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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

FEDERAL

DEPOSIT




INSURANCE

CORPORATION
1964




LETTER

OF T R A N S M I T T A L

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
Washington, D. C., October 29, 1965

SIRS: Pursuant to the provisions of Section 17(a) of the Federal
Deposit Insurance Act, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
is pleased to submit its annual report. Part One of the report,
separately submitted earlier in the year, is included in this volume.
Respectfully yours,

K. A. R A N D ALL,
Chairman

THE PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE
THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES




iii

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

iv




FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
5 5 0 1 7 t h S t r e e t , N . W. , W a s h i n g t o n , D. C.
20429

BOARD OF DI RECTORS
Chairman_ __ ________________________________K. A. Randal!
_
Comptroller of the Currency-__________________ James J. Saxon

Secretary______________________ E. F. Downey

OFFI CI ALS
Assistant to the Chairman________________________ John F. Lee
Administrative Assistant to the Chairman_______ John L. Flannery
Chief, Division of Examination_____________ Edward H. DeHority
General Counsel_________________________ William M. Moroney
Executive Assistant to the Board________ Timothy J. Reardon, Jr.
Controller______________________________ Edward F. Phelps, Jr.
Chief, Division of Liquidation__________________ A. E. Anderson
Chief, Division of Research and Statistics___ Raymond E. Hengren
Chief, Audit Division_________________________ James J. Bogart
Assistant to the Board________________________ Frank E. Tracy
Assistant to the Board______________________ Raoul D. Edwards




October 29, T965

FEDER AL

DEPOSIT INSURANCE

CO RP OR AT IO N

DISTRICTS

’C W
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/

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to : .............

K-rr...
12

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,A
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DI ST RI CT

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UB
o

OFFI CES

AND

SUP E RV I S I NG

EXAMI NERS

1. Claude C. Phillippe, Room
1365, No. 10 P.O. Square,
B oston, M a ssa ch u se tts
02109

7. Wallace A. Ryen, 715 Ten­
ney Building, Madison, Wis­
consin 53703

2. Philip C. Lods, 74 Trinity
Place, New York, New York
10006

8. D. E. Wilkins, 164 West
Jackson Boulevard, Chi­
cago, Illinois 60604

3. Lewis S. Rough, Jr., Suite
600, Huntington Trust Co.,
37 West Broad Street, Co­
lumbus, Ohio 43215

9. Roger B. West, 950 Federal
Reserve Bank Building,
Mi nneapol i s, Minnesota
55440

4. Albert E. Clark, 403 East
Grace Street, Richmond,
Virginia 23219

10. Stanley Pugh, 1207 Federal
Reserve Bank Building,
Kansas City, Missouri 64106

5. Roger C. Eagleton, 1000
Bank of Georgia Building,
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
6. Lewis C. Beasley, Locust
B u i l d i n g , 1015 L o c u s t
Street, St. Louis, Missouri
63101
FEDERAL

DEPOSIT

M ain

550

O ffic e :




1 7th

11. Lloyd Thomas, Federal Re­
serve Bank Building, Sta­
tion K, Dallas, Texas 75222
12. Walter W. Smith, Suite 1700,
582 Market Street, San
Francisco, California 94104

INSURANCE

S tre e t,

N.W .,

CORPORATION

W a s h in g to n ,

D.

C.

20429

CONTENTS
Summary________________________________________ ___________________

xv

PART ONE
OPERATIONS OF THE CORPORATION
Introduction_________________________________________________________
Federal deposit insurance coverage___________________________________
Insurance operations to protect depositors of failing banks______________
Supervisory activities________________________________________________
Legal developments_______________________________________ _________
Administration of the Corporation_____________________________________
Finances of the Corporation
___
______________________________

Page
3
8
9
13
18
21
23

PART TWO
LEGISLATION AND REGULATIONS
Federal banking legislation— 1964_____________________________________
Rules and regulations of the Corporation_______________________________
State banking legislation— 1964__________________
__________________

63
66
67

PART THREE
DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS AND INSURANCE COVERAGE
Introduction_________________________________________________________ _77
Accounts and deposits at four special call dates_________________________77
Distributions of accounts and deposits in 1964_________________________ _82
Depositor protection under different coverage limitations__________________87
Detailed statistics_________________________________ ________________ ___ 89
A ppendix______________________________________ ________ _____________ 89

PART FOUR
BANKING DEVELOPMENTS
______
Supervisory status of banks_______________________
Changes in number of banking offices_________________________________
Concentration and location of banking facilities_________________________
Assets and liabilities of banks________________________________________
Income of insured banks______________________________________ _____

133
136
139
147
150

PART FIVE
STATISTICS OF BANKS AND DEPOSIT INSURANCE
Number, offices, and deposits of banks________________________________
Assets and liabilities of banks_______________________________________
Income of insured banks_____________________________________________
Banks closed because of financial difficulties,
and deposit insurance disbursements_________
....




156
170
192
220
vii

LIST OF TABLES
PART ONE
OPERATIONS OF THE CORPORATION
INSURANCE OPERATIONS TO PROTECT DEPOSITORS IN FAILING BANKS:
1. Insured banks closed during 1964 requiring disbursements by the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation__________________________

10

2. Protection of depositors of insured banks requiring disbursements by
the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 1934-1964____________

11

3. Analysis of disbursements, recoveries and losses in deposit insurance
transactions, January 1, 1934-December 31, 1964________________

12

SUPERVISORY ACTIVITIES:
4. Applications acted upon by the Board of Directors of the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation during 1964______________________

14

5. Mergers, consolidations, acquisitions of assets and assumptions of
liabilities approved under section 18(c) of the Federal Deposit Insur­
ance Act during 1964________________________________________

15

6. Bank examination activities of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corpora­
tion in 1963 and 1964_______________________________________

16

7. Actions to terminate insured status of banks charged with unsafe or
unsound banking practices or violations of law or regulations, 19361964 _______________________________________________________

17

15. Description of each merger, consolidation, acquisition of assets or
assumption of liabilities approved by the Corporation during 1964___

31

ADMINISTRATION OF THE CORPORATION:
8. Number of officers and employees of the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation, December 31, 1963 and 1964______________________

22

FINANCES OF THE CORPORATION:
9. Statement of financial condition, Federal Deposit Insurance Corpora­
tion, December 31, 1964_______________________________________

24

10. Statement of income and the deposit insurance fund, Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation, year ended December 31, 1964___________

25

11. Determination and distribution of net assessment income, Federal De­
posit Insurance Corporation, year ended December 31, 1964_____

26

12. Sources and application of funds, Federal Deposit Insurance Corpora­
tion, year ended December 31, 1964____________________________

26

13. Income and expenses, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, by years,
from beginning of operations, September 11, 1933, to December 31,
1964, adjusted to December 31, 1964____________________________

27

14. Insured deposits and the deposit insurance fund, 1934-1964_________

28

viii



PART THREE
DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS AND INSURANCE COVERAGE
TABLES ACCOMPANYING TEXT:
16. Accounts and deposits, all insured banks, special call dates, 1964, 1955,
1945, and 1936_______________________________________________

78

17. Percentage changes in number of accounts and amount of deposits,
all insured banks, selected periods____________________________

79

18. Accounts and deposits in insured commercial banks, grouped by size
of account, September 21, 1955 and November 18, 1964_________

82

19. Proportions of fully protected to total accounts and insured to total
deposits, by class of bank, September 21, 1955, and November 18,
1964 _______________________________________________________

83

20. Accounts fully protected and deposits insured with specified amounts of
maximum coverage, all insured banks, November 18, 1964_______

88

DISTRIBUTION OF ACCOUNTS AND DEPOSITS, ALL INSURED BANKS:
21. Accounts fully and partially protected and deposits insured, all insured
banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district
and State ___________________________________________________

94

22. Accounts fully and partially protected and deposits insured, all insured
banks, November 18,1964
Banks grouped by amount of deposits, population of center in which
located, class, and percent of deposits insured; and accounts grouped
by type _________ _____________ ___________ _________________
96
23. Accounts fully and partially protected and deposits insured, all insured
banks, November 18,1964
Banks grouped by standard metropolitan statistical area and
city ________________________________________________________
DISTRIBUTION OF ACCOUNTS OF INSURED
ACCORDING TO SIZE OF ACCOUNT:

COMMERCIAL

98

BANKS

24. Distribution of accounts according to size, insured commercial banks,
November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district
and State __________________________________________________ 100
25. Distribution of accounts according to size, insured commercial banks,
November 18,1964
Banks grouped by amount of deposits, population of center in which
located, class, and percent of deposits insured; and accounts grouped
by type _____________________________________________________ 102
26. Distribution of demand accounts of individuals, partnerships, and corpo­
rations acording to size of account, insured commercial banks,
November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district
and State ___________________________________________________ 104




27. Distribution of savings and time accounts of individuals, partnerships,
and corporations according to size of account, insured commercial
banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district
and State _________________________________________________
106
28. Distribution of demand accounts of individuals, partnerships, and
corporations according to size of account, insured commercial banks,
November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by amount of deposits_____________________
108
29. Distribution of savings and time accounts of individuals, partnerships,
and corporations according to size of account, insured commercial
banks, November 18,1964
Banks grouped by amount of deposits________
109

DISTRIBUTION OF DEPOSITS IN INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS
ACCORDING TO SIZE OF ACCOUNT:
30. Distribution of deposits according to size of account, insured commercial
banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district
and State ___________________________________________________ 110
31. Distribution of Deposits according to size of account, insured commercial
banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by amount of deposits, population of center in which
located, class, and percent of deposits insured; and accounts grouped
by type _____________________________________________________ 112
32. Distribution of demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corpo­
rations according to size of account, insured commercial banks,
November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district
and State ___________________________________________________ 114
33. Distribution of savings and time deposits of individuals, partnerships,
and corporations according to size of account, insured commercial
banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district
and State ___________________________________________________ 116
34. Distribution of demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corpo­
rations according to size of account, insured commercial banks,
November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by amount of deposits________________________ 118
35. Distribution of savings and time deposits of individuals, partnerships,
and corporations according to size of account, insured commercial
banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by amount of deposits________________________ 119

DISTRIBUTION OF ACCOUNTS AND DEPOSITS BY SIZE OF ACCOUNT,
INSURED MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS:
36. Distribution of accounts according to size, insured mutual savings
banks, November 18, 1964




Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district,
State, amount of deposits, population of center, and percent of
deposits insured; and accounts by type__________________________ 120
37. Distribution of deposits according to size of account, insured mutual
savings banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district,
State, amount of deposits, population of center, and percent of de­
posits insured; and accounts by type ....
_________________ 122
ACCOUNTS FULLY PROTECTED AND DEPOSITS INSURED ASSUMING
ALTERNATIVE AMOUNTS OF MAXIMUM COVERAGE PER ACCOUNT:
38. Number of accounts fully protected and deposits insured assuming
alternative amounts of maximum coverage per account, insured com­
mercial banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district
and State_________ ____________ _____________________________ 124
39. Number of accounts fully protected and deposits insured assuming
alternative amounts of maximum coverage per account, insured
commercial banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by amount of total deposits, population of center
of location, class, and percent of total deposits insured; and accounts
_
grouped by ty p e ______________ _ __________ _________________ 126
40. Number of accounts fully protected and deposits insured assuming
alternative amounts of maximum coverage per account, insured
mutual savings banks, November 18, 1964
Banks grouped by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation district,
State, size of total deposits, population of center of location, and per­
cent of total deposits insured; and accounts grouped by type______ 128
41. Distribution of insured banks by percentage of deposits insured as­
suming alternative amounts of maximum coverage, November 18, 1964 130

PART FOUR
BANKING DEVELOPMENTS
SUPERVISORY STATUS OF BANKS:
42. All banks in the United States classified by supervisory status and
Federal deposit insurance participation, December 31, 1964_______ 133
43. Assets of banks classified by supervisory status and Federal deposit
insurance participation, December 31, 1964___ __________________ 134
44. Deposits of banks classified by supervisory status and Federal deposit
insurance participation, December 31, 1964_____________________ 135
45. Ratios of capital accounts to assets of banks of deposit classified by
supervisory status and Federal deposit insurance participation, De­
cember 31, 1964
____
______________________________ 135
CHANGES IN NUMBER OF BANKING OFFICES:
46. Analysis of changes in number of banks and branches in the United
States during 1964
__________________________________ 136




CHANGES IN NUMBER OF BANKING OFFICES:
46. Analysis of changes in number of banks and branches in the United
States during 1964
___
__________________________________ 136
CONCENTRATION AND LOCATION OF BANKING FACILITIES:
47. Commercial bank deposits and proportions of total held by the largest
commercial banks or bank groups, December 31, 1964 ... _______ 140
48. Relative size of largest commercial banks or bank groups in States
classified by status of branch banking, December 31, 1964_________ 141
49. Relative size of largest banks or bank groups in 65 metropolitan areas,
June 30, 1964________________________________________________ 142
50. Banks, banking offices, and population per bank and office in each
State, December 31, 1964, with change from December 31, 1960___ 144
51. Commercial banking offices in the United States grouped by location
in different-sized population centers with selected numbers of offices,
December 31, 1964 ___________________________________________ 145
52. Commercial banking offices, banks, and branches in metropolitan and
other areas grouped according to status of branch banking, Decemb.er
31, 1964___ ....
______________________________________ 146
ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF BANKS:
53. Assets and liabilities of all banks in the United States, by type of bank,
December 31, 1964
________________________________ 148
INCOME OF INSURED BANKS:
54. Sources and disposition of total income of insured commercial banks,
1962-1964 ___________________________________________________ 151
55. Distribution by deposit size of insured commercial banks operating
throughout 1964 and percentages of selected banking totals in each
size g ro u p ...
___________
________ __________________ 151
56. Operating data of insured commercial banks in operation throughout
selected years, 1950, 1955, 1960-1964_________________________ 153
57. Sources and disposition of total income of insured mutual savings
banks, 1962-1964
___________________________ 154

PART FIVE
STATISTICS OF BANKS AND DEPOSIT INSURANCE
NUMBER, OFFICES AND DEPOSITS OF BANKS:
Explanatory note____________________________________________________ 156
101. Changes in number and classification of banks and branches in the
United States (States and other areas) during 1964______________ 158
102. Number of banking offices in the United States (States and other
areas), December 31, 1964
Grouped according to insurance status and class of bank, and by
State or areas and type of office________________________________ 160




103. Number and deposits of all banks in the United States (States and
other areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped according to insurance status and by district and
State _______________________________________________________ 168
ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF BANKS:
Explanatory note____________________________________________________ 170
104. Assets and liabilities of all banks in the United States (States and other
areas), June 30, 1964
Banks grouped according to insurance status and type of bank_ 172
_
105. Assets and liabilities of all banks in the United States (States and other
areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped according to insurance status and type of bank_ 174
_
106. Assets and liabilities of all banks in the United States (States and other
areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped by district and State___________________________ 176
107. Assets and liabilities of all insured banks in the United States (States
and other areas), June and December call dates, 1961 through 1964 178
108. Assets and liabilities of insured commercial and insured mutual savings
banks in the United States (States and other areas), December and
June call dates, 1962 through 1964_____________________________ 182
109. Average assets and liabilities and assets and liabilities per $100 of
total assets of insured commercial banks in the United States (States
and other areas), 1964
By ciass of bank__________ ____________________________ ____ 186
110. Assets and liabilities and assets and liabilities per $100 of total assets
of insured commercial banks operating throughout 1964 in the United
States (States and other areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped according to amount of deposits______________ 187
111. Average assets and liabilities of insured commercial banks in the United
States (States and other areas), by State, 1964__________________ 188
112. Distribution of insured commercial banks in the United States (States
and other areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped according to amount of deposits and by ratios of
selected items to assets _____________________________________ 190

INCOME OF INSURED BANKS:
Explanatory note____________________

____________________________ 192

113. Income of insured commercial banks in the United States (States and
other areas), 1956-1964 ____
______________________________ 194
114. Ratios of income of insured commercial banks in the United States
(States and other areas), 1956-1964
___________________________ 196
115. Income of insured commercial banks in the United States (States and
other areas), 1964
By class of bank
_________ 198




116. Ratios of income of insured commercial banks in the United States
(States and other areas), 1964
By class of bank____________________________________________ 200
117. Income of insured commercial banks operating throughout 1964 in the
United States (States and other areas)
Banks grouped according to amount of deposits
____________ 202
118. Ratios of income of insured commercial banks operating throughout
1964 in the United States (States and other areas)
Banks grouped according to amount of deposits _____________ 204
119. Income of insured commercial banks in the United States (States and
other areas), by State, 1964 ___________________________________ 206
120. Income of insured mutual savings banks, 1956-1964________________ 216
121. Ratios of income of insured mutual savings banks, 1956-1964_______ 218
BANKS CLOSED BECAUSE OF FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES,
AND DEPOSIT INSURANCE DISBURSEMENTS
Explanatory note____________________________________________________ 220
122. Number and deposits of banks closed because of financial difficulties,
1934-1964, by years___________________ _______________________ 222
123. Insured banks requiring disbursements by the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation during 1964______________________________________ 223
124. Depositors, deposits, and disbursements in insured banks requiring dis­
bursements by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 1934-1964
Banks grouped by class of bank, year of deposit payoff or deposit
assumption, amount of deposits, and S tate_____________________ 224
125. Recoveries and losses by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation on
principal disbursements for protection of depositors, 1934-1964____ 226

xiv



SUMMARY
The 13,820 banks insured by the Corporation at the end of 1964
comprised 97 percent of the 14,281 banks and trust companies
operating in the United States.
A survey on November 18, 1964 showed that total deposits in
insured banks amounted to $338 billion, which were held in 175
million accounts. Deposits covered by insurance were 54.5 percent
of the total, while 97.2 percent of all accounts were fully protected.
At the end of 1964, the deposit insurance fund, which totaled $2.8
billion, bore a ratio of 1.48 percent to insured deposits, and 0.82
percent to total deposits in insured banks.
In the protection of depositors the Corporation made disburse­
ments in 1964 of $12.7 million, bringing such disbursements since
1934 to $390.0 million. Total deposits in the seven insured banks
which failed in 1964, $23.3 million, were about equal to the deposits
in the two failed banks in 1963. Deposit Insurance National Banks
were organized by the Corporation— for the first time since the
mid-1930’s— in two communities in order to provide essential bank­
ing facilities and to facilitate the payoff of insured deposits.
The Corporation’s field examinations and investigations num­
bered 12,484 during the year, 385 more than were conducted in
1963.
The number of banking offices in the United States, totaling
29,727 on December 31, rose by 1,358 during the year. The growth
consisted of 189 banks and 1,169 branches. Banks supervised by
the Corporation, which are State-chartered insured banks not
members of the Federal Reserve System, accounted for 82 of the
net increase in banks, and 310 of the new branches.
The combined assets of all banks and trust companies increased
10.7 percent during 1964 to a total of $402.7 billion on December
31. Total income of insured commercial banks was $15.3 billion,
up 9.8 percent from 1963, while net income after taxes rose 6.1
percent to $2.3 billion.
Public Law 88-467, signed by the President on August 20, 1964,
amended the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange
Act of 1934, as amended, to extend disclosure requirements to the
issuers of additional publicly traded securities. Administration of
the new provisions was vested in the Corporation with respect to
the banks under its supervision. Among other Federal banking
legislation was an amendment to the Federal Deposit Insurance
Act, enacted as Public Law 88-593, approved on September 12,
providing for notice to the appropriate Federal banking agency of
change in control of management of insured banks.




XV




OPERATIONS
OF THE CORPORATION




PART

ONE




INTRODUCTION
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has completed
thirty-one years of operation. Established by the Banking Act of
1933 at the depth of the most severe banking crisis in the nation’s
history, its immediate contribution was the restoration of public
confidence in banks, and over the years it has helped to strengthen
our banking system. The insurance of bank deposits, effective on
January 1, 1934, has sustained their use as the major means for
settling accounts. Thereafter, both the reduction in bank failures
and the ready availability of insured deposits in those insured
banks which closed because of financial difficulties have clearly
exerted a stabilizing influence upon our economy.
Most people who know about the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation recognize it as the agency which insures bank de­
posits up to $10,000 for each depositor. Less well known, but
equally significant, have been its responsibilities in the field of
bank supervision deriving from its role as insurer. Actually the
Corporation has very limited powers; it can neither charter a bank
nor close a bank, and has power to pass upon only about one-half
of the new banks admitted to insurance. Nevertheless, the super­
visory powers accorded the Corporation complement and
strengthen the supervision of banks exercised by State and other
Federal agencies, particularly in the area of bank examinations.
As the principal source of money used in transacting the nation’s
business, banks have long been recognized as institutions uniquely
affecting the public interest and therefore properly subject to
special governmental supervision. Long before checks drawn on
bank deposits became the predominant means of payment, this
function was performed by other obligations, specifically bank
notes. Failures in banking impaired the usefulness of bank notes
and led to efforts well over a century ago to create a mechanism
which would assure their safety.
New York was the first of 14 States which adopted plans, over
a period from 1829 to 1917, to insure or guarantee bank obliga­
tions which served as currency. The confinement of the plans to
individual States and to State-chartered banks, along with varied
individual weaknesses, limited their usefulness, although some
of them were notably successful. Three of the six pre-Civil War
plans expired when member banks converted into national banks
following the prohibitive tax levied upon State bank notes in
1865. National bank notes were expected to supersede State bank



3

4

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

notes, and they were further expected to provide an adequate
and reliable means of payment, because of their guarantee by
the Federal government.
It was not foreseen that another type of bank obligation— bank
deposits— would soon overshadow bank notes as the dominant cir­
culating medium, and that their vulnerability as a result of con­
tinuing bank failures would seriously weaken our monetary struc­
ture. When this happened, several States attempted to meet the
problem through the guaranty or insurance of deposits. Eight
States established such programs during the decade following
1907, but none of them survived the avalanche of bank failures
during the 1920's and early 1930’s. Meanwhile, proposals blos­
somed for a nation-wide system of depositor protection; among
the 150 bills introduced in the Congress on the subject between
1886 and 1933 may be found several of the features incorporated
in the act providing for Federal deposit insurance. This back­
ground of experience and experimentation enabled the architects
of Federal deposit insurance to design a better plan than otherwise
would have been possible.
Few substantive changes have been made in the character of
the Corporation during its 31 years of operation. Insurance cov­
erage was increased from an initial maximum of $2,500 to $5,000
per depositor on July 1, 1934, where it remained until raised to
the present $10,000 limit on September 21, 1950. The original basis
for assessments was changed to a regular rate basis in 1935, and
in 1950 a credit was provided against future assessments based
on Corporation losses and expenses. The Corporation’s super­
visory powers have also been clarified and strengthened by differ­
ent statutes.
That the Corporation has come to perform a key function in
the economy derives in large part from the fact that it insures all
but 461 of the 14,281 banks comprising our nation’s diverse bank­
ing system. Insured banks vary greatly in size, conduct different
types of business, and operate under the varied laws of 50 States
as well as the Federal government. Quite unlike banking else­
where, most banks in the United States are small. As of November
18, 1964, 12,812 commercial banks, none with deposits of more
than $50 million, accounted for 95 percent of the total number of
commercial banks insured by the Corporation and held 32 percent
of the deposits in insured commercial banks. At the same time, the
largest 34 insured commercial banks, each with deposits of $1
billion or more, held 33 percent of the deposits.
A banking system of this type, characterized by diversity and
decentralization, contains elements of instability. In nations where
a few huge institutions dominate the banking scene, failures are



5

INTRODUCTION

seldom if ever permitted, an achievement accomplished by cen­
tralization and rigid control. In this country, on the contrary, it
is recognized that the exercise of individual judgment may lead
to failure as well as success. During its 31 years of operation, 454
insured banks have required disbursements by the Corporation,
and an additional 126 noninsured banks have failed. The yearby-year totals are indicated in Chart A.
Chart A

BANK FAILURES DECLINED SHARPLY AFTER 1942

NUMBER OF FAILURES

100--------------------

NUMBER OF FAILURES

-------------------- 100

Given the preponderance of small banks in our banking system,
it is not surprising that 342 of the 454 banks which have received
financial assistance from the Corporation held deposits of $1
million or less at the time of closing. Even failures of this magni­
tude can impair public confidence in banking as a result of losses
to depositors and disruption of business activities in the affected
community. Within the scope of its authority the Corporation
endeavors to reduce depositor losses and to protect the circulat­
ing medium essential to the functioning of the economy. Deposit
insurance thus plays a strategic role by introducing important
elements of safety and confidence into a banking system whose
desirable diversity and freedom might sometimes produce injurious
consequences.
Deposits insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
are of two kinds: demand deposits, typically used in checking



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

6
Chart B

NEARLY ALL DEPOSITORS IN INSURED BANKS AND OVER HALF
OF THEIR DEPOSITS WERE FULLY PROTECTED on Nov. 18, 1964

NUMBER OF

AMOUNT OF
DEPOSITS

ACCOUNTS

Partially Insured
2. 8%

accounts, which bear no interest; and time or savings deposits,
which typically bear interest and may not be drawn upon by check.
The Corporation insures them up to a combined total of $10,000
for each depositor in any one bank.
The insurance of bank deposits by this Corporation is some­
times confused with the insurance by the Federal Savings and
Loan Insurance Corporation of share accounts held by savings and
loan associations. They are alike in that insurance by each is
limited to $10,000 for each depositor or shareholder; and the
insurer in each case is a Federal agency. A share account held
in a savings and loan association, however, does not represent
a true debtor— creditor relationship, and it lacks the medium of
exchange attribute of a demand deposit. Insurance of the share
accounts of associations, like that of savings and time deposits of
banks, is therefore directed more toward protection of individual
owners of property than to sustaining the circulating media.
Periodically the Corporation makes surveys of its liability as an
insurer, the most recent one as of November 18, 1964. On that
date, 97.2 percent of all accounts in insured banks, and 54.5
percent of all deposits, were within the $10,000 insurance limita­
tion, as illustrated in Chart B. For all demand accounts of business
and individuals, 97.8 percent of the accounts and 48.8 percent of



7

INTRODUCTION

the deposits were fully insured under the $10,000 limitation. A
slightly smaller percentage— 96.5 percent— of the savings and time
accounts of business and individuals were fully protected, but a
substantially higher percentage— 75.6 percent— of their deposits
were fully protected.
The actual protection provided by the Corporation to the de­
positors of failing insured banks has been greater than the indi­
cated extent of insurance protection. Over 99 percent of the
depositors or accounts in the failing insured banks have received
(or had available to them) full recovery, and a similar 99 percent
of deposits have been paid (or made available). Depositors in in­
sured banks have lost an estimated $4.1 million out of total de­
posits of $658 million in insured banks at the time of closing. This
high degree of protection has been accomplished at relatively
small cost to the Corporation; its total losses on insurance dis­
bursements are estimated at $37 million, or less than 10 percent
of total disbursements. Estimated recoveries and losses to the
Corporation and to depositors are shown in Chart C.
Though its favorable loss experience has enabled the Corpora­
tion to build up a substantial fund for the protection of depositors,
growth in the fund has barely kept pace with growth in deposits
in insured banks. At the end of 1964, the deposit insurance fund
Chart C
SINCE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE BEGAN, LOSSES TO DEPOSITORS
AND TO THE FDIC HAVE BEEN SMALL IN CLOSED BANK CASES

TOTAL DEPOSITS
$657,688,000




DISBURSEMENTS
BY FDIC
$392,004,000

Lost by FDIC $37,001,000

Lost or Not Yet Available
to Depositors $9,481,000

8

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

amounted to $2.8 billion, or less than one percent of total deposits.
In addition to its insurance fund the Corporation has authority to
borrow up to $3 billion from the U. S. Treasury to meet its insur­
ance obligations.
Both the Corporation and the banking industry take satisfaction
from the fact that deposit insurance requires no tax revenue. The
original capital of $289 million advanced by the Federal govern­
ment and the Federal Reserve Banks at the start of the Corpora­
tion has been repaid, with interest amounting to $81 million.
Assessments paid by insured banks have provided a surplus over
losses and expenses which is invested in U. S. Government obli­
gations; continuing assessments and income from these invest­
ments provide practically all the Corporation’s income.
The Corporation is an independent agency of the executive
branch of the government administered by a bipartisan Board of
Directors. It has achieved the respect of many critics who initially
opposed insurance as the enemy of soundness in banking. And it
has realized that ultimate accolade of being taken for granted by
a constituency largely unfamiliar with the ills which brought it
into being.
FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE COVERAGE
Banks insured by the Corporation totaled 13,820 at the end of
1964. These represented about 97 percent of the 14,281 banks and
trust companies in operation. The proportion so insured has never
been less than the 86 percent covered at the very beginning of
Federal deposit insurance.
Insurance is available to qualified incorporated banks and trust
companies which receive deposits. National banks authorized to
do business by the Comptroller of the Currency are automatically
insured, as are State banks which are members of the Federal
Reserve System. Other banks become insured upon application
to and approval by the Corporation’s Board of Directors. During
1964, 200 national banks, 3 State banks members of the Federal
Reserve System, and 140 State nonmember banks became insured.
Except for 20 of the banks in the last group, all were new banks.
Both commercial and mutual savings banks may become in­
sured. About two-fifths of the 461 banks not insured by the Cor­
poration are mutual savings banks, and nearly all of these are
members of a State insurance system. Most of the remaining un­
insured banks are institutions ineligible for insurance, either
because of their unusual character— such as private banks or
non-deposit trust companies— or because of their inability to meet
insurance standards.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE COVERAGE

9

The maximum protection of $10,000 applies to deposits main­
tained by a depositor in an insured bank in the same right and
capacity. An individual with more than $10,000 to keep in bank
deposits can obviously extend his protection by making deposits
in different insured banks. Additional protection may also be se­
cured by making deposits in the same insured bank which are
maintained in a different right or capacity as recognized by law.
For example, a husband and wife may have an insured joint de­
posit with right of survivorship in addition to their insured indi­
vidually-owned deposits.
Nevertheless, a substantial portion of deposits in insured banks
are outside the insurance guarantee. As shown by the survey of
November 18, 1964, 97.2 percent of the accounts in insured banks
were fully protected and 54.5 percent of total deposits were in­
sured. These percentages might differ slightly if allowance could
be made for the accounts which, when appropriately combined,
exceed the insurance maximum; and if similar allowance were
made for the accounts whose deposits exceed the insurance
maximum but which may, because of their being held in different
rights and capacities, actually be insured.
INSURANCE OPERATIONS TO PROTECT DEPOSITORS
OF FAILING BANKS
Banks failing in 1964. The Corporation made disbursements to
protect depositors in seven banks which failed in 1964. While this
was the largest number of insured banks to be closed in any year
since 1942, total deposits in the seven banks were approximately
the same amount as in the two which failed in 1963, and there
were only slightly more than half as many depositors.
Table 1 gives the name and location of the seven banks, and
the number of depositors and the amount of deposits in each of
them. There were approximately 19,900 depositors in the seven
banks, with total deposits of $23.3 million. As of December 31,
1964, 14,900 of these depositors, with balances totaling $16.9
million, had either been paid in full by the Corporation or otherwise
had their accounts fully satisfied.
Of the approximately 5,000 depositors in the seven banks who
had not yet received full recovery at the close of the year, about
4,500 can obtain full recovery simply by presenting their claims
to the Corporation or through offset against their debts to the
bank. Included among the remaining accounts are deposits in
excess of the $10,000 maximum insurance coverage, and money
placed in banks which was treated as deposits by the bank, the
insured status of which is now in litigation brought by the
Corporation.



10

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Table 1. INSURED BANKS CLOSED DURING 1964 REQUIRING
DISBURSEMENTS BY THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION1
Deposit
payoff
case
number

Name and
location

Date of
closing

Number
of de­
positors

Amount of
deposits
(in thou­
sands)

Date of first
payment to
depositors

Depositors Deposits
receiving
paid
(in thou­
fu ll re ­
covery
sands)

19,883

$23,322

14,923

$16,901 2

The First National
Bank of Marlin,
Marlin, Texas

March 10, 1964
268

2,215

3,459

March 16, 1964

2,095

2,811

269

The State Savings
Bank of Minden City,
Minden City, Michigan

March 17, 1964

1,156

1,233

March 23, 1964

1,106

1,158

270

First State Bank,
Dell City, Texas

July 4, 1964

719

1,082

July 10, 1964

614

662

271

Belleview Valley
Bank, Belleview,
Missouri

July 20, 1964

1,684

1,188

July 25,1964

1,390

1,115

272

Frontier Bank,
Covelo, California

July 31,1964

1,049

2,312

August 6, 1964

957

1,191

273

Crown Savings
Bank, Newport News,
Virginia

September 4,1964

9,677

7,023

September 10,
1964

5,989

4,470

274

Nebraska State
Bank of Valentine,
Valentine, Nebraska

October 29,1964

3,383

7,025

November 10,
1964

2,772

5,494

Total

1 Figures adjusted to and as of December 31, 1964.
2 Includes $12,029 thousand paid by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

Each of the insured banks which suspended in 1964 was placed
in receivership, with the Corporation serving as receiver in all
cases except Belleview Valley Bank, Belleview, Missouri, and
Nebraska State Bank of Valentine, Nebraska, Valentine, Nebraska.
The owners of uninsured claims are entitled to share, pro rata with
the Corporation and other common creditors, in the proceeds from
liquidation of the bank’s assets by the receivers.
Deposit Insurance National Banks. For the first time since 1935,
Deposit Insurance National Banks were organized by the Cor­
poration for the purpose of providing limited banking facilities in
a community which had suffered the loss of a bank and to facilitate
the payment of the insured deposits of such bank. During 1964,
Deposit Insurance National Banks were chartered in Dell City,
Texas, immediately after the closing of the First State Bank there;
and in Newport News, Virginia after the failure of the Crown Sav­
ings Bank.
A Deposit Insurance National Bank is organized as a non-stock
company, managed by an executive officer appointed by the Board
of Directors of the Corporation, and receives from the Corporation
funds necessary to commence operations and to cover operating
deficits. It may accept insured deposits transferred to it from
a failing bank and new deposits in amounts not to exceed $10,000



INSURANCE OPERATIONS TO PROTECT DEPOSITORS

11

from any depositor, except that such limitation is lifted in cases
where the Deposit Insurance National Bank is the only bank in the
community. Funds of the bank may be invested in direct or fully
guaranteed obligations of the United States. The bank is not
authorized to make loans. Unless ownership of the bank has been
disposed of by the Corporation within two years from the date of
its organization, the activity of the bank must be terminated, and
the Corporation assumes its assets and obligations.
Banks failing 1934-1964. Since the beginning of Federal deposit
insurance, the Corporation has made disbursements to protect
depositors in 454 banks experiencing financial difficulties. In 182
of these cases, the deposit liabilities of the failing bank were asTable 2.

PROTECTION OF DEPOSITORS OF INSURED BANKS REQUIRING
DISBURSEMENTS BY THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE
CORPORATION, 1934-1964
Deposit payoff
cases
(272 banks)

A ll cases
(454 banks)

Deposit
assumption cases
(182 banks)

Item
Number or
amount

N u m b e r of depo sitors or accounts
—t o t a l 1................................................
Full recovery received or a v a il­
a b le ..................................................
From
From
From
From

FDIC2.................................................
o ffse t4................................................
security or preference 5...................
asset liquidation 6.............................

Full recovery not received as of

Percent

1,516,468

100.0%

Number or
amount

481,735

Percent

Number or
amount

Percent

100.0%

1.034.733

100.0%

1,503,745

99.2

469,012

97.4

1.034.733

100.0

1,458,831
39,173
2,911
2,830

96.2
2.6
.2
.2

424,098 3
39,173
2,911
2,830

88.1
8.1
.6
.6

1.034.733

100.0

December 31t 1964..............

12,723

.8

12,723

2.6

Terminated cases........................................
Active cases 7 ..............................................

2,834
9,889

.2
.6

2,834
9,889

.6
2.0

A m o u n t of deposits (in tho usan ds)
—t o t a l..................................................

$657,688

100.0%

$466,527

100.0%

Paid or m ade a v a ila b le ...................

648,207

98.6

181,680

95.0

466,527

100.0

608,766
11,480
14,387
13,574

92.6
1.7
2.2
2.1

142,239 8
11,480
14,387
13,574

74.4
6.0
7.5
7.1

466,527

100.0

9,481

1.4

9,481

5.0

1,793
7,688

.3
1.1

1,793
7,688

1.0
4.0

By
By
By
By

FDIC2.....................................................
offset9 ....................................................
security or preference 10......................
asset liquidation 11...............................

100.0%

$191,161

N o t^ p a id as of D ec e m b e r 3 1 f
Terminated cases........................................
Active cases12.............................................

1 Number of depositors in deposit payoff cases; number of accounts in deposit assumption cases.
2 Through direct payment to depositors in deposit payoff cases; thro ugh assumption of deposits by other insured banks,
facilitated by FDIC disbursements of $198,074 thousand, in deposit assumption cases.
3 Includes 57,332 depositors in terminated cases who failed to claim their insured deposits (see note 8).
4 Includes only depositors with claims offset in fu ll; most of these would have been fu lly protected by insurance in the
absence of offsets.
5 Excludes depositors paid in part by FDIC whose deposit balances were less than the insurance maximum.
6 The insured portions of these depositor claims were paid by the Corporation.
7 Full recovery available to 9,073 of these depositors.
8 Includes $199 thousand unclaimed insured deposits in terminated cases (see note 3).
9 Includes all amounts paid by offset.
10 Includes all secured and preferred claims paid from asset liquidation; excludes secured and preferred claims paid
by Corporation.
11 Includes unclaimed deposits paid to authorized public custodians.
12 It is estimated that $5,398 thousand of this amount is or will be available to depositors.




12

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
Table 3.

ANALYSIS OF DISBURSEMENTS, RECOVERIES, AND LOSSES
IN DEPOSIT INSURANCE TRANSACTIONS
JANUARY 1, 1 9 3 4 -DECEMBER 31, 1964
(In thousands)
Type of disbursement

A ll d is b u rs e m e n ts —to ta l.
P rin c ip a l d is b u rs e m e n ts in d e p o s it a s s u m p tio n
and payoff c ases—t o t a l...............................................
Loans and assets purchased (182 deposit assumption cases):
To December 31, 1964.............................................................
Estimated additional................................................................
Deposits paid (272 deposit payoff cases):
To December 31,1964.............................................................
Estimated additional................................................................

A dvances and exp enses in de p o sit assu m p tion
and payoff cases—t o t a l..............................................

Disbursements

Recoveries 1

Losses

$392,004

$355,003

$37,001

$340,675

$305,276

$35,399

198,074 1

184,779 \
241/

13,054

142,0401
561J

106,373 \
13,883 /

22,345

$ 49,348

$ 47,296

32,872
14,424
214
1,838

32,872
14,424

Expenses in liquidating assets in 182 deposit assumption cases:
Advances to protect assets..................................................................
Liquidation expenses............................................................................
Insurance expenses..............................................................................
Field payoff and other insurance expenses in 272 deposit payoff cases.

O th er d is b u rs e m e n ts —to ta l..................................................
Assets purchased to facilitate termination of liquidations:
To December 31, 1964..........................................................
Estimated additional............................................................
Unallocated insurance expenses............................................

$

1,981

0

(2)
$

2,431

$ 2,052

214
1,838
$ (450)

1,7711

2,399 \
32/

(660)4

’210

(2)

210

' ‘

1 Excludes recoveries in excess of the amounts due the Corporation, which were returned to stockholders and holders
of capital obligations of failed banks. Does not include $9.1 million of interest and allowable return received by the Corpora­
tion on its advances.
2 Not recoverable.
3 Net recovery in excess of disbursements.
4 Net profit and net income.

sumed by another insured bank with the aid of funds made avail­
able by the Corporation. Under the deposit assumption procedure,
deposits are immediately available in full to all depositors. There
were 272 deposit payoff cases in which the Corporation, as soon
as possible after the closing of the bank, paid the insured deposits.
Payments on uninsured deposits depend upon the results of asset
liquidation. Table 2 shows that there have been more than 1.5
million depositors with deposits of $657.7 million in the 454 banks.
It is estimated that about 3,700 depositors will lose approximately
$4.1 million of uninsured deposits.
Corporation disbursements and losses. Table 3 shows that since
Federal deposit insurance became effective January 1, 1934, the
Corporation has disbursed $390.0 million to protect depositors in
454 insured banks and $1.8 million to purchase assets from re­
ceivers and liquidators of closed insured banks in order to facilitate
the termination of liquidation activities. Total recoveries made and
estimated additional recoveries of such disbursements amount to
$355.0 million, resulting in an estimated loss to the Corporation
of $37.0 million, including $0.2 million of non-recoverable insur­
ance expenses.



SUPERVISORY ACTIVITIES

13

The establishment and operation of banks have long been sub­
ject to public regulation. Each of the States has statutes and
regulations covering the chartering and operation of banks within
its jurisdiction. National banks are chartered and supervised by
the Comptroller of the Currency. Further regulations apply to
banks which are members of the Federal Reserve System; that is,
to all national banks and to those State banks which choose to
join the System. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation super­
vises certain aspects of the operation of all insured banks, with
direct supervision of insured State banks which are not members
of the Federal Reserve System.
Applications to become insured or operate a branch. Care in the
chartering of banks and establishment of branches is one way of
avoiding excessive failures among banks. At the same time, how­
ever, chartering authorities seek to bring about the benefits of
effective competition by avoiding unwarranted limitations on entry
into the banking business.
The Corporation does not charter banks but insures banks,
after approval by the appropriate Federal chartering or super­
visory authority, upon consideration of the following factors: the
financial history and condition of the bank, the adequacy of its
capital structure, its future earnings prospects, the general char­
acter of its management, the convenience and needs of the com­
munity to be served by the bank, and the consistency of its cor­
porate powers with the purposes of the Federal Deposit Insurance
Act. When national banks are chartered by the Comptroller of the
Currency and when State banks are admitted to the Federal Re­
serve System, they become insured upon certification that the
above factors have been considered by their respective super­
visory authority. Other banks apply directly to the Corporation for
deposit insurance.
During 1964 the Corporation acted upon 134 applications for
admission to insurance, and approved 130. The number of
branches approved for operation totaled 368. Other applications
acted upon during 1964 are classified in Table 4. The relatively
small number of disapprovals reflects in part the withdrawal or
improvement of some proposals after preliminary discussion, be­
fore their formal submission to the Board of Directors.
Merger transactions. The Corporation along with other Federal
bank supervisory agencies had, prior to 1960, limited responsibili­
ties in regulating bank mergers. These responsibilities were in­
creased by the Bank Merger Act of 1960, which requires approval
by the appropriate Federal banking authority for an insured bank




14

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Table 4. APPLICATIONS ACTED UPON BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OF THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION DURING 1964

Type of Application

Total acted
upon

Approved

Disapproved

A ll a p p lic a tio n s 1..............................................................................

905

895

A dm ission to in s u ra n c e —t o t a l.............................................
New banks....................................................... .........................................
Operating banks.......................................................................................

134
116
18

130
112

C o n tin u a tio n of in su ra n c e of banks w ithdraw in g from
Federal Reserve S y s te m .................................................

25

23

C hange in type of bu siness—t o t a l.....................................

71

70

66

65
5

To engage in trust business or to provide additional fiduciary ser­
vices 2.....................................................................................................
To enlarge the powers of a branch........................................................

A ssum ption of d e p o sit lia b ilitie s —to ta l..........................
Of
Of
Of
Of

another insured bank 3.......................................................................
a noninsured bank..............................................................................
a nondeposit financial institution 4...................................................
a branch of a noninsured foreign bank...........................................

O p era tio n of bra n c h e s —t o t a l...............................................
New branch offices...................................................................................
Banks to become branches as result of absorption............................
Continue branches of absorbed predecessor.......................................

5

18

33

33

27

27

1

1

3

3

2

2

369

368

319
26
24

318
26
24

C hange of lo ca tio n —t o t a l.......................................................

250

248

Main offices...............................................................................................
Branches....................................................................................................

170
80

168
80

R e tire m e n t or a d ju s tm e n t of c a p ita l................................
S e rv ice of person convicted of d ish onesty or breach
of tr u s t .....................................................................................

1 Excludes applications supple mentary to a primary application; for example, for an extension of time with respect to
an insurance commitment for a new bank. Also excludes a few applications acted upon in prior years on which additional
action was taken during 1964.
2 Includes permission to four new banks to do a trust business.
3 In one case only a branch of an insured bank was absorbed.
4 Includes two safe deposit companies and one savings and loan association.

to engage in any absorption transaction. In passing upon applica­
tions, the appropriate Federal banking authority is required to
consider the effect of the transaction on competition, including
any tendency toward monopoly, in addition to the six banking
factors enumerated above. Consent of the Corporation is required
in those transactions which involve any insured bank and a non­
insured bank or institution, or in which the resulting bank is an
insured bank not a member of the Federal Reserve System (out­
side the District of Columbia). The other Federal banking agencies
have similar authority over other merger transactions in which the
resulting bank is under their jurisdiction, and each of the agencies,
along with the Attorney General, submits advisory reports concern­
ing the effects of the transaction on competition to the Federal
banking agency taking action thereon.
There were 254 banks involved in merger applications approved
by the three Federal banking agencies during 1964. The 139 ab­
sorbed financial institutions, mostly banks, had resources totaling
$2,238 million; nearly all continued in operation as banking offices.



SUPERVISORY ACTIVITIES

15

Further information regarding the applications approved during
1964 is given in Table 5.
The Corporation approved 29 merger applications during 1964.
These involved the absorption of 31 financial institutions with
resources of $573 million. Most of these, with resources totaling
$490 million, were nonmember banks. Data concerning these cases,
with a statement giving the basis for approval and a summary
Table 5. MERGERS, CONSOLIDATIONS, ACQUISITIONS OF ASSETS
AND ASSUMPTIONS OF LIABILITIES APPROVED UNDER SECTION 18(c)
OF THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE ACT DURING 1964
Offices operated 2
Banks

Number
of
ban ks1

Resources
(in
thousands)2

Prior to
trans­
action

After
trans­
action

ALL CASES

B an ks in v o lv e d ...........................................................................

254

$27,561,786

1,840

1.837

Absorbing banks.....................................................................................
Absorbed banks 3...................................................................................
National...............................................................................................
State banks members FRS...............................................................
Not members FRS..............................................................................
Noninsured institutions.....................................................................

115
139
66
16
52
5

25,323,619
2,238,167
1,120,103
407,505
695,940
14,619

1,597
243
120
38
82
3

1.837

B anks in v o lv e d ...........................................................................

168

$13,130,756

1,121

1,115

Absorbing banks.....................................................................................
Absorbed banks......................................................................................
National...............................................................................................
State banks members FRS...............................................................
Not members FRS..............................................................................
Noninsured institutions 4...................................................................

75
93
52
12
28
1

11,740,873
1,389,883
890,459
350,986
148,438

964
157
89
31
37

1,115

B an ks in v o lv e d ...........................................................................

33

$12,412,024

521

524

Absorbing banks.....................................................................................
Absorbed banks......................................................................................
National .............................................................................................
State banks members FRS...............................................................
Not members FRS..............................................................................
Noninsured institutions 5..................................................................

15
18
7
3
6
2

12,126,181
285,843
174,376
54,419
57,048

485
36
18
6.
12

524

B anks in v o lv e d ...........................................................................

53

$ 2,019,006

198

198

Absorbing banks.....................................................................................
Absorbed banks......................................................................................
National................................................................................................
State banks members FRS...............................................................
Not members FRS 6...........................................................................
Noninsured institutions 7..................................................................

25
28
7
1
18
2

1,456,565
562,441
55,268
2,100
490,454
14,619

148
50
13
1
33
3

198

CASES WITH RESULTING BANK
A NATIONAL BANK

CASES WITH RESULTING BANK A
STATE BANK MEMBER OF THE
FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM

CASES WITH RESULTING BANK NOT
A MEMBER OF THE
FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM

1 The number of resulting banks is smaller than the number of transactions, which totaled 133, because a few banks
engaged in more than one transaction.
2 In cases where an absorbing bank engaged in more than one transaction, the resources included are those of the bank
before the latest transaction, and the number of offices before the first and after the last transaction.
3 Includes 3 institutions other than banks.
4 Includes one case in which a bank with resources of $4,039 billion, and operating one office in the United States
acquired the assets, amounting to $10,979 million, and assumed the liabilities of 2 branches of a foreign corporation. The
2 branches were in foreign countries, and are, therefore, not included in FDIC statistics of banks and branches. The re­
sources and number of offices operated by both the absorbing bank and the absorbed offices are omitted from this table.
5 One bank absorbed 2 safe deposit companies which were affiliated with it. Assets and offices of the 2 companies are
omitted from this table.
6 Includes one case where a branch only was absorbed by a newly organized bank. The resources and office of the
branch are included in this table.
7 Includes one case in which a savings and loan association was absorbed.




16

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

by the Attorney General of his report regarding the competitive
factors involved, are shown in Table 15, pp. 31-60.
Bank examinations. The Corporation has long sought to promote
sound banking. This it does primarily through examinations wherein
it evaluates bank management and the current condition'of banks,
and seeks to discover and correct unsafe or unsound practices or
violations of law and regulations.
The Corporation regularly examines insured State banks not
members of the Federal Reserve System, which comprise over
half of all banks. Almost a third of these examinations are made
jointly or concurrently with those of the State bank supervisory
authorities. The Corporation may also examine other insured banks
if deemed necessary for insurance purposes. In lieu of such exam­
inations, it reviews reports of examination made available by
other Federal agencies. During 1964, there was a sharp drop in
review activity, as reports of examination of national banks were
not readily available. The number and type of examinations and
investigations made in 1963 and 1964, along with reviews made
of reports, are shown in Table 6.
Citations for unsafe or unsound banking practices and violations
of law. The ultimate remedy available to the Corporation for se­
curing compliance with law and regulations and discontinuance
of unsafe and unsound practices is termination of a bank’s in­
sured status. This action has taken place only 12 times in the
Corporation’s history.
Table 6. BANK EXAMINATION ACTIVITIES OF THE FEDERAL
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION IN 1963 AND 1964
Number
Activity
1964

1963

Field e xa m in a tio n s and in v e s tig a tio n s —t o t a l..........................................

12,484

12,099

E x a m in a tio n s off m ain offffices......................................................................

6,753
6,592
124
37

6,630
6,494
95
41

3,977
981
2,996

3,949
1,001
2,948

New bank investigations...................................................................................................

1,754
214

1,520
175

State banks m em bers o f Federal Reserve System .................................................. .....................
B anks no t m em bers o f Federal Reserve System ...........................................................................

5
209

5
170

New branch investigations................................................................................................
Mergers and consolidations..............................................................................................
Miscellaneous investigations.............................................................................................

373
147
1,020

392
163
790

7,600
57
1,134
6,409

11,176
2,848
1,666
6,662

Regular examinations of insured banks not members of Federal Reserve Systems
Re-examinations; or other than regular examinations.................................................
Entrance examinations of operating noninsured banks................................................

E x a m inations of d e p a rtm e n ts and b ra n c h e s .......................................
Examinations of trust departments..................................................................................
Examinations of branches..................................................................................................

In v e s tig a tio n s ......................................................................................................

W ashington office review off rep orts of e xa m in atio n of in su red
b a n k s —-to ta l........................................................................................................
National banks......................................................................................................................
State banks members of Federal Reserve System..........................................................
State banks not members of Federal Reserve System...................................................




SUPERVISORY ACTIVITIES

17

When unsafe or unsound banking practices or violations of law
or regulations are discovered in an insured bank, corrections are
normally effected through cooperative actions between the Cor­
poration and the bank. If, however, correction does not occur,
the Corporation gives formal notice of the violation or objection­
able practices and grants a stipulated period for their correction.
Upon failure to comply, the Corporation has the authority to pro­
ceed toward termination of the bank’s insured status. Prior to final
Board action, the bank is given further opportunity to present its
case, including an administrative hearing. After termination of
insurance, the insured deposit of each depositor in the bank on
the date of termination, less all subsequent withdrawals, continues
to be insured for two years.
During 1964, proceedings to terminate their insured status were
started against four insured banks. One case was closed when
necessary corrections were made, while the other three cases
were pending at the year’s end. The disposition of all cases insti­
tuted under the Corporation’s authority to terminate a bank’s
insured status is shown in Table 7.
Table 7. ACTIONS TO TERMINATE INSURED STATUS OF BANKS
CHARGED WITH UNSAFE OR UNSOUND BANKING PRACTICES OR
VIOLATIONS OF LAW OR REGULATIONS, 1936-1964
Disposition or status
1936-1964 1

Started
during 1964 2

T o ta l b anks a g a in s t w hich action was ta k e n ................................................

189

4

C ases c lo s e d ............................................................................................................

186

1

Corrections made....................................................................................................................
Banks absorbed or succeeded by other banks...................................................................

72
68

1

W ith fin a n c ia l a id o f the C orporation .............................. .... ................................................................
W ith o u t fin a n c ia l a id o f th e Corporation ...........................................................................................

62
Q

Banks suspended prior to setting date of termination of insured status by Corporation.
Insured status terminated, or date for such termination set by Corporation, for
failure to make corrections ....................................................................................................................................................................................................

34

Banks suspended p rio r to or on the date o f te rm in a tio n o f in s u re d s ta tu s ...................................................
Banks c o n tin u e d in op era tion ^ .............................................................................................................................................................. .... ................ ....

9
3

C ases not closed D e c e m b e r 31, 1964 ........................................................................................................................................
Correction period not expired ............................................................................................................................................................................................................
Action deferred pending analysis of examination ....................................................................................................................................

12

3

3

1
2

1
2

1 No action to terminate the insured status of any bank was taken before 1936. In 5 cases where initial action was
replaced by action based upon additional charges, only the latter action is included.
2 No cases started prior to 1964 were pending at the beginning of the year.
3 One of these suspended 4 months after its insured status was terminated.

Reports from banks. The reports obtained from banks are both
an important instrument in bank supervision and a valuable source
of data useful in the analysis of economic conditions and trends.
Since 1934, the Corporation has prepared tabulations based upon
reports of condition obtained from insured banks as of mid-year
and year-end dates. Similar information has been secured from



18

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

noninsured banks since 1935, permitting tabulation of condition
data for all banks.
As a result of statutory changes in the method of computing
deposit insurance assessments, each insured bank has filed four
reports of condition a year since the beginning of 1961. In 1964,
reports were required for April 15, June 30, October 1, and Decem­
ber 31. Tabulations of semiannual condition reports, classified
by State, are published separately by the Corporation.
Reports of income of all banks participating in Federal deposit
insurance are submitted on a calendar year basis. No information
is received by the Corporation on the income of noninsured banks.
In addition to the regular calls, a special call was issued as of
November 18, 1964, for information concerning the number of and
amounts in deposit accounts of insured banks. Like the last previ­
ous comparable call made as of September 21, 1955, its purpose
was to determine the extent of insurance coverage under present
and selected higher limitations and to estimate the Corporation’s
contingent liability.
Tabulations of the assets and liabilities of both insured and
noninsured banks and data on the income of insured banks are
presented in Parts Four and Five. Results of the special deposit
survey are presented in Part Three.
LEGAL DEVELOPMENTS
Federal legislation. Probably the most significant Federal bank­
ing legislation enacted in 1964 was that requiring disclosure of
certain information by banks. Approved by the President on
August 20, 1964, Public Law 88-467 provides that the powers,
functions, and duties vested in the Securities and Exchange Com­
mission to administer certain registration, reporting, and disclosure
provisions of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 be vested
in the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation with respect to se­
curities issued by insured State banks which are not members of
the Federal Reserve System. The same authority was vested in
the Comptroller of the Currency with respect to securities issued
by national banks, and in the Board of Governors of the Federal
Reserve System with respect to securities issued by State member
banks.
The statute imposes the following requirements on banks hav­
ing assets of at least $1 million and a minimum of 750 share­
holders: (1) the filing of an initial registration statement contain­
ing information of a financial, legal, administrative, and historical
nature; (2) the filing of supplemental and amendatory documents
to the original registration statement, as well as annual and
periodic reports; (3) the submission, before use, of proxy informa­



LEGAL DEVELOPMENTS

1.9

tion; and (4) the filing by certain stockholders, directors, and
officers of a monthly report listing changes in their holdings of
securities in their banks.
Other Federal banking legislation of major importance enacted
in 1964 included Public Law 88-593, which was signed by the
President on September 12, 1964. This statute amends the Federal
Deposit Insurance Act to require the president or other chief
executive officer of an insured bank, either State or national,
to report to the appropriate Federal banking authority any change
in ownership in the bank’s outstanding voting stock resulting in a
change in the control of the bank. This act also requires such
banks to report loans which are secured by 25 percent or more
of the stock of any insured bank. When there has been a change
in control, the bank is also required to report promptly to the
appropriate Federal banking agency any changes or replacements
in the chief executive officer or directors occurring in the next 12month period, including in its report a statement of the past and
current business and professional affiliations of the new chief
executive officer or directors.
Public Law 88-563 was signed by the President on September 2,
1964, imposing a tax retroactive to July 19, 1963, on the acquisi­
tion of stock, securities, or other obligations of foreign issuers,
and depository receipts, or other evidence of interest in or rights
to acquire such interest. Normally, the tax is not applicable to
loans made by commercial banks in the ordinary course of bank­
ing business. However, the Act empowers the President to extend
the tax to commercial bank loans to foreign borrowers when he
determines that the acquisition of such obligations by commercial
banks has materially impaired the effectiveness of the tax inas­
much as the loans replace acquisitions by individual citizens of
debt obligations of foreign obligors which are subject to the tax.
Public Law 88-341, signed by the President on June 30, 1964,
liberalizes the restrictions on loans by national banks with respect
to forest tracts. The act increases the permitted amount of loans
by national banks on forest tracts, including land improvements
thereon, from the previously existing 40 percent to 60 percent
of the appraised value offered as security for a term of up to
three years, and, in the case of amortization, permits an extension
of such loans up to 15 years.
Finally, on September 2, 1964, Public Law 88-560 was approved.
This provides for additional authorizations and funds to continue
existing Federal housing programs for another year, and increases
the limitations on certain real estate loans made by national banks
from 20 to 25 years maturity and from 75 to 80 percent of the
appraised value of the real estate securing the loan.



20

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Rules and regulations of the Corporation. Upon enactment of the
Securities Acts amendments of 1964 on August 20, 1964, responsi­
bility was placed in the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation for
administering sections 12, 13, 14(a), 14(c), and 16 of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, with respect to insured State
banks which are not members of the Federal Reserve System. In
implementation of this new law, proposed rules and regulations
of the Corporation were published in two instalments on August 26
and September 17, 1964, and interested parties were afforded an
opportunity to submit their comments, views, and arguments.
Revised rules and regulations were adopted on December 31,
1964, and became effective on January 1, 1965. These new regula­
tions appear as a new Part 335 to Title 12 of the Code of Federal
Regulations. They cover six general areas: (1) registration state­
ments and reports of banks; (2) inspection and publication of in­
formation; (3) proxy information; (4) individual officer, director,
and stockholder holding reports; (5) form and content of financial
and reporting statements; and (6) forms for annual and stock­
holder reports.
On November 24, 1964, Part 329 of the Corporation’s regula­
tions was amended to conform with an amendment adopted by
the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System providing
for payment of a maximum p e rm is s ib le rate of interest of 41
/2
percent per annum on certain deposits by national and other mem­
ber banks. Section 329.6 was amended to permit insured State
nonmember banks to pay a maximum permissible rate of 41
/2
percent per annum, compounded quarterly, on time deposits which
have maturities of 90 days or more from the date of deposit, and
to pay a maximum permissible rate of 4 percent per annum, com­
pounded quarterly, on savings deposits and time deposits with
maturities of less than 90 days.
On May 7, 1964, an official interpretation was added to Part 330
(Recognition of Deposit Ownership Not on Bank Records) of the
Corporation’s regulation dealing with the computation of interests
of beneficial owners of commingled funds on deposit in custodial
accounts in insured banks. Section 330.4 provides that if the name
and interest of an owner of any portion of a specifically designated
custodial deposit is disclosed on the records of the person in
whose name the deposit is maintained and such records are main­
tained in good faith and in the regular course of business, such
owner will be recognized for all purposes of claim for insured
deposits to the same extent as if his name and interest were
disclosed on the records of the bank.
Heretofore, Section 330.4 has been interpreted to mean that
where a portion of commingled funds, held in custody by a



LEGAL DEVELOPMENTS

21

depositor for the benefit of various beneficiaries, is deposited in
one or more insured banks, the exact interest, in dollars and cents,
of each beneficial owner must, at all times, be shown on the
records of the depositor and that such interest could not be com­
puted on a fractional or percentage basis.
The new interpretation provides that if the records of the de­
positor, maintained in good faith and in the regular course of
business, reflect, at ail times, the name and ascertainable interest
of each beneficial owner in a specifically designated custodial
deposit, such interest may be determined on a fractional or per­
centage basis and each beneficial interest shall be separately
insured. This may be accomplished in any manner which indicates
that where the funds of a beneficial owner are commingled with
other funds held in custody and a portion thereof is placed on
deposit in one or more insured banks, his interest in a custodial
deposit in any one insured bank would represent at any given
time the same fractional share as his share of the total commingled
funds.
Pertinent provisions of the foregoing statutes, regulations,
amendment, and interpretation, along with a summary of signifi­
cant State banking legislation, are presented in Part Two of this
report.
Deposit insurance litigation. The Corporation in 1964 instituted
several declaratory judgment actions to determine the insured
status of funds shown on the bank’s records as deposits, on which
the person placing the funds in the bank received more compensa­
tion than permitted to be paid on deposits under applicable Fed­
eral regulations. This action was taken pursuant to the provision
of section 11(f) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act that in any
case where the Corporation is not satisfied as to the validity of a
claim for an insured deposit, it may require the final determination
of a court of competent jurisdiction before paying such claim. It
is the position of the Corporation that the funds involved in the
litigation were not received in the usual course of business as
required by the definition of the term “ deposit” in the Federal
Deposit Insurance Act but were actually borrowings by the bank.
ADMINISTRATION OF THE CORPORATION
Structure and employees. Management of the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation is vested in a bipartisan Board of Directors
of three members appointed by the President by and with the
advice and consent of the Senate. The two directors appointed
specifically to the Board are named for terms of six years; one of
them serves as Chairman. The Comptroller of the Currency serves



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

22

ex officio as the third director. No more than two directors may
be members of the same political party.
Mr. Joseph W. Barr was appointed to a six-year term as a mem­
ber of the Board of Directors on January 22, 1964, and was elected
Chairman the following day. Mr. James J. Saxon, the Comptroller
of the Currency, served as a director throughout 1964 and acted
as Chairman until Mr. Barr’s election to that office. Following ex­
piration of the term of office of Mr. Jesse P. Wolcott on January
26, 1964, Mr. Kenneth A. Randall was appointed to a six-year term
as director on March 10, 1964, and was elected Chairman on
April 21, 1965, after the designation of Mr. Barr to become Under­
secretary of the Treasury. Mr. Barr continued as director until his
resignation effective April 29, 1965.
Corporation officials are listed on page v of this report, adjacent
to an organization chart of the Corporation. The location of each
district office and the area it serves, with the names of the respec­
tive Supervising Examiners, are given on page vi.
Greater activity in handling bank liquidations and the filling of
vacancies resulted in an increase of 139 in the personnel of the
Corporation during the year. Almost one-fourth of the added em­
ployees were temporary, being engaged in liquidation activity at
the site of each liquidation and released in accordance with the
progress of the particular liquidation. At the end of 1964, there
were 67 temporary employees as compared with 36 at the end
of 1963. During the course of the year 215 temporary field liquida­
tion employees were hired and 185 separated. A distribution of
the Corporation’s employees at the end of 1963 and 1964, by Divi­
sion and location, is shown in Table 8.
Table 8. NUMBER OF OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THE FEDERAL
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION, DECEMBER 31, 1963 AND 1964
District and other
field offices

Washington
office

Total
Division
1964

1963

1964

1963

1964

1963

T o t a l .......................................................

1,388

1,249

346

289

1,042

960

Directors..............................................
Executive Offices.................................
Legal Division......................................
Division of Examination.....................
Division of Liquidation.......................
Division of Research and Statistics..
Audit Division......................................
Office of the C ontroller......................

3
29
26
1,013
108
65
38
106

2
19
21
958
64
47
40
98

3
29
26
58
41
65
18
106

2
19
21
55
28
47
19
98

0
0
0
955
67
0
20
0

0
0
0
903
36
0
21
0

The turnover rate among employees was about the same as in
1963. For all employees (excluding temporary field liquidation
personnel) it was 16 per 100, compared with 17 per 100 in 1963.
Among field examiners, who comprise the largest group of em­
ployees, it continued at 12 per 100. Of the 91 examiners who left



ADMINISTRATION OF THE CORPORATION

23

the Corporation’s employ in 1964, 32 went to banks or to other
bank supervisory agencies.
Employee benefits and programs. Nearly all Corporation em­
ployees have elected, where they have an option, to avail them­
selves of the benefits which generally apply to employees of the
Federal government. All are covered by retirement annuity sys­
tems, 89 percent participate in the Federal Employees Group
Life Insurance program, and 87 percent participate in the Federal
Employees Health Insurance program.
The high qualifications required of examiners and the demand
elsewhere for their skills caused the Corporation to start an on-thejob training program in 1946 which has evolved into an educa­
tional program with several facets. The program consists primarily
of correspondence courses, but encompasses also participation
in graduate schools of banking at nine leading universities, a bank
examination school staffed by Corporation and Federal Reserve
System personnel, and regional training programs in automation.
At the end of 1964, about three-fourths of all examiners were en­
rolled in such study courses.
FINANCES OF THE CORPORATION
Assets and liabilities. Assets of the Corporation totaled $3,008.9
million on December 31, 1964. United States Government obliga­
tions, valued at amortized cost, with accrued interest, comprised
$2,981.5 million. About half of the remaining $27.4 million con­
sisted of the estimated net value of assets acquired in insurance
transactions. The Corporation’s headquarters building and site
were valued at $8.2 million, and cash at hand amounted to $4.9
million.
Liabilities of the Corporation on December 31, 1964, totaled
$164.2 million. Net assessment income credits and other credits
due insured banks, amounting to $161.1 million, were the principal
liability items. The excess of the Corporation’s assets over its
liabilities, consisting of the accumulated net income since incep­
tion, constitutes the deposit insurance fund. At the end of 1964 this
fund amounted to $2,844.7 million. Assets and liabilities of the
Corporation on December 31, 1964, are presented in Table 9.
Further resources are available to the Corporation through its
borrowing authority. The Corporation has authorization to borrow
from the U. S. Treasury, and the Secretary of the Treasury is
authorized and directed to loan to the Corporation, on such terms
as they may agree upon, not to exceed $3 billion outstanding at
any one time, when in the judgment of the Corporation’s Board
of Directors such funds are required for insurance purposes. This
borrowing power has never been used.



24

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
Table 9.

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION, FEDERAL DEPOSIT
INSURANCE CORPORATION, DECEMBER 31, 1964
!
j

ASSETS

i

]

$

4,884,751

U .S . G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s :
Securities at amortized cost (face value $2,969,620,500; market or redemption
value $2,869,798,878)............................................................................................
Accrued interest receivable......................................................................................

$2,955,054,328
26,456,824
i

Subrogated claims of depositors against closed insured banks..........................
Net insured balances of depositors in closed insured banks, to be subrogated
when paid— see related liability 2 .......................................................................
Loans to insured banks.............................................................................................
Equity in assets acquired under purchase agreements........................................
Assets purchased ou trig h t........................................................................................

j

2,981,511,152

I

A ssets acq uired in rec e iv e rs h ip and d ep o sit assu m p tion
tran sa c tio n s : 1
$
1

$
Less reserves for losses........................................

21,164,000

:

560,939
953,791
1,464,320
32,553
24,175,603
10,019,669

14,155,934

M iscellan eo u s a s s e ts ................................................................................

145,175

Land and office b u ild in g , less d e p re c ia tio n on b u ild in g .........

8,176,151

F u rn itu re , fix tu re s , and e q u ip m e n t (c o s t $ 8 8 5 ,0 4 7 ) .................

1

T o tal a s s e ts ...........................................................................

$3,008,873,164

LIABILITIES AND DEPOSIT INSURANCE FUND 3

Accounts payable and accrued lia b ilitie s ........................................

$

1,104,110

E arn est m oney, escrow fu n d s , and collectio ns held for
o th e rs ....................................................................................................

179,885

A ccrued a n n u al leave of e m p lo y e e s ..................................................

1,271,724

D ue insured banks:
Net assessment income credits available July 1,1965 4 (See Table 11)................
Other assessment credits available im m ediately..................................................

$

145,189,588
15,901,702

161,091,290

N e t insured balances of depositors in closed insured banks
— see rela te d a s s e t.........................................................................

560,939

T o tal lia b ilitie s .....................................................................

$

D ep osit in su rance fu n d , ne t in co m e a cc u m u la ted since
in ception 5 (S e e T a ble 1 0 ) ...........................................................

164,207,948
2,844,665,216

$3,008,873,164

To tal lia b ilitie s and de p o sit in su ran ce f u n d ..........
l

The following notes are an integral part of this statement.
1 Reported hereunder is the book value of assets in process of liqiudation. An analysis of all assets acquired in receiver­
ship and deposit assumption transactions, including those assets which have been liquidated, is furnished in Table 3.
2 The amount reported under this caption does not include any portion of certain Certificates of Deposit, carried on the
books of some of the closed banks as "deposits” , which are in litigation to determine whether they represent funds
received by the banks in the usual course of business. If the Courts find that all such Certificates of Deposit were acquired
in the usual course of business, the holders would be entitled to recover the insured portion from the Corporation, amount­
ing to about $1.3 million. The Corporation would in turn have a common claim against the banks’ assets in like amount.
3 Capital stock was retired by payments to the United States Treasury in 1947 and 1948 pursuant to the Acts of August
5, 1947 (61 Stat. 773) and June 29, 1948 (62 Stat. 1092), with total interest payments made thereon in 1950 and 1951,
pursuant to the Act of September 21, 1950 (64 Stat. 873).
4 Represents the portion of the Corporation’s net assessment income for 1964 which, pursuant to the Federal Deposit
Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1817), shall be credited to assessments becoming due from insured banks after June 30, 1965.
These credits in effect reduce insured banks’ assessments for 1964 from the statutory rate of one-twelfth of one percent of
assessable deposits to an effective rate of almost one th irty-first of one percent of such deposits.
5 The deposit insurance fund of $2.8 billion as of December 31, 1964, represents the accumulated net income of the
Corporation and is available for insuring deposits and payment of expenses. The Fund amounts to 1.48 percent of insured
deposits, estimated at $191.8 b illio n ; and to 0.82 percent of total deposits in all insured banks, amounting to approximately
$349.0 billion. In addition to this Fund, the Corporation is authorized to borrow from the United States Treasury, and the
Secretary of the Treasury is authorized and directed to loan to the Corporation on such terms as may be fixed by the Cor­
poration and the Secretary, not to exceed $3 billion outstanding at any one time, when in the judgment of the Board of
Directors of the Corporation such funds are required for insurance purposes. No borrowings have been made under this
authorization.
NOTE: This statement does not include accountability for the assets and liabilities of either the closed insured banks
for which the Corporation acts as receiver or liquidating agent or those of the two wholly owned Deposit Insurance National
Banks in operation on December 31,1964. Periodic and final accountability reports of its activities as receiver or liquidating
agent are furnished by the Corporation to the Courts, supervisory authorities, and others, as required. The operating
deficits of the two Deposit Insurance National Banks, amounting to $27,908, are reflected in the Corporation’s statement
of income and deposit insurance fund.




25

FINANCES OF THE CORPORATION

Income and expenses in 1964. Net income added to the deposit
insurance fund during 1964 amounted to $176.7 million. Income
from assessments aggregated $93.0 million, after allowing a credit
of $145.2 million to insured banks as their share of the net assess­
ment income for the year. Other income, derived principally from
investments in U. S. Government securities, totaled $104.1 million.
Operating expenses amounted to $15.5 million, and provision for
insurance losses and absorbed insurance expenses aggregated
$4.9 million. The Corporation’s income and expenses for the year
ended December 31, 1964, are presented in Table 10.
Table 10. STATEMENT OF INCOME AND THE DEPOSIT INSURANCE
FUND, FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION,
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1964
In c o m e :
Deposit insurance assessments:
Assessments earned in 1964
Less net assessment income credits to insured banks....................................

............................................

$238,196,409
145,185,179

$

93,011,230

$

32,350
93,043,580
104,111,445
9,794

$

197,164,819

$

15,457,810

Adjustments of assessments earned in prior years......................
Net income from U.S. Government securities........................................................
Other income..............................................................................................................

T o tal in c o m e .........................................................................
Expenses and Losses:
Administrative and operating expenses:
Salaries and wages
Civil Service retirement fund and F.I.C.A. payments
Travel expenses.....................................................................................................
Office rentals, communications and other expenses

....................................................
.....................
......................

Provisions for insurance losses:
Applicable to 1964.................................................................................................
Adjustments applicable to prior years................................................................

$ 10,575,829
675,480
2,618,268
1,588,233

$

4,131,000
414,925

4,545,925

Non-recoverable insurance expenses incurred to protect depositors— net............

T o tal exp e n s es and lo s s e s .............................................

405,382

$

20,409,117

N e t in co m e fo r 1 9 6 4 —a d d itio n to th e d e p o s it in su ra n c e f u n d .

$ 176,755,702

D ep o s it in s u ra n c e fu n d , J a n u a ry 1, 1 9 6 4 .......................................

2,667,909,514

D ep o s it in s u ra n c e fu n d , D e c e m b e r 3 1 , 1 9 6 4 , n e t in co m e
a c c u m u la te d since in ce p tio n (S e e T a b le 9 and note 5
of T a b le 9 ) ..........................................................................................

$2,844,665,216

The statutory assessment rate of one-twelfth of 1 percent of
assessable deposits would have yielded assessment income of
$238.2 million in 1964. The Federal Deposit Insurance Act of 1950
(as amended) provides, however, that expenses and losses be
charged to such assessment income, and that two-thirds of the
remainder be credited to insured banks and one-third to the Cor­
poration. Credits provided under this allocation reduced the ef­
fective assessment rate in 1964 to one-thirty-first of 1 percent of
assessable deposits. The determination and distribution of net
assessment income in 1964 is shown in Table 11.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

26

Table 11. DETERMINATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF NET ASSESSMENT
INCOME, FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION,
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1964
D e te rm in a tio n of n e t a ss e s s m e n t in c o m e :
Total assessments which became due during the calendar year

.............

Less:
Administrative and operating expenses..............................................................
Net additions to reserve to provide for insurance losses:
Provisions applicable to 1964.......................................................................
Adjustments to provisions made in prior years........................................

$238,196,409

$ 15,457,810
$

4,131,000
421,925 1

Insurance expenses...............................................................................................

4,552,925
407,906 *

Total deductions.....................................................................................

$ 20,418,641

N e t ass e s sm e n t in co m e fo r 1964...................................

$217,777,768

D is trib u tio n of n e t a ss e s sm e n t in co m e , D e c e m b e r 31,1964:
Net assessment income for 1964:
33V^% transferred to the deposit insurance fu n d ............................................
66% % credited to insured banks........................................................................

$ 72,592,589
145,185,179

T o t a l..........................................................................................

$217,777,768

A llo ca tio n of n e t a ss e s sm e n t in co m e c re d it am ong in su red
b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 31, 1964:

...........................................................

Percentage of total
assessment
becoming due in
1964

Credit for 1964
Adjustments of credits for prior years...................................................................

$145,185,179
4,409

60.952%
.002

T o t a l..........................................................................................

$145,189,588

60.954%

1 Adjustments reported on Table 10 reflect a reduction in provision for loss of $7,000 not applicable to net assessment
income.
2 Insurance expenses reported on Table 10 are net after applying a credit of $2,524, representing income not applicable
to net assessment income.

In addition to its income, the roll-over of its investments and
minor miscellaneous sources provide funds which the Corporation
has at its disposal. As shown in Table 12, most of the activity is in
its securities account, i.e. redemption and sale of U. S. Govern­
ment securities on one hand, and their purchase on the other.
Table 12. SOURCES AND APPLICATION OF FUNDS, FEDERAL DEPOSIT
INSURANCE CORPORATION, YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1964
Funds provided by:
Net deposit insurance assessments............................................................................................................
Income from U.S. Government securities, less amortized net discounts..............................................
Maturities and sales of U.S. Government securities.................................................................................
Collections on assets acquired in receivership and deposit assumption transactions........................
Increase in assessment credits due insured banks..................................................................................

$ 93,043,580
102,955,164
529,829,159
8,368,421
8,951,926

T o ta l fu n d s p ro v id e d .........................................................................................

$743,148,250

F u nds a p p lie d to :
Administrative, operating and insurance expenses, less miscellaneous credits..................................
Acquisition of assets in receivership and deposit assumption transactions.........................................
Construction costs of office building............................................................................................................
Purchases of U.S. Government securities..................................................................................................
Net change in other assets and lia b ilitie s..................................................................................................

$ 15,718,008
12,201,824
43,652
710,889,028
4,295,738

T o tal fu n d s a p p lie d ............................................................................................

$743,148,250




27

FINANCES OF THE CORPORATION

Income and the deposit insurance fund, 1934-1964. Table 13 pre­
sents a recapitulation of the income, expenses, and losses of the
Corporation for each year since its establishment.
The steady rise in investments from a relatively minor status
as a source of income to its position of preeminence is apparent
Table 13. INCOME AND EXPENSES, FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE
CORPORATION, BY YEARS, FROM BEGINNING OF OPERATIONS,
SEPTEMBER 11, 1933, TO DECEMBER 31, 1964,
ADJUSTED TO DECEMBER 31, 1964
(In millions)
Income
Year
Total

Expenses and losses

Deposit
insurance
assess­
ments1

Invest­
ments
and
other
sources2

Total

Deposit
insurance
losses and
expenses

Interest
on capital
stock3

Adminis­
trative
and
operating
expenses

$80.6

$216.2

Net
income
added to
deposit
insurance
fund4

1933-64.

$3,178.5

$2,077.9

$1,1 0 0 .6

$333.8

$37.0

1 9 6 4 ....

197.1

93.0

104.1

20.0

4.5

15.5

177.1

1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 1 ....
1960.
1959.

181.9
161.1
147.3
144.6
136.5

84.2
76.5
73.4
79.6
78.6

97.7
84.6
73.9
65.0
57.9

16.4
13.8
14.8
12.5

2.0
.1

14.4
13.7
13.2
12.4
11.9

165.5
147.3
132.5
132.1
124.4

1 9 5 8 ....
1 9 5 7 ....
1 9 5 6 ....
1 9 5 5 ....
1 9 5 4 ....

126.8
117.3
111.9
105.7
99.7

73.8
69.1

11.6

62.4

53.0
48.2
43.7
39.6
37.3

11.6
9.6
9.1
8.7
7.7

115.2
107.6
102.3
96.7
91.9

1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1951.. ..
1950.. ..
1949

94.2

60.2
57.3
54.3
54.2
122.7

34.0
31.3
29.2
30.6
28.4

7.8
6.4

1.4
.3

7.2
7.0
6.6
6.4
6.1

86.9
80.8
76.9
77.0
144.7

119.3
114.4
107.0
93.7
80.9

26.3
43.1
23.7
27.3
18.4

7.0
9.9
10.0
9.4
9.3

.7
.1
.1
.1
.1

4.8
5.8
5.8
5.8

5.7
5.0
4.1
3.5
3.4

138.6
147.6
120.7
111.6
90.0

70.0
56.5
51.4
46.2
40.7

16.6
12.6
10.6
9.7
10.5

9.8

.2

10.1

.6

12.9
16.4

3.5
7.2

5.8
5.8
5.8
5.8
5.8

3.8
3.8
3.7
3.6
3.4

76.8
59.0
51.9
43.0
34.8

9.4
9.4

11.3

8.2

12.2

2.5
3.7

20.8

38.3
38.8
35.6
11.5

10.9
11.3

2.6
2.8

7.0

(5)

5.8
5.8
5.8
5.8
5.6

3.0
2.7
2.5
2.7
4.2 6

36.4
36.0
32.9
9.5
- 3 .0 7

1948.
1947
1946.
1 9 4 5 ....
1 9 4 4 ....
1 9 4 3 ....
1942.
1941
1940.
1939.
1938.
1 9 3 7 ....
1 9 3 6 ....
1 9 3 5 ....
1933-34.

88.6
83.5
84.8
151.1
145.6
157.5
130.7

121.0
99.3

86.6
69.1
62.0
55.9
51.2
47.7
48.2
43.8

68.2
66.1

9.3
7.0

12.1

1.6
.1
.2

9.7
9.6
9.0
7.8
7.3
7.8

6.6

10.1

10.0

.5

.2

.6

$2,844.7

1 For the period from 1950 to 1964, inclusive, figures are net after deducting the portion of net assessment income
credited to insured banks pursuant to provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act of 1950, as amended. Assessment
credits to insured banks for these years amounted to $1,456 million, equal to 58 percent of gross assessments.
2 Includes $9.1 m illion of interest and allowable return received on funds advanced by the Corporation in 161 receiver­
ship and deposit assumption cases.
3 Paid in 1950 and 1951, but allocated among years to which it applies. Initial capital of $289 million was retired by
payments to the United States Treasury in 1947 and 1948.
4 The amounts shown herein give effect to adjustments to the deposit insurance fund in the years to which they are
applicable, whereas the amounts of the Fund shown in Table 14 represent the Fund as reported on the dates specified.
Hence the deposit insurance fund reported in Table 14 cannot be computed by annual addition of income reported herein,
except for the Fund as of December 31,1964.
5 Assessments collected from members of the temporary insurance funds which became insured under the permanent
plan were credited to their accounts at the termination of the temporary funds and were applied toward payment of subse­
quent assessments becoming due under the permanent insurance fund, resulting in no income to the Corporation from
assessments during the existence of the temporary insurance funds.
6 Net after deducting the portion of expenses and losses charged to banks withdrawing from the temporary insurance
funds on June 30,1934.
7 Deduction.




FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

28

in the table. In the late 193Q’s investments provided about onefifth of the Corporation’s income. The formula which reduced
assessment income starting in 1950 permitted investment income
to overtake it by 1961 as the major income source. Operating ex­
penses have risen steadily, conforming to a generally common
experience. The low level of insurance losses, despite some ad­
vance in recent years, has been particularly significant in per­
mitting the deposit insurance fund to grow to a level nearly match­
ing the Corporation’s borrowing power.
The relationship between the deposit insurance fund and the
Corporation’s contingent liability, that is, insured deposits, has
long been observed as a reference point of some significance.
Similarly, attention has also been given to the relationship betweeen the insurance fund and total deposits in insured banks,
including deposits not insured but whose security still concerns
Table 14.

INSURED DEPOSITS AND THE DEPOSIT INSURANCE FUND,
1934-1964

Year
(Dec. 31)

Deposits in
insured banks
(in millions)
Total

Percent
of
deposits
insured

Deposit
insurance
fund
(in
millions)

Insured 1

Total
deposits

Insured
deposits

55.0%

$2,844.7

.82%

1.48%

1963..................
1962..................
1961..................
1960..................
1959..................

313,3042
297,548 3
281,304
260,495
247,589

177,381
170,210 4
160,309 4
149,684
142,131

56.6
57.2 4
57.0 4
57.5
57.4

2,667.9
2,502.0
2,353.8
2,222.2
2,089.8

.85
.84
.84
.85
.84

1.50
1.47 4
1.47 4
1.48
1.47

1958..................
1957..................
1956..................
1955..................
1954..................

242,445
225,507
219,393
212,226
203,195

137,698
127,055
121,008
116,380
110,973

56.8
56.3
55.2
54.8
54.6

1,965.4
1,850.5
1,742.1
1,639.6
1,542.7

.81
.82
.79
.77
.76

1.43
1.46
1.44
1.41
1.39

1953..................
1952..................
1951..................
1950..................
1949..................

193,466
188,142
178,540
167,818
156,786

105,610
101,842
96,713
91,359
76,589

54.6
54.1
54.2
54.4
48.8

1,450.7
1,363.5
1,282.2
1,243.9
1,203.9

.75
.72
.72
.74
.77

1.37
1.34
1.33
1.36
1.57

1948..................
1947..................
1946..................
1945..................
1944..................

153,454
154,096
148,458
158,174
134,662

75,320
76,254
73,759
67,021
56,398

49.1
49.5
49.7
42.4
41.9

1,065.9
1,006.1
1,058.5
929.2
804.3

.69
.65
.71
.59
.60

1.42
1.32
1.44
1.39
1.43

1943..................
1942..................
1941..................
1940..................
1939..................

111,650
89,869
71,209
65,288
57,485

48,440
32,837
28,249
26,638
24,650

43.4
36.5
39.7
40.8
42.9

703.1
616.9
553.5
496.0
452.7

.63
.69
.78
.76
.79

1.45
1.88
1.96
1.86
1.84

1938..................
1937..................
1936..................
1935..................
1934..................

50,791
48,228
50,281
45,125
40,060

23,121
22,557
22,330
20,158
18,075

45.5
46.8
44.4
44.7
45.1

420.5
383.1
343.4
306.0
333.0

.83
.79
.68
.68
.83

1.82
1.70
1.54
1.52
1.84

1964..................

$348,981

$191,787

Ratio of deposit
insurance fund to—

1 Figures estimated by applying to the deposits in the various types of account at the regular call dates the percentages
insured as determined from special reports secured from insured banks.
2 December 20, 1963.
3 December 28, 1962.
4 Revised.




FINANCES OF THE CORPORATION

29

both depositors and the Corporation. The overriding observation
that might be made about these ratios is their remarkable stability
over the years, as indicated in Table 14. The ratio of the deposit
insurance fund to insured deposits has varied within a range of
1.3 to 2.0 percent; and the ratio of the fund to total deposits in
insured banks has stayed within a range of 0.6 to 0.9 percent. At
the end of 1964, the respective ratios were 1.5 percent and 0.8
percent.
Ratios of the deposit insurance fund to insured or total deposits
do not, of course, measure all the elements of the Corporation’s
risk. There are specific areas of risk, such as those represented
by banks with inadequate capital, or large amounts of substandard
assets, or in situations especially vulnerable to adverse develop­
ments. Other risks come from the concentration of deposits, in
geographic areas as in individual banks.
At the same time, it is well to remember that means other than
the deposit insurance fund protect bank depositors. The different
supervising agencies provide a continuing basis for confidence
through examinations, required reports, and other supervisory
powers and actions. Depositors, particularly large depositors,
exert a disciplinary influence through their preference for doing
business with banks which show strength in the various dimen­
sions of financial soundness. Banks themselves possess great
financial strength in the form of high quality assets which exceed
liabilities by a substantial capital margin. Validating these various
elements of depositor security is the determination to promote
the full employment, improving productivity, and price stability
characteristic of a dynamic economy.
Audit. The Audit Division of the Corporation conducts a con­
tinuing internal audit of its financial operations, including the Cor­
poration’s fiscal involvement in liquidation activities. Insurance
assessments computed and paid by insured banks are verified by
field audits on a sample basis and by routine verification in the
office of the Fiscal Agent.
Outside audits of the Corporation have been made each year
since its beginning, first by private firms, and since 1945 by the
General Accounting Office. The report on audit conducted by
the Comptroller General for the year ended June 30, 1964, was
not available in time for inclusion in this report.







BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

31

Table 15. DESCRIPTION OF EACH MERGER, CONSOLIDATION,
ACQUISITION OF ASSETS OR ASSUMPTION OF LIABILITIES
APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION DURING 1964'

Case No. 1
Continental Illinois National Bank
and Trust Company of Chicago,
Chicago, Illinois
to acquire the assets and assume
liabilities of two branches of
Nationale Handelsbank, N.V.,
Amsterdam, Holland 3

Resources
(in
tho usan ds
of dollars)

4,039,116

10,979

B an king offices
In
o p eration

To be
o p e ra te d

2

2

2

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, D e c e m b e r 2 3 , 1 96 3
Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust Company of Chicago seeks to
acquire from Nationale Handelsbank, N.V., a Netherlands corporation, its Japa­
nese branches in Tokyo and Osaka. In terms of size the institutions to be
acquired represent less than one-half of one percent of that of Continental
Illinois. In each city the only branch offices of United States banks are those
of New York and San Francisco banks. No Chicago banks maintain branch
facilities in either city.
No further information is furnished by the applicants with respect to the
competitive aspects of the proposed transaction. On the basis of the information
which is provided it would not appear at this time that the acquisitions in question
would involve substantial competitive issues affecting domestic or foreign trade.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, Jan u ary 3 , 1 9 6 4
This transaction involves the acquisition by Continental of the Tokyo and Osaka
branches of Nationale Handelsbank, N.V., a Netherlands corporation. Since
nationalization of its Indonesia branches, Nationale Handelsbank has desired to
dispose of its other Far Eastern branches and this transaction will facilitate the
liquidation of its Far Eastern business. Continental’s only foreign branch is in
London. Bank of America NT&SA, The Chase Manhattan Bank, and First National
City Bank of New York operate branches in both Tokyo and Osaka.
The transaction, which will enable Continental to more effectively service the
banking requirements of its domestic and foreign customers and those of other
American and foreign concerns operating in Japan, as well as increase compe­
tition among American banks for this business, is considered to be in the public
interest.
Case No. 2
Montcalm Central Bank,
Stanton, Michigan
to consolidate with
The State Bank of Crystal,
Crystal

Resources
(in
tho usan ds
o f dollars)

B an king offices
in
o p era tio n

To be
o p e ra te d

9,128

2,424

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, N o v e m b e r 4 , 1 9 6 3
Montcalm Central Bank is proposed to result from a consolidation of an existing
bank of that name with The State Bank of Crystal, the facilities of the latter to be
operated as a branch office.




FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

32

Both existing banks operate within the same service area, so that some
overlapping of loan and deposit accounts exists. Nearest offices are 11 miles
apart, but the banks have traditionally confined most of their activity to their re­
spective immediate areas. A substantial number of independent banks will con­
tinue to operate in the general territory, so that adverse effects upon competition
will not be significantly adverse.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, Jan u ary 3 , 1 9 6 4
Much of Montcalm County is included in the service area involved in this
consolidation and the consolidated bank’s service area will be extended some
few miles eastward. Seven banks, of which Montcalm Central Bank is third
largest and among which The State Bank of Crystal ranked sixth, operate a
total of 12 banking offices in the county. The relatively small increases in deposits
and loans attributable to the consolidation will not change the third-place stand­
ing of Montcalm Central Bank; and, it is notable that the smallest of the seven banks
had a greater loan volume than did Crystal. Competition between the principals
has been only moderate but there are statistical indications that Crystal has been
ineffective as a competitor. A severe management succession problem, which
appears to be of such magnitude as to seriously threaten the continued existence
of Crystal as a unit bank, will be solved by the consolidation.
The resultant bank will retain an office in Crystal, Michigan, continuing to fill
the need for banking services in that area and will bring into the community a
lending program that is characterized as progressive and aggressive. Numerous
other banking offices, other than those within the county, are within easy distances
of many points in the county.
It is concluded that this consolidation is in the public interest and that it does
not involve a tendency toward monopoly.

Case No. 3
The Pennsylvania Bank and Trust
Company,
Titusville, Pennsylvania
to merge with
The Youngsville National Bank,
Youngsville

R esources
(in
tho usan ds
of dollars)

B anking offices
In
o p eration

46,463

5

4,662

To be
o p e ra te d

1

6

S u m m ary rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, N o v e m b e r 13, 196 3
Pennsylvania Bank and Trust Co. operates in two service areas— one com­
prising most of Warren County and the other comprising contiguous portions
of Warren, Crawford, Venango and Forest Counties. Only a few banks conduct
business in these sparsely populated areas. In the first, the charter and merg­
ing banks compete with each other and with the Warren National Bank. Of
these three banks, Youngsville is many times smaller than either of the other
two, which are of substantially the same size. In this area the proposed merger
would eliminate the existing competition between the charter and merging
banks and leave the area’s banking business to only two banks, both of which
have grown, to a large degree, through recent mergers and acquisitions.
In the second service area, the charter bank competes primarily with the
much smaller Second National Bank in Titusville and, it is believed, to a con­
siderably less degree with two large banks in Oil City, 16 miles from Titusville
and roughly 40 miles from Warren. In this area the proposed merger would
affect, though probably not substantially, competition between the charter bank
and Second National.



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

33

In view of the elimination of competition between the charter and merging
banks, the increase in concentration in already concentrated Warren County
and the disparity in size between the charter bank and Second National, its
principal competitor in Titusville, the competitive effects of this merger may
be adverse.

B asis fo r C orporation approval, April 1, 1 9 6 4
The relevant service area involved in this merger is located in northwestern
Pennsylvania, encompassing all of Warren County, the eastern portion of Craw­
ford County, the northern portion of Venango County and a small portion of
Forest and McKean Counties. The area is lightly populated and the economy
principally industrial with some agriculture. Within this area, The Pennsylvania
Bank and Trust Company operates its main office and four branches— Youngsville is a unit bank. The main offices of the banks are 30 miles apart and the
closest offices 9 miles apart. There is no significant competition between them
which will be eliminated.
The Pennsylvania Bank and Trust Company is the fourth largest of six banks
operating in this area and its rank will be unchanged as a result of the
merger. It will hold approximately one-sixth of the aggregate IPC deposits and
loans of the banks operating in the area and, although the increment in its
size resulting from this transaction is modest, it would provide increased com­
petition for the third largest bank, The Warren National Bank, both in terms of
size and office location. The fifth largest bank, which is substantially smaller
than all others in the area, would not be affected by the merger.
The service area of The Pennsylvania Bank and Trust Company generates
a limited loan demand while the loan demand in the area of the Youngsville
Bank is beyond the latter’s ability to conveniently serve. Consummation of the
merger will enable Pennsylvania, with its larger resources and availability of
funds, to more conveniently serve the growing credit and other banking re­
quirements of the Youngsville area.
It is concluded that the merger, which will not have an unfavorable effect
on competition, or the banking structure of the area, and will provide increased
availability of funds and support for continuing industrialization of the area, is in
the public interest.

Case No. 4
Fidelity-Bankers Trust Company,4
Knoxville, Tennessee (change title
to Valley Fidelity Bank and Trust Company)
to merge with
The Tennessee Valley Bank,
Knoxville

Resources
( in
tho usan ds
of dollars)

B an king offices
In
op era tio n

2,817

1

34,262

To be
o p e ra te d

6

5

S u m m a ry rep o rt by A tto rn e y G eneral, Jan u ary 2 0 , 1 9 6 4
Tennessee Valley is the third largest of five commercial banks serving Knox­
ville, Tennessee. It seeks to acquire Fidelity-Bankers which engages primarily in
trust work and mortgage loans. Except for minor services, the participants do not
compete with each other. The addition of the loan accounts of Fidelity-Bankers
to those of Tennessee Valley would not substantially alter that bank’s position in
Knoxville commercial banking. Moreover, it would put Tennessee Valley in a posi­
tion to compete for the first time with Knoxville’s largest bank for trust business.
It does not appear that the effect of the proposed acquisition on competition
would be adverse.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

34

Basis fo r C orporation approval, April 1, 1 9 6 4
Fidelity-Bankers Trust Company does not conduct a commercial banking busi­
ness nor accept deposits, whereas Tennessee Valley Bank is a commercial bank
which does not exercise trust powers. Consequently, there is no competition to
be eliminated; in fact, the services provided by each bank tend to complement
each other. The resulting bank will be a full-service institution able to compete
more effectively with two other much larger banks in Knoxville. Tennessee Valley
Bank is third largest among five commercial banks serving the area, and this
merger will not alter that position in relation to total deposit volume. The result­
ing bank will be less than one-fifth the size of Knoxville’s largest bank, when
measured in terms of total deposits, and less than one-third the size of the second
largest bank.
There is no tendency toward monopoly involved and the merger of these two
institutions would permit intensified competition with the two largest banks. It
was concluded further that the convenience and needs of the community would
be served as a result of the proposal and that its consummation would be in the
public interest.
R esources
/ in
Un
tho u s an d s
of dollars)

Case No. 5
Citizens Bank of Maryland,
Riverdale, Maryland
to merge with
National Bank of Maryland, Silver Spring,
Silver Spring

B anking offices
In
op eration

To be
o p e ra te d

97,379

15

17

6,679

2

S u m m ary rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, Jan u ary 3 , 1 9 6 4
A degree of actual and potential competition between the merging banks will
be eliminated by the proposed merger.
The principal competitor of each of the banks is Suburban Trust Company,
which dominates the service area with approximately 45 percent of all deposits
and 50 percent of all loans and discounts. In the service area there are also 15
other banks, all of which are smaller than Citizens and 6 of which are smaller
than National.
The merger may place upon the smaller banks the burden of meeting the com­
petition of the resulting bank as well as that of Suburban Trust and may force
them to consider merging with one of the larger banks in the service area. That
there is already a merger trend in the area is indicated by the mergers effec­
tuated by Suburban Trust Company in its ascent to a dominant position.
The proposed merger further increases the size of one of the larger banks in
the area and may place the smaller banks at a greater competitive disadvantage,
thereby increasing the probability of further merger activity with a resultant
adverse effect on competition.

Basis fo r C orporation app ro val, April 2 2 , 1 9 6 4
The merging banks operate in Montgomery and Prince Georges Counties, Mary­
land, both of which border on Washington, D. C. Within this area, they are
subject to competition, not only from local Maryland banks, one of which is
almost three times larger than the resulting bank, but also from recently estab­
lished branches of significantly larger Baltimore banks, and from larger banks in
the District of Columbia. There is some competition between the merging banks,
particularly in the Silver Spring area, which will be eliminated, but it is not
significant in relation to the total banking competition just described. Although
the modest increase in resources and capital which the applicant would enjoy as
a result of the transaction would not materially affect the banking structure or



35

BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

competition among banks in the two counties, Citizens Bank of Maryland feels
that the increase will enable it to provide more effective competition to these
larger banks, and to offer better banking services required by the constantly
expanding economy of its service area.
Since favorable findings have been made on all factors required to be con­
sidered by law, it is concluded the merger is in the public interest.
Resources
(in
tho usan ds
of dollars)

Case No. 6
The City Savings Bank of Brooklyn,
New York (Brooklyn), New York
(change title to The Greater New York
Savings Bank)
to merge with
The Greater New York Savings Bank,
New York (Brooklyn)

B an king offices
In
op eration

111,154

3

367,326

To be
o p e ra te d

8

5

S u m m a ry re p o rt by A tto rn e y G eneral, April 2 2 , 1 9 6 4
The City Savings Bank and The Greater New York Savings Bank are both
mutual savings banks. All of the 5 offices of Greater New York Savings Bank are
located in Brooklyn, as are 2 of the 3 offices of City Savings Bank.
City Savings Bank is the smallest of 21 savings banks in Brooklyn and ranks
47th in size among 52 savings banks in New York City.
The Greater New York Savings Bank is 7th in size among Brooklyn savings
banks and ranks 23rd among all savings banks in New York City. The bank
resulting from the merger will rank 5th in Brooklyn and 18th in the City. It will
hold 5.97 percent of the total deposits in Brooklyn savings banks and 2.46 per­
cent of the deposits held by all savings banks, savings and loan associations, and
commercial banks in the area.
The merger would result in the elimination of substantial competition between
the merging banks. Moreover, another major objection to the proposal from the
viewpoint of its effect on competition stems from the competitive advantage
which the New York Banking Law gives to a merged savings bank. While savings
banks which are not a product of a merger are limited to a maximum of five
offices in the City, merged banks not only are permitted to retain all existing
branches of the merging banks, but retain as well all unexercised branching
privileges. Even without taking advantage of the unexercised branching privileges,
the resulting bank will have more Brooklyn offices than any other savings bank,
over 10 percent of the total of such offices in the borough. This is a competitive
advantage which can be duplicated by other savings banks only through the
same merger route and thus raises the distinct possibility that a merger trend may
be precipitated.
In view of the elimination of competition, increase in concentration in banking
offices which would result from the merger, and the threat of the precipitation of
a merger trend thereby, it is our conclusion that the competitive effects of the
proposed merger would be significantly adverse.

