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Annual Earnings
a n d E m p l o y m e n t P a t terns
of Private Nonagricultural
Employees, 1966-67

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Dayton & Montgomery Co.

Public Library

AUG 141373

Bulletin I765




DOCUMENT COLLECTION




Annual Earnings
and Employment Patterns
of Private Nonagricultural
Employees, 1966-67
Bulletin 1765
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
Peter J. Brennan, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ben Burdetsky, Deputy Commissioner

1973

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Preface
The statistics presented in this bulletin were developed by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics from the records of the Social Security Administration and the Railroad
Retirement Board and relate to 1966 and 1967. The data provide a more comprehensive
and accurate picture of the eamings-employment pattern than is available from any
other source.
The Bureau planned originally to publish annual earnings and employment data as
they become available from the Social Security Administration each year. Under a
speeded-up delivery system, data for 1968 and 1969 have already been received by the
Bureau and data for 1970 are expected in mid-1973.
To take advantage of the speeded-up delivery, the Bureau will forego processing and
publication o f the 1968-69 data, and will accelerate production of the 1970 data. The
Bureau is planning release of a summary o f the highlights of the 1970 data in late 1973,
and a complete bulletin will follow in a few months. These steps should result in a
considerable shortening o f the time lag between the reference year and date of
publication. The 1968-69 data will be stored on tapes, and will be available in the future
for processing and time series analysis.
This bulletin was prepared in the Bureau’s Division o f General Compensation
Structures by Franz A. Groemping, under the general direction of Alvin Bauman.




iii




Contents
Page
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................
Annual earnings and employment patterns...................................................................................................
Technical note...............................................................................................................................................

1
3
11

Tables:
1. Employment and earnings o f four-quarter workers in motor vehicles and equipment,
by race, 1965 and 1967 .............................................................................................................
2. Average employment and earnings o f production workers in motor vehicles and
equipment, 1965 and 1967.........................................................................................................
3. Median annual earnings o f four-quarter workers, ranked by industry division and region, 1967 ----4. Median earnings ratios o f four-quarter workers by region, total sector, and three largest
industry divisions, 1967 .............................................................................................................
5. Index changes in median earnings, by sector and selected industry division, 1965-67 ......................
6. Distribution of earners and earnings at estimated mean levels, 1966 ................................................
7. Gini ratios o f lows and highs for selected categories, 1967................................................................
8. Workers having major proportion o f earnings in each industry division and percent change,
1965 and 1967 ...........................................................................................................................
9. Employment increases in selected industry divisions, by sex and race, 1965 and 1967 ....................
10. Distribution of four-quarter employment, by selected industry division or group
and region, 1967.........................................................................................................................
11. Hypothetical worker’s employment and earnings by industry and quarters......................................
12. Rough approximation o f sampling variability o f estimated numbero f persons................................
13. Rough approximation to sampling variability of estimated percentages...........................................

4
4
4
5
5
6
6
8
8
9
12
14
14

Chart:
Gini index o f concentration (cumulated percent distributions o f nonagricultural wage and salary
earners and annual earnings, 1 9 6 6 ).................................................................................................

7

Detailed tables:
Earnings and employment patterns in two-digit industry divisions
A -l. Median annual earnings o f workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
of major earnings and race, 1966 ...........................................................................................
A-2. Median annual earnings o f workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
of major earnings and race, 1967 ...........................................................................................
A-3. Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
o f major earnings and race, 1966 ...........................................................................................
A-4. Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
o f major earnings and race, 1967 ...........................................................................................




v

19
21
23
25

Contents— Continued

Page
Detailed tables— Continued
A-5.
A-6.
A-7.
A-8.
A-9.
A-10.
A-l 1.
A-12.
A -l3.

A-14.

A -l5.
A-16.
A-17.
A-18.
A-19.
A-20.
A-21.
A-22.
A-23.
A-24.
A-25.
A-26.
A-27.
A-28.

Median annual earnings from all wage and salary employment o f workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region o f major earnings, 1966..........................
Median annual earnings from all wage and salary employment o f workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region o f major earnings, 1967..........................
Average annual earnings from all wage and salary employment o f workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region of major earnings, 1966..........................
Average annual earnings from all wage and salary employment o f workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region o f major earnings, 1967..........................
Distribution o f workers by annual earnings from all wage and salary employment by
industry o f major earnings, 1966 ...........................................................................................
Distribution o f workers by annual earnings from all wage and salary employment by
industry o f major earnings, 1967 ...........................................................................................
Distribution o f workers by annual earnings in industry o f major earnings, 1966.........................
Distribution o f workers by annual earnings in industry o f major earnings, 1967.........................
Distribution o f workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in all wage and salary employment and by industry o f major
earnings, 1966 .......................................................................................................................
Distribution o f workers with four quarters o f earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in all wage and salary employment and by industry o f major
earnings, 1967 .......................................................................................................................
Distribution o f workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in their industry o f major earnings, 1966 ........................................................
Distribution o f workers with four quarters o f earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in their industry o f major earnings, 1967........................................................
Industry employment, 1966 ......................................................................................................
Industry employment, 1967 .......................................................................................................
Industry employment by race and sex, 1966 .............................................................................
Industry employment by race and sex, 1967 .............................................................................
Quarters o f work, 1966..............................................................................................................
Quarters o f work, 1967..............................................................................................................
Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and industry
of major earnings, 1966 .........................................................................................................
Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and industry
of major earnings, 1967 .........................................................................................................
Single and multi-industry employment o f all workers by number o f major
industry employers, 1966 .....................................................................................................
Single and multi-industry employment o f all workers by number o f major
industry employers, 1967 .....................................................................................................
Regional distribution of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by
industry o f major earnings, 1966 ...........................................................................................
Regional distribution of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by
industry of major earnings, 1967 ...........................................................................................




27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41

43

45
47
49
51
53
55
57
59
61
63
65
67
69
71
73

Contents— Continued

Page
Detailed tables— Continued
Earnings and employment patterns in three-digit industry groups
B-l.
B-2.
B-3.
B-4.
B-5.
B-6.
B-7.
B-8.
B-9.
B-10.
B-l 1.
B-12.
B-13.

B-14.

B-15.
B-l6.
B-17.
B-18.
B-19.
B-20.
B-21.
B-22.

Median annual earnings o f workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
o f major earnings and race, 1966 ...........................................................................................
Median annual earnings o f workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
of major earnings and race, 1967 ...........................................................................................
Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
o f major earnings and race, 1966 ...........................................................................................
Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
of major earnings and race, 1967 ...........................................................................................
Median annual earnings from all wage and salary employment o f workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region o f major earnings, 1966..........................
Median annual earnings from all wage and salary employment o f workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region o f major earnings, 1967..........................
Average annual earnings from all wage and salary employment o f workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region o f major earnings, 1966..........................
Average annual earnings from all wage and salary employment o f workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region o f major earnings, 1967..........................
Distribution o f workers by annual earnings from all wage and salary employment by
industry o f major earnings, 1966 ...........................................................................................
Distribution o f workers by annual earnings from all wage and salary employment by
industry o f major earnings, 1967 ...........................................................................................
Distribution o f workers by annual earnings in industry o f major earnings, 1966 ........................
Distribution o f workers by annual earnings in industry o f major earnings, 1967 ........................
Distribution of workers with four quarters o f earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in all wage and salary employment and by industry o f major
earnings, 1966 .......................................................................................................................
Distribution o f workers with four quarters o f earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in all wage and salary employment and by industry o f major
earnings, 1967 .......................................................................................................................
Distribution o f workers with four quarters o f earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1966................................................................
Distribution o f workers with four quarters o f earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1967................................................................
Industry employment, 1966 .......................................................................................................
Industry employment, 1967.......................................................................................................
Industry employment by race and sex, 1966...............................................................................
Industry employment by race and sex, 1967...............................................................................
Quarters o f work, 1966...............................................................................................................
Quarters o f work, 1967...............................................................................................................




77
80
83
86
89
92
95
98
101
104
107
110

113

116
119
122
125
128
131
134
137
140

Contents— Continued

Page
Detailed tables— Continued
B-23. Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and industry
o f major earnings, 1966 .........................................................................................................
B-24. Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and industry
o f major earnings, 1967 .........................................................................................................
B-25. Single and multi-industry employment of all workers by number o f major
industry employers, 1966 .....................................................................................................
B-26. Single and multi-industry employment of all workers by number o f major
industry employers, 1967 .....................................................................................................
B-27. Regional distribution o f workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by
industry o f major earnings, 1966 ...........................................................................................
B-28. Regional distribution o f workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by
industry of major earnings, 1967 ...........................................................................................




143
146
149
152
155
158

Introduction
The Bureau’s program of studies of annual earnings and employment patterns was initiated in the
1960’s to fill the gap in knowledge of annual wage and salary earnings from private nonagricultural
employment. Coverage o f hourly and weekly earnings data reported in other studies1 cannot be
converted to annual earnings estimates with any degree of precision because annual earnings are
determined by the interaction of variables, such as straight-time rates o f pay, number o f hours
worked, and hours worked at premium rates. These, in turn, depend on other variables such as
occupation, union status, industry, and area. Moreover, some workers move into and out of the
labor force during the year. In addition, a substantial portion works for more than one employer in
the same industry and for one or more employers in different industries.
The first study in this series for 1964,2 was limited to wage and salary earnings covered by social
security. The second,3 for 1965, included data on wage and salary earnings covered under either the
Social Security Act or the Railroad Retirement Act. This study, for 1966 and 1967, has the same
scope as the 1965 study and contains the most recent available data.
The major statistical data in this bulletin have been divided into two sections. Tables A-1 to A-28
provide information for all private nonagricultural industries and each major (two digit) industry
group. Instead o f being treated in their usual combined form, transportation, communication, and
public utilities are handled as separate divisions, as are wholesale and retail trade. Data have been
tabulated by quarter years o f employment, as well as by industry, race, sex, and geographical region.
Separate data also show earnings in the worker’s industry of greatest earnings combined with his
earnings in other employment.
Tables B-l to B-28 provide data for selected three-digit industry groups, and for purposes of
ready reference, also provide totals for each division and for all private nonagricultural industries as
a whole. Workers are counted in each industry in which they had any earnings. Consequently,
employment data for three-digit industries (as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual) do not add to the total for individual two-digit industry groups, and data at the two-digit
level do not add to the total at the division level. Nevertheless, data for all major earners at any level
of industry classification (e.g. division) do, except for rounding, add to the total for the private
nonagricultural economy.
The data, though available only for white-collar and blue-collar workers combined, are unique
because, unlike annual earnings data from other sources, they permit an analysis of the distribution
of wage and salary earnings and employment patterns of workers by industry and quarters of
employment. Attention is directed to explanations and definitions of differences in these methods
given in the Technical Notes at the end o f this bulletin.




1




Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns
the year. (See tables A-l and A-2.) Lowest average
earnings from all employment o f four quarter workers
were made in private households ($1,499) and in eating
and drinking places ($3,201). Average total earnings of
workers in these industries who worked in any quarter
were $1,115 and $1,670 respectively. (See table A-4.)
Of all workers in the private economy, 9 percent
earned at least $10,000 in 1967 compared with 6
percent in 1965.(See table A-10.) Industry divisions with
a smaller than average proportion o f workers who earned
$10,000 or more were retail trade (3 percent) and
services (6 percent); the low level o f wages reflected the
high incidence of part-time and transient employment.
The proportion o f four-quarter workers at this earnings
level in these, as in all industry divisions, was much
higher: 6 percent in retail trades, 9 percent in services.
(See tables A-10 and A-14.)

Earnings

Total average annual earnings o f workers in the
private nonagricultural economy who were employed in
four quarters o f the year in their industry o f major
earnings in 1967 were $6,256. (See table A-4.) However,
the earnings were dispersed widely around the mean.
The middle one-third o f these workers earned $4,000 to
$7,000. (See table A-14.) In 1965 the corresponding
average earnings were $5,733, and the middle one-third
earned from $3,700 to $6,400. The median annual
earnings o f four-quarter workers increased from $4,920
in 1965 to $5,372 in 1967. (See table A-2.) Average
annual earnings in the private nonagricultural sector, of
workers employed in four quarters of the year in their
industry of major earnings, were 9.1 percent higher in
1967 than in 1965. The greatest gains were in contract
construction (13.3 percent) and services (12 percent).
Other industry divisions with greater than average
percentage gains were wholesale trade (9.2), utilities
(10.8), transportation (10.7), and finance, insurance,
and real estate (9.7). The remainder had gains which were
below the overall: retail trade (8.6), mining (8.3),
manufacturing (8.1), and communications (7.3).
During 1967 all workers, including those employed
fewer than four quarters, averaged $4,614, or one-fourth
less than four-quarter workers. (See tables A-4 and A-8.)
Earnings o f one-third o f the workers, who were
employed in any quarter in their industry o f major
earnings, were less than $1,800 in 1967; one-half earned
less than $3,700, one-fourth more than $6,700, and 8.7
percent earned more than $10,000. (See table A-10.)
The lowest levels o f total average annual earnings of
workers who worked during any quarter in their
industry o f major earnings in 1967 were reported by the
retail trade ($2,807) and services divisions ($3,436),
which together provided more than two-fifths o f private
nonagricultural employment. (See table A-18.) One-half
of such workers in retail trade received less than $1,629
in all employment in 1967, compared with $1,525 in
1965, while one-half o f those in services received
$2,203, compared with $2,009 in 1965. (See table A-2.)
These industry divisions also reported the lowest aver­
ages for workers who had earnings in all fear quarters of



In the private nonagricultural sector, average annual
earnings o f black four-quarter workers as a percent of
the earnings o f whites increased by 2 percentage points,
from 61.3 in 1965 to 63.3 in 1967. In every division but
manufacturing the ratio increased by amounts which
ranged from .5 percentage points in contract construc­
tion and in communications to 3.9 in services. The
greatest gains in the earnings of blacks in relation to
those of whites were made in the low-paid services
division (3.9 percentage points), followed by retail trade
(3.6), utilities (3.2), and wholesale trade (3.0). Gains in
these divisions are especially significant in view of the
large employment o f black workers. Percentage increases
in earnings o f black workers were smaller in employment
in any quarter than in four-quarters. However, the
earnings ratio o f blacks to whites for both four-quarter
and any quarter work was higher in 1967 than in 1965.
In manufacturing the proportion o f earnings o f black
workers to those of white workers dropped 2.1 per­
centage points from 1965 to 1967. Overall employment
or earnings developments in the manufacturing division
do not explain this drop. Employment in the division
increased 9 percent from 1965 to 1967, compared with
8 percent in the private nonagricultural sector. Division
earnings of four-quarter workers increased 8 percent,
sector earnings 9 percent. Earnings of whites increased 9
percent, those of blacks 5 percent on the division level.

3

Table 2. Average em ploym ent and earnings o f pro du c­

The drop o f 7.7 percentage points in the relative
earnings o f blacks was greatest in the important motor
vehicle industry which in 1967 employed 1.2 million
workers. (See table B-4.) Large industry groups with
significant percentage points drops included trans­
portation equipment (6.5 points), apparel and textile
(4.5 points), primary metals (3.5 points), nonelectrical
machinery (3.2 points), electrical equipment (2.9
points), and chemicals (1.6 points). (See table A-4.) The
transportation equipment group’s development was
unique, in that not only were earnings o f blacks relative
to earnings o f whites lower in 1967 than 1965, but
actual average earnings o f black four quarter workers
declined from an average o f $6,755 in 1965 to $6,534 in
1967. (See table A-4.)
Table 1 shows that in the motor vehicle and
equipment group, employment of white workers
declined, but their average earnings increased; employ­
ment of blacks increased sharply, but their average
earnings dropped considerably.
The increased employment o f blacks, as well as the
sharp drop in their average earnings, appears to be tied
to the relatively high turnover in employment during the
1965-67 period, involving high percentage rates for
hirings and rehirings, and layoffs and quits. In the
aggregate blacks were more affected than whites, shown
by the fluctuations in table 2.4
The decrease in average annual earnings o f black
workers in this industry appears to be due to a
percentage increase o f blacks in low level entry jobs and
probably, also to a reduction in overtime pay. Overtime
of all production workers in this industry dropped from
a weekly average o f 6.2 hours in 1965 to 4.9 in 1966,
and 3.4 in 1967.5
Median-four-quarter earnings in 1967 for the private
nonagricultural sector as a whole were highest in the

tion workers in m otor vehicles and equipm ent, 1965
and 1967

Year

Monthly Employment
(in thousands)

Low
1965 .............
1966 .............
1967 .............

High

560.4
518.0
534.0

696.4
709.6
686.8

Weekly Earnings

Low

High

$136.45 $156.18
140.42
154.86
133.86
158.98

North Central region, followed by the West, the North
East, and the South. Again, the South ranked lowest
among the industry divisions as shown in table 3.
Except in the South, the order o f median earnings o f
industry divisions varied from that o f the entire
sector. In the West, which ranked second as a region,
seven of the industry divisions ranked first, but in the
North East and North Central regions fewer than half o f
the industry divisions were in the same order as the
entire private nonagricultural sector.
Median annual earnings in the three highest regions
were grouped between $5,690 and $6,032. The South
trailed with $4,452. (See table 3.) Among regions, the
rank o f median earnings o f workers employed in any
quarter in their industry o f major earnings was reversed
in the West and the Northeast.
As shown in table 4, median earnings for the entire
private nonagricultural sector were 12 percent above the
national level in the North Central and Western regions,
6 percent above in the Northeast, and 17 percent below
in the South. Median earnings in the three major

Table 3. M edian annual earnings o f four-quarter workers,
ranked by industry division and region, 1967

Table 1. E m p lo ym e n t and earnings o f four-quarter
workers in m otor vehicles a n d e q u ip m e n t, b y race,

Region

1965 and 1967

Item

1965

1967

Industry

Percent
change

Employment (in thousands)
All w orkers.........................
Whites .....................
Blacks .....................

1,048
931
117

1,029
897
132

-1.8
-3.7
+12.8

$8,095
8,215
7,104

$8,173
8,382
6,607

All private nonagri­
cultural industries
M in in g.....................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.........
Transportation.........
Communications . . .
U tilities...................
Wholesale tra d e ___
Retail tra d e .............
Services...................

+1.0
+2.0
-7.0

Earnings
All w orkers.........................
Whites .....................
Blacks.......................




4

North
East

South

North
Central

West

3
3
3
3
2
1
3
2
2
1

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

1
2
2
2
3
3
2
3
3
3

2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2

trade, and 1.0 in manufacturing in the South, and 1.6 in
manufacturing in the Northeast, while decreases were
due chiefly to percentage point declines o f 3.1 in
services, 2.8 in retail trade, and 1.2 in manufacturing in
the West, and 1.8 in manufacturing in the North Central
region.
From 1965 to 1967 a comparison o f changes in the
level o f regional median annual earnings to national
median earnings from all wage and salary employment in
any quarter shows that the earnings position o f workers
in the South improved greatly, in the North Central
region to a lesser degree, while in the Northeast it was
unchanged, and in the West it decreased. (See table 5.)
The greatest change in the relationship occurred in
retail trade in the North Central region, where median
earnings increased from 84.3 percent o f the national
median in 1965 to 96.3 percent in 1967, and in services
in the same region where the increase was from 88.5
percent to 99.8 percent.

Table 4. M edian earnings ratios o f four-quarter workers
b y region, total sector, and three largest industry
divisions, 1967
Region
Industry

Total, private
nonagricultural.
Manufacturing . . . .
Services.................
Retail trades...........

United North­
States
east

100
100
100
100

10S.9
99.2
115.5
107.6

North
Central

South

82.9
79.6
81.0
90.9

West

112.3
108.0
96.8
97.9

112.2
109.8
114.7
115.1

divisions in the West were 10 percent to 15 percent
above the national division medians, while the division
medians for the South were 9 percent to 20 percent
below the national division medians. Between these
extremes, in the Northeast the median for manu­
facturing was about the national division median, and
the medians for services and retail trades were above the
national division medians, while in the North Central
region the median for manufacturing was above, and the
medians for services and retail trades were below the
national division medians.
The bottom rank o f median four-quarter earnings in
the manufacturing division in the South does not apply
to all groups in the division. Workers in the South had
higher earnings in ordnance and accessories industries
than workers in the Northeast; in tobacco industries
than those in the Northeast and the West, and in
petroleum industries than those in the North Central
region. (See table A-6.)
A comparison o f the rate o f change o f the regional
means with the national mean, for annual earnings of
workers employed four quarters in their industry of
major earnings in 1965 and 1967, shows increases o f 0.9
percentage points in the Northeast and 1.3 in the South,
and decreases o f 1.4 in the North Central and 1.5 in the
West regions. The increases were due chiefly to per­
centage point increases o f 2.8 in services, 1.6 in retail

Inequality o f earnings distribu tion 6

A comparison of the Gini ratios available at the
present time for both 1966 and 1967 indicates that the
earnings o f workers who were employed in one, two, or
three quarters were distributed more unequally than
those o f four-quarter workers. Therefore, in all indus­
tries for both years, the Gini ratios were markedly higher
for any quarter workers than for four-quarter workers.
Industry divisions with irregular employment, such as
retail trade and services, generally had higher Gini ratios,
while industries with regular, year-round employment,
such as transportation and communications, had low
Gini ratios.
Gini ratios also reveal considerable variation in the
equality of the distribution o f annual earnings by
industry, region, sex, and race. Table 6 shows the
distribution of wage and salary earners while chart 1
shows the Lorenz Curve formed by the distribution of
these earnings, and the corresponding Gini ratio o f
.486461.

Table 5. Index changes in median earnings, by sector and selected industry division, 1965-67
1965
Industry

Private nonagricultural .............
Manufacturing...........................
Retail tra d e................................
Services......................................




North­
east

South

112.5
96.4
117.7
127.5

75.0
75.2
87.5
76.4

1967

North
Central

West

North­
east

South

North
Central

West

112.4
112.8
84.3
88.5

104.7
111.5
112.2
110.8

112.5
100.8
112.9
128.8

82.4
79.1
93.1
80.7

114.7
116.2
96.3
99.8

103.8
112.0
107.9
112.9

5

tables of annual employment, by industry, single and
multiple employer, quarters of work, region, sex, and
race for 1966 and 1967. More detailed analysis will be
undertaken for publication in future studies. As data
become available for successive years, the analysis will
include a search for longitudinal trends.
Increases, from 1965 to 1967, in the number o f
workers employed in the largest divisions, manu­
facturing, services, and retail trades in table 8, apply not
only to major earners, but also to workers who had only
some earnings in these divisions.
The percentage decrease in employment in mining
was about the same for workers with major earnings as
for those with only some earnings in the division;
however, in contract construction the slight decrease in
the number o f major earners was accompanied by an
increase in the number of workers who had some
earnings in the division.
The proportion o f workers in the private nonagricultural industries who had four quarters o f employ­
ment decreased from 68.5 percent in 1965 to 67.6
percent in 1967. (See table A-22.) Only the contract
construction division showed an increase o f 1.7 percent
to 65.3 percent in 1967. Decreases in the other divisions
ranged from .6 percent in mining to 2.0 percent in
finance, insurance, and real estate. Utilities (86.0 per­
cent) and communications (80.2 percent) had the
highest proportion o f four-quarter workers in 1967. The
one-third o f the workers in the sector, who had fewer
than four quarters o f earnings in 1967, were divided
about evenly among those who had earnings in one, two,
and three quarters. The proportion o f one-quarter
workers did not change from 1965 to 1967; that of
two-quarter and three-quarter workers increased .3 and
.6 percentage points respectively.
Analysis o f table A-20 reveals that the rate of increase
in employment in the private nonagricultural sector
from 1965 to 1967 was more than twice as high for
women as for men, and higher for blacks than for

Table 6. D istribu tion o f earners and earnings at estimated
mean levels, 1966
Cumulative percent
Earnings
Earners

16.2
25.7
33.1
39.1
45.1
50.9
56.4
61.6
66.6
71.2
75.6
80.5
83.9
86.8
89.5
91.6
93.1
94.4
95.4
96.1
100.0

Under $ 6 0 0 ....................................
Under $1,200 ................................
Under $1,800..................................
Under $2,400..................................
Under $3,000..................................
Under $3,600......................... ..
Under $4,200..................................
Under $4,800..................................
Under $5,400..................................
Under $6,000..................................
Under $6,600..................................
Under $7,200..................................
Under $7,800..................................
Under $8,400..................................
Under $9,000..................................
Under $9,600..................................
Under $10,200 .............................
Under $10,800................................
Under $11,400................................
Under $12,000................................
$12,000 and over...........................

Earnings

1.1
3.0
4.2
7.0
10.7
15.0
19.9
25.2
31.0
36.9
43.2
50.9
56.7
62.0
67.3
71.8
75.1
78.2
80.7
82.6
100.0

In the major industries and regions, Gini ratios in
1967 were much higher for white four-quarter workers
than for black four-quarter workers, except in the North
Central region. There was no discernible trend from
1966 to 1967 in the ratios for four-quarter black
workers or for any quarter white workers. However, the
inequality o f the earnings’ distribution for four-quarter
white workers from 1966 to 1967 increased in all
regions and major divisions but decreased for any
quarter black workers in all these categories.
The wide range o f Gini ratios is indicated by table
7 showing low and peak ratios for various categories of
workers.
Upon request, the Bureau will furnish copies o f Gini

Table 7. G in i ratios o f lows and highs fo r selected categories, 1967
High

Low

Category

Any quarter w orkers...............
Four quarter workers...............

Public utilities
Public utilities

.292404 Retail trade
.220001 Services

.567754
.407022

All workers, r a c e .....................

Black

.475623 White

.480995

All workers, sex

Male

.438751

North Central

.467113 South

1967

.486119

.....................

All workers, region

...............

All workers, y e a r.....................




Female

1966

.460995
.498203
.486461

Chart 1

Gini Index o f Concentration
Cumulated Percent Distributions of Nonagricultural Wage
and Salary Earners and Annual Earnings, 1966

Y — Axis
Percents of Earnings




B

X — Axis

7

Table 8. Workers having major proportion o f earnings in each industry division and
percent change, 1965 and 1 96 7 1

1965
(Employees
in
thousands)

Industry division

Percent of
total

1967
(Employees
in
thousands)

Percent of
total

Percent
change,
1965-67

68,448
725
4,527
22,046
3,138
1,025
762
4,312
13,337

100.0
1.1
6.6
32.2
4.6
1.5
1.1
6.3
19.5

73,907
713
4,505
23,995
3,247
1,138
789
4,594
14,090

100.0
1.0
6.1
32.4
4.4
1.5
1.1
6.2
19.1

+8.0
-1.7
-.5
+8.8
+3.5
+11.0
+3.5
+6.5
+5.6

3,659
14,919

5.3
21.8

3,936
16,901

5.3
22.9

+7.6
+13.3

Private nonfarm.......................
M ining......................................
Contract construction.............
Manufacturing.........................
Transportation.........................
Communications.....................
Public utilities.........................
Wholesale tra d e .......................
Retail tra d e .............................
Finance, insurance and real
estate ..................................
Services....................................

1 Although the numbers of workers differ from those in Employment and Earnings—United
Bulletin 1312-8, the percentage changes generally agree with those for the
sector and the industry divisions from the Employment and Earnings data.

States, 1909-71, BLS

whites. Percentage increases for workers who had some
earnings were:
All private nonagricultural w orkers................................

7.6

M en.......................................................................
Whites.........................................................
Blacks.........................................................

5.5
5.2
8.4

W om en.................................................................
Whites.........................................................

12.0
11.5

B la c k s ..........................................................................

Although this impressive percentage gain was distributed
fairly evenly among the major industries in this division,
the participation rate of black women in manufacturing
employment was still low after the rise from 2.5 percent
in 1965 to 2.9 percent in 1967. Black men in retail trade
had the lowest rate of increase among the three divisions
with 1.1 percent, but their relative position at 5.9
percent of total employment in the division was nearly
twice as high as the ratio of black women to total
employment. Percentage gains of the race-sex groups of
12.0 percent to 16.7 percent in services were the least
dispersed among the three major divisions. (See table 9.)

1 5 .9

Black women in manufacturing scored the greatest
employment gains: 182,000, or nearly 30 percent.

Table 9. E m p lo ym e n t increases in selected industry divisions, b y sex and race, 1965 and
1967
Manufacturing

Retail Trade

Services

Number
(employees
in
thousands)

Percent

Number
(employees
in
thousands)

Percent

Number
(employees
in
thousands)

M e n ......................................
Whites.......................
Blacks.......................

1,329
1,026
303

7.6
6.5
17.7

485
473
12

5.1
5.5
1.1

1,047
847
200

12.7
12.0
16.7

Women..................................
Whites.......................
Blacks.......................

1,021
839
182

14.2
12.8
29.9

786
692
94

10.4
10.0
15.8

1,540
1,303
237

15.4
15.9
13.0

Sex and race




8

Percent

From 1965 to 1967, employment o f women in­
creased 12 percent, compared with 5.5 percent for men.
In manufacturing and retail trade, as in die entire private
nonagricultural sector, the percentage increase in the
employment o f women was twice that o f men. In
services, the increase for women was only a fourth more
than that o f men.
In the distribution o f four-quarter employment in the
United States in 1967 by region, the North Central
region has 30.0 percent, the Northeast 27.8 percent, the
South 26.8 percent, and the West 14.7 percent. Some
major deviations from the general pattern occur in
various industry divisions and groups, as shown in table
10. A fifth region, called “Others,” has been added to
the four major regions to cover employment distribution
in U.S. territories, on foreign soil, and aboard ocean­
going vessels.
In the Northeast, mining employment was much
underrepresented on the division level, but the region
provided all o f the employment in the anthracite coal
industry. The South, on the other hand, provided more
than one-half o f the total employment in mining,
because it had three-fifths o f employment in bituminous
coal, seven-tenths in gas and oil extraction, and almost
two-fifth in nonmetallic minerals. The South also pro­
vided three-fourths of all employment in the tobacco
industries, two-thirds in textile manufacturing, and
nearly one-half o f the national employment in private
households.
The Northeast provided more than one-half o f the
total employment in leather industries, instruments, and
miscellaneous manufacturing groups. The North Central
region furnished nearly one-half o f all employment in

industries, as well as one-half in the machinery indus­
tries. This region was credited with having almost
one-half o f total employment in transportation, chiefly
because all railroad employment is treated as existing in
the region. The West gave employment to more than
one-half of all workers in the ordnance and accessories
industries, nearly one-half in mining, one-third in the
lumber and wood products industries, and one-third in
the motion picture industry.
The percentage share of the regions in private
nonagricultural employment changed slightly from
1965 to 1967, as follows:
Northeast ........................................
South................................................
North Central....................................
West..................................................
O ther................................................

-.4 percentage
+.4 percentage
-.1 percentage
+.1 percentage
no change

Major changes occurred in the tobacco industries,
where the share in employment decreased 2.9 percentage
points in the Northeast, and increased 4.1 percentage
points in the South. Employment o f security brokersinvolving 33 percent more persons than the tobacco
industry—
shifted to the Northeast, which had an in­
crease of 3.0 percentage points at the expense o f the
West and the North Central regions. The number of
workers involved in regional employment from 1965 to
1967 changed in percentage points as follows:

South

North
Centra/

West

-.4

North­
east

+.5

Manufacturing

-.6

Retail trade . .

-.6

+.1

+.5

--

Services.........

the fabricated metal and transportation equipment

-.8

+.3

+.3

+.1

Table 10. D istribution o f four-quarter em ploym ent, b y selected industry division o r group and region.
1967
Regions
Industry Division, group or
industry

Private nonagricultural
industries ............................
M ining........................................
Construction..............................
Tobacco ....................................
Textiles......................................
Leather......................... ..
Machines—nonelectric...............
Security b ro k e rs.......................
Private household................... ..
Water transportation.................
Motion pictures .......................

United
States

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Northeast

South

North
Central

West

Others1

27.8
10.9
21.4
15.1
26.8
53.8
29.8
56.8
23.8
25.4
31.1

26.8
52.6
35.6
74.4
68.0
17.1
11.3
13.3
47.2
23.4
20.1

30.0
17.7
26.0
2.0
3.0
22.5
50.1
17.0
16.8
6.7
15.4

14.7
18.0
16.0
.9
1.5
3.5
8.6
12.8
11.4
15.8
32.9

.7
.8
1.0
7.6
.7
3.1
.2
.1
.8
28.7
.5

1 Although the "Others" region constitutes only .7 percent of total sector employment, it amounts to 28.7
percent in water transportation, 7.6 percent in tobacco, and 3.1 percent in leather manufacturing.




points
points
point
point

9

In summary, both overall annual median earnings and
employment in the private nonagricultural sector
increased about 8 percent from 1965 to 1967. More
precisely, median annual earnings o f all workers
employed in the private nonagricultural sector in 1967
were 7.7 percent higher than in 1965. Among these
workers 9 percent earned at least $10,000 in 1967,
compared with 6 percent in 1965. Median annual
earnings o f black workers employed in all four-quarters,




as a percent o f the earnings of whites, rose from 63.7 in
1965 to 64.9 in 1967.
Overall employment in the private nonagricultural
sector increased 8.0 percent from 1965 to 1967. The
rate o f increase in employment was twice as high for
women as for men. Black workers made gains in
employment of 11.4 percent, compared with 7.6 percent
for white workers. The rate of increase for black women
was 15.9 percent, that for black men, 8.4 percent.

10

Technical Note
able limit subject to Railroad Retirement Act taxes.
Hence, even earnings reported at the maximum level for
each month may be substantially lower than total
earnings. The Railroad Retirement Board, however,
collects information from employer records about the
total annual earnings of a sample o f workers covered by
the act. To raise creditable compensation to total
railroad earnings, total earnings data for individuals
collected in the special study are compared with the
aggregated monthly earnings data for the same individ­
uals. The incremental factors for workers in the same
broad occupational categories are then averaged. The
resulting factors, developed by the Railroad Retirement
Board, are applied by the Bureau o f Labor Statistics to
the credited monthly earnings of each individual in this
study according to his occupational category.

Sources o f data

Data for this study were developed by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics from the individual employer and
employee records maintained by the Social Security
Administration and the Railroad Retirement Board.
Under social security, each employer reports the indus­
try, place o f employment, and amount o f wages or
salary paid during a calendar quarter to the maximum
annual limit o f $6,600 in 1966 and .1967. Each applicant
furnishes demographic information (date o f birth, sex,
and race) for a social security number. Under the
Railroad Retirement system, each employer reports the
occupation and monthly earnings o f each worker to a
maximum limit o f $550 in 1966 and 1967.
Estim ation o f Earnings

D efin itio n o f terms and m ethod o f classification

As actual earnings o f employees may be substantially
greater than the “ taxable limit” earnings reportable
under the Social Security Act ($6,600 annually in 1966
and 1967) and the Railroad Retirement Act ($550 a
month in 1966 and 1967), the Social Security Adminis­
tration (SSA) and the Railroad Retirement Board have
devised procedures for estimating the total earnings of
covered employees. These estimated total quarterly and
annual earnings are used in this report.
The SSA in its procedure determines the quarter in
which the taxable limit is reached (“limit quarter”). If
wages in the prior quarter are equal to or greater than
the “limit quarter” wages, they are substituted for those
in the “limit quarter” and in all subsequent quarters.
Limit quarter earnings, however, are used to estimate
earnings in the limit and subsequent quarters, if limit
quarter earnings were higher than earnings in previous
quarters. After these substitutions, the sum o f the
quarterly wages becomes the estimated annual total
unless the taxable limit is reached in the first quarter.
Then $42,000 for men and $33,000 for women was used
by the Social Security Administration as the estimated
total for 1966 and 1967.
Employers covered by the Railroad Retirement Act
are required to provide information about the monthly
earnings o f each employee up to the maximum credit­



Terms used in this report and the methods used to
classify employees by industry and region of major
earnings are described briefly below.
Annual earnings. For this study, annual earnings are
defined as gross wages, salaries, and other payments
(such as bonuses) received by employees, before deduc­
tions of any type, in employment covered under the
Social Security Act or the Railroad Retirement Act.
Such payments may be received in cash, cash equiva­
lents, or goods or services.
Earnings and employment data, for work covered
under the Acts, in agriculture, governmental functions,
military service, and self-employment, as well as for
work not covered, have been excluded from this study.
Also excluded from earnings are most payments made
by employers to or on behalf o f employees, or for
employees and their dependents for retirement, death,
sickness, accidental disability, or medical and hospitali­
zation expense under the provisions o f a plan or system
meeting certain general criteria, and employer payments
to a trust fund, such as a pension trust, exempt from tax
under the Internal Revenue Code.
Workers with some earnings in the industry. All workers
who had at least $1 in earnings in an industry during the
11

year are counted in each industry in which they had any
earnings. For example, a worker who had some earnings
in each of five three-digit industries, as defined in the
Standard Industrial Gassification Manual, is counted in
each of these industries as well as in each two-digit
industry and in each division of which the three-digit
industries are a part. Because a worker is counted in each
three-digit industry, each two-digit industry, and in each
division in which he had $1 in covered wage and salary
earnings or more, the aggregate count of workers at each
level (three-digit, two-digit, or division) is greater than
the total number at each broader industry level (twodigit, division, private nonagricultural economy).

concept, this worker’s industry of major earnings was
industry group 412 at the three-digit level, major
industry group 53 at the two-digit level, and G at the
industry division level.

Industry of major earnings

Employer. An employer is defined here as an individual,
partnership, or corporation recognized as a separate legal
entity meeting certain criteria. However, since a firm
may incorporate separately each of its locations and
each corporation may be considered to be a separate
employer, a worker transferred by his firm from one
location to another that is separately incorporated may
be classified as having more than one employer in the
same year even though he continued to work for the
same firm.

Quarters o f work. For social security coverage, a quarter
of work is defined as a calendar quarter in which a
worker earned any pay in covered employment; house­
hold workers must earn at least $50. Workers who reach
their maximum taxable earnings limits in a single
employment before the fourth quarter of the year are
considered to have worked in each quarter, although
earnings above the maximum are not reported.

The industry of major earnings, in this study, is the
industry in which a worker earned more of his annual
wages and salary than in any other industry. As many
workers have earnings in several industry divisions or at
several levels of one industry group, determination of a
worker’s industry of major earnings involves a plurality
earnings test which is applied separately to earnings at
each industry level.
The employment and quarterly earnings pattern of a
hypothetical worker who shifts employment several
times a year is illustrated in table 11.
In table 11 the worker had greater earnings at the
three-digit level in industry 412 than in any other
three-digit industry; at the two-digit level he had greater
earnings in industry 53 than in either 41, 61, or 63, and
at the division level he earned more in division G than in
either E or F. Therefore, applying the plurality earnings

Industrial classification. The employment and earnings
data presented in this report, which are based on the
Social Security Administration’s (SSA) data file, are
classified according to the Administration’s industrial
classification system, which differs slightly from that
developed by the U.S. Bureau of the Budget and
published in the Standard Industrial Gassification
Manual 1967 (SIC), and employed in most other

Table 11. Hypothetical worker's employment and earnings by industry and quarters
Quarters
Industry
No.

$2,650

Private nonagricultural economy
D iw icinn
9-H init n r m m
9-H init n r m in

Division......................................
2-digit grou p...................
3-H init c iroiin .
9-rlini+ nrm in

Division......................................
2-digit grou p...................
3-digit grou p...................




9-rlinit y iu um • • • • • • • • • •
4 "U iy ii n r m f j

3-digit grou p...................

Total

1st

3d

4th

$650

$750

$850

300
300
300

$400

2d

450
450
450

E
41
412

750
750
750

F
53
531
533

900
900
650
250

300
300
50
250

250
250
250

G
61
612
63
633

1,000
500
500
500
500

100
100
100

100
100
100

12

350
350
350

300
300
300

500

500
500

to the North Central region where many railroads and
related organizations have headquarters.

statistical series. The major difference is in the assign­
ment of industry codes to nonpolicymaking govern­
mental units. All separable nonpolicymaking units are
assigned nongovernmental SSA industry classifications
appropriate to their activity. Employment and earnings
data presented in this report which are based on the
Railroad Retirement Board’s data file are classified into
the following industries as defined in the SIC Manual.
Railroads, SIC 401; sleeping car companies, SIC 402;
express companies, SIC 404; rental of rail cars com­
panies, SIC 474; and other companies performing
services in railroad transportation and certain railway
labor organizations, SIC 861 and 863. A worker is
assigned on the basis of the industrial classification of his
last employer under the Railroad Retirement Act.
Single and multi-industry workers. At each level of
industry classification (i.e., three-digit, two-digit, and
division) the employment experience of each sample
member was examined to see if all of his earnings during
the year were in one industry or in more than one
industry. Those with earnings in more than one industry
were classified as multi-industry workers. This con­
ceptual approach may be seen for a worker who was
employed by an employer in each of two three-digit
industries within the same two-digit industry. At the
three-digit level, the worker is classified as a multi­
industry worker. However, at the two-digit and at the
divisional level he is classified as a single industry
worker. This classification is assigned because both
three-digit industries in which he was employed are part
of the same two-digit industry and therefore, he worked
in only one industry division.

Race. All workers in this study have been divided into
two groups by race: “ white” and “ black.” The white
category includes all workers, except Negroes. Other
non-white minorities, for whom the sample was not large
enough to permit separate presentation of data, have
been assigned to the white category; this minimizes their
effect in the distribution of data by race.
Median annual earnings in this study were computed
from data grouped into $250 intervals. Minor differences
in medians for the same grouping of workers as shown
on different tables result from rounding and from minor
differences among the methods of entering the data at
various stages of processing into the computer file.
Average (mean) annual earnings were computed by
summing the earnings of each worker in the entire
distribution and dividing the sum by the number of
workers in the distribution.
The Gini Index o f Concentration is used in this report
to measure inequality in the distribution of income. The
Gini Index expresses the ratio of the area between a
Lorenz curve and the “ line of equality” to the area of
the triangle as shown in chart 1. The X-axis shows the
cumulative percent distribution of wage and salary
earners; the Y-axis shows the cumulative percent of
earnings. The diagonal line of equality (A-B) represents a
Lorenz curve on which all units have exactly the same
earnings. The Gini Index of Concentration therefore is
the ratio of the total area formed by the Lorenz Curve
and the diagonal line of equality to the area of the
triangle formed by the X and Y-axis and the diagonal
line of equality. Thus, the lower the Gini Index number,
the more equal the distribution, and vice versa.

Regions. In this study, the United States and other areas
are divided into five regions. Four regions covering the
50 States and the District of Columbia are: Northeast—
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire,
New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and
Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District
Vermont; South—
of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana,
Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia;
North Central—
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan,
Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio,
South Dakota, and Wisconsin; and W est-Alaska, Ari­
zona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana,
Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and
Wyoming. The fifth region includes all employment
covered under the provisions of the acts in U.S.
territories, on foreign soil, or aboard ocean-going vessels.
Because the data file for this study does not indicate
the location of the work covered by the Railroad
Retirement Act, a convention was adopted ascribing all
employment covered under the Railroad Retirement Act



Sample design

The sample used for this series of studies was selected
on the basis of a multistage systematic cluster sampling
procedure. It includes 1 percent of all social security
numbers. Any individual, once selected, remains perma­
nently in the sample and is identified by his social
security number.7 To preserve confidentiality and facili­
tate statistical processing, the Social Security Adminis­
tration combines data from various employments and
assigns each individual and employer a permanent
control number, different from his social security and
employee identification numbers.
Sampling variability8

Estimates based on samples can be expected to differ
because of sampling variability from figures that would

13

number of persons with given characteristics. The
estimates and approximate sampling variability shown
are for data which have been inflated by 100. Linear
interpolation may be used for estimated numbers not
shown in the table.
Sampling variability of estimated percentage of
persons.—
The reliability of an estimated percentage
depends on both the size of the percentage and on the
size of the total upon which the percentage is based.
Table 13 shows the approximate sampling variability (95
percent confidence level) for percentages (of persons
with a given characteristic). The body of the table is
expressed in percentage points. The bases shown are
expressed in terms of data inflated by 100. Linear
interpolation may be used for percentages and base
figures not shown in table 13.
Sampling variability of estimated mean earnings.—
A
rough approximation to the standard error of an
estimated mean can be calculated from the distribution
from which it was obtained. The formula can be found
in elementary statistics texts (for example, p. 218,
Applied General Statistics, by Croxton and Cowden,
Prentice Hall, 2nd Ed. 1955).

have been obtained had all rather than specified samples
of the records been used for the compilations. The
standard error is a measure of sampling variability. The
chances are about 68 out of 100 that the difference due
to sampling variability between a sample estimate and
the figure that would have been obtained from a
compilation of all records is less than the standard error.
The chances are 95 out of 100 that the difference is less
than twice the standard error and about 99 out of 100
that it is less than Vh times the standard error. The
standard error of an estimate depends on the sample
design elements such as the method of sampling, the
sample size, and on the estimation process.
No exact calculation of standard errors of estimates
based on the stratified cluster continuous work history
samples has been carried out. However, approximate
standard errors of estimates utilizing the assumption of
simple random sampling are likely to be reasonably close
to those for the actual sample design used for many
attribute statistics. While the actual method of selection
(stratified cluster sampling) differs from simple random
sampling, there is evidence that, for most statistics, the
several factors affecting the sampling variability give a
joint factor close to unity relative to the sampling
variability of simple random sampling.
Sampling variability of estimated number of per­
sons.—
For the convenience of the reader, table 12
provides approximate estimates of sampling variability
(95 percent confidence level) for estimates of the

Nonsampling variability

Because of the nature of the OASDHI program and
the manner in which it is administered, certain aspects of
the program lead to variability that would be present in
a complete compilation of records as well as in a sample.
For example, the data relate to covered employment
rather than people (minimized by use of precise defini­
tion); changes in earnings records may not be reflected
promptly because of time-lag in posting and processing
cutoff date, and errors in classification and compilation.

Table 12. Rough approximation of sampling variability
of estimated number of persons
(Range of 95 chances out of 100)

500
800
1,000
3,000
5,000
8,000
10,000
30,000
50,000
80,000
100,000
300,000
500,000
800,000
1,000,000
3,000,000
5,000,000
8,000,000
10,000,000
30,000,000
50,000,000
80,000,000
100,000,000




500
600
700
1,100
1,400
1,800
2,000
3,300
4,500
5,600
6,300
10,800
14,000
17,600
20,000
33,000
44,500
55,500
63,000
108,000
110,000
112,000
115,000

Table 13. Rough approximation to sampling variability
of estimated percentages
Range of 95 chances out of 100
Estimated percentage
percentage
(inflated
sample)

500
......................
1,000 ......................
5,000 ......................
10,000.....................
100,000 .................
1,000,000 ..............
10,000,000 ...........
100,000,000 ...........
1 Less than 0.05.

14

2
or
98

12.5
8.9
4.0
2.8
.9
.3
.1
(M

5
or
95

10
or
90

25
or
75

50

19.5
13.8
6.2
4.4
1.4
.5
.2
.1

26.8
19.0
8.5
5.9
1.9
.6
.2
.1

38.7
27.4
12.2
8.8
2.7
.9
.3
.1

44.7
31.6
14.1
10.0
3.1
1.0
.3
.1

These problems are byproducts of the administrative
processes and the errors introduced are probably
negligible.
In this context, the factors contributing to the
nonsampling variability are: (1) the scope of covered
employment; (2) duplication in the estimation of
workers because of persons receiving wage credits from
different employers on more than one account number;
(3) the extent to which covered earnings are reported,
taxed, and credited; and (4) the distribution of workers
and aggregate wages above the maximum earnings base.

of the Bureau of the Census, they
are based on a different concept of industry attachment
(i.e. industry of longest job, rather than industry of
major earnings, as used in the AEE system), and provide
only for the industry division data, while AEE data
cover industry divisions, major two-digit SIC groups, and
the most important three-digit groups. Moreover, other
differences in methods or approach may result in
important differences in sampling and nonsampling
variances between this and other studies. For example,
CPS data are based on household interviews, whereas the
AEE data are based on employer tax returns. Further­
more, CPS 1967 data are not comparable with data for
prior years because of changes in methodology in the
CPS. Therefore, caution must be exercised in using the
data presented in this bulletin in conjunction with other
annual earnings and employment patterns data.

Population Reports

Data presented in this bulletin
have been developed, as previously described, from
information reported by employers about the earnings
of individuals up to an earnings limit and estimates of
earnings higher than this limit. Although annual earnings
and employment data are available in the Current

Relation to other studies,.

— FOOTNOTES—
1 F o r a d e s c r ip tio n o f th e r e la tio n s h ip o f this series t o o th e r

7 F or

an n u al earnin gs a n d e m p lo y m e n t stu d ies, see p a g e 1 1 .

a

d e ta ile d

d is cu s s io n

ra ilroa d

2 A n n u a l E arnings a n d E m p l o y m e n t P a ttern s, P riva te N o n -

r e tire m e n t

sy ste m s ,

u n d e r S o c ia l S e c u r ity , 1 9 6 0
E arnings

and

E m p lo ym en t

P a ttern s

of

P riva te

p age

11

fo r

U .S . D e p a r tm e n t o f H e a lth ,

( 1 9 6 8 ) an d S o c ia l S e c u r ity H a n d ­

8 T h e d iscu ssio n s o n S a m p lin g an d N o n s a m p lin g V a ria b ility

1 9 0 9 -7 1 , B LS

1967,

e x p la n a t io n

o f G in i r a tio s a n d

U .S .

S o c ia l

U n ited S ta tes,

S e cu rity

D e p a r tm e n t

of

H e a lth , E d u c a t io n ,

A d m in is tr a t io n ,

O ffic e

of

and

W e lfa re ,

R e se a rch an d S ta­

tistics, p p . 3 1 7 - 3 1 8 ; G o v e r n m e n t P rin tin g O f f i c e , W a sh in g to n :

th eir

1971

s ig n ifica n ce .




see

ha ve b e e n ta k e n f r o m E a rn in g s D is tr ib u tio n in th e U n ite d S ta tes

B u lle tin 1 3 1 2 -8 , p a g e 2 5 8 .
6 See

p roced u re,

p l o y m e n t In s u r a n c e S y s t e m s .

U n ite d S ta tes, 1 9 0 9 - 7 1 , B L S

B u lle tin 1 3 1 2 -8 , p p . 2 5 6 -2 5 7 .
5 E m p l o y m e n t a n d Earnings,

sa m p lin g

b o o k ; a ls o , see H a n d b o o k o n R a ilro a d R e t i r e m e n t a n d U n e m ­

N on a g ricu ltu ra l E m p l o y e e s , 1 9 6 5 (B L S B u lletin 1 6 7 5 , 1 9 7 0 ).

4 E m p l o y m e n t a n d E arnings,

th e

E d u c a t io n , a n d W e lfa re , S o c ia l S e c u r ity A d m in is tr a t io n , W ork ers

agricultural E m p l o y m e n t , 1 9 6 4 (B L S R e p o r t 3 3 0 , 1 9 6 9 ) .

3 Annual

of

r e p o r tin g crite ria , an d co v e ra g e u n d e r th e s o c ia l s e cu rity and

15







D etailed Tables
Earnings and employment patterns in two-digit industry divisions




T a b le A-1.

M e d ia n a n n u a l e a r n in g s o f w o rk e rs e m p lo y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in fo u r q u a r te r s

by in d u s t r y o f m a jo r e a r n in g s a n d ra c e , 1 96 6
INDUSTRY
QUARTERS

E A R N I N G S OF W O R K E R S BY
W O R K E D IN T H E I N D U S T R Y

E A R N I N G S F R O M A L L W A G E A N O S A L A R Y E M P L O Y M E N T OF
WORK E R S WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
I N D U S T R Y B Y Q U A R T E R S W O R K E D IN THE I N D U S T R Y

INDUSTRY
A N Y
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

..................

$ 3,*22

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
W H I T E 11 NEGRO
$ 3,6*2

$ 2,109

*,022

............................................. . .............

5,886

5,97*

M E T A L M I N I N G .................................................
A N T H R A C I T E M I N I N G ..........................................
B I T U M I N O U S C O A L A N D L I G N I T E M I N I N G ...................
O I L A N D G A S E X T R A C T I O N ...................................
N O N M E T A L L I C M I N E R A L S , E X C E P T F U E L S ...................

6**48
*,607
6,575
5,773
*,966

6,*61
*,607
6,576
5,837
5,199

........................................

*,111
3,373
3,87*
*,20*

*,638
6,310
3,*86
2,805
3,*2*
2,*22
2,7*3
3,333
5,270
*,5*9
6,176
7,*29
*,156
2,716
*,912
6,601
*,87*
6,031
*,591
6,661
*,993
2,736

...................................... ..........

R A I L R O A D T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ..................................
L O C A L A N D I N T E R U R B A N P A S S E N G E R T R A N S I T ..............
T R U C K I N G A N D W A R E H O U S I N G .................................
W A T E R T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ............... ......................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N B Y A I R .....................................
P I P E L I N E T R A N S P O R T A I ON ..................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N S E R V I C E S ..................................

m i ni n g

CONTRACT

CONSTRUCTION

G E N E R A L B U I L D I N G C O N T R A C T O R S ...........................
H E A V Y C O N S T R U C T I O N C O N T R A C T O R S ........................
S P E C I A L T R A D E C O N T R A C T O R S ...................... .

MANUFACTURING

..................................................

O R D N A N C E A N D A C C E S S O R I E S .................................
F O O D A N D K INDRED. P R O D U C T S ...............................
T O B A C C O M A N U F A C T U R E R S .....................................
T E X T I L E M I L L P R O D U C T S .....................................
A P P A R E L A N D O T H E R T E X T I L E P R O D U C T S ...................
l u m b e r a n d WOOD PRODUCTS
.............................T _ T
F U R N I T U R E A N D F I X T U R E S .......................... .........
P A P E R A N D A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ........................... .
P R I N T I N G A N D P U B L I S H I N G ..................................
C H E M I C A L S A N D A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..........................
P E T R O L E U M A N D C O A L P R O D U C T S ............................
R U B B E R A N D P L A S T I C P R O D U C T S , N E C ......................
L E A T H E R A N D L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ...........................
S T O N E , C L A Y , A N D G L A S S P R O D U C T S .......... .............
P R I M A R Y M E T A L I N D U S T R I E S .................................
F A B R I C A T E D M E T A L P R O D U C T S ...............................
M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ...........................
E L E C T R I C A L E Q U I P M E N T A N D S U P P L I E S ....................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T .................................
I N S T R U M E N T S A N D R E L A T E D P R G D U C T S ......................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A N U F A C T U R I N G I N D U S T R I E S .............
TRANSPORTATION

See footnote at end of tab le.




FOIJR Q U A R T E R S
ALL
1
R A C E
WHITE i1 NEGRO
WORKERS
%

5,268

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WHITE i NEGRO
|

FOtJR Q U A R T E R S
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS
W H I T E i| N E G R O

$ 5,519

1 3,465
t

$ 3,422

* 3,6*2

*
J 2,109

$ 5,268

S 5,519

3 3,465
l

4,9*9

6,133

6,220

4,272

6,993

7,05*

5,035

6,572
4,805
6,628
6,076
5,569

6,527
2,87*
3,92*

7,200
5,187
6,993
7,128
6,629

7,199
5,187
7,038
7,152
6,852

-

6,666
4,2*9
*,*99

6,570
4,805
6,623
6,020
5,301

6,666
4,499
4,499

4,866

2,519

6,863

7,2*4

4,076

2,42*
2,761
2,436

6,6*8
6,807
7,32*

7,019
7,213
7,626

4,249
4,368
4,164

6,9*5

7,002

6,527
2,2*9
3,8*0

7,179
5,156
6,959
7,080
6,527

7,177
5,156
6,990
7,110
6,738

*,*92

2,2*6

6,699

7,08*

3,987

*,*75

3,763
**203
*,577

1,879
2,236
2,052

6,3*5
6,610
7,020

6,6*9
6,855
7,325

3,932
4,178
3,965

4,058
*,*87
4,779

*,*51
4,839
5,139

*,831

3,128

6,155

6,31*

4,699

4,793

4,956

3,293

6,251

6,400

4,788

6,*85
3,766
3,583
3,505
2,*68
3,125
3,*81
5,*38
*,695
6,357
7,589
*,313
2,759
5,12*
6,7*8
5,027
6,12*
*,712
6,751
5,161
2,939

*,12*
2,159
957
2,806
2,038
1,957
2,4*4
3,749
2,788
4,256
4,499
2,85*
1,826
3,52*
5,70*
3,478
*,079
3,113
5,803
2,821
1,6*6

7,98*
5,920
*,678
*,159
3,125
*,*59
4,710
6,552
6,629
7,136
8,0*6
6,113
3,592
6,216
7,372
6,425
7,1*9
6,055
7,533
6,5*6
4,445

8,120
6,125
*,782
*,202
3,1*6
5,117
4,863
6,6*1
6,712
7,280
8,138
6,218
3,608
6,375
7,522
6,527
7,21*
6,161
7,663
6,622
4,602

5,72*
*,**6
*,*31
3,81*
2,960
2,795
3,758
5,287
4,769
5,435
6,083
5,016
3,3*9
4,658
6,482
5,355
5,793
4,733
6,663
4,718
3,473

6,650
3,775
2,985
3,556
2,501
2,95*
3,566
5,501
4,693
6,355
7,5*7
*,*17
2,82*
5,162
6,71*
5,199
6,295
4,812
6,816
5,237
2,971

6,818
*,061
3,749
3,616
2,533
3,401
3,738
5,653
4,849
6,526
7,689
4,560
2,857
5,367
6,88*
5,3*7
6,382
4,938
6,919
5,398
3,13*

4,699
2,472
1,073
3,115
2,210
2,1*4
2,78*
3,978
3,131
*,*35
5,187
3,229
2,132
3,887
5,8*8
3,8*0
*,*3*
3,420
5,981
3,291
1,931

8,112
6,02*
4,720
4,188
3,1*0
4,535
4,786
6,595
6,692
7,236
8,110
6,200
3,635
6,309
7,4*2
6,537
7,253
6,1*0
7,631
6,661
4,531

8,227
6,237
4,828
4,227
3,162
5,193
4,930
6,678
6,782
7,367
8,202
6,285
3,6*6
6,468
7,601
6,619
7,315
6,2*4
7,751
6,742
4,681

5,833
4,541
4,514
3,880
3,004
2,83*
3,812
5,443
4,865
5,535
6,281
5,222
3,428
4,782
6,57*
5,558
5,965
4,845
6,768
4,812
3,520

5,990

6,2*1

*,180

6,909

7,02*

5,599

6,175

6,412

*,*31

6,979

7,113

5,682

6,738
*,310
5,082
5,393
6,335
7,8*6
*,393

6,820
*,218
5,482
5,730
6,**9
7,8*6
*,576

5,495
*,772
2,701
*,130
*,791

6,92*
5,9*1
7,12*
7,087
7,112
8,12*
6,0*3

6,988
5,8*5
7,332
7,403
7,206
8,12*
6,206

5,77*
6,285
4,7*0
5»678
5,535

6,787
4,5*0
5,476
5,798
6,503
7,916
4,793

6,865
*,**2
5,901
6,106
6,570
7,916
4,9*6

5,571
5,10*
3,053
4,590
5,166

6,969
6,0*1
7,222
7,403
7,231
8,187
6,172

7,061
5,955
7,416
7,726
7,309
8,187
6,35*

5,844
6,384
4,838
5,983
5,673

_
-

-

3,2*9

_
-

-

*,*58

_
-

-

3,7*9

-

4,999

T a b le A-1.

M e d ia n a n n u a l e a r n in g s o f w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in fo u r q u a r t e r s

b y in d u s t r y o f m a jo r e a r n in g s a n d r a c e , 1 9 6 6 ---- C o n t in u e d
INDUSTRY
QUARTERS
INDUSTRY

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

ECONOMY

Q U A R T E R
R A C i E
WHITE 11 NEGRO

- CONTINUEO

w o rk e rs
(-)




o f

a ll

in d ic a te s

ra ce s
e it h e r

oth e r
th e

th a n

s a m p le

1,564

1,597

1,344

3,531

3,599

3,020

3,381
3,222
3,080
3,854
2,737
3,409
2,515
2,986

3,280
1,493
1*831
3,040
1,478
3,136
902
1,659

3,396
1,510
1,866
3,148
1,492
3,273
905
1,683

2,509
1,372
1,353
2,461
1,308
2,397
944
1,462

4,941
3,211
4,165
5,257
3,087
5,021
2,459
3,673

5,081
3,199
4,227
5,398
3,126
5,195
2,433
3,753

3,455
3,309
3,147
3,919
2,779
3,558
2,607
3,105

3,469

3,889

4,001

2,347

5,027

5,134

3,593

3,799
3,785
4,166
4,107
2,874
3,014
2,749
3,499

3,938
3,948
5,718
4,434
3,878
2,455
3,134
3,903

3,979
3,977
5,829
4,508
3,911
2,630
3,281
4,307

2,999
2,874
3,499
3,032
1,666
1,829
999
937

4,697
5,041
7,214
5,725
4,918
4,316
4,924
6,124

4,732
5,086
7,319
5,824
4,947
4,561
4,974
6,399

3,899
3,958
4,249
4,212
2,999
3,164
2,749
3,749

2,066

2,313

1,280

3,949

4,352

2,477

1,148
2,019
2,449
2,867
3,786
1,225
1,004
2,418
3,807
3,580
2,874
1,507
769
5,124

1,071
1,807
1,084
1,586
2,285
1,111
1,273
2,112
1,937
2,370
2,666
726
788
2,299

2,752
3,154
5,204
5,033
5,743
5,314
4,084
3,462
4,821
5,424
4,949
3,907
1,136
7,583

2,921
3,344
5,467
5,362
5,861
5,471
4,244
3,564
4,834
5,563
5,124
3,992
1,240
7,657

2,410
2,708
3,511
3,638
4,374
2,749
3,321
3,077
3,124
4,117
3,874
3,249
1,080
5,249

4,985
3,168
4,175
5,303
3,084
5,095
2,363
3,682

3,866

2,010

4,946

5,064

3,840
3,730
5,588
4,240
3,687
2,146
2,944
3,562

3,888
3,767
5,687
4,321
3,729
2,317
3,071
3,849

2,714
2,699
3,399
2,644
1, 1 8 7
1,546
999
812

4,639
4,957
7,099
5,622
4,866
4,195
4,899
5,974

4,681
5,014
7,212
5,718
4,897
4,463
4,949
6,249

1,914

2,173

1,205

3,901

4,300

2,429

986
1,815
1,859
2,088
3,064
1,042
895
2,259
3,529
3,254
2,694
1,155
744
4,659

H O T E L S A N D O T H E R L O D G I N G P L A C E S .........................
P E R S O N A L S E R V I C E S • • • • ................................ • • • • •
M I S C E L L A N E O U S B U S I N E S S S E R V I C E S ..................... .
A U T O R E P A I R , S E R V I C E S * A N D G A R A G E S ..................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S R E P A I R S E R V I C E S ............................
M O T I O N P I C T U R E S ...............................................
A M U S E M E N T A N D R E C R E A T I O N S E R V I C E S * N E C ...... .........
M E D I C A L A N D O T H E R H E A L T H S E R V I C E S ......................
L E G A L S E R V I C E S ................................................
E D U C A T I O N A L S E R V I C E S ........................................
M U S E U M S , B O T A N I C A L , Z O O L O G I C A L G A R D E N S ...............
N O N P R O F I T M E M B E R S H I P O R G A N I Z A T I O N S ..................
P R I V A T E H O U S E H O L D S ...........................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S S E R V I C E S .....................................

d ash

2,941

3,742

...........................................................

A

4,234

4,843
3,172
4,111
5,159
3,040
4,907
2,385
3,603

B A N K I N G ..........................................................
C R E D I T A G E N C I E S O T H E R T H A N B A N K S .......................
S E C U R I T Y , C O M M O D I T Y B R O K E R S A N D S E R V I C E S .......
I N S U R A N C E C A R R I E R S ................................ ..........
I N S U R A N C E A G E N T S * B R O K E R S A N D S E R V I C E .................
R E A L E S T A T E ....................................................
C O M B I N E D R E A L E S T A T E * I N S U R A N C E * E T C ..................
H O L D I N G A N D O T H E R I N V E S T M E N T C O M P A N I E S ...............

I n c lu d e s

6,630

2,162
1,122
1,204
2,021
1,107
2,055
806
1,261

......................

1

6,508

3,059
1,380
1,694
2,720
1,369
2,957
805
1,519

2,959
1,357
1,662
2,626
1,350
2,819
808
1,491

N O T E -

2,885

3,534

.....................................................

B U I L D I N G M A T E R I A L S A N D F A R M E Q U I P M E N T ................
R E T A I L G E N E R A L M E R C H A N D I S E ................................
F O O D S T O R E S ....................................................
A U T O M O T I V E D E A L E R S A N D S E R V I C E S T A T I O N S ..............
A P P A R E L A N D A C C E S S O R Y S T O R E S .............................
F U R N I T U R E A N D H O M E F U R N I S H I N G S S T O R E S ................
E A T I N G A N D D R I N K I N G P L A C E S ................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S R E T A I L S T O R E S ..............................

SERVICES

5,027

3,448

1,467

.................................................

ESTATE

4,768

1,184

1*408

6,725

REAL

5,263

4,120

................................................

AND

7,619

6,572

2,523

$ 4,931

INSURANCE*

7,524

6,398

4,742

FINANCE*

4,312

6,836

4,469

trade

6,989

5,142

7,433

RETAIL

$ 4,685

7,540

4,124

$ 4* 8 4 8

TRADE

$ 6,111

$ 4,994

6,880

WHOLESALE

$ 5,989

$ 4,918

$ 6,048

........................................... .........

UTILITIES

3,706

4,607

S 5,926

PUBLIC

A N Y
. Q U A
R . T E R - _______ EQl1R Q U A R T E R S
R A C _ J _____
ALL
ALL
R A C i ______
WORKERS
WHITER 1 NEGRO
.WORKERS. W H I T E 1 1 M G R Q . .

FOUR QUARTERS
R A ,C E
ALL
W H I T E 11 N E G R O
WORKERS

3,591

COMMUNICATION

E A R N I N G S F R O M A L L W A G E A N D S A L A R Y E M P L O Y M E N T OF
W O R K E R S W H O S E M A J O R E A R N I N G S WERE FROM THIS
I N D U S T R Y B Y Q U A R T E R S W O R K E D IN T H E I N D U S T R Y

E A R N I N G S OF W O R K E R S BY
W O R K E D IN T H E I N D U S T R Y

%

1,013
1,879
2,086
2,378
3,172
1,059
877
2,323
3,594
3,424
2,708
1,365
727
4,757

910
1,649
892
1,287
1,799
812
1,086
1,980
1,666
2,179
2,583
636
759
1,857

%

2,837
3,309
5,318
5,210
5,715
5,109
4,045
3,535
4,796
5,486
4,999
3,938
1,214
7,543

2,684
3,124
5,045
4,892
5,612
4,901
3,877
3,423
4,779
5,343
4,906
3,841
1,110
7,452

2,330
2,675
3,341
3,485
4,249
2,666
3,249
3,022
3,124
4,011
3,749
3,128
1,054
5,049

1,128
1,956
2,184
2,582
3,630
1,216
1,025
2,362
3,749
3,414
2,874
1,291
780
5,002

$

N eg ro.
d id

n o t in c lu d e

any

w o rk e rs

w ith

th e se

c h a r a c te r is tic s ,

o r

th a t th e

d a ta

d id

n ot m e e t

th e

B u r e a u 's

p u b lic a tio n

c r ite r ia .

T able A -2 . M edian annual earnings of w orkers employed in any quarter and in four quarters
by industry of m ajor earnings and race, 1967
EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ...................................

0 U A R TE R
RAC E
WHITE 1 1 NEGRO

% 3 ,6 1 5 $ 3,8 3 9

FOlJR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE1 1 NEGRO

$ 2,3 1 0 i

5 ,372 $ 5 ,712

*

ANY
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R TE R
R A C E
WHITE M NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE i| NEGRO

3 ,709

$ 3,615

$ 3 ,8 3 9

$ 2 ,3 1 0

$ 5,372

$ 5 ,712 S 3 ,7 0 9

M I N I N G .................................................................... ...........................................

6,0 3 1

6,1 0 4

4,464

7 ,259

7 ,323

5 ,546

6,2 8 3

6,368

4,6 6 6

7 ,323

7 ,382

5 ,6 7 1

METAL MINING ............................................................................................
ANTHRACITE MINING ................................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LI G N IT E M I N I N G ............... .....................
OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION ...................................................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS ......................................

5,7 1 8
5,0 5 3
6,9 2 5
6 ,0 0 4
5,032

5 ,687
5,0 5 3
6 ,9 3 4
6 ,081
5 ,2 4 9

7,374
6,8 3 3
2,8 7 4
3 ,9 9 9

6 ,802
5 ,749
7,389
7,627
6 ,713

6 ,793
5,7 4 9
7 ,408
7,6 6 7
7 ,026

7,4 9 9
7,062
5 ,1 2 4
4 ,9 1 6

5,971
5,1 4 5
7 ,0 1 1
6,3 0 4
5,4 3 9

5,9 4 3
5 , 145
7,023
6,378
5 ,6 8 3

7 , 374
6 ,857
3 ,499
4,3 2 1

6 ,935
5,874
7 ,4 1 7
7,683
6 ,666

6 ,927
5 ,874
7 ,434
7 ,722
7,115

7,499
_
7,062
5,593
4 ,9 9 9

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ...........................................................................

4 ,412

4,788

2 ,479

7,1 5 1

7 ,491

4 ,320

4 ,7 5 4

5,140

2 ,7 4 7

7 ,316

7,668

4 ,435

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS ....................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ........................................ . . .
SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTORS ............................................................

3,644
4 ,104
4,5 5 5

3 ,9 9 4
4,418
4 ,9 1 7

2,0 3 1
2 ,521
2 ,173

6,7 2 4
6*983
7 ,472

7 ,089
7 ,394
7 ,750

4,221
4 ,3 3 8
4 ,4 0 8

4 ,3 4 0
4,653
5,0 8 4

4 ,7 3 2
4 ,996
5 ,5 0 4

2 ,583
3,051
2,674

7,0 9 0
7 ,233
7,753

7 ,439
7,6 6 2
8,028

4 ,510
4,4 8 4
4,554

MANUFACTURING ..............................................................................................

4,836

5,038

3,3 8 3

6,2 8 6

6,4 6 2

4 ,7 9 3

4 ,9 7 0

5,1 5 2

3 ,5 2 3

6 ,352

6,523

4 ,890

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES ................................... ................... ..
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ............................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ......................................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS ........... ..........................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ........................ ...........
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS ..............................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES ................................... ...............................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS................................... ........................
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING .................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ..................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS .......................................................
RUBBER ANO PLASTIC PRODUCTS, N E C .....................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ....................................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS .............................................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES .................................................. ..
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ............................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ....................................................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ........................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..............................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ........................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ............................

6,4 0 1
3,586
3,017
3,5 0 4
2,6 2 6
2,9 7 7
3 ,550
5 , 504
4 ,6 9 3
6 ,3 6 5
7 ,7 5 4
4 ,251
2 ,851
5 ,112
6,5 5 3
5 ,117
6 ,1 5 9
4,865
6 ,6 5 8
5,2 4 6
2,994

6,555
3,854
3,629
3 ,5 7 4
2,6 6 1
3,4 4 6
3 ,732
5 ,703
4,830
6,557
7 ,919
4,397
2 ,8 9 9
5,3 4 6
6,693
5,2 6 9
6 ,264
5 ,001
6,7 3 0
5,416
3 ,139

4,3 6 2
2,4 0 1
1 ,138
2 ,935
2,3 5 1
2 ,0 4 0
2 ,586
3 ,976
3 ,0 8 9
4 ,4 9 6
5 ,549
3 ,130
2 ,046
3 ,695
5 ,613
3,829
4 ,3 9 8
3, 652
5 ,648
3,053
2 ,1 0 5

7 ,472
6 ,1 5 2
4,774
4,2 1 7
3 ,274
4,810
4,7 7 8
6 ,699
6 ,731
7,2 5 4
8 ,371
6,005
3,7 6 9
6 ,325
7 ,2 0 7
6 ,512
7 ,1 0 5
6,200
7 ,413
6,5 8 7
4,638

7,636
6 ,3 9 0
4,8 9 1
4,277
3 ,3 0 2
5 ,379
4 ,9 4 7
6 ,838
6,8 6 7
7 ,420
8,502
6,1 3 2
3 ,790
6 ,5 0 9
7,3 8 3
6,5 9 5
7 ,186
6 ,352
7 ,567
6,6 6 2
4 ,8 3 3

5 ,898
4 ,595
4 ,4 6 4
3,807
3 ,067
3 ,029
3 ,8 7 0
5 ,4 4 0
4,758
5 ,624
6 ,374
4,918
3,4 9 9
4 ,681
6,339
5,3 6 6
5 ,713
4,712
6,5 7 3
4 ,681
3 ,642

6,5 8 1
3 ,8 7 2
3 ,109
3 ,629
2 ,6 9 4
3 ,170
3,7 5 5
5 ,746
4,867
6 ,551
7 ,829
4 ,4 8 6
2 ,9 6 4
5 ,330
6 ,6 6 7
5 ,3 9 5
6,3 8 5
5,0 3 8
6,7 6 1
5 ,4 3 6
3,1 5 7

6,658
4 ,133
3 ,7 8 8
3,687
2,723
3 ,6 9 8
3,9 1 9
5,907
5,0 0 6
6,680
7,9 9 2
4,640
3,008
5,581
6 ,8 1 3
5,552
6 ,4 8 7
5 ,1 7 5
6,883
5,614
3,307

4 ,724
2 ,774
1,227
3,1 7 8
2 ,493
2,2 5 2
2 ,940
4,3 2 8
3 ,2 9 9
4,7 2 8
5,7 0 8
3 ,531
2 ,333
3 ,941
5 ,778
4,1 6 4
4 ,8 1 0
3 ,819
5 ,830
3,3 9 9
2,3 4 7

7,559
6,2 2 9
4 ,829
4,2 5 6
3 ,294
4,8 6 6
4 ,857
6,7 5 4
6 ,8 1 1
7 ,357
8,418
6 ,127
3 ,8 1 1
6,4 2 2
7,311
6,6 0 5
7,211
6,304
7 ,539
6 ,657
4 ,722

7,712
6,467
4,9 3 7
4 ,310
3,321
5 ,422
5 ,012
6,903
6,9 4 7
7 ,516
8,549
6,232
3,826
6 ,584
7,4 8 4
6,681
7,293
6 ,444
7,681
6 ,737
4,905

5,992
4,6 9 6
4 ,5 3 5
3 ,891
3 ,1 0 1
3 ,062
3,9 4 6
5,6 5 9
4,973
5 ,784
6,4 6 4
5 ,098
3 ,562
4,8 5 7
6 ,469
5 ,5 2 3
5,872
4 ,810
6,6 5 6
4,9 4 9
3 ,7 0 6

TRANSPORTATION........................................... ................................................

6,308

6,5 7 3

4,342

7 ,2 5 9

7 ,385

5,9 4 8

6,4 9 3

6,717

4,6 3 9

7 *3 5 2

7 ,471

6 ,0 4 4

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION .................................................................
LOCAL AND INTERUR8AN PASSENGER TRANSIT ............................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ..............................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION.......................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR ......................................................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTAION.................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ................................................................

7,076
4,429
5,344
5,4 5 0
6 ,862
8,3 0 8
4 ,4 4 3

7 ,1 4 2
4,2 9 1
5 ,797
5 ,871
6 ,9 8 5
8,324
4,7 4 9

5,8 4 7
5 , 161
2,6 3 4
4,3 2 8
5,2 6 7
2,2 4 9
2,249

7,234
6,139
7 ,426
7 ,527
7 ,902
8 ,583
6,3 1 2

7,3 2 6
6,0 0 6
7 ,607
7 ,9 2 3
8 ,0 1 6
8,591
6,4 2 2

6,0 6 6
6,6 1 0
5,1 8 2
5 ,710
6 ,277
5 ,624
5 ,062

7 ,1 2 4
4,647
5,7 5 8
5 ,9 7 0
7,0 2 2
8,345
4 ,802

7 ,1 9 5
4,505
6,203
6 ,3 1 3
7 , 125
8,3 6 0
5,046

5,911
5,5 2 4
3,114
4,729
5 ,484
2,4 9 9
2,999

7,3 1 9
6,264
7 ,528
7,8 4 6
8,003
8,5 8 3
6,4 1 6

7,408
6,1 3 4
7 ,709
8 ,284
8,1 0 7
8,591
6,507

6,137
6 ,7 8 6
5 ,2 9 8
5,971
6 , 5 74
5 ,6 2 4
5 ,416

S e e fo o t n o t e a t en d o f ta b le .




Table A-2. M edian annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters
by industry of major earnings and race, 1967----Continued
EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJCR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INOUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

Q U A R _T E R
R A C E
WHITE 1 1 NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
1
W 1RKERS 1 WHITE 1 1 NEGRO
C

$ 5,060

$ 5,1 6 2

it 3 , 6 5 4

$ 5 ,9 7 7

.......................................................................................

6,983

7 ,1 5 1

4 ,518

WHOLESALE TRADE . . . ......................................................................................

4,7 1 0

4,9 6 2

RETAIL T R A D E ................................................................................... • • • • • •
BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM E QU IPM EN T..........................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE ..........................................................
FOOD STORES ............................ .................................... .............................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS ..........................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES .....................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ..............................
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES ..........................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ........................................................
FINANCE,

INSURANCE,

Q U A R TER
R A C E
WHITE 1 1 NFGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE1 1 NEGRO

CONTINUED

COMMUNICATION ................................................................................................
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

A NY
ALL
WORKERS

$ 5 , 1 3 3 S 5 , 2 3 4 i& 3 , 8 3 0 $ 6 , 0 4 4

6 ,108

$ 4 ,624

7 ,6 9 2

7 ,821

5 ,345

7,1 0 9

7,2 7 1

4,654

7,802

7 ,917

5 ,474

2 ,627

6,603

6,7 2 4

4 ,412

4 ,981

5 ,2 3 7

3,0 4 6

6 ,667

6 ,8 2 1

4 ,5 1 6

2
l

$ 6,172

J
t

4,697

1,523

1,544

1 ,272

3,554

3,6 1 4

3,130

1 ,629

1,635

1 ,4 4 0

3 ,617

3,674

3 ,195

3,157
1,490
1 ,7 4 7
2,729
1,429
2,903
833
1 ,5 8 2

3 ,271
1 ,520
1 ,781
2 ,789
1 ,439
3 ,029
829
1 ,6 1 2

2,2 8 9
1,181
1,3 7 0
2,2 8 6
1 ,336
1 ,845
908
1,301

5 ,116
3 ,319
4 ,2 1 5
5,358
3,193
5,092
2,408
3,779

5 ,236
3 ,323
4 ,267
5 ,495
3,231
5 ,237
2 ,378
3 ,843

3,6 6 6
3,2 8 6
3 ,459
4 ,0 8 7
2,933
3,6 3 3
2,6 0 5
3 ,217

3,4 8 0
1,641
1,918
3 ,1 3 4
1 ,575
3,1 8 3
926
1 ,747

3 ,589
1 ,663
1 ,948
3 ,208
1,5 7 9
3,324
925
1,774

2,5 4 9
1,4 1 1
1,545
2,662
1 ,514
2 ,437
1 ,042
1 ,5 3 0

5,201
3 ,351
4 ,2 9 5
5,470
3 ,239
5,1 7 1
2 ,477
3,841

5,316
3 ,3 5 3
4,355
5,607
3 ,2 6 6
5,350
2,4 4 6
3 ,9 0 9

3,7 1 6
3,3 3 9
3,5 2 3
4 ,2 0 4
2 ,999
3 ,758
2,6 9 5
3,2 7 8

AND REAL ESTATE .........................................

3,908

4 ,0 3 2

2 ,309

5 ,176

5,2 9 6

3,792

4,047

4,151

2 ,6 0 8

5,251

5,3 6 8

3,929

BANKING ..........................................................................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ................................. ..
SECURITY, COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES ........................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ...............................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERVICE ...............................
REAL ESTATE ................................. ................................................. ..
COMBINED REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC ..................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .............................

3,991
3,880
5 ,972
4 ,419
3,804
2 ,2 1 1
3,374
3 ,3 9 9

4 ,043
3,9 3 7
6,0 6 1
4,510
3,834
2 ,362
3 ,482
3,8 9 4

3 ,084
2,214
2 ,8 7 4
3,015
1 ,749
1,7 2 5
708
774

4,8 2 0
5 ,168
7,412
5,8 6 7
5 ,062
4,4 5 5
4 ,6 2 4
6,397

4 ,8 7 0
5 ,206
7,531
5 ,990
5,1 0 4
4,7 5 6
4 ,732
6 ,546

4,076
3 ,7 3 4
4 ,8 7 4
4 ,243
3,041
3,249
3,062
3 ,874

4,080
4,0 9 6
6,100
4,586
3,9 7 1
2,530
3 ,455
3,979

4,121
4,138
6,185
4 ,6 6 9
3,996
2,688
3,5 8 3
4,243

3,3 6 1
2 ,7 4 9
3 ,749
3,312
2,624
2,042
708
1 ,062

4,880
5 ,282
7,5 2 4
5 ,978
5 ,121
4 ,580
4,6 7 4
6 ,5 4 6

4 ,9 2 0
5,3 0 7
7 ,6 3 1
6,084
5,160
4 ,862
4,7 6 5
6,734

4 ,219
3 ,968
4,8 7 4
4 ,4 7 4
3,156
3 ,398
3,062
3 ,9 9 9

SERVICES ...........................................................................................................

2,100

2 ,3 5 6

1 ,349

4,158

4,564

2 ,671

2 ,203

2 ,480

1,434

4,2 0 7

4,617

2 ,711

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES .............................................
PERSONAL SERVICES ............................................. ..................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ..............................................
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES ......................................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ...................................................
MOTION PICTURES ................................................................................... ..
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES, NEC ............................
MEDICAL ANO OTHER HEALTH SERVICES .........................................
LEGAL SERVICES ........................................................................................
EDUCATION *L S E R V I C E S .........................................................................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS . • • • • • • • • • • .
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ......................................
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ..............................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ....................................................................

1 ,0 6 3
1 ,9 7 3
1 ,9 2 2
2,299
3,5 5 9
1,088
948
2 ,536
3 ,636
3,4 0 6
2 ,324
1 ,1 8 2
788
4,9 2 0

1,073
2 ,0 1 8
2,1 7 7
2,4 9 3
3,6 8 3
1 ,090
93 6
2,6 0 4
3 ,7 0 2
3,576
2,2 8 1
1,383
770
5 ,074

1 ,030
1,8 6 4
929
1 ,615
2,474
1,0 7 2
1 ,1 8 4
2 ,262
1,449
2,4 4 1
2,4 9 9
661
800
2,0 6 8

2,8 2 9
3,2 8 6
5 ,309
5 ,183
5 ,872
4,950
3 ,9 9 0
3,717
5,004
5,6 1 3
4,916
3,920
1 ,1 5 6
7,8 8 5

2,9 8 2
3 ,484
5,592
5,4 9 3
5 ,982
5,1 4 8
4,2 1 5
3 ,820
5 ,040
5 ,740
5,0 2 4
4,0 2 4
1 ,2 7 2
7 ,993

2 ,476
2 ,785
3,445
3,949
4,178
2 ,749
3 ,2 6 6
3,2 9 4
3,374
4 ,236
4,3 1 2
3 ,291
1,098
4 ,910

1 ,216
2 ,1 0 4
2 ,255
2,7 0 8
3,913
1,251
1 ,097
2,634
3 ,845
3,5 5 6
2,624
1,310
819
5 ,296

1,2 1 4
2 ,1 5 2
2,554
2,929
4,003
1,261
1,0 7 8
2 ,6 9 3
3 ,9 0 3
3,723
2,5 3 1
1,5 0 0
810
5,440

1 ,217
1,981
1 ,109
1,960
2,895
1,1 6 2
1,4 1 2
2,3 8 6
1 ,833
2,609
2 ,9 9 9
746
829
2,749

2 ,906
3 ,329
5 ,4 5 9
5,341
5 ,9 9 0
5 ,289
4 ,2 4 4
3, 758
5,044
5,6 8 6
5,249
3 ,988
1 ,1 8 2
8,031

3,059
3 ,526
5,7 3 9
5,660
6,1 2 4
5 ,544
4 ,4 1 1
3,8 5 0
5,076
5 ,824
5,281
4,0 9 0
1,291
8 ,1 6 0

2 ,543
2 ,833
3,6 3 8
4 ,0 6 9
4,2 2 2
2,833
3 ,453
3,356
3,437
4,353
4 ,874
3,398
1 ,1 2 7
5 ,2 8 1

1 I n c lu d e s
NOTE:

w o r k e r s o f a ll r a c e s o t h e r th an N e g r o .

A d a s h ( - ) i n d i c a t e s e i t h e r t h e s a m p l e d i d n o t i n c l u d e a n y w o r k e r s w it h t h e s e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ,




o r t h a t t h e d a t a d i d n o t m e e t t h e B u r e a u 's p u b l i c a t i o n c r i t e r i a .

Table A-3. Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quartern
by industry of major earnings and race, 1966
INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ............................
MINING ................................................................................................................

Q U A R TE R
R A tC E
w h i t e " 1 NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
ALL
R A C E
WORKERS WHITE 1 1 NEGRO

ANY
ALL
WORKERS

% 2,7 0 6

$ 6 ,0 0 1

$ 6,230

% 3 ,883

$ 4,4 0 8

% 4 ,613

5 ,999

4,007

7,540

7 ,6 2 4

5 ,044

6 ,146

6 ,2 1 4

4,2 4 7

7 ,634

7,7 1 9

5 ,1 3 1

_

7 ,619
6,4 3 8
7 ,294
7,907
7 ,4 4 7

_
6,1 6 8
4,539
4,547

6,398
5,2 4 5
6,231
6 ,2 4 8
5,7 1 9

6,398
5 ,284
6,2 6 4
6 ,292
5,887

_
5,3 7 9
3 ,4 2 2
3,9 4 5

7,685
6,570
7,333
7 ,972
7,296

7 ,6 9 1
6 ,570
7,380
8,008
7 ,5 7 1

_
_
6 ,192
4,8 1 9
4,6 1 7

% 4,408 $ 4,613
5,9 3 0

Q U A R TE R
R A C E
WHITE 1 | NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE 1 I NEGRO

$ 2 , 7 0 6 $ 6 ,0 0 1

$ 6,230 $ 3,883

METAL M I N I N G ................................... .......................................................
ANTHRACITE MINING ...............................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LI GN ITE M I N I N G ............................ ..
OI L AND GAS EXTRACTION ....................... ...........................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS. EXCEPT FUELS .....................................

6,213
5,014
6 ,076
6,013
5,3 9 7

6 ,222
5,0 5 0
6,104
6,059
5,5 5 6

5,3 5 5
3 ,0 5 5
3 ,7 1 7

7,6 1 3
6,4 3 8
7,250
7 ,869
7,1 7 6

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION............. ............................................................

4 ,902

5 ,1 7 9

2 ,751

7,2 5 0

7,572

4 ,335

5 ,152

5,438

2,9 2 7

7,4 1 4

7,743

4 ,445

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS ....................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ...............................................
SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTORS ............................................................

4,2 8 3
4 ,6 9 9
5,0 1 5

4,573
4 ,9 6 2
5,2 6 6

2 ,469
2 ,759
2 ,602

6,8 6 9
7,394
7,434

7 ,210
7,7 0 8
7 ,689

4 ,301
4 ,6 6 8
4 ,285

4 ,756
5 ,178
5,395

5,062
5 ,464
5,654

2,841
3 ,081
2 ,9 0 5

7 ,2 2 4
7,6 6 4
7,689

7 ,577
7 ,9 9 2
7,948

4 ,5 7 8
4,8 2 4
4 ,497

MANUFACTURING ...............................................................................................

5 ,241

5 ,4 2 4

3 ,5 0 6

6 ,7 9 4

6 ,9 6 3

4 ,9 3 8

5 ,367

5,549

3,644

6,869

7 ,037

5,027

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .............................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ...........................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ......................................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS.....................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS .....................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .................................................. ..
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES ...................................................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ............................................................
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING ................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.................... ............................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ......................................................
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC ..........................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ....................................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS .............................................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES .............................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ...........................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ........................................ ..
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ........................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .............................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..........................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ............................

6 ,8 3 8
4,153
3 ,312
3 ,715
2 ,8 6 4
3,4 2 8
3,8 2 2
5 ,427
5 ,391
6 ,7 4 4
7 ,514
4,697
3 ,127
5,2 3 8
6 ,593
5,3 0 7
6 ,231
5 ,251
6 ,887
5,9 3 4
3 ,620

6,999
4,348
3,959
3 ,8 2 4
2,9 5 1
3 ,763
3,988
5,588
5,5 2 5
6,9 7 1
7 ,7 0 5
4,843
3 ,193
5 ,4 1 5
6,798
5,4 7 3
6 ,329
5 ,3 9 7
7,0 4 8
6,096
3 ,848

4 ,2 0 9
2,791
1 ,779
2 ,7 4 2
2 ,1 5 7
2 ,046
2 ,643
3 ,688
3 ,1 8 7
4,064
4 ,4 7 1
3 ,355
2,1 7 4
3,661
5 ,340
3,6 5 1
4,164
3,3 3 5
5 ,2 7 4
3 ,292
2,0 8 1

8,8 3 7
6 ,312
4 ,9 9 6
4,8 1 8
4,0 0 8
5 ,083
5 ,540
7,0 2 3
7 ,295
8 ,2 5 6
8 ,876
6 ,620
4,3 9 2
6,781
7 ,917
7,181
7 ,867
6,9 9 8
8,402
7 ,7 4 8
5,542

8 ,945
6,524
5,196
4 ,9 0 0
4 ,091
5 ,632
5 ,714
7,1 5 3
7,3 8 8
8 ,455
9,0 2 1
6 ,726
4,434
6 ,978
8,1 3 0
7,323
7 ,945
7 ,119
8,548
7 ,859
5 ,719

6,385
4 ,590
3,9 7 7
3,905
3,231
2 ,902
4,0 6 4
5,3 3 0
5 ,220
5 ,463
5 ,936
5 ,420
3,5 7 0
4 ,871
6,551
5,466
5,872
4 ,9 8 8
6,776
5,193
3,794

7 ,159
4 ,3 3 9
3 ,442
3 ,848
2 ,947
3 ,621
4 ,049
5,6 2 8
5 ,542
6 ,960
7 ,755
4 ,9 2 7
3 ,259
5 ,489
6,791
5,6 0 0
6,4 9 5
5 ,470
7 ,127
6,194
3 ,799

7,313
4,536
4 ,090
3,949
3 ,0 3 0
3,9 7 1
4 ,213
5,787
5 ,675
7 ,1 8 4
7,939
5,0 6 5
3,3 2 0
5,6 6 2
6 ,9 9 3
5,7 6 7
6,592
5,6 1 3
7 ,2 8 5
6,354
4 ,027

4 ,631
2 ,958
1,9 0 4
2,9 5 8
2 ,2 7 6
2 ,1 8 0
2,8 8 1
3,921
3,3 6 3
4,309
4 ,8 1 5
3 ,6 6 0
2 ,372
3,947
5 ,557
3 ,947
4,4 5 5
3 ,5 9 8
5 ,536
3,560
2,2 6 2

8,955
6 ,420
5,069
4,8 7 7
4 ,0 5 0
5,176
5,654
7 ,095
7 ,382
8,363
8,9 8 2
6,738
4,465
6 ,903
8,015
7,327
7 ,990
7,099
8,5 1 4
7 ,875
5,635

9 ,063
6,633
5 ,2 6 1
4 ,955
4 ,132
5 ,7 3 5
5,828
7,222
7 ,474
8,561
9 ,127
6 ,837
4,506
7 ,100
8,225
7,469
8,066
7 ,218
8,659
7 ,988
5 ,812

6 ,490
4 ,6 9 0
4 ,091
4,0 1 1
3,282
2,9 5 8
4 ,173
5 ,438
5 ,349
5,569
6,0 3 2
5,626
3,6 9 0
5,0 0 2
6 ,669
5,621
6 ,042
5,128
6,911
5 ,304
3 ,894

TRANSPORTATION ............................................................................................

5,7 5 0

5 ,948

4,0 8 0

7 ,277

7,461

5,5 3 4

5,9 4 7

6,146

4,270

7,399

7 ,5 8 1

5,673

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ................................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ...........................
t r u c k i n g a nd w a r e h o u s i n g ..............................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION 8Y AIR ......................................................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTA ION ................................................................
TRANSPORTATION S E R V I C E S ................................................................

6,468
4,4 4 0
5 ,2 5 4
5,8 0 8
7 ,050
7,761
4,9 0 4

6,607
4 ,4 1 5
5 ,5 0 7
6 ,1 3 2
7 ,1 7 5
7,7 6 1
5 ,045

4 ,9 2 3
4,5 7 9
3 ,211
4,314
4,685

7,272
5 ,7 8 7
7,2 0 3
7 ,8 7 4
8 ,678
8 ,653
6,7 1 2

7 ,400
5,7 3 5
7 *4 3 8
8,302
8 ,830
8 ,653
6,8 7 9

5,759
6 ,088
4 ,920
5,8 6 0
5,706

6 ,611
4 ,6 3 4
5 ,496
6,2 1 0
7,2 7 2
7,9 3 3
5 ,232

6,748
4,6 0 6
5,754
6,542
7,3 8 9
7 ,9 3 3
5,3 7 1

5 ,081
4,788
3,4 1 8
4,680
5 ,065

7,369
5 ,929
7 ,330
8 ,234
8,788
8,750
6,9 6 2

7 ,496
5,876
7,567
8 ,658
8 ,930
8 ,750
7,125

5,871
6 ,234
5 ,037
6 ,237
6 ,020

S e e fo o tn o te at en d o f ta b le .




-

-

3,2 1 3

-

4,455

_

3,570

4 ,752

Table A-3. Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters
by industry of major earnings and race, 1966----Continued
INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

quar te rs

INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE 11 NEGRO

ANY
Q U A R TE R
ALL
R A ,C E
WORKERS WHITE 1 1 NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE 1 1 NEGRO

% 3,581

$ 7,0 6 1

$ 7,142

$ 5,012

$ 5 ,739

$ 5,837

$ 3 ,771

$ 7 ,1 3 6

CONTINUED

COMMUNICATION ................................................................................................
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

Q U A R TE R
RAC E
WHITE M NEGRO

$ 5 ,614 $ 5 ,7 1 5

$ 7 ,2 1 6 $ 5 ,138

.........................................................................................

6,623

6 ,7 8 1

3 ,9 7 7

7 ,695

7 ,815

5,239

6 ,753

6 ,9 0 4

4,202

7 ,7 6 2

7,8 7 7

5 ,405

WHOLESALE TRADE ...........................................................................................

5 ,490

5,7 3 4

2 ,771

7 ,642

7,8 7 8

4 ,316

5 ,716

5,959

3 ,0 0 2

7 ,766

8 ,002

4,4 4 9

RETAIL TRADE ...................................................................................................

2 ,5 8 8

2 ,665

1 ,796

4,3 9 1

4 ,488

3,2 3 2

2 ,686

2,7 6 1

1 ,917

4,4 6 0

4 ,5 5 4

3 ,324

BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ...............................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE ...........................................................
FOOD STORES ................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE OEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS ..........................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES ......................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ...............................
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES ...........................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ........................................................

3 ,597
2 ,366
2,833
3,702
2,388
3,817
1 ,5 1 0
2 ,770

3 ,687
2,4 1 7
2,8 8 4
3,8 0 9
2,452
3 ,953
1,5 3 4
2 ,852

2 ,385
1,765
2 ,004
2,530
1,580
2 ,327
1 ,352
1,805

5,3 5 5
4 ,1 8 8
4,636
5 ,9 5 8
4,066
5 ,7 0 6
3,030
4,6 7 5

5 ,4 8 8
4,2 4 1
4,6 9 1
6 ,125
4 ,1 5 3
5 ,875
3,0 7 0
4 ,784

3 ,533
3,425
3,566
4 ,051
2 ,798
3 ,608
2 ,757
3 ,161

3 ,810
2,4 6 9
2 ,949
3 ,917
2 ,483
4,0 0 8
1 ,612
2 ,900

3,9 0 1
2,518
3 ,0 0 0
4 ,0 2 3
2,544
4,141
1,6 3 4
2,978

2,592
1 ,906
2 ,1 1 9
2,756
1 ,707
2 ,5 5 4
1,4 7 4
1 ,982

5 ,469
4,2 4 8
4,7 0 3
6 ,0 8 2
4,1 2 9
5 ,815
3 ,115
4,7 5 5

5 ,602
4 ,298
4,759
6 ,2 4 8
4 ,213
5,9 8 1
3 ,1 5 2
4,8 6 2

3 ,645
3 ,517
3,638
4,187
2,897
3 ,748
2,861
3,2 7 6

F I NANCE, INSURANCE,

AND REAL ESTATE ...................................... ..

4 ,794

4,9 5 3

2 ,4 2 9

6 ,425

6,5 6 8

3,6 7 2

4,9 4 3

5,097

2,644

6,5 0 9

6 ,648

3,833

B A N K IN G ......................................................................... ................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ............................................
SECURITY, COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES .......................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ..............................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERVICE . . . . . ...................
REAL ESTATE ........................................................................................... . .
COMBINED REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC .................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .............................

4 ,570
4,598
8 ,9 4 0
5,348
4,899
3,275
4,447
5,723

4,647
4 ,652
9 ,0 5 5
5 ,4 4 2
4,949
3,5 1 4
4,582
6,089

2,744
2 ,701
3,5 2 1
3,163
1 ,980
2 ,038
1,5 8 9
1 ,702

5,8 3 2
6 ,1 7 6
11,586
6,876
6,538
5 ,055
6,563
9 ,1 0 6

5,897
6,2 3 5
11,713
6,9 5 4
6 ,590
5 ,392
6 ,675
9 ,366

3,872
3,8 5 7
4 ,696
4 ,5 6 4
2 ,8 1 1
3 ,203
2,550
3,9 9 3

4,7 1 2
4,8 2 5
9 ,129
5 ,528
5 ,096
3,5 1 2
4,6 6 3
6 ,085

4 ,7 8 4
4 ,8 7 6
9 ,2 3 9
5,619
5,146
3,753
4 ,798
6 ,4 6 6

2,996
3 ,041
3 ,898
3 ,401
2,173
2,267
1 ,788
1,9 0 5

5 ,919
6 ,312
11,693
6 ,969
6,6 5 7
5 ,222
6,7 4 8
9 ,394

5,9 8 0
6 ,365
11,816
7 ,0 4 6
6,7 0 9
5,5 5 7
6,864
9,658

4 ,060
4,200
5 ,036
4,7 1 4
2,970
3 ,378
2 ,616
4,1 8 6

SERVICES ............................................................................................................

3,072

3 ,3 1 6

1 ,870

4 ,755

5 ,120

2,8 7 7

3,1 6 6

3,4 1 5

1 ,939

4 ,824

5,1 9 1

2,930

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ..................... ................... . .
PERSONAL SERVICES .................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ..............................................
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES ......................................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ...................................................
MOTION P I C T U R E S ..................... ................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES* NEC ............................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES .........................................
LEGAL S E R V I C E S ........................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES .........................................................................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ............................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ......................................
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ................................. ............................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ....................................................................

1 ,6 8 9
2,473
3,674
3 ,0 3 0
3 ,8 0 5
3,520
2,155
2,805
3 ,9 5 9
3 ,8 7 3
3,540
2 ,476
1,024
5,747

1 ,789
2,6 3 6
3 ,939
3 ,279
3 ,8 9 7
3 ,638
2,1 7 5
2 ,908
4,014
3 ,9 8 4
3 ,672
2 ,6 8 4
ltlll
5 ,850

1,3 2 4
1,888
1 ,717
1 ,956
2,5 5 2
1 ,669
1 ,942
2,248
2,0 2 9
2 ,9 3 9
2,609
1,5 7 0
958
3,0 0 7

3,2 6 4
3 ,810
6 ,6 6 1
5 ,2 7 0
5 ,798
6,689
4,874
4 ,0 6 8
5 ,4 4 3
5 ,470
5 ,717
4,530
1,3 9 8
8,3 5 1

3 ,471
4 ,0 6 3
6 ,945
5 ,603
5,888
6 ,8 6 8
5 ,008
4 ,1 9 9
5,4 8 7
5 ,616
5,9 5 0
4,664
1,6 5 7
8,433

2,509
2,8 7 3
3 ,690
3 ,6 1 6
4 ,348
3,2 9 7
3 ,7 3 3
3 ,309
3,221
4,2 1 5
4 ,051
3 ,626
1,239
5 ,3 1 4

1 ,826
2,571
3 ,910
3 ,313
4,076
3 ,7 7 4
2,3 7 7
2 ,887
4,1 0 1
3 ,9 8 8
3,662
2,6 0 6
1 ,063
6,053

1 ,930
2 ,7 3 2
4,181
3,577
4 ,1 6 7
3,897
2,399
2,984
4 ,1 5 4
4 ,0 9 8
3,783
2,812
1 ,157
6 ,1 5 9

1,4 5 0
1 ,993
1 ,915
2,176
2,848
1 ,842
2,1 3 5
2 ,3 5 5
2 ,2 2 5
3 ,063
2,804
1 ,709
991
3,263

3,369
3,8 6 5
6,837
5 ,440
5 ,930
6,994
5 , 179
4 ,1 2 1
5,5 1 6
5 ,570
5,846
4,6 3 3
1 ,429
8,538

3,5 7 9
4,1 1 6
7 ,116
5,773
6 ,016
7 ,175
5 ,323
4,2 4 8
5,5 5 8
5 ,715
6 ,083
4,7 6 2
1,691
8 ,6 2 0

2 ,602
2,931
3,920
3 ,789
4,538
3,571
3,948
3,384
3,387
4,331
4 ,151
3,767
1 ,269
5,506

1

I n c lu d e s w o r k e r s o f a ll r a c e s o t h e r th a n N e g r o .

NOTE:

A d a s h ( - ) i n d i c a t e s e i t h e r t h e s a m p l e d i d n o t i n c l u d e a n y w o r k e r s w it h t h e s e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ,




o r t h a t t h e d a t a d i d n o t m e e t th e B u r e a u 's p u b l i c a t i o n c r i t e r i a .

Table A-4. Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters
by industry of major earnings and race, 1967
EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WORKERS

ANY
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R 1
FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
R A C E
ALL
WHITE i 1 NEGRO 1WORKERS WHITE i 1 NEGRO

Q U A (1 T E R
R A C E
WHITE i T NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE i| NEGRO
$ 6 ,4 9 1 $ 4 , 1 0 9

$ 4 ,614

$ 4 ,824

$ 2 ,883

% 6 ,256

$ 6,491

$ 4 ,109

$ 4,6 1 4

$ 4 ,8 2 4

$ 2,8 8 3

$ 6,256

MINING ...................................................................... .

6 ,1 5 6

6 ,221

4,3 6 7

7 ,878

7 ,959

5,556

6,3 9 0

6,4 5 5

4,5 8 9

7,998

8 ,079

5,687

METAL M I N I N G ..................................................
ANTHRACITE MINING ......................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LI G N IT E MINING
OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION ..........................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS * EXCEPT FUELS

5 ,960
5,2 5 9
6,529
6 ,310
5 ,538

5,952
5,259
6 ,549
6,3 6 1
5 ,691

6,6 4 6

7,400
6 ,8 1 9
7 ,769
8,3 3 7
7 ,395

7,405
6,8 1 9
7,807
8,3 8 4
7 ,633

7,062
6,7 8 4
5,130
4,894

6,2 1 4
5,5 0 4
6,690
6,5 5 2
5,8 8 5

6 ,208
5,504
6,714
6 ,600
6,0 4 9

6 ,742

5,987
3 ,492
3,8 6 3

6 ,0 3 5
3 ,943
4 ,0 9 5

7 ,542
7 ,0 4 1
7 ,8 6 7
8,439
7,600

7,549
7 ,0 4 1
7,908
8,482
7,843

7 ,069
6 ,8 0 1
5 ,526
5 ,042

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ........................

5 ,2 2 6

5 ,505

2 ,963

7 ,7 1 4

8,027

4 ,685

5 ,476

5,7 6 2

3 , 152

7,886

8,203

4 ,812

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS .
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS
SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTORS . . . .

4,610
4 ,979
5 ,335

4 ,890
5 ,259
5 ,5 9 1

2 ,682
2 ,9 7 2
2,7 8 8

7,3 5 8
7 ,8 0 5
7,890

7,6 8 8
8,1 7 3
8,1 2 6

4,6 2 0
4,7 7 2
4,716

5,1 0 3
5,4 3 6
5 ,7 3 0

5,3 9 9
5,7 3 3
5 ,992

3,0 5 6
3,3 1 7
3 , 122

7,7 2 7
8 ,0 9 1
8 , 164

8 ,069
8,471
8,403

4 ,8 8 6
4,9 5 9
4,9 5 8

5 ,451

5,6 4 8

3 ,647

6,982

7,1 6 9

5,018

5,5 7 4

5,769

3 ,786

7,059

7,2 4 4

5 ,1 2 3

8 ,7 7 6
6,671
5,226
5,020
4,265
5 ,4 5 5
5,770
7,393
7,639
8 ,6 4 1
9 ,3 6 1
6 ,655
4 ,659
7 ,1 0 1
7,974
7 ,429
8,112
7,317
8,554
8,140
5 ,9 6 8

8 ,933
6,898
5,444
5,118
4 ,363
5,955
5 ,942
7 ,5 4 4
7,757
8,8.47
9 ,536
6 ,773
4 ,703
7 ,3 1 4
8,196
7,5 8 3
8,199
7,4 6 6
8 ,735
8,270
6,1 6 5

6,317
4,924
4 ,2 8 7
4 ,069
3 ,382
3 ,260
4 ,293
5 ,604
5,331
5,845
6,407
5 ,409
3,849
5,098
6,561
5 ,688
5 ,9 9 1
5,178
6,698
5 ,298
4,1 0 0

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY

MANUFACTURING ..............................................................

-

-

-

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES ..............................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ............................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS........... ..........................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS ......................................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS . . .
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS ..............................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES ...................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ............................
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING .................................
CHEMICALS ANO ALLIED PRODUCTS ..................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS .......................
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC ...........
LEATHER AND LEATHER PROCUCTS ..................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS .............
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ..............................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ............................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ....................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES . . . .
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..............................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ...........
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

6,849
4,2 9 6
3 ,451
3,8 3 9
3 ,064
3 ,6 6 7
4,038
5 ,6 9 6
5 ,640
7,0 0 6
7,7 8 6
4,730
3 ,263
5 ,4 3 2
6 ,641
5 ,532
6 ,505
5,617
6,9 8 8
6 ,331
3 ,871

7,066
4 ,491
4,056
3 ,9 6 2
3, 153
4,037
4,228
5 ,8 6 6
5,7 7 9
7 ,238
7 ,997
4,883
3,336
5,644
6 ,867
5 ,703
6 ,6 1 4
5 ,765
7, 190
6 ,5 1 8
4 ,081

4,3 1 0
2 ,9 7 0
2 ,031
2 ,851
2,3 4 4
2 ,1 5 2
2 ,727
3,961
3 ,433
4,298
4,7 4 7
3 ,382
2 ,288
3 ,6 8 4
5 ,269
3,864
4,2 8 7
3,7 2 7
5, 115
3 ,365
2 ,342

8 ,663
6 ,561
5 ,144
4 ,9 5 8
4,213
5 ,374
5 ,667
7 ,3 0 6
7 ,548
8,529
9,250
6,549
4,594
6 ,9 8 0
7,8 5 5
7,279
7,9 9 4
7,2 1 1
8,4 3 3
8,0 1 9
5,8 6 5

8,8 2 3
6 ,790
5 ,3 7 0
5 ,061
4,311
5,868
5,8 4 0
7,462
7 ,669
8 ,738
9 ,426
6 ,678
4,641
7 ,195
8,0 8 4
7,436
8,0 8 4
7 ,3 6 2
8,618
8,150
6,0 6 5

6 , 163
4,7 9 1
4,1 7 5
3 ,965
3 ,3 3 1
3 ,206
4,1 7 4
5,472
5,190
5,699
6,281
5,176
3 ,736
4,961
6 ,398
5,496
5,827
5,046
6 ,5 3 4
5 ,148
3,971

7,1 3 6
4,4 7 9
3,5 6 2
3,9 8 6
3,157
3 ,843
4,256
5,8 9 8
5 ,7 9 5
7,225
7 ,9 9 6
4,939
3,3 8 2
5 ,671
6,837
5 ,800
6,7 4 8
5,8 1 5
7 ,214
6 ,566
4 ,0 5 5

7,3 4 7
4 ,6 7 3
4,1 7 0
4,100
3,2 4 3
4,225
4,441
6 ,0 6 3
5 ,931
7,454
8 ,2 0 6
5 ,081
3 ,4 5 0
5,8 8 0
7,0 5 8
5 ,9 7 0
6,854
5,9 6 2
7 ,4 1 3
6 ,7 5 1
4,265

4,669
3,165
2 ,139
3 ,0 6 3
2 ,460
2,278
2 ,9 7 8
4 ,2 1 8
3,644
4 ,551
4 ,9 7 4
3,6 8 1
2 ,4 7 4
3,938
5,4 9 3
4,1 4 6
4 ,6 0 5
3 ,945
5,368
3,6 2 6
2 ,535

TRANSPORTATION ...................................................................

6 ,0 7 0

6,286

4,2 7 5

7 ,678

7 ,870

5,856

6,267

6 ,481

4,4 8 9

7,8 0 3

7,994

6,0 0 0

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ........................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT . .
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ......................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR .............................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTAION ........................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ........................................

6 ,8 1 2
4 ,662
5,5 0 0
6,135
7 ,6 8 1
7 ,586
5 ,161

6,950
4 ,5 9 5
5,7 7 3
6,512
7,821
7,626
5,406

5,2 7 3
5 ,0 1 5
3 ,327
4 ,3 7 8
5 ,135
3 ,903
2 ,8 1 2

7,666
6 ,091
7,484
8 ,376
9 ,368
8,7 6 3
7,240

7,809
6 ,046
7 ,697
8,912
9,5 1 0
8 ,782
7,386

6,024
6,3 1 9
5,294
5,928
6 ,452
5,687
5 ,028

6 ,968
4 ,8 6 3
5 ,7 4 4
6,5 1 3
7,8 7 9
7,805
5,5 0 6

7 ,1 0 2
4 , 793
6 ,0 1 5
6 ,8 9 9
8,012
7 ,845
5 ,7 4 1

5,4 6 5
5,2 3 4
3,583
4,716
5,4 6 7
4 ,0 4 7
3 ,255

7,777
6,235
7,618
8 ,717
9,466
8 ,8 5 1
7 ,474

7,918
6 ,188
7,8 3 0
9 ,256
9,601
8 ,872
7,604

6,1 4 7
6,477
5,438
6 ,250
6,7 2 0
5,687
5,478

S e e fo o tn o te at en d o f ta b le .




Table A-4. Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters
by industry of major earnings and race, 1967----Continued
EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

Q U A R TE R
R A C E
WHITE i 1 NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WHITE i 1 NEGRO....
WORKERS

ANY
ALL
WORKERS

FOUR QUARTERS
_
Q U A R T .E _R
R A C E
ALL
R A C E
WHITE 1 1 NEGRO WORKERS WHITE * | NEGRO

CONTINUED

COMMUNICATION........................................... .................................................

$ 5 ,850 $ 5 ,9 7 4 $ 3,6 8 2 $ 7 ,1 8 0 i

7,278

% 5,041

% 5,980

$ 6 ,1 0 2

$ 3 ,855

S 7,2 6 8 $ 7 ,3 6 4 $ 5,161

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ......................................................................................

6 ,927

7 ,090

4 ,2 8 3

8 ,036

8,1 7 4

5 ,4 6 1

7,051

7 ,2 0 7

4,523

8 ,110

8 ,242

5 ,6 4 4

WHOLESALE TRADE ........................................................................................

5,757

6 ,011

2 ,953

7 ,958

8,189

4,6 4 5

5,9 8 8

6,2 4 1

3 ,195

8,091

8 ,3 2 2

4 ,7 8 9

RETAIL TRADE ................................................................................................

2,710

2 ,7 8 4

1 ,926

4,557

4,650

3,4 2 2

2 ,807

2,879

2 ,045

4,624

4 ,7 1 4

3 ,516

BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ............................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE.................. ....................................
FOOD STORES .............................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS ........................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES ...................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES .............................
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES ........... ............................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES .....................................................

3,770
2,510
2,978
3,848
2,528
3,955
1 ,5 6 5
2,921

3 ,857
2,567
3,0 2 9
3 ,9 4 4
2,5 8 7
4,0 9 9
1,582
3,002

2,5 2 0
1,8 5 9
2,1 7 0
2 ,747
1,769
2 ,380
1 ,453
1 ,946

5 ,556
4,346
4 ,8 4 2
6 ,1 9 0
4,266
5,940
3,114
4,9 2 1

5,6 7 1
4 ,407
4 ,892
6,3 2 9
4 ,350
6 ,1 1 1
3 ,152
5 ,027

3 ,798
3 ,508
3,889
4 ,473
3 ,029
3,740
2 ,844
3,414

3 ,981
2 ,613
3 ,0 9 6
4,061
2 ,634
4,159
1 ,670
3,0 5 9

4 ,067
2,667
3 ,145
4 ,157
2,690
4 ,300
1 ,6 8 4
3,137

2,7 5 3
1,995
2 ,3 0 8
2 ,959
1,911
2,6 2 1
1 ,571
2,1 1 7

5 ,667
4 ,403
4 ,9 1 6
6 ,299
4,3 3 8
6 ,037
3 ,201
5 ,0 1 0

5 ,781
4 ,4 6 1
4 ,964
6 ,436
4,4 1 9
6,2 0 5
3,237
5, 115

3 ,921
3,6 0 5
3 ,996
4 ,5 9 4
3 ,139
3 ,867
2 ,949
3 ,5 0 6

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ......................................

4,971

5 , 138

2,6 7 0

6,6 8 9

6 ,845

3,963

5 ,121

5,2 8 2

2 ,8 9 6

6,7 7 5

6,9 2 6

4,1 4 3

BANKING .......................................................................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS .........................................
SECURITY, COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES .....................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ...........................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERVICE ............................
REAL ESTATE .............................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC ...............................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ..........................

4 ,767
4 ,688
8 ,6 4 1
5,532
5,217
3 ,376
4 ,684
5,957

4 ,8 5 3
4,759
8 ,7 9 2
5 ,6 4 5
5 ,2 6 3
3,5 9 7
4,841
6 ,3 8 6

3,032
2 ,558
3 ,1 6 6
3 ,368
2 ,182
2 ,2 4 6
1,449
1,775

6 ,076
6,3 4 0
11,333
7,1 6 8
7*019
5 ,2 6 9
6,169
9,7 0 1

6 ,154
6,4 0 3
11,449
7 ,2 6 6
7 ,077
5 ,6 0 8
6,2 8 6
9 ,958

4 ,1 6 1
3 ,884
5, 124
4 ,818
2,843
3 ,460
2,275
4,1 3 2

4,9 0 5
4 ,908
8,8 4 8
5 ,717
5 ,433
3 ,608
4 ,831
6 ,363

4 ,985
4 ,9 7 4
8,9 9 6
5 ,8 2 6
5 ,476
3 ,8 3 0
4,986
6 ,800

3,2 9 2
2,906
3 ,4 8 9
3 ,6 2 0
2 ,5 8 0
2 ,478
1 ,621
2 , 102

6 , 160
6,4 6 1
11,447
7 ,269
7,1 7 9
5 ,438
6,286
10,050

6 ,232
6 ,520
11,559
7,3 6 3
7 ,233
5 ,777
6 ,404
10,313

4,3 9 3
4,134
5,4 3 9
5 ,019
3,301
3 ,630
2,3 7 4
4,347

SERVICES .........................................................................................................

3 ,344

3 ,598

2 ,0 6 6

5 ,1 5 1

5 ,5 2 4

3 ,176

3,4 3 6

3,6 9 5

2,1 3 5

5,217

5,593

3 ,228

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ...........................................
PERSONAL S E R V I C E S ................................. ............................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ...........................................
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES ...................................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ................................................
MOTION PICTURES ...................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES, NEC ..........................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ......................................
LEGAL SERVICES ......................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES .......................................................................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS .........................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ....................................
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ............................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .......................................................... ..

1 ,8 0 9
2,651
3 ,812
3 ,302
4 ,162
3,680
2,238
3,124
4,141
4 ,2 8 4
3,357
2,5 4 7
1,077
6 ,120

1,901
2,8 0 5
4 ,1 0 3
3,5 0 4
4,2 6 0
3 ,782
2,261
3,2 3 4
4 ,206
4,4 0 7
3,4 2 0
2 ,768
1 ,176
6,2 4 6

1 ,462
2 ,0 5 0
1 ,7 7 8
2,3 4 8
2 ,8 6 5
1,931
1 ,994
2,5 2 4
2 , 182
3 ,255
2 ,8 4 6
1 ,659
1,0 0 2
3 ,176

3 ,456
4 ,0 6 0
6,8 9 1
5,6 3 5
6 , 151
7,054
4,9 9 0
4,4 6 0
5 ,679
6 ,043
5 ,436
4,704
1 ,466
8 ,875

3,6 6 0
4,3 1 3
7,1 9 2
5,9 1 7
6,2 6 1
7,2 7 3
5,132
4,599
5 ,745
6,208
5 ,608
4,850
1,7 5 5
8 ,990

2,687
3,066
3,819
4,1 7 9
4,516
3,1 8 9
3,788
3,660
3,275
4,6 3 6
4 ,210
3 ,789
1,290
5,4 6 2

1 ,949
2,755
4 ,0 4 9
3 ,5 7 0
4,4 4 3
4,0 2 0
2,4 5 0
3 ,2 1 2
4,2 8 3
4,399
3 ,521
2 ,6 7 5
1 ,115
6 ,430

2,042
2 ,9 1 2
4,346
3,7 8 3
4 ,539
4,131
2 ,474
3,317
4,348
4 ,5 2 0
3,568
2 ,8 9 8
1,2 2 0
6 ,556

1 ,597
2,1 4 6
1 ,976
2 ,5 6 0
3 ,1 6 9
2 , 110
2 ,1 9 9
2 ,644
2,319
3 ,3 7 7
3,1 4 3
1 ,782
1 ,036
3,472

3,5 5 7
4,1 2 7
7 ,058
5,7 9 0
6 ,292
7,626
5 ,240
4,517
5 ,7 5 0
6 ,142
5,6 3 3
4,810
1,499
9 ,065

3,7 6 5
4,3 8 2
7,3 5 3
6,072
6,4 0 8
7 ,8 6 9
5 ,3 8 4
4,6 5 1
5,815
6,3 0 6
5 ,784
4,9 5 0
1 ,789
9 ,178

2,7 7 4
3 ,130
4 ,042
4 ,3 3 2
4,5 8 2
3 ,356
4 ,025
3,747
3 ,391
4 ,7 4 5
4,5 6 1
3,928
1,323
5 ,697

1 I n c lu d e s
NOTE:

w o r k e r s o f a l l r a c e s o t h e r th a n N e g r o .

A d a s h ( - ) i n d i c a t e s e i t h e r t h e s a m p l e d i d n o t i n c l u d e a n y w o r k e r s w it h t h e s e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ,




o r th a t t h e d a t a d i d n o t m e e t t h e B u r e a u 's p u b l i c a t i o n c r i t e r i a .

Table A -5. M edian annual earnings from all wage and salary em ploym ent of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters
by industry and region of major earnings, 1966

STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS W
HO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R TER
ANY
F O U R
Q U A R T E R S
NORTH
NORTH
NORTH­
UNITED
NORTH­
SOUTH
CENTRAL
WEST
EAST
SOUTH
EAST
STATES
CENTRAL

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .....................................

$3,422

$3,893

$2,785

$4,018

$3,573

$5,268

$5,456

$4,262

$5,897

$5,850

M I N I N G ...................................................................................................................

6 ,1 3 3

6 ,378

5,7 8 5

6,041

6,7 3 7

6 ,802

6 ,733

6,641

6 ,725

7,542

METAL MINING ..........................................................................................
ANTHRACITE m i n i n g ...................................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LI G N IT E MINING ........................................
OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION ......................................................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS ........................................

6,5 7 0
4,8 0 5
6 ,623
6 ,020
5 ,301

6 ,5 9 9
4,805
6 ,8 6 7
5 ,7 4 9
5 ,874

5 ,2 4 9
6 ,4 9 9
5 ,891
4,7 8 5

6 ,559
1 ,2 4 9
7,062
4,9 3 7
4 ,681

6 ,6 3 6

7,0 5 2
5 ,1 5 6
6 ,914
6 ,878
6 ,305

6,724
5,1 5 6
7 ,124
6 ,749
6,6 1 3

5,7 4 9

5,9 3 7
6,8 6 3
6 ,928

6,731
6 ,776
5 ,3 3 8

6 ,8 3 9
7 ,799
6 ,2 9 9
6 ,227

7 ,4 2 8
6 ,874
7 ,5 1 9
7,765

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .............................................................................

4,4 7 5

5 ,452

3 ,271

5,463

5,679

6,506

7 ,0 4 3

4,9 7 9

7,400

7 ,6 9 2

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS .......................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS .................................................
SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTORS................................. ............................

4 ,0 5 8
4 ,487
4,779

5 ,2 6 6
5,8 5 1
5 ,442

2 ,8 5 8
3 ,521
3,3 8 5

5,119
4 ,9 4 3
5 ,968

5 ,178
6 ,031
5,7 3 9

6,1 8 2
6 ,3 4 0
6 ,7 3 9

6 ,7 0 7
7 ,696
7 ,049

4 ,720
4 ,9 7 0
5,1 8 0

7,021
7,0 0 6
7 ,755

7,239
7 ,9 9 2
7,849

MANUFACTURING ................................. ...............................................................

4,793

4,789

3 ,7 5 8

5,659

5 ,370

6,039

5,936

4,732

6 ,633

6,800

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .................................................................
FOOD AND KINDREO PRODUCTS.................. ...........................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS....................................................... ................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS ........................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ........................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PROOUCTS ................................................................
f u r n i t u r e AND FIXTURES .....................................................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ..............................................................
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING ............................................. .....................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ....................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS .........................................................
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC ............................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ......................................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS ...............................................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES .................................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ..............................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ......................... ............................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ..........................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ..............................

6,6 5 0
3,775
2 ,985
3 ,556
2 ,501
2*954
3 ,566
5,501
4 ,6 9 3
6 ,3 5 5
7 ,5 4 7
4 ,417
2,8 2 4
5 ,1 6 2
6,7 1 4
5 ,199
6 ,2 9 5
4,8 1 2
6 ,8 1 6
5,2 3 7
2,971

5 ,6 9 2
4,687
3,0 2 0
3,4 9 0
2 ,685
2,8 1 4
3 ,918
5 ,240
4 ,957
6 ,4 0 8
7 ,4 7 7
4,086
2,8 2 6
5 ,749
6 ,820
5 ,300
6,3 7 0
5,0 4 9
6,870
5 ,8 9 2
2 ,873

6,554
3 ,129
3,4 1 2
3,6 2 2
2 ,3 3 6
2,3 4 9
3,2 3 5
5 ,595
4 ,0 8 0
6,3 2 1
7,534
4 ,3 4 5
2,7 5 8
4,375
6,3 0 2
4,2 6 8
4 ,874
4,219
5,8 8 7
3 ,4 2 6
3 ,033

5,846
4,7 6 5
3 ,749
3 ,044
2 ,765
3,038
4 ,0 2 9
5,588
4 ,741
6 ,385
7,592
4,868
3 ,146
5,407
6,820
5,537
6 ,576
4,764
6 ,923
5,128
3 ,319

7,411
2 ,518
1 ,749
3,224
2 ,408
4,878
4,6 3 1
5,9 5 4
4,9 9 9
6 ,367
7 ,5 9 2
4,199
2,812
5,7 3 1
6 ,581
5 ,405
6,044
5 ,089
7 ,200
5,1 5 6
2,842

7,6 2 7
5,6 9 7
4 ,5 7 8
4 ,0 6 9
3,071
4,254
4,5 2 0
6 ,343
6 ,3 9 6
6,967
7 ,928
5 ,805
3 ,499
6,0 1 1
7,249
6 ,176
6,944
5,8 2 3
7,377
6 ,330
4,1 9 9

6,2 8 7
5,9 6 5
3,7 4 9
4,197
3 ,273
4,231
4 ,9 5 0
6 ,0 4 7
6,5 6 0
7 ,017
8*235
5 ,224
3 ,521
6,3 7 7
7 ,307
6 ,136
6 ,9 1 5
6 ,0 0 6
7,2 8 4
6,6 9 5
4,1 0 7

7 ,602
4,5 4 9
4,8 7 1
4 ,0 4 6
2 ,8 3 5
3,0 6 2
3 ,836
6,2 3 7
5 ,581
6,841
7,8 4 2
5 ,513
3 ,264
4,979
6 ,787
5,1 1 0
5,8 0 1
5 ,060
6 ,564
4,2 2 2
3,5 9 9

7,011
6 ,364
4 ,2 4 9
3 ,840
3,381
4 ,2 5 7
5 ,340
6 ,507
6 ,429
7,012
7,916
6 ,239
3,878
6,253
7,3 6 9
6 ,467
7 ,234
5,842
7 ,4 5 1
6 ,140
4 ,772

8 ,3 5 6
6,256
3,249
4,049
3 ,3 9 1
6,048
5,884
7,024
6,908
7,196
7,926
6 ,208
4 ,124
6,645
7,186
6 ,5 4 1
7 ,0 1 7
6,340
7,954
6,607
4,749

TRANSPORTATION 1 ............................................................................................

6,645

5,767

6,8 4 0

6,9 2 4

5,8 4 9

6 ,949

7 ,1 8 5

-

_

INDUSTRY

u n it e d

-

-

WEST

6 ,1 7 5

6,120

4,503

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION 1 .................. .............................................
LOCAL AND INTE°URBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ..............................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ................................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR ........................................................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTAION ...................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES .........................................................

6 ,7 8 7
4,540
5 ,4 7 6
5 ,798
6,5 0 3
7 ,916
4,7 9 3

_
5,3 1 2
6,143
6,7 6 6
6 ,776
6,7 4 9
4,8 9 9

3,774
4 ,1 5 7
4,227
6 ,2 2 2
7,964
3,6 9 4

6 ,788
4,6 5 2
6 ,3 0 4
4,3 2 1
6 ,3 7 4
7,899
5 ,770

3,8 1 6
6,0 0 6
6 ,615
6 ,407
8 ,4 9 9
4 ,291

6,9 3 2
5,8 1 7
6 ,883
7,077
6,9 9 9
8 ,104
5 ,803

6 ,193
7,1 1 6
7 ,640
7 ,241
6,749
5 ,722

4,9 6 8
5,6 5 6
5 ,788
6 ,727
8,1 2 4
4,874

6,933
5,9 7 4
7 ,432
7 ,187
6 ,889
7,999
6,4 5 8

5 ,8 6 3
7 ,6 2 4
8,769
7,022
8 ,4 9 9
5,708

COMMUNICATION .................................................................................................

4 ,9 1 8

5,2 6 1

4 ,484

4,902

5,1 3 9

5 ,703

6,104

5 ,127

5 ,733

5 ,9 2 1

S e e fo o t n o t e at e n d o f ta b le




_

_

Table A -5. M edian annual earnings from all wage and salary em ploym ent of workers em ployed in any quarter and in four quarters
by industry and region of m ajor earnings, 1 9 6 6 ----Continued
EARNING S

OF

WORKERS

WHO WORKED

IN

ANY WAGE AND SAL ARY

EMPLOYMENT

DURING

WEST

UNITED
STATES

F O U R
NORTH­
EAST

Q U A R T E R S
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL

$7,313

$6,999

$7,369

$7,939

$6,505

$7,683

$7,516

3 ,9 9 2

5,061

4 ,9 0 1

6,144

6,4 9 9

5 ,242

6 ,4 3 5

6 ,596

1 ,813

1,408

1,506

1,713

3,391

3,6 5 4

3,0 2 9

3,3 4 5

3 ,954

3 ,280
1 ,493
1,831
3,0 4 0
1 ,478
3 ,136
$902
1,659

3 ,810
1,522
1,901
3 ,880
1 ,880
3,4 3 3
1 ,2 5 1
2 ,038

3,0 6 3
1,3 6 9
1,6 0 0
2 ,5 8 9
1 ,258
2 ,948
$741
1,5 4 4

3,1 3 6
1,5 7 4
1,755
3 ,258
1 ,426
3 ,368
$766
1 ,547

3,9 9 9
1,5 9 0
2 ,471
3 ,148
1,4 3 0
2,906
1,066
1 ,647

4 ,715
3,0 9 3
3,8 5 0
4 ,8 7 2
2,966
4,716
2 ,327
3,418

5 ,174
3,1 6 4
4,1 7 3
5 ,274
3 ,216
4 ,853
2,7 0 9
4,0 2 6

3 ,989
2,8 6 2
3,3 1 7
4,0 9 8
2 ,668
4 ,2 2 7
1 ,928
3 ,008

4,9 0 3
3,107
3,512
5 ,128
2 ,922
5,0 5 5
2,1 6 8
3,3 9 8

5,474
3,4 3 6
5,447
5,493
3,269
5 ,367
2,8 1 0
3 ,857

AND REAL ESTATE .............

3,889

4,3 0 5

3,526

3,7 6 7

3 ,976

4,824

5,1 3 0

4 ,4 1 5

4,7 4 2

5,015

BANKING ...............................................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ................
SECURITY* COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES
INSURANCE CARRIERS ...................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERVICE . .
REAL ESTATE ....................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE* INSURANCE* ETC . . .
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .

3 ,9 3 8
3,948
5,718
4 ,4 3 4
3,8 7 8
2 ,455
3,1 3 4
3,9 0 3

4,329
3 ,9 6 0
5 ,812
4,6 6 6
4 ,169
3 ,281
3,7 1 8
5 ,535

3,656
3,839
5,2 2 2
4 ,2 6 7
3,634
2,0 0 3
2 ,8 7 4
2,4 9 9

3 ,691
3,9 0 0
5 ,999
4 ,284
3,6 2 1
2,541
2,624
3,7 1 4

4,0 9 5
4,242
5,6 6 6
4,540
4 ,1 8 7
2 ,131
3,249
3,4 9 9

4,5 4 6
4,749
6,713
5,3 8 8
4,7 6 7
4 ,111
4 ,7 7 4
5 ,653

4 ,943
4,8 1 2
6 ,738
5,475
4 ,990
4 ,519
4,8 7 4
6,749

4 ,1 3 9
4 ,5 9 4
6,6 2 4
5,3 0 6
4,3 6 4
3 ,468
4,6 8 7
4,374

4 ,3 6 3
4,795
7,124
5,2 9 1
4 ,461
4,265
4,2 4 9
5 ,187

4,7 2 2
5,0 2 9
6 ,499
5 ,479
5 ,262
4 ,293
4 ,874
5,874

2,066

2 ,6 3 5

1 ,608

2,0 3 2

2 ,280

3 ,832

4,446

3,056

3 ,7 1 6

4 ,435

1,147
1,9 9 7
1,597
2 ,0 6 6
3,2 8 5
$641
$835
2,2 1 7
3 ,390
3,4 7 2
1,083
1,6 7 0
$769
5 ,231

1 ,324
2,1 3 1
2 ,377
2,2 0 4
3,9 8 0
2 ,285
1 ,343
2 ,547
4,045
3,6 9 7
2 ,6 2 4
1 ,287
$854
5 ,232

2 ,5 9 5
3 ,037
4,7 7 4
4,597
5 ,245
4 ,673
3 ,577
3,3 5 3
4,669
5 ,2 7 7
4,854
3 ,6 9 7
1 ,144
7 ,1 1 9

2,9 4 0
3 ,2 6 2
5,0 0 2
4,9 5 8
5 ,562
5,531
4 ,3 1 2
3 ,879
4,8 0 2
5,9 9 2
4,9 3 7
4,268
1 ,526
7,387

2 ,1 1 4
2 ,526
4,356
3 ,825
4 ,5 6 5
1,886
3 ,058
2,891
4,2 4 9
4,5 0 6
4,249
2,7 8 8
988
6 ,4 4 2

2,3 8 2
3,0 9 6
4,193
4 ,6 9 2
5,2 4 9
2 ,949
2 ,962
3,161
4,5 4 1
5,3 5 4
4,624
3,7 5 2
1 ,153
7,190

3 ,139
3 ,607
5 ,562
5,374
6,166
6 ,520
4,5 6 2
3,813
5 ,173
5 ,552
5,7 4 9
3 ,9 3 1
1,445
7,638

UNITED
STATES

ANY
NORTH­
EAST

Q U A R T E R
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL

$6,836

$7,539

$5,893

WHOLESALE TRADE

4-,768

5 ,347

RETAIL TRADE .....................................................................

1 ,564

BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT .
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE ............................
FOOD STORES ..................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES .......................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES .
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES ............................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ..........................

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

FINANCE,

CONTINUED

....*

INSURANCE,

SERVICES ............................................................................
HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES . . . . . .
PERSONAL SERVICES ................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES .............
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES . . .
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ..................
MOTION PICTURES .....................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES, NEC
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES . . . .
LEGAL SERVICES ........................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES .........................................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS . . .
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ..............................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ....................................

1,126
1,956
2,184
2,582
3 ,630
1,216
1 ,025
2 ,362
3 ,749
3 ,414
2,8 7 4
1 ,2 9 1
$780
5 ,002

1 ,075
2,4 0 7
2 ,616
3,274
4 ,3 7 4
1 ,946
1,046
2,868
4,062
4 ,2 8 4
4 ,2 9 1
1,802
1,058
5 ,432

$999
1 ,631
2,076
2 ,594
2,9 9 9
707
1 ,003
2,0 3 8
3,458
2,7 0 7
2,999
823
685
4,0 7 3

1 F o r p u r p o s e s o f t h i s s t u d y , a n d b e c a u s e i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t t h e i r a c t u a l p l a c e o f e m p l o y m e n t w a s n o t a v a i l a b l e in t h e f i l e s s t u d i e d ,
la t e d o r g a n iz a t io n s c o v e r e d b y th e R a il r o a d R e t i r e m e n t A c t w e r e c o n s id e r e d to h a v e b e e n e m p lo y e d in th e N o r th C e n t r a l R e g io n .
NOTE:

A

dash




(-)

in d ic a te s

e ith e r

WEST

th e

s a m p le

d id

not

in c lu d e

any

w ork ers

w it h

th ese

c h a r a c te r is tic s ,

or

th a t

th e

d a ta

d id

not

e m p lo y e e s

m eet

th e

o f r a ilr o a d s

B u r e a u 's

and

r a ilr o a d

p u b lic a tio n

re­

c r ite r ia .

Table A -6. M edian annual earnings from all wage and salary em ploym ent of w orkers employed in any quarter and in four quarters
by industry and region of major earnings, 1967

UNITED
STATES

HO WORKED IN ANIY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
EARNINGS OF WORKERS W
F OUR
Q U A R T E R S
ANY
Q U A R TER
NORTH­
NORTH
NORTH­
NORTH
UNITED
SOUTH
EAST
WEST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
CENTRAL
STATES
EAST

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .....................................

$3 , 6 1 5

$4 , 0 6 6

$2 , 9 7 7

S4, 148

$3 , 7 5 4

$5 ,3 7 2

$5 , 6 9 0

$4,452

$6,032

$6,1026

M I N I N G .................................................................................................................

6 ,2 8 3

6 ,601

6 ,1 1 6

6 , 243

6 ,4 3 0

7 ,1 1 1

7 ,0 3 4

7 ,017

7 ,074

7,,479

METAL MINING ..............................................................................................
a n t h r a c i t e m i n i n g .................................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND L I G N IT E ‘ M I N I N G ......................... . ...........
OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION .....................................................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS .......................................

5,967
5 ,124
7 ,0 1 1
6 ,304
5 ,439

6 ,843
5 ,124
7 ,092
5 ,874
6 ,249

5 ,833

6 , 266
7 , 749
5, 874
5, 288

5 ,511
6 ,499
6 ,909
7,055

6 ,782
5 ,874
7 ,355
7 ,299
6 ,535

6 ,999
5 ,874
7 ,374
6 ,874
6 ,799

6,1 6 6

6 ,8 2 9
6 ,174
4 ,689

6 ,749
8,416
6 ,805
6,616

6,,674
6,,916
7,,862
8,,052

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION................................. . ........................................

4 ,754

5 ,840

3 ,532

5 , 764

5 ,9 6 5

6 ,8 5 1

7 ,5 9 3

5,372

7 ,842

8, ,003

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS.............................. .................... .
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS .................................................
SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTORS .............................................................

