Fifth Illinois
E i f b t h Illinois
T h i r t e e n t h Illinois

375
2,953

'

2,080
1,388

H
3,516

1,107

360

835

2, 221

9,814

3,373

I

"•
1,975

1,566
43

459

9,600
2,152

6,834
126

2,941

1,036
385

1

•

td

1
866

30, 539

18, 508

1,034

41

1,039

71, 250
372
1,697

19, 436
1,152
9,637

28,125

12, 602

4,257

16, 020

7,287

865
331

>
o

td

Fiftli I o w a
Fifth Kentuck v
Sixth Kentucky
Sftvputb K e n t u c k v

25,
185,
54,
99,
17,

:

Third Marvland

..

Third Massachusetts
Tenth Massachusetts
First Missouri

o

1

Second I o w a


F o u r t h Missouri
:


to

.

.

.

..

469
488
985
309
935
312
9,054
5,326
1,905

••

28, 517
237, 820
49, 909
145, 668
16, 443
4,809
41,636
4,294
3,463

49, 004
301, 631
67, 284
167, 010
16, 795
11,294
55,161
6,294
2, 633
6,271

74, 725
392,120
102, "§21
214, 571
16, 571
7,373
61, 823
6,102
427
13,185

913
86

2,955
1,580
39

1,011
1,333
391

89, 579
379, 585
132,169
169, 923
19,199
15, 606
66, 292
4.9793,404
3,214
138
1,488

90
72, 319 ^
217, 920
81, 828
138, 564
17, 334
7,002
48,810
3, 936
683
1,276
687
294-

405
-32,051
69, 710
25, 384
33, 406
40
152
53, 304
. 2,121
636

•

Ul

ill
5,490
10, 723
17,470

6,330
22, 221
22, 230
7,120

23,
179,
41,
34,

883
974
961
309
301

42
60, 395

61, 868

74, 338

.497

5,155
1,052
653

296
868
173
465

223

378
697

Fifth Missouri
Sixth
Missouri .
Nebraska

... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

First New York
Twenty-first New York
Twenty-fourth New York
Thirtieth New York

..

..'.

350
8,992

.. .

592
599
5, 651
8,974
2,100
13, 093

....
. .
.

.-

...
9,665
• 299
13, 213
454
2,116

Ninth Pennsylvania
Twelfth Pennsvlvania
Fourteenth Pennsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsyl vania
Twentieth Pennsylvania
Twenty-second Pennsylvania
Twenty-third Pennsylvania
-

.•

.

3,085'
1,991

3," 254'

13. 032

4,943

874
639
5,580
6,332
1,478
34, 354
1,091
12, 769

43
F.61
988
33,122
12,464
4,292
33, 670
2,486
15, 826

in
19, 281
519

88
7,292
95
195
. 1, 870
1, 242
76, 230
8, 364
4, 230
11, 713
2.990
7,916

357
14
696
3,098

686
17, 962

1,024
642
22, 713

2,309

4,078

4,712
6,189

45
2,514
1,660
70, 496
12, 429
3.764
24, 844
2,732
13, 796
334
429
39, 691
1,022
6, 574
271
3,321
1, 975
1,578
96, 889
43,952
90

2, 729
5,513
1,772
53, 792
25, 913
46

60,124
32, 723
69

12, 044

6,230

17, 717

2,905
4,464
227
83, 784
26, 379
71
45
24, 810

403

230

1,376

443

1, 371

1, 671

310
1,959

423
2,294

591
3,235

819
8,114

404

127

1, 015

947

584, 665

772, 954

973, 947

. 1, 236, 742

1, 514, 241

2, 036, 418

•

33,126

,

23

2," 362"
637

570

592

1,397

4,601

11,192

3,910

373

1, 246
1,972
5,457
12,754
3, 798
.13,171
442
2,082
2,123

397
1,332
125
11,712
1,244

723
1,525
4,909
10, 466

869
850
8, 222
16, 517

i,493
1,993
42
16, 750

o
o
Ul
Ul

771
90

13, 878
370
444
318

248
30, 665
134
4, 987

264
25, 603
1, 502.
1,726

601
2,325

232
19,175
3, 522
3, 522

887
17, 349 '

19i 794

2,634
4,964
619
55, 076
25, 749

. .

3,790
1,469
i, 283'
88, 207
38, 569
152
125
27,434

6,426

609
2, 095
83, 988
45, 665
103
24, 486

16, 849
181
1,973
2,791
24
1,242
67, 036
9,612
33, 549

.
:

:

T o t a l s in" w a r e h o u s e J u n e 30, 1879, p r o d u c e d
from M a r c h 1877 t o J u n e 1879




'334"
5,-858

•

First Pennsylvania

Totals

6,378

... . .................

Fourth North Carolina
Fifth North Carolina
Sixth North Carolina .. . . .
First Ohio
Third Ohio
Fourth Ohio . .
..
Sixth Ohio
Seventh Ohio
Tenth Ohio
Eleventh Ohio
Fifteenth Ohio

Fifth Tennessee
Fii orhtil "Tennessee
Tlnrd Texas
Fourth'-T exas
Third Virginia
...
Fifth Virginia
Sixth Virginia
Second West Virginia
First Wisconsin

• 7,698

1,275,045 . 1,321,600
2,271,892

2, 298, 061

4,894 ^
499

O
tg
Pi

o

70, 871
19, 899
92

5,617
715
1,288
96, 855
54,366
189

32, 302
129

51, 426
31

26

169

W
td
<i

td

26
12,572
14, 269

11, 391
24, 479

4,855
27,137

4,325
. 27,004

3,505
28, 846
278

912, 572

476, 713

311, 842

354, 427

684, 911

•2:
H
t5
Pi

t-*

1, 942, 328

to
00

SPIRITS IN WAREHOUSE JuNE 30, 1880—Continued.

to

TABLE showing, hy DISTBICTS, the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of S P I B I T S i n WAEEHOUSE June 30, 1880, with MONTH of PBODUCTION—ContinneA.
District and State.

Second A l a b a m a
ArkarLvSasi;.
F i r s t Cah'fornia
Colorado 'j.•:r
First Connecticut : . .
Second C o n n e c t i c u t . . .
Second Georgia.,..
Third Georgia
Idaho
F i r s t Hlinois
Second I l l i n o i s
,
T h i r d HUnois
F o u r t h Illinois u.
Fifthlllinois
E i g h t h Hlinois
T h i r t e e n t h Illinois
First Indiana
Fourth Indiana
Sixth Indiana
Seventh Indiana
Eleventh Indiana
Second I o w a
1...
Fourth Iowa
Fifth Iowa
Kansas
'..
Second K e n t u c k y . : . . .
Fifth Kentucky . . . . . . .
Sixth K e n t u c k y
Seventh K e n t u c k y ...
Eighth Kentucky
Ninth Kentucky
Third Marylaud
Fourth Maryland.....
T^'hird M a s s a c h u s e t t s .
Fifth Massachusetts..
Tenth Massachusetts.
i r s t Missouri
Digitized for FSecond
FRASER
Missouri.
.
Fourth Missouri......
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

November,
1879.

Deceraber,
1879.

Gallons.

Gallons.
808
21, 502

17;5.

January,
1880.
GalUns.
44
1,088
17, 312

1,055

February,
1880.
Gallons.
ISl
1,248
8,834

March,
1880.
Gallons.
1,155
3,643
19, 793

A p r i l , 1880. M a y , 1880. J u n e , 1-680.

Gallons.
945
5, 227
2U, 377

Gallons.
1,098
4,410
10, 629

GaUons.
1,129
3,013' 14,886
2,778
2, 359
3,753
64

,531
44

1,845
253

4,102
172

3,748
44

• 692
21, 983
3,364

'4,297
39, 945
3,630

1,668
50, 552
3,724

74, 779
3,394

151, 506
4, 012

189,T11
3,930

173,124
3,923

1,642
471

6,791
560

16, 065
471

6,892
515

6,305
562

412
558

12, 560
7,936
557

91
18, 981
576
1,168
571

3,944
98,446

4, 733
97, 927
936
3,208

.
272
140, 472
1,792
303

7,834
205, 900
12. 375
17, 502

7,776
217, 803
863
1, 562

135, 246
162
64, 036

2, 788
529

160, 764
4,004
43, 587
14, 602
109, 967
56, 926
8,909
4,982
• 82, 911
35, 929
561
22, 205
•,800

3,372
51, 712
320,100
86, 693
88,136
18, 884
8,559
86, 099
1,235
6,554
.
90

1,075
121, 563
538, 958
111, 279
221, 530
36, 684
21, 222
56, 957
5,829
9,532
7, 235

.1, 615
75
979

2,972
74
895

83
146,104
633, 044
217, 041
313, 287
41. 602
27, 482
76, 756
11, 318
15,413
10, 736
4,102
1,184
823

158, 742
645, 782
206, 799
352, 976
51, 543
23, 065
118, 474
12, 267
11,150
26, 947
714
.5, 832
942
1,787

195, 413
847, 696
304,164
426, 945
68, 246
27, 495
145, 042
13, 661
3,046
34, 758
1,190
8,339
1,441
1,578

241,633
934,167
357, 314
481, 610
7U, 770
29, 364
133, 084
12,022
3, 780
27, 238
1,405
12, 044
1,102
1, 071

250,987
905, 673
358, 788
465, 854
62,635
28, 225
154, 840
10, 348
5,054
33, 437
4,977
4,179
518

274,110
711,710
278, 556
394, 812
48, 855
22, 256
167, 871
8, 176
36, 813
90, 975
5,827
398
1,162
916

T o t a l in w a r e house J u n e
30, 1880.
Gallons.
6,685
21, 799
128, 706
2, 388
2, 778 •
2,652
• 16,367
620
7,148
885, 893
33, 843
43, 587
42,118
197, 452
61, 590
8,909
29,632
1, 217, 331
19,803
159,092
1,992
22, 205
2, 520
9,800
6, 079
1, 915, 562
8, 208, 723
2, 725,107
4, 036,106
555,425
239,375• 1, 584, 585
128,211
112,358
261, 082
14, 939
45, 650
13, 697
16, 382

Pitd

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Fifth Missouri
Sixth Missouri .
Nebi'flska
New Hampshire
First New York
Twenty-first N ew York
Twenty-tbuith New York
Thirtieth New York
Second North Carolina
Foiuith North Cardlina
Fifth North Carolina
Sixth North Carolina
FirstOhio
;
Third Ohio
Fourth Ohio
Sixth Ohio
Seventh Ohio
Tenth Ohio
Fifteenth Ohio
Eiobteenth Ohio...
Fii'st Pennsylvania .
Eighth Pennsylvania
Ninth Pennsylvania

4,288
568
710

;

^.. ...
•-

.

i
:

Fourteenth Pennsylvania '.
Sixteenth Pennsylvania

T

Twenty-second Pennsylvania
Twenty-third Pennsylvania
South Cai'olina
Second Tennessee
FifthVIennessee ' . .
E i g h t h Tennessee'.
1
Fourth Texas
T h i r d Viiiffinia
Fifthj^^irginia
Sixth-Virginia
..
Second W e s t V i r g i n i a
F i r s t W^isconsin
..
Third Wisconsin
Total

37,122
350.

. .

.

.-

2,569
2,074
13, 889
22, 800

..

.'
.

.

.

.
.

9,649
31, 503
44

314
477
9,649
29, 314
1,678

,309
959
11, 614
24, 978

499
364
1,842
13,768
30,153
4, 934

386
1,835
13,232
29, 088
866

338
12, 032
27, 453
• 7, 362

131
35
10,987
14, 672
13, 375
508

1,829,542

2, 208, 632

2,454,730

3, 254, 966

3, 534, 663

3, 566,129

3, 513, 367

31, 363,137

1,553
19, 356
5,574
3.889
10,189
4, 644
6, 225
16, 533

717
10. 998
13, 541
130, 575
25, 705
4,278
49, 078
10, 072

916
10,444
18,162
108, 891
26, 339
4, £69
55, 381
10, 908
11,474

1, 395
9,135
158
4,955
5,125
4, 727
3,513
20, 318
318
838
11,220
22,783184, 659
26, 299
3,236
54, 863
9,930
2U,301

2,449
2,468
26, 255
2,953
• 8, 481
222
6,744
5,633
4,531
138, 355
68, 308
435
543
44, 520
347

1,644
1,650
32, 484
1,835
^ 10,103
445
8,152
5,933
4,007
188, 894
79, 288
1,303
1,190
56, 522
732

498
1,095
29, 525
4, 222
9, 946
1,119
6, 457
7, 125
3,715
194, 343
85, 023
1,.^40
1,824
67, 299
936

946
586
29, 573
3,458
9,983
639
6,748
7,479
223
196, 433
84,108
1, 295
3.150
86. 243
i; 319

12, 973
18; 397
860
5,549

400
2,969

9,781

3,543
2,518
55, 465
25, 642
2,200
48, 673

• .128
5,284
4,116
18, 934
26, 395
4, 087
50, 530
1,624

418
1,440
1,048
53, 522
2,191
4,766

1,567
1,337
34, 440
1,665
7,646

7,257
1,303
1,915
116, 955
57, 076
134

8,018
2, 244 .
4, 204
134, 876
61, 710
286
48
40, 241

. 7, 868
4,264
1,676
150, 808
70, 746
250
223
38, 539
316

47, 923

10, 698
142
328
6,771
6,651
110, 309
23,345
3. 869
43, 765
3,136

225
14,626
9, 586
435
2,987
5i5
2,433
21, 745

9,101
14, 657
913
2,254

392
375
322
39, 314
2,979
3,601

•..

218

313

7.462
25, 743
703
1,121,728

,

T o t a l i n - w a r e b o u s e J u n e 30,1879, p r o d u c e d from M a r c h ,
1877 t o J u n e 1879




402
1,313
18, 829
4,531
4,808
5,803
2, 795
22, 507
462
538
7,244
27,261
216, 863
25, 830
4,346
42, 874
4, 939
11,340
15, 204
914
510
28,51.4
3,397
9,047
659
6,451
4,905

3, 598
93, 510
100,747
20, 521
34, 010
15, 689
2(1, 929
205,013
1,053
3, 792
72,336
114, 920
1, OOu, 076
334, 601
57, 249
598,443
53, 397
113,194
23,108
11,191
13, 427
524,194
37,141
107,119
3,394
102,129
76,151
38,164
2, 329, 640
1, 005, 271
7,599
12,154
811, 629
4,364
3,823
499
.2,230
8,390
152, 881
334,739
32,123
508

»6, 516
4,469
478

199,192
87, 991
1,244
2,866
83, 954
554

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19,212,470

-

to

D I F F E R E N T KINDS OF SPIRITS IN WAREHOUSE J U N E 3 0 , 1 8 8 0 .
STATEMENT of the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of each K I N D of SPIBITS, as KNOWN to ihe TBADE, BEMAINING in DISTIL. L E B Y WABEHO USES June Z0,,1SS0.
District and State.

Bourbon
whisky.

Rye
whisky.

Alcohol.

Rum.

Gin.

High
wmes.

GaUons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

GaUons.

GaUons.

Gallons.

P u r e , n e u t r a l , MiscellaAggregate.
or Cologne
neous.
spirits.
Gallons:

Second A l a b a r a a
F i r s t Ca/litbrnia

Gallons.
6,685

610

21,189

2,234

126,472
2,388

^

- .

2, l i s
2,652
16, 367
620

Second" G e o r g i a
T h i r d Geor^Ta
685

7,148
6, 729

7,690

26, I U

24,303

819, 742

33, 843
T h i r d Illinois
F o u r t h Illinois*
Fifth Illinois
E i " h t h Illinois
T h i r t e e n t h Hlinois

43, 587

. ...
28,- 581
106, 262
......

•

~

15, 965
^50

5,757

1, 712
505, 350
19,803
128, 995
1, 992

Eleventh Indiana

13, 537
11, 783
8,715
7,539

63, 442
47, 787
341, 259
48

3,150

'

5,088
1,370
21, 813
370, 722

26,899

22, 205
2,520
9,800
171

Fifth Iowa
Second E e n t n o k v
Fifth KentuckY
Sixth K e n t u c k y

5,908
1,915,562
7, 571, 572
2, 368, 559

- - r -.

3, 704, 703
482,108
209, 076

Ei'T^hth K e n t u c k y
Third Marvland
Tbird Massachusetts
F i l t h Massachusietts
Tenth Massachusetts

First Missouri
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
Second M i s s o u r i

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

•

615,923
171,319

2,256

331,403
73, 317
29, 618
l; 528, 250
128, 211

356

77, 317

21,228
105, 300

. 1, 655

54, 547

681
133

112,358
261, 082
.
:

37,062
13, 697

176

14, 939
222

8,190

to
a:)

Specific k i n d s of s p i r i t s r e p o r t e d in
miscellaneous column.

GaUons.
6,685 C o r n w h i s k y .
21, 799
128, 706 C o r n w h i s k y .
2,388
2, 778
2,' 652
16, 367 C o r n w h i s k y .
620
Do.
7,148
885, 893 W h i s k y .
33, 843
43, 587
42,118
197, 452
61, 590 C o r n w h i s k y .
8,909 F r e n c h s p i r i t s .
29, 632 W h i s k y .
1, 217, 331 Corn, w h e a t , a n d m a l t w h i s k i e s .
19, 803
159, 092
1, 992
22,205
2, 520 C o r n w h i s k y .
9,800
6,079
1, 915, .562
8, 208, 723 M a l t w h i s k y .
2, 725,107 W h e a t , m a l t , a n d c o r n w h i s k i e s a n d
• whisky.
4, 036,106
555, 425
239, 375 W h e a t w h i s k y .
1, 584, 585 I r i s h w h i s k y .
128,211
112, 358
261,082
14,939,
45, 650 W h i s k y a n d corn w h i s k y .
13, 697

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F o u r t h Missouri
Fifth Missouri

15, 304
3,598
93, 490
56, 839

..

^Nebraska

1,078
20
24, 907

9,243

9,758
20, 521

First New York
Twenty-first N e w York
Twenty-fourth New York
Thirtieth New York ..
Second N o r t h C a r o l i n a
F o u r t h N o r t h Carolina
Fifth N o r t h Carolina
Sixth N o r t h Carolina
FirstOhio
.

1,752

17,114
33,'680"

259
1,034

4,740
164, 255

5,352

3,002

252

15, 930
5,792

123

99, 000

930
3,792
72, 336
114, 920
• 20, 242

129

814

•

Tliird Ohio
F o u r t h Ohio
S i x t h Ohio
T e n t h Obio
E l e v e n t h Ohio
F i f t e e n t h Ohio
E i c r h t e e u t b Ohio

830, 996

124, 825

265, 623
52, 903
160,810
50, 963
42, 507
1,243
9,647
2,881

68,035

135
Twelfth Pennsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsvlvania'
Twentieth Pennsylvania

45

Twenty-tbird Pennsylvania

5,176

553

9, 284
4,340

247, 566
1,583
70, 079
1,544
10, 546
524,194
27,188
192, 222
1,416
102,129
76,151
38,119
2, 329, 640
835, 788

190, 067
851

,

608

21, 865

7,630
4,897
1, 978

.1,734

231
4, 364

^

169,483
7, 599'
12,154
764,128

47,270

4,080
974

. 2, 230

8,390
1,505

151, 376
. 334, 739

Second vv e s t v ir^'inia

1,124
T h i r d W^isconsin

Total

454

•

Second Tennessee
E i g h t h Teamessee
ThirdijTexas
Fourth Texas '
.. •
^ T h i r d ViVo'inia
Fifth Virginia

6,790
15, 689

603

26,074

4,322

508

.... .

R e m a i n i n g in w a r e h o u s e s J u n e
30,1879




16, 382
C, 598
93, 510
100, 747
20, 521
34, 010
15, 689
20, 929
205, 013
1, 053
3,792
72,336
114, 920
1, 090, 076

Whisky.
Malt whisky.
Corn w h i s k y .
Do.
Do.
Do
W h i s k y , c o r n w h i s k y , a n d copper-distilled whisky.
Malt whisky.

334, 601
57, 249
598, 443 F r e n c h s p i r i t s a n d " B o w e n " w h i s k y .
53, 397
113,194
23,108
11,191
13, 427
524,194
37,141 W h e a t ' w h i s k y
107,119
3,394
102,129
76,151
38,164
2, 329, 640
1,005,271 C o r n a n d r y e w h i s k y .
7, 599- C o r n w h i s k y .
12,154
Do.
811, 629"
Do.
4, 364
4,080 C o m w h i s k y .
974
Do.
2,-230
8,390 C o r n a n d r y e w h i s k y .
152. 881 C o r n whiftkv
334, 739
32,123
508

18, 798, 347

8, 512, 791

243, 034

394, 084

31,189

294, 899

312, 485 2, 777, 040

31, 363, 869

11, 050, 491

5, 030, 266

186, 978

339, 920

60, 477

519, 612

470, 546 1, 554,180

19, 212, 470

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D I F F E R E N T KINDS OF SPIRITS PRODUCED DURING THE YEAR.

to

STATEMENT of the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of E A C H K I N D of SPIBITS, as KNOWN to the TBADE, D E P O S I T E D in
D I S T I L L E B Y WABEHOUSES during the year ended June 30, 1881.
District and State.

Second A l a b a m a
A rkansas
F i r s t California
First Connecticut
Second C o n n e c i i c u t
Second G e o r g i a
Third Georgia
Idaho
F i r s t Hlinois
Second Illinois
T h i r d Illinois
F o u r t h Ulinois
F i f t h Illinois
E i g h t h Hlinois
Tliirteenth Illinois

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Rye
whisky.

Alcohol.

Rum.

Gin.

High wines.

Pure,
n e u t r a l , or
cologne
spirits.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

GaUons.

Miscellaneous.

Gallons.
11,075

46, 650
1, 731, 416
116, 497
28,172
186, 943
5,715

82
-

9, 479
73, 841

161,038 •

2, 511, 387

5, 674, 086

2,168, 501

36, 506
1, 467, 683
30, 672
841, 725
7,796

First Indiana
Fourth Indiana
Sixth Indiana
S venth Indiana
Eleventh Indiana
Second I o w a
F i ftll I o w a
Kansas
Second K e n t u c k y
Fifth K e n t u c k y
Sixth K e n t u c k y
Seventh K e n t u c k y
Eighth Kentucky
Ninth Kentucky
Louisiana
Thii d Maryland Fourth Maiyland
Third Massachusetts
Fifth Massachusetts

Tenth Massachusetts
First Missouri. :
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/

Bourbon
whisky.

13, 332
429, 031
22, 848
1,147, 767
2,884
51,
4,125,
13, 696,
3, 314,
:

56,273

7, 648, 940
3, 814, 822

285, 200

93, 489
251, 347
41, 384
2, 098, 768
'

1, 027, 729
1,103,422
12,249

025
416
360
916

639, 822
104, 421

6, 590, 856
698, 052
251, 507

291, 536
9, 455
12, 503

414, 792
2,150, 429
580,547
227, 900

8 025 393
915 1

685
1, 525, 880
940,176
127,197

2, 613
510, 600
10, 987

4 fii.'S
37 841

4,922
1, 915,440

ii2,i67

6, 882, 392
707, 507
264, 010
3,193
2, 299, 543
96, 300
727, 993
1, 340, 418
109, 007
2, 245,467

3,698

12, 569

2,163,154
96, 300

159, 368

3,193
.34, 830

101, 559

173, 867

1, 591,177

,727, 993
1, 340, 418
68, 077

293,115

109, 007
7,064

Gallons.
11, 075
46, 650
1, 731, 4 1 6 '
116, 497
28,172
186, 943
5,797
9,479
lO; 654, 853
• 36, 506
1, 467, 683
445, 464
18, 722, 766
4, 408, 695
265, 741
172, 039
4, 301, 789
1, 018, 735
3, 496, 970
2,884
1, 031, 427
• 1,104,196
63, 274
4,12.5, 416
14, 341,104
5,548,618

61, 920
1,299,731
3,340
123,238

774

41, 904

Aggregate.

OO

Specific k i n d s of s p i r i t s r e p o r t e d
tn^" M i s c e l l a n e o u s " c o l u m n .

Corn whisky.

O
Pi
H

Corn whisky.
Do
Whisky.

O
Corn w h i s k y .
F r e u c h spirits, Bourbon whisky,
and whisky.
Whisky.
•
C o i n w h i s k y a n d rectified w^hisky.
Wheat whisky.
Whisky.

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Malt whisky.
Corn whisky, m a l t
whisky.

Whisky.

whisky,

and

cbecona Jiiissouri
'.
Fonrth Missouri
Fiftli Missouri
Sixth Missouri
."
Nebraska
•^ New Hampshire
i_( T h i r d N e w J e r s e y
^ F i r s t N e w Y o r k .'
Twenty-first N e w York
Twenty-fourth New York . . .
Thirtieth New York
Second N o r t h C a r o l i n a
F o u r t h N o r t h Carolina
Fifth N o r t h Carolina
Sixth N o r t h Carolina
F i r s t Ohio
T h i r d Ohio
F o u r t h Ohio
S i x t h Ohio
\
S e v e n t h Ohio
T e n t h Ohio
E l e v e n t h Ohio
F i f t e e n t h Ohio
E i g h t e e n t h Ohio
First Pennsylvania
Eighth Pennsylvauia
Ninth Pennsylvauia
Twelfth Pennsylvania
Fourteenth Pennsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsylvania
Twentieth Pennsylvania
Twenty-second Pennsylvania
Twenty-third Pennsylvania..
South Carolina
Second T e n n e s s e e
Fifth Teunessee
Eighth Tennessee
Third Texas
Third Virginia
Fifth Virginia
Sixth Virginia
Second W e s t Virginia
F i r s t Wisconsin
Third Wisconsiu
Total
Deposited during year ended
J u n e 30, 1880




12.159
10, 348
9,929
61, 815
125, 417

839'
630
26, 631

1, 219, 727

600

444, 716

4,834

1, 003, 053

1,795
17, 417

69, 955
601, 229

50, 095
168, 508
14,183
113, 415

100, 358
1,726
143, 718

1, 216, 947

341, 000

815, 336

244, 275
30, 580
5,651
35, 682
339, 733
2,459
4,535
1,056

44,154

147, 706

4, 704

"
2,528
8,916
6,863

108, 973
1,315
9,284

31,406

30, 487
70, 734

36, 783

103, 710

3, 478, 524

4, 443, 667

3,028
10, 984
148, 422
424,180
2,145, 740

560, 643
431,714
57, 993

365, 259

11, 832

28, 333
1, 474, 602

9,802
16, 218
446, 800
27, 851
98, 480
5,482
113, 358
119, 357
12, 212
2, 562, 476
1,049,109

57, 400
13, 959
7,854

47
12, 929
6,865

331, 396
209,115
27, 247 •

37, 597

• 1,484

187, 430
33, 380
37, 357
1, 222, 575

•

50,270

3,586
1,179
10, 506
105

159, 731
. 511, 376
321, 781

3,274

283
276, 503

277, 298

5,624
33, 632, 615

9,931,609

22, 988, 969

2,118, 506

549,596

14, 363, 581

23, 556, 608

15, 414,148

6,341,991

21, 631, 009

2, 439, 301

394, 668

15, 210, 389

20, 657, 975

12,159
17,187
9,929
62, 445
1, 817, 091
50, 095
168, 508
1, 211, 234
13, 959
111, 817
946, 513
3, 028
10, 984
148, 422
424,180
12, 477, 997
1, 373, 869
462, 294
504, 013
246,112
508, 307
1, 477, 061
14, 337
17, 274
446, 800
71, 683
111, 409
" 12,347
113, 358
119, 357
12, 212
2, 562, 476
1, 236, 539
33, 380
37, 357
1, 275, 373
8,916
10, 449
1,179
10, 506
159. 836
51i; 659
878, 856
5,624

Whisky.
Malt whisky.
Whisky.
Corn w h i s k y .
Do.
Do.
Do.
M a l t , corn, copper-distilled w h i s kies, and whisky.
Wliisky.
W h e a t whisky and whisky.

o
o
Ul
Ul
>-{

O

td
Pi
O

W h e a t whisky.

Corn and r y e whisky.
Corn whisky.
Do
Do.

i2i
H
td
Pi

Pi
cd

<
td

Corn whisky.
Corn a u d r y e w h i s k y .
Corn w h i s k y .

d
td

10, 586, 666 117, 728,150
8, 265, 789

90, 355, 270

to

D I F F E R E N T KIND^ OF SPIRITS WITHDRAWN PROM WAREHOUSE D U R I N a T H E YEAR.
O

STATEMENT of the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of E A C H K I N D of SPIBITS, as KNOWN io ihe TBADE, WITHDRAWN from
D I S T I L L E B Y WABEHOUSES during the year ended June 30, 1881.
Bourbon whisky.

Rye whisky.

Rum.

Alcohol.

Gin.

P u r e , n e u t r a l , or co- Miscellalogne spirits.
neous.

High wines

District and State.
T a x - p a i d . E x p o r t e d . Tax-x^aid. E x p o r t e d . T a x - p a i d . E x p o r t e d . T a x - p a i d . E x p o r t e d . T a x - p a i d . T a x - p a i d . E x p o r t e d . T
Gallons.

Gallons.

41, 502

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

axp

Gallons.

1, 608, 593

•

Gallons.
alO, 568
582

........

2 Georsria
3 Georsria

al65, 072
a4, 848

1, 316, 870 1, 233, 804

673

164, 203

:

8,705
571, 434
19, 489
563, 084
60

847, 019

4,128
264, 581
11, 357
892, 703
1, 873

135,221
3,482 1

43

-• -

8, 225
74, 385

12,261
208, 772
40,444
1, 242, 772

809, 028

841
404
848
360
685
1, 515, 284
930, 215
153, 227

34, 732

961, 432

3,698

2, 078, 713 5, 447, 659
843, 504 2, 825, 906

"

13 Tlliuois

7 Indiana

Gallons.

180

75, 515
30, 820

431,
56, 273 2,161,
583,
235,

85, 692
42, 575

5, 495, 468

::.::.::.
180,217 l&l,730,920
i

7, 717, 886
915
2, 955
504, 366 '
10,705

289, 886
a2, 046
c35, 520
&52.115
4,212 cZl,035,005
&55,128
a2,172

2 Kentucky
5 Kentucky
6 Kentucky
'7 K e n t u c k y
8 Kentucky
9 Kentucky
3 Marylaud
4 Maryland
3 Massacbusetts..
5 Massachusetts
FRASER
10 M a s s a c h u s e t t s . .

25, 850
542, 534
2, 244, 681
957, 281
926, 540
188, 506
78, 824

Digitized for


99, 756 1, 005, 209
11, 310
2,130
4,452
1,457

187, 837
60, 202
114, 067
16,183
14, 903
386, 043
69,820

774

35, 894

'

1,242
463, .553
639, 374

269, 332
591, 602
98, 860

10, 772

-

157, 221

32, 883

106, 309

Aggregate.

Tax p.

594

1 California

2 Hlinois

. Exported.

A;12, 442
61,688,501

Gallons.
10 568
42, 096
1, 609, 355
75, 515
30, 820
16.5, 072
4,848
8, 225
10,196, 540
8,705
1, 418, 453
451, 330
18, 314, 905
4; 256, 279
270 880
157 836
3, 710, 016
992, 721
3,156, 383
1 873
999, 862
2,172
1,105, 739
37 160
542, 534
2, 447, 090
2, 914, 323
1, 042, 064
204, 689
93 727
526, 477
69, 820
732, 885
1, 230, 976
98, 860

td
O
H
O

W

td
t25

o

td

Ul

Missouri
Missouri
Missoui'i
Mi.«;snm'i'"
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey ..
New York"......
New York
New York
NeAV Y o r k
N o r t h Carolina .
N o r t h Carolina
N o r t h Carolina
North Carolina.
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
:
Ohio
Obio
Ohio.Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Pennsylvania...
Pennsylvania...
PennsylA''ania
Pennsylva.nia...
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania .
Pennsylvania...
Pennsylvania...
Pennsylvania
S o u t h Carolina. .
Tennessee
Tennessee..
Tennessee
Texas
Texas
Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
AVest V i r g i n i a . .
Wisconsin

54, 454
9,857
19, 663
8,385
40,147
29, 953

251, 917

28,221

421, 694

772, 171

7,286

173, 86?

6107,103

1, 559, 808

1,408
16, 358

435, 527
42, 818

12, 857
99, 315

24, 931
112, 642

30,454

24,123
' 66, 813

4,446
134, 276

9, 963

984, 024

582
15, 606

83, 333
596, 356

7,909

119

845, 928
.102, 245
27, 394
97, 695
21, 464
206,177
1,612
7,317
1, 267

702

138, 729
21, 974

273

963

107, 499
1,808
36, 079

975

4, 239
12, 904
260. 793
17, 486
70, 288
4, 447
63, 373
76, 089
13, 679
795, 716
268, 955

1,148

41

503, 261
2,025

316, 373
145, 509

•

29, 432 3,471,251
550, 509
407, 775
57, 993

102, 962

28, 333
1, 419, 857

*5, 442
9, 564
2,669

g62, 850
209,185
25, 976

..

...:
".

.

i86,
a33,
a35,
a777,

•

^

•

216
441
389
416

aS, 6f)6
a774

1,474•^9, 367
a273

• 138, 437
78, 921
288, 937
* 3,946 gallons belong to rye whisky.
a.Corn whisky.
6 Whisky.
c French spirits and whisky.
(iCorn whisky and rectified whisky.
e Corn wliisky, malt whisky, and whisky.




/i390

35, 379

2,370
•

a2, 352
a9, 695
a U l , 202
a399, 440
6, 078 /2,089.598
&8,'009

4, 484, 965
354, 655

2, 212

7, 449
2,374

&32, 408
k'6, 965
3,436

33, 580

2, 993

283
250, 411

280, 901

/ M a l t , com, and copper-distilled whisky, and whisk3^
g Wheat whisky and whisky.
/i Wheat whisky.
i Corn and rye whisky.
A; Malt whisliy.

2,182, 656
9,857
21, 071
8,385
40,147
1, 521, 538
42, 818
12, 857
1,189, 004
3, 965
115, 920
925, 693
2, 471
9,695
141, 202
399, 440
11, 886, 590
1,184, 986
• 435,169
327, 975
232, 457
399, 527
1, 421, 469
11, 556
14,171
260, 793
59, 845
79, 852
7,116
63, 373
76, 089
13, 720
797, 928
. 355,171
33, 441
35, 389
779,786
7,449
6,040
774
1,474
9, 367
138", 710
79, 204
856, 822

O

O
1^

S

Ul
Ul

O
Pi
O

^H
W
W

i:^

>
M
Pi
td

<
td
^

atd
"

oo

D I F F E R E N T KINDS OF S P I R I T S WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE DURING^ T H E

YEAR—GoHtinued.
to

STATEMENT of the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of E A C H K I N D of SPIBITS, ^c—Continued.
Bourbon whisky.

Rye whisky.

Alcohol.

Rum.

Gin..

H i g h wines.

P u r e , n e u t r a l , or co- Miscellalogne spirits.
" neons.

District and State.

Aggregate.

T a x - p a i d . E x p o r t e d . T a x - p a i d . E x p o r t e d . Tax-xDaid. E x p o r t e d . T a x - p a i d . E x p o r t e d . T a x - p a i d T a x - p a i d . E x p o r t e d . T a x - p a i d . E x p o r t e d . T a x p a d.
Gallons.
3 Wisconsin
Total
F o r t r a n s f e r t o manufacturing warehouse
L o s t b y l e a k a g e or
e v a p o r a t i o n in
warehouse
F o r scientific p u r p o s e s a n d u s e of
theUnited States
Lost by casualty ..
Total

8, 393, 841

Gallons.

Gallons.
6,132

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons. . Gallons.

\ ^ ± ^ R d . f\9.f^

180 9.^ ndfi i(\R

GaUons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

1

4,702 8, 257, 509 14,554,178 1,145, 864

13,186 3, 276, 323

860 934

4Q^

Mfi

Gallon
6,132

488, 302 8, 601, 909 83, 294, 057
°"

966

913

190, 481

13, 468

"
439, 210

259, 672

3,381

6, 521
100

83, 642

19, 530
86
213, 478

6,621

-

205 828

Pi
hJ
O
pi
H
O

205

4,136

6,218

92,123

811, 466

23, 655

24, 549
108, 008

115, 778

1,149, 851

H"
•

1, 660
417
442, 253

344, 227

G r a n d t o t a l . . . 8, 836, 094

13,186 3, 620, 550

Witbdrawn during
. year ended J u n e
30,1880
7, 657, 732

8,660 2, 859, 209




2, 469
208

i
6,605

20, 476

860, 934

496, 249 14,161,190

180 23,067,184

488, 302 8, 717, 687 84, 443, 908

42 6, 488, 786 15,086,167 1,111,019 1, 274,118

423, 956 15,430,909

3,128 20,227,184

589 817 7 '14.:^ 144 78, 203, 871

4,702 8, 470, 987 14,554,178 1,152,485

413

790

W
t^

O
td
Ul

COMMISSIONER O F INTERNAL REVENUE.

133

S P I R I T S WITHDRAWN FROM DISTILLERY WAREHOUSES UPON
MENT OF TAX.

PAY-

Gallons.
The cxuantity of spirits withdrawn from distillery warehouses upon payment of t a x was, in 1881
67, 372,575
And was in 1880 , . . .
61,100,362
Increase

6,272,213

This increase is distribnted, except as to the kind known as high
wines, as follows:
Bourbon whisky
Rye whisky
Alcohol
Rum
:
Oin.
Pure, neutral, or cologne spirits
Miscellaneous
Total increase
.:
Decrease in withdrawals of high wines

.'.
,
,..
..,

Gallons.
787, 050
. 440,641
1,788,825
35,158
. 71,888
2, 846, 819
1,575,990
7,546, 371
1,274,158

Net increase in withdrawals, tax-paid

6,272,213

LOSS OF SPIRITS BY LEAKAGE IN WAREHOUSE.

The qnantity of spirits, 811,466 gallons, reported in the preceding
table as lost by leakage or evaporation in warehonse is that portion of
the actual leakage in. warehonse which has occnrred during the year
and which has been allowed in accordance with the provisions of section 17 of the act of May 28, 1880. It is noted that in most cases the
qnantity allowed by the law has covered the entire loss, so that the
above qnantity is believed to indicate almost the entire loss in warehouse on the spirits withdrawn during the year, except in cases of
casualty, and may be safely nsed as a factor in computing probable
losses on spirits in distillery warehouses.
LOSS OF SPIRITS BY CASUALTIES.

During the fiscal year 1881 there were reported as lost by fire and
other casualties, while stored in warehouse, 108,008 taxable gallons
of spirits, or about seventy-three thousandths of one per cent, of the
entire quantity of spirits (149,092,019 gallons) handled in the several
distillery warehouses in the United States during that period. The loss
so reported is distributed among the several kinds of spirits as follows:
Whisky
Rye whisky
Alcohol
Gin
Miscellaneous
Total

,

•-

Gallons.
417
83,642
86
208
23,655
108,008

Of the 83,642 gallons of rye whisky above reported, 73,785 gallons
were reported destroyed by one fire in the twenty-second district of
Pennsylvania -, and of the 23,655 gallons miscellaneous spirits, 23,612
gallons were reported as lost in Southern districts, and mainly in warehouses located in remote parts of the districts where the supervision of
revenue officers is necessarily limited.



134

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

SPIRITS EXPORTED DURING FISOAL YEAR 1880.
STATEMENT hy DISTBICTS, and in TAXABLE GALLONS, of the QUANTITY of
the D I F F E B E N T K I N D S of SPIBITS as KNOWN to the TBADE, and of the
TOTAL QUANTITY WITHDBA W N for E X P OBT during the fiscal year ended June
30, 1880.

• i
4^ ft
fl

Districts.

o

1
o
Gallons.
1
3
5
8
1
4
7
2
5
7
3
5
1
1
1
22
1

Illinois
Hlinois
Hlinois
Hlinois
Indiana . . . .
Indiana .
...
Indiana
Iowa
Iowa
Kentucky
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Missouri
Nebraska
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
W^isconsin . . . . .
Total




>

'A

-J-l

A

A

H

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.
78,175

3,128

505, 025

o
rfl

fl o

<

..
2, 274

Gallons.
2, 326, 956
907, 412
5, 927, 311
2,184, 204
48, 761
12,191
1,549,239
541,160
297, 580

5,310
250, 625
1, 023, 493
1,076

6,6i7

43, 340
380. 783
4,133
642,172

42
^ 24,659
8,660

42 1,274,118

'

3,128

589, 817

1 .
bfl

9
So
be

<1
Gallons.
2,405,131
907 412
6, 435, 464
2,184, 204
48, 761
12 191
1, 551, 513
541,160
297, 580
5 310
250, 625
1, 023, 493
43, 340
380, 783
11 826
642* 172
42
24, 659

14, 889, 901 • 16, 765, 666

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE,

135

SPIRITS EXPORTED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1 8 8 1 .
S I A T E M E N T M DISTBICTS, and in TAXABLE GALLONS, of the QUANTITY of
the D I F F E B E N T K I N D S of SPIBITS as KNOWN to the TBADE, and of the
TOTAL QUANTITY WITHDB AWN for E X P OBT during the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1881.

Districts.

1

i

.2

a

§

Gallons.
1 California
1 Hlinois
3 Illinois
5 Illinois
8 Illinois
1 Indiana
4 Indiana . . .
7 Indiana
2 Iowa
5 Iowa
^
5 Kentucky
6 Kentucky
7 Kentucky
3 Maryland
3 Mfissachusetts
5 Mfl,saaf.busetts
IMissouri
Nebraska
1 New York
1 Ohio
3 Ohio
6 Ohio
22 P e n n s y l v a n i a
1 Wisconsin

Gallons.

bfl

A

S

Gallons.

Gallons.
180

. A

1

o
o
o

bfl
9
bl)
bfl

rq

..fl

Gallons.
180, 217
289, 886
4, 212

3,482

Gallons.

33, 580

Gallons.
180
.1, 414, 021
847, 019
5, 737, 545
2, 825, 906
85, 692
46, 787
812, 510
961, 432
1, 005, 209
2,130
4,452
1,457
1,242
269, 332
591, 602
28, 221
772,171
7,909
323, 426
145, 509
1,938
2,212
33, 580

14, 554,178

15, 921, 482

1, 233, 804
847, 019
5, 447, 659
2, 825, 906
85,692
42, 575
809, 028
961," 432
1, 005, 209

2,130
4,452
1,457
""i,'242
269, 332
591,602
.

Total

28, 22i
772,171
702

273

963

975
2, 212

13,186

4,702

7,909
6,078

860, 934

180

488, 302

316, 373
145, 509

•

The following figures show the increase or decrease as to the various
kinds of spirits exported in the year 1881, as compared with the year
1880:
Gallons.

Decrease
Decrease
Decrease
Decrease

in
in
in
in

alcohol
„
rum
x')ure, neutral, or cologne spirits
high wines

335,723
413,184
101, 515
2, 948

Total decrease

853,370
Gallons.

Increase in bourbon whisky

4,526

Increase in rye whisky

4,660

Total increase
Net decrease

9.186
...=

844,184

The decrease in the quantitj^ of spirits exported during the fiscal
year 1881, as compared with the previons year, is owing to the high
price of grain, and occurred during the latter part of the year. This
cause is likely to produce a still greater reduction during the year ending June 30, 1882. During the four months ended ISTovember 1, 1880,
the exportations exceeded those of the four months ended November .1,
1879, by 815,148 gallons, while during the fonr months ended November
1,1881, the quantity exported fell short of the quantity exported during
the four months ended November 1, 1880, by 2,044,787 gallons.



PORTS FROM WHICH AND PORTS TO WHICH SPIRITS W E R E EXPORTED D U R I N a T H E FISCAL YEAR 1 8 8 0 .
STATEMENT of the D I F F E B E N T K I N D S of S P I B I T S and the POBTS fi-om which and POBTS to which they were EXPOBTED during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1880.
D I F F E R E N T K I N D S OF SPIRITS A N D PORTS F R O M W H I C H EXPORTED.
ALCOHOL.

PORTS

TO W H I C H
POPvTED.

BOURBON W H I S K Y .

EX-

8

1
Galls.

•i
Galls.

'o

t

i

1

1
Galls.

r*

A
Galls.

1

1

British Columbia
Buenos A y r e s , S o u t h Ajn e r i c a . . .
C a p e Coast, A f r i c a
Cape de Verde, Africa
Cartbagena Spain
Corunna, Spain
,
Dedeagatch Turkey
Elmina, Africa
Eerroi, Spain
Genoa Italy.
Gold Coast, A f r i c a
Gibraltar Spain
Goree Africa
Glasgow, Scotland




13, 025
172, 986
172, 641
,75,126
334, 617

o

1

.§

u
PR

-A

i
o
A

i

1
CCS

o

1

A

Galls. &alls. Galls. Galls. GaUs. Galls. Galls. Galls. Galls.

A.ccra Africa
-A-dclah A f r i c a
Alexandria^ E g y p t
Alicante Spain
A n t w e i ' p Belsiium
'.
Aspinwall, Central America
Barcelona, Spain
Belfast, I r e l a n d
Bermnda Berninda Islands
Bilboa, S p a i n
B o c a del T o r o , C e n t r a l A m e r i c a . .
Bordeaux France .

•

CD

'o

HIGH
SPIRITS.
WINES.

RUM.

RYE W H I S K Y .

Galls.

1 1
g

1
o
A

A

o

o

1

1

Galls. Galls.
Galls.
65, 655
130, 268
1,050

'

Galls.

Galls.

8,751

60, 792
8,714
3,906
5,286

956, 295
4,363
81, 726
17, 582

13 129
1,061

761, 750
116,190

21, 968
20, 896
504, 023
21,866

214, 522
20, 684
25, 745

....

"^

8,634
198, 539

• 5, 651
1, 020,184

13, 598
39,190

1, 296, 769
.'"

4, 343
98, 401

6, 613

26, 378

OO
05

Hamburg Germany
406,183
.
Hamilton, Ontario
3,779
Havre. France
^ 52,368
Honolulu Sandwich Islands. • .
Huelva, Spain
130, 471
21, 960
Las Palmas, Canary Islands
406, 259
Eeghora, Italj'^
Lisbon, Portugal
.
' 1^9,268
12, 772
Liverpool, England
London, England
Ma,1a,gf«, Spain
fi.7ni
Marseilles France
3 544 55n
Matamoras, Mexico
431 4, 379
Melbourne Australia
66, 495
Mazagan, Morocco
Mp-sainn,, Sicily
,
85, 307
Monrovia' Africa
Montevideo South America
287, 862
Nicaragua, Central America
4,394
Oporto Portugal
30, 486
Palma, Spain
; ..
919, 456
Panama, Central America
6,509
Ponce Porto Rico
• 3,893
Porto Rico, Porto Rico
162, 698
Pasages, Spain
8,687
Riva-de-Sella Spain '
8,662
Rotterdam Holland
St. Andrews, New Brunswick
St. Pierre Miquelon
21,110 30, 640
431
St. Thomas West Indies
Salonica, Turkey
104, 598
San Sebastian Spain
9, 241
Santa Cruz, Canary Islands
4, 272
608. 700
Santander, Spain
Seville Spain
410, 730
Sierra Leone, Africa
Smyrna, Turkey
'.
..-.
6,482
Tarragona, Spain
212,140
Trieste, Austria
Valencia, Spain
1, 471, 660
Vigo, Spain
306, 446
West coast of Africa
Yokohama Japan
10, 401
Total




14,760,092 95, 811 3,779

3,128

120, 365

1, 299

1,089

'...
7,658

3,160

7,822

5,728

19, 214

12, 919

193,112
1,719
39, 518
• 14,669
18, 974

•
2,271
10, 384
1,076
2, 274

1,096

1,083

2,560

...
12, 936
3 026

'41, 232
25, 793

19, 099
46, 060
3,311

17, 300

17, 300 12, 919 6,510 2,150

70, 411
42

29, 267 1, 244, 851

3,128

589, 817

OO

PORTS FROM WHICH AND PORTS TO WHICH SPIRITS W E R E EXPORTED D U R I N a THE FISCAL YEAR 1 8 8 1 .

CO
GO

STATEMENT of ihe D I F F E B E N T K I N D S of S P I B I T S and the POBTS from which and POBTS to which they were EXPOBTED during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1881.
D I F F E R E N T K I N D S OF SPIRITS A N D PORTS FROM W H I C H E X P O R T E D .
ALCOHOL.

P O R T S TO W H I C H

EXPORTED.

•4
CO

i
1

"A

Alicante, Spain
Ancona Italy
A n t w e r p , Belgium
A r r o y o , AVest I n d i e s
Aspinwall Central America
A t h e n s Greece
Barbadoes, W e s t Indies
Barcelona Spain
Belfast Ireland
-Bermuda, B e r m u d a s
Bilboa Spain
.
Bluefields N i c a r a g u a
Bordeaux, F r a n c e
Bremen, Gemiany
Buenos Ayres, South America
Cadiz, S p a i n
Camargo, Mexico
-.
C a p e Coast, A f r i c a
Cape de Verde, Africa
Cape Gracias, Central A m e r i c a . ..
Carthagena, Spain
Constantinople, T u r k e y
C o r u n n a , Spain
.''.
for FRASER
Dedeagatch, T u r k e y

Digitized


Galls.
38, 237
492, 070
40,162
78, 007
17, 352
99, 786
86
866
260, 254
16, 454

6

A

cc

1

o
A
Galls.

o
Galls.

o
1 t
1 1

o
A

Galls.

A
Galls.

1
"A

i

6
o

•i
-o

1

Galls. Galls.

?
A
fl

o
fl

Ga . Galls.

i

1 1
a

s

1

1

"A

A

"A

GaUs.

Galls.

Galls.

i

. Galls. Galls.

1

'o

w
1

1

A
Go

Galls.

Pi
b:j
hj

O
•H
O

.^
H

w
86

158

963

2,905

866

17, 398

1, 392, 379
2,146
252, 515
5,630
1, 242, 307
456, 348

2, 574
13, 014
• : . . . . .

79,07

'

2,144
5,608

315, 960
21,622 10,100
13,125

101, 864
17,110

SPIRITS.

^

'.

5,697
1 699
339, 410

a

o

RUM.

RYE W H I S K Y .

BOURBON W H I S K Y .

l-H

o
m

Elmina, Africa
Enos TurkeySouth America
Esmeraldas,

Gibraltar Spain
Glasgow, Scotland
Goree Africa
Greytown Nicaragua
17, 676
Halifax, Nova Scotia
1,907
Hamburg Germany
535, 639
Havre France . . . .
17, 517
Hong-Kong China
439
6,497
Honolulu, Sandwich Islands
1,014
Huelva Spain
75, 682
Kingston, Ontario
58, 650 26, 046
LasPalmas, Canary
57, 846
Lisbon Portugal
60, 274
Liverpool England
24, 781
London, England
3,051
13, 504
Malta Isle of Malta
30, 208
3, 265, 088
Marseilles France
.
4,315
Matamoras, Mexico
32,509
4,372
Melbounie, Australia
Messina Italy
8,596
Monrovia, Africa
..
.
Montevideo, South America
555, 000
Montreal, Canada
Naples, Italy
. . .
32, 085
Nuevo Laredo, Mexico
2,598
Oporto, Portugal
Palermo, Italy . . .
30, 429
Palma, Spain
356, 606
Palma de Maiorca
232, 963
Panama, Central America
45
Paris, France
139
Port au Prince, Hayti
2,163
Port Limon CostaRica
Rotterdam, Holland
17, 949
St. John, New Brunswick
St. John's, Porto Rico
4,354
St. Pierre, Miqnp.lon
22, 686
7,846
Bt. Thomas, West Indies
3,482
1,678
Salonica, Turkey
12, 207
San Andreas, United States of Colombia
2,249
San Sebastian, Spain
"
386, 306
Santander, Spain
...
585, 970
Santa Cruz, Canary Islands
31, 054
Seville, Spain '.
504, 013
Sierra Leone, Africa '.
Smyrna, Turkev
24, 256
Tarragona, Spam
69, 378




128, 207

? '""12,'998'
292, 913
436, 403
57, 978

180
14, 647
28, 424
64, 819

47
1,952

17, 691

993

124

2,191
•10, 866

37, 501

866 132, 906

59, 825
159

3,314
37, 546

^

46

1,313

_
13,126

2,178

122, 823

7,909

1881—Continne(i.

^

STATEMENT ofthe D I F F E B E N T K I N D S of S P I B I T S and the POBTS from-wUch and POBTS'to which they were EXPOBTED, #c.—Continue4.

^

P O R T S FROM WHICH AND PORTS TO WHICH SPIRITS W E R E E X P O R T E D DURING T H E FISCAL YEAR

D I F F E R E N T K I N D S O F S P I R I T S A N D P O R T S F R O M VVHICH E X P O R T E D .
ALCOHOL.

PORTS TO W H I C H

BOURBON W H I S K Y .

EXPORTED.

1
Totals




Galls.
1,631,251

fl
o

1
o
A
Galls.

1
*rfl

o
Galls.

fl

5
Galls.

E
o

1 i
1 1

i
o

|-

1

fl
Ol

...

fl

1

1

RUM.

SPIRITS.

,i4

o

o

fl

1

1
o

Galls. Galls. Galls. Galls. Galls. G^aZZs. 6^aZZs. Galls. Galls.
702

....

.

HIGH
WINES.

d
J4

Valencia, Spain
Vera Cruz Mexico
Vigo Spain
..
W e s t c o a s t of A f r i c a

RYE W H I S K Y .

44

273

702 1,952 1,313 4,224

273

(?aZZ5.

Galls.

1

1
1

Galls. Galls.

Pi
hj

CO

O
Pi
H

Galls..

O

131, 607
90, 614
14.342,97a 58, 650

26, 046

89,258 34,653 2,598 9, 219

205

50, 029 810, 905 484, 988 3,314

W
180

^^
a
02

COMMISSIONER O F INTERNAL

141

REVENUE.

The quantity of each month's pTodnct of spirits in warehonse July 1,
1880, which was withdrawn during the year ended June 30, 1881, is
shown in the following tabular stateinent:
©o"

P r o d u c t of t h e m o n t h

of-

co o
fll»
ooo

fl p*
fln:)
^ rtr.;
c3 <I>oo
^ . °o
•;?

•^ t>:CO

rtrH

QJrfl rH

1877.
M o n t h s prior to J u n e , mostly Marcb, April, and M a y .
June
July .
August
Sepiiember .
October —
November.
December..

Gallons.
8,830
111, 983
30,719
4, 749
6, 239
11, 887
24, 571
48, 976

Gallons.
8,830
111. 983
30, 719
4, 749
6, .239
• 11,887
24, 571
.48,976

130, 313
149, 630
179, 436
265, 779
308,136
146, 321
73, 276
43, 255
35, 607
79, 875
' 198, 865
352, 989

130, 313
149, 630
179, 436
265, 779
303, 749
114, 825
59, 890
37, 440
. 24,956
42,183
85, 033
161, 014

4,387
31, 496
13, 386
5,815
10, 651
37, 692
113,832
191, 975

584, 665
772, 954
973, 947
1, 275, 045
1, 321, 600.
912, 572
476, 713
311, 842
354, 427
684, 911
1,121, 728
1, 829, 542

284, 812
393, 546
531, 868
718, 010
695, 511
487, 910
269, 690
177, 236
161, 320
317, 430
475, 893
748, 349

299, 853
379, 408
442, 079
557, 035
626, 089
424, 662
207, 023
134, 606
193, 017
367, 481
645, 835
1, 081,193-

2, 208, 632
2, 454, 730
3, 254, 966
3, 534, 663
3, 566,129
3, 513, 367

755,155
731, 418
938, 828
886, 391
850, 327
1,178,154

1, 453, 477
1, 723, 312
2, 316,138
2, 648, 272
2, 715, 802
2, 335, 213

31, 363, 869

12, 404,140

18, 959, 729

Gallons.

1878.
Jannary ...
February ..
March
April
May
June
July
August
September .
October
November .
December..
1879.
January —
February ..
M a r c h ."....
April
May
,
June
July
August
September .
October
November .
December.1880.
J a n u a r y ..
February
March . . .
April
May

Jurie

TotaL.




142

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Section 15 of the act of May 28,1880, also makes provision, in case of
transfers of spirits to manufacturing warehouses, for an allowance for
loss by nuavoidable accident, Avithont fraud or negligence, as in the
case of spirits shipped iii bond for exxiortation.
The transfers during jthe fiscal year 1879 were 13,213 gallons, during
the fiscal year 1880, 21^,212 gallons, and during the fiscal year 1881,
205,828 gallons. Attention, however, is called to the fact, that inasmuch as the original act: was passed March 1, 1879, and the amendatory
act May 28, 1880, the transactions of the fiscal years prior "to 1881 do
not cover a full year's operations under the law as it now exists.
SPIRITS WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES,
, AND FOR USE OF THE UNITED STATES.

The quantity of alcohol withdrawn free of tax from distillery warehouses for the nse of colleges and other institutions of learning in the
preservation of specimens of natural history in their several museums,
or for use in their chemical laboratories, and of spirits of various kinds
for use of the United States, amounted during the year to 24,902 gallons, an increase of 353 gallons over the quantity withdrawn during
the previous yean
DISTILLED SPIRITS ALLOWED FOR LOSS BY LEAKAGE OR EVAPORATION IN WAREHOUSES.

The quantity of distilled spirits allowed under the pro\asions of section 17 of the act of May 28, 1880, for loss by leakages or evaporation
in warehouses during June, 1880 (the only month of the fiscal year in
which the act Avas in force), was 75,834 gallons.
The quantity allowed during the fiscal year 1881 was 811,466 gallons.
SPIRITS REMAINING IN WAREHOUSES AT T H E CLOSE OF THE YEAR.

In my report for the year ended June 30, 1879, it was shown that the
quantity (19,212,470 gallons) in warehouses June 30,1879, exceeded the
quantity in warehouse at the close of any preceding fiscal year. This
quantity, however, was much exceeded by the quantity (31,363,869 gal- lons) remaining in warehouse June 30, 1880, which latter quantity is
more than doubled by the quantity (64,646,111 gallons) in warehouse
June 30, 1881.
The following table shows the quantity remaining in distillery ware' houses at the close of each of the thirteen fiscal years during which
spirij^ have been stored in such warehouses:
Gallons.

Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity
Qua.ntity

remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining
remaining

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
Juno
June
June
June
June
June




30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,

1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

.,
,
.-.

316,685,166
11, 671,886
6,744,360
10,103, 392
14, 650,148
1 . . . 15, 575,224
13,179,596
12,595,850
13, 091,773
14, 088,773
19,212,470
31, 363,869
64, 648, 111

COMMISSIONER

OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

143

It is understood from leading distillers that since the extension of the
bonded period the business of selling spirits in bond has largely increased, and that the greater portion of goods now in bond is owned by
dealers in various parts of the country who have assumed to the distiller the payment of the taxes as they fall due.
It is evident that the causes adverted to in my last year's report as
leading to this great increase in the stock of spirits remaining in distillery warehouses, and as indicating the growing ability on the part of
distillers to discharge their obligations to the government, have been
in full operation the past fiscal year.
The case of the sixth district of Korth Garolina was then cited as
illustrating the great increase in the number of the legally authorized
distilleries in sections of the country recently infested by illicit distillers. The same district can be again used as illustrating this fact, the
nnmber of distillery warehouses in that district having increased from
229 July 1, 1880, to 253 June 30, 1881.
In my last year's report reference was made to the building and
successful operation of the largest distillery in the United States. I
have now to report that this distillery has been enlarged and continued
in successful operation during the year, that another having a capacity
greater than the original capacity of the largest distillery has been
built and operated during this year, and that others of its class have
been greatly enlarged ^nd fitted up Avith the latest improvements, thns
enabliu ^ them to materially reduce the cost of production and to improve
the character of their products. By the nse of the latest improved
purifying, refining, and redistilling apparatus, and the employment of
experts, fine grades of alcohol, and pure, neutral, or cologne spirits are
produced, in distilleries read^^ for use in the arts and sciences without
additional maniiiulation. "
The decrease in the production and withdrawal of high wines, and
theincrease in the production and withdrawal of all other and finer
kinds of spirits, are facts satisfactorily showing continued improvement
in the methods of producing distilled spirits.
^ E^early nine-tenths of the spirits remaining in warehouse June 30,
1881 (58,102,094 gallons out of 64,648,111 gallons), were bonrbon and
rye whiskies, and the increase in the quantity in warehouse that day
over that in warehouse June 30, 1880, was mainly the increase in these
two varieties.
There Avas an increase in all A^arieties, as folio AVS :
Increased quantity in ys^areliouse, of—

^
Gallons.

Bourbon whisky
Rye whisky
Alcohol
Rum
Gin
High wines
Pure, neutral, or cologne spirits
Miscellaneous
Totalincrease




:

2^,751,479
6,039,477
256,919
105,083
53,351
.208,016
1,122
1,868,795
33,284,242

SPIRITS IN WAREHOUSE J U N E 3 0 , 1 8 8 1 .
TABLE shoioing hy DISTBICTS the QUANTITY in TAXABLE GALLONS of S P I B I T S in WAEEHOUSE June 30, 1881, with M O N T H of
PBODUCTION.
Prior to
J u n e , 1878. J u n e , 1878. J u l y , 1878.

District and State.

Gallons.
Second A l a b a m a
'.
Arkansas
F i r s t Cahfornia
.
Colorado
F i r s t Connecticut
Second G e o r g i a
Third Georgia
Idaho
F i r s t Illinois
Second Illinois
T h i r d Illinois
Fourth niinois
Fifth Illinois
E i g h t h Illinois
T h i r t e e n t h Illinois
First Indiana
Fourtb Indiana
Sixth Indiana
Seventh Indiana
Eleventh Indiana
Second I o w a
Fifth Iowa
Kansas
Second X e n t u c k y
Fifth Kentucky."
Sixth Kentucky
.
Seventb Kentuck y
Eighth Kentucky
Ninth Kentucky
IiOuisiana
i
Third Maryland
Fourth Maryland
T b i r d Mns.sa.cbnsp,tts .
.
F i f t b M a s s a c h nse, t t s
Tenth Massachusetts
Tfi r s t Mi ason ri
,. - . ,
Sp-coiifl M i s s o n r i
_
Fourth Missouri
Fifth Missouri




Gallons.

Gallons.

August,
1878.

September,
1878.

October,
1878.

November,
•1878.

Deceraber,
1878.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.
91

Gallons.
220

:
"<y

4,275

... ....^
..
456
81

220
21

490

1,491

January,
1879.
Gallons.
320
48
473

February,
1879. '
Gallons.
97
1,088

Pi

opi

491
91
230
249
1, 764

1, 355
1 172

866

11 281

H
O

w
460

1, 672
170

, ..
....
i

4,994
5,501
5,638
462

1,494
217
1, 697

2,782
2,081

1, 452
577

440

432
268

.. . .

,

14, 802
220
2,019

1,806

•

2,083
40

4,342
53, 464
1,938

705

.q 682

4,602
91,741
13, 231
10, 841
1, 048
217

9,086
127, 792
19, 708
51, 501
14, 029
312

4,777

7,990

6,934
2, 671
1,295

....

207
214

'...

183

•^ 11

305
124, 929
28, 968
74, 028
5 142
2,258
17 693
2 373
2,227

86

Ul

Sixth Missouri

^
^
''

,

Third New Jersev
First New York
. .*.
Twenty-first N e w Y o r k .
Twentv-fourth New York
Tbirtieth New York
.
• Second N o r t h C a r o l i n a
Fifth N o r t h Carolina
Sixth N o r t h Carolina
F i r s t Ohio
T h i r d Ohio
F o u r t h Ohio
•Sixth Ohio

2,232
.'..
"

.

-

.

.

.

.

'..
. .

606

90
860
1,691

-

.

Total

1,848

7,822

258
614

634

221
4,009

59

47
100
864

3,345

5, 493
41
335

692

. ......

30
651
21
863

.

281

3,221
307
4,354

1,132
12, 810

3,792

4,887
105
4,782

4.57
1,186
219

1,434
438
352

21
5, 457
788
175

168
3, 862

..
i , 842
224

756
2, 469
677

126

3, 693

87

43

22
353
1,061
4,887
5, 797

i , 253
574
2,250
. 21,482
6,789

1,624
1,065
856
14, 703
9,488

1, 833
825
89
21, 444
14, 276

796
930
1 447
29, 740
23, 244

3,318

4,258

90

179

3, 218

5,751

15,114

4,694

4 . 9.^(i

...
..........

1, 905

^

l—l

Ul
Ul
h-i

o
"^
w

l-H

"^
H
t:^
W

Pi

•.

:'.

o
o

o
>^

. . . . .
212

Twenty-tbird Pennsylvania
South Carolina
.
Second Tennessee
Fifth Tennessee
E i g h t h Tennessee
Third Texas
Fourth Texas
T h ird Virginia
Fifth Virginia
ISiKth V i r g i n i a
' '.
Second W e s t Virginia
F i r s t Wisconsin
B o n d e d spii'its u n d e r s e i z u r e

287
36

-.

Nini h Pennsylvania
Twelfth Pennsylvania
Twentieth Pennsylvania

286
132

.
.

T e n t h Ohio
E l e v e n t h Ohio
.'.
F i f t e e n t h Obio
"
E i g h t e e n t h Ohio
First Pennsylvania

1,650

i.'527'

•

34
143

<
522

584

cl

224
4,387

31,496

13, 386

5,815

10,651

37, 692

113, 832

191, 975

299, 853

379, 408

T o t a l i n w a r e h o u s e J l i n e 30, 1880, p r o d u c e d
from M a r c h , 1878, t o J u n e , 1880.:




Or

SPIRITS IN WAREHOUSE JUNE 30, 1881—ContiDucd.
TABLE showing hy DISTBICTS the QUANTITY in TAXABLE GALLONS of S P I B I T S in WAEEHOUSE June 30, 1881, with MONTH of.
PBODUCTldN—Continned.
District and State.

Second A l a b a i n a
Arkp.ngas
F i r s t California

March,
1879.

A p r i l , 1879.

Gallons.

Gallons.

M a y , 1879, J u n e , 1879. J u l y , 1879.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Angust,
1879.

September,
1879.

October,
1879.

November,
1879.

December,
1879.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

...
186
16; 356

38
715

.
744

Second G e o r g i a
'.
Third Georsia
Idaho .
.
.
. . . . .
Firstlllinois
'
.
Second I l l i n o i s
T h i r d Dlinois
...
..
'
F o u r t h Dlinois
Fifth Illinois
E i g h t h Illinois
'.
. . . . " ..
T h i r t e e n t h Illinois
First Indiana
. . .
Fourth Indiana
...... .......................
Sixth Indiana

1,189

152

303

hj

360

243

43

465
. -~

i, 488

5,001

2,422
525

24, 362

2,112
. 126

419

7,364
123
3,535

7, 930

5, 243

3,442

870

301

1,536

342

345

9,158
95

27, 382
187
828

.
:

84, 392
336, 533
57, 013
175, 385
23, 808
15,124

..

".

31, 309
182, 546
42,158
122, 585
6. 855
2, 323

44,221
186, 054
68, 587
83, 006
9, 27'8
5,336

33,167
4,441

51, 369
4,385
1,240
1,163

45
40, 269
84, 797
44, 900
91, .593
.
3,194
2,429

45
16,251
19, 989
12, 572
20,940

27, 240
1,322

27,135
• 226

3,874
7,064
10, 343
5,073

11,210
98, 330
21.439
23, 249

136
28,185
179, 452
49; 368
72, 763
14,244
4,400

33, 496

45, 428

51, 796

65,854

332

4,306

171
2,492
2,569.
8,130

131
•

Third Maryland
Fourth Maryland
Third Massacbusetts
Fifth Massachusetts
Tenth Massachnsetts
Eirst Missouri
o u r t h Missonri
forFFRASER
Fifth Missouri

24,663*
4,083
1,774
394

1,283

....

Digitized

,,,

777
.

927
106

1,102

w

Q

•

21, 098
149, 806
40, 438
88, 255
5,774
5, 280

H

42

......
..

O
H
O

"^

883

Second I o w a
Fifth Iowa
.
Kansas
Second K e n t u c k y
Fifth Kentucky
Sixth Kentucky
Seventh Kentucky
Eighth Kentucky
Ninth Kentuckv

3,774
1,878

2,531
2,310

457
247

2,610

46, 654
2, 451
2,496
1,718

92

426

"

.

Sixth Missouri.

250
548

2,445

1,548

357

- 1,814

Third New Jersev

.....

6, 002

4, 613
.129
191
6, 028
2,286
1,530
9.131
1,304
3,984

87
398
. 439
21,354
2, 268
2,790
2,610
1,290

-.... ^

Ei<''bth P e n n s v l v a n i a . .
......
Ninth Pennsylvania . . . . . . . : . . . . .
....
.
..
T w e l f t h P e n n s y l v a n i a '.
Fourteenth Pennsylvania
.. .
....... .....
Sixte*enth P e n n s y l v a n i a
'.
-.
Twentieth Pennsvlvania
Twenty-second Pennsylvania
Twenty-third Pennsylvania
South Carolina
. . .
Second Tennessee . . . .
...............
.... .
Fifth Tennessee
,.

.

TlTird. T e x a s
"^
Fourth Texas
Third Virginia..............
F i f t h Vii'ginia
Sixth Virginia
Second W e s t Virginia
First Wisconsin
Bonded spirits under s e i z u r e . . . . . . . . . .

4, 979

6, 625

132

802

i,585
2,948

1,027
908

45
1, 219
446
22,-759
3,309
3.764
5, 214
2, 732
9,768
44
120
11, 277
297
2, 571
829

.

4,309

496

938

85
375
942
6, 047
2,078
2,516

62
125
3,703
1,244

1, 739
8,534

180
63
2,838
9,918

4,962

318

400

346
192

109
4,666
2, 696.
150

142

.1, 639
1,837
185
13, 557
1, 835
2,463
42
551
53, 549
9,858
42

85
11, 251
89
174

8,808

1,402
34, 876
22, 764

578
32, 280
1,323

132

27,926
14,130

44,140
9, 521

316
47, 566
15,' 928

: 9, 858

5, 767

17, 393

5, 017

5,173

3,395

4,434
7,950

5,338
17, 336

424, 662 ^

207,023

768

8,017

1,126
83
6,489
13, 259

9,264

23, 530

266
264

1 334
494
18, 478
18, 242
1,455
26, 640

o

i4, 2^8
1,856
94

29, 738
1 059
2, 387

o

3,606
43
1, 421
78, 092
36,188

4,553
247
3,523
87 039
35, 888
142

" 52,184
10, 098

48
73, 709
21, 304

8,923

11,185
129

12, 677

6,219

19, 452

1, 566
11,335

3, 439
20, 384

864
19, 6j)2

1,965
22, 653

2,545
26 620

134, 606

193, 017

367, 481

645,835

1,081,193

88
..

T o t a l i n w a r e h o u s e J u n e 30, 188.0, p r o d u c e d
from M a r c h , 1878, t o J u n e , 1880
^

741

45

175

297

442, 079

557, 035

,

-,
626, 089

K-1
Ul
Ul
l-H

"

2,598

"

o
o

69
222
•

3, 966

....

Total




248

..

Twenty-first N e w Y o r k
Twenty-fourth New York . . . . . .
Thirtieth New York.
Second N o r t h Carolina
.^.
Foiirth N o r t h Carolina . . . . .
Fifth N o r t h Carolina
Sivtb ^ o r t h Carolina . . . .
E i r s t Ohio
T h i r d Ohio
E o u r t h Ohio
.
.
S i x t h Ohio . . . . . . " .
S e v e n t h Ohio
T e n t h Ohio
E l e v e n t h Ohio
F i f t e e n t h Ohio
Eififbteenth Ohio . . . . .

E i c r h t , l i '^rp.nTiA.<a.<SAA

2, 4181,695

2, 562
208

Pi.

td

SPIRITS IN WAREHOUSE JUNE 30, 1881—Continued.
TABLE showing hy DISTBICTS the QUANTITY in TAXABLE GALLONS of S P I B I T S in WAEEHOUSE June 30, 1881, with MONTH of
PBODUCTION—Contiuned.
District and State.

January,
1880.
Gallons.

Second A l a b a m a
. . . . . . .
Arkansas
.•
..F i r s t California
.'
.-...•..:.......
Colorado
•..•
.•
i.... . . ;.-.•
F i r s t Connecticut.- . . - . • . . . . . . ; i . .
:
Second Georo^ia
•; .•
•
. . . '^. .
. .
Third Georgia
;i.... :..;.i;
.•
Idaho
J
:
.i.i
F i r s t Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . i ^.:
..-..-;.:
Second Illinois
-.-.a
:;.
Third Dlinois
.•.;;.-....•......
F o u r t h Illinois
.
•
- •
Fifth Illinois
...;:.:.....-..E i g h t h Illinois
..;;.•.•.^.;
T h i r t e e n t h Illinois
• ..
- . .. i.
First Indiana
Fourth Indiana
:...:
.•
Sixth Indiana
; . . ; . . ; . ; , .•
....;
Seventh Indiana
Eleventh I n d i a n a . ; : .
. . . .
Second I o w a
i
;...:
::.-:.
Fifth Iowa
- •
Second K e n t u c k y . i : ;
.m..^
Fifth K e n t u c k y . . . . . : - : . . . . . ; .
Sixth Kentucky .;. i : : ; ^ ^ . . : . . . . .
m...
Seventh Kentucky;;:...; ^; ^ ^ i . . : : . . . ^
Eighth Kentucky
;:.;. ^ . . i ^ ;-.; i . ^ .-.....: ;
Ninth Kentucky
^ . . . . : . ^ -.:i:
Louisiana
j . . .i.a
m... .;.i
..Third M a r v l a n d
-.. i i . * - • . .
.
;
Fourth Maryland
........:
Third Massachusetts ;
;
F i f t h M a s s a c h u s e t t s . . . . ^ . . ; ; ; ^ . . -. i i . i i . i i . . .
Tenth Massachusetts
-.iii
i
^
Eirst Missonri
Second M i s s o u r i
. . .
..
F o u r t h Missouri . . . . . - • •
• •
FRASER
F i f t h M i s s o u r i . . ; i . : : ; . ' - . v . - . - . - . ; i i - . . i i . . . . i i i i . i-.i....

Digitized for


608
3,336

F e b r u a r y , M a r c h , 1880 A p r H , 1880.' M a y , 1880. J u n e , 1880.
1880.
Gallons.
137
633
6,112

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

7,148
2,864

15,989
3,120

761
429

2,020
562

26, 793
423
3,208

74, 751
572

136, 536
6,507
9,206

Gallons.

Gallons.
174
43

Gallons.
802
171

- 8,452

618

32

13, 508
3,756

6,091

11, 575

1,816
1,967
428

2,748
2,667
338

11, 641
214

• 371
11, 556

10, 049

126, 409
3,141
20, 673

55^ 593

44,176
3,340

27, 806

35, 000

18, 106

. ii, .360

142

4,860

12, 659
3,126

16,199
3,839

215
150, 540
6,007

Gallons.

October,
1880.

10,193

/
278
216

September
1880.

88
39

224
582
5,930
3,019

• Gallons.

August,
1880.

92
9, 037

900
7,544

533
3,386

J u l y , 1880.

.. .\

561

3, 667

Pi

27, 432
2, 527-

25, 052
1, 958
..

17,214
343

114, 945
459, 746
136,377
248, 831
29, 408.
18, 036
63,860
1,271
• 1,197
656
2, 220
741

775
055
822
830
301
995

169,713
743, 573
212,135
383, 004
53,118
22, 839

213, 510
838, 600
256,180
440,- 29^
55, 692
19, 364

229,237
811, 461
293, 708
443, 076
53, 226
20, 260

93; 920
5,341
2,670
• 4, 941

134,147
' 6, 071
270
• 4,959

122, 220
8,273
1,213
4,739

127, 693
8,987
468
1,344

151,700
7.128
3,540
695

2; 281
- 718

877
1,079

5,945
1, 003
576
208

49
927
653

500

130,
530,
147,
300,
41,
14,
•

•

,

• 150

O
H

h-i

220
30, 832'
38, 594
113, 292
32, 284
1,202

157,151
353, 622
145, 975
175, 249
1, 913
2,985
117, 264 • •
2,606
483

c, .

...

»-d
O
Pi
H

068

.
.244,122
623, 708
224, 611
361,286
43, 994
16,175

OO

83

32,768
652
2,634
1, 802

35,
181,
127,
78,

499
550
034
026
051
422

438
133, 788
680j 495
104, 913
291, 540
31,436
5,334

156 492
63, 275
2,040
622 ^ •
• 2,183
1,715
861
44
• 682
141
• 208
778
441
392

o

Sixth Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nebraska
.:
New H ampshire
Third New Jersey
-•
First New York
Twenty-first New York.
Twenty-lourth New York
Thirtieth New York ..
. •
Second North Carolina
Fourth North Carolina.
Filth North Carolina
.• -.
Sixth North Carolina
Eirst Ohio
.
.
.
. .
Third Ohio
Fourth Ohio T.
Sixth Ohio
. . . .
Seventh Ohio
Tenth Ohio
.-.
Eleventh Ohio
Fifteenth Ohio
.;
Eighteenth. Ohio .
Eighth Pennsylvania
Ninth Pennsylvania
Twelfth Pennsylvania
Fourteenth Pennsylvania . . ;.
Sixteenth Pennsylvania
Tvventieth Pennsylvania
. . . . . . . .^.. . .
Twenty-third Pennsylvania
South Carolina .;
Second Tennessee '.
Fifth Tennessee
Eio'hth T e n n e s s e e . . . . . i . . . . . .
Third Texas
Eourth Texas
Third Virginia
Fifth Virginia
Sixth Virginia
. ... .
Second West Virginia
First Wisconsin
Bonded spiiits under seizure

.•='....
••'

.«-.

Total
T o t a l i n w a r e h o u s e J u n e 30,1880, p r o d u c e d
from M a r c h , 1878, t o J u n e , 1880




6,384
8,340

3,453
12, 839

9,355
4,042

551
515
5,109
1,800
• 745
3,444
19, 712
• 618
28, 608.
268

4,749

10, 334

1, 235
581
37,113
15, 741
1,794
31; 601

226
2,156
1,319
22, 972
18, 894
1,941
37,142
• 4,903

1,079
367
. 27, 694
1,206
2, 923

1,400
47
20,193
1,826
1,384

808
23, 369
486
6,727

498
156
1,572
122, 702
62,338

2, 765
166
2,849
117, 016
57, 014
48
48
- 13,296

5, 085
709
1,977
145, 629
63, 537
25
305
13, 297

15, 663

12, 289
5,139
2,155
4,099
6,396
22
277
1, 718
3,158
35, 683
^ 2 1 . 991
i;529
40, 326
6, 111
4,445
363
24, 378
2,201
7,187
641
2,715
1,923
2, 535
203, 640
65, 566
114
308
10, 595

i36

179

274

977
19, 587

1,771
23, 026
1, 614

3,314
27, 024

4,260
24, 903
266

1, 453, 477

1, 723, 312

-

2, 316,138

2, 648, 272,

6, 813

3,698
7, 784 .
52
922
506
62, 344
24, 547
3,236
35, 777
9, 392
15, 792
93
789
27, 915
1,188
7,458
462
5,508
2,955
223
195, 964
71, 608
84
78
33, 559
126

1.

1, 238
2, 032

383

436

9,145
1,381

3,317

5,924

1,276
5,534

2,386

6, 430
27
72
362
1,064
102, 753
23, 799

\ 10, 818

867
703
1,152
12, 729

595
1,259
25, 229

1,662
13, 035
4, 831

670
18, 033

16, 919

42
• 24, 324
1,349
5,331
635
2, 207
2,442

156
28, 631
297
3,301
233
5,311
1,975

88
25, 411
349
1,961

201, 042
77, 394

155, 621
95, 067

124, 620
6,113
92
471
21,357
520

1,163
1, 030
600
9,'205

31, 973
4, 024
. 9,649

46
32, 845
100

1 317
1,128
30, 367
9,412

o
o
Ul
Ul

161
9,602
272
2,126
604
4,282
1,051
1, 000
143, 442
60, 562

19, 508
230
15, 6B6
2CS
155
426
29, 353
295
4,685
562
6, 306
1,363
1 502
172, 310
90,173

146
37, 482
901

56, 023
1 162

>j

.

350
22,503
38

/

11, 420
2,921
13,136

4,159
455

I—)

O
t?J •
Pi

o
H
Pi
fe{

>

<

111
25
4, 228
• 19,378
2,734

4,968
14, 078
2,608

2,042
13, 421
135

443
.10

3,036
5,738

6,180
36, 392
1,878

2,715, 802

2, 335, 213

1, 409, 677

535, 837

891, 462

2, 001, 096

fel
d

SPIRITS IN WAREHOUSE JUNE 30, 1881—Continued.
TABLE showing hy DISTBICTS the Q U A J S I T I T Y in TAXABLE GALLONS df S P I B I T S in WAEEHOUSE June ZO, 1881, with MONTH of
PBODUCTION—Continued.
District and State.

Second A l a b a m a
Arkansas
F i r s t California
Colorado
First Connecticut
Second G e o r g i a . .
T h i r d Georgia
Idaho
F i r s t Dlinois
Second I l l i n o i s
T h i r d Illinois
F o u r t h Illinois
.
Fifth Illinois
E i g h t h Illinois •
T h i r t e e n t h Illinois
.
First Indiana
Fourth Indiana
'
Sixth Indiana
. . .
Seventh Indiana
Eleventh Indiana
Second I o w a
Fifth Iowa
Kansas
Second K e n t u c k y . .
Fifth K e n t u c k y
Sixth K e n t u c k y
Seventh K e n t u c k y
Eighth Kentucky
Ninth Kentucky
Louisiana
Third Maryland
Fourth Maryland
Third Massachusetts
Fifth Massachusetts
Tenth Massachusetts
F i r s t Missouri
Second M i s s o u r i
*..
FRASER
F o u r t h Missouri
Fifth Missouri

Digitized for


'...

November,
1880.

December,
1880.

Gallons.
131
1,037

Gallons.
511
111
10, 030

Gallons.
394
2, 505
7,179

Gallons.
705
4,895
. 18,658

Gallons.
956
5,004
43, 832

Gallons.
851
4, 979
26, 221

Gallons.
091
2,879
54, 526

6, 212
1,749
92

9.101
5,966
234

7,894
9,386
229

5,586
9,599
435

9,736
8,704
511

33, 437
3,940

3,675
94, 034
3,830

1,464
1,182
68
3,314
88, 609
3,546

198, 883
3,296

194, 938
3,753

185, 858
4,418

153, 992
4, 377
28, 811

i7i,84i

9,188
532

18, 063
532

35,163
513

5,443
48, 419
560
539

106, 739
1,071

809
116, 727
950
55, 211

737
. 172, 917
1,715
49, 272

59, i 5 3
156, 373
1,440
8, 562
130,467
4,757
70, 828
613
34,083

68, 077
44, 750

57, 727
558
3,930

7,450
45, 675
515
1,712
11,749
147, 600
1, 396
54, 940

.

2,584

"

.
,
..
°.
'

February,
M a r c h , 1881. A p r i l , 1881. M a y , 1881. J u n e , 1881.
1881.

Gallons.
201
•
1,391
13, 065

1,095
.

January,
1881.

i77, 408
1, 216
74, 467

4, 354
118, 430
552
101, 589
1,669

.

..

.

...

...
;...
^

904
335
975
778
729
525
573

3, 361
380,418
1, 357, 488
320, 411
652, 046
68, 915
27,108

5, 227
403, 764
1, 438, 778
356,949
670, 496
82, 677
27, 748

2,345
401,556
1,589,485
394, 540
736, 377
81, 626
29, 018

196, 801
2, 799
3,878
43,172

217, 576
6,438
11, 438
. 50,00.0

2,312

14,730

176, 300
.8, 466
' 5, 452
19, 561
1,286
5,697

191, 058
9,365
-2, 832
. • 30, 932
3,345
7,478

1,101
345

500
140

264,
980,
168,
496,
55,
23,

5, 504
512, 936
2, 008, 288
544, 588
930, 724
98, 659
36, 975

4,356
4,330
586,658
527,231 „
2, 046,171
2, 082, 769
561, 771
440, 353
966, 233
930, 548
93, 031
88, 133
37, 973
32, 496

. ..
. . .
i
. .
,

.

..

174

"

257,984
13,117
7,946
41, 455
2,227
2,112
361
448
740

250,913
14, 720
5,548
55, 442
4,674
2,720
1, 879 .
1, 020

252, 845
13, 733
3i,'02C)"
8,524
29, 516
3,407
3,027
775

4,861
64, 006

16, 499
65, 431
13, 460
25, 442
1, 016
17, 759
8,211
4,302
615, 757
1,470,161
320, 050
826, 543
79, 323
31, 868
3,193
249, 678
13,124
36,114
69,127
4, 721
•25,8881, 282
1, 236.
222

Ox
O

T o t a l in w a r e house J u n e
30,1881.
Gallons.
6,790
26,150
248,145
2, 388
43, 760
37,499
1,569
8,062
1, 273, 324
61,194
92, 817
34, 390
449, 485
208,190
3,691
. 42,710
1, 781, 910
44. 999
490, 656
2,900
53, 511
8,211
31,883
5, 464, 914
19, 909, 031
5, 294, 650
9, 796, 570
1, 043, 495
404, 557
3,193
3, 309, 245
149, 403
106, 336
365,-487
24,-821
100,713
15, 431
10, 935
5,086

hj

O

fej
fej
O
Ul

Sixth Missouri
Nebraska
New Hampshire
Third New Jersey
First New York
Twenty-tirst New York
Twenty-fourth N e w York
Thirtieth New York
Second N o r t h Carolina :
F o u r t h N o r t h Caroliua
Fifth N o r t h Carolina
Sixth N o r t h Carolina
F i r s t Ohio
T h i r d Obio
F o u r t h Ohio
S i x t h Ohio
S e v e n t h Ohio
T e n t h Ohio
E l e v e n t h Ohio
F i f t e e n t h Ohio
E i g h t e e n t h Ohio
First Pennsylvania
Eighth Pennsylvania
,
Ninth Pennsylvania...r
Twelfth Pennsylvania
Fourteentli Pennsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsylvania...
Twentieth Pennsylvania
Tweiity-second Pennsylvania .
T w e n t y - t h i r d P e n n s y l v a n i a •...
South Carolina
Second Tennessee
Fifth Tennessee
Eighth Tennessee
Third Texas
Fourth Texas
Third Virginia
Fifth Virginia
S i x t h V i r g i n i a . -.
Second W e s t Virginia
Firs t Wisconsin
Bonded spirits under'seizure ..
Total.'..

1,019
14, 633
4,660
18, 057

1,898
16, Oil
752
18, 265

1,104
27,205
559
17, 628
1,703

2,119
14,390
2, 740
14, 404
3,563

7,087
71

15, 742
118

8,149

1,543
939
73, 821
24, 324
1,958
44, 817
273
14, 498
2,398
910

908
1,693
121, 560
27, 085
4,177
49, 964

19, 088
235
• 611
4,079
4,453
138,124
39,441
3,643
50,164
2,322
202
7,178
862
1,720
36, 495
3,231
7,937
660
8,634
14, 035
965
193, 900
115, 634
130
. 1,048
86, 631
222

8, 228
2,902
1, 288
218, 587
97, 668

24, 207
413
. 758
396
41,115
2,539
7,911
350
11, 775
6,401
1, 867
228, 743
128, 654

205
78, 614
658
2, 405

238
97, 328
598
2,061

36, 660
4,380
5,387

40
10,020
52, 467
3,821

1,246
10, 477
56, 589
1,386

45
1,559
2, 393
42, 822
33, 940
4,026
45, 499
597
4,079
1,162
754
37, 423
3, 270
8,047
- 717
9,649
12, 072
953
219, 288
124, 245
334
518
75, 653
332

1,088
7,617
57, 449
2,037

1,409
• 11, 040
50, 361
1,903

4,329,474

4, 815, 051

•

10, 969
13, 063
1,098
18, 419

37,838
15, 767
3,054
18, 475
19, 689

15, 397
16, 095
2,936
18, 665
8,151

878
16,717
311
763
7,938
13, 771
236,135
41, 851
4,405
59, 908
7, 920
5. 694
12; 842
903
2,646
45, 840
3, 450
11, 311
1, 2U2
8,981
• 17,382
1,669
232,175
129, 566
665
924
116, 731
252

11, 028
21, 293
413
1,279
12, 064
29, 682
250, 954
43, 314
18, 698
60, 201
9,576
5,445
17,281
2,225
1,745
46, 487
4,182
12, 405
800
9,695
17, 470
1,666
205, 686
125, 260
1,481
1,704
124,- 745
358
274

20,150
298
741
11, 901
32, 478
187, 459
39, 432
12, 861
" 60, 261
8,128
13, 617
15, 577
2,619
2, 041
41, 597
3,926
. 14, 715
1,039
13, 004
13, 437
1,092
211,883
126, 097
1,194
2,405
125, 496
402
1,440

345
1,910
15, 834
59, 233
5,397

522
1,385
17, 851
58, 368
9,707

161
287
1,836
15, 202
59, 539
8,221
6,121, 991

6, 397,188

9,844
54, 616
3,936
18, 383
7, 9U9
2, 505
30, 988
63
740
9,961
33, 222
173, 017
43, 981
9, 097
48, 386
3,035
25, 607
15, 213
1,081
2,456
39, 730
3,900
12, 967
617
12,139
11,219
217, 097
122, 883
1,881
3,273
138, 305
1,564

20,
57,
10,
*31,

701
038
999
592

5, 510, 934

113, 346
228, 129
27,.344
155, 432
44, 997
25, 473
14, 411
219, 070
• 1,594
4, 938
66, 982
132, 958
1, 644,225
515, 473
81, 876
749, 222
65,
218,
77,
13,
15,
688, 059
47, 404
133, 709
8, 522
147, 609
116, 048
35, 456
3, 944.849
1, 856,876
0, 232
12, 067
1, 240,754
798
832
161
854
973
165, 542
760, 531
53, 402
31, 592

O
O
Ul
Ul
H-l

O
fel
Pi

o
fej

Pi

Pi
fej

64, 648, 111

T o t a l in w a r e h o u s e J u n e 30,1880, p r o d u c e d f r o m M a r c h ,
1878, t o J u n e , 1880




* Produced during various months.
0\

D I F F E R E N T KINDS OF S P I R I T S IN WAREHOUSE J U N E 3 0 , 1 8 8 1 .

Ox

STATEMENT of the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of E A C H K I N D of SPIBITS, as KNOWN to the TBADE, B E M A I N I N G in DISTILLEBY WABEHOUSMS June Z0,1S81.
. .
. . .
.
.

District and State.

Bourbon
whisky.

Rye
whisky.

Alcohol.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Rum.

Gin..

Gallons. Gallons.

26,150

High
wines.

Pure,
n e u t r a l , or
cologne
spriits.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallo n s
6,7. .
1, 561'

246, 584
2,388

'•

Miscellaneous.

