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Analysis of Work
Stoppages, 1976
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1978
Bulletin 1996




Analysis of
Work Stoppages, 1976
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1978
Bulletin 1996




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402
Stock No. 029-001-02208-5




Preface
This bulletin, continuing an annual feature of the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the field of
industrial relations since 1941, provides a detailed statistical presentation of work stoppages in
1976. The data presented in earlier bulletins have been supplemented by the addition of a histori­
cal record by industry group, 1937-76 (appendix A).
Preliminary monthly estimates of the level of strike (or lockout) activity for the United States
as a whole are issued about 30 days after the end of the month of reference and are available on
request. Preliminary estimates for the entire year are available at year’s end; selected final tabula­
tions are issued in the early summer of the following year. The methods used to prepare work
stoppage statistics are described in appendix B.
The Bureau wishes to acknowledge the cooperation of employers and employer associations,
labor unions, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and various State agencies which
furnish information for this program.
The bulletin was prepared in the Division of Industrial Relations, Office of Wages and Industrial
Relations, by Linda H. LeGrande.
Material in this publication is in the public domain and may be reproduced without the permis­
sion of the Federal Government. Please credit the Bureau of Labor Statistics and cite Analysis o f
Work Stoppages, 1976, Bulletin 1996.




iii

C ontents
Page
Strike duration................................................................... .................................................................................................... 1
Size of strikes........................................................................................................................................................................... 1
Major issues.............................................................................................................................................................................. 2
Monthly pattern...................................................................................................................................................................... 2
Contract status......................................................................................................................................................................... 2
Union affiliation...................................................................................................................................................................... 2
Industry.................................................................................................................................................................................. 3
Occupation of workers............................................................................................................................................................ 5
Location........................................................................................................... ...................................... .............................. 5
Type of settlem ent................................................................................................................................................................. 6
Impasse procedures................................................................................................................................................................. 7
Text tables:
1. Work stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more, by industry group and major issue, 1976............................... 3
2. Work stoppages by single-firm unions, 1960-76............................................... ....................................................... 3
3. Work stoppages in mining, construction, and government, 1940-76........................................................................ 5

Charts:
1. Number of work stoppages beginning in the year by sector, 1950-76......................................................................4
2. Number of workers involved in stoppages beginning in the year by sector, 1950-76 ..............................................4
3. Idleness as a percentof estimated working time by sector, 1950-76............................................................................ 6
Reference tables:
Work stoppages:
1. In the United States, 1927-76 ...........................................................................................................................
2. By month, 1975-76 ...........................................................................................................................................
3. By size and duration, 1976 ................................................................................................................................
4. Involving 10,000 workers or more, 1927-76 .....................................................................................................
5. Involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1976.......................................................................................
6. By industry group and size, 1976 ......................................................................................................................
7. By affiliation of unions involved, 1976 ............................................................................................................
8. By contract status and size, 1976 ......................................................................................................................
9. By industry group and contract status, 1976.....................................................................................................
10. By contract status and major issue, 1976 ..........................................................................................................
11. By major issue, 1976 .........................................................................................................................................
12. By industry group and major issue, 1976 ..........................................................................................................
13. By major issue and size, 1976 ...........................................................................................................................
14. By industry, 1976 ..............................................................................................................................................




iv

8
9
10
11
12
14
15
16
17
19
20
21
25
26

Contents— Continued

Page

Reference tables— Continued
Work stoppages— Continued
15. By industry group and occupation, 1976 ............................................................................................................
16. By major issue and level of government, 1976.....................................................................................................
17. In government by major issue and union participation,1976 ..............................................................................
18. By occupation and level of government, 1976.....................................................................................................
19. In government by level, function, and occupation,1976......................................................................................
20. In government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 1976 ...............................................................................
21. By region and State, 1976....................................................................................................................................
22. By region, State, and occupation, 1976 ..............................................................................................................
23. In States having 25 stoppages or more by industry group, 1976 ........................................................................
24. By State and metropolitian area, 1976.................................................................................................................
25. By industry group and duration, 1976.................................................................................................................
26. By major issue and duration, 1976 ......................................................................................................................
27. By contract status and duration, 1976.................................................................................................................
28. By contract status and mediation, 1976...............................................................................................................
29. By contract status and type of settlement, 1976 .................................................................................................
30. By major issue and type of settlement, 1976.......................................................................................................
31. By industry group and type of settlement,
1976 ......................................................................................
32. By contract status and procedure for handling unsettled issues, 1976 ...............................................................

33
36
37
38
40
44
50
51
54
60
62
64
65
66
67
68
69
71

Appendixes:
A. Work stoppages by industry group, 1937-76......................................................................................................... 72
B. Scope, definitions, and methods......................................................................................................... ...................78




v




Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1976
three-fourths of all stoppages that were in effect 2 weeks
or less took place in nonmanufacturing industries, and
almost one-third of these disputes continued for only 1
day. Walkouts in manufacturing were longer, on the aver­
age, accounting for 60 percent of all stoppages in effect
for 1 month or more.
Stoppages over noneconomic issues were of shorter dura­
tion than those over economic matters, as has historically
been the case (table 26). Noneconomic issues1 accounted
for 87 percent of the stoppages and 77 percent of the
workers involved in 1-day strikes. Seventy-eight percent
of longer walkouts, those in the 15- to 29-day range, were
over economic issues and involved an equal proportion of
workers.
The occurrence of shorter stoppages in nonmanufac­
turing was attributable to the preponderance of noneconomically motivated disputes in mining (table 12). Of the
2,544 stoppages over noneconomic issues, almost 80 per­
cent were in nonmanufacturing industries, more than 52
percent in mining alone. More than three-fourths of the
disputes over plant administration and over two-thirds
of the strikes concerned with “other working conditions”
took place in the mining industry, primarily bituminous
coal.

In 1976, unions had a greatly increased opportunity to
negotiate contracts more beneficial to the workers they
represented than was the case from 1971 to 1975. The
economic climate improved considerably over the earlier
years and there were many more contract expirations and
reopenings.
From 1971 to 1974, negotiated provisions of collective
bargaining agreements had to comply with the wage-price
guidelines then in effect. After controls were removed in
April 1974, a catchup policy by union negotiators became
evident but this lasted only briefly.
The very slow economic improvement in 1975, coupled
with a light bargaining calendar, helped to keep the number
of stoppages at a fairly low level for that year. However,
with the more than 900 contract renegotiations and wage
reopenings and the improved economic picture in 1976,
American labor and management reported the fourth
highest level of work stoppages ever—
some 5,648 stoppages
began during the year, or 12 percent above the previous
year.
In the private nonagricultural sector, major contracts
(covering 1,000 workers or more) that expired or reopened
in 1976 covered 4.4 million workers as compared with 2.5
million in 1975. Along with this increase in collective
bargaining activity, the number of workers who partici­
pated in labor-management disputes increased to 2.4
million, a 39-percent rise between 1975 and 1976. Workers
participating in stoppages in 1976 made up 3.0 percent
of the total work force, almost 1 percentage point higher
than in 1975. Some 37.9 million days of idleness were
recorded in 1976, 6.7 million days more than in 1975.
The percent of total working time accounted for by labormanagement disputes in 1976 was 0.19 percent (1.9 work­
ing days idle per thousand), up from 0.16 percent in the
previous year.

Size of strikes

Approximately 75 percent of all stoppages in 1976
involved fewer than 250 workers, as in 1974 and 1975 (table
8). But there were 23 major work stoppages (those in­
volving 10,000 workers or more) in 1976, 3 more than in
1975 (table 4). The number of workers who participated
in major walkouts in 1976, 1.0 million, was more than
double the 1975 figure and almost triple the 1972 figure,
when wage-price controls were in effect. The proportions
of workers involved in major disputes in 1976 and the
resulting days of idleness were the highest since 1971.
Noneconomic issues were the most frequent cause of
stoppages involving 250-999 workers (table 13). About
two-fifths of these stoppages were in the mining industry
where 9 out of 10 walkouts were over noneconomic issues
(tables 6 and 12).

Strike duration

As in past years, a large proportion of work stoppages
were of short duration (table 1). One-half of the 5,654
labor disputes that ended in 1976 lasted 11 days or less and
almost one-fifth were in effect for 1 day (table 3). This
concentration of short walkouts was largely accounted for
by the 1,383 mining strikes that were in effect less than 2
weeks (table 25).
Shorter disputes occurred more often in the nonmanu­
facturing sector than in the manufacturing sector. Almost



1Noneconomic issues are union organization and security, job
security, plant administration, other working conditions, inter­
union and intraunion affairs, and other contractual matters.

1

As in the past, stoppages that occurred while attempting
to renegotiate -an agreement in 1976 accounted for over
one-half of all labor-management disputes.
Most of the strikes that took place while a contract was
in effect were due to disagreements over plant administra­
tion, primarily in the mining industry. Somewhat over 70
percent of the 1,950 mid-contract stoppages occurred in
the mining industry and 77 percent of all stoppages over
day-to-day administration of the contract were in mining
(tables 9 and 12).
Stoppages in wholesale and retail trade, services, govern­
ment, and the transportation and communication industry
constituted one-half of the labor disputes that occurred
when unions were negotiating an initial contract or seeking
recognition (table 9). Seven out of 10 stoppages that took
place while a collective bargaining agreement was in effect
occurred in the mining industry. Since these industries
compose most of the nonmanufacturing sector, relatively
more stoppages occurred in nonmanufacturing in connec­
tion with a first agreement or union recognition and when a
contract was in effect (87 percent).

Major issues

As in the past, economic issues were the primary cause
of most work stoppages in 1976 (table 11). However,
relatively fewer disputes and days of idleness occurred
over economic issues than in 1975.
Of the 23 major work stoppages in 1976, 12 resulted
from disagreements over economic issues (text table 1).
Nine of the major strikes over economic issues were in
nonmanufacturing industries, although economic issues
were not the cause of most stoppages in this sector. Over
half of the workers who participated in major stoppages
where economic demands were the chief issue were em­
ployed in the transportation and communication industry.
Job security was the most common nonecomic cause of
major stoppages. However, it should be noted that in 7 of
8 strikes over job security, wage-related demands were also
involved. The proportion of all disputes in which job
security and economic matters were the issues (44 percent)
was the same as for major strikes alone (text table 2 and
table 11).
One major work stoppage in the transportation equip­
ment industry accounted for more than one-half of the
workers involved in strikes over union organization and
security. A second major stoppage in this industry ac­
counted for two-fifths of all workers who struck over the
issue of job security.

Union affiliation

Unaffiliated unions greatly increased their work stop­
page activity in 1976 compared with AFL-CIO unions
(table 7). The number of strikes by unaffiliated unions rose
by more than 5 percentage points, workers involved by
almost 23 percentage points, and days of idleness by about
18 percentage points.
The increase in work stoppage activity by unaffiliated
unions arose largely from strikes involving 10,000 workers
or more (table 5). There were three labor disputes by un­
affiliated unions in 1975 (15 percent of all major strikes)
while in 1976 there were 10 (43 percent).3 Eighteen per­
cent of all workers involved in major stoppages during 1975
were represented by unaffiliated unions, in contrast with
70 percent during 1976. Only 11 percent of days idle in
1975 were attributable to major strikes by unaffiliated
unions. In 1976, 54 percent of days idle were due to the
major strike activity of unaffiliated unions. Most of the
increase between 1975 and 1976 was attributable to large
stoppages in the transportation and communication in­
dustry, the motor vehicle and equipment industry, and the
farm machinery and equipment industry.
Fewer single-employer unions struck in 1976 than in any
year since 1965. However, the annual average number of
strikes called by these unions during the 1970’s was greater
than during the 1960’s; their proportion of all stoppages
was unchanged (text table 2). The number of workers
involved in these strikes decreased both absolutely and rela­
tively between the two time periods. In contrast, the

Monthly pattern

May, June, and July are usually the peak months of
work stoppage activity. However, in 1976, April was also
a very active month. This may be explained by the timing
of contract renegotiations and reopenings. In April, May,
and June more agreements expired or were reopened than
in other months in 1976;2 the largest number of work
stoppages began during these 3 months.
Contracts that covered workers in trucking (450,000),
rubber (98,000), and construction (136,000) were up for
renewal in April. Of the 465,000 workers who struck begin­
ning in April— peak month for strikers—
the
more than twothirds were employed in these three industries.
Contract status

Work stoppages that resulted from efforts of a union to
negotiate a first agreement or to obtain recognition con­
tinued to decline. Such disputes accounted for 9.6 percent
of all stoppages in 1974, 8.4 percent in 1975, and 7.9
percent in 1976 (table 10).

3
Four additional major work
filiated and affiliated union members:
Workers and days idle are not available
pages by both affiliated and unaffiliated

2 Lena Bolton, “Auto, trucking lead increased 1976 bargaining
a c t i v i t y M onthly Labor Review, December 1975.



2

stoppages involved both unaf­
2 in 1975 and 2 in 1976.
by union affiliation in stop­
union members.

annual average of days idle during the 1970’s rose by more
than one-half from the prior decade.

idleness as a proportion of worktime—
3.93 percent (39.3
working days idle per thousand). These record levels re­
flected the 5-month strike in the industry in 1976.
In the food industry, the number of days idle (1.8 mil­
lion) and idleness relative to estimated working time (0.43
percent) in 1976 were among the highest years on record
for this industry. Days of idleness in 1976 were surpassed
only in 1946 and 1948. A month-long stoppage that in­
volved 29,000 workers accounted for 14 percent of days
idle in the food industry in 1976. The ratio of days idle
to total worktime exceeded the 1976 level in only 3 years.
The chemical industry experienced 1.1 million days of
strike-related idleness and 0.43 percent of working time
due to stoppages. In just 5 other years did days idle exceed
1 million—
once in the 1940’s and twice during both the
1960’s and 1970’s. Including 1976, there were 8 years in

Industry

Manufacturing. The trends in work stoppage activity for the
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing sectors are illustrated
in appendix A and charts 1, 2, and 3. Not since 1970
have the number of days idle and idleness as a percent of
total working time in manufacturing been as high as in
1976—
24.3 million and 0.51 percent, respectively. This was
largely due to the work stoppage activity in three industries-rubber, food, and chemical.
The total of 6.1 million days idle in the rubber industry
during 1976 was the highest for the industry since 1937
when data first became available. This was also true for

Text table 1. Work stoppages involving 10,000 wokers or more, by industry group and major issue, 1976
(Workers in thousands)

Industry
group

Union organization
and security

Economic 1

Ail issues

Workers

Stoppages

Workers

Stoppages

23
9
17
2

1,030.1
438.3
592.0
128.8

12
4
9
-

539.5
139.0
400.6
-

2

26.5

1

14.5

7

314.0

4

3

5.6

1
4
2

22.0
60.5
34.5

Stoppages

All industries2 • • •
Manufacturing . ■ •
Nonmanufacturing2
M in in g ..................
Contract construction . . •
TransportationCommunicatio n ..................
Wholesale and
retail trade . .
Finance, insur­
ance, and
real estate • •
Services..............
Government. • .

Workers

Plant
administration

Job
security
Stoppages

Workers

Stoppages

66.7
66.7
—
-

8
4
6
-

295.1
232.6
61.7
-

2
2
2

-

-

1

12.0

-

-

283.8

-

-

3

30.1

-

-

1

(3)

-

-

2

5.2

-

-

1
3
1

22.0
58.6
21.1

—

—

—

—

-

-

—
1
1

—
1.9
13.4

—
—

—
—
-

1
1
—
-

1 Economic issues are defined as general wage changes, supple­
mentary benefits, wage adjustments, and hours of work.
2 The number of stoppages reported for a major industry group
may not equal the sum of its components because individual stop-

128.8
128.8
128.8

pagesoccurring in 2 groups or more and counted in each.Workers are
allocated among the respective groups.
3 Fewer than 50 workers.

Text table 2. Work stoppages by single-firm unions, 1960-76
(Workers and days idle in thousands)
Stoppages beginning in the year
Year

Stoppages
Number

Days idle
during year

Workers involved

Percent of
all stoppages

Number

Percent of
ali workers

Number

Percent of
days idle

Year, 1960-69* • •

29

0.6

17.8

0.9

195.2

0.6

Year, 1970-76- • •

35

.6

12.4

.5

300.2

.7

1 1966 data were excluded in computing the decade average. In
that year, single-firm unions and professional employee associations




Workers

were combined,

3

Chart 1. Number of work stoppages beginning in the year by sector, 1950-76
N um ber of work stoppages
in thousands

1950

55

60

65

70

75 76

Chart 2. Number of workers involved in stoppages beginning in the year by sector, 1950-76
Workers
in thousands

1950




55

60

65

4

70

75

76

which idleness as a percent of working time in the chemical
industry was equal to or greater than 4.3 working days
idle per thousand.

workers than any other occupational group (table 15).
All measures of work stoppage activity related to these
workers rose between 1975 and 1976.
The greatest decrease in the number of strikes called by
a single occupational group was among service workers.
The number of stoppages involving service workers de­
clined about 30 percent and related days of idleness de­
clined by 40 percent. The number of service workers who
struck, however, rose by 28 percent between 1975 and
1976.
Walkouts involving professional and technical workers
fell by 27 percent. The entire decrease occurred in govern­
ment, with 147 stoppages in 1976 as opposed to 233 stop­
pages in 1975. There was also a 65-percent decrease in the
number of government workers who struck and a 48percent reduction in days of idleness.
The decline in work stoppages among government pro­
fessional and technical workers was due to decreased strike
activity among teachers (table 19). Between 1975 and
1976, the number of teacher disputes declined by almost
40 percent, teachers on strike by 65 percent, and days idle
by 50 percent.

Nonmanufacturing. The number of nonmanufacturing stop­
pages was the highest since 1936. More recently, the
heightened work stoppage activity in the nonmanufac­
turing sector has been attributed to events in three
industries: Mining, contract construction, and govern­
ment. In 1976, the three industries combined accounted
for 41 percent of the stoppages, 36 percent of the workers,
and 19 percent of the days idle in the total economy (table
14). Work stoppage activity in the three industries, how­
ever, has not followed a single pattern.
The numbers of workers and days idle have differed
significantly among the three industries (text table 3). In
mining, after having peaked in the 1940’s, strikers and days
idle declined steadily, on the average, until 1970-76. Days
idle in the construction industry, in contrast, rose in each
period; the 1970’s experienced the highest worker average.
Government workers who struck and days of idleness per
year, on the average, have grown at a rapid rate, except
for a slight decline between the two earliest periods.
These different patterns explain the variations in average
size and average length of labor-management disputes in
the three industries from 1940 to 1976. In the 1940’s,
mining strikes averaged 1,313 workers per stoppage and
declined by 2Vi times between 1970 and 1976. Reflecting
the frequent mid-contract walkouts in mining, the most
recent 7-year period averaged only 6 days per strike. Con­
struction walkouts have tended to lengthen during these
37 years, averaging 18.9 days between 1970 and 1976.
While the average length of stoppages in government rose
gradually to 7.9 days between 1942 and 1976, the average
size of these disputes grew nearly fourfold to 541 workers
per stoppage.