4 ,340
4 ,653
5 ,083

5 ,613
5 ,837
5 ,932

3 ,142
3 ,740
3 ,6 3 9

5, 601
5, 126
6, 292

5 ,383
6 ,171
6 ,238

6 ,601
6 ,6 0 4
7 ,190

7 ,262
8 ,124
7 ,623

5 ,1 5 9
5 ,3 0 4
5 ,579

7,581
7 ,4 0 b
8,158

7,,567
8,,145
8,,222

4 ,969

5 ,009

3 ,928

5, 773

5 ,5 6 6

6 ,160

6 ,1 1 3

4,9 0 5

6 ,6 5 0

6,,766

6 ,5 8 1
3 ,871
3 ,1 0 5
3 ,629
2 ,694
3 ,169
3 ,755
5 ,745
4 ,867
6 ,5 5 1
7 ,827
4 ,486
2 ,9 6 4
5 ,3 3 0
6 ,6 6 6
5,395
6 ,385
5 ,038
6 ,760
5 ,435
3 ,157

5 ,8 9 4
4 ,716
3 ,124
3 ,649
2 ,852
3 ,164
4 ,190
5 ,2 8 3
5 ,172
6 ,591
7,984
4 ,275
2 ,999
5,7 8 6
6 ,7 4 6
5 ,526
6 ,433
5 ,313
6 ,860
6 ,057
3 ,097

5 ,870
3,2 3 4
3 ,537
3,6 5 6
2 ,585
2,5 1 5
3 ,336
5 ,8 4 5
4 ,327
6 ,573
7 ,887
4 ,209
2 ,845
4 ,575
6 ,487
4 ,595
5 ,1 1 9
4 ,5 3 7
6 ,173
3 ,603
3 ,1 1 6

5,
4,
2,
3,
2,
3,
4,
5,
4,
6,
7,
4,
3,
5,
6,
5,
6,
4,
6,
5,
3,

779
736
999
328
976
182
299
899
849
511
636
895
233
661
725
657
616
973
922
202
563

6 ,848
2 ,668
2 ,999
3 ,124
2 ,478
5 ,200
4 ,847
6 ,270
5 ,153
6 ,538
7 ,833
4 ,421
3 ,149
5 ,928
6 ,358
5 ,592
6 ,155
5 ,332
6 ,768
5 ,4 1 1
2 ,833

7 ,0 9 1
5 ,882
4 ,6 8 8
4 ,153
3 ,2 3 1
4 ,5 8 2
4 ,599
6 ,5 3 7
6 ,530
7 ,1 1 3
8 ,247
5 ,7 8 1
3 ,674
6 ,181
7 ,138
6 ,354
6 ,9 5 6
6 ,019
7 ,294
6 ,393
4 ,420

6 ,5 7 8
6 ,132
3 ,636
4 ,4 5 0
3 ,426
4 ,374
5 ,176
6 ,246
6 ,6 6 6
7,209
8 ,649
5 ,359
3 ,764
6 ,510
7 ,134
6 ,315
6 ,965
6 ,288
7 ,347
6 ,749
4 ,399

6,612
4,781
4,9 7 7
4 ,0 8 5
3 ,029
3,309
3 ,847
6,4 8 9
5,641
7 ,017
8,221
5,2 2 7
3,391
5,231
6,8 8 9
5 ,3 9 4
6 ,002
5,317
6 ,736
4,3 0 8
3 ,798

6,641
6,5 1 8
5,2 4 9
4,4 3 1
3,502
4 ,611
5,2 3 5
6 ,664
6,545
7 ,109
8,058
6,190
3,9 1 2
6 ,4 8 4
7,278
6 ,585
7 ,170
5,950
7,371
6,224
4 ,732

7,,710
6,,436
3,,499
4,,138
3,,535
6,,238
6,,093
7,,072
7,,284
7,,445
8,,229
6,,105
4,,035
6,,945
6,,994
6,,741
7,, 184
6,,444
7,,565
6,,499
5,,312

6 ,493

6 ,3 5 0

4 ,7 1 0

7, 024

6 ,147

7 ,185

7 ,305

6,148

7 ,2 9 1

7,, 758

7 ,1 2 4
4 ,647
5,758
5 ,968
7 ,0 2 2
8 ,3 3 8
4 ,8 0 2

-

-

5 ,282
6 ,236
7 ,249
7 ,448
6 ,499
4 ,985

4 ,036
4 ,291
4 ,443
6 ,698
8 ,431
3,2 4 9

7,
4,
6,
5,
6,

125
783
678
124
699
8 , 062
5 , 874

4 ,365
6 ,414
6 , 874
6 ,974
8 ,624
4 ,499

7 ,270
5 ,9 5 0
7 ,1 7 4
7 ,465
7 ,718
8 ,4 9 9
6 ,041

_
6 ,631
7,412
8 ,210
7 ,9 8 0
7 ,9 9 9
5 ,890

_
5 ,112
5,8 9 2
5,818
7 ,419
8 ,5 8 3
4 ,874

7,271
5,999
7,7 1 7
6 ,937
7 ,6 1 8
8,187
6 ,749

_
5,,74 9
8,, 106
9,,527
7,,749
8, ,624
5, , 9 9 9

5 ,1 3 3

5 ,437

4 ,7 0 3

5 , 146

5 ,404

5 ,810

6 ,347

5 ,272

5 ,8 6 0

6, ,034

INDUSTRY

MANUFACTURING........................................................................................... . .
ORDNANCE AND A CC ES SOR IES .................. ............................ ..
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ..............................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS........... .......................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS ........................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS .......................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PROOUCTS ......................................................... ..
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES ................................... . ...............................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .............................................................
PRINTING AND P U B L I S H I N G ..................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ....................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ........................................................
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC ............................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ................................................. ..
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS ...............................................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ................................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ..............................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT E L E C T R I C A L ......................................................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ..........................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ......................... ..................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ..............................
TRANSPORTATION 1 ..................................................................................
RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION 1 ...............................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ..............................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ................................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A I R .................. ............................................. ..
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTAION .......................................... .......................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ...................................................................
COMMUNICATION ......................................................................................... ..

S e e fo o t n o t e at e n d o f ta b le




-

-

-

7,2 0 2
7 ,191
5,445

WEST

T a b l e A - 6 . M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d s alary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s
b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e g i o n of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d

UNITED
STATES

INDUSTRY

P R IV AT E NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED I N
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
NORTH­
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
WEST

ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
F O U R
Q U A R T E R S
NORTH­
UNIT ED
NORTH
SOUTH
EAST
CENTRAL
STATES

WEST

CONTINUED

P U BL IC U T I L I T I E S

...................................................................................................

$7 * 109

$7,852

$6,281

$7,514

$7,334

$ 7 ,6 5 6

$8,352

$6,746

$7,9 0 0

$7,959

WHOLESALE TRADE

......................................................................................................

A , 981

5 ,512

4 ,3 1 5

5,240

5,090

6 ,4 1 1

6,658

5,547

6,591

6,798

RETAIL

T R A D E ..............................................................................................................

1,629

1 ,839

1 ,5 1 7

1,568

1,758

3,489

3,754

3,173

3,414

4 ,0 1 6

B U IL D I N G MAT ERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT . . . . . . ....................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE ..................................................................
FOOD S T O R E S ............................... ...........................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS ..............................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES .............................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FU RN ISH IN GS STORES ....................................
EA TI NG AND D R IN K I N G P L A C E S ............................................... ..................
MISCELLANEOUS R E TA IL STORES ...............................................................

3,4 -8 0
1,641
1*918
3,134
1,57*
3,183
$9 2 6
1,7 4 7

4,208
1 ,6 5 4
1,892
3 ,9 8 9
1,849
3 ,4 4 9
1,247
2,088

3,129
1 ,4 8 9
1,780
2 ,781
1 ,3 7 8
3,009
$800
1,638

3 , 36 3
1,707
1 ,8 2 9
3 ,3 3 5
1,526
3 ,441
$808
1,606

4,072
1 ,7 5 4
2,583
3 ,050
1,588
3 ,1 1 8
1,063
1 ,813

4,956
3 ,2 3 3
3 ,9 3 3
5 ,0 7 4
3,104
4 ,8 6 5
2 ,339
3,602

5,519
3,345
4,133
5 ,5 4 9
3 ,3 9 3
5 ,0 3 2
2,745
4,148

4,224
3,006
3 ,4 4 5
4 ,3 3 5
2 ,8 2 6
4 ,401
1 ,9 9 9
3 ,1 9 0

5 ,1 3 0
3,233
3,490
5 ,3 2 9
2 ,9 8 2
5 ,1 4 2
2,161
3,552

5 ,7 0 8
3,531
5,517
5,696
3,362
5 ,3 9 9
2,771
4 ,0 2 7

F IN A N C E *

AND REAL E S T A T E ..............................................

4,047

4 ,4 7 9

3,713

3 ,9 7 7

4,080

5,043

5,396

4 ,6 1 0

4 ,9 1 5

5,232

BANKING ......................................................................................................................
C R ED IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS .................................................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND SE RV ICE S ............................
INSURANCE C A R R I E R S ............ .. .........................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SER VIC E ....................................
REAL ESTATE ...........................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE* INSURANCE* ETC .......................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .................................

4,080
4,096
6,100
4,585
3,971
2,529
3,446
3,979

4 ,4 8 0
4 ,0 9 2
6,129
4 ,7 1 6
4,329
3 ,4 1 6
3 ,3 1 2
5,799

3,816
4 ,0 1 4
5,699
4 ,5 2 3
3 ,6 7 7
2,206
3 ,3 7 4
2,499

3,928
4,091
6,249
4 ,4 3 9
3,799
2 ,4 5 8
3,374
3,749

4,152
4,333
6,124
4,692
4 ,2 8 1
1,988
3 ,9 9 9
2 ,9 9 9

4 ,7 2 1
4,982
7,141
5 ,6 4 0
4 ,9 2 1
4 ,3 1 1
4,499
6,062

5,162
4,968
7,162
5 ,7 3 2
5 ,261
4,860
4,499
7 ,5 6 2

4 ,2 8 3
4,850
6,999
5,597
4,404
3,639
4 ,4 1 6
4 ,9 9 9

4,540
4 ,9 2 6
7 ,031
5,560
4,680
4,474
3 ,9 9 9
5 ,8 3 3

4,874
5 ,3 7 4
7,333
5,673
5,466
4,541
4,999
6 ,1 6 6

.........................................................................................................................

2,203

2 ,8 3 7

1,777

2 , 198

2 ,4 8 7

4,067

4,699

3,294

3,938

4,664

HOTELS AND OTHER LOOGING PLACES ....................................................
PERSONAL SERVICES .................................................................... . . . . . . . .
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SE RVICES .....................................................
AUTO R E P A IR , SE RV IC ES* AND GARAGES . ..........................................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SE RV ICE S ..........................................................
MOTION PICTURES ................................................................................ . . . . . .
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S , NEC .................................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ...............................................
LEGAL SERVICES ...................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SE RVICES . . . . . . ..................................................................
MUSEUMS* BO TA NI CA L, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS .................................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGA NIZA TIONS ............................................
PR IV AT E HOUSEHOLDS ........................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SE RVICES .............................................................................

1,216
2,104
2,255
2,708
3,913
1,249
1,097
2,634
3,844
3,556
2,599
1,310
$8 19
5,296

1,173
2,484
2,713
3 ,5 8 6
4,737
2 ,6 9 9
1,142
3 ,1 3 5
4,192
4,367
3 ,349
2 ,1 2 6
1,088
5,822

1,146
1.825
2,088
2,703
3,437
690
1,016
2,343
3,232
2,936
1,374
81 1
741
4,447

1,220
2 ,0 8 2
1 ,7 2 6
2,260
3,749
685
89 6
2,493
3,701
3,604
1,499
1,469
76 3
5 ,3 8 4

1,312
2 ,383
2 ,4 2 3
2 ,3 6 2
4,607
1,979
1 ,4 6 4
2 ,8 9 2
4,430
3 ,7 8 0
2,374
1,469
89 2
5 ,4 5 5

2 ,7 0 5
3 ,2 1 0
4,957
4,930
5,671
4,767
3,680
3,638
4,895
5 ,5 3 5
4,899
3,758
1,190
7 ,6 1 1

3 ,1 0 9
3,446
5 ,2 9 7
5,240
5 ,9 1 6
5,964
4,199
4,180
5 ,1 2 8
6,184
5,624
4,415
1,589
7,964

2,311
2 ,7 0 0
4 ,5 7 5
4,267
5,049
2 ,1 1 5
3,206
3 ,1 3 2
4,416
4,797
4,499
2,867
1,046
6 ,7 8 8

2 ,5 2 6
3 ,2 6 0
4 ,2 0 7
5 ,031
5 ,4 1 6
2,699
3 ,0 4 9
3,420
4,7 0 8
5 ,6 7 5
4 ,0 8 3
3 ,7 1 8
1,176
7 ,571

3 ,3 0 4
3 ,7 6 4
5,647
5,613
6,416
6 ,578
4,454
4,110
5,515
5,756
4 ,4 1 6
4,174
1,499
8,105

SE RV ICES

INSURANCE*

1 F o r p u r po se s of t h is study , and be c a u s e i n f o r m a t i o n about t h e i r act ua l pla ce of e m p l o y m e n t w as not a v a i l a b l e in the f i l e s stu di ed,
l a t e d o r g a n i z a t i o n s c o v e r e d by the R a i l r o a d R e t i r e m e n t A c t w e r e c o n s id e re d to h av e be en e m p l o y e d i n the N o r t h C e n t r a l Re g io n .
NOTE:

A

dash ( -) indicates




eith er

the

sam p le

did

not include

any w ork ers

with

these

c h a r a c te r is tic s ,

or

that

the

data

did

e m p l o y e e s of r a i l r o a d s

not m eet

the

B u rea u 's

and r a i l r o a d

re­

publication cr ite r ia .

T a b l e A-7. A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in four quarters
b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e g i o n of m a j o r e arnings, 1 9 6 6
EARNINGS

OF

WORKERS WHO WORKED

UNIT ED
STATES

A N Y
NORTH­
EAST

Q U A R T E R
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL

*4,4 0 8

*4,784

*3 ,6 4 0

M I N I N G ......................... ................................................... .

6,147

6,379

METAL M IN IN G ........................................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G ...........................................
BIT UMI NOU S COAL AND L I G N I T E M ININ G
O I L AND GAS EXTRACTION ............................
NONMETALLIC MIN ER A LS , EXCEPT FUELS

6,398
5,246
6,231
6 ,2 4 8
5,719

7,135
5 ,2 8 8
6,599
7,565
5 ,9 6 3

5,758
6,177
5 ,3 2 9

INDUSTRY

PR IV ATE

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

IN

ANY WAGE AND SALARY

EMPLOYMENT

DURING

WEST

UNITED
STATES

F O U R
NORTH­
EAST

*4 ,7 3 8

*4 ,5 4 5

*6 ,001

*6,301

5 ,9 5 6

5,950

6,646

7,330

7 ,3 0 8

7 ,098

7,223

5,337

6 ,3 0 5
1,091
7,415
4,874
5,482

6 ,4 4 2

8 ,213
6,400
7,271
8 ,4 5 9
7,044

6,106

7 ,0 5 4

6,647
6 ,8 4 4
6,645

7,451
6,400
7,182
7,598
6,843

-

-

Q U A R T E R S
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL
*5 ,0 6 6

*6,328

*6,4 9 9

7,972

WEST

7 ,739

-

-

_

6,689
7 ,5 1 9
6 ,0 7 2

8 ,5 6 2
6,297
6,970

8 ,6 9 9
8,119
7,992

..........................

5 ,1 5 2

5 ,9 3 4

4,009

5,812

6,025

7,005

7 ,6 7 1

5,676

7 ,7 1 7

8,049

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTORS .
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS
SP EC IA L TRADE CONTRACTORS

4,756
5,179
5,396

5 ,6 9 5
6,389
5 ,8 9 9

3 ,6 7 7
4,137
4 ,1 6 6

5,455
5,400
6,203

5,569
6,465
6,058

6,677
7,031
7,184

7,486
8,356
7,553

5 ,4 0 6
5 ,7 2 2
5 ,8 2 5

7 ,3 3 2
7,518
7,984

7,719
8,429
8,029

.................................................. ..................

5,368

5 ,4 7 3

4,412

5,880

5,744

6,645

6,691

5,518

7 ,155

7 ,455

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ..............................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ..........................................
T E X T I L E M IL L P R O D U C T S .................... ....................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS . . .
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .................................
FURNITURE AND FI XTU RE S .......................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ..............................
P R IN T I N G AND P U B L IS H IN G ....................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ....................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS .........................
RUBBER AND P L A S T IC PRODUCTS, NEC ............
LEATHER AND LEATHER PROCUCTS ......................
STONE, CL AY, AND GLASS PROCUCTS ..............
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R IE S .................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ...............................
M ACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ......................
EL ECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES . . . .
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ............
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

7,159
4,339
3 ,4 4 2
3,849
2 ,9 4 7
3,622
4,049
5,629
5 ,5 4 2
6,960
7,755
4,928
3,259
5,490
6,792
5,601
6,496
5 ,4 7 1
7,127
6 , 195
3,800

5,946
4,976
3,844
4,143
3,348
3,345
4,237
5,517
5,891
7 ,3 1 4
8,411
4,567
3,319
6,152
7,034
5,744
6,532
5 ,8 7 7
7,108
6,9 1 3
3,752

7 ,2 6 2
3,654
3,471
3 ,7 4 8
2,444
2,723
3 ,4 3 9
5 ,6 9 9
4,804
6,836
7,325
4 ,8 7 4
2 ,8 1 6
4 ,6 8 3
6,352
4,701
5,170
4,902
5,972
4,108
3,298

5,933
4,887
5,036
3 ,8 8 3
3,224
3,531
4 ,5 7 2
5 ,6 4 4
5,637
6,850
7 ,7 2 6
5 ,2 3 9
3,636
5*631
6,799
5,805
6 ,7 9 5
5 ,1 8 8
7 ,2 1 6
5 ,7 5 9
4,199

7 ,8 3 0
3,843
3 ,911
3,659
2,918
4,921
4,843
5,785
5,473
6 ,5 3 4
7,612
4 ,9 2 1
3,334
5,619
6,616
5,760
6,448
5,884
7,742
6,249
3,848

8,359
6,0 7 6
4,864
4,687
3 ,9 2 2
4,893
5 ,2 8 9
6,726
7,036
7,991
8,619
6,324
4,269
6,535
7,701
6,835
7 ,577
6 ,7 0 8
8,143
7 ,4 3 3
5 ,271

6,775
6,440
5,037
5,184
4,319
4,844
5 ,5 6 7
6,574
7,3 8 3
8,406
9 ,4 2 5
5 ,8 6 6
4,376
7,138
7,881
6 ,9 0 8
7,490
7 ,0 5 5
7 ,9 5 3
8 ,083
5 ,2 6 0

8 ,4 0 2
5,056
5,051
4,483
3,292
3,678
4 ,3 8 2
6 ,6 7 7
6,227
7 ,6 7 8
8,104
6,061
3 ,580
5 ,553
7,127
5 ,7 9 9
6 ,1 7 7
5 ,9 7 7
7 ,0 4 5
5 ,2 2 2
4 ,161

7,275
6 ,620
5 ,7 9 6
5 ,0 5 4
4,284
4,963
6 ,1 5 8
6,779
7,072
7 ,915
8,589
6,671
4 ,6 5 8
6 ,7 5 3
7,768
7,060
7 ,8 7 9
6 ,4 4 5
8,213
6 ,8 8 6
5 ,7 8 4

9,059
6 ,361
6 ,477
4 ,681
4 ,2 2 9
6,459
6 ,4 1 0
7,168
7,162
8,057
8,458
6,838
4 ,732
6,957
7 ,733
7,265
7,927
7 ,393
8 ,885
7,792
5,740

TRANSPORTATION 1 ............................ ..................................

5 ,9 4 8

6,017

4 ,8 9 4

6 ,3 3 3

5,944

7 ,1 3 2

7 ,1 9 4

6,227

7,269

7,661

RAILROAD T R AN SPO RTA TI ON 1 .................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION .............................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AI R ..........................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTA ION ....................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ....................................

6 ,6 1 1
4 ,6 3 4
5,497
6 ,2 1 1
7 ,2 7 3
7,934
5 ,2 3 3

5 ,1 2 3
5,743
7,112
7,649
7,997
5,704

4,015
4,5 3 6
4,961
6 ,8 9 4
7,897
4,153

6,614
4 ,6 3 3
6 ,0 8 0
4,811
7 ,003
7,853
5,778

4,183
5 ,9 1 8
6,3 0 8
7 ,2 6 3
8 ,9 6 3
4 ,6 6 4

7 ,235
5,731
6,946
7,871
8 ,3 5 7
8,524
6,580

6,013
7 ,0 8 5
8,334
8 ,5 2 3
8 ,9 0 7
7,071

5 ,1 3 8
5 ,8 9 0
6,481
7,930
8 ,3 7 7
5 ,3 5 5

7,237
5,748
7,507
7 ,4 4 8
8 ,1 5 9
8,501
6,890

5,675
7,656
8,418
8,586
9,552
6 ,3 7 4

5,739

6,277

5 ,111

5 ,6 4 4

5 ,9 5 3

6,853

7,295

6,174

6,800

7,151

MANUFACTURING

COMMUNICATION

See footnote at end of table.




T a b l e A-7.

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e g i o n of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d
EARNINGS

OF

WORKERS WHO WORKED

IN

ANY WAGE AND SALARY

EMPLOYMENT

DURING

WEST

UNIT ED
STATES

F O U R
NORTH­
EAST

$7,100

$ 6 ,8 4 2

$7,557

$8,150

$6,838

$7,804

$7,816

4 ,9 0 1

5,824

5,538

7,319

8,015

6,421

7 ,3 5 5

7,475

2,936

2,361

2,686

2,907

4 ,3 2 0

4 ,511

3,841

4,342

4 ,8 3 2

3 ,810
2 ,470
2 ,9 *9
3,917
2,484
4 ,0 0 8
1,613
2,901

4 ,2 7 4
2 ,5 9 6
3,045
4 ,4 1 1
2,825
4,228
2 ,0 0 5
3 ,4 0 3

3,464
2 ,2 0 8
2,491
3,370
2,125
3,705
1,298
2,510

3 ,7 1 8
2,570
2,875
4,189
2,521
4,347
1,451
2,814

4,275
2 ,5 4 1
3,699
4 ,0 9 3
2 ,4 4 2
3,840
1,844
3,054

5,208
4,067
4,472
5 ,6 3 2
3,950
5,517
2,959
4,492

5 ,6 9 8
4 ,2 3 8
4,591
6 ,0 0 2
4,245
5 ,7 0 5
3,278
4,989

4,6 7 3
3,696
3,828
4 ,8 9 0
3 ,4 7 3
5,074
2 ,4 5 5
3 ,9 1 5

5 ,251
4,1 1 2
4 ,3 0 4
5,934
3,997
5,868
2,805
4,409

5,740
4,328
5,616
6 ,1 7 0
4 ,1 4 7
5,676
3 ,4 3 6
4 ,9 4 6

4,943

5,394

4,462

5,004

4 ,8 5 7

6,234

6 ,5 9 5

5 ,7 1 7

6,296

6,307

4 ,7 1 3
4,826
9 ,1 2 9
5,529
5,097
3,512
4,664
6,086

5,200
5,149
8 ,4 0 0
5 ,6 3 5
5,767
3,856
5,593
8,736

4,359
4,529
9,661
5 ,3 6 7
4 ,4 9 6
2,960
4,238
3,988

4 ,5 0 6
4 ,9 9 2
10,635
5 ,6 2 3
4,958
3 ,8 1 3
4,125
4,809

4 ,6 3 9
4,860
9 ,5 5 7
5,411
5,118
3,619
5,005
5,816

5 ,6 9 9
5 ,9 7 0
11,0 1 6
6,633
6,393
4,979
6,486
8,456

6 ,2 4 1
6,464
10,192
6,612
7 ,0 4 5
5 ,033
6,849
10,716

5 ,2 3 5
5 ,5 4 5
11,656
6,547
5,596
4,365
6 ,1 9 7
5 ,742

5,535
6 ,1 0 6
12,631
6,758
6,242
5 ,3 5 5
6 ,1 3 8
6,837

5,600
6,094
11,490
6,600
6,769
5,565
6 ,8 4 5
8,848

...................................................................................

3,167

3 ,7 3 7

2,589

3 ,0 5 0

3,417

4 ,6 9 9

5 ,3 6 3

3 ,8 5 5

4,522

5,290

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ...............
PERSONAL S E R V I C E S .............. ................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ...............
AUTO R E P A IR , S E R V IC E S , AND GARAGES . . .
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SE RV ICE S ....................
MOTION PICTURES ...........................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S , NEC
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES . . . .
LEGAL SERVICES ..............................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES .............................................
MUSEUMS, BO TA NI CA L, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZA TION S . . .
PR IV AT E HOUSEHOLDS ..................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SE RVICES .......................................

1,827
2,572
3,911
3 ,314
4,077
3,775
2,377
2 ,887
4 , 101
3 ,9 8 9
3 ,662
2 ,607
1,064
6,054

1 ,903
2,908
4 ,4 0 0
3,691
4,399
4,699
2 ,7 5 5
3 ,4 7 6
4,518
4,753
4 ,4 4 4
3 ,0 5 3
1,455
6,278

1,544
2,183
3,478
3 ,0 1 6
3,658
1,730
2,084
2,418
3,683
3 ,4 4 3
4 ,1 6 4
1,927
$845
5,264

1,772
2,624
3,411
3 ,329
3 ,9 6 8
2,297
1,901
2,685
3 ,8 6 4
3 ,816
2,421
2 ,8 5 7
1,017
6,212

2 ,1 3 2
2,780
4 ,0 6 4
3 ,2 9 7
4 ,3 5 4
5,359
2,798
3 ,001
4 ,2 9 7
4,125
3,566
2,697
1 ,210
6 ,4 5 9

3,157
3 ,7 1 3
6,3 2 4
4,995
5,544
6,528
4,740
3,991
5,291
5,439
5,658
4 ,4 0 1
1 ,4 3 9
8 ,083

3 ,4 8 5
3,963
6,779
5 ,2 4 8
5 ,5 2 8
7,420
5,782
4,627
5,656
6,264
5,830
4,919
1,905
8 ,2 5 3

2 ,6 4 5
3,183
5,629
4,286
5,044
3 ,1 5 5
3 ,9 6 7
3,368
4 ,6 9 7
4,729
6,0 1 7
3,540
1,128
7 ,3 2 7

2 ,9 2 1
3 ,8 1 5
5,787
5 ,3 0 9
5 ,5 4 8
4,700
3,847
3 ,7 3 3
5,151
5,244
4,758
4,487
1,408
7,996

3,750
4,239
6,776
5 ,418
6 ,236
8 ,5 3 4
5,361
4,311
5,738
5,690
5,761
4,751
1,769
8,715

UNITED
STATES

A N Y
NORTH­
EAST

Q U A R T E R
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL

$6,753

$ 7,468

$6,0 1 7

WHOLESALE TRADE

5,717

6 ,541

RETAIL

T R A D E ............................................................................

2 ,686

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT . .
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE ...............................
FOOD STORES ........................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SE RVICE STATIONS
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES .........................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U RN IS H IN GS STORES .
EATING AND D R IN K IN G PLACES ...............................
MISCELLANEOUS RE TA IL STORES ............................

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

INSURANCE,

AND REAL

ESTATE

...............

BANKING ......................................................................................
C R ED IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ..................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERV ICES
INSURANCE CARRIERS .........................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERV ICE . .
REAL ESTATE ...........................................................................
COMBINED REAL ES TAT E, IN SURANCE, ETC . . .
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .

SE R V IC ES

1

F o r pu rposes of this study, and b ecau se inform ation about their actual place of em ploym ent was not available in the file s studied,
lated organizations co v e re d by the R ailro ad R etirem ent Act w ere con sidered to have been em ployed in the North C entral R egion.
NOTE:

A

d' ,h ( -)




indicates

either

WEST

CONTINUED

PU BLI C U T I L I T I E S

FI N A N C E *

Q U A R T E R S
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL

the

sam ple

did

not

include

any w orkers

with

these

c h a r a c te r is tic s ,

or

that

the

data

did

em ploy ees of railroad s and railroad r e ­

not m eet

the

B u reau 's

publication crite ria .

Table A-8.

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a / t e r

a n d in fou r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y a n d reg i o n of m a j o r e a r n ings, 1 9 6 7

UN ITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN
Q U A R T E R
A N Y
NORTH­
NORTH
SOUTH
EAST
WEST
CENTRAL

$4,614

$5,020

INDUSTRY

PRIVAT E NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .........................................

$ 3 ,8 5 5

$4,925

$ 4,732

ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH­
SOUTH
EAST
CENTRAL
STATES
$6,257

$6,615

$5,340

$6,535

WEST
$6,723

.............................................................................................................................

6,390

6,760

6,225

6,375

6,484

7,662

7 ,7 3 7

7,468

7,655

7,953

METAL M IN IN G ........................................................................................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G .......................................... ............... ...............................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND L I G N I T E M IN IN G ...........................................
O I L AND GAS EXTRACTION ...........................................................................
NONMETALLIC M IN ER A LS , EXCEPT FUELS ...........................................

6,214
5,505
6 ,6 9 0
6,553
5,886

7,780
5,505
6,894
7,280
6 ,4 9 5

5,770
6 ,2 2 7
6,476
5,213

6,205
8,085
5 ,4 0 6
6 , 05 5

5,935
6 ,5 5 3
6,902
6 ,6 1 4

7,265
6,930
7 ,7 2 5
7,977
7,172

8,622
6,930
7 ,7 0 9
8,218
7 ,484

6,446
7,266
7 ,8 5 6
6 ,3 0 0

f , 030
9 ,175
6,861
7,610

7,176
8,373
8,527
8,070

CONTRACT C O N S T R U C T I O N ...................................................................................

5,476

6,328

4,307

6 , 156

6 ,3 2 8

7 ,4 4 5

8,231

6,095

8,167

8,423

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTORS ......................... .................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ......................................................
SP EC IA L TRADE CONTRACTORS ....................................................................

5,103
5,437
5,731

6 ,0 7 7
6 ,4 6 8
6 ,3 9 6

4 ,0 1 1
4,452
4,415

5,856
5 , 76 3
6,482

5,880
6 ,7 0 7
6 ,4 0 5

7 , 158
7 ,4 1 2
7,623

7 ,9 9 5
8,812
8 ,1 5 9

5 ,8 7 2
6 ,1 3 7
6,209

7,896
8,039
8,339

8,095
8,752
8,455

..........................................................................................................

5,575

5 ,7 3 2

4 ,6 3 4

6 ,0 5 3

5 ,9 3 0

6,854

6,979

5 ,7 5 8

7,295

7,627

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .......................................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ....................................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ...............................................................................
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS ...............................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS ...........................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS ......................................................................
FURNITURE AND F I XT U RE S ....................................................... ....................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRGOUCTS ...................................................................
P R IN T I N G AND P U B L IS H IN G .........................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS .........................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ..............................................................
RUBBER AND P L A S T IC PRODUCTS, NEC .................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ............................................................
STONE, CL AY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS ....................................................
PRIMARY METAL IN D U S T R IE S .......................................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ....................................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ...................................... ....................
ELECT RICA L EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ..............................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .......................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ......................................... ..
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING IN DU STR IES .................................

7,137
4 ,4 8 0
3,563
3,986
3,157
3,843
4 ,2 5 6
5,899
5,796
7,226
7,996
4,940
3,383
5,671
6,837
5 ,8 0 0
6,748
5,815
7,214
6,566
4,056

6,279
5 ,062
3,703
4 ,3 7 5
3,551
3,709
4 ,5 6 8
5 ,6 6 3
6 ,1 7 2
7 ,650
8 ,762
4,6 6 9
3 ,498
6 ,1 9 7
7 ,088
6,034
6 ,7 7 6
6,246
7 ,2 2 6
7 ,403
4,045

6,578
3,786
3 ,6 4 7
3,844
2,692
2,902
3,565
5,935
5 ,0 8 7
7,151
7,677
4,666
2,855
4,871
6,473
4,899
5,545
5,410
6,368
4,523
3,508

5,929
5 ,0 5 4
3 ,9 6 4
4,287
3 , 50 5
3,745
4 ,7 4 1
6 , 050
5 , 83 8
7,021
7, 980
5 ,2 5 5
3 ,7 3 7
5,943
6 , 841
5,948
7 ,0 2 7
5,426
7 ,296
5 ,9 5 3
4,440

7 ,937
4,027
3,755
3,481
2 ,9 9 7
5,108
5,194
6,124
5 ,738
6,700
7 ,642
4 ,9 3 4
3,547
5,802
6 ,5 2 1
5,941
6 ,7 4 3
6 ,2 5 9
7,681
6,385
4,065

8 ,2 4 6
6 ,3 0 8
5,038
4,840
4 , 156
5,185
5,412
7,031
7*295
8 ,290
9,012
6,290
4,453
6,772
7,715
7,041
7,772
7,009
8 ,2 0 0
7,744
5 ,6 1 8

7,271
6 ,6 4 8
4 ,8 7 8
5 ,474
4,574
5,180
5 ,8 1 6
6 ,8 7 6
7 ,6 9 4
8 ,804
9 ,9 7 2
5 ,9 4 0
4,649
7 ,3 1 0
7,862
7 ,228
7 ,7 1 3
7,390
8,125
8 ,4 8 0
5 ,6 9 6

7 ,6 1 7
5,295
5 ,2 9 7
4,582
3 ,5 4 0
3 ,958
4 ,442
6,970
6,456
7,988
8,594
5,772
3 ,7 1 6
5,785
7 ,227
5,989
6,561
6,492
7,427
5,678
4,536

7,201
6,871
5,594
5,646
4,606
5 ,1 3 4
6,069
7,153
7,298
8 ,1 1 4
8 ,876
6 ,686
4,735
7,091
7,792
7,186
7,998
6 ,6 2 4
8,203
7,091
5,943

8,981
6,586
5,632
4 ,5 4 8
4,429
6,655
6,907
7,335
7,460
8 ,370
8,618
6,582
4 ,9 8 9
7,149
7 ,6 5 0
7,499
8 ,286
7,681
8 ,852
7,736
6,137

TRANSPORTATION 1 .....................................................................................................

6,267

6,366

5 ,1 1 2

6 ,6 5 2

6 ,4 8 8

7 ,5 0 7

7.610

6 ,5 1 0

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION 1 ......................................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .................................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .....................................................................
WATER T R A N S P O R T A T I O N .................................. ...............................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A I R ...............................................................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTAION .........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERV ICES ........................................................................

6,968
4,864
5,744
6,514
7,879
7,806
5,506

-

-

7,645
6,006
7 ,2 0 3
8 ,2 7 0
9,048
8 ,593
7,008

_

4,127
4 ,6 8 4
4,916
7 ,611
7,965
3,983

4,5 2 2
6,3 5 4
6,953
8 ,0 3 4
9,559
5,398

-

5,336
5 ,945
7,692
8,255
7 ,1 2 8
6,037

6,9 7 3
4,915
6 , 355
5 ,3 0 3
7 , 371
7,234
5 ,7 8 2

6,348
7 ,3 0 0
9 ,1 4 1
9,147
10,514
7,440

C O M M U N I C A T I O N ..........................................................................................................

5,980

6 ,5 2 2

5,269

5,964

6 ,228

7 ,0 2 2

7 ,6 4 5

M IN IN G

MANUFACTURING

See footnote at end of table.




7,602

8,313

5,264
6 ,0 7 0
6 ,4 3 7
8,742
8,844
5 ,517

7,647
6,050
7,701
7,163
8 ,5 8 0
7,653
7,197

5,969
8,225
9,325
9,492
9,559
7 ,066

6,231

6,978

7,289

-

Table A-8.

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in fou r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e g i o n of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d

UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED I N
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
NORTH­
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
WEST
CENTRAL

$7,051

$7*741

$ 6 ,3 9 6

$ 7,443

$6,964

$ 7,918

$ 8 ,5 5 6

$7,186

$ 8,217

$8,096

WHOLESALE TRADE

5,989

6 ,7 3 6

5,265

6 ,071

5 ,8 0 6

7,649

8,332

6,829

7,629

7 ,820

R E T A I L TRADE ......................... .................................................

2,808

3 ,043

2,498

2,821

3,001

4 ,4 8 1

4,689

4,021

4,497

4 ,9 5 0

BU IL O IN G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT •
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE ...............................
FOOD S T O R E S ............................... ................................. . .
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SER VICE STATIONS
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES ..........................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U R N ISH IN G S STORES .
EATING AND D R IN K I N G P L A C E S .................
MISCELLANEOUS R E T A IL STORES ............................

3,982
2,614
3,096
4,062
2,634
4,160
1,670
3,059

4,676
2,771
3,112
4,605
2 ,9 1 6
4,285
2,058
3,533

3,562
2,319
2,682
3 ,5 6 0
2,252
3,873
1 ,3 7 0
2,688

3 ,8 9 7
2,721
3,057
4,3 1 7
2,710
4,6 0 0
1,505
3,007

4,357
2,674
3,859
4,146
2,680
3,976
1,886
3 ,1 6 9

5,424
4,214
4,645
5 ,8 4 8
4,132
5 ,7 0 3
3 ,0 4 3
4,732

6 ,0 2 4
4,491
4,7 3 2
6 ,2 8 6
4 ,3 8 0
5,745
3,393
5,148

4,801
3,806
4,008
5,168
3 ,6 2 7
5 ,3 2 6
2,551
4,226

5 ,4 5 0
4,236
4 ,5 2 9
6 ,098
4 ,2 3 8
6 ,1 3 5
2,835
4,673

6,034
4,399
5,765
6 ,306
4 ,3 5 0
5 ,7 9 0
3,543
5,122

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ...............

5,122

5 ,6 1 2

4,692

5 , 122

4,979

6 ,4 8 8

6,949

5 ,9 6 0

6 ,4 3 6

6 ,5 7 4

BANKING ......................................................................................
CR ED IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ..................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERV ICES
INSURANCE CARRIERS ........................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SE RVICE . .
REAL ESTATE ...........................................................................
COMBINED REAL ES TA T E, IN SURANCE, ETC . . .
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .

4,906
4,908
8,849
5,718
5,434
3,609
4,832
6,364

5,352
5 ,2 4 9
8,398
5 ,8 3 0
6,248
4,029
5,136
9,842

4,598
4,655
9,434
5,671
4,662
3 ,1 5 2
4,713
4,036

4,786
4,9 5 6
9,214
5,750
5 ,4 1 6
3 ,7 6 3
4 , 53 9
5,040

4,747
5,007
9,778
5 ,5 4 5
5,330
3,601
4,963
5 ,7 2 2

5,938
6,093
10,871
6,919
6,844
5 ,1 8 6
5 ,9 9 8
9,207

6,4 6 7
6,533
10,397
6 ,9 5 8
7,796
5,355
6,299
1 2 ,6 5 0

5 ,4 7 7
5 ,7 1 2
11,399
6,841
5 ,8 2 7
4,620
6,024
6,171

5,791
6,026
1 0,972
7,0 0 4
6,694
5,458
5 ,5 3 9
7 ,102

5,876
6,511
12,274
6,813
7,088
5,637
6 , 149
9 ,0 1 4

3,437

4 ,0 2 1

2,822

3 , 35 8

3 ,6 8 5

5 ,0 7 4

5 ,7 5 3

4,197

4,948

5,621

1,949
2,755
4,050
3,570
4,444
4,020
2,451
3,213
4,284
4,399
3,521
2,676
1,116
6,431

2 ,0 3 8
3,070
4,560
4,102
4,776
5,661
2,770
3,794
4,748
5 ,0 8 6
4,225
3,308
1 ,475
6 ,6 5 0

1.722
2,384
3 ,631
3,283
3,975
1,770
2,156
2,718
3 ,5 6 5
3,773
2 ,8 1 2
1,967
$911
5,611

1,857
2 , 77 0
3 ,499
3,481
4 ,4 1 2
2 , 128
1 ,9 8 0
2 ,9 9 4
4,129
4,427
3,001
2 ,8 0 4
1,071
6,603

2 ,1 9 5
3,028
4,254
3,480
4,836
5,357
2 ,9 6 6
3 ,4 0 7
4,757
4,483
3,613
2,921
1,264
6,740

3 ,3 3 8
3,977
6,504
5 ,3 4 9
5,967
7 ,0 5 7
4,760
4,372
5,534
5 ,9 7 9
5 ,411
4,552
1,512
8,629

3 ,652
4,2 6 8
7,040
5,638
6,060
8 ,5 0 3
5,548
5 ,082
6,036
6,650
6 ,5 5 8
5 ,1 6 9
1,972
8 ,782

2 ,8 7 7
3 ,4 6 3
5 ,8 4 5
4 ,7 6 5
5,588
3,394
4 ,202
3 ,6 9 5
4,817
5,169
4,725
3 ,6 9 5
1,208
7 ,8 2 4

3 ,0 9 8
4,031
5 ,7 8 8
5 ,4 3 3
5 ,8 0 0
4,296
3 ,9 4 9
4,058
5 ,2 4 6
6,101
4,614
4,541
1,482
8 ,509

3 ,900
4 ,4 7 0
7,050
5,765
6,660
9 ,2 4 0
5 ,2 9 0
4 ,7 5 8
6 ,058
6,173
4,823
5,006
1,870
9,295

INDUSTRY

PR IV ATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY PUBLIC

S E R V I C E S .................................... .............................................
HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ...............
PERSONAL S E R V I C E S ................. .. ..................... ..
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ...............
AUTO R E P A IR , S E R V IC E S , AND GARAGES . . .
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SE RV ICES ....................
MOTION PICTURES ....................... .. ................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S , NEC
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES . . . .
LEGAL SERVICES .............................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES .............................................
MUSEUMS, BO TA NIC A L, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGA NIZA TIONS . . .
PR IV AT E HOUSEHOLDS ..................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .......................................

1

F o r p u rp oses of th is study, and b ecau se inform ation about their actual place of em ploym ent w as not available in the f ile s
orga n ization s cov ered by the R ailro ad R etire m en t A ct w ere con sidered to have been em ployed in the North C entral R egion.
NOTE:

A dash (-)




in d ica tes

either

WEST

CONTINUED

U T IL IT IE S

FINANCE,

ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
NORTH
NORTH­
UNIT ED
SOUTH
EAST
CENTRAL
STATES

the

sam ple

did not

include

any w o rk e rs

with th ese

c h a r a c te r is tic s ,

or that

the

studied,

data

e m p l o y e e s of r a i l r o a d s and r a i l r o a d r e l a t e d

did not m eet

the

Bureau* s

publication criteria,

Table A-9.

Distribution of w o r k e r s b y a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t

b y i n d u s t r y of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 6

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
W
ERE LESS THAN
$1800

PR IV ATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY .........................................................................

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

3 3 .1

39.1

45.1

51.0

5 6.6

61.7

6 6 .7

71.2

75 .6

8 0 .5

83.9

8 6 .8

$9000 $10000 $11000

8 9 .4

9 2.5

9 4.6

M I N I N G .............................................................................................................................................................

1 6 .0

1 9 .7

23.0

2 7 .0

31 .7

3 7.0

4 2 .4

48 .7

5 5.5

6 6 .1

73.4

7 8 .8

83.4

8 8 .7

9 2 .2

METAL M I N I N G ............................................................................................. .. ........................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G ..........................................................................................................................
BITUMINO US COAL AND L I G N I T E M IN IN G ............................................................................
O I L AND GAS EXTRACTION .................................................................... .......................................
NONMETALLIC M IN ER A LS , EXCEPT FUELS ............................................................................

1 1 .6
19.0
1 3.1
18.3
16.8

14.1
2 2 .0
1 6 .2
22.3
2 1 .1

16.3
2 6.0
2 0.0
2 5.6
24.7

20.2
2 8 .0
2 2 .9
2 9.2
3 0 .9

23.2
36.0
2 7.2
33.4
3 8 .1

28.7
51 .0
30.6
38 .6
4 4 .7

33.6
6 7 .0
35.3
43.9
50.6

41.0
75.0
4 0.0
49 .8
58.0

50 .5
84.0
4 7.1
56.1
64 .2

62.6
8 9 .0
63.8
6 4.9
71.8

71.3
93 .0
7 3.2
71.3
78.1

7 9 .8
95.0
79.3
7 6 .0
82.8

8 4 .6
9 6 .0
84.3
80.5
86.9

89.1
96.0
9 0.0
86.1
9 2.1

9 4.4
97.0
94.3
8 9.4
9 4.4

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

.....................................................................................................................

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTORS

.............................................. ............................................
heavy c o n str u c tio n contractors • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
SPEC IAL TRADE CONTRACTORS ........................................................................... .. ............. ..

MANUFACTURING

.................................................................................................................................. ..

27.0

3 2.2

3 7.3

4 2.3

47 .6

5 2.8

57.9

62 .6

6 7 .4

7 1 .9

75.6

7 9.3

8 2 .9

88.2

9 2.2

3 0 .1
25.5
25.7

3 5.7
30.6
30.8

4 1.1
36.1
35.6

4 5 .9
41.8
40.4

5 1.4
4 7 .4
4 5 .4

56.6
53.0
50.2

6 1.6
58.7
5 5.1

6 6.3
6 3.9
59.5

7 1.4
68 .7
64.1

75.9
7 3.4
68.5

7 9 .5
76.7
72.4

83.2
79.9
76.4

8 6 .5
83.1
80.3

9 0 .7
88.2
8 6.6

9 3.7
91.8
9 1.4

20 .6

2 5.9

3 1.9

38.1

44.1

5 0 .0

55.8

6 1.5

67 .3

73 .5

7 8.4

82.6

86.1

9 0 .4

93.2

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .......................................................................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ............................................................................................ ..
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ...............................................................................................................
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS ....................... .......................................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS ............................................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .................................................................... ..................................
FURNITURE AND F IX TU RE S ............................................................................................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
P R IN T I N G AND P U B LI S H IN G ..........................................................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ..........................................................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................
RUBBER AND P L A S T IC PRODUCTS, NEC .................................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ............................................................................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS pRODUCTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PRIMARY METAL IN D U S T R IE S ......................................................................... .............................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ................................................................... .. .............................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ............................................................................................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SU PPLIES ...............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTR IES .................................................................

1 0.4
32.8
36.5
22.3
3 5.0
3 3.3
2 7.7
16.3
24.7
1 1 .4
7.8
2 3.7
3 1 .3
1 6.4
9.9
18.1
13.2
1 8 .3
9 .7
15.9
3 4.8

13.9
3 8 .3
43.7
29.3
47.2
4 1.5
33.6
2 0 .6
2 9 .2
14.6
10.2
2 8 .6
4 0.6
2 0.6
12.8
2 2 .8
16.7
2 3.2
12.5
2 0 .8
41.7

1 7.7
43 .3
50.2
3 9.0
63 .9
50.7
41 .0
25.2
3 4 .2
17.7
1 2.7
34.0
54.1
25.0
15.5
2 7.6
1 9.9
28.8
15.4
2 5.4
50.4

21.1
4 8.4
56.9
50.9
76.1
5 8 .9
50.5
30.1
39.6
21.3
15.9
40.8
66.7
30.6
18.6
33.2
2 3.8
3 5.1
18.7
31.4
59.4

2 5.4
53.5
6 2 .9
64 .3
8 3.2
6 5.6
59.9
35.9
4 5 .3
26.2
18.8
4 7 .6
75.5
37.7
2 1.9
3 9 .1
2 8.5
42 .3
22.1
37.8
66.5

3 0.6
58.7
70.5
7 4.8
87.5
7 1.2
6 8 .2
42 .0
50.9
32 .4
2 2.2
5 3.9
8 2.0
45 .6
26.1
4 5 .7
3 3.7
4 9 .9
26.2
4 5 .2
72.5

36.5
6 4 .4
80.0
82.2
90 .5
7 7.0
74.5
48 .6
55.6
3 8.7
26.5
5 9.9
8 6.4
52 .9
31.6
52.3
3 9.8
57.2
3 1 .1
51.6
7 7.0

43 .3
6 9.8
86.0
87.0
9 2.2
82.0
80.1
5 6 .2
59.9
4 5.5
30.7
6 5.4
89.9
60.1
38.7
5 9.2
46.4
63.3
37.5
57.4
8 0.6

4 9.5
7 4.9
8 9.6
90.5
93 .7
86 .0
84.8
6 3 .6
6 4.1
5 3 .3
3 6.8
7 0.8
9 2 .4
67 .6
47.5
6 6 .2
54 .0
69.1
45 .7
62.8
8 4.2

5 5 .7
8 0 .5
9 3.4
93.2
95.0
89.3
88.4
72.4
6 9.2
60.8
45.2
76.5
94.4
7 4.9
5 7 .0
7 3 .2
62.4
74.5
5 5 .7
68.6
8 7 .4

6 1.4
84.8
94.2
9 4 .8
95.8
91.6
9 1.1
78.9
73.8
68.0
5 4.4
81.1
95.9
80.5
66.0
7 8.4
69 .0
78.5
63 .5
73.2
8 9.6

6 6.7
88.3
95.8
95.8
9 6.5
93.7
9 3.0
8 4 .2
7 8.3
74.2
65.2
8 5.0
9 6.8
84.9
73.4
82.8
7 5.0
8 2.1
69.8
77.2
91.3

7 2 .4
9 1.5
9 6.6
96.6
97.0
9 5.2
9 4 .8
8 8 .3
8 2.2
79.4
73.1
8 8.4
97.3
8 8.9
79.3
8 6.2
80.1
8 5.5
75.5
8 0 .7
9 2 .9

79.3
9 5 .0
9 7 .3
97.3
97.6
96.8
9 6 .2
9 2 .6
87.5
85.4
8 1.4
92.9
9 7 .9
93.0
86.6
9 0 .2
8 6 .1
89.4
82.5
85.5
94.7

8 4.4
96.6
97 .7
97 .9
98.0
9 7.6
9 7.3
95.1
9 1.0
89.2
8 6.5
9 5.4
9 8.2
95.3
9 1.3
9 3.2
90.5
92.1
87.4
89.2
9 6.2

T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ................................................................................................ .......................................

17.2

20.7

24.2

27.9

3 2.0

36.5

41 .4

47 .9

5 5.6

6 6.7

7 2.6

77.4

84.8

9 0.6

94.2

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION .................................................................................... .. ..................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .........................................................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .......................................................................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A I R .................................... ..........................................................................
PI P E L IN E TRANSPORTAION ...................... .. ................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ..........................................................................................................

7.2
26.1
2 2.4
20.1
10.0
6.0
21.7

9.1
3 0.7
2 6 .6
23.9
13.2
7.1
26.3

1 0.9
35.3
31.0
2 7 .4
16.1
8 .7
3 2.1

12.6
40.6
3 5 .4
3 1 .3
19.6
9.8
37.7

1 4 .7
4 6 .6
4 0 .2
35.8
23.7
9.8
43 .7

1 7.6
52.3
4 4 .7
4 1.1
2 9.5
9 .8
50 .3

22.2
5 7.7
4 9 .4
4 6 .0
3 5.9
1 3 .7
56.9

3 1.1
63.9
5 4.0
51.9
43 .2
1 6 .9
6 4.7

4 3 .6
7 0 .4
59.4
57.3
51.7
2 5.1
70 .5

6 4 .5
7 7 .8
66.5
6 4.6
61.2
3 3 .3
77.3

6 9.3
84.2
7 2 .7
69 .7
69 .4
46 .4
81.5

7 2.8
88.4
78.4
73.8
75.0
61 .7
85.0

8 7.1
9 2.4
8 3.7
7 7.9
80.1
76.0
88.4

9 3 .5
9 7.0
8 9 .7
84.3
85.6
84.2
91.7

97.6
9 8.7
93.6
88.8
8 8 .1
9 2.3
94.2

15.8

20.9

2 5 .3

3 1 .4

3 8.8

48.1

5 6.8

62.8

67 .0

70.4

73.3

7 6 .4

80.8

8 6 .9

91.2

COMMUNICATION

...........................................................................................................................................




T a b l e A~9.

Distribution of w o r k e r s b y a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t

b y i n d u s t r y of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
WERE LESS THAN
$9000 $10000 $11000

$1800

PR IVAT E
P U BL IC

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

...................................................................................................................................

1 0.5

12.7

15.1

18.1

22.4

26.9

3 2 .4

38.5

46 .2

5 4.6

6 2.8

70.2

7 8.6

8 7.5

92.5

................................................................................................................ ....................

24.3

2 8.6

3 3 .2

38.5

4 4 .2

50.3

56.2

61.6

67 .0

7 3.0

7 7.1

80.7

83.8

87.6

90.2

..............................................................................................................................................

53.3

60.9

6 7.8

7 3 .3

78.0

81.7

8 5.0

87.7

90.1

92 .5

9 4 .0

95 .2

9 6.2

9 7 .3

9 8.0

8 3 .6
92 .5
86.7
8 1.8
92.5
8 1.0
9 7 .1
88 .6

88.7
94 .2
90. 1
85.7
94.2
8 5 .7
98 .0
91.1

9 1 .6
95.4
9 2 .4
88.3
95.3
8 8 .3
98 .5
92.5

9 3.7
9 6 .3
9 4 .4
9 0 .4
9 6.0
90 .6
9 8.9
93.8

94 .9
96.9
95.9
92.3
96.7
92 .3
99.1
9 4.7

9 6.5
9 7.7
9 7 .6
94.4
9 7 .4
94.6
9 9.4
9 6.0

97.3
98.2
98.6
95.8
97.9
96.0
99.5
97.0

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

U T IL IT IE S

WHOLESALE TRADE

RETAIL

TRADE

CONTINUED

3 5.5
5 4.3
49 .5
37.6
54.7
36.0
69.3
52.0

4 1 .0
62 .4
57.1
43.9
62.6
42.0
7 7.5
5 9.4

4 6 .9
7 1.3
63.0
4 9.6
7 1.4
4 8 .7
83.7
6 6.0

5 3.2
7 8 .0
6 7.9
55.1
7 8 .3
54.8
87.9
71.8

6 0 .3
8 2.8
72 .4
61 .3
83.0
6 0 .9
9 1 .0
7 6.4

6 7 .0
86.1
7 6 .0
6 7.3
86.1
6 6 .6
93.1
80.2

73.5
88.7
7 9.9
72.9
88 .9
71.9
9 4.9
83 .6

78.7
90.6
8 3.5
77.7
90 .7
76.4
9 6 .1
86.3

2 4.8

30.8

3 7.0

45.6

54.6

62.2

68.5

73.3

7 7.5

81.5

8 4.2

86.6

88.5

9 1 .2

93.0

19.8
22.4
1 4 .7
18.3
2 5 .1
42 .0
3 4.8
31.6

2 6 .2
28.1
18.7
23.1
3 1 .0
4 9 .4
4 0.1
38.1

32.8
34 .9
2 2.6
29.0
37.7
56.0
4 8 .0
41.7

43.5
4 4.4
28.3
37.5
45.4
62.7
5 4.9
47.3

55.1
54.1
3 4 .6
4 6.8
5 4.9
6 8 .7
60 .9
52.0

64. 7
62 .3
4 0 .6
5 4 .2
62.5
7 4.4
66 .8
5 7.0

7 2 .1
6 9.3
4 7.3
60.5
6 9.0
79.1
72.0
63.2

7 7 .1
7 5 .0
51.9
6 5 .4
73.3
83.3
76.3
6 9 .1

81 .2
7 9 .2
57.1
7 0.5
7 7 .4
86.2
7 9 .4
72.3

8 4 .9
83.6
6 2.8
7 5.1
8 1 .5
8 9 .1
83.6
75.9

87.3
86.4
6 5 .9
7 8.8
84.0
9 0 .9
86 .5
7 7 .7

89.3
88.5
68 .4
82.1
86.0
9 2.5
87.3
80.0

90.8
9 0.4
7 0 .6
8 5 .2
87.5
93.9
88.1
8 1.8

9 2 .8
9 3.1
74.3
8 9.2
89.5
95.4
8 9 .4
84.6

9 4.3
9 4.6
77.0
91.9
91.1
96 .4
91.3
86.7

.........................................................................................................................................................

46 .5

5 4 .0

6 0 .8

66 ,9

72,0

76,4

8 0,5

8 3 .8

8 6.8

90 .4

9 2,1

9 3 ,4

94 ,5

9 5 ,8

96 ,7

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • •
PERSONAL SERVICES ...........................................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ....................................................................................
AUTO RE P A IR * S E RV IC ES * AND GARAGES • • « • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • * • • • • • • • • •
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ..........................................................................................
MOTION PICTURES ................................................................................ . .............................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E RV IC E S * NEC .................................................................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
LEGAL SERVICES ...................................................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ...................................................................................................................
museums* b o t a n ic a l * z o o lo g ica l gardens • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
PRIV AT E HOUSEHOLDS ........................................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .............................................................................................................

6 3 .4
4 7.2
4 6.1
42 .3
33 .6
58.2
62 .7
40 .6
2 7.7
34.9
4 0 .1
5 6.6
83.2
2 5 .9

72.3
58.0
51.9
48.0
3 9 .5
62.4
69.2
50.5
33.9
4 1.2
4 5.0
62.4
90.8
3 0.3

79.9
68.0
57.4
54.4
45.0
6 5.4
7 4 .1
6 1.2
40 .4
46 .5
5 0.5
6 7.5
9 4.7
34.7

85.5
7 6.2
62.6
6 0.6
49.8
67.9
78.4
7 0.7
47 .8
51.5
5 5.0
7 2.3
96.9
3 8 .9

89.5
81 .6
6 7 .4
6 6.6
55.7
70.6
81.3
78.0
56.7
56.7
6 1 .4
7 7.5
9 8 .3
4 3 .6

92 .1
8 5.5
7 1.3
71.8
61 .6
7 3.0
84.6
8 3.6
66 .6
6 2 .0
69 .3
81.3
98 .9
4 8 .4

9 4.1
8 9 .1
75.0
77.3
6 6 .9
75.6
8 7 .2
8 7 .7
7 5 .2
6 7.7
75.2
84.7
9 9 .4
53.0

9 5 .4
9 1.3
78.0
81.8
7 2 .7
78.0
8 9 .3
9 0.7
8 0 .6
73.5
8 1.2
8 7 .3
99 .6
5 7 .4

9 6 .6
93 .5
8 0.9
8 6 .2
7 8 .4
80.5
91.6
92 .9
8 5.4
78.5
8 5 .1
8 9.5
9 9 .7
61.1

9 7 .4
95 .6
83.6
9 0.1
8 3 .2
82.9
93.4
9 4.4
8 8.8
8 7.4
88.6
91.5
99.8
6 5.7

98 .0
9 6.7
85.6
9 2 .7
8 7 .7
84.7
9 4 .4
9 5 .5
9 0 .6
9 0.1
90 .6
9 2 .9
9 9 .9
6 9 .4

9 8 .5
97 .4
87.3
94.8
9 0 .4
86 .3
9 5 .5
9 6 .4
91 .8
9 2 .0
91.6
9 4 .2
99 .9
72.7

98.7
9 7.9
88.8
96.2
93 .0
8 7 .8
96.2
97 .6
93 .0
93.3
94.1
9 5.2
9 9.9
7 6.2

99.1
9 8 .6
9 0 .9
97.6
95.6
9 0 .0
97.1
9 8 .3
9 4 .6
94.8
9 4.6
9 6.6
100 .0
8 0 .9

9 9.3
99.0
9 2.6
9 8.4
96.8
92.1
97.6
98.6
95.8
9 5.8
94.6
97.5
1 0 0 .0
8 4.8

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ....................................................................
R E T A I L GENERAL M E R C H A N D I S E .......................................... .......................................................
FOOD STORES ...........................................................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS * ■ • • • • • • • • • • * • » • • • • * • • • •
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • •
FURNITURE AND HOME F U RN IS H IN GS STORES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
EATING AND D R IN KI NG PLACES ..................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RE T AI L STORES

F I NA NC E *

INSURANCE*

AND REAL ESTATE

B A N K I N G ......................................................................................................................................................
CR E D IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • •
SE CU RI TY * COMMODITY BROKERS AND SE RVIC ES • * • • • • < • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
INSURANCE CARRIERS ........................................................................................................................
i n s u r a n c e a g e n t s * b r o k e r s and s e r v i c e • • • • • • • » • ♦ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
REAL ESTATE ...........................................................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE* INSURANCE* ETC • • • • • • • • • • • • # • • • • • • • • • • • • • *
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES # • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • *

SERVICES




T a b l e A - 1 0 . Distribution of w o r k e r s b y a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t
b y indu s t r y of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 7

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
W
ERE LESS THAN
$1800

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

NONAGRlCULTURAL ECONOMY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

32.0

3 7 .8

43.5

49 .4

55 .0

.......................................................................... . ................................................................................

15.4

18.7

22 .4

2 6 .3

31.0

1 0.3
19.4
12.1
17.7
16.8

12.7
2 3.7
14.7
21.2
2 1.4

1 5 .4
2 9.0
18.7
2 4.8
2 5.2

20.0
3 1 .2
21.7
2 8.6
29.9

2 5 .0
3 3.3
2 5.1
33.0
36.7

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ....................................................................................................................

2 6.1

31.0

35.9

40.6

4 5.3

5 0.4

55.2

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTORS . . . .
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS
SPEC IAL TRADE CONTRACTORS ....................................................................................................

29.0
2 4.6
2 5.2

34.5
2 9.4
29.7

39.5
34.7
34.3

44.2
40.1
38.7

4 8.9
4 5 .5
43.1

53.7
51.5
4 7.8

5 8 .4
5 6.9
52.3

PR IV AT E

M IN IN G

METAL M IN IN G

........................................................................................................................................
a nth r a c ite m in in g
..........................................................................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND L I G N I T E M I N I N G ................................................. .. ........................
O IL AND GAS EXTRACTION .............................................................................................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS* EXCEPT FUELS ............................................................................

$4800 $5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

65 .0

6 9.5

7 3 .9

78.8

82.3

85.3

3 5 .9

4 1.3

4 7 .0

5 3.4

62.0

6 9 .8

7 5.7

3 2 .8
3 8.7
2 8 .5
3 7.2
4 3.1

42.0
5 5.9
31.2
41 .9
4 9.3

5 0 .4
6 3 .4
35 .0
47.3
55.6

58.1
7 6.3
4 1 .5
52.8
6 2.4

6 7.1
86.0
54.6
60.1
68.9

74 .8
87.1
68 .2
6 6 .0
7 5.1

81.1
91 .4
7 4.9
71.7
8 0 .6

59.8

64 .4

68.9

72.8

76 .6

63. 1
6 2.1
5 6.5

67 .7
66 .9
61.1

7 2.4
71.1
65 .5

76.3
7 4 .6
6 9 .6

80.2
7 8 .3
73.4

6 0.1

$9000 $10000 $11 000

8 7 .9

91.3

9 3.5

80.2

8 6.0

9 0.3

85.4
9 2.5
79.5
76.3
85. 1

8 9.3
9 5 .7
84.7
83. 1
90.5

93. 1
95.7
90 .4
87.7
93.4

80.2

85.8

90. 1

83.7
81.6
77.2

88.7
86.6
83.6

9 1.9
9 0.3
88.9

...........................................................................................................................................

19.4

24.3

2 9.8

36.0

42 .2

4 8 .2

54.2

59.9

6 5 .6

7 2.5

77.3

81.4

84.8

89.0

92.1

ORDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ........................................................ .............................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS . . ................................................................................. ........................
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS ............................................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .......................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIX TU RE S ....................................................................................... ....................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
P R IN T I N G AND PU B L I S H IN G ..........................................................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS . . .................................................................... ..
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS
RUBBER AND P L AS T IC PRODUCTS* NEC .................................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ............................................................................................
STONE* C L A Y , AND GLASS PRODUCTS
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R IE S .......................................................................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT EL ECT RI CAL .................................................... . .....................................
ELE CT RICA L EQUIPMENT AND SU PP LIES ..............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • •
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUST RIE S .................................................................

9.5
32.6
3 4.5
21.3
32.3
3 1 .1
24 .8
1 5.5
23.2
10.8
9 .4
2 2.8
30.9
16.4
9 .6
17.4
1 1 .9
16.2
9.6
1 3.9
32.6

12.7
37.8
4 1 .1
2 7.5
4 3.0
38.4
30.9
1 9.2
2 7.9
13.8
1 1.7
28*1
3 8 .7
2 0 .3
12.1
21.6
15.0
2 0 .7
12.3
1 7.9
3 9.9

16.2
4 2 .5
48 .8
3 6.8
58 .6
4 7 .4
37.8
23.3
32.5
1 6 .8
1 3.7
33.0
50.7
24.5
14.5
2 6.0
18.1
25.5
15.0
22 .4
4 7 .5

19.8
4 7.7
55.5
4 9 .2
72.9
55.4
4 7.6
28.7
38.1
20.1
16.3
40.2
6 3 .2
29.2
17.5
30.8
21.8
32.2
18.0
28.1
5 6.3

2 4 .0
52.7
6 1 .2
62 .6
81 .0
62 .2
57 .9
34 .3
43 .9
24 .7
1 9.3
46 .7
7 3 .8
35 .5
21.4
36.6
2 6.5
39.6
21 .6
3 5.1
64 .0

2 8.5
5 8.2
6 8.6
7 3.0
85.9
68.2
66. 3
3 9 .7
4 9 .4
30.4
22 .3
53.5
80.4
4 3.1
25.8
4 2 .9
31.9
4 7.0
25 .7
4 2 .0
7 0 .1

3 5.0
6 3.4
7 8.5
8 0.4
89.3
74.1
72.7
46 .3
54.3
37.1
25.9
59.8
85.5
5 0.9
3 1.7
5 0.1
38.3
54. 1
30.8
4 9 .5
7 5.2

4 1 .4
68 .3
84.3
8 5 .4
91.2
79. 1
78 .4
5 3.2
58.8
43 .6
3 0.8
6 5.7
8 9 .2
5 8 .0
39.3
5 7.0
4 5 .2
60 .5
36.7
55 .7
7 8 .9

48 .5
7 3.3
89 .4
8 9 .1
92.9
83.7
82.9
60 .9
62.8
5 0.3
35 .6
70 .9
9 1 .4
6 5 .4
48.2
64 .0
52.8
66.2
4 4 .6
6 1 .4
82.1

60.1
78.7
9 2.1
92.3
94.2
87.7
87.2
69 .4
6 7.9
59.1
4 2.6
7 8.0
9 3 .9
73.0
5 8 .6
7 1.9
61.4
72.2
5 6.6
6 7 .3
86.4

6 5.7
82 .9
9 3 .4
94. 1
95.2
9 0.3
89.8
7 5 .8
72.1
66 .0
4 9 .2
82.4
95.1
78.8
6 7.0
7 7.4
6 7 .9
7 6.4
64.1
7 2.0
88 .6

7 0 .6
86 .6
9 4.7
95 .4
95 .9
92 .6
9 1.8
8C .9
76.3
7 1 .6
5 9.5
86. 1
9 6 .3
83 .6
74. 1
81.7
73.9
80. 1
70.1
75.5
90 .3

74.8
89.8
95.7
9 6 .0
96.4
9 4 .2
9 3 .5
85.6
80.2
76.7
68.2
89.1
9 6 .7
87.3
79.6
8 4.8
78.2
83.2
75.2
7 8 .6
91.8

80.8
93.5
96.8
96.9
97. 1
96. 1
9 5 .7
9 0 .8
85.5
83.3
77.1
9 2.4
97.4
9 1 .7
86. 1
8 9 .0
83.8
87.3
8 2.0
8 2 .9
9 3.7

8 5.2
95 .7
97.3
9 7.5
97.5
97. 1
9 7.0
94.0
8 9.5
8 7.3
84.0
95.0
97.9
9 4.2
9 1.2
9 2.3
88.4
9 0.3
86. 8
8 7 .0
9 5 .C

T R A N S P O R T A T I O N .......................................................................................................................................

1 6 .8

2 0.3

23.6

27.1

3 0.9

35.2

39.7

4 5 .0

5 1.2

6 0.8

6 8 .5

7 3.9

8 0 .2

8 8 .6

91.9

6 .4
2 6 .6
21.7
20. 1
9.4
8.5
21.7

8.4
3 1 .5
2 6.0
23.6
11.9
11.1
27.0

10.2
35.9
2 9.9
27.8
13.8
11.6
3 1 .8

11.8
40.3
34.2
3 1 .8
17.3
13.8
37.1

13.9
4 5 .7
38 .6
35 .7
2 0 .9
1 4 .8
42 .8

16.4
51.5
4 3.2
39.9
26.0
16.9
4 9 .7

1 9.8
56.5
47.6
45.3
31.7
18.5
55.9

25.9
6 2.3
51.7
5 0.2
3 8.1
21.7
6 3 .1

3 4.5
67.5
56.6
5 6 .1
44 .8
24.3
6 8 .9

54.4
73.3
6 2.7
6 1.7
52.2
29.6
7 5 .6

6 6 .0
79.9
69.2
66 .4
59.1
4 0 .2
80.2

7 0 .2
84 .4
75.4
7 1.5
6 5 .7
50.8
83. 7

78.9
8 8 .9
81.3
75.2
7 2 .6
69.3
87. 1

92.9
9 3 .9
88.1
8 1 .4
8 0 .5
81.0
91.1

93.6
97.2
92.4
8 5 .7
85.8
8 8.9
92.3

1 4.7

19.1

23.5

28.5

36.0

44 .7

53 .9

6 1 .2

65.4

6 8 .9

71.9

7 5.4

7 9 .7

8 5 .9

89.9

MANUFACTURING

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ..........................................................................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT
t r u c k i n g a n d w a r e h o u s i n g . . . . . ................................. ......................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A I R ...............................................................................................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTA ION ........................................................ ................................................
TRANSPORTATION SE RVICES ..........................................................................................................

C O M M U N I C A T I O N ............................................................................. ...........................................................




T a b l e A -10.

Distribution of w o r k e r s b y a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t

b y i n d u s t r y of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N
INDUSTRY

OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
W
ERE LESS THAN
$9000 $10000 $11000

S 18 0 0

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

...................................................................................................................................

10.5

12.8

1 5 .0

17.8

21.2

25.7

30.8

36.2

4 2 .6

5 1.2

5 8.7

6 5.9

7 3 .8

8 3 .3

89.6

.......................................................... ..........................................................................

23.4

27.5

31.7

3 6.6

4 2.1

48. 1

53.9

59.3

64 .6

7 0 .9

7 5.0

78.8

82.0

86.3

89.2

R E T A I L TRADE .............................................................................................................................................

52.3

59.7

6 6 .4

72.2

77.0

8 0.6

84.0

8 6 .7

8 9.1

91.4

9 3 .1

9 4 .4

95.5

96.8

97.6

86.5
9 3.4
8 8 .5
8 4.0
9 3.4
8 4.1
97.6
89.7

9 0 .0
94.7
9 1.0
8 6 .7
94.5
86.9
98.1
91.2

9 2 .3
9 5.6
9 3.2
89 .2
9 5 .4
89 .3
9 8.5
9 2.5

9 4 .1
96.5
95.0
91.0
96.1
91.0
9 8 .8
93.6

96.0
9 7 .4
96.9
93.4
9 7 .1
9 3.6
99.2
9 5 .2

97.2
98.0
98. 1
95.0
9 7.7
95.4
99.4
96.3

PRIVATE
PU BL IC

NONAGRICULTURAL

U T IL IT IE S

WHOLESALE TRADE

ECONOMY -

CONTINUED

34.5
5 2.2
4 8.2
37 .4
53.5
34.8
6 8.8
50.6

40 .4
59.8
56.1
4 3.2
6 0 .9
41.2
77.0
57.9

45 .5
6 8 .4
62.2
48 .8
69.2
4 8 .0
8 3 .1
6 4.2

51.1
76.1
6 7.1
54.1
7 6.7
54.2
87.6
70.0

57 .7
8 1.5
7 1.4
6 0.1
8 2.0
6 0 .2
9 0 .6
75 .0

6 4.4
85. 1
75.0
65.6
8 5.3
6 5.2
9 2.7
78.9

7 0 .6
87.8
7 8.6
7 1.1
88.1
70.6
94 .5
82.4

7 6.1
8 9.9
82.1
75.8
89.9
75. 1
95.7
8 5.0

8 1 .4
91 .7
85.3
80.0
9 1 .7
7 9.7
96 .7
8 7.4

............................. ................................................

24.2

29.9

3 5.6

4 3.4

52.2

60. 1

66.4

71.5

75.7

7 9.9

82.8

85.2

87.2

9 0.1

92. 1

B A N K I N G .......................................................... - ................................... ....................................................
CR ED IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS
.
SE CU RI TY * COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERV ICES ................................. .........................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ........................................................................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SE RVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
REAL ESTATE .................................. ..................................................... ......................... .......................
COMBINED REAL EST AT E* INSURANCE* ETC .......................................................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .................................................................

1 8 .6
2 2.9
14.2
17.5
2 5.5
4 1 .9
30.4
3 2.7

2 4.8
2 8.6
18.2
2 2.9
30.5
4 8 .6
3 6.6
37.8

30.8
33.8
2 2 .1
2 8.2
36.5
5 4.8
43.1
4 3.2

40.7
41.8
26.2
35.9
44.7
6 0.8
5 1.8
47.6

5 2.3
5 1.7
31.5
4 4 .8
53.1
66 .8
5 9 .6
5 2.7

6 2.6
5 9.9
37.9
52.8
6 0.4
7 2.3
65.0
56.3

70.0
6 7.1
4 3.2
5 8 .9
6 6 .9
7 7.5
69 .9
62 .5

75.3
73.1
48.9
6 4.1
71.7
8 1.6
74.5
67.6

7 9 .4
77.8
5 4.3
6 8 .8
7 5 .0
85 .0
78.6
70.8

8 3.6
82. 1
61.7
73.3
79.4
8 8 .1
80.5
7 4.8

8 6.0
85.0
64.8
77.1
82.5
90.1
8 2.9
7 7.1

8 8.0
8 7 .7
67.5
80.5
84 .4
9 1 .8
84.3
78 .3

8 9 .7
89 .4
69.4
83.7
86. 1
9 3.0
85.6
8 0 .1

9 2.0
91.9
7 3.7
8 7 .8
88.6
94.7
8 9 .4
8 2 .3

9 3.7
94 .0
76. 7
90.6
90.3
96.0
92. 1
84. 7

.........................................................................................................................................................

4 4 .5

51.8

58 .4

64.6

69 .8

74.3

7 8 .2

81.6

84.7

87.8

89 .9

9 1 .5

92.8

9 4.3

9 5.5

HOTELS AND OTHER LOOGING PLACES ....................................................................................
PERSONAL SE RVICES ...........................................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES • • • • • • « • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
AUTO R E P A IR * S E R V IC ES * AND GARAGES ............................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SE RVICES ..........................................................................................
MOTION PICTURES ................................................................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S * NEC • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • « *
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
LEGAL SERVICES ...................................................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ...................................................................................................................
MUSEUMS* BOT ANICAL* ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP O R G A N I Z A T I O N S ................ ..........................................................
PR IV AT E HOUSEHOLDS ........................................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .............................................................................................................

61.6
45.0
4 5 .4
40 .6
3 1.7
5 7 .8
61.8
36.9
2 7.7
3 3.4
43 .0
5 7 .0
82.0
2 5.2

70.7
55 .4
5 1.3
4 6.8
3 6 .5
6 1.2
68.1
46.1
3 3.6
3 9 .8
48.1
6 2.3
8 9.7
2 9.5

78 .0
65.1
56.4
5 2.7
41 .8
64.5
72 .8
5 6.0
3 9 .8
4 5 .2
54.0
6 7.2
9 4.0
33.5

83.9
7 3 .6
61.5
58.1
4 6.8
67.2
76.9
66.0
46.8
50.3
5 8 .6
72.0
96.4
37.9

8 8.1
79.5
66.2
6 3 .3
52.7
6 9 .9
8 0.2
74. 1
54.3
5 5.2
6 2 .4
76 .9
9 7 .8
4 2 .0

9 0.9
8 3.9
70.2
68.7
57.6
73.0
8 3.5
7 9.9
6 3.2
6 0 .0
6 9 .6
81.0
98 .7
46 .6

9 3 .0
87.4
73 .7
7 4.4
63.2
75 .8
86.5
8 4.3
71.6
6 5 .0
7 4.7
84.0
99.2
50.8

9 4 .6
89.9
76 .9
78.3
6 8.8
7 8.0
8 8.6
87.6
77.9
70.5
8 0 .2
86 • 7
9 9 .4
54.6

9 5 .9
9 2.1
7 9 .7
83 .2
74.4
80.3
9 1.1
9 0 .3
8 2.5
75.6
85.2
89.1
99 .7
58 .3

9 7.0
94.4
82.5
87.3
7 9.9
8 2.8
93.1
92.6
8 6.9
8 1.0
8 8.6
9 1.0
99.8
62.9

9 7.7
95.7
8 4 .6
9 0.3
84.7
84.7
94.3
94.0
89. 1
84.8
92.0
92 .5
9 9.8
66.3

9 8 .0
98.3
9 6 .6
97.3
87.9
8 6.3
9 4.4
92 .8
9 1.3
88.3
8 6.2
87.2
9 5.8
95.2
95. 1 96.0
91.9
9 0 .8
89.4
87 .4
94.1
9 3 .2
9 3.7
9 4.7
9 9 .9 10 0 .0
69 .9
73.2

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ....................................................................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE . . . . . ....................................................................................
FOOD STORES ...........................................................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE S T A T I O N S ................. ............................................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES
.
FURNITURE AND HOME F U RN IS H IN GS STORES ....................................................................
EATI NG AND D R IN K I N G P L A C E S ............................ ....................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS R E T A I L STORES ...............................................................................................

FI NA NC E*

SERV ICES

INSURANCE*




AND REAL ESTATE

99. 1
98.8
98. 7
98.2
91.7
90.0
9 7.4
9 6 .5
96.0
94.3
91 .3
89.5
97 .4
9 6.7
98. 1
9 7.0
94. 1 9 5.0
9 1 .6
93.0
96.2
9 6 .2
97.0
96.1
1 0 0 .0 1 0 0 .0
82.5
78.0

Table A-11.

Distribution of workers by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1966
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N

OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS

IN

THE

INDUSTRY OF

M JO EARN G W R LESS T A
A R
IN S E E
HN
INDUSTRY
$1800

PR IVAT E

MIN IN G

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY

.........................................................................

........................................................................................................................................................

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

33.1

39.1

45.1

5 1.0

56 .6

61.7

66.7

71.2

75.6

8 0 .5

83.9

8 6.8

89.4

9 2 .5

94.6

$9000 $10000 $11000

1 8.2

2 2 .2

26.1

3 0 .4

34.8

40 .1

4 5 .3

51.2

57.7

6 7.5

74.5

7 9 .7

84.1

89.0

92.4

METAL M IN IN G ........................................................................................................................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G ..........................................................................................................................
BIT UMI NOU S COAL AND L I G N I T E M IN IN G ............................................................................
O I L AND GAS EXTRACTION .................................................................................... .......................
NONMETALLIC M INER AL S, EXCEPT FUELS ......................................................................

1 3 .3
2 2.0
14.0
21.0
20.5

15.7
26.0
1 7.9
25.1
25.4

1 8 .8
28 .0
2 1.8
28.9
30 .4

2 3 .0
30.0
2 4 .7
33.3
3 5.9

2 6.1
3 9.0
2 8 .7
3 7.2
42 .3

3 1.7
55.0
32.9
4 2.0
48 .2

36.3
70.0
3 7.0
47 .0
5 4.3

43.6
7 8 .0
41.7
5 2.1
61 .9

5 2.6
86.0
4 9.0
57.8
67.6

63.3
91 .0
6 5.1
66. 1
74.4

7 2.4
9 4 .0
7 3.7
7 2.4
80.1

80.6
96 .0
79.9
76.8
84.4

8 4 .9
96 .0
8 4 .7
8 1.3
8 8 .2

8 9.3
96.0
90.3
86.5
9 2 .6

94 .5
97.0
94.7
89.7
94.7

CONTRACT C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................................... .......................................

29.5

35.1

40 .4

4 5 .5

50.8

5 5.8

60.8

6 5.3

6 9.7

73.9

77.3

80.7

84.0

89.1

92.8

GENERAL B U IL D I N G C O N T R A C T O R S ....................................................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS .......................................................................................
SP EC IA L TRADE CONTRACTORS ....................................................................................................

34.3
29.6
29.3

4 0.6
3 5 .6
34.7

46.7
4 1.8
39.7

51.9
4 7 .3
4 4.7

5 7.5
53.1
49 .9

62.8
5 8.9
54.7

6 7.7
6 4.3
59.6

7 1 .9
69.3
63.8

76.3
73.6
6 8.0

80.0
7 7 .6
72.1

82.9
80.2
75.7

8 5.8
8 2.9
7 9 .2

8 8 .6
85.7
82.6

9 2.2
90.1
88.3

94.7
93.2
92.5

..................................................................... ....................................................................

2 2.2

27.6

33.6

39.7

4 5 .6

51.5

57.2

62 .7

6 8.5

74.4

79.2

8 3.2

8 6 .6

9 0.7

93.4

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES ...................... ................................................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ............................................................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ...............................................................................................................
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS .......................................................................................................... ..
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .......................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIX TU RE S ............................................................................................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ...................................................................................................
P R IN T I N G AND PU BL IS H IN G ..........................................................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS .........................................................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................
RUBBER AND P L AS T IC PRODUCTS, NEC .................................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS .................................................................................... ..
STONE, CL AY , AND GLASS PRODUCTS ....................................................................................
PRIMARY METAL IN D U S T R IE S .......................................................................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ......................... .. ............................................................. ..
MAC HINERY, EXCEPT ELECT RICA L ............................................................................................
EL ECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SU PPLIES ..............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTR IES ...................................... ..........................

12.9
3 5.4
3 8 .2
2 5 .1
3 7.1
37.0
31.6
19.3
27.0
1 3 .6
9.5
2 7 .0
34.1
1 9 .5
11.9
21.8
1 5 .7
2 1.2
11.8
1 8 .7
38.2

17.2
40.8
4 5 .2
3 2.4
49.1
4 5 .1
3 7.9
2 3.8
31.4
17.2
12.5
3 2 .3
4 3.6
24.2
15.1
26.9
19.5
26.3
15.1
24.0
4 5 .4

2 1 .3
45.8
5 2 .2
4 2.2
65.3
53.9
45 .3
28.3
36.0
20.4
1 5 .2
3 7.6
5 6.4
28.9
17.9
32.0
23.3
3 1.8
1 8.3
28.7
53.3

25.3
5 0.9
59.0
5 3.3
7 7.0
6 1.8
54.0
33.1
41.4
2 3.9
18.6
4 4.1
6 8 .4
34.5
21.2
37.4
27.3
38.1
2 1.7
34.7
6 1.7

29.5
55.9
64 .3
65 .8
83 .8
6 8 .0
6 2 .6
38 .7
46 .7
28 .9
21 .9
5 0.5
76.8
41.1
2 4.8
4 2 .9
3 2 .1
45.1
25 .3
40 .9
68 .4

3 5.0
6 1.0
71.8
7 6 .1
87.9
7 3.2
7 0.6
4 5.1
52.2
3 4.9
25 .6
56.6
8 3.0
48.7
28.8
4 9.2
3 7.3
5 2 .7
29.5
47.8
74.3

4 0.7
66.3
8 1 .1
8 3 .1
90.8
7 8.7
7 6 .3
51.3
5 6 .8
41.2
2 9.7
6 2.0
87.3
5 5.5
34.3
55.7
43.2
59.7
34.3
54.2
78.4

47.2
7 1.6
87.2
87.6
92 .5
83.4
8 1.8
58.4
61.0
4 7 .8
34.0
67.3
9 0.6
62.6
41.1
62.4
4 9 .7
65 .6
40.2
6 0 .0
8 1.9

52.9
76.5
90.4
9 1 .0
9 4.0
87.2
8 6.1
65.3
65.2
55.5
4 0.1
7 2 .4
92.9
69.7
49.5
69.0
56.8
7 1.2
48 .4
65.3
85.3

5 8.6
81.8
94.0
93.6
95.2
90.0
89.4
7 3 .5
70.4
6 2.6
47 .0
7 7.8
94.6
7 6.4
5 8 .7
7 5 .4
64.5
76.0
58.0
70.8
8 8 .2

64 .0
8 5.7
94.5
9 5 .0
9 6 .0
9 2 .2
91 .7
7 9.7
7 4 .8
69.6
56.1
81.9
96.1
8 1.8
67 .5
8 0.1
7 0.9
79.6
6 5.2
7 5.0
90.1

6 8.6
89. 1
96.0
96 .0
96.6
9 4.0
93.5
84.7
7 9 .1
75.4
66.5
85.7
96.9
8 6 .0
7 4 .6
8 4.2
76.3
83.0
7 1 .3
7 8.6
91.8

7 4 .0
9 2 .2
9 6.7
96 .7
9 7.1
9 5.5
95.0
8 8 .7
83.1
80.3
7 4 .3
8 9.0
97.4
8 9 .7
8 0.2
87.2
81.1
86.2
7 6.6
82.3
93.3

80.5
95.3
9 7 .4
97.5
97.7
96.9
96.5
92.9
88.0
85.9
8 2 .4
93.2
9 8.0
9 3 .3
87.2
9 1 .0
86.8
9 0.0
83.3
8 6.4
9 5 .0

8 5 .2
9 6.8
97.8
9 7.9
9 8 .1
9 7.7
97.5
95.3
91.4
89.6
86.9
95.7
9 8.3
9 5.6
91.7
93.7
9 0.9
92.5
8 8.0
89.7
96.3

........................................................................................................................................

19.1

22.9

2 6.7

30.4

3 4.5

38.8

4 3.7

5 0.0

57.5

6 8.5

7 4 .1

7 8 .7

85.8

9 1 .3

9 4.6

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION .........................................................................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .................................................................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .......................................................................................................
WATER T R A N S P O R T A T I O N .......................... .......................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AI R ...............................................................................................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTAION ..........................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ..........................................................................................................

8.3
28.5
25.4
22.0
11.7
7.1
2 4.5

10.3
33.5
2 9 .9
26.5
15.6
9.3
29.6

12.2
3 8.1
3 4 .5
30.8
19.4
9 .3
35.9

14.0
4 3.3
39.0
34.9
23.0
10.9
41.7

1 6 .1
4 9 .0
43 .7
40 .2
27 .2
1 0.9
4 7 .7

19. 1
5 4 .3
4 8 .0
45.3
3 2.5
12.6
5 3.8

2 3 .7
59.5
52.4
50.2
38.6
15.8
60.4

3 2.8
6 5.6
56.8
55.6
4 5.8
20.2
67.5

45.3
7 2.2
61.7
61 ,0
5 3.6
2 6.8
73.5

6 6.9
79.4
6 8.2
6 8.3
63.5
34.4
80.1

7 1.0
85.5
7 4.0
73.1
7 0.9
48.1
84.1

74.1
89.6
7 9 .5
77.5
76.3
63.4
87.3

8 8.4
93.5
8 4.4
80.8
80.9
77.0
90.2

94.2
97.5
90.2
86.6
86.0
85.2
92.8

98.0
98.8
93.9
90.2
88.3
92.3
94.7

17.5

22.9

27.4

33.1

40 .3

49.2

57.8

63.7

67.6

7 0.9

73.8

76.9

81.2

87.4

91.5

MANUFACTURING

TRANSPORTATION

COMMUNICATION

...........................................................................................................................................




Table A-11.

Distribution of workers by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1966----Continued
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS i I N

THE

INDUSTRY OF

IN S E E
HN
M JO EARN G W R LESS T A
A R

INDUSTRY

$ 8 4 0 0 1$ 9 0 0 0 $ 1 0 0 0 0 $ 1 1 0 0 0

$1800

PR IVAT E
PU BL IC

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

...................................................................................................................................

11.7

14.3

16.9

20.0

2 4.2

28.6

3 3.8

3 9.9

4 7 .7

56.2

64.2

71.2

79.5

88.1

92.8

......................................................................................................................................

2 6 .8

31.5

3 6.4

41.7

4 7 .3

53.0

58.6

63.8

68.9

7 4 .4

78.3

8 1.7

8 4 .6

8 8.2

9 0.6

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

U T IL IT IE S

WHOLESALE TRADE

R E T A IL

$2400

CONTINUED

T R A D E ........................................................................ . ...................................................................

55.3

62.7

69.3

7 4.7

79.1

8 2 .6

85.8

8 8.3

90 .6

92 .9

94 .3

95 .4

96.3

97.4

9 8 .1

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT • • • • • • ■ • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • •
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE ..................................................................................................
FOOD STORES ............................................................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERV ICE ST ATI ON S ..............................................................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ■ • • • • • • • • • • • •
FURNITURE AND HOME F U RN IS H IN GS STORES ....................................................................
EATING AND D R IN K I N G PLACES ..................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS R E T A I L STORES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

3 8 .2
5 6 .6
5 2.0
41 .5
5 7.0
38.6
72.0
5 4 .7

4 4 .1
6 4.4
59.1
47 .9
6 4.5
45.2
79.6
61.6

5 0.4
7 2.8
64 .6
5 3 .3
72.9
51.9
85.2
67.9

56.9
7 9 .3
6 9.3
58.5
7 9 .3
5 7 .6
89.1
73.3

6 3 .3
8 3.8
7 3.6
64 .2
8 3 .8
6 3.5
9 1.8
7 7.8

69.8
87.0
7 7.0
6 9.8
8 6 .7
69 .0
9 3.7
81.3

75.6
89.4
80.8
7 4.8
89 .4
74.2
9 5.4
84.6

80.5
9 1.2
84. 3
79.2
9 1 .1
78.3
9 6 .4
8 7.0

85.1
93 .0
87.5
82.9
92 .9
8 2.4
97 .4
89.1

89.6
9 4.6
9 0.6
86.5
94.5
86 .9
98 .2
91.5

92.3
95.7
92.8
88 .9
95.5
89.0
9 8.6
92.8

9 4.2
9 6.5
9 4 .7
90 .9
9 6.2
91.1
9 8.9
94. 1

95.3
97.0
9 6 .1
92.7
9 6 .8
9 2 .7
9 9.2
95.0

9 6.8
9 7.8
9 7.7
9 4 .6
9 7 .5
9 4 .9
99.4
96.2

9 7.5
9 8.2
98.7
96.0
98.0
96.1
9 9 .6
97.1

2 7 .1

33.4

39.7

47.9

5 6.6

6 3.9

69 .9

7 4.6

78.5

8 2.2

84.8

8 7.0

8 8 .8

9 1 .4

9 3 .1

BANKING ......................................................................................................................................................
C R E D IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
SECURITY# COMMODITY BROKERS AND SE RV ICES ............................................................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ................................................................................................ .......................
INSURANCE AGENTS# BROKERS AND SERVICE • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
REAL ESTATE ............................................................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE* INSURANCE* ETC .......................................................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .................................................................

2 2.1
25.5
17.0
2 0.7
27.5
45.3
3 6.9
35.5

29.0
3 2 .0
2 1 .5
2 6.3
3 4.0
53.2
42.2
42.1

35.6
3 9.3
2 5.3
32.4
4 0.9
59.6
50.4
44 .8

45.6
4 8.0
3 0.8
4 0.6
4 8.6
65.9
58.8
5 0 .2

56.9
5 7.2
37.1
4 9 .5
57.3
71 .5
63 .3
56.5

66.1
64.7
42.3
5 6.4
6 4 .2
7 7.1
67.8
61 .4

73.2
71.0
4 8 .4
6 2 .4
70.3
8 1.4
7 3.6
67.1

7 8 .2
76.5
5 3 .0
67 .0
74.8
85.3
78.1
7 1.5

82.1
80.5
58.3
71.8
79.3
88.0
81.0
74 .5

85.6
8 4.6
6 3.8
76.0
83.0
90 .4
84.7
7 7.6

87.8
8 7.0
66 .7
79 .5
8 5 .1
9 1.9
87.1
79.5

8 9.6
8 9.0
6 9 .0
82.7
86.8
9 3 .3
87.9
81.2

91.0
9 0.9
71.2
85.6
88.1
94 .4
88.7
8 2 .7

93.1
9 3 .4
74.8
89.6
9 0.1
95.7
90.2
85.3

9 4.6
9 4.7
77.5
9 2.1
9 1.6
96.7
92.1
87.4

S E R V I C E S .........................................................................................................................................................

4 8.1

55.5

62.1

6 8.0

7 3.0

77.3

8 1.3

8 4.5

87.4

90.9

92.5

9 3 .7

94.8

96.0

96.8

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES
PERSONAL SERVICES ...........................................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ............ .......................................................................
AUTO REPAIR# SERVICES# AND GARAGES < • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • •
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
MOTION PICTURES .................................................................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES# NEC .................................................................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
LEGAL SERVICES ...................................................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ...................................................................................................................
MUSEUMS* BOTANICAL# ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS .................................................................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS • • * • « • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
PRIV AT E H O U S E H O L D S ............................................................. ..........................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SE RVICES .............................................................................................................

66.7
4 9.8
49 .4
47.1
37.3
60.7
66.2
42.5
30.2
3 6.4
41 .6
5 8.5
8 4.3
28 .0

75.3
60.3
55.1
52.5
4 3.9
64.6
7 2 .0
52.3
36.9
42.8
46 .0
6 4 .4
91.5
32.9

8 2.1
69 .6
6 0.7
58.6
4 9.4
67.3
76.4
6 2.6
4 3 .1
4 7 .9
52.5
6 9.3
95.0
3 7.4

87.3
7 7 .3
6 5.6
6 4.8
54.4
6 9 .6
80.6
71.7
5 0 .6
5 2 .8
5 7.4
74.1
97.1
4 2.0

90.8
82 .6
6 9 .9
70 .3
60. 1
72 .3
83.5
78.8
59.2
57.9
64 .4
7 8.8
98.5
46 .3

93.1
8 6.4
73.7
7 5.4
6 5 .1
7 5 .1
86.3
8 4 .2
68.4
63.0
71.3
82.6
99.1
51.2

9 4 .9
89.7
77.2
80.4
7 0 .5
77.5
88.7
8 8.2
76.4
68.8
7 6.2
85.8
99.5
5 6.0

96 .0
9 1.9
79.9
8 4 .3
75.3
79.6
9 0.6
91.1
81.6
7 4.6
82.2
8 8 .2
9 9 .6
60.3

9 6 .9
9 3 .9
8 2.5
8 8.4
80.5
8 1.9
9 2.5
93.1
85 .9
79.6
85.6
90 .2
99.8
64.0

97 .8
95.9
8 4 .8
91.2
8 5 .0
8 4.1
9 4.3
94 .6
8 9 .1
88.6
89.1
92 .2
99.8
68.1

98 .2
9 6.8
86.6
9 3.3
89.0
86.0
9 5.2
9 5.7
9 0.8
90.9
91.1
93.4
99.9
71.5

9 8.6
97 .5
88.2
9 5 .2
9 1 .2
87.5
96. 1
96.6
9 1 .8
9 2.6
92.6
9 4 .5
99.9
74.4

98.8
98.0
89.6
96.4
9 3.7
8 9.1
96.7
9 7.8
9 3.2
9 3.8
94.1
9 5.6
99.9
77.7

99.2
9 8 .6
91.4
97.7
9 5 .9
9 0.9
9 7.5
9 8 .5
94.7
95.1
94.6
9 6 .8
1 00 .0
82.0

99.4
9 9.0
9 3 .1
9 8.6
97.2
9 2.9
9 8.0
9 8.8
95.8
9 5.9
94.6
9 7.7
1 0 0 .0
8 5.7

FI NA NC E#

INSURANCE#




AND REAL ESTATE

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Table A-12.

Distribution of workers by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1967
CUMULATIVE

PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N

OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL

EARNINGS

IN

THE INDUSTRY OF

M JO EA N G W R LESS T A
A R R IN S E E
HN

INDUSTRY

$9000 $10000 $11000

$1800

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

PR IVAT E NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOHY « . . • . • « « . « . . . . a . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 2.0

37.8

43.5

49.4

55.0

60. 1

65.0

69.5

73 .9

7 8.8

82.3

85.3

87.9

91.3

9 3.5

M I N I N G ....................................... .. ................................... ...............................................................................

17.3

21.1

25 .3

29.1

33.9

39.1

4 4.4

49. 7

5 5.9

63.9

7 1 .1

76.8

8 1 .2

86.6

90.6

12.0
19. A
1 3.0
20 .2
19.9

1 4 .9
23.7
16.0
2 4.6
2 4.1

1 7.7
3 0.1
20.3
28.9
29.0

2 2 .7
32.3
23.2
32.3
3 3 .9

28 .5
34 .4
26.8
3 6.6
4 0 .5

36.3
41 .9
30. 1
4 0 .7
4 7 .6

45 .6
5 9.1
33.1
4 5 .1
53.7

54.1
66.7
3 6 .4
5 0.0
59.2

62.2
7 7.4
43 .0
54.9
66.1

70.1
8 7 .1
5 6 .4
6 1.7
7 1.4

7 6.7
8 8 .2
69 .0
6 7 .3
77 .3

82.2
93.5
7 5.9
7 2.6
82.3

8 6 .3
9 4.6
79.8
7 7.4
8 6.7

89.9
95.7
85.0
8 3 .7
91.6

93.4
95.7
90.7
88.0
93.9

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .....................................................................................................................

28.6

3 3 .7

3 8.7

43.5

48 .2

5 3.1

57.9

6 2 .4

66.8

7 0 .9

74 .5

7 8 .0

8 1.4

86.8

90. 8

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTORS • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CO NT RA CT O RS ..................... ................................................................
SPECIA L TRADE CONTRACTORS ................................................................. ..................................

3 2.9
2 8.5
28 .4

38.9
34.2
3 3 .4

4 4 .4
39.7
38.2

4 9.7
4 5.3
4 2 .8

5 4.7
50 .9
4 7.2

59.9
56.7
5 2.0

6 4.6
6 1.9
5 6 .5

69 .0
6 6.9
60 .9

73.1
71.4
6 5 .1

7 6.9
7 5 .0
6 9 .1

80.1
7 7.9
7 2 .7

83. 1
8 0.8
76.2

8 6 .0
8 3 .9
79.5

90. 3
88.3
85.5

9 3.2
91.6
9 0.2

............................................ ............................................................................................

2 0.9

25.8

3 1 .4

37.6

43 .7

4 9.6

55.4

6 1 .1

66 .8

7 3 .5

78.2

82.2

85.3

89.4

92.3

ORDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ................. ......................................................................... ..
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
TOBACCO M AN UFA CTU RER S ....................................................................... . .....................................
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS ............................................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .......................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND F IX TU RE S ...........................................................................................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
P R IN T I N G AND P U B L IS H IN G ..........................................................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ........................................................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................
RUBBER AND P L A S T IC PRODUCTS, NEC .................................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ............................................................................................
STONE, C L A Y , AND GLASS PRODUCTS
PRIMARY METAL I N D U ST R IE S .......................................................................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT E L E C T R I C A L ................................................. ..........................................
ELE CT RICA L EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ..............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................................
I N D U S T R I E S ................................................................

11.7
35.1
36 .4
2 4.0
34.4
3 4.6
2 9.2
18.0
2 5.5
12.7
11.3
25.9
3 3.8
19.2
11.2
20.3
14.2
18.4
1 1.6
16.1
35.8

1 5 .7
40 .4
42.4
30.8
4 4.9
42.3
35.0
2 2 .2
3 0 .1
15.9
1 3.6
3 1 .1
41.7
23.0
13.9
24.8
17.6
2 3.0
14.7
2 0.5
43 .0

19.6
4 5 .1
4 9 .8
4 0.0
5 9 .9
5 0 .3
4 2 .0
26.4
34.6
19.1
15.9
36.3
53.0
27.5
1 6 .6
29.4
21 .0
28.2
1 7 .7
2 5 .4
5 0.1

23.7
50.1
5 7.1
52.1
7 3 .9
5 7 .8
50.8
3 1 .6
40 .0
22.8
18.5
4 3.0
64.9
32.2
19.9
34.3
2 4 .8
3 4 .6
20.8
31.2
58.4

2 7 .8
5 4.9
6 2 .5
64 .6
8 1.8
64 .4
6 0 .4
37.3
4 5 .5
2 7 .4
2 1.2
4 9 .4
74.7
3 8.5
2 3.8
4 0 .0
29 .6
41 .9
24 .5
3 8.1
66.0

3 2 .9
60.2
69.7
7 4.4
8 6.5
69.9
68.5
42 .6
5 1.0
33.0
24 .6
55.8
8 1.0
4 6 .0
28.3
46.2
35.2
4 9.2
28.6
4 4 .9
7 1.8

3 9 .6
6 5.2
80.1
81.6
8 9.8
7 5.4
7 4 .5
49 .0
55.7
39.6
28.0
61.9
8 6.2
5 3 .5
34.1
53.2
41.4
5 6.0
3 3.4
51.6
7 6.8

4 5 .6
6 9.8
8 5.5
86.3
9 1 .6
80.3
80.2
5 5.5
6 0 .0
46. 1
32.6
67 .6
89.5
60 .8
41.7
60 .0
4 8 .0
62.3
39.3
57.7
80.3

52.2
74.7
90.3
89.7
9 3 .3
84.7
84.2
62.7
63.8
52.7
37.4
7 2.6
9 1.9
67 .9
50.5
6 6.6
55 .4
67.9
47.1
63.2
83.4

62. 1
79.9
92.6
9 2.7
94.5
88.5
8 8 .2
7 0.6
68.9
61.0
4 4.1
7 9 .5
9 4 .2
7 4 .7
60.4
7 4 .0
63.5
73.6
58.8
69.2
8 7 .3

67 .4
83.9
93.9
9 4 .4
95.4
9 1 .0
90.5
7 6.7
7 3 .1
67 .6
50.5
83.7
95.3
80.2
68.6
7 9 .3
69.8
7 7.7
6 6 .0
7 3 .6
8 9.4

72.0
87.5
95. 1
95.6
96. 1
93 .0
92.3
81.7
7 7 .2
7 3.0
6 0.5
87. 1
96.5
8 4 .8
7 5.6
83. 1
75.5
8 1.2
71.5
76.8
91.0

7 6 .0
9 0 .5
9 6.0
9 6.2
96.6
9 4.6
9 3 .8
86.1
81.1
77.8
6 9 .2
89.7
9 6 .8
8 8 .2
8 0 .7
8 5 .8
79.4
84. 1
7 6.3
7 9.7
92.2

8 1 .6
9 3.9
9 7 .0
97. 1
9 7 .2
96.2
96.0
9 1 .2
86. 1
84.0
78.0
9 2 .9
97.5
92.2
86.8
89.8
8 4 .5
87.9
82.8
83.8
94.0

8 5 .8
96.0
9 7.4
97.6
9 7.6
97.3
97. 1
94. 3
8 9.9
87.8
8 4.7
95.4
9 8.0
9 4.5
9 1.6
92. 7
88.9
90.7
8 7 .4
87.5
9 5.3

........................................................................................................................................

1 8 .7

2 2.5

26.0

2 9.6

33.4

37.5

41.8

47 .0

5 3.0

62.8

7 0.1

7 5 .2

8 1.3

8 9.3

92.4

RAILROAD T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ....................................................................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .................................................................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ............................ ..........................................................................
WATER T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ............................... .. ................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A I R ...............................................................................................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTA ION .........................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SER VICES ..........................................................................................................

7.4
28.9
24.4
22.8
1 0.7
9.5
25.0

9.5
3 3 .9
29.3
26.4
13.8
12.7
30.4

11.3
38.6
3 3.4
30.6
16.8
1 4 .3
3 5.9

13.2
4 2 .9
37.6
3 4 .9
20.6
15.9
40.8

1 5.2
4 7 .9
4 2 .0
38.9
2 4.4
16.4
47.2

17.8
53.7
46.4
4 4 .0
2 8.6
19.0
5 2.9

2 1 .1
5 8 .8
50.4
49.5
3 3 .6
2 1 .2
59.0

2 7.4
6 4.0
5 4.4
5 4.1
40 .0
23.8
6 5.6

36.3
69.4
5 8.9
59.8
4 6.5
26.5
7 1 .1

57.3
75.0
6 4.5
6 5 .1
54.0
3 1.7
77.7

68.5
8 1 .4
70.7
6 9 .6
60.7
4 1.3
82.4

72. 1
85.6
76.6
74 .4
66.8
5 2.4
85.6

8 0 .5
9 0 .0
8 2 .3
77.8
73.7
6 9 .8
8 8 .9

9 3 .9
9 4 .4
8 8.7
83.0
81.1
8 2 .0
9 2.2

9 4.2
97.5
92.9
8 7 .C
86.2
89.4
93 .4

16.1

20.8

2 5.2

30.2

37.4

4 5 .9

55.0

6 2.1

66.3

6 9.6

7 2.5

7 5 .9

8 0.2

86.4

90.2

METAL M IN IN G ........................................................................................................................................
ANTHRACITE M I N I N G .................... ....................................................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL ANO L I G N I T E M ININ G ............................................................................
O I L ANO GAS EXTRACTION ............................................................................................................
NONMETALLIC MINE RA LS, EXCEPT FUELS ............................................................................

MANUFACTURING

in s t r u m e n t s

and

related

products

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING

TRANSPORTATION




Table A-12. Distribution of workers by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1967----Continued
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N

OF WORKER.S WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS

IN

THE

INDUSTRY OF

M JO EARN G W R LESS T A
A R
IN S E E
HN
I NOUSTRY
$1800

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

...................................................................................................................................

11.7

14.1

1 6.5

19.1

22 .6

27.3

32.2

37.7

44.1

5 2 .7

60.2

67.1

7 4.8

83.9

90.0

WHOLESALE T R A D E ............................................. .......................................................... ............................

25.7

30.3

34.7

3 9 .7

45.1

5 0.8

56.4

61.5

6 6.5

7 2 .4

7 6 .2

7 9.9

82.9

8 6.9

89 .6

RETAIL

T R A D E ............ ................................................................. ...............................................................

5 4 .2

6 1 .4

6 8 .0

7 3 .6

7 8 .1

8 1.6

8 4.8

87.3

8 9.6

9 1.8

9 3.3

94 .6

9 5 .6

96. 9

9 7 .7

B U I L D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ...................................................................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • •
FOOD STORES ...........................................................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SE RV IC E STATION S ..............................................................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
FURNITURE AND HOME FU R N IS H IN G S STORES ....................................................................
EA TI NG AND D R IN K I N G PLACES .................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS R E T A I L S T O R E S ....................... ............................................ . .......................

37.2
54.5
50.6
41.2
55.7
38.5
71.3
5 3 .3

43.4
61.8
5 8.2
47 .0
62.8
44.6
7 9 .0
6 0.1

4 8 .5
7 0 .0
6 3 .9
5 2.4
7 0.9
51.1
84 .6
66.2

5 4 .3
7 7.4
68.5
5 7 .5
78.0
57.1
8 8 .6
71.7

60 .6
8 2.6
72 .6
63. 1
82 .9
6 2 .7
9 1 .5
76.5

6 6.8
8 5.9
7 6 .0
68 .3
86.1
67.6
9 3 .4
80. 1

72.8
8 8.5
79.5
73.2
8 8.7
7 2.8
95 .0
83.4

77.8
90.5
8 2.9
77.4
9 0 .3
77 .0
96. 1
85.9

82 .9
92.2
8 6.1
8 1 .2
92 .0
81.2
97 .0
88 .0

87.8
93.8
89.2
8 4.9
93.6
8 5 .2
97 .9
9 0.2

90 .9
95.0
9 1.5
87.3
94.7
87.6
98.3
9 1 .6

9 2.9
95.8
9 3 .5
8 9 .6
9 5 .6
89.7
9 8.7
92.8

94 .6
9 6.6
95.3
9 1.4
9 6.2
91.3
98.9
9 3.8

96.3
9 7 .5
9 7.0
93.6
9 7.2
93.8
99.2
9 5 .3

97.4
98. 1
98. 1
9 5.2
97. 8
9 5.6
9 9 .4
^ 6 .4

2 6.3

32.4

38.0

45.4

5 4.1

61.8

6 7 .9

72.8

76.7

8 0.7

83.4

8 5.7

8 7.6

9 0.4

92.3

2 0.8
2 6.5
16.1
19.9
27.8
45 .0
32.2
36.0

27.4
32.6
20.4
25.7
33.6
51.9
38.8
41.0

33.2
37 .7
24 .8
3 1.1
39.9
5 8 .0
44 .4
47.1

42.7
45.4
29.0
38.4
47 .4
63.8
5 2 .8
50.9

53 .9
54.8
3 3.8
47. 1
55 .4
6 9 .5
6 1 .0
5 6 .6

6 4.0
6 2 .4
39.8
55.0
61 .9
74.9
65.9
59.7

7 1 .2
69.5
44 .7
60 .9
68 .3
79.7
71.0
65 .3

76.4
74.8
5 0 .2
65.8
72.8
83.6
7 5 .9
69 .9

8 0.3
7 9 .1
55.6
70.3
76 .4
86 .6
7 9.4
73.3

84.3
8 3.0
63.1
74.5
80.4
89.3
8 1.6
7 6 .7

8 6.5
85.7
66.1
7 8.0
8 3.3
91.1
8 3.5
78.9

8 8 .4
88. 1
68.5
81 .3
8 5.0
92.6
8 4.8
79.8

90.1
8 9.6
7 0 .0
8 4.3
86.4
93.7
86 .4
8 1 .3

92.2
9 2 .2
7 4 .6
8 8 .3
8 8.8
95.3
8 9 .7
83.2

93.9
94 .2
77.6
90.9
90 .6
96 .4
9 2.7
85. 7

9 1 .9

93.1

9 4 .5

95.6

PR IV AT E
PU BL IC

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

U T IL IT IE S

FINANCE*

INSURANCE*

AND REAL ESTATE

CONTINUED

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

B A N K I N G ............................................. . .....................................................................................................
C R E D IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS • • • • • • « • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND SE RV IC ES ...........................................................
INSURANCE C A R R I E R S .................... . ................................................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND S E R V I C E ...................................................................
REAL ESTATE ...........................................................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE* INSURANCE* ETC ......................................................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT C O M P A N I E S .............. .................................................

........................................................................................................................................................

46 .0

5 3 .2

59.6

65.6

70.8

75. 1

78 .9

8 2.3

8 5.4

88.4

90 .4

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • « •
PERSONAL SERVICES ...........................................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES
AUTO R E P A IR , S E R V IC E S , AND GARAGES • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
m i s c e l l a n e o u s r e p a i r SERV ICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
MOTION P I C T U R E S ............................................................ ................. ...............................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S , NEC ................................................................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • •
LEGAL S E R V I C E S ...................................................................................... ............................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ..................................................................................................................
museums, b o t a n ic a l , z o o lo g ic a l gardens
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • » • • • • • • •
PR IVA TE HOUSEHOLDS ................................................................................................... ..
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ............................................................................................................

65.1
47.1
4 8 .7
45.0
3 4 .5
59.4
65.2
3 8 .8
3 0.1
3 4 .8
4 5.1
5 9.0
8 3.1
27 .0

73.4
57.3
5 4.4
5 0.9
40 .2
63 .4
71.1
4 7 .9
36.2
4 1.4
50.2
6 4 .1
9 0.4
3 1.6

80.3
6 6.6
5 9.5
5 6.9
4 5 .4
6 6.3
7 5.5
57.5
42.3
46 .5
55.7
69.0
94 .4
3 6.0

85.5
74.8
6 4.3
62.2
50.4
69.1
7 9 .6
6 7 .1
49.4
51.5
6 0.3
73.6
96.6
40.4

89 .4
8 0.5
6 8 .7
6 7 .3
5 6.2
71.5
8 2 .5
74 .9
56.8
56.2
6 4 .6
78 .2
9 8.0
4 4.5

9 1.9
84.7
72.5
72.2
61.3
74.8
8 5.3
80 .5
65.0
61.0
71.7
82. 1
98.9
49 .2

9 3 .9
8 8 .1
75.7
77 .4
6 7 .0
77.6
8 7 .9
8 4.8
7 2.9
66 .0
77 .6
85.0
99.3
53.6

95.2
90.5
7 8 .7
81. 1
72.3
7 9.6
8 9.8
88 .0
79. 1
7 1.5
82.3
87.7
99.5
5 7 .5

9 6 .4
92 .7
81.4
8 5.4
77.2
8 1.7
9 2.1
9 0 .6
8 3.3
76.7
85 .7
9 0.0
9 9.8
61 .4

9 7.3
9 4.8
8 3 .8
8 8 .8
82.2
8 3.7
93.9
92.9
87.5
82.0
8 8 .6
91.8
99.8
65.4

97 .9
95.9
8 5.7
9 1 .4
86.2
8 5.6
95 .0
94.3
89.5
85.6
9 2.8
9 3.1
99.9
68.6

SE RVICES




$9000 $10000 $11000

9 8 .2
98 .5
9 7.4
9 6.8
8 7.3
8 8 .7
94.9
93 .4
89. 1
91.8
87.0
8 8 .2
95 .8
96.4
95.3
96.2
9 1.1
92.2
88. 1
89.9
9 3.7
9 4.9
9 4.2
9 5.1
1 0 0 .0 1 0 0 .0
7 1.8
74.8

98.9
9 9.2
98 .7
9 8 .2
90 .6
92.1
96.7
97.5
9 4 .9
96 .6
9 0.4
92.1
97. 1 9 7 .7
97.2
98 .3
94.4
95. 1
92.0
93. 1
9 6.6
96.6
96.4
9 7.2
1 0 0 .0 1 0 0 .0
8 3.7
79.3

Table A-13. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by annual earnings
in all wage and salary employment and by industry of major earnings, 1966
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL

E P O M N W R LESS T A
ML Y E T E E
HN

INDUSTRY
$1800

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

10.2

15.7

22.6

3 0 .0

3 7.4

44 .5

51.3

57.7

64.1

71.3

76.3

80.5

..............................................................................................................................................................

2 .8

4 .8

7.3

11.1

15.8

21 .6

2 8.2

3 5.7

43.9

57.3

66.5

METAL M IN IN G ........................................................................................................................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G .........................................................................................................................
BI TU MIN OUS COAL AND L I G N I T E M IN IN G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O IL AND GAS EXTRACTION .............................................................................................................
NONMETALLIC M IN ER A LS , EXCEPT FUELS ............................................................................

0 .7
4.1
2.1
3.4
3.8

1 .3
5.5
3.6
6 .0
6.1

2.2
8.2
6.8
8.5
9 .3

4 .9
8 .2
9.3
12.0
16.0

7.7
19.2
1 3.5
16.3
23 .0

1 2.9
34.2
1 7 .3
22.4
30. 1

18.5
56.2
22.6
29.0
37.4

27.4
67.1
2 7.8
36.2
4 6 .4

3 8.7
7 9 .5
36.2
4 3.7
54.1

5 3 .7
86.3
56.4
5 5 .1
63.8

64.5
9 0.4
67.7
63.3
7 1.9

PRIVAT E

M IN IN G

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .........................................................................

$9000 $10000 $11000

8 4.4

8 9.0

73.4

79.1

8 5 .7

9 0.2

7 5.1
93 .2
75. 1
69 .3
78.0

81.0
94.5
8 1 .2
75.2
83.2

86.4
9 4 .5
8 8 .0
8 2 .3
8 9.9

93.0
95.9
93.3
8 6.5
92.8

92.0

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .....................................................................................................................

5 .4

9.0

1 3 .7

18.9

25.2

31.5

3 8.2

4 4 .6

5 1 .1

57.7

63.2

6 8.8

7 4 .2

8 2 .3

88.3

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTGRS
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS .......................................................................................
SPEC IAL TRADE CONTRACTORS ....................................................................................................

5.9
4.3
5.6

10.0
7 .5
9 .3

15.3
1 2.4
1 3.4

2 0.6
18.3
18.4

2 7.2
25.1
24.1

3 4 .1
3 2 .1
29.8

4 1 .0
39.4
3 6 .0

4 7 .7
4 6 .4
4 1 .9

5 5.2
52.7
4 7.9

62.1
5 9.7
54.1

67.8
64.5
5 9.8

73.6
69.3
6 5.6

7 8 .9
74.2
7 1.3

8 5.5
8 1.9
80.4

90.2
87.5
87.5

MANUFACTURING ...........................................................................................................................................

3.8

7 .6

1 3.6

2 0.6

2 7.7

35.0

42.2

49 .5

57.0

6 5.0

7 1 .5

77.0

81.7

8 7 .3

91.0

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ...............................................................................................................
T E X T I L E M I L L PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS ............................................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .......................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIX TU R E S ............................................................................................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
P R IN T I N G AND P U B L IS H IN G .........................................................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS .........................................................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................
RUBBER AND P L A S T IC PRODUCTS, NEC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS .............................................................. ............................
STONE, CL AY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R IE S .......................................................................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECT RICA L ................................................. ..........................................
ELECT RICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING I NDUSTR IES .................................................................

0.7
6.8
7.5
4.7
9 .7
9.7
5.3
2-3
6.2
1 .5
1.1
3 .3
7.8
2.6
2.8
1.9
2.3
0.8
2.3
8.7

1 .8
11.4
1 5.8
10.6
2 4.1
1 7 .9
10.2
4.6
9 .6
2.8
1 .9
6.7
17.1
5.2
2.0
5.6
3 .5
5 .1
1 .7
5 .1
1 5.7

3.8
1 6.9
2 4.6
2 1.5
47.6
29 .4
1 8 .7
8.3
1 4 .6
5.0
3.5
1 2 .3
3 5.1
9 .0
3.6
9.6
5.8
10.1
3.3
9 .0
2 6.9

6.2
2 3.5
34.8
3 6 .3
6 5 .2
40.4
3 0.7
13.6
21.1
8 .1
5.7
20.3
5 2 .6
14.7
6.1
15.7
9.2
17.2
5.6
15.4
39.7

1 0 .2
30.5
43 .6
53.6
7 5.6
4 9.2
4 3.6
2 0.2
2 8 .1
1 3.1
8.3
2 9 .0
6 5.1
2 2.7
9.2
22 .5
14.0
25 .7
8.7
22 .6
4 9 .8

1 5 .6
37.8
5 5.0
6 7.1
8 1.7
5 7.2
5 5.0
27.3
35.0
19.9
11.7
3 7.3
7 4.2
3 2.2
1 3 .4
30.4
1 9 .7
35. 1
1 2.9
31.5
5 8.6

2 2.4
4 6.0
69.4
7 6 .7
86.0
6 5.5
6 3.8
35.4
4 1 .0
27.1
16.3
4 5.2
80.5
4 1 .0
19.4
38.4
26.8
4 4 .4
1 8.2
3 9 .2
65.3

30.4
54.0
78.6
8 3.0
8 8.5
7 2.9
71 .7
4 4.7
46 .5
35. 1
20.6
52.6
85.5
4 9 .8
2 7.5
47.2
34.6
5 2 .2
2 5.5
46 .3
7 0 .7

37.7
61 . 7
8 4.0
8 7 .6
9 0.7
7 8.8
78.3
5 4.1
5 1.9
4 4.1
27.3
59.8
8 9 .1
5 9 .2
37.8
5 6.1
43 .5
5 9.7
35.1
5 2.8
7 6 .0

45 .3
70.2
8 9.9
91.1
92.6
83.7
83.4
65.1
58.7
5 3 .1
3 6.9
67.7
92 .0
68.4
49 .0
6 5 .1
53.8
66.7
47.1
60.2
8 1.0

52.4
76 .7
91.1
9 3.1
93.8
87.4
8 7.4
73.3
6 4 .9
61.7
47.5
7 4.0
9 4.2
75.5
59.7
7 1.9
6 2.0
7 1.9
56.3
6 6 .0
84.2

5 8 .8
8 2 .2
9 3.6
9 4.5
94.7
9 0.5
9 0.0
8 0.0
7 1.0
69. 1
59.8
7 9 .4
9 5.5
8 1.1
6 8 .4
77.7
6 9.3
7 6 .5
63.9
7 1.0
86.8

65.9
87.1
9 4 .8
9 5 .6
9 5.5
92.8
9 2 .5
8 5.2
76.1
7 5 .4
69.0
8 4.1
96.2
8 6 .0
7 5 .5
8 2 .0
7 5 .6
81.0
70.7
7 5 .5
8 9.2

74.4
92.4
95.8
9 6 .5
96.4
9 5 .2
9 4.6
90.7
8 3.3
82.5
78.5
90.2
97.1
91.1
84.1
87.3
83.0
86.2
79.1
8 1 .6
92.0

80.7
94 .9
96.4
9 7.2
9 7.1
9 6.4
96. 1
93.9
8 8.0
87.1
84.4
9 3.7
9 7.4
94. 1
89.7
9 1 .2
88.3
89.7
84.9
86.3
94.2

TRANSPORTATION

1.0

........................................................................................................................................

3.8

5 .8

8 .4

11.6

16.0

20.7

26.5

34.3

43.7

57.7

6 5.2

7 1.3

8 0 .7

88.1

92.7

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ..........................................................................................................
LOCAL AND I N T e RURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .................................................................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .......................................................................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A I R ...............................................................................................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTAION .................................... .. ..................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERV ICES ..........................................................................................................

0.8
9 .7
5.1
4.4
1.2
0.6
5.1

1 .4
13.7
8.1
6 .7
2 .0
1.2
8.2

2.3
1 8 .0
11.8
8 .9
3.8
1.8
12.8

3 .2
2 3 .8
1 6.4
12.2
6 .7
2.4
19.1

4 .8
30.9
21.6
17.0
10.7
2.4
2 6.1

7.4
37.8
26 .8
22 .6
16.4
2.4
3 3.7

1 2.1
4 4 .6
3 2.4
28.6
2 3.6
5 .5
4 2 .4

22.1
52.6
38.2
35 .5
32.0
8.5
5 2 .5

36.0
6 1.0
4 5 .1
4 2.0
4 1 .9
17.0
60.0

59.8
70.8
5 4 .6
51.6
53.2
26.1
69.3

6 5.2
79.1
63.1
58.3
6 3 .1
40.6
74.9

69. 1
8 4 .6
70.8
6 4.0
69.8
5 7.6
7 9.6

85.3
90.0
7 8 .0
69.5
76.0
73.3
84.2

92.7
96.1
8 6.0
78.2
82.6
82.4
88.7

9 7.3
98.2
91.3
8 4 .5
85.6
91.5
9 2 .1

COMMUNICATION ...........................................................................................................................................

2.5

5 .0

8.3

14.7

2 3.5

34 .9

4 5.9

53.3

58.2

62.6

66.2

70.2

7 5 .6

8 3.4

8 8 .9




Table A-13. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary em ploym ent by annual earnings
in all wage and salary em ploym ent and by industry of major earnings, 1966----Continued
CUMULATIVE
INDUSTRY

PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL
EMPLOYMENT W
ERE LESS THAN

$1800

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

...................................................................................................................................

1 .9

3.0

4.6

7.0

11.4

16.1

2 2 .1

28.9

3 7.6

47 .3

5 6.8

6 5 .4

75.2

8 5 .5

91.3

......................................................................................................................................

5.6

8.6

1 3 .0

1 9 .0

26 .0

3 3.6

4 1.1

4 8 .3

5 5.3

6 3.4

6 9 .0

73.9

78.0

83.3

86.7

..............................................................................................................................................

2 2.0

32.6

4 3 .5

5 2 .8

60 .7

67.1

72.9

77.7

8 2.0

8 6 .3

8 9.1

9 1 .3

93.0

95.1

96.4

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM ECUIPMENT ....................................................................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE ..................................................................................................
FOOD STORES ...........................................................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SE RVICE STATI ON S ...............................................................
APPAREL AND ACCESSQRY STORES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • * • • • • • • • * • • • • •
FURNITURE AND HOME FU RN IS H IN GS STORES ...................................................................
EA TING AND D R IN K I N G PLACES ..................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS R E T A I L STCRES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11.3
2 0.5
2 0.8
11.1
24.8
11.5
3 6 .5
2 3 .8

1 6.7
32.9
3 0 .8
17.1
36.0
1 8 .0
51.6
3 3 .3

2 3.5
4 8.0
39.4
23.7
50.7
2 6.3
64 .2
4 3.3

31.8
60.0
46 .9
3 1 .2
6 2.3
3 4 .5
73.3
52.5

4 1 .7
6 8 .6
54 .0
40 .0
7 0.5
43 .1
79 .9
6 0 .0

51.2
74.5
59.7
4 8 .9
7 5.7
5 1.0
8 4.6
6 6 .4

60 .5
7 9 .1
6 6 .1
57.4
8 0.4
58.5
8 8.3
7 2 .1

68 .3
82.7
72.1
64 .7
8 3.4
65.1
91 .2
76.4

75.6
86.1
77.5
7 1 .1
86.7
71.5
93.5
80.2

83.2
89.3
83.2
7 7 .2
89.7
7 8 .6
95.4
84.5

87.6
91.5
87.2
81.4
91 .6
8 2.3
96.5
86.9

90 .7
93.1
9 0.5
84.7
9 3 .0
8 5.9
9 7 .4
89.2

92.5
94.2
93.1
87.8
9 4 .1
8 8 .5
98.0
9 0.8

9 4.9
95.7
95.9
9 1 .1
95.4
91.9
98.6
93.1

96.1
9 6.6
97.6
9 3.4
96.4
94 .0
9 9.0
94.8

7.2

11.5

1 7.8

28.2

3 9 .7

4 9 .6

57 .9

64.3

6 9 .7

75.0

78.7

81.8

84.5

88.1

9 0 .5

4.5
6.5
2.1
4 .3
7.9
17.6
11.9
10.4

8 .9
10.2
4 .0
7 .2
12.6
25.4
1 6 .0
15.4

1 5 .3
16.3
7.6
1 2 .5
1 9.7
33.5
25.5
19.4

28.0
2 7 .7
1 3 .4
2 2.4
29.0
4 2.7
3 5 .0
2 6.1

4 2 .5
3 9 .9
2 0 .0
33 .6
4 1 .0
5 1 .3
4 2 .0
32.0

5 4.7
50.6
27.2
4 2 .4
5 0.6
60 .3
50.2
38.2

64.1
59.6
3 4.7
5 0 .1
5 9.2
6 7 .4
5 8.0
4 6 .7

7 0 .5
67.0
4 0 .3
5 6 .2
64.8
7 4.0
64.6
5 4.3

75.6
7 2.3
4 6 .4
62 .6
70.1
7 8.4
69.5
58.8

80.4
7 8 .1
53.5
68.3
75.5
82.7
75.7
64.0

8 3.6
81.9
57.3
73.0
78.8
85.7
8 0.2
6 6.7

86.1
8 4 .7
6 0 .3
7 7.3
8 1.4
88.3
81.5
70.0

88.0
8 7.3
6 3.1
81.2
8 3 .4
9 0.4
82.7
72.7

9 0.6
9 0.8
67.7
86.3
8 6 .0
92.9
8 4 .8
7 6 .9

92 .6
9 2.7
7 1 .1
8 9.7
88.2
94.6
87.2
8 0 .1

PR IVAT E
P U B L IC

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

U T IL IT IE S

WHOLESALE TRADE

R E T A I L TRADE

F IN A N C E *

$9000 $10000 $11000

CONTINUED

INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BANKING ......................................................................................................................................................
CR ED IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SE CU RI TY * COMMODITY BROKERS AND SE RV ICES ............................................................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ........................................................................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SERVICE ....................................................................
REAL ESTATE ...........................................................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ES TAT E* INSURANCE* ETC .......................................................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .................................................................

.........................................................................................................................................................

2 0.3

28.9

3 8.1

4 6.9

54 .6

6 1 .4

6 7 .7

7 3.2

7 7.9

83.9

86.8

8 9.0

9 0 .8

93.0

94.4

HOT ELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PERSONAL SERVICES ...........................................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AUTO RE PA IR* S E R V IC ES * ANO GARAGES .................................................... .......................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MOTION PICTURES .................................................................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E RV IC ES * N E C .................................................................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ............................................................ .................
LEGAL SERVICES ...................................................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL S E R V I C E S ........................................................................... .......................................
MUSEUMS* BOTANICAL * ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS .................................................................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZAT IONS ...................................................................... ..
PR IV AT E H O U S E H O L D S ................................................................................ .......................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .............................................................................................................

29.9
20.2
14.1
1 3 .6
1 1.0
2 8.5
24.1
1 5.2
8.8
1 3 .9
8.7
2 5 .2
74.0
6.0

4 4.9
3 4 .3
2 0.5
1 9 .7
1 5 .6
3 4.2
33.3
2 6.7
1 3 .0
19.1
11.3
32.4
8 5.2
9 .1

5 9.3
4 9.1
28.1
27.3
2 1.3
38.5
42 .2
4 1 .3
1 9.1
2 4.4
18.3
40.3
91.3
1 2 .9

70.3
6 1.7
36.3
3 6.1
2 7.7
4 2.2
5 0 .1
55.2
2 8.1
3 0.1
2 5.2
48 .5
9 4 .9
1 7.0

7 8 .2
7 0.2
43 .8
4 4 .9
3 6.0
4 6 .6
56 .3
66 .1
39.6
3 6 .6
35 .7
5 7 .7
97.2
2 2.2

83.5
76.3
5 0.2
52 .8
4 3 .7
50.7
63 .6
74.5
52.8
4 3 .7
4 7 .0
6 4.7
98.2
2 7.7

8 7.7
8 2 .1
56.3
6 1 .4
5 1.0
55.2
6 9 .5
8 0.9
6 5 .0
51.7
5 7 .4
70 .8
9 9 .0
33.7

9 0.5
85.7
61.3
68.8
5 9.1
59 .4
74.3
85.5
7 2 .4
60.1
67.8
75.8
9 9.3
39 .5

92 .8
89.2
66.1
76.3
6 7.5
6 3 .8
7 9.9
88.8
7 9.2
6 7.4
7 3.9
7 9.7
99.5
4 4 .2

9 4.6
9 2.7
7 0 .9
8 2.9
74.6
6 8.2
83.9
91.2
8 4 .1
8 0 .9
8 0 .0
8 3.5
99.7
5 0.6

9 5.8
94.4
7 4 .4
8 7.4
8 1.4
7 1.5
86.6
9 3 .0
8 6.8
84.9
8 3.5
86.3
99 .8
55.9

96.8
95 .7
7 7.4
9 1 .1
85 .6
7 4 .6
89.2
94 .4
88.3
8 7.8
8 5.2
88.7
99 .8
60.6

9 7 .2
96.6
8 0 .0
93.4
8 9.4
7 7.3
90.9
96.2
89.9
8 9.8
8 9 .6
90.7
9 9.9
6 5.6

9 8.2
9 7.6
8 3.7
9 5.8
9 3 .5
81.4
9 3.0
97.3
9 2 .2
9 2 .1
9 0 .4
9 3.3
1 0 0 .0
72.3

98.6
98.3
8 6.9
97.2
9 5.3
85.2
9 4.3
97.9
93 .8
9 3.6
9 0 .4
95.1
1 0 0 .0
78.1

SE RVICES




Table A-14. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employm ent by annual earnings
in all w a g e and salary em ploym ent and by industry of major earnings, 1967
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL

PR IV AT E

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • # • * • • • • •

$3600

$4200

9 .7

14.7

2 1 .1

28.3

3 5.6

o

$3000

C
D
o

$2400

*

$1800

42 .4

o
o

E P O M N W R LESS T A
ML Y E T E E
HN

INDUSTRY

4 9 .2

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

5 5.5

6 1.7

68.8

7 4.0

78.4

$9000 $10000 $11 000

82.2

87.2

90.5

..............................................................................................................................................................

2 .8

4 .3

6.7

10.0

14.5

1 9.7

25.9

32.8

40 .6

5 1 .5

6 1 .4

6 9.0

74.7

82.1

8 7.6

METAL M IN IN G .......................................................................................................................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G ..........................................................................................................................
BI TU MIN OUS COAL AND L I G N I T E MIN IN G
O I L AND GAS EXTRACTION ............................................................................................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS* EXCEPT FUELS ...................... ....................................................

1 .6
4.4
1.6
3 .7
3.1

2.2
5.9
2.9
5.2
5 .8

3.1
7.4
5.7
7.6
8.5

6.4
8.8
8 .4
11.1
12.8

1 0 .0
1 1.8
11.5
15.5
19.2

17.5
19. 1
14.7
20.3
26 .4

26.5
4 2 .6
1 7 .4
2 6.0
34.2

36.5
51.5
21.8
32.6
42.2

4 6 .0
67 .6
29.5
3 9.4
5 0.7

5 7 .5
8 0 .9
4 5.3
4 8.7
59.2

67 .5
82.4
61.7
5 6.3
6 7 .3

7 5.6
88.2
69 .7
63. 7
7 4.5

81.2
8 9.7
7 5.2
6 9 .5
8 0 .4

86.2
9 4 .1
81.5
78.3
87.5

91. 1
94. 1
88. 5
8 4 .2
9 1.3

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ....................................................................................................................

5 .0

8.2

12.4

17.1

2 2 .4

28 .5

34.4

4 0.5

4 6.8

53.3

5 9 .1

6 4.7

70.2

7 8 .6

85. 1

5.7
3.8
5.3

9 .5
6 .5
8 .4

1 3.9
1 0 .9
12.3

18.8
16.5
16.6

2 4 .2
22 .7
2 1.4

3 0.4
29 .8
2 6 .8

3 6.6
3 6 .4
3 2 .3

43.2
4 3.1
3 7 .9

4 9 .7
49.8
43 .8

56.8
56.0
50. 1

62.8
61 .2
5 5.9

6 8.9
66. 7
61.3

74.4
71.9
6 6.8

8 2.3
79.2
76.2

87.4
8 4.9
83.8

...........................................................................................................................................

3.3

6 .5

11.9

18.9

26.1

33.3

4 0 .6

47 .8

55.2

6 4 .0

70.4

75.8

80. 1

8 5 .7

8 9.6

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .......................................................................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED P R O D U C T S ................. . ............. ................................. .. .............................
TOBACCO M AN UFA CTU RER S.................................................................................................... . . . .
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E P R O D U C T S .............................................. ............................
LUMBER AND WOOD P R O D U C T S .......................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND F I X T U R E S ............ ...............................................................................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
P R I N T I N G AND P U B L IS H IN G ..........................................................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS .........................................................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
RUBBER AND P L A S T IC PRODUCTS* NEC • • • • • * • • • • * • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ............................................................................................
STONE* CLAY* AND GLASS PRODUCTS ....................................................................................
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R IE S ......................................................................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
MACHINERY* EXCEPT ELECT RICA L
ELE CT RICA L EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .............................................. .. .............................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED P R O D U C T S ................. ....................... .......................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S .................................................................

0.7
6.1
5.3
4.3
7 .8
7 .3
4.5
1.9
6.2
1.3
1.3
3 .6
7.2
2.4
1.1
2.7
1.8
2.0
1.0
1.6
7.0

1 .5
10.2
12.3
9.1
1 9.5
13.8
9 .2
3.7
9 .4
2.5
2 .0
6 .9
14.8
4.8
2.0
4.8
3.2
4.4
2 .0
3 .5
13.7

3.1
1 5 .6
22.5
19.0
41.0
2 4 .9
1 6.8
6 .9
13.8
4 .4
3.1
1 1 .4
30.6
8.3
3 .4
8.5
5 .3
8.4
3.4
7.5
2 3.0

5.7
22.4
32.1
3 4 .2
61.3
3 5 .3
29.2
12.4
20.0
7 .2
4.9
2 0.0
47.7
12.9
5.7
13.4
8 .4
15.6
5.6
13.4
3 5.2

9 .3
29.1
4 0 .5
5 1 .5
7 2 .8
4 4 .8
4 2.8
18.8
2 7 .0
1 1 .8
7.8
2 8.4
62 .7
2 0.0
9 .2
19.9
13.1
2 4 .2
8.9
21.3
4 6.3

14.0
3 6 .6
51.9
6 4 .9
7 9 .8
5 3.0
5 3.9
2 5 .0
33.7
17.8
10.9
36.9
71 .9
2 8 .9
1 3 .7
27 .4
18.9
33. 1
1 3.0
29. 1
55.2

2 1 .2
4 4 .1
67 .0
7 4 .5
84.5
61.5
6 2.6
3 2.8
3 9.8
25.3
14.3
4 5 .3
79.2
38.3
2 0 .1
3 6.1
2 6 .2
41.8
1 8.4
3 7.9
62.6

28.8
51.5
7 5.9
8 1.0
8 7.2
68.9
7 0.4
41.2
4 5 .4
32.8
1 9.6
5 3.0
84.4
4 7 .2
28 .7
44 .7
34. 1
49.8
25 .2
4 5 .4
68. 1

37.2
5 8.9
83.6
85.8
89.6
75.6
76.4
5 0.7
50.5
40 .7
24.9
6 0.1
8 7.6
5 6.3
38.9
53.5
4 3.0
5 6.8
34.3
5 2.4
72.8

5 1.3
67.3
87.8
89.9
91.5
81.4
82.4
61.5
57.2
5 1 .1
3 3 .0
6 9.8
91.2
65 .9
5 1.2
6 3.7
5 3 .4
6 4.4
4 8.5
59.6
7 9 .3

5 8 .1
73.8
8 9.9
92 .2
9 2.9
85.5
8 6.0
6 9.4
6 2.8
5 9.3
40 .7
7 5.9
92.9
73.2
61.1
7 0.9
6 1 .3
6 9.9
5 7 .4
65 .4
8 2 .6

64.1
7 9 .5
91 .9
9 3 .9
94.0
8 8.9
88.8
75.9
6 8.4
66. 1
5 2 .8
8 0.9
94 .7
79.3
6 9.5
76 .4
68 .6
7 4.5
64.5
6 9 .7
8 5.3

69 .2
8 4 .4
93.4
94.8
94.8
9 1 .3
9 1 .1
8 1 .9
73.7
72.1
62.9
85.1
95.3
83.9
7 6 .0
8 0.4
73.8
7 8.6
7 0.6
7 3.5
8 7 .5

76.5
90.0
95. 1
9 5 .9
9 5.7
94.1
94. 1
8 8.4
8 0 .7
8 0 .0
73.3
89.6
96.3
89.5
83.7
8 5 .8
8 0.5
83.7
78.7
78.8
9 0.4

8 1.9
93.4
9 5.8
96 .7
96 .4
95.7
95.9
92.5
86.0
8 4.8
81.3
93. 1
9 7.0
9 2 .6
89.6
90 .0
86.0
8 7.5
8 4.4
8 3.9
92.5

M IN IN G

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTORS • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS
«
SP EC IA L TRADE CONTRACTORS ............................................................ .......................................

MANUFACTURING

t r a n s p o r t a t io n

............................... ............... ...............................................................................

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ..........................................................................................................
LOCAL ANO INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .................................................................
TRUCKING AND W A R E H O U S IN G ......................................................................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A I R ...............................................................................................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTA ION .........................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION S E R V I C E S ................. .......................................................................................

COMMUNICATION

....................................................................... .................................................................