43,760
..,

4,472

17, 595

F i r s t lUinois

37, 499
1,487

82
8,062
6,097

17,671

1, 227, 489

61,1-94
Third Illinois
Fifthlllinois...

92, 817
32, 574
379, 445
7,736
10, 816
658, 410
30, 476
372, 457
2,900

36, 263
187, 523

940
49, 691

F i r s t Mis.souri



io, 596
9,961
405

1,990
282

1,050,'/92
211, 456

9, 297, 429
978, 543
377, 592

499,141
64, 952
26, 284

2,146

7,752

79, 272

3,193
3,489

46, 505

106, 336
365, 467
24, 821
7,198

12, 251
328, 295

A g g r e g a t e . Specific k i n d s of s p i r i t s r e p o r t e d i n
• "miscellaneous column."

GaUons.
a, 190
26.150 .
248,145
2, 388
43, 760
37, 499
1,569
8,062
1, 273, 324
61,194
_ 92,817
34, 390
449, 485
208,190
3,691
42,710
1, 781, 910
44. 999
490, 656
2,900
53, 511
8,211
31, 883
5, 464, 914
19, 909, 031
5, 294, 650

Pi
Com whisky.

31, 291

9, 796, 570
- 1,043,495
404, 557
681
3,193
3, 309, 245
133
149, 403
106, 336
365, 487
24, 821
100,713
id, oi9

i

C o m whisky.
Do.

H

Whisky.

i.
w

fej-

Corn w h i s k y .
Whisky.
Wheat whisky.
Whisky.

^ '

o
Uu

Malt whiskv.
whisky.

3, 259,118
149, 403

49, 205

7,530
3,691
30, 635
627, 802
3,340
68,103

^

53, 511
8,211
1,021

30,862
5, 464, 914
' " * 18, 845, 988
4, 665, 729

Third Maryland . . . .

33,120

1,259
. 483,112

Fifthlowa
Fifth Kentucky

i,8i6
657
5,401

to,

Irish whisky.

Whisky.

Second Missouri
Fourth
Missouri
Fifth Missonri
Sixth Missouri.
Nebraska
New Hampshire
*
Third New Jersey
First New York .'
.
Twenty-fivst New York
Twenty-fourth New York:
Thirtieth New York
Second North Carolina
Fourth North Carolina
Fifth North Carolina
Sixth North Carolina .
FirstOhio
Third Ohio
Fourth Ohio
.
Sixth Ohio
Seventh Ohio
Tenth Ohio
Eleventh Ohio
Fifteenth Ohio . . . .
Eighteenth Ohio
.
First Penusyivania
Eighth Pennsylvania
Ninth Pennsylvania ...'
Twelfth Pennsylvania"^
Fourteenth Peunsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsylvania
Twentieth Pennsylvania
Twenty-second Pennsylvania
Twenty-third Pennsylvania
South Carolina
=
Second Tennessee
Filth Teunessee
Eighth Tennessee
Third Texas
Fourth Texas
Third Virginia Fifth Virginia . . . .
. . .
Sixth Virginia
Second West Virginia
First Wisconsiii
^
Total....
Remaining in warehouse
30,1880.".




35,431
10, 510
5, 086
112, 696
150, 221

425
650
33, 915

24,973

600

18, 420

27, 344
155, 432
2,704

5,691
1,726
168, 402

33, 769

5,190
4,171

5,124
1, 213
2, 063

1,864
10, 665

0

1,170, 627
401,166
53,591
57, 338
64,118
175,482
1,986
6,517
2, 629

323, 648
88,847

138
172

236, 981
999
40,174

1,356

7,860

16, 433
9,996
28, 285

6, 996
13,199
688, 059
36, 566
125. 657
2,367
147, 609
116, 048
35, 456
3, 944, 849
1, 592,121

i,749
8, 052
6,155

781'
1,271

3,930

i , 484

264, 755
6,232
12, 067
1,174,178

95, 052

2,759
5, 798
4,466

1, 594
4,938
66, 982
132, 958
75, 504
4,563
454, 903

75, 862

3, 675

50, 015
10, 720

31. 478
25, 473
4,418

3, 623
161

'

1,854

.

8,973
1,245

164, 297
760,531

15,431
.10, 935
5,086
113, 346
228,129
27, 344
155, 432
44, 997
25, 473
14,411
219, 070
1,594
4,938
66, 982
132, 958
1, 644, 225
515, 473
81, 876
749,222
65, 798
218,283
77, 848
13, 513
15, 828
688, 059
47, 404133, 709
8, 522
147, 609
116, 048
35, 456
3,944,849
1, 856, 876
6, 232
12, 067
3, 272, 089
5,798
8,089
161
1,854
. 8, 973
165, 542
760. 531
53, 402'

841

51, 712

677

43, 549, 826

14, 552; 268

^ 499, 953

499,167

84, 540

502,915

^ 313,607

4, 645, 835 •64,648,111

18 798j 347.

8, 512, 791

243, 034

394, 084

31,189

.294,899

312, 485

2, 777, 040. 31, 363, 869

172

Whisky.
Malt whisky.
Whisky.
Corn whiskv.
Do.
Do.
Do
Corn and malt whiskies and w h i s k y .
Malt whisky.
W h e a t whisky and whisky.

o
o

g

Ul
Ul
M

o
fe^

•

pi

•

o

Wheat whisky.

fej

'
Corn and r y e whisky.
Corn whisky.
Do.

Do.

Com whisky.
Do.
Cora and r y e whisky.
Whisky.

fe!

>
<
fe^
d

June
Ol

154

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

TRANSFER OF S P I R I T S TO MANUFACTURING WAREHOUSES.

Ll my report for the iiscal year ended June 30, 1880, attention was
called to the law then recently enacted (May 28, 1880, section 14) enlarging the provisions of the internal-revenne act of March 1, 1879, as
to transfers of spirits from distillery warehouses to warehouses known
as mannfacturing warehousi^s, and established at ports of entry for the
manufacture of medicines, preparations, compositions, perfumeries, cosmetics, cordials, and other liquprs for exxiort.
As stated in my previous report the act of May 28, 1880, enlarged
the scope of the act of March 1,1879, so as to provide for the withdrawal
of every kind of spirits from distillery warehouses, the article theretofore withdrawn having been limited to alcohol.
The following varieties of spirits appear to have been withdrawn
under this new provision of the law, viz:
Gallons.

Bourbon wliisky
Rye whisky
Pure, neutral, or cologne spirits

.'

966
913
13,468

„

Total.
Add alcohol withdrawn

15,347
190,481

Total all kinds withdrawn

205,828

This quantity is 13,384 gallons less than the quantity withdrawn for
transfer to manufacturing warehouses during the year ended June 30,»
1880.
SPIRITS AND TOBACCO REMOVED IN BOND FOR EXPORT.

The following statement shows the quantity and percentage of production of distilled spirits and manufactured tobacco (including snuff)
removed in bond for export during each fiscal year since the passage of
the act of June 6, 1872:
Distilled spirits.
Year.

Taxahle (proof) Percentage ofgallons ex- producported.
tion.

' Year.

1873
1874
1875
1876
1877 \
1878
1879
1880
1881-

..

Total

Manufactured tobacco.

..

;




2, 358, 630 •
4,060,160
587,413
1, 308, 900
2, 529. 526
5, 499, 252
14, 837, 581
16, 765, 666
15, 921, 482
63, 868, 612

3.45+
5.90+
^0.96-12.25 +
i- 22,-^
9. 80 +
20. 63+
18.55+
13.52+

1873
1874
1875
1878
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

o Pounds of tob a c c o exported.

'.
--.
Total

10,110,045
10, 800, 927
9,179. 316
9, 434, 485
11, 335, 046
10, 581. 744
11, 034, 951 •
9, 808, 409
10, 686,132
92, 971, 055

Percentage of
production.
8.59+
9.11 +
7.13+
7.87 +
8.88+
8.89+
8.62+
6. 71+
6.61-f-

STOGE: O N H A N D , P R O D U C T I O N , A N D M O V E M E N T O F SPIRITS FOR FIVE YEARS.

The following table shows the stock on hand, production, and movement of spirits for the fiscal years 1877,1878, 1879,
1880, and 1881:
1878.

1877.
Gallons,

Gallons.

Gallons.

1879.
Gallons.

Gallons.

1880.
Gallons.

Gallons.

1881.
Gallo

Gallons.

Gallons.

O
O
CH

Q u a n t i t y of s p i r i t s a c t u a l l y i n w a r e h o u s e s h e g i n n i n g of fiscal y e a r
-.
Q u a n t i t y of s p i r i t s p r o d u c e d d u r i n g fiscal y e a r

12, 595, 850
59, 912, 268

13, 091, 773
56,103, 053

14, 088, 773
71, 892, 621

19,212,470
90, 355, 270

31, 363, 869
117, 728,150

Total
72, 508,118
Q u a n t i t y of s p i r i t s w i t h d r a w n , tax-paid, d u r i n g
fiscal y e a r
56, 848, 525^
Q u a n t i t y of s p i r i t s w i t h d r a w n for e x p o r t a t i o n duri n g fiscal y e a r
2, 529, 528
Q u a n t i t y of s p i r i t s w i t h d r a w n for scientific p u r p o s e s , for u s e of t h e D n i t e d S t a t e s , for t r a n s f e r
t o m a n u f a c t u r i n g w a r e h o u s e , d e s t r o y e d b y fire,
a l l o w e d for loss h y l e a k a g e i n w a r e h o u s e s , & c . . . .
38, 292

69,194, 826

85, 981, 394

109, 567, 740

149. 092, 019

Total

,;

Q u a u t i t y of s p i r i t s remft.ining i n w a r e h o u s e s a t e n d
of fiscal y e a r -




9, 416, 345
13, 091, 773

Ul ,
g
O

!z5

49, 571,128

51, 885, 939

61,100, 362

67, 372, 575

5, 499, 252

14, 837, 581

16, 765, 666

15, 921, 482

45, 404

337, 843

H

w
o
^
h-i

66, 768, 924

78, 203, 871.

84,443 908

31, 363, 869

64, 648, 111

S
^

td

<
d

PRODUCTION AND WITHDRAWALS OF SPIRITS D U R I N a FIRST FOUR MONTHS OF CURRENT FISCAL YEAR,
STATEMENT of the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of S P I B I T S PBODUCED and WITHDBAWN, and the AMOUNT of TAX P A I D
during the months of July, August, Septemher, and Octoher, 1881.
S e p t e m h e r , 1881.

A u g u s t , 1881.

J u l y , 1881.

Cn-

a:)

Octoher, 1881.

District.

Second A l a b a m a
Arkansas
F i r s t California.
First Connecticut
Second C o n n e c t i c u t —
Second Georgia
T h i r d Georgia
Ida^ho
F i r s t Illiuois
S e c o n d Illinois
Third Illinois
F o u r t h Illinois
F i f t h Illinois
E i g h t h Illinois
Thii t e e n t h Illiuois
First Indiana
Fourth Indiana
Sixth I n d i a u a
Seventh Indiana
..
Eleventh Indiana
Secoud I o w a
Fifth I o w a . . .
Kausas
Second K e n t u c k y
Fifth Kentucky
Sixth Kentucky
Seventh Kentucky
Eighth Kentucky
Ninth Kentucky.
Louisiana
Third Maryland
Fourth Marylaud
Third Massacbusetts .
Fifth Massachusetts..
Tenth Massachusetts.
for FRASER
^ F i r s t Missouri

Digitized


Produced.

Withdrawn;

T a x paid.

GaUons.
3.52
617
135, 322
3,692
2, 346

Gallonb.
589
3, 776
122, 453
7,037
1,171

$530
3, 398
110, 207
6, 333
1, 053

10
40
70
30
90

254
188
523
759, 002
848,143
843
1,601
55, 269
69, 366
19, 912
19, 546
, 569, 740 1, 043, 727
94; 112
74, 221
1, 542
3,719
9,714
295,255
263, 622
61,914
55, 368
162, 657
270, 126
236
1, 078
6, 727
46, 433
11, 797
83, 965
1,433
726
164, 807
53,182
524, 510
180,195
246, 517
188, 225
68,014
313, 410
57,103
15, 118
8,386
4,794
8,710
4,606
40, 526
124, 755
8, 380
6,086
29, 371
62,547
55, 399
75, 465
7, 277
8,281
212, 686
199, 161

. 228
470
683,101
758
49,742
17, 59i
939, 354
- 84,700
1, 387
3,347
265, 729
55, 722
146, 391
212
6, 054
10, 617
1, 289
47,863
162,175
169, 402
61,212
13, 606
4, 314
4,145
36, 473
5, 477
26,433
49, 859
6, 549
191,417

60
70
80
70
10
40
30
80
80
10
50
60
30
40
30
30
70
80
50
50
60
20
60
40
40
40
90
10
30
40

Produced.

Withdrawn.

Gallons.
275
2,651
122, 756 137,187
7,084
•2,286
2, 917
2,587
11, 561
6, 827
165
275
474
792,160
784, 182
2,057
53, 478
33, 492
39, 456
1, 556, 642 1, 256, 839
74, 692
101, 040
2,053
1,596
6; 738
3,410
328, 396
282, 373
95, 464
91, 409
142, 972
165, 533
257
113
5,180
47, 752
17, 725
110, 332
896
1,180
64, 557
• 19,109
198, 012
231, 224
192, 700
258, 555
74, 274
93, 470
47, 077
15, 905
1
9,100
6,232
9,698
33,116
11, 689
6,334
527
62, 432
40, 034
107, 945
55, 772
8,905
6, 886
243, 396
229, 697
Gallons.
602

T a x paid.

Produced.

Withdrawn.

T a x paid.

Produced.

Withdrawn.

T a x paid.

GaUons. Gallons.
Gallons. Gallons.
$247 50
$243 90
213
753
271
$677 70
3, 625 20
1,059
3,015
2, 385 90
4,028
2, 713 50
177,794
10
206,
441
123, 468 30
185, 376 60
205, 974
173, 881 197, 549
3,268
4, 748 40
6, 375 60
5, 276
7,355
6, 619 50
2,978
2, 334 60
2, 625 30
3,587
2,358
2,594
3, 228 30
9,346
11,879 10
10, 404 90
6, 782
13, 199
13, 037
11, 733 30
261
122 40
148 50
264
545
490 50
136
822 60
426 60
. 525
. 472 50
914
769, 666 50 822, 020 883,163
705, 763 80
794, 846 70
788, 688 855,185
1, 008 90
• 1,851 30
609
548 10
i, 121
11, 387 70
48,128 40
87, 230
87, 230
78, 507 00
15,128
IZ, 653
53,123 40
63,196
30,142 80
58,459
. 52, 613 10
57, 540
59, 026
1,131, J 55 10 1, 441, 2701,404, 751 1, 264, 275 901, 868,130 1, 638, 611 i; 474, 749 90
180, 812 70 268, 795 231, 339
67, 222 80
197, 032 200, 903
208, 205 10
18, 386
1, 847 70
9, 876 60
21, 657
19, 491 30
15, 080
10, 974
7,362 90
6, 064 20
3, 002
2, 701 80
8,181
314, 749 80 334, 273 357,166
295, 556 40
321, 449 40
305, 762 349, 722
85, 917 60
90,783 00
103, 573 106, 216
95, 594 40
99, 848 100, 870
135,791 10
63,565
148, 979 70
21, 643
57, 208 50
29, 931 150, 879
138 60
153
419
231 30
137 70
154
5, 060 70
3,377
4, 662 00
3, 039 30
1,817
5,6^3
43, 952 40
15, 952 50
95, 657
92, 514
86, 091 30
48, 345
48, 836
1,208 70
1,148
1, 062 00
1,033 20
1,343
64, 791 90 293,133
67. 080
58,101 30
60, 372 00
49, 362
71, 991
237,229 20 1, 488, 795 299, 809
208,101 60
269, 828 10
752, 978 263, 588
240,532 20
232, 699 50
280, 908 90
283, 728 312,121
189, 531 267, 258
66, 846 60
108,189 00
201, 471 113, 814 . 102, 432 60 404, 642 120, 210
14, 314 50
16,
254
00
22,
606
20, 345 40
50,
523
59,960
18, 060
• 8,190 00
8, 865 90
14, 080
12, 672 00
9,851
13,
683
12, 314 70
14,
823
90
9,831
5, 608 80
9,739
16, 471
53, 436
48, 092 40
53, 552 70 221, 389
29, 804 40
126, 368
59, 503
4,499
4, 049 10
• 7, 719 30
^•5, 538
5, 700 60
2,644
8,577
48,.010 50
53, 345
66, 233
47, 439 90
36, 030 60
60, 270
52, 711
74,
029 50
82,
255
130, 698
61,109 10
50. 194 80 111, 285
67,899
4,036
3, 632 40
8, 444 70
9,195
6,197 40
8,466
9, 383
176, 230 2
160, 622 10 195, 297 195, 818
219, 056 40 177,151
178, 469

O

o
H

w
w

^

o
Ul

•

Second Missouri
Fourth Missouri
Fifth Missouri
Sixth Missouii
Nebraska
New Hampshire
Third New Jersey
-....
First New York
Twenty-first New,York
Twenty-fourth New York
Thirtieth New York
Second North Carolina
Fourth North Carolina
Fifth North Carolina
Sixth North Carolina
,
First Ohio .. ^
Third Ohio
Fourth Ohio
Sixth Ohio
".
Seventh Ohio
Tenth Ohio
,
Eleventh Ohio
Fifteenth Ohio
,
Eighteenth Ohio
First Pennsylvania
,
Eighth Pennsvlvania ...'
Ninth Pennsylvania
—
Twelfth Pennsylvania
Fourteenth Pennsylvania
Sixteenth Pennsylvania
Twentieth.Pennsylvania
Twenty-secoud Pennsylvania.
Twenty-third Pennsylvania...
k J V U V U \ y cu I. \J1.1 X±CJU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Second Tennessee
Fifth Tennessee
Eighth Tennessee
Third Texas
Fourth Texas
Third Virginia
Fifth Virginia
Sixth Virginia
SeconrTWest Virginia
±irst Wisconsin .'
Third Wisconsin
Total .

131

1,746

1,263
1,434
6, 276
73,122
2,595
1,914
71, 310
318
5,508
64,143
•94
242
7,898
13,127
898, 788
78, 424
35,-417
16,267
21, 581
31, 453
75,748
661
2, 279
18, 016
5,950
6,135
733
6,870
7,077
893
54, 016
26, 779
1,133
3,283
40, 573
492
684

1, 213
15,412
37, 418
23, 528

169
705
11, 448
6,666
26, 572

2,052
92, 578
4,671
18, 641
68, 613
536
74,743
236
398
6,145
25, 881
900, 242
148, 908
23, 221
20, 558
48, 578
88, 357
740
802
33, 038
2,716
8,243
564
11, 942
4,875
197, 615
131, 088
1, 811
3,153
118, 906

555
755 10
992
1,136 70
1,290 60
146
911
3,756
5, 648 40
37, 501
65, 809 80
76, 731
4,722
2, 335 50
6,609
19, 081
1,722 60
11, 915
66,
848 . 75, 502
64,179 00
•286 20
4, 957 20
1,806
57, 728'70
67, 084
63,270,
247 •
84 60
• 71
217 80
85
631
4,157
7,108 20
8, 558
11,814 30
15,625
30, 615
808, 909 20s 990, 957 1', 007. 935
70, 581 60
160, 149
141, 286
31, 875 30
23, 465
25, 495
70
14, 640 30
22, 455
19, 422 90
22, 443
26, 723
28, 307 70
45, 937
35, 546
68,173 20
92, 347
92, 786
594 90
709
1,368
2, 051 10
1,871
16, 214 40 "'7,'352'
18, 652
5, 355 00
1,016
2, 770
5, 521 50
5,771 • 6,787
, 659 70
910
870
6,183 00
11,142
6,053
6, 369 30
3,184
5,776
803 70
799
48, 614 40 156, 143
77,159
24,101 10
14, 012
30, 993
1, 019 70
1, 514
2, 468
^ 2, 954 70
1,807
2, 9^91
36, 515 70 110, 596
63, 935
442 80
479
615 60
191
62
152 10
634 50
10, 303 20
5, 999 40
23, 914 80

7, 362, 663 5,147, 956 4, 633,160 40

9,781
23
23, 207

258
420
11, 634
8,485
26, 029

499 50
892 80
131 40
3, 380 40
69, 057 90
5, 948 10
10, 723 50
.61, 951 80

650
970
221
5,366
97, 280
92,117
4,583
1,223
12, 775
17, 884
53, 046
58, 530
630
1,625 40
2,718
60, 375 60
84,193
87, 552
63 90
101
567 90
199
636
7,702 20
8,136
3, 542
27, 553 50
37, 370
14, 200
907,141 50 . ,085,614 1,104, 038
127,157 40 I 138, 241
124, 734
22, 945 50
22, 560
25, 091
20, 209 50
25, 437
24, 050 70
24, 548
21, 029
31, 991 40
39, 880
29, 413
83, 507 40
89, 796
90, 789
1, 231 20
775
1,004
1, 683 90
875
1,565
16. 786 80
28, 805
18, 743
2,493 00
5,138
6,093
6,108 30
8,333
5,727
783 00
846
321
5, 447 70
11, 615
5, 286
5,198 40
6,674
8,342
719 10
. 1, 303
69, 443 10
199, 828
88,168
27,893 70
92, 056
38, 067
2, 221 20
1,469
2, 232
2,691 90
1, 612'
2, 535
57, 541 50
94,148
78, 742
. 43110
260
- 171 90
382
.60
232 20
486
- 378 00
524
10,470 60
12, 576
10, 288
7, 636 50
39. 079
9. 538
23, 426 10
49, 602
39,159

1,035
593 10
757
873 00
955
150
198 90
4,487
4,829 40
17, 926
101,634
82, 905 30
104, 376
5, 325
1,100 70
4,466
13,891
11, 497 50
18, 608
52, 677 00 . 90,378
85, 608
913
. 567 00
463
2, 446 20
80, 928
78,796 80
81,127
77
90 90
975
572 40
408
9,599
7, 322 40
3,889
38, 678
33, 633 00
17, 505
993,634 20 1,177, 712 1,184, 8(:4
112, 260 60 I 115,035
96, 583
21, 742
20, 917
22, 581 90
28, 845
22, 893 30
25,100
22, 093 20
22, 913
26, 471 70 , 38,593
28, 814
80,816 40
104, 681
103, 485
903 60
1,318
574
1,551
1, 408 50
1,297
25, 587
16, 868 70
31, 661
6,498
5, 483 70
7,198
10,129
5,154 30
6,939
585
288 90
1,221
6,069
4, 757 40
13,164
7,507 80
8,486
9,119
1,172 70
2,698
79, 351 20
84, 285
2.57, 220
41,
667
34, 260 30
127, 058
1,906
2, 008"' 80
2.665
2,563
2, 281 50
2,867
73,219
70, 867 80
99, 990
. 526
234 00
175
343 80
683
54 00
437„ 40
81
471 60
503
9, 259 20
11,431
15, 616
8. 584 20
10. 072
.5.5. 859
55,138
48i 674
35, 243 10
155

5, 347, 933 20 7,159, 695 6, 622, 649 5, 960, 384 10

563,572 7,207,932

931 50
681 30
135 00
038 30
470 60
792 50
501 90
047 20
821 70
416 70
835 20
69 30
877 50
639 10
34, 810 20
1,066, 377 60
86, 924 70
18, 825 30
25, 960 50
22, 590 00
25, 932 60
94, 212 90
1, 186 20
1< 395 90
23, 028 30
848 20
5, 116 10
526 50
462 10
637 40
428 20
856 50
500 30
715 40
306 70
897 10
473 40
157 50
• 72 90
452 70
10,287 90
9. 064 80
49i 624 20
6,487,138 80

Produced, withdrawn, and tax
paid in July, A u g u s t , Septemher, a n d October, 1880
7,130, 075 4, 988, 217 4, 489, 395 30 5, 727, 961 5, 422, 381 4, 880,142 90 6, 828, 431 5, 867, 415 5, 280, 673 50 8, 691, 720 6, 327, 715 5, 694, 943 50




O
O
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Ul
h-i •

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Pi.

158.

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

SPIRITS IN DISTILLERY WAREHOUSES NOVEMBER 1 , 1 8 8 1 .
STATEMENT of ilie QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of SPIBITS BEMAINI N G in D I S T I L L E B Y WABEHOUSES Novemher 1, 1881.
District.

Second Alabama
Arkansas
First California
Colorado
.First Connecticnt
Second Connecticnt
Second Georgia
Tliird Georgia
Idalio
1
Firstlllinois
Second Illinois
Third Illinois
Fonrtli Illinois
Fifth Illin ois
Eighth Illinois
Thirteenth Illinois
First I n d i a n a . . ,
Fonrth Indiana.
Sixthlndiana
Seventh Indiana
Eleventh Indiana
Second Iowa
Fifthlowa
Kansas
Second Kentncky
Fifth Kentucky
Sixth Kentncky
Seventh Kentucky
Eighth Kentucky
Ninth Kentucky
Louisiana
Third Maryland . . . . „
Fonrth Maryland . . . :
Third Massachusetts
Fifth Massachnsetts .
Tenth Massachusetts
First Missouri .•
Second Missouri
Fourth Missouri
Fifth Jiiissouri
Sixth Missouri
Nebraska...-..,




\

Gallons.

Gallons.
District.
New Hampshire
29,,712
Third NCAV Jersey
•187;,654
First New York
32,,359
Twenty-first New York
23,;, 461
Twenty-fourth NCAV York
4 ,295
Thirtieth New York
220 ,910
21,261 Second North Caroliiia
1,726
1, 4i5 Fourth North Carolina
3 ,053
'
5,508 Fifth North Carolina
47 ,231
1,126,162 Sixth North Carolina
85,, 173
57, 839 First Ohio
1, 550;,850
19,455 Third Ohio
552;,224
.43, 567 Fourth Ohio...
64 ,962
592,421 Sixth Ohio
648,,239
63, 745 Seventh Ohio
53 ,850
2,431 Tenth Ohio
'265:,139
'...
33,769 Eleventh Ohio
89:,607
1, 625,864 Fifteenth Ohio
11-,738
30,313 Eighteenth Ohio
11,259
186,298 First Pennsylvania
701,044
3,663 Eighth Pennsylvauia
41,439
3,196 Ninth Pennsylvania
132,532
1,560 Twelfth Pennsylvania
9:,516
28,319 Fourteenth Pennsylvania
169!,373
5,721,493 Sixteenth Pennsylvania
• 108,, 852
21,820,752 Twentieth Pennsylvania
29,,141
5,150,865 Twenty-second Pennsylvania. 4,422:,394
10, 397,751 Twenty-third Pennsylvania.. 2, 069,,560
1,181,288 South Carolina
5,,677
372,511 Second Tennessee
10,,006
Fifth Tennessee
1,424 , 392
3,589,747 Eighth Tennessee
3;,987
8,398
133,959 Third Texas
95
114,976 Fourth Texas
810
:...
299,102 Third Virginia
6,749
32^ 176 Fifth Virginia
171,548
70,534 Sixth Virginia
854,913
12,380 Second West V i r g i n i a . . . 50,940
7,721 First Wiscpnsin
155
3,107 Third Wisconsin
112,870
Total
67,442,186
198,284

5,942
14,253
222, 382
2,388
25,956

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL

159

REVENUE.

SPIRITS WITHDRAWN FOR EXPORT DURING FIRST FOUR MONTHS OF
PRESENT FISCAL YEAR.
STATEMENT, hy DISTBICTS, of the QUANTITY in TAXABLE GALLONS, and
D I F F E B E N T K I N D S of SPIBITS, WITHDBAWN for E X P O B T during the four .
, months ended Octoher 31, 1881."
Taxable gallons.

1

Districts.
Pl 0

1°
First California
First Illinois
Third Illinois
Fifth Illinois
Eiffhth Illinois

. . .
...

.

.

. .
..

Second Iowa.
.
Fifth Iowa
Sixtli Kentucky
Seventh Kentucky
Third Massachusetts
.
Fifth Massachusetts
Nebraska
First Ohio
Third Ohio
Sixth Ohio
Twenty-third Pennsylvania
Total




.

67, 071
52, 036
851, 485
183, 299
53,511
125, 267
167, 792

.

a

1

o
A.
441

27, 238
28, 001

. . . .
12,149
28, 515
^80, 637

4,339

1, 621, 762

59, 578

67, 068
127, 407

233

2,514

210

292
194,475

443

3 247

160

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

SPIRITS WITHDRAWN FOR EXPORT DURING FOUR
OCTOBER 3 1 , 1877 TO 1 8 8 l t

MONTHS

ENDED

STATEMENT, hy ,DISTBICTS, of the QUANTITY, in TAXABLE GALLONS, of
S P I B I T S WITHDBAWN for E X P O B T during the four months ended Octoher Zl, in
the years 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880, amd 1881.
T a x a b l e gallons.
Districts.
1878.

1879.

165, 376
43, 088
218, 411

1, 043, 630
98, 711
1, 334, 489

513,097
128, 505
1, 436, 534
214, 380
25, 913

6,327

52, 352

. 1877.
F i r s t California
F i r s t Illinois
T h i r d Illinois
F i f t h Illinois
F i g h t l i Illinois

.'

Seventh Indiana
Second I o w a
F i f t h Towa
Fifth Kentucky
Sixth Kentucky
Seventh Kentucky . . .
Eighth Kentucky
Third Maryland
Third Massachusetts
Fifth Massachusetts

1880.

394, 839
1,064
2,493'
1,096
1,053

1,022
....
,
.:

-

Nebraska ...
First New York
FirstOhio
T h i r d Ohio
S i x t h Ohio
Twentv-third Pennsylvania
First Wisconsin

7, 687
26, 233
289, 365
5, 986

7,886
53, 906

2i,-497

180
265, 050
252, 527
1, 453, 922
812, 937
68, 200
13, 362
192, 441
117, 732
196, 729

441
94,309
52, 036
879, 486
183, 299
'

53 511
12.5, 267
167, 792

1,367
139

2,747

84, 062
369, 840

106, 216
263, 078

67 068
227 407

20,134

98, 201
7,909
128, 351
43, 953
. 1, 938

17, 436

2,479

16, 698
28 515
80, 637
292

4,404

/^787,471

\ Total

147, 642
357, 900
• 200,494

1881.

3, 302, 766

3, 209,144

4,024,292

1, 979, 505

. PRODUCTION AND MOVEMENT OF S P I R I T S DURING THE F I R S T
MONTHS OF T H E PRESENT FISCAL YTEAR.

FOUR

The preceding tables show the production and movement of distilled
spiiits duriug the first four months of the present fiscal year.
, Thc}^ show that the production is 1,889,623 gallons greater thau for
the corresponding period last year, the withdrawals for exportation
are 2,044,787 gallons less,, the withdrawals upou payment of the tax
2,314,957 gallons greater, aud that the increased receipts from the
gallon tax amount to $2,083,461.30.
Months.

J u l y , 1881
August, 1881.. Septeniber, 1881
October, 1 8 8 1 . . .
Total....

I n c r e a s e o v e r 1880.

In
In
In
In

July
August...
September
October—
Total..




Produced.

Withdrawn
for e x p o r t .

Withdrawn
tax-paid.

A m o u n t of
t a x paid.

Gallons.
1, 362, 663
6,181, 880
7,159, 695
9, 563, 572.

Gallons.
1,112, 827
535, 605
149, 419
181, 654

Gallons.
5,147, 956
5, 942,148
6, 622, 649
7, 207, 932

$4, 633,160
5, 347. 933
5, 960. 384
6, 487,138

30, 267, 810

1, 979, 505

24, 920, 685

22, 428, 616 50

Production.

* Withdrawn
for e x p o r t .

Withdrawn
tax-paid.

40
20
10
80

A m o u n t of
t a x paid.

Gallons.
232, 588
453, 919
331, 264
871, 852

GaUons.
86, 575
238, 027
684, 492
1, 035, 693

Gallons.
159, 739
519, 767
755, 234
880, 217

$142, 765 10
467,790 30
679,710 60
792,195-30

1, 889, 623

2, 044, 787

2, 314, 957

2, 083, 461 30

*Decrea8e.

COMMISSIONEB

OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

161

EXPOETATIOIsr OF MANUFACTUEED TOBACCO AND SNUFF
IN BOND.
1. Bemoved and unaccounted for July 1, 1880.
Pounds.

Tohacco,
Bonds in
Tohacco,
Tohacco,
Tobacco,
Tobacco,

Pounds.

at 20 cents per ponnd tax
29, 002 the hands of United States district attorneys
17, 094
at 24 cents, removed nnder exportation honda
533,212
at 24 cents, removed nnder transportation bonds.
207, 660'-^
at 16 ceats, removed under exportation bonds
3,946, 809^
at 16 cents, removed nnder transportation bonds .
307,926^
5,041,704^
2. Bemoved during the year ended June 30, 1881.

Tobacco and snuif, at 16 cents per pound t a x
Tobacco and snuff, at 16 cents per pound tax (excess)

10, 686,132|
339

10, 686,471-1
15,728,175f

3. Exported and during the year accounted for.
Tobacco, at 20 cents p,er pound tax
29, 002
Tobacco, at 24 cents per pound t a x
580,200
Tobacco and snuff, at 16 cents per pound t a x
14, 007, 644^pJ
Tobacco, at 24 cents per pound t a x (tax paid on deficiencies)
-.
386
Tobacco and snutf, at 16 cents per pound t a x (tax paid on
deficiencies)
470
14, 617,702i|
4. Bemaimng unaccounted for June ZO, ISSl.
Bonds in the hands of United States district attorneys.. 17,094
Tobacco, at 24 cents, removed under exportation b o n d s . . . o . . 33,974
Tobacco, at 24 cents, removed under transportation b o n d s . . . 126, 312-i%
Tobacco and snuff, at 16 cents, removed under exportation
bonds
:
830,576ii
Tobacco and snnff, at 16 cents, removed nnder transportation
bonds
102,5I5-i^(r
:
1,110,^47211
15,728,175f

The quantity removed from manufactories for exportation during the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1881, is 879,421.25 pounds greater than that
removed during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1880, while the quantity
unaccounted for at the close of the year 1881 is 3,931,231.375 pounds
less-than at the close of the year 1880.
The great diminution in the balance unaccounted for is clearly due to
the operation of the act of June 9, 1880, amendatory of section 3385 of
the Eevised Statutes, to which attention was called in my last annual
report. The increase in exportations may also, it is believed, be fairly
attributed to the same cause.
In this connection I would call attention to the following paragraph
which appeared in my last year's report, and renew the recommendation
contained therein:
,
It, however, appears t h a t in striking out a portion of section 3385, Revised Statutes, and substituting for the portion stricken out the amendatory provisions of
11 F



16^

RiEPORT ON^TIIE FINANCES. ^

the new law, the language of t h a t part of section 3385 relied upon as authprizing the
•expoi-tal^iori of tobacco, snuff, and cigars by railioad cars and other l a n d conveyances
was, through ihadvertehce, iiot restoi'^d. I see no 'go*od reaisbhs why the exportatrdn
of these articles under section 3385j as abihended, should be confined to vessels, and I
would therefore recommend t h a t as early as possible in t h e next session of Congress
the l a w b e amended so as to clearly provide forthe exportation-of tobacco, snuff,, and
cigars by railroad or other land conveyances.
EXPORTATION OF CIGARS AND CIGARETTES IN
1. Bemoved and unaCcouiited for July 1,1880.
Number.

Cigars, at | 6 per M t a x .
Cigarettes, at $1.75 vper M t a x

Number.

1,123,600
20,356,280
-^—
•— 21, 479, 880 •

;....

2. Bemoved^ during the year ended June 30,. 1881.
Cigars, at $6 per M t a x
Oigarettes, at $1.75 per M tax

2,726,075
37,662,060
:

40,388,135
61,868,^015

3. Exported and accounted for during the year ended June 30, 1881.
Cigars, at $6 per M t a x
....,
3,768,225
Giirarettes, at $1.75 per M t a x . . . . . . . . . i . . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53,865^340
— —— 57,633,565
4. Bemaining unaccounted for June 30, 1881.
Cigars, at | 6 per M
Cigarettes, a f $1.75 per M
^
v-

....,
..."
.'........:..........

-

.

81,450
4,153,000
--^
:___::.

4,234,'450
61,868,015

DATE OF BONDS REMAINING UNACCOUNTED FOR J U N E 3 0 , 1 8 8 1 .

The years in which the bonds were given for the exportation of the
tobacco, snuff, cigars, and cigarettes remaining unaccounted for by the
evidence required by law for their cancellation ou June 30, 1881, are as
ibllows, viz:
N

.

Year.

1S12.:.J....
1873
1874
1875
..
-. • . . . . . - . . : : . . . . .
'1876
1877
1878
1879
1880...:,....-.'..
1881.
Total




.

Tobacco.

Shuff.

• Cigars.

• Cigarettes.

Pounds.
17, 094

Pounds.

Number.

Nimiber.

..........

.....
/..
i...........
:

2,066
.48,584*
16, 080"^
51, 925^
99, 740
94, 810
780, 372-1:1

10, 500
70,950

32 000
6,'0O0
4,115,000

, 110, 4 7 2 i |

81,450

4,153, 009

COMMISSIONER O P INTERNAL REVENUE.

163

XPORTATION OF FRICTION MATCHES, P R O P R I E T A R Y ARTICLES, &C.,
UNDER SECTION 19 OF THE ACT OF MARCH 1, 1 8 7 9 .
Amount of t a x :
Remaining unaccounted for J u n e 30, 1880
Bonded dufing the year ended June 30, 1 8 8 1 . . . :
Accounted for as exported during the year ended June 30,
1881
Remaining unaccounted for June 30, 1881




$9,245 76
248,268 78
.. $257, 514 -54
254,791 02
2,723 52
257,514 54

164

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

SPIRITS IN HANDS OF WHOLESALE LIQUOR
STATEMENT of the QUANTITY, in PBOOF-GALLONS, of TAX-PAID S P I B I T S
^
Octoher
Statement of different kinds and total held October 1,1881.
Domestic.
District.
ri

CD

fl fl

Alabama
Alahama.
...
Arizona
Arkansas . . . . . . .
California.
California
...
Colorado
Connecticut
Connecticut
Dakota
Delaware
,.
Florida
Georgia
Oeorgia..
Idaho
Illinois
Illinois..'.
Illinois
Illinois
Illinois
Illinois
Illinois
Illinois
Indiana
Indiana
Indiana
Indiana
Indiana
Indiana
Iowa
lowal.
Iowa.
lowa.^
Kansas
Kentucky
Kentucky
Kentucky...
Kentucky
...
Kentucky
Kentucky.
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Maryland ..
Massachusetts..
Massachusetts..
Massachusetts..
Michigan
Michigan
Michigan
Michigan . . . . . . .
Minnesota
Minnesota . . . . . .
Mississippi .
Missouri
i..
Missouri
Missouri
Missouri
Missouri
Montana
Nehraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
NewJersey




43, 804
68,100
18, 941
45, 309
767, 284
68, 416
101, 452
53, 712
50, 357
26, 717
13,126
2,476
47, 554
84, 533
8,125
383, 055
7, 605
12, 085
51, 409
64.159
3, 318
25, 866
27, 538
46, 445
9,744
55, 375
45, 389
13, 098
2,527
16, 227
37, 562
. 36, 002
17,689
34, 927
18, 937
353, 931
203, 434
56,177
0
22, 323
290, 522
5,840
634, 217
10, 387
753,905
27. 486
44, 381
97, 000
3,596
33, 830
.20, 614
7,269
194, 783
51. 692
493, 730
4,148
3,447
16, 000
137, 085
57, 708
39. 570
li;629
4,843
3,619

11
20,
15,
25,
461
46,
69,
23,
' 19,
29,
I
4,
6,
2,
316,
6,
11,
59,
35,
2,
17,
15,
31
7,
41
34;
5,
3,
10,
22,
26,
6,
13,
27,
152,
38,
46,
22,
94,
1:
249,
15,
30,
42,
1,
18,
15,
6,
64,
23,
261
3,
20,
18,
104,
60,
22,
4,
2,

18,133
. 11,150
799
2,100
46, 516
3, 437
8,750
7,178
8,812
3, 712
5,824
1,769
11,091
38, 035
563
43, 457
1,401
1.849
3, (
5,450
30
4,090
1, 923
628
191
2,265
2, 097
4, 076
2,567
1,708
2,685
3,617
621
437
1,182
7,253
13, 877
2,965
1,053
61,037
•747
354, 629
4, 520
70, 946
3,020
6; 256
10, 833
1,652
2,934
4, 721
660
12,223
1,764
14,104
176
20
581
7,658
2,955
1, 699
444

126
40
22
724
11, 003
1, 915
639
342
362
1,253
10
185
1,,138
2,740
30
13, 628
307
1, 528'

i,r'
242
647
194
30
931
875
297
123
645
2,480
1,209
297
1, 767
,, 19
7,302
9,044
20

728
679
100
355
10, 418
1,590
1,533
3,104
2,055
1,134
194
328
IJ
5,425
60
10, 351
610
402
1,223
1,245
15
360
300
301
126
605
572
191
1,052
338
613
104
236
72
1,064
1, 671

2,308
1, 252
930
756
10.197 11, 764
166
' 10
71, 603 116, 974
-1,168
7,037
324
5,593
2,185
2,590
88
154
793
803
288
341
367
81
7, 448
2, 533
431
55
9, 718
4, 601
45
625
3,967
1,254
1, 751
22
495
' 42

^

160
1,672
548
623
274
1,815
35

3,484
3, 908
446
3,320
12,467
2,423
4,778
3,653
4,127
1,721
425
1,104
1,839
6,992
210
6,645
730
693
2, 909
2,567
100
986
627
1,275
46
2,379
1,800
547
259
856
2,221
1,
173
815
1,375
3,573
277

135
37
70

4, 342

929
60

20, 302
4,004
1,116
610
137
44
55

525

120
-309

481

2,974
1,'
28, 229
786
2,888
11, 711

594
490
156

44
177
125
737
161
2,239
2,072
9

4,615

25
8,708
2,935
190
8,728 '38," 114
118
16, 492
2, 237
6,932
2,704
84
1, 95'8
1,342
278
180
2,.
2,693
6,151
163
259
.887
5,102
527
1,224
1, 306
161
"'16
592
26

' 495
10, 814
44, 270

17, 918
25
51, 891
140
19, 533:
496
8,742
907
105

47
5, 940
3, 300
2, 992
359;
• 55
18(

165

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.
DEALERS AND RECTIFIERS OCTOBER 1, 1880 AND 1881.

held fry WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS and RECTIFIERS, October 1, 1880, and

1, 1881.

Statement of different kinds and total lield October 1,1881.
Foreign.

Domestic.

*

£

1,038
604
3, 289
7,008
4, J
2,146
1,641
3, (
18,800
9,367
3,167
" 1,295
94, 065
78
57, 603
805
16,180;
816!
2,339'
•8,182i
339!
6,249;
1,7141
1,484 !
10, 504;
9, 253!
73,694,
826
1,025
6,375;
9,675!
1,9431
8,124!
739|
425:
1,754i




1
3

a
1?

1

8, r ~

'3D

cS
.2
*eg

A

54,204
56,036
18,327
40,621
27
598.630
917
62,940
100
99,112
244
40,932
35
39,656
56
42,449;
10
11,978!
19
6,805
45,825
77,549
30
4,931
494, 710
412
12,008
12
16,766
84,251
74,001
2,420
29,949
27, 955
43, 345
11,193
60, 502
49,214
12,536
7,325
18,593
40, 022
40,461
10, 731
17,509
33, 535
198, 941
65
124,720
52,541'
120;
298.
24,446
282, 542!
179
4,263!
547,176i
127
6,403s
563,502! 7,"827!
29,980!
so;
52,850;
109!
78,223;
4,204
32,298!
21
24,076
9,778}
104,825| 221
37,2531
10
411* 596: 1,0541
4,798!
21,5631
27,017!
138,813!
71,346!
39,084!
6,87lj
6,416!
5,410

fe cs
•s

£

3

15,317
19,645
623
8,535
35, 919
3, 243
12, 779
2,444
4,463
5, 373
5, 285
1,705
21,931
15,701
1, 028
75, 782
1, 851
1,761
12, 956
10, 605
69
7,180
6, 205
9,505
2, 817
12, 412

P

a

rW
oc

45
57
26
3,793
508
734
119
249
100

144
20
2,572
10
71
115
62
13
67
20
10

S

164
124
86
4,878
523
888
183
248
109
67

25
218
85
87
864
1, 001
25
20
63
154

132
2,342
65
146
190
120
38
66;
40

354

232
49

165
90

85

4
82
114
9
22

101
355
125
187
33
51
180

"i9i
"ioo

1,312
4
6,415,
73:
245
162i
74;
546,

16i
508!
186;
156j
84;

*26'

51
136
1621
4l!
5,751
1,403,
1, 074j
1,749!
1,083!
83
251
20
442
4,643

21 i
30

305
145
1Q
102
88
120
186
41
60
36
347
111
73
15
40
454
19
161

14!.
834;
328
4
10!
175
2,000!
13 .
4,775 "3,"©28
23;
82
861!
328
17:
231
197
2631
40
842;
106
1, 085;
15;
20'
312:
539:
186!!
112;

40
37

;

!

44;

173!
43
* 316
23
49 j
i

|

8.

112
2,144
142
4,121
56
15,221
659
2,593
898
25
.

274!
50
838
82
2,846
9
428
236
223
114
166
356

128
77 i
925
575!
678
310 i
474
2941
15,6621 31,219
1,512] 4,131
7,170
4,143
4,121
1,171
3,424
787
302
935
513
107
67*
1,248
611!
2,003
778;
167
48
10,315 20,638
154
5;
438
120
1,403
723|
453
|
67
429
194;
353
185!
375
209i
100
lOOi
733
i
2981
148|
83:
253
107|
4, 5751 5,404
383!
841
105
410
28!
108
6061
702
1,816!
2, 741
454!
473!
484;

1,145
390
8,416

112;
10, 846!
184
12,814
133
48,115
1,343
5,268
1,919
25
1,099
1,087
90
3,765
631
15,195

352!
1,292
475
546
245
2021
27

15!
4291
2,637
1,495
1,150
593
423
458!

28
5,079
60!
10,849!
456!
1,132!

611!

tiUO
470;

54,332
56,961
19,005
41,095
629,849
67,071
106,282
45,053
43,080
42,751
12, 913
6,912
47,073
79,552
515| 348
12,162
17,204
85,654
74,454
2,487
30,378
28, 308
43,720
11,293
61,235
49,712
12,744
7,408
18, 846
45,426
41,302
11.141
17,617
34, 237
201,682
125,193
53,025
298
24, 558,
293,388!
4,447!
559,990|
6,536!
611,617
31,323
58,118
80.142
4,229
33,397
25,163
9,868
108, 590i
37,884!
426,791'
4,798!
21,578!
27,446!
141,450
72,841!
40,234j
7,464
6,839

26
19
21
25!
185|
37!
83!
•21|

25
27;

T
6'

18;

23!
14i
59!
7!
71
10
l!
12!
14j
211

3;
17!
15!
10!
12;
11
19!
12j
14!
14|
1001
38!
18'

1!
7!
138;
6!
140;
9!
151!
14
221
12!
11!
5i
31!
27j
126!
6'
3!
16|
45j
43
18
13
5!
4i

1
2
3
0 4
79 5
6
10
7 7
6 8
8i 9
0 10
4
0
2

2

0!
9!
5!
1i
63!
2

11
12

13
14
15
16
17

0 18
5 19
5; 2 0
0 21
1 22
5 23
1 24
1 25
5 26
1 27
2 28
0 29
1 30
3 31
3 32
0 33
2 34
2 35
36 36
7 37
1 38
0 39
0 40
24 41
0 42
63 43
1 44
42 45
2 46
1 47
6 48
0 49
2 50
1 51
1 52
9 53
0 54
47 55
0 56
0 57
0 58
12 59
1 60
3 61
1 62
1 63
1 64

166

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
SPIIfJTS; IN HANDS; OF. WHG^LESALE:LIQUOa^

STATEMENT of flie. Q UAWTITY'yifn. FBOOF^GALLOm, of TAXrPAID SPIBITS
S t a t e m e n t of different k i n d s a n d t o t a l h e l d O c t o h e r 1,1881.

Domestic.

Districts.

3
O
A

.CD.O

-ciJ

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
SO
31
32
33
34
35
.36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
.54
55
56
.57
58
59
60
- 61
62

5, 510
NewJersey
53,5541
NewJersey.
25,431
N e w M4ki*?o^.
115; 415
N e w Yor£":
1,490; .520
N e w Yoriil
186,814
New Yoi^k:.......,.,
7; 017
New York.
3, 027
N e ^ YOrt:
37,925
New Ybrk.
17, 813
New York:....
37,348
N 6 w York-:
25,1851
N e w York..:
6,9i89
New York;
. 87,250
New York.
184,610
N 6 w Yoi:k;i
11,191
N o r t h Carolina
,
2; 498
N o r t h Carolina
• • "61
N o r t h Carolina
10, 645
N o r t h Carplina
..
996^609
Ohio
22,892
Ohio . . . . . . . . . .
..
16, 993
Ohio
:
1,4251
Ohio
^ 64,804|
Ohio
41,454
Ohio
19, 909
Ohio
1,674
Ohio
:
132,194
Ohio 28.160
Oregon
1,141,.923
Pennsylvania
34, 591
Pennsylvainia
34,117
Pennsylvania....
Pennsylvania.
31, 616
Pennsylyahia.
/, 5,026
Pennsylvania
10, 085
Pennsylvania,
,..
U , 698
Pennsylvania.
8,737
Pennsylyaiiia.
348,079
Pennsyly^niisi,
21, 696
120, 272
Rh6de Inland
• 72,173
Sotith C a r d l i n a -.
Tennessee,
7, 852 i
T e n n e s s e e '....:
189,952
Tennessee...
126,995
Texas
. 7iS, 913
Texas
65, 329
Texas......'
38,236
Utah.....
17, 9691
Vermont;..
687
Vitginia^t.
33, 616
Virginia!-.,. - -.-r
67, 424
Virginiai,-.....
"0
Virginia...,.'..
'•
16,066
Vii'ginia,..
14,6,031
"Washingtoii T e r r i f y
10,58
"West V i j ' g i n i a , . . . . . .
54,102
Wiest V i r g i n i a .
0
Wisconsin
170, 340
Wisconsin.....
..
4,341
i8,:4i4|
Wisconsini
W i s c o n s i n -...
3, 289
Wyoming!.
7.073
Total...




433
3,259
346
416
24, 502
2, 32,6
15, 507
655| .2, 523
884
20,090
• 102
1, 416
71
28,477
43, 316
3, 800
4,173
1, 395]
364, 959
277, 557 99, 861 38, 307 26, 320
49,352
51,348
4, 520
3,694
5,143
1V022
1, 719
590
666'
215
908
729
59
21
16, 950
7,137!
2,130
2.3861
875|
8, 542
2,196
1, 505
843
1^*
14, 276
6,173
2,176 : 1,1201 2,178
10,119|
7, 914
713|
1, r 1, 385
4, J
. 4,739
654
208|
783
13, 8951
2, 045|
2,
344|
35,132
2,198
3,!
85, 637|
3, 3591
53,164
2, 749
650 • 4,296
.
i
,
r
"'"
973
956
1, 574!
162]
100
4, 512
402, 218
14, 653
-8,782
- 1,112
31, 356
27, 397
10; 470
68,192
30, 585
19, 691
3, 022
60
2,792
800
1, 392
- 8, 352
2, 885
13, 901
1,7521
60,119i
11, 597
663
27,874
65; 885
66; 061
51, 5771
25, 6I81
15; 339
150
1,456|
15,944
559|
86
462
10, 865
10, Oil
61,941
2, 297
11, 718]
2, 629
8,189

1,120
80, 715
^,649
3,432
206
15, 951
12, 430
1, 280

11,748
171
2051
641
572
121

60
6, 563
180
100

85
16, 609
828

566
842
120

2, 864
8.55
704

1,060]
4,367|
160
2,160 '* 56,'5331
8, 223i 144, 0171
240] , 11, 5641
50'
874 19,521
1, 5471
3, 775
4, 5181
1, 795 .'HJBSO!
5, 727 • 22, 774I

47, 986 .178,625;
1,158
^ 73
729
130
35

530
2, 407i
699!

2, 972]
5, 672
4, 462|
55, 454
3,232
2, 271
1, 301
3, 582
1,611
1, 962 • 872
•553
734, 578 17, 305]
7, 502
9, 659 30; 527| 84,,013|
3, 742
14, 247
353
2, 397
1, 87i
• 5
1, 029
15, 295
191
415
520
110
4,330
12, 346
164|
1, 300
1, 083
5,153
3, 444
37
140 - 317i
20
22|
307
6, 030
11, 406
88
592
926|
59 ' 156
284
7, 288
15, 739
3, 582
199,723
1,163
1,172
5141
1, 835!
186
133
13, 013
2, 770l
1,4501 10, 514
8,9451
20, 562i
•542
4, 094;
631
2, 582
30, 943|
3551
1, 887
38
6, 036, •i,'386 'i?;"320l
28, 594 37, 266
972
30!
11, 325|
40
474
1, 585
4,191
319
274
9, 636
2, 098 "'"3151
1,633
2, 219
264 .2,418,
14,6131
506;
573
2; 973,
1, 504
205
l,r--'
1,121
314
20]
501
60
4, 704
21, 315
3,518
1, 747
2, 561
793!
45, 834|
1,971 . 3,172
2,432
214
251]
64
10, 330]
5i6
. i84;i
7; 112
150
5431
204
770
924
156
2,221
15, 920
506
1,129
625
13,123
238
1, 997
242
962

12, 293 683 4, 512,644 2,802,364

13, 777
161
433
188|

4, 241
42]
264
135|
• 258

;, 847| 327,406

3,129 ' 2, 273
68
.429
23
9781

17, 436
• 880
30

173,489 ;. 934,28m

167

COMMISSIONER. OF- INTERNAL REVENUE.
DEALERS AND RECTIFIERS, &c.—Continned,
heldhy WHOLESALE LIQUOB DEALEBS and BECTIFIEBS, ^c—Continued.
S t a t e m e n t of. different M n d s a n d t o t a l h e l d O o t o b e r . 1,1881.

Foreign.

Domestic.

ac
%

cC

1
CD

'^

•

•

rfl

'i
S .

^
CD
A

•a

t
c3

m

k

M

1.3,109
7,595
71,191 •218
21, 311
6, 341
29, 064
315
8,369
148, 223
319
102,162 1, 061, 406 .6, 950
8, 996
134, 857 1,312
2, 623
7,342
92
902
2,619]
4, 456
53,542|
135
1, 074
17,010
58
37,386!
93
7. 647
2, 051
28,2331
38
13,096'
2,344
9,530
81. 589
412
lO; 088
187,497
63
11, 729
4 724
5
3,955
1,063
3, 799
152, 366
5, 604
3,229
114
5, 657
9,095
3,546

CD

c

%
^
•t

9, 576
896, 830 v'-464
25,313
53
16, 865
1,432
83
57, 695
53, 633
40
16, 940
21

16, 756
159, oii i34
3,885
44, 351
4
191, 491 1,094,766 5,787
7,639
33,273;
56
19, 757
2,137
6, 292
33, 460
78
5, 603
5
7, 943
I9i.
44
22, 291
927
18
531
11, 203
482
242, 907
7,627
20, 596
26
2,775
249
108, 967
4,607
17,160
66, 981
9,502
20
6,559
80
163, 497
278, 939
12, 374
91; 713
14)
92, 343 . 106 .
9,449
10
13,189
85, 913
81
39,851
8,472
19, 491
50
1,632
522
73
10
37, 418
'
1,909
84, 449
14,155
711
1, 799
20
12, 418 •
1, 302
8,524
10
257
14, 864
20
1,945
10
35, 485
5, 073

'3D

'o
u

o -

."a"

22
20
016
640
9
235
1,096 • • 1,282
15,181 15, 295
2,516
2,712
100
175
32
28
219
457
24)
179
426
192
246
223
40
110
565
569
493
568
75
150
006
2)

i,452
55
61

50
224
18

223
292
89

400
549
4, 567
129
26
304

220
524
4,445
224
43
209
2

33
66
629
60
461
59
10
, 65
25
218
35
143
74

73
59
1,181
80
455
^ 107
10
134
224
132
133
205
161

200
20

11.8
5

15
.76 142

15
142
139

"^

365

43
36

.50
. 15
29

43
59
01
55

44
6
24

1, 617; 613 11, 065, 611 30, 483

52,929

59, 415

61




.2

n

W

so. •

OJ

p
ce

s.

i, 272
20
116
69
110

2,392
.34
604
80
122

o

O

'S-

%

-^-

f'

.5

S

"A.

5,644 .
97
873
274
376

166,779
4,151
22, 222
4, 051
12, 880

t
=fl„.
•-5

i^

^

io

i,625

161,135
4,054
21, 349
8,777
12, 504

i

o

6
13,574
22
465
162
'239
5, 426
76, dl7
44
126
2,178
1,648
127
142
403
1,236
30, 300
34
286 • 1,847
3,187
8,017
156, 240
38
8,689 34, 574 103, 610 184, 299 1, 245, 705
377
1,406
4, 872 16, 5^12 29, 360
164, 217
89
118
524
1,151
2; 160
9, 502
•7
102
17)
40
372
2, 991
7
911
2,124
1, 040
4,886
58,428
35
22)
519
527
1, 743 , 18,753
23
550
681
2,069
39, 455
20
127
248
928
1, 914
3,597
31, 890 • 18
166
260
323
899
13,995
11
. 328
1, 646
1, 895
5, 415
87, 004
27
283
1,332
2, 649
5, 388
192, 885
48
62
137
11,863
3
5
4, 265
66
89
310
0
9, 591
15
15
8
162
906, 200
9,370
244
1,826
4, 778
113
170
411
25, 727
13
127
241
429
17, 294
7
I
1, 432
25
59,
230
624
540
1,535
i5
166
313
1, 412
2,44.7
56, 080
26
13
50
128
306
17, 246
0
57
161, 551
751
2,540
68
967
19
642
1, 841
3, 579
47, 930
16
1,232 16, 063 16, 349 48, 443 1,143, 209
209
548
752
1,709
34, 985
25
59
212
876 • 1,216
20, 973
14
92
732
1,175 •• 2,590
36,050
17
3)
90
127
5, 730
7
10
30
7,973
5
20
9
22, 762
132
149
471
40
5
168
45
361
11, 564
9
2, 363
6,278
249,185
59
167
1,456
132
272
570
21,166
8
545
1,535
1, 569
4,814
113, 781
37
725
740
1, 631
68, 612
22
194
28
272
9,774
4
35
927
1, 702
280, 641
29
461
120
807
948 - 2,264 - 93,977
33
109
479
1,142
2,186
94, 529
36
44
317
423
962
86, 875
19
192
.573^ • 1,194
41,045
14
20
85
3, 498 . 3,888
23, 379
12
618
1
75
. 21
96
38, 203
180
15
14
262
785
59
911
995
85, 444
22
1,799
1
12, 635
3
187
217
10
5
8,707
107
183
36
179
405
822
15, 686
11
249
570
1,110
36, 595
11

529

45, 215
368
• 6,478
560
2,031

^,

-'

a.

>i
'>,•

fl

d'

So
"S

44
4
11
8
9

3
10
0
10
122
23
2
0
9
2
4
11
1
17
20
}

1
0
6
57
3
li
Oi
31
12
3
0

1
2
•3

4
5
6
V
•8

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27

^ll ?^'

5 29
128 30
15 31
7 32
10 33
1 34
0 35
1 36
1 37
29 38
3 39
6 40
1 41
1 42
7 43
0 44.
6; 45.
1 46
0 .47
3 4849
50
6 51
0 -52
0 53
2 54
0 56
5 56
0 57
23 58
2 59
1 60
0 61
0 62

I

24, 878 134, 729 270, 367 572, 797 11, 638, 408 • 3, 580 1, 062

I'68

•

OPERATIONS AT

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

SPECIAL BONDED WAREHOUSES FOR STORAGE
ORAPE BRANDY.

OF

The following stateinent shows the quantity of grape brandy placed in
•special bonded warehouses, withdrawn therefrom, and remaining therein
a-t the beginning and close of the fiscal year ended June 30,1881, in taxable gallons:
Gallons. Oallons. Gallons,

Remaining in warehouse July 1, 1880:
First district of California
Fourtli district of California

'
63,157
'. 60, 456
123,613

Removed for exportation and unaccounted for July 1, 1880:
First district of California
Produced and bonded during tlie year:
First district of California
Fourth district of California

439
——^— 124,052

-

125, 521
114, 603
_ 240,124
Received in Iirst district from fourth district of California...
20, 345
.,

260,469
384,521
Exported aud accounted for dnring the year:
^' First districtof California
Kernoved tax-paid d u r i n g t h e year:
First district of California
Fourth district of California

689
'...

69,238
72,231
141,469

.Loss by regauge act of May 28, 1880:
First district of California
Fourth district of California

2, 686
1, 961
4,647

Loss allowed for casualty:
Fourth district of California
Eemoved from fourth district to iirst district of California..

47
20, 345
'

167,197

Eemoved for expdrtation and unaccounted for June 30, 1881:
First district of California
•...
Kemainiog in Nvarehouse June 30, 1881:
First district of California
:
136,174
Fourth district of California
80,475

675

216, 649
V

^l''^ -^24
384,521

The amount produced and bonded during the fiscal year ended June
30, 1881, Avas 111,038 gallons more than in the previous year, while the
amount remov^ed tax-paid was 29,749 gallons larger than in 1880.
Of the quantity in warehouse June 30, 1881, 136,174 gallons were in
the following-named warehouses in the first district of California:
Gallons.

No. 1. Bode & Danforth, at San Francisco
No. 2. J u a n Bernard, at Los Angeles
No. 3. G. C. Carlon, at Stockton

.^
°
..^i

104,264
19,179
12,731

and 80,475 gallons were in the following-named warehouses in the fourth
district of California:
Gallons.

No.
No.
No.
No.

1.
2.
3.
4.

George Lichthardt, at Sacramento
J. F. Boyce, at Santa Rosa
H. J. LeweUing, at Saint Helena
John Tivnen, at Sonoma




.

37,766
13,894
23, 885
4, 930

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL

169

REVENUE.

STATEMENT of DBAWBACK of INTEBNAL B E V E N U E TAXES allowed on E X POBTED MEBCHANDISE during the fiscal year 1881.
=4-1

o
r,

Port.
"A

CD

NewYork.-..
Philadelphia
"Rochester
San Francisco
Snspension Bridge
Saint Lonis
Troy
Total
AlloAYCd, 1880

T o b a c c o . Snutf. C i g a r s .

P
A

Baltimore
Boston
. -.

o .

II

Total.

Stills.
•iH

W

P

A^

•

6
$195 70 $2, 265 42 $26 08
25
543 04
568 72
6
632 25,169 92
$166 68
633 70
18 1, 544 91
24 63
1
86 40 5, 078 70
31
1, 065 75
25 92
2
854 47
25
3
38 88
749 28, 483 87

$186 83
157 25
784 30

8, 596 60 26 08 1, 232 43 1,128 38

872 35,153 86 22, 314 02

.1,094 97 2, 205 42

$20 00
200 00

'$2, 487 20
1 318 59
157 25
$455 40 27, 460 00
66 60 1, 611 51
24 03
639 90 6, 870 81
25 92
854 47
38 88

220 00 1,161 90 40,849 26
80 00

*888 00 61, 736 27

* Machinery exported, 1868.,

In connection with the foregoing statement I have to renew the recommendation made in my last annual report, that section 3244 Eevised Statutes be so amended as to include distilling-worms belonging to stills
mauufactured for export, which, like stills, are subject to a tax of $20
each. Also that an appropriation be made for the payment of drawback on articles exported under said section 3244 Eevised Statutes, as
also on distilled spirits exported under section 3329 Eevised Statutes.
While a number of claims covering both stills and distilled spirits
have been allowed by this of&ce during the preceding two years, the
claimants in these cases are unable to recover the amounts due them, in
consequence of a failure on the part of Congress to make the necessary
appropriation.




170

REPORT ON THE, FINANCES.

AVERAGE. CAPITAL AND: DEPOSITS: IN 1 8 8 0 .
STATEMENT of the AVEBAGE CAPITAL and DEPOSITS of BANKS and BANKE B S for the twelvemonths ended. May Zl, 18S0.
A v e r a g e c a p i t a l a n d l e p o s i t s of
b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s . — F o r r a 67.
States and Territories.

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California ,
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
Delaware
Florida.
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
-ilowa
K a n s a s .'.
Kentncky
L o u i s i a n a ...^
Mfl,iiift . _'.'_ _.

Maryland
Massachusetts .
Michigan ..
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska .
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
N e w Mexico
New York
N o r t h Carolina
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania ..
•Khode I s l a n d
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas..
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washin "ton
West Virginia..
AVisconsin . . .
Wyoming
Total

Average
capital;

Average
ta.Kable
capital.

$1,037,541
99,638
230, 823
21,559,464
573, 241
2, 641, 708
126, 897
626,927
77', 977
3, 708, 344
• 8,962
8, 323, 244
4, 533, 080
5, 006,, 604
1, 534, 888
11, 584, 219
3,261,758
47, 637
4,286,746
4, 229, 315
3, 242, 540
1, 833, 571
1,134,153
9, 804, 376265, 883
601, 526
303,112
56, 000
1, 301, 882
5,833
59, 430, 688
482, 556
8„ 069, 345
1, 530, 323
14, 471,168
3, 205, 618
520, 828
1, 724, 882
3, 597, 522
208, 500
353, 700
2, 759, 924
232,000
1, 277, 764
2,139,081
121, 717

$1, 037, 541
99, 688
156, 738
19, 046, 300
573, 241
2, 200,402
126, 897
616, 927
77-, 97.73, 672, 778
8, 962,
4, 769, 760
4, 032, 818
4,701,328
1, 436, 606
10, 594, 43.0,
2, 550, 806
36,122
3, 337, 018
2, 369, 672
2, 750, 460
1, 725, 044
920,166
8, 343, 336
265, 883
524, 558
303,112
51, 690
965, 786
5,833
39,199, 858
482, 556
6, 296, 594
1, 972, 024
12, 901,106
2,,606, 662
469, 912
1, 598, 206
3, 357; 700
208, 500
315,174
2, 476, 758
232, 000
1, 223, 296
1, 937, 748
121, 717

Avera.ge
deposits. .

Average,
capital.

Ayerage
taxable
capital.

Average
deposits.

Average
taxable,
deposit^.;

$2, 014, 606
204, 286
444, 340
36. 726, 952 $2,758,110.; $2,362,430 $44, 888, 379 $15,189,,67.8
3, 057, 638
72, 398, 522
1,100,726
4, 481, 490..
359,168
8 7^0
791v500
1,162,104
233, 558
3, 878, 374
848, 773
406, 668
38,110
522, 500
67, 400
07, 400
15, 860
27,- 030, 242
64,152
11, 387, 716
1, 313,113
11, 867, 800.
21, 860
44, 833
42,918'
191, 090
4, 461, 820
13, .022, .1.50.
12, 666
4, 777, 700
41, 666
41, 666
20,833
154; 796
72, 008
21-, 223, 37080, 680.
7, 5.11, 212
30,118
30,118 21,584,253:
115, 926
9, 541, 442
199, 541,160
168,848
11, 911, 454
150, 000
150, 000
1, 734, 358
239, 537
19 518
4, 433, 632
2, OOS," 284
30, 598, 526 •
497, 536.
1, 764, 456
1,646,-762
312, 392
184, 294
2,083
2,083 25, 698, 662
2, 795, 798
5,000 16, 868, 209
121, 460
45, 000
196, 744
310, 782, 302
1 093,552
140,195, 414
864, 604
9, 364, 939
27, 380
27, 486
27, 948, 784
65, 000
1,104
988, 244
17, 720
26, 333
20, 871
60, 936, 564
433, 300
403, 784 23, 777, 962
625, 034
2 558,186
37, 640,116
3, 933, 962
623, 962
2, 852, 256
5, 845,150
1,170, 064
17, .542
6, 770, 695
- 1,552,842
107,126
107,126
7,179, 372
346, 440
346, 440
454, 070
3, 995, 672
12, 309, 396
254, 636

192,173, 555 151, 801, 690 |469,124, 384




A v e r a g e capital anddepositsof savings banks.—
Foiiul06.

.

/

/

.

4, 004, 821

3, 496, 945 796,704, 336

22,141,192

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

171

AVERAGE- CAPITAL AND DEPOSITS IN 188i0.
S TA TEMENT of th^ AVEBA GE CAPITAL and,PEPOSITS of BANKS and BANKEBS
for the twclvs montlis ehded May 31, 1880.
T o t a l a v e r a g e a n d t a x a b l e a v e r a g e of capilial a n d deposits.• "
'Fbrms"67audl00.
'
States and Territories.
A v e r a g e capital.
Alabam.a.
Arizona
Arkansas...
California.......
Colorado.;.:...,^...
Conn'ectiOut . 1 . . .
Dakota
Delaware
Florida
> ..
Georgia
Idalio
niinois
Indiana
Iowa.
Kamsas
Kentiicky
,.
Louisiana)
Maine.
Maryland
Massachusetts.;
Michigan
Minnesota
Missisisippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska...-:...
Nevada
N e w Hamxishire
NewJersey.....
N e w Mexico
New York
N o r t h Carolina .
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsyl vania..Khodelsland,...
S o u t h Carolina...
Tennessee
Texas.
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington,
West Virginia..
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Total




$1, 037; 54199, 688
230, 823
24, 317, 574
573, 241
2, 641, 708
126, 897
626, 927
77; 9773, 708, 34^:
8, 962
8, 390; 644
4, 533, 080
5, 051, 437.
1, 534, 88,8.11, 584, 219.
3, 303, 424
47,637
4, 316, 864
4,229,315
3, 392, 540.
1, 833, 571
1,134,-153.,
9,804,376
, 265, 883
601, 526
303,112.
58, 083"
1, 346, 882
5,833
59, 430, 688
482, 556,.
8,134, 345
1,551,194
14, 904, 468.,
3,205,618.
520, 828
1, 724, 882.
3, 597, 522.
208, 500
353,700
3,106, 364.
232, 000,,
1, 277, 76.4
2,139,081
121, 717
196,178, 376

A v e r a g e t a x a - A v e r a g e depos- A v e r a g e ^taxaits.
• ble capital.
ble deposits.
$1, 037,541.
99, 688
15(^ 738
21, 408, 730.
57^, 24i:
2, 200, 402
126, 897'
616, 927
77,977^
3, 672, 778
• 8, 962.
4,83,7,160
4,032,818
4, 744, 24'6 •
1,436,60"6.
10, 594, 43Q:
2, 592, 472
36/122:
3, 367,136
2, 369, 672.
2.900,460
1,725, 044.
920,166
8, 343, 336
265, 883:
524, 558
303; 112
53, 773
970, 786
. 5,833
39,199, 858
482, 556,
6, 323, 980.
1, 089, 744.
13, 304, 89.0'
2,606,662.
469, 912
1,598,. 206
3,357,700
208, 500
315,174
2, 823,198..
232, 000.
1,223,296,
1, 937,;748,.
121,717;
155, 298, 635

$2, 014,1306
204, 286
444, 340
81, 615; 331
3, 057 • 638
76, 88.0, 012
3'59,168
1, 953,, 604
233, 558
4, 727,147
38,110
27, 552', 742
12, 700, 329
12, 058, 890
'A; 46i; 320
13, 022,150
4, 798, 539
21, 378,166
29, 095,465
209, 082, 602
13,-645, 812
4, 673; 169
2, 005, 284
30, 59,8, 526
497,536
1, 764, 456
1, 646, 762
25, 882, 956
19,664,007
196, 744
450, 977, 716
864, 604
37, 313, 723
1, 014. 577
84, 714, 526
41, 5.74; 078
623, 962
2, 852, 256
5, 845,150
1,170; 064
8, 323, 537
7, 286, 498
454, 070
3, 995, 672
12,309,396
254,.636
1,265,828,720

$2j 014, 606
204, 28.6
444, "340
51,916,630
3, 0.5'7,-,638
5, 582, 216
359,'168
806,. 226
233,558
4, 285, 042
38,110
27, 046,102
11, 451, 868
11, 889, 660
4, 461, 820
13,022,150
-4, 790,372
226, 804
7, 59i; 892
9, 057, 368
12, 080, 302
4, 453,150
2, 005, 284
30,52-8,526
497, 536
1, 764, 456
1, 646, 762
496,686
2, 917, 258
196,744
141, 288,-966
864, 604
27, 976, 270
989, 348
61, 561, 598
6, 492,148
623, 962
2,852,256 •
5, 845,150
1,170, 064
1, 570, 384
7, 286, 498
454, 070
3, 995, 672
12, 309, 396
. 254,636
491, 265, 576

172

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

AVERAGE CAPITAL AND DEPOSITS IN 1 8 8 1 .
S T A T E M E N T of the AVEBAGE CABITAL and DEPOSITS of BANKS and BANKE B S for the twelve months ended May 31, 1881.
A v e r a g e c a p i t a l a n d d e p o s i t s of
b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s — F o r m 67.
:States and Territories.
Average
capital.

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
^Caflifornia
Colorado
•Connecticut...
Dakota
Delaware . . . . .
Florida
•Georgia
Idaho
• Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
"Kentucky
Xouisiana
Maine.
Maryland
Massachusetts
.Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
-Missouii
Montana
Nebraska
NeA'ada
• NewHampshire
N e w Jersey
New Mexico...
New York
N o r t h Carolina.
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania ..
Rhode Island...
' South Carolina.
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia..
AA^isconsin
Wyoming
•eHhG[ \ir T o t a l

$1,173,152
110,462
210, 698
17, 692, 995
836, 631
2, 618, 433
175, 622
599, 895
103, 809
3, 510, 748
8,238
13, 648, 905
4, 651, 431
5, 450, 705
1, 857,194
11, 221, 780
2, 430, 091
51, 876
3, 679, 662
4, 797, 559
3, 211, 427
2, 690, 270
1, 031, 672
9, 758, 712
456, 498
907, 537
253, 290
50, 531
1,186, 048
All, 666
73, 646, 840
500, 486
7, 732, 671
750, 069
14, 457, 707
2, 740, 994
533,946
1, 785,175
3, 849, 398
203, 868
355, 035
2, 625, 653
287, 628
1, 235, 468
2, 223, 292
139, 247

Average
taxable
capital.

Average
deposits.

Average
capital.

Average
taxable
capital.

Average
deposits.

$1,173,152 $2, 995, 620
519, 800
85, 464
596, 518
145, 948
14, 070, 518 40, 845,114 $2, 673, 242 $1, 995,172 $43, 620, .021
3, 991, 330
836. 631
2, 474, 578 5, 610, 278
76, 753, 879
422,470
175, 624
845, 448
592, 384
'i,'369,'975
403, 566
103, 804
3, 502, 242 4, 603, 238
885,145
8,238
22, 936
11, 415, 468 40, 776, 598
82, 625
79, 392
937, 609
3, 842, 048 13, 328, 754
1, 524, 858
5, 203 998 16, 794, 430
'46,'000'
'38,'584'
223, 412
1, 741, 680 0, 057, 004
10, 696, 066 14, 874, 552
2, 067,176 4, 720, 446
1,064
1,199
1,064
45, 894
250, 098
23, 565, 806
2, 905, 270 9,146, 002
30, 284
30, 284 23, 460, 645
3,196, 424 13, 410, 570
215, 464, 587
2, 843, 936 .14, 539, 344
'3.56,'666
"iso," 666' 2, 363, 840
2, 626, 508 6, 478, 374
433, 321
859, 640 2,108, 226
8, 947,182 42, 977, 060
841, 640
456, 498
2, 625, 722
889,122
253, 290 1, 318, 322
03, 532
37, 820
47, 722
37, 820 21, 214; 808
. 890, 324 3, 357, 784
42, 500
19, 718, 740
375, 776
11, 668
54, 749, 980 181, 866, 738
342, 087, 78.6
500, 482
981, 036
164,166
122, 658 i6,'858,'834
6,159, 470 32,609,290
1,
354, 504
746, 918
12, 865, 020 75, 591, 686
'533'366'
'498,166 50, 095,196
37, 330,121
2, 740, 992 4, 770, 622
504, 612 1, 084, 510
""'7," 566"
""7," 566"
225
1, 656, 704 3, 294, 610
3, 843, 916 7, 444, 884
1, 541, 692
203, 868
1, 957, 592
280, 968
7, 677, 245
424, 895
2, 420, 074 8, 358, 712
479, 292
414, 048
646, 766
287, 628
1,146, 638 4, 201, 342
1, 999, 970 16, 354, 546
422, 432
139, 248

207,454, 924 172,354,985 597,381,514




A v e r a g e c a p i t a l a n d d e p o s i t s of s a v i n g s b a n k s FoiTO 106.

4,187, 396

3, 374, 628 890, 066, 544

Average
taxable
deposits.

$11, 205, 504
1, 427, 982

86"i2
343, 744
51, 328
61, 038
21, 416

77, 258
105, 852
98,130
332, 906
47, 746

372, 882
143, 720
881, 734
"52'566.
827, 260
2, 361, 452
92

10,152
147, 572

18,578,346

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

173:.

AVERAGE CAPITAL AND DEPOSITS IN 1881.
STA TEMENT of the A FEB A GE CAPITAL and DEPOSITS of BANKS and BANKEBS^during the twelve months ended May 31, 1881.
Total average and taxable average of capital and depositsForms 67 and 106.
States and Territories.
A v e r a g e capital.

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
Delaware
Plorida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts..
Michigan
Minn esota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
NewJersey
New Mexico
NewYork
North Carolina .
Ohio
Oregon
i
Pennsylvania...
Khode Island . . .
South Carolina. Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
AVashington —
West Virginia..
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Total




$1,173,152
110,462
210, 608
20, 366, 237
836, 631 •
2, 618, 433
175, 622
599, 895
103, 809
3, 510, 748
8,238
13, 731, 530
4, 651, 431
5, 490, 705
1, 857,194
11, 221,780
2, 431,155
51, 876
3, 709, 946
4, 797, 559
3, 361, 427
2, 690, 270
1, 031, 672
9, 758, 712
456, 498
907, 537
253, 290
88, 351
1, 228, 548
11, 666
73, 646, 840
500, 486
7, 896, 837
750, 069
14,991,007
2, 740, 994
541, 446
1, 785,175
3, 849, 398
203, 868
355, 035
3, 050, 548
287, 628
1, 235, 468
2, 223, 292
139, 247
211, 642, 320

A v e r a g e t a x a - A v e r a g e depos- A v e r a g e t a x a ble capital.
its.
ble deposits.
$1,173,152
85, 464
145, 948
16, 065, 690
836, 631
2, 474, 578
175,624
592, 384
103, 804
3, 502, 242
8,238
11,494,860
3, 842, 048
5, 242, 582
1, 741, 680
10, 696, 066
2, 068, 240
1
45,894
2, 935, 554
3,196, 424
2, 993, 936
2, 626, 508
859, 640
8, 947,182
. 456,498
889,122
253, 290
85, 542
890, 324
11, 668
54, 749, 980
500, 482
6, 282,128
746, 918
13,363,126
2, 740, 992
512,112
1, 656, 704
3, 813, 916
203, 868
230, 968
2, 834,122
287, 628
1,146, 638
1, 999, 970
139, 248

$2, 995,1620
519, SOO
596, 518
84, 465,135
3,991,330
82, 364,157
422, 470
2, 215, 423
. 403, .566
5,488,383
22, 936
41, 714, 207
14, 853, 612
17, 017, 842
6,057,004
14, 874, 552
4, 721, 645
23, 815,904
32, 606, 647
228, 875,157
16,903,184
6, 911, 695
2,108, 226
42, 977, 060
841, 640
2, 625, 722
1, 318,322
31, 278, 340
23,076,524
375, 776
523, 954, 524
981, 036
43, 468,124
1, 354, 504
125, 686, 882
42,100,743
1, 084, 735
3, 294, 610
7, 444, 884
1, 541, 692
9, 634, 837
8, 838, 004
646, 766
4, 201, 342
16, 354, 546
422, 432

175, 729, 613

1, 487, 448, 058

$2, 995, 620^"
519, SOOv596, 518
52,050,6183, 991, 330 •
7, 038, 260
422, 470.-'
853, 460
403, 566-4, 946, 982 '
22, 93640, 827, 926 -•
13, 389, 792
16,815,8466,057,00414, 874, 552
4. 720, 440
327, 356- ^
9, 251, 854
13, 508, 700
14, 872, 250
6, 526,120 •
2,108, 226 •
42, 977, 060
841, 640
2, 625, 722 •
1, 318, 322
436, 414
3, 501, 504
375, 776
182,748,472.981, 036-.
32, 661, 856
1, 354, 504
76, 418, 946.^
7,132, 074
1, 084, 602
3, 294, 610
7, 444, 884
1, 541, 692 •
1, 967, 744
S, 506, 284 •
646,766>.
4, 201, 342
16,354,546.^
422, 432
615,959,860.'^

174

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

ASSESSMENTS ON CAPITAL AND DFiPOSITS I N - 1 8 8 0 .
STATEMENT of the AMOUNT of TAXES ASSESSED on Hlie CAPITAL M d ' D E POSITS of BANKS and BANKEBS held diiring the tivelve mmiihs ended May 31,1880.
Banks and bankers.

Savings banks.

States and Tenitories.

Total.
On c a p i t a l .

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
Delaware
Florida..
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts .
Michigan
,
Miunesota
Mississippi
Missouri
,
Montana
Nebraska
,
Nevada
N e w Hami)shire
New Jersey
^New M e x i c o
'NCAV Y o r k

N o r t h Carolina.
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania...
Khode I s l a n d . . .
S o u t h C a r o l i n a ..
Tennessee
Texas
,
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
A\''ashington
AVest V i r g i n i a . . .
Wisconsin
Wyoming
'

Total.......




On d e p o s i t s .

$5,187 70
498 46
•783 69
95;231 50
2, 866 22
11,002 01
634 52
3,084 64
389 85
18;363 89
44 81
23, 848 80
• 20,164 09
23, 506 (34
7,183 03
52, 972 15
12, 754 03
180 61
16,685 09
11, 848 36
13, 752 30
8, 625 22
4, 600 83
41,716 68
1, 329 42
2, 622 79
1,515'55
258 45
4, 828 93
29 16
195, 999 29
2,412 77
31, 482 97
5, 360 12
64, 505 53
13, 033 31
2, 349 56
7, 991 03
16, 788 50
1,042 50
1, 575 87
12, 383 79
1,160 00
6,116 48
9, 688 74
608 60

$10, 073 03
. 1, 021 43
, 2, 221 70
183,634 76
15,288 19
22; 407'45
1,795 84
3,-957 50
1,167 79
19, 391 "87
190 ,55
135,151 21
56, 938 58
59, 339 00
22;309 10
65,110 75
23, 888 53
773 98
37, 556 06
47, 707 21
• 59, 557 27
22,-168 16
10,026 42
152, 992 63
2, 487 68
8,822 28
8, 233 81
921 47
13, 978 99
983 72
700,977 07
4, 323 02
139,743 92
4, 941 22
304, 682 82
19, 669 e i
3,119 81
14, 261 28
29, 225 75
5, 850 32
7, 764 21
35, 896 86
2, 270 3519, 978 36
61,'546 98
.. 1, 273 18

759, 008 48

2, 345, 621 92

On c a p i t a l .

$11, 812 15

337 00
214 59

150 59

'756'66

10 42
25 00

136 93
88 60
2, 018 92

1, 732 20

17, 484 73

On d e p o s i t s .
$15, 260 73
1, 519 89
3;005 39
$75, 948 39
366, 626 80
18,154 41
5, 503 63
38.913 09
2, 430 36
7,085 74
43 60
1,557.-64
2, 033 34
39, 789 10
79 30
651 66
159,000 01
320 76
77, 423 43
109 30
83,169 53
29, 402 13
' 118, 082 90
63 33
36.914 22
1, 314 63
360 04
403 40
•54,795 14
60.135 20
579 63
74, 903 81
844- 24
30,890 97
97 59
14, 627 25
194, 709 31
3, 817 10
11,445 07
9, 749 36
1,561 96
- 2, 752 30
607 30
19, 440 22
1,012 88
902, 444 12
5,467 76
6, 735 79
137 43
171,501 25
5 52
10, 395 46
3,125 17
374, 332 44
12,790 93
45, 494 05
5,469 37
22, 252 31
46, 014 25
6, 892 82
87 71
9, 427 79
535 63
50,548 48
. 3, 430 35
26, 094 84
71, 235 72
1, 881 78
110, 705 96

3, 232, 821 09

COMMISSIONER O F INTERNAL

175

REVENUE.

AS^ESSMlfeNTS ON CAPITAL AND DEPOiSITS' IN 1 8 8 L
STATEMENT of the AMOUNT of TAXES ASSESS&D on the CAPITAL and D E
POSITS of BANKS and BANKEBS held diiring the twelve inoiiths ended May Zl, 1881.
Banks and bankers.

Savings banks,

States and Territories.

Total.
On c a p i t a l .

Alabama
..
Arizona
,
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
Delaware
Plorida
Georgia.
Idaho
Illinois
Indiaua
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts .
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississipxii
,
Missouii
Montana
Nebraska
,
Nevada
N e w Hampsliire
New Jersey
NCAV M e x i c o

$5, 865 76
427 32
729 74
70, 352 59
4,183 20
12,372 89
878 12
2,961 92
519 02
17, 511 21
41 19
57, 077 34
19, 210 24
26, 019 99
8, 708 40
53, 480 33
10, 335 88
229 47
14, 526 35
15, 982 12
14, 219 68
•13,132 54
4, 298 20
44, 735 91
2, 282 49
4, 445 60
1, 266 45
238 61
4, 451 62
58 34
273, 749 90
2, 502 41
30, 797 35
3, 734 59
64, 325 10
13, 704 96
2, 523 06
8, 283 '52
19, 219 58
1, 019 34
1, 404 84
12,100 37
1, 438 14
5,733 19.
9, 999 85
696 24

—

New York
N o r t h Carolina.
Ohio
OregonPennsylvania ...
Khode I s l a n d —
South C a r o l i n a .
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
•'
Vermont
Virginia
AVashington
West Virginia..
AVisconsin
Wyoming
Total

On dei)osits.

On c a p i t a l .

$14,978 10
2, 599 00
2, 982 59
204, 225 57
19, 956 65
28, 051 39
2,112 35
4, 227 24
2, 017 83
23, 016 19
114 '68
203. 8S2 99
66, 643 77
83,V972 15
30, 285 02
74, 372 76
23, 602 23
1,250 49
45, 730 01
67,052 85
72, 696 72
32, 391 87
10, 541 13
214, 885 30
4, 208 20
13,128 61
6, 591 61
317 66
16, 788 92
1,878 88
909, 333 69
4, 905 18
163, 046 45
6, 772 52
377, 958 43
23,853 11
5, 422 55
16, 473 05
37, 224 42
7, 708 46
9, 787 96
41, 793 56
3, 233 83
21, 006 71
81, 772 73
2,112 16

$9, 975 86

On d e p o s i t s .

$56, 027 52
7,139 91

""46*66'
1,718 72
256 64
305 19
107 08

151 42

'75600

386 29
529 26
490' 65
1, 664 53
238 73

189 10

1,864 41
718 60

613 29

""262" 83'

4,408 67

'2,'496"53'
'""'37"56

2, 070 24

861, 774 96 2, 986, 907 57

16, 873 M

4,136 30
11, 807 26
46

50 76
737 86

92, 891 73

$20,843 86
3,026 32
3,712 33
340,581 54
24, 139 85
47, 564 19
2,990 47
7,229 22
536 85
42^ 246 12
•lo« 87
'261,613 93
86,159 20
110,292 14
38, 993 42
127,853 09
33, 943 43
1,866 25
60, 937 04
83, 525 62
89, 330 93
45, 763 14
14, 839 33
259,621 21
6,490 69
574 21
17, 858 06
7,609 78
2; 959 14
21, 937 22
1,492 26
1,187,407 59
7,719 92
194, 507 11
10, 910 36
448, 365 33
49, 983 57
7,756 57
24, 444 00
.56,727 80
• 8 , 243 56
11, 702 03
56, 671 97
4,739 90
26, 772 58
91. 808 40
2;
3, 958; 447 40

AVERAGE CAPITAL AND DEPOSITS FOR LAST FIVE FISCAL YEARS*
STATEMENT of the GBOSS AMOUNTS of AVEBAGE CAPITAL and DEPOSITS
of SAVINGS BANKS, BANKS, and BANKEBS, other than NATIONAL BANE^,
for the years ended May 31, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880, and 1881.
1880.

$3,597,392
193,781,219
829, 912,178
407, 661, 079

$4, 004, 821
192,173, 555
796, 704, 336
469,124,384

$4,187,31)6
207, 4*54, 924
'890, 066, 544
597, 381, 514

1,591,083,519' 1,539,350,514 1, 434, 951, 868 1, 462, 007, 096

1, 699, 090, 378

C a p i t a l of s a v i n g s b a n k s
Ca,pital of b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s . .
D e p o s i t s of s a v i n g s b a n k s
D e p o s i t s of b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s .
Total

1878.

1879.

-

1877.

$4; 965, 500
217, 215, 388
893,112, 567
475, 790, 064




$5,
206,
843,
483,

609,
897,
416,
426,

.
330
732
920
532

1881.

176

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

STATEMENT of AVEBAGE CAPITAL and DEPOSITS of SAVINGS BANKS and
^ the CAPITAL of BANKS and BANKEBS other than NATIONAL BANKS invested in
UNITED STATES BONDS, compiled from ihe returns of said BANKS and BANKEBS, for theyears ended May, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880, and 1881.
1879.

1880.

.$362, 095
$601,872
33, 027, 436. 36, 425, 306
102, 859, 674 121, 855, 622

$429, 791
40, 013, 370
154, 847, 346

$507, 876
40; 371, 865
182, 580, 893

$812, 708
35, 099, 930. 194,886,529'

136, 249, 205

195, 290, 513

223, 460, 634

230, 799, 23(>

1877.
Capital of savings banks
Capital of banks and bankers..
Deposits of savings banks
Total

:

1878.

158, 882, 800

1881.

ASSESSMENTS.

The following table shows the assessments made by the Commissioner
of Internal EcA^eniie during the fiscal years ended June 30, 1880, and
June 30, 1881, respectively, and the increase pr decrease on. each article
or occupation:
Amount assessed during
fiscal year ended—

Fiscal year ended June
• 30,1881.

June 30,18^80. June 30,1881,

Increase I Decrease
over 1880. I from 1880.

Article or occupation.