Location

Region4 and State. Six out of 10 stoppages in the United
States took place in Regions III and V (table 21). The three
States that experienced the most stoppages in 1976—
Penn­
sylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio— located in these re­
are
gions. Of the nearly 2,000 stoppages in the three States,
4Region I: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire,
Rhode Island, Vermont. Region II: New Jersey, New York. Region
III: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Vir­
ginia, West Virginia. Region IV: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Ken­
tucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee.
Region V: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin.
Region VI: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas.
Region VII: Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska. Region VIII: Colo­
rado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming.
Region IX: Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada. Region X: Alaska,
Idaho, Oregon, Washington.

Occupation of workers

As in past years, there were relatively more stoppages
(85 percent) involving production and maintenance

Text table 3. Work stoppages in mining, construction, and government, 1940-76
(Workers and days idle in thousands)
Construction

Mining
Period

Work
stoppages

Workers
involved

Days
idle

Work
stoppages

Government

Workers
involved

Days
idle

Work
stoppages

Workers
involved

Days
idle

Annual average
1940-49 1..................

453

595

7,847

323

102

1,070

33

5

29

1950-59 ..................

371

175

2,558

782

343

4,052

25

3

20

1960-69 ..................

221

97

1,124

897

308

5,187

119

70

539

1970-76 ..................

989

367

2,185

703

429

8,123

392

212

1,684

G overnm ent data begins in 1942. In 1940 and 1941, govern­
ment stoppages were included in "other nonmanufacturing indus­
tries."




5

almost one-half occurred in mining and 9 out o f 10 in­
volved production and maintenance workers (tables 22 and
23).
In addition, Regions III and V led the other areas in
number o f workers who engaged in stoppages, with
544,000 and 773,700 workers, respectively (table 21). Most
o f these workers were in production and maintenance
occupations and employed in the mining industry (tables
22 and 23).
One-third o f total days idle in 1976 were due to stop­
pages in Region V (table 21). In two o f the States in this
region—
Michigan and Ohio—
days idle due to labor-manage­
ment disputes exceeded 3 million. In Michigan, 35 percent
o f days idle were caused by strikes in transportation equip­
ment manufacturing (table 23). Strike activity in the rubber
industry accounted for 30 percent of all days idle in Ohio.
The idleness rates (days idle as a percent o f working
time) in Region X (0.30), Region V (0.29), and Region VII
(0.28) were the highest in the Nation (table 21). Within Re­
gion X, the highest ranking region, the State o f Washington
recorded an idleness rate o f 0.44 percent o f working time.
Ohio, in Region V, registered 0.47 percent. Iowa recorded
the highest rate (0.43 percent) among the States in Region
VII. Although Region IV as a whole averaged only 0.16
percent o f worktime idle, Alabama and Kentucky reported
rates o f 0.43 and 0.48 percent, respectively.

Detroit was the metropolitan area with the most workers
who engaged in labor disputes during 1976 (129,300).
Ranking second, New York City had 99,700 workers who
walked o ff their jobs. Three major walkouts accounted for
three-fourths o f these New York City workers (tables 5 and
24).
Whereas six metropolitan areas experienced more than 1
million days o f idleness in 1975, only two were above this
figure in 1976: Detroit (2.0 million) and Akron (1.1 mil­
lion). Most o f the idleness in Akron was due to disputes in
the rubber industry (tables 23 and 24).

Type of settlement
More than 7 out o f 10 stoppages were resolved by a
formal settlement in which all disputed issues were cleared
up or further dispute-handling procedures were specified
(table 29). Formal settlements were not reached in onefifth o f all short protest or sympathy strikes. Only 4 perpercent o f all strikes were broken and 3 percent were ended
by a court injunction. In 0.7 percent o f the labor manage­
ment disputes the employer went out o f business.
Almost all short protest or sympathy strikes took place
in the nonmanufacturing sector (table 31). Ninety-five
percent o f these walkouts were in mining. Similarly, fourfifths o f the strikes that ended because o f a court injunc­
tion occurred in nonmanufacturing industries. Over half
o f these involved miners.

M etropolitan area. Five metropolitan areas, one more than
in 1975, each experienced more than 100 stoppages: Pitts­
burgh (164), Chicago (129), Los Angeles-Long Beach (126),
Detroit (117), and New York City (115) (table 24).

Chart 3. Idleness as a percent of estimated working time by sector, 1950-76
Percent




6

Strikes that took place during contract renegotiations
were more likely to involve mediators (73 percent) than
those that occurred while an initial agreement was being
bargained (54 percent) or during the term o f contract
(4 percent).
There were 516 stoppages that ended with a procedure
for resolving still unsettled issues as a part o f the formal
settlem ent5 (table 32). Direct negotiation was the most
frequently used impasse procedure (3 4 percent), followed
closely by referral o f unsettled matters to a government
agency (27 percent).
When dispute-handling procedures were specified in
settlements ending a stoppage occurring during contract
renegotiations, more than half o f the contracts called for
continued direct negotiations. Almost as frequently, agree­
ments consummated after the negotiation o f an initial
contract provided for referral o f unsettled issues to a
government agency. In their formal agreements, mid­
contract stoppages most often (34 percent) requested
intervention by a government agency to resolve still un­
settled matters.

Seven out o f 10 stoppages that ended in a formal settle­
ment were over economic issues (table 30). On the other
hand, more than 9 out o f 10 o f the short protest or sym­
pathy strikes were caused by noneconomic disagreements,
primarily over plant administration. Plant administration
was the cause o f 43 percent o f the stoppages that were
ended by court injunctions.
Nine-tenths o f renegotiation disputes and three-fourths
o f stoppages during initial contract bargaining ended in
formal settlements (table 29). Slightly more than half o f
the short protest or sympathy strikes conducted while a
contract was in effect involved no formal settlement.

Impasse procedures
Dispute-handling procedures, in addition to head-tohead collective bargaining, may come into play either while
negotiating an agreement or while tidying up unsettled
issues after a formal agreement has been negotiated, or on
both occasions.
Government mediation occurred in slightly less than half
o f the labor-management disputes in 1976 (table 28). In
8 out o f 10 o f these, the Federal Government was the
mediator. Mediation by private sources occurred in only
2 percent o f the stoppages.




5For 25 strikes that involved 6,800 workers and 618,600 days
idle, no information was available on the type of procedure included
in the formal settlements.

7




Table 1. W ork stoppages in the United States, 1927-761
(W
ORKERS AM DAYS IDLE IN THOUSANDS)
D
W R STOPPA azs
OK
YEAR

H UM
BER

W
ORKERS INVOLVED

DURATION
(DAYS)
M
EAN 2 /

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR

PERCENT
NUM
BER
OF
NUM
BER
•TOTAL
EMPLOYED 3/

MEDIAN

PERCENT OF
SST. TOTAL
PER
W
ORKING
W R ER
OK
TIME 3 / INVOLVED

1927..........................................
1928...........................................
1929 ..........................................
19 3 0 ..........................................
1931...........................................

707
604
921
637
810

26.5
27.6
22.6
22.3
1 8 .8

3
(9)
(93
(9)
(9)

330
319
289
183
392

1.4
1. 3
1. 2
.8
1.6

26,200
1 2 ,6 00
5,350
3,320
6,890

(9)
(<*)
(9)
(9)
(9)

79.5
90.2
18.5
18.1
20.2

1932...........................................
1933..........................................
1939 ..........................................
1 9 3 5 ..........................................
1936..........................................

841
1, 6 95
1,8 56
2,019
2, 172

1 9. 6
16.9
19.5
23.8
23.3

(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

329
1, 1 7 0
1,970
1, 1 2 0
789

1 .8
6.3
7. 2
5.2
3. 1

10,500
1 6 ,9 00
1 9 ,6 00
1 5 ,5 0 0
13,900

(9)
(«)
(9)
(9)
(9)

32.9
1 4. 4
13.9
1 3 .8
17.6

1 9 3 7 ..........................................
193 8 ..........................................
1939...........................................
199 0 ..........................................
19 4 1 ..........................................

4, 740
2,772
2,613
2, 5 08
9,288

20.3
23.6
23.9
2 0 .9
1 8. 3

(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

1,860
688
1,170
577
2,360

7.2
2.8
3. 5
1.7
6. 1

28,400
9,150
1 7 ,8 0 0
6,700
23,000

(9)
(9)
.21
.0 8
.23

15 .3
1 3 .3
15.2
11.6
9 .8

199 2 ..........................................
1993...........................................
1 9 4 4 . . . . .................................
1995...........................................
1946 ..........................................

2,968
3,752
9,956
9,750
4,985

1 1. 7
5 .0
5 .6
9.9
29. 2

(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

890
1,9 80
2 , 120
3,970
4,600

2.0
4.6
4.8
8.2
1 0 .5

9,180
1 3 ,5 0 0
8,720
38,000
116,000

.04
.1 0
.07
.31
1 . 04

5.0
6.8
4.1
1 1 .0
25.2

194 7 ..........................................
1998 ..........................................
1999..........................................
19 5 0 ..........................................
1951..........................................

3,693
3,919
3,606
9,893
9,737

25.6
21.8
22.5
1 9 .2
17.4

(9)
(9)
(«)
8
7

2 , 170
1, 9 6 0
3,030
2,910
2,220

4.7
4.2
6.7
5. 1
9.5

39,600
39,100
50,500
38,800
22,900

.30
.28
.4 4
.33
.18

15.9
17.4
16.7
16.1
10.3

19 5 2 ..........................................
1953..........................................
1959..........................................
19 5 5 ..........................................
1956 ..........................................

5, 117
5,0 91
3,968
9, 3 20
3,825

19 .6
20.3
22.5
1 8 .5
18.9

7
9
9
8
7

3,590
2,900
1,530
2,650
1, 9 0 0

7.3
9.7
3. 1
5.2
3.6

59,100
28,300
22,600
28,200
33,100

.48
.2 2
.18
.2 2
.24

16.7
11.8
14.7
1 0.7
17.9

195 7 ..........................................
1958 ..........................................
1959 ...........................................
196 0 ..........................................
1961 ..........................................

3,673
3 ,6 9 9
3,708
3,333
3,367

19. 2
19.7
29.6
23.9
23.7

8
8
10
10
9

1,390
2,060
1,880
1,320
1,9 50

2.6
3.9
3. 3
2.9
2.6

16,500
23,900
69,000
1 9 , 100
16,300

.12
.18
.50
.1 4

.11

11.4
1 1.6
36 .7
1 9. 5
1 1.2

196 2 ..........................................
1963..........................................
1969 ..........................................
1965 ..........................................
1966 ..........................................

3,619
3,362
3,655
3 ,9 6 3
9 ,9 0 5

29.6
23.0
22.9
25.0
22.2

9
8
8
9
9

1, 2 3 0
991
1,690
1, 55 0
1, 9 6 0

2.2
1.1
2. 7
2.5
3.0

18,600
16,100
22,900
23,300
25,900

. 13
.11
.15
.1 5
.1 5

1 5. 0
17.1
1 4 .0
1 5.1
12.9

196 7 ..........................................
1968 ..........................................
1969..........................................
19 7 0 ..........................................
197 1 ..........................................

9,595
5,095
5,700
5 , 7 16
5, 138

22.8
24.5
22.5
25.0
27.0

9
10
10

11
11

2,870
2 ,6 4 9
2, 4 8 1
3,305
3,280

4.3
3.8
3.5
9. 7
9.5

42,100
99,018
42,869
66,919
97,589

.25
.2 8
.24
.3 7
.26

14.7
18 .5
17 .3
20 .1
19.5

19 7 2 ..........................................
1973 5 / ...................................
1979 5 / ...................................
1975 ...........................................
1 9 7 6 . . . ............. ..............

5 ,0 1 0
5,353
6 ,0 7 9
5, 0 31
5,698

24. 0
29.0
2 7 .1
26.8
28.-0

8
9
19
11
11

1,7 14
2,2 51
2,778
1,796
2,920

2.3
2.9
3.5
2. 2
3.0

27,066
27,998
97,991
31,237
37,859

.15
.1 9
.29
.16
.19

15.8
12.9
17 .3
1 7 .9
15.6

g iv e n e q u a l w e ig h t r e g a r d l e s s of its s iz e .
3 A g r ic u ltu r a l a n d g o v e rn m e n t e m p lo y e e s a r e in ­
c lu d e d in th e to ta l e m p lo y e d a n d to ta l w o rk in g tim e ; p r i ­
v a te h o u s e h o ld , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r y e m p lo y e e s a r e e x ­
c l u d e d . A n e x p l a n a t i o n o f th e m e a s u r e m e n t o f i d l e n e s s
a s a p e r c e n ta g e o f th e to ta l e m p lo y e d la b o r f o r c e a n d
o f th e t o t a l t i m e w o r k e d i s f o u n d i n " T o t a l E c o n o m y
M e a s u r e o f S t r i k e I d l e n e s s , " M o n t h l y L a b o r R e v ie w ,
O c t. 1968.
4 N ot a v a ila b le .
5 D o e s n o t in c lu d e a n u n d e te r m in e d n u m b e r of
j u r i s d i c t i o n a l d is p u te s f o r w h ic h id e n tif y in g in f o r m a tio n
w a s n o t a v a ila b le .

1 T h e n u m b e r o f s t o p p a g e s a n d w o r k e r s r e l a t e to
t h o s e s t o p p a g e s t h a t b e g a n in th e y e a r ; a v e r a g e d u r a t i o n ,
to th o s e e n d in g in th e y e a r . D a y s o f id l e n e s s in c lu d e a ll
s to p p a g e s in e f f e c t. W o r k e r s a r e c o u n te d m o r e th a n o n c e
if th e y w e r e in v o lv e d in m o r e th a n 1 s to p p a g e d u r in g th e
y e a r.
A v a ila b le in fo rm a tio n f o r e a r l i e r p e r io d s a p p e a r s
in H a n d b o o k of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s . 1975 R e f e r e n c e E d itio n .
B L S B u lle tin 1865 (1 9 7 5 ), ta b le s 1 5 9 -6 4 . F o r a d is c u s s io n
o f t h e p r o c e d u r e s i n v o l v e d in th e c o l l e c t i o n a n d c o m p i l a ­
tio n of w o rk s to p p a g e s ta tis tic s , s e e B L S H a n d b o o k of
M e th o d s . B L S B u lle tin 1910 (1 9 7 6 ), c h . 27 .
2 F ig u r e s a r e s im p le a v e r a g e s ; e a c h s to p p a g e is

8

Table 2. W ork stoppages by month, 1975-76
(MCBKFBS A D DAYS IDLE IN THOUSANDS)
M
NUMBER OF STOPPAGES
M
ONTH

BEGINNING IN M NTH
O

SORKERS INVOLVED

IN EFFECT
DOEING M
ONTH

BEGINNING IN M NTH
O

NOHBER

PERCENT

NUMBER

PERCENT

NUM
BER

PERCENT

1975
JANUARY....................
FEBRUARY..................
M
ARCH.........................
APPIL.........................
HAT..............................
j h v e ............................
JOLT............................
AUGOST.......................
SEPTEMBER...............
OCTOBER....................
NOVEMBER..................
DECEMBER..................

5 ,0 3 1
390
339
375
491
555
533
518
420
495
426
300
239

10 0 .0
6 .8
6.7
7.5
9.8
1 1.0
1C.6
10 .3
8.3
5.8
8.5
6.0
4.8

8,897
581
540
612
751
850
876
899
836
907
823
656
566

10 0 .0
6.5
6. 1
6.9
8 .4
9.6
9.8
10.1
9.4
10.2
9.3
7.4
6.4

1, 7 4 6
13 2 .3
10 8 .6
100 .9
13 1 .3
18 6 .6
174.3
230.8
17 1. 7
216.8
14 3 .4
62.8
8 6 .1

luo.o

1976
JANUARY....................
FEBRUARY..................
MARCH.........................
APRIL.........................
MAT..............................
JUNE............................
JOLT............................
AUGOST.......................
SEPTEMBER................

5,648
338
362
443
591
572
577
505
480
521
559
452
248

10C.0
6.0
6.4
7. 8
1 0 .5
10.1
10 .2
8 .9
8.5
9.2

10, 08 9
612
615
67 9
894
921
1, 0 07
960
937
972
1, 0 24
861
60 7

100.0
6. 1
6. 1
6.7
8.9
9. 1
1 0 .0
9 .5
9.3
9.6
10. 1
8.5
6.0

2,420
76.8
96.2
157.3
464.7
163.8
231.3
2 9 1 .7
171.1
339.8
151.5
200.6
75.2

10 0. 0
3.2
4.0
6.5
1 9. 2
6.8
9.6
12.1
7.1
14.0

NOVEMBER..................
DECEMBER..................

8.0
4.4

8.3
3.1
NOTE:

1 See footnote 3 t> table 1.




7.6
6.2
5.8
7.5
1 0. 7
1 0 .0
1 3 .2
9.8
12.4
8.2
3.6
4.9

to ta ls .

9

DAYS IDLE DURING M
ONTH

IN EFFECT
DURING M
ONTH
NUM
BER

NUM
BER

PERCENT

PERCENT OF
EST. TOTAL
TIMS y

PERCENT

2,906
178 .2
17 1 .0
168.5
205. 4
265.2
297.7
381.8
324.9
371.7
245.8
14 2 .8
153.4

10 0. 0
6.1
5. 9
5.8
7. 1
9.1
1 0. 2
13.1
1 1. 2
1 2. 8
8 .5
4. 9
5.3

31,237
1 ,6 04.9
1,557.3
1 ,7 74.3
2,177.0
3,3 1 9 .0
3,362.0
4,464.5
3,376.7
3,683. 8
2,3 2 7 .0
1,736.8
1,853.7

10 0 .0
5.1
5.0
5.7
7 .0
10.6
10.8
14.3
10.8
11 .8
7.4
5.6
5.9

0. 16
.09
. 11
. 11
.13
.20
.20
.26
.20
.2 2
. 14
.11
.11

3 ,9 6 1
136. 2
138. 5
1 9 9 .3
530.2
295. 4
372. 5
490 .1
409.5
466.3
428.7
326.2
1 6 8 .0

100.0
3 .4
3.5
5 .0
13.4
7.5
9.4
12.4
10.3
11.8
1 0. 8
8.2
4 .2

37,859
1 ,2 00.3
1,029.5
1,762.3
3 ,1 33.1
3,5 9 6 .7
4,388.4
5,1 4 4 .9
4,5 5 7 .4
4,8 4 7 .7
4, 3 4 8 . 2
2 ,3 91.1
1,4 5 9 .4

100.0
3.2
2.7
4.7
8.3
9.5
1 1.6
13.6
12.0
12.8
1 1. 5
6.3
3.9

. 19
.07
.0 7
. 10
. 18
.22
.24
.30
.2 6
.28
.28
. 14
.08

B ecause

o f ro u n d in g ,

s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s

m ay n o t equal

Table 3. Work stoppages by size and duration, 19761
(POBKKBS AH DATS IDLE IS THOUSABDS).
D
NUM
BER OF W
ORKERS INVOLVED

1

TOTAL

4r 6
DAYS

2-3
DAYS

DAY

7-14
DAYS

30-59
DAYS

15-29
DAYS

6 0- 89
DAYS

90
DAYS
AND
OVER

STOPPAGES ENDING IN YEAR
ALL STOPPAGES................................................................

5,654

1,1 13

6 72

564

893

842

769

370

431

6 AND UNDER 2 0 ...................................................................

662
2 ,0 7 5
1,404
913
369
188

91
346
351
245
64
13
3

57
168
198
153
75
17

57
172
137
116
48
29
3

110

124
348
176

107
326
184
80
38
27
5

46
159
87
43
19
14

2

2

70
191
82
42
25
17
3

20 AND UNDER 100.............................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 ............................................................
250 AND UNDER 5 0 0 ................................... .......................
500 AND UNDER 100 0.........................................................
1, 0 0 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ................................................
10,000 AND OVER................................................................