B asis fo r C orporation approval, April 2 2 , 1 9 6 4
This merger involves The City Savings Bank of Brooklyn, with $102,559,000 in
deposits and three offices, and The Greater New York Savings Bank, Brooklyn,
with $321,598,000 in deposits and five offices. The merger was prompted by
serious problems in management, internal operations and controls, and loan
administration at the City Savings Bank whose trustees concluded, after diligent
study, that it would be in the public interest and that of its depositors to correct
its problems through merger with another savings bank.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

36

With the exception of an office of City Savings located in Queens, all of the
offices of the two banks are located in Brooklyn. The resulting bank would have
8 offices and hold $424 million in deposits of the 69 offices operated by the 21
savings banks with main offices in Brooklyn which hold $2.6 billion in regular
savings deposits. The resulting bank would hold only 10.3 percent of the total
deposits held by the Brooklyn based savings banks and only 2.1 percent of the
total deposits held by the 51 mutual savings banks in New York City. It would
rank fifth among the Brooklyn mutual savings banks, approximately one-fourth the
size of the largest which holds 36 percent of the aggregate deposits held by the
Brooklyn savings banks. The bank resulting from this merger would rank 18th
among 50 mutual savings banks in New York City. In addition to the competition
among savings banks, intensive competition is also provided by commercial banks
and savings and loan associations; there are 15 of the latter institutions operating
20 offices in Brooklyn which hold aggregate withdrawable balances of approxi­
mately $675 million. The mortgage portfolio of the resulting bank, which would
comprise 81.3 percent of its gross assets and extends nation-wide, would be less
than 2 percent of the nearly $22 billion in mortgages held by savings banks in
New York State and a relatively insignificant percentage of the real estate mort­
gages held by the major financial institutions in the country. The merger would
have no significant effect upon the quality or intensity of competition in the
savings and mortgage markets in which the merging banks are competitive.
Although both banks compete in the same general service area for deposits,
competition between them is limited, and results, in part, from legal restrictions
as to the amount individuals may deposit in a savings bank, and the insurance
ceiling of $10,000. A substantial proportion of the total savings business of each
of the banks is derived from the relatively limited area served by its locally
oriented offices. The closest offices of each of them are the main offices which are
1.1 miles apart. There are main offices of four Brooklyn savings banks, including
those of the two largest, iocated closer to the main office of City Savings than
that of The Greater New York Savings Bank. In no instance is an office of one
of the merging banks directly competitive with an office of the other. The merger
has been approved by the Superintendent of Banks for the State of New York who
has concluded that it is in the public interest. Some operating economies will flow
from the merger which will be of benefit to the depositors of the merged institu­
tion and, immediately, the higher dividend rate paid by The Greater New York
Savings Bank will be paid to the depositors of The City Savings Bank.
It is concluded that the merger will have no material effect on competition and
does not represent a tendency toward monopoly, that it will correct the serious
managerial and operational problems as well as strengthen the surplus and
reserve position of The City Savings Bank; and that, therefore, it is in the public
interest.
R esources

Case No. 7
The Northwestern Bank,
North Wilkesboro, North Carolina
to merge with
Bank of Yanceyville,
Yanceyville

fin

th o u san d s
of dollars)

Banking offices
In
op eration

To be
o p e ra te d

181,177

53

54

4,205

1

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, D e c e m b e r 17, 1 96 3
The Northwestern Bank, North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, proposes to merge
Bank of Yanceyville, Yanceyville, North Carolina.
Northwestern is the fifth largest bank in North Carolina, with total resources of
approximately $163 million, and operating 47 offices principally in western and



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

37

central North Carolina. During the past seven years it has acquired nine other
banks with total deposits of more than $48 million. Northwestern holds approxi­
mately 4.7 percent of total banking resources in the State.
Bank of Yanceyville, operating one office in a community of 1,100 people located
in a rural tobacco growing county, has total assets of $3.5 million. It has no com­
mercial loans outstanding and does not make instalment loans, although the
application indicates such business may be available in the area. The Bank of
Yanceyville has doubled its net current operating income since 1957. The applica­
tion states that the merger is desired because Bank of Yanceyville has been
unable to meet the present needs of the area. The application fails to substantiate
this statement.
While this particular merger will not have a significant effect on competition,
the continuing trend toward banking concentration by merger and acquisition on
the part of the larger banks in North Carolina will bring about a seriously adverse
effect on competition in commercial banking in the State. Since 1960, of the total
resources involved in bank mergers in the State, four of the five largest banks
have accounted for 91.9 percent. Northwestern Bank has contributed significantly
to this trend.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, April 2 2 , 1 9 6 4
The Northwestern Bank is the fifth largest bank in North Carolina, operating its
main office in North Wilkesboro and a network of branches serving the western,
northwestern, and central sections of North Carolina. It is a satisfactorily operated
bank that has aggressively increased its service potential in recent years through
the establishment of de novo branches and through the absorption of other
banks. Although it does not compete throughout all of North Carolina with the
larger banks, it does effectively compete with their offices located within its serv­
ice area. The Northwestern Bank holds 4.5 percent of the aggregate deposits of all
banks in North Carolina and this merger would increase the proportion only 0.1
percent. This compares with 21.5 percent for the largest bank in the State—
Wachovia Bank & Trust Company, and 17.9 percent for the second largest—
North Carolina National Bank. The Northwestern Bank is one-fifth the size of the
largest bank in the State and one-half the size of the fourth largest, and con­
summation of this merger would have no significant effect on the concentration of
banking resources in North Carolina, nor will it affect the relative position of The
Northwestern Bank or competition in its service area.
The Bank of Yanceyville is a small unit bank located in Yanceyville (Caswell
County), in north-central North Carolina, about 15 miles south of Danville,
Virginia. Its 1960 population was 1,113, a decline of 278 in the preceding decade.
The area is rural and the economy agricultural, with tobacco accounting for fourfifths of the farm income. The bank has been operated most conservatively— only
14 percent of its assets is in loans— and the larger resources and more progres­
sive policies of The Northwestern Bank could be expected to more adequately
support an expansion and diversification of the local economy. Specifically, North­
western would offer commercial and instalment loans, and its agricultural advisory
department in the Yanceyvilie service area where such services are not available
on a local level.
There are no other banks in the service area of The Bank of Yanceyville,
although there are many larger banks outside the service area that solicit busi­
ness therein. A branch of the applicant would provide increased competition for
these banks. The closest office of Northwestern to Yanceyville is 27 miles away
in Burlington and there is no important competition between them that will be
eliminated.
The merger, which will provide broader banking services in greater depth,
particularly commercial and instalment loans, in the Yanceyville area with no
unfavorable effects on competition, either in the broad service area of North­
western or the restricted service area of the Bank of Yanceyville, is concluded to
be in the public interest.



38

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Resources
(in
tho u s an d s
of dollars)

Case No. 8
Somersworth Savings Bank,
Somersworth, New Hampshire
(change title to Somersworth-Rollinsford
Savings Bank)
to merge with
Rollinsford Savings Bank,
Rollinsford

B anking offices
In
o p era tio n

12,790

1

8,688

To be
o p e ra te d

2

1

S u m m a ry rep o rt by A tto rn e y G eneral, M a rc h 31, 1 9 6 4
This is an acquisition which affects five savings banks in small towns within an
8-mile radius of Somersworth. The fourth largest savings bank in the area would
be merged into the third largest. The combined bank will continue as the third
largest savings bank, but its percentage of total time deposits will be raised from
14 percent to 24 percent.
The merger will result in the elimination of actual and potential competition
between the participating banks and may affect the competitive position of the
smallest remaining savings bank. In addition, concentration of IPC time deposits
in the three largest savings banks in the area would rise from 80 percent to 90
percent.
The competitive effects of the merger would appear to be adverse.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, M a y 2 8 , 1 9 6 4
This merger involves two unit mutual savings banks operating 4 miles apart
in southeastern New Hampshire. The main office of the resulting bank will be
located in Somersworth and it will operate a branch in Rollinsford. The two
savings banks are closely associated, through stock ownership and management,
with two commercial banks operating in the same towns— The First National
Bank of Somersworth and the Salmon Falls Bank, Rollinsford. This proposal is
closely allied with the proposed merger of the two commercial banks which has
been approved by the Comptroller of the Currency. The resulting commercial bank
will also have its main office in Somersworth and a branch in Rollinsford.
The economy of the service areas of the merging banks is primarily industrial,
although nearby defense establishments are an important factor. Banking in
this area is characterized by a number of savings and commercial banks which
are closely associated through stock ownership and management. In most cases,
the two types of banks are not competitive with each other— the commercial banks
not accepting savings deposits or mortgage loans and the savings banks not
competitive for demand deposits or instalment loans. The Somersworth Savings
Bank is the third largest of five savings banks in the relevant service area and its
position will be unchanged as a result of the merger. It will hold 24 percent of the
aggregate IPC dposits of the banking offices competing for savings accounts in
its area— the two largest would hold 35.7 percent and 27 percent, respectively.
There is some competition between the merging banks which will be eliminated,
but there are many convenient competitive alternatives and it does not appear
that there will be any substantial effect on competition, nor is any tendency toward
monopoly indicated.
The proposed merger, which will enable the resulting bank to more effectively
serve the growing mortgage needs of its area and which will provide manage­
ment succession presently lacking at both banks, is considered to be in the
public interest.



39

BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

Case No.

R esources
fin
tho u s an d s
of dollars)

9

Groton Savings Bank,
Mystic, Connecticut
to acquire the assets and assume
liabilities of
Stonington Savings & Loan Association, Inc.,
Pawcatuck

B an king offices
In
op eration

To be
o p e ra te d

2 1 ,0 8 7

2

3

2 ,4 1 7

1

S u m m a ry rep o rt by A tto rn e y G eneral, M a y 6, 1 9 6 4
The Groton Savings Bank and Stonington Savings & Loan Association are
by far the smallest financial institutions in their service areas, with deposits of
approximately $19 million and $2 million, respectively. Service areas of the two
institutions are contiguous and they are presently competitors for those services
offered by both, mainly time deposits and residential real estate loans.
The competitive effects of the proposed merger probably would be adverse in
that all presently existing competition between the two institutions would be
eliminated. However, in view of the limited size of the two institutions and the
limited areas of competition, such anticompetitive effects would appear to be
minimal.

B asis fo r C orporation approval, June 18, 1 9 6 4
This transaction involves a mutual savings bank which is insured by the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation and a State chartered savings and loan associa­
tion which is insured by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation. It
was the intention of the two institutions to combine into one corporation and,
although a merger would be the most practical means of attaining this objective,
Connecticut Banking Law does not provide for the merger of a savings and loan
association with a mutual savings bank. It was determined that the practical effect
of a merger could be realized through this transaction, which provides for a com­
bination of the surplus and reserve accounts of the two institutions, and the sub­
sequent dissolution of the savings and loan association.
The two institutions serve the southeastern section of Connecticut located
just west of the Rhode Island line. The primary service area of the savings bank
includes the towns of Groton, Stonington and Ledyard while that of the savings
and loan association is confined to Stonington, Connecticut and Westerly, Rhode
Island. The savings and loan association is small, provides limited services, and
has enjoyed only modest growth during its more than 40 years of existence. The
savings bank, on the other hand, offers broad mortgage and thrift deposit services
and has grown rapidly in recent years. There is minor overlapping of the service
areas of the two institutions in the town of Stonington and, thus, a very small
amount of competition for conventional mortgages and thrift accounts will be
eliminated upon consummation of the transaction. However, there is located in
Westerly, the branch offices of the largest commercial bank in Rhode Island, and
a large Providence mutual savings bank, as well as at relatively large local com­
mercial bank. There will be no significant effect on competition in the over-all
service area of the savings bank but competition for the larger banks in the
present service area of the savings and loan assocation would be increased. The
branch office of the savings bank would provide the following services not pres­
ently offered by the savings and loan association: larger mortgage loans, FHA
and VA mortgage loans, collateral and personal loans and savings bank life
insurance.



40

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

It was concluded that the transaction which would result in increased banking
service and competition, with no tendency toward monopoly involved, was in
the public interest.

R esources
( in
Un
tho u s an d s
of dollars)

Case No. 10
Guaranty Bank & Trust Company,
Worcester, Massachusetts
to consolidate with
The First National Bank of Westboro,
Westboro

B an king offices
In
op eration

To be
o p e ra te d

72,024

10

11

5,662

1

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, M a y 8 , 1 9 6 4
Guaranty Bank & Trust Company of Worcester, Massachusetts with assets of
$72,024,000 proposes to consolidate with the First National Bank of Westboro,
Westboro, Massachusetts with assets of $5,662,000, under the charter and title
of the former.
The proposed consolidation would remove one of three small, indpendent banks
in the primary service area in and around Westboro. Moreover, despite the
disclaimers in the application, competition would be eliminated between First
National of Westboro and the Grafton branch of Guaranty. Certain, significant
competitive factors involved in the consolidation would therefore appear to be
slightly adverse.

Basis fo r C o rporation approval, June 19, 1 9 6 4
The relevant service area involved in this consolidation extends through Wor­
cester County in central Massachusetts, from the State line on the north to the
southern border of the county, and State, occupying approximately the eastern
one-half of the county. The area is highly developed with diversified industry
constituting the principal economic activity. The main offices of the participating
banks are 10 miles apart and the nearest offices are 7.7 miles apart. There is
an insignificant amount of competition between the two banks which will be
eliminated.
The Guaranty Bank & Trust Company, Worcester, is the second largest bank
operating in this area and its rank will be unchanged as a result of the con­
solidation. It will hold approximately 20.8 percent of IPC deposits held by com­
mercial banks in the area, an increase of only 1.1 percent. Upon consummation of
the consolidation, the resultant bank would be approximately two-fifths as large
in terms of IPC deposits as the largest commercial bank, and would be operating
only 11 offices compared to 25 for the largest bank. The relative rank and service
areas of the numerous financial institutions competitive in the over-all area would
be unchanged by this consolidation. Expanded banking services, including a sub­
stantially higher interest rate on time deposits, would be immediately available
to residents of Westboro where the principal noticeable effect of the consolidation
would be the substitution of a branch of the applicant for the unit bank.
It is concluded that the consolidation, which will not have an unfavorable effect
on competition or the banking structure of the area, and will provide increased
banking services and greater availability of banking resources for support of the
growth which is anticipated for the Westboro area, without tending toward
monopoly, is in the public interest.



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

Resources
(in
th o u s an d s
of dollars)

Case No. 11
The St. Marys Trust Company,
St. Marys, Pennsylvania (change
title to Elk County Bank and Trust
Company)
to merge with
The Elk County National Bank of
Ridgway,
Ridgway

41

B an king offices
In
o p eration

9,227

1

5,600

To be
o p e ra te d

2

1

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, M a y 6, 1 9 6 4
This merger would appear to eliminate a degree of presently existing competi­
tion between the merging banks. Of more importance, however, would be the
resulting high degree of concentration in Elk County banking. Thus, the result­
ing bank and the Warren National Bank, which itself entered this area through
acquisition, would account for 76.4 percent and 80.5 percent, respectively, of the
county’s deposits and loans. In addition, the resulting bank will be closely
affiliated with the area’s third largest bank, itself accounting for 13.3 percent of
the deposits and 9.4 percent of the loans therein, through common directors and
stock ownership.
The two remaining independent banks in Elk County would thus be compelled
to compete at a serious disadvantage and may well find it desirable to merge with
each other or with another larger bank, thus completely eliminating independent
banking from this area.
For these reasons we believe that approval of this merger may have a significant
adverse effect on competition in Elk County.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, July 10, 1 9 6 4
The merging banks are located 11 miles apart and neither operates branches.
National does not exercise trust powers. There are only three communities
in Elk County having banking facilities. Ridgway, St. Marys and Johnsonburg,
the latter located 7 miles northeast from Ridgway and 8 miles northwest from
St. Marys. There are three banks in St. Marys, two in Ridgway, and one in
Johnsonburg, all competing with each other. National presently is fifth largest,
as measured in terms of IPC deposits, and the applicant is third largest, al­
though it is affiliated with another bank in St. Marys (second largest). The
controlling owners in the two affiliated banks also own effective control of
National, all of this ownership having been acquired over a period of many years.
The resulting bank under this merger would become the second largest and to­
gether with its affiliate would hold more than three-fifths of the area IPC deposits.
The largest bank is that in Johnsonburg, which is a branch of Warren National
Bank, Warren (acquired by merger in November 1963). Warren National Bank is
the largest bank in northwestern Pennsylvania, having total resources of nearly
$63 million which is much greater than the combined resources of the other five
banks in Elk County. This merger will provide a larger bank in St. Marys and
Ridgway which will be able to afford increased competition to the Johnsonburg
bank.
The combination of the applicant and National, which will do little more than
formalize a long-standing relationship because of ownership, will assist the
Ridgway community in its economic development; also, the larger resulting bank
will be better able to serve the area through strengthened management, a larger
lending limit, and the ability through size to provide improved banking services to
the public. In addition, the facilities of its trust department will become imme­
diately available to the customers of National.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

42

With five banking choices remaining, there is no tendency toward monopoly
involved, and in view of the stronger bank which will emerge in both St. Marys
and Ridgway and its ability to better serve the two communities, more especially
Ridgway, it is concluded that the merger is in the public interest.

R esources
(in
th o u s an d s
of do llars)

Case No. 12
Peoples Trust & Savings Bank,
Green Bay, Wisconsin (change title to
Peoples Bank of Green Bay)
to acquire the assets and assume
liabilities of
Bank of Green Bay,
Green Bay

B an king offices
In
op eration

To be
o p era ted

20,858

16,955

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, F e b ru a ry 10, 1 9 6 4
The proposed acquisition of assets and assumption of liabilities of the Bank
of Green Bay, Green Bay, Wisconsin, by the Peoples Trust & Savings Bank, Green
Bay, Wisconsin, a bank controlled by The Marine Corporation, a bank holding
company, would have a seriously adverse effect upon competition.
Since Peoples is presently owned by The Marine Corporation, the proposal is
in effect an attempt by this holding company to acquire a second bank in Green
Bay. Moreover, as a result of the proposed transaction, The Marine Corporation
would control approximately 25 percent of the loans and IPC deposits in the
trade area.
The bank resulting from the pending application would have a larger lending
limit than the largest bank in the area, Kellogg-Citizens National Bank, an inde­
pendent bank. This factor, coupled with the resources of the Marine System
throughout the State would give the resulting bank a competitive advantage over
all other banks in the Green Bay area.
Finally, substantial competition between the Bank of Green Bay and Peoples
would be eliminated. The proposal would have a seriously adverse effect upon
competition in the area and tend to increase concentration in commercial banking
in the State of Wisconsin.

Basis fo r C o rporation approval, July 10, 1 9 6 4
This is a consolidation of the second and fourth largest banks in Green Bay but
the resulting bank would still be much smaller than the largest bank in that city,
Kellogg-Citizens National Bank of Green Bay, and other banking choices would
remain readily available. The resulting bank would be capable of providing better
Bervice for the public than can be provided by the two smaller consolidating banks
and could more effectively compete with the largest bank in the city.
One of the banks is faced with a serious management problem at the top level
which it and the State Bank Authority have not been able to solve and, in addi­
tion, its earnings have averaged well below normal for a number of years. The
other bank has an adequate staff of capable executives and it produces good
earnings. The consolidation should solve the management and earnings prob­
lems. The resulting bank would be controlled by The Marine Corporation, a bank
holding company, but the consolidation would increase the percentage of Wiscon­
sin banking resources controlled by that corporation by only 0.3 percent and such
resources would still be less than 7.3 percent of the total for the State of Wis­
consin.
While some existing competition between the two consolidating banks would
be eliminated, this is outweighed by the advantage to the public of the increased



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

43

competition with the largest bank, and the benefits to be derived with respect to
management, earnings, and needs and convenience of the public; and, therefore,
the Board of Directors concludes that the proposed transaction would be in the
public interest.
Resources

Case No.

/in
U n

13

th o u san d s
of dollars)

The Northwestern Bank,
North Wilkesboro, North Carolina
to merge with
Security Bank and Trust Company,
Rutherfordton

1 7 9 ,1 4 1

8,825

B an king offices
In
o p eration

To be
o p era ted

55

60

5

S u m m a ry rep o rt by A tto rn e y G eneral, M a y 2 0 , 1 9 6 4
Northwestern Bank, North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, proposes to acquire by
merger Security Bank and Trust Company, Rutherfordton, North Carolina. North­
western, with total resources in June, 1963 of $160 million, operates 53 offices in
36 cities concentrated in the Piedmont-Mountain region of North Carolina. North­
western is the fifth largest bank in the State and holds approximately 4.5 percent
of total resources of all banks. The present acquisition would be its eighth since
December 1961.
Security Bank was organized in 1928. It now operates five offices in Rutherford
County, a largely rural area except for some textile companies in a few com­
munities. Security had total resources in June, 1963 of $8.2 million.
Northwestern claims this acquisition is necessary in order to enable it to com­
pete with the four largest banks in the State which also have a history of mergers
and acquisitions. A similar argument of countervailing power was rejected by the
Supreme Court in United States v. Philadelphia National Bank, 374 U.S. 321. The
effect of the proposed acquisition on commercial banking in North Carolina
viewed against the background of acquisitions and increasing concentration can
only be adverse.

B asis fo r C orporation approval, July 3 0 , 1 9 6 4
The Northwestern Bank, fifth largest in North Carolina, serves a broad area in
the State but has no office in Rutherford County or within effective competitive
distance of any of Security Bank and Trust Company’s five offices in the county.
The Northwestern Bank’s state-wide ranking would be unchanged by this merger,
deposit acquisitions through this transaction approximating 0.2 percent of the
State total. Within Rutherford County, the relevant service area, the merging bank
is third largest among five banks although the next smallest is almost equally
large. One is markedly smaller but the two largest banks are near three times its
size. Upon the entry of the Northwestern Bank into Rutherford County, it would
be the predominant bank in the area, but it would acquire only 12.7 percent of
deposits in the county by the merger.
There is no significant competition between the merging banks which would
be eliminated by the merger. The number of alternative banking choices in the
area would not be reduced and the transaction appears to involve no tendency
toward monopoly. Added banking services, an increased lending limit, and an
aggressive management possessed of specialized skills would increase competi­
tion for banking customers. There is nothing evident which suggests the other
banks in the county could not effectively compete with resultant bank. It is con­
cluded that this merger is in the public interest.



44

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Resources
(in
tho usan ds
of dollars)

Case No. 14
Berks County Trust Company,
Reading, Pennsylvania (change title
to American Bank and Trust Co. of Pa.)
to merge with
The Schuylkill Trust Company,
Pottsville

B anking offices
In
o p eration

To be
o p e ra te d

215,187

12

13

11,902

1

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, M arc h 2 4 , 1 9 6 4
Although the degree of competition between the merging banks which will be
eliminated by the proposed merger is negligible, the resulting concentration in
two market areas would be extreme.
Berks dominates the Reading area with approximately 54.2 percent of all !PC
deposits and 56.6 percent of all loans and discounts. There are only two banks, in
addition to Berks, operating in Reading, and the larger of these two banks,
Peoples Trust City Bank, is approximately one-half the size of Berks. The re­
sulting bank’s percentage share in the Reading area would be 55.4 percent of
all IPC deposits and 57.7 percent of all loans and discounts. Thus the anti­
competitive effects of concentration would be significantly increased in that area.
The effect of the merger on competition in the Pottsville area would be even
more adverse, since a branch of a bank with IPC deposits of $204 million (ap­
proximately 2.7 times greater than the total deposits of the three remaining local
banks) would be created in this market. Berks, because of its excessive size,
would be able to dominate banking within the Pottsville area. Such dominance
might well force the independent banks to take steps which would further increase
concentration.
On the basis of this analysis, it would appear that the effect of this merger on
competition would be seriously adverse.

Basis fo r C o rporation approval, July 3 0 , 1 9 6 4
The merging banks are located about 35 miles apart in eastern Pennsylvania.
Berks County Trust Company, whose main office is in Reading approximately 55
miles northeast of Philadelphia, operates 11 offices in Berks County and 1 in
Lancaster County— Schuylkill Trust is a unit bank.
Berks County Trust Company is a progressive, well managed bank with a
history of service to its community, particularly in providing financial and other
support for industrial diversification and expansion. The industrial economy of its
service area is well diversified and its future prospects are favorable.
Pottsville, formerly a center of anthracite mining in Pennsylvania, is part of the
“ Appalachia” and has shared in the economic problems of this area. Its popula­
tion decline has been accompanied by a persistently high level of unemploy­
ment. Substantial assistance in the economic revivication of Pottsville and Schuyl­
kill County can be provided by the direct representation therein of the Berks
County Trust Company, since the resulting bank will provide complete banking
and fiduciary services beneficial to the people, industry and commercial estab­
lishments in this area that the local banks can now provide only on a restricted
basis. These services include electronic data processing, a larger lending limit,
full scale consumer credit and personal loan facilities and more extensive and
competitive trust services. In addition, the resulting bank can provide experienced
financial specialists in Pottsville who have demonstrated their ability to assist in
the rehabilitation of an economically depressed area.
The service area of the resulting bank would include Berks, Schuylkill and
Lancaster Counties as well as portions of four other contiguous counties in which



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

45

applicant is authorized to establish branches under State law. Although Berks
County Trust Company is and will be the largest bank with offices in this area,
only a modest increment in its resources will be realized through this transaction
and the resulting degree of concentration of banking resources will not be exces­
sive. There will remain a number of banks in the area sufficiently large to offer
effective competition. Further, competition for the banking business of larger
accounts in the area with large out-of-territory banks will be enhanced, particu­
larly in Pottsville. There is no significant competition between the merging banks
which would be eliminated, and, in view of the competition remaining, there is
no tendency toward monopoly involved.
It was concluded, since the merger would have no seriously adverse effects on
competition, the extension of the services of a progressive, locally oriented bank
to an economically depressed area would be beneficial to that community and,
therefore, the merger was in the public interest.

Case No. 15
The Edison Bank,
Edison, New Jersey
to merge with
The First National Bank of Milltown,
Milltown

R esources
(in
tho usan ds
of dollars)

B anking offices
In
o p era tio n

25,072

2

11,895

To be
o p e ra te d

3

1

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, June 15, 1 9 6 4
First National, which opened for business in 1917, is the only commercial bank
located in its service area. As of March 31, 1964, it had total assets of $11,895,000,
total deposits of $10,916,000, net loans and discounts of $4,566,000, and total
capital accounts of $979,000.
The Edison Bank, which began operations in 1956, as of March 31, 1964 had
total assets of $25 ,072,000, total deposits of $23,075,000, net loans and discounts
of $12,264,000, and total capital accounts of $1,792,000. It is presently the third
largest in deposit strength of four banks located in its service area.
It appears that little competition exists between the merging banks, with the
total volume of deposits of either bank originating in the service area of the other
amounting to less than $10,000. The nearest office of The Edison Bank is located
6 miles from the office of First National. While The Edison Bank will become the
second largest in its service area by virtue of the merger, its advantage does not
appear to be decisive, particularly in view of the success which it and the other
area banks have had in competing with the much larger First Bank and Trust
Company.
It therefore appears that the competitive effects of the transaction will not be
significantly adverse.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, A u g u s t 13, 1 9 6 4
The merging banks are located in Middlesex County which is in the central
northeastern section of New Jersey on the periphery of the New York metropolitan
area. The economy of this area is industrial and fairly well diversified, although
there are some rural sections which are not yet deveolped.
The participating banks serve separate areas except for a small portion of the
city of New Brunswick wherein are located three commercial and one savings
bank which provide very strong competition. Virtually no competition between the
merging banks will be eliminated and the increase in concentration of banking



46

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

resources in the over-all service area is not significant. The Edison bank presently
holds 8.6 percent of the aggregate deposits of all banks in the service area. This
will be increased to 12.3 percent after the merger and compares to 25.3 percent
held by the largest bank in the area.
The merger will result in improved and expanded services in the Milltown area,
will permit accommodation of the credit needs of the larger firms in the area and
will benefit Milltown depositors through increased rates on savings deposits. The
merger would stimulate competition to banks and other financial institutions
within the present service area of the Edison bank and, in view of the size of the
resulting bank, would provide competition where relatively little existed to outside
banking and financial institutions and increase competition with banks in inter­
vening and proximate areas to the service areas of the participating banks.
The merger will have no unfavorable effects on competition and, in view of the
benefits to be derived by the present and potential customers of the merging
banks, the proposal is concluded to be in the public interest.

Case No. 16
Farmers-Citizens Bank,
Salem, Indiana
to acquire the assets and assume
liabilities of
The Citizens Bank,
Pekin

R esources
/in
vn
.1
tho u s an d s
of do llars)

B anking offices
In
op era tio n

8,991

3

1,973

To be
o p e ra te d

1

4

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, M a y 2 2 , 1 9 6 4
The proposed acquisition of assets and assumption of liability to pay deposits
of The Citizens Bank, Pekin, Indiana by The Farmers-Citizens Bank, Salem, Indiana
would eliminate presently existing competition between the two banks. It would
extend the service area of Farmers Bank and substantially increase the competi­
tive advantage of Farmers Bank over other banks in the resulting service area.
Farmers Bank is now the largest bank in its own area as well as in the area of
Citizens Bank.
Because of the elimination of competition between the two banks and the
further increase of Farmers Bank competitive advantage over other banks, the
effect of the proposed acquisition would be adverse.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, A u g u s t 2 0 , 1 9 6 4
This transaction involves banks located in Washington County which is situated
in the south-central part of Indiana bordering the Louisville, Kentucky metropolitan
area. The economy of the area is agricultural and Washington County is one of
the principal chicken raising areas in the nation.
The participating banks serve areas which overlap to a small degree and com­
mon deposits and loans are relatively small in total amounts. There has not been
any substantial competition between the participating banks which would be
eliminated. The Salem bank presently holds 20 percent of the aggregate deposits
of all banks with offices in the service areas. This ratio will be increased to
25 percent under the proposed transaction and the Salem bank will continue in
its position as the largest bank in its own, as well as the over-all trade area. The
increased concentration of banking resources is not considered of adverse sig­
nificance and should have no detrimental effect on other banks in the area.
The transaction will result in improved and expanded banking services in the
Pekin area and will permit accommodation of the credit needs of larger borrowers
in the over-all service area. Competition to other financial institutions in the



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

47

county, which is described as intense, would be stimulated and also would be
increased to larger banks located out of the county and service area. The credit
needs of larger farmers and industries which must presently use these outside
facilities will be adequately accommodated, in most cases, by the increased lend­
ing limit under the proposed transaction.
The transaction will have no unfavorable effect upon competition and is con­
cluded to be in the public interest in view of the benefits to be derived by the
present and future customers of the partcipating banks.

Case No. 17
First State Bank of Oregon,
Milwaukie, Oregon
to merge with
Gresham State Bank,
Gresham and
Peoples Bank of Oregon,
Beaverton

Resources
(in
tho usan ds
of dollars)

B anking offices
In
o p eration

23,077

4

5,429

7

1

8,853

To be
o p e ra te d

2

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, June 3 , 1 9 6 4
The First State Bank of Oregon (State Bank), Milwaukie, Oregon, has requested
permission to merge with the Gresham State Bank (Gresham), Gresham, Oregon,
and the Peoples Bank of Oregon (Peoples), Beaverton, Oregon. The State Bank
intends to operate the acquired banking facilities as branches.
Robert W. Franz and Elsie M. Franz are among the principal stockholders in
the three banks proposing to merge. They own, either individually or jointly,
48 percent of the stock of the Gresham Bank, 80 percent of the stock of the
Peoples Bank, and 38 percent of the stock of the State Bank. In addition, Robert
W. Franz is a director on each of the boards of the three merging banks, and
Elsie M. Franz is a director on the board of the Peoples Bank and she is also an
officer of the State Bank. Therefore, there is presently to a large extent a common
ownership and direction of the three participating banks.
The service areas of the three banks to be merged do not overlap; for this
reason, there is no direct or substantial competition between these banks. How­
ever, the service area of the resulting bank includes much of the Portland Metro­
politan Area and in this area there are two large statewide banking chains (First
National Bank of Oregon and U.S. National Bank of Oregon) which control 80
percent of the deposits and loans throughout the entire State and are also sub­
stantial factors in the area. Although the resulting bank will have only slightly
over 1 percent in deposits and loans and will be next to the smallest bank in its
service area, this consolidation would reduce the number of competing banks from
nine to seven.
Thus, as an outcome of this increased concentration, similar pressures may be
placed on other small banks in the area to consolidate, and consequently to this
extent the effect of the consummation of the proposed merger on competition may
be adverse.

B asis fo r C orporation approval, A u g u s t 2 0 , 1 9 6 4
The three banks to be merged under this proposal are located in three different
counties and serve essentially different primary service areas, although all three
are located within the Portland metropolitan area. Although each bank derives
some business from Portland, there is no significant competition between them
that will be eliminated. The resulting bank will have total resources of less than
$38 million, and its 7 offices will be in direct competition with 18 offices of
Oregon’s two largest banks, with main offices in Portland, and each of which has



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

48

resources in excess of $1 billion, collectively holding nearly four-fifths of the
State’s total banking resources. In addition, the $1 billion The Bank of California,
N. A. has a branch in Portland. The volume of the bank to result from this merger
would be insignificant in relation to the size of its three Portland competitors,
two of which operate multiple branch systems throughout the State. Consequently,
to some small degree, the resulting bank will be in a better position, through
greater resources and a larger lending limit, to compete with these large banks.
On a competitive basis and also from the standpoint of community needs the
larger lending limit, greater resources, combination of executive personnel, more
specialized banking services, and inauguration of trust department facilities, will
result in definite benefits to the public in Milwaukie and the communities wherein
existing banking offices will be continued.
With three $1 billion banks represented in the area there is no tendency
toward monopoly involved and it is concluded that the merger of these three
banks, which already are commonly owned and managed, would be in the public
interest.

Case No. 18
The Jefferson Banking Company,
Jefferson, Ohio
to merge with
The Citizens Banking Company of
Rock Creek, Ohio,
Rock Creek

R esources
(in
th o u s an d s
of dollars)

B anking offices
In
op eration

8,743

1

2,100

To be
op e ra te d

2

1

S u m m ary rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, July 8 , 1 9 6 4
In the resulting bank’s service area, where concentration is already high, the
resulting bank would remain number three, approximately one-third as large as
the number two bank. Because of exceptional circumstances, this proposed
merger would not appear to have serious adverse effects upon competition in
commercial banking in the affected areas.
The merging banks are small banks; the largest holding assets of $8,743,000.
Citizens has serious earnings problems— suffering a loss of $7,000 in 1963. This
situation has been caused, to some degree, by the disproportionate amount of
Citizens’ total deposits represented by time deposits— 80 percent. As Citizens is
the only bank in Rock Creek, Ohio, its acquisition by Jefferson will assure con­
tinued banking services in this area.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, A u g u s t 2 7 , 1 9 6 4
The merging banks are located in Ashtabula County which is situated in the
northeastern corner of Ohio, bounded by Pennsylvania on the east and Lake Erie
on the north. The northern portion is becoming highly industrialized and contains
two ports along the St. Lawrence Seaway. The industrialization is progressing
southward and applicant’s service area, which is in the center portion of the
county, is mixed industrial and agricultural. The other bank, 7 miles southwest
of applicant, is located in an area which is primarily agricultural.
The service areas of the participating banks overlap to some extent but the
number and amount of common deposits and loans are nominal and little, if any,
competition between the banks will be eliminated. The increase in concentration
of banking resources in the over-all area is not considered significant and there
will be no unfavorable effect on competition. Applicant presently holds 8.8 per­
cent of aggregate IPC deposits in the area and this will be increased to 11.4
percent under the proposal. The latter figure compares to 35 percent and 43.1
percent held by the two larger banks.



49

BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

The merger will result in improved, expanded and more efficient services in the
Rock Creek area and provide a most logical solution to the many problems which
Citizens has been unable to solve. Under the proposal, continuity of banking
services will be assured in the Rock Creek area and the proposed transaction is
concluded to be in the public interest.

Case No. 19
The First Trust Company of
Allegany County,
Wellsville, New York
to merge with
Belfast National Bank,
Belfast

R esources
(in
tho u s an d s
of dollars)

B an king offices
In
op era tio n

23,388

5

2,088

To be
o p e ra te d

1

6

S u m m a ry report by A tto rn e y G eneral, June 2 2 , 1 9 6 4
The First Trust Company, largely through a series of mergers of four other
banks in Allegany County, New York, occurring since 1956, is the largest bank
in the county with close to 30 percent of the total IPC deposits and loans of all
eight banks in the county.
The merger of Belfast National would eliminate a substantial independent
bank which competes with the First Trust Company’s dominant position in Alle­
gany County; and would increase banking concentration in the county to a point
where three banks would control more than 82 percent of the area banking,
leaving the five remaining banks in the county in a less advantageous competitive
position and less able to resist pressures for still additional mergers in the area.
We therefore conclude that this merger may substantially adversely affect com­
petition and increase the tendency to monopoly in commercial banking in Alle­
gany County, New York.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, O c to b e r 1, 1 9 6 4
National, a small unit bank located at Belfast in Allegany County, would be
merged by this proposal into the applicant, the largest bank in that county which
is presently served by eight banks. With its five offices, the applicant extends its
influence throughout most of the county save the northwestern portion wherein
National is located. Belfast is 19 miles northwest of Wellsville, the home of the
applicant, 7 miles northwest of Angelica and 12 miles north of Friendship, in
both of which communities the applicant maintains branches.
By the addition of National’s IPC deposits totaling $1,533,000, the applicant
will gain somewhat in its relative standing with respect to its principal competitor,
The Citizens National Bank of Wellsville which also operates five offices in
Allegany County. Most of these are situated to the east of Wellsville, rather than to
the west as are the applicant’s. The applicant will increase its share of the
combined IPC deposits of the service area outlined in the application from 14.6
percent to 15.9 percent, as contrasted with 12.2 percent for The Citizens National
Bank of Wellsville. The merger proposal does, however, introduce a new and
effective competitor to the banking scene as the Rushford branch of a bank
headquartered outside Allegany County will be brought into contact with the
applicant.
Although there are some deposit and loan accounts common to both partici­
pating banks, the available evidence strongly suggests National has long failed
to exert effective competition to either the applicant or any of the other banks in
the area. Its management is aged and ultra-conservative and either unable or
unwilling, or both to fully serve its community. The applicant will bring to Belfast
several specialized banking services presently not conveniently available, includ­



50

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

ing a comprehensive trust department and various specialized checking account
and loan features. The county has suffered the virtual loss of a principal industry
as the importance of oil production has progressively declined here and attempts
to attract new industry should be enhanced by the expansion of its banking
capabilities, however slight.
It is believed the proposed merger will have little effect on bank competition
except in the Belfast service area, where there likely will be a significant increase.
The merger is concluded to be in the public interest.

Case No. 20
Citizens Marine Jefferson Bank,
Newport News, Virginia (change title
to Citizens and Marine Bank)
to merge with
The Citizens National Bank of Hampton,
Hampton

R esources
(in
th o u s an d s
of do llars)

B an king offices
In
o p era tio n

To be
o p e ra te d

26,929

4

10

18,682

6

S u m m ary rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, A u g u s t 18, 1 9 6 4
Citizens Marine Jefferson Bank with deposits in excess of $25 million, is a
subsidiary of United Virginia Bankshares, a bank holding company with combined
assets of over $484 million operating 6 banks with 45 offices in 11 communities in
Virginia. Of the 4 other banks in Newport News, one is a branch of First and
Merchants National Bank, the largest bank in Virginia; two, The Bank of Virginia,
(fourth largest bank in Virginia) and The Bank of Warwick, are subsidiaries of
Virginia Commonwealth Corporation, a bank holding company, with combined
assets in excess of $230 million. The remaining bank, The Bank of Hampton
Roads with assets of only slightly over $11 million, is the only independent bank
in Newport News.
The city of Hampton, where Citizens National Bank of Hampton is located,
adjoins Newport News. With deposits of $17,875,482, it is the largest bank in
Hampton. The other three banks in Hampton, each slightly smaller than Citizens
National, are all independent banks. The application discloses that competition
between the merging banks is substantial, and the advantages accruing to the
resulting bank from the merger will give it a decided competitive advantage over
the three remaining independent banks in Hampton.
Approval of this merger will act as a precedent for the other large banking
organizations in Newport News to absorb the three remaining independent banks
in Hampton.
The effect of this proposed merger upon competition will be adverse. It will not
only result in a substantial lessening of competition but will foster and encourage
the rapidly increasing concentration of banking in Virginia.

Basis fo r C orp oratio n appro val, O c to b e r 1, 1 9 6 4
Newport News and Hampton are adjoining independent cities serving the
important Hampton Roads port area of Virginia. Together with a small portion of
York County, these expansive communities comprise the service area relevant to
this proposal. Jefferson, the second largest bank in terms of local IPC deposits,
holding 13.1 percent thereof, presently serves Newport News through 4 offices,
all within the city limits. It is owned by United Virginia Bankshares, Incorporated,
a registered bank holding company, presently controlling 5 banks in other
communities. National, the fourth largest of the 10 banks located in this area,
holding 9.6 percent of aggregate local IPC deposits, operates 5 offices in
Hampton and extends its influence slightly into York County through a branch



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION
located at Grafton. The bank resulting from this merger would hold 22.7 percent
of aggregate IPC deposits of the banking offices in the service area, and though
the second largest would hold much less than the 5 offices of the largest, which
hold 31.5 percent. The latter is a Richmond bank (the largest in the State) having
total deposits in excess of $402 million. Two other competing banks, one of which
is more than five times the size of the resulting bank, are affiliates of another
holding company and together their local offices held 19.5 percent of the area’s
aggregate IPC deposits. Competition with these banking offices will be increased.
The main offices of the two participating banks are 5.8 miles apart and their
closest offices— Jefferson’s main office and National’s Pembroke Avenue branch
— are 2 miles apart. These last, however, are separated by effective physical
barriers that have served to restrict competition between the two to a small
degree. There is some overlapping of service areas of Jefferson’s New Market
branch and National’s Mercury Boulevard branch 2Vz miles away, but a branch
of another bank is situated between the two. Competition between the two
subject banks that will be eliminated by their merger is believed to be of rela­
tively small degree.
There will remain 8 different banks, operating 32 offices in the area, prob­
ably competing on a somewhat increased tempo as a result of this merger.
The increase in the lending limit of Jefferson from $150,000 to $250,000 will
enable it to service locally the credit needs of all but the largest industrial
establishments in Newport News and Hampton and, also, it will offer a broader
and more sophisticated range of banking services than National is able to pro­
vide. Further, the resources of Jefferson after the merger will enable it to provide
substantially improved trust services which are available in the area now, only
through the branches of Richmond banks.
In view of the broader range of banking services which will be offered by the
resulting bank in the Newport News-Hampton area, without any significantly
adverse competitive effects, the merger is concluded to be in the public interest.

Case No. 21
Bank of Sacramento,
Sacramento, California
to merge with
Bank of Davis,
Davis

R esources
(in
tho u s an d s
of dollars)

B an king offices
In
o p era tio n

24,667

1

6,713

To be
o p e ra te d

2

1

S u m m a ry rep o rt by A tto rn e y G eneral, O c to b e r 8 , 1 9 6 4
Application has been made to merge the Bank of Sacramento in the city of
Sacramento, California, and the Bank of Davis, Davis, California, which is located
approximately 15 miles west of Sacramento on U.S. Highway No. 40.
Banking in the area in question is presently highly concentrated in three of
the large California branch bank systems— Bank of America, Wells Fargo Bank,
and Crocker-Citizens National Bank. Of the estimated total IPC deposits in the
area of $517 million, these three control $445 million or approximately 85 percent.
Of the total outstanding loans in the area of approximately $504 million, they
possess $431.4 million or approximately 86 percent.
In contrast to this, the applicant banks possess $16 million or 3.1 per­
cent of the total deposits and $15 million or 3 percent of the total loans in the
area.
In view of the relatively minor size of the applicant banks, and the fact that the
service area in question is currently being served by 10 other competing banks,
including the 3 large dominant branch systems noted above, it is our opinion
that the merger in question would have little adverse competitive impact.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

52

Basis fo r C o rporation approval, O c to b e r 2 9 , 1 9 6 4
The applicant bank is located in Sacramento, the county seat of Sacramento
County and the capital of the State of California. It is approximately 93 miles
northeast from San Francisco and is a marketing center for a large, rich and
varied farming region. Industry is well diversified and during the past decade
population and business expansion has been rapid. The merging bank is located
in Davis, Yolo County, California approximately 16 miles west from Sacramento.
Agriculture is important to its economy but the chief attraction for new business
and residents is the University of California, Davis Campus, located adjacent to
the west border of the downtown area.
The participating banks serve separate areas and there is virtually no competi­
tion between them. The resulting bank will hold but 3.1 percent of the aggregate
IPC deposits of the banking offices in the combined service area which contains
offices of some of the largest banks in California. The merger will stimulate com­
petition in the Davis service area, where there are offices of Bank of America and
Wells Fargo Bank, through improved and expanded services which will be avail­
able as a result of the proposal. Further, it will provide a solution to the many
problems which have confronted the Bank of Davis for many years.
The merger is concluded to be in the public interest.

Case No. 22
Council Bluffs Savings Bank,
Council Bluffs, Iowa
to acquire the assets and assume
liabilities of
McClelland Savings Bank,
McClelland

R esources
(in
tho usan ds
of do llars)

B anking offices
In
op era tio n

33,175

3

947

To be
o p e ra te d

1

4

S u m m a ry rep o rt by A tto rn e y G eneral, A u g u s t 2 4 , 1 9 6 4
Council Bluffs Savings Bank, organized in 1856, is the oldest bank in the State
of Iowa. Its home office and one of its two branches are in Council Bluffs (popula­
tion 54,361). It has the largest trust department in southwestern Iowa and its
deposits total nearly $30 million.
McClelland Savings Bank, organized in 1904, has but one banking office in
McClelland, Iowa (population 170), 12 miles northeast of Council Bluffs. It has
no trust department and its deposits total less than $1 million.
Competition between the participating banks appears to be minimal. Moreover,
the merger will have little effect upon competition and shares of the market in
the service area of the resulting bank.
Although a small unit bank will be eliminated, it does not appear that the
proposed purchase of assets and assumption of liabilities will have a substantially
adverse effect on competition or involve any significant tendency toward monopoly
in the resulting service area.

Basis fo r C o rporation app ro val, N o v e m b e r 4 , 1 9 6 4
The proposed transaction involves two banks located in Pottawattamie County
which is situated in southwestern Iowa. The county is bounded on the west by
the Missouri River which also serves as the State’s western boundary at that
point. Applicant bank is located in Council Bluffs, the seat of the county govern­
ment and a railroad and small manufacturing center. Council Bluffs is situated
on the east bank of the Missouri River which separates it from Omaha, Nebraska.
McClelland is a small rural town which is in economic decline and located 16
miles northeast from Council Bluffs.



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

53

Applicant’s service area includes that of McClelland but there has been virtually
no competition between the participating banks for many years because of their
extremely close working relationship. The resulting bank would be the largest in
the primary service area, holding 33.2 percent of aggregate IPC deposits and
37.2 percent of aggregate loans held by all banks competing in the designated
area. This, however, represents an increase in applicant’s share of the market
of less than 1 percent of the aggregate of both IPC deposits and loans. When
consideration is given the banks located in Omaha, Nebraska, the resulting bank
would be the fourth largest and would hold but 5 percent and 4.9 percent, re­
spectively, of the aggregate IPC deposits and loans.
The town of McClelland is located away from well-traveled highways, has
limited trade facilities, and little attraction as a residential or shopping point.
The prospects for its continued ability to support an independent banking unit
are not favorable. The advanced age of McClelland’s executive officer and the
extreme difficulty which would be encountered in attracting a qualified individual
presents the related problem of management succession. Under the proposal,
McClelland would continue operations as a branch under competent and younger
management.
In view of the negligible amount of competition, if any, which might be elimi­
nated and the minimal increase in concentration of banking resources, the effect
of the proposal on competition in the over-all service area would not be adverse.
The proposed transaction will assure continuity of both a banking facility and
capable management in McClelland and is concluded to be in the public interest.

Case No. 23
The Northwestern Bank,
North Wilkesboro, North Carolina
to merge with
First State Bank,
Hazelwood

Resources
/ in
un
th o u s an d s
of do llars)

B an king offices
In
op eration

To be
o p e ra te d

200,822

60

62

2,133

2

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, S e p te m b e r 2 5 , 1 9 6 4
The proposed merger of the First State Bank, Hazelwood, North Carolina, into
the Northwestern Bank, North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, if approved, will replace
a small sound independent bank with a branch of one of North Carolina’s large
chain banks which will be in competition with a branch of an even larger chain
bank, also acquired. There being no significant competition to be eliminated
by the merger, its effect on competition, standing alone, would not be adverse.
However, this acquisition is but the latest of numerous acquisitions of small banks
in North Carolina by the large chain banks in that State, a pattern, if continued,
will further concentrate banking resources in the State in a few banks and result
in the disappearance of locally owned independent banks.

B asis fo r C orporation approval, N o v e m b e r 4 , 1 9 6 4
Northwestern is the fifth largest bank in North Carolina, operating its main
office in North Wilkesboro and a network of branches serving the western, north­
western, and central sections of the State. It is satisfactorily operated, when
measured in terms of all six banking factors to be considered, and has aggres­
sively increased its service potential in recent years through the establishment
of de novo branches and through the absorption of other banks. Although it
does not compete throughout all of North Carolina with the four largest banks,
it does effectively compete with offices of these banks at many of its locations.
Northwestern holds less than 5 percent of the aggregate deposits of all banks in



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

54

North Carolina and the merger with First State would increase this proportion
only infinitesimally. This compares with 22 percent for the largest bank in the
State, 16 percent for the second largest, 11 percent for the third largest, and 9
percent for the fourth largest. The sixth largest holds 3.4 percent of the total.
Northwestern is only about one-fifth the size of the largest bank in the State and
about one-half the size of the fourth largest. The merger would have no sig­
nificant effect on the concentration of banking resources in North Carolina, nor
will it affect the relative position of Northwestern or competition in its service area.
First State is a relatively small bank, operating two offices only about one
mile apart, for which principal competition is provided by three branches of the
State’s third largest bank and one branch of the fourth largest. The entry of
Northwestern into the Hazelwood area in place of the small bank would increase
competition for the two larger banks. The nearest offices of the merging banks
are more than 30 miles apart and there is no competition between them which
would be eliminated. Specifically, Northwestern would offer a larger lending
limit in competition with the two larger banks, and would bring trust services
and a wider range of loan services, particularly an agricultural advisory depart­
ment, to the customers of First State. The larger lending limit should benefit the
rapidly expanding industrial economy of the Hazelwood and Waynesville area
and will result in a better balance in that area’s banking structure.
There is no tendency toward monopoly involved, and in view of the foregoing
competitive aspects which are favorably resolved, it is concluded that the merger
would be in the public interest.

Case No. 24
Union Bank and Trust Company,
Pottsville, Pennsylvania
to merge with
Silver Creek State Bank,
New Philadelphia

R esources
(i n
tho u s an d s
of dollars)

B an king offices
In
op eration

10,899

3

3,707

To be
o p e ra te d

1

4

S u m m ary rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, S e p te m b e r 3 0 , 1 9 6 4
The merger in question will eliminate all competition between Union Bank and
Silver Creek Bank, which are in communities only 6 miles apart, and will elimi­
nate the latter as an independent bank. However, the competition thus eliminated
does not appear critically significant in the context of the several alternative
banking sources available in the relevant market area. Silver Creek Bank, with
less than $3 million in IPC deposits, is the smallest of the 10 commercial banks
in the area, accounting for less than 3 percent of the total IPC deposits. While
the resulting bank will have 11.2 percent of the total IPC deposits, it will be less
than one-half the size of each of the 2 leading banks competing in the area
and not disproportionately larger than the other 6 remaining. The addition of
less than 3 percentage points to Union Bank’s present share of IPC deposits
and 2.2 percentage points to its present share of loans would not seem to place
the remaining banks in the area at any significant competitive disadvantage.
The proposed merger will not have a substantially adverse effect upon com­
petition.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, N o v e m b e r 12, 1 9 6 4
The merging banks are located about 6 miles apart in Schuylkill County which
is situated in the east-central part of Pennsylvania. Applicant operates its main
office and two branches in Pottsville. Silver Creek, located in New Philadelphia,
is a unit bank.



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

55

The service areas overlap to a modest degree but both banks are small and
serve primarily their own immediate areas. In addition, a competitive relation­
ship between them is not indicated in the recent instance of applicant’s assign­
ment of its cashier to Silver Creek in an advisory capacity upon the death of
Silver Creek’s executive officer. The latter had made no provision for management
succession and found itself unable to supply officer material from its personnel
and unable to attract capable applicants for the position.
Applicant’s share of the aggregate IPC deposits in the combined service area
will be increased by less than 3 percent and the resulting bank will hold 11.2
percent of aggregate IPC deposits and 14.9 percent of the loans. Each of the two
larger banks, with a total of six offices in the combined service area, hold more
than twice the aggregate IPC deposits than will the resulting bank. Further, the
resulting bank will not be so large as to place the other six banks at a dis­
advantage.
The share of the market to be held by the resulting bank and the nominal
competition which might be eliminated would not adversly affect the over-all
competitive situation. The proposed transaction would provide easy access to
full trust services and expanded instalment loan and other services in the Silver
Creek area, as well as a solution to Silver Creek’s management succession
problem, and is concluded to be in the public interest.

Case No. 25
Washington Mutual Savings Bank,
Seattle, Washington
to consolidate with
Citizens Mutual Savings Bank,
Spokane

R esources
(in
tho usan ds
of do llars)

B an king offices
In
o p eration

To be
o p e ra te d

438,225

9

11

12,202

2

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, O c to b e r 14, 1 9 6 4
The proposed consolidation will eliminate a substantial degree of actual exist­
ing competition between the two savings institutions. It will also eliminate a clear
potential for additional future competition and confront the other savings institu­
tions in the Spokane area with the full impact of having the largest savings bank
in the State enter the area by merger and thereby immediately acquire two
branches and a significant share of the market.
The proposed consolidation will have a substantially adverse effect on com­
petition among savings institutions in the Spokane-Pullman area of eastern
Washington State.

B asis fo r C o rporation approval, N o v e m b e r 12, 1 9 6 4
This transaction involves a mutual savings bank which is insured by the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and a State chartered savings and loan
association which is insured by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Cor­
poration. Citizens Mutual does not and will not operate as a mutual savings
bank— it presently operates as Citizens Savings and Loan Society, Spokane.
Because applicable State law does not provide for the consolidation of a mutual
savings bank and a savings and loan association, the desired consolidation
requires the prior conversion of the savings and loan association into a mutual
savings bank. It is planned that the conversion and consolidation will be effected
on the same date with a minimum of intervening time.
Washington Mutual, the largest of four savings banks in Washington, operates
eight branches in the Seattle metropolitan area and has approval for an additional
branch in Seattle and one in Spokane. Washington Mutual has enjoyed consid­



56

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

erable success and is a primary competitor for mortgage loans and thrift deposit
services in its service area. The consolidation will have no effect on competition
in these banking fields in the present service area of Washington Mutual where
it is in direct competition with the offices of 8 commercial banks, 2 mutual
savings banks, and 17 savings and loan associations.
Citizens Savings and Loan Society is a relatively small association with its
main office in Spokane, 288 miles east of Seattle, and a branch in Pullman, 78
miles south of Spokane. In this area, it is in competition with five other savings
and loan associations, three of which are more than 13 times its size, and five
commercial banks. Introduction of the applicant into this area should beneficially
increase competition for mortgage loans and thrift deposit services.
Consummation of the consolidation will solve a management succession prob­
lem at the savings and loan association, and expand the services offered by
the two present Citizens’ offices. This expansion of savings bank facilities should
be a beneficial addition to the economy of eastern Washington as well as en­
hancing the convenience for present and potential mutual savings bank customers
in this area.
There is no tendency toward monopoly involved and, since there are no
adverse aspects relative to the statutory factors to be considered, the consolida­
tion is concluded to be in the public interest.

Case No. 26
Chemical Bank New York Trust Company,
New York, New York
to merge with
First National Safe Deposit Company
of Pelham, N. Y., Inc.,
Pelham 2
and
First National Safe Deposit Company of
Mt. Vernon, N. Y.,
Mt. Vernon 3

R esources
(in
th o u s an d s
of do llars)

5,876,496

B anking offices
In
op eration

To be
o p era ted

127

127

S u m m ary rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, S e p te m b e r 14, 1 9 6 4
The First National Safe Deposit Company of Pelham, N. Y., Inc., Pelham,
New York, and the First National Safe Deposit Company of Mt. Vernon, N. Y.,
Mount Vernon, New York, are, with the exception of director shares, presently
owned by the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company, New York, New York,
as a result of the merger of the First National Bank of Mt. Vernon, Mount Vernon,
New York, with Chemical in February 1964, pursuant to the approval of the
Federal Reserve Board. No further adverse competitive effects are believed
present in the merging of these two companies with Chemical.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, N o ve m b er 2 5 , 1 9 6 4
Chemical Bank New York Trust Company acquired all but Directors’ qualifying
shares of the two safe deposit companies, whose operations are limited to the
safe deposit business, through a merger on February 24, 1946, with The First
National Bank of Mount Vernon, Mount Vernon, New York. All of the officers of
the safe deposit companies are also officers or employees of Chemical. The
objective of the subject transactions is to eliminate duplication of accounting
reports and records and to save the time of the officials who are serving in a
dual capacity. Consummation of the mergers would have no effect on the condi­



BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

57

tion or prospects of Chemical nor upon banking competition. Favorable findings
have been made on the seven factors required to be considered by the Corpora­
tion and it is concluded that the merger is in the public interest.

Case No. 27
Mechanics-State Bank,
McComb, Mississippi
to merge with
Farmers Exchange Bank,
Centreville

R esources
(in
tho usan ds
of do llars)

B an king offices
In
op eration

To be
o p e ra te d

1 6 ,0 1 1

2

3

1 ,9 5 3

1

S u m m a ry rep o rt by A tto rn e y G eneral, S e p te m b e r 15, 1 9 6 4
Farmers Exchange Bank with assets of $1,953,000 operates one banking office
in Centreville, Mississippi, and serves an area the basic economy of which is
agricultural and stock raising. Its principal competitors are the eight small banks
located in towns from 8 to 30 miles distant from Centreville and having assets
ranging from roughly $1 to $5 million.
Mechanics-State Bank has assets of $16,011,000. The merger will give the
resulting banks assets of about $18 million, which will be over 3 times the size of
the eight banks now competing with Farmers Exchange. Thus, these eight banks
will thereafter operate at a competitive disadvantage. The precedent of this merger
may act as a spur to these smaller banks to likewise merge to offset the greatly
increased lending limit and other banking facilities the larger resulting bank will
have, and thereby encourage the concentration of banking in Mississippi. How­
ever, it is the view of this Department that the approval of this proposed merger
standing alone will not have an adverse competitive effect.

B asis fo r C orporation approval, D e c e m b e r 9 , 1 9 6 4
The merging banks are located 40 miles apart in southwestern Mississippi
east of the Mississippi River and a few miles north of the Louisiana state line.
There is little, if any, competition between them that will be eliminated as a result
of the merger; consequently, elimination of competition is not a factor in this
proposal.
Farmers, the bank being absorbed, serves a limited service area around Cen­
treville which straddles the line between Wilkinson and Amite Counties. The
applicant, in McComb, serves all of Pike County in which it is located and
portions of the surrounding counties of Amite, Walthall, Lincoln, Lawrence and
Franklin. Over the past several years, the management of applicant has been
aggressive and has pursued progressive policies, showing a deep interest in
community welfare and betterment. On the other hand, Farmers has not been a
progressive bank. Farmers is the only bank in Centreville and its nearest competion is provided by one bank located 8 miles south in Norwood, Louisiana,
and one bank located 8 miles north of Gloster, both being aggressive com­
petitors. The merger of Farmers into the applicant not only would tend to in­
crease banking competition in the Centreville service area, but would bring to
the public broader and more complete banking services such as trust depart­
ment facilities, a much larger lending limit, broader and more specialized loan
facilities and services, a more aggressive and experienced management, and
continuity of management succession. The addition of the resources of Farmers
to those of the applicant would have no significant effect on the competitive
climate in McComb as it presently exists. Following the merger nine other banks
will remain in competition with the applicant.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

58

There is no tendency toward monopoly involved and in view of the foregoing
it is concluded that the merger is in the public interest.

Case No. 28
Page State Bank,
Page, North Dakota
(Proposed new bank)
to acquire the assets and assume
liabilities of 1 branch of
First State Bank of Hope,
Hope

R esources
(in
tho usan ds
of do llars)

B an king offices
In
op eration

To be
o p e ra te d

1

1,260 5

16

S u m m ary rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, N o v e m b e r 13, 1 9 6 4
The Page State Bank is a newly organized State bank having received its
charter in April 1964.
The First State Bank of Hope has since July 1, 1944, operated a paying and
receiving station at Page, 14 miles south of Hope. The Page station, with lim­
ited banking authority, has been the only banking facility at Page. The Page
State Bank was organized to supplant the Page station with an institution pro­
viding full banking authority to the Page community. Under the proposed plan
of acquisition, the Page State Bank would acquire all property and accounts
of the First State Bank of Hope applicable to the Page community in exchange
for its capital stock. The stock of Page State Bank and of First State Bank of
Hope will be closely held and the banks will have common shareholders.
After the acquisition (scheduled to take place, according to the application,
on or after October 1, 1964) the First State Bank of Hope will have total deposits
of $3,069,750 and total loans of $2,030,490. Page State Bank will have total
deposits of $1,063,341 and total loans of $892,816.
There will be no discernible adverse competitive effects as a result of the
acquisition of the paying station’s assets and assumption of the deposit
liabilities applicable to the Page community by the newly organized Page State
Bank as the acquisition merely results in the supplanting of a limited banking
facility with an institution providing full banking authority.

Basis fo r C orporation approval, D e c e m b e r 2 2 , 1 9 6 4
The transaction involves an operating bank in Hope, North Dakota, and a
proposed new bank to be located in Page, North Dakota, at the site of the Hope
bank’s paying and receiving station. Hope and Page are 14 miles apart and each
serves a strictly agricultural area.
The effect of the transaction will be to supplant the limited power station by
a full service bank to be capitalized by a spin-off of capital funds from the Hope
bank offset by the transfer of certain assets and deposits to the proposed new
bank. The number of banking facilities in the area will not be diminished and
there will be no elimination of competition. The concentration of banking re­
sources will be decreased by the acquisition and assumption transaction and no
adverse effects on over-all competition are apparent.
The State authority in recent months has instituted a program of bringing the
operation of banking stations into conformity with State law which does not
permit stations to make and service loans. The station at Page has been grant­
ing loans, and enforcement of the program will curtail its services to the com­
munity while the proposed new bank, which will be under similar management
and control as the station, will have full banking authority.
The proposed transaction will have no unfavorable competitive effects but
will insure continuation of full banking service in the Page area and is concluded
to be in the public interest.



59

BANK ABSORPTIONS APPROVED BY THE CORPORATION

Case No. 29
Southern Bank and Trust Company,
Greenville, South Carolina
to merge with
Citizens Bank,
Fountain Inn

Resources
(in
th o u san d s
of dollars)

B an king offices
In
o p eration

14,704

4

2,899

To be
o p e ra te d

6

2

S u m m a ry rep ort by A tto rn e y G eneral, D e c e m b e r 4 , 1 9 6 4
Southern is the third largest bank in the Greenville area, accounting for about
8.8 percent of all bank deposits in Greenville County, and one of five large banks
in the area with deposits of $10 million or more, which together account for
about 91.8 percent of deposits in the county. Southern does business principally
in the Greenville area, having three offices there and also one branch 100 miles
east in Rock Hill, South Carolina. Citizens is one of five small, independent banks
which have deposits of less than $4 million and do business predominantly in
the Greenville area. Citizens accounts for about 1.8 percent of deposits in the
county, and has two offices, 15 and 20 miles southeast of Greenville.
The proposed merger will not eliminate substantial competition between the
applicants. Moreover, it will not significantly alter the availability of alternative
banking sources in the relevant market area. While the resulting bank will hold
10.6 percent of the total deposits in Greenville County, it will remain far smaller
than the two largest banks and will not be disproportionately larger than two of
six others.
We conclude, therefore, that the proposed merger will have no substantially
adverse effects upon competition.

B asis fo r C orporation approval, D ec em b e r 2 2 , 1 9 6 4
The proposed transaction involves two banks located in Greenville County
which is situated in northwest South Carolina. Applicant operates its main office
and two branches in Greenville and a third branch in Rock Hill, about 95 miles
to the east. Citizens operates its main office in Fountain Inn and a branch at
Gray Court, 8 miles to the south. The main and closest offices of the participat­
ing banks are 18 miles apart, and there is little, if any, competition between
the two that would be eliminated as a result of the merger.
Applicant serves an area which is principally industrial in nature and confined
largely to the communities of Greenville and Rock Hill. The merging bank serves
an area which is still predominantly agricultural but which is experiencing some
industrial expansion and the trend is toward further expansion in this direction.
The applicant will not advance its position as the fourth largest bank in the area
it now serves and will hold but 2.8 percent and 3.3 percent of deposits and
loans, respectively, in the combined service areas. In the Greenville and Rock
Hill areas, which contain offices of the two largest banks in the State, there will
be no discernible effect on competition. Entry of the applicant into the area of
Citizens would make available expanded banking services, including a higher
lending limit and more attractive interest rates on time and savings deposits
to the banking public in that area. This will tend to stimulate competition in the
area served by Citizens, especially for time deposits, but not to the extent that
other banks in the area would be adversely affected.
There will be no diminution of banking facilities and the proposed merger will
not only provide a continuance of adequate banking facilities for the communities
of Fountain Inn and Gray Court but will assure a continuity of capable and more
aggressive management as well. Further, it will provide a solution to a number
of problems which have confronted the Citizens Bank in recent years.
In view of the foregoing, the proposed merger, which will have no significant
effect on competition, is concluded to be in the public interest.



60

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

1Unless otherwise indicated, the first named bank is a resulting insured non­
member bank. Cases are listed in chronological order of determination.
2 Prior to this transaction the Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust Com­
pany of Chicago was operating 1 office in the United States (States and other
areas). FDIC statistics do not include offices in foreign countries.
3Corporation approval is required for absorption of a noninsured bank or insti­
tution by an insured bank. In Case No. 1, absorption is by a national bank; in
Case No. 26, absorbing bank is a State bank member of the Federal Reserve
System.
4 Fidelity-Bankers Trust Company, a noninsured institution, also applied for
admission to Federal deposit insurance effective simultaneously with consumma­
tion of the merger.
5 Deposits in branch being absorbed.
6 Branch only is being absorbed. First State Bank of Hope will continue to
operate its main office.







LEGISLATION
AND REGULATIONS

PART

TWO




FEDERAL BANKING LEGISLATION 1964
Public L a w 8 8 - 4 6 7
8 8 th C ongress, S. 1 6 4 2
A ugust 20, 1964

AN ACT
To amend the Securities Act of 1933y as amended, and the Securities Exchange
Act of 1934, as amended, to extend disclosure requirements to the issuers of
additional publicly traded securities, to provide for improved qualification and
disciplinary procedures for registered brokers and dealers, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled, That this Act may be cited as the “ Securities
Acts Amendments of 1964” .
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
Sec. 3. (a) Section 12(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is amended
as follows:
#
#
#
#
#
#
*
#
#
(e) Section 12 of said Act is further amended by adding thereto the following
new subsection:
“ (i) In respect of any securities issued by banks the deposits of which are
insured in accordance with the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, the powers,
functions, and duties vested in the Commission under this title to administer
and enforce sections 12, 13, 14(a), 14(c), and 16 (1) with respect to national
banks and banks operating under the Code of Law for the District of Columbia
are vested in the Comptroller of the Currency, (2) with respect to all other mem­
ber banks of the Federal Reserve System are vested in the Board of Governors
of the Federal Reserve System, and (3) with respect to all other insured banks
are vested in the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The Comptroller of
the Currency, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, and the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation shall have power to make such rules and
regulations as may be necessary for the execution of the functions vested in
them as provided in this subsection and none of the rules, regulations, forms or
orders issued or adopted by the Commission pursuant to this title shall be in
any way binding upon such officers and agencies in the performance of such
functions, or upon any such banks in connection with the performance of such
functions.”
#
#
#
#
#
*
#
#
*
Sec. 13. The amendments made by this Act shall take effect as follows:
(1) The effective date of section 12(g)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of
1934, as added by section 3(c) of this Act, shall be July 1, 1964.
(2) The effective date of the amendments to sections 12(b) and 15(a) of the
Securities Exchange Act of 1934, contained in sections 3(a) and 6(a), respec­
tively, of this Act, shall be July 1, 1964.
(3) All other amendments contained in this Act shall take effect on the date
of its enactment.
Approved August 20, 1964.




63

64

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Public L a w 8 8 - 5 9 3
8 8 th C ongress, H. R. 1 2 2 6 7
S e p te m b e r 12, 1 9 6 4

AN ACT
To provide for notice of change in control of management of insured banks, and
for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled, That the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12
U.S.C. 1811-1831), as amended, be amended by adding the following new sub­
section (j) at the end of section 7 thereof:
“ (j) (1) Whenever a change occurs in the outstanding voting stock of any
insured bank which will result in control or in a change in the control of the
bank, the president or other chief executive officer of such bank shall promptly
report such facts to the appropriate Federal banking agency upon obtaining
knowledge of such change. As used in this subsection, the term ‘control’ means
the power to directly or indirectly direct or cause the direction of the manage­
ment or policies of the bank. A change in ownership of voting stock which
would result in direct or indirect ownership by a stockholder or an affiliated
group of stockholders of less than 10 percent of the outstanding voting stock
shall not be considered a change of control. If there is any doubt as to whether
a change in the outstanding voting stock is sufficient to result in control thereof
or to effect a change in the control thereof, such doubt shall be resolved in
favor of reporting the facts to the appropriate Federal banking agency.
“ (2) Whenever an insured bank makes a loan or loans, secured, or to be
secured, by 25 per centum or more of the outstanding voting stock of an insured
bank, the president or other chief executive officer of the lending bank shall
promptly report such fact to the appropriate Federal banking agency of the bank
whose stock secures the loan or loans upon obtaining knowledge of such loan
or loans, except that no report need be made in those cases where the borrower
has been the owner of record of the stock for a period of one year or more, or
the stock is that of a newly organized bank prior to its opening.
“ (3) The reports required by paragraphs (1) and (2) of this subsection shall
contain the following information to the extent that it is known by the person
making the report: (a) the number of shares involved, (b) the names of the
sellers (or transferors), (c) the names of the purchasers (or transferees), (d) the
names of the beneficial owners if the shares are registered in another name,
(e) the purchase price, (f) the total number of shares owned by the sellers (or
transferors), the purchasers (or transferees) and the beneficial owners both
immediately before and after the transaction, and in the case of a loan, (g) the
name of the borrower, (h) the amount of the loan, and (i) the name of the bank
issuing the stock securing the loan and the number of shares securing the loan.
In addition to the foregoing, such reports shall contain such other information
as may be available to inform the appropriate Federal banking agency of the
effect of the transaction upon control of the bank whose stock is involved.
“ (4) Whenever such a change as described in paragraph (1) of this subsection
occurs, each insured bank shall report promptly to the appropriate Federal
banking agency any changes or replacement of its chief executive officer or of
any director occurring in the next twelve-month period, including in its report
a statement of the past and current business and professional affiliations of the
new chief executive officer or directors.
“ (5) The Comptroller of the Currency shall immediately furnish to the Board
of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and to the Federal Deposit Insur­
ance Corporation a copy of any such report required in this subsection and
received by him, and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
shall immediately furnish to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation a copy
of any such report required in this subsection and received by it.




FEDERAL BANKING LEGISLATION

65

“ (6) As used in this section, the term ‘appropriate Federal banking agency’
shall mean (a) the Comptroller of the Currency in the case of a national banking
association or a district bank, (b) the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve
System in the case of a State member insured bank (except a district bank),
and (c) the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in the case of a State non­
member insured bank (except a district bank).”
Approved September 12, 1964.

Public L a w 8 8 -3 4 1
8 8 th C ongress, H. R. 8 2 3 0
June 3 0 , 1 9 6 4

AN ACT
To amend section 24 of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371) to liberalize the
conditions of loans by national banks on forest tracts.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled, That the second paragraph of section 24 of
the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371) is amended to read:
“ Any national banking association may make real estate loans secured by first
liens upon forest tracts which are properly managed in all respects. Such loans
shall be in the form of an obligation or obligations secured by mortgage, trust
deed, or other such instrument; and any national banking association may pur­
chase any obligation so secured when the entire amount of such obligation is
sold to the association. The amount of any such loan shall not exceed 60 per
centum of the appraised fair market value of the growing timber, lands, and
improvements thereon offered as security and the loan shall be made upon such
terms and conditions as to assure that at no time shall the loan balance exceed
60 per centum of the original appraised total value of the property then remaining.
No such loan shall be made for a longer term than three years; except that any
such loan may be made for a term not longer than fifteen years if the loan is
secured by an amortized mortgage, deed of trust, or other such instrument
under the terms of which the installment payments are sufficient to amortize the
principal of the loan within a period of not more than fifteen years and at a rate
of at least 6% per centum per annum. All such loans secured by first liens upon
forest tracts shall be included in the permissible aggregate of all real estate loans
prescribed in the preceding paragraph, but no national banking association shall
make forest-tract loans in an aggregate sum in excess of 50 per centum of its
capital stock paid in and unimpaired plus 50 per centum of its unimpaired surplus
fund.”
Approved June 30, 1964.

Public L a w 8 8 - 5 6 0
8 8 th C ongress, S. 3 0 4 9
S e p te m b e r 2, 1 9 6 4

AN ACT
To extend and amend laws relating to housing, urban renewal, and community
facilities, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled, That this Act may be cited as the “ Housing
Act of 1964” .




TITLE X— MISCELLANEOUS

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

66

#

#

#

#

#

*

#

#

#

R E A L E S T A T E L O A N S B Y N A T IO N A L B A N K S
Sec. 1004. Clause (3) of the third sentence of the first paragraph of section 24
of the Federal Reserve Act is amended to read as follows:
“ (3) any such loan may be made in an amount not to exceed 80 per centum of
the appraised value of the real estate offered as security and for a term not
longer than twenty-five years if the loan is secured by an amortized mortgage,
deed of trust, or other such instrument under the terms of which the installment
payments are sufficient to amortize the entire principal of the loan within the
period ending on the date of its maturity, and” .
#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

Approved September 2, 1964.

RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE CORPORATION
TITLE 12— BANKS AND BANKING
CHAPTER III— FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
PART 329— PAYMENT OF DEPOSITS AND INTEREST THEREON
BY INSURED NONMEMBER BANKS
§ 329.6 Maximum rates 1 of interest payable on time and savings deposits by
2
insured non member banks— (a) Maximum rate of 4Vz percent.
No insured nonmember bank shall pay interest accruing at a rate in excess
of 41 percent per annum, compounded quarterly 1 regardless of the basis upon
/2
3
which such interest may be computed, on any time deposit having a maturity
date 90 days or more after the date of deposit or payable upon written notice
of 90 days or more.
(b) Maximum rate of 4 percent. No insured nonmember bank shall pay in­
terest accruing at a rate in excess of 4 percent per annum, compounded quar­
terly,1 regardless of the basis upon which such interest may be computed:
3
(1) On any savings deposit, or
(2) On any time deposit having a maturity date less than 90 days after the
date of deposit or payable upon written notice of less than 90 days. Effective
Nov. 24, 1964 (Sec. 9, 64 Stat. 881; 12 U.S.C. 1819. Interprets or applies Sec. 18,
64 Stat. 891; 12 U.S.C. 1828). [F.R. Doc. 64-12135; Filed Nov. 30, 1964, 8:45 a.m.,
29 F.R. 15944]
i2 T h e m axim um rates of interest payable by insured nonm em ber banks on tim e and
savings deposits as prescribed herein are not applicab le to any deposit which is payable
only a t an office of an insured nonm em ber bank located outside of th e States of th e
U nited States and the D istrict of Colum bia.
I3 This lim itation is not to be interpreted as preventing the com pounding of interest at
other than qu arterly intervals: Provided, Th at th e aggregate am o unt of such in terest so
com pounded does not exceed the aggregate am o unt of interest at the rate above prescribed
when com pounded quarterly.

IN T E R P R E T A T IO N
The question has been raised as to the maximum rate of interest payable under
revised section 329.6 of the Corporation’s rules and regulations on savings
deposits that had remained in a bank less than twelve months prior to November
24, 1964, the effective date of the revised section. New maximum rates are not
retroactive. Consequently, a savings deposit that has remained on deposit for less
than twelve months prior to November 24, 1964, may bear interest at a rate not
exceeding 4 percent only for the period beginning with such date and at a rate
not in excess of 31 percent for the period prior to such date, except that if and
/2
when a savings deposit, which was in the bank prior to November 24, 1964, has
remained in the bank for a full twelve-month period, interest may be adjusted to
provide for a yield not in excess of 4 percent from the date of deposit.




RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE CORPORATION

67

PART 330— RECOGNITION OF DEPOSIT OWNERSHIP NOT ON BANK
RECORDS
Sec. 330.4— Deposits in Custodial Accounts

IN T E R P R E T A T IO N
§ 330.401 Recognition of deposit ownership in custodial accounts. The opinion
of the Board of Directors has been requested as to whether a fractional or per­
centage computation of the interests of beneficial owners of commingled funds on
deposit in custodial accounts in banks insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation meets the requirements of section 330.4 of the Corporation’s rules
and regulations.
Section 330.4 provides that if the name and interest of an owner of any portion
of a specifically designated custodial deposit is disclosed on the records of the
person in whose name the deposit is maintained and such records are maintained
in good faith and in the regular course of business, such owner will be recognized
for all purposes of claim for insured deposits to the same extent as if his name
and interest were disclosed on the records of the bank.
Heretofore, section 330.4 has been interpreted to mean that where a portion of
commingled funds, held in custody by a depositor for the benefit of various bene­
ficiaries, is deposited in one or more insured banks, the exact interest, in dollars
and cents, of each beneficial owner must, at all times, be shown on the records
of the depositor and that such interest could not be computed on a fractional or
percentage basis.
The Board of Directors has concluded that, if the records of the depositor,
maintained in good faith and in the regular course of business, reflect, at all
times, the name and ascertainable interest of each beneficial owner in a specifi­
cally designated custodial deposit, such interest may be determined on a frac­
tional or percentage basis and each beneficial interest shall be separately insured.
This may be accomplished in any manner which indicates that where the funds of
a beneficial owner are commingled with other funds held in custody and a portion
thereof is placed on deposit in one or more insured banks, his interest in a
custodial deposit in any one insured bank would represent at any given time the
same fractional share as his share of the total commingled funds. (Sec. 9, 64 Stat.
881, 12 U.S.C. 1819. Interpret or apply Sec. 12, 64 Stat. 887, 12 U.S.C. 1822)
[F.R. Doc. 64-4553; Filed, May 6, 1964, 8:45 a.m.; 29 F.R. 6003]
PART 335— SECURITIES OF INSURED STATE NONMEMBER BANKS
NOTE: On December 31, 1964 the Board of Directors of the Corporation
adopted a new Part 335 to the Corporation’s Rules and Regulations. This new
Part, which became effective January 1, 1965, prescribes rules and regulations
governing the issuance of securities issued by insured State banks which are not
members of the Federal Reserve System. These regulations were issued under
the authority of Public Law 88-467 of the 88th Congress, 2d session and were
published in the Federal Register of January 12, 1965.

STATE BANKING LEGISLATION 1964
In 1964, the legislatures of 22 States held regular sessions and seven held
special sessions. Some of the more important State banking legislation enacted
during 1964 is summarized below on a State-by-State basis.

ALABAM A

(Special Session)

Authority for certain banks to establish branches based upon
amount of capital stock and population of county location of
bank ___________________________________________________




Act
24
SB 107— XXX
HB 160— XXX
HB 238— XXX

68

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

A L A S K A ( R e g u la r S e s s io n )
Authorization of trust company to establish common trust fund
for self-investment _______________________________________
Nominees of banks permitted to hold investments of banks acting
in a fiduciary capacity ___________________________________
Federally-chartered banks and savings and loan associations
exempt from net income tax ______________________________
Restrictions on banking interests of State banking officers
and employees __________________________________________
A R IZ O N A

(R e g u la r

Ch.
HB
Ch.
HB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB

S e s s io n )

Conditions and effect of issuance, conversion and retirement of
capital notes and debentures ______________________________
Bonus plan restrictions upon savings and loan associations___
Furnishing of bond, securities, or safekeeping receipt by banks
receiving deposits ________________________________________
C A L I F O R N IA

( R e g u la r

Ch. 41
HB 230
HB 337
Ch. 82
SB 158

S e s s io n )

Acceptance of deposits by foreign b a n k s ____________________

Ch. 37
HB 21— X

Taxation of banks, corporations, associations and Massachusetts
Trusts __________________________________________________ SB
G E O R G IA ( R e g u la r S e s s io n )
Legal status and nonliability of fiduciary under certain
conditions ______________________________________________
Application for renewal of bank charter ___________________
Legal investments for trust funds of savings and loan
associations ___________________________________________
“ Industrial Loan Act of 1964” ______________________________
Fees for application for bank charter _______________________
K E N T U C K Y ( R e g u la r S e s s io n )
Time and attendance of meetings of credit union members____
Establishment of Industrial Finance A u th o rity _________________
Settlement of estates of contested value ____________________
Establishment of Savings and Loan Association Act _________
Filing exclusion of certain security interests _________________
Constructive knowledge of certain financing transactions by
custodian bank __________________________________________
L O U IS I A N A

( R e g u la r

70— X

Act
HB
Ch.
HB
Act
HB
Act
HB
Act
SB

732
542
547
787
664
795
758
949
978
71

HB
SB
SB
SB
SB

140
207
27
244
143

SB 212

S e s s io n )

Authorization of deposit of shares of savings and loan association
into cemetery trust funds _________________________________
Saturday as a banking h o lid a y _____________________________
Authority of State Market Commission to make and participate
in loans ________________________________________________
Restrictions on loans by State building and loan associations
and Federal savings and loan associations relative to security
and purpose of loan _____________________________________




14
174
25
175
71
288
86
316

Act
HB
Act
SB
Act
HB

279
589
250
279
298
909

Act 348
HB 584

69

STATE BANKING LEGISLATION
Louisiana Trust Code enacted _____________________________
Territorial restrictions on loans by building and loan
associations _____________________________________________
Inapplicability of small loan retail transactions to industrial
motor vehicles __________________________________________
Assignment of accounts receivable by debtors _______________
Investment of State funds in time certificates of d e p o s it_______
Guaranteed loans by State Market Commission for agricultural
and forest facilities ______________________________________
M A IN E

(S p e c ia l

Act 338
HB 417
Act 474
HB 293
Act 523
HB1198
Act 511
HB 790
Act 37
SB 123
HB 908

S e s s io n )

Joint share accounts in credit unions _____________
SB 651— X
Guaranteed industrial loans and industrial mortgage
SB 688— X
insurance _______________________________________________ SB 677— X
M AR YLAN D

(R e g u la r

S e s s io n )

General and special duties of Bank Commissioner— Organization
of Savings Bank _________________________________________
Officer and director membership in building or homestead
associations _____________________________________________
Uniform Commercial Code correction relating to bank deposits
and collections __________________________________________
Imposition of a franchise tax upon Federal savings and loan
associations _____________________________________________
Income tax deduction for loss from shares in savings and loan
associations ________________________ _____________________
Conditions upon insurance premium financing agreements ___
Restrictions upon the administration of deposits of securities_
_
Special regulations relative to currency exchanges __________
M A S S A C H U S E T T S (R e g u la r S e s s io n )
Exemption of certain deposits in trust company from limitations
on amount _______________ ______________________________
Restrictions of investment of deposited funds by credit
unions _________________________________________________
Limitations upon issuance of real estate loans by credit unions
Credit union passbooks as sufficient collateral for bail _______
Authorization of savings banks and credit unions to provide
group insurance for employees_____________________________
Minimum requirements relative to security needed by savings
banks’ chattel mortgages _________________________________
Two-year waiting period for conversion of cooperative banks
into Federal savings and loan associations __________________
Share and deposit limitations of credit union members _______
Restrictions upon real estate loans by cooperative banks ____
1964 regulations for audits and examination of cooperative
banks __________________________________________________
Special regulations for savings deposits not insured by FDIC
in guaranty fund of trust companies ________________________
Payment of savings accounts in name of deceased depositors
of national banks or savings and loan associations____________



HB

6

HB 206
HB

88

HB

99

HB 96
HB 354
HB 55
HB
8

Ch. 279
HB 677
Ch. 222
HB 678
HB 679
Ch. 67
HB 746
Ch. 237
HB 873
Ch. 280
HB 875
Ch. 386
HB3211
HB3212
HB 3241
Ch. 611
HB 3335
Ch. 304
HB 3356
Ch. 352
HB 3396

70

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Saturday as a banking holiday ____________________________
Limitation of 90% value of a savings bank’s mortgage on certain
types of real e sta te _______________________________________
Restrictions on loans secured by mortgages of leasehold
interests by savings banks ________________________________
Authorization of loans by savings banks secured by mortgages
on leasehold interests in certain air rig h ts ___________________
Investments by savings banks in certain stocks of fire and
casualty insurance companies _____________________________
Investments by savings banks in bank and bank holding
company stocks _________________________________________
Establishment of guaranty funds by credit unions as members
_
of Massachusetts Credit Union Share Insurance Corporation _
Authorization of purchase by a bank or group of banks of group
accident or health insurance ______________________________
Regulations concerning content of reports to directors of trust
companies ______________________________________________
Regulation of insurance premium financing agencies_________
M IC H IG A N

Establishment, powers, and duties of the State Banking
Department ______________________ __ ____________________
Uniform Commercial Code amendments relating to commercialfinancial transactions _____________________________________
M IS S IS S IP P I

(R e g u la r

JE R S E Y

HB 109
Act 159
HB 141
Act 122
HB 414
Act 126
HB 494
HB 661
Act 74
HB 779
Act 156
SB 1073
Act 36
SB 1136
Act 250
SB 1508

S e s s io n )

Duties and obligations of directors and examining committees
of State banks __________________________________________
Appointment of attorney-referees by savings and loan
associations for certain purposes __________________________
Authorization of savings banks to establish teller drive-in
windows __________ _____ ________________________________
Restrictions on handling of bills of lading by b a n k s __________
Regulation of distribution of assets of testator by fiduciary
and transfer of trust accounts _______________ _____________
Exempt securities of building and loan associations ___ ________

SB 1826
SB 1808
SB
SB
SB
SB
HB

1824
1848
2060
2059
897

Ch.
HB
Ch.
HB

114
196
156
234

( R e g u la r S e s s io n )

Minors authorized to contract in their own right for lease of
safe-deposit box _________________ __ ____________________
License requirements for independent check-cashing
organizations ____________________________________________



93
5
219
11
220
12
206
14
98
633
232
691
208
694
236
710
300
767
935

( R e g u la r S e s s io n )

Uniform act regulating issuance and sale of certain securities.—
Annual examination fees for all banks payable to State
Treasury __________________________________________ __ ___
Legal investment of State and political subdivisions in home loan
corporations or other banks insured by the F D IC _____________
Investment of surplus funds of political subdivisions of State in
certificates of deposit of banks insured by FDIC _____________
Directors’ meetings requirements of credit unions ____________
1964 regulation governing annual reports and examinations of
savings and loans associations ____________________________
“ Savings and Loan Association Act of 1964” _____ ____________

NEW

Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
SB

STATE BANKING LEGISLATION
Limitations on commissions above expenses payable to certain
fiduciaries ______________________________________________
Regulations relative to restrictions on bank loans to certain
small businesses ________________________________________
Uniform Commercial Code amendments to commercial-financial
loan transactions ________________________________________
Savings and Loan Association Act amendments______________
Prohibition of investment changes by fiduciaries based upon
market fluctuations alone _________________________________
Election, vacancies, and tenure of banking directors _________
Banking Act of 1948 amendments relative to investments of
savings banks ___________________________________________
Limitations on types of mortgage loans in which savings banks
are authorized to invest __________________________________
Bank stockholder’s preemptive right to purchase s to c k _______
Restrictions on stock option plans _________________________
NEW

M E X IC O

(S p e c ia l

71
Ch.
HB
Ch.
HB
Ch.
HB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
Ch.
SB
SB
SB

S e s s io n )

State Park and Recreation Commission bonds as legal investment
for savings banks _______________________________________ SB
NEW

YORK

10— XX

( R e g u la r S e s s io n )

Restrictions and rules governing the merger of savings banks
Effect of absence of notice of defense against or claim to draw
against corporate funds __________________________________
Regulation of the use of the word “ savings” by financial
institutions ______________________________________________
License required to change location of place of business of
licensed lender __________________________________________
Uniform Commercial Code amendments relating to mortgage
loan transactions ________________________________________
Restrictions on loans made by industrial banks to officers,
directors, and others ________________ __ __________________
Separation of N. Y. banking laws from stock corporation laws
and general corporation laws _____________________________
Limitations upon amount of shares in a credit union permitted
to be owned by members ________________________________
Restrictions relating to property improvement loans by savings
banks and savings and loan associations ___________________
Limitations upon participation by savings banks in investments
in bonds and mortgages _________________________________
Effect of failure to file declaration or underpayment of estimated
tax by certain banks _____________________________________
Disbursement and ownership of joint deposits and shares in
banking organizations ____________________________________
Publication in State paper of certain securities_______________
Restrictions upon the establishment of branches by banks and
trust companies _________________________________________
Related assessments upon deposit of securities by national
banks acting as fiduciary _________________________________
Investment in bank service corporations by savings banks ___




25
397
162
489
166
591
19
24
50
87
32
143
70
191
98
192
262
263

Ch. 501
HB 1200
Ch. 114
HB 3380
Ch. 115
HB 3383
Ch. 167
HB 3388
HB 3451
Ch. 250
HB 3478
Ch. 849
HB 4641
Ch. 594
HB 4234
Ch. 551
HB 4395
Ch. 235
HB 4402
Ch. 367
HB 5243
Ch. 157
SB 671
SB 1083
Ch. 160
SB 2076
Ch. 248
SB 2241
Ch. 231
SB 2427

72

STATE BANKING LEGISLATION
P E N N S Y L V A N IA

(R e g u la r

S e s s io n )

Excise tax on net earnings of mutual thrift institutions ___
RHODE

IS L A N D

(R e g u la r S e s s io n )

Limitations on investments by savings b a n k s _________________
Filing requirement for secured transactions relating to personal
property _____________________ __________________________
Amended fiduciary pow ers_________________________________
Participation of minors in deposits and shares in credit unions ....
Reserve and guaranty fund requirements of non-Federally
affiliated banks __________________________________________
Investment by savings banks or trust companies in investment
companies and trusts ____________________________________
SO UTH

C A R O L IN A

HB 128

HB 1645
HB 1643
HB1808
SB 538
SB 678
SB 704
SB 798

(R e g u la r S e s s io n )

Unlawfulness of false statements relating to solvency of savings
and loan associations ____________________________________
Shareholder voting in savings and loan associations___________

Bank accounts of foreign insurance companies ______________

Act 864
HB1696
Act 880
HB 2085
Act 879
HB 2084
Act 1109
HB 2225
Act 918
HB 2226
Act 950
HB 2228
Act 1311
HB 2260
Act 1339
HB 2587
Act 724
SB 356
SB 519

S O U T H D A K O T A (R e g u la r S e s s io n )
Investments by savings banks in corporations organized to hold
title of bank’s premises ___________________________________
Penalties for over-charging for instalment loans _____________

HB 644
SB 183

Proxy voting by shareholders of savings and loan associations
Effect of fictitious payee on negotiable instrum ents___________
Interpretation of the word “ capital” under laws of R. I. ___
Bank examination fees and frequency of exam inations_________
Unlawfulness of fraudulent checks issued for services performed
Procedures for effecting adverse claim on bank deposit when
claim not based on fiduciary relationship or court o rd e r_______
Composition of State Bank Central Board ___________________

VERMONT

(S p e c ia l

S e s s io n )

Limitations on amortization of bank mortgage loans ________
Disposition of abandoned bank deposits or other securities held
by b a n ks________________________________________________
V IR G IN IA

(R e g u la r

HB

44— X

HB

15— X

S e s s io n )

Payment of subscriptions to capital stock of b a n k s __________

Ch.
HB
Charges made by banks on certain secured mortgage
Ch.
transactions not to exceed rate of FHA ____________________ HB
Qualifications and requisites of fid u cia rie s___________________ HB
Disposition, control, and audit of common trust funds by savings Ch.
banks __________________________________________________
HB
Appointment and qualifications of tru ste e s___________________ HB




58
14
438
326
380
436
422
423

STATE BANKING LEGISLATION
Disposition and disbursement of abandoned funds by savings
banks __________________________________________________
Limitations on loans secured by secondary lien on real property

HB
Ch.
HB
Interest rates payable by banks on savings deposits___________ Ch.
HB
Taxation of stock of bank holding companies_________________ Ch.
SB
Savings and loan associations permitted to act as custodian Act
under Uniform Gifts to Minors Act ________________________ SB
Legal investments of savings and loan associations___________ Act
SB
Uniform Commercial Code amendments relating to negotiable Ch.
instruments _____________________________________________ SB
Adoption of Uniform Commercial C o d e ______________________ Ch.
SB




425
150
482
486
483
52
39
55
62
151
160
314
222
219
1




DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS AND
INSURANCE COVERAGE




P A RT T H R E E




INTRODUCTION
The survey of November 18, 1964, was the ninth request for spe­
cial reports of deposits in all insured banks. These surveys have
been made at irregular dates back to October 1, 1934, to aid the
Corporation in estimating its liability in insuring bank deposits.
The 13,795 banks insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation on November 18, 1964 reported 175 million deposit
accounts totaling $338 billion. Of these accounts, 97.2 percent had
balances of $10,000 or less and, therefore, were fully protected by
Federal deposit insurance. The amount of deposits insured in these
accounts and in larger accounts in which the first $10,000 was
covered by insurance totaled $184 billion, or 54.5 percent of all
deposits in insured banks.1
Since the last previous comparable survey in 1955, the number
of accounts in insured banks increased by 45 million, and the
amount of deposits by $135 billion. Despite this growth and a significent increase in the average size of account, the proportion of
accounts fully insured declined only slightly from the 1955 figure of
98.2 percent. The percentage of total deposits covered by deposit
insurance was also slightly below the 1955 level (55.1 percent).
ACCOUNTS AND DEPOSITS AT FOUR SPECIAL CALL DATES
Table 16 summarizes key data from four special calls at inter­
vals of approximately a decade, dating back to the 1936 survey.
Changes in the amounts and proportions of insured accounts be­
tween the 1945 and the 1955 calls were influenced primarily by the
statutory increase in maximum insurance coverage from $5,000 to
$10,000 per depositor enacted in 1950. Table 17 shows percentage
changes in the number and average size of accounts and in the
amount of total and insured deposits in insured banks during each
of three periods.
While the number of insured banks has not changed significantly
over the past three decades, dramatic increases have occurred in
the number of bank accounts and in the amount of deposits. The
175 million bank accounts in 1964 were almost three times the
number in 1936. Total deposits experienced a six-fold increase over
the period and reached $337.5 billion. Deposits per capita rose
from $354 in 1936 to $1,738 in 1964, a four-fold increase.
1 Deposits reported in the special deposit surveys differ slightly in concept from
the legal definition of deposits applied by the Corporation when a bank is placed
in receivership, and from deposits reported in the regular call reports of condition.
These differences are explained in the Appendix at the end of this section.




77

78

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

TABLE 16. ACCOUNTS AND DEPOSITS, ALL INSURED BANKS,
SPECIAL CALL DATES, 1964, 1955, 1945, AND 1936
Ite m 1

Nov. 18, Sept. 21, Oct. 10, May 13,
1964
1955
1945
1936

Number of banks............................................

13,795

13,498

13,481

14,148

Number of accounts (in thousands):
Total...............................................................
Demand (IPC)............................................
Savings and time (IPC)............................
Other..........................................................

174,787
70,895
86,683
17,208

129,713
52,212
67,246
10,256

92,333
35,622
51,509
5,203

58,785
22,109
33,915
2,761

Proportion of accounts fully protected by
deposit insurance:2
All accounts..................................................
Demand (IPC)...........................................
Savings and time (IPC)3...........................
O ther..........................................................

97.2%
97.8
96.5
97.7

98.2%
97.6
98.8
97.4

96.4%
95.1
97.9
94.8

98.4%
98.1
99.0
93.6

Number of accounts per 100 population:4
Total...............................................................
Demand (IPC)...........................................
Savings and time (IPC)............................
Other..........................................................

90
37
45
9

77
31
40
6

68
26
38
4

45
17
26
2

Average size of accounts:
All accounts..................................................
Demand (IPC)............................................
Savings and time (IPC)............................
Other..........................................................

$1,931
1,747
1,761
3,547

$1,563
1,918
964
3,683

$1,523
2,016
743
5,853

$785
892
399
4,670

Amount of deposits (in millions):
Total............................................................... $337,522
Demand (IPC)............................................ 123,855
Savings and time (IPC)5........................... 152,636
Other..........................................................
61,031

$202,787
100,166
64,846
37,775

$140,603
71,887
38,263
30,453

$46,168
19,738
13,536
12,894

Amount of insured deposits (in millions):2
Total............................................................... $184,114
60,386
Demand (IPC)............................................
Savings and time (IPC)5........................... 115,413
8,315
Other..........................................................

$111,755
47,186
59,019
5,550

$65,859
28,705
34,597
2,557

$20,456
7,620
11,229
1,607

Proportion of deposits insured:2
Total deposits...............................................
Demand (IPC)............................................
48.8
75.6
Savings and time (IPC)............................
13.6
O ther3.........................................................

55.1%
54.5%
47.1
91.0
14.7

39.9
90.4
8.4

Deposits per capita:4
Total...............................................................
Demand (IPC)............................................
Savings and time (IPC)............................
Other..........................................................

$1,211
598
387
225

$1,036
530
283
224

$1,738
638
786
314

44.3%
46.8%
38.6
83.0
12.5
$354
151
104
99
1

1IPC refers to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.
2With insurance coverage of $10,000 per account in 1964 and 1955, and $5,000 per account in 1945
and 1936.
3 In 1945 and 1936, for insured commercial banks only.
4Computed from estimated population ,at midyear (States and other areas) in thousands: 1964—
194,184; 1955-167,518; 1945-135,667; 1936-130,362.
5For 1936 and 1945 includes all insured deposits in mutual savings banks. In 1955 insured deposits
in savings and time accounts were 99.3 percent of all insured deposits in mutual savings banks.
Note: Due to rounding differences, components may not add to totals.



ACCOUNTS AND DEPOSITS AT FOUR SPECIAL CALL DATES

79

There have been less dramatic, but nonetheless significant,
changes in the average size of accounts over the period. Rising by
almost 100 percent between 1936 and 1945, the average account
size in 1945 was $1,523. After remaining near that level through
1955, it rose to $1,931 at the time of the 1964 survey.
One interesting change has been the shift in the average size of
demand accounts of business and individuals as compared to time
and savings accounts. In 1936 the average demand account was
$892, compared with only $399 for savings and time accounts. The
average size of each type of account doubled from 1936 to 1945.
Since the end of World War II, however, the average demand ac­
count has declined somewhat in size, while the average savings
and time account has doubled again and at $1,761 exceeds the
average demand account.
Various factors may be mentioned as influential in the compara­
tively rapid growth in recent years in the average size of savings
and time accounts of individuals and businesses. Larger savings
have resulted from higher personal incomes, and from the existence
and expectation of relatively stable price levels. Additionally, as
opportunities open to banks for lending and investing profitably
TABLE 17. PERCENTAGE CHANGES IN NUMBER OF ACCOUNTS
AND AMOUNT OF DEPOSITS, ALL INSURED BANKS, SELECTED
PERIODS
Ite m 1

1955 to 1964 1945 to 1955 1936 to 1945

Number of accounts—total................

+

34.7%

+

40.5%

+

57.1%

Demand (IPC)...................................
Savings and time (IPC)....................
O ther..................................................

+
+
+

35.8
28.9
67.8

+
+
+

46.6
30.6
97.1

+
+
+

61.1
51.9
88.4

Amount of deposits—total..................

+

66.4

+

44.2

+ 204.5

+ 23.6
+ 135.4
+ 61.6

+
+
+

39.3
69.5
24.0

+ 264.2
+ 182.7
+ 136.2

Demand (IPC)...................................
Savings and time (IPC)....................
Other..................................................
Amount of insured deposits—to tal...

+

64.7

+

69.7

+ 222.0

Demand (IPC)...................................
Savings and time (IPC)....................
Other..................................................

+
+
+

28.0
95.6
49.8

+ 64.4
+ 70.6
+ 117.1

+ 276.7
+ 208.1
+ 59.1

23.5
8.9
+ 82.7
— 3.7

2.6
4.9
+ 29.7
— 37.1

+ 94.0
+ 126.0
+ 86.2
+ 25.3

Average size of accounts:
All accounts.......................................
Demand (IPC)...................................
Savings and time (IPC)....................
O ther..................................................

+

1 IPC refers to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.



+

80

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

have increased, they have bid more aggressively for funds, through
greater use of certificates of deposit in large denominations and by
paying higher interest rates on savings and time deposits, the latter
permitted by a liberalization of interest rate regulations. At the same
time, growth of demand deposits has been slowed in part by the
prohibition of interest on them in a period of rising interest rates
and by the development of various means of economizing on the
size of demand deposit balances.
With respect to the proportions of accounts fully protected and
of dbposits insured, Table 16 reveals, for the most part, only slight
differences among the survey dates. Between 1936 and 1945 there
was a decline in the proportion of fully insured accounts but an
increase in the percentage of total deposits insured. Both ratios
rose following the 1950 increase in coverage from $5,000 to $10,000, and both declined between 1955 and 1964.
Changes in the proportion of fully insured accounts. Between 1955
and 1964 the proportion of accounts fully protected declined from
98.2 percent to 97.2 percent. Declines occurred in both commercial
banks and mutual savings banks, but not in all types of accounts.
There was a slight increase in the proportion of demand accounts
of business and individuals that were fully protected, as well as in
such United States Government accounts.
The most notable change was in time and savings accounts of
business and individuals, where the proportion below $10,000 de­
clined from 98.8 percent in 1955 to 96.5 percent in 1964. Since this
type of account predominates in mutual savings banks, the decline
there was sharper, from 98.2 percent to 94.0 percent. There was
substantial relative growth in accounts of $10,000 to $25,000 in
both mutual savings and commercial banks, and also sharp in­
creases in accounts over $100,000.
Changes in the proportion of insured to total deposits. Deposits
protected by insurance have increased relatively faster than total
deposits in insured banks over the past three decades. From 1936
to 1964 the proportion of total deposits insured rose from 44.3
percent to 54.5 percent. The chief factor in this change was the
1950 statutory increase in insurance coverage; this is indicated
by the rise in deposits insured from 48.8 percent to 54.3 percent
between the 1949 and 1951 survey dates. This interpretation is
further supported by the finding in the 1951 survey that the per­
centage of deposits insured would have declined between 1949
and 1951 had insurance coverage remained at the old level. Other
factors tending to increase the proportion of insured deposits have
been the latitude for growth in the average account before it



ACCOUNTS AND DEPOSITS AT FOUR SPECIAL CALL DATES

81

reaches the insurance maximum and the opening of many new
accounts below the insured limit, notably the sharp rise in smallsize special checking accounts.
Nevertheless, between 1955 and 1964 the proportion of insured
to total deposits declined slightly. One possible factor in this de­
velopment has been the obscuration of the insured limit in the
attitude of depositors as deposit insurance comes to be taken for
granted. Also contributing to this result has been the substantial
growth in the demand balances of business, which cannot be split
as readily as personal deposits for purposes of extending insur­
ance coverage. The development of the time certificate of deposit
in recent years as an instrument for conserving or attracting bank
funds may also have tended to reduce the proportion of insured
deposits, depending upon the source of the funds, for such certifi­
cates are issued in large denominations far in excess of the
insured maximum.2 From a level of about $3 billion in 1955, repre­
senting about 6 per cent of savings and time deposits,3 certificates
of deposit outstanding (both negotiable and non-negotiable) have
risen to upwards of $30 billion, and currently account for over
one-fourth of all savings and time deposits in commercial banks.
In commercial banks’ business and personal savings and time
accounts of more than $100,000, which include substantial amounts
of certificates of deposit, deposits reached $20 billion, a nine-fold
increase over 1955. Smaller size accounts also increased, but
much less rapidly: deposits in accounts between $25,000 and
$100,000 increased less than four times while deposits in accounts
from $10,000 to $25,000 slightly more than doubled. Meanwhile,
for deposits in accounts of $10,000 or less, the increase was only
four-fifths during the period.
The decline between 1955 and 1964 in the proportion of deposits
insured was reflected sharply in the experience of mutual savings
banks, which showed an upsurge of deposits in accounts above
$10,000. In 1955, 84.1 percent of all deposits in mutual savings
banks were in accounts of $10,000 or less; by 1964 this ratio had
dropped to 60.2 percent. Conversely, the proportion of total de­
posits in accounts of $10,000 to $25,000 rose from 15.0 percent to
35.2 percent, and larger-size accounts also had greater proportions
of total deposits than in 1955.
“ A 1963 Federal Reserve Survey showed that 90 percent of the negotiable certifi­
cates of deposit were issued in denominations of $100,000 and larger. The rapid
increase in the use of negotiable certificates of deposit began in 1961. Federal
Reserve Bulletin, April, 1963, p. 460.
5 Estimated. On June 6, 1957 insured commercial banks had outstanding $3.2
billion of certificates of deposit and time and savings deposits of $50.8 billion.