3.8

5.8

8 .2

11.2

1 5 .0

1 9 .5

2 4.5

3 0.8

38.3

50.4

60. 1

66 .9

74.9

8 5.5

89. 7

0.5
11.0
5 .1
4 .6
0.9
0 .6
4 .4

l.l
14.9
7.8
6.8
1 .5
1.2
7.6

1.8
19.0
11.2
9.6
2.3
1.8
11.6

2.5
2 3.7
15.5
13.1
4.5
3.0
16.8

3.9
3 0.0
20.5
17.1
7 .4
4 .2
2 3 .8

5.7
36.8
25 .7
2 1.7
1 2.3
6 .5
3 2.5

8.9
43.1
3 0.8
27.8
1 8 .6
8.3
4 0.0

1 5 .6
50.6
3 5 .9
3 3.7
2 5.9
1 1 .9
49.5

2 5 .1
57.4
42.1
4 0 .4
33.7
1 4 .9
5 7.5

47.8
65.1
5 0 .2
4 7.4
42 .6
20.8
66.6

6 1 .0
7 3.7
58.9
5 3.6
5 0.9
32.7
73.1

6 5.9
79.6
6 7.2
60 .4
58.8
4 4 .6
7 7 .8

7 5 .9
85.4
7 5.1
6 5 .6
67. 1
6 5 .5
82.5

9 1.9
92.0
8 4 .2
74.2
7 6 .6
78.6
87.8

9 2.6
9 6.3
8 9 .9
80.2
8 2.9
87.5
89.6

2.5

4 .7

8.1

1 3.2

2 1.8

32.1

4 3 .4

52.2

57.2

61.6

65 .3

6 9.6

7 4 .9

8 2.7

87.6

T able A-14. Distribution of w orkers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary em ploym ent by annual earnin gs
in all wage and salary em p loym en t and by industry of major earnings, 1967----Continued

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL
EMPLOYMENT WERE LESS THAN
$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

1 4 .5

2 0 .0

26. 1

3 3.4

43 .3

52.0

6 0.4

69.6

8 0.7

8 8.0

2 3.6

30.9

38.3

4 5 .3

52.2

6 0.6

6 6.2

71.4

75.7

81.5

85.4

5 1.5

59.4

65.5

7 1 .3

7 6.0

8 0.2

84.5

8 7.4

89.9

91.8

9 4 .2

9 5.7

2 2.1
4 4 .3
3 9.0
22.9
47 .9
2 6.1
63.5
40 .6

29.0
57.6
46.4
2 9.8
60.4
34.2
72.8
4 9.9

3 8.1
67 .0
53.0
3 8.2
6 9 .2
4 2 .4
79.3
5 7.8

4 7 .6
73.1
58.6
46. 1
74 .7
49.1
8 3.6
64.2

56.5
7 7 .9
6 4 .4
54.4
79.6
56.7
87.6
6 9 .9

6 4 .4
8 1.7
70.1
6 1.6
8 2 .5
63 .2
90.2
7 4 .3

72.2
84.9
75.3
6 8.1
8 5 .5
6 9 .7
92.5
78 .2

79.9
87.9
8 0.7
74.4
88.5
76.4
94.5
82.2

8 5.1
90.3
84.9
7 8.8
90 .5
80.5
95.7
84.8

8 8.5
9 2.1
88.6
82.7
92.0
84. 1
9 6 .7
87. 1

9 1.2
9 3.5
9 1.7
8 5.7
93.2
8 6.6
9 7.3
8 9.0

9 4.1
95.3
94.8
89.4
94.9
90.4
98.2
91.7

95.8
9 6.4
96 .8
92. 1
96. C
93. 1
9 8.6
93 .7

10.7

16.1

25.2

3 6.3

4 6 .4

54.7

61 .4

67 .0

72.6

7 6.5

79.8

82.6

86.5

89.2

7.9
9 .8
3.6
6.9
12.3
23.5
18.2
13.9

1 3 .0
1 4 .7
6 .2
1 1 .5
18.2
31.4
26.1
17.9

24.4
24.4
9.5
19.8
2 8.2
3 9.5
38.3
22.7

38.7
3 6 .7
14.7
30.4
3 8.8
48 .3
4 7 .0
29.2

51 .6
4 7 .2
22 .0
3 9.8
48. 1
56 .6
5 4.2
33.9

6 1 .0
56.5
28.1
4 7 .3
56.4
64.6
6 0.6
42 .5

6 7 .9
64 .3
34.7
5 3.8
62 .6
70 .9
6 7 .0
4 9 .4

7 3 .2
70.7
41 .2
59.7
6 6.8
76 .3
7 2.0
5 4.5

7 8 .6
76.3
50.5
65.5
7 2 .3
8 1.0
74.6
60.8

81.7
8 0 .2
5 4.6
7 0 .4
7 6 .5
84.2
77 .7
6 4.5

84 .3
83.7
58. 1
7 4 .9
79.1
86.8
79.5
66 .4

8 6 .6
86.0
60.6
7 9 .0
8 1 .3
88.8
8 1 .1
6 9.1

89.6
8 9.2
66. 1
84.3
84.7
9 1.6
86.4
72.6

91.8
92. 1
70.0
8 7.9
87.0
9 3.6
90.2
76.1

$3000

$3600

$4200

...................................................................................................................................

1.6

2 .5

4.1

6.3

9 .7

WHOLESALE T R A D E ............ ........................................................................................................................

5.2

7.9

1 1 .8

17.1

21.5

31.5

4 1 .9

11.3
19.6
20.5
11.2
24. 1
11.2
36.3
2 2.0

16.4
30.3
30.5
16.6
34.6
17.5
5 1.4
3 1.3

6.8
4.1
6 .3
1.8
4.0
8.5
16.8
1 4.4
9.3

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S

RETAIL

CONTINUED

TRADE ..............................................................................................................................................

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ....................................................................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ■ « • • • • • • •
FOOD STORES .................................................................... ....................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS . . . . . .................................................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES
FURNITURE AND HOME FUR NIS HIN GS STORES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
EATING AND D R IN KI NG PLACES ..................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RE T A I L STORES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • •

F I NA NC E*

INSURANCE*

AND REAL ESTATE

o
o
00

$6000

$2400

PR IVAT E

$9000 $10000 $11000

$5400

$1800

••••« ••••••••••••••••••••*••••

B A N K I N G ............................... .. ........................... .. ........................ ............................................................
CR ED IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS .................................................................................
S E CU RI TY * COMMODITY BROKERS AND SE RV ICES . . . . . . . . . a . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INSURANCE CARRIERS ........................................................................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SE RV ICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
REAL ESTATE . . ......................................................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ES TATE* INSURANCE* ETC .......................................................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ...................... .. .......................................

........................................................................................................................................................

18.7

2 6 .7

3 5.3

43.9

51 .6

58 .2

64.2

69 .8

7 4.7

7 9 .8

8 3.3

85.9

8 8.0

9 0 .6

9 2.5

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
PERSONAL S E R V I C E S ............................... . ........................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSI NE SS SERVICES
AUTO R E P A IR * SE RV IC ES * AND GARAGES
MISCELLANEOUS REPA IR SERV ICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MOTION PI CTURES ................................................................ ..............................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S * NEC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LEGAL SERVICES ...................................................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ..................................................................................................................
MUSEUMS* BOTA NICA L* ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ...........................................................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP OR GANIZA TIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PR IV ATE HOUSEHOLDS ..................................................................................... .........................
MISCELLANEOUS SERV ICES .............................................................................................................

2 7 .8
17.8
14.4
12.3
10.7
27.4
25.3
12.6
9.4
13.1
12.7
25.5
7 2.1
5 .5

4 2.6
30.8
20.7
18.3
14.5
32.9
34.1
22.4
14.1
18.5
17.2
3 2 .3
83.5
8.3

5 6.0
4 4.9
27.5
2 5.5
19.9
3 8.2
4 1 .7
3 5.2
19.3
2 3.8
24.6
39 .7
90.1
1 1 .5

67.6
5 7.8
3 4.8
3 2 .7
25.4
41.8
4 9.0
4 9.2
2 7.4
29.4
31.3
47.5
93.9
15.5

7 5 .7
67 .0
4 2.1
40. 1
3 2.8
4 5 .5
55 .7
6 0 .9
36 .4
35. 1
3 8.1
55.9
96 .4
19.8

8 1 .4
7 3 .7
4 8 .3
48. 1
38 .6
50 .0
6 2 .4
69 .4
48 .4
41 .4
4 8 .5
6 3 .3
97.8
24 .8

8 5 .6
7 9.3
5 4.1
57.0
4 6.1
54.7
6 8.7
76 .0
5 9.9
48 .3
56.7
6 9.0
98.6
30.0

8 8 .9
83.4
59.5
6 3 .4
54. 1
58.2
73.2
8 1.0
68 .7
56 .3
64 .9
7 4 .0
9 9.0
3 5.0

91 .5
86.9
64.1
71 .5
62.2
6 2 .3
78.7
85 .0
7 5 .1
63 .5
73 .9
7 8 .6
99 .5
40 .0

93.7
90 .7
69. 1
7 8 .3
70.2
67 .0
83.4
8 8 .6
8 1.4
7 1 .6
7 9.9
82.3
9 9.6
46.4

95. 1
92.8
72 .8
8 3 .4
7 7.2
7 0 .8
8 6.3
9 0.7
84.4
77.3
8 5.8
8 5.2
9 9.7
51.3

95.9
94.4
75.8
87.7
82.6
73.5
88.6
9 2.5
8 6.8
8 1.2
88. 1
8 7.7
99.9
56.5

9 6.6
95.5
7 8 .6
9 0.5
87.0
75.4
90.0
93 .9
8 8 .4
84.3
8 9 .6
89.6
99.9
6 1 .2

9 7 .5
9 6.9
8 2.3
9 4.0
9 1 .6
79.7
92.0
9 5 .4
91.6
87.5
93.3
9 2.3
9 9.9
68.0

98.2
9 7.8
8 5.3
9 5.5
9 4.0
8 3.3
93. 8
97.0
92.8
89.4
9 3 .3
94.0
10 0 .0
74.6

SE R V IC ES




T a b le A-15. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary em ployment
by annual earn ing s in their industry of major earnings, 1966
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS

$1800

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

ECONOMY .........................................................................

10.2

15.7

2 2.6

30.0

37.4

44 .5

5 1 .3

5 7.7

64.1

7 1 .3

76.3

80.5

..............................................................................................................................................................

4.6

7.4

1 0 .9

15.0

19.6

25.3

3 1.6

3 8.7

4 6 .6

59.0

67.8

7 4 .5

METAL M IN IN G ........................................................................................................................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G ..........................................................................................................................
BITU MINO US COAL AND L I G N I T E M IN IN G ............................................................................
O IL AND GAS E X T R A C T I O N ......................... ....................................... .........................................
NONMETALLIC MIN ER A LS , EXCEPT FUELS ...........................................................................

1 .8
5.5
2.8
5.9
7.1

3.2
9.6
5 .1
8.8
1 1 .0

5.0
11.0
8.6
12.6
15.5

8 .2
11.0
11.1
16.8
21.7

1 1 .3
2 1 .9
1 5 .2
21.0
2 8 .0

1 6.6
39.7
1 9.9
26 .5
34.5

2 1.9
6 0.3
2 4.7
32.7
4 1 .9

30.6
71.2
29.9
39.0
51.4

41 .3
8 2.2
3 8.5
4 6 .0
58.4

5 4 .6
89.0
5 8.0
5 6 .5
67.1

65 .8
91.8
68.3
6 4 .7
7 4.5

7 6 .0
9 4.5
75.9
70.3
79.9

.....................................................................................................................

8 .0

12.4

17.7

23.2

29 .6

35.9

4 2 .5

48 .5

54 .6

6 0.7

6 5.8

7 0 .9

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTORS ............................................................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ...................................................... ............... ...............
SP EC IA L TRADE C O N T R A C T O R S ............................ .................................... ..................................

10.3
8.4
9.2

16.1
1 2.9
1 3 .6

22.9
19.3
18.4

29.0
2 5 .6
24.0

36.1
32.8
30.2

43.2
40 .5
3 6 .1

5 0.3
47.6
42.4

56.5
54.5
4 8 .0

6 3.0
60.2
53.5

6 8.6
6 6 .2
59.4

7 3.1
70.0
64.5

77.7
74.0
6 9.7

...........................................................................................................................................

5.3

9 .5

1 5.6

22.6

29.6

36 .8

4 4 .0

5 1 .1

5 8.5

66.3

72.6

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES ...................... ............................................. ..................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ............................................................................................ ..
TOBACCO M AN UFA CTU RER S...............................................................................................................
T E X T I L E M IL L P R O D U C T S ....................... ............................................................ ..........................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS .............. ............................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .......................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND F IX TU RE S .............................................................................................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
P R IN T I N G AND P U B LI S H IN G .........................................................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ..........................................................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................
RUBBER AND P L A S T IC PRODUCTS, N E C .............. .. ................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ............................................................................................
STONE, CL AY , AND GLASS P R O D U C T S ............................................ .......................................
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R I E S ......................................................................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ....................................................................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ...........................................................................................
EL ECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPP LIES ...............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING I ND US TR IE S .............................. ..................................

2.8
9.8
9 .6
7.6
1 2 .6
1 3 .9
9.3
4.8
8 .6
3.1
2.5
6.6
11.3
5.3
2.4
6.2
3.9
5.0
2.4
5.0
1 2 .7

5.0
14.5
18.1
14.3
26.9
22.4
15.6
7.9
12.2
5 .4
4 .1
11.3
2 1.1
9.0
4.2
1 0.1
6 .4
8.5
4.1
8 .4
20.7

7 .8
2 0.3
27.6
2 5.6
49 .5
3 3 .9
24.5
11.9
1 6.9
7.9
6.0
1 6 .9
3 8 .1
13.5
6 .1
14.8
9 .6
13.8
6.2
12.9
3 1 .1

11.0
27.1
3 7.7
3 9 .5
66.4
44.5
35.6
17.2
23.4
11.1
8.7
2 4.8
55.0
19.4
9.1
2 0 .9
13.2
20.8
9.0
19.4
42.9

15.0
33.9
45 .7
55.5
7 6 .4
52.9
4 7 .4
2 3.6
2 9.9
1 6.2
1 1 .7
3 2.9
66 .9
27 .0
1 2.5
27.3
1 8 .2
29.2
12.4
26.5
5 2.6

20 .9
41 .2
57.0
68.8
82.3
60.1
58.4
3 1 .2
3 6.8
2 2 .8
1 5.6
4 0 .9
75 .7
36.0
1 6 .6
34.8
24.1
3 8.7
1 6 .6
3 4.8
61.3

27.5
4 9 .0
7 1.1
77.9
86.5
68.1
6 6 .4
38.7
42.5
3 0 .1
1 9 .9
48.1
81.8
4 4.2
22.5
4 2 .8
30.9
4 7 .7
21.9
42.6
67.4

35.1
56.8
80.5
83.8
89.0
74.9
74.1
47.5
48.0
3 7.8
24.4
55.3
8 6.5
5 2.9
30 .4
51.3
38.5
55.2
28 .8
49 .7
7 2.7

41 .8
6 4.1
85.4
8 8.3
9 1.0
80.6
80.1
5 6 .1
5 3.4
46 .8
3 1.2
6 2 .0
8 9.8
6 1.9
4 0 .2
5 9.7
4 7 .0
6 2.3
38 .4
5 6 .1
77.7

4 8.9
72.1
9 0.8
9 1.6
92.9
84.8
8 4 .9
6 6.6
60.2
5 5 .3
39.0
69.4
92.3
70.3
51.1
6 8.0
56.5
68.6
4 9 .8
62.9
8 2 .2

55.6
78 .2
9 1.7
9 3.5
9 4 .1
88.2
88.2
74.4
6 6.2
6 3.6
4 9.4
7 5.1
9 4.4
77.1
61.5
74.1
64 .3
7 3.3
5 8 .4
68 .2
8 5.0

........................................................................................................................................

5.4

8.1

11.2

14.8

1 9.0

2 3 .6

2 9.3

36.9

46 .2

60.0

6 7.1

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ..........................................................................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .................................................................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .......................................................................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ............................................................................... ..................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AI R ................................................................................................................
P I P E L IN E TRANSPORTAION ..........................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ..........................................................................................................

1.5
1 2 .3
8.0
6.1
2.4
1 .8
7 .8

2 .4
1 6.9
11.5
9.2
4.6
2 .4
12.0

3.5
21.4
15.9
12.8
7 .4
2.4
17.8

4.7
2 7 .2
2 0 .9
16.5
10.5
3.6
23.9

6.2
34.0
26.2
22.2
1 4 .7
3.6
3 1 .1

9 .0
4 0 .3
3 1 .2
28. 1
1 9 .9
4 .8
38.1

1 3 .8
46 .9
36.5
33.9
2 6.8
7 .3
46 .7

2 4 .0
54.7
42 .0
40. 1
35.0
12.1
55.8

3 8.0
6 3.3
48.2
4 6 .8
44.1
18.8
63.8

62.5
7 2.8
56.9
5 6 .6
5 6 .0
2 7 .3
72.8

4 .1

7.3

10.8

16.8

25.3

36.3

4 7 .1

5 4.4

5 9.0

6 3 .2

PR IV AT E NONAGRICULTURAL

M IN IN G

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

MANUFACTURING

TRANSPORTATION

COMMUNICATION

...........................................................................................................................................




IN

THEIR

IN U Y O M JO EARN G W R LESS T A
D STR F A R
IN S E E
HN

INDUSTRY

$9000 $10000 $11000

8 4 .4

89.0

9 2.0

80.0

8 6 .2

90.5

8 1.4
9 4.5
81.6
76.2
84.8

8 6.7
9 4.5
88.4
82.8
90.4

9 3 .1
95.9
93.7
86.8
93.1

75.9

8 3 .6

8 9 .2

82.2
78.2
74.6

8 7.8
85.0
8 2 .9

9 1 .7
89.6
89.0

77.8

8 2 .4

8 7.7

91.3

6 1.2
8 3 .4
93 .9
94 .8
9 5.0
91 .0
90.7
8 0.7
7 2.0
70.5
6 1.4
8 0 .3
95.6
8 2.3
6 9.9
79.4
71 .0
7 7.7
6 5.6
7 2.8
8 7 .5

6 7.9
8 8.0
95.0
9 5.7
9 5 .7
93.2
92.9
85.7
77.3
76.4
70.4
84.8
96.3
87.0
76.6
8 3.4
76.8
81.9
72.0
77.5
89.7

75.9
9 2 .8
96.1
9 6.7
96.5
9 5 .3
95.0
91.0
8 3.9
8 3.2
79.7
90.6
97.2
91.6
84.8
88.3
83.8
86.8
80.0
8 2 .7
9 2.4

81.7
95.1
96.7
97.3
97.2
96.6
96.4
94.1
88.4
87.6
8 5 .0
94.1
9 7.6
94.4
9 0.2
91.8
88.9
90.2
85.6
86.9
9 4.4

72.9

82.0

88.9

93.1

67.1
80.9
6 4.8
63 .0
65.0
4 2 .4
78.3

70.6
86.3
72.2
69. 1
71.5
5 9.4
8 2 .6

8 6.9
91.4
78.9
73.4
77.0
74.5
86.6

93.5
96.7
8 6 .7
81.5
83.1
83.6
9 0 .2

97.7
98.4
9 1.8
8 6.4
8 5 .8
9 1.5
9 2.8

6 6.8

7 0.7

76.2

84.0

8 9.3

Table

A-15.

D i s t r i b u t i o n o f w o r k e r s w i t h f o u r q u a r t e r s of e a r n i n g s in all w a g e a n d s a l a r y e m p l o y m e n t

b y a n n u a l e a r n i n g s in their i n d u s t r y of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THEIR
INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNINGS W
ERE LESS THAN
$1800 $2400 $3000

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

$3600 $ 42 00 $480 0 $54 00 $600 0 $660 0 $720 0 $780 0 $8400 $9000 $10000 $11000

CONTINUED

.......................................................................................................................

2 .8

4 .4

6 .3

9.1

13.3

17.9

23.6

30.4

39.3

49.2

58.5

66.6

76.2

86.2

91.6

WHOLESALE T R A D E ..........................................................................................................................

8 .0

11.9

17.0

23.1

29.9

37.2

44.4

51.2

57.9

65.4

70.6

75.2

79.1

84.0

87.2

RETAIL TRADE .................................................................................................................................

24.9

35.4

46.2

55.2

62.8

68.8

74.3

78.8

83.0

87.0

89.6

91.7

93.3

95.2

96.5

BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT .............................................................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE .........................................................................................
FOOD STORES ...............................................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS .........................................................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • •
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ..............................................................
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES .........................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES .......................................................................................

14.3
24.1
24.3
15.6
28.3
14.6
41.7
27.5

20.5
36.2
34.0
22.4
39.2
22.4
56.0
36.7

28.4
50.7
42.1
29.0
53.2
30.9
67.4
46.3

37.1
62.2
49.1
36.1
64.1
38.6
75.7
55.0

46.2
70.4
55.9
44.6
71.8
46.8
81.8
62.4

55.5
76.1
61.3
52.8
76.7
54.3
86.0
68.3

63.8
80.5
67.6
60.3
81.2
6 1.7
89.4
73.8

70.9
83.7
73.5
67.1
84.2
67.8
91.9
77.7

77.9
87.0
78.8
72.8
87.3
73.6
94.1
81.2

84.6
90.0
84.1
78.5
90.2
80.2
95.8
85.2

88.6
92.0
87.8
82.4
92.0
83.5
96.8
87.5

91.4
93.5
91.0
85.5
93.3
86.6
97.6
89.7

93.1
94.5
93.4
88.3
94.4
89.0
98.1
91.2

95.3
95.9
96.2
91.4
95.6
92.4
98.7
93.4

96.4
96.7
97.7
93.6
96.5
94.2
99.0
95.0

FINANCE*

INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

9.4

14.6

21.2

31.2

42.4

51.9

59.8

65.9

71.0

76.0

79.4

82.4

84.9

88.4

90.8

BANKING .........................................................................................................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
SECURITY* COMMODITY BROKERS ANC SERVICES ......................................................
INSURANCE CARRIERS .............................................................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SERVICE ......................... ...................................
REAL ESTATE ...............................................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE* INSURANCE* ETC • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ....................... ...................................

6.8
9 .5
4.1
6 .5
10.2
21.6
14.8
14.6

12.0
14.6
7 .3
10.7
16.1
30.6
18.5
20.1

18.7
21.8
10.7
16.6
23.6
38.7
28.4
23.3

30.6
32.3
16.5
26.0
33.1
47.5
40.3
29.8

44.8
44.0
23.2
36.9
44.2
55.7
45.3
38.2

56.6
53.7
29.4
45.2
52.8
64.5
51.9
4 4.7

65.6
61.9
36.1
52.5
60.9
71.1
60.5
52.4

71.9
69.0
41.8
58.2
66.8
77.0
67.5
58.1

76.7
74.1
48.0
64.2
72.6
81.3
72.0
61.8

81.2
79.5
54.7
69.5
77.5
84.8
77.4
66.5

84.2
82.7
58.2
73.9
80.3
87.3
81.1
69.5

86.6
85.3
61. 1
78.0
82.4
89.4
82.3
71.7

88.4
87.8
63.9
81.7
84.2
91.3
83.5
73.9

91.0
91.2
68.4
86.7
86.7
93.4
86.0
77.9

92.9
93.0
71.7
89.9
88.8
95.0
88.5
81.1

SERVICES ...........................................................................................................................................

22.4

31.1

40.2

48.7

56.2

62.8

69.1

74.4

78.9

84.8

87.4

89.5

91.3

93.3

94.6

HOTELS ANO OTHER LODGING PLACES
.
PERSONAL SERVICES ................................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
AUTO REPAIR* SERVICES* AND GARAGES
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES
MOTION PICTURES .....................................................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES* NEC ............. ....................... .................. ..
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES
LEGAL SERVICES .......................................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ........................................................................................................
MUSEUMS* BOTANICAL* ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS
«
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ............................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ...................................... ............................................. - ...........

35.9
23.9
18.5
19.8
15.1
32.3
30.2
17.7
11.3
15.5
9 .6
28.1
75.7
8 .1

50.8
37.8
25.5
26.4
21.2
37.9
39.1
29.2
16.5
20.9
12.2
35.9
86.4
12.0

63.7
51.7
33.6
34.1
27.4
41.6
47.4
43.4
22.9
26.3
21.7
43.6
91.8
16.4

74.0
63.6
41.2
43.0
34.2
45.0
55.3
56.7
32.0
31.8
29.6
51.8
95.3
21.1

80.8
71.8
48.2
50.9
42.0
49.6
61.5
67.2
4 3.2
38.3
40.9
60.2
97.5
25.9

85.5
77.7
54.4
58.8
48.8
54.4
67.7
75.4
55.4
45.2
50.4
6 7.0
98.5
31.7

89.2
83.1
60.2
66.6
56.2
58.6
73.2
81.6
66.8
53.3
59.1
72.9
99.1
37.9

91.7
86.6
64.6
73.1
63.0
62.4
77.6
86.1
73.9
61.8
69.6
77.4
99.4
43.6

93.5
89.9
68.9
80.1
70.7
66.5
82.2
89.3
79.9
69.0
74.8
81.1
99.6
48.3

95.2
93.1
73.0
84.9
77.3
70.5
86.1
91.6
84.5
82.7
80.9
84.8
99.7
54.0

96.3
94.7
76.2
88.5
83.5
73.9
88.4
93.3
87.0
86.2
84.3
87.2
99.8
58.9

97.2
95.8
78.9
91.7
86.7
76.7
90.7
94.7
88.5
88.8
87.0
89.4
99.9
63.0

97.5
96.7
81.4
93.8
90.5
79.7
92.1
96.5
90.1
90.5
89.6
91.4
99.9
67.7




98.3
98. 7
98.4
97.7
84.6
87.7
97.6
96.0
93.9
95.8
86.6
83.0
94.0
95.2
97.6
98.0
93.9
92.3
93.8
92.5
90.4
90. A
93.8
95.5
100.0 100.0
74.0
79.3

T a b l e 16. Distribution of w o r k e r s w i t h four q u arters of e a r n i n g s in all w a g e
b y a n n u a l e a r n i n g s in their industry of m a j o r earnings, 1 9 6 7

INDUSTRY

a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THEIR
INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNINGS W
ERE LESS THAN
$1800 $2400 $3000 $3600 $4 2 0 0 $480 0 $54 00 $600 0 $660 0 $7200 $7800 $8400 $9000 $1CC00 $11000
42.4

54.0

63.2

61.4
82.4
47.5
50.7
62.4

70.0
83.8
62.7
57.9
70.1

56. 3
63.8
61.9
55.3

14. 7

21.1

28.3

MINING .......................................................................................................... ....................................

4 .2

6 .4

9.8

13.3

18.0

23.6

29.7

36.2

43.8

METAL MINING ...........................................................................................................................
ANTHRACITE MINING ...............................................................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LIG NI TE M I N I N G ................................... .................................
OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION ..................................................................................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS* EXCEPT FUELS .....................................................................

2 .4
4 .4
2.0
5 .9
5.4

3 .9
5.9
3 .7
8 .6
8 .1

5 .4
8.8
7 .4
11.9
12.5

9 .2
10.3
9.8
15.4
17.4

13.9
13.2
13.3
2 0 .C
24.0

21.7
23.5
16.5
24.6
32.2

31.1
47.1
19.7
30.0
39.8

41.3
55.9
23.6
36.0
47.0

51.3
69.1
31.4
42.1
55.6

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ....................................................... ..................................................

7 .4

11.3

15.9

20.9

26.3

32.3

38.3

44.3

50.3

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS ...................................................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ....................................... ......................................
SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTORS ...................................................................................... ..

9.5
7 .6
8 .4

14.4
11.8
12.5

19.9
17.1
16.9

26.2
23.2
21.7

32.4
29.8
26.8

39.5
37. 1
32.4

46.0
43.8
38.2

52.1
50.3
44.1

58.1
56.6
4 9.6

MANUFACTURING ...................................................................... .......................................................

4 .7

8.3

13.8

20.7

27.9

35.0

42.3

49.4

56.7

65.4

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .................................. ................................. ........................
FOOD ANO KINDRED PRODUCTS ...........................................................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS................ .............................................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS .....................................................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PRCDUCTS ....................................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS ................................... .........................................................
FURNITURE AND F I X T U R E S .................. ...............................................................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ...........................................................................................
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING .......................................................................... .....................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRCDUCTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS* NEC ..........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ...................................................... ............................
STONE* CLAY* AND GLASS PRODUCTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ....................... ............................ .........................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ...........................................................................................
MACHINERY* EXCEPT ELECTRICAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ........................................................... ..
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .............................................................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ........................................................... ..............
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ..................................... .....................

2.5
8 .8
7 .7
6 .9
10.5
11.1
9.2
4 .0
8 .3
2 .7
2 .6
6 .6
10.6
4.9
2.3
5.4
3.6
3 .9
2 .4
3.5
10.7

4.5
13.7
14.1
13.0
22.1
18.5
14.2
6 .9
11.9
4 .5
3.7
10.5
18.7
7 .7
3 .7
8.3
5.8
6 .8
4.1
6 .4
17.6

6 .7
19.3
23.7
23.2
42.9
28.7
22.2
10.4
16.4
6.8
5.3
15.5
33.6
11.6
5.6
12.4
8.4
11.6
6.0
11.0
26.6

9.9
25.7
34.6
38.0
62.7
38.7
33.4
15.9
22.5
10.2
7 .4
23.6
50.2
16.5
8 .2
17.6
11.8
18.5
8.8
17.1
38.3

13.7
32.3
42.6
54.1
74.0
47.9
46.4
22.4
29.1
14.9
9.9
32.0
63.9
23.5
12.0
24.1
16.7
27.0
12.2
24.8
49.2

19 . 1
39.6
53.6
66.8
80.5
55.5
57.0
28.5
35.7
20.9
13.3
4 0.0
72.8
32.4
16.6
31.5
22. 7
35.9
16.3
32.6
57.7

26.7
46.8
69.5
76.1
85.2
63.5
65.0
36.1
41.5
28.3
16.6
48.0
80.1
41.5
22.9
40.1
29.8
44.2
21.4
40.4
65.0

33.9
53.8
77.7
82.1
87.8
70.6
72.8
44. 1
4 7.0
35.8
21.6
55.7
84.9
50.7
31.5
48.5
37.5
52.1
28.2
47.8
70.3

41.7
61.1
85.1
86.5
90.1
77.1
78.3
52.9
51.8
43.5
27.0
6 2.4
88.3
59.4
41.6
56.9
46.2
59.0
37.3
54.5
74.7

53.8
69.1
88.7
90.5
91.9
82.7
83.7
62.9
58.5
53.4
34.8
72.0
91.7
68.0
53.4
66. 5
56.0
66.3
51.1
62.0
80.7

TRANSPORTATION.................................................................................... ......................................

5.5

8.0

10.8

14.0

17.9

22.3

27.0

33.2

40.6

52.8

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ...................................................................................... ..
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ..........................................................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ..............................................................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ........................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR ................................. ....................... ...........................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTA ION ................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ................................................................................................

1 .1
13.3
7 .8
7 .0
1.8
1.2
7.6

2 .0
17.6
11.4
9 .6
3 .3
3 .0
11.0

2 .8
22.4
15.2
12.8
5.5
4 .2
1 6. 1

3.9
26.9
19.7
16.6
8.1
5 .4
21.3

5.3
32.9
24.7
21.0
11.4
6 .0
29.4

7 .3
39. 7
29.7
26.7
15.4
8 .9
36.4

10.4
46.0
34.5
32.9
20.9
11.3
44.2

17.3
52.9
39.5
38.6
28.2
14.3
53.0

27.2
60.0
45.2
4 5.3
35.8
17.3
60.5

51.2
67.2
52.7
52.1
44.8
23.2
69.5

3 .7

6.5

10.1

1 5. 1

23.5

33.6

44.7

53.3

58.3

62. A

66.1

49.2

55.5

61.7

78.4

9.7




35.6

74.0

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ..................................................................

68.8

82.2

87.2

90.5

70.4

76.0

82.9

88.0

77.0
91.2
70.8
64.8
76.7

82.3
92.6
75.6
70.9
82.5

87.0
94. 1
81.9
79.0
88.9

91.5
94. 1
88.8
84.5
91.9

61.7

66.9

72.0

80.0

86. 1

68.7
66.4
6 0.4

73.5
70.7
65.4

78.0
75.4
70.3

84.8
82.0
78.9

89.4
87.0
85.7

71.5

76.7

80.9

86.1

89.9

60.2
75.2
90.7
92.6
93.2
86.5
87.0
70.6
64.1
61.3
4 2.2
77.6
93.3
75.0
63.1
73.3
63.5
71.5
59.6
67.3
83.8

65.8
80.9
92.5
94.3
94.3
89.5
89.5
77.0
69.6
67.7
54.0
82.4
94.9
90.8
71.2
78.2
70.4
75.9
66.2
7 1. 3
86.4

70.6
85.4
93.8
95.1
95.0
91.9
91.5
82.5
74.8
73.4
64.1
85.9
95.4
85.1
77.3
81.7
75. 1
79.7
71.9
74.9
88.2

77.6
90.6
95.3
96. 1
95.8
94.4
94.6
89.0
81.5
80.8
74.3
90.3
96.4
90.2
84.4
86.8
81.3
84.5
79.6
79.9
90.9

82.6
93.8
95.9
96.8
96.5
95.9
96. I
92.8
86.5
85.4
82. 1
93.7
97.2
93. 1
90. 1
90.6
86.6
88.2
85. 0
84.6
92.8

62.2

68.6

76.4

86.4

90. 3

64.0
75.7
60.9
58.1
52.8
33.9
76.1

68.0
81.1
68.8
64.5
60.2
46.4
80.5

77.7
86.9
76.4
69.2
68.4
66. 1
85.0

93.0
92. 7
84.9
76.5
77.4
79.8
89.4

93.3
96.7
90.5
8 2 .C
83.4
88. 1
9 1 .C

70.3

75.6

83.2

88.0

T a b l e A-16.
by annual

D i s t r i b u t i o n of w o r k e r s w i t h f o u r q u a r t e r s of e a r n i n g s in all w a g e a n d s a l a r y e m p l o y m e n t
e a r n i n g s in their i n d u s t r y of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d
CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THEIR
INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNINGS W
ERE LESS THAN
$1800 $2400 $300 0 $3600 $420 0 $4800 $540 0 $600 0 $660 0 $7200 $780 0 $8400 $9000 $10000 $11000

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

CONTINUED

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ......................................................................................................................

2.5

3.8

5.6

7.8

11.3

16.3

21.6

27.8

35.1

45.1

53.8

61.9

70.7

81.3l

88.5

WHOLESALE T R A D E ............................ ............................................................................................

7.3

11.0

15.5

20.9

27.4

34.4

41.5

48.2

54.7

62.7

67.9

72.8

76.9

8 2. 3 i

86.0

RETAIL TRADE .................................................................................................................................

24.2

34.2

44.5

53.8

61.4

67.3

72.7

77.1

81.2

85.2

87.9

90.2

92.1

9 A. 3
1

95.8

............ ................................................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE ....................................................... .................................
FOOD STORES ..............................................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE S T A T I O N S ............. ...........................................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY S T O R E S ............. .......................... ...........................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES .............................................................
EATING AND DRINKING P L A C E S ..................................... ...................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES .......................................................................................

14.2
23.0
23.7
15.7
27.4
15.2
41.3
25.6

20.3
33.5
33.5
21.5
37.6
22.0
55.5
34.8

26.3
47.0
41.5
28.1
50.7
30.2
66.7
43.8

33.7
59.8
48.5
34.8
62.7
38.2
75.1
52.7

42.3
68.8
54.9
42.7
70.8
45.9
81.1
6 0.4

51. 1
74.7
60.2
50.2
7 6. 1
52.6
85.3
66.3

59.7
79.2
65.9
57.7
80.6
60.1
88.8
71.7

67. 1
82.8
71.4
64. 1
83.3
66.0
91.1
75.8

74.5
85.8
76.6
70.0
86.1
72.0
93.1
79.3

81.7
88.6
81.8
75.9
88.9
78.0
95.0
83.1

86.4
90.8
85.8
79.7
90.8
81.5
96.0
85.5

89.5
92.4
89.2
83.5
92.3
84.6
97.0
87.6

92.0
93.8
92.1
86.2
93.4
87.0
97.5
89.3

9A.6. 9 6 . 2
9 5 .A 96.5
t
1
9 5 .C 96.9
89.7
9 2 .A
95. 1 96.2
90.6
9 3 .A
98.3. 9 8 .6
92.0i 9 3 .9

b u il d in g

m ate rials

a nd

f a rm

equipment

INSURANCE« AND REAL ESTATE • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

8.9

13.6

19.0

27.9

38.8

48.7

56.7

63.1

68.4

73.7

77.3

80.5

83.1

86.9'

89.6

B A N K IN G .......................................................................................................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ............................................... ................ ..
SECURITY* COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES ......................................................
INSURANCE CARRIERS .............................................................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SERVICE .............................................................
REAL ESTATE ..............................................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE* INSURANCE* ETC
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ...........................................................

6.1
9.7
3 .0
6 .1
10.8
20.5
16.3
12.8

10.9
14.7
5 .6
10.0
16.0
28.0
20.8
17.4

15.9
19.6
9 .1
14.8
22.4
36.1
28.0
22.7

26.9
29.1
12.7
22.8
31.7
44.1
39.8
27.4

40.8
40.7
17.5
33.2
41.8
52.4
4 8.9
35.3

53.5
50.5
24.4
42.6
50.2
60.7
55.3
39.0

62.6
59.8
30.0
49.9
58.4
68.1
62.1
46.6

69.3
66.7
36.3
56.0
64. 1
74.1
68.9
53.1

74.3
72.3
42.9
61.7
68.7
78.9
73.1
58.5

79.5
77.5
52.4
67.0
73.7
82.8
76 . 1
63.8

82.4
81.1
56.2
71.6
77.6
85.7
78.4
67.3

84.9
84.3
59.2
75.8
79.8
88. 1
80.3
68.7

87.1
86.3
61.3
79.8
81.8
89.9
82.2
71.0

89.9i
8 9. 7
67.2
8 A. 9i
8 5. 0 1
92.5i
86.7’
7A.C1

92.0
92. A
71.1
88.3
87.3
94.3
90.9
77.7

SERVICES ...........................................................................................................................................

20.7

28.8

37.1

45.5

53.0

59.6

65.5

70.9

75.8

80.7

84.0

86.5

88.5

9 1 .C 92.8
1

FINANCE*

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES
PERSONAL SERVICES ...............................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
AUTO REPAIR* SERVICES* AND GARAGES
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES
MOTION PICTURES .................................................................................................................. ..
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES* NEC
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES
LEGAL SERVICES .......................................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ........................................................................................................
MUSEUMS* BOTANICAL* ZOOLOGICAL GAR DENS..........................................................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS .............................................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ........................................... ........................................ ..............




34.0
2 0.6
18.9
17.9
13.9
30.3
31.5
15.0
12.1
14.7
16.4
28.3
73.8
7 .1

47.9
33.7
2 5.4
24.3
18.9
36.5
40.0
24.9
17.0
20.4
20.9
35.1
84.7
10.6

60.5
47.2
32.4
31.8
2 4.6
41.3
47.6
37.4
22.7
25.5
26.9
42.7
90.8
14.4

70.7
59.8
39.4
39.2
30.1
45.0
55.1
50.8
30.9
31.0
34.3
50.4
94.3
18.6

78.4
6 8.6
46.3
46.5
3 7.4
48.4
60.8
62.1
4 0.0
36.6
41.0
58.5
96.7
23.1

83.5
7 5.2
52.4
53.7
44. 0
53.5
66.4
70.4
50.9
42.9
52.2
65.4
98. 1
28.4

87.5
8 0.5
57.7
62.0
51.6
58.2
72.0
76.8
61.7
49.8
61.9
71.0
98.8
34.1

90.2
84.4
62.8
68. 1
5 9.3
61.2
76.1
81.7
70.3
57.7
68.7
75.9
99.2
39.1

92.5
87.8
67.2
75.2
66.2
64.9
81.1
85.6
76.1
65.2
74.6
80.3
99.6
44.4

94.4
91.2
71.4
8 0. 9
7 3.6
68.7
85.4
89. 1
82.2
73.2
79.9
83.8
99.7
50.0

95.6
93.2
74.7
85.4
79.5
72.3
88.1
91.2
85.1
78.6
87.3
86.3
99.8
54.7

96.3
94.7
77.4
8 8.7
83.9
75.3
90.0
92.8
87.3
82.3
88.8
88.6
99.9
59.3

96.9
97.7
98.3
95.7
97.0l 9 7 .9
80.0
83.3i 8 6. 1
91.3
9 A. A 9 5 . 8
►
87.9
92.5i 9 4 .9
77.4
8 1 .A 84.8
►
9 1 . A 93.2! 9 4 .5
95.6i 97. 3
94.2
88.9
92.0l 9 3 .0
85.0
88.01 8 9 .7
9A.C1 9 4 . 0
91.0
9 0 . A 92.8l 9 4 .4
1 0 0 . 0 1 0 0 .0 1 1 0 0 . 0
1
63.5
7 0 . C 76.3

T a b l e A-17.

Industry e m p l o y m e n t , 1 9 6 6

(NUMBERS IN THOUSANDS)

INDUSTRY

W0 R K E R S
WH O
HAD
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY i
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY 2
PERCENT OF
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
NUMBER
PERCENT
NUMBER
PERCENT
THE INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ..............................

72,457

100.0

72,457

100.0

100.0

M I N I N G ............................ ..............................................................................

939

1.3

726

1 .0

77.3

METAL M I N I N G .......................................................................................
ANTHRACITE MINING ...........................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND L IG NI TE MINING .................................
OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION ..............................................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS . ..............................

112
13
168
428
226

.2
(3)
.2
.6
.3

94
10
147
322
156

.1
( 3)
.2
.4
.2

84.1
78.1
87.1
75.2
69.1

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ......................................................................

6 ,114

8 .4

4 , 574

6 .3

74.8

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS ...............................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ..........................................
SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTORS................. ....................................

2 ,309
1 ,7 9 3
3,179

3 .2
2 .5
4 .4

1 ,387
1 ,120
2,061

1 .9
1 .5
2 .8

60.0
62.5
64.8

MANUFACTURING ..........................................................................................

26,919

37.2

23,900

33.0

88.8

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .........................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ......................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ................................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS .................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS....................... .................................
FURNITURE AND F I X T U R E S ...................... ......................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING ............................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .............................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ..........................................
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC .....................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ...............................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS ........................................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES .........................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS .......................................... ..
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ...............................................
e l e c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t AND SUPPLIES ...................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .........................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .....................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING IN D U S T R I E S ............. • • • •

452
3 ,256
164
1,428
2,2 9 0
1,098
818
1 ,037
1,563
1,420
278
882
614
1,096
1,8 7 4
2,3 1 2
2 ,849
2,934
2,8 0 9
613
826

.6
4 .5
.2
2.0
3 .2
1 .5
1 .1
1.4
2 .2
2.0
.4
1.2
.8
1 .5
2 .6
3.2
3 .9
4 .0
3.9
.8
1.1

373
2 ,3 9 2
128
1,179
1,920
7 74
552
798
1 ,229
1,177
229
631
472
814
1 ,569
1 ,628
2 ,230
2 ,375
2 ,331
489
573

.5
3.3
.2
1.6
2 .7
1 .1
.8
1 .1
1 .7
1.6
.3
.9
.7
1 .1
2 .2
2.2
3.1
3 .3
3 .2
.7
.8

82.5
73.5
78.3
82.5
83.9
70.5
67.5
77.0
78.6
82.9
82.3
71.5
76.9
74.3
83.7
70.4
78.3
81.0
83.0
79.9
69.3

TRANSPORTATION......................................................................................

4,1 9 8

5 .8

3,1 8 6

4.4

75.9

............................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ......................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .........................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION .................................................. ................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR .................................................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORT A ION ............................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ............................................................

935
511
1,885
431
364
20
203

1 .3
.7
2 .6
.6
.5
(3)
.3

848
359
1,238
302
311
18
120

1.2
.5
1 .7

90.7
70.2
65.7
70.0
85.4
93.4
59.1

r a il r o a d

t r a n spor ta tio n

See footnotes at end of ta b le .




.4
.4

(3)
.2

T a b l e A-17.

I n d us t r y e m p l o y m e n t , 1 9 6 6 — C o n t i n u e d

(NUMBERS IN THOUSANDS)
W O R K E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY 1
INDUSTRY

NUMBER
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

PERCENT

WH O
HAD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY 2
PERCENT OF
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
NUMBER
PERCENT
THE INDUSTRY

CONTINUED

COMMUNICATION ..........................................................................................

1 ,2 5 2

1.7

1 ,1 0 1

1 .5

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ...................................................................................

664

1.2

773

1 .1

89.4

TRADE .....................................................................................

6 ,2 4 2

8 .6

4,5 2 9

6 .3

72.6

RETAIL TRADE .............................................................................................

18,379

25.4

13,829

19.1

75.2

BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT .........................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE .....................................................
FOOD STORES ..........................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS .....................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES ................................................
FURNITURE ANO HOME FURNISHINGS STORES .........................
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES .....................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ..................................................

863
4,288
2 ,8 3 3
2 ,8 9 0
1,5 01
761
4,897
2 ,2 5 3

1 .2
5.9
3 .9
4 .0
2.1
1 .0
6 .8
3.1

583
2,9 9 3
2,0 8 5
1,801
1,034
505
3,291
1 ,524

•8
4 .1
2 .9
2 .5
1 .4
.7
4 .5
2 .1

67.6
69.8
73.6
62.3
68.9
66.4
67.2
67.7

INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE ...................................

4,784

6 .6

3 ,794

5 .2

79.3

BANKING ....................................................................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ......................................
SECURITY, COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES ..................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ......................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SERVICE .........................
REAL ESTATE ..........................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC ............................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .......................

1 ,1 0 0
522
188
1 ,3 0 2
374
1 ,2 6 8
53
130

1.5
.7
.3
1 .8
.5
1 .7
.1
.2

975
399
159
1 ,074
292
805
38
61

1 .3
.6
.2
1.5
.4
1.1
.1
.1

88.7
76.5
84.6
82.5
78.0
63.5
71.4
46.9

S E R V I C E S .......................................................................................................

20,002

27.6

16,046

22.1

80.2

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES .........................................
PERSONAL SERVICES ...........................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES .........................................
AUTO REPAIR* SERVICES, ANC GARAGES............. ...................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES .............................................
MOTION PICTURES ................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES, NEC .......................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ...................................
LEGAL SERVICES ...................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL S E R V I C E S ..................................................... ..............
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS .......................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS .................................
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS........................................... .............................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ......................................... .....................

1 ,7 6 4
1 ,8 0 4
2,918
762
361
400
1 ,1 3 5
3 ,7 5 2
293
4,430
26
2 ,0 7 8
1 ,2 1 5
839

2 .4
2 .5
4 .0
1 .1
.5
•6
1 .6
5 .2
.4
6.1
( 3)
2 .9
1.7
1.2

1 ,138
1,397
1,6 1 9
413
211
248
651
3,2 1 9
242
3 ,836
20
1,372
1 ,0 6 4
618

1.6
1.9
2 .2
.6
.3
.3
.9
4 .4
.3
5 .3
( 3)
1.9
1 .5
.9

64.5
77.4
55.5
54.3
58.6
62.0
57.3
85.8
82.5
86.6
78.0
66.0
87.5
73.7

w ho lesa le

FINANCE*

1 W o rk e rs who had some earnings in
in dus tr y group and divi sion .
Th us, some
2 The nu mber of w o rk e r s who r ec e iv e d
at the di vis io na l le v e l.
T h e r e f o r e , de ta il
because the test used to assign w o r k e r s to
in the m a j o r industry groups that c om pr is e
3 Less than 0 . 0 5 pe rc e n t.




88.0

m o r e than 1 industry group and in m or e than 1 industry division, a re included in the count of those with some earnings in each such
w o rk e r s a re counted m or e than once and, t h e r e f o re , det ail does not add to tot al.
the m aj or proportion of the ir earnings in each industry group is an unduplicated count of w o rk e r s , as is the count of m a j o r earners
by industry group and detail by division do (except
fo r rounding) equal the to ta l f o r the p riv at e no na gr icu ltu ral economy. H ow ev er,
an industry is applied independently at each lev e l of
industry cla ssi fica tio n (e. g . ,industry group or division) the number of worke rs
a division may not equal the tota l fo r the division.

T a b l e A-18.

Industry e m p l o y m e n t , 1 9 6 7

(NUMBERS IN THOUSANDS)

INDUSTRY

WH O
W 0 R K E R S
HAD
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY 1
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY 2
PERCENT OF
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
NUMBER
PERCENT
PERCENT
NUMBER
THE INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ..............................

73,907

100.0

73,907

100.0

MINING ...........................................................................................................

897

1.2

713

1.0

79.4

METAL M I N I N G ................................. ................................. ...................
ANTHRACITE MINING ...........................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LI G N IT E MINING .................................
OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION ..............................................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS ............... ................

110
12
166
403
215

. 1
(3)
.2
.5
.3

95
9
148
310
153

.1
( 3)
.2
.4
.2

86.5
78.2
89. 1
76.9
71. 1

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION..............................................................

100 . 0

5 ,974

8.1

4 ,505

6 .1

75.4

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS ...............................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS.........................................
SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTORS .......................................................

2,2 1 4
1,735
3 , 121

3.0
2.3
4 .2

1,359
1,094
2 ,049

1.8
1.5
2 .8

61.4
63.0
65.6

..........................................................................................

26,911

36.4

23,995

32.5

89.2

ORONANCE AND ACCESSORIES .........................................................
FOOD ANO KINDRED PRODUCTS ......................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS................................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS .................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .........................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES ..............................................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .......................................................
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING ............................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .....................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS.................................................
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC .....................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS .......................................... ..
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS............. ..........................
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R I E S ....................... .................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS .......................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ...............................................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .........................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .....................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES .......................

570
3,251
160
1 ,403
2 ,231
1,039
771
1,013
1,573
1 ,4 3 1
277
897
593
1,057
1,785
2,241
2,8 5 2
2,8 8 7
2,741
623
804

.8
4 .4
.2
1 .9
3.0
1 .4
1.0
1.4
2. 1
1 .9
.4
1 .2
.8
1 .4
2 .4
3.0
3 .9
3 .9
3 .7
.8
1.1

482
2,431
125
1,172
1,8 8 7
749
536
794
1 ,260
1,199
231
645
458
786
1 ,5 1 8
1,619
2 ,2 8 2
2 ,399
2 ,308
5C8
569

.7
3.3
.2
1 .6
2 .6
1 .0
.7
1.1
1.7
1.6
.3
.9
.6
1.1
2 .1
2 .2
3.1
3 .2
3 .1
.7
.8

8 4. 5
74.8
78. 3
83.5
8 4* 6
7 2. 1
69.6
78.4
80. 1
83.8
83.5
71.9
77.2
74.4
85. 1
72.2
80.0
83.1
84.2
81.5
70.8

TRANSPORTATION ............................... .......................................................

4 ,2 2 7

5 .7

3,247

4.4

76.8

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ............................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .......................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .........................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ....................... ...........................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR .................................................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTA ION ...........................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ............................................................

879
536
1 ,8 7 3
428
412
20
219

1.2
. 7
2.5
.6
.6
( 3)
.3

817
374
1 ,249
301
361
19
133

1 .1
.5
1.7

92.9
69.8
66.7
70.3
87.6
93.6
60.8

m an ufactur in g

See footnotes at end of ta b le .




.4

.5
(3)
.2

T a b l e A-18.

In d ustry e m p l o y m e n t , 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d

{ NUMBERS IN THOUSANDS)

_____________________
W O R K E R S
SOME EARNINGS I N THE INDUSTRY 1
INDUSTRY
NUMBER

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

WH O
HAD
MAJCR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY 1
2
PERCENT Ur
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
________ THE INDUSJ-RY_________
PERCENT
PERCENT_________ ________ NUMBER_______

CONTINUED

COMMUNICATION..........................................................................................

1 ,2 7 7

1 .7

1 ,1 3 8

1 .5

89. 1

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ...................................................................................

877

1 .2

789

1 .1

90.0

WHOLESALE TRADE .....................................................................................

6,218

8.4

4,5 9 4

6 .2

73.9

RETAIL T R A D E .................. .........................................................................

18,531

25.1

14,090

19.1

76.0

BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT .........................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE .....................................................
FOOD STORES .......................................... ..............................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS .....................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES ................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ..........................
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES .....................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ...................................................

835
A , 251
2,892
2 , 89A
1 ,5 15
769
5 ,0 3 3
2,239

1.1
5.8
3 .9
3.9
2.1
1 .0
6 .8
3 .0

569
3 ,004
2 , 147
1 ,836
1,053
517
3 ,4 1 8
1 ,5 4 1

.8
4 .1
2 .9
2 .5
1.4
.7
4 .6
2 .1

68.1
70.7
74.2
63.5
69.5
67.3
67.9
68.8

....................................

4,903

6 .6

3 ,9 3 6

5 .3

80.3

BANKING ....................................................................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ......................................
SECURITY, COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES ..................
INSURANCE C A R R I E R S .............................................................. ..
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SERVICE .........................
REAL ESTATE ..........................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE* INSURANCE, ETC ............................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .......................

1, 1 4 8
523
213
1 ,3 6 0
371
1 ,2 5 3
50
139

1 .6
.7
.3
1 .8
.5
1.7
.1
.2

1,022
403
179
1,1 3 0
294
812
37
68

1 .4
.5
.2
1 .5
.4
1.1
( 3)
. 1

89.0
77.0
83.9
83. 1
79.4
64.8
73.2
48.8

SERVICES .......................................................................................................

20,839

28.2

16,901

22.9

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ........................................
PERSONAL SERVICES ...........................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES .........................................
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES .................................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES .............................................
MOTION PICTURES ................................. ..............................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES* NEC ..................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ...................................
LEGAL SERVICES ...................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ....................................................................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS .......................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS .................................
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ........................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ...............................................................

1 ,7 7 6
1,7 71
3 ,0 8 0
756
359
404
1 ,1 6 3
3 ,9 9 7
306
4,732
31
2 ,2 6 9
1 ,1 5 9
867

2 .4
2 .4
4.2
1.0
.5
.5
1.6
5.4
.4
6 .4
( 3)
3.1
1 .6
1 .2

1,153
1 ,3 8 1
1 ,755
425
218
250
669
3,470
250
4 ,1 1 9
24
1,515
1,022
650

1 .6
1.9
2 .4
.6
.3
.3
.9
4 .7
.3
5 .6
(3)
2 .0
1.4
.9

FINANCE*

INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE

81.1
64.9
78.0
57.0
56.2
60.8
61.9
57.5
86.8
81.8
87. 1
77.5
66.8
88. 1
75.0

1 W o rk e rs who had some earnings in
m o r e than 1 industry group and in m or e than 1 indus try division, a re included in the count
of those with some earnings in each such
in dustry group and divi sio n.
Thus, some
w o rk e r s a re counted m or e than once and, t h e r e f o re , de ta il does not add to tot al.
2 The nu mber of w o rk e r s who rec e iv e d the m a j o r proportion of the ir earnings in each industry group is an unduplicated count of w o rk e r s , as is the count of m a j o r earners
at the di vis io nal le v e l.
T h e r e f o r e , d e t a il by industry group and detail by division do (except
f o r rounding) equal the t o t a l f o r the pr iv a te no na gr icu ltu ral economy. However,
because the test used to assign w o r k e r s to
an industry is applied independently at each le v e l of industry clas sifica tion ( e . g . , indus tr y group or division) the number of work er s
in the m a j o r industry groups that c o m p r is e a division may not equal the tota l fo r the division.
3 Less than 0 . 0 5 pe rc e n t.




T a b l e A-19.

In d ustry e m p l o y m e n t b y race a n d sex, 1 9 6 6

(NUMBERS IN THOUSANDS)

INDUSTRY

WORK E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY i
WH I T E 3
N E G R 0
TOTAL
1 MEN
TOTAL
W
OMEN
MEN
| WOMEN
|

WH O
HAD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY2
W H I T E 3
N E G R O
| MEN
| W
TOTAL
| MEN
| WOMEN
TOTAL
OMEN

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .......................

64651

39701

2495 0

7806

4560

3246

64651

39701

2495 0

7806

4560

3246

M I N I N G ...................................................................................................

901

841

60

38

36

2

701

650

51

25

24

1

METAL MINING ................................................................................
ANTHRACITE MINING .............................................................. ..
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LI G N IT E MINING .........................
OI L AND GAS EXTRACTION .......................................................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS .........................

111
13
162
418
205

106
12
157
377
197

5
1
5
41
9

1
6
10
21

1
_
6
9
20

1
1

93
10
141
317
143

89
9
137
281
135

4
1
4
35
7

1
_
6
5
14

1
_
6
4
13

_
1
1

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................................

5346

5035

311

768

743

24

4052

3818

235

522

507

15

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS..............................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ...................................
SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTORS............. .................................

1956
1535
2806

1847
1482
2651

109
54
155

353
258
373

341
254
364

12
4
10

1195
986
1868

1118
944
1751

77
42
117

191
134
194

184
132
188

7
2
6

MANUFACTURING ..................................................................................

24177

16860

7317

2741

1970

771

21617

14936

6681

2283

1621

662

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES ....................... ..........................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ...............................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ..........................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS....................... , ...............................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS .........................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS ..................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES .......................................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ...............................................
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING ....................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ......................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ..........................................
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC ..............................
LEATHER ANO LEATHER PRODUCTS ........................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS .................................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ..................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ...............................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ........................................
e l e c t r i c a l EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ............................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..............................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S ............. ..

423
2798
109
1264
2013
881
707
929
1451
1288
255
785
564
972
1596
2077
2701
2694
2551
571
702

332
1982
62
684
456
799
563
709
929
988
221
510
257
810
1455
1692
2288
1582
2247
354
395

91
816
47
581
1557
82
144
220
522
300
34
274
307
162
141
385
413
1112
304
217
308

29
458
55
164
277
217
112
107
112
132
24
98
50
123
279
235
148
239
258
42
124

22
336
35
110
74
20 2
93
83
72
109
22
64
24
113
270
201
129
125
235
21
58

7
122
20
54
204
15
19
25
40
23
2
33
26
10
9
34
19
114
23
21
66

352
2093
90
1059
1709
623
484
730
1159
1085
216
569
441
732
1348
1479
2129
2207
2120
461
499

272
1442
47
544
341
560
375
551
742
831
186
362
189
594
1230
1177
1791
1268
1858
28 3
263

80
651
43
515
1368
63
110
179
416
254
29
207
253
137
118
301
338
939
262
178
236

22
299
38
119
212
151
68
68
71
92
14
62
31
82
221
149
101
168
211
28
74

16
207
22
76
45
141
56
53
44
75
12
39
14
75
215
126
87
79
193
13
31

6
92
16
43
167
11
13
15
26
17
1
23
16
7
6
23
14
89
19
15
43

TRANSPORTATION ................................................................................

3686

3286

399

512

489

23

2848

2522

325

338

322

16

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION .....................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ...............
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ..................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION.................. .........................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR .........................................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORT A ION ....................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ....................... ............................

851
438
1635
341
345
20
172

800
393
1488
318
256
18
123

51
45
146
22
89
2
49

83
73
251
90
19
31

80
67
241
89
17
30

3
6
9
2
2

730
270
992
230
217
17
73

48
34
109
18
78
1
38

70
55
136
54
16

68
50
131
53
14

2
5
6
1
2

-

-

-

1

777
304
1101
248
295
18
111

9

9

1

COMMUNICATION ..................................................................................

1187

573

614

65

23

42

1049

496

553

53

17

36

See footnotes at end of ta b le .




_
-

-

T a b l e A-1 9 .

industry

employmatit by race and sex, 1 9 6 6 —- C o n t i n u e d

(NUMBERS IN THOUSANDS)
WORK E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY *
w H I T E 3
N E G R 0
TOTAL T
MEN
1 W
OMEN
TOTAL T
MEN
r WOMEN

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

WH O
HAD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY2
WH I T E 3
N E G R O
1 MEN
1 W
OMEN
TOTAL 1
MEN
1 WOMEN
TOTAL

CONTINUED

............................................................................

807

682

125

57

53

4

729

613

116

43

40

4

WHOLESALE TRADE ..............................................................................

5616

4271

1344

626

516

no

4157

3105

1052

372

299

73

RETAIL TRADE ......................................................................................

16570

9092

7478

1809

1122

687

12603

6423

61 8 0

1226

709

517

BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ..................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE ..............................................
FOOD STORES ...................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS .............
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES .........................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ..................
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES ..............................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ...........................................

788
3894
2650
2628
1381
686
4210
2049

660
1349
1715
2375
471
488
1889
1139

129
2544
934
253
911
198
2320
910

74
395
184
262
120
75
687
203

70
177
136
248
50
60
376
144

4
218
48
14
69
15
311
59

543
2757
1964
1650
959
463
2850
1405

444
816
1229
1463
292
317
1117
738

99
1941
735
187
667
146
1733
667

41
237
121
151
75
42
441
119

38
89
87
143
27
32
212
81

2
148
34
8
48
10
229
39

FINANCE* INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE ............................

4397

2239

2158

387

255

132

3555

1708

1848

239

141

98

BANKING .............................................................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ...............................
SECURITY, COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES ...........
INSURANCE CARRIERS ..................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERVICE ..................
REAL ESTATE ...................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC .....................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ................

1048
503
184
1241
364
1038
50
115

394
222
112
640
129
713
19
77

654
281
71
601
235
326
31
37

52
19
5
61
9
230
4
16

23
11
3
28
5
176
2
12

29
8
1
33
5
54
1
4

936
388
156
1030
287
675
36
56

346
166
97
520
101
438
14
31

590
222
59
511
185
236
23
25

39
11
3
44
5
131
2
5

16
6
3
17
2
95
1
3

24
5
1
27
3
36
1
2

SERVICES ................................................................................................

16637

7633

90 0 4

3365

1353

2013

13341

5432

7909

2704

879

1825

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES .................................
PERSONAL SERVICES ....................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES .................................
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES .........................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ......................................
MOTION PICTURES ..................................................... ...................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES, NEC ................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ............................
LEGAL SERVICES ............................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES .............................................................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ..........................
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS..................... .................................. . . . .
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ........................................................

1371
1393
2462
609
328
373
1025
3130
282
3935
23
1704
543
802

659
534
1465
551
281
237
724
643
64
1656
13
886
77
541

712
859
998
59
47
136
301
2487
218
2279
10
818
466
261

393
411
456
152
32
27
110
623
11
495
3
374
673
36

181
135
328
143
28
17
87
172
5
197
2
203
48
23

212
2 76
128
9
4
9
22
451
6
298
1
172
624
14

892
1092
1425
336
197
233
595
2719
235
3430
18
1116
463
595

387
386
790
297
163
144
399
504
55
1358
10
484
54
405

505
706
635
39
34
89
196
2215
179
2071

246
305
194
78
15
15
55
500
7
407
3
256
601
23

97
84
123
73
12
9
42
116
2
148
2
121
35
14

149
221
70
5
2
6
13
384
5
259
1
135
566
9

8
632
40 9
190

1 W o rk e rs who had some earnings in m o r e than 1 industry group and in m or e than 1 industry division, a re included in the count of those with some earnings in each such
industry group and divi sio n.
Thus, some w o r k e r s are counted m or e than once and, t h e r ef o re , det ail does not add to tota l.
2 The numb er of w o r k e r s who r ec eiv ed the m a j o r proportion of their earnings in each industry group is an unduplicated count of w o rk e r s, as is the count of m a j o r earners
at the divi sio nal le v e l.
T h e r e f o r e , det ail by in dustry group and detail by division do (except for rounding) equal the total for the priva te nonagr icu ltu ral economy.
However,
because the test used to assign w o rk e r s to an industry is applied independently at each lev el of industry clas sifica tion ( e . g . , industry group or division) the number of workers
in the m a j o r industry groups that c om pr is e a division may not equal the tota l f o r the division,
3 Includes w o rk e r s of a ll races other than Neg ro .
NOTE:

A dash ( - ) indicates e ith e r the sample did not include any worke rs with these c ha ra c t e ri s t i c s , or that the data did not meet the Bureau's publication c r i t e r i a .




Table A-20. Industry employment by race and sex, 1967
(NUMBERS

IN

THOUSANDS)

INDUSTRY
TOTAL

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

‘ SOME EARNINGS IN
W H I T E 3
MEN
| WOMEN
|

W O R K
E R S
INDUSTRY1
N E G R 0
TOTAL
|
MEN
| WOMEN

THE

...........................

65902

40053

25849

8004

4640

M I N I N G ................................................. .......................................................................

863

804

60

34

32

109

102
11

160
394
197

156
355
188

4
39
9

9
18

17

5253

4928

325

721

697

1898
1495
2769

1783
1433
2614

115
62
156

316
240
351

305
236
342

.....................................................................................................

24108

16711

7397

2803

2012

ORDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .............................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED P R O D U C T S ...................... .. ............................. ..
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS .......................................................................
T E X T I L E MILL PRODUCTS ......................................................................
APPA REL AND OTHER T E X T IL E PRODUCTS ........................ ..
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .............................................................
FURNITURE AND F I X T U R E S ...................................................................
PAPER AND A L L I E D PRODUCTS ..........................................................
P R I N T I N G AND P U B L I S H IN G ................................................................
CH EM IC ALS AND A L L I E D PRODUCTS ..............................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ....................................................
RUBBER AND P L A S T I C PRODUCTS* NEC ....................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS .................................................
STONE* C L A Y , AND G LA S S PRODUCTS ........................................
PRIMA RY METAL I N D U S T R I E S ............................................................
F A BR IC AT ED METAL PRODUCTS ..........................................................
MA CH INE RY , EXC EPT E L E C T R I C A L .................................................
EL E C T R IC A L EQUIPMENT AND S U P P L I E S ..................................
TR AN SP OR TA T IO N EQUIPMENT .............................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .....................................
MISCE LLAN EOUS MANUFACTURING IND U ST RI ES ...................

522
2793
106
1232
1957
832
664
904
1460
1297
254
794
544
926
1520
20C7
2702
2653
2463
581
693

396
1947
60
665
440
746
522

126
846
46
567
1517

35
333
34
116
76
192

517
248
767
1377
1628
2260
1591
2154
364
380

143
218
535
307
34
277
296
159
143
379
442
1062
309
218
313

48
458
54
172
275
207
106
109
113
134

.................................................................................................

*3 7 0 7

3276

431

R A IL RO AD TR AN SP OR TA T IO N ................................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER T R AN S IT ...................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .............................................................
WATER TR AN SP OR TAT ION .........................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N BY A I R ......................................................................
P I P E L I N E T R A N SP O R T A ION ............................ .. ................................
TR AN SP OR TA T IO N S E R V IC E S ............................................. ..

803
457
1625
336
389

49
49
152

184

754
408
1473
315
283
18
126

C O M M U N I C A T I O N .............................................................. ......................................

1201

578

METAL MINING ..................................................................................................
ANTHR ACITE MIN ING ..................................................................................
BIT UMINOUS COAL AND L I G N I T E M I N I N G ............................ ...
O I L AND GAS EX T R AC T IO N ...................................................................
NONMETALLIC M IN ER AL S* EXCEPT FUELS ...............................

CONTRACT

CON STR UC TION

...................................................................... ...

GENERAL B U I L D I N G C O N T R A C T O R S ............................................. ...
HEAVY CON STRUC TION CONTRACTORS ...........................................
S P E C I A L TRADE CONTRACTORS ..........................................................

MANUFACTURING

TR AN SP OR TA T IO N

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b le .




12

20

686
924
990

220

7

1

1
_
6

1
6
8

3364

WHO
MAJOR

H A D
PROPORTION (3F THEIR EARNINGS
W H I T E 3
1 WOMEN
TOTAL
I
MEN
TCTAL

65902

IN THIS INDUSTRY2
N E G R 0
.
MEN
|
1
WOMEN

40053

25849

8004

4640

50

25

23

2

688

63 8

_

94
9
142
304
140

89
9
139
271
133

4
33
7

13

24

4011

3770

242

494

479

12
4
10

1187
960
1862

1108
912
1747

79
48
116

172
134
187

166
131
181

21640

14875

6764

2355

1671

12
20

444
2118

38
312
37
129
207
147

27
215

56
199
15
18
24
41

333
1441
46
538
336
535
355
54 7
752
843
185
365
179
569
1182
1165
1807
1302
1813
295
259

_

_

1
1

791

125

88

6
1

111
678
42
505
1343
67
114
177
432
261
31
214
248
133

1

1

-

-

5

5
5

6

12

21

_
1
1

15

6
3

6
684

11
97
16
45
162

108
26

57

54

519

489

29

2897

2539

358

350

329

21

75
79
248
92
23
-

73
72
236
90

3
7

749
315

67
59
140
53
19

64
54
133
52
16

3
5
7

3
-

46
39
118
16
94

-

-

-

58

35

32

3

703
276
992
232
248
17
76

44

13

11

624

76

23

53

510

566

62

17

21

106

2

111

85
72

112
20
66
25
117
256

200
21

20

22
2

37
25
14
9
34

22
21

12
2

1110
248
342
19

120

1076

303
368
922
270
183
241

_

129
126
251

22

103
50
131
265
234
150
233
277
42

88

32
85
215
151
107
175
225
30
69

1

1043
1680
602
468
723
1185
1105
216
579
426
702
1303
1468
2175
2223
2083
478
500

86

84
45
135
54
54
47
78
14
41
15
75
207
127
92
87
204
13
31

3364

121

2

68
71
75
95
15

66

12

14
17
28
17

2

25
17
9

8

24
16

88
22
17
38

1

3

2
45

Table A -2 0 .
(NUMBERS

IN

Industry em ploym ent by race and sex, 1967----Continued

THOUSANDS)

INDUSTRY
TOTAL

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY -

SOME EARNINGS IN
W H I T E 3
WOMEN
|
MEN
r

W O R K
IN D U S T R Y1
N E G R 0
MEN
r
TOTAL
T

4

113

4213

3126

1086

381

304

77

1098

690

12868

6535

6334

1222

697

525

67
393
193
250
123
77
676
197

63
174
142
234
51
61
370
135

4
218
51
15

532
2763

16
306
63

1689
977
474
2984
1423

430
815
1245
1486
297
322
1192
743

1947
775
203
680
152
1792
680

37
241
127
147
76
43
434
118

35
89
90
138
27
33
209
77

225
41

2240

402

252

150

3670

1737

1934

266

153

113

692
284
79
629
236
327
29
42

61

25

36

348
161

5
31
3
167

3
42
5
54

48
13
5
56
4
133

19
7
3

3
17

13

4

33

626
228
63
541
189
239
23
28

29

7
73

974
390
174
1074
290
679
35
62

9501

3455

1398

2057

14098

5700

8398

732
865
1053
60
48
142
320
2665
224
2447

376
376
499
144
30
25

169
125
354
136
27
16
87
180
4
209

207
251
146

316

912
1098
1535
351
203
236
611
2933
242
3681

396
388
852
309
169
145
404
536
57
1449

516
711
683
42
34
91
207
2397
186
2232

6C3
17

1213
441
624

521
50
419

692
391
205

4204

1387

626

513

.........................................................................................................

16744

9097

7646

1788

BU I L D I N G MA T ER IA LS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ......................
R E T A I L GENERAL M E R C H A N D I S E ................ .......................................
FOOD S T O R E S ...................... ...............................................................................
AU TO MOT I VE D E AL E R S AND S E R V I C E S T A T I O N S ................
AP PAREL ANO ACCESSORY ST ORE S ..................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U R N I S H I N G S STORES .......................
EA TIN G AND D RI N K IN G PLA CE S ........................................................
MISCE LLAN EOUS R E T A IL S T OR ES .....................................................

768
3859
2699
2644
1392
692
4357
2042

637
1317
1718
2370
471
488
1958

1120

131
2542
981
274
921
205
2400
922

...................................

4501

2261

BANKING ...................... ..........................................................................................
C R E D I T A G E N C I E S OTHER THAN BANKS ......................................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND S E R V I C E S . . . . .
INS UR ANCE C A R R I E R S ................................................................................
I NS UR ANCE A G E N T S , BR OKER S AND S E R V I C E ......................
REAL ESTATE ......................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL E S T A T E , IN S U R AN CE , ETC .........................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ...................

1087
501
206
1287
363
1032
47

395
217
127
659
127
704
18
80

7882

.............................................................................................

T R A D E .................................................................................... ..

INS UR AN CE *

AND REAL

ESTATE

122

.....................................................................................................................

17383

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES .........................................
PERSONAL S E R V IC E S ...................................................................................
MISCE LLANEO US BU S I N E S S S E R V I C E S .........................................
AUTO R E P A I R , S E R V I C E S , AND GARAGES ................................
MISCE LLANEOUS R E P A IR S E R V I C E S ...............................................
MOTION P IC T U R E S ..........................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECR EA TION S E R V I C E S , NEC ...................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH S E R V IC E S ...................................
LEGAL S E R V IC E S .............................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL S E R V IC E S ..........................................................................
MUSEUMS, B O T A N I C A L , Z O O L O G I C A L GARDENS ...................
NONPROF IT MEMBERSHIP O R G A N IZ A T I O N S ................................
P R I V A T E HOUSEHOLDS ................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SE R V IC E S ....................................................................

1400
1395
2580
612
330
379
1053
3341
292
4206
27
1839
509
826

SE R V IC E S

1

668
5 30
1527
552
82
237
733
676

2

68

1759
15
942

68

547

6

42

5592

FINANCE*

TOTAL

46

54

TRADE

WOMEN

IN TH IS INDUSTRY2
N 1 G R 0
E
|
MEN
|
WOMEN

117

59

R E TA IL

EARNINGS

626

127

WHOLESALE

TH EI R

743

690

U TILITIE S

WOMEN

H A D
PROPORTION OF
W H I T E 3
1
MEN
I
TOTAL

CONTINUED
817

PUBLIC

WHO
MAJOR

E R S

THE

22
8
221

110

656
14
526
3
430
650
41

12

898
441
279

12

2

2

229
47
25

12

10

1

8

3
9
23
476

10

1
201

2020

21

111
533
101
441

12

12

102

10

2
6

21
2
98
1

2
152
37
9
49

11

6
2

34
3
35

1

3

3

2804

925

1879

241
283

93
80
138
69
13

149
203
82
5

220
74
15
14
58
538

8

439
3
302
581
27

1

8

2

44
124

5
15
414

159

280

143
34
16

160
547

2

2

6
1

11

W o r k e r s w h o h a d s o m e e a r n i n g s i n m o r e t h a n 1 i n d u s t r y g r o u p a n d in m o r e th a n
i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , a r e i n c l u d e d in the c o u n t o f t h o s e w it h s o m e e a r n i n g s in e a c h s u c h
in d u stry g r o u p and d iv isio n .
T h u s , s o m e w o r k e r s a r e c o u n t e d m o r e than o n c e and, t h e r e f o r e , d e t a il d o e s n o t a dd to t ota l.
T h e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s w h o r e c e i v e d the m a j o r p r o p o r t i o n o f th e ir e a r n i n g s in e a c h i n d u s t r y g r o u p is an u n d u p l ic a t e d c o u n t o f w o r k e r s , as is the c o u n t o f m a j o r e a r n e r s
a t th e d i v i s i o n a l l e v e l .
T h e r e f o r e , d e t a il b y i n d u s t r y g r o u p and d eta il b y d i v i s i o n d o ( e x c e p t f o r f o u n d i n g ) e q u a l the tota l f o r the p r i v a t e n o n a g r i c u l t u r a l e c o n o m y .
H owever,
b e c a u s e the t e s t u s e d to a s s i g n w o r k e r s to an in d u s t r y is a p p lie d in d e p e n d e n t ly at e a c h l e v e l o f i n d u s t r y c l a s s i f i c a t i o n (e. g. , i n d u s t r y g r o u p o r d i v i s i o n ) the n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s
i n t h e m a j o r i n d u s t r y g r o u p s t h a t c o m p r i s e a d i v i s i o n m a y n o t e q u a l the t o t a l f o r t h e d i v i s i o n .
I n c lu d e s w o r k e r s o f a ll r a c e s o th e r than N e g r o .

2

3

NOTE:

A

d a sh (-) in dicates




e i t h e r the s a m p l e d id n o t i n c lu d e a n y w o r k e r s w it h t h e s e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ,

o r that th e d a t a d i d n o t m e e t the B u re a u * s p u b l i c a t i o n c r i t e r i a .

Table A-21. Quarters of work, 1966
P E R C 1 N T
E
0 F
J 0 R K E R S
4
)
W H C
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS
SOME EARNINGS IN T H I S
INDUSTRY DURING
IN ANY ]
INDUSTRY DURING

INDUSTRY
ANY
QTR

P R IV A T E

MININ G

NONAGRICULTURAL

100.0

ECONOMY

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

......................................................................................

METAL M I N I N G .............................................................. .
ANTHR ACITE M INI NG ................................................
BI TUM INO US COAL AND L I G N I T E MINING
O I L AND GAS EX TR AC TI ON ............................... .
NONMETALLIC M I N E R A L S . EXCEP T FUELS

CONTRACT

C O N S T R U C T I O N .................................................... .................................

GENERAL B U I L D I N G CO N TR A CT OR S ..........................................................
HEAVY C O N S T R U C T I O N CO N TR A CT OR S ....................................................
S P E C I A L TRADE CO N TR A CT OR S ...................................................................

MANUFACTURING

ORDNANCE
FOOD

..................................................................................................

AND

AND

ACCESSORIES

KINDRED

.................................................

PRODUCTS

..............................................

T OBACCO

MANUFACTURERS

.............................................................

TEXTILE

MILL

.............................................................

APPAREL

AND

LUMBER

AND

PRODUCTS
OTHER

WOOD

PRODUCTS

FURNITURE

AND

P APER

ALLIED

AND

PRINTING

AND

TEXTILE

FIXTURES
PUBLISHING

AND

ALLIED

PETROLEUM

AND

COAL

RUBBER
LEATHER
STONE,
PRIMARY

AND

AND

METAL

METAL

MACHINERY,

EXCEPT

ELECTRICAL

EQUIPMENT

NEC

........................

..............................................

ELECTRICAL
AND

....................

..................................

.................................................

P RODUCT S

RELATED

..............................

......................................

PRODUCTS

EQUIPMENT

AND

MISCELLANEOUS

TRAN SP OR TA T ION

P RODUCTS

GLASS

FABRICATED

INSTRUMENTS

.................................................

PRODUCTS

INDUSTRIES

TRANSPORTATION

.............................................

PRODUCTS.

LEATHER

CLAY,

..................................................

PRODUCTS

PLASTIC

AND

. . . .

.........................................................

PRODUCTS

CHEMICALS

PRODUCTS

..................................

SUPPLIES

................

.................................................
PRODUCTS

MANUFACTURING

....................

INDUSTRIES

.............................................................................

RA IL RO AD TR AN SP OR TAT ION ............................ ..
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ........................................
WATER TR AN SP OR TA T IO N .....................................................
TR AN SP OR TA T ION BY A I R .................................................
P I P E LIN E TRANSPOR TA I O N ............. .............................
TR AN SP OR TA T ION S E R V IC E S ...........................................

COMMUNICATION




100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

ONE
QTR

9 .9

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

11.2

1 1 .3

6 7 .4

100.0

20.2

1 4 .3

9 .9

5 5 .4

100.0

1 5 .2
1 8 .7

1 3 .9
1 6 .4
9 .9
1 4 .4
1 7 .9

8.0
10.0
9 .1
11.6

6 2 .7
5 2 .3
6 7 .9
5 2 .7
4 5 .5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

12.0
2 3 .7
2 4 .9

1 2 .5

ONE
QTR

9 .9

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

11.2

1 1 .3

6 7 .4

100.0

9 .9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6.0

1 0 .5
1 4 .3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

11.6

1 4 .9

16

1 4 .5

1 8 .0
1 9 .0
1 4 .8

20 . 4

1 1 .7

7 5 .7

7 .8

1 0 .7

10.8

7 0 ,,5

8 0 .7
6 5 .4
6 5 .4
7 5 .9

7 .6
1 4 .8
1 5 .1
7 .6
1 0 .9
1 2 .3
1 1 .5

1 2 .4
1 5 .6
1 5 .9

11.6
11 . 9
10.0
12.6
1 4 .8
16 . 3
13 .8
10 . 7
10. 4
8. 9

68,,1

5 .3

7 .2

8 .4

7 8 .9

7 .4

12.0

7 .9
L 1 .0
7 .4

4 .1

8.2

8 0 .5
7 3 .0
8 2 .8
7 7 .6
7 7 .5

5 .3
7 .3

8.1
10. 1

2 4 .2

1 8 .3

1 4 .3

4 3 .0

100.0

9 .1

11.1

3 3 .4
3 2 .8
2 9 .2

22.2
22.0

1 4 .1
1 4 .8
1 3 .3

3 0 .1
30. 1
3 7 .7

100.0
100.0
100.0

10.6
8 .4
8 .5

12.2
12.0
10.0

1 3 .7

1 3 .0

1 0 .3

6 2 .8

8 .4

9 .4

1 5 .5
1 7 .8
1 7 .7
1 4 .3
1 5 .2
1 9 .3
1 8 .9
1 4 .4
1 4 .5
1 2 .7

10.1

5 6 .2
4 2 .7
4 6 .3
5 6 .6
5 1 .6
3 9 .4
4 0 .1
5 3 .9
5 4 .4
6 2 .8
6 5 .5
4 5 .1
4 8 .0
5 1 .8
6 4 .7
4 6 .3
5 6 .5
5 4 .0
6 2 .6
5 5 .1
3 9 .4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6 .3

1 8 .1
2 9 .7
2 7 .5
1 7 .7

4 .7
1 1 .3
1 2 .3
5 .6
9 .0
9 .1
7 .8
5 .1
7 .3
3 .9
3 .0
7 .5

7 .0

7 .3

20.0
2 8 .2
3 0 .5

22.8

1 9 .5

9 .7
8 .3

11.1
1 2 .9
1 2 .9
1 0 .3
8 .7
9 .4

2 1 .5
1 6 .2
1 5 .7
2 8 .7
2 5 .0
2 3 .3
1 5 .3
2 5 .7
1 8 .8
1 9 .7
1 6 .0
1 9 .5
3 1 .6

1 7 .1
1 5 .7
1 5 .0
1 1 .9
1 7 .3
1 4 .6
1 5 .6
1 2 .9
1 4 .9
1 8 .3

9 .8
7 .8
1 0 .5
9 .9
1 0 .5
8 .3
1 0 .3
1 0 .5

20.6

1 3 .5

9 .8

5 5 .9

9 .5

5 .8

1 0 .9
1 1 .7
9 .6
3 .0
1 0 .3

7 6 .8
5 3 .0
4 3 .8
4 6 .0
6 4 .0
7 9 .5
4 1 .9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

9 .5

6 5 .0

100.0

12.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3 0 .5

7 .6
1 5 .1
1 6 .2
1 5 .2
1 2 .5
9 .1
1 7 .1

100.0

1 3 .1

1 2 .3

21.1
2 9 .0
2 6 .9
1 3 .7

8.1

8.1

6 .7
8 .9

11.1

10.6

8.2

4 .9
3 .4
5 .3
4 .1
5 .6
3 .8
5 .0
1 0 .7

1 4 .2

6 5 .4

1 4 .5
1 5 .6
1 3 .2

6 2 .6
6 3 .8

12.0

11.1

1 3 .6
7 .8

8 .5
1 0 .4
1 3 .2
1 4 .0

10.8
1 1 .7

10.1
7 .4
9 .1
5 .8
4 .4

10.1
1 0 .7
7 .2
5 .7
7 .9

6.6
8.6

12.2
8 .4
9 .0
6 .7
5 .7
9 .7
1 1 .5

8.6

6 .5
9 .9
7 .8
9 .4

5 .7
7 .6
1 1 .7

6.8
8.6
12.1

6.0

6 .9

8.6

3 .0
7 .2
7 .8
7 .0
3 .7

3 .7
7 .9

5. 1
9 .2
1 0 .3

68.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
66.8 100.0
6 4 .9
100.0
6 9 .7
100.0
7 9 .0
100.0
7 4 .4
100.0
8 3 .3
100.0
8 6 .7
100.0
7 2 .5
100.0
6 9 .4
100.0
100.0
7 9 .2
8 4 .2
100.0
7 6 .7
100.0
8 1 .3
100.0
7 6 .2
100.0
8 3 .5
100.0
7 8 .7
100.0
6 5 .4
100.0
7 8 .3

88.0

12.6

7 .0

9 .3
6 .3
4 .3
1 0 .7

7 .1
3 .8
9 .0

7 5 .5
7 3 .6
7 0 .9
8 2 .7
9 0 .1
7 3 .1

4 .8

7 .4

8.8

7 8 .8

1.6

H A D
T H I S INDUSTRY AND WORKED
IN T H I S INDUSTRY DURING

TWO
QTRS

4 .0
4 .0
4 .3

6.8

IN

8.1

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

11.2

11 . 3

6 7 . .4

7 .4

1 0 .3

6.2

1 0 .5

11.2
9 .0
1 4 .0
10.2
10 . 5

7 .0
5 .5
9 .5

12.8

8.2

9 .6
5 .6
4 .4

11.2
1 1 .4
7 .8
5 .2
8 .4
6 .3
8 .5
5 .7
7 .3
1 4 .5

12.0
6.6

11.2
12.8
1 6 .0
1 5 .6

11.2

1 1 .9
9 .7
9 .0
1 4 .6
1 3 .1
1 1 .3
8 .9

12.8
1 0 .7

12.6

9 .5
1 1 .5
1 5 .8

14 . 9

.8

18 . 7

16 . 5

5 .9

8 4 . ,3
6 9 . ,3
64.
63.
74,
85.
63.

7 2 .,9

100.0

6.6

1 0 .4

10.0

8.1

,8

7 1 . ,9

9 .3

12.2

1 4 .8

9 .3

4 8 . .7
4 7 , .5
56.

10. 5

13 . 3

11.2
12.2

11.1
.2
.8
10 . 5
3 .2
12.2

5 .6

10.0
12.8
1 1 .7

56,. 5

13 . 4

7 .5

11 . 3
1 3 .1
11 . 7
8. 7

4 .1
9 .3
1 0 .4
9 .9
5 .4
3 .2
9 .6

9 .6

.0
.1
.0

5 7 ,,5
58,
,, 4
6 1 , ,3
55.
59.
6 9 . .7
6 7 , ■9
7 5 .,5
79.
6 2 . ,7
6 2.. 1
69.
77.
65.
71.
.. 5
75.
,
5 6.. 1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

7 .8

71.

74.
67,
7 7 ,.5
6 9 ..3
6 4 ,,5

13
13

68

,8

,2
.0

,0

,1
.0
,2
,6

66
.2
68 .8

,6
,2
,6
,2
.1

Table 21.

Quarters of w ork, 1966----Continued
WH O
P E R C E N T
W O R K
E R S
0 F
MAJOR PROPORTION OF T HE IR EARNINGS
SOME EARNINGS IN TH I S
INDUSTRY DURING
IN ANY INDUSTRY DURING

INDU STRY
ANY
QTR

P R IV A T E
PUBLIC

TRADE

ECONOMY -

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

9 .7

6 .3

7 3 .2

100.0

4 7 .7

100.0

7 .5

6.6

8 1 .2

3 .4

4 .9

5 .4

86.0

100.0

4 .5

8.1

9 .0

9 .4

7 3 .3

100.0

1 0 .5

12.8

1 7 .7
1 3 .7
2 2 .9
1 5 .0
1 4 .8

2 5 .0

1 7 .0

10.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

2 6 .3

20.1

1 3 .7

3 9 .1

100.0

1 5 .7

1 5 .5

1 4 .2

5 4 .5

3 0 .6
3 6 .3
2 6 .4
3 1 .2
3 3 .9
3 1 .3
3 4 .8
3 3 .1

1 8 .3
1 8 .8
2 0 .9

1 0 .9
1 0 .4

4 0 .0
3 4 .3
3 9 .7
3 4 .9
3 6 .1
3 9 .7
2 5 .9
3 5 .8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

10.8

11.0

1 1 .7

1 9 .2

1 4 .8
1 4 .9

1 0 .9
1 7 .0
1 1 .3
1 9 .2
1 4 .6

1 3 .7

1 4 .2
1 3 .6
1 3 .5

2 0 .4
1 4 .4

1 7 .5
1 3 .7

6 6 .3
5 3 .6
5 8 .8
6 2 .5
5 5 .6
6 5 .7
4 2 .7
5 7 .0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

7 .2

9 .2

10.1

7 3 .3

100.0

5 .0

8 .4
7 .9
7 .3
7 .6
8 .4
1 3 .2

11.6

7 6 .8
7 4 .8
7 9 .5
7 8 .4
7 4 .7
6 0 .9
6 4 .1
6 5 .9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

...........................................

B A N K I N G ......................................................................................................... .................
C R E D I T AG EN CIE S OTHER THAN BANKS ..............................................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND S E R V I C E S ......................
INSURANCE C A R R I E R S • • • • • • • • • • • • • « « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
INSURANCE A G E N T S , BROKERS AND S E R V IC E ............. .................
REAL ESTATE ...............................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL E S T A T E , INS UR AN CE , ETC ..................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ............................

.......................................................................................................................... *

HOT ELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ..................................................
PERSONAL S E R V IC E S «
.
MISCELLANEOUS BU S I N E S S S E R V IC E S ..................................................
AUTO R E P A I R , S E R V I C E S , AND GARAGES ........................................
MISCELLANEOUS R E P A IR S E R V I C E S .......................................................
MOTION P IC T U R E S ............................................................................................ ...
AMUSEMENT AND RE CR EA TI O N S E R V I C E S , NEC ......................... ...
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH S E R V IC E S ...........................................
LEGAL SE R V IC E S .....................................................................................................
EDuCATI ONA L SE R V IC E S
MUSEUMS, B O T A N I C A L , ZO OL OG IC AL GARDENS ............................
NON PROFIT MEMBERSHIP O R G A N IZ A T I O N S ........................................
P R I V A T E HOUSEHOLDS .........................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS S E R V IC E S .............................................................................




FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

100.0

ESTATE

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

.........................................................................................................

AND REAL

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

10.6

INS UR AN CE ,

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

ONE
QTR

100.0

T R A D E ..................................................................................................................

SE RV IC ES

THREE
QTRS

CONTINUED

BU I L D I N G M A T E R IA L S AND FARM EQUIPMENT ...............................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE .................................................................
FOOD STORES ...............................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SE R V IC E S T A T I O N S .........................
APPAREL AND AC CESSORY STORES
FURNITURE AND HOME F U R N IS H IN G S ST ORES ...............................
EAT ING AND D RI N K IN G PLA CE S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MISCE LLANEOUS R E T A IL ST ORES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

FINANCE,

TWO
QTRS

H A D
T H I S INDUSTRY AND WORKED
IN TH IS INDUSTRY DURING

.....................................................................................................

U TILITIE S

WHOLESALE

RE TA IL

NONAGRICULTURAL

ONE
QTR

IN

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

21.1
1 8 .5
1 8 .2
2 4 .8
1 9 .3

12.8
1 2 .5
1 1 .4

10.6
1 4 .3
11.6

1 9 .7

1 4 .6

1 0 .7

5 4 .7

100.0

1 2 .3
1 9 .5
1 5 .3
1 6 .1
1 9 .6
3 3 .4
2 6 .7
4 2 .4

1 3 .4
1 4 .9
1 3 .0
1 3 .7
1 4 .5
1 8 .9
1 6 .5
1 8 .5

10.8
12.2
8 .9
1 0 .5
1 0 .7
1 1 .5
1 2 .4
7 .7

6 3 .3
5 3 .2
6 2 .7
5 9 .5
5 5 .0
3 6 .0
4 4 .2
3 1 .2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100*0
100.0
100.0

22.8

1 8 .9

1 2 .5

2 2 .9
1 7 .7

1 2 .3
1 3 .0

3 9 .6
2 6 .7
3 9 .4
4 0 .8
3 5 .9
3 2 .3
3 8 .4
1 8 .9
1 8 .6
1 7 .0
2 2 .7
3 3 .1
1 9 .5
2 4 .4

21.2
21.1
2 0 .3
22.1

11.2
11.8
11.1
12.8

2 7 .5
1 7 .7
1 6 .9
1 8 .7

1 3 .0
1 2 .4

20.8
2 0 .5
1 5 .0
1 9 .2

12.1
9 .5
1 3 .5

11.0
1 4 .7

11.1

100.0
2 5 .0
100.0
4 2 .4
100.0
2 7 .9
100.0
2 6 .1
100.0
3 2 .6
100.0
3 2 .6
100.0
21.0 100.0
5 0 .9
100.0
5 2 .2
100.0
5 4 .6
100.0
4 2 .8
100.0
3 5 .2
100.0
5 0 .6
100.0
4 5 .1
100.0
4 5 .7

12.0

6.6
5 .6
5 .2
7 .6
1 2 .7

12.8
11.8

12.2
11.0

9 .6
1 0 .4
7 .4
8 .7
9 .1
1 3 .0
1 4 .7

11.0
10. i

10.0
12.2

1 3 .1

1 4 .6

1 2 .9

5 9 .2

1 9 .5

1 8 .1
1 3 .0
1 4 .6
1 4 .1
1 1 .9
1 6 .2
2 2 .9
1 3 .5

1 6 .1
1 4 .2
1 2 .9
1 3 .8

4 6 .1
5 9 .8
5 5 .6
5 7 .9
6 5 .6
5 2 .6
3 9 .4
6 3 .2
6 8 .5
6 5 .5
5 6 .9
5 1 .3
5 8 .2
6 8 .9

12.8
1 6 .6
1 4 .0

10.1

1 6 .2
1 9 .7
1 0 .3
7 .7

10.1
12.8
1 8 .7
1 3 .3
9 .0

11.8

1 4 .0
1 5 .8
1 7 .0
1 3 .0
1 1 .5

12.2
1 4 .9
1 7 .8

12.8
11.8
10.2
1 4 .3
12.8
1 5 .3
1 0 .4

1 1 .9

6 4 .6

1 7 .3

1 5 .2

49. 7

1 8 .4

1 5 .2
1 6 .9
1 7 .9
1 7 .1
1 5 .9
1 5 .0
2 3 .3
1 7 .2

1 3 .8
1 2 .5
14 .8
1 5 .3
1 3 .7
1 2 .9
17 .6
1 4 .4

5 7 .2
4 7 .6
5 2 .1
5 2 .7
5 0 .0
5 7 .3
36. 1
4 9 .8

9 .2

1 1 .9

12.0

6 6 .7

6.6

11.2
11.8
10.2
11.0
1 6 .3

1 1 .5
1 4 .3
9 .8
1 1 .4
1 2 .3
1 4 .5
1 5 .8
1 3 .7

7 0 .6
6 5 .2
7 2 .6
7 0 .5
6 7 .3
5 1 .8
5 8 .0
54. 1

1 4 .8

1 6 .4

13 .5

5 5 .0

2 4 .5
1 5 .4
2 0 .3
1 9 .2
1 4 .2

22.1

16 .1
1 5 .4
1 4 .7
17.1
15 .7
1 4 .8
1 7 .0
13.5
1 3 .5
9 .7
1 4 .8

3 7 .1
5 3 .4
4 6 .4
4 5 .0
5 3 .7
4 5 .8
3 0 .8
5 8 .4
6 1 .6
6 2 .0
5 2 .4
4 4 .8
5 5 .7
5 9 .7

20.2
1 4 .6
22.8

8 .5
7 .2
6 .9
9 .3
1 6 .4
1 4 .5
1 5 .7

20.6

2 4 .5
1 2 .3
9 .5
1 1 .7
1 4 .8
2 3 .3
1 4 .9

11.8

1 0 .9
1 7 .1

11.6

1 5 .6
1 8 .4
1 8 .5
1 6 .3
1 9 .3
2 7 .5
1 5 .7
1 5 .2
1 6 .4
1 7 .8
1 9 .1
1 4 .0
1 5 .2

12.6
15.3
1 3 .1

Table A-22.

Quarters of work, 1967
E
C F
1 0 R K E R S
H
W H ()
P E R C 1 N T
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS
SOME EARNINGS IN TH IS
IN ANY INDUSTRY DURING
INDUSTRY DURING

INDUSTRY
ANY
QTR

PR IV A T E

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

.....................................

100.0

ONE
QTR

9 .8

5 .5

7 .1

9 .0

7 8 .2

100.0

6.2

1 1 .7
6 .4
6 .9
8 .4
1 0 .9

7 7 .5
7 3 .1
8 2 .7
7 7 .6
7 5 .8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

.....................................................................................

100.0

GENER AL B U I L D I N G CONTRACT ORS ..........................................................
HEAVY C O N S T R U C T I O N C O N T R A C T O R S ...................................................
S P E C I A L TRADE CONTRACTORS ...................................................................

100.0
100.0
100.0

. . . ....................................................................................................

100.0

1 3 .4

Or d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s • • « • • » • • • * • • • « • • • • • • • • • •
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ............................ .....................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ...............................................................................
t e x t ile
m ill
products
...............................................................................
APPA REL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS ........................................
LUMBER ANO WOOD PRODUCTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
FURNITURE AND F I X T U R E S ............................................................................
PAPER AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ............................................................. .. ...
P R I N T IN G AND P U B L I S H IN G .........................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L I E D PRODUCTS ......................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS .............................................................
RUBBER AND P L A S T I C PR OD U CT S , NEC ..............................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ................................................
ST ON E, C L A Y , AND GLASS PRODUCTS .................................................
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R I E S • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • •
fab ric ate d
metal
products
•••••••••••••••••••••••
MA CHINERY, EXCEPT E L EC T RI C AL • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • •
E L EC TR IC AL EQUIPMENT AND S U P P L I E S ...........................................
TR AN SP OR TAT ION EQUIPMENT • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • •
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING IND US TR IES ............................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1 5 .5
2 8 .1
2 7 .7
1 7 .2
1 9 .5
2 7 .0
2 9 .0
2 1 .7

1 5 .9
1 6 .0
2 8 .1
2 5 .7
2 3 .9
1 4 .7
2 5 .0
1 7 .9
1 7 .9
1 5 .2
1 8 .3
3 0 .2

1 1 .5

2 3 .9

1 8 .5

1 3 .8

4 3 .6

100.0

3 3 .4
3 2 .3
28. 7

2 1 .7

1 3 .5
1 4 .5

12.8

3 1 .2
3 0 .9
3 8 .4

100.0
100.0
100.0

1 2 .4

9 .8

6 4 .2

100.0

1 5 .3
1 8 .6
1 6 .5
1 3 .9
1 5 .1
1 8 .8
1 7 .7
1 4 .1
1 4 .6

9 .6
. 1
8 .5
1 1 .5

5 9 .4
43. 1
47. 1
5 7 .1
5 3 .5
4 1 .9
4 3 .2
5 5 .5
5 6 .0
6 3 .9
6 6 .4
4 6 .2
4 8 .3
5 2 .3
6 7 .2
4 9 .5
6 0 .0
5 8 .8
6 4 .8
5 9 .0
4 0 .5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1 6 .7
1 5 .6
1 4 .6
1 0 .5
1 5 .8
1 3 .1
1 3 .4

12.0

1 3 .3
1 8 .5

100.0

4 .4
7 .5
5 .5
5 .9
5 .2

1 5 .8
1 7 .0

12.0
10.2

6 7 .6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1

59. 7
5 4 .6
70. 1
5 3 .3
4 6 .6

20.0

1 1 .3

5 6 .3

10.

1 4 .7

MANUFACTURING

11.1

9 .8

1 4 .3

22.1

ANY
QTR

100.0

12.1
1 9 .3
8.6

1 9 .9

FOUR
QTRS

6 7 .6

1 9 .2

CONSTRUCTION

THREE
QTRS

1 1 .3

11.1

1 3 .A
1 5 .9
1 3 .0
2 1 .9
2 4 .6

CONTRACT

TWO
QTRS

ANY
QTR

THREE
QTRS

100.0

METAL M I N I N G ................ .........................................................................................
A NT H R A C I T E M I N I N G ...........................................................................................
B I T U M I N O U S COAL AND L I G N I T E MI NI N G ........................................
O I L AND GAS E X T R A C T I O N . . . . . .............................................................
N ON MET AL LIC M I N E R A L S , E X C E P T FUEL S ........................................

10.0
8.0
8.8

10

11.8
12.1
9 .9
8 .5
9 .2

8.0

7 .2
8 .9

10.2
9. 1
7 .4
9 .5

8.8

9. 7
7 .7
9 .2

10.6

ONE
QIR

1 2 .9
4 .8
7 .9
7 .9

1 1 .4

1 4 .0

6 5 .3

12.2
1 1 .9
10.6

1 4 .2
1 6 .2
1 2 .7

6 3 .0
6 2 .8
6 8 .3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6 .3

8.1

9 .1

7 6 .3

100.0

4 .0

6 .7

7 .4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
68.0 100.0
6 5 .9
100.0
7 1 .9
10C . 0
100.0
7 9 .2
100.0
7 4 .8
8 3 .4
100.0
8 5 .5
100.0
7 2 .7
100.0
6 8 .9
100.0
7 8 .8
100.0
8 4 .7
100.0
7 7 .2
100.0
8 2 .6
100.0
7 8 .0
100.0
8 4 .1
100.0
8 0 .7
100.0
6 5 .3
100.0

9. 1
1 C .4

8.8
8 .3

11.0
11.6
5 .8
8 .9
9 .6
7.4
5 .5
7 .3
4 .0
3 .8
7.7
9 .7
5 .3
3 .6
5 .5
3 .9
5 .6
3 .7
4 .8
1 0 .4

12.8
1 3 .3
7 .9

10.6

1 0 .9
9 .6
7 .0
8 .7
5 .7
4 .7
9 .3

10.0
7 .3
4 .9
7 .8

11.2
9 .9
10.0
1 2 .3
1 3 .4

10.8
8.2
9. 1
6 .7
5 .8

10.0
11.2

6.0

8 .5
6 .5
9 .2
7 .3

7 .4
5 .4
6 .7
1 1 .7

. 6
7 .6
1 2 .4

8.8
6

............. .............................................................................................

100.0

20.1

1 3 .3

9 .7

5 6 .7

100.0

6.0

6.8

8.

RAILRO AD TRANSP ORTAT ION • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • * • • •
LOCAL AND I N T ER U RB A N P AS S E N G E R T R A N S I T ................ ..
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ......................................................................
WATER TRAN SPOR TAT ION
TR AN SP OR TA T ION BY A I R • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
P I P E LIN E TR AN SPOR TAIO N • * • • • • * * •
TR AN SP OR TAT ION S E R V IC E S .........................................................................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

8.2

6. 3
10.6
10.2

11.0
1 2 .3
1 7 .2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

8.

6 .4
3 0 .5

1 2 .5
9 .2
3 .9
11. 3

7 7 .9
5 2 .7
4 5 .4
4 5 .0
6 7 .0
7 7 .2
4 0 .8

2.8

12.6

7 .4
1 5 .1
1 6 .2
1 5 .0

7 .2
7 .5
1
4 .2
.5
7 .8

4 .1
7 .6
. 1
8 .4
5 .3
8 .9
9 .5

5 .7
8 .9
9 .5
1 3 .1
7. 3
1 .5
1 0 .3

C O M M U N I C A T I O N ................................................ ...........................................................

100.0

12.2

11.1

9. 1

6 7 .4

100.0

4 .5

7 .1

TR AN SPOR TAT ION




2 1 .4
2 8 .0
2 7 .3

H A D
THIS INDUSTRY AND WORKED
N THIS INDUSTRY DURING

FOUR
QTRS

TWO
QTRS

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

M I N I N G ................................................................. ..................................................... ..

IN

8

5

8.0

8 1 .8
6 4 .8
6 4 .9
7 6 .1

CNE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

9 .8

11.1

1 1 .3

6 7 .6

7 .3

1 0 .9

1 1 .5

5 .4
7 .5
6 .3

9 .9
1 5 .0
6 .9
1 3 .0
1 2 .4

1 5 .8

8.2
8.1

1 4.8

7 8 .3
6 8 .5
64. 5

1 1 .5

15 .1

1 6 .2

5 7 .C

1 4 .4
1 3 .1
1 1 .5

18 .1
1 8 .4
15.3

17 .7

4 9 .6
4 8 .3
5 7 .3

20.0
1 5 .7

7 .7

10.1

1 0 .3

7 1 .7

6 .3
1 4 .4
1 4 .9
7 .7
1 0 .7

1 2 .4
1 6 .3
1 4 .8
1 0 .9
1 2 .9
1 4 .8
1 3 .8

1 0 .9

7 0 .2
57. 1
60. 1

12.6
8.1

1 1 .4
9 .3

6.0
5 .6
11.2
1 2 .3
8.0
5 .4
8.6
6.0

11.0
11.8

8 .9
7 .3
13.3
1 3 .2

11.2
7.6
11.6

9 .3
1 0 .5

12.1
10.0

1 3 .0
1 3 .2
15 .1
1 2 .9

10.1
10.1
8 .9
8.0

1 1 .4
1 2 .3
1 0 .9

8.1
10.0

1 1 .7

1 0 .9
8 .5

68.2

6 3 .0
5 7 .4
6 1 .6
70. t
6 8 .5
7 6 .C
7 8 .9
6 3 .9
62. 1
69. 7
7 8 .7
. C
7 4 .5
7 0 .6
76. 8
72. 1
5 6 .7

68

7 .8
5 .9
7 .0
1 3 .6

1 5 .9

13.6

7 .6

9 .6

1 0 .5

72. 1

3 .9
8 .9
9 .9

6.0

6 .4

1 3 .9

15 .3
9 .8
3 .1
1 3 .5

8 3 .5
6 9 .4
6 5 .9
62. C
7 5 .9
8 2 .5
61. C

9 .2

9 .5

7 5 .C

7 8 .4

100.0

8 7 .1
76. 1
7 4 .6
7 0 .2
8 3 .0
7 2 .3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5 .7
3 .1
1 1 .4

8 0 .2

100.0

6.0

88.8

8.6

8 .4

10.1

70. 1

68. 7
68.8

10.6

8.6
10.1

1 0 .4
1 1 .9
1 1 .9
8 .4

11.1

10.6

11.2
12.2

Table A-22.

Quarters of work, 1967----Continued
W O R K
P E R C E N T
0 F
E R S
)
WH C
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS
SOME EARNINGS IN TH IS
IN ANY INDUSTRY DURING
INDUSTRY DURING

INDUSTRY
ANY
QTR

PR IV A T E
PUBLIC

NONAGRICULTURAL

U TILITIE S

WHOLESALE TRADE

ECONOMY

-

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

.....................................................................................................

............................................................................................ ..

FOUR
QTRS

7 .5

5 .8

8 2 .C

3 .3

5 .4

5. 1

86.0

100.0

4 .6

100.0

2 4 .6

1 6 .3

9 .9

4 9 .0

100.0

8.1

8 .9

9 .4

7 3 .4

100.0

10.6

1 2 .3

1 1 .7

65. 1

2 6 .2

1 9 .9

1 3 .9

3 9 .7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1 5 .4

1 5 .3

1 4 .4

54. 7

1 7 .1

1 5 .3

5 0 .0

1 C .1
1 8 .2

1 2 .4
1 2 .7
1 4 .3
1 3 .9
1 2 .9

6 6 .4
5 4 .6
5 9 .4
6 2 .0
5 6 .6

1 3 .2
2 1 .9
1 5 .1
1 4 .7
1 9 .7
1 4 .5
2 2 .5
1 7 .9

1 4 .2
1 6 .5
1 7 .3
1 7 .3
1 6 .2
1 5 .0
2 3 .4
1 7 .6

1 4 .5

1 9 .1
1 4 .5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
66.2 100.0
4 2 .6
100.0
5 7 .1
100.0

1 7 .3

1 0 .9
1 4 .3
1 4 .0
1 3 .0
1 3 .9
1 0 .7
2 0 .3
1 4 .5

5 7 .9
4 8 .6
5 2 .6
5 2 .3
5 0 .3
57. 1
3 6 .C
4 9 .9

7 .6

9 .3

BANKING ...........................................................................................................................
C R E D I T AGEN CIES OTHER THAN BANKS ..............................................
SE C U R IT Y * COMMODITY BROKERS AND S E R V I C E S ......................
INSURANCE C A R R I E R S ........................................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND S E R V IC E ................... ..
REAL ESTATE ..............................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL E S TA TE * INSUR ANCE* ETC ..................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ............................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

S E R V I C E S ................................................................. ............................................................
HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES
PERSONAL SE R V IC E S ............................................................................................
MISCE LLANEOUS B U S I N E S S S E R V IC E S ..................................................
AUTO R E P A IR * S E R V IC E S * AND GARAGES ........................................
MISCELLANEOUS R E P A IR S E R V I C E S .......................................................
MOTION P IC T U R E S ..................................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND R ECR EA TION S E R V I C E S * NEC ............................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH S E R V IC E S ...........................................
LEGAL S E R V IC E S .....................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SE R V IC E S
MUSEUMS* BO T A N IC AL * Z O OL OG IC AL GARDENS ............................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP O R G A N IZ A T I O N S ........................................
P R I V A T E HOUSEHOLDS .........................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS S E R V IC E S




THREE
QTRS

100.0

1 4 .8

ESTATE

TWO
QTRS

7 4 .4

1 9 .4

AND REAL

ONE
QTR

5 .6

100.0

general

INSURANCE*

ANY
QTR

9 .8

...........................................

M AT ER IA LS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ...............................
MERCHANDISE • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
FOOD STORES . . . . . ...............................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SE R V IC E S T A T I O N S .........................
APPA REL AND ACC ESSO RY ST OR ES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • » • • • • •
FURNITURE AND HOME FU RN IS H IN G S STORES ...............................
EA TIN G AND D RI N K IN G PL AC ES • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • •
MISCE LLANEO US R E T A IL ST ORES ..............................................................

FI N AN CE *

FOUR
QTRS

10.0

18; 1
1 8 .4
1 9 .9
2 1 .4
1 8 .6
1 8 .2
2 4 .7

..................................................................................................................

BU I L D I N G

r e ta il

THREE
QTRS

100.0

2 9 .5
3 5 .2
2 6 .7
30 .5
3 3 .5
3 0 .9
3 4 .3
3 1 .4

TRADE

TWO
QTRS

H A D
TH IS INDUSTRY AND WORKED
IN TH IS INDUSTRY CURING

CONTINUED

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

R E TA IL

ONE
QTR

IN

20.1

11.8

4 0 .9
3 5 .5
4 0 .5
3 5 .2
3 6 .6
4 0 .1
2 6 .1
3 6 .4

1 0 .5

5 5 .1

1 1 .4

10.6
1 2 .7
1 2 .7

11.1

1 0 .5
1 4 .7

12.1
10.8
1 6 .4

11.2

11.8

1 7 .8
1 3 .7

1 1 .3

7 6 .5
7 4 .9
7 7 .1
7 7 .2
7 4 .3
6 0 .5
7 1 .5
6 3 .5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

9 .2
7 .7
7 .9
9 .7
1 6 .6
9 .4
1 6 .9

100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
66.0 100.0
5 6 .5
100.0
100.0
5 0 .3
100.0
5 7 .5
100.0
6 8 .7

10.1
10.0

4 3 .7

1 3 .1
1 5 .5
1 3 .5
1 4 .0
15 .1
1 9 .6
1 6 .0
1 7 .1

1 0 .7
1 1 .3
9 .6
1 0 .5
9 .7
1 0 .9
1 1 .7
7 .5

6 3 .5
5 3 .5
6 0 .1
5 9 .0
5 5 .7
3 7 .1
5 0 .3
3 1 .5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0

22.2

1 8 .5

1 2 .7

4 6 .5

100.0

12.8

1 4 .4

13. 1

5 9 ,5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3 8 .4
2 6 .1
3 8 .7
4 0 .6
3 4 .9
3 3 .6
3 8 .6
18.1
19.7
16 .7
2 6 .4
3 2 .3
1 7.9
2 4 .0

2 2 .7
1 7 .5
2 1 .3

1 2 .7
1 3 .0

2 6 .0
4 3 .2
2 8 .7
2 7 .6
3 5 .7
3 1 .6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1 8 .5
1 2 .3
1 6 .5
1 3 .8
1 0 .3
1 6 .8
1 9 .1
9 .7
8 .3

1 8 .1
1 3 .2
1 4 .6
1 3 .7

1 6 .4
1 4 .5
1 2 .9
1 4 .2

4 6 .8
5 9 .8
5 5 .8
58. 1
6 7 .4
5 0 .7
4 0 .2
6 4 .1
6 9 .5

1 2.5
19 .5
1 6.6
1 6 .4
19 .3
3 2 .2

21.8

20.1
1 8 .9

21.2
2 6 .9
1 6 .5
1 6 .7
1 8 .5
1 7 .9

11.2

1 1 .5
1 0 .3
1 3 .5
1 3 .1
1 2 .9
1 0 .7
9 .4
1 4 .7

21.2

11.8

1 5 .2
1 8 .6

1 5 .6

11.1

21.2

5 2 .2
5 2 .8
5 5 .2
4 0 .8
3 4 .4
5 1 .1
4 6 .1

5 .3
7 .1
5 .7
5 .8
7 .8
1 3 .2
7 .5
1 2 .3

10.0
12.6

1 8 .2
1 3 .0
8 .9

8.1
8.6
7 .2
7 .9
9 .1
1 3 .3
9 .7

12.6

11.0
1 6 .8
22.8

9 .2
9 .8
8 .9

8.6

1 2 .9

11.1

11.2

1 5 .4
1 7 .7
13. 3
1 0 .3

1 2 .7
1 1 .7
1 3 .8

10.1

1 7 .4
1 3 .1
1 1 .7

1 8 .5
1 3 .9
1 6 .2
1 0 .5

12.2

7 2 .8

9 .6

6.8

12.1
11.0

12.8
1 4 .8
1 5 .6
1 3 .6
1 3 .1
1 7 .8
1 4 .5

1 1 .7

6 6 .4

1 1 .5
1 2 .9
1 0 .7
1 1 .4

1 6 .8

12.6

7 0 .5
6 5 .3
7 0 .4
6 9 .4
6 6 .9
5 1 .9
6 5 .C
5 3 .5

14 ,5

1 6 ,3

13 ,7

5 5 .4

2 3 .7
1 4 .9

2 1 .4
1 5 .7
1 8 .5
1 8 .0
1 5 .0
1 9 .3
2 8 .4
1 4 .9
1 4 .9
1 6 .3
1 6 .4

1 6 .5
1 5 .2
1 4 .8
1 6 .4
1 4 .0
1 5 .7
1 7 .0
1 4 .0
1 1 .7
9 .7
1 7 .7
1 3 .6
1 6 .2
1 2 .9

3 8 .2
5 4 .C
4 6 .3
4 6 .4
5 6 .4
4 4 .6
3 1 .C
5 9 .2
6 2 .7
6 2 .3
5 1 .4
4 3 .9
5 5 .4
6 0 .2

20.2
1 9 .0
1 4 .4

20.1
2 3 .4
11.8
10 .4
1 1 .5
1 4 .3

1 2 .3

11.0
11.1
12.2
1 7 .3

12.1

22.2

20.1

1 4 .2
1 1 .9

1 4 .0
1 4 .8

11.0

1 4 .0
1 3 .2

Table A -23. Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and
industry of major earnings, 1966
p
A N Y

R C E N T
Q U A R T

O F

W 0

INDUSTRY

I N ALL

C E

ALL
WORKERS
P R IV A T E

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

. . . .....................

•

M I N I N G .....................................................................................................
metal m in in g
.............................................................................
ANTH RACITE MININ G ..............................................................
BIT UMINOUS COAL AND L I G N I T E MINING . . . .
O I L AND GAS EXTR AC TION .................................. ...
NONMETALLIC M I N E R A L S , EXCEPT FUELS . . . . ......................... •

CONTRACT

CONSTR UCTIO N

.......................................................

GENERAL B U I L D I N G CONTRACTORS ............................
HEAVY CONSTR UCTIO N CONTRACTORS ...................... • • • • • • • • • .
S P E C IA L TRADE CONTRACTORS .....................................

MANUFACTURING

........................................................ .. ....................

ORDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ........................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS .....................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS .................................................
T E X T IL E MILL PRODUCTS ..................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T IL E PRODUCTS . . . .
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS ........................................
FURNITURE AND F I X T U R E S ..............................................
PAPER AND A L L I E D PRODUCTS .....................................
P R I N T IN G AND P U B L I S H IN G ...........................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L I E D PRODUCTS .................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ......................
RUBBER AND P L A S T I C P RO D U CT S , NEC ...........
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ....................
STON E, C L A Y , AND GLASS PRODUCTS .............
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R I E S ............................
FA BR IC AT ED METAL PRODUCTS .....................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT EL EC T RI C AL ............................
EL EC TR IC AL EQUIPMENT AND S U P P L I E S .............
TR AN SP OR TAT ION EQUIPMENT ........................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING IND U ST RI ES

T RA NS PO RT AT ION

.............................................................................

RA ILR O AD TR AN SP OR TAT ION ...........................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TR AN SIT
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ........................................
WATER TR AN SPOR TAT ION ....................................................
TR AN SPOR TAT ION BY A I R .................................................
P I P E LINE TRANSPORTA ION ...........................................
TR AN SPOR TAT ION S E R V IC E S ...........................................

S e e f o o t n o t e at e n d o f t a b l e .




R K E R S

E R

. . . . . . . . .
••••••••• .
••••••••• •
. . . . . . . . . •

•

................. •
•••••••# ••
••••••••• •

R A
W H I T E1
MEN | WOMEN

100.0

5 4 .8

3 4 .4

6 .3

8 9 .5

7 .0

3 .3
l .l

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
lo o . o

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

9 4 .9
9 3 .0
9 3 .7
8 7 .5

4 .0

6.0
2.6
11.0

N E G R 0
MEN [ WOMEN

1.0

E M P L 0
.

6 7 .4

4 0 .2

20.6

4 .1

.2

7 9 .0

7 1 .3

4 .9

2.6

_

80.6

1.1

3 .0

-

.4

7 6 .9
7 0 .0
7 8 .2
6 8 .4
6 7 .4

2.6

7 3 .0
8 2 .9
7 7 .7
7 7 .5

2 .9

3 .1
.9
6 .9

6 .7

4 .5

-

1.6
8.2

4 .7

8 3 .5

5 .1

11.1

.3

6 5 .4

5 5 .5

3 .1

8 0 .6
8 4 .3
8 4 .9

5 .6
3 .7
5 .7

1 3 .3

.5

6 2 .6
6 3 .8

68.2

5 1 .3
5 4 .5
5 8 .9

3 .1
2 .3
3 .5

6 2 .5

2 8 .0

2.8

7 5 .8

5 0 .6

1 8 .6

7 2 .8
6 0 .3
3 6 .5
4 6 .2
1 7 .7
7 2 .3
6 7 .8
6 9 .1
6 0 .4
7 0 .6
8 1 .4
5 7 .4
4 0 .0
7 3 .0
7 8 .4
7 2 .3
8 0 .3
5 3 .4
7 9 .7
5 7 .8
4 6 .0

2 1 .4
2 7 .2
3 3 .8
4 3 .7
7 1 .3

1 .5
3 .9

8 0 .8
6 5 .4
6 5 .4
7 6 .0
6 6 .9
6 5 .0
6 9 .8
7 9 .0
7 4 .4
8 3 .4

6 1 .5
4 4 .1
2 7 .3
3 7 .3
1 3 .1
4 7 .1
4 9 .3
5 7 .2
4 8 .8
6 1 .4
7 1 .6
4 5 .5
3 0 .1
5 9 .1
6 7 .0
5 7 .9
6 7 .1
4 4 .6

1 5 .0
1 3 .9
2 5 .9
3 1 .5
4 6 .9
4 .9
1 2 .3
1 5 .7

3 6 .4
4 1 .2

7 9 .2

10.2

86.1

5 .6
9 .6

7 5 .2
8 0 .2
7 6 .3
6 9 .9
9 2 .9
6 0 .9

8.1

1 9 .8
2 2 .4
3 3 .9

21.6
12.8
3 2 .8
5 3 .5
1 6 .9
7 .5
1 8 .5
1 5 .2
3 9 .5

11.2

8.8

5 .9
2 5 .0
7 .1
3 1 .5

.2

11.8

.2

9 .1

.3

6.8
4 .3
8 .7
1 6 .9
6 .5
2 .3
1 8 .2

10.1
6.6
3 .6
6 .4
5 .4

6.1

12.8
3 .6
8 .7
1 .4
2 .3
1 .9

2.1
1 .4
.5
3 .7
3 .5
.9
.4
1 .4

86.8

22.1
1 6 .0
ip .4

20.6

3 .0
7 .5

7 2 .5
6 9 .4
7 9 .3
8 4 .3
76*8
8 1 .3
7 6 .2
8 3 .5
7 8 .7
6 5 .4

4 8 .8
3 3 .6

5 .6
1 2 .5
1 0 .9
2 6 .8
8 .4
2 6 .1
2 4 .9

.5

7 8 .4

6 3 .5

7 .2

88.1

1 7 .5
4 .5

.3
1 .4
.4
.3
.5

7 .2

.5

7 6 .4
5 8 .6
6 0 .9
5 4 .9
5 8 .8
8 4 .7
4 6 .0

4 .7
5 .8
5 .5
3 .6
1 9 .9
5 .5
2 1 .4

3 .0
9 .2
1 3 .7
7 .7
3 .9
3 .3
8 .3
2 .7
5 .4

10.1
8.0
1 3 .8

10.6

.6
.8

3 .8

D 1 R
U

I

N G

0

TOTAL

3 .8
1 .4
8 .3

86.6

Y E D

F 0 U R
Q D A R T
E R S
WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT
IN THI S INDUSTRY ONLY
R A C
E
R A C
E
W H I T E1
N E G R
W H I T E1
N E G R 0
MEN | WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN
TOTAL
MEN | WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN

7 5 .5
7 3 .7
7 1 .0
8 2 .7
9 0 .2
73. 1

68.0

3 5 .6

12.2

8.

1
7 .0
5 .6

5 .0
3 .3
5 .8

8.6
5 .0
1 .5

12.2
6.8
5 .1
2 .4
5 .1
4 .2
4 .5
1 .9
7 .5
1 1 .4
5 .7
3 .0
2 .5
6 .7

6 7 .4

4 0 .2

20.6

4 .1

•1

7 1 .0

6 4 .5

4 .2

2.2

-

.4

7 4 .2
6 7 .0
7 7 .6
6 9 .4
6 4 .6

7 1 .3
6 4 .0
7 3 .2
6 1 .6
5 6 .2

2 .3
3 .0
1 .3
7 .0
2 .3

3 .1
.7
5 .6

.1
.2
.1
.2

5 6 .6

4 8 .4

2.6

5 .5

. 1

4 8 .7
4 7 .6
5 6 .9

4 0 .5
4 0 .8
4 9 .6

2 .5
1 .9
3 .0

5 .6
4 .8
4 .1

. 1

1 .5

7 0 .5

4 7 .3

1 7 .3

4 .5

1 .4

1.0

68.2

12.8

2.2

1 .7
3 .5

5 7 .5
5 8 .9
6 8 .4
6 1 .4
5 5 .3
5 9 .0
6 9 .8

1 2 .4
2 4 .5
2 9 .3
4 3 .8
4 .3
1 0 .4
1 4 .0
1 9 .6
14.1
9 .2
1 7 .7
3 2 .3

4 .8
6 .5
3 .9

.7
1 .5
3 .1
1 .7
4 .7
.5

2 .5

-

.1

2.2
.8

5 .3

1 .3

1.0
1.1
.8
.5
1.8

68.0

7 5 .6
7 9 .0
6 2 .7
6 2 .2
6 9 .1
7 7 .1
6 5 .2
7 1 .7

5 2 .5
3 8 .9
2 4 .7
3 3 .5
1 1 .7
3 9 .9
4 2 .4
5 0 .8
4 5 .4
5 6 .4

66.1

2 .5

. 1

.5
-

1.2
10.6
5 .2
4 .2

2.1

4 .3
3 .3
3 .7
1 .5

_

_

. 1
.4

.1
.1

1.0
.8

.9
.7
.4
1 .4
1 .5
.3
.3
.5
.3

1.8

68.8

3 .5

3 .5

5 6 .2

3 9 .9
2 6 .8
5 2 .0
6 1 .8
4 9 .6
5 9 .6
3 9 .4
6 1 .6
4 3 .5
2 9 .3

7 .4

.3

7 2 .0

5 8 .7

6 .4

6.6

.3

6.8

.2
.6
.2
.1

8 4 .3
6 9 .4
6 4 .6
6 3 .2
7 4 .6
8 5 .2
6 3 .2

7 3 .3
5 3 .9
5 3 .7
4 8 .9
5 4 .1
8 0 .9
4 0 .0

4 .5
5 .3
4 .9
3 .2
1 6 .9
4 .4
1 8 .9

6 .3
9 .6
5 .9

.2
.6
.2

3 .3

. 1
.4

4 .1

. 3

2.1

1 0 .5
7 .0
1 2 .3
3 .7
5 .3

1 .9
.5
.3
.7
.4
2 .3
.5

.4
.5

66.6
7 5 .3

10.6
4 .9
10.6

9 .4
2 3 .4
7 .4
2 2 .5
2 1 .7

6.1
10.1
4 .4
2 .4

1.8

2.0
1.6
2.6

2.6

5 .8

11.0

.4
1 .3

Table A-23. Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and
industry of major earnings, 1966----Continued
p

A N Y

W 0

O
i F

E R C E N T
Q U A R T

E R

INDUSTRY

I N ALL
ALL
WORKERS

PR IV A T E

COMMUNICATION

PUBLIC

RE TAIL

100.0

4 5 .0

5 0 .2

1 .5

3 .3

.....................................................................................................

100.0

7 9 .4

1 5 .0

5 .1

........................................................................................................

100.0

68.6

2 3 .2

TRADE

TRADE

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

4 6 .4

4 4 .7

ECONOMY -

..................................................................................................................

BU I L D I N G MA T ER IA LS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ...............................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
FOOD STORES ...............................................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SE R V IC E S T A T I O N S .........................
APPA REL AND ACCE SSORY STORES ...........................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U R N IS H IN G S STORES ...............................
e atin g
a n d D RI N K IN G PL AC ES .................................................................
MISCELL ANEOUS R E T A I L STORES .................................................. ..

76 .1
2 7 .3
5 8 .9
81.2
2 8 .2
6 2 .7
3 4 .0
4 8 .4

1 6 .9
6 4 .8
3 5 .3
1 0 .4
6 4 .5
2 8 .9
5 2 .6
4 3 .8

...........................................

100.0

4 5 .0

4 8 .7

BANKING ...........................................................................................................................
CR ED IT AGEN CIE S OTHER THAN BANKS ...............................................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND S E R V IC E S ......................
INS URANCE C A R R I E R S
INSURANCE A G E N T S , BROKERS AND S E R V IC E ...............................
REAL ESTATE ..............................................................................................................
c o m b in e d
real
e state ,
IN S U R A N C E , ETC ..................................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ............................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

35.5
4 1 .6
6 1 .1
4 8 .4
3 4 .8
5 4 .4
3 5 .9
5 0 .2

6 0 .4
5 5 .7
3 6 .8
4 7 .5
6 3 .6
2 9 .4
5 9 .6
4 1 .4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

33.9

4 9 .3

34 .0
27 .6
4 8 .8
71.8
7 7 .2
58.3
6 1 .4
1 5 .7
2 2 .9
3 5 .4
4 8 .5
3 5 .2
5 .0
6 5 .5

4 4 .4
5 0 .6
3 9 .2
9 .4
1 5 .9
3 5 .8
3 0 .2

FINANCE,

S E R V IC E S

INS UR AN CE ,

AND RE AL

ESTATE

e

N E G R 0
MEN | WOMEN

TOTAL

E M P L 0

Y E D

D U R

I

N G

F 0 U R
Q U A R T E R S
IN THI!5 INDUSTRY ONLY
WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT
R A I E
R A C E
C
W H I T E i
N E G R 0
W H ][ T E 1
N E G R 0
MEN
| WOMEN
MEN 1 WOMEN
TOTAL
MEN | WOMEN
menH | WOMEN

CONTINUED

..............................................................................................................

U TILITIE S

WHOLESALE

R A (;
W H I T E i
MEN 1 WOMEN

NONAGRICULTURAL

R K E R S

..............................................................................................................................

HOTELS ANO OTHER LODGING PLACES ..................................................
PERSONAL SE R V IC E S ............................................................................................
MISCE LLANEOUS B U S IN E S S S E R V IC E S ..................................................
AUTO R E P A I R , S E R V I C E S , AND GARAGES ........................................
MISCELLANEOUS R E P A IR S E R V I C E S • • • • • * • • «• • • • • • • • • •
MOTION P IC T U R E S ...................................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RE CREATION S E R V I C E S , NEC ............................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH S E R V IC E S ...........................................
LEGAL S E R V IC E S ......................................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL S E R V I C E S ................... ................................................................
MUSEUMS, B O T A N I C A L , Z O O L O G I C A L GARDENS ............................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP O R G A N IZ A T I O N S ........................................
P R I V A T E H O U S E H O L D S ........................... ............................................................
MISCELLANEOUS S E R V IC E S .............................................................................

68.8
7 4 .3
5 4 .0
3 9 .1
4 6 .1
3 8 .5
3 0 .8

7 8 .9

3 8 .7

3 6 .8

1.1

.5

86.1

7 0 .1

1 1 .7

6.6

1.6

7 3 .4

5 3 .3

1 4 .8

5 .1

3 .7

5 4 .5

2 7 .7

2 2 .3

2 .9

1 .7

6.6

.4
4 .9

5 1 .5
1 6 .7
3 5 .9
5 1 .1
1 7 .6
4 3 .4
1 4 .9
3 0 .0

10.2

4 .5

.2
2.2
.8
.2
2 .4
1.2
2.8

2.6

.5
4 .7

6 .4
6 .4
5 .3

7 .0
2 .5

6 6 .4
5 3 .7
5 8 .8
6 2 .5
5 5 .7
6 5 .8
4 2 .7
5 7 .1

3 .7

2.6

7 3 .4

1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6

2 .4

3 .0
4 .2
7 .9

.7

1.6

2.0

1.2

.5
2 .5

1.0
1.6

11.8

4 .4

2 .9
4 .7

3 .6

3 3 .1
1 9 .9

6.1

2.2

7 3 .0

3 6 .6

3 3 .6

.9

1 .9

3 .9

.4

8 1 .3

*66.6

1 0 .9

3 .5

.3

4 .5

.8

6 4 .6

4 7 .5

12.8

3 .6

.7

4 9 .7

2 5 .0

2 0 .9

2 .4

1.4

4 4 .3
1 4 .3
3 1 .8
4 3 .2
1 5 .7
3 7 .9
1 2 .3
2 6 .5

9 .0
3 0 .3
1 7 .8
5 .2
3 1 .1
1 5 .2
1 9 .1

3 .7
1 .3
1 .9
4 .1

.2
1.8

1 .4

5 7 .2
4 7 .6
5 2 .2
5 2 .7
5 0 .0
5 7 .4
3 6 .1
4 9 .9

20.0

3 .3
2 .3
2 .4

.1
2.0
1.0
2 .3
1.0

66.8

3 2 .4

3 1 .1

2.0

1 .3

7 0 .6
6 5 .2
7 2 .6
7 0 .5
6 7 .3
5 1 .9
5 8 .0
5 4 .2

2 7 .6
3 0 .4
4 7 .1
3 8 .5
2 6 .9
2 8 .4
2 3 .7
2 9 .1

4 0 .8
3 3 .2
2 4 .2
2 9 .7
3 9 .5
1 5 .4
3 2 .7
2 2 .4

1.0

6.0
1.1
2.1

1 .3
.7
.4
1 .3
.5
1 .9
.5
.5

1.6
2.2

2 2 .7

5 .0
1 .5
4 .2
3 .0
3 .0

3 5 .1

3 4 .4

2 .5

1 .5

7 6 .8
7 4 .9
7 9 .5
7 8 .4
7 4 .7
6 1 .0
6 4 .1

4 5 .0
3 8 .9
2 7 .5
3 4 .2
4 4 .7
1 7 .6
3 6 .7
2 7 .5

1.2
1.1
1.1
1.2

1 .5

66.0

2 9 .2
3 4 .2
5 0 .5
4 1 .5
2 9 .0
3 3 .7
2 5 .6
3 5 .4

3 4 .1
1 7 .0

22.0

.8

.4

1.6
.6

.5
7 .5
1 .3
2 .3

2 .3
.5

.8

5 .5

1 1 .4

5 9 .3

2 1 .3

2 8 .3

3 .1

6 .5

5 5 .1

1 9 .4

2 6 .7

2 .7

1 3 .1
1 5 .8
4 .3

3 7 .2
5 3 .5
4 6 .5
4 5 .1
5 3 .7
4 5 .8
3 0 .9
5 8 .4
6 1 .7
6 2 .1
5 2 .5
4 4 .9
5 5 .7
5 9 .8

1 3 .3
1 6 .9
2 6 .6
3 3 .5
4 2 .7
3 0 .6
1 9 .3
9 .5
1 3 .6
2 3 .6
2 9 .2
1 6 .9
2 .5
4 2 .0

1 5 .8
2 5 .3
1 5 .8
4 .0
7 .9
1 2 .9
8 .4
4 0 .3
4 6 .9
3 2 .0
1 6 .8

3 .4
3 .4

6 5 .6
5 6 .9
5 1 .4
5 8 .2
6 9 .0

1 9 .5
2 7 .9
1 8 .9
5 .2
9 .3
1 5 .6
1 0 .9
4 3 .2
5 2 .6
3 3 .5
1 7 .8
2 5 .0
1 9 .7
1 8 .6

5 .5
9 .1

6 .7
3 .0
9 .8
5 3 .2
1 .4

1 6 .5
1 8 .8
3 1 .6
4 2 .8
5 1 .9
3 4 .4
2 4 .6
1 0 .4
1 4 .5
2 5 .1
3 1 .7
1 9 .0
2 .7
4 8 .3

4 .7
4 .1
3 .6
9 .7
4 .0

1 1 .9

4 6 .1
5 9 .8
5 5 .7
5 8 .0
6 5 .7
5 2 .6
3 9 .5
6 3 .3

7 .6
1 7 .6
5 .9
3 .5
6 .4
3 .6
.7
3 .9
9 .4

8.8
3 .3
2 .3

1.2
1.0

2 .5

2.0
2.0

A d a s h (-) i n d i c a t e s e i t h e r the s a m p l e d id not in c lu d e a n y w o r k e r s w ith t h e s e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ,




.9
.9
.9
.4

8.6
6.0

68.6

1.6
.3
.4

1.6

1.0

3 .1
2 .3
.3

7 .4

2.6
5 .4
3 .6

2.2
1 .4

.8

1.1
2.0

4 .4
3 .8
3 3 .7
.7

22.2
1 8 .8
1 6 .2

1 In c lu d e s w o r k e r s o f all r a c e s o th e r than N e g r o .
NOTE:

1.2

o r th at t h e d a t a d i d

not m e e t the B u r e a u 's p u b li c a t io n c r i t e r i a .

2.8
7 .3
2.8
1 .4
2.6
1 .9
.3
2 .4
5 .0

2.8
2.1
1.0

. 7

6.2
4 .6
7 .9
1 .3

.2

.3
.9
.7
6 .7
.9
4 .1
1 .5
3 .0
3 2 .5
.5

Table A-24. W orkers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and
industry of major earnings, 1967
P

E

R

C

E

N

T

Q

A N Y

U

A

O F
R

T

E

W

O

R

K

E

R

S

E M P L O

INDUSTRY

IN

ALL

WA G E

AND

R A C E
ALL

W

H

W O R K E R S " ME N
NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

MINING
METAL

M I N I N G ....................................... ... ....................................

ANTHRACITE

MINING

BITUMINOUS

COAL

AND

GAS

CONTRACT

LIGNITE

MINERALS*

CONSTRUCTION

G ENERAL
HEAVY

.............................................................

AND

EXTRACTION

NONMETALLIC

BUILDING
T RADE

MINING

..........................................
EXCEPT

FUELS

..................................................................................................

CONTRACTORS

CONSTRUCTION

SPECIAL

...............................................................

CONTRACTORS

CONTRACTORS

........................................................

..........................................................................

MANUFACTURING
ORDNANCE
FOOD

AND

AND

TOBACCO

. . .
. . .

AND
AND

FURNITURE
PAPER

PRODUCTS

MILL

APPAREL
LUMBER

ACCESSORIES

KINDRED

MANUFACTURERS

TEXTILE

PRODUCTS
OTHER

WO O D
AND

AND

PRINTING

FIXTURES

ALLIED
AND

TEXTILE

AND

ALLIED

AND

COAL

AND

LEATHER
STONE,

AND

ANO

PRODUCTS

PRODUCTS,

LEATHER

METAL

PRODUCTS

GLASS

FABRICATED

METAL

MACHINERY,

EXCEPT

ELECTRICAL

EQUIPMENT

INSTRUMENTS

IANSPORTAT ION

. . . . . .

RELATED

. . .

...............................

ELECTRICAL
AND

. .

....................

SUPPLIES

.

...................................
PRODUCTS

MANUFACTURING

. .

INDUSTRIES

.................................................. ... ............................................................................

» n & n T R A N C P f l R T A T i n N .... ..........................

LOCAL

AND

TRUCKING
WATER

INTERURBAN
AND

TRANSPORTATION
LINE

PASSENGER

E

1

| WO ME N

R

BY

AIR

TRANSIT
................................................. # # # # ( . . . . . .