Tax on deficiencies in production of distilled
spirits
$48, 494 36
$24, 664 27
$73,158 03
Tax on excess of materials used in tlie produc° tion of distilled spirits
3,547 10
2, 829 97
$717 13
Tax on deposits and capital of banks and bankers
and of savings institutions other tlian national
banks
3, 247, 998 90 3, 955,183 20 707,184 30
Tax on circulation of banks and others
461,597 82
10, 788 02
450, 809 80
Tax on distilled spirits fiaudulently renioved or
seized
53,312 18
40, 396 42
12, 915 76:
Tax on fermented liquors removed from brewery
unstamped
877 75
854 96
22 79
Tax on tobacco, snufF, and cigars removed from
factory unstamped
^
88, 584 85
46, 385 27
42,1S9 58
Tax on proprietary articles removed unstamped .
3, 602 43
1, 529 86
5,132 29
Assessed penalties
93,265 14
143, 862 78 50, 597 64
Legacies and successions
71, 673 41.
135, 532 80
63,859 39
Unassessed and unassessable penalties, interest,
taxes previously abated, conscience money, and
deficiencies in bonded accounts which have been
collected, interest tax on distilled spirits; also,
fine's, penalties, and forfeitures, and costs paid
to collectors by order of court or by order of.
Secretary, and unassessable taxes recovered;
also, amount of penalties and interest received
for validating unstamped instruments (Form
58)
555, 315 50
275, 524 93
279, 790 57'
59, 776 56
60,411 59
§pecial taxes (licenses)
,
635 03
40, 614 60
14, 903 33
Tax on income and dividends
'"25,'7ii'27.
Total

4, 814, 394 56 4, 669, 343 64

145, 050 92-

The foregoing table shows that a decrease has occurred in the assessments of the following taxes, as compared with the year ended June 30,.
1880, viz:
On deficiencies in the production of distilled spirits.
On the circulation of banks.
•
On distilled spirits fraudulently removed or seized.
On fermented liquors remoA^ed from breweries nnstamped.
On tobacco, snuff, and cigars sold or remoA^ed.
On legacies and successions.



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL

REVENUE.

177

On specific iDCualties, interest, taxes collected through suits.
On incomes and dividends.
The decrease on all the items named, except those relating to legacies
and successions, incomes, and dividends, which are due uncier repealed
laws, indicates a better observance and a clearer understandings of the
requirements of the laws. The reduction of the assessed taxes on deficiencies in the production of distilled spirits, especially, indicates that the
distillers are conducting their operations in a more business-like manner.
Tbe reduction in the amount assessed on circulation, which has been
principally the 10 per cent, tax on notes issued by manufacturing establishments and used in circulation in their A^icinities, indicates that a rigid
enforcement of the law levying snch a tax has practically driven out of
circulation all currency and monc}^ other than the standard coin or notes
issued by the United States or secured by United^ States bonds.
The following statement shows the amount of assessments in each of
the several States and Territories of the United States during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1881:
.
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
Delaware...
Florida
Georgia
'Idaho
Illiuois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri

:.

12 F




$41,758
4, 468
7, 556
376,647
27,785
54,03(3
4,434
10,195
5,230
51,187
475
424,346
105,362
127, 528
40,638
152,227
50, 629
4,742
73,771
90,393
103,851
48,551
24,960
272,876

97 Moutana
64 Nebraska
63 Nevada
'..-.
78 New Hampshire
92 New Jersey
20 New Mexico
39 NewYork
14 North Carolina
00 Ohio
56 Oregon...
12 Pennsylvania
70 Rhodelsland
36 South Garolina
50 Tennessee
98 Texas
56 Utah
33 Vermont
59 Virginia06 Washington
05 AVest Virginia
90 V^isconsiu
73 Wyomiug
47
01
Total

| 6 , 682 15
19,116 90
8,894 81
18,275 56
35,132 49
2, 318 72
1,250,662 63
52,179 68
221,468 83
12,656 95
519,381 63
50,352 09
23,684 64
53,243 34
64,025 79
9,352 27
13,389 42
70,801 10
5,312 75
29, 4.55 78
96,239 39
3,060 07
4, 669, 343 64

178

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

RECEIPTS FOR FIRST FOUR MONTHS OF PRESENT FISCAL YEAR.

The following table shows the receipts from the several sources of revenue for the fiTst four months of the current fiscal year. The receipts
for the corresponding period in the last fiscal year, and a comparison of
the receipts for the two periods, are also given:

Sources of reveuue.

Receipts
Receipts '
from July 1, from July 1
1880, • I
1881,
to October 31, to October 31,
1880.
1881,

Increase.

Spirits distilled from aiDples, peaches, or grapes.. $388, 749 22 $446, 518 75
$57, 769 53
Spirits distilled from materials other than apples,
20, 362, 974 8622, 377, 909 70 2, 014, 934 84
peaches, or grapes
AVine made iii'imitation of chamleague, &,c
9,250 00
10, 420 87
1,170 87
Kectifiers (special tax)
,
Dealers, retail liquor (special tax)
355, 990 96
356, 536 20
545 24
Dealers, Avholesale liquor (special tax)
22, 866 77
27,112 59
4, 245 82
Manufacturers of stills, and stills and worms
manufactured (special tax)
3, 390 84
2, 716 68
4, 666 10
Stamps for distilled
""ed spirits
g
intended for export .
2, 413 00
681 77
Miscellaneous
Total.

21,148, 570 52 23, 223, 627 79 2, 075, 057 27

5, 537, 551 40 6, 407, 041 55
Cigars and cheroots
:
19, 490 15
349, 366 77
Cigarettes
345, 293 97
Manufacturers of cigars (special tax)
6, 607 04
7, 055 65
448 61
48, 222 97
Sniifli" of all descriptions
241, 926 28
290,149 25
Tobacco, manufactured, of all descriptions
7, 819, 825 7910, 248, 892 01 2, 429, 066 22
Stamps foi- tobacco, snutf, and cigars intended for
2, 432 30
export
1, 984 60
Dealeis iu leaf tobacco, not over 25,000 pounds
(special tax)
256 64
758 82
1, 015 46
Dealers in leaf tobacco (special tax)
.".
6,460 18
1,865 02
4, 595 16
Retail dealers in leaf tobacco (special tax)
583 34
583 34
Dealers in manufactured tobacco (siiecial tax) ...
173,953 33
11,440 90
185, 394 23
Manufacturers of tobacco (special tax).
,
555 85
485 85
Peddlers of tobacco (special tax)
3, 565 75
2, 913 36

Total..

14,140, 636 31 17, 497, 269 45 , 356, 633 14
FERMENTED LIQUOKS.

Fermented liquors, tax^of $1 per barrel on.
Brewers (special tax) .'.
,
Dealers in malt liquors (special tax)
Total.

5, 051, 656 12 6, 032, 944 21
6,133 47
7,116 95
39, 449 42
42, 829 99

981, 288 09
983 48
3, 380 57

5, 097, 239 01 6, 082, 891 15

985, 652 14

BANKS AND BANKERS..

Bank deposits
Savings-bank deposits
Bank capital
_.
Savings-bank capital
'.
Bank circulation
Notes of persons, State banks, towns, cities, &c.,
paid out
Total.

508, 913 60
8, 379 70
180, 010 40
6, 710 69
544 32

712, 543 34
36, 235 25
359, 801 64
7,194 88
2, 406 74

203,629 74
27, 855 55
179, 791 18
484 19
1, 862 42

1,118,181 85
MISCELLANEOUS.

Adhesive stamps
Penalties ..'.
•
."
Collections not otherwise herein provided for
Total

^.

Aggregate receipts




2, 598, 907 31 2, 867, 726 36
89, 528 04
52, 360 24
34, 913 27
35, 807 30

268, 819 05

2, 724, 242 65 2, 954, 999 87

230, 757 22

43, 815, 247 2650, 876, 970 11 7, 061, 722 85

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL R E V E N U E .

179

TABULAR STATEMENTS FOR THE APPENDIX.*

I submit herewith, to accompany the bound volume, tabular stateLients, as follows:
TABLE A.—Showing the receipts from each specific source of revenue, and the
.mounts refunded in each collection district, State, and. Territory of the United States,
or the Iiscal year enped June 30,1881.
TA.BLE B.—A statemeut of the number and value of special-tax stamps, of stamps
or distilled spirits, fermented liquors, tobacco, snuff, cigars, and cigarettes issued; of
he number and value of internal-revenue stamps ordered monthly from the American
5ank Note Company and the New York Graphic Company; and the monthly receiiits
torn t h e sale of stamps, a n d ' the commissions allowed thereon, for the fiscal year
nded J u n e 30, 1881.
,
"
TABLE C.—Comparative statement showing the percentages of receipts from the
everal general sources of revenue in each State and Territory of the United States to
he aggregate receipts from the same sources, by fiscal years, from July 1,1863, to J u n e
^0, 188i.
, '
,
TABLE D.—Comparative statement showing t h e aggregate receipts from all sources,
u. each collection district. State, and Territory of the United States, by fiscal years,
fom September 1, 1862, to J u n e 30, 1881, with appendix showing differences between
eported and true collections.
TABLE E.—Showing the receipts frpm each specific source of internal revenue, by
Lscal years, from Se]3tember 1, 1862, to June 30, 1881.
TABLE F.—Exhibiting the ratio of receipts i n t h e United States from specific sources
f revenue to the aggregate receipts from all sources, by fiscal years, from J u l y 1,1863,
o June 30, 1881.
,
TABLE G.—Statement of the returns of distilled spirits, manufactured tobacco, snuff,
igars, and cigarettes, under the several acts of legislation, and under the various rates
f taxation, by fiscal years, from September 1, 1862, to J u n e 30, 1881.
TABLE H.—Statement of the receipts from special taxes in each collection dis.trict,
itate, and Territory for the s^jecial-tax year ended April 30, 1881.
TABLE I.—Abstract of reports of district attorneys concerning suits and prosecutions
[iider the internal-revenue laws during the fiscal year ended J u n e 30, 1881.
TABLE K.—Abstract of seizures of proiDcrty for violation of internal-revenue laws
during the fiscal year ended J n n e 30, 1881.
Very respectfully,

GEEEIS^ B. EAUM,
Gommissioner.
Hon.

CHAS. J. F O L G E R ,

.

Secretary of Treasury,

* These statements are omitted for want of space, but they are printed in the bound ^
volumes of the Commissioner's report.







REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CIIRRENCY.




181




REPORT
OF

THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,
O F F I C E OF T H E COMPTROLLER OF T H E CURRENCY,

Washington., Becember 3, ISSli
I have the honor to submit for the consideration of Congress the nineteenth annual report ofthe Comptroller ofthe Currency, in compliance
with section 333 of the Eevised Statutes of the United States.
Eighty-six national banks were organized during the year ending
I^ovember 1 last, with an aggregate authorized capital of $9,651,050, to
which $5,233,580 in circulating notes have been issued. This is the
largest number of banks organized in any yeajr since 1872. Twentysix banks with an aggregate capital of $2,020,000, and circulation of
$1,245,530, have voluntarily discontinned business dnring the year.
Iiational banks are located in every State of the Union except Mississippi and in every Territory except Arizona, the total number in operation on October 1 last being 2,132. This is the greatest number of banks
that has pver been in operation at any one time. The total number of
national banks organized from the establishment ofthe national-banking
system, February 25, 1863, to November 1 of the present year is 2,581.
From the establishment of the system to Novemberl last, 340 banks
have gone into voluntary liquidation by the vote of shareholders owning
two-thirds of their respective capitals, and 86 have been placed in the
hands of receivers for the purpose of closing up their affairs. The total
amdunt of claims i)roved by the creditors of these insolvent banks is
$25,966,602, and the amount of dividends paid to creditors is $18,561,698.
The estimated losses to creditors from the failures of national banks,
during the eighteen years since"^ the passage of the act, is $6,240,000,
p i d the average annual loss has therefore been about $346,000, in the
jlbusiness of corporations having an average capital of about $450,000,000,
land deposits averaging about $800,000,000. Twenty-one of these injsolvent banks have paid their creditors in full, and forty of them have
[paid more than 75 j)er cent. each. The individual liabilities of share;
holders of insolvent banks has been enforced in fifty-three instances^
md about $2,700,000 has been collected from this source. During the
. '
• •
183 ,



184

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

past year dividends have been declared in favor of the creditors of insolvent national banks, amounting to $929,059, and the affairs of twelve
such banks have been finally closed, nine of which have paid their creditors in full.
^
There were no failures of national banks during the period from June
JL9, 1880, to November 1 of the present year. Since (that date the Mechanics' National Bank of Newark, and the Facific National Bank of
Boston, to which reference will ^be made hereafter, have suspended, and
the former bank has been placed in the hands of a receiver.
The following table exhibits the resources and liabilities of the national
banks, at the close of business on the 1st day of October, 1881. the returns from New York City, from Boston, Fhiladelphia and Baltimore,
from the other reserve cities, and from the remaining banks of the country, being tabulated separately :
New York
City.

48 b a n k s .

Boston, P h i l a - O t b e r r e s e r v e
delpbia, a n d
cities.^'
Baltimore.
87 b a n k s .

102 b a n k s .

Country
banks.

Aggregate.

1,895 b a n k s .

2,132 b a n k s .

RESOURCES.

Loans and discounts
$246, 757, 659 $211, 814, 653
143, 733
. 55,507
•Overdrafts
-..
22, 991, 500
57, 290, 800
B o n d s for c i r c n l a t i o n
820, 000
625, 000
B o n d s for d e p o s i t s
. 7, 854, 050
2, 518, 050
U . S. b o n d s on b a n d .
7, 386, 271
13, 413, 567
Other stocks and bonds
...
20. 866, 093
U u e from .reserve a g e n t s
14,143,191
19, 917, 055
U u e from o t h e r n a t i o n a l b a n k s .
U u e from o t h e r b a n k s a n d
3, 278,155
1, 496, 037
bankers ,.
I
H e a l e s t a t e , f u r n i t u r e , a n d fix10, 760, 838
6, 739,161
tures
1, 089,101
792, 083
Current expenses
247,164
1, 061, 797
Premiums
1,
337, 655
2,
513,144
Checks and other cash items ..
27,198, 422
E x c h a n g e s for c l e a r i n g - h o u s e . . 146, 597, 213
1, 580, 588
1, 802, 778
Bills of o t h e r n a t i o n a l b a n k s . .
37, 964
40, 426
Fractional currency . . :
,...
51^ 524, 768. . 17, 584, 343
Specie
6, 934, 070
8,983,371
Legal-tender notes
1, 915, 000
2,150,000
U . S. certificates of d e p o s i t
F i v e p e r cent, r e d e m p t i o n fund.
1, 016, 807
2,543,414
D u e from U . S. T r e a s u r e r . ;
395,180
218,485
Totals .

542, 651, 490

3S3, 783, 603

$134, 406, 498
386,397
27, 847,100
3, 848, 000
6, 302, 000
4, 614, 456
19,767,054
10,479,467
3, 775, 495
•

4, 593,197
844, 553
360, 495
1, 048, 504
14, 592, 607
2,019,871
54, 971
17, 256, 624
10, 767, 998
2, 055, 000
1,194, 348''
136,165

$576, 043, 493 $1,169, 022, 303
4, 773, 780
4,188,143
363,335,500
255, 206,100
15, 540, 000
10, 247, 000
40, 972, 450
24, 298, 350
61, 896, 703
36, 482, 409
132, 968,183
92, 335, 036
78, 505, 446
33, 965, 733
10, 757,140
25,
4,
2,
9,

19, 306, 827

235, 915
006,199
469,130
932, 577
834,013
12,329,475
240, 585
27, 969, 001
26, 473, 002
620, ood
11,361,183
607,014

47, 329, 111
6, 731, 936
4,138, 586
14, 831, 879
189, 222, 256
17, 732, 712
373, 946
114, 334, 736
53,158,441
6,740,000
16,. 115, 752
1,356,844.

266, 350, 800 1', 165,601, 498

2, 358, 387, 391

' LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
:...,
.
S u r p l u s fund
U n d i v i d e d profits
,.
National bank notes outstandState b a n k notes outstanding..
Dividends unpaid
Individual deposits.
U . S. d e p o s i t s
,--...:..
D e p o s i t s of U. S. d i s b u r s i n g
officers
D u e td national banks
D u e to o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
N o t e s a n d bills r e d i s c o u h t e d . .
Bills p a y a b l e
Totals .

51,150, 000
19, 947, 316
12,832,315
20,112,590
47, 472
246, 228
295, 692, 013
437, 422
89, 934
104,089,-161
38, 007, 039

79, 398, 330
21,954,102,
6, 287, 274

463, 821, 985
128,140,618
56„372,191

50, 632, 029
23, 513,195 225,942,155
320,199, 96.9
35, 614
245, 018
161,932
1, 356, 702
172, 542
3,835,927
2, 060, 455
163, 432, 337 120, 094, 419 491, 778, 762 1, 070, 997, 531
366, 243
2, 262, 560
8, 476, 690
5, 410, 465
107,140
45, 523, 222
13, 926, 472
764,138

542, 651, 490

40, 401, 500 292, 872,155
12, 208, 793
74,030,407
5,779,776
31,-472,826

844, 813
2,589,916
34, 048, 738
22, 201, 825
24, 885, 452
12,228,508
364, 393
2, 726, 772
1, 774, 619 • 2, 125, 320

3,631,803
205, 862, 946
89,047,471
3,091,165
4, 664, 077

266, 350, 800 1,165, 601, 498' 2, 358, 387, 391

^ T h e r e s e r v e cities, i n a d d i t i o n t o N e w Y o r k , B o s t o n , P h i l a d e l p h i a , a h d B a l t i m o r e , a r e A l b a n y ,
P i t t s b u r g h , W a s h i n g t o n , N e w O r l e a n s , Louisville, C i n c i n n a t i , Cleveland, Chicago, D e t r o i t , M i l w a u k e e ,
Saiut Louis, a r d San Francisco.
.
.
'
-




185'

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The following table exhibits, in the order of their capital the sixteen
states having an amount of 'capital in excess of $5,000,000, together'
?vith the amount of circulation,, loans and discounts, and individual deposits of each, on October 1, 1,881:
^
Capital.

states.

Circulation.

$96,177, 500
85, 780,160
56, 518, 340
29, 389, 000
25, 539, 630
20, 065, 000
15,199, 600
13, 603, 030
13, 093, 500
12, 960, 000
10, 435,100
10, 385, 000
9. 435, 600
8,151, 000
5, 950, 000
. 5,830,000

V[a.ssach u s e t t s . .
)(c>w Y o r k
?enn3ylvania...
)hio
^Connecticut
Rhodelsland —
Cllinois
Maryland
[ndiana
^'ew J e r s e y
Kentucky.
Maine
Michigan
Vermont...
[owa
^ew Hampshire

$71,
47,
42,
21,
17,
14,

267, 089
946, 726
429,.247
468, 480
966, 332
l i s , 956
165,189
605, 433
767, 700
386, 784
885, 111
211, 247
614, 979
442, 899
414,103
158, 159

Individual
deposits.

Loans and
discouuts.

$125,198,-324
$205, 248, 480
372, 853, 780
330, 257, 556
338,046,152
138, 869, 386
60, 960, 674
66, 518, 608
25,761,231
43, 475, 312
11, 317, 33828, 496, 882
72, 972,402
61,555,705
26,117, 350
30, 205, 683
23, 206, 436
24, 899. 023
28, 250, 618
29, 233, 480
9,145, 739
17, 774, 891
9, 325, 083
17, 305, 908
23,127,184
24, 329, 000
5,191,352
. 10,899,272
15, 770,134
13, 456, 0'65
4, 292, 087
7, 518, 017

I
COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS OF THE NATIONAL BANKS FOR ELEVEN
Y^FARS.

The following table exhibits the resources and liabilities of the national banks for eleven years, at nearly corresponding dates, from 1871
to 1881, inclusive:
Qst.2, Oct, 3, S e p t . l 2 , | O c t . 2 , Oct. 1, Oct. 2, Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 2, Oct. 1, O c t . l ,
1875.
1876.
1871. 1872.
1873. 1874.
1879.
188L
1877.
1878.
1880.
1,767 1,919
1, 976 2,004 2, 087 2, 089 2,080 2, 053 2, 048 2, 090 2,132
banks. banks. b a n k s . banks banks. banks banks. banks. banks, banks banks.
RESOURCES.
MUlions. ^MUlio-\

Loans
Bonds for circulation]
L\)ther U . S. b o n d s . . .
Stocks, b o n d s , & c . . .
Due from b a n k s . : . .
Real e s t a t e
Specie
Legal-tender n o t e s . .
Nat'1-bauk notes . . .
0. H . e x c h a n g e s
U. S. cert, of d e p o s i t
Due f r o m U . S.' Treasj
Other r e s o u r c e s .

831. 6,
364. 5
45. 8
24.5
143.2
30.1
13.21
107. 0|
14.3
115. 2

877. 2|
382. 0

41. 2

25. 2

ACiUions. Millions Million

944. 2,
388. 31
27. ol
23. 6|
23,
23. 7
128. 21
149. 5
32.3 • 34.7
10. 2|
19. 9
92. 41
102.1
16.1
15. 81
125. 0|
100. 3
6.7
20. 6!
17.3

Millions Millions Millions Millions \Millions ^Millions.

931. 3j
337. 2|
47.8
34.4
146. 91
43. l|
2L4
84.21
15. 9
100. 0
29. 2|
16.
19.11

954. 4 984.
383. 3| 370.
28.0
28.
27.8
33.
134. 8 144.
42.
38.1
2L2
8.
80. 0|
76.
l;
18.
109. 7 . 87.
42.
48.
20.3
19.
18.31
19.

891. 9!
336. 8!
45.01
34. 5
129. 9
45. 2|
22. 7
66. 9i
15. 6|
74. 5|
33. 4!
16. 0|
28. 7i

834. oi
347. 6
94.7
36. 9|
138.
46.71
30.7
64.4
16.91
82. 4!
32. 7,
16.5'
24. 9i

878. 5 1,041.01,173.8
363. 3
357. 3' 357,
43.6'
56. 5
71. 2|
48.9
6L9
39.71
167. 3; 213. '5 230. 8
48.0
47. 3
47.8
42.2 109. 3 114. 3
56.6,
53.2
69.2|
18. 2!
17.7
16. 7
113. 0| 121.1 189. 2
7.7
26.
6.7
17.1
17. Ol
17. 5
22.1
23.0
26.2

T o t a l s . . . . . . . . -ll, 730. 6 1 , 755. 8' 1, 830. e'l, 877. 211, 882. 2ll, 827. 2'l, 74L 11, 767. 3 1 , 868. 8 2,105. 8 2, 358. 4
LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
S u r p l u s fuud
U u d i v i d e d profits . .
Circulation
' ..
Due to depositors ..
D u e to b a n k s
O t h e r liabilities

458. 3 479. o;
101.1 110. 3
42. 0|
46. 6
317. 4 335. ll
631. 4 628. 9;
17L 9 143.
8.5
11.

Totals

49L 0
120. 3
54. 5
340. 3
640. 01
173. 0
11.5

493. 8
129. 0
51. 5
334. 21
683.
175.
9;lj

504.
499. 8
134. 4 132. 2
53.0
46.4
319. ll 292. 2
679. 4 666. 2
179. 7 179. 8
11. 8i
10. 6

479. 5 466. 2
122. 8i 116. 9
44
44.9
291. 91 301. 9
630.4 668. 4
161. 6| 165.1
10.4
7.9

454.1, 457. 6| 463.8
114. 8 120,
128.1
41. 3
46.11
56. 4 '
313. 8 317. 3 320. 2
736. 9 887. 9 1, 083.1
201. 2| 267. 9] 294. 9
6.
1L9

1, 730. 6,1, 755. 8 1, 830. 6 1 , 877. 2 1, 882. 2;1, 827. 2,1, 741. Iil, 767. 3 1, J 1. 8 2,105. 2, 3.58. 4

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

. i

i .

I

The following table shows, at corresponding dates for three years, the
increase of loans, deposits, circulation, capital and surplus, the amount
of United States bonds on hand, and the movement of money in the
national banks of the country, arranged in three grouiis—viz, those in
the New England and Middle States, those in the VYestern and North


186

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

western States, including Kentucky and Missouri, and those in the re
maining States and Territories:
N E W ENOLA^ND AND MIDDLE STATES.
Oct. 1, 1881.

Oct. 1, 1880.^ j Oct. 2, 1879.

No. of banks, No. of banks. ';No. of banks,
1,202.
1,187.
•I
1,168.
Loans and discounts
United States bonds on hand
Capital
Surplus
Net deposits
Cii'culation
Specie
Legal-tenders and United States certificates

$843, 092, 901
27, 373, 650
335, 009, 700
96, 046, 995
749, 303, 734
233,132,972
82,209,124
33, 828, 596

$773, 916, 399
21, 076, 400
333, 363, 300
90, 827, 648
689, 694, 705
229, 826, 416
89, 074, 603
36, 485, 314

$654, 037, 64
41, 983, 65
331, 646, 03
86, 749, 49
548, 757, 24
227, 824, 38
32, 977,60
66, 097,35

WESTERN AND NORTHWESTERN STATES.

Loans and discounts
United States bonds on hand
Cajiitil
Surplus
Net deposits
..
Circulation
•
Specie
Legal-tenders and United States certificates

Oct. 1, 1881.

Oct. 1, 1880.

Oct. 2, 1879,

No. of banks,
748.

N o . of banks,
729.

No. of banks,
715.

$264, 703, 034
11, 502, 450
99, 769, 000
25, 708, 991
295, 520, 514
66, 442, 810
23, 985, 587
21,170, 992

$212, 796, 017
6, 578, 500
95, 597, 500
24,191, 511
227, 994, 373
66, 957, 403
15, lis, 278
23, 4gi, 204

$179,161,25<
9, 551,10<
94, 013,15(
23, 034. 72'
179 119,12'
66, 376, 62^
6, 229, 42<
24, 465, 93^

SOUTHERN AND PACIFIC STATES AND TERRITORIES.
Oct. 1,1881.

j Oct. 1,1880.

No. of banks, i No. of banks,
182.
I
174.

! Oct. 2,1879.
No. of banks,
165.

.!_:
Loans and discounts
'
United States bonds on hand
,
Capital
,
...
Surplus
Net deposits
Circulation
Specie
Legal-tenders and United vStates certificates

$66, 000,148
2, 096, 350
29, 043, 285
6, 384, 632
66, 804, 503
20, 624. 287
6,477,845
4, 891, 016

$54,464,852
$45, 304,19S
1,138,500
1, 407, 35C
28, 593,185 j
28, 408,185
5,499,424 j
5, 002, 303
50,342,345 i
41, 008, 042
20,566,217 ;
19, 585, 330
3, 988, 508 I .
2, 966, 703
5, 392, 678
4,415,410 i

!
Similar tables in reference to a number of the States in different sections of the countrj^ are given in the Appendix.
EXTENSION OF THE CORPORATE EXISTENCE OF NATIONAL BANKS.

Section 11 of the National Bank Act of February 25^ 1863, provided
that—
Every association formed pursuant to the provisions of this act may make and use
a common seal, aud shall have succession by the name designated in its articles of
association'and for the period limited therein, not, however, exceeding twenty years
from the passage of this act.

Section 8 of the act of June 3, 1864, provides that each association—
Shall have power to adopt a corporate seal, and sliall have succession by the name
designated in its organizati'on certiticate, for the period of twenty years from its organization, unless sooner dissolved according to the provisions of its articles of association, or' by the act of its shareholders owning two-thirds of its stocky or unless the
franchise shall be forfeited by a violation of this act.



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

187

The act last named, as well as that which preceded it, contains the
following provision:'
Copies of such [organization] certificate, duly certified by the Comptroller, and
authenticated.by his seal of office, shall be legal and sufficient evidence in all courts
and places within t h e U n i t e d States, or the jurisdiction of the government thereof, of
t h e existence of such association, and of eveiy other matter or thing which could be
j)roved by the' production of the original certificate.

Section 5136 of the Revised Statutes of the United States provides
that—
\
Upon duly^making aud filing articles of association and an organization certificate
t h e association shall become, as from the date of the execution of its organization
certificate, a body corporate, and as such and in the name designated in the organization certificate, it shall have power, first, to adopt and use a corporate seal; second,
to have succession for the jDeriod of twenty years from its organization, unless it is
sooner dissolved according to the provisions of its articles of association, or hy the
act of its shareholders owning two-thirds of its stock, or unless its franchise becomes
forfeited by sbme violation of law.

From these sections it appears that the period of existence of an association, as a bod}^ corporate, commences from the date of its organization certificate, and not from that of the certificate of the Comptroller,
authorizing the association to commence business, as provided for in
section 5169 of the Eevised Statutes. The corporate existence of the
national bank ifirst organized will, under this limitation of law, expire
on January 1, 1882, and that of the second bank on April 11 following.
From the date last named to February 25, 1883, the number of, banks
whose corporate existence will'terminate is 393, having a capital of
nearly 92 millions, and circulation of nearly 68 millions, as follows:
'Date.

N o . of
banks.

Capital.

Circulation.

1882.
In
In
In
In
In
In
In
In

May.
:..
June
July
August^
S e p t e m b e r ..
October . . .
November
December

$3, 900, 000
4,-205, 000
4, 385, 000
1, 205, 000
3, 532, 500
550, 000
850, 000
570, 000

$1,781,500
.3,452,500
3, 591, 500
863, 000
1,577,500
494,100
770, 000
505,' 000

9
297

1, 250, 000
71. 538,450

1, 080, 000
53, 740, 810

393

91, 985, 950

67, 855, 910

...
.,
c

.,
In j a n u a i y
On F e b r u a r y 25

1883.
:

Totals

The numberof national banks organized under the actof June 3,
1864, the term of whose corporate existence will cease during each year
prior to 1891, is 1,080, with capital and circulation as follows:
Tears.

,884.
1.885.

N o . of
banks.
248
728
19
6
10
4
65

Totals.




Capital.

Circtilation.

$80, 034, 390
186,161,775
. 2,560,300
1,100, 000
950, 000
650, 000
9, 415, 500

$62, 740, 950
119, 266, 745
1, 780, doo
976, 500
692,100
567, 000
6, 557, 790

280, 871, 965

192, 581, 085

188

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Bills will undoubtedly be brought before Oongress during its present
session for the extension of the charters of those banks whose corporate existence is soon to expire.
'
The principal reason urged by those who favor a disGontinuance of
the national banking s^'Stem is, that money can be saved by authorizing
the government to furnish circulation t o t h e country; in other words,
that the profit to the banks upon their circulation is excessive. Sixteen
years ago the banks had on deposit, as security for eirculation, 276 millions of dollars in United States bonds, of which amount nearly 200
millions was in six per cents and 76 millions in h^ve per cents., The
banks now hold 32 millions of four and a half per cents; 92 millions of
fbur per cents; 241 millions of three and a half per cents, converted
from five and six ,per cents; and also 3J millions of Pacific railroad
sixes. The remaining five per cent, bonds held by them, amounting in
all to $758,900, have ceased to, bear interest. The average premiuni
borne by the four per cent, bonds during the last six months.has been,
about sixteen percent., and at tliis> price they net to the holders less
than three and a half per cent., interest. During the same period the
three and a half per cents also have, for a considerable portion of the
time, been worth' a jiremium in the market of from one to two per cent.,
so that the banks do not at the present time, and it is probable that they
will not, for a long time to come, receive aii annual average rate of
interest as great as three and a half per cent, upon the United States
bonds deposited by them as security for their circulating notes. Until
the year 1877 the banks continued to receive interest upon the par value
of their bonds at the rate of either five or six per cent., ^yhile the net
interest iiow received, a's already stated, does not exceed three and onehalf per cent. On ten per cent, ofthe amount of bonds thus deposited
by the banks, amounting to 39 millions, they receive no circulation; and
from this portion of their bond deposit they derive no benefit or advantage not possessed by any other class of bondholders. They.pay a tax
of one per cent, upon the amount of their circulating notes outstanding;
keep on deposit with the Treasurer an amount of lawful money equal to
fivie per c^nt. of their issues, as a permanent redemption fund; and also
reimburse to the United States the expense of redeeming their notes at
the Treasur3^ The actual net profit upon circulation, based upon a 4
and a 3^ per cent, boiid, and with rates of interest on bank loans varying from five to ten per cent., is estimated to be as shown in the following table:
•'
5 per
cent.

Class of bonds deposited.

4 per cent, bonds, at 16 per cent, premium
3^ per cent, bonds, at 1 per cent, premium

.

.

6 per
cent.

7 • .per

cent.

8 per
cent.

9 per
cent.

10 per
cent.

Per ct. Per ct. Per ct. Per Gt. Per ct. Perct.
.03
1.49
1.19
.88
.58 • .27
.96
1.74
1.59
1.43
1.12 1.28

The profit upon circulation is seen to be greatest where the rate of interest for the loan of money is least; and this arises from the fact, already]
stated, that the bank receives in. circulating notes ten,per cent, less in
amount than it deposits iu bonds. Thus, if the bonds deposited are three
and one-half per cents, and the' commercial rate of interest is ten per
cent., there is a loss to the bank of six and one-half per cent, upon the ten!
Xjer cent, margin of bonds deposited. If the commercial value is six per
cent, only, then the loss upon the margin mentioned is two and one-hall
per cent., instead of six and one-half per cent., as in the previous case



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

189

The profit on circulation varies, therefore, from one and one-eighth per
cent., where the interest on loans is nine per cent., to one and one-half
per cent, where the rate of interest is six per cent.
The proportion of taxation, ^N'ational and State, Imposed upon the
banks has been showii to be much greater than that upon aiiy other
moneyed capital, being in the aggregate equal to an average rate of four
p"er cent, upon the amount of their issues. The amount pf interest received by the banks upon the United States bonds held by them has in late
years gradually decreased, and the profit upon circulation has thereby
been reduced almost to the minimum. Such profit cannot now, at least,
be said to be excessive. But if the National Bank Act has^conferred ui^on the associations organized thereunder the right to issue circulating notes, it has placed
them all under the operation of a uniform system, and has surrounded
them with numerous restrictions, among which are the following:
The capital stock must be fully paid in, and a portion of this capital,
not less in any case than $50,000, must be invested in United States
bonds and deposited with the Treasurer. If the capital stock of an
association becomes impaired at any time, it must be promptly restored.
Their circulating notes must be redeemed at par, not only at the place
ofissue, but at the Treasury of the United States.
The banks must lend on personal security only, and not upon that of
real estate, and only ten per cent, of their capital may be loaned upon
accommodation notes, or other than actual business pai)er, to any one person, company,fiTiiior corporation. They cannot lend money on their own
circulatiug notes, or upon shares of their own stock, and must take the
notes of every other national bank in payment of debts due to them.
The rate of interest charged must not be greater than the rate provided
by the laws of the several States in which they are located. They must
pay taxes or duties to the government upon their capital stock, deposits
and circulation, and to the States they must pay such taxes as are imposed^ on other moneyed capital. They are required to keep on hand as
a reserve, in coin or other lawful money, a certain proportion of their
deposits. There miist be no i)reference of creditors in cases of insolvency.,
• .. •
Shareholders are held individually responsible for all contracts, debts
and engagements of the association, to the extent of the par value of
their stock, in addition to the amount invested in such shares. The
banks are required, before the declaration of any dividend, semi-annually
to increase their surplus fund by an amount equal to one tenth of their
net earnings for the preceding six months, until it shall equal twenty
per cent, of their capital. Losses and bad d e b t s must be charged to
profit andloss account before dividends are paid. In other words, dividends lii ust be earned before they are declared. Full statements, accompanied by schedules, of their resources and liabilities must be made to
the Comptroller several times in each year, and mustalso be published
a t t h e expense of the association making the same. Other statements,
showing their semi-annual profits, losses, and dividends, must also be
returned, and statements in referience to the business of any association
making the same may be required at any time, a penalty of $100 per day
being prescribed for each day's delay to comply with the call therefor.
[The banks are subject to personal examinations, and if a bank becomes
Insolvent a receiver may be at once appointed. If the directors knowingly violate, or permit to be violated, any of the provisions of the act, all
:he rights and privileges of the bank are thereby forfeited; and the di-




190

REPORT 0N^ THE FINANCES. .

rectors are held personally and individually responsible for all damages
sustained by any person in consequence of such violation.
It is recommended that an act be passed during the present session,
authorizing any national bank, witli the approval of the Oomptroller, at
any time within two years prior to the date of the expiration of its corporate existence, to extend its period of succession fbr twenty years, by
amending its articles of association. The bill may provide that such
amendments must be authoiized by the votes of shareholders owning
not less than two-thirds of the capital of the association, the amendment
to be certified to the Comptroller of th^ Currency, by the president or
cashier, verified by the seal of the association, and not to be valid until
the Comptroller's approval thereof shail have been obtained, and he shall
have given to the association a certificate authorizing it to continue its
business under such extension. Eespousibility for the extension of the
corporate existence of the banks will thus, in a measure, rest with the
Comiitroller; and he can require such an examination of its afiairs to be
made, prior to granting the extension, as may seem to him proper, in
order to ascertain if the capital stock is intact, and alLthe assets ofthe
bank in a satisfactory condition.
It is unquestionably triie that many national banks would greatly
prefer the abolishment of the national system, if it were accompanied by
a repeal of the provision of law imposing a tax ot ten per cent, upon State
bank circulation; and there is little reason to doubt that such repeal
would speedily follow the abrogation of the JSTational Bank Act. The
laws in many of the States authorize the issue of State bank notes, based
upon the deposit of State bonds as security therefor.' The repeal of the
tax law referred to would result in re-establishing the State bank systems
in many parts df the country, the issues of which would be far more profitable to the banks themselves, than is the circulation now issued under
the national system; while in other sections circulating notes, x>iit forth
without any security whatever, would prevail as formerly. . The notes of
these various systems would be redeemable, not at any common center,
as at present, but at the chief, city of each State or section of country
issuing the same; and the price of exchange would thereby be enhanced
to rates certainly not less than.the cost of transporting gold from the
places of redemption to the commercial center of the country. In many
parts of the country these rates would necessarily be oppressive, resulting in great loss to the people, which loss would steadily increase with
the growth of business.
As another consequence of the abolition of the present system, the
.large surplus which the national banks have now accumulated, Amounting to $128,140,618, and which adds greatly to their strength and safety,
would doubtless be divided among their shareholders; while many of the
safeguards and restrictions of the present law, wiuch experience has
shown to be valuable, will be either abolished or so changed by the vary;
ing legislation of the several States, as to be practically of little value in
comparison with the present homogeneous system.
If, on the other hand, the corporate existence of the national banks
shall be extended, all the advantages ofthe existing system will be preserved, subject to such amendments as may be hereafter found necessary;
while the circulation of the banks, which is the principal objection urged
against the systein, will, under existing laws, diminish in volume as the
public debt siiall be reduced.
The whole number of national banks in operation on October 1 last was
2,148. Of this number 393 were associations having a capital of $50,000
each ; 164 had a capital of over $50,000 and less than $100,000, and the
capital of 829 banks ranged from $100,000 to $150,000 each. The mini


COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

191

miim amount of bouds required to be deposited by banks of the capital
named is one-third of their-capital, but not less in any case than $30,000.
The niinimum amount required by all other banks is $50,000, and the
least amount'of bonds which, under existing laws, maybe deposited by
the 2,148 banks now in operation, is abDut $82,400,000. It is probable
that from 100 to 150 millions of United States bonds would be sufficient
to supply the minimum amount necessary to be deposited with the Treasurer by all the banks w^hich may be established during the next twenty
years. It is therefore evident that the national banking system may be
continued-without change. in this respect for many years, even if the
bonded debt of the United States shall, during that time, continue to
be reduced as rapidly as it has in the past year. _ The discussion of the
question as to the kind of circulating notes which will be substituted for
the national-bank notes, if the latter are retired, is postponed for the
preserit, as it is impossible to forsee the events which may occur to
affect that question within the next few years.
If, for any reason, the.legislation herein proposed shall not be favorably
considered by Congress, the banks can still, under the present laws,
renew their existence if they so desire; and in the absence of prohibitory
legislation many 5f them undoubtedly will, on the expiration of their
present charters, organize new associations, with nearly the same stockholders as before, and will then apply for and obtain from the Comptroller certificates authorizing them to continue business for twenty
years from the respective dates of their new organization certificates.
Such a course of procedure will be perfectly legal, and, indeed, under
the existing laws, the Comptroller has no discretionary power in the
matter, but must necessarily sanction the organization, or reorganization, of such associations as shall have conformed in all respects to the
legal requirements.
The passage, however, of a general act directly authorizing ah extension of the corporate existence of associations whose charters are about
to expire would, in many instances, relieve the banks from embarrassment. As the law now stands, if the shareholders of an association are
all agreed, the process of reorganization is simple; but if any of the
shareholders object to such reorganization, they are entitled to a complete liquidation of the bank's affairs, and to a j^ro rata distribution of
all ;its assets, including its surplus fund. In many instances executors
and administrators of estates hold national-bank stock in trust; and
while they might prefer to retain their interests in the associations which
issued the stock, they would perhaps have no authority to subscribe for
jstock in the new organizations., While, therefore, the legislation asked
p r is not absolutely essential, yet its passage at an early day would be
ja great convenience to many of the national banks, and especially so
to the class last referred to.
SUBSTITUTES FOR MONEY.

For a long period in their early history, bills of exchange were in fact
^hat their name imiilied—namely, bills drawn in one country to be
)aid in another. The common law of England, avhich inflexibly for)ade the assignment of debt, was a bar to their early introduction into
hat country; but they eyentually forced themselves into use there,
hrough the facilities which they afforded in the conduct of trade wath
Ither nations. It was long before the transfer of inland debts was
auctioned in England; but the practice at length prevailed, bfeing first
dopted in the intercourse betweeii London ancl York, and London and
'nstoL By the gradual striking off of one limitation after another, bills




192

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES

of exchange,* after the lapse of several centuries, became what they
now are, simply an order from one person to another to pay a definite
sum of money. The convenience of trade gradually overpowered the
narrow restrictions of the common law, until it became lawful to transfer an obligation from one person to another, in the form of a bill of exchange, while at the same time it remained unlawful to do so in other
forms, such as by a simple acknowledgment of the debt by the debtor.
About the end of the sixteenth century the merchants of Amsterdam
and Hamburg, and-of some other places, began to use instruments of
credit among themselves; and, as their intercourse increased, these instruments naturally assumed the form of an acknowledgment of the
debt by the debtor,'^ w i t h a promise to pay to the bearer, on demand, or
at a specified time. Such instruments are now called promissor^^ notes.
-They first began to be used by the goldsmiths, who originated the
modern system of banking soon after 1640. They were then called goldsmiths' notes, but they were not recognized by law. The first promissory notes issued in England, under the sanction of law, were those of the
Bank of England, in 1694, and which were technically bills'obligatory, or
bills,of credit. By the act founding the bank its notes were declared
to be assignable by indorsement, although this privilege was not then
extended to other promissory notes. Btit by an act passed in 1704,
promissory notes of every kind, including those of privat;e bankers and
merchants, as well as of the Bank of England, were all placed on the
sanie footing as inland bills of excharige; that is to say, they were all
made transferable, by indorsement on each separately. With respect,
however, to the Bank of England notes, as these were always payable
on demand, the practice of indorsing soon fell into disuse, and they
imssed from hand to hand like money. In the case also of .the notes of
private bankers of great repute, the indorsement was often omitted.
Until near the year 1772, this method of making exchanges by the
issue of promissory notes, made payable to bearer on demand, was
generally adhered to by bankers. But about that time the practice in
this respect becaine changed. When the bankers made discounts for
their customers, or received deposits from them, instead of giving as
before promissory notes or deposit receipts, they wrote down the
amount to the credit of their customers on their looks. They then gave
them books containing a nuinber of printed forms. These forms were
called checks, and were really bills of exchange drawn upon the banker,
payable to the bearer on demand.
Prior to the period when checks were introduced, the issue of promissory notes by the London bankers was very extensive; but the method
of doing business by the use of checks was found by them to be so convenient, and it possessed so many practical advantages over that by way
of notes, that issue's of the latter were soon generaliy discontinued, and
that of checks adopted in their stead. The bankers, however, were
never forbidden to issue such notes until the bank act of 1844.
For many years the English courts held that a check is binding on
the banker, having assets of the drawer, without acceptance; but more
recently these earlier decisions have been overruled, and it is now^ the
established doctrine of the highest English tribunals that a check is not
binding upon a bank until accepted," notwithstanding the fact that the,
bank has assets of the drawer. In a case in which the First ISrationa]
Bank of l^ew Orleans was defendant, w^here certain holders of its draftq
on a Liverppol bank attemiited to recover from the latter bank th'
amount of the drafts out of an ample balance to the credit of the Ne
* Much of tlie information regarding bills of exchange is-gleaned from Macleod
Theory and Practice of Banking.



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

193

Orleans bank after its failure, the House of Lords affirmed the decision
of the Lord Chancellor, and held that the drafts were not even equitable assignments of any iiart of the drawer's funds.*
PROPORTION

OF

B A N K C H E C K S , .BANK N O T E S , A N D COIN U S E D
DATA P R E P A R E D B Y SIR. J O H N L U B B O C K .

I N LONDON,

FROM

The first information given to the public as to the amount and proportion of checks, bank notes, and coin used in the business of banking, was
by Sir John Lubbock, an eminent scientist and banker, and president of
the London Institute of Bankers, and was based upon the business of
his own bank during the last few days of 1864. His statement, giveu
below, is copied from a paper read by him before the London Statistical
Society, in June, 1865, entitled ''Country Clearing," and published in
the journal of that society for September, 1865, to whose tables I have
added the proportions of checks, bank notes, and coin:
In order to give the proportion of the transactions of bankers which passes through
the clearing house to t h a i whicii does not, I took the amount of £2o,000,000, which
passed throngh our hands during the last few days of last year, and found that it was
made up as follows ;
.
Clearing..
'
'.
£16,346,000 70. 8 per cent.
Cheques and'hills, which did not pass through the clearing
5,394,000 23.4
''
Ba.nk notes.
1,137,000 4.9
''
Coin
:-...
139,000
0.6
''
Countrynotes
79,000 0.3
''
Total
'
....:.
23,095,000 100.0
''
I t would appear from this that out of each £1,000,000, rather raore than £700,000
passes throngh the clearing. The second amount given abov^e, £5,394,000, includes,
of course, the transfers made in our own books from the account of one customer to
t h a t of another. These amounted to £3,603,000, the remainder, £1,791,000, representing the cheques and bills on banks which did not clear.
I n order to ascertain the proportion of payments made in bank notes and coin, in
town, I have taken an amount, £17,000,000, paid in by our London customers. This
was made np as follows:
Cheques and bills on clearing bankers
-. £ 13, 000, 000 77. 4 per cent.
Cheques and bills on ourselves
1,600,000 9.5
'^
Cheques and biUs on other bankers
1, 400, 000 8. 3
'^
Bank of England notes
674,470 4.0
.''
Country bank notes
9,570
0.1
''
Coin ..'
117,960 0.7
'^
Total

16,802,000 100.0

''

The above amount of bank notes, small .as it is, panst, I think, be still farther reduced. All the clearing bankers have accounts at the Bank of Engla^nd, and, as we
require notes to supply our till, we draw them from the Bank of England,, crediting
the bank in our books. Out of the above amount of £674,470, £266,000 were notes
thus drawn hy us from the bank to replenish our till, and did not represent an ampunt
paid in by our customers to their credit. Tliis amount raust, therefore, I think, be
deducted frora both sides pf the account. On the other hand we must add the amount
of notes paid in for collection and discount, and loans on security, which pass through
a diiferent set of books and wbich represented a sum of £2,460,686.
Making these alterations we find t h a t out of £19,000,000 credited to our town customers, £408,000 consisted of bank, notes, £79,000 of country bank notes, and £118,000
of coin:
,
^
Cheques and-bills
£18,395,000 96. 8 per cent.
Banknotes
408,0.00 2.2
''
Country notes
79,000 0.4
<*
Coin
118,000
0.6
"
Total
.

19,000,000 100.0 • ''
* House of Lords, p. 352/Jnne 17-19, 1873.

13 F



"

194

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

In an article on bank notes, published in the Journal of the Institute
of Bankers, London, for March, 1880, Mr. John B. Martin gives a table
showing the percentiage of bank notes, coin and checks used in banking transactions, w^hich was compiled by him from several sources.
This table is given below:
Eobarts, Lubbock
& Co.

Bills a n d c b e q n e s . . .
Notes
....
Coin
- -.

M o r r i s o n , Dillon M a n c b e s t e r a n d Salford
B a n k a n d a n o t b e r local
&Co.
bank.

Eeceived Keceived
1864,
1864,
Keceived.
L o n d o n . oeneral.

Paid.

1859. •

P e r cent. P e r cent. P e r cent.
96.894.1
90
2.6
5.3
7
.6
.6
3

P e r ct.
97
2
1

P e r ct.
47

100

• 100

100

. 100

^100

1864.

P e r ct.
58
38
4

C
\

100

1872.

M a r t i u & Co.
Keceived Paid
18781878-'79.
'79.

P e r ct. P e r cent. P . c t .
68
96. 5
96.9
27
2.6
2 1
5
.9
1 0
100

100

100

The first two columns of percentages are obtained from the data contained in the table previously given, and show the ratio of checks, notes,
and coin received by the firm of Eobarts, Lubbock & Co., in payments
made to them during the last few days of 1864; the first column showing
the percentages of the items named above, in the receipts from London
bankers alone, and the second, the percentages in the receipts from all
sources. The next two columns are derived from an analysis of the
receipts and payments of the firm of Messrs. Morrison, Dillon & Co.
The next three columns show, for the years 1859,1864, and 1872, respectively, the percentages of checks and cash deriyed from an estimate made
of the total transactions of the Manchester and Salford Bank, and pub^ lished in the Journal ofthe Statistical Society for March, 1873, at page 86,
In reference to these transactions of the Manchester banks, it is stated
that the amount of cash shown is very remarkable, and that it is believed
- the proportion of coin in it very largely exceeds that of England, taken
as a AAdiole, because the' statement proceeds from a great wage-paying
district. The last two columns of the table show the results of an analysis of the receipts and payments.of Martin & Co. To obtain these percentages, the transactions of Mr. Martin's owu firm were observed for
six working days in each month, from the 20th to the 26th, for a period
of several months, covering the latter part of 1878 and the first part of
1879.
'
In each instance in this table, it is to be observed, the transactions
are those of one -bank or firm only, and in making up the aggregate,
from AA^hich the percentages are calculated, the business for several daj^s
has been taken; differing in these respects from the returns hereafter
given from the national banks in this country, Avhich are results obtained
from combining the transactions upon one day, and for the most part of
the same day, of a large number of banks doing business in widely different sections of the country.
PKOPORTION

OF B A N K

C H E C K S U S E D , .FKOM DATA P R E S E N T E D B Y P R E S I D E N T
FIELD.

GAR-

- The first information CA^er given upon this subject in this country Avas
compiled by the late President G-arfield, who was well known as a careful investigator of economic subjects.
Ihhis speech on resumption, delivered in the House of EepresentatiA-es
on November 16,1877, he said:
'
'
* In 1871, AA^hen I was chairman of the Committee on Banking and Currency, I asked
t h e Comptroller ofthe Currency to issue an order, naming fifty-two banks which were



.

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. '

195

to make an analysis of thedr receipts. I selected three gronps. The first was the city
banks. The second consisted of banks in cities of the size of Toledo and Dayton, iu
t h e State of Ohio. In the third group, if I aiay coin a word, I selected the /'conntriest'^ banks, the smallest that could be found, at points aAvay from railroads and telegraphs. The order was t h a t those banks should analyze all their receipts for six consecutive days, putting into one list all t h a t can be'called cash—either coin, greenbacks, bauk notes or coupons, and iuto the other list all drafts, checks., or cooimercial
bills. AVhat was the result? Duriug those six days $157,000,000 were received over
the counters of the fifty-two banks; and of t h a t amount, $19,370,000—12 per cent,
only—in cash, and eighty-eight ])ev cent., t h a t vast amount representing every grade
of ibusiness, was in checks, drafts, and commercial bills.
R E C E I P T S I N M O N E Y AND C H E C K S O F ALL T H E N A T I O N A L B A N K S .

In order to obtain the fullest possible information on this subject the
Comptroller recently issued two circular letters to the national banks,
asking for classified returns of their receipts and payments at different
dates. The first circular requested a return to be made for June 30,
Avhich date marked the close of the fiscal year; and the second one asked
for a return, on September 17, A\-hich was the middle of the third month
following. It was believed that a comparison of returns made for dates
so dissimilar would be a substantial test of 'their accuracy, and would
present a fair average of their operations forthe current year. Eeturns
for June 30, were received from 1,966 of the 2,106 national banks then
in operation, and in response to the request for statements for the date
of September 17, returns were receiA\ed from. 2,132 banks, b6ing all of
the banks in operation at that date. A fcAV of these later returns, about
fifty in number, were for a day subsequent to September 1.7, but their
rel&itiA^e number being small they haA^e been tabulated as being of that
date
The total receipts ofthe 1,966 banks, on June 30 last, Avere 284 millions
of dollars ($284,714,017). Of this ambunt there was less than two millions ($1,864,105) in gold coin, about half a million ($440,997) in silver
coin, and eleven aijid one-half millions ($11,554,747) in paper money; the
remainder, amounting to 270 millions ($270,854,165), being in checks and
drafts, including nine millions ($9,582,500) of clearing-house certificates.
The gold coin equaled 0.65 of one per cent, of the total receipts;, the
silA^er coin Avas 0.16 of one per cent.; the paper money 4.6 per cent.;
AAdiile the checks and drafts constituted 91.77 per cent, of the whole
amount; or, including the clearing-house certificates, they were equal
to 95.13 per cent. In other AA^ords, the total percentage of coiii and
paper money received was 4.87 per cent, only, while that of cheqks aud
drafts was 95.13.
The receipts of all of the national banks, 2,132 in number, on September 17, were $295,233,779. Of this sum $4,078,044 consisted of gold
coin, $500,301 of silver coin, and $13,026,570 of paper inoney. The
remainder, amounting to $27,7,628,862, consisted of checks and drafts,
and. $6,592,337 of clearing-house certificates. The gold coin equaled
1.38 per cent, of the total receipts; the sih-er coin 0.17 of one per cent.;
the paper money 4.36 per cent., and the checks and drafts 91.85 per cent.,
Avliile the checks, drafts and clearing-house certificates, together, were
equal to 94.09 per cent, of the whole. On September 17, therefore, the
total percentage of cash was 5.91 per cent. only.
T O T A L R E C E I P T S OF M O N E Y AND C H E C K S B Y T H E

BANKS

IN

N E W YORK C I T Y A : ^ D

I N F I F T E E N O T H E R P R I N C I P A L C I T I E S . A N D B Y T H E REMAlNINGr B A N K S .

The receipts of the forty-eight national banks in ISTew York City,
on June 30, were 167 millions ($167,437,759), of which less than one


196

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

half million ($460,993.67) was in gold coin, $15,996.95 in silver coin, and
$1,706,604.06 in paper money; the remaining 165 millions ($165.,254,l64)
being in checks.and drafts, including nearly four inillions ($3,835,500)
of clearing-house certificates.
The,banks in New York City, on September 17, reported receipts
amounting to $165,193,347, of which $805,588 AA^as in gold coin, $7,857
in sih-er coin, and $1,071,315 in paper monej^, the remainder, $163,308,587, being in checks and drafts, including $3,792,000 of clearinghouse certificates.
The receipts of the 187 banks in the fifteen reserve cities, exclusive
of ISTew York, on June 30, were scA^eiity-seven millions ($77,100,705), of
Avhicli $581,070 Avas in gold, $114,485 in silver, $3,631,710 in paperrinoney,
and seventy-two millions ($72,773,450) in checks and drafts, including
$5,747,000.of gold clearing-hoase certificates.
On September 17 the receipts of 189 banks in fifteen reserA^e cities,
exclusive of ISTew York, AYcre $77,922,246, of Avhich $1,448,415 was in
gold, $138,248 in silver, $4,486,045 in paper money, aud $71,849,538 in
checks and drafts, including $2,734,378 in clearing-house certificates.
The total receipts of the banks outside of the cities, 1,731 in number,
on June 30, Avere forty millions ($40,175,542), of which $822,041 was in
gold coin, $310,516 in .silver coin, six millions ($6,216,433) in paper
money, and nearly thirty-three millions ($32,826,552) in checks and
drafts.
On September 17 these banks, 1,895 in. number, received $52,118,185,
of which $1,724,040 Avas in gold coin, $354,197 in silver coin, $7,469,210
in paper currency, and $42,570,738 in checks and drafts.
TOTAL

R E C E I P T S AND

P R O P O R T I O N S O F GOLD COIN, S I L V E R
AND CHECKS AND DRAFTS.

COIN, P A P E R

MONEY,

In the following tables are shoA^^n, both for June 30 and fbr September 17, the proportions of gold coin, silver coin, paper money, and
checks and drafts, including clearing-house. certificates, to the total
receipts, in I^ew York City, in the other reserve cities, and in banks
elsewhere, separately, and also the same proportions for the United
States I s
J U N E 30. 1881.

Proportions.
Localities.

N e w York City . . . .
O.tber r e s e r v e cities
Banks elsewbere...

Number
of b a n k s .

Gold
coin.

•48 $167, 437, 759
187
77,100, 715
1,731
40,175, 542

IJnited States

,

Receipts.
• Silver
coin.

P e r cent. P e r
0.27
0.76
2.04

284, 714, 016

Paper
Cbecks,
c u r r e n c y , idrafts, &c

cent. P e r cent. P e r
0.01
L02
0.'15
4.71
0.77
15.47

cent.
98.70
94. 38
81.72

0.65

0.16

4.06

95.13

0.65
5.61
14. 27

98.80
92.35
81.74

S E P T E M B E R 17, 1881.

ifew York City
O t b e r r e s e r v e cities
Banks elsewbere...

48
189
1,895

$165,193, 347
77, 922, 247
52,118,185

0.54
L86
3.31

0.01
0'. 18
0.08

Uiiited States

2,132

295, 233, 779

L38

0.17




94. 09

197

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

On June 30 the proportion of gold coin to the whole receipts in ISTew
York City was 0.2.7 of one percent.; of sih-er coin, 0.01 of one per cent.;;
of paper money, 1.02 per cent.; and of checks and drafts, including
clearing-house certificates, 98.7 per cent.
The percentage of gold coin receiA^ed in the fifteen other cities was
0.76; of silver coin, 0.15; of paper currency, 4.71; and of checks ancl
drafts, 94.38. The percentage of gold coin received by the banks not
included in these cities Avas 2.05; of silver coin, 0.77; of paper currency,,
15.47; and of checks and drafts, 81.71.
Taking all the banks to'gether, the relative proportion of gold coin receiA^ed was 0.65, of sih-er coin 0.16, of paper currency 4.06, and of checks
and drafts 95.13 per cent.
On September 17 the proportion of gold coin to the Avhole receipts
in ISTew York City was 0.545 of one per cent., and of sih-er coin, 0.005 of
one per cent.; of paper money, 0.65 of one per cent., and of checks and
drafts, iucluding clearing-house certificates, 98.8 per cent.
The percentage of gold coin received in 15 otlier cities was 1.86; of
silA^er coin, 0.18; of paper currency, 5.61; and. of checks and drafts,
92.35. The percentage of gold coin by the remaining banks in the country was 3.31; of sih-er coin, 0.68; of paper currency, 14.27; and of checks
and drafts, 81.74. The receipts of the 2,132 banks together show a relative proportion of gold coin, 1.38; of silA^^er coin, 0.17; of paper currency,
4.36; and of checks and, drafts, 94.09.
CHECKS AND DRAFTS I N T H E P R I N C I P A L CITIES.

The following table shows, for'June 30 and September 17, the number of banks, the total receipts, and the ratio to such total of the checks
and drafts receiyed, in ISTew York City and in fifteen of the other principal cities:
S e p t e m b e r 17, 1881.

J u n e 30, 1881.
Cities.
N o . of
banks.

48

N e w T o r k City
Boston
Albany
Pbiladelpbia
Pittsburgb
Baltimore
Wasbington
N e w Orleans. ^
Louisville . Cincinnati
Cleveland
Cbicago"
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Louis
San Fiancisco

-- —

:

$167, 437, 759
33, 088, 080
1, 417, 704
18, 061, 565
2,149, 067
3, 875, 255
206, 601
1, 206, 759
742, 330
2, 965, 355
1, 751, 037
8,141,189
806, 211
417,244
1,940,053
332, 265

'.

•-

Eeceipts.

\

Total, excluding N e w
Y o r k City

Proportion
of^ c h e c k s ,
drafts, &c.
P e r cent.
98.7

235
1,731

244, 538, 474
40,175, 542

IJnited States

1,966

284, 714, 016




97.3
81.7

Eeceipts.

ProjDortion
of c b e c k s ;
drafts, (fee.
P e r cent.

48

$165,193, 347
24, 094, 061
1, 486, 315
17, 830, 648
3,126, 749
4, 425,113
226, 783
. 1, 620, 771
775, 304
3, 876, 785
2, 618, 064
13, 026, 835
L 219, 481
670,172
2, 627, 045
298,121

93.7
96.5
96.4
86.2
93.9
45.8
80.2
83;"4
90.0
95.1
90.8
93.5
94.9
8L5
77.4

189

77, 922, 247

92.3

237

243,115,594
52,118,185

96.7
8L7

2,132

95, 233, 779

96.5
93.8
96.0
90. 4^
92.9
60.0
89.8
92.8
88.0
94.0
92:0
87.5
88.3
82.3
9L8

77,100, 715

T o t a l , i n c l u d i n g NCAV'
York City . . : .
Banks elsewbere

N o . of
banks.

198

.REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
PROPORTION OP THE RECEIPTS I i i THE FOUR PRINCIPAL CITIES. •

The table below exhibits the total receipts, on June 30 ahd September 17, of the 48 banks in ISTew York City, the 54 in Boston, the 32 in
Philadelphia, and the 9 in Chicago, and the proportion which the receipts in each city, and the aggregate of all of them, bear to the receipts
of all the banks in the United States on the same dates. It also
shoAvs the receipts, and proportion to the whole, of the banks in twelve
other cities, and the samQ as to the remaining banks of the country:
J u n e 30, 1881.
B a n k s in four p r i u c i p a l
cities, a n d e l s e w b e r e .

o?r.!ifd ^>™-*

T o t a l s of cities
A.11 o t h e r b a n k s
United States

\

P e r centage to total
receipts.

48
54
32
9

$167,437,759
33,088,080
18,061,565
8,141,189

58.81
11. 62
6.34
2.86

-

143
92

226, 728, 598
17, 809, 881

79. 63
6.26

...

235
1, 731

244, 538, 474
40,175, 542

85.89
14.11

1, 966

.284,714,016'

N e w York City
Boston
. -.
Pbiladelpbia
Cbi<;;aoo
Totals
T w e l v e o t h e r cities

S e p t e m b e r 17,1881.

100

Number
of b a n k s .

Amount

Percentage to total
receipts.

347
061
648
835

55.95
8.16
6.04
4.41

143
94

220,144, 891
22, 970, 703

74.56
7.78

237
1, 895

243,115, 594
52,118,185

82. 34
17. 66

2,132

295, 233, 779

.

48
54
32
9

$165.193,
24, 094,
17, 830,
13, 026,

100

From an examination of this table it will be seen that the receipts of
the 48 banks in ISTCAV York City on ^June 30 were nearly three-fifths
(58.81 per cent.) of the whole, and on September 17 about 56 per cent.
This fact shows how closely connected is the business of all the national
banks with the gi:eat commercial center of the country, nearly every
bank and banker in the Union having deposits, subject to sight-drafts,
at that point. The receipts of the Boston banks on June 30 were
nearly 12 per cent, -of the whole, and were 8 per cent, on September 17;
while those of Philadelphia were about 6 per cent, at the latter date,
and of the banks in Chicago about 4.5 per cent. The receipts in these
four great cities comprised nearly four-fifths of the total receipts on June
30, and nearly three-fourths of the total ou September 17; while the receipts of the sixteen reserve cities on June 30 Avere more than 85 per '
cent., and on September 17 more than 82 per cent., of the whole amount.
The receipts of 1,731 banks located in the districts outside of these cities
on June 30 Avere but 14.11 per cent., and of the 1,895 banks on September
17 but 17.66 per cent., of the whole.
TOTAL R E C E I P T S AND P R O P O R T I O N S O F C H E C K S AND D R A F T S I N STATES AND T E R R I TORIES.
^

The table next given shows, for the same dates, the receipts of
the banks in each State and Territory, exclusive of those located in
the cities named in the previous table, with similar percentages. Attention is called to the remarkable coincidence shown in this table,
in the percentage of checks and drafts for the two dates named, it
being 81.7 per cent, in each instance. The percentages of the cities
for the same dates, as giA^en in the next preceding table, also correspond
A^ery nearly, the small difference between them being principally due to
the change in the cit^^ of Boston from 96.5, on June 30, to 93.7 per cent.




199

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

on September 17. The slight variation in the average ratios for the two
dates is evidence of the general accuracy of the returns :
J u n e 30, 1881.
states and Territories.
N o . of
banks.

Maine
:
New Hampshire
VermontM a s s a c b u s e t t s - . .•' Ebode Island
Connecticut
New York
N e w Jersey^
Pennsylvania
Delaware
M a r y l a n d . .•
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
N o r t b Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia.
F l o r i d a ....^
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
•...
Indiana
Illinois
'.
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
.....'
Kansas
Nebraska
Colorado
Nevada
California
Oregon
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
N e w Mexico
Utab
Washington
Wyoming
Totals .

67
45
41
182
58
79
226
62
179
14'
20
1
18
16
12
9
11
2
8
14
2
37
21
142
80
120
70
30
68
25
13
10
11
13
1

1,731

Eeceipts.

$1,167, 284
509, 594
405, 256
4, 246, 968
1, 235, 886
2, 533,108
5, 059, 233
3, 907, 471
3, 934, 436
313, 628
278,008
27, 983
1, 518, 480
' 112,415
344, 720
395, 441
281, 995
23^ 020
100,177
292, 786
53, 220
446, 27D
702, 408
2, 825, 066
1, 321, 819
1, 411, 907
988, 890
543, 935
975, 956
' 1, 227, 770
163. 481
421, 744
511, 723
1,185, 387
6,543
235, 384
165, 420
48, 474

S e p t e m b e r 17, 1881.
Proportion
of c h e c k s ,
drafts, <fcc.
P e r c^nt. .
82.3
75.3
79.2
83.5
87.9
• 87. 4
83.1
92.0
84.8
86.3
83.7
64.0
89.5
65.0
8.5.0
85.9
69.5
23.7
72.0
07.8
66.2
76.7
63.9
80.0
74.6
70.6
73.5
80.8
68.2
80.8
67.3
78.1
76.0
SH
.52. 8
48.2
7L8
68.6

N o . of
banks.

Eeceipts.

69
47
47
190
62
85
243
67
191
14
22
1
18
17
15
13
12

19, 662
117,306
92, 969
15,526
6,782

88.6
82.5
49.8
37. 4
33.6

15
2
42
25
161
93
130
76
31
76
27
17
13
12
17
1
10
1
8
1
3
4
1
2
3

40,175, 542

8L7

1,895

P R O P O R T I O N O F R E C E I P T S AVHICH R E P R E S E N T L E G I T I M A T E

$1,-016,
500,
• 407,
4, 047;
1, 486,
3, 536.
5, 634,
4, 412,
5, 718,
381,
2.52;
44,
1, 439,
180,
391
728;
7;-,i

40,
293,
832,
51,
688:
893;
3,150,
2, 092,
3, 332,
1,423,
545,
1, 552,
1,784,
566,
395,
815,
1, 533,
7.
260;
174,
257,
17,
75,
119,
112,
38,
144,

Proportio n
of c h e c k s
drafts, & c .
P e r eent.
79.8
75.7
74.3
8L3
90.5
88.1
83.3
9L0
84.9
89.0
77.8
76.4
87.2
72.4
78.3
80.4
77. 3
77.8
85.7
76. g
76.7
87.0
73.3
76.1
72.7
80.0
77.1
64.3
•7L4
78.1
82.3,
65.6
80.1
85.1
8.2
52.5
72.6
64.3
5L2
58.1
79.3
80.5
30.0
87.8

52,118,185

8L7

BUSINESS.

If all of these receipts i-epresented legitimate business, the means for
merchandising and for manufacturing Avoiild be most abundant. It would
be an interesting subject for investigation to determine what proportion
of the checks received by the banks in ISTew York City, on any given day,
represent operations at the Stock Exchange, and what proportions
of these operations represent legitimate and what speculative transactions. In taking as a basis for such an estimate the posted sales of the
Stock Exchange, a difficulty arises from the fact that these sales on any
one day do not by any means include all the transactions at the board. In the opinion of the mo'st experienced brokers, not more than onethird of the purchases and sales are recorded in the printed list. Even
in the case of those recorded, the number of shares bought or sold, as-sumedly at par, is not an indication of the money value of the transactions as they appear in the bank clearings, on account of the different




200

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

par value of the various shares dealt in. The par is usually one hundred
dollars per share, but the average price of sales Avould not'probably exceed sixty dollars per share.
The checks received-by the banks in I^ew York City, including both
State and ISTational, on the 30th of June, 1881, and which were cleared
on the fblloAving day, amounted to 141 millions. Of this amount, 113.
millions were cleared by twenty-three banks, all of which have relations
to a greater or less extent with brokers. From an examination of the
clearings of each of these twenty-three banks, it was found that the total
of certified checks on that day amounted to about 80 millions, of which
it is probable that at least 90 per cent., or 72 millions, represented stock
transactions. About ten per cent, of this amount should be allowed for,
the daily payment and reborrowing of loans by brokers, which is accomplished by meaus of certified checks,. It is therefore estimated by those
Avho are conversant with these subjects, that of the 141 millions of exchanges, about 65 millions represent stock exchange transactions.
There are really no data upon Avhich a conclusion can be obtained as
to what proportion of these large stock transactions are speculative,*
and what legitiuDate, or for investment. It is estimated, h o w l e r , by
those who haA^e had long experience in the business, that not more than
five per cent, of all purchases and sales at the stock board are for investment account. Assuming that these estimates are reasonable, it would
follow that about 60 millions of th6 141 millions of clearings upon June
30, or about three-sevenths of the whole, represent the speculatiA^e transactions: of the stock board, and that 81 millions, or four-sevenths, represent legitimate business transactions.
P R O P O R T I O N O F C H E C K S AVHICH PASS T H R O U G H T H E C L E A R I N G H O U S E .

The checks, drafts and certificates receiA^ed by the natibnal banks in
ISTew York City on June 30 amounted, as has been seen, to $165,233,164.
The gold clearing-house certificates amounted to $3,814,500, which were
receiA^ed b}^ the banks in payment of balances due them on the morning of
Jtine 30. The remainder consisted of checks and drafts alone. Theclearirig-house statement shows that on the morning of July 1 $126,937,110 of
the before-mentioned checks and drafts were paid through the clearinghouse. The remaining $34,381,554, which did not pass through the
clearing-house, consisted iirobably of checks, which had been used in
payments made by one depositor to another, in the same bank, and were
consequently settled by simple transfers of accounts on the books of
such banks. On Saturday, September 17, the total amount received
by the banks in checks, drafts, and Certificates was $163,208,586; of which
$3,792,000 Avere in gold clearing-house certificates, received bythe banks
in payment of the balances due them at the clearing-house on thesame
day, leaving $159,416,586 of checks and drafts receiA^ed. Of this latter
sum, $139,881,760 consisted of checks, &c., AA^hich were paid through the
clearing-house on the morning of Monday, September 19 (the next business day), by the same banks, as shown by the clearing-house statements
of that clay. Of the checks and drafts receiA^ed by the national banks
•of ISTCAV York City on September 17, about 20 millions were settled without passing through the clearing-housjB; aud, as was remarked in reference to similar checks and drafts shown by the statement of June 30,
they were probably settled by transfers of accounts on the books of the
banks on which they were draAvn*
I t was about eighty years after the first issue of promissory notes by




COMPTROLLER OF . THE CURRENCY.

'201

the Bank of England that the London clearing-house Avas established,
and the orgahization of the Kew York clearing-house dates eighty years
still later, in 1853; so that it may be said that the clearing arrangement
now in use in this country, and so familiar to all bankers, has been in
operation but twenty-eight years. The assistant treasurer in 'New York
. has been a member of the clearing-house but three years, and the large
payments to the clearing-house banks, averaging two and a quarter
tons of gold coin daily doring the past year, which would be about
thirty-six tons daily if paid in silver, are transferred in bags, or upon
drays from the Treasury to the banks. If these balances could be paid
in gold certificates instead of coin, the system of bank machinery in
I:^ew York would be complete.
Checks, certificates of deposit, and drafts, or bills of exchange, which
are IIOAV used so largely as substitutes for money, are the most important
and useful parts of the machinery ^of the bank. The issue of circulating
notes is not an essential feature of banking, for there are many banks
in this countr}^, chiefly incorporated under State laws, Avhich do not issue
such notes. But checks and draffs are almost as indispensable to the
successful conduct of the business of banking as capital or deposits.
U S E OF C H E C K S I N F R A N C E , E N G L A N D , SCOTLAND, A N D I R E L A N D , A N D I N T H E U N I T E D
STATES.

In England, banks and bankers are numerous, and large numbers of
such instruments of exchange are used, particularly in the principal
cities. In France, on the other hand, their use is much more infrequent,
for except the Bank of France, with its 90 branches, there are no incorporated banks in that 30untry, and thirteen of these branches were
conducted in 1880 at a loss of more than $30,000.
Yictor Bonnet, a well-known French writer, says:
The nse of cleposits, bank accpunts, and checks is still in its infancy ih this country.
They are very little used, even in the great cities, while in theNrest of France they
are corax!)letely unknown. It is, however, to be hoped that they will be more employed
hereafter, and that here, as in England a n d t h e United States, payments Avillbemore
generally made through the medium of bankers, and by transfers in accounts current.
If this should be the case, we shall economize l)oth in the use of specie and of bank
notes; for it is to be observed t h a t the use of bauk notes does not reach its fullest development, except in countries where the keeping of bank accounts is unusual, as is
evident by comparing .France in this respect with England: M. Pinard, manager of
the Comptoir d'Escompte, testified before the commission of iuquiry, t h a t the greatest
efforts had been made by that institution to iuduce French merchants- and shopkeepers
to adopt English habits in respect to the use of checks and the keeping of bank accounts, but in vain; their prejudices were invincible; it was no use reasoning with
them, they would not do it, because they would not.

It would seem, however, from the following extract from the report of
the Bank of France for 1880, that an effort is being made to OA^ercome
this prejudice:
Since the end of the operations of 1879, we have endeavored to give new advantages to those who had current accounts with os, aud we have granted them facilities
for transfer from one place to another, free of cost, for all sums proceeding from discount operations, or the encashment t)f documents ou demand. We have desired to
proceed further with this plan, and Ave have just completed this first arrangement bygiving to all those who had current accounts with us, without exception, the meansof
disposing by open cheques of the whole of the sums wliich stand to their credit. These
cheques, which are subject to a commission when they represent a simple deposit of
funds, will, on the contrary, be delivered grataitously when they are drawn against
the Iiroceeds of discounts or drafts on demand encashed by the bank., aud they will
be made payable in all our establishments indifferently. The cheques will thus beconie
a powerful and very convenient means of exchange, which will simplify all transac-




202

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

tions, and which will probably reduce, in considerable proportion, t h e n e e d f o r t h e note
circulation. In addition to this Ave have authorized the use of cheques within the
town itself for the withdrawal of funds which dono^ require the displacement of capital. We are certain t h a t Avhen the use of cheques i^ thoroughly understood it will be
of great service to commerce.
I

There are now in this country 6,796 banks tod bankers located in all its
principal cities and Aallages, and the number of checks and drafts in daily
use by our own people is consequently larger' in fact, far greater, than anywhere else in the world. In some countries a charge is made to the depos-,
itor for keeping his account. In others, bank accounts are refused unless
the depositor comes well introduced and it is|believed that his account will
be of considerable pecuniary benefit to the bank. In this country the
bank is in many instances a coiiA^enience tjo the depositor, rather than
the depositor of benefit to the bank; for the latter keeps the cash account
of the depositor, and pays out amounts upoi|i his order, and at his request"
returns to him his checks properly indorsed, which are then held by the
depositor as A^ouchers or receipts for the payment of his debts. '
It is evident that the amount of coin and paper currency used in any
country depends largely upon the number of banks and bankers it contains, and upon the method of doing business; and no theory is more
absurd than that Avhich has been so frequentlj^ urged during the currency
discussions ofthe past few years, that the aijnount of money required is in
proportion to population. Tables showing the per capita of coin and
currency in use in any country are curious and interesting, but alraost
A^alueless in determining the am ount of papier money required. Through
the machinery of the bank, with its systeni of checks, bills of exchange
and clearing-houses, large amounts of business may be settled Avithout
the use of coin or circulating notes. Coin aind currency are but the small
change used in trade. Checks and draftj are substitutes for money,
and in CA^ery case, if these were not used, the latter would be required.
Yet, notwithstanding the almost exclusive use of these substitutes for
money in large business transactions, all payments, great and small, depend for their integrity upon a true measure of value, and that measure
is a piece of gold coin of standard weight and fineness. All other coins,
not subsidiary, and intrinsically worth less than the general standard
recognized at commercial centers, and all kinds of paper money which
are not immediatel}^ redeemable in gold coin, are not only not needed,
but are worse than useless, for they disturb A-alues.
The London Bankers' Magazine for November, Avhich has just been
receiA^ed, contains an abstract of a i)aper recently read by Mr. Pownall before the London Bankers' Institute, from which the folloAving table has
been compiled. The percentages of the receipts in the city of New York
©n September 17 have also been* addedvto t^ie table:
Localities.

New York
London
.-.
Erlinburgb
Dublin
•Conntry b a n k s i n .261 j)laces •

Coin.

Notes.

Cbecks.

P e r cent. P e r cent. P e r
. 55
.65
.73
2.04
. 55
12.67
L57
8.53
15.20
1L94

cent.
98. 80
97. 23
86.78
89. 90
72.80

I t will be seen thatthe proportion of checks and draft;S used in London
does not vary greatly from that of the same items shown in the receipts
0 of the banks in New York City. The proportions used in the banking
business of the country districts is less, as in the IJnited States it is less
in the banks outside the cities'; but the use of checks and drafts in the
eountry districts in the United States is nearly nine per cent, greater
than in the corresijonding districts in England.



' COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

203

Through the courtesy of Mr. E. Dayrell Reed, secretary of the Institute of Bankers, London, the Comptroller acknowledges the receipt of
a '^ rough proof" of an important paper read by Mr. G-eorge H. Pownall
before the Institute, on October 19 last, on '' The proportional use of credit
documents and metallic money in English banks," and regrets that it
was received too late for use in the preparation of this part of the report.
The paper is elaborate, and gives, in addition to the table already quoted,
many others; among which are tables showing the proportion of gold
coin, silver coin, bank notes and checks used by banks located in agri-'
cultural places, in the metropolitan area, andin the cotton, woolen, iron,
pottery, and silk manufacturing districts. The entire paper will greatly
interest the economic student; but under the circumstances the Comptroller is compelled,to content himself with the folloAving e^xtracts : "
There is a certain grim satire in these figures, when one thinks of the libralries filled
with blue books full of Aveighty arguments, all curiously Avrought out, to help in the
settlement of the great note question. I t is clear that the cheque and the clearing
system are the main lines apon Avhich bauking is destined to run. i)ead theories respecting notes and the right ofissue belong to the generation to which they were liA^ing verities. To us the living fact is the substitution of a UCAV instrument of credit.
For the present generation the improvement o f t h e cheque and the cleapriug system, the
mechanical details of office organization, those details of bookkeej)iug Avhich save
time, are, from the enormous nuraber ot documents passing through the hands of
bankers, of more weight than the most learned treatise on notes and note makers.
if

• •*

-ff

:*

*.

if-

'

*

Banking statistics, gathered Avith due patience, AA'^OUUI play a great part in industrial statistics. They represent trading totals, they rise and fall with prices, they
expand with commercial iDrosperity, they contract in the day of bad trade. Systematically collected, they would furnish constant lessons. From no other source could
Ave gain so much and so valuable information as to trading currents as from bankers.
In their books the trading world is photographed. I t has been calculated t h a t 97 per
•cent, of the transactions of British Avholesale commerce pass through the hands of the
bankers of t h e United Kingdom. The sources of t h a t commerce and its distribution
must in the broadest way be marked in the totals of the banking world. The cottons )
•of Lancashire, the woolens of Yorkshire, the shipping of Liverpool, the commerce and
finance of London, are all represented "there.
The tendency of this generation is to seek to place its theories upon an exact basis.
HOAV much AVO aid the social and trading life of England be illustrated if we could
mark out, though only at intervals, or even for a single day, the magnitude of our
great industries as they are represented in the books of bankers.
The couA^ersion of the mode of settlement of claims from payment by coin and notes
into payment by cheque and clearing is not merely a local, or even a national, movement. The American statistics, so opportunely published, demonstrate the Avide-reaching influence o f t h e causes AA^orking in that direction.
WhercA^er the English race has planted itself and foanded a community, there the
tendency towards a common financial organization has shoAvn itself. We see this at
home, Ave see this in America, it is repeated in Australia. There is, therefore, in despite of much diversity, much t h a t is common to all these systems.

. In the Appendix will be found tables giving the amounts and ratios of
gold and silver coin and paper money, as Avell as that of checks and
drafts, in each of the cities. States, and Territories of the Union.
TRANSACTIONS OF THE NEW Y^ORK C L E A R I N a HOUSE.

The New York Clearing EEouse Association is composed of forty-five
national and tweh^e State banks, and the assistant treasurer of the
United States at New York.
Through the courtesj^ of Mr. W. A. Camp^ its .manager, a statement
of the transactions during the year ending October 1, 1881, has been
obtained, which shows that the total exchanges were more than
$48,000,000,000, while the balances paid in money were less than
$1,800,000,000. The daily average balances paid were nearly $6,000,000,
or about 3.5 per cent, of the amount of the settlements. The balances
paid in money during the year consisted of $1,394,966,000 in clearing
house certificates of the Bank of America, legal-tenders amounting to
over $8,633,161, and $372,419,000 in gold coin, weighing 686J tons. If,



204

REPORT OF T H E FINAISRCES.

instead of gold.coin, silver had been used, the weight AYOuld have beera
nearly 11,00.0 tons. The largest transactions for any one day w(ire on
the 28th of November, and amounted to $295,821,422.37. The total
transactions for the year exceed that of any previous j^ear, by $11,643,269,121.43. The following table shows the yearly transactions of the
NCAV York clearing house for the twenty-eight years since its organizatioii in 1853, and the amounts and ratios of currency required, for the
payment of daily balances:
Tears.

1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860 ..-.
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866...•
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872 . . . . . . . .
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
•..
1879
1880
1881

N o . of
banks.

.

50
48
50
50
46
47
50
50
50
50
49
55
58
58
59
59
61
62
61
59
59
59
59
58
57
59
57
60

^Capital.

$47, 044, 900
48, 884, 180
.52, 883, 700 •
64, 420, 200
67,146, 018
67, 921, 714
69, 907, 435
68,900,605
68, 375, 820
68, 972, 508
68, 586, 763
80,363,013
82, 370, 200
81, 770, 200
82, 270, 200
82, 720, 200
83, 620, 200
84, 420, 200
84, 420, 200
83, 370, 200
81, 635, 200
' 80,435,200
81, 731, 200
71, 085, 200
63,611,500
60, 800, 200
60, 475, 200
61,162, 700
t71, 403, 745

Excbanges.

Average
B a l a n c e s p a i d AA'erage daily daily bali n inoney.
excbanges. ances paid
in inony.

Ratios.

P r . ct.
$988, 078
5.2
$5, 750, 455, 987
$297,411,494
$19,104, 505
5, 362, 9.1.2, 098
289, 694,13.7
17, 412, 052
940, 565
5.4.6, 906, 213, 328
'334. 714,489
22, 278,108
1, 079, 724
4.S
8,333,226,718
365,313,902
26, 968, 371
1, 182,246
4.4
4, 756, 664, 386
314, 238, 911
15, 393, 736
1, 016, 954
6.6
6, 448, 005, 956
363, 984, 683
20, 867, 333
1,177, 944
5.6
7, 231,143, 057
380, 693, 438
23, 401, 757
1, 232, 018
5. a
5,915,742,758
353, 383, 944
19, 269, 520
1, 151, 088
6.0
6,871,443,591
415, 530, 331
22, 237, 682
1, 344, 758 • 6.0
14, 867, 597, 849
677, 626, 483
48, 428, 658
2, 207, 252
4.6
24, 097,196, 656
885; 719, 205
77, 984, 455 . 2, 866, 405
3.7
26, 032, 384, 342
1, 035, 765,108
84, 796, 040
3, 373, 828
4.0
28, 717,146, 914 J., 066,135,106
93,541,195
3, 472, 753
3.7
28, 675,159. 472
1,144,963,451
93,101,167 - 3,7.17,414
4.0
28, 484, 288, 63.7
1,125, 455, 237
92,182.164
3, 642, 250
4.0
37. 407, 028, 987
1,120,318,308
121, 451, 393
3, 637, 397
3.0
27,804,-539,406 • 1, 036, 484, 822
90, 274, 479
3. 365, 210
3.7
29, 300, 986, 682
1, 209, 721, 029 . 95,133,074
3, 927, 666
4.1
32, 636, 997, 404
1, 213, 293, 827
105. 964, 277
3, 939, 266
3.7
33, 972, 773, 943
1,152, 372.108
111,022,137
3, 765, 922
3.4
20, 850, 681, 963
971,231,281
68,139,484
3,173, 958 • 4 . 7
23,042,276,858
1,104. 346, 845
75, 301, 558
3, 608, 977
4.8
19, 874, 815, 361
1, 009, 532, 037
64,738,812
3, 288, 381
.5.1
20,'876, 555, 937
1,015,256,483
68, 447, 724
3, 328. 710
4.9
19, 922, 733, 947
951, 970, 454
65,106, 974
3", 111, 015
4.8
24, 553,196; 689
1,3"21,119,298
79,977,839
4, 303, 320
5.4
37, 182,128, 621
] , 516, 538, 631
121, 510, 224
4, 956, 009
4.1
48, 565, 818, 212
1,776,018,162
165, 055, 201
5, 823, 010 ' 3.5
:}:584, 440,115, 759 J2t, 448, 833, 204

68, 181,7 83

t2, 843, 647

4.2

The total amount of transactions for the twenty-eight years giA^en in
the table is $584,440,115,759, and the annual average is $20,872,861,277.
The clearing-house transactions of the assistant treasurer of the United
States at NCAV York, for the year ending NoA^ember 1,1881, were as follows: .
Exchanges recei\^ed from clearing-house
Exchanges delivered to clearing-house
Balances paid to clearing-house
Balances received from clearing-house

^
1
i

$358,193,774
92,748,620
........

270,966,495
5,521, 341

ShoAving that the amouut paid by the assistaut treasurer to the clearing> house Avas in excess of the amount received by him

265,445,154

A table compiled from statements inad'e by the New York clearinghouse, giving the clearings and balanqeb weekly for the months of
September,. October, and November, of th0 year from 1872 to 1880, will
be found in the appendix, and may be A-aluable for purposes of comparison.
^
j
. '

DISTRIBUTION OF COIN AND P A P E R CURRENCY.

The' reports for 1879 and 1880 gave valuable tables of the amount of
coin and paper money in the country oiij January 1, 1879 (the date of
resumption), and on November 1 in 1879 and 1880.
* The capital is for A'-arious dateS} the araount at a faniform date in each year not being
obtainable,
'
t Yearly averages for twenty-eight years.
' t Totals for tAventy-eight'yearg|..



205

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY

The imports of gold in excess of exports, from the date of resumption
to November 1, 1881, have been $197,434,114, and the estimated gold
production of the inines is $104,150,000. The amount receive^ from
these two sources during the year ending November 1, 1881, has been
$114,749,390. ••: ^
• -;
1 ' - '• ,
The stock of standard silver dollars is also increasing at the rate of
aibout two millions three hundred thousand monthly, the amount coined
during the year haAing been $27,824,955. Tables are again given herewith showing the amount of coin and currency in the country on Janwary 1, 1879, and on November 1, 1879, 1880 and 1881:
January
1879.
Crold coin *

...........

..

Xegal-tender n o t e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
N a t i o n a l b a n k n o t e s -----.-• - ^ : ,
Totals.

...,,...„......,...

1,

$278,310,126
106. 573, 803
346,6,81,016
323, 791, 674
1,055,356,639

!N"ovember .1,
1879.
$355. 681, 532
-126, 009, 537 '
346, 681, 016
' 337,181,418
1,165, 553, 503

:N'oyember 1,
1880.

N o y e m b e r 1,
1881.
.

$453, 882, 692
158, 320, 911
346,681,016
3.43,834,107

$562,
186,
346,
360,

1,302, 718,.726

568, 971
037, 365
681, 016
344, 250

.1,455,631,602

The amount of legal-tender notes has remained the same since May
31, 1878, in accordance Avith law. The increase of national-bank notes
during the year ending November 1 last was $16,510,143. This, together
with the increase of the gold coin, $108,686,279, an.d of silver coin,
$27,716,454, makes a total increase of coin and bank notes of $152,912,876.
The statement below gives the amount of coin and currency in the
Treasury at the same dates as in the previous tables, and the amount in
the national banks on the dates of their returns nearest thereto—viz,
January 1 and October 2, 1879, and October 1, 1880 and 1881, respectivel3^ The amounts gi A'en for the Statej banks, trust companies and
savings banks, are for the nearest comparative dates of their of&cial
reports:
J a n u a r y 1,
; 18.79.

'

N o v e m b e r 1,
1879.

:N^ovember 1,
' 1880.

No.vember 1,
- 1881.

GOLD.

I n t h e T r e a s u r y , l e s s certificates
I n n a t i o n a l b a n k s , i n c l u d i n g certifiGates.......
-...:
i n S t a t e banks," i n c l n d i n g certificates
Tot?il g o l d , . . - . . , , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$112,703,342

$156, 907, 986

$133,679,349

.$167,781,909

35, 039, 201
io, 937, 812

37,-187, 238
12,171, 292

,102,851,032
17,102,1.30

107,222,169
19,901,491

158, .68,0, 3.55

206, .266, 516

253,632,511

'•294,965,569

17,249,740
9,121,417
6,048,194
6,460,557

32,115, 073
3,824,931
17, 8.54, 327
4, 986,492

47,156, 588
6,185,000.!
.24, 635, 5.61
6, 495,.477

38,879,9.08

58,780,823

84,472,. 626

SILVER.

I n t b e T r e a s u r y , s t a n d a r d s i l v e r dollars . - . . l . i . . . . .....
]in t h e T r e a s u r y , b u l l i o n
I n t h e T r e a s u r y , f r a c t i o n a l coin
Sil n a t i o n a l b a n k s
Total silver

. 66,576,378
•.3,424,-575
25,. 984,687
7,112,567
'

103,098,207

CUERENCY.