82

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACCOUNTS
AND DEPOSITS IN 1964
Like previous deposit surveys, the latest one found that there
is greater variation in the proportions of deposits insured than in
the percentages of accounts that are fully protected, when accounts
are classified in various ways.
Accounts and deposits in insured commercial banks. On Novem­
ber 18, 1964, the 13,468 insured commercial banks reported 155
million accounts with deposits totaling $295 billion. Of these ac­
counts, 97.6 percent were fully protected by deposit insurance;
37.0 percent of the deposits were within the insurance maximum of
$10,000 for each depositor. Both percentages were slightly below
the comparable proportions in 1955. Table 18 shows some of the
significant changes in accounts and deposits in insured commer­
cial banks between the 1955 and 1964 survey dates.
TABLE 18. ACCOUNTS AND DEPOSITS IN INSURED
COMMERCIAL BANKS, GROUPED BY SIZE OF ACCOUNT,
SEPTEMBER 21,1955 AND NOVEMBER 18,1964
Accounts of—
Account or deposit item

Total
$10,000
or less

$10,000 to $25,000 to More than
$25,000 $100,000 $100,000

Accounts:

Number (in thousands)
1964.........................
1955.........................
Percent of to ta l............
1964.........................
1955.........................

154,975
114,568
100.00%
100.00

151,226
112,551
97.58%
98.24

2,657
1,334

830
514

263
169

1.71%
1.16

.54%
.45

.17%
.15

Deposits:

Amount(in m illions)...
1964.........................
1955.........................
Percent of to ta l...........
1964.........................
1955.........................

$295,378
181,849

$109,272
71,295

100.00%
100.00

36.99%
39.21

$1,906
1,587

$723
633

35.27%
62.43

34.36%
53.27

20.10

14.22

$37,617
19,551
12.74%
10.75

$38,684
23,912
13.10%
13.15

$109,804
67,091
37.17%
36.89

Average size of
account:

1964.........................
1955.........................

$14,158
14,656

$46,607
46,521

$417,506
396,988

Percentage change,
1955-1964:

Number of accounts...
Amount of deposits....
Average size of
accounts...............
Note:

99.18%
92.40
-3.40

Due to rounding differences, components may not add to totals.




61.48%
61.78

55.62%
63.66

.18

5.17

DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACCOUNTS AND DEPOSITS IN 1964

83

Grouping of insured commercial banks by class of bank shows
little variation in the proportions of accounts fully protected, but
fairly wide differences in the proportions of deposits insured. The
latter largely reflect variations in the composition of deposits and
size of banks. For example, State banks that are not members of
the Federal Reserve System, and as a group comprise the smallest
banks, had 69.4 percent of their deposits insured, appreciably
higher than national banks or other State commercial banks. The
proportions of accounts fully protected and deposits insured for
the different classes of insured commercial banks and for insured
mutual savings banks, in 1955 and 1964, are shown in Table 19.
TABLE 19. PROPORTIONS OF FULLY PROTECTED TO TOTAL
ACCOUNTS AND INSURED TO TOTAL DEPOSITS, BY CLASS OF
BANK, SEPTEMBER 21, 1955, AND NOVEMBER 18,1964

Class of bank

Number
of
banks

Proportion of
accounts fully
protected

Proportion of
deposits insured

1964

1955

1964

1955

1964

1955

All insured banks..........

13,795

13,498

97.2%

98.2%

54.5%

55.1%

Mutual savings banks.

327

220

94.0

98.2

88.6

96.9

Commercial banks:
National...................

4,755

4,725

97.5

98.2

48.6

49.2

State, members
F.R. System.............

1,459

1,856

97.1

97.8

40.0

41.2

State, not members
F.R. System.............

7,254

6,697

98.2

98.7

69.4

73.6

Accounts and deposits in insured mutual savings banks. The 327
mutual savings banks insured by the Corporation on the survey
date had nearly 20 million accounts and deposits totaling $42
billion. Accounts fully protected by deposit insurance comprised
94.0 percent of the total, and contained 60.2 percent of total de­
posits. Both percentages were appreciably below 1955 levels, re­
flecting rapid growth since that time in savings and time accounts
above $10,000; nearly all deposits of mutual savings banks are in
savings and time accounts. Detailed data on accounts and deposits
of insured mutual savings banks on the survey date are shown in
Tables 36 and 37.
Insurance coverage by type of account. Only when data are
arranged by type of account is there wide variation in the pro­



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

84

portion of accounts fully protected by deposit insurance. This is
illustrated by Chart D. Slightly over one-fourth of the interbank
accounts and a little less than two-thirds of State and political sub­
division accounts were fully insured. A much higher proportion of
United States Government accounts were fully protected, while a
still higher proportion of business and personal accounts were
fully insured.
The range was even wider for the proportion of deposits insured
among the various types of accounts. Over three-fourths of savings
and time deposits of individuals and business were insured, but
no other type of account had more than one-half of the deposits
therein insured. For United States Government deposits, the ratio
was a very low 3.7 percent, despite the fact that 84.1 percent of all
U. S. Government accounts were fully insured. Government de­
posits are usually protected by surety bonds or by pledges of
securities in addition to deposit insurance.
CHART D

THREE-FOURTHS OF THE DEPOSITS IN SAVINGS AND TIME ACCOUNTS
OF BUSINESSES AND INDIVIDUALS WERE INSURED IN 1964
ACCOUNTS FULLY PROTECTED
100

75

50

25

DEPOSITS INSURED
0

PERCENT

0

25

50

75

25

50

75

SAVINGS AND TIME*

DEMAND*
INTERBANK
U.S. GOVERNMENT
STATE AND POLITICAL
SUBDIVISIONS
UNINVESTED TRUST
FUNDS
DRAFTS
OTHER ITEMS
0

0

100

*IPC; individuals, partnerships, and corporations. Data as of N ovem ber 18, 1964

Insurance coverage by size of bank. The consistently high pro­
portion of accounts fully protected by insurance in all sizes of
banks was coupled with a declining proportion of deposits insured
with increasing size of bank. This reflects the fact that the larger
banks, usually located in the larger commercial centers, attract



DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACCOUNTS AND DEPOSITS IN 1964

85

accounts with very large balances. This characteristic is illustrated
in Chart E, which shows that in banks of all sizes upwards of 95
percent of the accounts were fully protected, but that the propor­
tion of deposits insured varied widely by size of bank. The range
was from 87.8 percent in the smallest banks to 31.9 percent in the
14 largest banks.
CHART E

IN ALL INSURED BANKS THE PROPORTION OF INSURED
TO TOTAL DEPOSITS DECLINED WITH INCREASING SIZE OF BANK

$1 million

million

million
million
$500
$2,500
million
million
SIZE OF BANK (Amount of Deposits)

or more

Insurance coverage by size of population center. The grouping of
banks by population center exhibits a pattern similar to that shown
by size of bank. Again, while most accounts were fully protected,
the coverage of deposits ranged downward from 83.9 percent in
the smallest communities to 43.1 percent in the largest metropoli­
tan centers. These disparities reflect substantial interbank and
corporate deposits and large savings and time deposits in the
larger population centers.
Accounts and deposits in banks grouped geographically. The 1964
survey exhibited little variation among the States in the percent
of accounts with balances of $10,000 or less. New York had the
smallest proportion of such accounts, 95.0 percent, influenced in
large part by the New York City ratio of 93.8 percent. South Caro­
lina with 98.5 percent had the highest State ratio. In other States,



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

86

accounts with balances of $10,000 or less ranged between 96.6
and 98.3 percent of total accounts.
There were much wider variations among the States in the
proportions of insured to total deposits. The ratios ranged from
a low of 42.4 percent in the District of Columbia to a high of 80.4
percent in Vermont. Five other States showed less than 50.0
percent of deposits protected by insurance, while only three
additional States had coverage of 75 percent or more. The Stateby-State figures are shown in Chart F.
CHART F

THIRTY-FIVE STATES EXCEEDED THE NATIONAL AVERAGE IN
THEIR PERCENTAGES OF INSURED TO TOTAL DEPOSITS

p l f f l Below 54.5%
Data as of Novem ber 18, 1964

Deposit survey data for the largest 53 Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Areas and 25 cities are shown in Table 23. No SMSA
nor city had less than 93.8 percent of its bank accounts fully pro­
tected. The ratios of insured to total deposits averaged 49.0 in
the 53 SMSA’s and 41.8 percent in the 25 cities. Among the cities,
Dallas’ ratio of 29.0 percent was the lowest, and Buffalo’s 66.1
percent was the highest.
DEPOSITOR PROTECTION UNDER DIFFERENT
COVERAGE LIMITATIONS
Under present law, accounts of $10,000 or less, plus the insured
component of larger accounts, comprise the Corporation’s liability



DEPOSITOR PROTECTION UNDER DIFFERENT COVERAGES

87

in insuring bank deposits. What the liability might be if coverage
were extended is also a matter of considerable interest. Accord­
ingly, the surveys have obtained data on accounts and deposits
above the insured limit as a tentative basis for projecting possible
liability, a procedure which necessarily assumes that the distribu­
tion of accounts and deposits would remain the same under a
higher insurance limit.
Insurance protection under alternative coverages. In both the
1955 and the 1964 surveys each insured bank was asked to report
the number of its deposit accounts and the amount of deposits in
those accounts by the following sizes: $10,000 or less; $10,000 to
$25,000; $25,000 to $100,000; and more than $100,000. Such data
are useful for evaluating proposals to extend coverage to higher
deposit maximums, and for other analytical purposes. Table 20
shows for all insured banks, as of November 18, 1964, the number
of accounts fully protected and deposits insured, assuming alterna­
tive amounts of maximum coverage per account. As noted in the
Appendix, these data relate to accounts, and deposits therein,
whereas the insurance limitation applies to each depositor.
The survey shows that raising the insurance limit from $10,000
to $25,000 per depositor would add an additional 3.8 million ac­
counts to those fully protected, and would increase by $31 billion
the amount of deposits insured by the Corporation. Further ex­
tension of coverage from $25,000 to $100,000 would add about
900,000 accounts to the number fully protected, and would increase
the amount of insured deposits by $38 billion. Telescoping the two
step-ups, an increase in coverage from $10,000 to $100,000 per
account would increase by 2.8 percent the number of accounts
fully protected and by 37.7 percent the amount of insured deposits.
An extension of the insurance program from the present $10,000
limitation to full coverage of all deposits would add less than 5
million accounts to the number fully protected, but it would in­
crease insured deposits by $153 billion. The increase in the num­
ber of accounts fully protected would be 3 percent as compared to
a rise in the amount of insured deposits of 83 percent.
The percentage of accounts fully protected, if the insurance
limit were $25,000, would increase to 99.4 percent, and deposit
coverage would rise to 63.9 percent. If the insurance limit were
$100,000, again assuming no change in the distribution of deposits
because of the higher coverage, the percentage of fully protected
accounts would be 99.9 percent, and deposit coverage, 75.1 per­
cent. The first upward step in coverage, from $10,000 to $25,000,
would thus add slightly more to the proportion of accounts fully



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

88

protected, but somewhat less to the proportion of deposits insured
than would the second step to $100,000.
Detailed data concerning the number of accounts fully protected
and deposits insured, assuming these alternative amounts of
maximum coverage per account, are shown in Tables 38-40.
TABLE 20. ACCOUNTS FULLY PROTECTED AND DEPOSITS
INSURED WITH SPECIFIED AMOUNTS OF MAXIMUM COVERAGE,
ALL INSURED BANKS, NOVEMBER 18,1964
Accounts fully protected with maximum coverage of
Item
$100,000

Unlimited
coverage

$10,000

$25,000

169,841,878

173,652,480

174,522,933

174,787,244

Incremental number . . .
Incremental percentages

3,810,602
2.24%

870,453
0.50%

264,311
0.15%

Cumulative number
from $10,000 .

3,810,602

4,681,055

4,945,366

2.24%

2.76%

2.91%

99.85%
99.35%
Amount (in thousands)
$215,501,183 $253,590,183

100.00%
$337,521,905

Incremental am ounts.........
Incremental percentages

$ 31,387,616
17.05%

$ 38,089,000
17.67%

$ 83,931,722
33.10%

Cumulative amounts
from $10,000...............

$ 31,387,616

$ 69,476,616

$153,408,338

17.05%

37.74%

83.32%

63.85%

75.13%

100.00%

Number
Total, all insured banks........

...

Cumulative percentages
from $10,000
Percentage fully
protected.......................

97.17%

Total, all insured banks........

$184,113,567

Cumulative percentages
from $10,000
Percentage insured............

54.55%

Concentration of risk to the Corporation. The fact that a relatively
small number of banks holds a large share of deposits is one di­
mension of the risk to the Corporation. Less than 1 percent of the
insured banks (96) held 32 percent of all insured deposits on the
survey date. The 14 largest banks had $22.4 billion of insured
deposits or about eight times the amount of the Corporation’s
deposit insurance fund. Other measures of concentration, such as
by geographic area or population of banking center, are weighted
by these individually large banks.



DEPOSITOR PROTECTION UNDER DIFFERENT COVERAGES

89

The distribution of total deposits in insured banks also has an
important bearing on the potential liability of the Corporation.
Banks with a large proportion of their deposits uninsured generally
hold large amounts of interbank deposits; these uninsured depos­
its are more highly concentrated than insured deposits in the large
banks and in banks in large cities. Failure of such a bank could
cause difficulties in correspondent banks with relatively larger
amounts of insured deposits. Thus consideration of insured de­
posits alone does not portray accurately the total impact of these
large banks upon the Corporation’s possible liability.
DETAILED STATISTICS
For those interested in more detailed information than that
offered in the preceding pages, additional data are presented in
Tables 21-41. The data are presented in various configurations: by
type and size of account, type of bank, by Federal Deposit Insur­
ance Corporation District, by State, by population of center in
which located, and by percent of deposits insured.
Comparisons may be made with the 1955 survey as follows:
Tables 21 and 24-41 correspond with Tables 35 and 37-54, respec­
tively, of the Corporation’s 1955 Annual Report. Tables 23-24
expand Table 36 of the 1955 Annual Report by including data for
additional cities and for each of the 53 Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Areas with a population of 500,000 or more in 1960.
Where percentages occur in the detailed tables, they have been
rounded to the nearest one-tenth of 1 percent. Due to rounding
differences, neither percentages nor deposit data necessarily add
to totals.
APPENDIX
In these special surveys banks have been asked to report the
number of their deposit accounts of various types, and balances
in these accounts grouped in size categories. While data showing
deposits in the combined accounts of each depositor holding more
than one account would have been desirable, only in the first sur­
vey were banks asked to undertake the additional task of report­
ing this information.
The deposit insurance law provides for insurance protection to
a maximum of $10,000 in an insured bank for each depositor. For
this purpose, all deposits held in the same right and capacity in
a given bank, including deposits in branches, are combined, and
from this total a deduction is made for any matured debt owed the
bank by the depositor.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

90

The amount of insured deposits computed from the deposit
surveys thus does not agree exactly with the amount obtaining
when a bank is placed in receivership. Differences result from the
fact that when an insured bank is placed in receivership, some
accounts on the bank's books, such as those of estates of de­
cedents or of beneficial trusts, must be divided to ascertain
amounts due each depositor on funds maintained by him in differ­
ent rights and capacities. In addition, banks placed in receivership
frequently are found to have various accounts not shown on the
bank’s books.
The number of accounts reported in the deposit surveys exceeds
the number of depositors, probably by a sizeable amount; how­
ever, it is estimated that the Corporation’s insurance liability under
the definitions and procedures applicable to banks placed in re­
ceivership is only slightly smaller than its liability calculated from
the survey data. It was shown, for example, in the 1951 survey that
95 percent of the demand accounts of individuals, partnerships and
corporations and 96 percent of their savings and time accounts,
had balances of less than $5,000. The average balance in all ac­
counts of less than $10,000 was $690 in 1951 and $793 in 1964.
These data suggest that the vast majority of depositors holding
more than one account have had less than $10,000 in the combined
accounts.
★

*

*

*

Figures of deposits in the special survey differ from deposits
as given in the “ reports of condition” obtained by the Federal
supervisory agencies on at least four dates each year. Outstanding
bank drafts and advices or authorizations to charge a bank’s
balance in another bank, and reciprocal demand deposits with
other banks, are included in the survey as deposit liabilities in­
sured by the Corporation, but are excluded from deposits in the
reports of condition. The latter are also used with modification as
the base for the computation of deposit insurance assessments.
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARATION OF SUMMARY OF
DEPOSITS, FORM 89— CALL NO. 8, AS OF THE CLOSE OF
BUSINESS NOVEMBER 18, 1964
GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS
Each bank operating a branch or branches is requested to submit a consolidated
report for the bank as a whole including deposits of all domestic branches and of
those branches in Puerto Rico, Guam, or the Virgin Islands, the deposits of which
are accorded insurance coverage. Do not include interbranch deposits (amounts
due to branches and head office) in making the consolidated report.
An entry should be made in every space on the form. Where there are no figures
to report, the word “ None” must be written or stamped.



INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARATION OF SUMMARY OF DEPOSITS

91

NUMBER OF ACCOUNTS AND AMOUNT OF DEPOSITS
All deposit liabilities of the bank should be included at items 1 through
8 of this statement even though some of these deposits may be excluded from
deposits for Report of Condition purposes. For the purpose of this report include
commercial, checking, savings, time, thrift accounts, certificates of deposit, offic­
ers’ or cashiers’ checks, travelers’ checks, certified checks, outstanding drafts,
letters of credit, and trust funds held in the trust department or on deposit in any
other department of the bank.
The deposit classifications correspond with the usual ledger and con­
dition report items, with the exception of:
Item 6, “Trust funds,” which is found only in banks having trust powers and
which is computed from the record of the trust department. The item “ Trust
funds” means all trust funds (principal and/or income cash) retained in cash
in the trust department, or deposited in the commercial or savings depart­
ment of the bank, or held in any other department of the bank, and trust de­
partment checks outstanding. Do not deduct overdrafts, if any, unless such
overdrafts may legally be offset by a cash balance in a related trust depart­
ment account. Each trust department account reflecting trust funds (principal
and/or income cash, including cash deposited in savings and checking ac­
counts), as shown in the records of the trust department should be reported
as a separate account;
Item 7, “Outstanding bank drafts,” which is to be determined by the bank as
of November 18, 1964. Include outstanding drafts drawn for any purpose on
a correspondent or a Federal Reserve bank.
Item 8, “All other deposits,” which will include letters of credit and travelers’
checks issued for money or its equivalent; bank money orders; certified
checks outstanding; cashiers’ and other officers’ checks outstanding regard­
less of the purpose for which drawn; and amounts due to Federal Reserve
bank (transit account) represented by authorizations (other than outstanding
drafts) to charge the reporting bank’s clearing balance or reserve account.

Report in the column “ Amount of deposits” the bank’s deposit liabili­
ties, by type of deposit and size of account. Show in the column “ Number of
accounts” the number of accounts corresponding to these deposits. The entire
amount of an account should be included under the appropriate subitem. For
example, the entire $17,493.65 of an account of $17,493.65 should be placed in
subitem (g) headed “ $10,000.01 to $25,000.00.” Do not enter $10,000.00 in subitem
(f) headed “ 10,000.00 or less” and $7,493.65 in subitem (g) headed “ $10,000.01 to
$25,000.00.” Only those accounts the entire balance of which does not exceed
$10,000.00 should be included in subitem (f) headed “ $10,000.00 or less.”
For the purposes of this report, kindly note that:
Accounts should not be combined. Each acount standing to the credit of a
depositor, whether or not in the same capacity and the same right, should
be considered a separate account. The number of accounts reported should
agree with the number of accounts on the books of the bank. If school
savings are carried as one account, one account should be reported; if
school savings accounts are entered individually the total number of such
accounts should be reported.
Each dormant and inactive account should be reported as a separate

account.
Report as a separate account each outstanding certificate of deposit, letter
of credit sold for money or its equivalent, outstanding draft, certified and
officer’s check. However, all travelers’ checks outstanding in the same name
should be combined and reported as one account.




FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

92

SUMMARY OF DEPOSITS
As of the close o f business November 18, 1964

Name and Address of Bank

Please read carefully the accompa­
nying "Instructions for the Prepara­
tion o f Summary o f Deposits.” For
each item include all deposit liabil­
ities even though some may be ex­
cluded from deposits for Report of
Condition purposes.

TYPE OF DEPOSIT

NUMBER OF ACCOUNTS

SIZE OF ACCOUNT

AMOUNT OF DEPOSITS

DOLLARS
$10,000.00 or less_________
1. Demand deposits o f individuals, partnerships, and
corporations (exclude trust funds o f own trust

a

110,000.01 to $25,000.00.. b.__________________________

ships, and corporations (exclude trust funds o f
ow n trust department)

d
e

$10,000.00 or less_________
2. Savings and time deposits o f individuals, partner­

$25,000.01 to $100,000.00
$100,000.01 or m o re _____
T otal______________________

department)

a___________ _______________ _ f ____________

h._

___

j

$10,000.01 to $25,000.00..
$25,000.01 to $100,000.00.
$100,000.01 or m ore______ d

h____________
i

e
110,000 00 or less_________
3. Deposits o f U. S. G overnm ent (include postal

i

a __________________ _______

f ____________

$10,000.01 to $25,000.00.. b__________ ________________
h____________
i

$25,000.01 to $100,000.00.
$100,000.01 or m ore______ d

savings)

e

j
f ....................

$10,000.00 or less_________
$10,000.01 to $25,000.00..

5. Deposits o f dom estic and foreign banks (include
amounts "d u e to other banks" without deduction
o f any amounts "d u e from other banks"— exclude
amounts due to own branches or head o ffic e)
6. Trust funds as recorded in own trust department

a___________________________

$25,000.01 to $100,000.00
$100,000.01 or m ore______

c ___________________________
d

T otal______________________

4. Deposits o f States and political subdivisions

CTS.

f ____________

e

)

$10,000.00 or less_________

a ___________________________

f ____________

$10,000.01 to $25,000.00..

b___________________________

b _________

$25,000.01 to $100,000.00. c ___________
$100,000.01 or more______ d
Total______________________

_____

____

_____________

e

h____________

h____________
j
f ____________

$10,000.00 or less_______ _

(i.e., all trust funds received or held in cash in the

$10,000.01 to 125,000.00..

b.__________________________ j

trust department, and held or deposited in own

125,000.01 to 1100,000.00,
$100,000.01 or m ore______

d

T o ta l______________________

e

j

$10,000.00 or less_________

a___________________________

f ___________

$10,000.01 to $25,000.00..

b____________________________

banking dept.)

7. Outstanding bank drafts

h____________
i

$25,000.01 to $100,000.00. c ___________________________
$100,000.01 or m ore______ d

h ___________

T o ta l__________________ . . . .

a ___________________________

f ___________

$10,000.01 to $25,000.00..

b ___________________________

$25,000.01 to $100,000.00
$100,000.01 or m ore______

c ___________________________
d

T o ta l______________________

e

j

$10,000.00 or less________

a ___________________________

f ____________

110.000.01 to $25,000.00..
9. T otal deposits (total o f items 1 through 8)

j

$10 000 00 or less________
8. A ll other deposits

e

b___________________________

g ____________

125.000.01 to $100,000.00
1100.000.01 or more______

c __________________________
d

h.............. .....

T o ta l______________________ e

--------- . . . . . .
h ___________

j

T h e above statem ent is correct to the best o f m y kn o w le d g e and be lie f__________________________________________________
(N a m e and title o f o fficer)
(Signature o f above o fficer)

R E T U R N O R IG IN A L (W H IT E ) T O FDIC, W A S H IN G T O N , D. C. 20429




R E T A IN D U PLIC A TE S (BUFF) FO R Y O U R FILES




Table 21. ACCOUNTS FULLY AND PARTIALLY PROTECTED AND DEPOSITS INSURED, ALL INSURED BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U PED BY FED ER A L DEPOSIT INSURANCE CO RPO RATION DISTRICT AND S T A T E
P e rc e n t o f
a c c o u n ts

N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts

Total U nited States

13,795
13,787




174,201,759

169,841,878
169,263,799

4,945,366
4,937,960

Fully
p ro te c te d

P a rtia lly
p ro te c te d

97.2%

2.8%

97.2

2.8

T o ta l

T o ta l
in s u re d

In fu lly
p ro te c te d
a c c o u n ts

$337,521,905 $184,113,567 $134,659,907
336,846,875

183,738,751

In p a rtia lly
p ro te c te d
a c c o u n ts

$49,453,660 $153,408,338

54.5%

134,359,151

49,379,600

153,108,124

54.5

300,214

55.5

585,485

578,079

7,406

98.7

1.3

675,030

374,816

300,756

530
735
1,145
883
1,241
1,505
1,365
1,680
1,172
1,702
1,399
438

11,677,780
34,714,221
20,126,334
12,126,578
9,173,635
9,764,686
15,212,873
11,764,118
5,529,951
6,704,760
11,101,652
26,890,656

11,337,931
33,163,067
19,637,358
11,893,541
8,962,249
9,542,344
14,886,118
11,402,112
5,416,165
6;535,675
10,802,908
26,262,410

339,849
1,551,154
488,976
233,037
211,386
222,342
326,755
362,006
113,786
169,085
298,744
628,246

97.1
95.5
97.6
98.1
97.7
97.7
97.9
96.9
97.9
97.5
97.3
97.7

2.9
4.5
2.4
1.9
2.3
2.3

19,766,440
95,019,927
34,887,188
17,308,960
15,233,772
17,272,831
24,288,656
27,261,715
8,999,142
11,956,736
22,085,136
43,441,402

12,302,573
49,668,015
19,722,028
9,894,668
8,455,520
9,488,672
14,910,595
13,858,775
5.808.407
6.812.407
10,474,368
22,717,539

8,904,083
34,156,475
14,832,268
7,564,298
6,341,660
7,265,252
11,643,045
10,238,715
4,670,547
5,121,557
7,486,928
16,435,079

3,398,490
15,511,540
4,889,760
2,330,370
2.113.860
2,223,420
3,267,550
3,620,060
1.137.860
1,690,850
2,987,440
6,282,460

7,463,867
45,351,912
15,165,160
7,414,292
6,778,252
7,784,159
9,378,061
13,402,940
3,190,735
5,144,329
11,610,768
20,723,863

62.2
52.3
56.5
57.2
55.5
54.9
61.4
50.8
64.5
57.0
47.4
52.3

252
15
242
186
203

1,900,834
1,127,156
1,194,461
20,148,414
1,430,359

1,859,044
1,097,760
1,166,493
19,687,311
1,389,351

41,790
29,396
27,968
461,103
41,008

97.8
97.4
97.7
97.7
97.1

2.2
2.6
2.3
2.3
2.9

2,870,411
1,886,435
1,926,402
32,746,216
2,715,187

1,688,099
1,043,021
1,196,611
16,400,085
1,440,534

1,270,199
749,061
916,931
11,789,055
1,030,454

417,900
293.960
279,680
4,611,030
410,080

1,182,312
843,414
729,791
16,346,131
1,274,653

58.8
55.3
62.1
50.1
53.1

131

4,096,604
528,213
779,328
3,588,226
2,466,666

3,962,562
512,417
754,894
3,493,048
2,418,901

134,042
15,796
24,434
95,178
47,765

96.7
97.0
96.9
97.3
98.1

3.3
3.0
3.1
2.7
1.9

6,529,623
987,948
2,021,564
6,535,876
3,960,796

4,693,088
546,311
856,508
3,612,183
2,034,704

3,352,668
388,351
612,168
2,660,403
1,557,054

1,340,420
157.960
244,340
951,780
477,650

1,836,535
441,637
1,165,056
2,923,693
1,926,092

71.9
55.3
42.4
55.3
51.4

2
2

15
415
380

2.1
3.1

2.1
2.5
2.7
2.3

CORPORATION

C o n n e cticu t............
Delaware.................
D istrict of Columbia
Florida.....................
G eorgia....................

174,787,244

P a rtia lly
Fully
p ro te c te d 1 p r o te c te d 2

P e rce n t
o f to ta l
d e p o s its
in s u re d

INSURANCE

State
A la b a m a ..................
A rizo n a ....................
A rka n sa s.................
C alifo rn ia ................
C olorado.................

T o ta l

U n in s u re d
in p a rtia lly
p ro te c te d
a c c o u n ts

74,060

O ther a re a s.................
FDIC D is tric t
D istrict 1 ...................
D istrict 2 ...................
D istrict 3 ...................
D istrict 4 ...................
D istrict 5 ...................
D istrict 6 ...................
D istrict 7 .................
D istrict 8 .................
D istrict 9 .................
D istrict 1 0 ...............
D istrict 1 1 ...............
D istrict 1 2 ................

In s u re d

DEPOSIT

50 States and D. C.

Num ber
of
banks

FEDERAL

FDIC D is tr ic t a n d S ta te

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s )

501,575
8,739,062
4,001,678
2,663,050
1,814,596

13,309
310,096
77,971
51,910
45,626

97.4
96.6
98.1
98.1
97.5

2.6
3.4
1.9
1.9
2.5

805,773
23,138,106
6,180,813
4,123,609
3,084,838

546,812
11,043,233
3,726,534
2,815,542
1,964,488

413,722
7,942,273
2,946,824
2,296,442
1,508,228

133,090
3,100,960
779,710
519,100
456,260

258,961
12,094,873
2,454,279
1,308,067
1,120,350

67.9
47.7
60.3
68.3
63.7

K e n tu c k y ....................
L o u is ia n a ....................
M a in e ...........................
M a ry la n d .....................
M a s s a c h u s e tts

341
208
66
126
162

1,967,768
2,362,604
1,127,978
2,963,006
3,882,243

1,930,415
2,310,695
1,104,423
2,905,752
3,773,463

37,353
51,909
23,555
57,254
108,780

98.1
97.8
97.9
98.1
97.2

1.9
2.2
2.1
1.9
2.8

2,862,346
3,725,602
1,301,849
3,880,044
8,054,449

1,724,633
1,849,528
1,007,162
2,378,705
3,782,195

1,351,103
1,330,438
771,612
1,806,165
2,694,395

373,530
519,090
235,550
572,540
1,087,800

1,137,713
1,876,074
294,687
1,501,339
4,272,254

60.3
49.6
77.4
61.3
47.0

M ic h ig a n .....................
M in n e s o ta ..................
M is s is s ip p i.................
M is s o u r i......................
M o n ta n a ......................

358
714
194
632
127

7,165,527
3,676,111
1,217,909
3,900,543
611,653

6,989,965
3,605,867
1,191,256
3,805,931
595,109

175,562
70,244
26,653
94,612
16,544

97.5
98.1
97.8
97.6
97.3

2.5
1.9
2.2
2.4
2.7

12,269,873
6,006,481
1,866,689
7,784,066
1,038,908

7,326,266
3,651,517
1,120,534
4,147,483
705,495

5,570,646
2,949,077
854,004
3,201,363
540,055

1,755,620
702,440
266,530
946,120
165,440

4,943,607
2,354,964
746,155
3,636,583
333,413

59.7
60.8
60.0
53.3
67.9

N e b ra s k a ....................
N e v a d a ........................
N ew H a m p s h ire . . . .
N ew J e r s e y ................
N ew M e x ic o ...............

425
8
102
254
63

1,257,150
376,781
917,579
7,039,993
586,513

1,228,083
366,909
890,170
6,848,694
572,361

29,067
9,872
27,409
191,299
14,152

97.7
97.4
97.0
97.3
97.6

2.3
2.6
3.0
2.7
2.4

2,254,587
651,433
1,327,723
11,128,540
912,205

1,367,169
332,016
1,022,925
7,554,097
533,609

1,076,499
233,296
748,835
5,641,107
392,089

290,670
98,720
274,090
1,912,990
141,520

887,418
319,417
304,798
3,574,443
378,596

60.6
51.0
77.0
67.9
58.5

N e w Y o r k ....................
N o rth C a ro lin a .........
N o rth D a k o ta ............
O h io ..............................
O k la h o m a ...................

451
151
159
549
413

26,560,530
2,735,940
585,702
8,606,667
1,863,382

25,223,877
2,686,341
572,506
8,420,958
1,819,198

1,336,653
49,599
13,196
185,709
44,184

95.0
98.2
97.7
97.8
97.6

5.0
1.8
2.3
2.2
2.4

82,228,409
3,984,736
924,177
13,730,368
3,354,809

41,192,791
2,042,025
703,815
7,721,129
1,719,182

27,826,261
1,546,035
571,855
5,864,039
1,277,342

13,366,530
495,990
131,960
1,857,090
441,840

41,035,618
1,942,711
220,362
6,009,239
1,635,627

50.1
51.2
76.2
56.2
51.2

O re g o n .........................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ............
R h ode I s la n d ............
S o u th C a ro lin a .........
S o u th D a k o ta ............

50
596
15
130
172

1,644,653
11,519,667
1,082,005
1,114,921
656,485

1,601,477
11,216,400
1,048,734
1,097,730
642,683

43,176
303,267
33,271
17,191
13,802

97.4
97.4
96.9
98.5
97.9

2.6
2.6
3.1
1.5
2.1

2,724,598
21,156,820
1,859,649
1,329,595
1,029,575

1,609,902
12,000,899
1,239,670
754,184
747,580

1,178,142
8,968,229
906,960
582,274
609,560

431,760
3,032,670
332,710
171,910
138,020

1,114,696
9,155,921
619,979
575,411
281,995

59.1
56.7
66.7
56.7
72.6

T e n n e s s e e .................
T e x a s ............................
U ta h ..............................
V e rm o n t......................
V ir g in ia .........................

290
1,113
53
54
278

2,701,914
7,025,379
782,299
571,371
3,212,278

2,639,505
6,822,092
764,040
558,579
3,150,057

62,409
203,287
18,259
12,792
62,221

97.7
97.1
97.7
97.8
98.1

2.3
2.9
2.3
2.2
1.9

4,700,018
15,560,894
1,235,445
693,146
4,470,289

2,419,945
7,048,210
703,993
557,534
2,797,909

1,795,855
5,015,340
521,403
429,614
2,175,699

624,090
2,032,870
182,590
127,920
622,210

2,280,073
8,512,684
531,452
135,612
1,672,380

51.5
45.3
57.0
80.4
62.6

W a s h in g to n ................
W est V ir g in ia .............
W is c o n s in ...................
W y o m in g .....................
A la s k a ..........................
H a w a ii..........................

99
183
578
68
11
7

2,680,997
1,321,105
3,967,697
293,647
167,687
574,941

2,613,041
1,298,767
3,894,475
284,447
162,791
565,266

67,956
22,338
73,222
9,200
4,896
9,675

97.5
98.3
98.2
96.9
97.1
98.3

2.5
1.7
1.8
3.1
2.9
1.7

4,050,157
1,622,732
5,837,970
547,315
341,538
886,243

2,529,376
1,065,335
3,857,795
321,033
174,077
421,276

1,849,816
841,955
3,125,575
229,033
125,117
324,526

679,560
223,380
732,220
92,000
48,960
96,750

1,520,781
557,397
1,980,175
226,282
167,461
464,967

62.5
65.7
66.1
58.7
51.0
47.5

1 Accounts with balances of $10,000 or less.
2 Accounts with balances of more than $10,000.




BANKS

514,884
9,049,158
4,079,649
2,714,960
1,860,222

O ALL INSURED
F

24
1,021
429
659
593

ACCOUNTS A D DEPOSITS
N

Id a h o ............................
I llin o is ..........................
In d ia n a ........................
Io w a ..............................
K a n s a s .........................

Table 22. ACCOUNTS FULLY AND PARTIALLY PROTECTED AND DEPOSITS INSURED, ALL INSURED BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U PE D B Y A M O U N T OF DEPO SITS, PO PU LATIO N OF C E NTER IN W H IC H LO C A TED , CLA S S , A N D PE RC ENT
OF D E PO SITS INSURED; AND A C C O U N T S G RO UPED BY TYPE
P e rc e n t o f
a c c o u n ts

N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts

C la s s ific a tio n

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s )
In s u re d

T o ta l

Fully
P a rtia lly
Fully
p ro ­
p ro te c te d 1 p r o te c te d 2 te c te d

13,795 174,787,244 169,841,878

4,945,366

P a rtia lly
p ro ­
te c te d

T otal

T otal
in s u re d

In fu lly
p ro te c te d
a c c o u n ts

97.2%

2.8% $337,521,905 $184,113,567 $134,659,907

In p a rtia lly
p ro te c te d
a c c o u n ts

U n in s u re d
in p a rtia lly
p ro te c te d
a c c o u n ts

$49,453,660 $153,408,338

P e rce n t
o f to ta l
d e p o s its
in s u re d

54.5%

FEDERAL

All insured banks................................

N um ber
of
banks

Banks with total deposits of—
14
88
591
2,078
4,413

4,513
38,786
487,030
2,986,512
12,603,715

4,486
38,334
481,178
2,944,053
12,386,340

27
452
5,852
42,459
217,375

99.4
98.8
98.8
98.6
98.3

.6
1.2
1.2
1.4
1.7

2,276
36,368
464,068
3,127,976
14,786,996

1,999
31,202
393,759
2,606,446
11,653,456

1,729
26,682
335,239
2,181,856
9,479,706

270
4,520
58,520
424,590
2,173,750

277
5,166
70,309
521,530
3,133,540

87.8
85.8
84.8
83.3
78.8

DEPOSIT

$ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........
$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 . . .

2,936
2,188
688
342
255

16,819,799
25,277,303
15,870,742
13,357,466
20,228,155

16,511,027
24,761,683
15,492,946
12,977,570
19,576,096

308,772
515,620
377,796
379,896
652,059

98.2
98.0
97.6
97.2
96.8

1.8
2.0
2.4
2.8
3.2

20,743,698
33,666,739
24,020,010
23,613,950
38,759,675

15,437,919
23,337,118
15,473,690
14,272,989
23,078,377

12,350,199
18,180,918
11,695,730
10,474,029
16,557,787

3,087,720
5,156,200
3,777,960
3,798,960
6,520,590

5,305,779
10,329,621
8,546,320
9,340,961
15,681,298

74.4
69.3
64.4
60.4
59.5

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 . . .
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
$ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e ....................

106
57
25
14

16,505,772
14,804,562
11,148,165
24,654,724

15,927,593
14,183,625
10,618,131
23,938,816

578,179
620,937
530,034
715,908

96.5
95.8
95.2
97.1

3.5
4.2
4.8
2.9

37,071,191
37,353,764
33,505,935
70,369,258

19,559,701
19,912,974
15,913,373
22,440,564

13,777,911
13,703,604
10,613,033
15,281,484

5,781,790
6,209,370
5,300,340
7,159,080

17,511,490
17,440,790
17,592,562
47,928,694

52.8
53.3
47.5
31.9

INSURANCE

Less th a n 2 5 0 ..........................................
2 5 0 to 5 0 0 .................................................
5 0 0 to 1 , 0 0 0 .....................................
1 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 .........................................
2 ,5 0 0 to 5 , 0 0 0 .........................................

523
1,143
1,853
2,768
1,759

679,236
1,800,280
4,008,147
9,422,469
8,964,376

667,321
1,770,314
3,939,561
9,246,208
8,786,718

11,915
29,966
68,586
176,261
177,658

98.2
98.3
98.3
98.1
98.0

1.8
1.7
1.7
1.9
2.0

968,975
2,152,218
4,743,638
11,539,823
11,401,420

709,978
1,805,349
3,883,591
9,160,113
8,639,562

590,828
1,505,689
3,197,731
7,397,503
6,862,982

119,150
299,660
685,860
1,762,610
1,776,580

258,997
346,869
860,047
2,379,710
2,761,858

73.3
83.9
81.9
79.4
75.8

5 ,0 0 0 to 1 0 , 0 0 0 ......................................
1 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 5 , 0 0 0 ...................................
2 5 ,0 0 0 to 5 0 , 0 0 0 ...................................
5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 .................................
1 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................

1,598
1,498
833
548
430

11,824,736
17,085,434
14,343,256
14,442,458
18,346,209

11,585,468
16,727,556
14,006,399
14,096,907
17,855,861

239,268
357,878
336,857
345,551
490,348

98.0
97.9
97.7
97.6
97.3

2.0
2.1
2.3
2.4
2.7

15,576,937
23,345,182
21,410,699
22,741,101
32,538,954

11,157,611
15,822,871
13,761,177
13,988,805
18,072,682

8,764,931
12,244,091
10,392,607
10,533,295
13,169,202

2,392,680
3,578,780
3,368,570
3,455,510
4,903,480

4,419,326
7,522,311
7,649,522
8,752,296
14,466,272

71.6
67.8
64.3
61.5
55.5

2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................
5 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 ,0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ..........................
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ......................
2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e ................................

339
288
48
167

14,412,341
30,627,336
9,566,305
19,264,661

13,994,155
29,812,606
9,249,645
18,103,159

418,186
814,730
316,660
1,161,502

97.1
97.3
96.7
94.0

2.9
2.7
3.3
6.0

30,801,050
59,633,900
22,371,108
78,296,899

14,632,489
27,909,935
10,818,116
33,751,286

10,450,629
19,762,635
7,651,516
22,136,266

4,181,860
8,147,300
3,166,600
11,615,020

16,168,561
31,723,965
11,552,992
44,545,613

47.5
46.8
48.4
43.1

Banks in centers with population
in 1960 of—




CORPORATION

Less th a n $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................
$ 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ........................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .....................
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ................
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .................

Class and type of bank—
84,110,843
32,167,181
38,697,427
19,811,793

82,002,019
31,237,213
37,986,928
18,615,718

2,108,824
929,968
710,499
1,196,075

97.5
97.1
98.2
94.0

2.5
2.9
1.8
6.0

163,561,653
82,205,483
49,610,381
42,144,387

79,459,432
32,860,387
34,445,464
37,348,284

58,371,192
23,560,707
27,340,474
25,387,534

21,088,240
9,299,680
7,104,990
11,960,750

84,102,221
49,345,096
15,164,917
4,796,103

48.6
40.0
69.4
88.6

1 0 0 p e r c e n t...............................................
9 0 to 1 0 0 ....................................................
8 0 to 9 0 ......................................................
7 0 to 8 0 ......................................................
6 0 to 7 0 ......................................................
5 0 to 6 0 ......................................................

5
1,497
4,474
4,029
2,129
1,001

1,972
11,231,630
29,225,942
28,557,783
26,877,848
38,613,620

1,972
10,750,334
28,191,547
27,998,295
26,300,456
37,773,931

0
481,296
1,034,395
559,488
577,392
839,689

100.0
95.7
96.5
98.0
97.9
97.8

.0
4.3
3.5
2.0
2.1
2.2

876
19,124,375
45,746,868
35,815,340
37,823,065
58,574,877

876
17,529,474
39,163,919
26,841,394
24,646,340
32,093,065

876
12,716,514
28,819,969
21,246,514
18,872,420
23,696,175

0
4,812,960
10,343,950
5,594,880
5,773,920
8,396,890

0
1,594,901
6,582,949
8,973,946
13,176,725
26,481,812

100.0
91.7
85.6
74.9
65.2
54.8

4 0 to 5 0 ......................................................
3 0 to 4 0 ......................................................
2 0 to 3 0 ......................................................
10 to 2 0 ......................................................
0 to 1 0 .........................................................

389
172
79
16
4

18,368,775
9,487,453
8,753,054
3,507,653
161,514

17,849,744
9,167,116
8,335,563
3,325,754
147,166

519,031
320,337
417,491
181,899
14,348

97.2
96.6
95.2
94.8
91.1

2.8
3.4
4.8
5.2
8.9

39,383,261
28,055,204
44,576,015
24,516,464
3,905,559

17,958,934
10,057,349
11,216,228
4,377,656
228,330

12,768,624
6,853,979
7,041,318
2,558,666
84,850

5,190,310
3,203,370
4,174,910
1,818,990
143,480

21,424,327
17,997,855
33,359,787
20,138,808
3,677,229

45.6
35.8
25.2
17.9
5.8

70,895,151
86,683,440
104,269
388,808
128,341
1,361,147
1,346,374
13,879,714

69,356,616
83,667,684
87,642
249,411
34,620
1,299,753
1,307,718
13,838,434

1,538,535
3,015,756
16,627
139,397
93,721
61,394
38,656
41,280

97.8
96.5
84.1
64.1
27,0
95.5
97.1
99.7

2.2
3.5
15.9
35.9
73.0
4.5
2.9
.3

123,854,691
152,636,128
7,392,035
20,551,224
18,290,824
4,692,964
3,310,816
6,793,187

60,386,094
115,412,869
273,458
2,066,288
1,104,161
1,676,670
791,864
2,402,132

45,000,744
85,255,309
107,188
672,318
166,951
1,062,730
405,304
1,989,332

15,385,350
30,157,560
166,270
1,393,970
937,210
613,940
386,560
412,800

63,468,597
37,223,259
7,118,577
18,484,936
17,186,663
3,016,294
2,518,952
4,391,055

48.8
75.6
3.7
10.1
6.0
35.7
23.9
35.4

Banks with percent of deposits
insured of—

Type of account—
D e m a n d ( IP C ) 3.........................................
S a v in g s a n d tim e ( IP C ) 3......................
U. S. G o v e r n m e n t...................................
S ta te a n d p o litic a l s u b d iv is io n s .......
In te r b a n k ...............................................
U n in v e s te d t r u s t f u n d s ........................
D r a f ts ...........................................................
O th e r it e m s ...............................................

1 Accounts with balances of $10,000 or less.
2 Accounts with balances of more than $10,000.
3 1 refers to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.
PC




BANKS

4,755
1,459
7,254
327

ACCOUNTS A D DEPOSITS O ALL INSURED
N
F

C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s :
N a tio n a l...................................................
S ta te , m e m b e rs F. R. S y s t e m . . .
S ta te , n o t m e m b e rs F. R. S y s te m
M u tu a l sa v in g s b a n k s ...........................

<>
£

Table 23. ACCOUNTS FULLY AND PARTIALLY PROTECTED AND DEPOSITS INSURED, ALL INSURED BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G RO UPE D BY S T AN D AR D M E TR O P O LITAN S T A T IS T IC A L A R E A A N D C IT Y
P e rc e n t o f
a c c o u n ts

N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts

SM SA a n d C it y 1

Num ber
of
banks

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s )
In s u re d

T o ta l

Fully
p ro te c te d

P a rtia lly
p ro te c te d

Fully
p ro te c te d

P a rtia lly
p ro te c te d

T o ta l

T o ta l
in s u re d

In fu lly
p ro te c te d
a c c o u n ts

In p a rtia lly
p ro te c te d
a c c o u n ts

U n in s u re d
in p a rtia lly
p ro te c te d
a c c o u n ts

Total United States.......

13,795

174,787,244

169,841,878

4,945,366

97.2%

2.8% $337,521,905 $184,113,567 $134,659,907

53 Largest SMSA’s

2,358

97,660,195

94,406,949

3,253,246

96.7

3.3

224,636,729

110,059,769

77,527,309

32,532,460

114,576,960

49.0

N ew Y o rk ............................
Los A n g e le s .......................
C h ic a g o ...............................
P h ila d e lp h ia ......................
D e tr o it..................................

145
64
273
86
46

18,916,036
4,236,311
5,577,825
4,850,650
3,246,657

17,850,721
4,107,114
5,349,842
4,707,063
3,149,089

1,065,315
129,197
227,983
143,587
97,568

94.4
97.0
95.9
97.0
97.0

5.6
3.0
4.1
3.0
3.0

69,001,294
9,679,213
17,468,321
9,462,404
6,949,203

32,050,024
4,498,763
7,199,834
5,033,185
3,653,504

21,396,874
3,206,793
4,920,004
3,597,315
2,677,824

10,653,150
1,291,970
2,279,830
1,435,870
975,680

36,951,270
5,180,450
10,268,487
4,429,219
3,295,699

46.4
46.5
41.2
53.2
52.6

San F ra n c is c o ...................
B o s to n .................................
P itts b u r g h ..........................
S t. L o u is ..............................
W a s h in g to n , D. C .............

39
70
47
132
63

14,804,841
2,278,073
2,064,569
2,005,802
1,709,817

14,500,752
2,199,766
1,999,803
1,958,165
1,668,997

304,089
78,307
64,766
47,637
40,820

97.9
96.6
96.9
97.6
97.6

2.1
3.4
3.1
2.4
2.4

21,356,891
5,892,182
5,471,267
4,265,092
3,246,352

10,848,645
2,550,776
2,416,878
2,063,489
1,631,680

7,807,755
1,767,706
1,769,218
1,587,119
1,223,480

3,040,890
783,070
647,660
476,370
408,200

10,508,246
3,341,406
3,054,389
2,201,603
1,614,672

50.8
43.3
44.2
48.4
50.3

C le v e la n d ............................
B a ltim o r e ............................
N e w a rk ................................
M in n e a p o lis -S t. Paul . ..
B u ffa lo .................................

14
31
57
111
15

1,993,349
2,047,309
2,274,033
1,716,578
1,823,389

1,931,388
2,008,627
2,195,195
1,677,580
1,748,057

61,961
38,682
78,838
38,998
75,332

96.9
98.1
96.5
97.7
95.9

3.1
1.9
3.5
2.3
4.1

4,362,519
2,654,182
4,197,842
3,393,764
3,487,184

2,139,479
1,559,359
2,760,098
1,655,335
2,328,331

1,519,869
1,172,539
1,971,718
1,265,355
1,575,011

619,610
386,820
788,380
389,980
753,320

2,223,040
1,094,823
1,437,744
1,738,429
1,158,853

49.0
58.8
65.8
48.8
66.8

H o u s to n ..............................
M ilw a u k e e ..........................
P a te rs o n .............................
S e a ttle ..................................
D a lla s ...................................

79
61
35
26
98

999,371
1,110,545
1,393,985
1,905,955
1,219,399

963,576
1,083,598
1,361,672
1,854,460
1,183,080

35,795
26,947
32,313
51,495
36,319

96.4
97.6
97.7
97.3
97.0

3.6
2.4
2.3
2.7
3.0

3,089,403
2,213,239
2,027,081
3,033,881
3,605,053

1,078,392
1,120,265
1,418,186
1,848,613
1,161,057

720,442
850,795
1,095,056
1,333,663
797,867

357,950
269,470
323,130
514,950
363,190

2,011,011
1,092,974
608,895
1,185,268
2,443,996

34.9
50.6
70.0
60.9
32.2

C in c in n a ti...........................
K a n sa s C ity .......................
San D ie g o ...........................
A tla n t a .................................
M ia m i...................................

48
114
9
41
58

896,225
966,587
422,178
607,101
590,244

876,954
935,073
412,462
592,923
569,252

19,271
31,514
9,716
14,178
20,992

97.8
96.7
97.7
97.7
96.4

2.2
3.3
2.3
2.3
3.6

1,603,592
2,356,166
654,214
1,453,349
1,440,596

731,709
1,091,005
373,943
534,836
681,637

538,999
775,865
276,783
393,056
471,717

192,710
315,140
97,160
141,780
209,920

871,883
1,265,161
280,271
918,513
758,959

45.6
46.3
57.2
36.8
47.3

D e n v e r.................................
N ew O rle a n s ;....................
P o rtla n d ..............................
P ro v id e n c e .........................
San B e rn a rd in o ...............

62
20
15
16
7

810,841
958,508
1,460,592
1,095,881
65,039

785,292
941,483
1,421,787
1,063,605
63,795

25,549
17,025
38,805
32,276
1,244

96.8
98.2
97.3
97.1
98.1

3.2
1.8
2.7
2.9
1.9

1,761,644
1,478,653
2,457,275
1,847,471
73,856

835,516
574,367
1,431,022
1,222,390
52,406

580,026
404,117
1,042,972
899,630
39,966

255,490
170,250
388,050
322,760
12,440

926,128
904,286
1,026,253
625,081
21,450

47.4
38.8
58.2
66.2
71.0

T a m p a . ................................
L o u is v ille .............................
In d ia n a p o lis ......................
D a y to n .................................
FRASER n to n io .......................
San A

52
17
40
29
33

639,100
573,831
817,983
548,377
430,102

621,523
563,126
800,045
539,782
418,136

17,577
10,705
17,938
8,595
11,966

97.2
98.1
97.8
98.4
97.2

2.8
1.9
2.2
1.6
2.8

1,177,344
1,015,041
1,635,890
741,110
948,020

714,849
448,244
724,066
397,337
452,088

539,079
341,194
544,686
311,387
332,428

175,770
107,050
179,380
85,950
119,660

462,495
566,797
911,824
343,773
495,932

60.7
44.2
44.3
53.6
47.7

54.5%

FEDERAL
DEPOSIT
INSURANCE
CORPORATION

Digitized for


$49,453,660 $153,408,338

P e rce n t
o f to ta l
d e p o s its
in s u re d

23
9
25
4
8

614,581
994,773
1,043,196
127,127
364,747

602,572
968,791
999,432
124,224
354,048

12,009
25,982
43,764
2,903
10,699

98.0
97.4
95.8
97.7
97.1

2.0
2.6
4.2
2.3
2.9

1,074,979
1,667,759
2,294,697
187,332
796,631

492,690
923,639
1,485,331
112,870
365,121

372,600
663,819
1,047,691
83,840
258,131

120,090
259,820
437,640
29.030
106,990

582,289
744,120
809,366
74,462
431,510

45.8
55.4
64.7
60.3
45.8

M e m p h is .............................
J e rs e y C ity .........................
R o c h e s te r ...........................
N o rfo lk .................................
G a ry ......................................

13
13
20
8
20

533,077
665,615
1,012,079
449,724
396,458

517,887
645,072
976,417
441,741
389,341

15,190
20,543
35,662
7,983
7,117

97.2
96.9
96.5
98.2
98.2

2.8
3.1
3.5
1.8
1.8

1,325,131
1,200,991
1,878,370
611,056
541,101

481,154
820,809
1,194,854
344,073
326,767

329,254
615,379
838,234
264,243
255,597

151,900
205,430
356,620
79,830
71,170

843,977
380,182
683,516
266,983
214,334

36.3
68.3
63.6
56.3
60.4

F o rt W o r th ..........................
S y ra c u s e .............................
H a r t fo r d ..............................
A k r o n ....................................
O k la h o m a C ity ..................

37
17
21
11
49

504,793
839,767
1,121,753
508,861
450,568

491,134
810,488
1,088,644
496,838
438,331

13,659
29,279
33,109
12,023
12,237

97.3
96.5
97.0
97.6
97.3

2.7
3.5
3.0
2.4
2.7

1,034,471
1,312,756
1,904,239
798,331
1,025,585

468,342
925,302
1,152,143
473,388
413,118

331,752
632,512
821,053
353,158
290,748

136,590
292,790
331,090
120,230
122,370

566,129
387,454
752,096
324,943
612,467

45.3
70.5
60.5
59.3
40.3

Y o u n g s to w n ......................
S a c ra m e n to .......................
H o n o lu lu .............................

14
6
7

368,005
33,047
574,941

361,218
31,722
565,266

6,787
1,325
9,675

98.2
96.0
98.3

1.8
4.0
1.7

524,683
71,786
886,243

334,014
43,570
421,276

266,144
30,320
324,526

67,870
13,250
96,750

190,669
28,216
464,967

63.7
60.7
47.5

54,405,304

2,053,138

96.4

3.6

154,537,891

64,565,023

44,033,643

20,531,380

89,972,868

41.8

10,880,833
3,198,557
3,767,518
3,487,331
2,308,275

10,208,620
3,020,367
3,650,787
3,368,801
2,226,933

672,213
178,190
116,731
118,530
81,342

93.8
94.4
96.9
96.6
96.5

6.2
5.6
3.1
3.4
3.5

52,234,844
14,288,465
8,809,078
7,749,362
5,807,175

18,515,362
4,928,688
4,035,148
3,924,613
2,853,909

11,793,232
3,146,788
2,867,838
2,739,313
2,040,489

6,722,130
1,781,900
1,167,310
1,185,300
813,420

33,719,482
9,359,777
4,773,930
3,824,749
2,953,266

35.4
34.5
45.8
50.6
49.1

B a ltim o r e ............................
H o u s to n ...............................
C le v e la n d ............................
W a s h in g to n , D. C .............
S t. L o u is ..............................

11
57
8
15
26

1,897,480
837,307
1,903,946
779,328
902,026

1,861,354
804,031
1,843,249
754,894
872,585

36,126
33,276
60,697
24,434
29,441

98.1
96.0
96.8
96.9
96.7

1.9
4.0
3.2
3.1
3.3

2,498,362
2,897,906
4,267,853
2,021,564
2,733,784

1,440,230
958,970
2,078,062
856,508
1,074,265

1,078,970
626,210
1,471,092
612,168
779,855

361,260
332,760
606,970
244,340
294,410

1,058,132
1,938,936
2,189,791
1,165,056
1,659,519

57.6
33.1
48.7
42.4
39.3

San F ra n c is c o ...................
M ilw a u k e e ..........................
B o s to n .................................
D a lla s ....................................
N e w O rle a n s ......................

18
23
11
42
6

14,499,765
699,730
977,188
956,248
764,652

14,203,014
679,283
920,091
924,139
749,819

296,751
20,447
57,097
32,109
14,833

98.0
97.1
94.2
96.6
98.1

2.0
2.9
5.8
3.4
1.9

20,903,438
1,729,852
4,348,317
3,292,496
1,287,917

10,557,062
769,268
1,625,358
955,093
464,244

7,589,552
564,798
1,054,388
634,003
315,914

2,967,510
204,470
570,970
321,090
148,330

10,346,376
960,584
2,722,959
2,337,403
823,673

50.5
44.5
37.4
29.0
36.0

P it t s b u r g h ..........................
San A n to n io .......................
S an D ie g o ...........................
S e a ttle ..................................
B u ff a lo .................................

12
26
6
11
8

1,446,717
388,062
394,803
1,802,466
1,714,745

1,395,230
376,733
385,493
1,752,456
1,643,313

51,487
11,329
9,310
50,010
71,432

96.4
97.1
97.6
97.2
95.8

3.6
2.9
2.4
2.8
4.2

4.479,577
896,315
627,950
2,935,552
3,346,439

1,803,763
416,456
356,293
1,774,388
2,212,956

1,288,893
303,166
263,193
1,274,288
1,498,636

514,870
113,290
93,100
500,100
714,320

2,675,814
479,859
271,657
1,161,164
1,133,483

40.3
46.5
56.7
60.4
66.1

C in c in n a ti...........................
M e m p h is .............................
D e n v e r .................................
A t la n t a .................................
M in n e a p o lis .......................

6
7
25
9
23

649,472
493,966
495,726
371,080
841,221

633,628
479,740
475,120
359,570
816,054

15,844
14,226
20,606
11,510
25,167

97.6
97.1
95.8
96.9
97.0

2.4
2.9
4.2
3.1
3.0

1,354,724
1,269,439
1,429,492
1,241,879
2,086,112

558,169
445,257
607,307
379,540
974,114

399,729
302,997
401,247
264,440
722,444

158,440
142,260
206,060
115,100
251,670

796,555
824,182
822,185
862,339
1,111,998

41.2
35.1
42.5
30.6
46.7

1 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas with population of 500,000 or more, and the 25 largest cities, according to the population in the 1960 census. Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas are desingated by
name of the major city, with data applying to the entire SMSA as defined by the Bureau of the Budget in 1964.




BANKS

56,458,442

45
80
25
15
7

25 Largest Cities

O ALL INSURED
F

522

N e w Y o r k ............................
C h ic a g o ................................
Los A n g e le s .......................
P h ila d e lp h ia ......................
D e tr o it..................................

ACCOUNTS A D DEPOSITS
N

C o lu m b u s ...........................
P h o e n ix ...............................
A lb a n y ..................................
San J o s e .............................
B ir m in g h a m ......................

1
00

Table 24. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCOUNTS ACCORDING TO SIZE, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U PE D BY F ED ER A L DEPOSIT INSURANCE CO RPO RATION DISTRICT AND S T A T E
N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts
FDIC D is tric t a n d S ta te

Num ber
o f banks

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M o re
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

151,226,160

2,657,034

829,741

262,516

97.6%

1.7%

• 5%

154,389,966

150,648,081

2,652,018

827,945

261,922

97.6

1.7

.5

.2

Other Areas.............................................................

8

585,485

578,079

5,016

1,796

594

98.7

.9

.3

.1

2 .....................................................................
3 .....................................................................
4 .....................................................................
5 .....................................................................
6 .....................................................................
7 .....................................................................
8 .....................................................................
9 .....................................................................
1 0 ..................................................................
1 1 ..................................................................
1 2 ..................................................................

380
587
1,136
877
1,241
1,505
1,358
1,680
1,171
1,702
1,399
432

7,539,248
21,942,490
18,458,136
11,585,614
9,173,635
9,764,686
15,127,377
11,764,118
5,264,958
6,704,760
11,101,652
26,548,777

7,384,795
21,280,917
18,044,685
11,366,505
8,962,249
9,542,344
14,802,450
11,402,112
5,160,404
6,535,675
10,802,908
25,941,116

103,780
441,989
304,604
154,699
146,983
155,189
243,869
265,525
76,173
120,883
203,072
440,268

37,989
157,188
82,697
49,767
49,989
51,406
63,616
73,071
21,968
37,546
72,797
131,707

12,684
62,396
26,150
14,643
14,414
15,747
17,442
23,410
6,413
10,656
22,875
35,686

98.0
97.0
97.8
98.1
97.7
97.7
97.9
96.9
98.0
97.5
97.3
97.7

1.4
2.0
1.7
1.3
1.6
1.6
1.6
2.3
1.4
1.8
1.8
1.7

.5
.7
.4
.4
.5
.5
.4
.6
.4
.6
.7
.5

.2
.3
.1
.1
.2
.2
.1
.2
.1
.2
.2
.1

A la b a m a .....................................................................
A r iz o n a ........................................................................
A rk a n s a s .....................................................................
C a lifo rn ia ....................................................................
C o lo ra d o .....................................................................

252
15
242
186
203

1,900,834
1,127,156
1,194,461
20,148,414
1,430,359

1,859,044
1,097,760
1,166., 493
19,687,311
1,389,351

29,722
22,284
19,784
332,166
29,220

9,464
5,717
6,518
101,496
9,136

2,604
1,395
1,666
27,441
2,652

97.8
97.4
97.7
97.7
97.1

1.6
2.0
1.7
1.6
2.0

.5
.5
.5
.5
.6

.1
.1
.1
.1
.2

C o n n e c tic u t...............................................................
D e la w a re ....................................................................
D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia ...............................................
F lo rid a .........................................................................
G e o rg ia ........................................................................

60
20
15
415
380

1,988,887
423,434
779,328
3,588,226
2,466,666

1,946,956
413,279
754,894
3,493,048
2,418,901

30,079
7,183
15,801
67,740
31,279

9,290
2,313
6,512
21,336
12,331

2,562
659
2,121
6,102
4,155

97.9
97.6
96.9
97.3
98.1

1.5
1.7
2.0
1.9
1.3

.5
.5
.8
.6
.5

.1
.2
.3
.2
.2

FDIC District
1 .....................................................................

D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

•2%

State




CORPORATION

154,975,451

13,460

INSURANCE

13,468

50 States and D. C................................................

DEPOSIT

Total United States..................................................

FEDERAL

Total

P e rc e n t o f to ta l a c c o u n ts

1,441
32,699
9,708
5,654
4,965

228
10,369
2,456
1,097
780

98.0
96.9
98.1
98.2
98.2

1.4
1.9
1.2
1.3
1.3

.5
.9
.5
.4
.4

K e n tu c k y ....................................................................
L o u is ia n a ....................................................................
M a in e ...........................................................................
M a ry la n d ....................................................................
M a s s a c h u s e tts .........................................................

341
208
40
120
154

1,300,148
1,105,364
263,104
1,001,848
1,440,705

1,281,716
1,080,184
258,250
981,323
1,395,332

12,502
15,983
3,130
12,507
26,364

4,862
7,499
1,427
6,313
14,654

1,068
1,698
297
1,705
4,355

98.6
97.7
98.2
98.0
96.9

1.0
1.4
1.2
1.2
1.8

.4
.7
.5
.6
1.0

M ic h ig a n .....................................................................
M in n e s o ta ..................................................................
M is s is s ip p i.................................................................
M is s o u ri......................................................................
M o n ta n a .....................................................................

358
713
194
632
127

2,467,973
1,457,936
776,505
2,157,679
317,288

2,418,518
1,434,282
764,032
2,113,097
309,804

29,918
14,903
8,362
28,451
5,406

15,340
6,789
3,550
12,633
1,782

4,197
1,962
561
3,498
296

98.0
98.4
98.4
97.9
97.6

1.2
1.0
1.1
1.3
1.7

.6
.5
.5
.6
.6

N e b ra s k a ...................................................................
N e v a d a ........................................................................
N ew H a m p s h ire ......................................................
New J e rs e y ................................................................
N ew M e x ic o ...............................................................

425
8
70
233
63

776,898
161,163
194,904
2,112,567
321,394

760,256
157,073
191,315
2,059,293
314,873

12,023
2,545
2,323
33,460
4,396

3,895
1,238
1,080
16,193
1,819

724
307
186
3,621
306

97.9
97.5
98.2
97.5
98.0

1.5
1.6
1.2
1.6
1.4

.5
.8
.6
.8
.6

N e w Y o rk ....................................................................
N o rth C a ro lin a .........................................................
N o rth D a k o ta ............................................................
O h io ..............................................................................
O k la h o m a ...................................................................

326
151
159
547
413

6,013,388
1,601,209
322,440
3,286,596
1,272,696

5,791,046
1,576,309
316,525
3,218,697
1,252,759

121,207
15,558
4,468
40,966
13,291

73,610
7,396
1,259
20,724
5,431

27,525
1,946
188
6,209
1,215

96.3
98.4
98.2
97.9
98.4

2.0
1.0
1.4
1.2
1.0

1.2
.5
.4
.6
.4

O re g o n .........................................................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ............................................................
R hode Is la n d ............................................................
S o u th C a ro lin a .........................................................
S o uth D a k o ta ............................................................

49
589
8
130
172

770,977
3,987,599
190,319
742,653
367,864

756,673
3,898,548
184,612
731,397
361,757

9,343
54,357
3,320
7,411
4,753

3,990
26,997
1,880
3,190
1,162

971
7,697
507
655
192

98.1
97.8
97.0
98.5
98.3

1.2
1.4
1.7
1.0
1.3

.5
.7
1.0
.4
.3

T e n n e s s e e .................................................................
T e x a s ............................................................................
U ta h .............................................................................
V e rm o n t......................................................................
V irg in ia ........................................................................

290
1,113
53
48
278

1,607,274
4,478,763
345,571
160,532
1,634,096

1,585,073
4,383,181
339,565
158,281
1,609,044

13,765
61,547
3,646
1,517
16,261

6,590
27,211
1,855
643
7,090

1,846
6,824
505
91
1,701

98.6
97.9
98.3
98.6
98.5

.9
1.4
1.1
.9
1.0

.4
.6
.5
.4
.4

W a s h in g to n ...............................................................
W est V ir g in ia .............................................................
W is c o n s in ...................................................................
W y o m in g .....................................................................
A la s k a ..........................................................................
H a w a ii.........................................................................

95
183
575
68
10
7

1,135,911
731,123
1,451,769
167,539
81,896
183,330

1,116,432
721,786
1,423,519
163,964
79,857
179,072

12,318

5,640
2,679
8,390
926
618
1,337

1,521
537
2,072
143
108
373

98.3
98.7
98.1
97.9
97.5
97.7

1.1
.8
1.2
1.5
1.6
1.4

.5
.4
.6
.6
.8
.7

101




6,121
17,788
2,506
1,313
2,548

BANKS

3,744
66,990
22,117
17,848
14,900

COMMERCIAL

261,306
3,486,249
1,790,371
1,365,482
1,147,033

O INSURED
F

266,719
3,596,307
1,824,652
1,390,081
1,167,678

ACCOUNTS

K a n s a s ........................................................................

24
1,021
425
659
593

Id a h o ...........................................................................
Illin o is ..........................................................................
In d ia n a ........................................................................

102

Table 25. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCOUNTS ACCORDING TO SIZE, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U PE D BY A M O U N T OF DEPO SITS, PO PU LATIO N OF CENTER IN W H IC H LO CATED , C LASS , AN D PERC ENT
OF DEPO SITS INSURED; AND A C C O U N TS G RO UPED BY TYPE
P e rc e n t o f to ta l a c c o u n ts

N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts
C la s s ific a tio n

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

2,657,034

829,741

262,516

4,486
38,334
481,178
2,939,175
12,354,371

22
371
4,689
33,963
169,882

5
74
1,098
7,665
41,054

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

13,468

154,975,451

151,226,160

14

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

97.6%

1.7%

■ 5%

■ 2%

0
7
65
743
5,756

99.4
98.8
98.8
98.6
98.3

.5
1.0
1.0
1.1
1.4

.1
.2
.2
.3
.3

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

$ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ............................
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .........................
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .........................
$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .......................
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ....................

2,908
2,105
629
301
198

16,662,462
24,406,520
14,614,866
11,911,685
15,521,558

16,359,023
23,925,064
14,295,322
11,606,039
15,114,191

233,397
364,456
234,699
221,955
285,777

58,860
94,840
67,479
65,430
92,698

11,182
22,160
17,366
18,261
28,892

98.2
98.0
97.8
97.4
97.4

1.4
1.5
1.6
1.9
1.8

.4
.4
.5
.5
.6

.1
.1
.1
.2
.2

12,448,574
10,429,464
8,242,660
24,654,724

12,094,670
10,127,439
7,948,052
23,938,816

237,080
197,528
197,823
475,392

85,026
73,898
68,976
172,638

31,798
30,599
27,809
67,878

97.2
97.1
96.4
97.1

1.9
1.9
2.4
1.9

.7
.7
.8
.7

.3
.3
.3
.3

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ....................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ................
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ............
$ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e ...................................
B a n k s in c e n te rs w ith p o p u la tio n in 1 9 6 0
o f—
Less th a n 2 5 0 ........................................................
2 5 0 to 5 0 0 ...............................................................
5 0 0 to 1 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
1 .0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 .......................................................
2 ,5 0 0 to 5 , 0 0 0 .......................................................

522
1,142
1,851
2,738
1,734

674,162
1,796,145
4,004,528
9,203,344
8,711,328

662,452
1,766,258
3,936,076
9,037,221
8,547,046

9,214
24,682
55,648
132,302
127,669

1,963
4,680
11,444
29,665
31,355

533
525
1,360
4,156
5,258

98.3
98.3
98.3
98.2
98.1

1.4
1.4
1.4
1.4
1.5

.3
.3
.3
.3
.4

.1
.0
.0
.0
.1

5 .0 0 0 to 1 0 ,0 0 0 ....................................................
1 0 .0 0 0 to 2 5 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
2 5 .0 0 0 to 5 0 , 0 0 0 .................................................
5 0 .0 0 0 to 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...............................................
1 0 0 .0 0 0 to 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ............................................

1,576
1,447
782
517
397

11,575,466
16,352,208
13,090,294
13,187,125
15,710,039

11,346,843
16,027,871
12,814,493
12,900,149
15,338,985

175,534
243,558
203,333
205,161
259,473

43,873
65,139
57,411
64,017
84,065

9,216
15,640
15,057
17,798
27,516

98.0
98.0
97.9
97.8
97.6

1.5
1.5
1.6
1.6
1.7

.4
.4
.4
.5
.5

.1
.1
.1
.1
.2

2 5 0 .0 0 0 to 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ............................................
5 0 0 .0 0 0 to 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ........................................
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ....................................
2 .5 0 0 .0 0 0 o r m o r e ...............................................

329
272
44
117

13,192,723
28,694,675
8,029,328
10,754,086

12,832,236
27,990,618
7,779,154
10,246,758

243,284
490,204
172,064
314,908

85,992
159,845
58,152
132,140

31,211
54,008
19,958
60,280

97.3
97.5
96.9
95.3

1.8
1.7
2.1
2.9

.7
.6
.7
1.2

.2
.2
.2
.6




CORPORATION

591
2,075
4,402

4,513
38,786
487,030
2,981,546
12,571,063

8
8

INSURANCE

B a n k s w ith to ta l d e p o s its o f—
Less th a n $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ............................................
$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 .......................................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ...................................
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ...............................
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ...............................

DEPOSIT

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

Total

FEDERAL

A ll in s u re d c o m m e rc ia l b a n k s ...............................

N um ber
o f b a n ks

,486,535
631,377
539,122

469,512
218,485
141,744

152,777
80,106
29,633

97.5
97.1
98.2

1.8
2.0
1.4

.6
.7
.4

.2
.2
.1

B a n k s w ith p e rc e n t o f d e p o s its in s u re d
o f—
1 0 0 p e r c e n t..............................................................
9 0 to 1 0 0 ...................................................................
8 0 to 9 0 ......................................................................
7 0 to 8 0 ......................................................................
6 0 to 7 0 ......................................................................
5 0 to 6 0 ......................................................................

5
1,325
4,323
4,025
2,129
1,001

1,972
3,055,996
17,635,289
28,512,277
26,877,848
38,613,620

1,972
3,022,852
17,346,290
27,955,316
26,300,456
37,773,931

0
29,535
240,440
439,440
432,109
607,531

0
3,527
43,748
99,374
117,831
183,060

0
82
4,811
18,147
27,452
49,098

100.0
98.9
98.4
98.0
97.9
97.8

.0
1.0
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.6

.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5

.0
.0
.0
.1
.1
.1

4 0 to 5 0 ......................................................................
3 0 to 4 0 ......................................................................
2 0 to 3 0 ......................................................................
10 to 2 0 ......................................................................
O to 1 0 .........................................................................

389
172
79
16
4

18,368,775
9,487,453
8,753,054
3,507,653
161,514

17,849,744
9,167,116
8,335,563
3,325,754
147,166

352,717
201,748
249,145
99,405
4,964

124,905
84,578
113,870
54,005
4,843

41,409
34,011
54,476
28,489
4,541

97.2
96.6
95.2
94.8
91.1

1.9
2.1
2.8
2.8
3.1

.7
.9
1.3
1.5
3.0

.2
.4
.6
.8
2.8

69,986,658
68,631,261
96,634
381,276
128,016
1,360,398
935,313
13,455,895

68,449,173
66,807,568
80 077
242,503
34,354
1,299,073
898,324
13,415,088

954,135
,550,060
5,531
50,559
22,265
35,763
15,288
23,433

455,982
231,254
5,915
54,839
34,504
19,849
15,670
11,728

127,368
42,379
5,111
33,375
36,893
5,713
6,031
5,646

97.8
97.3
82.9
63.6
26.8
95.5
96.0
99.7

1.4
2.3
5.7
13.3
17.4
2.6
1.6
.2

.7
.3
6.1
14.4
27.0
1.5
1.7
.1

.2
.1
5.3
8.8
28.8
.4
.6
.0

Type o f acco u n t
D e m a n d ( IP C ) 1........................................................
S a vin g s an d tim e ( IP C ) 1......................................
U. S. G o v e rn m e n t...................................................
S ta te a n d p o litic a l s u b d iv is io n s ........................
In te r b a n k ...................................................................
U n in v e s te d t r u s t f u n d s ........................................
D r a fts ...................................................
O th e r it e m s ...............................................................

BANKS

82,002,019
31,237,213
37,986,928

COMMERCIAL

84,110,843
32,167,181
38,697,427

O INSURED
F

4,755
1,459
7,254

ACCOUNTS

C lass o f b a n k
N a tio n a l......................................................................
S ta te , m e m b e rs F. R. S y s te m ...........................
S ta te , n o t m e m b e rs F. R. S y s te m ..................

1 IPC refers to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.

103




104

Table 26. DISTRIBUTION OF DEMAND ACCOUNTS OF INDIVIDUALS, PARTNERSHIPS, AND CORPORATIONS ACCORDING TO SIZE
OF ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U P E D BY F E D E R A L DEPOSIT INSURANCE CO RPO RATION DISTRICT AND S T A T E
P e rc e n t o f to ta l a c c o u n ts

N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts
FD IC D is tr ic t a n d S ta te

T otal

13,468

69,986,658

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

68,449,173

954,135

455,982

127,368

97.8%

1.4%

■
7%

•2%

455,112

127,153

97.8

1.4

.7

.2

68,343,785

Other A reas.............................................................

8

108,166

105,388

1,693

870

215

97.4

1.6

.8

.2

5 .....................................................................
6 .....................................................................
7 .....................................................................
8 .....................................................................
9 .....................................................................
1 0 ..................................................................
1 1 ..................................................................
1 2 ..................................................................

380
587
1,136
877
1,241
1,505
1,358
1,680
1,171
1,702
1,399
432

3,109,055
8,439,015
7,274,195
6,097,952
5,526,669
5,851,517
5,744,394
4,986,388
2,465,528
4,170,545
6,445,978
9,875,422

3,025,915
8,155,472
7,117,245
5,993,138
5,429,665
5,752,461
5,632,408
4,851,731
2,422,368
4,093,378
6,309,060
9,666,332

49,875
159,523
95,323
65,635
62,731
64,206
69,823
84,838
29,530
53,344
88,114
131,193

26,217
92,204
47,721
31,180
27,892
27,754
33,438
38,353
10,992
19,863
39,311
61,057

7,048
31,816
13,906
7,999
6,381
7,096
8,725
11,466
2,638
3,960
9,493
16,840

97.3
96.6
97.8
98.3
98.2
98.3
98.1
97.3
98.2
98.1
97.9
97.9

1.6
1.9
1.3
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.2
1.7
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.3

.8
1.1
.7
.5
.5
.5
.6
.8
.4
.5
C
’6
.

.2
.4
.2
.1
.1
.1
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
.2

A la b a m a ......................................................................
A riz o n a ........................................................................
A rk a n s a s .....................................................................
C a lifo rn ia ....................................................................
C o lo ra d o .....................................................................

252
15
242
186
203

1,152,028
540,457
786,416
6,929,855
785,734

1,134,673
530,822
772,575
6,776,354
769,366

11,087
6,188
9,488
95,736
10,624

5,096
2,782
3,669
44,938
4,646

1,172
665
684
12,827
1,098

98.5
98.2
98.2
97.8
97.9

1.0
1.1
1.2
1.4
1.4

.4
.5
.5
.6
.6

.1
.1
.1
.2
.1

C o n n e c tic u t...............................................................
D e la w a re .....................................................................
D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia ...............................................
Florida
......................................................
G e o rg ia ........................................................................

60
20
15
415
380

859,491
204,894
387,023
2,126,890
1,471,246

838,125
199,745
373,279
2,084,156
1,446,804

13,221
3,163
7,777
27,994
15,288

6,533
1,531
4,512
12,133
7,113

1,612
455
1,455
2,607
2,041

97.5
97.5
96.4
98.0
98.3

1.5
1.5
2.0
1.3
1.0

.8
.7
1.2
.6
.5

.2
.2

D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tr ic t
D is tr ic t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

2 .....................................................................
3 .....................................................................

4 ...............................................................

State




.4
.1
.1

CORPORATION

69,878,492

INSURANCE

13,460

DEPOSIT

50 States and D. C.................................................

952,442

FDIC District
D is tric t 1 .....................................................................

FEDERAL

Total United States...................................................

Num ber
o f banks

Id a h o ...........................................................................
Illin o is ..........................................................................
In d ia n a ........................................................................

480
20,516
4,682
2,894
2,416

97.4
96.6
98.1
98.1
97.5

2.0
2.5
1.4
1.4
1.8

.5
.7
.4
.4
.5

K e n tu c k y ....................................................................
L o u is ia n a ....................................................................
M a in e ...........................................................................
M a ry la n d ....................................................................
M a s s a c h u s e tts ........................................................

341
208
40
120
154

1,967,768
2.362,604
767,923
2,422,042
3,204,186

1,930,415
2,310,695
756,410
2,378,716
3,135,464

26,518
34,969
8,692
31,395
40,725

8,579
12,977
2,294
9,227
20,055

2,256
3,963
527
2,704
7,942

98.1
97.8
98.5
98.2
97.9

1.3
1.5
1.1
1.3
1.3

.4
.5
.3
.4
.6

M ic h ig a n .....................................................................
M in n e s o ta ..................................................................
M is s is s ip p i.................................................................
M is s o u ri......................................................................
M o n ta n a .....................................................................

358
713
194
632
127

7,165,527
3,411,118
1,217,909
3,900,543
611,653

6,989,965
3,350,106
1,191,256
3,805,931
595,109

133,692
42,788
18,242
64,696
12,419

32,964
13,559
6,858
22,675
3,417

8,906
4,665
1,553
7,241
708

97.5
98.2
97.8
97.6
97.3

1.9
1.3
1.5
1.7
2.0

.5
.4
.6
.6
.6

N e b ra s k a ...................................................................
N e v a d a ........................................................................
N ew H a m p s h ire ......................................................
N ew J e rs e y ................................................................
N e w M e x ic o ...............................................................

425
8
70
233
63

1,257,150
376,781
457,678
6,008,383
586,513

1,228,083
366,909
449,322
5,869,176
572,361

20,365
7,028
6,145
107,867
9,921

6,807
2,233
1,775
25,038
3,383

1,895
611
436
6,302
848

97.7
97.4
98.2
97.7
97.6

1.6
1.9
1.3
1.8
1.7

.5
.6
.4
.4
.6

N ew Y o rk ....................................................................
N o rth C a ro lin a .........................................................
N o rth D a k o ta ............................................................
O h io ..............................................................................
O k la h o m a ..................................................................

326
151
159
547
413

14,925,188
2,735,940
585,702
8,574,381
1,863,382

14,420,383
2,686,341
572,506
8,389,166
1,819,198

321,923
33,490
10,350
137,933
31,041

128,041
12,246
2,407
36,198
9,938

54,841
3,863
439
11,084
3,205

96.6
98.2
97.7
97.8
97.6

2.2
1.2
1.8
1.6
1.7

.9
.4
.4
.4
.5

O re g o n ........................................................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ............................................................
R h ode Is la n d ............................................................
S o u th C a ro lin a .........................................................
S o u th D a k o ta ............................................................

49
589
8
130
172

1,619,871
9,883,755
647,098
1,114,921
656,485

1,578,738
9,655,519
631,685
1,097,730
642,683

30,876
166,671
11,074
11,313
10,616

8,153
46,499
3,322
4,597
2,585

2,104
15,066
1,017
1,281
601

97.5
97.7
97.6
98.5
97.9

1.9
1.7
1.7
1.0
1.6

.5
.5

T e n n e s s e e .................................................................
T e x a s ...........................................................................
U t a h .............................................................................
V e rm o n t......................................................................
V irg in ia ........................................................................

290
1,113
53
48
278

2,701,914
7,025,379
782,299
473,476
3,212,278

2,639,505
6,822,092
764,040
464,958
3,150,057

44,191
135.
13,621
7,065
46,102

13,634
50,720
3,567
1,253
12,656

4,584
16,669
1,071
200
3,463

97.7
97.1
97.7
98.2
98.1

1.6
1.9
1.7
1.5
1.4

.5
.7
.5
.3
.4

W a s h in g to n ...............................................................
W e st V irg in ia .............................................................
W is c o n s in ...................................................................
W y o m in g .....................................................................
A la s k a ..........................................................................
H a w a ii..........................................................................

95
183
575
68
10
7

2,368,498
1,321,105
3,930,146
293,647
163,089
574,941

2,318,851
1,298,767
3,857,546
284,447
158,426
565,266

36,804
16,598
53,971

10,072
4,529
14,775
2,019
1,162
2,426

2,771
1,211
3,854
488
320
888

97.9
98.3
98.2
96.9
97.1
98.3

1.6
1.3
1.4
2.3
2.0
1.1

.4
.3
.4
.7
.7
.4




6
,1
3,181
6,361

.4
.4

105

2,598
62,516
15,877
10,555
9,646

BANKS

10,231
227,064
56,206
38,461
33,564

COMMERCIAL

501,575
8,739,062
3,954,939
2,663,050
1,814,596

O INSURED
F

514,884
9,049,158
4,031,704
2,714,960
1,860,222

ACCOUNTS

K a n s a s ........................................................................

24
1,021
425
659
593

10
6

Table 27. DISTRIBUTION OF SAVINGS AND TIME ACCOUNTS OF INDIVIDUALS, PARTNERSHIPS, AND CORPORATIONS ACCORDING
TO SIZE OF ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U P E D BY FE D E R A L DEPOSIT INSURANCE CO RPO RATION DISTRICT AND S TA T E
N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts
FDIC D is tric t an d S tate

N um ber
o f banks

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

66,807,568

1,550,060

231,254

42,379

97.3%

2.3%

■
3%

50 States and D. C.................................................

13,460

68,245,739

66,425,852

1,547,070

230,603

42,214

97.3

2.3

.3

.1

Other Areas.............................................................

8

385,522

381,716

2,990

651

165

99.0

.8

.2

.0

1 .....................................................................
2 .....................................................................
3 .....................................................................
4 .....................................................................
5 .....................................................................
6 .....................................................................
7 .....................................................................
8 .....................................................................
9 .....................................................................
1 0 ..................................................................
1 1 ..................................................................
1 2 ...................................................................

380
587
1,136
877
1,241
1,505
1,358
1,680
1,171
1,702
1,399
432

3,460,659
10,879,927
9,581,620
4,537,700
3,167,874
3,392,120
8,172,753
5,455,158
2,502,087
2,159,089
3,736,145
11,586,129

3,406,108
10,575,253
9,362,065
4,443,989
3,082,205
3,299,237
7,991,087
5,263,383
2,455,707
2,089,864
3,613,908
11,224,762

47,163
254,628
193,823
81,419
73,065
79,287
160,737
166,599
40,570
59,048
100,076
293,645

5,982
39,278
22,119
10,842
11,079
12,059
18,626
21,662
5,138
8,764
18,067
57,638

1,406
10,768
3,613
1,450
1,525
1,537
2,303
3,514
672
1,413
4,094
10,084

98.4
97.2
97.7
97.9
97.3
97.3
97.8
96.5
98.1
96.8
96.7
96.9

1.4
2.3
2.0
1.8
2.3
2.3
2.0
3.1
1.6
2.7
2.7
2.5

.2
.4
.2
.2
.3
.4
.2
.4
.2
.4
.5
.5

.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.0
.1
.1
.1

A la b a m a .....................................................................
A r iz o n a ........................................................................
A r k a n s a s ....................................................................
C a lifo rn ia ....................................................................
C o lo ra d o .....................................................................

252
15
242
186
203

677,319
477,520
344,675
8,591,891
550,757

658,215
459,275
334,803
8,308,576
530,399

16,540
15,376
8,559
226,442
17,109

2,342
2,446
1,209
48,148
2,761

222
423
104
8,725
488

97.2
96.2
97.1
96.7
96.3

2.4
3.2
2.5
2.6
3.1

.3
.5
.4
.6
.5

0
.1
.0
.1
.1

C o n n e c tic u t...............................................................
D e la w a re ....................................................................
D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia ...............................................
F lo rid a .........................................................................
G e o rg ia ........................................................................

60
20
15
415
380

900,642
180,812
312,606
1,251,265
855,269

883,953
176,851
303,088
1,209,347
840,072

15,072
3,511
7,563
35,976
12,813

1,415
423
1,591
5,151
2,014

202
27
364
791
370

98.1
97.8
97.0
96.6
98.2

1.7
1.9
2.4
2.9
1.5

.2
.2
.5
.4
.2

.0
.0
.1
.1
.0

■
1%

FDIC District
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

State




CORPORATION

68,631,261

INSURANCE

13,468

DEPOSIT

T otal United States..................................................

FEDERAL

T otal

P e rc e n t o f to ta l a c c o u n ts

72
3,398
314
116
200

96.9
96.0
98.2
98.4
97.0

2.8
3.5
1.6
1.5
2.7

.3
.5
.2
.1
.3

.0
.1
.0
.0
.0

K e n tu c k y ....................................................................
L o u is ia n a ....................................................................
M a in e ..........................................................................
M a ry la n d ....................................................................
M a s s a c h u s e tts ........................................................

341
208
40
120
154

557,940
1,018,744
419,906
1,011,827
1,289,180

544,434
999,924
414,413
991,965
1,274,622

11,854
15,881
5,039
17,830
11,316

1,532
2,569
425
1,825
2,361

120
370
29
207
881

97.6
98.2
98.7
98.0
98.9

2.1
1.6
1.2
1.8
.9

.3
.3
.1
.2
.2

.0
.0
.0
.0
.1

M ic h ig a n .....................................................................
M in n e s o ta ..................................................................
M is s is s ip p i.................................................................
M is s o u ri......................................................................
M o n ta n a .....................................................................

358
713
194
632
127

4,080,159
1,778,475
384,021
1,499,011
261,496

3,969,873
1,750,532
374,571
1,462,010
254,089

96,811
24,212
7,736
31,266
6,456

11,774
3,187
1,572
5,042
887

1,701
544
142
693
64

97.3
98.4
97.5
97.5
97.2

2.4
1.4
2.0
2.1
2.5

.3
.2
.4
.3
.3

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

N e b ra s k a ...................................................................
N e v a d a ........................................................................
N ew H a m p s h ire ......................................................
N ew J e rs e y ................................................................
New M e x ic o ...............................................................

425
8
70
233
63

418,270
188,462
226,437
3,389,560
224,219

410,539
183,285
222,648
3,313,190
218,418

6,558
4,257
3,421
70,446
4,917

1,070
787
330
5,441
788

103
133
38
483
96

98.2
97.3
98.3
97.7
97.4

1.6
2.3
1.5
2.1
2.2

.3
.4
.1
.2
.4

.0
.1
.0
.0
.0

N e w Y o rk ...................................................................
N o rth C a ro lin a .........................................................
N o rth D a k o ta ...........................................................
O h io ..............................................................................
O k la h o m a ..................................................................

326
151
159
547
413

6,924,033
994,056
212,971
4,552,535
485,014

6,703,496
975,831
207,210
4,450,037
466,563

177,681
15,417
5,155
90,644
15,606

32,763
2,440
575
10,414
2,299

10,093
368
31
1,440
546

96.8
98.2
97.3
97.7
96.2

2.6
1.6
2.4
2.0
3.2

.5
.2
.3
.2
.5

.1
.0
.0
.0
.1

O re g o n ........................................................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ............................................................
R h o d e -ls la n d ............................................................
S o u th C a ro lin a .........................................................
S o u th D a k o ta ...........................................................

49
589
8
130
172

757,134
5,029,085
345,782
287,340
249,145

734,288
4,912,028
337,299
283,928
243,876

19,759
103,179
7,181
2,947
4,747

2,737
11,705
1,068
388
489

350
2,173
234
77
33

97.0
97.7
97.5
98.8
97.9

2.6
2.1
2.1
1.0
1.9

.4
.2
.3
.1
.2

.0
.0
.1
.0
.0

T e n n e s s e e .................................................................
T e x a s ...........................................................................
U ta h .............................................................................
V e rm o n t......................................................................
V irg in ia ........................................................................

290
1,113
53
48
278

990,494
2,015,662
384,212
278,712
1,396,264

957,990
1,936,291
373,654
273,173
1,364,419

27,608
63,902
9,312
5,134
27,941

4,276
12,264
1,091
383
3,525

620
3,205
155
22
379

96.7
96.1
97.3
98.0
97.7

2.8
3.2
2.4
1.8
2.0

.4
.6
.3
.1
.3

.1
.2
.0
.0
.0

W a s h in g to n ...............................................................
W est V irg in ia .............................................................
W is c o n s in ...................................................................
W y o m in g ....................................................................
A la s k a ..........................................................................
H a w a ii..........................................................................

95
183
575
68
10
7

1,054,529
535,607
2,192,737
108,173
64,717
327,468

1,027,916
524,758
2,156,274
103,661
63,143
322,974

23,013
9,721
32,664
3,827
1,326
3,527

3,159
1,073
3,511
609
210
797

441
55
288
76
38
170

97.5
98.0
98.3
95.8
97.6
98.6

2.2
1.8
1.5
3.5
2.0
1.1

.3
.2
.2
.6
.3
.2

.0
.0
.0
.1
.1
.1




107

709
19,941
3,341
1,721
2,025

BANKS

6,009
148,674
31,262
17,925
15,948

COMMERCIAL

210,926
4,081,661
1,864,940
1,181,722
578,702

O INSURED
F

217,716
4,253,674
1,899,857
1,201,484
596,875

ACCOUNTS

K a n s a s ........................................................................

24
1,021
425
659
593

Id a h o ...........................................................................
Illin o is ..........................................................................
In d ia n a .......................................................................

108

Table 28. DISTRIBUTION OF DEMAND ACCOUNTS OF INDIVIDUALS, PARTNERSHIPS, AND CORPORATIONS ACCORDING TO SIZE
OF ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
BAN KS G R O U PED BY AM O U N T O F D EPO SITS
P e rc e n t o f to ta l a c c o u n ts

N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts
Size g ro u p

N um ber
o f b a n ks

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

Total

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M o re
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

97.8%

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

1.4%

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

.7%

.2%

954,135

455,982

127,368

$ 2 5 0 0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 0 0 0
........................
$ 5 0 0 0 0 0 to $1 0 0 0 ,0 0 0
...................................
................
$1 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
$ 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 0 ,0 0 0
........................

14
88
591
2,075
4,402

2,798
30,590
361,885
2,014,881
7,575,183

2,783
30,345
359,001
1,995,818
7,483,541

10
215
2,454
15,715
71,505

5
30
409
3,150
18,416

0
0
21
198
1,721

99.5
99.2
99.2
99.1
98.8

.4
.7
.7
.8
.9

.2
.1
.1
.2
.2

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

$ 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................................
$ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...............................
$ 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
........................
$ 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
........................
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..........................

2,908
2,105
629
301
198

9,127,370
11,984,890
6,503,983
4,973,736
6,438,742

9,001,381
11,785,974
6,369,391
4,849,713
6,266,817

92,746
136,726
86,721
76,213
100,880

29,619
53,437
39,727
38,747
55,740

3,624
8,753
8,144
9,063
15,305

98.6
98.3
97.9
97.5
97.3

1.0
1.1
1.3
1.5
1.6

.3
.4
.6
.8
.9

.0
.1
.1
.2
.2

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..........................
$ 5 0 0 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......................
$1 0 0 0 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o re ........................................

82
41
20
14

5,158,488
4,247,497
3,273,172
8,293,443

5,004,564
4,114,579
3,161,382
8,023,884

86,553
73,287
61,486
149,624

50,931
43,447
36,727
85,597

16,440
16,184
13,577
34,338

97.0
96.9
96.6
96.7

1.7
1.7
1.9
1.8

1.0
1.0
1.1
1.0

.3
.4
.4
.4

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

.0

2.9
10.8

.0
.0
.5
2.9
10.9

.0
.0
.3
1.6
7.5

.0
.0
.1
.7
4.0

.0
.0
.0
.2
1.4

c i n n n n n n n n tA c o ^ n n n n n n n

13.0
17.1
9.3
7.1
9.2

13.2
17.2
9.3
7 1
9.2

9.7
14.3
9.1
8.0
10.6

6.5
11.7
8.7
8.5
12.2

2.8
6.9
6.4
7.1
12.0

t o K n n n n n n n tn tRnn nnn nnn
t c n n n n n n n n +r* i i n n n n n n n n n
c i fUUUfUUU,UUU tn f ^ . fOUUrUUU,UUU..................
% n n n n n n nnn TO to cnn nnn nnn
pl
c o c a h n n n n n n ak maka

7.4
6.1
4.7
11.9

7.3
6 0
4.6
11.7

9.1
7.7
6.4
15.7

11.2
9.5
8.1
18.8

12.9
12.7
10.7
27.0

Banks with total deposits of—

Banks with total deposits of—
i acc thsn
RH nnn
O K n nnn +r* CPinn nnn
ic o n nnn +r* t i nnn nnn
c 1 nnn nnn
co nnn nnn
co nnn nnn
nnn nnn
n n n n n n tn t i n nnn nnn
c i n nnn nnn
cor nnn nnn
cok n n n n n n fn i ^ n nnn nnn
J e n n n n n n n tn i i n n n n n n n n




o

.
’5

CORPORATION

68,449,173

INSURANCE

69,986,658

DEPOSIT

13,468

FEDERAL

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

Table 29. DISTRIBUTION OF SAVINGS AND TIME ACCOUNTS OF INDIVIDUALS, PARTNERSHIPS, AND CORPORATIONS ACCORDING
TO SIZE OF ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
BAN KS G R O UPED BY A M O U N T OF DEPOSITS

Percent of total accounts

N um ber of accounts
Size group

$5,0 00 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .......
$ 10 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 25 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 ....
$ 25 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ....
$ 5 0 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 . .
$ 10 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .

$5,0 00 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .......
$ 1 0 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......
$ 25 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......
$ 5 0 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 . .
$ 10 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .




1,

$ 100,000

More
than
$ 100,000

231,254

to
$ 25,000

42,379

$25,000
to

$10,000
or less

97.3'

13,468

68,631,261

66,807,568

14

1,376
6,171
104,262
843,327
4,436,517

0
0

102,890
829,373
4,347,620

4
64
1,264
13,048
81,659

0
6

591
2,075
4,402

105
873
6,909

3
33
329

99.7
98.9
98.7
98.3
98.0

2,908
2,105
629
301
198

6,644,773
10,714,547
6,988,661
5,855,790
7,620,326

6,506,925
10,479,965
6,832,653
5,700,721
7,422,717

124,708
209,345
136,896
135,445
169,856

12,350
23,190
17,150
17,343
23,946

790
2,047
1,962
2,281
3,807

97.9
97.8
97.8
97.4
97.4

6,063,349
4,790,693
4,002,688
10,558,781

5,898,839
4,655,595
3,848,042
10,174,755

137,369
111,744
125,844
302,814

22,131
18,875
22,854
65,522

5,010
4,479
5,948
15,690

97.3
97.2
96.1
96.4

100. 0%

100. 0%

100. 0%

100.0%

100.0%

.0
.0
.2
1.2

.0
.0
.2
1.2

.0
.0
.1
.8

.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.1

6.5

6.5

5.3

9.7
15.6
10.2
8.5

9.7
15.7

13.5

10.0

8.7

11.1

11.1

7.4
7.5
10.4

7.0
5.8
15.4

7.0
5.8
15.2

8
8

1,372

6,101

10.2

8.5

8.0
8.8

11.0
8.9
7.2

8.1

19.5

.4
3.0
5.3

$ 10,000
to
$25,000
2.3
.3

1.0
1.2
1.5

1.8
1.9

2.0
2.0
2.3

2.2

2.3
2.3
3.1
2.9

$25,000
to
$ 100,000
.3%

More
than
$ 100,000

•1%

1.9
4.8
4.6
5.4
9.0

9.6

8.2

11.8
10.6

9.9
28.3

14.0
37.0

109

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .......
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 to $ 1,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
$ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 or m o re ....................

$ 10,000

BANKS

Percent of to ta l....................................
Banks with total deposits of—
Less than $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ........................
$25 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...................
$ 50 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...............
$1,0 00 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........
$2,0 00 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........

or less

COMMERCIAL

$ 25 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .......
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
$ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 or m o re ....................

$ 10,000

O INSURED
F

Banks with total deposits of—
Less than $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 .......................
$25 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 500,000 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............
$1,0 00 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........
$ 2 ,0 00 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........

Total

ACCOUNTS

Savings and tim e accounts—total

N umber
of banks

110

Table 30. DISTRIBUTION OF DEPOSITS ACCORDING TO SIZE OF ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U P E D BY FE D E R A L DEPOSIT INSURANCE CO R PO R ATION DISTRICT AND S T A T E
P e rc e n t o f to ta l d e p o s its
in a c c o u n ts o f—

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s ) in a c c o u n ts o f
FD IC D is tr ic t a n d S ta te

T otal

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

37.0%

12.7%

13.1%

37.2%

108,971,617

37,541,730

38,605,788

109,583,335

37.0

12.7

13.1

37.2

13,468 $295,377,500 $109,272,373

$37,616,613

$38,684,460 $109,804,054

8

675,030

300,756

74,882

78,672

220,719

44.6

11.1

11.7

32.7

1 .....................................................................
2 ......................................................................
3 .....................................................................
4 .....................................................................
5 .....................................................................
6 .....................................................................
7 .....................................................................
8 .....................................................................
9 .....................................................................
1 0 ..................................................................
1 1 ..................................................................
1 2 ..................................................................

380
587
1,136
877
1,241
1,505
1,358
1,680
1,171
1,702
1,399
432

12,552,505
64,818,219
31,998,353
16,635,155
15,233,770
17,272,829
24,194,084
27,261,713
8,560,892
11,956,734
22,085,135
42,808,111

4,417,378
16,095,173
13,151,334
7,120,965
6,341,660
7,265,252
11,577,628
10,238,715
4,373,410
5,121,557
7,486,928
16,082,372

1,501,428
6,287,650
4,261,552
2,194,331
2,103,281
2,235,582
3,397,908
3,707,523
1,092,435
1,721,738
2,916,201
6,196,983

1,764,374
7,321,055
3,827,693
2,301,435
2,348,782
2,409,573
2,963,974
3,384,628
1,026,450
1,761,667
3,519,275
6,055,555

4,869,325
35,114,341
10,757,773'
5,018,424
4,440,047
5,362,423
6,254,573
9,930,847
2,068,597
3,351,771
8,162,731
14,473,201

35.2
24.8
41.1
42.8
41.6
42.1
47.9
37.6
51.1
42.8
33.9
37.6

12.0
9.7
13.3
13.2
13.8
12.9
14.0
13.6
12.8
14.4
13.2
14.5

14.1
11.3
12.0
13.8
15.4
14.0
12.3
12.4
12.0
14.7
15.9
14.1

38.8
54.2
33.6
30.2
29.1
31.0
25.9
36.4
24.2
28.0
37.0
33.8

A la b a m a .....................................................................
A riz o n a ........................................................................
A rk a n s a s ....................................................................
C a lifo rn ia ....................................................................
C o lo ra d o .....................................................................

252
15
242
186
203

2,870,411
1,886,435
1,926,401
32,746,215
2,715,186

1,270,199
749,061
916,931
11,789,055
1,030,454

420,113
307,347
284,453
4,682,631
414,253

436,322
265,441
303,252
4,658,249
429,768

743,777
564,586
421,765
11,616,280
840,711

44.3
39.7
47.6
36.0
38.0

14.6
16.3
14.8
14.3
15.3

15.2
14.1
15.7
14.2
15.8

25.9
29.9
21.9
35.5
31.0

C o n n e c tic u t...............................................................
D e la w a re ....................................................................
D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia ...............................................
F lo rid a .........................................................................
G e o rg ia ........................................................................

60
20
15
415
380

3,071,127
784,207
2,021,564
6,535,875
3,960,795

1,222,976
270,899
612,168
2,660,403
1,557,054

432,901
103,112
230,381
959,298
456,989

425,084
104,818
297,072
1,001,140
586,415

990,165
305,379
881,943
1,915,034
1,360,337

39.8
34.5
30.3
40.7
39.3

14.1
13.1
11.4
14.7
11.5

13.8
13.4
14.7
15.3
14.8

32.2
38.9
43.6
29.3
34.3

FDIC District
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

State




CORPORATION

Other Areas.............................................................