ME N

| WO ME N

3 5 .0

6 . 3

8 9 .5

7 .0

3 .3

9 2 .9

6.0

1.2

9 3 .5

6 . 5

-

9 4 .0

2 .4

3 .7

8 7 .5

1 0 .7

8 7 .0

4 . 6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

8 3 .7

5 .4

8 1 .5

5 .8

8 3 .4

4 .4

8 5 .3

5 .6

6 2 .0

2 8 .2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5 8 .0
4 5 .6

1 0 0 .0

7 8 .2

1 1 .0

6 9 .1

2 3 .0

5 9 .3

2 7 .9

3 6 .8

3 3 .3

4 5 .9

4 3 . 1

1 7 .8

7 1 .2

7 1 .4

8 .9

4 . 6

2

TOTAL

ME N

| WOMEN

5 .2
4 . 2

1.2

.5

10.6
12.2
12.0
8.8

.3

6 5 . 4

55

.5

6 3 . 0

52

7 2 .2

G
T

E

R

IN

S

THIS

I NDUSTRY

ONLY

R A C

| WO ME N

T OTAL

h

:I

MEN

T

E

E

N E G R O

1

| WOMEN

MEN

2 . 6

6 7 .7

3 9 .8

21.2

4 .1

2

7 0 .2

6 3 .2

4 . 6

2. 2

6 8 .7

6 4 .0

3 .7

6 5 .6

3 .2

_

1.0

7 3 .8

1.6

7 7 .6

.2

7 8 .3
6 8 .5

6 0 . 3

7 .2

.9

7 5 .9

6 5 .7

3 . 4

6 . 3

.5

6 4 . 6

5 6 .0

2 .9

5 .2

7

3 .3

6.2

4 8 .8

2 .9

5 .2

.

3 . 4

7 .1

.2
.2
.1
1

5 7 .1

3

4 9 .7

4 1 .5

2 . 9

5 .2

.

1.1

.3

6 2 . 9

52

9

2 . 7

7. 1

6 8 .3

59,

3

3 .7

5 .2

2 .8

7 6 .4

5 0 .6

1 9 .0

5 . 2

1 7 .0

4 . 3

8 1 .8

5 9 .0

4 .0

6 4 .8

4 3 .1

1 3 .9

6 5 . 0

2 6 .9

2 4 .9

7 6 .1

5 .9

8.8
1.6

3 6 .8

3 1 .5

1 3 .3

4 7 . 6

4 7 .9

5 .6

1 1 .7

1 4 .0

6 . 9

8 3 .4

6 1 .1

8 0 .2

1 3 .3

5 .8

8 5 .6

7 0 . 1

3 3 .2

6 . 3

3 .8

7 2 .7

4 5 .1

3 9 .0

5 4 .1

3 .2

7 2 .4

1 6 .8

1 .5

68.1
66.0

.

7 2 .0

4 9 .5

7 9 .2

5 7 .2

1 5 .5

7 4 .9

4 8 .5

2 2 .5

5 .6

-

-

2 .9

-

4 0 .9

2.2

5 .1

.

5 0 .1

3 .2

3 .8

.

1 .7

7 1 .7

4 7 .7

17 .8

4 .7

1 .5

1 .5

7 0 . 3

14.6

3 .2

1 .9

5 7 .1

3 8 .2

1 2 .4

5 .0

4 . 4

6 0 .1

2 4 .9

2 3 .9

7 .4

5 1 .5

2 .3

68.2

5 .6

6 3 .1

12 1

.7

5 7 .5

4 2 . 0

3 2 .9
.

2 8 .9
4 4 .6
4 .8

4 .4

5 . 1

5 .1

1 .3

6 8 .9

2 9 .4

2.1

7 8 .8

5 9 .0

7 .4

.7

6 9 .7

5 2 .3

8 4 .8

6 7 .2

5 .9

1 1 .3

.3

7 8 .8

6 2 .8

1 8 .7

7 .9

1 .5

7 7 .3

5 8 .0

1 2 .7

5 .8

7 9 .2

1 6 .

4 . 0

.7

8 2 .6

6 7 .2

1 1 .9

3 . 2

5 4 .3

3 8 .4

3 .6

7 8 . 1

4 5 .9

2 6 .9

2 .7

8 4 .2

6 7 .4

9 .1

7 . 0

7 6 .9

8 0 . 7

4 9 .9

2 6 .8

1 .9

7 2 .1

4 5 .4

4 2 .3

5 . 5

6.6

2.0

.7

3 6 .1

8.8
2.6

3 .7

6 5 . 4

3 3 .6

2 5 .2

3 .5

3 .1

5 6 .7

2 9 .2

8.1
22.2

2.6
6.2
1.6
2.8

.6

7 8 .5

6 2 .8

7 .8

7 .5

.4

7 2 .1

5 8 .3

7 .0

6.6

9

.3

8 7 .2

5

1 .4

7 2 .0

7 8 .5

1 1 .7

10

7

1

1 0 0 .0

8 6 .1

i nn n

73 •7

I *A
i uD * t

1 0 0 .0

7 9 .4

9 .5

10

6

5 .6

1*T
XA

1.2

.9
3. 3

5 .2
4 .6

3 5 .4

.4

7 0 .6

68.6
7 6 .0

4 3 .2
5 1 .3
4 5 . 1
5 6 .4

12.0
20.1
13.8

1 4 .4

4 .5

2.2

4 .5

7 9 .0

6 5 .4

9 .2

3 .9

6 3 . 9

4 0 .0

1 8 .5

4 .0

2 6 .4

3 2 .6

6 2 .2

68.0

5 1 .3

10.8
11.2
5 .3

7 4 .5

6 1 .1

1 0 .5

7 0 .6

4 1 .9

2 4 .2

6 2 .0

2 3 .6

1.6
6.2
1 0 .4
4 .8
2 .3

4 . 7

6 . 9

.2

8 3 .6

7 2 .4

4 .5

7 6 .1

5 7 . 1

6 .3

1 1 .9

.9

6 9 . 4

5 2 . 1

5 .8

10.8

6 1 .1

6 . 3

7 .0

.3

6 5 .9

5 4 .5

5 .6

5 .6

.3

6 2 .1

4 7 .7

3 .2

5 5 .6

1 6 .9

3 .1

8 2 .5

7 6 .7

5 .3

.5

6 1 .1

3 8 .3

1 8 .9

3 .4

.

. 5
1 .5

1.6
. 5
. 3
. 7
.3

2 .3

.6
1.6
2.6
. 3

1 0 .9

7 6 .0

-

7 5 .3

7 7 .0

5 .3

17

3

5 4 .2

3 .6

6 8 .7

2 6 .1

4

5

8 3 .1

5 9 .2

1 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 1 .0

7 .9

1

1

-

8 8 .9

8 2 .0

5 .8

.
..................................................... * * • • • . . . . .

1 0 0 .0

5 7 .4

3 3 .1

8

1 .4

7 2 .3

4 4 .0

2 2 .9

0

.8
2.6

6 1 .7

7 4 .7

1 0 0 .0

.4

4 . 7

1 .3

1.0
1.6
2.0
.6
1.0
1.2
8
3 .9

1.2
10.1

.5

9 .6

1 6 .3
1 0 .3

1
1
1
1

4 8 .4

3 .8

8.0
1

1 .4

1

5 7 . 3

1 3 .6

7 7 .9

6 .5

5 .4

2.6

.

.4

.

20.8
11.8

7 0 .3

-

68.8

2 .3

.

I

_

1 3 .0

3 .7

2 .6

_

5 6 .7

3 4 .3

| WOMEN

_

1 0 0 .0

SERVICES

N
R

1.6
1.1
.8
.6
2.1
2.0

5 9 .7

21.2
22.2
21.8

I

3 .1

.3

3 .9

A

1.6
8.2

4 . 3

5 .5

1
10 1
6.8

R

U

68.8
68.1
7 8 .0

1 6 .9
7. 1

U

w

2. 6

7 .8

2 . 4

ME N

7 0 .2

7 3 . 1

1 8 .

D
Q

E
N E G R O

7 8 .2

8 2 .7

8.8

P

4 .1

8.6
26
2.1
2.2
.6

66.2
68.8

A

1

21.2

7 7 .5

.2

E

3 9 .8

_

7 .0

D

EMPLOYMENT

6 7 .7

_

1.6

T

............................................................. • • • • i
.
•• ••i . . . . .
..................................... ...

S ee fo o tn o te at end o f table,




5 4 .2

:I

h

.
................................................................ • « • • • . . . . .

T R A N S P O R T A I ON

TRANSPORTATION

W

N E G R O

1 0 0 .0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

SALARY

.6
.8

WAREHOUSING

TRANSPORTATION
PIPE

NEC

...................................

P RODUCT S

EQUIPMENT

AND

MISCELLANEOUS

................

........................

PRODUCTS

INDUSTRIES

TRANSPORTATION

...............................

......................................

PRODUCTS

PLASTIC

CLAY,

PRIMARY

. .

PRODUCTS

PUBLISHING

PETROLEUM
RUBBER

PRODUCTS

PRODUCTS

CHEMICALS

RATI

T

1 0 0 .0

PRIVATE

OIL

I

Y . E
F O U R

R

7 0 .2

12.1
3 .6
1. 1
4 . 7

.6
.8

6 .5

.2
-;2
.7

.4
_
. 4

T a b l e A - 2 4 . W o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s b y r a c e , s e x , a n d
in d u stry o f m ajor earning s, 1 9 6 7 — - C o n t in u e d
P E R C E N T
A N Y

W 0 R K IE R S

OF

Q U1 A R T E R

INDUSTRY

I N ALL
R A C
W H I T E1
ALL
WORKERS MEN I WOMEN

PR IV ATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECCNOMY -

E
N E G R 0
MEN
| WOMEN

TOTAL

E M P l. 0 Y E D

44.8

4 9 .7

1.5

4 .0

80.2

39.5

3 7.0

1. 1

PU BL IC

10 0 .0

79.3

14.9

5.3

.5

86.0

7 0 .0

1 1 .5

100 .0

68.1

2 3.6

6.6

1.7

7 3 .5

5 2 .9

TRADE ........................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

4 6.4

4 5 .0

4.9

3.7

54.7

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM E Q U I P M E N T ................ • • • •
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE ............................................... • • • •
FOOD STORES .................................. .. ...................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERV ICE ST ATIO NS . . . . . • • • •
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES .......................................... • • • •
FURNITURE AND HOME F U RN IS H IN G S STORES ................. . . . .
EATING AND D R IN K IN G PLACES ................................................ • • • •
MISCELLANEOUS R E T A IL STORES ............ .. ............................. • • • •

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0

75.6
27.1
58.0
80.9
28.2
62.3
34.9
48.2

17.8
6 4.8
36.1
11.1
64.5
2 9.4
52.4
44.1

6 .2
3 .0
4 .2
7.5
2 .6
6 .3
6.1
5.0

.4
5.1
1 .7
.5
4 .6
2.1
6 .6
2.7

............................ . . . .

1 0 0 .0

44.1

49.1

3.9

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
100 .0

34.0
40.1
62.1
47.2
34.2
54.3
33.3
49.3

61.3
56.7
35.2
47 .9
64.3
29.4
62.1
41.4

1.8
1 .6
1.5
1.9
.5
12.1
3.3
5 .0

1 0 0 .0

33.7

49 .7

5.5

10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

34.3
28.1
48.6
72.6
77.4
58.0
60.4
15.4
2 2 .6
35.2
48.5
34.4
4 .9
6 4.4

4 4 .8
5 1.4
3 8.9
9 .9
15.6
3 6 .5
30.9
6 9 .1
74.2
54.2
40.5
45.7
3 8 .3
3 1 .5

8 .0
5.8
7 .9
16.3
6 .1
3 .3
6 .5
3.6
.8
3.9
7.2
9.4
3.3
2 .4

U T I L I T I E S .................................................................................

F IN A N C E *

............................................... ..................................

INSURANCE*

AND REAL ESTATE

BANKING ...................................................................................................
CR ED IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ...............................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERV ICES . . . .
INSURANCE CARRIERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SE RVICE .................
REAL ESTATE .........................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ES TA TE , INSURANCE* ETC ....................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ...............

SERVICES

N G

CONTINUED
1 0 0 .0

RETAIL

I

F 0 U R
Q U A R T E R S
WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT
I N TH IS INDUSTRY ONLY
R A C E
R A C E
W H I T E1
N E G R 0
W H I T Ei
N E G R 0
MEN | WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN
MEN ] WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN
TOTAL

C O M M U N I C A T I O N ................. .......................................................................

WHOLESALE TRADE

D U R

••. •
••••
••••

. . . .
....

......................................................................................................

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ................................. . . . .
PERSONAL SERVICES • • • • .................... ........................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES .................................. • • • •
AUTO RE P A IR * S E R V IC E S , AND GARAGES .........................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SE RVICES ....................................... • • • •
MOT ION PICTURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • • •
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S , NEC .............. • . • •
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ............................ . . * .
LEGAL SERVICES .................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MUSEUMS* BOT ANICAL* ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ............... • • • •
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP OR GANIZA TIONS ......................... • • • •
PR IV AT E HOUSEHOLDS ......................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SE RVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •

2.6

7 5 .1

37.8

34.0

1.0

2.3

4.2

.4

82.0

67.1

10.7

3 .8

.4

15.3

4.5

.8

6 5 .2

4 7 .6

13.4

3.6

.6

27.6

22.7

2.7

1.7

50.0

25.0

2 1.3

2.2

1.5

6 6 .5
5 4.7
59 .4
62.1
56.6
66 .2
4 2.6
57.2

51.5
16.9
3 6 .1
50.8
17.9
43.3
1 5 .0
29.8

1 0 .6
3 3 .9
2 0.2
6.4
35 .0
17.7
22.0
2 3.3

4 .2
1.6
2.3
4.7
1.3
4.0
2 .7
2 .8

.2
2.3
.9
.2
2.4
1.2
2 .9
1.3

5 7 .9
48 .7
52.7
52.3
50 .4
57.2
3 6.1
49 .9

4 5.0
14.5
3 1.9
42 .9
15.7
37.2
1 2.3
26. 1

9 .4
30.9
18.1
5 .5
31.5
1 5.8
19.2
2 0.5

3 .4
1.3
1.9
3.8
1.0
3.2
2.1
2 .2

. 1
2 .0
.7
.1
2. 1
.9
2.4
1 .0

2.9

7 2 .9

3 4 .3

34.3

2.5

1.8

6 6 .4

3 1 .7

31.0

2.1

1.5

2.9
1 .6
1.2
3 .0
1.0
4.3
1.4
4 .3

76.5
75.0
7 7.1
77.2
7 4 .4
60.5
71.5
63.6

28.6
3 3 .6
49.4
3 9.9
2 8.3
3 3.1
25.2
34.1

44.7
39.3
2 6.2
34.0
4 5.0
1 7 .4
43 .9
25.4

1 .2
1 .0
1.0
1 .3
.4
7.7
1.6
2.5

2.0
1.0
.6
2 .0
.7
2.3
.8
1.6

70 .6
65.4
70.5
6 9 .5
6 7 .0
51.9
6 5 .0
5 3.5

27.1
30. 1
46.2
36.9
2 6.5
28.5
23.0
28.5

40. 7
3 3 .7
23.0
29.8
3 9 .5
15.2
40.1
2 2.7

1.1
.9
.8
1.2
.4
6.2
1.4
1.6

1.6
.7
.5
1 .6
. 5
2.0
.5
. 7

11.1

5 9.6

2 1.2

2 8.9

3. 1

6.4

55.5

19.3

2 7.3

2 .7

6. 1

12.9
14.7
4.7
1.2
.9
2.2
2.2
11.9
2.4
6 .8
3.8
10.5
5 3.5
1.6

4 6 .9
5 9 .9
55.8
5 8 .2
67 .4
50.8
40.2
64. 1
6 9.5
66 .0
56.5
50.3
57.5
68 .7

16.2
18.8
31.2
4 3.1
53.8
3 2 .3
24.7
10.3
14.4
25.0
29.1
18.4
2.5
48 .0

20.6
28 .8
19.2
5.6
9.1
15.7
11.4
4 3 .9
53.3
3 4 .0
20.3
2 4.3
19.4
1 8 .4

4 .4
3 .8
3.6
9 .0
3.9
1.8
3. 1
2 .3
.3
2 .7
5 .1
3.7
2 .1
1.6

5.7
8.5
1.8
.4
.6
1 .0
.9
7 .6
1.5
4 .4
2.1
3.9
33 .4
.7

3 8.3
5 4.1
46 .4
46 .4
5 6.5
4 4 .7
31.0
5 9 .2
62.8
6 2 .4
5 1.5
4 3 .9
5 5.5
60 .2

13.2
16.9
26.3
3 4 .3
44.6
28.5
18.9
9 .4
13.3
23.5
27.0
16.1
2 .3
4 2.6

17.1
2 6.2
15.9
4 .6
8.2
1 3 .8
8 .9
4 1 .0
47 .7
3 2 .3
18.1
21.7
18.6
15.7

3.3
3.2
2.7
7.2
3.3
1.5
2.5
1.9
.3
2.4
4.6
2.8
2.0
1.4

4. 7
7 .8
1.4
. 3
.3
.9
.8
6 .9
1.4
4. 1
1. 7
3.2
32.5
.6

1 Includes w o rk e rs of all ra c e s other than N eg ro .
NOTE:

A dash (-) indicates eith er the sam p le did not include any w orkers with these c h a r a c te r is tic s , or that the data did not m eet the B u rea u 's publication c rite ria ,




T a b le

A-25.

S i n g l e a n d m u l t i - i n d u s t r y e m p l o y m e n t o f all w o r k e r s by n u m b e r o f m a j o r in d u s t r y e m p l o y e r s , 1 9 6 6

ALL
WRKRS TOTAL

PERCENT OF WORKERS EMPLOYED IN THEIR INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNINGS DURING—
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
F 0 U R
Q U A R T E R S
INDUSTRY WORKERS
M U L T I- IN D U S T R Y WORKERS
SINGLE INDUSTRY WORKERS
MULT I - I N D U S T R Y WORKERS
NUMBER OF
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF
NUMBER OF MAJOR
EMPLOYER S
INDUSTRY EMPl.OYERS
EMPLOYERS______
INDUSTRY EMPLOYERS
MORE
MORE
MORE
MORE
THAN
THAN
ALL
THAN
THAN
ONE
TWO
TWO
TOTAL
ONE
TWO
TWO
WRKRS TOTAL
ONE
TWO
TWO
ONE
TWO
TWO
TOTAL

10 0 .0

10 0 .0

6 8.0

SINGLE
INDUSTRY

PR IV ATE

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY . .

MIN IN G

1 2 .4

.0

.0

.0

.0

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

67.9

18.8

13.3

.0

.0

.0

.0

1 00 .0

METAL M IN IN G ..........................................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G ............................................
BITUMI NOU S COAL ANO L I G N I T E MIN IN G
O I L ANO GAS EXTRACTION ...............................
NONMETALLIC MINERALS* EXCEPT FUELS

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

••••••••••••••••••

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTORS ......................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS .................
SP EC IA L TRADE CONTRACTORS ...............................

MANUFACTURING

19.6

*..« .« « .. . . . . . a . . . . . . . . . . .

7 7 .2

6 7.5

6.6

3.0

2 2 .8

1 7 .0

3.4

2.5

1 0 0 .0

8 8.2

7 6.8

7 .7

3.7

11.8

8.0

1 .9

1 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0

78.4
77.0
8 5.5
7 5.1
69.7

7 5 .5
55.0
72.1
63.0
67.1

2.4
1 9 .0
10.4
7 .1
2 .6

.5
3.0
3.0
5 .0
.0

21.6
23.0
14.5
24.9
3 0 .3

18.8
1 4 .0
1 0 .8
1 5 .6
28.4

2 .3
8.0
2.9
4.4
1.7

.4
1.0
.8
4 .8
.2

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

8 8.1
86.6
92.3
8 7 .1
85.6

8 4 .8
5 9 .7
7 7.5
7 2.3
82.4

2 .7
2 2.4
1 1 .4
8.7
3 .2

.6
4 .5
3 .3
6.1
.0

11.9
1 3.4
7.7
12.9
14.4

10.3
6.0
5.3
6.6
13.7

1.3
7.5
2.0
2.2
.6

.3
.0
.4
4 .0
.1

1 0 0 .0

69.9

4 8 .1

1 1 .8

10.0

30.1

15.4

6.3

8.4

1 0 0 .0

79.3

5 1.3

1 3.9

1 4 .0

2 0 .7

7.4

4.2

9.1

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

57.4
5 7 .8
63.6

4 8.1
46.4
49.2

6 .6
9 .2
8.5

2.6
2.3
5 .9

42.6
4 2 .2
3 6.4

2 5.0
27 .3
21.5

9.0
9 .4
7 .3

8.6
5.6
7 .6

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 8.2
75.2
74.6

54.6
58.0
5 5.4

9.4
13.5
10.5

4.2
3.6
8.7

31.8
24.8
2 5.4

14.1
12.9
11.2

7 .2
6.2
5.4

10.4
5.8
8.8

1.9

10 0 .0

8 9.0

78.4

8.2

2.4

11.0

7 .5

2 .0

1 .5

8 6.0
80.8
87.7
8 2.9
80.3
7 6 .6
7 9.5
8 4 .2
79.3
87.1
8 7 .5
83.6
8 2.9
8 2 .5
8 5 .5
79.4
81.1
8 3.9
8 3.4
84.1
81.0

.5
4.7
3.8
5.9
9.3
7.2
4 .4
4 .1
6.5
1.4
1.4
2.4
4.9
3 .1
1.6
3.2
3.6
3 .0
1.8
1.5
3.9

.0
.4
.1
1.2
3.0
2 .4
.7
.1
2 .7
.0
.0
.2
1 .1
.2
.0
.2
.4
.2
.2
.0
•6

1 3.4
14.1
8.3
10.0
7 .4
13.7
15.4
11 . 6
11.5
11.5
11.0
13.9
11.2
14.3
12.8
17.2
14.8
12.9
14.5
1 4.4
14.5

13.2
12.1
8 .2
7.6
5 .4
10.0
12.5
10.6
9 .5
11.1
10.6
12.7
9 .1
13.3
11.8
15.0
12.7
11.8
13.3
13.8
13.5

.2
1.5
.1
1.6
1.2
2.5
1.9
.9
1.4
.4
.4
1.0
1.2
.9
.9
1.8
1 .6
.9
1.0
.5
.8

.0
.5
.0
.8
.9
1.2
1.0
.1
.7
.0
.1
.2
.9
.1
.2
.5
.5
.2
.3
.1
.2

1 0 0 .0

81.7

7 1 .3

8 .1

2.3

18.3

1 2 .9

3.5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
100 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

72.0
7 4 .8
80.6
79.2
8 3 .8
72 .4
69.7
74.9
79.1
7 8.2
79.7
71.9
77.2
72.6
7 7 .6
6 8.7
73.4
7 4.3
75.3
7 3.8
7 2.3

71.6
69.8
7 7 .3
7 2 .9
73.1
64.6
65.9
71.6
72.1
76.9
7 8 .4
69.8
72.1
7 0.1
76.1
66.0
70.0
7 1.7
73.4
7 2.6
68.6

.4
4.6
3.0
5.3
8.3
5.9
3.3
3.2
5 .1
1.2
1.3
2.0
4.3
2 .4
1.4
2.5
3.0
2.5
1.7
1 .2
3.2

.0
.4
.3
1.0
2.4
2.0
.5
.1
1.9
.0
.0
.1
.9
.1
.0
.1
.4
.1
.2
.0
.4

2 8.0
2 5 .2
1 9.4
20.8
16.2
27.6
3 0 .3
25.1
20.9
21.8
2 0.3
28.1
2 2 .8
27.4
2 2.4
31.3
2 6 .6
25.7
2 4.7
2 6 .2
27.7

2 7.8
21.8
18.1
17.3
1 3 .0
21.8
26.6
23.4
18.4
2 1.1
1 9 .8
26.4
20.0
25.6
20.8
27.7
2 3.6
23.8
2 2.6
25.2
2 5.4

.2
2 .8
1.3
2.5
2.1
4.2
2.9
1.5
1.8
.7
.5
1 .5
1.9
1.7
1.3
3.0
2 .4
1.7
1.7
.9
1.8

.0
.6
.0
1.0
1.1
1 .6
.8
.3
.7
.1
.0
.2
.8
.1
.3
.7
.7
.2
.4
.1
.5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0

8 6.6
8 5.9
9 1.7
90.0
92.6
8 6 .3
84.6
88.4
88.5
8 8.5
8 9 .0
86.1
8 8.8
85.7
87.2
82.8
8 5 .2
8 7 .1
85.5
85.6
85.5

....................................... ..........................

1 0 0 .0

7 6 .4

6 6 .8

7.0

2.7

2 3 .6

16.9

3 .5

3.2

10 0 .0

84.7

73.9

7.8

3 .0

15.3

9.9

2.3

3.1

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ....................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING .................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TRANSPORTATION BY AI R ..........................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTA ION ....................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ....................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

8 4 .5
77.1
7 1 .7
57.8
7 4 .5
86.3
6 7.4

81.8
63.0
6 2.6
4 0.0
7 1 .0
8 2.0
6 3.6

2.5
1 1.8
6.8
1 0 .0
3 .2
4 .4
3.3

.1
2.3
2.3
7.7
.3
.0
.4

15.5
2 2.9
2 8 .3
42.2
2 5.5
13.7
3 2.6

14.7
18.3
20.4
17.1
2 3 .7
12.6
2 8.3

.7
3.8
4 .5
7.3
1.7
1.1
2.4

.1
.9
3.3
17.8
.1
.0
1.9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

89.7
84 .4
83.1
6 1.6
8 3.3
9 4 .2
76.9

86.8
67.8
7 1.5
42.2
7 9 .3
8 9.1
72.0

2.9
13.7
8 .5
10.6
3.6
5.1
4.5

.1
2.9
3 .1
8.7
.4
.0
.4

10.3
1 5.6
16.9
3 8.4
16.7
5 .8
23.1

9.6
12.3
11.0
10.7
15.6
4.5
18.2

.6
2.5
3.0
6 .0
1 .0
1 .3
2.4

.1
.8
2.9
2 1.7
.1
.0
2.5

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS . . .........................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ..........................................
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS ..........................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS . . .
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS ..................................
FURNITURE AND FI XTU RE S .......................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ...............................
P R IN T I N G AND P U B L I S H IN G ....................................
CHEMICALS AND AL L IE D PRODUCTS ....................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS .........................
RUBBER AND P L AS T IC PRODUCTS, NEC ............
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ......................
STONE, CL AY , AND GLASS PRODUCTS ..............
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R IE S .................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ...............................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT EL ECT RIC AL ......................
ELECT RICA L EQUIPMENT AND SU PP LIES . . . .
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ............
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING IN DUSTRIES

TRANSPORTATION




T a b le

A -25.

S i n g l e a n d m u l t i - i n d u s t r y e m p l o y m e n t o f all w o r k e r s b y n u m b e r o f m a j o r i n d u s t r y e m p l o y e r s , 1 9 6 6 ---- C o n t i n u e d

SINGLE

all

WRKRS TOTAL
PR IVAT E

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

CONTINUED
10 0 .0

8 1 .9

79.2

2 .4

.4

18.1

17.1

.9

.2

1 0 0 .0

8 9.9

86.7

2.7

.5

10.1

9.2

.7

.2

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

1 0 0 .0

82.8

82.0

.8

.1

17.2

16.8

.3

.0

1 0 0 .0

89.2

88.4

.7

.1

10.8

10.5

.3

.0

TRADE . . . ■ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 0 0 .0

74.9

70.6

3.9

.3

2 5 .1

21.7

2.8

.6

1 0 0 .0

85.9

80.8

4 .8

.4

14.1

1 1 .7

1.9

.5

1 0 0 .0

8 2 .4

66.2

1 2 .2

4.0

1 7 .6

1 1 .0

4.1

2 .5

10 0 .0

8 8.7

7 0 .5

13.1

5.1

11.3

6.1

2 .8

2.4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

86.4
89.6
87.1
8 4 .2
8 9 .2
85.8
8 2.6
88.3

8 2 .6
84.4
77.8
70.2
7 8.8
8 0.2
51.1
80.1

3.6
4.8
7 .3
10.4
8.3
4.8
2 2 .2
6.8

.2
.4
1.9
3.6
2 .2
.7
9 .4
1.4

13.6
10.4
1 2.9
15.8
10.8
14.2
1 7.4
1 1.7

1 2 .4
8.9
1 0 .0
9.9
7.9
1 2 .5
7.2
10.0

1.0
1.3
2.1
3.9
2.0
1.5
4.4
1 .3

.2
.2
.8
2.0
.8
.3
5.8
.4

COMMUNICAT I ON

PU BL IC

U T IL IT IE S

WHOLE SALE

RETAIL

TRADE

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT .................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE ...............................................
FOOD STORES
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE ST ATI ON S ............
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES ..........................................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U RN IS H IN G S STORES ..................
EA TING AND D R IN K I N G PLACES ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS R E TA IL STORES .............................................

F IN A N C E *

INSURANCE*

AND REAL ESTATE

.................... ..

BANKING ...................................................................................................
C R E D IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ...............................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND SE RV ICE S . . . .
INS URANCE CARRIERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERV ICE .................
REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
COMBINED REAL ES TA TE , INSURANCE, ETC ....................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ...............

SE RVICES

PERCENT OF WORKERS EMPLOYED IN TH EIR INDUSTRY OF MAJOR E R IN S DURING—
AN G
Q U A R T E R S
F 0 U R
Q U A R T E R
A N Y
M U L T I - IN n U S T R Y WORKERS
SINGLE INDUSTRY WORKERS
MULTI - IN D U S T R Y WORKERS
INOUSTRY WORKERS
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF
LNDUSTRY EMPt.OYERS
INDUSTRY EMPL OYERS
EMPLOYERS
EMPLOYERS
f
MORE
MORE
MORE
MORE
THAN
THAN
THAN
ALL
THAN
TWO
TWO
TOTAL
ONE
TWO
TWO
ONE
TWO
TWO
WRKRS TOTAL
TWO
t o t a l ! ONE
TWO
ONE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ..................................
PERSONAL SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SE RVICES ............ .....................
AUTO R E P A IR , S E R V IC E S , AND GARAGES ..........................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES .......................................
MOTION PICTURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E RV IC ES * NEC ..............
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ............ ...............
legal s e r v ic e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EDUCAT IONAL SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MUSEUMS, BO TA NI CA L, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ...............
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP OR GANIZA TIONS ..........................
PR IV ATE HOUSEHOLDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .




10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

7 4 .4
79.6
7 7 .0
70.5
79.9
7 4 .8
74.8
77.0

7 1.7
75.2
70.3
60.2
72.5
7 0.6
5 3.0
7 1 .4

2.5
4.1
5 .6
7 .9
6 .0
3 .7
1 6 .1
4.8

.2
.3
1 .2
2 .4
1 .4
.5
5.6
.8

25.6
2 0.4
2 3.0
29.5
20.1
25.2
25.2
2 3.0

23.9
18.0
1 9.6
21.6
1 6 .7
2 3.0
1 4 .6
2 0.6

1.5
2.2
2.7
5.8
2.7
1.8
6 .0
2.0

.2
.2
.7
2 .1
.7
.4
4.6
.4

10 0 .0

7 9.9

72.8

6 .0

1 .0

2 0.1

1 7.3

2.3

.5

1 0 0 .0

88.8

80.1

7.3

1.4

11.2

9 .0

1.6

.5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

8 0.3
7 5.5
8 1.0
78.7
7 9.6
7 1.3
74.9
6 8 .2

77.5
6 8.3
74.3
75.0
74.8
6 4.9
7 3.6
6 7 .3

2.6
6.2
6 .3
3 .3
4.1
4 .9
1.3
1.0

.1
1 .0
.4
.4
.8
1.5
.0
•0

1 9.7
2 4 .5
1 9 .0
21.3
20.4
28.7
2 5 .1
31.8

18.8
21.4
17.1
19.8
1 9.2
2 4 .2
24.5
30.4

.9
2 .5
1.6
1 .3
1 .0
3.2
.5
1.0

.1
.6
.3
.2
.2
1 .3
.0
.3

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

8 8.3
8 6.5
89.8
88.3
8 8 .7
82.5
8 4 .1
8 2 .5

85.2
77.2
81.6
8 3.8
82.9
7 3.1
8 2.7
81.0

3.0
7 .9
7 .7
4.0
4.7
7.0
1.4
1.5

.2
1.5
.5
•6
1.1
2.4
.0
.0

1 1.7
13.5
10.2
11.7
11.3
17.5
15.9
1 7 .5

11.0
1 1.0
8.6
1 0 .4
1 0 .2
13.5
1 5 .0
1 6 .3

.6
1.9
1.3
1.0
.9
2.4
.9
.6

.1
.6
.3
•2
.2
1.6
.0
.6

1 0 0 .0

8 4 .6

6 7 .2

1 4 .0

3.5

1 5 .4

10.4

3.4

1 .6

1 0 0 .0

9 0.5

6 8.3

1 7.4

4 .8

9 .5

5.4

2.5

1 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 9 .8
80.4
71.3
64.8
6 9.4
68.1
6 9 .7
84.1
7 9 .8
83.4
8 1.7
76.9
88.9
75.2

56.5
6 5 .6
6 4.7
5 8 .8
66.9
59.0
61.0
7 4.4
71.6
6 4.9
8 0.2
73.1
6 9.2
6 9.4

1 1 .2
1 1 .4
5.7
4 .9
2.5
6.3
6 .7
8.3
7.0
1 6 .7
1.5
3 .4
13.6
5.0

2.2
3.4
.9
1.1
•0
2.8
1 .9
1 .5
1.1
1 .8
.0
•4
6.1
.8

3 0.2
1 9 .6
2 8.7
3 5 .2
30.6
31.9
3 0.3
1 5.9
2 0.2
1 6.6
1 8.3
2 3.1
11.1
2 4 .8

20.9
15.5
23.2
2 9 .1
28.8
21.0
23.2
1 3 .4
1 6 .6
1 3 .0
17.8
2 1.6
8.2
2 2 .1

6 .3
2 .9
3.9
4 .5
1 .5
4 .4
4.6
2.0
2.9
3.1
.5
1.3
2 .0
2.0

3 .0
1.1
1.6
1 .5
.3
6 .4
2.5
.5
.7
.4
.0
.2
.9
.6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

80.6
90.2
81.9
79.0
84.2
7 1.5
7 6.3
91 .4
8 8 .8
87.3
8 6.8
8 6.1
9 2 .1
8 6 .2

60.3
70.9
73.2
70.1
8 0 .4
58.1
61 .3
7 9.6
78.3
62.8
84.0
8 0.4
64.9
78.1

16.5
14.7
7.5
7.0
3.9
8.4
1 1 .0
9.9
9.1
22.1
2.8
4 .9
17.6
6.9

3.8
4.6
1 .2
1.9
.0
5.0
4 .0
1 .9
1 .5
2 .4
.0
.9
9.6
1.2

19.4
9 .8
18.1
21.0
1 5.8
2 8 .5
2 3.7
8 .6
11.2
12.7
13.2
13.9
7.9
13.8

10.6
7 .1
1 3 .5
15.6
1 4.7
12.7
14.1
6.6
8.1
8.6
12.3
12.3
4.8
11.9

4.8
1.7
3.1
3.7
.7
4.8
5.3
1 .6
2.6
3.5
.9
1.2
1 .8
1.2

4 .0
1.0
1 .5
1 .7
.4
10.9
4.2
.5
.5
•6
.0
.3
1.3
.6

T a b le

A -26.

S i n g l e a n d m u l t i - i n d u s t r y e m p l o y m e n t o f all w o r k e r s by n u m b e r o f m a j o r in d u s t r y e m p l o y e r s , 1967
PERCENT OF WORKERS EMPLOYED IN THEIR INDUSTRY OF MAJOR E R IN S DURING—
AN G
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
Q U A R T E R S.
F 0 U R
SING L : INDUSTRY WORKERS
MULT I - I N D U S T R Y WORKERS
SINGLE INDUSTRY WORKERS
M U LT I- IN D U S TR Y WORKERS
NUMBER OF
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF
NUMBER.OF MAJOR
EMPLOYERS
INDUSTRY EMPl.OYERS
EMPLOYERS
INDUSTRY.EMPLOYERS
MORE
MORE
MORE
MORE
ALL
THAN
THAN
ALL
THAN
THAN
WRKRS TOTAL
ONE
TWO
TWO
TOTAL
TWO
TWO
ONE
WRKRS TOTAL
TWO
ONE
TWO
TWO
ONE
TWO
TOTAL

INDUSTRY

PR IVAT E

M IN IN G

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY ..............

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

69.7

1 8 .9

11.5

.0

.0

.0

.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

69.8

18.0

12.2

.0

.0

.0

.0

........................................................................................................

10 0 .0

7 7.5

68. 7

5.9

2.9

2 2.5

1 7.7

2.7

2.2

1 0 0 .0

8 8 .2

78.2

6 .7

3.4

11.8

9 .1

1 .2

1 .4

METAL M IN IN G ...................................................................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G .....................................................................
BITUMINO US COAL AND L I G N I T E M IN IN G ......................
O I L AND GAS E X T R A C T I O N ......................................................
NONMETALLIC M IN ER A LS , EXCEPT FUELS ................ ..

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

7 4 .8
82.8
87.1
7 5.4
7 0.7

71.5
7 5.3
77.2
63 .6
67 .6

3.1
7.5
7.6
6 .7
2.9

.2
.0
2 .4
5.1
.1

25.2
17.2
1 2 .9
2 4.6
29.3

2 3 .4
1 4 .0
10.0
16.2
27%
9

1.5
2.2
2 .3
4 .0
1.4

.3
1.1
.5
4 .4
.1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

84.1
84 .4
9 3 .1
8 8.0
84.5

80.2
7 3.4
82.7
74.5
80.7

3 .8
10.9
7.7
7 .5
3.7

.2
.0
2 .7
6 .0
.1

1 5 .9
15.6
6 .9
12.0
1 5.5

14.5
14.1
5 .6
7.4
14.8

1.1
1.6
.9
1 .7
.7

.3
.0
.4
2 .8
.0

CONTRACT C O N S T R U C T I O N ...............................................................

10 0 .0

7 1 .6

50.5

11.1

9 .9

2 8.4

15.1

5 .8

7 .6

1 0 0 .0

8 0.9

54.5

12.8

13.6

19. 1

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CONTRACTORS .......................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS .................................
SPEC IAL TRADE CONTRACTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
100 .0

58.1
60.3
6 5.0

4 9.0
51 .4
51.2

6 .3
6 .4
8.4

2.8
2.5
5 .4

41.9
39.7
35 . 0

25.3
26.8
20.8

8.8
7 .8
7.Q

7.9
5.1
7 .2

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0

70.3
76.2
76.0

57.2
6 4.2
57 .6

8.5
8 .4
10.7

4 .5
3.5
7.7

2 9.7
2 3 .8
2 4.0

10 0 .0

82.6

7 2.3

8 .1

2.1

1 7.4

1 2.6

3.2

1.6

1 0 0 .0

89.0

7 8 .5

8 .3

2.2

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
100 .0
10 0 .0

73.6
7 5 .6
79.1
80.0
84.6
74.7
7 0 .8
76.1
7 9.3
78.4
7 9.9
7 1 .9
7 9 .6
7 4.4
78.1
71.4
7 5.3
7 7 .7
76.1
76.2
74.2

68.1
70.7
7 6.6
7 3.8
7 4 .3
6 7.0
6 7.0
7 4 .0
72.4
7 6.3
77.6
7 0.3
7 4.4
72.0
76.7
68.5
71.4
7 4 .5
72.3
7 3.7
70.0

5.5
4.4
2.2
5 .0
7.9
6.1
3 .3
2.0
5.2
2.0
2.3
1 .6
4 .6
2.1
1.4
2.7
3.5
3 .1
3 .7
2 .4
3.8

.0
.5
.2
1 .1
2 .4
1.7
.4
.1
1 .8
.0
.0
. 1
•6
.2
.0
.2
.4
.1
.1
.0
.4

26 .4
24.4
2 0 .9
20.0
1 5 .4
25.3
2 9.2
23.9
20.7
2 1 .6
2 0.1
2 8.1
2 0.4
25.6
2 1.9
2 8.6
2 4.7
22.3
23.9
2 3 .8
25.8

2 5.5
21.2
19.8
1 6 .5
1 2 .4
2 0.7
26 .4
2 2.3
1 8 .2
20.7
19.3
2 6.6
17.5
2 4 .0
2 0.8
25.5
21.9
20.4
21 .6
22.6
2 3.5

.9
2 .7
.8
2 .4
2.1
3.3
2 .2
1 .4
1.8
.9
•8
1.3
2.2
1 .3
l.Q
2.6
2 .3
1.7
1.9
1.1
1.9

.0
.5
.3
1.0
.9
1 .3
.6
.2
.7
.0
.0
.1
.8
.3
.1
.5
.5
.2
.4
.0
.4

1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0

87.2
8 6.6
8 8.3
90.7
92.7
86.7
85.8
8 8.0
87.9
88.0
8 8 .6
8 3.9
8 9.9
8 6 .4
85.8
82.9
8 5.2
8 7 .5
85.5
86.5
87.1

79.7
81.3
8 6.6
8 3 .4
8 1.5
77.4
80.9
85.6
7 9.0
8 5 .6
85.8
82.0
8 3 .6
83.5
84.3
79.4
80.5
8 3.7
8 0.9
83.5
8 1.7

7.4
4 .7
1 .6
6 .0
8.4
7.0
4 .3
2.3
6.6
2 .4
2.8
1.8
5.6
2 .7
1.5
3 .3
4.2
3 .6
4.4
2.9
5.0

.0
.6
.1
1 .3
2.8
2.3
.6
. 1
2 .3
.0
.0
. 1
.7
.3
.0
.2
.5
.2
.1
. 1
.4

1 0 0 .0

77.2

6 7 .9

6 .7

2 .7

2 2.8

16.3

3.3

3 .2

1 0 0 .0

85.1

7 5.0

7 .2

2 .9

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0

84.4
77.5
7 2 .7
59.4
7 8 .7
84.1
68 .4

8 1 .6
64.8
6 3.6
4 1 .9
7 5.6
82.5
64.7

2.7
1 0.5
6 .8
9.1
2.9
1.6
3.4

.1
2.1
2.3
8.3
.3
.0
.3

15.6
22.5
27.3
40 .6
2 1.3
15.9
3 1 .6

1 4.7
19.1
1 9 .6
15.9
1 9 .9
15.9
2 7.8

.8
2 .6
4 .3
7 .3
1 .3
.0
2 .5

.1
.9
3.4
1 7 .4
. 1
.0
1.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0

89.2
8 4 .8
8 3 .3
6 3.5
86.9
9 2.9
8 1.4

86. 1
71.0
7 2.2
45.3
83.7
91 .0
7 6.0

3 .0
11.2
8.2
9.0
2.9
1.9
5.0

.1
2 .5
2 .9
9 .2
.3
.0
.4

MANUFACTURING

............................................................................. ..

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ..............................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS ..........................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PROOUCTS ......................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .................................................
FURNITURE AND F I XT U RE S ....................................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ...............................................
P R IN T I N G AND P U B L I S H I N G .................... ...............................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ....................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PROOUCTS .................................... ..
RUBBER AND P L AS T IC PRODUCTS, NEC ...........................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ......................................
STONE, CL AY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS ...............................
PRIMARY METAL IN D U S T R IE S ..................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ...............................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECT RICA L .......................................
EL ECT RIC AL EQUIPMENT AND SU PP LIES .........................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ............................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING IND U ST R IE S ............

TRANSPORTATION

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ............................................ ..
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ............
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ............ ....................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ............ ...............................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A I R ..........................................................
P I P E LI NE TRANSPORTAION ....................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES .................................... ...............




7.3

3.7

8 .2

13.9
13.3
10.6

6 .4
5 .3
5.2

9.4
5.2
8.1

11.0

7 .8

2 .0

1.2

12.8
13.4
1 1.7
9 .3
7.3
13.3
14.2
1 2.0
12.1
12.0
11.4
16.1
10.1
13.6
14.2
17.1
14.8
12.5
1 4 .5
13.5
12.9

12.1
11.6
1 1.0
6.9
5.4
9 .8
12.1
11.1
9 .8
11.3
10.9
15.3
8 .2
12.7
13.5
15.1
12.9
11.4
13.0
12.5
11.1

.7
1 .5
.5
1.5
1 .1
2.1
1.4
.7
1.5
.6
.5
.8
1.3
.8
.6
1.6
1.6
1.0
1.3
1 .0
1 .5

.0
.4
. 1
.9
.8
1.3
.7
.2
.7
.0
.0
.1
.6
.1
.1
.4
.4
.2
.3
.0
.4

14.9

9.8

2.2

2.9

10.8
15.2
16.7
3 6 .5
13.1
7.1
18.6

10.1
13.1
10.7
10.7
12.0
7.1
15.1

.7
1 .4
3.0
5 .4
1.0
.0
1 .6

.1
.7
3 .0
20.4
.1
.0
1.8

T a b le

A -26.

S i n g l e a n d m u l t i - i n d u s t r y e m p l o y m e n t o f all w o r k e r s by n u m b e r o f m a j o r in d u s t r y e m p l o y e r s , 1 9 6 7 ---- C o n t i n u e d

SINGLE
INDUSTRY

ALL
WRKRS TOTAL
PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

PERCENT OF WORKERS EMPLOYED IN THEIR INDUSTRY OF MAJOR E R IN S DURING—
AN G
Q U A R T E R S
Q U A R T E R
F 0 U R
A N Y
M U L T I - IN D U S T R Y WORKERS
SINGLE INDUSTRY WORKERS
M U L T I - IN D U S T R Y WORKERS
INDUSTRY WORKERS
NUMBER OF
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF
INDUSTRY EMPLOYERS
EMPLOYERS
INDUSTRY EMPl.OYERS
EMPLOYERS
MORE
MORE
MORE
MORE
THAN
THAN
THAN
THAN
ALL
TWO
TWO
TWO
TWO
TWO
WRKRS TOTAL
TOTAL .... ONE..
TWO
TWO
TOTAL
ONE
TWO
ONE
ONE

CONTINUED
1 0 0 .0

83.0

80.4

2 .4

.2

17.0

16.0

.8

.2

1 0 0 .0

89.9

86 .9

2.8

.2

10.1

9 .3

.7

. 1

..............................................................................

1 0 0 .0

83.0

82.4

.5

.1

17.0

1 6 .7

.3

.0

1 0 0 .0

88.6

88.0

.5

.1

11.4

11.2

.2

.0

WHOLESALE TRADE ................................................................................

1 00 .0

75.1

70.9

3 .9

.3

2 4.9

21.6

2.8

.5

10 0 .0

8 6.0

80.9

4.7

.4

14.0

11.8

1.8

.5

RETAIL

1 00 .0

8 2.9

6 6 .9

12.1

3.9

17.1

10.8

4 .0

2 .3

1 0 0 .0

89.3

71.3

13.0

5 .0

10.7

5.9

2 .6

2.2
.2
.2
.9
1.9
.7
.3
5.0
.4

COMMUNICATION

P U B L IC

......................................................................................

U T IL IT IE S

T R A D E ............... .. ......................................................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

7 6 .0
79.9
77.4
71.7
79.5
74.1
7 5.4
7 7 .5

73.3
75.8
71.1
61.2
72.4
70.5
54.1
71.9

2.5
3 .9
5.4
8 .2
5.9
3. 1
15.8
4 .8

.2
.3
.9
2.4
1 .2
.5
5.5
.8

24.0
2 0.1
2 2.6
28.3
2 0.5
2 5 .9
24.6
2 2.5

22.8
17.7
19.3
20 .7
1 7 .2
2 3 .6
14.7
2 0.2

.9
2.1
2 .7
5 .5
2 .7
1.9
5.9
2 .0

.2
.2
.7
2.0
.6
.4
4.0
.4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

87.7
9 0.1
87.5
85.4
89.2
87.0
83.1
88.4

8 3.9
85.5
79.1
70.8
79.6
8 2 .1
52.3
80.7

3 .5
4 .1
7 .0
10.8
7 .5
4.2
2 1 .7
6.4

.4
.4
1.4
3.8
2.0
.8
9 .0
1.3

12.3
9 .9
12.5
14.6
10.8
1 3 .0
16.9
11.6

11.5
8.5
9 .7
9 .4
8 .1
1 1 .6
7.6
9.7

.6
1.2
1.9
3.3
1.9
1.0
4.3
1.5

..........................

1 0 0 .0

80.4

73.4

6 .0

1.0

1 9 .6

17.0

2.1

.5

1 0 0 .0

89.2

80.5

7 .4

1 .3

10.8

8 .8

1.6

.4

BANKING .................................................................................................
CR ED IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ............................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND SE RV ICES . . .
INSURANCE CARRIERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INSURANCE AGENTS* BROKERS AND SERVICE ...............
REAL ESTATE .......................................... ...........................................
COMBINED REAL ES TA T E, INSURANCE, ETC ..................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ............

10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

81.4
75.9
81.4
7 8.7
79.2
72.2
82.9
70.9

77.8
68.9
74.7
75.1
74.8
6 5.9
82.9
70.4

3.5
5.7
5.5
3 .2
4 .0
5 .0
.0
.3

.1
1.3
1.2
.4
.4
1.3
.0
.3

18.6
24.1
1 8 .6
2 1.3
2 0.8
2 7.8
17. 1
29.1

17.4
21 .7
1 7.0
2 0 .0
19.2
23.7
16*5
2 7.9

1.2
1.9
1 .3
1 .2
1.4
3.0
.5
.9

.0
.4
.3
.2
.2
1 .1
.0
.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0

88.7
87.3
91.0
8 8.5
88.4
83.2
90.0
82.6

8 4.5
7 8.0
82.7
84.1
82.7
7 4.1
9 0.0
81.8

4.1
7 .6
6.8
4.0
5.0
7.0
.0
.3

.1
1.7
1 .4
.4
.7
2.1
.0
.6

11.3
12.7
9 .0
11.5
1 1.6
1 6.8
1 0.0
17.4

10.3
11.0
7.7
10.5
1 0.5
1 3.1
9 .2
1 6 .0

.9
1 .2
1.1
1.0
1.0
2 .4
.8
.8

.0
.5
.2
.1
.2
1.2
.0
.6

S E R V I C E S ....................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

85.2

71.1

1 1.2

2 .8

14.8

1 0.4

3.0

1.4

1 0 0 .0

90.9

74.2

13.0

3.8

9.1

5.6

2 .0

1.5

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ..............................
PERSONAL SERVICES
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SE RV IC ES ...............................
AUTO RE P A IR * SE RV IC ES* AND GARAGES .......................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVIC ES .....................................
MOTION PI CTURES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S * NEC ............
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES .........................
LEGAL SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
MUSEUMS* BOT ANICAL* ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS . . . . .
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP OR GAN IZA TION S .......................
PR IVAT E HOUSEHOLDS • • » . . • • • • » » • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0

7 1 .0
81.7
7 1.4
6 5.7
70.3
70.5
69.2
8 4 .0
80.3
8 4.2
7 5.9
77.9
90.1
76.0

5 7 .9
6 7 .0
65.3
59.3
6 7 .7
60.8
61.1
74.8
72.0
78.3
74.3
74.8
70.0
70.4

1 1 .0
11.6
5 .1
5.1
2 .4
6 .8
6 .2
7 .7
7.1
5 .4
1.7
3.0
13.7
4.9

2.1
3.1
.9
1 .3
.2
2 .8
1.9
1.5
1.2
.5
.0
.1
6 .4
.8

29 .0
18.3
28.6
34.3
29.7
2 9.5
3 0.8
16.0
19.7
15.8
2 4 .1
22.1
9 .9
24.0

21.0
1 4 .7
23.5
28.5
2 7.3
1 9.8
2 3 .9
1 3 .7
1 6.9
1 4 .5
22.8
2 0 .4
7 .0
21.5

5 .7
2 .8
3 .6
4.2
2.1
3.7
4 .4
1 .8
2 .0
1.2
1.3
1 .6
1.7
2 .0

2.4
.9
1.5
1.6
.4
6 .0
2.5
.5
.7
.1
.0
.1
1.2
.5

10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

82.3
90.7
82 .5
79.4
8 3.9
7 2.2
75.8
91.6
8 8.3
8 8.1
79.5
8 7.0
9 2.3
8 6.2

62.3
7 2.4
7 4 .8
7 1 .0
79.8
57.9
6 2.3
80.6
77.4
8 1.0
77.9
82.3
65 .5
78 .4

16.4
14.3
6.3
6.3
3.8
9.6
9.5
9.1
9.3
6.6
1.6
4.5
16.7
6.7

3.6
4 .0
1.3
2. 1
.2
4 .7
3.9
1.8
1.6
.5
.0
.2
10.1
1.1

17.7
9.3
17.5
2 0.6
16.1
27.8
2 4 .2
8.4
11.7
11.9
20.5
13.0
7.7
13.8

1 0 .3
6.9
1 3.6
15.8
14.6
12.7
15.2
6 .8
9.5
10.6
1 8 .9
11 .4
4.1
1 1.7

4 .4
1.7
2.4
3.0
1.2
4.4
4 .2
1.2
1.3
1.2
1.6
1.4
1.7
1 .6

2 .9
.7
1.6
1.9
.3
10.7
4 .9
.5
1.0
.1
.0
.1
1.8
.4

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ...............
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE .............................................
FOOD STORES ......................................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SE RVICE ST ATIONS . . . .
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES .......................................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U RN IS H IN G S STORES ...............
EATING AND D R IN K I N G P L A C E S .................... ........................
MISCELLANEOUS R E T A I L STORES ....................................... ..

F IN A N C E *

INSURANCE*




AND REAL ESTATE

T a b le

A-27.

R e g i o n a l d i s t r i b u t i o n o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

by in d u s try o f m ajo r e a r n in g s , 1966
PERCENT OF WORKERS THAT EARNED MAJOR PROPORTION OF TH EIR
N Y

INDUSTRY
u n ite d

STATES
PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL ECGNOMY .................................

10 0 .0

............................................................................. ........................................

METAL M IN IN G ..................................................................... . .......................
ANTHRACITE M I N I N G .................................................................................
BI TU MI NO US COAL AND L I G N I T E M IN IN G ....................................
O IL AND GAS EXTRACTION ....................................................... ..
NONMETALLIC M IN E R A LS , EXCEPT FUELS ....................................

M IN IN G

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

NORTH
EAST

Q U A

R T E R

NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL

2 6 .9

2 7.4

10 0 .0

9.8

5 2 .5

17.8

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0

6 .2
99.0
18.5
2.3
13.3

6.0
6 1.1
7 2.4
34.7

33.3
1 .0
17.7
8.7
2 8.5

_

29.3

WEST
1 5 .6

1 0 0 .0

2 8.0

2 6.5

19.1

1 0 0 .0

10.2

5 3.6
2.8
15.5
2 2.4

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6.2
1 00 .0
L9.5
2 .5
13.8

_

EARNINGS

IN

F O U R
Q U A
ALL WAGE ANDi SALARY EMPLOYMENT
NORTH
UNIT ED NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST
STATES EAST

T H IS

INDUSTRY AND REGION DURING

R T E R
T
UN IT ED
STATES

S
I N
H I S
I N D U S T R Y
NORTH
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

30.1

14.6

1 0 0 .0

28.0

2 6.5

52.9

1 7.4

1 8 .7

1 0 0 .0

10.5

53.2

17.2

18.3

6 .3

35.1

51.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6.7
1 0 0 .0
19.5
2 .7
1 4 .5

6.7

3 5.2

_

50.3

60.4
73.2
36.9

17.7
8.1
2 5.7

2.4
15.2
2 1.8

_

60 .4
7 2 .7
36.8

_

1 7 .7
8 .1
26.3

_

2.4
1 5.7
2 2 .1

_

30.1

14.6

_

.............................................................................

1 0 0 .0

2 0 .2

3 6.7

24.7

16.8

1 0 0 .0

2 1 .3

3 5.2

2 5.4

17.1

1 0 0 .0

21.7

34.6

25.5

17.2

GENERAL B U IL D I N G C O N T R A C T O R S ................. ..................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS .............................. ...............
SP EC IA L TRADE CONTRACTORS ............................................................

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0

18.9
14.7
2 4 .2

37.1
43.1
32.9

2 4.5
2 2.3
2 6.3

1 6.7
1 8 .8
15.7

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0

2 0 .3
1 5 .0
25.1

3 5 .2
43.4
30.9

26.1
20.9
2 7.6

16.6
1 9.8
15.8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

21.1
14.9
25.7

33.7
4 4 .2
30.0

2 6.9
19.7
2 7.8

16.5
20.4
16.0

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............ .. ....................................................................................

10 0 .0

30.1

23.8

32.8

1 2 .6

1 0 0 .0

30.6

2 3.4

3 3.6

1 1 .8

1 0 0 .0

3 1 .1

23.1

3 3.7

11.5

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES ............................................ ..................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ............................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS .................................................................. ..
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS .......................................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS ....................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS ...............................................................
FURNITURE AND F I XT U RE S ............................ .......................................
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ............................................................
P R IN T I N G AND P U B LI S H IN G ..................................................................
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS .................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS .......................................................
RU8BER AND P L AS T IC PRODUCTS, NEC .........................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PROCUCTS ....................................................
STONE, CL AY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS ............................................
PRIMARY METAL IN D U S T R IE S ...............................................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ............................................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECT RICA L ...................................................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SU PP LIES .......................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ...............................................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .........................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING IN DU STR IES .........................

10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

11.0
2 0 .0
14.7
29.1
4 4.6
11.7
2 1 .9
31.4
3 4 .9
31.6
2 2.2
3 3.0
5 5 .8
27.5
33.3
28.2
2 9 .0
36.0
17.5
5 0.7
5 2.5

2 3 .5
2 7.0
7 4 .7
6 5 .2
3 4.7
40.9
40.3
2 4.4
19.3
34.8
3 7.2
1 4.0
15.9
2 7.2
15.4
16.1
11.7
14.6
1 4.4
10.0
11.9

17.1
3 2 .1
2.3
3.2
1 1 .8
15.1
2 6.6
33.9
3 3.0
2 6 .1
2 1.0
4 3.0
2 1 .8
3 3 .4
4 2.9
45.0
4 9.9
37.0
4 7.6
2 7 .8
2 5 .1

4 8.2
19.7
.9
1 .6
6.4
32.0
10.5
10.1
12.6
7 .2
18.2
9.4
3.6
11.0
8 .2
10.5
9.3
12.1
2 0 .5
10.5
9.5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0

11.3
22.0
15.7
28.1
46.8
10.9
21.9
3 1.5
3 5 .6
3 1 .6
2 1.9
3 2 .7
55.2
2 8.7
3 3.8
2 8 .8
2 9 .6
37.2
1 7 .9
5 2.6
51.8

23.8
27.2
72.5
66.8
33.3
41.7
41.6
25.1
18.6
3 5.8
3 7.4
14.6
16.1
27.2
15.6
15.8
1 1.3
14.5
13.8
9.1
13.1

1 5 .9
33.7
3.0
2 .9
12.0
1 4 .9
25.7
33.8
3 3 .5
2 5.9
21.1
4 3.6
2 2.8
33.1
4 2.6
4 5.3
5 0 .3
36.2
47 .9
2 7.7
25.6

4 8.9
15.8
.8
1.5
5.7
3 2 .3
10.1
9.5
1 2.2
6 .5
18.1
8.5
3.2
1 0 .3
7.9
9.9
8 .7
11.7
20.3
1 0 .0
8.7

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 1.5
2 2.4
16.3
27.9
47.5
10.6
22.0
3 1.4
35.9
32.0
2 1 .7
32.4
5 5 .2
2 9.4
3 4 .3
29.8
30.3
38. 1
18.2
53.6
5 2 .3

2 4.8
26.7
71.7
67.3
32.8
4 2 .5
4 1 .3
25.8
18.4
36.1
37.7
14.8
15.7
26.6
15.9
15.1
10.5
13.5
13.4
8 .7
13.2

14.5
34.2
2 .9
2 .8
11.8
14.3
2 5.7
33.1
3 3 .4
2 5.4
20.8
4 4 .3
2 3.4
33.1
4 2.4
4 5 .6
5 0 .9
36.6
48.3
2 7.5
25.1

49. 1
15.4
.7
1.3
5.7
3 2.3
10.3
9.5
12.1
6.3
18.3
8.0
3 .0
10.0
7.4
9.4
8.2
11.4
20. 1
9.5
8 .4

TRANS PO RTA TION 1................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

20.7

19.6

44 .8

11.6

1 0 0 .0

2 0.8

18.3

47 .4

10.6

1 0 0 .0

21.0

17.4

48.4

10.3

RAILROAD TR AN SPORTATION1 ..................................................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .........................
TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSING ...............................................................
WATER T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ....................................... ..................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A IR .......................................................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTAION ..................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ..................................................................

10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

2 0.0
29.6
2 4.0
26.8
61.2
18.3

100 .0
24.2
30.4
8 .8
19.3
26.2
25.1

13.2
15.1
1 5 .9
22.1
7.7
15.8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

19.1
2 8.7
2 4.1
2 6.8
61.8
17.6

100.0
2 4 .2
3 1 .3
6.7
18.9
2 6.1
2 6.9

11.4
1 4 .6
15.6
21.3
7.9
14.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

18.5
27.8
2 3.4
26.1
62.2
17.3

100 .0
24.1
31.5
5 .8
18.7
25.6
2 7 .6

10.7
14.5
15.9
2 1 .4
7.7
12.9

See footnote at end of table.




41.8
2 4.5
2 2 .0
30.3
4 .4
39.2

44.8
25.2
24.9
31.5
4.2
3 9.8

46.2
25.9
26.3
3 2.2
4.5
40.6

T a b le

A-27.

R e g i o n a l d i s t r i b u t i o n o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y o f m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 6 ---- C o n t i n u e d
PERCENT OF WORKERS THAT EARNED MAJOR PROPORTION OF TH EIR
\

INDUSTRY

N Y

UNITED NORTH
STATES EAST
PR IVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY COMMUNICATION

Q U A

R T E R

NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

EARNINGS

IN

Q U A
F O U R
ALL WAGE AND SALARY’ EMPLOYMENT
NORTH
UNITED NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST
STATES EAST

TH IS

INDUSTRY AND REGION DURING

R T E R
T
UNIT ED
STATES

S
I N
H I S
I N D U S T R Y
NORTH
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

CONTINUED

....................................................................................................

1 00 .0

26.3

26.1

25.6

2 1.6

10 0 .0

2 7.4

25.6

25. 1

21.4

1 0 0 .0

2 7.7

25.6

2 5.2

21.1

PU BLI C U T I L I T I E S

...........................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

23.1

31.8

27.0

16.9

1 0 0 .0

23.8

30.9

2 7.7

16.5

1 0 0 .0

24.4

3 0 .5

2 7 .7

16.3

WHOLESALE TRADE

..............................................................................................

1 00 .0

27.3

27.5

27.2

1 7.3

1 0 0 .0

2 8.7

2 6.7

2 7.7

1 6.2

1 0 0 .0

29.2

2 6.3

2 7 .9

1 6 .0

......................................................................................................

10 0 .0

23.9

28.9

2 8.5

18.0

1 0 0 .0

25.3

28.4

28.5

17.1

1 0 0 .0

25.6

2 8.2

28.7

16.9

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ............................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE ..........................................................
FOOD STORES ........................................................................... .......................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATI ON S ......................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES .....................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U RN IS H IN GS STORES ............................
EATING AND D R IN K I N G PLACES ..........................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RE TA IL STORES .......................................................

1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0

17.7
25.9
26.8
17.8
30.5
24.8
22.8
23.5

29.8
26.8
27.3
34.2
28.3
3 0.4
2 7.6
31.1

3 6 .1
2 9.6
28.3
2 7.3
25.1
26.0
29. 1
2 6 .9

15.5
16.7
17.0
2 0.2
15.6
1 7.8
19.9
1 7 .8

10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 8 .0
26.6
2 7.1
19.0
3 2.7
25.5
26.7
25.1

3 0 .4
2 6.3
26.6
33.7
27.2
3 0.7
26.2
3 0.7

3 5 .1
3 0.6
28.8
28.0
2 5.3
2 6 .7
27.4
26.7

15.6
15.8
17.0
18.9
14.1
16.1
19.2
16.9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

18.3
26.3
27.4
19.3
3 3 .3
2 5.5
27.5
25.5

3 0 .1
2 6.5
2 6 .1
33.4
2 7.1
30.6
2 5.4
30.6

3 5 .2
30.7
2 8.9
2 8 .2
2 5 .2
2 6 .8
2 7 .7
2 6.8

15.5
15.7
17.1
1 8 .7
13.9
15.9
18.8
16.4

RETAIL

TRADE

.......................................

1 0 0 .0

31.0

26.4

24 .9

16.9

1 0 0 .0

32.3

25.7

25 .0

1 6.2

1 0 0 .0

32.9

25.4

2 5 .0

16.0

BANKING ...............................................................................................................
CR ED IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ..........................................
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERV ICES ....................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ................................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SE RV IC E ............................
REAL ESTATE ....................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL EST AT E, INSURANCE, ETC ...............................
HOLDING ANO OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .........................

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

32.0
18.1
55.3
32.4
28.7
30.4
24.5
31.6

2 4.4
32.1
1 3 .8
2 6 .1
26.0
29.2
3 1.1
23.4

2 5.4
29.3
17.8
26.6
2 6.7
20.9
26.9
22.1

17.5
19.6
1 3 .0
1 4 .6
1 8 .0
1 7.9
1 7 .2
2 2.6

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

32.4
1 7 .9
5 4 .7
33.4
2 9.7
34.2
2 8.8
3 7.2

24.6
3 2.3
13.7
2 5.4
26.0
27.0
30.0
2 1.8

2 4 .8
29.8
18.3
2 6.6
26.6
2 1.3
2 3.5
2 0.3

1 7 .5
19.3
13.1
14.2
1 7 .0
16.0
1 7 .7
2 0.6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 2.4
18.1
5 4 .6
33.9
30.6
3 6 .0
29.5
40.5

24.8
3 2 .4
13.5
25.1
26.4
25.7
29.1
2 0 .2

24.9
29.9
18.6
26.5
2 5 .7
2 1 .6
2 3.2
19.3

17. 1
18.9
13.1
14.1
16.5
15.4
18.2
19.9

.................................................................................................................

10 0 .0

27.7

29.2

25.4

17.1

1 0 0 .0

2 9 .2

2 8.8

25.3

16.2

1 0 0 .0

2 9.4

28.8

25.3

15.9

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES .............................................
PERSONAL SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • •
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES .............................................
AUTO R E P A IR , S E R V IC E S , AND GARAGES ....................................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SE RV ICE S ....................- ..........................
MOTION PICTURES .........................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S , NEC .........................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES .......................................
LEGAL SERVICES ...........................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ...........................................................................
MUSEUMS, B O T A N IC A L , ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS .........................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP O R G A N I Z A T I O N S .................... ...............
PR IVAT E HOUSEHOLDS ................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .....................................................................

10 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

26.5
2 3.7
33.7
24.9
24.7
25.4
27.1
28.2
33.0
27.6
37.1
28.0
23.7
30.5

2 8.8
32.4
2 2.0
2 8.1
3 3 .7
22.5
23.0
26.7
2 5.5
31.2
20.3
3 0.0
45 .5
22.9

22.0
26.4
23.5
25.0
20.9
19.4
2 6 .7
2 8.4
2 4.0
26.6
2 9 .2
26.3
18.1
24.6

21.3
1 7 .2
20.2
21.4
1 9.8
32.4
22.8
1 6.4
1 6 .8
1 4 .0
1 2 .9
15.1
1 2.0
20.9

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

2 4 .8
2 5.5
3 5 .8
2 6.7
26.9
2 8.4
2 6.0
3 0.0
3 5.1
2 9 .2
45.2
2 9.9
24.8
30.8

28.9
32.1
2 1.9
30.2
33.0
19.8
23.7
26.2
25.8
30.8
2 2.6
26.3
46.0
21.7

2 3.8
26.4
22.2
23 .9
2 0.5
1 6.0
25.3
2 8 .2
22.8
26.0
19.1
28.8
1 7.8
2 5.7

2 0.8
1 5.8
1 9.3
18.8
18.5
3 5.5
2 4.4
15.3
1 5.5
13.8
1 3.0
1 4 .4
1 0 .7
20.9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

24.9
25.6
36.8
2 8.4
28.5
30.0
25.8
30.2
3 5 .5
2 9.4
4 7.2
30.5
24.8
30.9

28.4
3 2.5
21.4
2 9.5
30.6
1 9 .2
23.8
2 6 .1
25.5
30.6
2 0 .8
25.4
46 .3
21.8

2 4.3
26.0
2 2.2
23.6
2 0 .9
15.7
25.1
28.1
22.6
2 6 .0
17.9
29.2
17.6
26.1

2 0 .3
15.6
18.8
1 8 .0
1 8.7
3 4 .8
2 4 .6
15.3
15.4
13.6
14.2
14.2
10.6
2 0 .3

FINANCE,

SE RVICES

INSURANCE,

AND REAL

ESTATE

1 F o r pu rp oses of th is study, and becau se inform ation about th eir actual place of em ploym ent w as not available in the file s
orga n ization s cov ered by the R ailro ad R etire m en t A ct w ere con sid ered to have been em ployed in the North C entral R egion.
NOTE:

A dash ( - )




in d ica te s

either

the

sam p le

did not include

any w ork e rs

with th ese

c h a r a c te r is tic s ,

or

that

the

studied,

data

em p loy ees of ra ilro a d s and railroad related

did not

m eet

the

B u r e a u 's

publication c rite ria .

T a b le

A-28.

R e g i o n a l d i s t r i b u t i o n o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y o f m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1967
PERCENT OF WORKERS THAT EARNED MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR
\

INDUSTRY

N Y

Q U A

R T E R

EARNINGS

IN

Q U A
F O U R
ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT
NORTH
UNIT ED NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST
STATES EAST

T H IS

INDUSTRY AND REGION DURING

R T E R
T
UNITED
STATES

S
I N
H I S
I N D U S T R Y
NORTH
NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST
EAST

UNITED NORTH
STATES EAST

NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .................................

10 0 .0

2 6 .8

27.6

29.0

15.7

1 0 0 .0

27.8

26.8

30.0

14.7

1 0 0 .0

2 7.8

2 6 .8

3 0 .0

14. 7

M I N I N G ......................................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

10.3

52.2

1 7 .8

18.8

10 0 .0

10.9

5 2.6

17.7

18.0

1 0 0 .0

11. 1

52.8

18.0

17. 1

METAL M IN IN G ...............................................................................................
ANTHRACITE M IN IN G ..................................................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND L I G N I T E MIN ING ....................................
O I L AND GAS EXTRACTION ....................................................................
NONMETALLIC M INERALS, EXCEPT FUELS ....................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0

8.2
1 0 0 .0
18.6
2 .7
13.6

5.9

33.7

51.5

48.4

45. 3

18.3
8.8
2 5.2

2.1
15.5
2 1.6

8 .7
1 0 0 .0
19.6
3 .2
14.2

38.0

60.4
71.4
37.8

100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0

7.2

2.3
15.8
21.7

9.1
1 0 0 .0
19.2
3.0
14.4

3 5.3

17.8
9 .0
26.5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6.5

6 1.2
71.3
36.8

60.1
71.7
37.9

18.2
8.9
25.2

2.2
14.8
21.6

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .............................................................................

1 0 0 .0

20.6

37.0

25.1

15.7

1 0 0 .0

21.4

3 5.6

26.0

16.0

1 0 0 .0

2 1.9

35.1

25.8

16.2

GENERAL B U IL D I N G CO NT RA CT O RS ...................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CO N T R A C TO R S .............. ...............................
SP EC IAL TRADE CONTRACTORS ............................................................

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

19.3
15.3
24.5

37.4
44.0
3 2 .9

2 4.4
2 2 .2
27. 3

1 6 .0
17.3
14.5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0

20.7
1 4.4
2 5 .5

35.4
45 .0
3 0 .9

2 5.9
2 1 .1
2 8 .5

16.1
18.5
14.6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

21.0
14. 1
2 6.0

34.1
46.5
29.9

26.9
19.2
28.6

16. 1
19.2
1 5 .0

MANUFACTURING ...................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

29.9

24.2

3 2 .3

12.9

1 0 0 .0

3 0.3

2 3.7

33.2

12.1

1 00 .0

30.6

23.5

33.3

11.9

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES ................. .............................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ......................................... ..................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS .......................................................................
T E X T I L E M IL L PRODUCTS ............................................................
APPAREL AND OTHER T E X T I L E PRODUCTS ....................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
FURNITURE AND FI XT U RE S ................................................................ ..
PAPER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ............................................................
P R IN T I N G AND PU BL IS H IN G • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
CHEMICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS .................................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS .......................................................
RUBBER AND P L A S T IC PRODUCTS, NEC .........................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS ...................................................
STONE, CL AY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS ............................................
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R IE S ................................................. .............
FABRICATED METAL P R O D U C T S ................. .. ..................................... ..
MACHINERY, EXCEPT EL ECT RICAL ..............................................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPP LIES ......................................
TRANSPORTATION E Q U I P M E N T ................. ............................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .........................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDU STR IES .........................

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0

10.1
19.7
14.1
27.9
44. 1
10.9
21 . 4
3 2 .0
3 5 .4
31.0
2 2 .3
3 2.4
5 4 .2
2 7.5
33.4
28.1
2 9.4
3 6.2
18.1
51.1
51.0

17.4
2 7.6
7 6.5
6 6.3
3 5.1
4 1.0
4 0 .9
2 5.6
19.4
3 5.0
36.4
14.8
17.2
27.8
15.5
15.8
11.8
15.4
16.1
10.3
13.0

19.6
32.0
1.9
3.2
1 1 .4
14. 7
26. 1
32 .0
32.6
26.5
21.7
4 2.2
2 1.3
33 .0
4 2.3
45.4
4 9 .3
3 5.9
45.8
2 7.0
25.2

5 2 .8
19.5
1.0
1.7
6 .9
3 3.2
1 1.0
10.1
12.4
6.9
17.8
1 0.0
3 .9
1 0.7
8.8
10.4
9 .4
12.1
19.9
10.8
9 .8

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

10. 1
2 1.5
15. 1
26.8
45.4
10.6
21.5
31.2
3 5 .9
31.0
2 2 .0
32.4
53.8
2 8.0
34.2
2 8.7
29.8
37.2
18.3
53.2
5 0 .0

1 7 .5
2 7.7
7 4.4
6 8.0
3 4 .7
40.3
41.3
2 6.2
19.2
3 6 .2
3 6.8
15.0
17.1
27.8
15.7
15.5
11.3
15.5
15.5
9.5
13.7

18. 1
33.6
2.0
3.0
11.6
14.7
2 6.2
32.4
32.8
26.2
22. 1
42 .7
2 2 .5
33.0
41.9
45.8
50. 1
3 5 .2
46.6
2 6.5
2 6.5

5 4 .3
16.0
.9
1.5
5.9
3 4 .3
1 0 .4
9.9
1 1 .9
6 .2
1 7 .5
9.4
3 .5
10.3
8.2
9.8
8.6
11.7
1 9.5
10.3
9.0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

10.1
2 1 .9
14.8
25.4
4 6 .0
1 0 .4
2 1.7
3 0.9
36.1
31.2
2 2.0
3 2 .6
54.4
2 8.5
3 4.8
29.3
30.2
3 7 .6
18.3
54.4
5 0 .8

17.3
27.0
74.7
69.8
34.1
4 0 .2
40.7
26.9
19.0
36.3
37.5
15.0
16.5
27.2
15.7
15.1
10.9
15.5
14.9
9.3
13.7

18.1
3 3.9
2 .1
2.8
11.6
14.7
2 6 .5
3 2.3
32.8
2 6 .2
2 1 .4
43.6
22.3
3 3 .3
41.7
4 6 .0
5 0.7
35.2
47.4
2 5.9
2 5 .8

54.4
15.9
.4
1.3
5.8
34. 7
10.6
9.7
1 1.9
6.0
17.3
8 .2
3 .4
10. 1
7. 8
9.4
8. 0
11.3
19. 3
9.8
8.8

TRANSPORTATION1 ................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

21.6

19.8

43.2

12. 1

1 0 0 .0

21.7

1 8 .5

45.8

11.3

10 0 .0

21.7

17.8

46.7

11. 1

100.0
2 4 .6
31.5
5.7
18.0
29.5
24.9

11.8
14.9
16.5
21. b
7. 7
14.8

PRIVATE

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION1 ....................................................... ..
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .........................
TRUCKING a n d WAREHOUSING ...............................................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION .........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY A I R .......................................................................
P I P E L I N E TRANSPORTAION .................................................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
See footnote at end of table.




1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0

_

4 1 .5
2 4 .9
22.7
31.1
5.8
41.7

_

_
20.0
2 9.7
2 3.1
26.4
57.1
17.6

_

100.0
24. 1
3 0.0
7.6
18.7
30.2
2 2.5

_

_

13.8
1 5.2
1 6.0
22.2
6 .9
17.1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

_
4 3.6
2 5 .3
2 5 .4
3 2 .4
4.2
43. 1

_

_

1 9.2
2 8.5
23.4
26.3
56.5
15.7

_

100.0
24.4
3 1.2
6. 7
18.5
3 1.5
2 3.5

_

_
1 2 .4
1 4 .7
1 5.8
21 .6
7 .7
16.2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

_

44.5
2 5.6
26.6
3 3 .0
4.5
43.2

_

_

18.5
2 7.8
22.9
26.3
58.3
15.6

_

_

_

T a b l e A - 2 8 . R e g i o n a l d i s t r i b u t i o n o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s
b y i n d u s t r y o f m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 7 ---- C o n t i n u e d
PERCENT OF WORKERS THAT
A N Y

INDUSTRY

UNITED NORTH
STATES EAST

PR IVAT E

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

Q U A

EARNED MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR

R T E R

NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

EARNINGS

IN

T H IS

INDUSTRY AND REGION DURING

Q U A 1 T E R
R
F O U R
T
ALL WAGE AND SALARY’ EMPLOYMENT
NORTH
UNIT ED
UNIT ED NORTH
STATES
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST
STATES EAST

S
I N
H I S
I N D U S T R Y
NORTH
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

CONTINUED

C O M M U N I C A T I O N .............. ..................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

26.9

26.4

25.4

2 0.9

1 0 0 .0

27.2

2 6.3

2 5 .1

2 1.1

1 0 0 .0

27.3

26.4

2 5.0

2 0.9

PU BL IC

....................... . .................................................................

1 0 0 .0

23.0

3 2 .0

26.8

1 6 .9

1 0 0 .0

23 .5

3 1.9

27 .4

1 6.2

1 0 0 .0

23.9

3 1.4

27.4

16.2

WHOLESALE TRADE ..............................................................................................

10 0 .0

27.3

27.8

2 7 .2

17.0

1 0 0 .0

2 8.3

27.3

27.7

1 5.9

1 0 0 .0

2 8.9

27.0

27.7

15. 7

......................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

23.8

28 .9

28.6

18.0

1 0 0 .0

2 4 .9

28.5

2 8.8

1 7.2

1 0 0 .0

25.2

28.2

29.0

1 7.0

B U IL D I N G MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ............................
R E T A I L GENERAL MERCHANDISE ..........................................................
FOOD S T O R E S ............................ ......................................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SE RV IC E STATION S ......................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES • • • • • • • * * • • • • • • • • • • •
FURNITURE AND HOME F U R N IS H IN G S STORES ................. ..
EATING AND D R IN K IN G P L A C E S .........................................................
MISCELLANEOUS RE TA IL S T O R E S ....................................................

10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0

17.1
26.0
26.7
17.3
30.8
24.3
22.8
23.1

29.8
27.1
27.8
3 4.4
2 7.6
3 1.2
27.2
30.9

3 6 .9
2 9.5
2 7.9
2 7.6
2 5.4
26.2
2 9.3
27.2

1 5.3
16.5
17.0
20 .3
15.4
17.0
20.2
18.1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 8.2
26.0
26.3
1 8 .6
32.6
25 .0
26 .0
24 .9

3 0 .2
26.2
27.6
33.8
26.6
31.0
26.1
30.3

3 6.0
31. 1
2 8.4
28.2
25 .6
27.5
2 7 .9
2 7 .2

14.8
15.9
17.2
19.0
1 4.6
1 5.4
1 9 .5
17.0

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

18.4
25.8
26.6
19.2
3 3.0
25.4
27.2
25.3

29 .9
2 6.2
27.4
3 3.5
26.8
3 0.4
25.2
30.4

3 6.0
31.4
28.7
2 8.1
2 5.5
28.1
2 8.1
2 7 .1

14.9
15.8
1 6 .9
1 8.7
1 4 .2
14.9
19. 1
16.6

AND REAL E S T A T E ............... . .....................

1 0 0 .0

31.2

2 6 .0

25.0

1 6.9

1 0 0 .0

32.1

25.9

2 5 .4

16.0

1 0 0 .0

32.5

25 .6

2 5.4

15.9

..............................................................................................................
C R E D IT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ............................ ..
S E C U R I T Y , COMMODITY BROKERS AND SE RV ICE S ....................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ................................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERVICE ............................
REAL ESTATE ...................................................................................................
COMBINED REAL ES TAT E, IN SURANCE, ETC ...............................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .........................

1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00 .0

31.4
18.6
57.6
32.3
28.6
30.7
2 7 .6
29.8

24 .2
3 1.6
1 2.9
25.9
25.9
29.0
28.5
24.2

25.6
29.9
16.3
26.7
27.0
2 1 .0
25.5
2 3.0

18.0
18.8
1 3 .1
14. 7
17.7
17.6
1 8.4
2 2.1

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

31.5
1 8 .4
56.8
32.8
29.1
3 4 .0
28 .0
34.8

24.6
31.8
13.3
2 6.0
25.9
2 8 .1
28.4
21.6

2 5.7
31.2
1 7 .0
2 6 .6
27 .4
20.9
2 5.8
2 3.0

1 7.4
1 7.6
1 2 .8
1 4.3
16.9
1 5 .6
1 7.8
2 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 1 .6
18.2
5 6 .7
33.2
2 9.8
35.6
27.9
37.7

2 4 .7
32.1
1 3.0
25 .8
2 6.0
2 7 .1
2 7.5
19.8

2 5 .6
3 1.1
17.2
26.6
27.0
21.1
2 6 .3
22 .9

1 7 .4
17.6
1 3 .0
1 4 .2
16.5
1 5 .0
18. 3
1 8 .7

.................................................. * ...........................................................

10 0 .0

27.5

2 9 ,4

2 5,4

1 7,1

1 0 0 ,0

28,7

2 8,8

25 ,5

1 6 ,5

1 0 0 ,0

2 9,0

28,7

2 5,5

16,3

HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES .............................................
PERSONAL SERVICES ...................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS S E R V I C E S ............................................
AUTO R E P A I R , S E R V IC E S , AND GARAGES ....................................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVIC ES ..................................................
MOTION PICTURES ........................................................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION S E R V IC E S , NEC .........................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES .......................................
LEGAL SERVICES ...........................................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ...........................................................................
MUSEUMS, B O TA NI CA L, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS .........................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ....................................
PR IV ATE HOUSEHOLDS ....................... ........................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .....................................................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 00 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

25.5
2 3 .6
3 3 .7
24.2
24.0
2 5.9
2 6.2
28.3
32.3
27.3
38.4
26.5
23.7
29.8

2 9.3
3 2.4
2 2.2
2 8.8
3 3.7
22.6
24 .6
26.4
26.0
31.3
19.0
32.6
4 5.7
2 3.1

22.2
2 6.7
2 3.7
2 3.4
2 2.4
18.5
26.4
28.5
23.8
26.7
26.6
25.4
17.2
2 5.3

21 .7
1 7 .0
19.8
23 .0
18.7
3 2 .6
2 2 .4
1 6 .5
17.1
1 4 .2
15.6
14.7
12.7
2 0 .4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

24.3
24 .8
35.5
26 .3
25 .5
3 1.1
25.7
2 9.3
33.2
28.8
3 8 .1
2 9.4
2 3.8
3 0.4

29.9
3 2.0
22.0
2 9.7
32.0
2 0 .1
23.8
26.1
2 4.0
30.6
17.9
28.2
47.2
22 .0

2 3.2
26.6
22.9
22.9
2 2 .9
15.4
24 .6
2 8.4
24 .6
2 6 .3
26.1
27.1
16.8
26.5

2 0.8
16.4
1 9 .0
2 0 .7
18.3
3 2 .9
2 5 .6
16.0
1 7 .2
1 4.0
1 7 .9
1 4.6
1 1 .4
1 9.9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

24.3
2 5 .2
3 6.4
2 7 .2
26. 1
3 1.6
2 5.6
2 9.7
33.2
2 8.9
4 0 .2
3 0.2
2 3 .8
3 0 .7

2 9.2
3 1.9
21.7
2 9.2
31.5
19.5
23.2
26.0
2 3 .7
30.5
17.2
2 6.7
47 .3
21 .6

23.6
2 6.5
2 2 .7
2 3.4
2 2 .7
15.4
2 5 .2
28.4
24.9
26.2
23.8
27.8
16.7
2 6.9

20.6
16.3
18.6
1 9.8
18. 3
33.0
25.4
15.7
17.3
1 4.0
1 8 .9
1 4.5
11.4
19. 7

RETAIL

U T IL IT IE S

TRAOE

FINANCE*

INSURANCE*

b a n king

SERVICES

F o r p u rposes of this study, and b ecau se inform ation about their actual place of em ploym ent was not available in the file s
organizations cov ered by the R ailro ad R etirem en t Act w ere con sid ered to have been em ployed in the North C en tral Region.
NOTE:

studied, em ploy ees of railroad s and railroad related

A dash ( -) indicates either the sam p le did not include any w orkers with these c h a r a c te r is tic s , or that the data did not m eet the B u r e a u 's publication c r ite r ia .







Earnings and employment patterns in three-digit industry groups




T a b l e B-1.

M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y quarter a n d in four qua r t e r s

b y industry of m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 6

INDUSTRY EARNINGS O W R S BY
F O KER
QUARTERS W R
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY

EARNINGS FR M ALL W G AN SALARY EM
O
AE D
PLOYM
ENT O
F
W RKER W O E M
O
S HS
AJOR EARNINGS W R FR M THIS
EE O
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS W R
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY
ANY
Q U A R TER
ALL
RA CE
W R S WHITE1 |NEGRO
O KER
[
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL E O O Y ............................
CNM

FO QUARTERS
UR
ALL
RA C E
W R S WHITE1 ! N R
O KER
EG O

$ 3,422 $ 3,642 $ 2,109 $ 5,268 $ 5,519

$

3,465

ANY
ALL
WR S
O KER

Q U A 1 TER
R
FO R QUARTERS
U
RACE
RACE
ALL
WHITE1 1 N R
EG O W R E S WHITE1 I N R
OKR
EG U

$ 3,422 $ 3,642 $ 2,109 $ 5,268 $ 5,519 $ 3,465

MINING ..........................................................................................

5,886

5,974

4,022

6,945

7,002

4,949

6,133

6,220

4,272

6,993

7,054

5,035

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
G LIQUIDS ........................................................................
AS
OIL AND G FIELD SERVICES ................................ .......... .
AS

6,695
4,124

6,742
4,172

2,499
1,999

7,357
6,656

7,392
6,665

3,249
4,499

6,768
4,871

6,813
4,910

2,999
2,833

7,410
6,732

7,446
6,741

3,249
4,499

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ............................................................

4,111

4,492

2,246

6,699

7,084

3,987

4,475

4,866

2,519

6,863

7,244

4,076

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ....................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, N
EC ....................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ............................
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ............................
ELECTRICAL WORK...................................................................
MASONRY, STONEW
ORK, AND PLASTERING ..............................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ................................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL W R ..........................................
OK
CONCRETE W R .................................................................... . .
OK

3,602
3,979
5,263
2,994
6,143
3,268
3,043
3,612
2,704

3,892
4,397
5,556
3,073
6,274
3,779
3,134
3,959
3,183

2,197
2,203
1,694
1,687
2,249
2,076
2,187
2,166
1,774

5,915
7,686
7,730
5,802
8,869
6,065
6,109
6,368
5,874

6,171
8,178
7,871
5,861
8,906
6,620
6,233
6,684
6,406

3,857
4,749
3,527
4,374
4,749
4,166
4,499
3,333
3,972

4,127
4,909
5,858
3,429
6,621
3,880
3,654
4,065
3,509

4,429
5,392
6,166
3,505
6,698
4,540
3,749
4,416
3,985

2,673
2,844
2,166
2,374
2,833
2,490
2,499
2,464
2,249

6,073
8,156
8,007
6,009
9,134
6,454
6,406
6,539
6,517

6,347
8,660
8,167
6,092
9,177
6,968
6,545
7,032
7,068

3,958
4,892
3,593
4,374
4,749
4,446
4,874
3,449
4,208

MANUFACTURING ............................................................................

4,638

4,831

3,128

6,155

6,314

4,699

4,793

4,956

3,293

6,251

6,400

4,788

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FO SMALL A M ................................
R
RS
M
EAT PRODUCTS ........................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ............................................................ .
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FO DS ....................................
O
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ............................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .............................................. ................ .
BEVERAGES ................................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ........................................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS...............................................
KNITTING MILLS ......................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ........................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* SUITS AND COATS ....................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ............................................
W
OMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERW
EAR ........................................
W
OMEN'S AN CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS............ ............
D
CHILDREN'S O
UTERW
EAR ..........................................................
SAWMILLS AN PLANING MILLS ..............................................
D
MILLWORK, PLYW O AN RELATED PRODUCTS ......................
OD C
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ............................................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ..........................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BO
XES ....................................
NEW
SPAPERS ..............................................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ........................ ...................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ..........................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AN SYNTHETICS ................................
D
D U S ........................................................................................
RG
SOAP, CLEANERS, AN TOILET G G S ..................................
D
OD
PETROLEUM REFINING ..............................................................
TIRES AN INNER TUBES ........................................................
D

6,495
3,911
4,914
1,063
4,896
4,482
4,863
3,891
3,853
2,634
3,195
3,404
2,274
2,445
2,216
2,305
2,623
3,549
3,207
6,466
4,253
4,771
4,970
7,369
6,071
5,744
4,621
7,824
7,676

6,698
4,366
4,969
1,121
5,098
4,609
5,253
3,996
3,902
2,682
3,278
3,448
2,327
2,484
2,237
2,329
3,007
3,905
3,349
6,559
4,349
4,910
5, 144
7,490
6,163
5,937
4,928
7,891
7,742

3,899
2,772
3, 399
798
3,281
3,578
2,374
3,153
2,999
2,049
2,636
2,999
1,642
2,069
2,041
1,999
1,942
2,428
2,453
5,343
3,642
3,035
3,541
5,555
4,749
4,357
2,666
5,999
6,874

8,431
6,169
6,285
4,557
6,362
5,971
6,596
4,396
4,499
3,356
3,868
4,142
2,908
3, 101
3,051
2,927
4,261
5,363
4,402
7,171
5,727
6,775
6,882
7,972
6,935
6,712
6,480
8,223
8,368

8,551
6,442
6,317
4,754
6,549
6,173
6,772
4,475
4,529
3,363
3,889
4,198
2,931
3,120
3,077
2,925
5,011
5,684
4,523
7,257
5,857
6,841
6,989
8,073
7,021
6,867
6,674
8,270
8,437

5,749
4,499
4,999
3,437
4,714
4,942
3,974
3,916
4,199
3,249
3,687
3,724
2,594
2,934
2,777
2,937
2,749
3,062
3,662
5,916
4,999
4,374
5,549
6,124
5,699
5,374
4,916
6,499
7,624

6,843
4,208
5,243
1,213
5,081
4,737
5,212
3,968
3,978
2,738
3,370
3,461
2,370
2,535
2,318
2,398
2,842
3,928
3,405
6,599
4,602
4,952
5,246
7,506
6,214
5,977
4,826
7,920
7,738

7,055
4,657
5,297
1,264
5,275
4,875
5,515
4*065
4,021
2,777
3,428
3,494
2,422
2,560
2,345
2,418
3,285
4,346
3,539
6,663
4,717
5,088
5,410
7,612
6,300
6,093
5,195
7,990
7,790

4,642
2,941
3,999
935
3,499
3,774
2,799
3,419
3,499
2,338
3,076
3,208
1,885
2,299
2,104
2,272
2,141
2,666
2,733
5,399
3,840
3,187
3,826
5,704
4,886
4,812
2,999
6,124
7,049

8,488
6,267
6,438
4,646
6,532
6,106
6,676
4,416
4,536
3,384
3,920
4,175
2,926
3,124
3,053
2,958
4,332
5,465
4,455
7,210
5,856
6,882
7,009
8,027
7,005
6,830
6,583
8,294
8,442

8,610
6,523
6,468
4,815
6,662
6,297
6,908
4,487
4,573
3,391
3,933
4,230
2,948
3,140
3,080
2,953
5,064
5,762
4,569
7,300
5,961
6,947
7,109
8,123
7,075
6,992
6,803
8,345
8,491

5,916
4,555
5,374
3,524
4,749
5,088
4,111
3,969
4,199
3,272
3,839
3,749
2,624
2,970
2,777
2,979
2,806
3,192
3,735
5,968
5,224
4,458
5,772
6,187
5,799
5,549
4,937
6,499
7,999

See footnote at end of tab le.




T a b l e B-1.

M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y quarter a n d in four qua r t e r s

b y industry of m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d

INOUSTRY EARNINGS O W R S BY
F O KER
QUARTERS W R
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY

EARNINGS FR M ALL W G AND SALARY EM
O
AE
PLOYM
ENT O
F
W R S WOE M
O KER
HS
AJOR EARNINGS W R FR M THIS
EE O
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS W R
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY

ANY
QUARTER
FO QUARTERS
UR
ALL
RACE
ALL
RA C E
W R S WHITE1 j N R
O KER
EG O W R S WHITE1 | N R
O KER
EG O

ANY
ALL
WR S
O KER

QUARTER
FO
UR Q
UARTERS
ALL
RACE
R AC E
WHITE1 ! N R
EG O W R S WHITE1 | N G O
O KER
ER

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL EC N M - CONTINUED
OOY
MANUFACTURING - CONTINUED
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS...................................,
FOOTW
EAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ...............................
GLASS AN GLASSWARE, PRESSED O BLO N . .
D
R
W
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AN PLASTER PRODUCTS .
D
BLAST FURNACE AN BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS .
D
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES .............................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AN DRAW
D
ING .................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDW
ARE ...........
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS . . .
SC EW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC .........
R
METAL STAMPINGS ...............................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES .....................................
FAR MACHINERY .................................................
M
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY .........
METAL W
ORKING MACHINERY ...............................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY .........................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY .....................
OFFICE AN COMPUTING MACHINES ...................
D
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...........................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ...............
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES.....................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .
RADIO AN TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT . . . . . . .
D
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ...............................
ELECTRONIC COM
PONENTS AND ACCESSORIES . .
M TO VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT .....................
O R
AIRCRAFT AN PARTS .........................................
D
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING . . .
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES
OTHER MANUFACTURING .......................................
TRANSPORTATION ..................................

$ 4,578 $ 4,656 $ 3,541
2,749
2,780
1,624
3,749
4,896
4,970
4,834
4,515
3,285
7,169
7,305
6,356
5,419
6,252
6,021
4,769
6,124
6,268
4,749
3,249
4,890
4,950
3,328
5,111
3,799
5,174
5,256
4,214
4,976
5,061
6,604
6,659
5,249
5,871
3,916
6,005
6,389
6,327
4,749
6,584
4,249
6,631
3,699
5,926
6,033
6,120
6,169
5,299
6,249
6,068
3,499
2,999
4,911
4,999
5,507
5,355
3,464
5,133
3,249
5,067
4,746
3,305
4,631
4,267
2,874
4,101
3,233
3,073
2,374
5,859
5,959
4,395
3,625
3,703
2,428
6,690
6,759
6,312
7,189
7,325
5,145
5,494
4,166
5,296
3,999
5,329
5,396
3,237
3,466
1,812
5,990

$ 4,783 $ 4,843
2,845
2,870
5,004
5,084
5,280
4,937
7,270
7,395
6,227
6,422
6,352
6,506
4,974
5,124
5,364
5,519
5,431
5,493
5,374
5,303
6,744
6,794
6,129
6,233
6,552
6,605
6,846
6,910
6,178
6,263
6,352
6,422
6,573
6,443
5,244
5,388
5,545
5,683
5,271
5,355
5,196
5,290
4,328
4,453
3,361
3,455
6,081
6,203
3,889
3,821
6,822
6,895
7,525
7,394
5,950
5,716
5,670
5,605
3,470
3,679

$ 3,899

1,874
4,083
3,647
6,424
5,525
4,954
3,549
3,583
4,083
4,562
5,999
4,624
5,374
4,374
3,699
5,392
3,857
3,249
4,041
3,499
3,749
3,277
2,699
4,578
2,916
6,437
5,589
4,549
4,149
2,449

$ 5,832 $ 5,886 $ 5,159
3,507
3,166
3,503
5,956
5,437
5,906
6,716
4,531
6,407
8,009
6,980
7,865
6,857
6,343
7,060
6,214
7,322
7,255
6,274
4,999
6,201
5,166
6,577
6,673
6,499
6,916
6,970
6,951
7,042
6,388
7,424
7,404
7,062
7,292
7,335
6,583
7,289
7,241
6,333
8,067
6,249
8,022
6,913
5*343
6,983
7,156
7,205
6,222
4,999
7,581
7,682
5,124
6,459
6,519
6,627
6,716
5,099
5,099
6,452
6,520
6,084
5,333
6,152
4,724
5,363
5,446
5,197
4,074
5,077
7,377
5,861
7,223
4,249
5,137
5,060
6,902
7,422
7,533
6,699
8,296
8,402
7,232
5,916
7,056
5,999
6,696
6,712
3,916
5,102
4,985

6,175

6,412

4,431

6,979

7,113

5,682

6,958
6,803
4,051
7,270
7,190

7,036
6,777
3,964
7,442
7,265

5,768
6,924
4,624
4,929
5,615

6,822
6,515
2,927
5,765
6,650

6,894
6,470
2,909
6,143
6,700

5,591
6,661
2,999
3,333
5,499

7,011
6,963
4,157
7,356
7,309

7,109
6,921
4,049
7,523
7,372

5,847
7,194
4,899
4,999
5,749

3,591

5,926

6,048

4,607

4,918

4,994

3,706

5,989

6,111

4,685

4,870
5,105

3,684
2,749

5,718
7,031

5,826
7,093

4,569
4,374

4,840
5,270

4,907
5,395

3,793
3,249

5,763
7,135

5,873
7,197

4,660
4,374

6,880

4,124

7,433

7,540

5,142

6,836

6,989

4,312

7,524

7,619

5,263

6,850
6,296
2,621
5,729
6,601

5,516
6,544
2,805
2,883
5,178

COMMUNICATION ........................................ .

4,848

4,931

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .................
RADIO AN TELEVISION BROADCASTING
D

4,796
5,022
6,725




$ 5,820 $ 4,964
3,479
3,083
5,437
5,891
4,318
6,585
7,917
6,905
6,964
6,224
7,237
6,071
4,874
6,202
6,577
5,066
6,499
6,878
6,891
6,222
6,749
7,326
6,374
7,276
7,148
6,295
5,916
7,954
6,907
5,249
6,214
7,108
4,999
7,598
6,414
4,999
6,635
4,958
5,083
6,441
6,055
5,083
4,645
5,363
3,999
5,146
7,246
5,649
5,065
4,197
7,444
6,785
8,298
6,547
5,854
7,098
6,595
5,999
4,994
3,749
5,599

4,180

6,775
6,349
2,645
5,362
6,540

See footnote at end of table

3,471
5,839
6,262
7,770
6,747
7,156
6,122
6,462
6,833
6,806
7,301
7,227
7,092
7,920
6,830
7,059
7,499
6,343
6,536
6,374
5,973
5,269
5,018
7,100
4,983
7,323
8,194
6,929
6,586
4,882

7,024

6,241

RAILROADS .............................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION
TAXICABS ...............................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LO
NG DISTANCE
AIR TRANSPORTATION ...........................

PUBLIC UTILITIES

$ 5,746

6,909

T a b l e B-1.

M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y quarter a n d in four q u a r t e r s

b y industry of m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d

PLO ENT O
F
EARNINGS FR M ALL W G /\ND SALARY EM YM
O
AE
EE RM
W R S W O E M R E\RNINGS W R F O THIS
O KER
HS
AJO i
WRE
E
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS 1 O K D IN TH INDUSTRY

F OKR Y
INDUSTRY EARNINGS O W R E S B
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY
QUARTERS W R
INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WR S
O KER

FO QUARTERS
UR
Q U A R TER
RAC E
RAC E
ALL
EG O
O KER
EG O
WHITE 11 N R W R S WHITE1 1 N R

ANY
ALL
WR S
O KER

l
Q U A R T E R _____ FOJR QUARTERS
RAC E
ALL
R A ,C E
____
ER
OKR
WHITE 11 N R
EG O W R E S WHITE 11 N G O

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL EC N M - CONTINUED
OOY
W
HOLESALE TRADE ......................................................................
M TO VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ..................
O R
DRUGS* CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRO
DUCTS ......................
D Y G O S AND APPAREL .................................................. ..
R OD
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ....................................
ELECTRICAL G O S ................................................................
OD
HARDW
ARE, PLUMBING AN HEATING EQUIPMENT ................
D
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ..............................

$ 4,469 S 4,742 $ 2,523 $ 6,398
4,672
5,393
3,770
3,424
5,013
4,714
5,474

4,799
5,591
3,983
3,683
5,154
4,935
5,653

3,374
2,599
2,468
2,208
2,999
2,583
2,880

6,242
6,837
5,601
6,016
6,688
6,305
7,060

%6,572

$ 4,120

6,340
6,953
5,897
6,305
6,823
6,457
7,174

4,472
4,874
3,999
4,117
4,708
3,928
4,399

$ 4,768 $ 5,027 $ 2,885
5,004
5,741
4,040
3,816
5,278
5,008
5,833

5,122
5,979
4,224
4,060
5,413
5,167
6,010

3,749
3,549
2,818
2,589
3,249
2,999
3,358

$

6,508 $ 6,630 $ 4,234
6,347
6,948
5,681
6,145
6,782
6,378
7,149

6,441
7,091
5,999
6,409
6,923
6,516
7,269

4,749
4,964
4,099
4,249
4,821
3,999
4,499

RETAIL TRADE ............................................................................

1,408

1,467

1,184

3,448

3,534

2,941

1,564

1,597

1,344

3,531

3,599

3,020

DEPARTMENT STORES................................................. ..........
MAIL O
RDER HOUSES ..............................................................
VARIETY STORES .......................................... .........................
G
ROCERY STORES ....................................................................
M TO VEHICLE DEALERS .....................................................
O R
MEN• S AN BOYS* CLOTHING AN FURNISHINGS ................
D
D
WM
O EN*S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ........................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ....................................................
SHO STORES ..........................................................................
E
FURNITURE AND H M FURNISHINGS................ ..................
OE
D G STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ............................
RU
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ...................................................... .

1,394
2,370
898
1,804
4,403
1,678
1,237
1,184
1,453
2,826
1,303
3,943

1,412
2,659
914
1,854
4,601
1,701
1,254
1,175
1,467
3,027
1,307
4,124

1,186
1,347
696
1,223
2,617
1,291
1,073
1,343
977
2,071
1,260
2,083

3,251
4,400
2,678
4,308
5,992
4,124
2,874
2,763
3,897
4,954
3,008
5,182

3,260
4,494
2,673
4,385
6,170
4,241
2,904
2,781
3,999
5,205
3,005
5,292

3,162
4,083
2,767
3,105
4,237
3,124
2,694
2,636
2,874
3,249
3,027
3,499

1,546
2,565
1,011
1,979
4,671
1,892
1,373
1,315
1,667
3,180
1,440
4,211

1,554
2,838
1,021
2,032
4,869
1,910
1,383
1,303
1,675
3,363
1,439
4,409

1,460
1,653
902
1,374
2,899
1,666
1,264
1,464
1,541
2,394
1,432
2,249

3,287
4,427
2,699
4,367
6,093
4,194
2,911
2,787
4,041
5,052
3,043
5,292

3,293
4,544
2,690
4,448
6,267
4,294
2,937
2,802
4,120
5,304
3,037
5,383

3,225
4,107
2,833
3,153
4,338
3,249
2,736
2,692
3,062
3,361
3,093
3,624

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AN REAL ESTATE .............................
D

3,742

3,866

2,010

4,946

5,064

3,469

3,889

4,001

2,347

5,027

5,134

3,593

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ............................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ................ ....................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ........................................
LIFE INSURANCE ..................................................................
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ........................

3,797
4,064
3,385
4,352
4,199

3,846
4,119
3,399
4*467
4,229

2,624
2,999
2,624
2,589
2,749

4,589
4,908
4,749
5,783
5,503

4,629
4,981
4,789
5,914
5,559

3,749
3,624
4,083
4,078
4,124

3,895
4,163
3,717
4,622
4,332

3,935
4,196
3,731
4,759
4,363

2,924
3,124
2,624
2,944
3,124

4,650
4,999
4,874
5,929
5,596

4,680
5,044
4,908
6,047
5,649

3,855
3,916
4,416
4,124
4,499

SERVICES...................................................................................

1,914

2,173

1,205

3,901

4,300

2,429

2,066

2,313

1,280

3,949

4,352

2,477

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND M
OTELS • • . . . . . . ..........
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ............................ .
MOTION PICTURES...................................... ..........................
HOSPITALS ..............................................................................

1,059
1,691
669
2,424

1,114
1,709
671
2,470

885
1,663
649
2,255

2,749
2,904
2,799
3,486

2,943
3,038
2,944
3,597

2,304
2,706
2,333
3,157

1,209
1,859
769
2,550

1,267
1,875
768
2,586

1,052
1,834
812
2,407

2,826
2,938
3,057
3,544

3,032
3,076
3,194
3,644

2,381
2,744
2,374
3,217

1 Includes

w o rk e rs of a ll r a c e s other than N egro.




T a b l e B-2.

M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y o f m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 7

EARNINGS FR M ALL W G AND SALARY EM
O
AE
PLOYM
ENT O
F
W R S W O E MAJCR EARNINGS W R F O THIS
O KER
HS
EE RM
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS W R
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS O W R S BY
F O KER
O KED IN TH INDUSTRY
E
QUARTERS W R
INDUSTRY

R
Q U A 1 TER
FO
UR QUARTERS
RACE
ALL
RA CE
O KER
EG O W R S WHITE 1T N G O
ER
WHITE1 1 N R

ANY
Q U A R TER
FO R QUARTERS
U
RA C E
RA CE
ALL
ALL
HITE 11 N R
EG O
O KER
EG O W R S W
W R E S WHITE1 1 N R
OKR
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL E O O Y ....................
CNM

ANY
ALL
WR S
O KER

$ 3,615 $ 3,839 $ 2,310 i 5,372 $ 5,712 $ 3,709

S 3,615 $ 3,839 $ 2,310 $ 5,372 $ 5,712 $ 3,709

MINING ..........................................................................................

6,031

6,104

4,464

7,259

7,323

5,546

6,283

6,368

4,666

7,323

7,382

5,671

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL G AND NATURAL
AS
GAS LIQUIDS ........................................................................
OIL AND G FIELD SERVICES ..............................................
AS

6,967
4,130

7,026
4,208

3,812
2,374

7,802
7,232

7,843
7,263

4,999
5,374

7,086
4,884

7,142
4,946

4,812
2,687

7,846
7,381

7,881
7,416

5,749
5,374

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ............................................................

4,412

4,788

2,479

7,151

7,491

4,320

4,754

5,140

2,747

7,316

7,668

4,435

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION .....................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, N
EC ....................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ............................
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ............................
ELECTRICAL WORK....................................... ............................
MASONRY, STONEW
ORK, AN PLASTERING ........................ ..
O
CARPENTERING AN FLOORING ................................................
D
ROOFING AN SHEET METAL WORK.............................. ...........
D
CONCRETE W R ........................................................................
OK

3,867
4,188
5,837
3,151
6,336
3,369
3,120
3,616
2,833

4,142
4,574
6,078
3,231
6,494
3,853
3,237
3,918
3,281

2,424
2,526
2,249
2,339
1,916
2,231
1,680
1,949
2,071

6,194
8,142
8,269
6,337
9,170
6,445
6,638
6,635
6,174

6,470
8,664
8,443
6,393
9,227
6,932
6,725
7,032
6,736

4,054
4,749
4,287
4,291
4,541
4,632
5,124
3,656
4,166

4,349
5,103
6,427
3,680
6,916
3,972
3,808
4,138
3,729

4,615
5,550
6,632
3,775
7,079
4,600
3,929
4, 536
4,180

2,972
3,154
2,555
2,803
2,874
2,611
2,531
2,416
2,749

6,345
8,538
8,628
6,495
9,376
6,818
6,842
6,908
6,662

6,620
8,949
8,778
6,538
9,431
7,312
6,953
7,282
7,089

4,163
4,899
4,291
4,291
4,541
4,822
5, 187
3,821
4,749

MANUFACTURING ............................................................................

4,836

5,038

3,383

6,286

6,462

4* 793

4,970

5,152

3,523

6,352

6,523

4,890

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FO SMALL AR S ................................
R
M
M
EAT PRODUCTS ........................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS......................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FO D ....................................
OS
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS............................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ....................................................................
BEVERAGES .................................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON .........................................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ................................................
KNITTING M ILLS................................................... ...................
YARN AN THREAD MILLS ........................................................
D
MEN'S AND BOYS* SUITS AND COATS ...................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ............................................
W
OMEN'S AND MISSES' O
UTERW
EAR ........................................
W
OMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ..........................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR.........................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ..............................................
MILLWORK, PLYW O AND RELATED PRODUCTS ......................
OD
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ........................................................ .
PULP AN PAPER MILLS ..........................................................
D
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES .....................................
NEWSPAPERS..............................................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ............................................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ..........................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ............................ .
DRUGS ........................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET G O S ..................................
OD
PETROLEUM REFINING ..............................................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES .........................................................

6,544
3,975
4,885
1,117
5,187
4,693
5,014
3,910
3,854
2,850
3,190
3,447
2,545
2,634
2,460
2,530
2,894
3,856
3,362
6,659
4,619
4,927
5,062
7,450
6,221
5,928
4,996
8,193
6,921

6,611
4,384
4,952
1,148
5,399
4,845
5,506
4,035
3,950
2,891
3,288
3,550
2,585
2,657
2,489
2,544
3,355
4,281
3,523
6,728
4,788
5,041
5,225
7,615
6,362
6,065
5,234
8,261
7,034

4,444
2,859
3,199
931
3,642
3,968
2,697
3,301
2,791
2,466
2,637
2,704
2,214
2,428
2,283
2,443
2,095
2,410
2,556
5,583
3,471
3,449
3*462
5,642
4,846
4,599
2,843
6, 124
6,229

7,689
6,227
6,554
4,734
6,683
6,237
6,788
4,414
4,544
3,522
3,863
4,300
3,125
3,242
3,200
3,115
4,659
5,643
4,453
7,354
6,100
6,927
6,983
8,154
6,961
6,812
6,802
8,608
7,359

7,909
6,601
6,571
4,927
6,828
6,462
6,974
4,517
4,624
3,528
3,897
4,355
3,154
3,255
3,222
3,124
5,312
5,909
4,572
7,452
6,222
7,005
7,132
8,295
7,062
6,965
7,064
8,667
7,527

6,111
4,333
5,687
3,541
5,027
5,213
4,270
3,863
4,031
3,458
3,524
3,812
2,860
3,155
2,954
3,017
2,950
3,536
3,749
6,269
5,053
4,437
5,384
6,249
5,499
5,624
5,149
7, 124
6,580

6,642
4,242
5,259
1,267
5,418
4,960
5,341
3,977
3,994
2,961
3,357
3,557
2,626
2,716
2,570
2,618
3,075
4,161
3,538
6,722
4,936
5,153
5,291
7,633
6,391
6,156
5,246
8,247
7,175

6,694
4,651
5,319
1,295
5,638
5,100
5,735
4,086
4,081
3,001
3,425
3,650
2,663
2,728
2,585
2,619
3,626
4,632
3,699
6,799
5,100
5,249
5,453
7 ,79C
6,514
6,304
5,485
8,327
7,307

4,892
3,070
3,749
1, 122
3,843
4,318
3,141
3,493
3,041
2,637
2,895
2,849
2,342
2,583
2,472
2,614
2,277
2,758
2,802
5,799
4,020
3,687
3,762
5,821
5,062
4,999
2,924
6,124
6,468

7,784
6,315
6,624
4,809
6,733
6,334
6,876
4,441
4,592
3,554
3,901
4,335
3,141
3,264
3,213
3,132
4,728
5,714
4,511
7,405
6,177
7,033
7,123
8,253
7,028
6,971
6,994
8,653
7,569

7,983
6,666
6,644
4,984
6,927
6,533
7,066
4,538
4,659
3,552
3,929
4,388
3,169
3,273
3,234
3,142
5,352
5,983
4,619
7,506
6,289
7,114
7,271
8,386
7,116
7,159
7,235
8,711
7,659

6,178
4,409
6,031
3,642
5,062
5,380
4,421
3,925
4,031
3,566
3,624
3,843
2,901
3,195
2,958
3,020
2,969
3,566
3,822
6,303
5,192
4,645
5,458
6,361
5,774
5,892
5,249
7,166
6,656

See footnote at end of ta b le.




T a b l e B-2.

M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y o f m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 7 —

Continued

EARNINGS FR M ALL W G AND SALARY EM
O
AE
PLOYM
ENT O
F
W R S WOE M
O KER
HS
AJCR EARNINGS W R F O THIS
EE RM
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS W R
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY

F O KER
INDUSTRY EARNINGS O W R S BY
O KED IN1 THE INDUSTRY
QUARTERS W R
INDUSTRY

FO QUARTERS
UR
QUAR T ER
L
RACE
ALL
RA c E
ER
O KER
EG O W R S WHITE1 I N G O
WHITE1 1 N R

ANY
Q U A R TER
FO QUARTERS
UR
RAC E
1
RACE
ALL
ALL
O KER
EG O W R S WHITE1 ! N R
EG O
W R S WHITE1 | N R
O KER

ANY
ALL
WR S
O KER

* 4,533 $ 4,631 $ 3,666 $ 5,692 $ 5,805 $ 4,863
3,671
3, 149
1,946
3,657
2,905
2,943
5,941
5,118
5,210
3,895
5,870
4,982
6,519
4,349
6,878
4,719
5,136
3, 385
7,248
6,299
7,734
6,772
7,104
7,590
6,929
6,675
6,020
5,268
6,198
5,953
6,094
6,209
4,749
6, 860
6,942
5,972
3,499
6,268
6,157
4,941
5,070
4,812
5,289
5,074
6,587
6,690
5,458
3,730
6,907
6, 156
4,124
6,839
5,459
5,416
5,874
3,979
6,625
6,698
5, 384
5,222
7,249
7,287
6,701
6,720
6,312
7,285
7,184
5,428
4,374
7,087
6,060
6,182
7,044
6,028
6,512
6,982
6,427
5,270
7,894
6,437
6,674
6,716
4,416
7,928
5,099
6,900
5,971
6,092
3,781
6,847
6,911
6,836
5,765
6,015
6,115
4,892
7,816
5,333
3,640
6,430
7,722
6,581
6,309
6,390
5, 341
3,749
5,208
5,202
4,999
5,626
6,685
6,818
3,486
5,482
4,924
6,415
6,478
5,290
5,421
3,666
6, 107
6,202
4,895
5,246
3,928
5,118
5,453
5,326
4,567
4,313
3,545
4,418
4,859
3,290
3,802
3,200
2,733
4,688
7,365
7,530
5,658
6,138
6,271
4,789
5,299
3,947
4,007
3, 513
5, 159
4,190
6,674
7,226
6,765
5,893
6,628
7,363
7,070
7,230
5,906
8,003
8,154
6,631
7,077
5,594
4,499
6,914
6,071
5,448
6,539
4,624
5,499
5, 590
3,958
6,478
2,420
3, 759
5,273
3,393
3,553
5,133

$ 4,691 $ 4,800 $ 4,027 $ 5,809 $ 5,891 $ 4,999
3,149
3,706
3,693
2,991
3,026
2,152
5,020
4,089
5,989
5,305
5,918
5,197
4,519
7,013
6,618
5,533
5,101
3,630
6,840
7,815
7,200
7,350
6,398
7,671
7,057
6,161
5,439
6,812
6,387
6,151
6,222
7,042
6,963
6,470
5,227
6,358
6,354
4,833
5,255
3,611
6,252
5,128
5,298
6,813
5,654
5,825
4,199
6,704
6,156
6,947
7,006
4,999
5,727
5,682
6,069
6,699
6,784
5,491
5,688
4,431
7,249
7,354
7,349
6,854
6,822
6,520
4,649
7,281
5,583
6,229
6,361
7,188
6,154
7,158
7,097
6,595
6,645
5,548
8,019
6,624
8,055
4,666
7,006
6,933
5,149
7,006
6,956
6,285
6,396
4,053
5,823
5,099
6,911
6,986
6,242
6,357
5, 349
7,918
7,812
3,874
6,636
6,802
5,416
6,489
4, 166
6,425
5,604
5,482
5,199
3,924
6,792
6,906
5,673
5,845
4,968
6,529
6,474
5,573
3,821
5,463
5,046
6,214
6,306
5,410
4,104
5,305
5,529
4,656
5, 399
4,487
4,580
3,645
3,874
4,931
3,504
3 , C73
4,775
3,412
5,698
7,458
7,618
6,530
4,974
6,382
4, 199
5,385
4,168
3,620
5,255
4,105
6,703
6,027
7,361
7,495
6,794
6,918
6,717
6,170
8,141
8,281
7,283
7,418
6,124
6,041
7,193
5,831
4,772
7,040
6,530
6,591
5,041
5,704
5,792
4,093
5,366
3,836
5,232
2,806
3,602
3, 768

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL EC N M - CONTINUED
OOY
MANUFACTURING - CONTINUED
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ......................................................
FOOTW
EAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ..................................................
GLASS AN GLASSWARE, PRESSED O BLO N ......................
D
R
W
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AN PLASTER PRO
D
DUCTS ....................
BLAST FURNACE AN BASIC STEEL PRO
D
DUCTS ....................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAW
ING .................................. .
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARD AR ..............................
W E
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ........................
SC E MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ............................
RW
METAL STAMPINGS ..................................................................
ENGINES AN TURBINES ............................................ ..........
D
FARM MACHINERY ....................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AN RELATED MACHINERY ................ .
D
METAL W
ORKING MACHINERY ..................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ............................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ........................................
OFFICE AN COMPUTING MACHINES ......................................
D
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ..............................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT ................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ..................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ........................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ....................
RADIO AN TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ................................
D
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ................ .................................
ELECTRONIC COM
PONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ......................
M TO VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ........................................
O R
AIRCRAFT AN PARTS ............................................................
D
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AN REPAIRING ........................
D
MECHANICAL MEASURING AN CONTROL DEVICES ................
D
OTHER MANUFACTURING ..........................................................
TRANSPORTATION ........................................................................

6,308

6,573

4,342

7,259

7,385

5,948

6,493

6,717

4,639

7,352

7,471

6,044

RAILROADS ..............................................................................
LOCAL AN SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ..............................
D
TAXICABS ................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LO
NG CISTANCE ..............................
AIR TRANSPORTATION ............................................................

7,095
6,649
2,673
5,635
7,062

7, 158
6,494
2,558
6,056
7, 154

5,873
7,135
3,349
2,741
5,662

7,273
7,287
4,282
7,551
7,971

7,361
7,207
4, 196
7,702
8,073

6,057
7,598
4,859
5,431
6,406

7,150
6,845
2,982
6,052
7,207

7,213
6,687
2,874
6,436
7,291

5,935
7,374
3,599
3,266
5,874

7,355
7,395
4,374
7,646
8,080

7,443
7,304
4,282
7,803
8,164

6,129
7,781
5,041
5,577
6,718

COMMUNICATION ..........................................................................

5,060

5, 162

3,654

5,977

6, 108

4,624

5,133

5,234

3,830

6,044

6,172

4,697

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ..................................................
RADIO AN TELEVISION BROADCASTING ..............................
D

5,000
5,169

5,102
5,266

3,669
2,937

5, 766
7,306

5,872
7,387

4,584
4,208

5,056
5,433

5,156
5,513

3,815
3,208

5,818
7,468

5,919
7,536

4,637
4,374

PU8LIC UTILITIES ....................................................................

6,983

7, 151

4,518

7,692

7,821

5,345

7,109

7,271

4,654

7,802

7,917

5,474

See footnote at end of tab le.




T a b l e B-2.

M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y quar t e r a n d in four quarters

b y industry o f m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d

EARNINGS FR M ALL W G AND SALARY EM YM
O
AE
PLO ENT O
F
W R S W O E M R EARNINGS W R F O THIS
O KER
HS
AJO
EE RM
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS W R
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY

F O KER Y
INDUSTRY EARNINGS O W R S B
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY
QUARTERS W R
INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WRES
OKR
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL EC N M
OOY

-

FO QUARTERS
UR
Q U A R TER
RA CE
RA CE
ALL
EG O
O KER
WHITE 1 1 N R
EG O W R S WHITE1 1 N R

U A R TER
FO Q
UR UARTERS
RA CE
ALL
RACE
O KER
WHITE1 1 N R
EG O W R S WHITE1 1 N G O
ER

ANY
ALL
WR S
O KER

a

CONTINUED

W
HOLESALE TRADE ......................................................................

$

5,237 $ 3,046 $ 6,667 $ 6,821 $ 4,516

6,724 $ 4,412

$ 4,981

M TO VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ..................
O R
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AN ALLIED PRODUCTS ......................
D
D Y G O S AND APPAREL ................................... ...................
R OD
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ....................................
ELECTRICAL G O S .................................................................
OD
HARDW
ARE, PLUMBING AN HEATING EQUIPMENT ................
D
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ..............................

4,840
5,706
4,112
3,764
5,172
4,813
5,587

4,952
5,915
4,403
4,013
5,333
4,985
5,797

3,402
2,799
2,303
2,370
3,318
3,249
2,966

6,489
7,155
6, 133
6,382
6,718
6,524
7,198

6,545
7,310
6,530
6,580
6,857
6,612
7,357

5,083
5*468
4,249
4,656
4,656
4, 156
4,468

5,139
6,026
4,362
4,122
5,381
5,154
5,971

5,271
6,179
4,655
4,377
5,535
5,349
6,158

3,837
3,416
2,862
2,980
3,541
3,499
3,513

6,562
7,301
6,249
6,515
6,836
6,584
7,325

RETAIL TRADE............................................................................

1,523

1,544

1,272

3,554

3,614

3,130

1,629

1,635

1,440

3,617

3,674

3,195

3,420
4,499
2,923
4,495
6,412
4,196
3,069
2,952
3,842
5,132
3,204
5,662

3,427
4, 636
2,925
4,555
6,564
4,249
3,099
2,951
3,891
5,358
3,187
5,745

3,340
3,999
2,899
3,613
4,569
3,718
2,886
2,964
3,174
3,597
3,406
4,124

$

4,710

%

4,962 $ 2,627

$

6,603

$

6,613
7,482
6,570
6,670
6,979
6,675
7,486

5,249
5,553
4,249
4,815
4,812
4,178
4,597

DEPARTMENT STORES ...............................................................
MAIL O D HOUSES ...............................................................
R ER
VARIETY STORES .....................................................................
GROCERY STORES .....................................................................
M TO VEHICLE DEALERS .......................................................
O R
M N• S AN BOYS* CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS................
E
D
W
OMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES .........................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ....................................................
SH E STORES ...........................................................................
O
FURNITURE AND H M FURNISHINGS .....................................
OE
D U STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ............................
RG
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .........................................................

1,571
2,330
1,008
1,895
4,601
1,752
1,312
1,278
1,515
2,906
1,374
4,129

1,600
2,702
1,006
1,937
4,817
1,781
1,310
1,295
1,522
3,086
1,391
4,323

1,207
1,258
1,029
1,392
2,949
1,399
1,343
1,089
1,406
1,749
1,214
1,749

3,390
4,433
2,902
4,407
6,330
4,134
3,009
2,928
3,737
5,071
3,162
5,517

3,400
4,578
2,902
4,474
6,506
4,209
3,043
2,930
3,809
5,244
3,144
5,596

3,286
3,999
2,883
3,541
4,466
3,474
2,843
2,916
3,024
3,479
3,364
3,999

1,719
2,607
1,153
2,069
4,888
2,014
1,451
1,394
1,788
3,188
1,520
4,474

1,740
2,907
1,150
2,114
5,090
2,034
1,448
1,400
1,796
3,416
1,531
4,655

1,458
1,534
1,187
1,549
3,181
1,624
1,474
1,347
1,703
2,416
1,418
2,249

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ..............................

3,908

4,032

2,309

5,176

5,296

3,792

4,047

4, 151

2,608

5,251

5,368

3,929

4,871
5,245
5,127
6,337
5,957

4,164
3,874
4,812
4,364
4,527

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ............................
SAVINGS AN LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ......................................
D
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ........................................
LIFE INSURANCE .....................................................................
FIRE, MARINE, AN CASUALTY INSURANCE ..................
D

3,957
4, 174
3,582
4,539
4,411

4,007
4,229
3,609
4,648
4,460

2,992
2,999
2,291
2,973
2,949

4,769
5,129
4,979
6,102
5,749

4,817
5,208
4,994
6,232
5,845

4,027
3,714
4,374
4, 140
4,187

4,044
4,295
3,830
4,749
4,534

4,084
4,362
3,851
4,871
4,581

3,257
3,571
2,874
3,184
3,374

4,831
5, 189
5,119
6,202
5,868

SERVICES .....................................................................................

2,100

2,356

1,349

4,158

4,564

2,671

2,203

2,480

1,434

4,207

4,617

2,711

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ..........................
LAUNDRIES AND D Y CLEANING PLANTS ................ ............
R
MOTION PICTURES ...................................................................
HOSPITALS ...............................................................................

1,121
1,913
688
2,797

1,153
1,898
678
2,851

1,009
1,943
968
2,566

2,877
3,061
2,884
3,857

3,070
3,186
3,027
3,952

2,484
2,800
2,374
3,495

1,288
2,054
785
2,902

1,317
2,053
768
2,961

1,194
2,056
1,041
2,685

2,965
3,096
3,149
3,904

3,157
3,220
3,299
3,992

2,547
2,846
2,499
3,561

1 Includes

w o rk e rs of all r a c e s other than N eg ro .




T a b l e B - 3 . A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s
b y i n d u s t r y of m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 6

INDUSTRY EARNINGS O W R S BY
F O KER
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY
QUARTERS W R

EARNINGS FR M ALL W G AND SALARY EM YM
O
AE
PLO ENT O
F
W R S WOE M
O KER
HS
AJOR EARNINGS W R F O THIS
EE RM
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS W R
O KED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY
ANY
Q U A R TER
FO QUARTERS
UR
ALL
RACE
ALL
RAC E
EG O W R S WHITE1 | N R
WHITE1 | N R
EG O
WR S
O KER
O KER
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL E O O Y ..........................
CNM

$ 4,408 $ 4,613

t

2,706

%6,001

$ 6,230 $ 3*883

ANY
ALL
WR S
O KER

Q U A R TER
RA CE
WHITE1 | N R
EG O

FO R QUARTERS
U
RACE
ALL
ER
W R E S WHITE1 | N G O
OKR

$ 4,408 $ 4,613 $ 2,706 $ 6,001 $ 6,230 $ 3,883

MINING ........................................................................................

5,930

5,999

4,007

7,540

7,624

5,044

6,146

6,214

4,247

7,634

7,719

5,131

C
RUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL G AN NATURAL
AS D
G LIQUIDS ................ .................. ................................
AS
OIL AND G FIELD SERVICES.............. ................... .
AS

7,063
4,759

7,130
4,783

3,068
3,038

8,364
7,098

8,422
7,109

3,895
5,908

7,247
5,155

7,311
5,179

3,443
3,393

8,455
7,296

8,510
7,306

4,191
6,155

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION........................................................

4,902

5,179

2,751

7,250

7,572

4,335

5,152

5,438

2,927

7,414

7,743

4,445

HIGHWAY AN STREET CONSTRUCTICN............ .....................
D
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, N
EC ..................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ..........................
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ..........................
ELECTRICAL WORK.............................................. ..................
MASONRY, STONEW
ORK, AND PLASTERING ............................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING.......... ..................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL W R .......................................
OK
CONCRETE WORK......................................................... ..........

4,247
4,989
5*846
3,789
6,516
3,976
3,883
4,467
3,658

4,467
5,288
6,058
3,852
6,596
4,354
3,967
4,696
4,011

2,541
2,882
2,119
2,446
3,206
2,707
2,749
2,355
2,537

6,606
8,275
8,117
6,150
8,911
6,236
6,433
6,703
6,169

6,845
8,675
8,263
6,219
8,973
6,696
6,517
7,021
6,643

4,220
5,130
3,833
4,408
5,356
4,446
4,871
3,532
4,470

4,679
5,677
6,289
4,079
6,900
4,376
4,308
4,833
4,239

4,912
6,020
6,507
4,136
6,982
4,774
4,401
5,078
4,620

2,883
3,266
2,461
2,852
3,487
3,040
3,063
2,572
3,028

6,826
8,688
8,359
6,321
9,147
6,533
6,690
6,915
6,662

7,074
9,119
8,508
6,387
9,212
7,014
6,785
7,241
7,156

4,361
5,304
3,984
4,642
5,451
4,661
4,936
3,659
4,891

MANUFACTURING ........................................................................ .

5,241

5,424

3,506

6,794

6,963

4,938

5,367

5,549

3,644

6,869

7,037

5,027

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FO SMALL A M ..............................
R
RS
M
EAT PRODUCTS ................ .....................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ....................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FO D ..................................
OS
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ..........................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS.................................................................
BEVERAGES.............................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON......................................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ...................... ......................
KNITTING M ILLS...................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ...................................... ..............
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ..................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ................................ .
W
OMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERW
EAR .....................................
W
OMEN'S AN CHILDREN'S UNDERGARM
D
ENTS ........................
CHILDREN'S O
UTERW
EAR .......................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ............................................
MILLWORK, PLYW O AND RELATED PRO
OD
DUCTS ....................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ..........................................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ........................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BO
XES ..................................
NEWSPAPERS..........................................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING .........................................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS................................ .......................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ..............................
D S ......................................................................................
RUG
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET G O S ................................
OD
PETROLEUM REFINING ............................................................
TIRES AN INNER TUBES ......................................................
D

7,068
4,412
4,983
2,288
5,227
4,562
5,097
3,983
3,915
3,017
3,257
4,027
2,434
2,964
2,552
2,578
3,307
4,116
3,566
6,392
4,674
5,242
5,750
7,782
6,671
6,914
5,522
8,078
7,514

7,238
4,675
5,023
2,400
5,424
4,702
5,383
4,141
3,998
3,084
3,352
4,154
2,503
3,051
2,598
2,644
3,631
4,358
3,722
6,477
4,807
5,313
5,887
7,929
6,804
7,101
5,813
8,149
7,588

4,195
3,242
3,773
1,564
3,598
3,507
2,820
2,812
2,989
2,335
2,482
3,045
1,768
2,211
2,033
2,169
2,024
2,303
2,577
4,817
3,537
3,233
3,722
5,312
4,548
4,341
3,030
5,558
6,686

9,122
6,229
6,571
5,364
6,942
6,153
7,000
5,000
5,109
4,076
4,265
5,167
3,496
4,066
3,687
3,679
4,915
5,915
5,139
7,696
6,428
6,931
7,668
8,971
8,000
8,355
7,616
9,157
8,607

9,225
6,537
6,604
5,615
7,142
6,282
7,252
5,113
5,177
4,115
4,312
5,300
3,555
4,150
3,745
3,729
5,485
6,248
5,317
7,792
6,563
6,988
7,765
9,127
8,123
8,537
7,872
9,222
8,693

6,581
4,765
5,401
3,640
5,128
5,035
4,394
3,928
4,157
3,557
3,724
4,041
2,760
3,234
3,000
3,308
2,838
3,247
3,845
5,906
5,160
4,968
5,786
6, 189
5,815
5,468
4,867
6,542
7,636

7,389
4,605
5,208
2,428
5,466
4,802
5,356
4,111
4,103
3,151
3,420
4,160
2,522
3,072
2,637
2,690
3,497
4,426
3,768
6,601
4,930
5,408
5,947
7,995
6,876
7,120
5,773
8,257
7,678

7,555
4,877
5,247
2,544
5,668
4,937
5,641
4,256
4,174
3,212
3,500
4,279
2,586
3,156
2,685
2,752
3,836
4,676
3,919
6,690
5,057
5,478
6,081
8,143
7,010
7,300
6,058
8,327
7,745

4,594
3,392
4,028
1,675
3,800
3,788
3,083
3,034
3,309
2,536
2,770
3,241
1,902
2,351
2,098
2,307
2,151
2,553
2,808
4,962
3,846
3,428
3,961
5,530
4,730
4,638
3,341
5,782
6,932

9,227
6,336
6,681
5,473
7,079
6,260
7,122
5,042
5,177
4,134
4,345
5,246
3,530
4,131
3*709
3,723
5,008
6,058
5,237
7,759
6,532
7,055
7,793
9,068
8,101
8,462
7,772
9,238
8,683

9,331
6,651
6,713
5,729
7,282
6,384
7,375
5,149
5,245
4,171
4,384
5,384
3,587
4,215
3,768
3,769
5,586
6,396
5,413
7,855
6,660
7,110
7,887
9,225
8,224
8,642
8,019
9,304
8,761

6,640
4,840
5,569
3,715
5,247
5,192
4,513
4,013
4,223
3,636
3,890
4,077
2,828
3,299
3,007
3,386
2,901
3,349
3,960
5,967
5,329
5,169
5,978
6,264
5,903
5,615
5,116
6,579
7,816

S ee fo o tn o te at en d o f ta b le .




T a b l e B-3.

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y of m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d
INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INOUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY MANUFACTURING -

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS
WHITE 1 NEGRO

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

3 ,650
1,975
3 ,7 1 3
3 ,468
5,991
5 ,059
4,677
3,376
3 ,288
4,4 5 3
4,289
5 ,179
4,3 6 3
4,653
4,136
3 ,760
4,622
3,8 1 4
3 ,139
3 ,420
3 ,577
3,360
3,010
2,6 4 0
4,4 1 8
2 ,779
5 ,655
4,985
4,097
4,2 0 7
2 ,369

$ 6*141
4,128
6 ,488
6 ,787
8 ,312
7 ,2 2 0
7,7 0 7
6 ,853
7 ,193
7,6 5 6
7,629
7,936
7,6 9 1
7,7 5 9
8 ,657
7,701
7 ,776
8 ,046
7 ,0 8 9
7 ,360
7,044
6 ,662
6 ,143
5 ,839
8 ,1 2 4
6 ,251
8,2 1 7
9 ,082
7 ,344
7 ,4 2 4
5,889

* 6 ,226
4,151
6 ,545
7,173
8,4 7 8
7,562
7,8 2 6
6,963
7,338
7,734
7,7 7 5
7,988
7,771
7,823
8,700
7,809
7,846
8,1 3 1
7,1 8 8
7,469
7,107
6 ,769
6,292
6,000
8,246
6,347
8,378
9 ,183
7,4 9 4
7,475
6 ,064

$ 5,154
3,180
5,456
4,548
7 ,064
6 ,240
6,231
5,122
5,014
6,292
6 ,264
6 ,818
6 ,213
6,3 4 2
6 ,363
5,188
6,058
5,383
4,9 1 4
4 ,978
5,217
5,087
4 ,670
4 ,240
5,855
4 ,513
6,942
6 ,748
6,147
6,1 3 2
4 ,067

$ 4 ,937
3 ,136
5 ,346
5,3 2 6
7,325
6 ,129
6 ,488
5,499
5 ,663
5,904
5 ,816
6,8 9 3
6,101
6 ,612
7,1 8 2
6,5 2 6
6,5 8 1
6,790
5 ,586
6,101
5 ,742
5 ,358
4,739
3,921
6 ,838
4,5 5 2
7 ,113
7 ,8 3 4
5,684
6 ,149
4 ,2 8 7

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WHITE1 1 NEGRO

Q U A R TE R
R A PE
WHITE1 NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
ALL
R A C E
WORKERS
WHITE 1 1 NEGRO

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ............ ............... .. ..........................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ....................................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN .............
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS . . . . .
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS . . . . .
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ..................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING .................................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE .........................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS .................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ......................
METAL STAMPINGS ..........................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES .............................................................
FARM MACHINERY .............................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY.................... ..
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ....................................................
SPECIAL INOUSTRY MACHINERY ...........................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY .................................... ..
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES.................... ..
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ..............................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT . . .
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ..............................
HOUSEHOLD A P PL IA N CE S............................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT . . . . .
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ......................... .
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ....................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES .............
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT .................................... .
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ..................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND R E P A I R IN G .............. .
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES . . .
OTHER MANUFACTURING ...............................................................

TRANSPORTATION .....................................................
RAILROADS .............................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION
TAXICABS ................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE
AIR TRANSPORTATION ....................................