I n t h e T r e a s u r y , less certificates
I n mational b a n k s , i n c l u d i n g certificates./......-• -I n S t a t e b a n k s , i n c l u d i n g certificates.
'
Hiji s a v i n 0*8 b a n k s Total currencv
Grrandtotals

r

44,425, 655

21,711,376

18, 221, 826

22, 774, 830

126, 491, 720
' 25j 944,485
14, 513, 779

118,546,369
25,555,280
.
15,880,921

86,439, 925
25, 828, 794
17,072,680

77, 630, 917
27, 391, 317
11,782 243

.211,375,639

181, 693, 946

147, 563, 225

139, 579, 307

408, 935, 902

446,741,285

485, 668, 362

537,583,083

^Estimate of Director of the Mint, Avhich includes bullion in process of coinage.



206

REPORT ON^ T H E

FINANCES.

If the amount of coin and currency in the Treasury and in the banks
be deducted from the total amount estimated to be in the country, theremainder will be the amount then in the hands of the people outside'
of these depositories, as follows:
.;
J a n u a r y 1,
1879.
Gold
Silver
Gurrency

..--

Totals

'

]N"ovember 1,
1879.

November
1880.

1,

November
1881.

1, ''
;

$119,629,771
67, 693, 895
459, 097, 051

$149, 415, 016
67,228,7l'4
502,168,488

$200,250,181
73,848,285
542, 951,898

$267, 663, 402
82,939,158
567,445, 95a

646, 420, 717

718,812,218

817,, 050, 364

918, 048, 51§H

The gold in the Treasury, including bullion in process of coinage, has
increased during the year $34,102,560, and in the banks $7,170,498 .The
paper currency in theTreasury has increased $4,553,004, and in the banks
it has decreased $13,727,914. The increase of gold, outside of the Treasury and the banks, is $67,413,221, and of paper currency $241,494,061.
In the foregoing tables the silver certiiicates issued by the Treasury
have not been included, but the standard silver dollars kept to redeem
them on presentation forma portion of the silver coin in the Treasury.
The silver certiticates i n t h e hands of the people and the banks, at
dates corresponding with those given in the preceding tables, were as
follows:
January 1, 1879.
• $413,360.-•

November 1, 1879. .
•"$1,604;370. •.

November 1,1880.
• $19,7^0,240.''

^ N o v e m b e r l . 1881.
' !$58,838;770.:,-. •

I t willbe seen that the amount of these certificates in circulation has
increased $39,058,530 during the past year. Of the $58,838,770 circulating on NoA^ember 1, 1881, a large portion are constantly in the liands
of the people, being paid out by the banks in preference to'gold coin or
legahtender notesi'^
i M
. The, total amohht of sih-er dollars coined up to NoA^ember l,;1881y
was $100,672,705, of Avhich, as stated in one of the foregoing tables,
$66,576,378 was then in the Treasury, although an ainount equal to
$58,838,769 was represented by certificates in the hands of the people
and the banks, leaAang only $7,737,609 actually belonging to the Treasury. Of the $100,672,705 coined, $34,096,327 were therefore circulating in the form of coin and $58,838,7,69 in the form of certificates.
The remainder of the silver, $85,364,660, is in subsidiary and trade
dollars and bullion, of Ayhich $29,409,262 is in the Treasury, and
$55,955^398 is in use in place of the prcAdous fractional paper currehcy,
which, oh March ,23, 1874, was at its highest point, and amounted to
$49,566,760. The increase since'the date of resumption of gold and silver cbin and i)aper currency outside of the Treasury and the banks, is
thus estimated to be $271,627,802, and the increase durihg the year- ending NoA^ember 1, $100,998,254. Qr, if the amount of silver certificates,
in circulation be added, the total increase i n t h e circulating medium
since resumption Avould be $330,053,217, and during the past vear, ^
$140,056^782. •
.'.
. /• '. . ^ - v -•^''-;•'- ^ ,
\
AMOUNT OF INTEREST-BEARING^ FtJNDEB DEBT OF THE/UNITED STATES
\
AND T H E AMOUNT % ^

The report for 1880 contained tables exhiliiting a classification of the
interest-bearing bonded debt of the United States, andof the bonds
held by the national banks, for a series' of years. These tables are a'gaiii
presented, and UOAV exhibit also the a*mount of the outstanding bounds
of the government, and the amount held by the banks, on NoA^emb0r 1
of thepresent year.
.v



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

2D7-

The operations of the Secretary of the Treasury, in continuing the 5
and 6 per cent, bonds Avhich matured during the year 1881, give them
increasing interest. On March i, 1881, 5 per cent, bonds amounting
to $469,320,650 were outstanding, redeemable at the option of the
gOA^ernment after May 1, 1881, and 6 per cent, bonds amounting to
$202,266,550 were then outstanding similarly redeemable after July
1,1881. The refunding bill, authorizing the sale of 3 per cent, bonds,
with the proceeds of which, if sold, the maturing bonds: would haA^e
been paid, did not receiA^e the signature of the President, and failed to;
become a law. On April 11, the whole ainount of 6 per cent, bonds Avere
called for payment on July 1, 1881; but to the holders of all the 6 per
cent, loans (except the Oregon war debt, amounting to $688,200) perinissibn was gwen to haA^e their bonds continued, at the pleasure of the
government, with interest at 3^ per cent, per annum, provided they should
so request and the bonds should be received.by the Treasury for that
puipose on or before May 10, 1881, which time was afterwards extended
to May 20., Of these bonds there AA^ere presented for continuance, the
amount of $178,055,150, and the remainder, amounting to $24,211,400,
has, since March 1,1881, been either paid from the surplus reA^enues or
has ceased to bear interest.
On May 12, a like!priAalege (for continuance at 3J per cent.) Avas given
to the holders of the fiA^e per cent, bonds, if presented on or before
July 1, 1881; and on the latter date notice Avas giA^en for the payment
on October 1, 1881, o f t h e registered fiA^es not continued. The total
amount of five per cent, bonds continued uikler this arrangement was
$401,504,900, and of 6 per cent, bonds $178,055,150. The remaining'
5 and 6 iier cent, bonds outstanding March 1, 1881,'a?j>ounting to
$92,027,150, Avere paid upon presentation, or now remain outstanding
Avithout interest. There has also been paid during the year ending November 1, $123,969,650 of interest-bearing bonds, making a saying in
' interest of $6,352,240. The total interest saved during the year, by continuance and payment of the bonds, was $16,826,192.
/. ,
Thefollowing table exhibits the classification of the unmatured, interest beaiing, bonded debt of the United States* on August 31, 1865,
when the public debt reached its maxiinum, and on the 1st day of July
in each year thereafter, together with the amount outstanding on NoA-ember 1 of the present year:
Date.

A u g u s t 31, 1865.
J u l y l , 1866
J u l y l , 1867
J u l y 1,1868....-.
July 1,1869...:.
J u l y l , 1870
July 1,1871.....
J u l y 1,1872
J n l y 1,1873
,
J u l y l , 1874......
J u l y ] , 1875
J u l y 1,1876
,
J u l y 1,1877......
July 1,1878......
J u l y l , 1879
J u l y l . 1880.....
J u l y 1, 1881
N o v e n i b e r 1,1881 ..

6 per cent,
bonds.

5 p e r cent,
bonds.

, $908, 518, 091
1, 008, 388, 469
. 1, 421,110, 719
1, 841, 521, 800
1.886,341,300
1, 764, 932. 300
613, 897, 300
374, 883, 800
281, 238, 650
213, 624, 700
100, 865, 550
984,999,650
854, 621, 850
" , 738, 619, 000
• 310,932,500
235,780,400
196, 378, 600
Gontinued a t
34 p e r c e n t .
161,876,050

$399,792,100
198, 528, 435
.. 198,533,435
'i21, 588, 400
221 ,,589, 300
221,'.589, 300
274,236,450
414, 567, 300
414, 567, 300
510,628,050
607,132, 750
711, 685, 800
. 703,266, 650
703, 266, 650
646,, 905, 500
484, 864, 900
439, 841; 350
Continued at
3 | per cent.
- 401,504,900

4 | p e r cent,
bonds.

$140,
240,
250,
250,
250,

4 p e r cent,
bonds.

000, 000
000, 000 . $98, 850,-000
000,. 000 679, 878,110
000, 000 739, 347,' 800
000, OOb 739, 347,^800

250,000,000.

739, 347, 800

Total.

$1,108,310,191
1, 206,''916, 904 .
1,619,644,154
2, 063,110, 200
2,107,930,600
1, 986, 521, 600
1, 888,133, 750
1, 789, 451,100
' 1,695,805,950
1,724.252,750
1, 707, 998, 300
1, §96, 685, 450
1,696,888.500
1, 780, 735, 650
, 1,887,716,110
] , 709, 993,100
1, 625, 567, 750
1, 552„728, 750

'^The Navy pension fund, aniounting to 114,000,000 iii'3 per cents., the interest upon
which is applied to the payment of naval pensions exclusively, is not included in th^
table.
^
'
, .



208

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

These operations of the Secretary durmg the present year have
largely reduced the amount of interest receiA^able by the national banks
upon the bonds held by them.
During the year 1871, and previous thereto, a large portion of the
bonds bore interest at the rate of 6 per eent.; and until the year 1877
all of the bonds bore interest at either five or six per cent. At the
present' time, more than 65 per cent, of the amount pledged for circulation consists of bonds bearing interest at the IOAV rate of 3J percent.,
and nearly 35 per cent, of them bear interest at the rate of 4 and 4 j per
cent. This will be seen from the following table, which exhibits the
ambunts and classes-of United States bonds owned by the banks, including those pledged as security for circulation and for public deposits, on
the first day of Jaly in each year sin^^
upon Kovmeber 1 of
the present year: .
U . S. . b o n d s
b e l d for
otber pur"poses at
nearest
date.

U n i t e d S t a t e s b o n d s b e l d as s e c u r i t y for circulation.^
'

•

.

Date. {
6 p e r cent. 5 per cent, 4 | per cent. 4 p e r cent..
bonds.
bonds. .
.bonds.
bonds.

Tptal.

Grrand

total.

•

$170, 382, 500
241, 083, 500
251, 430, 400
250, 726, 950
255,190, 350
247, 355, 350
'220, 497, 750
173, 251, 450
160, 923, 500
154, 370, 700
136, 955,100
109, 313, 450
87, 690, 300
82, 421, 200
56, 042, 800
58, 056,150
61,901,800
Continued
a t 3^ p e r
cent.
N o v . 1 , 1 8 8 1 . . - . . 53,741,600

J u l y 1,1865
J u l y l , 1866.....
J u l y l , 1867
J u l y l , 1868-....
J u l y l , 186.9.....
J u l y 1,-1870
J u l y l , 1871.....
J u l y 1,1872......
J u l y l , 1873....'.
J u l y l , 1874.....
J u l y l , 1875
J u l y l , 1876
J u l y l , 1877.....
J u l y l , 1878.....
J u l y ' l , 1879
J u l y l , 1880
July 1,1881.....

. • ,

$65, 576, 600
$235(, 959,100 $155, 785, 750 $391, 744, 850
86,226,850
327, 310, 350 121,1.52, 950 448, 463, 300
•\
> 89,177,100
340, 607, 500 84, 002, 650 424, 610,150
90, 768, 950
341, 495, 900 80, 922, 500 422,418,400
87,661,250
342, 851, 600 55,102, 000 397, 953, 600
94,923,200
342, 278, 550 43, 980, 600 386, 259,150
139, 387, 800
359, 885, 550 > 39, 450, 800 399, 336, 350
207,189, 250
380, 440, 700 31, 868, 200 412, 308, 900
229, 487, 050
390, 410, 550 25, 724, 400 416 134 950
236, 800, 500
391,171, 200 25, 347,100 416 518*300
239, 359, 400
376, 314, 500 26, 900, 200 403, 214, 700
232, 081, 300
341, 394, 750 45,170, 300 386, 565, 050
206, 651, 050 $44, 372, 250
338, 713, 600 47, 315, 050 386, 028, 650
199, 514, 550 48, 448, 650 $19," 162,'000 349,546,400 . 68, 850, 900 418, 397, 300
144, 616, 300 35, 056, 550 118,538,950 354, 254, 600 76, 603, 520 430, 858,120
139, 758, 650 37, 760, 950 126, 076, 300 361, 652, 050 42, 831, 300 404,483,350
172, 348, 350 32, 600, 500 93, 637, 700 360, 488, 400 63, 849, 950 424, 338, 350
Continued
a t 3^ p e r
cent.
187, 634, 550 31,981, 650 ,92, 005, 800 369,608,500 56,512,450 426,120, 950

The banks also held $3,486,000 of Pacific Eailroad 6 per cents., and
$738,900 of 5 per cents., upon which interest had ceased^ which latter
amount has since been reduced to $229j000.
AMOUNT OF UNITED STATES BONDS H E L D BY COMMERCIAL BANKS,
TRUST COMPANIES, AT^JD SAyiNG^S BAIIKS ORG:ANIZED UNDER STATE
LAWS.

The amount of United States bonds held by banks organized under
State laws is ascertained from such reports as have been received by the
Comptroller, through the courtesy of State of&cers who have responded
to his request for copies of their official returns at the latest dates. From
such returns it is found that these institutions held, at difierent dates
during the year 1881, the following amount of United States bonds:
Held by State banks in twenty-one States
Held by trust companies in live States .•
Held by savings banks in fifteen States . - . .
Total

o-




^

|12,048,452
15,681,573
210,845,514
. . . , . - . . 238,525,539

209.

COMPTROI^LER OF THE CURRENCY.

The amount held by geographical divisions in 1880 and 1881,was as
follows:
1880.

Geograpbical divisions.
Eastern States
Middle States
Southern S t a t e s . . . . ..
W estern States
Pacific S t a t e s

$45, 230, 098
157,563,757
958,470
2, 672, 242
'.j^..'!
. . - '7,240,835'

-.

--

......:
'
- ----

.1881.

-

---

213,665,402

Totals

$40 468, 340
176, 373, 889
1, 073, 460
5, 735, 518
, 14,874,332
238, 525, 539

• •
This amount is $3,201,340 less than that returned to the Commissioner
of Internal Revenue, who receives semi-annual reports, for purposes ot
taxation, not onlyfrom banks organized under State laws, but also from
private bankers, giving.their average capital and deposits, and the
amount of such capital invested in United States bonds. From these
returns the following table has been compiled, showing, by geographical
divisions, the average amount of capital invested in United States bonds
for the six months ending May 31, in the years 1879, 1880, and 1881:
Capital invested in United States bonds.

\'

By State banks,
private bank- 1 By savings
ers, a n d t r u s t
banks.
" companies.

Geograpbical divisions.

M a y 31, 1879:
.
N e w England States
Middle States
Soutbern States
• WesteMi States
.
. .
Pacific^tates and Territories

,
. . . . . . . .
-

UnitedStates.
M a y 31, 1880:
JS^ew E n g l a n d S t a t e s
Middle States
Southern States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Z . . . .
Western States
Pacific S t a t e s a n d T e r r i t o r i e s
United States
M a y 31, 1881:
N e w England States
Middle States
.
^
Southern States
^
W e s t e r n States
Pacific S t a t e s a n d T e r r i t o r i e s
UnitedStates

Total.

$3, 669, 967
25, 686, 469
3, 593,179
8, 326, 402
5,015,948

• 34,941,378
123, 818,148
,; 86,021
2,164, 668
1, 372, 845

38, 611, 845
149, 504, 617
3,679,200
10, 491, 070
.6, 388, 793

46,291,965

162, 383, 060

208, 675, 025

3, 737, 093
20, 564, 834
2, 541, 991
8,137,554
3, 883, 816

37, 693, 200
146, 301,155
1, 000
2,474,557
2,717,904

41, 430, 293
166, 865, 989
2 542,991
10, 612, 111
6,601,720

38, 865, 288

189,187,816

228 053 104

985, 496
908, 703
707,702
714, 948
004, 313

36,. 640, 795
168, 617, 049
21,689
2, 689, 447
6, 911,198

39 626 291
190, 525, 752
1,729,391
9, 404, 395
11,915,511

38, 321,162

214, 880,178

253,201,340

'.. 2,
21,
1,
6,
5,

-.

...

,

The above table gives the average amount of capital invested in
United States bonds, from which should be deducted the amount of
premium paid at the time of purchase, which cannot be ascertained.
The amount of United States bonds held by the national banks on
October 1, 1881, was $426,120,950, and the average amount held by the
other banks and bankers ofthe country, during the six months ending
May 31 last, was $253,201,340. The total amount held by all the banks
and bankers during the last two years is thus shown to be considerably
•••"

1 4 F

'

•




' ' . • . - , • • •

' . - l . ; • ' - ' • -

':

•21^0->.

REPORT ON -THE . FINANCES.

more than one-third of the whole interest-bearing funded debt of the
United States, as follows:
1880.
National banks
Savings banks
State banks and trust companies
Private bankeis - . - - . - . . . . . . . . . .
,

Totals

$403, 369, 350
189,187, 816
24, 498, 604
14,366,684

$426,120, 950
214, 880,178
21, 650, 668
16,670,494

631, 422, 454

679, 322, 290

LOANS AND..RATES O F - I N T E R E S T .

The following table gives the classification of the loans of the banks:
in the city of Kew York, in Boston, Philadelphia, and Baltimore, and
in the other, reserve cities, at corresponding dates in each of the last
three years:.;
- •
OCTOBEE 2, 1879.

Classification,.

N e w T o r k Boston, P h i l a O t h e r redelphia, and
City.
s e r v e cities.
Baltimore.

Country
• banks.

Aggregate.

99 banks-.

82 b a n k s .

1,820 b a n k s .

2,048 b a n k s .

$8, 286j525

$2, 017, 226

$4, 360, 523

$14, 664, 274

78, 062, 085

22, 605, 795

11, 445, 079

112,112,959

22, 491, 926
87,011,366

13,136, 911
118, 267,128

7,150, 239
65,023,494. "$435,"i54,'8i6'_ ,

42, 779, 076".
705,456,798

195,851,902

156,027,060

87, 979, 335

'47 b a n k s .
On U . S. b o n d s on d e m a n d
O n o t h e r s t o c k s , b o n d s , &c.,
on d e m a n d
O n single-name p a p e r w i t h o u t
other security
...
Albother. loans'
Totals..

V-----

. .

435,154,.810 ) : ..875,013,107

OCTOBER..1. 1880.;

Classification.

101 b a n k s .

47 b a n k s -

On U^ S. b o n d s . o n d e m a n d
O n o t h e r st.ookSj b o n d s , &c.,
on d e n i a n d . ^
On s i n g l e - n a m e p a p e r w i t h o u t
other security
All other loans
.'.
Totals

$3,.915, 077

$525, 445.

83 b a n k s .

1,859 b a n k s .

2;090rbanks.

$1,378,168

:„:.-'$5,818,690

30,838,692

16, 558, 260

140,027,934

27, 755,152
114,127, 290

22, 542, 776
137,405,246

10, 402, 295
75,687,334

238,. 428, 501

191,312,159

.104,026,057

503,294,724

1, 037, 061, 441

87 b a n k s .

1,895 b a n k s . .

2,132 b a n k s .

92, 630, 982 '

60,700,223
830. 514 594

$503-,-294, 724-

OCTOBEK 1, ,1881.

. Classification.

48 b a n k s . .

On U . S. b o n d s on d e m a n d , . . . .
On o t h e r s t o c k s , b o n d s , &c.,
on d e m a n d
On single-name p a p e r w i t h o u t
oth e r aecuritV
All other loans
-.
Totals.

-




^ 102 b a n k s .

$2, 539, 928.

$415,164

97,249,162

39, 251, 526

26,935,878
120,032,691

34,465,661
137, 682, 302

246, 757, 659

211, 814, 653 .

$468, 496 .

$2,661,256

'

$6, 084, 844

35,423, 896

.196,151,742

12, 904, 338
73,114, 405
96, 806, 506 . .. 464, 843, 937

147, 420, 282
819,365,436

576, 043, 494

1,169, 022, 304

24, 227,158

134,406,498

211

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

In the table beloAv is given a full classification of the loans in New
York. City alone for the last five years :
O c t o b e r 1,
1877.

O c t o b e r 1,
1878.

October 2,
1879.

O c t o b e r 1,
1880.

I O c t o b e r 1,
;
1881.

47 b a n k s .

47 b a n k s .

47 b a n k s .

47 b a n k s .

48 b a n k s .

$92,618,776
15, 800, 540
4, 763, 448
48, 376, 633
497, 524
4, 319, 014
2, 786, 456

$83, 924,
17, 297,
7, 003,
51,152,
786,
6 75'>
2, 670,

$81,
22,
8,
78,

169,162, 391

169, 585, 980

Loans and discounts.

I n indorsed p a p e r

J»...

I n v . S. b o n d s on d e m a n d
J n o t h e r stock, &c., on d e m a n d .
[)n r e a l - e s t a t e s e c u r i t y
P a v a b l e i n trold
^11 o t h e r loans

Totals

333
475
085
021
514
181
371

520,129
491, 926
286, 525062, 085
670, 021

$107, 058, 860
27,755,152
3, 915, 077
92, 630, 982
• 1, 336, 513

$112,
26,
2,
97,

049, 004
935, 878
539, 928
249,162
236,100

4, 821, 216

5, 731, 917

7, 747, 587

195, 851, 902

238, 428, 501

24,6, 7.57, 659

The following table exhibits the amount of loans, capital, surplus, net
deposits, specie and paper money in the banks in I^ew York City, in.
the other reserve cities, in the States and Territories, and in the Union,
on October 1, 1881:
New York
City.

Other reserve ! States and TerIlnited States.
cities.
ritories.

Assets and liabilities.

Loans
Capital
Surplus
Net deposits
Specie
Legal tender notes and United States'
certificates
,

48 banks.

189 banks.

$246, 757, 659
51,150, 000
19, 947, 316
268, 769, 373
50, 627, 368

$346, 221,151
119, 799, 830
34,162, 895
335, 669, 226
34, 535, 367

$576, 043, 494
292, 872,155
74, 030, 407
507, 200, 770
27, 509, 821

10, 898, 371

21, 899, 231

27, 093, 002

1,895 banks.

2,132 banks.
., 169, 022, 304
463,821,985
128,140, 618
., Ill, 639, 369
112, 672, 556
59, 890, 604

The loans of the banks on October 1 were $1,169,022,304, which is an
increase of $132,000,000 over the corresponding date in last.year. The
total individual and bank deposits, not deducting the amount due from
banks and the clearing-house exchanges, have increased $225,725,49(),>
and amount to the unprecedented sum of $1,381,852,887. The ratio of
the total loans to capital, surplus, and net deposits was then 68.9 per
cent.; in 1880 it Avas 67.3 per cent.j in 1879 65.3 per cent. The proportion of cash to net deposits was 15.5 per cent, on October 1, 1881, and,
for the corresponding dates in 1880 and 1879 it was 17.9 and 18.0. i
In his report for last j-ear the Oomptroller gave tables showing t h e
ratios of loans to capital, surplus and net deposits, and of cash to net
deposits, of the banks in New York City, in other reserve cities, and of
those elsewhere, on or near October 1 of each year, from 1870 to 1880,.
inclusive, and he then remarked as follows in reference thereto:
If the ratios of the loans of the banks in New York City to their capital, surpluSj,
and net cleposits be examined, it will be found t h a t in October of 1879 and l(SyO, they
were70.8 per cent., in 1878 but 65.4 per cent., in 1877 but 68 per cent., aiad in 1876, 65.1
per cent.; and t h a t the loans are now proportionately higherthan at anj- time sincel873.
The means of the banks in Boston and the other reserve cities were more fully employed, in October than they were at the corresponding:^ dates for the two previonvS
years,'though the business of the banks was not as much exteuded as it was dnring
the lour years following the crisis of 1873.
The ratios of the loans of the banks in the country districts were, on October 1, last/




212

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

7.3 per cent, less than at the corresponding dates in 1875, and 5.2 per cent, less than
in 1877. The opportunities for using money in this group of banks are not in proportion to the increase of deposits, and their balances in other banks have iby no means
diminished.
It will surprise those whose attention has not heretofore been called to the subject
to find how closely the means of the banks in the commercial cities have been employed during the last eleven years, notwithstanding the variations in rates of interest, and particularly during the last two years, when money has been so abundant and
the deposits have so rapidly increased. It will be seen t h a t prior to 1876, with the
exception of a single year, the loans in New York exceeded the net deposits, while since
t h a t time, though there has been considerable variation, the jiet deposits have been
somewhat in excess of the loans at the dates given. In. the other principal cities, which
continually keep large amounts of money in New York subject to demand, and thus
diminish their own net deposits, as given in the above table, the loans have always
largely exceeded their deposits. The same remark is true of the banks in the country
districts which have in New York, as well as in other cities, large amounts of money on
deposits subject to call. The capital of this class of banks is also much larger as compared with their deposits than is t h a t of the banks in the large cities, and their loans
therefore relatively greater..

The same comments apply with equal force to the ratios shown by the
returns for October 1 of the present year, as may be seen from the following table:
Dates.

New York Other re- States and United
City.
serve cities. Territories. States.
Per cent.
• 72.6
70.8
70.8

October 1,1881
Octoberl, 1880
October 2,1879

Per cent.
70.8
67.7
65.4

Per cent. Per cent.
66.4
68.9
65.7
67.3
63.9
65.7

The ratios of cash to net deposits for the same dates were as follows:
Dates.

October 1,1881
October 1,1880
October 2,1879

New York Other re- States and United
serve cities. Territories. States.
City.
Per cent.
22.9
26. 4
24.7

Per cent.
16.8
18.5
19.4

Per cent. Per cent.
10.8
15 5
12.1
17 9
12.7
18 0

In reference to reserves the Comptroller last year remarked as follows:
The amount pf legal cash reserve required of the banks in New York City is 25 per
cent, of their dej^osits, of the banks in the other reserve cities one-half of this ratio,
and of the banks in the country districts 6 per cent, of their deposits.
.The banks in the interior, if we consider their large deposits elsewhere, are as a rule
found to be much stronger in available means than the banks in New York City; while
the reverse of this should always be true when such large balauces, amounting to more
than 100 millions ofthe funds of other banks, are constantly on deposit In the latter
city subject to demand.
The amount of legal reserve required to be held by the banks was largely,reduced
Iby the act of June 20, 1874, the provision requiring reserve on circulation having been
repealed, and the percentage held in the larger cities has been greatly diminished during the past few years. The sudden and enormous increase of individual and bank
deposits in the commercial centers should be accompanied, not only by the reserve required by law, but by a much greater percentage of coin aud a much smaller.expansion
of loans, if the banks would check unhealth.y speculation, and keep themselves in
condition for an adverse balance of trade and forthe legitimate demands ofthe depositors and correspondents who confide in them.

On October 1 of the present year the aggregate reserve held by the
Kew York City banks, including the five per cent, redemption fund,



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

213

was 23.3 per cent, only, falling below the amoant required by law, and
similar deficiencies were shown by previous statements of the clearinghouse; but the retnrns of the banks to the clearing-house for the weeks
ending October 27 and 29 following, show a contraction of loans and
reduction of liabilities, and a slight excess of reserve over the amount
required by law. The reserves in the other reserve cities, which include the amount held by agents in JSTew York, were considerably less
than at the corresponding date last year, although still in excess of the
amount required by law, being 30 per cent, of deposits; while the total
reserves of the banks in other localities were, as usual, very strong,
amounting to 31.2 per cent, of the net deposits.
The loans and deposits for each year since resumption day, on January
1, 1879, have increased largely in each gronii of banks, wbile the cash
reserves in each are being gradually reduced. It is evident that these
deposits consist, to a much greater extent than usual, of the avails of
loans placed to the credit of dealers. This exhibit shows that the banks
are rapidly expanding; and there are many indications that this rapid
increase is not the result of legitimate business, but of ventuiesome.
speculation, largelj^ consequent upon the importation of coin and increased issues of silver certiticates and bank notes. The increase in
the amount of United States bonds held by the banks has been 13 millions during the last year, but it is 15 millions less than at a corresponding date in 1879. This is somewhat surprising, when it is considered
that 3J per. cent, bonds can be purchased at about par, and that the rate
of interest paid on deposits in IsTew York City is from two to three per
cent. only.
The attention of Congress has previously been called to section 5200
of the Kevised Statutes, which i)laces restrictions uj)on loans, and to the
difficulty of enforcing its provisions. In cities where large amounts of
produce are received and stored, it is represented that it is iinpossible
for the banks to transact this class of business, if restricted to loans for
an amount not "exceeding in any instance one-tenth of their capital. I t
is true that the limitation does not apply to loans upon produce in transit,
where the drafts are drawn on existing values; bnt if produce is stored
instead of being shipped, large loans cannot be made except in violation
of law. In such case the Comiitroller has no means of enforcing the law,
except by bringing a suit for forfeiture of charter, and this course might
result in great embarrassment to business, as well as loss to many innocent stockholders of the banks. It is evident that the law should be so
amended as to exclude from the limitation mentioned legitimate loans
upon produce or warehouse receipts, as AA^CII as loans upon United States
bonds.
Large loans are also continually being made upon other stocks and
bonds, and these loans are largely made to stock-brokers, the result
being to assist and promote speculative operations upon the stock board.
The provision of law mentioned is valuable, so far as it afiects banks outside of the large commercial centers, as it provides for a just*distribution
of loans; but it is recommended that the limit be increased to ten per
cent, upon the combined capital and surplus, and that loans upon United
States bonds be not limited in amount. It is also recommended that
the limit for loans npon stocks and bonds be increased to fifteen per cent,
upon capital and surplus, and that such penalty be then imposed for exceeding this limit as would make a violation of the provision unprofitable if the penalty were collected. It is important that some amendment
of this kind be enacted, or that means be provided for enforcing the provisions of the section as it now stands.



•214:.

•'• R E P O R T - O N T H E FINANCES.

R A T E S O F I N T E R E S T I N N E W YORK C I T Y , AIS'D I N T H E BANK O F E N G L A N D AND T H E
BANK O F F R A N C E .

The average rate of interest in New York City for each of the fiscal
years from 1874: to 1881, as ascertained from data derived from the Jour-/nal of Cpmmerce and The Commercial and Financial Chi?onicle, was as
follows:
1874, call loans,
1875, call loans,
1876, call loans,
1877, call loans,
1878, call loans,
1879, call loans,
1880, call loans,
1881, call loans,

3.8 ];)er cent. ;. commercial paper, 6.4 per cent.
3.0 per cent.; commercial paper, 5:6 per cent.
3.3 per cent. ; commercial paper, 5.3 per cent.
3.0 per cent. ; commercial paper, 5.2 per cent.
4.4 per cent. ; commercial paper, 5.1 per cent.
4.4 per cent. ; commercial paper, 4.4 per cent.
4.9 per cent.: comniercial paper, 5.3 per cent.
3.8 per cent.; commercial ijaper, 5.0 per cent.

"
'

"

The average rate of discount of the Bank of England for the same
years was as follows:

.

During the
During the
During the
During the
During t h e
During the
During the
During the

calendar year ending December 31, 1874, 3.69 per cent.
calendar year ending December 31, 1875, 3.23 per cent.
calendar year ending December 31, 1876, 2.61 per cent.
calendar year ending December 31, 1877, 2.91 per cent.
calendar year ending December 31, 1878, 3.78 per cent.
calendar year ending December 31, 1879, 2.50 per cent.
calendar year ending December 31, 1880, 2.76 per cent.
fiscal year ending June 30, 1881, 2.74 per cent.

,

,

' . .i /

The rate of interest in the city of New York on Becember 2°, as derived
from the Daily Bulletin, was, on call loans, from 4 to 6 per cent., and on
commercial paper from 6 to 7 per cent.
. '
'
During the present year the rate of discount of the Bank of England
' has been changed six times, as follows: On January 13, increased from 3
to 3J per cent.; February 17 reduced to 3 per cent., and on April 28
further reduced to 2J per cent,; on August 18 increased to 3^ per cent.;
August 25 to 4 per cent.; and again increased on October 6 to 5 per cent.
The rate of the Bank of France has been changed but twice during
; the present 3'ear, and in each instance there was an increase, as follows:
On August 25 from 3J to 4 per cent., and on October 20 from 4 to 5 per
cent., which is the rate at the present-time. The bank rates of discount
for the week ending IN'O vember 12 were, in Berlin, 5^ per cent., Amsterdam, 4 per cent., Brussels, 5^ per cent., Vienna, 4 per cent., and St. Petersburg 6 per cent.^
.

,

•

)

.

'

DUTIES OF DIRECTORS AND EXAMINERS.

•

'

•

•

•

'

-

•

'

The recent failure of The Mechanics' National Bank of N^ewark has
called the attention of the public directly to the duties of bank directors
and of examiners of national banks.
.--.''
Section 5147 of the Kevised Statutes provideB that each director, wheii
. appointed or elected, shaUtake an oatli that he will, so far as the duty
devolves oo him, diligently and honestly administer the affairs of such
association, and will not knowingly violate or permit to be violated any
of the provisions of this act. Section 5136 also provides that the association shall have power to presQribe, by its board of directors, by-laws
not inconsistent with law, regulating the manner in which its stock sEall
be transferred, its directors elected or appointed, its officers appointed,
its property transferred, its general business conducted, and the privi- J
leges granted to it by law exercised and enjoyed.
;. ^ ,




* The Economist, London, November 12, 1881.

;

COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

215

In accordance with the provisions of this last named section, by-laws
are generally adopted by national banks soon after their organization,
which usually contain, among other provisions, sections similar to the
following-:
,
There shall be a standing committee, to be known a.s the ^'Exchange Committee,"
appoiuted by the board, every six months, to continue to act until succeeded, who
;shall have power to discount and purchase notes and bills and other evidence of debts,
and to buy and sell bills of exchange, and who shall, at each regular meeting, make a
report of the notes and bills discounted and purchased by them siace their last previous
report.
•
.
There shall be appointed by the board every three months a committee, whose duty
it shall be to examine into the affairs of the bank, to count its cash, and to compare
its assets and liabilities with the balances on the geueral ledger tor the purposeof
ascertaining t h a t the books are correctly kept aud the conditiou of the bank corresponds therewith, and that the bauk is in a sound ancl solvent condition; the result of
which examination shall be repovted t o t h e board at its next regular meeting.

The object of these by-laws is, first, to keep the board of directors continuously informed what notes and bills are discounted, and to furnish
them with a detailed account thereof; and secondly to establish a check
by the directors upon the cashier, teller and bookkeeper of the bank,
to whose immediate custody and control the assets and accounts of the
bank are committed. A method is thus provided by which the diligent
^nd continuous administration of the directors, which is required by
their oaths, shall be performed.
It is thus seen that both the laws of the United States and the by-laws
adopted by the directors themselves, under the law, in clear terms define their duties. The men employed by them in the banks are under
their supervision, the law providing—
|
That the bank shall have power to elect or appoint directors, and by this board of
directors to appoint a president, vice-president, cashier, and other officers, define their
-duties, require bonds of them and fix t h e penalty thereof, dismiss such officers or any
of them at pleasure, and appoint others to fill their places.

The duties of the board of directors are plainly defined, and however
innocent they may be of any intention of wrong, they are responsible
for the safety of funds committed to their care. If it can be shown that
any of them had notice of illegal transactions, it is a serious question
whether they are not legally bound to make good the loss which may
occur; and it is a question whether they are not also liable for losses
which may occur from neglect of duty, even without notice. If this is
not the just and proper construction of the present law, then it becomes
a subject for the consideration of Congress, whether additional legislation upon this point is not required. The National Bank Act is full
of restrictions, to which reference has already been made in>another portion of this report, snch as those requiring an adequate reserve; the
enforced accumulation of the surplus; the method of increasing and
reducing the capital stock and its prompt restoration if impaired; the
prohibition against making loans on real estate and on the security of
their own shares of stock, or of accommodation or other loans than business paper in excess of one-tenth of the capital of the bank; tlie prohibition against the declaration of dividends unless earned; against certifying checks without the necessary deposit; and many other similar provisions. These restrictions are intended to protect these institutions,
by imposing upon them general rules, which experience has shown may
be properly done by the government loithont its thereby becoming the
guardian of the banlc^ or of the moneys of its clepositors or stockholders^ or
being in any way resBonsible for the management of its funds. I t is the
duty of the examiner to ascertain whether the officers of the bank
a n d its directors are complying with the requirements of the law



216

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

and whether they are in any way violating any of its provisions,,
to the end that in snch case they may ^be enforced by the proper
authority.
The stockholders elect the directors, who are usually men not only
of high character and well known in the community where the bank is
located, but are generally also large stockholders iii the bank, and having
therefore each a personal interest in its prosperity and good management.
The depositors confide in the bank because they believe the directors will
manage its affairs honestly and dihgently, and will employ honest and
faithful servants for that purpose. They know that the bank is organized under laws which contain.wholesome restrictions, and that it is the
duty of the Comptroller, so far as he can through his corps of examiners,,
to inform himself of the condition of the bank, and to require that its
business shall be conducted in conformity with law.
The examiner can have but a limited knowledge of the habits and
character of those employed in the bank. If the teller is making false
entries, and daily abstracting the funds of the bank; if the bookkeeper
is keeping false accounts and rendering untrue statements; if the
cashier is placing forged paper among the bills receivable and upon
the register book, and transmitting such paper to distant places where
it is purported to be payable, it is not possible for an examiner, in a
day or two, to unravel this evil work, AA hich may have continued for
months, and obtain a correct balance sheet. A full and complete
examination of the bank necessitates not only counting the cash,,
proving the bills receivable and stock ledger, comparing the indiAddual deposit accounts with the general ledger, aud ascertaining if the
busiuess of the bank is conducted in accordance with laAv; but, also,
the thorough examination of all accounts, the verifying of accountscurrent, and ascertaining by telegraph or letter the correctness of such
verification, the calling in of every depositor's book, and correspondence
Ayith every bank or banker doing business with the bank.
Examinations should be periodically made by a comj)etent committee^,
selected from the board. The directors have abundant means,at their
command, and if they have any reason to suspect dishonesty or fraud,
it is their business to investigate thoroughly, and they should employ experts to assist them in so doing. The national bank examiners have, in
fact, been frequently called upon by the directors of both national and
State banks for this purpose; and if it is the intent of the law that the
national banks shall be thus searchingly examined, it should be soamended as to make this intent clear, ahd should also make provision
for the necessary compensation for such service. The small compensation
now provided does not cdntemplate a yearly auditing of all the accounts
of a bank by the examiner, as the pay is entirely inadequate for such a
work—the amount allowed for the examination of banks of like capital
being the same, without reference to the difference in the A^olume of their
business. The inspection by an examiner of a small bank is usually completed in a day; of larger banks, through the aid of an assistant, in twoor three days. But a thorough analyzing and scrutiny of cA'^erything
would require one or two weeks; and if fraud Avere suspected it might
continue for months without entirely satisfactory results.
The reports of the bank, as made to the Comptroller five times in
each year, are each published in a newspaper where the bank is located,,
and CA^ery stockholder has, therefqre, an opportunity to scrutinize these
statements, and to make inquiry of the directors in reference to the affairs
of the association.
The detection of embezzlement may occur as an incident, but it is not



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

217

the principal object, of the system of bank examinations. It is peculiarly
the business ofthe directors, who are daily or Aveekly in session, to keep
themselves informed of the habits and characters of their employes, to
see that their time iSogiven to the service of the bank, and that they
are not engaged in speculations, and thus, by continuous watchfulness, to prevent defalcations on the part of their servants; while it is the
business of the examiner to detect frauds so far as in his power, and in
his occasional visits to see that the directors are loaning the funds, and,,
with the other officers, managing the afiairs of the bank strictly according
to the proAHsions ofthe law. The examiner's visits are usually made about
once a year, while the directors are at hand at all times. Faithful performance of the duties of each giA^es assurance of almost absolute safety.
Lax performance of duty on the part of either invites disaster. The
directory must continuously look after its own servants. The examiner looks after the acts of the directors.
The report of the examiner is confidential. It is for the use of the
Comptroller's office onh^, and is in no sense a certificate of the good
condition of the bank. In many instahces the capital stock of a bank
has thus been found to be impaired, and the deficiency has been, made
good without the knoAvledge of the general public. In other instances
banks have been obliged to pass their usual dividends, using their earnings to liquidate all bad and doubtful debts—the number of banks passing dividends duriug the present year being 175; in 1880, 230; in 1879,
.304; and in 1878, 343.
i
Hundreds of instances haA^e occurred annually, and many are occurring daily, wherein the banks, under the reports of the examiner,,
are notified of violations of the act and are brought under the discipline
of the law. The betterment of the condition of the banks, and the enforcement of the requirements of the law, are part of the continual and
ordinary supervision exercised by this Office. It is a supervision and
labor not seen or known of by the general public, whose attention is
only arrested Nvhen some sudden or unexpected failure occurs; and this
simply illustrates the fact that, with the best endeaA^ors, and the most
careful supervision by this Office, such disasters may happen in the
many contingencies of administering difficult and extensive duties, if
directors neglect to exercise that continuous vigilance for which they
were elected, and which they have sworn to perform.
The Mechanics' ISTational Bank of ISTcAvark was placed in th^ hands
of the receiver on IsToveinber 2 last. It had a capital of $500,000, a surplus of $400,000, and deposits of over $2,500,000. The capital and surj)lus are lost, through the criminal conduct of the cashier, and the
stockholders are personally liable for an amount equal to the capital
stock. The depositors will,.it is estimated, receive at the outcome from
60 to 80 per cent, of their claims, depending upon the amount collected from the stockholders and that received from the esi^ate for whose
benefit the funds of the bank are alleged to haA^e been abstracted,.
Avhich estate is also now in the hands of a receiver appointed by the
court. This bank was many times examined by skilled accountants of
great experience, but it cannot be denied that some of them were misled
by the criminal cashier, Avho, through his apparently high character and
.standing, so long deceived not only the directors, but every one with
whom he had business relations. The examination of August 14, 1879,.
was conducted by two experienced experts, but was, as I am informed,,
rendered useless by a forged telegram purporting to be from the correspondent of the bank in ^ew York. The examiner, on August 16, 1880,
verified the accounts of correspondents, as he was specially instructed to



"'218

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

do in a letter from the Comptroller in June previous; but he also Avas
deceived by a forged letter from the I^Tew York correspondent, skillfully
planned for this purpose, addressed to the examiner, received through
the mail, and bearing the New York postmark. Either of these examinations would have disclosed the robbery of the cashier, if the examiners had not been deceiA^ed by forgeries which would have been likely to
mislead the most thorough expert.
Itas, hoAvcA^er, far from correct to represent that similar defalcations
in national banks haA^e not been previously discoA'ered. The greatest
defalcation in the history of the gOA^ernment, of eleven hundred thou.sand dollars, in the office of the assistant treasurer of IS^ew Oiieans,
. which had certainly existed, in whole or in part, for more than a year,
was discoA^ered nearl}- fifteen years ago by an officer of this bureau,
which discovery also resulted in the disclosure of a large deficiency in
the First Iiational Bank of New Orleans, and the placing of that bank
in the hands of a receiver. Since that time many of the other banks
which have failed have beeu placed in the hands of receivers through
the Aigilance of bank examiners; and in many other instances officers
of solA^ent and insolA'cnt^banks have, through the same means, been indicted and couAHcted for criminal acts. The bank examiners in ISTew
York City and Boston are nominated by the clearing-houses of those
cities, and many other examiners now employed are men of the highest
character, who have for years rendered excellent service. It is of the
greatest importance that all men employed in this branch of the public
service shall be AA^ell-trained and fitted forXheir work. It is not claimed
that CA^ery examiner employed is a first-class expert—the compensation
authorized is not sufficient for that purpose in many small districts. If
^ t a t e lines can be disregarded in the appointment of examiners, and
men be selected for these positions upon merit alone, and kept Avellemployed, a corps of skilled examiners would soon be engaged in this work,
who would reflect the highest credit upon this branch of the public
.service. The records of this office show, however, that only one among
all the examiners ever appointed has been found guilty of wrongdoing,
while in no branch of the government service have men ]ierfor;ned more
faithful duty than those Avho have been engaged in the exaniinations of
the national banks.
•
Such disasters do not exhibit the weakness of the banking system,
but rather the* weakness and wickedness of human nature. The system
is strong, and carefully and elaborately guarded. PriA^ate companies
and individuals are continuously suffering from embezzlements and
forgeries. It is scarcely to be expected, if a robber or a forger is placed
in control of all of its assets, that a national bank can be saved from
disaster b y t h e occasional visits of an examiner. Some additional legislation Avill be required; but there is not so much necessity for additional
restrictions as there is for increased care upon the part of examiners,
and increased diligence and sagacity on the part of directors who are in
charge of grea;t trusts.
.
'
The Pacific ISTational Bank of Bost on suspended on November 18 ultimo.
The last report of the examination of this bank gave Avhat seemed to be a
thorough, exhibit of its affairs. A long communication was addressed by
the Comptroller to the directors ofthe bank on February 19 last informing
them of such irregularities as then existed in. the conduct of its business.
They Avere specially informed that the irregular and illegal practice of
loaning the credit of the bank by the issue of certificates must be. discontinued. In reply to this communication a letter from the president of
the association was received on February 28, explaining the irregulari


COMPTKOLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

'219

ties referred to. In regard to the issuing of the certificates he said that
^' never in a single instance has any stipulation been made by us in regard
to any certificate issued to any party. They are issued in regular form,
and are payable ^at any moment upon presentation." To this it was
replied by the Comptroller on March 3 that—
The examiner distinctly stated in his recent report that '^ loans are sometimes made
by the issuing of demand certificates, and parties obtaining loans in this way indorse
the certiticates and pledge them as collateral, or stipulating the time of payment for
them, have them regularly discounted, and thus raise nioney indirectly from other parties and banks." If this statement be correct, the bank is lending its credit, which it is
not authoriized by law to do, and the practice must, as stated in my letter of the 19th
ultimo, be discontinued.

That this information was brought to the attention of the directors is
CA'ident from a letter received since the date of suspension, on the 25th
instant, from the person who made the examination, which says:
Had your letter, which you wrote after my last examinatiou, which was read by Mr.
Benyon, the president, to the board, as you requested, been heeded, the present condition of things would have been avoided.

Such a letter, in any properly-conducted bank, addressed by the
€3omptroller to a board of directors composed, as Avas the case in this
instance, of prominent merchants and business men, should have been
sufficient to correct the abuse and save the bank from the disaster
AN hich has occurred.
The examiner also informs me that during the examination, and subsequent thereto, he called special attention of the directors to the hazardous manner of doing business, and ur°ged them to follow closely the
president and examine loans made by him and the way.in which his
business was conducted, and was promised by more than one director
that close attention Avould be given to the whole matter. The directors
thus had full Information in reference to the irregular and illegal methods
of the bank which liaA^e since caused its ruin.
The law should certainly be so amended as to make it a criminal offense
for an officer of a bank clandestinely to make loans, either by the use of
certificates, as in this case, or otherwise.
RETIREMENT OF NATIONAL-BANK NOTES AND WITHDRAAA^AL OF BONDS
HELD AS SECURITY THEREFOR.
The only legislation in reference to the national banks during the last
session of Congress wa^s contained in section 5 of ^'the funding act of
1881," Avliich was as follows:
S E C 5. From and after the first day of July, eighteen hundred and eighty-one, the
three per centum bonds authorized by the first section of this act shall be the only
bonds receivable as security for n.ational-bank circulation, or as security for the safekeeping and prompt payment of the public money deposited with such banks; but
when any such bonds deposited for the purposes aforesaid shall be designated for purchase or redemption by the Secretary of the Treasury, the banking association depositing the same shall have the right to substitute other issues of the bonds of the United
States in lieu thereof: Provided, That no bond upon whicli interest h%s ceased shall be
accepted or shall be continued on deposit as security for circulation or for the safekeeping of the public money; and in case bonds so deposited shall notcbe withdrawn,
as provided by law, within t h i r t y days after interest has ceased thereon, the banking
association depositing the same shall be subject to the liabilities and proceedings on
the part of the Comptroller provided for in section 5234 of the Revised Statutes of the
United States : Andlorovided further, That section four of the act of l u n e twentieth,
eighteen hundred and seventy-four, entitled '^An act fixing the amount of United
States notes, providing for a redistribution of the national-bank currency, and for other
purposes," be, and the same is hereby, rejiealed; and sections 5159 and 5160 of the
Revised Statutes of the United States be, and the same are hereby, re-enacted.

This act was,vetoed by the President.
The number of national banks, which deposited legal tender notes for



220

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the purpose of obtaining possession of their bonds, in anticipation of the
passage of this bill, was 141. These banks were located in twenty-four
States, and the amount of legal tender notes deposited by them was
$18,764,434, as follows :
s t a t e s a n d cities.

Philadelpliia
Pennsylvania
Boston
Massacliusetts
Connecticut
Montana
District, of C o l u m b i a
Kliode .Island
Nebraska
,
Kansas
Illinois
Maine
ISToith C a r o l i n a
Maryland

JS^O. of
banks.

Amount.

590,
083,
034,
81,
675,
36,
72,
385,
1-71,
81,
£45,
135,
135,

S t a t e s a n d cities.

ji^few Y o r k C i t y .
[New Y o r k
.New J e r s e y
!lndiana
I Missouri
I Virginia
,.

lohiS

jMinnesota
jlven t u c k y
jMiChi^an
I o w a .-"
I V e r m ont
Wisconsin
Totals.

N o . of
banks.
843, 849
934, 600
837, 000
080, 000
164, 745
45,000402,630
135, 000
310, 900
27,000
100, 4C0
463, 5G0
21, L50
18, 7C4, 434

Only about one-third of the bonds which Avere thus released were subsequently redeposited, and for some months thereafter the total amount
of bonds redeposited by the 141 banks which reduced their circulation
Avas less than 7 millions. The Third National Bank of ISTew York, which
withdrew $840,000 of bonds, soon thereafter disposed of the same to
the GoA^ernment, and has not since made any deposit whatever. The
same statement may be mad'e in reference to eight other large banks,
whicli Avithdrew bonds amounting to over two millions of dollars, and
also lo many other smaller banks—thus showing that they Avithdrew
their bonds because they desired control of them, and not for the purpose of arbitrarily reducing circulation. The Comptroller has been unable to obtain any CAudence that there was a combination on the iiart
of the banks to deposit legal tender notes and withdraw bonds for the
purpose of derarnging the money market.
Since the acljournment of Congi'ess, only $2,394,545 of legal-tender
notes have been deposited under the act of June 20, 1874, for the pur-"
pose of retiring circulation, and these notes have been redeemed without
any expense whatever to the Government of the ITnited States—the cost
thereof haAing been paid from the five per cent, redemption fund. The
bonds now held are chiefly 3^ and 4 ]ier cents, there being 241 millions
of the former and 92 millions of the latter. The amount of interest
received from an iuA^e^tment in either class of these bonds is nearly
the same, and there is but little disposition to deposit legal-tender notes
for the purpose of Avithdrawing them. Some banks take occasion to
Avithdraw their 4 per cents, for the purpose of realizing the large premium of 16 per cent., Avhich they now bear, as this premiuin can be used
for the puipose of iiquidating any losses which may occur in their business. The 3J per cent, bonds are being frequently called by the Secretary, and the banks may therefoie have occasion to withdraw them after
interest has ceased, and it is important that they continue to haA^e this
priAdlege, upon a deposit of laAvful money as noAV provided by law^
The amount of loans of the national banks in New York City on
October 1, 1881, was 246 millions, and 97 millions of this amount was
payable on deniand; the total amount of loans of all the banks was
1,169 millions, of AA^hich 196 milhons was demand loans. It is probable
that the proportion of demand loans held by the State banks is fully
as great. Any proceeding which would tend to bring on a panic, or
. erange the money market in New York, would, first of all, afiect the



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

221

A-alue of the stocks and bonds held by the banks as securities for these
loans. It would be directly against the interest of the bank to pursue
such a course, and it is a new principle in banking to assume that banking institutions will so conduct their business as to depress the value
of securities Avhich tliey themselves hold. If the banks, hoAvever, either
National or State, or private bankers, should at any time odesire to
derange the market, they could do so, independently of any legislation
by Congress, by calling in their demand loans. Such a course Avould be
much more sim^^le and easy of accomplishment than the depositing of
legal-tender notes in the Treasury, and it would be much more effectiA^e.
If, hoAvever, Congress shall consider it advisable to prevent the banks
from depositing in the Treasury for this purpose large amounts of coin
or other lawful money, then sectioii 4 of the act of June 20, 1874, may
be so amended as to require those desiring to withdraw bonds to give
a reasonable notic(^. of their intention to do so, before completing the.
transaction.
When bonds deposited to secure the circulation ofthe national banks
are called for payment by the government, it is necessary that the banks
should withdraw them for redemption. This they can do, either by substituting other bonds or by depositing, under section 4 of the act of
June 20, 1874, lawful money, to retire the circulation secured by the
bonds which they desire.to AAathdraw. The most convenient method
for the banks is to aA^ail themselves of the provision of section 4 referred to, as in many cases they desire permanently to withdraw bonds,
without substitution. Prior to May 23 last, the Treasurer of the United
States, and his predecessors in ofiice, had, as a matter of convenience both
to the banks and the goA^ernment, i)ermitted the redemption of called
bonds by the following method: The banks sent a power of attorney,
authorizing the Comptroller to withdraw the bonds, and the Treasurer
of the United States to assign them to the Secretary of the Treasury for redemption on account of the bank, as much of the proceeds as
might be necessary being used to retire the circulation secured by the
bonds. The bonds were never out ofthe hands of the officers of the
Treasurj^ Department. The banks were thus relieved from the necessity
of first sending in the money to retire their circulation, and the Government was enabled to get in its called bonds with more promptitude. On
May 23, however, the Treasurer declined longer to allow this method of
withdrawal and redemption, alleging that the proceeds of these bonds
were coin, and not legal-tender notes, and that section 4 of the act of
June 20 requires deposits for the retirement of circulation to be made
in legal-tender notes only.
On June 1 the Comptroller addressed a letter to the Secretary of
the Treasury, in which he stated the position taken by the Treasurer,
and '' that he declined to receive gold coin, which is a legal tender in
payment of all debts, andlnsisted upon a deposit of United States notes,
which are but iiromises to pay coin on demand." The Comptroller
dissented from this ruling of the Treasurer, and held that the act, properly construed, authorized the receipt of ''laAA-ful money," which includes
gold and sih-er coin as Avell as United States notes, and requested that
the question be referred to the Attorney-General for his construction of
section 4 ofthe act of June 20, 1874.
On the 6th of June the Secretary referred the matter to the AttorneyGeneral, and on the 14th of the same month the latter oflicer decided
that ^^the banks may withdraAV their bonds upon the deposit of the
requisite amount of any kind of lawful money." He said, further, that—
The language of sectiou 4 is almost too unambiguous for construction, as it expressly
confers upon national banking associations the right to deposit sums of not less than



222

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

$9:,000 in lawfal money, and to take up the bonds deposited for security of circulating
notes; and t h a t these words, as here-nsed, possess their ordinary signification is ap- .
parent from the phraseology of concomitant and other provisions of law, and from
considerations touching the general subject.

He also qifoted a decision of his predecessor on a similar point, in
confirmation thereof. On the same date that this decision Avas rendered
b y t h e Attorney-General, the Secretary ofthe Treasury addressed another letter to him, in which two additional questions in reference to this
matter AVer e asked: First, whether, under section 3 ofthe act appro A'cd
June 20,1874, chapter 343, a national banking association may deposit
any lawful money other than United States notes for redemption of its
circulating notes; and, second, Avhether the holders of the notes of any
solvent national banking association may demand of the Treasurer^^
under the provision of sections 3 and 4 of that act, redemption of such
notes in United States notes'?
On June 30, 1881, the Attorney-General replied, and, as to the first
question, decided that a bank may deposit coin for the purpose mei^tioned in the 3d section as above quoted. In ansAver to the second question, he said:
I think the Treasurer, while having the privilege, under sections 3 and 4 of said
act, to redeem bank circulation in tTnited States notes, has the right to pay them in
coin. The government notes are promises to pay dollars, and for such promises t h e ,
thing promised may properly be substituted, by the promiser, and t h a t the act of J u n e
20, 1874, chapter 343, was not intended to repeal or afi:ect the general provisions of t h e
law (Revised Statutes, section 3585, et seq.) making the coin ofthe United States legal
tenders inrtZ?xiayments.

This decision removed all the distinctions Avhich had been previously
insisted upon by the Treasurer of the United States^ as to the kind of
lawful money that niight be received or paid in these transactions.
STATE AND
SAVINGS-BANKS, AND . P R I V A T E BANKERS.

The capital of the 2,115 national banks in operation on June 30,1881,
as.will be seen by a table in the Appendix, was $460,227,835, not including surplus, which fund at that date amounted to more than 126. millions of dollars; while the aA-erage capital of all the State banks, private
bankers and saAangs banks, for the six months ending May. 31, 1880,*
was but $210,738,203. The latter amount is but little more than one-third
of the combined capital and surplus of the national banks,
The folloAving table exhibits in a concise form, by geographicail divisions, the total average capital and deposits of all State and savingsbanks and private bankers in.the country, for the six months ending
May 31, 1881:
S t a t e b a n k s and t r u s t
companies.

Private bankers.

S a v i n g s b a n k s w i t b b aSnakvsi nwgist h capital.
out capital.

G e o g r a p b i c a l divisions.
DeposN o . Capital.
its

N e w E n g l a n d S t a t e s — 41
218
Middle States
240
Southern Stales'
AVestern S t a t e s a n d Ter479
ritories
Ilnited States

978




MilVs
7.26
39.28
24. 71

Mill's
20.97
189. 78
42.43

No.

C a p i t a l . D e p o s - N o . C a p i t a l . Depos- No. D e p o s its.
its
its.

80
938258

MilVs
4.70
55.40
5.59

MilVs
5.16
94.11
17. 32

1
7
6

41.94

132. 44 1, 762

113.19

385. 62 3, 038

27.64

125. 26

99

3.15

31.90

93. 33

241. 85

36

4.22

37 61 fi9.Q

MilVs
.02
.61
.44

MilVs
.19 424
4.68- 174
.84
3
28 •

MilVs
402. 86^
428.40
1.24
29.86
862 36

223.

COMPTROLLER OF.THE CURRENCY.

The table beloA7 exhibits the capital and net deposits of the national
banks on Juue 30,1881, together Avith the aggregate average capital and
deposits of all classes of banks other than national, for the six months
ending May 31, 1881:
;

Geographical

divis-

State
banks, savingsbanks, private bankers, & c .

No.

N e w Engla.nd S t a t e s 546
1, 337
Middle States
S o u t h e r n S t a t e s . . . . 507
AVestern S t a t e s a n d
2, 291
Territories

Deposits.

No.

Millions. Millions.
12.0
429. 295.3
717.0
30.7
61.8

552
664
184

Capital.

72.7

D n i t e d S t a t e a . . 4, 681

210. 7

319. 4

Total.

National banks.

Capital.

N e t deposits.-

No.

Capital.

Deposits..

M i l l i o n s . Millions.
Millions. Millions.
165. 9
208. 6 1,098
177.9
637. a
599. 7 2, 001
267.0
171. 7
1,316.7^
59.5
61.8
691121.3
31.1

715

91.5

272.1 3,006

164. 2

591.5-

1, 527. 4 2,115

400. 2

1,139.9 6,796

670. 9

2, 667. 3

From this table it will be seen that the total number of banks and
bankers in the country at the date named was 6,796, with a total banking capital of $670,966,043, and total deposits of $2,667,343,595;
In the Appendix will be found similar tables for various periods.; from
1875 to 1881, where Avill also be found other tables giAang the assets and
liabilities of State institutions during the past year, so far as they could
be obtained from the official reports of the several State officers.
A table arranged by States and principal cities, giAnng the number,
capital and deposits, and the.tax thereon, of all banking institutions
other than national, for the six months ending May 31, 1881, and for^
previous years, Avill also be found in the Appeudix.
The folloAving table exhibits, for corresponding dates nearest to May
31 in each of the last, six years, the aggregate amounts of the capital
and deposits of each of the classes of banks given in the foregoing table:
National banks.

State.banks, private
b a n k e r s , &-c.

Savings banks
with, c a p i t a l .

Savings
b a n k s without capital.

Total.

Years.
No.

1876...
187.7....
1878.-1879...
1880...
1881...

%f

Deposits.

MilVs MilVs
2,091 .500. 4 713.5
2,078 481.0 768.2
2,056 470. 4 677. 2
2,048 455.3 713. 4
2,076 455. 9 900.8
2,115 460.2 .1,139.9

No.

3,803
3,799
3,709
3,639
3,798
4,016

Capi- DeposCupi- D e p o s N o . DeposNo.
tai.
tal.
its.
its^
MilVs MilVs
214. 0 480.0
218. 6 470.5
202.2 413. 3
197.0 397.0
190. 1 501.5
206.5 627. 5

26
26
23
29
29
36

No.

MilVs
MilVs MilVs
. 5. 0
37.2 691 844.6 6,611
4.9
38.2 676 843.2 6,579
, 3.2
26. 2 668 803. 3 .6,456
. 4.2
36.1 644 747.1 6,360
4.0
34.6 629 783.0 6, .532
4.2
37.6 629 862.3 6,796

Capital.

Deposits./

MilVs
719. 4
704.5
675.8
656. 5
650. 0.
670.9

MilVs
2, 075. 3
2,120.1
1, 920. 0
1,893.5
2, 219. 9.
2, 667. 3

PRIVATE BANKERS.

In the Appendix willbe found a table giA'ing by geographical diAas-'
ions, and by States, Territories and principal cities, the number of State
banks, savings banks, trust and loan companies and private bankers
of the country, together with the amount of their capital and.deposits,and the amount invested by them in United States bonds. The iirst
official information of this character ever published in regard to thC'
private bankers of the country was 'contained in a table in the Comptroller's report for 1880. From the table in the Appendix, mentioned
above, the folloiving information in reference to the private bankers in




224

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

sixteen of the principal cities has b.een separated, it being thought that
it will prove of special interest:
Cities.

Boston.
New York City.
Albany
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Washington
N e w Orleans
Louisville
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Chicacro
Detroit:
Milwaukee
Saint Louis
San P r a n c i s c o . . -

Number
of b a n k s .
47
508
3
52
7
19
6
5
3
8
4
24
7
4
11

Totals..

Capital.

Deposits.

$4. 065, 097
45, 482, 515
550, 000
1, 890, 614
563, 910
773, 6.57
364, 000
32, 000
178, 000
812,167
55, 000
2, 004,197
161, 256
64, 667
261. 302
1, 275, 918

$2, 570, 068
45, 414, 376
1,611,470
6,174, 785
2, 025, 477
2, 389, 032
3, 747, 703

58, 534, 300

89, 996, 545

728,
3, 863.
963,
10, 455,
945,
530,
304,
8, 271,

464
817
938
063
669
047
976
660

I n v e s t e d in
TJ. S. b o n d s .
$1, 003, 343
9, 670, 751
351, 000
. 224, 208
20, 374
195, 384
287, 029
280, 205
8,967
172, 589
7,333
350
44, 405
104,074

The following table gwes similar information for the thirty-one States
and Territories, exclusive of the cities in the above table, having an
amount of capital in excess of $100,000. In this table the number of
piwate bankers is 2,255; the aggregate amount of capital, $34,169,435 ;
and of deposits, $148,178,652, the aA-erage capital being $15,152, and the
average deposits $65,711:
states and Territories.

Number
of b a n k s .

Dlinois
Pennsylvania.
Ohio
Indiana
Iowa
Texas
New York
Michigan
,
Missouri
,
Kansas
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Nebraska
Alabama
Colorado
Montana
,
Georgia
Oregon
California
Virginia
Kentucky
R h o d e I s l a n d ..
Mississippi —
Nevada
Washington ...
South Carolina
Dakota
,
Connecticut ...
Dtah
Louisiana
Wyoming
,

310
172
213
106
276
107
163
137
81
335
79
89
86
21
51
14
30
12
22
18
23
7
11

Totals ..,

2, 255

Capital.

Deposits.

$4,183, 346
$21, 656,149
19, 978, 585
4,140, 679
19, 931, 774
4.119, 220
11. 870,164
3,130, 268
10, 388, 843
2, 975, 737
7, 033, 240
2, 560, 951
12, 699, 067
1] 551, 347
5, 218, 413
1, 213, 796
6, 843, 267
1.120, 244
4, 076, 393
1, 001,172
4, 901, 883
848, 746
2, 772i 567
679, 227
2, 053, 586
675,300
1, 372, 342
• 564, 085
2, 705, 441
547, 827
904, 498
512, 706
1, 308,131
478, 910
973, 519
436, 500
1, 022, 592
387, 709
2,102, 077
369, 792
368, 731
1, 936, 815
462, 268
3.58,181
833, 326
314, .579
292, 851
637, 530
284, 050
657, 015
229, 956
53, 921
484, 335
216, 263
168, 500
1, 359, 079
157, 225
1, 484, 710
146, 329
' 35,812
421, 310
135, 208
34,169, 435

148,178, 652

Investedin
TJ. S. b o n d s .
., 245, 738
288, 461
656, 222
571, 999
67, 287
14, 000
364, 268
74,464
134,142
32, 600
111, 960
45, 848
14, 070
800
15, 000
7,000
250, 000
35, 000
80, 000
32,613
48, 280
100, 000

8,063
'36,'000
4, 227, 815

The remaining fifteen States and Territories, not enumerated in the
aboA^e table, contain 66 private bankers, with an aggregate capital of
$620,120, and aggregate deposits of $3,670,357. Massachusetts has only
three private bankers, outside the city of Boston, with an aggregate
capital of $50,000, and aggregate deposits of $539,028. Maryland has
but two private bankers, outside of the city of Baltimore. The State



225

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

of Maine has but seven private bankers. North Carolina four, New
Hampshire four. New Jersey five, Delaware and Yermont'only one each,
Florida six, and Arizona ^ve. The average amount of capital held by
each of these 66 private bankers is $9,244, and of deposits $57,127.
The total number of private bankers in the foregoing cities is 717, with
an aggregate capital of $58,534,300, and aggregate deposits of $89,996,545
—the average capital being $81,637, and the av^erage deposits $125,518.
About 70 per cent, of these private banks are located in New York
City, representing nearly four-fifths of the aggregate capital and more
than one-half of the aggregate deposits. The average amount of capital and deposits of each priA^ate banker in the city of New York is
about $89,000 5 and the bankers in that city also held $9,670,751 of
United States bonds, which is more than one-half of the amount of
such bonds held by all of the private bankers uf the country.
The following table shows, by geographical divisions, the number of
private bankers in theUnited' States, with the aggregate amount of
their capital, deposits, and investments in United States bonds, for the
six months ended May 31,1881:'
Number
of b a n k s .

Geographical divisions.

N e w England States
..
.
Middle States
Southern States
AVestern S t a t e s a n d T e r r i t o r i e s
Dnited States

.

.

...

Invested in
TJ. S. b o n d s .

Capital.

Deposits.

80
938
258
1,762

$4,
55,
5,
27,

698, 782
397,130
588, 828
639,115

$5,] 62, 708
94,104, 980
17, 323, 504
125,254,362

$1, 067, 652
11, 401, 808
263 7809
3, 937, 254

3,038

93, 323, 855

241, 845, 5.-^4

16, 670,494

The table below is a recapitulation of the foregoing, showiiQgby groups
the aggregates for the bankers in the sixteen principal cities, in the
thirty-one States and Territories having a private banking capital in
excess of $100,000, and in the fifteen remaining States and Territories:
RECAPITULATION.
Number
of b a n k s .
Principal cities
Princii)al S t a t e s a n d T e r r i t o r i e s
Hemainintr S t a t e s a n d T e r r i t o r i e s
Dnited States

Capital.

Deposits.

I n v e s t e d In
V . S. b o n d s .

717
2,255
66

$58, 534, 300
34,169, 435
620,120

$89, 996, 545
148,178, 652
: 3, 670, 357

$12, 370, 012
4, 227, 8 U
' 72,667

3,038

93, 323, 855

241, 845, 554

16, 670, 494

STATE BANKS, SAYINGS BANKS, AND TRUST COMPANIES.

The act of Congress of February 19, 1873, section 333 of the Eevised
Statutes, requires the Comptroller to obtain from authentic sources, and
to report to Congress, statements exhibiting under appropriate heads the
resources and liabilities of such banks and savings banks as are organized under the laws of the several States and Territories. In compliance
Avith this act he has presented annually in the appendices to his reports
the resources and liabilities of these corporations, so far as it has bfeen
possible to obtain them.
Through the courtesy of State officers, returns of State banks, savings banks, and trust and loan companies have during the past year
been received from tAventy-three States. Many of the States and Territories, including Illinois, Nebraska, Dakota, Oregon, Yirginia, and
Tennessee, do not require periodical returns of the condition of the different classes of banks organized under their laws,
15 F
.



226

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
STATE BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES.

From these returns the folloAving abstract has been compiled, showing
the resources and liabilities of State banks and trust companies for. the
last two years, the number reporting in 1880 being 650, and in 1881 683-:
1880.

1881.

KESOURCES.

Loans and discounts
Overdrafts :
Dnited States bonds
Other stocks, bonds, &c
Due from banka
Eeal estate
Other assets
Expenses
Cash items
:
Specie
Legal tenders, bank-notes, &c

'

496, 731
597,699
252,182
661,792
340, 345
489, 086
374, 037
979, 492
176, 592
905, 977
500, 226

i.

Total

$352, 725, 986
1,407,695
27, 680, 025
42, 330, 957
54, 662, 829
21, 396, 772
11, 941, 741
1,136,427
16, 900, 762
17, 925, 628
27, 391,-317

481, 774,159

575,500,139

318, 451
283, 308
25, 008,431
10, 774,731
486, 094
298, 759, 619
3 8,613,336
18, 530,18'9

112,111,325
274, 941
27, 857, 976
12, 237, 320
576,413
373, 032, 632
19,105,664
30, 303, 868

481, 774,159

575, 500,139

LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
Circulation
Surplus fund
Dndivided profits
Dividends unpaid
Deposits
Due to banks
' Other liabilities

'..

Total.......

The foregoing table was prepared from returns trom five New Eng
land States, exclusive of Maine, which has but one State bank in
operation; from four Middle States, not including Delaware; and from
all the Western States excepting Illinois, Kansas, and Nebraska. The
only Southern States represented therein are South Carolina, Georgia,
Louisiana, Texas, and Kentucky. The only Pacific State is California.
There is but one State bank in New Hampshire, six in Yermont, and
nonedn Massachusetts. There are, hoAvever, five trust and loan companies in tlie latter State, and ten in Connecticut.
'
SAVINGS BANKS.

The following table exhibits the aggregate resources and liabilities
of 629 savings banks in 1880 and in 1881:
1880.
BESOLRCES.

Loans on real estate
Loans on personal and collateral security . . .
Dnited States bonds ,
."
:State, mnnicipal, and other bonds and stocks
Bailroad bonds and stocks
Bank stock
Real estate
Other assets
Expenses —.,,
Due from banks
Cash
.;
Total.:.,..-.
Deposits
rSui-plus fund
Undivided profits
•Other liabilities
Total




$315, 273, 232 $307,096,158
70,175, 090
95, 817, 641
187, 413, 220
210, 845, 514
150, 440, 359 . 159,819,942
20, 705, 378
27, 069, 048
32, 225, 923 . 33,249,203
39, 038, 502
41, 987, 674
27, 053, 452
37, 408, 163
216, 423
135, 572
22, 063, 091
40, 603, 641
17, 072, 680
13, 758, 106
• 881, 677, 350

967, 790, 662

819,106, 973
51, 226, 4724, 740, 861
6, 603, 044

891, 961,142
60, 289, 905
10, 325, 800
5, 213, 815

881, 677, 350

967,790,662

LIABILITIES.

'.

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

227

. The foregoing table includes the returns from the six New England
States, from four Middle. States, not including DelaAvare, from the State
of California, and from three other States and the District of Columbia.
The aggregate of loans in the New England States is ,$230,239,027, and
of deposits $403,304,135. In the Middle States the aggregate of. loans
is $130,204,828, and of deposits $424,212,944.
Some ofthe largest savings banks in the city of Philadelphia, organized under old charters, are not required to make reports to any State
officer. Eeturns received, directly from four of these banks, ha\nng deposits amounting to $26,895,295, are included in. the returns for the State
of Pennsylvania.
The savings-bank deposits given inthe foregoing table for 1881, based
on reports made to the State authorities, are $891,961,142, and the deposits of the State banks and trust companies were $373,032,632. These
deposits do not include bank deposits. The deposits of the national
banks on October 1, 1881, exclusive of those due to banks, were
$1,086,942,470. These deposits of the national banks bear to those of
the savings banks the proportion, nearly, of 55 to 45, to those of the
State banks and trust companies the proportion of 74 to 26^ and to the
combined deposits of both the proportion of 46 to 54.
The total population of New England, according to the census of 1880,
is 4,010,529, and the number of open deposit accounts in the savings
banks is 1,227,899; Avhich is,equal to 30.6 accounts to each one hundred
of the entire population. The average amount of each account is
$328.45; and if the total deposits were diA^ided among the entire popu' lation, the aA-erage sum of $100.56 could be giA^en to each individual.
The deposits of the saAangs banks in the State of New York were
$353,629,657, while the population is 5,082,871; showing that an equal
distribution of the savings-bank deposits among the entire population
of the State Avoiild give $69.57 to each individual.
Tables showing the aggregate resources and liabilities of State banks,
trust companies and savings banks, in each State from which returns
turns have been received from the State authorities, appear in the adpendix.
SECURITY FOR CIRCULATINa NOTES.

During the past year there has been much change in the classes of
United States bonds which the national banks have on deposit to secure
their circulation, owing to the redemiition or continuation of the five
and six per cent, bonds of 1881. The classes and amount of these
bonds held by the Treasurer on the 1st day of November, -1881, are
exhibited in the following table:
Class of bonds.
Ten-forties of 1864 (interest ceased)
Punded loan ofl881 (interest ceased).
Punded loan of 1891
Punded loan of 1907
Loan of July and August, 1861, continued.
Loan of 1863, continued (81s)
Punded loan of 1881, continued
Pacific Pail way bonds
Total

Authorizing act.

Pate of interest.

Araount.

March 3, 1864
5 per cent:
July 14, 1870, and Janaary 20, 1871.... 5 ..do -.'-do
do
.•
4^..do . . . .
do
do
4 ..do . . . .
3^..do . . . .
July 17 and August 5, 1861

$50, 000
708, 900
31, 981, 650
92, 005, 800
36, 040, 650

Ma.rch 3, 1863,
3|..do . . . .
July 14, i870, and January 20, 1871.... 3 i . . d o . . . .
July 1, 1862, and July 2 1864
6 ..do....

17, 700, 950'
187,634,550
3, 486, 000
•369,608,500

The total amount of bonds held for the purpose of securing circulation on October 1,1865, was $276,260^550, of which $199,397,950 was in 6
per cent, and $76,852,600 in 5 per cent, bonds. On NovembeT 1,1880, the
banks held $56,605,150 of six per cents, and $147,079,750 of 5 per cents.



228

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

On November 1,1881, all of these bouds had been called, and, with the
exception of $758,900, on Avhich interest had ceased, had been redeemed,
or extended at the rate of 3^ per cent. The banks now hold $31,981,650
of 4J per cents, and $92,< 05,800 of 4 per cent, bonds. They hold also
$3,486,000 of Pacific Eailroad bonds, and $758,900 called bonds on which
interest has ceased. The remainder, $245,601,050, consists of bonds
, bearing interest at the rate of 3J per cent. The aA-erage rate of interest
hoAvpaid by theUnited States upon the bonds deposited as security for
circulating notes is about 3.7 per cent, upon their par value. The amount
of interest paid is equal to about 3J per cent, only of the curreht market
A-alue of the bonds.'
SPECIE IN BANK AND IN THE TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES, AND
ESTIMATED AMOUNT IN THE COUNTRY^—SPECIE IN THE BANK OF
ENGLAND, AND IN THE BANK OF FRANCE.

The following table exhibits the amounts of specie held by the national
banks at the dates of their reports for the last eight years, the coin
and coin certificates held by the New York City banks being stated
separately:
Held b y national banks in N e w Y o r k City.
Dates.
Coin.

D . S.
gold certificates.

Clearing-house
certificates

$920, 767 37 $5,454, 580
Oot. 3, 1872.
1,306, 091 05 12,471,940
3)ec. 27, 1872.
1, 958,769 86 11, 539, 780
P e b . 28, 1873
1, 344,950 93 11, 743, 320
A p r . 25, 1873.
1, 442,097 71 22,1H9, 080
J u n e 13, 1873.
1,063, 210,55 13,522,600
Sept. 12, 1873.
1, 376,170 50 18, 325, 760
iJec. 26, 1873.
1,167, H20 09 23, 518, 640
P e b . ' 2 7 , 1874.
1, 530,282 10 23, 454. 660
M a y 1, 1874.
1, 842,525 00 .13, 671, 660
J u n e 26, 1874.
1,291, 786 56 13, 114,480
Oct. 2, 1874.
1, 443,215 42 14, 410, 940
Dec. 31, 1874.
1, 08i,555 54 10, 622,160
M a r . 1, 1875.
M a y 1, 1875.
930, 105 76
.5, 753, 220
J line 30, 1875.
1, 023,015 86 12, 642,180
Oct. 1, 1875.
4, 201, 720
753, 904 90
Dec. 17, 1875.
869, 436 72 12,532,810
M a r . 10, 1876.
3,261, 131 36 19,086,920
M a y 12, 1876.
832, 313 70 1.5, 183,760
J u n e 30, 1876.
1, 214,522 92 16, 872, 780
• Oct. 2, 1876.
1,120, 814 34 13, 446, 760
Dec. 22, 1876.
1, 434,701 83 21, 602, 9u0
J;.n 20, 18771, 669,284 94 33, 629. 660
A p r . 14, 1877.
1, 930,725 59 13, 889, 180
J uue22, 1877.
1, 423,258 17 10, 324, 320
Oct. 1, 1877.
1, 538.486 47 11, 4U9, 920
Dec. 28, ]877.
1, 955,746 20 ]9,119, 080
M a r . 15, 1878.
2, 428,797 44 3.5, 003, 220
M a y 1, 1878.
2, 688,092 06 25, 397, 640
J n n e 29, 3878.
1, 905,705 22 11, 954, 500
Oct. 1, 1878.
1,779, 792 43 11,514,810
Dec. 6, 1878.
4, 009,299 01 12,277, 180
J a n . ] , 1879.
5.
421, 552 49 12, 739, 544
A p r . 4, 1879.
5, 312,966 90 12,220,940
J u n e 14, 1879.
6,
058,472 34 12, 291, 270
Oct. 2, 1879.
7,218. 967 69 12.130,900
D.^c. 12, 1879.
249 64
20,
096,
8, 36<>, 140 $21, 509, 000 00
P e b . 21, 18R0.
7, 464, 650 35, 855, 000 00
A p r . 23, 1880. 12, 252, 541 44
720
49
12,595,
6,
914, 250 25, 458, 000 00
J u n e 11, 1880.
7,810,200 33, 337, 000 00
Oct. 1, 1880. 16, 682, 226 40
855
28
;i6,104,
7,
489,
700 36,189, 000 00
P e c . 31, 3880.
M a r . 11, 1881. 19, 773,859 01 ' 6, 709, 900 28, 246, 000 00
683
90
30, 809, 000 00
15,
924,
4.
825,
300
Mav ' (i. 1881.
4,62.5,900 34,176, 000 00
J u n e 3 0 , 1H81. 26, 242,108 60
790
87
41,
8.58, 000 00
4,
.5.13,'400
20,
822,
Oct. 1, 18814, 486, 600 31,721, 000 00
15, 317,168 04




Aggregate.

Total.

Held by
other national
banks.

$6, 375, 347 37
13, 778, 031 05
13, 498, 541 86
13, 088,259 93
23, 581,177 71
14, .585,810 55
19,701, 930 50
24, 686,460 09
24, 984,942 10
15, 514, 185 00
14, 406, 266 56
15, 854, 155 42
11, 706, 715 54
6, 683,325 76
13, 605, 195 86
4, 955,624 90
13, 402,246 72.
22, 348, 051 36
16,016, 073 70
18, 087,302 92
14, 576, 574 34
23, 037,601- 83
35, 298,944 94
15, 829,905 59
11,747, 578 17
12,948, 406 47
21,074, 826, 20
37,432, 017 44
28, 085,732 06
13, 860,205 22
13, 294,602 43
16, 286,479 01
18,161, 092 49
17, .533 906 90
18,349, 742 34
19, 349,867 69
50, 031,389 64
55, 572,191 44
44, 967,970 49
57, 829,426 40
59, 783,555 38
54,120, 759 01
51, .5.58. 983 90
65, 044, 008 60
67,194, 190 87
51, 524, 768 04

$3, 854, 409 42
5, 269, 305 40
4, 279, 123 67
3, 780, 557 81
4, 368, 909 01
5, 282, 658 90
7, 205, 107.08
8, 679, 403 49
7, 585, 027 16
6, 812, 022 27
6, 834, 678 67
6,582, 605 62
4, 960, 390 63
3, 937, 035 88
5, 294, 386 44
3, 094, 704 83
3, 668, 659 18
6,729, 294 49
5, 698, 520 66
7,131, 167 00
6, 785, 079 69
9, 962, 046 06
14,410, 322 61
11, 240, 132 19
9, 588, 417 89
9, 710. 413 84
11,832, 924 50
17, 290, l;40 58
17, 938, 024 00
15,391, 264 55
17, 394, 004 16
18, 068, 771 35
23, 338, 664 83
23, 6.14. 656 51
23, 983, 545 10
22, 823, 873 54
28, 981,- 651 95
33, 869, 860 31
41,461, 761 72
41, 677, 078 86
49, 562, 954 11
52, 443, 141 91
53, 597, 211 36
57, 584, 553 48
61, 444, 736 63
62, 809, 968 08

$10, 22P,756 79
19, 047,336 45
17, 777,673 53
16, 868,808 74
27, 950,086 72
19, 868,469 45
26, 907,037 58
33, 365,863 58
32, 569,969 26
22, 326, 207 27
21, 240, 945 23
22, 436,761 04
16, 667,106 17
10, 620,361 64
18, 959,582'30
8, 050,329 73
17, 070,905 90
29, 077,345 85
21,714, 594 36
25, 218,469 92
21, 361,654 03
32, 999, 647 89
40, 709, 267 55
27, 070,037 78
21,335, 996 06
22, 658,820 31
32, 907,750 70
54, 722,058 02
46, 023,756 06
29, 251,469 77
30, 688,606 59
34, 355, 250 36
41,499. 757 32
41,148, 563 41
42, 333, 287 44
42,173, 731 23
79, 013,.041 59
89,442, 0,51 75
I 86,429,732 21
: 99,506,505 26
109, 346, 509 49
1U7,172, 900 92
105,156, 195 26
122, 628, 562 08
128, 638, 927 50
314,334, 736 12

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

22iV

The issue of gold certiiicates was authorized by the fifth section
of the act March 3, 1863, and they Avere used for clearing-house purposes soon after the passage of the National Bank Act. The first issue
was made on November 13, 1865. On June 30, 1875, there were outstanding $21,796,300, of Avhich the national banks in New York City
held $12,642,180. The issue of these certificates Avas discontinued on
Deceinber 1, 1878, and the amount outstanding had decreased on June
30, 1879, to $15,418,700, and on October 1, 1880, to $7,480,100. The
issue of these certificates having been discontinued by the government,
and the amount of gold coin havhig rajiidly increased, the banks in
New York found it necessary to establish a depository of gold coin, for
the couA^enience of the clearing-house. This depository, at the present
time, is the Bank of America, by Avhich bank certificates of deposit were
first issued on October 14, 1879. The amount of such certificates outstaDding on NoA^ember 1, 1879, Avas $9,155,000, on January 1, 1880,
$25,610,000, and on June 1 following, $39,550,000. The amount held by
the national banks in New York City on June 30,1881, was $41,858,000;
and on October 1, $31,721,000.
The clearing-houses of Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore haA^e
organized similar depositories, in order to utilize their gold coin, and
to save the risk and incouA^enience of handling and transporting it.
The total amount of such certificates held by the national banks in
New York on October 1 was $31,721,000; bv those in Philadelphia,
$5,325,000; in Boston, $4,949,000; and in Baltimore, $1,095,000; total,
$43,090,000.
The national banks held silver coin amounting, on October 1,1877, to
$3,700,703, and on October 1, 1878, to $5,392,628: On October 2, 1879,
the amount held was $4,986,493, and on October 1, 1880, it was
$6,495,477, including $1,165,120 in silver treasury certificates. On October 1, of the present year, the official reports of the State banks in NewEngland, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Louisiana,
Ohio, Indiana, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Minnesota, show
that these banks then held specie amounting to $9,019,500, of which
the banks in New York City held $4,985,820. The official returns from
the State banks of California do not give separately the amount of coin
held by them; but the bank commissioners of that State estimate that
of the total cash reported, amounting to $11,276,000, $10,846,672 consisted of coin. The amount of coin held by State banks in the States
before mentioned, including California, was, therefore, $19,866,172.
The Director of the Mint, in his report for 1880, estimates the
amount of coin in the country on June 30, 1880, at $501,555,711, of which
$358,958,691 Avas gold and $142,597,020 Avas silver. His estimate for
the fiscai year ending June 30, 1881, is as folloAvs:
Amount of coin in the country June 30, 1880
Net gold coinage for the year
Net silver coinage for the year
Net importation of gold for the year
Net importation of silver for the. year
Total amount of coin June 30, 1881 . . . : . .

$501, 555, 711
Z8,293, 087
27, 642,6605, 824,975
1,295, 086
614,611,519

Of this amount the Director estimates that there was used in the arts
$3,300,000 of gold, and $75,000 of silver, making a total of $3,375,000. If
this be deducted from the total given above, it will make the amount in
circulation on July 1, 1881, $611,236,519, of which $439,776,753 Avas in
gold, and $171,459,766 in silver. From July 1,1881, to Noveraber 1, t h e .
Director estimates that there was added to the coin $28,716,474 of gold



230

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

and $9,610,858 of silver, making the stock of coin in the countrv at the
latter date $649,563,851, of Avhich $168,493,227 was gold and $181^070,624
Avas silA^er.
The amount of bullion in the mint and in the New York assay office on
NoA^eniber 1 is stated to have been $94,075,744 of gold and $4,966,741 of
silver, making in all $99,042,485; AA^hich, added to the estimated amount
of. coin stated above, gives $748,606,336, of which amount $562,568,971
was gold and $186,037,365 Avas silver.
The following table shows tlie amount of gold and sih-er, including
the amount held to protect gold and silver certificates, and the percentage of each, in the Treasury of the United States, on September 30 of
each year from 1876 to 1881, and on November 1, 1881:
P e r c e n t , of—

Silver.
Period.
Standard
dollars.
S e p t e m b e r 30, 1876.
S e p t e m b e r 30, 1877.
S e p t e m b e r 30, 1878.
S e p t e m b e r 30, 1879.
S e p t e m b e r 30, 1880.
S e p t e m b e r 30, 1881.
N o v e m b e r l , 1881...

$12,155, 205
31, 806, 774
47, 784, 744
60, 092, 667
66, 576, 378

O t b e r coin T o t a l silver.
a n d bullion.
$6, 029, 367
7, 425, 454
15, 777, 937
21,173, 023
30, 878, 286
28, 945, 297
29, 409, 262

G-old coin
a n d bulliou.

$6, 029, 367
7, 425, 454
27, 933,142
52,979,797
78, 663, 030
96, 037, 964
95, 985, 640

$55, 423, 059
107, 039, 529
136, 036, 302
169, 827, 571
135,641,450
174, 361, 343 •
172, 989, 829

T o t a l coin
a n d bullion.

$61, 452, 426
114,464,983
163, 969, 444
222, 807, 368
214, 304, 480
269, 399, 307
268, 975, 469

Silver.

Gold. '

9.8
6.5
17.0
23.8
36.7
35.3
35.7

90.'2
93.5
83.0
76.2
63.3
64.7
64.3

The bullion, in the Bank of England for each year from 1870 to 1881
is shown in the following table, the pound sterling being esthnated at
five dollars:
•
1870
1871
1872.1
1873
1874
1875....

$103,900,000 11876
117,950,000 1877
112,900,000 1878
• 113,500,000 1879*
, - . . . 111,450,000 18801
119,600,000 | 18811

•

$143,500,000
126,8.50,000
119,200,000
150,942,980
141,637,000
115,221,870

Below is a similar table, giving the amount of gold and silver, and
the percentage ofeach, in the Bank of France, on December 31 of each
y e a r | from 1870 to 1880, and on November 10, 1881, five francs being
estimated at one dollar:
P e r c e n t , of
Silver coin
a n d bullion.

Tears.

Oold coin
a n d bullion.

Total.
Silver. Gold.

D e c e m b e r 31, ] 870
D e c e m b e r 31 !187l
D e c e m b e r 31,3 872
D e c e m b e r 33,1873
D e c e m b e r 31 1874 .
D e c e m b e r 31,3 875
D e c e m b e r 31, ] 876 '.
D e c e m b e r 31,1877
D e c e m b e r 31 3 878
Tkop.ember 31,1879
l > e c e m b e r 31,1880
"JSTovember 10, 1881

.'
'...

$13, 700, 000
16, 240, 000
26, 520, 000
31,260,000
62, 640, 000
101, 000,. 000
127, 720, 000
173, 080, 000
211, 620, 000
245, 520, 000
244, 360. 000
236, 895, 452

$85, 740, 000
1.10, 680, 000
131, 740, 000
122, 260, 000
204, 220, 000
234, 860, 000
306, 080, 000
.235, 420, 000
196, 720, 000
148, 320, 000
110,480,000
124, 440, 284

$99, 440, 000
126, 920, 000
158, 260, 000
153, 520, 000
266, 860, 000
335, 860, 000
433, 800, 000
408, 500,'000
408, 340, 000
393, 840, 000
354, 840, 000
361, 335, 736

13.8
12.8
16.8
20.4
23.5
30.1
29.4
42.4
51.8
62.3
68.9
65.6

86.2
87 2
8.3.2
79.6
76 5
69.9
70.6
57.6
,48 2
37.7
31.1
34.4

* London Economist, Noveniber 8, 1879.
tLondon Bankers' Magazine, October, 1880 and 1881.
if The-Bulletin de Statistique, as quoted in the Bankers' Magazine, New York, vol.
xiii, page 740; except t h e items for 1879,'80 a n d ' 8 1 , which were obtained from the
London Banker's Magazine for August, 1880, page 661, and September, 1881, page 716,
and the last item from The London Economist, November 12, 1881.



COMPTROLLER

OF T H E CURRENCY.

231

NATIONAL-BANK F A I L U R E S AND DIVIDENDS TO CREDITORS.