20
23

1

2

3

365
189
1 14

120

68

32
31
5

40
3
4

6

-

1

W
ORKERS INVOLVED
3 4 2 .0

4 6 4 .4

6 AND UNDER 20...................................................................

ALL STOPPAGES.................................................................

2 ,4 21.2

8. 1

1. 1

0.7

20 AND UNDER 100..............................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 ............................................................
250 AND UNDER 500 ............................................................
500 AND UNDER 1 0 0 0 .........................................................
1 , 00 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ...............................................
10 , 0 0 0 AND OVER................................................................

10 3 .9
225.2
320.5
248.8
354.4
1 30 . 2
1,030.1

18.9
57.3
8 8 .7
4 1 .6
20. 1

0.7
9. 1

33. 2
53 .9
50. 3
2 7. 6
5.2
28 5. 0

22.2

-

114. 2

227.4

8.6

41.1
31. 5
57 .2
1 9. 6
4 6 .0

332. 1

308.b

3 2 1 .3

265.3

1.4
18.0
29. 9
3 9. 9
47. 6
7 5. 4

1 .5
16.8
2 8 .1
4 0 .6
2 1 .9
56.0
3 3 .2
10 6 .4

1.3
15. 2
28.6
27. 3
25.8
53.8
32. 4
13 7 .0

0.5
7.9
12.9
14.7
12 .4
32 .8
18 4 .0

2,253. 6

3,682.6

6,8 5 7 .2

8,501.1

10. 1

22.6

130. 3

252.4
420 .1
609. 5
31 9 .7
743.8
466.4
848.0

3 7. 5
446.0
843. 1
77 7. 1
733.0
1,493.4
732.9
1,794.1

26.4
389.7
633.2
715.7
595.3
1,452.5

20.6

99. 3

-

160.0

0.8
9.4

12.8
14.4
1 7. 8
29 . 4
19. 2
56.2

DAYS IDL
ALL STOPPAGES................................................................

3 8 ,106.6

342.0

995.3

6 AND UNDER 20 ...................................................................

18 5 .6
2,311.7
3,585.3
4,220.8
4 ,1 32.8
7,0 3 0 .2
2,597.3
14,042.9

1.1

1. 5
17.8

20 AND UNDER 10 0 ..............................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 ............................................................
250 AND UNDER 5 0 0 ............................................................
500 AND UNDER 1 0 0 0 .........................................................
1 . 00 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
5, 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ...............................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND OVER................................................................

6 8 2 .0

18.9
5 7 .5
8 8 .7
4 1.6

68.8
1 10.2
110.2

114. 2

2 .4
3 1. 8
7 7 .7
135.4
100. 1
188.4
45.8
10 0. 4

5 0 .6
7.8
628. 4

20.1

2 10.3
261 .9
32 6. 4
52 0 .4
12 6 .3
668. 0

-

4 ,688.3

14,792.6
83. 9
1,024.8
1 ,2 7 4 . 6
1,522.4
1,906.3
2,560.9
1,218.0
5 ,2 01.5

PERCENT DISTRIBUTION - STOPPAGES
ALL STOPPAGES................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.3

100. 0

100. 0

100.0

100.0

6 AND UNDER 2 0 ...................................................................

11 .7
36.7
24.8
16.1
6.5
3.3
.4
.4

8.2

8.5
25. 0
2 9 .5
22. 8

10. 1

12. 3
4 0 .9

14. 7
4 1 .3
2 0 .9
14.3
3.8
3 .7

13.9
42.4
2 3 .9
10.4
4.9
3. 5

1 2 .4
43.0
2 3 .5

20 AND UNDER 100..............................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 ............................................................
250 AND UNDER 500 ............................................................
500 AND UNDER 100 0.........................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ...............................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND OVER.................................................................

31. 1
31.5

22.0

11.2

5 .8

1.2

3 0 .5
2 4 .3

20.6

21.2
12. 8

3.5
5. 1
- 5
. 4

7 .6
4.5
. 3
.4

2.5

-

.

1

.4

.3

.

6

11.6
5.1
3. 8
-

100. U
16.2
44.3
19. 0
9.7
5. 8
3 .9

. 7
. 3

.7

.5

. 7
. 2

100.0

PERCENT DISTRIBUTION - W
ORKERS INVOLVED
ALL STOPPAGES......................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

6 AND UNDER 2 0 .................................................... ...............

0.3
5.5
16.8
25.9

0.

1

1 .9
7. 1

11.6

0.3
4 .0
9 .8
18. 1

0.4
5. 4
9.0

12.0

0.5
5.4
9. 1
1 3. 2

0.4
4.7
8.9
8.5

0.2

20 AND UNDER 100 ...................................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 ................................................................
250 AND UNDER 5 0 0 ................................................................

0.3
4.3
9 .3
13.2

1 , 00 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 ......................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ...............................................
10 ,0 00 AND OVER.....................................................................

1 4 .6
5.4
42.5

5. 9
33.4

5. 9

2 5 .2

22.7

1 8. 8

16.7
10. 1
42.7

-

12.0

69.3

35- 1

100. 0

1.1

6 1 .4

8.6
20.2

6.2

10.8

2 9. 9

35. 1

PERCENT DISTRIBUTION

-

9.0

1 2. 4

1 8 .4

ALL STOPPAGES.................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

0.5

0.3
5.5
1 6 .8
2 5 .9

0.2
1.8
6. 9
11.1
11 . 1

0.4
5 .8
9.3

0.6

0.5
6. 5
12.3
11. 3
1 0. 7

5. 9
3 3 .4

5. 1

0.4
4 .7
1 1.4
19.8
14.7
2 7 .6
6 .7
14.7

0.3
4.6
7.4
8.4
7.0
17.1
55.1

6.1

9.4

1 1. 1
10.8
18 .4

6.8
36.9

12.2

.8

63. 1

1 T o ta ls in th is ta b le d if f e r f r o m th o s e in ta b le s 1 a n d 2 a n d 6 - 2 4
b e c a u s e t h e s e s t o p p a g e s e n d e d d u r i n g th e y e a r , a n d t h u s i n c l u d e i d l e n e s s
o c c u r r i n g in p r i o r y e a r s .




to ta ls .

10

11.6

14. 5
23.1
5 .6
29 .6

8.0

DAYS IDLE

6 AND UNDER 20 ...................................................................
20 AND UNDER 1 00 ..............................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 ...........................................................
250 AND UNDER 5 0 0 ...........................................................
500 AND UNDER 1 0 0 0 .........................................................
1, 0 0 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ................................................
10 , 0 0 0 AND OVER................................................................

0-5
5.9

3.0
4.9
5 .6

6.9
11.4
16.6
8.7

20.2

21.8

12.7
23.0

10 .7
26.2

N O T E : B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,
D a s h e s ( -) d e n o te z e r o s ,

0.6
6.9

8.6
1 0 .3
1 2 .9
1 7. 3

8.2

35.2

s u m s o f i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s m a y no^ e o u a l

Table 4. Work stoppages involving 1 0,000 workers or more, 1927-76




(W
ORKERS AND CAYS IDLE IN THOUSANDS)
W
ORKERS INVOLVED
¥ EAR

NUM
BER
OP W R
OK
STOPPAGES

1

1927........................................
1928........................................
1929........................................
1930 ........................................
1931........................................

5

1
1
6

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
PERCENT OF
PERCENT OF
ES I. TOTAL
NUM
BER
TOTAL FOR
W
ORKING
YEAR
TIME 1/

NUM
BER

PERCENT OF
TOTAL FOR
YEAR

165
137
15
30

122

50.0
43.6
5.2
1 6. 4
37.7

9,737
1 0 ,0 86
195
270
1,9 54

37.2
80.0
3.6

8.1

2 8 .4

0.19
.14
( 2)
(2)
.0 3

.12
.11

1932........................................
1933........................................
1939........................................
1935........................................
1936........................................

7
17
18
9

140
429
725
516
169

93. 2
36.7
99.3
46. 1
21.9

5,337
5,199
7,488
9,523
2,893

20.8

.1 5
.0 8
.09

1937........................................
1936........................................
1939........................................
1990........................................
1941.......................................

26

5 28
39
572
57
1, 0 70

28.4
5.7
48.9
9.9
45.3

9, 110
171
5,731
331
9 , 344

32. 1
1.9
32.2
4. 9
4 0 .6

.14
(2)
.09
(2)
. 13

1942........................................
1943........................................
1944........................................
1995........................................
1996........................................

6
10

74
737
350
1, 3 50
2,920

8.8
37.2
1 6 .5
38.9
63.6

245
9,427
1, 25 9
1 9 ,3 0 0
66,400

5.9
69. 8
14.4
5 0 .7
57.2

(2)
.10
.01

51.2
55.3
6 9 .0
5 6. 0
2 4 .8

.21
.20

8

2
8

4
29

16
92
31

1997........................................
1948........................................
1999........................................
1950........................................
1951........................................

15

20
18

22
19

5 0 .8
30.7
38.2
29. 2

.29
.8 2

1,0 30
870
1, 92 0
7 38
457

97.5
99.5
63.2
30.7

20.6

17,700
1 8 ,9 0 0
34,900
21,700
5,680
36,900
7, 270
7,520
12,3 00
1 9 ,6 00

6 2 .6
25.7
33.3
4 3.4
59. 1

.36
.07
.07
. 11
.17

.45
.06
.04

.41
.25
.57

1952........................................
1953........................................
1959........................................
1955........................................
1956........................................

35
28
18
26

1,690
650
937

12

758

97.8
2 7 .1
28.5
45.6
39.9

1957........................................
1958 ........................................
1959 ........................................
1960........................................
1961........................................

13

283
823
845
384
601

20.9
40.0
45.0
29.2
41.4

3,050
1 0 ,6 0 0
50,800
7, 140
4,950

18.5
4 4 .2
7 3. 7
3 7 .9
30.4

318

25.8
37.0
25.0
30.7

4,800
3, 5 9 0
7,990
6,070
7 ,2 9 0

2 5 .8

607
387
600

3 9 .8
26.0
2 8. 7

1, 39 0
994
1, 65 3
1,901

46.5
37.5
26.9
50.0
58.0

21,900
20,519
1 7 ,8 53
35,990
23,152

5 0 .7
41.8
41.6
5 3. 4
48.6

.13

390
713
836
474
1, 0 30

22.7
31.7
3 0 .1
27.2
42.6

7,499
6,062
1 2 ,8 61
7,982
1 9 ,0 9 3

2 7 .7
21.7
26.8
2 9. 0
37. 1

.04
.03
.06
.04
.07

21
20
17
14

16
7
18

1962........................................
1963. . . ................................
1964........................................
1965........................................
1966........................................

21
26

1967 ........................................
1968........................................
1969........................................
1970........................................
1971........................................

28
32
25
39
29

1972........................................
1973 ........................................
1974........................................
1975........................................
1976........................................

18
25
27

1 S e e fo o tn o te 3, ta b le

20

23

1,210

102

10.8

668

1.

22.0

2 L e s s th a n 0 .0 0 5 p e r c e n t.

11

.26

.10

.04
.03
.0 6
.05
.05
.15

.12
.10
.20

Table 5. Work stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1976
B e g in n in g
d a te

M a r.

1

M a r.

11

A p r.

A p p ro x im a te
d u ra tio n
(c a le n d a r
d a y s)1

1

7

15

3

E s ta b lis h m e n ts )
a n d lo c a tio n (s )

U n io n (s)

A p p ro x im a te
n u m b e r of
w o rk ers
in v o lv e d 3

in v o lv e d 2

U n i t e d M in e W o r k e r s
o f A m e ric a ( in d .)

18. 800

P ro te s t

N evada R e so rt
A s s o c ia tio n —
L as V egas

H o te l a n d R e s ta u r a n t
E m p lo y e e s a n d
B a rte n d e rs In te rn a ­
t i o n a l U n io n

2 0 ,0 0 0

4 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d a n n u a l w a g e in c r e a s e s a v e r ­
a g in g 30 c e n ts th e f i r s t 3 y e a r s a n d 35 c e n ts th e f o u r th
y e a r ; e m p l o y e r s ' p e n s i o n c o n t r i b u t i o n s t o r i s e , in s t a g e s ,
to 40 c e n ts a n h o u r a n d h e a lth a n d w e lf a r e c o n tr ib u tio n s
to 37 c e n ts a n h o u r ; " n o s t r i k e , n o - lo c k o u t" c la u s e ; s u b ­
c o n tra c tin g o f w o rk w a s lim ite d .

T ru c k in g In d u s try —
N a tio n w id e

In te rn a tio n a l B r o th e r ­
hood of T e a m s te rs ,
C h a u ffe u rs, W a re ­
h o u se m e n and
H e lp e rs o f A m e ric a

2 4 9 . 300

5

3

A s s o c ia te d G e n e ra l
C o n tra c to rs of
A m e ric a , I n c .—

b la c k

lu n g l e g is la tio n .

W o rk ers

re tu rn e d .

3 -y e a r a g re e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e in c r e a s e of $ 1 .6 5 an
houx— 65 c e n ts
o n A p r i l 1, 1 9 7 6 , a n d 5 0 c e n t s o n A p r i l
1, 1 9 7 7 a n d 1 9 7 8 —f o r l o c a l c a r t a g e d r i v e r s , a n d $ 1 , $ 1 . 2 5 ,
a n d $ 1 .2 5 p e r m ile on th e r e s p e c tiv e d a te s f o r o v e r4 :h e r o a d d r i v e r s ; th e c a p w a s r e m o v e d f r o m th e c o s t-o f-liv in g
a llo w a n c e ; i n c r e a s e d e m p lo y e r p e n s io n a n d h e a lth a n d w e l­
fa re
c o n trib u tio n s ;
e s ta b lis h m e n t of 3 d a y s s ic k le a v e .

L a b o r e r s In te rn a tio n a l
U n io n o f N o r th
A m e ric a

1 4 ,5 0 0

3 - y e a r s e t t l e m e n t p r o v i d e d 4 0 - 5 5 c e n t s o n A p r i l 1, 1 9 7 6 ,
4 0 - 5 5 c e n t s o n A p r i l 1, 1 9 7 7 , a n d 4 0 - 4 5 c e n t s o n A p r i l
1, 1 9 7 8 ; 4 5 c e n t s a n h o u r c o n t r i b u t i o n t o p e n s i o n f u n d o n
A p r i l 1, 1 9 7 6 ( w a s 4 0 c e n t s ) ,
i n c r e a s e d to 50 c e n ts on
A p r i l 1, 1 9 7 7 , a n d 5 5 c e n t s o n A p r i l 1, 1 9 7 8 ; 5 0 c e n t s
a n h o u r c o n tr ib u tio n to h e a lth a n d w e lf a r e fu n d on A p r il
1, 1 9 7 6 ( w a s 3 5 c e n t s ) , i n c r e a s e d t o 6 0 c e n t s o n A p r i l 1,
1 9 7 7 a n d 7 0 c e n t s o n A p r i l 1, 1 9 7 8 .

G o o d y ear T ire and
R u b b e r C o. ; F i r e ­
s to n e T ir e a n d
R u b b e r C o. ; B. F .
G o o d ric h C o . ;
U n iro y a l, I n c .—
N a tio n w id e

U n ite d R u b b e r , C o rk ,
L in o le u m a n d P la s tic
W o rk e rs o f A m e ric a

5 6 ,2 0 0

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t f i r s t r e a c h e d w ith G o o d y e a r o n A u g u s t
2 4 , w ith F i r e s t o n e 2 d a y s l a t e r , f o llo w e d b y U n ir o y a l o n
S e p te m b e r 3, a n d fin a lly G o o d ric h 3 d a y s l a t e r ; i n itia l w a g e
i n c r e a s e o f 80 c e n ts a n h o u r w ith a d d itio n a l in c r e a s e s a t
th e l a s t 3 c o m p a n ie s to e lim in a te p a y l e v e l d if f e r e n c e s ;
30 c e n t g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e o n J u n e 6, 1977, a n d 25
c e n ts on M ay
1, 1 9 7 8 ; c o s t - o f - l i v i n g c l a u s e e s t a b l i s h e d .
( S e e C u r r e n t W a g e D e v e l o p m e n t , S e p t e m b e r 1 9 7 6 , p . 1 .)

1 2 ,2 0 0

3 - y e a r s e t t l e m e n t p r o v i d e d 6 5 c e n t s o n M a y 1, 1 9 7 6 , 5 0
c e n t s o n M a y 1, 1 9 7 7 , a n d M a y 1, 1 9 7 8 ; a n n u a l c o s t - o f l i v i n g c l a u s e r e v i s e d t o p e r m i t u n l i m i t e d a d j u s t m e n t s ; $ 17
p e r w e e k i n c r e a s e to p e n s io n a n d w e lf a r e fu n d s (w a s $ 4 4 );
p r o v is io n s s i m i l a r to tr u c k in g i n d u s tr y c o n t r a c t .

2 2 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d $ 35 a w e e k w a g e in c r e a s e s —
$ 13 i m m e d i a t e l y ,
$ 6 in O c to b e r 1977, a n d A p r il 1 978,
a n d $ 10 i n O c t o b e r 1 9 7 8 ; $ 3 i n c r e a s e i n e m p l o y e r s ' w e e k ­
l y c o n t r i b u t i o n t o t h e w e l f a r e fu n d a n d a $ 1 i n c r e a s e in
t h e i r p e n s io n c o n tr ib u tio n ; c o s t - o f - l i v i n g c l a u s e c o n tin u e d ..

In d ia n a

A p r.

21

M ay

1

16

U n ite d P a r c e l
S e r v i c e — 11 C e n t r a l
a n d M id w e s te rn
S ta te s

I n te rn a tio n a l B r o th e r ­
hood of T e a m s te rs ,
C h au ffeu r, W a re ­
h o u sem en and
H e lp e rs o f A m e ric a
(In d .)

M ay 3

17

A p a r tm e n t B u ild in g s N e w Y o rk C ity

S e rv ic e E m p lo y e e s
I n te r n a tio n a l U n io n

O h io B e l l T e l e p h o n e
C o m p a n y - - O h io

C o m m u n ic a tio n
W o rk e rs o f A m e ric a

1 2 ,0 0 0

C W A c h a r g e d th a t th e c o m p a n y v io la te d th e c o n tr a c t w h e n
i t o p e n e d a r e t a i l s t o r e s ta f f e d b y e m p lo y e e s o f a n e w jo b
c la s s ific a tio n —p h one c e n te r re p re s e n ta tiv e .
T h e w a lk o u t
w a s e n d e d b y a te m p o r a r y r e s tr a in in g o r d e r th a t c lo s e d
th e s to r e .

C o m m o n w e a lth o f
M a s s a c h u s e tts —
S ta te w id e

A m e ric a n F e d e ra tio n
o f S ta te , C o u n ty , a n d
M u n ic ip a l E m p lo y e e s ;
S e r v ic e E m p lo y e e s
I n t e r n a t i o n a l U n io n

2 1 , 100

1 - y e a r c o n tr a c t r a tif ie d on N o v e m b e r 1976 in c r e a s e d p a y
$ 1 ,2 5 0 ; c o n t r a c t to e x p ir e J u n e 3 0 , 1 977.