$ A , 710 % 4 , 8 1 2
3,01 A
3 ,052
5,159
5 ,2 6 4
A , 977
5,228
7,155
7 ,327
6,1 7 2
5,883
6,2 3 0
6,3 7 5
5,257
5 ,410
5,273
5 ,439
5,632
5*709
5,520
5 ,672
6,724
6,6A1
5,964
5,863
6,3 9 2
6,303
6,886
6 ,957
6,253
6,3 7 5
6 ,300
6 ,3 7 6
6,5 0 4
6 ,615
5,267
5 ,403
5,870
6,020
5,508
5,593
5,008
5*156
A, A9A
4 ,6 7 7
3,699
3,8 3 0
6,578
6,713
A , 338
4 ,451
6,891
7,0 5 6
7,5 9 0
7,7 3 7
5,367
5,5 4 5
5,858
5,9 3 9
A , 06 7
4,296

$

$ 5 ,027
3 ,170
5,451
5 ,578
7,484
6,4 2 5
6,630
5,6 4 8
5,834
5 ,980
5 ,967
6 ,971
6,193
6,700
7 ,2 5 2
6,650
6 ,6 5 7
6 ,9 0 2
5,7 2 1
6,245
5,824
5 ,499
4 ,9 1 9
4,050
6 ,9 7 2
4,663
7 ,277
7,9 7 5
5 ,8 6 4
6,232
4 ,514

$ 3 ,9 9 4
2 ,1 7 9
3 ,899
3,8 1 5
6,169
5 ,287
4,967
3 ,674
3 ,618
4,7 1 6
4 ,5 8 5
5,5 1 1
4,749
4 ,9 8 8
4,455
4,009
4,894
4,059
3 ,472
3 ,753
3,8 7 9
3 ,7 8 6
3,2 8 8
2,8 7 6
4,6 7 2
3 ,0 1 4
5 ,879
5 ,339
4,406
4,450
2 ,605

$ 6,256
4 ,191
6,549
6 ,963
8,397
7,330
7,839
6,9 8 0
7 ,387
7,763
7,765
8,0 5 7
7,788
7,892
8,796
7 ,819
7 ,907
8,178
7 ,228
7,4 9 7
7 ,144
6,784
6,261
5 ,953
8,250
6,336
8,315
9,2 0 1
7,4 9 3
7,562
5 ,993

$ 6 ,332
4,2 1 4
6,6 0 7
7,3 5 2
8,561
7,6 6 3
7,959
7 ,088
7 ,534
7,8 4 6
7,909
8 ,104
7,865
7 ,956
8,839
7,925
7,9 7 7
8 ,266
7,321
7,601
7,208
6,8 8 6
6,401
6 ,117
8,373
6 ,432
8 ,474
9,299
7,646
7 ,614
6,165

$ 5,368
3,268
5,4 9 2
4 ,708
7,161
6,375
6,3 5 4
5,283
5,193
6 ,324
6,4 1 4
7,0 5 6
6,3 7 7
6,473
6,502
5,354
6 ,199
5 ,414
5,1 7 5
5,232
5,279
5,283
4,871
4,320
5,968
4,6 0 4
7,050
6,955
6,2 7 0
6,239
4 ,212

5,750

5 ,9 4 8

4 ,080

7,2 7 7

7,461

5,5 3 4

5 ,947

6,146

4,270

7,399

7,581

5,673

6,535
5,844
3,124
5 , A22
7,386

6,6 6 7
5,767
3 ,110
5 ,648
7 ,491

4,983
6,2 1 6
3,190
3 ,369
5,0 3 3

7,3 2 8
6,8 3 9
4 ,4 5 6
7 ,337
8,8 3 5

7,451
6,804
4 ,365
7,543
8,964

5,783
7 ,002
4,962
5,082
5,875

6 ,679
6 ,063
3 ,313
5,6 7 6
7 ,604

6 ,8 0 9
5,9 8 0
3,3 0 1
5,904
7 ,702

5,1 4 4
6,4 6 5
3 ,368
3 ,603
5,391

7,426
6,975
4 ,614
7 ,472
8 ,944

7,548
6,938
4,522
7,6 7 9
9,066

5,894
7,149
5,127
5,198
6,1 5 1

COMMUNICATION ........................................................

5,614

5 ,715

3,581

7,061

7,142

5,012

5 ,739

5,8 3 7

3 ,771

7,136

7,216

5,138

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .......................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING

5 , A74
6 , A98

5,5 6 9
6,5 8 6

3,531
4,2 0 6

6 ,816
8,728

6,896
8,815

4 ,790
6,253

5 ,565
6,827

5 ,656
6 ,924

3,728
4 ,2 7 7

6 ,857
9,027

6,9 3 3
9,1 2 3

4,925
6,296

6,623

6 ,781

3,977

7 ,695

7,815

5,239

6 ,753

6 ,904

4,202

7,762

7,8 7 7

5,405

PUBLIC UTILITIES

S e e fo o tn o te at en d o f ta b le .




T a b l e B-3.

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y qu a r t e r a n d in four q u a r t e r s

b y industry of m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d
INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY
AN Y
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECCNOMY WHOLESALE

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WHITE1 | NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS
WHITE1 | NEGRO

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WHITE1 | NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WHITE1 | NEGRO
WORKERS

CONTINUED

TRADE

$ 5,490

5,734

$ 2 ,771

$ 7 ,642

$ 7 ,878

$ 4 ,316

$ 5 ,716

$ 5,9 5 9

$ 3,002

7,766

* 8,002

$ 4,4 4 9

5,3 1 7
6 ,611
5 ,733
A , 295
6,247
5,5 9 4
6,6 0 6

5 ,437
6 ,8 2 7
6 ,0 5 8
4,5 0 1
6 ,418
5 ,7 7 0
6,776

3,3 6 8
3 ,120
2,657
2,629
3 ,123
2,615
3,063

7 ,173
8 ,591
8 ,365
6,5 9 3
8,350
7,4 6 0
8 ,660

7,306
8,744
8,7 2 5
6,8 3 6
8,501
7 ,622
8,806

4 ,732
4,865
4,0 9 7
4,2 7 0
4,798
3,9 3 1
4,5 6 9

5,5 8 6
6,9 1 0
6 ,017
4 ,5 0 4
6 ,5 3 4
5,844
6 ,911

5,700
7 ,121
6,345
4,7 0 7
6,708
6,020
7 ,0 7 9

3 ,735
3 ,488
2 ,907
2,8 5 6
3,3 6 8
2,8 4 5
3 ,386

7,2 9 2
8,756
8,536
6,707
8,5 1 5
8,809

7,422
8,910
8,9 0 1
6,948
8,667
7,7 5 4
8,955

4,8 9 4
5,0 2 1
4 ,210
4 ,4 i0
4 ,920
4 ,068
4 ,712

2 ,588

2,6 6 5

1,7 9 6

4,391

4 ,488

3,232

2,6 8 6

2 ,761

1,9 1 7

4,460

4,554

3 ,324

2,3 6 6
3,2 8 8
1,841
2,969
5,1 0 2
3,0 7 3
2 ,066
2 ,107
2 ,743
3,920
2 ,592
4,295

2 ,414
3,5 9 1
1,8 6 9
3,0 2 9
5,3 0 6
3 ,147
2,1 2 8
2,1 4 6
2 ,7 9 4
4 ,104
2 ,^ 5 7
4,430

1 ,796
2 ,0 2 4
1,394
2 ,027
3,0 3 0
1,958
1,449
1,547
1,839
2,2 8 0
1 ,853
2 ,391

4,1 4 5
5,4 3 0
3,658
4,7 7 6
6,9 1 0
5,083
3,6 0 4
3,6 8 8
4,763
5 ,839
4 ,4 1 7
5 ,799

4,1 9 6
5,6 2 4
3,690
4,839
7 ,114
5,192
3,686
3 ,771
4,8 4 2
6,077
4,5 0 5
5 ,935

3,409
4,1 3 5
3,043
3,596
4 ,478
3,250
2,654
2,541
3,232
3,458
3,250
3,391

2,471
3,428
1,9 2 4
3 ,088
5 ,329
3,2 0 9
2 ,152
2,2 3 0
2 ,878
4 ,119
2,6 9 3
4 ,5 2 4

2,5 1 5
3,728
1 ,949
3 ,148
5,531
3,2 7 8
2,2 1 3
2 ,2 6 9
2,9 2 7
4,298
2,7 5 2
4,652

1,942
2,1 7 9
1,525
2 ,138
3 ,273
2,190
1 ,550
1 ,671
1,999
2 ,5 1 2
2 ,0 2 4
2 ,7 0 8

4,202
5,513
3,696
4,845
7,0 3 6
5, 187
3,655
3,7 6 8
4,859
5,945
4,476
5,918

4 ,249
5,714
3,726
4,907
7,2 3 8
5,294
3,735
3,850
4 ,935
6 ,180
4,560
6,0 4 8

3,516
4,1 7 0
3,1 0 7
3 ,664
4,6 1 9
3,3 9 4
2,728
2,625
3,378
3,595
3,3 6 7
3,604

4,794

4 ,9 5 3

2 ,429

6 ,425

6,5 6 8

3,672

4 ,943

5,097

2,6 4 4

6,509

6,648

3,8 3 3

4 ,518
5,063
4 ,053
5 ,622
5,128

4,5 9 2
5,149
4 ,081
5 ,758
5,1 7 2

2,681
2 ,978
2 ,701
3 ,269
2 ,7 8 4

5,7 7 8
6,382
5,600
7 ,208
6,527

5,8 3 7
6,467
5,6 3 1
7 ,326
6 ,557

3,838
3,977
3,9 9 7
4,661
4,2 9 4

4 ,661
5,252
4 ,305
5,8 3 3
5,301

4 ,7 3 0
5,3 2 3
4,335
5,966
5 ,343

2,952
3 ,522
2 ,9 1 6
3,514
3,0 9 1

5,866
6,5 1 8
5,720
7,325
6,605

5,9 2 1
6,587
5,749
7,442
6,633

4,055
4,563
4 ,246
4 ,805
4,500

...........................................................................

3,072

3,3 1 6

1,8 7 0

4,7 5 5

5,120

2,8 7 7

3,1 6 6

3,4 1 5

1 ,939

4 ,824

5,1 9 1

2,930

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .
MOTION PICTURES ..................................................
HOSPITALS ...................................................................

1 ,766
2 ,2 7 8
2,138
2,9 1 8

1 ,904
2,474
2,187
3 ,016

1,3 1 5
1,862
1,413
2,4 4 7

3,3 4 0
3,601
4 ,445
4,154

3,571
3,937
4,5 5 7
4,2 8 9

2,522
2,865
2,820
3,486

1,9 1 2
2 ,395
2,341
3,021

2 ,0 5 4
2,590
2 ,3 9 3
3 ,1 1 5

1 ,444
1,9 7 9
1 ,557
2,568

3,446
3,662
4,7 3 3
4,220

3,6 8 1
3,995
4,853
4 ,353

2,615
2,932
3,002
3,5 5 7

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS . .
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ...............................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ......................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ............................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ..............

RETAIL

TRADE

DEPARTMENT STORES ..........................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ..........................................................
VARIETY STORES ..................................................................
GROCERY STORES ..................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ...............................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ............................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ............................................
SHOE STORES . . ......................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ......................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ............
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ..................................................

FINANCE,

INSURANCE,

AND REAL ESTATE

..

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ..............
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS .................
LIFE INSURANCE ........................................................
FIR E, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE

SERVICES

I n c l u d e s w o r k e r s o f a l l r a c e s o t h e r th a n N e g r o .




%

%

I t 592

T a b l e B-4.

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d

in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y o f m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 7
EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY
ANY
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R TE R
RAC; E
WHITE1 1 NEGRO

FOLIR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
;
WHITE1 1NEGRO
WORKERS

R
Q U A R TE R
FOlJ QUARTERS
A N Y
ALL
______ R A C E ______
ALL
______ fL -A —f L_E______
WORKERS
w h i t e 1 1 NEGRO
WHITE1 I NEGRO
WORKERS

2 ,883

$ 6 ,256

$ 6,491

1 4,1 0 9
►

$ 4 ,6 1 4

$ 4 ,8 2 4

$ 2,883

$ 6,256

$ 6 ,491

6,2 2 1

4,367

7,878

7,9 5 9

5,5 5 6

6 ,3 9 0

6,455

4,5 8 9

7,998

8,079

5,687

7 ,443
5 ,030

3,7 7 2
3 ,091

8 ,7 7 5
7 ,693

8,8 4 2
7 ,716

4,894
5,707

7,5 7 4
5 ,386

7,639
5 ,420

4 ,413
3 ,269

8,872
7 ,878

8,9 3 2
7,9 0 2

5,421
5,783

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAl ECONOMY .......................................

$ 4,614

$ 4,824

MINING ............................................................................................................................

6,156

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURA.L GAS AND NATURAL
GAS LIQUIDS ...................................................................................................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ................................................................

7,369
4,999

ii

it

4,1 0 9

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ...................................................................................

5,226

5,5 0 5

2 ,963

7,7 1 4

8,027

4,685

5 ,476

5,762

3,1 5 2

7 ,886

8 ,203

4 ,812

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION.................... ............................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ........................................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ......................................
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING .......................................
ELECTRICAL WORK ..............................................................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ..........................................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ..................................................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ..........................................................
CONCRETE WORK ....................................................................................................

4,5 0 2
5,313
6,326
4,0 1 5
6,841
4,181
4,0 0 4
4,591
3,915

4,737
5,6 3 0
6,503
4,073
6 ,937
4,5 5 5
4 ,1 0 2
4 ,8 1 8
4,2 6 6

2,779
3 ,077
2,553
2 ,684
3 ,253
2 ,870
2,786
2 ,391
2,772

6,946
8,7 5 1
8,628
6,5 0 9
9 ,212
6 ,617
6,840
7 ,127
6 ,727

7,2 4 4
9,202
8 ,758
6 ,575
9,2 8 1
7,0 5 3
6 ,962
7 , 398
7 ,205

4,329
5,222
4 ,414
4 ,662
5,617
4,811
5,053
4,074
4,865

4 ,928
5,9 6 3
6,764
4 ,311
7,2 3 7
4,594
4 ,4 0 4
4 ,948
4,489

5 ,171
6,314
6,9 4 7
4 ,3 6 8
7 ,335
4,990
4,503
5,1 8 8
4 ,8 4 9

3 ,1 5 0
3,489
2,8 6 2
3,0 1 0
3,566
3,2 0 6
3 , 185
2 ,6 1 9
3,315

7,1 8 4
9,164
8 ,919
6 ,6 8 6
9 ,4 7 9
6,914
7 ,054
7 ,347
7,1 4 0

7,492
9,640
9,0 5 4
6 ,7 5 2
9,5 5 0
7 ,361
7,1 7 7
7,623
7,6 0 3

4 ,486
5,4 4 3
4,528
4 ,817
5,7 8 4
5,065
5,255
4 ,243
5,337

MANUFACTURING .........................................................................................................

5,4 5 1

5 ,648

3,647

6,9 8 2

7 ,169

5 ,018

5,574

5,7 6 9

3 ,786

7,059

7,2 4 4

5,1 2 3

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ............................................
MEAT PRODUCTS ...................................................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS .................................................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ..................................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ..................................................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ..............................................................................................
BEVERAGES ...............................................................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ..............................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ..................................................................
KNITTING MILLS .................................................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ..............................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ..................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS .............................................................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR .......................................................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNCERGARMENTS............ .......................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ........................................................ .. .....................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ................................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ................. . . . . .
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ...................................................................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ................................................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ..................................................
NEWSPAPERS ............................................................................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ..................................................................................
INDUSTRIAL CH EMICALS ............................................................. ..................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ............................................
D R U G S .............. ........................................ ................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ...............................................
PETROLEUM REFINING ......................................................................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ..............................................................................

7,063
4,593
5,015
2,437
5,513
4 ,846
5,312
4,066
4,0 1 2
3,199
3,203
4 ,079
2,674
3,1 8 8
2,764
2,749
3,565
4,301
3,714
6,662
5,005
5,470
5,979
8 ,056
6,959
7,1 0 2
5,825
8 ,354
7,331

7,2 7 2
4 ,885
5,0 7 1
2,543
5 ,690
5,008
5 ,610
4,2 4 8
4 ,149
3 ,260
3,3 0 2
4,241
2,7 3 8
3 ,273
2,8 1 5
2,792
3,9 1 5
4 ,564
3 ,896
6 ,7 5 3
5,1 7 8
5 ,531
6,143
8,2 3 5
7 , 100
7,301
6 ,123
8 ,480
7 ,469

4,430
3,346
3 ,648
1,7 4 1
4,022
3 ,751
2 ,978
2,9 1 4
2,747
2 ,608
2 ,5 0 5
2 ,825
2,083
2 ,441
2 ,233
2 ,4 3 2
2 , 137
2,437
2,616
5 , 111
3,638
3,705
3,778
5,354
4,6 9 6
4,5 0 2
3,179
5 ,253
5 ,860

8 ,952
6 ,414
6,800
5,5 6 6
7 ,398
6,4 9 1
7 ,238
5,051
5,088
4,265
4,232
5,2 8 5
3,7 0 1
4,2 9 6
3 ,858
3,867
5 ,166
6,0 9 6
5 ,2 4 8
7 ,967
6 ,726
7,1 4 4
7,8 9 0
9 ,298
8,2 4 9
8 ,529
7 ,996
9,501
8 ,064

9 ,108
6,7 7 9
6,8 3 8
5 ,825
7 ,610
6,658
7,4 7 6
5,198
5 ,173
4 ,308
4,292
5 ,420
3,773
4 ,3 7 7
3,918
3,936
5 ,634
6,3 8 3
5,422
8 ,057
6 ,895
7,205
8 ,023
9 ,480
8,392
8,731
8,2 4 9
9 ,578
8,201

6,318
4,782
5,6 9 0
3,847
5,498
5,260
4,7 4 3
3,925
4 ,044
3,771
3,688
4 ,023
2 ,967
3,489
3,1 3 4
3,341
3,148
3,734
3*953
6,3 1 6
5,187
5,084
5,705
6 ,347
5,734
5,6 1 7
5,165
7,0 9 1
6,544

7 ,358
4,779
5,2 5 5
2,5 7 4
5 ,745
5,065
5,5 5 0
4 ,187
4,1 9 8
3,328
3,345
4,2 4 9
2,7 6 7
3,2 9 2
2 ,8 6 9
2 ,864
3 ,736
4,555
3 ,919
6 ,843
5 ,268
5 ,617
6,1 9 9
8 ,280
7,171
7,3 3 6
6,0 8 6
8 ,506
7 ,513

7,5 6 2
5,079
5,3 0 9
2 ,678
5,924
5,214
5,838
4,358
4,332
3 ,381
3 ,430
4 ,4 0 9
2,8 2 9
3,3 7 5
2,917
2,904
4 ,1 0 3
4 ,819
4 ,096
6 ,937
5 ,430
5 ,672
6,3 6 0
8 ,4 5 6
7,307
7 ,5 2 7
6,393
8,630
7,6 4 2

4,789
3 ,5 0 2
3 ,930
1 ,884
4,242
4,062
3,2 9 9
3,1 1 1
2,9 6 7
2,821
2,7 4 1
3 ,011
2,197
2,553
2,3 6 9
2 ,571
2 ,243
2,6 7 9
2,851
5,252
3,9 9 1
4,011
4 ,0 4 7
5 ,617
4,9 9 8
4,854
3,3 5 6
5,4 2 8
6 , 137

9,0 4 8
6,514
6,931
5,690
7 ,5 3 3
6,6 0 0
7 ,361
5,092
5 , 165
4,3 1 6
4,2 7 7
5,371
3 ,742
4,3 5 3
3,8 9 7
3,910
5 ,250
6,2 0 4
5,341
8,0 3 4
6,851
7,2 4 8
8,041
9,403
8,3 4 3
8,663
8,145
9 ,5 8 4
8,2 0 8

9,202
6 ,8 8 0
6 ,966
5 ,944
7,7 4 8
6,757
7,5 9 5
5 ,233
5 ,250
4,3 5 3
4,330
5 ,511
3,8 1 3
4 ,435
3 ,955
3 ,976
5,7 2 9
6 ,491
5,5 1 3
8,1 2 6
7,0 1 2
7,3 0 4
8 ,174
9,585
8,4 8 2
8 ,855
8,4 0 0
9 ,660
8,3 3 3

6 ,437
4,874
5 ,920
3,997
5 ,604
5 ,446
4,902
4,0 1 6
4 ,138
3,8 9 2
3 ,792
4 ,0 5 7
3,025
3,533
3 ,200
3,409
3,182
3,837
4,0 5 8
6,3 5 6
5,3 7 9
5 ,377
5,861
6,460
5 ,897
5,9 0 6
5 ,280
7 ,177
6 ,808

S e e fo o t n o t e at en d o f ta b le .




T a b l e B - 4 . A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s
b y i n d u s t r y of m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d
INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

AN Y
Q U A R T E R
ALL
______ R A C E
WORKERS
WHITE1 1 NEGRO
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY MANUFACTURING -

FOtJR QUARTERS
ALL
R A C E
WORKERS
WHITE1 1 NEGRO

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C F
WHITE1 J NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS
WHITE1 1 NEGRO

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS . ,
FOOTWEAR* EXCEPT RUBBER
GLASS AND GLASSWARE* PRESSED OR BLOWN . .
CONCRETE* GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS .
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES . . . . . .........................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ......................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARCWARE ..............
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS . . .
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ............
METAL STAMPINGS ................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ..................................................
FARM MACHINERY ..................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY . . . . .
METAL WORKING MACHINERY .........................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY .................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ...........................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .........................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES......................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ....................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ...................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT .................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ...................... .. ................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES . .
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ......................... ..
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS .......................................................
SHIP ANO BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING . . .
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES
OTHER MANUFACTURING .....................................................

TRANSPORTATION......................................................
RAILROADS ............................................................. .
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION
TAXICABS ...............................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE
AIR TRANSPORTATION............................... ..

COMMUNICATION ............................................
TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .......................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING

PUBLIC UTILITIES
S e e fo o t n o t e a t e n d o f ta b le ,




EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

4,778
3,156
5 ,367
5,122
7 ,200
5 ,9 3 6
6,354
5 ,445
5,551
6,004
5,6 4 1
6 ,844
6,2 4 1
6,434
7 ,142
6 ,473
6 ,387
6,9 5 9
5,521
6,140
5,7 2 6
5 ,325
4,7 5 5
3 ,790
7,011
4 ,865
6,9 1 3
7,738
5,508
6 ,126
4 ,2 8 8

$ 4,890
3 ,197
5,502
5,4 1 2
7,381
6,272
6 ,519
5 ,592
5 ,714
6,0 9 1
5 ,856
6,8 9 5
6 ,3 6 2
6,5 3 5
7 ,214
6,602
6 ,495
7 ,0 9 0
5 ,655
6,316
5 ,826
5,4 4 3
4,9 2 6
3,9 1 9
7 ,163
4,9 7 8
7 ,152
7 ,894
5,684
6 ,248
4,481

$ 3 ,6 9 4
2,1 3 1
3,7 3 8
3,419
5 ,933
4 ,963
4,6 1 4
3,626
3,587
4,5 4 3
4 ,1 3 0
5 ,981
4,294
4 , 785
4 ,487
3 ,719
4,377
3 ,878
3 ,592
3,581
3,778
3,885
3 ,363
2,809
4,783
3 ,287
5 ,290
5,229
4 , 3 09
4,0 0 2
2,683

6 ,0 7 0

6,2 8 6

4,2 7 5

i

6 ,2 0 7 $ 6,3 0 5
4,290
4 ,3 1 3
6 ,631
6 ,723
7,0 7 5
7 ,471
8,1 6 1
8,3 4 3
7 ,2 2 3
7,6 1 2
7,8 0 4
7 ,662
7 ,010
7 , 142
7 ,339
7,491
7 ,838
7 ,915
7,3 9 6
7,609
7,9 3 0
7,974
7,7 8 3
7,901
7 ,663
7,7 4 2
8,834
8,8 8 4
7,914
8,0 0 6
7 ,909
7 ,808
8 ,459
8 ,545
7 ,0 5 4
7,1 4 6
7 ,627
7 , 761
7 ,004
7 ,074
6,754
6,883
6 ,303
6 ,491
5,7 2 2
5 ,909
8,615
8,4 6 7
6 ,643
6 ,780
8,1 7 3
8,3 8 2
9 , 106
9 ,235
7 ,493
7,6 8 4
7,5 0 2
7,628
6 ,2 0 4
6,4 1 5

7 ,678

7 ,870

$ 5,128
3,445
5,181
4,714
6,845
6,0 7 1
5,960
5,040
5,2 1 0
6 ,389
5,716
7 , 143
5,659
6,1 7 8
6,490
5,296
5 ,714
5,580
5,271
5,067
5,271
5,058
4 ,614
4 , 197
6 ,069
4 ,568
6 ,607
6,683
6 ,094
5 , 153
4 , 128

$ 4 ,9 6 8
3 ,257
5 ,529
5,449
7,3 4 3
6 ,205
6,6 0 8
5,6 7 3
5,905
6,254
5 ,907
7 ,049
6 ,472
6,726
7 ,421
6,748
6,6 7 2
7 ,206
5,811
6,3 7 5
5,936
5 ,532
4,989
3,997
7,252
5,0 8 5
7,133
7,975
5,818
6,3 7 8
4,509

5,856

6,2 6 7

$ 5,0 6 6 $ 4 ,0 3 0 $ 6,306 $ 6,388
4 ,365
4,343
3 ,293
2 ,335
6,694
6,7 8 7
5 ,664
3,901
7,2 1 8
7,6 1 5
5,753
3,662
6 ,0 9 4
8,255
8,431
7,521
7,749
6 ,5 3 3
5,252
7,3 7 2
7,935
4,882
7,795
6 ,772
7,2 4 6
7,1 1 5
3,847
5 ,821
3,9 3 9
7 ,674
7,528
6,069
7,953
8,029
4 ,8 8 0
6 ,3 3 7
7,547
6,118
4,4 2 2
7,752
8,0 3 4
8,079
7 , C95
6,2 5 5
7,901
8,017
6,589
4 ,584
5,076
7,798
7,877
6 ,826
9 ,034
8,984
4,8 1 5
7,492
8 ,124
8,033
4,047
6 ,8 7 5
4,669
8,037
7 ,936
6,780
8,563
8,651
7 ,3 3 1
4 ,2 7 7
7,187
3 ,967
7,273
5,9 4 0
7,767
6,542
3 ,934
7,895
4,037
7 ,098
7 ,167
6,0 3 3
5,6 4 9
fc, 869
6,993
4 , 112
6,428
6,6 1 7
3 ,575
5 , 163
5,829
6,016
4,123
3 ,0 3 6
5,0 0 2
8,586
8,7 3 6
7,4 0 5
6,750
6,8 8 9
5 , 199
3 , 483
8,302
6,508
7 ,369
5 ,525
5 ,566
9,220
8,1 2 4
9 ,342
6,004
4 ,5 5 7
7 , 645
7,838
7,629
6,4 9 9
4,2 6 2
7,753
4 ,6 9 6
2 ,943
6,332
6,538

6 ,4 8 1

4 ,4 8 9

7,803

$ 5,401
3 , 556
5,218
4 ,855
6,9 8 1
6,2 5 8
6 ,139
5,1 6 3
5,475
6 ,509
5,929
7,236
5 ,794
6,315
6,615
5 ,450
5,8 5 1
5,638
5,531
5,324
5,376
5,233
4,7 2 5
4 ,312
6,154
4,651
6,7 5 0
6,913
6 ,220
5 ,333
4,308

7 ,994

6 ,000

7,818
7,4 9 9
4 ,764
7 ,735
9,632

7,956
7,438
4 ,692
7,918
9 ,744

6,1 5 4
7,752
5,0 8 1
5,583
6,938

6,8 5 8
6,2 3 7
3,261
5 ,659
7 ,975

6 ,985
6 ,1 3 7
3,186
5,9 0 6
8,0 9 5

5 ,337
6,679
3,621
3 ,447
5 ,385

7 ,709
7 ,334
4,629
7,5 9 4
9,529

7,8 4 7
7,280
4,5 5 8
7,778
9 ,651

6,0 3 4
7,559
4,942
5 ,440
6,6 0 2

7 ,011
6,471
3,4 5 7
5 ,912
8 , 177

7,136
6,360
3,3 8 4
6 ,1 5 8
8 ,289

5,514
6 ,9 5 6
3 ,808
3 ,720
5,769

5,850

5,9 7 4

3,682

7 ,180

7,2 7 8

5,041

5,9 8 0

6 ,1 0 2

3 ,855

7,2 6 8

7 ,364

5,161

5,683
6,7 3 8

5 ,808
6 ,815

3,561
4 ,5 0 0

6,894
9 ,0 6 1

6,9 8 7
9,145

4,852
6 ,376

5,7 7 8
7 ,0 8 0

5,9 0 0
7 , 161

3 ,7 2 3
4 ,7 3 2

6,9 4 3
9,388

7 ,034
9,477

4,9 4 8
6,576

6 ,927

7,090

4,283

8,0 3 6

8 ,174

5,461

7,051

7,2 0 7

4,523

8,110

8,2 4 2

5,644

T a b l e B-4. A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q uar t e r a n d in four q uarters
b y industry of m a j o r e a r n i n g s a n d race, 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d
EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INOUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY
AN Y
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAl ECONOMY -

Q U A R TE R
RAC F
WHITE1 l NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WHITE1 1 NEGRO
WORKERS

AN Y
QUA R T E R
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS _ WHITE1 1 NEGRO

FOlJR QUARTERS_______
ALL
R A C E
WHITE1 1 NEGRO
WORKERS

CONTINUED
6 ,011

$ 2 ,953

$ 7 ,958

$ 8 ,189

$ 4,645

S 5 ,988

$ 6,241

$ 3 ,195

$ 8,091

$ 8 ,322

$ 4,789

5,5 1 7
6,875
6,138
4 ,564
6,6 0 9
5,875
6,792

5,648
7,1 0 0
6,5 6 3
4,7 7 1
6 ,797
6 ,042
6,982

3,494
3,343
2 ,598
2,9 2 6
3,3 2 6
3,0 3 0
3,2 6 1

7,4 4 4
8,938
8,886
6 ,952
8 ,769
7,8 3 2
8 ,904

7 ,565
9 ,103
9,241
7,178
8,937
8,013
9,0 6 9

5 , 190
5,3 6 3
4,424
4 ,813
4,9 6 2
4,2 9 7
4,831

5 ,793
7,193
6,409
4,7 8 7
6,895
6 ,168
7,1 0 3

5 ,9 2 3
7 ,418
6,826
4 ,9 9 1
7 ,0 8 4
6 ,3 4 0
7 ,290

3,7 7 6
3 ,648
2,9 3 8
3,1 7 3
3 ,596
3 ,220
3 ,625

7,598
9,1 2 3
9,062
7,075
8 ,943
7,995
9 ,052

7 ,719
9 ,2 8 7
9,4 2 0
7,3 0 0
9,113
8 , 181
9 ,2 1 6

5 ,333
5 ,558
4,569
4,9 4 0
5 ,089
4,3 5 5
5 ,002

TRADE ...................................................................................................... ..

2 ,710

2,784

1,926

4 ,5 5 7

4,650

3,422

2 ,807

2,8 7 9

2,0 4 5

4 ,624

4 ,7 1 4

3 ,516

DEPARTMENT STORES . . . • • • .....................................................................
MAIL OROER HOUSES ......................................................................................
VARIETY S T O R E S .............................................................................................
GROCERY S T O R E S ................................................................... ..........................
MOTOR VEHICLE D EA LE R S ............................................................. ..
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS ......................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR S T O R E S ................................. ....................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ............................... .. .....................................
SHOE S T O R E S ....................... ..............................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ..................................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ............................... ..
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .............................................................................

2,541
3,321
2*003
3,118
5,3 4 3
3,1 9 9
2,211
2 ,246
2,866
4,055
2,7 7 5
4 ,523

2,597
3,635
2,0 2 5
3,1 7 7
5 ,543
3,2 8 5
2 ,261
2,3 0 7
2,9 0 9
4,2 5 3
2,8 4 2
4,6 7 2

1,877
2,045
1,661
2 ,217
3 ,284
2 ,003
1,668
1,509
2 ,142
2 ,286
1,965
2 ,549

4 ,323
5,494
3 ,820
4 ,966
7 ,260
5,2 9 8
3 ,802
3,959
4,829
6 ,055
4 ,7 0 7
6 ,1 3 9

4,377
5,705
3 ,865
5,020
7,456
5,373
3,881
4,0 3 9
4 ,903
6 ,278
4 ,7 8 0
6,258

3,5 5 3
4 ,141
3 , 110
3,953
4 ,8 9 9
3,731
2,8 9 0
2,7 3 8
3,465
3,597
3,649
3,962

2 ,646
3,454
2,0 8 8
3 ,235
5 ,568
3 ,361
2 ,310
2 ,370
3 ,0 1 2
4 ,257
2 ,880
4 ,754

2,700
3 ,762
2 ,110
3 ,292
5,766
3,4 4 0
2 ,3 5 7
2,4 2 8
3 ,052
4,4 4 9
2,944
4,902

2 ,0 1 3
2 ,204
1,7 5 3
2,3 5 5
3,517
2,257
1,793
1 ,674
2 ,321
2 ,539
2 ,112
2 ,797

4 ,381
5 ,562
3,8 6 4
5 ,039
7 ,3 6 5
5 ,400
3 ,859
4,057
4 ,913
6,1 4 4
4,777
6 ,2 7 0

4,432
5 ,773
3,9 0 8
5,091
7 ,5 5 9
5 ,470
3 ,935
4 ,1 4 0
4 ,9 8 1
6 ,365
4 ,848
6,389

3,6 6 6
4 ,2 0 6
3 ,166
4,0 6 1
5,029
3,9 3 7
2 ,989
2,7 8 5
3,651
3,717
3,742
4 ,105

WHOLESALE TRADE .................................................................................................

$ 5,757

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT .........................
DRUGS* CHEMICALS* AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ...............................
DRY GOODS AND APPAR EL................................................................ ....
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..................................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ........................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ......................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ............................ ..

RETAIL

(

......................... ...............

4,971

5,138

2,670

6 ,6 8 9

6,8 4 5

3,963

5,121

5,2 8 2

2,896

6 ,775

6,926

4,143

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .......................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS .....................................................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS .......................................................
LIFE INSURANCE ..............................................................................................
FIR E, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE .................................

4,722
5,271
4 ,156
5,802
5,407

4,8 0 5
5,3 7 6
4 ,1 9 3
5 ,944
5 ,474

2,9 7 0
2,8 6 1
2 ,7 3 4
3 ,554
2,880

6 ,027
6,649
5 ,775
7 ,519
6,8 9 5

6 ,100
6,7 6 6
5 ,798
7,6 5 8
6,9 4 3

4 , 142
3 ,684
4 , 395
4 ,910
4 ,4 2 9

4,8 6 2
5 ,458
4,3 9 9
6 ,018
5 ,576

4,939
5 ,5 5 6
4 ,4 3 1
6,156
5,6 4 2

3,2 4 7
3,2 2 5
3 ,149
3 ,830
3,0 7 7

6,1 1 3
6,7 6 3
5,890
7 ,640
6,981

6,179
6 ,874
5 ,909
7,774
7,027

4,3 9 2
3 ,932
4 ,7 5 9
5 , 138
4,626

SERVICES ....................................... ...........................................................................

3,3 4 4

3,598

2,0 6 6

5 , 151

5,5 2 4

3,176

3 ,436

3,695

2 ,135

5,217

5,593

3,228

3,6 2 8
3 ,873
4,851
4,703

3,8 5 9
4,197
4 ,992
4,8 5 1

2,796
3 ,128
2,8 9 0
3 ,961

FINANCE,

INSURANCE,

AND REAL ESTATE

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ....................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ..........................................
MOTION PICTURES ...........................................................................................
H O S P I T A L S ...........................................................................................................

1

I n c lu d e s w o r k e r s o f a ll r a c e s o t h e r th a n N e g r o .




1,870
2,4 7 6
2,210
3,323

1,989
2 ,658
2 ,254
3,4 3 8

1,457
2,0 5 9
1 ,537
2,7 6 3

3,5 2 1
3 ,806
4,504
4,632

3 ,747
4,130
4,6 3 3
4 ,783

2 ,705
3,064
2,724
3 ,870

2,0 2 3
2,597
2,4 2 1
3,435

2 ,1 4 5
2,7 8 5
2,4 7 0
3,5 4 5

1,596
2 , 164
1,661
2,9 0 0

T a b l e B - 5 . M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e
b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e g i o n of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 6

a n d s a lary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d

in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS W
HO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
AN Y
U
F OUR
Q U A R T E R
Q < A R T e R S
NORTH­
NORTH
NORTH­
NORTH
UNITED
EAST
SOUTH
WEST
CENTRAL
EAST
SOUTH
STATES
CENTRAL

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .........................................

$3,422

$3 , 8 9 3

$2 , 7 8 5

$4 , 0 1 8

$3 , 5 7 3

$ 5,268

$5 , 4 5 6

$4 , 2 6 2

$5 , 8 9 7

$5 , >850

................................................................ .. ..........................................................

6,1 3 3

6 ,378

5 ,7 8 5

6 ,0 4 1

6 ,737

6 ,802

6 ,733

6 ,641

6 ,7 2 5

7,>542

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
GAS LIQUIDS ....................................................................................................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ................................. ...............................

6,768
4 t 871

5 ,449
5 ,999

6 ,7 1 7
4 ,799

5 ,812
3,499

7 ,3 8 6
5 ,916

7 ,238
6 ,472

5 ,749
7 ,249

7 , 212
6 ,2 5 8

6 ,583

7,>636
7,>285

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .......................................................... .........................

4,475

5 ,452

3 * 27 1

5 ,463

5 ,6 7 9

6,5 0 6

7 ,043

4 ,979

7 ,400

7,>692

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION................. .. ..........................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC .........................................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING .........................................
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ......................... ..
ELECTRICAL WORK ................................................................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ............................................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ................................................. ..................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WCRK ............................................................
CONCRETE WORK ................................................................................................ ..

4 , 127
4,9 0 9
5 ,858
3 ,429
6 ,621
3,880
3 ,654
4,0 6 5
3,509

5 ,2 4 9
6 ,3 9 9
6 ,237
4 ,0 3 7
6 ,674
5 ,027
4 ,406
4 ,386
4 ,571

3 .518
3 ,518
4 ,1 7 0
2 ,394
5 ,299
2 ,416
2 ,3 7 4
3 ,133
2 ,149

4 ,569
5 ,4 0 6
7,2 1 7
4 ,218
7 ,937
5 ,367
5 ,0 5 5
5 ,035
4 ,1 8 7

5 ,632
6 ,489
7,1 3 4
4 ,222
8,374
4 ,9 7 4
4 ,7 9 9
5 ,437
4 ,049

5,681
7 ,095
7,568
5,521
8 ,760
5 ,872
5,8 8 7
6,041
5,6 3 8

6 ,949
8 ,437

6 ,576

7 ,624
5 ,349
8 ,894
6 ,704
6 ,299
6 ,6 2 4
6 ,124

4 ,656
5 ,513
5 ,828
4 ,3 6 5
7 ,115
4 ,129
4 ,113
4 ,343
3 ,9 9 9

6 ,874
6 ,749
6 ,583

7,>223
8 ,>554
9,>124
6 ,>678
9,>634
6 ,>546
61>458
7,, 0 8 3
6 ,>124

4,7 9 3

4 ,789

3 ,758

5 ,659

5 ,370

6,039

5 ,9 3 6

4 ,732

6 ,633

6 ,>800

6,8 4 3
4,2 0 8
5 » 243
1,2 1 3
5 ,081
4 ,737

5 ,541
4 ,999
5 ,4 4 9
1 ,763
5 ,071
4 ,959
5 ,999
3 ,687
3 ,659
2 ,938
3 ,012
3 ,814
2 ,656
2 ,6 3 1
2 ,439
2 ,5 6 0
2 ,1 2 4
3 *624
3 ,637
6 ,627
4 .341
5 ,9 4 9
5 ,499
7 ,660
6 ,1 7 4
6 ,2 4 0
4 *27 1
8 ,107
7 ,093
4 ,762
2 ,864
5 ,386
6 ,0 3 1
7 ,297
6 ,181

6 ,892
2 ,754

5 ,149
6 ,0 2 4
5 ,155
92 2
5,922
4 ,657
5 ,812
1, 2 4 9
2 ,499
2 ,541
1,749
3,485
2 ,3 9 9
2 ,916
2 ,783
2 ,312
2 ,437
4 ,093
3 ,772
6 ,6 4 1
4 ,855
4 ,690
5 ,458
7 ,506
5,999
6 ,266
5 ,769

7 ,235
4 ,659
6 ,8 4 9
1,240
5 ,249
5 ,555
6 ,3 0 3
1,499
2 ,7 4 9
3 ,178
624
3 ,312
2 ,307
2 ,4 9 9
2 ,599
1 ,2 4 9
4 ,9 2 1
5 ,383
4 ,406
6 ,730
5 ,291
5 ,160
6 ,062
6 ,8 7 4
6 ,4 1 6
4 ,041
5 ,749
7 ,672
7 ,749
5 ,416
2 ,2 4 9
4 ,7 4 9
6 ,2 9 9
7 ,465
5 ,937

7,9 1 1
5 ,922

5 ,999
5 ,812
6 ,278
4 ,846
6 ,166
6 ,074
7 ♦O i l
4 ,2 4 9
4 ,374
3 ,581
3 ,541
4 ,391
3 ,191
3 ,115
3 ,060
2 ,961
3 ,687
4 ,749
4 ,646
6 ,8 8 9
5 ,214
7 ,214
6 ,749
8 ,1 1 8
6 ,7 8 7
6 ,8 1 9
5 ,660
8 ,7 0 4
7 ,349
5 ,468
3 ,413
5 ,815
6 ,785
7 ,670
6 ,499

7 ,826
3 ,864
5 ,3 8 7
3 ,120
4 ,485
5 ,199
5 ,151
4 ,312
4 ,358
3 ♦ 195
3 ,847
3 ,484
2 ,7 7 6

6 ,749
6 ,806
6 ,2 2 9

8 ,>257
6 ,>458

INDUSTRY

MINING

MANUFACTURING

...........................................................................................................

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ............................................ ..
MEAT PRODUCTS .....................................................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ...................................................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ...................................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS .....................................................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ................................................................................................
b e v e r a g e s ..................................... .. .......................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ...............................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ....................................................................
KNITTING M I L L S ..................................................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ...............................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* SUITS AND COATS .........................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ...............................................................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR .........................................................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ......................................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ..............................................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ..................................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS .................................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE .....................................................................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ............................................... ..................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ....................................................
NEWSPAPERS ..............................................................................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING .....................................................................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ..................................................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ...............................................
DRUGS ........................................................ .................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GCODS .................................................
PETROLEUM REFINING ........................................................................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ................................................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ...............................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ..........................................................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN ....................................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .................................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS .................................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES .......................................................................




5,212

3,968
3,9 7 8
2,738
3 ,370
3,461
2,3 7 0
2 ,535
2,3 1 8
2,3 9 8
2,842
3 ,928
3 ,405
6,5 9 9
4 ,6 0 2
4,952
5,2 4 6
7 ,506
6,2 1 4
5 ,977
4 ,826
7 ,920
7,738
4,783
2,845
5,0 0 4
4,9 3 7
7,2 7 0
6,227

4 ,661
1 ,1 5 5
3 ,724
4 ,3 6 2
4 ,1 1 5
3 ,987
4 ,0 4 7
2 ,711
3 ,508
2 ,999
2 ,3 1 3
2 ,257
2 ,435
2 ,3 0 3
2 ,2 1 8
2 ,897
3 ,218
6 *4 3 2
4 ,321
4 ,3 1 7
4 ,237
7 ,504
6 ,2 3 5
4 ,124
4 ,8 7 4
7 ,874
7 ,557
3 ,823
2 ,777
4 ,738
3 ,8 7 8
6 ,8 4 2
5 ,223

8,112

7 ,999
5,189
3,092
4 ,967
5 ,531
7 ,362
6 ,536

6,200

4 ,158
6,121

5,7 8 6
6,3 1 8
4 ,308
4,356
3,3 1 0
3 ,790
4,033
2,866

3,034
2 ,955
2,861

4,0 2 1
5 ,139
4,244
6,9 6 9
5,518
6,6 5 3
6 ,676
7,868
6,7 1 1
6 ,638
6,312
8,188
8,222

5,591
3,3 9 6
5,608
5 ,990
7 ,690
6,6 4 8

2 ,688

3 ,0 5 2
2 ,712
2 ,973

3 ,499
3 ,791
6 ,869

5 ,189
5 ,719
5 ,863
7 ,779
6 ,672
4 ,812
5 ,916
8 ,081
7 ,774
4 ,649
3 ,237
5 ,218
4 ,620
7 ,254
5 ,739

5 ,916

7 ,659
8 ,681
6 ,633

9 ,409
7 ,138

4 ,949
6 ,726
5 ,857
6 ,761
1,249
2 ,499
3 ,349
2 ,999
4 ,068
2 ,922
3 ,4 1 6
3 ,374
2 ,999
3 ,714
5 ,138
4 ,891
6 ,985
5 ,777
6 ,608
6 ,732

7 ,823
6 ,729
6 ,799
6 ,687
8 ,279
8 ,519

5 ,899
3 ,676
5 ,704
6 ,547
7 ,876
6 ,967

WEST

7,>478
4t>568
7,>208
61>632
7,>483
li >499
5,>499
3,>562
li >249
3,,7 81
3,>357
3,,3 9 6
3,>249
2 ,>833
5,>983
61>156
5,>458
?i >374
6 ,>949
6 ,>955
7,>464
7,>785
6 ,, 8 7 4
6 ,>166
7,,1 4 9
81>027
8 ,>624
61>406
3i,7 4 9
6 ,>166
7,>049
7,>970
6 ,>687

T a b l e B-5.

Median

b y industry a n d

a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e

a n d s a l a r y e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d

in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

r e g i o n o f m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d

N G F O K S H O KD
N AE N
PLO EN U IN
EAR IN S O W R ER WO W R E IN A Y W G A D SALARY EM YM T D R G
INDUSTRY
UNITED
STATES
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL
MANUFACTURING -

ECONOMY -

AN Y
NORTH­
EAST

Q U A R TE R
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL

WEST

UNITED
STATES

F O U R
NORTH­
EAST

Q U A_..B T E R ____
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL

WEST

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

NQNFERROUS ROLLING AND CRAWING ...............................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE .......................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ...............
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ....................
METAL STAMPINGS .........................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ...........................................................
FARM MACHINERY ...........................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ....................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ..................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ..........................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY .....................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ..................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES .............................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT . .
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ............................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ...........................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT . . . .
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ..........................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ..................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ............
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT .....................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ...............
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES . .
OTHER MANUFACTURING .............................................................

$6,352
A , 9 74
5 , 364
5*431
5 ,303
6,7 4 4
6 , 129
6,552
6,8 4 6
6,-1 78
6,352
6 ,443
5 ,244
5,545
5,271
5*196
4*328
3,361
6,081
3,821
6 ,822
7 ,394
5,7 1 6
5,605
3 ,470

$6,399
4,969
5 ,935
5 ,2 0 4
4,9 3 7
7 ,026
6 ,541
6,5 4 6
6,5 9 2
6,2 9 5
6,4 1 3
6,444
5,8 8 8
6 ,381
5,576
5,016
4 ,0 9 6
3,759
6 ,573
4 ,1 0 6
6 ,682
7,287
6*579
6,3 4 5
3 ,224

$6,428
3,321
4 ,3 0 9
4 ,749
3 ,833
3 ,749
4 ,312
5,9 5 8
4,499
4,910
4 ,9 7 4
5 ,049
3,9 4 4
4,666
4,0 7 6
4 ,2 6 0
3,799
2,1 9 9
5 ,640
3 ,838
6,022
6 ,7 9 9
5,358
3,999
3,181

$6,3 3 3
5,5 3 9
5 ,586
5 ,902
5 ,648
6,660
6,426
6,8 0 9
7,3 9 6
6,5 9 7
6,5 4 5
6,631
5,5 7 6
4,4 2 3
5,509
5 ,543
4,8 3 6
3 ,432
5 ,678
3,124
6 ,9 9 3
7,201
5,1 8 7
5 ,203
3,934

$6,159
4 ,4 1 6
6 ,1 4 0
5 ,166
5,3 3 3
7,1 4 2
3,999
6,403
6 ,1 6 6
6,107
6,222
6,3 9 2
5,249
5 ,653
4,949
5,2 9 1
4 ,2 9 5
4 ,3 7 4
6,508
3,944
6,525
7,798
5 ,687
5 ,4 6 4
3 ,8 9 9

$7,008
5 ,858
6 ,228
6 ,5 4 9
6,444
7,2 1 7
6 ,972
6,9 4 4
7,691
6,687
6,8 8 0
7,1 8 4
6 ,120
6,4 0 6
6 ,187
5,8 4 9
5,0 7 9
4,643
6 ,852
4,801
7,218
8 ,013
6 ,736
6 ,445
4,708

$6,984
5,571
6 ,607
6,208
6,068
7 ,223
6 ,749
6 ,947
7,153
6 ,667
6 ,813
7,204
6,605
6,9 2 5
6,124
5,4 8 9
4 ,898
4,821
7 ,390
4 ,976
6 ,888
7,897
7,211
6,7 4 9
4 ,718

$6,974
4,1 4 2
5,2 4 3
5 ,249
4,7 8 1
4,749
5,8 0 5
6,3 9 9
5 ,392
5 ,555
5 ,687
5,999
4,599
5 ,249
4,937
5,031
4,549
3,3 1 2
6 ,307
4,4 3 5
6 ,4 1 8
7,489
6,3 4 9
4,624
3,6 8 3

$7,119
6 ,458
6,364
6,8 1 2
6,738
7,2 3 2
7,201
7 ,2 4 9
8 ,265
7 ,172
7,0 8 6
7,239
6,194
5,5 6 6
6,499
6,183
5,6 6 3
4,640
6,4 4 4
4,419

$6,892
5,562
6 ,944
6 ,374
6 ,249
7,499
5,583
6,999
7,749
6,642
7,437
7,527
6,522
6,573
6,499
5,8 7 4
5,041
5,218
7,646
5,236

7 ,457
7,7 4 3
6 ,062
6 ,0 8 3
5,031

6,846
8,4 8 3
7,159
6 ,499
5,833

TRANSPORTATION 1.................................................................................

6,1 7 5

6,120

4,5 0 3

6 ,645

5 ,767

6,840

6 ,924

5,8 4 9

6,9 4 9

7,185

6,822
6,5 1 5
2,927
5,765
6 ,650

-

-

-

4,974
1,883
4 ,557
6 ,587

6,964
6 ,791
3,961
7 ,016
7 ,083

_

7 ,107
2,8 6 6
6,301
6 ,8 5 4

6 ,823
6 ,227
4,156
6,504
6,568

_

7 ,313
3 ,670
7,1 9 0
7,286

5,5 7 1
2,999
5 ,970
6 ,934

6 ,965
6,4 8 4
5,4 6 8
7,550
6,949

6,572
3 ,964
7 ,742
7,041

RAILROADS 1.........................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .......................
TAXICABS ............................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE .......................
AIR TRANSPORTATION ................................................................

6 ,0 9 3
2,624
6,203
6 ,531

-

COMMUNICATION ........................................................

4,918

5 ,261

4 ,4 8 4

4 ,902

5,1 3 9

5 ,703

6,104

5 ,127

5,7 3 3

5,921

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .......................
RADIO ANO TELEVISION BROADCASTING

4 ,840
5,270

5,134
6,524

4 ,4 7 4
4,386

4,7 7 7
5,3 9 9

5 ,081
5,374

5,525
6 ,782

5 ,787
7 ,749

5,009
5 ,681

5 ,561
6,8 1 2

5,716
7,535

6,836

7 ,539

5,8 9 3

7,3 1 3

6,999

7,369

7,9 3 9

6,505

7,6 8 3

7,516

PUBLIC UTILITIES

......................................................................

4,7 6 8

5,347

3 ,992

5,061

4 ,9 0 1

6,144

6,499

5,242

6 ,4 3 5

6,5 9 6

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS . .
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS .......................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ..............................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...............

5,004
5,741
4,0 4 0
3,816
5,278
5,008
5,833

5,466
5 ,937
4,4 6 6
4 ,878
5 ,802
5 ,184
6,1 8 7

4,436
5,178
3,3 5 7
3,289
4 ,5 8 3
4 ,5 2 4
5,3 1 0

5 ,335
5 ,916
3,3 7 4
4,724
5 ,383
4,999
6,0 1 3

5,0 4 6
6,269
3,449
2*459
5,2 2 2
5*583
5 ,8 8 9

5 ,994
6 ,673
5,2 2 3
5,721
6 ,4 1 4
6,041
6,746

6,288
6,711
5,662
6,292
6,641
6,4 0 6
7 ,011

5 ,255
6 ,093
4 ,666
4 ,7 4 9
5 ,8 5 4
5,2 7 0
6,315

6 ,3 4 2
6 ,8 6 3
4 ,4 1 6
6 ,4 7 6
6,531
6 ,468
6 ,841

6 , 2 2<j
6,861
5,166
6,3 1 5
6,2 7 4
6 ,556
6,924

wholesale

t ra de

S ee fo o tn o te at end o f ta b le .




T a b l e B- 5 .

M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in four q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y a n d regi o n of m a j o r earnings, 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d

INDUSTRY
UNITED
STATES
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

EARNINGS OF WORKERS W
HO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
AN Y
Q U A R TE R
NORTH
NORTH­
NORTH
NORTH­
UNITED
SCUTH
CENTRAL
EAST
WEST
STATES
EAST
SOUTH
CENTRAL

WEST

CONTINUED

RETAIL TRADE ...........................................................................................................

$ 1,564

$1,813

$1,408

$1,506

$1,713

$3,391

$3,654

$3,029

$3,345

$3,954

DEPARTMENT STORES ........................................................................................
m a i l order h o u s e s ........................................................................................
VARIETY S T O R E S ...............................................................................................
GROCERY STORES ................................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ............................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS .........................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ..........................................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ..........................................................................
SHOE STORES ..................................................................... ..................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ....................................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ..........................................
FUEL AND ICE DE A LE R S....................... .. ......................................................

1 ,546
2 ,565
1,011
1 ,979
4 ,671
1,892
1,373
1,315
1 ,667
3,180
1 ,440
4 ,211

1 ,468
2,1 4 4
1 ,274
2,0 9 0
4,976
2,6 1 3
1,780
1,437
2,181
3 ,4 7 4
1,5 2 2
5,0 6 9

1,537
2 ,5 9 9
773
1 ,683
3,8 7 3
1,6 4 4
1 ,254
1,086
1,2 9 6
2,987
1,330
3,1 9 6

1,511
2,6 6 6
1,1 5 4
1,903
4 ,971
1,826
1,197
1,407
1,689
3 ,340
1,318
4 ,299

1,766
2 ,749
903
2 ,823
5,3 5 0
1,616
1,2 5 7
1,464
1,687
3,0 8 3
1,975
4,187

3,160
4,229
2 ,609
4 ,031
5 ,760
3,931
2 ,778
2,7 4 0
3 ,609
4,756
2,8 7 3
5,147

3,134
3,791
2,714
4 ,512
5,927
4,474
3,004
2,921
4,0 1 9
4 ,82^
2 ,782
5 ,720

3,008
3 ,999
2 ,457
3 ,369
4,974
2,9 7 9
2 ,538
2,6 1 0
3,249
4,2 0 8
2,6 2 4
4,1 3 6

3 ,044
4 ,383
2,599
3,743
6 ,0 5 4
4,0 2 2
2,698
2,660
3,781
5,166
2,849
5,173

3 ,636
4 ,349
2,851
5,786
6 ,594
4 ,449
3,041
3,0 9 3
3 ,958
5,6 6 6
3,930
5,374

AND REAL ESTATE .............................................

3 ,889

*♦,305

3,526

3 ,767

3 ,976

4,824

5,1 3 0

4,415

4,7 4 2

5,015

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ..........................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS .......................................................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ..........................................................
LIFE INSURANCE.................... .. .........................................................................
FI R E, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE .....................................

3,895
4 ,1 6 3
3 ,717
4,622
4,332

4 ,2 3 3
3,9 2 8
3 ,777
4,914
4 ,446

3 ,6 5 0
4,0 6 6
3,5 7 4
4,466
4,095

3,6 7 6
3 ,987
3,7 2 7
4,553
4,188

4,099
4,729
3,9 1 6
4,419
4,699

4 ,489
4,789
4 ,599
5 ,558
5 ,238

4,874
4,6 7 8
4,5 5 3
5 ,669
5 ,257

4,121
4,583
4,572
5 ,483
5,0 9 6

4,3 4 2
4,4 0 6
4 ,769
5 ,586
5,0 9 4

4,709
5,388
4 ,624
5,296
5,636

2 ,066

2,635

1 ,608

2,032

2 ,2 8 0

3,832

4*446

3,056

3 ,716

4,4 3 5

1 ,209
1,859
769
2 ,550

1 ,344
2 ,395
1 ,249
3 ,143

1,011
1,506
627
2,1 2 9

1,166
1,949
51 2
2,3 9 6

1,4 1 7
2 ,083
927
2 ,783

2 ,638
2,831
2,5 4 1
3,4 2 7

3,0 4 7
3 ,206
4,0 4 1
4,1 5 2

2,112
2,278
1,615
2,872

2,4 1 9
2 ,917
1,857
3,210

3,215
3 ,320
3,666
3,830

FINANCE*

INSURANCE*

SERVICES ................................................................................... ............................ . .
HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MO TEL S..............................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ...........................................
MOTION PICTURES ..............................................................................................
HOSPITALS ............................................. ...............................................................

1 F o r pu rp oses of this study, and because inform ation about their actual place of em ploym ent was not available in the file s
organizations co v ered by the R ailroad R etirem ent A ct w ere con sid ered to have been em ployed in the N orth C entral R egion.
NOTE:

A d a s h ( - ) i n d i c a t e s e i t h e r t h e s a m p l e d i d n o t in c lu d e a n y w o r k e r s w it h t h e s e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ,




studied, em ploy ees of railroad s and railroad related

o r th a t th e d a ta d id n o t m e e t th e B u r e a u 's p u b l ic a t i o n c r i t e r i a .

T a b l e B-6.

Median

a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d s a l a r y e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d

in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e g i o n of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 7

EAR IN S O W R ER WO W R E IN A Y WG A D SALARY EM LO M T D R G
N G F OK S H OKD
N AE N
P Y EN U IN
WEST

UNITED
STATES

F O U R
NORTH­
EAST

Q U A R T E R S
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL

$ 3,754

$5,372

$ 5,690

$4,452

$6,032

$6,026

6 , 24 3

6 ,430

7,111

7 ,034

7 ,017

7 ,074

7,479

7 ,032
4,7 4 9

6 , 562
3,749

7 ,566
5,6 2 4

7,631
6 ,683

6 ,833
5 ,499

7,671
6,5 2 6

6,937
6,178

7,821
7,916

5 ,840

3 ,532

5 ,764

5 ,965

6,8 5 1

7 ,593

5,3 7 2

7,842

8,003

5,049
6,6 8 7
7,095
3 ,874
7,111
5,269
5 ,023
5,062
4,9 9 9

3 ,728
3 ,7 5 4
4 ,5 4 8
2 ,487
5 ,374
2 ,557
2 ,359
3,1 1 6
2,3 4 9

4 , 838
5,419
7,4 7 9
4,681
8 , 357
5,766
4,9 9 9
4,974
4 , 357

5 ,880
6,5 6 8
7,802
5 ,374
8,6 2 4
4,785
4,4 4 9
4,8 4 9
3 ,999

5 ,930
7,5 8 5
8 ,080
5 ,957
8,959
6,2 3 7
6 ,387
6 ,360
5 ,715

7,294
8,671
8 ,468
5 ,888
9,031
6,903
6,7 4 9
6,8 3 3
7,1 2 4

4,8 6 3
6,1 8 9
6,2 0 5
4,779
7,2 0 3
4,4 9 9
4 ,4 7 4
4,7 4 9
4,374

6,857
8,0 1 0
9,1 6 4
6,9 9 9
9,808
7,349
7,312
7,113
6 ,874

7,381
8,905
9,161
7 ,624
9,999
7,194
7,2 4 9
7,291
6 ,249

UNITED
STATES

AN Y
NORTH­
EAST

Q U A R TER
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL

$3,615

$4,066

$2,977

$4,148

MINING ..............................................................................................

6,283

6,6 0 1

6,1 1 6

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
GAS LIQUIOS ......................................................................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ..................................

7,0844,884-

6 ,249
4,249

4,754
4,348
5,102
6,4 2 6
3,677
6,9 1 6
3,9 7 0
3,8 0 8
4,131
3,729

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION............................ ..
HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ....................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ..........................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING . . . .
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING _____
ELECTRICAL WORK ............................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ............
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING .....................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK............................
CONCRETE WORK ......................................................................
MANUFACTURING.......................................... ................................
AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ...............
MEAT PRODUCTS ............................................................ ..
DAIRY PRODUCTS ...................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS .....................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS .....................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ............................................... ................
BEVERAGES .................................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ................................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ....................................
KNITTING MILLS ...................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ....................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ...............................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ..........................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS . . .
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ...................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ............................ ..
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS .
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE .................................................. ..
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ...................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ....................
NEWSPAPERS.................... ........................................................ .
COMMERCIAL P R I N T I N G .............. ......................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ..................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ...............
DRUGS ...........................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS .................
PETROLEUM REFINING ........................................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ..........................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN . .
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS .
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ....................................... .




WEST

4,969

5,0 0 9

3 ,928

5 ,773

5,566

6 , 160

6 ,113

4 ,905

6,6 5 0

6 ,766

6,642
4,241
5,259
1,267
5,4 1 8
4,959
5,3 3 9
3,9 7 6
3,994
2,961
3,3 5 7
3,5 5 7
2,625
2,716
2,5 6 9
2,618
3,075
4,159
3,538
6,7 2 2
4,9 3 4
5,153
5,291
7,632
6,390
6,153
5,243
8,246
7,172
4,691
2,990
5,197
5,101
7,200
6,151

5,812
4 ,8 9 5
5,3 7 4
2 ,197
5,4 4 9
5,307
6,211
3,519
3,924
3,065
3 ,176
3,985
2,943
2 ,795
2,743
2,755
2 ,749
4,249
3 ,836
6,585
4 ,499
6,1 0 5
5,532
7,7 4 3
6,2 3 7
6,4 6 9
4,683
8,363
6,812
4 ,812
3,033
5,337
5,968
7,217
5,9 2 4

6 ,0 9 9
3 ,0 4 4
4 ,757
1,168
4,1 2 4
4,5 3 2
4,211
3,9 9 6
4,009
2,9 6 4
3 ,425
3,0 0 9
2,5 7 5
2,5 1 6
2,688
2,5 5 4
2 ,434
3 ,120
3 ,312
6 ,711
4,604
4,4 5 2
4,489
7,658
6,4 9 0
4,1 8 7
5 ,166
8 ,255
6 ,9 9 9
3,791
2,922
4 ,9 9 9
4,091
6,914
5 ,4 7 0

5 , 192
5 ,882
5,267
1,014
6 ,057
4 ,931
5 ,956
2 , 74 9

6,734
4 ,642
6 ,608
1,214
6,1 4 9
5,6 6 6
6,359
1,499
5 ,749
2 ,666
49 9
2,916
2,583
2,5 8 3
2 ,874
1,499
5,337
5,661
4,285
6,866
5,8 8 8
5 ,357
6,093
6,888
5,7 4 9
4 ,499
6 ,333
8 ,079
6 ,888
5 ,499
2,749
4 ,874
6,5 6 2
7,367
5 ,499

7 ,200
5,970
6,407
4 ,354
6,5 3 2
6,046
6 ,5 4 6
4 ,313
4,4 0 0
3 ,453
3 ,780
4,1 6 6
3 ,076
3 ,213
3 ,109
3,085
4,4 7 4
5 ,369
4 ,286
7 ,175
5,897
6 ,762
6 ,769
8 ,069
6,8 4 2
6 ,728
6 ,643
8,5 3 8
7,5 0 9
5,5 4 2
3,595
5 ,784
6 ,253
7 ,585
6 ,606

6 ,8 7 4
5,9 4 2
6,526
5 ,062
6,416
6,3 6 2
7,2 7 4
4 ,5 4 9
4,499
3 ,696
3,657
4 ,537
3,3 9 4
3,284
3,3 2 0
3,181
3,8 1 8
5,2 4 9
4,7 8 4
6,906
5,592
7,2 6 3
6,990
8,275
6,8 1 2
6,9 8 6
6 ,083
9 ,142
6,968
5 ,467
3 ,675
5 ,943
6 ,9 5 4
7,5 2 3
6 ,262

6,6 8 5
4 ,007
5,587
3,222
4,9 9 9
5,391
5,447
4,3 0 6
4,381
3 ,356
3 ,820
3,4 2 7
2 ,986
2,9 3 2
3,143
2 ,959
3 ,2 2 4
3 ,799
3,807
7 ,139
5 ,499
6 ,015
5,443
7,977
6 ,8 1 9
4 ,999
6 ,583
8,4 6 4
7,2 9 9
4,374
3,4 2 4
5,328
4 ,883
7 ,306
5 ,920

6 ,343
7 ,112
6 ,493
4,8 3 3
6,887
6,108
6 ,949
8,499

7,517
6,714
7,423
4,708
7,599
6 ,946
7,249
3,9 9 9
5,7 4 9
3,583

_

2,9 5 8
1,999
3,6 7 3
2,702
3,065
2 ,843
2, 74 9
2,624
4 , 392
4 ,0 3 2
6 ,937
5,2 7 2
4,972
5,441
7 ,646
6 , 149
6 ,406
5 , 805
8 , 374
7,407
4 ,965
3,210
5 , 289
5,899
7 , 285
6,491

-

3 ,607
2,9 1 6
4,1 9 9
3,138
3,507
3,499
3 ,099
3,968
5 ,235
5,007
7,357
6,121
6 ,749
6,937
8,137
6 ,874
6 ,874
7 ,124
8,607
7,740
5,8 5 6
3,7 9 1
5,9 6 4
6,8 4 3
7,7 2 3
6,922

-

3,999
3,4 1 0
3,487
3,416
3,249
6,175
6,535
5,687
7,5 5 8
6,642
7,374
7,892
7,818
7,499
6,583
7,499
8,326
7,124
6,531
3,399
6,3 3 3
7,624
7,749
6,499

T a b l e B-6 .

M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in four q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e g i o n of m a j o r earnings, 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d

I NDUSTRY
UNITED
STATES
PRIVATE

NQNAGRICUL TLRAL

MANUFACTURING -

ECCNOMY -

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
NORTH­
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
WEST

ANY

WAGE

AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
NORTH
NORTH­
SOUTH
CENTRAL
EAST

UNITED
STATES

WEST

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ............................................. ..............
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ....................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ...........................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS. BOLTS, ETC ................................................
METAL STAMPINGS ..........................................................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ...........................................................................................
FARM MACHINERY ................................................................................... .. ................. . .
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ................................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ..................................................................................
S PECI AL INDUSTRY MACHINERY .........................................................................
GENERAL I ND US T R I AL M A C H I N E R Y ................ .. ...............................................
OFFI CE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ................ .. ............................................
SERVI CE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...........................................................................
ELECTRI C TEST AND D I S T R I B U T I N G EQUIPMENT ...............................
ELECTRI CAL I N DUS TR IA L APPARATUS ..........................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLI ANCES ...........................................................................................
ELECTRI C L I G HT I NG AND WI RI NG EQUIPMENT ....................................
RADIO AND TV RE CE IV ING EQUIPMENT .............................................. ..
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ......................... ........................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES .......................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ..................................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS .................................................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ...........................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ...............................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ..............................................................................................

$ 6 ,358
5,1 2 8
5,6 53
5 ,6 8 2
5 ,4 91
6,8 1 9
6,2 2 6
6,5 9 5
6,9 31
6 ,2 8 3
6 ,2 41
6,6 3 6
5,4 82
5,6 73
5 ,4 61
5,3 05
4 ,4 8 7
3 ,4 1 0
6,3 8 2
4 ,1 0 5
6,7 9 4
7 ,2 8 3
5 ,8 3 1
5,7 04
3,6 0 2

$ 6 ,3 1 8
5 ,1 3 0
6 ,1 0 6
5,6 3 3
5 ,2 7 9
7 ,2 6 1
6 ,8 9 9
6 ,3 0 5
6 ,5 7 1
6 ,4 7 9
6 ,2 3 7
6 ,6 6 6
6 ,0 8 9
6,6 6 1
5 ,8 7 4
5,0 2 7
4,3 0 1
3 ,6 3 3
6 ,9 0 4
4 ,3 0 9
6 ,5 8 9
7,3 5 7
6 ,6 5 3
6,3 1 8
3 ,5 6 8

$ 6 ,5 1 9
3 ,8 5 4
4 ,7 4 9
5 ,0 4 9
4 ,3 6 5
4 ,7 4 9
4 ,6 9 9
6 ,1 7 0
4 ,8 5 7
4 ,9 0 9
5 ,2 4 9
5 ,6 6 6
4 ,4 3 3
4 ,7 4 9
4 ,2 4 9
4,4 3 1
3 ,8 4 6
2 ,3 3 3
6 ,0 2 9
4 ,1 6 4
5 ,6 5 5
7 ,1 1 3
5 ,5 5 3
4 ,2 4 9
3,1 9 2

$ 6 ,3 4 8
5 ,5 4 4
5 , 863
5,9 21
5, 886
6 , 723
6 ,4 5 0
6 , 795
7,5 3 5
6,6 3 5
6 ,4 2 7
6 ,7 8 4
5,7 0 3
4 ,6 3 7
5, 738
5 ,7 3 5
5 ,0 1 3
3,4 3 8
5,9 7 0
3 ,4 0 6
6 ,9 9 4
7 , 287
4 ,9 9 9
5 ,3 0 3
3 , 871

$6 ,3 4 9
5 ,0 6 8
6,4 2 1
5 ,2 4 9
4 ,9 9 9
6 ,1 2 4
4 ,7 4 9
6 ,5 5 5
6 ,4 9 9
6,2 9 1
6 ,3 1 2
6 ,7 0 4
5 ,2 4 9
5,6 8 1
5 ,3 9 9
5,5 6 2
4 ,6 0 4
4 ,3 4 3
6 ,4 1 9
4 ,4 7 9
6 ,2 3 4
7,3 0 3
5 ,6 9 9
5 ,4 9 9
3 ,3 7 4

$ 6 ,7 7 9
6 ,0 1 7
6 ,4 8 1
6 ,6 2 2
6 ,5 4 2
7 ,2 3 5
6 ,9 5 7
6 ,9 1 9
7 ,7 5 4
6 ,7 7 7
6 ,6 9 3
7 ,5 1 8
6 ,1 7 7
6 ,5 5 8
6 ,2 6 9
5 ,9 9 3
5 ,1 8 5
4 ,4 4 0
7 ,1 4 6
4 ,9 5 7
7 ,1 7 7
7 ,8 4 2
6 ,7 0 5
6 ,3 5 2
4 ,9 4 5

$6 ,7 4 4
5 ,7 8 5
6,7 6 1
6 ,2 3 3
6 ,2 0 2
7 ,4 8 7
7,2 4 9
6 ,6 2 9
7 ,2 6 9
6 ,8 2 5
6,6 6 7
7,5 1 7
6 ,6 7 0
7,1 9 4
6 ,5 4 1
5,6 9 9
4 ,9 9 9
4 ,8 8 3
7,6 61
5 , 177
6 ,8 2 8
7 ,8 4 0
7 ,1 7 0
6 ,6 2 8
5 ,1 8 7

$ 6 ,7 7 4
4 ,3 0 5
5,5 6 5
5,4 3 7
4 ,9 9 9
6 ,7 4 9
5 ,4 9 9
6 ,5 5 9
5,3 3 3
5,7 9 5
5,9 9 9
6 ,5 8 3
4 ,7 4 9
5 ,1 5 6
4 ,5 6 9
5,2 2 1
4 ,5 6 6
3 ,6 3 4
6,6 7 3
4 ,7 4 9
6 ,3 6 8
7,6 2 2
6 ,4 8 4
5 ,2 4 9
3,9 26

$6 ,833
6,5 3 6
6,6 0 4
6,7 7 9
6 ,7 1 7
7,1 5 6
7,1 1 0
7 ,1 9 0
8 ,1 7 9
7,1 2 0
6 ,7 4 3
7,5 1 0
6 ,2 5 7
5,6 6 6
6 ,5 2 6
6 ,3 6 4
5,7 4 9
4 ,3 3 5
6 ,6 7 9
4 ,3 6 5
7,3 91
7 ,7 11
6,0 8 3
6 ,1 7 3
4,9 5 2

$ 6 ,803
6,0 7 6
7,3 86
7,1 2 4
6 ,4 1 6
6,4 9 9
6,2 4 9
7,0 99
7 ,7 9 1
6,7 4 9
7 ,3 7 4
7,9 4 4
6,3 3 3
6,6 02
6 ,3 7 4
5 ,9 9 9
5,1 9 4
5 ,9 1 6
7,5 7 6
5,4 86
6,6 6 6
8,0 49
6 ,8 7 4
6 ,1 9 9
6,1 87

TRANSPORTATION1 ...................................................................................................................

6,4 9 3

6 ,3 5 0

4 ,7 1 0

7 ,0 2 4

6,1 4 7

7,1 8 5

7,3 0 5

6,1 4 8

7,2 9 1

7,7 58

RAI LROADS1 .............................................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ...................................................
TAXICABS ................................................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ...................................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION .................................................................................................

7 ,1 5 0
6,8 43
2,9 7 9
6,0 5 2
7,2 05

7 ,5 2 2
2 ,8 0 7
6 ,4 4 1
7 ,4 1 6

5 ,2 8 8
1,6 7 1
4 ,6 8 0
7 ,1 3 5

7 , 151
6 , 333
4 ,2 2 7
6 ,8 2 3
7,0 2 6

5 ,9 9 9
3 ,1 6 6
6 ,6 6 0
7 , 102

7 ,3 0 8
7,2 7 5
4 , 176
7,3 1 2
7 ,8 1 0

7 ,8 5 7
3,7 7 0
7,4 7 7
7 ,8 6 9

5 ,6 2 4
3 ,0 4 9
6 ,2 5 3
7 ,7 3 8

7,3 0 9
6,8 3 3
5,5 1 6
7 ,8 2 4
7 ,7 3 6

6 ,9 9 9
4 ,5 1 6
8,2 3 8
7,8 0 9

............................................ .. ...............

5,1 3 3

5 ,4 3 7

4 ,7 0 3

5 , 146

5 ,4 0 4

5 ,8 1 0

6 ,3 4 7

5,2 7 2

5 ,8 6 0

6,0 3 4

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .........................
RADIO AND TEL E V ISI ON BROADCASTING

5,0 5 6
5,4 3 3

5 ,3 3 0
6 ,3 7 4

4 ,6 3 3
4 ,7 7 4

5, 074
5,3 61

5 ,3 4 7
5 ,7 4 9

5,6 4 1
7 ,0 8 3

5 ,9 6 7
8,5 6 2

5,1 4 1
5 ,9 4 4

5 ,7 0 9
6,8 7 4

5,8 37
7,7 1 4

7 ,1 0 9

7 ,8 5 2

6 ,2 8 1

7 ,5 1 4

7 ,3 3 4

7 ,6 5 6

8 ,3 5 2

6,7 4 6

7 ,9 0 0

7,9 5 9

.............................................................................

4 ,9 8 1

5,5 1 2

4 ,3 1 5

5 ,2 4 0

5 ,0 9 0

6,4 1 1

6,6 5 8

5 ,5 4 7

6 ,5 9 1

6,7 9 8

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND- ALLIED PRODUCTS . .
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .....................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS .........................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ....................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ................

5,1 38
6,0 2 4
4 ,3 5 9
4 , 12 2
5 ,3 81
5,1 5 2
5,9 7 0

5,5 5 2
6 ,2 3 7
4 ,7 4 9
5 ,3 6 4
5 ,8 1 9
5,3 6 6
6 ,2 7 4

4 ,5 6 4
5 ,6 2 4
3 ,8 4 6
3,5 1 2
4 ,8 6 9
4 ,5 3 8
5 ,5 7 8

5,6 5 1
5,9 4 1
3,9 9 9
5 ,0 5 8
5 , 214
5,0 9 0
6,0 4 9

5 ,1 4 2
6 ,3 5 2
4 ,0 8 3
2,6 4 6
5 ,6 5 6
5 ,7 4 9
6 ,0 9 5

6 ,2 0 7
6 ,8 2 2
5,7 3 1
6 ,0 5 4
6 ,5 6 1
6 ,2 7 1
6 ,9 1 0

6 ,4 3 7
7,2 3 8
6 ,2 4 9
6 ,5 3 4
6,7 9 7
6 ,6 1 3
7 ,2 3 2

5,3 2 3
6 ,3 9 0
4 ,6 6 6
5,0 8 7
5 ,6 3 3
5,6 3 3
6 ,5 3 0

6 ,6 3 2
6 ,7 1 2
5 ,1 2 4
6,6 8 1
6,5 4 5
6 ,2 7 4
7,0 4 2

6,4 9 9
7,1 36
6 ,2 4 9
6 ,7 2 1
6 ,7 4 9
6,6 5 2
7,0 3 8

COMMUNICATION

PUBLIC

UTILITIES

WHOLESALE TRADE

See footnote at end of table




T a b l e B-6.

M e d i a n a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in f o u r q u a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e g i o n of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d

INDUSTRY
UNITED
STATES
PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

-

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
F O U R
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH­
NORTH
NORTH­
STATES
EAST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
WEST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
EAST

WEST

CONTINUED

...........................................................................................................................

S I , 629

$1 ,8 3 9

$ 1 ,5 1 7

$1 ,5 6 8

$1 ,7 5 8

$ 3 ,4 8 9

$ 3 ,7 5 4

$3 ,173

$ 3 ,4 1 4

$4 ,0 1 6

.....................................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES .....................................................................................................
VARIETY STORES ..............................................................................................................
GROCERY STORES ..............................................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS .........................................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS ' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS ..............................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ...................................................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ......................................................................................
SHOE STORES ........................................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ........................................... ..................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES .................................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ............................................................................................

1 ,7 19
2 ,6 07
1,1 5 3
2,0 6 9
A, 887
2,0 1 1
1,4 5 1
1 ,3 9 3
1 ,7 8 8
3 ,1 8 8
1,5 20
4 ,4 74

1,6 43
2 ,2 7 4
1 ,2 61
2 ,0 4 2
5,2 91
2 ,6 6 6
1,7 2 6
1,4 67
2 ,1 0 4
3 ,5 4 5
1,5 5 8
5,2 4 9

1,6 8 7
2 ,4 6 4
943
1,8 51
4 ,1 5 6
1 ,6 9 4
1,3 7 0
1 ,2 2 9
1,4 2 8
3 ,0 2 2
1,4 6 9
3 ,3 2 6

1.7 11
2 ,7 1 2
1, 324
1,9 8 7
5 ,1 6 7
1,6 81
1, 307
1,4 9 9
1 ,7 4 9
3 ,2 4 9
1, 365
4 ,6 0 7

1,9 18
2,9 2 8
1,1 0 4
2 ,9 5 8
5,4 6 8
2 ,1 5 6
1,4 1 1
1,5 2 7
1 ,9 1 6
3 ,4 2 4
2 ,1 3 6
5,0 6 2

3 ,3 0 4
4 ,2 4 2
2,8 3 1
4 ,0 9 0
6 ,0 5 8
3 ,9 0 8
2 ,9 4 0
2 ,8 7 5
3 ,5 3 4
4 ,8 2 8
3,0 0 8
5 ,4 5 7

3 ,3 0 6
4 ,2 8 5
2,9 6 3
4 ,3 4 3
6 ,2 6 7
4 ,4 1 0
3 ,2 2 7
2,9 4 1
4 ,0 4 9
4 ,9 9 9
2 ,8 5 8
6 ,1 5 6

3,2 0 8
4 ,0 7 4
2 ,6 5 3
3 ,5 0 4
5 ,1 9 0
3 ,3 3 3
2 ,6 7 3
2,7 71
3 ,2 3 0
4 ,3 5 4
2 ,7 8 8
4 ,3 7 4

3 ,1 8 4
4 ,2 1 9
2 ,8 0 7
3,7 1 3
6,3 2 5
3 ,8 9 2
2 ,8 2 1
2,8 2 9
3 ,3 4 6
5,0 2 9
2 ,9 0 8
5 ,4 2 8

3,6 8 4
4,4 9 9
3 ,0 8 3
5,8 2 7
6 ,9 3 5
4 ,3 9 9
3,1 5 9
3,3 88
3,7 4 9
5 ,7 0 8
4 ,0 6 2
5,7 4 9

RETAIL

TRADE

department

stores

....................................................

4,0 4 7

4 ,4 7 9

3 ,7 1 3

3 ,9 7 7

4 ,0 8 0

5 ,0 4 3

5 ,3 9 6

4 ,6 1 0

4 ,9 1 5

5 ,2 3 2

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN A SSO CIA TIO NS .................................................................
PERSONAL CREDIT IN ST IT U TI ON S ....................................................................
LIFE INSURANCE ...............................................................................................................
FI RE * MARINE, AND CASUALTY I N S U R A N C E ...................... ....................

4 ,0 43
4 ,2 9 2
3,8 28
4,7 4 9
4 ,5 3 4

4 ,4 0 6
4 ,2 7 2
3,7 6 3
4 ,9 1 7
4,6 1 9

3 ,8 0 6
4 ,1 1 2
3 ,8 2 1
4 ,8 0 6
4 ,3 2 2

3 ,9 0 2
4 , 224
3,8 3 3
4 ,6 2 4
4 ,4 0 6

4 ,1 5 4
4 ,7 2 9
4,0 3 1
4 ,5 0 9
4 ,8 5 8

4 ,6 8 0
4 ,9 6 8
4 ,8 4 3
5 ,8 7 5
5,4 9 1

5 ,0 7 9
4 ,7 4 9
4 ,6 7 8
6 ,0 4 5
5 ,4 9 9

4 ,2 6 5
4 ,7 2 2
4 ,8 5 8
5 ,8 4 2
5 ,4 5 3

4 ,5 1 4
4 ,7 4 9
4 ,9 2 4
5,8 7 8
5,3 5 3

4 ,8 7 0
5 ,5 8 9
4 ,9 9 9
5 ,5 3 3
5,8 33

.......................................................................................................................................

2,2 0 3

2,8 3 7

1 ,7 7 7

2 , 198

2 ,4 8 7

4 ,0 6 7

4 ,6 9 9

3 ,2 9 4

3 ,9 3 8

4 ,6 6 4

H O T E L S , TOURI ST S COUR TS , AND MOTELS ..............................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ....................................................
MOTION P I C T U R E S ...........................................................................................................
h ospitals
..............................................................................................................................

1,2 88
2 ,0 53
784
2 ,9 02

1,4 1 7
2 ,4 9 6
1,3 3 3
3,4 5 3

1 ,1 6 7
1 ,8 1 6
627
2 ,4 6 0

1 ,2 1 3
2 ,0 5 9
545
2 ,7 8 5

1,3 6 6
2,3 3 7
1 ,0 6 5
3,2 9 8

2 ,7 2 9
2 ,9 8 8
2 ,6 3 0
3 ,7 7 3

3,1 7 1
3 ,3 7 7
3,7 4 9
4 ,5 3 5

2 ,3 1 4
2 ,4 7 4
1,7 38
3 ,1 5 4

2,5 3 7
3 ,0 6 2
1,8 12
3 ,5 4 9

3 ,4 1 0
3,4 60
4 ,2 4 9
4,2 6 3

FINANCE*

SE RV IC ES

INSURANCE*

AND REAL

ESTATE

1 F o r p u r p o s e s o f th is s tu d y , and b e c a u s e in fo r m a t io n ab ou t th e ir a c tu a l p l a c e o f e m p lo y m e n t w a s n o t a v a ila b le in the f i l e s
o r g a n i z a t io n s c o v e r e d b y the R a il r o a d R e t i r e m e n t A c t w e r e c o n s i d e r e d to h a v e b e e n e m p l o y e d in the N o rth C e n tr a l R e g io n .
NOTE:

s tu d ie d , e m p l o y e e s o f r a i l r o a d s

1

and r a i l r o a d r e la te d

A dash ( -) indicates either the sam ple did not include any w orkers with these c h a r a c te r is tic s , or that the data did not m e e t the B u rea u s publication c r ite r ia .




T a b l e B-7. A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in four quarters
b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e g i o n of m a j o r e arnings, 1 9 6 6

UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
NORTH­
NORTH
SOUTH
WEST
CENTRAL
EAST

..............................................

$4 ,4 0 8

$ 4 ,7 8 4

$ 3 ,6 4 0

$ 4 ,738

$ 4 ,5 4 5

$6 ,001

$6 ,301

$5 ,0 6 6

$ 6 ,3 2 8

$6 ,499

M I N I N G .............................................................. .............................................................................

6 ,1 4 7

6 ,3 7 9

5,9 5 6

5 ,9 5 0

6 ,6 4 6

7,3 3 0

7,3 0 8

7 ,0 9 8

7 ,2 2 3

7,9 72

CRUDE PETROLEUM* NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
GAS L IQ UI DS ................................................................................................................
OIL AND GAS FIEL D SERVICES ........................................................................

7 ,2 4 7
5 ,1 5 5

6 ,8 2 5
8 ,7 1 3

7,2 5 1
4 ,9 7 1

5,4 5 8
4,1 3 5

7 ,8 9 2
5 ,9 3 0

8,2 21
6 ,7 6 6

7 ,4 7 5
10 ,0 5 7

8 ,2 5 9
6 ,5 1 8

6 ,5 4 0
5,9 6 2

8,5 47
7 ,6 32

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

ECONOMY

ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
UNITED
NORTH­
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
STATES
CENTRAL

WEST

..............................................................................................

5 ,1 5 2

5 ,9 3 4

4 ,0 0 9

5 ,8 1 2

6 ,0 2 5

7 ,0 0 5

7 ,6 7 1

5 ,6 7 6

7,7 1 7

8,0 4 9

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION .........................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC .................................................................................
PLUMBI NG, H E A T I N G , AI R C ON DI TI ONI NG ..............................................
P A I N T I N G , PAPER HANGI NG, D E C O R A T I N G ......................... .. .................
ELECTRICAL WORK ..........................................................................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND P L A S T E R I N G ............................ ....................
CARPENTERING AND F L O O R I N G .................................. .. ......................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL W O R K ..................................................................
CONCRETE WORK ................................................................................................................

4 ,6 8 0
5,6 7 8
6 ,2 9 0
4 ,0 7 9
6 ,9 0 1
4 ,3 7 6
4 ,3 0 8
4 ,8 3 4
4,2 3 9

5 ,8 8 9
6 ,7 8 9
6 ,6 6 0
4 ,3 7 3
7 ,2 2 6
5 ,2 2 5
4 ,6 9 7
5 ,1 3 0
5 ,0 5 7

3,8 6 5
4 ,4 4 7
4 ,8 0 2
3 ,0 6 6
5,7 61
3,1 1 2
2,9 5 4
3 ,8 1 5
3,0 0 9

4 ,8 6 7
5,9 4 9
7 ,2 1 2
4 ,7 3 5
7,7 7 7
5,2 71
5,1 1 3
5 ,5 5 4
4 ,8 1 9

5,8 9 1
6 ,9 5 8
7 ,2 9 2
4 ,7 1 0
7,5 6 1
5 ,0 9 7
5 ,1 5 1
5 ,4 4 3
4 ,5 8 7

6,3 2 3
7 ,7 1 9
7,9 2 3
5 ,8 5 6
8 ,6 0 9
6 ,0 1 3
6 ,2 0 4
6 ,5 0 5
5 ,9 4 3

7 ,7 7 7
8 ,7 7 4
8 ,1 8 8
5 ,7 6 5
8,9 1 0
6,7 8 3
6,6 2 8
7 ,0 1 6
6 ,6 6 9

5 ,2 3 0
6 ,3 2 4
6 ,3 4 0
4 ,7 2 4
7 ,3 3 3
4 ,5 2 0
4 ,5 2 5
5 ,2 9 2
4 ,4 8 6

6,8 7 5
8,0 7 3
8,6 93
6 ,7 7 9
9 ,3 9 1
6,9 5 7
6 ,9 3 8
7 ,3 2 7
6 ,7 4 0

7,7 80
8 ,9 73
9,1 53
6,8 10
9 ,5 8 4
6,8 00
7,1 32
6 ,8 6 0
6 ,3 6 2

MANUFACTURING

......................................................................................................................

5 ,3 6 8

5 ,4 7 3

4 ,4 1 2

5,8 8 0

5 ,7 4 4

6 ,6 4 5

6 ,6 9 1

5 ,5 1 8

7,1 5 5

7 ,4 55

A MMUNITI ON, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ...................................................
MEAT PRODUCTS .................................................................................................... ...
DAIRY PRODUCTS .............................................................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS .........................................................
GRAIN MILL PROOUCTS ................................................................... ..........................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .........................................................................................................
BEVERAGES ............................................................................................................................
weaving m i l l s ,
C O T T O N ............................ .................................................. ..
WEAVING M I L L S , SYNTHETICS ...........................................................................
K N I T T I N G M I L LS .............................................................................................................
YARN AND THREAD M I L L S ........................................................................................
M EN' S AND B O Y S ' S U I T S AND COATS .........................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* FURNISHINGS .................................................................. ...
WOMEN'S AND M I S S E S ' OUTERWEAR ...............................................................
WOMEN'S AND C HI LD RE N' S UNDERGARMENTS ...........................................
CH ILD REN 'S OUTERWEAR ...........................................................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ........................................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS .....................................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ............. ...............................................................................
PULP AND PAPER M I L L S ............................... ...................................... .. .................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND B O X E S .................................. ..
NEWSPAPERS ..........................................................................................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ..............................................................................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ...........................................................................................
P LA S TI C S MATERIALS AND S Y N T H E T I C S ..................... .............................
DRUGS ................................................................................................................................ ..
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET G O O D S ......................................................
PETROLEUM R E F I N I N G .................................. ..............................................................
T I R E S AND INNER T U B E S ........................................................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ........................................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ..................................................................................
GLASS AND GLAS SWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN ........................................
CONCRETE, GY PS UM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .....................................
BLAST FURNACE AND B A S I C STEEL P R O D U C T S ...................... ...
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ...............................................................................

7 ,3 9 0
4 ,6 0 5
5 ,2 0 8
2 ,4 2 8
5 ,4 6 7
4 ,8 0 3
5 ,3 5 6
4 ,1 1 1
4 ,1 0 4
3 ,1 5 2
3 ,4 2 1
4 , 161
2 ,5 2 2
3 ,0 7 3
2 ,6 3 8
2,6 9 1
3 ,4 9 7
4 ,4 2 7
3 ,7 6 8
6 ,6 0 2
4 ,9 3 1
5 ,4 0 8
5 ,9 4 7
7 ,9 9 6
6 ,8 7 6
7 ,1 2 0
5 ,7 7 4
8 ,2 5 8
7 ,6 7 8
4 ,9 3 8
3 , 136
5 ,3 4 6
5 ,3 2 6
7 ,3 2 5
6 ,1 2 9

6 ,1 1 2
5 ,1 2 5
5 ,3 4 5
3 ,2 1 7
5 ,2 6 2
5 ,0 5 4
6,0 1 3
3 ,7 4 5
4 ,3 0 7
3 ,4 5 6
3,3 5 1
4 ,6 4 7
3 ,1 4 8
3 ,2 5 5
3 ,0 7 7
3,0 0 2
2 ,7 0 5
4 ,3 4 2
3 ,9 3 7
6 ,5 8 3
4 ,9 0 7
6 ,1 0 2
6 , 146
8 ,7 6 3
6 ,8 4 5
7 ,4 3 1
5 ,3 8 8
8 ,8 9 8
7 ,0 7 4
4,8 7 3
3 ,2 2 3
5 ,7 9 7
6 ,2 3 7
7 ,4 9 5
6 ,4 1 0

7,5 1 1
3 ,2 3 9
4 ,8 1 2
1,9 7 2
3 ,8 4 2
4 ,3 2 2
4,5 3 7
4 ,1 3 5
4 ,0 4 3
2 ,9 7 2
3 ,4 7 7
3 ,3 7 5
2,3 2 7
2 ,3 2 4
2 ,4 4 0
2,3 9 2
2,6 3 0
3 ,1 0 6
3 ,3 7 0
6 ,5 1 2
4 ,5 4 6
4 ,7 8 6
5,0 5 2
7 ,6 3 7
7 ,0 5 1
5,0 2 6
5 ,5 0 7
7 ,9 2 9
7,3 0 5
4 ,0 2 0
2 ,7 9 9
4 ,8 1 5
4 ,3 0 0
6 ,9 1 2
5,1 9 6

5 ,8 5 7
5 ,5 8 8
5,0 8 5
2 ,5 2 2
6,2 2 6
4 ,6 7 3
5,7 6 9
2,4 1 2
2 ,3 7 2
3,3 8 2
2,4 5 0
4 ,0 3 4
2 ,4 9 8
3,5 5 4
2,7 6 7
2,2 5 8
2,8 21
4 ,6 1 7
4 ,2 8 0
6 ,8 2 2
5,0 3 3
5 ,3 8 5
6 ,1 6 4
7 ,7 4 4
5 ,9 6 5
7,7 61
6 ,1 6 8
8 ,3 6 2
7,8 6 0
5 ,1 7 6
3 ,4 4 6
5,3 4 8
5,6 2 8
7 ,2 7 5
6,3 6 5

7 ,6 1 9
4 ,6 9 2
6 ,0 6 5
2 ,3 6 5
5 ,7 3 5
5,5 8 6
5 ,7 1 3
1 ,4 2 9
4 ,0 0 3
3 ,3 9 1
800
3 ,2 9 1
2 ,5 9 3
3 ,2 6 2
2,8 2 2
1 ,5 1 4
4 ,9 1 2
5 ,3 8 5
4 ,4 4 1
6,2 5 1
5 ,4 3 7
5 ,3 1 0
6 ,1 4 7
6 ,9 4 7
7 ,1 2 2
4 ,8 3 3
6 ,4 6 6
7 ,7 6 8
7 ,7 5 5
5 ,9 5 4
2 ,4 2 8
5 ,0 2 3
6 ,3 4 1
7,5 5 1
5 ,6 6 9

8 ,5 7 1
6 ,0 1 6
6,4 3 1
4 ,9 9 7
6 ,7 0 0
5 ,9 4 4
6,6 6 4
4 ,8 4 5
4 ,8 4 9
3 ,9 8 6
4 ,1 5 2
5 ,0 6 2
3 ,3 9 8
3 ,9 7 8
3 ,5 6 5
3 ,5 4 7
4 ,6 9 9
5 ,6 3 3
4 ,9 0 2
7 ,4 6 4
6 ,0 9 6
6 ,7 7 7
7 ,3 8 5
8 ,7 6 7
7 ,7 4 3
8 ,1 4 8
7,3 3 3
9 ,0 1 5
8,4 3 1
5,9 71
4 ,0 1 8
6,2 0 0
6 ,5 0 2
8 ,1 4 4
6 ,9 9 8

6 ,8 0 3
6 ,3 2 6
6 ,4 8 0
5 ,5 9 6
6 ,3 9 9
6 ,1 6 1
7 ,3 6 6
4 ,8 3 4
5 ,4 3 8
4 ,4 3 2
4 ,2 4 5
5,4 5 6
4 ,0 7 4
4 ,1 2 1
4 ,0 8 4
3 ,8 0 5
4 ,0 4 0
5,6 21
5,1 4 5
7 ,3 6 3
5,9 9 5
7 ,3 9 9
7 ,5 6 8
9,5 31
7 ,7 6 0
8 ,2 9 4
7 ,1 3 3
9,9 6 3
7,5 91
5 ,8 5 5
4 ,1 4 4
6 ,5 1 5
7 ,5 8 0
8 ,2 8 0
7,2 2 9

8,5 6 8
4 ,5 1 5
5 ,7 6 4
3 ,6 7 4
4 ,8 4 4
5,3 4 1
5 ,6 8 0
4 ,8 4 9
4 ,6 8 9
3 ,6 7 8
4 ,1 5 0
4 ,2 1 7
3 ,1 3 0
3,0 7 5
3,3 2 6
3,1 9 7
3 ,5 8 7
4 ,0 1 0
4 ,2 7 1
7 ,2 7 4
5 ,5 3 5
6 ,0 4 9
6 ,6 3 1
8 ,2 6 8
7 ,8 1 9
5 ,9 7 4
6 ,8 7 1
8 ,5 5 6
7 ,9 0 0
5 ,0 1 7
3 ,4 9 5
5 ,5 6 1
5,2 4 2
7 ,6 3 3
5,9 4 6

7,6 3 3
6 ,9 4 0
6 ,5 5 6
5,6 88
7 ,3 7 8
5,9 0 9
7,0 9 3
1 ,0 1 1
2,3 72
4,4 5 8
3,9 5 4
5 ,0 6 9
3,3 6 3
4 ,6 0 2
3,7 3 8
3,2 21
4 ,0 6 6
6,0 2 6
5,7 8 6
7,7 4 7
6 ,2 5 3
6,7 0 2
7 ,4 7 6
8,5 21
7 ,0 5 5
8,6 9 7
7 ,4 7 3
8,9 5 6
8,6 7 2
6,2 1 3
4 ,3 1 4
6 ,2 9 9
6 ,9 5 0
8,1 6 8
7,2 3 6

8,8 29
6 ,3 2 0
7,2 92
5 ,2 72
7 ,7 65
6,8 0 6
7,3 82
1 ,4 29
5,3 63
4 ,1 5 9
1 ,1 1 4
4,8 0 6
3,9 2 6
4,5 08
3,8 8 8
2,7 80
6 ,3 4 7
6,6 36
6,0 1 8
7 ,3 97
7 ,0 92
6,9 5 7
7 ,7 0 1
8 ,3 01
8,9 04
6 ,9 8 9
8 ,1 96
8,5 7 1
8 ,8 93
7,1 74
3,6 89
6,3 5 5
7,5 1 3
8,3 5 8
6 ,9 9 5




T a b l e B-7.

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in four quarters

b y indus t r y a n d r e gion of m a j o r earnings, 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d

INDUSTRY
UNITED
STATES
PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

MANUFACTURING

-

ECONOMY -

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
NORTH­
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH­
NORTH
CENTRAL
EAST
SOUTH
WEST
STATES
SOUTH
CENTRAL
EAST

CONTINUED

CONTINUED
$7 ,4 6 3
6 ,5 5 6
6 ,8 5 6
7 ,1 5 8
7 ,1 8 7
7 ,7 3 3
7 ,3 1 3
7 ,4 8 7
8 ,3 7 6
7 ,4 4 0
7 ,5 1 7
7 ,7 7 6
6 ,7 0 7
7 ,1 6 8
6 ,7 9 7
6 ,3 5 4
5 ,8 7 3
5 ,4 1 0
7 ,8 4 5
5 ,9 6 6
8 ,0 0 1
8 ,8 0 9
7 ,0 6 4
7 ,1 7 7
5,6 3 1

$ 7 ,461
6 ,5 5 7
7,1 6 5
6 ,9 7 0
7 ,0 8 2
7 ,8 1 6
6 ,8 2 8
7 ,6 9 6
7 ,5 6 0
7,6 0 2
7 ,2 1 6
7 ,7 2 6
7 ,2 8 6
7,7 5 8
6 ,8 9 3
6 ,2 7 6
5 ,6 3 4
5 ,7 2 6
8,4 2 2
6 ,1 7 9
7,2 9 7
8,5 8 8
7 ,5 8 5
7,5 8 1
5 ,4 5 2

$7 ,1 3 7
4 ,4 3 5
5,9 3 7
5,3 7 5
5,3 8 1
6 ,6 3 9
5 ,7 5 8
6,6 0 6
5,9 8 5
6 ,2 7 5
6 ,4 2 4
6 ,5 9 8
5,0 3 0
6 ,0 4 6
5,4 7 0
5,5 1 6
4 ,9 3 5
4 ,5 7 1
7 ,2 7 2
5 ,5 5 8
6 ,6 0 3
8 ,1 4 5
6 ,6 3 9
5,5 6 1
4 ,2 6 5

$ 7 ,5 8 4
6 ,9 7 0
7 ,0 5 3
7 ,3 5 4
7,3 6 3
7 ,5 1 9
7 ,6 4 5
7 ,7 1 3
9 ,0 2 0
7 ,8 7 0
7 ,8 0 9
7 ,7 1 7
6 ,8 2 8
6 ,2 7 9
6 ,9 5 9
6 ,7 2 2
6 ,4 9 5
5 ,3 1 0
6 ,8 9 8
5 ,4 8 1
8 ,3 0 3
8,3 0 8
6 ,8 0 6
6 ,7 8 1
6 ,1 4 8

$7 ,7 2 0
5,9 45
7 ,6 91
7,6 29
7 ,8 7 8
9 ,2 1 3
5,5 85
7 ,6 02
8 ,1 6 5
7 ,1 06
8 ,7 3 5
8 ,5 6 4
6,9 3 7
7,6 30
7,1 9 0
6 , 31C
6 ,0 0 1
5,9 69
8,5 7 3
6,4 7 9
7,2 3 7
9 ,3 9 6
7,3 8 5
7,7 20
6,8 86

5 ,9 4 4

7,1 3 2

7 ,1 9 4

6,2 2 7

7 ,2 6 9

7,6 6 1

_

7 ,2 8 5
6 ,7 5 7
4 ,4 3 2
7 ,0 7 5
8 ,5 2 4

_

_

5 ,1 6 3
2 ,8 8 4
6 ,0 9 4
7 ,4 7 4

7 ,2 8 8
3 ,6 2 8
7 ,1 5 9
8 ,6 0 5

5,7 41
3 ,5 9 9
6 ,0 5 9
8 ,3 2 8

7 ,2 8 7
6 ,2 2 2
5 ,6 9 1
7 ,6 1 0
8 ,3 0 5

6,2 9 7
4 ,4 0 0
7,8 0 4
8,6 01

5 ,6 4 4

5 ,9 5 3

6 ,8 5 3

7,2 9 5

6 ,1 7 4

6 ,8 0 0

7,1 5 1

5,4 8 0
6,7 8 2

5,7 5 1
7 ,1 8 3

6 ,5 8 6
8 ,5 9 8

6 ,9 2 9
9 ,9 4 9

6,0 4 1
6 ,9 8 9

6,5 6 1
8 ,4 7 5

6 ,8 3 1
9 ,3 1 1

6 ,8 4 2

7 ,5 5 7

8 ,1 5 0

6 ,8 3 8

7 ,8 0 4

7,8 1 6

NONFERROUS ROLLING AND D R A W I N G ................................................. ...
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ............................................... .
FABRI CATED STRUCTURAL METAL PROOUCTS ...........................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, B O L T S , ETC .................................................
METAL S T A M P I N G S ............................................... .. .........................................................
ENGI NES AND TURBINES ............................................................................................
FARM MACHINERY ............................................................................................ .. ...............
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ............. .. ................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ..................................................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY M A C H I N E R Y .........................................................................
GENERAL INDUSTRI AL MACHINERY ...................................................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ................................................. ...
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ............................................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DI ST RI B U TI NG EQUIPMENT ...............................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ..........................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ............................................................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .....................................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT .......................................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ...................................................................... ..
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ........................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ...................................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ..................................................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ...........................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ...............................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ...............................................................................................

$ 6 ,468
5,5 0 0
5,6 6 4
5,9 0 4
5,8 17
6,8 9 3
6 ,1 0 1
6,6 1 3
7,1 82
6,5 2 7
6 ,5 8 1
6,7 9 0
5,5 86
6,1 0 2
5,7 4 2
5,3 5 9
4,7 4 0
3,9 22
6,8 3 8
4,5 52
7,1 1 3
7,8 3 5
5 ,6 8 4
6,1 4 9
4,2 8 8

$ 6 ,5 2 7
5 ,6 4 6
6 ,0 6 8
5 ,8 6 9
5 ,7 0 8
7 ,3 1 3
6 ,1 1 6
6 ,7 2 8
6 ,5 8 8
6 ,8 2 7
6 ,3 8 1
6 ,7 2 2
6 ,2 4 7
6 ,8 7 2
5 ,9 9 2
5,1 8 5
4 ,5 3 8
4 ,2 6 3
7 ,4 6 8
4 ,8 6 7
6 ,7 2 7
7 ,6 5 5
6 ,3 9 3
6 ,7 3 0
4 ,0 3 2

$6 ,332
3 ,5 3 9
4 ,7 9 8
4 ,4 8 2
4 ,1 5 9
5 ,1 7 0
4,7 2 3
5 ,7 3 2
4 ,8 6 7
5 ,4 1 3
5 ,3 2 9
5 ,7 2 5
4 ,0 6 6
5 ,2 2 9
4 ,4 6 1
4 ,5 6 7
4 ,0 9 2
2 ,8 1 7
6 ,3 7 6
4 ,5 2 1
5 ,7 8 2
7 ,2 0 6
5 ,3 7 5
4 ,5 4 9
3 ,5 5 2

$ 6 ,499
5 ,8 1 9
5 ,8 8 7
5,9 6 9
6,0 0 7
6,5 9 8
6 ,4 1 7
6 ,9 0 1
7 ,7 7 3
6,7 6 2
6 ,9 2 6
6,8 8 2
5 ,7 0 8
4 ,9 8 1
5,9 4 1
5,7 5 6
5,2 8 7
3,8 9 0
5,9 4 3
3,8 3 7
7 ,3 7 4
7 ,3 1 5
5 ,2 1 8
5,7 6 3
4,7 5 3

$6 ,6 6 8
4 ,8 3 4
6 ,2 6 3
6,3 1 1
6 ,2 9 7
8*142
4 ,2 1 5
6 ,4 9 4
6 ,4 6 4
6 ,1 5 8
7 ,0 8 3
7 ,2 5 6
5 ,4 6 8
6 ,4 7 9
5 ,5 3 8
5 ,1 2 8
4 ,6 1 8
4 ,6 4 1
7,2 9 5
4 ,7 9 1
6 ,2 5 9
8 ,4 1 0
5,5 2 6
* ,4 3 0
4 ,9 2 9

TRANSPORTATION1 ............. ......................................................................................................

5,9 4 8

6 ,0 1 7

4 ,8 9 4

6,3 3 3

RAILROADS1 ................................................................................... .........................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ....................................................
TAXICABS ................................................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ....................................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................................

6 ,6 8 0
6,0 6 4
3 ,3 1 3
5 ,6 7 6
7,6 05

6 ,8 1 4
2 ,8 6 0
5 ,8 5 0
7 ,8 1 6

6 ,6 8 3
5,5 2 9
4 ,4 9 4
6,2 1 6
7 ,2 9 2

.......................................................................................................................

5 ,7 3 9

6 ,2 7 7

5,1 1 1

...................................................................................
BROADCASTING ....................................................

5 ,5 6 6
6 ,8 2 7

6 ,0 0 7
8 ,1 3 7

5 ,0 5 1
5 ,5 7 0

..............................................................................................................

6,7 5 3

7 ,4 6 8

6 ,0 1 7

7 ,1 0 0

COMMUNICATION
telephone

RADIO

PUBLIC

WEST

com m unication

AND TEL EV ISI ON

UTILITIES

_

_
4 ,9 2 4
2 ,5 2 6
4 ,7 8 0
7 ,5 3 7

‘

_

.................................................................................................................

5,7 17

6 ,5 4 1

4 ,9 0 1

5,8 2 4

5 ,5 3 8

7 ,3 1 9

8,0 1 5

6,4 2 1

7 ,3 5 5

7,4 75

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ..................................
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ........................................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .........................................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS .............................................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ........................................................ .. ............................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ..............................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ....................................................

5,5 8 7
6,9 1 0
6,0 1 8
4,5 0 5
6,5 35
5 ,8 4 4
6 ,9 1 1

6 ,0 6 2
7 ,6 0 6
6 ,8 8 4
5 ,3 1 9
7 ,1 2 3
6 ,2 1 0
7 ,5 4 0

5 ,1 0 6
6 ,1 3 3
4 ,7 5 3
3 ,7 0 4
6 ,1 4 9
5 ,5 8 5
6 ,4 1 4

5 ,7 7 8
6,7 2 0
4 ,9 0 0
5,2 06
6 ,2 9 4
5,7 4 0
6 ,9 2 5

5 ,3 6 4
6 ,7 7 7
5 ,1 3 6
4 ,0 8 4
6 ,0 6 5
5 ,9 3 1
6 ,6 6 9

6 ,8 1 2
8 ,2 8 9
7 ,8 5 8
6 ,2 8 3
7,9 3 7
7 ,1 8 8
8 ,2 5 7

7 ,3 2 6
8,9 9 0
8,6 5 9
6 ,8 0 8
8 ,2 8 4
7 ,5 8 8
8 ,9 2 0

6 ,1 9 8
7 ,4 2 9
6 ,4 2 3
5,2 1 1
7 ,6 9 0
6 ,7 2 9
7 ,6 9 2

7 ,0 5 5
8 ,0 5 3
6 ,5 2 0
6 ,8 2 5
7 ,7 4 3
7 ,1 8 6
8 ,1 9 6

6,6 45
8 ,2 25
7 ,4 18
6 ,6 4 3
7 ,6 11
7,3 80
8 ,1 66

WHOLESALE TRADE

See footnote at end of table.




T a b l e B-7. A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in four quarters
b y in d u s t r y a n d region of m a j o r earnings, 1 9 6 6 --- C o n t i n u e d

STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED I N ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
NORTH­
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH­
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
WEST
EAST
STATES
SOUTH
CENTRAL

.................................................................................................

$ 2 ,6 8 6

$ 2 ,9 3 6

$2 ,3 6 1

$ 2 ,6 8 6

$ 2 ,9 0 7

$4 ,3 2 0

$4 ,511

$ 3 ,8 4 1

$4 ,342

$4 ,832

DEPARTMENT STORES ............................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ............................................................................
VARIETY STORES .....................................................................................
GROCERY STORES .....................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ................................................................
MEN * S AND BO YS ' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ..........................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES .............................................................
SHOE STORES .............................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ....................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ........................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ...................................................................

2 ,4 7 1
3,4 2 8
1 ,9 2 4
3 ,0 8 8
5 ,3 3 0
3 ,2 1 0
2 ,1 5 2
2 ,2 3 1
2 ,8 7 8
4 ,1 1 9
2 ,6 9 3
4 ,5 2 4

2,5 0 4
3 ,0 9 0
2 ,3 7 9
3 , 199
5 ,5 8 3
3 ,6 0 2
2 ,5 2 1
2 ,3 5 3
3 ,3 3 2
4,2 8 2
2 ,9 0 8
5 ,3 3 9

2 ,3 4 2
3 ,2 6 6
1,6 0 8
2 ,5 5 8
4 ,5 7 6
2,6 9 3
1,9 1 7
1,9 8 9
2,3 91
3 ,8 3 4
2 ,2 9 2
3 ,5 1 5

2 ,4 4 1
3 ,5 4 6
1,9 5 6
3,0 2 9
5 ,6 7 1
3,4 12
2 ,0 2 6
2 ,3 2 8
3,0 8 2
4,4 9 3
2,6 22
4 ,2 9 3

2 ,6 5 4
3 ,7 2 9
1,7 8 2
3 ,9 6 7
5 ,8 8 8
3 ,0 3 8
2 ,0 2 8
2 ,5 5 7
2 ,6 4 6
4 ,0 1 5
3 ,4 1 3
4 ,2 1 0

4 ,0 2 8
5 ,1 8 7
3 ,4 9 0
4,6 0 0
6 ,6 5 8
4 ,8 9 2
3 ,4 7 4
3 ,6 4 7
4 ,5 1 2
5 ,6 2 8
4 ,1 9 5
5 ,7 0 2

4,0 9 8
4 ,7 5 6
4 ,0 9 9
4 ,7 6 0
6 ,8 8 1
5 ,2 0 4
3 ,8 4 2
3 ,6 9 5
4 ,8 6 4
5,7 1 2
4 ,2 9 2
6 ,4 2 0

3 ,8 0 9
4 ,8 0 6
3 ,0 5 2
3 ,8 7 0
5 ,8 1 1
4 ,1 6 6
3 ,1 1 5
3 ,4 0 6
3 ,8 8 9
5,1 5 1
3 ,6 0 8
4 ,5 4 0

3 ,9 3 1
5,3 9 6
3,3 78
4 ,4 6 2
6,9 7 7
5,0 4 4
3,3 8 5
3,5 9 9
4,8 5 0
6 ,1 3 4
4 ,2 2 1
5,5 75

4 ,4 1 0
5,5 9 5
3 ,4 9 3
5 ,8 2 2
7 ,3 6 5
5,1 45
3 ,4 2 7
4,3 7 2
4 ,4 3 7
5,9 4 5
5,2 1 0
5,5 36

INDUSTRY
u nited

PRIVATE
RETAIL

NCNAGRICULTURAL

TRADE

FINANCE*

INSURANCE*

ECONOMY -

AND REAL

ESTATE

CONTINUED

..

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSO CIA TIO NS ................
PERSONAL CREDIT IN ST IT U TI ON S ...................
LIFE INSURANCE ..............................................................
F I R E , MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE

SERVICES

................... ...............................................................

H O T E L S , T OURI ST S COUR TS , AND MOTELS
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .
MOTION PICTURES ........................................................
HOS PI TA LS .......................................................................... 1

4,9 4 3

5 ,3 9 4

4 ,4 6 2

5 ,0 0 4

4 ,8 5 7

6 ,2 3 4

6 ,5 9 5

5 ,7 1 7

6,2 9 6

6,3 07

4 ,6 6 1
5 ,2 5 3
4 ,3 0 6
5 ,8 3 3
5 ,3 0 1

5,0 7 7
5 ,2 4 2
4,4 0 9
5 ,8 8 8
5 ,4 2 4

4,3 6 8
5 ,0 4 2
4 ,1 2 7
5 ,6 5 4
4 ,9 7 6

4 ,5 2 1
5,3 18
4,6 8 8
6,1 0 2
5 ,3 0 5

4 ,6 3 4
5 ,4 0 2
4 ,0 5 9
5 ,6 2 0
5 ,4 0 0

5 ,6 4 0
6 ,2 4 4
5,4 1 4
6 ,9 7 4
6 ,2 7 7

6 ,1 1 9
6 ,3 5 3
5 ,6 8 3
6 ,9 3 3
6 ,2 3 6

5,2 4 6
5 ,9 3 3
5 ,1 1 9
6 ,8 6 0
6 ,0 7 3

5 ,5 4 8
6 ,2 4 7
5,8 4 9
7,2 22
6 ,3 4 5

5 ,5 83
6 ,4 9 9
5 ,1 2 1
6,8 85
6,4 66

3 ,1 6 7

3 ,7 3 7

2,5 8 9

3 ,0 5 0

3 ,4 1 7

4,6 9 9

5 ,3 6 3

3,8 5 5

4 ,5 2 2

5,2 9 0

1 ,9 1 2
2 ,3 9 6
2 ,3 4 1
3 ,0 2 1

2 ,1 0 8
2 ,8 1 9
3 ,4 3 8
3 ,7 5 6

1 ,5 6 3
1,9 39
1 ,5 1 3
2 ,4 2 9

1,8 30
2,4 53
1 ,8 51
2 ,7 2 4

2 ,2 2 8
2 ,7 1 3
2 ,6 8 2
3 ,1 1 5

3 ,2 1 2
3,4 9 2
4,3 9 6
4 ,0 8 0

3 ,5 7 3
3 ,8 5 9
5 ,6 7 2
4 ,8 9 6

2,6 4 8
2,8 5 6
2,8 4 3
3 ,3 3 8

3,0 07
3,6 0 7
3,9 95
3,6 99

3,8 2 8
4 ,2 1 3
4 ,8 9 2
4 ,2 91

1 F o r p u r p o s e s o f th is s tu d y , and b e c a u s e in fo r m a t io n abou t t h e ir a c tu a l p la c e o f e m p lo y m e n t w a s n ot a v a ila b le in the f i l e s
o r g a n iz a t io n s c o v e r e d b y the R a ilr o a d R e t ir e m e n t A c t w e r e c o n s i d e r e d to h a ve b e e n e m p lo y e d in the N o rth C e n tr a l R e g io n .
NOTE:

s tu d ie d , e m p lo y e e s o f r a i lr o a d s

and r a ilr o a d r e la te d

A dash ( -) indicates either the sam ple did not include any w ork ers with these c h a r a c te r is tic s , or that the data did not m eet the B u r e a u 's publication crite ria .




WEST

T a b l e B-8.

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y qu a r t e r a n d in four quarters

b y i n dustry a n d reg i o n of m a j o r earnings, 1 9 6 7

UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
F O U R
Q U A R T E R S
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
NORTH­
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH
NORTH­
SOUTH
EAST
CENTRAL
WEST
STATES
SOUTH
CENTRAL
EAST

...............................................

$4 ,6 1 4

$ 5 ,0 2 0

$3 ,8 5 5

$ 4 ,9 2 5

$4 ,7 3 2

$ 6 ,2 5 7

$ 6 ,6 1 5

$5 ,3 4 0

$6 ,535

$ 6 ,723

.............................................................................................................................................

6,3 9 0

6 ,7 6 0

6 ,2 2 5

6 ,3 7 5

6 ,4 8 4

7,6 6 2

7 ,7 3 7

7 ,4 6 8

7 ,6 5 5

7,9 53

CRUDE PETROLEUM* NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
GAS L I Q U I D S .................................................................................................................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ..........................................................................

7,5 74
5 ,3 8 7

7 ,7 8 9
5 ,8 2 2

7 ,5 1 6
5 ,2 7 2

6 ,2 0 3
4 ,3 2 4

7,9 6 0
6 ,0 0 4

8,5 4 3
7 ,1 6 3

8,2 8 7
7 ,9 5 6

8 ,5 1 9
6,9 1 1

7 ,1 1 0
6,3 3 1

8 ,8 5 7
8 ,1 62

5 ,4 76

6 ,3 2 8

4 ,3 0 7

6 , 156

6,3 2 8

7 ,4 4 5

8 ,2 3 1

6 ,0 9 5

8 ,1 6 7

8,4 2 3
8,0 55
9 ,3 8 7
9,3 1 5
7,3 3 0
9,9 9 8
7,1 8 0
7,6 9 4
7,3 2 2
6,9 9 2

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE

MINING

N0NA6RICULTURAL ECONOMY

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

...............................................................................................

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ..........................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ...................................................................................
PLUMBING* HE A TI N G, AIR C O N D I T I O N I N G ........................................
P A IN T IN G , PAPER HANGING, DECORATING .............................................
ELECTRICAL WORK ...........................................................................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING .................................................
carpenterin g
a nd f l o o r i n g
....................................................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ....................................................................
CONCRETE WORK .................................................................................................................
MANUFACTURING

.......................................................................................................................

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ....................................................
MEAT PRODUCTS .................................................................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ..............................................................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ...........................................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................
BAKERY P R O D U C T S ...........................................................................................................
B E V E R A G E S ....................................................................................................................... ..
WEAVING M I L L S , C O T T O N ...................................................................................... ...
WEAVING M I L L S , SYNTHETICS .............................................................................
KN ITTING MILLS ..............................................................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS .........................................................................................
MEN'S AND B O Y S ' SU IT S AND COATS ...........................................................
MEN'S AND B OYS ' FURNISHINGS ......................................................................
WOMEN'S AND M I S S E S ' OUTERWEAR ................................................................
WOMEN'S AND C H I L D R E N ' S UNDERGARMENTS ...........................................
C H IL D RE N' S OUTERWEAR ............................................................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS .......................................................................*
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS .....................................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ...............................................................................................
PULP AND PAPER M I L L S ......................................... ........................................ . . .
PAPERBOARD CONTAI NERS AND B O X E S ..........................................................
NEWSPAPERS ...........................................................................................................................
COMMERCIAL P R I N T I N G ..............................................................................................
INDUSTRIAL C H E M I C A L S ............................................................................................
P L A S T I C S MATERIALS AND SYNTHET ICS ....................................................
D R U G S ................... ............................................. - ....................................................................
SOAP, c l e a n e r s , a n d t o i l e t g o o d s .......................................................
PETROLEUM REFINING ................ ................................................................................
T I R E S AND INNER TUBES .........................................................................................
OTHER RUBBER P R O D U C T S ...................... ..................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ...................................................................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN ........................................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER P R O D U C T S ................ ....................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PROOUCTS .....................................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ................................................................................




WEST

4,9 29
5,9 64
6 ,7 65
4,3 1 1
7 ,2 3 7
4,5 9 4
4,4 04
4,9 48
4,4 89

5 ,8 0 9
7 ,0 8 1
7 ,4 6 0
4 ,3 6 1
7,6 71
5 ,4 9 0
5 ,1 1 4
5 ,7 0 9
5 ,6 6 7

4 ,1 6 9
4 ,7 9 4
5 ,1 1 5
3 ,2 4 7
6 ,0 6 2
3 ,2 8 8
2 ,9 6 8
3 ,8 4 0
3 ,0 5 9

5 ,2 4 2
6 , 263
7,5 8 3
5 ,2 0 3
8 ,0 0 7
5,5 8 2
5 ,0 3 8
5,5 4 8
4 ,9 7 6

6 ,1 4 0
7,2 0 9
7 ,7 2 6
5 ,3 2 2
7 ,9 7 3
5,2 6 8
5,2 8 3
5 ,2 1 2
4 ,8 2 0

6 ,6 3 7
8,2 0 0
8 ,3 8 9
6 ,1 9 1
8,9 6 2
6 ,3 8 9
6 ,5 2 6
6 ,8 4 3
6 ,4 3 9

8 ,2 3 3
9 ,2 1 6
8,9 9 1
6 ,0 9 4
9 ,3 8 3
7 ,1 3 9
7,0 2 2
7 ,3 8 4
7 ,6 0 7

5 ,5 6 4
6 ,8 9 8
6 ,6 4 3
5,0 7 1
7 ,6 1 6
4 ,8 9 9
4 ,8 6 3
5 ,6 2 7
4 ,6 7 6

7 ,3 7 0
8 ,6 0 0
9 ,2 0 5
7,0 1 5
9 ,7 2 3
7 ,3 1 4
7 ,2 1 6
7 ,4 7 8
6 ,9 7 8

5 ,5 75

5 ,7 3 2

4 ,6 3 4

6 ,0 5 3

5 ,9 3 0

6 ,8 5 4

6 ,9 7 9

5 ,7 5 8

7 ,2 9 5

7,6 27

7,3 58
4,7 80
5 ,2 5 5
2 ,5 7 4
5 ,7 46
5,0 66
5,5 5 1
4,1 8 8
4,1 9 8
3 ,3 29
3 ,3 45
4,2 49
2,7 67
3,2 9 3
2,8 6 9
2,8 6 4
3 ,7 37
4,5 55
3 ,9 2 0
6,8 44
5 ,2 68
5,6 18
6,1 99
8 ,2 80
7 ,1 7 2
7 ,3 3 7
6 ,0 87
8 ,5 0 6
7,5 1 3
4,9 69
3,2 58
5 ,5 3 0
5 ,4 49
7,3 4 4
6 ,2 05

6 ,5 6 6
5 ,1 6 1
5 ,3 5 9
3 ,5 2 1
5 ,6 8 3
5 ,4 8 0
6 ,3 1 2
3 ,8 6 3
4 ,6 9 8
3 ,6 0 1
3 ,3 6 8
4 ,7 7 1
3 ,3 9 4
3 ,4 5 6
3 ,3 8 2
3 ,2 0 9
3 ,1 6 5
4 ,6 6 3
4 ,1 1 0
6 ,6 6 8
5 ,0 8 6
6 ,2 5 0
6 ,4 9 9
9 ,2 4 3
7 ,0 2 7
7 ,7 2 7
5 ,8 3 2
9 ,3 7 7
7 ,1 8 3
5 ,0 9 5
3,4 0 5
5 ,7 4 1
6 ,2 2 6
7 ,5 4 8
6 ,2 4 9

6 ,8 4 5
3 ,5 1 1
4 ,6 4 6
2 ,0 1 6
4 ,2 2 4
4 ,5 1 5
4 ,6 6 2
4 ,2 0 5
4 ,0 5 4
3 ,1 8 2
3 ,3 6 0
3 ,3 4 1
2 ,5 9 5
2 ,5 7 4
2 ,6 5 4
2 ,6 0 3
2 ,8 5 7
3 ,3 3 5
3 ,5 0 5
6 ,7 6 4
4 ,8 2 6
4 ,9 1 5
5 ,3 8 5
7 ,8 5 9
7 ,4 0 5
5 ,3 9 8
5 ,9 5 3
8 ,3 4 7
6 ,8 3 6
4 ,0 4 3
2,8 7 9
5 ,0 6 5
4 ,5 0 8
6 ,9 5 5
5 ,4 4 8

5,7 2 8
5,7 5 2
5, 259
2 ,6 4 8
6 ,3 1 4
4 ,9 5 0
6 ,0 5 3
5 ,3 8 9
3 ,7 4 8
2,9 1 1
4 , 133
2 ,7 2 6
3,9 9 2
2,8 4 7
2 ,6 1 4
3 ,0 5 5
4 , 751
4 ,4 2 7
7 ,2 4 7
5 ,5 8 6
5 ,6 3 0
6 , 309
7,9 6 9
6 , 197
7,7 0 7
6 , 291
8,3 3 8
7 ,8 0 1
5 ,0 8 5
3 ,5 0 9
5 ,7 4 6
5 ,8 4 6
7,2 6 0
6 ,4 7 4

7 ,7 7 4
4 ,9 6 6
6 ,1 8 6
2 ,5 1 4
6 ,0 3 2
5,7 0 9
5 ,7 0 9
3 ,6 8 3
5,5 7 3
2 ,9 9 9
$514
3,2 2 3
2 ,8 7 8
3,2 6 1
2,9 0 9
1 ,8 51
5 ,0 9 4
5 ,4 8 8
4 ,5 6 7
6,6 6 5
5 ,6 3 2
5 ,6 5 6
6,3 8 6
7 ,0 7 4
7 ,0 7 4
5 ,6 0 8
6,7 3 5
7,8 9 0
7,1 5 7
5,7 1 6
2,5 2 3
5,1 2 5
6 ,5 0 5
7 ,4 8 6
5 ,8 2 4

8 ,4 7 6
6 ,2 0 6
6 ,5 9 2
5,2 2 7
7 ,1 8 3
6 ,2 9 9
6 ,9 0 6
4 ,8 9 5
4 ,9 4 8
4 ,1 6 1
4 ,1 1 4
5 ,1 2 9
3 ,6 2 0
4 ,2 4 4
3,7 4 8
3 ,7 8 7
5,0 1 7
5,8 1 1
5 ,0 2 3
7 ,7 4 8
6 ,4 4 5
6 ,9 8 7
7 ,6 5 2
9 ,0 9 8
8 ,0 7 0
8,3 2 8
7 ,6 8 7
9 ,3 2 8
8,0 9 5
6 ,0 2 9
4 ,1 8 5
6 ,4 9 0
6,7 2 1
8 ,1 0 3
7 ,0 4 1

7 ,8 8 2
6 ,5 7 7
6 ,7 9 9
5 ,7 7 6
7 ,2 3 2
6 ,6 6 5
7 ,7 2 5
5,1 7 1
5,5 0 5
4 ,6 5 5
4 ,1 8 9
5,6 7 3
4 ,3 0 7
4 ,3 5 2
4 ,4 1 3
4 ,1 2 3
4 .3 8 9
5 ,8 9 2
5 ,3 5 6
7 ,5 8 3
6 ,3 7 6
7,5 2 7
8 ,0 1 1
1 0 ,1 0 5
8 ,1 6 6
8 ,6 1 3
7,4 9 8
1 0 ,5 6 0
7,5 9 1
5 ,9 7 9
4 ,4 1 3
6 ,7 6 2
7 ,6 0 4
8 ,2 4 3
7 ,0 4 8

7 ,9 1 6
4 ,7 7 4
5 ,7 1 1
3 ,9 1 6
5 ,3 0 2
5 ,6 2 4
5 ,9 5 4
4 ,8 8 5
4 ,7 9 0
3 ,8 4 3
4 ,1 1 2
4 ,0 4 8
3 ,3 7 7
3 ,3 8 8
3 ,4 1 9
3,4 2 2
3 .9 2 1
4 ,2 7 7
4 ,3 6 0
7,6 0 5
5 ,8 9 2
6 ,3 1 1
6,4 8 8
8,4 7 5
8 ,1 0 9
6 ,3 4 6
7 ,4 2 4
9 ,0 7 0
7,3 5 9
5,0 61
3,6 7 7
5 ,7 7 0
5,5 5 2
7,6 8 8
6 ,0 6 8

7,3 4 9
7,1 7 5
6 ,7 9 0
5 ,7 1 0
7 ,6 9 5
6 ,2 4 7
7 ,3 2 9
8,2 5 8
4 ,9 7 9
4 ,1 5 5
5,0 4 1
3 ,6 1 8
5 ,1 2 3
3 ,9 3 0
3 ,3 7 4
4 ,4 3 3
6 ,0 3 0
5 ,7 3 7
8 ,1 0 2
6,7 1 7
6 ,9 3 4
7,7 5 3
8 ,8 5 7
7 ,3 7 7
8 ,6 1 3
7 ,7 7 5
9 ,0 8 9
8 ,4 1 6
6 ,2 5 3
4 ,3 2 3
6,6 8 9
7 ,3 5 0
8 ,0 9 4
7 ,3 6 4

8 ,7 9 0
6,5 3 6
7,3 53
5,5 6 8
8,1 37
7,0 9 8
7 ,2 3 4
4,3 61
5 ,5 7 3
4,0 1 9
4 ,6 6 5
4 ,0 8 4
4,6 21
4 ,1 0 0
3,3 5 9
6 ,4 6 9
6 ,9 51
6,3 9 1
7 ,7 72
6 ,7 8 1
7 ,1 4 4
8,3 9 9
8 ,4 08
9,4 8 8
7,5 7 5
8,4 4 8
8,6 1 7
7,9 0 0
7,0 79
3 ,5 21
6,7 6 9
7,7 16
8,2 1 5
7,0 1 8

T a b l e B- 8 .

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in four q u arters

b y i n d u s t r y a n d r e gion of m a j o r earnings, 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d

UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R
A N
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
NORTH
NORTH­
NORTH
NORTH­
UNITED
SOUTH
SOUTH
WEST
CENTRAL
EAST
CENTRAL
STATES
EAST

NONFERROUS ROLLING AND D R A W I N G ............................................................
CUTLERY* HAND TOOLS* AND HARDWARE ....................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ...........................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLT S, ETC ................................................
METAL S T A M P I N G S ............................................................ ............................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ...........................................................................................
FARM M A C H I N E R Y .......................... ................................................... .. ..........................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ........................ .......................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY .............................................................................. ...
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ........................................................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ...................................................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ...............................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ................... ........................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DIST RI B U TI NG EQUIPMENT ...............................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL A P P A R A T U S ............................... .. .......................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES . . ............................................................. . ....................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ....................................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT .................................... . ..............
COMMUNICATION E Q U I P M E N T ............................ . ............................. .. .................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES • • • • • • • • ................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ... ................................ . ..........................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS .................................................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ...........................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ...............................
OTHER MANUFACTURING . . . . . ................................................. .. ..........................

$ 6 ,608
5,6 7 4
5,9 0 6
6,2 5 5
5 ,9 0 7
7,0 4-9
6 ,4 7 2
6,7 2 6
7 ,4 2 2
6 ,7 4 8
6,6 7 2
7,2 0 7
5,8 12
6,3 7 5
5 ,9 3 6
5,5 3 3
4 ,9 8 9
3 ,9 9 7
7 ,2 5 2
5,0 8 5
7 ,1 3 3
7 ,9 7 5
5 ,8 1 8
6,3 7 8
4 ,5 0 9

$ 6 ,7 0 3
5 ,8 3 4
6 ,3 3 3
6 ,3 0 7
5 ,7 5 9
7,3 7 8
6 ,6 5 7
6,5 0 3
6 ,7 4 5
7,1 4 1
6,5 2 2
7 ,1 8 9
6 ,4 1 9
7 ,2 5 3
6 ,1 6 5
5,3 8 8
4 ,8 2 7
4,1 9 1
7,9 3 1
5 ,3 0 5
6 ,4 4 9
7,8 0 5
6 ,8 2 4
6,9 7 1
4 ,5 4 2

$ 6 ,4 4 4
3 ,9 3 9
5 ,0 3 9
4 ,9 2 9
4 ,6 0 2
6 ,6 6 9
5 ,2 9 6
5 ,9 5 2
5 ,2 1 4
5 ,7 1 3
5 ,4 9 3
6 ,1 5 5
4 ,5 7 0
5,4 2 7
4 ,5 6 9
4 ,9 8 1
4 ,1 3 9
3 ,0 6 9
6 ,7 8 7
5 ,4 5 9
5 ,8 6 0
7 ,7 2 1
5 ,5 7 9
5,1 8 7
3 ,6 0 6

$ 6 ,6 1 6
5,8 3 0
6 , 125
6 , 233
6,0 9 2
6 ,9 4 0
6,7 3 7
7 ,0 5 8
8,0 6 4
6 ,9 3 8
6,8 7 3
7 , 261
5,8 9 9
5 , 168
6 , 160
5 ,8 1 9
5,4 9 5
3,9 7 3
6 ,4 5 0
4 , 140
7 ,4 3 0
7 ,5 6 1
5, 104
5 ,9 4 2
4 ,8 1 3

$ 6 ,5 4 6
5 ,6 4 7
6 ,3 8 4
6,7 9 5
6,1 1 7
6 ,5 2 9
4 ,8 2 9
6 ,8 3 0
6 ,9 1 0
6 ,0 4 6
7,6 31
7 ,6 1 1
5 ,4 5 0
6,5 4 5
5 ,9 3 6
5,7 1 6
5 ,0 4 0
5 ,1 2 4
7 ,3 8 3
5,3 8 6
6 ,0 6 4
8 ,3 9 0
5,4 3 1
6,5 9 2
4 ,7 5 9

$7 ,4 8 4
6 ,8 2 3
7,1 0 2
7 ,4 6 5
7,2 11
7 ,8 0 9
7,5 8 1
7 ,5 1 2
8 ,5 9 4
7,7 22
7 ,5 5 3
8 ,2 3 6
6 ,7 9 4
7 ,4 3 8
6 ,8 4 6
6 ,6 0 4
6,1 1 5
5,4 2 8
8,2 5 3
6 ,4 0 2
8,0 0 2
8 ,8 5 6
7 ,1 4 7
7 ,3 0 2
5,9 5 8

$ 7 ,5 5 1
6 ,9 6 8
7 ,4 6 5
7 ,3 6 9
7 ,0 3 6
7 ,9 6 4
7,6 81
7 ,2 9 5
7,8 3 1
7,8 9 9
7 ,3 1 0
8 ,2 2 6
7 ,4 2 0
8 ,1 4 9
6 ,9 9 6
6 ,5 0 8
5 ,8 8 6
5 ,8 9 3
8,9 0 6
6 ,4 2 4
7 ,2 3 5
8,6 4 0
7 ,8 5 4
7,7 1 6
6 ,0 2 1

$ 7 ,191
4 ,6 0 7
6 ,1 6 6
5,8 7 2
5,7 21
9 ,6 6 2
6 ,4 3 2
6 ,7 9 0
6 ,2 5 4
6 ,8 3 0
6,6 6 7
7,1 7 2
5,3 8 1
6 ,0 3 4
5 ,2 5 0
6 ,1 0 9
5,1 9 1
4 ,4 0 3
7 ,7 1 4
6 ,7 2 4
6 ,7 3 6
8,5 3 6
6 ,8 1 6
6 ,1 8 4
4,6 2 6

$7 ,537
7,1 07
7 ,2 8 6
7 ,4 4 4
7,3 9 8
7,6 96
7 ,8 01
7,7 81
9 ,2 3 3
7 ,9 8 4
7,6 7 0
8,1 2 3
6 ,8 3 9
6,4 7 0
7,1 43
6,8 32
6,6 2 8
5,2 6 5
7 ,3 7 1
5,6 3 8
8,2 8 5
8,3 84
6 ,5 8 5
6 ,9 6 2
6,1 87

$7 ,576
6 ,6 9 8
7,8 2 0
8,6 6 4
7,7 53
7,7 47
6,5 3 6
7,8 11
8 ,4 0 4
7,3 00
9,4 0 0
8 ,9 75
6,9 4 2
7,7 35
7 ,0 33
6,8 50
6,5 9 3
6,9 28
8,6 0 1
6,9 46
7,0 6 6
9 , 360
7 ,2 4 4
7 ,6 1 3
6 ,9 4 9

TRANSPORTATION1 ...................................................................................................................

6 ,2 6 7

6,3 6 6

5 ,1 1 2

6,6 5 2

6 ,4 8 8

7 ,5 0 7

7 ,6 1 0

6 ,5 1 0

7 ,6 0 2

8,3 13

V

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

MANUFACTURING -

ECONOMY -

CONTINUED

RAILROADS1 ....................... .....................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ...................................................
T A X I C A B S ....................................................... .......................................................................
T RUCKI NG, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ...................................................
AIR T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ................................................. * ...................... ....................

C O M M U NI C A TI ON ..................................................................................... ....................... ..
TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ................................................................................
RADIO AND TE LE V IS IO N BROADCASTING ....................................................

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S
WHOLESALE TRADE

.............................................................................................................
....................................................................................................... ..

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ..................................
DRUGS, CH EMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ........................................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .......................................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ............................................................
ELECTRI CAL GOODS .......................................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ...............................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLI ES ...................................................

See footnote at end of table.