During the year ending November 1, 1881, no national banks have
failed; but since that date, the Mechanic's National Bank of Newark,
N. J., and the Pacific National Bank of Boston, Mass., have suspended^
and the former bank has been placed in the hands of a receiver.
The affairs of twelve banks Avhich failed prior to November 1, 1880,
have, during the year, been finally closed, and final dividends have been
paid to creditors. These banks with the total dividends paid, are giA^en
below:
Total dividends.

Bethel, Conn., First National Bank
Brattleboro', Vt., First National Bank
Delphi, Ind., First National Bank
Duluth, Minn., First National Bank
Fort Scotfc, Kans., Merchant's National Bank
Franklin, Ind., First Natioual Bauk
Kausas City, Mo., First National Bank
New Orleans, La., Crescent City National Bank
Poultney, Vt., National Bank
Saratoga, N. J . , Commercial National Bank
Warrensburg, Mo., First National Bank
Winchester, 111., First National Bank

100 per cent, and interest.
100 per cent, and interest in full.
100 per cent, and interest in full.
100 per cent, and interest in full.
«
60 per cent.
100 per cent, and iuterest in full.
,
100 per cent.
84.83 per cent.
100 per cent, and interest in full.
100 per cent, and interest in full.
100 per cent, and mterest in full,
63.6 per cent.

Attention is called to the fact that nine of the twelve foregoing insolvent nationalbanks, whose affairs have been closed during the past year,
have pj-iid in full the principal ofthe claims proA^ed against them, and
that eight of the nine haA^e paid principal and interest, scA^en of them
paying interest m full.
The following banks whose affairs are still in the hands of receiA^ers.
paid dividends during the past year, as follows, the total dividends paid
by them up to November 1 being also given:
Bozeman, Mont., First National Bank, 15 per cent.; total, 85 per cent.
Butler, Pa., First National Bank, 10 per cent.; total, 40 per cent.
Charlottesville, Va., Charlottesville National Bank, 5 per cent.; total, 55 per cenfc.
Chicago, III., City National Bank, 7 per cent.; total, 77 per cent.
Chicago, III., Third National Bank, 10 per cent.; total, 100 pfer cent.
Chicago, III., German National Bank, 25 per cent.; total, 80 per'cent.
Fishkill, N. Y., National Bank, 15 per cent.; total 90 per cent.
Georgetown, Colo., Miners' National Bank, 30 per cent.; total, 65 per cent.
Helena, Mont., PeopVes' National Bank, 15 per ceut.; total, 30 per cent.
Lock Haven, Pa., Lock Haveu Natioual Bank;, 10 per cent.; total, 90 per cent. Meadville, Pa., First National Bauk, 35 per cent.; total, 100 per cent.
Newark, N. J., First Natioual Bank, 10 per cent.; total, 90 per cent.
'
Norfolk, Va., First Natioual Bank, 4 per cent.; total, 49 per cent.
Saint Louis, Mp., National Bank of State of Missouri, 5 per cent.; total 95 per cent.
Scranton, Pa., Second National Bank, 25 per cent ; total, 25 per ceut.
AVashington, D. C , German-American National Bank, 20 per cent.; total, 40 per cent.

I t Avill be noticed that two of the above banks have already paid the
principal of their claims to creditors, and it is believed that they will
also pay interest, either in part or in full. Of the banks given which
haA^e not paid 100 per cent., it is expected that many will do so, and they
will perhaps pay interest, in addition.
The total ainount of dividends paid by the Comptroller to the creditors
of insolA'-ent national banks during the year ending November 1, 1881,
was $929,059.16. The total dividends paid to creditors of the 86 banks
placed in thehands of receiverspriortoNovemberlamountto$18,561,698,
upon approved claims amounting to $25,966,602. The dividends paid
equal about 70 per cent, of the proved claims. Assessments amounting
to $7,601,750 haA^e been made upon the shareholders of insolvent national
banks, for the purpose of enforcing their individual liability, of which



232

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

about $3,000,000 has been collected, and nearly $400,000 of it within
the past year.
A table showing the national banks which have been placed in the
hands of receiA^ers, the amount of their capital, of claims proA^ed, and
the rates of dividends paid, and, also, one showing the amount of circulation of such banks issued, redeemed, and outstanding, will be found in
the Appendix.
TAXATION OF NATIONAL BANKS.

The Gomptroller again respectfully repeats his recommendation for
the repeal of the laAv imposing a tax upon bank capital and deposits,
and the two-cent stamp upon bank checks.
The receipts of internal revenue show an increase of $10,447,763 for
the fiscal year 1880, and a still further increase of $11,447,996 for 1881,
the total increase during the whole period being more than twenty-one
and a half millions. The increase of the receipts of the goA^ernment
from customs, internal revenue, and other sources during the year 1880
was $59,699,426, and for the two years named it was nearly 87 millions ($86,955,108). The expenditures of the government during the
last fiscal year were less than for either of the two previous years, and
the surplus rcA^enue during the same period was morethan 100 millions.
The receipts for the four months ending NoA^ember 1 last show a still
further increase, and it is probable that the surplus revenue for the
present year Avill be iliuch greater than for any one that has preceded
it. The Avhole amount of internal revenue collected by the Commissioner during the last fiscal year was $135,229,912, all of Avhich, with
the exception of $11,520,704, was derived from the tax on spirits, beer,
and tobacco.
.
.
The amount paid by the national banks to the Treasurer of the United
States, for taxes on capital and deposits, during the year ending June
30, 1881, was $5,372,178.22, and the amount paid by banks, other than
national, to the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue, under the law taxing bank capital and deposits, was $3,757,912. The value of the twocent check stamps issued during the fiscal year was $2,366,081. The
total amount of bank taxes which it is recommended should be abated
is $11,496,171, which amount is much less than the annual increase of
the internal revenue durihg the past two years. The receipts from
taxes are largely increasing, while the expenditures of the government'
are largely decreasing, through the reduction of the public debt and ot
the interest thereon. The reason that has heretofore been urged against
the abrogation of these laAvs—namely, that the amount produced was
necessary for the support of the gOA^ernment and for the paymfent of the
public debt—has long since lost its force. Their repeal has already
been recommended, both b y t h e Secretary of the Treasury and the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue.
While in many of the States there may be a necessity for taxing banking capital and deposits, for purposes of revenue, this reason for retaining a war tax, in the case of the [Jnited States GoA^ernment, has passed
aAvay. The rates of interest for money are gradually lessening, and the
State taxes which the banks are compelled to pay are as much as should
be imposed upon these great agencies for developing the manufacturing
and commercial interests of the country. The Comptroller herewith
presents tables which give, as far as can be ascertained, the amount of
the banking capital of the country, the amount of United States and
State taxes, and the rate of taxation paid by the national banks in every
State and principal city in the Union for the year 1880.
The following table shows the amount of United States and State



233

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

taxes, and the rate of taxation paid by the national banks, in every
State and principal city of the Union for the year 1880:
A m o u n t of t a x e s .
s t a t e s and Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire.
Vermont
Massachusetts ...
Boston
Rhode Island
Connecticnt
jS^ewEngland S t a t e s .
New York
N e w York City
A^lbnny
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
'.
Delaware
..
Maryland
Baltimore.
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Washinsrton
Middle States .
Virginia
AVest V i r g i n i a . .
N o r t h Carolina.
South Carolina .
Georgia
:.
Florida
Alabama
N e w Oiieans .
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
..
Louisville
Tennessee
Southeni States.
Ohio
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
D e t r o i t . ....c
Wisconsin
Milwaukee
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Saint Louis
Kansas
Nebraska
Colorado
1
!N e v a d a
Californiat
San Francisco t
Oregon
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
NeAV M e x i c o
Utah
•
Washington
Wyoraing
Western States a n d
Territories

Capital."

$10,435, 000
5, 827, 830
8, 355, 083
44, 995, UIO
50, 500, 000
20, 009, 800
25, 550, 933
165, 680, 256
32, 847, 771
50, 650, 000
1, 800, 000
13,147, 917
28, 969, 856
17,180, 580
9, 850, 000
1, 761, 677
2, 306, 815
10,8911,330
. 252,000
1,125, 000
170,781,946
2, 866, 000
1, 780, 795
2, 501, 000
2, 324, 900
2, 201, 506
75, 000
1, 518, 000
2, 875, 000
1, 267, 042
205, 000
7,151,135
3, 008. 500
3, 055, 300

United
States.

State.

$124,
70,
93,
560,
813,
210,
308,

$228, 263
97, 720
141,678
819, 389
943,219
255, 850
400,797

884
523
745
299
080
778
612

2,190,921

2,886,916

55,-892
25, 033
34, 459
32, 299
31, 418
1, 195
20, 054
56, 992
19, 248
3, 546
92; 417
49, 664
57, 396

Total.

$353,147
168, 243
235, 423
1, 388, 688
1, 756, 299
466, 628
709, 409

P e r ct.
L2
L2
• 1.1
L3
16
LO
L2

P e r ct. P e r ct.
2.2
3.4
L7
2.9
2.9
3.1
1.%
3.5
1.0
2.3
L3
2.8'
L6

S 077, 837 I

Lcl I

1.8

TotaL

3.1

L7
2.1
3.1
L7
L6
2.4
L7
L6
, L6
L4
1.9
L5

L9
2.9
3.2
L9
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.4
1.4
L5
L6
0.4

3.6
6.0
6.3
3.6
2.3
3.1
2.4
2.0
3.0
2.9
'3,5
L9

2, 927, 948 6, 625,193

2.2

L8

4.0

2.0
L4
L4
1.4
1.4
1.6
L3
2.0
L5
L7
L3
L7
L9

2.0
L7
1.4
2.5
L7
2.0
2.2
0.2
2.0
L3
0.6
0.6
2.7

4.0
3,1
2.8
3.9
3.1
3.6
3.5
2.2
3.5
3.0
1.9
2.3
4.6

L6
2.3
L4
L6
L9

L9
L6

4.8
1.6
2.2
2.0
4.0

L7
L7
L9

3. 5
4.6
3.0
3.8
3.7
7.3,
3.3
3.9
3.9
7.0
3.9
3.4
4.1
4.9
4.5
5 8

51,
26,
32,
55,
36,
1.
32,
4,
17,
2,
41,
18,
80,

107,162
51,868
66, 936
87, 484
68,194
3,170
.52, 808
61, 843
. 36, 796
6,296
133, 505
68, 272
138, 371

30, 829,178

479, 613

403, 092

882, 705

18, 699, 746
4. 225, 000
3, 700, 000
13,236,452
10, 714, 600
4, 250, 000
7, 384, 851
2,100,000
2, 425, 000
650, 000
5, 793, 813
4, 901, 552
1, 416, 667
2, 650, 0(10
865, 694
854,121
1, 070, 000
30, 874
1, 680, 073
1, 500, 000
250, 000
376, 722
100, 000
200, 000
' 400,000
200, 000
- 150, 000
150, 000

296, 403
96.157
54, 013
213, 989
199, 573
203, 049
114, 968
46, 326
48, 903
26, 048
103,810
76, 613
25, 024
62, 407
19, 903
28, 071
51, 853
340
23, 955
17, 325
8, 660
7,587
1, 564
6, 622
6,857
• 4,513
2, 622
3,169

325, 047
94, 722
,60, 362
272, 963
180, 842
107, 447
115, 216
36, 446
43, 332
19, 409
121, 676
81, 289
25, 673
64, 089
13, 899
20, 381
28, 645
184
16, 369
102
3,688
5,430
3,111
2,078
8, 655
3, 350
1,440
3,021

621,450
190, 879
114, 375
486, 952
380, 415
310, 496
230,184
82, 772
92, 235
45, 457
225, 486
157, 902
50, 697
• 126, 496
33, 802
48, 452
80, 498
524
40, 324
17, 427
12, 348
13, 017
4,675
8,700
15, 512
1, 863
4,062
6,190

I, 975,165

State.

1,151, 997
3, 040,135
112, 522
467, 334
647, 504
521, 211
233, 653
35, 996
68, 801
316, 352
8, 747
20, 941

561, 912
590, 085
., 580, 926 1, 459, 209
55, 398
57,124
225, 397
241, 937
465, 380
182,124
405, 834
115, 377
161, 365
72, 288
28, 573
7, 423
37, 263
31, 538
153,847
•162,505
4,837
3,910
16, 513
4,428
3, 697, 245

R a t i o s to c a p i t a l .
TJnited
States.

1, 750, 324 1, 658, 866

L8
L6
L8
2.4
2.3
3.3
4.9
Ll

L4
L2
3.5
2.0
1.6
3.3

L7
2.3

L7
2.1

2.3
2.2
1.8
2.5

3.0
2.1

L8
2.3
2.5
2.2
2.5
2.8
0,4
LO
0.0
L5
L7
3.1
2.1
2.2
1.7
LO
2.0
2.0

3, 409,190

I. 0
2.4
L2
5.0
3.7
4.7
5.4
3.9
4.0
2.7
4.1
3.9

3.6
I
*• T h e caxiital of t h e b a n k s t h a t r e p o r t e d S t a t e , c o u n t y , a n d m u n i c i p a l t a x e s on s t o c k a n d r e a l e s t a t e
i s $444,773, 085.
t California b a n k s p a y n o S t a t e t a x e s on c a p i t a l , e x c e p t on s u c h a s is i n v e s t e d i n r e a l e s t a t e .
Totals

457,266,545




8,1.18,103

7, 876, 822

15, 994, 925

L8

234

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Like tables for the years 1867 and 1869, and for the years 1874 to
1879, inclusive, mnj be found in'the Appendix.
^
In order that the great inequality of the percentage of the United
States and State taxes to the capital of national banks in the different
geographical divisions of the,country may be seen, tables have been prcj
pared for the years 1879 and 1880, in which the capital stock invested
and the percentage thereto of taxes paid is given, as foliow^s:
1879.

Katios to capital.

A m o u n t of t a x e s .
Geographical divisions.

Capital.
United
States.

State.

Total.

$4, 474, 213
6,126, 382
809, 924
3, 208, 844

1.2
L9
L4
L6

L5
1.7
L3
2.0

2.7
3.6
2.7
3.6

14, 619, 363 •

L5

L7

3.2

L8
L8
1.4
2.0

3.1
4.0
3.0
3.9

United
States.

State.

Total.

$165, 032. 512
N e w England States
170, 431, 205
Middle States
Southern States
30, 555, 018
90, 949, 769
AVestern S t a t e s a n d T e r r ' s .

$1, 942, 209
3,190,113
425, 997
1,457,812

$2, 532, 004
2, 936, 269
383, 927
1, 751, 032

456, 968, 504

7, 016,131

7, 603, 232

United States
1

1880.

$165, 680, 256
N e w England States
170, 781, 946
M i d d l e S'tates
30, 829,1.78
Southern States
..
AVestern S t a t e s a n d T e r r ' s
89, 975,165

$2,190, 921
3, 697, 245
479, 613
1, 750,,324

$2, 886, 916
.2, 927, 948
403, 092
1, 658, 866

$5, 077, 837
6, 625,193
882, 705
3, 409,190

L3
2.2
L6
L9

457, 266, 545

8,118,103

7,876,822

15, 994, 925

L8

United States

•

L8

The inequality in the percentages in United States taxes, which appears in the foregoing tables, arises from the fact that, while the United
States tax is imposed on the three items of circulation, deposits, and
capital, the percentages giA^en in the tables are those of the total tax, derived from these three sources, to capital only. Where deposits and
circulation are large in proportion to capital, the percentage of United
States tax in the table is therefore greater; Avhere the deposits and circulation are proportionately smaller, the percentage is less. The inequality in State taxes originates in an actual difference in the rates.
The table below shoAvs for the years 1878, 1879, and 1880 the great
inequality in the rates in State taxation paid in the principal States
in the country.
1878.

1879.

1880.

Cities.
United
states.

Boston
NewYork...
Albany
..
Philac1eli.ihia
Pittsburgh..
Baltimore . . .
Washington
N e w Orleans
Louisville...
Cincinnati..
Cleveland-..
Chicao-o
Detroit
MilwaailvPe..
Saint Louis .
Saint P a u l ..




state.

Total.

United
States.

State.

P e r ct. P e r . ct. P e r ct. P e r ct. P e r ct.
1.3
1.3
2.6
L3
L3
2.9
5.1
2.2
2.9
2.6
2.8
5.. 6
2.5
2.8
2.9
0.7
2.7
0.7
2.0
2.1
0.5
L8^
0.6
L3
L4
L8
3.0
L3
L2
1.2
0.6
2.0
0.4
1.4
L4
LO
2.5
0.5
L5
1.7
0.5
L9
0.6
L4
L5
4.2
2.4
.7
1.5
L9
3.1
2.0
.0
Ll
L3
5.1
2.4
2.6
2.5
3.4
3.2
2.2
L5
L7
1.8
5.0
2.5
2.6
2.4
2.8
4.0
2.1
2.4
L6
L8
. 2.8
L5
'L5
L3
1.5

Total
ret.
2.6
5.5
5.4
2.8
2.0
2.5
L8
2.2
2.1
'4.3
3.3
5.8
4.0
5.3
3.9
3.0

United
States.

State.

P e r ct. P e r ct.
L6
1.9
3.1
2.9
3.1
3.2
•2:4
0.7
• L 7
0.7
L4
L5
L5
0.4
2.0
0.2
1.7
0.6
2.3
2.3
L4
L6
4.8
2.5
2.2
L7
4. 0
3.0
2.4
2.5
L7
L8

Total.
P e r ct.
3.5
6.0
6.3
3.1
2.4
V

2.9

L9
2.2
2.3
4.6
3.0
7.3
3.9
7.0
4.9
3.5

235

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The tables already given indicate the necessity of some precise rule
of State taxation. The States in Avhich the rates of taxation were most
excessiA^e during the years 1878, 1879, and 1880 are given in the following table:
1878.

1880.

1879.

states.

New York
New Jersey
Oliio
1:
Indiana
Illinois
AVisconsin
Kansas
Nebraska
South Carolina
T e n n e s s e e '.

•

.'

United
States.

State.

Total.

United
States.

State.

United
States.

State.

Total.

P e r ct.
2.0
L4
L3
L3
L7
L7
L6
2.3
LO
1.6

P e r ct.
2.6
L8
2.2
2.1
2.1
2.2
2.6
2.6
2.1
2.1

Perct.
4.6
3.2
3.5
3.4
3.8
3.9
4.2
4.9
3.1
3.7

P e r ct.
L5
L5
L4
1.4
L5
L6
2.1
2.6
L2
L7

P e r ct. P e r ct. P e r ct.
3.5"
2.0
1.1
3.3
• L8
1.1
3.4
2.0
L6
3.5
2.1
L6
3.3
L8
L9
3.4
L8
2.0
4.8
2.7
2.3
5.2
2.6
3.3
3.2
2.0
L4
3.5
L9

P e r ct.
L9
1.9
L9
2.2
L8
1.9
2.2
2.5
2.5
2.7

P e r ct.
3 6
3 G
3.5
3.8
3.7
3.9
4 5
5.8
3.9
4.6

Total.

The national banks, under present law, pay to the United States a
tax of one per cent, upon the amonnt of their notes in circulation, onehalf of one per cent, npon the amount of their deposits, and the same
rate upon the average amount of capital invested in United States
bonds. These taxes are paid semi-annually by the national banks to
Treasurer the of the United States.
The following table shows the amount annually paid nnder this law,
from the commencement of the national banking system to July 1,
1881, showing an aggregate of taxes paid to the United States, by
national banks, of $108,855,021.90: •
Years.
1864
1865..'
1866 .
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874 . .
1875 . . .
1876
1877
1878
1879 .
1880
1881

•
.

.
.

•

-

Affffresates

.

On c i r c u l a t i o n .

On d e p o s i t s .

On c a p i t a l .

$53,193
733,247
2,106,785
2, 868, 636
2, 946, 343
2, 957, 416
2, 949, 744
2, 987, 021
3,193, .570
3.353,186
3, 404, 483
3, 283, 450
3, 09L 795
2, 900, 957
2, 948, 047
3, 009, 647
3,153, 635
3,121,374

$95, 911
1,087,530
2, 633,102
2, 650,180
2, 564,143
2, 614, 553
2, 614, 767
2, 802, 840
3.120, 984
3,196, 569
3, 209, 967
3, 514, 265
3: 505,129
3, 451, 965
3,273,111
3, 309, 668
4,058,710
4,940,945

$18, 432
133, 251
406, 947
321, 881
306, 781
312, 918
375,962
385, 292
389, 356
454, 891
469, 048
507,417
632, 296
660, 784
560, 296
401,920
379,424
431, 233

32
59
30
78
07
73
13
69
03
]3
11
89
76
53
08
16
63
33

49, 062, 536 26

87
86
77
09
44
58
61
85
37
29
72
39
64
38
74
90
61
12

52, 644, 349 23

07
15
74
36
67
68
26
13
27
51
02
76
16
90
83 .
61
19
10

7,148,136 41

Total.
$167 537
1, 954, 029
5,146, 835
5, 840, 698
5, 817, 268
5, 884, 888
5, 940, 474
6 175 154
6 703,910
7, 004, 646
7 083 498
7 305 134
7,229 221
7, 013, 707
6,781,455
6, 721, 236
7,591,770
8, 493, 552

26
60
81
23
18
99
00
67
67
93
85
04
56
81
65
67
43
55

108, 855,'021 90

The amount of tax paid upon circulation alone is $49,062,536, while
the Avhole cost to the governmentof the national system, since its establishment in 1863, has been but $5,148,649.01.
The banks, other than national, pay taxes to the United States on
account of their circulation, deposits and capital, at the same rates as
are paid by the national banks; but these taxes, instead of being paid
tp the Treasurer, are collected by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue.
' The table below exhibits the taxes which have been paid by these
banks for the years from 1864 to 1881, inclusive. The amounts given



236

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

under the head of tax on circnlation haA^e, for a nnmber of years, been
principally derived from the tax of ten per cent, upon State bank circulation paid out. The AA^hole amount of tax paid by these banks is
$61,540,471.63:
Years.

On c i r c u l a t i o n .

1864
1865
1866
1867
1868 . .
1869
:
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880 1881

...

•

$2, 056, 996
1, 993, 661
990, 278
214, 298
28, 669
16. 565
15, 419
22,781
8, 919
24, 778
16, 738
22, 746
17, 947
5,430
> L 118
13, 903
28, 773
4, 295

On c a p i t a l .

$780, 723 52
30
84 • 2, 043, 841 08
2, 099, 635 83
11
75
1, 355, 395 98
88
1,438,512 77
05
1,734,417 63
2,177, 576 46
94
2,702,196
84
92
82
3. 643, 251 71
62
3, 009, 302 79
2, 453, 544 26
26
27 • 2, 972, 260 27
2, 999, 530 75
67
2, 896, 637 93
16
2, 593, 687 29
72
2, 354, 911 74
29
2,510,775 43
37
2, 946, 906 64
08

$903, 307 98
374,074 11
470, 867 73
399, 562 90
445, 071 49
827, 087 21
919, 2t)2 77
976, 057 61
736, 950 05
916,878,15
1,102, 241 58
989, 219 61
927, 661 24
897, 225 84
830, 068 56
811, 436 48
811, 006 35

42, 713,108 92

13, 344, 039 66

5, 483, 323 05

Affcrreiiates

On d e p o s i t s .

Totals.

.

$2,837,719
4 940, 870
3, 463, 988
2, 046, 562
1 866 745
2, 196,054
3,020,083
3,644,241
4, 628, 229
3, 771, 031
3, 387,160
4, 097, 248
4, 006, 698
3, 829, 729
3,492,031
3,198, 883
3, 350, 985
3, 762, 208

82
90
05
46
55
17
61
53
14
46
67
12
03
33
85
59
28
07

61, 540, 471 63

From returns heretofore received, the following condensed table has
been prepared, which shows the taxes, both National and State, paid by
the national banks during each year from 1866 to 1880, inclnsive, and
their ratios to capital:
K a t i o of t a x t o c a p i t a l .

A m o u n t of t a x e s .
Capitalstock.

1866
1867.
1868
1869
1870
1871.
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880

$410, 593, 435
422, 804, 666
420,143, 491
419, 619, 860
429, 314," 041
451, 994,133
472, 956, 958
488, 778, 418
493, 751, 679
503, 687, 911
50L788,079485, 250, 694
• 471, 06i, 238
456,968,504
457, 266, 545

United States.

State.

-

$8, 069. 938
8, 813,127
8, 757, 656
7, 297, 096
7, 465, 675
7, 860, 078
8, 343, 772
8, 499, 748
9, 620, 326
10, 058,122
9, 701, 732
8, 829, 304
8, 056, 533
7, 603, 232
7, 876, 822

$7,949,451
9, 525, 607
9,465,652
10, 081, 244
10,190, 682
10, 649, 895
6, 703, 910
7, 004, 646
7, 256, 083
7, 317, 531
7, 076, 087
6, 902, 573
6, 727, 232
7, 016,131
8,118,103

'

Total.

$16, 019, 389
18,338,734
18. 223, 308
17, 378, 340
17, 656, 357
18, 509, 973
35,047,682
15, 504, 394
16, 876, 409
17, 375, 653
16, 777, 819
15, 731, 877
14, 783, 765
14, 619, 363
15, 994, 925

United
States.

State.

P e r ct.
L9
2.2
2.2
2.4
2.4
2.4
L4
L4
L5
L5
L4
L4
L4
L5
L8

P e r ct. P e r ct.
2.0
3.9
4.3
2.1
4.3
2.1
L7 . 4 . 1
L7
4.1
L7
4.1
3.2
L8
3.2
L8
3.5
2.0
3.5
2.0
3.4
2.0
3.3
1.9
3.1
L7
3.2
L7
3.6
L8

Total.

These statistics show that during the fifteen years covered by the table
the average amount annually paid by the national banks to the States
and to the United States was $16,589,199, or more than 3J per cent,
upon their capital stock; during the last year given, the total amount
paid Avas $15,994,925, or more than 4 per cent, npon the amount of the
average circulation of the banks then in operation.
STATE TAXATION OF NATIONAL BANKS.

The United States Supreme Court, in the case of The People ex rel.
WiUiams vs. Weaver, at the. October term in 1879, decided that the
States have no right to assess the shares of national banks located
within their borders, for purposes oi taxation, at a greater rate or valuation than other monej^ed capital in the hands of indiAdduals is assessed;
and that an individual in New York, holding bank shares, has the same
right to deduct his just debts from the amount of his bank shares as he
would haA^e to deduct them from his personal property, including his



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

237

moneyed capital. The Supreme Oourt also pointed out the method ot
relief for national banks to pursue when taxes are assessed upon them
at a greater rate than is assessed upon other moneyed capital in the
same State, such method being to enjoin the collection of excessive
taxes.
In NoA^ember, 1880, it was decided by the United States circuit court
of the northern district of the State of New York, in the case of the
Albany Exchange Bank vs. Oharles A. Hills et al.., that the law of the
State of New York, under authority of Avhich taxes had been assessed
for fourteen years upon bank shares, was A^oid and invalid, for the reason
that this act did not permit the owners of bank shares to reduce their
assessment by the amount of their debts, while owners of other moneyed
caxntal possessed that privilege under the general statutes of the State.
As soon as this decision Avas known, injunctions Avere obtained by nearly
every bank in New York Oity, restraining, the collection of taxes imposed by State authority upon the shareholders of those banks. The
collection of over $1,700,000 was thus enjoined. The question involved
was appealed to the Supreme Oourt of the United States.
Since my last annual report, IAVO acts have been passed by the NCAV
York State legislature, to establish a system of taxation. One of them
expressly permitted the deduction of debts, in the assessment of shai'es
of banks organized under the authority of the State or of the United
States. In the second act the taxation of corporations generally was
provided for, excluding banks and some other corporations.
Although the first act apparently removed the objection which existed
to the former State law taxing National and State bank«, yet it did not
provide against the unjust and discriminating A^aluation of the shares of
banks, as compared Avith the A^aluation of real estate and of other personal i)roi)erty. After considerable discussion the majority of the banks
in the Olearing-House Association of New York haA^e decided to pay
the tax imposed under this law for the year 1881, notwithstanding this
objection to it.
During the year there haA^e been two imxiortant decisions in reference
to taxation of national-bank shares rendered in the United States cir^'
cuit court for the northern district of the State of New York. The first
Avas in the case of the New York State National Bank of Albany vs.
W. J. Maker, where the court held that the assessments against the
shareholders of the bank were absolutely A^oid, for the reason that the
assessors did not place the names of the shareholders, with the nuniber
of their shares and the assessable value of the same, upon the regular
assessment-roll, but upon a list separate therefrom.
The second decision was in a suit brought by the First National Bank
of Utica against the State tax-collector, to test the efiect of the acts
which provided for the taxation of corporations generally.
The amount of the tax imposed by the law nientioned, in all cases
other than those of banks and certain specified corporations, ,was at a
rate much less than the rates of local taxation in many parts of the
State, and less than that imposed upon the shares of banks. In this
suit it was decided that Oongress did not intend to prohibit the State
liom taxing its own corporations more lightly than shares in national
banks, provided that the latter class of property was not assessed more
heavily than other moneyed caxiital in the hands of individuals.
A suit Avas brought by the Evansville National Bank, in the United
States circuit court of the State of Indiana, in order to test the vaUdit.y of the statutesof that State, directing the assessment of bank shares.
I t was held by the bank that these statutes are A^oid, becajuse they do
not grant to the owners of bank shares the privilege of deducting their



238

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

just debts from the assessed A^aluation of such shares, while under the
general statutes of the State that right was granted to the owners of
other moneyed caxiital. Justice Harlan, of the United States Supreme
Oourt, recently decided in this suit that the laAvof Indiana ^^ enforces in
certain cases a rule of taxation inconsistent with the principle of equality
underlying the legislation of Oongress, and conformity to which is essential to the validity of State taxation of national bank shares." He
decides that every shareholder of a national bank, who, at the time of
assessment, had debts, and no credits from AA^hich he could deduct the
same, except national bank shares, from Avhich the State laws did not
pern^it him to make such deduction, is entitled, thi'ough the bank, to
an injunction against the tax assessed upon the shares.
As it is in the power of the States, under the present law of Oongress,
so to legislate that through unequal valuations bank shares may be discriminated against as comxiared with other moneyed capital in the
hands of corporations or indiAdduals, a necessity appears to exist that,
in order to avoid protracted and exxiensive litigation, Oongress shall
so amend the present law that there can be no doubt as to the precise
amount of taxation which may be imposed by the States on national
bank shares.
^ I n my last annual report a suggestion was made in reference to the
amendment of section 5219, Kevised Statutes of the United States. It
is now again recommended that the section named shallbe kmended to
read as fOUOAVS :
But the legislature of each State may determine and direct the manner and place of
taxing the sha.res of national banking associations located within t h e State, snbjec.t
to the following restrictions, namely: T h a t t h e maximum rate of t a x shall not exceed
per cent.; t h a t the rate, and the valuation upon which such, rate is calculated
shall not exceed the least rate and valuation to which other moneyed capital, in the
hands of individuals, or of corporations of any class, in such State is-subjected, and
t h a t the .shares of any national banking association, owned by a non-resident of any
State, shall be taxed in the State or town in w^hich. the bank is located, and not elsew'here.

If such an amendment becomes a law it Avill, ih a great measure, preA^ent the various forms of discrimination which haA^e been exercised in
the imxiosition and collection of taxes tipon national-bank shares, under
State authority. The Supreme Oourt of the United States has decided
that, without the permission of Oongress, the States would have no right
to impose any taxes whatever upon national banks, and that in enacting
the law under which the States now exercise this right, Oongress was
conferring a power on the States Aviiich they would not otherwise have
had. This court also decided that it was the evident intention of Oongress to protect the banks from anything beyond their equal share of
the public burdens. Oongress has therefore the power wholly to rescind
the right granted to the States to tax national banking associations.
This, however, is not asked or desired. But, inasmuch as it has been
the tendency of legislation in difi'erent States to disregard, or render
inoperative, the provisions of the act of Oongress permitting and restricting State taxation of national bank shares, it is certainly not too
much to expect that Oongress A\dll regard it as due to themselves to pass
such amendments as Avill carry out the intention of their original act,
clearly defined and sustained as it has.been by the decisions of the
Supreme Oourt of the United States.
LOSSES, SURPLUS, EARNINGS AND DIVIDENDS
BANKS.

OF

THE

NATIONAL

, , During the year ending September 1,1881, the national banks charged
oft'losses amounting to $12,691,349.75. Of this, $5,889,761.19 was charged



239

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

off during the six months ending March 1,1881, and $6,801,588.56 during the similar xieriod ending September 1, 1881. The following table
shows the number of banks that charged oft* these losses, and the amount
so charged oft* by them, in each State and reserve city throughout the
United States, for the two semi-annual periods ending March 1 and September 1,1881, respectively. The total losses charged off in each of the
fonr preceding years have been added to the table. Full tables for the
five previous years may be found in the Appendix:
Marcli 1,1881.
states and Territories.

Maine
Isew Hampshire
Vei-mont
Massachusetts
Boston :
Bhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New York City...
Albany
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
,
Pittsburgh
.Delaware
Maryland
iBaltimore
District of Columbia .
Washington
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Oeorgia
Ploiida
....
Alabama
New Orleans
Texas
1
' Arkansas
Kentucky
Louisville
Tennessee
Ohio
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Indiana
Illinois
•Chicago
Michigan,
Detroit
AA''isconsin
Milwaukee
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
SaintLouis
Kansas
Nebraska
1
Colorado
Nevada
California
San Prancisco —
Oregon
Dalfota.
Montana
New Mexico .'.
Utah . . . ,
. .Washington

No. of
banks.
37
24
23
96
35
27
43
128
36
6
47
120
27
16
6
11
9
1
5
13
10
7
7

$77,806 40
99, 725 42
126, 093 71
240, 971 17
280, 815 43
566, 227 60
193, 035 40
441, 955 39
989, 797 57
40, 960 64
211,657 61
398, 222 91
175, 251 05
152, 358 84
21, 076 93
15, 713 42
51, 336 66
436 60
49, 435 34
53, 809 45
24, 596 12
30, 522 29
63, 772 53
10, 544 64
1; 070 16
10, 270 81
15,137 27
39, 264 53
5, 925 33
51, 239 83
35, 232 24
43, 222 31
189, 875 45
37, 435 88
98, 097 39
397,352 79
185, 954 89
49,189 62
143, 548 ,67
28, 208 26
14, 595 30
15, 556 79
75, 411 39
101, 230 17
20, 294 95
37,215 69
21, 534 68
10, 805 98
70, 390 95
123 30
26, 939 94.
' 10, 425 43
21, 799 20
17,050 20
4,277 20
12, 284 79
776 50.

1,210
1,360
1,421
1,304
980

5,889,761 19
•7,563,886 04
10, 238, 324 98
10, 903,145 04
8,175, 960 56

Add
Add
Add
Add

A g g r e g a t e losses for five y e a r s .




42, 771, 077 81

A.ggregate.

1^0. of
banks.
39
29
29
108
34
25
54
136
38
6
49
121
26
18
4
10
10
1
5
13
9

1, 900 18

Wyoming
Totals for 1881for 1880
for 1879
for 1878
for 1877

Losses.

September 1,1881.

1, 269
1, 321
1,442
1,430
1,108

689 17
123, 014 54
155, 990 86
439, 978 14
420, 239 30
247, 484 81
238, 940 77
579, 034 66
1, 331,205 05
46, 262 49
217, 217 23
356, 224 18
230, 998 11
105, 729 25
513 49
429 10
843-10
-109 45
543 63
828 98
851 42
067 00
138, 042 71
55, 418 00
2, 155 64
56, 027 38
782 98
59, 519 97
71,

$159, 495 57
222, 739 96
282, 084 57
680, 949 31
701, 054 73
813, 712 41
431, 976 17
1, 020,990 05
2, 32i,002 62
87, 223 13
428, 874 84
754, 447 09
406, 249 16
258, 088 09
21, 590 42
52, 142 52
179 76
546 05
72, 978 97
112, 638 43
33, 447 54
119, 589 29
201, 815 24
65( 962 64
3, 225 80
66, 298 19
74, 920 25
110, 784 50
5, 925 33
116 50
59, 876 67
ni. 870 67
122, 638 43
Vol,
246
52
75, 024 21
118, 223 62
215,348 17
405,
613
93
39,178 05
76, 072 70
45, 975 31
144, 836 31
200,488 52
397, 365 62
110, 410 73
296, 391 37
36, 201 75
85, 270 53
97, 721 86
241;
808 12
10.599 86
38, 993 22
21, 397 92
648 78
'
35,
21, 091 99
36, 651 15
89, 239 76
164,
68,889 50
119 67
170, 705 87
16, 410 92
36, 899 72
85, 684 03
102, 744 89
23,210 21
44, 468 64
39, 662 66
50, 280 09
119,889 14
190,
461 89
338 59
57, 865 76
• '30, 925 82
13, 652 26
3, 226 83
44, 210 46
22, 411 26
30, 067 49
13,017 29.
3, 254 94
7, 532 14
1, 858 45
34, 143 24
•2,542 40
3;318 90
2, 893 13
2, 893 13
43 75
1, 943 93

6, 801,
7,142,
11, 487,
13, 563,
11, 757,

588
519
330
654
627

56
96
17
85
43

50, 752, 720 97

12,691,349
14,706,406
21, 725,655
24, 466, 799
19, 933, 587

75
00
15
89
99

93, 523, 798 78 .

240

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

In order to compare the losses experienced by nationalbanks located
in the difi'erent sections of the United States, the following table is given,
which shows the total losses charged ofi* in each geographical division of
the country during the lastfiA^eyears. The number of banks reporting
losses js also given:
•

Six m o n t h s end-

New England
States.

Western States United States.
and Territories.

Southern
States.

Middle States.

ing—
No.

Amount.

M a r c h L 1877
289 $2, 465, 328
S e p t e m b e r 1,1877 . 312 4, 825, 040
T o t a l , 1877 . . . .

7, 290, 368

M a r c h 1,1878
327
S e p t e m b e r 1,1878 . 399

3,344,012
4, 016, 814

T o t a l 1878

Total, 1879
M a r c h L 1880
362
S e p t e m b e r 1,1880 . 326
...

M a r c h 1,1881
285
S e p t e m b e r 1,1881 . 318
T o t a l , 1881
T o t a l for five
years

3, 612,128
3, 388, 394

Amount.

No.

314 $3, 462, 684
353 3, 945, 806

80
86

7, 408, 490
417
449

7, 360, 826

M a r c h 1,1879 . . . . . 379
S e p t e m b e r 1,1879 . 384

T o t a l , 1880

No.

4,506,813
5, 502, 770

3, 592, 950
4, 360, 440

125
139

7, 000, 522

7, 953, 390

2, 236, 928 446
1, 866, 658' 440

3,152, 317 1 2 1 '
2,817,870 124

4,103, 586

5, 970,187

1, 584, 675
1, 707, 338

412
428

2, 548, 203
2, 975,110

No.

No.

Amount.

19, 933, 588

4, 244, 637

672, 0321, 225,602

436
442

1, 897, 034

....

696, 646
1, 235, 784'

458
4r,6

1,932,430

.....

530, 769
787, 046
1,317,810

112
119

Amount.

297 $1, 769, 697
980 $8,175, 961
357 2, 474, 940 1,108 11, 757, 627

$478, 252
511, 841
990, 09 {

124
140

10, 009, .583
459
463

Amount.

431
431

2, 380, 288 1,304 10, 903,145
2,818,469 1,430 13, 563, 655
24, 466, 800

5,198,757

2, 336, 600 1,421 10, 238, 324
2, 502, 712- 1,442 11, 487, 330
21, 725, 654

4, 839, 312
3,643,872 1,360
1, 670, 946 1,321

7, 563, 8S6
7,142, 520
14, 706, 406

3, 314, 818

384. 607 •401 •1,372,276 1,210
797, 233 404 • 1, 321, 908 1, 269

5, 889, 761
6, 801, 589

3, 292, 013

5, 523, 313

1,181, 840

2,694,184

12,691,350

29, 047, 315

36, 864, 963

7, 319, 812

20, 291, 708

93, 523, 798

Of the losses given in the foregoing tables, a portion is on account of
the depreciation'in the. premium on United States bonds held by the
banks. The amount of premium thus charged ofi' during the past year
Avas $2,271,339.50; and, dnring the last fonr and a half years, it amounted
to $13,107,099. The total losses, shown in the above table, extending
over a period of five years, are equal to 24.5 per cent, of the entire capital ofthe banks, and 19.1 per cent, of their combined caiiital and surplus.
In order further to illustrate this subject, several of the principal
cities ofthe United States have been selected, and the losses sustained
during the pastfiA^eyears by the national banks located in each are
given in the following table :
Cities.
New York
Boston
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
NewOrleans

1877.
•. $4, 247, 941
2,192, 053
333, 248
289, 466
200, 597
. 286, 259

1878.

1879.

1880.

66 $5,147,319 98 $3,135, 557 37 $2, 054, 381
81 2, 490,197 46 2, 655, 390 58 1,110,831
47
491, 558 36
561, 676 30
399, 943
333, 022 99
59
419, 036 51
258,128
294, 507 00
74
368, 915 99
211,329
272, 889 87
47
338, 496 90
118, 080

1881.

.

Total.

52 $2, 321, 002 *62 $16,906,203 35
72
701, 054 73
9,149, 528 30
2,192, 676 03
74
406, 249-16
1, 557, 742 33
15
258, 088 09
1,174, 529 50
01
99,179 76
1, 090, 646 87
38
74, 920 25

The losses charged off'by the banks during thelast year are about
$2,000,000 less than those experienced daring the previous year. A part
of the losses charged off, as shown by the preceding tables, consisted of
bad debts as defined in the law—viz, debts on Avhich interest was due
and unpaid for a period of six months, and which were neither secured
nor in process of collection. The bad debts so charged off consisted of
other stocks and bonds on which interest had ceased, as well as of bills
receivable. Since the resumption of specie payments, the value of a



241

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

portion of these bad assets has been realized; and it is estimated that
in this Avay about 25 per cent, of these losses has since been recoA^ered.
DIVIDENDS AND EARNINGS.

From the semi-annual returns made by the banks to this Office, tables
have been prepared, shoAving the dividends and profits, and the ratios
of each to capital, and to capital and surplus combined. The following
table shows the capital, surplus, dividends, and total earnings of all the
national banks, for each half year, from March 1, 1869, to September 1,
1881, with the ratios, as before specified :

P e r i o d of
N o . of
six months,
banks.
ending-

Sept. 1,1869
M a r . 1,1870
Sept. 3,1870
M a r . 1,1871
. Sept. 1,1871
M a r . 1,1872
Sept. 1,1872
M a r . 1,3873
Sept. 1,1873
M a r . 3,1874
Sept. 1, 1874
M a r . 1,1875
Sept. 1,1875
M a r . 1,1876
Sept. 1,1876
M a r . 1,1877
Sept. 1,1877
M a r . 1,1878
Sept. 1,1878
M a r . 1,1879
Sept. 1,1879
M a r . 1,1880
Sept. 1,1880
M a r . 1,1881
S e p t . 1,1881

. Capital.

T o t a l dividends.

Surplus.

Total net
earnings.

Dividends Earnings
Divid e n d s to t o c a p i t a l t o c a p i t a l
cai)ital. a n d sur- a n d surplus.
X>lus. •

1, 481 $401, 650, 802 $82, 105, 848 $21, 767, 831 $29,221,384
L 5 7 1 416, 366, 991 86,118,210 21, 479, 095 28, 996, 934
1,601 425, 317,104 91, 630, 620 21, 080, 343 26, 813, 885
1,605 4-J8, 699,165 94, 672, 401 22, 205,150 27, 243,162
1,693 445, 999, 264 98, 2d6, 591 22,325,279 27, 315, 311
1,750 450, 693, 706 99, 431, 243 22, 859, 826 27, 502. 539
3,852 465, 676, 023 105,181, 942 23, 827, 289 30, 572, 891
1,912 475, 918, 683 114, 257, 288 24, 826, 061 31,926,478
1,955 488,100, 951 118,113,848 24, 823, 029 33,122, 000
L967 489, 510, 323 123, 469, 859 23, 529, 998 29, 544,120
1, 971 489, 938, 284 128, 364, 039 24, 929, 307 30, 036, 811
2,007 493, 568, 831 131, 560, 637 24, 750, 816 29,136, 007
2,047 497, 864, 833 134,123, 649 24, 317, 785 28, 800, 217
2,076 504, 209, 491 134, 467, 595 24. 811. 581 23, 097, 921
2,081 500, 482, 271 132, 251, 078 22, 563, 829 20, 540, 231
2,080 496, 651, 580 130, 872,165 31, 803, 969 19, 592, 962
2,072 486, 324, 860 124. 349, 254 22,117.116 15, 274, 028
2,074 475, 609, 753 122, 373, 561 18, 982, 390 16, 946. 696
2, 047 470, 231, 896 118,687,334 17, 959, 223 13, 658,' 893
2,043 464, 413, 996 116, 744,135 17, 541, 054 14, 678. 660
2,045 455,132, 056 115,149, 351 17, 401, 867 16, 873, 200
2,046 454, 080, 090 117,226,501 18,121, 273 21,352,784
2, 072 454, 215, 062 120.145, 649 18, 290, 200 24, 033, 250
2,087 456, 844, 865 122, 481, 788 18, 877, 517 24, 452, 021
2,100 458, 934, 485 127, 238, 394 19, 499, 694 29,170, 816

P e r cent.
5.42
5.16
4.96
5.18
4.96
5.07
5.12
5.22
5.09
4.81
5.09
5.01
4.88
4.92
4.50
4.39
4.54
3.99
3 81
3.78
3.82
3.99
4.03
4.13
4.25

P e r cent.
4.50
4.27
4.08
4.24
4.07
4.16
4.17
4.21
4.09
3.84
4.03
3.96
3.85
• 3.88
3.57
3.47
3.62
3.17
3.04
3.02
3.05
3.17
3.18
3.26
3.33

Percent..
6.04
• 5.77
5.19
5.21
5.02
5.00
5.36
' 5.41
5.46
4.82
4. 86
4.66
4.56
3.62
3.25
3.12
'2.50
2.83
2.31
•2.53
2.96
3.70
4.18
4.22'
4.98

In the following table is giA^'cn, by geographical divisions, the number
of national banks, with their capital, which paid no dividends to their
stockholders during thp. two semi-annual periods of 1881, to which the
totals for each semi-annual period in the four preceding years have been
added:
Six m o n t h s e n d i n g A v e r a g e for
year.
G-eographical d i v i s i o n s .

M a r c h 1, 1881.

Silfs'

for
for
for
for
for

1881
1880
1879
1878
1877

A v e r a g e for e a c h y e a r . . .

16 F



No. of
banks.

$1, 881, 000
8,746,630
2,109,900
7, 584, 000

New England States
Middle States
Southern States
AVestern S t a t e s a n d T e r r i t o r i e s
Totals
Totals
Totals
Totals
Totals

Capital.

175
326
328
245

20,
30,
53,
48,
40,

321,
407,
843,
797,
452,

530
200
700
900
000

38, 764, 466

the

S e p t e m b e r 1, 1881.
Capital.
$1,
6,
1,
7,
171
233
299
357

N o . of
banks.

925, 000
842, 400
875,150
745, 000

18, 387, 550
26, 334,150
44, 576, 300
58, 736, 950
41,166, 200
37, 840, 230

Capital.
$1, 903, 000
7, 794, 515
1, 992, 525
7, 664, 500

173
230
304
343
266

19,
28,
49,
53,
40,

354, 540
370, 675
210, 000
767, 425
809,100

38, 302, 348

242

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The percentage to capital of dividends paid, and of dividends and
earnings to combined capital and surplus, is given by similar divisions
foi^ the years 1879, 1880 and 1881, in the following table:

. Geographical
divisions.

N e w England
Sta,tes
Middle States . .
Southern Slates
Western States
a n d Territories
United States..

1881.

1880.

1879.

DiviDiviDiA-iEarnings
Divi- dends to Earnings
Divi- , dends to Earaings
Divi- dends to
to capital
to
capital
to
capital^
capital
dends to capital
dends to
dends to capital
and sur
and
surand
surcapital. and surcapital. and surcapital. and surplus.
plus.
plus.
plus.
plus.
plus.
Per ct.

Per ct.

Per ct.

Per ct.

Per ct.

Per ct,

Per ct.

6.4
7.9
7.6

5.2
6.1
6.0

4.2
5.8
5.4

6.8
,8.4
7.8

5.5
6.5
6.7

6.4
8.6
7.6

7.2
8.5
8.3

5.8
6.4
6.9

7.3
9.4
1L3

9.4

7.5

• . 7.1

,9.5

7.6

9.3

10.4

8.1

1L6

7.6

6.1

5.5

8.0

6^4

7.9

8.4

6.6

9.2

Per ct.

.

Per ct.

Under the law requiring the national banks to carry to surplus fund,
before declaring dividends, a certain proportion of their earnings, the
national banks of the country have accumulated a fund, in addition to
their capital, Avhicli now amounts to $128,140,618. This surplus is not
infringed uiion, except in case of extraordinary losses, such as cannot be
paid from the current earnings of the banks, and consequently forms,
with the capital, the working fund of the banks. In the following
table the gradual accumulation of this :|'uiid, from the commencement of
the system to the present time, is shown, as nearly as possible, by semiannual periods. The increase or decrease for each period is also giA^en :
Dates.

Amount.

Semi-annual
increase or
decrease.

Dates.

Amount.

J u n e 13, 1873
December26,1873.June26,1874.-..;..
D e c e m b e r 31, 1874.
J u n e 30,1875

$116, 847, 455
120, 961, 268
126,239,308
130, 485, 641
133,169, 095

D e c e m b e r 17, 1875.
J u n e 30, 1876
D e c e m b e r 22, 1876 .
J u n e 22,1877
D e c e m b e r 28, 1877.
J u n e 29,1878
J a n u a r y 1, 1 8 7 9 . . . .
J u n e 14,1879

133, 085, 422
131, 897,197
131, 390. 665
124, 714, 073
121, 568, 455
118,178, 531
116, 200, 864
114, 321, 376

D e c e m b e r 12, 1879.
J u n e 11, 1880
D e c e m b e r 31, 1880 .
J u n e 30, 1881

115, 429,
118,102,
121, 824,
126, 679,

•Increase.
•July 4,1864
J a u u a r y 2, 1865
J u l y 3,'l865
J a u u a r v 1,1866
J u l y 2,1866
J a n u a r y 7,1867
July L'1867

J a n v i a r y 6,1868
J u l y 6,'l868
J a n u a r y 4,1869
J u n e 12,1869
J a n u a r y 22,1870 . . . . . .
J u n e 9,1870
D e c e m b e r 28,1870
J u n e 10,1871
D e c e m b e r 16, 1871
J u n e 10, 1872
D e c e m b e r 27, 1 8 7 2 . . . .

$1, 129, 910
' 8 , 663, 311
31, 303, 566
43. 000, 371
50, 151, 992
59, 992, 875
63, 232, 811
70, 586,126
75, 840,119
81, 169, 9H7
82, 218, 576
90, 174, 281
91, 689, 834
94, 705, 740
98, 322, 204
101, 573,154
105, 18L943111, 410, 249

$7, 533,401
22, 640, 255
11,696,805
7,151, 621
9, 840, 883
3, 239, 936
7,253,315
5, 253, 993
5, 329, 818
1, 048, 639
. 7, 955, 705
1, 515, 553
3, 015, 906
3, 616, 464
3, 250, 950
3, 608, 789
6, 228, 306

032
014
629
518

Semi-annual
increase or
deerease.
Increase.
$5. 437, 206
4,113, 813
• 5, 278, 040
4, 246, 333
2.. 683, 454
Decrease.
$83, 673
1,188, 225
506, 532
6, 676, 592
3,145, 618
3, 389, 924
1. 977, 667
1, 879, 488
Increase.
$1,107, 656
2, 672, 982
3, 722, 615
4, 854, 889

From December, 1875, to elune, 1879 there was a constant decrease in
this fund. In all other case^ a gradual increase is to be noted.
UNITED STATES LEGAL-TENDER NOTES AND NATIONAL-BANK CIRCULATION.

The acts of February 25, 1862, July 11, 1862, and March 3,1863, each
authorized the issue of 150 millions o.f dollars of legal-ten der notes, making an aggregate of 450 millions of dollars. On January 30, 1864, the
amount of such notes outstanding was $449,338,902, which was the highest amount outstanding at any one time. The act of June 30, 1864,



243

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

provided that the total amount of United States notes issued or to be
issued should not exceed 400 millons of dollars, and such additional
sum, not exceeding 50 millions, as may be temporarily required for the
redemption of temporary loans. By the act of June 20, 1874, the maximum amount was fixed at $382,000,000.
Section 3 of the act of January 14^ 1875, authorized an increase of the
circulation of national banks in accordance with existing law, without
respect to the limit previously existing, and required the Secretary ofthe
Treasury to retire legal-tender notes to an amount equal to 80 per cent,
of the national-bank notes thereafter issued, until the amount of such
legal-tender notes outstanding should be .300 millions, and no more.
Under the operation of this act $35,318,984 of legal-tender notes were
retired, leaving the amount in circulation on May 31, 1878, the date of
the repeal of the act, $346,681,016, which is the amount now outstanding. '
The act of July 12, 1870, pro\nded that no national banking association organized after that date should have circulation in excess of
$500,000. As this restriction was enacted at a time when a limit existed
as to the aggregate amount of circulation which could be issued to
national banking associations, the necessity for it ceased after the passage of the act of January 14, 1875, which, as stated, removed all limit
upon the aggregate amount of circulating notes, and a repeal of the
restriction is recommended by the Comptroller. A bill was, at the last
session of Congress, reported from the finance committee, authorizing
all banks to receive circulation equal to the full amount of their capital,
as was the case in the original bank act. The passage of this bill would,
give the banks the privilege of increasing their circulation up tp the
limit of their capital, if at certain seasons^of the year such an increase
should be desirable. This increase would not probably be great, for the
amount of circulation outstanding is now much less than that authorized by law.
Since the passage of the act of June 20, 1874, $127,923,596 of legaltender notes haA^e been deposited in the Treasury by the national banks,
for the purpose of reducing their circulation, and $101,034,675 of bank
notes liaA^e been redeemed, destroyed, and retired. In the following
table are given the amounts and kinds of the outstanding currency of
the United States and ofthe national banks, on January 1 of each year,
from 1866 to 1880, and on NTovember 1,1881; to which is added the amount
on,August 31, 1865, when the public debt reached its maximum:
United States issues.

Date.

Legal-tender
notes.

A u g . 31,1865 . $432, 553, 912
J a n . . 1,1866... • 425, 839i 319
380, 276,160
J a n . 1,1867...
356,000,000,
J a n . 1,1868...
J a n . 1,1869... , 356, 000, 000
356, 000, 000
J a n . 1,3870...
J a n . 1,387.1 ..
356, 000, 000
J a n . 1,1872...
357, 500, 000
J a n . 1,3873 . .
358, 557, 907
J a n . 1,1874...
378, 401, 702
J a n . 1,1875...
•382, 000, 000
J a n . 1,3876-..^
371, 827, 220
J a n . 1,1877....
366, 055, 084
Jau. L1878...
349, 943, 776
J a n . 1,1879...
346, 681, 016
J a n . 1,1880...
346,681,016
J a n . 1,1881 . .
346, 681, 016
N o v . 1,1881 . .
346, 681, 016

Old
demand
notes.

Fractional
currency.

$402, 965
392, 070
221, 632
159,127
128, 098
113,098
101, 086
92, 801
84, 387
79, 637
72,317
69, 642
65, 462
63, 532
62, 035
61, 350
60,-745
60, 400

$26, 344, 742
26, 000, 420
28, 732, 812
• 31, 597, 583
34, 215, 71539, 762, 664
39, 995, 089
40, 767, 877
45, 722, 061
48, 544, 792
46, 390, 598
44.147,072
20, 348, 206
17,764,109
16,108,159
15, 674, 304
15, 523, 464
15, 469, 086




N o t e s of national b a n k s ,
including
gold n o t e s .

Aggregate.

$176,213,955 $635, 515, 574
236, 636, 098 . 688,867,907
298, 588, 419
707, 819, 023
299, 846, 206
687, 602, 916
299, 747, 569
690, 091, 382
299, 629, 322
695, 505, 084
306, 307, 672
702, 403, 847
328, 465, 431
726, 826,109
344, 582, 812
748, 947,167
350. 848, 236
777, 874, 367
354,128, 250
782, 591,165
346, 479, 756
762, 523, 690
321, 595, 606
714, 064, 358
321, 672, 505
689, 443, 922
323, 791, 674
686, 642, 884.
342,387,336
704, 804, 006
343,792,832
706, 058, 057
359, 863, 000
722. 073, 502

Gold
Currency
p r i c e of p r i c e of
$100
cur$100 gold.
rency.

$144 25
144 50
133 00
133 25
135 00
120 00'
110 75
309 50
112 00
110 25
112 50
132 75
107 00
102 87
100 00
3 00 00
100: 00
100. 00

$69
69
75
75
74
83
90
91
89
90
88
88
93
97
100
100
100
100

32
20
18
04
07
33
29
32
28
70
89
69
46
21
00
00
00
00

244

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

In the.following table is shown by States the amount of circulation
issued and retired during the year ending NTovember 1, 1881, and the
total amount issued and retired since June 20, 1874:
Circulation retired.
s t a t e s and Territoriea.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Phode Island
,
Connecticut
N e w Yoi-k
.'...
New Jersey
'.
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
Disbrict of C o l u r a b i a . .
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
North Caiolina
^ South Carolina
" G-eorgia
Plorida
Alabama.
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Iventucky
Tennessee
Missouri
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas
Nebraska
Nevada
Oregon
Colorado
Utah
Idaho
Montana
AA''yoming
N e w Mexico
'
Dakota
•
AVashington
California
S u r r e n d e r e d t o t h i s olfice a n d r e t i r e d .
Totals
P r e v i o u s l y r e t i r e d , u n d e r a c t of J u n e 20,1874.
Previously surrendered, uuder same act
G rand totals .

Circulation
issued.

$45,000
10, 300
200, 700
3, 635, 840
1, 586, 280
' 1, 912, 360
7,198, 370
1,186,170
5, 300, 690
45, 000
700, 000
500
256, 300
81, 000
22, 480

Total.
Act.of J u n e Liquidating
banks.
20, 1874.
$68,145
165, 471
1, 586, 655
290,219
819, 721
4, 683,765
310,419
1, 511, 536
24, 240
16, 655
70, 955
40, 805
• 51,134
93, 258
8,541
34, 710

338, 000
121, 500
809, 950
• 201,600
876,100
2,549,380
660, 970
897, 560
311, 400
472, 500
447,300
147, 600
121,480
198, 900

* 55,'982'
16, 442
163, 376
9,997
129, 054
460, 751
750, 020
344, 914
225, 460
85, 784
81, 222
94, 733
38, 301
40, 682

149, 400
126, 000
27, 000

9,934

$23, 863
5, 684
38, 759
8,232
1,672
2,265
186, 681
110, 952
93, 377

$92, 008
5,684
204,230
1, 594, 887
291, 891
821, 986
4, 870, 446
421, 371
1, 604, 913

2,243
13, 013
32, 800
13, 014
13,435
12, 354

26, 483
29, 668
103, 755
53, 819
64, 569
93,258
20, 895

8,859
70
12, 620
6,970
60
31, 238
23, 565
92, 372
116,122
122, 329
130, 434
49, 023
51, 457
66, 051
47, 092
43, 429
2,032
160

43, 569
70
68, 602
6, 970
16, 502
194, 614
. 33, 562
221, 426
576, 873
872, 349
475, 348
274,483
137, 241
147, 273
141, 825
81, 730
42, 73.4
160

10, 468
3,835

10, 468
3,835

25, 483

117, 000
90, 000
135, 000

20, 365
"4i6,'875

30, 979, 630
91, 748, 275

12, 303, 246
71,135, 348

122, 727, 905

83, 438, 594

1, 402. 013
16,194; 067

14,116,134
87, 329, 415*
11, 794, 880
113, 240, 429

The amount of circulation issued to national banks for the year ending November 1, 1881, was $30,979,630, including $5,233,580 issued to
banks organized during the year. The amount retired during the year
Avas $14,075,054, and the actual increase for the same period was therefore $16,904,576, making the total on NTovember 1, $359,422,738, which
is the largest amount outstanding at any one time.
During the year ending JNovember 1,1881, lawful money to the amount
of $23,847,844 was deposited Avith the Treasurer to retire circulation, of
which amount $1,554,790 was deposited by banks in liquidation. The
amount previously deposited under the act of June 20, 1874, was $85,:
684,998; by banks in liquidation, $18,390,555, to which is to be added a
balance of $3,813,675, remaining from deposits made by liquidating



245

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

banks prior to the passage of that act. Deducting from the total the
amount of circulating notes redeemed and destroyed without reissue^
$101,034,675, there remained in the hands of the Treasurer on November 1, 1881, $30,702,596 of lawful money for the redemption and retirement of bank cir€ulationo
C I R C U L A T m a NOTES OF THE BANK OF FRANCE AND IMPERIAL BANK
OF GERMANY, BY DENOMINATIONS—NATION AL-BANK .AND LEGALTENDER NOTES, BY DENOMINATIONS.
,

The following table* exhibits by denominations the circulation ofthe
Imiierial Bank of Germany, on January 1, 1881, in thalers and marks,
Avhich are here converted into our currency:
Tbalers.

N u m b e r Deaaomiaia- V a l u e o f
each p i e c e
of p i e c e s .
tions.
i n djollars.

2,
1,
8
9,

81
246
690^
726
026^

50O
100
50
25
10

thalers.
thalers. •
thaiers.
thalers.
thalers.

Marks.

!

375
75
S7
18
1

A m o u n t iii
d o l l a r s . ISTumher of
(Thaler—
pieces.
75 c e a t s . )

00
00
50
75
.50

21, 770

.30. 375
168,450
63, 394
163, 612
67, 699

260, 5'82
217, 449
4, 348, 382^

493,530

4, .826, 413^

Denominations.

V a l u e of
each piece
i n dollars-

^50
125
25

1, 000 m a r k s .
500 m a r k s .
lOG m a r k s .

A n i o u n t in
dollars.
(Marks=
25 cent.)
65,145, 500
•27,181,125
106, 709, 562

201, .036,187

The circulation of the Imperial Bank of Germany, on January 1,1879?
.was $165,933,942; its circulation on January 1, 1880, was $198,201,144;
showing an increase of $32,267,202 during that year.
The following tablet gives the circulation of the Bank of France and
its branches, Avith the number of pieces^ and the denom.inations in francs
and in dollars, on January 27, 1881:

5
1, 370, 596
712, 243
2,889
7, 555, 345
671,119
25, 587
282, 999
189, 095
L224

V a l u e of each p i e c e
A m o u n t i n fraaacs. A m o u n t in d o l l a r s .
in dollars.
( F r a n c = 20 cents.)

Denomiaations.

ISTumber of p i e c e s .

1

5, 000 ft-aucs.
1, 000 francs.
500 francs.
,
20O francs.o
100 francs.
50 francs.
25 francs20 fr-ancs.
5 francs.
F o r m s o u t of d a t e .

10, 811,102

1
;
;
j
|
1
i

1,000
206
100
40
20
10
5
4
1

25, OOO
i, 370, 596, 000
356,121,500
577,800
755, 534, 500
33, 555, 950
.
639,675
5, 659, 980
945, 475
425, 900
2,524, 081, ISO

,

5,000
274,119, 200 •
71, 224, 300
115,560
151.106,900
61, 711,190
127, 93B
1,131,996
189,095 .
S5,180
504, 816, 356

The amount of circulation of the Bank of France on Janizary 29,1880,
was 2,321,474,365 fraucs, or, say, $464,294,873, showing an increase
betAveen that time and January 27,1881, the date of the foregoing table,
of 202,607,415 francs, or $40,521,483.
* London Bankers' Magazine for Septeniber, 1881, page 706.




tIbid., page 719.

246

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

I t will be seen that the Imperial Bank of Germany issues no notes
of a less denomination than $7.50, and that the Bank of France issues
less than two millions of dollars in notes of a less denomination than
five dollars. The Bank bf^England issues no notes of less than twentyfiA-e dollars, and the Banks of Ireland and Scotland none of less than
five dollars.
The amount of circulation in this country in denominations of five
dollars and under, on November 1, 1880, Avas $214,326,838. In the foreign countries named a large amount of silver and gold coin of the
lower denominations enters into general circulation. It will be impossible to keep in circulation here any large amount of small gold coins or
silver dollars, unless the coinage of the latter is restricted and the small
notes AVithdrawn.
In accordance with law, no national-bank notes of denominations less
than five dollars have been issued since the 1st of January, 1879. Since
that date the amount of ones and twos has been reduced $5,867,465,
and durin^^ the same period the amount of legal-tender notes of these
denominations has been increased $7,903,621. During the last year the
amount of naticmal-bank notes of these denominations has decreased
$1,648,440. The.total increase, therefore, of the amount of one and two
dollar bills outstanding, in national-bank and legal-tender notes, is
$6,255,181.
'
'
.
. •
The following table shows, by denominations, the amount of nationalbank and legal-tender notes ontstanding on iL^Tovember 1, 1881, and the
aggregate amounts of both kinds of notes at the same date in 1879 and
1880:
1881.

Denominations.

NationalLegal-tender
b a n k notes.'
notes.

Ones
Twos
rives
-.Tens
Twenties
Jj'ifties
One hnndieds
-..
Five hundreds
One thou sa.n ds
r i v e thousands
Ten thousands
Add for unredeemed fragments
of J1 ati onal-bank notes
Deduct for legal-tender notes
destroyed in Chicago fire..
Totals

-.

$1, 329,112
522,170
100, 480, 080
121, 308, 840
81,116, 500
23, 284, 200
29, 951, 000
732, 000
201, 000

Aggregate.

1880.

1879.

Aggregate.

Aggregate.

$24, 464, 059
23, 732,196
67, 899, 982
75, 408, 831
70,'806, 003
23,157, 575
33,239,370
14, 217, 500
12, 065, 500
2,430, 000
260, 000

$25, 793,171
24, 254, 366
168, 380, 062
196, 717, 671
151, 922, 503
46, 441, 775
63,190, 370
14, 949, 500
12, 266, 500
2, 430, 000
260, 000
+ 1 6 , 586

+15,129

+ 1 3 , 586

— 1 , 000, 000

— 1 , 000, 000

— 1 , 000, 000

— 1 , 000, 000

358, 941, 488 • 346,681,016

705, 622, 504

688, 744, 467

681, 815, 520

+16, 586

$24, 247, 362
23, 036. 578
167, 042, 898
189, 655, 588
147. 719,^837
45, 777, 475
59, 958, 600
16, 765, 500 14, 640, 500
565, 000
320, 000

$22, 887. 502
21, 030, 863
159, 522, 853
181, 447, 558
141, 445, 933
46,177, 945
58, 339, 780
23, 088, 000
23, 111, 500.
3, 250, 000
2,500„000

The written signatures of the officers of the banks are necessary as
an additional precaution against counterfeiting. It is recommended
that a bill fbr preventing the lithographing or printing of the signatures of ofiicers of banks, now required by laAv to be written on the
notes, be passed by Congress, imposing a penalty of twenty dollars for
a Aiolation thereof.
REDEMPTIONS.

Section 3 of the act of June 20,1874, provides that CA^ery national bank
*^ shall at all times keep and have oil deposit in the Treasury of the



247

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

United States, in lawful money of the United States, a sum equalto fiA^e
per centum of its circulation, to be held and used for the redemption of
such circulation." Since the passage of ^this act tbe banks have, as a
rule, maintained their redemption fund, and their circulating notes have
been promptly redeemed at the Treasury, without expense to the government.
The following table exhibits the amountof national-bank notes received
for redemption monthly, by the Comptroller of the Currency, for the year
ending October 31, 1881, and the ainount receiA^ed for the same period
at the redemption agency of the Treasury, together with the total amo.unt
received since the passage of the act of June 20, 1874:
Eeceived b y t h e Comptroller.
Months.

1880.
ISTovember
December
1881.
January
Pebruary
March
April
May
....
June...July
August
September
October

Prom national
b a n k s for l e - F r o m r e d e m p tion agency
. i s s u e or sur- for r e i s s u e .
render.

N o t e s of nationalbanks Under a c t
i n l i q u i d a - of J u n e 20,
1874.
tion.

Total.

Received a t
redemption
ageucy-

$11, 600
42, 700

$2, 596, 200
2, 824, 500

$78, 305
146, 741

$558,194
225, 647

$3, 244, 299
3, 239, 588

$3,369,417
4,151, 971

77, 624
29, 905
55, 230
24, 400
3,205
14, 900
50
20, 850
58, 710
^ 67,720

3, 218, 900
4, 005, 600
3, 251, 400
3, 071, 800
4, 659, 300
6. 220, 800
3,149, 800
3,467, 500
2,178, 700
3, 789, 600

203, 374
139, 613
125,155
143, 025
' 98,066
310, 635
57, 214
99, 885
69, 233
155, 472

656, 677
751, 995
858, 932
2, 231, 988
1, 540, 498
2, 239, 566
647, 235
1,184, 073
624, 066
740, 834

4,156, .575
4, 927,113
4, 290, 717
5,471,213
6, 301, 069
8,785,901
3, 8.54, 299
4,772, 308
2, 930, 709
4, 753, 626

5, 550, 743
4, 498, 501
4. 804, 393
6, 850, 425
8, 035, 983
7,151,961
4; 988, 307
4, 540, 053
3, 622, 833
4, 945, 668

406,894

42,434,100

1, 626, 718

12, 259, 705

56, 727, 417

62,510,255

.

Totals
K e c e i v e d frora J u n e
20, 1874, t o Octob e r 31, 1880

12, 667,195

387, 314,155

16, 069, 075

71, 345, 508

487, 395, 933

1, 038, 013, 014

G-rand t o t a l s .

13, 074, 089

429. 748, 255

17, 695, 793

83,605,213

544,123, 350

1,100, 523, 269

From the passage of the act of June 20,1874, to October 31,1881, there
was received at the redemption agency of the Treasury $1,100,523,269
of national-bank currency. During the year ending October 31,1881,
there was received $62,510,225; of which'amount $23,923,000, or about
38 per cent., was received from banks in New York City, and $5,679,000,
or about 9 per cent., was received from banks in the city of BostoUc
The amount received from Philadelphia was $5,169,000; from Baltimore, $723,000; Pittsburgh, $624,000; Cincinnati, $1,023,000; Chicago,
$2,777,000; Saint Louis, $732,000; Providence, $1,415,000. The amount
of circulating notes fit for circulation returned by the redemption agency
to the banks of issue dnring the year Avas $4,536,200.
The total amount received by the Comptroller of the Currency for
destruction, from the redemption agency and from the national banks
direct, was $56,727,417. Of this amount, $5,836,203 were issues of banks
in the city of New York, $5,819,519 of Boston, $2,275,055 of Philadelphia, $912,700 of Baltimore, $971,483 of Pittsburgh, $409,300 of Cincinnati, $138,330 of Chicago, $105,800 of Saiut Louis, $1,786,791 of Providence, and of each of the other principal cities less than $400,000.
The folloAving table exhibits the number and amount of national-bank
notes, ofeach denomination, which have been issued and redeemed since




248

REPORT ON THE

CURRENCY.

the organization of the system, and the number and amount outstanding
on November 1, 1881:
Number.

Amount.

Denominations.
Issued.

23,167, 677
7,747.519
73, 612, 504
29,477,-519
8, 940. 817
1, 357. 574
959, 712
21, 959
7,144

21, 838, 565
7, 486, 434
53,516,488
17, 346, 635
4, 884, 992
891, 890
660, 202
20, 495
6,943

145, 292, 425

106, 652, 644

Ones
Twos - -Fives
Tens
Twenties
Fifties
One h u n d r e d s
Pive hundreds
One t h o u s a n d s
P o r t i o n s of n o t e s
Totals

Eedeemed.

Outstanding.

Eedeemed.

Outstanding.

$23,167, 677
15,495,038
368, 062, 520
294, 775,190
178, 816, 340
67, 878, 700
95, 971, 200
10, 979, 500
7,144, 000

$21, 838, 565
14, 972, 868
267, 582, 440
173,466,350
97, 699, 840
44, 594, 500
66, 020, 200
10, 247, 500
6, 943, 000

$1, 329,112
522,170
100, 480, 080
121, 308, 840
81,116, 500
23, 284, 200
29, 951, 000
732, 000
201, 000

—16, 586

+ 1 6 , 586

38, 639, 781 1, 062, 290,165

703, 348, 677

358, 941, 488

Issued.

1, 329,112
261, 085
20, 096, 016
12,130,884
4, 055, 825
465, 684
299, 510
1,464
201

A table showing the numbers and denominations of national-bank notes
issued and redeemed, and the numberof eackdenomination outstanding
on November 1 for the last thirteen years, will be found in the Appendix.
The following table shows the amount of national-bank notes received
at this office and destroyed yearly since the establishmentof the system:
Prior to November 1,1865
During the year ending October 31,1866
Daring the year ending October 31,1867.
Dnring the year ending October 31,1868
Dnring the year ending October 31,1869
Dnring the year ending October 31,1870.'
Dnring tbe year ending October 31,1871
Dnring tbe year ending October 31,1872
During t h e y e a r ending October 31,1873
During the year endiug October. 31,1874
During the year ending October 31,1875
During the year ending October 31,1876
During the year ending October 31,1877
Duriug the year ending October 31,1878
".
During the year ending October 31,1879
During the year eu ding October 31, l.s80
Dj.iring the year endiug October 31,1881
Additional amount of notes of national, banks in liquidation
Total...

:

,

....
J..

$175,490
1,050,382
3,401,423
4,602,825
8,603,729
1 14,305,689
24, 344, 047
30,211,720
36,433,171
49,939,741
137, 697, 696
98, 672,716
.76,918, 963
57,381,249
41,101,830
35, 539,660
54,941,130
28,027,215
703,348,676

The ainount of one and two dollar notes outstanding is but one-half
of oue per cent, of the whole circulation of the banks, the fives constitute 28 per cent., the tens 33.8 per cent., the twenties 22,6 per cent.,
while the fifties and OA'^er are only 15.1 per cent, of the ^entire circulation. While the amount of ones and twos of the national bank circulation is steadily diminishing, the legal-tender notes of these denominations are as steadily increasing. Of the entire amount of nationalbank and legal-tender notes outstanding, nearly 7.1 per cent, consists
of one and two dollar notes, more than 30.9 per cent of ones, twos, and
fives, more than 58.8 per cent, is in notes of a less denomination than




249

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

twenty'dollars, while about 80.4 per cent, is in notes of a lower denomination than fifty dollars. Of the entire issue, about 19.4 per cent, is in denominations of fifties, one hundreds, five hundreds, and one thousandSo
There are also outstanding 486 legal-tender notes of the denomination
offiA^ethousand, and 26 notes of the denomination of ten thousando
RESERVE.

The following table exhibits the amount of net deposits, and the reserve required thereon by the act of June 20, 1874, together with the
amount and classification of reserve held by the national banks in I^Tew
York Gity, in the other reserve cities, and by the remaining banks, at
the dates of their reports in October of each year from 1875 to 1881:
N E W TOEK C I T T .

Numb e r of N e t de- E e s e r v e
b a n k s posits. required.

Millions.

O c t o b e r 1,1875.
O c t o b e r 2,1876
O c t o b e r 1,1877
O c t o b e r l 1878
O c t o b e r 2,1879O c t o b e r 1,1880.
O c t o b e r 1,1881.

48
47
47
47
4-7
47
48

202.3
197.9
174.9
189.8
210.2
•268.1
268.8

Millions.

50.6
49.5
43.7
47.4
52.6
67.0
67.2

Eeserve held.
Amount.
Millions.

60.5
60.7
48.1
50.9
53.1
70.6
62.5

Classification of r e s e r v e .

Eatio to
O t b e r law- D n e from E e d e m p Specie. ful m a n e y . a g e n t s : tion fund.
deposits.
Per cent
29. Q

30.7
27.5
26.8
25.3
26.4
23.3

Millionsr

5.0
14.6
13.0
13.3
19.4
58. T
50.6

Millions.

MiU'iono.

Millions.

54.4
45.3
34.3
36.5
32.6
11.0
10.9

1

1.1
0L8
0.8
1.1
1.1
0.9
1.0

OTHEE E E S E E V E CITIES.

O c t o b e r 1,1875
O c t o b e r 2,1876
O c t o b e r 1,1877
O c t o b e r l , 1878.
O e t o b e r 2,1879.
O c t o b e r 1,18S0.
O c t o b e r l , 1881.

188
189
188
184
181
184
189

223.9
217.0
204.1
199.9
228.8
289.4
335.4

56.0
54.2
51.0
50.0
57.2
72.4
83.9

74.5
76.1
67.3
71.1
83.5
105. 2.
100.8

33.3 '
35.1
33.0
35.6
36.5
36.3
30.0

37.1
37.1
34.3
29.. 4
33.0
25.0
21.9

32.3
32.0
24.4
29.1
35 7
.4&2
40.6

S.G
3.0
3.&3.2
3.5
3.7
3.7

1.6
2.. 7
4.2
8.0
11.5
21.2
27.5

33.7
31.0
31. 6
31.1

53.3
55.4
48.9
56.0
71.3
86 4
92.4

11.5
10.8
10.7
11.0
11.2
11.3
11.4

8.1
21.3
22.8
30.7
42 2
108.2
112.7

125. 2
113.4
100.2
97.0
95.9
64.3
59.9

1.5
4.0
5.6
9.4
11.3
28.3
34.6

STATES AND T E E E I T O E I E S .
O c t o b e r l , 1875.
O c t o b e r 2,1876.
O c t o b e r l , 1877.
O c t o b e r 1,1878
O c t o b e r 2,1879.
O c t o b e r l , 1880.
O c t o b e r l , 1881.

1, 851
1, 853
1.845
1, 822
1,820
1,859
1,895

307.9
291.7
290.1
289.1
329.9
410.5
507.2

46.3
43.8
43.6
43.4
49.5
61.6
76.1

100.1
99.9
95.4
106.1
124.3
147.2
158.3

32.5
34.3
32.9
36.7
37.7
35.8
31.2

m.d.
28.3
27.1

SUMMAET.

O c t o b e r l , 1875.
O c t o b e r 2,1876.
O c t o b e r 1,1877.
O c t o b e r l , 1878.
O c t o b e r 2,1879.
O c t o b e r 1,1880.
O c t o b e r l , 1881.

734.1
2,087
706 6
2,089
2,080
669.1
2,053
678.8
768.9
2,048
2,000
968.0
2,132 1, 111. 6




152.2
147.5
138.3
140.8
159. 3
201.0
227.2

235.1
236 7
210. 8
228.1
260.9
323.0
321.6

32.0
33.5
31.5
33.6
33.9
33.4
28.9

!
85.6
87.4
73.3
85.1
. 107.0134.6
. 133.0

16.2
14.6
14.5
. 15.3
15.8
15.9
16.1

250

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

Thefollowing table, compiled from returns made to the clearing-house
by the national banks in New York City, exhibits the movement of their
reserA^e, weekly, during October, for the last eight years:
E a t i o of r e s e r v e t o Week ending-

October
Ootober
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
'October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October
October

4,1873
11,1873
18,1873
25.1873
3,1874
10,1874
17,1874
24,1874
31,1874,
2,1875
9,1875
16,1875
23, 1875
30,1875
7,1876
14,1876
21,1876
28,1876
6,1877
13, .1877
20,1877
27,1877
5,1878
12,1878
19,1878
26,1878
4,1879
11,1879
18.1879
25,1879
2,3880
9,1880
16,3880
23,1880
30,1880
1,1881
8,3.881
15,1881
22,1881
29,1881

Specie.

240, 300
506, 900
650,100
433, 500
373, 400
517, 700
691, 400
457, 900
324, 900
438, 900
716, 200
528, 500
735, 000
975, 600
682, 600
233,600
577, 500
011,600
665, 600
720, 500
087, 400
209, 000
995, 800
184,600
531, 400
384, 200
979, 600
901, 800
686, 500
636, 000
823, 700
521,300
760, 600
888, 200
471, 600
954, 600
287, 900
008, 300
016, 200
961, 200

Legal tenders.

$9, 251, 900
' 8, 049, 300
.5,179, 800
7,187, 300
53, 297, 600
52.152, 000
53,855,100
49, 893, 900
50, 773, 000
56,181, 500
51, 342, 300
48, 582, 700
47, 300, 900
45, 762, 800
45, 535, 600
43, 004, 600
41, 421, 700
41, 645, 600
36,168, 300
35,178, 900
35,101, 700
34, 367, 800
38, 304, 900
37,685,3 00
36, 576, 000
35, 690, 500
34, 368, 000
32, 820, 300
29, 305, 200
26, 713, 900
11,329,100
10, 785, 000
10, 939, 200
10, 988, 200
10, 925, 000
12,150, 400
12.153, 800
12, 452, 700
12, 496, 500
12, 947, 900

Total.

Circnlation and D e p o s i t s .
deposits.

P e r cent. P e r cent.
$18, 492, 200
11.6
14.0
18, 556, 200
11.6
14.1
16, 829. 900
10.7
13.0
18, 620, 800
12 2
14.8
68,671,000
30.0
33.9
29.6
33.3
66, 669, 700
29.0
32.7
64, 546, 500
•28.8
31.7
61, 351, 800
27. 9
31.6
61, 097, 900
28.1
30.6
61, 620, 400
26.5
28.9
57, 058, 500
. 25.4
27.7
54,111,200
'
27.7
53, 035, 900
' 25.3
29.0
26 5
54, 738, 400
3
2 4
30.5
63, 2.18, 200
31.1
28,8
, 59, 238, 200
30.0
27.8
56, 999, 200
30.3
28.0
55, 657, 200
29.5
27.0
. 50, 833, 900
29.2,
26.7
49, 905, 400
29 0
26 5
49,189,100
29.4
26 8
49, 576, 800
28.4
25.7
53, 300, 700
27.0
24.4
49, 869, 700
27. 3
24.7
50,107, 400
28.5
53, 074, 700
' 25. 8
25.8
• 53, 347,t)00
23.3
25.9
53, 722, 100
23.4
26.1
53, 991, 700
23.5
25.5
52, 349, 900
23.0
•
26 4
• 25.4
70, 952, 800
27.2
73, 306, 300
. 25.4
27.1
73,699,800
25.5
26.6
24.9
71, 876, 400
26.7
25.0
72, 396, 600
.24.8
23.1
67, 105, 0.00
24.9
23.1
65, 441, 700
25.0
23.2
63, 461, 000
26.6
24.6
66, 512, 700
27.4
25.6
68, 909,100

APPENDIX.

Tables will be found in the appendix, exhibiting the reserve of the
national banks as shoAvn by their reports, from October 2,1874, to October 1,1881; the reserve by States ancl principal cities for October 1,1881;
and in the States and Territories, in ISTew York City, and in the other,
reserve cities, separately, at three dates in each year, from 1878 to 1881.
Special attention is called to the synopsis of judicial decisions contained
in the appendix, to the numerous and carefully prepared tables in both
report and appendix, and to the index of subjects and list of tables to be
found at the close of the appendix. At the end of the full volume of
more than seven hundred pages is an alphabetical list of the cities and
villages in which the national banks are situated.
In concluding this report the Comptroller gratefully acknowledges the
zeal and efficiency of the officers and clerks associated with him in the
discharge of ofiicial duties.
JOHN J A Y KNOX,
Comptroller of the Currency,
Hon.

JOSEPH WARREN KEIFER,

Speaker of the House of Representatives.
* The appendix, wMcli is ouiitted for want of space, may be found in 'the bound
volumes of the Comptroller's report.



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.




2,51




REPORT
OF

THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
B U R E A U OF T H E M I N T ,

November.!^ 1881,
S I R : I haA^e the honor to iiresent my third and the ninth annual report from this bureau, showing the operations of the mints and assay
oihces of the United States for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1881.
The influx of gold from foreign countries, noticed in my last re])ort,
continued during the year, giAnng a net import of $5,836,058, American
golcl coiu, and of $91,715,012 foreign coin and bullion.
This has not only largely increased the work of this bureau but the
business and operations of the New York assay ofifice, where $91,499,168.61
of foreign gold was received, and of the Philadelphia mint, to which it
was sent for coinage. Besides this heaA^y import, the American mines
have maintained [Avithin a few thousand dollars], a gold production equaling that bf the preceding year.
DEPOSITS AND PURCHASES.

The bullion and coin received and operated upon'during the year, at
all the mints and assay offices, including redeposits, containeci $193,371,101.01 of gold and $32,854,421.45 of silver, a total of $226,225,522.46,
exceeding in value the receipts of any previous year by more than
$50,000,000.
The reports and accounts submitted to this bureau show, during the
year, deposits of gold of domestic production, $35,815,036.55; of plate,
jewelry, and worn coin, $1,784,207.90; and of foreign coin and bullion,
$93,233,858; being a total of $130,833,102.45, and thirty-two millions
in excess of the gold deposits of last year.
The silver bullion deposits and iiurchaises, including partings from
gold, amounted at the coining A-alue to $30,791,146.66, of Avhich
$28,477,059.21 consisted of domestic bullion, $2,046,576.80 of foreign coin
and bullion, and $267,510.65 of plate, jewelry, and American coin. The
following table shows the aniount and character of the deposits :
Oold.
Domestic production
U n i t e d S t a t e s coin
F o r e i g n bullion
F o r e i g n coin
Old j e w e l r y , p l a t e , &c
Total




$35,815,036
440, 776
37, 771, 472
55, 462, 385
1, 343, 43^^

Silver.
55
97
26
74
93

130, 833,102 45

$28, 477, 059
7, 307
1,312,144
734,432
260, 203

Total.
21
40
58
22
25

30, 791,146 66

$64, 292, 095
448, 084
39, 083, 616
56,196, 817
1, 603, 634

76
37
84
96
18

161,624,249 11

253

254

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

A portion of these deposits were manufactured at the institutions receiAdng them into bars, which were again deposited or transferred to
other institutions for treatment or coinage. The redeposits for this purpose amounted to $62,537,998.56 in gold, and to $2,063,274.79 in sih-er.
COINAGE.

A t the commencement of the fiscal year the coinage mints and assay
offices held ,$40,724,337.91 of uncoined gold bullion. The deposits of
the year, amounting to $130,833,102.45, increased the stock of bullion
available for coinage to $171,557,440.36.
The AT-alue of the total gold coinage of the year was $78,733,864, and
of the gold bullion uncoined at its close, $86,548,696.96, a portion of the.
deposits having been paid in fine bais.
The silver coinage amounted to $27,649,966.75, of which $27,637,955
were silver dollars, and $12,011.75 proof silver coins of other denominations.
The coinage of gold into smaller denominations than heretofore executed was continued, only $15,345,520 in double eagles having been
struck, while the eagles and halfeagles amounted to $63,371,230.
Nearly all of the gold produced on the Pacific coast was deposited
and coined at the San Francisco Mint, while the principal part of the
gold coined at the Philadelphia Mint consisted of New Ybrk Assay
Office bars manufactured from imported bullion and coiUo
The number of pieces and the value of the total coinage were as follows :
Pieces.
Gold
Silver
Minor •

v
w.

. > .

Total

.'

Value.

10, 111, 115
27, 698, 820
38, 335, 665

$78, 733, 864 00
27, 649, 966 75
405 109 95

76,145, 600

106,788,940 70

The comparative values of the coinage of gold, silver, and minor coins
executed during the fiscal year and the calenclar year 1880 are as follows:
Calendar year
1880.

Fiscal year
1881.

$62, 308, 279 00
27,409, 706 75

$78,733, 864 00
27,649, 966 75

Total

89, 717, 985 75
391, 395 95

106, 383, 830 7 5
405,109 95

Total coinage

90,109,381 70

106, 788, 940 70

Gold
Silver
Minor

The gold coinage of the mints prior to theyear 1873 has been grouped
and tabulated into three divisions. The first embracing the forty years
from the commencement of coinage at the Philadelphia Mint in 1834 to
the time of the change in the ratio of gold and sih^^er and the reduced
valuation of the gold dollar to correspond therewith, during which period
$11,915,890 of gold were coined.
The second from 1834 to 1849, when gold from California first began
to arrive at the mints, adding $64,425,550 to the gold coinage.




255

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT,

The third from 1849 to 1873, during which time $740,564,438.50 were
coined.
The coinage of silver before 1873 is separated into two periods: The
first containing the coinage prior to 1853, during AA^hich time all the sih
A^er coins, amounting in value to $79,213,371.90, were full weight and
unlimited legal tender.
The second from 1853 to 1873, when fractional silver of reduced weight
and limited tender to the amount of $60,389,564.70 was coined on government account; but, although the mints were open to individuals for
the coinage of full-weight sih-er dollars, only $5^538,948 of the latter
were coined.
BARS.

Fine, standard, sterling, and unparted bars were manufactured during
the year to the value of $100,750,649.94 in gold and $6,542,232,35 in
silver.
At the New York Assay Office $89,643,135.29 of gold deposits were
made into bars for conversion into coin at the mint at Philadelphia.
The value of fine gold bars manufactured at the mints and assay
offices was $10,041,482.78 and of the unparted bars $1,066,031.87. Of
the silver bars $5,857,276.98 were fine, $77,611.39 were standard and
sterling, $88,296.45 unparted, and $519,047.53 Avere made at the NCAV
York Assay Ofifice and transmitted to Philadelphia for coinage.
PARTING AND REFINING-.

During the year, 11,449,704,19 stress ounces of bullion, containing both
gold and silver or base metals, were sent to the acid refineries of the coinage mints and assay office at New York for parting or refining, from
AYhich were separated or refined 1,295,443.259 ounces of standard gold
and 9,774,730.86 ounces of standard silver.
The folloAving table exhibits in detail the gross ounces of bullion sent
to the respective renneries and the ounces of standard gold and silver
received therefrom:
OUNCES.

M i n t or a s s a y office.

Gross.

Pliiladelphia.
San F r a n c i s c o
Carson
. N e w Orleans .
New York —
Total...

S t a n d a r d gold. S t a n d a r d silver.

535, 770. 27
6, 507, 762. 50
625, 785. 05
13, 886 37
3, 866, 500. 00

125, 700. 460
• 612, 429. 779
27, 819. 475
2, 798. 545
526, 700. 000

389,617.83
5. 591, 629.12
507, 723. 00
] 1, 860. 91
3, 273, 900. 00

11, 449, 704.19

1, 295, 443. 259

9, 774, 780. g

VALUE.

M i n t or a s s a y office".
Pbilarl e l p b i a .
San Francisco
Carson
N e w Orleans .
New York

Total ...




Gold,

Silver.

Total.

$2, 338, 613 21
11, 394, 042 40
517,571 62
51, 972 93
9, 799, 069 76

$453, 373 47 $2, 791,.986 68
6, 506, 622 98 17, 900, 665 38
590, 804 94 1,108, 376 56
13,801 78
65, 774 71
3, 809, 629 09 13, 608, 698 85

24,101, 269 92

11, 374, 232 26 35, 475, 502 18

256

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
DIES AND MEDALS.