INSURANCE

13,460

DEPOSIT

50 States and D. C................................................

294,702,470

FEDERAL

Total United States..................................................

Num ber
o f banks

145,220
3,159,009
788,202
548,514
477,105

113,661
2,886,824
738,207
497,805
443,390

133,170
9,149,999
1,687,229
780,848
656,115

51.3
34.3
47.4
55.7
48.9

18.0
13.7
12.9
13.3
15.5

14.1
12.5
12.1
12.1
14.4

16.5
39.5
27.6
18.9
21.3

K e n tu c k y ....................................................................
L o u is ia n a ....................................................................
M a in e ...........................................................................
M a ry la n d ....................................................................
M a s s a c h u s e tts ........................................................

341
208
40
120
154

2,862,345
3,725,601
778,577
3,206,241
6,516,971

1,351,103
1,330,438
419,354
1,362,832
1,750,804

386,425
505,557
121,768
442,575
606,714

404,167
603,639
102,676
418,185
943,985

720,651
1,285,967
134,779
982,649
3,215,469

47.2
35.7
53.9
42.5
26.9

13.5
13.6
15.6
13.8
9.3

14.1
16.2
13.2
13.0
14.5

25.2
34.5
17.3
30.6
49.3

M ic h ig a n .....................................................................
M in n e s o ta ..................................................................
M is s is s ip p i.................................................................
M is s o u ri......................................................................
M o n ta n a .....................................................................

358
713
194
632
127

12,269,872
5,568,232
1,866,689
7,784,065
1,038,908

5,570,646
2,651,940
854,004
3,201,363
540,055

1,846,685
617,755
266,881
938,556
178,145

1,542,621
649,234
324,905
1,062,087
152,387

3,309,921
1,649,304
420,899
2,582,060
168,320

45.4
47.6
45.7
41.1
52.0

15.1
11.1
14.3
12.1
17.1

12.6
11.7
17.4
13.6
14.7

27.0
29.6
22.5
33.2
16.2

N e b ra s k a ...................................................................
N e v a d a ........................................................................
N ew H a m p s h ire ......................................................
N ew J e rs e y ................................................................
N ew M e x ic o ...............................................................

425
8
70
233
63

2,254,587
651,433
545,219
9,269,479
912,205

1,076,499
233,296
260,563
4,520,864
392,089

296,464
100,505
87,685
1,488,590
140,304

316,537
104,190
81,263
1,147,103
163,739

565,086
213,442
115,708
2,112,923
216,073

47.7
35.8
47.8
48.8
43.0

13.1
15.4
16.1
16.1
15.4

14.0
16.0
14.9
12.4
17.9

25.1
32.8
21.2
22.8
23.7

N ew Y o rk ...................................................................
N o rth C a ro lin a .........................................................
N o rth D a k o ta ............................................................
O h io ..............................................................................
O k la h o m a ..................................................................

326
151
159
547
413

54,089,502
3,984,736
924,177
13,702,051
3,354,808

11,002,654
1,546,035
571,855
5,844,187
1,277,342

4,621,066
469,863
144,564
1,920,293
439,562

5,990,462
582,244
108,478
1,679,891
477,773

32,475,321
1,386,594
99,280
4,257,680
1,160,132

20.3
38.8
61.9
42.7
38.1

8.5
11.8
15.6
14.0
13.1

11.1
14.6
11.7
12.3
14.2

60.0
34.8
10.7
31.1
34.6

O re g o n ........................................................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ............................................................
R h o d e Is la n d ............................................................
S o u th C a ro lin a .........................................................
S o u th D a k o ta ...........................................................

49
589
8
130
172

2,660,011
18,296,302
1,121,805
1,329,594
1,029,575

1,143,863
7,307,147
445,685
582,274
609,560

429,692
2,341,259
155,372
166,881
151,971

380,380
2,147,802
156,977
215,448
116,351

706,077
6,500,094
363,771
364,991
151,692

43.0
39.9
39.7
43.8
59.2

16.2
12.8
13.9
12.6
14.8

14.3
11.7
14.0
16.2
11.3

26.5
35.5
32.4
27.5
14.7

T e n n e s s e e .................................................................
T e x a s ...........................................................................
U t a h .............................................................................
V e rm o n t......................................................................
V irg in ia ........................................................................

290
1,113
53
48
278

4,700,017
15,560,893
1,235,445
518,806
4,470,288

1,795,855
5,015,340
521,403
317,995
2,175,699

626,148
1,962,993
185,949
96,988
652,346

640,068
2,486,455
164,529
54,389
583,660

1,637,947
6,096,104
363,564
49,434
1,058,583

38.2
32.2
42.2
61.3
48.7

13.3
12.6
15.1
18.7
14.6

13.6
16.0
13.3
10.5
13.1

34.8
39.2
29.4
9.5
23.7

W a s h in g to n ...............................................................
W est V irg in ia .............................................................
W is c o n s in ...................................................................
W y o m in g .....................................................................
A la s k a ..........................................................................
H a w a ii..........................................................................

95
183
575
68
10
7

3,492,467
1,622,732
5,809,038
547,315
330,524
886,243

1,537,738
841,955
3,105,447
229,033
118,769
324,526

513,335
232,285
763,022
94,355
47,886
91,764

459,515
204,826
683,146
94,200
57,663
117,368

981,878
343,665
1,257,423
129,727
106,206
352,585

44.0
51.9
53.5
41.8
35.9
36.6

14.7
14.3
13.1
17.2
14.5
10.4

13.2
12.6
11.8
17.2
17.4
13.2

28.1
21.2
21.6
23.7
32.1
39.8




111

413,722
7,942,273
2,901,535
2,296,442
1,508,228

COMMERCIAL BANKS

805,773
23,138,104
6,115,173
4,123,609
3,084,838

IN INSURED

24
1,021
425
659
593

DEPOSITS

I d a h o ...........................................................................
Illin o is ..........................................................................
In d ia n a ........................................................................
Io w a .............................................................................
K a n s a s ........................................................................

B A N K S G R O U P E D B Y A M O U N T OF DEPO SITS, PO PU LATIO N OF CEN TE R IN W H IC H LO C A TE D , C LASS , A N D PER C EN T
OF DEPO SITS INSU RED; AN D A C C O U N TS G RO UPED BY TYPE
P e rc e n t o f to ta l d e p o s its
in a c c o u n ts o f—

D e posits (in th o u s a n d s ) in a c c o u n ts ofC la s s ific a tio n

T otal

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

13,468 $295,377,500 $109,272,373

$37,616,613

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$38,684,460 $109,804,054

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

37.2%

37.0%

12.7%

13.1%

Banks with total deposits of—
1,729
26,682
335,239
2,178,081
9,452,276

358
5,449
68,634
482,951
2,394,168

188
3,244
49,858
343,083
1,849,505

0
992
10,337
118,866
1,054,347

76.0
73.4
72.2
69.7
64.1

15.7
15.0
14.8
15.5
16.2

8.3
8.9
10.7
11.0
12.5

.0
2.7
2.2
3.8
7.1

$ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........................
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........................
$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ........................
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......................

2,908
2,105
629
301
198

20,516,364
32,303,401
21,890,110
20,907,435
29,817,313

12,196,922
17,298,292
10,371,705
8,811,575
10,979,474

3,280,994
5,123,139
3,310,926
3,121,429
4,042,886

2,698,174
4,344,125
3,126,303
3,044,688
4,353,720

2,340,273
5,537,845
5,081,177
5,929,744
10,441,233

59.4
53.5
47.4
42.1
36.8

16.0
15.9
15.1
14.9
13.6

13.2
13.4
14.3
14.6
14.6

11.4
17.1
23.2
28.4
35.0

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............
$ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e .....................................

82
41
20
14

28,831,979
26,637,729
25,727,923
70,369,258

8,745,401
7,268,657
6,324,856
15,281,484

3,362,785
2,825,824
2,840,480
6,756,589

4,028,913
3,521,344
3,342,557
7,978,759

12,694,879
13,021,904
13,220,030
40,352,426

30.3
27.3
24.6
21.7

11.7
10.6
11.0
9.6

14.0
13.2
13.0
11.3

44.0
48.9
51.4
57.3

of—
Less th a n 2 5 0 ..........................................................
2 5 0 to 5 0 0 .................................................................
5 0 0 to 1 ,0 0 0 .............................................................
1 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 .........................................................
2 ,5 0 0 to 5 , 0 0 0 .........................................................

522
1,142
1,851
2,738
1,734

961,362
2,147,839
4,737,798
11,168,416
10,926,707

586,670
1,502,311
3,193,797
7,167,564
6,574,659

130,523
345,688
782,037
1,860,264
1,794,990

89,388
205,750
504,698
1,321,261
1,412,346

154,781
94,090
257,266
819,327
1,144,711

61.0
69.9
67.4
64.2
60.2

13.6
16.1
16.5
16.7
16.4

9.3
9.6
10.7
11.8
12.9

16.1
4.4
5.4
7.3
10.5

5 ,0 0 0 to 1 0 ,0 0 0 ......................................................
1 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 5 , 0 0 0 ...................................................
2 5 ,0 0 0 to 5 0 , 0 0 0 ...................................................
5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 .................................................
1 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................................

1,576
1,447
782
517
397

15,170,734
22,081,795
19,202,361
20,498,515
28,152,700

8,505,233
11,452,688
9,049,054
9,120,293
10,459,197

2,451,590
3,430,710
2,867,681
2,905,795
3,660,798

1,996,883
3,007,867
2,668,927
2,951,572
3,964,168

2,217,029
4,190,530
4,616,700
5,520,855
10,068,536

56.1
51.9
47.1
44.5
37.2

16.2
15.5
14.9
14.2
13.0

13.2
13.6
13.9
14.4
14.1

14.6
19.0
24.0
26.9
35.8

2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................................
5 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..........................................
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ......................................
2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o re .................................................

329
272
44
117

28,669,924
55,824,277
19,807,808
56,027,264

9,148,515
17,516,049
6,151,981
8,844,364

3,466,182
6,961,558
2,441,149
4,517,647

4,090,578
7,516,155
2,741,761
6,213,107

11,964,649
23,830,515
8,472,918
36,452,147

31.9
31.4
31.1
15.8

12.1
12.5
12.3
8.1

14.3
13.5
13.8
11.1

41.7
42.7
42.8
65.1

Banks in centers with population in 1960




CORPORATION

2,276
36,368
464,068
3,122,981
14,750,296

INSURANCE

14
88
591
2,075
4,402

DEPOSIT

Less th a n $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................................
$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 .........................................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .....................................
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .................................
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .................................

FEDERAL

All insured commercial banks..............................

Num ber
o f banks

1
12

Table 31. DISTRIBUTION OF DEPOSITS ACCORDING TO SIZE OF ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964

Class of bank
4,755
1,459
7,254

163,561,646
82,205,481
49,610,372

58,371,192
23,560,707
27,340,474

21,058,412
8,976,357
7,581,844

21,941,203
10,236,380
6,506,877

62,190,839
39,432,037
8,181,178

35.7
28.7
55.1

12.9
10.9
15.3

13.4
12.5
13.1

38.0
48.0
16.5

DEPOSITS

1 0 0 p e r c e n t..............................................................
9 0 to 1 0 0 ....................................................................
8 0 to 9 0 ......................................................................
7 0 to 8 0 ......................................................................
6 0 to 7 0 ......................................................................
5 0 to 6 0 ......................................................................

5
1,325
4,323
4,025
2,129
1,001

876
2,911,345
19,913,470
35,717,369
37,823,062
58,574,876

876
2,357,284
13,841,566
21,196,613
18,872,420
23,696,175

0
400,186
3,301,871
6,109,520
6,089,739
8,558,955

0
142,652
1,911,930
4,458,850
5,414,699
8,411,915

0
11,223
858,102
3,952,386
7,446,204
17,907,832

100.0
81.0
69.5
59.3
49.9
40.5

.0
13.7
16.6
17.1
16.1
14.6

.0
4.9
9.6
12.5
14.3
14.4

.0
.4
4.3
11.1
19.7
30.6

4 0 to 5 0 ......................................................................
3 0 to 4 0 ......................................................................
2 0 to 3 0 ......................................................................
10 to 2 0 ......................................................................
0 to 1 0 ........................................................................

389
172
79
16
4

39,383,261
28,055,204
44,576,015
24,516,464
3,905,559

12,768,624
6,853,979
7,041,318
2,558,666
84,850

5,046,413
2,928,106
3,619,305
1,482,712
79,806

5,919,613
4,088,448
5,492,785
2,592,205
251,363

15,648,610
14,184,671
28,422,606
17,882,880
3,489,541

32.4
24.4
15.8
10.4
2.2

12.8
10.4
8.1
6.0
2.0

15.0
14.6
12.3
10.6
6.4

39.7
50.6
63.8
72.9
89.3

13,468
13,468
13,468
13,468
13,468
13,468
13,468
13,468

123,633,441
110,969,246
7,388,016
20,519,375
18,288,126
4,690,350
3,162,889
6,725,987

44,806,422
60,203,149
105,893
664,146
165,482
1,061,941
326,600
1,938,709

14,492,270
20,645,347
90,160
839,611
380,329
548,621
253,154
367,103

20,944,392
10,246,393
315,939
2,990,908
1,867,392
925,823
838,594
555,004

43,390,356
19,874,357
6,876,024
16,024,710
15,874,923
2,153,965
1,744,542
3,865,171

36.2
54.3
1.4
3.2
.9
22.6
10.3
28.8

11.7
18.6
1.2
4.1
2.1
11.7
8.0
5.5

16.9
9.2
4.3
14.6
10.2
19.7
26.5
8.3

35.1
17.9
93.1
78.1
86.8
45*9
55.2
57.5

IN INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS

N a tio n a l......................................................................
S ta te , m e m b e rs F. R. S y s te m ..........................
S ta te , n o t m e m b e rs F. R. S y s te m ..................

Banks with percent of deposits insured
of—

Type of account
D e m a n d ( IP C ) 1........................................................
S a vin g s a n d tim e (IP C ) 1......................................
U. S. G o v e rn m e n t...................................................
S ta te a n d p o litic a l s u b d iv is io n s ........................
I n te r b a n k ...................................................................
U n in v e s te d t r u s t f u n d s ........................................
D r a f ts ...........................................................................
O th e r it e m s ...............................................................
1 IPC refers to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.

113




114

Table 32. DISTRIBUTION OF DEMAND DEPOSITS OF INDIVIDUALS, PARTNERSHIPS, AND CORPORATIONS ACCORDING TO SIZE OF
ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U PED BY FED ER A L DEPOSIT INSURANCE CO R PO R ATION DISTRICT AND S T A T E
P e rc e n t o f to ta l d e p o s its
in a c c o u n ts o f—

D e posits (in th o u s a n d s ) in a c c o u n ts o f
FDIC D is tr ic t a n d S ta te

Total

13,468 $123,633,441

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$44,806,422

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

35.1%

36.2%

11.7%

16.9%

44,738,764

14,466,528

20,905,128

43,343,647

36.2

11.7

16.9

35.1

Other Areas.............................................................

8

179,375

67,659

25,743

39,265

46,709

37.7

14.4

21.9

26.0

1 .....................................................................
2 .....................................................................
3 .....................................................................
4 .....................................................................
5 .....................................................................
6 .....................................................................
7 .....................................................................
8 .....................................................................
9 .....................................................................
1 0 ..................................................................
1 1 ..................................................................
1 2 ..................................................................

380
587
1,136
877
1,241
1,505
1,358
1,680
1,171
1,702
1,399
432

6,155,212
26,253,192
12,809,510
7,958,078
7,066,094
7,699,194
8,674,075
11,125,719
3,398,912
5,702,655
10,088,154
16,702,645

1,967,154
5,861,144
4,409,855
3,341,058
3,165,039
3,481,642
3,506,574
3,904,990
1,697,921
2,812,272
4,125,554
6,533,219

766,665
2,455,429
1,449,781
996,970
952,673
967,448
1,057,703
1,284,803
442,900
796,623
1,355,062
1,966,214

1,199,710
4,308,140
2,215,352
1,411,888
1,261,875
1,254,173
1,536,895
1,760,599
494,735
884,291
1,820,699
2,796,036

2,221,683
13,628,479
4,734,522
2,208,163
1,686,507
1,995,932
2,572,904
4,175,327
763,356
1,209,469
2,786,839
5,407,176

32.0
22.3
34.4
42.0
44.8
45.2
40.4
35.1
50.0
49.3
40.9
39.1

12.5
9.4
11.3
12.5
13.5
12.6
12.2
11.5
13.0
14.0
13.4
11.8

19.5
16.4
17.3
17.7
17.9
16.3
17.7
15.8
14.6
15.5
18.0
16.7

36.1
51.9
37.0
27.7
23.9
25.9
29.7
37.5
22.5
21.2
27.6
32.4

A la b a m a .....................................................................
A riz o n a ........................................................................
A rk a n s a s ....................................................................
C a lifo rn ia ....................................................................
C o lo ra d o .....................................................................

252
15
242
186
203

1,301,439
731,311
937,234
12,523,401
1,223,152

604,300
325,106
485,730
4,680,634
519,622

168,840
95,509
141,253
1,431,151
159,665

230,280
128,733
160,627
2,056,084
208,575

298,019
181,963
149,624
4,355,532
335,290

46.4
44.5
51.8
37.4
42.5

13.0
13.1
15.1
11.4
13.1

17.7
17.6
17.1
16.4
17.1

22.9
24.9
16.0
34.8
27.4

C o n n e c tic u t...............................................................
D e la w a re ....................................................................
D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia ...............................................
F lo rid a .........................................................................
G e o rg ia ........................................................................

60
20
15
415
380

1,567,185
409,008
1,154,806
2,995,642
1,924,960

537,452
138,605
322,695
1,345,455
779,947

207,051
48,232
119,816
426,512
230,793

298,788
71,008
207,665
545,835
327,118

523,895
151,163
504,630
677,840
587,102

34.3
33.9
27.9
44.9
40.5

13.2
11.8
10.4
14.2
12.0

19.1
17.4
18.0
18.2
17.0

33.4
37.0
43.7
22.6
30.5

FDIC District
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

State




CORPORATION

$43,390,356

123,454,066

INSURANCE

$20,944,392

13,460

DEPOSIT

$14,492,270

50 States and D. C.................................................

FEDERAL

Total United States...................................................

Num ber
o f b a n ks

57,345
1,021,419
330,891
263,384
222,177

62,868
1,511,606
443,104
248,993
217,286

57,591
3,890,417
679,498
284,909
181,640

53.4
30.7
45.1
57.1
57.1

15.0
11.0
12.5
14.2
15.3

16.5
16.3
16.7
13.4
15.0

15.1
42.0
25.7
15.3
12.5

K e n tu c k y ....................................................................
L o u is ia n a ....................................................................
M a in e ...........................................................................
M a ry la n d .....................................................................
M a s s a c h u s e tts .........................................................

341
208
40
120
154

1,449,669
1,683,158
325,033
1,506,957
3,474,778

742,247
669,698
149,070
588,315
974,847

188,157
243,057
47,855
190,407
401,698

219,872
338,004
62,516
279,744
674,577

299,393
432,398
65,592
448,492
1,423,656

51.2
39.8
45.9
39.0
28.1

13.0
14.4
14.7
12.6
11.6

15.2
20.1
19.2
18.6
19.4

20.7
25.7
20.2
29.8
41.0

M ic h ig a n .....................................................................
M in n e s o ta ..................................................................
M is s is s ip p i....................................................... . ........
M is s o u ri......................................................................
M o n ta n a ......................................................................

358
713
194
632
127

3,824,680
2,058,817
844,053
3,557,142
469,727

1,393,701
898,479
435,338
1,483,211
249,268

457,069
227,503
126,527
429,886
80,244

711,454
313,687
158,642
569,222
76,666

1,262,456
619,148
123,546
1,074,823
63,549

36.4
43.6
51.6
41.7
53.1

12.0
11.1
15.0
12.1
17.1

18.6
15.2
18.8
16.0
16.3

33.0
30.1
14.6
30.2
13.5

N e b ra s k a ....................................................................
N e v a d a ........................................................................
New H a m p s h ire ......................................................
New J e rs e y ................................................................
New M e x ic o ...............................................................

425
8
70
233
63

1,174,752
285,998
236,089
3,696,924
421,875

625,086
105,735
108,196
1,429,639
216,298

178,102
38,862
35,771
513,519
65,298

170,178
59,995
48,757
744,405
81,425

201,385
81,406
43,365
1,009,361
58,853

53.2
37.0
45.8
38.7
51.3

15.2
13.6
15.2
13.9
15.5

14.5
21.0
20.7
20.1
19.3

17.1
28.5
18.4
27.3
14.0

New Y o rk ....................................................................
N o rth C a ro lin a .........................................................
N o rth D a k o ta ............................................................
O h io ..............................................................................
O k la h o m a ...................................................................

326
151
159
547
413

21,967,886
1,889,865
429,227
5,563,519
1,632,306

4,225,241
781,005
267,726
1,909,110
723,762

1,867,935
233,909
65,150
626,114
199,075

3,453,463
338,838
54,385
964,272
248,455

12,421,247
536,114
41,967
2,064,023
461,014

19.2
41.3
62.4
34.3
44.3

8.5
12.4
15.2
11.3
12.2

15.7
17.9
12.7
17.3
15.2

56.5
28.4
9.8
37.1
28.2

O re g o n .........................................................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia .............................................................
R h ode I s la n d ............................................................
S o u th C a ro lin a .........................................................
S o u th D a k o ta ............................................................

49
589
8
130
172

1,076,571
7,245,991
402,604
810,149
441,140

494,285
2,500,745
118,372
381,123
282,449

139,742
823,667
51,366
112,740
70,003

184,689
1,251,080
87,535
144,144
49,997

257,856
2,670,499
145,330
172,141
38,692

45.9
34.5
29.4
47.0
64.0

13.0
11.4
12.8
13.9
15.9

17.2
17.3
21.7
17.8
11.3

24.0
36.9
36.1
21.2
8.8

T e n n e s s e e .................................................................
T e x a s ............................................................................
U ta h ..............................................................................
V e rm o n t......................................................................
V irg in ia ........................................................................

290
1,113
53
48
278

1,755,149
7,251,811
475,288
149,522
1,891,744

770,454
2,914,453
198,461
79,216
893,664

208,151
951,199
55,407
22,924
247,797

304,452
1,272,536
86,150
27,536
321,916

472,092
2,113,624
135,270
19,846
428,367

43.9
40.2
41.8
53.0
47.2

11.9
13.1
11.7
15.3
13.1

17.3
17.5
18.1
18.4
17.0

26.9
29.1
28.5
13.3
22.6

W a s h in g to n ...............................................................
W e st V ir g in ia .............................................................
W is c o n s in ...................................................................
W y o m in g .....................................................................
A la s k a ..........................................................................
H a w a ii..................................................................

95
183
575
68
10
7

1,520,555
704,557
2,201,036
223,453
132,311
307,279

676,018
374,257
918,007
115,913
60,314
114,334

184,633
92,301
269,743
37,604
20,492
38,582

254,067
119,581
382,337
39,797
29,868
62,314

405,836
118,418
630,950
30,139
21,637
92,048

44.5
53.1
41.7
51.9
45.6
37.2

12.1
13.1
12.3
16.8
15.5
12.6

16.7
17.0
17.4
17.8
22.6
20.3

26.7
16.8
28.7
13.5
16.4
30.0




115

203,438
2,844,896
1,194,866
1,060,094
827,889

IN INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS

381,241
9,268,338
2,648,359
1,857,381
1,448,992

DEPOSITS

K a n s a s .........................................................................

24
1,021
425
659
593

Id a h o ............................................................................
Illin o is ..........................................................................
In d ia n a ........................................................................

16
1

Table 33. DISTRIBUTION OF SAVINGS AND TIME DEPOSITS OF INDIVIDUALS, PARTNERSHIPS, AND CORPORATIONS ACCORDING
TO SIZE OF ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U P E D BY FED ER A L DEPOSIT INSURANCE CO R PO R ATIO N DISTRICT AND STA T E
P e rc e n t o f to ta l d e p o s its
in a c c o u n ts o f—

D e posits (in th o u s a n d s ) in a c c o u n ts o f—
FDIC D is tric t a n d S ta te

50 States and D. C................................................

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

13,468 $110,969,246

$60,203,149

$20,645,347

$10,246,393

$19,874,357

54.3%

110,628,164

59,985,894

20,601,526

10,221,266

19,819,478

54.2

13,460

Total

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

18.6%

9.2%

17.9%

18.6

9.2

17.9

12.8

7.4

16.1

217,255

43,820

25,128

54,878

5 ....................................................................
6 .....................................................................
7 ....................................................................
8 .....................................................................
9 .....................................................................
1 0 ..................................................................
1 1 ..................................................................
1 2 ..................................................................

380
587
1,136
877
1,241
1,505
1,358
1,680
1,171
1,702
1,399
432

3,763,243
22,310,089
13,279,466
5,595,082
4,850,822
5,703,344
11,358,616
10,961,552
3,564,626
3,738,442
6,655,342
19,188,622

2,226,652
9,374,714
8,279,250
3,560,785
2,948,472
3,554,382
7,706,415
5,954,833
2,522,465
2,136,867
3,068,602
8,869,710

628,302
3,379,792
2,567,821
1,073,142
967,420
1,075,407
2,121,614
2,198,356
549,929
786,543
1,315,518
3,981,504

261,705
1,679,656
950,174
477,065
500,710
542,173
816,168
941,619
224,621
398,422
882,249
2,571,831

646,583
7,875,927
1,482,221
484,091
434,220
531,382
714,418
1,866,743
267,612
416,610
1,388,973
3,765,577

59.2
42.0
62.3
63.6
60.8
62.3
67.8
54.3
70.8
57.2
46.1
46.2

16.7
15.1
19.3
19.2
19.9
18.9
18.7
20.1
15.4
21.0
19.8
20.7

7.0
7.5
7.2
8.5
10.3
9.5
7.2
8.6
6.3
10.7
13.3
13.4

17.2
35.3
11.2
8.7
9.0
9.3
6.3
17.0
7.5
11.1
20.9
19.6

A la b a m a .....................................................................
A riz o n a ........................................................................
A rk a n s a s ....................................................................
C a lifo rn ia ....................................................................
C o lo ra d o .....................................................................

252
15
242
186
203

1,004,011
829,665
589,681
15,155,526
978,544

626,399
401,398
397,618
6,574,775
472,518

217,017
200,453
115,104
3,093,859
230,460

100,161
111,622
56,297
2,160,881
124,337

60,434
116,193
20,662
3,326,011
151,229

62.4
48.4
67.4
43.4
48.3

21.6
24.2
19.5
20.4
23.6

10.0
13.5
9.5
14.3
12.7

6.0
14.0
3.5
21.9
15.5

C o n n e c tic u t...............................................................
D e la w a re ....................................................................
D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia ...............................................
F lo rid a .........................................................................
G e o rg ia ........................................................................

60
20
15
415
380

940,684
186,498
638,311
2,113,477
1,130,301

618,517
117,580
270,544
1,225,643
716,348

197,754
46,944
103,134
470,247
173,177

56,065
16,604
69,293
233,941
88,776

68,347
5,370
195,340
183,645
152,000

65.8
63.0
42.4
58.0
63.4

21.0
25.2
16.2
22.2
15.3

6.0
8.9
10.9
11.1
7.9

7.3
2.9
30.6
8.7
13.4

FDIC District
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

1 ....................................................................
2 ....................................................................
3 .....................................................................

4 ..............................................................

State




CORPORATION

341,082

Other Areas.............................................................

INSURANCE

8

63.7

DEPOSIT

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

FEDERAL

Total United States..................................................

Num ber
o f banks

196,873
4,776,096
1,620,828
1,178,738
631,284

79,231
1,957,520
411,571
240,837
211,494

28,238
869,627
147,803
71,992
86,814

19,005
1,840,871
91,319
25,872
49,070

60.9
50.6
71.4
77.7
64.5

24.5
20.7
18.1
15.9
21.6

8.7
9.2
6.5
4.7
8.9

5.9
19.5
4.0
1.7
5.0

K e n tu c k y ............
L o u is ia n a ...........
M a in e ...................
M a ry la n d ............
M a s s a c h u s e tts .

341
208
40
120
154

831,903
1,015,072
342,464
1,118,416
1,421,468

565,521
598,099
253,439
739,629
679,580

162,751
212,103
65,596
234,924
156,392

67,846
113,922
17,361
80,636
109,149

35,785
90,949
6,069
63,227
476,347

68.0
58.9
74.0
66.1
47.8

19.6
20.9
19.2
21.0
11.0

8.2
11.2
5.1
7.2
7.7

4.3
9.0
1.8
5.7
33.5

M ic h ig a n .............
M in n e s o ta ..........
M is s is s ip p i.........
M is s o u ri..............
M o n ta n a .............

358
713
194
632
127

6,313,817
2,382,197
603,033
2,509,710
415,154

3,984,660
1,665,082
380,082
1,616,338
276,977

1,273,819
330,265
106,979
425,654
87,989

517,878
146,522
77,831
229,061
35,610

537,459
240,328
38,140
238,658
14,578

63.1
69.9
63.0
64.4
66.7

20.2
13.9
17.7
17.0
21.2

8.2
6.2
12.9
9.1
8.6

8.5
10.1
6.3
9.5
3.5

N e b ra s k a ...........
N e v a d a ................
N ew H a m p s h ire
N ew J e r s e y ........
N ew M e x ic o . . . .

425
8
70
233
63

585,119
245,258
208,744
4,259,923
281,496

417,171
118,332
141,859
2,952,658
163,060

88,932
57,826
45,425
910,977
64,825

49,555
33,584
13,196
222,896
36,080

29,462
35,515
8,264
173,392
17,533

71.3
48.2
68.0
69.3
57.9

15.2
23.6
21.8
21.4
23.0

8.5
13.7
6.3
5.2
12.8

5.0
14.5
4.0
4.1
6.2

N ew Y o r k ............
N o rth C a ro lin a ..
N o rth D a k o ta ...
O h io ......................
O k la h o m a ..........

326
151
159
547
413

17,522,586
1,118,306
382,426
5,852,481
996,040

6,087,221
703,992
283,730
3,730,792
511,446

2,378,050
195,192
67,827
1,193,615
204,773

1,415,029
113,540
23,304
449,291
109,283

7,642,286
105,582
7,564
478,783
170,537

34.7
63.0
74.2
63.7
51.3

13.6
17.5
17.7
20.4
20.6

8.1
10.2
6.1
7.7
11.0

43.6
9.4
2.0
8.2
17.1

O re g o n ................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ...
R hode I s la n d . . .
S o u th C a ro lin a . .
S o uth D a k o ta ...

49
589
8
130
172

1,100,536
7,426,985
531,576
245,022
384,848

609,922
4,548,458
306,135
175,416
296,675

260,440
1,374,205
95,473
38,620
63,847

119,334
500,883
49,876
17,500
19,185

110,838
1,003,439
80,092
13,485
5,141

55.4
61.2
57.6
71.6
77.1

23.7
18.5
18.0
15.8
16.6

10.8
6.7
9.4
7.1
5.0

10.1
13.5
15.1
5.5
1.3

T e n n e s s e e .........
T e x a s ...................
U ta h .....................
V e rm o n t..............
V ir g in ia ................

290
1,113
53
48
278

1,772,050
4,529,108
529,222
318,307
1,847,001

974,906
1,906,046
304,051
227,122
1,224,120

371,898
838,137
120,290
67,662
373,555

188,969
620,626
44,694
16,058
152,729

236,277
1,164,299
60,186
7,465
96,596

55.0
42.1
57.5
71.4
66.3

21.0
18.5
22.7
21.3
20.2

10.7
13.7
8.4
5.0
8.3

13.3
25.7
11.4
2.3
5.2

W a s h in g to n .......
W est V ir g in ia . . .
W is c o n s in . ........
W y o m in g ............
A la s k a ..................
H a w a ii..................

95
183
575
68
10
7

1,403,565
628,027
2,773,278
200,077
90,228
340,941

816,684
447,083
2,100,927
104,448
50,813
198,260

304,432
127,717
436,223
50,885
17,249
48,176

137,687
43,367
150,487
28,432
9,367
38,045

144,762
9,860
85,641
16,312
12,799
56,459

58.2
71.2
75.8
52.2
56.3
58.2

21.7
20.3
15.7
25.4
19.1
14.1

9.8
6.9
5.4
14.2
10.4
11.2

10.3
1.6
3.1
8.2
14.2
16.6




117

323,347
9,444,113
2,271,521
1,517,439
978,661

IN INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS

24
1,021
425
659
593

DEPOSITS

Id a h o ...................
Illin o is ..................
In d ia n a ...............
Io w a ......................
K a n s a s ................

11
8

Table 34. DISTRIBUTION OF DEMAND DEPOSITS OF INDIVIDUALS, PARTNERSHIPS, AND CORPORATIONS ACCORDING TO SIZE OF
ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
BAN KS G R O UPED BY A M O U N T OF DEPO SITS
P e rc e n t o f to ta l d e p o s its
in a c c o u n ts o f —

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s ) in a c c o u n ts o f Size g ro u p

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

13,468 $123,633,441

$44,806,422

$14,492,270

$20,944,392

$43,390,356

T otal

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

35.1%

36.2%

11.7%

16.9%

Banks with total deposits of—
1,090
19,034
215,092
1,213,898
4,725,527

161
3,136
35,816
227,260
1,048,335

188
1,200
17,297
129,698
771,510

0
0
3,377
31,012
302,065

75.7
81.4
79.2
75.8
69.0

11.2
13.4
13.2
14.2
15.3

13.1
5.1
6.4
8.1
11.3

.0
.0
1.2
1.9
4.4

$ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................................
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...............................
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...............................
$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .............................
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..........................

2,908
2,105
629
301
198

8,904,377
13,673,117
9,063,243
8,464,374
12,509,751

5,539,747
7,289,768
4,095,544
3,270,744
4,162,433

1,377,324
2,061,125
1,319,992
1,160,888
1,553,910

1,274,178
2,357,876
1,786,446
1,776,211
2,599,902

713,129
1,964,347
1,861,262
2,256,532
4,193,508

62.2
53.3
45.2
38.6
33.3

15.5
15.1
14.6
13.7
12.4

14.3
17.2
19.7
21.0
20.8

8.0
14.4
20.5
26.7
33.5

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..........................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......................
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e ........................................

82
41
20
14

12,253,031
11,569,536
10,008,603
28,441,711

3,371,961
2,806,823
2,221,454
5,873,308

1,328,218
1,131,391
967,574
2,277,141

2,381,652
2,060,855
1,763,156
4,024,223

5,171,200
5,570,467
5,056,420
16,267,039

27.5
24.3
22.2
20.7

10.8
9.8
9.7
8.0

19.4
17.8
17.6
14.1

42.2
48.1
50.5
57.2

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

.0
.0
.2
1.3
5.5

.0
.0
.5
2.7
10.5

.0
.0
.2
1.6
7.2

.0
.0
.1
.6
3.7

.0
.0
.0
.1
.7

$ 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
$ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0
$ 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
$ 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
$ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

7.2
11.1
7.3
6.8
10.1

12.4
16.3
9.1
7.3
9.3

9.5
14.2
9.1
8.0
10.7

6.1
11.3
8.5
8.5
12.4

1.6
4.5
4.3
5.2
9.7

$ 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
$ 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
$1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
$ 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o r m o re

9 9
9.4
8.1
23.0

7.5
6.3
5.0
13.1

9.2
7.8
6.7
15.7

11.4
9.8
8.4
19.2

11.9
12.8
11.7
37.5

Percent of total
Banks with total deposits of—
Less th a n $ 2 5 0 0 0 0
$ 2 5 0 0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 0 0 0
$ 5 0 0 0 0 0 to $1 0 0 0 0 0 0
$1 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
$2 0 0 0 0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 0 0 0 0




CORPORATION

1,439
23,371
271,582
1,601,868
6,847,437

INSURANCE

14
88
591
2,075
4,402

DEPOSIT

Less th a n $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ..................................................
$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ............................................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ........................................
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .....................................
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .....................................

FEDERAL

Demand deposits—to ta l.........................................

Num ber
o f banks

Table 35. DISTRIBUTION OF SAVINGS AND TIME DEPOSITS OF INDIVIDUALS, PARTNERSHIPS, AND CORPORATIONS ACCORDING
TO SIZE OF ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
BANKS G R O U PED BY A M O U N T O F DEPO SITS

Percent of total deposits
in accounts of—

Deposits (in thousands) in accounts o f Size group

Total

13,468 $110,969,246

$10,000

$ 10,000

or less

to
$25,000

$25,000
to
$ 100,000

$ 100,000

$60,203,149

$20,645,347

$10,246,393

$19,874,357

1.0

513,722
994,936
767,654
774,452
1,068,168

142,142
428,294
441,946
580,198
1,136,192

73.3
69.5
66.3
62.4
58.8

19.1
21.4
20.8

6.0
7.3
8.6
9.3
9.9

1.7
3.1
4.9
6.9
10.5

1,821,278
1,494,966
1,701,517
4,111,466

1,013,053
852,947
1,079,257
2,862,165

1,859,434
1,962,120
2,950,591
10,311,737

51.6
48.9
40.0
33.0

18.8
17.7
17.8
15.9

10.4

19.2
23.3
30.9
40.0

100. 0%

100. 0%

100. 0%

.0
.0

.0
.0

2,908
2,105
629
301
198

8,605,970
13,699,897
8,968,817
8,370,852
10,814,011

6,305,208
9,514,897
5,948,972
5,223,557
6,362,689

1,644,898
2,761,770
1,810,245
1,792,645
2,246,963

9,704,515
8,432,238
9,557,956
25,780,453

5,010,750
4,122,205
3,826,591
8,495,085

100.0%

100. 0%




8.1

7.5
9.7
8.7
7.6
8.6

23.2

.1
.8

0
0

.0

.0

.3
2.7

.0

5.2

10.6

8.0
13.4
8.8
8.7
10.9

5.0
9.7
7.5
7.6
10.4

8.3
6.8
6.4
14.1

7.2
8.2
19.9

9.9
8.3
10.5
27.9

10.5
15.8
9.9
8.7

.3

20.2
20.2

10.1
11.3

11.1

.0

.0
.4
.5

.7
2.2
2.2

2.9
5.7
9.4
9.9
14.8
51.9

119

$ 25 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .........
$50 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
$ 2,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 or m o re .....................

7.8
12.3

.0
.0

0

IN INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS

.0
3.0
3.6
3.3
4.8

$ 5 ,0 00 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .......
$ 1 0 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......
$ 25 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......
$ 5 0 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..
$ 10 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .

$ 5,0 00 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .......
$10 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ....
$ 2 5 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ....
$ 5 0 ,00 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 . .
$ 10 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 00 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .

17.9%

13.3
12.7
13.5
15.8
18.4

197
4,412
35,318
280,112

1.4
7.3

More
than

$ 100,000

86.7
84.3
82.6
80.5
75.8

74
832
16,666
170,247
1,071,779

.2

$25,000
to

$ 100,000

493
5,073
56,137

483
5,537
102,054
869,623
4,415,498

.0
.0

to
$25,000

9.2%

557
6,566
123,625
1,080,261
5,823,526

.0
.0
.1
1.0
5.2

$ 10,000
18.6

14
88
591
2,075
4,402

Percent of to ta l....................................
Banks with total deposits of—
Less than $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ......................
$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 .................
$50 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...............
$1,000,000 to $ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........
$ 2 ,0 00 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..........

$ 10,000
or less
54.3

Banks with total deposits of—
Less than $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 .......................
$25 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 500,000 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...............
$ 1,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........
$ 2,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .......
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...
$ 1,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
$ 2,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 or m o re ....................

More
than

DEPOSITS

Savings and tim e deposits—to ta l..

Num ber
of banks

120

Table 36. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCOUNTS ACCORDING TO SIZE, INSURED MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U PE D BY FEDER AL D EPO SIT INSURANCE C O R P O R A TIO N D IST R IC T, STATE, A M O U N T OF D E PO SITS,
P O P U LA T IO N OF CENTER, AN D PERCENT OF D EPO SITS INSU RE D; A N D A C C O U N T S BY TYPE
N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts
C la ss ific a tio n

Num ber
o f b an ks

Total

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

19,811,793

18,615,718

1,153,568

40,712

1,795

94.0%

5.8%

• 2%

• 0%

1 ........................ ............................................
2 .....................................................................
3 .....................................................................
4 .....................................................................
7 .....................................................................
9 .....................................................................
1 2 ..................................................................

150
148
9
6
7
1
6

4,138,532
12,771,731
1,668,198
540,964
85,496
264,993
341,879

3,953,136
11,882,150
1,592,673
527,036
83,668
255,761
321,294

173,744
868,082
68,874
12,716
1,681
8,734
19,737

11,488
20,117
6,482
1,158
141
495
831

164
1,382
169
54
6
3
17

95.5
93.0
95.5
97.4
97.9
96.5
94.0

4.2
6.8
4.1
2.4
2.0
3.3
5.8

.3
.2
.4
.2
.2
.2
.2

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

C o n n e c tic u t...............................................................
D e la w a re .....................................................................
In d ia n a ........................................................................
M a in e ...........................................................................
M a ry la n d .....................................................................

71
2
4
26
6

2,107,717
104,779
47,945
360,055
540,964

2,015,606
99,138
46,739
348,013
527,036

86,828
5,381
1,092
11,413
12,716

5,267
250
108
616
1,158

16
10
6
13
54

95.6
94.6
97.5
96.7
97.4

4.1
5.1
2.3
3.2
2.4

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

M a s s a c h u s e tts .........................................................
M in n e s o ta ..................................................................
New H a m p s h ire .......................................................
New J e r s e y ................................................................
New Y o rk ....................................................................

8
1
32
21
125

678,057
264,993
459,901
1,031,610
11,635,342

637,999
255,761
440,848
979,518
10,803,494

37,249
8,734
17,626
49,113
813,588

2,790
495
1,375
2,926
16,941

19
3
52
53
1,319

94.1
96.5
95.9
95.0
92.9

5.5
3.3
3.8
4.8
7.0

.4
.2
.3
.3
.1

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

O h io ..............................................................................
O re g o n .........................................................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia .............................................................
R h ode Is la n d ............................................................
V e rm o n t......................................................................

2
1
7
7
6

32,286
24,782
1,635,912
434,907
97,895

31,792
22,739
1,560,881
417,049
93,621

465
1,915
68,409
16,579
4,049

22
116
6,460
1,226
214

7
12
162
53
11

98.5
91.8
95.4
95.9
95.6

1.4
7.7
4.2
3.8
4.1

.1
.5
.4
.3
.2

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

W a s h in g to n ................................................................
W is c o n s in ...................................................................
A la s k a ..........................................................................

4
3
1

312,499
37,551
4,598

294,190
36,929
4,365

17,626
589
196

682
33
33

1
0
4

94.1
98.3
94.9

5.6
1.6
4.3

.2
.1
.7

.0
.0
.1

United States
FDIC District
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

State

CQRPORATION




INSURANCE

327

DEPOSIT

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

FEDERAL

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

P e rc e n t o f to ta l a c c o u n ts

Banks with total deposits of—
82
656
5,102
32,538
55,731

6
27
229
1,603
2,492

0
0
2
23
29

98.2
97.9
96.6
96.1
95.4

1.7
2.0
3.2
3.7
4.4

.1
.1
.1
.2
.2

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ........................
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......................
$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............

41
57
24
16
5

1,445,781
4,706,597
4,057,198
4,375,098
2,905,505

1,371,531
4,461,905
3,832,923
4,056,186
2,670,079

70,916
236,537
215,761
310,062
226,183

3,238
7,843
8,187
8,531
8,556

96
312
327
319
687

94.9
94.8
94.5
92.7
91.9

4.9
5.0
5.3
7.1
7.8

.2
.2
.2
.2
.3

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

Less th a n 2 5 0 ..........................................................
2 5 0 to 5 0 0 .................................................................
5 0 0 to 1 ,0 0 0 .............................................................
1 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 .........................................................
2 ,5 0 0 to 5 , 0 0 0 .........................................................

1
1
2
30
25

5,074
4,135
3,619
219,125
253,048

4,869
4,056
3,485
208,987
239,672

176
77
125
9,693
12,768

29
2
9
443
596

0
0
0
2
12

96.0
98.1
96.3
95.4
94.7

3.5
1.9
3.5
4.4
5.0

.6
.0
.2
.2
.2

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

5 .0 0 0 to 1 0 , 0 0 0 ......................................................
1 0 .0 0 0 to 2 5 , 0 0 0 ...................................................
2 5 .0 0 0 to 5 0 , 0 0 0 ...................................................
5 0 .0 0 0 to 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 .................................................
1 0 0 .0 0 0 to 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................................

22
51
51
31
33

249,270
733,226
1,252,962
1,255,333
2,636,170

238,625
699,685
1,191,906
1,196,758
2,516,876

10,288
32,005
58,188
56,070
114,154

351
1,517
2,812
2,409
5,049

6
19
56
96
91

95.7
95.4
95.1
95.3
95.5

4.1
4.4
4.6
4.5
4.3

.1
.2
.2
.2
.2

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

2 5 0 .0 0 0 to 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................................
5 0 0 .0 0 0 to 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..........................................
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ......................................
2 .5 0 0 .0 0 0 o r m o r e ................................................

10
16
4
50

1,219,618
1,932,661
1,536,977
8,510,575

1,161,919
1,821,988
1,470,491
7,856,401

54,833
105,090
60,725
639,376

2,808
5,466
5,603
13,618

58
117
158
1,180

95.3
94.3
95.7
92.3

4.5
5.4
4.0
7.5

.2
.3
.4
.2

.0
.0
.0
.0

172
151
4

8,175,634
11,590,653
45,506

7,727,482
10,845,257
42,979

438,720
712,707
2,141

9,171
31,172
369

261
1,517
17

94.5
93.6
94.4

5.4
6.1
4.7

.1
.3
.8

.0
.0
.0

908,493
18,052,179
7,635
7,532
325
749
411,061
423,819

907,443
16,860,116
7,565
6,908
266
680
409,394
423,346

788
1,150,822
36
400
50
46
1,138
288

237
39,672
29
185
8
21
400
160

25
1,569
5
39
1
2
129
25

99.9
93.4
99.1
91.7
81.8
90.8
99.6
99.9

.1
6.4
.5
5.3
15.4
6.1
.3
.1

.0
.2
.4
2.5
2.5
2.8
.1
.0

.0
.0
.1
.5
.3
.3
.0
.0

Banks in centers with population in
1960 of—

Banks with percent of deposits insured
of—
9 0 to 1 0 0 ....................................................................
8 0 to 9 0 ......................................................................
7 0 to 8 0 ......................................................................

Type of account
D e m a n d ( IP C 1 ........................................................
)
S a vings a n d tim e ( IP C 1 ......................................
)
U. S. G o v e rn m e n t..................................................
S ta te a n d p o litic a l s u b d iv is io n s .......................
In te r b a n k ...................................................................
U n in v e s te d t r u s t f u n d s ........................................
D r a fts ...........................................................................
O th e r it e m s ...............................................................
1 IPC refers to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.




121

4,878
31,969
152,004
836,619
1,197,624

BANKS

4,966
32,652
157,337
870,783
1,255,876

MUTUAL SAVINGS

3
11
28
83
59

ACCOUNTS A D DEPOSITS O INSURED
N
F

$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ................................
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ................................
$ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........................
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........................

122

Table 37. DISTRIBUTION OF DEPOSITS ACCORDING TO SIZE OF ACCOUNT, INSURED MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS,

NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U PE D BY FE D E R A L DEPO SITS INSU RANCE C O R P O R ATIO N D IS T R IC T, STATE, A M O U N T OF
P O P U LA T IO N O F CENTER, AN D PERCENT OF DEPO SITS IN SU R E D ; A N D A C C O U N TS BY TYPE

P e rc e n t o f to ta l d e p o s its
in a c c o u n ts o f—

D e posits (in th o u s a n d s ) in a c c o u n ts ofNum ber
o f banks

$42,144,387

$25,387,534

$14,855,563

$1,342,539

$558,750

1 .....................................................................
2 .....................................................................
3 .....................................................................
4 .....................................................................
7 .....................................................................
9 .....................................................................
1 2 ..................................................................

150
148
9
6
7
1
6

7,213,934
30,201,707
2,888,834
673,803
94,570
438,248
633,291

4,486,706
18,061,302
1,680,934
443,333
65,416
297,137
352,706

2,326,540
11,022,169
932,433
177,952
22,225
121,647
252,597

371,738
644,939
233,712
43,530
5,841
18,281
24,499

C o n n e c tic u t...............................................................
D e la w a re .....................................................................
In d ia n a ........................................................................
M a in e ...........................................................................
M a ry la n d .....................................................................

71
2
4
26
6

3,458,497
203,741
65,639
523,272
673,803

2,129,692
117,452
45,289
352,257
443,333

1,168,448
74,960
14,740
146,558
177,952

M a s s a c h u s e tts .........................................................
M in n e s o ta ..................................................................
N ew H a m p s h ire .......................................................
New J e rs e y ................................................................
New Y o r k ....................................................................

8
1
32
21
125

1,537,478
438,248
782,504
1,859,060
28,138,906

943,591
297,137
488,271
1,120,243
16,823,607

O h io ..............................................................................
O re g o n .........................................................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia .............................................................
R h ode Is la n d ............................................................
V e rm o n t......................................................................

2
1
7
7
6

28,317
64,587
2,860,517
737,844
174,340

W a s h in g to n ................................................................
W is c o n s in ...................................................................
A la s k a ..........................................................................

4
3
1

557,689
28,931
11,014

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

60.2%

35.2%

3.2%

1.3%

28,950
473,297
41,754
8,989
1,088
1,183
3,489

62.2
59.8
58.2
65.8
69.2
67.8
55.7

32.3
36.5
32.3
26.4
23.5
27.8
39.9

5.2
2.1
8.1
6.5
6.2
4.2
3.9

.4
1.6
1.4
1.3
1.2
.3
.6

155,834
8,523
4,523
22,705
43,530

4,523
2,806
1,088
1,752
8,989

61.6
57.6
69.0
67.3
65.8

33.8
36.8
22.5
28.0
26.4

4.5
4.2
6.9
4.3
6.5

.1
1.4
1.7
.3
1.3

505,374
121,647
232,351
632,356
10,314,853

85,822
18,281
53,986
97,274
539,142

2,691
1,183
7,896
9,187
461,304

61.4
67.8
62.4
60.3
59.8

32.9
27.8
29.7
34.0
36.7

5.6
4.2
6.9
5.2
1.9

.2
.3
1.0
.5
1.6

19,852
34,280
1,661,082
461,275
111,619

6,007
22,984
926,426
222,734
51,076

805
4,622
232,907
45,448
7,943

1,652
2,701
40,102
8,387
3,703

70.1
53.1
58.1
62.5
64.0

21.2
35.6
32.4
30.2
29.3

2.8
7.2
8.1
6.2
4.6

5.8
4.2
1.4
1.1
2.1

312,078
20,127
6,348

227,227
7,485
2,385

18,184
1,319
1,693

200
0
588

56.0
69.6
57.6

40.7
25.9
21.7

3.3
4.6
15.4

.0
.0
5.3

FDIC District
D is tr ic t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

State




CORPORATION

327

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

INSURANCE

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
to
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

DEPOSIT

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
o r less

United States.........................................................

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0
to
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

M ore
th a n
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

T otal

FEDERAL

C la ss ific a tio n

D E PO SITS,

Banks with total deposits of—
1,028
8,382
65,896
422,082
720,662

189
883
7,855
54,732
79,695

0
0
303
3,896
5,517

75.6
74.8
67.4
64.7
62.2

20.6
22.8
29.0
31.0
33.8

3.8
2.4
3.5
4.0
3.7

.0
.0
.1
.3
.3

$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ........................
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......................
$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............

41
57
24
16
5

2,706,514
8,942,362
8,239,212
10,716,035
7,778,012

1,662,454
5,578,313
5,032,511
6,434,947
4,288,178

915,991
3,039,010
2,832,361
3,918,412
2,931,739

108,579
259,082
272,993
272,765
285,767

19,490
65,957
101,347
89,911
272,328

61.4
62.4
61.1
60.0
55.1

33.8
34.0
34.4
36.6
37.7

4.0
2.9
3.3
2.5
3.7

.7
.7
1.2
.8
3.5

Less th a n 2 5 0 ..........................................................
2 5 0 to 5 0 0 .................................................................
5 0 0 to 1 , 0 0 0 .............................................................
1 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 .........................................................
2 ,5 0 0 to 5 , 0 0 0 .........................................................

1
1
2
30
25

7,613
4,378
5,838
371,403
474,711

4,158
3,379
3,935
229,939
288,323

2,496
943
1,639
127,410
164,662

959
56
264
13,767
18,889

0
0
0
287
2,837

54.6
77.2
67.4
61.9
60.7

32.8
21.5
28.1
34.3
34.7

12.6
1.3
4.5
3.7
4.0

.0
.0
.0
.1
.6

5 .0 0 0 to 1 0 , 0 0 0 ......................................................
1 0 .0 0 0 to 2 5 , 0 0 0 ...................................................
2 5 .0 0 0 to 5 0 , 0 0 0 ....................................................
5 0 .0 0 0 to 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 .................................................
1 0 0 .0 0 0 to 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................................

22
51
51
31
33

406,200
1,263,385
2,208,336
2,242,586
4,386,254

259,699
791,403
1,343,554
1,413,003
2,710,005

133,282
418,494
757,800
728,411
1,498,399

12,212
50,672
93,956
83,676
158,335

1,007
2,816
13,027
17,497
19,515

63.9
62.6
60.8
63.0
61.8

32.8
33.1
34.3
32.5
34.2

3.0
4.0
4.3
3.7
3.6

.2
.2
.6
.8
.4

2 5 0 .0 0 0 to 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................................
5 0 0 .0 0 0 to 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..........................................
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 ......................................
2 .5 0 0 .0 0 0 o r m o r e .................................................

10
16
4
50

2,131,126
3,809,622
2,563,300
22,269,634

1,302,115
2,246,586
1,499,535
13,291,902

715,686
1,356,980
822,079
8,127,283

97,056
178,008
202,169
432,520

16,269
28,049
39,517
417,930

61.1
59.0
58.5
59.7

33.6
35.6
32.1
36.5

4.6
4.7
7.9
1.9

.8
.7
1.5
1.9

172
151
4

16,213,028
25,833,393
97,966

10,359,230
14,978,403
49,901

5,505,570
9,319,434
30,560

288,219
1,039,795
14,525

60,010
495,760
2,980

63.9
58.0
50.9

34.0
36.1
31.2

1.8
4.0
14.8

.4
1.9
3.0

221,235
41,666,872
4,015
31,836
2,697
2,612
147,921
67,198

194,321
25,052,160
1,295
8,171
1,469
790
78,704
50,623

11,806
14,814,263
554
5,839
798
735
17,202
4,366

10,234
1,292,233
1,321
8,318
319
817
21,597
7,700

4,874
508,216
845
9,507
111
270
30,417
4,508

87.8
60.1
32.3
25.7
54.5
30.2
53.2
75.3

5.3
35.6
13.8
18.3
29.6
28.1
11.6
6.5

4.6
3.1
32.9
26.1
11.8
31.3
14.6
11.5

2.2
1.2
21.0
29.9
4.1
10.3
20.6
6.7

Banks in centers with population in
1960 of—

Banks with percent of deposits insured
of—
9 0 to 1 0 0 ....................................................................
8 0 to 9 0 ......................................................................
7 0 to 8 0 ......................................................................

Type of account
D e m a n d ( IP C 1 ......................................................
)
S a vings a n d tim e ( IP C 1 ......................................
)
U. S. G o v e rn m e n t...................................................
S ta te an d p o litic a l s u b d iv is io n s ........................
In te r b a n k ...................................................................
U n in v e s te d t r u s t f u n d s ........................................
D r a f ts ...........................................................................
O th e r it e m s ...............................................................
1 IPC refers to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.




123

3,775
27,430
153,276
882,626
1,324,025

BANKS

4,993
36,694
227,331
1,363,335
2,129,899

MUTUAL SAVINGS

3
11
28
83
59

ACCOUNTS A D DEPOSITS O INSURED
N
F

$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .................................
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ................................
$ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........................
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...........................

14
2

Table 38. NUMBER OF ACCOUNTS FULLY PROTECTED AND DEPOSITS INSURED ASSUMING ALTERNATIVE AMOUNTS OF MAXIMUM
COVERAGE PER ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U PE D BY F ED ER A L DEPOSIT INSURANCE CO RPO RATION DISTRICT AND S TA T E
P e rc e n t o f a c c o u n ts fu lly
p ro te c te d a s s u m in g
m a x im u m coverage
per a c c o u n t o f—

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s )
in s u re d a s s u m in g m a x im u m
co v e ra g e p e r a c c o u n t o f—

N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts fu lly p ro te c te d
a s s u m in g m a x im u m c o v e ra g e
p e r a c c o u n t o f—
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

otal United States.......

151,226,160

153,883,194

154,712,935

97.6%

99.3%

99.8% $146,765,283 $174,195,411

$211,825,046

50 States and D. C. . . 150,648,081

153,300,099

154,128,044

97.6

99.3

99.8

146,390,467

173,760,022

578,079

583,095

584,891

98.7

99.6

99.9

374,816

2 .....................
3 .....................
4 .....................
5 .....................
6 .....................
7 .....................
8 .....................
9 .....................
1 0 ..................
1 1 ..................
1 2 ..................

7,384,795
21,280,917
18,044,685
11,366,505
8,962,249
9,542,344
14,802,450
11,402,112
5,160,404
6,535,675
10,802,908
25,941,116

7,488,575
21,722,906
18,349,289
11,521,204
9,109,232
9,697,533
15,046,319
11,667,637
5,236,577
6,656,558
11,005,980
26,381,384

7,526,564
21,880,094
18,431,986
11,570,971
9,159,221
9,748,939
15,109,935
11,740,708
5,258,545
6,694,104
11,078,777
26,513,091

98.0
97.0
97.8
98.1
97.7
97.7
97.9
96.9
98.0
97.5
97.3
97.7

99.3
99.0
99.4
99.4
99.3
99.3
99.5
99.2
99.5
99.3
99.1
99.4

99.8
99.7
99.9
99.9
99.8
99.8
99.9
99.8
99.9
99.8
99.8
99.9

A la b a m a ......................
A r iz o n a ........................
A r k a n s a s ....................
C a lifo rn ia ....................
C o lo ra d o .....................

1,859,044
1,097,760
1,166,493
19,687,311
1,389,351

1,888,766
1,120,044
1,186,277
20,019,477
1,418,571

1,898,230
1,125,761
1,192,795
20,120,973
1,427,707

97.8
97.4
97.7
97.7
97.1

99.4
99.4
99.3
99.4
99.2

C o n n e c tic u t...............
D e law are
................
D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia .
F lorida
....................
G e o rg ia ........................

1,946,956
413,279
754,894
3,493,048
2,418,901

1,977,035
420,462
770,695
3,560,788
2,450,180

1,986,325
422,775
777,207
3,582,124
2,462,511

97.9
97.6
96.9
97.3
98.1

99.4
99.3
98.9
99.2
99.3

FDIC District
1 .....................




$ 1 0 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

49.7%

59.0%

71.7%

211,311,335

49.7

59.0

71.7

435,388

513,711

55.5

64.5

76.1

5,961,908
22,710,903
17,285,844
9,312,055
8,455,520
9,488,672
14,826,898
13,858,775
5,418,950
6,812,407
10,474,368
22,158,982

7,185,630
27,872,423
20,134,061
10,925,546
10,055,016
11,179,659
17,001,987
16,358,263
6,175,370
8,048,345
12,794,929
26,464,180

8,951,580
35,943,478
23,855,579
13,081,031
12,235,123
13,485,106
19,683,711
19,671,866
7,133,595
9,670,563
16,209,904
31,903,510

47.5
35.0
54.0
56.0
55.5
54.9
61.3
50.8
63.3
57.0
47.4
51.8

57.2
43.0
62.9
65.7
66.0
64.7
70.3
60.0
72.1
67.3
57.9
61.8

71.3
55.5
74.6
78.6
80.3
78.1
81.4
72.2
83.3
80.9
73.4
74.5

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.8

1,688,099
1,043,021
1,196,611
16,400,085
1,440,534

1,992,012
1,234,208
1,405,984
19,695,111
1,739,407

2,387,033
1,461,349
1,671,236
23,874,035
2,139,675

58.8
55.3
62.1
50.1
53.1

69.4
65.4
73.0
60.1
64.1

83.2
77.5
86.8
72.9
78.8

99.9
99.8
99.7
99.8
99.8

1,642,286
372,449
856,508
3,612,183
2,034,704

1,952,177
448,311
1,058,374
4,305,651
2,426,193

2,337,161
544,729
1,351,721
5,231,041
3,015,958

53.5
47.5
42.4
55.3
51.4

63.6
57.2
52.4
65.9
61.3

76.1
69.5
66.9
80.0
76.1

CORPORATION

State

$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

INSURANCE

D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

DEPOSIT

Other areas..................

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0

P e rce n t o f d e p o s its
in s u re d a s s u m in g
m a x im u m co ve ra g e
p e r a c c o u n t o f—

FEDERAL

FDIC D is tric t a n d S tate

99.9
99.8
99.9
99.9
99.9

546,812
11,043,233
3,669,185
2,815,542
1,964,488

635,892
13,177,082
4,203,712
3,181,181
2,286,883

720,603
16,039,705
4,896,144
3,632,161
2,670,322

67.9
47.7
60.0
68.3
63.7

78.9
56.9
68.7
77.1
74.1

89.4
69.3
80.1
88.1
86.6

K e n tu c k y ....................
L o u is ia n a ....................
M a in e ...........................
M a ry la n d ....................
M a s s a c h u s e tts
...

1,930,415
2,310,695
756,410
2,378,716
3,135,464

1,956,933
2,345,664
765,102
2,410,111
3,176,189

1,965,512
2,358,641
767,396
2,419,338
3,196,244

98.1
97.8
98.5
98.2
97.9

99.4
99.3
99.6
99.5
99.1

99.9
99.8
99.9
99.9
99.8

1,724,633
1,849,528
534,484
1,796,092
2,438,024

2,008,403
2,259,495
611,647
2,103,682
3,057,443

2,367,294
2,835,934
696,499
2,493,992
4,095,702

60.3
49.6
68.6
56.0
37.4

70.2
60.6
78.6
65.6
46.9

82.7
76.1
89.5
77.8
62.8

M ic h ig a n .....................
M in n e s o ta ..................
M is s is s ip p i.................
M is s o u r i......................
M o n ta n a ......................

6,989,965
3,350,106
1,191,256
3,805,931
595,109

7,123,657
3,392,894
1,209,498
3,870,627
607,528

7,156,621
3,406,453
1,216,356
3,893,302
610,945

97.5
98.2
97.8
97.6
97.3

99.4
99.5
99.3
99.2
99.3

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.8
99.9

7,326,266
3,262,060
1,120,534
4,147,483
705,495

8,464,081
3,725,294
1,331,160
4,887,819
821,326

9,850,552
4,385,428
1,601,090
5,926,105
941,388

59.7
58.6
60.0
53.3
67.9

69.0
66.9
71.3
62.8
79.1

80.3
78.8
85.8
76.1
90.6

N e b ra s k a ....................
N e v a d a ........................
N e w H a m p s h ire . . . .
N ew J e r s e y ................
N e w M e x ic o ...............

1,228,083
366,909
449,322
5,869,176
572,361

1,248,448
373,937
455,467
5,977,043
582,282

1,255,255
376,170
457,242
6,002,081
585,665

97.7
97.4
98.2
97.7
97.6

99.3
99.2
99.5
99.5
99.3

99.8
99.8
99.9
99.9
99.9

1,367,169
332,016
344,123
5,912,934
533,609

1,590,513
404,901
403,524
6,792,954
638,168

1,879,001
499,091
473,112
7,786,757
780,932

60.6
51.0
63.1
63.8
58.5

70.5
62.2
74.0
73.3
70.0

83.3
76.6
86.8
84.0
85.6

N e w Y o r k ....................
N o rth C a ro lin a ..........
N o rth D a k o ta ............
O h io ..............................
O k la h o m a ...................

14,420,383
2,686,341
572,506
8,389,166
1,819,198

14,742,306
2,719,831
582,856
8,527,099
1,850,239

14,870,347
2,732,077
585,263
8,563,297
1,860,177

96.6
98.2
97.7
97.8
97.6

98.8
99.4
99.5
99.4
99.3

99.6
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.8

16,050,704
2,042,025
703,815
7,696,337
1,719,182

20,195,770
2,418,623
787,569
8,946,530
2,045,479

27,098,282
2,984,442
868,797
10,552,771
2,515,177

29,7
51.2
76.2
56.2
51.2

37.3
60.7
85.2
65.3
61.0

50.1
74.9
94.0
77.0
75.0

O re g o n .........................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ............
R h o d e Is la n d ............
S o u th C a ro lin a .........
S o u th D a k o ta ............

1,578,738
9,655,519
631,685
1,097,730
642,683

1,609,614
9,822,190
642,759
1,109,043
653,299

1,617,767
9,868,689
646,081
1,113,640
655,884

97.5
97.7
97.6
98.5
97.9

99.4
99.4
99.3
99.5
99.5

99.9
99.8
99.8
99.9
99.9

1,555,193
9,589,507
599,815
754,184
747,580

1,829,979
11,187,531
709,531
896,106
841,181

2,164,334
13,302,808
859,734
1,092,704
937,983

58.5
52.4
53.5
56.7
72.6

68.8
61.1
63.2
67.4
81.7

81.4
72.7
76.6
82.2
91.1

T e n n e s s e e .................
T e x a s ............................
U t a h ..............................
V e rm o n t ......................
V ir g in ia .........................

2,639,505
6,822,092
764,040
464,958
3,150,057

2,683,696
6,957,990
777,661
472,023
3,196,159

2,697,330
7,008,710
781,228
473,276
3,208,815

97.7
97.1
97.7
98.2
98.1

99.3
99.0
99.4
99.7
99.5

99.8
99.8
99.9
100.0
99.9

2,419,945
7,048,210
703,993
403,175
2,797,909

2,877,453
8,663,058
823,302
451,308
3,231,020

3,520,471
11,131,689
978,981
489,372
3,758,006

51.5
45.3
57.0
77.7
62.6

61.2
55.7
66.6
87.0
72.3

74.9
71.5
79.2
94.3
84.1

W a s h in g to n ................
W est V ir g in ia .............
W is c o n s in ...................
W y o m in g .....................
A la s k a ...........................
H a w a ii..........................

2,318,851
1,298,767
3,857,546
284,447
158,426
565,266

2,355,655
1,315,365
3,911,517
291,140
161,607
571,627

2,365,727
1,319,894
3,926,292
293,159
162,769
574,053

97.9
98.3
98.2
96.9
97.1
98.3

99.5
99.6
99.5
99.1
99.1
99.4

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.8
99.8
99.8

2,034,208
1,065,335
3,831,447
321,033
165,399
421,276

2,372,148
1,217,740
4,334,194
386,063
203,705
499,140

2,787,689
1,400,166
4,937,015
466,388
256,318
622,458

58.2
65.7
66.0
58.7
50.0
47.5

67.9
75.0
74.6
70.5
61.6
56.3

79.8
86.3
85.0
85.2
77.5
70.2




125

99.4
99.1
99.5
99.5
99.4

COVERAGES

97.4
96.6
98.1
98.1
97.5

ALTERNATIVE

514,404
9,028,642
4,027,022
2,712,066
1,857,806

ASSUMING

511,806
8,966,126
4,011,145
2,701,511
1,848,160

PROTECTION

501,575
8,739,062
3,954,939
2,663,050
1,814,596

INSURANCE

I d a h o ............................
I llin o is ..........................
In d ia n a ........................
Io w a ..............................
K a n s a s .........................

126

Table 39. NUMBER OF ACCOUNTS FULLY PROTECTED AND DEPOSITS INSURED ASSUMING ALTERNATIVE AMOUNTS OF MAXIMUM
COVERAGE PER ACCOUNT, INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U P E D B Y A M O U N T OF T O T A L DEPO SITS, PO PU LA TIO N OF CEN TE R OF LO C A T IO N , C LASS , A N D PE RC ENT
OF T O T A L DEPO SITS INSURED; AN D A C C O U N TS G RO UPED BY TY PE

C la s s ific a tio n

N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts fu lly p ro te c te d
a s s u m in g m a x im u m coverage
p e r a c c o u n t o f—

All insured commercial banks............... 151,226,160

$25,000

$100,000

153,883,194

154,712,935

Banks with total deposits of—

$10,000

$25,000

97.6%

99.3%

$100,000

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s )
in s u re d a s s u m in g m a x im u m
c o v e ra g e p e r a c c o u n t o f—
$10,000

$25,000

$100,000

99.8% $146,765,283 $174,195,411 $211,825,046

P e rc e n t o f d e p o s its
in s u re d a s s u m in g
m a x im u m co verage
pe r a c c o u n t o f—
$10,000

$25,000

49.7%

59.0%

$100,000

71.7%

4,513
38,779
486,965
2,980,803
12,565,307

99.4
98.8
98.8
98.6
98.3

99.9
99.8
99.8
99.7
99.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1,999
31,202
393,759
2,601,791
11,619,196

2,212
34,156
432,947
2.871,232
13,016,694

2,276
36,076
460,230
3,078,415
14,271,549

87.8
85.8
84.8
83.3
78.8

97.2
93.9
93.3
91.9
88.2

100.0
99.2
99.2
98.6
96.8

$5 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .....................
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...............
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ............

16,359,023
23,925,064
14,295,322
11,606,039
15,114,191

16,592,420
24,289,520
14.530,021
11i 827,994
15,399,968

16,651,280
24,384,360
14,597,500
11,893,424
15,492,666

98.2
98.0
97.8
97.4
97.4

99.6
99.5
99.4
99.3
99.2

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.8
99.8

15,231,312
22,112,852
13,567,145
11,868,035
15,053,144

17,228,967
25,346,431
15,803,756
14,025,279
18,062,110

19,294,291
28,981,556
18,545,534
16,803,791
22,265,280

74.2
68.5
62.0
56.8
50.5

84.0
78.5
72.2
67.1
60.6

94.0
89.7
84.7
80.4
74.7

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .............
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
$ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e ...........................

12,094,670
10,127,439
7,948,052
23,938,816

12,331,750
10,324,967
8,145,875
24,414,208

12,416,776
10,398,865
8,214,851
24,586,846

97.2
97.1
96.4
97.1

99.1
99.0
98.8
99.0

99.7
99.7
99.7
99.7

12,284,441
10,288,907
9,270,936
22,440,564

15,028,786
12,706,906
11,584,961
28,050,973

19,316,899
16,675,725
15,288,793
36,804,632

42.6
38.6
36.0
31.9

52.1
47.7
45.0
39.9

67.0
62.6
59.4
52.3

Less th a n 2 5 0
..................................
2 5 0 to 5 0 0
............................
5 0 0 to 1 0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 ................................................
2 ,5 0 0 to 5 , 0 0 0 ................................................

662,452
1,766,258
3,936,076
9,037.221
8,547;046

671,666
1,790,940
3,991,724
9,169,523
8,674,715

673,629
1,795,620
4,003,168
9,199,188
8,706,070

98.3
98.3
98.3
98.2
98.1

99.6
99.7
99.7
99.6
99.6

99.9
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.9

703,770
1,801,181
3,878,317
8,828,794
8,217,479

779,593
1,978,124
4,295,934
9,873,353
9,284,974

859,881
2,106,249
4,616,532
10,764,689
10,307,795

73.2
83.9
81.9
79.1
75.2

81.1
92.1
90.7
88.4
85.0

89.4
98.1
97.4
96.4
94.3

5 0 0 0 to 10 0 0 0
....................................
1 0 .0 0 0 to 2 5 , 0 0 0 ..........................................
2 5 .0 0 0 to 5 0 , 0 0 0 ..........................................
SO 0 0 0 to 1 0 0 0 0 0 ......................................
1 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 .....................................

11,346,843
16,027,871
12,814,493
12,900,149
15,338,985

11,522,377
16,271,429
13,017,826
13,105,310
15,598,458

11,566,250
16,336,568
13,075,237
13,169,327
15,682,523

98.0
98.0
97.9
97.8
97.6

99.5
99.5
99.4
99.4
99.3

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.8

10,791,463
14,696,058
11,807,064
11,990,053
14,169,737

12,284,048
16,902,873
13,728,435
14,071,463
16,909,520

13,875,306
19,455,265
16,091,361
16,757,460
20,835,764

71.1
66.6
61.5
58.5
50.3

81.0
76.5
71.5
68.6
60.1

91.5
88.1
83.8
81.7
74.0

2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 .....................................
5 0 0 0 0 0 to 1 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .................................
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .............................
2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e ............................. —

12,832,236
27,990,618
7,779,154
10,246,758

13,075,520
28,480,822
7,951,218
10,561,666

13,161,512
28,640,667
8,009,370
10,693,806

97.3
97.5
96.9
95.3

99.1
99.3
99.0
98.2

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.4

12,753,385
24,556,619
8,653,721
13,917,644

15,544,772
29,823,932
10,545,880
18,172,511

19,826,375
37,394,562
13,330,691
25,603,118

44.5
44.0
43.7
24.8

54.2
53.4
53.2
32.4

69.2
67.0
67.3
45.7

Banks in centers with population in
I9 6 0 of—




CORPORATION

4,508
38,705
485,867
2,973,138
12,524,253

INSURANCE

4,486
38,334
481,178
2,939,175
12,354,371

DEPOSIT

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ................................
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ............................
$1 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .......................
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

FEDERAL

$10,000

P e rc e n t o f a c c o u n ts fu lly
p ro te c te d a s s u m in g
m a x im u m c o v erage
p e r a c c o u n t o f—

97.5
97.1
98.2

99.3
99.1
99.6

99.8
99.8
99.9

79,459,432
32,860,387
34,445,464

94,986,829
40,001,839
39,206,742

116,648,508
50,784,044
44,392,494

48.6
40.0
69.4

58.1
48.7
79.0

71.3
61.8
89.5

1 0 0 p e r c e n t ......................................................
9 0 to 1 0 0 ...........................................................
8 0 to 9 0 .............................................................
7 0 to 8 0 .............................................................
6 0 to 7 0 .............................................................
5 0 to 6 0 .............................................................

1,972
3,022,852
17,346,290
27,955,316
26,300,456
37,773,931

177,713
17,459,768
31,374,689
27,289,189
39,521,851
16,164,848

1,714,685
51,950,631
32,396,860
39,051,596
14,258,194
5,749,031

100.0
98.9
98.4
98.0
97.9
97.8

100.0
99.7
99.6
99.5
99.4
99.1

100.0
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.7
99.5

876
2,688,724
16,731,556
26,766,223
24,646,340
32,093,065

157,732
18,472,069
33,404,290
28,956,093
40,200,191
18,602,562

1,681,379
61,220,858
41,005,319
47,399,446
23,496,049
12,955,329

100.0
92.4
84.0
74.9
65.2
54.8

100.0
93.7
85.0
75.3
64.5
55.1

100.0
95.5
85.0
74.8
65.1
55.3

4 0 to 5 0 .............................................................
3 0 to 4 0 .............................................................
2 0 to 3 0 .............................................................
10 to 2 0 .............................................................
O to 1 0 ................................................................

17,849,744
9,167,116
8,335,563
3,325,754
147,166

9,150,985
7,491,087
4,933,234
171,991
147,839

7,332,108
2,072,876
186,349
605
0

97.2
96.6
95.2
94.8
91.1

98.8
98.2
97.9
95.1
94.6

99.4
99.1
97.8
99.8
.0

17,958,934
10,057,349
11,216,228
4,377,656
228,330

12,344,911
12,611,479
8,585,302
497,872
362,911

17,163,501
6,060,069
842,309
787
0

45.6
35.8
25.2
17.9
5.8

45.9
34.7
26.8
18.2
9.9

45.2
36.4
21.5
10.3
.0

68,449,173
66,807,568
80,077
242,503
34,354
1,299,073
898,324
13,415,088

69,403,308
68,357,628
85,608
293,062
56,619
1,334,836
913,612
13,438,521

69,859,290
68,588,882
91,523
347,901
91,123
1,354,685
929,282
13,450,249

97.8
97.3
82.9
63.6
26.8
95.5
96.0
99.7

99.2
99.6
88.6
76.9
44.2
98.1
97.7
99.9

99.8
99.9
94.7
91.2
71.2
99.6
99.4
100.0

60,181,272
78,440,079
271,463
2,051,876
1,102,102
1,675,191
696,490
2,346,779

73,882,443
87,689,321
471,703
3,709,107
2,330,736
2,249,612
1,122,279
2,740,162

92,979,885
95,332,789
1,023,092
7,832,166
6,102,503
3,107,685
2,021,447
3,425,415

48.7
70.7
3.7
10.0
6.0
35.7
22.0
34.9

59.8
79.0
6.4
18.1
12.7
48.0
35.5
40.7

75.2
85.9
13.8
38.2
33.4
66.3
63.9
50.9

Banks with percent of deposits in­
sured of— 1

Type of account
D e m a n d ( IP C 2 ................................................
)
S a vin g s a n d tim e ( IP C 2 .............................
)
U. S. G o v e r n m e n t..........................................
S ta te a n d p o litic a l s u b d iv is io n s ...............
I n te r b a n k ..........................................................
U n in v e s te d t r u s t f u n d s ...............................
D r a f ts ..................................................................
O th e r it e m s .......................................................

127




COVERAGES

1 The number of banks in each category varies with the maximum coverage. For the number of banks, see Table 41.
2 IPC refers to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.

ALTERNATIVE

83,958,066
32,087,075
38,667,794

ASSUMING

83,488,554
31,868,590
38,526,050

PROTECTION

82,002,019
31,237,213
37,986,928

INSURANCE

Class of bank
N a tio n a l..............................................................
S ta te , m e m b e rs F. R. S y s te m ..................
S ta te , n o t m e m b e rs F. R. S y s te m ..........

128

Table 40. NUMBER OF ACCOUNTS FULLY PROTECTED AND DEPOSITS INSURED ASSUMING ALTERNATIVE AMOUNTS OF MAXIMUM
COVERAGE PER ACCOUNT, INSURED MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS, NOVEMBER 18, 1964
B A N K S G R O U P E D BY FE D ER AL D E PO SIT INSU RANCE CO RP O R ATIO N D ISTR IC T, STATE, SIZE OF T O T A L DE PO SITS,
P O P U LA T IO N OF CENTER OF LO C A TIO N , AN D PE RC ENT OF T O T A L DE PO SITS IN SU RED;
AN D AC C O U N TS G RO UPED BY TYPE
P e rc e n t o f a c c o u n ts fu lly
p ro te c te d a s s u m in g
m a x im u m co ve ra g e
per a c c o u n t o f—

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s )
in s u re d a s s u m in g m a x im u m
c o v e ra g e p e r a c c o u n t o f

$10,000

$25,000

$100,000

$100,000

$10,000

$25,000

$100,000

18,615,718

19,769,286

19,809,998

94.0%

99.8%

100.0%

$37,348,284

$41,305,772

$41,765,137

1
.....................................................
2
................................
3
4
..............................
7
......................................
9
...................................................
1 2 .........................................................

3,953,136
11,882,150
1,592,673
527,036
83,668
255,761
321,294

4,126,880
12,750,232
1,661,547
539,752
85,349
264,495
341,031

4,138,368
12,770,349
1,668,029
540,910
85,490
264,990
341,862

95.5
93.0
95.5
97.4
97.9
96.5
94.0

99.7
99.8
99.6
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6,340,666
26,957,112
2,436,184
582,613
83,696
389,457
558,556

7,104,546
29,620,946
2,779,642
651,585
91,317
431,234
626,503

C o n n e c tic u t ...................................................
D e la w a re ..........................................................
In d ia n a
............................................
M a in e
..................
M a r y la n d ...........................................................

2,015,606
99,138
46,739
348,013
527,036

2,102,434
104,519
47,831
359,426
539,752

2,107,701
104,769
47,939
360,042
540,910

95.6
94.6
97.5
96.7
97.4

99.7
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3,050,802
173,862
57,349
472,677
582,613

M a s s a c h u s e tts ................................................
M in n e s o ta
.......................................
N ew H a m p s h ire ............................................
N e w J e rs e y
....................................
N ew Y o r k ...........................................................

637,999
255,761
440,848
979,518
10,803,494

675,248
264,495
458,474
1,028,631
11,617,082

678,038
264,990
459,849
1,031,557
11,634,023

94.1
96.5
95.9
95.0
92.9

99.6
99.8
99.7
99.7
99.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

O hio
..........
O re g o n ................................................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ...................................................
R h o d e Is la n d
....................................
V e r m o n t .............................................................

31,792
22,739
1,560,881
417,049
93,621

32,257
24,654
1,629,290
433,628
97,670

32,279
24,770
1,635,750
434,854
97,884

98.5
91.8
95.4
95.9
95.6

99.9
99.5
99.6
99.7
99.8

W a s h in g to n .......................................................
W is c o n s in
....................................
A la s k a .................................................................

294,190
36,929
4,365

311,816
37,518
4,561

312,498
37,551
4,594

94.1
98.3
94.9

99.8
99.9
99.2

FDIC District

State

$10,000

$25,000

$100,000

88.6%

98.0%

99.1%

7,201,384
29,866,610
2,863,979
670,215
94,083
437,365
631,502

87.9
89.3
84.3
86.5
88.5
88.9
88.2

98.5
98.1
96.2
96.7
96.6
98.4
98.9

99.8
98.9
99.1
99.5
99.5
99.8
99.7

3,430,215
198,911
62,879
514,540
651,585

3,455,574
201,935
65,152
522,820
670,215

88.2
85.3
87.4
90.3
86.5

99.2
97.6
95.8
98.3
96.7

99.9
99.1
99.3
99.9
99.5

1,344,171
389,457
678,801
1,641,163
25,142,087

1,519,190
431,234
756,297
1,827,074
27,594,960

1,536,687
437,365
779,808
1,855,173
27,809,502

87.4
88.9
86.7
8&.3
89.3

98.8
98.4
96.7
98.3
98.1

99.9
99.8
99.7
99.8
98.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

24,792
54,710
2,411,392
639,855
154,359

26,584
60,464
2,753,058
715,984
168,320

27,365
63,087
2,836,615
734,757
171,737

87.6
84.7
84.3
86.7
88.5

93.9
93.6
96.2
97.0
96.5

96.6
97.7
99.2
99.6
98.5

100.0
100.0
99.9

495,168
26,347
8,678

556,380
28,438
9,658

557,589
28,931
10,826

88.8
91.1
78.8

99.8
98.3
87.7

100.0
100.0
98.3

CORPORATION




$25,000

INSURANCE

D is tr ic t
D is tr ic t
D is tr ic t
D is tr ic t
D is tr ic t
D is tr ic t
D is tr ic t

$10,000

DEPOSIT

United States..........................................

P e rc e n t o f d e p o s its
in s u re d a s s u m in g
m a x im u m co ve ra g e
p e r a c c o u n t o f— ’

FEDERAL

C la s s ific a tio n

N u m b e r o f a c c o u n ts fu lly p ro te c te d
a s s u m in g m a x im u m coverage
p e r a c c o u n t o f—

4,878
31,969
152,004
836,619
1,197,624

4,960
32,625
157,106
869,157
1,253,355

4,966
32,652
157,335
870,760
1,255,847

98.2
97.9
96.6
96.1
95.4

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.8
99.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

4,655
34,260
206,606
1,224,266
1,906,545

4,953
36,487
224,947
1,345,358
2,107,711

4,993
36,694
227,227
1,361,739
2,127,281

93.2
93.4
90.9
89.8
89.5

99.2
99.4
99.0
98.7
99.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
99.9
99.9

$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ................
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .............
$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .............
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .........
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 . . .

1,371,531
4,461,905
3,832,923
4,056,186
2,670,079

1,442,447
4,698,442
4,048,684
4,366,248
2,896,262

1,445,685
4,706,285
4,056,871
4,374,779
2,904,818

94.9
94.8
94.5
92.7
91.9

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

2,404,954
8,025,233
7,275,261
9,624,067
6,642,438

2,661,795
8,821,198
8,077,722
10,574,609
7,450,992

2,696,624
8,907,605
8,170,565
10,658,024
7,574,384

88.9
89.7
88.3
89.8
85.4

98.3
98.6
98.0
98.7
95.8

99.6
99.6
99.2
99.5
97.4

INSURANCE

B a n k s in c e n te rs w ith p o p u la tio n in
1 9 6 0 o f—
Less th a n 2 5 0 .................................................
2 5 0 to 5 0 0 ........................................................
5 0 0 to 1 , 0 0 0 ....................................................
1 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 ................................................
2 ,5 0 0 to 5 , 0 0 0 ................................................

4,869
4,056
3,485
208,987
239,672

5,045
4,133
3,610
218,680
252,440

5,074
4,135
3,619
219,123
253,036

96.0
98.1
96.3
95.4
94.7

99.4
100.0
99.8
99.8
99.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6,208
4,169
5,275
331,319
422,083

7,378
4,372
5,798
368,474
468,185

7,613
4,378
5,838
371,317
473,074

81.5
95.2
90.4
89.2
88.9

96.9
99.9
99.3
99.2
98.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.7

PROTECTION

5 ,0 0 0 to 1 0 , 0 0 0 .............................................
1 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 5 , 0 0 0 ..........................................
2 5 ,0 0 0 to 5 0 , 0 0 0 ...........................................
5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ........................................
1 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 .....................................

238,625
699,685
1,191,906
1,196,758
2,516,876

248,913
731,690
1,250,094
1,252,828
2,631,030

249,264
733,207
1,252,906
1,255,237
2,636,079

95.7
95.4
95.1
95.3
95.5

99.9
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

366,149
1,126,813
1,954,114
1,998,753
3,902,945

401,906
1,248,297
2,173,054
2,204,039
4,336,904

405,793
1,262,469
2,200,909
2,234,689
4,375,839

90.1
89.2
88.5
89.1
89.0

98.9
98.8
98.4
98.3
98.9

99.9
99.9
99.7
99.6
99.8

2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 .....................................
5 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .................................
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .............................
2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e ........................................

1,161,919
1,821,988
1,470,491
7,856,401

1,216,752
1,927,078
1,531,216
8,495,777

1,219,560
1,932,544
1,536,819
8,509,395

95.3
94.3
95.7
92.3

99.8
99.7
99.6
99.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1,879,105
3,353,316
2,164,395
19,833,642

2,089,450
3,743,140
2,465,639
21,789,135

2,120,656
3,793,273
2,539,583
21,969,705

88.2
88.0
84.4
89.1

98.0
98.3
96.2
97.8

99.5
99.6
99.1
98.7

B a n k s w ith p e rc e n t o f d e p o s its in ­
s u re d o f— 1
10 0 p e r c e n t ......................................................
9 0 to 1 0 0 ...........................................................
8 0 to 9 0 .............................................................
7 0 to 8 0 .............................................................

0
7,727,482
10,845,257
42,979

8,138
19,756,587
4,561
0

411,490
19,398,508
0
0

.0
94.5
93.6
94.4

100.0
99.8
99.2
.0

100.0
100.0
.0
.0

0
14,840,750
22,432,363
75,171

8,632
41,287,482
9,658
0

652,930
41,112,207
0
0

.0
91.5
86.8
76.7

100.0
98.0
87.7
.0

100.0
99.1
.0
.0

Type o f a cco u n t
D e m a n d ( IP C 2 ...............................................
)
S a vings a n d tim e ( IP C 2 .............................
)
U. S. G o v e r n m e n t..........................................
S ta te an d p o litic a l s u b d iv is io n s ..............
I n te r b a n k ..........................................................
U n in v e s te d t r u s t f u n d s ...............................
D r a f ts ..................................................................
O th e r it e m s ......................................................

907,443
16,860,116
7,565
6,908
266
680
409,394
423,346

908,231
18,010,938
7,601
7,308
316
726
410,532
423,634

908,468
18,050,610
7,630
7,493
324
747
410,932
423,794

99.9
93.4
99.1
91.7
81.8
90.8
99.6
99.9

100.0
99.8
99.6
97.0
97.2
96.9
99.9
100.0

100.0
100.0
99.9
99.5
99.7
99.7
100.0
100.0

204,821
36,972,790
1,995
14,411
2,059
1,480
95,374
55,353

212,677
40,897,448
2,698
19,611
2,492
2,100
109,132
59,615

218,860
41,315,556
3,670
26,229
2,686
2,542
130,404
65,190

92.6
88.7
49.7
45.3
76.3
56.7
64.5
82.4

96.1
98.2
67.2
61.6
92.4
80.4
73.8
88.7

98.9
99.2
91.4
82.4
99.6
97.3
88.2
97.0

COVERAGES
129




ALTERNATIVE

1The number of banks in each category varies with the maximum coverage. For the number of banks, see Table 41.
2 IPC refers to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.

ASSUMING

B a n k s w ith to ta l d e p o s its o f—
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ........................
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ........................
$ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .....................
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 ...............
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................

N u m b e r o f b a n k s by p e rc e n t o f to ta l
d e p o s its in s u re d a s s u m in g m a x im u m
co v e ra g e p e r a c c o u n t o f—

P e rc e n t o f d e p o s its in s u re d

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0

P e rc e n ta g e o f b a n k s by p e rc e n t o f
to ta l d e p o s its in s u re d a s s u m in g
m a x im u m co v e ra g e p e r a c c o u n t o f—

$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0

$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

1 0 0 p e r c e n t ..................................................................................................................................
9 0 to 1 0 0 .......................................................................................................................................
8 0 to 9 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
7 0 to 8 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
6 0 to 7 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
5 0 to 6 0 ..........................................................................................................................................

5
1,497
4,474
4,029
2,129
1,001

156
5,559
4,513
2,089
876
353

890
10,179
1,818
571
211
83

.0
10.9
32.4
29.2
15.4
7.3

1.1
40.3
32.7
15.1
6.4
2.6

6.5
73.8
13.2
4.1
1.5
.6

4 0 to 5 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
3 0 to 4 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
2 0 to 3 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
10 to 2 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
O to 1 0 .............................................................................................................................................

389
172
79
16
4

151
72
18
6
2

30
8
4
1
0

2.8
1.2
.6
.1
.0

1.1
.5
.1
.0
.0

.2
.1
.0
.0
.0

....................................

13,468

13,468

13,468

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 p e r c e n t..................................................................................................................................
9 0 to 1 0 0 ........................................................................................................................................
8 0 to 9 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
7 0 to 8 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
6 0 to 7 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
5 0 to 6 0 ..........................................................................................................................................

5
1,325
4,323
4,025
2,129
1,001

153
5,236
4,512
2,089
876
353

861
9,881
1,818
571
211
83

.0
9.8
32.1
29.9
15.8
7.4

1.1
38.9
33.5
15.5
6.5
2.6

6.4
73.4
13.5
4.2
1.6
.6

4 0 to 5 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
3 0 to 4 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
2 0 to 3 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
10 to 2 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
O to 1 0 .............................................................................................................................................

389
172
79
16
4

151
72
18
6
2

30
8
4
1
0

2.9
1.3
.6
.1
.0

1.1
.5
.1
.0
.0

.2
.1
.0
.0
.0

Insured mutual savings banks............................................................................................

327

327

327

100.0

100.0

100.0

0
172
151
4

3
323
1
0

29
298
0
0

.0
52.6
46.2
1.2

.9
98.8
.3
.0

8.9
91.1
.0
.0

100.0%

100.0%

Insured commercial banks........................................
Banks with percent of deposits insured of—

Banks with percent of deposits insured of—
1 0 0 p e r c e n t...................................................................................................................................
9 0 to 1 0 0 ........................................................................................................................................
8 0 to 9 0 ..........................................................................................................................................
7 0 to 8 0 ..........................................................................................................................................




CORPORATION

100.0%

INSURANCE

13,795

DEPOSIT

13,795

Banks with percent of deposits insured of—

FEDERAL

13,795

All insured banks...................................................................................................................

1
30

Table 41. DISTRIBUTION OF INSURED BANKS BY PERCENTAGE OF DEPOSITS INSURED ASSUMING ALTERNATIVE AMOUNTS OF
MAXIMUM COVERAGE, NOVEMBER 18, 1964

BANKING DEVELOPMENTS




PART

FOUR




SUPERVISORY STATUS OF BANKS
Number of banks. On December 31, 1964, there were 14,281
banks and trust companies operating in the United States. These
consisted of 13,775 commercial banks and trust companies, and
506 mutual savings banks. The number of banks operating on
December 31, 1964, classified by supervisory status, by type of
bank, and by participation in Federal deposit insurance is shown
in Table 42.
Table 42. ALL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES' CLASSIFIED BY SUPERVISORY
STATUS AND FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE PARTICIPATION,
DECEMBER 31, 1964
Commercial banks
and trust
companies 2

All banks
Supervisory status
Insured

Total

Non­
insured

Insured

Non­
insured

M utual savings
banks
Insured

Non­
insured 3

Number of banks and trust
companies—total..............

14,28
1

13,820

41
6

13,493

22
8

37
2

19
7

Banks of deposit..................

14,234

13,820

44
1

13,493

25
3

37
2

19
7

4,780

4,780

1,447

1,447

1 f 447

7,593
414

7,593

7,266

Examined by and reporting to: 4
Comptroller of the Currency 5..........
State authorities and Federal
Reserve banks 6 ............................
State authorities and Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation 7..
State authorities only 8.....................

Trust companies not regu­
larly engaged in deposit
banking 9
Percentage insured and non­
insured :
A ll banks and trust companies............
Banks of deposit....................................
Trust companies not regularly engaged
in deposit banking ..........................

327

414

96.8%
97.1

100.0

179

235

4
7

4
7

100.0%
100.0

4,780

4
7

3.2%
2.9
100.0

98.0%
98.3

2.0%
1.7

64.6%
64.6

35.4%
35.4

100.0

1 Here and in Tables 43-57, except as otherwise noted, United States includes the 50 States, District of Columbia, and
Other Areas (enumerated in Table 102).
2 Includes stock savings banks.
3 171 of these banks were insured by the Massachusetts Savings Central Fund, Inc.
4 Classification relates to regular examination and periodic submission of reports of condition (assets and liabilities).
5 Includes all national banks and 7 nonnational banks in the District of Columbia; of the latter, 4 are members of the
Federal Reserve System.
6 Includes all State banks that are members of the Federal Reserve System except 4 commercial banks in the District
of Columbia and 1 noninsured trust company.
7 Includes all insured banks not members of the Federal Reserve System except 3 in the District of Columbia.
8 Includes 22 branches of foreign banks located in 3 States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Also includes 74
unincorporated banks located in 7 States. Unincorporated banks in 3 of these States (Georgia, Iowa, and Texas) are not
examined by the State authorities, and do not submit detailed periodic condition reports to the State authorities. Financial
statements of 4 unincorporated banks were not available to the Corporation at the close of 1964.
9 Subject to supervision by State authorities only, except for 1 which is a member of the Federal Reserve System but
not insured by the Corporation. Excludes institutions chartered under banking or trust company laws, but operating as
investment or title insurance companies and not engaged in deposit banking nor fiduciary activities.

All banks of deposit in the United States are subject to examina­
tion and regulation under Federal law or by the banking authority
of the State, Territory, or District in which the bank is located.1 At
‘ United States Code, Title 12, Section 378.




133

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

134

the close of 1964, approximately one-third of the banks, consisting
of all national banks in the nation plus the nonnational banks in
the District of Columbia, were supervised by the Comptroller of
the Currency. State banks that were members of the Federal Re­
serve System, which constituted about one-tenth of all operating
banks, were supervised by their respective State authorities and
the Federal Reserve Banks. Nonmember State banks that partici­
pated in Federal deposit insurance, comprising over one-half of
all banks, were supervised by their respective State authorities and
the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. About 3 percent of all
banks were State banks neither members of the Federal Reserve
System nor participants in Federal deposit insurance, and there­
fore not subject to examination or reporting requirements by Fed­
eral bank supervisory authorities, but subject to supervision by
their respective State authorities.
Assets and deposits of all banks. Banks supervised by both the
State authorities and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
constitute more than one-half of the total number and hold onefourth of the assets of all banks. The distribution of assets among
banks, classified by supervisory status, type of bank, and Federal
deposit insurance participation at the end of 1964, is shown in
Table 43.
Table 43. ASSETS OF BANKS CLASSIFIED BY SUPERVISORY STATUS AND
FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE PARTICIPATION, DECEMBER 31, 1964
Commercial banks
and trust
companies 1

All banks
Supervisory status
Total

Insured

Noninsured

Insured

Assets of banks and trust companies
3 5,130
(in millions)—total..................... $402,673 $392,174 $10,499 $ 4
...........................of 402,386 392,174
Banks
deposit
Examined by and reporting to:
Comptroller of the Currency.......................... 191,295
State authorities and Federal Reserve banks 98,075
State authorities and Federal Deposit Insur­
ance Corporation.......................................... 102,804
State authorities o n ly ...................................... 10,212

Trust companies not regularly
engaged in deposit banking. ..

10,212 345,130

191,295
98,075

$3,303 $47,044

$7,196

3,016

47,044

7,196

47,044
3,016

27
8

7,196

27
8
i

97.4%
97.5

1 See notes to Table 42.
N o te: Due to rounding, com ponents may not add to totals.




Non­
insured

55,760
10,212

Percentage in insured and nonin­
sured banks:
All banks and trust companies.......................... 100.0%
Banks of deposit.................................................. 100.0
Trust companies not regularly engaged in
deposit banking................................................ 100.0

Insured

191,295
98,075

102,804

27
8

Non­
insured

Mutual savings
banks

2.6%
2.5
100.0

99.1%
99.1

0.9%
0.9
100.0

86.7%
86.7

13.3%
13.3

SUPERVISORY STATUS OF BANKS

135

Total deposits were distributed among the various classes and
groups of banks in approximately the same proportions as assets.
A distribution of deposits of all banks, classified as above, is given
in Table 44.
Table 44. DEPOSITS OF BANKS CLASSIFIED BY SUPERVISORY STATUS AND
FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE PARTICIPATION, DECEMBER 31, 1964
Commercial banks
and trust
companies

All banks
Supervisory status 1
Total

Insured

Deposits of banks and trust com­
panies (in millions)—total....... $357,565 $348,981
Demand................................................................. 180,538
Time and savings................................................. 177,027

179,024
169,957

57,449 3 8 8
4 ,9 1
Banks of deposit........................... 3
Demand.............................................................. 180,453
Time and savings............................................. 176,997
Examined by and reporting to:
Comptroller of the Currency
99.250
Demand.........................................................
Time and savings......................................... 71,275
State authorities and Federal Reserve banks
52.250
Demand.........................................................
Time and s a v in g s ....................................... 33,167
State authorities and Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation
Demand.........................................................
27,525
Time and savings......................................... 65,515
State authorities only
Demand..........................................................
1,428
Time and savings.........................................
7,039

179,024
169,957

Non­
insured

Insured

$8,584 $306,230
1,514
7,070

Non­
insured

Mutual savings
banks
Insured

$2,197 $42 51
,7

Noninsured

$6,387
6
6,381

178,691
127,539

1,508
689

8,468 3 ,2
06 30

2,080

4 ,7 1
2 5

6,387

1,428
7,039

1,422
658

333
42,418

6
6,381

178,691
127,539

99.250
71,275

99.250
71,275

52.250
33,167

52.250
33,167

27,525
65,514

27,192
23,097

333
42,418

333
42,418
1,422
658

1,428
7,039

Trust companies not regularly en­
gaged in deposit banking.......

16
1

16
1

16
1

Demand.........................................................
Time and savings.........................................

86
31

86
31

6
6,381

86
31

Percentage in insured and nonin­
sured banks:
All banks and trust companies.......................... 100.0%
Banks of deposit.................................................. 100.0
Trust companies not regularly engaged in
deposit banking................................................ 100.0

97.6%
97.6

2.4%
2.4

99.3%
99.3

100.0

0.7%
0.7

87.0%
87.0

13.0%
13.0

100.0

1 See notes to Table 42.
N ote: Due to rounding, components may not add to totals.

Table 45. RATIOS OF CAPITAL ACCOUNTS TO ASSETS OF BANKS OF DEPOSIT
CLASSIFIED BY SUPERVISORY STATUS AND FEDERAL DEPOSIT
INSURANCE PARTICIPATION, DECEMBER 31, 1964
Commercial banks
and trust
companies

All banks
Supervisory status 1
Total

All banks of deposit.........................
Examined by and reporting to:
Comptroller of the Currency..........................
State authorities and Federal Reserve banks
State authorities and Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation. . . .
. .
State authorities o n ly ......................................
1 See notes to Table 42.




Insured

8.0%

7.9%

7.9
7.9

7.9
7.9

8.0

8.0

Noninsured

11.0

11.0%

Insured

8.0%

Non­
insured

15.1%

Mutual
savings
banks
Insured

7.9%

Non­
insured

9.3%

7.9
7.9

11.0

8.1

7.9
15.1

9.3

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

136

Capital ratios. Table 45 shows the ratios of total capital accounts
to assets (less valuation reserves) of all banks of deposit, classified
according to supervisory status and Federal deposit insurance
participation. The overall ratio for these banks was 8.0 percent on
December 31, 1964, down from 8.2 percent on December 20, 1963.
CHANGES IN NUMBER OF BANKING OFFICES
Increases during 1964. The 29,727 banking offices in the United
States on December 31, 1964, consisting of 14,281 banks and
15,446 branches, exceeded by 1,358 the total of a year earlier.
The increase of 189 banks in 1964 was 48 more than the gain in
the previous year, but the net addition of 1,169 branches was 30
less than the increase for 1963. As shown in Table 46, 126 branches
were established as successors to the 138 banks absorbed by
other banks in 1964.

Table 46. ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN NUMBER OF BANKS AND BRANCHES IN
THE UNITED STATES DURING 1964'

Type of office and change

Total

Commercial
banks and
trust
companies

Mutual
savings
banks

ALL BANKING OFFICES
Number, December 31, 1964........................................................................................

29,727

28,546

1,181

N e t change du rin g y e a r .......................................................................

+ 1,358

+ 1,312

+46

Number, December 31, 1964........................................................................................

14,281

13,775

506

N e t c hange du rin g y e a r .......................................................................

+ 189

+193

-4

Banks beginning operations.....................................................................................
Banks ceasing operations.........................................................................................
Absorbed.................................................................................................................
Suspended..............................................................................................................
Other liquidations 2 ...........................................................................................
Other or unclassified changes— n e t........................................................................

336
149
138
8
3
+2

335
144
133
8
3
+2

1
5
5

Number, December 31, 1964........................................................................................

15,446

14,771

675

N e t change du rin g y e a r.......................................................................

+ 1,169

+1,119

+50

Branches beginning operations...............................................................................
Succeeded absorbed banks..................................................................................
Other new branches..............................................................................................
Branches discontinued..............................................................................................
Other or unclassified changes— n e t........................................................................