WEST

CONTINUED

_

_

_

_

_

_

7 ,0 11
6,4 71
3 ,4 5 8
5 ,9 1 3
8 ,1 7 7

7,2 0 9
2 ,9 3 6
6 ,0 4 1
8 ,2 8 5

5 ,1 0 0
2 ,4 7 4
4 ,9 0 5
8 ,3 2 6

7,0 1 6
6 , 179
4 ,7 0 4
6 ,4 7 1
7 ,7 1 6

5,5 1 6
3 ,2 7 2
6 ,5 6 9
8 ,2 0 3

7 ,6 8 9
7 ,2 8 2
4,5 6 1
7 ,3 2 4
9 ,2 2 2

7,8 8 8
3,6 9 8
7 ,3 4 6
9 ,0 6 9

5 ,7 8 2
3 ,6 6 6
6 ,2 5 4
9 ,2 7 0

7,6 9 1
7 ,1 31
5,7 6 9
7,7 78
8,7 8 6

6 ,7 9 3
4,5 79
8,4 03
9,5 6 9

5 ,9 8 0

6,5 2 2

5 ,2 6 9

5 ,9 6 4

6 ,2 2 8

7 ,0 2 2

7 ,6 4 5

6,2 3 1

6,9 7 8

7 ,2 8 9

5 ,7 7 9
7 ,0 8 0

6 ,2 2 5
8,2 01

5 ,1 6 2
5 ,7 1 9

5,7 9 8
7,0 0 0

5,9 9 6
7 ,7 5 2

6 ,7 0 9
8,9 4 5

7,1 7 4
1 0 ,5 4 5

6,0 7 7
7 ,0 8 6

6,7 25
8,7 93

6,9 17
9,8 8 2

7 ,0 5 1

7,7 4 1

6 ,3 9 6

7,4 4 3

6 ,9 6 4

7,9 1 8

8 ,5 5 6

7,1 8 6

8 ,2 17

8,0 9 6

5,9 8 9

6 ,7 3 6

5 ,2 6 5

6 ,0 7 1

5 ,8 0 6

7 ,6 4 9

8 ,3 3 2

6 ,8 2 9

7,6 2 9

7,8 20

5 ,7 9 3
7 ,1 9 3
6 ,4 1 0
4 ,7 8 8
6 ,8 9 5
6 ,1 6 8
7 ,1 0 4

6 ,1 3 6
7 ,9 6 3
7,0 0 7
5 ,5 8 1
7 ,3 5 4
6,6 9 1
7,7 1 3

5 ,2 0 6
6 ,4 4 4
5 ,3 7 3
4 ,0 0 3
6 ,6 5 5
5,8 2 2
6 ,6 6 4

6 , 174
6,8 3 5
5,6 5 0
5 ,5 3 9
6,5 9 5
5,9 4 0
7 ,0 6 4

5 ,4 8 4
7,1 2 5
5 ,8 8 3
4,2 7 5
6 ,5 8 6
6 ,3 5 7
6 ,9 0 0

7,1 1 2
8,5 2 3
8,3 7 2
6 ,6 5 4
8,3 9 8
7 ,5 3 9
8 ,4 9 4

7,4 21
9,4 3 8
9,2 2 1
7 ,0 4 4
8,7 8 2
8 ,2 4 5
9 ,1 6 4

6 ,3 2 2
7 ,6 4 4
6 ,9 2 0
5,6 5 2
7,8 6 5
7 ,0 9 8
7,9 4 3

7,5 8 8
8,0 47
7,2 0 4
7,1 4 9
8,3 13
7,2 5 9
8,4 9 6

7,0 08
8 ,5 7 4
7,8 80
7,0 9 4
8 ,3 32
7 ,6 67
8,3 1 7

T a b l e B-8.

A v e r a g e a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in a n y q u a r t e r a n d in four qu a r t e r s

b y i n d u s t r y a n d region of m a j o r e a rnings, 1 9 6 7 --- C o n t i n u e d

INDUSTRY
UNITED
STATES
PRIVATE
RETAIL

NCNAGRICULTURAL

TRADE

ECONOMY

-

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
0 U A R T E R S
F O U R
NORTH
NORTH­
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH­
SOUTH
SOUTH
EAST
CENTRAL
CENTRAL
WEST
STATES
EAST

WEST

CONTINUED

100

..........................................................................................................................

$2 ,808

$3 ,0 4 3

$ 2 ,4 9 8

$ 2 ,821

$3 ,0 0 1

$ 4 ,481

$4 ,6 8 9

$4 ,021

$ 4 ,4 9 7

$4 ,9 5 0

DEPARTMENT STORES .....................................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES . . . . . ...............................................................................
VARIETY STORES ..............................................................................................................
GROCERY S T O R E S ............................. ....................... ........................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ........................................................................................
ME N' S AND B O Y S ' CLOTHING AND F URNI SHI NGS ...............................
WOMEN'S REA DY -T O- WE AR STORES ...................................................................
FAMI LY CLOTHING S T O R E S ..................................................... ................................
SHOE S T O R E S .......................................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U R N I S H I N G S ................................................. ..
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES .............................................. ...
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ............................................................................................

2,6 47
3,4 54
2 ,0 89
3,2 36
5,5 6 8
3,3 6 1
2 ,3 1 0
2,3 7 0
3,0 12
4,2 5 7
2 ,8 81
4,7 5 5

2 ,6 7 7
3,3 7 1
2,5 4 2
3,2 5 5
5 ,9 1 9
3 ,7 0 6
2 ,6 1 8
2,3 2 2
3 ,5 0 9
4 ,3 1 9
3,0 1 8
5 ,5 6 8

2 ,4 9 3
3 ,1 9 0
1 ,7 7 6
2 ,7 4 1
4,9 0 2
2 ,8 4 3
2 ,0 2 7
2 ,1 4 0
2 ,4 4 4
3 ,9 9 3
2 ,5 2 8
3 ,5 7 6

2 ,6 4 9
3 ,4 8 2
2 , 131
3 ,2 2 3
5 ,8 1 0
3 ,4 4 8
2 ,3 0 5
2 ,5 2 9
3,0 9 5
4 ,6 9 1
2,7 9 7
4 ,4 5 8

2,8 0 8
3,8 2 2
1,9 1 9
4 ,1 3 3
5 ,9 9 6
3 ,4 1 3
2 ,2 2 4
2,8 2 5
3 ,0 1 2
4 ,2 5 1
3,6 0 0
4 ,9 7 6

4 ,2 0 5
5 ,2 4 5
3 ,6 4 6
4 ,7 5 8
6,9 7 5
5,0 7 1
3,6 8 0
3,8 3 6
4 ,5 9 3
5 ,7 9 0
4 ,4 8 3
6,0 1 1

4 ,3 2 8
5 ,2 4 6
4 ,3 6 3
4 ,8 7 7
7 ,2 2 7
5 ,1 8 0
4 ,0 2 6
3 ,6 9 9
5 ,0 6 8
5 ,7 2 7
4 ,4 8 3
6,7 1 5

4,0 0 1
4 ,8 2 6
3 ,1 9 4
4 ,0 5 0
6 ,1 5 0
4,4 6 5
3 ,2 8 9
3,4 9 5
3 ,8 9 1
5,4 1 6
4 ,0 1 4
4 ,7 2 9

4 ,1 0 4
5 ,2 5 9
3 ,4 9 9
4 ,6 4 8
7 ,2 3 3
5 ,5 0 3
3 ,6 2 0
4 ,0 0 1
4 ,7 5 9
6 ,2 9 2
4 ,4 0 2
5,6 6 6

4 ,4 5 6
5,7 17
3 ,6 1 1
5 ,9 7 4
7,7 13
5 ,1 1 0
3,6 93
4,7 5 5
4,5 63
6 ,1 3 6
5 ,5 6 0
6 ,2 9 9

....................................................

5,1 22

5 ,6 1 2

4 ,6 9 2

5 ,1 2 2

4 ,9 7 9

6 ,4 8 8

6 ,9 4 9

5 ,9 6 0

6 ,4 3 6

6,5 7 4

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ..................................... ...
SAVINGS AND LOAN A S S O C I A T I O N S ................... ......................................
PERSONAL CREDIT IN ST IT U TI O N S ...................................................................
L I F E I N S U R A N C E .................................................. .. ........................................................
F IR E * MARINE* AND CASUALTY I N S U R A N C E ................ ..........................

4 ,8 6 3
5 ,4 5 9
4,4 0 0
6,0 1 9
5 ,5 77

5,2 3 8
5 ,6 3 9
4 ,3 5 4
6 ,0 5 9
5 ,7 0 5

4 ,6 1 5
5 ,1 5 7
4 ,3 3 3
6 ,0 1 3
5 ,2 5 2

4 ,7 9 0
5 ,4 5 7
4 ,7 2 7
6 , 163
5 ,6 0 5

4 ,7 4 7
5,6 9 8
4 ,1 9 1
5,6 4 4
5,6 3 6

5 ,8 9 1
6 ,4 8 2
5 ,5 5 9
7,2 6 6
6,6 4 1

6 ,3 5 5
6 ,4 4 4
5 ,5 8 4
7,2 8 3
6 ,6 6 5

5,4 9 0
6 ,0 9 0
5 ,3 9 4
7 ,2 0 4
6 ,3 4 6

5,8 01
6 ,4 5 8
5 ,8 4 4
7 ,4 1 6
6,7 2 8

5,8 74
7 ,0 0 4
5,4 89
7,0 69
6 ,7 5 4

......................................................................................................................................

3 ,4 37

4 ,0 2 1

2 ,8 2 2

3 ,3 5 8

3,6 8 5

5 ,0 7 4

5,7 5 3

4,1 9 7

4 ,9 4 8

5 ,6 21

HOT EL S* TOURI ST S COURTS* AND MOTELS ..............................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ....................................................
MOTION P I C T U R E S ................ ..........................................................................................
HOS PI TAL S .............................................................................................................................

2 ,0 23
2 ,5 98
2,4 21
3,4 3 6

2,2 1 8
2 ,9 2 1
3 ,7 0 9
4 ,1 5 8

1 ,7 4 8
2 ,1 7 8
1 ,5 7 0
2 ,7 6 7

1,8 9 4
2,6 71
1,7 0 5
3,1 3 2

2,2 7 2
2 ,9 4 7
2 ,8 9 9
3,7 1 4

3 ,3 9 4
3,7 1 0
4 ,5 0 7
4 ,5 4 2

3 ,6 9 4
4 ,0 9 3
5,9 2 2
5 ,4 5 2

2,8 9 1
3 ,0 9 1
3 ,0 7 6
3 ,6 8 1

3 ,1 9 5
3 ,8 4 3
3 ,6 7 6
4 ,1 1 7

4 ,0 0 4
4,2 9 9
5,1 75
4 ,9 0 7

FINANCE*

SE RVI CE S

INSURANCE*

AND REAL

ESTATE

1 F o r p u r p o s e s o f t h is s tu d y , a n d b e c a u s e in fo r m a t io n abou t t h e ir a ctu a l p l a c e o f e m p lo y m e n t w a s not a v a ila b le in th e f i l e s
o r g a n i z a t io n s c o v e r e d b y th e R a il r o a d R e t i r e m e n t A c t w e r e c o n s i d e r e d t o h a v e b e e n e m p lo y e d in th e N o rth C e n tr a l R e g io n .
NOTE:

s tu d ie d , e m p l o y e e s o f r a i l r o a d s an d r a i l r o a d r e la te d

A dash ( - ) in d ica tes either the sam ple did not include any w orkers with th ese c h a r a c te r is tic s , or that the data did not m eet the B u r e a u 's publication c r ite r ia .




T a b l e B-9.

Distribution of w o r k e r s b y a n n u a l e a r n i n g s f r o m all w a g e a n d salary e m p l o y m e n t

b y industry of m a j o r e a r n i n g s , 1 9 6 6
CUMULATIVE

PERCENT DISTRI BU TIO N

INDUSTRY

OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL
W
ERE LESS THAN

EARNINGS

FROM ALL

EMPLOYMENT

$1800

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

............................................................................

3 3 .1

3 9 .1

4 5 .1

51 .0

5 6 .6

6 1 .7

6 6 .7

71 .2

7 5 .6

80.5*

8 3 .9

86 .8

8 9 .4

9 2 .5

9 4 .6

..........................................................................................................................................................................

16 .0

1 9 .7

23 .0

2 7 .0

3 1 .7

3 7 .0

4 2 .4

4 8 .7

5 5 .5

66 .1

7 3 .4

7 8 .8

8 3 .4

88 .7

92 .2

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS .........................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ........................................... ...........................................................

11 .6
2 5 .6

14 .6
3 0 .8

16 .7
3 5 .4

19 .6
39 .8

2 3 .7
4 4 .0

29. 1
4 8 .9

3 3 .9
5 4 .8

4 0 .0
6 0 .4

4 7 .0
6 5 .9

5 6 .5
74 .1

6 4 .2
7 9 .0

70 .2
8 2 .4

76 .1
85 .4

82 .0
9 0 .6

86 .2
9 2 .9

............................................................................................................................

2 7 .0

3 2 .2

3 7 .3

4 2 .3

4 7 .6

5 2 .8

5 7 .9

6 2 .6

6 7 .4

7 1 .9

7 5 .6

7 9 .3

82 .9

8 8 .2

9 2 .2

HIGHWAY AND STREET C O N S T R U C T IO N ............................................................. .. ........................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ................................................................................................................
PLUMBING, HE ATING, AIR CONDITIONING ............................................................................
P A IN T IN G , PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ............................................................................
ELECTRICAL W O R K ............................................................................ ...................................... .....................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ...............................................................................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING .........................................................................................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ..............................................................................................
CONCRETE W O R K .................................................................................. ...........................................................

2 6 .4
2 4 .8
21 .1
3 2 .5
1 8 .8
3 0 .4
3 2 .7
2 8 .0
3 2 .6

3 1 .5
2 9 .8
2 4 .9
3 8 .7
2 2 .8
3 6 .6
3 8 .1
3 3 .8
3 9 .5

3 7 .8
34 .5
2 8 .7
4 4 .9
2 6 .1
4 1 .9
4 4 .2
4 0 .1
4 5 .3

4 4 .0
39 .6
33 .0
5 1 .5
2 9 .8
4 7 .3
4 9 .4
45 .1
5 0 .6

5 0 .7
4 4 .2
3 7 .2
5 7 .3
3 4 .4
5 2 .4
5 5 .0
5 1 .6
5 6 .9

5 7 .1
49. 1
4 1 .7
63. 1
3 8 .2
5 8 .0
5 9 .7
5 6 .2
6 1 .1

6 3 .5
5 3 .9
4 6 .2
6 8 .2
42 .1
6 3 .4
6 5 .5
6 1 .3
6 6 .4

6 9 .2
58 .6
51 .1
73 .5
4 5 .7
6 8 .3
6 9 .6
6 5 .6
7 0 .7

7 4 .2
6 3 .2
5 5 .7
7 7 .9
4 9 .6
7 3 .4
7 4 .5
6 9 .4
7 4 .7

7 9 .0
6 7 .8
6 0 .3
8 1 .9
5 3 .7
78 .2
78 .1
7 3 .4
79 .1

8 2 .3
7 1 .0
6 4 .2
8 6 .2
5 7 .0
8 2 .4
8 1 .8
7 7 .7
8 2 .9

8 5 .3
7 4 .4
6 8 .5
8 9 .9
6 0 .2
8 6 .6
8 5 .7
8 1 .5
8 6 .5

8 8 .2
7 7 .8
72 .9
9 2 .6
64 .6
8 9 .7
89 .3
85 .6
8 9 .7

92 .6
83 .7
80 .6
9 6 .6
74 .1
9 4 .3
9 3 .9
9 1 .2
9 3 .3

9 5 .3
8 8 .3
87 .3
9 8 .0
8 2 .5
9 7 .4
9 6 .6
9 4 .7
9 5 .8

......................... „ .......................................................................................................................

2 0 .6

2 5 .9

3 1 .9

38 .1

4 4 .1

5 0 .0

5 5 .8

6 1 .5

6 7 .3

7 3 .5

7 8 .4

8 2 .6

86 .1

9 0 .4

9 3 .2

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS .................................................................................
MEAT PRODUCTS ................................................................................................................ .. ...........................
DAI RY PRODUCTS ...........................................................................................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ........................................................................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ............................................................................................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .......................................................................................................... .. ...........................
BEVERAGES ...........................................................................................................................................................
WEAVING M I L L S , COTTON ......................................................................................................................
WEAVING M I L L S , S YNTHET ICS ..........................................................................................................
K N IT T I N G MI LL S ...........................................................................................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ......................................................................................................................
ME N ' S AND B O Y S ' S U I T S AND COATS .......................................................................................
ME N ' S AND B O Y S ' F URNI SHI NGS .................................................................. .............. .. ...............
WOMEN'S AND M I S S E S ' OUTERWEAR ..............................................................................................
WOMEN'S AND C H I L D R E N ' S UNDERGARMENTS ........................................................................
C H I L D R E N ' S O U T E R W E A R .........................................................................................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING M I L L S ................................................. .. ..................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ...................................................................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ............................................................................................................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ................................................................................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ........................................................................................
N E W S P A P E R S ............................................ ..................................................................................................... ..
COMMERCIAL PRINTING .......................................................................................................... .. ...............
I NDUSTRI AL CHEMICALS .............................................................................................................
P L A S T I C S MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ..................................................................................
DRUGS .......................................................................................................................................................................
S O A P , CL EA NE RS , AND T O I LE T GOODS ....................................................................................
PETROLEUM R E F I N I N G ...............................................................................................................................
T I R E S AND INNER TUBES ......................................................................................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ......................................................................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ................................................................................................................

9 .7
2 7 .1
2 2 .5
6 0 .5
1 9 .1
21 .8
22 .7
1 7 .6
17 .4
2 9 .1
24 .4
2 1 .6
36 .9
3 3 .4
3 8 .1
35 .4
3 4 .9
2 3 .6
2 8 .3
9 .7
2 0 .9
2 5 .9
2 1 .5
6 .2
8 .8
1 1 .2
2 2 .0
6 .1
6 .2
1 8 .4
2 9 .9

1 3 .4
32 .6
2 6 .0
6 7 .6
23 .6
2 7 .2
2 7 .2
2 2 .3
2 3 .5
4 0 .8
3 0 .2
2 9 .2
5 0 .6
45 .8
5 2 .2
4 9 .3
4 3 .2
3 0 .3
3 4 .9
1 2 .4
2 5 .9
2 9 .9
2 6 .1
8.2
12 .1
1 4 .3
26 .2
7 .9
8 .2
2 2 .3
3 9 .6

17 .2
3 8 .7
2 9 .2
7 2 .7
2 8 .8
31 .7
3 1 .1
2 8 .7
3 0 .7
5 6 .1
4 1 .1
3 9 .5
7 1 .5
6 3 .4
6 8 .0
69 .0
5 2 .6
3 7 .5
4 3 .0
1 5 .5
3 1 .4
3 4 .4
30 .5
10 .2
14 .7
17 .9
31 .0
9 .4
10 .6
2 7 .3
5 3 .9

20 .5
4 5 .2
33 .0
76 .7
34 .2
3 7 .3
3 5 .4
3 9 .3
4 0 .3
7 0 .1
5 6 .0
52 .9
8 4 .2
75 .9
8 0 .3
80 .6
6 0 .3
4 6 .3
5 3 .3
1 7 .6
3 7 .8
3 9 .5
35 .1
1 2 .3
18 .4
22 .3
3 6 .3
11 .3
13 .3
3 4 .7
68 .4

2 4 .6
5 0 .0
38 .7
80 .4
3 9 .5
4 3 .2
4 0 .3
5 6 .8
55 .8
7 9 .4
7 2 .5
6 3 .3
9 0 .4
83 .0
8 7 .3
8 7 .4
6 7 .4
5 2 .8
6 4 .0
2 0 .5
4 5 .4
4 4 .1
4 0 .7
1 5 .0
2 3 .4
2 7 .6
4 3 .2
1 3 .5
16 .3
4 2 .4
7 7 .9

2 9 .3
5 4 .6
4 4 .9
8 3 .4
4 6 .4
5 0 .8
4 5 .8
7 1 .1
7 0 .4
85 .2
8 2 .8
72 .1
9 3 .3
8 7 .5
9 1 .2
9 1 .4
7 2 .8
5 9 .5
7 3 .0
2 5 .2
52. 1
4 8 .8
4 6 .3
1 9 .5
30 .7
34 .7
50 .0
1 6 .3
18 .6
50 .2
84. 1

3 5 .0
59 .1
5 2 .0
8 6 .7
5 4 .1
5 7 .8
5 2 .3
8 1 .6
7 9 .2
8 8 .6
8 7 .9
7 9 .2
9 5 .1
90 .1
93 .8
9 3 .5
78 .6
6 7 .5
7 9 .4
3 1 .2
6 0 .2
5 3 .0
51 .2
23 .6
3 9 .1
4 2 .5
54 .2
1 9 .7
23 .3
5 8 .5
88 .9

4 1 .9
6 4 .8
59. 1
8 9 .1
60 .1
6 4 .9
5 8 .6
8 7 .5
8 5 .0
9 1 .1
9 1 .6
83 .5
96 .2
9 1 .8
94 .8
94 .9
8 3 .2
74 .1
8 4 .9
3 9 .5
6 7 .7
5 7 .0
5 5 .9
2 9 .4
46 .8
5 0 .2
59 .6
23 .6
2 7 .6
6 6 .4
9 1 .9

4 7 .8
7 1 .1
6 6 .5
9 0 .9
6 5 .5
7 1 .4
6 4 .6
9 1 .0
9 0 .8
9 3 .2
9 4 .4
87 .1
9 7 .2
9 3 .0
9 5 .7
9 5 .9
8 7 .2
7 9 .3
8 9 .0
4 9 .6
7 3 .8
6 1 .0
6 0 .6
3 7 .1
5 5 .7
5 6 .9
65 .8
2 9 .1
3 3 .3
74 .4
9 4 .1

5 3 .2
7 8 .4
73 .7
9 2 .7
72 .2
7 8 .5
7 1 .3
9 3 .7
9 4 .2
9 4 .9
9 6 .1
8 9 .9
9 7 .8
9 4 .4
9 6 .1
9 6 .6
90 .1
8 4 .4
9 2 .1
6 1 .3
8 0 .2
6 6 .8
6 6 .4
4 5 .5
6 3 .6
6 3 .8
7 1 .3
37 .6
4 3 .0
8 1 .1
95 .5

5 8 .2
8 3 .3
8 0 .2
9 4 .2
7 7 .5
8 3 .7
7 6 .7
9 5 .5
9 5 .7
9 5 .8
9 6 .9
9 2 .2
9 8 .0
9 5 .2
9 6 .9
97 .1
9 2 .4
8 7 .7
9 4 .1
7 0 .1
8 4 .8
7 2 .3
71 .3
5 4 .8
7 1 .9
6 9 .7
75 .5
4 7 .8
51 .0
8 6 .1
9 6 .7

6 3 .0
8 7 .5
8 5 .6
9 5 .1
8 1 .9
8 7 .9
82. 1
9 6 .2
9 6 .7
9 6 .8
9 7 .7
9 3 .7
9 8 .3
9 5 .6
97 .5
9 7 .5
94. 1
9 1 .0
9 5 .4
7 8 .5
8 8 .4
77 .9
7 5 .9
64. 1
7 7 .7
7 4 .9
7 8 .8
60. 1
5 8 .5
9 0 .1
97 .3

69 .0
9 1 .2
9 0 .6
96 .1
8 6 .9
91 .7
8 6 .5
96 .8
9 7 .3
97 .5
9 8 .3
9 5 .3
98 .4
9 6 .1
98 .1
9 7 .7
95 .6
9 3 .4
9 6 .5
8 4 .5
9 1 .5
82 .5
7 9 .9
7 2 .2
82 .3
7 9 .2
8 1 .8
6 9 .5
6 7 .2
9 2 .9
9 7 .9

7 6 .4
95 .3
95 .1
97 .5
91 .7
9 5 .4
9 2 .4
97 .6
97 .8
9 8 .0
9 8 .6
9 6 .0
98 .7
9 6 .7
9 8 .5
9 7 .9
97 .3
95 .5
9 7 .3
9 0 .7
9 4 .7
8 9 .1
8 5 .6
81 .4
87 .3
8 4 .1
86 .7
7 8 .6
80 .8
96 .1
98 .4

82 .2
9 7 .4
9 6 .6
9 8 .2
9 3 .7
9 7 .3
9 5 .2
9 8 .0
9 8 .C
9 8 .5
9 8 .8
9 6 .7
98 .9
97 .4
9 8 .7
9 8 .2
9 7 .9
9 6 .9
9 7 .9
9 3 .8
9 6 .7
9 2 .9
89 .1
8 6 .8
9 0 .6
87 .7
8 9 .8
84 .5
8 8 .4
9 7 .5
9 8 .6

PRIVATE

MINING

NONAGRICULTURAL

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

101

MANUFACTURING




ECONOMY

$9000 $10000 $11000

T a b le B -9 .

D is t r ib u t io n o f w o r k e r s b y a n n u a l e a r n in g s fro m a ll w a g e a n d s a la r y e m p lo y m e n t

b y in d u s tr y o f m a jo r e a r n in g s , 1 9 6 6 ---- C o n t in u e d
CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
W
ERE LESS THAN

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY MANUFACTURING -

o
o
00
■4
*

$1800 $2400 $30 0 0 $3600 $ 4 2 0 0

$ 54 0 0 $60 0 0 $660 0 $7200 $780 0 $8400 $90 00 UOOOO $11000

CONTINUED

CONTINUED
87.4
84.4
67.0
81.4
76.8
84.0
82.4
80.0
79.2
72.6
78.4
77.1
65.7
78.6
76.0
69.0
85.0
78.0
80.5
87.4
88.5
92.4
70.7
87.4
72.1
61.6
79.2
79.0
88.6

9 4 .C
i
92.1
83.1
9 1 .A
88.6.
91.5i
89.81
88.5
l
8 7 .C
86.1
90.2
88.1
77.6.
88. A
88.1
82.3i
92.5.
8 7 .A
•
90.6.
93.81
93.6,
95.3t
8 1. 6 »
91.fi1
84.6i
76.0l
90.7
87,9i
93.1

13.3
19.2
7 .8
11.3
10.2
16.1
17.2
17.3
18.3
8 .2
15.4
10.3
13.6
11.9
11.2
11.1
15.8
14.2
13.7
16.2
21.9
30.0
11.1
24.9
8 .4
7 .6
18.4
13.4
29.8

17.4
23.8
10.3
14.4
14.0
20.0
22.2
21.2
23.2
10.9
19.5
13.4
16.6
15.0
14.0
14.4
20.0
17.9
18.1
20.4
26.9
37.2
14.7
31.3
11.1
10.1
21.7
18.0
35.6

21.4
28.8
12.1
17.7
17.3
26.7
26.6
25.1
28.0
13.9
23.6
16.0
20.0
17.5
16.9
17.7
24.1
22.3
23.5
24.9
32.9
45.4
18.5
38.4
13.7
12.8
25.1
21.5
43.0

27.0
34.9
14.4
21.5
21.3
33.7
31.7
30.3
33.3
16.3
27.4
19.1
22.7
21.6
21.3
21.5
29.9
27.8
29.5
31.0
40.1
53.3
23.3
46.4
16.7
15.6
29.3
26.8
51.2

34.3
41.8
16.8
25.7
2 5.9
40.6
37.2
37.5
38.4
20.2
32.0
22.8
26.4
27.3
26.0
27.0
36.4
34.0
37.0
37.4
47.9
61.8
28.4
56.1
20.1
18.1
34.2
32.8
58.9

46.3
48.6
19.8
31.3
31.6
47.6
43.3
43.6
45.1
25.1
37.2
27.3
30.9
32.6
31.2
33.3
4 3.8
40.7
43.3
44.3
57.6
69.4
35.9
64.9
23.8
2 2.0
39.8
39.8
65.4

55.9
55.4
24.2
38.0
39.1
55.0
50.5
49.6
50.9
31.5
42.6
32.5
35.9
39.6
38.1
40.1
51.9
48.2
51.5
53.8
66.6
76.1
42.7
71.4
28.5
26.3
4 6.3
47.4
71.1

64.3
61.6
30.6
46.5
45.7
61.9
58.2
54.9
57.2
38.4
48.6
40.2
40.8
4 7.3
45.3
46.2
59.3
54.7
58.3
61.8
73. 1
81.2
49.1
76.3
35.1
32.0
53.1
54.7
75.4

72.7
68.2
39.5
56.4
52.9
69.2
65.8
61.3
63.2
47.8
55.2
50.7
46.3
56.3
53.3
51.4
67.8
61.9
65.1
69.7
78.4
85.4
55.2
79.9
44.1
39.7
60.5
61.0
80.4

79.4
75.0
48.9
67.0
61.5
75.2
72.9
69.1
69.0
57.1
63.6
61.7
53.7
65.4
62.4
58.3
75.5
68.2
70.6
78.3
83.0
88.0
61.0
83.1
56.9
47.6
68.1
69.5
84.0

TRANSPORTATION ........................................................................................................................

17.2

20.7

24.2

27.9

32.0

36.5

41.4

47.9

55.6

66.7

72.6

77.4

84.8

90.6.

94.2

42.4
52.1
88.4
57.3
48.7

63.2
64.5
92.1
64.5
58.8

67.9
75.7
94.4
71.1
67.6

71.5
82.6
96. 1
77.0
73.6

86.4
89.6
97.6
82.6
78.8

93.2!
96.5i
98.5i
88.9>
84.7

97.6
98.8
99.0
93.1
87.3

96.0
94.9
89.1
94.7
92.4
94.7
93.3
91.9
90. 1
91.5
9 3.7
92.9
83.1
9 2 .A
91.7
87.1
95.1
90.6
93.9
95.6
95.5
96.6
85.6
93.8
89.6
81.8
93.6
91.0
95.0

12.2
17.8
59.6
33.3
16.2

14.2
21.8
68.7
38.1
20.1

17.1
27.1
76.3
42.4
26.1

21.6
32.7
81.9
47.1
32.5

30.5
41.3
85.5
51.8
39.9

25.3

31.4

38.8

48.1

56.8

62.8

67.0

70.4

73.3

76.4

80.8

86.9'

91.2

24.5
31.6

30.9
36.0

39.0
40.5

49.3
45.2

58.5
50.8

64.6
55.7

68.4
59.7

71.4
65.2

73.9
6 9.2

76.9
72.3

81.5
75.4

88.0i
7 9 .A

92.5
82.3

TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ...................................................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION .........................................................................................................

6 .8
10.3
36.3
20.9
7.5

8.7
12.5
43.2
25.0
10.4

10.5
14.9
50.9
29.1
12.9

COMMUNICATION ..........................................................................................................................

15.8

20.9

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ............................................................................................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING ...................................................................

14.6
23.5

19.9
27.7

RAILROADS ...............................................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ...................................................................

84.1
80.5
58.5
75.4
70.7
79.6
78.4
74.9
74.3
65.7
71.6
69.6
60.1
72.5
69.6
63.9
80.5
73.0
75.6
83.5
86.2
90.5
66.0
85.3
65.3
55.0
74.4
74.6
86.4

90.8
87.8
74.0
86.8
82.0
87.3
85.9
84.1
82.5
79.5
83.7
82.6
70.7
83.4
81.7
75.2
88.5
82.3
84.9
90.8
91.2
93.6
75.5
89.6
77.6
68.3
83.8
82.1
90.8

GLASS AND GLASSWARE* PRESSED OR BLOWN .........................................................
CONCRETE* GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ......................................................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ......................................................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES .........................................................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND D RA W IN G................................................................... ..
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ...................................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ...........................................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ................................................................
METAL STAMPINGS ................................................................................................................
e n g i n e s a nd t u r b i n e s ...................................................................................................
FARM MACHINERY ..................................................................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED M A C H IN E R Y ....................... .........................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ............................................................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY .....................................................................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ................................................................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .............................................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES .......................................................................................
ELECTRIC TEST ANO DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT .................................................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ........................................................................
HOUSEHOLD A P P L IA N C E S ........................................................................... . .....................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ......................................................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ......................................................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ............................................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES .........................................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ................................................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ........................................................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND R E P A I R I N G ..................................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OTHER MANUFACTURING ......................................................................................................

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S .................................................................... .............................................

10.5

12.7

15.1

18.1

2 2.4

26.9

32.4

38.5

4 6.2

54.6

62.8

70.2

78.6

87.5i

92.5

WHOLESALE TRADE .............................................................................. ......................................

24.3

28.6

33.2

38.5

44.2

50.3

56.2

61.6

67.0

73.0

77.1

80.7

83.8

87.6*

90.2

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ....................................................
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .........................................................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ........... .....................................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ................................................................... .. . .
ELECTRICAL GOODS ..............................................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...................................................................

20.2
16.1
24.9
33.6
18.3
19.7
16.4

24.8
19.7
30.6
38.5
22.2
24.5
20.1

28.7
23.3
38.1
43.0
27.4
29.5
23.8

34.3
28.0
44.9
47.9
32.4
35.4
28.9

4 0.2
33.5
52.0
53.4
38.6
4 1.6
34.3

47.5
40.0
59.3
58.5
4 4.7
4 7.8
40.0

54.4
46.5
64.3
63.9
51.5
54.6
45.9

61.2
52.1
69.0
6 8.9
56.8
61.0
51.6

68.1
58.2
72.4
74.0
62.1
66.5
57.6

76.0
65.1
76.7
79.6
68.2
73.2
64.0

80.5
69.2
78.8
83.8
72.0
78.5
68.8

83.9
73.0
81.3
87.4
76.2
81.4
72.6

87.3
76.9
82.7
90.1
79.0
84.2
76.7

90.6> 9 2 .7
82.3l 8 6 .1
8 5 .C 86.9
I
93.3l 9 5 .0
83.fi1 8 6 . A
88.3i 9 1 . A
81.7
85.6




T a b le B -9 .

D is t r ib u tio n o f w o r k e r s by a n n u a l e a rn in g s fro m a ll w a g e a n d s a la r y e m p lo y m e n t

by in d u s t r y o f m a jo r e a r n in g s , 1 9 6 6 ---- C o n t in u e d
CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
W
ERE LESS THAN

INDUSTRY

$1800 $24 00 $300 0 $3600 $420 0 $4800 $ 54 00 $600 0 $660 0 $7200 $7800 $84 00 $9000 $10000 $11000
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

CONTINUED

103

RETAIL TRADE ...........................................................................................................................

53.3

60.9

67.8

73.3

78.0

81.7

85.0

87.7

90.1

92.5

94.0

95.2

96.2

97.3

9 8 .C

DEPARTMENT STORES ..........................................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ..........................................................................................................
VARIETY S T O R E S .................................................................................................................
GROCERY S T O R E S ................................................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE D E A L E R S ............. ................................................................... ..
MEN*S AND BOYS* CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS .................................................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ...............................................................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES .............................................................. ...............................
SHOE STORES
FURNITURE AND HOME F U R N I S H I N G S ...........................................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY S T O R E S ................................................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ..................................................................................................

53.7
40.4
62.8
47.4
22.5
48.8
57.0
57.6
51.9
35.2
56.5
26.1

61.7
48.2
71.5
55.0
27.3
55.0
65.5
66.4
58.2
41.4
64.4
31.8

70.1
54.6
82.8
60.8
32.3
61.3
75.1
77.4
64.1
48.2
71.9
37.1

77.0
62.7
89.1
65.9
37.6
67.1
83.1
83.6
70.1
54.3
77.9
42.5

82.5
69.6
91.9
70.6
44.4
71.8
88.3
87.7
74.7
60.5
81.6
49.9

85.9
76.4
93.3
74.4
51.4
76.1
91.2
90.2
78.4
66.0
84.3
57.5

88.5
80.6
94.5
78.6
58.2
79.3
93.7
92.2
82.1
71.1
86.1
66.5

90.5
84.3
95.5
82.4
64.4
82.7
95.1
93.2
84.5
75.8
87.6
73.2

92.5
86.8
96.5
85.8
7 0.4
86.3
96.2
94.5
87.8
80.1
88.8
78.4

94.2
89.4
97.2
89.3
76.3
89.8
96.8
95.6
91.0
85.0
90.3
84.7

95.5
91.2
97.8
91.8
80.4
91.8
97.1
9 6.6
93.0
87.6
91.2
87.9

96.4
92.5
98.2
9 3.9
83.7
93.2
97.5
9 7.3
94.4
90.0
92.4
91.2

97.0
93.6
98.3
95.6
86.8
94.4
97.8
97.6
95.9
91.4
93.3
93.3

97.9
94.8
98.7
97.4
90.3
95. 5
98.1
97.9
97.2
93.9
94.8
95.7

98.4
95.5
98.8
98.5
92.7
96.6
98.5
98.3
97.8
95.5
96.2
96.7

24.8

30.8

37.0

45.6

54.6

62.2

68.5

73.3

77.5

81.5

84.2

86.6

88.5

91.2

93.0

20.1
18.4
24.7
18.4
16.8

26.5
24.0
31.3
23.0
21.6

33.3
30.6
38.6
28.8
27.5

44.2
39.2
48.4
36.3
37.7

56.1
50.9
57.6
44.8
48.1

65.4
59.7
65.6
51.9
55.6

72.6
67.7
72.0
58.5
61.0

77.4
73.3
77.6
63.7
65.9

81.5
76.5
82.2
69.3
70.4

85.1
80.9
86.6
73.5
75.5

87.6
83.9
89.1
76.8
80.0

89.5
85.9
91.2
79.7
84.2

90.8
87.8
93.1
82.3
88.1

92.8
90.3
95.8
86.8
92.0

94.4
92.3
96.8
89.7
94.4

FINANCE* INSURANCE,

AND REAL ESTATE ....................................................

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS B A N K S .......... .....................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ............................................................................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ...............................................................................
L I F E INSU RA N CE ...................................................... .................................... .....................
F I R E , MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ............................................................
S E R V I C E S ............................................................................................................ ........................

46.5

54.0

60.8

66.9

72.0

76.4

80.5

83.8

86.8

90.4

92.1

93.4

94.5

95.8

96.7

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ..............................................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ..................................................................
MOTION P I C T U R E S .................. ............................................................................................
H O S P I T A L S ........... ........................................................ ....................... ..

61.8
48.7
69.7
37.2

70.7
60.9
74.2
47.2

78.4
72.1
77.1
58.8

84.3
80.5
79.4
69.0

88.5
85.2
81.6
76.3

91.3
88.1
83.3
81.9

93.6
90.6
85.5
86.2

95.0
92.4
87.3
89.5

96.2
94.3
88.9
92.0

97.1
96.1
90.6
93.6

97.8
97.0
91.7
95.0

98.2
97.7
93. 1
96.1

98.5
98.2
94.3
97.6

99.0
98.8
95.8
98.4

99.3
99.2
97.0
98.8




T a b le B -1 0.

D is t r ib u t io n o f w o r k e r s b y a n n u a l e a r n in g s fro m a ll w a g e a n d s a la r y e m p lo y m e n t

by in d u s tr y o f m a jo r e a r n in g s , 1967

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
W
ERE LESS THAN
$1800 $2A00 $300 0

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ..............................................................

MINING ...........................................................................................................................................
CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS ..................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ....................................................................................

$3600 $ A200 $A800 $5A00 $6000 $660 0 $7200 $780 0 $8A00 $9000 $10000 $11000

32.0

37.8

A3 »5

A9.A

55.0

60. 1

65.0

69.5

1 5 .A

18.7

2 2 .A

26.3

31.0

35.9

A1 . 3

11.2
25.2

13.5
30.0

16.1
3A.9

1 8 .A
AO.A

2 2 .A
A5.1

26.6
A9. 3

73.9

78.8

82.3

85.3

87.9

91.3

93.5

A7.0

5 3 .A

62.0

3 1 .A
5A.0

37.0
59.0

A2.9
6A.0

51.7
69.6

69.8

75.7

80.2

86.0

90.3

59.7
7 3.3

66.2
78.0

71.7
81.5

79.2
87.6

8A.2
91.6

26.1

31.0

35.9

AO.6

A5.3

5 0 .A

55.2

59.8

6A.A

68.9

72.8

76.6

80.2

85.8

90. 1

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION............................................. .................. ..
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ............................................................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR C O N D I T I O N I N G .................. ..........................................
PA INT ING , PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ..............................................................
e l e c t r i c a l work ................................................................................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ................................................................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ......................................................................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ...............................................................................
CONCRETE WORK ....................................................................................................................

25.2
23.9
19.6
31.6
18.9
30.0
3 3 .A
30.1
30.5

3 0 .A
28.6
22.9
37.9
22.5
35.8
38.6
35.7
36.3

35.5
33.9
26.6
AA.O
26.3
A2.0
A3.6
AO. 1
A3.1

A1.5
38.8
30.5
A 9 .5
2 9 .A
A7.3
A8.6
A5.2
A8.7

A8.2
A2.8
33.9
5A.9
32.8
51.6
53. 1
50.3
5A.5

55.2
A7.7
3 8 .A
60.6
36.7
5 6 .A
58.0
55.5
6 1.0

61.3
5 2 .A
A2.3
65.1
AO .7
61.2
63.2
60.3
65.5

67. 1
5 6.9
A6.7
70.2
A3.6
65.7
67.3
6A.3
70.5

72.5
61.1
51.5
7A.8
A7.A
70.7
72.3
68.6
73.5

77.0
65.0
56.0
79.6
51.7
75.3
7 7 .A
71.9
77.3

80.3
68.6
60.2
83.8
55.0
79.5
81.5
76.3
81.0

83.7
72.5
6A.0
87.7
58. 1
8 A .0
8A.A
79.9
8 3 .A

86.6
7 6 .A
68.2
9 0 .A
62.3
87.8
87.5
83.6
87.1

91.3
81.6
76. 1
95.1
70.3
92.8
92.6
89.5
90.9

9A.6
85.9
83. A
97. 1
79.2
96. 1
96.0
92.9
9A.3

MANUFACTURING .........................................................................................................................

1 9 .A

2 A .3

29.8

36.0

A2.2

A8.2

5 A .2

59.9

65.6

72.5

77.3

8 1 .A

8 A .8

89.0

92. 1

9.2
25.3
23.6
59.3
20.6
22.2
20.9
17.0
1 6 .A
26.9
2A.9
21.0
3 2 .A
30.6
33.3
3A. A
31.8
22.8
2 6 .A
9.1
19.1
25.0
20.1
6 .A
8.0
10.0
20.2
7.1
5 .A
1 8 .A
29.3

12.2
31.2
27.7
65.9
2 A .5
26.2
25.6
20.9
21.8
36.2
31.7
28.8
A3.6
A1.9
A 6. 2
AA.6
39.2
28.5
32.6
12.1
23.6
29.1
2A.9
8 .A
11.0
13.0
2 A .8
9 .1
7 .A
23.5
37.3

1 5 .A
37.0
31.1
70.7
28.3
30.8
29.7
27.3
29.5
50.9
A2.2
39.3
62.8
58.1
6 2 .A
62.8
A8.9
35.7
A O .5
15.0
28.3
33.3
29.2
10.2
1 3 .A
15.9
30.1
1 0 .A
9 .3
27.5
50.2

18.9
AA.2
35.2
7 5 .A
32.9
35.7
33.9
39.6
A O .3
66.2
57.1
50.7
8 0 .A
72.2
76.6
78.1
56.5
A3.5
51.2
17.9
35.1
3 8 .A
3A . 5
11.6
16.8
21.2
35.0
1 2.A
11.9
3 5 .A
63.8

22.5
A9.7
AO.A
7 8 .A
38.0
A1.2
3 9 .A
56.9
55.2
76.9
72.9
6 0.9
88.5
80.1
85.3
8 5.7
62.8
50.6
62.5
21.0
A1.6
A3.2
AO • 0
1 A. A
21.7
2 6 .A
39.8
1 A. 3
1A. 6
A3.3
75.7

26.7
*5.2
A 5.6
82.0
A3.3
A8.2
A5.1
70.7
67.8
83. 1
82. 1
7 0 .A
92.0
85.0
90. 1
90.1
69.0
56.7
71.3
23.8
A8.A
A7.5
A5.9
17.9
2 8.9
33.2
A5.7
16.7
1 8.A
5 1 .A
82.3

32.7
60.6
51.3
8A.9
A9.8
55.3
50.6
80.1
77.6
87.2
88.7
77.7
9A.3
8 8 .A
92.9
92.6
7 A .8
6A.A
77.7
29.3
55.6
51.7
50.8
22.8
37.1
A1.3
51.6
19.6
23.0
59.8
87.3

38.5
6A.7
57.8
87.2
56. 1
61.7
56.6
86.0
83.3
89.9
91.8
8 2 .A
95.6
9 0 .A
9A.3
93.9
79.8
71.2
83.1
36.7
6 2 .A
55.7
55.1
28.6
A 5. 1
A8.2
5 6 .A
23.5
28.3
67.2
90.8

A5.3
69.9
6A.7
89.7
62.5
68.2
6 2 .A
89.9
88.3
92.1
93.9
86.1
96.6
92.2
95.2
95.1
8A.5
77.3
87.5
A5.8
70.5
59.7
59.5
35.0
52.5
55.3
61.6
27.3
35.6
73.6
93.2

58.8
75.6
72.5
92.0
70.0
75.2
69.2
9 3 .A
92.1
9A. 1
96.1
89.2
97.3
93.5
95.5
96.0
88.7
82.5
9 1 .A
58.1
7 7 .A
65.5
65.0
A3.9
62.5
62.1
67.7
3 3 .A
50.1
81.2
95.3

63.8
80.3
78.9
9 3 .A
7A.7
79.8
7A.9
95.2
9A.3
95.3
97.0
9 1 .A
97.7
9A.3
96.3
96.8
91.3
8 6 .A
93.2
66.3
8 2 .A
70.0
69.7
52.0
69.9
67.6
71.8
A O .5
59.7
85.7
96.2

68. 1
8A.7
83.6
9A.6
79.5
8A.8
80.3
9 6 .A
95.8
9 6 .A
97.9
92.6
98.0
95.0
97.0
97.2
9 3 .A
8 9 .A
9A.6
73.8
86.2
75. 1
7A . 2
60.6
75.5
71.9
75.5
52.8
67. 1
89.3
97.2

72.6
89.1
87.6
95.7
83.8
89.2
8A.5
96.9
96.5
97.0
98.2
93.8
98.2
95.5
97.5
9 7 .A
95.0
92.0
95.5
81.1
89.6
80.2
78.0
69.1
79.6
76.1
78.8
63.5
7 3 .A
91.9
97.5

78.9
93.6
92.9
96.9
89.0
93.2
90. 1
97.6
97.1
97.8
98.6
95.0
98.5
96.3
98.0
97.8
96.6
95.3
97.0
8 8 .A
92.9
86.2
83.6
78.8
85.6
81.6
8A .0
7A.A
8 1 .A
9A.8
98.2

83.9
96.0
95. A
97.6
92. A
96.2
93.6
97.9
97.8
98.5
98.9
96.0
98.6
96.8
98.5
97.9
97.5
96.8
97.7
92.5
95.6
90.9
87.6
8 A .2
88.7
85. 1
87.8
82. 1
88.8
96.7
98.5

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.....................................................................................................

104

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ...................................................................
MEAT PRODUCTS ...................................................................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ............................................................................................ .....................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN F O O D S .............................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ......................................................................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ...............................................................................................................
BEVERAGES ...............................................................................................................................
WEAVING M IL L S , C O T T O N ................................. ..............................................................
WEAVING M IL L S , SYNTHETICS .......................................................................................
KNITTING MILLS ..................................................................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS .................................................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ........................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* FURNISHINGS .................................................................................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ...............................................................................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ...........................................................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ..................................................................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ....................................................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ..................................................... ...............................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ...................................................................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ........................................................................
NEWSPAPERS...........................................................................................................................
COMMERCIAL P R I N T I N G .....................................................................................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ..................................................................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ...................................................................
D R U G S ........................................................................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS .....................................................................
PETROLEUM REFINING ........................................................................................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES .................................................................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS................................................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ...........................................................................................




T a b le B-10.

D is t r ib u t io n o f w o r k e r s by a n n u a l e a r n in g s fro m a ll w a g e a n d s a la r y e m p lo y m e n t

by in d u s try o f m a jo r e a r n in g s , 1967---- C o n tin u e d

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
W
ERE LESS THAN
$180 0 $2400 $300 0 $3600 $ 42 00 $480 0 $54 00 $60 00 $ 66 00 $720 0 $78 0 0 $840 0 $9000 $10000 $11000

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY MANUFACTURING -

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

105

GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN .........................................................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .............................. ........................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS .......................................................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ..........................................................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ..........................................................................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ...................................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS.......... .................................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ................................................................
METAL STAMPINGS ................................................................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ....................................................................................................
FARM MACHINERY ...................................................................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ................................................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY .............................................................. ..
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY .................................................................................. ..
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ................................................................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .............................................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES .......................................................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DI STRIBUTING EQUIPMENT ...................................................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ........................................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ....................................................................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .......................................................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ......................................................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ............................................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ..........................................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ................................................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS .........................................................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ............................................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ..................................................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ......................................................................................................

14.2
19.8
7 .4
11.0
9 .4
15.3
16.2
16.3
17.9
7.3
14.3
8.6
12.4
11.0
10.6
9 .6
14.2
13.2
12.4
15.2
19.7
27.8
9.8
20.7
8.7
6 .9
18.0
11.1
29.2

17.6
24.1
9 .5
14.3
12.3
20.5
19.9
20.0
22.3
10.1
17.2
10.7
15.5
14.0
13.4
12.8
18.2
16.6
16.2
19.5
24.2
35.6
13.0
26.2
11.2
9 .0
21.9
14.3
35.8

21.7
28.8
11.1
17.1
15.2
25.7
23.8
24.2
26.6
12.5
20.6
13.8
18.1
17.1
16.7
15.2
21.3
20.6
20.3
23.1
29.2
43.3
16.3
33.0
14.0
11.3
25.8
18.4
42.6

26.0
33.9
13.2
20.8
18.8
31.0
28.4
28.5
31.0
14.7
23.8
17.2
21.5
20.5
20.3
19.6
25.8
26.2
26.1
29.3
37.5
53.6
20.7
41.3
16.7
13.9
29.4
23.8
50.2

31.7
40.8
15.5
2 6.0
24.0
38.6
33.3
33.6
36.4
18.1
28.2
21.2
25.4
25.8
25.5
24.5
32.3
32.1
33.7
35.6
45.7
63.4
25.5
51.8
20. 1
16.9
33.7
30.5
57.5

4 1.7
46. 7
18.3
32.0
29.5
45. 7
39.8
39.4
42.5
22.7
33.5
25.1
29.5
32.5
31.6
30.3
39.7
39.3
41.8
42.8
55.2
70.5
31.5
60.8
24. 1
20.5
39. 1
37. 1
63.5

53.7
53.5
22.9
39.1
36.8
53.1
46.9
4 7.0
49.1
28.6
39.4
31.0
35.0
39.4
38.3
37.7
48.6
46.3
49.2
51.6
64.3
75.7
39.0
66.7
29.5
24.5
44.9
4 5.6
69.3

62.9
59.3
30.3
47.6
44.5
60.6
54.4
53.7
54.4
36.0
47.2
39.3
40.2
46.3
46.2
4 3.4
56.6
53.4
56.0
60.5
71.3
80.1
45.9
71.5
35.5
30. 1
51.7
53.9
74.0

70.5
65.8
39.0
57.4
53.8
6 7.0
62.4
59.9
61.7
4 5.0
54.4
49.5
4 5.7
54.5
54.6
49.1
65.4
59.5
63.0
67.2
76.3
84.4
52.1
75.5
44.2
36.8
59.5
61.5
78.5

76.4
71.9
50.0
67.3
65.6
73.9
70.4
67.6
70.3
56.1
62.5
61.6
52.6
64.0
65.2
55.0
73.1
66.2
69.9
77.0
81.5
87.8
58.4
79.3
57.6
49.0
68.3
69.4
83.0

81.6
77.4
59.9
75.1
72.3
78.6
76.7
73.7
75.7
66.3
69.0
69.7
59.2
7 0.3
71.2
61.0
79.1
71.3
75.3
83.0
85.6
89.6
63.2
81.8
65.9
56.2
75.2
74.5
85.4

85.5
82.3
68.5
81.3
77.9
82.2
81. 1
78.2
79.9
73.2
75.8
77.3
65.4
76.4
77.2
66.2
83.9
75.8
80.1
86.9
87.9
91.3
67.9
84.5
72.3
62.3
80.2
78.4
87.6

88.9
86.4
75.1
85.8
82.0
85.5
84.4
81.3
82.3
78.4
80.2
81.9
69.6
80.6
81.4
71.7
87.4
79.8
84.4
89.7
90.4
93.3
72.0
86.7
77.3
68.3
84.1
81.7
89.4

92.8
91.7
83.1
90.6
87.8
90.2
88.8
86.2
86.0
84.9
86.4
87.8
75.2
85.9
86.8
78.5
91.3
85.4
89.4
93.0
92.4
94.7
77.9
89.4
84.5
75.8
88.9
85.8
91.9

95. 1
94.2
89.7
93.9
91.8
93.0
92.4
89.9
90.3
91. 1
90.6
91.6
81.6
90.0
90.5
84.0
93.9
89.2
92.6
95.4
9 4 .C
95.8
82.8
91.6
89. 1
81.4
92.5
90. 1
93.9

TRANSPORTATION ........................................................................................................................

16.8

20.3

23.6

27.1

30.9

35.2

39.7

45.0

51.2

60.8

68.5

73.9

80.2

88.6.

91.9

RAILROADS ...............................................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ...................................................................
TAXICABS .................................................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ...................................................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION .........................................................................................................

6 .3
10.9
36.5
20.3
7 .4

8.3
13.9
43.2
24.5
9 .7

10.0
16.0
50.2
28.4
11.4

11.7
18.6
56.8
32.5
14.8

13.8
22.3
65.2
36.8
18.1

16. 1
27. 1
73.0
4 1.3
23.1

19.4
31.4
78.9
45.4
28.8

25.6
38.7
84.0
49.6
35.2

34.2
46.5
86.5
54.5
42.1

53. 1
55.9
89.9
60.7
49.9

6 4.9
66.7
93.5
67.4
57.2

6 9 .C
74.5
95.1
74.0
64. 1

78.1
82.3
96.6
80.2
71.3

92.6
93.4
90.3i 9 6 .0
98.01 98. 7
87.4
9 2 .C
79.7
85.0

COMMUNICATION ..........................................................................................................................

14.7

19.1

23.5

28.5

36.0

44.7

53.9

61.2

65.4

68.9

71.9

75.4

7 9.7 '

85.<5)

89.9

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ............................................................................................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING ...................................................................

13.5
22.2

18.1
25.9

22.7
29.8

28.0
34.1

36.1
38.8

45.5
43.7

55.4
49.6

62.9
54.5

66.9
59.2

70. 1
63.3

72.9
67.4

76. 1
71.1

80.6.
)
7 4 .C

8 7. 3 \
7 7 . t5

91.5
80.6

36.2

42.6

51.2

58.7

65.9

73.8t

8 3. 3 i

89.6

...................................................................................................................

10.5

12.8

15.0

17.8

21.2

25.7

30.8

WHOLESALE TRADE .....................................................................................................................

23.4

27.5

31.7

36.6

42.1

48. 1

53.9

59.3

64.6

70.9

75.0

78.8

8 2 .C
l

8 6. 3 \

89.2

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT .....................................................
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ..........................................................
DRY GOODS AND A PP A R EL ................................................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ...........................................................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS .............................................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ..................................................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT ANC SUPPLIES ...................................................................

20.5
15.0
23.8
31.9
17.4
19.7
16.0

24.2
18.9
29.1
36.4
21.8
23.8
19.7

28.7
22.3
35.0
40.9
25.5
27.5
23.6

33.6
26.4
41.6
45.5
31.6
33.4
27.9

39.5
32.0
47.7
50.6
37.4
40.8
32.9

4 6.3
37.5
55.0
55.6
44.0
46.4
39.0

52.4
43.4
60.7
60.9
50.1
52.3
44.8

58.9
49.7
64.9
66.2
55.8
58.7
50.3

65.6
56.0
69.1
70.8
61.1
64.0
56.0

73.8
63.0
73.8
76.7
67.2
71.7
62.6

78.4
67.0
76.5
80.6
71.2
76.6
67.4

82. 3
71.3
78.6
85.0
74.6
80.2
71.6

85.81
7 5 . 3i
80.3;
88.01
77.5>
83. 1
75.01

8 9. 4 i
80.4►
8 2. 6 ,
9 7 .7 '

91.9
84.4
85.4

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S




81.8

94- 3
84.8

87.2l
81. C
1

90.0
84.9

T a b le B-10.

D is t r ib u t io n o f w o r k e r s b y a n n u a l e a r n in g s fro m a ll w a g e a n d s a la r y e m p lo y m e n t

b y in d u s t r y o f m a jo r e a r n in g s , 1 9 6 7 ---- C o n t in u e d
CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
W
ERE LESS THAN

INDUSTRY

$180 0 $2400 $300 0 $3600 $ 42 0 0 $48 00 $540 0 $600 0 $6600 $7200 $78 00 $840 0 $9000 $100 00 $11000
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

CONTINUED

106

RETAIL T R A D E .............................................................................................................................

52.3

59.7

66.4

72.2

77.0

80.6

84.0

86.7

89.1

91.4

93.1

94.4

95.5

96.8

97.6

DEPARTMENT STORES ............................................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ............................................................................................................
VARIETY STORES .......................................................................................... ........................
GROCERY STORES ...................................................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE D E A L E R S .................................................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS ..................................................
WOMEN * S READY-TO-WEAR STORES . . . * ......................................................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ...............................................................................................
SHOE STORES ................................................ .........................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ...........................................................................
DRUG STORES ANO PROPRIETARY STORES ................................................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ...................................................................................................

51.1
41.0
59.7
46.2
22.3
48.1
55.5
56.6
50.2
34.4
55.0
25.5

58.8
47.7
67.2
54.1
26.5
54.2
62.8
63.7
57.5
40.6
62.9
30.2

67.0
54.2
77.9
60.2
31.3
59.9
72.4
74.2
63.3
48.1
69.9
34.9

74.7
61.6
86.9
65.2
36.6
66.3
81.1
82.0
70.0
53.7
76.5
39.9

80.6
69.2
90.9
69.6
42.8
71.4
86.8
87.2
74.7
59.9
80.7
46.7

84.5
75.7
92.7
7 3.4
49.0
75.5
90.2
89.5
78.2
64.9
83.2
53.8

87.2
81.0
94.1
77.2
55.5
79.5
92.8
91.4
81.3
70.6
85.3
61.8

89.5
85.0
95.1
80.9
61.8
82.6
94.1
92.5
83.8
75.1
86.8
69.4

91.4
87.5
95.9
84.3
67.5
85.2
95.4
93.6
87.0
79.2
88.2
74.1

93. 1
89.7
96.7
87.7
73.3
88.8
96.2
95.1
89.7
83.5
89.3
81.0

94.5
91.1
97.3
90.4
77.4
90.8
96.6
95.9
9 2.5
86.0
90.2
85.3

95.6
92. 1
97.8
92.7
81.1
92.2
97.0
96.6
94. 1
88.5
91.1
88.9

96.5
92.8
98.1
94.7
84.2
93.6
97.4
96.9
95.1
90.2
92.2
90.9

97.6
93.8
98.5
96.7
88.1
95.2
97.7
97.9
96.7
92.9
93.9
93.5

98.2
95.2
98.7
97.9
91.0
96.4
98.2
98.3
97.3
94.9
95.0
95.4

....................................................................

24.2

29.9

35.6

43.4

52.2

60. 1

66.4

71.5

75.7

79.9

82.8

85.2

87.2

90.1

92. 1

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .................................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ....................................................... .....................
PERSONAL CREDIT INST ITU TION S ................................................................................
LIFE INSURANCE ...................................................................................................................
F I R E , MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ............................................................

18.9
19.0
24.5
17.6
15.5

25.1
24.3
30.9
23.1
20.6

31.1
28.2
37.0
28.6
25.9

41.2
35.9
46.1
35.4
34.6

53.0
48.5
55.2
4 2.9
45.0

63.3
57.5
62.9
50.7
53.5

70.5
65.4
69.8
56.6
59.5

75.8
71.1
75.6
62.2
64.0

79.8
75.2
80.5
67.2
68.3

83.8
79.7
84.5
71.9
72.7

86.2
82.2
87.6
75.6
76.9

88.2
84.6
90.5
78.6
81.2

89.8
86.1
92.2
81.5
85.3

92.1
88.5
94.8
85.4
90.1

93.7
91.4
96.3
88.5
92.6

S E R V I C E S .......................................................................................................................................

44.5

51.8

58.4

64.6

69.8

74.3

78.2

81.6

84.7

87.8

89.9

91.5

92.8

94.3

95.5

94.1
90.9
86.4
8 5.4

95.5
92.9
87.8
88.5

96.7
94.9
89.7
91.2

97.5
96.2
91.2
92.8

97.9
97.0
92.3
94.3

98.2
97.6
93.1
95.4

98.7
98.3
95.2
96.5

9 9 .C
98.9
96. 8
98.0

FINANCE,

INSURANCE,

AND REAL ESTATE

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND M O T E L S ....................... .......................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ..................................................... .............
MOTION PICTURES .......................................... .....................................................................
HOSPITALS ...............................................................................................................................




60.1
45.3
69.4
32.5

69.5
57.4
73.4
41.5

76.8
68.4
76.5
51.7

82.7
77.4
78.6
62.7

87.1
82.8
80.6
71.3

90. 1
86.5
82.5
77.2

92.3
88.9
84.5
81.6

D is t r ib u t io n o f w o r k e r s by a n n u a l e a r n in g s in in d u s tr y o f m a jo r e a r n in g s , 1 9 6 6

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY OF
MAJOR EARNINGS W
ERE LESS THAN
$180 0 $2400 $300 0

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY

$3600 $42 00 $ 48 00 $54 00 $600 0 $6600 $7200 $78 00

C
D
&
o
o

T a b le B-11.

$9000 $10000 $11000

33.1

39.1

45.1

51.0

56.6

61.7

66.7

71.2

75.6

80.5

83.9

86.8

89.4

92.5

94.6

MINING ...........................................................................................................................................

18.2

22.2

26.1

30.4

34.8

40.1

45.3

51.2

57.7

67.5

74.5

79.7

84.1

89.0

92.4

CRUDE PETROLEUM* NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS .....................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ............................................. ......................................

12.7
30.8

16.4
35.5

19.5
40.7

22.9
45.9

26.9
50.3

31.4
55.5

36.2
60.3

4 1.7
64.9

48.3
69.5

57.5
76.4

65.3
81.0

70.9
83.6

77.0
86.4

82.4
91.1

86.4
93.3

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION................................................... ....................... ........................

29.5

35.1

4 0.4

45.5

50.8

55.8

60.8

65.3

69.7

73.9

77.3

80.7

84.0

89.1

92.8

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION.......................................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION* NEC ...........................................................................................
PLUMBING* HEATING* AIR CONDITIONING ..............................................................
P AINTING* PAPER HANGING* DECORATING ..............................................................
ELECTRICAL WORK...................................................................... ........................................
MASONRY* STONEWORK* AND PL A S T E R IN G .................................................... ..
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ........................................................... ..
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ...............................................................................
CONCRETE WORK ...................................................................................................................

30.7
29.6
23.9
36.9
21.6
35.5
36.9
31.9
37.7

36.6
36.1
28.1
43.3
25.8
41.7
43.7
38.3
46.7

43.9
4 1.4
32.5
50.0
29.2
47.0
49.5
43.9
53.1

49.9
46.9
36.9
55.8
32.9
53.2
55.5
49.7
58.0

56.7
51.6
41.4
61.1
37.8
58.5
61.1
55.9
64.5

63.0
56.9
46.4
66.6
41.4
63.9
65. 8
60.4
69.5

68.5
61.8
51.0
71.8
45.6
68.9
71.6
65.0
74.6

74.1
66.5
55.9
76.6
49. 1
73.2
75.2
69.8
77.5

78.3
70.8
60.4
80.5
53.1
77.5
79.3
73.5
81.6

82.2
74.4
65.0
84.2
57.4
81.9
81.8
77.0
84.6

84.6
76.8
68.6
87.7
60.7
85.2
84.7
80.8
87.9

87.3
79.3
72.7
91.2
63.9
88.5
88.0
84.3
90.3

90.0
82.1
76.5
93.2
68.7
90.8
91.2
87.3
92.3

93.8
87.1
83.4
97.0
77.2
95.2
94.9
92.4
94.8

96.1
90.8
89. 1
98.1
84.3
98.0
97. 1
95.7
96.6

MANUFACTURING....................... .. ...................................

22.2

27.6

33.6

39.7

45.6

51.5

57.2

62.7

68.5

74.4

79.2

83.2

86.6

90.7

93.4

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS . . . .
MEAT PRODUCTS ..........................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS .......................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS .............
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS..........................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .....................................................
BEVERAGES...................................................................
WEAVING M IL L S , COTTON ......................................
WEAVING M IL LS , SYNTHETICS ............................
KNITTING M I L L S .......................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ......................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS .............
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS .......................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ..................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS .
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ........................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS .........................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOO AND RELATED PRODUCTS
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ...........................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS .........................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES .............
NEWSPAPERS .......................................................... ..
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ...........................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS .........................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS . . . .
DRUGS ..............................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS* ANO TOILET GOODS ..........
PETROLEUM REFINING .............................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ......................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ......................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER .................................

12.3
29.9
24.4
62.9
22.2
25.2
26.0
20.4
21.7
32.2
28.4
23.5
39.8
36.0
41.0
39.4
38.6
28.4
32.5
11.9
24.9
28.0
23.9
7 .6
11.1
12.8
24.6
6 .9
7 .7
21.2
32.7

16.7
35.4
28.2
69.9
26.6
30.4
30.5
25.5
28.5
44.1
34.7
31.4
53.1
48.5
54.4
51.6
46.9
34.7
39.2
14.8
30.1
31.8
28.2
10.3
14.6
16.6
29.8
8.9
10.0
25.7
42.6

20.9
41.6
32.0
74.4
32.5
35.2
34.2
32.1
35.1
58.9
45.9
41.6
73.0
65.0
68.9
71.1
55.5
42.7
47.1
17.8
35.5
36.2
32.3
12.5
17.5
20.7
34.5
10.9
12.4
31.1
56.1

24.9
47.8
36.4
78.1
37.5
41.1
38.8
42.0
44.5
72.3
58.7
54.2
85.1
76.9
81.0
81.9
63.0
51.0
56.4
20.2
42.0
4 1.4
37.1
14.4
20.9
24.8
39.3
13.2
15.3
38.6
69.9

28.9
52.2
42.4
81.6
42.1
46.9
43.7
58.4
58.2
80.7
74.0
64.5
90.9
83.7
87.7
88.2
69.8
57.4
66.3
23.5
49.4
45.6
42.8
17.6
26.2
29.8
45.7
15.7
18.1
45.5
78.9

33.9
56.6
48.7
84.4
48.8
54.1
49.3
72.3
72.6
86.1
83.9
73.1
93.7
88.1
91.6
91.9
74.7
63.8
74.9
29.5
56.0
50.2
48.4
21.9
33.5
37.1
51.7
18.8
20.8
53.4
85. 1

39.3
61.1
55.6
87.5
55.8
60.7
55.4
82.4
80.6
89.2
88.9
80.5
95.3
90.5
94.2
94.0
80.1
71.3
80.9
35.4
63.5
54.1
53.1
26.4
4 1.5
45.2
56.1
22.2
25.1
61.0
89.7

4 5.7
66.7
62.1
89.8
61.7
67.8
61.6
88.1
85.9
91.6
92.2
84.8
96.4
92.0
95. 1
95.4
84.3
77.0
86.1
42.8
70.3
58.3
57.9
32.1
49.0
52.3
62.0
26.5
29.8
68.6
92.4

50.9
72.8
69.0
91.6
67.5
73.7
67.0
91.4
91.4
93.7
94.7
88.2
97.3
93.2
95.9
96.3
88.2
81.8
90.2
52.2
75.6
62.4
62.6
39.9
57.3
59.2
68.1
32.2
35.0
76.2
94.4

55.7
79.9
75.6
93.2
73.9
80.3
73.0
94.0
94.4
95.4
96.3
90.5
97.8
94.6
96.3
96.9
90.7
85.9
92.9
62.4
81.7
68.3
68.0
47.7
65.0
66.0
72.9
39.2
44.1
82.4
95.6

60.6
84.5
81.4
94.6
78.6
85.2
78.1
95.7
95.8
96.0
97.1
92.7
98.1
95.3
97.0
97.3
92.9
88.8
94.6
71.0
85.9
73.5
72.8
56.7
72.9
71.8
77.0
49.5
51.9
86.9
96.9

64.8
88.5
86.5
95.5
83.0
89.1
83.2
96.3
97. 1
96.9
97.9
94.2
98.3
95.8
97.7
97.5
94.4
91.7
95.7
79.0
89. 1
79.3
76.9
65.5
78.5
76.5
79.6
61.5
59.5
90.6
97.3

70.5
92.2
91.4
96.4
87.8
92.6
87.5
96.9
97.4
97.5
98.4
95.6
98.5
96.2
98.1
97.7
95.7
93.9
96.7
84.9
92.1
84.1
81.0
73.3
83.0
80.4
82.5
70.7
68.2
93.4
97.9

77.5
95.8
95.3
97.7
92.3
95.8
92.8
97.6
97.9
98.1
98.7
96.4
98.7
96.8
98.5
97.9
97.4
95.6
97.5
91.0
95.0
90.1
86.2
82.0
87.8
84.8
87.3
79.7
81.7
96.2
98.4

83.0
97.6
96.9
98.2
94.1
97.5
95.3
98.0
98. 1
98.5
98.9
97.1
98.9
97.5
98.8
98.2
98.1
97.0
98.0
94.0
96.8
93.6
89.4
87.5
91.0
88.0
90.1
84.9
89.2
97.6
98.6




T a b le B-11.

D is t r ib u t io n o f w o r k e r s b y a n n u a l e a r n in g s in in d u s try o f m a jo r e a r n in g s , 1 9 6 6 ---- C o n t in u e d

V
*
00
o
o

$54 00 $60 00 $66 00 $720 0 $780 0 $840 0 $900 0

o
o
o
o

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY MANUFACTURING -

_ ___

$1800 $2400 $30 00 $3600 $ 4 2 0 0

o
o
o

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY OF
MAJOR EARNINGS W
ERE LESS THAN
INDUSTRY

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

108

66.0
65.3
32.7
49.7
4 8.4
63.9
62.6
57.7
60.1
41.5
51.1
45.1
44.7
50.8
48.3
49.4
62. 8
56.9
61.0
68.3
75.3
82.4
51.6
77.9
38.0
34.7
56.8
57.9
77.6

73.9
71.2
41.3
59.0
55.1
70.8
69.7
63.7
65.7
50.0
57.7
54.7
49.9
59.1
56.2
54.4
70.6
63.7
67.2
74.9
79.9
86.2
57.8
81.4
47.0
42.4
64.0
63.8
81.8

80.1
77.4
50.4
68.8
63.8
77.1
76.1
70.7
71.1
59.6
65.3
64.5
56.4
67.8
64.8
60.5
78.0
70.1
72.5
80.3
84.2
88.7
63.4
84.2
59.2
50.1
70.9
71.4
85.0

84.8
82.3
60.1
76.9
72.2
81.1
80.9
76.0
76.1
68.2
73.0
71.9
62.3
74.6
71.5
65.9
82.4
74.5
77.1
84.9
87.1
90.9
67.9
86.1
66.9
57.1
76.2
76.4
87.3

88.2
86.0
68.4
82.5
78.0
85.0
84.5
81.0
80.5
74.4
79.0
78.9
67.7
80.1
77.5
70.7
86. 1
79.3
81.8
88.4
89.4
92.7
72.2
88.1
73.3
6 3.4
80.9
80.1
89.4

91.2
89.1
74.9
87.5
83.0
88.2
87.5
84.8
83.7
81.1
84.4
83.8
72.2
84.6
82.8
76.5
89.2
83.4
86.2
91.4
91.9
94.0
76.6
90.3
78.5
69.7
85.1
83.3
91.4

94.3i
92.7
83.8t
9 1 . 9'
89.3
92.3i
90.8i
8 9 .C
1
87.7'
87.2!
90.6i
88.7
78.5i
89.2!
88.9i
83.5i
9 3 .C
l
1
8 8 .C
91.4>
94.4►
1
9 4 .C
95.6,
82.5>
92.4►
85.2!
77.1
91.4>
88.81
93.6i

16.1
2 3 .A
9.2
14.1
12.7
19.4
21.4
20.5
22.5
10.4
18.8
12.7
15.9
14.1
13.6
13.0
19.0
16.7
16.5
19.4
25.4
34.5
13.5
28.4
10.4
9 .4
21.0
16.0
33.5

20.5
28.9
11.9
17.5
17.1
24.5
26.9
25.6
27.8
13.8
22.7
16.3
19.0
17.5
17.2
17.4
24.3
20.9
21.0
23.8
30.7
41.9
17.3
34.8
13.6
12.2
25.4
20.8
39.8

25.3
34.2
13.9
21.0
20.3
30.3
31.7
30.8
32.4
16.8
26.9
19.9
23.0
21.2
20.8
20.8
29.1
25.4
26.5
28.6
36.9
49.3
21.6
41.6
16.5
15.2
29.7
25.8
46.3

30.3
40.2
16.1
25.4
24.9
37.2
36.7
35.7
37.5
20.0
30.8
23.4
25.9
25.3
24.9
24.9
35.7
30.6
32.8
35.3
43.9
56.5
26.4
49.6
19.7
18.2
34.4
31.0
54.0

37.4
46.2
19.0
29.7
29.6
43.4
4 2.3
41.1
42.1
23.3
35.5
27.4
30.1
30.8
2 9.9
30.1
41.6
36.1
39.6
4 3.0
51.1
64.1
31.3
58.9
2 3.3
21.1
39.2
36.9
61.6

4 8.4
53.1
21.9
34.9
35.3
50.6
48.3
46.5
48. 1
28.4
40.6
31.8
34.7
36.8
34.9
36.6
48.2
42.6
46.3
52.6
6 0.7
71.6
38.6
67.0
27.0
24.9
44.7
43.0
68.2

57.8
59.3
26.3
4 1.7
42.2
58.1
55.5
52.4
53.9
34.4
45.7
37.3
39.9
43.3
41.6
4 2.9
55.8
50.6
54.5
61.6
69.1
77.6
45.2
73.2
31.6
29.3
50.9
50.7
73.1

TRANSPORTATION .......................................................................................................................

19.1

22.9

26.7

30.4

34.5

38.8

43.7

50.0

57.5

68.5

74.1

78.7

85.8

91.3t

94.6

RAILROADS ...............................................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ...................................................................
T A X I C A B S ......................................................................................................... .......................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG OISTANCE ...................................................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION............................... ........................................................................

7 .9
12.3
39.3
23.9
8.9

9.9
14.6
46.8
28.4
12.8

11.7
17.5
54.4
32.8
16.2

13.5
20.8
62.3
37.1
19.6

15.5
24.5
70.8
41.6
2 3.6

18.6
29.6
78.0
45.9
29.0

23.2
35.1
83.1
50.3
35.1

32.2
43.8
86.2
54.7
42.5

44.1
55.1
89.2
59.7
50.6

65.5
67.3
92.9
66.3
61.2

69.6
78.0
95.1
72.5
69.1

72.8
84.7
96.8
78.1
74.9

87.8
91.2
98.1
83.4
79.6

94.0l
97.1
98.9i
89.4r
85.1

98.0
99. 1
99.1
93.5
87.5

COMMUNICATION ............................................................... .. .......................................................

17.5

22.9

27.4

33.1

40.3

49.2

57.8

63.7

67.6

70.9

73.8

76.9

81.2

87.4

91.5

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION............................... ...........................................................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING ...................................................................

16.4
25.1

21.8
30.1

26.5
34.5

32.4
39.0

40.2
43.4

50.0
48.2

59.2
53.3

65.2
57.6

68.8
61.3

71.7
66.6

74.2
70.3

77.2
73.8

81.8
76.4

88.3
80.5

92.6
83.7
92.8

GLASS AND GLASSWARE* PRESSED OR BLOWN .........................................................
CONCRETE* GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ......................................................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS................................... ..................
IRON AND STEEL F O U N D R I E S .......................... ...............................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ...........................................................................
CUTLERY* HAND TOOLS* AND HARDWARE ...................................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ............................................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ................................................................
METAL STAMPINGS ................................................................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ....................................................................................................
FARM MACHINERY ...................................................................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ................................................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ............................................................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY M ACH INER Y................................................................. ..................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MA CH IN ER Y .................. . ..........................................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING M A C H IN E S ........................................................................ ..
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES .......................................................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DI STRIBUTING EQUIPMENT .................................................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ........................................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ....................................................................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ......................................................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ........... ..........................................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ............................................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES .........................................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ...............................................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ........................................................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ............................................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES .................................................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ......................................................................................................

96.2
95.3
89.6
95.1
92.7
95.1
93.8
92.6
90.7
91.9
94.1
93.2
83.7
92.7
92.5
88.0
95.3
91.0
94.4
9 6.0
95.7
96.7
86.3
94.3
90.1
82.5
94. 1
91.4
95.2

..................................................................................................................

11.7

14.3

16.9

20.0

24.2

28.6

33.8

39.9

47.7

56.2

64.2

71.2

79.5

88.1

WHOLESALE TRADE ....................................................................................................................

26.8

31.5

36.4

41.7

47.3

53.0

58.6

63.8

68.9

74.4

78.3

81.7

84.6

88.21 9 0 .6

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ....................................................
DRUGS* CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .........................................................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .................................................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ........................................... ...............................
ELECTRICAL GOODS .............................................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT .................................................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...................................................................

23.2
18.4
28.7
36.0
21.0
22.7
19.1

28.5
22.4
34.9
41.3
25.7
27.2
23.3

33.4
26.2
42.3
46.3
30.4
32.5
27.9

39.1
31.2
48.2
51.4
35.8
38.7
32.8

44.5
36.8
55.0
56.3
41.8
44.8
38.5

51.3
43.5
61.5
61.2
47.5
50.8
43.9

57.7
50.3
66.2
66.4
54.2
57.2
49.3

64.0
55.5
70.6
71.0
59.3
63.1
54.8

70.7
61.2
74.1
75.7
64.4
68.9
60.3

77.5
67.3
78.1
80.9
70.2
75.1
66.1

81.6
70.8
79.7
84.8
73.6
79.9
70.5

84.9
74.2
82.1
88.2
77.6
82.5
74. 1

88.0
77.7
83.6
90.7
80.2
85.1
78.0

91.0i
82.9i
85.7
93.6*
84.6.
89.0i
82.6i

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S




92.8
86.6
87.6
95.3
87.0
91.7
86.2

T a b le B-11.

D is tr ib u tio n o f w o rk e rs by a n n u a l e a rn in g s in in d u stry o f m a jo r e a r n in g s , 1 9 6 6 ---- C o n tin u e d

INDUSTRY

CUMUILATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY DF
MAJOR EARNINGS W
ERE LESS THAN
$180 0 $2400 $3000 $3600 $420 0 $48 00 $540 0 $60 0 0 $66 00 $720 0 $780 0 $8400 $9000 $10000 $11000

PRIVATE NONAGRICUL TURAL ECONOMY - CONTINUED

109

RETAIL TRADE ................................................................................ ...........................................

55.3

62.7

69.3

74.7

79.1

82.6

85.8

88.3

90.6

92.9

9 4.3

95.4

96.3i

DEPARTMENT STORES ...........................................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ...........................................................................................................
VARIETY S T O R E S ..................................................................................................................
GROCERY STORES ..................................................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ................................................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS ..................................................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ..................................... .........................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES .............................................................................................
SHOE S T O R E S .................. ......................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ..................................... ....................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ................................................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ...................................................................................................

56.0
43.5
6 5.1
50.0
25.3
51.8
59.1
60.3
55.2
38.0
58.7
29.4

63.7
50.4
73.2
57.0
30.4
57.5
67.2
68.9
60.8
44.8
66.1
35.1

71.6
56.6
83.9
6 2.5
35.6
63.3
7 6.5
79.2
66.7
51.7
73.1
40.4

78.2
64.3
89.9
67.3
41.1
68.6
84.0
85.0
72.1
57.3
78.8
46.3

83.4
70.7
92.5
71.7
47.7
73.3
88.8
88.8
76.0
63.1
82.4
53.2

86.7
77.4
93.8
75.4
54.4
76.9
91.6
90.9
79.4
68.2
84.9
60.9

89.2
81.6
95.0
79.4
60.5
80.2
94.0
92-8
82.7
73.3
86.7
69.5

91.1
84.8
95.7
83.2
66.5
83.4
95.4
93.8
85.2
77.8
88.0
75.8

93.0
87.6
96.7
86.5
72.1
87.1
9 6.3
94.8
88.3
81.6
89.2
80.3

94.7
90.2
97.3
89.9
77.6
90.3
96.9
96.0
91.4
86.2
90.5
86.2

95.7
91.8
97.9
92.2
81.4
92.2
97.2
96.7
9 3.4
88.5
91.4
89.2

96.6
92.9
98.2
9 4.2
84.4
93.5
97.6
97.4
94.7
90.5
92.5
92.4

97.1
98.0l
93.81 94.9'
98.3i 98.7
95.8I 97.5
87.3I 90.6i
94.6i 95.7
97.9' 98.2!
97.6> 98.0I
96.1
97.2
91.81 94.2
93.5i 95.0I
9 3.9i 95.9>

FINANCE,

97.4

98.1
98.4
95.5
98.8
98.6
92.9
96.6
98.6
98.4
97.8
95.6
96.4
96.9

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ...................................................................

27.1

33.4

39.7

47.9

56.6

63.9

69.9

74.6

78.5

82.2

84.8

87.0

88.8i

9 1. A

93.1

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ................................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS . . . . . ................................................................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTI TUTIO NS ..............................................................................
L IF E INSURANCE ..................................................................................................................
F I R E , MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ...........................................................

22.5
21.5
28.5
20.8
19.3

29.4
27.5
36.1
26.4
24.9

36.1
33.8
44.1
32.5
31.1

46.3
41.2
53.1
39.8
40.3

57.8
52.7
61.7
4 8.2
50.0

66.9
6 1.4
68.6
54.8
57.5

73.8
68.9
74.2
60.9
62.9

78.6
74.2
79.5
65.6
67.4

82.3
77.6
84.1
70.6
72.0

85.7
81.8
87.7
74.4
76.7

88.0
84.4
89.8
77.4
80.9

89.8
86.4
91.6
80.2
84.9

91.1
88.4►
93.5i
82.8
88.6i

93.1
90.8I
96.1
87.2
92.2

94.7
92.6
96.9
90.1
94.5

S E R V I C E S ......................................................................................................................................

48.1

55.5

62.1

68.0

73.0

77.3

81.3

84.5

87.4

90.9

92.5

93.7

94.8!

96.0I

96.8

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ..............................................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .......................................................• • • • •
MOTION PICTURES ................................................................................................................
H O S P I T A L S ............................ .................................................................................................

65.4
52.0
72.5
39.5

73.9
63.5
76.3
4 9.4

80.7
74.0
78.6
60.6

86.3
81.9
80.9
70.4

89.9
86.3
82.9
77.4

9 2.4
89.0
84.8
82.8

94.4
91.4
86.8
8 6.8

95.6
93.0
88.4
90.0

96.6
94.8
89.9
92.3

97.5
96.4
91.6
93.9

98.0
97.2
92.8
9 5.3

98.5
97.9
93.8
96.4

98.7
98.3.
95.1
97.9'

99.1
98.8
96.4
98.7

99.3
99.2
97.5
9 8.9




T a b le B-12.

D is tr ib u tio n o f w o r k e r s by a n n u a l e a rn in g s in in d u stry o f m a jo r e a rn in g s , 1967

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INOUSTRY OF
ERE LESS THAN
M
AJOR EARNINGS W
O
o

$1800

$30 0 0 $3600 $ 4 2 0 0 $48 0 0 $54 00 $ 60 00 $ 66 00 $ 72 00 $780 0 $84 00 $9000 $10000 $110 00

32.0

37.8

43.5

49.4

55.0

60.1

65.0

69.5

73.9

78.8

82.3

85.3

87.9

91.3

93.5

MINING ...........................................................................................................................................

17.3

21.1

25.3

29.1

33.9

39. 1

44.4

49.7

55.9

63.9

71.1

76.8

81.2

86.6

90.6

CRUDE PETROLEUM* NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS ....................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ....................................................................................

13.0
29.1

16.1
35.7

18.3
41.9

21.4
45.6

25.4
50.5

29.9
54.8

34.2
59.3

39.6
63.3

44.9
67.4

53.2
72.1

60.8
75.4

67.3
79.4

72.8
82.9

79.8
88.2

84.5
92.0

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ......................................................................................................

28.6

33.7

38.7

43.5

48.2

53. 1

57.9

62.4

66.8

70.9

74.5

78.0

81.4

86.8

90.8

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ........................................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION* N E C ...........................................................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING* AIR CONDITIONING ..............................................................
PAINTING* PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ..............................................................
ELECTRICAL WORK ................................................................................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ................................................................
CARPENTERING AND F L O O R I N G .................. ....................................................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ...............................................................................
CONCRETE WORK .......................................................... . .......................................................

29.5
28.7
22.1
35.5
21.6
34.5
38.6
33.9
37.6

35.3
34.5
25.8
42.6
25.2
40.7
43.7
38.7
44.0

41.1
40.1
29.8
48.6
28.7
46.6
48.9
44.2
52.2

47.2
45.1
33.9
54.3
31.9
52.3
54.4
50.0
56.6

53.6
50.1
37.6
58.6
35.8
56.9
58.5
54.8
62.4

60.4
55.0
42. 1
64.2
39.7
62. 1
64.0
59.3
67.8

66.1
59.5
46.4
69.1
44.1
67.0
68.1
64.0
71.8

71.6
64.0
51.3
73.1
47.8
71.3
72.3
6 7.7
76.1

76.3
68.0
55.9
77.1
51.7
75.0
76.6
72.0
79.2

79.9
71.3
60.1
81.8
55.4
79.2
80.3
75.2
81.8

82.5
74.1
64.1
85.2
58.5
82.7
83.8
78.9
84.8

85.4
76.7
68.0
88.8
61.3
86.3
86.5
82.4
86.8

88.3
80.0
71.6
91.2
65.2
89.3
89.2
85.6
89.6

92.5
84.5
79.1
95.6
72.9
93.8
93.9
91.0
92.7

95.2
88.3
85.6
97.3
81.0
96.9
96.6
94.0
95.0

MANUFACTURING ..........................................................................................................................

110

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ..............................................................

20.9

25.8

31.4

37.6

4 3.7

49.6

55.4

61.1

66.8

73.5

78.2

82.2

85.3

89.4

92.3

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ...................................................................
MEAT PRODUCTS .....................................................................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ...................................................................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ........................................................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ......................................................................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ................................................................................................................
BEVERAGES .................................... ..........................................................................................
WEAVING M IL L S , C O T T O N ............. ...................................................................................
WEAVING MI L LS , SYNTHETICS .......................................................................................
KNITTING M I L L S .................................................................................................... ..
YARN AND THREAD M I L L S ........................................... .....................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* SUITS AND COATS ........................................................................
MEN * S AND BOYS* FURNISHINGS ..................................................................................
WOMEN• S AND MISSES* OUTERWEAR ............................................................................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ...........................................................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ...................................... ............................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ....................................................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ......................................................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ......................................................................................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ....................................................................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND B O X E S ...................................... .................................
NEWSPAPERS .............................................................................................................................
COMMERCIAL P R I N T I N G .......................................................................................... ..
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ...................................................................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ...................................................................
ORUGS ............................................................................................................- ..........................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS .....................................................................
PETROLEUM REFINING ........................................................................................................
TIRES AND INNER T U B E S ....................................................................................... ..
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS .................................................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ............................................................................................

11.2
28.0
26.1
61.9
2 3.0
24.8
23.6
20.0
20.2
30.2
27.8
23.9
35.2
33.1
36.7
37.7
35.2
27.2
31.0
11.0
22.4
26.7
22.8
7.9
9 .7
11.8
23.0
8.2
6 .1
21.5
31.6

14.8
34.0
30.2
68.2
27.1
29.1
28.8
24.2
27.6
39.6
35.5
31.6
46.4
44.2
49.3
4 7.4
42.8
33.4
37.0
14.3
27.7
30.9
27.5
9 .9
12.9
14.9
27.9
10.4
8.3
26.4
39.9

18.8
39.8
34.1
7 2.6
31.4
33.7
33.1
30.7
34.8
53.5
46.4
41.6
64.2
59.7
64.1
64.8
51.7
39.3
44.5
17.0
32.7
35.2
31.7
11.7
16.1
18.2
32.4
11.8
10.6
31.2
52.0

22.5
46.7
37.9
76.6
35.5
38.6
37.5
42.0
44.3
68.0
60.3
52.7
81.2
73.2
77.5
79.4
59.1
46.8
54.3
19.9
39.2
40.1
36.8
13.7
19.8
24.0
37.5
13.6
13.1
38.2
65.4

26.3
51.9
43.4
79.4
40.7
4 4.3
42.7
58.3
57.3
78.3
74.6
6 2.9
89.1
80.8
85.8
87.0
65.4
54.0
64.8
23.5
45.6
44.7
42.1
16.9
24.8
29.1
42.4
15.4
16.3
45.5
76.5

31.6
5 7.3
49.2
82.8
46.0
51.2
48.1
71.7
68.7
84.2
83.4
71.8
92.5
85.5
90.4
90.8
70.8
59.6
73.4
26.8
52.2
49. 1
47.7
20.9
32.0
35.9
48.0
18.3
20.1
53.8
83. 1

37.7
6 2.5
54.6
85.6
5 2.5
57.9
53.1
80.6
78.6
88.0
89.4
79.2
94.7
88.8
93.2
93.5
75.9
66.6
79.2
32.5
59.1
53.0
52.4
25.8
39.9
43.6
54.1
21.2
24.8
6 1.9
87.9

43.1
66.4
60.6
88.0
58.3
64.2
58.8
86.5
83.9
90.6
9 2.3
83.6
95.9
90.7
94.7
94.7
80.7
73.4
84.7
39.2
65.3
57.0
57.0
31.7
4 7.4
51.0
58.6
24.6
30.8
69.0
91.0

49.6
7 1.4
6 7.3
90.4
64.4
70.4
64.3
90.3
88.8
9 2.7
94.1
87.3
96.8
9 2.4
95.4
95.6
85.3
79.2
88.6
4 7.9
72.5
60.9
61.5
38.0
54.4
57.8
64.0
28.5
38.2
75.1
93.5

61.0
77.0
7 4.6
92.4
71.2
76.9
70.9
93.7
92.3
94.5
96.2
89.8
97.5
93.7
95.8
96.4
89.3
84.7
92.0
59.1
78.8
66.5
66.7
46.3
63.8
64.4
69.8
34.5
53.9
82.6
95.5

6 5.7
81.4
8 0.3
9 3.8
76.0
8 1.4
76.2
95.4
94.4
95.7
97.1
91.7
97.8
94.5
96.6
97.0
92.0
88.0
93.6
67.2
83.5
71.2
71.4
54.4
71.1
69.9
73.5
41.7
62.8
86.6
96.4

69.4
8 5.8
8 4.8
94.8
80.6
86.1
81.8
96.5
96.0
96.8
98.0
93.2
98.1
95.2
97.2
97.3
93.8
90.5
94.9
74.8
87. 1
76.3
75.6
62.6
76.6
73.8
76.5
53.8
69.5
89.9
97.3

73.8
89.9
88.6
96.0
84.6
90.1
85.8
97.0
96.8
97.3
98.3
94.3
98.3
95.6
97.5
97.4
95.3
92.9
95.7
81.8
90. 1
81.5
79.1
70.5
80.5
77.7
79.7
64.5
74.5
92.3
97.5

79.8
94.0
93.6
97.0
89.8
93.7
90.6
97.7
97.4
98.0
98.8
95.5
98.5
96.4
98.1
97.8
96.8
95.7
97.1
89. 1
93.4
87.3
84.4
79.5
86.0
82.6
84.7
75.3
82.3
95.1
98.2

8 4.5
96.4
9 5.8
9 7.7
9 3.2
96.4
93.9
97.9
98. 1
98.6
99.0
96.4
98.7
96.9
98.6
97.9
97.7
9 7. 1
97.8
93.0
95.9
91.7
88.2
84.9
89. 1
85.7
88.5
82.8
89.4
96.9
98. 5




Table B-12.

Distribution of workers by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1967----Continued
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N

$1800

PR IV AT E

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

MANUFACTURING -

IN

THE

INDUSTRY OF

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

$9000

19.9
2 8.3
10.5
17.1
15.0
23.8
2 3.8
2 3.5
24.9
12.3

23.4
33.6
12.3

27.6
38.5
14.7
24.4
22.4
34.3
33.1
32.3
33.6
17.4
26.7
2 0 .4
2 4.4
2 4 .0
2 4 .4

3 3.6
4 5 .0
16.9
29.7
27 .6
4 1 .6
38 .3
37.3
39 .4

89.5
87.7
7 6 .4
87.0
8 2 .9

45.3

82.4
79 .3
61.4
7 7 .2
7 4.0
80.0
7 9 .1
75.0
77.8
6 7.9
71.1
7 2 .5
6 1 .6
7 2.6
73.1
62.8
80.9
72.9
77.2
84.3
86.5
9 0 .4
64.9
8 2.9
6 7.9
5 8 .1
76.8
7 6.3
86 .4

8 6.5
83.9
7 0 .0
82.9
79. 1
83.8
83.0
79.0
81.2
7 4.7
7 7.7
79.2
6 7.5
78.1
7 8 .9
67.9
85. 1
7 7 .5
81.7

32.0
27.2
4 9 .6
48 .5
71 .4

6 4 .4
63 .2
3 2.0
50.7
48 .6
62.8
5 8.7
5 6.9
57.3
38.8
4 9 .3
43 .0
4 3 .0
5 0.4
4 9 .8
4 5 .9
59 .8
55.9
57.8
62 .8
73 .4
8 1.8
4 8 .4
73.1
38.2
32.7
56.1
56. 7
75 .9

7 7.6
7 4.0
5 1 .6
69.7
67.5
76.0
7 3 .5
6 9 .1
72.4
58.2
64.3
64.8
5 5.3

3 0.0
28.8
28.6
31.9
40.3
5 6.5
23.5
44.3
19.5
16.7
34.0
26.8
52.6

55.3
57 .0
2 4.6
4 2 .5
40 .6
55 .4
5 1.3
5 0.1
51.9
30.6
4 1 .9
3 5 .3
3 7.9
43 .4
4 1 .9
40.5
52.6
48 .8
51.0
5 4.0

7 1.6

3 1.6
24.6
28.2
2 9 .4
29.5
27.6
36.7
35 .0
36.1
38.4
4 8 .4
65 .8
28 .0
5 4.3
2 3.1
1 9 .8
38.6
3 4 .1
60 .0

4 3 .4
5 0 .9
1 9.8
35.3
3 3.5
48. 1
44 .5
43. 1
4 5.3
24.4
36.6
2 9.5
32 .7
36.7
35.4
33.3
4 4 .2
42.0
4 4.2
4 5 .4
57.9
7 2.8
34.1
63.2
27.1
23 .3
44. 1
4 1 .0
6 6 . 1

$10000 $ 1 10 00

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

GLASS AND GLASSWARE. PRESSED OR BLOWN ...............................................................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER P R O D U C T S ..................... .....................................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ...........................................................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES .................................................................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND D R A W I N G ......................................................... .......................
CU TLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ..........................................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ................................................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ......................................................................
METAL S T A M P I N G S .........................................................................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES .............................................................................................................
FARM M A C H I N E R Y ..................................................................... ......................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ......................................................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ............................................... ....................................................
SP ECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ......................................................................... ..................
GENERAL I N D U S T R IA L MACHINERY ......................................................................
O F F I C E AND COMPUTING MACHINES ....................................................................................
SE RVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...............................................................................................
EL ECT RIC TEST AND D I S T R I B U T I N G EQUIPMENT ......................................................
EL EC TR IC AL I N D U S T R IA L APPARATUS ................................................................. ..
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES .............................................................................................. ..
EL EC T RI C L I G H T I N G ANO W IR IN G EQUIPMENT ...........................................................
RADIO AND TV R E C E IV IN G EQUIPMENT ................................................................. ..
COMMUNICATION E Q U I P M E N T ............ .. ............................................. .......................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ................................... .. ........................
MOTOR VE HI CL ES AND E Q U I P M E N T .......................................................................... ..
AI RCRAFT AND PARTS ..................................................................................................................
S H IP AND BOAT B U IL D I N G ANO R E P A I R I N G ................................................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ......................................................
OTHER M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............ ............................................... ............................................... ..
TRANSPORTATION

OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS

M J R E R IN S W R L SS T A
AO A N G E E E
HN

INDUSTRY

....................................................... .................................................................. ..

RAILROADS ...........................................................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ........................................................................
T A X I C A B S ............ ...................................................................................... ..........................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ......................................................................
A I R TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................................................
COMMUNICATION ........................................................................................................................• • • • •
TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ....................................................................................................
RADIO AND T E L E V I S I O N B R O A D C A S T IN G .........................................................................

1 6.6
2 3.8
8 . A
1 3 .5
11.4
1 8.4
19.2
1 9.6
2 0 .8

9.7
1 6 .4
1 1 .0

1 4 .6
13.1
1 2 .8

2 0 . 0

13.5
1 7.9
1 6 .4

2 0 . 6

18.5
28.7
28.0
2 7 .1
29.8
1 4 .6
2 3.6
1 7.0
2 0 .8

19.8

1 6 .6

2 0 . 2

1 1 .6

15.1

1 7.2
15.1
14.6
17.4

2 1 .2

1 8 .2
2 5.6
23.1
2 3 .1
25.6
3 2.8
47.3
19.0
3 6.6
16.4
13.8
3 0.2

2 2 . 6

31.7
1 1 .6

23.4
1 0.4
8.4
21.9
1 3 .2
32.4

19.1
18.4
2 1.5
2 7.5
3 9 .2
15.2
29.6
1 3.6
1 1 .1

2 5.8
16.8
3 9.2

2 1 . 6

2 2 . 8

2 0 . 0

6 6 . 8

77.6
41.3
6 8 . 8

6 8 .8

4 0 .6
60 .9
5 7.2
6 9 .1
66.4
6 2.0
6 3 .9
47 .2
57.1
5 3.4
48 .6
58.2
5 7.6
51.3
6 8 . 0

6 6 . 8

67.3
5 6.9
7 5.3

61.8
65 .0
69.4
7 8.2
8 5 .6
5 4.3
77.1
4 7 .0
39.6
62 .8
6 4 .0
8 0 .1

60.2
80.6
6 0 .0
5 1 .4
7 0 .2
7 1.4
84.2

6 8 . 0

71.9
78.9
82.7
8 8 . 6

8 8 . 0
8 8 .8

92.0
69.2
85. 3
73.8
6 4.0
81.1
79.6
8 8.4

8 6 .8

8 5 .9
82.2
8 3.2
7 9.7
8 1.3
83.8
71.3
81.7
8 2.5
72.9
88.5
81.0
85.7
9 0 .6
9 0 .8
93.6
7 3.2
87.3
7 8.5
69.6
84.9
8 2 .6
9 0 .1

9 3.4
92.5
83.9
91.3
8 8.4
9 0.9
8 9.8
8 6 .8

86.7
85.7
86.9
8 8 .8

76.4
8 6 .7
87.2
79.2
92.1
8 5 .9
9C .3
9 3.6
9 2 .8
9 5.0
78.9
89.9
8 5.3
7 6.6
89.5
86.5
9 2.5

95 .5
94 .7
9 0.2
94.3
9 2.2
9 3.6
92.9
9 0.2
90.9
9 1.9
91.2
92.4
8 2 .3
9 0 .6
91.0
84. 7
94.2
89 .6
9 3.2
9 5.8
94.3
9 6.0
83.7
9 2.1
89.6
82. 1
93 .0
90.5
9 4.2

1 8.7

22.5

26.0

29.6

33.4

37.5

41 .8

4 7 .0

5 3.0

6 2.8

7 0 .1

7 5 .2

81.3

89.3

92.4

7.3
12.7
3 9.5
23.0
8.5

9 .4
15.8
46.5
27.9
11.5

1 1 .1

12.9

1 8.3
53.8
3 1 .9
14.5

59.6
36.1
18.0

1 5.0
24.3
67 .6
4 0 .4
21 .5

17.5
29.7
7 4 .6
4 4 .6
25 .5

20.7
34.1
80.5
4 8.4
3 0.6

27.1
4 1 .4
84.9
5 2.4
37 .2

3 6.1
4 9 .6
87.6
56 .9
43.9

56. 0
58.4
90.8
62.6
51.7

67.4
6 9.2
9 4.3
6 9.0
5 8.8

70.9
76.7
95.8
75.2
65.3

79.7
84.5
9 7 .0
81.2
72.4

93.7
9 1 .3
9 8 .4
87.9
80.6

94.0
96.5
99.0
9 2 .4
85.6

16.1

2 0 . 8

25.2

30.2

37 .4

4 5 .9

55.0

62.1

66.3

69.6

7 2.5

7 5.9

8 0.2

86.4

90.2

1 4.9
2 3.7

19.9
27.9

24.5
31.7

2 9 .5
3 6.6

37.3
4 1 .2

4 6 .5
4 6 .4

5 6.3
5 2.2

63.7
56.5

67.6
6 1 .0

70.5
65.2

73.3
69.3

76.5
72.7

8 0.9
7 5 .0

87.6
78.9'

91 .6
81.7

2 1 .1

PU BLI C U T I L I T I E S .................................................................................................. .. ........................

1 1.7

14.1

1 6.5

19.1

2 2 . 6

27.3

3 2 .2

3 7 .7

44.1

52.7

60.2

67.1

7 4 .8

83.9

90 .0

WHOLESALE TRADE

................................................................................................................................

25.7

3 0 .3

34.7

39.7

4 5 .1

50.8

56.4

6 1 .5

66.5

72.4

76.2

79.9

8 2.9

8 6.9

8 9.6

MOTOR VE HI CL E S AND AUTOMOTIVE E Q U I P M E N T .............. .........................................
DRUGS, CH EM IC AL S, AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ..............................................................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ..............................................................................................« . . .
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..................................................................................
EL EC TR IC AL GOODS ........................................................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ......................................................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SU PPLIES ...................................... ..................................

2 3.2
1 8.0
2 6.8
34.7
20.3
2 2.4
18.7

2 7.6

32.5
2 5.6
38.8
44.1
29.3
3 1.0
2 7.3

3 7 .4
30.2
45.1
48.5
3 4.9
3 7.3
31.8

4 3 .4
35.7
50.6
53 .4
40.4
44 .2
3 7.0

49.8
41 .2
5 7.3
58.3
46 .4
50.0
4 3 .0

55.2
47 .0
6 2.7
63.2
52.4
55.7
4 8 .4

61 .4
52.6
6 6 .7

6 7.8
58.6
70.5
7 2 .7
6 3 .1

7 5.5
6 4.9
75.0
78. 1

7 9 .8

83.3
72.3
79.4

8 9.9
81. 1
83.3
9 2.7
82.4

6 6 . 6

73.9
6 5.0

8 6 .5
76.3
81.1
88.9
7 8 .4
84.4
7 6 .2

92 .3
85.1
8 5.9
94.7
8 5.2
9 0.4
8 5.6




2 2 .0

32.5
39.7
24.9
26.7
2 3 .1

6 8 . 2

57.9
6 1.6
53.6

5 9.1

6 8 .8

6 8 . 6

7 7.3
81.8
7 2.2
7 8.2
69.2

8 6 .0

75.7
8 1.6
7 3.0

8 8 .0

8 1.9

Table B-12.

Distribution of workers by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1967----Continued
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N

$1800

PR IV AT E

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS

IN

THE

INDUSTRY OF

M JO E R IN S WR LE T A
A R A N G E E SS H N

INDUSTRY
$2400

$3000

$3600 $ 4 2 0 0

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

$9000

$100 00 $ 1 1 0 0 0

CONTINUED

............ ................................ . ...................................• .................................................

54.2

61.4

6 8 . 0

7 3 .6

78.1

81 .6

84.8

87 .3

89 .6

9 1.8

9 3.3

94 .6

9 5.6

9 6 .9

9 7.7

DEPARTMENT STORES .....................................................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ....................................... .. ..........................................................................
V A R IE TY S T O R E S ....................................................................... .....................................................
GROCERY S T O R E S ................................................................................................... .........................
MOTOR VE HICL E DEALERS ...........................................................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* CLOTHING AND FURN IS H IN GS ......................................................
WOMEN * S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ............................ .........................................................
FA MI LY CLOTHING S T O R E S .................................. « ..................................................................
SHOE S T O R E S .....................................................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURN ISH ING S ..................................................................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ......................................................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .............................................................................................................

53.3
4 3.9
62.1
4 8.6
25.2
5 0.7
57.8
58.4
53.8
38.0
5 7 .5
28.0

60.6
50.7
6 9 .1
5 6.1
2 9 .7
5 7.0
65.0
65.7
60.3
44.1
64.8
33.4

6 8 . 6

7 6.4
6 2 .5
8 1 .4
5 0.8

85.4
7 6.8
93.2
74.4
52.0
7 7.0
9 0.8
90 .2
79.6
67.2
83.7
57.0

8 1.9
9 4.5
78.1
5 8.2
80.6
93.2
92.1
82 .4
7 2.6
85 .8
6 5.1

90. 1
8 5.6
95 .4
81.7
63.7
83.5
94.5
93.1
8 4 .5
7 6.7
87.3
72 .3

9 1 .9

3 9 .9
68.5
82.0
8 3.7
72.5
57.0
77.4
4 3.6

81 .7
70.4
9 1.5
7 0.8
46 .1
73.3
8 7.6

8 8 . 0

56.2
79.2
61.9
34.6
62.7
74.2
75.9
65.9
51.1
7 1 .2
3 8 .2

7 6 .0
6 3 .2
87.6

9 3.5
90.3
9 6.9
8 8.4
7 4 .7
8 9.2
96.4
95 .5
9 0.1
8 4.5
89.7
8 2.6

94 .8
9 1 .7
9 7 .4
9 0 .9
7 8 .3
9 1.0
96.7
96.2
92.7
86.9
9 0 .5
86.7

95.8
92.5
97.8
9 3.0
81.8
92 .5
97. 1
9 6.8
9 4.1

9 6.6
9 3 .3
9 8 .1
94.9
84.8
9 3 .9
9 7.5
9 7.0
95.1
90.4
92.4
9 1.5

9 7 .6
9 4.0
98.6
96.7
8 8 .4
9 5 .3
97.9
9 8 .0
9 6 .7
93.1
9 4 .0
9 3 .8

9 8.2
95.3
98.7
9 8.0
91.3
96.5
98.3
9 8 .4
97.3
95. 1
95. 1
95.6

26.3

3 2.4

38.0

45.4

54. 1

61.8

6 7 .9

72.8

76.7

80.7

83 .4

8 5.7

8 7 .6

9 0 .4

92.3

2 1 .1

33.6
32.1
4 1.1
3 1.6
28.8

4 3.3
39.3
4 9.9
3 8 .2
36.9

5 4.7
50.7
5 9.1
4 5 .7
4 7 .2

64.7
59.2

71.7
66 .5
73.1
5 9.1
6 1.1

76.9
7 2 .1
7 8 .1
64.2
65.7

80.6
76.1
82.3
69.1
6 9 .7

84.5
8 0.3
85.8
73.3
73.8

8 6 .7
8 2.6

8 8 .6

9 0 .2
8 6.4
9 2.6
82.2
85.8

92.3
8 9.0
9 5 .1

17.6

27.7
2 7.6
3 5 .5
2 6.1
2 3.4

9 0 .6

93.9
9 1.8
9 6.6
8 9 .0
92.8

...................................................................................................................................................

4 6.0

53.2

5 9.6

6 5.6

70.8

75. 1

7 8 .9

8 2.3

8 5.4

HO TE LS , TO URISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ....................................................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ......................................... ..............................
MOTION PI CTURES ...........................................................................................................................
HOS PITALS .................................................................................. .......................................................

64.0
4 7.9
71.1
3 4.7

7 2 .5
5 9.8
7 5 .3
43.7

79.3
7 0.3
7 7 .9
5 3.5

8 4 .5
7 9.0
8 0.2
6 4 .2

8 8 . 6

9 1 .3
87.4
84.0
7 8.1

9 3 .4
89.7

94.8
91 .5

9 6.1
93 .4
89.0
89 .0

R E T A I L TRADE

1 1 2

FINANCE*

INSURANCE*

AND REAL ESTATE

............................... .................................... ..

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .......................................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN AS SO CIA TI ON S ....................................................................................
PERSONAL CR ED IT I N S T I T U T I O N S .......................................................................................
L I F E INSURANCE ..............................................................................................................................
F I R E * MAR INE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE .................................................................

SERVICES




2 1 . 6

28.6
2 0 .2

6 6 .6

8 8 . 1

8 3 .9
81 .8
7 2 .5

6 6 . 2

5 3.5
55.2

8 6 . 0

8 8 . 0

8 2 .4

85.9

8 8 . 2

96 .0
85 .0
69.1
8 6 .1

95.7
9 4 .3
8 7.3
8 0.6
8 8 . 6

7 6 .5

8 8 . 8

9 1.3
89 .8

7 6.6
77.9

85.0
91. 1
79.5
81 .8

8 8.4

9 0 .4

9 1 .9

9 3 .1

9 4 .5

95.6

97. 1
95.3
90.7
91.7

97 .7
9 6.5
91 .9
93 .3

98. 1
9 7 .3
9 3 .0
94 .6

9 8.4
9 7.8
93.7
95.7

98.8
9 8 .4
95.7
9 6 .8

99. 1
98.9
9 7 .1
98.3

8 8 .6

8 6 .0

Table B-13. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by annual earnings
in all wage and salary employment and by industry of major earnings, 1966
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL

E P O M N WR LE T A
M L Y E T E E SS H N

INDUSTRY
$1800

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

$9000

$10000 $110 00

1 0 .2

1 5 .7

2 2 .6

30.0

3 7.4

44.5

5 1.3

5 7.7

6 4.1

71.3

76.3

80.5

8 4 .4

89.0

92 .0

M I N I N G .........................................................................................................................................................

2 . 8

4 .8

7.3

1 1 .1

15.8

2 1 . 6

2 8.2

35.7

4 3 .9

57.3

6 6 .5

7 3 .4

79.1

8 5 .7

9 0.2

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL GAS LI Q U ID S .......................
O I L AND GAS F I E L D SERV ICES ............................................................................................

2.4
4 .7

3.7
9.0

4 .9
1 3.4

7.6
18.0

11.7

17.6
28 .8

2 3.1
36 .7

30.0
4 4 .5

3 7.8
51.6

4 8 .9
63.3

5 8.0
70.4

6 5.0
75.2

7 1 .9
79.5

78.9

2 2 . 6

8 3.8
90 .0

8 6 .8

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ................................................................................................................

5.4

9.0

1 3 .7

18.9

25.2

31.5

3 8.2

4 4 .6

51.1

5 7 .7

6 3.2

6 8 . 8

74.2

82.3

88.3

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ...............................................................................
HEAVY CON STRUCTION, NEC ....................................................................................... ..
PLUMBING, H E A T I N G , A I R C O N D IT IO N IN G ....................................................................
P A I N T I N G , PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ....................................................................
ELECTRICAL W O R K ....................................................................................................... ..................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING .......................................................................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ................................................................. .............................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK .......................................................................................
CONCRETE WORK ............................................. ..................................................................................

4.4
4.4
4 .5
7.4
3.7
7.6
6 .4

1 3 .6

2 0 .6

29.2

1 1 .2

15.9
14.3
25.2

2 1 . 1

37.7
26 .9
23.6
4 0 .9
20 .3
3 7 .4
36.3
37.6
40 .7

4 6.4
3 2 .8
29.0
4 8.5
2 4.7
44 .5
4 4 .7
4 3.9
4 7 .9

54.2
3 8.8
35.2
56.2
28 .9
5 1.6
51.0
4 9 .7
53.7

60.8
4 4 .8
4 0.6
63.1
33.4
59 .0
58 .4
54.6
59.6

6 8 . 2

7 3 .0
56.2
5 1.9
77.0
4 3 .0
72.5
70.2

9 .5

7.6
7.5
6 .9
11.7
5.9
13.0
10.7
11.7
1 4.8

72.5

77.6
61.1
57.6
83. 1
47.1
79.2
7 6 .5
7 2.5
7 8 .1

82.1
66.4
6 3.6
8 7 .7
5 3 .0
8 4 .0
8 2 .4
78.5
83.1

88.7
75.3
73.9
9 4.5
6 5.5
91.2
9 0.0
87.0
89.1

9 2.8
8 2 .2
82.9
9 6 .9
7 6 .7
96.0
9 4.4
9 2.2
9 3.1

113

MANUFACTURING ..................................................................... ,
AM MU NIT ION , EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS . . . .
MEAT PRODUCTS .................................................................
DAIRY P R O D U C T S ....................... .. ...................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ..............
GRAIN M IL L PRODUCTS ...............................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ..........................................................
BEVERAGES ...........................................................................
WEAVING M I L L S , COTTON ..........................................
WEAVING M I L L S , SY NT HE TI CS ...............................
K N I T T I N G M IL L S .............................................................
YARN AND THREAD M IL L S ..........................................
M EN'S AND BOYS* S U IT S AND COATS ..............
MEN'S AND BOYS' FU R N IS H IN G S .........................
WOMEN'S AND M I S S E S ' OUTERWEAR ....................
WOMEN'S AND C H IL D R E N 'S UNDERGARMENTS .
C H IL D R E N 'S OUTERWEAR ............................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING M IL L S ............................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS
HOUSEHOLD FURNITU RE ...............................................
PULP AND PAPER M IL L S .............................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ..............
NEWSPAPERS ........................................................................
COMMERCIAL P R I N T I N G ...............................................
IN D U S TR IA L CHEMICALS ............................................
PL AS T IC S MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS . . . .
ORUGS ......................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND T O IL E T GOODS ............
PETROLEUM R E F I N I N G ..................................................
T I R E S AND INNER TUBES ..........................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ..........................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ....................................




6 . 8

8 . 2

1 2 .0

1 8 .5
1 6 .7
17.4
2 1 .1

2 4.6
2 2 .5
2 2 .9
2 6 .7

18.7
3 2.9
16.6
30.3
2 9.5
31.7
35.2

1 0 .1

17.6

5 1.4
46 .6
6 9.7
38.7
6 6 . 2

6 4.2
60 .4
6 6 .4

6 6 . 8

3.8

7.6

1 3 .6

2 0 .6

27.7

35.0

4 2 .2

4 9 .5

57.0

6 5 .0

71.5

7 7.0

8 1 .7

87.3

91 .0

0 . 6

1 .8

6 . 0

1 0 .0

4 .7
3.0
3.1

8 . 0

14.7
37.2
2 9.0
58.0
31.2
3 4.9
29.7
64.0
6 2.7
79.4
77.4
6 4.1
89.7
82.5

2 1 . 2

10.3
7.8
24.3
5.9

6.3
2 5 .3
14.7
42.0
16.5
19.4
17.0
24.8
2 5 .0
58.9
4 2.6
40.0
76.0
66.3
7 0.2
72.6
4 3.0
27.5
3 4 .7
5 .2
1 9 .7
2 2.4
17.5
3.5
6.5
9.0
16.3

1 0 .0

5.7
5.4
1 4 .9
3.0

3.8
17.2

29.3
51.0
46 .7
71.8
48 .5
5 3.0
46 .0
8 4 .4
8 0.9
87.7
88.9
78.7
9 4 .2
88.3
9 2.2
9 2.6
74.7
6 3 .9
78.6
28.7
5 7.4
43.5
42 .8
20 .3
37.7
4 0 .9
4 5 .9
14.4
18.1
56.9

3 6.3
5 9.7
56 .3
76 .5
55 .4
6 1 .6
5 3.7

42 .9
69.9
6 5.7
8 1.1
6 4.0
71.0
62.3
92.1
9 2.6
92.9
94 .9
86.9
96.5
9 2.0
94. 1
9 5.0
85.0
7 8.1

49. 1
7 6 .6
7 4 .1
84.8
7 1.0
7 8 .1
69.5
94.4
94.5
94.1
95.9
8 9.8
97.0
93.1
95.3
95.8

5 4 .8
8 2 .6
8 1.2
87.3
76.5
83.8
7 6.5
9 5.3
95.9
95.5
96.9
91.8
9 7.3
93.7
9 6.3
96.3
9 1.2
8 7.3
93.5
74.6
84.7
7 0 .8

6 2 .2
8 7.7
87.7
90.0
83.0
8 8.9
8 2.2
96.0
9 6 .5
9 6 .5
9 7 .8
9 3 .9
9 7.6
94.3
97.1
9 6 .7
9 3 .3
90.7
95.0
81.6

71.1
93.5
9 3.6
93.6
89.3
9 3 .9
9 0 .0
9 7 .0
9 7.2
9 7 .2
98.2
94.8
98.0
95.3
97.6
96.9
95.9
93.7
96.2
8 9.0
93.1
85.5
81.1
78.9
85.1
8 1.0
82 » 1
75.9
78.1
94.9
97.8

78.2
96.3
95.5
9 5.3
91.9
96 .4
93 .7
97.5
97.5
97.9
98 .4
9 5.8
9 8.3
96.3
9 8 .0
97.3
9 6.8
95.6
97.0
9 2.6
95.7
9 0.6
85.8
8 5 .0
88.9
85.4

8 . 0

5.3
4 .3
9.2
10.7
1 1.3
9.5
11.9
4 .4
5.7
0 . 8

3.6
8 . 6

5.8
7.4
2 0 .5
1 0 .6

1 1.4
25.8
2 5 .0
2 8 .6
2 7 .5
2 1 .0

9.6
11.5
1.7
7 .1
1 1 .9

1 0 .6

3 3 .1
1 0 .6

1 3 .7
1 2 .1
1 2 .1

14.1
39 .9
23.7
2 3.4
56.7
48 .9
51.8
5 5 .5
3 2.8
17.2
2 1 .2

3.5
1 2 .2

16.5

4.8
0.4
0 .7

0.9

2 . 0

1 .8

1 .8

2.7

8 . 2

1 2 .2

3 .1

6 . 2

0 . 6

0 .9

3 .5
4 .8
10.9
1.4

0 . 6

1 .1

2 . 1

2 .7
7.5

4 .8
17.1

9.6
36.3

2 . 6

4 .0
17.3
56.1

31.1
2 1 . 8

50.8
22 .7
25 .8
2 2 . 8

4 6.2
4 4 .3
7 1.6
63 .9
5 3.0
8 5.4
7 6.2
80.9
82 .4
5 2.4
3 5.6
49 .3
7.6
2 8.9
27.8
2 4.0
5 .8
1 1.4
1 4.8
24.6
4 .4
6 . 6

2 6.8
69.2

8 6 . 8

87.5
59.8
44.2
61.8
1 2 .5
3 7.3
3 3.4
30.9
9 .5
19.4
23.0
33.3
7.2
8 .9
36.4
77.8

43 .2
3 7.8
65 .8
40 .9
43 .6
37.9
77.0
73.6
8 4.2
84.1
7 3 .1
92 .5
8 6 . 0

9 0.8
90.5
6 8 . 0

5 4.8
7 0.7
19.1
4 7 .7
38.4
37 .0
1 3 .9
28.7
32.1
3 8.8
1 0 .6

13.6
4 7 .0
8 4 .4

8 8 . 6

8 8 . 8
8 8 . 2

90.5
9 2 .6
8 3.2
95 .7
90 .0
93.5
9 4 .0
80 .7
7 1.0
84.4
40 .5
6 5.4
4 8 .6
4 8.7
28.8
4 8.0
48 .7
53 .9
2 0.3
24.1
67.1
91.8

8 8 .8

5 4 .4
7 3 .9
56. 1
56.1
3 8.3
57.2
56.9
61.2
29.7
3 5.1
7 5.7
9 3.7

8 8 .6

8 2.7
9 1.7
64.6
8 0.0
6 3.5
62.6
48.8
66.9
6 3.9
6 7 .0
4 1.2
44.1
8 2 .1
95.5

6 8 . 6

59.3
7 3.8
70. 1
7 1.3
55.1
5 2 .7
87.2
9 6.2

8 8 .8

7 6 .9
73.7
68.5
79.2
75.3
75.5
6 5 .7
62.6
90.9
9 7.0

8 6 .2

82.5
8 6 .8

96.7
98. 1

Table B-13. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by annual earnings
in all wage and salary employment and by industry of major earnings, 1966----Continued
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS

$1800

PR IV ATE

NONAGRICUL TURAL ECONOMY -

MANUFACTURING -

FROM ALL

E P O M N WR LE T A
M L Y E T E E SS H N

INDUSTRY
$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

2.3
3.8
0 . 6

4 .2

6 . 6

1 1 .8

6 . 8

11.3

1.3

2 . 0

18.0
3.7

19.8
2 5 .9
5.6

2 . 8

5 .1
4 .3
10.3
9 .2
7.7
9.1
2 .9
6.9
4 .1
5 .9
5.5
4 .6
5.2
7.3
7.3

46 .0
4 2 .3
1 2.9
26.3
26.4
43.2
3 6.6
3 5 .8
3 5.8

8 . 0

3 4.2
3 3.9
8 .4
1 8.7
18.2
34.1
27.8
28.6
28.7
1 2 .9

114

$6000

$ 6 6 0 0

$7200

$7800

$8400

56.1
5 0.1

7 4 .6
67.3
40 .9
60.5
53.2
6 5.0
6 0.0
59.3
4 9.8
53.9
54.7
43 .7
5 8.6
5 5 .1
5 0.0
68.5
60.8
62 .7
72.8
77.4
81.3
5 3.3
75.8
49 .6
38.6
57.5
6 2.5
77.4

8 0.3
74 .5
52 .0
70.6
64.4
74.2
7 2.1
67 .5
66.3
59 .8
6 4 .0
63 .9
51.5
67 .1
6 3 .6
5 6.7
7 5.0
6 6.7
6 8 .9
79.3
8 1 .6
85.0
59.3
7 8.9
5 9 .4
4 7.1
6 5 .9
6 8 .9
8 0.8

8 4.4
79.6
61.9
7 7.8
7 1 .8
79.8
77.3
74.1
7 2 .7
67.8
7 2.6
72.9
5 8.3
74 .4
7 1.3
6 2 .9
8 0.7
72.8
75.1
84.2
8 4.7
6 4 .9
81.9
6 7.4
55.0
72 .2
7 4.1
8 3.9

84.0
69.9
84.2
78.1
84.0
81.9
7 9.3
77.0
7 6 .0
79.4
79.3
64.4
8 0 .2
78.1
7 0.3
8 5 .2
78.2
80.8
8 8 .5
88.4
9 0.0
70.6
8 5.1
73.8
6 2.8
7 8.4
77.9
86.9

$9000

$100 00 $1 10 00

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

GLASS AND GLASSWARE. PRESSED OR BLOWN ...............................................................
CONCRETE. GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PROCUCTS ............................................................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ............................................................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ..................................................................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ..................................................................................
CU TLE RY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ..........................................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS .................................................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BO LTS, ETC ......................................................................
METAL STAMPINGS ...........................................................................................................................
ENGINES AND T U R B I N E S ............................................................................................................
FARM MACHINERY ..............................................................................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY .......................................................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY .....................................................................................................
SP EC IAL INDUSTRY M A C H I N E R Y ............................................................................................
GENERAL I N D U S T R IA L MACHINERY .......................................................................................
O FF IC E AND COMPUTING MACHINES ....................................................................................
SE RVIC E INDUSTRY MACHINES ................................................................................................
EL ECTRI C TEST AND D I S T R I B U T I N G EQUIPMENT ......................................................
EL ECT RIC AL IN D U S T R IA L APPARATUS ..............................................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ..............................................................................................................
ELE CT RIC L I G H T I N G AND W IR IN G EQUIPMENT ............................................................
RADIO AND TV R E C E IV IN G EQUIPMENT .................................................................... ..
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ................................................................................................ ..
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ...............................................................
MOTOR VE HIC LE S AND EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ...................................................................................................................
S H IP AND BOAT B U IL D I N G AND R E P A IR IN G .................................................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DE VICE S ......................................................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ................................................................................................................

1 .5
0.9
2 . 6
2 . 8
2 . 8

2.4
0 . 6
2 . 0
1 . 2
2 .1

1.9
1 .4
1.4
2 . 1
1 . 6

1 .7
1.9
3.3
4.7
1.4
3.0
0.7
0.5

2 . 2

4.5
5.8
4 .9
4.7
1.4
4.1
2 .5
3 .7
3 .7
2 .5
2.9
4 .3
3.4
3.9
4.5
6 .9
9.3
3.0
7 .5
1 .4

8 . 0

8.5
13.2
1 8.0
5.5
1 4 .9

8 . 6

1 2 .8

7.7
18.1
14.5
12.7
15.0
4.4

1 2 .3
2 5.8
20 .9
21.3
2 0 . 6

1 5 .2

2 1 . 0

6 . 6

1 0 .2

8.4
9 .2
8.5

1 2 .2

15.1
1 7.1

1 0 .1

8 . 6
1 2 .8

13.1
14.2
15.2
21.7
28.8
1 0 .1

2 0 .1

27 .4
2 0 .8

8 . 1

1 1 .6

6 . 2

9.8

1 3.7
1 8.4
42 .7

26.8
51.6

23.0
28.8
2 6 .4
2 8.8
38.3
36.5
39.2
42 .5
5 5.7
62 .8
31.8
59.3
1 6 .7
1 4 .2
2 9 .1
35.6
5 9 .3

1 5 .3
13.0
14.2
19.6
19.7
22.5
2 2.5
3 1.7
4 1 .4
15.5
3 8.0

28.3
2 7.6
29.4
3 0.7
4 4 .0
5 2.8
2 4 .0
5 0 .1

2 1 . 0

18.7
2 1 . 0

3 7 .8
44 .6
65.3

66.3
5 8.4
30.1
4 7.9
4 2.8
6 0 .9
5 6.0
50.0
51.5
38 .8
4 3.1
41 .6
34.7
4 7 .7
44.2
41 .8
58.6
53.1
55 .6
6 2 .0
7 1.3
7 7.2
4 6 .4
7 1 .2
34 .6
29 .3
4 7 .4
5 2 .1
72.4

2 0 . 0

3 6 .1
34.1
5 1.9
4 6.3
4 1.9
4 3 .8
28.0
34.8
29.6
2 8.5
37.4
34.7
35.8
47 .7
4 4.2
4 7.4
5 2 .3
6 4 .4
70.7
3 9.3

6 8 . 6

8 8 .1

8 8 .6

9 2.5
8 9 .7
8 0 .5
89.7

92.2
9 1.6
92.6
7 7.9
8 8 .3
82.0
7 1.9
87.6
85.1
9 0.2

95.1
93.4
8 7 .4
93.7
90.7
9 3.3
9 1.4
89.5
87.0
90.0
92.0
91.6
79.5
9 0.9
90.1
84.5
93.8
88.4
9 2.2
9 4.5
94.0
9 4.7
8 2.7
91.2
8 7 .8
7 8.6
91.4
8 8.9
9 3.0

8 6 .1

8 9.3
8 6 .8

8 5 .0
8 2 .9
8 3 .7
87.5
85.9
7 2 .7
8 6 .1

8 5 .8
78.8
90 .4
8 4 .5
8 8 .0

8 . 1

3 .3
4.2
13.1

2 1 .8

24.9
4.9
4 .2
9.1
1 1 .9
3 2.6

...................................................................................................................................

3.8

5.8

8.4

1 1 .8

16.0

20.7

2 6.5

34.3

4 3 .7

5 7.7

6 5.2

7 1.3

8 0.7

8 8 .1

9 2.7

RAILROADS ............................................................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .........................................................................
T A X I C A B S .............................................................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG D l S T A N C t ..........................................................................
A I R TRANSPORTATION ...................................................................................................................

0 . 8

1.4
3.3
21.9
7.6

2 .3
4.5
3 0.4

9 .0

21.7
32.0
78.2
3 6.2
30.0

3 4 .9
4 4 .3
82.5
4 3.2
4 0 .0

52.7
51.7

6 3 .7
7 1 .8
91 .6
61.5
62.1

6 7 .8
7 9.9
9 4 .2
69 .4
69 .0

84.7

22 .4
7 3.1
30.5
2 1.7

5 8.3
5 8.7

2 .9

7.1
16.3
65.1
25.0
1 4 .6

1 1 .8

5 4.3

1 .6

3.1
7.1
41.6
15.2
5.4

4 .6

1 4 .6
4.8
0 .9

9 6.4
7 6 .8
7 5 .1

9 2.3
9 5.9
97.8
8 5.2
82.1

9 7.2
9 8.7
9 8.5
9 0.8
85.1

5.0

8.3

14.7

23 .5

34 .9

4 5 .9

5 3 .3

5 8.2

62.6

6 6 . 2

70.2

7 5.6

83.4

8 8.9

76.7
6 7.6

84.9
7 2.9

90.5
7 6.8

TRANSPORTATION

COMMUNICATION

......................................................................................................................... ..

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ....................................................................................................
RADIO AND T E L E V I S I O N BROADCASTING ..........................................................................

2 . 0
2 . 0

2 . 1

2 .5
2 . 0

6.7

1 .2

4 .4
9.9

2 . 8

2.4
5.7
6 .7

1 1 .0

7.7
13.5

14.5
18.1

1 0 .8
2 0 . 2

2 4.1
23 .4

2 0 . 6

3 6.7
28.8

48.2
3 6.0

6 6 .1

24.3
2 0 . 6

55.7
42.1

8 8 .2

60 .2
47.1

6 4.0
5 4.3

6 7.1
59.6

70 .9
6 3.6

8 8 .0

..............................................................................................................................

1.9

3.0

4 .6

7.0

1 1.4

16.1

2 2 . 1

28.9

3 7.6

4 7 .3

5 6.8

65 .4

7 5 .2

85.5

9 1.3

WHOLESALE TRADE .................................................................................................................................

5.6

8 . 6

13.0

19.0

2 6.0

33.6

4 1.1

48.3

55.3

6 3.4

6 9 .0

7 3.9

78.0

83.3

8 6 .7

MOTOR VE HI CL E S AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ........................................................
DRUGS, CH EM IC AL S, AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ................................................. ..
DRY GOODS AND A P P A R E L .................... ........................................................................ ..
GROCERIES AND RELATED P R O D U C T S .......................................................... .......................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ........................................................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ......................................................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SU PPLIE S ..........................................................................

4.7

8 . 2

2 4 .4
1 7 .9
35 .3
31.2
2 3 .5
2 5 .8
19.5

3 3 .1
2 5.4
44.7
3 8 .4
3 0 .5
33.2
26.1

41.6
3 3.4
5 1.4
46 .2
3 8.6
41.6
32.8

50.0
4 0 .2
5 7 .8
53.5
45.2
4 9.6
3 9.9

5 8.8
4 7 .7
62 .0
61 .0
5 1.7
56.7
4 7.1

69.1
56.3
67.7
69.5
59.3
6 5.2
5 5.0

74.9
6 1 .4
7 0.8
75.8
64 .2
7 2 .1
6 1.0

7 9 .2

8 3.6
71.1
76.0
8 5.3
7 3 .2
7 9 .5
70.9

8 8 .0

4 .5
9 .7
12.4

11.4
7.4
1 8 .0
17.4

1 7 .4

2 . 8

77.9
79.2
90.0
7 9 .2
8 4.8
77.1

90.6
82.6
8 1.9
92.6
8 2 .6

PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S




5 .0
8.3
3.6
3.8
3.5

6 . 2

1 1 .0

6 . 8

1 1 .9
8.7

5.6

1 2 .1

2 6 .2
2 3 .6
16.3
18.7
13.7

6 6 . 1

7 4.1
81.2
6 9 .6
75.8
65.7

8 8 .8

8 2.0

Table B-13. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by annual earnings
in all wage and salary employment and by industry of major earnings, 1966----Continued
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM

$1800

PRIVATE
RETAIL

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

ALL

E P O M N WR LE T A
M L Y E T E E SS H N

INDUSTRY
$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

$9000

$1 0000 $ 1 10 00

CONTINUED

115

T R A D E .......................................................................................................... .............................

2 2 . 0

3 2 .6

43 .5

52.8

60 .7

6 7.1

72.9

77.7

8 2.0

86.3

8 9 .1

9 1 .3

9 3 .0

95.1

96.4

DEPARTMENT S T O R E S ...................................................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES .....................................................................................................................
VA R IE T Y S T O R E S ............................................................................................................................
GROCERY S T O R E S ............ .. .............................................................................................................
MOTOR VE HIC LE D E A L E R S ....................... ............................................ ....................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FU RN ISHINGS ......................................................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES .......................................................................................
FA MI LY CLOTHING STORES ......................................................................................................
SHOE STORES .....................................................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U RN IS H IN GS .............................................................. ..................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY S T O R E S ......................... ...........................................
FUEL AND I C E DEALERS .......................................................... . ..........................................

2 0 .2

46.5
25.8
6 4.6
3 7.2
1 3.7
37.4
55.6
5 9 .5
40.2
2 6.4
5 2.7
1 8.2

5 8.7
38.2
77.4
44.7
19.6
4 6.2
6 9 .9
7 0 .4
4 9.9
34.7
62.8
2 4 .0

6 8 .4
49.5
8 3.2
52 .0
2 7 .7
5 3.7
7 9.3
7 7.6
57.5
4 3 .0
6 8 .9
33.0

74.5
60 .9
57.9
36.4
60 .2
84. 1
82.2
6 3 .3
50.6
73.4
42 .8

79.0
67.7
8 8.7
64 .6
44 .9
65.5
88.5
85.9
6 9 .3
57.8
7 6 .5
5 4.9

82.7
7 3.8
90.8
70.9
52.8
71.2
91.0
8 7 .5
73.3
64 .6
7 8.7
6 3.6

8 6 . 2

77.9
92.8
76 .4
60 .6
77.1
92 .9
89.9
78.9
70.6
80.6
70 .7

8 9.4
82.2
94.2
82.3
6 8 .4
8 2.9
94. 1
92 .0
8 4.6
77.8
8 3 .1
79.1

9 1 .7
85.2
9 5.4
86.5
7 3.8
86.3
9 4 .6
9 3.7

2 9 .1
8.5

3 2 .3
17.2
4 1.8
29.0
9.0
2 8.1
38.7
40.1
3 1 .2
1 7.9
40.5
12.7

9 3 .4
8 7.4
9 6 .2
89.9
7 8 .2
8 8.5
9 5 .4
9 5 .0
90.4
8 5 .1
8 6.7
8 8 .0

9 4 .5
89.3
96.5
92.7
82.4
90.6
9 5.9
9 5 .6
92.8
87.3
8 8 .3
90.9

96.1
9 1 .2
9 7 .3
95.7
87.1
9 2.5
96.5
96.2
9 5 .2
9 1 .0
9 0 .9
94.1

97.0
92.4
97.5
97.5
90.2
94.4
97.2
96.8
96.2
9 3 .3
93.4
95.5

........................................................................

7.2

11.5

17.8

2 8 .2

39.7

4 9 .6

57.9

6 4.3

6 9.7

75.0

7 8.7

81.8

84.5

8 8 .1

9 0.5

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS B A N K S .............. .......................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN AS SO CIAT ION S ....................................................................................
PERSONAL CR ED IT I N S T I T U T I O N S ................................................. .........................
L I F E INSURANCE ............................................................................................................................
F I R E , M AR IN E, AND CASUALTY I N S U R A N C E .................................................................

4 .7

15.7
1 4.9
1 8 .7
13.4

4 3 .8
39.1
4 2 .8
3 1.8
3 5.7

55.6
4 9 .6
5 3.4
40 .1
4 4 .9

64 .8
5 9.5
6 2 .0
48.1
51 .4

8 0 .6
75.9
8 1.6
66.5
6 9.4

83.8
7 9.7
8 5.1
70 .7
7 5 .0

8 8 .1

69.5
5 4 .4
57.4

75.9
70.4
75.7
6 1.2
6 3 .0

8 6.3
82 .2

1 1 .2

2 8 .9
2 5.1
3 0 .6
21.7
23.1

70.9

2 . 8

9.0
. 9.3
11.9
8.3
5.3

74 .4
80.3

8 4 .7
9 0.5
7 7 .7
85.1

90.7
87.8
94.3
8 3 .3
9 0 .0

92.8
9 0.3
95.5
8 6.9
9 3.0

S E R V I C E S ..................................................................................................................................................

2 0.3

2 8.9

38.1

46.9

54.6

6 1 .4

6 7 .7

73.2

7 7 .9

83 .9

8 6 . 8

8 9.0

90.8

9 3 .0

9 4.4

HO TE LS, TO UR ISTS COURTS, AND M O T E L S ..............................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ........................................................................
MOTION PICTUR ES ..........................................................................................................................
HOSPITAL S ..........................................................................................................................................

29.7
20.5
4 0 .7
12.7

4 4 .1
37.6
48.5
23.8

5 8.0
5 4.8
5 3.4
3 9.2

6 9 .1
68.3
5 7 .7
5 3 .7

77.2
7 5 .7
6 2 .0
6 4 .3

82.5
80.3
65 .6
72 .5

87.0
84 .4
69 .9
79.0

89.8
87.4
7 3.6
84.0

92.2
90 .5
76 .9
8 7.7

94.2
93.5
80.5
9 0.2

95 .5
9 5 .0
82.9
92 .3

96.5
96 .2
85.7
94 .0

96.9
9 6 .9

98.1
9 7 .9
91.2
9 7.5

9 8.5
98 .6
93.8
9 8.1

FINA NC E,

INSURANCE,




AND REAL ESTATE

8 . 2

25.6
1 9 .3
5 .6
2 0.3
2 5.9
2 7 .1
2 2 .2
1 1 .0

6 . 1

7.1
5.2

8 6 .1

6 6 . 6

8 8 .1

81.5
8 4.7
83.5

8 8 . 0

8 8 .2

9 6 .3

Table B-14. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by annual earnings
in all wage and salary employment and by industry of major earnings, 1967
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T IO N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL
EMPLOYMENT W
ERE LESS THAN

INDUSTRY

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

2 1 .1

2 8 .3

35 .6

42.4

4 9.2

5 5 .5

6 1 .7

4.3

6 .7

1 0 .0

1 4 .5

19.7

25.9

32.8

3.7
7.7

5 .0
11.4

6.9
17.3

10.7
22.7

1 5 .1
2 7 .9

20.4
34.3

$1800

$2400

....................................................................

9.7

14.7

.........................................................................................................................................................

2 . 8

CRUDE PETROLEUM* NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL GAS L I Q U ID S ......................
O I L AND GAS F I E L D SERVICES .............................................................................................

2 . 8

PR IV ATE

M IN IN G

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

5 .3

$3000

$7200

$7800

$8400

$9000

6 8 . 8

74.0

78.4

8 2 .2

8 7.2

90.5

4 0 .6

51.5

6 1.4

6 9.0

74.7

82.1

8 7 .6

2 6.7
4 1 .1

33 .4
48 .0

4 3.5
56. 1

52.9
61 .3

60.6
6 8 . 2

6 7.0
73.1

75.7
8 2.0

81.6
8 7 .8

$1 0000 $110 00

CONTRACT C O N S T R U C T I O N ...............................................................................................................