During the year the engraver of the mint at Philadelphia prepared
1,229 dies for coinage, and 13 for medals and experimental pieces, a total
of 1,242.
The mints at San Francisco, Carson, and New Orleans are supplied
with coinage dies by the Philadelphia Mint, the latter being the only
one provided with an engraving department.
The number of medals made was 1,682, of Avhich 112 were struck in
fine gold, 1,196 in tine silver, and 374 in bronze copper.
SILVER PURCHASES.

At the commencement of the last fiscal year there were on hand in the
coinage mints and New York Assay Office 5,403,980 ounces of standard
silA^^T bullion, worth, at its coining valne, $6,283,613. This bullion in
part consisted of 1,750,000 standard ounces procured prior to the passage of the resumption act, under the provisions of section 3545 of the
EcAised Statutes, and held as part of the bullion funcl for the immediate
payment of silver deposits in silver bars. A further portion, amouuting
to 2,500,000 standard ounces, had been purchased subsequent to January 14, 1875, the date of the resuhiption act, for the coinage of subsidiary silver, under the proAdsions of that act, or had been parted from
gold or receiA^ed in payment of charges on silver bullion, under sections
3520 and 3506. The remainder, about 1,400,000 standard ounces, A^as
obtained by direct purchase for the coinage of the standard dollar, or in
settlement for silver parted from gold, ancl in payment of charges on
silA^er deposits.
Notwithstanding the regular monthly coinage of 2,300,000 and upwards
of silver dollars, the purchases and deposits had increased the silver
bullion on hand January 1,1881, to 6,553,350 standard ounces, the cost of
which was $7,145,487, and its coinage value $7,625,717. Of this amount,
2,928,752.49 standard ounces were at the Philadelphia Mint.
The limit of subsidiary' coinage haAdng been reached, no necessity
existed for keeping on hand any sih-er for such coinage. It was, therefore, considered adAdsable by the Secretary of the Treasury to use in
the silver-dollar coinage the balance of sih-er that had been procured
for the subsidiary coinage, and to reduce the amount of monthly purchases, especially at the Philadelphia Mint, where, in Adew ofthe heavy
amount of gold coinage required, it was thought that sufficient silver
bullion had already been accumulated for the probable silver coinage
of that mint during the remainder of the fiscal year.
By includiug the 2,250,000 ounces of standa.rd silver as belonging to the
account of purchased silver, to be used in the coinage of the standard
dollar, it became necessary i30 reduce the amount on hand, so that not
more than $5,000,000 aboA^e the resulting coinage should be invested in
such purchases. The weekly purchases of the department were, therefore, much lighter during February and the succeeding months of the
year.
In the month of May, OAving to the higher prices asked and the small
amounts ofi'ered for delivery at the Pacific coast mints, the weekly purchases of silver bullion were reduced for San Francisco and resumed
at the Philadelphia Mint.
To enable the Philadelphia Mint to employ as much of its force as '
possible in the coinage of gold,.the monthly allotment of silver coinage
for the New Orleans Mint was increased and that for the Philadelphia



DIRECTOR

OF T H E

257

MINT.

Mint lessened, and to procure sufficient bullion to execute the required
<3oinage at the NCAV Orleans Mint, the owners of silver bullion Avere solicited to bid aud send their bullion for cleliA^ery at that mint.
The prices for deliA^ery in lots of less than ten thousand ounces at the
New Orleans Mint were. also fixed from time to time by the Director
of the Mint, slightly below the equiA^alent of the London price, and notices ofthe rates and changes Avere gwen to the smelting and refining
Avorks in the AA^estern States nearest to the mint, with the hope of inducing them to cleliA^er their sih-er bullion at NCAA^ Orleans. Two of these
refineries haA^e aA^ailed themselA^es ofthe aclA^antages of direct shiiiment,
.saAdiig the prcAdous expense of double transportation to and from the
Atlantic sea-board ancl benefiting the GoA^ernment as w^ell as tliemselA^es.
The purchases during the year, of sih-er bullion, were 21,904,351.54
standard ounces, at a cost of $22,339,728.67. The silA^er receiA^ed for
charges and parted from gold and iiaicl for as proAdded by sections 3520
and 3506 of the KcAdsed Statutes, costing $239,183.05, Avas 232,568.85
standard ounces, making the total amount purchased 22,136,920.39
standard ounces, at the cost of $22,578,9^11.72.
From the sih-er purchases of the year and the 2,250,000 standard
ounces, directed to be used and carried into the sih-er purchase account,
23,751,368 standard ounces, exclusiAT^e of sih-er bullion wasted and sold
in SAveeps, AA^ere consumed in the coinage of 27,633,955 standard dollars,.
being an aA-eragemonthly coinage of $2,303,166.
The London price of sih-er, during the year, aA^^eraged 51|f pence,
which with exchange at par ($4.8665) equals $1.13852 iier ounce, and at
. the NCAV York aA'erage inonthly price of sight exchange on London
($4,847) equals $1.13508 per ounce fine. The NCAV York average price
of silver during the year Avas $1.12957 per ounce fine.
The following statement shows the purchases a t t h e coining mints
and the NCAV York Assay Ofiice.
SILA'-ER P U R C H A S E S , 1881.
Purchases.
ixt w h i c h d e l i v e r e d .

Standard
ounces.

Cost.

Partings and received
for c h a r g e s .
Standard
• ounces.

Cost.

Total purchased.
Standard
ounces.

Cost.

Philadelphia.
San Prancisco
N e w Orleans
Carj5on C i t y
New York

6, 322,103. 90 $6, 458, 604 34
10, 236, 585.17 10, 412, 523 54
4, 839, 852. 28 4, 954, 753 78
513,847 01
505, 810.19

21, 726. 01
73. 373. 57
' 957.11
1, 912. 89
134, 599. 27

$21, 726 01 6, 343, 829, 91
73, 629 04 10, 309, 958. 74
957 47 4, 840, 809. 39
1, 912 89
507, 723. 08
134, 599. 27
140,957 64

$6, 480, 330
10, 486,152
4, 955, 711
515 759
140, 957

Total

21, 904, 351. 54 22, 339, 728 67

232, 568. 85

239,183 05 22,136, 920. 39

22, 578, 9i;i 7 2 ^

35
58
25
90
64

DISTRIBUTION OF SILVER.

Including the amounts paid out at the mints and exchanged for gold
Nas xirovided by law, $17,706,924 of the $27,637,955 silA'-er dollar coinage
of the year, haA^e been transmitted and distributed under the regulations mentioned in my last report.
The amount of standard dollars in the niints at the close of the fiscal
year, including $2,000,000 received at the New Orleans Mint, and
$1,000,000 at the Philadelphia Mint from assistant treasurers, was
$23,341,000.60, of which nearly $16,000,000 was in the San Francisco
•Mint.
17 F
^'^
• ,^



258

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The coinage a.nd distribution at each mint, as shoAvn by their statements to this bureau, appear in the following table:

'

AMOUNT of SILVEE DOLLARS BEPOBTED ly the COINAGE MINTS on S A N D
.June 30, 1880, COINED during and on HAND at CLOSE of the FISCAL YEAB ended
June 30, 1881.

On h a n d J u n e 30, 1880.. -•
C o i n a g e of y e a r
Total
I n m i n t s J u n e 30 1881
Distributed

.

.

Philadell)hia.

San Fr ancisco.

Carson.

NewOrleans.

$875, 942
9,113, 955

$5, 469, 769
11, 460, 000

$1,119, 700
539, 000

$2, 944, 618
,6, 525, 000

$10, 410, 029
27, 637, 955

9, 989, 897
n , 250, 802

16,929,769
15, 941,135

1, 658, 700
1, 060, 991

9, 469, 618
t5, 088,132

38, 047, 984
23, 341, 060

9, 739, 095

988, 634

597, 709

6, 381, 486

17, 706, 924

Total.

* I n c l u d e s $1,000,000 t r a n s f e r r e d from t h e T r e a s u r y .
t I n c l u d e s $2,000,000 t r a n s f e r r e d from t h e T r e a s u r y .

Besides the standard dollars remaining in the mints at the close ofthe
. year, considerable amounts had been deposited in the Treasury for the
payment of outstanding silver certificates.
The following table, compiled from the Treasurer's monthly statements
of assets and liabilities, shows in six months' periods from the commencement until the close of the last fiscal year and up to November 1,
1881, the amount (including that in the mints) in the Treasury, held for
the payment of siWer certificates ahd for other purposes and the amount
in general circulation:
COMPABATLVE STATEMENT of the COINAGE MOVEMENT and CIBCULATJON
of STAND ABD SILVEB DOLLABS at the end of each six months from July 1, 1880,
to July i, 1881, and for the four months ending November 1, 1881.
In the Treasury.

Period.

T o t a l coinage.

:H
. J u l y 1,1880
J a n u a r y 1,1881 - . J u l y 1,1881
• N o v e m h e r 1,1881.

I.f 63, 734, 750
77,453,005
"91, 372, 705
100, 672, 705

$5, 789, 569 $38, 635, 746 $44, 425, 315- $19, 309, 435
36.127, 711 12, 062, 807 48,190, 518
29,262,487
39, ] 10, 729 23, 433, 993 62, 544, 722 - 28, 827, 983
58, 838, 770
7, 737, 608 66, 576, 378
34, 096, 327

APPROPRIATIONS, EARNINGS, AND E X P E N D I T U R E S . '

The total appropriations for the support of the mints and assay offices during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881, amounted to $1,178,250,
out of which the sum of $1,160,347.71 was expended. In addition $97,311.60 was expended on account'of the mints and $7,440.14 at the Treasury Department, a total of $104,751.74 from the apxiropriation contained
in the act of February 28, 1878, authorizing the coinage of the standard
silA^er dollar.'



259-

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

The appropriations for and expenditures at the several mints and
assay offices are shown in the following table:
A P P R O P R I A T I O N S , 1881.

f I £i
Institution.

'=>z:A-^
Q

Philadelphia Mint..
San Francisco M i n t
Carson M i n t
N e w Orleans M i n t
Denver Mint
N e w Y o r k A s s a y Oflice.
H e l e n a A s s a y Offi ce
B o i s e C i t y A s s a y Office
C h a r l o t t e ' A s s a y Office .

$34, 850
24, 900
23, 550
21, 400
10, 950
32, 900
5, 950
3, 000
2, 750

00 5295, 000 00
00 265, 000 00
72, 000 00
00
80, 000 00
00
10, 000 00
00
00
22, 500 00
00
12, 000 00
00
00

160, 250 00

756, 500 00

C^ CC

Total,

TH

$82, 500 00
80, 000 00
30, 000. 00
'35, 000 00
6, 000 00
9, 000 00
12, 000 00
6, 000 00
1, 000 00

$412,350
369, 900
125, 550
136, 400
26, 950
64, 400
29, 950
9, 000
3, 750

261, 500 00

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

1,178, 250 OO

E X P E N D I T U R E S , 1881.
850
900
345
236
835
900
946
000
750

Philadelphia Mint
San. E r a n c i s c o M i n t
Carson M i n t
N e w Orleans M i n t
Denver Mint
N e w Y o r k A s s a y Office
H e l e n A s s a y Office
B o i s e C i t y A s s a y Office.
C h a r l o t t e A s s a y Oflice..

00 $294, 999 86
00 264, 302 47
61
71, 606 30
88
79, 923 01
80
9. 998 75
00
21, 776 00
73
lO; 958 66
00
00

159, 765 02

$82,497 57
;78, 712 48
7, 749 42
80, 000 00
22,649 86
134, 998 27 10, 849 70
4,133, 82
8, 563 90
8, 257 92
4, 916 30
1,000 00.
247, 017 64

97, 311 60

$491, 059
376, 951
117,601
147, 007
24, 968
63, 239
25,163
7, 916
3, 750

91
89^
77
86 •
37
90
31
30-.
00

1, 257, 659 3 1

" I n c l u d e s $5,000 for r e p a i r s a n d m a c h i n e r y .
t I n c l u d e s $4,999.58 for r e p a i r s a n d m a c h i n e r y .

R E F I N E R Y EARNINGS AND E X P E N D I T U R E S .

• During the year .$255,939.78 was collected from depositors, and^
$274,784.64 paid on account of parting and refining bullion.,
The following statement shows the amount collected for parting and
refining, and the payments for exiienditures in those operations, including that portion of the operative officers' Avastages and the loss on sale
of sweeps properly chargeable to that fund.
A much larger amount, consisting of undeposited refinery earnings
of previous years, Avas deposited in the Treasury to the credit of the
appropriation.
Included in the payments are expenses for railroad freight incurred
in prior years, the bills for Avhich were not rendered until the last fiscal
year.
Institution. -

Philadelphia Mint
San Francisco M i n t
Carson M i n t
N e w Y o r k A s s a y Office
Total




C h a r g e s collected.
$5, 399
161,441
9, 008
80, 090

89
22
33
34

255, 939 78

Expenditures.

$9,
170,
10,
84,

753
276
397
356

05
94
79
86

274,784 64

260

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The net excess of the earnings of the refineries over the expenses,
from the 1st of July, 1876, to June 30,1881, as shoAvn by the books of the
Treasury Department, amounted to $121,238.90.
ANNUAL ASSAY.

The commission appointed by the President to test the weight and
fineness of the coins reser\^ed for the annual assay, performed the cluty
at the time cfesignated by law, and the records of their proceedings
show that all the coins tested by them were found td be within the limits
of exactness required by law, as to Aveight, and that A^ery few varied
from the standard by one-haif the tolerance.
As to fineness, the record states that in all cases, both in mass and
single pieces, the coins from Philadelphia, San Francisco, and New
Orleans were found to be correct, and safely within the limits of tolerance. But the committee on assaying reported that, in the case of the
Carson Mint, they found the assay of mass melt of silver to be very
low, but within tolerance, and that one single piece showed a fineness
below the limits of tolerance. This fact was reported to the President,
as required by law.
The assayer ofthe Mint Bureau, in October, 1880, in his assay of the
coins required monthly to be forwarded to the Director, for test, had
discoA^ered that a silver coin of the Carson Mint, from the coiner's July
deliA^ery of that year, Avas below the legal limit of tolerance. The
superintendent of that mint was immediately directed not to pay out,
but to retain in his possession all ofthe coins of that deliA^ery, and to seal
up, until further orders, all packages which might contain any of such
<coins, after selecting and forA\^arding to the Director sample coins from
-each package for further test. Ninety-six packages, each containing one
thousand dollars, ^were thus sealed up and reserved for further assays at
t h e bureau, and a special examination made by Andrew Mason, melter
and refiner ofthe NCAV York Assay Office, in conformity Avith the order of
the President to investigate the matter, confirmed the previous assays,
^nd demonstrated that the fineness.of a certain bar of bullion, about to be
melted for coinage, had been incorrectlj^ stated to the melter and refiner
of the Carson Mint, and that ingots of defective fineness macle therefrom had afterward passed the assay department of that mint without
detection. I t did not appear that the error had occurred through the
neglect of the assayer's subordinates, ancl as the assayer himself had
died shortly after the first discovery of the defective cdinage, it became unnecessary to take any further action, except to order all the
<3oins contained in the 96 packages to be remelted for coinage, A^^hich
was done.
ESTIMATION OF THE VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS.

. The values of foreign coiiis were estimated by the Director of the Mint,
and proclaimed by the Secretary of the Treasury on thefirst of January
of the current year, as required by law. The comiiutation of their
values was made in the same manner as that of the prcAdous year. No
change in the value of the gold coins will be found, excepting that
resulting from,.more accurate information or recent modificationsof the
laAv prescribing their weight and fineness.
The commercial A-alue of silver bullion for the tiine the estimation was
made haAdng fallen about 1.56 per cent, from its A-alue for a like period
of the preceding year, the A-alue of sih-er coins based on the market rate
<of sih-er Avei:e .correspondingly reduced.



DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

261

B^^ reason of this decline in the A-alue of sih^^er, and the more recent
and reliable information, the values of foreign golcl aiid sih'er coins were
modified from those proclaimed in 1880, as follows:
The florin of Austria Avas reduced from 41.3 cents to 40.7; the bolivi>
ano of Bolivia from 83.6 to 82.3 5 the milreis of Brazil increased from 54.5
to 54.6; the peso of Ecuador reduced from 83.6 to 82.3; the rupee of
India from 39.7 to 39. Japan haAdng adopted the free-coinage system
fbr silver, the jeii^ A\^hich was formerly giA^en as 99.7 in ^old, is now
88.8 in silyer. The Mexican dollar froih 90.9 to 89.4; the sol of Peru
from 83.6 to 82.3; the rouble of Eussia from 66.9 to 65.8-, the mahbub of
Tripoli from 74.8 to 74.3; the peso of Colombia from'83.6 to 82.3; the
peso of Cuba Avas giA^en at 93.2, and the bolivar of Yenezuela at 19.3«
The monetary unit of Egypt, which formerly was stated as. the pound a t
$4,974, is IIOAV fixed as the piaster, .049.
EXAMINATIONS AND ANNUAL SETTLEMENTS.

The usual examinations and settlements AA^ere macle at the close ofthe
fiscal year at all the mints and at the NCAV York Assay Office. The director personally superintended the closing ofthe settlements at Philadelphia and New York, andrepresentatiA^es of the bureau Avere detailed t o
take charge of the settlements at NCAV Orleans, Carson, a;nd San Fran-Cisco.
The magnitude and importance of these settlements are evident Avheni
it is known that they coA^ered for the last year transactions and actual
transfers betAveen the superihteiident and operative officers of gold ancl
silver bullion to the A-alue of $603,230,121, and that bullion and funds,
amounting at the time of settlement to $128,318,274 were examined^
counted, or weighed, and their A^^alue ascertained.
A t each institution the superintendent, after the delivery to him of
the bullion in the hands of the operative officers, Avas, upon taking account of the coin, bullion, and other moneys in his possession, found t(>
hold the amount requirecl by his accounts Avith the Treasury.
The Avastage of each of the operative officers Avas found to be Avithin
the legal limit, and the total AN^astage cluring the year Avas, considering
the amount receiA^ed and worked, much less than that of the preceding
year.
The total amount operated upon in the melter and refiner's department of the mints and the New York Assay Office <^Avas, of gold bullion,
16,319,460 standard ounces, on which the legal limit of A^^astage w^as
16,319 standard ounces and the actual wastage 1,608 standard ounces^
and, of sih-er bullion, 54,798,707 standard, ounces, on Avhich the\legal
limit of wastage was 82,198, and the actual wastage only 4,453 standard
ounces.
The amount operated upon in the coining department of the mints
was, of gold bullion, 10,514,159 standard ounces, upon which the legal
limit of wastage Avas 5,257 standard ounces, ancl the actual wastage 367
standard ounces; ancl of sih-er bullion, 48,182,982, upon Avhich the l e g a l '
limit of Avastage Avas 48,183 standard ounces, Avhile the actual wastage
AA^as only 4,021 standard ounces, being heaAderin golcl and less in silver
than that of last year.
The total wastage during the year was $36,767.14 gold and $8,576.83
silver, a total of $45,343.97, A\ddch was'no greater than that of the previous year, although three times as much gold AV as melted. Bullion^
liowever, ofthe A^aliie of $8,406.12 Avas recovered during the year, from
the deposit melting-rooms, and the melter and refiner of the New York



262

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Assaj^ Office returned, on settlement, suri:)lus bullion of the value of
$24,733^24, making a total of $33,139.36 bullion gained. The net actual
loss to the government on the immense amount receiA^ed, redeposited,
^ n d reworked, during the year, was only $12,204.16.
Loss and wastage in the handling, melting, separating, refining, and
coinage of the precious metals is unaA^oidable. It is contemplated, and
provideci for by law, which limits and authorizes an allowance to be
made in favor of the melter and refiner's accounts, to the extent of one
thousandth of gold and one and a half thousandths of the sih-er, and,
of the coiner's accounts, one-half thousandth of the gold and one thou^sandth of the silver deliA^ered to' them, respectively, during the year, if
the superintendent is satisfied there has been bona fide waste of the precious metals.
At the last, as well as the preceding settlement, the melter and refiner's gold wastages at the Philadelphia and San Francisco Mints, although far within the legal limits, w,ere heavier than the usual loss of
those officers.
During the last two years large amounts, aggregating $90,000,000 of
foreigh coin and bullion, receivecl and melted at the New York Assay
Office, were transmitted to the PhUadelphia Mint in the form of gold
mint-bars alloyed Avitli copper. The melter and refiner of that mint attributed his AA^astage, in part, to insufficient deductions on these bars
for oxide of copper and other adhering imi)urities, the weight of which
would occasion a loss in his accounts, but increase, to a corresponding
'extent, the surplus at the New York Assaj^ Office, and, therefore, cause
no real loss to the gOA^ernment.
The melter and refiner's Avastage at the San Francisco Mint can, in
part, be accounted for by greater deposits during the year of brittle,
fine gold bars and unrefined gold bullion, containing refractory and volatile base metals, in the elimination of which loss of gold is a frequent,
if not a necessary, consequence. HOAV far this cause has operated t o
produce the wastage of that mint is ujider consideration; but, as yet,
sufficient examination and analysis have not been macle of the records
and transcripts obtained for a comparison of the character of the
deposits and the methods of weighing, assaying, and reporting the
fineness of gold buUion, Avith those of prcAdous years and of other mints
and assay offices.
REAaEAV OF THE MINT SERVICE.

During the year the regulations governing the mints and assay offices
have been carefully rcAdsed so as to bring their clirections in harmonj^
with later provisions of the statutes, and the chai;ges collected of depositors have been rcAde wed and modified in order that the rates at each
institution may equal, but not exceed, the expenses of the operations
for which they are imposed.
The mints and NCAV York Assay Office haA^e been required to make,
:as far as practicable, their purchases of supplies after public adv-ertisement for bids and submission of the awards to this office, and to foiAvard
for examination original records of deposits and monthly statements
showing the silver bullion purchased and the character and amount of
the various classes of gold and sih-er bullion sent to and received from
the refineries, and the cliarges collected and expenditures paid for parting
and refining.
'
The data in regard to the annual productionof precious metals in the
United States, too imperfect at the time of submitting my last annual



DIRECTOR

OF T H E

263

MINT.

report for a reliable estimate of the production b}' States, after subsequent careful examination and comparison, were presented in both a
sunimary form and detail as to localities, and the report has been published by order of Congress.'
The collection and compilation of these monetary statistics, the. more
thorough inspection of the operations, reports, and accounts of the mints
and assay offices, and a closer superAdsion of their expenditures, have
largely increased the work, and, as is beliCA^ed, the usefulness bf this
bureau.
P H I L A D E L P H I A MINT.

On account of the continued heavy imx3ort of foreign gold coin and the
l)ayment of its value immediately upon assaj^ in American coin it became
necessary to increase the nionthly gold coinage at the Philadeljphia Mint
to sup'ply the Treasury with coin thus paid out. Its gold coinage had
aA'eraged previous to the heav^^.gold import of 1880 less than $10,000,000,
but in 1881, besides coining $9,125,966.75 silver and $405,109.95 minor
coins, its gold coinage amounted to $49,809,274, and at the close of the
fiscal year the mint held $23,023,206.62 of uncoined gold bullion.
.
This increased coinage necessitated the employment of a larger Avorking force and extra hours of labor, and also much heavier purchases of
copper and other supplies.
,By reason of these greater expenditures and in order to execute the
monthly silver coinage required by law, it became necessary to make advances to the mint and use during the year $78,712.48 from the appropriation contained in the act autliorizing the coinage of' the standard
silver dollar.
• The following presents a comiiarison of the operations of the last and
the preceding fiscal year:
\
Deposits

-

-.

...

.

.. .

. . .'.

Cxold coinage
Silver coinage
Minor coinage
Total coinage

•

,..,

value.. .$53,309,250 60
pieces..
do...
do...

1

Gold coinage
Silver coinage
Minor coinage
Total coinage
Gold b a r s . .
Silver bars
Total bars
Gold operated upon by melter aud refiner
Silver operated upon by melter and refiner
Gold operated upon by coiner
Silver operated upon by coiner
Gold wastage of melter and refiner
Silver wastage of melter and refiner
'Gold wastage of coiner
Silver wastage of coiner

1881.

1880.

3, 789,-820
15, 223, 400
26, 831, 850

$70,651,442 91
7, 275, 926
9,174, 820
38, 335, 665

45, 845, 070

54, 786, 411

$27, 639, 445 00
value.. 15,194, 437 50
269, 971 50
do...

$49, 809, 274 00
9,125, 966 75
405,109 95

do...

do...
do...
do...
value.
....do...
standard ounces..
do...

V.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.V.'.V.do'.'.]
do...
ddo
o..
do...

43,103, 854 00

59, 340, 350 70

$145, 200 85
83, 688 67

$236,141 78
60,123 09

228, 889 52

296, 264 87

3.
26.
3;
26,

316
008
227
668

7,669,139
16, 551, 054
7, 233, 415
16, 259, 728

' 577

352
1, 050
197
1,869

951,
640,
694,
326,

3, 047

. On the large amount operated upon during the last year the wastage
of the melter and refiner was, on golcl, 4.5 per cent, of the legal limit of
his allowance and 4.2 xier cent, on sih'er, and of the coiner on gold 5.4
per cent, and on sih-er 11.4 xier cent,



264

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCED.

SAN FRANCISCO MINT.

A much larger amount of work was executed at this mint, both in
coinage and in the refinery, during the xiast fiscal year than in 1880, the
number of pieces of gold coined being nearly half a million more, and
of silA^er about three and a half millions more.
The comparatiA'e values of the cleposits, number of xiieces coined, and
bullion operated on in the refinery cluring the last ancl preceding years,,
are:
1880.
Deposits

. . . . . . . value

i

Gold coinage
Silver coinage

pieces..
do...
do...

Total coinage
Gold coinage
Silver coinage

A'alue..
do...

Total coinage
Gold bars
Silver bars

......,...:

$39, 387, 949 .$41, 959, 062 71
2,284,950
7, 910, 000

2, 774, 000'
11, 460, 000.

10,194, 950

14, 234, 000.

$2^, 143, 000 • $28, 500, 000)
7, 910, 000
11, 460, 000
36, 053, 000

39, 960, 000'

.$2, 355, 252 07

$8, 700 55.
1,110, 045 74

do...

2, 355, 252 07

1,118,746 29

.standard ounces.
do...

524, 229
4, 887, 291

612, 429
5, 59i, 629

2, 902, 878
lo, 733, 815
2,918,714
13, 497, 415

3, 236, 75»
22, 471, 852
3, 230, 718
20, 960, 005

:....do-..

...

value
do

Total bars
Crold received from the refinery
Silver received from tbe refinery
Gold operated ijpon by tlie melter and refiner
Sih-er operated upon Tby the melter and refiner
Gold operated upon by the coiner
Silver operated upon by the coiner

1881.

Gold wastage of the melter and refiner
Silver wastage of the melter and refiner. .^
Gold wastage of the coiner
Silver wastage of the coiner

,

do .
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
:. do.

1,229
2, 49&
168:
942

A t the annual settlement, the melter and refiner's wastage in gold
was 40 per cent, of the legal limit of allowance, and his silver wastage 7
lier cent. His silver, wastage was much less, but the gold ,wastage
heavier than that of the preceding year. The coiner's gold Avastage was
i3f per cent, and his sih'er wastage 4 J per cent, ofthe amount allowed
bylaw.
"
»
ImproA^ements liaA^e been made at this mint in refining bullion by the
use of the sulphuric-acid process. The charges for parting and refining
the higher grades of bullion AA'ere, near the beginning of the year, reduced, yet, as a greater amount of bullion requiring to be parted or
refined Avas deposited during the year, the charges collected for these
operations exceeded those of the xireceding year. The expenses of the
refinery, howcA'cr, owing to the larger ainount of work performed, Avere
shghtly increased. Besides this heavier expenditure, the sum of $6,000
was exxiended in procuring axixiaratus and fixtures and making the necessary arrangements for operating the sulphuric-acid refinery, and nearly
$4,000 Avas x^aid on account of freight bills of the previous year.
These necessary,, but unusual exxienditures made the xiayments during'
the year for expenses on account of xiartin and refining some $8,000
more than the charges collected.
CARSON MINT.

Coinage at the Carson Mint, which had been suspended in May, 1880,
was resumed July 1, 1880, and was continued from that date until April



265-

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT..

1, 1881, during which period $883,590 were coined, when, for lack of
sufficient bullion, it Avas again discontinued, and so remained until the
close of the year. The mint, howcA^er, Avas kexDt open for the redexition
and purchase of bullion, ancl payment was made, as usual, ondeposits
and purchases as soon as the A-alue could be ascertained. No inconven-ience or delay was therefore occasioned to.depositors or to the mining;
interests of that portion of the country.
The work at this mint during the year compares Avith th at of the xirevious vear as follows:
' '
. 1880.
Deposits

value..

G old coinage...
Silver coinage.

.pieces.
do..

Total coinage.

.do..

Gold coinage . .
Sih-er coinage .

$990,466 39

$1,108, 376 65

39, 567
408, 000

53,189
539, 000

447, 567

592,189

.value..
...do...

$246, 790 00
408, 000 00

$344, 590 00
539, 000 00

do...

054, 790 00

, 590 00

. standard ounces..

35„ 421
869. 478
25, 735
704, 486

49,133
1,129, 355
40, 467
1, 010, 406

Total coinage
Gold operated upon by melter and refiner...
Silver operated upon by melter and refiner .
Gold operated upon by coiner
,
Silver operated upon by coiner

1881.

do...
do...
do...

Gold wastage of melter and refiner
Silver wastage of melter and refiner
Gold wastage of coiner
Silver wastage of coiner, .i

-do...
.do...
.do...

24
249'
3
148.

. 7
135
2
138

At the annual settlement the wastages of the ox^eratiA'C officers were
as follows: of the melter and refiner, on gold 49.3 xier cent, of the legal
limit, and on sih-er 14.7 per cent.; ofthe coiner, 15.7 per cent, on gold and
14.7 per cent, on silver. The assayer of the mint, William P. Prescott,
died December 5,1880, and Josiah M. Hetrich was apxiointed to the xiosition December 21, 1880, and entered uxion duty January 4,, 1881.
NEAV ORLEANS MINT.

The work of. this mint has been principally confined to the manufacture of standard sih-er dollars, for which the demand through the South
continued heavy during the year and nearly equaled the coinage. The
inonthly allotment of silver coinage was raised to 500,000, and occasionally to 600,000 standard dollars, and executed with clispatch and little
additional expense under the efficient management of the officers of the
mint.
The following table exhibits the deposits and purchases of bullion and
the coinage of the year compared with the fiscal year 1880:
1880.
Deposits

.

va.l n p.

Gold coinage
Silver coinage
Total coinage

•

Gold coinage
Silver coinage
Total coinage




,

,..

1881.

$4,599,895 64

.$6, 439, 652 39*

pieces..
do...

10, 525
4, 430, 000

8, 000'
6, 525, 000'

...do...

4, 440, 525

6, 533, 000'

value..
do...
..do...

$128, 500
4,430,000

$80, 000'
6, 525, 000

4, 558, 500

6,605,000-

,

266

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.
1880.

Gold operated upon by melter and refiner
Silver operated upon by melter and refiner
Gold operated upon by coiner
Silver operated upon by coiner
Gold wastage of melter and refiner
Silver wastage of melter and refiner
Gold wastage of coiner
Silver wastage of coiner

'.
•.

.^

standard ounces..
do.
do.
do.

•

do.
do.
do.
: do..

• 1881.

16, 325
7, 925, 875
15, 316
7, 773, 352

11, 850
9, 976, 250
9,564
9, 952, 845
4
656

807

1, 062

The wastage during the year of the melter and refiner was, on gold,
31.5 xier cent, of ^the legal limit, and on sih-er 4.3; and of the coiner,
nothing on gold, and on silver 10.6 of the legal limit.
Notwithstanding the amount of work performed at this mint during
the year many necessary repairs were made in the rolling and coining
rooms, and to the machinery; and it is expected that other repairs will
be comxileted during the present fiscal year.
The deficiency of 1,000 silver dollars, to which reference was made in
my rexiort of last year, has been made good.
NEAV YORK ASSAY OFFICE,

The business of the New York Assay Office assumed immense proportions during the year, owing to the continued and increased importation
of foreign gold. The gold deposits were the largest in the history of the
institution, $91,497,168.61 of the amount being foreign coin and bullion.
The following table exhibits the value of deposits and of bars manufactured at the New York Assay Office during the fiscal years ended
June 30, 1880, and June 30, 1881:
Deposits and bars.
Gold deposits..
Silver deposits.
Total deposits .
Gold, fine bars, manufactured
Gold, mint bars, manufactured
Silver, fine bars, mf^nufactured
Silver, sterling bars, manufactured.
Silver, mint bars, manufactured
Total bars manufactured .

1881.
$68, 273, 628
4, 491, 416

$99, 635, 644 46
5, 285,715 57

72, 765, 044

104, 921, 360 03

11, 378, 980
57, 368, 761
4, 372, 705
24, 347

9, 805, 028 07
89, 643,135 29
4, 763,189 08
1,418 03
519, 047 53

73,144, 795

104, 731, 818 00

There Avere paid during the year to depositors $99,603,605.42 in gold
€oin and bars and $4,976,641.10 in silver coin and bars, making the
.aggregate payments $104,580,246.52, and gold bullion of the value of
$61,560,816.10 was transferrecl to the mint at Philadelxihia for conver.sion into coin. ^
I was present at the close of the annual settlement, w^hen the bullion
and coin on hand, which had been carefully weighed and counted by
rexiresentatiA'es of this bureau, were found to agree with the balance,
$65,194,122.56, as shown by the books to be on hand June 30, 1881.
On the annual settlement of his accounts the melter and refiner
returned 1,329.100 standard ounces of golcl bullion of the A-alue of
#24,727.44^ and 4.98 standard ouuces of sih-er bullion, valued at $5,80,




DIRECTOR

OF'THE

267

MINT.

in excess of the amounts with which he was charged, having recovered
the same in his oxierations.
The aggregate of'these sums, $24,733.24, has been deposited in the
Treasury of the United States.
But, although the amount axixieiirs as an earning of the assay office,
it is not available for xiayment of expenses, and was not credited to the
appropriation for xi^J^iting and refining, as, by law, only the charges
collected from clepositors for x)arting and refining bullion are authorized to be used for defraying the expenses of those operations.
DENVER MINT, AND ASSAY OFFICES AT CHARLOTTE, H E L E N A ,
CITY, AND SAINT LOUIS.

BOISE

The assay offices were established for the local convenience and dcA^elopment of the mining interests in their vicinity and to affi)rd miners ancl
those owning, operating, and prospecting for mines facilities for ascertaining the value of ores and bullion, and for the exchange of their gold
bullion for coin.
The work done by each during the year, including the Denver Mint
(which, b}^ law, can only be operated as an assay office), was—
Denver.
Gold deposits
Silver deposits
Unparted bars manufactured..
Charges collected:
On deposits
On ore assays
Total earnin gs
Total expenses

$235,137 15
3, 805 77
238, 942 92
< 239 17
921 00
1, 643 21
24, 968 37

Cliarlotte.
$86, 919 59
626 80
87, 546 39
133 94
260 35
995 37
3, 750 00.

Helena.

Boise.

Total.

$568, 525 13v $163, 469 86
84, 314 97
2,828-50
652, 840 10
166, 298 36
666 05
.1, 718 00
2, 551 71
25,163 31

185
186
441
7, 940

id
00
69
15

054, 051 73
91, 576 04
145, 527 77
1, 224
3, 085
5, 631
61, 821

20
35
98
83

Besides the AA^ork enumerated, the assayers in charge of the offices
haA^e rendered A-aluable assistance in collecting statistics of xiroduction
in their resxiectiA^e States and Territories.
I have heretofore called attention to the necessity of the DeuA^er Mint
being put in better rexiair, and an apxiropriation should be made for
that xiurpose.
The Saint Louis Assay Office was established so near the close of the
.fiscal year that nothing could be done except to have suitable rooms set
apart in the IJnited States building at Saint Louis, and to commence fitting them up and procuring the necessary fixtures and apx)aratus for the
use of the office. Mr. E. C. Jewett was axipointed assayer July 1, 1881,
and has been placed in charge. The appointment of melter was delayed until his serAdces should be requirecl, and the office ready for the
reception of bullion.
INTERNATIONAL MONETARY CONFERENCE.

The monetaiy conference called by France and the United States to
consider proxiositions for an international agreement to coin gold and
silyer at a common fixed ratio, met at the city of Paris in April of the
present year.
Although much instructive discussion occurred, and A'aluable facts
Avere presented, no xiractical conclusions AA^ere reached, and, finally, on
the 8th of July the conference Avas adjourned to meet in April, 1882,
at the same place.



268

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Delegate from several European countries gave little encouragement for the expectation of any efiective aid from their governments in
the efi'ort to restore silver to its former place in the monetary circulation. The hope, howcA^er, seems to haA'e been entertained that furthei?
deliberation, and a consideration of the inevitable complications and
disturbances to commercial exchanges between Asiatic countries and
the Avestern world to be feared from the exclusion of sih^^er from coinage;^
Avill enlist the co-oxieration of those nations in this, possibly the final,
effort to retain silver conjointly with gold as a measure of values. In
Adew, hoAvever, of the failure of the Conference to agree upon any "
practical measure, and Avhile awaiting its future action, it is a question
tor our serious and early consideration, whether it is not desirable to
suspend the further* coinage of silver until, by international agreement
and efiective legislation, the unlimited coinage of silver and gold at a
common fixed ratio shall have been authorized by the princixial commercial nations of Europe and America.
The silver circulation of this countrj^, before the close of this fiscal
year, will amount to $200,000,000, and Avill suffice for the needs of our
people, for coins of the denomination of one dollar and less.
The United States has done its x^^Tt toward retaining silver as a
monetary agent for measuring and exchanging A'alues. For three years
it has axipropriated to coinage xmrposes one-third of the world's xiroduction of silver, and maintained its average bullion price nearly to the
avera,ge of 1878. As Avas said in m^^ first report, '^should the $650,000,000 of silver coih UOAV full legal tender in Europe be demonetized^
the United States could not, single-handed among commercial nations,
Avith no Euroxiean co-operation or allies, sustain the value of silver from
the incAdtable fall." ^
•
With t h a t danger menacing us, we cannot, without serious embarrassment, continue such coinage, unless other commercial nations will
agree upon the general use of silver as well as gold.
But should such international agreement be secured, neither our ratio
of comparatiA'e A^aluation nor even one based upon the present exchangeable A-alue of gold and silver Avill xirobably be adoxited. The
ratio of fifteen and a half to one, already apxiroA^ed and in use among
the nations comxiosing the Latin Union, would doubtless be chosen.
This Avoiild, if the coinage of silver as Avell as gold at all the mints of
the world were made free, as bimetallism implies, cause the voluntary
withdrawal from circulation of the standard dollars, and their recoinage. In such case the further coinage of silver dollars of the present
weight, unless needed for circulation, is a useless expenditure.
MONETARY STATISTICS OF T H E DNITED STATES.

The statistics of the xiroduction, consumption, and circulation of the
precious metals in the United States during the fiscal year ended June
30, 1881, have been sought, and inquiries x^i'osecuted, in the manner and
through the agencies emxiloyed in the previous year.
The results have been very satisfactory, both as to the extent and
character of the information obtained.
I t will suffice to xiresent here in a summary form the conclusions deduced from the detailed statements and reports received at the bureau.
PRODUCTION OF THE PRECIOUS METALS IN T H E UNITED STATES IN

1881.
For the calendar year 1880, embracing the first half of the last fiscal
year, a sxiecial report on the annual production of the United States was



269

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

submitted to the Secretary of the Treasury, in March last, and ordered
to be published by Congress.
Further investigation has not materially changed the estimate I then
macle of the total production of the United States, and of each State
and Territory, during the preceding fiscal year and the calendar year
1880.
From the data receiA^ed at the Mint Bureau, I estimate the xiroduction
• for the fiscal year ended June 30,1881, to haA^e been, of gold $36,500,000,
and of silver, at its coining A-alue, $42,100,000, or, at its commercial
bullion A-alue, about $37,000,000.
The estimated production of each State and Territory for the fiscal
years 1880 and 1881 are as folloAvs:
F i s c a l y e a r 1880.

P i s c a l y e a r 1881.

s t a t e or T e r r i t o r y .
Gold.
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Dakota
Georgia
Idabo
Montana
Nevada
N e w Mexico
N o r t h Carolina .
Oregon
South Carolina .
Tennessee
Utah
Virginia
AVashington
AVyoming
Other

$6, 000
400, 000
17, .500. 000
3, 200, 000
3, 600, 000
120, 000
1, 980, 000
2, 400, 000
4, 800, 000
130, 000
95, 000
1, 090, 000
15, 000
210,
10,
410,
20,
14,

000
000
000
000
000

Total.

Silver

$2, 000, 000
1,100, 000
17, 000, 000
70, 000
450, 000
2, 500, 000
10, 900, 000
42.5, 000
15, 000
4, 740, 000

39, 200, 000

Total.
$6, 000
2, 400, 000
18, 600i 000
20,'200, 000
3, 670, 000
120, 000
2, 430, 000
4, 900, 000
15, 700, 000
555, 000
95, 000
1,105, 000
15, 000
4, 950,
10,
410,
20,
14,

000
000
000
000
000

75, 200, 000

Gold.

Silver.

$7, 000
770, 000 $7,. 800, 000
19, 000, 000
870, 000
3, 400, 000 15, 000, 000'
4, 500, 000
60, 000
1.50, 000
1, 930, 000
1,100,000
2, 500, 000. 2, 300, 000
2, 700, 000
8, 860, 000
120, 000
270,000
75, 000
1, 000, 000
80, 000
18,000
2, 000
200, 000
5,710,000
11, 000
100, 000
7,000
10, 000
50, 000
36, 500, 000

42,100, 000

Total.
$7, 000
8, 570, 000
19, 870, OOO
18,400,000
- 4,560,000
150,000
3, 030, 000
4, 800, 000
11, 560, 000
390, 000
75, 000
1, 080, 000
18,000
2,000
5, 910, 000
11, 000
100, 000
7,000
60, 000
78, 600, 000

CONSUMPTION OF THE PRECIOUS METALS.

It is a pleasure to report that the continuance of the inquiries hereto-'
fore instituted in regard to the annual consumption of gold and sih^^er
in the United States has resulted in the accumulation of A'ery comxilete
and satisfactory information.
''
Circular letters were again addressed, to the number of 6,417, to xiersons
and firms rexiorted to be using and consuming gold and silver in manufactures and the arts. At the date of this report, of the persons replying, 1,300 used no gold or silver in their business. It is believed that
nearly all the xirincipal manufacturers haA^e responded to the request of
this bureau. ^
The character of the gold and silver used was rexiorted at—
Material used.

3^'ine b a r s u s e d
P o r e i g n coin, j e w e l r y p l a t e &c
Total

Gold.

.

.

Silver.

Total.

$3 315 882
6,17i; 317
599,524

$72,190
3,127, 432
188, 799

$3, 388, 072
9,298,749
788, 333

10, 086, 723

3, 388, 421

. 13, 475,144

From the information obtained it appears that 1,143 xiersons 6r firms
use in the manufacture or repair of instruments, chemicals, leaf andfoil^



27.0

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

pens, plates, spectacles, watch cases, watches and jewelry, over ten
millions of dollars gold ahd over three millions of dollars silver, a total
of thirteen millions ofdollars, of Avliich three'and a quarter millions is
gold coin and seventy thousand dollars sih-er coin of theUnited States.
The usual report was obtained from the NCAV York Assay Office, which
gives a full statement of the amount and character of the gold and
silver supxihed to manufacturers by that office:
B a r s f u r a i s h e d to m a n u f a c t u r e r s .
Of
Of
Of
Of

foreign coin
foreign b u l l i o n .
doraestic bullion
p l a t e , &c
Total

Silver.

Gold.
$167, 368
1, 380, 416
3, 6.53,136
522, 918

00
00
00
00

5, 723, 838 00

$120,791
250, 207
4, 579, 994
177,940

Total.
00
00
00
00

5,128, 932 00

$288,159
1,630,623
8, 233,130
700, 858

00
oa
00
00

10, 852, 770 00

A discrepancy similar to that of the preceding year appea-rs between
the amounts returned by manufacturers and those reported by the New
York Assay Office. Taken together they indicate that last year's estimate of the consumxition of sih-er in the United States should be increased to $6,000,000, and of gold to $11,000,000.
The estimate of last year, that, of the bullion produced in the United.
States, $4,000,000 of silver and $5,500,000 of gold Avere appropriated
for use in manufactures and the arts, is not changed as to gold by th^
information thus far received, but must be increased $1,000,000 as to
silver, and the consumption, therefore, of domestic bullion in the United
States for the fiscal year may be estimated to be, of gold, $5,500,000^
sih-er, $5,000,000.
COIN CIRCULATiON OF THE UNITED STATES.

. ^

. In the last annual report the circulation of United States coin Avas
estimated from the amount xireviously on hand, and the annual coinage
and import of United States coin to have been on the 30th of June, 1880,
$358,958,691 of gold and $142,597,020 of sih-er. The net gain during
last year from coinage and import was, in gold coin, $84,118,062, and
in silver coin, $28,937,746. This would make the totaf circulation of
United States coin.on the 30th of June, 1881, $443,077,023 gold, and
$171,534,766 silver.
^
. Heretofore no deduction has been made Ipr coin used in manufactures
and the arts, as it was belicA^ed that it should be ofiset by the excess.of
United States coin brought by immigrants uxion their persons above
the sums in like manner taken out of the country by travelers ; but the
circulation of United States gold coin, and its consequent abrasion and
use in the arts, haA^e largely increased, while the amount held abroad
has, as shown by its diminished import, become dexileted, so that much
less American coin than heretofore is obtained and brought into the
country by immigrants.
I t seems proper, therefore, tliat allowance should be made for use iiii
the arts to the extent of the sum reported to this bureau to have been
used by manufacturers, AA-hich was, forthe last fiscal year, in round numbers, $3,300,000 gold, and $75,000 sih-er. This would reduce the circulation of United States gold coin at the close of the fiscaf year to about
$440,000,000, and of silver coin to $171,500,000.
During the first four months ofthe current fiscal year there has been
a further coinage of $26,544,000 aud a net import of $2,172,474 gold,



271

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

a,nd a coinage of $9,300,000 and net import of $310,858 United States
silver coin, making a total gain to the first of November, 1881, in the
circulation,' of $28,609,000 gold and $9,600,000 sih-er. This, added to
the amount estimated to be in circulation June 30, 1881, makes the coin
circulation of the country, November 1, about $469,000,000 gold and
$181,000,000 silver, a total of $650,000,000. A t the latter date the
mints and assay office at New York held of bullion $94,075,744 gold
and $4,966,741 silver, swelling the stock of coin and bulhon available
for coinage to $563,000,000 gold and $186,000,000 sUver, a total of
$749,000,000, being 2Lper capita of $14.93.
The following table shows the gain in the coin circulation of the United
States from June 30, 1880, to June 30, 1881, and to October 31, 1881:
•Gold.

Silver.

[$358, 958, 691
78,^293, 087
5, 824, 975

$142, 597, 020
27, 642, 660
1, 295, 0^6

$501, 555, 711
105, 935, 747
7,130, 061

443, 076, 753
3, 300, 000

171, 534, 766
75, 000

614,611,539
3, 375, 000

C i r c u l a t i o n J u l y 1, 1881
C o i n a g e t o N o v e m b e r 1,1881
N e t i m p o r t s t o N o v e m b e r 1,1881.

439, 776, 753
26, 544, 000
^-2,172, 474

171, 459, 706
9, 300, 000
310, 858

,611,236,519
35, 844, 000
2, 483, 332

C i r c u l a t i o n N o v e m b e r 1,1881

468, 493, 227

181, 07Ct, 624

649j 563, 851

U n i t e d S t a t e s coin.
C i r c u l a t i o n J u n e 30, 1880
'.
Coinage, less d e p o s i t s for r e c o i n a g e .
N e t import
Total
Less amount used in t h e a r t s .

Total.

* I m p o r t s fbr O c t o b e r a t t h e p o r t of N e w Y o r k only.

The coin circulation of the country, according to the rexiorts of the
Treasurer for the amount of coin in the Treasury on the 1st of November, and of the Comptroller of the Currency for the amount held by
National banks on the 1st of October, 1881, estimated for other banks,^
appears to have been held by-the banks. Treasury, and priA-ate parties
as follows:
snver.
Gold.

H e l d in.—

Treasury
»
National banks
Other banks . . . . . Private hands
Total

-

Total.
Legaltender.

Subsidiary.

$76, 036, 377
*$7, 737, 608
102, 000, 369
3, 000,000
20, ooo; 000
. 270,963,254 1189, 862, 392

$25, 984, 687
2, 450, 387

$109,758,672
107, 450, 756

51,964,926

432,-790, 572

+80, 400, 000

650, 000, 006

469, 000, 000

100, 600, 000

"•'•Excess a b o v e a m o u n t h e l d for p a y m e n t of o u t s t a n d i n g s i l v e r certificates,
t I n c l u d i n g a m o u n t for w h i c h silver certificates a r e o u t s t a n d i n g ,
t I n c l u d e s $7,000,000 t r a d e dollars.

MONETARY STATISTICS OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES.

The comprehensiA-e reports obtained from our national representatives in foreign countries, and presented in my last annual report, contain so much valuable and recent nionetary information that it will
hardly be expected that additional statistics of equal imxiortance can
be gathered in the same fields during the year immediately succeeding.
Through the agencies heretofore successfully employed, reliable information has been obtained for later periods, enabling me to continue the
statistical summaries of previous years. , To the replies received from



272

REPORT ON THE FINANCES, t

^foreign countries haA^e been added, under the heading of the appropriate country, extracts from other official publications or reliable authorities, which form a xiart of the data upon which are based the conclusions submitted in. the text and tables of this rexiort. Again I desire to express my acknowledgements to the United States ministers,
* consuls, and official rex)resentati\-es of foreign countries, who have so
-courteously resxionded and heartily seconded these efibrts to obtain the
latest and fullest monetary statistics from all the countries of the world.
While the appended tabulated statements* conveniently group these
statistics for comparison and use, a condensed statenient of the facts
-communicated in the disxiatches and accomxianying xiapers may be found
useful aud convenient.
Great Britain.—The xiapers forwarded by Minister Lowell contain the
following informatibn:
The coinage of gold during the calendar year, 1880 was £4,150,052,
and of silver £761,508; whicli was largely in excess of that of the preAdous year. The exportation of gold coin and bullion exceeded the
.amount imported by about £3,500,000. The silver exported, exceeded
the amount imported by about £750,000. The sxiecie circulation at the
• close of 1880 is estimated to be as follows:
Goldcoin, £123,771,000
Silver coin, £18,959,000

|602,331,571
92,263,973

These amounts include the bank reserves. The amount of gold in
circulation is about £1,500,000 larger, and of siWer a trifle less, than at
the close of 1879. The paper circulation is stated at £42,536,000, of
which £26,006,000 were notes of the Bank of England.
Australia.—The disxiatches of J. H. Williams, United States consul
at Sj-dney, furnish very comxilete financial statistics of New South Wales.
' The xiroduction of gold from the mines of the colony from 1851 to 1879,
inclusiAT^e, is estimated at £33,042,362, and for 1879 the xiroduction was
A^alued at £264,018. The A^^alue of the sih-er produced in this colony up
to the close of 1879 is estimated to be between £300,000 and £400,000.
'The importation and exportation of gold and sil.A-er were as follows:
. Gold imported, £1,262,371; exported, £718,617.
SilA'-er imported, £136,433; exported, £106,615. '
Canada.—The imports and exxiorts of gold and silver, as given in the
. statement of the finance department of Canada, were for the calendar
year 1880:
Imnorts....
Exports

'

$966,804
878,248

•

Small quantities of gold and sih-er are xnoduced from the mines,
A-alued for the year at about $900,000, being princixially gold. The cirV cuiation is rex)ortecl on the 31st day of December, 1880, to have been as
folloAvs:
'
Gold
.Silver
Paper.....

:

. . : . 19,026,000
1,020,000
41,562,711

Nearly all the gold was helcl by the banks and treasury-, together with
: about one-half of the sdver.
Germany.—The production of gold and silver in Germany during the
year 1880 was about as follows:
Gold, $280,693; silver, .$4,893,061, a considerable portion of which
was from ores mined.in other countries, sent to Germany to be smelted,
* The documents here, referred to are omitted for Avant of space, but they may Ibe
: found in the volumes of the Director's report.



DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

273

The imxiorts and exports of silver coin and bullion AA-ere as follloAvs:
Imports, $4,987,200 silver; exports, $5,685,408 silver, showing a loss
of silver of only about $700,000..
About $100,000,000 of old thaler pieces, partly of German and partly
of Austrian coinage, are estimated to remaiii in circulation.
France.—A very interesting paper will be found in the Appendix,
from Benj amin F. Peixotto, United States consul at Lyons, in Avhich he
treats uxion the infiuences afi'ecting the A^ariation in the- relatiA^e value
of gold and silver.
Austria.—Minister I^HSSOU transmits, under date of March 18, 1881,
a coxiy of the new laAV of Austria in relation to the deviation allowed
^in the fineness of the minting of Austrian gold coin.
The Netherlands.—The xiapers transmitted by Hon. James Birney,
United States minister at the Hague, furnish the following information:
There was coined at the mint during the year 1880, 501,000 fiorins in
ten-guilder pieces, and 25,372 golden ducats, ancl in sih'cr 100,000 fiorins
in ten-cent, pieces.
The imports and exxiorts of gold and silver coin and bullion were as
follows:
•

Imports,
Exports,
Imports,
Exports,

gold.
gold
silver
silAW

•

Morins.

7,301,193
3,236,450
4,438,458
1,753,240

. I t is estimated that there was in circulation on the 31st of December,
1880, in standard gold coins, 72,897,320 fiorins, of which OA-er 40,000,000
florins was in the Bank of the Netherlands, and of silver coin 140,518,785
florins, of which about 84,000,000 florins were held by the same bank.
The paper currency issued for the State amounted to 10,000,000 florins,
and by the Bank of Netherlands 198,549,505 florins.
Sioitzerland.—The reply of Minister Fish, transmitting from the SAVISS
GoA-ernment the desired information in regard to the financial condition of Switzerland, contains statistics as to the imports and exports of
gold and sih'er into and from the confederation and the amount in the
treasury; also cbpies of two recent enactments of the Swiss Government, one concerning the emission of bank-notes, the other concerning
the IICAV coinage of 20-centime xii^^ces. The xiJipei" money circulation
amounts to about 86,000,000 of francs.
Greece.—The dispatch of B. O. Duncan, United States consul at
Smyrna, shows that the entire debt of Greece amounted, December 31,
1880, to 317,276,572 dr.=$61,234,378, the annual interest of which
amounts to $2,895,000, and that in addition to this the Chambers have
A-oted a further loan of $23,160,000 (120,000,000 dr.) to cover the deficit
of 1881 and to supxiort the army on a war-footing.
Feru.—Minister Christiancy rexiorts, under date of November last,
that an attemxit Avas made to introduce a forced paper currency in Peru
called the '' inca''; and, under date February of this year, that the attemxit had failed, and that the paper soles are the only circulating,
medium of the country, gold and silver being commodities not circulating as money.
•
The value of a paxDcr sole just prior to the taking of Lima by the
Chilians Avas about hve cents (twenty-one xiaper soles being about equal
to one dollar United States coii^); since the conquest of Peru by Chili
the minister states that they have apxireciated to seA^enteen paper soles
for one dollar United States gold coin. The mountains of Peru, rich in
18 F



274

REPORT, ON THE FINANCES.

the precious metals, OAviug to the unsettled condition, are not mined to
any considerable extent.
Venezuela.—Mr. Jehu Baker, United States minister, furnishes very
satisfactory information resxiecting the monetar}^ condition of Yenezuela.
He transmits a resolution adopted by the governinent of that country
fixing a tariff of prices for various foreign silver coins. The importation
of all foreign silver money, excexit those,coined by the States of the Latin
Union, is strictly prohibited. The xirincipal foreign moneys in circulation
are United States gold coins and Spanish-American doubloons. The pa-^
per money in circulation consists of notes issued h j the Bank of Caracas,
amounting to about $250,000 (1,300,000 bolivars), Avhich circulate freely
at their face value. The coinage of 5,000,000 bolivars, nearly $1,000^000,
executed in Belgium, has been recently imxiorted into Yenezuela. With
this_ exception, the importation of gold a,iid silver has been insignificant." During the fiscal year 1880 there was exxiorted in bullion nearly
$1,500,000.
Hayti.^^M.im^teY Langston'reports that the imxiortation of American
and Spanish gold during the year amounted to about $40,000, and of
silver to $500,000; the export of the latter amounting to about $250,000
more. He estimates the money in circulation to be about $5,000,000, prineipally American and Mexican silver. He states that a law has been
passed providing for the establishment of a national bank.
African States.—There Avas imported into Algeria during the year, in
gold coin and bullion, 3,089,577 francs, and of silver 6,052,699 francs. No
exports of gold or sih-er are reported. The coin in circulation amounts
to about 50,000,000 francs, of Avliich 30,000,000 are gold. The paper circulation is about 50,000,000 francs, in notes of the Bank of Algeria.
Owing to the secrecy with which the afi'airs of the government are conducted, and the lack of official accounts, A^ery little information in regard
to the finances of Morocco cah be obtained, but such as has been possible
to*secure has been furnished by Mr. Matthews, the consul.
Liberia.—The United States minis'ter to Liberia furnishes the following information in regard"to the finances of that country: Mining operations do not exist, nor is any coinage executed. The xirincipal circulating medium is United States gold and sih-er coin, and thos6 of Great
Britain. I t has a paper circulation amounting to $150,000.
B u l g a r i a . S o n . Eugene Schuyler, consul-general at Bucharest, reXiorts that the Eussian sih-er ruble has been demonetized, and its place is
to be supplied by 5-franc pieces, of which 7,000,000 francs are now ready
for issue.
THE AVORLD'S PRODUCTION.

My last report contained tables giAdng by countries the total productions Of gold and silver for the years 1877, 1878, and 1879, based
;^rincipally upon official statements or estimates communicated to this
bureau.
>
.
,
The table is continued to embrace the year 1880, with such modifications of the former years as official intelligence since receiA^ed required
to be made. Troy ounces are reduced to or from kilograms at the
valuation given by the United States statute: one g r a m ' = 15.432 grains,
one kilogram therefore equals 15,432 grains.
In the reports for the years 1877, 1878, and 1879, the production as
estimated for the rest of South America Avas correctly statecl in kilograms, but an unnoticed clerical error misplaced one cplumn to the
right, the figures for the equiA-alent dolhir valuation of 250,000 kilogramsof sih-er. The amounts are correctly stated in' this report.



275

DIRECTOR OF THE. MINT.

The total product for the calendar year 1880 was, of gold, $107,037;697,
and of silver, $87,543,072. The xiroduction of the United States is given
for the fiscal year, which does not materially A^ary from the production
of the calendar year.
THE AVORLD'S C O N S U M P T I O N

OF T H E P R E C I O U S

METALS.

The estimates and discussions contained in previous reports regarding
the annual apxiropriation of t h e xirecious metals for manufactures, in
the arts, :&c., seem to have awakened the interest and attracted the
attention of European statisticians, and a better axipreciation is had
of the propriety and necessity of subtracting largely from the Avorld's.
axiparent accumulated stock, for annual Avaste and consuDiption.
. The total production since the discovery of America, and CA-en siiice
the discovery of gold in California, has, of late years, been frequently
presented as an evidence,of the mass of metal money in use or in stock
for coinage. But few writers or statisticians haA'-e presented, in the
same connection, estimates or statistics of the consumption.
From a review of the information published in this and preceding reXiorts and other authorities, I estimate that, including the annual consumption inthe-United States of $11,000,000 gold and $6,000,000 silver,
the annual consumxition of the world in-ornamentation manufactures
anci the arts is at least $75,000,000 of gold and $35,000,000 of silver.
COINAG-E OF FOREIG-N COUNTRIES.

The continued import of gold into the United States, with the retention of the domestic xiroduction, increased, as in the xireceding year, the
coinage of gold in the" United States, and as largely diminished that of
other countries.
In the year 1880, two-thirds of the gold and one-third of the silver
coinage reported for nine of the xirincixial countries of the world was
executed by the mints of the United States.
A tabulated statement is appended giving the value in United States
money of the coinage executed by a number of countries, for the years
1878,1879,^ and 1880. I t shoAVS that, for th0 years and by the number of
countries stated, the following amounts of gold and silver were coined:
Years.
1878
1879
1880.

'

Conntries.
18
13
9

Gold.

Silver.

$188, 386, 611 $161 191, 913
90, 714, 493 104, 888, 813
114, 837, 811
81, 951, 354

Total.
$349, 578, 524
195,603,306
196, 789,165

CIRCULATION OF T H E PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES OF T H E WORLD.

The tables presented in thelast annual report showing the paxier and
specie circulation of thirty-one ofthe leading countries ofthe A\^orld, and
the amounts of coin and bullion held by banks and national treasuries,
have been corrected to the latest date possible.
Further rexilies to the circular of the Secretary of the Treasury from
our ministers and consuls w-ill, i t i s believed, contain additional information, Avhich will be xiublished ig subsequent reports.
The estimated amount of gold circulation is $3,221,000,000; silver, full
legaltender, $2,115,000,000; limited tender, $423,000,000; total specie,




276

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

$5,759,000,000; of paper, $3,644,000,000; and the total circulation, including the amounts held in governnient treasurieSj banks, and in active
circulation, is $9,403,000,000.
COURSE OF PRICES.
The table of the prices of exports, ascertained by dividing declared
A-alues by quantity, has been continued for the fiscal year 1881. It shoAvs
an adA^ance of 5 per ceut. on the xircAdous year's export xirices, but a
decline on the gold prices of the same articles comuared with other prices
in 1870.
^
Tables have been prepared, under my direction, with great care and
labor, by the comxiuter of the bureau, Mr. Frederick Eckfeldt, which exhibit the aA-^erage annual xirices in the New York market from 1825 to
1880, inclusive, of leading staple commodities, the leading prices of each
of the articles for 1856, and the xiercentage of each annual xirice com-'^
Xiared AAdth ^the mean price.
The prices quoted were obtained for the years 1825 to 1874, inclusive, .
from the tables of their average prices in NCAV York, found in the Finance Eexiorts of 1863, 1873, and 1874. For the succeeding six years,
they were compiled in this office from the xiublished semi-weekly quotations in the NcAA-York Shipxiing and Commercial List, from Avhich xiaper
it is understood the quotations were taken in compiling the tables found
in the Finance Eexiorts.
The comparatiA-e xiercentages for each year on all the articles taken
will measure, as far as the varying xirices of those commodities can do
so, the A^arying purchasing power of money for the year.
The xiiices during the suspension of specie'payments in the years
18.37 and 1838 and from 1862 to 1878, during AA-hich there was a
premium on gold, have been reduced to a gold basis.
The table bf final averages, therefore, xiresents, for the years named,
the xiiHchasing xiower of gold in theUnited States, as shown b y t h e
Xirices of leading commodities in the New York inarket.
For instructive coinparison, the circulation, paper and hietallic, for
the saine j^ears, as far as ascertainable, is given in aclditional columns,
as Avell as the xier capita circulation and estimated Avealth. They show
(as similar tables published in my last annual report showed as to
France) that prices a.re less aff'ected by circulation, paper or metallic,
than by other xiotent agencies. They are worthy of special consideration at this time, and should tend to allay the prevalent fear of impending commercial disaster as a consequence of abundant and increasing
monetary circulation, expanding with the growth of business and accompanied by enlarged xiroduction and substantial xirosperity.
' In closing this report it is a pleasure to again commend the zealous
co-oxieration of the clerks in the Mint Bureau, and to acknowledge theirefficient aid in x-)reparing, tabulating, and A^erifying the statistics relating to those branches of the mint service assigned to them, as well as
in the performance of their official duties.
I am, verv respectfully,
HORATIO C. BUECHAED,
Director.
Hon.

W I L L I A M WINDOM,

Secretary of the Treasury,




^

^

AP.PENDIX.
I.—DEPOSITS and PURCBASES of GOLD and SILVER BULLION during tU fiscal year ended Jime 30, 1881.
A s s a y offices.

Mints..

Description.

Total.
PMladelphia.

San Francisco.

Carson.

Denver.

N e w Orleans.

New York.

Bois6..

Helena.

Charlotte.

GOLD.

Unitecl States bullion (domestic production)
TTnited States coin

47
16
69
45
21

35
66
96
24
10

$517, 571 62

517, 571 62

Jewelers' bars, old plate, &c .

$184, 062
177, 254
-44, 276
124, 240
435, 485

Total
•r^ -1 - -J. C Pine bars
Redeposits { frnpaited bars

965, 318 98
61, 560, 816 09
682, 767 03

28, 722, 539 31

Total gold received and
operated upon.

63, 208, 902 10

28, 846, 898 04

517,571 62

11,172,525
1, 268
1, 038, 398
164,370
1, 611

590, 805 0 3 .

$27,196,124
990
368,162
1,128, 727
28, 534

$235,137 15

235,137 15 , -

$2, 639
7, 427
2, 393
66, 401
29,171

72
$6, 875, 980 43 $163, 469 86 $556 322 08
48
254. 674 36
10 - 37, 356; 639 51
34
54,142, 529 10
42
849, 015 31

108 033 06

99, 478, 838 J l

163, 469 86

-156, 805 75

124, 358 73

$83, 728 87
430 31
487 61
1, 224, 89

556, 322 08

85, 871 68

12, 203 05

1,047 91

• 130, 833,102 45
61,560,816 09
977,182 47
193, 371 101 01

99, 635, 644 46

163, 469 86

568,525 13

86, 919 59

85
70
44
42
46

4, 635, 027 41

2, 828 50

83, 946 77

537 45
7 66

3,805 77 . 5, 476, 784 87
854, 834, 46

5,188,405 90
. 21, 556 40
75, 753 27

2, 828 50

235,137 15

108, 033 06

$35, 815, 036 55
440, 776 P7
37; 771,472 26
55, 462, 385 -74
1 343 430 93

o
o

SILVER.

TJnited States bullion (domestic production)
United States coin
J^^oreififn coin
Jewelers' bars, old plate, &c.
Total

92
85
85
43
62

3,805 77

5, 029, 261
1, 638
18, 281
402, 507
25, 095

^ 252, 227 24
121, 747 47
179, 403 78

12, 378,175 67
733, 633 14
355 86

590,805 03

Total silver received
and operated upon . . 7, 442, 540 81

13,112,164 67

590, 805 03

3, 805 77

6, 331, 619 33

5, .285, 715, 57

- 8, 031, 089 10 . 41,100, 714 98
62, 243, 583 12
124, 358 73
376, 770, 69
733 989 00

1,108, 376 65

238, 942 92

5, 584, 817 93
• 854j.834 46

6, 439, 652 39

G'Old a^nd silver deposits and
purchases
T

51
19
05
62
75

7, 065, 770 12
373, 828 26
2, 942 43

Kedeposits.{~Sbars:

-r,

6, 958, 320
4, 392
3, 237
45, 798
54, 021

• i.

C Gold

Redeposits.. 1 ^ ^ ; ^ ^ - - ; ; ; • - ; ; '
T o t a l gold a n d s i l v e r received and operated
upon




70, 651, 442, 91

41, 959, 062 71

1,108, 376 65

238,942 92

8 28
70 64

28, 477, 059
7,307
1, 312,144
734 432
260, 203

21
40
58
22
25

83, 946 77

624 03

368 20

2 77

30, 791,146 66
1 983 852 26
79,422 53

2, 828 50

84, 314 97

626 80

32, 854, 421 45

104, 667, 244 61
156, 805 75
97, 309 67

166, 298 36

640, 268 85
12, 203 05
368 20

86, 495 71
1, 047 91
2 77

161, 624, 249 11
62 537 998 56
2 063 274 79

104,921/360 03.

166, 298 36

652, 840 10

87, 546 39

226, 225, 522 46

^

H

to
-a

11.—DEPOSITS of ^ O L D of DOMESTIC PBODUCTION diiring thefisoal year ended June 30, 1881.

GO
A s s a y offices.

Mints.

•

Locality.
Philadelphia. San rrancisco.
Alabama
Alaska
California
Colorado
Dakota- . .
Georgia...-.

. . . .
.

30, 064
1,103
14, 687
18, 734
5,100
40

54
29
59'
59
35
13

2, 401
315
4, 630
8, 200
5, 249
313
'1,358

73
78
99
48
25. .
56
44

$1,353'06
.. 351,930 46
7,439, 515 68

,

Totalgold




$75 630 73

361, 875 39 ia ; =.
24, 051 59
103 507 88
775 16

• •!

i

184, 062 47

New York.

Boise.

, ..

.

•

. 27, 904
359
16,157, 523
1, 940, 599
. ; 47, 878

99
61
91
14
25

27,196,124 35

. Helena.

827
418
982
241
875
292

98
94
23
49 '
$208 78
61
86 111, 995 93

868
161
49
2

190
816
026
534
847

94
02
53
73
18

$i9, U>h 29

.
669 69 $55o. 322 08
46, 999 53
50, 595 46
"i7,'574'05'

130 88
6, 957 19
5,152 80

....
•.

•

517, 571 62

113 77

380 47
151,17^9 05
375, 977 77

2, 639 72

6, 875, 980 43

852 89

57 67

235,137 15

^

163,469 86

" 556,322

Total.

Charlotte.

"

14
20
1,687
3, 385
79
65

• 723, 693 45
15,155 78

4, 335 11
76, 494 68

•

$1,673 06

441 883 22

5, 616 20
4, 964 50

B e f i n e d gold
P a r t e d from "silver

.=-, .
$225 535 12
9, 602 03

MR,ryl R.nd
N e w Mexico
. .
N o r t h Carolina
Oregon.........
South Carolina
Tennessee
Utah
Virginia
W a s h i n ffton>T e r r i t o r v

N e w Orleans.

$147 76

$451 26

.

Denver.

Carson.

08 , 83,728 87

$599
1, 353
366, 758
7, 565, 629
1, 914, 620
3,409, 739
117,765
645, 937
40
190
1, 452, 261
706, 733
54, 940
.58,047
: 779, 538
17,887
1,489
22,112
10, 769
27, 904
-6,615
16, 308, 702
2, 321, 025
124, 372

02
06
44
89
64
89
49
59
13
94
11
41
88
19
16
61
32
97
00
99
14
96
79
93

35, 815, 036 55

O
H
O

K

>
o
cc

XVL.—DEPOSITS and PUBCHASES of SILVEB of DOMESTIC PBODUCTION during thefiscalyear ended June 30, 1881.
A s s a y offices.

Mints.

Total.

Locality.
Philadelphia. San Francisco.

Dakota
Georsria

.

. . . .

Michifiran f l i a k e S u n e r i o r )
N e w Mexico
N o r t h Carolina

. •

South Garolina
Utah
Vermont
Virgiiiia
Washington Territory
VV vomino"




96
31
23
68
71
02
38
20
45
46
80
88
13
99

$5 08
3, 414, 392 68
618,135 75

Denver.

$9, 820 33

N e w Orleans.

New York.

.

$227, 925 21
9, 228 88
974, 029 30

$526 18

Boise.

...,,...-:..,.....

Charlotte.

•

"'"'$68'67'
•

;"..' 24,559 33
209,344 08
4, 634, 292 36
... 17 77

Helena.

580, 984 25

52, 413
40, 800
862, 974
108, 569
262,191

00
86
02
01
43

$447 11
$83, 946 77
427 58

15, 280 21

13, 969 44

9.3, 526 25

1,157, 854 72
43 50

41 80

30;65
110 96

P a r t e d from ffold
C o n t a i n e d i n erold
Total silver

$2, 515
13
i
• 154
- . . 11
, 67
- -2,843
248
4, 866
3
7
. .28
.
. 2
1

Carson.

""'*""3';69"
6,928,536:20
16, 964' 90

1,497,652112
:• -48; 486:80

:2, 018 87

616,722 53

-x

'•

"'",45'
$5, 028, i50 71
1,111.14

813, 618 53
111, 409 51
2,381 39

3,279 59
-

6, 958, 320 51 • 11,172, 525 92

-590, 805 03

.. 3,805 7.7

5, 029, 261 85

4, 635, 027 41

2,828 50

83, 946 77

537 45

$5
3, 644, 833
637,198
974, 556
154
79
. 77, 486
. 43, 644
1,156,-513
5,328,712
262,212
' 435
29, 278
43
1
1,251,380
43
. 30
110
4
14,267,957
177,972
5, 660
618, 741

08
85
27
71
68
78
46
24
07
07
66
38
53
93
99
97
50
65
96
14
56
35
98
40

O
O

H-i

28,477, 059 21

"-a

TV.—COINAGE EXECUTED dnring the fiscal year ended. Jnne 30, 1881.
Philadelphia.

San Francisco.

CO
O

N e w Orleans.

Carson.

Total.

Denomination.
Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

GOLD.

Double-eagles
Eagles
Half-eagles
Three dollars
Quarter-eagles
Dollars

".
.

.....

' Total gold

2,276
2, 684,176
4, 580, 976
1,566
3,656
3,276

$45, 520
26, 841, 760
22, 904, 880
4, 698
9,140
3, 276

00
00
00
00
00
00

765, 000
631, 000
1, 378, 000

$15, 300, 000 00
6, 310, 000 00
6, 890, 000 00 '

7, 275, 926

49, 809, 274 00

2, 774, 000

28, 500, 000 00

53,189

344, 590 00

11, 460, 000 . 11, 460, 000 00

539, 000

539, 000 00

15, 729 $157, 290 00
37,460 187, 300 00

8,000

• $80, 000 00

'. 8,000-

80, 000 00

767, 276 $15, 345, 520 00
3, 338, 905 33, 389, 050 00
5, 996, 436 29, 982,180 00
1,566
4, 698 00
3,656
9,140 00
3, 276
3,276 00
10, 111, 115

78, 733, 864 00

O

27, 637,
9,
14,
36,

955
355
555
955

27,637,955 00
^ 4, 677 50
3 638 75
3,695 50

O

27, 698, 820

27, 649, 966 75

K

3, 555
1, 080, 555
37, 251, 555

177 75
32,416 65
372, 515 55

38, 335, 665

405,109 95

SILVER.

DoUars
Half-dollars
Quartbr-dollars
Dimes

.

9,113,
9,
14,
36,

. . . .

955
355
555
955

9,113, 955
4,677
3, 638
3, 695

00
50
75
50

9,174, 820

9,125,966-75

3,555
1, 080, 555
37. 251, 555

177 75
32, 416 65
372, 515 55

Total minor

38, 335, 665

405,109 95

T o t a l coinage .

54, 786, 411

59, 340, 350 70

T o t a l silver

11, 460, 000

;
...




..

539, 000

539, 000 00

6, 525, 000

6, 525, 000 -00

•

6, 525, 000 00

'

Mmoii.
P i v e cents
Three cents
One cent . . .

11, 460, 000 00

6, 525, 000

V

14, 234 000

39, 960, 000 00

592,189

883, 590 00

6, 533, 000

6, 605, 000 00

76,145, 600 106. 788, 940 70

H

i2l

o
Ul

"V.—-COINAGE EXECUTED during the calendar year ended Decemher 31, 1880.
Philadelphia.

San Francisco.

^

Carson.

Total.

N e w Orleans.

Denomination.
Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

GOLD.

Double-eagles.
Eagles
Half-eagles
Three dollars
Quarter-eagles
Dollars
^

. . ..... .

...

. . . .

Total gold
.

51, 456
1, 644, 876
3,166, 436
1,036
2,996
1,636

$1, 029,120 00
16, 448, 760 00
15,832,180 00
3,108 00
7, 490 OT)
1, 636 00

836,000
606, 250
1, 348, 900

$16, 720, 000 00
5, 062, 500 00
6, 744, 500 00

4,868,436.

33, 322, 294 00

2, 691,150

28, 527, 000 00

62, 207

12, 601, 355
9,755
14, 955
37, 355

12, 601,
4,
3,
3,

00
5'0
75
50

8, 900, 000

.8,900,000*00

591, 000

12, 663, 420

12, 613, 706 75

8, 900, 000

8-, 900, 000 00

591, 000

887, 456 $17, 749,120 00
2,171, 516 21, 715,160 00
4, 566, 353 22, 831, 765 00
1,036
3,108 00
2,996
. 7, 490 00
1,636
1,636 00

9,200

$92, 000 00

366, 985 00

9,200

92, 000 00

7, 630, 993

62, 308, 279 00

591, 000 00

5, 305, 000

5, 305, 000 00

27, 397, 355
9,755
• 14,955
37, 355

27, 397, 355 00
• 4,877 50
3,738-75
3, 735 50

27, 459, 420

27, 409, 706 75

X l l , 190 $111, 900 00
51, 017 255, 085 00

u
w
ow

SILVER.

Dollars
Half-dollars
.
Quarter-dollars
Dimes

. . .

Total silver

.

...

355
877
738
735

591, 000 00

19, 955
24, 955
38, 964, 955

997 75
748 65
389, 649 55

Total minor

39, 009, 865

391, 395 95

Total coinage

56, 541, 721

46, 327, 396 70

5, .305, 000 00

11, 591,150

37,427, 000 00

653, 207

957, 985 00

5, 314, 200

o
^ j

•

-

MINOR.

Five cents
Three cents
One cent

5,305, 000

o?:)

5, 397, 000 00

19,955
24,955
38, 964, 955

997 75
748 65
389, 649 55

39, 009, 865

391, 395 95

74,100, 278 90,109,381 70

H

w
y-H

!^
H

P r o o f t r a d e dollars, 1,987.




IM)
OD

Vi.—J^ABS MANtJFACTUBEDlduring the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881.

to
oo

A s s a y offices.

Mints.

Total.

Description.
Philadelphia.

San Francisco.

Denver.

Carson.

N e w Orleans.

New York.

Bois6.

Helena,

Charlotte.

$163, 469 86

$568, 525 13

$86, 919 59

163, 469 86

568, 525 13

'86,919 59

GOLD.
•

Fine bars
Unparted bars

$312 93

$236,141 78
$8, 700 55

$9, 805, 028 07

$238, 416 74
89, 643,135 29

Totalgold

236,141 78

8, 700 55 •

- .\- '
•' •

' '

238,416 74

.

312 93

$10, 041, 482 78
1,066,031 87
89, 643,135 29

•

99, 448,163 36

100, 750, 649 94
hj

..

o

SILVER.
•

Fine bars
Standard bars
Unparted bars
Mint bars

60,123 09
.'

Total silver
T o t a l gold a n d s i l v e r .




.

"^

•

1, 033, 964 81
76,080 93

112 43

y..

4, 763,189 08
1,418 .03
2, 828 50

. 526 18

84,3i4 97

5i9, 047 53
60,123 09

1,110, 045 74

526 18

112 43

5, 283, 654 64

2,828 50

296, 264 87

1,118, 746 29

238, 942 92

425 36

304,731,818 00

166, 298 36

84, 314

.. :97

652, 840 10

626:80

5, 857, 276
77, 611
88, 296
519 047

98
39
45
53

626-80

6, 542, 232 35

87, 546 39

107, 292, 882 29

H
O

s
o
CQ

283

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

Y l l . — C O I N A G E and MEDAL DIES.MANUFACTUBED at t h c M I N T at P H I L A D E L P H I A during thefisccd year ended June 30, 1881.
Philadel- San Fran- Carson.
phia.
cisco.

Denomination.
For gold coinage:
JSao-le
-.i
Half-eacle
Three-dollar
...
Quarter-eagle -.
Dollar

.

Total
For silver coinage:
Dollar
' Half-dollar
Quarter-dollar

2
94
115
4
4
,4

30
40
36

223

106

148
•-

..

...

i

21

12

'^62

200

50

119

• 517
. 4
4
6

200

50.

119

'531

•

•

4
6

2
•. . 57
251

2
-.57
251

.

T 01 al

Total.

; 38
148
l64
4
4
•4

'.6
8
7

4

162

Total
For minor coinage:
Five-cent
Three-cent

NewOrleans.

310

_

310

Total N U M B E B of DIES.
Gold coinage
.
:'.--.. - - - . . . . . . - . .. —
Z''.',.'l ....'.•.-....
Silvercoinage.
.
.....
. . . . . . - . - . - - . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . " . ...I . . . .
Minor coiuage,: .^
........
Experimental dies
-....'....
....
Proof coinage^
.-•--. . . . . . . . - - . . - - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . : .'^.V:'.""...
Jolin Egar Howard ( r e x ) r o d u c t i o n ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V . . . . . . ? . . . . . . . . " . . . V . . . . : . . .
Tea farm medal (William G. Le Due)
...-..,--.
- Life-saving medal (Department of State)
.V.'..": \ . . : . . . . . . . . . . .
Annual assay
. 1 . . . . . . .....>
.*.'..'..".-V.'.;..^'. . . v . ' . . .
Total




'....,

......:.....::..:.-.v...%...."

.362
. ^ 531
310
^' 6
'^.26
.;. 1
2
; 2
' 2
'i'k2

284

REPORT ON, T H E

FINANCES.

T i l l . — M E D A L S MANUFACTUBED at the M I N T at P H I L A D E L P H I A diiring
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881.
Name.

Gold.

Life-saving (firstdass)
.Life-saving (second class)
Maryland Institute
Massachusetts Humane Society
National Fair Association
1
Rumford
:
Department of State
Norman
^.
New England Agricultural Society.
Fomidas
College of Pharmacy
Dr. Hodge
,
Adams Academy
Elliott-Cresson '.
, Vanderbilt University
,
GeorgetoAvn College
\
Shakspeare
Santini
H. M. Dodd
McKee
'.
Jesse Ketchum (large)
Jesse Ketchum (small)
'Amidon
Lincoln (grammar School
'Saint Louis Agricultural and Mechanical Association (large)
Saint Louis AgTicultural aud Mechanical Association (small)
Michigan State Agricultural Society
Maine State Agricultural Society
Bicycle Club
.•
Wisconsin State Agricultural Society ,.
Allegiance
'.
Massachnsetts Horticultural Society
:
Bridge.
Washington Wreath
Washingtion and Lincoln
Washington and Jackson
Commencement of Cabinet
Emaiicipation
Saint Ignatius College (large) .
Saint Ignatius College (small) .
Denman School...:
Grant Indian Peace'
Franklin School
Carne.y.
Baltimore Female College (large)
Baltimore Female College (small)
Brown memorial.
Major-General Taylor, Palo Alto
Major-General Taylor, Monterey
Ma.] or-Gen eral Taylor, Buena Vista .
Major-General Scott, Mexico
Colonel Lee
Thoraas Jefierson, Presiiient
Blind Asylum
John Paul Jones
Cratchet
John Scott
Marksman's Badge
DaAns, TJ. S
.'
President James Madison
General Grant
President Jackson
Presidency Relinquished
President R. B. Hayes
Director J, R. Snowden
Captain Truxton
Coi. A. Louden Snowden
President A. Johnson
President A. Lincoln
President James Monroe •
President M. Van Buren
President John Q. Adams
President James K. Polk
President 2. Taylor
President M. Fihnore
President F. Pierce
President James Madison
President John Tyler
Total.




Silver.

68

41
15
42
15
13
50
11
6
25
60
50
50
50
10
1
200
200
21
1
30
12
5

112

1,176

Bronze.

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

285

IX.—MEDALS and PBOOF SETS SOLD during the fiscal year ended Juno 30, 1881.
Nnmiier
sold.

Description.

,

>

.,

•

Value.

MEDALS.

Gold
Silver
Bronze

i

..-

Total

113
1,124
435

$4, 680 42
1, 895 49
422 50

1,672

6, 998 41

36
1,065

1, 548 00
4, 260 00

1,101

5 808 00

PROOF SETS.

Gold
Silver

:
T 0 tal




:.

..
;

X.—STATEMENT of E A B N I N G S and E X P E N D I T U B E S of the UNITED STATES MINTS and ASSAY OFFICES for the.fiscal year ended
Jline 30, 1881.

to
OO

EARNINGS.
A s s a y ofiices.

Mints.

Total.

^
M e l t i n o ' alloy a n d b a r c h a r g e s
Profits on s t a n d a r d and silver dollars coined

Philadelphia.
$5, 399
926
. 1, 079,104
2,120
274, 423

89
24
25
65
73

San Francisco.

N e w Orleans.

Carson.

$161, 441 22
4, 669 56
1, 431,130 65

$200 00
Q32 77
771,023 73

$9, 008 33
50 65
65, 691 36

y

$239 17

N e w York.

Bois6.

Helena.

^

$80, 090 34
4,513 40

$185 10

$133 94

$666 05

1,718 00
151 00

24 00

1,414 51

215 33

15 00

921 00

490 00

186 00

260 35

462 76

5, 430 85

70 59

326 5 4 '

G r a i n s , fluxes, a n d s w e e p i n g s from d e p o s i t melt1,345 4 8 -

Charlotte.

. -.

P r o f i t s on t h e m a n u f a c t u r e of m e d a l s a n d p r o o f
2, 519 06
228 50

Denver.

$256,139
12, 016
3, 346, 949
2,120
274, 423

78
88
99
65.
'73

2, 519 06
3, 993 85

77 28

9, 343 29

241 74
32 80

90 38

24, 733 24
351 40
2, 239 05

995 37

2, 551 71

3,934,830 92

S u r p l u s b u l l i o n r e t u r n e d b y m e l t e r a n d refiner
24,733 24
19 28
Total

811 69

1,251 56

143 00

1, 366, 879 44

1, 600, 058 50

772, 238 83

74, 765 34

1, 642 21

115, 257 83

441 69

hj

O
H
O

)—I

EXPENDITURES.
S a l a r i e s of ofiicers a n d c l e r k s
C o n t i n g e n t exj)enses, n o t i n c l u d i n g w a s t a g e a n d
loss on s w e e p s
i..
P a r t i n g a n d refining e x p e n s e s , n o t i u c l u d i n g
E x p e n s e of d i s t r i b u t i n g standa,rd s i l v e r d o l l a r s . . .

34,850 00
. 345, 061 18

24, 900 00
265, 296 97

21,. 236 88
84, 938 76

23, 345 61
71, 606 30

10, 835 80
9, 998 75

32, 900 00
21, 776 00

S, 000 00

111, 148 73

86, 754 92

40, 832 22

22, 261 88

4,133 82

8, 563 90

4, 916 30

9, 574
67,950
13,125
7,362
23, 763

63
61
41
07
46

164,108
5, 720
29,481
11,126

09
77 "'14*162'66*
90
1, 832 94
48

Total




612, 836 09

587, 389 13

162, 943 46

1,000 00

5, 946 73
10, 958 66

159, 765 02
809,636 62

8, 257 92

287. 869 69

84, 356 86

10, 217 17
2, 702 34
903 73

268, 256
90,476
- 45, 343
22, 926
23, 763
23

4, 437 62

...

L o s s on b u l l i o n s l i i n n e d t h e m i n t for coinao'e

2,750 00

ii

131, 037 03

24, 968 37

152, 034 38

.

23 85

7, 940 15

3,750 00

25,163 31

75
38
98
17
46
85

1, 708, 061 92

o
m

287

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.
ILl.—WASTAGES and LOSS on SALE of SWEEPS, 1881.
o
o

c3

03

la

M e l t e r a n d refiner's gold w a s t a g e .
Melter and refiner'ssilver wastage
C o i n e r ' s s i l v e r wasta'^'e
Total...
. P a i d a s follow;s::
F r o m contingent appropriation . . .
F r o m ijarting a n d refining appropriation
F r o m profit a n d loss
Total

1

i

$6, 542
3, 663
1, 049
1, 869
7,362

66 $22, 863
98
3,118
67 .
2, 540
10
958
07
'11,126

^1

i •

S

Losses.

/

CO

3
o
H

$446
59
249
148

89
85
97
19
48

71
54
41
06

$69
1
672
1, 089

903 72

1, 832 94

24,132 36

387 98

..

. 180 62

5, 858 63

6,1(38 85
1, 414 50
8, 892 67

20, 487 48

40, 608 38

20, 487 48

40, 608 38

14,356 38
272 47

$29, 922
. 6, 844
4 512
4,064
$4, 437 62 22,926

64
87
20
.23

4, 437 62

90
24
25
58
17

68, 270 14
38,876 72

4,437 62

335 12

62 68
8 83
1,761 43

6,684 6 2
5, 86;0 95
16,847 85

903 72

i;832 94

4.437 62

68,270 14

X J l . — S T A T E M E N T of tlie NUMBEB of MELTS of INGOTS MADE and the NUMB E B CONDEMNED at E A C H MINT, from 1874 to 1881.
GOLD.

. 6
Fiscal years—

g

g
•

o

; H

B

•a

1874
1875 . . . . . - .
1876
v..
1877
•.. i
1878
. •
.•• ". ' . ' . . . . .
1879
.'...'.:.'
1880
'-.
1881
....'........;.......
Total

1, 204
.191
.260
-•306
327
314
722
1, 328
4,652

Average ner vear

.

Carson.

San Francisco.

226
39
14
13
2
7
4

813
925
942
1,141
1,393
981
931
If 033

307

8,159

s
.g

3
8

92
100
125
77
36
15
10
14

"61

"469

5
13
6
3
19
•

' 4

. 7 p . ct.

6. 5 p . c t .

N e w Orlean

.

6

Number condemned.

Philadelphia.

i

H
11

fl~.

o .-

3

1 ,11
2

•

•••6
3
8
6
11

14

2. 3 p . ct.

SILVER.
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880...
1881
Total

3,678
2, 677
4,429
6, 670
6,970
7,057
8,646
5,315
45, 442

•Average p e r y e a r




401
127
103
62
57
85
51
20

2,648
4,378
9,454
13, 210
13, 610
12, 789
8,104
12, 617

906

76, 810

1. 9 p . ct.

•

11
8
14
14
14
38

323
2,709
2,996
2,963
2,410
1,680
392
555

124

14, 028

. 1 p . ct.

17
138
79
46
14
6
2
12

195
971
1,182

314

2,348

2. 2 p . c t .

2
1]

10
2£
.9p

288

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

X l l l . — P E B C E N T A G E of COIN produced from GOLD and SILVEB OPEI^ATED
UPON^y the COINEBS of the MINTS, 1874 to 1881.
GOLD COIN.
Philadelphia; San Francisco.

Fiscal year.

1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

i
.

..

.

'
.

Average

...

.

.

.

P e r cent.
40.1
41.5
46.1.
4L6
4L1
41.5
40.2
37:1

P e r cent.
55
51
- .51.5
50
51 2
.53.2
52*9
48 2

4L15

-

'Carson.

N e w Orleans.

P e r cent.
50.4
52.7
53.2
52.9
50. 9
47.7
51 1
• 45 7 •

P e r cent..

45.1
44. 9

51 62

50 57

45

54
52
49
50
52.7
52.2
51.6
47.8

5L4
52.9
48.3
52.8
48.6
45 9
49 7
46.7

44 9
49.1
56.3

5L16

49.53

50 1

SILVER COIN.
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

1
^

..