1,209
126
1,083
39
-1

1,160
123
1,037
39
-2

49
3
46

BANKS

BRANCHES3

+1

1 Excludes changes not affecting number of banks or branches of commercial banks and trust companies or of mutual
savings banks.
2 Includes 1 bank which ceased banking operations but now engages in other business.
3 Includes facilities established in or near military or other Federal Government installations at request of the Treasury
Department or the Commanding Officer of the installation.
Back data: See Annual Reports for 1963, p. 60; and for 1962, p. 59.




CHANGES IN NUMBER OF BANKING OFFICES

CHART G

33 STATES HAD FEWER BANKS IN 1964 THAN IN 1934,
WHILE NONE HAD FEWER BRANCHES

D E C R EASE

IN C R E A S E

300

300

D E C R EASE




600

900

IN C R E A S E

137

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

138

Changes since 1934. During the past 30 years the number of
banking offices in the United States has grown by about 10,350.
This growth is the combined effect of a net decline of nearly 1,850
in the number of banks and a net rise of approximately 12,200 in
the number of branches.
Chart G shows for each State, classified by status of branch
banking, the change in banks and branches during the years 19351964. There were 11 percent fewer banks operating in the entire
United States in 1964 than 1934, but 54 percent more banking
offices. In 33 States and the District of Columbia, there were net
declines in the number of banks over the period, while in only
four States were there decreases in total banking offices. Changes
in offices were small in most States in which unit banking has been
prevalent.
Approximately 3,000 new banks began operation in the years
1935-1964. The number opened yearly ranged from 22 in 1942 to
336 in 1964, with more than one-fifth of the total for the period
occurring during the last two years. The new banks consisted of
nearly 800 national banks and 2,200 State banks. Although the
number of national banks opened has increased markedly in the
last three years, only about one-third of the banks operating at
NEWLY CHARTERED NATIONAL BANKS OVERTOOK
NEW STATE BANKS IN 1963

CHARTh

“ VT

«
I
I
-f/
/
I
JL_

r -

/\
STATE BANKS H
/

\

\

I

/i
\

------------------ /i x

\ /

\_

v

/

^
\
30

_

f

—

f ^

j

J

/ ------------------- ;
NATIONAL BANKS /

-------------^ — \ j I---------------------------------------- —
/•' —
y

* 1
y s / --------------------- 30
N—

° f'T T > T 7 l V f 1 I I I I I [ I I I I I I 1 I ! I ! I I I |°




1964

CHANGES IN NUMBER OF BANKING OFFICES

139

the close of 1964 had national charters, slightly below the propor­
tion 30 years earlier. Chart H shows the numbers of national and
State banks opened in each year, 1935-1964.
New branches opened during the 30-year period, exclusive of
branches succeeding absorbed banks, totaled about 11,000. The
number opening has increased rapidly in recent years, rising from
fewer than 500 each year prior to 1956 to more than 1,000 in each
of the last two years. Of the 2,155 new branches opened in 19631964, 57 percent were branches of national banks. National bank
branches comprised 53 percent of all bank branches in 1964, com­
pared to 40 percent thirty years ago.
CONCENTRATION AND LOCATION OF BANKING FACILITIES
Share of deposits in largest commercial banks in the United States.
Table 47 shows the proportion of deposits in all commercial banks
held by the largest banks and bank groups on December 31, 1964.
In the bank-group classification, deposits of all banks controlled
by an individual company registered under the Bank Holding Com­
pany Act of 1956, and one additional group controlled by common
stock ownership, were treated as the deposits of one bank.
About one-fifth of the deposits of all commercial banks were
in the largest 10 banks, and slightly over one-half of all deposits
were in the largest 1 percent (134) of the banks or bank groups.
In most cases, percentages for the banks had not changed sub­
stantially since 1962, although they were higher than in 1960.
Banking concentration in areas grouped by type of banking struc­
ture. Data showing percentages of deposits in commercial banks
in each State on December 31, 1964 held by the largest banks or
bank groups are given in Table 48. The States are grouped accord­
ing to the status of branch banking under the laws of each State
as of December 31, 1958, in order to facilitate comparison with
similar tables in earlier annual reports. In spite of some changes
in State statutes since that date, the status of branching in the
individual States still conforms in general with the classification
adopted.
Concentration of deposits among banks is highest in States in
which statewide branch banking is prevalent; in five of these States,
the largest five banks held more than 90 percent of the deposits
of all banks in the State. In only two of the States with limited-area
branch banking, and in no State with unit banking, was as much
as 50 percent of the deposits held by the largest five banks. How­
ever, in certain unit banking States where group banking is promi­
nent, e.g., Minnesota and Montana, deposits in the five largest



140

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Table 47. COMMERCIAL BANK DEPOSITS AND PROPORTIONS OF TOTAL HELD
BY THE LARGEST COMMERCIAL BANKS OR BANK GROUPS,
DECEMBER 31, 1964
Commercial banks

Commercial banks
and bank groups 1

50 States
and
D. C.

48 States
and
D. C.

Entire
United
States

50 States
and
D. C.

48 States
and
D. C.

13,760
$307,146

13,736
$306,426

13,395
$308,427

13,380
$307,146

13,356
$306,426

.73%
$142,199
46.30%

.73%
$142,199
46.41%

.75%
$147,834
47.93%

.75%
$147,360
47.98%

.75%
$147,360
48.09%

$63,171
$63,171
$63,645
$63,171
........................ $63,645
20.57%
20.62%
Percent of deposits of all commercial banks......... 20.57%
20.64%
20.64%

$63,171
20.62%

Entire
United
States

A ll c o m m e rc ia l banks
Number ....................................................................
13,775
Deposits (millions)
.............................................. $308,427

Largest 1 0 0 banks (o r bank g ro u p s )
Percent of number of all commercial banks..........
• 73%
Deposits (m illions)................
.................... $142,673
Percent of deposits of all commercial banks......... 46.26%

Largest 10 banks (o r bank gro u p s )
Deposits (m illions)...............

Largest 5 banks (o r bank groups)
$43,611
14.14%

$43,137
14.04%

$43,137
14.08%

$43,611
14.14%

$43,137
14.04%

$43,137
14.08%

$32,664
10.59%

$32,190
10.48%

$32,190
10.50%

$32,664
10.59%

$32,190
10.48%

$32,190
10.50%

$12,970
$12,970
.................... $12,996
$12,996
4.22%
4.21%
4.23%
4.21%
.........
Percent of deposits of all commercial banks

$12,970
4.22%

$12,970
4.23%

Deposits (m illio n s)..................................................
Percent of deposits of all commercial banks.........

Largest 3 banks (o r bank grou ps)
Deposits (m illio n s ). . . .
....................
Percent of deposits of all commercial banks.........
i

Largest ba n k (o r bank gro u p )
Deposits (m illio n s )............

Largest 1 p e rce n t of th e banks (o r b a n k
g ro u p s )
Number........................................................................ '
138
Deposits (m illions).................................................... $155,578
Percent of deposits of all commercial banks......... 50.44%

138
$155,104
50.50%

137
$154,729
50.49%

134
$160,129
51.92%

134
$159,655
51.98%

134
$159,606
52.09%

69
$127,386
41.47%

69
$127,386
41.57%

67
$131,335
42.58%

67
$130,816
42.61%

67
$130,861
42.71%

14
$75,227
24.49%

14
$75,227
24.55%

13
$73,325
23.77%

13
$72,851
23.72%

13
$72,851
23.77%

Largest V2 of 1 p e rce n t of th e banks (o r
ba n k g r o u p s ).............................................
Number........................................................................
69
Deposits (m illio n s ).................................................... $127,860
Percent of deposits of all commercial banks......... ! 41.46%

Largest 1 /1 0 of 1 p e rce n t of th e banks
Number.......................................................................
Deposits (m illio n s)....................................................
Percent of deposits of all commercial banks.........

14
$75,701
24.54%

1 Figures for bank groups are the deposits of banks in each State controlled by a holding company registered under
the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, plus one group controlled through common stock ownership included for com­
parability with data for earlier years, treated for each case as though they were a bank and branches in the State.
Back data: See Annual Reports for 1962, p. 53; and for 1960, pp. 51, 100.

banks and bank groups exceeded 50 percent, when specific bank
groups are treated as individual banks. The fact that group bank­
ing occurs more frequently in unit-banking States than in States
where branching is possible supports the view that it is to some
extent an alternative to branching.
On the mid-year call date, in alternate years, deposit data are
compiled for banks grouped by their county of location. The per­
centages of deposits, as of June 30, 1964, in large banks and bank
groups located in the principal counties of leading metropolitan
areas, are shown in Table 49. In about one-third of the metropolitan
areas, the largest bank held two-fifths or more of the total deposits



CONCENTRATION AND LOCATION OF BANKING FACILITIES

141

of all banks located in the area. In over one-half the areas, the
largest three banks held at least three-fourths of total deposits.
Table 48. RELATIVE SIZE OF LARGEST COMMERCIAL BANKS OR BANK
GROUPS IN STATES CLASSIFIED BY STATUS OF BRANCH BANKING,
DECEMBER 31, 1964
Percentage of deposits of all
commercial banks in—
State 1
Largest
bank

Largest
three
banks

Largest
five
banks

Percentage of deposits of all
commercial banks in— 2
Largest
bank
or
bank
group

Largest
three
banks
or bank
groups

Largest
five
banks
or bank
groups

S ta te s w ith s ta te w id e branch bankin g
p re v a le n t
Nevada.....................................................................
Rhode Island...........................................................
Arizona....................................................................
Delaware.................................................................
Oregon.....................................................................
Hawa i i ......................................................................
California.................................................................
Idaho........................................................................
Washington.............................................................
Utah..........................................................................
Alaska......................................................................
South Carolina........................................................
North Carolina........................................................
M aryland.................................................................
Connecticut.............................................................
Verm ont...................................................................

57.2%
52.0
46.4
37.1
42.1
39.7
38.6
36.0
34.2
29.8
30.4
24.5
22.2
20.1
18.1
12.5

79.9%
89.2
81.5
75.5
85.0
81.1
60.9
77.4
61.2
62.5
67.6
46.9
50.2
44.7
42.5
30.7

95.2%
94.7
92.7
91.0
87.5
91.5
78.7
87.1
73.2
73.2
81.5
55.4
64.0
63.1
56.1
43.0

66.9%
52.0
46.4
37.1
42.1
39.7
38.6
36.0
34.2
30.9
30.4
24.5
22.2
20.1
18.1
12.5

89.7%
89.2
89.8
75.5
85.0
81.1
60.9
77.4
61.2
63.6
67.6
46.9
50.2
44.7
42.5
30.7

98.1%
94.7
94.4
91.0
87.5
91.5
78.7
87.1
74.1
74.3
81.5
55.4
64.0
63.1
56.1
43.0

26.8
19.8
17.2
17.4
17.0
16.5
13.7
13.8
14.4
12.2
11.5
10.7
11.2
10.4
9.8
5.7

44.0
39.2
39.7
36.1
42.3
30.4
27.4
34.1
28.1
25.0
23.9
26.7
30.4
25.6
23.4
15.9

54.0
48.9
47.9
44.9
58.4
39.9
36.3
48.1
38.9
29.1
31.2
34.3
42.8
34.9
28.6
22.4

26.8
19.8
19.9
17.4
17.0
16.5
13.7
13.8
14.4
12.2
11.5
10.9
11.2
10.9
9.8
5.7

47.5
39.2
46.7
43.8
42.3
30.4
27.4
34.1
28.1
25.0
23.9
27.3
30.4
30.0
23.4
15.9

64.8
48.9
54.9
52.8
58.4
39.9
36.3
48.1
38.9
29.1
33.3
34.9
42.8
35.7
28.6
22.4

17.4
14.9
13.8
12.9
4.2
11.6
10.5
11.4
10.5
8.6
7.7
6.1
6.8
6.2
5.6
5.5
5.6
4.7

37.9
35.4
23.0
25.6
10.7
30.6
27.9
29.1
25.4
22.0
20.3
12.3
13.2
16.3
15.9
15.2
15.2
11.4

44.7
44.7
26.0
35.6
16.8
34.8
37.7
39.6
32.9
33.1
28.2
16.9
18.0
22.4
25.3
20.8
22.6
16.3

17.4
14.9
17.9
12.9
16.6
29.6
15.9
11.4
10.5
23.5
7.7
9.9
6.8
6.2
14.1
5.5
29.4
6.4

37.9
36.0
32.1
28.9
40.8
60.0
34.0
29.3
25.4
39.3
20.3
22.1
13.2
16.3
24.4
15.2
47.1
13.1

44.7
46.8
34.2
38.9
47.2
62.4
40.8
39.7
32.9
45.1
28.2
26.7
18.0
22.4
33.8
20.8
56.0
18.2

S tates w ith lim ite d -a re a branch b a n k ­
ing p re va len t
Massachusetts........................................................
Michigan..................................................................
Georgia....................................................................
New Mexico............................................................
New Y o rk................................................................
Alabam a..................................................................
Louisiana.................................................................
Maine.......................................................................
Pennsylvania..........................................................
M ississippi..............................................................
Ohio..........................................................................
Kentucky.................................................................
Tennessee...............................................................
V irg in ia ....................................................................
Indiana....................................................................
New Jersey..............................................................

S tates w ith u n it banking pre va len t
Illin o is ......................................................................
Colorado..................................................................
Wisconsin................................................................
Nebraska.................................................................
North Dakota..........................................................
Minnesota................................................................
Wyoming..................................................................
Oklahoma................................................................
Missouri...................................................................
South Dakota..........................................................
Texas........................................................................
Florida......................................................................
Kansas.....................................................................
Arkansas.................................................................
New Hampshire......................................................
West V irgin ia..........................................................
Montana..................................................................
Iowa.........................................................................

1 Classification of States by prevalent type of bank organization as of December 31,1958, described in Table 23 of the
Annual Report of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation for 1960, p. 45.
2 See fn. 1 to Table 47.
B a c k fig u re s : See A n nu a l Reports for 1962, p. 55; and for 1960, pp. 54-55, 101.




Principal county or counties in
metropolitan area

Percentage of deposits of a II
commercial banks in— 3

Largest
bank

Largest
three
banks

Largest
five
banks

Percentage of deposits of all
commercial banks in— 4
Largest
bank or
bank
group

Largest
three
banks or
bank groups

Largest
five banks
or bank
groups

M e tro p o lita n a re a s in S ta te s w ith s ta te w id e b ra n c h banking p re va len t

47.8
34.5
20.5
30.6
57.5
51.4
50.3
32.1
36.2
46.0
50.6
39.8
33.2
39.1
31.2
43.6
29.9
43.5
42.4
21.0

89.2
67.1
45.6
73.9
97.4
82.5
94.8
84.0
75.9
92.8
89.9
73.7
59.2
96.1
67.9
85.5
76.2
93.0
92.6
55.6

97.7%
85.2
90.7
86.3
96.2
94.1
98.9
91.5
93.2
95.7
87.4
92.1
87.8

30.1%
39.5
38.8
33.4
47.3
41.9
52.4
47.8
39.2
39.2
39.5
42.3
38.0

71.5%
81.7
79.6
71.2
90.3
89.3
93.0
85.6
84.0
82.6
76.9
76.8
71.6

47.8
34.5
20.5
30.6
57.5
51.4
50.3
32.1
36.2
50.6
50.6
39.8
33.2
39.1
31.2
43.6
31.0
43.5
42.4
21.0

89.2
67.1
45.6
75.9
97.4
82.5
94.8
84.0
75.9
97.4
89.9
73.7
59.2
96.1
67.9
85.5
78.6
93.0
92.6
55.6

97.7%
85.2
90.7
86.3
97.4
94.1
98.9
91.5
93.2
95.7
87.4
92.1
87.8

M e tro p o lita n a re a s in S ta tes w ith lim ite d -a re a branch banking p revalen t
Akron: Summit County, O hio......................................................................................................................................
Albany: Albany, Rensslaer and Schenectady Counties, New Y o rk.......................................................................
Allentown: Lehigh and Northampton Counties, Pennsylvania...............................................................................
Atlanta: Fulton and DeKalb Counties, Georgia.........................................................................................................
Birmingham: Jefferson County, Alabama..................................................................................................................
Boston: Suffolk County, Massachusetts.....................................................................................................................
Buffalo: Erie and Niagara Counties, New Y o rk........................................................................................................
Cincinnati: Hamilton County, Ohio.............................................................................................................................
Cleveland: Cuyahoga County, Ohio.............................................................................................................................
Columbus: Franklin County, Ohio...............................................................................................................................
Dayton: Montgomery County, Ohio.............................................................................................................................
Detroit: Wayne County, Michigan................................................................................................................................
Gary: Lake County, Indiana.........................................................................................................................................
Indianapolis: Marion County, Indiana........................................................................................................................
Jersey City: Hudson County, New Jersey..................................................................................................................
Knoxville: Knox County, Tennessee...........................................................................................................................
Louisville: Jefferson County, Kentucky.....................................................................................................................
Memphis: Shelby County, Tennessee........................................................................................................................
Nashville: Davidson County, Tennessee....................................................................................................................
Newark: Essex and Union Counties, New Jersey.....................................................................................................




678,197
1,088,463
699,250
1,718,995
752,136
3,390,349
1,823,078
1,333,644
4,211,452
991,549
530,498
5,896,559
454,214
1,381,328
874,520
346,934
933,920
1,173,302
874,982
2,540,343

99.2
80.8
64.2
91.1
99.1
96.6
98.2
97.9
97.7
97.4
94.7
87.4
77.7
99.7
93.6
100.0
95.5
97.2
98.6
67.7

99.2
80.8
64.2
93.1
99.1
96.6
98.2
97.9
97.7
99.2
94.7
87.4
77.7
99.7
93.6
100.0
97.8
97.2
98.6
67.7

CORPORATION

71.5%
81.7
79.6
71.2
89.1
89.3
93.0
85.6
84.0
82.6
76.9
76.8
71.6

INSURANCE

30.1%
39.5
38.8
33.4
47.3
41.9
52.4
47.8
39.2
39.2
39.5
42.3
38.0

DEPOSIT

Baltimore: Baltimore City and Baltimore County, M aryland................................................................................... $1,567,012
Hartford: Hartford County, Connecticut.....................................................................................................................
989,712
Honolulu: Honolulu County, H awaii...........................................................................................................................
750,563
Los Angeles: Los Angeles County, California........................................................................................................... 12,015,392
Phoenix: Maricopa County, Arizona...........................................................................................................................
1,167,538
Portland: Clackamas and Multonomah Counties, Oregon......................................................................................
1,222,631
Providence: Bristol, Kent and Providence Counties, Rhode Island.....................................................................
976,234
Sacramento: Sacramento County, California............................................................................................................
955,632
San Bernardino: Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California..................................................................
948,854
San Diego: San Diego County, California.................................................................................................................. 1,187,910
San Francisco: Alameda and San Francisco Counties, California......................................................................... 8,204,851
San Jose: Santa Clara County, California.................................................................................................................
1.202,335
Seattle: King County, W ashington.............................................................................................................................. I ! 525,460

FEDERAL

Total
deposits
in all
commercia 1
banks
(thousands
of
dollars)2

142

Table 49. RELATIVE SIZE OF LARGEST BANKS OR BANK GROUPS IN 65 METROPOLITAN AREAS, JUNE 30, 1964'

39.3
21.7
48.6
16.3
27.0
49.6
29.9
43.6
31.6
33.1
50.8
29.8
18.9
23.3

297,475
,517,882
,487,140
,394,161
980,734
,185,293
733,730
,778,751
,380,243
,946,639
,637,232
949,439
623,683
887,517
,293,581
,111,623
753,537
107,662

29.5
23.4
33.9
27.7
32.7
26.1
27.9
26.1
28.1
39.3
22.5
32.7
41.5
29.3

78.7
54.1
77.8
43.2
63.6
80.6
73.4
86.2

84.0
78.2
8 8 .1

73.3
43.3
57.1

99.1
75.3
91.9
55.1
8 6.2

89.1
90.0
99.5
94.4
99.8
98.5
86.7
54.9
83.8

39.3
21.7
48.6
16.3
27.0
49.6
29.9
43.6
31.6
33.1
50.8
29.8
18.9
23.3

78.7
54.1
77.8
43.2
63.6
80.6
73.4

29.5
23.4
33.9
27.7
36.6
26.1
33.7
26.1
28.1
40.6
44.9
32.7
41.5
29.3

68.1

86.2

84.0
78.2
8 8 .1

73.3
43.3
57.1

99.1
75.3
91.9
55.1
86.2

89.1
90.0
99.5
94.4
99.8
98.5
86.7
54.9
83.8

AD
N

253,091
322,968
393,068
940,349
,506,211
,413,335
883,962
955,414
359,933
576,712
608,541
,978,727
475,183
506,328

M e tro p o lita n a re a s in S ta tes w ith u n it banking p revalen t
81.6
61.5
81.6
83.7
77.4
67.7
80.6
64.4
48.4
71.5
67.9
79.5
85.6
72.3
55.4
49.1
83.6
96.0

21.6
11.8

38.0
40.9

51.9
76.2
67.6
76.9
63.5
81.5
58.3
41.8
76.1
83.5
71.0
84.5
61.7
48.2
34.2
75.8
81.6

81.6
61.5
81.6
83.7
81.1
67.7
90.4
64.4
50.3
80.9
90.9
79.5
89.5
72.3
58.6
49.1
83.6
96.0

nocit!
commer^iaI ba n k s an d branches located in county (or counties). These figures are as published by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in “ Distribution of Bank De­
posits by Counties m Standard Metropolitan Areas June 30, 1964 (in the case of counties with mutual savings banks, deposits in all banks minus deposits in mutual savings banks).
a " sJ a“ u'a^ec*» deposits in a bank consist of those in head office and any branches within the area, or, if the head office is located elsewhere, of deposits in all branches within the area.
A bank group includes banks that are members of a holding company registered under the Bank Holdi ng Company Act of 1956, or (in one case) controlled through common stock ownership.

N o te : It is recognized that service areas for deposits vary with the type and size of account, and that a much greater proportion of the deposits in larger than in small banks is in large accounts Ratios
based oni deposits> without | •
ic
J
these characteristics, therefore,
not
accurate indicators of 111G shares of an area's deposits held
.
,
■
- regard _!to •----. * ------ ,------------ * ' -..W. W w. w, may ..vv be very UVSVUIUVW HIUIVUIUIU V» the OllCIt CO Ul a il OICO O UC}JUOlld I l£ It by individual banks. Ratios that more nearly approximate
_
these snares are currently being derived from the Corporation s most recent survey of deposits and will be released in a forthcoming publication,




143

B ack d a ta : See Annual Reports for 1962, pp. 56-57; and for I960, pp. 56-57, 102-103.

FACILITIES

tho A ^ n n J f 'R f L T f ^ Q R n 60
a[eas as defined by the Bureau of the Budget, with population of 400,000 or more on April 1, 1960, and in 5 other areas included in Tables 29 and 40 of
oMhe population within ^a'ndard metfop'olitan^areas
Massachusetts- and Rhode lsland (where standard metropolitan areas are defined in terms of cities and towns) they are counties with the m ajority

O BANKING
F

2 1.6
11.8

38.0
40.9

68.1

51.9
76.2
67.6
73.0
63.5
71.6
58.3
40.0
65.8
59.6
71.0
78.7
61.7
47.8
34.2
75.8
81.6

LOCATION

Charleston: Kanawha County, West V irgin ia..............................................................
Chicago: Cook County, Illin o is .......................................................................................
Dallas: Dallas County, Texas.........................................................................................
Denver: Denver County, Colorado................................................................................
Fort W orth: Tarrant County, Texas..............................................................................
Houston : Harris County, Texas.....................................................................................
Jacksonville: Duval County, Florida.............................................................................
Kansas City: Clay and Jackson Counties, M issouri...................................................
M iam i: Dade County, Florida.........................................................................................
M ilwaukee: Milwaukee County, Wisconsin.................................................................
M inneapolis: Hennepin and Ramsey Counties, Minnesota......................................
Oklahoma City: Oklahoma County, O klahom a...........................................................
Omaha: Douglas County, Nebraska..............................................................................
San Antonio: Bexar County, Texas..............................................................................
St. Louis: St. Louis City and St. Louis County, Missouri.........................................
Tam pa: Hillsboro and Pinellas Counties, Florida.......................................................
T u lsa : Tulsa County, Oklahoma..............................................................
W heeling: Ohio County, West V irginia...................................................................

CONCENTRATION

New Orleans: Orleans County, Louisiana...................................................................
New York: Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties, New York
N orfolk: Norfolk City, Portsmouth City and Norfolk County, Virginia....................
Paterson: Bergen and Passaic Counties, New Jersey...............................................
Philadelphia: Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.....................................................
Pittsburgh: Allegheny County, Pennsylvania............................................................
Richmond: Richmond City and Henrico County, Virginia.........................................
Rochester: Monroe County, New Y o rk...............................................................
Springfield: Hampden County, Massachusetts...........................................................
Syracuse: Onondaga County, New Y o rk.....................................................................
Toledo: Lucas County, Ohio..........................................................................................
Washington: District of Columbia.................................................................................
W ilkes-Barre: Luzerne County, Pennsylvania............................................................
Youngstown : Mahoning and Trum bul Counties, Ohio...............................................

144

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Banking offices in relation to population and banking structure.
Population per bank and per banking office in each State on
Table 50. BANKS, BANKING OFFICES, AND POPULATION PER BANK AND
OFFICE IN EACH STATE, DECEMBER 31, 1964, WITH CHANGE
FROM DECEMBER 31, 1960
December 31, 1964

Change from 1960 to 1964

Number
Number
of banks
and trust of offices
companies operated

A ll S tates

Popula­
tion per
bank 1

Popula­
tion per
office 1

14,250

29,450

13,370

6,469

+277

+4,573

8
17
16
22
52
12
200
24
101
55
13
133
152
137
127
55

66
167
263
92
301
127
2,478
144
494
158
64
375
868
520
533
106

51,000
53,765
98,813
22,318
35,981
58,417
90,420
28,833
29,545
18,036
19,231
19,211
31,921
20,190
27,024
7,436

6,182
5,473
6,011
5,337
6,216
5,520
7,298
4,806
6,040
6,278
3,906
6,813
5,590
5,319
6,439
3,858

+

1

+

6

+
+
+

83
8
10
5

-

12
31
4
12
7

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

22
32
74
12
54
29
685
29
103
34
18
83
177
124
111
10

+10,246
+ 3,207
-3 1 ,4 0 3
+ 2,032
+ 1,968
+ 5,686
-4 3 ,9 1 5
+ 7,983
- 1,809
+
223
+ 1,834
+ 2,779
+ 7,024
+ 2,210
+ 4,717
+ 1,148

302
894
879
242
945
937
- 1 ,4 6 8
996
- 1 ,2 5 7
904
-1 ,0 1 1
-1 ,3 4 7
- 1 ,0 0 4
- 1 ,0 8 3
909
203

338
361
252
431
479
63
209
78
598
549
196
294
348
435
277
257

1,015
1,166
394
600
2,515
147
445
253
1,804
1,422
387
589
561
876
763
911

15,793
22,432
13,520
9,963
37,401
16,000
16,593
12,679
19,162
18,397
11,806
12,918
9,078
11,092
15,805
26,000

5,259
6,945
8,647
7,157
7,123
6,857
7,793
3,909
6,352
7,103
5,979
6,448
5,631
5,508
5,738
7,335

- 18
- 19
+ 14
+ 10
- 50
+
8
+ 19
1
-1 1 2
- 38
+
3
3
7
- 12
- 28
- 17

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

163
208
66
73
449
36
79
35
252
194
58
76
60
118
174
180

+ 1,331
+ 1,845
206
+
597
+ 5,676
- 1,291
549
+
410
+ 3,219
+ 1,861
+
520
+
908
+
520
+
661
+ 2,799
+ 3,858

784
- 1 ,2 2 1
- 1 ,3 1 3
325
100
-1 ,8 3 4
- 1 ,1 0 6
537
941
801
641
505
433
643
997
964

1,030
246
582
432
163
417
721
68
643
173
1,130
424
245
594
184
129
105
675

1,035
254
752
459
207
453
730
69
699
245
1,180
441
335
644
184
132
131
896

10,183
7,992
7,057
3,426
3,957
5,911
4,883
5,044
6,857
4,133
9,201
13,455
7,890
3,746
9,766
5,465
6,229
4,083

10,134
7,740
5,461
3,224
3,116
5,442
4,823
4,971
6,308
2,918
8,811
12,937
5,770
3,455
9,766
5,341
4,992
3,076

+ 64
+ 54
+ 19
+
6
+
7
+ 28
+ 31
+ 13
+ 17
1
+119
+115
+
8
+
7
+
2
+
8
2
+
2

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

65 253
55 - 1,143
31 +
38
21 +
113
22
97
41
74
34 65
957
13 44
48
12 +
222
141 274
118 - 2,569
52 +
353
32 +
35
2 456
10 112
18 +
557
40
14

259
- 1 ,0 7 4
20
+
2
303
209
82
923
328
3
409
- 2 ,3 9 3
542
105
456
190
379
145

Number
of banks
Number
and trust of offices
companies operated

Popula­
tion per
bank

+

591

Popula­
tion per
office

-

709

States w ith s tate w id e
b r a n c h b a n k in g
p re v a le n t
Nevada..............................
Rhode Island.....................
Arizona..............................
Delaware............................
Oregon...............................
Hawaii................................
California...........................
Idaho..................................
Washington........................
Utah....................................
A laska................................
South Carolina..................
North Carolina....................
Connecticut.......................
M aryland...........................
Vermont.............................

S ta tes w ith lim ited
a re a branch b ank­
in g p revalen t
Massachusetts..................
M ichigan............................
Alabam a............................
Georgia..............................
New Y o rk..........................
New Mexico......................
Louisiana...........................
Maine.................................
Pennsylvania....................
Ohio....................................
Mississippi........................
Tennessee.........................
Kentucky...........................
Indiana..............................
Virginia ..............................
New Jersey........................

S ta tes w ith u n it bank
ing p re v a le n t
Illin o is ................................
Colorado............................
Wisconsin..........................
Nebraska...........................
North Dakota....................
Oklahoma..........................
Minnesota..........................
Wyoming............................
M issouri.............................
South Dakota....................
Texas.................................
Florida...............................
Arkansas...........................
Kansas...............................
West V irgin ia....................
M ontana.............................
New Hampshire................
Iowa...................................

1 Computed from population, July 1, 1964 (total resident population).
Back data: See Annual Report for I960, pp. 42, 101.




CONCENTRATION AND LOCATION OF BANKING FACILITIES

145

December 31, 1964, together with changes since the end of 1960,
are shown in Table 50, with the States grouped by status of branch
banking.
The average (mean) population per banking office in the 50
States was 6,469 on December 31, 1964, about 700 persons fewer
than the average four years earlier. In the States with statewide
branch banking, the median population per banking office was
less than 6,000. In States with limited-area branch banking, the
median population per office was slightly above 6,000. Where unit
banking is prevalent, the median was slightly above 5,000, but
averages for individual States ranged from about 3,000 to nearly
13,000 per office. The arithmetic mean for each of the three groups
of States was even closer to the overall average. Thus, differences
in population per banking office were comparatively small among
groups of States classified according to prevalent type of banking
structure.
The degree of branching permissible in the different States was
reflected in the distribution of banks and banking offices in 1964.
Thus, in the statewide branching group, 83 percent of banking
offices were branches, compared to 63 percent under limited
branching, and only 11 percent in States where unit banking is
prevalent. States in which statewide branching is prevalent had
8 percent of the nation’s banks but 37 percent of total branches.
The 36 percent of the banks which were in States with limited-area
branch banking had 57 percent of the branches. Unit-banking
States had 56 percent of the banks and 6 percent of the branches.
Table 51. COMMERCIAL BANKING OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES GROUPED
BY LOCATION IN DIFFERENT-SIZED POPULATION CENTERS WITH
SELECTED NUMBERS OF OFFICES, DECEMBER 31, 1964
Offices in centers or metropolitan areas w ith—
Population of center
or metropolitan area

All
offices

Banking offices-total1 28,197

1
office

2
offices

3
offices

4
offices

5
offices

6
offices

7-8
offices

9-19
offices

20 or
more
offices

7,575

3,264

1,344

740

570

282

470

1,149

12,803

701
3,784
2,841
234
15

6
160
1,890
1,180
28

12
243
1,020
69

52
552
136

15
310
240
5

6
156
120

183
248
39

11
67
442
629

In centers or metro­
politan
areas
with population
of—
Less than 250................
250 to 1,000...................
1.000 to 5,000................
5.000 to 25,000..............
25.000 to 100,000..........
100.000 to 500,000........
500.000 to 2,500,000...
2.500.000 or m ore........

707
3,956
5,058
3,702
1,298
4,176
5,360
3,940

3,503
5,360
3,940

1
Excludes trust companies not regularly engaged in deposit banking and “ facilities" at m ilitary or other Federal
Government establishments.
B ack d a ta : See A n nu a l Reports for 1962, p. 60; and for I960, p. 48.




146

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Location of banking offices by size of population center. Of the
28,197 commercial banking offices in the United States at the end
of 1964, over one-fourth were in areas with only one banking office,
nearly all of which were in population centers of less than 5,000.
Table 51 shows further that about 55 percent of the total offices
were in population centers of less than 100,000.
Approximately 95 percent of all offices in the larger centers of
100,000 or more were in centers having at least 20 offices. Between
June 30, 1962 and December 31, 1964, the number of banking
offices increased by nearly 3,200, with four-fifths of the gain being
in centers with 20 or more offices.
Table 52. COMMERCIAL BANKING OFFICES, BANKS, AND BRANCHES IN
METROPOLITAN AND OTHER AREAS GROUPED ACCORDING TO
STATUS OF BRANCH BANKING, DECEMBER 31, 1964'
Number
Status of branch banking and
type of area

United States (50 States and D. C.)—
total............................................

Total
offices

Banks

Percentage
Branches

Total
offices

Banks

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

Branches

28,02
1

13,713

14,308

13,653
14,368

4,106
9,607

9,547
4 6
,7 1

48.7
51.3

29.9
70
.1

66.7
33.3

10 States without locational lim itations:
Metropolitan area counties...................................
Other counties.........................................................

2,979
1,701

289
412

2,690
1,289

10.6
6.1

2.1
3.0

18.8
9.0

6 States with some locational limitations:
Metropolitan area counties...................................
Other counties........................................................

803
730

147
151

656
579

2.9
2.6

1.1
1.1

4.6
4.0

9 States with countywide branch banking prevalent:
Metropolitan area counties...................................
Other counties........................................................

3,593
2,971

838
1,776

2,755
1,195

12.8
10.6

6.1
12.9

19.3
8.3

7 States and D. C. with other limited area branch
banking prevalent: 4
Metropolitan area counties...................................
Other counties.........................................................

3,993
2,563

779
1,444

3,214
1,119

14.3
9.2

5.7
10.5

22.5
7.8

7 States with limited branch banking: 5
Metropolitan area counties...................................
Other counties........................................................

710
2,894

536
2,384

174
510

2.5
10.3

3.9
17.4

1.2
3.6

11 States without branch banking: 6
Metropolitan area counties...................................
Other counties........................................................

1,575
3,509

1,517
3,440

58
69

5.6
12.5

11.1
25.1

.4
.5

Metropolitan area counties 2.............
Other counties...................................
States with statewide branch banking :3

States with limited area branch bank­
ing prevalent: 3

States with unit banking prevalent
throughout the State: 3

1 Excludes trust companies not regularly engaged in deposit banking and “ facilities” at Federal Government estab'
lishments.
2 Includes all metropolitan areas as defined by the Bureau of the Budget, except that in States where metropolitan
areas are defined in terms of cities and towns (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island),
counties with the majority of their population in the metropolitan portions are included in lieu of the specified cities
and towns.
3 For the States in each group, see Table 23 in the Annual Report of the Corporation for 1960, p. 45. In addition to
the States listed in the 1960 report, this table includes in States with statewide branch banking: Alaska, without limitations,
and Hawaii, with limitations.
4 For the branch banking areas, see note 6 to Table 23 in the Annual Report of the Corporation for 1960, p. 45.
5 For the type of branches permitted, see note 7 to Table 23 in the Annual Report of the Corporation for 1960, p. 45.
6 See note 8 to Table 23 in the Annual Report of the Corporation for 1960, p. 45.
B ack d a ta : See A n n u a l Reports for 1962, p. 61; and for 1960, p. 46.




CONCENTRATION AND LOCATION OF BANKING FACILITIES

147

Counties in Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas contained
almost one-half the banking offices of the nation’s commercial
banks at the end of 1964, as shown in Table 52. Only three-tenths
of the commercial banks were located in metropolitan area coun­
ties, while two-thirds of the branches were in those counties.
ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF BANKS
Assets and liabilities at the close of 1964. Total assets of all banks
in the United States on December 31, 1964 amounted to $402.7
billion, an increase of 10.7 percent over the figure as of December
20, 1963. Percentage increases in recent years, influenced some­
what by differences in the year-end call dates, were 5.6 percent
in 1963, 6.8 percent in 1962, and 7.8 percent in 1961.' Banks
participating in Federal deposit insurance held 97.4 percent of
the assets of all banks on December 31, 1964.
The increase of $39 billion in total assets in 1964 was comprised
of gains of $24 billion in loans, $10 billion in cash, $4 billion in
securities other than obligations of the United States Government,
and $1 billion in other assets. There was a decline of $302 million
in holdings of United States Government obligations. These in­
creases were balanced by gains of $37 billion in deposits, and
$2 billion in the capital accounts of banks.
Some of the differences between the operations of commercial
banks and mutual savings banks are reflected in Table 53. Com­
mercial banks, on December 31, 1964, had 35.5 percent of their
assets in cash and United States Government obligations; however,
mutual savings banks, needing fewer such assets to satisfy liquidity
or legal reserve requirements, had only 12.5 percent. On the other
hand, loans constituted 75.8 percent of the assets of mutual savings
banks, but only 50.7 percent of the assets of commercial banks.
Almost all the loans held by mutual savings banks were secured
by real estate. One-third of the loans of commercial banks were
classified as commercial and industrial, one-fourth were secured
by real estate, and more than one-fifth were loans to individuals
for household, family, and other personal expenditures. Time and
savings deposits of individuals constitute nearly all deposits in
mutual savings banks, while demand deposits exceed time and
savings deposits in commercial banks.
Changes in assets and liabilities since 1934. During the last 30
years, total assets of all banks increased from $59 billion to nearly
$403 billion. There were also notable changes in the composition
of assets. Cash and funds due from banks declined from 20 percent
to 15 percent of total assets. Securities were also lower, falling
' Call dates for banks participating in Federal deposit insurance were Decem­
ber 31, 1964; December 20, 1963; December 28, 1962; and December 30, 1961.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

148

Table 53. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF ALL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES,
BY TYPE OF BANK, DECEMBER 31, 1964
Amount (in millions)
Asset or liability item

Assets—total........................
Cash and funds due from banks_
_
U. S. Government obligations...........
Other securities..................................
Loans and discounts 1.......................
Other assets........................................

Commercial
banks and
trust
companies

All banks

$402,673

$34
8,433

61,644
68,921
44,362
217,658
10,088

60,640
63,133
38,872
176,573
9,216

Percentage distribution

Mutual
savings
banks

All banks

Commercial
banks and
trust
companies

$54,240
!
!
i
j
!

100.0%

Mutual
savings
banks

100.0%

1,004
5,788
5,490
41,085
873

15.3
17.1
11.0
54.1
2.5

17.4
18.1
11.2
50.7
2.6

1.8
10.7
10.1
75.8
1.6

100.0%

i

Liabilities and capital ac­
counts—total..................

402,673

348,433 i

54,240

100.0

100.0

100.0

Deposits— to ta l...................................
Other lia b ilitie s..................................
Capital accounts— to ta l......................

357,565
12,812
32,295

308,427
12,112
27,895

49,139
700
4,401

88.8
3.2
8.0

88.5
3.5
8.0

90.6
1.3
8.1

180,137

41,309

100.0

100.0

60,612
7,520
8,387
43,976
40,011
14,443
5,187

164
2
32
40,556
510
26
19

27.5
3.4
3.8
38.2
18.3
6.5
2.3

33.6
4.2

100.0
.4

24.4
22.2
8.0
2.9

( 3)
.1
98.2
1.2
.1
( 3)

Loans—gross total 2.............
Commercial and industrial...............
Agricultural (except real estate ).. . .
For carrying securities......................
Real estate loans................................
Other loans to individuals................
To financial institutions....................
All other...............................................

221,446
60,776
7,523
8,419
84,532
40,521
14,469
5,206

!
i
i
i
j

4.7

357,565

308,427

49,139

100.0

100.0

100.0

Business and personal deposits:
Demand 4........................................
Time and savings..........................

141,562
162,054

141,232
113,284

330
48,770

39.6
45.3

45.8
36.7

99.2

Government deposits:
States and subdivisions................
United States..................................
Interbank deposits 5..........................

23,504
6,814
23,631

23,475
6,807
23,629

29
7
2

6.6
1.9
6.6

7.6
2.2
7.7

.1
( 3)
( 3)

Deposits—total.....................

.7

1 Net of valuation reserves.
2 Includes valuation reserves.
3 Less than .05 percent.
4 Includes certified checks, letters of credit, etc.
5 Includes postal savings deposits.
N o te: Due to rounding, components may not add to totals.

from 39 percent to 28 percent of the total. However, loans in­
creased to 54 percent of assets, up from 35 percent at the end
of 1934.
The last decade has been one of notable acceleration in rates
of change, and of significant changes in the composition of assets
and deposits. Almost one-half of the growth in bank assets which
took place during the past 30 years occurred in the 10 years
ending December 31, 1964. Total loans and the obligations of
States and their subdivisions expanded at more than twice the
percentage change of total assets. Other major categories of assets
increased at differing rates, while holdings of United States Gov­
ernment obligations declined 12 percent.
Significant changes also took place in the composition of de­
posits during the last decade. Time and savings deposits rose from
36 percent to nearly 50 percent of the total, with the rise particu­
larly rapid in the last three years. A prosperous and expanding



ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF BANKS

149

economy, enabling individuals to increase their savings, has been
fundamental to this upward trend in savings deposits. Payment of
higher interest rates by many banks following upward adjustments
in the permissible maximum rates, along with relative price stabil­
ity, has provided an added inducement to save. To some extent,
there has been a shifting of funds from demand to savings or time
deposits. The corporate financial practice of seeking to maximize
yields on short-term investments has led to the increased use of
certificates of deposit.
Although certificates of deposit have been issued by banks for
many years, prior to 1961 the volume was small and the certificates
were generally non-negotiable. After large banks began issuing
negotiable certificates in 1961, a secondary market was estab­
lished in which certificates in denominations of $1 million or more
were readily negotiable. These certificates provide the depositor
with both liquidity and income, thus serving as substitutes for other
instruments in the money market.
Small banks, both because they have fewer of the accounts of
large businesses and their certificates of deposit are not so readily
negotiable, have been less affected by the development of this
instrument than have the largest banks. The issuance of negotiable




150

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

certificates of deposit has contributed to the relatively rapid in­
crease in time and savings deposits held by large banks shown in
Chart I. Changes in the percentages of time and savings deposits
to total deposits among banks of different sizes have also been
influenced by various other factors, such as differences among
banks in rates of deposit growth and in interest rates paid on
time and savings accounts.
INCOME OF INSURED BANKS
Income of all insured banks in 1964. Banks insured by the Cor­
poration reported total income in 1964 of $17.6 billion. Insured
commercial banks had income of $15.3 billion, or 87 percent of
the total, while the income of insured mutual savings banks com­
prised the remainder. Total income was 9.8 percent greater than
in 1963, compared to an increase of 10.5 percent in assets.
Sources and disposition of income of insured commercial banks
in 1964. Current operating revenue, consisting of income from
loans, securities, and other sources amounted to $15 billion in the
year. Net current operating earnings were $4.1 billion, after deduc­
tion of current operating expenses. These included salaries and
wages, interest on deposits, and other expenses.
Items of income and expense also arise when assets are dis­
posed of, or charge-offs and recoveries are made, such transac­
tions being based in part upon considerations of tax advantage
and alternative uses for the funds. Net income after taxes reached
nearly $2.3 billion in 1964, and for the first time dividends to share­
holders exceeded $1 billion.
Table 54 shows the amounts and percentage distribution of
sources of income and its disposition for insured commercial banks
in 1962,1963, and 1964. Each item of current operating income and
expense increased in amount during both 1963 and 1964. However,
income from loans and from obligations of States and political
subdivisions produced larger shares in 1964, while interest on
United States Government obligations declined as a percentage
of the total. Slightly more than one-half of total income was re­
quired for salaries and wages and interest on deposits. While there
was a decline in the percentage of income needed to pay wages
and salaries, the share needed for payment of interest on deposits
rose sharply.
Figures related to bank assets and earnings are dominated by
a relatively few large banks. As shown in Table 55, fewer than
3 percent of the insured commercial banks operating throughout
1964 had deposits of $100 million or more, but they held more
than three-fifths of the assets and earned approximately the same



INCOME OF INSURED BANKS

151

Table 54. SOURCES AND DISPOSITION OF TOTAL INCOME OF INSURED
COMMERCIAL BANKS, 1962-1964
Amount
(in millions)

Income

Percentage distribution

1964

Total income........................

1963

1962

1964

$15,347

$13,978

$12,686

9,785
2,240
1,085
781
1,132
322

8,672
2,176
921
729
1,011
468

7,718
2,093
759
681
968
467

63.8
14.6
7.1
5.1
7.3
2.1

62.0
15.6
6.6
5.2
7.2
3.4

60.8
16.5
6.0
5.4
7.6
3.7

4,187
4,088
2,623
1,017
1,148
1,088
1,195

3,908
3,464
2,343
884
1,227
993
1,159

3,651
2,845
2,093
837
1,256
941
1,063

27.3
26.6
17.1
6.6
7.5
7.1
7.8

28.0
24.8
16.7
6.3
8.8
7.1
8.3

28.8
22.4
16.5
6.6
9.9
7.4
8.4

100.0%

1963

100.0%

1962

100.0%

Sources
Loans....................................................
U. S. Government obligations..........
Other securities..................................
Service charges on deposits.............
Other current income........................
Recoveries, etc. 1...............................

Disposition
Salaries and wages 2.........................
Interest on deposits..........................
Other current expenses.....................
Charge-offs, etc. 3..............................
Income taxes......................................
Dividends to stockholders 4.............
Additions to capital accounts...........

1 Includes recoveries from assets previously charged off (except those credited to valuation reserve accounts), profits
on assets sold, and transfers from valuation reserve accounts.
2 Consists of salaries, wages, fees, and benefits, and includes those of officers and employees in building department.
3 Includes losses and other charge-offs (except those charged to valuation reserve accounts), and transfers to valu­
ation reserve accounts.
4 Includes interest on capital notes and debentures.
N o te :

Due to rounding, components may not add to totals.

proportion of net income after taxes. On the other hand, slightly
over one-half of the banks were small institutions with deposits of
less than $5 million, employing 8.4 percent of total employees,
holding 5.9 percent of the assets, and receiving 6.4 percent of net
income after taxes.
Sources and distribution of income in 1964 differed among banks
of different size. With increasing size of banks, declines occurred
in the percentage of their current operating revenue received from
interest on United States Government securities, which were balTable 55. DISTRIBUTION BY DEPOSIT SIZE OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS
OPERATING THROUGHOUT 1964 AND PERCENTAGES OF SELECTED
BANKING TOTALS IN EACH SIZE GROUP
Size of bank

All banks..............................................

Number
of banks
(Dec. 31)

100.0%

Number of
employees
(Dec. 31)

100.0%

Assets
(Dec. 31)

100.0%

Net current
operating
earnings

Net income
after taxes

100.0%

100.0%

Banks with deposits of—
Less than $1,000,000.................................................
$1,000,000 to $2,000,000...........................................
$2,000,000 to $5,000,000...........................................
$5,000,000 to $10,000,000.........................................
$10,000,000 to $25,000,000.......................................
$25,000,000 to $50,000,000.......................................
$50,000,000 to $100,000,000.....................................
$100,000,000 to $500,000,000...................................
$500,000,000 or m o re ...............................................

4.9
15.2
32.5
21.9
15.9
4.6
2.3
2.1
.6

.4
1.7
6.3
8.1
12.5
8.1
7.5
20.6
34.8

B ack d a ta : See A n nu al Reports for 1963, p. 76; and for 1962, p. 64.




.2
1.0
4.7
6.5
10.4
6.8
6.9
19.4
44.1

.1
1.0
4.4
6.4
10.0
6.4
6.4
19.7
45.6

.2
1.2
5.0
6.9
10.2
6.3
6.4
19.4
44.4

152

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

anced in part by increases in the proportion generated by loans.
Wages and salaries accounted for a larger part of current operat­
ing expense in small-sized banks than in medium or large-sized
banks. Interest on deposits, on the other hand, was highest in
relation to total current operating expense in the largest banks of
$500 million or more in deposits, and lowest in the smaller banks
with deposits below $5 million.
Trends in income and expense of insured commercial banks. Both
total current operating revenue and current operating expenses
have increased from year to year for the past quarter of a century.
Net current operating earnings have fluctuated around 35-38 per­
cent of total current operating revenue during most of this period.
Since 1960 there has been a steady decline in this percentage,
reaching 27.5 percent in 1964, the lowest proportion since 1940.
The $2.4 billion of net income after taxes received in 1964 rep­
resented a return of 8.4 percent on total capital accounts, higher
than in 1950 or 1955, but lower than in the years 1960-1963. Net
current operating earnings on assets showed a similar pattern.
Banks have, in recent years, experienced a rising volume of assets
from which higher rates of income were received, but which en­
tailed costs at times rising more rapidly than income. Table 56
gives selected data reflecting items of income and expense of
insured commercial banks in the years 1950, 1955, and 1960-1964.
Total salaries, wages, fees, and benefits for officers, directors,
and employees have declined slightly in recent years relative to
current operating revenue. While average salaries have risen
steadily, the amount of assets per employee and current operating
revenue per employee have also increased.
Interest on time and savings deposits absorbed 27 percent of
total current operating revenue in 1964, almost as much as com­
pensation paid to employees. Interest payments in 1960, following
a rising trend in both dollar volume and in relation to current
operating revenues, amounted to 17 percent of revenues. Since
then the upward movement has accelerated, resulting from higher
rates paid by banks, permitted under revised regulations, as well
as from the relatively rapid growth in the amount of time and
savings deposits, particularly certificates of deposit.
Sources and disposition of income of insured mutual savings
banks in 1964. The sources and disposition of income of mutual
savings banks are greatly influenced by the mutual form of organi­
zation and by the fact that almost all the deposits in these banks
consist of savings accounts. Because of the relative stability of
the deposits, these banks are not required to maintain the degree
of liquidity needed by commercial banks. Mutual savings banks




INCOME OF INSURED BANKS

153

Table 56. OPERATING DATA OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN OPERATION
THROUGHOUT SELECTED YEARS, 1950, 1955, 1960-1964
1950

1955

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

Net current operating earnings per $100
of total capital accounts....................

$13.22

$16.09

$18.34

$16.40

$15.33

$15.06

$15.18

Net income after taxes per $100 of total
capital accounts..................................

8.32

7.69

9.69

9.02

8.47

8.56

8.41

Current operating revenue per $100 of
total assets..........................................

2.36

3.03

4.17

3.98

4.13

4.32

4.36

Item

Net current operating earnings per $100
of total assets.....................................

.89

1.15

1.48

1.31

1.23

1.22

1.20

Income on loans per $100 of loans..........

3.90

4.47

5.78

5.61

5.51

5.55

5.60

Income on U. S. Government obligations
per $100 of U. S. Government obli­
gations.................................................

1.66

2.18

2.95

2.87

3.17

3.45

3.58

Income on other securities per $100 of
other securities..................................

1.87

2.14

2.81

2.66

2.62

2.65

2.82

Current operating expense per $100 of
current operating revenue................

62.15

62.00

64.60

67.12

70.24

71.79

72.47

Current operating expense per $100 of
total assets..........................................

1.47

1.88

2.69

2.67

2.90

3.10

3.16

Salaries, wages, fees, and benefits per
$100 of current operating revenue..

31.19

30.28

26.58

30.93

29.86

28.88

27.83

Interest on time and savings deposits
per $100 of current operating
revenue................................................

19.00

23.28

25.63

27.25

8.73

10.67

16.67

Interest paid per $100 of time and
savings deposits.................................

.94

1.35

2.43

2.54

2.90

3.09

3.21

Salaries, etc. per $100 of total assets

.74

.92

1.11

1.23

1.23

1.25

1.21

Assets per employee (in thousands of
dollars)................................................

433.4

425.3

420.8

438.2

450.9

458.7

491.2

Current operating revenue per employee
(in thousands of dollars)..................

10.2

12.9

17.6

17.4

18.6

19.8

21.4

receive most of their income from mortgage loans.
Higher payments to time and savings depositors are made by
mutual savings banks than by commercial banks: 4.13 percent
compared to 3.42 percent in 1964. Since almost all deposits of
mutual savings banks are of this type, dividends and interest on
deposits absorb a large part of total income— more than seventenths in 1964. The virtual absence of demand deposit accounting
is chiefly responsible for the ability of mutual savings banks to
operate with an average of more than four times as much assets
and receive five times as much current operating income per
employee as the average commercial bank.
A distribution of the income of insured mutual savings banks
in 1962, 1963, and 1964, by amounts and percentages, is shown in
Table 57.




154

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Table 57. SOURCES AND DISPOSITION OF TOTAL INCOME OF INSURED
MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS, 1962-1964
Amount (in millions)

Percentage distribution

Income
1964

Total income........................................

1963

1962

$2,270

$2,060

$1,86
1

1,772
153
207
50
87

1,562
154
204
56
84

168
136
1,654
75
26
211

159
133
1,482
84
23
179

1964

1963

1962

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

1,366
156
206
48
85

78.1
6.8
9.1
2.2
3.8

75.8
7.5
9.9
2.7
4.1

73.4
8.4
11.1
2.5
4.6

149
123
1,334
90
18
147

7.4
6.0
72.9
3.3
1.1
9.3

7.7
6.5
71.9
4.1
1.1
8.7

8.0
6.6
71.7
4.8
1.0
7.9

Sources
Loans...........................................................................
U. S. Government obligations..................................
Other securities..........................................................
Other current income 1.............................................
Recoveries, etc. 2.......................................................

Disposition
Salaries and wages 3.................................................
Other current expenses 1..........................................
Dividends and interest on deposits........................
Charge-offs, etc. 4......................................................
Income taxes 5...........................................................
Additions to surplus accounts..................................

1 Includes amounts classified as “ nonrecurring” income or expenses.
2 Includes recoveries from assets previously charged off (except those credited to valuation reserve accounts), profits
on assets sold, and transfers from valuation reserve accounts.
3 Includes salaries, wages, fees, and benefits.
4 Includes losses and other items charged off (except those charged to valuation reserve accounts), and transfers to
valuation reserve accounts.
5 Includes franchise taxes computed on an income basis.
N ote: Due to rounding, components may not add to totals.




STATISTICS OF BANKS
AND DEPOSIT INSURANCE




PART

FIVE

Table 101.
Table 102.

INSURANCE
CORPORATION




Branches include all offices of a bank other than its head office,
at which deposits are received, checks paid, or money lent. Bank­
ing facilities separate from a banking house, banking facilities at
government establishments, offices, agencies, paying or receiving
stations, drive-in facilities and other facilities operated for limited
purposes are defined as branches under the Federal Deposit Insur­
ance Act, Section 3(o), regardless of the fact that in certain States,
including several which prohibit the operation of branches, such
limited facilities are not considered branches within the meaning
of State law.

DEPOSIT

Tabulations for all banks are prepared in accordance with an
agreement among the Federal bank supervisory agencies. Provision
of deposit facilities for the general public is the chief criterion for
distinguishing between banks and other types of financial institu­
tions. However, trust companies engaged in general fiduciary busi­
ness though not in deposit banking are included; and credit unions
and savings and loan associations are excluded except in the case
of a few which accept deposits under the terms of special charters.

FEDERAL

Table 103.

Changes in number and classification of banks and branches in the United
States (States and other areas) during 1964
Number of banking offices in the United States (States and other areas),
December 31, 1964
Grouped according to insurance status and class of bank, and by State
or area and type of office
Number and deposits of all banks in the United States (States and other
areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped according to insurance status and by district and State

156

NUMBER, OFFICES, AND DEPOSITS OF BANKS

DEPOSITS
O BANKS
F
157




Mutual savings banks include all banks operating under State
banking codes applying to mutual savings banks.
Institutions excluded. Institutions in the following categories are
excluded, though such institutions may perform many of the same
functions as commercial and savings banks:
Banks which have suspended operations or have ceased to
accept new deposits and are proceeding to liquidate their assets
and pay off existing deposits;
Building and loan associations, savings and loan associations,
credit unions, personal loan companies, and similar institutions,
chartered under laws applying to such institutions or under general
incorporation laws, regardless of whether such institutions are
authorized to accept deposits from the public or from their members
and regardless of whether such institutions are called “ banks” (a
few institutions accepting deposits under powers granted in special
charters are included) ;
Morris Plan companies, industrial banks, loan and investment
companies, and similar institutions except those mentioned in the
description of institutions included;
Branches of foreign banks, and private banks, which confine their
business to foreign exchange dealings and do not receive “ deposits”
as that term is commonly understood;
Institutions chartered under banking or trust company laws, but
operating as investment or title insurance companies and not en­
gaged in deposit banking or fiduciary activities;
Federal Reserve banks and other banks, such as the Federal
Home Loan banks and the Savings and Loan Bank of the State of
New York, which operate as rediscount banks and do not accept
deposits except from financial institutions;
The postal savings system.

NUMBER, OFFICES, AN
D

Commercial and stock savings banks include the following cate­
gories of banking institutions:
National banks;
Incorporated State banks, trust companies, and bank and trust
companies, regularly engaged in the business of receiving deposits,
whether demand or time, except mutual savings banks;
Stock savings banks, including guaranty savings banks in New
Hampshire;
Industrial and Morris Plan banks which operate under general
banking codes, or are specifically authorized by law to accept
deposits and in practice do so, or the obligations of which are
regarded as deposits for deposit insurance;
Special types of banks of deposit: cash depositories in South
Carolina; a cooperative exchange in Arkansas; a savings and loan
company operating under Superior Court charter in Georgia; gov­
ernment operated banks in American Samoa, North Dakota, and
Puerto Rico; a cooperative bank, usually classified as a credit
union, operating under a special charter in New Hampshire; a sav­
ings institution, known as a “ trust company,” operating under
special charter in Texas; an employes’ mutual banking association
in Pennsylvania; the Savings Banks Trust Company in New York;
and branches of foreign banks engaged in a general deposit busi­
ness in New York, Oregon, Washington, Puerto Rico, and Virgin
Islands.
Private banks under State supervision, and such other private
banks as are reported by reliable unofficial sources to be engaged
in deposit banking.
Nondeposit trust companies include institutions operating under
trust company charters which are not regularly engaged in deposit
banking but are engaged in fiduciary business other than that inci­
dental to real estate title or investment activities.

Table 101. CHANGES IN NUMBER AND CLASSIFICATION OF BANKS AND BRANCHES IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND
OTHER AREAS) DURING 1964
158

C o m m e rc ia l and s to c k saving s ba n k s
a n d n o n d e p o s it tr u s t c o m p a n ie s

All ban ks

M u tu a l saving s ban ks

N o n in s u re d
T yp e o f c h a n g e
In ­
su re d

Total

Non­
ins u re d

M e m b e rs F. R.
S ystem

Total

N a­
tio n a l

S tate

Not
m em ­
bers
F. R.
S ys­
te m

B a nks
of
de­
p o s it

N on­
d e p o s it
tr u s t
com ­
pan ies 1

T o ta l

In ­
s u re d

Non­
in s u re d

FEDERAL

Total

BA N K S

N e t c h a n g e d urin g year

1 ,2 1
4 8
1 ,0 2
4 9

1 ,8 0
3 2
1 ,6 1
3 2

+189

+199

-10

1 ,4 3
3 9
1 ,2 1
3 9

4,773
4
,615

335

+193

+202

+158
200
200

25
3
22
4

56
0
50
1

+85
120
12 0

37
3

33
2

323

335

323

1 5
,4 1
1,492

7,269
7
,184

1
2

19
4

14
4

14
4

11
4

A b s o rp tio n s , c o n s o lid a tio n s an d m e rg e rs .
C losed b e c a u s e o f fin a n c ia l d iffic u ltie s .
O th e r liq u id a tio n s .................................
D is c o n tin u e d d e p o s it o p e ra tio n s .

138

136
7

133

133
7

1

N oninsured banks becom ing in s u re d ...........

+20
+20

A d m is s io n to in s u ra n c e , o p e ra tin g b a n k s

1

+20
+20

-2 0
-2 0

+20
+20

O ther changes in c la s s ific a tio n ...................

+26

-27

+ 1

N a tio n a l b a n k s s u c c e e d in g S ta te b a n k s .
S ta te b a n k s s u c c e e d in g N a tio n a l b a n k s .
A d m is s io n to F. R. S y s te m ...........................
W ith d ra w a l fro m F. R. S y s te m ....................

+32

-1 3

-6

+ 1

-1 9
+5
-4
+19

+4
-1 9

Changes not in vo lving n u m b e r in any class:
S u c c e s s io n .......................................................................
C h a n g e s in t i t l e .............................................................
C h a n g e s in lo c a tio n .....................................................
C h a n g e s in title an d lo c a tio n ...................................
C h anges in n a m e o f lo c a tio n ...................................
C h a n g e s in c o rp o ra te p o w e rs:
To o p e ra te u n d e r g e n e ra l b a n k in g la w s :i..........
G ra n te d p e rm is s io n to e x e rc is e t r u s t p o w e r s 4
O th e r 5..................... .. .................................... ............




1

1

118

115

117

114

11

11

11

11

13

13

13

13

2

2

2

2

62
2

19
7
10
8

- 1
- 1

CORPORATION

Banks ceasing o p e ra tio n ...................................

37
2
30
3

INSURANCE

1 5
3,77
13,58
2

33
2

Banks beginning o p e ra tio n .......................................
New b a n k s .........................................................................
F in a n cia l in s titu tio n b e c o m in g b a n k o f d e p o s it.
B a n ks a d d e d to c o u n t 2................................................

41
6
41
7

DEPOSIT

N u m b e r o f banks, Decem ber 31, 1964
N u m b e r of banks, December 31, 1963

BRANCHES

Number of branches, December 31, 19646
Number of branches, December 31, 19636

1 ,4 6
5 4
1 ,2 7
4 7

1 ,2 2
5 5
1 ,0 7
4 8

14
9
10
9

1 ,7 1
47
1 ,6 2
3 5

1 ,7 3
4 0
1 ,5 5
3 8

8 8
,1 1
7 3
,4 4

3 0
,3 8
3 0
,2 0

3 1
,2 4
2 5
,9 1

Net change during ye a r..............................

+1,169

+1,165

+4

+1,119

+1,118

+747

+108

+263

1 1
,2 6

1 0
,2 8

1 6
,1 6

1 6
,1 2

3
125
14
1,067
7

69
7

3
124
13
1,061
7

14
9

4
7

4
7

Branches opened fo r b usiness..................................
Facilities provided as age nts o f the g o v e rn m e n t8
A b sorb ed banks c o n v e rte d to b ra n c h e s .................
B ranch es re p la c in g head o ffic e s re lo c a te d ...........
O ther branche s o p e n e d 9..............................................
B ranch es added to c o u n t2...........................................

Branches d isco n tin u ed ...............

3

3

2

122

122
12

1,019

85
3
587

177

6

2

1

13
1, 022
6

4
7

4
7

1

1

1

1

38

F a c ilitie s ..........................................
B ra n c h e s ........................................
B ranches d ele ted fro m c o u n t1
1

38

38

16
2
13
2

+50

+47

+3

5
0

4
6

4
.....

9
255
3

...

3
.

20
1

18

+3

1

+88

-17
-17

-3

NUMBER, OFFICES, A D DEPOSITS
N

B ranch es c h a n g in g class as re s u lt of s u c c e s s io n n e t ........................................................................................
Branch es o f ins u re d banks w ith d ra w in g fro m F. R.
S y s te m ................................................................................
B ranch es o f n o n in s u re d banks a d m itte d to
in s u ra n c e ...........................................................................
B ranch es tra n s fe rre d th ro u g h sale or as re s u lt of
a b s o rp tio n .........................................................................

59
4
52
0

1
21

+75

+4

+1

4

1

Other changes in cla ssifica tion .....................................

65
7
65
2

+1

+ 13
+3

+3

+1

+3
+ 13

+3

-3

-1 6

+1

- 1

Changes not involving num ber in any class:
Branch es tra n s fe rre d as re s u lt o f abso rption or
s u c c e s s io n .........................................................................
Changes in title , location or nam e of lo c a tio n ..........
Changes in o p e ra tin g pow ers o f b ra n c h e s ................

47
281

45
281

41
274

41
274

6

6

6

6

27
153

ALL BA N K IN G OFFICES

2 ,7 7
9 2
2 ,3 9
8 6

2 ,0 2
9 7
2 ,7 8
7 0

Net change during ye a r............................

+1,358
1 5
,5 4

Offices opened.
B a n k s .............
B ra n c h e s .......

Offices closed.
B a n k s ............
B ra n c h e s ....

Changes in classification:
A m ong b a n k s ....................
A m ong b ra n c h e s ............

65
5

2 ,5 6
8 4
2 ,2 4
7 3

2 ,1 6
8 9
2 ,8 6
6 7

1 ,9 4
2 5
1 ,0 9
2 4

4 5
,7 9
4 9
,6 2

1 ,4 3
0 8
1 ,1 5
0 3

+1,364

+1,312

+1,320

+905

+67

+348

13
,5 1

1 0
,5 3

1 8
,4 5

338
1,216

89
7

323
1,208

17
9

337
1,166

323
1,162

200

3
194

16
9

11
9

11
9

149
47

144
47

144
47

679

28
8
24
9

17
18

+24

+23

+114

-95

+20

+20

+26

-2 7

+4

+3

+88

86
7
82
3

+46

+44

5
1

4
6

5

+2

120

1

289

50

'46'

4

5

3

5

3

2
2

3
5
141
47

18
,1 1
1 3
,1 5

56
9

+4
+21

-1 7

-2 2

-1 9
-3

+1

+r

1

O BANKS
F

Number of offices, December 31, 1 9 6 4 6
N umber of offices, December 31, 1 96 3 67

- 1

’- i '

1Includes one trust company member of the Federal Reserve System.

Digitized for


159

2 Opened prior to 1964 but not included in the count as of December 31,1963.
3 One private bank incorporated, and one nondeposit trust company amended its charter and began deposit banking.
4 Information available only for insured banks not members of Federal Reserve System.
5 Absorbtion of nonbanking financial institutions by insured banks.
6 Includes a few seasonal offices of State banks members of the Federal Reserve System and insured State banks not members of the F.R.S. which were not in operation December 31,1964.
7 Figures differ from those published in the annual report for 1963 due to reclassification of the following branches previously tabulated as insured not members of the Federal Reserve Svstem ■ Pacific Islands 3
to national; Puerto Rico, 11 to national, and 4 to State members; Virgin Islands, 4 to State members.
’
8 Facilities established in or near military or other Federal Government installations at request of the Treasury Department or the commanding officer of the installation
9 Excludes opening and closing of seasonal offices (except those newly established in 1964).
FRASER 10 Closed prior to 1964 but included in count as of December 31, 1963.

Table 102. NUMBER OF BANKING OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), DECEMBER 31, 1964
G R O U P E D AC C O R D IN G T O INSURANCE S TATU S AND C L A S S O F BANK, AND BY S T A T E OR A R E A AND TY P E O F O FFICE
P e rce n ta g e in s u r e d 1

M u tu a l s a v in g s b a n k s

N o n in s u re d

In s u re d
S ta te a n d ty p e o f b a n k o r o ffic e
In ­
s u re d

T o ta l

Non­
in s u re d

M em b e rs F. R.
Sys1tem

T otal
T otal

S tate

Not
m em ­
bers
F. R.
Sys­
te m

N on­
B a nks
d e p o s it
of
tru s t
de­
com ­
p o s it 2
p a n ie s 3

In ­
s u re d

T o ta l

Non­
in s u re d

74.2

67
126

98.3
9 8 .0
9 9 .4
99.6

64.6
58.1
7 2 .0
81.3

876

303

98.1

99.0

74.3

327
155
172
549

112
66

178

97.1
9 7 .0
9 7 .5
98.9

98.0
9 8 .0
9 9 .5
99.8

64.8
5 8 .0
7 2 .3
81.5

85.4

86.4

5
15

327
155
172
549

264

62

1,179

228
213
15
36

47

505
267
238
674

28,196

12,954

4,759

10,483

288

13,775
1 0 ,7 3 2
3 ,0 4 3
14,771

13,493
1 0 ,4 7 3
3 ,0 2 0
14,703

4,773
3 ,4 8 1
1 ,2 9 2
8,181

1,451
1 ,0 0 6
445
3,308

7,269
5 ,9 8 6
1 ,2 8 3
3,214

235
217
18
53

50 States and D. C.—all offices

29,549

28,920

629

28,370

28,044

12,937

4,751

10,356

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................
Banks operating branches...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

14,265
1 0 ,9 9 4
3 ,2 7 1
15,284

13,812
1 0 ,6 2 7
3 ,1 8 5
15,108

453
367

176

13,760
1 0 ,7 2 7
3 ,0 3 3
14,610

13,485
1 0 ,4 7 2
3 ,0 1 3
14,559

4,772
3 ,4 8 1
1 ,291
8,165

1,451
1 ,0 0 6
445
3,300

7,262
5 ,9 8 5
1 ,2 7 7
3,094

.......

178

152

26

176

152

17

8

127

24

2

2

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks
Banks operating branches
B r a n c h e s ...............

16

8

8

15

8

1

7

1

1

11

7
144

A
18

16

8

120

3
17

1

161

7
144

1

162

1

1

Other areas—all offices

1

86

4

5
10

1

7

1
6

1

42
5
15

4

112

125

50.0

53.3

20.0

20.0

6 3 .6
88.9

7 0 .0
89.4

100.0

CORPORATION

28,546

461
371
90
194

State
394

394

394

394

192

31

171

100.0

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks
Banks operating branches
B r a n c h e s .....................................

252
213
39
142

252
213
39
142

252
213
39
142

252
213
39
142

80
55
25
112

23
19

149
139

100.0

Alaska—all o f f i c e s ................

64

62

2

63

61

48

13

2

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................
Banks operating branches...........
B ra n c h e s
.................................

13
5

11
3

2

2

12

10

5

5

2

51

51

51

51

5
43

3
8

Arizona—all offices...................

263

254

9

263

254

176

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks
..
Banks operating branches
B ra n c h e s
....................

16

15

1

16

15

1

247

9
239

Alabama—all offices




8

6
10

8

6

8

4
8

6
10
247

2
8

4
8

100.0

1
1

1

2

18

60

9

1

4

1

10

1

9

3
172

239

100.0

96.9

96.8

100.0

1

84.6
6 0 .0

83.3
5 0 .0

100.0

17

50

1

100.0

100.0

100.0

6

1

100.0
100.0

1

22

5
5

100.0

100.0
100.0

10

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

8

100.0

100.0

INSURANCE

99.0

97.1
9 7 .0
9 7 .4
98.8

876

506
267
239
675

655

13,820
1 0 ,6 2 8
3 ,1 9 2
15,252

DEPOSIT

98.0

179

1,181

47

29,072

14,281
1 0 ,9 9 9
3 ,2 8 2
15,446

42

Com ­
m e rcia l M utu al
b an ks savings
banks
of
d e p o s it

305

62

29,727

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................
Banks operating branches ...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

United States—all offices

All
b a n ks
of
de­
p o s it

FEDERAL

N a­
tio n a l

16
0

C o m m e rc ia l and s to c k sav in g s b a n ks
and n o n d e p o s it t r u s t c o m p a n ie s

All b a n k s

100.0

Arkansas—all offices...............

335

331

4

335

331

112

186

3

1

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................

241
187

4

99.1

99.1

245
191

3
3

1
1

54

54

63
39
24
49

158

4

245
191

98.8
9 8 .4
1 0 0 .0
100.0

98.8
9 8 .4
1 0 0 .0
100.0

11

100.0

100.0

6

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

100.0
1 0 0 .0

B r a n c h e s .....................................

90

90

90

241
187
54
90

California—all offices...............

2,478

2,467

11

2,478

2,467

1,777

424

266

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................
Banks operating branches ...........
B r a n c h e s ...............................

200
109
91
2,278

194
105
89
2,273

6
4

2
5

200
109
91
2,278

194
105
89
2,273

90
58
32
1,687

16
3
13
408

88
44
44
178

Colorado—all offices................

254

215

39

254

215

120

18

77

39

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................

84.6

84.6

207
200
7
8

39
39

246
239
7
8

207
200
7
8

115
111
4
5

17
16

75
73
2
2

39
39

B r a n c h e s .....................................

246
2 39
7
8

84.1
8 3 .7
1 0 0 .0
100.0

84.1
8 3 .7
1 0 0 .0
100.0

Connecticut—all offices...........

520

515

5

352

347

180

84

4

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................

1

168

168

99.2

98.9

100.0

132
57
75
383

5

66
28
38
286

61
23
38
286

27
12
15
153

27
11
16
57

4
4

1
1

71

34

B r a n c h e s .....................................

137
62
75
383

37
97

71
34
37
97

97.1
9 3 .4
1 0 0 .0

10 0.0

93.8
8 5 .2
1 0 0 .0
100.0

100.0
100.0

Delaware—all offices................

92

92

84

84

8

43

8

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks. .
.................
Banks operating branches...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

22
12
10
70

8

100.0

22
12
10
70

100.0

20
12
8
64

100.0

20
12
8
64

5

13
8

10 0 .0

30

100.0
100.0

10 0.0

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

1 0 0.0

1
3

D. C.—all offices........................

99

99

99

99

54

11

100.0

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ...........................
Banks operating branches...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

15
2
13
84

15

15
2
13
84

8
2
6
46

3

10 0.0

13
84

15
2
13
84

100.0

100.0
100.0

10 0.0

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

Florida—all offices....................

441

438

3

441

438

199

230

1

424

2

99.5

3
3

424
408
16
17

421
405
16
17

187
176
11
12

99.5

225
220

2
2

1
1

9 9 .5

16
17

421
405
16
17

99.5
100.0

10 0 .0

99.5
9 9 .5
1 0 0 .0
100.0

Georgia—all offices..................

600

550

50

600

550

162

340

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................
Banks operating branches ...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

50

431
3 73
58
169

381
323
58
169

50
50

431
373
58
169

91.7

91.7

381
323
58
169

55
31

50
50

107

310
283
27
30

88.6
8 6 .6
1 0 0 .0
100.0

88.6
8 6 .6
1 0 0 .0
100.0

127

121

6

127

121

43

78

6

12

7

5

12

7

100.0

100.0

2

5

5

100.0

100.0

1
1

1 0 0 .0

100 0

8

115

7
114

4

1
1

8
115

7

114

2
41

2

3
8

5

j
73

4

2

2
6

2
6

10 0.0

100.0

10 0.0

100.0

10 0.0
10 0.0

100.0

10 0.0

161




4

4

1

2
5

O BANKS
F

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks .............................
Banks operating branches...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

24

1

4

DEPOSITS

Hawaii—all offices..................

408

4

28

NUMBER, OFFICES, A D
N

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................
Banks operating branches ...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

,5

54

134
24

TABLE 102. NUMBER OF BANKING OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
DECEMBER 31, 1964— CONTINUED
162

G R O U PE D AC CO R D IN G TO INSURANCE STATU S AND C LA SS O F BANK, AND BY S T A T E OR A R E A AND TY P E O F O FFICE
C o m m e rc ia l and s to c k s a v in g s b a n k s
and n o n d e p o s it t r u s t c o m p a n ie s

A ll b a n k s

In su re d

Non­
in s u re d

M e m b e rs F. R.
System

T otal
Total

N a­
tio n a l

Unit banks ..................
Banks operating branches

144

144

100

26

18

100.0

24

24

24

9

6
3
3

9
5

100.0

4

12
12

12
12

12
12

91

20

415

115

499

3

6

6

1,030
1 ,0 2 6

115
115

499
499

3
3

3
3

876

871

5

872

867

371

145

351

4

1

435
274
161
441

430
269
161
441

5
5

431
270
161
441

426
265
161
441

124
63
61
247

94
69
25
51

208
133
75
143

Iowa— all o ffic e s ...........
B a n ks...........................

Unit banks .................
Banks operating branches

896

880

16

896

880

124

81

675
502
173
221

659
486
173
221

16
16

675
502
173
221

659

101
80

173
221

21

23

64
49
15
17

B ra n ch e s.....................
Kansas— a ll o ffic e s ......
B a n ks...........................

644

643

1

644

643

196

Unit banks .................
Banks operating branches

594
546
48
50

593
545
48
50

594

593
545

169

144

B ra nch e s.....................

50

Kentucky— a ll offices
B a n ks ...........................

Unit banks ...................
Banks operating branches

B ra nch e s.....................




99.7

3

1,020

1

1

1,024

1,020
4

410

4

5

4
5

5

546
48
50

486

48

99.7

10 0 .0

9

9 9 .7

5

406
4

100.0

100.0
100.0

99.7
100.0

1 0 0.0

4

1

4

1

675

15

494
357
137
181

15
15

1

49

398

25
27

42
35
7
1

382
366
16
16

4

4

4

4

4

4

99.5

1 0 0 .0

99.7
100.0

10 0.0

99.5

99 .1

100.0

9 9 .1 100.0

9 8 .5
1 0 0 .0
100.0

9 8 .5
1 0 0 .0
100.0

1

98.3

98.3

1

97.8
9 7 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

97.8
9 7 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

1

99.8

99.8

1

99.8
9 9 .8
1 0 0 .0
100.0

99.8
9 9 .8
1 0 0 .0
100.0

1

9 9 .7

561

555

6

561

555

190

49

316

6

98.9

98.9

348
252
96
213

342
246
96
213

6
6

348
252
96
213

342
246
96
213

82
43
39
108

14
7
7
35

246
196
50
70

6
6

98.3
9 7 .6
1 0 0 .0
100.0

98.3
9 7 .6
1 0 0 .0
100.0

100.0

CORPORATION

120

1,029

1,024

100.0

INSURANCE

120

1,030
1 ,0 2 6
4
5

Com ­
m e rcia l M u tu a l
b a n ks savings
of
ba n ks
d e p o s it

100.0
100.0

1,035

120

1,029

B ra nch e s.....................

12
12

4
5

6

120

Unit banks ..................
Banks operating branches

All
b an ks
of
de­
p o s it

144

1,035

Indiana— all offices. .. .
B anks...........................

N on­
in s u re d

24

B ra nch e s.....................

B ra nch e s.....................

In ­
su re d

T o ta l

144

Illin o is — a ll o ffic e s .......
B a n ks...........................

Unit banks ..................
Banks operating branches

Non­
B a nks
d e p o s it
of
tr u s t
de­
com ­
p o s it 2
p a n ie s 3

DEPOSIT

Idaho— a ll o ffic e s .........
B a n ks ...........................

S tate

Not
m em ­
bers
F. R.
S ys­
te m

FEDERAL

In ­
s u re d

P e rce n ta g e in s u r e d 1

N o n in s u re d

S ta te a n d ty p e o f b a n k o r o ffic e
T o ta l

M u tu a l sav in g s b a n k s

L o u is ia n a -a ll o ffic e s ...............
B a n ks........................................
Unit banks ..............................
Banks operating branches...........

B ra nch e s..................................
M aine— a ll o ffic e s ......................
B a n ks........................................
Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches...........

B ra nch e s..................................

Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches...........

B ra nch e s..................................
M assachusetts— a ll o ffic e s ....
B a n ks ........................................

Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches...........

B ra nch e s4................................
M ichigan— a ll o ffic e s ................
B a n ks ........................................

Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches...........

B ra nch e s..................................

Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches .........

B ra nch e s..................................

Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches...........

B ra nch e s ............................

M isso u ri— a ll o ffic e s .................
B anks...................................... .
Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches.........

B ra nch e s..................................

M ontana— a ll o ffic e s .................
B a n ks........................................
B ra nch e s..................................




444

176

233

1

209
126
83
236

208
125

151
105
46
82

1
1

236

47
17
30
129

253

232

21

209

194

87

51

15

78
39
39
175

44

66
31
35
166

12
8
4
9

46
13
33
163

38

40
11
29
154

22
8
H
65

12
1
11
39

6
2
4
9

32
26
6
12

26
20
6
12

533

526

7

491

484

227

198

7

127
63
64
406

126
63
63
400

42

42

1

120
62
58
364

49
23
26
178

64
38
26
134

1

1
6

121
62
59
370

1
6

6
1
5
36

6
1
5
36

1,015

712

303

685

678

398

143

137

5

2

338
160
178
677

330

34

162
51
111
550

176
109
67
127

159
53
106
526

154
49
105
524

93
33
60
305

17

4
4

1

17
126

44
16
28
93

1

1
1

179
107
72
151

8
2
6
26

1,166

1,162

1,166

1,162

452

433

277

361
193
168
805

3

1

359
192
167
803

4
2
1
1
2

361
193
168
805

359
192
167
803

96
43
53
356

99.7

126
69
57
307

137
80
57
140

1

1
1

99.7

99.7

100.0

100.0

1
2

9 9 .4
99.8

9 9 .4
99.8

730

724

6

729

723

199

28

496

6

1

1

721
716
5
9

715
710
5
9

6
6

720
715
5
9

714
709
5
9

99.2

193
191
2
6

28

99.2

493
490

6
6

1
1

1
1

99.2
9 9 .2

99.2
9 9 .2

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

387

385

2

387

385

75

281

2

196
108
88
191

194
106
88
191

2
2

196
108
88
191

194
106
88
191

31
8
23
44

99.5

156
96
60
125

99.5

2
2

99.0
9 8 .1
100.0

699

688

11

699

688

108

483

643
587
56
56

632
576
56
56

11
11

8

3

643
587
56
56

632
576
56
56

91
74
17
17

457
431
26
26

8
8

3
3

132

131

1

132

131

50

36

1

129
126
3
3

128
125
3
3

1
1

129
126
3
3

128
125
3
3

48
46
2
2

36
36

1
1

83

99.8
99.5
9 9 .2

100.0

100.0

3

99.5
9 9 .2

100.0

100.0

6

91.7

92.8

86.4

6
6

84.6
9 7 .5
8 9 .7
94.9

87.0

81.3
7 6 .9
100.0

98.7

8^.6
8 7 .9
94.5

98.6

100.0

100.0
100.0

99.2

99.2

100.0

10 0.0

9 8 .4
98.5

9 8 .3
98.4

296

70.3

99.0

10.3

171
105
66
125

48.1
3 1 .9
6 2 .7
81.4

97.5
9 2 .5

4.5
1 .9
8 .3
17.2

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0
100.0

100.0

99.7

99.0
9 8 .1
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100. 0

100.0

100.0

163

Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches ...........

445

1
1

O BANKS
F

M ississip p i— a ll o ffic e s ............
B a n ks........................................

1

208
125
83
236

DEPOSITS

M innesota— a ll o ffic e s .............
B a n ks ........................................

444

209
126
83
236

NUMBER, OFFICES, A D
N

M aryland— a ll o ffic e s ...............
Banks. .....................................

445

14
6

TABLE 102. NUMBER OF BANKING OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
DECEMBER 31, 1964— CONTINUED
G R O U P E D AC CO R D IN G TO INSURANCE S TATU S AND C L A S S O F BANK, AND BY S T A T E OR AR E A AND TY P E O F O FFICE
C o m m e rc ia l and s to c k s aving s b a n k s
and n o n d e p o s it t r u s t c o m p a n ie s

All b a n k s

In su re d

Non­
in s u re d

M e m b e rs F. R.
S ystem

T otal
T otal

N a­
tio n a l

B a n k s ......................................
Unit banks .........................
Banks operating branches......
B ra n c h e s ...............................

B a n k s ......................................
Unit banks .........................
Banks operating branches......
B r a n c h e s ...............................

New Hampshire—all offices

New Jersey—all offices.........
B a n k s ......................................
Unit banks .........................
Banks operating branches......
B r a n c h e s ...............................

New Mexico— all o ffic e s ....
B a n k s ......................................
Unit banks ..........................
Banks operating branches......
B r a n c h e s ...............................

New York—all offices..........
B a n k s ......................................
Unit banks .........................
Banks operating branches......
B r a n c h e s 4. . .........................




100.0

100.0

1

9

100.0

100.0

66
8

66
8

35
3

21
3

10
2

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

58

58

32

3
18

8

1 0 0.0

10 0.0

93
73
55
18
20

90
70
52
18
20

68
50

1
1

863
236
85
151
627

860
233
82
151
627

541
146
52
94
395

212
48
13
35
164

107
39
17

147
63
27
36
84

147
63
27
36
84

80
33
16
17
47

14
8

6

53
22
7
15
31

2,166
354
182
172
1,812

2,133
326
158
168
1,807

962
203
no
93
759

1,042
86
30
56
956

129
37
18
19
92

66
8

66
8

58

58

131
105
81
24
26

128
102
78

911
257
95
162
654

908
254
92
162
654

147
63
27
36
84

147
63
27
36
84

2,515
479

2,482
451

253
2,036

5
5
5

25
27

25
27

2
6

24

2
6

3
3
3

26

202

2 49
2,031

C om ­
m e rcia l M u tu a l
b an ks savings
of
b anks
d e p o s it

14
13

454
427

2
6

1
1

All
b a n ks
of
de­
p o sit

142
125
109
16
17

459
432
407
25
27

402

N o n­
in s u re d

3
3

33
28

24
4
5

402

2
6

1

34

12
1

1

16
18

298
289
281

8

1

4

1
1

21
19
17

100.0
100.0
3
3
3

38
32
26

6

38
32
26

6

9 7 .7
97 .1
9 6 .3

100.0

99.8
99.8
9 9 .8

100.0
100.0
96.8
95.9
9 4 .5

100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

6

68

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0

27

100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0

22

6
48
21

100.0
100.0

3
3
3

48
21

27

2

4
4

99.8
99.8
9 9 .8

4
4

100.0

98.9
95.1

98.7
93.4
8 9 .3
9 7 .7
99.7

10
11

10
11

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

28
23
19

4
5

5
5
5

349
125

349
125

44

44

91.4

81
224

81
224

9 8 .4
99.8

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0

100.0

CORPORATION

B a n k s ......................................
Unit banks .........................
Banks operating branches ......
B r a n c h e s ...............................

454
427

In ­
s u re d

T otal

INSURANCE

Nevada—all offices.............

459
432
407
25
27

N on­
Banks
d e p o s it
of
tru s t
de­
com ­
p o s it 2
p a n ie s 3

DEPOSIT

Nebraska—all offices.........

S tate

Not
m em ­
b e rs
F. R.
S ys­
te m

FEDERAL

In ­
s u re d

P e rce n ta g e in s u r e d 1

N o n in s u re d

S ta te a n d ty p e o f b a n k o r o ffic e
T o ta l

M u tu a l saving s b a n ks

North Carolina—ail o ffic e s ....

868

864

4

868

864

151
67

151
67

713

3

152
67
85
716

31

Banks operating branches...........
B ra n c h e s .....................................

152
67
85
116

1

286

B a n k s ............................................

713

North Dakota—all offices........

207

203

4

207

203

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................
Banks operating branches...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

163
130
33
44

159
126
33
44

4
4

163
130
33
44

159
126
33
44

7

Ohio—all offices.........................

1,422

1,421

1

1,418

1,417

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ..............................
Banks operatinq branches...........
B ra n c h e s ......................................

549
3 22
227
873

548
321
227
873

1
1

547
321
226
871

546
3 20
2 26
871

Oklahoma—all offices..............

453

452

1

453

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks...............................
Banks operating branches...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

417
383
34
36

416
382
34
36

1
1

Oregon—all offices....................

301

299

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches...........
B r a n c h e s 4 ...................................

52
27
25
249

Pennsylvania—all offices........
B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches...........
B r a n c h e s 4 ....................................

98
4

480

4

1

94

116
57
59
364

48

5

41
35
6

3
2
\

99.5

99.5
99.3
100.0

9 8 .8
99.6

150

4

98.1

98.1

4

97.5
9 6 .9

97.5
9 6 .9

2

115
89
26
35

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

687

417

313

221
103
118
466

130
82
48
287

195
135
60
118

452

251

26

175

1

417
383
34
36

416
382
34
36

111
195
27
29

24
22
2

1

100.0

1

100.0
100.0

100.0

2

170
165
5
5

100.0

100.0

2

300

298

211

14

73

1

50
25
25
249

2

51
26
25
249

49

11
5

200

11

35
16
19
38

1

25
249

3
2
1

1,804

1,791

13

1,739

1,726

1,119

353

10

3

65

65

588
361
227
1,203

10

254

598
369
229
1,206

99.4

100.0

591
367
224
1,148

581
3 59
2 22
1,145

387

8
2
3

146
93
53
207

7
5
2
3

3
3

732

48
24
24
206

7
2
5
58

7
2
5
58

9 8 .6
9 9 .1
99.8

98.8
9 8 .6
9 9 .1
99.7

100.0
100.0
100.0

Rhode Island—all offices........

167

158

9

122

113

57

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches ...........
B r a n c h e s .....................................

10

30

8

9

45

45

15

2

26

17

1

94.6

4

2

92.6

100.0

3

7

7

88 .2

80.0

100.0

17
150

15
143

2
7

10

112

8
105

4
53

1
25

3
27

2
7

7
38

7
38

100.0

95.3

8 0 .0
93.8

South Carolina—all offices__

375

371

4

375

371

189

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches...........
B ra n c h e s ......................................

9

173

133
75
58
242

4

129
71
58
242

4
4

133
75
58
242

98.9

129
71
58
242

25
5
20
164

98.9

5
3
2

4

99
63
36
74

245

244

1

245

244

67

27

150

1

173

172
139
33
72

173

172
139
33
72

33
28

25
23
2
1

114
88
26
36

1

South Dakota—all offices




140
33
72

1
1

140
33
72

24

22
255

6

242
145

5

34

4

1

4

1

4

99.9

99.9

100.0

2

2

1

1
1

1
1

99.8
9 9 .7
100.0

99.8
9 9 .7
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0

2

1

2

100.0

4

1

1
1

1

99.7

1

99.7

1

1

1

98.0
9 6 .2
100.0

98.0
9 6 .0
100.0

100.0

1

100.0

97.0
9 4 .7

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
1

100.0
1 0 0 .0

97.0
9 4 .7

100.0

4

100.0
100.0

99.4

99.4
9 9 .3

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

165

B a n k s ............................................
Unit banks ...............................
Banks operating branches...........
B ra n c h e s ......................................

2

84

O BANKS
F

9 8 .8
99.6

1

DEPOSITS

1
3

84

j

NUMBER, OFFICES, A D
N

99.3
10 0.0

9

TABLE 102. NUMBER OF BANKING OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
DECEMBER 31, 1964— CONTINUED
166

G R O U P E D A C CO R D IN G TO INSURANCE S TATU S AND CLA SS O F BANK, AND BY STA T E OR A R E A AND TY P E O F O FFICE
C o m m e rc ia l and s to c k s aving s b a n k s
and n o n d e p o s it t r u s t c o m p a n ie s

A ll b a n k s

In s u re d

N on­
in s u re d

M e m b e rs F. R.
S ystem

Total
T otal

N a­
tio n a l

S ta te

N ot
m em ­
b e rs
F. R.
Sys­
te m

Non­
B a nks
d e p o s it
of
tr u s t
de­
com ­
p o s it 2
p a n ie s 3

In ­
su re d

T otal

N on­
in s u re d

All
b a n ks
of
de­
p o sit

Com ­
m e rcia l M u tu a l
ba n ks savings
ban ks
of
d e p o s it

99.5

99.5

99.0
9 8 .5
1 0 0 .0
100.0

99.0
9 8 .5
1 0 0 .0
100.0

15

98.7

98.7

15
15

98.7
9 8 .6
100.0

98.7
9 8 .6
1 0 0 .0
100.0

99.4

99.4

98.2
9 7 .1
1 0 0 .0
100.0

98.2
9 7 .1
1 0 0 .0
100.0

8

100.0

100.0

100.0

6
4
2
2

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

585

4

589

585

257

294

4
4

294
200

290
196

295

290
196
94
295

295

295

75
33
42
182

23

207
160
47
90

1,180

1,165

15

1,180

1,165

558

80

527

B a n k s ................................
Unit banks ...................
Banks operating branches.
B r a n c h e s .........................

1.130
1,07.9
51
50

1,115
1 ,0 6 4
51
50

15
15

1,130
1 ,0 7 9
51
50

1,115
1 ,0 6 4
51
50

539
519
20
19

75
70

5

501
475
26
26

Utah—all offices.............

158

157

1

158

157

68

40

49

1

B a n k s ................................
Unit banks ...................
Banks operating branches.
B r a n c h e s .........................

55
35

1

55
S3
20
103

54
20
103

12
8
4
56

13
6
7
27

29
20
9
20

1

103

54
34
20
103

Vermont—all o ffic e s .. . .

106

105

1

98

97

54

43

1

8

B a n k s ................................
Unit banks ...................
Banks operating branches.
B r a n c h e s .........................

55

1
i

49
30
19
49

48
29
19
49

28
18
10
26

20
U
9
23

1

21
51

54
33
21
51

6
4
2
2

Virginia—all offices.......

763

763

763

763

409

148

B a n k s ................................
Unit banks ...................
Banks operating branches.
B r a n c h e s .........................

277
151
126

277
151
126
486

277
151
126
486

111
151
126
486

123
60
63
286

61
39
22
87

Washington—all offices.

494

493

1

475

474

357

36

81

1

19

19

99.8

99.8

100.0

B a n k s ................................
Unit banks .....................
Banks operating branches. .
B ra n c h e s 4.......................

101

100
62
38
393

1

97
62
35
378

96
61
35
378

28
14
14
329

10

58
42
16
23

1

4

1

1

4
1
3
15

99.0
9 8 .4
1 0 0 .0
100.0

99.0
9 8 .4
1 0 0 .0
100.0

100.0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100.0

B a n k s ...............................
Unit banks .................
Banks operating branches.
B r a n c h e s . .....................

20

3
4

63
393

I

1

94

94

5
26

297

3
3
3

1
1
1

10 0 .0

1

1

2QS
93
52
41
113

3
15

CORPORATION




H

31
8
3

INSURANCE

Texas—
-all offices.......

200

DEPOSIT

589

Tennessee—all offices.

FEDERAL

In ­
s u re d

P e rce n ta g e in s u r e d 1

N o n in s u re d

S ta te a n d ty p e o f b a n k o r o ffic e
T o ta l

M u tu a l s aving s b a n k s

West Virginia—all offices.

184

183

184

183

99.5

B a n k s ....................................
Unit banks ........................
Banks operating branches
B r a n c h e s .............................

184

183
183

184
184

99.5

18 4

183
183

99.5
9 9 .5

99.5
9 9 .5

Wisconsin—all o ffices...

752

748

748

745

134

543

99.7

582
476
106
170

578

99.9

B a n k s ................................
Unit banks ...................
Banks operating branches.
B r a n c h e s .........................

578
472
106
170

75.0

575
469
106
170

109
96
13
25

410
323
87
133

99.7
9 9 .6

99.8
9 9 .8

75.0
7 5 .0

106
170

Wyoming—all offices__

16

B a n k s ................................
Unit banks ...................
Banks operating branches.
B r a n c h e s .........................

16
16

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0

100.0

Pacific Islands—all offices5.

30.8

30.8

B a n k s ........................................
Unit banks 6..........................
Banks operating branches........
B r a n c h e s 7...............................

33.3

33.3

Other areas

Panama Canal Zone—
all offices......................

Puerto Rico—all offices.
B a n k s ................................
Unit banks .....................
Banks operating branches..
B r a n c h e s 9.......................

151
11

141
7

3

1

140

6
134

8

151
11

141

126

93.4

93.4

7

7
6
119

63.6
3 3 .3
7 5 .0
95.7

63.6
3 3 .3
7 5 .0
95.7

3

1

8

1

Virgin Islands—all offices.

12

10

7

B a n k s ....................................
Unit banks ........................
Banks operating branches....
B r a n c h e s 10..........................

4

58.3

3

70.0

1

25.0

33.3

3 3 .3
75.0

5 0 .0
85.7

/

3

1




167

1 Nondeposit trust companies are excluded in computing these percentages.
2 Includes 10 noninsured branches of insured banks; 8 branches in the Pacific Islands and 2 in the Panama Canal Zone.
3 Includes one trust company in Massachusetts member of the F.R. System operating one branch.
4 Includes the following branches of banks located in other States or in Puerto Rico: 1 noninsured branch in Massachusetts and 1 in Pennsylvania of a noninsured bank in New York; 5 insured branches in New
York of 2 insured banks in Puerto Rico not members of the F. R. System; 1 insured branch in Pennsylvania of a national bank in New Jersey; 1 insured branch in Oregon and 2 in Washington of a national bank in
California.
5 United States possessions (American Samoa, Guam, Midway Islands, and Wake Island); Trust Territories (Kwajalein, Palau Islands, Ponape Island, Saipan, and Truk Atoll).
6 American Samoa.
7 Consists of the following branches of a national bank in California: 1 noninsured in Caroline Islands, Truk Atoll (Moen Island) and 4 in the Mariana Islands (3 insured on Guam and 1 noninsured on Saipan);
also 7 branches of an insured bank in Hawaii, not a member of the F. R. System, consisting of 1 insured branch on Guam and 6 noninsured branches; 2 in Caroline Islands, Palau Islands (Koror) and Ponape Island
(Kolonia); 2 in Marshall Islands, Kwajalein Atoll: 1 in Midway Islands, Sand Island; and 1 on Wake Island.
8 One noninsured branch of a national bank in New York, and 1 noninsured branch of an insured bank in New York a member of the F. R. System.
9 Includes 4 insured branches of an insured bank in New York a member of the F. R System, and 11 branches of a national bank in New York.
.
1 Includes 4 insured branches of a national bank in New York.
0
Back figures: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 118-125, and earlier reports.

O BANKS
F

140

6
134

DEPOSITS

B a n k s ................................
Unit banks .....................
Banks operating branches.
B r a n c h e s 8.......................

NUMBER, OFFICES, A D
N

100.0

100.0
100.0

Table 103. NUMBER AND DEPOSITS OF ALL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), DECEMBER 31, 1964
BA N K S G R O U P E D ACCO RDIN G TO INSURANCE S TA T U S AND BY DISTRICT AND S TA T E

C o m m e rc ia l a n d s to c k savings
b a n k s a n d n o n d e p o s it
t r u s t c o m p a n ie s
FDIC D is tric t a n d S tate

M u tu a l sa vin g s b a n ks

All
banks

N on­
B a n k s d e p o s it
o f d e ­ tru s t
p o s it 1 c o m ­
panies

T o ta l

In ­
s u re d

N on­
in ­
sured

T o ta l

In s u re d

N on­
in s u re d ;

T o ta l

In s u re d

N on­
in s u re d

235

47

506

327

179

357,565,487

308,426,952

306,230,277

2,196,675

49,138,535

42.751.099

6,387,436

13,760

13,485

228

47

505

327

178

356,284,149

307,146,040

305,088,805

2,057,235

49,138,109

42.751.099

6,387,010

O ther a re a s ...........................

16

15

8

7

1

1,281,338

1,280,912

1,141,472

139,440

426

FDIC D istrict
1 ................................
2 3...............................
3 ................................
4 ................................
5 ................................
6 ................................
7 ................................
8 ................................
9 ................................
1 0 ..............................
1 1 ..............................
1 2 4............................

730
773
1,147
888
1,303
1,530
1,378
1,705
1,186
1,757
1,418
466

403
624
1,138
882
1,303
1,530
1,370
1,705
1,185
1,757
1,418
460

381
587
1,127
875
1,248
1,505
1,360
1,683
1,173
1,711
1,401
442

19
29
8
7
54
20
6
18
11
41
16
6

26,410,208
102,113,199
35,847,903
17,788,339
15,588,940
17,818,952
24,983,625
27,808,813
9,064,474
12,080,068
23,486,292
44,574,674

12,766,049
71,480,545
32,846,915
17,111,703
15,588,940
17,818,952
24,885,583
27,808,813
8,623,812
12,080,068
23,486,292
43,929,280

12,569,124
70,206,551
32,815,945
16,909,471
15,534,247
17,778,179
24,851,487
27,732,123
8,513,307
12,051,263
23,439,609
43,828,971

196,925
1,273,994
30,970
202,232
54,693
40,773
34,096
76,690
110,505
28,805
46,683
100,309

13,644,159
30,632,654
3,000,988
676,636

State
Alabam a.................................
A laska.....................................
A rizo n a ...................................
A rka nsa s................................
C alifornia...............................

252
13
16
245
200

252
12
16
245
200

252
10
15
241
194

2,843,218
324,392
1,979,697
1,878,606
33,665,460

2,843,218
313,008
1,979,697
1,878,606
33,665,460

2,843,218
308,056
1,970,220
1,875,172
33,665,460

4,952
9,477
3,434

C olorado.................................
C o n n e cticu t...........................
Delaware................................
D istrict of C olu m b ia ............
Florida.....................................

246
137
22
15
424

246
66
20
15
424

207
61
20
15
421

39
4

2,720,784
6,614,430
1,075,361
2,089,834
6,825,316

2,720,784
3,136,771
863,359
2,089,834
6,825,316

2,693,634
3,121,415
863,359
2,089,834
6,802,267

27,150
15,356

G eorgia...................................
H aw aii.....................................
Id a h o ......................................
Illin o is .....................................
In d ia n a ...................................

431
12
24
1,030
435

431
12
24
1,030
431

381
7
24
1,024
426

50

4,044,849
908,931
828,568
23,705,594
6,286,448

4,044,849
908,931
828,568
23,705,594
6,218,492

4,025,009
894,534
828,568
23,654,021

19,840
14,397

D istrict
D istrict
D istrict
D istrict
D istrict
D istrict
D istrict
D istrict
D istrict
D istrict
D istrict
D istrict




1

1
5
4
4
1
5
1
12

2
3

2

327
149
9
6

150
148
9
6

177
1

8

7

1

1

1

6

6

1

3
8
3

1

71
2

71
2

1
1
6
1

1

5
3
4

3
1

4

4

6 ,211,021

426
7,258,048
30,632,228
3,000,988
676,636

6,386,111
426

899

98,042

97,143

440,662

440,662

645'394

645'394

11,384

11,384

3,477,659

3,477,659

212,002

212,002

67,956

67,956

23,049

51,573
7,471

CORPORATION

13,493

14,265

INSURANCE

13,775

50 States and D. C..............

DEPOSIT

Total U nited S ta te s............. 14,281

FEDERAL

T o ta l

In ­
s u re d

C o m m e rc ia l a n d s to c k sav in g s
b a n k s a n d n o n d e p o s it
tr u s t c o m p a n ie s

M u tu a l saving s banks

N o n in s u re d

All
banks 1

1
68

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s o f d o lla rs )

N u m b e r o f b an ks

ooy
593
342
208
40

ID

M a r y la n d ...................................
M a s s a c h u s e tts ........................
M ic h ig a n ....................................
M in n e s o ta .................................
M is s is s ip p i................................