5 .0

8 . 2

1 2 .4

17.1

22 .4

2 8.5

34.4

4 0.5

46 .8

5 3 .3

5 9.1

64.7

70.2

78.6

8 5 .1

HIGHWAY AND STREET C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................................... ..
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION* NEC .....................................................................................................
PLUMBING* H E A TI N G * A I R C O N D IT IO N I N G ............ .. .....................................................
P A I N T I N G * PAPER HANGING* DECORATING ....................................................................
ELECT RICAL WORK ...........................................................................................................................
MASONRY* STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING .......................................................................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING .......................................................................................... . .
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ..................................................................... .................
CONCRETE WORK ................................. ....................................................................... . ..................

4.2
3 .5
4 .4
7.4
4 .1
6.9
4 .7
6 .4
5.3

7.2
5.9
6.5

18.6
14.4
13.0

5 1.0
3 5.1
3 0.6
50.7
27.4
47 .0
45.6
46.8
52.2

5 8.5
40 .9
36.5
5 8 .2
3 1.5
54.1
53 .0
5 2.9
5 6.6

7 0.3
5 2.0
4 7.5
73.0
4 1.1
67 .9
68 .3
6 4 .2

75.3
57.8
52 .6
79.5
45.0
74.8
7 2.8
6 9.7
7 2 .4

7 9 .7
63.8
5 8 .1
84.0
5 0.4
80.9
7 8 .2
75.3
7 8 .4

8 6 .6

36.3
19.7
34.2
33 .0
34 .7
38.8

4 3.2
2 9.4
25.4
4 2 .8
24.2
40 .4
39.5
41.2
44.8

6 5.2
46.5
4 2.2

2 3.3

26 .8
18.6
16.4
29.4
15.5
28.1
25.9
27.7
30.8

35.4
2 4.1

1 0 .1

11.9
9 .9
9.5
16.4
9 .0
1 7.3
1 4 .4
15.0
1 6 .5

91.5
78.2
78.1
9 5.2
7 2 .6
9 3.8
93.0
8 9.3
90.3

1 1 .2
6 . 2

11.7
9 .3
1 0 .2

2 2 .0

11.9
2 3 .3
2 0 . 0
2 1 .1

2 1 .1

6 6 . 2

3 6 .8
6 1.3
61.5
5 7 .5
62 .4

6 8 . 6

1 1 6

......................................................................................................................................

3.3

6.5

11.9

18.9

2 6.1

33.3

40.6

4 7 .8

55.2

64.0

70.4

75.8

AMMUN ITION * EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ..........................................................................
MEAT P R O D U C T S ......................................... ...................................................................................
DA IR Y P R O C U C T S ......................................... ...................................................... ............................
CANNED* CURED, AND FROZEN F O O D S ....................................... .......................................
GRAIN M IL L PRODUCTS ................................................................................................................
BAKERY P R O D U C T S ..........................................................................................................................
B E V E R A G E S ...........................................................................................................................................
WEAVING M I L L S , COTTON ...........................................................................................................
WEAVING M I L L S * SY NTHET ICS ................................................................................................
k n i t t i n g m i l l s ..............................................................................................................................
YARN AND THREAD M I L L S ..........................................................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' S U IT S AND COATS ...............................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' F U RN ISH IN GS ....................... ..................................................................
WOMEN'S AND M IS S E S ' OUTERWEAR .....................................................................................
WOMEN'S AND CH IL D R E N 'S UNDERGARMENTS ........................................... .. ..................
C H IL D R E N 'S OUTERWEAR .............................................................................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING M IL L S .............................................................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PROCUCTS ............................................................
HOUSEHOLD F U R N I T U R E ............................................. .. ................................................................
PULP AND PAPER M IL L S ........................................................................................................ . .
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND B O X E S ............ .............................................................. .
NEWSPAPERS .........................................................................................................................................
COMMERCIAL P R IN T I N G ................................................................................................................
I N D U ST R IA L CHEMICALS ..............................................................................................................
PL A S T IC S MATERIALS AND SYNT HETICS ..........................................................................
DRUGS ......................................................................................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS* AND T O I L E T GOODS ............................................................................
PETROLEUM R E F I N I N G ...................................................................................................................
T I R E S AND INNER T U B E S ..................................................... ....................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ..........................................................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER .....................................................................................................

0 . 6

2 . 6
1 2 .1

2 1 .1

30.4

3.1
4.7
3.8
3.1
2.3
6.5

5.1
7.7
6 .9
5 .4
5 .7
15.5
11.9
1 1.7
19.2
20.5
23.5
19.7
15.2

1 2.3
3 7.6
2 8.2
5 5 .8
26. 1
3 1.8
2 8 .7
6 3.7
59.9
76.9
76.3
6 2 .3
88.3
7 9,2
85.8
85.7
5 4.2
40 .3
60.4

1 8.9
44.8
35.4
62.8
34.0
41 .0
35.4
7 5 .3
7 2 .2
82.6
8 4.9
71.6
91.7
8 3,8
8 9.8
8 9 .2
62.6
5 0.8
69 .0
16.8
42 .8
3 7 .2
3 6.7
13.1
26.8
31.1
35.5
9.9
15.1
4 8.1
8 2.2

2 5.7
5 0.3
43 .7

1 2 .6

5.0
24.9
16.1
40.7
1 3 .4
17.0
15.7
2 5 .5
25.2
54.1
43.1
38.1
7 1.4
6 1 .5
66.4
68.4
37.2
2 3 .7
33.1
5 .2
17.4

8 . 1

5 .2
6.5

1.3
9 .5
9.3

33.6
57.6
52.9
7 4 .4
50.3
57.8
50 .4
87.4
85.2
8 9 .1
91 .9
82.2
9 5 .0
88,9
9 3 .0
92 .8
7 7.0
68 .4
82.7
35 .9
61.6
47 .2
4 7.2
2 6.3
44 .3
4 7 .2
48 .6
18.1
2 8.8
6 5.5
9 0 .4

5 0.0
65.6
6 3.3
8 0.1
60 .3
67.0
59.4
91.8
90.0
9 1.8
94.8

56.1
72.3
7 1.9
83.7
66 .5
7 3.2
66.9
9 4 .0
92.7
93 .5
9 6.0

61 .2
78.4
7 8.2
86.5
7 2.9
7 9.8
7 4.0
95.6
9 4 .7
9 5.1
97.2
90 .4
97. 1
92*9
95. 7
95.8
9 0.2
85.2
92.6
69. 1
82. 1
6 7.4
6 6 .4
55.3
71.4
6 7 .0
67.2
46 .8
63.6

MANUFACTURING




6 . 0

4.1
6.9
8.3
8 .8

8.5
8 . 2

3.4
4 .7
0 . 6
2 . 8

8 .9
4 .8
0 . 8

0.5
1.5
3.0
1 .1

6 . 6

9.8
1 .7
5 .0
11.9
7 .8

1 5 .9

8 . 8
1 2 .0

1 0 .9
1 1.4
12.7
34.1
23.6
24.1
46 .3
42.1
4 6.1
46.1
2 7.0
14.4
1 8.8
3.2
9 .6
16.0
11.9

1 .2

2 .1

1 . 0

2.3
4 .5

2.7
5.5
1.5

1 0 .1
2 . 1

0 . 6

1 .2

2 . 0

3.1

6 . 0

6 . 6

14.5

9.3
3 1 .4

2 1 .6

17.8
2.7
5 .1
9 .2
15.8
3.3
4.2
17.9
49.8

3 1.4
2 2 . 0

4 7 .4
1 9.6
2 3.5
2 1 .7
46 .6
4 3 .9
68.7
6 4 .0
5 0.5
8 3.1
72.4
7 9.0
79.5
4 5 .9
3 2.8
4 8 .3
8 . 0

1 0 .8

2 5 .6
27.1
24.1
5.1

33.9
32.1
30.8
8.3
17.5

1 0 .0

1 4.6

2 1 . 8

2 1 . 0

28. 1
7 .2

5.0
6 . 6

1 0 .2

27.6

3 7.4
7 5.3

6 6 . 2

6 8 . 6

4 2.2
4 9 .4
43.1
8 2.6
7 8.9
8 6.3
8 9 .1
7 7.7
93.6
8 6,4
91.8
9 1.1
7 0.1
60.0
7 6 .6
2 5.2
51 .4
42.2
4 1 .9
1 9.3
35.9
39. 1
4 1 .7
1 3.9
2 0.7
57.4
87.0

8 6 .0

8 8 . 8

9 6.0
9 0,8
93.4
94.1
8 3.3
7 5.6
8 8 . 1
50.4
70.6
54.7
5 4 .4
3 6.2
56.0
5 5 .3
5 6.7
24.9
4 4.9
75.5
93.4

96 .6
91 .9
94.6
9 5 .3
87.1
8 1.1
90.6
60.2
77 .2
6 C .7
60.5
4 5 .5
6 4.7
61.9
6 2 .3
32.9
55.6
81.3
94.6

8 6 . 0

96 .0

80.

1

6 6 . 6

84.7
8 3 .5
89.4
7 8 .6
8 5.6
7 9 .6
9 6 .2
9 5.6
9 5.9
97.7
92.0
97 .4
93-6
96.3
96.1
92.6
8 8 .8

9 3.8
77.7
8 6.5
74.0
7 1 .3
64.9
7 6.2
7 1 .7
71.5
5 8 .8
70 .6
89.4
9 6.4

71.7
6 8.5
9 1 .9
6 0 .9
8 8 .7
8 7 .2
84.3
8 4 .9

8 5.7

8 9 .6

74.4
9 1 .1
9 0 .7
92.3
85.4
91.0
8 7 .0
97.0
96.3
97.0
9 8.2
9 3.5
9 7.7
9 4.7
97.1
9 6 .8
94.9
93.5
95.9
86.3
9 0.8
8 1 .9
7 8 .6
7 5.9
83.1
7 8.2
7 8 .6
71.1
7 9.4
93.2
97.4

8 0 .4
94. 5
9 3.9
9 4.0
89.9
95.0
91.6
97.3
97.3
98. 0
98. 5
94.9
97.9
95.4
97.8
9 6.9
96. 3
95.6
96.9
91.1
9 4 .2
8 8 . 1
8 3 .9
82. 1
8 6 .7
82.3
8 3 .7
79.8
8 7 .6
9 5.7
97.9

Table B-14. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary em ploym ent by annual earnings
in all wage and salary em ploym ent and by industry of major earnings, 1967----Continued
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T IO N

OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL

E P O M N WR LE T A
M L Y E T E E SS H N

INDUSTRY
$1800

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

MANUFACTURING

-

$2400

$3000

117

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

9 .3
16.2
3 .2

28. 1
3 0 .9
7.7

42 .7
39.2
12.5
28.1
2 5.6
4 0.6
3 2.6
33.4
34 .7
1 8 .4
26.1

7.9

1 1 .6

8 . 2

1 7.8
26. 1
2 6.3
30.5
28.2
42. 1
55.6
1 9 .7
4 7.6
1 2.5
9 .4
2 1.4
25.7
4 8 .4

2 2.3
27.8
2 7.6
2 6.3
3 6.8
34.6
39.0
39.1
53.7
63.3
28.2
55.2
18.2
13.4
28.4
35.1
5 6.4

5 4 .2
4 6.6
20.7
3 7.9
34.4
49 .7
4 1.8
4 1.5
4 1 .4
2 6 .7
35.3
29.5
28.2
35.7
3 6.7
3 2 .6
4 6 .6
43.0
4 6 .8
50. 1
6 2.8
6 9.7
36.2
61.6
25. 1
1 9 .6
37.0
44.8
6 2.9

6 3.2
54.9
3 0 .4
4 9.4
4 5 .3
57.7
51.8
4 9.3
50.6
3 6.8
44.1
4 1 .2
3 4.5
45 .3
4 6 .3
39.2
57.2
50.5
5 5.1
58.6
69.1
7 5.9
43 .2
66 .7
3 5.1
27.2
47 .0
53.6
69.4

70.6
62.9
42.9
61.1
59.3
66.5
6 2 .1
59.0
61.7
49.6
54.0
5 5 .3
4 2 .8
5 6 .7
58.9
46.2
66.7
58.8
63.5
70.9
75.8
81.2
50.6
7 1 .8
50.6
41.3
5 8 .5
63.1
7 5 .8

7 7 .0
70.1
54.2
70.4
6 7.2
7 2 .5
70. 1
6 6.7

6 . 2

1 6 .0
23.9
5.0
1 3.7
11.7
22.9
16.8
1 8.4
18.9
7.3
13.2
9 .8

8 2 .0
7 6 .7
6 4.0
77.8
73.9
77.2
75.7
7 2 .5
74.0
69. 1
7 0 .4
73.5
5 8 .3
7 1.6
73. 1
59.6
80.2
7 0 .5
7 5 .9
83.5
8 4.2

$9000

$1 0000 $ 1 10 00

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED CR BLOWN ...............................................................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ............................................................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ................................. ..........................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ..................................................................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND CRAWING ..................................................................................
CUTL ER Y, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE .........................................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL P R O D U C T S ................. ...............................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BO LTS , ETC .......................................................................
METAL STAMPINGS ...........................................................................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES .............................................................................................................
FARM MACHINERY .............................................................................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATEC M A C H I N E R Y ......................* .............................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ............................................................... ....................................
SP EC IA L INDUSTRY MACHINERY ............................................................................................
GENERAL IN D U S T R IA L MACHINERY ......................................................................................
O FF ICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ...................................................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...............................................................................................
EL ECT RIC TEST AND D I S T R I B U T I N G EQUIPMENT .......................................................
e l e c t r ic a l
i n d u s t r i a l APPARATUS ...............................................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES .......................................................... . ................................................
EL EC TR IC L I G H T I N G AND W IR IN G EQUIPMENT ............................................................
RADIO AND TV R E C E IV IN G EQUIPMENT ............................................................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT .....................................................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ...............................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE S AND EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ..................................................................................................................
SH IP AND BOAT B U IL D I N G AND RE PA IRI NG .................................................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CCNTRCL DEVICES .......................................................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ................................................................................................................

1 .4
3.6

3.5

5.9

6 . 6

1 0 .8

0 . 6

1 .2

1.9
0.7
1.7
2.3
3.6
2.5
0 .7

3 .3
1 .5
4.0
3.9
5 .3
5.3
1.4
3.3
1 .9
3.6
3.2

1.9
5.0
3 .4

2 . 0
1 . 0

1.9
1.9
1.4

8 . 2
6 . 6

8 . 6

14.2

7.2
8 .4
8 .4

1 1 .6

2 . 6

5.8
3.5
5.3
5.4
4 .9
3 .3
6 .4
6 .4
6.7
5 .8
10.5
17.4
4.3
1 2.7
3.3

13.0
12.9
4.2
8 . 6

2 0 . 0

17.4
31.6
24. 1
24.9
26. 3
11.9
19.2
13.5
16.0
2 0.3

2 0 . 0

6 8 . 6

61.2
62. 1
64 .7
50.7
64.3
65.9
5 3.4
74.2
64.9
70.0
7 8 .5
81.2
84.0
56 .4
7 5 .3
60.3
49.5
6 7 .5
6 9 .3
79.2

8 6 .2

82.1
71.6
8 3.2
78.8
81.4
80.0
76.3
77.2
75.1
75.8
78.9
63.2
76.6
78.0

91. 1
8 9.0
80.7

9 3.9
92.4

8 8 .8

92.8
90.2
9 1 .1
90. 3
8 7.3
8 7 .5
89. 8

8 5.6
87.4
85.7
82.6
81.8
82.7
8 3.4
85.8
7 0.1
83.0
84.4
74.2
8 9.3
82. 1
87.1
91.1
9 0 .0
9 1 .8
73.8
8 5.5
82.0
72.1
85.5
82.8

8 8 .2

8 8 .6

90. 3
77.8
8 7 .9

0 . 6

1 .2

2 . 2

2 .4
1.4
7 .3

4 .3
2.7
12.9

6.5

1 0 .2

6 . 2
2 0 .6

11.3
30.4

1 3 .5
13.4
1 1.5
1 8 .2
1 8 .3
21.5
1 9.3
30.3
4 5 .6
1 3.0
3 5 .8
8 .5
6.3
15.2
1 8 .5
4 0 .2

T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ..................................................... .. .................. .......................................................

3.8

5.8

8 . 2

1 1 .2

1 5 .0

1 9.5

24.5

30.8

3 8.3

50.4

60.1

66.9

74.9

85.5

89. 7

RAILROADS ............................................................................................. .............................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .........................................................................
TAXICABS ..............................................................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE .........................................................................
AI R TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................................................

0.5
2.5
15.8
4.8
0.5

1 .1

1 .8

3 .8

3.7
22.3
7.3

4.9
30.3
1 .6

5.5
15.2
61.2
2 4.2
10.7

8.5
19.9
6 9.6
29.0
16.8

15.3
28.4
7 6.9
34. 1
2 4 .0

24.9
3 7.5
8 0.5
4 0 .2
3 1.9

4 6.4
48.5
85.3
48.3
41.1

59.8
6 1 .2
9 0 .6
57.2
4 9 .7

64. 5
7 0.3
92.9
6 5.8
57.8

74.9
79.3
95.1
74.0

1 .1

2.5
7.1
38.9
14.6
3.7

6 6 .2

91.6
88.7
97. 1
83.5
76. 1

9 2.4
95.3
9 8.2
89.4
8 2.4

.....................................................................................................................................

2.5

4 .7

8 . 1

13.2

2 1 . 8

32. 1

43 .4

52.2

57.2

6 1.6

65.3

6 9.6

74.9

82.7

8 7 .6

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ....................................................................................................
RADIO AND T E L E V I S I O N BROADCASTING .........................................................................

1.9
6 . 8

4.1
9 .7

7 .6
13.2

13.1
16.9

2 2.5
21.9

3 3.6
27.5

45 .7
3 4.4

54.9
40 .2

59.6
4 5 .4

63.6
50.9

6 6 .9
5 6.4

7 0 .9
61.2

76.4
65.0

84.6
70.2

89. 7
73.9

COMMUNICATION

PU BL IC

U T IL IT IE S

........................................................................................................................... ..

2 . 8

0 . 8

2 . 0

2 .3
1.4

4. 3
3.0
3.4
3.1
5 .9
9 .3
2.3
6.5

1 .6

1.5
2 . 8

4.1
1 .0

3.0
0.9

1 .8

1 0 .6

8 . 2
6 . 6
1 1 .0
1 2 .1

12.9
12.4
2 0 .0

3 1 .2
8 .1

22.4
5.4
3.9

1 0 .8

50.3
19.2
6 . 1

2 0 . 1

8 6 .6

6 6 .2

84.5
75.3
81.1
87.0
8 7.5
89.6

6 1.9
78.9
6 7 .7
56.5
74.2
7 3 .9
82.4

6 6 .8

81.8
7 3 .6
63.4
79.2
77.9
85.0

8 8 .6

8 8 .8

8 0 .8
92.5
86.7
91.0
94.2
92. 1
93.6
79.6
88.5
87.4
7 8 .6
9 0 .2
8 8 . 1
91 .4

1 .6

2.5

4.1

6.3

9.7

14.5

2 0 . 0

26.

1

3 3.4

43.3

52.0

60. 4

69.6

80.7

8 8 .0

...............................................................................................................................

5.2

7.9

1 1 .8

17. 1

2 3.6

30.9

38.3

45.3

52.2

60.6

6 6 . 2

7 1.4

75.7

81.5

8 5 .4

MOTOR V E H IC L E S AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT .........................................................
DRUGS, CH EM IC AL S, AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS ...............................................................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ..........................................................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..................................................................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ........................................................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HE ATING EQUIPMENT .......................................................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .........................................................................

5.2
3 .2
4.6
7.3
3.2
4 .6
3.3

7.5
5 .3
8.4

11.4
7 .8
14.5
15.6

1 6.4

22.9
1 7.8
30.2
2 7.8

31. 1
24.0
39. 5
3 4.6
29.2
3 2.2
24.8

3 8 .7
3 0.6
4 6 .7
41 .8
36.6
3 9 .0
3 1.7

4 6 .8
3 8.0
52.3
4 9 .5
43.6
4 6 .9
38. 1

55.2
45 .5
57.8
56.2
50.3
53.8
4 5 .0

65.9
5 4 .2
63.7
65. 1
58. 1
63.5
53. 1

7 1 .9
5 9.2
6 7 .3
70.9
63. 1
69. 8
5 9 .1

77.0
64. 5
7 0 .3
77.6
67.5
7 4 .5
6 4.4

81.6
6 9.5
72.5
8 2.0
71.3
7 8 .3
6 8 .7

86.3
75.8
75.8
8 8 . 3
76. 7
83.6
76.2

8 9 .6
8 0.7

WHOLESALE TRADE




1 0 .8

5 .5
7 .2
5.6

8 . 6

1 0 .4
8 . 6

1 1 .8

2 2.3
2 1 .3
15.1
16.8
12.7

2 1 . 6

2 5.3
1 8.0

7 9 .7

9 1.5
8 0 .5
87.2
8 1 .C

Table B-14.

Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by annual earnings

in all wage and salary em ploym ent and by industry of major earnings, 1967----Continued

$5400

$6000

65. 5

71. 3

6 6 . C
48 .8
81.9
51 .3
2 5.8
53.7
76.9
77.5
58. 1
4 2 .6
6 7.5
28 .6

72. 6
59. 5
85. 6
57. 1
33. 1
60. 0
82. 8
81. 3
63. 6
49. 5
71. 6
38. 0

77.
.
.
63.
41.
6 6 .
87.
84.
6 8 .
57.
75.
48.

25.2

3 6.3

24.9

39.5
36.3
3 9.5
28 .6
31.4

$1800

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

.........................................................................................................................................

21.5

31.5

41. 9

5 1.5

59.4

DEPARTMENT STORES ......................................................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ......................................................................................................................
VA R IE T Y STORES ..............................................................................................................................
GROCERY STORES ..............................................................................................................................
MOTOR VE HI CL E DEALERS ...........................................................................................................
M EN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND F U RN IS H IN GS ......................................................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES .......................................................................................
FA MI LY CLOTHING STORES ........................................................................................................
SHOE STORES ......................................................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME F U R N IS H IN G S ..................................................................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES .......................................................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ...................................... .....................................................................

1 8.9
7.9
24.1
1 9.2
5.4

29.7
15.5
36.4
2 9 .1
8.3
28.3
35.7
3 6 .5
3 1.8
1 7 .6
38.5
1 1 .2

43.
25.
56.
37.
1 2 .
36.
51.
54.
40.
26.
49.
15.

1

56.0
3 6.6
74.1
44.7
18.5
45.7
67.0
6 8.4
50.9
34.3
60.7
2 0.9

1 0 .7

16.

1

13. 1
.0
16. 9
1 2 . 9
9. 6

PR IV AT E
RETAIL

NONAGRICULTURAL

TRADE

118

F IN A N C E *

AND REAL ESTATE

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

$9000

7 6 .0

80.

2

8 4.5

87. 4

8 9 . ,9

91.. 8

94.

3

81.3
74.9
90 .2
6 9.0
4 9 .3
71 .4
89.7
8 6 .7
7 2.7
6 3.7
77.4
58.7

84. 6
78. 9
91. 8
74. 4
56. 6
75. 6
91. 9
8 8 . 6
78. 2
69. 5
79. 5
64. 7

8 7 .7
82.6
93.5
7 9 .9
64 .4
8 1.4
9 3.2
91.3
82.8
7 5 .7
8 1.5
74.1

90.
85.
94.
84.
69.
84.
94.
92.
87.
79.
83.
79.

9

92., 1
8 6 .. 6
9 5 . .5
8 8 ., 0
74,►
7
87.. 0
9 4 . ,7
94., 0
90.. 1
83.. 1
8 4 . ,5
85., 0

93.. 8
8 8 .. 0
96.. 1
91.►
3
78., 8
8 9. .3
9 5 . .4
9 4 . .5
9 1 , ,7
85., 6
8 6 .,4
8 7. . 6

95.
89.
97.
94.
84.
92.
96.
96.
94.
89.
89.
91.

46. 4

54. 7

6 1 .4

67.

0

72.6

76. 5

79,. 8

82.. 6

8 6

52.
47.
49.
37.
41.

68.5
6 3.9

6

61. 8
56. 8
58. 9
44. 5
49. 1

73. 6
69. 1
73. 3
57. 8
59. 9

78 .9
74.7
78.7
63.8
65.4

82. 0
77. 8
82. 9
6 8 . 5
70. 8

8 4 . .5
8 0 . >8
8 6 .►
9
7 2 . ,4
76., 2

8 6 .,7
8 2 . .7
89., 2
76 . . 1
8 1 , ,4

2

64.

2 1 . 0

24.6
25.6
2 2.3
1 1.4
27.3
7.3
6 . 8

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .......................................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN A S S O C I A T I O N S ....................................................................................
PERSONAL CR ED IT I N S T I T U T I O N S .................................................. ....................................
L I F E I N S U R A N C E .............................................................................................................................
F I R E , M AR IN E, AND CASUALTY I N S U R A N C E .................................... ............................

4.1
5 .4

7 .9
9 .0

6 . 6

1 0 .8

5.3

8 . 2

2 . 6

5.1

0
0

7
3
8

4
6

5
4
8
8

1 2

2 1 .1

28.1
2 0 .1

1 9.0

5
4
5
4

....................................................................................................................................................

18.7

26.7

35. 3

4 3.9

5 1.6

58.

H O TE LS , TO UR ISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ............................................ .......................
LAUNDRIES AND ORY CLEANING PLANTS .........................................................................
MOTION PICTURES ...........................................................................................................................
HOSPITALS .............................................................................................. ............................................

27.3
1 7.9
39.7
9.9

4 2.2
3 3.8
4 6 .9
18.7

55. 1
50. 2
53. 0
31. 3

6 6.3
6 4.3
5 6 .9
4 6.1

7 4 .5
7 2 .8
6 0.4
58.2

80. 3
78. 4
64. 2
6 6 . 5




$10000 $ 1 10 00

CONTINUED

..........................................................................

SE RV IC ES

INSU RA NC E,

ECONOMY -

00

CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T I O N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL
EMPLOYMENT WERE LESS THAN
o
o

INDUSTRY

3

6 8

2

8 8

3
0
2

3
4
8

9
5
0

6 6 . 6

51.5
54.7

2
1

5
3
7
5
0

7
4
4
0

2

95 , . 7

7

2

96 , .7
91 ,. 9
97 . .4
96.. 6
8 8 .. 0
94., 0
96., 8
97., 0
95 , ,5
9 2 . .5
91..4
9 3 . ,9

. 5

89.. 2

89. 6
85. 7
92. 8
81. 2
87. 5

91., 8
8 9 . .3
9 4 . ,9
85., 2
90., 6

6
0

5
0
0
0

3
5
5
3

2

69.8

74. 7

7 9.8

83. 3

8 5 . ,9

8 8 ., 0

90.

6

9 2 . ,5

84. 7
82. 2
6 8 . 3
72. 8

8 8 .2

90. 9
8 8 . 4
74. 6
82. 8

93.3
9 1.6
7 8 .4
8 6.9

94. 9
93. 7
81. 8
89. 3

95., 8
95. 1
84., 1
9 1 . ,5

9 6 . ,4
96.,1
85., 6
93. 2

97. 4
97. 3
89. 9
94. 8

98., 0
98., 1
93.,2
9 7 . ,C

85.3
71.7
78.3

Table B-15. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment
by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1966
CUMULATIVE PERCENT D I S T R I B U T IO N OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS

IN THEIR

IN U T Y O M JO E R IN S WR LE T A
D S R F A R A N G E E SS H N

INDUSTRY
$1800

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

$9 0 0 0

$ 1 00 00 $110 00

NONAGRICULTURAL E C CN OM Y ...................................................................

1 0 .2

15.7

2 2 .6

30.

0

3 7.4

44. 5

51. 3

57.. 7

64.1

7 1.3

76.3

80.5

84.4

89 , , 0

9 2.0

............................................... ................................................ „ .....................................................

4.6

7.4

10.9

15.

0

19.6

25. 3

31.

38. 7

46.6

59.0

67.8

74.5

80.0

8 6 ., 2

90.5

CRUDE PETROLEUM* NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL GAS LI Q U ID S .......................
O IL AND GAS F I E L D S E R V I C E S ................. ............................................................... ..

3.3

7.9
2 0 .3

.
26.

0
2

1 5 .2
31.2

2 0

1 0 .2

5 .4
14.3

.
38.

0

25. 6
44. 3

31, . 8
50, , 8

39.3
56.7

5 0.1
66.4

5 9.2
73.1

6 5.9
76.9

73.1
80.8

79, .4
87,,5

8 4 .0
90.7

........................................................................... ..................................

8 . 0

12.4

17.7

23.

2

29 .6

35. 9

42. 5

4 8 . ,5

54.6

6 0.7

65.8

7 0.9

75.9

83, .6

8 9 .2

HIGHWAY AND STREET C O N S T R U C T I O N ...................... „ .....................................................
HEAVY CON STRUCTION, NEC ....................................................................................................
PLUMBING, H E A T I N G , A IR C O N D IT IO N IN G ....................................................................
P A I N T I N G , PAPER HA NGIN G, DECORATING ....................................................................
EL ECT RIC AL WORK . . .............. ........................................................................ .. ..........................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND P L A S T E R I N G .............. .......................................................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ................................................. ..................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL W O R K .....................................................................................
CONCRETE W O R K ...............................................................................................................................

8.9

13.7
13.8

2 1 .6

8

37.6
30.9
23.8
38.5

46.
37.
29.
46.
24.
46.
46.
43.
54.

6 1 , ,5
50,.3
4 1 , ,5
6 1 . ,4
3 3, .3
59, , 0
60., 0
5 5, , 8
6 4, »5

6 7.1
5 6.1
4 7 .0
6 7.7
37.9
65.2

73.1
61.5
53.0
73.6
43.5
71.8
70.2
65.7
75.2

76 .7
6 5.1
5 7.8
79 .6
47 .9
7 7.0
75.0
71.5
8 0 .5

8 0.8

84.8
72.9
6 8.4

9 0 , .5
80, ,5
77, ,7
95 , . 2
69 , .7
9 2 . ,5
91,, 6
8 8 ,. 8
91,, 6

94.1

0

53.
43.
35.
54.
29.
52.
54.
49.
60.

85.4
96.9
79. 1
96.8
95.3
9 3.8
94.4

PR IVAT E

M IN IN G

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

119

MANUFACTURING

................................................................................ ............................................... ..

AMM UN ITION , EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS .........................................................................
MEAT PRODUCTS ................................................................................................................................
D A IR Y P R O D U C T S .......................................... ............................................................... ..................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ..............................................................................
GRAIN M ILL P R O D U C T S .................................... .................................................. .......................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ...........................................................................................................................
BEVERAGES ...........................................................................................................................................
WEAVING M I L L S , COTTON .............................. ..........................................................................
WEAVING M I L L S , SY NTHETICS ............................................................ ..................................
K N I T T I N G M I L L S .......................................................................................... ..................................
YARN AND THREAD M ILL S ..........................................................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* SU IT S AND C O A T S ..............................................................................
MEN * S AND BOYS* FU RN ISH IN GS .........................................................................................
WOMEN'S AND M IS SE S * OUTERWEAR ...................................................................................
WOMEN'S AND C H IL D R E N 'S UNDERGARMENTS......................... .......................................
C H IL D R E N 'S OUTERWEAR .............................................................................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING M IL L S ............................................ .. .............................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ................................... .......................
HOUSEHOLD F U R N I T U R E .................................... ..................................... .........................
PULP AND PAPER M I L L S ....................... .................... ...............................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ........................................................... ..................
NEWSPAPERS ..................................................................................................... ..................................
COMMERCIAL P R I N T I N G ................................................................................................................
I N DU ST R IA L C H E M I C A L S ............................................................................... .. ...........................
P L AS T IC S MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .........................................................................
DRUGS ................................................................................................................................................ ..
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND T O IL E T GOODS .............................................. .............................
PETROLEUM R E F I N I N G ..................................................................................................................
T I R E S AND INNER TUBES ............................................................................... ..........................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ..........................................................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER .....................................................................................................




1 1

1 5.0

1 7 .4
9.0
1 9.2
1 8 .0
16.6
23.8

3 1.5

28.
25.
18.
31.
15.
32.
31.
29.
36.

5.3

9.5

1 5.6

2 2

3.0

5.3
13.6

8 . 0

8 .8

6.9
12.3
6.4
1 3.6
11.3
1 1 .1

8 . 6

7.2
19.3
6.3
9 .1
8.3
5.8
7.8
1 1 .8

9.9
6.5
13.4
1 4.2
1 5 .3
1 4.5
16.1
9.2
1 0.4
2.4
7.2
1 0 .8

7.2
1.5
2.5
3.1
5.3

1 0 .0

1 0 .2

2 8 .6
9.2
13.2
1 2 .0

9 .5
1 3.5
25.0
16.4
14.0
29.7
2 8 .7
3 1 .9
30.8
25.7
1 4 .5
17.1
3.8
1 1.7
1 4.0
1 0.5
2 . 8

4 .3
4.8
1 0 .0

1 .0

1 .6

1 .6

2 .3
8.9

5.3
10.9

2 1 .2

19.2
14.2
2 4.8
1 1 .8

25.1
2 3 .7
2 2 .2

2 1 .0

13.9
36.8
1 4 .9
17.5
1 5 .9
16.2
19.7
4 3 .9
29.9
26.0
59.1
51.0
53.1
58.4
36.7
23.8
2 6.8
5.9
17.1
18.5
1 4.4
4.1
6 .3
7 .8
15.2
3.0
3.6
14.2
39.1

3
7
7
7

2 0 .8

0

2

7
4
3
4

6

8

9
2
2
2

7
4
3

6 8 . 6

63 .3
8 5.4
5 2 .1
8 2.0
80.3
7 6 .7
8 4 .2

8 8 .8

58.4
85.7
85.5
81.1
87.5

8 6 .0

8

38.9
39.3
37.7
4 6.6

6

29.6

36.

8

44.

0

51 , , 1

58.5

6 6.3

72.6

7 7.8

82.4

87. .7

91.3

. 1
28. 7
18. 9
45. 2
2 0 . 5
24. 0
2 1 . 3
28. 0
30. 4
62. 0
46. 1
41. 5
77. 3
67. 7
71. 2
74. 2
46. 9
34. 0
39. 0
8 . 1
24. 9
24. 8
2 0 . 0
5. 6
9. 4
1 1 . 8
2 0 . 4
4. 6
5. 9
2 2 . 2
58. 2

14.8
34.2
26 .3
53 .6
2 6.1
30.5
27 .2
48.2
4 7 .4
73.5
6 5 .9
5 4.6

.
40.
33.
60.
34.
39.
34.
65.
65.
80.
78.
65.
90.
83.
87.
8 8 .
62.
50.
64.
17.
42.
35.
33.
1 2 .
2 2 .
25.
35.
1 0 .
1 1 .
40.
79.

1

26.
45.
42.
67.
43.
47.
42.
78.
75.
85.
85,
74.
92.
8 6 .
91.
91.
70.
60.
72.
23.
52.
39.
39.
17.
31.
35.
41.
13.
15.
50.
85.

3
9
4

3 3 , ,9
53 , . 6
50,►
6
7 3, , 6
50 , , 6
56 , , 8
49,, 8
8 5, , 1
8 2, , 1
8 8 ,,4
8 9, ,7
8 0 ., 3
94,,4
8 8 ., 7
9 2 , ,7
93., 2
7 6 , ,3
6 7 , >8
8 0, , 3
3 2, , 6
60,►
9
45,, 2
4 5 . ,3
2 3 . ,3
40,, 2
4 3 , ,5
49., 2
17 ,,7
2 0 .,5
5 9. . 8
8 9 . ,4

40.1
6 1.9
5 9.5
78.2
58 .0
6 4.7
5 6.8
89 .3
89 .0
91.2
9 3 .1
84.7
95 .8
9 0.3
93.8
94.5
8 2.1
74.5

46.0
7 1 .9

52.0
78.3
7 5.6

5 7.0
83.9
82.3
88.3
7 8.0
85.4
7 8 .0
9 5 .4
96.3
95.7
9 7.2
92.5
9 7.3
94.0
9 6.6
96.3
91.6
88.3
93.9
7 5 .1
85.7
7 2.6
6 9.9
60.9
74.7
7 2.0
7 2 .5
5 6 .6
53.9
87.9
96.3

64.0
89.1
88.7
9 0.7
84.2
90.1
83.7
9 6.2
9 6 .7
9 6.5
9 7.9
94.4
9 7.6
9 4.5
9 7 .1
9 6.7
93.6
9 1 .3
9 5.3
82.1
89.6
78.9
75.2
6 9 .7
80.1
76.7
7 6.3
6 7 .0
63.7
91.5
97.2

72. .5
94 , , 2
93 . ,9
9 3 , .9
90 , . 0
94 , .4
90,. 6
97,. 1
97,, 3
9 7 , ,4
98 , . 2
9 5 , ,4
98,, 0
95 . ,5
9 7 , ,7
96 . .9
96., 0
93,, 8
9 6 , ,4
89 , ,3
9 3 , ,5
8 6 ..9
82 . , 0
79,, 6
8 5 , ,7
81,►
9
82 , , 8
77,, 2
79,, 1
95., 0
97,, 8

79.2
96.6
9 5.9
95.4
9 2.4
9 6.7
9 3.9
97.5
9 7.6
98.0
9 8.6
96.3
98.3
9 6.4
9 8.2
97.3
97.1
95.7
97.2
92.9
95.8
91.5

1 1

.

2

3
3

8 6 .1

77.2
81 .4
8 3.2
55.8
4 1 .7
5 2.5
1 1 .1

34.0
2 9.7
26.5
8 .4
1 4 .5
17.4
2 8.0
6 .9
8 . 6

30.7
7 0.7

2 0

0
1

5

1
8

5
3
2

3
4
3
6
8

4
3
2

3
2

4
0

5
5
4
2

4
3

6
8

7
1

3
4
2

8

8
1

5
1
0

4
0

3
8
8

4
3
2

3
1

9
9
0
8

4
0
6

4
4
5
6
2
6

6 6 .1

60.7
70.9

8 6 . 0

4 3 .6
67 .8
50.3
51.3
31.9
49 .8
51.4
56.9
2 3.8
26.0
6 9.4
9 2.2

6 8 .1

82.3
6 6.3
7 3.5
6 4.6
9 2.5
92.9
93.5
95.2
87.7
9 6.6
9 2.2
9 4 .4
9 5.5
8 6 .0

80.2
8 9 .9
55.6
75.9
58.1
5 8 .2
40.8
5 8.8
5 9.5
63.4
3 1 .6
3 6.3
77.4
93 .9

8 6 . 0

72 .3
8 0.1
71.3
9 4 .6
94 .6
94 .4
96 .2
9 0.5
97.0
93 .3
9 5 .4
96 .0
89.2
84.2
9 2 .4
6 5.7
81.4
6 5 .0
6 4 .5
50.8
6 8 . 2

6 6 .4
6 9 .0
4 3 .2
4 5 .2
83.1
9 5 .7

8 6 .2

8 5 .8
8 9 .4
8 5 .7
86.7
8 3 .0
87.7
97.0
98. 1

Table B-15.

Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment

by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1966----Continued
QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS
CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR i
EE
AN
INDUSTRY O M R EARNINGS W R LESS TH
F AJO

INDUSTRY

IN THEIR

$9000 $10000 $11000

$1800

$2 4 0 0

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

4 .5
7.5
1.5
3.7
2 .7
5.6
6.9
5.6
6.2
2.4
5.2
3 .2
3 .7
3.9
3.5
3.0
4.9
3 .9
4 .2
5.0
7 .3
9 .3
3 .3
6.5
2 .1
1 .8
4 .4
4.1
1 2.0

7 .4
12.3
2 .7
5.7
5 .2
9 .1
1 0.8
10.1
9.8
3.9
7 .6
5 .4
6 .0
6.4
5.9
5 .8
9 .0
6 .4
7 .0
8.3
11.3
1 5.6
5 .6
11.9
3 .5
3 .2
7.4
7.1
18.3

11.2
17.9
3 .9
8.7
7.5
14.4
15.3
14.4
1 4.4
6.1
10.7
8 .3
9.1
9 .6
8.9
8 .4
13.1
1 0.7
1 1.6
13 .0
1 8.2
23 .8
8.9
19.1
5.5
4.8
11.0
11.5
26.1

15.7
2 4.5
5.6
13.2
11.8
22.1
20.7
19.5
20.1
8 .4
14.2
11.2
12.1
13.5
12.5
1 2.3
20 .0
16.2
18.2
2 0 .4
26 .7
33.8
13.5
29.1
8 .1
6.8
15.4
16.8
3 6.2

23.7
31 .3
8.2
1 7.5
1 6.7
2 9 .4
2 7 .2
25.7
25.4
11.5
19.4
15.3
1 6.5
19.4
1 7.5
1 7 .6
26 .1
22 .0
25.7
29.3
35 .8
4 4.9
18.8
41 .8
1 1.7
9.5
20.0
23.3
46.3

36.9
39 .6
1 0.8
2 3 .0
22.5
3 7.8
34 .1
3 2 .2
32 .6
16.7
25.3
2 0 .2
2 1 .7
25*8
23.0
24 .9
3 3 .8
29.8
3 3.1
4 1.0
48.1
56.1
2 7.1
5 3.1
15 .3
1 3.0
2 6.9
30 .7
5 5 .4

48.3
4 7.2
15.3
30 .7
30.0
47.0
42.8
39.3
39.8
23 .3
31.3
26.3
27.7
33.2
30 .5
32.1
4 3 .2
3 9.3
42.9
52.1
59 .0
65.1
34.7
6 1.8
20 .4
17.6
3 5.1
39.7
62.1

58.1
54 .7
2 2 .5
4 0.0
37.4
5 4 .4
51.9
45 .5
47 .6
31 .7
38.0
35.3
33 .3
41 .7
38 .3
39 .7
52 .2
46.9
5 0 .7
60 .4
6 7 .2
72 .5
42.3
68.4
2 7 .6
2 3 .6
42.6
4 8 .6
6 8 .4

6 7 .8
62 .3
32.1
50 .9
4 5 .5
63.0
60.9
53.1
5 4 .8
41.4
46.3
46.3
39.1
5 1.1
47.6
45 .3
62 .2
5 5 .3
58 .3
6 8 .5
73 .3
7 8 .5
49.4
73.4
37.9
32 .5
52.1
55 .6
74 .4

7 5.5
7 0.4
42.6
62.7
56.0
71 .0
69.1
6 2 .0
62 .0
52 .6
56.0
58 .0
46 .9
6 1 .4
57.9
5 2.6
7 1.7
63.1
65 .0
75.2
78 .9
82.4
56.1
7 7.3
5 2.2
4 1 .5
6 1.1
64 .8
78 .9

81.2
76 .8
5 3 .9
7 2 .4
66.2
76.1
7 5 .4
68.9
6 8 .6
62.7
65.8
6 6 .7
54.1
69.6
65.9
59 .0
77.3
6 8 .5
70 .8
81.0
82 .8
85.8
6 1 .5
8 0.1
61.3
4 9 .6
6 8.2
71 .0
82.1

85.4
8 1.6
63 .4
79. 1
7 3.2
8 1.0
80. 1
7 5.3
74.3
70 .0
73.5
75.0
60.8
76 .1
73 .1
6 4 .8
82.2
74.4
7 6 .8
85 .5
85 .9
88 .6
66 .6
8 3 .0
68.8
5 7.1
74.5
75 .5
84.9

89.2
85 .7
71.0
85.0
79.3
85 .1
83.8
8 0 .3
78.5
77.8
80.4
8 0.8
6 6 .2
8 1 .6
7 9 .5
71.8
86.2
79 .6
82.5
89 .2
89.2
9 0.7
71.9
8 6.1
74.8
64.5
80.0
7 9.5
8 7.8

9 3.0
90.4
81.3
9 0.3
86.9
9 0.2
88.2
85.8
83.9
85.0
88.1
86.7
73.9
87.1
86.8
80.2
9 1.0
85.2
89.1
93.0
92.1
93.1
7 8.9
8 9.0
82.7
7 3.2
88.5
86.2
9 0.9

9 5.3
9 3 .9
88.0
94.1
9 1.1
9 3 .8
9 2.1
90 .4
87.7
90.5
9 2 .5
9 2 .0
8 0.2
9 1 .3
9 1 .0
85.7
94 .0
8 8 .9
9 2 .9
95 .0
94 .3
94 .9
83 .5
9 1 .9
88 .4
79.4
92.1
8 9.4
9 3 .3

5.4

8.1

11.2

14.8

19.0

2 3 .6

29 .3

36.9

46.2

60.0

6 7 .1

72 .9

8 2.0

88.9

93 .1

RAILROADS ............................................................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .........................................................................
TAXICABS .............................................................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ..........................................................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION..................................................................................................................

1.5
3 .7
18.4
7.7
1.9

2.4
5 .4
26 .4
11.1
3 .8

3 .4
7 .3
3 5.4
15.1
6 .3

4 .5
10.3
4 5 .5
19.8
9.2

6 .0
1 3.7
57 .4
24.8
1 2 .9

8.7
18.9
6 7 .5
29.5
1 7 .9

13.6
25.2
74.8
3 4 .6
2 4 .7

23 .6
3 4 .9
79.2
4 0 .1
33 .0

36 .8
47.8
83 .7
4 6 .3
42.2

61.0
62.0
8 9.4
5 5.0
54.5

65.6
74 .5
92.7
6 3 .3
63.8

69.2
8 2 .3
9 5 .2
70.8
70 .6

8 6.2
89.9
97.2
77.8
7 6.0

93.2
96.6
9 8.4
85.9
82.5

97.7
9 8 .9
98.7
9 1 .3
8 5.3

COMMUNICATION ......................................................................................................................................

4.1

7.3

10.8

16.8

25.3

36 .3

47.1

5 4 .4

59 .0

63.2

66.8

70 .7

7 6.2

84.0

89.3

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ....................................................................................................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING .........................................................................

3 .5
8 .3

6 .6
12.8

10.1
16.9

16.3
2 1.9

25.5
27.2

37.7
3 2.7

4 9 .1
3 9.1

56 .6
44.4

60 .8
49.3

64.3
56.1

6 7 .5
61 .1

71 .3
6 5 .6

77 .0
69.0

85.2
74.4

90 .7
78.6

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY MANUFACTURING -

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN ..............................................................
CONCRETE* GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ............................................................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ............................................................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ..................................................................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING....................................................... .........................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE .........................................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS .................................................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC .......................................................................
METAL STAMPINGS ...........................................................................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES .............................................................................................................
FARM MACHINERY..................................................... .. .....................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY .......................................................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY .....................................................................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY............................ ..................................... . ........................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY.............................................................. .......................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ....................................................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES................. .. ..........................................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT ......................................................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ...............................................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES .............................................................................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ...........................................................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ............................................................... ..
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT .....................................................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ..............................................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT .................................................................................. ..
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ................................................................................................ .. ...............
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ................. ...............................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ..............................................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ...............................................................................................................
TRANSPORTATION ................................................................................................... ..............................

PUBLIC UTILITIES

.................................................. ..........................................................................

2 .8

4 .4

6 .3

9.1

1 3.3

17.9

23 .6

30.4

3 9 .3

49.2

5 8 .5

6 6 .6

76.2

86.2

9 1.6

WHOLESALE TRADE ................................................................................................................................

8.0

11.9

1 7.0

2 3.1

29.9

3 7.2

44.4

5 1.2

57.9

6 5 .4

70.6

75.2

79.1

84.0

8 7.2

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ........................................................
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ..............................................................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ..........................................................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..................................................................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ........................................................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ......................................................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .........................................................................

7 .7
4 .7
9 .0
11.1
6 .4
6 .4
5 .9

12.1
7.4
14.9
16.2
9.8
10.1
9 .1

16 .9
1 0.7
2 3.4
2 2 .0
1 4.6
15.6
13.2

23.2
15.9
30.5
2 8.6
20.5
2 2.7
18.2

29.9
22.0
39 .3
35.4
27.5
29.8
2 4 .5

38.0
2 9 .8
47.6
42.4
34.1
3 7 .0
3 0.8

4 5 .7
38 .0
54.0
4 9.8
42.0
44 .8
37.0

53.8
4 4.4
5 9 .8
56.6
48 .4
52 .3
43.8

62.3
51 .4
64 .3
63.5
54 .6
59 .7
50 .4

71.0
59.0
69.7
71.4
62 .0
67 .7
57 .6

7 6.3
63 .4
72.0
7 7 .3
66.2
73 .9
6 3 .1

8 0.6
6 7 .7
75.1
8 2 .4
7 1.4
7 7.3
67.5

84.6
72.2
7 7.2
86.2
7 4.7
80.7
7 2.5

88.5
78.7
80.2
90.4
80.3
85.7
78.2

90 .8
8 3.2
82 .7
9 3 .0
83.4
8 9.2
82.7




Table B-15. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary em ploym ent
by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1966----Continued

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THEIR
INDUSTRY O M R EARNINGS W R LESS TH
F AJO
EE
AN
$1800

$2400

$3000

RETAIL TRADE ........................................................................................................................................

24 .9

35.4

46 .2

55 .2

62.8

68.8

DEPARTMENT STORES .....................................................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES .................................................... ...............................................................
VARIETY STORES ..................................................................................................................
GROCERY STORES ..............................................................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ..........................................................................................................
MEN•S AND BOYS* CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS .......................................................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES .................................................... ..................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES .......................................................................................................
SHOE STORES ......................................................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ................................................................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY S T O R E S ...................................................... .. .............
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .............................................................................................................

23 .8
12.2
30.0
22 .8
8 .2
24.4
29 .4
3 1.5
27.0
14.3
32 .5
1 1.7

35.7
20 .5
45.0
3 2.1
12.4
32 .0
41.6
44.4
3 5.6
2 2 .6
4 3 .2
1 6.5

4 9.1
29.1
6 6.7
39.9
17.7
4 0 .5
5 7.9
6 2.5
4 4 .3
31.4
54.6
2 2 .0

60 .8
4 0 .9
79.2
4 7 .0
2 3.8
4 8 .8
7 1.3
72.9
53.2
3 8.9
64.4
28 .7

7 0 .1
5 1.4
8 4 .3
53.9
3 2.0
5 6.1
8 0 .0
7 9.6
5 9.7
46.8
7 0.4
37 .3

75.9
62 .5
87.2
5 9 .5
40 .3
61 .6
84 .9
8 3 .6
65 .0
53 .6
74.4
47 .4

9 .4

14.6

2 1.2

3 1.2

42 .4

51.9

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ..............................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ....................................................................................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS .......................................................................................
LIFE INSURANCE ..............................................................................................................................
FIR E, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ...................................................... ..

7.1
8 .9
10.9
7.5
5.3

12.3
13.4
17.3
12.1
9.1

19.1
18.8
25 .7
1 7.6
15.5

31.6
27.6
3 7.0
2 6.0
26.3

4 6.0
41.3
48 .3
3 5 .9
3 8 .0

S E R V I C E S ................. .................................................................................................................................

22 .4

31.1

40.2

4 8 .7

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ....................................................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .........................................................................
MOTION P I C T U R E S ............................... .. ........................................................................................
H O S P IT A L S .................... .. ........................................................................... .. .....................................

36.0
25 .4
45 .6
15.6

50.1
41 .8
52.6
26.9

62.4
5 7.8
56.6
4 1 .8

7 3.0
70.5
60.6
55 .9

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL

121

FINANCE.

INSURANCE,




ECONOMY -

AND REAL ESTATE

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

74 .3

78.8

83.0

87.0

89.6

9 1 .7

93.3

95.2

96.5

80.4
6 9 .5
8 9.5
66.0
47.9
67.1
89.1
87 .0
70.4
60.9
77.5
5 8 .9

83.8
74 .7
91.2
72.2
55.6
7 2.3
9 1 .4
88.6
74.5
67 .4
7 9.5
67.1

87.2
7 9 .2
9 3 .1
77.6
62.8
7 8 .4
93.2
90 .5
79.8
72 .7
81 .2
73.3

90 .2
8 3.5
94 .5
83.2
7 0 .0
83.8
94.3
92 .7
8 5.3
79 .4
8 3.5
8 1.2

92.2
86 .2
9 5 .7
87 .1
7 5 .1
87.0
94.8
93.9
8 8 .7
82.8
85 .0
85.3

93.7
88.1
9 6.3
9 0.5
7 9.2
8 9.2
9 5.6
95.2
9 0.9
85.9
87.0
8 9.6

94.7
89.6
9 6.6
9 3 .0
83.1
91 .0
96.0
95.7
9 3.2
87.9
88.7
91.7

96.3
9 1 .4
97.3
95.9
87.4
92 .9
96 .8
96.4
95 .2
91 .4
91.2
94.5

97 .1
9 2.4
97.5
97 .6
9 0 .5
9 4 .4
97.4
9 7.1
9 6 .2
9 3 .6
9 3.6
95.8

59.8

65.9

71.0

7 6 .0

7 9.4

8 2 .4

84.9

88.4

90 .8

57.5
5 1.9
57 .5
43.8
47 .1

66.3
61.0
64 .9
5 1 .0
53 .8

72-4
67.7
7 2.2
56.8
59 .3

76.9
7 1 .7
78 .2
6 2 .8
65 .0

81.4
77.0
8 3.2
6 7.6
70.8

84.4
80.4
85.9
71 .4
76.2

8 6.7
82.9
8 8.5
75.0
81.2

8 8.5
85.4
91.1
78.3
85.7

91 .0
88.4
94 .7
8 3.8
9 0.3

93 .0
9 0 .7
9 5 .8
87.4
9 3.2

5 6 .2

6 2 .8

6 9.1

74.4

78 .9

84.8

87.4

89.5

9 1.3

93 .3

94 .6

7 9 .9
77.6
64.6
6 6 .0

8 4.6
81 .9
68 .6
73.9

8 8 .6
85.8
72 .6
7 9.9

9 1.1
8 8 .4
75 .9
8 4.7

93.0
91.3
79.0
8 8.3

9 4 .9
94.0
82 .5
90.7

96 .0
95.4
85 .0
92.8

96 .9
96.4
87.0
94 .4

97.3
97.1
89.7
96.8

98 .2
98.0
92.3
9 7.9

98 .6
9 8 .6
94 .7
9 8 .4

$7200

$7800

$8 4 0 0

$90 0 0 $ 1 0 0 0 0 $ 1 10 00

CONTINUED

.........................................................................

Table B-16. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment
by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1967

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS
AN
INDUSTRY O M R EARNINGS W R 1 ESS TH
F AJO
EE L

IN THEIR

$2400

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ....................................................................

9 .7

14.7

21.1

28.3

3 5 .6

4 2.4

49 .2

55 .5

61.7

68.8

7 4 .0

78.4

8 2 .2

87.2

90.5

MINING .........................................................................................................................................................

4 .2

6.4

9 .8

13.3

18.0

23.6

2 9 .7

3 6.2

43.8

54.0

6 3 .2

70.4

76 .0

82.9

88.0

CRUOE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS ......................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES .............................................................................................

4 .0
9.4

5.6
14.1

7 .3
19.8

10.3
2 3 .8

14.1
30 .0

18 .9
35.2

23.7
4 1 .5

29.8
47.2

35.6
52.8

45.3
59.6

54.2
64.4

6 1 .8
70. 1

6 8 .3
75 .2

76.4
82.9

81 .9
88.4

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ................................................................................................................

7.4

11.3

1 5.9

2 0 .9

26.3

32 .3

3 8 .3

44.3

50.3

56.3

61.7

66.9

72.0

80.0

86. 1

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ...............................................................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ............................................................................. .......................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ....................................................................
PAINTING* PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ....................................................................
ELECTRICAL WORK ...........................................................................................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ............................................................
CARPENTERING AND FLOOR ING...............................................................................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK .......................................................................................
CONCRETE WORK ................................................................................................................................

122

S 1800

8 .3
7 .6
6.8
11.5
6.9
1 1.5
9.9
1 0.2
13.0

13.0
11.8
9 .6
17.4
9.2
1 7.5
15.5
1 4.4
20.5

1 8.9
1 7.0
13.2
23 .5
12.0
2 3 .3
21.2
20 .7
29.8

26 .0
22.5
16.9
29.3
14.8
30 .0
28.9
27 .5
3 5 .6

33.8
28 .4
2 0 .7
34.8
1 8.9
35 .6
34.0
34 .0
43.1

42 .5
34.3
25.7
42 .1
23.3
42.4
42 .2
40.0
4 9 .6

50.1
40.0
30 .5
49.1
2 8 .0
49 .0
47 .8
46.7
5 5 .2

57.6
45.7
36.5
55 .5
3 2.5
55.5
53 .6
5 1 .8
61.6

64.3
51 .2
42 .2
62 .1
3 7.1
60.9
6 0 .1
58.0
66.1

6 9 .6
5 6.3
4 7.5
69 .6
41.6
6 7 .4
66 .3
6 2.5
7 0.0

73 .7
60 .4
5 2.8
75 .4
45 .6
72 .9
7 2.2
6 8.2
7 4 .9

7 7.9
64 .4
57 .8
8 1.3
49 .3
7 8 .5
7 6.4
73.5
7 8 .2

82 .2
69 .5
62.6
85.4
54.3
8 3 .3
81.1
78 .4
82 .7

88.5
76.2
72.4
92.7
64.3
90 .3
8 9.4
86.5
87.9

92.5
81.9
8 1 .C
95.4
7 5.0
95. 1
94. 0
9 0 .9
91 .5

4 .7

8 .3

13.8

20 .7

27.9

3 5 .0

42 .3

49 .4

56 .7

65.4

7 1.5

7 6.7

80.9

86.1

89.9

3.9
12.9
12.2
2 6.2
8.0
11.1
1 0.7
9 .3
12.4
2 0 .0
16.7
15.2
23.2
23 .5
2 7.9
23 .8
1 9.4
12.5
15.5
3.6
9.6
13.9
1 0.6
2.6
2 .7
4.5
8 .9
2 .6
2 .1
9.2
17.7

6 .1
19.5
15.8
34 .6
12.4
1 5.5
15.1
15.5
19.3
37 .6
28 .9
27 .0
48 .3
4 4 .2
4 8.4
4 9 .2
30 .6
19.0
24 .3
5 .0
1 5.0
18.1
15.0
3.5
4 .9
6 .9
12.8
3 .4
3 .2
13.3
3 3.7

9 .0
28.2
19.5
4 3.3
16.8
20 .7
20 .0
28.5
30.2
56.6
4 7.3
4 0 .6
72.6
6 2 .9
6 7.7
70.4
4 0 .7
2 8.0
37.1
7.5
2 2 .6
23 .7
20 .6
5.0
8.3
12.1
18.9
4 .6
5 .4
21.1
52.0

12.6
3 4 .3
25.9
49.6
2 2 .8
2 7 .4
25.9
48.4
46 .6
7 0.5
66 .3
5 3 .0
84. 1
73 .5
7 9.7
81 .4
49 .5
3 7 .4
51.4
11.0
3 0 .8
2 9 .0
2 6 .7
7 .8
13.4
17 .4
24.2
6 .3
8.3
3 0 .2
67 .3

18 .0
40 .3
32 .7
57.8
29 .5
3 5 .8
3 2.4
64.9
6 1.0
7 8 .5
7 8.0
64. 1
89.0
79.8
86.2
86.8
56.8
44.3
63.3
14 .3
38 .6
34. 1
33.0
11.5
20 .9
24 .9
3 1 .0
9 .0
1 1 .9
4 0 .4
76 .3

2 4 .9
4 7.4
3 9 .7
64.6
37 .5
44 .4
38.7
76.0
7 3 .5
8 3 .7
8 5 .9
73 .5
92.3
84.4
9 0.2
90.5
6 4 .1
5 3 .9
71.1
20 .5
47.3
3 8 .9
38.7
16.5
3 0.0
3 3 .8
38 .8
11.6
16.9
50 .7
8 2 .9

3 1 .3
5 2 .6
47.5
7 0 .5
45 .1
5 2 .7
46 .0
83 .3
79.8
8 7 .2
89 .8
79.1
94 .1
8 6 ,9
92.3
92 .3
7 1 .4
63 .0
78.9
28 .2
55.1
43 .8
44. 4
22 .8
38.6
4 2.4
44.7
1 5.2
23.5
5 9 .8
87.4

38 .9
59 .7
56.3
7 6 .0
5 2 .8
60.7
53 .0
87 .9
85 .8
90.0
92.1
83 .6
95 .3
89,1
93.3
93.6
78.2
71.1
8 4.2
38 .3
64.3
48.7
4 9 .9
2 9 .6
46.5
50.3
51 .8
1 9.5
31.7
67.5
90.7

52.7
6 7.5
66. 1
8 1.2
61 .9
6 9.3
61 .6
9 2.1
9 0.3
92 .4
9 5 .0
8 6.8
96 .3
91 .0
93.9
9 4 .6
84.2
78.6
88.9
51 .6
72 .4
56. 1
56.6
3 9.0
57.7
58. 1
5 9.6
2 6.2
49.0
7 7.2
9 3.7

58.4
7 3 .7
7 3 .8
8 4 .5
68.3
75.3
68.6
94.2
92 .9
9 4 .1
9 6 .2
89 .3
96.8
92,2
95.1
95 .5
8 8.1
83 .2
91.2
6 1 .2
78 .5
62 .3
62.7
4 8 .1
66 .2
64.5
64.5
34 .3
58 .9
82.5
94 .9

62.9
7 9 .9
79 .8
87.2
74.3
8 1 .5
7 6.0
95 .6
94 .9
95 .6
9 7 .3
91 .2
97.2
93 ,1
96 .0
95.9
9 0 .8
86 .7
93.0
70 .2
8 3.3
69.0
68.2
57.5
72.6
6 9 .2
68.5
47.9
66.3
8 6 .8
96. 1

68.1
85.8
84.8
8 9 .9
7 9 .6
8 6 .9
81 .2
96.3
95.9
96.3
9 7.8
92 .6
97 .5
9 3 .8
96.4
96.2
9 3 .0
9 0.1
94 .1
78 .5
87.2
75.8
72.8
66.5
7 7.3
7 3 .6
7 2.8
60.0
71 .9
90 .0
96.4

7 5.4
9 1.6
91.6
9 2.6
86.4
9 1.7
87.7
9 7.1
96.7
97.2
98.4
94.1
97.8
9 4.8
9 7.2
9 6.8
95.2
94.0
96.1
87.1
9 1.4
8 3.4
79.6
76.7
83.7
79.5
79.5
72.1
80.3
93.7
97.5

81.2
9 5 .0
9 4 .4
94.4
91 .0
95 .3
91 .9
9 7 .3
97.5
9 8 .0
98 .6
95.4
98 .0
9 5 .6
97.9
96 .9
9 6 .6
9 5 .9
97.0
91 .7
9 4 .6
89.2
8 4.6
82.8
87.2
83. 1
84.5
8 0 .6
88. 3
9 5.9
97 .9

MANUFACTURING ............................................................................................................................ . . .
AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ..........................................................................
MEAT PRODUCTS................................................................................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ..............................................................................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ...............................................................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ................................................................................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ...................................................................................... ....................................
BEVERAGES ............................................................................................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, C OT TON ............................... ............................................. ............................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ................................................................................................
KNITTING MILLS ........................................................ .....................................................................
YARN AND THREAO MILLS ........................................................................ .................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND C O A T S .................... ..........................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ..........................................................................................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR .....................................................................................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNCERGARMENTS.................................................................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR........................................................................................ .. ..................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS .............................................................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ................................. .........................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ...............................................................................................................
PULP AND PAPER M I L L S .................... .................. .....................................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ...............................................................................
NEWSPAPERS ........................................................................................................... - ..........................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ................................................................................................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ........................................................................................................ ..
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ....................... ......................... .......................
DRUGS ......................................................................................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ............................................................................
PETROLEUM REFINING ........................................................................................................ ..
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ...........................................................................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ...........................................................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER........................................................ ............................................




2.0
8 .1
8 .6
17.4
5 .5
7 .2
6 .3
6.1
5 .9
10.3
9. 1
7.6
10.5
11.2
13.1
12.7
11.9
7 .5
9.9
1.9
5.5
10.6
7.2
1.7
1 .2
3 .1
5 .9
1 .9
l.l
6.0
9 .4

$9000 $10000 $11000

Table B-16. Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment
by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1967----Continued
CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS
INDUSTRY O M R EARNINGS W R LESS TH
F AJO
EE
AN

INDUSTRY

$1800

$2400

$3000

$3 6 0 0

3.6
7 .4
1 .2
4 .0
2 .1
4.2
5.1
6 .6
5.2
2.1
3 .9
2.7
3.7
3 .7
3 .1
2.3
5.1
3 .0
3 .6
3 .2
5.7
8 .5
2.4
5.4
2 .1
1.6
6 .0
3.3
10.6

5 .6
11.3
2 .0
6.0
3.9
7 .6
8.2
9.0
7.8
3 .3
6 .0
4 .3
5.9
5 .6
5.7
4 .1
7 .5
5 .5
5.7
5 .3
9 .6
14.2
4 .2
10.3
3 .9
2.9
8.1
5.6
17.0

7 .8
16.2
3.1
8.8
6 .6
12.0
12.0
11.8
12.0
4 .8
9 .2
6 .6
8.3
8 .3
8.7
6 .5
11.0
9.3
9.8
8 .6
1 5.0
2 3 .3
7.2
17.1
5 .6
4 .5
11.9
9 .9
24 .3

11.3
21 .7
4 .6
12.3
10.7
18.0
17.2
17.4
16.0
7 .0
11.9
9.7
11.0
12.1
12.6
10.2
15.8
15.2
15.8
15.4
23.5
35.6
11.3
26.2
8 .4
6 .8
16.0
14.7
33.9

18.4
29.1
6 .6
1 7.9
15.9
26 .5
22.8
2 3 .C
22 .5
9 .4
17.1
13.7
14.9
1 7.5
18.0
15.2
23.3
21.8
24.2
22 .9
33 .8
49 .3
1 5.9
39.0
11.8
9 .5
2 1 .3
22.4
4 3 .7

5.5

8.0

10.8

14.0

RAILR OAD S....................................................................................... ....................................... ..
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION.............. ..........................................................
TAXICABS ........................................................................................................................................... ..
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE .................................................... ..................
AIR TRANSPORTATION .................................................................................... .............................

1.0
3.7
1 9.5
7 .4
1.3

1.9
5.3
26.6
11.0
2.7

2.7
7 .5
3 5.1
1 4.7
4.7

COMMUNICATION .....................................................................................................................................

3.7

6.5

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ...................................................................................................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BRGADCASTING......................... ...............................................

3 .2
8 .3

6.0
12.0

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

MANUFACTURING -

$4200

$4800

123

$5400

$6000

$6600

3 0.2
36 .2
9 .5
23.8
22 .1
34.5
3 0 .0
29 .3
2 9.9
1 3.8
22.8
1 8.5
19.7
25.2
24.4
21 .3
3 1 .5
29 .6
33.3
31.6
4 5 .4
59.1
22.7
50 .7
1 5.8
1 2.6
27 .9
30. 1
52. 1

44.6
43.7
1 4.4
32.1
30 .0
43 .4
3 8.1
37.1
38.3
2 0 .7
29.1
2 5 .0
25.8
32 .5
31 .8
29 .7
41.7
3 7 .6
41.0
42.1
56 .8
6 6.2
3 0.8
5 8.0
2 1.1
16.5
3 4 .4
3 8.5
59.6

56.0
51 .7
22.6
41.6
39 .2
52 .5
47.3
45.5
4 5 .1
29 .9
37.8
33 .8
31.6
40.5
40 .9
35.6
5 0 .5
46.1
49 .0
53.0
6 5 .5
72 .2
3 9 .0
6 3 .7
28.1
22 .5
42 .7
4 8 .2
65 .7

6 4 .6
59 .0
32.2
53 .6
4 9 .2
6 0 .4
56 .9
51 .9
5 3 .5
3 9 .3
47.4
45.7
38.0
49 .7
49.9
4 1.9
6 0.5
53 .3
57.5
61.3
71 .5
7 7 .8
45.9
68.9
38.2
3 0.3
5 1 .3
56 .6
71.7

17.9

22 .3

2 7 .0

33 .2

3 .8
9 .9
42 .7
18.9
7 .0

5.1
13.1
5 3 .7
2 3.7
9.8

7 .0
18.3
63.5
28.4
13.4

10.0
23 .0
7 1 .9
3 2 .8
1 8.9

17.0
31 .5
78.2
37.7
26.4

10.1

15.1

23.5

33.6

44 .7

9.7
15.6

14.8
2 0.1

2 3 .9
2 4 .8

3 4 .8
30 .7

46.9
37.5

$7 2 0 0

IN THEIR

$9 00 0 $1 00 00 $ 1 1 0 0 0

$7800

$8 4 0 0

7 2.2
6 5.6
4 4 .7
64 .0
6 1.5
6 9 .2
66. 1
6 0.9
64.3
52.0
56.2
58 .9
46.0
6 0 .0
6 1.4
4 8 .5
69.5
6 1.0
65.8
7 3.3
77.4
8 2.5
52.7
73.5
5 3.4
44.0
6 0.9
6 5.6
77.6

78.1
7 2 .8
55 .9
72 .9
69 .3
7 4 .4
73 .2
68 .3
71 .3
63.1
64 .6
67.9
53.7
66 .9
68 .2
55 .6
76.4
66 .9
72 .4
80.2
82 .4
8 5 .2
5 8.3
76 .7
6 2 .6
5 1 .7
69 .6
71 .4
80.6

83.2
7 8.8
6 5.7
7 9.7
75.3
79.2
78.2
7 3 .4
75.7
70.8
7 2.7
75.8
60.8
7 3.5
75.0
6 1.7
81.6
7 2 .5
77.8
84.8
8 5.4
8 7.7
6 3.5
79.9
69.5
5 8.5
75.3
75.3
8 3.5

8 7.0
83.7
73.1
84 .5
79.8
83.2
8 1.9
77.5
78.3
76.6
77.2
8 1.2
65.3
77.9
79.3
6 7.7
85.8
76.8
82.6
88.1
8 8.0
90.1
6 8.2
82.7
75.0
64.9
8 0.3
79.0
85.9

91.81
9 0 .C
1
81.6i
89.6»
86.31
88 .A
►
87.0l
83.31
82.7’
83.5i
84.1
86.91
71.4t
84.0i
84.9I
75. 1
90.3.
82.7'
88.2!
91.9•
90.5i
92.2!
74.9I
86.2!
82.81
7 3 .C
1
86.2!
83.7
89. <
i>

9 4 .4
93 .0
88.8
9 3 .3
9 0 .8
91.8
91 .0
87.7
88.2
90. 6
89.4
91. 1
78. 7
88.7
89.4
8 1.7
92 .9
8 7.2
9 1.7
94.6
9 2 .6
9 3.9
8 0.7
89.2
8 7 .9
7 9.4
90 .8
8 8.6
9 1 .9

40 .6

52.8

62.2

6 8.6

76.4

86.4*

90. 3

27 .0
41.1
8 2.1
43.3
3 4 .0

49.6
5 1.5
86.6
50.8
4 3 .2

62.7
6 4 .1
9 1 .7
59 .2
51 .6

6 6.7
72.9
93.9
6 7.4
59.2

76.7
8 2.0
95.7
7 5.3
67.6

92.8;
89.81
97.6i
84.2!
77.2!

93 .1
9 5 .9
9 8.6
9 0.0
83. 1

53.3

58.3

6 2.4

6 6.1

70.3

75.6

83.2!

88.0

55.8
42.7

60 .4
47 .7

64. 1
5 3.3

67.4
5 8 .9

7 1.3
63.3

76.9
6 6 .3

85.01
71.6.

8 9.9
7 5.4
88.5

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN.............. ...............................................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ...........................................................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS............................................................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ..................................................................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING.................................................................................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE . . . . . ............................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ..................................................................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ......................................................................
METAL STAMPINGS ..........................................................................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES .............................................................................................................
FARM MACHINERY............................................... .. ....................................................................... ..
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY .......................................................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY............ .......................................................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY . . . ......................................................... ..........................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ................................................................................. ..
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ....................................................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ............................................................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT .......................................................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS...................................................... ........................
HOUSEHOLD APPL IAN CE S................... ............................. . ..................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ................................................. ..
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ............................................................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT .....................................................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES .............................................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ..................................................................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ..................................................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES .......................................................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ......................................................................................................... ..
TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................

2.5

3 .8

5 .6

7 .8

11.3

1 6.3

21 .6

2 7 .8

35.1

45. 1

5 3.8

61.9

7 0.7

81.3l

WHOLESALE TR A D E ..................................... ..........................................................................................

7.3

1 1.0

15.5

20.9

27.4

34 .4

4 1 .5

48.2

54 .7

62 .7

67 .9

72.8

76.9

82.3l

8 6.0

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT .........................................................
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ...............................................................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL......................................................................................... ..
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS......................... ......................... ..
ELECTRICAL GOODS ....................................................... ............................... ...............................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT .......................................................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT ANC SUPPLIES ......................................................... .. .............

7 .4
5 .9
7.8
10.2
5 .5
7.0
5 .7

11.4
8.7
1 2.4
14.9
8 .6
10.3
9. 1

16.1
11.4
19.3
19.9
12.9
14.6
1 2.6

21.0
16.2
26.9
25 .4
19.0
2 1.5
17.1

27 .6
22.2
33 .9
31.9
25.4
29.6
22.8

35 .4
28.4
4 2 .2
38 .5
32.2
36.7
29 .5

4 2.1
3 4.9
4 9 .4
45.3
39.6
4 3 .4
3 6.0

50.0
4 1 .6
54 .7
52.5
46 .3
5 0 .6
42. 1

5 8.1
48.8
59 .6
59.0
5 2 .9
57.1
48.7

68.1
56 .6
65.3
67.2
60 .0
66 .4
56. 1

73.8
61. 1
68 .5
72 .7
6 4 .5
7 1 .9
61.4

78.3
6 5.7
71.3
79.0
69 .0
76 .3
66. 1

82.5
70.7
73 .6
8 3.4
7 2.4
7 9.9
70.2

87 .C
)
76.7'
76.8
89. 1
77.5i
8 4 . t»
77.4►

9 0.0
8 1 .6
80.3
92.1
8 1.1
8 7.8
8 2.0

PUBLIC UTILITIES




Table B-16. Distribution of w orkers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment
by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1967----Continued
CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS
INDUSTRY OF M R EARNINGS W R LESS TH
AJO
EE
AN

INDUSTRY

$6600

$7 2 0 0

$7800

$8 4 0 0

7 2.7

77.1

81 .2

8 5.2

87.9

90 .2

92.1

94.3

95. 8

7 4.3
6 1.2
86.5
58.6
3 7.1
62.6
84 .0
82 .8
6 6 .0
52.7
72 .4
42.4

7 8.7
69.6
89.1
64 .5
44.7
68.3
8 8.2
86.2
7 0 .6
60 .4
7 5 .7
52 .8

82 .4
7 5.9
90.9
70.2
5 1 .8
72 .9
90.4
88 .0
73.9
6 6 .0
78.2
62.6

85.6
8 0.1
92.1
7 5.5
58.7
7 7 .0
9 2 .3
89 .8
7 8 .7
71 .4
80.2
67.9

88.4
83.7
9 3 .8
80 .9
66 .2
82.1
9 3 .6
92 .0
8 3 .4
77.2
82.1
76.3

9 0.7
86.1
94 .7
8 5.1
70.9
8 4 .9
94.2
93 .2
87 .7
80 .6
83 .6
81 .9

92.5
87.5
9 5 .6
8 8.6
75.6
8 7.5
9 5 .0
94.3
90. 1
8 3.5
84.9
86.1

94.0
88.7
9 6.2
91.7
79.6
8 9.8
9 5.6
94.8
91.7
85.8
86.8
88.5

95.8
89.9
97.1
9 4.7
84.4
92.2
96.3
96.4
94.5
89.7
89.5
91.7

9 6.8
92. 1
9 7 .4
9 6 .7
88.3
94. 1
97.0
97. 1
95.6
92 .8
91 .5
94 .2

48 .7

56 .7

63. 1

68 .4

7 3 .7

7 7 .3

80 .5

83.1

86.9

8 9.6

7 9.8
75.4
8 0 .5
65.5
6 6.8

82.6
7 8 .4
84.4
69 .8
72.0

85. 1
81.3
87.8
73 .6
77.0

8 7.2
8 3.0
8 9.8
77.1
82.0

89.9
86.4
93.3
82.0
88.1

92. C
8 9 .8
95 .4
85 .8
90 .9

$2400

$3000

$3 60 0

$4200

T R A D E .................... ...................................................................................................................

24.2

3 4.2

44.5

53.8

6 1 .4

67 .3

DEPARTMENT STORES ..................................................................... ...............................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ....................................................................................................................
VARIETY S T O R E S..................................................... .. .....................................................................
GROCERY S T O R E S .............................................................. ..........................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DE A LE R S............ .......................................................... ..................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS ......................................................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ............................................................... .......................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES .................................................................. . ..................................
SHOE STORES ......................................................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FUR NIS HING S................. ................................................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES .......................................................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .............................................................................................................

22.2
12.0
2 8.1
22.3
8.2
2 4 .4
28 .5
28 .5
27.2
15.2
3 0 .9
9 .7

32.6
20.1
39 .9
31.9
11.9
3 2.6
39.4
40.1
3 6 .0
2 2 .0
41 .6
14.8

45 .6
2 8.3
59 .2
3 9.8
16.9
40.8
5 4.8
5 7 .7
44.4
3 0 .9
52 .0
19.2

58.2
3 9.4
75.6
46 .7
22.7
4 9.3
6 8 .6
7 1.4
5 5.0
3 8.9
62.1
25.6

67 .9
5 0.9
83.2
53.2
29.9
56.7
7 8 .3
7 8.9
61.0
46 .3
68.6
34. 1

8 .9

13.6

19.0

27.9

38 .8

PRIVATE

FINANCE*

NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

$9 00 0 $ 1 00 00 $ 1 1 0 0 0

$6000

$4800 $5400

$1800

RETAIL

IN THEIR

CONTINUED

INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE ....................... ..................................................

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ......................................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ....................................................................................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS .......................................................................................
LIFE INSURANCE.................................. ..........................................................................................
FIRE* MARINE* AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ......................................... .......................

6 .2
7.9
10.7
7 .3
4.5

1 1.0
12.6
16.5
11.4
8 .3

16.1
16.7
22.1
16.2
13.0

27 .4
2 5.3
33.2
23.3
21.8

41 .6
39.1
44 .8
32.0
33 .9

54.3
49 .5
54. 1
41.0
43 .8

63.4
58 .2
63 .4
47.6
51.1

69 .9
65 .2
70.1
53 .9
56.8

7 4 .6
7 0 .2
75.7
60. 1
6 1 .7

SERVICES ....................................................................................................................................................

2 0 .7

28 .8

3 7.1

45.5

53 .0

5 9.6

65 .5

70 .9

75.8

8 0 .7

8 4.0

8 6.5

88 .5

91.0

9 2 .8

HOTELS* TOURISTS COURTS* AND MOTELS ....................................................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .................................... ....................................
MOTION PI C TU R ES .......................................... .................................................................. •••••
HOSPITALS .............................................................................................................................. ..

34.0
2 1.5
42.9
1 2.4

47.7
37 .5
50.5
21.6

59 .8
53.0
55.7
33.8

6 9.7
66.7
60 .0
4 8.3

77.5
7 4 .5
63.0
59.9

8 2 .7
79 .9
6 7 .2
67.8

86 .8
83.4
71.3
74.0

89.6
8 6.2
75.1
79. 1

9 2 .0
89.3
7 7 .0
83 .6

9 4 .0
9 2.2
80 .5
87.6

95.4
94 .3
8 3.2
90.0

96.2
9 5 .6
85 .5
9 2 .0

9 6 .7
96.5
8 6.9
93 .6

97.6
9 7.4
90.8
95.2

98 .2
98.3
9 3 .9
97. 5




Table B-17.

Industry employment, 1966
W 0 1 K E R S
R
SOME EARNINGS

IN THE INDUSTRY1

HAD
WH O
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS

NUMBER

PERCENT

NUMBER

PERCENT

IN THIS INDUSTRY2
PERCENT OF
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
THE INDUSTRY

72,457

100.0

72 ,4 5 7

100.0

100.0

MINING ..............................................................................................

939

1.3

72 6

1 .0

77 .3

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
GAS L I Q U I D S ................. ................ .......................................
OIL AND GAS FIELD S E R V I C E S .........................

206
242

.3
.3

169
153

.2
.2

8 1.7
6 3.0

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ...................................................

6,114

8 .4

4,574

6 .3

74.8

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION . . . . . . . .
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ..........................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING . . . .
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING . . . .
ELECTRICAL WORK ................................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ...........
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ....................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ............................
CONCRETE WORK .....................................................................

91 1
1,0 2 9
69 9
308
430
531
255
272
239

1.3
1 .4
.4
.6
.7
.4
.4
.3

557
557
46 1
199
308
303
138
143
103

•8
.8
.6
.3
.4
.4
.2
.2
.1

61.1
5 4.2
6 5.9
64 .7
71.7
57.1
54.2
52.7
42 .9

MANUFACTURING .....................................................................

26,919

37.2

2 3 ,900

3 3 .0

8 8.8

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS . . . .
MEAT PRODUCTS ...............................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS .............................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ..............
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ...............................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ..........................................................
BEVERAGES ..........................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ..........................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ...............................
KNITTING MILLS ..................................... .......................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS .................................... ..
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ..............
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS .........................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ....................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS .
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ............................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ............................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ...............................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ............................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ..............
NEWSPAPERS ........................................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ...............................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ............................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS . . . .
DRUGS ....................................... .............................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GCCDS . . . . .
PETROLEUM REFINING ..................................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ..........................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ..........................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ....................................

303
55 7
39 0
77 3
202
471
435
33 4
121
404
199
208
603
679
230
158
456
282
575
295
373
49 6
511
397
312
164
193
199
133
292
387

.4
.8
.5

25 4
400
29 9
535
151
341
29 7
285
95
322
150
172
481
553
187
115
318
187
394
255
260
392
382
351
267
142
143
178
119
221
307

.4
.6
.4
.7
.2
.5
.4
.4
.1
.4
.2
.2
.7
.8
.3
.2
.4
.3
.5
.4
.4
.5
.5
.5
.4
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.4

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECGNOMY

125

See footnotes at end of table.




1 .0

1 .1

.3
.6
.6
.5
.2
.6
.3
.3
.8
.9
.3
.2
.6
.4
.8
.4
.5
.7
.7
.5
.4
.2
.3
.3
.2
.4
.5

83.8
71.9
7 6.5
69. 1
74.8
72i 5
6 8.2
85.2
7 9.0
79.7
75.4
82.7
79.9
8 1 .4
81.5
7 2.5
69.9
66 .3
68.5
8 6.4
69 .7
79.0
74.6
88.3
85.3
86.8
74.3
89 .5
90 .0
75 .6
79.5

Table B-17.

Industry employment, 1966----Continued
W 0 R K E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY1
INDUSTRY

.NUMBER
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY MANUFACTURING -

PERCENT

WHO
H AD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY2
PERCENT OF
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
NUMBER
PERCENT
THE INDUSTRY

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

GLASS AND GLASSWARE. PRESSED OR BLOWN ............................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .........................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS .........................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ................................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND CRAWING ...............................................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE .......................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ...............................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ....................................
METAL STAMPINGS .........................................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ...........................................................................
FARM MACHINERY ...........................................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ....................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ...................................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ..........................................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY .....................................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ..................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES .............................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT ....................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS .............................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ...........................................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .........................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ..........................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ...................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ............................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT .....................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ..................................................................... ..
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ...............................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ....................
OTHER MANUFACTURING .................................................. .. ........................

183
374
839
362
306
267
743
192
349
143
237
414
4 79
303
438
320
221
291
308
303
302
303
647
662
1,258
1,011
329
157
32 9

.3
.5
1 .2
.5
.4
.4
1.0
.3
.5
.2
.3
.6
.7
•4
.6
•4
.3
.4
.4
.4
.4
.4
.9
.9
1 .7
1 .4
.5
.2
.5

151
237
762
276
245
198
4 74
137
252
123
181
315
363
231
338
265
154
2 34
248
2 39
22 2
218
551
501
1,0 7 0
866
231
128
219

.2
.3
1 .1
•4
.3
.3
.7
.2
.3
.2
.2
.4
.5
.3
.5
.4
.2
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.8
.7
1 .5
1.2
.3
.2
.3

TRANSPORTATION .................................................................................................

4,1 9 8

5.8

3 , 186

4.4

7 5 .9

RAILROADS .........................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .......................................
TAXICABS ............................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE .......................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION ................................................................................

872
172
223
1,685
312

1.2
.2
.3
2 .3
.4

801
139
138
1 ,113
276

1.1
.2
.2
1 .5
.4

91 .9
80 .7
61.7
66.1
88.4

COMMUNICATION ...................................................................................................

1,252

1.7

1,101

1 .5

88.0

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .................................. .. .............................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING .......................................

983
192

1 .4
.3

910
133

1.3
.2

92 .5
69 .5

PUBLIC UTILITIES

82 .2
63.4
90.9
76 .3
80.1
73 .9
6 3.9
7 1 .4
7 2.3
8 6 .0
76 .2
76.2
7 5.9
7 6 .3
77 .3
82.9
6 9 .6
80 .5
80.4
79 .0
7 3.5
72.1
85 .2
75.8
85.0
85.7
70 .3
8 1 .2
66.5

...........................................................................................

864

1 .2

773

1.1

89.4

WHOLESALE T R A D E ..............................................................................................

6,242

8 .6

4,529

6 .3

72.6

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ......................
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ............................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ........................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS....................... .......................
ELECTRICAL GOOOS ......................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ....................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .......................................

595
337
236
1,074
382
256
1,068

.8
.5
.3
1 .5
.5
.4
1.5

420
24 9
173
728
28 7
181
785

•6
.3
.2
1 .0
.4
.3
1 .1

7 0 .5
73 .8
73.4
67.8
75. 1
70. 3
73 .5

See footnotes at end of table.




Table B-17.

Industry employment, 1966----Continued
_____________ .___W Q Jt K E R S_____J L H O ____ H A D ___________________
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY1
2
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY1
PERCENT OF
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
THE INDUSTRY
PERCENT
NUMBER
PERCENT
NUMBER

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

CONTINUED

RETAIL TRADE ......................................................................................................

18,379

25 .4

1 3,829

19.1

75.2

DEPARTMENT STORES .................................................................. ...............
MAIL ORDER HOUSES . ................................................................................
VARIETY S T O R E S ..........................................................................................
GROCERY STORES ..........................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS .......................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS ....................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ............................................... .
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ....................................................................
SHOE STORES ............................................................................................... .
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS .............................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ....................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ..........................................................................

2,515
29 4
761
2 ,464
1,1 4 5
2 54
559
283
281
481
799
177

3 .5
.4
1 .1
3.4
1 .6
.4
.8
.4
.4
.7
1 .1
.2

1,700
2 09
531
1 ,834
846
159
38 8
190
174
321
559
121

2.3
.3
.7
2 .5
1 .2
.2
.5
.3
.2
.4
.8
.2

6 7.6
7 1.2
69.8
74.4
7 3.9
6 2.7
69 .4
67.0
62 .0
66.7
69.9
68 .2

FINANCE,

AND REAL E S T A T E .................................... ..

4,784

6 .6

3,7 9 4

5 .2

7 9.3

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ....................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS .................................................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ....................................................
LIFE INSURANCE ...........................................................................................
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ..............................

INSURANCE,

1,0 1 4
130
282
700
4 57

1.4
.2
.4
1.0
.6

899
109
203
575
3 90

1 .2
.2
.3
.8
.5

8 8.7
83.8
72.0
8 2.2
85 .4

SERVICES .................................................................................................................

20,002

2 7.6

16,046

2 2.1

8 0.2

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS.........................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .......................................
MOTION PICTURES ................. .. ...................................................................
HOSPITALS ..................................................... ............................................... ..

1,480
1,059
302
2,472

2 .0
1.5
.4
3 .4

930
786
178
2,1 1 0

1 .3
1 .1
.2
2 .9

62 .8
74.2
5 8.9
85.3

1 W o rk e rs who had som e earn ings in m ore than 1 industry group and in m ore than 1 industry division , are included in the count of those with som e earnings m each such
indu stry group and division .
T h u s, som e w orkers are counted m ore than once and, th ere fo re, detail does not add to total.
.
2 The num ber of w ork e rs who rece iv ed the m a jo r proportion of their earnings in each industry group is an unduplicated count of w o rk e rs, as is the count of m a jo r earn ers
at the d ivision al le v e l. T h e r e fo r e , detail by industry group and detail by division do (except for rounding) equal the total for the private nonagricu ltu ral econom y. H ow ever,
becau se the te st used to a ssig n w ork ers to an industry is applied independently at each le v e l of industry c la s s ific a tio n ( e .g . , indu stry group or division) the number of w orkers
in the m a jo r indu stry groups that com p rise a division m ay not equal the total dor the division.




Table B-18.

Industry employment, 1967
W O R K E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY i

WH O
HA D
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS

INDUSTRY

IN THIS INDUSTRY 2
PERCENT OF
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
THE INDUSTRY

PERCENT

NUMBER

PERCENT

73,907

100.0

73,907

100.0

100.0

MINING .......................................................................................................................

897

1.2

713

1.0

79.4

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
GAS LIQUIDS .............................................................................. ..................
OIL AND GAS FIELD S E R V I C E S ..................................................

196
226

.3
.3

164
146

.2
.2

8 3 .6
64 .7

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .............................................................................

5,974

8.1

4,5 0 5

6 .1

7 5 .4

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION .............................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ..................................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ................................
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING............................... ..
ELECTRICAL WORK........................................................................... ..
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ....................................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ....................... . ...................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ...............................................
CONCRETE WORK ....................................... .. ...................................................

128

NUMBER
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ..................................

888
978
680
285
430
507
253
274
231

1.2
1.3
.9
.4
.6
.7
.3
.4
.3

554
537
451
187
316
29 0
137
150
102

.7
.7
.6
.3
.4
.4
.2
.2
.1

62.3
54.9
66.3
65 .6
73 .4
57.2
54.4
5 4.7
4 4 .3

MANUFACTURING ....................................................................................................

26,911

36.4

2 3,995

32.5

89.2

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS .......................................
MEAT PROOUCTS ..............................................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ...........................................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS .............................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ..............................................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .........................................................................................
BEVERAGES ................................................................................................. ..
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ........................................................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS .............................................................
KNITTING MILLS ...........................................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ........................................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* SUITS AND C O A T S ............................................
MEN * S AND BOYS* FUR NI S HI N GS ........................................................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ..................................................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ...............................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR............ ..............................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ..........................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS .........................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ..............................................................................
PULP ANO PAPER M I L L S ..........................................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND B O X E S ............................... ..
NEWSPAPERS ................................................................ .....................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ..............................................................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ...........................................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .......................................
DRUGS ....................................................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ..........................................
PETROLEUM REFINING ................................................................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ........................................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ........................................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ...................................................................

381
549
386
786
206
462
431
333
119
388
198
214
568
653
228
150
413
261
537
283
359
502
507
402
304
171
187
189
128
301
364

.5

323
401
295
553
156
340
308
281
93
313
154
178
468
530
182
110
297
174
379
25 0
25 7
397
393
357
263
151
141
170
116
230
292

.4
.5
.4
.7
.2

See footnotes at end of table.




.7

.5
1 .1
.3
.6
.6

.5
.2

.5
.3
.3
.8

.9
.3
.2
•6
.4
.7
.4

.5
.7
. 7

.5
.4
.2
.3
.3
.2
.4

.5

.5
.4
.4
. I
.4
.2
.2
.6
.7
.2
.1
.4
.2

.5
.3
.3

.5
.5
.5
.4
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.4

84 .9
73. 1
76.3
70.4
76.0
73 .6
71 .4
84.3
77 .8
80.8
7 7.8
83 .3
82.4
81,1
7 9.8
7 3.4
71.8
66 .7
70 .6
88.4
71.4
79. 1
77.5
8 8.8
86.3
8 8.6
75.5
9 0 .C
90. 2
76.3
80.4

Table B-18.

Industry employment, 1967---- Continued

SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY

W 0 R K E R S
W HO
HAD
i
MAJCR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY
PERCENT OF
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
NUMBER
PERCENT
THE INDUSTRY

NUMBER

PERCENT

GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN .........................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS . . . . . . . . . .
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS .......................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES .........................................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ..........................................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ...................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ............................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ................................
m e t a l STAMPINGS ................................................................................
ENGINES AND T U R B IN E S ............. .....................................................
FARM MACHINERY ....................................................... ..........................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY .................................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ............................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ....................................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ...............................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .............................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES .......................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND D ISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT ..................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS........................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ....................................................................
ELECTRIC LIGH TIN G AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .......................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ......................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ............................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES .........................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ...............................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ........................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ............................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ..................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ......................................................................

177
367
798
336
293
261
705
183
340
139
233
404
482
300
435
334
215
293
298
302
293
283
668
619
1 ,2 0 1
1 ,0 2 2
310
152
313

.2
.5
1 .1
.5
.4
.4
1 .0
.2
.5
.2
.3
.5
.7
.4
.6
.5
.3
.4
.4
.4
.4
.4
.9
.8
1 .6
1 .4
.4
.2
.4

148
237
728
263
239
195
466
134
247
122
182
311
376
238
343
282
157
245
246
243
224
2C5
575
493
1 ,0 2 9
888
224
124
218

.2
.3
1 .0
.4
.3
.3
.6
.2
.3
.2
.2
.4
.5
.3
.5
.4
.2
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.8
.7
1 .4
1 .2
.3
.2
.3

TRANSPORTATION ........................................................................................

4 ,2 2 7

5 .7

3 ,2 4 7

4 .4

7 6 .8

RAILROADS ...............................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ...................................
TAXICABS ..................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ...................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION ........................................................................

832
177
238
1 ,6 7 7
350

1 .1
.2
.3
2 .3
.5

776
142
142
1 ,1 2 9
314

1 .1
.2
.2
1 .5
.4

9 3 .3
7 9 .8
5 9 .8
6 7 .3
8 9 .7

COMMUNICATION ..........................................................................................

1 ,2 7 7

1 .7

1 ,1 3 8

1 .5

89. 1

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ............................................................
RADIO AND TELEVISIO N BROADCASTING ...................................

1 ,0 0 6
195

1 .4
.3

937
141

1 .3
.2

9 3 .2
7 2 .4

PRIVATE NONAGRIC ULTUR.* L ECONOMY MANUFACTURING -

129

PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S

CONTINUED

CONTINUED
8 3 .5
6 4 .7
9 1 .3
7 8 .2
8 1 .8
7 4 .9
66. 1
7 3 .3
7 2 .7
8 7 .2
7 7 .9
7 7 .1
7 8 .0
7 9 .4
7 9 .0
84. 7
7 2 .8
8 3 .6
8 2 .6
8 0 .4
7 6 .6
7 2 .2
8 6 .2
7 9 .6
85. 7
8 6 .9
7 2. 3
8 1 .4
6 9 .4

..................................................................................

877

1 .2

789

1 .1

9 C .0

WHOLESALE TRADE .....................................................................................

6 ,2 1 8

8 .4

4 ,5 9 4

6 .2

7 3 .9

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ....................
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .........................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..........................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS .............................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ..................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...................................

584
342
229
1 ,0 4 8
384
253
1 ,1 2 5

.8

420
254
163
732
292
177
846

.6
.3
.2
1 .0
.4
.2
1 .1

7 1 .9
7 4 .3
7 1 .2
6 9 .9
7 5 .9
7 0 .2
7 5 .2

S ee fo o t n o t e s at e n d o f ta b le .




.5

.3
1 .4
.5

.3
1 .5

2

Table B-18. Industry em ploym ent, 1967---- Continued
W0 R K E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY1
INDUSTRY

NUMBER
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

PERCENT

W HO
HAD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARN INGS IN THIS INDUSTRY1
2
PERCENT OF
WORKERS W O
H
HAD SOME
EARNINGS IN
NUMBER
THE INDUSTRY
PERCENT

CONTINUED

130

RETAIL TRADE ...............................................................................

1 8 ,5 3 1

2 5 .1

1 4 ,0 9 0

1 9 .1

7 6 .0

DEPARTMENT STORES .............................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES .............................................................
VARIETY STORES .....................................................................
GROCERY STORES ....................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ...................................................
MEN• S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS . .
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES .................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ................................................
SHOE STORES ............................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ............................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ..................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .....................................................

2 ,5 1 4
278
733
2 ,5 1 2
1 ,1 1 8
249
567
280
298
480
785
169

3 .4
.4
1 .0
3 .4
1 .5
.3
.8
.4
.4
.6
1 .1
.2

1 ,7 2 1
2C4
518
1 ,8 8 9
839
165
391
190
188
324
556
119

2 .3
.3
.7
2 .6
1 .1
.2
.5
.3
.3
.4
.8
.2

6 8 .5
7 3 .4
7 0 .7
7 5 .2
7 5 .0
66. 1
6 8 .9
67. 7
63. 1
6 7 .6
7 0 .8
7 0 .9

4 ,9 0 3

6 .6

3 ,9 3 6

5 .3

8 0 .3

1 ,0 6 7
130
2 84
717
479

1 .4
.2
.4
1 .0
.6

9 50
110
2C4
588
411

1 .3
. 1
.3
.8
.6

89. G
8 4 .0
7 1 .9
82. 1
8 5 .8

SERVICES ....................................................................

2 0 ,8 3 9

2 8 .2

1 6 ,9 0 1

2 2 .9

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .
MOTION PICTURES ..............................................
HOSPITALS .............................................................

1 ,4 7 9
999
297
2 ,5 8 5

2 .0
1 .4
.4
3 .5

939
750
176
2 ,2 4 3

1 .3
1 .0
.2
3 .0

FINANCE,

INSURANCE,

AND REAL ESTATE . .

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS .............
PERSONAL CREDIT IN S TITU TIO N S ................
L IF E IN SU RA N CE................................................... .
F IR E , MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE

81. 1
6 3 .5
7 5 .0
5 9 .3
8 6 .7

1 W o rk e rs who had some earnings in m o re than 1 in dustry group and in m ore than 1 in d u s try d ivision, are
included in the count of those w ith some earnings in each such
in d u s try group and d ivisio n .
Thus, some w o rk e rs are counted m ore than once and, th e re fo re , d e ta il does not add to to ta l.
2 The num ber of w o rk e rs who rec e iv e d the m a jo r prop ortion of th e ir earnings in each in d u s try group is an unduplicated count of w o rk e rs , as is the count of m a jo r earners
at the d iv is io n a l le v e l. T h e r e fo r e , d e ta il by in dustry group and deta il by divisio n do (except fo r rounding) equal the to ta l fo r the p riv a te n o n a g ric u ltu ra l econom y.
H ow ever,
because the te st used to assign w o rk e rs to an in dustry is applied independently at each le v e l of in dustry c la s s ific a tio n ( e .g . , in d u s try group or division) the num ber of w o rkers
in the m a jo r in d u s try groups that c om prise a division m ay not equal the to ta l fo r the d ivision.




Table B-19. Industry employment by race and sex, 1966

INDUSTRY

WORK E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN1 THE INDUSTRYi
N E G R 0
WH I T E 3
TOTAL
T o ta l
p
HEN
1 WOMEN
"
MEN
|“ WOMEN

WH O
HAD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY2
W H I T E 3
N E G R 0
TOTAL |
MEN
| WOMEN
TOTAL
|
MEN
|
WOMEN

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ..................

64651

39701

24950

7806

4560

3246

64651

39701

249 5 0

7806

4560

3246

MINING ...............................................................................................

901

841

60

38

36

2

701

650

51

25

24

l

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS ANO NATURAL
GAS L I Q U ID S ................................................ ..........................
O IL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ..................................... ..

201
238

171
226

30
12

5
5

4
5

1
-

166
151

140
141

26
9

3
2

2
2

_

5346

5035

311

768

743

24

4052

3818

235

522

507

15

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ............................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ..................
PA IN TIN G , PAPER HANGING* DECORATING ..................
ELECTRICAL WORK............................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, ANO PLASTERING ....................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ..........................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ...................................
CONCRETE WORK.......................... ..............................................

784
877
638
290
411
395
233
238
176

755
851
595
278
381
381
224
226
170

28
26
44
12
30
14
9
13
5

128
152
60
18
19
137
22
34
64

126
150
59
17
18
135
21
33
62

2
2
2
1
2
2

471
469
402
182
278
224
122
121
75

23
19
34
8
23
10
6
8
3

64
69
25
9
7
70
10
14
25

63
68
24
8
6
69
9
14
24

1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1

493
488
436
190
301
234
129
129
78

MANUFACTURING.............................................................................

24177

16860

7317

2741

1970

771

21617

14936

6681

2283

1621

662

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS .......................
MEAT PRODUCTS • • • • ...............................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ......................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ............................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS........... .............................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS............. .....................................................
BEVERAGES ................................................... ...............................
WEAVING M IL L S , COTTON .....................................................
WEAVING M IL L S , SYNTHETICS ..........................................
KNITTING M I L L S ......................................................................
YARN AND THREAD M I L L S ............................ ........................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ............................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS .....................................
WOMEN'S AND M ISSES' OUTERWEAR .................................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS . . • • • • .
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR .......................................................
SAWMILLS and PLANING MILLS ........................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ...........
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ..........................................................
PULP AND PAPER M I L L S ........... .....................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ............................
NEWSPAPERS............................................................... ................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING .........................................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS .......................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .......................
DRUGS ............................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TO ILET GOODS .........................
PETROLEUM R EFIN IN G ............................................................
TIRES AND INNER T U B E S ....................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS .....................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ...............................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED CR BLOWN .............
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ...........

285
446
374
659
176
410
377
290
109
361
175
182
540
601
209
135
363
245
490
279
329
477
468
373
291
151
169
191
121
263
369
170
319

227
321
303
366
147
292
330
171
73
115
96
57
103
111
29
20
341
220
381
243
242
344
326
323
227
91
101
164
103
170
149
117
300

58
125
72
293
29
118
46
119
37
246
80
125
437
490
180
115
22
25
109
36
87
133
142
50
65
60
68
27
18
93
221
53
20

19
111
16
115
26
61
59
44
11
43
24
26
62
78
21
23
93
38
85
17
45
19
43
25
21
13
24
7
12
30
17
13
55

15
79
14
62
24
49
55
34
9
18
15
9
13
17
4
5
90
34
70
15
36
15
32
23
18
9
14
6
11
23
8
9
54

4
32
2
53
2
12
4
10
2
25
9
17
50
61
17
18
3
4
15
1
9
5
12
2
3
4
10
1
1
7
9
4
1

240
327
289
463
135
301
264
251
87
293
134
152
436
495
172
99
254
165
341
242
233
379
357
331
251
132
128
173
110
202
297
141
203

188
229
232
231
111
210
228
141
56
86
66
47
73
82
22
13
237
145
256
210
165
270
250
288
195
79
74
149
93
126
111
92
188

52
98
58
232
24
91
36
110
32
207
68
105
364
413
150
86
17
20
84
32
68
109
107
44
56
53
54
24
16
76
185
48
15

14
73
10
72
16
40
33
34
8
29
16
20
45
58
15
16
64
22
54
13
27
13
24
20
16
10
15
5
10
19
11
10
34

11
47
8
33
15
31
30
26
6
10
10
6
7
11
2
3
62
19
43
12
22
10
18
18
13
7
9
4
9
14
4
6
34

3
26
2
39
2
9
3
8
2
19
7
14
38
47
13
13
2
3
10
I
5
3
6
2
3
3
6
1
1
5
6
4

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .................................................. ..

131

S ee fo o t n o t e s at en d o f t a b le .




-

-

1
1

Table B-19.

Industry employment by race and sex, 1966-----Continued
WORK E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY1
W H I T E3
N E G R 0
MEN
TOTAL
WOMEN
TOTAL |
MEN
| WOMEN

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

WH O
HAD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INCUSTRY2
W H I T E 3
N E G R O
MEN
p ” WOMEN
TOTAL ~~j
TOTAL
|
MEN
|
WOMEN

CONTINUED

MANUFACTURING - CONTINUED

132

BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ...........
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ..............................................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ...............................
CUTLERY. HAND TOOLS. AND HARDWARE .......................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ...............
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC .....................
METAL STAMPINGS ....................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ........................................................
FARM MACHINERY ......................................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY .....................
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ................................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY .........................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ....................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...........................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTR IB U TIN G EQUIPMENT . . .
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ............................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ........................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ...........
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ..........................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES .............
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ....................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ............................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES . . .
OTHER MANUFACTURING.................. .......................................

733
267
276
244
678
178
310
134
222
391
463
287
415
306
206
271
292
272
263
266
607
608
1110
955
289
149
284

692
249
227
171
614
142
242
116
201
356
401
248
343
215
177
177
193
202
155
123
393
262
993
801
275
95
186

41
17
49
73
64
37
68
18
21
34
62
39
72
91
29
95
99
71
108
143
215
345
117
154
13
54
98

106
95
29
23
65
13
39
9
15
23
16
16
23
14
15
19
16
30
38
37
40
54
148
56
40
8
45

104
94
25
15
62
11
34
8
14
22
14
14
20
7
14
12
10
21
24
15
19
21
137
46
38
5
27

2
1
5
8
3
2
6
1
2
1
1
1
2
7
2
7
6
9
14
23
20
33
11
9
2
3
18

670
204
224
183
438
129
225
116
169
299
354
220
324
255
145
220
237
219
197
195
518
467
944
820
202
122
193

632
190
183
124
390
100
173
100
152
270
305
189
265
181
124
142
154
160
109
82
334
189
845
685
192
77
121

38
14
41
58
48
29
52
16
18
29
49
32
59
74
21
78
84
60
88
112
184
278
99
135
11
45
72

93
72
21
15
37
8
28
7
12
16
9
11
15
11
9
14
11
20
24
24
32
34
126
46
29
6
26

91
71
17
11
35
7
24
6
10
15
9
10
13
5
8
8
6
13
14
7
16
9
117
39
27
3
15

l
1
1
1
2
5
1
6
4
7
11
17
17
24
9
7
2
3
11

TRANSPORTATION ............................................................................

3686

3286

399

512

489

23

2848

2522

325

338

322

16

RAILROADS ...................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .......................
TAXICABS ......................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE .......................
AIR TRANSPORTATION .............................................................

799
145
185
1485
298

751
136
170
1369
214

48
9
15
116
84

73
27
38
200
14

71
26
34
195
13

2
2
4
5
1

739
115
114
1003
264

694
108
103
915
190

45
8
11
88
75

62
24
24
110
12

61
22
21
108
11

2
2
3
3
1

COMMUNICATION ..............................................................................

1187

573

614

65

23

42

1049

496

553

53

17

36

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ................................................
RADIO AND TELEVISIO N BROADCASTING .......................

934
184

389
135

545
49

49
8

11
5

38
2

867
128

366
94

502
34

43
5

10
3

33
2

PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S .......................................................................

807

6 82

125

57

53

4

729

613

116

43

40

4

WHOLESALE TRADE ........................................................................

5616

4271

1344

626

516

110

4 157

3105

1052

372

299

73

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT . . . .
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .............
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .....................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ...............................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ..................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT . . .
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .......................

550
311
209
934
356
234
1000

452
225
117
696
250
181
779

99
86
91
239
106
53
221

45
26
27
139
26
25
68

42
22
14
115
20
23
59

4
4
13
24
6
1
9

396
234
156
648
272
171
749

318
167
88
469
191
130
580

78
68
68
179
81
42
169

24
15
17
80
15
10
36

22
11
9
65
10
9
30

2
3
3
15
5
1
6

S ee fo o tn o te s at en d o f ta b le .




l
1
4
4
2
2
4
_

Table B-19.

Industry employment by race and sex, 1966-----Continued
WORK E R S
SOME EARNINGS If i THE INDUSTRY1
WH I T E 3
N E G R 0
TOTAL
MEN
| WOMEN
TOTAL |
MEN
| WOMEN

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

WH O
HAD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY2
W H I T E 3
N E G R O
TOTAL
| MEN
| WOMEN
MEN |
TOTAL |
WOMEN

CONTINUED

133

RETAIL TRADE ................................................................................

16570

9092

7478

1809

1122

687

12603

6423

6 18 0

1226

709

517

DEPARTMENT STORES ...............................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ..............................................................
VARIETY STORES ......................................................................
GROCERY STORES .....................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS .....................................................
MEN'S ANO BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS . . .
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ...................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ..................................................
SHOE S T O R E S ............................ ..................... ..........................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ..............................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ....................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .......................................................

2284
231
710
2301
1023
238
504
262
263
423
722
163

786
85
154
1573
898
156
64
78
160
301
305
132

1498
146
556
729
126
82
440
184
103
123
417
31

230
63
51
163
122
17
56
21
18
58
77
15

108
23
19
123
118
12
15
10
13
46
48
14

122
40
32
40
4
5
41
11
5
12
29
1

1569
169
501
1724
770
149
352
177
165
289
514
113

448
56
97
1139
671
93
38
45
97
196
208
88

1121
113
4 04
585
99
57
315
133
68
93
306
25

131
41
31
110
76
10
36
12
9
32
45
8

53
13
9
81
73
7
8
4
7
25
27
7

79
28
22
29
3
3
28
9
3
8
18
1

FINANCE*

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE .......................

4397

2239

2158

387

255

132

3555

1708

1848

239

141

98

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ....................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ................................
PERSONAL CREDIT IN STITU TIO N S ...................................
L IF E INSURANCE ......................................................................
F IR E , MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ...............

967
124
274
659
446

358
44
133
397
187

610
80
141
263
259

47
6
8
40
10

21
4
5
19
3

25
2
3
21
7

865
105
199
544
383

315
36
93
321
163

550
69
106
222
220

35
4
4
31
7

14
3
2
14
2

20
2
2
18
5

SERVICES ..........................................................................................

16637

7633

9 004

3365

1353

2013

13341

5432

7 909

2704

879

1825

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ..................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .......................
m o t io n PICTURES ....................................................................
HOSPITALS ...................................................................................

1128
722
281
2025

562
274
174
481

566
447
107
1544

353
338
21
447

168
100
13
135

185
238
8
312

714
535
167
1746

324
185
100
379

390
350
67
1367

217
251
11
364

90
61
6
93

127
190
5
272

1 W o rk e rs who had some earnings in m ore than 1 industry group and in m o re than 1 in dustry division, a re included in the count of those w ith some earnings in each such
in d u s try group and d ivision.
Thus, some w o rk e rs a re counted m ore than once and, th e re fo re , d e ta il does not add to to ta l.
2 The num ber of w o rk e rs who rec e iv e d the m a jo r proportion of th e ir earnings in each in dustry group is an unduplicated count of w o rk e rs , as is the count of m a jo r earn e rs
at the d iv is io n a l le v e l. T h e re fo re , d e ta il by industry group and d e ta il by division do (except fo r rounding) equal the to ta l fo r the p riv a te n o n a g ric u ltu ra l economy.
H ow ever,
because the test used to assign w o rk e rs to an industry is applied independently at each le v e l of in dustry c la s sific atio n (e. g. , in dustry group or d ivision) the num ber of w o rkers
in the m a jo r in d u s try groups that com prise a division may not equal the to ta l fo r the division.
3 Includes w o rk e rs of a ll races other than Negro.
NOTE:

A d a s h ( - ) i n d i c a t e s e i t h e r t h e s a m p l e d i d n o t in c l u d e a n y w o r k e r s w it h t h e s e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ,




o r th a t th e d a ta d id n o t m e e t th e B u r e a u 's p u b l ic a t i o n c r i t e r i a .

Table B -20.

Industry employment by race and sex, 1967

1NOUSTRY

W0 R K E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY i
N E G R 0
WH I T E
men
WOMEN
TOTAL
MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL

H
WHO
1 AD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY 2
WH I T E 3
N E G R 0
WOMEN
MEN
TOTAL
TOTAL
MEN
WOMEN

65902

40053

25849

8 00 4

4640

3364

65902

40053

25849

8004

464 0

3364

MINING ................................................................................................

863

804

60

34

32

2

688

638

50

25

23

1

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
GAS LIQ U ID S ............................................................................
O IL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES .........................................

191
221

162
211

29
10

5
5

4
4

1
-

161
144

135
136

25
8

3
2

3
2

1
-

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ..........................................................

5253

4928

325

721

697

24

4011

3770

242

494

479

15

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ............................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ..................
P A IN TIN G , PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ..................
ELECTRICAL WORK ....................................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING .....................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ...........................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ....................................
CONCRETE WORK .........................................................................

766
842
627
271
411
382
231
241
169

731
813
583
260
381
368
222
229
165

34
29
45
10
30
14
9
13
5

123
136
52
14
20
125
22
33
61

121
134
51
14
18
124
22
32
60

2
2
2
1
2
2

460
449
398
172
284
215
121
126
75

27
21
33
7
23
10
6
10
3

66
67
20
8
8
64
10
14
24

65
65
19
8
7
63
10
14
23

1
2
1

1
1

487
470
431
179
308
225
127
136
78

1
1
1

MANUFACTURING ..............................................................................

134

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ..................

24108

16711

7397

2803

2012

791

21640

14875

6 76 4

2355

1671

664

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS .......................
MEAT PRODUCTS .........................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS .......................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN F O O D S .......................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ..........................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ....................................................................
BEVERAGES ...................................................................................
WEAVING M IL L S , COTTON .............................................. ..
WEAVING M IL L S , SYNTHETICS ...........................................
K NITTING MILLS .......................................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS .....................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* SUITS AND COATS ............................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ......................................
WOMEN'S AND M ISSES' OUTERWEAR .................................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ........................................... ..
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS .........................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS . . . . .
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ..........................................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ........................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES .............................
NEWSPAPERS .................................................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ................................................ ..
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ........................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .......................
DRUGS .............................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS. AND TOILET GOODS .........................
PETROLEUM REFINING .............................................................
TIRES AND INNER T U B E S ................ ....................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS .....................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ................................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN .............
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PROCUCTS ...........

351
439
367
676
181
398
371
285
106
348
172
186
507
578
207
130
327
225
455
265
311
482
466
376
285
158
163
180
116
270
346
163
310

273
318
291
361
151
281
320
168
69
113
93
60
92
106
31
21
304
200
347
231
228
344
325
327
218
96
96
154
ICO
176
142
108
290

78
122
76
315
30
117
51
117
37
235
79
126
414
473
176
109
23
25
108
34
84
139
141
50
66
62
67
26
17
94
204
55
20

30
110
19
110
25
64
60
48
13
40
26
28
61
75
21
19
86
36
81
17
48
20
42
26
20
13
24
8
12
32
18
15
57

23
76
17
59
23
49
56
36
10
17
17
9
12
17
4

7
34
2
51
2
15
4
12
3
24
9
20
49
58
18
15
3
3
14
2
10
5
12
2
4
4
8
1
1
8
9
6
2

300
325
283
480
140
296
273
242
84
284
135
158
422
476
166
97
238
153
325
236
228
384
366
335
247
141
127
163
106
208
281
137
203

231
229
22 3
231
116
206
232
135
51
83
69
49
69
79
22
15
220
133
238
205
163
271
254
292
189
85
75
140
90
130
104
88
188

69
96
60
249
24
91
41
107
32
200
66
109
353
397
144
82
19
20
87
31
65
113
112
43
59
56
52
23
16
79
178
49
15

24
76
12
73
17
44
35
38
9
30
19
20
46
54
16
13
59
22
54
14
29
13
27
22
15
11
14
7
10
22
11
11
35

18
48
10
35
15
32
32
28
7
11
11
6
8
10
3
2
56
19
42
13
22
10
20
21
12
8
9
5
9
15
5
7
34

6
28
2
38
l
12
3
10
2
18
8
14
38
44
14

S ee fo o t n o t e s at e n d o f ta b le .




4

83
33
67
16
39
15
30
24
16
10
16
7
11
24
9
9
56

-

-

11

2
2
12
1
7
3
8
2
3
3
6
1
1
6
6
4
1

Table B -20.

Industry employment by race and sex, 1967---- Continued
WORK E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY i
WH I T E 3
N E G R 0
TOTAL
MEN
| WOMEN
TOTAL |
MEN
| WOMEN

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY MANUFACTURING -

WH O
HAD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY 2
N E G R O
W H I T E 3
TOTAL |
MEN
| WOMEN
TOTAL
|
MEN
| WOMEN

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

135

BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ...........
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ............................................
NQNFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING .........................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE .......................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS . . . . . . .
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ....................
METAL STAMPINGS ....................................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES .......................................................
FARM MACHINERY ......................................................................
CONSTRUCTION ANO RELATED MACHINERY . . . . . . . . .
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ...............................................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ....................... ..
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ...................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...........................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND D ISTR IB U TIN G EQUIPMENT . . .
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ............................
HOUSEHOLD A P P L IA N C E S ................................. .....................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ...........
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT .........................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ...............................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES .............
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ...................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ............................................................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING . . . • • • •
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES . . .
OTHER MANUFACTURING.........................................................

697
249
264
238
644
171
295
132
218
378
464
284
409
319
202
273
282
276
255
248
623
572
1040
959
271
144
273

655
233
214
164
584
135
230
113
193
341
398
243
338
222
171
183
187
202
146
123
403
267
929
799
2 54
92
175

42
15
5C
74
60
37
65
19
25
37
66
41
71
97
31
90
95
74
110
125
220
306
111
160
17
52
99

101
87
28
23
61
12
45
8
15
25
16
16
26
15
13
20
16
26
37
35
45
47
161
63
39
8
40

99
86
23
16
58
10
38
7
14
24
16
14
23
8
11
12
10
17
24
17
22
18
149
51
38
5
25

2
1
5
7
3
2
7
1
1
1
2
2
3
8
2
8
6
9
13
19
23
29
12
12
1
4
16

637
195
219
181
431
127
216
115
171
293
366
227
326
271
147
229
234
224
199
181
538
460
897
836
195
117
194

601
182
177
120
386
98
165
99
151
263
312
193
267
189
122
151
153
162
108
80
347
203
800
694
182
74
120

37
14
42
61
45
28
51
16
20
30
54
35
59
82
25
78
81
63
92
101
191
257
97
142
14
43
74

91
67
21
15
36
8
31
7
11
18
10
11
18
12
10
16
12
18
25
24
37
33
132
52
29
7
23

89
66
17
10
34
6
26
6
9
17
9
10
16
6
9
10
7
12
15
9
17
10
122
42
28
4
15

2
1
4
5
2
2
5
1
1
1
1
1
2
6
2
6
5
7
10
15
20
23
10
10
1
3
9

TRANSPORTATION ...........................................................................

3707

3276

431

519

489

29

2897

2539

358

350

329

21

RAILROADS ..................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .......................
T A X IC A B S ....................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE .......................
AIR TRANSPORTATION ............................................................

764
148
198
1476
333

717
137
181
1356
234

46
11
17
120
100

67
30
40
201
17

65
28
36
194
14

2
2
4
8
3

716
115
118
1016
300

672
106
105
921
211

44
9
12
95
89

60
26
25
114
14

58
25
22
no
12

2
2
2
4
2

COMMUNICATION.............................................................................

1201

578

624

76

23

53

1076

510

566

62

17

45

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ................................................
RADIO AND TELEVISIO N BROADCASTING .......................

945
187

391
139

554
48

61
8

12
6

49
2

885
136

373
101

512
35

52
5

10
3

42
2

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ........................................... ..........................

817

690

127

59

54

6

743

626

117

46

42

4

TRADE ........................................................................

5592

4204

1387

626

513

113

4213

3126

1086

381

304

77

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT . . . .
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .............
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .....................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PROCUCTS ..............................
ELECTRICAL GOODS .................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT . . .
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .......................

541
315
200
911
359
230
1050

445
224
107
674
246
179
810

96
91
93
236
113
52
240

43
27
30
137
25
22
75

40
22
15
114
17
20
64

3
5
15
23
7
2
11

395
239
146
650
276
168
803

318
168
80
476
190
127
617

76
71
66
175
85
41
186

26
15
18
82
16
10
43

24
12
8
66
11
9
35

2
4
9
16
5
1
9

w holesa le

S ee fo o t n o t e s at e n d o f ta b le .




Table B -20. Industry employment by race and sexf 1967— Continued
WORK E R S
SOME EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY1
WH I T P
N E G R 0
TOTAL
1 MFN
WOMEN
To t a l
[
■ MEN
|
WOMEN

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY -

WH O
HAD
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY1
2
W H I T E 3
N E G R 0
TOTAL
| MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL
MEN
WOMEN

CONTINUED

136

RETAIL TRADE .................................................................................

16744

9097

7646

1788

1098

690

12868

6535

6334

1222

697

525

DEPARTMENT STORES ...............................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ...............................................................
VARIETY S T O R E S ............................ .........................................
GROCERY STORES .......................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE D EA L E R S ........... .........................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS . . .
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ....................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ..................................................
SHOE STORES .............................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ...............................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES .....................
FUEL AND ICE D EA L E R S ............................ ..........................

2284
214
683
2341
1004
231
512
255
280
421
712
155

778
78
146
1578
875
149
66
74
168
295
302
125

1506
136
537
763
129
82
445
182
112
127
411
29

230
64
51
171
114
18
56
25
19
58
72
14

108
22
19
129
111
12
15
11
12
47
41
13

122
42
31
42
4
6
41
14
6
12
31
1

1586
164
487
1774
765
154
358
175
178
291
513
111

462
54
92
1156
661
97
38
44
99
195
209
88

1123
110
395
618
104
57
320
131
78
96
304
23

135
40
31
115
74
11
33
15
11
33
43
8

53
11
10
84
72
7
6
5
7
24
24
7

82
29
21
32
2
4
27
9
4
9
19
1

FINANCE, INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE .......................

4501

2261

2240

402

252

150

3670

1737

1934

266

153

113

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .....................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS .................................
PERSONAL CREDIT IN STITU TIO N S ....................................
L IF E INSURANCE .......................................................................
F IR E * MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ................

1012
124
274
673
465

362
42
130
403
199

651
82
143
270
266

55
7
10
44
14

23
4
6
21
4

32
3
5
23
10

907
105
199
553
400

319
36
89
321
172

588
69
110
233
228

43
5
5
35
11

17
3
2
16
3

26
2
3
19
8

SERVICES ..........................................................................................

17383

7882

9501

3455

1398

2057

14098

5700

8398

2804

925

1879

HOTELS* TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ..................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .......................
MOTION P IC T U R E S ...................................................................
HOSPITALS ...................................................................................

1148
699
277
2126

567
271
168
498

581
428
109
1628

331
301
20
460

154
88
12
138

176
213
7
322

730
522
165
1861

330
186
96
402

401
336
69
1459

209
227
11
381

84
55
6
97

124
172
5
284

1 W o rk e rs who had some earnings in m o re than 1 industry group and in m ore than 1 in dustry division, a re included in the count of those with some earnings in each such
in dustry group and d ivisio n .
Thus, some w o rk e rs a re counted m ore than once and, th e re fo re , d e ta il does not add to to ta l.
2 The num ber of w o rk e rs who rec e iv e d the m a jo r proportion of th e ir earnings in each in dustry group is an unduplicated count of w o rk e rs , as is the count of m a jo r e arners
at the d iv is io n a l le v e l. T h e r e fo r e , d e ta il by in dustry group and d e ta il by division do (except fo r rounding) equal the to ta l fo r the p riv a te n o n a g ric u ltu ra l economy.
H ow ever,
because the te st used to assign w o rk e rs to an in dustry is applied independently at each le v e l of in dustry c la s s ific a tio n (e. g. , in dustry grouD or division) the num ber of w o rkers
in the m a jo r in dustry groups that co m p ris e a division m ay not equal the to ta l fo r the division.
NOTE:

A d a sh ( - ) in d ic a t e s




e ith e r th e

s a m p le

d id n ot

in c lu d e

any w ork ers

w it h t h e s e

c h a r a c t e r is tic s ,

o r th a t th e d a ta d id n o t m e e t th e B u r e a u 's p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .

P
SOME EARNINGS IN THIS
INDUSTRY DURING

INDUSTRY
ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

o

Quarters of w ork, 1966
m

Table B-21.

E N T
0 F
1 ORK E R S
W
WH 0
H i* D
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY AND WORKED
IN ANY INDUSTRY DURING
IN THIS INDUSTRY DURING

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

TW
O
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECCNQMY ............................

1 0 0 .0

9 .9

1 1 .2

1 1 .3

6 7 .4

1 0 0 .0

9 .9

1 1 .2

1 1 .3

6 7 .4

1 0 0 .0

9 .9

1 1 .2

1 1 .3

6 7 .4

.........................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

2 0 .2

1 4 .3

9 .9

5 5 .4

1 0 0 .0

5 .3

7 .2

8 .4

7 8 .9

1 0 0 .0

7 .4

1 0 .3

1 1 .2

7 1 .0

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
GAS L I Q U ID S .............................. . ......................................... . .
O IL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ..................................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 5 .9
3 3 .8

1 1 .5
1 8 .4

6 .6
1 1 .8

6 5 .8
3 5 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 .7
10. 1

5 .8
9 .0

5 .3
11. 1

8 4 .9
6 9 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

5 .4
1 4 .4

7 .9
1 4 .0

6 .9
1 5 .7

7 9 .6
5 5 .8

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ....................................................................

1 0 0 .0

2 4 .2

1 8 .3

1 4 .3

4 3 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 .1

1 1 .1

1 4 .2

6 5 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 1 .6

1 4 .9

1 6 .8

5 6 .5

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ......................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ..........................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ............................
P A IN TIN G , PAPER HANGING, DECORATING .............................
ELECTRICAL WORK ..............................................................................
MASCNRY, STONEWORK, AND P LA S TE R IN G ..............................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING .....................................................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK .............................................
CONCRETE WORK ................................................................. .................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

3 4 .1
3 8 .8
2 8 .7
3 3 .7
2 4 .0
3 5 .0
4 0 .4
4 1 .0
4 6 .6

2 2 .3
2 3 .1
1 7 .9
2 1 .2
1 7 .0
2 1 .5
2 0 .9
1 8 .2
2 1 .2

1 4 .3
1 3 .5
1 1 .5
1 3 .4
1 2 .2
1 3 .5
1 2 .4
1 0 .8
1 2 .9

2 9 .0
2 4 .4
4 1 .8
3 1 .4
4 6 .6
2 9 .7
2 6 .1
2 9 .7
1 9 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

7 .8
9 .0
6 .9
1 0 .7
6 .4
9 .6
1 1 .4
9 .0
1 1 .0

1 3 .3
1 0 .8
7 .9
1 3 .8
7 .7
1 1 .8
1 2 .6
9 .5
1 1 .0

1 6 .1
15. 1
1 1 .0
1 6 .3
1 0 .9
1 4 .4
1 4 .8
1 4 .4
1 7 .3

6 2 .6
6 4 .9
7 4 .1
5 9 .0
7 4 .8
6 3 .9
6 1 .0
6 6 .9
6 0 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 2 .3
1 4 .8
9 .5
1 4 .6
8 .6
1 3 .8
1 6 .0
1 3 .8
1 6 .3

2 0 .2
2 0 .0
1 3 .4
1 9 .4
1 2 .6
1 6 .8
1 8 .6
1 4 .2
2 0 .0

2 0 .6
2 0 .6
1 4 .5
1 7 .9
1 4 .4
1 8 .3
1 8 .8
1 6 .8
2 1 .5

4 6 .8
4 4 .3
6 2 .5
4 7 .9
6 4 .2
5 0 .9
4 6 .4
5 5 .1
4 2 .0

MANUFACTURING ........................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 3 .7

1 3 .0

1 0 .3

6 2 .8

1 0 0 .0

6 .3

8 .4

9 .4

7 5 .7

1 0 0 .0

7 .8

1 0 .7

1 0 .8

7 0 .5

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS .................................
MEAT PRODUCTS ...................................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ................................................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ......................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ....................................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ..............................................................................
BEVERAGES .............................................................................................
WEAVING M IL L S , COTTON ...............................................................
WEAVING M IL L S , SYNTHETICS .....................................................
KNITTING MILLS ................................................................................
YARN AND THREAD M I L L S ..............................................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ......................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ................................................
WOMEN'S AND M ISSES' OUTERWEAR ...........................................
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ..........................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR .................................................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ..................................................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS .....................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ....................................................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS .................................................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ......................................
NEWSPAPERS ..........................................................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ....................................................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS .................................................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .................................
DRUGS .......................................................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ...................................
PETROLEUM R EFIN IN G ......................................................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ...............................................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ...............................................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER .................................................... ..
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN .......................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .....................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 6 .5
2 9 .1
2 1 .2
4 3 .7
2 5 .8
2 6 .7
2 9 .7
1 5 .4
1 9 .8
2 0 .9
2 2 .1
1 9 .2
2 3 .1
2 0 .7
2 2 .3
2 8 .3
2 8 .0
2 9 .6
2 9 .7
1 4 .5
2 9 .5
1 8 .2
2 3 .6
1 0 .8
1 4 .3
1 3 .2
2 5 .5
1 0 .6
1 0 .4
2 3 .7
2 2 .1
1 7 .9
3 0 .3

1 6 .0
1 5 .6
1 6 .5
2 4 .7
1 4 .1
1 5 .2
1 7 .0
1 2 .9
1 4 .7
1 6 .0
1 6 .6
1 2 .2
1 7 .2
1 4 .8
1 7 .6
1 5 .8
1 9 .8
2 0 .1
1 9 .1
1 0 .8
1 6 .6
1 3 .8
1 4 .5
1 0 .1
1 1 .9
1 1 .3
1 7 .0
9 .1
8 .3
1 5 .4
1 5 .3
1 3 .6
1 8 .2

9 .8
9 .4
9 .5
9 .3
8 .0
1 0 .8
8 .2
9 .9
1 2 .8
1 2 .8
1 0 .9
1 0 .4
1 3 .6
1 3 .3
1 2 .5
1 2 .2
1 2 .9
1 1 .8
1 0 .3
8 .9
8 .9
1 0 .3
9 .3
7 .1
7 .9
8 .1
8 .1
5 .2
7 .0
8 .6
1 1 .5
9 .9
1 0 .4

5 7 .6
4 5 .7
5 2 .7
2 2 .1
5 1 .9
4 7 .2
4 5 .0
6 1 .6
5 2 .5
5 0 .1
5 0 .2
5 8 .0
4 5 .9
5 1 .1
4 7 .3
4 3 .4
3 9 .1
3 8 .3
4 0 .8
6 5 .6
4 4 .8
5 7 .6
5 2 .4
7 1 .8
6 5 .8
6 7 .2
4 9 .2
7 4 .9
7 4 .1
5 2 .1
5 0 .9
5 8 .3
4 1 .0

4 .0
9 .3
6 .1
2 2 .9
6 .5
6 .6
6 .8
5 .3
5 .9
6 .6
4 .6
6 .4
9 .7
7 .9
9 .6
9 .5
9 .0
6 .1
8 .4
3 .5
6 .3
6 .6
6 .9
2 .6
3 .3
4 .2
6 .9
2 .4
2 .5
5 .6
7 .5
3 .8
5 .2

7 .0
9 .1
8 .8
2 3 .2
6 .8
7 .6
8 .2
6 .2
5 .6
9 .1
9 .5
7 .8
1 1 .3
1 0 .2
1 0 .9
9 .5
1 1 .1
1 0 .9
9 .3
5 .2
8 .5
8 .5
8 .0
4 .4
5 .3
5 .7
8 .9
3 .7
3 .6
8 .1
9 .8
6 .1
8 .3

7 .2
9 .8
8 .5
1 5 .3
9 .2
1 1 .5
8 .5
8 .5
9 .8
1 3 .2
1 0 .0
9 .0
1 4 .6
1 2 .8
1 4 .0
1 2 .7
1 4 .2
1 1 .9
1 2 .3
6 .6
9 .5
9 .1
8 .5
4 .9
6 .3
5 .9
9 .9
4 .9
6 .0
8 .6
1 1 .4
9 .0
10. 1

8 1 .6
7 1 .5
7 6 .4
3 8 .5
7 7 .3
7 4 .1
7 6 .2
7 9 .9
7 8 .4
7 0 .9
7 5 .8
7 6 .6
6 4 .2
6 8 .9
6 5 .3
6 8 .1
6 5 .4
7 1 .0
6 9 .8
8 4 .5
7 5 .6
7 5 .6
7 6 .4
8 8 .0
8 4 .9
8 4 .0
7 4 .0
8 8 .8
8 7 .6
7 7 .5
7 1 .0
8 0 .9
7 6 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6 .9
1 1 .9
8 .1
2 9 .7
9 .7
9 .7
1 0 .3
7 .1
7 .6
8 .8
7 .8
8 .7
1 1 .9
9. 8
1 1 .1
1 2 .4
1 1 .9
9 .7
1 1 .6
6 .0
1 0 .6
8 .2
9 .4
3 .7
4 .7
5 .3
1 0 .2
3 .7
4 .2
8 .4
1 0 .0
6 .3
8 .4

1 3 .1
1 2 .8
1 2 .5
2 6 .0
1 1 .7
1 2 .3
1 3 .5
9 .6
1 0 .7
1 3 .2
1 2 .4
9 .3
1 4 .5
1 2 .2
1 5 .8
1 2 .4
1 6 .3
1 7 .1
1 5 .4
8 .1
1 3 .6
1 0 .9
1 0 .9
7 .4
9 .3
8 .5
1 4 .3
7 .1
6 .1
1 2 .4
1 2 .5
1 1 .0
1 4 .3

1 1 .0
1 2 .0
1 1 .0
1 2 .4
1 0 .0
1 3 .7
1 0 .8
1 0 .9
1 5 .3
1 5 .2
1 3 .4
1 2 .0
1 6 .2
1 5 .4
1 5 .0
1 5 .3
1 6 .3
1 5 .7
1 3 .7
9 .9
1 1 .7
1 0 .7
1 0 .8
7 .5
8 .8
8 .7
9 .8
5 .5
7 .4
1 0 .4
1 3 .6
1 1 .5
1 3 .9

6 8 .7
63. 1
6 8 .2
3 1 .7
6 8 .5
6 4 .1
6 5 .2
7 2 .2
6 6 .2
6 2 .7
6 6 .2
6 9 .9
5 7 .3
6 2 .5
5 7 .9
5 9 .7
5 5 .3
5 7 .3
5 9 .2
7 5 .9
6 4 .0
7 0 .0
6 8 .8
8 1 .2
7 7 .0
7 7 .3
6 5 .6
8 3 .6
8 2 .0
6 8 .6
6 3 .7
7 1 .0
6 3 .2

m in in g

137




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

Table B-21. Quarters of work, 1966-----Continued
PERCENT

ANY
QTR

138

5.6
6.7
7.8
10.1
10.0
9.5
10.5
6.6
8.7
6.8
7.0
7.5
7.2
6.7
9.9
7.5
10.2
7.9
9.0
13.8
7.0
11.9
5.9
6.1
9.4
7.9
10.9

86.4
83.5
82.0
78.7
77.2
77.0
75.6
85.3
78.5
84.4
82.0
83.6
83.5
83.3
77.3
80.9
78.6
79.7
74.7
63.6
83.3
69.2
85.3
85.1
74.8
81.2
70.1

100.0

6.0

6.9

8.6

78.0
65.8
42.4
44.7
68.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

2.8
3.7
11.3
7.4
2.6

3.6
4.3
10.1
7.6
5.4

13.5

9.8

55.9

9.0
13.4
28.6
28.3
10. 9

7.1
12.0
15.9
15.8
10.9

5.7
8.6
12.9
10.9
9.5

...............................................

100.0

20.6

R A I L R O A D S ...................................................
L O C A L A N D S U B U R B A N T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ..................
T A X I C A B S .....................................................
T R U C K I N G , L O C A L A N O L O N G D I S T A N C E ..................
AIR T R A N S P O R T A T I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

TRANSPORTATION

............................................. .

U T I L I T I E S ......................... ..................

TWO
QTRS

THREE
OTRS

FOUR
QTRS

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.8
6.3
5.9
6.8
8.0
8.1
10.3
4.8
7.2
5.1
6.5
5.5
5.2
5.9
8 .1
7.3
6.3
9.3
9.8
14.0
5.4
11.0
5.7
4.6
10.0
6.0
12.9

7.8
9.4
10.2
11.8
13.9
14.1
13.1
9.4
12.6
10.5
10.2
9.0
10.4
10.6
13.3
9.5
11.2
12.6
13.9
19.2
10.1
15.7
8.3
9.3
13.4
10.7
13.7

7 .3
9.7
11.0
12.7
14.4
12.8
12.6
8.6
11.6
10.7
10.5
11.8
10. 5
9.9
14.2
10.0
13.6
14.6
12.1
15.2
10.4
14.5
8 .0
8.7
12.5
12.2
13.4

80.9
74.4
72.7
68.5
63.5
64.9
63.8
76.9
68.4
73.5
72.6
73.5
73.7
73.4
64.2
73.0
68.8
63.3
64.0
51.4
73.9
58.7
77.7
77.1
63.9
70.8
59.8

78.3

100.0

7.8

9.6

10.5

71.9

5.0
6.2
12.1
10.1
6.7

88.3
85.6
66.4
74.7
85.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.9
5.0
14.4
9.8
4.2

5.5
7.3
11.4
11.3
8.1

5 .9
8.6
14.4
13.1
10.2

84.5
78.9
59.6
65.6
77.3

100.0

13.1

12.3

9.5

65.0

100.0

4.8

7.4

8.8

78.8

100.0

6.6

10.4

10.0

72.9

100.0
100.0

10.5
22.7

11.7
14.9

9.3
10.2

68.3
51.9

100.0
100.0

4.3
7.2

7.4
7.6

8.8
9.2

79.3
75.8

100.0
100.0

6.0
9.4

10.4
10.9

9.8
10.7

73.6
68.8

100.0

1 0.6

9.7

6.3

73.2

100.0

3.4

4.9

5.4

86.0

100.0

4.5

7.5

6.6

81.2

100.0

8.1

9.0

9.4

73.3

100.0

10.5

12.8

11.9

64.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5.7
5.3
8.2
11.7
5.5
5.9
5.2

8.0
6.8
9.4
10.8
8.2
8.0
6.8

9.0
8.2
11.0
11.1
8.2
8.9
8.3

77.1
79.5
71.1
66.2
77.9
77.0
79.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

8 .2
8.1
11.1
14.8
7.7
8.7
7.5

13.3
10.6
14.1
15.2
13.4
11.6
11.6

12.4
11.1
13.7
12.9
11.2
11.7
11.5

65.8
70.0
61.0
56.9
67.6
67.8
69.2

..............................................