A s s o c ia te d G e n e ra l
C o n tra c to rs of
A m e ric a , I n c .—
A riz o n a

L a b o r e r s In te rn a tio n a l
U n io n o f N o r t h A m e r ­
ic a ; I n te r n a tio n a l U n ­
io n o f O p e ra tin g E n g in e e rs t B ric k la y e rs ,
M asons and P la s te r ­
e r s ' In te rn a tio n a l U n ­
io n of A m e r ic a ; In ­
te r n a tio n a l B r o th e r ­
hood of T e a m s te rs ,
C h a u ffe u rs, W a re ­
h o u s e m e n a n d H e lp ­
e r s of A m e ric a ( I n d .)

1 2 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p r o v id e d 15. 6 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in w a g e s
a n d f r i n g e b e n e f i t s o v e r t h e c o n t r a c t 's t e r m ; i n c l u d e s a
19- c e n t - a n - h o u r p a y in c r e a s e in J u n e 1 9 7 6 , a 2 6 - c e n t a n - h o u r i n c r e a s e in J a n u a r y 1977, a 5 0 - c e n t- a n - h o u r in ­
c r e a s e o n J u n e 1, 1 9 7 7 , a n d o n J u n e 1, 197 8.

G e n e ra l E le c tric
C o .— K e n tu c k y

I n te rn a tio n a l A s s o c ia ­
tio n o f M a c h in is ts
and A e ro sp a c e
W o rk ers

1 3 ,9 0 0

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e s o f
$ 2 4 a w e e k o n J u n e 2 8 , 1 9 7 6 , a n d $ 10 a w e e k o r 4 p e r ­
c e n t (w h ic h e v e r is g r e a t e r ) o n J u n e 2 7 , 1977 a n d J u n e 2 6 ,
1978; s k ille d w o r k e r s re c e iv e d a n a d d itio n a l $ 2 “$ 2 0 a w e e k
on J u n e 2 8 , 1976; a n u n lim ite d c o s t- o f - liv in g a n n u a l a d ­
ju s t m e n t in N o v e m b e r o f 1 c e n t a n h o u r f o r e a c h 0 . 3 p e r ­
c e n t i n c r e a s e in th e C P I u p to 7 p e r c e n t a n d a b o v e 9 p e r ­
c e n t w ith no c r e d i t to w a rd th e a d ju s tm e n t f o r th a t p o r tio n
o f th e C P I r i s e b e tw e e n 7 a n d 9 p e r c e n t.
(S e e C u r r e n t
W a g e D e v e lo p m e n ts , J u ly 1 976, p . 1 .)

L e a g u e o f V o lu n ta ry
H o s p ita ls and
H o m e s— N ew Y o rk

R e ta il, W h o le s a le ,
a n d D e p a r tm e n t S to re
U n io n

3 7 ,7 0 0

S t r i k e o v e r t h e L e a g u e 's r e j e c t i o n o f a F e d e r a l f a c t
fin d in g p a n e l 's r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s o f a c o s t - o f - l i v i n g w a g e i n ­
c r e a s e b a s e d u p o n t h e i r c o n te n tio n th a t th e n e w S ta te lim i t s
o n M e d ic a id a n d B lu e C r o s s p a y m e n ts to th e in s titu tio n s
p r e c lu d e d a n y p a y r a i s e ; a r b i t r a t i o n w a s a g r e e d to a f te r
th e S ta te th r e a te n e d to te r m in a te a ll p a y m e n ts .

In te rn a tio n a l B r o th e r ­
hood of E le c tric a l
W o rk e rs; In te rn a ­
tio n a l U n io n o f
E le c t r i c a l , R a d io an d
M a c h in e W o r k e r s ;
U n ite d E l e c t r i c a l ,
R a d io a n d M a c h in e
W o r k e r s ( I n d .)

3 0 ,2 0 0

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t s i m i l a r to G .E . a c c o r d ; w a g e s i n c r e a s e d
6 0 c e n t s ( i n c l u d i n g a n 11 - c e n t a d v a n c e c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a d ­
ju s tm e n t) o n J u ly 12,
1976, a n d 25 c e n ts o r 4 p e r c e n t
( w h i c h e v e r i s g r e a t e r ) o n J u l y 11, 1 9 7 7 a n d J u l y 10, 1 9 7 8 ;
s a l a r i e d e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e d a 10 p e r c e n t g e n e r a l i n c r e a s e
( in c lu d in g a $ 1 9 -a - m o n th a d v a n c e c o s t- o f - liv in g a d ju s t­
m e n t) ; e m p lo y e r p e n s io n c o n tr ib u tio n r a i s e d to a r a n g e
o f $ 7 . 5 0 - $ 1 1 .0 0 (w a s $ 6 - $ 9 ) a m o n th f o r s e r v i c e p r i o r
to J a n u a r y l , 1 9 6 7 , a n d $ 7 .5 0 - $ 1 2 .0 0 (w a s $ 7 - $ 1 0 ) f o r
la te r s e rv ic e .

M a y 28

141

over

of s e ttle m e n t4

B itu m in o u s C o a l
I n d u s t r y —V i r g i n i a ,
W e s t V irg in ia

( I n d .)
A p r.

M a jo r te r m s

17

Ju n e

21

3

Ju n e

22

17

Ju n e

28

7

J u ly

7

10

'

C ity

J u ly

12

17

W e s tin g h o u s e
E le c tr ic C o rp .—
N a tio n w id e

----------------------------------------S e e fo o tn o te s




a t e n d o f ta b le .

12

Table 5. Work stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1976—Continued
B e g in n in g
d a te

J u ly

A p p ro x im a te
d u ra tio n
(c a le n d a r
d a y s)1

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s)
a n d lo c a tio n (s )

U n io n (s)

in v o lv e d 2

A p p ro x im a te
num ber of
w o rk e rs
in v o lv e d 3

16

43

B itu m in o u s C o al
I n d u s tr y —A la b a m a ,
C o lo ra d o , I llin o is ,
I n d ia n a , K e n tu c k y ,
O h io , P e n n s y l v a n i a ,
V irg in ia , W e s t V ir ­
g in ia

U n ite d M in e W o r k e r s
o f A m e ric a ( in d .)

1 1 0 ,1 0 0

J u l y 20

12

C a lifo rn ia P r o c e s s o r s
In c . — N a tio n w id e

In te rn a tio n a l B r o th e r ­
hood o f T e a m s te rs ,
C h a u ffe u rs, W a re ­
h o u sem en and
H e lp e rs o f A m e ric a
( I n d .)

2 9 , 000

4

N ew Y o rk C ity
H e a lth an d H o s p ita ls
C o r p .— N ew Y o rk

A m e ric a n F e d e ra tio n
o f S t a t e , C o u n ty ,
a n d M u n ic ip a l
E m p lo y e e s

1 3 ,4 0 0

568

F o r d M o to r C o m p a n y
p a n y — N a tio n w id e

U n ite d A u to m o b ile ,
A e ro sp a c e and
A g ric u ltu ra l
Im p le m e n t W o rk e rs

A ug.

4

S e p t.

15

16

86

S e p t.

18

1

of se ttle m e n t4

S tr ik e o v e r a jo b p o s tin g d is p u te a t th e C e d a r C o a l C o m ­
p a n y ; th e s t r i k e s p r e a d a f t e r a F e d e r a l D i s t r i c t J u d g e f i n e d
th e l o c a l u n i o n o n g r o u n d s o f b r e a c h o f c o n t r a c t a l u m p ­
s u m a m o u n t p l u s a n a d d i t i o n a l a m o u n t f o r e v e r y d a y th e
w a l k o u t c o n t i n u e d ; m i n e r s r e t u r n e d to w o r k a f t e r th e J u d g e
s a i d h e w o u ld n o t i m p o s e t h e f i n e s a n d j a i l t e r m s a n d a f t e r
3 0 0 u n io n o f f ic ia ls e n d o r s e d a b a c k - to - w o r k o r d e r . N o
fo rm a l s e ttle m e n t.
3 - y e a r s e ttle m e n t o n J u ly 3 1 p r o v id e d a n im m e d ia te in ­
c r e a s e o f 3 0 - 5 2 c e n t s a n h o u r , a f l a t 53 c e n t s a n h o u r
i n t h e s e c o n d y e a r , a n d a f l a t 52 c e n t s a n h o u r i n t h e t h i r d
y e a r ; so m e s k ille d w o r k e r s r e c e iv e d a n a d d itio n a l 50 c e n t
a n h o u r i n c r e a s e e f f e c tiv e im m e d ia te ly ; te r m in a te d th e
c o s t- o f - liv in g e s c a la to r c la u s e ; im p ro v e d in s u ra n c e b e n e ­
f i t s ; a n 1 1 th p a i d h o l i d a y .
S tr ik e o v e r th e la y o f f o f 1 ,3 5 0 w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d by
A F S C M E , th e T e a m s t e r s , a n d th e P r a c t i c a l N u r s e s A s s o ­
c ia tio n ; th e 1 ,0 0 0 A F S C M E m e m b e r s r e g a in e d t h e i r jo b s
a f t e r u n io n m e m b e r s a g r e e d to f o r e g o t h e i r a n n u a l c o s t o f - l i v i n g i n c r e a s e i n 1 9 7 6 a n d a p o s s i b l e a d j u s t m e n t in
1977.

1 6 6 ,3 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t on O c to b e r 5 p r o v id e d a ll e m p lo y e e s w ith
a y e a r o f s e n io r ity , 5 a d d itio n a l d a y s o ff in th e se c o n d y e a r,
a n d 7 in th e th i r d y e a r ; g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e s 3 p e r c e n t
o f b a s e r a t e s , p l u s 2 0 c e n t s a n h o u r o n O c t o b e r 18 , 1 9 7 6 ,
a n d 3 p e r c e n t b a s e r a t e s on S e p te m b e r 19, 1977 a n d S e p ­
t e m b e r 18, 1 9 7 8 ; s k i l l e d w o r k e r s r e c e i v e d a n a d d i t i o n a l
10 o r 15 c e n t s ( d e p e n d i n g u p o n t h e i r p a y g r o u p ) o n O c t o b e r
18, 1 9 7 6 a n d 10 c e n t s o n S e p t e m b e r 1 9 , 1 9 7 7 ; f i n a n c i n g
c h a n g e s m a d e to s tr e n g th e n S U B F u n d ; o n e - tim e in f la tio n
b o n u s f o r r e t i r e e s . (S e e C u r r e n t W ag e D e v e lo p m e n ts . N o v e m b e r 1 9 7 6 . p p . 1 a n d 1 5 .)

( I n d .)

S e p t.

M a jo r t e r m s

U n ite d P a r c e l S e r ­
v i c e — 15 E a s t e r n
S ta te s

In te rn a tio n a l B r o th e r ­
hood o f T e a m s te rs ,
C h a u ffe u rs, W a re ­
h o u se m e n and
H e lp e rs o f A m e ric a
(In d .)

1 7 ,8 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t on D e c e m b e r 9 p ro v id e d fo r m a in te n a n c e
o f t h e n u m b e r o f f u l l - t i m e p o s i t i o n s in e a c h b u i l d i n g a s
o f S e p t e m b e r 15 , 1 9 7 6 ; i m m e d i a t e 6 5 c e n t h o u r l y w a g e
i n c r e a s e a n d 50 c e n ts in th e s e c o n d a n d th i r d y e a r s ; u n ­
l i m i t e d a n n u a l c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a d j u s t m e n t s in t h e s e c o n d a n d
th ir d y e a r s ; a d d itio n a l h e a lth a n d w e lf a r e a n d p e n s io n c o n ­
tr ib u tio n s ; u p to $ 50 r e i m b u r s e m e n t f o r p e r s o n a l l o s s e s
f r o m h o ld u p s .

T r a n s W o rld A i r ­
li n e s — N a tio n w id e

In te rn a tio n a l A s s o c ia ­
tio n o f M a c h in is ts
and A e ro sp a c e
W o rk e rs

2 2 ,8 0 0

3 - y e a r s e ttle m e n t p ro v id e d 5 p e r c e n t in c r e a s e r e tr o a c tiv e
t o N o v e m b e r 1, 1 9 7 5 , 4 . 7 p e r c e n t r e t r o a c t i v e t o J u l y 1,
1 9 7 6 , 2 . 8 p e r c e n t o n J a n u a r y 1, 1 9 7 7 , 4 . 3 p e r c e n t o n J u l y
1, 1 9 7 7 , 3 . 4 p e r c e n t o n J a n u a r y 1, 1 9 7 8 , a n d 2 . 2 p e r c e n t
o n J u l y 1, 1 9 7 8 ; 13 c e n t s a n h o u r l o n g e v i t y p a y a f t e r 16
y e a r s s e r v i c e ( w a s 10 c e n t s , m a x i m u m a f t e r 13 y e a r s ) ;
im p ro v e d h o s p ita liz a tio n , d e n ta l, a n d m a jo r m e d ic a l b e n e ­
f i t s ; $ 2 , 00 0 i n c r e a s e in lif e in s u r a n c e ; $ 2 m o n th ly b e n e f its
i n c r e a s e i n p e n s i o n s e r v i c e b e n e f i t s ; 12 c e n t s a u t o m a t i c
c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a d j u s t m e n t r e t r o a c t i v e t o S e p t e m b e r 1, 1 9 7 6 .

Jo h n D eere and
C om pany—
N a tio n w id e

U n ite d A u to m o b ile ,
A e ro sp a c e , and
A g r ic u ltu r a l Im p le ­
m e n t W o rk e rs (In d .)

2 7 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p ro v id e d a 3 3 -4 3 c e n t in c r e a s e f o r h o u rly
p a id e m p lo y e e s a n d a 2 7 -3 6 c e n t in c r e a s e f o r in c e n tiv e
w o r k e r s ; 3 - p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e s in t h e s e c o n d a n d t h i r d y e a r s ;
i n c o r p o r a t e d m o s t o f c u r r e n t c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a d j u s t m e n t i n to
b a s e r a t e s ; u n lim ite d q u a r t e r l y c o s t-o f-liv in g a d ju s tm e n ts .
(S e e C u r r e n t W ag e D e v e lo p m e n ts , D e c e m b e r 1976. p p . 1
an d 9 .)

O c t.

1

N ov.

18

4

In te rn a tio n a l H a r ­
v e s t e r — N a tio n w id e

U n ite d A u to m o b ile ,
A e ro sp a c e and
A g r ic u ltu r a l Im p le ­
m e n t W o r k e r s ( in d .)

3 2 ,6 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p ro v id e d a 3 p e r c e n t a n n u a l im p ro v e m e n t
f a c t o r i n 1 9 7 7 a n d 1 9 7 8 ; $ 1. 16 o f c u r r e n t $ 1 . 2 1 c o s t o f - l i v i n g a l l o w a n c e i n c o r p o r a t e d in t o b a s e r a t e s ; t e r m i ­
n a t e d t h e " b o n u s h o u r s " p r o g r a m ( i m p r o v e d a t D e e r e l in
fa v o r o f i n c r e a s e d tim e o ff u n d e r th e v a c a tio n p la n .
(S e e
C u r r e n t W a g e D e v e l o p m e n t s , D e c e m b e r 1 9 7 6 , p p . 1 a n d 8. )

N ov.

19

i

G e n e r a l M o to rs
C o r p . — N a tio n w id e

U n ite d A u to m o b ile ,
A e ro sp a c e and A g ri­
c u ltu r a l I m p e lm e n t
W o r k e r s ( in d .)

66, 700

A 1 2 -h o u r " m i n i - s t r i k e " w a s h e ld ; 3
v id e d th a t th e c o m p a n y w o u ld " n e ith e r
c o u r a g e " u n io n o r g a n iz in g e f f o r t s ; 3
b a s e r a t e s in 1977 a n d 1978; s i m i l a r
w i t h i n c o r p o r a t i o n o f $ 1. 0 9 o f c u r r e n t
in g a l l o a w n c e i n t o b a s e r a t e s .

D ec.

10

1

G e n e r a l M o to rs
C o r p . — N a tio n w id e

I n t e r n a t i o n a l U n io n
o f E l e c t r i c a l , R a d io
a n d M a c h in e W o r k e r s

2 5 , 500

3 - y e a r s e ttle m e n t p ro v id e d a 3 p e r c e n t h o u rly w a g e in ­
c r e a s e p l u s 2 0 c e n t s p e r h o u r in t h e f i r s t y e a r r e t r o a c t i v e
to S e p te m b e r 2 0 , 1976 w h e n th e o ld c o n t r a c t e x p ir e d ; p a id
a b s e n c e a llo w a n c e ; r e t i r e e s r e c e iv e d
$ 20 p e r
y ear of
s e r v i c e a l l o w a n c e ( m a x i m u m o f $ 3 0 0 ) t o b e p a i d p r i o r to
D e c e m b e r 1977; G M in c lu d e d a l e t t e r p r o m is in g a n e u tr a l
a ttitu d e in th e s e le c tio n o f b a r g a in in g u n its in its s o u th e r n
p la n ts .

39

1 I n c lu d e s n o n w o rk d a y s , s u c h a s S a tu r d a y s , S u n d a y s, a n d e s t a ­
b lis h e d h o lid a y s .
2 T h e u n i o n s l i s t e d a r e t h o s e d i r e c t l y in v o l v e d in t h e d i s p u t e b u t
th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d m a y in c lu d e m e m b e r s o f o th e r u n io n s
o r n o n u n io n w o r k e r s id le d b y d is p u te s in th e s a m e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
The
u n io n s a r e a f f ilia te d w ith th e A F L - C I O , e x c e p t w h e r e th e y a r e n o te d a s
in d e p e n d e n t ( i n d . ).
3 T h e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d is th e m a x im u m m a d e id le f o r
1 s h i f t o r l o n g e r in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i r e c t l y i n v o lv e d in a s to p p a g e .
T h is
d o e s n o t m e a s u r e th e in d ir e c t o r s e c o n d a r y e f f e c t o n o ilie r e s t a b l i s h ­




-y e a r c o n tra c t p ro ­
d is c o u ra g e n o r e n ­
p e rc e n t in c re a s e of
to F o r d a g r e e m e n t
$ 1. 4 4 c o s t - o f - l i v ­

m e n ts o r in d u s tr ie s w h o s e e m p lo y e e s a r e m a d e id le a s a r e s u l t o f m a ­
te r ia l o r s e rv ic e sh o rta g e s .
4 A d p a te d la r g e ly fro m C u r r e n t W ag e D e v e lo p m e n ts ,
p u b lis h e d
m o n th ly b y th e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s .
5 T h e n a t i o n w i d e s t r i k e b e g a n o n S e p t e m b e r 15 a n d e n d e d o n D e ­
c e m b e r 10.
H o w e v e r , m a n y s i t e s c o n tin u e d to b e s t r u c k o v e r lo c a l
is s u e s .
W h ile t h e d u r a t i o n o f t h e n a t i o n a l c o n t r a c t s t r i k e w a s a p p r o x i ­
m a te ly 2 8 c a le n d a r d a y s , th e d u r a tio n o f s t r i k e s o v e r lo c a l is s u e s r a n g e d
f r o m 2 9 to 68 c a le n d a r d a y s in c lu d in g th e 2 8 d a y s .