.

42.8
49.4
47.1
' 47.8
48
48 2
49 5
48 2
47.62

Average

X I X . — S T A T E M E N T of the halance of GOLD and SILVEB B U L L I O N and COIN on
hand at the UNITED STATES MINTS and N E W YOBK ASSAY OFFICE, June 30,
1881.
J u n e 30,1881.

Gold b u l l i o n . . $23, 023, 206
4,216,028
Silver b u l l i o n . 1, 236, 332
Silver c o i a : . . . 1, 418, 242
Total

San Francisco.

Carson.

62 $2, 345,152 45
50 4, 003, 386 24
08 1, 296, 899 68
81 17, 476, 016 96

$357, 745
80, 455
286, 035
1,187,082

Philadelphia.

29, 893, 810 01 25,121, 455 33




N e w Orleans.

23
00
77
87

1, 911, 318 87

$55, 767
39, 550
371, 254
5, 507,134

New York.

01 $60, 766,'825
28
3, 660, 290
98
647,116
30
31, 664

5, 973, 706 57

Total.

65 $86, 548, 696 96
47 11, 999, 710 49
36
3, 837, 638 87
95 25, 620,141 89

65,105, 897 43- 128, 006,188 21

DIRECTOR

OF

THE

289

MINT.

X V . — G O L D aud SILVEB of DOMESTIC P B O D U C T I O N DEPOSITED at ihe
MINTS and ASSAY OFFICES from their OBGANIZATION^ to the close of the fiscal year ended June ZO, 1881.
Locality.

Gold.

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
California
,
Colorado
Dakota
,.'
Georgia
Idaho
Indiana
l...
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan (Lake Superior)
Montana
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Mexico
North Carolina,
Oregon
South Carolina
Tennessee
Utah
Verm ont
Virginia
Washington Territory
Wyoming
Refined bullion
Parted from silver
,..

Silver.

$220,471 97
31, 325 53
2, 623, 500 50
709, 624, 600 24
37, 332,138 18
10, 644, 852 78
7, 815, 847 52
24, 683, 354 70
40 13
593 06
123 99
50,141, 267 20
15,139, 055 96
11, 020 55
1, 624,413 02
10, 671,398 29
16,194,047 73
1, 419,732.91
85, 755 57
467, 246 58
(10, 981 27
1, 683,436 70
236, 864 36
723, 581 61
217, 364,618 22
16, 295,800 68
9, 322,268 97

Contained in silver
Parted from gold
Contained in gold
Other sources
Total.

$5 08
5, 761, 551 49
2, 314, 748 72
21,158, 446 27
21, 276 22
537 98
• 804, 781 96
917 56
3, 477, 319 02
5, 527, 897 19
77, 435, 742 76
2, 483, 697 29
46, 016 71
33, 684 91
74 37
1 99
10, 288, 337 98
43 50
30 05
110 96
11, 798 00
57, 057,970 43

10, 367,104 26

6, 991, 451 19
526, 284 79
31, 955, 945 16

1,144, 735, 442 48

225, 898, 672 18

Total.
$220,471
31, 330
8, 385,051
711, 939,348
58, 490, 584
10, 666,129
7, 816,385
25, 488, 136
40
593
917
3, 477,443
55, 669,164
92, 574,798
11, 020
110
4,108,415
10, 717,732
16, 227,807
1, 419,757
85, 584
10, 755, 024
11, 467
1, 683,975
236, 379
735, 588
274, 422, 80016,295,268
9, 322,451
6,991,284
526, 049
42, 323,

97
61
99
96
45
00
50
66
13
06
56
01
39
72
55
31
00
64
28
56
56
77
35
32
61
65
68
97
19
79
42

1, 370, 634,114 (

X Y I . — S T A T E M E N T of COINAGE from the OBGANIZATION of the M I N T to
the close of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881.
GOLD COINAGE.

. Period.

1793 t o 1848
1849 t o 1873
1874
1875
1876 . . . \
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

Doubleeagles.

Eagles.

Half.
eagles.

Three
dollars.

$25, 662, 270 $45, 265, 355
$646, 727, 980 29, 851, 820 22, 994, 390 $i,
809, 780
48,283,900
383, 480
203, 655
32, 748,140
599, 840
71, 800
37, 896, 720
153, 610
67, 835
43, 941, 700
56, 200
51, 406, 340
155; 490
688, 680
37, 234, 340 1, 031, 440 1, 442,130
21, 515, 360 18, 836, 320 15, 790, 860
15, 345, 520 33, 389, 050 29, 982,180

Quartereagles.

$5,413, 815
169, 913 20, 804, 702
516,150
125, 460
2, 250
60
53, 052
135
5, 780
4,464
408, 900
137, 850
109,182 1,166, 800
3, 075
9,090
9,140
4,698

Dollars.

00
50 $i9,'6i5,'633
00
323, 920
00
20
50
3, 645
00
2, 220
00
1, 720
00
3, 020
00
3, 030
00
3, 276

Total.
$76,341,440
740, 564, 438
50,442,690
33, 553, 965
38,178, 962
44, 078,199
52, 798, 980
40, 986, 912
56,157, 735
78, 733, 864

00
50
00
00
50
00
00
00
00
00

935,100, 000 110,119, 520 117, 316, 665 1, 560, 852 28, 383, 665 00 19, 356, 484 1, 211, 837,186 00

Total

19 F




290

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
XVI.—STATEMENT pf COINAGE, ^-c—Contmued.
SILVER COINAGE.
1

Period.

1793 to 1852
1853 to 1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881

Trade-dollars.

Half-dollars.

Quarter-dollars. Twenty-cents.

$3, 588, 900
5, 697, 500
6,132, 050
9,162, 900
11, 378, 010

$2, 506, 890 $66, 249,153 00 $3, 999, 040 50
5, 538, 948 33, 596, 082 50 18, 002,178 00
458, 515 50
1, 438, 930 00
623, 950 00
2, 853, 500 00
4, 985, 525 00
4,106, 262 50
9, 746, 350 00
7, 584,175 00
3, 703, 027 50
8, 573, 500
3, 875, 255 00
112 50
27, 227, 500
, 225 00
27, 933, 750
' 3, 275 00
• 3, 837 50
27, 637, 955
4, 677 50
3, 638 75

$5,858
263 560'
1 440

35, 959, 360

99, 418, 543 122, 752, 973 00

271, 000

. .

Total

Period.
1793 to 1852
1853 to 1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
•
1880
1881
Total

Dollars.

«

Half-dimes.

Dimes.

38, 484, 737 75

Three-cents.

$3,890,062 50
5,170, 733 00
497, 255 80
889, 560 00
3, 639,105. 00
2, 055, 070 00
760, 891 00
45 00
1, 575 00
3,695 50

$1, 823, 298 90
3, 083, 648 00

16, 907 992 RO

4 906 946 90

142

Total.

$744, 927 00
536,923 20

$79,^213,371 90
65, 928, 512 70
5, 983 601 30
lO: 070, 368 00
19,126,502 50
28, 549, 935 00
28 290 825 50
27,227,882 50
27, 942, 437 50
27, 649 966 75

1.281.8.50 20

.m 9 983 40.^ 65

i
MINOR COIN.
Five-cents.

Three-cents.

1793 to 1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880.:
1881

$5, 276,140 00
244, 350 00
94,650 00
132,700 00
25, 250 00
80 00
1,175 00
1, 247 50
177 75

$805, 350 00
29, 640 00
12,540 00
7,560 00

Total

5, 775, 770 25

889, 521 15

Period.




48 00
984 00
982 50
32, 416 65

Two-cents. '

Cents.

$912, 020 oojU , 886, 452 44
137, 935 00
123,185 00
120, 090 00
36, 915 00
30, 566 00
95, 639 00
267,741 50
372, 515 55
912, 020 00' 6, 071, 03.9 49

Half-cents.

Total.

$39, 926 11 $11, 919, 888 55
411, 925 00
230,375.00
260 350 00
62,165 00
30 694 00
97 798 00
269, 971 50
405 109 95
39, 926 11 13, 688, 277 00

291

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

XVll.—AVEBAGE MONTHLY PBICE of FINE SILVEB BABS at London, ^c.
r6
.+3 r - c o

mi

m

Date.

fl o
o+^

1880.
July
August
..
September
October
November
December

Pence.
52H
'
51H

0 o

-MOO

fl ftw?

S-rf

(^

o M

H

$1 15.496
1 14 400
1 1 4 . 674
1 14.400
1 13.441
1 13. 578

s rt

H^ TTi lA

on (n

<

W

$4
4
4
4
4
4

86.1
84 5
84.3
84.4
83.4
82.6

4
4
4
4
4
4

83 6
85.7
83.2
84.7
87.1
86.7

1^^

fl o fl fl. o

1^^

quivale
money
1,000 fi
age mo
tations
averag

•5 "

tin United S
ffinebar s
e, based on
thly London
with exchan
monthly rat

•Q fl
cocq

$1 15. 348
1 14 873
1 14. 246
1 13.798
1 1-2.698
It 12. 669

flCM

So
O tH

|> ft
<j

$1
1
1
1
1
1

15.125
14 524
13. 375
12. 932
11. 906
11. 650

1
1
1
1
1
1

11 604
12 818
13. 226
13. 019
13 020
12. 285

1881.
January
February
March
April
May
June

.

Average




'..

51i
51H
52^5
523*5

•IS
51il

1
1
1
1
1
1

12.345
13. 578
14.400
14.126
13. 304
12. 482

1 13. 852

4 84.7

1
1
1
1
1
1

11 821
13. 407
13. 616
13. 697
13 396
12. 532

1 13. 508

1 12. 957

[
292

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

X V I I I . — C I R C U L A R , ESTIMATING AND PROCLAIMING, IN UNITED STATES
MONEY OF ACCOUNT, T H E VALUES OF T H E STANDARD COINS IN CIRCULATION OF T H E VARIOUS NATIONS OF T H E W O R L D .
TREASURY DEPA-RTMENT,
BUREAU OF THE MINT,
Washington, D. C , January 1, 1881.

1881.
DEPARTMENT No. 1,
SP:CRETAUY'S OFFICE.

Hon. J O H N SHERMAN,
Secretary of the Treasury :
S I R : 111 pursuance of t h e provisions of section 3564 of the Revised Statutes of tlie
United States, I have estimated the values of the standard coins in circulation of the
various nations of the world, and submit the same in the accompanying table.
Very respectfully,
HORATIO C. BURCHxlRD,
*
Director of the Mint.
E S T I M A T E o f VALUES of F O B E I G N COINS.-

Country.

Monetary unit.

Standard coin.

Standard.

Austria
Belgium . .v
Bolivia
Brazil..'.
British Possessions in
North America.
Chih

Florin
Frfinc
,.
BoliA^iano
Milreis of 1,000 reis .
Dollar

SOver
Gold and silver
Silver
Gold
...do

Peso.

Gold and silver

Cuba
Denmark .
Ecuador . .
Egypt . . . .

...do . . .
Crown ..
Peso
Piaster .

...do .
Gold...
Silver.
Gold..

France
Great Britain .

Gold and silver
Gold

Greece.

Franc
Pound sterling.
Drachma

Gold and silver

German Empire.
India
Italy
Japan

Mark
Rupee of 16 annas Lira
Ten

Gold
Silver
Gold and silver
Silver

Liberia .
Mexico .

Dollar .
...do ..

Gold.Silver.

Netherlands
Norway
Peru
Portugal
Russia
Sandwich Islands.
Spain

Florin
Crown
Soi
Milreis of 1.000 reis ..
Rouble of 100 copecks
Dollar
Peseta of 100 centimes

Gold and silver
Gold
Silver
Gold
Silver
Gold
Gold and silver

Sweden
Switzerland.
Tripoli......
Turkey.....

Crown
Franc
Mahbub of 20 piasters
Piaster
!

Gold
Gold and silver
Silver
Gold

50 40. 7
19.3 5,10, and 20 francs.
82.3 Boliviano.
54.6
1 00
91.2

Condor, doxibloon, and
escudo.
•hy h h 2, and 1 doubloon.
10 and 20 crowns.
Peso.
5,10, 25, 50, and 100 piasters.
19.3 5,10, and 20 francs.
4 86. 6i| I sovereign and sovereign.
5,10, 20, 50, and 100 drachmas.
23.8 5,10, and 20 marks.
39
19.3 5,10, 20, 50, and 100 lire.
1, 2, 5,10, and 20 yen; gold
and silver yen.
1 00
89.4 Peso or dollar, 5, 10, 25,
and 50 centavo.
40.2'
26.8 10 and 20 crowns.
82.3 Sol.
1 08
2, 5, and 10 milreis.
65.8 ^, ^, and 1 rouble.
1 00
19.3 5,10, 20, 50, and 100 pesetas.
26.8 10 and 20 crowns.
19.3 5,10, and 20 francs.
74.3
04.4 25, 50, 100, 250, ,and 500
93.2
26.8
82.3
04.9

piasters.

United States of Colorabia] Peso
Venezuela
Bolivar .

Silver
,
Gold and silver

82.3
19.3

Peso.
5,10, 20, 50, and 100 Bohvar.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
Washington, D. C , January 1, 1881.
The foregoing estimation, made hy the Director of t h e Mint, of t h e value of t h e
foreign coins above mentioned, I hereby proclaim to be t h e values of such coins expressed in t h e money of account of t h e IJnited States, and to ho taken in estimating
t h e values of all foreign merchandise, made out in any of said currencies, imported on
or after J a n u a r y 1, 1881.
JOHN SHERMAN,
Secretary of the Treasury.




293

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

X I X . — S T A I E VIE :^T of IMPORTS and EXPORTS of GOLD aud SILVER during
the fiscal year ended June 30^ 18'Sl.' {Beported hy Chief of Bureau of Statistics.)
IMPORTS.
Gold.

Silver.
Coin.

Coin.
Total.

Ports.
Bullion.

Bullion.
American.

American.

Foreign.

Foreign.
Trade
dollars.

Other.

N E W YORK.

$2.5,680
542, 294
2, 690, 8.54
194,160
2, 640, 231
8, 400, 791
3, 527, 662
94, 534
5, 495, 004
6,197, 766
15, 731
9,128

$49, 603
$82, .370
159, 833 8, 300, 631
88,100 15, 853, 819
1, 716, 887 14, 038, 372
2, 482,195 3, 273, 882
804, 586 6, 358,126
925, 346
58, 787
82, 336
54, 662
37, 953 1,462,697
271, 642 8, 662, 389
55, 336 1,142, 558
27, 419
44, 086

^. 29, 851, 835

5, 823, 670 60, 209, 945

J u l y , 1880
Auirust, 1 8 8 0 . . . .
S e p t e m b e r , 1880..
O c t o b e r 1880
N o v e m b e r , 1880 . .
D e c e m b e r , 1880 . .
J a n u a r y , ls81
Februarv, 1881..
March, 1 8 8 1 . . . . ' . .
A p r i l . 1881
M a y , 1883
J u u e 1881
Total

$312
3,239
1, 373
2,500
42
384
1,404

$27

'i2,'3i6'
6,689
22, 299
19, 466

2, 946

12, 200

$213, 067
125, 096
96, 699
97, 524
96, 946
77,181
71, 078
87, 642
157, 226
101, 707
105, 900
105, 522

$181, 213
341, 432
119,175
189, 276
737, 234
530, 422
120, 704
269, 037
155,108
147, 288
90, 048
127, 941

$552, 272
9, 472, 525
18, 850, 020
16, 248, 535"
9; 248, 677
16, 202, 447
4, 723, 427
589, 615
7, 307, 988
15,383,738
1, 409, 573
314, 096

60, 797 1, 335, 588 3,008,878 100, 302, 913

SAN FRANCIS.CO.

J u l y , 1880
A u g u s t , 3880
S e p t e m b e r , 1880..
October, 1880
N o v e m b e r , 1880 .
D e c e m b e r , 1880 . .
J a n u a r y , 1881
Febrnarv, 1881...
M a r c h , 1881
A p r i l , 1881
May,1881
J u n e , 1881
Total

14, 219
113,439
127,719
126, 784
491,108
43, 875
30, 414
49, 913
16,764

47, 017
3,672
6,205
17, 892
4,147
3,490
15,591

36, 779
63, 410

.

139, 961
174, 241
112,248
186, 435
58, 000
53, 257
150, 495
40, 500
150, 755

67, 905
60,175
270, 516
•252, 946
140, 282
209,192
201,192
165, 452
193, 630
164, 808
212, 029

1, 065, 892 1, 938,127

1,114,424

98, 014

1,233
3, 9.57
4, 541
2,552
2,758
1,187
2,297
880
861

1,250
3,063
52, 240
1,310
471, 542
725, 326
1,690
215, 300
100, 210
65, 593
7,406
10, 808

22, 958
18, 501
23, 520
18,140
10, 434
46, 740
3, 781
6, 262
3,028
4,095
5,679
15, 943

54, 097
20, 053
41, 050
13, 813
4,535
74, 826
53, 723
23, 249
23,159
17, 780
22, 997
3,863

1, 655, 738

^ 179, 081

3.53,145

'i6,'6o6'
13, 600

"i,'666'
'i,666'
31, 600

6,755
11, 954
13, 351
32,175
12, 745
26, 050
39, 295
74, 252
10, 493
5,071
6,085
2,389

143,
89,
138,
343,
123,
147,
336,
247,
188,
323,
118,
35,

551
076
583
065
700
765
506
384
.389
683
318
894

279, 447
278,316
• 572,374
926, 423
801, 794
474, 367
806, 332
646, 332
434, 355
673, 879
366, 490
464, 477

240, 615 2, 235, 914

6, 724, 586

' 10, 300
14, 925
6,704
10, 391
11, 466
39,109
19, 445
8,873
10, 718
6,789
30, 604
4,526

553
398
444
900
567
701
029
538
533
756
881
224

213, 391
98, 897
247,499
201,106
551, 302
1,109, 889
160; 965
299,102
232, 509
149 013
100, 355
183, 970

173,850 1,153, 524

3, 547, 998

ALL OTHER PORTS.

J u l v , 1880
A u g u s t , 1880
S e p t e m b e r , 1880..
October, 1880
Noveraber, 1880 . .
D e c e m b e r , 1880 . .
J a n u a r y , 1881
February, 1881...
M a r c h , 1881
A p r i l , 1881
M a y , 1881
J u n e , 1881
Total

11, 788
606
32, 660

T o t a l i m p o r t s 30, 998, 919

7, 577, 422 61, 454, 918 2, 303, 472




123,
38,
119,
154,
50,
222,
80,
44,
. 94,
54,
21,
148,

92, 397 1, 750, 053 J6, 398, 316 110, 575, 497

294

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
XIX.—STATEMENT of IMPOBTS and EXPOBTS, #c.—Continued.
EXPORTS (DOMESTIC).
Gold.

Silver.

Ports.

Coin.
BulHon.

Coin.

Total.

Bullion.
Trade
dollars.

Other. .

N E W YORK.

J u l y 1880
A u g u s t , 1880
S e p t e m b e r 1880
October, 1880
N o v e m b e r , 1880
D e c e m b e r 1880
J a n u a r y 1881
F e b r u a r y , 1881
M a r c h , 1881
A p r i l 1881
M a y 1881
J u n e , 1881

$5, 760

$50, 000

4, 000
11,100
5, 500
61, 600
17,100
190, 400
139,100
39, 200
8,900
27, 559

$238. 000
76, 000
71, 000
694,100
460, 500
1, 232. 320
855, 650
815, 400
1, 001, 800
1, 016, 600
486, 200
^ 918,100

50, 000

510, 219

7,865,670

816
600
9,170
7,780 ,
10, 554'
3, 373
500
300
170
600
20

31, 942
50, 961
43, 623
121,291
164,160
82, 381
4,820
15, 610
21, 236
39, 069
35, 450
23, 343

67,243
83, 416
75, 443
1, 246, 557
52, 347
58, 960
304, 855
377, 496
14, 800
569, 530
865, 300
270, 378

33, 883

633, 886

3, 986, 325

.

.

...

Total

$41, 227
25,581
2,100
22, 500
17, 700
27, 500
28, 342
52, 085
3,458
500
•

220,993

$284, 987
76, 000
100, 581
707,300
488, 500
1, 311, 620
900, 250
1, 034,142
1,192, 985
1, 059, 258
495, 600
995, 659
8, 646, 882

SAN FRANCISCO.

J u l y 1880
A u g u s t , 1880
S e p t e m b e r , 1880
O c t o b e r 1880
N o v e m b e r 1880
D e c e m b e r , 1880
J a n u a r y , 1881
F e b r u a r y , 1881
M a r c h , 1881
A p r i l , 1881
M a y , 1881
J u n e 1881

-

Total

.

20, 000

100 001
135, 977
153, 236
1, 375, 628
227,561
147, 714
310,175
408, 426
38, 036
618, 769
901, 350
313, 741

76, 500

4, 730, 614

1,722
4,258
990
6,582
3,637
7,686
3,817
20, 363
134, 774
12, 672
45, 408
8,220

20, 090
19, 345
2,990
34, 282
28, 137
9,186
8,752
,21,132
134, 774
13, 672
45, 408
511, 680

i,666
. 25,000
500
3,000
$20

15,000
2, 000
10, 000

20

ALL OTHER P O R T S .

J u l y 1880
A n g u s t , 1880
S e p t e m b e r . 1880
O c t o b e r 1880
...
N o v e m b e r , 1880
D e c e m b e r 1880 .
J a n u a r y 1881
F e b r u a r y , 1881
M a r c h , 1881
A p r i l , 1881
M a y , 1881
J u n e 1881
Total
Total domestic exports




18, 368
15,087
2,000
27, 700
24, 500
1,500
4,135
569

.

800
.200

1,000
1,060

502, 400

1,060

597, 259

84, 943

1,741,364

1,000
11, 852, 995

20

250,129

849, 448

547,622

14, 226, 944

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

295

XlXo—STATEMENT of IMPOBTS and EXPOBIS, c/c—Continued.
EXPORTS (FOREIGN).
Silver.

Gold.

Ports.

Total.
Coin.

Bullion.

Bullion.

Coin.

N E W YORK.

J u l y , 1880
A u g u s t , 1880
S e p t e m b e r , 1880
October, 1880
N o v e m b e r , 1880
D e c e m b e r , 1880
J a n u a r y , 1881
F e b r u a r y , 1881
M a r c h , 1881
A p r i l , 1881
M a y , 1881
J u n e , 1881

$5, 000
24, 261
22,121
2,000
16, 045
$55, 900

'
-.. .
$2,157
j
".

Total

.^f

2,157

3,860
64, 500
450
6,997
569, 548
12,166
726, 948

5, 400
4,260

65, 560

S168,
299,
121,
485,
177,
300,
114,
70,
103,
134,
104,
30,

530
768
663
743
946
442
499
441
487
312
950
736

2,112, 517

$173,
324,
143
487,
193,
356,
118
140,
103,
147,
674,
42,

530
029
784
743
991
342
359
341
937
726
498
902

2, 907,182

SAN FRANCISCO.

J u l y 1880
A u g u s t 1880
S e p t e r a b e r , 1880
October, 1880
N o v e m b e r 1880
D e c e m b e r , 1880
J a n u a r y , 1881
F e b r u a r y , 1881
M a r c h , 1881
A p r i l 1881
M a y , 1881
J u n e , 1881

135,
56,
162,
218,
288,
187,
70,
285,
59,
282,
271,
120,

9,720

..

Total

..

:.

9,720

663
048
218
973
719
967
245
815
514
665
538
713

135 663
56 048
162, 218
218, 973
288, 719
197 687
7Q, 245
285, 815
59, -514
282 665
271, 538
120, 713

2,140, 078

2,149, 798

ALL QTHER P O R T S .

J u l y , 1880
A u g u s t 1880
S e p t e m b e r , 1880
October, 1880
N o v e m b e r 1880
D e c e m b e r , 1880
J a n u a r y , 1881
F e b r u a r y 1881
M a r c h , 1881
A p r i l , 1881
M a y , 1881
J u n e , 1881

6,388

6, 388

3,535

3,035

107, 968

107, 968

5,532

5, 532

:

Total
T o t a l foreign e x p o r t s




2,157

736, 668

65, 560

122, 923

122, 923

4, 375, 518

5,179, 903
i

,296

REPORT

ON THE' FINANCES.

X X . - S T A T E M E N T hy COUNTBIES of the N E T I M P O B T S OF AMEBICA N SILVEB COIN for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1881.
[From the Report of the Bureau of Statistics.]
Countries.

Dollars.

Central American States
China
Danish West Indies
France
French possessions, aU other
Germany
England
Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and
Prince Ed ward's'Island
Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, and the
Northwest Territory
Newfoundland and Labrador
British West Indies
British Honduras
British j)Ossessions in Africa and adjacent islands
Hawaiian Islands
Hayti
Japan

Countries.

Dollars.

Mexico
Dutch West Indies
Azore, Madeira, and Cape V e r d e
Islands
San D o m i n g o
(3uba
P o r t o Rico
U n i t e d S t a t e s of Colombia ".
Venezuela
All other countries and ports in South
America n o t elsewhere specified...
A l l o t h e r c o u n t r i e s a n d p o r t s in A f r i c a
n o t e l s e w h e r e specified

188,184
40, 279
82, 760
1,267
1,783
90, 591
93, 268
31, 420
6,417
2,679
136,505
3,843

Total imports
Total exports..;

60, 543
7,800
713, 362
7,291

116, 701
22, 376
898
106, 214
49, 659
80, 720
120,205
75, 435
300
1,850
*1, 842, 450
1547, 642
1, 294,1

* I n c l u d e s 92, 397 t r a d e d o l l a r s .

t I n c i u d e s 20 t r a d e d o l l a r s .

x x i . — T A B L E exhihiting the VALUE and CHABACTEB of ihe GOLD and SILVEB
used in MANUFACTURES and the ABTS in ihe UNITED STATES during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1881, as BEPOBTED hy PEBSONS and F I B M S engaged in
the MANUFACTUBES NAMED, in response to circular inquiries addressed from the
B UBEA U of the MINT.
Gold.
OJ

s

i
Manufactures.

1

'I

'i

CM

rt

O

bf-

_rt

ciJ

11
^

•

1
rt

"A

"A

o

^

PTi! p

s

,rt"|
'o

CO

1 ••
s
*q

'P

^

d
o

•

1
rt

.ER

FR

'^

"o
H

•

Instruments
Chemicals
Leaf and foil
Pens.
..
Plate
Soectacles
Watch-cases

197
328
53
34
390
229
48
5,138

11
142
28
18
159
98
17
1,900

22
17
28
9
119
28
17
903

120
186
25
16
231
131
31
3,238

$1, 520
4,851
95, 692
27, 111
56, 062
10,199
593, 450
2, 526, 997

$522
12, 031
434, 927
. 15,652
41, 269
22, 232
1, 795, 600
3, 849, 084

$1, 969
1," 620
55,459
3,240
5,527
. 7,260
39, 309
485,140

$4, Oil
18, 502
586, 078
46, 003
102,858
39, 691
2, 428, 359
6, 861, 221

Total

6, 417

2, 439

1,143

3,978

3, 315, 882

6,171, 317

599, 524

10,086,723




297

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

X X l . — T A B L E exhihiting the VALUE and CHABACTEB of the GOLD and SILVEB
used in MANUFACTUBES and the ABTS in the UNITED STATEi^, cfc—Cont'd.
Silver.*

•i •
Manufactures.

i

1

1

.
.

Total

4

3

a

1

1

Instruments
Cheraicals
Leaf and foil
Pens
Plate
Spectacles
W^atch-cases
Jewelry &c

>

s

o
H

$696
17
3,336
85
788
1,443
. . . . 4,312
61, 513

$1, 744
351,133
22, 903
4,027
1, 035, 241
3,303
1, 418, 985
290, 096

$1,188
27,188
4,344
1,045
46, 369
1,489
42, 944
64, 232

$3, 628
378, 338
30, 583
5,157
1, 082, 398
6,235
1., 466, 241
415, 841

$7, 639
396, 840
616, 661
51,160
1,185, 256
45, 926
3, 894, 600
7, 277, 062

72,190

3,127,432

188,799

3, 388, 421

13, 475,144

* SUver calculated-at its coining value, $1.16i\ per ounce, standard (900 fine).

XXII.
U N I T E D STATES ASSAY O F F I C E AT N E W YORK,

Septemher 14, 1881.
S I R : Deposits of gold and silver bullion, for bars which, have probably been issued
in the arts and manufactures during the fiscal year from July 1, 1880, to June 30,1881,
appears as ±ollo"^s, viz:
Gold.
Of
Of
Of
Of

foreign coin
foreign bullion .
doraestic bullion
plate, &c

$167, 368
1, 380, 416
3, 653,136
522, 918

Total

Silver.
00
00
00
00

5,723, 838 00

$120,791
. 250, 207
4, 579, 994
177, 940

00
00
00
00

5,128, 932 00

Very respectfully,
THOS. C. ACTON, Superintendent.
R. E. PRESTON,

Esq.,

Acting Director Mint, Washington, D. C.

XXIII.
[From the "Watchmaker and Metal Worker," for October, 1881.]
HOROLOGICAL PRODUCTIONS OF VARIOUS COUNTRIES.

Watches to the value of $2,135,000 were imported into Great Britain in 1880. From
a Swiss journal we learn t h a t in 1880 there were produced at Besan9on, France, 146,047
gold and 267,783 silver watches, being 3,860 gold and 26,618 silver watches less t h a n
during the preceding year. The total value of this trade for 1880 is estimated at
19,108,170 francs. The falling off in the iDroduct is attributed to increased importations of watches from Switzerland into France, the Swiss having heen ahle to reduce
the wages of mechanics considerably, owiug to the falling off of the American demand
for Swiss watches. In 1872 there were imported into the United States 366,000 watches;
in 1876 only 75,000. In these four years the industry had been so developed, and its
products so cheapened, t h a t we had become large exporters of watches, and could beat
the Swiss Avatchmakers on their own ground. This led the Swiss manufacturers to
change their tactics. As the Americans could surpass them in the finer grades of
w^atches, they began to cheapen their productions, and were thus able again to bring
up their export trade quite largely, until in 1880 t h a t country excelled her best previous record, her exportations of watches having reached a total value of $2,000,000.



298

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

There were imported into France in 1880, 32,082 gold and 51,592 silver watches,
exceeding by 20 per cent, the importations of 1879. The total number of watches represented in the G-eneva trade of 1880 w a s :
^
Watches from Besan^on
^
413,832
Watches from other French towns
800
Foreign.
.^
83,674
Total
:
•-.-. 498,306
Formerly; Switzerland sent to France watches to the value of over 4,000,000 francs;
but France now sends a large number of watches into Switzerland. The valine of the
entire clock and watch trade of France in 1880 is estimated at 57,000,000 francs, and
something like 60,000 workmen are engaged in this industry, of which the greater part
are employed at Besangon. In Paris there are 6,000 watchmakers.

*

*

*-

#

*

*

*

According to M. .Saiinier, England contributes to this art in money valne about onefifteenth of the production, of the world. Tbe following table, showing the total
annual manufacture of horological instruments in the various nations, does not give
the year covered by the estimate:.
France, clocks and watches
$13,000,000
Switzerland, watches
:
12,000,000
America, clocks and watches
6,400, 000
Germany, clocks
5,000,000
England, chronometers and watches
3,200, 000
Austria, clocks
.'.
2,'000,000.
Total

41,700,000

,
X X I V . — A V E B A G E and COMPABATIVE PBICESof the P,BINCIPAL DOMESTIC
COMMODITIES E X P O B T E D from the UNITED STATES from declared values at
time of export.

Average price dur
i n g m o n t h of J u n e —
Commodities.

A v e r a g e p r i c e during vear ended
J u n e 30—

P e r c e n t a g e of t h e
pr.ices of y e a r 1881
to p r i c e s of t h e
years—

1880.
Acids.
Hogs
Horned cattle
Horses
Mules
Sheep
Ashes, pot and pearl
Beer:
,
I n bottles
I n casks
Bones and bone-dust
Bone-black, l a m p - b l a c k
Barley
Bread and biscuit
I n d i a n corn
Indian-corn meal
Oats..'
Rye
Rye-flour
•.
Wheat
Wheat-flour
Bricks
Candles
Coal:
Anthracite
Bituminous
Copper, p i g s and b a r s
Cordage, rope, twine.,
Cotton:
Sea-island
Other
Colored
Uncolored
Apples, dried
Ginseng
Glue
Hay




pound,
piece.
do..
do. .
do. do..
pound.

:

$0
5
72
144
90
2

2.8
89.7
34. 6
51. 0
00. 0
50.4
07.6

$0
11
71
165
76
4

04. 2
95. 3
19. 6
89. 2
69. 2
5L6
06.3

$0
5
73
220
102
4

02. 9
04.6
01. 6
63. 3
41. 6
26.8
8.9

1880.
$0
7
77
111
110
4

03. 0
38.6
02. 2
07. 5
35. 9
23.8
8.0

56.5
46.8
49.3
132.7
78.2
76.2
111.1

103.3
146.3
105.4
.^0. 3 •
107.7
99.2

dozen.
gallon
cwt.
pound
bushel
pound
bushel
barrel.
bushel
do..
: .barrel
bushel.
barrel
M.
- .pound.

1 74.8
37.8
2 68.0
07.4
46.5
4.2
5L5
2 78.1
42.2
83.6
4 26.0
1 27.3
5 69.9
8 01. 0
12.1

1 38.0
35.7
2 50.0
23.2
56.1
4.3
56.7
2 90.5
47.2
1 11.5
5 93.8
1 17.2
5 75.4
7 76.0
11.2

1 78.8
32.6
1 42.0
5.2
69.5
4.6
54.2
2 79.8
40.2
8L1
4 76.4
1 24.3
5 87.6
7 78.4
12.1

1 77.9
27.4
2 68.7
3.2
62.0
4.6
55.2
2 92.0
43.9
97.7
5 40.8
1 1L3
5 66. 9
8 32.0
1L8

61.3
76.7
163.3
68.0
112.9
80.7
59.7
58.3
69.7
86.3
98.0
86.3
92.7
74.9
7L9

99.5
84.0
189.2
61.5
89.2
100.0
101.8
104.3
104.2
120.4
113.5
89.5
96.4
106.8
97.5

ton.
do»«,
pound.
do...

4 33.0
3 67.2
29.3
14.3

4 57.4
2 99.0
16.3
11.4

3 47.1
3 12.2
15.8
11.0

4 52.6
3 87.1
16.1

68.2
82.1
92.5
56.0

130.4
123. 9
101.9
104.5

pound.
do...
yards.
d o . -.
pound.
d o . -.
do...
ton.

a5.2
11.6
8.0
8.6
7.1
1 35.8
15.7
18 05. 4

24.6
10.9
7.0
7.9
6.1
1 62.3
14.3
18 54. 3

33.2
1L5
7.8
8.4
6.0
1 36. 2
15.0
15 05. 3

29.6

55.1
47.6
42,9

89.1
97.4
93.5

94.9
174.7
64.0
105.8

90.0
121.1
106.6
122.4

n.5
-n.2
7.3
5.4
1 66.0
16.0
18 44. 3

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

299

XXIV.—AVEBAGE and COMPABATIVE PBICES, #c.—Con-binued.
A v e r a g e p r i c e dur- A v e r a g e p r i c e during year ended
i n g m o n t h of J u n e —
J u n e 30—

• Commodities.

Hemx) cables, c o r d a g e
Hops
~.
Ice
I n d i a - r u b b e r boots, &c
Iron:
Pig
Bar
Boilei-plate
Railroad bars
Sheet, band, «fec
Car-wheels
Nails and spikes
Steel, i n g o t s
L e a t h e r , sole a n d u p p e r
Boots and shoes
Lime and cement
Rosin and turpentine
Tar and pitch
Oil-cake
M i n e r a l oil, c r u d e
N a p h t h a s , benzine, &c
H l u m i n a t i n g oil
L u b r i c a t i n g oil
L a r d oil
Neat's-foot oil ..,
Sperm-oil
W h a l e oil
Cotton-seed oil
L i n s e e d oil
Gunpowder
Bacon and h a m s
F r e s h beef
Saltedbeef
Butter
Cheese
Eggs
Fish:
Dried
Pickled
Lard
M u t t o n , fresh
Pork
Onions
Potatoes
Quicksilver
Rags
Rice
Salt
:
C o t t o n seed
Soap
Spermaceti
Spirits:
'
Grain
'.
Molasses
'.
S p i r i t s of t u r p e n t i n e
Starch
Sugar:
Brown
Refined
Molasses
Tallow
Tobacco, leaf
Varnish
W a x , bees
Boards, planks
Timber, sawed
Wool, raAV
Zinc:
Ore
Plates, bars

1880.

1881.

cwt.
pound.
ton.
pair.

$11 Oi. 9
25.3
2 97.5
1 95.3

$12 91. 3
19.1
3 00.1
1 46.6

pound.
do...
do...
do...
.". . d o . . .
piece.
pound.
.do...
do...
pair.
barrel.
do...
do...
pound.
gallon.
do.. .
do.. .
:
do...
do...
.•.. . d o . . .
:
do...
.do...
do.. .
do.. .
pound.
do...
do...
do...
do. - do...
dozen.

1.1
3.9
3.5
1.6
5.4
96.8
3.6
14.4
22.1
17.7
30. 5
70. 5
15.9
L3
7.7
6.5
9.2
21.0
54.0
79.2
02.2
35.9
44.6
78.0
13.4
6.8
8.6
6.4
17.5
11.4
11.8

1.5
3.7
5.2
3.7
3.7
93. 2
3.3
11.4
20.2
25. 4
52.0
81.1
51.2
1.5
7.4
9.2
9.0
21.7
77.8
83.5
86.6
42.5
30.5
67.4
16.7
9.0
9.6
7.6
17.2
10.1
17.3

1.8
3.4
3.5
2.1
5.2
7 92.5
3.9

9

1
1
. 2
2

1

10

1
1
2
2

1881.

23.2
16.6
25.2
27.6
05.5
1.3
6.8
6.4
8.6
20.1
54.1
77.4
1 01.0
34.1
46.0
81.2
14.7
6.7
8.7
..6.3
17.0
9.5
16.4

1
1
2
2

cwt.
barrel.
pound.
do...
do.. bushel.
do...
pounddo.. do...
bushel.
pound.
do...
do...

3 96.9
5 29.7
7.4
6.9
6.3
1 43.9
76.5
.38.3
L4
7.0
41.0
8
4.4
20.1

4 21.5
5 58.1
10.9
8.1
8.1
1 02.9
79. 5
38.5
2.0
6.1
1 30.7
1.0
5.0
19.6

4 n.9

gallon.
do...
do. - IDOund.

20.0
33.1
27.4
4.8

21.4
34.9
37.7
4.6

pound.
do...
gallon.
pound.
do...
gallon.
.pound.
M. feet.
cubic feet.
pound.
cwt.
- .pound.

Average




2 61.
33.
15 84.
14.
16.
3 60. 0

10.1
8.9
21.2
6.3
8.9
2 22.7
27.4
18 34. 8
15.8
1 60.5
8.8

1
1
2
2

1870.

1880.

" 73.0
146.4
73.2
43.3

102.1
84.8
99.5
70.0

1.4
3.7
3.2
2.2
4.6

87.5
7.5.0
69.5
6L1
85.1

77.7
108.8
9L4
' 104. 7
88.4

3.4
10.8
22.5
26. 3
45.2
47.0
34.1
L4
7.6
9.8
10.3
2L7
66.7
77.8
96.4
38.2
45.9
67.1
16.2
8.1
9.3
6.5
19.8

59.6
90.7
79.2
83.1
73.5
81.1
77.3
69.0
36.8
94.2
33.7

87.1
93.9
. 96.9
108.3
115.9
108. 5
113.9
107.6

$10 91.4 $11 14. 7
26.4
22.4
2 99.3
2 97.8
2 00. 8.
1 40.7

n.5

P e r c e n t a g e of t h e
p r i c e s of y e a r 1881
Ito p r i c e s of t h e
years—

n.o

17.1

48.5
60.0
60.6
52.0
63.4
103.1
51.5
129.1
147.7
67.5
7L8
43.2

in. 7
153.1
119.7
107.9
123.2
100.5
95.4 .
112.0
99.8
82.6
110.2
120.8
106.8
103.1
116.4
115.7
104.2 •
95.9
97.1
125,6
104.0
124.6
142.8
96.1
108.9
in.i
9L6

5 23.1
7.4
7.5
6.1
90.7
74.9
38.0
L8
7.2
29.8
Ll
4.7
22.7

3 95.2
5 08.1
9.3
7.8
7.6
1 29.6
• 72.0
4L4
2.0
6.6
33.1
1.3
4.8
34.1

55.8
77.3
104.3
IOL 9
22.4
in. 8
82.5
60.0
103.6

118:1
102.1
150.2

25.5
30.9
30.0
4.3

20.6
35.4
35.0
4.6

100.1
47.3
83.7
56.0

80.7
114.5
116.6
106.9

9.0
15.0
6.2
7.5
2 n.6
25.2
14 80. 8
13.5
37.5

8.1
9.2
24.7
7.0
8.2
79.5
24.5
19.7
14.5
26.8

72.3
73.6
82.3
69.3
72.5
113.1
61.8
78.1
84.8
74.6

128.5
102.2
164.6
112.9
109. 3
84.8
97.2
109.3
107.4
7L4

3 22. 7
8.7

1 44.0
8.9

27.0
92.7

44.6
102.3

76.1
62.0
56.3

in.i

105.3

X X V . -TABLE showing the ANNUAL AVEBAGE GOLD and CUBBENCY P B I C E S of STAPLE ABTICLES in the NEW' YOBK M A B K E T
from 1825 to 1880, and the M E A N GOLD P B I C E of each for the WHOLE P E B I O D .

>
Flour.

Date.

6

t
CO

1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835 . . . . . .
1836

1837 .... 1
1838 . - . - ^
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
for1856.:
FRASER

[Currency prices m black

1 1i

^
^

Candles.

1

O

i.

CoaL

1

1

P r . bbl. P r . bbl. P r . bbl. P r . bbl. P r . bush. P r . bush. P r . bush. P r . bush. P r . b u s h P r . b u s h
$5 13. 0 $3 79. 5 $2 93. 0 $2 88. 0
$0 92. 0
$0 31. 7 $0 55. 0
$0 53. 8
94.0
4 81.0 4 86.0 3 66.6 3 90.5
47.5
76.5
70.7
99.2
5 14.0 5 33.5 3 53.5 3 24.5
'40.5
6L0
68.0
1 21. 8
5 58.0 5 74.0 2 98.0 2 88.0
30.0
52.5
53.6
1 24.5
6 45.2 6 72.5 3 76. 0 2 77.0
35.5
56.5
66.0
1 07.0
4 98.5 5 3 L 0 3 39.5 2 75.0
29.5
56.0
65.0
5 71.0 6 OLO 3 97.2 3 60. 5 - 1 18. 5
37 5
69.5
78.2
1 26.0
5 77.0 6 23.5 4 44.0 3 44. 5
45.5
68.0
83.0
1 19:3
5 56.5 5 89. 0 3 93.0 3 85.0
40.5
73.5
80.0
1 05.8
4 98.0 5 20.5 3 44.0 3 45.0
35.7
65.9
66.2
1 22. 0
5 85.5 6 23.0 4 39.5 4 07.5
48.2
90.5
OLO
1 78.0
52.9
95.0
7 49.5 8 12.0 5 8 L 0 4 72.0
1 04.0
1 69.8
50.2 1 00.0
8 74.7 9 64.6
4 66.5
1 07.6
1 77.5
52. 5 1 0 4 . 5
9 1 4 . 0 10 08. 0
87.5
1 12.5
1 90.2
39.1
83.4
7 88.4
5 i 3 . 8 3 82.5
1 03. 5
1 92. 0
39.5
7 95. 6
84.2
5 18.5 3 8 6 . 0
1 04.5
1
24.5
47.0
7 30.0
86.5
4 83.5 4 04.0
96.8
1 05.5
34.0
5 29.5
57.0
3 15.5 3 22.5
59.8
1 18.5
44.0
5 58.5
62.5
3 36.5 3 10.0
63.8
1 14.0
36.5
5 57.0
59.5
3 52. 5 2 72.0
65.5
98.1
29.0
4 85.5
55.0
3 17.5 2 76.5
62.1
97.5
3L8
4 67.0
50.0
3 22.0 2 60.0
67.5
1 04.0
38.0
.54.8
4 93. 5
3 36.0 2 70.5
68.5
1 08.5
39.5
68.0
5 06.0
3 60.5 3 55.0
74.6
1 36.5
49.0
85.5
6 68.5
4 82. 5 4 19.5
99.0
1 17.5
41.4
63.5
5 96.0
3 75.5 2 86.0
73.5
1 24.0
38.7
62.7
4 5L0
3 05.0 2 95.0
60.1
1 27.5
43.0
62.5
5 55.0
2 99.0 2 97. 0
64.7
1 07. 5
43.5
61.7
4 52.0
3 47.5 3 08.5
73.0
1 10.5
43.0
67.5
5 00.5
3 60.5 3 43.5
8L5
47.5
71.0
5 78.0
4 15.0 3 42.5
1 39.0
92.0
54.0
84.5
8 94. 5
5 86. 5 4 00.0
2 2L0
1 19.5
50.5
99.0
8 76.0
2 43.5
6 66.0 4 64. 5
1 33.5
43.2
70.5
6 42.0
1 75.5
3 95. 5; 3 54. 5
96.0

Digitized


o

figures.]

Wheat.

OO

O

P r . lb.
$0 11. 5
12.2
13.0
1L7
10.5
09.6
n.2
12.5
12.6
12.1
n.3
12.5
12.5
13.1
14.8
15.0
15.0
12.8
12.5
. 10.5
. 10.1
10.5
10.1
10.0

n.o
12.3
11.5
n.5
n.5

n.o

12.2
14.5
14.8
14.2

Coffee.
bi;
•ft

1
o

d

•A

P r . ton. P r . chald. P r . lb.
P r . lb.
$9 16. 5 <ftl9 10 0
$0 34. 0
10 91 5'
T^ 0
33.0
10 9L 5
30.0
10 44.5
14.2
11 33. 5
26.0
11 40. 5
13.0
10 91. 5
23.0
11 15. 5
12.3
10 72. 5
23.0
9 43.5
9 0.5. 0
n.2
28.0
10 20. 5
n.2
7 08.5
3L5
12 02 0
10 21. 0
19. ^
33.5
10 lo! o!
12! 3
6 82.0
30.6
6 00.0
9 12..0
n.5
32.3
9 59 5
Tl «
6 7L0
33.5
11.5
10 97. 5
8 54.5
• 30.6
10.1
10 12. 5
9 26.3
32.0
10.6
9 6 8 . 0 10 58. 0
32.0
10.3
7 8L9
10 26. 6
32.3
10.4
7 89. 0 10 36. 0
39.5
10.8
8 10.0
10 15. 5
39.5
10.1
7 14..5
8 26.0
37.8
10.0
7 56.0
8 67.5
28.0
08.3
6 35.0
6 93. 5
25.5
07.2
5 11.0
7 97.5
30.3
06.5
5 06.0
8 6L5
28.0
06.7
9 30.5
4 83.0
27.0
07.0
7 58.0
- 5 72. 5
30.0
07.0
7 84.5
5 70.5
3L5
06.0
8 72. 0
5 39. 0
35.0
06.9
8 29.0
5 59.0
4L5
10.6
5 73.0
8 3L'5
44.0 . 5 22. 0
09.0
7 43.0
39.5
08.5
7 99.5
5 44.5
31.8
09.2
9 63.5
5 72.0
29.4
10.1
6 9L5
11 18. 0
32.0
10.0
6 36. 0
8 32.0
39.0
10.7
6 87.5
7 SLO

i

1

0
P r . lb.
$0 19. 4
16.6
16.1
15.0
14.4
14.0
11.5
13.1
12.7
12.3
12.5
13.2
13.0
13.6
12.2
12.4
12.5
12.8
n.7
11.0
11^0
10.0
08.2
08.3
07.7
07.1
06.6
12.0
.
n.5
10.8
1L2
• 13.1
13.5
14.2

P r . lb.
$0 20. 0
18.5
17.8
18.a
18.2
17.7
18.0
17.5
16.5
16.2
16.5
20.5
17.7
18.5
16 8
ITO
17 5
18 2
18 0
17 0
17 0
17 5
17 2
17.8
18 1
18. 0
17 1
17.2
17 5
19.5
23.6
29.3
24.0
25.0

o
H
O

w
l—l

o
cc

1857
1858
1859
1860
1861

....
....
....
....
....

1862 . . . .
1863 . . . .
1864 . . . .
1865....^

1866 .... I
1867

....<

1868 . . . . <
1869 . . . . <

1870 .... I
1871 .'...[

1872 . . . . 1873 . . . .
1874 . , . .
1875 . . . .
t

1876--...,^
1877 . . . . - '
1878 . . . .
1879
i880
Average .

4 09. 5
5 78.5
3 23. 5
4 29.5
3 8L0
5 11.0
3 67.5
5 19.0
3 17.0
4 96.5
3 26. 7
4 56.0
3 70.0
5 16.5
3 92.0 4 63.0 2 99.0
5 6 9 . 0 6 72. 0 4 3 4 . 0
3 96.6 4 03.5 3 82.-9I
8 0 6 . 2 8 20. 2 7 78.3
4 90.1| 5 52.6 4 30.4
7 70.6 8 68.9 6 76.8
5 62 3 7 20.1 4 35.
7 9 2 . 0 10 14. 3 6 13.1
6 63.4 8 18.9 5 65. 8|
9 1 6 . 4 11 31.2 7 81.6'
5 66. 4 6 67. 8| 5 96.3
7 9 1 . 2 9 3 2 . 7 8 32. 9
4 30. 5; 4 84. 0! 4 32. 5|
5 72. 5 6 4 3 . 7 5 75. 2
4 6L4
4 37. 5i 4 73.
5 0 2 . 9 5 44.8' 5 3 0 . 4
4 72.2
5
69.2
5 23. 8
5 85; 2 6 36. 0 5 27.7
4 40. 2
6
13.2
5 52,
6 21.01 6 8 9 . 1 4 94.7
4 83.8
5
92.5
5 13. 4
5 8 4 . 1 6 7 4 . 1 5 50. 4i
4 77. 5j
5
13.
3|
4 61. 2
5 30. 2 5 7 1 . 0 5 3 1
4 03. 2
4
76.7
4 28. i |
4 92.1 5 4 8 . 0 4 63.
4 01,
4
76.5
3 92. 6|
5 3 0 . 7 4 47. 6j
4 37
5 40. 3| 6 32. 5| 4 27. 4
5 66. 4 6 63. 0 4 4 8 . 1 '
3 92.4 4 76. 3i 3 n . 8
3 95. 6 4 8 0 . 2 3 14.4
2 90.9
4 10. 5 4
4 13.5 4 66. 3! 3 61 6

3 62.5
3 60.0
3 89.0
3 57. 5
2 88. 0
2 80.3
3 17. 5
3 01. 0|
4 37. 0
3 43.8
6 98. 9
3 76. 2
5 9L 6
3 36.7
4 74. 3
4 35.5
6 01. 6
4 24. 6|
5 93.1
3 68.0
4 89. 4
4 38.9
5 04.
3 62 2
4 04^8
3 16. 4
3 55. 6
2 95. 6
3 36.4
3 74.7
4 16. 8
3 47.4
3 99. 4
2 55. 3
2 84. 3
2 82. 2
2 95. 9
2 4L4
2 43.4
2 43.6
2 80.4

5 44. 8! 5 72. 5! 3 99. 9|

3 40. 0




2 09.0
2 94.5
2 0.5. 9
2 84.4
1 8L9
2 54.1
1 24.1
1 65.1
1 19.4
1 37. 3
1 41.4
1 58.1
1 58.4
1 78. 0
1 57. 0|
1 78.7
1 36. 3|
1 51.7
1 22.
1 40. 3
1 18. 5|
1 32. 0
1 6
1 68.5
1 24. 2
i 25. 2
1 22,
1 25. 3

$0 98. 4
2 00.0
1 25.2
1 96. 9
1 67.9
2 36.6
1 62.7
2 24.8
1 53.4
2 14. 5
1 08.3
1 44.1
98.4
1 13. 2
1 36.2
1 52.2
1 49.5
1 68.0
1 47. 0|
1 ()T. 3
1 29.7
1 44.3
1 07. 7
1 23. 9
1 06.0
1 1
1 43. 4|
1 50.4
1 12.6
1 13.6
1 12.9
1 21.3

94.01
72. 0|
85.
82.5
70.0
70.1
79.5
73.3
1 06,
77. 4|
1 57. 5
75.8
1 19. 2
•74.5
1 05 0
1 07. 2
1 48.^
1 35.0
1 76.0
97.6
1 29. 8
88.9
1 02. 2
89.4
90. 9
81.
92.0
84.2
95. 9
9L8
1 02. 2
84,
97. 6
7L3
.5
76.0
79.7
64,
64.7
68.3
. 93.4

52.6
4.5.0
48.0
41.
3.5. 5|
42.
48.0
52.9
76.8
45.6
92.7
46.9
73.8
38.0
53.6
54.3
75.0
.58.4
81.6
54.8
73.0
52.2
60. 0
53.7
1.0
42.7
48.0
43.0
49.0
67,
75.0
54 ,
62.8
36.
40.2
42.4
44.
32.
33.1
38.51
43,

1 34. 9|

1 28.2

79.4

43.71

1 67.5
1 32.5
1 43.5
1 49. 5
1 42.5
1 29.7
1 39. 0
1 12.9
1 64.0
95.5
1 94. 2
1 37. 3

2 16.0

81.
80.
86
74.
61.
55.
62.
61.
89.
73.
1 50.
78.
1 23.
64.
90.
87.
1 21.
84.
1 18.
76.
1 01.
84.
97.
68.
76.
60.
68.
55.
62.
80.
89.
70.
80.
5L
57.
58.
61.
51.
51.
49.
54.
70. 0|

12.01

41.
39.5
40.7
37.7
31.0
25.6
29. 0
25.6
37. 2

$0 84.
1 71.
90.
1 42.
76.
1 08.
86.
1 19.
1 50.
2 10.
1 24.
1 65.
84. 5|
97.2
96.
77.
87.
1 11.
1 26.
1 52.
1 70.
1 18.
I 36.
86.
96.
60.
63.
46.
47.
67.
75.
12. 0|

32. 6|

6 n.o
5 22.5
5 3L0
5 52.0
5 24.5
5 02.8
5 69. 5
5 97.0
8 6.6. 5
4 93. 5|
10 0 3 . 1
7 26.0
11 4 1 . 6
6 76.5
9 50.0
5 2L2
7 20. 0
5 53.9
7 75.0
6 64.
8 83. 3|
4 38
5 03.6
6 48.8
7 25. 0
4 33. (i
4 87. 3:
4 36. 5|
4 96. 6
5 10. 3|
' 5 67
5 02. 8
5 78.0
4 19.0
4 66.7
3 3
3 55.11
3 54. 9i
3 57. 8
2 89.8
4 08.9
6 35. 6!

7
7
7
8
6
5
6
5
8

69. 5|
34.0
97.0
87.0
19.5
34.6
05.5
86.3
51.0

n.o

24.7
23.2

14.
15.6
15. 8|
'.6
13.51
13
14.71
12.

15.41
15. 8|
14,
15.5
17.5
23.9
27. 0
25.1
36.5
23.4
47.6
19.2
30.3
18.6
26.2
17.9
24.8
16.7
23.4
17.3
23.1
18,
21
18,
20.5
18.9
21.3
19.
22.
23,
25.61
22.6
26.0
18.8
21.0
22.5
23. 6
22. 2|
22.4
24.01
2L6

12.2

15.3

19.0

10.3

n.2

13.5
13.
19.4
22. 0
20.8
30.
20.4
4L5
15. 5|
24.5
14.6]
20.7
13.41
18.5
12.0]

16. 9J
09.3
12. 6
13.
15.4
14.7
16.5
17. 3|
1
17.5
19. 9
9.7
22.0
16.0

n.4

8 98. 0|

00
O

XXV.—TABLE shoiving the ANNUAL AVEBAGE GOLD and CUBBENCY PBICES of STAPLE ABTICLES, #c.—Continued.

OO
O
IN9

[Currency prices in black letters.]
Copper.

bb-

Date.

cc

Pr.lb.
1825
1826
1827
1828
189.9
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837 . . . . 1
1838..., j
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
18.53
1854
1855
1856
1857
FRASER

'

Fish.

i

t

'i
%

CO

i

1^

i

a

'c3

4

s
P r . lb.

$0 16. 5
14.0
13.5
14.5
15.3
15.5
22.5

P r . box. P r . lb. P r . lb.
$3 56. 5 $0 08. 5 $on.5
3 25. 0
09.6
.14.7
2 46. 0
09.2
ILl
2 74.0
07.5
n.2
2 96.5
08.3
:
5
1
9.1
2 48.0
06.5
17.7
2 47.5
07.0
17.2
2 96.0
09.5
16.5
2 10.5
04.5
16.2
05.1
1 5L0
09.8
07.5
2 69.5
12.5
06.8
2 32.0
10.1
05.2
1 04.3
07.6
05.5
1 09 0
08.0
08.2
1 63.0
•
n.8
08.3
1 64.5
12.0
12.1
1 32.5
n
.5
08.5
1 52.0
09.2
• 07.1
1 85.0
07.1
1 34. 5
08.6
1 70.0
09.1
2 25. 5
2 45.0 • 08.7 " • i 2 . " 5
2 03.5
10.8
10.8
1 7L5
10.1
1 56.5
10.6
12.0
1 97. 0
17.6
2 55.5
2 0L5
1 95.0
2 88.0
2 75.0
2 7L5
3 36.0
4 05.0

s .

Hemp.

bb

to

P r . lb.
P r . lb. P r . lb. P r . cwt. P r . bbl.
$5 33. 5
$0 30. 4 $0 18. 2 $2 49. 0
n.i
2 26. 0
5 19.5
29.7
5 32.5
09.7 2 97.5
26.2
5 35.5
10.0 2 88.5
24.7
5 5L0
09.0 2 5 L 5
23.5
5 83 0
10.0 2 33.0
22.0
09.0 2 77.5
22.2
6 30.0
09.5 2 87.5
22.5
5 64. 5
12.5 2 72.0
23.0
6 62.0
12.5 2 38.5
23.5
6 24.5
16.7 2 79.5
23.5
7 15.0
16.6 3 36.5
27.0
9 6L5
25.8
9 40.7
n.5
3 27. 7
27.0
12.0 3 4 2 . 5
9 83.0
25.2
10.6 3 47.8
11 23. 3
25.5
10.7 3 51.0
11 33.0
24.5
13.3 3 74.5
13 5L 0
24. 5
08.7 2 5 L 0
12 82. 0
25.0
09.8 2 58.5
13 55. 0
22.7
08.0 2 27. 0
10 55.0
2L2
. 0 6 . 6 2 46.0
9 25. 0
2L5
06,6 2 67.0
10 78. 5
22.7
06.2 2 62 5 12 56. 5
07.3 2 82.5 10 64.5
. 23.5
10.3 3 58.0
23.2
9 99.0
2 L 5 - 0 6 . 1 2 95.5
8 44.5
08.0 2 52.0
2L5
10 55. 5
12.3 2 60, 0
2L5
10 79. 5
10.2 2 74.0
20.5
9 94.0
09.0 3 44, 5
23,5
10 06. 0
10.6 3 32.0
29.1
13 45. 5
.09.0 3 40.5
30.2
16 9L 5
09.2 3 84.0
29.7
20 10. 0
31 2
i o ; 6 3 86.0
20 89. 5
80.1
20 50.0
14.0 3 77.5

Digitized for


Gunpowder.

Fruit.

6

s

1

P r . lb. P r . 100 ft. P r . 25 lbs. P r . 25 lbs. P r . 25 lbs.
$5 61. 5
$4 54.0
$6 17. 5
$4 93. 5
5 42.5
4 52.0
6 24.0
5 28.5
4 50. 0
5 37. 5
6 12.5
4 86.5
4 50.0
5 20.5
6 12.5
5 8L0
4 87.5
6 12.5
7 10.0
. 4 50. 0
4 87. 5
6 12.5
4 50.0
6 45.5
4 87.5
6 12.0
4 50. 0
5 34.0
6 12.0
4 50.0
4 87. 5
4 65.5
6 12.0
4 50.0
4 87.5
4 27.0
5 75.0
4 50.0
4^87.5
4 35.0
5 10.0
4. 50. 0
4 87. "5
4 50.0
5 37.0
4 50.0
4 87.5
5 20.5
5 50.2
4 30.6
4 66.5
4 30.6
4 87. 5
4 60.0
4 50. 0
5 75.0
4 83.1
4 45.-9
4 45.9
5 69.8
4 87". 5
5 75. 0 . 5 0 . 0
4 50.0
4 87. 5
4 50.0
5 75.0
4 50.0
18 50. 0
4 00.0
5 75.0
3 50.0
18 50. 0
3 87.5
5 75.0
3 37.0
3 87.5
18 50. 0
5 75.0
3 00.0
3 87.5
18 50. 0
5 75.0
3 00.0
18 50. 0
5 75.0 ^ 3 87. 5
3 00.0
3 12.0
17 57. 5
. 3 06. 0
2 75. 0
17 32. 5
2 .54. 0
2 75.0
17 50. 0
2 25.0 " ' 6'i2."0
2 75.0
17 50. 0
2 25. 0
6 12.0
2 75. O' 17 50. 0
2 25.0
6 12.0
2 75. 0
17 50. 0
2 25. 0
6 12.0
2 75. 0
17 50. 0
2 25.0 '^ 6 12.0
2 75. 0
17 50. 0
2 25.0
6 12.0
2 00.0
5 75.0
2 64.5
1 35.5
5 75.0
2 62.5
1 30. 5
5 75. 0
3 29.0
4 46. 5
1 42. 0
5 83. 0^
5 37.5
$3 69. 5
1 78. 5
6 39. 0

1
P r . ton.

1
P r . ton.

O
H
O

'^
H

a
GQ

1858.
1859.
18601861.
1862.
1863.
1864 .
1865 .
18661867186818691870 .
1871.
1872.
1873.
1874.
1875.
1876.
1877.
1878.
1879.
1880.
Average . I

0 27.7
56.3
3L7
49.^9
32.9
46.4
26.7
36.9
23.8
33.3
25.2
33.6
27.2
31
29.0
32.5
38.6
43.4
37.0
4
29.5
32.9
26.1
30.0
28.7
32.0
29.5
31.0
27.7
28.0
25.1
30.0
29.2




26.0
26.1
26.2
24.2
26.5
30.0
28.6
41. 6
27.4
5.5.8
34.9
55. 0
32.9
46.4
25.9
35.9
22.8
31.9
24.4
32.5
25.7
29.6
27.2
30.4
37.2
41.9
35.6
40.5
24.2
27. 0
25.2
29. 0
27.8
31.0
27.6

29.0

25.8
26.0
23.1
28. 0
25.9

3 38. 01 11 68. 0
4 n . 51 15 93. 0
3 48.5
16 71. 0
3 05.0
11 63,
3 42. 6| 13 52.7
3 8 8 . 0 15 3 2 . 0
12 02.
3 98.5
5 78. 5
17 4 6 . 0
3 70.1
7 00.5
7 52.4
14 2 3 . 9
5 34. 6| 11 97. 0
8 40.6
18 8 2 . 2
4 98.8
13 80. 0
T 0 2 . 6 19 4 3 . 7
4. 9L 9] 13 93.1
6 79. 61 19 24. 3
4 70.5
15 08. 0
6 57. 2 21 0 6 . 2
5 59. 2| 20 44. 4
7 43.7
27 18.7
5 93.1
22 18. 5
6 81.8 25 5 0 . 0
13 79. 7
5 18.2
5 7 9 . 1 15 4 1 . 6
5 10.7
11 92.1
5 7 3 . 9 13 3 9 . 5
5 32.4
15 71. 2
6 05. 7
17 8 7 . 5
4 77.2
12 75. 41
5 30.9
14 18.7
5 43.4
15 10. 3
6 2 4 . 7 17 3 6 . 0
5 79.2 • 16 88. 2
6 45.1
18 8 0 . 0
n . i 6 03.8 19 55. 7
ii.7 6 33.0 2 0 5 0 . 0
18 55. 0
10.7 5 65: 4
IS TO.
1 0 . 8 5 TO.O
19 40. 0
5
27.7
n.4
17 20. 0
12.1 5 99.6
14.6 3 71.5
12 26. 6

15.0
12.3
12.7
12.5
14.5
16.5
15.9
23.2

13.01

n.4

10. 5
16.1
36.3
41.2
5L2
74.3
55.8
1 13.5
37.6
59.2
28.2
39.8
19.7
27.3
19.3
27.0
22.4
29.9
18.
21.3
16.0
17.9
18.4
20.7
16.5
18.8
14.
16.5
13.0
15.0
10.5
11.7

2
2
2
1
2
3
2
4

26.5
25.5
46. 0
82.5
94.9
34.0
80.0
06.5

1 12. 01
1 29. 5
1 10.0
1 10.0
1 29.8
1 47, 0
1 90.5
2 76.5

10.3
15.0

0 10.
22.
13.
20.
14.
20.
13.
19.
14.
19.
15.
20.
12.
14.
13.
14.
14.
16.
14.
17.
14.
16.
12.
14.
12.
14.
14.
15.
14.
15.

13.7

2 32.7

8.7

12.8

3 24.

6- 49. 0
6 25. 0
6 25. 0
6 25. 0|
5 55.4
6 29.0
6 44. 2
9 35.0
5 35.6
10 88. 6
8 2L4
12 9 1 . 6
9 08.0
12 79. 0
9 12.5
12 6 0 . 4
8 36.6
11 6 8 . 6
10 59. 0
14 08. 3
12 83.2
14 75. 0
13 0 . 1
14 5 . 0
13 62. 7
15 3 1 . 2
15 96. 7
18 1 6 . 6
17 22. 8
19 16, 4
17 09. 5
19 6 5 . 0
17 78. 0
19 80. 0
15 83. 6
16 6 0 . 0
13 39. 2
13 50. 0
14 62. 0
13 02. 0

5 28 5
5 30.5
5 12.5
5 12.5
5 6!
6 45.5
4 76.4
6 91. 5
4 03,
8 20. 8
5 5L1
8 66.6
5 50. 2
7 75.0
5 00.7
6 91. 6
4 56.4
6 50.0
4 81
6 50.0
5 38.2
6 18.71
5 14.6
5 75.0
5 24. 6|
5 89. 5
3 88.1
4 41. 6
5 5L0
6 12. 9
4 28.4
4 92. 5
4 84.9
5 40.0
5 15.1
5 40.0
5 45.3
5 49. T
5 6.5. 0
6 00.0

; 07.3

4 37.4

3 58.0
3 06.0
3 14.0
3 25.0
3 46.1
3 92. 0
2 95. 5
4 29. 0
2 89.9
5 89.3
• 4 23. 9
6 66. 6
3 81 6
5 37. 5
3 22. 7
4 45.-8
2 86.4
4 00.0
3 00.8
4 00. 0
3 11. 7
3 58.3
-2 68. 5
3 00.0
2 96.6
3 33.3
3 25. 9
3 70
3 27.3
3 64.1
2 46.8
2 83.7
2 60. 4
2 90. 0
3 00.5
3 15.0
3 12. 4
3 15.0
3 1.5. 0
3 15.0
10 97. 8

3 16.6

O
O-

o

205 48. 8,

138 19. 2

OO
O

XXV.—TABLE shoiving the ANNUAL AVEBAGE GOLD and CUBBENCY PBICES of STAPLE ABTICLES, ^c—Continued. '
[Currency prices in black letter.]
Hides.

Iron.

Liquors.

Date.

Oco

<1p

g

a
P e r ton.
1825......
1826..-.1827
1828
1829
1830
.1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1 8 3 7 . - -. <

1838 - - -. <
1839---.1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
.1855
1856
1857

H
P e r lb. P e r lb. P e r lb.
$0 17. 7 $0 13. 2 $0 17. 7
16.7
12.0
16.7
16 6
10.7
13.5
16.5
11,
6.5
15.0
7.4
• n. 0
15.3
13.0
11,
16.0
n.5
13.2
14:4
18.5
n.3
13.8
28.2
10.7
12.
14.9
09.7
13.7
14.5
13.4
14.6
13.0
07.1
13.6
07.5
14.1
08.1
14.3
08.2
15.0
15.9
14.6
. 37.5
14.3
24.3
13.3
12.5
13.5
n.2
12.3
09.7
10.9
12.1
08.6
10.8
12.0
15.1
n.5
19.6
09.
09.
10.3
n.5 .07.8
05.0
09.1
08.8
08.3
10.0
13.8
10.6
12.5
37.5
IL
13.6
30.6
11.
14.7
25.2
15.0
17.5
33.6
16.0
2L2
19.1
17.8
2L4
07.-7
2L7
26:5
26.6
32.7




Molasses.

Per
$2
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

lb.
P e r ton. P e r ton.
19. 7 $60 10. 0 $106 00. 0
94 37. 5
63.5
61 04. 0
85 43. 0
7L5
51 50. 0
80 10. 0
3L 5
52 21. 0
79 48. 0
05.5
49 37. 5
74
93. 5
92.0
43 96. 0
72 12. 5
43 33. 0
90.7
72
62.
5
43 23. 0
93.5
74 6.4.5
41 69. 0
92.5
71 71. 0
41 39. 5
99.0
40 25. 0
69 37. 0
0L5
52 68. 5
94 04. 0
02.5
49 74. 0
91 60. 8
99.0
95 7 2 . 5
0 3 . 5 51 97.5
43 14. 8
87 43. 5
06.1
07.1 4 3 54.0 88 23. 0
88 44. 0
23.5
38 62. 0
70 62
07. 5
35 18. 5
68 35. 0
99.0
34 85. 0
57 08. 0
76.5
28 66. 0
56 98. 0
26 12. 5
84.5
61 33. 0
32 56 0
76.0
74 58. 0
37 97. 5
70.5
78 25. 0
38 2 L 5
6L5
34 44. 0
72 29. 0
73.0
59 06. 0
29 10. 5
64.5
47 12. 5
24 37. 0
65.
41 87. 5
22 33. 0
69.4
36 49. 5
21 31. 0
72.0
39 80. 5
22 71. 5
72.0
65 14. 0
34
52.
0
74.5
71 12. 5
38 47. 5
8L0
58
75. 0
28
75.
0
82.0
59 39. 0
32 41. 5
8L8
50
14. 0
31
12.
5
76.0

.W
P e r lb. P e r cwt. P e r lb. P e r gal. P e r gal. P e r gal. P e r gal. P e r ga
P e r lb.
$1 27. 2
$0 07. 9
$0 35. 0
$0 29. 0
$6 88. 0 $0 23. 2
$0 26. 6
$0 42. 5
1 24.6
08.3
33.0
26.7
6 00.0
29.0
2L0
45.5
1 53.5
07.5
35.5
. 30.5
6 00.0
29.5
20.1
45.1
1
4
L
0
07.0
33.0
29.2
5 12.5
22.5
.21.0
38:2
1 25. 5
07.3
29.7
24.5
3 75.0
23.3
20.2
38.5
1
28.0
07.3
29.7
23.6
25.2
20.0
37.2
3 00.0
1 84.5
07.3
28.5
24.7
3L5
2L7
26.5
4 12.5
1 63.5
07.3
30.0
26.0
30.5
20.2
27.
5 50.0
1 62.0
07.0
32.0
28.5
30.7
17.6
3L0
5 43.7
1
58.0
03.5
29.0
23.5
25.0
16.2
27.1
4 87. 5
1 65.0
3L7
26.9
17.1
30.0
6 00.0
'33; 6
1 76.5
44.0
36.1
18.5
39.2
07.0
5 87.5
37.0
1 45.4
35.4
33.0
18.1
33.9
06.9
5 74.2
34.9
1
5
2
.
0
3
4.5
35.5
07. 2
36.5
37.0
6 00.0 1 9 . 0
1 56.0
30.4
18.4
34.1
, 00.4
35.8
36.6
1
5
7
.
5
3
0
.7
18.6
34.5
06.5
36.2
37.0
1 68.5
3L7
2L6
29.0
06.5
36.5
34.5
1
70.0
25.5
18.6
22.0
06.5
25.0
. 26.1
19.6
20.7
23.5
06.5
2L4
4 12.5
1 61. 5
25.6
15.9
17.1 ' 1 60.5
18.1
I 13.5 3 06. 2
18.5
20.7
19.0
16.2
2L5
IL 5
22. 0
2 16.5
22.5
24.5
15.6
27.0
12.4
23.8
2 46.5
29.7
24.0
27.7
23.0
n.7 3 37.5 14.5
2 68.0
27.7
18.8
24.5
2L7
n.5 4 15.5 12.8
2 82. 5
29.5
21.
15.7
27.0
28.2
11.5 4 3 L 5
2 80.5
33.7
18.5
13.7
2L5
24.0
2 62.0
24.5
1 L 7 4 18.5
20.6
15.6
23.6
24.0
2 60.5
26.0
12.9 4 55.5
2L0
15.7
24.3
25.3
2 78.0
27.0
13.5 4 7 L 5
19.5
14.5
24.0
23.3
2 73.0
30.7
13.5 4 69.5
18.5
15.2
22.5
22.5
2 78.0
29.2
4 73.0
10.
2L0
18.5
22.5
24.5
28.5
68.0
4 77.0
n.2 66 75.0
22.3
2L0
23.5
32.1
24.5
5 36.0
12.6 6 44.5
27.2
22.5
29.0
37.7
30.5
6 10.0
15.7 7 02.5
38.2
25.5
•4L5
32.5
5L0
6 29.0
15.3 7 03.0
40.0
26.6
45.5
27.1
65.'5
6 19.0
12.0

P e r lb.

$0 07. 5
07.1
05.5
05.6
05.8
05.0
05.5
06.0
06.5
06.2
06.5
05.9
06.0
06.2
05.5
05.5
04.0
04.5
04.5
04.5
04.5
04.5
04.5
04.0
03.5
03.5
03.2
04.6
04.1
04.0
03.5
03.3

OO

$251 12.4
510 4 1 . 6
303 42.4
477 0 8 . 3
254 26. 8
358 12. 5
257 47. 2
355 6 2 . 5
201 82.1
281 8 7 . 5
191 44. 6
254 58. 3
215 32. 5
247 50. 0
207 52. 8
231 8 7 . 5
193 94. 5
217 9 1 . 6
191 18.2
217 5 0 . 0
202 88.7
225 6 8 . 1
192 36. 5
221 11.0
183 37.1
204 20. 0
196 50.7
2 0 5 98. 3
2iJ0 88. 0
2 0 2 50. 0
196 80. 0
179 32. 8

24.3
25.5
23.5
19.5
21.6
24.5
19.7
28.6
15.6
31.8
15.7
24.8
14.0
19.8
15.1
20.9
14.8
20.8
16.8
22.4
19.8
22.8
22.7
25.4
23.
26.
22.9
26.1
22.6
25.2
19.7
22.7
17.7
19.8
2L3
22.4
20.2
20.4
24.1
2L1

20.1
22.7
20.7
16.5
18.9
21.5
16.6
24.1
15.0
30.6
14.0
22.1
12.1
17.1
13.9
19.2
14.7
20.6
16.4
21.9
19.7
22.7
2L4
24.0
23.3
26.2
22.9
26.1
2L7
24. 2
18.8
2L6
16.6
18.5
19.6
20.6
18.4
18.6
22.6
19.6

13.2
20.5
14,
16.5
15.1
22.0
12.5
25.5
22.9
36.1
34.7
48. 9
4L3
57.2
26.8
37.6
11.5
15.3
14.7
17.0
14.4
16.1
45.
50.7
38.0
44.0
25.5
28.4
14.9
17.2
17.5
19. 5
11.4
12.0
10.5
10.6
27.5
19.

212 92. 2

17.2

15.

17.9

1859 .
1860.
1861.
51862 .
1863 .

•-{

1864..
1865 . .
1866..
1867 . .
1868 . 1869 . .
1870 . -

•{

1871..
1872 - 1873 - .
1874 •- --

{

1875 - - . .
1876---.
1877-,.-.
1878 . . . .
1879.-.1880....

Average .




06.5

n.8

73.0
85.5
84.0
87.5
1 02.4
1 16. 0
76.
1 11.5
68.8
1 40.0
83.5
1 31.4
7L1
1 00.2
60.7
84.1
59.4
83.1
67.5
89,
9L0
1 04.7
1 00.4
1 12. 2
88.7
99.7
69.9
79.6
67.4
75.0
6L5
70.7
64.6
72.0
69.9
73. 3
72.7
73.3
75.0
75.0

51 89. 0
24 47. 5
45 46. 0
25 27. 0
42 44. 0
23 51. 0
43 89. 5
22 25. 0
52 09. 7
22 95. 3
25 99. 5 59 0 0 . 0
5J 68. 9
25 00. 6
73 5 7 . 0
37 16.
77 38. 7
26 15.7
53 16. 6 157 2 9 . 1
82 41. 4
32 58. 0
51 2 2 . 7 129 58. 3
78 54. 3
34 52. 4
110 62. 5
48 62
71 87.1
31 31. 3
43 25. 0 99 27. 0
63 39. 5
29 59. 4
88 5 4 . 1
41 33. 3
66 74.0
30 36. 2
4 0 37. 5 88 75. 0
66 33. 7
30 01. 5
34 50. 0 76 2 5 . 0
63 24. 6
30 26.1
33 81.2 70 6 6 . 6
88 42.5
43 38. 7
48 75. 0 99 35. 4
77 71. 7
45 03. 0
88 41. 6
51 22. 9
38 18.1 -67 89. 2
75
52.0
42 47.
29 78 0
34 23. 0
25 87.1
28 81 0
25 98. 7
27 24. 0
24 23, 8
24 43. 4
27 13. 4
24 48. 9
34 61. 3

06.!

12.0
10.7
13.2
16.1
13.6
15.5
12.0
17.5

5 70.5
5 69.5
5 70.0
5 50.5
6 24.8
7 07.7
6 0L7
8 73.3
6 -59. 3
13 39. 5
7 1L8
11 1 9 . 2
5 74.8
8 09.7
4 89.8
6 78.0
4 75. 2
6 63.8
4 95.7
6 59. 2
5 60.4
6 44.2
5 66.1
6 32. 5
5 «4. 2
6 56. 5
6 04.6
6 87. 9
6 00.0
6 67. 5
5 12.2
5 88.8
5 79.2
45.1
5 26.7
5 52.1
3. 68. 0
3 71.0
5 13.6
4 23.3

12.6

5 32.3

23.
24.
21.
19.
20.
23.
20.
29.
18.
37.
23.
36.
24.
34.
22.
30.
20.
28.
22.
30.
30:
35.
25.
28.
25.
28.
24.
27.
24.
27.
23.
26.
19.
22.
22.
23.
20.
20.
24
21.
20.3

4 85.5
4 94.0
5 50.0
5 60.0
5 19.6
-5 88.5
5 25.0
7 62. 0

2 92.8

22.2
26.5
22.
18.1
24.9
28.3
35.3
51.3

38.8
39.0
46.5
39.5
37.0
42.0
33.9
49.
46.4
94.3
72.3
1 13.7
68.
96.
6L4
84.8
59.3
82.9
59.9
79.7
72.2
83.0
50.4
56.4
58.4
65.7
60.3
68.7
68.5
76.3
58.5
67. 3
52.7
58.7
49.1
61.5
44.1
44.5
53.6
37.0
40.3

26.5
26.5
27,
18.3
20.7
23,
29.9
43.4
37.4
76.1
34.0
53.6
35.
50. 2
35.9
51.0
34:6
48.5
37.9
50.5
33.3
38.3
3L7
35.5
27.4
30.
26.6
30.3
25.8
28.

22.6
23.0
2L5
22.0
24.7
28.0
. 25.5
3T.0
3L2
63.5
28.4
44.7
29.7
41.9
33.0
.45.7
30.7
43.0
34.4
45.8
29.2
33.6
28.0
31.3
24.8
27.9
24.6
28.
24.
27.6
38.0
43.7

03.0
03.0
03.0
03.0
02.7
03.1
03.4
05.0
03.8'
07.8
04.7
07.4
04.9
07.0
04.3
06.0
03.7
05.2
03.6
04.8
03.8
04.4
04.1
04.6
04.3
04.9
04.3
04.9
03.6
04.0
03.3
03.8
03.1
03.5
03.0
03.2
02.8
02. 9
04.3
03.1
04.3

OO

O

OO

X X V . — T A B L E shoiving the ANNUAL AVEBAGE GOLD and CUBBENCY P B I C E S of STAPLE ABTICLES, ^c—Continued.
[Currency prices in black
Nails.

NaVal stoies.

Oil.

figures.]

Paint.

o

05

s
Petroleum.

Pork.

Beef.

Date.

..s
pi

H
P e r lb.
1825 .
1826 1827 .
1828.
1829.
1830.
1831.
1832 1833 1834.
18351836.
1837.
1838.
1839-..1840 . - .
1841...
1842---1843 . -.
1844 - -.
.1845 . . .
• 1846 . - .1847...
1848 . . .
1849 - . .
1850 . . .
1851 . . 18.52
1853
1854
-.
1855
1856
FRASER
1857

) 13.5
13.1
13.0
13.0
13.0
13.0
12.0
12.0
12.5
12.9
13.5
13.0
13. 2
13.5
13.5
13.5
11,

n.o
n.o
n.o
n.o
12.0
10.2
09.0
09.0
09.0
07.0
08.5
. 09.3
09,
06.5
05.9

p i "

I

Pergal. P e r bbl. ' P e r g a l . I P e r gal. P e r gal. P e r go
P e r gal. P e r cwt. P e r cwt. P e r g a l .
$0 78. $9 47. 5
$0" 40. i $1 49. 5 ^1 25.8 • $0 58. 5 $0 66. 5
$0 93. 5
27.5
65.5
7L5
76.
30.. 2 1 46.0
9 8L0
8.3.0
32.5
72.0
73.
36.5 1 49.5
63.0
9 47.0
• 97.0
32.5
70.0
72.
37.6 1 45.5
6L5
9 25.0
79.0
3L0
76.0
36.0 1 43.5
78.
7 32.0
66.5
.80.0
34.0
80.2
29.2 - 1 4 L 0
79.
6 74.0
69.7
95.5
33.0
90.0
29.2 1 37.0
6 55.0
74.5
96.
92.5
28.5
9.5.5
36.5 1 37.0
6 75.0
.9L
83.5
97.2
1 43.5
26.1
1 0L3
41.
6 64.5
91.
90.0
1 03.5
26.7
94.1
47.1 1
.90.
6 50.0
76.
94.0
37.0
96.
54.8 1 7 L 0
1 09.
7 00.0
84.5
1 17. 5
46.6
98.7
55.0 1 73. 5
1 02.
7 87,
89. 5
1 IL 5
33.1
9L4
37.3 1 61. 2
83.2
78.
8 6L3
9L8
34.6
95. 6
3 9 . 0 1 68. 5
•82.
9
00. 0
81. 0
96.0
3L9
92.6
3 L 7 1 65.0
78.
8 42.3
83.4 •
1 09.5
32. 2
93
32. 0 1 6 6 . 5
79.
8
50.0
84.2
1 10. 5
32.6
1 16.1
33.5 1 83.1
1 05.
7 88.0
1 07.4
75.2
30.'0
1 12.
27.6 1 50.5
1
09.
7
50. 0
1 02.
69.
32.3
1 07.6
30,
1 31.
7 50.0
94.7
1 35.0
86.3
34
85. 3
35.0 1 1.7 5
92.
6
12. 5
72.1
89.0
73.0
34.7
5 50.0
84.
34.3
63.1
89.0
80.5
94.5
34.7
5.
50.-0
c.
92.
36.4
90.2
76.0
69.0
94
43.5
5 50.0
33.7
89.6
73.
OLO
68.5
48.0
5
50.0
32.9
' 74.
9L3
95.6
88.1
65.5
4L6
5 50.0
35.3
. 66.
1 07. 0
1 13.2 ' 1 16. 5
64.0
37.6
32.5
58.
5 50.0
1 06. 5
1 14.6
1 06.7
84.5
34.3 1 OLO
39.7
63.
1 10.2
1 17.0
93,
6 25.0
32.6 1 16. 0
48.5
ol 23.5
' 94.2
.78.
6 50.0
1 18.5
36.0 2 48.5
46.1
1 30.0
86.0
74.
5 50.0
1 24.
4.5.3 3 36. 0
68.7
1 3L7
1 05. 0
63.
5 50.0
1 27. 5
6 L 0 3 79.5
58.0
1 35. 5
1 24.5
. 65.
7 25.0
1 3L4
56.5 3 36.0
58.0
1 60.2
1 2.5. 5
77.
7 75.0
1 56. 0
7L0
1 19.5
85.
7 37.5
3 12. 0
1 95.5
2 0L5
' 42,
1.21,
7 75.0
1 82. 0
1 90.5
40.3 3 86.0 • 78.5
72r5
1 26.0
7 16.5
1 50.0
46.5 5 68.5
1 40.5

Digitized for


a

•

PH

CO

Per gal.

a

I-

P e r bbl.
P e r lb.
P e r bbl. P e r bbl.
P e r bbl.
$5 81.0
$0 09. 2
$8 78. 5
$13 73. 5 $10 15. 0
09.6
• 4 91.5
7 86.5
9 16. 0
11 39. 5
10.6
6 27.0
8 47.0
9 02.0
12 96. 0
6 44.5
09.5
9 14
13 50. 0
9 8L5
7 13.5
8 2L5
09.5
12 55. 0
10 10. 5
5 90.0
8 99.5
9 65.0
13 21. 5
09.8
5 53.0
8 49.0
13 90. 5
10 81. 5
5 59.5
09.5
13 46. 0
11 04. 5
9 46.5
5 75.5
09.3
14 58. 0
9 38. 5
11 26. 5
5 85. 0
9 17.5
13 71.5
9.74.0
09.0
7 66.0
16 39. 0
12 51. 5
11 08. 0
09.7
7 15. 5
22 46.5
17 16. 5
10 97.
12.7
14 96. 9
12 91.4
20 17. 3
8 n.5
n.9
2 1 08. 0
15 6 4 . 2 13 49. 5
8 48.0
12.5
2 i 18. 2
15 8
14 56. 2
10 98. 0
12.1
21 3 7 . 5 16 0 3 . 0 14 69. 5 11 0 8 . 0
12.2
15 46. 0
14 31. 0
1.9 35. 5
10 45. 5
12.0
12 58. 0
12 52. 0
14 30. 5
8 86.5
9 12.0
9 OLO
11 12. 5
5 6 J.. 5,
07.6
6 25.5
7 39.0
8 4L5
4 08. 5'
06.5
8 17. 0
7 1.5. 5
9 90.0
4 87. 5'
7 31. 5
5 67. 5
9 -30. 0
3 66.0
8 27.0
os.'o
12 46. 0
9 63.0
5 32. 5
7 54.0
10 78. 0
8 87. 5
5 30. 5
07.6
14 43, . 11 41. 0
11 44.0
8 23. 5
10.7
11 11. 0
8 44. 0
9 88.5
5 78.0
•07.8
10 78. 5
8 95.0
11 68. 5
8 .50. 0
08.5
10 62. 5
8 48.7
9 0
5 79. 5
08.0
14 01,
11 50. 0
8 86.0
5 09.5
08.1
17 20'. 0
10 72. 0
5 34. 5
15 55. 0
09.1
16 09. 5
9 37.0
5 31. 5
08.8
13 65.
10 94. 5
6 50.0
07.6
13 77.
11 96. 0
11 47. 0
8 86.5
09.0
16 06. 0
16 48. 0
9 46. 5
7 72.5
09.1
16 22. 5
18 56. 5
9 78. 0
.10.5
12 37, 5
21 89. 5
18 47..5

S
S
2
y

2
^
o
^
^_3
S
a
^^
M

3

^
>t:^
O '
fel
^

.

1858 . . . .
1859..-,
1860 . . . ,
1861 . . . .
1862...
1863...
1864 . . .
1865...
1866...'
1867 , . .
1868...
1869,..
1870...
1871 - . .
1872 . . .
1873...
1874...
1875...
1876 . . .
1877.-.
1878...
1879...
1880 . . .
Average . I

04.7
5 32.
46.
03." 6
47.
4 4.5.
42.
3 09.
04.2
87.
5 03.
04.2
03.8 1 54. 12 .54.
0 4 . 3 1 75. 14 21.
2 12.
19 48.
3 09! 28 27.
1 48. 17 69.
3 0 1 . 35 95.
7 97.
1 05.
1 66. 12 54.
2 88.
59,
4 06.
84.
46.
2 7.5.
63.
3 80.
37.
2 01.
52.
2 8L
35.
1 71.
46.
2 28.
37.
1 73.
4lJ.
1 99.
49.
2 76.
55.
3 08.
56.
3 57.
63.
4 01.
44.
2 77.
50.
3 15.
36.
2 18.
40.
2 43.
31.
04. 4|
1 64.
36.
05.1
1 88.
3L
1 74.
04.3
35.
04.8
1 94.
34.
04.3
1 84.
36.
04.6
1 93.
29.
1 48.
04.4
29.
1 49.
04.5
38.
05.6
1 56:
30.
04.5
1 39.
09.2




49.0

2 98. 3

5.3.5
5L5
48.5
44.5
52.1
59. 0|
66.1
9 Ol

42.01

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

20. 5|
33. 5l
41. 5
3L 0
2.5. 8|
42. 5
I L 9|
62.5

1 03.2|

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

3L 0
39.0
51. 0
54.0
69.1
9L 5
34.1
94. 5
94.9
1 93. 0
1 40.
2 2L 6
1 79.8
2 53.3
1 7L2
2 36.6
1 40.
1 96.81
1 40.1
1 86.3
1 17. 8|
1 35. 5^
^ 1 16. 6
1 30.3
1 32.9
1 49. 3
1 3L0
1 49.1
1 44.0
1 60. 2
1 43.
1 65.4
1 20.7
1 34.5
1 15. 8
1 21. 4
92.
93. 4|
1- 00.
83.8

1 04. 51
1 12. 0
1 26. 0
1 13.5
1 17.4
1 33.0
1 24.0
1 80.0
1 1L9
2 27. 5
1 67. 3|
2 63.1
1 27.9
1 80. 2
1 17. 6
1 62. 5
1 63.4
2 28. 3
1 19. 5
1 58.9
1 2L1
1 39. 3
1 08:7
1 21.5
1 16.0
1 30.3
1 01
1 21. 0
1 05.8
1 17.7
1 02. 7
1 18.1
1 10.8
1 23.4
1 13.7
1 19. 2
1 14. 5|
1 15.5
1 00. 0|
1 06.