127
338
361
721
196

121
159
361
720
196

120
154
359
714
194

1
4
1
6
2

M is s o u ri.....................................
M o n ta n a .....................................
N e b ra s k a ...................................
N e v a d a .......................................
New H a m p s h ire .....................

643
129
432
8
105

643
129
432
8
73

632
128
427
8
70

8

N ew J e r s e y ...............................
N ew M e x ic o ..............................
New Y o r k 5.............................
N o rth C a ro lin a ........................
N o rth D a k o ta ...........................

257
63
479
152
163

236
63
354
152
163

233
63
326
151
159

23
1
4

O h io .............................................
O k la h o m a ..................................
O re g o n ........................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ...........................
R h ode I s la n d ...........................

549
417
52
598
17

547
417
51
591
10

546
416
49
581
8

1
7
2

S o u th C a ro lin a ........................
S o u th D a k o ta ..........................
T e n n e s s e e ................................
T e x a s ...........................................
U ta h .............................................

133
173
294
1,130
55

133
173
294
1,130
55

129
172
290
1,115
54

4
1
3
15
1

V e r m o n t.....................................
V irg in ia .......................................
W a s h in g to n ..............................
W est V ir g in ia ............................
W is c o n s in ........................
W y o m in g ....................................

55
277
101
184
582
68

49
277
97
184
578
68

48
277
96
183
575
68

1
1
1

7
1

4
2

i

1
6
1
6

1

6
8

1

1
1

26

6
179

3
1
4

3

32

32

3

21

21

5

125

125

2

2

1
7
7

1
7
7

1
1
1
3

1

1

2

6

6

4

4

4

3

1

4,055,246
14,518,282
12,690,169
6,058,921
1,875,557

3,378,610
6,631,478
12,690,169
5,618,259
1,875,557

3,220,500
6,530,629
12,664,477
5,610,809
1,863,753

158,110
100,849
25,692
7,450
11,804

8,010,594
1,038,694
2,181,793
655,847
528,351

7,992,466
1,038,694
2.181.311
655,847
517,892

18,128

10,459

783,517

783,517

9,451,170
917,787
59,957,255
4,079,183
980,408

9,450,711
917,787
58,783,849
4,048,808
877,964

459

1,882,731

1,882,731

1,173,406
30.375
102,444

28,537,495

28,537,495

14,344,934
3,481,349
2,756,899
21,502,969
1,900,671

171

25,117
813
9,397
830
30,931

11,333,901
917,787
88,494,750
4,079,183
980,408

1

4,078,102
3,155,028
3,193,664
3,920,090
769,056

8,010,594
1,038,694
2,181,793
655,847
1,311,868

6

4,103,219
3,155,841
3,203,061
3,920,920
799,987

14,316,031
3,481,349
2,692,102
18,530,884
1,155,932

14,314,219
3.480.989
2,681,803
18,501,726
1,116,602

1,812
360
10,299
29,158
39,330

28,903

28,903

64,797
2,972,085
744,739

64,797
2,972,085
744,739

1,336,010
986,451
4,726,691
16,667,888
1,280,360

32

4,103,219
3,155,841
3,203,061
3,920,920
1,373,939

1,336,010
986,451
4 726 691
16!667!888
1,280,360

1.332.312
985,840
4,716,877
16,631,512
1,279,087

3,698
611
9,814
36.376
1,273

691,018
4,581,281
4,082,066
1,646,785
6,007,008
540,301

513,530
4,581,281
3,512,853
1,646,785
5,976,922
540,301

513,530
4,581,281
3,482,776
1,636,736
5.975.989
540,301

45,458
26 693
1,146,511
62,676

45,458
26,693
1,146,511
62,250

1,048,929
59,703

573,952

525,070

48,882

676,636
7,886,804

676,636
1,549,575

6,337,229

440,662

440,662

482

177,488
30,077
10,049
933

177,488

569,213

569,213

30,086

29,187

899

Other area
P a cific Is la n d s 6......................
P a nam a C a nal Z o n e 7...........
P u e rto R ic o 8.............................
V irg in I s la n d s 9.........................

1

1

11
4

11
3

1

1

1

32,840

12,618
26,693
97,582
2,547

426

426

169

1 Includes 4 noninsured banks of deposit (2 in Iowa and 2 in Texas) for which data are not available.
2 Includes figures for 16 branches of foreign banks (tabulated as banks) licensed to do a deposit business in the State of New York. Data for these offices, which on December 31,1964 had deposits of $512,000 000
were not available for previous tabulations.
'
,
3 Includes Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.
4 Includes Alaska, Hawaii, Pacific Islands, and the Panama Canal Zone.
5 Includes deposit data for 5 insured branches operated by 2 insured banks in Puerto Rico. See also footnote 2.
6 In United States possessions (American Samoa, Guam, Midway Islands, and Wake Island) and Trust Territories (Kwajalein, Palau Islands, Ponape Island, Saipan, and Truk Atoll). Consists of deposit data for 1
noninsured bank in American Samoa and 5 branches of an insured bank in California, 1 noninsured in Caroline Islands, Truk Atoll (Moen Island) and 4 in the Mariana Islands (3 insured on Guam and 1 noninsured on
paipan)-Also, 7 branches of an insured bank in Hawaii, consisting of 1 insured branch on Guam and 6 noninsured branches: 2 in Caroline Islands, Palau Islands (Koror) and Ponape Island (Kolonia); 2 in Marshall
Islands, Kwajalein Atoll; 1 in Midway Islands, Sand Island; and 1 on Wake Island.
7 Consists of deposit data for 2 noninsured branches operated by 2 insured banks in New York.
8 Includes deposit data for 15 insured branches operated by 2 insured banks in New York.
9 Includes deposit data for 4 insured branches operated by an insured bank in New York.
Note: Data for the above branches are
figures for
FRASER figures: See the Annual Report fornot included in the and earlier the States in which the parent banks are located.
Back
1963, pp. 126-127,
reports.

Digitized for


O BANKS
F

D/3

594
348
209
46

DEPOSITS

D/3

594
348
209
78

NUMBER, OFFICES, A D
N

lUWd.............................................
K a n s a s .......................................
K e n tu c k y ...................................
L o u is ia n a ...................................
M a in e ..........................................

Table 104.
Table 105.

Table 109.

Table 111.
Table 112.




CORPORATION

Table 110.

INSURANCE

Table 108.

DEPOSIT

Table 107.

FEDERAL

Table 106.

Assets and liabilities of all banks in the United States (States and other
areas), June 30, 1964
Banks grouped according to insurance status and type of bank
Assets and liabilities of all banks in the United States (States and other
areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped according to insurance status and type of bank
Assets and liabilities of all banks in the United States (States and other
areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped by district and State
Assets and liabilities of all insured banks in the United States (States and
other areas), June and December call dates, 1961 through 1964
Assets and liabilities of insured commercial and insured mutual savings
banks in the United States (States and other areas), December and June
call dates, 1962 through 1964
Average assets and liabilities and assets and liabilities per $100 of total
assets of insured commercial banks in the United States (States and other
areas), 1964
By class of bank
Assets and liabilities and assets and liabilities per $100 of total assets of
insured commercial banks operating throughout 1964 in the United States
(States and other areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped according to amount of deposits
Average assets and liabilities of insured commercial banks in the United
States (States and other areas), by State, 1964
Distribution of insured commercial banks in the United States (States and
other areas), December 31, 1964
Banks grouped according to amount of deposits and by ratios of selected
items to assets

170

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF BANKS

LIABILITIES
O BANKS
F

Sources of data
National banks and State banks in the District of Columbia not
members of the Federal Reserve System: Office of the Comptroller
of the Currency.
State banks members of the Federal Reserve System: Board of
Governors of the Federal Reserve System.
Other insured banks: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.
Noninsured banks: State banking authorities; and reports from
individual banks.

AN
D




Instalment loans are ordinarily reported net if the instalment pay­
ments are applied directly to the reduction of the loan. Such loans
are reported gross if, under contract, the payments do not immedi­
ately reduce the unpaid balances of the loan but are assigned or
pledged to assure repayment at maturity.
Asset and liability data for noninsured banks are tabulated from
reports pertaining to the individual banks. In a few cases these
reports are not as detailed as those submitted by insured banks,
and some of the items reported have been allocated to more detailed
categories according to the distribution of asset and liability data
for insured State banks not members of the Federal Reserve System
or for other noninsured banks.
Additional data on assets and liabilities of all banks as of June
30, 1964, and December 31, 1964, are shown in the Corporation’s
semiannual publication, “ Assets, Liabilities, and Capital Accounts,
Commercial and Mutual Savings Banks,” Report of Call No. 6 8 , and
Report of Call No. 70. Data from Call No. 67, April 15, 1964, and
Call No. 69, October 1, 1964, were not tabulated for all insured
banks. Comparable tabulations for State and national banks were
not feasible because of a change in the form used for national
institutions.

ASSETS

Statements of assets and liabilities are submitted by insured com­
mercial banks upon either a cash or an accrual basis, depending
upon the bank’s method of bookkeeping. Assets reported represent
aggregate book value, on the date of call, less valuation and pre­
mium reserves.
Assets and liabilities held in or administered by a savings, bond,
insurance, real estate, foreign, or any other department of a bank,
except a trust department, are consolidated with the respective
assets and liabilities of the commercial department. “ Deposits of
individuals, partnerships, and corporations” include trust funds
deposited by a trust department in a commercial or savings de­
partment. Other assets held in trust are not included in statements
of assets and liabilities.
In the case of banks with one or more domestic branches, the
assets and liabilities reported are consolidations of figures for the
head office and all domestic branches. In the case of a bank with
foreign branches, net amounts due from its own foreign branches
are included in “ Other assets,” and net amounts due to its own
foreign branches are included in “ Other liabilities.” Branches out­
side the 50 States of insured banks in the United States are treated
as separate entities but as in the case of other branches are not
included in the count of banks. Data for such branches are not
included in the figures for the States in which the parent banks are
located.
Demand balances with and demand deposits due to banks in the
United States, except private banks and American branches of for­
eign banks, exclude reciprocal interbank deposits. Reciprocal inter­
bank deposits arise when two banks maintain deposit accounts with
each other.
Individual loan items are reported gross instead of net of valua­
tion reserves. Accordingly, reserves for losses on loans are shown
separately.

Table 104. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF ALL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), JUNE 30, 1964
B A N K S G R O U PE D AC C O R D IN G TO IN SU RA NCE S T ATU S A N D TY PE OF B A N K
(A m ounts in tho u sa n d s o f d o lla rs )

172

C o m m e rc ia l an d s to c k saving s b a n ks and
n o n d e p o s it tr u s t c o m p a n ie s

All b an ks

M u tu a l sa vin g s b a n ks

N o n in s u re d
A sse t, lia b ility , o r c a p ita l a c c o u n t ite m
Banks of
d e p o s it

N on­
d e p o s it
tru s t
com ­
p a n ie s 1

321,083,191

1,992,880

53,341,833

52,969,638

368,818
24,394
5,724
36,149

4,571,344
16,773,717
12,300,284
457,888
371,402
18,867,198

4,552,579
16,773,717
12,005,653
433,514
365,678
18,838,497

104,390,950

3,107,607

95,928,468

63,269,961
31,615,328

2,202,003
275,513

59,456,125
31,477,264

3,884,930
4,143,643
2,107,179

3,813,096
3,909,572
1,782,993

71,834
234,071
324,186

Loans and discounts, net—to ta l...........................................

203,992,013

198,530,566

V a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ...........................................................................

3,485,776

3,461,096

In s u re d

9,243,215

323,348,848

53,768,750

477,750

4,671,492
16,773,717
12,464,351
612,791
365,678
18,880,721

42,665

107,498,557
65,471,964
31,890,841

366,105,553

54,246,500

Cash ite m s in p ro ce ss o f c o lle c tio n .....................................

4,714,157
16,773,717
12,833,169
637,185
371,402
18,916,870

Securities—to ta l........................................................................
U. S. G ov’t o b lig a tio n s (in c l. g u a ra n te e d ) .........................
O b lig a tio n s o f S ta te s a n d s u b d iv is io n s ..............................
S e c u ritie s o f F ed era l a g e n c ie s a n d c o rp o ra tio n s ( n o t
g u a ra n te e d by U. S .) ...............................................................
O th e r b o n d s, no te s, a n d d e b e n tu r e s .................................
C o rp o ra te s to c k s ..........................................................................

D e m a n d b a la n ce s w ith b a n k s in U. S.................................
O th e r b a la n c e s w ith b a n k s in U. S .......................................

Real e s ta te lo a n s — t o t a l.............................................................
Secured by farm, land ..............................................................
Secured by residential properties:
Insured by F H A .................................................................
Insured or guaranteed by V A ................................................
Not insured or guaranteed by FHA or VA ..............................
Secured by other properties.......................................................
Loa ns to c o m m e rc ia l a n d fo re ig n b a n k s
Loa ns to o th e r fin a n c ia l in s t itu tio n s ....................................
Loa ns to b ro k e rs a n d d e a le rs in s e c u r itie s ......................
O th e r lo a n s fo r c a rry in g s e c u r itie s .......................................
Loa ns to fa rm e rs d ire c tly g u a ra n te e d by th e C o m ­
m o d ity C re d it C o rp o ra tio n
O th e r lo a n s to fa rm e rs (e xcl real e s ta te )
C o m m e rc ia l a n d in d u s tria l lo a n s ...........................................
O th e r lo a n s to in d iv id u a ls .........................................................
All o th e r lo a n s (in c lu d in g o v e r d r a f ts ) ..................................

Miscellaneous assets—to ta l..................................................

Bank
 p re m is e s , fu r n itu r e a n d fix tu re s , a n d re a l e s ta te .
A ll o th e r m
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ is c e lla n e o u s a s s e ts ...............................................
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

51,999,920

45,022,362

6,977,558

334,094

38,101

904,667

799,112

105,555

17,263

1,502

142,813

118,913

23,900

264,958
20,662
5,424
25,787

29,673
3,712
300
2,914

532,885
179,297

458,698
179,277

74,187
20

49,672

42,224

7,448

95,010,439

752,414

165,615

11,570,089

9,380,511

2,189,578

58,953,758
31,230,057

435,648
208,022

66,719
39,185

6,015,839
413,577

4,316,203
385,271

1,699,636
28,306

3,169,215
962,483
863,381

3,099,001
931,823
795,800

67,682
24,199
16,863

2,532
6,461
50,718

715,715
3,181,160
1,243,798

714,095
2,977,749
987,193

1,620
203,411
256,605

5,461,447

165,336,220

164,480,262

816,547

39,411

38,655,793

34,050,304

24,680

3,257,547

3,249,257

8,197

93

228,229

211,839

16,390

4,605,489

207,477,789

201,991,662

5,486,127

168,593,767

167,729,519

824,744

39,504

38,884,022

34,262,143

4,621,879

79,846,978
2 ,6 1 0 ,0 5 6

75,153,728
2 ,5 8 3 ,2 3 1

4,693,250
2 6 ,8 2 5

41,648,224
2 ,5 5 7 ,5 4 5

41,447,444
2 ,5 3 5 ,5 3 3

188,017
2 1 ,0 6 7

12,763
945

38,198,754
5 2,51 1

33,706,284
4 7 ,6 9 8

4,492,470
4 ,8 1 3

1 8 ,5 3 4 ,1 7 2
1 3 ,6 1 9 ,8 3 8
3 0 ,0 0 3 ,1 0 3
1 5 ,0 7 9 ,8 0 9
2,901,937
10,482,731
5,538,817
2,732,635

1 7 ,7 8 0 ,2 0 8
1 2 ,5 9 8 ,9 8 4
2 7 ,6 9 3 ,1 8 2
1 4 ,4 9 8 ,1 2 3
2,859,830
10,443,943
5,504,905
2,698,850

7 5 3 ,9 6 4
1 ,0 2 0 ,8 5 4
2 ,3 0 9 ,9 2 1
5 8 1 ,6 8 6
42,107
38,788
33,912
33,785

7 ,1 5 8 ,2 3 9
2 ,7 9 3 ,4 3 6
1 7 ,7 9 8 ,5 1 0
1 1 ,3 4 0 ,4 9 4
2,882,933
10,473,850
5,526,300
2,719,654

7 ,1 0 6 ,3 2 9
2 ,7 5 4 ,7 9 3
1 7 ,7 3 4 ,2 3 8
1 1 ,3 1 6 ,5 5 1
2,840,826
10,435,192
5,492,413
2,686,925

4 8 ,9 9 9
3 8 ,5 8 8
5 8 ,5 1 7
2 0 ,8 4 6
42,107
38,358
20,978
27,514

2 ,9 1 1
55
5 ,7 5 5
3 ,0 9 7

1 0 ,6 7 3 ,8 7 9
9 ,8 4 4 ,1 9 1
9 ,9 5 8 ,9 4 4
3 ,1 8 1 ,5 7 2
19,004
8,751
12,492
11,925

7 02 ,0 5 4
9 82 ,2 1 1
2 ,2 4 5 ,6 4 9
5 5 7 ,7 4 3

300
12,909
5,215

1 1 ,3 7 5 ,9 3 3
1 0 ,8 2 6 ,4 0 2
1 2 ,2 0 4 ,5 9 3
3 ,7 3 9 ,3 1 5
19,004
8,881
12,517
12,981

368,987
7,335,812
55,557,939
38,244,820
4,467,133

366,380
7,312,822
55,257,892
37,952,479
4,440,833

2,607
22,990
300,047
292,341
26,300

368,987
7,333,666
55,414,938
37,773,811
4,451,404

366,380
7,310,676
55,120,779
37,598,158
4,430,726

2,607
22,738
290,130
173,740
18,555

252
4,029
1,913
2,123

2,146
143,001
471,009
15,729

2,146
137,113
354,321
10,107

5,888
116,688
5,622

9,611,698

9,415,287

196,411

8,742,327

8,622,852

89,825

29,650

869,371

792,435

76,936

5,009,066
4,602,632

4,924,022
4,491,265

85,044
111,367

4,618,649
4,123,678

4,587,288
4,035,564

16,798
73,027

14,563
15,087

390,417
478,954

336,734
455,701

53,683
23,253

130
25
1,056

CORPORATION

Loans and discounts, gross— total

272,777

INSURANCE

375,348,768

Cash, balances with other banks, and cash collection
items—to ta l.........................................................................

In s u re d

DEPOSIT

Total assets....................................................................................

N on­
in s u re d

T otal

FEDERAL

In s u re d

C u rre n c y a n d c o in .......................................................................

N on­
in s u re d

T otal

Total

Total lia b ilitie s and c a p ital a c c o u n ts ........................................

375,348,768

366,105,553

9,243,215

323,348,848

321,083,191

1,992,880

272,777

51,999,920

45,022,362

6,977,558

B usiness and personal dep o sits— t o ta l............................
Individuals, p a rtn ersh ip s, and coporations— demand
Individuals, p artnerships, and co rpo ra tion s— t im e . ..

280,780,258

273,587,716

7,192,542

233,872,277

232,821,964

945,420

121,726,667
154,187,285
1 2 6 ,1 9 5 ,6 0 8
8 9 7 ,4 2 0
2 7 ,0 9 4 ,2 5 7

121,036,112
147,739,255
1 1 9 ,8 5 8 ,8 2 2
8 9 5 ,3 8 7
2 6 ,9 8 5 ,0 4 6

104,893

46,907,981

40,765,752

690,555
6,448,030
6 ,3 3 6 ,7 8 6
2 ,0 3 3
1 09 ,2 1 1

121,391,091
107,624,877
7 9 ,6 6 6 ,9 3 5
8 9 6 ,6 3 1
2 7 ,0 6 1 ,3 1 1

6,142,229

120,715,072
107,304,540
7 9 ,4 4 7 ,9 5 5
8 9 4 ,7 0 0
2 6 ,9 6 1 ,8 8 5

596,829
294,700
2 0 7 ,5 5 8
1,9 31
85 ,2 1 1

79,190
25,637

335,576
46,562,408
4 6 ,5 2 8 ,6 7 3
789
3 2 ,9 4 6

321,040
40,434,715
4 0 ,4 1 0 ,8 6 7
687
2 3,16 1

14,536
6,127,693
6 ,1 1 7 ,8 0 6
102
9 ,7 8 5

66

Savings deposits ...................................................................
Deposits accumulated for payment of personal loans ...................
Other deposits of individuals, partnerships, and coporations........

C ertified and o ffic e rs ’ checks, le tte rs of credit, and
tra ve le rs' checks, e tc......................................................

4,866,306

4,812,349

53,957

4,856,309

4,802,352

53,891

G overnm ent d ep o sits— to ta l . * ......................................
U nited States G overnm ent— d e m a n d ............................
U nited States G overnm ent— tim e ...................................
States and su bdivisions— d e m a n d .................................
States and subdivisions— tim e ........................................

31,978,721

31,764,288

214,433

31,948,137

31,735,033

212,235

10,289,804
260,738
12,676,172
8,752,007

10,257,861
257,574
12,562,582
8,686,271

31,943
3,164
113,590
65,736

10,283,140
260,720
12,674,672
8,729,605

10,251,709
257,556
12,561,082
8,664,686

30,562
3,164
113,590
64,919

D om estic in te rb a n k and postal savings deposits— to ta l
Com m ercial banks in the U. S.— d e m a n d ....................
Com m ercial banks in the U. S.— tim e ............................
M utual savings banks in the U. S.— d e m a n d ...............
M utual savings banks in the U. S.— tim e ......................
Postal sa vings......................................................................

14,489,076

14,261,223

227,853

14,487,608

14,259,755

13,091,229
364,576
861,855
152,199
19,217

13,051,155
359,132
749,168
82,561
19,207

40,074
5,444
112,687
69,638

10

13,091,168
363,169
861,855
152,199
19,217

Foreign governm ent and bank deposits— to ta l..............
Foreign governm ents, central banks, etc.— dem and.
Foreign governm ents, central banks, etc.— tim e ........
Banks in foreign co un trie s— d e m a n d ............................
Banks in foreign countries— tim e ...................................

5,824,717

5,733,893

90,824

681,498
3,598,274
1,364,041
180,904

675,616
3,574,254
1,316,494
167,529

Total d e p o s its ...................................................................

333,072,772
1 6 5 ,5 5 7 ,5 7 2
1 6 7 ,5 1 5 ,2 0 0

M iscellaneous lia b ilitie s — to ta l..........................................
Rediscounts and o th e r borrowed m o n e y .....................
All other m iscellaneous lia b ilitie s ....................................

11,145,979
2,123,674
9,022,305

11,422
1 4 ,2 1 5

9,997

29,255

1,329

869

6,664
18
1,500
22,402

6,152
18
1,500
21,585

512

227.686

167

1,468

1,468

13,051,094
357,725
749,168
82,561
19,207

39,907
5,444
112.687
69,638

167

61
1,407

61
1,407

5,824,675

5,733,851

90,279

545

5,882
24,020
47,547
13,375

681,457
3,598,274
1,364,040
180,904

675,575
3,574,254
1,316,493
167,529

5,838
24,020
47,546
12,875

44

500

325,347,120

7,725,652

286,132,697

284,550,603

1,475,620

106,474

46,940,075

1 6 4 ,4 6 1 ,3 3 7
1 6 0 ,8 8 5 ,7 8 3

1 ,0 9 6 ,2 3 5
6 ,6 2 9 ,4 1 7

40,796,517

1 6 5 ,2 0 3 ,7 3 2
1 2 0 ,9 2 8 ,9 6 5

6,143,558

1 6 4 ,1 2 2 ,5 4 5
1 2 0 ,4 2 8 ,0 5 8

1 ,0 0 0 ,8 5 0
4 7 4 ,7 7 0

8 0 ,3 3 7
2 6 ,1 3 7

3 5 3 ,8 4 0
4 6 ,5 8 6 ,2 3 5

3 3 8 ,7 9 2
4 0 ,4 5 7 ,7 2 5

1 5,04 8
6 ,1 2 8 ,5 1 0

10,726,686

419,293

10,354,878

10,118,845

214,804

2,059,441
8,667,245

21,229

64,233
355,060

2,102,964
8,251,914

791,101

607,841

2,039,406
8,079,439

183,260

61,840
152,964

1,718
19,511

20,710
770,391

20,035
587,806

675
182,585

817

ASSETS
AD
N

10

LIABILITIES

1

Total lia b ilitie s (e xclu d in g ca pita l a cco u n ts)..........

344,218,751

336,073,806

8,144,945

296,487,575

294,669,448

1,690,424

127,703

47,731,176

41,404,358

6,326,818

Capital accounts— to ta l.........................................................
Preferred c a p ita l..................................................................
Common s to c k .......................................................... ..........
S u rp lu s...................................................................................
U ndivided p ro fits and re serve s .......................................

31,130,017

30,031,747

1,098,270

26,861,273

26,413,743

603,305
7,870,113
15,661,751
6,994,848

302,456

559,875
7,744,931
15,133,523
6,593,418

4,268,744

43,430
125,182
528,228
401,430

602,627
7,870,113
12,719,552
5,668,981

1,618,004

559,197
7,744,931
12,551,781
5,557,834

650,740

43,230
82,844
99,633
76,749

145,074
200

N um ber of b a n k s 2......................................................................

14,189

13,728

461

13,682

13,401

233

O BANKS
F

Demand ...........................................................................
Time ...............................................................................

9,997

30,584

678

678

42,338
68,138
34,398

2,942,199
1,325,867

2,581,742
1,035,584

360,457
290,283

48

507

327

180




173

1 ^ m.ou. *s shown as deposits are special accounts and univested trust funds with the latter classified as demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations.
n
2 Includes 18 noninsured banks of deposit for which asset and liability data are not available.
Back figures: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 130-131, and earlier reports.

Table 105. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF ALL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), DECEMBER 31, 1964
B A N K S G RO UPED A C C O R D IN G TO INSU RANCE STATU S AN D TY PE OF B A N K
(A m ounts in thou s a n d s o f d o lla rs )

17
4

C o m m e rc ia l an d s to c k saving s b a n k s and
n o n d e p o s it tr u s t c o m p a n ie s

All banks

M u tu a l saving s b a n ks

N o n in s u re d
Total

A sse t, lia b ility , o r c a p ita l a c c o u n t ite m
Total

Cash, balances with other banks, and cash collection
items—total

392,174,389

10,498,919

348,433,496

N on­
d e p o s it
tr u s t
com ­
p a n ie s 2

345,130,205

3,016,367

Non­
in s u re d

N on­
in s u re d

T otal

in s u re d

286,924

54,239,812

47,044,184

7,195,628

60,640,246

60,032,916

569,822

37,508

1,003,738

893,139

110,599

45,712

4,551,889
17,580,743
14,090,586
558,335
300,841
22,950,522,

19,486

1,466

163,603

138,843

24,760

561,903
29,155
40,396
40,763

4,572,841
17,580,743
14,577,048
587,352
341,237
22,981,025

458,000
24,618
40,160
27,558

28,462
4,399
236
2,945

552,085
224,412

476,644
224,274

75,441
138

63,638

53,378

10,260

Securities—to ta l........................................................................

113,283,341

110,084,808

3,198,533

102,004,922

100,959,700

861,826

183,396

11,278,419

9,125,108

2,153,311

U. S. G ov’t, o b lig a tio n s (in c l. g u a ra n te e d ) ........................
O b lig a tio n s o f S ta te s a n d s u b d iv is io n s ..............................
S e c u ritie s o f Federal a g e n c ie s a n d c o rp o r a tio n s ( n o t
g u a ra n te e d by U. S .) ...............................................................
O th e r b o n d s, no te s, a n d d e b e n tu re s ...................................
C o rp o ra te s to c k s ...........................................................................

68,921,384
33,985,319

66,698,504
33,711,653

2,222,880
273,666

63,133,110
33,594,205

62,588,052
33,343,807

475,673
204,583

69,385
45,815

5,788,274
391,114

4,110,452
367,846

1,677,822
23,268

4,239,188
3,990,325
2,147,125

4,195,363
3,667,522
1,811,766

43,825
322,803
335,359

3,488,868
899,968
888,771

3,446,144
762,790
818,907

38,463
125,786
17,321

4,261
11,392
52,543

750,320
3,090,357
1,258,354

749,219
2,904,732
992,859

1,101
185,625
265,495

Loans and discounts, net—to ta l...........................................

217,657,808

6,328,562

176,572,772

35,679

41,085,036

36,233,052

4,851,984

V a lu a tio n r e s e rv e s ...........................................................................

Loans and discounts, gross—total
Real e s ta te lo a n s— t o t a l.............................................................
Secured by farm land ..............................................................
Secured by residential properties:
Insured by F H A .................................................................
Insured or guaranteed by V A ................................................
Not insured or guaranteed by FHA or V A ..............................
Secured by other properties.......................................................
Loans to c o m m e rc ia l a n d fo re ig n b a n k s .
..............
Loans to o th e i ■ m c ia l in s t itu tio n s ....................................
Loans to b ro k o
; ‘d d e a le rs in s e c u r itie s .......................
O th e r lo a n s fo i 1 't y in g s e c u r itie s .......................................
Loans to fa rm e r s d ire c tly g u a ra n te e d by th e C o m ­
m o d ity C re d it C o rp o ra tio n ...............
............
O th e r lo a n s to fa rm e rs (e x c l. real e s t a t e ) .......................
..........................................
O th e r lo a n s to in d iv id u a ls .........................................................
All o th e r lo a n s (in c lu d in g o v e r d r a f ts ) ..................................

Miscellaneous assets—to ta l..................................................

B a n k p re m
f n
a n d fix tu r e s , a n d real e s t a te
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ is e s ,llau re oitusr e s s e ts ................................................
A ll o th e r m isc e n u a
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

211,329,246

175,096,194

1,440,899

14,166

3,787,959

3,762,450

25,509

3,564,019

3,552,676

11,144

199

223,940

209,774

221,445,767

215,091,696

6,354,071

180,136,791

178,648,870

1,452,043

35,878

41,308,976

36,442,826

4,866,1£0

84,532,443
2 ,6 9 1 ,2 1 8

79,556,374
2 ,6 6 5 ,2 3 3

4,976,069
2 5 ,9 8 5

43,976,082
2 ,6 3 8 ,0 3 1

43,733,086
2 ,6 1 6 ,6 0 4

230,297
2 0 ,5 2 3

12,699
904

40,556,361
5 3 ,1 8 7

35,823,288
4 8 ,6 2 9

4,733,073
4 ,5 5 8

1 9 ,6 0 1 ,4 5 6
1 3 ,8 6 2 ,9 5 1
3 1 ,9 5 5 ,2 0 5
1 6 ,4 2 1 ,6 1 3
3,509,569
10,959,478
5,567,471
2,850,998

1 8 ,7 7 1 ,3 2 4
1 2 ,8 1 3 ,7 4 2
2 9 ,5 5 0 ,6 9 1
1 5 ,7 5 5 ,3 8 4
3,437,217
10,858,968
5,381,309
2,799,024

8 3 0 ,1 3 2
1 ,0 4 9 ,2 0 9
2 ,4 0 4 ,5 1 4
6 6 6 ,2 2 9
72,352
100,510
186,162
51,974

7 ,3 1 4 ,5 9 0
2 ,7 4 1 ,8 5 2
1 8 ,8 7 5 ,7 1 6
1 2 ,4 0 5 ,8 9 3
3,493,341
10,950,005
5,541,687
2,845,094

7 ,2 4 3 ,4 9 7
2 ,6 8 4 ,4 6 8
1 8 ,8 1 0 ,7 9 8
1 2 ,3 7 7 ,7 1 9
3,420,989
10,849,646
5,355,550
2,794,217

6 8 ,2 0 8
5 7 ,3 2 9
5 9 ,1 7 0
2 5 ,0 6 7
72 352
100,237
175,648
46,193

2 ,8 8 5
55
5 ,7 4 8
3 ,1 0 7

1 1 ,5 2 7 ,8 2 7
1 0 ,1 2 9 ,2 7 4
1 0 ,7 3 9 ,8 9 3
3 ,3 7 7 ,6 6 5
16,228
9,322
25,759
4,807

7 5 9 ,0 3 9
9 91 ,8 2 5
2 ,3 3 9 ,5 9 6
6 38 ,0 5 5

122
10,489
4,684

1 2 ,2 8 6 ,8 6 6
1 1 ,1 2 1 ,0 9 9
1 3 ,0 7 9 ,4 8 9
4 ,0 1 5 ,7 2 0
16,228
9,473
25,784
5,904

516,838
7,005,642
60,776,296
40,521,291
5,205,741

513,580
6,984,795
60,197,360
40,205,923
5,157,146

3,258
20,847
578,936
315,368
48,595

516,838
31
513,580
3,227
7,003,490
473
6,982,643
20,374
Com
rc ia l a n d
2,564
60,612,317 m e60,040,383 in d u s tria l lo a n s
569,370
40,011,207
2,395
194,034
39,814,778
5,186,730
2,421
5,143,998
40,311

2,152
163,979
510,084
19,011

2,152
156,977
391,145
13,148

7,002
118,939
5,863

10,088,175

9,834,280

253,895

9,215,556

9,041,395

143,820

30,341

872,619

792,885

79,734

5,191,748
4,896,427

5,096,486
4,737,794

95,262
158,633

4,793,519
4,422,037

4,753,588
4,287,807

23,479
120,341

16,452
13,889

398,229
474,390

342,898
449,987

55,331
24,403

151
25
1,097

CORPORATION

717,929

4,690,732
17,580,743
14,567,230
782,609
300,841
23,003,900

INSURANCE

60,926,055

4,736,444
17,580,743
15,129,133
811,764
341,237
23,044,663

DEPOSIT

61,643,984

C u rre n c y a n d c o in .......................................................................
R e serve w ith F. R. b a n k s (m e m b e r b a n k s ) ......................
D e m a n d b a la n ce s w ith b a n k s in U. S ..................................
O th e r b a la n ce s w ith b a n k s in U. S........................................
B a la n ce s w ith b a n k s in fo re ig n c o u n trie s
................
..............
C ash ite m s in pro ce ss o f c o lle c tio n .........

FEDERAL

Total assets.................................................................................... 402,673,308

In s u re d
Banks of
d e p o s it1

In s u re d

402,673,308

392,174,389

10,498,919

348,433,496

345,130,205

3,016,367

286,924

54,239,812

47,044,184

7,195,

B u s in e s s a n d p e rs o n a l d e p o s its — t o t a l ..............................
In d iv id u a ls , p a r tn e rs h ip s , an d c o p o ra tio n s — d e m a n d
In d iv id u a ls , p a rtn e rs h ip s , an d c o rp o ra tio n s — tim e . ..
Savings deposits ...................................................................
Deposits accumulated for payment of personal loans ...................
Other deposits of individuals, partnerships, and coporations........
C e rtifie d a n d o ffic e rs ’ c h e c k s , le tte rs o f c re d it, a n d
tra v e le rs ’ c h e c k s , e tc ...........................................................

303,616,424

295,697,698

7,918,726

254,515,874

252,983,403

1,418,604

113,867

49,100,550

42,714,295

6,386,255

135,555,827
162,054,439
1 8 2 ,0 2 1 ,3 4 1
9 59 ,2 8 6
2 9 ,0 7 3 ,8 1 2

134,613,437
155,194,386
1 2 5 ,3 4 1 ,3 4 2
9 5 7 ,2 1 0
2 8 ,8 9 5 ,8 3 4

942,390
6,860,053
6 ,6 7 9 ,9 9 9
2 ,0 7 6
1 7 7 ,9 7 8

135,237,520
113,284,098
8 3 ,2 7 1 ,7 0 4
9 5 7 ,8 5 2
2 9 ,0 5 4 ,5 4 2

134,300,734
112,804,696
8 2 ,9 6 6 ,9 7 1
9 5 6 ,4 1 0
2 8 ,8 8 1 ,3 1 5

853,783
448,545
2 8 9 ,4 7 8
1 ,4 4 2
1 5 7 ,6 2 5

83,003
30,857
1 5 ,2 5 5

318,307
48,770,341
4 8 ,7 4 9 ,6 3 7
1 ,4 3 4
1 9 ,2 7 0

312,703
42,389,690
4 2 ,3 7 4 ,3 7 1
800
1 4 ,5 1 9

5,604
6,380,651
6 ,3 7 5 ,2 6 6
634
4 ,7 51

6,006,158

5,889,875

116,283

5,994,256

5,877,973

116,276

11,902

11,902

G o v e rn m e n t d e p o s its — t o t a l ....................................................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t— d e m a n d ..............................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t— t im e ......................................
S ta te s a n d s u b d iv is io n s — d e m a n d ....................................
S ta te s a n d s u b d iv is io n s — t i m e ............................................

30,318,309

30,103,156

215,153

30,282,284

30,068,312

211,571

2.401

36,025

34,844

1,181

6,540,336
274,152
13,616,218
9,887,603

6,507,450
270,984
13,499,246
9,825,476

32,886
3,168
116,972
62,127

6,533,274
274,000
13,614,634
9,860,376

6,500,876
270,832
13,497,662
9,798,942

29,997
3,168
116,972
61,434

2.401

7,062
152
1,584
27,227

6,574
152
1,584
26,534

693

D o m e s tic in te r b a n k a n d p o s ta l s a v in g s d e p o s its — to ta l
C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s in th e U. S.— d e m a n d . ....................
C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s in th e U. S.— t i m e ..............................
M u tu a l sa v in g s b a n k s in th e U. S.— d e m a n d ................
M u tu a l sa vin g s b a n k s in th e U. S.— t im e ........................
Postal s a v in g s .............................................................................

16,981,852

16,756,448

225,404

16,979,892

16,754,488

225,304

1,960

1,960

15,548,318
393,380
844,434
176,186
19,534

15,492,886
384,815
740,382
118,835
19,530

55,432
8,565
104,052
57,351
4

15,548,230
391,508
844,434
176,186
19,534

15,492,798
382,943
740,382
118,835
19,530

55,332
8,565
104,052
57,351
4

100
100

88
1,872

88
1,872

F o re ig n g o v e rn m e n t a n d b a n k d e p o s its — to ta l
F ore ig n g o v e rn m e n ts , c e n tra l b a n k s , etc.— d e m a n d .
Foreign g o v e rn m e n ts , c e n tra l b a n k s , e tc .— t im e ........
B a n k s in fo re ig n c o u n trie s — d e m a n d ...............................
B a n ks in fo re ig n c o u n tr ie s — t i m e ......................................

6,648,902

6,424,074

224,828

6,648,902

6,424,074

224,741

857,395
3,950,936
1,569,401
271,170

826,137
3,893,693
1,454,685
249,559

31,258
57,243
114,716
21,611

857,395
3,950,936
1,569,401
271,170

826,137
3,893,693
1,454,685
249,559

31,207
57,243
114,715
21,576

T o ta l d e p o s its .........................................................................
Demand ..........................................................................
Time ..............................................................................

357,565,487

348,981,376

8,584,111

308,426,952

306,230,277

2,080,220

116,455

49,138,535

42,751,099

6,387,436

1 8 0 ,5 3 8 ,0 8 7
1 7 7 ,0 2 7 ,4 0 0

1 7 9 ,0 2 4 ,0 9 8
1 6 9 ,9 5 7 ,2 7 8

1 ,5 1 3 ,9 8 9
7 ,0 7 0 ,1 2 2

1 8 0 ,1 9 9 ,1 4 4
1 2 8 ,2 2 7 ,8 0 8

1 7 8 ,6 9 1 ,2 4 7
1 2 7 ,5 3 9 ,0 3 0

1 ,4 2 2 ,3 3 4
6 5 7 ,8 8 6

8 5 ,5 6 3
3 0 ,8 9 2

3 3 8 ,9 4 3
4 8 ,7 9 9 ,5 9 2

332,851
4 2 ,4 1 8 ,2 4 8

6 ,0 9 2
6 ,3 8 1 ,3 4 4

M is c e lla n e o u s lia b ilitie s — t o t a l..............................................
R e d is c o u n ts a n d o th e r b o rro w e d m o n e y ........................
All o th e r m is c e lla n e o u s lia b ilitie s .......................................

12,812,387

12,024,063

788,324

12,111,921

11,461,821

627,150

22,950

700,466

562,242

2,710,521
1 0 ,101,866

2,611,535
9,412,528

98,986
689,338

2,690,019
9,421,902

2,591,133
8,870,688

96,415
530,735

2,471
20,479

20,502
679,964

20,402
541,840

138,224
100

T o ta l lia b ilitie s (e x c lu d in g c a p ita l a c c o u n ts ) ...........

370,377,874

361,005,439

9,372,435

320,538,873

317,692,098

2,707,370

139,405

49,839,001

43,313,341

C a p ita l a c c o u n ts — t o t a l ...............................................................
P re fe rre d c a p it a l........................................................................
C o m m o n s t o c k ............................................................................
S u rp lu s ...........................................................................................
U n d iv id e d p r o fits an d re s e r v e s ..........................................

32,295,434

31,168,950

1,126,484

27,894,623

27,438,107

308,997

4,400,811

3,730,843

897,362
8,015,677
16,097,251
7,285,144

853,078
7,886,432
15,552,060
6,877,380

44,284
129,245
545,191
407,764

896,688
8,015,677
13,062,780
5,919,478

852,404
7,886,432
12,893,189
5,806,082

44,084
86,955
100,259
77,699

147,519
200

N u m b e r o f b a n k s 3............................................................................

14,281

13,820

461

13,775

13,493

235

1 5 ,6 0 2

1

AD
N
LIABILITIES
O BANKS
F

138,124

6,525,660

674

674

42,290
69,332
35,697

3,034,471
1,365,666

2,658,871
1,071,298

375,600
294,368

47

506

327

179

175

1 Includes asset and liability figures for 16 branches of foreign banks (tabulated as banks) licensed to do a deposit business in the State of New York. Data for these offices, which on December 31,1964 had assets
of $900,000,000 and deposits of $512,000,000, were not available for previous tabulations. Capital is not allocated to these branches by the parent banks.
2 Amounts shown as deposits are special accounts and uninvested trust funds, with the latter classified as demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations.
3 Includes 4 noninsured banks of deposit for which asset and liability data are not available.
Back figures, 1934-1963: See the preceding table and the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 132-133, and earlier reports.




ASSETS

Total liabilities and capital a cco u n ts..................................

Table 106. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF ALL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), DECEMBER 31, 1964
BA N K S GRO UPED BY D IS T R IC T A N D STATE
(A m ounts in th o u s a n d s o f d o lla rs )
L ia b ilitie s a n d c a p ita l a c c o u n ts

A sse ts

FDIC D is tric t and S tate

Num ­
ber of
C ash a n d
b a n k s 1 d u e fro m
banks

D e posits
U. S. Gov­
e rn m e n t
o b lig a tio n s

O th e r
s e c u ritie s

Loans, d is ­
c oun ts,
a nd o v e r­
d ra fts

M is c e lla ­
neous
assets

T otal
B u s in e s s
and p e r­
sonal 2

G o v e rn ­
m e n t5

T otal
M isce lla ­
n eo us lia b il­ c a p ita l
Foreign
a c c o u n ts
g o v ’t an d
itie s
in t e r b a n k 4

44,361,957

217,657,808

10,088,175

402,673,308

303,616,424

30,318,309

23,630,754

12,812,387

32,295,434

68,774,174

44,285,748

216,654,160

9,927,879

401,132,548

302,575,635

30,123,819

23,584,695

12,654,910

32,193,489

Other areas...........................

16

153,397

147,210

76,209

1,003,648

160,296

1,540,760

1,040,789

194,490

46,059

157,477

101,945

730
773
1,147
888
1,303
1,530
1,378
1,705
1,186
1,757
1,418
466

2,704,215
16,373,340
5,808,907
3,279,257
3,337,720
3,936,983
4,115,785
4,793,506
1,517,681
2,548,289
5,510,108
7,718,193

5,065,004
13,805,283
7,302,305
4,011,687
3,749,683
4,035,093
6,698,025
6,882,659
2,279,854
2,939,642
4,527,595
7,624,554

2,801,909
13,423,138
5,590,753
1,998,808,
1,833,708
2,215,811
2,989,751
3,866,758
1,194,302
1,294,972
2,591,854
4,560,193

18,876,151
70,117,477
20,897,801
10,207,228
8,025,392
9,245,679
13,234,994
14,710,834
4,802,777
6,459,925
12,754,137
28,325,413

518,261
3,889,385
676,909
437,200
431,126
300,198
486,709
623,358
196,210
233,553
705,667
1,589,599

29,965,540
117,608,623
40,276,675
19,934,180
17,377,629
19,733,764
27,525,264
30,877,115
9,990,824
13,476,381
26,089,361
49,817,952

24,382,353
86,464,977
31,760,738
15,210,528
12,516,009
14,364,104
21,601,558
23,443,144
7,667,307
9,813,182
18,461,991
37,930,533

1,290,403
5,777,070
2,720,727
1,709,704
2,012,984
1,713,370
2,606,967
2,257,860
902,565
1,505,236
2,845,346
4,976,077

737,452
9,871,152
1,366,438
868,107
1,059,947
1,741,478
775,100
2,107,809
494,602
761,650
2,178,955
1,668,064

895,476
6,098,734
1,003,978
507,230
339,717
314,447
582,619
647,056
146,873
199,257
523,169
1,553,831

2,659,856
9,396,690
3,424,794
1,638,611
1,448,972
1,600,365
1,959,020
2,421,246
779,477
1,197,056
2,079,900
3,689,447

A la b a m a ....................................
A la s k a .........................................
A r iz o n a .......................................
A r k a n s a s ...................................
C a lifo rn ia ...................................

252
13
16
245
200

548,599
54,272
313,229
434,409
5,853,354

690,290
86,620
255,179
350,152
5,554,750

398,255
33,889
188,953
281,043
3,447,792

1,462,156
161,272
1,372,619
963,724
21,685,037

56,824
11,598
84,176
31,424
1,195,176

3,156,124
347,651
2,214,156
2,060,752
37,736,109

2,384,606
233,027
1,707,771
1,584,529
28,641,230

341,667
88,383
239,838
177,262
3,604,420

116,945
2,982
32,088
116,815
1,419,810

46,323
4,092
55,099
17,988
1,299,582

266,583
19,167
179,360
164,158
2,771,067

C o lo ra d o ....................................
C o n n e c tic u t..............................
D e la w a re ...................................
D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia .............
F lo rid a ........................................

246
137
22
15
424

543,904
680,052
200,861
423,069
1,486,685

581,012
840,573
247,861
539,214
1,864,334

216,548
976,186
172,550
111,105
740,874

1,629,203
4,794,608
576,607
1,195,434
3,273,531

74,067
113,309
23,754
40,985
225,575

3,044,734
7,404,728
1,221,633
2,309,807
7,590,999

2,317,774
6,226,782
946,012
1,904,593
5,414,635

254,426
321,503
116,071
53,912
916,320

148,584
66,145
13,278
131,329
494,361

68,233
170,514
28,605
52,932
152,573

255,717
619,784
117,667
167,041
613,110

G e o rg ia ......................................
H a w a ii.........................................
Id a h o ..........................................
I llin o is .........................................
In d ia n a .......................................

431
12
24
1,030
435

930,700
139,555
133,378
4,046,416
1,182,868

807,715
164,607
180,656
5,752,504
1,934,818

377,512
93,796
80,810
3,398,883
610,450

2,345,130
595,581
489,990
12,586,715
3,160,736

104,189
55,544
21,429
571,242
109,308

4,565,246
1,049,083
906,263
26,355,760
6,998,180

3,208,626
704,120
712,126
19,856,538
5,329,911

517,584
176,091
112,587
1,932,249
750,558

318,639
28,720
3,855
1,916,807
205,979

105,804
32,752
15,024
620,630
183,271

414,593
107,400
62,671
2,029,536
528,461

Io w a .............................................
K a n s a s .......................................
K e n tu c k y ...................................
FRASERn a ..................................
L o u is ia
M a in e ..........................................

675
594
348
209
78

747,090
561,104
760,885
923,252
139,353

1,130,155
883,354
832,863
978,103
278,967

467,875
444,236
313,909
459,152
183,806

2,124,119
1,564,887
1,579,292
1,900,937
921,488

52,116
41,481
48,688
70,288
26,785

4,521,355
3,495,062
3,535,637
4,331,732
1,550,399

3,586,606
2,435,161
2,640,107
2,934,669
1,290,642

325,611
584,874
291,918
619,033
67,626

191,002
135,806
271,036
367,218
15,671

26,426
26,498
35,752
69,224
30,591

391,710
312,723
296,824
341,588
145,869

FDIC District
D is tric t 1 ....................................
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t
D is tric t

2 5.................................
3 ....................................
4 ....................................
5 ...................................
6 ....................................
7 ....................................
8 ....................................
9 ....................................
1 0 .................................
1 1 .................................
1 2 6...............................

State

Digitized for


CORPORATION

68,921,384

61,490,587

INSURANCE

61,643,984

14,265

DEPOSIT

14,281

50 States and D. C ..............

FEDERAL

Total United States.............

127
338
361
721
196

621,653
1,556,864
1,882,826
1,090,750
371,736

909,362
3,365,216
3,133,463
1,417,317
387,344

465,310
1,104,314
1,726,363
784,704
317,067

2,389,056
10,283,265
6,948,343
3,253,787
944,575

119,115
313,840
256,310
130,371
44,538

4,504,496
16,623,499
13,947,305
6,676,929
2,065,260

3,579,339
13,191,746
10,944,020
5,116,163
1,508,142

351,501
703,805
1,415,168
513,547
237,413

124,406
622,731
330,981
429,211
130,002

80,663
574,633
310,190
99,478
35,017

368,587
1,530,584
946,946
518,530
154,686

M is s o u r i.....................................
M o n ta n a .....................................
N e b ra s k a ...................................
N e v a d a .......................................
N ew H a m p s h ire ......................

643
129
432
8
105

1,722,282
164,890
478,218
96,972
98,799

1,883,422
268,563
521,476
133,233
224,761

1,047,665
121,885
234,977
57,679
119,128

4,129,819
562,727
1,169,457
411,854
1,028,389

131,883
24,281
35,586
25,620
23,233

8,915,071
1,142,346
2,439,714
725,358
1,494,310

6,399,032
890,252
1,782,547
555,112
1,239,614

762,414
115,499
190,139
96,671
58,406

849,148
32,943
209,107
4,064
13,848

148,797
21,684
42,629
14,265
38,715

755,680
81,968
215,292
55,246
143,727

N ew J e r s e y ...............................
New M e x ic o ..............................
New Y o rk 7.................................
N o rth C a ro lin a .........................
N o rth D a k o ta ...........................

257
63
479
152
163

1,391,195
162,569
14,637,710
875,570
118,395

2,177,668
223,427
11,233,510
729,190
288,646

1,892,608
80,229
11,281,771
546,308
190,416

6,866,766
516,136
61,702,408
2,374,429
468,077

224,552
21,556
3,513,211
111,626
21,818

12,552,789
1,003,917
102,368,610
4,637,123
1,087,352

10,389,677
733,610
74,131,949
3,244,337
815,870

820,739
161,319
4,673,983
511,596
148,244

123,485
22,858
9,688,818
323,250
16,294

295,668
12,355
5,618,905
186,135
12,458

923,220
73,775
8,254,955
371,805
94,486

O h io .............................................
O k la h o m a ..................................
O re g o n ........................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ...........................
R h ode I s la n d ...........................

549
417
52
598
17

2,523,020
854,904
484,801
3,285,887
167,132

3,359,875
802,665
520,741
3,942,430
238,112

1,748,817
359,249
302,402
3,841,936
363,411

8,116,821
1,812,960
1,630,518
12,780,980
1,329,353

254,459
69,244
102,050
422,450
28,974

16,002,992
3,899,022
3,040,512
24,273,683
2,126,982

12,622,165
2,841,858
2,341,032
19,138,573
1,779,891

1,274,960
388,117
372,576
1,445,767
104,221

447,809
251,374
43,291
918,629
16,559

339,024
55,108
69,862
664,954
67,171

1,319,034
362,565
213,751
2,105,760
159,140

ASSETS

S o u th C a ro lin a ........................
S o u th D a k o ta ...........................
T e n n e s s e e ................................
T e x a s ...........................................
U ta h .............................................

133
173
294
1,130
55

280,108
143,646
1,019,407
4,111,058
259,733

307,179
305,328
968,656
3,070,886
196,810

175,724
97,297
573,194
1,863,520
127,938

713,257
518,186
2,572,844
8,964,445
801,024

31,725
19,740
88,203
529,647
25,303

1,507,993
1,084,197
5,222,304
18,539,556
1,410,808

1,111,290
845,022
3,740,436
13,085,941
1,044,205

186,067
125,275
481,776
1,825,156
183,744

38,653
16,154
504,479
1,756,791
52,411

40,015
13,253
111,910
386,491
24,388

131,968
84,493
383,703
1,485,177
106,060

AD
N

V e r m o n t .....................................
V ir g in ia .......................................
W a s h in g to n ..............................
W e st V ir g in ia ............................
W is c o n s in ..................................
W y o m in g ....................................

55
277
101
184
582
68

62,015
785,605
686,305
293,252
1,050,091
110,159

117,375
955,912
786,171
570,830
1,629,744
151,135

55,064
535,385
415,887
164,976
652,938
39,962

519,048
2,736,841
2,518,185
798,211
3,125,915
283,418

12,120
100,047
120,451
33,702
121,091
13,175

765,622
5,113,790
4,526,999
1,860,971
6,579,779
597,849

653,678
3,936,039
3,656,231
1,434,930
5,327,627
435,842

34,842
443,225
313,392
163,403
441,241
87,680

2,498
202,017
112,443
48,452
238,140
16,779

13,852
117,030
91,945
30,455
89,158
6,789

60,752
415,479
352,988
183,731
483,613
50,759

O th e r a re a
P a cific Is la n d s 8.......................
P a n a m a C a nal Z o n e 9...........
P u e rto R ic o 10...........................
V irg in Is la n d s 11.......................

1
11
4

8,736
1,087
138,088
5,486

141,470
4,774

75,406
803

29,003
2 949
926*914
44,782

9,747
22,681
115,763
12,105

48,452
26,717
1,397,641
67,950

29,369
14,081
952,997
44,342

15,776
12,437
148,305
17,972

313
175
45,209
362

1,897
24
152,517
3,039

98,613
2,235

1,097




177

1 Includes 4 noninsured banks of deposit (2 in Iowa and 2 in Texas) for which data are not available.
2 Demand and time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations, certified and officers’ check ;, letters of credit, etc.
3 Deposits of the United States Government and of States and subdivisions.
4 Includes postal savings deposits.
5 Includes Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.
6 Includes Alaska, Hawaii, Pacific Islands, and the Panal Canal Zone.
7 Includes asset and liability data for 5 insured branches operated by 2 insured banks in Puerto Rico. S 3 also Table 105, footnote 1.
8 In United States possessions (American Samoa, Guam, Midway Islands, and Wake Island) and Trust T ritories (Kwajalein, Palau Islands, Ponape Island, Saipan, and Truk Atoll). Consists of asset and liability
data for 1 noninsured bank in American Samoa and 5 branches of an insured bank in California, 1 noninsured Caroline Islands, Truk Atoll ’(Moen Island) and 4 in the Mariana Islands (3 insured on Guam and 1 noninsured on Saipan). Also, 7 branches of an insured bank in Hawaii, consisting of 1 insured branch on Guam id 6 noninsured branches: 2 in Caroline Islands, Palau Islands (Koror)and Ponape Island (Kolonia); 2
in Marshall Islands, Kwajalein Atoll; 1 in Midway Islands, Sand Island; and 1 on Wake Island.
9 Consists of asset and liability data for 2 noninsured branches operated by 2 insured banks in New Yo
10 Includes asset and liability data for 15 insured branches operated by 2 insured banks in New York.
1 Includes asset and liability data for 4 insured branches operated by an insured bank in New York.
1
Note: Data for the above branches are not included in the figures for the States in which the parent bar
are located.
Back figures, 1945-1963: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 134-135, and earlier reports.

O BANKS
F

966

LIABILITIES

M a ry la n d ...................................
M a s s a c h u s e tts ........................
M ic h ig a n ....................................
M in n e s o ta .................................
M is s is s ip p i................................

1
78

Table 107. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF ALL INSURED BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
JUNE AND DECEMBER CALL DATES, 1961 THROUGH 1964
(Amounts in thousands of dollars)
J u n e 30,
1961

Dec. 30 ,
1961

Ju n e 3 0 ,
1 96 2

Dec. 2 8 ,
19 6 2

June 29,
1963

Dec. 20 ,
196 3

June 30,
1964

288,705,613

314,438,740

313,495,544

335,934,112

340,388,582

354,809,831

366,105,553

392,174,389

46,152,653
3,004,061
16,488,024

57,009,666
3,819,191
16,918,416

49,281,330
3,295,166
16,839,174

54,582,416
4,382,304
17,679,794

51,665,841
3,596,056
16,529,350

51,166,975
4,157,140
17,149,613

53,768,750
4,671,492
16,773,717

60,926,055
4,690,732
17,580,743

11,332,602
250,433
144,889
14,932,644

14,306,711
248,350
249,421
21,467,577

11,850,224
312,949
178,081
16,805,736

13,021,881
416,948
237,431
18,844,058

12,321,213
575,162
245,254
18,398,806

12,086,463
508,860
298,992
16,965,907

12,464,351
612,791
365,678
18,880,721

14,567,230
782,609
300,841
23,003,900

Obligations of the U. S. Government, direct and guaranteed—total

66,091,244

70,780,767

68,688,732

70,605,519

67,667,433

67,135,755

63,269,961

66,698,504

D ire ct:
T re a s u ry b ills ...........................................................................................................
T re a s u ry c e rtific a te s o f in d e b te d n e s s ..........................................................
T re a s u ry n o te s m a tu rin g in 1 y e a r o r le s s ................................................
T re a s u ry n o te s m a tu rin g a fte r 1 y e a r .........................................................
U n ite d S ta te s n o n -m a rk e ta b le b o n d s ..........................................................
O th e r b o n d s m a tu rin g in 1 y e a r o r le s s ......................................................
O th e r b o n d s m a tu rin g in 1 to 5 y e a r s .........................................................
O th e r b o n d s m a tu rin g in 5 to 1 0 .y e a r s ......................................................
O th e r b o n d s m a tu rin g a fte r 10 y e a r s ..........................................................
G u a ra n te e d o b lig a tio n s ...........................................................................................

7,453,153
3,369,968
5,467,315
15,728,308
756,811
6,632,888
13,542,866
9,724,474
3,218,798
196,663

11,515,532
2,142,610
8,418,081
18,630,152
601,522
2,465,962
16,098,292
7,143,149
3,550,078
215,389

8,440,540
3,657,486
11,467,088
15,362,125
569,852
1,058,937
14,401,180
10,072,252
3,424,328
234,944

11,791,016
3,996,330
5,322,085
19,150,662
449,760
2,285,148
11,648,541
13,598,734
2,123,031
240,212

9,308,207
3,255,341
4.627.951
19,844,588
421,017
1,508,840
10,068,307
15,957,065
2.469.952
206,165

11;208,197
1,670,638
6,138,257
16,757,376
393,648
1,155,685
13,468,861
13,667,498
2,433,898
241,697

9,202,774
32,445
6,552,501
17,064,558
368,416
1,873,321
12,795,720
12,710,246
2,364,612
305,368

13,533,705

26,950,629
19,125,026

28,728,617
20,732,516

31,778,264
23,458,724

34,126,296
25,076,053

37,145,497
28,037,856

39,700,867
30,022,176

41,120,989
31,615,328

43,386,304
33,711,653

2,255,285
4,331,164
426,270
812,884

2,617,755
4,079,476
444,213
854,657

2,910,983
4,013,148
457,069
938,340

3,486,442
4,064,339
465,705
1,033,757

3,597,544
3,909,101
481,062
1,119,934

4,215,668
3,787,856
491,175
1,183,992

3,813,096
3,909,572

4,195,363
3,667,522

1,782,993

1,811,766

93,041,873

99,509,384

100,466,996

104,731,815

104,812,930

106,836,622

104,390,950

110,084,808

A s s e ts

Cash, balances with other banks, and cash collection items—total......

Total securities




|

CORPORATION

O b lig a tio n s o f S ta te s a n d s u b d iv is io n s ...................... ...................................
S e c u ritie s o f F ed era l a g e n c ie s a n d c o rp o ra tio n s (n o t g u a ra n te e d
by U. S .) ..............................................................................................................
O th e r b o n d s, n o te s , a n d d e b e n tu r e s .............................................................
F ed era l R e serve b a n k s t o c k ...............................................................................
O th e r c o rp o ra te s to c k s .........................................................................................

INSURANCE

Other securities—to ta l......................................................................................

7,225,361
12,152,456
339,889
1,915,555
15,616,677
13,588,921
2,019,222
306,718

DEPOSIT

C u rre n c y a n d c o in .....................................................................................................
R e serve w ith F e d e ra l R e serve b a n k s (m e m b e r b a n k s ) ...........................
D e m a n d b a la n ce s w ith b a n k s in th e U n ite d S ta te s (e x c e p t p riv a te
b a n k s a n d A m e ric a n b ra n c h e s o f fo re ig n b a n k s ) .................................
O th e r b a la n ce s w ith b a n k s in th e U n ite d S ta te s ........................................
B a la n ce s w ith b a n k s in fo re ig n c o u n tr ie s ......................................................
Cash ite m s in p ro c e s s o f c o lle c tio n .................................................................

FEDERAL

Total assets.

Dec. 31,
19 6 4

Loans and discounts, net—to ta l.....................................................................

142,624,229

150,619,460

156,309,473

168,801,321

175,498,110

188,232,982

198,530,566

211,329,246

2,878,319

2,909,688

3,226,382

3,213,551

3,461,096

3,762,450

159,187,792

171,711,009

178,724,492

191,446,533

201,991,662

215,091,696

Real e s ta te lo a n s — t o t a l..........................................................................................
Secured by farm land .......................................................................................
Secured by residential properties:
Insured by F H A .........................................................................................
Insured or guaranteed by V A ........................................................................
Not insured or guaranteed by FHA or V A .......................................................
Secured by other properties ................................................................................
Loa ns to d o m e s tic c o m m e rc ia l a n d fo re ig n b a n k s ....................................
Loa ns to o th e r fin a n c ia l in s t itu tio n s .................................................................
Loans to b ro k e rs a n d d e a le rs in s e c u ritie s ...................................................
O th e r lo a n s fo r p u rc h a s in g o r c a rry in g s e c u ritie s ......................................
Loa ns to f a rm e r s d ire c tly g u a ra n te e d by th e C o m m o d ity C re d it C o r­
p o ra tio n .................................................................................................................
O th e r lo a n s to fa rm e rs (e x c lu d in g lo a n s on real e s ta te )..........................
C o m m e rc ia l a n d in d u s tria l lo a n s (in c l. o pe n m a rk e t p a p e r)..................
O th e r lo a n s to in d iv id u a ls fo r p e rs o n a l e x p e n d itu re s — t o t a l..................
Passenger automobile instalment loans ................................................................
Other retail consumer instalment loans ................................................................
Residential repair and modernization instalment loans ..........................................
Other instalment loans for personal expenditures....................................... ...........
Single-payment loans for personal expenditures ....................................................
A ll o th e r lo a n s ( in c lu d in g o v e r d r a f ts ) ...............................................................

53,929,237
1 ,7 4 4 ,7 5 2

55,970,118
1 ,7 7 6 ,8 1 1

59,043,989
1 ,9 5 5 ,8 7 0

62,750,776
2 ,0 4 8 ,9 4 3

67,032,568
2 ,2 6 6 ,2 3 6

70,980,241
2 ,3 5 0 ,0 9 9

75,153,728
2 ,5 8 3 ,2 3 1

79,556,374
2 ,6 6 5 ,2 3 3

1 3 ,0 1 3 ,0 3 3
1 1 ,0 3 7 ,1 2 9
1 8 ,7 9 6 ,7 1 0
9 ,3 3 7 ,6 1 3
1,010,420
6,002,658
2,918,638
1,977,880

1 3 ,5 3 2 ,5 2 6
1 0 ,9 9 1 ,5 4 7
1 9 ,8 5 8 ,5 2 1
9 ,8 1 0 ,7 1 3
1,039,297
7,313,493
4,046,266
2,113,021

1 4 ,3 2 8 ,9 0 7
1 1 ,1 5 1 ,0 6 8
2 0 ,8 6 2 ,4 9 5
1 0 ,7 4 5 ,6 4 9
1,476,902
7,232,209
3,242,678
1,988,629

1 5 ,1 7 6 ,7 3 9
1 1 ,4 7 2 ,0 4 2
2 2 ,4 7 1 ,2 0 2
1 1 ,5 8 1 ,8 5 0
2,560,370
8,473,355
5,177,925
2,114,934

1 6 ,2 5 5 ,5 1 6
1 2 ,0 5 4 ,8 9 6
2 3 ,9 3 0 ,9 4 6
1 2 ,5 2 4 ,9 7 4
1,915,015
8,646,348
4,629,754
2,211,103

1 7 ,0 1 6 ,7 4 8
1 2 ,3 1 7 ,8 2 5
2 5 ,7 6 7 ,5 5 2
1 3 ,5 2 8 ,0 1 7
3,610,250
9,448,495
5,349,920
2,488,339

1 7 ,7 8 0 ,2 0 8
1 2 ,5 9 8 ,9 8 4
2 7 ,6 9 3 ,1 8 2
1 4 ,4 9 8 ,1 2 3
2,859,830
10,443,943
5,504,905
2,698,850

1 8 ,7 7 1 ,3 2 4
1 2 ,8 1 3 ,7 4 2
2 9 ,5 5 0 ,6 9 1
1 5 ,7 5 5 ,3 8 4
3,437,217
10,858,968
5,381,309
2,799,024

573,996
5,442,825
42,835,956
27,462,028
8 ,9 4 0 ,2 1 5
3 ,1 4 5 ,0 5 7
2 ,7 1 8 ,5 4 2
4 ,4 2 4 ,5 2 1
8 ,2 3 3 ,6 9 3
3,099,916

927,685
5,298,734
45,268,944
28,055,161
9 ,0 6 6 ,8 5 1
2 ,8 0 8 ,0 7 7
2 ,7 5 5 ,1 6 9
4 ,5 2 2 ,9 8 3
8 ,9 0 2 ,0 8 1
3,412,918

870,226
5,906,652
46,062,053
29,653,900
9 ,9 0 8 ,8 2 1
2 ,7 5 6 ,7 4 4
2 ,7 3 7 ,8 3 2
4 ,8 2 8 ,8 3 8
9 ,4 2 1 ,6 6 5
3,710,554

1,111,661
5,963,558
48,860,921
30,790,186
1 0 ,5 3 4 ,9 2 0
2 ,8 5 8 ,8 8 5
2 ,8 2 5 ,4 9 1
5 ,0 9 2 ,5 1 1
9 ,4 7 8 ,3 7 9
3,907,323

799,576
6,733,102
50,022,702
32,921,628
1 1 ,6 9 3 ,7 1 7
3 ,0 0 8 ,8 5 4
2 ,8 5 3 ,0 2 9
5 ,4 7 5 ,2 8 3
9 ,8 9 0 ,7 4 5
3,812,696

816,838
6,647,074
53,144,882
34,919,957
1 2 ,4 5 1 ,2 5 0
3 ,2 0 1 ,5 3 5
2 ,9 7 6 ,0 4 0
5 ,8 0 7 ,4 0 4
1 0 ,4 8 3 ,7 2 8
4,040,537

366,380
7,312,822
55,257,892
37,952,479
1 3 ,8 4 7 ,3 4 1
3 ,4 9 4 ,7 7 2
2 ,9 8 6 ,7 7 4
6 ,2 5 6 ,1 1 6
1 1 ,3 6 7 ,4 7 6
4,440,833

513,580
6,984,795
60,197,360
40,205,923
1 4 ,6 8 6 ,0 9 0
3 ,7 4 9 ,7 9 9
3 ,0 8 8 ,2 5 8
6 ,5 6 7 ,2 3 1
1 2 ,1 1 4 ,5 4 5
5,157,146

235,666,102

250,128,844

256,776,469

273,533,136

280,311,040

295,069,604

302,921,516

321,414,054

3,662,950

3,811,021

3,975,558

4,172,496

4,428,257

4,707,697

4,924,022

5,096,486

B a n k p r e m is e s ...........................................................................................................
F u rn itu re a n d f ix tu r e s .............................................................................................
Real e s ta te o w n e d o th e r th a n b a n k p re m is e s .............................................
In v e s tm e n ts a n d o th e r a s s e ts in d ire c tly re p re s e n tin g b a n k p re m ­
ises o r o th e r real e s t a te ................................................................................

2,495,042
732,940
103,130

2,607,260
741,278
113,989

2,714,370
778,152
123,522

2,852,967
819,099
126,659

3,122,721
838,200
128,093

3,343,007
892,555
112,159

]
I
0)

(:)

331,838

348,494

359,514

373,771

339,243

359,976

I
)

Miscellaneous assets—to ta l.............................................................................

3,223,908

3,489,209

3,462,187

3,646,064

3,983,444

3,865,555

4,491,265

4,737,794

C u s to m e rs ' lia b ility on a c c e p ta n c e s o u ts ta n d in g ........................................
O th e r a s s e ts ................................................................................................................

1,432,973
1,790,935

1,651,595
1,837,614

1,456,612
2,005,575

1,618,937
2,027,127

1,549,880
2,433,564

1,591,458
2,274,097

1,690,721
2,800,544

1,697,120
3,040,674

16.0%
22.9
9.3
49.4
2.4
8.5

18.1%
22.5
9.2
47.9
2.3
8.1

15.7%
21.9
10.1
49.9
2.4
8.3

16.2%
21.0
10.2
50.3
2.3
8.1

15.2%
19.9
10.9
51.5
2.5
8.1

14.4%
18.9
11.2
53.1
2.4
8.2

14.7%
17.3
11.2
54.2
2.6
8.2

15.5%
17.0
11.1
53.9
2.5
8.0

13.9

13.6

13.4

12.9

12.5

12.2

12.1

11.8

\

O BANKS
F

T o ta l lo a n s a n d s e c u r itie s .................................................................................

Bank premises, furniture and fixtures, and other real estate—total ..

LIABILITIES

2,826,177

153,445,637

AD
N

2,629,325

145,253,554

ASSETS

V a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ........................................................................................................

Loans and discounts, gross—to ta l.................................................................

PERCENTAGES
To total assets:
C ash a n d b a la n c e s w ith o th e r b a n k s ...............................................................
U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s , d ire c t a n d g u a ra n te e d .............................
O th e r s e c u r itie s .........................................................................................................
L oa ns a n d d is c o u n ts ...............................................................................................
O th e r a s s e ts ................................................................................................................
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts .............................................................................................
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts .............................................................................................




179

To total assets other than cash and U. S. Government obligations:

1
80

Table 107. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF ALL INSURED BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
JUNE AND DECEMBER CALL DATES, 1961 THROUGH 1964— CONTINUED
(Amounts in thousands of dollars)
Dec. 28,
1962

J u n e 29,
1 96 3

Dec. 20,
196 3

T o ta l lia b ilitie s a n d c a p ita l a c c o u n ts .......................................................................

288,705,613

314,438,740

313,495,544

335,934,112

340,388,582

B u s in e s s a n d p e rs o n a l d e p o s its — t o t a l ...............................................................
In d iv id u a ls , p a rtn e rs h ip s , a n d c o rp o ra tio n s — d e m a n d ............................
In d iv id u a ls , p a rtn e rs h ip s , a n d c o rp o ra tio n s — t im e .....................................
Savings deposits..............................................................................................
Deposits accumulated for payment of personal loans ..............................................
Other deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations ...................................
C e rtifie d an d o ffic e rs ’ ch e c k s , le tte rs o f c re d it, a n d tra v e le rs ’ ch ecks etc,

216,779,674

236,462,979

233,748,980

252,498,086

253,187,093

108,738,879
104,296,059
9 3 ,3 7 9 ,5 8 2
773 ,8 5 2
1 0 ,1 4 2 ,6 2 5
3,744,736

123,736,675
107,682,172
9 6 ,9 9 6 ,5 2 9
7 72 ,1 5 0
9 ,9 1 3 ,4 9 3
5,044,132

111,730,739
117,596,062
1 0 1 ,6 4 8 ,5 5 7
7 6 5 ,9 3 3
1 5 ,1 8 1 ,5 7 2
4,422,179

123,554,500
124,486,860
1 0 6 ,8 4 1 ,3 7 7
784,531
1 6 ,8 6 0 ,9 5 2
4,456,726

G o v e rn m e n t d e p o s its — t o t a l .....................................................................................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t— d e m a n d ...............................................................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t— t im e .......................................................................
S ta te s a n d s u b d iv is io n s — d e m a n d .....................................................................
S ta te s a n d s u b d iv is io n s — t im e ..............................................................................

23,742,796

23,904,925

27,970,218

6,367,691
283,411
11,838,523
5,253,171

5,949,325
280,096
12,217,682
5,457,822

9,544,587
295,840
11,794,877
6,334,914

D o m e s tic in te rb a n k a n d p o s ta l s a v in g s d e p o s its — t o t a l .............................
C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s in th e U. S.— d e m a n d .......................................................
C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s in th e U. S.— t im e ...............................................................
M u tu a l s a vin g s b a n ks in th e U. S.— d e m a n d ................................................
M u tu a l sa vin g s b a n ks in th e U. S .— t im e ........................................................
Postal s a v in g s ..............................................................................................................

12,668,987

16,681,398

11,849,410
173,437
605,544
23,004
17,592

15,751,964
197,186
700,355
15,113
16,780

F o re ig n g o v e rn m e n t a n d b a n k d e p o s its — t o t a l ................................................
F oreign g o v e rn m e n ts , c e n tra l b a n k s , e tc .— d e m a n d .................................
Foreign g o v e rn m e n ts , c e n tra l b a n k s , e tc .— t i m e .........................................
B a n ks in fo re ig n c o u n trie s — d e m a n d ................................................................
B a n k s in fo re ig n c o u n trie s — t im e .......................................................................

3,604,283
652,063
1,811,070
1,031,500
109,650

T o ta l d e p o s its ..........................................................................................................
Demand ......................................................................................................
Time ..........................................................................................................




Ju n e 30 ,
1964

Dec. 31 ,
1964

354,809,831

366,105,553

392,174,389

266,669,373

273,587,716

295,697,698

116,024,030
132,715,299
1 1 1 ,6 2 1 ,5 0 6
7 90 ,3 8 0
2 0 ,3 0 3 ,4 1 3
4,447,764

123,842,677
138,370,425
1 1 4 ,7 3 8 ,5 5 0
8 37 ,0 8 1
2 2 ,7 9 4 ,7 9 4
4,456,271

121,036,112
147,739,255
1 1 9 ,8 5 8 ,8 2 2
8 9 5 ,3 8 7
2 6 ,9 8 5 ,0 4 6
4,812,349

134,613,437
155,194,386
1 2 5 ,3 4 1 ,3 4 2
9 57 ,2 1 0
2 8 ,8 9 5 ,8 3 4
5,889,875

25,611,034

31,127,763

27,171,277

31,764,288

30,103,156

6,833,754
266,199
12,066,083
6,444,998

11,026,837
250,834
12,388,673
7,461,419

6,734,239
268,300
12,263,435
7,905,303

10,257,861
257,574
12,562,582
8,686,271

6,507,450
270,984
13,499,246
9,825,476

13,341,497

14,889,921

13,980,532

14,270,000

14,261,223

16,756,448

12,392,738
218,066
669,337
42,901
18,455

13,907,406
241,908
684,285
38,153
18,169

12,924,632
281,667
710,091
46,888
17,254

13,323,112
269,914
610,294
49,252
17,428

13,051,155
359,132
749,168
82,561
19,207

15,492,886
384,815
740,382
118,835
19,530

4,255,164

4,138,626

4,548,654

4,854,482

5,193,098

5,733,893

6,424,074

656,922
2,178,055
1,297,787
122,400

660,437
2,162,539
1,182,770
132,880

724,335
2,431,688
1,265,391
127,240

626,447
2,856,924
1,264,201
106,910

841,612
3,045,448
1,177,311
128,727

675,616
3,574,254
1,316,494
167,529

826,137
3,893,693
1,454,685
249,559

256,795,740

281,304,466

279,199,321

297,547,695

303,149,870

313,303,748

325,347,120

348,981,376

1 4 4 ,8 2 8 ,3 4 6
1 1 1 ,9 6 7 ,3 9 4

1 6 5 ,3 5 4 ,8 4 2
1 1 5 ,9 4 9 ,6 2 4

1 5 2 ,3 9 7 ,6 6 4
1 2 6 ,8 0 1 ,6 5 7

1 6 3 ,4 9 2 ,4 8 0
1 3 4 ,0 5 5 ,2 1 5

1 5 9 ,4 1 2 ,6 7 5
1 4 3 ,7 3 7 ,1 9 5

1 6 3 ,2 4 8 ,9 5 1
1 5 0 ,0 5 4 ,7 9 7

1 6 4 ,4 6 1 ,3 3 7
1 6 0 ,8 8 5 ,7 8 3

1 7 9 ,0 2 4 ,0 9 8
1 6 9 ,9 5 7 ,2 7 8

CORPORATION

J u n e 30 ,
196 2

INSURANCE

Dec. 3 0 ,
1961

DEPOSIT

J u n e 30,
1961

FEDERAL

L ia b ilitie s a n d c a p ita l

7,409,956

7,820,622

8,188,211

11,290,601

9,589,877

12,612,070

10,726,686

12,024,063

R e d is c o u n ts a n d o th e r b o rro w e d m o n e y ....................................... ...............
A c c e p ta n c e s o u ts ta n d in g ......................................................................................
O th e r lia b ilitie s ...........................................................................................................

441,799
1,461,052
5,507,105

473,448
1,689,406
5,657,768

782,362
1,498,878
5,906,971

3,590,812
1,655,648
6,044,141

1,516,411
1,597,026
6,476,440

3,614,177
1,620,293
7,377,600

2,059,441
1,724,102
6,943,143

2,611,535
1,737,101
7,675,427

Total liabilities (excluding capital accounts)....................................... 264,205,696

312,739,747

325,915,818

336,073,806

361,005,439

26,108,012

27,095,816

27,648,835

28,894,013

30,031,747

31,168,950

C a p ita l sto c k , n o te s, a n d d e b e n tu re s ..............................................................
S u rp lu s .............................................................................................................
U n d iv id e d p r o f its ......................................................................................................
R e s e rv e s ........................................................................................................

6,464,028
12,423,665
4,806,379
805,845

6,621,703
13,068,228
4,781,267
842,454

6,826,298
13,430,586
5,024,430
826,698

6,937,502
13,822,081
5,488,605
847,628

7,172,516
14,258,908
5,363,677
853,734

7,451,066
14,637,286
5,941,518
864,143

8,304,806
15,133,523
5,661,210
932,208

8,739,510
15,552,060
5,872,927
1,004,453

..............

29,973,285

31,782,351

34,659,071

35,844,661

38,492,256

e)

0)

0)

Captial stock, notes, and debentures:
Par or face value—to ta l.................................................................................

6,464,328

6,622,003

6,826,598

6,937,802

7,172,816

7,451,366

8,305,106

8,739,510

C o m m o n s t o c k .......................................................................................................
C a p ita l n o te s a n d d e b e n tu re s .........................................................................
P re fe rre d s t o c k ......................................................................................................

6,426,462
22,616
15,250

6,585,001
22,257
14,745

6,789,688
22,090
14,820

6,882,362
20,646
34,794

7,114,462
21,094
37,260

7,282,980
130,547
37,839

7,745,231
521,404
38,471

7,886,432
811,331
41,747

R e tira b le v a lu e o f p re fe rre d s t o c k ....................................................................

16,217

15,406

15,460

35,435

37,702

0)

0)

0)

N u m b e r o f b a n k s ..............................................................................................................

13,461

13,445

13,442

13,457

13,527

13,621

13,728

13,820

MEMORANDA
Pledged assets and securities loaned..............

O BANKS
F

308,838,296

25,313,652

LIABILITIES

287,387,532

24,499,917

AD
N

289,125,088

Capital accounts—to ta l.....................................................................................

ASSETS

Miscellaneous liabilities—to ta l.......................................................................

1 Not available for all banks.
Back figures, 1984-1961: See the Annual Report for 1961, pp. 106-109, and earlier reports.

181




182

Table 108. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF INSURED COMMERCIAL AND INSURED MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES
(STATES AND OTHER AREAS), DECEMBER AND JUNE CALL DATES, 1962 THROUGH 1964
(Amounts in thousands of dollars)
In s u re d c o m m e rc ia l ba n k s
A sse ts

Total s e c u ritie s ..........................................




Dec. 31,
1964

Dec. 28 ,
196 2

J u n e 29 ,
1 96 3

Dec. 20 ,
19 6 3

June 30,
1964

Dec. 3 1 ,
1964

295,982,703

298,808,700

311,790,848

321,083,191

345,130,205

39,951,409

41,579,882

43,018,983

45,022,362

47,044,184

53,798,705

50,877,148

50,445,462

52,969,638

60,032,916

783,711

788,693

721,513

799,112

893,139

4,259,137

3,486,794

4,053,057

4,552,579

4,551,889

123,167

109,262

104,083

118,913

138,843

17,679,794

16,529,350

17,149,613

16,773,717

17,580,743

12,563,869

11,876,629

11,644,517

12,005,653

14,090,586

458,012

444,584

441,946

458,698

476,644

256,823
237,431
18,801,651

388,686
245,254
18,350,435

367,817
298,992
16,931,466

433,514
365,678
18,838,497

558,335
300,841
22,950,522

160,125

186,476

141,043

179,277

224,274

42,407

48,371

34,441

42,224

53,378

65,966,306

63,122,231

62,811,737

58,953,758

62,588,052

4,639,213

4,545,202

4,324,018

4,316,203

4,110,452

11,570,253
3,917,424
. 5,199,158
18,518,818
303,366
2,253,167
11,332,096
11,967,665
768,599
135,760

9,063,613
3,202,828
4,486,173
19,259,933
285,371
1,490,993
9,760,193
14,366,215
1,112,495
94,417

10,999,429
1,651,564
5,921,023
16,402,791
277,927
1,141,495
12,931,738
12,244,036
1,137,045
104,689

8,994,405
32,171
6,313,028
16,742,337
267,411
1,862,679
12,021,002
11,487,935
1,097,971
134,819

13,301,211

244,594
52,513
141,778
584,655
135,646
17,847
308,114
1,590,850
1,357,457
111,748

208,768
19,074
217,234
354,585
115,721
14,190
537,123
1,423,462
1,296,853
137,008

208,369
274
239,473
322,221
101,005
10,642
774,718
1,222,311
1,266,641
170,549

232,494

7,097,197
11,872,107
247,362
1,904,040
14,766,228
12,481,688
778,067
140,152

220,763
78,906
122,927
631,844
146,394
31,981
316,445
1,631,069
1,354,432
104,452

128,164
280,349
92,527
11,515
850,449
1,107,233
1,241,155
166,566

28,946,174

32,095,360

34,660,292

36,056,681

38,371,648

5,180,122

5,050,137

5,040,575

5,064,308

5,014,656

24,582,904

27,610,889

29,611,314

31,230,057

33,343,807

493,149

426,967

410,862

385,271

367,846

2,870,165
804,088
465,705
223,312

2,973,360
780,871
481,062
249,178

3,099,001
931,823

3,446,144
762,790

616,277
3,260,251

624,184
3,128,230

712,425
3,003,773

714,095
2,977,749

749,219
2,904,732

795,800

818,907

94,912,480

95,217,591

95,010,439

100,959,700

3,503,243
784,083
491,175
|
270,477

97,472,029

810,445

870,756

913,515

987,193

992,859

9,819,335

9,595,339

9,364,593

9,380,511

9,125,108

CORPORATION

Other securities— to ta l..........................................
O bligations o f States and su bd ivisio n s.........
Securities of Federal agencies and co rpo ra ­
tions (n o t guaranteed by U. S .)...................
O ther bonds, notes, and d e b e n tu re s ............
Federal Reserve bank s to c k .............................
O ther corporate sto cks......................................

June 30,
1964

INSURANCE

O bligations o f th e U. S. G overnm ent, d ire c t
and guaranteed— to ta l.................................
Direct:
Treasury b ills ..................................................
Treasury certificates o f indebtedness . .. .
Treasury notes m a tu rin g in 1 year or less
Treasury notes m a tu rin g a fte r 1 y e a r.......
U nited States non-m arketable bonds . . .
O ther bonds m a tu rin g in 1 year or less. .
O ther bonds m atu rin g in 1 to 5 y e a rs .......
O ther bonds m aturing in 5 to 10 y e a rs ...
O ther bonds m atu rin g a fte r 10 y e a rs ........
Guaranteed o blig a tio n s....................................

Dec. 20,
1 96 3

DEPOSIT

Cash, balances w ith o ther banks, and cash
collection item s— to ta l.....................................
Currency and c o in .............................................
Reserve w ith Federal Reserve banks (m e m ­
ber ban ks).......................................................
Demand balances with banks in the United
States (except private banks and A m e ri­
can branches of foreign b a n k s ).............
Other balances w ith banks in the United
S ta te s................................................................
Balances w ith banks in foreign c o u n trie s ...
Cash item s in process of co lle ctio n ...............

Ju n e 29,
196 3

FEDERAL

Total a sse ts................................................................

In s u re d m u tu a l s a v in g s b a n ks

Dec. 28 ,
1962

Loans and discounts, net—to ta l............................

140,023,316

144,965,172

155,933,367

164,480,262

175,096,194

28,778,005

30,532,938

32,299,615

34,050,304

36,233,052

2,994,811

3,249,257

3,552,676

215,413

215,836

218,740

211,839

209,774

147,975,718

158,928,178

167,729,519

178,648,870

28,993,418

30,748,774

32,518,355

34,262,143

36,442,826

R eal e s ta te lo a n s — t o t a l............................................
Secured by farm land ................................................
Secured by residential properties:
Insured by F H A ..................................................
Insured or guaranteed by VA ..................................
Not insured or guaranteed by FHA or VA ................
Secured by other properties ........................................
Loa ns to d o m e s tic c o m m e rc ia l a n d fo re ig n
b a n k s ............................................................................
Loa ns to o th e r fin a n c ia l in s t itu tio n s ....................
Loa ns to b ro k e rs a n d d e a le rs in s e c u ritie s ___
O th e r lo a n s f o r p u rc h a s in g o r c a rry in g s e c u ri­
t ie s .................................................................................
Loa ns to fa rm e r s d ire c tly g u a ra n te e d by th e
C o m m o d ity C re d it C o rp o ra tio n ..........................
O th e r lo a n s to fa rm e r s ( e x c lu d in g loan s on
real e s ta te ) .................................................................
C o m m e rc ia l a n d in d u s tr ia l lo a n s (in c l. open
m a rk e t p a p e r) ...........................................................
O th e r lo a n s to in d iv id u a ls fo r p e rs o n a l e x p e n d ­
itu re s — t o t a l..............................................................!
Passenger automobile instalment loans .........................
Other retail consumer instalment loans ........................
Residential repair and modernization instalment loans. . .
Other instalment loans for personal expenditures...........
Single-payment loans for personal expenditures ............
All o th e r lo a n s ( in c lu d in g o v e r d r a f ts ) .................

34,309,294
2 ,0 0 2 ,8 7 1

36,768,959
2 ,2 2 1 ,0 5 8

39,088,205
2 ,3 0 3 ,2 5 1

41,447,444
2 ,5 3 5 ,5 3 3

43,733,086
2 ,6 1 6 ,6 0 4

28,441,482
4 6 ,0 7 2

30,263,609
4 5 ,1 7 8

31,892,036
4 6 ,8 4 8

33,706,284
4 7 ,6 9 8

35,823,288
4 8 ,6 2 9

6 ,4 9 4 ,9 4 6
2 ,6 3 5 ,2 4 0
1 4 ,2 3 7 ,3 5 7
8 ,9 3 8 ,8 8 0

6 ,8 3 0 ,2 6 9
2 ,8 0 3 ,3 2 3
1 5 ,1 9 9 ,0 4 8
9 ,7 1 5 ,2 6 1

7 ,0 4 7 ,2 3 8
2 ,8 1 7 ,1 5 2
1 6 ,3 8 0 ,8 8 9
1 0 ,5 3 9 ,6 7 5

7 ,1 0 6 ,3 2 9
2 ,7 5 4 ,7 9 3
1 7 ,7 3 4 ,2 3 8
1 1 ,3 1 6 ,5 5 1

7 ,2 4 3 ,4 9 7
2 ,6 8 4 ,4 6 8
1 8 ,8 1 0 ,7 9 8
1 2 ,3 7 7 ,7 1 9

8 ,6 8 1 ,7 9 3
8 ,8 3 6 ,8 0 2
8 ,2 3 3 ,8 4 5
2 ,6 4 2 ,9 7 0

9 ,4 2 5 ,2 4 7
9 ,2 5 1 ,5 7 3
8 ,7 3 1 ,8 9 8
2 ,8 0 9 ,7 1 3

9 ,9 6 9 ,5 1 0
9 ,5 0 0 ,6 7 3
9 ,3 8 6 ,6 6 3
2 ,9 8 8 ,3 4 2

1 0 ,6 7 3 ,8 7 9
9 ,8 4 4 ,1 9 1
9 ,9 5 8 ,9 4 4
3 ,1 8 1 ,5 7 2

1 1 ,5 2 7 ,8 2 7
1 0 ,1 2 9 ,2 7 4
1 0 ,7 3 9 ,8 9 3
3 ,3 7 7 ,6 6 5

2,552,321
8,468,121
5,120,629

1,903,897
8,641,977
4,614,755

3,594,633
9,441,479
5,325,642

2,840,826
10,435,192
5,492,413

3,420,989
10,849,646
5,355,550

8,049
5,234
57,296

11,118
4,371
14,999

15,617
7,016
24,278

19,004
8,751
12,492

16,228
9,322
25,759

2,103,614

2,204,117

2,476,760

2,686,925

2,794,217

11,320

6,986

11,579

11,925

4,807

1,111,661

799,576

816,838

366,380

513,580

5,961,308

6,730,646

6,644,575

7,310,676

6,982,643

2,250

2,456

2,499

2,146

2,152

48,668,367

49,868,910

52,984,200

55,120,779

60,040,383

192,554

153,792

160,682

137,113

156,977

30,524,024
1 0 ,5 2 9 ,1 8 4
2 ,8 5 7 ,6 8 2
2 ,7 6 2 ,4 2 3
5 ,0 3 4 ,2 8 2
9 ,3 4 0 ,4 5 3
3,898,252

32,639,569
1 1 ,6 8 4 ,5 3 9
3 ,0 0 7 ,9 6 5
2 ,7 9 0 ,3 0 9
5 ,4 0 5 ,5 6 7
9 ,7 5 1 ,1 8 9
3,803,312

34,531,746
1 2 ,4 3 7 ,2 7 2
3 ,2 0 0 ,6 1 2
2 ,9 0 9 ,5 9 0
5 ,7 1 8 ,9 2 0
1 0 ,2 6 5 ,3 5 2
4,024,100

37,598,158
1 3 ,8 2 8 ,3 2 5
3 ,4 9 3 ,8 0 6
2 ,9 1 6 ,6 1 9
6 ,1 5 0 ,5 3 8
1 1 ,2 0 8 ,8 7 0
4,430,726

39,814,778
1 4 ,6 6 1 ,7 2 0
3 ,7 4 8 ,7 8 3
3 ,0 1 2 ,8 6 1
1 1 ,9 5 0 ,2 1 0
5,143,998

266,162
5 ,7 3 6
1 ,2 0 3
6 3 ,0 6 8
5 8 ,2 2 9
1 3 7 ,9 2 6
9,071

282,059
9 ,1 7 8
889
6 2 ,7 2 0
6 9 ,7 1 6
1 3 9 ,5 5 6
9,384

388,211
1 3 ,9 7 8
923
6 6 ,4 5 0
8 8 ,4 8 4
2 1 8 ,3 7 6
16,437

354,321
1 9 ,0 1 6
966
7 0,15 5
1 05 ,5 7 8
1 58 ,6 0 6
10,107

391,145
2 4 ,3 7 0
1 ,0 1 6
7 5 ,3 9 7
1 2 6 ,0 2 7
1 6 4 ,3 3 5
13,148

Total loans and securities.........................

234,935,796

240,182,763

253,405,396

259,490,701

276,055,894

38,597,340

40,128,277

41,664,208

43,430,815

45,358,160

Bank premises, furniture and fixtures, and
other real estate—to ta l.....................................

4,587,288

4,753,588

288,287

301,394

312,897

336,734

342,898

243,406
25,206
19,675

251,295
27,558
22,541

260,904
29,168
22,825

271,529
33,462
31,743

277,072
39,117
26,709

6 ,4 4 1 J 0 4

4,126,863

4,394,800

2,609,561
793,893
106,984

2,871,426
810,642
105,552

3,082,103
863,387
89,334

373,771

339,243

359,976

Miscellaneous assets—to ta l....................................

3,363,993

3,621,926

3,545,190

4,035,564

4,287,807

282,071

361,518

320,365

455,701

449,987

C u s to m e rs ’ lia b ility on a c c e p ta n c e s o u t­
s t a n d in g .......................................................................
O th e r a s s e ts ...................................................................

1,618,937
1,745,056

1,549,880
2,072,046

1,591,458
1,953,732

1,690,721
2,344,843

1,697,120
2,590,687

282,071

361,518

320,365

455,701

449,987

I
!
r
I
I
j

m
v)

O

O BANKS
F

3,884,209

B a n k p r e m is e s ..............................................................
F u rn itu re a n d f ix t u r e s ...............................................
Real e s ta te o w n e d o th e r th a n b a n k p re m is e s .
In v e s tm e n ts a n d o th e r a s s e ts in d ire c tly re p ­
re s e n tin g b a n k p re m is e s o r o th e r real
e s ta te ............................................................................

LIABILITIES

3,010,546

142,717,591

AD
N

2,694,275

Loans and discounts, gross—to ta l........................

ASSETS

V a lu a tio n re s e r v e s ...........................................................

PERCENTAGES
To total assets:
18.2%

17.0%

16.2%

16.5%

17.4%

22.3
9.8
47.3
2.4
8.0

21.1
10.8
48.5
2.6
8.1

20.1
11.1
50.0
2.6
8.1

18.4
11.2
51.2
2.7
8.2

18.2
11.1
50.7
2.6
8.0

11.6
13.0
72.0
1.4
8.4

10.9
12.2
73.4
1.6
8.2

10.0
11.7
75.1
1.5
8.3

9.6
11.2
75.6
1.8
8.0

8.7
10.7
77.0
1.7
7.9

13.5

13.1

12.8

12.7

12.4

9.7

9.4

9.4

9.1

8.9

2.0%

1.9%

1.7%

1.8%

1.9%

To total assets other than cash and U. S. Gov­
ernment obligations:
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts ................................................




183

C ash a n d b a la n ce s w ith o th e r b a n k s ..................
U.S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s , d ir e c t a n d g u a r­
a n te e d ..........................................................................
O th e r s e c u r itie s ............................................................
Loans a n d d is c o u n ts ..................................................
O th e r a s s e ts ...................................................................
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts ...............................................

14
8

Table 108. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF INSURED COMMERCIAL AND INSURED MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES
(STATES AND OTHER AREAS), DECEMBER AND JUNE CALL DATES, 1962 THROUGH 1964— CONTINUED
(Amounts in thousands of dollars)
In s u re d m u tu a l sav in g s b a n ks

In s u re d c o m m e rc ia l b a n k s
L ia b ilitie s a n d c a p ita l

June 29,
1963

Dec. 20 ,
1963

J u n e 30 ,
1964

Dec. 31 ,
1964

345,130,205

39,951,409

41,579,882

43,018,983

45,022,362

47,044,184
42,714,295

Ju n e 29,
1963

Dec. 20,
196 3

J u n e 30,
1964

Dec. 31,
1964

295,982,703

298,808,700

311,790,848

321,083,191

Business and personal deposits—to ta l............ 216,424,179

Total liabilities and capital accounts...................

215,632,887

228,042,312

232,821,964

252,983,403

36,073,907

37,554,206

38,627,061

40,765,752

123,296,625

115,731,286

123,561,302

120,715,072

134,300,734

257,875

292,744

281,375

321,040

312,703

88,678,022
7 1 ,0 ^ 3 ,5 8 8
7 83 ,8 2 6

95,462,429
7 4 ,3 9 0 ,6 2 6
7 8 9 ,6 4 8

100,033,046
7 6 ,4 1 3 ,7 0 1
8 3 6 ,4 5 0

107,304,540
7 9 ,4 4 7 ,9 5 5
8 9 4 ,7 0 0

112,804,696
8 2 ,9 6 6 ,9 7 1
9 5 6 ,4 1 0

35,808,838
3 5 ,7 9 7 ,7 8 9
705

37,252,870
3 7 ,2 3 0 ,8 8 0
732

38,337,379
3 8 ,3 2 4 ,8 4 9
631

40,434,715
4 0 ,4 1 0 ,8 6 7
687

42,389,690
4 2 ,3 7 4 ,3 7 1
800

1 6 ,8 5 0 ,6 0 8

2 0 ,2 8 2 ,1 5 5

2 2 ,7 8 2 ,8 9 5

2 6 ,9 6 1 ,8 8 5

2 8 ,8 8 1 ,3 1 5

1 0 ,3 4 4

2 1 ,2 5 8

1 1 ,8 9 9

2 3 ,1 6 1

1 4 ,5 1 9

4,447,964

4,802,352

5,877,973

7,194

8,592

8,307

9,997

11,902

31,098,068

27,142,510

31,735,033

30,068,312

29,312

29,695

28,767

29,255

34,844

U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t— d e m a n d .............
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t— t im e .....................
S ta te s a n d s u b d iv is io n s — d e m a n d ...................
S ta te s a n d s u b d iv is io n s — t im e ..........................

6,824,658
266,143
12,064,372
6,426,549

11,019,039
250,798
12,386,649
7,441,582

6,729,214
268,203
12,261,389
7,883,704

10,251,709
257,556
12,561,082
8,664,686

6,500,876
270,832
13,497,662
9,798,942

9,096
56
1,711
18,449

7,798
36
2,024
19,837

5,025
97
2,046
21,599

6,152
18
1,500
21,585

6,574
152
1,584
26,534

Domestic interbank and postal savings de­
posits—to ta l.....................................................

14,888,976

13,979,354

14,268,764

14,259,755

16,754,488

945

1,178

1,236

1,468

1,960

13,907,380
240,989
684,285
38 153
18^169

12,924,607
280,514
710,091
46’ 888
17,254

13,323,080
268,710
610,294
49^252
17'428

13,051,094
357,725
749,168
82 561
19,207

15,492,798
382,943
740 382
118 835
19,530

26
919

25
1,153

32
1,204

61
1,407

88
1,872

4,548,654

4,854,482

5,193,043

5,733,851

6,424,074

............... 55

42

724,335

626,447

841,590

675,575

826,137

22

41

2,431,688
1 265 391
127[240

2,856,924
1,264,201
106,910

3,045,415
1,177,311
128,727

3,574,254
1,316,493
167,529

3,893,693
1,454,685
249,559

33

261,443,531

265,564,791

274,646,629

284,550,603

306,230,277

36,104,164

37,585,079

38,657,119

40,796,517

42,751,099

1 6 3 ,2 1 6 ,5 7 8
9 8 ,2 2 6 ,9 5 3

1 5 9 ,1 0 1 ,4 9 2
1 0 6 ,4 6 3 ,2 9 9

1 6 2 ,9 5 2 ,1 4 4
1 1 1 ,6 9 4 ,4 8 5

1 6 4 ,1 2 2 ,5 4 5
1 2 0 ,4 2 8 ,0 5 8

1 7 8 ,6 9 1 ,2 4 7
1 2 7 ,5 3 9 ,0 3 0

2 7 5 ,9 0 2
3 5 ,8 2 8 ,2 6 2

3 1 1 ,1 8 3
3 7 ,2 7 3 ,8 9 6

2 9 6 ,8 0 7
3 8 ,3 6 0 ,3 1 2

3 3 8 ,7 9 2
4 0 ,4 5 7 ,7 2 5

3 32 ,8 5 1
4 2 ,4 1 8 ,2 4 8

C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s in th e U. S.— d e m a n d . . .
C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s in th e U. S.— t im e .............
M IUtl ll C II c a v i n cg c hs»lnlr\o III tLhIp U 1. ^ . — U C I In u l l d .
H p r Ian U
IV u u a l o d v l l I r o U a k Q in I C 1 O

M u tu a l sa vin g s b a n k s in th e U . S. — tim e
P o stal s a vin g s

Foreign government and bank deposits—
total
. . .
...............
F ore ig n g o v e rn m e n ts , c e n tra l b a n k s , e tc . —
dem and
. . . .
F oreign g o v e rn m e n ts , c e n tr a l b a n k s , e tc .—
tim e
B a n k s in fo re ig n c o u n trie s — d e m a n d
B a n k s in fo re ig n c o u n trie s — tim e

Total deposits...................................................
Demand ...........................................................
Tim e ...............................................................




1

CORPORATION

4,439,172

25,581,722

INSURANCE

4,449,532

Government deposits—to ta l................................

DEPOSIT

In d iv id u a ls , p a rtn e rs h ip s , a n d c o rp o ra tio n s
— d e m a n d ............................................................
In d iv id u a ls , p a rtn e rs h ip s , a n d c o rp o ra tio n s
— t im e ....................................................................
Savings deposits....................................................
Deposits accumulated for payment of personal lo an s...
Other deposits of individuals, partnerships, and cor­
porations ..........................................................
C e rtifie d an d o ffic e rs ’ c h e c k s , le tte rs o f
c re d it, a n d tra v e le rs ' c h e c k s , e t c ..............

FEDERAL

Dec. 28 ,
196 2

Dec. 28,
1 96 2

Miscellaneous liabilities—to ta l..........................

10,786,803

9,009,288

11,821,823

10,118,845

11,461,821

503,798

580,589

790,247

607,841

R e d is c o u n ts a n d o th e r b o rro w e d m o p e y ___
A c c e p ta n c e s o u t s ta n d in g .....................................
O th e r lia b ilitie s .........................................................

3,583,534
1,655,648
5,547,621

1,499,211
1,597,026
5,913,051

3,576,530
1,620,293
6,625,000

2,039,406
1,724,102
6,355,337

2,591,133
1,737,101
7,133,587

7,278

17,200

37,647

20,035

20,402

496,520

563,389

752,600

587,806

541,840

Total liabilities (excluding capital ac­
counts) ...........................................................