13

Table 6. Work stoppages by industry group and size, 1976
fO RC TBS AID P IT S IDLE IN TBOOSANPS)

INDUSTRY GROUP

6
20
100
250
500
1,000
5,000
AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER
20
100
250
500
5,000
10,000
1,000
HORKERS
HORKERS
HORKERS
HORKERS
HORKERS
HORKERS
HORKERS

TOTAL

10,000
HORKERS
Ob
M RE
O

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
ALL INDUSTRIES......................................................... J / 5 , 6 4 8

661

2,068

1,4 25

900

363

188

20

MANUFACTURING................................................................. J / 2 . 2 U 5

218

888

616

303

123

81

7

9

1

-

80

51
-

47
-

1
21

_

-

-

3
-

9

11

10

2

1

16
35
39
37

15
16

1
1

_

10

29

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES..........................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS........................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES....................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS..................................................

227

APPAREL, ETC.2 / .................................................................
LUM
BER AND HOOD PRODUCTS, EXCEPT FURNITURE
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...............................................
PAPEB AND ALLIED PRODUCTS........................................

47
69
73
95

7

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES........................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..............................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND BELATED INDUSTRIES.

54
129
17

13
16
4

22

11

45

8

36
5

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS.................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES..........................................
FABRICATED M
ETAL PRODUCTS 3 / .................................

120
12
146
197
309

3
24
35

52
3
65
72
140

33
4
33
74
84

309

31

119

204
130
29
60

20

64
45
15

NONMANUFACTUBING.......................................................... 1 / 3 , 4 0 6

10
1,4 25
503

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL.................................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES.............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT..........................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC.0 / .......................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES....

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES.............
MINING.......................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION......................... ........................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, ELECTRIC,
GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES.................................
HHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE......................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL FSTATE...............
SERVICES ................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 5 / ......................................................................

1

36

22
3

1

6
3
4

12

5

2
8

7

22

7
15

-

8

10

-

“

1
2
-

-

12

-

5

12

1

-

-

1
6

4

-

_
-

3

2

4

20

1

2

“

1
2

7

23

4

2

-

23
32

6
11
11

80

39

20

14

1

5

52
34

35
19

16
7
-

11

2
2

4
3

8

2
4

15

6

1
1

240

107

13

1

2

474
108

395
65

131
40

23
30

183
249

52
44

23
27

11

11

5

5

13
113

3
36
90

27
58

3
3

-

597

2

21

18

2
6

443

1, 18 0

809

1

2

56
99

4
341
157

354
467

65
132

27
246
378

7
47
36

120

_

_

_

3

2

2
2

2
2

7
3

1
12

1
6

_

38

1

1
'

31

3

1

1

4
___

2

HORKERS INVOLVED
ALL INDUSTRIES.......................................................... 1 / 2 , 4 2 0 . 0
MANUFACTURING.................................................................

2/974. 5

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES...........................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS........................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES.................... . ........................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS..................................................

8.0

104. 1

229.0

2.7

46.0

96.9

0. 8

8.2

(6 )

4.C
. 1
.4

. 1
. 1
( 6)

.8
1.6
1. 8

2.2
2.2

90. 4
. 1
7.9

o.:

11.6

APPAREL, ETC. 2 / ..............................................................
LUM
BER AND HOOD PRODUCTS, EXCEPT FURNITURE
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES.........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS................................. ..

1 0 .3
10. 3
23.0

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES........................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..............................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED INDUSTRIES.

1.5

3.3
4.6

.1

2.3

13. 1
28. 6
1. 1

. 1
. 2
. 1

2.0

6.0

.3

93 . 1

< )
6
. 3

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL.................................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES.............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT...........................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 4 / .....................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES....

2

244.2

3 5 6 .7

131.7

1,030.1

102.7

84.6

15 8 .0

45. 3

438.3

5.8

_
12.7
-

0.8
16.6
3.2

13.9
1.5

2.6

.6

3.C
2.5
5.<^

1.C

.7

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS.................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES..........................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS 3 / .................................

3 16 .

1 .3

1.9

5.2
-

-

1.2
10.0

6.0

-

-

4.7

19 .9

-

4.0
7.4
7.4

7.0
7.0
7.2

.9
-

5.8
5 .1

.4

11.1

1 3. 4

10.1

144. 5

. 4

6.2

12.6

1 3 .^

13.3

26. 1

7.5

64.7

13 4 .8
238. 1
5.3
11.4

. 2
. 1
(6 )
. 1

3.5
2.3

11.5
6.4
.7
1.7

11.5
4.7

.8
1.0

8.5
5.2
1.3
2.7

12.6
12.6

63.7
17 2 .0

-

.1

4 .i

23.0
34.8
2.5
1.7

58.2

132 .1

213.5

15 9 .6

198 .7

86.3

591.9

0.2

0.4
79.2
17.1

0.4
143.6

21.0

86.2
26.7

3 9 .6
57.1

17. 1
1 4 .3

128. 8
26.5

7.7
9.0

7.9
3.0

22.1
8.0

17. 1

10.6

314.0
5.6

.2

5.3

.6

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES.............
MINING.......................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION..................................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, ELECTRIC,
GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES.................................
HHOLESALE AND RETAIL TfiA^DE......................................

2.4
5 14. 7
1 7 2. 4

(6 )
0.7

1.1

1 9 .5
7.5

386.4
55.8

.8
1.6

10 .7

8.4
6.5

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE...............
SERVICES ................................................................................
GOVERNMENT V ......................................- .............................

25.4
107.6
1 8 0. 7

. 1
. 5
.4

.5
5.2
6.4

5.8
14 .0

8.2

a t en d of ta b le .




-

3. 3
3.9
7.6

.2

14

.6

3.4
1.9
4.1
7.5

1.2
2.7
-

2.7
2.7
5.

2.4

2.6

28.0
54. 9
63.8

NONMANUFACTURING.......................................................... 2 / 1 , 4 4 5 . 5

S e e fo o tn o te s

1. 3

6.8

5.6

1. 2

_
29.0
-

.3
9.5

21 . j

56.8
4.3
17. 9
17.7

-

_
_

1 .4

.8
8.8

1.2
12.1

24.8

57.4

22.0
5.3

22.0

60.5
34.5

Table 6. Work stoppages by industry group and size, 1976—Continued
(BOBKBBS AID PAIS IPLB I I THOOS1NDS)

I N DU ST RY GROUP

TOTAL

5 ,000
6
100
1,000
500
2 50
20
AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER
20
250
100
5 ,000
10,000
1,000
500
WORKERS
WORKERS
WORKERS
WORKERS
WORKERS
WORKERS
WORKERS

10,000
WORKERS
OR
MORE

DAYS I D L E DURI NG YEAR

ALL I N D U S T R I E S ...................................................................... 1 / 3 7 , 8 5 8 . 9
MANUFACTURING................................................................................ 1 / 2 9 , 2 6 3 . 1

2, 3 0 9 .0

76. 0

3 ,7 9 0 .3

9 ,0 1 7 . 2

3 ,6 9 2 .9

7 ,0 9 9 .9

2 ,8 2 4.6

1 9 ,0 9 2 .9

1 ,2 5 9 .2

192.6

2 ,7 9 6 .6

2 ,6 1 3 .9

2, 4 8 1 .3

9 ,2 9 9 .9

8 2 2.9

9 ,9 6 9 .3

92. 1

4 2. 1
215.7

7. 0
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES................................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L PRODUCTS..............................................................

3. 2
1 1 5.0

.8

3.2
9 .8

A P P A R E L , E T C . £ / ............................................................................
LUBBER AND HOOD P RODUCT S, E XC EP T FURNI TURE
F URN IT URE AND F I X T U R E S ..........................................................
PAPER AND A L L I E D P RO DU CT S.................................................

230. 5
429. 4
26 6 .6
979. 0

1. 7
3. 5
1.3
1.7

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................

134.3

2 6 1 .0

66.5

26.1

5. 1

6 .8

28.6
6 3 .0
35.3
60.3

60.3
66.6
106. 1
117.6

40.0
57.0
35.8
95.5

1.2
9 .9
7 11. 5
199.5

234.3
76.7
59.9

51.0
47.7
6.4

80.5

10.2

11.1

55.6

97.2
2.4
7 9 .6
127. 1
1 8 7.3

1 0 9.9
1 7.6
161. 7
342. 1
275.6

6 3 .0
35.0
72. 3
232. 6
297.3

185. 1
464.4

130. 1
177.9

-

_
-

98. 7
-

*
-

225. 9

9. 8

AND RELATED I N D U S T R I E S .

19. 1

9. 7

RUBBER AND M I SCE LL AN EO US P L A S T I C S PRODUCTS
L EATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCT S.......................................

6 ,0 8 2 .9
55. 1
612. 5
1 ,3 0 4 .3
1,6 3 1 . 5

ii.

-

5 ,2 0 2 .7
83.8
282.9
2 18.5

2 ,7 2 1 .8

13. 1

199.7

393.0

380.3

989.2

395.9

74.3

781.9

2 ,2 3 5 .5
9 ,3 2 2 .9
128. 1
393. 9

6.3
1.8
.7
3.9

53.3
71.0
13.0
26.0

1 8 9.0
2 0 0 .5
37.0
96.0

35 6 .2
2 3 9.8
15. 9
30.5

3 38.9
1 26.0

9 3 .3
1 5 0 .9

393. 5
2 ,6 6 1 .3
. 3

199.9

85 5 .5
876.6
61.2
88.7

116.6

1,0 4 4 . 8

993. 7

1 ,9 0 3 .3

1 ,1 6 1 .6

2 ,7 9 9 .9

2 ,0 0 2 .3

PETROLEUM R E F I N I N G

F ABRI CA TE D METAL PRODUCTS 3 / ........................................
MACHI NERY, E X C E PT E L E C T R I C A L .......................................
E L EC TR IC AL MA CH IN ERY , E Q U I P ME N T, AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T RA NSPO RT AT IO N E Q U I P M EN T........................................... ..
MI SCE LL ANE OUS

MANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S . . . .

NONBA NUFA CT URI NG ...................................................................... 1 / 1 3 , 5 9 5 . 8

.5
-

5.1

1

7. 9

12. 1

165.3

-

4 4 8 .8

-

-

-

_

9 ,0 7 3 .6

A G R I C UL T UR E, F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S ...............
M I N I N G ..........................................................................................................
CONTRACT C ON ST R U C T I O N............................................................
T R A N S PO RT A TI O N , COMMU NI CA TI ON , E L E C T R I C ,
G A S, AND SAN IT ARY S E R V I C E S ........................................
WHOLESALE AND R E T A I L TRADE..............................................

13.9
2,220. 1
3 ,2 3 9 .8

(6)
3. 0
12.5

2. 1
3 8 .2
1 1 9.0

1.5
162.8
2 6 5 .7

3 .6
995.5
2 7 7 .5

6.7
205.9
375.9

156.3
1, 1 3 5 .7

3 8 .2
8 82.5

1 , 17G. 3
176.0

3 ,9 6 1 .3
1 ,3 1 1 .3

29. 8
51.9

268.5
398.9

182.5
189.9

200.3
90.6

169.2
81.5

565. 8
201. 6

299.9
2 5 9.7

1 ,8 0 0 .9
91.9

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND REAL E S T A T E ..................
S E R V I C E S .................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT £ / .....................................................................................

2 7 3.0
1 ,3 8 5 .7
1 .6 9 0 .7

9.6
17. 3
2.5

7. 1
210. 7
55.2

2. 1
1 0 3.5
90.6

1.3
123.8
260.7

51.8
79.1
19 1 . 5

16. 1
157.7
566. 8

_

197.8
9 2 9 .6

190.0
595.9
98.6

5
T he s itu a tio n s re p o r te d h e r e h a v e , f o r s ta tis tic a l p u rp o s e s , b een
d e e m e d t o f a l l w i t h i n t h e B u r e a u 's d e f i n i t i o n o f a w o r k s t o p p a g e .
T h is d e ­
c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o r k s to p p a g e h a s
ta k e n p l a c e in v io la tio n o f a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y ,
® F e w e r th a n 5 0 .
7 I d le n e s s r e s u l t i n g f r o m s to p p a g e ( s ) b e g in n in g in p r i o r y e a r ( s ) .

1 T h e n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s re p o r te d f o r a m a jo r in d u s tr y g ro u p o r
d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m o f its c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l s to p ­
p a g e s o c c u r r i n g i n 2 o r m o r e g r o u p s a r e c o u n t e d in e a c h . W o r k e r s i n ­
v o lv e d a n d d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d a m o n g th e r e s p e c t i v e g r o u p s .
2 In c lu d e s o th e r fin is h e d p r o d u c ts m a d e f r o m f a b r ic s a n d s im ila r
m a te ria ls ,
3 E x c lu d e s o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , a n d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t.
4 I n c lu d e s p r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tr o llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to ­
g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .

N O T E : B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,
t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o t e z e r o s .

s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s

m ay not

equal

Table 7. Work stoppages by affiliation of unions involved, 1976
(BOBKBBS AID DAIS IPLB IB THOOSABPS)
NUMBER

AFFILIATION

BE GI NN IN G I N I BAB
WOEKEES
S TO PPA GE S
I NVOLVED

PERCENT
DAIS ID LE
BE G IN N IN G
DURI NG YEAR
( A LL STOPPAGES] S TO PPA GE S

IN

IBAjjt

WORKERS
I NVOLVED

D A IS ID LE
DURI NG YEAR
( ALL ST OP PA G ES )

ALL S T O P P A G E S ..........................................................................

5,6 9 8

2 ,9 2 0 .0

3 7 ,8 5 8 .9

1 0 0.0

1 0 0.0

100.0

A F L - C I O .................................................................................................
O N A F F I L I A T E D U N I O N S .............................................................
S IN G L E F IE M O N I O N S ................................................................
D I F F E R E N T A F F I L I A T I O N S J / ..........................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L EMPLOYEE A S S O C I A T I O N S .............
NO ONION I N V O L V E D ................................................................ ...

2,812
2,515
17
97
201
56

9 5 9.7
1 ,2 9 8 .2
2 .8
7 5.9
89.8
9 .0

2 3 ,5 2 0 .1
1 2 ,5 0 6 .2
33.3
9 00.9
8 6 8 .2
3 0 .2

99. 8
99. 5
.3
.8
3. 6
1.0

39.5
53.6
.1
3.1
3.5
.2

62.1
33.0
. 1
2.4
2.3
.1

1 In c lu d e s w o r k s to p p a g e s in v o lv in g e i t h e r 1 u n io n o r m o r e
a f f ilia te d w ith A F L - C I O a n d 1 u n a f f ilia te d u n io n o r m o r e , o r 2 u n a f f ilia te d u n io n s o r m o r e .




N O TE: B ecause
e q u a l to ta ls ,

15

of ro u n d in g ,

su m s

of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t

Table 8. Work stoppages by contract status and size, 1976
(BOBBINS BIO OBIS IDLE I I

YBOOSBIDS)

NUM
BER

PERCENT

BEGINNING IN YEAR

BEGINNING IN YEAR

STOPPAGES

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

DAIS IDLE
LURING TEAR
(ALL
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES

ALL STOPPAGES................................................................

5,648

2,4 2 0 .0

37,858.9

100.0

100.0

6 IOC UNDER 2 0 ...................................................................

661
2,068
1, 4 2 5
900
363
188

8.0

192.6
2,304.0
3,7 4 0 .3
4,017.2
3,6 4 2 .9
7,094.4
2,824.6
14,042.9

1 1 .7
36.6
25.2
15.9
6.4
3.3
.4
.4

0.3
4.3
9.5
13. 1
10. 1
1 4 .7
5.4
42.6

7.9
2.4
3.9
.9
.4
.1
. i
d)

2.4
.1
.4
.3
.3
.9

.2

54.4
5.7
21.9
13.6
7. 1
3.2
2.3

68.3

88.6

.2

3.9
35.3

.3
4. 6
8. 3
9. 1
8.4
17.3
7. 1
33.5

28.6
. 1

7.9
( 1)

CONTRACT STATUS AND
NUM
BER OF W
ORKERS INVOLVED

20 AND UNDER 10C..............................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 ............................................................
250 AND UNDEE 50 0............................................................
500 AND UNDER 1 , 0 0 0 .......................................................
1 . 0 0 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ...............................................
10 , 0 0 0 AND OVER................................................................
NEGOTIATION OF FIRST AGREEMENT C
R
UNION REC06NIHON.......................................................
6 AND UNDER 2 0 ..............................................................
20 AND UNDER 100.........................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 .......................................................
250 AND UNDER 5 0 0 .......................................................
500 AND UNDER 1 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
1, 000 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 .............................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ..........................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND ONER...........................................................

20

23
445
136
223
51
25

10 4 .1
229.0
316.2
244.2
356.7
131.7
1,030.1

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

3
-

57.7
1.7
9.6
7.6
8.4
4.4
4.9
-

1

21 .1

1,119.7
61.0
407.6
321.0
100. 1
40.5
12 6. 0
63.4

RENEGOTIATION OF AGREEMENT
(EXPIRATION OR REOPENING)...................................
6 AND UNDER 2 0 ..............................................................
20 AND UNDEE 100.........................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 .......................................................
250 AND UNDER 5 00 .......................................................
500 AND UNDEE 1 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
1, 00 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 .............................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ...........................................
1 0, 0 0 0 AND OVER............................................................

3,075
323
1, 2 37
769
4 00
183
131
14
18

1,653.6
3.9
62.7
121.5
136.7
123.2
257.2
93.5
854.8

33,545.3
1 0 5 .2
1,732.0
3 , 135 .8
3,4 4 6 .0
3,1 9 6 .7
6,553.9
2,680.4
12,695.3

DURING TERM OF AGREEMENT (NEGOTIATION
OF N
EW AGREEMENT NOT INVOLVED)......................
6 AND UNDER 2 0 ..............................................................
20 AND UNDER 100.........................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 .......................................................
250 AND UNDER 50 0.......................................................
500 AND UNDER 1 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
1, 000 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 .............................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ..........................................
1 0, 0 0 0 AND OVER............................................................

1 ,9 5 0
155
515
583
464
171
52

2,9 8 0 .3
13. 5
84. 2
226.4
446.2
378. 3
40 3 .2
144.3
1,284.2

34.5
2.7
9 .1
1 0 .3

4

692.2
1.9
27.6
96.7
167.2
1 1 4 .7
91.8
38.1
154.2

59

4.8

1.5

29.0
1 .7
14.6
3.4
7.6
1.7
-

1.0

31
3
4

.4
.5
.1
. 1
d)
*

(D
.1
(D
. 1
(D
*

184.7

2.1

.5
O)

N CONTRACT OR OTHER CONTRACT STATUS.............
O
6 AND UNDER 2 0 ..............................................................
20 AND UNDER 100.........................................................
100 AND UNDER 25 0.......................................................
250 AND UNDER 5 0 0.......................................................
500 AND UNDER 1 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 .............................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ..........................................
1 0, 0 0 0 AND OVER............................................................
N INFORMATION O CONTRACT STATUS....................
O
N
6 AND UNDEE 20 ..............................................................
20 AND UNDER 100..........................................................
100 AND UNDER 2 5 0 .......................................................
250 AND UNDER 5 0 0 ......................................................
500 AND UNDER 1 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
1, 0 0 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 .............................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ...........................................
10 , 0 0 0 AND OVER............................................................




L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .

6

6

20

.2

.6
1.6
.8

1

-

*

119
27
62
19
7

11.7
.3
2.7

-

-

2.6
2.3

2
2

1.0
2.8

11.1
65.6
53.7
1 7 .2
25.7
1 1 .3
*

.3

8.2
3.0
.9

.1
.1

.5

1. 1
.3
.1
O)
( 1)

.2
.2

.2
2.6
5.0
5.7
5.1

10.6

1. 1

DAIS IDLE
DURING TEAR
(ALL
STOPPAGES)

100.0
0.5

6. 1
9. 9

10.6
9.6
18.7
7.5
37 . 1
3. 0

.2
1. 1
.8
.3
. 1
, 3

4.0
6.9
4.7
3.8

.2
.6
1.2
1.0
1. 1

6.4

•4
3. 4

1.6
.2

( 1)
“

. 1
(D
(D
(1)
(D
d)

.5
O)
. 2
. 1
d)
. 1
d)
*

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y
n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o t e z e r o s .

16

Table 9. Work stoppages by industry group and contract status , 1976
(BOSKBBS A I D DATS IDLE IN T H OD S A I D S )

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

445

5 7 .7

195

14.9

-

24
5

1.9
.4

60.6

36

42. 1
1,648.0
3.2
11 5 .0

_

90.4
. 1
7.9

4 0 .6

27

7.0

47

11.6

230. 5

6

.2

6.0

29

10.1

69
73
95

10.8

6
12

.4

10.3
2 3. 0

429. 4
266.6
479. 0

1.1

11.7
26. 4

5

.7

6.1

56
48
82

54
129

13.1
28.8

225.4
1,116.8

7
15

1.6

.4

11 .5
4 0 .4

17

1.1

19.1

1

(3)

16
7
16

.8

.6
1.6

9 7 4. 5

0.8

1
227

1

120
12

93.1

146
197
309

28.0
5 4 .9
6 3. 8

309
204
130
29
60

NONMANUFACTURING.................................................... 1 / 3 , 4 0 6

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT......................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 5 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES. . . .
MINING..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION...........................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, v*AS, AND SANITARY SERVICES. •
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNM
ENT 6/ ................................................................
S e e f o o tn o te s




DAIS
IDLE DURING
IEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

24,263. 1

2 ,4 20.0

RUBBER AND M SCELL AN20US PLASTICS
jl
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND .LEATHER PRODUCTS...........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES.....................................
FABRICATED HB1AL PRODUCTS 4 / ...........................

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

37,858.9

ALL INDUSTRIES.................................................... 1 / 5 , 64 8
MANUFACTURING............................................................ 1 / 2 .2 4 5

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEHICALS ANjj ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................

DAIS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

APPABE1, ETC. 2 / .........................................................
LUBBER AND H O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE......................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

NUM
BER

NUM
BER

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.....................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS.............................................

RENEGOTIATION OF AGREEMENT
(EXPIRATION O REOPENING)
B

NEGOTIATION OF FIRST
AGREEM
ENT
OR UNION RECOGNITION

TOTAL

_

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

1* 1 19 .7

3,075

1,653.6

33,545.3

5 0 8 .3

1, 7 1 6

845.6

23,011.4

1

0.8

185

84.0

42 . 1
1,710.6
3.2
71.4

1

.1

9.4
7. 1

208.4

21.0

410.0
217 .3
45 7 .4

100

43

12 .5
23.4

20 7 .5
1,015.3

.2

15

1.0

16.3

94
9

87.0

121

2.2
22. 2

153
259

46.7
59.1

6,032.2
50. 1
54 4 .7
1, 192.5
1,563. 1

6,0 8 2 .4
55. 1
612.5
1,304.3
1,631. 5

22

1.5

3 3 .5
10.3
4 4. 1
48.2

144.5

2 ,7 21.8

22

1.4

69. 1

225

117. 1

2,5 3 5 .9

134.8
238.1
5.3
11.4

2,2 3 5 .5
4,3 2 2 .9
128. 1
393.9

10
8
6

1 4 .7
22. 2
9.7
5 3. 1

125
95
19
49

10 5. 4
214. 0
3.7

7

.7
.5
.3
.7

10.6

2, 139.8
4,136.3
117.5
339.8

1,445.5

13,595.8

250

42.8

611.3

1,3 62

808. 0

10,533.8

1 3 .9

2 , 220.1
3,2 3 9 .8

2

0.2

1, 4 25
503

2.4
5 14 . 7
172.4

4
18

1. 3
34.7

2.8

111.8

5
33
290

140. 5

7.4
227 .8
2,931.9

354
467

386.4
5 5 .8

3 , 4 6 1. 3
1,311.3

45
75

2.4
2.7

7 6 .4
142.6

249
344

361.6
49.9

3,248. 1
1 , 1 3 6 .2

27
246
378

2 5 .4
107.6
180.7

273. 0
1,385.7
1,690.7

.8

20

50
50

12 8. 9
11 4. 8

158
267

25. 1
99 . 1
12 4. 3

26 7 .4
1,224.4
1,490.6

10

2.6

a t en d of ta b le .

17

6

~

2 .5

.2
2.6
29.4

1.6
6.0

Table 9. Work stoppages by industry group and contract status, 1976—Continued
(WORKERS AMD DATS I D L E I I

THOUSANDS)

DURING TERM OF AGREEMENT
(NEGOTIATION OF N AGREEMENT
EW
NOT INVOLVED)

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

N CONTRACT O OTHER
O
R
CONTRACT STATUS

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

N INFORMATION O
O
N
CONTRACT STATUS

CAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

ALL INDUSTRIES....................................................

1/1,950

692 .2

2,9 8 0 .3

59

4.8

29. 0

119

11.7

184 .7

MANUFACTURING............................................................

J/262

106.5

6 16.9

15

1.2

6.8

57

6.4

11 9. 6

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS.............................................

_
15
3

_
4. 2
.4

_
63. 4
2.9

1

(3)
0. 1

(3)
0. 1

“

APPAREL, ETC. 2 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND W O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

7

.9

3.5

2

. 1

5
3
3

1.0
1.1

1

1. 3

4. 9
4.7
15. 6

3
-

1
8

(3)
3. 1

4.3
39.4

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS.................................................................
.
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES......................................
FABRICATED M TAL PRODUCTS 4 / ............................
b

-

8
1
11

_

-

1

_

_

2

_
0.2
-

13. 3
-

3

.3

9.0

.2

1

-

. 7
-

7
-

(3)
.8
-

2.7
17.5
*

-

-

-

3

. 1
.6

21.7

-

“

3 .6

(3)

-

-

1

(3)

2.5

i

1.8
.1
.2
. 2

5.3

.6
2.8
20.8

.5

4.7

1

.2

1 0. 4
4.4
54.2
46.9
1 5. 4

4
-

.5
-

1.0

.2

.6

24
18

3. 1
.4
4.8
6 .5
2 .7

-

6

2
3
4

*

-

10

2.0

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL...........................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT......................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 5 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

59

26.0

113.0

-

_

_

3

. 1

3 .8

65
23

74.6
159.3
. 1
(3)

-

-

.8

1
1

. 1
(3)

.3

4
4

1

27.9
23.1
. 1
(3)

.2

2

6.4
5. 1
.3
.9

NONMANUFACTURING....................................................

1/1,603

585.7

2,3 6 3 .4

44

3 .6

2 2 .2

62

5.3

6 5 .1

(3)
1,951.8
173. 9

1

1
6

(3)
0.4

0.2

1

0. 5

1, 38 5
178

(3)
5 05 . 6
26. 8

.8

4.9
7.3

11

1. 5

4.9
.9
14.9

39

21. 3

11 3. 9
1 4 .5

6

5

. 1
. 1

2.4

16

1.0
1. 2

_

_

5

. 5

1.4
5. 1

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES.. . .
MINING..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION......................... ...................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
W
HOLESALE ANb RETAIL TRADE..................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNM
ENT 6/ ................................................................

2

1

21

1.8

1

.2

23
40

5.0
2 4 .9

4.7
26.3
78.2

1 T h e n u m b er of sto p p a g e s r e p o r te d fo r a m a jo r in d u s tr y grou p o r
d iv is io n m a y n ot eq u a l the su m o f it s co m p o n en ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l s to p ­
p a g e s o c c u r r in g in tw o o r m o r e grou p s a r e cou n ted in ea c h . W o rk er s i n ­
v o lv e d and d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d am on g the r e s p e c t iv e g ro u p s.
2 In clu d es o th e r fin is h e d p r o d u c ts m ad e fr o m fa b r ic s and s im ila r
m a t e r ia ls .
3 F e w e r than 50.
4 E x c lu d e s o rd n a n c e, m a c h in e r y , and tr a n sp o r ta tio n eq u ip m e n t.
5 In clu d es p r o fe s s io n a l, s c i e n t i f i c , and c o n tr o llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to ­




20

1.6

.8

1

2

21

.5
.2

. 1

.1

_

_

10
1

.4
.5

20.6
17. 1
_

4.8

2.0

g ra p h ic and o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s and c lo c k s .
6
T h e s itu a tio n s r e p o r te d h e r e h a v e , fo r s t a t is t ic a l p u r p o s e s ,
d e e m e d to f a l l w ith in che B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n o f a w o rk s to p p a g e . T h is
d e c is io n d o e s n ot c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th at a w o rk sto p p a g e
h a s tak en p la c e in v io la tio n of an y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
N O T E: B e c a u s e o f rou n din g,
to t a ls . D a s h e s (- ) d en o te z e r o s .

18

s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u al

been

Table 10. Work stoppages by contract status and major issue, 1976
(BOBKEHS AID PAIS IDLE IH TBOOSAiDS)

NUM
BER

PERCENT

BEGINNING IN YEAR

BEGINNING IN YEAR

CONTRACT STATUS AND HAJOE ISSUE

STOPPAGES

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

ALL STOPPAGES................................................................

5 , 648

2,420.0

NEGOTIATION Of fIBST AGP EEMENT...........................
GENERAL M E CHANGES...............................................
AG
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS..........................................
W G ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
AE
HOUPS CF W
ORK................................................................
OTHER CCNIRACTCAL MATTERS...................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECUPITY...................
JOB SECURITY...................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS......................................
INTERUNION AND INTRAONION MATTERS.... . .
NOT REPORTED..................................................................

445
195

RENEGOTIATION OF AGREEMENT (EXPIPATICN
O REOPENING)................................................................
R
GENEPAL W G CHANGES...............................................
AE
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS..........................................
W G ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
AE
HOURS CF W
ORK................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS..................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOB SECURITY...................................................................
PLANT AEMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS.....................................
INTERUNION AND INTRAUNION MATTERS...............
NOT REPORTED...................................................................
DUPING TERM OP AGREEMENT (NEGOTIATION
OF NEW AGREEMENT NOT INVOLVED)......................
GENERAL W E CHANGES...............................................
AG
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS..........................................
W E ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
AG
HOURS OF W
ORK................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS...................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOB SECUPITY...................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS......................................
INTERUNION AND INTBAUNION MATTERS...............
NOT FEFORTED...................................................................

14

57.7
37. 1
. 1
.3
.3
.5
17. 0
1.4
.7

2

1,653.6
1,161.5
10.3
12 .4
2. 0
1 6. 0
10 5 .2
329.5
16.0

2
6
1

3

202
20

121
85
147
62
5
3

1

1, 9 50

100.0

100.0

100.0

1,119.7
501. 7
3.3
4.9

7.9
3.5
(2 )
. 1
( 2)
. 1
3.6
.4

2.4
1 .5
(2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
.7
. 1
(2 )
( 2)
“

3.0
1 .3
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

.8
45.0
50 8 .4
4 3 .1

11.1
1.2

.2
.6

-

3 3 , 5 4 5 .3
23,124.5
185.3
398.1
56 . 1
281.7
1, 93 0 . 7
6,961.3
5 8 8 .3
7.0

8.0
4.4

(D

96
-

39.0
-

6

1.2

31
147
1,195
176
277

4. 3
70.6
470.9
49.6
53.9

17 5. 5
2, 149.8
16 9. 2
274. 1

692.2

2.8
(D

11.8

*

59
31
“

NO INFORMATION...................................................................

119




37,858.9

2,980.3
40.5
.3
15 7. 5
1.7

20
2

NO CONTRACT OR OTHER CONTRACT STATUS.............
GENERAL RAGE CHANGES...............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS..........................................
W E ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
AG
HOURS OF W
ORK................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS...................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOE SECURITY...................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS......................................
INTERUNION AND INTEAUNION MATTERS...............
NOT REPORTED...................................................................

1 F e w e r than 50.
2 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t.

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

*

-

1
-

3
17
i

5
1

•2

( 2)
*
54.4
45.4

.8
.6
. 1
2. 1
1. 5

2.6
1. 1
. 1
.1
( 2)
34.5
.4
( 2)
1. 7
. 1
.5

2.6
21.2

68.3
48.0
.4
.5
. 1
.7
4.3
13.6
.7
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
28.6
.1
( 2)

1.6
( 2)

.2

2.9
19. 5

3. 1
4.9

2.0
2.2

1.0

.2
.1

-

4.8
3. 0
*
. 1
-

.2

1.3
. 1
.2
d )

1 1 .7
NO TE:
eq u al to t a ls .

19

DAIS IDLE
DURING YEAR
(ALL
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES

.2

3,075
2,562
48
36
5

DAYS IDLE
DURING YEAR
(ALL
STOPPAGES)

.1

1 .3

.1
( 2)
( 2)

“

88.6
61.1
.5

1.1
.1

.7
5.1
1 8. 4

1.6
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

7 .9
.1
( 2)
.4
( 2)
( 2)
.5
5.7
.4
.7
-

-

-

.6

. 1

( 2)
( 2)

•2

.3
( 2)
.1
( 2)

. 1
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

.1
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

18 4 .7

2. 1

.5

.5

29.0
11 .7
“
.4
-

.5

2)

.9

8.9

.2
6.1

B e c a u s e o f rou n din g, s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not
D a s h e s (-) d en o te z e r o s .

Table 11. Work stoppages by major issue, 1976
^■OBKMS AID DAIS IDLE I I THOBSAMDSJ

NUM
BER

ftAJOR ISSUE

BEGINNING IN YEAR

STOPPAGES

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

PERCENT

DAYS IDLE
DURING
(ALL
STOPPAGES)

BEGINNING IN IEAB

STOPPAGES

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

DAIS IDLE
DURING
TEAR
(ALL
STOPPAGES)

ALL ISSUES........................................................................

5. 64 8

2 .4 20.0

37.858.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

GENERAL W E CHANGES....................................................
AG
GENERAL M
AGE INCREASE.............................................
GENERAL W
AGE INCREASE FLOS
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS.....................................
GENERAL SAGE INCREASE, HOUB DECREASE....
GENERAL W
AGE DECREASE.............................................
ESCALATION COST-OP-LIVING INCBBASZ.............
GENERAL HAGE INCREASE AND ESCALATION....
W
AGES AND W
ORKING CONDITIONS............................

2,857
783

1, 211.0

23,778.6
3,1 0 1 .6

50.6
13 .9

50.0
6.4

62.8

1, 37 8
9
4
37

755.4
1 .7

24.4

31.2
. 1
(D

25.7

425

50.2
117.3
13 2 .2

9,736.8
38.7
5.2
477.4
7,4 8 2 .6
2,936.3

53

10 .4

1 8 9 .0

.9

.4

.5

36

6.5

138.3

.6

.3

.4

.2
.1

3.9
.4
46.4

(D

(D
(D

( 1)
(D

51.9
1 0 .7
23.4
.5
.3
17. 1

562.0
379.4
1 3 5 .0
1 .5

2.5
.4

2.2

1.5

1.0
( 1)
. 1
1.0

1.0
( 1)
( 1)

2.2

56.9

.1
( 1)
.1

.1

.2

d)

( 1)

SOPPLEHENTARY BENEFITS................................................
PENSIONS, INSURANCE, AND OTHER
W
ELFARE PROGSAHS....................................................
SEVERANCE OB DISMISSAL PAY, AND OTHER
PAYMENTS ON LAYOFF OR SEPARATION.............
PREMIUM PAY......................................................................
OTHER....................................................................................

221

15 3 .6

.6

2
3

12

3.8

.2
. 1
.7
3.9
7.5

.1
.2

2.1

4.9
5.5

.2

8.2
.1
11)
1. 3
19.8
7.8

.1

W E ADJUSTMENTS..............................................................
AG
INCENTIVE PAY RATES O ADMINISTRATION.••
R
JOB CLASSIFICATION OR RATES..............................
DOWNGRADING.....................................................................
RETROACTIVITY.................................................................
M
ETHOD OF COMPUTING PAY........................................

142
24
56

HOURS OF W
ORK......................................................................
INCREASE.............................................................................
DECREASE.............................................................................

6
1
5

1.8

55.7

OTHER CONTRACTUAL HATTERS........................................
DURATION OF CONTRACT...............................................
LOCAL ISSUES SUPPLEMENTING NATIONAL
CONTRACT........................................................................
UNSPECIFIED............................................................

142
9

1 9 .2

338.0
1 5 .7

2.5

.2

(D

3
130

.2
17.9

1.4
320.9

.1
2.3

0)

O)
.9

UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY.........................
RECOGNITION (CERTIFICATION)..............................
RECOGNITION END JOB SECURITY ISSUES...........
RECOGNITION AND ECONOMIC ISSUES....................
STRENGTHENING BARGAINING POSITION O
R
UNION SHOP AND ECONOMIC IS S U E S . . .............
UNION SECURITY............................................. ................
REFUSAL TO SIGN AGREEMENT...................................
OTHER UNION ORGANIZATION MATTERS..................

325
96

1 2 6 .8

2 ,4 5 4 .9
229.7
6.9
35.6

5.8
1.7
m
.4

5.2
.4
(D
d)

6.5

118
34
18
33

102.2
6.0
1. 8

1,969.4
115.1
28.0
70.2

2. 1
.6

4.2
.3

.1
.2

5.2
.3

.3

JOB SECURITY........................................................................
SENIORITY AND/OR LAYOFF........................................
DIVISION OF W
ORK.........................................................
SUBCONTRACTING..............................................................
N
EW MACHINERY OR OTHER TECHNOLOGICAL
ISSUES.............................................................................
JOB TRANSFERS, BUMPING, ETC..............................
TRANSFER OP OPERATIONS O
R
PREFABRICATED GOODS.............................................
JOB SECURITY AND ECONOMIC ISSUES..................
OTHER....................................................................................

317
59
4
23

401.7
47.0
1 .5

7,186.9
306.1
1.9
54.1

5.6

.9.0

.4

16.6
1.9
. 1
.4

.3

.5
18.6

( 1)

( 1)

(D

-

140
84

316.9
23.7

6,766.0
39.9

2.5
1.5

13 .1

1 7 .9

PLANT ADMINISTRATION....................................................
PHYSICAL FACILITIES, SURROUNDINGS,
ETC...............................................................................
SAFETY MEASURES, DANGEROUS EQUIPMENT,
ETC....................................................................................
SUPERVISION............................ .........................................
SHIFT W RK
O ........................................................................
W R ASSIGNMENTS.........................................................
OK
SPEEDUP (WORKLOAD).............................. .....................
W R R U L E S .. .. ..............................................................
OK
OVERTIME W
ORK.................................................................
DISCHARGE AND DISCIPLINE......................................
OTHER ..................................................................................