100.0

25.0

17.0

10.1

47.7

M O T O R V E H I C L E S A N D A U T O M O T I V E E Q U I P M E N T ..........
O R U G S , C H E M I C A L S , A N D A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .............
DRY G OODS AND A P PAREL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G R O C E R I E S A N D R E L A T E D P R O D U C T S ......................
E L E C T R I C A L G O O D S .........................................
H A R D W A R E , P L U M B I N G A N D H E A T I N G E Q U I P M E N T .........
M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T A N D S U P P L I E S ..................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

25.2
23.4
26.1
3 2.5
22.7
26.8
22.9

17.6
14.7
17.4
18.2
16.6
15.1
16.0

9.9
9.2
10.7
9.8
9.2
9.4
9.5

47.1
52.5
45.5
39.3
51.2
48.6
51.4

WHOLESALE

ONE
QTR

- CONTINUED

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ........................
R A D I O A N D T E L E V I S I O N B R O A D C A S T I N G ..................
PUBLIC

5.2
5.5
6.3
7.3
7.5
8.5
7.6
4.8
8.3
5.7
6.4
5.3
5.9
6.2
7.4
6.6
7.3
6.7
9.8
13.8
5.9
11.3
5.0
5.4
8.7
7.9
9.2

ONE
QTR

WORKED
DURING

- CONTINUED

B L A S T F U R N A C E A N D B A S I C S T E E L P R O D U C T S ...........
I R O N A N D S T E E L F O U N D R I E S ..............................
N O N F E R R O U S R O L L I N G A N D D R A W I N G ......................
C U T L E R Y , H A N D T O O L S , A N D H A R C W A R E ..................
F A B R I C A T E D S T R U C T U R A L M E T A L P R O D U C T S ..............
S C R E W M A C H I N E P R O D U C T S , B O L T S , E T C .................
M E T A L S T A M P I N G S ...........................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES
FARM MACHINERY
C O N S T R U C T I O N A N D R E L A T E D M A C H I N E R Y .......... .
M E T A L W O R K I N G M A C H I N E R Y ................................
S P E C I A L I N D U S T R Y M A C H I N E R Y ............................
G E N E R A L I N D U S T R I A L M A C H I N E R Y .........................
O F F I C E A N D C O M P U T I N G M A C H I N E S ........................
S E R V I C E I N D U S T R Y M A C H I N E S ................. ...........
E L E C T R I C T E S T A N D D I S T R I B U T I N G E Q U I P M E N T ........
E L E C T R I C A L I N D U S T R I A L A P P A R A T U S .....................
H O U S E H O L D A P P L I A N C E S ....................................
E L E C T R I C L I G H T I N G A N D W I R I N G E Q U I P M E N T ...........
R A D I O A N D T V R E C E I V I N G E Q U I P M E N T ...................
C O M M U N I C A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ................................
E L E C T R O N I C C O M P O N E N T S A N D A C C E S S O R I E S .......
M O T O R V E H I C L E S A N D E Q U I P M E N T .........................
A I R C R A F T A N D P A R T S ................................. .
S H I P A N D B O A T B U I L D I N G A N D R E P A I R I N G ..............
M E C H A N I C A L M E A S U R I N G A N D C O N T R O L D E V I C E S .........
O T H E R M A N U F A C T U R I N G .....................................

COMMUNICATION

2.6
4.1
3.7
3.6
5.0
4.8
6.0
3 .1
4.2
2.9
4.4
3.5
3.3
3.6
5.2
4.8
3.8
5.5
6.3
8.6
3.7
7.4
3.6
3.2
6.8
2.8
9.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

9.8
13.2
14.1
16.1
18.8
17.5
16.7
11.5
16.7
14.5
15.0
14.0
14.0
14.1
16.9
12.8
14.5
16.0
17.0
21.2
12.9
18.6
11.4
12.2
18.1
14.2
16.5

ECONOMY

ANY
QTR

73.6
56.9
58.4
51.0
40.9
46.9
46.4
66.1
52.5
56.2
56.0
56.2
57.4
61.1
44.8
59.1
55.6
50.1
47.1
37.4
63.0
44.6
66.2
66.1
45.4
57.8
40.5

9.4
21.7
18.1
22.8
29.6
25.2
26.9
14.5
21.0
19.7
19. 8
19.8
19.6
15.7
27.4
19.2
18.4
21.7
26.1
29.6
14. 5
25.0
15.0
13. 6
25.9
1 7.2
32.7

NONAGRICULTURAL

FOUR
QTRS

7.0
8.1
9.2
9.9
10.5
10.2
9.7
7.6
9.5
9.5
9. 1
9.8
8.8
8.9
10.7
8.7
11.4
12.0
9.6
11.6
9.4
11.7
7.3
7.8
10.5
10.6
10.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

PRIVATE

THREE
QTRS

IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y A N D
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y

THREE
QTRS

ANY
OT*

TWO
QTRS

W
HO

0F

W O R K E R S
P R O P O R T I O N OF T H E I R E A R N I N G S
IN A N Y I N D U S T R Y D U R I N G '
TWO
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ONE
QTR

MANUFACTURING

MAJOR

S O M E E A R N I N G S IN T H I S
INDUSTRY DURING

INDUSTRY

TRADE




Table B-21. Quarters of work, 1966-----Continued
W O R K
W H O
E R S
P E R C f N T
:
0 F
M A J O R P R O P O R T I O N OF T H E I R E A R N I N G S
S O M E E A R N I N G S IN T H I S
INDUSTRY DURING
IN A N Y I N D U S T R Y O U R I N G

INDUSTRY

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

14.2

54.5

11.7
11.4
12.7
14.1
10.0
12.9
14.6
12.6
12.6
11.3
14.4
10.5

54.5
59.3
48.0
60.1
74.5
59.1
53.4
54.5
57.5
66.2
56.9
73.3

10. 1

8.4
7.5
7.9
6.9
7.9

9.6
7.6
12.0
8.8
8.0

13.1

14.6

12.9

59.2

100.0

14.8

16.4

13.5

55.0

17.4
13.0
17.6
9.1

17.9
13.2
18.2
13.0

16.4
13.7
16.5
12.8

48.1
59.9
47.6
64.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

21.9
16.0
21.3
11.3

22.7
16.8
21.8
15.7

16.6
15.2
15.7
13.6

38.6
51.8
40.9
59.2

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

T R A D E ............................ .....................

100.0

26.8

20.1

13.7

39.1

100.0

15.7

15.5

D E P A R T M E N T S T O R E S ................. ......................
M A I L O R D E R H O U S E S ........................................
V A R I E T Y S T O R E S ............... . ...........................
G R O C E R Y S T O R E S ...........................................
M O T O R V E H I C L E D E A L E R S .......... . .......................
M E N ' S A N D B O Y S ' C L O T H I N G A N D F U R N I S H I N G S .........
W O M E N ' S R E A D Y - T O - W E A R S T O R E S .........................
F A M I L Y C L O T H I N G S T O R E S ................... .............
S H O E S T O R E S ................................................
F U R N I T U R E A N D H O M E F U R N I S H I N G S . . ...................
D R U G S T O R E S A N D P R O P R I E T A R Y S T O R E S .................
F U E L A N D I C E D E A L E R S ....................................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

38.2
36.1
38.8
25.5
23.2
35.1
36.3
37.6
33.4
31.4
30.1
27.1

18.1
17.1
21.2
20.4
16.8
18.3
18.3
18.6
21.5
17.7
20.9
16.7

9.6
8.9
10.3
12.8
10.3
10.8
11.5
10.5
11.3
11.0
12.0
9.6

34.0
37.7
29.5
41.1
49.4
35.6
33.7
33.1
33.6
39.8
36.8
46.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

19.1
16.3
22.6
11.3
6.6
14.6
18.3
19.1
14.4
11.3
12.9
6.2

14.5
12.8
16.5
14.3
8.7
13.2
13.5
13.6
15.2
10.9
15.6
9.9

..................

100.0

19.7

14.6

10.7

54.7

100.0

7 .2

9.2

C O M M E R C I A L A N D S T O C K S A V I N G S 8 A N K S .................
S A V I N G S A N D L O A N A S S O C I A T I O N S .......................
P E R S O N A L C R E D I T I N S T I T U T I O N S ........................
L I F E I N S U R A N C E ............................................
F I R E , M A R I N E , A N D C A S U A L T Y I N S U R A N C E ..............

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

12.3
15.1
21.3
15.0
14.0

13.5
12.0
16.1
13.2
14.2

10.9
9.9
13.6
11.3
9.8

63.1
62.9
48.8
60.3
61.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5.1
5.4
7.1
5.3
4.3

100.0

22.8

18.9

12.5

45.7

100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

38.4
29.4
33.9
18.1

23.6
19.0
24.3
18.1

12.5
12.4
13.0
12.4

25.3
39.0
28.6
51.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

PRIVATE
RETAIL

139

FINANCE,

SERVICES

NONAGRICULTURAL

INSURANCE,

AND

ECCNOMY

REAL

THREE
QTRS

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

100.0

17.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

23.3
21.6
26.7
14.3
9.3
18.5
21.5
22.5
18.6
14.5
16.7
9.9

17.3

15.2

49.7

16.4
14.9
18.9
17.4
12.5
15.8
16.8
16.3
17.5
14.2
18.5
13.4

11.8
1 1.1
12.5
14.8
12. 2
13. 3
14.2
13. 1
14.1
13.5
14.7
11.5

48.3
52.1
41.7
53.4
65.8
52.3
47.3
47.9
49.5
57.5
49.9
65.0

73.3

100.0

9.2

11.9

12.0

66.7

76.7
79.3
72.8
78.8
79.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6.7
6.8
9.3
6.7
6.6

11.3
9.7
12.7
10.2
11.4

11.5
10.9
16.7
12.2
10.6

70.4
72.3
61.1
70.7
71.1

- CONTINUED

ESTATE

. . ....................................................

H O T E L S , T O U R I S T S C O U R T S , A N D M O T E L S ................
L A U N D R I E S A N D D R Y C L E A N I N G P L A N T S ............ .
M O T I O N P I C T U R E S ...........................................
H O S P I T A L S ...................................................




H A D
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y A N D W O R K E D
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y D U R I N G

Table B -22. Quarters of work, 1967
P E R C 1 N T
W O R K
WH 0
E
0 F
E R S
S O M E E A R N I N G S IN T H I S
M A J O R P R O P O R T I O N OF T H E I R E A R N I N G S
INDUSTRY DURING
IN A N Y I N D U S T R Y D U R I N G

INDUSTRY
ANY
QTR

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

................

M I N I N G .......... ............................. .............. .
CRUDE PETROLEUM* NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
G A S L I Q U I D S .............. .................................
O I L A N D G A S F I E L D S E R V I C E S ............................

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

IN

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

H A D
THIS INDUS T R Y AN D
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y

ANY
QTR

CNE
QTR

WORKED
DURING

TWC
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

100.0

9.8

11. 1

11.3

67.6

100.0

9.8

11.1

11.3

67.6

100.0

9.8

11.1

11.3

67. 6

100.0

19.2

14.3

10.1

56.3

100.0

5.5

7.1

9.0

78.2

100.0

7.3

10.9

11.5

70. 1

100.0
100.0

14.3
32. 1

11.5
20.8

7.5
10.8

66.5
36.1

100.0
100.0

J. 1
9.0

6.0
10.1

5.3
12.0

85.4
68.7

100.0
100.0

4.6
13.4

8.6
18.3

8.1
13.5

78.4
54.6

100.0

23.9

18.5

13.8

43.6

100.0

9.1

11.4

14.0

65.3

100.0

11.5

15.1

16.2

57.0

H I G H W A Y A N D S T R E E T C O N S T R U C T I O N .....................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION* NEC
.••
P L U M B I N G * H E A T I N G * A I R C O N D I T I O N I N G ................
P A I N T I N G * P A P E R H A N G I N G * D E C O R A T I N G . . . . ..........
ELECTRICAL WORK
«.
M A S O N R Y * S T O N E W O R K * A N D P L A S T E R I N G .................
C A R P E N T E R I N G A N D F L O O R I N G .............................
R O O F I N G A N D S H E E T M E T A L W O R K .........................
C O N C R E T E W O R K .............................................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

33.5
3 8.3
28.3
32.4
22.1
36.4
40.9
39.3
44.8

22.1
23.2
17.6
21.3
17.0
21.2
22.0
20.6
23.0

14.5
12.6
10.4
13.8
11.4
12.9
12.0
9.8
13.2

29.6
25.8
43.5
32.2
49.3
29.4
24.9
30.2
18.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

8.8
8.9
6.5
10.5
5.6
9.2
12.8
10.6
9.8

11.5
12.4
7.8
12.7
9.2
13.2
13.6
10.6
13.1

17.5
14.9
10.1
16.8
9.5
14. 1
16.0
12.7
18. 1

62.0
63.6
75.4
59.8
75.5
63.2
57.4
65.9
58.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1CC.0

13.3
14.6
9.6
14.4
7.8
13.9
18.0
14.2
15.7

18.3
20.2
12.6
17.6
12.9
17.7
19.2
16.8
22.3

21.2
19.1
13.1
19.4
13.1
17.8
18.2
14.8
21.7

47. 1
45.9
64.5
48.4
66. C
50.5
44.3
54.C
40.2

M A N U F A C T U R I N G .................................................

100.0

13.4

12.4

9.8

64.2

100.0

6.3

8.1

9.1

76.3

10C.0

7.7

10.1

10.3

71.7

A M M U N I T I O N , E X C E P T F O R S M A L L A R M S ..................
M E A T P R O D U C T S ..............................................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

15.2
27.6
22.6
39. 8
24.8
25.7
26.8
16.1
20.1
19.8
22.1
16.9
20.8
21.8
23.2
2 5.8
27.0
29.4
29.0
13.0
28.7
17.5
2 0.8
10.8
13.9
12.7
24.9
1 0.4
8.2
23.9
22.6
19.0

15.3
15.8
16.9
26.2
15.2
15.2
16.5
12.2
13.9
15.6
16.C
14.4
16.0
13.5
16.2
19.1
18.7
19.1
17.6
10.6
15.0
14.3
15.0
9.9
10.1
10.3
16.5
7.8
8.2
15.2
14.2
12.0

10.0
10.2
9.9
10.0
8.1
9.6
8.7
10.0
11.4
12.8
10. 1
11.0
12. 1
12.2
11.5
10.1
11.5
11.0
9.8
7.8
8.6
9.4
9.4
7.0
8.3
8.4
8.3
5.8
4.3
8.1
10.8
7.5

59.3
46.2
50.4
23.7
51.7
49.3
47.7
61.5
54.4
51.6
51.5
57.5
50.9
52.3
48.9
44.9
42.6
40.3
43.4
68.3
47.5
58.6
54.6
72.0
67.5
68.5
50.1
75.8
79.0
52.6
52.2
61.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3 .8
8.3
6.7
20.5
6.6
7.6
6.7
4.6
5.5
6.8
6.9
5.6
7.9
8.7
9,4
8.9
9.7
7.0
8.1
4.2
6.7
6.9
6.5
2.7
3.5
3.7
6.4
2.7
1.7
6.4
8.5
5.0

6.5
9.8
9.4
24.3
8.9
7.8
9.1
6.4
6.6
8.9
8.9
6.9
11.4
9.4
10,6
10.5
10.8
9.2
9.9
4.2
8.2
8.3
7.4
4.3
4.9
5.3
9.4
4.2
3.8
7.6
9.3
6.5

7.4
11.2
9.2
15.0
9.0
9.4
8.2
8.6
8.8
12.6
9.1
9.9
12.5
12.2
11,0
13. 1
12.5
12.0
10.4
7.0
8.1
8.4
9.6
5.0
6.4
6.5
9.5
4.2
4.2
9.6
11.4
8.3

82.1
70.5
74.5
39.9
75.3
75.0
75.8
80.2
78.9
71.6
74.9
77.3
67.9
69.5
68.8
67.3
66.8
71.6
71.3
84.4
76.9
76.1
76.3
87.8
85.0
84.4
74.5
88.7
90.2
76.2
70.6
80.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6.1
11.2
9.4
26.1
10.3
10.1
9.9
6.4
6.8
8.9
10.2
7.2
10.2
10.5
11.6
1 1.1
12.6
10.2
12.1
5.9
10.3
8.4
8.4
4.1
5.4
5.1
10.0
4.0
2.6
9.0
10.7
7.5

12.6
13.3
13.6
27.3
12.0
11.7
13.2
9.6
10.3
12.1
11.8
11.3
14.0
11.0
13.4
15.1
14.5
15.0
13.9
8.2
12.3
10.7
11.7
7.2
7.5
8.5
14.2
5.7
5.3
12.0
12.0
10. 1

11.4
12.7
11.4
12.9
10.1
11.8
10. 7
10.9
13.2
15.1
12.0
12.6
14.0
14.1
13.6
13.1
14.1
14.7
12.7
8.4
11.1
9.7
10.6
7.5
9.0
9 .1
9.9
6.1
4.6
10.2
12.5
8.7

69. 7
62.6
65.4
33.4
67.4
66.2
66. 1
72.9
69.5
63. 7
65.8
68.7
61.6
64.2
61.2
60.6
58.6
59.9
61.0
77.2
66. 1
71.0
69.2
81.C
77.9
77. 1
65. 7
84.0
87.2
68.6
64.6
73.5

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

140

CANNED* CURED* AND FROZ E N
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS

FOODS

.....................
••

WEAVING MILLS* COTTON
••
WEAVING MILLS* SYNTHETICS ••••••••••••••••••••••
K N I T T I N G M I L L S ............................ ........... . ••
YARN AND THREAD MILLS •*•*•.**«•*••••.•.••••••• •
M E N ' S A N D B O Y S ' S U I T S A N D C O A T S .....................
MEN'S AND BOYS' F U R N I S H I N G S • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
W O M E N ' S A N D M I S S E S * O U T E R W E A R ........................
W O M E N ' S A N D C H I L D R E N ' S U N D E R G A R M E N T S ..............
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR
«.
SAWMILLS AND P L A NING M I L L S • • * • • • * • • • • * • • • • • • • * •
M I L L W O R K * P L Y W O O D A N D R E L A T E D P R O D U C T S ...........
H O U S E H O L D F U R N I T U R E ................................. . ..
PULP AND PAPER MILLS • • * * # * « • • • • • • • • • . • • • • *• • • • •
P A P E R B O A R D C O N T A I N E R S A N D B O X E S .....................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING .•••*••••••••••«*••«*•*•••. .
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS
••
P L A S T I C S M A T E R I A L S A N O S Y N T H E T I C S ..................
S O A P * C L E A N E R S * A N D T O I L E T G O O D S ....................
P E TROLEUM R E F 1NING • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •
TIRES AND INNER TUBES • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • * •• * • •
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS
FOOTWEAR* EXCEPT RUBBER
. ••
G L A S S A N D G L A S S W A R E * P R E S S E D O R B L O W N .............




Table B -22. Quarters of work, 1967-----Continued
P E R C E N T
■
0 F
11 0 R K E R S
W H O
S O M E E A R N I N G S IN T H I !
5
M A J O R P R O P O R T I O N OF T H E I R 1 A R N I N G S
E
INDUSTRY DURING
IN A N Y I N D U S T R Y D U R I N G

INDUSTRY
ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

30.5
10.2
19.8
16.A
23.3
28.6
24.4
25.6
13.4
19.9
19.5
19.0
18.3
18.2
14.9
25.2
15.8
16.5
20.5
24.9
29.1
13.9
21.6
14.2
12.7
25.6
17.0
30.4

17.9
7.7
12.6
12.4
15.1
16.9
15.2
15.6
9.2
14.2
12.4
13.0
12.6
13.8
12.6
14.3
13.0
13.0
13.3
14.7
18.5
11.2
15.7
11.2
11.3
16.7
12.6
17.1

......................... . ....................

100.0

20.1

13.3

9.7

56.7

R A I L R O A D S ...................................................
L O C A L A N D S U B U R B A N T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ..................
T A X I C A B S ....................................................
T R U C K I N G , L O C A L A N D L O N G D I S T A N C E ..................
A I R T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ......................................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

7.9
14.8
28.8
27.1
10.9

7.2
11.9
17.9
16.0
9.6

6.2
7.1
11.8
10.2
9.3

78.4
66.1
41.3
46.5
70.0

................................................

100.0

12.2

11.1

9.1

67.4

T E L E P H O N E C O M M U N I C A T I O N ...............................
R A D I O A N D T E L E V I S I O N B R O A D C A S T I N G ............... ..

100.0
100.0

9.8
21.5

10.2
15.0

8.7
11.8

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

MANUFACTURING

ECONOMY

141

TRANSPORTATION

PUBLIC

UTILITIES

WHOLESALE

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

41.0
76.7
59.3
62.0
52.8
44.3
51.3
50.3
70.7
57.5
59.5
58.8
59.1
59.0
63.9
51.1
61.9
61.5
57.7
51.7
39.6
65.9
51.2
68.1
68.8
47.3
60.7
42.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

6. 1
3.4
3.5
3.3
5.0
5. 1
3 .7
5.4
3.2
4.9
3.0
3.8
3.6
3.3
4.1
3.6
4.4
4.0
5.5
6.7
9.3
3.8
6.9
3.7
2.7
6.6
3.7
9.5

8.4
3.9
5.4
5.3
7.8
7.5
7.8
8.2
3.4
6.8
4.6
6.3
5.2
5.8
5.6
7.4
6.4
5.8
7.8
8.1
11.9
5.0
8.9
4.7
4.8
8.6
5.5
9.6

10.1
5.0
6.8
7.2
9.2
9.7
9.3
9.0
6.4
7.0
6.6
7.2
8.0
6.3
6.8
8.2
7.6
7.7
7.5
8.6
14.0
7.0
10.8
5.7
5.8
8.4
7.8
11.2

100.0

6.0

6.8

8.5

78.4

100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

2.8
3.8
10.2
7.0
3.5

4.1
4.8
9.6
7.7
4.7

5.7
6.0
11.2
9.5
6. 8

87.2
85.3
68.8
75.7
84.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
10C.0
100.0

100.0

4.5

7.1

8.0

80.2

100.0

6.0

9.2

9.5

75.C

71.1
51.5

100.0
100.0

4.3
5.6

6.7
9.0

7.6
11.2

81.2
73.9

100.0
100.0

5.8
8.4

8.9
11. 4

9.1
12. 7

76. 1
67.4
82.C

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

75.2
87.5
84.2
84.0
77.8
77.5
79.0
77.2
86.9
81.1
85.6
82.6
82.9
84.4
83.3
80.6
81.4
82.3
79. 1
76.5
64 •6
84.0
73.3
85.7
86.5
76.2
82.7
69.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1CC.0
100.0
100.0
10C.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

CNE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

9.7
4.7
5.6
5.2
7.5
8.5
7.7
8.8
5.2
7.1
5.0
6.0
5.9
5.3
5.8
6.8
6.4
5.9
8.4
10.0
13.2
5 .3
9.6
5.7
4.7
9.6
5.7
12.6

14.3
5.8
9.4
8.9
12.0
11.9
11. 9
11.9
6.6
9.6
8.0
9.0
8.4
10.0
9.4
11. 2
9.4
9.4
10.2
12.1
16.7
8.3
12.9
7.8
8.2
13.0
9 .1
14.5

13.7
5 .3
9.2
10.2
10. 3
13.2
10. 7
10.5
6.9
9.8
9.9
10.3
11.3
10.3
9.3
11.8
1 0.3
10.2
9.5
1G.4
15.9
9.8
13.3
6.9
7.8
12. 5
10.9
12.6

7.6

9.6

10.5

72.1*

3.9
4.5
13.0
9.2
4.7

6.0
8.2
13.0
11.6
7.7

6 .3
7.6
13.0
12.1
9.7

83.6
79.5
60. 8
67.0
77.7

FOUR
QTRS

- CONTINUED

- CONTINUED

C O N C R E T E , G Y P S U M , A N D P L A S T E R P R O D U C T S ...........
B L A S T F U R N A C E A N D B A S I C S T E E L P R O D U C T S ...........
I R O N A N D S T E E L F O U N D R I E S .................. ...........
N O N F E R R O U S R O L L I N G A N D D R A W I N G ......................
C U T L E R Y , H A N D T O O L S , A N D H A R D W A R E ..................
F A B R I C A T E D S T R U C T U R A L M E T A L P R O D U C T S ..............
S C R E W M A C H I N E P R O D U C T S , B O L T S , E T C ................
M E T A L S T A M P I N G S ..........................................
E N G I N E S A N D T U R B I N E S ....................................
F A R M M A C H I N E R Y ........... ................................
C O N S T R U C T I O N A N D R E L A T E D M A C H I N E R Y ................
M E T A L W O R K I N G M A C H I N E R Y ...............................
S P E C I A L I N D U S T R Y M A C H I N E R Y ...........................
G E N E R A L I N D U S T R I A L M A C H I N E R Y .........................
O F F I C E A N D C O M P U T I N G M A C H I N E S .......................
S E R V I C E I N D U S T R Y M A C H I N E S .............................
E L E C T R I C T E S T A N D D I S T R I B U T I N G E Q U I P M E N T ........
E L E C T R I C A L I N D U S T R I A L A P P A R A T U S .....................
H O U S E H O L D A P P L I A N C E S ....................................
E L E C T R I C L I G H T I N G A N D W I R I N G E Q U I P M E N T ...........
R A D I O A N D T V R E C E I V I N G E Q U I P M E N T ...................
C O M M U N I C A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ...............................
E L E C T R O N I C C O M P O N E N T S A N D A C C E S S O R I E S ............
M O T O R V E H I C L E S A N D E Q U I P M E N T ........................
A I R C R A F T A N D P A R T S ......................................
S H I P A N D B O A T B U I L D I N G A N D R E P A I R I N G ..............
M E C H A N I C A L M E A S U R I N G A N D C O N T R O L D E V I C E S ........
O T H E R M A N U F A C T U R I N G .....................................

COMMUNICATION

THREE
QTRS

H A D
IN TH IS I N D U S TRY~ANI J WGRKEl
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y D U R I N G

TRADE

62. 1
84.C
75.5
75.4
70.C
66. 1
69.5
68.6
81. C
73.4
76.8
74.5
74.2
74.2
75.3
70.0
73. 7
74. 3
71.7
67. 3
54.C
76.4
64. C
79.3
79. 1
64. 7
74. 1
60. 1

............................................

100.0

10.0

9.8

5.6

74.4

100.0

3.3

5.4

5.1

86.0

100.0

4.6

7.5

5.8

.............................................

100.0

24.6

16.3

9.9

49.0

100.0

8.1

8.9

9.4

73.4

100.0

1C.6

12.3

11.7

65.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

25.2
22.9
27.8
31.4
22.6
26.0
22.4

16.6
15. 1
17.7
17.5
15.2
16.3
15.6

9.6
8.8
9.8
10.0
9. 1
9.2
9.6

48.4
53.0
44.5
40.8
52.9
48.3
52.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6.9
5.5
7.5
11.3
5.7
7.1
5.6

7.1
5.9
11.0
11.3
7.5
6.9
6.8

9.4
7.8
10.3
11.0
8.8
8.9
8.3

76.5
80.6
71.0
66.2
77.9
76.9
79.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

9.5
8.1
10.7
14.8
8.1
9.3
7.8

12. 2
10.9
14.9
14.9
11.7
11. 6
11.7

11.8
10.5
12.7
12.8
1 1.1
11.7
11.6

66.3
70.4
61.4
57.2
68.8
67.2
68.7

M O T O R V E H I C L E S A N D A U T O M O T I V E E Q U I P M E N T ..........
D R U G S , C H E M I C A L S , A N D A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .............
D R Y G O O D S A N D A P P A R E L ..................................
G R O C E R I E S A N D R E L A T E D P R O C U C T S ......................
ELECTRICAL GOODS .............................••
H A R D W A R E , P L U M B I N G A N D H E A T I N G E Q U I P M E N T ........
M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T A N D S U P P L I E S ..................




10.4
5.1
8.1
8.9
8.6
10. 1
8.8
8.3
6.4
8.2
8.4
9.0
9.7
8.8
8.3
9.2
9.1
8.9
8.3
8.5
12.6
8.8
11.4
6.4
7.0
10.2
9.5
10.1

Table B-22. Quarters of w ork, 1967-----Continued
W O R K
0 F
W H O
E R S
P E R C E N T
E
S O M E E A R N I N G S IN T H I S
M A J O R P R O P O R T I O N OF T H E I R 1 A R N I N G S
IN A N Y I N D U S T R Y D U R I N G
INDUSTRY DURING

INDUSTRY
ANY
QTR

PRIVATE

RETAIL

NONAGRI CUL T U R A L

ECONOMY

T R A D E ..................................................

142

INSURANCE*

AND RE A L

ESTATE

•••••••••••• ••

C O M M E R C I A L A N D S T O C K S A V I N G S B A N K S .................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ••••••••»•••••••••
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS •••••••••••••••••••
L I F E I N S U R A N C E ............................................
F I R E , M A R I N E , A N D C A S U A L T Y I N S U R A N C E ..............

SERVICES

.......................................................

H O T E L S , T O U R I S T S C O U R T S , A N D M O T E L S ...............
L A U N D R I E S A N D D R Y C L E A N I N G P L A N T S ... . . . . . . . . . . .
M O T I O N P I C T U R E S ...........................................
H O S P I T A L S ...................................................




TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

CNE
QTR

WORKED
DURING

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

- CONTINUED

D E P A R T M E N T S T O R E S ........................................
M A I L O R D E R H O U S E S ........................................
V A R I E T Y S T O R E S ............................................
G R O C E R Y S T O R E S ............................................
M O T O R V E H I C L E D E A L E R S ...................................
M E N ' S A N D B O Y S * C L O T H I N G A N D F U R N I S H I N G S .........
W O M E N * S R E A D Y - T 0” WEAR S T O R E S • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • •
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES
S H O E S T O R E S .................. . .............................
F U R N I T U R E A N D H O M E F U R N I S H I N G S .......................
D R U G S T O R E S A N D P R O P R I E T A R Y S T O R E S .................
F U E L A N D ICE D E A l FRS
••
FINANCE*

C NE
QTR

H A D
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y A N D
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y

100.0

26.2

19.9

13.9

39.7

100.0

15.4

15.3

14.4

54.7

100.0

17.3

17.1

15.3

50.C

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

36.8
34.2
37.9
25.7
22.5
35.3
35. 9
37.0
3 4.1
30.6
29.2
25. 7

17.7
17.9
20.0
19.5
16.9
17.2
19.0
18.9
20.4
18.2
21.0
16.7

9.8
8.4
10.5
12.5
1 0.8
10.2
11.0
10.1
11.5
10.3
11.8
10.3

35.6
39.3
31.3
42.1
49.7
37.1
33.9
33.9
33.8
40.7
37.9
47.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

18.2
15.0
20.7
11.4
6.6
14.4
17.5
18.3
14.0
10.7
13.3
7.1

13.7
13.9
16.2
13.5
8.9
12.7
14.5
14.1
14.0
10.6
14.6
11.1

12.0
11.5
13.2
13.9
10.3
13.1
13.4
11.8
12.6
11.4
14.4
9.2

56.0
59.4
49.8
60.9
74.0
59.7
54.4
55.6
59.2
67.1
57.4
72.5

100.0
100.0
10C.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

22.2
20.4
24.5
14.4
9.4
19.4
21.1
21.9
17.8
13.7
16.4
9.5

15.6
16.9
18.9
16.9
12.6
15.1
17.2
17.2
17.6
15.4
18.4
14.4

11.9
10.2
13.1
14.5
12.4
13.4
13.9
12.5
13.9
12.7
14.2
11.7

50.0
52.3
43.4
54.1
65.3
51.e
47.6
48. 1
50.6
58.0
50.8
64.2

100.0

19.4

14.8

10.5

55.1

100.0

7.6

9.3

10.1

72.8

100.0

9.6

12.1

11.7

66.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

12.4
14.0
22.0
15.4
14.3

13.2
13.4
16.3
14.2
13.6

10.8
9.4
13.0
11.4
9.8

63.4
63. 1
48.6
58.8
62.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

5.2
5.3
7.5
5.2
5.3

8.1
7.5
8.9
7.5
7.7

10.0
7.3
10.7
9.8
7.8

76.5
79.7
72.7
77.3
79.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6.8
7.3
10.0
7.4
7.3

11.0
9.9
13.1
10.8
10.8

11.6
10.2
15.3
12.3
10.7

70.4
72.4
61.3
69.2
71.C

100.0

22. 2

18.5

12.7

46.5

100.0

12.8

14.4

13. 1

59.5

100.0

14.5

16.3

13.7

55.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

37. 4
28.5
34.1
17.0

23.3
18.2
22.8
16.8

13. 1
12.2
14.4
12.7

25.9
40.9
28.5
53.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

16.9
11.5
16.7
8.3

18.0
13.2
19.1
12.3

16.7
14.0
17.5
12.8

48.2
61.1
46.5
66.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

21.3
14.7
20.0
10.5

22.3
16.5
21.7
15.0

17.2
1 4.8
17.6
13.6

39.C
53.8
40.5
60.7

Table B -23. W orkers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and
industry of major earnings, 1966
p
A N Y

INDUSTRY

R C E N T

O F

W 0 R K E R S

Q U A R T E R
IN A L L

R A i E
C
W H I T Ei
ALL
N E G R 0
I WOMEN
W O R K E R S "m e n
MEN | WOMEN

TOTAL

E M P l 0 Y E D
.

D U R

I N G

F 0 U R
Q U A R T E R S
WAGE A N O S A L A R Y E M P L O Y M E N T
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y O N L Y
R A C E
:
R A C ; e
W H I T Ei
1 N E G R 0
W H I T Ei
N E G R 0
MEN | WOMEN | MEN | WOMEN
MEN
1 WOMEN
TOTAL
MEN | WOMEN

........

100.0

54.8

34.4

6.3

4.5

67.4

40.2

20.6

4.1

2.5

67.4

40.2

20.6

4.1

2.5

M I N I N G ...................... ............................

100.0

89.5

7.0

3.3

.2

79.0

71.3

4.9

2.6

.1

71.0

64.5

4.2

2.2

.1

100.0
100.0

82.8
92.6

15.5
6.0

1.4
1 .3

.2
.1

85.0
69.7

71.4
65.2

12.3
3.6

1.1
•8

.2
.1

79.7
55.9

67.9
52.5

10.8
2 .8

.9
.5

.1
-

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND NATURAL
G A S L I Q U I D S ........................................
O I L A N D G A S F I E L D S E R V I C E S .................... •• •• *•
CONTRACT

CONSTRUCTION

143

MANUFACTURING

100.0

................... ..........

H I G H W A Y A N D S T R E E T C O N S T R U C T I O N ..............
H E A V Y C O N S T R U C T I O N , N E C .........................
P L U M B I N G , H E A T I N G , A I R C O N D I T I O N I N G ........ •.
P A I N T I N G , P A P E R H A N G I N G , D E C G R A T I N G ........
E L E C T R I C A L W O R K ....................................
•.
M A S O N R Y , S T O N E W O R K , A N D P L A S T E R I N G .......
C A R P E N T E R I N G A N D F L O O R I N G ...................... •.
R O O F I N G A N D S H E E T M E T A L W O R K ................ . ..
C O N C R E T E W O R K .......................................

•. •.

• • ..
• • •.
•. ..

.........................................

99
A M M U N I T I O N , E X C E P T F O R S M A L L A R M S ........... • •
M E A T P R O D U C T S ......................................
D A I R Y P R O D U C T S .....................................
C A N N E D , C U R E D , A N O F R O Z E N F O O D S .............. •. •. •.
G R A I N M I L L P R O D U C T S ..............................
B A K E R Y P R O D U C T S ....................................
B E V E R A G E S ............................................
W E A V I N G M I L L S , C O T T O N ...........................
W E A V I N G M I L L S , S Y N T H E T I C S ...................... .. .. ..
K N I T T I N G M I L L S ...... ..............................
Y A R N A N D T H R E A D M I L L S ............................
M E N ' S A N D B O Y S ' S U I T S A N D C O A T S .............. •. • • •.
M E N ' S A N D B O Y S ' F U R N I S H I N G S ...................
W O M E N ' S A N D M I S S E S ' O U T E R W E A R ................ .. .. ..
W O M E N ' S A N D C H I L D R E N ' S U N D E R G A R M E N T S .......
C H I L D R E N ' S O U T E R W E A R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •. • • ..
S A W M I L L S A N D P L A N I N G M I L L S ..................... .. .. ..
M I L L W O R K , P L Y W O O D A N D R E L A T E D P R O D U C T S ....
H O U S E H O L D F U R N I T U R E ..............................
P U L P A N O P A P E R M I L L S ............................. • • • • • •
P A P E R B O A R D C O N T A I N E R S A N D B O X E S .............. .. • * ..
N E W S P A P E R S ..........................................
C O M M E R C I A L P R I N T I N G ..............................
I N D U S T R I A L C H E M I C A L S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •. • • ..
P L A S T I C S M A T E R I A L S A N D S Y N T H E T I C S ........... • • .. ..
D R U G S .......................................... .
S O A P , c l e a n e r s , a n d t o i l e t g o o d s ............ •. • • • •
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G ...............................
T I R E S A N D I N N E R T U B E S ...........................
other
rubber
products
..................... ** •• •*

See footn ote at end o f tab le.




83.5

5.1

11.1

.3

65.4

55.5

3.1

6.7

.1

56.6

48.4

2.6

5 .5

.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

84.4
84.2
87.2
91.7
90.2
73.7
88.5
84.6
72.7

4.1
3.4
7.4
3.8
7.5
3.3
4.6
5.7
3.3

11.3
12.2
5.2
4.2
2.1
22.7
6.8
9.4
23.4

.2
.2
.2
.3
.3
.3
.1
.3
•6

62.7
64.9
74.1
59.1
74.9
64.0
61.0
67.0
60.6

53.8
55.1
66.6
54.2
68.8
47.6
54.5
56.7
44.2

2.4
2.1
4.5
2.1
4.6
2.1
2.6
3.9
2.0

6.3
7.6
3.0
2.6
1.3
14.1
3.8
6.2
14.0

.1
.1
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2
.4

46.8
44.3
62.5
47.9
64.3
51.0
46.4
55.1
42.0

40.4
37.7
56.6
44.3
59.3
38.8
41.9
46.5
31.3

2.1
1.7
3.8
1.8
3.9
1.8
2.2
3.6
1.6

4.2
4.9
2.1
1.7
.9
10.3
2 .3
4.8
9.0

.1
.1
.1
.2
.2
.1
.2
.2

100.0

62.5

28.0

6.8

2.8

75.8

50.6

18.6

5.0

1.5

70.5

47.3

17.3

4.5

1.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

73.9
57.1
77.6
43.2
73.2
61.6
76.8
49.4
58.4
26.7
43.8
27.4
15.1
14.8
11.7
11.5
74.5
77.8
65.0
82.4
63.3
68.8
65.6
81.9
73.3
55.9
51.7
84.0
78.1
56.9

20.5
24.5
19.3
43.4
16.0
26.7
12.1
38.7
33.4
64.3
45.3
61.2
75.5
74.8
80.2
74.6
5.3
10.5
21.4
12.4
26.2
27.8
28.0
12.4
20.8
37.4
37.8
13.3
13.7
34.4

4.4
11.8
2.6
6.2
9.7
9.2
10. 1
9.1
6.5
3.2
6.3
3.5
1.5
2.0
1.3
2.5
19.6
10.2
11.0
4.8
8.4
2.6
4.7
5.2
4.8
5.0
6.0
2.3
7.8
6.4

1.1
6.5
.5
7.2
1 .1
2.5
1.0
2.8
1.7
5.8
4.6
7.9
7.9
8.5
6.8
11.3
•6
1. 6
2.6
.4
2.0
.9
1.7
.5
1.1
1 .8
4.5
.4
.5
2.4

81.6
71.5
76.4
38.5
77.4
74.2
76.3
79.9
78.5
71.0
75.8
76.7
64.3
69.0
65.4
68.2
65.4
71.0
69.9
84.5
75.6
75.7
76.5
88.1
85.0
84.0
74.1
88.8
87.7
77.6

63.3
44.8
62.0
20.6
57.4
49.1
60.5
41.3
46.4
20.9
34.2
22.6
10.8
11. 1
9.0
8.6
48.2
56.5
47.4
70.7
50.2
55.0
54.2
73.5
63.8
49.9
42.6
75.7
69.6
46.4

14.3
14.2
12.1
12.9
12.0
17.0
8.1
29.7
25.4
44.2
34.0
45.2
48.0
51.2
51.5
50.6
3.4
6.2
13.2
9.7
17.6
18.3
18.1
9.7
16.6
28.8
24.5
10.8
10.9
24.8

3.4
8.7
2.0
2.8
7.5
6.7
6.9
7.1
5.4
2.4
4.7
2.6
1.0
1.2
.6
1.6
13.5
7.6
7.8
3.9
6.5
1.8
3.3
4.6
4.0
4.0
4.5
1.9
6.9
4.8

.7
3.8
.3
2.2
.5
1.4
.7
1.8
1.3
3.4
2.9
6.2
4.4
5.5
4.3
7.4
.3
.7
1.5
.2
1.3
.6
.9
.3
.6
1.3
2.4
.4
.3
1 .6

68.8
63.1
68.3
31.8
68.5
64.2
65.3
72.2
66.3
62.7
66.3
69.9
57.4
62.5
57.9
59.7
55.3
57.3
59.2
75.9
64.0
70.0
68.8
81.2
77.0
77.3
65.6
83.6
82.1
68.6

53.7
39.6
55.4
16.8
51.3
42.4
52.4
37.3
39.5
18.2
30.5
20.3
9.2
10.1
7.2
7.7
40.5
45.8
40.9
63.4
42.4
51.8
49.5
68.8
58.4
46.7
38.4
71.9
64.9
41.0

12.4
12.6
11.0
11.0
10.5
15.1
7.2
28.1
22.4
40.1
30.5
42.2
43.8
46.7
46.3
44.9
2.9
5.2
11.1
8.7
15 . 4
16.3
16.0
8.1
14.5
26.1
21.6
9.7
10.5
22.3

2.2
7.6
1.7
2.2
6.3
5 .4
5.2
5 .6
3.6
1.6
3.3
1.9
.7
.9
.5
1.1
11.7
5.8
5.9
3.7
5.2
1.5
2.6
4.0
3.6
3.5
3.8
1.6
6.4
4.0

.4
3.4
.2
1.8
.5
1.2
.6
1.3
.8
2.8
2.0
5.5
3.6
4.8
4.0
6.0
.2
.5
1.3
.2
1.0
.5
.8
.3
.5
1.1
1.7
.4
.3
1.4

Table B -23. Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, any
industry of major earnings, 1966-----Continued
P E R C E N T
A N Y

W1 0 R K E R S

0 F

Q U A R

T f R
:

INDUSTRY

IN A L L
ALL
WORKERS

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

MANUFACTURING

ECONOMY -

............. - ......... - ............. .

.........................................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

36.3
61.2
7 9.2
82.9
68.8
74.8
63.0
82.3
73.0
68.6
81.2
84.0
85.7
84.0
81.7
78.2
68.2
80.2
60.9
62.1
66.9
49.3
37.7
60.7
37.8
79.0
79.1
83.0
60.3
55. 1

60.3
32.0
6.5
5.0
5.2
16.6
29.5
10.0
20.9
20.5
13.4
9.7
9.2
13.4
13.6
17.5
27.8
13.8
33.3
33.7
24.9
39.7
51.4
33.4
55.5
9.3
15.6
4.6
35.0
33.0

1.4
4.2
14.1
12.0
25.7
7. 1
5.3
7.3
5.0
9.4
5.1
5.6
4.8
2.4
4.2
3.8
2.0
5.3
3.4
2.5
5.5
6.3
3.3
2.8
1.9
10.9
4.5
11.7
2.7
7.0

2.1
2.5
.2
.2
.3
1.5
2.2
.4
1 .1
1.5
.3
.7
.3
.1
.4
.5
2.0
.8
2.4
1.8
2.7
4.7
7.7
3.0
4.9
.9
.8
.6
2.0
4.9

.9
3.4
11.4
10.3
21.3
5.5
4.2
5.2
3.6
7.0
3.8
4.3
3.8
1.7
3.4
3.1
1.4
3.6
2.7
1.9
4.3
4.6
2.1
2.3
1.2
9.1
3.5
8.6
1.9
4.9

1.1
1.3
.1
.1
.3
1.2
1.1
.3
.7
.8
.2
.6
.2
.1
.2
.4
1.5
.2
1 .4
1 .0
1.5
2.8
4.8
2.3
2.9
.6
.5
.1
1.3
2.2

63.7
71.1
63.2
80.9
74.4
72.8
68.6
63.5
64.9
63.9
77.0
68.4
73.5
72.6
73.5
73.8
73.5
64.3
73.1
68.8
63.3
64.0
51.5
74.0
58.7
77.7
77.2
63.9
70.9
59.9

24.8
45.6
50.5
68.0
52.2
56.2
45.5
54.2
49.7
46.3
64.6
58.6
64.4
63.2
61.6
59.4
54.0
53.7
47.9
45.5
44.4
33.3
23.4
48.2
25.7
62.8
63.4
54.4
46.1
36.2

37.4
21.8
3.5
3.4
3.0
11.1
19.0
5.3
11.7
11.4
9.0
6.3
6.0
8.1
8.9
11.4
17.2
7.8
22.0
21.0
14.9
24.9
23.4
22.0
30.0
6.3
10.5
2.4
22.1
18.5

.7
2.9
9.2
9.4
19.0
4.4
3.1
3.9
2 .9
5.6
3 .2
3.3
3 .0
1.3
2.9
2 .6
1.1
2 .7
2.1
1.4
3.0
3.7
1.4
1.9
,9
8.1
2.8
7.1
1.5
3 .5

.8
.8
.1
.1
.3
1.0
1.0
.1
.6
.6
.2
.3
.2
.1
.2
.3
1 .2
.1
1.1
.9
1.0
2.2
3.3
1.9
2.2
.5
.4
1 .2
1.7

79.2

10.2

10.1

.5

78.4

63.5

7.2

7.4

.3

72.0

58.7

6.4

6.6

.3

5.7
5.4
7.7
7.9
27.0

7.6
16.0
15.3
9.7
3.8

.2
1.2
2.0
.2
•4

88.4
85.7
66.4
74.8
85.2

77.0
66.5
52.4
63.0
59.8

4.7
3.9
4.0
5.0
21.8

6.5
14.4
9.5
6.6
3.3

.2
.9
.5
.1
.3

84.6
79.0
59.6
65.6
77.3

73.8
61.4
47.1
55.7
55.4

4.5
3.5
3.5
4.5
18.7

6.0
13.2
8.6
5.4
2.9

.2
.9
.4
•1
.3

100.0

45.0

50.2

1.5

3.3

78.9

38.7

36.8

1.1

2.2

73.0

36.6

33.6

.9

1.9

79.3
75.8

35.5
56.6

40.6
16.7

•8
1.6

2.4
1.0

73.7
68.8

33.7
52.6

37.2
13.9

.7
1.6

2.1
.8

86.1

70.1

11.7

3.9

.4

81.3

66.6

10.9

3.5

.3

40.2
70.8

55.1
25.5

1.1
2.3

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... ••

100.0

79.4

15.0

5.1

.5




41.1
25.1
4.2
3.9
3.9
12.2
21.3
6.5
14.6
13.7
10.4
7.3
6.9
9.2
10.2
13.0
20.5
9.1
24.8
23.8
17.4
28.6
29.1
25.0
35.1
7 .1
11.8
2.9
26.6
21.0

86.5
77.5
75.1
82.2
68.8

100.0
100.0

See footn ote at end o f ta b le.

28.0
51.2
60.6
72.2
58.1
63.1
52.3
65.4
58.2
54.2
70.9
66.4
73.5
71.1
69.8
67.0
59.9
64.4
52.1
51.8
56.5
38.8
27.7
53.7
30.1
68.6
69.4
63.2
51.5
42.0

100.0

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ................... .. ..
R A D I O A N D T E L E V I S I O N B R O A D C A S T I N G ........... .... *•
UTILITIES

71.1
81.0
76.3
86.5
83.6
82.1
78.8
77.3
77.0
75.7
85.3
78.6
84.4
82.0
83.6
83.5
83.4
77.3
81.0
78.6
79.7
74.8
63.7
83.3
69.2
85.3
85.2
74.9
81.2
70.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.6
1.4

PUBLIC

I N G

CONTINUED

R A I L R O A D S ............................................
L O C A L A N D S U B U R B A N T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ........... • •••
T A X I C A B S ..............................................
T R U C K I N G , L O C A L A N D L O N G D I S T A N C E ........... • •••
A I R T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ...............................

COMMUNICATION

TOTAL

D U R

F 0 U R
Q U A R T E R S
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y O N L Y
WAGE AND SALARY EMPL O Y M E N T
R A ( e
:
R A ( e
:
W H I T Ei
N E G R 0
R 0
W H I T Ei
N E G
MEN | WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN
TOTAL
MEN
| WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN

- CONTINUED

F O O T W E A R * E X C E P T R U B B E R ......................... • • • .
G L A S S A N D G L A S S W A R E , P R E S S E D O R B L O W N ......
C O N C R E T E , G Y P S U M , A N D P L A S T E R P R O D U C T S .... • • • «
B L A S T F U R N A C E A N D B A S I C S T E E L P R O D U C T S . ...
I R O N A N D S T E E L F O U N D R I E S ........................ • • • •
N O N F E R R O U S R O L L I N G A N D D R A W I N G ............... • •••
C U T L E R Y , H A N D T O O L S , A N D H A R D W A R E ........... • • • •
F A B R I C A T E D S T R U C T U R A L M E T A L P R O D U C T S ....... . • • .
S C R E W M A C H I N E P R O D U C T S , B O L T S , E T C .......... . • • .
M E T A L S T A M P I N G S ................................
E N G I N E S A N D T U R B I N E S ............................. • • • .
F A R M M A C H I N E R Y .....................................
C O N S T R U C T I O N A N D R E L A T E D M A C H I N E R Y .......... • •••
M E T A L W O R K I N G M A C H I N E R Y ......................... • • • •
S P E C I A L I N D U S T R Y M A C H I N E R Y ..................... • . . .
G E N E R A L I N D U S T R I A L M A C H I N E R Y .................. • • • •
O F F I C E A N O C O M P U T I N G M A C H I N E S ................. • ...
S E R V I C E I N D U S T R Y M A C H I N E S ...................... . • • •
E L E C T R I C T E S T A N D D I S T R I B U T I N G E Q U I P M E N T .. • • • •
E L E C T R I C A L I N D U S T R I A L A P P A R A T U S .............. • • . •
H O U S E H O L D A P P L I A N C E S ............................. • •••
E L E C T R I C L I G H T I N G A N D W I R I N G E Q U I P M E N T •••• . . . .
R A D I O A N D T V R E C E I V I N G E Q U I P M E N T ............. • • . •
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ................... ••••
E L E C T R O N I C C O M P O N E N T S A N D A C C E S S O R I E S ...... • • • •
M O T O R V E H I C L E S A N D E Q U I P M E N T .................. • • . .
A I R C R A F T A N D P A R T S ................................
S H I P A N D B O A T B U I L D I N G A N C R E P A I R I N G ....... • • • •
M E C H A N I C A L M E A S U R I N G A N D C O N T R O L D E V I C E S ••
O T H E R M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..............................
TRANSPORTATION

W H
M EN

R A C E
1 T Ei
N E G f 0
<
1 WOMEN
MEN
| WOMEN

.
E M P 1 0 Y E D

Table B -23. Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and
industry of major earnings, 1966-----Continued
P E R C E N T
A N Y

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL
TRADE

ECONOMY

E

W O R K E R S
r

IN ALL
ALL
WORKERS

WHOLESALE

O F

Q U A R T

W H
MEN

R A C E
I T Ei
N E G R 0
| W O M E N | "m e n
| WOMEN

TOTAL

E M P L O Y E D

D U R I N G

F 0 U R
Q U A R T
E R S
SALARY EMPLOYMENT
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y O N L Y
R A C E
R A : e
W H I T Ei
N E G R 0
W H I T Ei
N E G R 0
MEN | WOMEN
MEN
1 WOMEN
MEN
I WOMEN
MEN 1 WOMFM
TOTAL

WAGE

AND

- CONTINUED

...................... ..................

100.0

68.6

23.2

6.6

1.6

73.4

53.3

14.8

4.5

.8

64.6

47.5

12.8

3.6

.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

75.7
66.9
51.0
64.4
66.6
71.6
73.9

18.5
27.3
39.5
24.6
28.2
22.9
21.6

5.3
4.5
4.9
8.9
3.5
5.2
3.8

.5
1.3
4.6
2.1
1.7
.4
.7

77.1
79.5
71.2
66.2
78.0
77.1
79.4

60.0
56.2
38.3
47.6
55.3
58.0
61.5

12.8
19.6
26.7
11.7
19.2
15.5
14.8

4.1
3.1
3.3
6.0
2.5
3.3
2.6

.3
.6
2.9
.9
1.0
.3
.5

65.9
70.1
61.0
56.9
67.6
67.8
69.2

51.5
50. 1
34.1
41.1
48.6
51.7
54.4

11.0
17.2
22.2
10.4
16.2
13.2
12.4

3.1
2.3
2.4
4.6
2.0
2.8
1.9

.2
.5
2.3
.8
.8
.2
.4

T R A D E .............................................

100.0

46.4

44.7

5. 1

3.7

54.5

27.7

22.3

2.9

1.7

49.7

25.0

20.9

2.4

1 .4

D E P A R T M E N T S T O R E S ..................... ..............
M A I L O R D E R H O U S E S ........... .......................
V A R I E T Y S T O R E S ........................................
G R O C E R Y S T O R E S .............. .........................
M O T O R V E H I C L E D E A L E R S ..............................
M E N ' S AND B O Y S * C L O T H I N G A N D F U R N I S H I N G S ....
W O M E N ' S R E A D Y - T O - W E A R S T O R E S ....................
F A M I L Y C L O T H I N G S T O R E S ............................. • • • .
S H O E S T O R E S ............................................
F U R N I T U R E A N D H O M E F U R N I S H I N G S ..................
D R U G S T O R E S A N D P R O P R I E T A R Y S T O R E S ............ . • • •
F U E L A N D I C E D E A L E R S ...............................
•• ••

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

26.4
26.7
18.2
62.1
79.3
58.2
9.7
23.6
55.6
61.0
37.2
72.8

65.9
53.9
76.0
31.9
11.7
35.5
81.1
69.9
39.0
28.9
54.7
20.6

3.1
6.2
1.6
4.4
8.6
4.4
2.0
2.0
3.8
7.6
4.9
6.1

4.6
13.1
4.2
1.6
.3
1.9
7.2
4.5
1.6
2.4
3.2
.5

54.5
59.4
48.0
60.2
74.5
59.2
53.4
54.6
57.6
66.2
56.9
73.4

16.3
19.7
9.1
38.3
60.6
37.1
5.5
14.5
35.1
42.4
23.1
55.1

34.3
30.8
36.3
18.8
7.8
18.2
43.3
36.3
19.5
17.3
29.3
13.6

1.7
3.0
.9
2.3
5.9
2.8
1.0
1 .1
2.2
5 .1
2.8
4.3

2.1
5.8
1.7
.8
.2
1.1
3.6
2.7
.7
1.5
1.8
.3

48.4
52.2
41.7
53.4
65.9
52.4
47.4
47.9
49.6
57.6
49.9
65.1

13.7
17.7
7.6
33.9
54.1
33.7
4.8
12.1
30.5
36.9
20.7
49.0

31.5
27.7
32.1
16.9
6.7
15.7
38.9
32.6
16.7
15.4
25.6
12.7

1.4
1.8
.7
2.0
4.9
2.1
.7
.9
1.8
4.0
2.2
3.4

1 .8
5 .C
1 .4
.7
.2
.9
3.0
2.3
.6
1.2
1 .3
.1

100.0

45.0

48.7

3.7

2.6

73.4

35.1

34.4

2.5

1.5

66.8

32.4

31.1

2.0

1.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

35.0
33.2
45.6
55.9
41.7

61.1
62.9
52.3
38.7
56.4

1.6
2.6
1.1
2.4
.5

2.3
1.4
.9
3.1
1.4

76.8
79.4
72.8
78.9
79.7

28.9
28.3
37.3
47.1
37.2

45.4
48.2
34.3
27.9
41.3

1 .1
1.9
.8
1.8
.3

1.4
1.0
.4
2.0
•8

70.4
72.3
61.2
70.8
71.2

27.2
26.9
31.7
43.2
34.9

41.2
42.9
28.2
24.4
35.4

.9
1.6
.7
1.4
.3

1.1
.8
.4
1.7
.6

M O T O R V E H I C L E S A N D A U T O M O T I V E E Q U I P M E N T ...... • •
D R U G S , C H E M I C A L S , A N D A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ........
D R Y G C O D S A N D A P P A R E L ........................... . • • . •
G R O C E R I E S A N D R E L A T E D P R O D U C T S .................. • . • •
E L E C T R I C A L G O O D S ................... .................
H A R D W A R E , P L U M B I N G A N D H E A T I N G E Q U I P M E N T ....
M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T A N D S U P P L I E S ..............

RETAIL

145

FINANCE,

INSURANCE,

ANO

REAL

ESTATE

..............

C O M M E R C I A L A N D S T O C K S A V I N G S B A N K S ............ . #
S A V I N G S A N D L O A N A S S O C I A T I O N S ................... • • • •
P E R S O N A L C R E D I T I N S T I T U T I O N S ...................
L I F E I N S U R A N C E ........................................
F I R E , M A R I N E , A N D C A S U A L T Y I N S U R A N C E .......... •• ••
S E R V I C E S ...................................................
H O T E L S , T O U R I S T S C O U R T S , A N O M O T E L S ...........
L A U N D R I E S A N D D R Y C L E A N I N G P L A N T S ............. • • • •
M O T I O N P I C T U R E S ......................................
H O S P I T A L S ...............................................

100.0

33.9

49.3

5.5

11.4

59.3

21.3

28.3

3. 1

6.5

55.1

19.4

26.7

2.7

6.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

34.8
23.6
55.9
18.0

41.9
44.5
37.8
64.8

9.6
7.8
3.4
4.4

13.7
24.2
2.9
12.9

48.2
60.0
47.6
64.9

18.3
16.1
30.2
12.1

19.0
24.8
14.4
41.5

5.3
5.2
1.6
2.8

5.7
13.9
1.3
8.5

38.6
51.9
40.9
59.3

14.9
13.8
26.5
11.0

15.2
21.8
11.8
38.4

3.9
4.2
1.5
2.3

4.6
12.0
1.2
7.7

1 Includes w o r k e r s of all r a c e s other than N e g r o .
NOTE:

A

d a s h (-)




indicates

either

the

sample

did not include

any

workers

with

these

characteristics,

or

that

the

data

did

not

meet

the

Bureau's

publication

criteria.

Table B -24. Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and
industry of major earnings, 1967
P

A N Y

INDUSTRY

NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

O F

W 0 R K

.. .... • • • • • • •

E R S

Q U A R T E R
IN ALL

W H
ALL
W O R K E R S "m e n
PRIVATE

E R C E N T

R A C E
I T E i
N E G R 0
MEN
| WOMEN
r WOMEN

TOTAL

WAGE
W H
MEN

E M P L 0 Y E D

D U R

I N G

F 0 U R
Q U A R T E R S
SALARY EMPLOYMENT
IN T H I S I N D U S T R Y O N L Y
R A 1 e
R A ( E
:
:
I T E 1
W H I T E i
N E G R 0
N E G R 0
MEN | WOMEN
TOTAL
MEN | WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN
r WOMEN

AND

100.0

54.2

35.0

6.3

4.6

67.7

39.8

21.2

4.1

2.6

67.7

39.8

21.2

4.1

2.6

100.0

89.5

7.0

3.3

.2

78.2

70.2

5.2

2.6

.2

70.2

63.2

4.6

2.2

.1

C R U D E PET R O L E U M , N A T U R A L GAS AND N A T U R A L
G A S L I Q U I D S ................................
O I L A N D G A S F I E L D S E R V I C E S .............. . . . . • .......

100.0
100.0

82.5
93.1

15.5
5.3

1 .7
1 .5

.3
.1

85.5
68.7

71.4
64.4

12.4
3.5

1.3
.8

.3
.1

78.5
54.7

66.2
51.0

10.9
3.1

1.1
.6

.2
-

........................ • • • • • • • • • • •

100.0

83.7

5.4

10.6

.3

65.4

55.7

3.3

6.2

.2

57.1

48.8

2.9

5 .2

.1

• • • • • •••••
• • • • . ••••••
• • • • . ••••••

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

83.2
83.7
88.3
92.1
9 0.1
74.2
88.2
84.3
73.7

4.8
3.9
7.3
3.6
7.3
3.6
4.3
6.3
2.8

11.8
12.1
4.3
4.0
2.3
21.9
7.4
9.1
22.8

.2
.3
.2
.2
.3
.4
•1
.3
.7

62.1
63.6
75.5
59.9
75.6
63.3
57.4
65.9
58.8

52.0
53.8
67.9
55.1
69.1
48.2
51.0
56.2
43.7

3.0
2.3
4.9
2.4
4.9
2.2
2.5
4.2
1.9

6.9
7.2
2.7
2.3
1.4
12.7
3.9
5.5
12.9

.1
.2

47.1
46.0
64.6
48.5
66.0
50.5
44.4
54.0
40.2

39.7
39.0
58.6
44.7
60.6
38.7
39.6
46.0
30.6

2.7
1.8
4.1
2.1
4.2
2.0
2.0
3.7
1.4

4.7
5.1
1.9
1.5
1.0
9.6
2.8
4.3
8.0

.1
.1
.1
.2
.2
.1
.2

...................................

100.0

62.0

28.2

7.0

2.8

76.4

50.6

19.0

5.2

1.7

71.7

47.7

17.8

4.7

1.5

A M M U N I T I O N , E X C E P T F O R S M A L L ARMS ....
M E A T P R O D U C T S ................................
D A I R Y P R O D U C T S ...............................
C A N N E D , C U R E D , A N D F R O Z E N F O C O S .......
G RAIN MILL PRODUCTS ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B A K E R Y P R O D U C T S .............................
B E V E R A G E S .............................. .
weaving m i l l s , c o tt o n
................
W E A V I N G M I L L S , S Y N T H E T I C S ...............
K N I T T I N G M I L L S ...............................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ................
M E N •S A N D B O Y S ' S U I T S A N D C O A T S .......
M E N ' S A N D B O Y S ' F U R N I S H I N G S .............
W O M E N ' S A N D M I S S E S ' O U T E R W E A R ..........
WOMEN'S AND CH I L D R E N ' S U N D E R G A R M E N T S .
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR .................
S A W M I L L S A N D P L A N I N G M I L L S ..............
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELA T E D PRODUCTS
H O U S E H O L D F U R N I T U R E ........................
P U L P A N D P A P E R M I L L S ......................
P A P E R B O A R D C O N T A I N E R S A N D B O X E S .......
N E W S P A P E R S ............................. .
C O M M E R C I A L P R I N T I N G ........................
I N D U S T R I A L C H E M I C A L S ......................
P L A S T I C S M A T E R I A L S A N D S Y N T H E T I C S ....
D R U G S ...........................................
S O A P , C L E A N E R S , A N D T O I L E T G O O D S ......
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G .........................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES . . . . . . . .........
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ................

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

71.4
57.1
75.6
41.8
74.0
60.4
75.3
48.2
55.3
26.6
44.7
27.6
14.8
15.0
12.1
13. 3
74.0
76.3
62.8
82.2
63.4
68.2
64.7
81.8
71.8
56.0
53.3
82.3
77.8
56.4

21.2
23.9
20.4
45.0
15.4
26.7
13.3
38.1
34.9
63.9
42.9
61.0
75.4
74.9
79.1
74.6
6.3
11.4
23.0
12.3
25.4
28.5
28.4
12.0
22.3
36.9
36.6
13.8
13.6
34.2

5.5
12.0
3.3
6.3
9.8
9.5
10.4
10. 1
7.6
3.6
7.3
3.5
1 .6
1.9
1.4
2.0
19.0
11.0
11. 1
5.1
8.6
2.5
5.0
5.8
4.7
5.0
6.0
3.2
8.1
6.7

1.9
7.0
.6
6.8
.8
3.4
.9
3.6
2.3
5.8
5.1
7.9
8.2
8.2
7.4
10.1
.7
1.4
3.1
.4
2.6
.8
2.0
.4
1.1
2.1
4.1
.7
.5
2.7

82.2
70.5
74.5
40.0
75.3
75.1
75.9
80.2
78.9
71.6
75.0
77.4
68.0
69.5
68.8
67.4
66.9
71.6
71.4
84.4
77.0
76.2
76.4
87.8
85.0
84.4
74.6
88.7
90.2
76.2

60.9
43.4
59.6
21.1
57.0
48.5
59.5
40.2
46.3
20.5
34.7
22.7
10.8
11.3
9.6
9.3
50.2
56.4
46.9
70.1
51.4
55.1
53.4
73.1
63.1
49.1
44.7
75.1
71.2
45.3

15.9
14.4
12.4
13.6
10.4
16.9
8.8
29.8
26.1
44.7
31.8
46.4
50.8
51.5
53.4
50.1
3.7
7.1
15.0
9.7
17.2
18.8
18.1
9.4
17.1
29.5
23.8
10.7
11.6
24.0

4.3
8.5
2.2
3.2
7.3
7.6
7. 1
8.0
5.5
2.8
5.6
2.3
1.2
1.1
1.0
1.3
12.6
7.8
7.6
4.4
6.8
1.7
3.6
4.9
4.1
4.4
4.2
2.4
7.0
5.2

1.1
4.3
.3
2.1
.6
2.0
•6
2.2
1.0
3.6
2.9
6.0
5.2
5.6
4.7
6. 7
.3
.3
1.8
.2
1.6
.6
1 .3
.4
.7
1.5
1.9
.6
.4
1.8

69.8
62.6
65.5
33.5
67.5
66.3
66.1
72.9
69.5
63.7
65.9
68.7
61.7
64.3
61.3
60.7
58.6
59.9
61.0
77.3
66.2
71.0
69.2
81.1
77.9
77.2
65.7
84.0
87.3
68.6

52.6
38.3
52.6
17.4
51.0
43.0
52.6
36.4
41.0
18.0
29.9
21.2
9.5
10.6
8.5
8.1
44.3
47.6
40.9
64.6
44.4
51.7
49.2
68.2
58.3
45.7
39.6
72.0
68.7
40.9

13.3
12.9
10.6
11.7
9.7
15.3
7.8
28.1
23.2
40.6
29.5
41.0
46.6
47.9
48.0
45.5
3.3
5.8
12.9
8.7
15.2
17.3
16.1
8.2
15.4
26.4
20,7
9.5
11.3
22.0

3.3
7.5
1.9
2.5
6.3
6 .2
5 .3
6.5
4.5
2.1
4.0
1.8
.9
.8
.8
.8
10.8
6.3
5.7
3.8
5.3
1.5
2.8
4.4
3 .6
3.9
3.5
2 .1
6.8
4.4

MINING

............................................

CONTRACT

CONSTRUCTION

HI G H W A Y AND S T REET C O N S T R U C T I O N ......
H E A V Y C O N S T R U C T I O N , N E C ..................
P L U M B I N G , H E A T I N G , A I R C O N D I T I O N I N G ..
P A I N T I N G , P A P E R H A N G I N G , D E C O R A T I N G ..
E L E C T R I C A L W O R K .............................
M A S O N R Y , S T O N E W O R K , A N D P L A S T E R I N G ...
C A R P E N T E R I N G A N D F L O O R I N G ...............
R O O F I N G A N D S H E E T M E T A L W O R K ...........
C O N C R E T E W O R K ................................

146

MANUFACTURING

See footn ote at end o f tab le.




• • • • • • •••••
• • • • • • •••••

••••••

.1
.2
.2
.1
.3

.6

3.9
.3
1.8
.4
1.7
.5
1.9
.8
3.C
2.5
4 .8
4 .6

5. C
4.0
6.2
.2
.2
1.5
.2
1.2
.5
1.1
.3
.6
1.1
1.8
.5
.4
1.4

Table B -24. Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and
industry of major earnings, 1967— Continued

IN U R
D ST Y

p E R C E N T OF W0 R K E R S E MP 1 0 Y E D D U R I N G
1
A N Y QUART E R
F 0 UR QUA R T E R S
IN A L WG A D S L R ' E P O MN
L AE N A A Y ML Y E T
IN TH IN U T Y O L
IS D S R NY
RA: E
R A( e
R A( E
:
WH I T E i
N E GR 0
WH I T E i
WH I T E i
NE GR 0
NE GR 0
AL
L
OE
E
OE
E
OE OA
OE
E
O E OA
E
OE
E
WR E S MN WMN MN 1 WMN T T L MN | WMN MN | WMN T T L MN | WMN MN r WMN
O KR E

147

PR A N N G IC L U A E O O Y - C N IN E
IV TE O A R U T R L C N M
O T UD
M N F C U IN - C N IN E
A UA T R G
O T UD
F O WA * E C PT R B E ••••••••«••••••••••••••••
OT ER XE
UBR
G A A D G A S A E PR
L SS N L S W R * ESSED O B O N ..................
R LW
C N R T * G PSU , A D PL ST R P O U T ................
O C EE Y M N A E R D CS
B A F R A E A D B SIC STEEL P O U T ................
L ST U N C N A
R D CS
IR N A D ST
O N EEL FOUNDRIES........... . ..........................
N N E R U R L IN A D CRAW
OFROS OL G N
ING........................ .
C TLER , H N T O S* A D H R W R .........................
U Y A D O L N AD AE
FA R A E ST U T R L MT L PR D C S .............. .
B IC T D R C U A E A O U T
S R W M C IN PR D C B L S* E C .......................
C E A H E O U TS, O T T
MT L ST M G ......................... ................... .
E A A PIN S
EN IN A D TU B ES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G ES N
R IN
F R M CH ERY
A M A IN ..................................... ...................
C N R C IO A D R L T D M C IN R .................
O ST U T N N E A E A H E Y
MT L W R IN M C IN R ..........................................
EA OK G AH E Y
SPECIA IN U R M CH
L D ST Y A INERY
........... ........................
G N R L IN U
E E A D STRIA M C IN R .................................
L AH EY
OFFICE A D C M T G M C IN S ..............................
N O PU IN A H E
SER ICE IN U R M C IN S ......................................
V
D ST Y A H E
ELECTRIC T ST A D DISTRIBUTING E U M N ............
E N
Q IP E T
ELEC IC L IN U IA APPARATUS.................
TR A
D STR L
H UE O D A
O S H L PPLIA CES ........................................ .
N
ELECTRIC LIG TIN A D W IN E U M N ................
H G N IR G Q IP E T
R D A D T RECEIV G E U E T ............ ............
A IO N V
IN Q IPM N
C M U IC T N E U E T ..........................................
O M N A IO Q IPM N
EL C R N C MO E T A D A C R ..................
E T O IC O P N N S N C ESSO IES
M T R V IC
O O EH LES A D E U E T .................................
N Q IPM N
A C A A D PA T •••••••*•••••••••••••••••*•••«
IR R FT N R S
SHIP A D B A BU IN A D REPA G ...................
N O T ILD G N
IRIN
M C A IC L M A R G A D C N R L D V ES ............
E H N A E SU IN N O T O E IC
O H R M N F C U IN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T E A UA T R G

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

35. A 60.8
59.3 33. 1
79.1
6.3
82.5
5.0
69.1
5.3
73.9 17.5
61.3 31.3
9.6
82.7
73.2 21.2
66.9 20.6
81.3 13.2
82.9 11.2
9.7
84.5
83.0 14.3
80.9 14.6
77.7 17.2
66.8 29.1
77.6 15.9
61.8 31.8
62. 1 33.0
66.6 25.8
48.0 41.0
39.0 49.3
60.3 33.3
41.2 52.1
77.8
9.4
78.2 16.0
81.0
6.2
59.9 34.7
55.1 34.2

1.7
4.7
14.2
12.2
25.2
7.1
5.0
7.2
4.5
10.5
5.0
5.2
5.5
2.4
4.0
4.5
2.1
5.5
4.0
3.0
4.8
6.5
4.2
3.0
2.1
11.9
4.7
12.4
2.9
6. 7

2. 1
3.0
.4
.2
.4
1.6
2.5
.5
1.1
2.0
.5
.7
.3
.3
.5
.6
1.9
1.0
2.4
1.9
2.8
4.5
7.5
3.4
4.6
.9
1.2
.4
2.5
4.0

70.6
80.1
75.2
87.5
84.2
84.0
77.8
77.6
79.1
77.2
86.9
81.2
85.6
82.7
82.9
84.4
83.4
80.7
81.5
82.3
79. 1
76. 5
64.6
84. 1
73.3
85.8
86.6
76.3
82.8
69.5

27.2
51.0
60.2
72.9
58.9
64.3
51.2
65.5
60.2
54.9
71.2
68.3
73.4
70.8
69. 1
67.0
58.8
64.6
53.3
53.8
55.8
38.7
28.8
53.6
34.0
68.0
69.2
63.2
52.4
41.5

41.1
23.9
4.3
4.0
3.8
13.0
21.7
6.7
14.5
13.5
10.9
8.4
7.6
9.9
10.6
13.4
21.6
11.6
23.6
24.7
17.6
30.0
28.4
25.4
34.6
7.5
12.7
4.0
26.1
21.3

1.2
3.4
10.5
10.5
21.2
5.6
3.4
5.3
3.6
7.9
4.5
4.2
4.5
1.9
3. 1
3.6
1.7
4. 1
3. 1
2.2
4.0
4.6
2.7
2.5
1.4
9.6
3.8
8.7
2.5
4.7

i. 1
1.8
.2
.2
.3
1.1
1.5
.2
.7
1.0
.2
.3
.2
.2
.3
.3
1.3
.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
3.2
4.7
2.6
3.3
.7
.9
.4
1.8
2.0

64.7
73.6
62.1
84.1
75.6
75.5
70.1
66.2
69.5
68.7
81.1
73.4
76.9
74.6
74.3
74.3
75.3
70.0
73.8
74.4
71.8
67.4
54.1
76.5
64.1
79.4
79.1
64.8
74.2
60.2

24.9
46.8
49.3
70.1
53.2
58.1
46.3
55.9
52.6
49.2
66.5
62.3
66. 1
64.1
62.1
59.3
54.6
56.3
49.1
48.8
50.8
34.3
23.4
49.4
29.9
63.4
63.8
53.6
47.5
35.6

38.0
22.4
3.8
3.8
3.3
11.5
19.3
5.9
13.4
11.7
10.3
7.3
6.9
9.0
9.6
11.5
18.6
10.3
21.0
22.6
15.9
26.3
24.8
22.7
30.2
6.7
11.3
3.4
22.9
19.0

.8
3.1
8.9
10.0
18.7
4.9
3.0
4.2
2.9
6.8
4.0
3.6
3.8
1.4
2.4
3.1
1.1
3.1
2.4
1.8
3.5
3.8
1.9
2.2
1.2
8.6
3.3
7.5
2.2
3.9

.9
1.3
.1
.2
.3
1.0
1.4
.2
.6
.9
.2
.3
.1
.1
.1
.3
1.1
.3
1.2
1.1
1.6
2.9
4.C
2.3
2.8
.7
.7
.2
1.6
1.7

TRA SPO TIO ......................................................
N RTA N
RAILROADS.................................................................
L C L A D S B R A T A SPO T T N ........................
O A N U U B N R N R A IO
TA IC B ...................................................................
X AS
TR C IN , L C L A D L N D N E ........................
U K G O A N O G ISTA C
A T A SPO T T N ..................................................
IR R N R A IO

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

78.2
86.5
75.1
74.2
81.5
67.3

11.0
5.7
6.3
8.5
8.4
28.3

10.1
7.5
17.5
15.6
9.7
3.7

.6
.3
1.1
1.7
.4
.7

78.5
87.2
85.4
68.8
75.7
84.8

62.8
75.7
64.6
51.7
63.4
59.5

7.8
4.8
4.1
4.9
5.8
21.7

7.5
6.5
15.8
11.5
6.4
3. 1

.4
.2
.9
•8
.2
.5

72.1
83.7
79.5
60.8
67.0
77.8

58.3
72.7
60.4
45.5
56.6
56.0

7.0
4.5
3.8
4.2
5.2
18.7

6.6
6.2
14.6
10.6
5.1
2.8

.3
.2
.8
.6
.2
.4

C M U IC T N ...............................................................
O M N A IO
T L PH N C M U IC T N .............. ..........................
E E O E O M N A IO
R D A D TELEVISION B O D A IN ........................
A IO N
R A C ST G

100.0
100.0
100.0

44.8
39.8
71.9

49.7
54.7
24.7

1.5
1.1
2.1

4.0
4.5
1.2

80.2
81.3
73.9

39.5
36.3
56.3

37.0
41.1
15.5

1. 1
.9
1.3

2.6
2.9
.9

75.1
76.2
67.4

37.8
35.1
52.0

34.0
37.7
13.4

1.0
.8
1.2

2.3
2.5
.9

PU LIC UTILITIES...................................................... .
B

100.0

79.3

14.9

5.3

.5

86.0

70.0

11.5

4. 2

.4

82.0

67.1

10.7

3.8

.4

S ee fo o tn o te at e n d o f ta b le .




Table B -24. Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and
industry of major earnings, 1967-----Continued

tu
>
•
o

D DUR I NG
)
p E R C E N T C F W0 R K E R S E MP L
F 0 UR QUAR T E R S
A N Y QUART E R
IN TH IN U R O L
IS D ST Y N Y
IN A L WG A D S L R E P O MN
L A E N A A Y ML Y E T
R AI E
C
RAC; e
R AC E
WH I T E1 N E G R 0
WH I T E 1 N E G R 0
WH I T E 1 N E G R 0
AL
L
OE
E
OE
E
O E OA
EN
E
OE
WMN T T L MN 1 WMN "M r WMN T T L MN r WMN MN 1 WMN
OE OA
OE
E
WR E S MN | WMN MN r
O KR E

IN U R
D ST Y

148

PR A N N G IC L U A E O O Y - C N IN E
IV TE O A R U T R L C N M
O T UD
W O E A E T A E ................................................
HLS L RD
M T R V IC
O O EH LES A D A T M T E E U E T . . .
N U O O IV Q IPM N
D U S, C EM LS, A D A
R G H ICA
N LLIED P O U T ........ ##
R D CS
D Y G O S A D A R L ................................ . . . • •
R O D N PPA E
G O ER A D R L T D PR D C S ....................
R C IES N E A E
OUT
ELEC IC L G O S ............................................
TR A O D
.
H R W R , PL M IN A D H A IN E U E T ••
A D A E U B G N E T G Q IPM N
M C IN R , E U E T A D SUPPLIES ............... •• •• ••
A H E Y Q IPM N N

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

68.1
75.8
66.2
49.2
65.0
65.3
71.5
72.9

23.6
18.1
27.8
40.1
23.8
29.3
23.0
22.0

6.6
5.6
4.5
5.1
9.0
3.7
5.0
4. 1

1.7
.5
1.5
5.6
2.2
1.7
.6
1.0

73.5
76.6
80.6
71.0
66.2
77.9
77.0
79.1

52.9
59.8
56.7
38.2
47.3
53.5
56.5
60.2

15.3
12.4
19.9
26.3
11.9
20.7
16.4
15.3

4.5
4. 1
3.3
3.4
6.0
2.6
3.9
3.0

.8
.3
.7
3.1
1.0
1.0
.2
•6

65.2
66.4
70.4
61.5
57.2
68.9
67.2
68.7

47.6
51.9
50.6
34.2
41.5
48.2
49.9
53.2

13.4
11.1
16.7
22.7
10.2
17.7
14. 1
12.8

3.6
3.2
2.7
2.6
4.8
2.1
3.1
2.2

.6
.2
.4
2. 0
.7
•8
.2
.4

RETA T A E .......................................................
IL R D
D P R M N ST R S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .
EAT E T O E
M IL O D R H U S ..........................................
A R E O SE
V R TY ST R S ................................................
A IE
OE
G O E Y ST R S ................................................
R CR
OE
M T R V IC D A E S ....................................
O O EH LE E L R
#
M 'S A D BO S' C O H G A D FU ISH G ..
EN N
Y L T IN N RN IN S
W M N R A Y O E R ST R S .......................
O E 'S E D -T -W A O E
FA IL C O H G ST R S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M Y L T IN
OE
S O ST R S .....................................................
HE OE
FU N U E A D H M FU ISH G ....................
R IT R N O E RN IN S
D U ST R S A D PR PR R ST R S .............
R G O E N O IETA Y O E
FU L A D ICE D A E S ..................................... •• •• •••
E N
E LR

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

46.4
26.9
26.4
17.7
61.2
78.8
58.7
9.8
23.0
52.8
60.3
37.6
73.4

45.0
65.3
53.9
76.3
32.7
12.3
34.7
81.8
69.3
41.6
29.7
54.7
19.6

4.9
3.1
5.5
2.0
4.4
8.6
4.1
1.5
2.8
3.7
7.4
4.3
6. 1

3.7
4.8
14.3
4. 1
1.7
.3
2.6
6.9
4.9
1.9
2.7
3.3
.9

54.7
56.0
59.4
49.9
61.0
74.1
59.8
54.4
55.7
59.2
67. 1
57.5
72.5

27.6
16.8
18.7
9.6
38.4
59.9
37.6
5.6
14.1
34.6
42.2
22.9
55.4

22.7
35.3
31.5
37.2
19.4
8.1
18.7
44.5
37.6
21.5
18.6
30.6
12.8

2.7
1.6
3.0
1.0
2.4
5.9
2.5
.7
1.2
2.0
4.9
2.5
3.9

1.7
2.2
6.2
2.1
.9
.2
1.0
3.7
2.7
1.2
1.4
1.4
.5

50.0
50.1
52.4
43.4
54.2
65.4
51.9
47.7
48.2
50.6
58.1
50.8
64.2

25.0
14.4
16.8
8.1
34.1
53.1
32.6
4.6
12.0
29.2
36.6
20.8
48.7

21.3
32.4
28.5
32.7
17.4
7.3
16.8
39.2
33.3
18.9
16.6
26.8
12.1

2.2
1.3
2.2
.8
2.0
4.8
1.8
.6
.9
1.6
3.7
2.1
3.0

1.5
2.C
4.9
1.8
.7
.2
•6
3.2
2. 0
1. C
1.1
1.1
•3

FINANCE, IN R N E, A D R A E A E ............... . . • •••
SU A C N E L ST T
C M E C L A D S O K SA IN S B N S .............
O M R IA N T C
V G AK
SA IN S A D L A A CIA N ......................
V G N O N SSO TIO S
PE SO A CRED INSTITUTIONS ....................... . . . . • •
R NL
IT
LIFE IN R N E ................................................
SU A C
FIRE, M R E, A D C S A T IN R N E ....... . •• •• ••
A IN N A U L Y SU A C

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

44.1
33.5
32.6
43.8
54.5
41.8

49.1
61.9
63.2
53.7
39.6
55.6

3.9
1.8
2.5
1.2
2.7
.6

2.9
2.7
1.7
1.3
3.2
1.9

72.9
76.5
79.7
72.8
77.3
79.0

34.3
28.3
28.4
36.2
45.5
36.7

34.3
45.3
47.9
35.1
27.7
40.7

2.5
1.2
2.0
.7
2.1
.3

1.8
1.8
1.4
•8
2.1
1.2

66.4
70.5
72.4
61.4
69.3
71.0

31.7
26.7
26.7
31.1
41.6
34.3

31.0
41.2
43.0
29.3
24.2
35.3

2.1
1.1
1.7
.5
1.8
.3

1.5
1.5
1.0
.5
1.8
l.C

SERV
ICES ..............................................................
100.0
HOTELS, TO RISTS CO R A D M T L . . . . . . . • • ## 100.0
U
U TS, N O E S
L U D IE A D D Y C E N G PL N S .............. . . • • 100.0
A N R S N R L A IN
AT
M T N PICTU
O IO
RES ..............................................
100.0
100.0
H SPITA .........................................................
O
LS

33.7
35.1
24.8
54.7
17.9

49.7
42.7
44.8
39.2
65.1

5.5
9.0
7“3
.
3.4
4.3

11.1
13.2
23.0
2.7
12.7

59.6
48.3
61.1
46. 6
66.5

21.2
17.8
16.7
28.6
12.2

28.9
19.7
25.9
14.9
42.8

3.1
4.9
5.0
1.8
2.8

6.4
5.8
13.5
1.3
8.6

55.5
39.0
53.9
40.6
60.8

19.3
14.5
14.4
24.7
11.1

27.3
16.1
23.1
13.2
39.6

2.7
3.7
4.1
1.5
2.3

6. 1
4.8
12. 3
1.2
7.8

1 In clu des w o r k e rs o f a ll r a c e s oth er than N eg ro.
N O TE : A dash ( - )




in d ica te s

e ith er the

sam p le

did not include any w o r k e rs

with th e se

c h a r a c t e r is t ic s ,

o r that the data did not m e e t the

B u r e a u 's

pu b lica tion

c r ite ria ,

Table B -25. Single and multi-industry employment of all workers by number of major industry employers, 1966

IN U R
D ST Y

PR A N N G IC L U A E O O Y . . . •• •• ••
IV TE O A R U T R L C N M

PE C N O W R E S E P O E IN TH IN U R O M JO E R IN D R G
R E T F O K R ML Y D
EIR D ST Y F A R A N G U IN —
A N Y QUA R T E R
F 0 U R QUA R T E R S
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y W R E S
G
D ST Y O K R
U
D STR O K R
U
D STR O K R
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y WR E S
G
D ST Y O K R
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
POES
EML Y R
IN U R E P Y S
D ST Y MI.O ER
E POES
ML Y R
IN U Y E P O E S
D STR ML Y R
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
AL
L
TA
HN
T A AL
HN L
TA
HN
TA
HN
WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O
RR OA N
W OA N
W
W
W RR OA N
W OA N
W
W
W
100.0 100.0 68.0 19.6 12.4
.0
.0
.0
.0 100.0 100.0 67.9 18.8 13.3
.0
.0
.0
.0

149

M IN ..........................................................
IN G
C U E PE R L U , N T R L G S A D N T R L
R D T O E M A U A A N AU A
G S LIQUIDS ••••••••••••••••••••••••• . . • •
A
O A D G S FIELD SERV
IL N A
ICES ................... •• •• ••
C N R C C N R C IO ................................ •• •• ••
O T A T O ST U T N
H H A A D STR
IG W Y N
EET C N R C IO ........... • • ##
O ST U T N
H A Y C N U TIO , N C ......................... • •• •..
E V O STR C N E
PLU B G H TIN , A C N ITIO IN . . . . . • . ..
M IN , EA G IR O D N G
PAINTING, PA R H N IN , D C R T G . . . • . . . ..
PE A G G E O A IN
electrical w r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ok
M S N Y ST N W R , A D PLA IN . . . . . . . .
AO R , O E O K N
STER G
C R TER G A D FLO R G ..................... . . .. ..
A PEN IN N
O IN
R O G A D SH E MT L WR ................ • . • . • •
O FIN N E T E A O K
C N R T WR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •• •• ••
O C E E OK

100.0 77.2 67.5
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

82.2
59.6
69.9
60.1
49.1
66.2
65.2
66.8
55.9
58.0
61.2
48.0

.4 17.8 16.1
79.2 2.6
45.2 8.6 5.8 40.4 21.2
48.1 11.8 10.0 30.1 15.4
49.8 9.4
.9 39.9 30.3
43.2 4.6 1.2 50.9 35.9
53.8 7.7 4.7 33.8 23.5
50.5 8.5 6.1 34.8 20.2
49.0 9.4 8.4 33.2 20.2
41.9 8.3 5.8 44.1 26.2
52.4 4.2 1.4 42.0 33.3
53.0 5.5 2.7 38.8 28.5
41.8 5.0 1.2 52.0 38.9

M N F C U IN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • •• •• •
A UA T R G
A M N IO , E C PT FO S A L AM .......
M U IT N X E
R ML R S
,.
MA PR D C S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ET O UT
D IR PR D C S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A Y OUT
C N E , C R , A D FR Z N F O S ...........
A N D U ED N O E O D
..
G A M L PR D C S ................................
R IN IL
OUT
..
B K R P O U T .......................................
AEY R D CS
B V R G S .................................................
EEAE
..
WA IN M
E V G ILLS, C T O ............................
OT N
..
WA IN M
E V G ILLS, SY TH S .....................
N ETIC
K ITTIN M
N
G ILLS .........................................
..
Y R AD T RA M
A N N H E D ILLS ............................
..
..
M 'S A D B Y SUITS A D C A S ...........
EN N O S*
N OT
..
M 'S A D BO S' FU ISH G ..................
EN N
Y
RN IN S
..
W M N A D MISSES' O T R E R ..............
O E 'S N
U E WA
..
W M N A D CHILDREN'S U D R A MN S ..
O E 'S N
NEGR ET
CHILDREN'S O T R E R ..............................
U E WA
•.
..
SA M L A D PL N G M
W IL S N A IN ILLS ...................
M L O K P Y O D AD R L T D P O U T
IL W R , L W O N E A E R D C S
..
H U E O D FU N R ................................
OSHL
R ITU E
..
PU P A D PA R M
L N PE ILLS ..............................
..
PA R O R C N IN S A D B X S ...........
PE B A D O TA ER N O E
N W PE S ................................................
E SPA R
C M E C L PRINTING ................................
O M R IA
••
IN U IA C E IC L ..............................
D STR L H M A S
•.
..
PLA
STICS M T R LS A D SY TH S .......
A E IA N
N ETIC
D U S ........................................................
RG
..
SO P, C N
A LEA ERS, A D TO
N
ILET G O S .........
OD
..
P T O E M REFINING .................................
ER LU
TIRES A D IN E T B S ............................
N NR UE
..
O H R R B E PR D C S ............................
T E UBR O U T
••

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

81.7
72.8
74.8
75.1
74.0
73.0
72.4
70.5
80.9
74.8
77.1
73.7
81.6
80.8
81.0
80.9
76.7
72.4
66.4
70.7
79.2
69.3
77.8
76.4
81.1
79.3
80.8
73.8
83.6
83.2
74.4

71.3
72.5
72.1
72.7
67.9
72.5
68.0
67.8
78.2
73.3
71.6
68.3
77.3
76.0
71.1
77.6
73.4
66.9
63.5
66.8
78.9
67.1
72.3
71.7
80.5
78.9
79.1
73.2
82.2
81.1
73.9




6.6

8.1
.3
2.4
2.4
5.5
.5
4.2
2.4
2.6
1.4
4.3
4.4
3.4
4.5
7.8
3.0
3.1
4.5
2.6
3.2
.3
2.1
4.3
3.6
.5
.4
1.6
.6
1.3
2.2
.5

3.0 22.8 17.0

2.3
.0
.3
.1
.6
.0
.2
.4
.1
.1
1.1
1.0
.9
.4
2.2
.3
.3
1.0
.3
•6
.0
•1
1.2
1.1
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0

18.3
27.2
25.2
24.9
26.0
27.0
27.6
29.5
19.1
25.2
22.9
26.3
18.4
19.2
19.0
19.1
23.3
27.6
33.6
29.3
20.8
30.7
22.2
23.6
18.9
20.7
19.2
26.2
16.4
16.8
25.6

12.9
27.2
22.8
23.2
22.4
26.4
25.3
27.0
17.3
23.9
19.6
22.8
17.0
17.3
14.5
17.4
22.0
23.3
31.3
25.9
20.4
28.7
18.6
21.2
18.5
20.5
19.2
25.4
16.1
16.7
24.6

3.4

2.5 100.0 88.2 76.8

7.7

3.7 11.8

8.0

.4 10.0 8.9
.5 100.0 90.0 86.5 3.1
1.2
8.2 11.0 100.0 74.3 52.9 12.2 9.3 25.7 8.6
6.3 8.4 100.0 79.3 51.3 13.9 14.0 20.7 7.4
7.1 2.5 100.0 78.9 62.5 15.1 1.4 21.1 14.1
9.8 5.3 100.0 68.3 59.0 7.0 2.2 31.7 18.5
5.4 4.9 100.0 78.9 62.0 10.0 6.9 21.1 11.6
6.7 8.0 100.0 77.5 58.8 10.3 8.5 22.5 8.7
5.2 7.9 100.0 76.3 52.5 12.0 11.8 23.7 10.5
9.2 8.7 100.0 65.2 44.9 10.7 9.6 34.8 15.1
6.3 2.4 100.0 71.0 62.7 5.6 2.7 29.0 20.4
6.3 4.0 100.0 74.8 64.1 6.3 4.4 25.2 15.6
8.0 5.2 100.0 60.6 49.9 8.1 2.6 39.4 23.4
3.5
.0
2.1
1.4
3.0
.5
1.8
2.1
1.3
.9
2.6
2.1
1.0
1.5
2.6
1.2
1.1
3.6
2.0
2.8
.4
1.7
2.6
1.6
.4
.2
.1
•8
.3
.1
.9

1.9
.0
.2
.2
.6
.1
.4
.4
.4
.3
.8
1.3
.3
.3
1.9
.5
.2
.8
.3
.6
.0
.2
1.1
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

89.0
88.0
85.7
85.6
87.4
85.5
85.3
84.3
92.0
88.9
89.0
86.3
90.9
91.7
90.5
92.8
90.1
86.5
83.8
85.5
90.8
85.4
83.9
86.4
89.7
89.4
88.8
86.9
90.4
91.3
86.5

78.4
87.7
82.6
83.0
81.9
84.7
79.5
80.9
88.9
87.3
82.5
80.2
86.0
85.8
78.4
88.9
85.4
79.7
79.6
80.5
90.5
82.2
77.0
80.3
89.0
89.0
87.0
86.3
88.9
88.8
86. 1

8.2
.3
2.8
2.5
4.9
•8
5.5
3.0
3.0
1.4
5.1
4.9
3.7
5.6
9.3
3.5
4.2
5.6
3.6
4.2
.3
3.1
5.4
4.5
.7
.4
1.7
.6
1.5
2.6
.4

2.4
.0
.3
.1
.5
.0
.3
•4
.1
.2
1.4
1.2
1.2
.3
2.8
.4
.4
1.1
.6
.8
.0
.1
1.5
1.6
.0
.0
.1
•0
.0
.0
•0

11.0
12.0
14.3
14.A
12.6i
14.5
14.7
15.7
8.0i
11.1
11.0
13.7
9.1
8.3
9.5
7.2
9.9
13.5
16.2
14.5
9.2
14.6.
16.1
13.6>
10.3i
10.6i
11.2
13.1
9.6i
8.7
13.5i

7.5
11.9
12.6
13.2
10.5
13.8
13.3
13.9
7.0
10.1
8.5
10.4
8.1
7.1
5.8
6.2
9.3
10.6
14.5
11.8
9.0
13.5
12.3
11.2
10.2
10.5
11.2
12.5
9.3
8.7
12.7

1.9

1.9

.8
.3
5.5 11.6
4.2 9.1
4.5 2.5
7.4 5.9
4.3 5.2
4.7 9.0
4.3 8.9
8.2 11.6
5.5 3.1
5.1 4.6
7.4 8.6
2.0
.1
1.5
1.0
1.6
.6
1.1
1.3
.7
.6
1.7
1.9
.7
.9
1.9
.9
.6
2.3
1.6
1.8
.1
1.0
2.3
1.4
.2
.1
.0
.6
.3
.0
.7

1.5
.0
.2
.1
.5
.1
.4
.5
.3
.3
.7
1.4
.3
.3
1.8
.1
.0
.6
.2
.9
.1
.1
1.5
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1

Table B-25. Single and multi-industry employment of all workers by number of major industry employers, 1966-----Continued

IN U R
D ST Y

PE C N O W R E S E P O E IN TH IN U R O M JO E R IN D R G
R E T F O K R ML Y D
EIR O ST Y F A R A N G U IN —
A N Y QUA R T E R
F 0 U R QUA R T E R S
U
D STR O K R
D ST Y O K R
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y W R E S
G
D ST Y O K R
U
D STR O K R
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y WR E S
G
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
E POE
ML Y RS
IN U R E P Y R
D ST Y MLO E S
E POES
ML Y R
IN U R E P O E S
O ST Y ML Y R
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
TA
HN
AL
L
TA
HN
T A AL
HN L
TA
HN
W OA N
W
W R R OA N
W
W OA N
W
WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O
R R OA N
W
W

150

PR A E N N G IC L U A E O O Y - C N IN E
IV T O A R U T R L C N M
O T UD
M N F C U IN - C N IN E
A UA T R G
O T UD
PO T E R E C PT R B E
O WA , X E
UBR
«
G A A D G A S A E PR
L SS N L S W R * ESSED O B O N ...........
R LW
C N R T , G PSU , A D PLA
OCEE Y M N
STER PR D C S .........
OUT
B A F R A E A D BA STEEL PR D C S .........
L ST U N C N
SIC
OUT
IR N A D STEEL FO N R S ••••••••••••••••••••
O N
U D IE
N N E R U R LLIN A D D A IN .......................
OFROS O G N RW G
C TLER , H N TO LS, A D H R W R ..................
U Y AD O
N AD AE
FA R A
B IC TED S R C U A MT L P O U T .............
T U T R L EA R D CS
S R W M C IN PR D C BO
C E A H E O U TS,
LTS, E C ................
T
MT L ST M G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E A A PIN S
EN IN A D TU B ES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G ES N
R IN
F R M C IN R ...................................................
AM A H E Y
C N R C IO A D R L T D M C IN R ................
O ST U T N N E A E A H E Y
MT L W R IN M C IN R ...................................
EA OK G AH E Y
SPECIA IN U R M C IN R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
L D ST Y A H E Y
G N R L IN U IA M CH ERY.................. .
E E A D STR L A IN
OFFICE A D C M T G M C IN S .........................
N O PU IN A H E
SERV IN U R M C IN S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ICE D ST Y A H E
ELECTRIC TEST A D DISTRIBUTING E U E T . . . .
N
Q IPM N
ELEC IC L IN U IA A R T S ......................
TR A D STR L PPA A U
H UE O D A
O S H L PPLIA C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
N ES
ELECTRIC LIG TIN A D W IN E U E T .........
H G N IR G Q IPM N
R D A D T RECEIV G E U E T ....................
A IO N V
IN Q IPM N
C M U IC T N E U E T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O M N A IO Q IPM N
ELEC O IC C MO E T A D A
TR N O P N N S N CCESSO
RIES ...........
M T R V IC
O O EH LES A D E U E T .......................
N Q IPM N
A C A A D PA T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IR R FT N R S
SHIP A D B A BU IN A D REPAIRIN .............
N O T ILD G N
G
M C A IC L M A R G A D C N R L D IC . . . .
E H N A E SU IN N O T O EV ES
O H R M N F C U IN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T E A UA T R G

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
loo.o
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

78.8
77.4
64.7
81.8
72.6
73.9
70.9
65.2
69.0
69.4
73.8
71.1
71.6
73.4
74.0
73.1
75.4
66.1
76.7
74.9
65.2
71.4
68.0
75.6
72.9
76.3
76.8
67.5
70.7
71.3

73.9
74.7
62.1
81.2
71.0
73.3
69.1
63.4
66.9
68.3
73.4
70.4
69.4
70.5
72.4
72.2
74.4
64.9
76.0
74.6
64.2
70.0
66.7
74.2
71.6
75.3
75.2
64.1
69.6
68.2

4.2
2.5
2.5
•6
1.6
•6
1.7
1.7
2.0
1.0
.4
•6
2.0
2.4
1.6
.8
1.0
1.3
.8
.3
1.0
1.4
1.3
1.4
1.2
.9
1.6
2.6
1.0
2.7

•8
.2
.1
.0
.1
•0
•1
.0
.1
.1
.0
.1
.2
.5
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.1
.0
.0
.7
.0
.3

21.2
22.6
35.3
18.2
27.4
26.1
29.1
34.8
31.0
30.6
26.2
28.9
28.4
26.6
26.0
26.9
24.6
33.9
23.3
25.1
34.8
28.6
32.0
24.4
27.1
23.7
23.2
32.5
29.3
28.7

18.4
21.4
32.8
17.7
25.8
25.5
28.5
31.4
28.9
29.1
26.0
28.1
27.0
24.1
25.4
26.4
24.2
33.1
22.8
24.8
34.2
27.7
30.7
23.7
26.3
22.7
22.0
28.0
28.0
27.2

2.0
1.1
2.4
.5
1.3
.6
•6
2.5
1.8
1.3
.2
.7
1.4
2.0
.6
.5
.4
.7
.4
.3
.6
.8
.9
.6
.8
.9
1.1
3.2
1.2
1.5

•8
.1
.0
.0
.3
.0
.0
.8
.2
.2
.0
.1
.1
.5
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.4
.1
.0
.1
.1
1.3
.2
.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

89.8
90.3
79.7
89.0
84.0
85.5
84.6
81.0
83.1
84.4
83.4
84.0
84.2
85.2
85.1
84.1
87.5
81.1
87.1
86.9
83.6
86.0
87.1
86.5
87.5
85.7
86.3
80.2
83.8
84.7

84.1
86.7
75.9
88.5
82.1
84.7
82.2
78.5
80.0
83.4
82.9
83.2
81.6
81.6
83.2
83.0
86.3
79.2
86.3
86.5
82.2
83.9
85.0
84.8
85.7
84.8
84.4
76.2
82.3
80.6

4.7
3.3
3.6
.5
1.9
.7
2.4
2.5
3.0
.9
.4
.7
2.4
3.1
1.8
1.0
1.2
1.9
•8
.4
1.4
2.0
2.1
1.6
1.7
.9
1.9
3.1
1.4
3.7

1.0
.3
.2
•0
.1
.0
.1
.1
.1
.1
.0
•1
.2
.6
.1
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
•1
.0
.0
.9
.0
•4

10.2: 8.1
9.7 9.0
20.3 19.0
1
11.C 10.7
16. C 14.9
1
14.5 14.1
15.4► 15.1
19.C 16.6
l
16.9' 15.7
15.6. 14.6
16.6i 16.6
16.0i 15.5
15.81 14.7
14.8 12.9
14.9 14.4
15.9' 15.5
12.5 12.2
18.9' 18.6
12.9 12.8
13.1 13.0
16.4 16.0
14.0 13.3
12.9 12.1
13.5 13.1
12.5 12.1
14.3i 13.7
13.7 13.0
19.8 16.5
16.2 15.0
15.3i 14.7

1.4
.6
1.3
.3
.9
.4
.3
1.7
1.1
.8
.0
.4
.9
1.6
•6
.3
.3
.3
.2
.2
.5
.6
.4
.4
.4
.5
.7
2.1
1.0
.5

.7
.2
.1
.0
.2
.0
•0
.7
.1
.2
.0
.2
.1
.3
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.4
.1
.0
.1
.0
1.2
.2
.0

T A SPO T TIO ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
RN RA N
R IL O D ............................................................
A RAS
L C L A D S B R A TRANSPORTATION..............
OA N UUB N
T X A S ..............................................................
A IC B
TR C IN , L C L A D L N D N E ..................
U K G O A N O G ISTA C
A T A SPO T T N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IR R N R A IO

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

76.4
84.5
77.1
76.5
71.8
74.7

66.8 7.0
81.8 2.6
73.8 3.1
49. 1 23.3
62.5 6.8
72.0 2.5

2.7
.1
.2
4.1
2.4
.3

23.6
15.5
22.9
23.5
28.2
25.3

16.9
14.7
21.7
15.3
20.1
23.9

3.5
.8
1.0
6.5
4.7
1.3

3.2
.1
.1
1.6
3.5
•0.

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

84.7
89.9
84.4
85.2
83.2
82.9

73.9 7.8
86.8 3.0
80.6 3.6
48.4 30.9
71.7 8.4
79.8 2.8

3.0
.1
.2
6.0
3.2
.3

15.3 9.9
10.1 9.5
15.6 14.9
14.8 8.8
16.8 10.8
17.1 16.3

2.3
.6
.5
4.4
2.9
.8

3.1
.1
.1
1.6
3.1
.0

C M U IC T N .........................................................
O M N A IO
telephone communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R D A D TELEVISION B O D A IN ..................
A IO N
R A C ST G

100.0 81.9 79.2
100.0 83.5 81.8
100.0 73.5 63.8

2.4
1.6
7.2

.4 18.1 17.1
.1 16.5 16.1
2.5 26.5 20.6

.9
.4
4.5

.2 100.0 89.9 86.7
.0 100.0 91.6 89.6
1.4 100.0 80.5 68.8

2.7
1.9
8.4

.5 10.1 9.2
.1 8.4 8.1
3.3 19.5 14.6

.7
.3
3.5

.2
.0
1.4

PU
BLIC UTILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

100.0 82.8 82.0

•8

.1 17.2 16.8

.3

.0 100.0 89.2 88.4

.7

.1 10.8 10.5

.3

.0




Table B-25. Single and multi-industry employment of all workers by number of major industry employers, 1966---- Continued

IN U R
D ST Y

PE C N O W R E S E P O E IN TH IN U R O M JO E R IN D R G
R E T F O K R ML Y D
EIR D ST Y F A R A N G U IN —
A N Y QUA R T E R
F 0 U R QUA R T E R S
U
D STR O K R
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y W R E S
G
D ST Y O K R
U
D STR O K R
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y WR E S
G
D ST Y O K R
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
N ME O
U BR F
IN U R E P Y R
D ST Y Mt.O E S
IN U R E P O E S
D ST Y ML Y R
E POES
ML Y R
E POES
ML Y R
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
TA
HN
TA
HN
AL
L
T A AL
HN L
TA
HN
W
W
W OA N
W R R OA N
W OA N
W
WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O
R R OA N
W
W

151

PR A E N N G IC L U A E O O Y - C N IN E
IV T O A R U T R L C N M
O T UD
WO ESA E T A E ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
HL L R D
M T R V IC
O O EH LES A D A T M T E E U M N .........
N U O O IV Q IP E T
D U S, C EM LS, A D A
R G H ICA
N LLIED P O U T ............
R D CS
D Y G O S A D A R L ........................................
R O D N PPA E
G O ER A D R L T D PR D C S ........................
R C IES N E A E
OUT
ELEC IC L G O S •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
TR A O D
H R W R , PL M IN A D H TIN E U M N .......
A D A E U B G N EA G Q IP E T
M C IN R , E U E T A D SUPPLIES ...................
A H E Y Q IPM N N

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

74.9
72.2
74.3
72.8
73.4
73.2
74.7
73.8

70.6
69.3
72.9
69.4
69.1
70.9
73.1
71.5

3.9
2.8
1.4
3.2
3.9
2.2
1.5
2.2

.3
.1
.0
.2
.4
.1
.1
.2

25.1
27.8
25.7
27.2
26.6
26.8
25.3
26.2

21.7
26.0
25;o
25.9
23.8
25.8
24.4
24.7

2.8
1.7
•6
1.0
2.4
.9
.8
1.3

.6
.2
.0
.3
.4
.1
.1
.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

85.9
85.5
86.8
86.2
85.0
85.7
86.6
85.9

80.8
81.8
85.1
81.4
79.8
82.9
84.3
83.0

4.8
3.6
1.7
4.4
4.8
2.7
2.1
2.7

.4
.1
.0
.4
.4
.1
.2
.2

RETA T A E •••••••••••••••••••••*•••••••••••«•
IL R D
D PA T E T ST R S
E r HN O E
M IL O D R H U S ••••••••••••••«*••••••••••••
A R E O SE
V R T STO ES •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
A IE Y
R
G O E Y STO ES •*••<••*••••*••••••••••••••••••
R CR
R
M T R V IC D A E S ........................................
O O EH LE E L R
M 'S A D BO S' C O H G A D FU N IN S .......
EN N
Y L T IN N R ISH G
W M N R A Y O E R STORES...........................
O E 'S E D -T -W A
FA IL C O H G ST R S ......................................
M Y L T IN
OE
S O ST R S •••••••••••••••••••••••••«••••*•••
HE OE
FU N U E A D H M FU ISH G ........................
R IT R N O E RN IN S
D U ST R S A O PR PR R ST R S ..................
R G O E N O IETA Y O E
FU L A D ICE D A E S ..........................................
E N
E LR

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

82.4
78.9
77.2
78.8
77.1
74.9
75.8
78.8
80.0
71.7
74.9
77.6
74.9

66.2 12.2
75.8 3.0
72.8 4.3
75.8 2.7
70.4 5.4
64.3 7.9
71.8 3.6
73.0 4.9
78.6 1.1
61.8 7.3
70.8 3.6
69.6 6.4
72.0 2.8

4.0
.1
.1
.3
1.2
2.7
.4
.9
.3
2.6
.6
1.6
.1

17.6
21.1
22.8
21.2
22.9
25.1
24.2
21.2
20.0i
28.3i
25.1
22.4
25.1

11.0
19.4
21.4
19.5
19.7
19.9
22.1
18.7
18.8
21.8
22.9
19.6
23.6

4.1
1.5
1.1
1.7
2.6
4.1
1.8
2.2
1.2
4.4
1.8
2.3
1.4

2.5
.1
.2
•0
.6
1.2
.3
.3
.1
2.1
.4
.5
.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

88.7
89.5
90.2
90.1
87.2
86.7
87.1
89.6
90.2
81.7
86.1
89.5
85.8

70.5 13.1
85.8 3.5
83.8 6.1
85.8 3.7
78.1 7.2
73.1 10.0
80.8 5.5
81.0 7.1
88. 1 1.5
66.5 11.0
80.7 4.7
77.5 9.3
81.6 4.1

FINANCE, IN RA C A O R A E A E ...................
SU N E, N E L ST T
C M E C L A D S O K SA IN S B N S .................
O M R IA N T C
V G AK
SA IN S A D L A A CIA N ..........................
V G N O N SSO TIO S
PE SO A CRED INSTITUTIONS ............................
R NL
IT
LIFE IN R N E •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
SU A C
FIRE, M R E, A O C SU L Y IN R N E ..............
A IN N A A T SU A C

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

79.9
80.1
79.7
72.0
77.5
78.1

72.8
77.3
77.9
62.2
75.2
75.0

6.0
2.7
1.6
8.3
2.1
3.0

1.0
.1
.1
1.6
.2
.1

20.1
19.9
20.3
28.0'
22.5
21.9'

17.3
19.1
19.5
23.5
21.4
20.3

2.3
•8
.7
3.4
1.0
1.1

.5;
.1
.1
1.0
.1
.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

88.8
88.2
87.2
85.4
86.6
88.8

SERV
ICES
H TELS, TO RISTS C U TS, A D M T L ................
O
U
OR
N OE S
L U D IE A D D Y C E N G PL N S ...................
A N R S N R L A IN
AT
M T N PICTU
O IO
RES ••••*•••••••••••••••••*•••••••
H SPITA ••••••••••••••••••••••»•••••••••••••
O
LS

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

84.6
68.6
76.7
68.9
81.7

67.2 14.0
53.5 12.6
69.1 6.1
61.9 5.6
76.0 5.1

3.5
2.5
1.5
1.4
.5

15.4
31.4
23.3
31.1
18.3

10.4
20.8
19.3
24.0
16.4

3.4
7.2
3.0
4.4
1.6

1.6
3.5
1.0
2.7
.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

90.5
79.9
88.7
71.3
89.8




11.7
13.1
13.0
12.8
13.0
13.7
12.8
12.8

1.9
1.2
.3
.7
1.6
.6
.6
1.1

.5
.2
.0
.4
.4
.1
.1
.2

5.1
•2
.3
.5
1.9
3.6
.7
1.5
•6
4.2
.7
2.7
.1

11.3> 6.1
10.5> 9.3
9.81 8.8
9.5i 8.9
12.81 10.0
13.3i 9.4
12.5> 10.8
10. A 8.2
►
9.8 8.9
18.3l 12.2
13.5l 12.4
10.5i 8.6
14.2! 13.0

2.8
1.1
.7
1.0
2.1
2.8
1.9
1.8
.8
3.5
1.2
1.3
1.0

2.4
.1
.3
.0
.7
1.2
.2
.4
.1
2.7
.2
.6
.3

80.1 7.3
85.0 3.0
85.3 1.8
71.3 11.7
84.0 2.4
84.9 3.8

1.4
.2
.1
2.4
.2
.1

11.2:
11.8l
12.81
14.6*
13.A
>
11.2!

9.o
11.2
12.0
10.9
12.4
9.6

1.6
.6
.6
2.6
.9
1.0

.5
.0
.1
1.1
.1
.6

68.3 17.4
57.2 18.5
78.5 8.1
59.5 8.6
82.8 6.2

4.8
4.3
2.1
3.2
.7

9.5•
20.1
11.3>
28.7
10.2!

5.4
10.1
8.7
17.3
8.7

2.5
5.4
1.6
5.2
1.3

1.6
4.5
1.0
6.2
.2

14.1.
14.5i
13.2!
13.8i
15. C
l
14.3i
13.A
14.1

Table B-26. Single and m ulti-industry employment of all workers by number of major industry employers, 1967

IN U R
D ST Y

PR A N N G IC L U A E O O Y ..............
IV TE O A R U T R L C N M
MINING.....................................................................
C U E PE R L U , N T R L G S A D N T R L
R D T O E M AU A A N AU A
G S LIQUIDS .....................................................
A
OIL A D G S FIELD SERV
N A
ICES ..............................
C N R C C N R C IO •••••••«•••••••••••*»••••
O T A T O ST U T N
H H A A D ST EE C N R C IO .....................
IG W Y N R T O ST U T N
H A Y C N U TIO , N C •••••••••••••••••••••
E V O STR C N E
PL M IN , H TIN , A CO D N G ..............
U B G EA G IR N ITIO IN
PAINTING, PA R H N IN , D C R T G ..............
PE A G G E O A IN
ELEC IC L WR •••••••••••••••«•••••••••••••
TR A O K
M S N Y ST N W R , A D PLA IN ................
AO R , O E O K N
STER G
C R N E IN A D FLO R G ................................
A PE T R G N
O IN
R O G A D SH E MT L WR ...........................
O FIN N
E T E A OK
C N R T WR
O C E E OK
152

manufacturing.........................................................

A M N IO , E C PT F R S A L A M ..................
M U IT N X E O M L R S
MA PR D C S
ET OUT
D IR PR D C S ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
A Y OUT
C N E , C R , A D FR Z N F O S .....................
A N D U ED N O E O D
G A M L PR D C S
R IN IL
OUT
B K R PR D C S •••* •••••••••••••••••••••••••
AEY O UT
B V R G S ............................................................
EEAE
WA IN M
E V G ILLS, C T O •••••••••*•••••••••••••
OT N
WA IN M
E V G ILLS, SY TH S ................................
N ETIC
K ITTIN M
N
G ILLS ••••••••••»•••••••••••••••••••
Y R AD T R A M
A N N H E D ILLS ••••*••••••••••••••••••
M 'S A D B Y * SUITS A D C A S .....................
EN N O S
N OT
M 'S A D BO S' FU ISH G ............................
EN N
Y
RN IN S
W MN A D M
O E 'S N ISSES' O T R E R .........................
U E WA
W M N A D CHILDREN'S U D R A M N S ............
O E 'S N
NEGR ET
CHILDREN'S O T R E R ••••••••••«•••••••••••••
U E WA
SA M L A D PL N G MILLS.............................
W IL S N A IN
M L O K P Y O D A D R L T D PR D C S .........
IL W R , L W O N E A E
OUT
H U E O D FU N U E
OSHL
R IT R
PU P A D PA R M
L N PE ILLS ••••••••••••••••••••••••
P PE B A D C N A E S A D B X S .....................
A R O R O T IN R N O E
N W PE S ••••••••••••••••••••••••#•••••••••
E SPA R
C M E C L PRIN G
O M R IA
TIN
IN U IA C E IC L
D STR L H M A S
.
PLASTICS M T R L A D SY TH S ..................
A E IA S N
N ETIC
SO P, CLEA ER A D TO
A
N S, N
ILET G O S ....................
OD
P T O E M REFIN G •••••«••••••••••••••••••••
ERLU
IN
TIRES A D IN E T B S
N NR UE
O H R R B E PR D C S
T E UBR O U T



PE C N O W R E S E P O E IN TH IN U R O M JO E R IN D R G
R E T F O K R ML Y D
EIR D ST Y F A R A N G U IN —
A N Y QUA R T E R
F 0 U R QUA R T E R S
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y W R E S
G
D ST Y O K R
U
D STR O K R
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y WR E S
G
D ST Y O K R
U
D STR O K R
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
E POES
ML Y R
IN U R E P O E S
D ST Y ML Y R
E POES
ML Y R
IN U R E P O E S
D ST Y ML Y R
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
AL
L
TA
HN
T A AL
HN L
TA
HN
TA
HN
WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O
R R OA N
W OA N
W RR OA N
W
W
W
W OA N
W
W
100.0 100.0 69.7 18.9 11.5
100.0 77.5 68.7

5.9

.0

.0

.0

2.9 22.5 17.7

2.7

2.2 100.0 88.2 78.2

.0 100.0 100.0 69.8 18.0 12.2
6.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

80.5
62.6
71.6
61.0
53.1
68.0
65. 1
67.4
57.7
61.5
64.4
48.8

76.9 3.1
48.5 7.1
50.5 11.1
56.2 4.0
46.6 4.7
55.8 8.3
49.4 9.0
50.0 8.8
44.7 7.6
55.9 4.2
55.4 6.1
43.3 4.2

.5
7.0
9.9
.8
1.7
3.9
6.7
8.5
5.4
1.4
2.9
1.3

19.5
37.4
28.4
39.0
46.9
32.0
34.9
32.6
42.3
38.5
35.6
51.2

18.3
21.5
15.1
31.5
32.5
21.5
21.7
19.8
26.4
30.6
27.5
40.8

1.1
6.9
5.8
5.5
9.6
5.4
6.0
5.4
7.7
5.2
4.1
6.1

.1
9.0
7.6
1.9
4.8
5.1
7.2
7.4
8.2
2.6
4.1
4.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

89.4
79.8
80.9
79.3
70.1
79.6
77.6
75.6
68.1
76.6
76.5
63.0

85.1
61.0
54.5
73.0
60.4
63.2
56.9
52.9
49.9
67.9
64.6
53.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

82.6
74.6
74.6
74.7
75.1
74.9
74.6
72.0
81.7
77.3
79.5
76.5
78.6
81.8
82.3
81.5
77.5
75.5
69.6
71.3
80.4
71.3
78.9
76.4
80.5
80.6
78.0
73.7
84.2
79.7
74.3

72.3
66.8
69.9
71.5
68.4
73.9
72.1
69.2
78.1
74.8
74.4
73.2
75.0
76.7
73.4
78.3
76.2
70.3
66.9
67.7
78.8
69.5
72.9
72.5
79.8
79.6
76.1
73.0
83.8
79.4
73.6

2. 1
.0
.2
.1
1.0
.0
.3
.4
.4
.4
1.0
.9
.4
.4
2.0
.4
.0
.8
.1
.4
.0
.2
.7
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

17.4
25.4
25.4
25.3
24.9
25.1
25.4
28.0
18.3
22.7
20.5
23.5
21.4
18.2
17.7
18.5
22.5
24.5
30.4
28.7
19.6
28.7
21.1
23.6
19.5
19.4
22.0
26.3
15.8
20.3
25.7

12.6
24.4
23.2
24.2
21.8
24.4
23.5
26.0
16.0
21.0
17.7
20.0
19.1
16.3
13.5
17.4
20.2
21.0
28.5
25.9
19.2
26.5
17.7
21.3
19.2
19.0
21.5
25.5
15.6
20.0
25.2

3.2
1.1
1.9
1.1
2.6
.6
1.6
1.7
2.0
1.7
1.9
2.7
2.0
1.9
2.9
.7
2.0
2.9
1.6
2.2
.4
2.1
2.2
1.7
.3
.4
.5
.8
.2
.3
.5

1.6
.0
.3
.0
.5
.1
.4
.3
.3
.0
.9
.8
.3
.0
1.3
.3
.3
.5
.3
.6
.0
.2
1.2
.7
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

89.0
89.6
85.6
86.1
86.4
87.0
86.0
84.7
91.8
89.1
90.8
89.5
90.6
92.2
90.6
92.9
91.0
87.1
85.2
86.5
90.4
85.6
84.0
85.3
88.6
90.0
86.4
87.6
90.2
83.3
84.8

78.5 8.3
78.9 10.6
80.1 5.2
82.2 3.6
78.6 6.5
85.7 1.3
82.5 3.1
81.4 2.9
87.4 3.9
86.0 2.5
84.1 5.6
85.2 2.9
86.6 3.5
85.9 5.8
80.3 7.7
89.0 3.4
89.2 1.8
80.4 5.5
81.6 3.5
81.7 4.2
88.4 2.0
83.5 1.9
76.6 6.5
80.4 3.8
87.8
.8
88.9 1.2
84. 1 2.3
87.0
.6
89.7
.5
82.9
.4
.8
84.0

8.1
7.8
4.5
3.1
5.7
1.0
2.3
2.4
3.2
2.1
4.1
2.5
3. 1
4.7
6.9
2.8
1.3
4.5
2.5
3.1
1.6
1.6
5.3
3.0
.8
1.0
1.9
.7
.4
.3
.7

.0

.0

.0

.0

3.4 11.8

9.1

1.2

1.4

3.6
.6 10.6 9.6
8.9 10.0 20.2 9.0
12.8 13.6 19.1 7.3
5.2 1.1 20.7 15.6
6.8 2.9 29.9 17.3
11.0 5.4 20.4 10.3
11.7 9.0 22.4 9.7
11.3 11.5 24.4 11.2
9.9 8.3 31.9 14.7
6.4 2.3 23.4 14.9
7.5 4.3 23.5 15.7
6.8 2.4 37.0 25.1
2.2
.0
.3
.2
1.2
.0
.4
.4
.5
.6
1.2
1.4
.5
.6
2.6
.4
.0
1.2
.2
.5
.0
.2
1.0
1.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
•0
.0

11.0
10.4
14.4
13.9
13.6
13.0
14.0
15.3
8.2
10.9
9.2
10.5
9.4
7.8
9.4
7.1
9.0
12.9
14.8
13.5
9.6
14.4
16.0
14.7
11.4
10.0
13.6
12.4
9.8
16.7
15.2

7.8
9.7
12.6
13.1
11.6
12.3
12.6
14.0
6.8
9.3
7.1
7.7
7.7
6.7
6.3
6.2
7.5
10.6
13.6
11.3
9.2
13.3
12.4
12.3
11.2
9.7
13.3
11.9
9.7
16.5
15.0

.9
.1
3.1 8.0
3.7 8.2
3.1 1.9
7.3 5.4
4.5 5.7
4.5 8.2
4.3 8.9
6.8 10.4
5.1 3.4
2.7 5.1
5.1 6.8
2.0
.8
1.5
.8
1.4
.7
1.2
1.0
1.0
1.6
1.4
2.0
1.3
l.l
2.0
.5
1.2
1.8
.9
1.7
.4
1.1
2.2
1.7
.2
.3
.3
.4
.1
.2
.2

1.2
.0
.3
.0
.6
.0
.3
.3
.3
.0
.8
.9
.4
.0
l .l
.4
.3
.5
.3
.6
.0
.1
1.3
.8
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0

Table B -26. Single and multi-industry employment of all workers by number of major industry employers. 1967---- Continued

IN U R
D ST Y

PE C N O W R E S E P O E IN TH IN U R O M JO E R IN D R G
R E T F O K R ML Y D
EIR D ST Y F A R A N G U IN —
A N Y QUA R T E R
F 0 U R QUA R T E R S
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y W R E S
G
D ST Y O K R
U
D STR O K R
SIN LE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y WR E S
G
D ST Y O K R
U
D STR O K R
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
E POES
ML Y R
IN U R E P O E S
D ST Y ML Y R
E POES
ML Y R
IN U R E P O E S
D ST Y ML Y R
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
AL
L
TA
HN
T A AL
HN L
TA
HN
TA
HN
WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O
RR OA N
W
W OA N
W
w
R R OA N
W
W OA N
W
W

153

PR A N N G IC L U A E O O Y - C N IN E
IV TE O A R U T R L C N M
O T UD
M N F C U IN - C N IN E
A UA T R G
O T UD
FO T E R E C PT R B E ............................
O WA , X E
UBR
G A A D G A A E PR
L SS N L SSW R , ESSED O B O N . . .
R LW
CNR
O C ETE, G PSU , A D PLA
Y M N
STER P O U T ..
R D CS
B A F R A E A D B SIC ST E P O U T ..
L ST U N C N A
E L R D CS
IR N A D STEEL FO N R ..........................
O N
U D IES
N N E R U R L IN A D D A IN ................
OFROS OL G N RW G
C TLER , H N TO LS, A D H R WR ...........
U Y AD O
N AD AE
FA R A E ST U T R L MT L PR D C S . . . .
B IC T D R C U A E A O U T
S R W M C IN PR D C BO
C E A H E O U TS,
LTS, E C .........
T
MT L ST M G ......................... ................
E A A PIN S
EN IN A D TU B ES .................................
G ES N
R IN
F R M C IN R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AM A H E Y
C N R C IO A D R L T C M C IN R .........
O ST U T N N E A E A H E Y
MT L W R IN M C IN R ............................
EA OK G A H E Y
SPECIA IN U R M C IN R .......................
L D ST Y A H E Y
G N R L IN U IA M C IN R ...................
E E A D STR L A H E Y
OFFICE A D C M T G M C IN S .............. .
N O PU IN A H E
SER ICE IN U R M C IN S ........................
V
D ST Y A H E
ELECTRIC TEST A D DISTRIBUTING E U M N
N
Q IP E T
ELEC IC L IN U IA A R T S ....... .
TR A
D STR L PPA A U
H UE O D A
O S H L PPLIA CES ..................................
N
ELECTRIC LIG TIN A D W IN E U M N ..
H G N IR G Q IP E T
R D A D T RECEIV G E U E T ............
A IO N V
IN Q IPM N
C M U IC T N E U E T ............................
O M N A IO Q IPM N
ELEC O IC C MO E T A D A C R . ..
TR N O P N N S N C ESSO IES
M T R V IC
O O EH LES A D E U E T ...................
N Q IPM N
A C A A D PA T .....................................
IR R FT N R S
SHIP A D B A BU IN A D REPA G . . . .
N O T ILD G N
IRIN
M C A IC L M A R G A D C N R L D IC
E H N A E SU IN N O T O EV ES
O H R M N F C U IN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T E A UA T R G

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

81.9
81.3
66.5
82.9
72.7
74.3
75.2
68.3
71.6
71.5
76.4
73.7
72.8
75.6
75.0
73.1
78.8
69.9
77.3
77.5
76.6
73.6
73.0
78.5
75.0
76.1
78.4
68.1
75.4
72.7

76.9
79.3
64.6
82.6
71.9
73.6
73.2
66. 1
69.4
69.8
76.3
72.7
69.2
72.7
73.4
70.3
78.0
68.9
76.4
77.0
75.2
71.7
69.2
77.4
72.6
74.6
72.7
64.6
74. 1
70.3

TR N R T N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —
A SPO TA IO
R IL O D ....................... ......... ..................
A RAS
L C L A D S B R A T A SPO T T N ...........
O A N U U B N R N R A IO
TA IC B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X AS
TR C IN , L C L A O L N D A C ...........
U K G O A N O G IST N E
A TR N R T N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IR A SPO TA IO

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

77.2
84.5
76.9
76.8
72.7
78.7

67.9 6.7 2.7 22.8 16.3
ft1 a ? ft
1H•O
01.0 4*O .1
1
lA A
74.6 2.0
.2 23.1 21.6
52.3 20.5 3.9 23.2 17.7
63.5 6.8 2.4 27.3 19.1
76.5 2.0
.2 21.3 20.2

C M U IC T N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O M N A IO
T L PH N C M U IC T N ............................ • • • •
E E O E O M N A IO
R D A D TELEVISION B O D A IN ........... • •••
A IO N
R A C ST G

100.0 83.0 80•4
100.0 84.5 83.0
100.0 73.9 64.5

1.4
8.4

PU
BLIC UTILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —

100.0 83.0 82.4

.5




4.4
1.6
1.7
.3
.8
.6
2.0
2.1
2.0
1.7
.1
1.0
3.7
2.5
1.6
2.7
.7
1.0
.9
.5
1.4
1.9
3.8
1. 1
2.4
1.4
5.6
3. 1
1.4
2.2

2.4

.5
.5
.2
.0
.0
.0
.1
.2
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.4
.0
.2

18.1
18.7
33.5
17.1
27.3
25.7
24.8
31.7
28.4
28.5
23.6
26.3
27.2
24.4
25.0
26.9
21.2
30.1
22.7
22.5
23.4
26.4
27.0
21.5
25.0
23.9
21.6
31.9
24.6
27.3

15.3
17.8
31.7
16.9
26.2
25.4
24.4
28.9
27.3
27.4
23.5
25.6
25.5
22.5
23.2
25.9
21.0
29.7
22.4
22.1
23.0
25.5
23.5
20.8
23.7
22.8
19.9
27.1
23.4
25.8

#2 1t • U 16.0
17 n
.0 15.5 15.2
1.1 26.1 21.1
.1

17.0 16.7

2.0
.5
1.4
.2
1.0
.3
.4
2.1
.9
.8
.1
.7
1.5
1.4
1.7
1.0
.3
.4
.4
.4
.4
.8
3.1
.6
1.2
1.0
1.5
3.8
1.1
1.4

.8
.4
.4
.0
.0
.1
.0
.7
.1
.2
.0
.0
.1
.5
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.4
.1
.1
.1
.2
1.0
.1
.1

100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

91.4
91.5
82.2
88.0
82.5
84.4
86.6
81.4
84.8
82.3
83.5
82.6
82.4
85.6
84.7
84.9
88.4
82.6
86.9
87.9
85.5
86.2
86.4
87.7
87.4
84. 1
87.8
81.7
85.3
86.1

85.6
88.9
79.6
87.6
81.7
83.6
83.8
78.4
82.2
80.0
83.4
81.3
78.0
82. 1
82.6
81.5
87.7
81.3
85.8
87.3
83.9
83.8
81.1
86.3
84.2
82.5
80.9
77.2
83.8
82.7

5.1
1.9
2.4
.3
.8
.8
2.8
2.8
2.4
2.2
.1
1.3
4.4
3.1
2.0
3.3
.7
1.3
1.1
.6
1.7
2.5
5.3
1.4
3.2
1.6
6.8
3.9
1.5
3.1

.7
.6
.2
.0
.0
.0
.1
.2
.2
.1
.0
.0
.0
.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.6
.0
.4

8.6
8.5
17.8
12.0
17.5
15.6
13.4
18.6
15.2
17.7
16.5
17.4
17.6
14.4
15.3
15.1
11.6
17.4
13.1
12.1
14.5
13.8
13.6
12.3
12.6
15.9
12.2
18.3
14.7
13.9

6.9
8.0
16.8
11.9
16.6
15.4
13.1
16.6
14.4
16.9
16.4
16.9
16.5
13.1
13.7
14.3
11.3
17.1
12.7
12.0
14. 1
13.1
12.2
11.9
11.7
15.2
11.0
14.7
13.7
12.8

1.1
.3
.7
.1
.9
.2
.3
1.6
•6
.6
.1
.5
1.1
.9
1.6
.8
.3
.3
.3
.1
.3
.6
.9
.4
.8
.7
1.0
2.7
.9
1.0

.6
.3
.3
.0
.1
.1
.0
.5
.2
.2
.0
.0
.0
.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.5
.1
.1
.0
.2
1.0
.1
.2

3.3
.9
1.3
4.0
4.4
1.1

3.2
•1
1
.3
1.5
3.7
.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

85. 1
89.2
82.8
86.8
83.2
86.6

75.0 7.2
86. 0 3.1
80.7 2.0
56.8 25.0
72.2 8.1
84.3 2.1

2.9
•1
.2
5.0
2.9
.2

14.9
10.8
17.2
13.2
16.8
13.4

9.8
10.0
16.3
9.3
10.4
12.4

2.2
.7
.6
2.8
3.1
.9

2.9
.1
.3
1.2
3.3
.1

.8
.3
3.8

o
Q
• c 100.0 Q Q oo. 'y 2.8
.0 100.0 91.4 89. 7 1.7
i.i 100.0 81.3 69.3 10.6

. 2 10.1 9.3
.0 8.6 8.3
1.4 18.7 14.0

•7
.3
3.6

.1
.0
1.1

11.4 11.2

.2

.0

.3

.0 100.0 88.6 88.0

.5

.1

Table B -26. Single and multi-industry employment of all workers by number of major industry employers, 1967-----Continued

IN U R
D ST Y

PR A N N G IC L U A E O O Y - C N IN E
IV TE O A R U T R L C N M
O T UD
WO ESA E T A E •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
HL L R D
M T R V IC
O O EH LES A D A T M T E E U E T .......
N U O O IV Q IPM N
D U S CH ICA A D A
R G * EM LS, N LLIED PR D C S ...........
OUT
D Y G O S A D A R L .......................................
R O D N PPA E
G O ER A D R L T D PR D C S .......................
R C IES N E A E
OUT
ELEC IC L G O S ••••••••••••*•••••••••••••••
TR A O D
H R W R , PL M IN A D H A G E U E T . . . .
A D A E U B G N E TIN Q IPM N
M C IN R , E U E T A D SUPPLIES ..................
A H E Y Q IPM N N

PE C T O O K R ML Y D
RE
F
H IR D ST Y F M R E R G U IN —
A
AN
----- j- N Y QUANR T~EW R E S E P O E IN T E IN U RF O U RJO QUA IN TD R G
R ERS
0
R
U
D STR O K R
D ST Y O K R
SIN LIE IN U R W R E S M LTI-IN U Y WR E S
G
ML IN U R W R E S
U TI— D ST Y O K R
SIN LE IN U R W R E S
G
D ST Y O K R
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
N ME O
U BR F
N ME O M JO
U BR F A R
N ME O
U BR F
IN U R E P O E S
D ST Y ML Y R
E POES
ML Y R
IN U R E P O E S
D ST Y ML Y R
E POES
ML Y R
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
MR
OE
TA
HN
TA
HN
T A AL
HN L
TA
HN
AL
L
W
W
W
W OA N
W R R OA N
W
W OA N
W
WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O WK S T T L O E T O T O T T L O E T O T O
R R OA N
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

75.1
72.7
74.0
73.5
73.1
74.6
74.5
73.6

70.9
69.7
72.5
70.8
69.4
72.8
72.1
70.7

3.9
2.9
1.5
2.6
3.3
1.6
2.2
2.7

.3
.2
.1
.1
.4
.2
.1
.1

24.9
27.3
26.0
26.5
26.9
25.4
25.5
26.4

21.6
25.4
25.5
24.9
24.5
24.8
24.7
25.1

2.8
1.8
.5
1.4
2.0
.6
.8
1.2

.5
.1
.0
.2
•4
.1
.1
.2

1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

86.0
85.0
86.1
86.3
84.7
85.8
86.2
86.2

80.9
81.0
84. 1
82.9
80.2
83.4
83.1
82.5

4.7
3.8
1.9
3.2
3.9
2.1
2.9
3.6

.4
.3
.1
.2
.6
.2
.2
.1

14.0
15.0
13.9
13.7
15.3
14.2
13.8
13.8

11.8
13.4
13.4
12.5
13.5
13.7
13.0
12.8

1.8
1.3
.6
.9
1.5
.5
.8
.9

.5
.2
.0
.3
.3
.0
.1
.2

R TA T A E • •.••••••••••••••••••••••«»•••••••« 100.0
E IL R D
D P R M N ST R S
EAT E T O E
100.0
M IL O D R H U S ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 100.0
A R E O SE
V R TY ST R S •••••••••••»•••••••••••••••••• 100.0
A IE
OE
G O E Y ST R S
R CR O E
100.0
M T R V IC D A E S •••••••••••*•••••••••«• 100.0
O O EH LE E L R
MN•S A D B Y C O H G A D FU ISH G . . . . 100.0
E
N O S* L T IN N RN IN S
W MNS R A Y O E R STO ES ........................... 100.0
O E * E D -T -W A
R
FA IL C O H G ST R S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100.0
M Y L T IN
OE
S O ST R S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100.0
HE OE
FU N R A D H M FU ISH G ....................... 100.0
R ITU E N O E RN IN S
D U ST R S A D PR PR R ST R S ................ , 100.0
R G O E N O IETA Y O E
fuel a d ice dealers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
n
100.0

82.9
79.7
76.4
78.9
77.5
75.9
75.4
79.1
77.2
73.5
74.4
77.9
75.3

66.9 12. 1
76.7 2.8
75.3 1.0
75.6 3.2
71.3 5.2
64.6 8.5
71.6 3.3
74.6 3.9
75.9 1.2
63.3 7.9
70.6 3.1
69.5 7.0
72.5 2.6

3.9
.1
.0
.1
1.0
2.8
.5
.6
.2
2.2
.6
1.4
.2

17.1
20.3
23.6
21.1
22.5
24.1
24.6
20.9
22-8
26.5
25.6
22.1
24.7

10.8
18.7
22.7
19.6
19.2
18.7
21.7
19.0
21.8
21.7
23.1
19.6
23.5

4.0
1.5
.7
1.4
2.6
4.1
2.1
1.6
.9
3.6
2.2
2.0
1.2

2.3
.1
.1
.1
.7
1.3
.8
.4
•1
1.2
.3
.5
.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

89.3
90.1
88.6
90.0
87.6
87.8
88.2
89.6
87.6
85.5
87.6
88.8
85.1

71.3 13.0
86.6 3.3
87.3 1.2
85.8 4.1
79.4 6.8
73.2 10.8
82.6 4.6
83.2 5.5
85.8 1.6
70.7 10.8
82.6 4.1
76.7 9.8
81.2 3.7

5.0
.1
.1
.1
1.5
3.8
.9
.9
.2
4.0
.9
2.3
.3

10.7
9.9
11.4
10.0
12.4
12.2
11.8
10.4
12.4
14.5
12.4
11.2
14.9

5.9
8.8
11.0
8.8
9.6
8.4
9.6
8.4
11.8
10.8
11.2
9.1
13.7

2.6
1.0
.3
1.0
1.9
2.6
1.5
1.5
.4