272,230,334

274,574,079

286,468,452

294,669,448

317,692,098

36,607,962

38,165,668

39,447,366

41,404,358

43,313,341

Capital accounts—to ta l.........................................

23,752,369

24,234,621

25,322,396

26,413,743

27,438,107

3,343,447

3,414,214

3,571,617

3,618,004

3,730,843

C a p ita l s to c k , n o te s, a n d d e b e n tu r e s ............
S u r p lu s .........................................................................
U n d iv id e d p r o f its .....................................................
R e s e rv e s ......................................................................

6,937,352
11,458,444
4,789,690
566,883

7,172,366
11,819,350
4,663,487
579,418

7,450,533
12,163,471
5,113,403
594,989

8,304,128
12,551,781
4,913,133
644,701

8,738,836
12,893,189
5,113,007
693,075

150
2,363,637
698,915
280,745

150
2,439,558
700,190
274,316

533
2,473,815
828,115
269,154

678
2,581,742
748,077
287,507

674
2,658,871
759,920
311,378

Pledged assets and securities loaned..............

35,844,661

38,492,256

(J)

C)
1

0)

Capital stock, notes, and debentures:
Par or face value—to ta l....................................

6,937,652

7,172,666

7,450,833

8,304,428

8,738,836

150

150

533

678

674

C o m m o n s t o c k ......................................................
C a p ita l n o te s a n d d e b e n tu r e s ........................
P re fe rre d s t o c k ....................................................

6,882,362
20,496
34,794

7,114,462
20,944
37,260

7,282,980
130,014
37,839

7,745,231
520,726
38,471

7,886,432
810,657
41,747

150

150

533

678

674

R e tira b le v a lu e o f p re fe rre d s t o c k ...................

35,435

37,702

C)
1

0)

C)
1

N u m b e r o f b a n k s .............................................................

13,126

13,196

13,291

13,401

13,493

331

331

330

327

327

562,242

ASSETS
AD
N
LIABILITIES

MEMORANDA

O BANKS
F

1 Not available for all banks.
Back figures, 1934-1962: See the Annual Report for 1962, pp. 130-133, and earlier reports.

185




186
Table 109. AVERAGE ASSETS AND LIABILITIES AND ASSETS AND LIABILITIES PER $100 OF TOTAL ASSETS OF INSURED
COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), 19641
BY CLA SS O F BANK
M e m b e rs F.R. S ystem
A s s e t o r lia b ility ite m

178,591,006

94,745,325

52,154,295

54,449,343
61,439,390
36,360,062
164,816,703
8,425,128

30,736,731
32,783,166
20,232,936
90,334,267
4.503,906

17,229,436
15,305,676
10,235,103
49,015,907
2,959,203

6,483,176
13,350,548
5,892,023
25,466,529
962,019

325,490,626

178,591,006

94,745,325

52,154,295

..................................................................................................................
..............................................................................................................................

287,988,560
1 6 8 ,3 8 2 ,1 2 2
1 1 9 ,6 0 6 ,4 3 8
11,110,692
26,391,374

158,805,679
9 2 ,5 7 5 ,8 8 8
6 6 ,2 2 9 ,7 9 1
5,499,37714,285,950

82,245,195
5 0 ,4 0 4 ,6 3 8
3 1 ,8 4 0 ,5 5 7
4,792,089
7,708,041

46,937,686
2 5 ,4 0 1 ,5 9 6
2 1 ,5 3 6 ,0 9 0
819,226
4,397,383

Assets and liabilities per $100 of total assets1
Assets—total
.............................................................................................................................................

U n ite d S ta te s G o ve rn rrre n t o b lig a tio n s
......................................................................................................................
O th e r s e c u ritie s
.................................................................................................................................................................................
L oa ns a n d d is c o u n ts
...................................................................................................................................................
A ll o th e r a s s e ts
...........................................................................................................................................................

Liabilities and capital'—total
T o ta l d e p o s its

.....................................................................................................................................
...........................................................................................................................................................

........................................................................................

Time and savings deposits
B o rro w in g s a n d o th e r lia b ilitie s
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts

T o ta l d e p o s its
Time and savings deposits
B o rro w in g s a n d o th e r lia b ilitie s
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

16.73
18.87
11.17
50.64
2.59

17.21
18.36
11.33
50.58
2.52

18.19
16.16
10.80
51.73
3.12

12.43
25.60
11.30
48.83
1.84

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

88.48
5 1 .7 3
3 6 .7 5
3.41
8.11

88.92
5 1 .8 4
3 7 .0 8
3.08
8.00

86.81
5 3 .2 0
3 3 .6 1
5.06
8.13

90.00
4 8.71
4 1 .2 9
1.57
8.43

......................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................
..............................................................................................................................
...........................................................................................................................................................

1 Asset and liability items are averages of the amounts reported for the following call dates: December 20,1963; June 30,1964; and December 31,1964.
Note: For income data by class of bank, see Tables 115 and 116, pp. 198-201.

Back figures, 1934-1963: See Tables 113 and 114, pp.194-197 the Annual Report for 1963, p. 144, and earlier reports.




CORPORATION

Liabilities and capital—total

$100.00

..........................................................................................................................
..................................................................................................................
......................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................
.......................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................

C ash a n d d u e f ro m b a n k s
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s
O th e r s e c u ritie s
L o a n s a n d d is c o u n ts
A ll o th e r a s s e ts

INSURANCE

325,490,626

Average assets and liabilities (in thousands of do llars)1

DEPOSIT

S tate

FEDERAL

Not
m e m b e rs
F.R. S ystem

N a tio n a l

T o ta l

Table 110. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES AND ASSETS AND LIABILITIES PER $100 OF TOTAL ASSETS OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS
OPERATING THROUGHOUT 1964 IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), DECEMBER 31, 1964
BA N K S GROUPED A C C O R D IN G TO A M O U N T OF DEPO SITS
B a nks w ith d e p o s its o f—
A s s e t o r lia b ility ite m

All
banks1

$1,000,000
to
$2,000,000

$2,000,000
to
$5,000,000

$5,000,000
to
$10,000,000

$10,000,000
to
$25,000,000

$25,000,000
to
$50,000,000

$50,000,000
to
$100,000,000

$100,000,000
to
$500,000,000

$500,000,000
or
more

22,315,202

35,569,318

23,223,138

23,457,042

66,127,378

150,701,032

541,831
1,079,487
246,815
1,489,370
35,679

2,411,220
4,650,729
1,555,544
7,047,790
227,300

3,251,349
5,781,476
2,684,639
10,232,354
365,384

4,977,828
8,533,045
4,443,978
16,945,854
668,613

3,225,656
5,203,421
2,885,177
11,444,256
464,628

3,594,773
5,076,495
2,790,290
11,519,426
476,058

11,846,667
11,688,072
7,032,919
34,120,276
1,439,444

29,378,077
19,819,366
16,404,633
79,934,656
5,164,300

Liabilities and capital—to ta l...................................

341,226,463

547,588

3,393,182

15,892,583

22,315,202

35,569,318

23,223,138

23,457,042

66,127,378

150,701,032

T o ta l d e p o s its ................................................................
Demand deposits......................................................
Time and savings deposits.........................................
B o rro w in g s a n d o th e r lia b ilitie s .............................
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts ................................................

302,891,342
1 7 6 ,6 5 9 ,3 3 5
1 26 ,2 3 2 ,0 0 7
11,335,968
26,999,153

475,833
335 ,0 3 6
140,797
2,605
69,150

3,009,421
1 ,8 5 4 ,9 0 0
1 ,1 5 4 ,5 2 1
16,282
367,479

14,275,113
8 ,0 8 2 ,1 7 4
6 ,1 9 2 ,9 3 9
121,619
1,495,851

20,224,373
1 0 ,9 7 3 ,8 3 1
9 ,2 5 0 ,5 4 2
230,937
1,859,892

32,255,412
1 7 ,2 0 7 ,5 0 2
1 5 ,0 4 7 ,9 1 0
558,618
2,755,288

21,006,198
1 1 ,3 6 5 ,6 2 6
9 ,6 4 0 ,5 7 2
498,075
1,718,865

21,172,756
1 1 ,7 6 0 ,8 9 0
9 ,4 1 1 ,8 6 6
524,016
1,760,270

59,296,065
3 6 ,0 5 7 ,0 2 0
2 3 ,2 3 9 ,0 4 5
1,764,289
5,067,024

131,176,171
7 9 ,0 2 2 ,3 5 6
5 2 ,1 5 3 ,8 1 5
7,619,527
11,905,334

Assets and liabilities per
of total assets
Assets—to ta l................................................................

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

Cash a n d d u e f ro m b a n k s .......................................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ..............
O th e r s e c u r itie s ............................................................
Loa ns a n d d is c o u n ts ..................................................
A ll o th e r a s s e ts .............................................................

17.39
18.17
11.16
50.69
2.59

19.63
32.03
5.70
41.84
.80

15.97
31.81
7.28
43.89
1.05

15.17
29.26
9.79
44.35
1.43

14.57
25.91
12.03
45.85
1.64

14.00
23.99
12.49
47.64
1.88

13.89
22.41
12.42
49.28
2.00

15.32
21.64
11.90
49.11
2.03

17.91
17.67
10.64
51.60
2.18

19.49
13.15
10.89
53.04
3.43

Liabilities and capital—to ta l...................................

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

T o ta l d e p o s its ................................................................
Demand deposits......................................................
Time and savings deposits.........................................
B o rro w in g s a n d o th e r lia b ilitie s .............................
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts ................................................

88.77
5 1 .7 7
3 7 .0 0
3.32
7.91

86.89
6 1 .1 8
25.71
.48
12.63

88.69
5 4 -6 7
3 4 .0 2
.48
10.83

89.82
5 0 .8 5
3 8 .9 7
.77
9.41

90.63
4 9 .1 8
4 1 .4 5
1.03
8.34

90.68
4 8 .3 8
4 2 .3 0
1.57
7.75

90.45
4 8 .9 4
4 1 .5 1
2.15
7.40

90.26

2.23
7.51

89.67
5 4 .5 3
3 5 .1 4
2.67
7.66

87.04
5 2 .4 3
3 4 .6 1
5.06
7.90

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 ...........................

13,160

639

1,999

4,271

2,878

2,098

607

308

283

77

$100

50.14
40.12

O BANKS
F

15,892,583

107,521
175,368
31,203
229,121
4,375

LIABILITIES

3,393,182

59,334,922
62,007,459
38,075,198
172,963,103
8,845,781

AD
N

547,588

C ash a n d d u e fro m b a n k s .......................................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ..............
O th e r s e c r u itie s ............................................................
L oa ns a n d d is c o u n ts ..................................................
A ll o th e r a s s e ts .............................................................

ASSETS

Assets and liabilities (in
thousands of dollars)
Assets—to ta l................................................................ 341,226,463

Less
than
$1,000,000

1 This group of banks is the same as the group shown in Table 115 under the heading "Operating throughout the year” . These ratios differ slightly from the ratios for all insured commercial banks shown in Table
Note: For income and expense data by size of bank, see Tables 117 and 118, pp. 202-205.
Back figures, 1941-1963: See the Annual Report for 1963, p. 145, and earlier reports.




187

114.

188

Table 111. AVERAGE ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES
(STATES AND OTHER AREAS), BY STATE, 1964 1
(Amounts in thousands of dollars)
L ia b ilitie s a n d c a p ita l a c c o u n ts 1

A s s e ts 1
S ta te

D e p o s its

T o ta l
T otal

Dem and

T im e an d
s aving s

Total United States............................

54,449,343

61,439,390

36,360,062

164,816,703

8,425,128

325,490,626

287,988,560

168,382,122

119,606,438

11,110,692

26,391,374

50 States and D. C..............................

54,360,370

61,350,894

36,301,356

164,372,776

8,397,975

324,783,371

287,360,023

168,093,080

119,266,943

11,087,922

26,335,426

Other areas..........................................

88,973

88,496

58,706

443,927

27,153

707,255

628,537

289,042

339,495

22,770

55,948

A la b a m a .................................................
A la s k a .....................................................
A riz o n a ...................................................
A rk a n s a s ................................................
C a lifo rn ia ................................................

513,280
44,101
262,168
383,311
5,549,505

657,289
75,091
264,690
347,538
5,459,117

374,310
25,051
160,934
266,023
3,431,084

1,385,388
142,950
1,288,590
898,149
20,588,926

53,334
10,219
72,906
30,269
1,138,473

2,983,601
297,412
2,049,288
1,925,290
36,167,105

2,679,634
276,731
1,838,599
1,749,592
32,280,048

1,691,571
152,668
989,400
1,171,973
15,189,421

988,063
124,063
849,199
577,619
17,090,627

44,742
3,106
58,922
17,254
1,332,036

259,225
17,575
151,767
158,444
2,555,021

C o lo ra d o .................................................
C o n n e c tic u t..........................................
D e la w a re ................................................
D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia ..........................
F lo r id a .....................................................

513,386
529,696
176,328
397,484
1,264,821

567,427
492,586
212,498
540,324
1,873,909

197,727
457,684
87,415
106,045
703,500

1,524,688
1,819,565
449,800
1,127,729
3,025,585

70,241
71,523
21,064
39,349
212,523

2,873,469
3,371,054
947,105
2,210,931
7,080,338

2,586,992
2,958,039
828,726
2,000,507
6,353,942

1,514,657
1,973,733
613,921
1,346,122
4,008,648

1,072,335
984,306
214,805
654,385
2,345,294

52,734
133,451
27,050
49,186
148,285

233,743
279,564
91,329
161,238
578,111

G e o rg ia ...................................................
H a w a ii.....................................................
Id a h o .......................................................
Illin o is ......................................................
In d ia n a ...................................................

851,613
109,843
118,393
3,701,772
1,062,525

773,580
171,084
169,985
5,595,747
1,824,375

368,289
86,039
75,753
3,267,972
545,241

2,190,738
557,199
472,836
11,680,824
2,893,167

95,557
41,865
20,212
464,556
104,365

4,279,777
966,030
857,179
24,710,871
6,429,673

3,778,111
852,205
779,350
22,196,741
5,758,134

2,549,552
433,581
459,505
12,379,402
3,579,016

1,228,559
418,624
319,845
9,817,339
2,179,118

119,370
28,948
16,041
607,956
163,257

382,296
84,877
61,788
1,906,174
508,282

Io w a .........................................................
K a n s a s ....................................................
K e n tu c k y ...............................................
L o u is ia n a ...............................................
M a in e ......................................................

658,964
526,311
638,158
811,664
106,086

1,038,134
857,170
809,167
968,396
169,333

432,979
428,019
283,506
430,114
72,945

2,039,102
1,471,859
1,479,930
1,747,549
469,458

51,415
39,441
45,632
67,756
19,594

4,220,594
3,322,800
3,256,393
4,025,479
837,416

3,799,063
2,987,242
2,934,024
3,631,318
736,815

2,323,686
1,984,222
2,066,171
2,548,379
390,997

1,475,377
1,003,020
867,853
1,082,939
345,818

40,846
31,731
34,340
63,057
23,759

380,685
303,827
288,029
331,104
76,842

M a ry la n d ................................................
M a s s a c h u s e tts ....................................
M ic h ig a n ................................................
M in n e s o ta .............................................
M is s is s ip p i............................................

528,733
1,311,590
1,773,798
959,021
338,567

717,239
1,209,558
3,057,495
1,354,832
370,099

341,165
547,269
1,638,805
633,120
299,652

1,732,588
3,977,164
6,410,888
2,797,296
875,166

68,594
185,906
233,655
116,150
41,615

3,388,319
7,231,487
13,114,641
5,860,419
1,925,099

3,048,487
6,219,895
11,909,790
5,276,764
1,739,716

1,885,553
4,751,282
5,349,437
2,883,609
1,151,289

1,162,934
1,468,613
6,560,353
2,393,155
588,427

73,501
334,546
303,426
115,763
32,546

266,331
677,046
901,425
467,892
152,837

T otal
c a p ita l
a c c o u n ts

State




CORPORATION

All
o th e r
a s s e ts

INSURANCE

Loans
and
d is c o u n ts

DEPOSIT

O th e r
s e c u ritie s

FEDERAL

B o rro w in g s
a n d o th e r
lia b ilitie s

U.S. Gov­
e rn m e n t
o b lig a tio n s

C ash a n d
d u e fro m
banks

1,814,967
262,772
488,249
132,407
103,222

927,250
115,316
201,545
61,444
40,085

3,888,779
538,950
1,136,068
394,115
346,619

123,543
23,177
33,282
25,577
10,511

8,296,155
1,098,739
2,289,435
701,071
577,511

7,449,538
996,332
2,040,145
632,721
500,239

4,897,207
573,958
1,491,845
363,458
291,250

2,552,331
422,374
548,300
269,263
208,989

140,663
23,328
41,196
16,557
20,522

705,954
79,079
208,094
51,793
56,750

N e w J e r s e y ...........................................
N e w M e x c io ...........................................
N e w Y o r k ................................................
N o rth C a ro lin a .....................................
N o rth D a k o ta ........................................

1,229,832
160,496
12,271,974
748,924
99,444

1,930,0/3
234,385
8,691,903
647,604
255,231

1,556,269
72,985
7,676,794
498,674
127,229

5,092,435
495,319
33,421,745
2,210,576
422,878

182,391
20,650
2,717,365
106,560
20,232

9,991,000
983,835
64,779,781
4,212,338
925,014

8,984,865
897,562
54,877,589
3,677,968
839,059

4,594,037
575,696
34,848,461
2,387,658
461,456

4,390,828
321,866
20,029,128
1,290,310
377,603

266,960
13,487
4,501,852
183,339
13,618

739,175
72,786
5,400,340
351,031
72,337

O h io ..........................................................
O k la h o m a ..............................................
O re g o n ....................................................
P e n n s y lv a n ia ........................................
R h o d e I s la n d ........................................

2,317,040
771,151
418,659
2,920,574
137,194

3,293,870
806,643
501,471
3,686,183
143,485

1,626,056
343,572
274,670
2,964,422
219,317

7,737,603
1,691,681
1,500,133
10,122,147
682,545

246,204
66,501
85,773
383,222
19,640

15,220,773
3,679,548
2,780,706
20,076,548
1,202,181

13,580,573
3,281,372
2,518,211
17,658,342
1,062,272

7,276,130
2,265,631
1,269,046
9,446,032
505,263

6,304,443
1,015,741
1,249,165
8,212,310
557,009

371,465
49,521
58,795
560,524
46,751

1,268,735
348,655
203,700
1,857,682
93,158

S o u th C a ro lin a .....................................
S o u th D a k o ta .......................................
T e n n e s s e e .............................................
T e x a s .......................................................
U t a h .........................................................

255,816
133,504
917,497
3,646,037
228,996

297,983
291,462
921,348
3,063,241
200,048

164,170
89,497
523,486
1,753,809
113,345

668,270
504,518
2,442,170
8,397,116
778,347

30,120
18,627
84,303
497,391
23,942

1,416,359
1,037,608
4,888,804
17,357,594
1,344,678

1,248,110
942,200
4,418,717
15,525,173
1,210,581

977,958
537,788
2,573,368
10,216,977
631,608

270,152
404,412
1,845,349
5,308,196
578,973

39,005
13,117
97,658
407,171
32,056

129,244
82,291
372,429
1,425,250
102,041

LIABILITIES

V e rm o n t..................................................
V irg in ia ....................................................
W a s h in g to n ...........................................
W e st V irg in ia .........................................
W is c o n s in ...............................................
W y o m in g .................................................

50,984
701,719
609,119
267,623
947,735
99,901

98,897
909,328
697,577
550,981
1,606,346
144,555

51,682
498,940
350,410
152,941
598,456
38,351

339,006
2,577,682
1,953,784
754,442
2,956,930
271,784

9,807
94,347
102,543
32,129
111,337
12,587

550,376
4,782,016
3,713,433
1,758,116
6,220,804
567,178

494,274
4,267,178
3,332,736
1,550,088
5,662,616
511,097

170,387
2,322,109
1,946,616
929,971
2,863,676
287,699

323,887
1,945,069
1,386,120
620,117
2,798,940
223,398

10,445
110,793
86,377
29,533
89,425
7,911

45,657
404,045
294,320
178,495
468,763
48,170

O BANKS
F

O th e r a re a
P u e rto R ic o ...........................................
V irg in I s la n d s .......................................

86,617
2,356

83,778
4,718

57,674
1,032

426,167
17,760

26,782
371

681,018
26,237

605,739
22,798

280,034
9,008

325,705
13,790

21,297
1,473

53,982
1,966

ASSETS

1,541,616
158,524
430,291
87,528
77,074

M is s o u r i..................................................
M o n ta n a .................................................
N e b ra s k a ...............................................
N e v a d a ........................................... ..... v
N e w H a m p s h ire ................................

AD
N

1 Asset and liability items are averages of the amounts reported for the following cal! dates: December 20,1963; June 30,1964; and December 31,1964.
Note: For income data by State, see Table 119, pp.206-215.

Back figures, 1946-1963: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 146-147, and earlier reports.

189




190

Table 112. DISTRIBUTION OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
DECEMBER 31, 1964
BANKS GROUPED ACCORDING TO AMOUNT OF DEPOSITS AND BY RATIOS OF SELECTED ITEMS TO ASSETS
N u m b e r o f b a n k s w ith d e p o s its o f—
R a tio s

All
banks

Ratios of obligations of States and subdivisions to
total assets of—

15 to 2 0 p e rc e n t
2 0 p e rc e n t o r m o re

.........................................................
.......................................................

$50,000,000
to
$100,000,000

$100,000,000
to
$500,000,000

$500,000,000
or
more

1
8
37
26
3
4

157
81
450
925
825
312
147

63
45
287
726
597
287
116

9
7
86
206
187
84
31

3
9
37
117
98
41
8

3
4
28
135
80
23
10

637
3,218
4,439
3,180
1 395
483
141

40
130
176
168
127
65
24

92
334
544
610
333
149
51

178
796
1,346
1,205
580
194
48

153
716
1,073
661
232
51
11

107
637
865
391
97
18
6

26
228
240
100
13
3

12
136
119
35
9
2

20
177
70
10
4
1
1

37
228
994
2,798
4,629
3,517
1,290

19
43
99
168
212
123
66

8
50
219
499
693
453
191

6
79
381
1,041
1,467
974
399

3
35
192
596
1,015
770
286

1
15
81
369
787
661
207

2
10
85
218
224
71

3
10
28
116
125
31

1
2
12
102
130
36

2,356
5,233
3,302
1,573
628
218
183

65
202
136
126
94
40
67

353
736
534
245
148
51
46

789
1,665
1,054
540
190
66
43

539
1,181
739
300
95
27
16

402
948
521
191
41
14
4

116
285
141
51
14
3

54
121
76
42
14
5
1

35
83
75
54
20
10
6
1

9
64
6

19
57
3

3
12
26
24
12
2

CORPORATION

518
358
1,143
1,189
706
283
150

INSURANCE




$25,000,000
to
$50,000,000

505
314
681
358
156
62
37

Ratios of cash and due from banks to total assets of—
Less th a n 10 p e rc e n t.
.................................................
10 to 15 p e rc e n t ...............................................................
15 to 2 0 p e rc e n t
...................................................
2 0 to 2 5 p e rc e n t ...............................................................
2 5 to 3 0 p e rc e n t
...............................................
3 0 to 3 5 p e rc e n t ...............................................................
OR n o r r o n t n y mATA

$10,000,000
to
$25,000,000

325
76
191
82
32
19
5

Ratios of loans to total assets of—
Less th a n 10 p e r c e n t..........................................................
10 to 2 0 p e rc e n t
Of) tr» qn n p r r p n t
3 0 to 4-0 p e rc e n t
4 0 to 5 0 p e rc e n t
.............................................
5 0 to 6 0 p e rc e n t
.............................................................
6 0 p e rc e n t o r m o re
................................

$5,000,000
to
$10,000,000

1,583
895
2,911
3,775
2,707
1,114
508

Ratios of U. S. Government obligations to total
assets of—
Less th a n 10 p e r c e n t..........................................................
10 to 2 0 p e rc e n t
.................................................
2 0 to 3 0 p e rc e n t
...........................................................
q n to A fl n p r r p n t
..
A fi tn Rf) n p r r p n t
RH to f if i n p r r p n t
..

$2,000,000
to
$5,000,000

DEPOSIT

M o re th a n z e ro b u t less th a n 1 p e r c e n t.....................

$1,000,000
to
$2,000,000

FEDERAL

Less
than
$1,000,000

1,301
5,389
3,358
1,568
748
415
244
470

2
60
126
126
94
81
65
176

30
394
575
421
261
143
103
186

175
1,434
1,414
728
292
147
66
91

307
1,535
743
200
63
29
7
13

417
1,238
348
72
27
13
2
4

191
327
81
8
3

88
177
31
9
5
2
1

75
173
28
4
3

16
51
12

Ratios of total capital accounts to total assets other
than cash and due from banks, U. S. Govern­
m ent obligations, C.C.C. loans, and F.H.A. and
V.A. real estate loans of—
Less than 10 percent....................................................
10 to 15 percent............................................................
15 to 20 p ercen t............................................................
20 to 25 percent............................................................
25 to 30 percent............................................................
30 to 35 percent............................................................
35 to 40 percent............................................................
40 percent or m ore.......................................................

1,007
5,184
3,478
1,684
887
447
261
545

2
47
118
118
105
80
53
207

23
336
536
431
306
161
109
211

140
1,294
1,425
784
355
154
86
109

237
1,479
807
237
81
33
10
13

333
1,253
396
87
29
16
2
5

150
339
107
11
2
1

67
189
37
12
5
2
1

48
189
38
4
4

7
58
14

Ratios of total capital accounts to total assets of— ..
Less than 4 percent.......................................................
4 to 6 percent.................................................................
6 to 8 percent.................................................................
8 to 10 percent...............................................................
10 to 12 percent............................................................
12 to 15 percent............................................................
15 percent or m ore.......................................................

32
877
4,341
4,187
2,086
1,201
769

2
2
50
122
156
182
216

20
331
600
493
394
275

3
143
1,160
1,532
852
449
208

4
220
1,168
1,001
353
103
48

12
285
993
598
159
53
21

5
122
292
146
37
8

4
46
161
79
14
9

2
35
151
77
14
3
1

4
35
32
8

Number of banks............................................................... 13,493

730

2,113

4,347

2,897

2,121

610

313

283

79

ASSETS

Ratios of total capital accounts to total assets other
than cash and due from banks and U. S. Govern­
ment obligations of—
Less than 10 percent....................................................
10 to 15 percent............................................................
15 to 20 percent............................................................
20 to 25 percent............................................................
25 to 30 percent............................................................
30 to 35 percent............................................................
35 to 40 percent............................................ ...............
40 percent or m ore.......................................................

AD
N
LIABILITIES
O BANKS
F

Back figures, 1958-1968: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 148-149, and earlier reports.

191




Table 114.

Table 116.

Table 120.
Table 121.




CORPORATION

Table 119.

INSURANCE

Table 118.

DEPOSIT

Table 117.

FEDERAL

Table 115.

INCOME OF INSURED BANKS
Income of insured commercial banks in the United States (States and other
areas), 1956-1964
Ratios of income of insured commercial banks in the United States (States
and other areas), 1956-1964
Income of insured commercial banks in the United States (States and other
areas), 1964
By class of bank
Ratios of income of insured commercial banks in the United States (States
and other areas), 1964
By class of bank
Income of insured commercial banks operating throughout 1964 in the
United States (States and other areas)
Banks grouped according to amount of deposits
Ratios of income of insured commercial banks operating throughout 1964
in the United States (States and other areas)
Banks grouped according to amount of deposits
Income of insured commercial banks in the United States (States and other
areas), by State, 1964
Income of insured mutual savings banks, 1956-1964
Ratios of income of insured mutual savings banks, 1956-1964

192

Table 113.

The income data received and published by the Corporation relate
to commercial and mutual savings banks insured by the Corporation.
Commercial banks

INSURED
BANKS

The present report of income and dividends for mutual savings
banks was first used by the Corporation for the calendar year 1951.
For a discussion of the history and principles of this report see pp.
50-52 in Part Two of the 1951 Annual Report.

O
F

Sources of data

National banks and State banks in the District of Columbia not
members of the Federal Reserve System: Office of the Comptroller
of the Currency.
State banks members of the Federal Reserve System: Board of
Governors of the Federal Reserve System.
Other insured banks: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.
193




Mutual savings banks

INCOME

Reports of income and dividends are submitted to the Federal
supervisory agencies on either a cash or an accrual basis.
Income data are included for all insured banks operating at the
end of the respective years, unless indicated otherwise. In addition,
appropriate adjustments have been made for banks in operation
during part of the year but not at the end of the year. Data for 4
insured branches in Guam of 2 insured banks in California and
Hawaii, for 5 insured branches in New York of 2 insured banks in
Puerto Rico, for 15 insured branches in Puerto Rico and for 4
insured branches in the Virgin Islands of insured banks in New
York are not available.
The uniform Report of Income and Dividends (formerly called
Report of Earnings and Dividends) was revised extensively in 1961.
New items were added, combining components previously included
in other items; and some items were subsumed into new categories.
Thus certain items, even carrying the same designation (e.g. other
current operating expenses), are not comparable with data reported
for prior years.
The revised form breaks out the following items not previously
available separately: (1) benefits to officers and other employees;
(2) net occupancy expense of bank premises, with a supporting
schedule; (3) furniture and equipment expense (including costs
related to the purchase or rental of automated data processing
systems); and (4) losses on securities sold.
Two expense items previously reported separately have been com­
bined with other items: (1) taxes other than on net income; and

(2) recurring depreciation on banking house, furniture and fixtures.
Taxes on bank premises, social security taxes paid in behalf of
building employees, and recurring depreciation on banking house
are now included under occupancy expense of bank premises. Other
social security taxes are included with officer and employee benefits.
Recurring depreciation on furniture and fixtures is now included with
furniture and equipment expense.
Revenue and expenses incident to “ Federal funds” transactions
have been classified as “ Interest and discount on loans” and “ In­
terest and discount on borrowed money,” respectively.
In addition to other minor changes in classification, new designa­
tions have been given to certain items. For example, the term “ net
income” is the new equivalent of the former term “ net profits.” A
further change entailed the division of officers and other employees
into two groups: those engaged in banking operations, and those
concerned with building operations.

Table 113. INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), 1956-1964
(A m ounts in th o u s a n d s o f d o lla rs )
19 5 6

1957

1958

19 5 9

196 1

1 96 2

1963

1964

11,069,604

12,218,959

13,509,713

15,024,487

1,901,732
629,134
6,891,442
117,259
630,458
223,283
502,871
473,425

2,093,207
759,030
7,578,200
139,645
681,243
237,446
543,916
>186,272

2,176,454
921,060
8,516,837
155,478
728,857
248,362
573,252
‘ 189,413

2,240,389
1,085,334
9,612,079
173,159
781,405
280,289
629,694
>222,138

8,500,949

1,442,379
412,497
4,879,676
83,815
440,892
186,815
354,520
249,828

1,544,023
501,978
5,046,782
94,674
486,507
191,408
379,395
256,183

1,732,174
546,253
5,856,688
111,991
531,916
205,935
426,016
258,381

1,790,341
578,783
6,698,655
108,655
589,954
218,566
460,251
278,340

Current operating expenses—to ta l..............................................

4,457,198

5,119,182

5,612,723

6,264,207

6,932,820

7,440,492

8,589,177

9,714,980

10,897,460

S a la rie s— o f fic e r s ...................................................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— o th e r e m p lo y e e s ........................................
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fits ........................................................
Fees paid to d ire c to rs a n d c o m m itt e e s .......................................
In te re s t on tim e a n d sa vin g s d e p o s its ........................................
In te re s t on b o rro w e d m o n e y ............................................................
T axe s o th e r th a n on n e t in c o m e .....................................................
R e c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n on b a n k in g h o u se , f u rn itu r e a n d
f ix tu r e s ...................................................................................................
O ccu p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t .............................
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t..................................................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s .......................... ..................

720,866
1,372,262
(3)
42,614
805,857
45,392
187,526

773,769
1,493,778
(3
)
45,396
1,141,715
49,538
205,903

827,142
1,573,330
(3
)
48,271
1,380,575
24,161
221,571

892,657
1,684,159
(3
)
51,866
1,580,250
78,350
252,763

966,643
1,831,323
(3)
56,292
1,785,086
87,385
285,801

21,028,869
21,869,961
377,494
59,794
2,106,645
37,997
(4
)

21,098,146
21,975,406
419,098
63,236
2,845,283
64,325
(4
)

21 ,183,264
2 ,101,111
2
457,033
67,469
3,464,308
106,517
(4
)

21,284,140
2 ,234,922
2
490,732
72,176
4,088,061
127,277
(4)

128,085
(6
)
(7
)
1,154,600

146,262
(6
)
(7
)
1,262,823

168,371
(6
)
(7
)
1,369,305

191,424
(6
)
(7
)
1,532,739

212,493
(6
)
(7)
1,707,797

(5)
510,691
224,852
81,224,189

(5
)
555,670
267,885
*1,300,128

(6)
608,462
311,518
81,415,298

(5
)
670,243
362,301
81,567,608

Net current operating earnings.....................................................

2,774,724

2,931,235

2,888,223

3,405,145

3,790,725

3,629,112

3,629,782

3,794,733

4,127,027

Recoveries, transfers from valuation reserves, and profits—
t o t a l .................
..................................................................

250,171

198,413

868,115

328,889

574,826

708,171

467,061

468,450

322,104

31,151
14,090
41,001

64,368
9,295
20,751

681,554
9,646
57,145

47,277
27,946
111,447

329,322
12,927
55,568

453,730
9,934
86,574

256,987
6,241
56,761

167,445
4,046
60,516

74,723
6,633
57,284

20,762
77,606
65,563

21,183
39,757
43,063

22,439
42,158
55,176

20,551
57,607
64,062

25,684
70,211
81,114

16,825
51,817
89,291

16,902
56,610
73,560

17,913
131,235
87,295

17,383
62,313
103,768

993,534

757,432

783,213

1,361,515

978,422

On s e c u ritie s :
P ro fits on s e c u ritie s s old o r r e d e e m e d ...................................
R e co ve rie s ..........................................................................................
T ra n s fe rs f ro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s
On loan s:
R e c o v e rie s ............................................................................................
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s .............................................
All o t h e r .....................................................................................................

Losses, charge-offs, and transfers to valuation reserves—
to ta l...............................................................................................
On s e c u ritie s :
Losses on s e c u ritie s s o ld ...............................................................
1
C h a rg e -o ffs p rio r to s a le .................................................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ..................................................
On loan s:
Losses a n d c h a rg e -o ffs ...................................................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ..................................................
All o th e r
.........................................................................................

Net income before related taxes..................................................




935,461

836,665

883,637

1,017,299

58,939
12,603
95,039

49,887
12,827
63,530

88,397
11,256
72,213

317,381

237,480

93,657

745,081

219,767

101,830

84,996

268,159

168,003

156,232

/ 44,290
\21,354
224,678

32,018
452,940
89,369

25,636
321,870
87,452

25,053
282,227
114,117

25,459
318,965
104,006

35,760
451,667
114,996

31,194
481,200
132,745

30,107
528,710
111,267

29,588
609,059
118,746

32,385
666,040
147,008

2,031,360

2,372,217

2,973,128

2,372,519

3,387,129

3,401,822

3,260,178

3,379,546

3,431,832

CORPORATION

8,050,416

1,342,842
370,045
4,339,866
73,562
385,927
168,497
322,117
229,068

INSURANCE

7,231,921

In te r e s t o n U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s .................................
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s ................................
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on lo a n s .......................................................
S e rvice c h a rg e s a n d fe e s on lo a n s ................................................
S e rvice c h a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts ...........................................
O th e r c h a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc ........................................
T ru s t d e p a rtm e n t
....................................................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g r e v e n u e ....................................................

DEPOSIT

Current operating revenue—to ta l.................................................

9,669,352

FEDERAL

1960

10,723,545

14
9

In c o m e ite m

Taxes on net income—to ta l...........................................................

814,636

998,397

1,271,459

884,458

1,384,397

F e d e ra l......................................................................................................
S ta te ...........................................................................................................

1,406,102

1,256,382

1,226,783

769,843
44,793

947,998
50,401

1,148,203

1,198,890
72,570

832,797
51,661

1,300,940
83,457

1,317,292
88,810

1,159,725
96,657

1,130,629
96,154

1,050,624
97,579

Net income after related taxes.....................................................

1,216,725

1,373,821

1,701,667

1,448,061

2,002,732

1,995,720

2,003,796

2,152,763

2,283,629

Dividends and interest on capital—to ta l...................................

616,890

678,101

725,866

776,386

831,546

895,053

C ash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d on c o m m o n s to c k .............................
D iv id e n d s d e c la re d on p re fe rre d s to c k and in te re s t on
c a p ita l n o te s a n d d e b e n tu re s .....................................................

941,189

993,374

1,088,310

614,501

675,867

723,500

774,167

829,522

893,230

939,426

990,039

1,062,561

2,389

2,234

2,366

2,219

2,024

1,823

1,763

3,335

25,749

Net additions to capital from incom e.........................................

599,835

695,720

975,802

711,675

1,171,186

1,100,667

1,062,607

1,159,389

1,195,319

3,332
42,717

2,646
50,824

10,410
69,073

5,585
73,790

18,294
68,232

9,911
73,844

4,714
84,863

6,216
96,897

4,515
157,791

95,505
123,529

74,529
117,937

19,741
127,515

207,061
122,315

47,716
264,405

22,463
249-500

16,305
238,825

17,314
323,475

43,683
394,181

Average assets and liabilities9
Assets—to ta l...................................................................................... 209,712,780

Memoranda

237,577,389

246,776,722

254,198,199

274,220,778

298,940,778

325,490,626

45,474,318
57,238,574
16,725,206
91,493,989
3,858,353

46,766,041
62,355,819
19,237,561
95,666,835
4,333,431

46,881,654
61,878,548
20,284,525
103,872,351
4,660,311

49,317,003
57,773,429
20,092,632
114,275,450
5,318,208

46,613,211
61,792,135
21,660,321
117,969,985
6,162,547

49,438,670
64,519,914
25,761,084
127,789,110
6,712,000

50,997,566
64,058,431
31,421,875
145,028,233
7,434,673

54,449,343
61,439,390
36,360,062
164,816,703
8,425,128

Liabilities and capital—to ta l.........................................................

209,712,780

214,790,440

228,359,687

237,577,389

246,776,722

T o ta l d e p o s its ...............................................................................
Demand deposits ..................................................
Time and savings deposits ...................................................
B o rro w in g s a n d o th e r lia b ilitie s .....................................................
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts .................................................

254,198,199

274,220,778

298,940,778

325,490,626

190,786,522
1 39 ,6 9 0 ,4 3 2
5 1 ,0 9 6 ,0 9 0
3,372,960
15,553,298

193,993,484
1 3 9 ,0 2 3 ,5 9 7
5 4 ,9 6 9 ,8 8 7
4,242,293
16,554,663

206,196,015
1 4 3 ,8 1 3 ,4 7 5
6 2 ,3 8 2 ,5 4 0
4,440,097
17,723,575

213,428,979
1 4 6 ,5 9 9 ,7 4 5
6 6 ,8 2 9 ,2 3 4
5,410,250
18,738,160

220,099,028
1 5 0 ,4 5 1 ,4 8 1
6 9 ,6 4 7 ,5 4 7
6,712,522
19,965,172

225,214,703
1 4 7 ,5 5 6 ,1 7 5
7 7 ,6 5 8 ,5 2 8
7,694,509
21,288,987

243,319,550
1 5 3 ,8 4 9 ,4 9 4
8 9 ,4 7 0 ,0 5 6
8,197,420
22,703,808

264,069,489
1 5 9 ,5 6 1 ,9 7 3
1 0 4 ,5 0 7 ,5 1 6
10,587,389
24,283,900

287,988,560
1 6 8 ,3 8 2 ,1 2 2
1 1 9 ,6 0 6 ,4 3 8
11,110,692
26,391,374

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s (in c lu d in g b u ild in g em p lo ye e s),
D ecem ber 31:
A c tiv e o f fic e r s ........................................................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s ..................................................................................

88,462
433,563

91,597
452,218

95,308
457,023

98,934
481,666

103,211
506,596

107,279
526,101

112,458
543,695

117,147
531,820

124,351
578,307

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 .......................................................

13,218

13,165

13,124

13,114

13,126

13,115

13,124

13,291

13,493




195

1 Excludes rentals from bank premises; included with “ Occupancy expense of bank premises— net.”
2 Excludes compensation of building officers and other employees; included with "Occupancy expense of bank premises— net.”
3 Included with “ Other current operating expenses” , except Social Security taxes paid on bank's account which were included with “ Taxes other than on net income.”
4 Included with “ Officer and employee benefits” , “ Occupancy expense of bank premises— net", and "Other current operating expenses.”
5 Included with "Occupancy expense of bank premises— net” , and “ Furniture and equipment.”
6 Included with "Taxes other than on net income," “ Recurring depreciation on banking house, Furniture and fixtures,” and “ Other current operating expenses.”
7 Included with "Recurring depreciation on banking house, furniture and fixtures” , and “ Other current operating expenses.”
8 Not comparable with amounts reported for previous years; see footnotes 3,4,6, and 7.
9 For 1956 through 1960 and for 1964, averages of amounts reported at beginning, middle, and end of year. For 1961 and 1962, averages of amounts for four consecutive official call dates beginning with the end of
the previous year and ending with the fall call of the current year. For 1963 averages of amounts reported at 1962 year-end, 1963 spring, mid-year, and year-end calls.
Note: Due to rounding differences, data for 1956-1959 may not add to totals.
Back figures, 1934-1955: See the following Annual Reports: 1955, pp. 134-135; 1950, pp. 250-251; and 1941, pp. 158-159.

BANKS

228,359,687

45,728,691
58,257,149
16,179,498
86,291,628
3,255,814

O INSURED
F

214,790,440

C ash a n d d u e f ro m b a n k s ................................................................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s .......................................
O th e r s e c u r itie s .....................................................................................
Lo a n s a n d d is c o u n ts ...........................................................................
A ll o th e r a s s e ts ......................................................................................

INCOME

R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s (n o t in c lu d e d in
re c o v e rie s a b o v e ):
On s e c u rite s ............................................................................................
On lo a n s ....................................................................................................
Losses c h a rg e d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s (rvot in c lu d e d in losses
a b o ve ):
O n s e c u ritie s ...........................................................................................
O n lo a n s ....................................................................................................

Table 114. RATIOS OF INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), 1956-1964
1
96

In c o m e ite m

1960

196 1

1962

1963

1964

In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ....................................................................................................
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s ..................................................................................................
In c o m e on lo a n s ......................................................................................................................................................
S e rvice c h a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts .............................................................................................................
O th e r ch a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc ..........................................................................................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g re v e n u e .....................................................................................................................

$100.00
18.57
5.12
61.03
5.33
2.33
7.62

$100.00
17.92
5.12
61.65
5.48
2.32
7.51

$100.00
18.16
5.91
60.48
5.72
2.25
7.48

$100.00
17.91
5.65
61.73
5.50
2.13
7.08

$100.00
16.69
5.40
63.48
5.50
2.04
6.89

$100.00
17.18
5.68
63.31
5.70
2.02
*6.11

$100.00
17.13
6.21
63.16
5.58
1.94
>5.98

$100.00
16.11
6.82
64.19
5.39
1.84
*5.65

$100.00
14.91
7.22
65.13
5.20
1.87
'5.67

Current operating expenses—to ta l..........................................................................................................

61.63

63.59

66.02

64.78

64.65

67.22

70.29

71.91

72.53

S a laries, w a ges, a n d f e e s ....................................................................................................................................
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fits ..........................................................................................................................
In te r e s t on tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its ..........................................................................................................
T axe s o th e r th a n on n e t in c o m e .......................................................................................................................
R e c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n on b a n k in g ho u se , fu r n itu r e and fix tu r e s ....................................................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t ...............................................................................................
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t................................................................................................................ ................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s ..................................................................................................................

29.53
(3)
11.14
2.60
1.77
(«)
(7
)
16.59

28.73
(3
)
14.18
2.56
1.82
(6)
(7
)
16.30

28.80
(3)
16.24
2.61
1.98
(6)
(7
)
16.39

27.19
(3)
16.34
2.61
1.98
(6
)
(7
)
16.66

26.62
(3
)
16.65
2.66
1.98
(6)
(7
)
16.74

2
26.73
3.41
19.03
(4
)
(5)
4.61
2.03
*11.41

2 . 67
25
3.43
23.28
(4)
(5
)
4.55
2.19
*11.17

2
24.81
3.38
25.64
(4
)
(6
)
4.50
2.31
*11.27

2
23.90
3.27
27.21
(4
)
(6
)
4.46
2.41
*11.28

Net current operating earnings.................................................................................................................

38.37

36.41

33.98

35.22

35.35

32.78

29.71

28.09

27.47

3.45
2.13
1.32
.12
.47
.97
.58

3.74
2.38
1.36
.09
.35
1.10
.64

3.72
2.46
1.26
.38
.34
1.30
.75

4.07
2.64
1.43
.14
.57
1.00
.63

4.35
2.81
1.54
.23
.40
1.37
.81

4.35
2.92
1.43
.28
.37
1.34
.79

4.45
3.13
1.32
.17
.30
1.19
.73

4.52
3.25
1.27
.16
.30
1.13
.72

4.62
3.35
1.27
.10
.32
1.05
.70

17.84
1.61
6.39
13.06
5.24
7.82
3.96
3.86

17.71
1.20
4.58
14.33
6.03
8.30
4.10
4.20

16.30
4.89
4.42
16.77
7.17
9.60
4.09
5.51

18.17
1.76
7.27
12.66
4.72
7.94
4.14
3.80

18.99
2.88
4.90
16.97
6.94
10.03
4.16
5.87

17.05
3.32
4.39
15.98
6.61
9.37
4.20
5.17

15.99
2.06
3.69
14.36
5.53
8.83
4.15
4.68

15.63
1.93
3.64
13.92
5.06
8.86
4.09
4.77

15.64
1.22
3.86
13.00
4.35
8.65
4.12
4.53

5.11
2.31
2.29
.28
1.58

5.42
2.52
2.47
.32
2.08

5.37
2.48
2.61
.34
2.21

5.75
2.80
2.69
.36
2.36

5.96
3.10
2.88
.39
2.56

5.94
3.08
2.90
.43
2.71

6.04
3.24
2.95
.44
3.18

5.98
3.40
2.93
.46
3.31

5.94
3.65
2.98
.46
3.42

Amounts per $ 100 of total assets9
C u rre n t o p e ra tin g re v e n u e — t o t a l.....................................................................................................................
C u rre n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s — t o t a l..................................................................................................................
N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e a r n in g s .........................................................................................................................
R e coveries, tra n s fe r s fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s , a n d p ro fits — t o ta l.....................................................
Losses, c h a rg e -o ffs , a n d tra n s fe r s to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s — t o ta l.........................................................
N e t in c o m e b e fo re re la te d t a x e s ......................................................................................................................
N e t in c o m e a fte r re la te d ta x e s ..........................................................................................................................

Amounts per $ 100 of total capital accounts9
N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e a r n in g s .........................................................................................................................
R e coveries, tra n s fe r s fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s , a n d p ro fits — t o t a l.....................................................
Losses, c h a rg e -o ffs , a n d tra n s fe r s to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s — t o ta l.........................................................
...
N e t in c o m e b e fo re re la te d t a x e s .................................................
T a xe s on n e t in c o m e ..............................................................................................................................................
N e t in c o m e a fte r re la te d ta x e s .....................................................
Cash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d ...........................................................................
..........
........................
N e t a d d itio n s to ca p ita l fro m in c o m e .............................................................................................................

Special ratios9
In c o m e on lo a n s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f lo a n s .....................................................
........................
In c o m e on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ...............
In c o m e on o th e r s e c u ritie s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f o th e r s e c u ritie s ......................................................................
S e rvice c h a rg e s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f d e m a n d d e p o s its .........................................................................................
In te re s t p a id p e r $ 1 0 0 o f tim e a n d sa vin g s d e p o s its .............................................................................




CORPORATION

1959

INSURANCE

1958

DEPOSIT

1957

FEDERAL

1956

Amounts per $10 0 of current operating revenue
Current operating revenue—to ta l.............................................................................................................

Assets and liabilities per $ 10 0 of total assets
Assets—to ta l.......................................................................

Liabilities and capital—to ta l...........................................

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 .......................................

27.78
7.71
41.15
1.55

21.17
26.65
7.79
42.60
1.79

20.48
27.31
8.42
41.89
1.90

19.73
26.05
8.54
43.72
1.96

19.98
23.41
8.14
46.31
2.16

18.34
24.31
8.52
46.41
2.42

18.03
23.53
9.39
46.60
2.45

17.06
21.43
10.51
48.51
2.49

16.73
18.87
11.17
50.64
2.59

10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 1 0 0 10 0 1 0 0 10 0 1 0 0
0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0
90.97
6 6 .6 1
2 4 .3 6
1.61
7.42

90.32
6 4 .7 3
2 5 .5 9
1.97
7.71

90.30
6 2 .9 8
2 7 .3 2
1.94
7.76

89.83
6 1 .7 0
2 8 .1 3
2.28
7.89

89.19
6 0 .9 7
2 8 .2 2
2.72
8.09

88.60
5 8 .0 5
3 0 .5 5
3.03
8.37

88.73
5 6 .1 0
3 2 .6 3
2.99
8.28

88.34
5 3 .3 8
3 4 .9 6
3.54
8.12

88.48
5 1 .7 3
3 6 .7 5
3.41
8.11

13,218

13,165

13,124

13,114

13,126

13,115

13,124

13,291

13,493

BANKS

1 Excludes rentals from bank premises; included with “ Occupancy expense of bank premises— net.”
2 Fxc,lu,de! comPensation of building officers and other employees; included with “ Occupancy expense of bank premises— net.”
3 nc uded with “ Other current operating expenses” , except Social Security taxes paid on bank’s account which were included with "Taxes other than on net income ”
included with Officer and employee benefits , ‘ Occupancy expense of bank premises— net,” and “ Other current operating expenses ”
5 Included with ^Occupancy expense of bank premises— net", and “ Furniture and equipment.”
6 Included with “ Taxes other than on net income," “ Recurring depreciation on banking house, furniture and fixtures,” and “ Other current operating expenses.”
Included with Recurring depreciation on banking house, furniture and fixtures” , and “ Other current operating expenses.”
8 Not comparable with amounts reported for previous years; see footnotes, 3,4,6, and 7.

O INSURED
F

T o ta l d e p o s its .........................................................................
Demand deposits.............................................................
Time and savings deposits ................................................
B o rro w in g s a n d o th e r lia b ilitie s .....................................
T o ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts ........................................................

10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 10 0 1 0 0
0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0 0 .0
21.81
INCOME

Cash a n d d u e fro m b a n k s ................................................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s .......................
O th e r s e c u r itie s .....................................................................
L oa ns a n d d is c o u n ts ...........................................................
All o th e r a s s e ts ......................................................................

th»
r K ! ^ i, ave,Ia? . l 0f amT ts reported at beginning, middle, and end of year. For 1961 and 1962, averages of amounts for four consecutive official call dates beginning with the end of
.
the previous year and ending with the fall call of the current year. For 1963 averages of amounts reported at 1962 year-end, 1963 spring, mid-year, and year-end calls.
Back figures, 1934-1955: See the following Annual Reports; 1955, pp. 136-137; 1950, pp. 252-253; and 1941, pp. 160-161.

197




Table 115. INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), 1964
BY CLASS OF BANK

198

(A m ounts in th o u s a n d s o f d o lla rs )
M e m b e rs F.R. S ystem
In c o m e ite m

T o ta l
N a tio n a l

S tate

Not
m e m b e rs
F.R. S ystem

O p e ra tin g
th ro u g h o u t
th e y e a r

O p e ra tin g
less th a n
fu ll year

2,648,846

14,880,868

143,619

551,394
309,504
2,694,442
46,696
165,784
73,925
311,024
75,174

499,259
174,153
1,641,269
32,729
174,212
73,105
28,339
25,780

2,219,652
1,075,504
9,520,740
171,112
775,515
277,599
620,722
220,024

20,737
9,830
91,339
2,047
5,890
2,690
8,972
2,114

Current operating expenses—to ta l....................................................................................

10,897,460

5,904,713

2,983,328

2,009,419

10,783,527

113,933

S a la rie s— o f fic e r s ............................................................................................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— o th e r e m p lo y e e s .................................................................................
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fits .................................................................................................
Fees paid to d ire c to rs a n d c o m m itte e s ................................................................................
In te re s t on tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its .................................................................................
In te re s t on b o rro w e d m o n e y .....................................................................................................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t ......................................................................
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t...........................................................................................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s ..........................................................................................

1,284,140
2,234,922
490,732
72,176
4,088,061
127,277
670,243
362,301
1,567,608

664,841
1,210,766
266,022
33,447
2,262,724
63,477
350,823
206,210
846,403

302,311
659,052
153,407
12,393
1,120,800
58,577
198,642
90,307
387,839

316,988
365,104
71,303
26,336
704,537
5,223
120,778
65,784
333,366

1,269,126
2,211,747
486,775
71,427
4,055,304
126,073
662,300
358,010
1,542,765

15,014
23,175
3,957
749
32,757
1,204
7,943
4,291
24,843

Net current operating earnings..........................................................................................

4,127,027

2,242,985

1,244,615

639,427

4,097,341

29,686

Recoveries, transfers from valuation reserves, and profits—to tal...........................

322,104

168,623

106,143

47,338

315,365

6,739

On s e c u ritie s :
P ro fits on s e c u ritie s s old o r r e d e e m e d ............................................................................
R e c o v e rie s .....................................................................................................................................
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ......................................................................................
On loan s:
R e c o v e rie s .....................................................................................................................................
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s .....................................................................................
All o t h e r ..............................................................................................................................................

74,723
6,633
57,284

43,318
1,564
39,214

14,975
3,909
14,764

16,430
1,160
3,306

73,549
6,592
56,400

1,174
41
884

17,383
62,313
103,768

7,640
19,288
57,599

2,729
37,097
32,669

7,014
5,928
13,500

17,296
60,883
100,645

87
1,430
3,123

Losses, charge-offs, and transfers to valuation reserves—total................................

1,017,299

556,940

288,273

172,086

1,004,288

13,011

On s e c u ritie s :
Losses on s e c u ritie s s o ld ........................................................................................................
C h a rg e -o ffs p rio r to s a le ..........................................................................................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s . ........................................................................................
On loan s:
Losses a n d c h a rg e -o ffs ............................................................................................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ...........................................................................................
A ll o t h e r ..............................................................................................................................................

88,397
11,256
72,213

49,738
4,442
41,340

29,947
3,936
23,920

8,712
2,878
6,953

87,711
10,170
71,337

686
1,086
876

32,385
666,040
147,008

13,465
365,585
82,370

3,380
186,211
40,879

15,540
114,244
23,759

32,171
658,841
144,058

214
7,199
2,950

Net income before related taxes........................................................................................

3,431,832

1,854,668

1,062,485

514,679

3,408,418

23,414




CORPORATION

4,227,943

1,189,736
601,677
5,276,368
93,734
441,409
133,259
290,331
121,184

INSURANCE

8,147,698

2,240,389
1,085,334
9,612,079
173,159
781,405
280,289
629,694
222,138

DEPOSIT

15,024,487

In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ...........................................................................
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s .........................................................................
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on lo a n s ................................................................................................
S e rvice c h a rg e s a n d fe e s on lo a n s .........................................................................................
S e rvice ch a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts ....................................................................................
O th e r ch a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc .................................................................................
T r u s t d e p a r t m e n t ...........................................................................................................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g r e v e n u e ............................................................................................

FEDERAL

Current operating revenue—to ta l......................................................................................

631,172

364,573

152,458

1,136,593

11,610

1,050,624
97,579

579,742
51,430

328,570
36,003

142,312
10,146

1,039,385
97,208

11,239
371

Net income after related taxes...........................................................................................

2,283,629

1,223,496

697,912

362,221

2,271,825

11,804

Dividends and interest on capital—to ta l.........................................................................

1,088,310

603,022

356,298

128,990

1,076,324

11,986

C ash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d on c o m m o n s to c k ......................................................................
D iv id e n d s d e c la re d on p re fe rre d s to c k a n d in te re s t on c a p ita l n otes a n d
d e b e n tu re s ...........................................................................................................................

1,062,561

591,695

343,355

127,511

1,051,750

10,811

25,749

11,327

12,943

1,479

24,574

1,175

Net additions to capital from income...............................................................................

1,195,319

620,474

341,614

233,231

1,195,501

- 182

N u m b e r o f b a n k in g e m p lo y e e s (e x c lu s iv e o f b u ild in g e m ployee s), D e ce m b e r 3 1 :
A c tiv e o f fic e r s .................................................................................................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s ............................................................................................................................

124,005
546,771

62,775
300,976

24,205
142,498

37,025
103,297

122,476
540,633

1,529
6,138

4,515
157,791

2,553
105,995

1,583
33,418

379
18,378

4,509
156,960

6
831

43,683
394,181

32,320
225,854

9,710
94,052

1,653
74,275

43,048
391,712

635
2,469

670,243

350,823

198,642

120,778

662,300

7,943

Memoranda
R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s (n o t in c lu d e d in recoveries above):
On s e c u r itie s ....................................................................................................................................
On lo a n s .............................................................................................................................................
L osses c h a rg e d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ( n o t in c lu d e d in losses abo ve):
On s e c u r itie s ....................................................................................................................................
On lo a n s .............................................................................................................................................

Occupancy expense of bank premises
Occupancy expense of bank premises, net—total.........................................................

160,915

100,366

46,123

14,426

160,183

732

831,158

451,189

244,765

135,204

822,483

8,675

2,464
91,151
11,018
146.899
94,133
144,064
221,477
119,952

1,485
52,831
6,268
81,760
56,140
74,593
110,149
67,963

738
26,114
3,876
41,037
21,683
42,387
74,811
34,119

241
12,206
874
24,102
16,310
27,084
36,517
17,870

2,449
90,315
10,938
145,102
93,115
142,552
218,858
119,154

15
836
80
1,797
1,018
1,512
2,619
798

R e nta l a n d o th e r in c o m e ...........................

S a la rie s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t o f fic e r s ................................................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a ges— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t e m p lo y e e s ..................................................
B u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t p e rs o n n e l b e n e fits .............................................................................
R e c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n ................................................................................................................
M a in te n a n c e a n d r e p a ir s ............................................................................................................
In s u ra n c e a n d u t ilit ie s .................................................................................................................
R e n ts p a id .........................................................................................................................................
T a xe s .................................................................................................................................................
N u m b e r o f b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 :
O ffic e rs .......................................................... .................................................................................

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 ................................................................................................

346
31,536
13,493




166
90
90
1
345
7,320
16,978 O th e r e m p lo y e e s ............................................................................................................................
7,238
31,247
289
4,773

1,451

7,269

13,160

333

199

Note: For average asset and liability data, see Table 109, p. 186.
Back figures, 1934-1963: See Table 113, p.194-195, the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 156-157, and earlier reports.

BANKS

.................................................................................

Occupancy expense of bank premises, gross—to ta l....................................................

O INSURED
F

1,148,203

F e d e ra l................................................................................................................................................
S ta te ....................................................................................................................................................

INCOME

Taxes on net income—to ta l.................................................................................................

200

Table 116. RATIOS OF INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), 1964
BY CLASS OF BANK
M e m b e rs F.R. S ystem
In c o m e ite m
T o ta l

N a tio n a l

S tate

Not
m e m b e rs
F.R.
S ystem

$100.00

$100.00

14.60
7.38
65.91
5.42
1.64
5.05

13.04
7.32
64.83
3.92
1.75
9.14

18.85
6.57
63.20
6.58
2.76
2.04

Current operating expenses—to ta l................................................................................................................................................................

72.53

72.47

70.56

75.86

S a la rie s, w a ges, a n d f e e s ...............................................................................................................................................................................................
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fits .....................................................................................................................................................................................
In te r e s t on tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its .....................................................................................................................................................................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n se o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t ..........................................................................................................................................................
F u rn itu re a n d e q u i p m e n t ............................
...........................................................................................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s .............................................................................................................................................................................

23.90
3.27
27.21
4.46
2.41
11.28

23.43
3.26
27.77
4.31
2.53
11.17

23.03
3.63
26.51
4.70
2.13
10.56

26.75
2.69
26.60
4.56
2.48
12.78

Net current operating earnings......................................................................................................................................................................

27.47

27.53

29.44

24.14

4.62
3.35
1.27
.10
.32
1.05
.70

4.56
3.30
1.26
.09
.31
1.04
.69

4.46
3.15
1.31
.11
.30
1.12
.74

5.08
3.85
1.23
.09
.33
.99
.69

(2
)
.05

(2)
.06

(2
)
.04

(2)
.04

.01
.12

.02
.13

.01
.10

(2
)
.14

INSURANCE

$100.00

14.91
7.22
65.13
5.20
1.87
5.67

DEPOSIT

$100.00

In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ..............................................................................................................................................................
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s .............................................................................................................................................................
In c o m e on lo a n s .................................................................................................................................................................................................................
S e rvice c h a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts ........................................................................................................................................................................
O th e r s e rv ic e c h a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc .....................................................................................................................................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g re v e n u e ................................................................................................................................................................................

FEDERAL

Amounts per $ 10 0 of current operating revenue
Current operating revenue—to ta l..................................................................................................................................................................

Amounts per $10 0 of total assets1

Memoranda
R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ( n o t in c lu d e d in re co ve rie s above):
On s e c u ritie s ....................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................
On lo a n s .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Losses c h a rg e d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ( n o t in c lu d e d in losses a bo ve):
On s e c u ritie s ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................
On lo a n s
....................................................................................
...........................................................................................................




CORPORATION

C u rr e n t o p e ra tin g re v e n u e — to ta l
.....................................................................................................
C u rr e n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s — to ta l
...........................................................................................................................................................................
N e t c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g e a rn in g s
...............................................................................................
R e coveries, tra n s fe r s fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s , a n d p ro fits — t o ta l...................................................................................................................
Losses, c h a rg e -o ffs , an d tra n s fe r s to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s — t o t a l.......................................................................................................................
N e t in c o m e b e fo re re la te d ta x e s ..................................................
.....................................................................................................
N e t in c o m e a fte r re la te d t a x e s .................................................................
...........................................................................................................

A m o u n ts p e r $ 1 0 0 o f to ta l c a p ita l a c c o u n ts 1
N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e a r n in g s .............................................................................................................
R e coveries, t ra n s fe r s fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s , and p ro fits — t o ta l.........................................
Losses, c h a rg e -o ffs , a n d tra n s fe r s to v a lu a tio n re se rve s— t o t a l.............................................
N e t in c o m e b e fo re re la te d ta x e s ..........................................................................................................
T axe s on n e t in c o m e ..................................................................................................................................
N e t in c o m e a fte r ta x e s ..............................................................................................................................
C ash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d ..........................................................................................................................
N e t a d d itio n s to c a p ita l fro m in c o m e .................................................................................................

15.64
1.22
3.86
13.00
4.35
8.65
4.12
4.53

15.70
1.18
3.90
12.98
4.42
8.56
4.22
4.34

16.15
1.37
3.74
13.78
4.73
9.05
4.62
4.43

14.54
1.07
3.91
11.70
3.46
8.24
2.94
5.30

.02
.43

.01
.42

.17
1.49

.23
1.58

.13
1.22

.04
1.69

S p e c ia l r a t io s 1
In c o m e on lo a n s p e r $100 o f lo a n s ....................................................................................................
In c o m e on U.S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s p e r $100 o f U.S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ___
In c o m e on o th e r s e c u ritie s p e r $100 o f o th e r s e c u ritie s ...........................................................
S e rvice c h a rg e s p e r $100 o f dem and d e p o s its ..............................................................................
In te r e s t p aid p e r $100 o f tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its ..................................................................

5.94
3.65
2.98
.46
3.42

5.94
3.63
2.97
.48
3.42

5.59
3.60
3.02
.33
3.52

6.57
3.74
2.96
.69
3.27

4.46

4.31

4.70

4.56

O ccu p a n cy e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f c u r re n t o p e ra tin g re v e n u e
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s , n e t— t o t a l ........................................................................
R e nta l a n d o th e r in c o m e ..........................................................................................................................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s , g ro s s — t o t a l ...................................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t o ffic e rs an d e m p lo y e e s ...................................
B u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t p e rs o n n e l b e n e fits ......................................................................................
R e c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n .........................................................................................................................
M a in te n a n c e a n d r e p a ir s .....................................................................................................................
In s u ra n c e a n d u t ilit ie s ...................................................................................................................
R e n ts p a id ...................................................................................................................................................
T a x e s .............................................................................................................................................................
N u m b e r o f b a n ks, D e c e m b e r 31

1.07

1.23

1.09

.54

5.53

5.54

5.79

5.10

.62
.07
.98
.63
.96
1.47
.80

.67
.08
1.00
.69
.92
1.35
.83

.64
.09
.97
.51
1.00
1.77
.81

.47
.03
.91
.62
1.02
1.38
.67

13,493

4,773

1,451

BANKS

.02
.74

O INSURED
F

.02
.60

INCOME

M e m o ra n d a
R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to re s e rv e a c c o u n ts (n o t in c lu d e d in reco v e rie s above):
On s e c u r itie s .............................................................................................................................................
On lo a n s ...................... ................................................................................................................................
Losse s ch a rg e d to re s e rv e a c c o u n ts ( n o t in c lu d e d in losses above):
On s e c u r itie s ..............................................................................................................................................
On lo a n s .......................................................................................................................................................

7,269

1 For average asset and liability data, see Table 109, p. 186.
2 Less than .005.
Back figures, 1934-1963: See Table 114, p. 196-197, the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 158-159, and earlier reports.

201




Table 117. INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS OPERATING THROUGHOUT 1964 IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND
OTHER AREAS)
B A N K S GRO UPED A C C O R D IN G TO A M O U N T O F DEPO SITS

202

B a n k s w ith d e p o s its o f— 2
In c o m e ite m

All
banks1

Less
than
$1,000,000

$1,000,000
to
$2,000,000

$2,000,000
to
$5,000,000

$5,000,000
to
$10,000,000

$10,000,000
to
$25,000,000

$25,000,000
to
$50,000,000

$50,000,000
to
$100,000,000

$100,000,000
to
$500,000,000

$500,000,000
or
more

(Amounts in thousands of dollars)

724,740

1,027,912

1,657,211

1,073,610

1,055,087

2,905,144

6,254,045

38,189
7,438
96,198
711
7,448
6,464
73
1,489

165,648
43,488
443,262
4,376
38,950
21,969
766
6,281

209,212
73,844
632,457
7,145
67,872
23,400
4,761
9,221

311,183
121,622
1,023,018
16,451
120,619
30,936
18,046
15,336

189,253
78,836
665,982
12,668
73,302
19,176
24,104
10,289

185,826
78,288
656,628
12,779
63,769
16,982
30,748
10,067

417,146
198,244
1,873,949
36,770
153,847
49,836
142,986
32,366

696,962
472,866
4,114,008
80,101
248,621
107,753
399,080
134,654

Current operating expenses—to ta l.......................

10,783,527

18,887

117,345

542,189

766,192

1,247,789

812,056

793,653

2,099,053

4,386,363

S a la rie s— o f fic e r s .........................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— o th e r e m p lo y e e s ..............
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fits ..............................
Fees p a id to d ire c to rs a n d c o m m itte e s .............
In te r e s t on tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its ...............
In te r e s t on b o rro w e d m o n e y ..................................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t . ..
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t.........................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s .......................

1,269,126
2,211,747
486,775
71,427
4,055,304
126,073
662,300
358,010
1,542,765

6,684
2,111
509
573
4,164
39
1,071
459
3,277

34,454
14,101
3,224
3,118
34,299
155
5,856
3,251
18,887

117,965
77,870
16,558
12,283
184,061
721
29,163
16,609
86,959

130,395
126,466
25,946
13,332
276,422
949
44,010
25,196
123,476

173,747
231,957
46,269
15,214
455,183
2,549
74,662
41,916
206,292

102,020
161,928
32,620
6,943
295,411
2,689
51,183
27,213
132,049

92,575
159,291
33,185
4,880
294,889
4,609
49,629
29,124
125,471

225,380
470,426
99,786
8,982
734,768
20,400
127,452
80,675
331,184

385,906
967,597
228,678
6,102
1,776,107
93,962
279,274
133,567
515,170

Net current operating earnings.............................

4,097,341

6,222

40,665

182,551

261,720

409,422

261,554

261,434

806,091

1,867,682

Recoveries, transfers from valuation reserves,
and profits—to ta l................................................

315,365

859

3,299

12,882

19,309

26,956

18,306

22,029

63,101

148,624

On s e c u ritie s :
P ro fits on s e c u ritie s s o ld o r r e d e e m e d ..........
R e c o v e rie s ..................................................................
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ..................
On lo a n s:
R e c o v e rie s ..................................................................
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n r e s e rv e s ...................
All o t h e r ...........................................................................

73,549
6,592
56,400

82
17
1

533
83
84

3,614
399
360

6,921
674
727

9,704
1,050
2,670

6,543
246
1,358

6,684
274
2,679

13,665
272
9,572

25,803
3,577
38,949

17,296
60,883
100,645

534
10
215

1,694
221
684

4,687
1,030
2,792

4,027
1,695
5,265

2,170
2,884
8,478

1,223
2,958
5,978

805
3,428
8,159

1,211
13,413
24,968

945
35,244
44,106

Losses, charge-offs, and transfers to valuation
reserves—to ta l....................................................

1,004,288

1,616

8,614

40,814

62,057

101,055

65,597

64,914

188,547

471,074

On s e c u ritie s :
Losses on s e c u ritie s s o ld .....................................
C h a rg e -o ffs p rio r to s a le .......................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ........................
On loan s:
Losses a n d c h a r g e - o ffs .........................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ........................
A ll o t h e r ...........................................................................

87,711
10.170
71,337

59
27
16

224
152
91

1,646
1,493
628

2,982
2,248
1,200

5,531
2,190
3,678

5,064
559
2,237

5,338
335
3,330

17,008
380
11,937

49,859
2,786
48,220

32.171
658,841
144,058

1,096
235
183

3,543
3,294
1,310

9,604
20,968
6,475

7,848
37,980
9,799

6,253
69,942
13,461

1,434
48,353
7,950

605
45,677
9,629

1,670
131,245
26,307

118
301,147
68,944

taxes...........................

3,408,418

5,465

35,350

154,619

218,972

335,323

214,263

218,549

680,645

1,545,232


Net income
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ before related
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

CORPORATION

158,010

6,233
878
15,238
111
1,087
1,083
158
321

INSURANCE

25,109

2,219,652
1,075,504
9,520,740
171,112
775,515
277,599
620,722
220,024

DEPOSIT

14,880,868

In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ........
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s ___
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on lo a n s .............................
S e rvice c h a rg e s a n d fe e s o n lo a n s ......................
S e rvice ch a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts .................
O th e r ch a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc ..............
T r u s t d e p a r t m e n t ........................................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g re v e n u e ..........................

FEDERAL

Current operating revenue—to ta l..........................

1,136,593

1,439

8,724

40,496

62,006

103,304

70,855

73,161

240,026

536,582

F e d e ra l.............................................................................
S ta te ..................................................................................

1,039,385
97,208

1,366
73

8,166
558

37,966
2,530

58,166
3,840

98,049
5,255

66,975
3,880

69,544
3,617

226,643
13,383

472,510
64,072

N et income after related taxes..............................

2,271,825

4,026

26,626

114,123

156,966

232,019

143,408

145,388

440,619

1,008,650

Dividends and interest on capital—to ta l.............

1,076,324

1,481

9,062

37,481

53,277

83,814

57,225

61,289

214,264

558,431

Cash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d o n c o m m o n s t o c k . ..
D iv id e n d s d e c la re d on p re fe rre d s to c k and
in te r e s t on c a p ita l n o te s a n d d e b e n tu r e s ....

1,051,750

1,480

9,060

37,451

53,142

83,627

56,822

60,626

208,307

541,235

24,574

1

2

30

135

187

403

663

5,957

17,196

Net additions to capital from incom e..................

1,195,501

2,545

17,564

76,642

103,689

148,205

86,183

84,099

226,355

450,219

N u m b e r o f b a n k in g e m p lo y e e s (e x c lu s iv e o f
b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s ), D e c e m b e r 3 1 :
A c tiv e o f fic e r s ................................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s .............................................., .........

122,476
540,633

1,459
964

5,630
5,139

15,632
24,649

15,328
37,470

17,610
65,698

9,472
44,477

7,967
41,406

18,996
117,151

30,382
203,679

Memoranda
4,509
156,960

98

1
844

38
5,732

116
9,138

189
15,254

139
9,561

281
9,603

1,134
28,123

2,611
78,607

43,048
391,712

255

14
2,321

77
15,017

203
26,577

719
49,032

781
33,385

1,193
31,822

8,470
68,624

31,591
164,679

Occupancy expense of bank premises
Occupancy expense of bank premises, n e t total ........................................................................

279,274

5,856

29,163

44,010

74,662

51,183

49,629

127,452

54

469

2,777

4,171

9,598

10,496

15,292

52,312

65,014

822,483

1,125

6,325

31,940

48,181

84,260

61,679

64,921

179,764

344,288

S a la rie s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t o f fic e r s .............
S a la rie s a n d w a ges— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t
e m p lo y e e s ..................................................................
B u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t p e rs o n n e l b e n e fit s ..........
R e c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n .............................................
M a in te n a n c e a n d r e p a ir s .........................................
In s u ra n c e a n d u t ilit ie s ..............................................
R e n ts p a id ......................................................................
T a x e s ................................................................................

2,449

1

10

41

38

56

85

197

727

1,294

90,315
10,938
145,102
93,115
142,552
218,858
119,154

49
2
132
177
473
88
203

466
12
1,058
988
2,169
608
1,014

3,169
132
6,594
4,180
8,533
4,074
5,217

5,250
329
10,337
5,980
10,699
7,561
7,987

9,459
720
17,198
10,760
15,992
16,239
13,836

7,305
701
11,799
7,544
10,022
15,091
9,132

8,042
826
11,462
7,949
9,707
17,225
9,513

23,632
3,051
28,679
19,581
28,097
51,309
24,688

32,943
5,165
57,843
35,956
56,860
106,663
47,564

N u m b e r o f b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s , D e c e m b e r 31:
O ffic e r s .............................................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s ..........................................................

345
31,247

9
141

32
925

37
3,292

14
3,034

14
3,755

16
2,521

25
2,842

64
7,104

134
7,633

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 ..............................

13,160

639

1,999

4,271

2,878

2,098

607

308

283

77

1This group of banks is the same as the group shown in Table 115 under the heading "Operating throughout the year” .
2 For asset and liability data, see Table 110, p. 187.
Back figures, 1941-1963 : See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 160-161, and earlier reports.




203

1,071

160,183

BANKS

662,300

R e nta l a n d o th e r in c o m e .............................................

Occupancy expense of bank premises, g ro s s total ........................................................................

O INSURED
F

R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s (n o t
in c lu d e d in re c o v e rie s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s ..................................................................
On lo a n s ..........................................................................
Losses c h a rg e d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ( n o t in ­
c lu d e d in losse s a b o ve ):
On s e c u ritie s ..................................................................
On lo a n s ..........................................................................

INCOME

Taxes on net income—to ta l.....................................

204

Table 118. RATIOS OF INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS OPERATING THROUGHOUT 1964 IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES
AND OTHER AREAS)
B A N K S G RO UPED AC C O R D IN G TO A M O U N T O F DE PO SITS
B a n k s w ith d e p o s its o f— 2
In c o m e ite m

Ail
banks1

Less
than
$1,000,000

$1,000,000
to
$2,000,000

$2,000,000
to
$5,000,000

$5,000,000
to
$10,000,000

$10,000,000
to
$25,000,000

$25,000,000
to
$50,000,000

$50,000,000
to
$100,000,000

$100,000,000
to
$500,000,000

$500,000,000
or
more

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

24.17
4.71
61.33
4.71
4.09
.99

22.86
6.00
61.77
5.37
3.03
.97

20.35
7.19
62.22
6.60
2.28
1.36

18.78
7.34
62.72
7.28
1.87
2.01

17.63
7.34
63.21
6.83
1.79
3.20

17.61
7.42
63.45
6.04
1.61
3.87

14.36
6.82
65.77
5.30
1.71
6.04

11.14
7.56
67.06
3.98
1.72
8.54

Current operating expenses—to ta l.......................

72.47

75.22

74.26

74.81

74.54

75.29

75.64

75.22

72.25

70.14

S a laries, w a ges, a n d f e e s .........................................
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fit s ..............................
In te r e s t on tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its ...............
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n se o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t . ..
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t.........................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s .......................

23.87
3.27
27.25
4.45
2.41
11.22

37.31
2.03
16.58
4.26
1.83
13.21

32.70
2.04
21.71
3.70
2.06
12.05

28.72
2.28
25.40
4.02
2.29
12.10

26.29
2.52
26.89
4.28
2.45
12.11

25.40
2.79
27.47
4.50
2.53
12.60

25.23
3.04
27.52
4.77
2.53
12.55

24.33
3.15
27.95
4.70
2.76
12.33

24.26
3.43
25.29
4.39
2.78
12.10

21.74
3.66
28.40
4.47
2.13
9.74

Net current operating earnings.............................

27.53

24.78

25.74

25.19

25.46

24.71

24.36

24.78

27.75

29.86

4.36
3.16
1.20

4.59
3.45
1.14

4.66
3.46
1.20

4.56
3.41
1.15

4.61
3.44
1.17

4.66
3.51
1.15

4.62
3.49
1.13

4.49
3.38
1.11

4.39
3.17
1.22

4.15
2.91
1.24

.09

.16

.09

.08

.09

.07

.07

.09

.10

.10

.29
1.00
.67

.30
1.00
.74

.25
1.04
.78

.26
.97
.72

.28
.98
.70

.28
.94
.65

.28
.92
.62

.27
.93
.62

.29
1.03
.67

.31
1.03
.67

( 3)
.05

.02

(3
)
.02

(3
)
.04

(3
)
.04

(3
)
.04

(3
)
.04

(3
)
.04

(3
)
.04

(3
)
.05

.01
.11

.05

(3
)
.07

(3
)
.09

(3
)
.12

(3
)
.14

(3
)
.14

.01
.14

.01
.10

.02
.11

Amounts per $ 10 0 of total assets2
C u rr e n t o p e ra tin g re v e n u e — t o t a l.............................
C u rr e n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s — t o t a l..........................
N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e a r n in g s .................................
R e coveries, tra n s fe r s fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ,
a n d p r o fits — t o t a l.....................................................
Losses, c h a rg e -o ffs , a n d t ra n s fe r s to v a lu a tio n
re s e rv e s — t o t a l..........................................................
N e t in c o m e b e fo re re la te d ta x e s ..............................
N e t in c o m e a fte r re la te d ta x e s ..................................

Memoranda
R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ( n o t
in c lu d e d in re c o v e rie s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s ..................................................................
On lo a n s ...........................................................................
Losses c h a rg e d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ( n o t in ­
c lu d e d in losse s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s ..................................................................
On lo a n s ...........................................................................




CORPORATION

$100.00

24.82
3.50
61.13
4.33
4.31
1.91

INSURANCE

$100.00

14.92
7.23
65.13
5.21
1.86
5.65

DEPOSIT

$100.00

In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ........
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s ___
In c o m e on lo a n s ...........................................................
S e rvice c h a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts .................
O th e r se rv ic e ch a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc .
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g r e v e n u e .........................

FEDERAL

Amounts per $10 0 of current operating
revenue
Current operating revenue—to ta l..........................

Amounts per $ 1 0 0
accounts2

of total capital

N e t c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g e a r n in g s ................................
R e co ve rie s, t ra n s fe r s fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ,
a n d p r o fits — t o t a l.........................................................
Losse s, c h a rg e -o ffs , a n d tra n s fe r s to v a lu a tio n
re s e rv e s — t o t a l..............................................................
N e t in c o m e b e fo re re la te d t a x e s ..............................
T a xe s on n e t in c o m e ......................................................
N e t in c o m e a fte r t a x e s ..................................................
C ash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d ..............................................
N e t a d d itio n s to c a p ita l fro m in c o m e .....................

15.18

9.00

11.07

12.20

14.07

14.86

15.22

14.85

15.91

1.16

1.24

.89

.86

1.04

.98

1.07

1.25

1.24

1.25

3.72
12.62
4.21
8.41
3.98
4.43

2.34
7.90
2.08
5.82
2.14
3.68

2.34
9.62
2.37
7.25
2.47
4.78

2.72
10.34
2.71
7.63
2.51
5.12

3.34
11.77
3.33
8.44
2.86
5.58

3.67
12.17
3.75
8.42
3.04
5.38

3.82
12.47
4.13
8.34
3.33
5.01

3.68
12.42
4.16
8.26
3.48
4.78

3.72
13.43
4.73
8.70
4.23
4.47

3.96
12.98
4.51
8.47
4.69
3.78

.02
.58

.14

(3
)
.23

(3
)
.38

.01
.49

.01
.55

.01
.56

.02
.55

.02
.56

.02
.66

.16
1.45

.37

(3
)
.63

.01
1.00

.01
1.43

.03
1.78

.05
1.94

.07
1.81

.17
1.35

.27
1.38

5.60

6.70

6.51

6.35

6.25

6.13

5.93

5.81

5.60

5.25

3.58

3.55

3.54

3.56

3.62

3.65

3.64

3.66

3.57

3.52

15.69

Memoranda

Special ratios2

2.81
.32

3.01
.40

2.80
.48

2.75
.62

2.74
.70

2.73
.64

2.81
.54

2.82
.43

2.88
.31

3.21

2.96

2.97

2.97

2.99

3.02

3.06

3.13

3.16

3.41

Occupancy expense of bank premises
per $ 10 0 of current operating
revenue
Occupancy expense of bank premises, n e t total ........................................................................

4.47

4.26

3.70

4.02

4.28

4.50

4.77

4.70

1.08

.22

.30

4.39

.39

.41

.58

.98

1.45

1.80

1.04

5.53

4.48

4.00

4.41

S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t
o ffic e rs a n d e m p lo y e e s .........................................
B u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t p e rs o n n e l b e n e fit s ..........
R e c u rrin g d e p r e c ia tio n .............................................
M a in te n a n c e a n d r e p a ir s .........................................
In s u ra n c e a n d u t ilit ie s ..............................................
R e n ts p a id .......................................................................
T a x e s .................................................................................

4.69

5.08

5.75

6.15

6.19

5.51

.62
.07
.98
.63
.96
1.47
.80

.20
.01
.53
.70
1.88
.35
.81

.30
.01
.67
.63
1.37
.38
.64

.44
.02
.91
.58
1.18
.56
.72

.51
.03
1.01
.58
1.04
.74
.78

.57
.04
1.04
.65
.97
.98
.83

.69
.07
1.10
.70
.93
1.41
.85

.78
.08
1.09
.75
.92
1.63
.90

.84
.10
.99
.67
.97
1.77
.85

.55
.08
.92
.58
.91
1.71
.76

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 ..............................

13,160

639

1,999

4,271

2,878

2,098

607

308

283

77

1 This group of banks is the same as the group shown in Table 115 under the heading "Operating throughout the year” . These ratios differ slightly from the ratios for all insured commercial banks shown in Tables
114 and 116.
2 For asset and liability data, see Table 110, p. 187.
3 Less than .005.
Back figures, 1941-1963: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 162-163, and earlier reports.




205

4.45

R e n ta l a n d o th e r in c o m e ..............................................

Occupancy expense of bank premises, g ro s s to ta l........................................................................

BANKS

2.82
.44

O INSURED
F

In c o m e on lo a n s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f lo a n s ........................
In c o m e on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s p e r
$ 1 0 0 o f U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ..........
In c o m e on o th e r s e c u ritie s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f o th e r
s e c u r itie s .....................................................................
S e rvice c h a rg e s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f d e m a n d d e p o s its . ..
In te r e s t pa id p e r $ 1 0 0 o f tim e a n d sav in g s
d e p o s its .......................................................................

INCOME

R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to re s e rv e a c c o u n ts (n o t
in c lu d e d in re c o v e rie s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s ..................................................................
On lo a n s ...........................................................................
Losses c h a rg e d to re s e rv e a c c o u n ts (n o t in ­
c lu d e d in lo s s e s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s ..................................................................
On lo a n s ...........................................................................

Table 119. INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS), BY STATE, 1964
(A m ounts in th o u s a n d s o f d o lla rs )
T o ta l
U n ite d
S ta te s

Current operating revenue—to ta l...................... 15,024,487

O th e r areas
P u erto
Rico

V irgin
Is la n d s

50 S ta te s
and
D.C.

206

In c o m e ite m

A la b a m a

A la ska

A rk a n s a s

A riz o n a

C a lifo rn ia

C o lo ra d o

C o n n e c ti­
cut

17,925

114,462

85,980

1,853,867

148,745

176,905

25

24,205
11,090
89,744
1,054
9,418
3,479
3,086
1,368

2,700
552
11,183
1,082
1,531
611
72
194

9,122
5,119
83,035
2,802
8,671
2,519
2,512
682

12,991
8,341
55,445
239
4,737
2,651
859
717

196,804
104,228
1,265,854
43,605
125,098
31,899
58,510
27,869

21,127
6,210
96,201
1,950
12,714
3,493
5,485
1,565

18,580
12,487
112,384
1,564
11,571
2,845
15,647
1,827

Current operating expenses—to ta l..................

10,897,460

34,300

1,181

10,861,979

100,119

13,853

90,249

61,836

1,406,895

113,576

127,926

S a la rie s— o f fic e r s ....................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— o th e r e m p lo y e e s .........
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fit s .........................
Fees p a id to d ir e c to rs a n d c o m m itte e s
In te r e s t o n tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its .........
In te r e s t on b o rro w e d m o n e y .............................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t.
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t ....................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s ..................

1,284,140
2,234,922
490,732
72,176
4,088,061
127,277
670,243
362,301
1,567,608

3,994
7,946
1,337
178
11,021
427
1,805
1,176
6,416

110
283
50
5
493
19
33
41
147

1,280,036
2,226,693
489,345
71,993
4,076,547
126,831
668,405
361,084
1,561,045

15,122
20,511
3,794
871
34,850
97
4,601
3,547
16,726

2,232
3,509
510
45
3,836
16
990
649
2,066

10,637
19,873
3,627
174
32,058
326
6,721
4,279
12,554

10,594
10,899
2,285
1,021
19,649
235
3,719
2,424
11,010

141,997
296,753
58,943
1,516
606,840
13,589
84,347
49,347
153,563

15,496
22,150
4,130
1,089
39,404
712
7,795
4,674
18,126

17,324
32,211
7,531
850
33,386
988
9,462
5,444
20,730

Net current operating earnings........................

4,127,027

7,912

459

4,118,656

43,325

4,072

24,213

24,144

446,972

35,169

48,979

Recoveries, transfers from valuation re­
serves, and profits—to ta l............................

322,104

1,268

25

320,811

2,128

92

1,461

1,714

28,447

2,501

3,985

73,932
6,633
57,284

1,203
15
56

18

733
1
283

492
7
164

5,469
3,165
3,512

501
47
400

1,526
2
433

9

On s e c u ritie s :
P ro fits o n s e c u ritie s s o ld o r r e d e e m e d . . .
R e c o v e rie s .............................................................
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s
On lo a n s:
R e c o v e rie s .......................
...
T ra n s fe rs fr o m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s .........
A ll o t h e r ......................................................................

74,723
6,633
57,284

791

17,383
62,313
103,768

55
19
403

25

17,328
62,294
103,340

311
99
444

74

435

402
186
463

884
10,598
4,819

413
62
1,078

38
217
1,769

Losses, charge-offs, and transfers to valu­
ation reserves—to ta l.....................................

1,017,299

2,028

78

1,015,193

9,439

2,010

7,413

5,023

143,979

8,388

11,189

88,075
11,256
72,213

414
99
100

80

316
1
124

287
143
44

8,875
35
15,160

745
147
103

1,472
4
43

On s e c u ritie s :
Losses on s e c u ritie s s o ld ................................
C h a rg e -o ffs p rio r to s a le ..................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ...................
On lo a n s:
Losses a n d c h a r g e - o ffs ....................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ...................
A ll o t h e r ......................................................................

88,397
11,256
72,213

322

32,385
666,040
147,008

414
1,143
149

49
29

31,971
664,848
146,830

627
7,094
1,105

1,793
137

15
6,208
749

604
2,926
1,019

1,691
92,942
25,276

966
5,128
1,299

44
5,953
3,673

Net income before related taxes......................

3,431,832

7,152

406

3,424,274

36,014

2,154

18,261

20,835

331,440

29,282

41,775




CORPORATION

143,444

2,237,030
1,083,567
9,580,758
170,514
779,991
277,635
629,665
221,475

INSURANCE

14,980,635

220
25
1,116
122
29
103

DEPOSIT

1,640

3,139
1,742
30,205
2,523
1,385
2,551
29
638

FEDERAL

42,212

2,240,389
1,085,334
9,612,079
173,159
781,405
280,289
629,694
222,138

In te r e s t o n U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s . ..
I n te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r it ie s . .
I n te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on lo a n s ........................
S e rvice c h a rg e s a n d fe e s on lo a n s ................
S e rvice c h a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts ...........
O th e r c h a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc ........
T r u s t d e p a r t m e n t ...................................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g r e v e n u e ....................

Taxes on net income—to ta l................................

1,148,203

794

130

F e d e ra l........................................................................
S t a te .............................................................................

1,147,279

12,172

1,050,624
97,579

490
304

736

7,122

5.386

130

125,327

1,050,004
97,275

11,832

10,732
1,440

722
14

6,677
445

16,068

5.386

95,241
30,086

10,198
1,634

12,647
3,421

Net income after related taxes.........................

2,283,629

6,358

276

2,276,995

23,842

1,418

11,139

15,449

206,113

17,450

25,707

Dividends and interest on capital—to ta l.........

1,088,310

2.098

C ash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d .o n c o m m o n s to c k .
D iv id e n d s d e c la re d on p re fe rr e d s to c k a n d
in te r e s t on c a p ita l n o te s a n d d e b e n tu re s .

1,086,212

9.421

1,062,561

565

2.098

6,541

4,659

128,339

1,060,463

8,362

9.421

565

13.073

6,294

4,647

120,276

8,213

13.073

247

12

8,063

149

N et additions to capital from incom e.............

1,195,319

4,260

276

1,190,783

14,421

853

4,598

10,790

77,774

9,088

12,634

124,005
546,771

490
2,263

10
71

123,505
544,437

1,580
5,962

156
678

1,008
4,979

1,291
3,278

13,826
65,493

1,501
5,644

1,452
7,666

N u m b e r o f b a n k in g e m p lo y e e s (e x c lu s iv e o f
b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s ), D e c e m b e r 3 1 :
A c tiv e o f fic e r s ...........................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s .....................................................

25,749

25,749

12

52

4,515
157,727

4
1,528

389

1,039

4
486

44
13,103

2
2,526

7
1,055

43,683
394,181

361

91

43,683
393,729

17
4,795

1,485

5,765

19
1,406

19,411
62,991

1
6,068

231
3,309

Occupancy expense of bank
premises
Occupancy expense of bank premises, n e t total ....................................................................

9,462

33

668,405

4,601

990

6,721

339

15

3,719

84,347

160,561

1,076

7,795

120

1,293

594

9,507

3,032

1,603

831,158

2,144

48

S a la rie s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t o ffic e rs
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t
e m p lo y e e s .. .......................................................
B u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t p e rs o n n e l b e n e f it s . ..
R e c u rrin g d e p r e c ia tio n ........................................
M a in te n a n c e a n d r e p a ir s ....................................
In s u ra n c e a n d u t ilit ie s .........................................
R e n ts p a id .................................................................
T a x e s ..........................................................................

828,966

5,677

2,464

1,110

10

8,014

4,313

93,854

2,454

20

10,827

50

7

11,065

287

33

8

91,151
11,018
146,899
94,133
144,064
221,477
119,952

178
26
266
297
496
594
277

6
6
5
30
1

90,973
10,992
146,627
93,830
143,563
220,853
119,674

777
84
1,070
620
1,131
1,708
267

39
2
195
189
331
261
93

438
68
1,281
564
1,745
3,305
563

560
51
1,224
372
842
653
604

3,790
616
11,523
14,271
13,865
38,610
10,892

1,062
146
1,304
1,142
1,346
4,470
1,324

1,244
150
1,864
1,200
1,906
3,085
1,608

N u m b e r o f b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s , D e c e m b e r
31:
O ffic e r s ........................................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s .....................................................

346
31,536

1
65

345
31,471

2
372

13

5
116

3
303

19
919

4
340

1
375

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 .........................

13,493

7

13,485

252

10

15

241

194

207

61

Note: For average asset and liability data by State, see Table 111, pp. 188-189.
Back figures, 1946-1963: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 164-173, and earlier




1

reports.

207

1,805

160,915

BANKS

670,243

R e n ta l a n d o th e r in c o m e ........................................

Occupancy expense of bank premises,
gross—to ta l......................................................

O INSURED
F

4,515
157,791

INCOME

Memoranda
R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s
( n o t in c lu d e d in re c o v e rie s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s .............................................................
On lo a n s ......................................................................
Losse s c h a rg e d t o v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s (n o t
in c lu d e d in lo sse s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s .............................................................
On lo a n s ......................................................................

Table 119. INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
BY STATE, 1964— CONTINUED
208

(Amounts in thousands of dollars)

D e law are

D is tric t
of
C o lum bia

Current operating revenue—to ta l.....................

47,403

102,871

336,095

224,338

53,512

46,340

1,058,789

292,604

193,728

150,574

140,597

In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s . ..
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s ..
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on lo a n s ........................
S e rvice c h a rg e s a n d fe e s on lo a n s ................
S e rvice c h a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts ...........
O th e r c h a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc ........
T r u s t d e p a r t m e n t ...................................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g r e v e n u e ....................

8,395
3,164
24,859
752
1,311
577
6,897
1,448

20,207
2,976
64,256
1,225
6,140
1,172
5,927
968

68,767
21,038
191,549
5,748
27,801
6,839
10,515
3,838

29,394
11,396
143,547
4,073
17,769
8,208
7,815
2,136

6,019
2,724
38,360
1,735
2,127
2,102
445

6,224
2,390
30,694
820
4,564
1,045
284
319

206,590
96,249
625,905
8,103
37,267
15,143
56,642
12,890

66,442
16,035
176,844
1,861
14,226
6,140
8,088
2,968

37,904
12,719
123,167
678
10,643
4,099
2,791
1,727

32,601
12,613
89,223
619
10,091
2,511
1,375
1,541

29,254
8,799
87,324
1,171
5,557
1,579
5,388
1,525

Current operating expenses—to ta l..................

27,713

66,843

255,146

162,452

39,696

32,591

770,212

213,031

141,298

103,688

94,491

S a la rie s— o f fic e r s ....................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— o th e r e m p lo y e e s .........
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fits .........................
Fees pa id to d ire c to rs a n d c o m m itte e s
In te r e s t on tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its .........
In te r e s t on b o rro w e d m o n e y .............................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t.
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t...................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s ..................

4,340
7,683
1,475
265
6,028
34
1,898
1,537
4,453

8,019
15,494
2,240
536
20,992
909
4,881
2,412
11,360

33,824
56,348
10,020
2,527
77,623
1,544
15,754
12,870
44,636

23,649
36,217
8,030
1,812
41,399
1,739
11,875
6,638
31,093

4,184
8,980
2,668
223
14,031
302
2,338
1,708
5,262

4,858
6,896
1,554
184
11,022
237
1,710
1,276
4,854

83,174
137,892
34,775
5,111
339,646
11,417
37,546
20,277
100,374

30,512
43,610
8,790
2,310
67,031
1,249
13,303
7,657
38,569

28,832
22,882
5,047
1,267
48,131
325
7,688
4,554
22,572

22,078
17,632
3,621
1,457
32,788
455
5,805
3,120
16,732

16,294
18,717
3,909
1,378
26,824
399
6,150
3,402
17,418

Net current operating earnings........................

19,690

36,028

80,949

61,886

13,816

13,749

288,577

79,573

52,430

46,886

46,106

Recoveries, transfers from valuation re­
serves, and profits—to ta l............................

1,885

In c o m e ite m

Florida

G eorgia

H aw aii

Id a h o

Illin o is

In d ia n a

Iowa

K a nsas

K e n tu c k y

243

30,625

6,501

3,469

3,085

2,372

1,399
246
140

86
9

40
13
56

9,771
122
15,714

1,988
42
1,918

1,285
45
119

920
133
107

754
24
547

38
932
105

68
38
256

732
502
1,182

435
157
6,278

4
30
1,209

76
1
57

942
1,676
2,400

263
917
1,373

647
286
1,087

1,033
142
750

365
185
497

Losses, charge-offs, and transfers to valu­
ation reserves—to ta l.....................................

1,818

3,236

22,381

12,619

1,857

2,462

101,936

20,175

9,235

8,702

7,676

353

227
6

6,720
494
9,401

1,611
238
2,058

539
335
68

426
588
79

233
242
887

On s e c u ritie s :
Losses on s e c u ritie s s o ld ................................
C h a rg e -o ffs p rio r to s a le ..................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ...................
On loan s:
Losses a n d c h a r g e - o ffs ...................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e r v e s ...................
All o t h e r ......................................................................

117
2
21

1,085
42

1,425
18
259

1,098
257
750

77
753
848

203
1,313
593

1,019
17,455
2,205

703
8,121
1,690

1,267
237

109
1,815
305

1,590
71,686
12,045

643
11,159
4,466

917
5,195
2,181

1,871
4,158
1,580

727
3,952
1,635

Net income before related taxes......................

19,757

33,281

63,253

57,922

13,297

11,530

217,266

65,899

46,664

41,269

40,802




CORPORATION

1,338

1,980
37
252

INSURANCE

8,655

126
1

DEPOSIT

4,685

589
118
103

FEDERAL

489

On s e c u ritie s :
P ro fits on s e c u ritie s s old o r r e d e e m e d . . .
R e c o v e rie s .............................................................
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n r e s e r v e s .............
On loan s:
R e c o v e rie s .............................................................
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n re s e r v e s .............
A ll o t h e r ......................................................................

Taxes on net income—to ta l................................

7,895

15.347

20,081

18.137

F e d e ra l........................................................................
S t a te .............................................................................

4,886

5,048

64.113

7,538
357

23.265

14.217

12,529

15.347

13.707

20,081

18.137

4,542
344

4,245
803

64.113

23.265

14.217

11,547
982

13.707

Net income after related taxes.........................

11,862

17,934

43,172

39,785

8,411

6,482

153,153

42,634

32,447

28,740

27,095

Dividends and interest on capital—to ta l.........

6.240

8.309

15,707

C ash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d on c o m m o n s to c k .
D iv id e n d s d e c la re d on p r e fe rre d s to c k an d
in te r e s t on c a p ita l n o te s a n d d e b e n tu re s

14,679

3,990

3,237

6.240

65,319

14,950

11,866

8.309

9,308

15,660

13,884

3,913

9,754

3,220

65,133

14,945

11,850

9,285

9,751

47

795

77

17

186

5

16

23

3

Net additions to capital from incom e.............

5,622

9,625

27,465

25,106

4,421

3,245

87,834

27,684

20,581

19,432

17,341

N u m b e r o f b a n k in g e m p lo y e e s (e x c lu s iv e o f
b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s ), D e c e m b e r 3 1 :
A c tiv e o f fic e r s ..........................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s ........................ ............................

395
2,000

605
3,522

3,449
15,775

2,520
9,912

383
2,188

469
1,950

7,275
32,208

3,100
11,790

3,083
6,737

2,537
5,088

2,037
5,593

Memoranda

2
O
O

R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s
( n o t in c lu d e d in re c o v e rie s a b o ve ):
On s e c u r itie s ............................................................
On lo a n s .....................................................................
L osses c h a rg e d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s (n o t
in c lu d e d in lo sse s a b o ve ):
On s e c u r itie s ............................................................
On lo a n s .....................................................................

140

1,831

18
3,488

18
3,022

16
275

1,429

2,127
20,103

205
4,335

17
1,714

1
1,028

10
1,244

23
836

1,409

125
14,854

270
6,554

21
824

647

1,776
30,499

429
7,256

36
3,312

32
3,346

671
2,437

Occupancy expense of bank
premises
Occupancy expense of bank premises, n e t total ...................................................................

1,898

R e n ta l a n d o th e r in c o m e ........................................

4,881

15,754

11,875

2,338

1,710

244

37,546

13,303

7,688

986

4,937

5,805

6.150

Occupancy expense of bank premises,
gross—to ta l.....................................................

2,510

764

403

9,247

3,559

1,266

1,328

1.150

2,142

5,867

20,691

14,385

3,102

2,113

46,793

16,862

8,954

8

71

7,133

7,300

30

44

1

163

33

12

31

5
1,064
87
1,400
1,015
1,454
1,331
944

S a la rie s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t o f fic e r s ........
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t
e m p lo y e e s .............................................................
B u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t p e rs o n n e l b e n e f it s . ..
R e c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n ........................................
M a in te n a n c e a n d r e p a ir s ....................................
In s u ra n c e a n d u t ilit ie s .........................................
R e n ts p a id .................................................................
T a x e s ...........................................................................

188
29
344
190
387
866
138

1,120
95
822
616
757
1,828
621

2,021
200
3,760
2,412
4,304
4,230
3,693

1,190
126
2,367
1,705
2,297
3,792
2,878

183
48
403
217
777
1,227
203

225
14
533
194
360
461
325

7,923
773
7,073
5,547
7,096
11,453
6,765

2,680
180
3,089
2,403
3,007
3,329
2,141

1,237
86
1,563
1,008
1,835
1,959
1,254

918
64
1,426
991
1,392
1,315
996

N u m b e r o f b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s , D e c e m b e r
31:
O ffic e r s .......................................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s .....................................................

73

1
323

6
655

3
493

3
85

1
94

22
2,106

7
1,083

12
765

9
489

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 .........................

20

15

421

381

7

24

1,024

426

659

593

Note: For average asset and liab ility data by State, see Table 111, pp. 188-189.
Back figures, 1946-1963: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 164-173, and earlier




reports.

S
m
O
T|
_
2
r/i
C
73
m
D
CD

J>

|
C/)

3

53
4
342

ro
o

VO

Table 119. INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
BY STATE, 1964— CONTINUED
210

(A m ounts in th o u s a n d s o f d o lla rs )
In c o m e ite m

L o u is ia n a

M aine

M ary la n d

M assa­
c h u s e tts

M ic h ig a n

M in n e ­
sota

M is ­
s is s ip p i

M is s o u ri

M o n ta n a

N e b ra ska

Nevada

356,691

606,951

280,704

91,420

351,808

56,292

104,647

38,661

26,360
9,882
101,022
2,624
11,578
3,267
3,712
1,724

41,580
15,925
228,591
3,672
23,594
11,534
23,538
8,257

112,728
48,991
380,545
5,514
26,643
9,690
17,566
5,274

51,454
18,752
166,742
1,951
16,847
13,928
8,478
2,552

14,369
10,125
54,831
236
5,919
4,146
793
1,001

66,170
26,599
222,314
1,988
14,958
5,140
10,550
4,089

9,857
3,496
35,206
985
4,076
1,612
452
608

18,419
5,666
68,731
429
6,230
2,029
2,283
860

4,957
1,673
26,300
1,268
2,555
494
981
433

Current operating expenses—to ta l..................