1. 290

489.0

2,7 7 6 .6

22.8

20.2

7.3

165

33.0

68.2

2.9

1.4

.2

216
48
32
90
27
46
81
288
297

53.5
19 .8
9.9
29. 1
9.0
7.9
1 8 .5
96.6

3.8

2.2
.8

.4
.i
. i
•4

211.6

1 5 7 .9
41.9
34.8
14 3 . 2
364.6
42.2
53.2
440.6
1,430.1

OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS..........................................
ARBITRATION......................................................................
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES...............................................
UNSPECIFIED CONTRACT VIOLATIONS.....................

185
4
49
132

50.3
1 .7
15.0
33.6

178.1

121.0

INTERUNION OR INTRAUNION HATTERS..................
UNION RIVALRY 2 / .........................................................
JURISDICTION-REPRESENTATION
OF NORKERS 4 / ............................................................
JURISDICTION-WORK ASSIGNMENT............................
UNION ADHINISTRATIOI 5 / ............. ...........................
STHPATHI.............................................................................
OTHBR ..................................................................

285

54.7
(3)

288.2
(3)

NOT REPORTED........................................................................

46

1

5
56

.4

1.0

10.6
.1
1.0

2
24

5.2

10.6

2

1.6

5
-

1

4 3 .9

1.2

12.0

45.1

.6
1.0
. 1

.1

.8
.6
1.6
.5

.8
1.4
5.1
5.3

.7

.1
.8

.7

.1

1.0

.4

1.2
.4
.3

.8
4.0
8.7

d)
•i

.2

.9
(D

.6

(D

.1

.1
.2
.8

(D

.1
.1

.1

1.0
.1
.1
1.2
3.8
(D

1.4

.3

5.0

2.3

(D

(D

(D

(1)

(D

2.6

.1

170.8
26.4
88.4

3.0
.4

1.6

1.0
.2
1.1

2.8

92

.4
id

2.1
. 1
.6

.1

20

1.0

3.3
. 1
.9
2.3

23.5
5.8
25.3

4
168

49.5

.8

.1

.5

.1
.8

.5

.1
.2

“

1 L e s s th a n 0. 05 p e r c e n t,
2 I n c l u d e s d i s p u t e s b e t w e e n u n io n s of d if fe r e n t a f f il i a ­
t i o n , s u c h a s t h o s e b e t w e e n A F L - C I O a f f ilia t e s and in d ep en d ­
e n t o rg a n iz a tio n s .
3 F e w e r th a n 50.
4 I n c l u d e s d i s p u t e s b e t w e e n u n io n s, u s u a lly of the
s a m e a f f i l i a t i o n o r b e t w e e n tw o lo c a l s of th e s a m e union,




2.2

.4

.1

o v e r r e p r e s e n ta t io n o f w o r k e r s .
5
In clu d es d is p u te s w ith in a u nion o v e r th e a d m in is ­
tr a tio n o f u n ion a f f a ir s o r r e g u la tio n s .

NO T E:
B e c a u s e of rounding, s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s
m a y n ot eq u a l to t a ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d en o te z e r o s .

20

Table 12. Work stoppages industry group and major issue, 1976
(BOBKBBS AID DAIS IDLE ! ■ THOPSA1DS)

TOTAL

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

GENERAL HAGE CHANGES

DAYS
IDL E D RING
U
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

HORKERS
INVOLVED

ALL INDUSTRIES.................................................... ,1 /5 , 6 4 8

2 ,4 20.0

MANUFACTURING............................................................ 1 / 2 , 2 4 5

974.5

1

0.8

227

90.4
. 1
7.9

42. 1
1,848.0
3.2
11 5 .0

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.....................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS.............................................
APPABEL, ETC. 2 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND HOOD PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
FURN ITURE......................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................
PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
RUBBER AND HISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHEB PRODUCTS............................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES.....................................
FABRICATED HETAL PRODUCTS 3 / ............................

1

36

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

HORKERS
INVOLVED

37,858.9

2,857

1 , 211.0

24. 26 3. 1

1 ,5 8 4

4 9 3 .9

1

0.8

169

76.0

1
22

.1
6.2

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

HORKERS
INVOLVED

23,778.6

53

10.4

189 .0

1 6 , 4 0 5. 6

25

5.7

12 4 .5

42. 1
1,557.2
3.2
58.3

_
5

-

1.1

_
44.9

-

1

-

. 3

-

1. 4

47

11.6

230.5

23

4.7

111.0

-

-

-

69
73
95

10. 8

50
53
72

8.8

1 0. 3
23.0

429.4
266.6
47 9. 0

20.1

396. 4
204. 1
41 6. 1

1
1

. 1
. 1

.6
.1

54
129

13.1
28. 8

225.4

29
84

1 1 .5
1 4 .4

137. 1
436.9

-

-

-

1, 1 1 6 .8

2

.6

11.0

17

1. 1

19 . 1

15

1.0

13.6
3

1.3
.3

25.3
7.7
7.7
8. 8

7.6

5

.6

13.4

120
12

93. 1

86.2

28.0
54.9
63.8

6,082.4
5 5 .1
612. 5
1,304.3
1,631.5

86

146
197
309

7
118
141
249

1 .7
1 7 .4

37.7

5,953. 1
31.6
437.5
8 43 . 1
1,126.8

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.....................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 4 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

309

14 4. 5

2,721.8

208

49 . 9

1,418.9

-

204
130
29
60

1 3 4. 8
238. 1
5.3
1 1 .4

2,235.5
4,322.9
128. 1
393.9

117
84
17
46

77.4
40.5

1,523.8
1,437. 6
46.8

-

7.7

210.6

-

*

-

NONHANUFACTURING....................................................

1/3,406

1,445.5

13, 5 9 5 . 8

1, 2 7 4

71 7 .1

7,373.1

28

4.8

64.5

10

2.4
5 14 . 7
17 2. 4

13.9

2, 220. 1
3,239. 8

7
31
247

1.3
5.3
10 4 .3

10. 5
198. 4
1,553.5

_

1,4 25
50 3

4

0.3
1 .3

1 0 .3

354
467

386.4
55.8

3,461. 3
1,311.3

235
337

329.2
42.8

2,014.4
95 6. 1

6
6

.5
.3

3.2
15. 1

27
246
378

25.4
107.6
180.7

273.0
1,385.7
1,690.7

18
151
250

25.0
85.7
123.7

266.0
1,057.0
1 ,3 1 7 . 0

1
6

2.0

(5)

.1
3 1 .9

3

.4

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES-----MINING..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
HHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNM
ENT 6/ .................................................................
S e e fo o tn o te s




a t end of

2.6

ta b le .

21

22.6

1.8

1
2
1
2

-

1

2

.6
.4

.2

2.6

-

-

.1

1.0

-

-

_

2.8

1.2

Table 12. Work stoppages by industry group and major issue, 1976—Continued
(■OBO ES AID DAIS IDLE ! ■ THOUSANDS)

RAGE ADJUSTMENTS

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN*
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

ALL INDUSTRIES....................................................
MANUFACTURING.................................................. ..

HOURS OF NORN

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

1 / 1*2

51.9

1/60

1 4 .0

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

OTHER CONTRACTUAL HATTERS

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

HORNERS
INVOLVED

562.0

6

2.2

56.9

142

19.2

338.0

36 3 . 4

1

0.3

32.3

71

13 .3

267.2

3.7
3 .1

*

*

-

-

_
3.5
. 3

35.1
38.2

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES..............................................
TEXTILE WILL PRODUCTS.............................................

-

1

0.3
. 1

APPAREL, ETC. £ / ..........................................................
LUBBER AND BOOD PRODUCTS, EXCBPT
FURNITURE......................................................................
FUBNITURE AM FIXTDBES...........................................
D
PAPEB A D ALLIED PBODOCTS....................................
M

*

.6

1. 4

-

-

-

5

.3

1.0

2

.6

1.9
35.8

-

-

1

(5)

1

(5)

*

3

(5)
1. 4
2.9

-

2
11

2.1

(5)

1.3
1 4. 6

1

(3)

2.9

.6

11.8

(5 )

.4
3.0
1 6 .2
53.3

PBIMTIMG, PUBLISHING, AM ALLIED
D
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING A D RELATED
M
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.............
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES......................................
FABBICATED HETAL PBODUCTS 3 / ............................

2

-

-

-

2
*

1

-

.8
-

. 1

.6

-

-

*

.2

-

.1
1.8

2.0

-

-

4.6
14.3

-

-

1
5

.7

12.1

1

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TEA NSPOBTATIOM EQUIPMENT......................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 4 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

13

3.8

17 4 . 7

-

-

-

17

3.6

1 5 .2
1 .5

-

-

NONMANUFACTURING....................................................
AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AM FI SH ERIES....
D
MINING................................................................. - ..............
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNMENT 6/ .................................................................

2

1

1
3

6
6

. 1
.2

.6
.6
2. 2

1

.2

7.0

5

4

.9
.4
1. 4

24.2
6.9
46.9

5.8

70.8

(5 )

0. 1
25.2

. 1
1.7

88.7

-

J/82

37.9

198. 7

5

1.9

24.6

71

1

(5 )

1

_

1 2 .9
2.7

0.9
-

1.8

49

(5)
25.2
19.7

5

1 6. 1
. 1

117. 2
2. 1

-

4
7

4. 1

28.5

2

.6

1
2
1

8

8

.3

2.1

2.8

6.0

S e e fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




-

5

32.3

0.3

7

11

22

-

3

1

•8

19

.2

12. 4
“

9
18

-

-

1

.3

1

8 .0

1. 6

2.2
.3

.8

2

(5)

15
7

2 .0

.5

8.1
22. 1
.5
11.5
3.3

Table 12. W ork stoppages by industry group and major issue, 1976—Continued
jBO lKM S AMD DATS I DIB IB THOUSANDS)

UNION ORGANIZATION AND
SECURITY

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAB

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

ALL INDUSTRIES....................................................

1/325

126.B

MANUFACTURING...........................................................

1/127

80.9

-

1.4

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS.............................................

11

PLANT ADMINISTRATION

JOB SECURITY

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

2 * 4 5 4. 9
730. 1

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

317

40 1 .7

121

271. 0
-

-

10

2. 1

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

LAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAB (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

7 ,1 86.9

1,2 90

4 89.0

2 ,7 76.6

5,261.3

177

76.0

919.7
57.4
3.0

_
35. 5

15
-

-

3

.2

57.4
7.8

2

4.4
. 4

APPAREL, ETC. 2 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND ROOD PRODUCTS* EXCEPT
FURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

5

. 1

5.9

2

5.3

99.5

5

.4

2.0

5

8
2

.3
. 6
•4

14 .5
8. 4
4.6

3
4
4

. 2
1 .5
.4

11 . 1
22.0

5
3

6

.4
.3

1.7
1. 1

PRINTING* PUBLISHING* AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHJSHICALS AND ALLIID PBODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND BELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................

9

.6
1. 1

41.2
11.5

9

11

.7
6.9

23. 3
34 5 .2

4

8

.2

1 8 .3
296. 1

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............................
STONE* CLAY* AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES.....................................
FABRICATED M
ETAL PRODUCTS 3 / ............................

-

.2

7

2. 0

1 1. 7

8

.8

3.3

28. 2

8

2.8

12

4.8
4.7
2. 2

1.4

50.3

9

4. 1
1 9. 2
1 2. 3

99.0
312.4
334. 3

23

59.2

872.9

31

19.8

2 0 1 .9

311.0
54. 2
2. 1
42.3

12

27.2
127 .3
2.9

1

.1

284.0
2,684. 4
70. 1
3.7

28
15
5
3

14. 2
17.1
. 3
(5)

51.5
132.1
5. 8
1.7

45.9

1* 72 4. 8

198

13 0 .7

1,925.6

1. 11 3

412.9

1,856.9

1

0.2
4.8
19. 5

109

40.9
15 .3

-

15
38

0.9
37.7
1,226.0

993
23

388.6
5.6

1*69 0.5
38.8

31
45

2.0

1 .7

49.9
14 2. 4

15
13

32.9

6.8

1,189.1
13 7. 3

.2

.9
157.1
10 9 .9

1

(5)
4.3
30.4

.8
54.5
21 1 .3

1

. 4
. 1

17

MACHINERY* EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.....................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 4 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..
NONAANUFACTUBING....................................................
AGRICULTURE* FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
MINING..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION*
ELECTRIC* GAS* AND SANITARY SERVICES..
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE................................
FINANCE* INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNMENT 6/ * ................................................- ...........

4
32
32

10.8

9
3

1.8

"

“

.2




-

~

4

S e e f o o tn o te s

3

5.2
7.6

4. 1
4 8. 8
37.6

10

16

8.7

39.7

9
7
5

5.2
48.2
(5)
.5

1/ 198

12

1

4.4
13.1

a t e n d o f ta b le .

23

15

2

8

17
37

108. 8
223.9

n
16

28

10.9
53.7
54.9
2 5 .6

0.6

22

1.6

4.1

43.7

1

.2

14
32

4.6
8.4

.7
34. 3
26.8

21.6

Table 12. Work stoppages by industry group and major issue, 1976—Continued
(BOBKBBS AMD D U S IM .B H

THOOSUDS)

OTHER WORKING CONDITIONS

INDOSTBY GROUP

INTERUNION OR INTRAUNION
MATTERS

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAH

DAYS
IDLE DUH1Nb
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

NO REPORTED
T

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS

DAYS
ID l E l U i N
k g
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)
NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

ALL INDUSTRIES....................................................

1/185

50.3

178. 1

285

54.7

288. 2

46

2.8

49.5

MANUFACTURING............................................................

J/41

11.0

45.6

16

6.9

89.8

22

1 .5

23.6

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FCOD AND KINDBED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS.............................................

-

-

3
-

1.5
(5)

56. 1
.7

-

-

*

APPABEL, ETC. 2 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND HOOD PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
FURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

1

(5)

-

(5)
.5

.5
17.5

1

-

1
2

0.8

. 1

. 6

1

.9

-

-

-

0.2

8.8

2

.4
-

3.2

-

-

2

.2

3.5

~

4.0
”

1
3

(5)
. 4

. 1
.9

1

1

0. 1

(5)

2.5

-

. 1
. 1
. 1

-

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES......................................
F ABEICAT 2D HETAL PRODUCTS 3 / ............................

“

1

.2

2

.3

4. 4
. 1
4.4

4

.2

1.9
. 9
1 .4

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT......................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 4 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

13

2. 7

4. 1

i

. 1

. 1

3

. 1

2.6

12
2
2

2. 8

9. 1
4.4
. 5

3

1 6 .2
.7
-

1

.1

.6

-

-

*

3.5
.7
*

NONMANUFACTURING....................................................

l/l**1
*

39.3

13 2 .5

26 9

47.9

198. 4

24

1.3

25.9

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES-----MINING..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE................................

124

109.9
7.2

-

1

36.6
. 1

25.4

149

20.8

46. 8
128. 3

5

0.3

6. 1

8
3

5.3
.4

7

6

.5
.4

9.9
2. 9

6

. 1

12

.3

-

7 /4.0

_
10.5

~

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND BEAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVER NM
EHT 6 / ................................................................

-

1
2
2

-

6
2

1
1

.4
(5)

1.0

(5)
.4

.7
. 8
4.8

.2

3.5
.3

.8

.6
1.0

-

2

~

2

101

2.6

-

_
-

3. 1

6

.6

1
2
2

-

-

-

1

-

.2

_
-

8. 1
1 1. 3

.7
(5)

.3

m a te r ia ls .

5 F e w e r t h a n 50.
6 T h e s itu a tio n s r e p o r te d h e r e h a v e , f o r s ta tis tic a l p u rp o s e s , b e e n
d e e m e d t o f a l l w i t h i n t h e B u r e a u 's d e f i n i t i o n o f a w o r k s t o p p a g e . T h i s
d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o r k s to p p a g e
h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
7 Id le n e s s r e s u ltin g f r o m s to p p a g e s (s ) b e g in n in g in p r i o r y e a r ( s ) .

3 E x c lu d e s o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , an d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t.
4 In c lu d e s p r o f e s s io n a l,
s c ie n tific ,
and c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ;
p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,
su m s
e q u a l to ta ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d e n o te z e r o s .

1 T h e n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s re p o r te d fo r
o r d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m of its c o m
s to p p a g e s o c c u r r in g in 2 o r m o r e g ro u p s a r e
i n v o l v e d a n d d a y s i d l e a r e a l l o c a t e d a m o n g th e
* I n c lu d e s o th e r fin is h e d p r o d u c ts m a d e




a m a jo r in d u s tr y g ro u p
p o n e n ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l
c o u n te d in e a c h . W o r k e r s
re s p e c tiv e g ro u p s.
fro m fa b ric s and s im ila r

24

of

in d iv id u a l

ite m s

m ay

not

Table 13. Work stoppages by major issue and size, 1976
(I01USS AID OATS IDLE II THOOSAIDS)

M
AJOR ISSUE

TOTAL

20
6
100
250
500
1,000
5,000
AND UNDER AM UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER AND UNDER
D
20
100
250
500
1,000
5,000
10,000
W
ORKERS
W
ORKERS
W
ORKERS
W
ORKERS
W
ORKERS
W
ORKERS
W
ORKERS

10,000

W
ORKERS
O
R
M RE
O

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
ALL ISSUES...................................................................

5, 6a 8

661

2 ,0 6 8

1, 62 5

900

36 3

188

20

23

GENERAL H
AGE CHANGES................................................
SUPPLEMENTARY EENEFITS...........................................
HAGE ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
HOURS OF W
ORK................................................................
OTHEP CONTRACTUAL HATTERS..................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOB SECURITY...................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS......................................
IHTRRUNION OB IHTBA0HIOH MATTERS..................
NCT REPORTED...................................................................

2,857
53
162

335
4
17
38
85
15
77
15
60
15

1, 196
23
62
58
158
90
362
69
92

696

351
9
33
3

151
3

108

2
6

13
-

11

2

-

6

1 42
325
317
1,290
185
285
46

12

31

2
26
37
98
397

66
73
9

20

12
1
8

10
25
52
319
55
61

9
33

122

-

1

-

20

9

-

1
1
5

1
8
2

13

-

-

11

8
-

-

-

-

2

26
7

-

W
ORKERS IMYOLYBD
ALL ISSUES...................................................................

2,620.0

8.0

106. 1

229. 0

316.2

266.2

356.7

131.7

1,030.1

GENERAL H
AGE CHANGES...............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS...........................................
W E ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
AG
HOURS OF ROBB................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS...................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOB SECURITY...................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS.....................................
INTEPUNION OR INTRAUNION HATTERS..................
NOT EEPOFTED...................................................................

1 , 211.0
10.6

6.1
. 1
.2

59.6

10 9 .2
1.9
5. 0
.3
3.9
5.3
1 6 .9
66. 1
7.7
1 1. 4

120.6

101 .9

203.0

85.2
8.3
5.9
32.3
-

527.5
-

51.9

2.2

1 9. 2
12 6 .8
601.7
689.0
50.3
56.7

2.8

1.0
2. 2

.4

-

2.6

1.0
.2

7.2
5. 1
18.6
2.7
6.3

.9

.2
.7

.2

.8

1.2

2.2

2.9
1 1 .7

8.5
.9
5.8

1.0

3.3
8.5
17.5
115. 1
1 9. 8
15.3

6.2

21.5
81.7

8.6

6.9

2.6
12.2

3.0
23.6
39.6
65.5
1 1.3
16.1

.6

12.0

66.7
29 5. 1
12 8 .8
-

*

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
ALL ISSUES...................................................................
GENERAL RAGE CHANGES................................................
SUPPLEMENTARY EENEFITS...........................................
HAGE ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
HOURS OF W
ORK................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS...................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOB SECURITY...................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS......................................
INTERUNION O INTRAUNION HATTERS..................
R
NCT REPORTED...................................................................
NOTE:
eq u al to ta ls .