1 17.6

1 05. 91

63.
7 0.0.
60.
7 00.
57.
6 25.
59.
6 25.
79.
6 95.
90.
7 87
94.
7 40.
1 36. 10 75
76.
8 50.
1 56. 17 29.
88.
9 76,
1 39. 15 35.
1 11.
8 91.
1 56. 12 56.
91.
8 45.
1 2 6 . 11 6 1
78.
7 8e
1 0 9 . 10 97
75.
8 16,
99.
10 85,
80.
8 44.
92.
9 70.
74.
8 09.
83.
9 04.
74.
7 93.
83.
8 91
74.
7 99
94.
9 10.
79.
8 09.
87.
9 00.
58.
7 26.
66.
8 35;
51.
7 36.
8 20.
56.
7 82.
60.
8 20.
63.
59.
8 89.
59.
8 97.
67.
6-56.
7 90.
79.3

$8 13. 8 0 19. 9|
40.61
16 5 4 . 1
26. 0|
10 14.
40.9
15 95. 8
19.1
11 47. 7
27. 0
16 1 6 . 6
12.7
10 31. 7
17.6
14 2 5 . 0
13.
9 42.6
19. 3
13 16. 6
17. 0|
9 99.4
22. 7
13 29. 0|
1.5.
9 91. 81
18.2
11 4 0 0
12. 7|
10 14. 3
14.3
11 33. 3
15.41
10 15.1
17.
11 4 0 . 6
07.
10 10. 8
08.3
11 5 0 . 0
0.5.4
10 15. 8
06.0
11 3 0 . 0
05.5
« 9 47. 4
06. 4
10 89. 0
n
.2
9 39.3
10 46. 0
12.5
9 25.3 • 08.4
08.9
9 70.0
06.2
8 03.5
06.3
8 10.0
03.7
8 80.0
04.7
7 40.0
9 54.9

12.0

17 01..O
16 38. 5
17 98. 5
15 8{
10 84. 8|
12 2 8 . 5
9 92. l'
14 4 0 . y|
[> 33. 6| 15 03. 8
68.31 3 0 56. 7
48.3
19 00. 6
76.1
2 9 88. 5
42. 9|
20 93. 5
60.5
29 48. 6
32.2
16 18. 2
4 4 . 6 22 35. 2
25.6
16 76. 9
^35.8
23 4 2 . 1
24.2
21 29.8
32. 2 28 32..2
22.7
23 59.-^3|
26.1
27 11. 9
22. 0|
14 97. 9|
24. 6
16 7 3 . 7
2L2|
12 29.1
23. 9
13 81. ll
16.41
14 73. 6
18.7
16 76. 5
12.3
16 53. 7
3.7
18 39. 5
1L2
16 16. 3
12. 9
18 57. 9
2L3
16 45. 0
23.8
18 3 1 . 9
14.9
13 21.1
15.7
13 84. 8
10.6
11 47,
10.7
11 56. 8
09.0
12 47. 6
08.0
10 14. 3
22.1

14 87. 0

13
11
13
11
8
9
7
11

87. 01
99. 5*
22. 5
16. 5
79.9
96.5
98.2
58. 5

10 48.51
7 59.0
5 17.0
5 67.0
6.92.2
7 84. 0
4 72. 6
6 8.0
5 2L7
10 6 0 . 4
9 91. 7|
1.5; 59. 3
12 08. 4
17 0 2 . 0
13 04. 6
18 0 2 . 0
11 67. 9
16 31.2
8 91. 8
11 86. 0
11 36. 3
13 0 6 . 2
11 05. 6|
12 35.41
8 07. 4
9 07.2
6 04. 3
6 87. 5
10 21. 6
11 3 6 . 4
9 89.5
11 3 7 . 4
10 12. 0
11 27 0
12 84. 0
13 46. 0
11 93. 3
12 0 3 . 0
10 50. 0
11 19. 9

7
6
4
4
4
5
3
5

18..0
06. 0
14.5
45.5
89.1
54.0
48.6
06.0

08.4
08.7
09.6
06.2
04.8
05.5
05.5

08.0

07.8
15.9
12.2
19.3
12.1
17.1
10.0
13.8
n.2
15.9
13.4
• 17. 8
1.5. 3
17:6

n.o

12.3
09.8
11.0
09.8
11.2
10.4
11.6
10.7
12.4
n.2
12.5
• 09.4
09.9
08.4
08.5
09.3
08.4

o

H
O
O

09.5

00

O

XXV.-TABLE showing the ANNVAL AVEBAGE GOLD and CUBBENCY PBICESof STAPLE ABTICLES, #c.—Continued.
[Currency prices in black
Salt.

figures.]
Soap.

Seeds.

Spices.

Spirits.

OO
O
00

Sugar.

Date.

"S
•3
P e r lb.
1825.
1.826.
1-827.
1828.
1829.
1830.
1'831.
1832.
1833.
1834.,
1835.
1836.,

1837....5
1838.

-1

1839.
1840.
1841.
18421843.
1844.
1845.
1846.
1847.
1848.
1849.
'1850.
1851.
1852.
1853.
1854...,.
1855....:
1856....FRASER
1857

u

6

^

.0

. O

aa

%

a

P e r lb.
P e r gal. P e r gal.
P e r lb.
Perlb.
P e r lb. P e r lb. P e t ' lb. P e r cwt. P e r sack. P e r bush. P e r lb. P r . bu^h P e r lb. P e r lb.
P e r lb.
$0 7 9 . 1
$0 89. 7
$0 17. 6
$1 73. 0
$0 08. 2|
$0 06.5 $0 10. 5
$0 09.3
$2 59. 5|
$2 65. 0
10 08. 6 $0 15.1 $0 07. 3
$0 51. 6|
97.0
78.5
10.5
i6. 5
08.
06.7
1 38.5
08.2
2 31.5
• 2 87.'5
50 0
15.7
08. (
07.7
1
07.
0
93.7
10.9
16.3
08.01
06.6
08.5
2 24,0
1 38.7
,57 0|
3 27.0
17.0
07. 3
08.5
1 22. 5
97.0
11.
15.6
07.8
05.8
08.6
2 56.5
1 33.0
49.7
15.5
06.8
06.1 . 3 15. 0
1
24.5
96.5
10.9
13.5
05.5
07.6
2 30. 5
1 42.0
• 07.1
48.5
3 do.'5
13.8
06. 2
05. ()
1 13.0
1 02. 5
10.0
13.8
05.0
07.0
3 08.2
1 99.0
1 42.0
0,7.2
46.5
2 67.0
.13.5
06.7
08.0
1
08.0
14.0
1
14
05.5
n.o
05.8
09.5
.06. 0
1 49.0
50.7
1 91.0
3 ld.'5
14.8
06. 0
09.0
1 08. 0
14.8
1 15.0
05.5
06.5
09.5 $2 85. 7
06.2
12.8
1 49.0
48.5
2 00.0
3 35.5
15. 5
08.5
06.0
1.03.2
09.5
05.5
07.2
1
15.5
06.3
1 27. 0
43.5
n.5
07.7
1 83.5
3 22. "0
15.6
07. b
08.6
n.7 23 42.6
1.09. 5
06.
05.5
.
07.1
1 10. 5
06.2
38.5
12.0
1 21.5
1 56.0
•3 91.0
14.1
07.1
- 07.8
07.0
1
13.5
07.3
05.5
07.8
1 n.5
07.2
36.2
14.5
1 40. 5
1 77.5
2 74.4
3 49. "5
07.2
.09.4
17.3
08.0 3 12.6
1 26.5
08.0
05.5
09.0
1 09.1
09.1
37.5
13.0
1 9L0
3" 68. 5
1 29.0
19.5
08.8
14.5
09.0 2 78.6
1 25.3
06.9
05.2
06.7
1 14. 8
06.3
30.
12.4
1 16.1
3 83.7 ^ 1 90. 9
17.2
09.0
10.0
09.9 2 91 2 - 0 5 . 5
1 31.0
07.0
1 20.0
06.6
38.5
13.0
I 99.5
07.2
1 21.4
4 01.0
10.5
18.0 • 0 9 . 5
1
0
.
4
1
32.3
06.8
06.6
1 18.9
39.1
12.8
1 93.7
3 06.7
07.1
1 10.6
05.4
19; 8
07.9
10. 5
4 31. 5
n.4
1 33.5
06.9
06.7
1 20. 0
39.5
13.0
1 95.5
05.5
07. 2
3 09. 5
1 1L7
10.6
20.0 08. 0 4 3 5 . 5
11.5
1
42.5
06.8
06.8
1 15.0
37.3
12.
1 74. 2
06.0
08.7
1 02.8
4. "36. 5
19.0
09.1
n.8
2 L 5 3 42.8
1 56. 0
05.8
05.7
1 13.5
34.7
1L6
1 52.5
05.5
07.1
2 84 4
86.2
3 38. 0
17.5
07.:
lo.o
12.1
1
60.5
06.0
06.0
1 13.5
30.0
13.7
1 59.0
05.5
07.1
7.9.2
3 46.0
07.3
1L9
05.7
08.3 3 95.2
1 49. 0
04.4
1 09.2
25.1
11. 2|
1 67. 0
05.5
07.1
2
79.9
81.6
04, 6
2 80.0
11.7
07.0
06. 2
08.1
1.
45.
0
05.3
1 22. 5
11,
1 46. 5
05.6
08.1
2 55.8
86.7
05.7
2 64.5
08.6
05.2
06. 2
06.
1 53. 0
05.2
1 22. 5
09.1
1 40. 5
05.3
10,1
2
45.6
1
0
L
2
06.2
3 03. 0
09.9
04.6
05.7
08.1
1 62. .5
05:8
1 23. 5
.08.1
1 37. 0
07. 4
10. Ol
2
33.3
1
19.0
05. 9
37.5
3 81. 0
13.5
06. J
07.3
07.1
06.3
.1 30. 0
08. 7|
i 34. 0
04.8
10.0
1
21.
5
08.'5
2
63.4
.
1
60.
5
33.0
3 65. 5
06.8
06.7 • 13.0
07.5
06.5
1 36.5
ILl
1 35. 5
,04.4
06.4
07.7
1
29.
.5
1
66.
0
30.0
3
18.5
4 12. 5
16.0
06.9
09.5
06.9
03.8
1 32.5
10.7
1 39. 0
0.5.2
05.4
06.7
1 16. 6
1 84.5
25.2
3 17. 0
16.0
06.7
07.5
06.2 3 25.6
. 04.7
1 2L5
09.
1 29.0
04.5
06.0
06.9
93.9
1'
68.
0
24.2
3
34.1
2 96.'5
15.0
05.0
00.5
06.0
05.1
1
08.0
09.0
1
36.
5
04.5
07.4
07.4
1
08.
6
1
56.0
23.4
3
28.9
'3 18. 5
15.1
06.2
06.4
06.8
05.2
91.0
0.9.0
1 34.0
04.5
0.8.
07.5
.99.
5
1
45.
0
22.5
3
15.7
3 02.5
08.1
14.2
05.7
08.5
04.
86.0
09.
1
20.0
04,
.0.9.
.0
07.0
90.
0
1
4
9
.
5
2
L
5
3
14.2
3 71. 5
10. 0
19.2
07.0
08.0
04.7
1 17. 5
10.7 .
1 34. 5
06. .0
.10. .5
07.2
1
39.
5
1
03,
34.0
3
1L.4
3 93.5
10.5
18.0
08.5
09.7
04.7
1 34.5
10. 7
1 59. 5
' 06.0
10. .4
06.7
1 62.0
47.0
' 1 07. 5
4 39. 0
09. 7
19.5
09. 5
09. 5 3 22.6
05.6
1 37 5
1.0. 5
1 03. 5
. 0.5. 7
10. .6
07.2
1 86.0
44.5
94.0
4 5i; 5
10.3
21.8
09.5
10.9 2 99.5
1
55.0
10.3
92.5
0.5,7
10.
09.8
1
83.5
•
07.8
29.2
88.7
3
45.5
4 16.5
11. 5
2L6
08.5
13.2
1 20,0
ILl
79.7
0.5.5
1L.3
1
95.5
10.
o|
22.1
"•
n.8
3
75.5
7,3,3
4 34. 0
1
13.6
.21.5
09.4
n.5;

Digitized for


o
o

o
QC

10.2
10.7

1868 .
1859
1860
1861

n.2

06. 5
- 13. 2
09.9
15.6
10.8
15.3
07. 3
10.2
- 08.2
11.5
10.6
14.2
10.7
12.3
06.1
00.9
05.3
06.0
06.3
07; 2
06.8
07. 6
08.0
09: 2
07.0
07.8
06.4
06.8
04.9
05.0
05.7
04.9

09.0
07. ii
08.3
07; 0
10, 2
08.3
17.0
13.2
20. 9
12. 5
- 17.7
09.3
12.9
n.6
16.3
13.7
18.3
13.7
15.
09.9
11.1
08.0
09.0
07.3
08.4
10.5
11.7
12.0
13:8
09.5
10.6
08.9
09.4
06.9
07.0
07.8
06.5

07.3

09.1

1862..
1863..
1864..
1865..
1866..
1867-.
1868..
1869..

.

1870-.
1871..
1872..
1873..
1874..
1875..
1876..
1877.1878..
1879..
1880

"i

Avera

ge




06.8
.1.8.5.
08.3
19.0
09.8
16.7
07.2
15.0
06.6
15.4
07.5
17.5
08.0
15.1
11.6
22. 0
08.2
18.7
16.8
38. 2
10.1
19.3
15.9
30.. 4
12.5
23.5
17.7
33:2
- 15.5
n.o
21:5
15.2
22..1
10.2
3L0
14.3
19.3
12..3
25.8
16; 5
20.1
12. 8
23.1
14.8
16.1
09.9
18.1
ILl
15..1
10.6
17.0
1L9 .
18.
1L3
20.8
12. 9
26.4
10.7
28.3
12.0
18.9
09.4
2L 8
10.9
20.4
09.4
22 8
10.5
24.0
25. 2 . . n ; 6
12. 2
23; 3
09.9
23.5 ^
10.0
32.7
1
L2
23.0
• 07.6
17.5

08..2

3 26. 5
3 66.5
4 08.0
5 02.5
6 36.2
7 20. 5
,4.19.2
6 08. 5
5 4L2
11 0 0 . 0
7 70.4
12 11. 4
, 9,10.3
12 82. 2
7 83. 5
10 82, 3
7 30.4
10 2 0 . 2
6 54.0
8 6^9.7
6 53.4
7 51.1
7 54. 3
8 42.9
7 75. 9
8 71.9
7 40. 9
8 42. 9
7 20.5
8 OL 5
6 47.0
7 43.7
5 28.0
5:88.0.
.5 80. 5
6 OS. 5
6 15.0
6 20.0
6 60.0
6 59.0

65.5
83.0
00.5
78.0
97.5
1 10.5
1 0L9
1 48: 0
1 27; 4
2 59.1
1 32.8
2 08. 9
1 32.2
1 86. 2
1 42.0
1. 96. 2
1 5L2
2 11.2
I 39. 2
1 85. 2
2 04.5
2 35.1
2 22.9
2 49.1
2 12.4
2 38.7
1 77.2
2 OL 6
1 00.4
1 11.7
83.2
95.7
80.1
89. 2
73.2
76.8
65.0
65.6
73.8
69.0

18. 5
18.5
18.5
20.1
25.1
28.5
27.3
39.7
33.
67. 8
34.7
54.7
34.6
48.8
86.7
50.8
33.2
46.5
35.2
46.8
34.8
40.0
39.8
44. 5
35.6
40.1
3L0
35.3
26.1
29.1
22. 4
25.8
• 24.4
27.2
27.1
28.4
26.3
26.6
28.8
30.5

08.3
08.7
07.8
07.8
07.0
08: 0
06.5
09. 5
08.3
17.0
14f6
23.0
08.6
12; 2
- 09.7
13.4
08.8
12.5
10.3
13.7
1L6
13.4
09.6
10.8
08.8
09.9
08.0
09.1
08.9
09. 9
10.1
11.6
13.5
15.1
12.2
12. 8
07.3
07.4
07.7
07.1

2 34.5
2 50.5
3 40.0
2 75.0
1 79.6
2 03.5
1 65.3
2 40.0
2 06.2
4 19. 3
3 19.8
5 02.9
3 42.3
4 82. 2
2 3L0
3 19.1
1 98. 7
2 77. 5
3 12.2
4 15.0
5 03.8
5 79.1
4 10. 0
4 58.2
3 09. 2
3 47. 5
3 30.5
3 76.1
2 75.1
3 06. 0
2 32.0
J 66.7
1 98.3
2 20. 9
1 70. 0
1 78.2
1 30.9
1 32. 0
2 75.7
1 78.9

05.5
05.7
06.5
05.5
0L8
. 5

4 60. 7

1 45.7

33.6

09.2

2 85.1

05.5

1L3
09.2
08.5
10.8
12.3
14.0
1L3
16

^

.08.2
08.2
07:2
08.1
13.8
15.7
18.4
]J6.7

56.5
49.6
43.0
43.5
61.9
70.2
58.1
84.3

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5

49. 5
37.5
40.5
39.5
49.2
69.0
90.9
77.1

1
1
1
2

99.0
94.5
90.0
07.5
47.4
67.0
05.3

06.5
06.3
07.1
06.0
07.8
08.9
07.4
10.8

-

•=

-,
10.9

10.1

1 05. 2

1 42. 3

1 15.3

06.4

08.7
08.8
08.5
07.6
09.0
10.2
07.2
10.5
08. 6
17.5
09.1
14.3
07.4
10.5
07.6
10.6
07. 8
11.0
08.3
11.1
07.9
09.1
07.8
08:8
07.4
08.4
07.0
08.0
07.0
07.8
07.0
08.1
08.2
09.2
08. 5
08.9
07.2
07.3
07.6
07. 0

w

o

H
O

w
o
w

07.4

OO

O

X X V . — T A B L E showing the ANNUAL AVEBAGE GOLD and CUBBENCY P B I C E S of STAPLE ABTICLES, #c.—Continued.

OO
I—»•

O

[Currency prices in black figures.]
Sugar.

Tea.

Tallow.

Wine.

Tobacco.

Wool.

©

Date.

fcJO
fcb

1
1825
1826......
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837....j

1838.-.. 1
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846......
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851.
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
;
1857
FRASER

§

!

Perlb.
Perlb. Perlb. Perlb.
$0 18. 0 $0 07. 9 $0 07. 5 J O 99. 2
17.8
09.0
09.0
92.0
18.0
09.3
09.0
96.5
18.0
07.8 .
08.2
93.3
18.0
06.4
07.7
'92. 0
18.0
07.5,
06.2
88.5
15.8
09.0
07.5
97.7
15.5
09.0
07.5
88.0
15.8
09.2
07. 5
74.5
15.8
07.0
07.6
OLO
15.0
08.2
08.5
62.8
16.2
09.2
63.7
14.8
09.9
58.8
15.5
10.4
6L5
15.3
10.2
57.4
15.5
10.3
58.0
15.5
1L6
'iL3
63.3
12.5
08.7
/ 67.7
08.0
12.0
07.5
74.9
10.0
07.0
64.0
10.7
06.8
'os.'s
60.0
ILO
06.6
60.0
07.5
1L4
06.7
59.5
07.5
ILO
07.2
58.0
10.0
08.7
52.0
08.0
08.0
48,5
08.5
07.5
47,5
09.5
06.8
49.6
09.0
06:7
5L3
0.8. 0 .
08.1
50.5
08.3
08.8
45.0
09.0
1L6
42.5
08,6
1L7
36.8
10.7
37.5
n.o
12.6
42.0
10.7

Digitized for


8
Perlb.

,

§

1
Perlb.
$0 62. 5
58.7
66.5
62.6
62.0
60.0
63.5
50.0
36.5
. 30.0
'27.5
32.0
29.1
30. 5
27.2
27. 5
27.5
45.5
58.9
. 49.4
43.0
o 37.0
36.5
39.0
56.0
27.0
34.7
40.0
34.3
30.5
27.0
23.0
2L0
17.7
28.7

>i

o
p
d

ci

.

o

1

es

>
tq

Perlb.
Perlb. Perlb.
Perlb.
$1 34.0
$0 05. 8 $0 15. 7
1 25.0
12.3
05.2
1 28.0
IL 5
04.6
1L5
04.0
• 1 16. 5
1L5
05.5
1 18.5
10.5
05.5
1 16.0
10.7
04.5
1 22. 0
04.0
1 15.0
n.o
04.7
92.0
n.o
06.5
80.0
12 0
, 08.0
8L5
13.0'
08.2
•82.5
15.6
06.2
77.7
15.3
81.2
16. 0
06.5
76.8
15.5
07.5
15.7
77.5
07.6
20.5
77.5
13.0
13.7
77.0
08.5
13.5
75.5
08.2
11.6
60.7
05.0
60.0
04.7 .
12.5'
63.0
04.0
12.5;
04.5
67.2
12.5
04.7
64.-0
12.5
04.8
56: 0
13.1
05.3
49.5
13.5
06.1
5L5
14.0
08.2
58.5
2L0
08.1
57.5
25.5
06.5
54.0
19.5
07.0
20.2
43.5
08.0
18.5
24.0
09.4
19.7
22.5
22.0
24.1
n.o
27.7
33.2
14.1

H^

©•

o

6

. a
i

Perlb.
P e r gal. P e r gal. P e r cask.
Perlb.
$0 33. 5
$1 75. 0
$2 75. 0 .$23 83. 0
$0 23. 5
30.0
1 73.0
23 9L 0
2 75. 0
30.1
25.0
1 66.5
22 46. 5
2 75.0
40.6
25.0
1 70.0
22 00. 0
2 62. 5
4L2
2L5
1 34.0
1 99.5
30.3
19 33. 0
22.0
1 10.0
1 90.5
26.0
17 00. 0
27.5
1 10.0
1 87.5
22.5
24 37. 0
27. 5
1 16.0
1 71.5
16.7
21 95. 5
3L5
1 28.5
1 68.5
15.7
17 20. 5
'
30.2
1 23.0
1 66.5
17.7
14 33. 5
33.7
1 23. 7
167.0
23.5
15 25. 0
42.8
1 30.8
1 62,5
15 29. 0
. 25.6
4L6
1 61.2
1 55.5
15 06. 8
20.0
-1 68. 5
162.5
15 7 4 . 5 .
21. 0
43.5
1 29.4
15 60. 8
19.4
30.4
1 65.1
1 30.6
19.6
30.7
1 6 6 . 6 15 75. 0
1 30.0
19.1
38.5
2 00.0
20 00. 0
1 16. 0
19.5
28.0
1 70.0
19 16. 5
1 06.0
20.3
27.0
1 67.0
15 00. 0
95.0
26.1
19.3
1 68.5
12 71. 0
87.5
35.5
20.5
1 25. 0
12 75. 0
1 08.5
40.7
30.0
1 62.0
19 00. 0
97.5
35.3
27.0
1 44.5
22 50. 0
1 13.0
34.0
23.5
1 55 0
22 00. 0
1 52.5
30.7
26.2
1 80.5 ^ 25 77. 0
1 50.5 V 1 83. 0
25.6
26.1
28 17. 0
1 50.5
32.3
29.2
1 88.5
23 50. 0
1 25.0
34.2
32.6
1 88.5
23 50. 0
1 33.5
34,5
35.5
1 90.0
23 50. 0
1 37.5
54,0
32.0
1 90.0
23 50. 0
1 38.0
41.0
23 50. 0
1 92.0
32.4
32 83. 0
36.6
2 14.0
1 67.5
29.8
43 33. 0
4L0
' 2 33. 0
2 21 0
33.5
50 00. 0
56.7
2 80.0
2 86.5
36.8
50 00. d
89.0
3 00.0
3 37.5

d
fl

i

Perlb.
$0 58. 5
49.5
. 39.0
37.0
34.5
39.0
53.5
47.5
.49.0
48.8
53.9
58.6
40.5
42.4
37.7
38.1
5L2
39.1
44.2
32.0
80.5
40.0
35.1
32.3
35.2
34.3
36.1

4o:o
42.5
39.7
50.0
42.1
37.0
44.6
49.0

Perlb.
$0 32. 6
28 7
21.6
24 0
25.0
28.5
55 0
42.7
46.7
46.3
47.1
5-2.1
40.3
42. 2
34. 3
34.7
42.5
28.2
33.0
29.0
23.0
32.0
29.7
23.6
28.0
26.0
• 27.6
32.5
34.7
32.7
40.0
30.-8
25.0
3L1
32.8

o
w
O

W

o
m

1858
1859...
1860
1861 -1862...
1863...
1864. - -•

{

1865...
1866.-.
1867...
1868.--

\

1869...

{

1870...

5

1871...
1872...
1873.-.
1874--.
1875.-.
1876.-.
1877-.1878.-1879
1880

Averag e .

10.0
09.5 '
09.8
08.0
10.1
11.5
10.0
14.6
09.9
20. 2
' 1L6
18.3
10.7
15.1
10.5
14.6
10.5
14.8
11.2
15.0
12.7
11.-2
12. 6
10.5
11.8
09.1
10.4
09.3
10.4
08.7
10.1
09.3
10.4
09.7
10.2
08.8
08.9
09.0
08.6

09.3
10.5
10.0
08.8
08.2
09.3
<07.7
11.2
07.5
15.3
08.7
13.7
08.7
12. 3
08.2
1L4
08.6
12.1
08.5
1L4
08.3
09.6
08 1
09.1
08.1
09.1
07.3
08.3
07.2
08.0
07.9
09.1
07.4
08.3
07.5
07.9
06. 9
07.0
06.2
06.3

1L7

08.3

n.o




08.0

35.5
22.7
25.0
43.0
54.3
6L5
38.7
56. 2
44.9
91.4
63.9
1 00.6
65.3
92. 0
62.9
.87. 0
67.0
93.6
72.4
96.3
73.4
84.4
42.8
47. 9
4L1
46.2
.
48.8
55.6
44.9
50.0
43.6
50:2
33.2
37.0
35.2
37.0
25.8
26.1
3L3
23.4

$0 53.4
1 08.6
69.8
1 09.8
79.8
1 12. 5
75.2
1 03.9
73.9
1 03.3
69.3
92. 2
70.9
8L5
62.6
70.0
52.3
58.8
. 4L1
46.8
54.2
60.4
36.6
42.1
38.7
43.1
4L9
44.0
32.9
33.2
28.8
29.8

56.7

53.6

.

26.5
29.5
30.0
27.0
38.8
44.0
40.7
59.1
47 1
95. 8
59.2
93.1
64.7
91. 2
70.7
97.7
70.9
99.1
67.9
90.3
73.1
84.1
6L8
69.1
52.2
58.7
40.8
46.5
38.9
43.3
39.0
44.9
42. 6
47.5
45.3
47.5
34.4
34.7
3L5
32.6

29.0
28.8
32.5
47.5
67.5
76.5
44.0
64.0

43.0

70,0

10.5
08.8
08.1
09.1
13.2
15. 0
14.4
2L0
13.1
26. 7
1L8
18.7
09.5
13.5
08.7
12.1
07.9
11.1
07.5
10.0
08.1
09.4
07.6
08.5
10.7
12.1
10.6
12.1
09.7
10.8
1L8
13 6
09.8
ILO
09.8
10.3
07.1
07.2
08.0
07.7
07.9

90.0
79.5
8L5
69.5
74.6
84.5
1 06. 9
1 55.2

24.0
23.0
19.7
24.0
37. 5
42.5
39.6
57.5

........

17.1

'$6'6L8
1 25.6
75.1
1 18.1
62.7
88.4
-47.3
65.4
57.3
80.0
• 64.2
• 85 5
66.9
77.0
74.1
82. 8
90.0
1 01. 2
8L4
92 7
67.7
75:3
8L3
93.5
88.9
99.0
9L5
96.0
87.5
88.2
90.9
92.2
75.3

2 95,0
2 92. 5
2 95. 0
2 80.0
2 42.8
2 75. 0
2 12.2
3 08.0

3 29.0
3 50.0
3 08.5
4.25.0
3 75. 2
4 25. 0
2 92.8
4 25.0

56 66. 0
52 50. 0
52 50. 0
52 50. 0
46 35. 7
52 50. 0
47 94. 0
69 58. 0

25.3
39.9
24.2
34.2
23.3
32. 2
2L4
30.
22.4
29. 8
19.6
22. 6
28.3
31.7
3L1
35.0
27.7
3L6
26.0
29. 0
25.1
28. 9
22.7
25.3
• 25.7
27. 0
24.1
24.3
32.6
25. 4

"

^.. .

39.9

. 1 63. 5

30.0
38.0
30.7
32.5
44.1
50.0
46.5
67.6

2 2L4

27 35. 3

29.5

39. 0
49.2
'. 50.0
43. 0
4f5. 7
53.0
5L4
74.7
43.7
88.9
5L3
80.7
47.3
66. 7
44.3
61.2
4L1
57.6
44.7
59.5
48.2

63.1
71.0
50.4
57.4
.5L6
57.4
48; 7
56.0
39.9
44.5
48.8
51.2
4L6
42. 0
52.0
4L4

24 8
32.0
29.4
26.5
36 2
41.0
40 3
58.6
43.3
88 1
48.7
76.6
41.3
58. 2
36 7
50.8
33.3
46 6
33.0
43 9
34.3
39.5
36.9
41.3
56.6
63.6
42.7
48.6
41.7
46. 4
38.8
44.6
3L2
34.8
36.2
38.0
33.6
33.9
41.4
34.9

44.5

35.0

155.5
53.7

860.0

fej

o

fej

^
H

OO

X X V I . — T ^ B Z : ^ shoioing the P E B C E N T A G E of YEARLY P B I C E S to the M E A N P B I C E of STAPLE ABTICLES in the N E W YORK MAB.
K E T fromlS2b to IHSO, and indicating the ANNUAL VABIA TIONS in the PUBCHASING VALUE of M O N E Y measured hy ihe P B I C E S of the
COMMODITIES named.

Flour:
Superfine
Western
Rye-;
Corn meal
Wbeat:
' Northern
W^estern
Bye
Oats
Corn
Barley !
Candles:
Mould
Sperm
Coal:
Anthracite
Liverpool
Coffee:
•- R i o
Java
Copper:
Bolts .
Sheathing
Cotton
Fish:
Cod
Mackeiel
Flax
Fruit:
Raisins
Fitrs
Prunes
•
Furs, beaver
Glass
Gunpowder:
Rifle
English
Blasting...'

-•




1825.

1826.

1827.

1828.

1829.

1830.

1831.

1832.

1833.

1834.

1835.

94.1
66.2
73.2
84.7

88.2
84.9
91.5
114.8

94.3
93.1
83.3
95.4

102. 4
100.2
74:5
84.7

118.4
117.4
94.0
8L4

91.5
92.7
84.8
80.8

104.8
104.9
99.3
106. 0

105.9
108.9

102.1
102.8
98.2
113.2

9L4
90.9
86.0
101.4

107.4
-108. 8
109.8
119.8

68.2

69.6

73.5

90.2

92.2-

79.3

87.8

88.4

78.4

90.4

13L9

125. 8

14L0

67.7
72.5
78.5.

89.0
108.6
109.2

85.6
92.6
87.1

67.5
68.6
75.0

83.1
81/2
80.7

8L8
67.5
80.0

98.4
85.8
99.2

93.4
104.5
104.1
97.1

100.7
92.6
105.0

83.3
8L7
94.1

114.6
110.2
129.2

130. 9
121. 0
135. 7

135.5
114.8
142.8

130.3
89.4
119.1

95.8
104. 3

IOL 6
IOL 2

108. 3.
92.0

97.5
79.7

87.-5
70.5

80.0
70.5

93.3
85.9

104.1
96.6

105.0 . 100. 8
93.8
102. 7

94.1
99.0

1041
102.7

104.1
93.8

123. 3
98.1

125.0
12L1

144.1
134.7

17L 7
12L5

178. 3
116.3

17L7
127,0

168. 7
124.-2

142:3
105.0

in. 4
113.6

160.6
133.8

107.8
113.1

94.4
IOL 5

105.5
106.8

134.4
122. 2

145.7
112.7

123: 0
114.3

127.4
113.0

139. 3
. 126. 7

122. 9
108. 4

116.3
105.2

106.5
98.0

100.8
94.1

91.8
91. 5

9 L 8 102.4 100.8
75.2, - 85. 6 - 8 3 . 0

94.2
- 80, 3

97.5
8L6

94.2
. -86. 2

82.7
84.9.

84.4
79. 7

88.5
8L6.

m.o
IOL 3

1836.

1837.

1838,

1839.

137.5 160. 5 -144. 7
1 4 L 8 168.4
14.5. 2
128. 4
138.8 "i37.'2" 112.5

1840.

1841.

1842.

13379

97.1

102.4

102.2

89.1

120.8
118.8

78.8
94.8

84.1
OLl

88.1
80.0

79 3
81.3

92.2

78.2

87.8

84,5

72.7

121. 9 • 75.3
107.5
77.8
123.5
8L4

80.3
100.6
89.2

82.5
83.2
85.0

78 2
66.3
78 5

106.6
12L1

104.1
115.9

87,5
85,9

84 1
78.2

112.4
9L9

118. 9
96.6

99.9
77.2

80.4
88.8

82.7
83.*7-

8L9
76.4

68.0
7L 8

59.0
-71. 8

1843.

105. 2

97.3

93.6

95.2

95.7

93,1

94.7

92.1

86.8

85.2

86:8

107,8

93. L

88.4

92.1

95.7

94,7

89.4

89.4

117.3
124.6

114.6
76.0.

lOLl
66.4

95.3
68.5

90.7
61.6

84:9
68.5

85.7
.6L6

86.8
65:0

88.8
85.6

90.7
85.6

90.7
114.3

104,2
113.7

99.6
78.7

97.3
72.6

94.6
9L1

94.6
59,5

96.5
87.6
67.1 ^ 5 4 . 8

81.8
45.2

67.0
43.4

60.8
42.3

80.0
43.4

77.6
43.6

67.6
44.9

62.7
47.5

74.6
5L3

77.3
46.0

73.2
53.9

64.2
50.9

75.2
58.2

90.5
78.3

88.2
76.6

93.6
9L5

100.8
110.1

67.5
104. 5

69.5
126.7

6L1
86.0

66.2
75.4

1.53. 2
• 97.7
89.8
151. 9
76.4

139.6
110.3
114. 8
162.7
77.2

105.7
10.5. 7
86.7
149. 7
75.8

117.7 127.4 106.5 106 3
95.4
74.7
86.2
80.4
87.5 149.2 ^ 138. 2 1 3 L 3
178.8 218.5 198.7 164.4
75.8 . 75.8
75.8
75.8

127. 2
109.1
128. 9
143.3
75.8

90.4
5L7
126.5
13L4
75.8

64.8
58.6
76.5
133.9
7L2

115. 8
86.2
97.6
138.5
63.1

99.6
78.1
78.9
160.2
66.5

44.8
59.7
59.3
132.5
68.1

70.0
94.2
92.1
137.2
70.5

56.9
139.0
89.8
1.38. 5
7L2

65,3
97,7
7L8
107.7
71. 2

79,5
8L6

57,7
8L6

73.0
98.8

103. 7
7L2

92,3
7L2

92.3
7L2

103. 7
5L1

103.3
49.4

102.8
48.9

102.8
47.4

102.844.4

102.8
44.4

102. 8
44.4

102.8
44.4

102.8
44.4

102. 8
44.4

98.4
42.4

101.9
44.0

102,8
44.4

9L4
168.5

88.5
168.5

88.5
168.5

88.5
168.5

102.8
44.4

102.8
44.4

OO

to-

Hemp:
Dressed
Undressed
Russia
Hides:
S o u t h A.m e r i c a .
Mexico..
Hops
!.,.
Indigo
Iron:
Scotch
English
Sheet
Russia
Lead, pig
Leather
Liquors:
Brandy
Whisky
Molasses:
N e w Orleans . . .
Sugar-house
West India
•Nails:
Cut
Wrought.......
Turpentine
Rosin
Oil:
Whale
Summer sperra.
Winter sperm..
Olive
L i n s e e d .'
Paint:
R e d lead
W h i t e lead
Petioleum:
Crude
Refined ..•..
Pork:
Prime.
Beef:
less
Prime.
Hams
Shoulders .
Lard
Butter
Cheese

Rice...




8L0
115.2

81.5
116.3

39.6
lOLO

45.2
120.4

88.8
140.1

209.5
122. 0

83.1
86.3
135. 7
lOLO

72.6
72.7
75.4
85.8

7L5
74.0
54.2
95.9

119. 5
105.2
50.7

116.2
IOL 8

152. 2
138.0
101.5

143.7
i:^4. 4
100.0

124. 6
128.3
92.7

in. 5
129.7
94.2

1016
103.6
94.2

100.6
100.3
94.2

82.8
83.7

75.4
83.6

9L5
79.8

112.7
84.2

110.3
91,1

107.8
89. J.

77.4
102.0

107.'i
57.5
8'4. 2

'9L2

102.1
86.7

63.0
116.0

55.8
112.5

55.3
113.2

53.9
92.2

56.3
123. 9

60.3
136.5

49.6
128.8

53.3
132.1

57.5
134.7

58.0
92.2

55.1
79.0

54.8
68.2

73.9
81.1

73.7
125.9
90.0

70.7
114.9
94.2

74.4
119. 2
99.2

79.4
118. 2
108. .8

7L9
112. 9
89.7

78.6
124.1
102.6

109.1
99.3
137.-7

87.8
68.7
126. 0

.90.8
60.8
116.0

85.8
9L3
.120. 9

64.7
8y.O
97.2

63.5
88.0
74.8

5L3
15L1
60:7

55.8
137. 8
72.5

165.1
142.3
73.5
48.1

127. 9
14L3
59.6
47.2

130.2
14L3
59.6
45.9

134.8
14L3
74.5
45.9

116.3
14L3
84.7
48.1

127. 9
130.4
96.0
56.5

139.5
130.4
111.8
57.8

15L1
135.8
112.0
58.1

144.2
140. 2
76.1
54.0

137.2
14L3
64.7
55.3

144.2
146.7
68.3
6L0

127.9
146.7
56.3
50.4

127.9
146.7
63.0
45.2

93.0
125. 0
7L4
39.4

104. 6
119.5
70.8.
29.8

77.4
59.6
59.5
74.6
9L7

73.8
64.4
64.6
75.5
98.3

80.9
67.5
68.1
90.1
100.2

78.5
72.2
76.5
87.3
12L0

67.8
80.9
8L2
9L8
114.7

62.1
87. 2
86.1
97.7
115.0

63.6
74.4
80.0
88.8
114.1

88.1
8L8
82^1
110.9
138.1

IILO
. 86.7
83.9
105.3
129. 2

78. 9
80.6
77.7
86.7

76.0
80.8
78.7
103.4
98.6

77.6
104.0
98.7
~7L0
133.0

7L4
99.7
95.9
66.0
137.4

77.0
917
91.4
8L5
166. 0

82.1
8L6
69.8
61.1
72.4
62.0
84.0
76.0
116. 0" 106.4

125.6

99.4

9L5

88.9

9L6

90.2

95.0

106.9

114.4

107.0

101.7

IOL 7

74.7

97.1
77.9
93.3
185.6

96.5.
09.4
75.4
194.6

95.9
74.6
36.3
149.2

87.8
7L4
4L3
119. 7

89.0
7.3.3
72.6
104.4

93.0
85.7
64.2
102.9

83.7
73.3
103.3
106.1

•80.2
73.8
69. 4*^ 62.9
83.2
157.5
105.0 lOLO

176.3
138.5
120.3

148.7
125.3
108.7

150'8
117.5
IOL 5

142.6
116.6
105.8

127. 0
109.9
10.5. 8

125.1
105.8
105.8

124.8
106.5
105.8

120.4
109.5
IOL 5

112. 7
103.4

112.7
99.0

96.1
103.4

70.4
99.5

56.3

77.4
106.9

42.9
107.0

52.4
108.8

48.1
83.0

42.9
86.0

43.7
93.0

8L8
88.3
101.9

88.1
910
116. 3

8L8
105.3

in. 4

73.7
110.6
93.5

74.5
50.1

176. 7
146.7
76.7
48.8

65.5
63.4
60.7
78.3
95.8

77.4
6L0
6L2
9L6
92.7

133.2

128.6

76.0
68.9

87.1
74.2

94! 8
77.1
IOL 0

93.3
98.4
1115

94.6
lOL 2
106.0

85.0
112.0
100.0

^93.0
92.6
103.1

87.8
86.8
112.6

84:6
89.7
97.5
62.4

93.4
97.1
89.0
70.9

74.7
88.5
74.3
68.3

6L5
78.8
75.6
65.2

87.9
77.1
8L7
57,9

84.5
73.1
67.3

84.3
88.4

77.9

85:5

8L9

106.4

'79.'8

98.0
98.7

82.2
85.3

110.2
109.6

151.0
150.4

135.6
13L1

142.4
139.2

130.1
135.4

96.2
110.1

74.7
79.9

56.5
54.8

66.5
7L6

97.9
87.8
100.0

97.1
90.3
97t8

94.9
9L8
147. 3

114.7
120. 2
102.1

113. 5
112.3
133.6

133.6
127.4
125.2

150. 7
172. 4
127.3

148.2
164.1
126.3

129.5
139.1

93.2
88.3
80.0

76.4
64.1
68.4

74.0
76.5

93.4
88.5
73.1
72.8

94.5
89.1
85.3

85.7
80.5
86.5
63.1

103.2
98.8
-87.8
75.8

159. 3
111. 4
107; 3
79.9

109.8
98.2
109.7
.83.2

115.3
113.1
96.3
93.6

129.6
108.5
110.9
94.7

109.8
100.0
86.5
73.3

80.2
68.0
69.5
75.1

68.1
66.8
85.3
60.7

68.1
49.1
63.4
57.4

93.5
94.7

X X V I . — T A B L E showing the P E B C E N T A G E of YEARLY P B I C E S to the M E A N P B I C E of STAPLE ABTICLES in the N E W YOBK MABKEV from 1825 to 1880, ^'C—Coutinued.

Salt:
Liverpool
Turk's Island .
Seeds:
Clover
Timothy
Soap:
Brown
Castile
Spices:
Pepper
....
Nutmeg
Spirits:
Jamaica
Gin
Sugar:
N e w Orleans . .
Cuba
Loaf
Tallow:
Araerican......
Foreign
Tea:
Young Hyson.
Oolong - Souchong
Imperial
Tobacco:
Kentucky
Manufactured.
Havana
Whalebone
Wine:
Port
Madeira
Claret
Wool:
Common
Merino
PuUed

Average .



1825:

1826.

1827.

1828.

1829.

18L8
153.5

158. 8
148.8

153.7
169.6

176.0
147.8

158.2
144.3

136.5
138.3

1831.

1832.

1833.

1834.

1835.

13L0
150.8

1H7. 2
144.3

125.9
129. 4

107.0
114.5

12L8
107.7

103.2
100.2

127.1
107. 9

76.0
85:6

-1837.

1838.

1839.

in. 6

13L0
109.5

132. 9
116.3

119.6
IILO

109. 6

107. 6
97. 7

123. 9
107. 5

13L0

1841.

1842.

104.6
103.2

109.1
89.2

114.6
74.7

233. 6
120.2

13L5
99.4

90.2
138.6

88.0
98.1

75.0
89.7

1843.

118.1
96.3

12L8
96.3

120. 0
100.0

105.4
105.5

100.0
100.0

90.9
9L7

100.0
100.9

100.0
117.4

100.0
105.5

100.0
110.1

100.0
133. 0

100.0
119.2

94.5
113.7

98.0
117.4

109.0
117.4

100.0
106.4

100.0
125.7

100.0
102.7

IOL 8
107.3

174.2
164.4

163.3
13L6

161.4
13L8

154.4
126. 4

133.6
135.0

136.6
135.0

138.6
14L6

146.5
141. 6

94.0
120.2

67.3
115.5

72.2
133.5

79.2
122. 6

68.3
110.3

70.3
105.1

86.1
97.7

70.3
8L9

70.3
75.3

70.3
77.5

80.2
82.4

63.0
68.6

68.1
68.0

75.2
8L2

86.1
84.1

87.5
83.6

75.9
.99.3

75.9
99.7

72.5
100.1

76.2
95..8

79.7
96.7

88.0
99.5

93.0
103.1

100.1
99. 7

109.6
98.4

112.8
98.4

104.7
94.6

IOL 8
106.2

129. 6^ 125. 0
110.8 114.8
152.1 153.8

12L8
116.2
153.8

107.0
102. 7
153.8

112.5
94.6
153.8

93.7
78.3
135.0

87.8
l:i2. 4

98.4
97.3
135. 0

95.9
135.0

112.5
105.4
128.2

142.0
121. 6
138.4

98.4
90.5
126.4

103.1
91.9
130.7

106.2
9L9
132.4

89.0
78.3
106.8

93.7
81.1
102.5

68.7
62.2
85.4

82.8
77.0
9L4

95.1
93.7

108.4
112.5

93. 9
102.5

77.1
96.2

90. .3
77.5

108.4
93.7

108.4
93: 7

110.8
93.7

98.7
106; 2

110.8

119.2

122.8

95. 0

139^7 104.8
141. 2- 100.0

162.2

170.1

164.5

13L3

107.5

112.3

103.7

IOL 2

145.3
19L4

136.5
178.5

154. 6'
182.8

145.5
166.4

144.1
169.2

139.5
165.7

147. 6
174. 2

116.2
164. 2

84.8
13L4

69.7
114; 2

63.9
116.4

74.4
117.8

67.6

in. 0

63 2
109.7

63.9
110.7

105.8
110.0

136.9
107.8

114.8
86.7

100.0
85.7

73.4
9L8

65.8
7L9

58.2
67.2

50.6
67.2

69.6
67.2

69.6
6L4

56.9
62.5

50.6
64.3

64.;

82.2
70.1

101.2
76.0

10:1 8
9L2

7-8.4
89.4

94.9
90.6

164.5
119.8

107.5
80.1

103. 8
78.9

63.2
67.8

59.4
73.1

75.4

IOL 7

47.8

48.8

107. 0
124.2
87.1

105.8
124.2
87.4

IOL 8
124.2
82.1

103.9
118.5
80.4

8L9
90.1
70.6

67.2
86.0
62.1

67.2
84.6
89.0

70.9
77.4
80.2

78.5
76.1
62.8

75.2
75.2
52.4

75.6
75.4
55.7

80.0
73.3
55.8

70.2
55.0

79.1
74.5
57.0

79.5
90.3
73.1

70". 9
76.7
70.0

64.8
75.4
54.8

58.1
76.1
46.4

53.5
56.4
46.6

113.5
13L4
93.1

IOL 6
11L2
•82.0

84.7
87.6
61.7

84.7
83.1
68.5

72.8
77.5
71.4

74.5
87.6
81.4

93.2
120. 2
157.1

93.2
106.7
122. 0

106.'^ 102.3
110.1 109.6
133. 4 . 132.2

114.2
121. 1
134.5

145. 0
131.6
150.5

141.0
OLO
11.5.1

103.0 130.5
84.7 I 115.0
98.0 121.4

94.9
87.8
80.5

9L.5
99. 394.2

^65.4
7L9
82.8

69.4
68.5
65.7

109.6

100.2

10 L.O

95. 3 i • 92. 6

128.1
125.7
153.8

112.-0
112.5

75.9

98. 9

50.1

4L8

92.6

8L9
106.2
105.8

Oo
tf^

X X V I . — T A B L E shoiving the PEBCENTAGE of YEABLY P B I C E S to the M E A N P B I C E of STAPLE ABTICLES in the N E W YOBK MABK E T from 182b to 188U, ^-c—Contiuned.
1844.
Flour:
Superfine
Western
Rve
C o r n raeal
Wheat:
Northern
AYesteru
Rye
Oats
Corn
"
B.Irl6 y . . . 'T
Candles:
Mold
'Coal:
Anthracite
Liverpool
Coffee:
Rio
Java
Copper:

i

. . .

.

.

1845.

1846.

1847.

1848.

1849.

1850.

1851.

1852.

1853.

1854.

1855.

1856.

1857.

1858.

1859.

'I860.

1861.

1862.

85.7

90.5

92.8

122. 7

109.4

82.7

IOL 8

82.9

9L8

106.0

164.1

160; 7

117.8

106.2

78.8

93.7

95.2

9L1

83.7

80.5
76.4

84.6
79.5

90.1
104,4

120.6
123.3

93.8
84.1

76.2
86.7

74.7
87.3

86.8
90.7

90.1
lOLO

103.7
100.7

146.6
117.6

166.5
136.6

98.8
104. 2

102.3
106.6

80.8
105.8

95.2
114.4

9L8
105.1

79.2
84.7

81 6
82 4

72.2

77.0

JO. 4

lOLl

87.1

9L9

94.5

79.6

81.9

103. 0

163. 8

180.5

130.0

124.1

98. 2~ , 106. 3

no. 8

105.6

96.1

85.0
72.7
7L4

86.2
93.9
86.9- • 90.3
78.2
97.1

124.6
112.1
122.1

92.5
94.7
90.7

,75.6
88.5
89.5

81.^4
98.4
89.2

91.9
99.5
88.1

102.6
98.4
96.4

115.8
108.6
101.4

150.5
123. 3
120.7

168.1
133.6
141. 4-

120.9
98.8
100. 7

118.3
120.3
115.7

90.6 107.6
102. 9'- 109.8
115.0 123.1

103.9
95.4
105.7

88.1
81.2
87.1

88 2
96 7
78 8

87.5
92.9

84.1
85.9

83.3
82.8

9L6
92.0

102.5
96.6

95.8
107.3

95.8
127.3

95.8
134. 9

96.6
121.1

IOL 6
97.5

120.8
90.1

123. 3
98.1

118.3
119.6

100.0
127.3

121.1

124. 8

115. 6

95.0

78 5

79.6
95:9

75.9
103.6

90.0
84.4

89.7
87.3

84.7
97.1

87.9"
92.3

90.1
92.5

82.1
82.7

85.6
89.0

90.0
107.2

108.7
124.4

100.0
92.6

108.1
86.9

96.1
85.6

82.2
8L0

83.5
88.7

86.8
98.7

82.5
68.9

79 1
59.5

"53.2
65.4

54.9
53.5

57.3
54.2

57.3
50.3

49.1 . 56.5
46.4
43.1

86."8
78.4

73.7
75.2

69.6
70.5

75.4
73.2

82.7
85.6

8L9
88.2

87.^7
92.8

90.1
100.6

84.4
103.2

9L8
94.7

110.6
IOL 3

112.2
114.3

159. 0
156.2

92.1

90.5

93.6

95.2

94.7

90.0

90.5

92.1

102.6

124.2

154.2

126. 3

13L5

130.0

122.1

Sheathing
Cotton
Fish:
Cod
Mackerel
Flax
Fiuits:

83.0
45.2

87.6
42.4

90.7
50.0

89.5
70.5

83.0
4L7

83.0
54.8

83.0
84.2

79.1
69.8

90.7
6L6

112.3
72.6

116.6
6L6

114.6
63.0

126.4
72.6

116. 2
95.9

100.3
89.0

100.7
78.0

lOLl
7L9

93.4
110.2

102.3
248.6

7L8
87.8

70.3
102.4

76.0
86.7

96.3
8L4

79.5
68.8

67.8
86^0

69.9
88.0

73.7
8L0

92.7
82.0

89.3
109.6

9L6
137. 9

103.3
163.8

103. 9
170.3

101. 6
167.1

90.9
95.2

110.7
129.8

93.8
136.2

82.1
94.8

92.2
110.2

no. b

Raisins
rig-a
Prunes
Furs, beaver
Gla«s .
.
Gunpowder:
Rifle
Eno"lish
Blasting...

96.9
104.5

105. 2
100.0
97.6
94.2

87.4
124.1
84.3
78.2

73.7
116.0

67.2
12L8

84.6
137. 9

109.7 . 86.5
202.3

93.3
83.7

90.0
123.7

96.7
118.1

102.0
116.6

103.3
144.. 3

150.0
174.0

100.0
97. 3

82.0
96.9

84.7
105.7

83.3
78.4

96.7
126. 7

69.2
75.8

69.2
75.8

69.2
75.8

69.2
69.2
75.8 • 75.8

69.2
75.8

6L5
7L2

4L7
7L2

40.1
7L2

43.7
72.2

54.9
79.1

34.4
80.3

39.8
77.4

33.8
77.4

33.8
77.4

39.9
68.7

7L3
160.0

62.8
157.8

62.8
159.4

62.8
159.4

62.8
159.4

62.8
159.4

60.4

60.0

75.2

102. 0

122.8

120.8

12L2

117.1

117.1

130. 2

116.7

113.0

96.6

99. i

102.6

109.0

Bolts

'.. .1




;

92.3
7L2
88.5
168.5

62.8
159.4

62.8
159.4

....

00
'h-^

X X V I . — T A B L E shoiving the PEBCENTAGE OF YEABLY P B I C E S fo the M E A N P B I C E of STAPLE ABTICLES in the N E W YOBK MABK E T from i82b to 1880, ^-e.-Continned.

\
Hemp:
Dressed
.
Undressed . . .

1844.

.

1847.

1848.

1849.

1850.

1851.

1852.

1853.

1854,

1855.

1856.

1857.

1858.

1859!

1860.

1862.

1861.
c

<=>

.--

70.3
70. L
48. 0
86.2

66.8
69.7
63.6
"84.3" 109.5
-80.0
69.8

66.8
67.0
54.7
82.8

52.9
50.6
27.9
73.2

58.1
53.9
49.1
74.3

72.6
68.8
77.0
78.7

79.0
75.3
209.5
8L7

85.4
75.9
170. 9
8L7

1017
97.4
140.8
84.5

123.2
103.9
187.8
9L9

124.4
115. 5
106.7
93.0

155.2
140.9
43.0
92.8

190,1
172.7
48.6
86.2

142.2
130.5
36.3
82.8

148.2
147.4
65.9
97.0

136.6
134.4
73.7
95.3

113.3
107.1
114.5
99.3

125.5
122. 7
8L0
116.2

94.6
90.0

109. 7
109.4

no. 4

99.5
106.0

84.0
86.6

70.4
69.1

64.5
6L5

61.5
53.5

65.6
58.4

99.7
95.6

llLl
104.3

83.0
86.2

93.6
87.1

89.9
82.3

70.7
76.1

73.0
66.7

67.9
62.2

64.2
64.4

66.3
"76.4

98.4
76.8

92.0
63.3
7L4

9L2
91.2
78.0
8L0
63.0 • 77.3

92.0
78.6
67.5

102. 3 ' 107.1 107.1
85.5
8 8 . 5 - 88.1
7L4
76.8
77.4

85.7
88.8
74.9

88.8
125. 5
911

100.0
126. 8
103.4

126. 2
121. 0
110.8

12L4
13L9
125.6

95.2
132.0
13L0

95.2
107.0
113. 3

84.9
107.0
120.7

104.7
107.0
105.9

127.7
103.4
96.0

108.0
117.3
100 0

84.2
88.0

915
.. 85. 0

96.,5
80.0

9.5.8
104.0

89.5
88.5

88.9
88.5

9L9
93.3

93.2
86.0

94.9
83.0

162.9
90. 4

183.0
118.,4

208.3
139.1

214.8
120.0

21L4
100. 0

165.8
82.1

168.7
97.7

187.8
8L9

19L2
66.-8

177.5
91.8

73.7
96.3
93.5

68.7
78.0
9L6

73.2
74.7
71. 7

83.6
74.7
83. 2

60.8
79.9
70.6

64.5
80.7
78.6

67.0
78.4

8o:i'

76.1
7L4
74.4

72.4
89.7
70. 6

70.7
814
80.1

60.8
92.0
"85.1

75.6
89.7
103. 8

126.5
7L4
107.6

162. 5
60.1
152. 6

96.3
78.0
86.2

96.7
73.0
87.8

115.3
96.3
82: 0

98.0
113.3
83; 9

91 8
112.3
*94;2-

104.6
119. 5
70.8
23.1

104.6
119. 5
88.7
22.9

104.6
119.5
97.9
2L9

104.6
130.4
84.9
2L4

104.6
110.8
lO.'l
28.3

93.0
97.8
70.0
33.8

81. 4
97.8
66.5
38.9

8L4
97.8
73.'5
83.3

74.4
76.0
92.4
112.7

106. 9'
92.3
124.5
127. 2

95.3
lOLO
115.3
112.7

93.0
8L4
103. 2. 70.6
86.7
82.2
104.6 129.4

76.7
64.1
95.0
190.6

69.7
5L1
95.0
178.5

69.7
39.1
97.3
149.3

69.7
4.5.6
86.7
103.6

69.7
45.6
177.5
168.8

62.7
41.3
316.1
420.6

86.6
87.4
80.3
...
7L7
116.7

80.2
86.8
80.6
85.9
93; 0

78.3
88.4
8L2
83.1
93.7

84.0
103.6
96.2
110.0
83.2

77.4
103.2
97.4
100.7
74.0

94.0
106.7
99.4
88.3
80,3

115.4
114.8
105.0
88.9
99.0

109.7
110.9
110.5
8L2
93.3

163.6
123.5
in. 9
99.1
8o;3

138.1
127.3
115.2
117.5
82.6

138.1
151.1
136.2
118.5
97.8

169.0
189. 4
17L3
112.8
107.8

187.0
176. 3
16L9
114.2
108.4

172.6 127.4
136.1 116.7
127. 5 i n . 3
119.0 .
98.6
96.5
80.0

122.6
129.3
118.1
105.7
76.3

115.5
137.1
128.4
119.0
72.8

106.0 124.0
126.9 1 2 L 9
130. 9 • 143.7
107.1 110.8
74.4 100.2

74.7

74.7

74.7

. 74.7

74.7

84.9

88.2

74.7

74.7

98.6

105.2

100. 1

105.2

95.0

95.0

84.9

84.9

94.4

114.3
12L5

110.1
105.1

120.9
115.9

106.8
97.8

72.9
77.1

•.. -

..

.
...

...

Nails:

Cut
•
Wrousrht
Turpentine
Rosin
Oil:
Whale
Summer sperm
W^inter s p e r m
Olive
•.
Linseed
Paint:
Red lead.
W h i t e lead
Petroleum:
Crude
Refined
Pork:
Mess
FRASER
Prime ....r

1846.

-

Hides:
South America
Hops
Indigo
.......
Iron:
Scotch
English
Sheet
. .
Russia
L e a d , nisr
Leather
Liquors:
Brandy
Whisky
. "^
Molasses:
N e w Orleans
Sugar-house
...
West India

1845.

. .....

Digitized for


114. 8

97.3

...

62.5
64.1

83.7
84,3

72.4
77.7

97.0
100.0

74.7
73.9

72.5
78:4

7L4
74.3

94.2
100.7

115. 6
136.2

108.2
119. 6

92.6
104.8

108.0
144.4

124.8
142.2

147.2
16L9

OO'
05

Beef:
Mess
Prime
Hams
;
Shoulders
Lard
Butter
Cheese..
Rice
Salt:
Liverpool
Turk's Island
Seeds:
- ---^
Clover
Timothy........
Soap:
Brown
•
...-.
Castile
Spices:
Pepper
.Nutmeg
.Spirits:
Jamaica
Gin . . .
...:
Sugar:
N e w Orleans
Cuba
Loaf
Tallow:
Araerican
Foreign ......
Tea:
Young Hyson
Souchong...
Imperial;
Tobacco:
K e n t u c k y ..'.
Manufactured
Whalebone
Wine:
T>nrt
Madeira
Claret
Wool:
Common . . .
Merino
Pulled
Average




...

58.7
57.5

85.5
83.6
84.2

78.0
83.2
80.0

118.4
129.3
113.6

102.2
90.7
82.1

120.9
133.4
89.4

94.0
90.9
84.2

90.6 110.9
79.9 .- 83.9
85.2
96.8

62.6
56.5
56.1
65.7

80.2
77.1
82.9
82.7

73.6
74.2
82.9
79.3

104.3
82.4
9L4
9L4
84.1^ .8L7
68.8
89.5

714
85.7
6U. 9
64.3

70.3
86.2
7.5.,6
69.1

89.0
81.1
69.5
65.6

96.4

94.0
in. 6

9L9
98.2

93.0 . 95.4
89.2
75.0

88.5
72.0

93.6
69.6

9L9
66.9

82.3
63.9

88.0
86.1

77.1
8L8

8L5
92.3

75.0
in. 7

67.3
114. 2

65.2
117.1

73.9.
115. 3

92.3
110.7

96.4
83.5

134. 5
74.3

87.2
79.8

80.0
IOL 8

95.0
98.1

81.8
88.1

8L8
82.5

100.0
96.2

99.0
113.1

99.0
115.5

63.3
123.1

53.4
110.8

.59.4
89.2

107.5
106.2

114.2
107.1

112. 8
112.7

116.6
118.3

129. 6
114.9

' 8 0 . 9 • 90.0
83.8
79.7
94.0
97.4

98.4
114.8
94.0

IOL 5
104.0
85.4

. 96.9
83.4
92.6

113.2
102.0
80.0

118.7, 97.9
139.1 1 2 1 3
95.7
94.7

128. 0
147.9
110.5

108.5
114.3
88.4

78.5
95.1
9L5

53.5
65.0
lOLO

109.8 115.3
109.7 102.8
.85.3 103.6
8 0 . 6 , 85.4

106.5
in. 4
115.8
95.2

113.1
124.5
115.8
98.0

126. 3
123.4
103.6
90.4

149.4
122. 8
114.6
94.2

112.0
105.7
82.9
70.8

117.5
108.5
101. 2
79.5

95. 4
119. 5
88. 5

85. 7
87. .8
109. 0

88.0
80.4
138.0

92.3
lOLl

109.4 - - 7 L 0
136.9 .132.4

63.4
86.9

54.7
65.7

44.9
55.0

56.9
55.0

62.1
55. 0

50.1
59: 8

66.9
74." 7

86.9
110.2

105.4
109.2

103.2
113.1

118.4
105.0

143.4
1211

125. 0
13L7'

90.2
82.2

94.5
•87.8

84.7
119.2

84.7
96.4

76.0
62.9

8L8
82.5

87.2
85.3

109.1
98.1

109.1
98.1

103.6
96.3

103. 6
94.5

100.0
IOL 8

100.0
103.6

103.6
84.4

118.1
78. 0

100. 0
99.1

87.2
112.8

73.8
103.2

84.7
94,6

89.1
85.5

103.9
98.4

102.9
102.1

104. 9
89.3

106.9
84.3

in. 8

811
53.7

8L1
47.1

71. 2
4'0.7

80. 2
4L3

133.6
58.8

118. 0
105.3

109.6
93.6

IOL 8
78.9

105.0
74.5

98.0
IOL 9

113.8
116.6

130.7
119.2

129.0
134. 4

105.0
85.8

96.6
8L9

98. 7
78. 0

98. 0
93. 2

104.8
127. 9

59.3
90.5
68.3

73.4
93.2
72.6

79.6
100. 0
, 81.1

'80.9
IOL 2
76.9

67.1
94.6
68.3

73.4
97.3
,70.9

73.4
90.5
76.9

87.5
97.3
73.5

12L8
132.4
9L4

137.4
in. 8
156.2
159.4
107.6

IOL 5
117.5
85.4

98.4
118.9
8L1

107. 0
93.7
1 1 4 . 8 ] 102.7
8 3 . 7 ^ 68.3

12L8
12L.6
86.3

120. 4 1 106. 0 "98.7

58.6
69.9
65.2

71.6
76 8
50.5

•..

'.

'...

69.7

i23. 6 1 98. 9" 80.2

79.5
93.7

80.7
93.7

86.7

104. 8

96.3

- 90.3

8L9

80.7

97.5

106.0

139.7

140.9

132. 5

128.9

112.0

126.5

105. 8

104.9

102.2

9L7

85.5

83.7

87.4

90.4

89.0

79.°3

74.9

64.9

66.1

74.0

62.6

40.0

.44.0

75.8

95.7

86.0
90.0

84.8
96.0

90.6
9L4

130.2
80.0

62.7
70.7

80.6
73.5

93.0
83.5

79.7
82.1

70.9
77.1

62.7
62.1

53.4
34.2

48.8
32.1

4L1
34.4

66.7
47.4

6L6
4L4

68. 6
.4L1

69.7
46.4

62.7
67.8

90.2
96,4

50.6
73.1

56.9
73.1

59.4
73.1

60.7
76.6

67.0
78.9

77.2
8L8

103.8
122.8

102.5
149.1

82.2
114.0

88.6
118.1

101. 2
108.1

118.9
115. 2

139.2
128.6

178. 4
161. 9

132.9
140.3

in. 3
134.5

102.5
115.2

115.1 154.4
140. 3 . 219.2

102.0

88.4

85.2

76.9

64.1

80;9

85.7

86.4

135.3

90.2

ioi 7

142.1

233. 0

225.5

199.2

204.2

174.1

66. 3
73.1
69.4

59.6
65.2
82.2

69.1
70.0
80.4

93.2
8L5
94.2

92.0
82.6
102.9

92.0
85.1
85.9

76.4
85.1
85.9

8L6
85.8
85.9

84.0
85.8
85.9

84.4
86.7
85.9

102.4
96.6
120.0

135.1
105.2
158.4

171. 2
129.4
182.7

183.4
152.4
182.7

180.4
148. 5
207.1

178.8
158.0
19L 9

180.4 " 1 7 L 2
166.4 191.9
19L9 19L9

148J

. . . . . . . . . 101.6
. . . . 89.8
9L4

9L5
78.8
84.8

79.6
72.5
67.4

88.8
79.1
80.0

88.4
77.0
74.2

98.9
8L1
78; 8

110.5
89.8
92.8

120.3
9.5.5
99.1

108.4
89.2
93.4

138.9
112. 3
114. 2

109.8
94.6
88.0

l.OLO
83.1
•71. 4

113.5
100.2
88.8

124.7
110.1
93.7

IOL 6
87.6
70.8

128.8
91.4

124.4
112. 3
84.0

110.1
96.6
75.7

149.4
104.9
103.4

82.7

86. 3

85.7

. 92.6

82.8 ^ 83.5

88.9

89.3

9L9

99.4

107.0

111. 1

112.2 -119.8

99.7

100.6

100.3

98.0

in. 6

.v....

.

no. 5

186.9
5
169.4
169.4

X X V I . — T A B L E showing the PEBCENTAGE of YEABLY P B I C E S to IU M E A N P B I C E of STAPLE ABTICLES in the NEW YOBK MAltK E T fo^om 182b to 1880, cfc—Continned.

Flour:
Superfine
VV e s t e r n
B,ye
Corn meal
Wheat:
Northern
W estern
Rye
Oats
Corn
Candles:
Moid

....

-:

...

.

Coal :^^ "^
Anthracite
Liverpool
Coffee:
Rio
Java
Copper:

.

,

Bolts
Sheathing
.
Cotton
Fish:
Cod
Mackerel
Flax
. . . .
Fruits:
Almonds . . .
Figs
Prunes.
Furs, beaver
Glass
Gunpowder:
Rifle
English
Blasting

.

......

1873.^ 1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

96.1 IOL 4
99.4 107.1
118. 0 .110.0
106. 5 . 93.0

94.1
103.5
120.9
86.9

84.6
89.6
119. 4
110.2

78.5
83.2
100.8
102.1

72.0
83.2
100.5
75.0

99.1

no. 4
106. 883.0

72.0
83.2
77.9
7L0

7.5.3
74.7
72.7
7L6

75.9
81.4
90.4
82.4

"88.5
76.7
in. 9
119.4
121.1
90.9

104. 0
106.2
112.6
122. 8
97.2
92. 9

117.4
116. 6 .
103. 0
97.7
86.7
83.4

116.3
114.6
106.0
98.4
78.5
119.4

lOLO
lOLl
115.6
154.2
115.1
164.5

90.4
87.8
84.0
82.6
106.9
89.8
124. 9 82.6
100.2
7.3.1
127.3
93.2

119.1
in. 8
95.7
97.0
83.2
65.2

92.0
87.8
80.7
75.0
73.2
50.2

90.6
88.0
80.0
88.1
70.0
72.1

92.8
94.6
117. 6
100.2
78.1
81.6

104.6

68.9

102.0

68.0

68.6

80.2

79.1

53.1

55.8

45.5

64.3

98.3
109.1

76.2
113.0

109. 0
119.6

120.4
119.6

14L8
123. 5

143.4
128.7

16L4
150. 3

131.1
147.7

l l 4 . 7 • 129. 5. 110.6
122.8 147. 0 145.0

120.4
156.8

104.9
14L1

8L5
88.0
132.1

86.3
94.2
153.4

93.1
99.2
126.7

99.3
105.0
109.5

132.1
143.6
126.0

126.7
137. 4
113.0

lOLO
93.4
IOL 3

89.3
97.3
89.0

98.0
107.3
7L9

lOLO
106.5
76.0

94.8
99.6
73.2

85.9
89.1
78.0

102.7
108.1
82.8

132.4. 126.6
113. 5 122.9
1 0 1 4 102.9

150. 5
166.6
114.6

159.6
180.8
92.7

139. 4
112.4
96.3

137. 4
97.1
106.5

143. 3^ 128.4
128. 0 103.9
108.7 104.3

146.2
123.1
92.7-

155. 9
137.6
9L2

162. 5 152.1
159. 4 151. 2
104. 3* 108,0

142.0
158.1

161,4
140.2

1863.

186L

1865.

1866.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

7L9
80.8
74.7
88.5

72.7
70.4
95.7
1011

89.9
96.5
107, 6
110.6

103.2
125.7
108.8
99.0

121 7
143.0
1414
128. 0

79.0
103.9
116. 6.
84.5
149.1 108.1
124.8 108.2

80.3
82.7
115. 3
129. 0

83.6

70.8
.76.7
97.4
104.3
105.5
90.8

IOL 7
97.6
95.4
107.3
112.2
97.2

154.9
130.9
93.8
86.9
9L7
82.7

152.6
126. 9
135. 0
124.2
125.1
93.0

134.8
170. 0
13L 4
120.8
162. 2

92.0
84.4
122. 9
125. 4
108.8
133.8

93.9
65.2

77.6

114.2

106.4

82.^0

87.1

170. 4
164.0

167. 2
152.9

127.0
125,4

119.6
121. 5

109.8
116.9

110.4
350.6

94.8
105.8
382.1

108.5
134.7
257. 5

112.6
127.0
193.1

914
100.0
134.9

99.6
57.1
79.5

143.9
97. 5
96.3

134.2
112.5
105.8

92.3
121. 0
87.5

in. 8




fej

o
O

106.0
120.3
118.4

...

QO

1880.

78.5

107.2
98.0

..

1872.

OO-

65.9

,

.<.

t

58.6
79.7

66.3

IOL 7

112.4

113. 0

103.6

13L1

158.9

163.5

168.7

-^

197.7

213.4

211. 7

220.2

196.1

165.8

18L0

16L2

108.9

92.3

125. 9

125.7

114.4

104.3

in, 7

123. 0

117.6

119.'9

88.7

125.9

97.9

no. 8

117.7

124. 6

129.1

137.1

93.3

91.5

133.8

120.5

161.9

96.4

95.0

98.4

84.8

V 93.6

i62.9 i63.3

77.9

82.2

94.9

98.6

99.4

99.4

W

fej

fej
Ul

Hemp:
Dressed
Undressed
Russia
,
Hides:
South AmericaMexico
Hops
Indigo
Iron:
Scotch
;
English
Sheet
Russia
Lead, pig
Leather
Liquors:
Brandy
Whisky
Molasses:
N e w Orleans
Sugar-house
West India
Naila:
Cut
Wrought
-^..
Turpentine
Rosin
Oil:
Whale
Summer sperm..
W i n t e r sperm ..
Olive
Linseed
Paint:
Red lead
W h i t e lead
P e t J oleum:
Crude
Refined
PorkMess-Prime.
Beef:
Mess.:
Prime...'.
Hams
Shoulders
,
Lard
,
Butter
Cheese:
Rice




127.0
12L5
84.2

73.8
OLO
117. 9

94.9
84.1
142.5

119.1
129. 0
119.4

128.7
140.0
120.9

106.8
100.2
94.7

109.6
107. 6
89.9

120. 2
120.7
lOLl

119.5
112.7
97.4

97.9
87.8
91.0

90.1
77.6
89.7

89.7
94.7
95.2

95.2
100. 7
90.3

84.1
83.3
86.-1

83.4
91.8
92.2

8.3,2
93.6
94.3

75.8
92.6
92.4

114.4
107.8
84.3
87.1

•90.6
97.4
69.8
•78.0

912
90.9
127. 9
94.7

8L4
78.5
193.8
80.7

87.8
90.2
230. 7
68. 9

.86.0
95.4
149.7
67.4

97.6
106. 5
64.2
76.6

115.1
127.9
82.1
103.3

132.0
139.0
80.4
113.9

138.3
151. 3
251.9
100.7

133.1
148. 7
215.6
79.3

131. 4
140.9
142.4
7.6.5

1.14. 5
122.0
83.2
69.8

102.9
107.8
97.7
73.3

123.8
127.2
63.7
79.3

117.4
119.4
58.6
82.5

140.1
146.7
153.6
85.1

122.6
127. 2 .
110.0
85.1

73.9
74.4

75.5
113.5

94.1
120.9

99.7
115.2

90.4
155. 4

85.4
93.0

87.7
97.9

86.7
97.3

87.4
92.8

125. 3
129. 7

130. 0
114.0

110.3-

86.0

74.7

75.0

70.0

78.3

70.7

95.2
113.0
98.5

123. 8
90.1

133.7
113.3

107.1
120. 2

9L9
108.8

89.2
.99.0

93.1
110.8

105.2
149.7

106.3
125.6

109.7
124.1

113.5
120. 7

112.7
122.1

96.0
115.2

108.8
• 97. 0

98.9
110.3

69.1
99.0

96.4
113.8

79.5
104.4

115.1
99.6
119.0

179.4
90.0
108.4

170. 5
103. 0
113.3

152: 3
92.3
126. 0

147.1
88.0
117.1

148.8
123.0
1313

179.1
127. 9
1114

125. 0
126. 9
106.8

144. 9
149.8
94.6

149.8
15L1
93.9

170.0
141. 2
94.6

130.7

12L8

133.0

9L8

145.3

88.3

95.3

302.4
593.0

216.1
267. 4

122.2
96.7

94.3
92.3

76.7
67.6

7L8
57.6

76.3
58.2

100.4
92.5

114.5
119. 0

90.2
93.0

73.6
73.2

76.7
47.8
63.8
55.0

72.0
46.7
64.7
58.4

69.7
46.7
70.2
6L7

100.0
60.8
78.1
52.6

72.0
48.9
62.8
46.8

150.5

124.8

124 1

122. 4

122. 2

102. 6

85.4

7L2

179.3
130.0
84.1
130.2
97.3.
79.0
434.5
653.0
157.3
108.4
114.0
117.0
118.5
100.6

49.0
54.7
-57. 8
76.9
86.2
97.5
90.9

83.7

104.1

65.1
47.8
6u. 0
49.7

80.6
10.5. 6
96.9

158. 0
111.8

120. 7
140.1

111.0
115.7

154.0
98.4

112. 8
94.7

114.3
10L2

102. 6
94.4

109.5
93.7

100.3
93.9

99.1

96.9
73.4

104.6
64.3

107: 3
76.1

108.1.
74.9

94.485.6

100.6
83.3

115.5
85.2

132.6
106.3

122.4
120.2

114.8
108.0

106.7
98.7

110.8
104.'6

114. 7
103.8

109.8
106.2

107.7
106.3

108.6
105.8

109.9
106.4

98.7
99.2

100.0
98.3

106.1
96.9

120.8
84.1

89.1
92.1

107.3
77.5

165.8
152.0

216.6
218.5

159.1
194.1

10.5. 9
145.7

115.0
115.8

14L6
109.5

13L6
102. 7

105.8
99.5

128.3
95.9

60.8
74.2

45.0
55.6

4.5.8
50.6

93.3
•95.8

70.0
67.4

51.6
47.9

30.8
40.7

39,2
36.1

lOLl

127.8

82.6

99.0

77.1

83.9

;8.2

54. 0

102. 6

125.0

135. 0

120.1

92. 3

117. 6

114.4

62.5

105. 7

102.4

104. 7

132. 8

108.6

115.8

82.1
89.0
912
106.8
100. 0
117. 4

128.4
135.6
145.0
110.2
123.1
1677 2

127.3
147.9
137.3
134. 2
152.4
197.5

105.2
100.0
102.1
88:5
134.1
170.0

117.8
112.3
127. 4
126.2
124.3
158.5

146.3
145.2
•150. 5
110.2
150.0
1419

16L0
146. 5
150.5
114. 8
156.1
14L8

115.7
83.5
108.7
92.0
120.7
163. 7

103.1
72.6
87.9
86.2
129. 2
168.4

131. 5
86.3
80.2
104.0
137. 8
160.8

109.4
93.1
115.3
145.1
130.5
156.3

112.6
109.5
13L8
108. 0
114.6
140.4

117.8
95.8
104.3
116. 5
114.6
114.6

98.9
67.1
87.6
75.8
97.8
137.1 133.1
1 4 1 4 120.7
126.0" 133.4

97.8
78.0
8.5.7
186.8
136.5
143,4

88.4
67.1
7L4
13L 4
92.6
143.0

112. 7

158.6

108.6

X X V I . — T A B L E showing the PEBCENTAGE of YEARLY P B I C E S to the MEAN P B I C E of STAPLE ABTICLES in the N E W YOBK MAB
K E T from 182b to 1880, ^"C—Continned.

OO

to

o

1863.

1864.

1865.

1866.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

"1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

:.

69.3
8L2

87.4
99.1

9L1
103.2

90.7
102.9

97.4
109. 2

103.7
98.8

95.5
104.7

140." 3
103. 5

152.9
118.4

145.7
114.8

12L6
92.2

68.9
77.6

57.1
66.6

54.9
72.6

50.2
80.6

44.6
78.2

50; 6
85.7

41 1
90. 7

...

70.6
57.9

90.2
72.3

158.6
112.1

93.4
120.0

105.4
8L0

95.6
69.6

1119
109.5

126.0
176.7

104.3
143. 8

95.6
108.4

86.9
115.9

96.7
96.4

109.7
81.3

146.7
69.5

132.6
59.6

79.3
45.9

83.6
96.7

77 1
62.7

1880.

Salt:
Turk's Island'
Seeds:
Timothy
Soap:
Castile
Spices:
Pepper
Nutme"' "
Spirits:
Jamaica
Gin
Sugar:
N e w Orleans
Cuba
Loaf
Tallow: .
Araerican

103.6
.

.

182.1
55.2

.

^

134.1
178.0

.

•

115.6
97.3
85.4

116.2
84.6

123.0
99.1

100.0
9L4

102. 7
89.7

105.4
89.7

112.1
95.7

106.7
94.0

105.4
95.7

100.0
89.7

94.6
77.7

J9.4

94.6

94.6
74.3

110.8
79.4

114.8
82.9

92.7

90.3

1-04. 8

104,8

98.7

103.6

102.4

100.0

97.5

97.5

87.9

86.7

95.1

89.1

79.1" 112. 6
99.6 130.2
109.5 137.6

115.1
148.8
150.4

110.9 .118.1
140.2 137. 8
164.4 164. 8.

127.6
129.2
157.9

129.4
132.2
170.0

75.4
116.7
143. 7

72.4
97.5
12L3

86.0
76.6
94.8

79.1
lOLl
90.4

76.8
68.2
90.6

165.8

149:3

120.2

110.1

100. 0'

94.9

102.5

96. 2

135.4

134.1

122.7

82.0

99.7

83.2

62.8

76.0

85.2

88.8

98.^4

119.5

108.1

89.9

85.7
157. 6
115. 5 "'98.'2' 115.2
115.1 123. 7 139.1

82.0
106.2
118.0

78.9
99.5
104.8

72.5
92.3
9.5.1

75.9
100.4
94.2

66.4
108.3
98.0

95.9
120. 6
105.4

105.4
14L7
16L7

93.8
113.2
122.0

110.1

119.1

113.0

107.6

108.2

118.1

108.1

112.6

107.6

97.3 102.7
7 5 . 2 . 76.9

94 6
73.5

90.3

83.1

74.7

75.9

58.5
72.2
99.0

62.0
78.1
105. 3

45.5
6L3
80.0

55.2
53.7
73.2

41.2
55.5
75 "8

149.3 -124. 0

124.0

89.8

IOL 2

97 4

107.9

118.0

121. 5

116.2

120.7

122 4

88.1
115.9
119.1

85.0
109.4

no. 8

76.9
89.6
89.1

87.1
109.6
103.4

8L6
93.4
96.0

110.5
1.16. 8
118.2

86.1
93 0
99.7

106. 8

98.3

94.2

98.0

88.0

94.7

90. 3

Tea:
68.2
Souchon sr

94.6
62.8

..

Tobacco:
Kentucky
Havana
Whalebone
Wine:
Port
Madeira
Claret
Wool:
Common

182. 2
23L5
267.9

..

Pulled
Average



-

..

129. 7
132.2
175.2

119.4

123.0

S2r

DI1RECT0R OF T H E MINT.

X X V l l . — T A B L E comparing the PEBCENTAGE of YEABLY GOLD and CUBBENCY P B I C E S to the MEAN GOLD P B I C E S of STAPLE ABTICLES in the
N E W YOBK MABKET for 56 years from 1825 to 1880, with the CIBCULATION
and its BATIO to the POPULATION and WEALTH of the UNITED STATES as
estimated for each year from the CENSUS BETUBNS of 1850, I860., 18,70, and 1880.
Percentage to
mean g o l d
price
for
56 y e a r s of
yearly— ,

R a t i o of total,
circulation

Circulation,
millions.

to—

Years.

1825.
18261827 .
1828182918301831.
1832 .
18331834 18351836 18371838183918401841.
18421843.
1844 .
1845.
184618471848.
18491850.
1851.
1852.
1853.
1854.
1855.
1856 1857.
1858.
1859.
1860.
•1861 1862.
1863 .
18641865.
18661867.
1868 .
1869.
1870.
1871.
1872.
1873.
18741875.
18761877.
1878 .
1879.
1880-

104.
102.
101.
98.
96.
92.
97.
99.
96.
109.
104.
101.
108.!
95.;
92.1
8L(
80. (
82.'
86.;
85.'
92. <
82.1

91.
99.
107.
111.
112.
119.
99.
100.
100.
98.
126.
173.
223.
193.
167.
156.
150.
143.
135.
120.
126.
122.
118.
112.
105.
102.

90.;

104.4
102.2
IOL 2
98.9
96.6
92.6
97.4
99.0
96.1
88.6
99.1
109. 6
100.2
101. 0
108.8
95.3
92.6
8L0
80.0
82.7
86.3
85.7
92.6
82.8
83.5
88.9
89.3
9L9
99.4
107.0

in.i

112.2
119.8
99.7
100.6
100.3
98.0
in. 6
119.4
110.1
123.0
119.1
113.0
107.6
108.2
118.1
108.1
112.6
107.6
106.8
98.3
94.2
98.0
88.0
94.7
90.3

$1917
20
22
22
25
32
33
35
41
57
64
73
77
92

84
103
102
125
120
134
172
205
228
266
295
295
315
287
307
280
248
310
341
336
269
248
216
206
156
159
169
139
140
Xl71
157
186
246
328
399
502

95
104
140
149
116
135
107
107
84
59
75
90
•106
106
129
115
131
155
170
196
205
187
196
215
155
193
207
202
218
539

945
858
757
752
743
746
751
749
778
783
763
714
690
687
705

121
136
161
204
222
193
227
195
196
168
142
178
192
204
204
254
235
265
327
375
424
471
482
491
530
442
500
487
450
528
880
972
1,157
L193
L074
963
908
902
915
890

940
949
960
1,018
1,086
1,207

1 L 2 $3, 273
11. 5
3, 377
1L9
3, 484
12.2 -3,594
12.5
3, 708
12.9
3, 825
13.3
3,946
13.6
4, 071
14.0
4,200
14.4
4,333
14.8
4,470
15.2
4,612
15.7
4, 759
16.1
4,900
16.6
5, 066
17.1
5, 226
17.6
5., 392
18.2
5, 563
18.7
5;, 739
19.3
51922
19.9
6,109
20.5
6,302
2L2
6, 501
2L8
6,707
22.5
6,918
23.2
7,136
24.0
7,981
24.8
8,838
25.7
9.708
26.5 10, 591
27.3 11, 488
28.1 12, 396
28.9 13, 318
29.8 14, 252
30.6 15, 200
3 L 5 16,160
32.1 17, 013
32.7 17, 906
33.4 18, 838
34.1 19, 809
34.8 20, 820
35.5 21, 869
36.3 22, 958
37.0 24, 086
37.8 25, 253
38.6 126. 460
39.6 27, 851
40.6 29,308
4 L 7 30, 831
42.8 32, 420
44.0 34, 074
45.2 35, 794
46.4 37, 579
47.6 39, 430
48.9 41, 347
50.2 43, 300

6.66
8.64
9.44
10.87
13.42
14.14
11.98
13.67
1L40

n.i3
9.23
7.59
9.22
9.64
9.95
9.62
1L65
10.44
1L42
13.62
15.12
16.50
17.77
17. 65
17.47
18.33
14.83
16.33
15.46
14.01
16.14
26.34
28. 50
33.24
33.60
29.58
26.02
24.02
23.36
23.10
2L92
2L32
22.17
2L36
20.99
20.68
2L38
22.20
24.04

,29.2
.3L3
, 36. 0
,44.2
,46.6
,39.4
.44.8
.37.3
,36.3
.30.2
,24.7
.30.0
.3L4
.32.3
.3L3
.37.8
.33.9
. 37.1
.40.9
.42.4
.43.6
.44.4
.4L9
,39.6
.39.8
.3L0
.32.9
. 30.1
.26.4
.29.5
.46.7
.49.0
.55.5
.54.5
.46.7
.40.0
.35.9
. 34. 0
.32.8
. 30. 3
.28.8
.29.2
.27.5
. 26.'5
. 25. 5
.25.8
.26.2
.27.9

* E s t i m a t e d for 1825 t o 1850 frora c e n s u s r e t u r n s of 1850 a n d official v a l u a t i o n of houses, l a n d s , a n d
s l a v e s i n 1815, vide P i t k i n s S t a t i s t i c s , p . 313.
f R e d u c e d t o gold v a l u a t i o n .

21 F



322

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

X X V I l l . — T A B L E comparing the BATIOS of CIBCULATION to P O P U L A T I O N and
WEALTH with the CUBBENCY and GOLD P B I C E S of STAPLE ABTICLES in
the N E W YOBK M A B K E T for years named, taking the BATIOS and P B I C E S of
1850 as 100.
P e r c e n t a g e to aver. a g e p r i c e s of 1850 of
yearly a v e r a g e -

P e r c e n t a g e of r a t i o
of c i r c u l a t i o n t o —

1850
1851
1852 . . 1
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
X869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878 .
1879
1880

.•

' '.

.
:
.

.
i

Population,

$1,000 of
wealth.

100.0
119.2
132.4
144.4
155. 6
154.5
152.9
160,5
129.8
143. 0
135.3
122.6
14L3
230.6
249.5
291. 0
294.2
259.0
227.8
210.3
204.5
202.2
19L9
186.7
194.1
187. 0
183.8
18L0
187.2
194. 2
210.5

100.0
110.2
114.2
117.5
119.6
112.9
106.7
107. 2
83.5
88.6
8L1
7L1
79.5
125.8
i32.0
149.5
146.9
125.8
107.8
96.7
9L6
88.4
8L6
77.6
78.7
74.1
7L4
68,7
69.5
70.6
75.2

Currency
prices.
100.0
114.7
123.3
130.9
137.6
133.7
129.8
133.8
106.6
115.8
108.2
96.8
110.4
178.2
190.7
220.2
220.5
192. 4
167.8
J 53. 5
148. 0
145. 3
136.7
132,1
136.4
130. 5
127.6
124.8
128.3
132.4
142.8

100.0
100.4
103.3
in. 8
120.3
125.0
126.2
134.7
112.1
113.1
112.8
110.2
142.1
194.9
25L7
217.5
188.7
175.6
169.0
161. 8
152.5
135.7
142.2
137.6
133.5
138.2
118.1
115.5
99.7
106.5
101.5

Gold
prices.
100.0
100.4
103.3
111.8
120.3
125.0
126. 2
134 7
112.1
113.1
112.8
110,2
125.5
134.3
123.8
138.3
134.0
127. L
1210
121.7
132.8
121.6
126.6
121.0
120.1
110.5
106.0
110.;2
98.9
106.5
101. 5

NOTE.—Many documents relating to monetary statistics of foreign countries are
omitted for want of space, but they may be found in tbe volumes of tbe Director's
report.




REPORT OF THE FIRST COMPTROLLER.




323




i

REPORT
OP T H E

FIRST COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
F I R S T COMPTROLLER'S O F F I C E ,

Waslmigton, October 22, 1881.
S I R : In compliance with the request made in your letter of September
30, 1881, I have the honor to submit the following report of the transactions of this office during the fiscal year which ended June 30, 1881.
The following-described Warrants were received, examined, countersigned, entered into blotters, and posted into ledgers under their proper
heads of appropriations:
Number
of warrants.

Kind.

Amounts covered thereby.

APPKOPRIATION.

Treasury proper
Publicdebt
Diplomatic ^nd consular
Customs
Internal revenue
Interior civil
Indians and pensions
War
Navy

54, 032,021
248, 722,325
1,193, 835
15,327, 045
5, 034,488
9, 832,622
32, 765,740
45, 492,539
16,137, 139

.....^

96
01
00
97
74
90
10
84
06

:, 537, 758 58
ACCOUNTABLE AND SETTLEMENT,

Treasury proper
Publicdebt
Quarterly salaries '.
Diplomatic and consular
Customs
Internal revenue
Judiciary
Interior "civil
Indians and pensions
War
Navy

,

\

3,465
103
1,248
2, 532
4, 765
. 4, 336
4,154
2,101
3,101
7, 328
2,117
35, 250

28, 630,103
248, 284,956
531, 237
1,176, 057
19, 451,322
5, 025,138
4,168, 951
8, 694,319
58, 561,463
• 41,762 550
21, 385,664

14
02
39
64
96
27
43
16
22
07
49

437, 671, 763 79

COVERING.

Customs
Internal revenue
Public lands
Miscellaneous revenue
Indians and pensions repay
War repay
'.
Navy repay
Miscellaneous repay -.

198,159,676 02
135, 264, 385 51
2, 201, 863 17
138, 906, 901 87
1, 988, 022 51
1, 296,144 50
4,634, 065 85
• 3, 433, 446 29
18, 010

Total




85, 884, 505 72

53, 433 $1,352, 094, 028_ 09

325

326

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Accounts have been received from the auditing offices, revised, recorded, and the balances thereon certified to the Eegister of the Treasury,
as follow:
/
N o . of I N o . of
accounts, vouchers. 1

Kind.

A m o u n t involved.

FROM THE FIl^ST AUDITOR.
1. J u d i c i a r y ••
A c c o u n t s of U n i t e d S t a t e s m a r s h a l s , for t h e i r fees, a n d e x p e n s e s
of U n i t e d S t a t e s c o u r t s , a n d a c c o u n t s of U n i t e d S t a t e s dist r i c t a t t o r n e y s . U n i