125,038

33,050

116,649

236,030

473,445

212,621

65,468

242,319

41,325

74,076

27,346

S a la rie s— o f fic e r s ....................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a ges— o th e r e m p lo y e e s .........
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fit s .........................
Fees p a id to d ire c to rs a n d c o m m itt e e s ........
In te r e s t on tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its .........
In te r e s t on b o rro w e d m o n e y ............................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t.
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t ...................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s .................

16,991
25,801
4,796
1,752
34,032
1,342
9,396
4,762
26,166

4,038
7,437
1,141
364
10,978
104
2,313
1,209
5,466

11,975
27,676
5,172
998
36,763
857
8,216
5,133
19,859

30,743
67,215
14,236
1,556
48,235
2,675
18,985
10,789
41,596

38,664
87,580
20,035
2,351
221,643
2,298
25,226
13,130
62,518

33,259
36,563
9,040
2,087
81,186
1,332
11,542
6,692
30,920

10,906
12,080
2,861
946
20,302
620
2,953
2,235
12,565

33,700
48,649
9,120
2,532
85,580
2,281
12,786
7,696
39,975

6,911
6,990
2,059
341
13,220
208
2,026
1,354
8,216

16,864
13,590
3,474
1,149
18,140
545
4,118
2,893
13,303

3,637
6,337
1,080
79
8,359
88
2,508
1,163
4,095

Net current operating earnings........................

49,687

11,125

43,520

120,661

133,506

68,083

25,952

109,489

14,967

30,571

11,315

Recoveries, transfers from valuation re­
serves, and profits—to ta l............................

4,339

897

8,196

25,073

9,160

5,311

2,974

13,489

1,823

2,370

772

2,638
37
335

231
16
296

814
22
28

4,552
38
10,645

2,083
15
55

1,200
67
63

639
140
863

2,846
74
4,576

391
240
458

708
214
220

342

348
304
677

94
17
243

110
53
7,169

211
727
8,900

442
3,441
3,124

822
382
2,777

276
357
699

508
1,965
3,520

419
76
239

226
228
774

366

12,838

On s e c u ritie s :
P ro fits on s e c u ritie s s o ld o r r e d e e m e d . . .
R e c o v e rie s .............................................................
T ra n s fe rs f ro m v a lu a tio n re s e r v e s .............
On lo a n s:
R e co ve rie s
. .
T ra n s fe rs f ro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s
All o t h e r ......................................................................

Losses, charge-offs, and transfers to valu­
ation reserves—to ta l.....................................

64

2,709

6,436

33,811

36,565

10,265

8,870

21,471

3,497

5,596

2,682

On s e c u ritie s :
Losses on s e c u ritie s s o ld ................................
C h a rg e -o ffs p rio r to s a le .
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n r e s e r v e s ...................
On lo a n s:
L osses a n d c h a r g e - o ffs ..................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n r e s e r v e s ...................
All o t h e r ......................................................................

373
220
2,382

244
11
62

194
169
501

2,325
47
989

1,320
108
1,602

428
188
98

133
704
1,208

1,493
1,556
2,899

49
186
382

260
353
533

111

625
7,102
2,136

118
1,645
629

230
3,643
1,699

305
19,978
10,167

448
26,093
6,994

1,188
6,245
2,118

425
4,913
1,487

1,156
11,068
3,299

464
1,962
454

534
3,012
904

1,505
985

Net income before related taxes ......................

41,188

9,313

45,280

111,923

106,101

63,129

20,056

101,507

13,293

27,345

9,405




81

CORPORATION

160,169

6,098
1,963
30,111
367
2,833
533
1,910
360

INSURANCE

44,175

34,956
12,876
105,450
1,214
10,967
5,737
1,524
2,001

DEPOSIT

174,725

In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s . ..
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s ..
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on lo a n s ........................
S e rvice ch a rg e s a n d fe e s on lo a n s ................
S e rvice c h a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts ...........
O th e r c h a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e t c ........
T r u s t d e p a r t m e n t ...................................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g r e v e n u e ....................

FEDERAL

Current operating revenue—to ta l.....................

Taxes on net income—to ta l...............................

14.516

3.454

14.546

45,817

25.803

23,646

4.996

35,831

4,405

9.867

3.712

F e d e ra l........................................................................
S ta te ............................................................................

14.516

3.454

14.546

37,954
7,863

25.803

18,930
4,716

4.996

33,835
1,996

4,122
283

9.867

3.712

Net income after related taxes.........................

26,672

5,859

30,734

66,106

80,298

39,483

15,060

65,676

8,888

17,478

5,693

Dividends and interest on capital—to ta l.........

10,188

2,845

10,796

32,089

34,228

16,686

5,662

25,206

3.788

7.177

2.913

Cash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d on c o m m o n s to c k .
D iv id e n d s d e c la re d on p r e fe rre d s to c k a n d
in te r e s t on c a p ita l n o te s a n d d e b e n tu re s .

10,011

2,840

10,745

32,079

33,504

16,609

5,657

24,028

3.788

7.177

2.913

177

5

51

10

724

77

5

1,178

Net additions to capital from incom e.............

16,484

3,014

19,938

34,017

46,070

22,797

9,398

40,470

5,100

10,301

2,780

N u m b e r o f b a n k in g e m p lo y e e s (e x c lu s iv e o f
b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s ), D e c e m b e r 3 1 :
A c tiv e o f fic e r s ..........................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s ..............................................

1,656
6,818

468
2,072

1,241
7,342

2,714
16,544

3,420
22,335

3,575
10,065

1,244
3,425

3,672
13,427

699
1,912

1,844
3,837

378
1,518

INCOME

Memoranda
85
494

2,366

15
3,923

25
7,053

2,002

52
1,289

999
3,275

3
370

6
1,131

225

90
3,383

30
1,332

49
2,010

945
11,351

1,962
13,580

5,067

167
2,711

1,549
6,125

9
1,007

7
2,494

1,732

Occupancy expense of bank
premises
Occupancy expense of bank premises, n e t to ta l...................................................................

9,396

2,313

8,216

18,985

25,226

11,542

2,953

12,786

2,026

4,118

2,508

R e n ta l a n d o th e r in c o m e ........................................

2,528

470

1,230

3,188

3,156

4,397

1,888

2,133

Occupancy expense of bank premises,
gross—to ta l.....................................................

720

1,185

300

11,924

2,783

9,446

22,173

28,382

15,939

4,841

14,919

2,746

5,303

2,808

S a la rie s — b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t o ffic e rs
S a la rie s a n d w a ges— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t
e m p lo y e e s .............................................................
B u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t p e rs o n n e l b e n e fits . . .
R e c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n ........................................
M a in te n a n c e a n d r e p a ir s ....................................
In s u ra n c e a n d u t ilit ie s .........................................
R e n ts p a id .................................................................
T a x e s ...........................................................................

52

4

22

116

101

21

1,863
143
2,048
1,065
1,745
2,375
2,633

443
30
503
225
484
700
394

717
65
1,639
1,801
1,346
2,913
943

2,498
393
3,788
2,629
4,221
3,950
4,578

3,829
491
5,335
3,740
5,152
5,919
3,815

1,352
133
2,420
1,535
3,245
5,023
2,210

461
53
722
598
952
1,005
1,050

2,240
273
3,137
1,909
2,917
3,019
1,400

380
37
558
266
452
429
624

688
74
864
606
929
1,381
745

311
17
571
338
459
420
692

N u m b e r o f b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s , D e ce m b e r
31:
O ffic e r s .......................................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s ....................................................

7
670

254

4
338

10
805

8
1,294

13
652

234

7
850

182

5
416

84

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 ........................

208

40

120

154

359

714

194

632

128

427

8

BANKS

2
1,593

O INSURED
F

R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re se rve s
( n o t in c lu d e d in re c o v e rie s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s ............................................................
On lo a n s .....................................................................
Losses c h a rg e d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s (n o t
in c lu d e d in losse s a b o ve ):
On s e c u ritie s ............................................................
On lo a n s .....................................................................




reports.

16

211

Note: For average asset and liability data by State, see Table 111, pp. 188-189.
Back figures, 1946-1963: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 164-173, and earlier

24

212

Table 119. INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
BY STATE, 1964— CONTINUED
(A m ounts in th o u s a n d s o f d o lla rs )

In c o m e ite m

N ew
H a m p s h ire

New
J e rs e y

New
M exico

New
Y o rk

N o rth
C a rolina

N o rth
D akota

O hio

O klahom a

O regon

P e n n syl­
vania

R hode
Island

207,230

46,383

678,144

168,999

139,945

928,732

60,246

311,316
230,469
1,763,917
25,067
86,104
41,270
201,025
81,780

23,380
13,352
134,499
3,944
13,447
9,555
6,890
2,163

10,265
3,876
26,080
321
2,407
2,691
364
379

119,647
51,627
427,296
4,832
33,618
8,248
26,748
6,128

30,224
10,103
109,502
1,050
11,628
2,494
2,378
1,620

16,127
7,581
94,391
1,971
12,577
2,020
3,668
1,610

132,945
87,020
587,821
7,066
32,856
12,038
57,762
11,224

4,928
6,297
38,819
528
3,032
858
5,052
732

Current operating expenses—to ta l..................

22,487

361,069

37,924

1,907,701

148,033

33,959

489,883

116,569

106,953

667,983

45,128

S a la rie s— o f fic e r s ....................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s — o th e r e m p lo y e e s .........
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fit s .........................
Fees p aid to d ir e c to rs a n d c o m m itte e s
In te r e s t on tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its .........
In te r e s t on b o rro w e d m o n e y ............................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t.
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t ...................................
O th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s .................

3,089
4,130
938
325
7,730
92
1,339
860
3,984

36,642
77,038
16,153
3,030
136,908
1,738
23,563
12,431
53,566

5,774
8,152
1,144
338
11,076
80
2,334
1,599
7,427

160,243
429,120
109,744
5,129
745,896
49,611
138,845
48,786
220,327

22,557
34,031
6,892
907
42,388
1,722
9,858
5,860
23,818

6,144
4,802
1,402
373
13,577
84
1,698
966
4,913

48,927
97,340
18,586
3,158
198,580
2,882
23,977
14,414
82,019

22,169
21,826
4,842
1,215
36,097
873
6,218
4,216
19,113

14,989
22,015
4,283
284
41,658
580
6,198
3,830
13,116

69,614
131,761
31,572
5,899
259,132
6,702
39,781
23,105
100,417

3,864
8,563
2,488
207
20,744
303
2,240
1,469
5,250

Net current operating earnings........................

7,426

107,160

12,325

833,247

59,197

12,424

188,261

52,430

32,992

260,749

15,118

Recoveries, transfers from valuation re­
serves, and profits—to ta l............................

947

11,676

796

57,675

3,326

551

10,150

5,055

1,851

11,579

1,123

381
316
1

3,650
23
1,023

355
9
124

6,549
607
6,939

592
8
160

249
8
4

2,168
32
1,733

945
20
197

274
1
922

3,573
254
1,219

347

37
8
204

283
1,071
5,626

60
4
244

652
24.964
17.964

60
330
2,176

93
45
152

430
2,785
3,002

1,102
86
2,705

33
621

599
2,305
3,629

15
300
412

1,707

33,117

5,099

192,548

13,448

2,846

31,186

12,716

9,149

58,975

3,623

102
249
136

3,313
102
2,322

203
38
145

25,579
2,511
12,125

501
65
1,071

80
43
5

4,335
137
1,758

426
46
159

2,283
1
1,017

8,427
548
4,140

226

65
931
224

763
23,333
3,284

173
4,073
467

510
135,666
16,157

167
9,771
1,873

134
2,100
484

1,078
20,189
3,689

2,387
8,202
1,496

72
4,225
1,551

1,074
37,191
7,595

47
1,407
1,173

6,666

85,719

8,022

698,374

49,075

10,129

167,225

44,769

25,694

213,353

12,618

On s e c u ritie s :
P ro fits on s e c u ritie s s o ld o r r e d e e m e d . ..
R e co ve rie s
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n re s e r v e s .............
On loan s:
R e c o v e rie s .............................................................
T ra n s fe rs fro m v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s
A ll o t h e r ......................................................................

Losses, charge-offs, and transfers to valu­
ation reserves—to ta l.....................................
On s e c u ritie s :
Losses o n s e c u ritie s s o ld ................................
C h a rg e -o ffs p rio r to sale
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n r e s e rv e s ...................
On loan s:
Losses a n d c h a r g e - o ffs ....................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ...................
A ll o t h e r ......................................................................

Net
income before related


taxes......................

49

770

CORPORATION

2,740,948

8,529
2,022
32,988
481
3,846
1,218
698
467

INSURANCE

50,249

69,564
46,295
295,895
4,297
27,766
5,088
15,090
4,234

DEPOSIT

468,229

3,651
1,384
20,972
233
2,364
444
515
350

In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s . ..
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r it ie s . .
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on lo a n s ........................
S e rvice c h a rg e s a n d fe e s on lo a n s ................
S e rvice c h a rg e s o n d e p o s it a c c o u n ts ...........
O th e r ch a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc ........
T r u s t d e p a r t m e n t ...................................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g re v e n u e ....................

FEDERAL

29,913

Current operating revenue—to ta l.....................

Taxes on net income—to ta l................................

2.267

18.709

2.738

F e d e ra l............................................................
S ta te .........................................................................

227,203

19,715

3,113

2.267

56.493

16,491

9,643

60.067

18.709

2.738

3,682

195,072
32,131

18,106
1,609

2,880
233

56.493

15,231
1,260

7,479
2,164

60.067

2,923
759

Net income after related taxes.........................

4,399

67,010

5,284

471,171

29,360

7,016

110,732

28,278

16,051

153,286

8,936

Dividends and interest on capital—to ta l.........

1.505

29,597

2.947

C ash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d on c o m m o n s to c k .
D iv id e n d s d e c la re d on p r e fe rr e d s to c k and
in te r e s t on c a p ita l n o te s a n d d e b e n tu re s

259,442

12,962

3.004

44,124

14,474

9.037

1.505

83,163

4.965

28,909

2.947

248,767

12,322

3.004

43,918

13,907

9.037

82,380

4.965

10,675

640

206

567

Net additions to capital from incom e.............

2,894

37,413

2,337

211,729

16,398

4,012

66,608

13,804

7,014

70,123

3,971

N u m b e r o f b a n k in g e m p lo y e e s (e x c lu s iv e o f
b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s ), D e c e m b e r 3 1 :
A c tiv e o f fic e r s ..........................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s .....................................................

346
1,184

3,251
19,358

576
2,251

11,525
86,239

2,360
9,826

726
1,505

4,444
23,962

2,398
6,135

1,600
5,395

6,616
32,807

351
2,176

688

783

Memoranda
R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s
( n o t in c lu d e d in re c o v e rie s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s .............................................................
On lo a n s ......................................................................
L o sse s c h a rg e d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s (n o t
in c lu d e d in lo sse s a b o v e ):
O n s e c u r itie s .............................................................
On lo a n s ......................................................................

Occupancy expense of bank
premises
Occupancy expense of bank premises, n e t total ................................................

2
O
O
218

32
2,356

34
883

274
31,014

44
1,451

214

71
7,297

4
2,494

640

80
8,538

262

m
O
~n

717

1,741
9,977

24
3,333

6,311
72,286

171
3,051

517

1,536
11,136

10
6,370

34
2,881

3,062
19,463

626

2

CO

c=

1,339

23,563

2,334

138,845

9,858

1,698

23,977

6,218

6,198

39,781

2,240

R e n ta l a n d o th e r in c o m e ........................................

159

2,958

490

Occupancy expense of bank premises,
gross—to ta l......................................................

28,371

1,821

433

13,003

4,052

392

6,868

1,563

1,498

26,521

2,824

167,216

11,679

2,131

36,980

10,270

6,590

46,649

3,803

349

39

1

150

33

105

166

42

m
o
m

S a la rie s — b u ild in g d e p a r tm e n t o f fic e r s ........
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— b u ild in g d e p a r tm e n t
e m p lo y e e s ....................................................
B u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t p e rs o n n e l b e n e f it s . ..
R e c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n ........................................
M a in te n a n c e a n d r e p a ir s ..................................
In s u ra n c e a n d u t ilit ie s .........................................
R e n ts p a id ............................................................
T a x e s ............................................................................

167
16
268
157
216
390
284

2,796
402
4,699
3,988
4,189
5,095
5,306

393
33
546
306
410
845
291

13,453
2,336
31,090
13,280
30,423
51,489
24,796

1.258
119
2,804
1,238
2.258
3,048
915

239
19
460
210
507
346
349

6,141
738
6,414
4,464
6,592
9,330
3,151

1,644
197
1,911
1,066
1,794
2,933
692

705
83
1,593
1,302
855
1,049
898

8,075
1,053
8,601
4,794
7,655
10,979
5,326

N u m b e r o f b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s , D e c e m b e r
31:
O ffic e r s ......................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s .....................................................

90

5
899

126

58
2,999

4
638

2
164

18
2,157

6
587

8
208

21
2,837

4
297

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 .......................

70

233

63

326

151

159

546

416

49

581

8

1

890
142
595
257
506
739
632

46

Note: For average asset and liability data by State, see Table 111, pp. 188-189.
Back figures, 1946-1963: See the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 164-173, and earlier




reports.

GO

ro

oo

Table 119. INCOME OF INSURED COMMERCIAL BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES (STATES AND OTHER AREAS),
BY STATE, 1964— CONTINUED
214

(A m ounts in th o u s a n d s o f d o lla rs )

In c o m e ite m

S o u th
C a ro lin a

S o uth
D akota

T ennessee

Texas

U ta h

V e rm o n t

V irg in ia

W a s h in g ­
to n

W est
V irg in ia

W isconsin

W yo m in g

753,668

70,102

28,743

239,987

191,459

80,648

272,910

27,526

34,597
15,627
149,788
1,984
8,531
3,733
4,299
1,400

111,766
52,681
506,399
7,899
39,845
11,611
15,851
7,616

7,189
3,401
47,924
2,004
5,694
1,894
1,613
383

3,477
1,588
20,766
245
1,615
234
532
286

32,663
15,172
161,229
3,161
14,544
4,276
7,009
1,933

25,641
10,533
122,674
2,820
17,349
4,169
5,908
2,365

20,018
4,323
48,969
686
2,817
1,184
1,885
766

60,076
17,267
167,591
1,664
12,662
3,547
6,678
3,425

5,027
1,151
18,135
327
1,743
727
200
216

Current operating expenses—to ta l..................

46,402

38,468

160,368

543,851

50,107

23,030

174,480

141,467

53,510

203,244

20,381

S a la rie s — o f fic e r s ....................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s — o th e r e m p lo y e e s .........
O ffic e r a n d e m p lo y e e b e n e fit s .........................
Fees p aid to d ire c to rs a n d c o m m itte e s
In te r e s t on tim e a n d s a v in g s d e p o s its .........
In te r e s t on b o rro w e d m o n e y .............................
O c c u p a n c y e x p e n s e o f b a n k p re m is e s — n e t.
F u rn itu re a n d e q u ip m e n t ...................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e s .................

9,217
12,546
2,482
557
7,135
65
2,991
2,341
9,068

7,751
5,977
1,722
528
13,852
48
1,866
1,193
5,531

18,996
28,280
5,796
1,120
67,250
1,023
8,531
5,421
23,951

79,140
94,849
19,031
5,593
184,162
11,417
35,421
18,361
95,877

5,882
9,471
1,752
350
20,728
289
2,547
1,920
7,168

2,520
3,620
714
322
11,336
52
1,232
617
2,617

22,257
34,215
6,685
1,754
64,765
750
9,554
6,215
28,285

18,706
34,235
5,982
416
47,870
620
9,246
6,039
18,353

7,703
10,471
2,071
864
18,316
111
2,746
1,968
9,260

29,656
32,502
8,352
2,561
85,947
781
10,547
5,688
27,210

3,342
3,574
751
272
7,424
85
1,021
914
2,998

Net current operating earnings........................

22,275

15,048

59,591

209,817

19,995

5,713

65,507

49,992

27,138

69,666

7,145

Recoveries, transfers from valuation re­
serves, and profits—to ta l............................

842

762

6,959

15,334

921

299

3,198

3,372

1,413

4,553

350

218
21
23

248
10

2,421
13
190

2,456
196
1,467

346

76
1

830
31
631

1,146
58
391

699
3
87

1,498
140
127

163
1

34
1
545

175
7
322

325
3,477
533

2,589
1,414
7,212

37
177
356

34
25
163

278
375
1,053

78
1,021
678

135
129
360

84
180
2,524

79
12
95

3,958

3,013

15,113

60,628

2,206

1,550

13,117

7,901

4,510

13,085

1,420

865
366
320

3,739
478
6,930

280
43
9

247
18
1

1,045
80
1,177

180
53
555

329
67
96

2,108
173
77

49
12
31

On s e c u ritie s :
P ro fits on s e c u ritie s s o ld o r r e d e e m e d . . .
R e c o v e rie s .............................................................
T ra n s fe rs f ro m v a lu a tio n r e s e r v e s .............
On loan s:
R e c o v e rie s .............................................................
T ra n s fe rs f r o m v a lu a tio n r e s e r v e s .............
A ll o t h e r ......................................................................

Losses, charge-offs, and transfers to valu­
ation reserves—to ta l.....................................

5

On s e c u ritie s :
Losses on s e c u ritie s s o ld ................................
C h a rg e -o ffs p rio r to s a le ..................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n r e s e rv e s ...................
On lo a n s:
Losse s a n d c h a r g e - o ffs ....................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ...................
A ll o t h e r ......................................................................

208
35
1

83
40
6

122
2,883
709

265
2,061
558

607
9,532
3,423

5,361
37,371
6,749

131
1,297
446

27
1,155
102

598
8,481
1,736

198
5,792
1,123

244
3,158
616

355
9,027
1,345

294
919
115

Net income before related taxes.......................

19,159

12,797

51,437

164,523

18,710

4,462

55,588

45,463

24,041

61,134

6,075




CORPORATION

219,959

10,983
2,732
33,148
256
2,929
2,485
402
581

INSURANCE

53,516

10,743
4,988
42,538
349
5,181
2,829
1,418
631

DEPOSIT

68,677

In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s . ..
I n te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r it ie s . .
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on lo a n s ........................
S e rvice c h a rg e s a n d fe e s on lo a n s ................
S e rv ic e c h a rg e s on d e p o s it a c c o u n ts ...........
O th e r ch a rg e s , c o m m is s io n s , fe e s , e tc ........
T r u s t d e p a r t m e n t ...................................................
O th e r c u r r e n t o p e ra tin g re v e n u e . . 1 ..............

FEDERAL

Current operating revenue—to ta l......................

Taxes on net income—to ta l................................

7,129

4,699

17,308

54.948

7,553

1,368

20.225

17.329

9.397

20,442

2.299

F e d e ra l........................................................................
S t a t e .............................................................................

6,671
458

4,261
438

16,962
346

54.948

7,227
326

1,219
149

20.225

17.329

9.397

17,424
3,018

2.299

Net income after related taxes.........................

12,030

8,098

34,129

109,575

11,157

3,094

35,363

28,134

14,644

40,692

3,776

Dividends and interest on capital—to ta l.........

5,319

3,129

12,444

54,926

5.765

1,528

17,095

11.793

5.009

16,640

1,447

C ash d iv id e n d s d e c la re d on c o m m o n s to c k .
D iv id e n d s d e c la re d on p re fe rre d s to c k a n d
in te r e s t on c a p ita l n o te s a n d d e b e n tu re s .

5,318

3,121

12,410

54,916

5.765

1,463

17,002

11.793

5.009

16,532

1,443

1

8

34

10

65

93

108

4

N et additions to capital from incom e.............

6,711

4,969

21,685

54,649

5,392

1,566

18,268

16,341

9,635

24,052

2,329

N u m b e r o f b a n k in g e m p lo y e e s (e x c lu s iv e o f
b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s ), D e c e m b e r 3 1 :
A c tiv e o f fic e r s ...........................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s .....................................................

1,014
3,779

885
1,781

2,204
8,004

8,085
25,575

636
2,684

303
1,051

2,464
9,756

1,837
8,051

869
2,973

3,099
9,257

338
930

579

14
1,799

199
10,994

409

158

89
1,414

913

2
420

2
2,586

382

1,281

7
1,339

3
4,766

2,077
32,388

889

2
790

732
5,191

2,237

85
1,321

18
3,941

644

Occupancy expense of bank
premises
Occupancy expense of bank premises, n e t total ...................................................................

1,021

1,866

8,531

35,421

2,547

1,232

9,554

9,246

2,746

10,547

266

308

2,642

25,031

807

141

1,605

924

862

2,722

329

3,257

2,174

11,173

60,452

3,354

1,373

11,159

10,170

3,608

13,269

1,350

S a la rie s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t o ffic e rs
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— b u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t
e m p lo y e e s .............................................................
B u ild in g d e p a rtm e n t p e rs o n n e l b e n e fit s . . .
R e c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n ........................................
M a in te n a n c e a n d r e p a ir s ....................................
In s u ra n c e a n d u t ilit ie s .........................................
R e n ts p a id .................................................................
T a x e s ............................................................................

1

1

39

133

20

74

306
41
790
432
788
721
178

271
30
348
255
525
389
355

1,435
116
2,576
1,271
2,007
1,495
2,234

6,182
564
11,234
6,067
10,139
11,673
14,460

384
26
807
248
603
931
355

196
19
255
113
235
384
171

1,665
166
2,220
1,161
2,135
2,892
900

892
130
3,035
1,730
1,736
1,545
1,028

N u m b e r o f b u ild in g e m p lo y e e s , D e c e m b e r
31:
O ffic e r s ........................................................................
O th e r e m p lo y e e s .....................................................

1
192

3
202

7
615

20
2,086

126

101

1
827

17
239

N u m b e r o f b a n k s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 .........................

129

172

290

1,115

54

48

277

96




liab ility data by State, see Table 111, pp. 188-189.
the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 164-173, and earlier reports.

3
150
13
301
198
255
133
297

3
295

10
789

2
71

183

575

68

19
608
48
719
473
688"
581
472

215

Note: For average asset and
Back figures, 1946-1963: See

74
1,682
173
2,535
1,452
2,313
2,849
2,191

BANKS

2,991

R e n ta l a n d o th e r in c o m e .........................................

Occupancy expense of bank premises,
gross—to ta l......................................................

O INSURED
F

10
250

INCOME

Memoranda
R e co ve rie s c re d ite d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s
( n o t in c lu d e d in re c o v e rie s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s .............................................................
On lo a n s ......................................................................
L osse s c h a rg e d to v a lu a tio n re s e rv e s ( n o t
in c lu d e d in losse s a b o v e ):
On s e c u r itie s .............................................................
On lo a n s ......................................................................

Table 120. INCOME OF INSURED MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS, 1956-1964
(Amounts in thousands of dollars)
In c o m e Ite m

195 6

195 7

1958

1959

1960

1961

1 96 2

1963

1964

1,461,763

1,595,183

1,755,582

In te re s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ..................................
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s ................................
In te re s t a n d d is c o u n t on real e s ta te m o rtg a g e lo a n s — n e t.
Interest and discount on real estate mortgage loans—gross ....................
Less: Mortgage servicing fees ...........................................................
Premium amortization ............................................................
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on o th e r lo a n s a n d d is c o u n ts — n e t . ..
In c o m e on real e s ta te o th e r th a n b a n k b u ild in g — n e t ..........
Income on real estate other than bank building—gross ..........................
Less: Operating expense..................................................................
In c o m e on o th e r a s s e ts ......................................................................
In c o m e fro m s e rv ic e o p e ra tio n s .....................................................

1,946,776

2,164,115

146,624
102,590
623,586
6 ^ 5 ,5 9 2
2 0 ,4 7 5
1 ,5 31
8,439
6
103
97
8,328
8,867

147,157
127,212
720,215
7 4 4 ,SOS
2 3 ,1 3 8
950
10,848
31

146,353
180,535
921,315
9 5 1 ,9 5 2
2 9 ,1 5 4
1 ,4 8 3
12,669
-1
216
217
7,486
11,990

152,458
199,258
1,070,173
1, 104,100
3 2 ,3 4 3
1 ,5 8 4
18,407
27
397
370
7,474
13,966

151,931
205,751
1,194,282
1 ,2 3 1 ,7 7 4
3 6 ,0 4 5
1 ,4 4 7
18,767
-3 8
379
4 17
9,081
15,409

156,410
206,367
1,342,896
1 ,3 8 3 ,7 3 5
3 9 ,2 8 3
1 ,5 5 6
22,733
-5 2
302
354
9,777
17,451

153,659
203,720
1,534,446
1 ,5 8 0 ,2 7 6
4 4 ,1 7 4
1 ,6 5 6
27,576
-108
296
404
9,984
17,499

153,368
207,164
1,738,621
1 ,7 9 0 ,3 1 8
4 9 ,7 5 6
1 ,9 41
33,538
-122

109
7,898
12,966

141,950
167,489
808,975
8 3 6 ,5 1 5
2 5 ,9 8 5
1 ,5 5 5
11,749
2
139
137
8,384
11,094

Current operating expense—to ta l.................................................

158,317

174,758

187,758

201,402

224,789

241,685

252,963

274,544

290,471

S a la rie s— o f fic e r s ...................................................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— e m p lo y e e s .....................................................
P e nsion, h o s p ita liz a tio n a n d g ro u p in s u ra n c e p a y m e n ts ,
a n d o th e r e m p lo y e e b e n e fits .....................................................
Fees pa id to tru s te e s a n d c o m m itte e m e m b e rs ......................
O c c u p a n cy, m a in te n a n c e , e tc. o f b a n k p re m is e s (in c lu d in g
ta x e s a n d re c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n )— n e t ...............................
Occupancy, maintenance, etc. of bank premises (including taxes and
recurring depreciation) —gross ...................................................
Less: Income from bank building ......................................................
D e p o s it in s u ra n c e a s s e s s m e n ts .....................................................
F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s (in c lu d in g re c u rrin g d e p r e c ia tio n ) . ..
All o th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e .............................................

25,861
53,962

28,590
58,310

30,099
61,797

32,082
64,396

36,608
71,295

38,158
75,303

40,466
79,165

42,792
84,514

45,391
89,514

14,643
2,809

16,478
3,007

18,314
3,203

20,006
3,366

22,656
3,731

24,134
3,994

25,419
4,158

27,202
4,404

28,138
4,604

17,492

19,326

20,925

22,695

25,255

27,369

29,269

32,160

34,683

2 5 ,3 8 0
7 ,8 8 8
8,437
3,058
32,055

2 7 ,8 4 6
8 ,5 2 0
9,407
3,251
36,389

3 0 ,2 5 2
9 ,3 2 7
10,183
3,501
39,736

3 2 ,2 6 8
9 ,5 7 3
11,316
4,445
43,096

3 5 ,1 2 0
9 ,8 6 5
11,707
4,740
48,797

3 7 ,2 9 8
9 ,9 2 9
12,824
5,438
54,465

3 9 ,2 9 7
1 0 ,0 2 8
12,172
5,997
56,317

4 2 ,5 8 3
1 0 ,4 2 3
12,709
7,714
63,049

4 5,87 1
1 1 ,1 8 8
14,035
9,182
64,924

Net current operating income........................................................

740,123

851,569

961,885

1,078,945

1,236,974

1,353,498

1,502,619

1,672,232

1,873,644

Franchise and income taxes—to ta l..............................................

8,955

9,060

10,342

11,649

13,637

16,011

17,966

22,587

26,022

S ta te fra n c h is e a n d in c o m e ta x e s ..................................................
Fed era l in c o m e ta x e s ...........................................................................

8,321
634

8,972
88

9,831
511

11,172
Ml

13,190
447

15,277
734

17,502
464

19,168
3,419

21,657
4,365

140

421

543
13,121
18,425

Net current operating income after taxes..................................

731,168

842,509

951,543

1,067,296

1,223,337

1,337,487

1,484,653

1,649,645

1,847,622

Dividends and interest on deposits.............................................

609,335

716,383

812,254

897,469

1,073,542

1,147,767

1,334,005

1,481,869

1,653,768

Net current operating income after taxes and dividends........

121,833

126,126

139,289

169,827

149,795

189,720

150,648

167,776

193,854

Non-recurring income, realized profits and recoveries
credited to profit and loss, and transfers from valuation
adjustm ent provisions—to ta l..................................................

48,192

48,148

66,160

91,205

142,009

113,763

105,907

113,085

105,454

10,537

13,434

17,295

21,147

31,133

17,567

20,453

28,678

18,048

17,355
456
413
1,435

16,022
259
437
431

30,974
138
367
624

39,498
192
646
2,498

34,860
283
535
6,576

54,263
629
337
459

55,751
739
462
957

28,752
2,465
807
871

36,472
1,088
571
1,096

4,463
12,501
29
1,003

5,939
10,850
65
711

8,345
8,068
28
321

14,270
12,021
17
916

57,588
10,480
86
468

10,873
29,068
36
531

5,460
21,465
66
554

26,995
24,342
46
129

22,029
25,786
92
272

N o n -re c u rrin g in c o m e ..........................................................................
R e alized p r o fits a n d re c o v e rie s o n :
S e c u ritie s sold o r m a tu r e d ............................................................
Real e s ta te m o rtg a g e lo a n s ..........................................................
O th e r real e s t a te ................................................................................
A ll o th e r a s s e ts ...................................................................................
T ra n s fe rs f ro m v a lu a tio n a d ju s tm e n t p r o v is io n s 1 o n :
S e c u ritie s ..............................................................................................
Real
a g e lo a n s ..........................................................
re s ta tee mto rtg................................................................................
O th e real s a te
A ll o th e r a
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ s s e ts ...................................................................................

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

CORPORATION

1,280,347

INSURANCE

1,149,643

DEPOSIT

1,026,327

FEDERAL

898,440

216

Current operating income—to ta l..................................................

1
Non-recurring expense, realized losses charged to profit
and loss, and transfers to valuation adjustment pro­
visions—to ta l.............................................................................
N o n -re c u rrin g e x p e n s e ......................................................................
R e alized losses on :
S e c u ritie s s o ld ...................................................................................
Real e s ta te m o rtg a g e lo a n s .........................................................
O th e r real e s t a te ..............................................................................
A ll o th e r a s s e ts ..................................................................................
T ra n s fe rs to v a lu a tio n a d ju s tm e n t p ro v is io n s 1 on:
S e c u ritie s .............................................................................................
Real e s ta te m o rtg a g e lo a n s .........................................................
O th e r real e s ta te ..............................................................................
A ll o th e r a s s e ts ..................................................................................

Net additions to total surplus accounts from operations. . . .

71,580

83,870

79,852

126,876

123,664

116,143

109,192

101,611

10,645

12,958

13,699

11,385

16,981

17,692

18,941

17,331

12,991

26,991
542
171
149

35,526
1,036
179
191

25,056
603
191
684

66,875
330
260
440

63,846
508
210
315

40,851
1,252
375
404

31,379
1,083
662
424

47,629
1,681
656
655

39,884
2,023
712
936

16,689
16,194
46
153

18,062
15,236
16
666

21,946
16,733
45
895

30,347
16,151
40
1,048

23,352
17,679
19
754

19,337
35,377
111
744

30,925
25,252
76
450

11,548
21,534
74
503

8,692
22,266
57
673

98,445

90,404

125,597

134,156

168,140

187,340

147,363

179,250

211,074

1,151
268

972
365
39
5

571
14

471
136

278
53

1,658
48

3,389
201

756
64

5

173
99
2
37

585

6

35

14

13

6,267
217
3
300

9,339
197
26
385

8,110
1,131
13
165

7,721
720
5
218

5,830
501
6
448

12,973
5,136
190
178

6,058
765

88,234

Memoranda
Recoveries credited to valuation adjustment provisions1
(not included in recoveries above) on:

9

Realized losses charged to valuation adjustment provi­
sions1 (not included in realized losses above) on:
S e c u ritie s .................................................................................................
Real e s ta te m o rtg a g e lo a n s .............................................................
O th e r real e s ta te ...................................................................................
A ll o th e r a s s e ts ...................................................... ...............................

24,533,839

26,904,256

29,160,570

31,248,671

34,339,564

35,916,590

38,152,221

Cash a n d d u e fro m b a n k s ................................................................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s .......................................
O th e r s e c u ritie s .....................................................................................
Real e s ta te m o rtg a g e lo a n s .............................................................
O th e r lo a n s a n d d is c o u n ts ...............................................................
O th e r real e s ta te .................................................................................
All o th e r a s s e ts ......................................................................................

41,180,616

757,496
5,730,449
3,034,920
14,494,241
155,376
2,197
359,160

44,609,410

723,830
5,592,025
3,559,430
16,445,982
185,174
3,586
394,229

742,225
5,338,796
4,378,447
18,045,621
227,027
4,361
424,093

689,698
5,236,825
4,677,222
19,937,652
244,010
7,002
456,262

721,308
5,092,512
5,036,291
22,628,058
355,327
11,555
494,513

757,912
4,791,909
5,228,022
24,255,437
353,474
18,955
510,881

794,362
4,748,691
5,151,555
26,435,337
441,994
19,640
560,642

786,298
4,563,328
5,115,637
29,538,513
543,458
21,114
612,268

768,719
4,351,936
5,057,794
33,121,502
588,196
28,389
692,844

Liabilities and surplus accounts—to ta l......................................

24,533,839

26,904,256

29,160,570

31,248,671

34,339,564

35,916,590

38,152,221

T o ta l d e p o s its .........................................................................................
Savings and time deposits...............................................................
Demand deposits...........................................................................
O th e r lia b ilitie s ......................................................................................
T o ta l s u rp lu s a c c o u n ts ......................................................................

41,180,616

22,202,156
2 2 ,1 6 7 ,5 3 7
3 4,61 9
249,779
2,081,904

24,322,261
2 4 ,2 9 5 ,7 6 1
2 6 ,5 0 0
318,445
2,263,550

44,609,410

26,304,610
2 6 ,2 7 4 ,7 5 8
2 9 ,8 5 2
431,019
2,424,941

28,136,390
2 8 ,1 0 6 ,0 8 9
3 0,301
512,192
2,600,089

30,822,839
3 0 ,7 9 0 ,5 9 9
3 2 ,2 4 0
598,011
2,918,714

32,320,488
3 2 ,1 1 3 ,1 2 9
2 0 7 ,3 5 9
506,744
3,089,358

34,350,820
3 4 ,0 7 0 ,5 1 1
2 8 0 ,3 0 9
537,630
3,263,771

37,175,285
3 6 ,8 7 0 ,9 0 6
3 0 4 ,3 7 9
588,622
3,416,709

40,334,274
3 9 ,9 9 7 ,2 1 7
3 37 ,0 5 7
660,037
3,615,099

N u m b e r o f a c tiv e o ffic e rs , D e c e m b e r 3 1 .......................................
N u m b e r o f o th e r e m p lo y e e s , D e c e m b e r 3 1 .................................

2,130
13,860

2,239
14,590

2,356
14,925

2,504
15,110

2,885
16,753

2,977
17,290

3,085
17,617

3,170
18,459

3,281
18,958

N u m b e r o f b a n ks, D e c e m b e r 3 1 .......................................................

223

239

241

268

325

330

331

330

327

258

1 Includes "Valuation reserves” and “ Other asset valuation provisions (direct write-downs).''
2 For 1956 through 1960, averages of figures reported at beginning, middle, and end of year. For 1961 through 1964, averages of amounts for four consecutive official call dates beginning with the end of the pre­
vious year and ending with the fall call of the current year.
Back figures, 1934-1955: Data for 1934-1950, which however are not comparable with figures for 1951-1964, may be found in the following Annual Reports: 1941, p. 173; and 1950, pp. 272-273. For 1951-1955 see
the Annual Report for 1959, pp. 166-167.




217

Average assets and liabilities2
Assets—to ta l......................................................................................

BANKS

51

8,741
342
127
67

O INSURED
F

4,055
318

INCOME

S e c u ritie s .................................................................................................
Real e s ta te m o rtg a g e lo a n s .............................................................
O th e r real e s ta te ...................................................................................
All o th e r a s s e ts ......................................................................................

218

Table 121. RATIOS OF INCOME OF INSURED MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS, 1956-1964
1960

1961

1962

1963

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

12.35
14.57
70.37
.73
.96

10.43
13.63
73.21
1.26
.51
.96

9.52
12.90
74.87
1.18
.57
.96

8.91
11.76
76.49
1.29
.56
.99

$100.00
7.89
10.46
78.82
1.42
.51
.90

$100.00

14.34
12.40
70.17
1.06
.77
1.26

$100.00
11.43
14.10
71.96
.99
.58
.94

$100.00

16.32
11.42
69.41
.94
.92
.99

C u rre n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e — t o t a l ......................................................................................................................
S a la rie s— o f fic e r s ...................................................................................................................................................
S a la rie s a n d w a g e s— e m p lo y e e s .....................................................................................................................
P e n sio n , h o s p ita liz a tio n a n d g ro u p in s u ra n c e p a y m e n ts , and o th e r e m p lo y e e b e n e fits . . .
Fees p a id to tr u s te e s a n d c o m m itte e m e m b e r s .....................................................................................
O ccu p a n cy, m a in te n a n c e , e tc. o f b a n k p re m is e s (in c lu d in g ta xe s and re c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n
— n e t ........................................................................................................................................................................
D e p o s it in s u ra n c e a s s e s s m e n ts .....................................................................................................................
F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s (in c lu d in g re c u rrin g d e p re c ia tio n )...................................................................
All o th e r c u r re n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e .............................................................................................................

17.62
2.88

17.03

16.33

15.73

15.38

15.15

14.41

2.79
5.68
1.60
.29

2.62
5.37
1.59
.28

2.51
5.03
1.56
.26

2.50
4.88
1.55
.26

2.39
4.72
1.51
.25

2.30
4.51
1.45
.24

14.10
2.20

13.42
2.10

4.34
1.40
.23

4.14
1.30
.21

1.95
.94
.34
3.57

1.88
.92
.32
3.55

1.82
.89
.30
3.46

1.77
.88
.35
3.37

1.73
.80
.32
3.34

1.72
.80
.34
3.42

1.67
.69
.34
3.21

1.65
.65
.39
3.24

1.60
.65
.42
3.00

N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g in c o m e .............................................................................................................................

82.38

82.97

83.67

84.27

84.62

84.85

85.59

85.90

86.58

F ra n c h is e a n d in c o m e ta x e s — t o t a l ...................................................................................................................
S ta te fra n c h is e a n d in c o m e ta x e s ..................................................................................................................
Fed era l in c o m e ta x e s ...........................................................................................................................................

1.00

.88

.91

.93

1.00

.87

.01

.04

.87
.04

.90
.03

.96
.04

1.02
1.00

1.16

.93
.07

.90
.86

81.38

82.09

82.77

83.36

83.69
73.44
10.25

N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g in c o m e a fte r t a x e s ......................................................................

6.00
1.63
.31

1.02

D iv id e n d s a n d in te r e s t o n d e p o s its ..................................................................................................................

67.82

69.80

70.65

70.10

N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g in c o m e a fte r ta x e s a n d d iv id e n d s .......................................................................

13.56

12.29

12.12

13.26




1964

7.09
9.57
80.34
1.55
.60
.85

.02

.98
.18

1.20
1.00
.20

83.85

84.57

84.74

85.38

71.95

75.99

76.12

76.42

11.90

8.58

8.62

8.96

CORPORATION

1959

INSURANCE

1958

DEPOSIT

1957

FEDERAL

1956

In c o m e ite m
A m o u n ts p e r $ 1 0 0 o f c u r re n t o p e ra tin g in c o m e
C u rr e n t o p e ra tin g in c o m e — t o t a l .......................................................................................................................
In te r e s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ..................................................................................................
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u r itie s ................................................................................................
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on real e s ta te m o rtg a g e lo a n s — n e t ................................................................
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on o th e r lo a n s a n d d is c o u n ts — n e t ..................................................................
In c o m e on o th e r a s s e ts ......................................................................................................................................
In c o m e fro m s e rv ic e o p e r a tio n s .....................................................................................................................

Amounts per $ 1 0 0 off total assets1
C u rr e n t o p e ra tin g in c o m e — t o t a l......................................................................
C u rre n t o p e ra tin g e x p e n s e — t o t a l..............................................................................
N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g in c o m e ...............................................................
S ta te fra n c h is e a n d in c o m e ta x e s .....................................................................
N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g in c o m e a fte r ta x e s ........................................
D iv id e n d s a n d in te re s t on d e p o s its ...........................................................
N e t c u r re n t o p e ra tin g in c o m e a fte r ta x e s an d d iv id e n d s ..................................
N o n -re c u rrin g in c o m e , re a liz e d p ro fits a n d re co ve rie s cre d ite d to p ro fita n d lo ss, a n d tra n s fe rs
fro m v a lu a tio n a d ju s tm e n t p ro v is io n s 2 t o t a l............................................
—
N o n -re c u rrin g e x p e n s e , re a liz e d losse s c h a rg e d to p r o fita n d loss, and t ra n s fe r s to v a lu a tio n
a d ju s tm e n t p ro v is io n s 2 t o t a l.........................................................................
—
N e t a d d itio n s to to ta l s u rp lu s a c c o u n ts fro m o p e ra tio n s .............................................

3.66
.64
3.02
.04
2.98
2.48
.50

3.81
.65
3.16
.03
3.13
2.66
.47

3.94
.64
3.30
.04
3.26
2.78
.48

4.10
.65
3.45
.03
3.42
2.87
.55

4.26
.66
3.60
.04
3.56
3.12
.44

4.44
.67
3.77
.05
3.72
3.19
.53

4.60
.66
3.94
.05
3.89
3.50
.39

4.73
.67
4.06
.05
4.01
3.60
.41

4.85
.65
4.20
.06
4.14
3.71
.43

.29

.41

.31

.28

.27

.24

.27
.43

.41
.43

.36
.49

.32
.52

.28
.39

.24
.44

.20
.47

2.56
3.38
4.30
5.43
2.75
4.73

2.63
3.57
4.38
5.86
2.95
3.99

2.66
3.83
4.48
5.18
3.09
5.18

2.79
3.86
4.62
5.19
3.19
5.16

2.99
3.96
4.73
5.18
3.49
5.76

3.17
3.94
4.92
5.31
3.57
6.06

3.29
4.01
5.08
5.14
3.92
4.52

3.37
3.98
5.19
5.07
4.02
5.25

3.52
4.10
5.25
5.70
4.13
5.84

Assets and liabilities per $ 10 0 off total assets1
Assets—to ta l............................................................................................................

100.00

C ash a n d d u e fro m b a n k s .............................................................................
U n ite d S ta te s G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ...........................................................
O th e r s e c u r itie s ..............................................................................................
Real e s ta te m o rtg a g e lo a n s ..............................................................................
O th e r lo a n s a n d d is c o u n ts ....................................................................
O th e r re a l e s t a te .......................................................................................................
All o th e r a s s e ts ..................................................................................................

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

3.09
23.36
12.37
59.08
.63
.01
1.46

2.69
20.78
13.23
61.13
.69
.01
1.47

2.55
18.31
15.01
61.88
.78
.02
1.45

2.21
16.76
14.97
63.80
.78
.02
1.46

2.10
14.83
14.67
65.90
1.03
.03
1.44

2.11
13.34
14.56
67.53
.99
.05
1.42

2.08
12.45
13.50
69.29
1.16
.05
1.47

1.91
11.08
12.42
71.73
1.32
.05
1.49

1.72
9.76
11.34
74.25
1.32
.06
1.55

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

90.50
9 0 .3 6
.1 4
1.02
8.48

90.40
9 0 .3 0

90.20
9 0 .1 0

90.04
8 9 .9 4

1.48
8.32

1.64
8.32

89.99
8 9 .4 1
.5 8
1.41
8.60

90.04
8 9 .3 0
.7 4
1.41
8.55

90.27
8 9 .5 3

1.19
8.41

89.76
8 9 .6 7
.0 9
1.74
8.50

1.43
8.30

90.42
8 9 .6 6
.7 6
1.48
8.10

223

239

241

268

325

330

331

330

327

Special ratios1
In te re s t on U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f U. S. G o ve rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s
In te re s t a n d d iv id e n d s on o th e r s e c u ritie s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f o th e r s e c u ritie s ..........
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on real e s ta te m o rtg a g e loans p e r $ 1 0 0 o f real e state m o rtg a g e lo a n s .
In te r e s t a n d d is c o u n t on o th e r lo a n s a n d d is c o u n ts p e r $ 1 0 0 o f o th e r loans a n d d is c o u n ts
D iv id e n d s a n d in te r e s t on d e p o s its p e r $ 1 0 0 o f saving s and tim e d e p o s its ...........
N e t a d d itio n s to t o ta l s u r p lu s a c c o u n ts fro m o p e ra tio n s p e r $ 1 0 0 o f total s u rp lu s a c c o u n ts ...
.

Liabilities and surplus accounts—t o t a l..................................................
T o ta l d e p o s its ........................................................................................
Savings and time deposits............................................................
Demand deposits...................................................................................
O th e r lia b ilitie s ................................................................................
T o ta l s u rp lu s a c c o u n ts ........................................................................................

N u m b e r o f b a n ks, D e c e m b e r 3 1 ..........................................................................

.1
0

.1
0

.1
0

.74

Back figures, 1 93 4 ,1 94 1 -1 95 0 , and 1951-1954: Data for 1934 and 1941-1950, which however are not comparable with figures for 1951-1960, may be found in the following Annual Reports: 1947, pp. 156-157 and
1950, pp. 274-275. For 1951-1955, see the Annual Report for 1959, pp. 168-169.




219

1 For 1956 through 1960, averages of figures reported at beginning, middle, and end of year. For 1961 through 1964, averages of amounts for four consecutive official call dates beginning with the end of the pre­
vious year and ending with the fall call of the current year.
2 Includes “ Valuation reserves” and “ Other asset valuation provisions (direct write-downs)” .

BANKS

.22

.31
.34

O INSURED
F

.18

INCOME

.19
.29
.40

BANKS CLOSED BECAUSE OF FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES,AND
DEPOSIT INSURANCE DISBURSEMENTS
Table 122.
Table 123.
Table 124.

Table 125.




Number and deposits of banks closed because of financial difficulties,
1934-1964, by years
Insured banks requiring disbursements by the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation during 1964
Depositors, deposits, and disbursements in insured banks requiring dis­
bursements by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 1934-1964
Banks grouped by class of bank, year of deposit payoff or deposit
assumption, amount of deposits, and State
Recoveries and losses by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation on
principal disbursements for protection of depositors, 1934-1964

BANKS

Sources of data

INSURANCE

Insured banks: books of bank at date of closing; and books of
FDIC, December 31, 1964.

DEPOSIT

One noninsured bank failed in 1964. This was Modoc State Bank,
Modoc, Kansas, which suspended December 30, 1964, having de­
posits of $429,000.
For data regarding noninsured banks which suspended in the
years 1934-1962, see the Annual Report for 1963, pp. 27-41. No
noninsured bank failed in 1963.

AD
N
DISBURSEMENTS
221




Noninsured bank failures

CLOSED

Disbursements by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to
protect depositors are made when the insured deposits of banks in
financial difficulties are paid off, or when the deposits of a failing
bank are assumed by another insured bank with the financial aid of
the Corporation. In deposit payoff cases the disbursement is the
amount paid by the Corporation on insured deposits. In deposit
assumption cases the principal disbursement is the amount loaned
to failing banks, or the price paid for assets purchased from them;
additional disbursements are made in those cases as advances for
protection of assets in process of liquidation and for liquidation
expenses.

Table 122. NUMBER AND DEPOSITS OF BANKS CLOSED
BECAUSE OF FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES, 1934-1964, BY YEARS

In s u re d

In s u re d
Non­
in s u re d 1

T o ta l

W ith o u t
d is b u rs e ­
m e n ts
by
F D IC 2

T otal

W ith
d is b u rs e ­
m e n ts
by
FD IC 3

T o ta l

N on­
in s u re d 1

Total

$745,606

$57,930

$687,676

7

23,751
23,440
4,231
10,611
7,965
2,595
10,413
12,502
11,689
11,953
2,948
45,101
3,313
6,464
5,555
9,217
10,674
7,207
494
5,695
1,915
12,525
19,541
18,805
142,787
160,211
60,444
34,141
28,100
13,987
37,332

429

23,322
23,440
3,011
8,936
6,930
2,595
8,240
11,247
11,329
11,953
998
44,711
3,170
3,408
5,513
6,665
10,674
7,040
347
5,695
1,915
12,525
19,186
18,726
142,429
157,772
59,406
33,613
27,508
13,404
1,968

3
9

2
3
9
3
3
5
4
5
4
5
5
9
3

2
1
5
1
3
4

2
2

2

5
1
3
4
1

2

5

5

2

2
2

4
3

3

2

2
4
4
3
5
1
1

1

4
5
3
5
1
1

2

2

5
23
16
48
72
80
83
72
32
61

5

5

20

20

14
43
60
73
76
69
26
9

14
43
60
73
74
69
25
9

6
2

2

1,220
1,675
1,035
2,173
1,255
360
1,950
390
143
3,056
42
2,552
167
147

355
79
358
2,439
1,038
528
592
583
35,364

$41,147

$646,529
23,322
23,440

3,011

10,(

26,449

U 90'

328
85

8,936
6,930
2,595
8,240
1,163
11,329
11,953
998
18,262
3,170
3,408
5,513
5,475
10,674
7,040
347
5,695
1,915
12,525
19,186
18,726
142,429
157,772
59,406
33,285
27,508
13,319
1,968

iformation regarding each of these banks, see Table 22 in the Annual Report of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation for 1963, and page 221 jof the report for
oninsured bank placed in receivership in 1934, with no deposits at time of closing, is omitted (see Table 22, note 9). Deposits are unavailable for 7 banks,
formation regarding these cases, see Table 23 of the Annual Report for 1963.
formation r
“
‘
*■ - *
•«
ludest
date c
ernment ( r __________
case no. 83) with deposits of $1,585 thousand.

CORPORATION

451

7

INSURANCE




459

1

W ith
d is b u rs e ­
m e n ts
by
F D IC 3

DEPOSIT

i
1964.

126

8
2

W ith o u t
d is b u rs e ­
m e n ts
by
F D IC 2

FEDERAL

585
1964.
1963.
1962.
1961.
1960.
1959.
1958.
1957.
1956.
1955.
1954.
1953.
1952.
1951.
1950.
1949
1948.
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.

222

D e p o s its (in th o u s a n d s )

N um ber

Table 123. INSURED BANKS REQUIRING DISBURSEMENTS BY THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT JNSURANCE CORPORATION DURING 1964
Case
num ber

D e p o sit
p a y o ff
268

Class o f
bank

T h e F irs t N a tio n a l B a n k o f M a rlin ,
M a rlin , T exa s

Num ber of
d e p o s ito rs 1

N

N a m e a n d lo c a tio n

2 ,2 1 3

M arch 10, 1 9 6 4

F irs t p a y m e n t to
d e p o s ito rs

D ate o f c lo s in g

R e ceiver o r liq u id a tin g a g e n t

M a rc h 16, 1 9 6 4

$ 1 ,9 0 3 ,4 2 9

F ed era l D e p o sit In s u ra n c e
C o rp o ra tio n

M a rc h 17, 1 9 6 4

M a rc h 2 3 , 1 9 6 4

1 ,0 7 8 ,2 2 3

F ed era l D e p o sit In s u ra n c e
C o rp o ra tio n

J u ly 4 , 1 9 6 4

J u ly 10, 1 9 6 4

4 7 8 ,0 8 3

F ed era l D e p o sit In s u ra n c e
C o rp o ra tio n

1 ,0 0 7 ,8 5 5

NM

1 ,1 4 7

270

F irs t S ta te B a n k ,
D ell C ity, T exa s

NM

719

271

B e lle vie w V a lley B a n k ,
B e lle vie w , M is s o u ri

NM

1 ,5 6 3

J u ly 2 0 , 1 9 6 4

J u ly 2 5 , 1 9 6 4

272

F ro n tie r B a n k ,
C ovelo, C a lifo rn ia

NM

995

J u ly 3 1 , 1 9 6 4

A u g u s t 6, 1 9 6 4

273

C row n S a vings B a n k ,
N e w p o rt N ew s, V irg in ia

NM

9 ,7 7 8

S e p te m b e r 4 , 1 9 6 4

274

N e b ra s k a S ta te B a n k o f V a le n tin e ,
N e b ra s k a
V a le n tin e , N e b ra s k a

NM

3 ,3 9 5

O c to b e r 2 9 , 1 9 6 4

7 3 9 ,8 2 9

F ederal D e p o sit In s u ra n c e
C o rp o ra tio n

S e p te m b e r 10, 1 9 6 4

2 ,8 9 1 ,3 7 5

F ederal D e posit |u su ra n ce
C o rp o ra tio n

N o v e m b e r 10, 1 9 6 4

4 ,3 7 1 ,8 7 0

S ta te B a n k in g A u th o rity

D e p o sit
p a y o ff
268

$3,651,148

U. S. G ov­
e rn m e n t
o b lig a tio n s

O th e r
s e c u ritie s

B a n k in g
house,
fu rn itu r e &
fix tu re s

$4,573,306

$505,678

$16,293,626

$337,198

O th e r
real
e s ta te

O th e r
a s s e ts 4

$1

T otal
D e p o s its 5

O th e r
lia b ilitie s

C a pita l
sto c k

O th e r
c a p ita l
a cc o u n ts

$787,747

$25,848,704

$23,321,804

$555,914

$757,584

$1,213,402

138,043

610,844

130,571

2,334,658

118,796

23,097

3,740,962

3,458,617

44,302

100,000

100,828

320,000

69,050

785,418

31,415

2,932

1,309,643

1,232,767

20,431

55,084

1,361

270

61,359

178,854

903,114

60,940

33,057

1,237,324

1,082,325

18,367

82,500

54,132

271

144,598

226,326

63,220

815,776

32,132

2,973

1,285,025

1,188,574

35,000

61,451

272

139,606

891,150

55,028

1,408,734

16,209

131,302

2,642,029

2,312,316

30,391

150.000

149,322

273

1,181,548

1,628,240

33,082

4,694,900

77,705

549,560

7,865,036

7,022,623

442,423

110.000

289,990

274

1,500,213

717,892

154,727

5,351,026

1

44,826

7,768,685

7,024,582

225,000

519,103

1

1 At date of closing.
2 To December 31,1964, plus estimated additional disbursements.
3 As determined by FDIC agents after adjustment of books of bank for liabilities or overdrafts discovered subsequent to closing.
4 Includes in case number 273 a shortage account of $205,927.
5 Includes money placed in banks which was treated as deposits by the bank, the insured status of which is now in litigation brought by the Corporation.




223

522,996

269

DISBURSEMENTS

Total

C ash a n d
Due fro m
banks

Loans,
d is c o u n ts ,
a nd
o v e rd ra fts

INSURANCE

L ia b ilitie s an d c a p ita l a c c o u n ts 3

A s s e ts 3
Case
num ber

S ta te B a n k in g A u th o rity

DEPOSIT

T h e S ta te S a vin g s B a n k o f M in d e n C ity,
M in d e n C ity , M ic h ig a n

AD
N

269

BANKS CLOSED

D is b u rs e
m e n t2

Table 124. DEPOSITORS, DEPOSITS, AND DISBURSEMENTS IN INSURED BANKS REQUIRING DISBURSEMENTS BY THE FEDERAL
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION, 1934-1964
BANKS GROUPED BY CLASS OF BANK, YEAR OF DEPOSIT PAYOFF OR DEPOSIT ASSUM PTIO N, A M O UNT OF DEPOSITS, AND STATE

C lassifica tion

D eposit
pa y o ff
cases

All banks

272

D eposit
as s u m p ­
tion
cases

Total

182 1,516,468

Deposit
payoff
cases

D eposit
assum p
tion
cases3

D e p o s its 1
(in th o u s a n d s o f dollars)

Total

D eposit
p ayo ff
cases

D eposit
assum p­
tion
cases

D isb u rse m e n ts by FDIC
(in th o u s a n d s o f dollars)
P rincipal d is b u rs e m e n ts

Total

224

N u m be r o f d e p o s ito rs 1

N u m b e r o f banks

A dvances and
e xp e n se s2

D e posit
D eposit
D eposit
D eposit
assum p­
assum p­
payo ff
payo ff
tion
tion
cases4
cases6
cases5
cases7

340,675

142,601

198,074

1,838

47,510

N a tion al b a n k s ............................
State b an ks m e m b e rs F. R. S.
B anks n o t m e m b e rs F. R. S.. .

27
24
350

8

237

53
16
113

244,676
285,606
504,451

134,052
190,536
333,100

34,340
29,417
127,404

99,712
161,119
205,696

62,985
103,265
174,425

24,372
22,994
95,235

38,613
80,271
79,190

311
151
1,376

6,196
19,273
22,041

1,968
13,320
27,508
33,349
59,684
157,772
142,429
29,718
19,186
12,525
1,915
5,695
347
7,040
10,674
5,475
5,513
3,408
3,170
18,262
998
11,953
11,329
1,163
8,240
2,593
6,930
8,936
23,266
23,322

1,968
9,091
11,241
14,960
10,296
32,738
5,657
14,730
1,817
6,637
456

941
8,890
14,781
19,160
30,479
67,770
74,134
23,880
10,825
7,172
1,503
1,768
265
1,724
2,990
2,552
3,986
1,885
1,369
5,017
913
6,784
3,333
1,031
3,026
1,835
4,765

941
6,025
8,056
12,045
9,092
26,196
4,895
12,278
1,612
5,500
404

6,418
17,759
20,975
50,970
71,017
112,700
105,110
113,321
159,418

4,947
13,920
12,462
24,182
22,200
36,562
27,636
49,252

313,465
372,545
830,458

68,789
86,939
326,007

15,767
44,655
89,018
130,387
203,961
392,718
256,361
73,005
60,688
27,371
5,487
12,483
1,383
10,637
18,540
5,671
6,366
5,276
6,752
24,469
1,811
17,790
15,197
2,338
9,587
3,073
11,171
8,302
36,321
19,883

15,767
32,331
43,225
74,148
44,288
90,169
20,667
38,594
5,717
16,917

38,347
83,370
89,949
157,514
205,962
248,044
222,926
198,028
272,328

29,695
65,512
56,777
71,868
66,755
69,405
32,643

Year8
1 9 3 4 ...
1 9 3 5 ...
1 9 3 6 ...
1 9 3 7 ...
1 9 3 8 ...
1 9 3 9 ...
1 9 4 0 ...
1 9 4 1 ...
1 9 4 2 ...
1 9 4 3 ...
1 9 4 4 ...
1 9 4 5 ...
1 9 4 6 ...
1 9 4 7 ...
1 9 4 8 ...
1 9 4 9 ...
1 9 5 0 ...
1 9 5 1 ...
1 9 5 2 ...
1 9 5 3 ...
1 9 5 4 ...
1 9 5 5 ...
1 9 5 6 ...
1 9 5 7 ...
1 9 5 8 ...
1 9 5 9 ...
1 9 6 0 ...
1 9 6 1 ...
1 9 6 3 ...
1 9 6 4 ...

4
1
1
3
3
1
5
2
7

1
1

83
86
36
32
17
11
4
3

24
23
23
35
33
25
12
3
4

1

5,465
2,338
4,380
3,073
11,171
8,302
36,321
19,883

12,324
45,793
56,239
159,673
302,549
235,694
34,411
54,971
10,454
4,588
12,483
1,383
10,637
18,540
5,671
6,366
5,276
6,752
24,469
1,811
9,710
9,732
5,207

6,503
4,701
1,163
4,156
2,593
6,930
8,936
23,266
23,322

4,229
16,267
18,389
49,388
125,034
136,772
14,988
17,369
5,888
1,459
5,695
347
7,040
10,674
5,475
5,513
3,408
3,170
18,262
998
5,450
6,628
4,084

4,438
2.795
1,031
2.796
1,835
4,765

6,201

4,309
11,554
10,223
19,106
16,717
23,763
17,491
39,438

272
934
905
4,902
17,603
17,237
1,479
1,076
72
37
96

11
354

200

106
87

166
524
127
195
428
145
665
51

38
51

31

68
153
245
255

19,225
12,471

4,999
12,906
14,588
33,963
38,896
58,385
43,776
59,509
73,653

44
108
67
103
93
162
89
50
38
53
9

20
230

6,201

19,225
12,471

2,865
6,725
7,115
21,387
41,574
69,239
11,602
9,213
1,672
1,099
1,768
265
1,724
2,990
2,552
3,986
1,885
1,369
5,017
913
2,346
538

Banks with deposits of—
Less th a n $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..................
$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 .............
$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 .............
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .........
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
.
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
$
$ 1 0 ,0
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

107

109
59
67
50
36
16

6
4

8,652
17,858
33,172
85,646
139,207
178,639
190,283
108,948
272,328

1,471
3,839
8,513
26,788
48,817
76,138
77,474
64,069
159,418

690
1,352
4,365
14,857
22,179
34,622
26,285
20,071
73,653

209
147
297
279
307
229
283

154
173
583
2,139
3,317
5,525
5,491
5,404
24,723

CORPORATION

466,527

INSURANCE

191,161

DEPOSIT

657,688

FEDERAL

481,735 1,034,733

Class of bank

State
A la b a m a ..............
A rk a n s a s ............
C a lifo rn ia ............
C o lo ra d o ..............
C o n n e c tic u t.......

6

3
b

1
8
2
8
15

1
2

Io w a ......................
K a n s a s ................
K e n tu c k y ............
L o u is ia n a ............
M a in e ...................

7
9
23
3
1

4
5
18
3

3
4
5

M a ry la n d ............
M a s s a c h u s e tts ..
M ic h ig a n .............
M in n e s o ta ..........
M is s is s ip p i.........

5
2
9
5
3

2

3
2
5

22,567
9,046
32,819
2,650
1,651

M is s o u ri..............
M o n ta n a ..............
N e b ra s k a ............
New H a m p s h ire
New J e rs e y ........

48
5
6
1
39

36
3
6

12
2

12

1
27

37,647
1,500
6,044
1,780
522,563

103,797

New Y o rk ............
N o rth C a ro lin a ..
N o rth D a k o ta .. .
O h io ......................
O k la h o m a ...........

26
7
29
4
11

3
2
18
2
8

23
5
11
2
3

269,621
10,408
14,103
13,751
25,071

O re g o n .................
P e n n s y lv a n ia . . .
S outh C a ro lin a ..
South D a k o ta . . .
T e n n e s s e e ..........

2
29
2
23
12

1
8
1
22
8

1
21
1
1
4

T e x a s ....................
V e rm o n t..............
V irg in ia ................
W a s h in g to n ........
W est V ir g in ia ....

26
3
9
1
3

24
2
4

W is c o n s in ...........
W y o m in g .............

31
1

20

1,642
9,410
2,451
79,612
30,006

448
8,797
2,451
41,693
12,549

1,194
613

16,055
5,145
36,139 6,087
9,710

4,066
2,254
18,490
6,087

2,285
1,764
7,104
8
1,526

100
1,168
6,026
8
1,526

2,185
596
1,078

491
1,959
1,894
50,586
13,593

217
1,870
1,894
24,903
3,932

274
89

9,401
1,234
8,888
1,652
5,450

4,383
539
3,954
1,652

5,018
695
4,934

15,924
9,046
30,735

4,566
3,019
14,765
818
334

828

8,169
651
1,780
418,766

9,273
1,095
8,066
296
194,630

33,128

28,440
3,677
6,760
7,585
20,150

241,181
6,731
7,343
6,166
4,921

145,439
3,266
3,830
7,223
13,765

3,439
166,894
1,848
12,515
12,358

1,230
43,828
403
11,412
9,993

2,209
123,066
1,445
1,103
2,365

2
1
5
1

36,233
11,057
35,718
4,179
8,346

34,705
8,687
12,641

1,528
2,370
23,077
4,179

11
1

26,898
3,212

18,739

12
5

1

4
5
3

7,111
905
3,169

3

37,919
17,457
11,989
2,891
17,649
9,710

6,643
2,084
2,650
1,651
29,478
849
6,044

8,346
8,159
3,212

1,089
984
3,721
8
1,242

94
840
2,860
8
1,242

995
144
861

300
1,620
1,493
28,450
6,197

203
1,551
1,493
20,467
3,096

97
69

3,875
974
5,455
668
2,346

2,804
482
3,329
668

3,738
3,019
13,373

3,109
1 564
7,368
640
257

735

2,033
880
296
161,502

6,661
640
5,168
117
82,125

26,468

117
55,657

161

8
20,154

13,286
1,421
1,552
2,345
11,053

132,153
1,845
2,278
4,878
2,712

67,872
2,387
2,657
2,098
9,256

10,836
1,156
1,397
1,610
7,945

57,036
1,231
1,260
488
1,311

32
23
24
7
164

10,847
179
203
44
104

2,670
75,756
849
2,987
1,942

1,368
14,340
136
2,861
1,620

1,302
61,416
713
126
322

1,948
51,292
274
2,411
1,278

986
10,133
136
2,388
1,164

962
41,159
138
23
114

11
75

81
9,524
10
9
25

18,672
3,725
17,778
1,538
2,006

17,986
3,375
7,652

686
350
10,126
1,538

12,104
3,445
7,799
935
1,458

11,811
3,259
3,403

293
186
4,396
935

9,512
2,033

5,967

7,188
202

5,096

25,683
9,661

5,450

1,392
818
334
7,240
215
8,066

2,006
3,545
2,033

1
8
61
(9)
8

7,983
3,101
1,071
492
2,126

3
33
29
274
39
46
5
44
10

2,346

1,217
640
257
6,015
186
5,168

91
48
138

2,374
1 564
6* 151

646
454

2,092
202

791
384
113
72
201
665

9
26
17
5
99
6
40

26
28
335
21
104
11

1,458

13
33

54

371
1 030
’ 760

77
21

44
22
505
512
410
19




225

1 Adjusted to December 31,1964.
2 Excludes $210 thousand of non-recoverable insurance expenses in cases which were resolved without payment of claims or a disbursement to facilitate assumption of deposits by another insured bank and
other expenses of field liquidation employees not chargable to liquidation activities.
3 Number of deposit accounts.
4 Includes estimated additional disbursements in active cases.
5 Excludes excess collections turned over to banks as additional purchase price at termination of liquidation.
6 These disbursements are not recoverable by the Corporation; they consist almost wholly of field payoff expenses.
7 Includes advances to protect assets and liquidation expenses of $47,296 thousand, all of which have been fully recovered by the Corporation, and $214 thousand of non-recoverable expenses.
8 No case in 1962 required disbursements. Disbursement totals for each year relate to cases occurring during that year, including disbursements made in subsequent years.
9 Less than $500.
Note: Due to rounding differences, components may not add to totals.

DISBURSEMENTS

2
10
2
20
20

794
3,529
5,396
10
5,379

INSURANCE

F lo rid a ..................
G e o rg ia ................
Id a h o ....................
Illin o is ..................
In d ia n a ................

7,905
4,434
8,565
10
5,379

BANKS CLOSED A D DEPOSIT
N

2
1
1

1
2

1
5
2
1
2

Table 125. RECOVERIES AND LOSSES BY THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION ON PRINCIPAL DISBURSEMENTS
FOR PROTECTION OF DEPOSITORS, 1934-1964
(AMOUNTS IN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS)
Deposit assum ption cases

Deposit payoff cases
Re­
Estimated
coveries a dditional
to Dec. recoveries
31, 1964

Num ber Principal
disburse­
of
m ents 3
banks

Losses2

N um ber Principal
disburse­
of
m e n ts 4
banks

226

Liquidation
All cases
status and
year o f de­
Re­
Estimated
posit payoff N um ber Principal
d isburse­ coveries additional Losses2
or deposit
of
to Dec. recoveries
assum ption
banks
m ents
3 1 ,1 9 6 4 '

Re­
Estimated
coveries additional
to Dec. recoveries
3 1 ,1 9 6 4 1

Losses2

35,399

272

142,601

106,374

13,883

22,345

182

198,074

184,779

241

13,054

26
428

93,351
247,324

69,208
221,945

14.123

10,020
25,379

18
254

47,149
95,452

25,425
80,949

13,883

7,842
14,503

8
174

46,201
151,873

43,783
140,996

241

2,177
10,877

Year
1934
1935
1936. ..
1937
1 9 3 8 .. ..

9
25
69
75
74

941
8,890
14,781
19,160
30,480

734
6,185
12,326
15,611
28,055

207
2,704
2,455
3,549
2,425

9
24
42
50
50

941
6,026
8,056
12,044
9,092

734
4,274
6,595
9,520
7,908

207
1,752
1,461
2,524
1,184

• 1
27
25
24

2,865
6,725
7,115
21,387

1,911
5,730
6,090
20,147

1

953
995
1,025
1,241

1939
1940
1941
1942
1943

60
43
15
20
5

67,770
74,134
23,881
10,825
7,171

60,617
70,240
23,290
10,137
7,048

7,153
3,773
591
688
123

32
19
8
6
4

26,197
4,895
12,278
1,612
5,500

20,399
4,313
12,065
1,320
5,377

5,798
582
213
292
123

28
24
7
14
1

41,574
69,239
11,603
9,212
1,672

40,219
65,927
11,225
8,816
1,672

1944
1945
1946
1947
1948

2
1
1
5
3

1,502
1,768
265
1,724
2,990

1,462
1,768
265
1,626
2,349

40

1

404

364

40

1
1

1,099
1,768
265
1,626
2,349

1949
1950
1951
1952
1953

4
4
2
3
2

2,552
3,986
1,885
1,369
5,017

2,183
2,601
1,792
577
5,017

90

1954
1955
1956
1957
1958

2
5
2
1
4

913
6,784
3,333
1,031
3,026

651
6,554
3,038
1,031
2,959

30

260
230
265

27

40

1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964

3
1
5

1,835
4,765
6,201

1,722
4,765
4,462

8

105

151

2
7

19,225
12,471

10,696
1,392

6,719
6,948

Status
A ctive ..........

1

121

72
641

5
3

1,099
1,768
265
1,724
2,990

369
1,385
3
792

4
4
2
3
2

2,552
3,986
1,885
1,369
5,017

2,183
2,601
1,792
577
5,017

1
26

2

30

230
265

2
1
1

913
2,346
538

651
2,346
538

27

40

1

230

230

4
1
1
3

4,438
2.795
1,031
2.796

4,208
2,500
1,031
2,729

3
1
5

1,835
4,765
6,201

1,722
4,765
4,462

8

105

1,588

151

1,588

1,810
4,131

2
7

19,225
12,471

10,696
1,392

6,719
6,948

1,810
4,131

1 Excludes in deposit assumption cases recovery of all advances for asset protection, totaling $32,872 thousand, and all liquidation expenses totaling $14,424 thousand.
2 Includes estimated losses in active cases. Not adjusted for interest or allowable return, which was collected in some cases in which the disbursement was fully recovered.
3 Includes estimated additional disbursements in active cases.
Excludes excess collections turned over to banks as additional purchase price at termination of liquidation.
4
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ to rounding differences, components may not add to totals.
Note: Due

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

122

26

90

2

1,355
3,190
378
396

72
641
369
1,385
3
792
260

CORPORATION

14.123

INSURANCE

291,153

DEPOSIT

340,675

FEDERAL

454

T o tal...........




INDEX




INDEX
Page
Absorptions:
Of insured banks requiring disbursements by the Corporation. See
Banks in financial difficulties.
Of operating banks, 1964______________________________________136-139
Of operating banks approved by the Corporation, 1964_____________ 31-60
Regulation of _________________________________________________ 11-12
Accounts in insured banks:
Average size, special call dates, 1936-1964_________________________78-79
Fully and partially protected by insurance. See Deposit Insurance
coverage.
Number, in all insured banks, November 18, 1964:
By FDIC district and State________________________________ 94-95
By size of bank, by population of center, and by class of bank___ 96-97
By type of account_______________ ________________________96-97
In banks grouped by percentage of deposits insured____________
97
In SMSA’s with population over 500,000_______________________ 98-99
Number and percent distribution, insured commercial banks,
November 18, 1964:
By
By
By
By
By

class of bank and size of account__________________________ 103
population of center and size of account________________ 102-103
size of account in each State and FDIC district____________ 100-101
size of bank and size of account__________________________ 102
type and size of account_________________________________ 103

In banks grouped by percentage of deposits insured, by size of
account _________________________________________________ 103
Number and percent distribution, insured mutual savings banks,
November 18, 1964:
By population of center and size of account___________________ 121
By size of account in each State and FDIC district______________ 121
By size of bank and size of account________________________120-121
By type and size of account__________________________________ 121
In banks grouped by percentage of deposits insured, by size of
account _________________________________________________ 121
Number and percent distribution, individual, partnership, and corporation
accounts, insured commercial banks, November 18, 1964:
Demand, by size of account in each State and FDIC district___ 104-105
Demand, by size of bank and size of account___________________

108

Savings and time, by size of account in each State and FDIC
district _______________________________________________106-107
Savings and time, by size of bank and size of account__________

109

Admission of banks to insurance:
Applicants for, 1964____________________________________________13-14
Different methods followed______________________________________ 13
Number of banks admitted, by class of bank, 1964_______________ __ 158
Application from banks____________________ _______________ ___ _____13-14




229

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

230

Areas outside continental United States, banks and branches located in:
Assets and liabilities, December 31, 1964_________________________ 176-177
Average assets and liabilities, insured commercial banks, 1964____188-189
Deposits, December 31, 1964____________________________________ 168-169
Earnings, expenses, profits, and dividends, 1964_________________206-207
Number, December 31, 1964_______________________ 160, 167-169, 176-177
Assessments for deposit insurance______________________________________ 24-28
Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks (see also Deposits):
All banks:
Amounts by type and supervisory status, December 31, 1964______ 134
By FDIC district and State, December 31, 1964_________________176-177
Capital ratios by type and supervisory status, December 31,
1964 _______________________________________________________

135

In banks grouped according to insurance status and type of
• bank, June 30, and December 31, 1964____________________ 172-175
Commercial banks, June 30, and December 31, 1964__________ 172-175
Insured banks, June and December call dates, 1961 through
1964 ____________________________________________________ 178-181
Insured commercial banks:
Amount, call dates, December 28, 1962 through December
31, 1964 ____________________________________________ 182-185
Average for 1964, by class of bank_______________________ 186
Average for 1964, by State___________ ___________________ 188-189
Percentage distributions, average for 1964, by class of bank___ 186
Percentage distributions, December and June call dates,
1962 through 1964___________________________________ 182-185
Percentage distributions of totals among size groups of banks,
December 31, 1964__ ______ _________________________151, 187
Ratio of selected items to total assets, by size of bank, De­
cember 31, 1964________ ____________________________ 190-191
Insured mutual savings banks:
Amount, and percentage distributions, December and June
call dates, 1962 through 1964_______________________ __182-185
Major categories, average, 1956-1964_______________________ 217
Mutual savings banks:
Amount and percentage distribution, December 31, 1964______ 148
Banks grouped by insurance status, June 30, and December
31, 1964 ............. ......... ...................................................................172-175
Sources of data_______________________________________ 171, 193, 221
Assets and liabilities of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation____23-24
Assets pledged to secure bank obligations_______________________ 181, 185
Assets purchased by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation from
banks in financial difficulties__________________________________ 12, 221
Assumption of deposits of insured banks with financial aid of the Cor­
poration (see also Banks in financial difficulties)____________ 14-15, 221




INDEX

231

Page
Attorney General of the United States, summary reports on absorp­
tions _________________________________________________________ 31-60
Audit of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation_________________

29

Bad-debt reserves. See Valuation reserves.
Bank supervision. See Supervision of banks; Examination of insured
banks.
Banking offices, number of. See Number of banks and branches.
Bank practices. See Unsafe and unsound banking practices.
Banks, applications from, acted on by the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation ____________________________________________________ 13-14
Banks, concentration and location of banking facilities____________ 139-147
Banks in financial difficulties:
Insured banks requiring disbursements by the Corporation:
Deposit size of___________________________________________ 224
Deposits protected, 1934-1964..................................3-12, 222, 224-225
Disbursements by the Corporation, 1934-1964__________ 7, 221-226
Loans made and assets purchased by the Corporation________

12

Location by State, 1934-1964____________________________ __ 225
Losses incurred by the Corporation_________ __________ 7, 12, 226
Losses incurred by depositors_____________ ____ _____ ______ 5-12
Name and location of, 1964.___________________________10, 223
Number of, 1934-1964............... ........... .......... ......................... 11-12, 222
Number of deposit accounts, 1934-1964..................................224-225
Recoveries by the Corporation on assets acquired, 19341964 ____ __ ______ ____ _____ ___ _____ ___ ____________ 12, 226
Noninsured banks:
Deposits of commercial banks closed, by year, 1934-1964........ 222
Sources of data___________________________________________
Suspensions,

221

1964 ______________________________ _____ ___ 158

Suspensions of noninsured banks, 1964_______________ __ ___ 221
Banks, number of. See Number of banks and branches.
Banks operating branches, December 31, 1964_____________________ 160-167
Banks, size of largest banks according to branch banking status, banks
grouped by large metropolitan areas, June 30, 1964__________ __ .142-143
Banks, size of largest banks according to branch banking status, banks
grouped by State, December 31, 1964____________________________ 141
Board of Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. See
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. See Federal Reserve
Authorities.
Branches (See also Number of banks and branches):
Establishment approved by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation,
1964 ____ ___ _____ _______ ______ ____ _____ _________________13-14
Examination of, 1963 and 1964_______

......

Increase, branches of all banks, 1964.

136, 159




16

232

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
Page
Business and personal deposits. See Deposits (items referring to type of
account).
Call reports. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Reports from
banks.
Capital of banks. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Banks in
financial difficulties; Income of insured commercial banks; Examina­
tion of insured banks.
Charge-offs by banks. See Income of insured commercial banks;
income of insured mutual savings banks; Valuation reserves.
Class of bank, banking data presented by:
Admissions to and terminations of insurance__________________

158

Assets and liabilities of all b a n k s ______________________________133
Deposits, December 31, 1964_________________________________ 135
Income of insured commercial banks, 1964_________________ 198-199
Insured banks requiring disbursements by the Corporation, 19341964 _____________________________________________________ 224
Number of banks and banking offices, 1964_____________ 133, 158-169
Ratios of income of insured commercial banks, 1964________ 200-201
Classification of banks_______________________________ 133-135, 156-157
Closed banks. See Banks in financial difficulties.
Commercial banks. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; De­
posit insurance coverage; Deposits; Income of insured commercial
banks; Number of banks and branches.
Comptroller General of the United States__________________________ 29
Comptroller of the Currency______________________IV, V, 8, 13, 22, 134-135
Consolidations. See Absorptions.
Credit, bank. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks.
Demand deposits. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Deposits
(items referring to type of account).
Deposit insurance coverage:
Accounts fully and partially protected, November 18, 1964:
Number and proportion of, all insured banks, banks grouped by size,
by percentage of deposits insured, by population of center, and
by class, and accounts grouped by type____________________ 96-97
Number and proportion of, all insured banks, by FDIC district and
State __________________________________________________94-95
Number and proportion of, SMSA’s with population over 500,000 _98-99
Accounts fully protected:
Definition of _____________________________________________ 89-90
90
Difference from depositors fully protected____________________
Number of, all insured banks, banks grouped by size, by per­
centage of deposits insured, by population of center, and by
class; and accounts grouped by type, November 18, 1964_____ 96-97
Special call dates, 1936, 1945, 1955, and 1964_________________ 77-78
Special call, November 18, 1964_______________________________



77

INDEX

233

Deposit insurance coverage— Continued
Page
Accounts fully protected, number and proportion, comparison with
assumed coverages of $25,000 and $100,000 November 18, 1964:
By type of account, insured commercial banks_________________ 127
By type of account, insured mutual savings banks___________ 129
Discussion of______________________________________________87-88
Insured commercial banks, by FDIC district and State_________ 124-125
Insured commercial banks, by size of bank, by population of center,
and by class of bank__________________________________ 126-127
Insured commercial banks grouped by percentage of deposits
insured _________________________________________________ 127
Insured mutual savings banks, banks grouped by FDIC district, by
State, by size of bank, by population of center, and by percent of
deposits insured, November 18, 1964______________________128-129
Banks grouped by percent of deposits insured, comparison with
assumed coverages of $25,000 and $100,000 November 18, 1964___ 130
Deposits insured:
Amount of, all insured banks, grouped by size, by percentage of
deposits insured, by population of center, by class, and ac­
counts grouped by type, November 18, 1964_______________ 96-97
Definition o f ________________________________________________ 90
Special call dates, 1936, 1945, 1955, and 1964_________________ 77-81
Special call, November 18, 1964_______________________________

77

Types o f ___________________________________________________

78

Deposits insured, amount and proportion, comparison with assumed
coverages of $25,000 and $100,000, November 18, 1964:
By type of account, insured commercial banks_________________

127

By type of account, insured mutual savings banks______________ 129
Insured commercial banks, by FDIC district and State___ _____124-125
Insured commercial banks, by size of bank, by population of
center, and by class of bank_____________________________126-127
Insured commercial banks grouped by percentage of deposits
insured
________________________________________________ 127
Insured mutual savings banks, banks grouped by FDIC district,
by State, by size of bank, by population of center, and by percent
of deposits insured, November 18, 1964____________________128-129
Deposits insured and uninsured, November 18, 1964:
Amount and proportion of, all insured banks, banks grouped by size,
by percentage of deposits insured, by population of center, and
by class, and accounts grouped by type____________________ 96-97
Amount and proportion of, all insured banks, by FDIC district and
State __________________________________________________ 94-95
Amount and proportion of, cities with population over 500,000, by
city ____________________________________________________

99

Instructions and form, special call for deposit information, November
18, 1964 ___________________________________________________ 91-92
Depositors (See also Accounts in insured banks):
Claims against closed insured banks. See Banks in financial difficulties.



234

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Depositors (See also Accounts in insured banks)— Continued
Losses. See Banks in financial difficulties.

Page

Number of, difference from number of accounts_____________________

90

Protected in insolvent or hazardous banks suspended or absorbed. See
Banks in financial difficulties.
Deposit insurance national banks______________________________________

10

Deposits:
All banks:
By insurance status of bank and type of account, December 31,
1964 _____________________________________________________ 175
By insurance status of bank and type of account, June 30, 1964___ 173
By supervisory status and insurance status, December 31, 1964___ 135
By type of account in each State and FDIC district, December 31,
1964 ___________________________________________________ 176-177
By type of bank and insurance status, December 31, 1964_________ 135
By type of bank in each State and FDIC district, December 31,
1964 ___________________________________________________ 168-169
All insured banks:
By FDIC district and State, November 18, 1964________________ 94-95
By percent of deposits insured and type of account, November 18,
1964 ___________________________________________________96-97
By size of bank, population center, and by class and type of bank,
November 18, 1964_______________________________________96-97
By Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area and City, November 18,
1964 ___________________________________________________ 98-99
By type of account, December 31, 1964________________________ 175
By type of account, call dates, June 30, 1961, through December
31, 1964 _______________________________________________ 180
Ratios of deposit insurance fund to, 1934-1964_____________ 24n, 28
Commercial banks:
By FDIC district and State, December 31, 1964______________ 168-169
By proportion of total deposits held by the largest banks, December
31, 1964 ________________________________________________ 140
By type of account, December 31, 1964________________________ 175
By type of account, June 30, 1964_____________________________ 173
Insured banks requiring disbursements by the Corporation. See Banks
in financial difficulties.
Insured commercial banks:
By type of account, call dates, December 31, 1962, through Decem­
ber 31, 1964_____________________________________________ 182
Percentage distributions of selected totals among size groups of
banks, December 31, 1964_________________________________ 187
Insured mutual savings banks:
By FDIC district and State, December 31, 1964______________ 168-169
By type of account, call dates, December 28, 1962, through Decem­
ber 31, 1964_____________________________________________ 182
Interest and dividends on, 1956-1964__________________________ 216



INDEX

235

Deposits— Continued
Page
Largest commercial banks:
By selected metropolitan area and character of branch system ___ 142
By State and character of branch system_____________________
United States______________________________________________

141
140

Mutual savings banks:
By FDIC district and State, December 31, 1964______________ 168-169
By type of account, June 30, and December 31, 1964_________ 173, 175
Noninsured banks:
By FDIC district and State, December 31, 1964_______________ 168-169
By type of account and type of bank, June 30, and December 31,
1964 _______________________________________________ 173, 175
Percent distribution of, insured commercial banks:
By size of account in each State and FDIC district, November 18,
1964 _________________________________________________ 110-111
By size of account and with banks grouped by FDIC district, by
State, by size of bank, by population of center, and by percent
of deposits insured, November 18, 1964____________________110-113
By type and size of account, November 18, 1964_______________ 113
Percent distribution of, insured mutual savings banks:
By size of account, and with banks grouped by FDIC district, by
State, by size of bank, by population of center, and by percent
of deposits insured, November 18, 1964__________________ 122-123
By type and size of account, November 18, 1964_______________

123

Percent distribution of, in individual, partnership, and corporation ac­
counts, insured commercial banks:
Demand, by size of account in each State and FDIC district,
November 18, 1964_____________________________________114-115
Demand, by size of bank and size of account, November 18, 1964 ... 118
Savings and time, by size of account in each State and FDIC dis­
trict, November 18, 1964________________________________116-117
Savings and time, by size of bank and size of account, November
18, 1964_________________________________________________ 119
Sources of data________________________________________________ 171
State legislation_____ __________________________________________ 67-73
Deposits, insured by FDIC, 1934-1964.......... ................ ........................................

28

Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. See Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation.
Disbursements. See Banks in financial difficulties.
Disclosure of information by banks (see also Legislation relating to deposit
insurance and banking; Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation rules and
regulations) ____________________________________________________18, 20
Dividends:
To depositors in insured mutual savings banks___ ___ 153-154, 216, 218-219
To stockholders of insured commercial banks. See Income of insured
commercial banks.



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

236

Page
Earnings of banks. See Income of insured commercial banks; Income of
insured mutual savings banks.
Educational program for bank examiners_______________________________

23

Employees:
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation____________________________22-23
Insured commercial banks:
Distribution by deposit size of bank, 1964______________________ 151
Number and compensation, 1955-1964_______________________194-197
Number and compensation, by class of bank, by size of bank, and
by State, 1964_________________________198-199, 202-203, 206-215
Insured mutual savings banks, number and compensation_________ 216-217
State

legislation

______________________________________________ 67-73

Examination of insured banks:
Banks examined by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation,
1964 ________________________________________________ 16, 133-134
Examination school_____________________________________________
23
Examination staff_______________________________________________ VI, 22
Powers granted to supervisory authorities________________________133-134
Expenses of banks. See Income of insured commercial banks; Income of in­
sured mutual savings banks.
Expenses of the Corporation_________________________________________ 25-27
Failures. See Banks in financial difficulties.
Federal bank supervisory authorities___________________________ 13-14, 133-135
Federal Deposit Insurance Act. (see also Legislation relating to deposit in­
surance and banking) _______________________________________________ 24n
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation:
Assessments on insured banks_____________________________________ 23-27
Assets

__________________________________________________________ 23-24

Audit _____________________________________________________________

29

Banks examined by, and submitting reports to ________________ 16, 133-135
Board of Directors, actions on applications and banking practices_____13-18
Borrowing

power _________________________________________________ 24n

Capital stock _____________________________________________________ 24n
Coverage of deposit insurance, banks participating____8, 77, 78, 133, 158-167
Deposit insurance fund (surplus)________________________________24n, 23-29
Directors (members of the Board)________________________________V, 21-22
Disbursements for protection of depositors______________ 5-7, 9-12, 221-226
Districts __________________________________________________________

VI

Divisions ________________________________________________________ IV, 22
Educational program for bank examiners___________________________
Employees

23

______________________________________________________ 21-22

Examination of banks____________________________________ VI, 16, 133-134
Financial

statements______________________________________________ 24-25

Income and expenses, 1933-1964___________________________________




27

INDEX
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation— Continued

237
Page

Income and expenses, 1964______ _____________________________ 25-27
Insured banks requiring disbursements by. See Banks in financial diffi­
culties.
Liabilities _____________________________________________________ 23-24
Loans to and purchase of assets from insured banks________ 221, 224-225
Losses incurred, 1934-1964__________________________________7, 12, 226
Methods of protecting depositors______________________________9-12, 221
Organization and staff_____________________________________IV-VI, 21-23
Payments to insured depositors__________________________________ 9-12
Protection of depositors___________________________________ 6, 224-225
Recoveries __________________________________________________ 12, 226
Reports from banks__________________________________________17-18, 92
Reserve for losses on assets acquired_____________________________ 25
Retirement of capital stock of the Corporation__________________8, 24n
Rules and regulations______________________________________ 20, 66-67
Sources and uses of funds_______________________________________ 26
Supervisory activities___________________________________13-18, 133-136
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation districts, banking data classified by:
All banks:
Assets and liabilities, December 31, 1964______________________ 176
Number and deposits, by type of bank, December 31, 1964______ 168
Federal Reserve authorities_____________________________________13, 133-135
Federal Reserve member banks. See Class of bank, banking data pre­
sented by.
General Accounting O ffice__________________________________________
Government deposits. See Deposits (items referring to type of account).

29

Income of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation___________________ 25-28
Income of insured commercial banks:
Amounts of principal components:
Annually, 1956-1964______________________________________194-195
By class of bank, 1964____________________________________198-199
By size of bank, 1964_____________________________________202-203
By State, 1964__________________________________________ 206-215
Charge-offs and recoveries, 1955-1964___________________________194-195
Income, sources and disposition of total, 1964___________________ 150-152
Profits, 1956-1964 ___________________________________________ 194-195
Profits, 1964____________________________________193, 198-199, 202-203
Rates of income on assets, 1956-1964__________________________ 196-197
Rate of net profit on total capital accounts, 1964___________ 193, 200, 205
Ratios of income items:
Annually, 1956-1964______________________________________196-197
By class of bank, 1964___________________________________ 200-201
By size of bank, 1964____________________________________ 204-205
Sources and disposition of total, 1962-1964____________________ 151



238

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Income of insured commercial banks— Continued
Page
Ratios of expense items_____________________ 153, 196, 200-201, 204-205
Revision of report of income and dividends_________________________ 193
Selected operating ratios, 1950-1964______________________________ 153
Sources of data_________________ ______________________________

193

Income of insured mutual savings banks:
Amounts of principal components, 1962-1964___________________ 216-217
Income, sources and disposition of total, 1963-1964________________

154

Rates of income on assets, 1956-1964_____________________________ 218
Ratios of expense items_______________________________________218-219
Ratios of income items________________________________________218-219
Sources of data_____________________________________________ __ 193
Insolvent banks. See Banks in financial difficulties.
Insurance of bank obligations______________________________________3-12, 28
Insurance status, banks classified by:
Assets and liabilities, June 30 and December 31, 1964____ 134, 172-175
Capital ratios______________________________________________ 135
Changes in number, 1964_________________________________158-159
Deposits, June 30 and December 31, 1964________ __ ________ 173-175
Number, December 31, 1964__________________________133, 158-169
Percentage of banks insured, by State, December 31, 1964_____ 160-167
Insured banks. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Banks in finan­
cial difficulties; Deposits; Deposit insurance coverage; Income of insured
commercial banks; Income of insured mutual savings banks; Number of
banks and branches.
Insured commercial banks not members of the Federal Reserve System. See
Class of bank, banking data presented by.
Insured deposits. See Banks in financial difficulties; Deposit insurance
coverage.
Insured State banks members of the Federal Reserve System. See Class of
bank, banking data presented by.
Interbank deposits. See Deposits (items referring to type of account).
Interest. See Income of insured commercial banks; Income of insured mutual
savings banks.
Investments. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Assets and liabil­
ities of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; Banks in financial
difficulties.
Law, violations of by insured banks________ __ ________________________16-17
Legislation relating to deposit insurance and banking:
Federal, enacted in 1964__________________________________18-19, 63-66
Relating to bank supervision_____________________________________ 133
State, enacted in 1964_________________________________________ 67-73
Loans. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Banks in financial diffi­
culties.



INDEX

239

Losses:
Of banks, charged off. See Income of insured commercial banks; In­
come of insured mutual savings banks.
Of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation_______________4, 7, 12, 226
Provision for, in insured banks, 1956-1964_______________194-195, 216-217
Mergers. See Absorptions.
Methods of tabulating banking data:
Assets and liabilities of banks____________________________________ 171
Deposit insurance disbursements_________________________________ 221
Income of insured banks________________________________________ 193
Number, offices, and deposits of banks__________________________156-157
Metropolitan areas, banking concentration in_________ 141, 142-143, 144
Mutual savings banks. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Deposit
insurance coverage; Deposits; Income of insured mutual savings banks;
Number of banks and branches.
National banks. See Class of bank, banking data presented by.
New banks, 1964____________________________________________ 136, 158-159
Noninsured banks. See Absorptions; Admission of banks to insurance;
Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Banks in financial difficulties;
Classification of banks; Class of bank, banking data presented by;
Deposits; Number of banks and branches; Reports from banks.
Number of banks and branches:
Banking offices (banks and branches):
By insurance status, type of bank, and State, December 31,
1964 ___________________________________________________ 160-167
Changes during 1964_____________________________________ 136, 159
Banks:
By insurance status and type of bank, December 31, 1964-133, 159, 175
By insurance status and type of bank, June 30, 1964___________ 173
By insurance status, type of bank, and State, December 31,
1964 _________________________________________________ 160-167
By insurance status, type of bank, FDIC district and State, December
31, 1964_______________________________________________ 168-169
By number of offices in center in which located and population of
center, December 31, 1964___________ __ __________________ 145
By status of branch banking and metropolitan area counties and
other counties, December 31, 1964__________ ______________

146

Changes during 1964, by type of bank______________________136, 159
Operating branches, by insurance status and State, December 31,
1964 ________________________________________________ 160-167
Branches:
By insurance status, type of bank, and State, December 31,
1964 _________________________________________________ 160-167
Changes in, during 1964____ _____________________________136, 159
Number of, 1964_________________________________________ 136, 159



240

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

Number of banks and branches— Continued
Page
Insured commercial banks:
December 31, 1956-1964__________________________________195, 197
December 31, 1964, by class, deposit size of bank, or
State ____________________________________151, 199, 203, 213, 215
Distributed by capital ratios and distribution assets, December
31, 1964 ______________________________________________190-191
Insured mutual savings banks, 1956-1964______________________217-219
Mutual savings banks, December 31, 1964_________________ 133, 159-169
Noninsured banks:
Noninsured banks, December 31, 1964________________ 133, 159-169
Trust companies, December 31, 1964______________________ 159-169
Unit banks, by insurance status and State, December 31, 1964__„160-167
Obligations of banks. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Deposits.
Officers of insured banks. See Employees.
Officers of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation_______________ V, 21-22
Operating banks. See Number of banks and branches.

Payments to depositors in closed insured banks. See Banks in financial
difficulties.
Personnel. See Employees.
Population of center, number of commercial banking offices by__________ 145
Possessions, banks and branches located in. See Areas outside continental
United States, banks and branches located in.
Protection of depositors. See Banks in financial difficulties.
Public funds. See Deposits (items referring to type of account).

Receivership, insured banks placed in. See Banks in financial difficulties.
Recoveries:
By banks on assets charged off. See Income of insured commercial
banks; Income of insured mutual savings banks.
By the Corporation on disbursements. See Banks in financial diffi­
culties.
Report from banks_________________________________________17-18, 77, 133
Reserves:
Of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, for losses on assets acquired

25

Of insured banks for losses on assets. See Valuation reserves.
With Federal Reserve banks. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks.

Salaries and wages:
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation____________________________
Insured banks. See Income of insured commercial banks; Income of in­
sured mutual savings banks.
Savings and time deposits. See Deposits (items referring to type of account).



25

INDEX

241
Page

Securities. See Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks; Assets and liabilities
of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; Banks in financial diffi­
culties.
Size of bank, data for banks classified by amount of deposits:
Assets and liabilities, insured commercial banks, 1964_______________ 187
Banks requiring disbursements by the Corporation, 1934-1964________

224

Disbursements for protection of depositors, 1934-1964_______________ 224
Income data of insured commercial banks, 1964_________________ 202-203
Income ratios of insured commercial banks, 1964___________ 151, 204-205
Number of employees of insured commercial banks, 1964________ 151, 203
Number of insured commercial banks, 1964__________________151, 203, 205
Number of insured commercial banks grouped by ratios of selected
items to assets, December 31, 1964__________________________190-191
Percentages of selected totals, insured commercial banks, 1964_____ 151
State bank supervisory authorities:
Data obtained from _____________________________________________ 171
Number of banks supervised by________________________________ 133-134
State legislation regarding_______________________________________ 67-73
State, banking data classified by:
Assets and liabilities of banks, December 31, 1964_________________176-177
Concentration of deposits, by prevalence of branch banking, December
31, 1964___________________________________________________ 139-141
Deposits of banks, by class of bank, December 31, 1964____________168-169
Disbursements, deposits, and depositors in insured banks requiring dis­
bursements by the Corporation, 1934-1964_______________________ 225
Income of insured commercial banks, 1964______________________ 206-215
Number of banks and branches, by class of bank and type of office,
December 31, 1964_________________________________________ 160-167
Percentage of banks insured, December 31, 1964__________________160-167
State banking legislation enacted in 1964______________________________67-73
State banks. See Class of bank, banking data presented by.
Stockholders of banks, net profits available for. See Income of insured com­
mercial banks.
Summary of this report______________________________________________ XV
Supervision of banks (see also Examination of insured banks):
By the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation_________ VI, 13-17, 133-136
Federal and State supervision__________________________________ 133-136
State legislation, 1964___________________________________________ 67-73
Suspensions. See Banks in financial difficulties.
Taxes paid by insured banks. See Income of insured commercial banks;
Income of insured mutual savings banks.
Terminations of insurance for unsafe and unsound practices______________16-17
Time and savings deposits. See Deposits (items referring to type of account).
Trust companies, classification of__________________________ ___ 133, 156-157



FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

242

Page
Trust powers:
Applications fo r ____ ___________________________________________
14
State legislation_ _____________________________________________ 68-73
_
Unit banks, by insurance status and State, December 31, 1964_________ 160-167
Unsafe and unsound banking practices________________________________ 16-17
Valuation reserves (see also Assets, liabilities, and capital of banks):
Amounts held, June and December call dates, 1961 through 1964_____

179

Amounts held, June 29 and December 31, 1964______________172, 174, 183
Changes, 1956-1964__________________________________ 194-195, 216-217
Violations of law or regulations, banks charged with_____________________16-17