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,
su m s
D a s h e s (-) d e n o t e z e r o s .




of

37,858.9

192 .6

2,3 0 6 .0

3 ,7 60.3

6,017.2

3,662.9

7,096.6

2,8 2 6 .6

16,062.9

23,778.6
189 .0
562. 0
5 6 .9
338.0
2 ,4 54.9
7,186.9
2,776.6
178. 1
288.2
49.5

110 . 1

1,662.6
27.5
2 6 .8

2 ,7 76.2
28.0
70.6

2 ,8 8 8 .7
69.2
33.5
36.3
50.6
16 6 .1
318.9
353.7
63.2
79 . 1

2 ,5 88.0
56.2
216.0

6,950.9
29.3
137 .8
58.0
761.0
693.8
563.6
26.2
9 3 .8

1 ,881.9

6,960.5

in d iv id u a l ite m s

.9

2.6

8.0

12.6
37.6
3.9
7.5
5 .1
4.8
7.9
m ay

12.8

58. 3
266.3
116.5

-

78.6
251.6
2 6 6 .0
188. 8
27. 0
2 8 .6
12.7

86.6

16. 2
34. 6,
26. 9
not

25

2.0

1 .8

8 0 .6
12 9. 6
18 6 .8
300.3
62.5
47.3
“

-

798.5
16.6
127.8
-

-

78.8
66.7
5 ,7 86.7
1,170.3
-

Table 14. Work stoppages by industry, 1976
(BOM BS S IB P DATS IDLE IN THOUSANDS)

STOPPAGZS BEGINNING IN YEAR

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
(ALL STOPPAGES)

INDUSTRY
NUM
BER

M
EAN
DURATION 1 /

W
ORKERS
IN VOLVED

NUM
BER

PERCENT OF
EST. TOTAL
W
ORKING
TIME 2 /

ALL INDUSTRIES................................................................

3/5,648

19. 9

2,4 2 0 .0

37,858.9

0.19

MANUFACTURING........................................................................

3/2,245

32.3

974.5

2 4 , 2 6 3. 1

0.51

0.8

42 . 1

0.11

1

74.0

_
1

7 4 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...............................................
M
EAT PRODUCTS........................................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS......................................................................
CANNED AND PRESERVED FRUITS, VEGETABLES,
AND SEA FOODS...................................................................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS.........................................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS...................................................................
SUGAR...........................................................................................
CONFECTIONERY AND BELATED PRODUCTS.....................
BEVERAGES..................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS FOOD PREPARATIONS AND KINDRED
PRODUCTS...............................................................................

227
60
14

26. 4
20.6
5. 0

90. 4
21.8
1.7

1,848.0
474.5
5. 9

22
19
32
2
9
42

14. 1
21.9
17. 0
23. 4
43.2
63. 5

35.7
2- 3
6. 6
2.6
2.3
13 .6

368.2
36.5
98 .2
4 1.9
69.3
606. 8

27

55.6

3.8

146.7

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...........................................................
CIGARETTES...............................................................................
CIGARS.........................................................................................
TOBACCO (CHEWING AND SMOKING) AND S N U FF .. ..
TOBACCO STEMMING AND REDBYING.................................

1
1
-

68.0
68. 0
-

. 1
• 1

'

'

*

TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS.........................................................
BBOADW
OVEN FABRIC MILLS, COTTON............................
BROADW
OVEN FABRIC MILLS, MAN-MADE FIBER
AND SILK...............................................................................
BBOADW
OVEN FABRIC MILLS,. W O INCLUDING
OL
DYEING AND FINISHING..................................................
NARROW FABRICS AND OTHER SMALLW
ABES MILLS:
COTTON, W
OOL, SILK, AND MAN-MADE FIBER.. .
KNITTING KILLS................................................................... 1
DYEING AND FINISHING TEXTILES, EXCEPT W O
OL
FABRICS AND KNIT GOODS.............................................
FLOOR COVERING MILLS..........................- .......................... .
YARN AND THREAD MILLS. • ^ ...................................
MISCELLANEOUS TEXTILE GOODS....’. .........................

36
6

14. 7
18 .3

7. 9
2.0

6

6.0

.1. 9

7.8

3

7.9

.5

2.6

1
11

18. 4 .

.2
2.0

-32.4
2 8 .2

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES..................................................
GUNS, HOWITZERS, MORTARS, AND RELATED
EQUIPMENT.............................................................................
AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SM
ALL ARMS.......................
TANKS, AND TANK COMPONENTS........................................
SIGHTING AND FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT..................
SHALL ARMS...............................................................................
SMALL ARM AMMUNITION....................................................
S
ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES NOT ELSEW
HERE
CLASSIFIED...........................................................................

.8
-

42. 1
-

.4 3

3.2
3.2
-

.02

11 5 .0
26.2

.05

21.0
7. 5
•35.5

47

24. 3

1 1. 6

39.3

1. 1

32.0

14
17

8. 1
2 1 .1

2.2
1 .6

15. 1
55.1

2
1
7

61. 1
6.0
26. 7

.2
. 1
6.3

10. 1
.3
2.9
115.1

LUMBER AND W O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT FURNITURE...
OD
LOGGING CAMPS AND LOGGING CONTRACTORS.............
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS........................................
MILLWOBK, VENEER, PLYW
OOD, AND
PREFABRICATED STRUCTURAL W O PRODUCTS...
OD
W DEN CONTAINERS..............................................................
OO
MISCELLANEOUS W O PRODUCTS.....................................
OD

69
3
15

55.3
104.8
60. 1

10.8
2. 1
1. 5

429.4
152. 1
63.4

34
7
11

21.0
106. 9
36.0

4.7
1.4
1.2

78.6
10 1 .4
33.8

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES......................................................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE.........................................................
OFFICE FURNITURE.................................................................
PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND RELATED FURNITURE..........
PARTITIONS, SHELVING, LOCKERS, AND OFFICE
AND STORE FIXTURES.......................................................
MISCELLANEOUS FURNITURE AND FIXTURES................

73
52
2
3

27. 1
26.5
35. 3
14. 6

10. 3
5.3
2 .7
. 2

266.6
158 .5
73.5
2 .6

14
2

1 8. 6
20. 8

1.9
.3

28.2
3.9

.

23 0 . 5

6

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b l e .




26

-3
.6
.4 •

_

1
3
5

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED PRODUCTS M
ADE FRO
M
FABRICS AND SIMILAR MATERIALS.................................
MEN• S, YOUTHS’ , AND BOYS’ SUITS, COATS, AND
OVERCOATS.........................................................................
MEN'S, YOUTHS*, AND BOYS* FURNISHINGS, W R
OK
CLOTHING, AND ALLIED GARMENTS............................
W EN’ S , MISSES', AND JUNIORS' OUTERWEAR...
OM
W EN’ S , MISSES', CHILDREN'S, AND INFANTS'
OM
UNDERGARMENTS...................................................................
HATS, CAPS, AND MILLINERY..........................................
GIRLS', CHILDREN'S, AND INFANTS' OUTERW
EAR.
FUR GOODS..................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES.............
MISCELLANEOUS FABRICATED TEXTILE PRODUCTS..

,

_

_

3 .6
3 .9
1 0. 2

.07

,

.2 8

.22

Table 14. Work stoppages by industry, 1978—Continued
(W
ORKERS AMD DAIS IDLE I» THOPSANPS)
DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
(ALL STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
INDUSTRY
NUM
BER

>UI
DOBATIOH J /

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

NUM
BER

PERCENT OF
ESI. TOTAL
HORKING
TIME 2 /

MANUFACTURING - CONTINUED
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...............................................
PULP MILLS...............................................................................
PULP HILLS EXCEPT BUJIIING PAPEB HILLS...........
PAPERBOARD MILLS................................................................
CONVERTED PAPER AND PAPERBOARD PRODUCTS,
EXCEPT CONTAINERS AND BOXES.................................
PAPEB 00 ABD CO TAINEBS AND BOXES............................
N
BUILDING PAPER AND BUILDING BOARD HIL LS .. *.

95
6
22
b

27. b
1 8 .2
30.4
29.5

23.0
5.7
4.7
1.4

479.0
60.6
10 2 . 3
38.8

28
30
3

33. 1
24.4
b3. 9

8.4
4.3
.5

156.8
81.7
38.7

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED INDUSTRIES..
NEWSPAPERS: PUBLISHING AND PRINTING..................
PERIODICALS: PUBLISHING AND PRINTING................
BOOKS...........................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS PUBLISHING.............................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING.........................................................
MANIFOLD BUSINESS FORMS...............................................
GBEET1NG CABO PUBLISHING.............................................
BLANKBOOKS, LOOSE LEAF BINDERS AID
BOOKBINDING W
ORK............................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRIES FCR THE PRINTING TRADE*.

54
10
4
4
1
27
2

1 3. 2
22.0
20.5
1 1 .7
bl .O
1 0 .2
85. 8

1 3. 1
.7
.8
2.1
(4)
8.8
.2
-

225.4
69.6
12 .3
4 4 .1
. 4
72.7
8.2
-

4
2

40. 1
83.0

.3
.2

12.9
5.2

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS............. ........................
INDUSTRIAL INORGANIC AND ORGANIC CHEMICALS.
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETIC RESINS,
SYNTHETIC RUBBER, AND OTHER M
AN-M
ADE
FIBERS, EXCEPT GLASS..................................................
DRUGS............................................................................................
SOAP, DETERGENTS, AND CLEANING
PREPARATIONS, PERFUMES, COSMETICS, AND
OTHER TOILET PREPARATIONS......................................
PAINTS, VARNISHES, LACQUERS, ENAMELS, AND
ALLIED PRODUCTS..............................................................
G M AND W O CHEMICALS..................................................
U
OD
AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS..................................................
MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICAL PRODUCTS............................

129
46

40.9
3 8 .3

28.8
1 0 .1

1, 116 .8
51 4 .1

25
b

4b. 1
30.4

7.3
1.1

250.9
30.9

13

82.9

4.0

17 3 .3

13
2
6
18

22.2
10 3 .2
33.7
21.3

1.9
.3
.7
3.5

28.2
15.0
33.5
71.0

PETBOL £UH BEFINING AND BELATED PRODUCTS.............
PETROLEUM R E F I N I N G . .. .. ...............................................
PAVING AND ROOFING MATERIALS................. ..
MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND
COAL.........................................................................................

17
3
10

21.4
17.7
20.3

1.1
. 1
.5

19.1
2.2
9.8

4

23.9

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS.••
TIRES AND INNER TUBES....................................................
RUBBER FOOTW
EAR...................................................................
RECLAIMED RUBBER.................................................................
FABRICATED RUBBER PRODUCTS NO ELSEW
T
HERE
CLASSIFIED..........................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS.................. ..

120
22
2
-

94.2
108. 4
87.0

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS........................................
LEATHEB TANNING AND FINISHING.................................
INDUSTRIAL LEATHEB BELTING AND PACKING..........
BOOT AND SHOE CUT STOCK AND FINDINGS................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER...............................................
LEATHER GLOVES AND MITTENS........................................
LUGGAGE.......................................................................................
HANDBAGS AND OTHER PERSONAL LEATHER GOODS..
LEATHER GOODS NOT ELSEWHERE CLASSIFIED..........

12
1
2
8
1
*

30.3
53.0
24.0
24.8
128.0

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS................................
FLAT GLASS................................................................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED CB BL OW N......
GLASS PRODUCTS, HADE FRO PURCHASED GLASS.•
M
CEMENT, HYDRAULIC....................................................
STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS................................... ..
POTTERY AND RELATED PRODUCTS...................................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS...........
CUT STONE AND STONE PRODUCTS...................................
ABRASIVES, ASBESTOS, AND MISCELLANEOUS
NONMETALLIC MINERAL PRODUCTS...............................

14b
3
10
3
2
24
12
b3
5

27.3
32.b
9.3
54.3
14.3
25.8
24.2
37.4
1b. 1

25

25.5

4.2

88.6

PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES..................................................
BLAST FURNACES, STEEL W
ORKS, AND BOLLING
AND FINISHING HILLS....................................................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES.............................................
PRIMARY SMELTING AND REFINING 07 M FERBOOS
OM
METALS....................................................................................
SECONDARY SMELTING AND REFINING OF
NONFEBROUS METALS............................................ • • • • •
ROLLING, DRAWING, AND EXTRUDING OF
NONFERROUS METALS......................................• • • • • • • •
NONFERROUS FOUNDRIES..................................... ................
HISCELLABEOUS PBIHABY HETAL PBODUCTS................

197

29.8

54.9

1,304.3

39
b5

34.2
27.8

b.9
31.3

208.8
621.0
33.2

S e e fo o t n o t e s




-

-

-

3b
bO

38.3 .
28. 1

.4
93 .V
74. 1
.7

.43

.04

7. 1
'6,082.4 ■
5,5 9 4 .4
39.3

3.93

-

-

259.5
18 9 .2

2.8
. 1
.2
2.2
. 1

5 5 .1
3.6
3.5
37.2
1 0. 8

.08

612.5
88.7
27.5
44.8
2 .9
94.9
140 .4
121.8
3.0

.3 9

28.0
3.9

4.0

1. 2
.3
3.3
6.4
4.4
.3

5

72.5

.7

34.0

.8

23
37
24

32.2
25.5
35.0

3.9
b. 2
5.3

27

.08

9.8
8.7

10

a t e n d o f t a b le .

0.28

15.1
117.1
127 .2
181 .9

.43

Table 14. Work stoppages by industry, 1976—Continued
(HOBKBBS AMD PAYS IDLE II THOUSANDS}__________________________________
DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
(ALL STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
INDUSTRY
M
EAN
DURATION J /

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

NUM
BER

1 ,6 3 1.5
39.8
78. 1

PERCENT OF
EST. TOTAL
W
ORKING
TIME 2 /

MANUFACTURING - CONTINUED
FABRICATED M
ETAL PRODUCTS, EXCEPT ORDNANCE,
MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT....
M
ETAL CANS...............................................................................
CUTLERY, HANDTOOLS, AND GENERAL HARDWARE...
HEATING APPARATUS (EXCEPT ELECTRIC) AND
PLUMBING FIXTURES.........................................................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL M
ETAL PHODUCTS................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, NUTS,
SCREWS, AND RIVETS........................... ..........................
M
ETAL STAMPINGS....................................................................
COATING, ENGRAVING, AND ALLIED SERVICES-----MISCELLANEOUS FABRICATED W
IRE PRODUCTS..........
MISCELLANEOUS FABRICATED M
ETAL PRODUCTS....
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL........................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES.......................................................
FARM MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT...................................
CONSTRUCTION, MINING, AND MATERIALS
HANDLING MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT....................
M
ETALW
ORKING MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT.............
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY, EXCEPT
METALW
ORKING MACHINERY.............................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY AND
EQUIPMENT.............................................................................
OFFICE, COMPUTING, AND ACCOUNTING MACHINES.
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES..........................................
MISCELLANEOUS MACHINERY, EXCEPT
ELECTRICAL..........................................................................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES....................................................................................
ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION
EQUIPMENT.............................................................................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS............................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES.......................................................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT..........
RADIO AND TELEVISION RECEIVING SETS, EXCEPT
COMMUNICATION TYPES....................................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT...............................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES.............
MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRICAL MACHINERY,
EQUIPMENT, AND SUPPLIES..........................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT...............................................
M TO VEHICLES AND M
O R
OTOB VEHICLE
EQUIPMENT.............................................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS............................................................
SHIP AND BOATBUILDING AND REPAIRING..................
RAILROAD EQUIPMENT...........................................................
MOTORCYCLES, BICYCLES, AND PARTS.........................
MISCELLANEOUS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT..........
PROFESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND CONTROLLING
INSTRUMENTS; PHOTOGRAPHIC AND OPTICAL
GOODS; HATCHES AND CLOCKS..........................................
ENGINEERING, LABORATORY, AND SCIENTIFIC AND
RESEARCH INSTRUMENTS AND ASSOCIATED
EQUIPMENT................................... - .......................................
INSTRUMENTS FOR MEASURING, CONTROLLING, AND
INDICATING PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS...............
OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS AND LENSES..............................
SURGICAL, MEDICAL, AND DENTAL INSTRUMENTS
AND SUPPLIES.....................................................................
OPHTHA LIMIC GOODS..............................................................
PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES..................
WATCHES, CLOCKS, CLOCKW
ORK OPERATED DEVICES
AND PARTS.............................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES...............
JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, AND PLATED W
ARE...............
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.........................................................
TOYS, AMUSEMENT, SPORTING AND ATHLETIC
GOODS.......................................................................................
PENS, PENCILS, AND OTHER OFFICE AND
ARTISTS' MATERIALS.......................................................
COSTUME JENELRY, COSTUME NOVELTIES,
BUTTONS, AND MISCELLANEOUS NOTIONS,
EXCEPT PRECIOUS METALS.............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES...........

309
11
18

28.7
24.9
27.7

63.8
1.8
3.7

21
143

26.2
36. 1

4 .2
20.8

155.6
590.0

9
35
19
12
42

32.6
1 9 .9
35. 8
28.2
33. 2

1 .4
20.9
1.8
1.6
7.7

205.6
299.5
45.5
32.7
184.7

309
37
18

23. 2
9.8
23. 1

144.5
1 4 .4
58.3

2,721.8
11 3. 7
8 25 . 1

55
51

33.0
28.0

12.0
1 1 .0

330.6
402.6

24

40.9

2.8

16. 1
22.2
38. 4

29. 5
.9
1 2 .8

5 4 6 .2
1 4 .0
337.9

31

26. 1

3.0

59.6

2,2 3 5 .5

204

20.0

134.8

19
49
23
45

1 8. 8
5. 8
26.0
24. 6

14 .9
38.8
27.2
1 2 .3

7
18
21

35.3
38.0
42. 7

2.0
12. 1
3.3

15 7 .3
322.1
96.7

27

20. 8

24.3

334.6

130

25. 0

238.1

4,3 2 2 .9

68
21
22
7
2
10

23.3
37.7
27.6
46.6
1 1 .2
41.5

200.0
13.0
18. 1
4.4
.6
2.0

3 ,2 4 5 .3
330.5
525.5
157.5
4.8
59.4

29

34.5

5 .3

128.1

4

35.3

3.0

72.2

9

1

38.4
93. 0

1.4
(9)

3 7 .9
.6

8
2
4

35.7
29. 0
6. 5

.6
(“)
.3

1 3. 7
2.2
1 .4

1

4.0

(9)

.1

60
2
4

34. 2
28.0
25.4

11.9
.5
.9

393.9
65.2
17.1

15

42.6

9.6

165.1

6

64.5

1 .4

76.2

3
30

24.2
20. 8

.2
3.7

3.7
66.7

.48

299. 1
179.6
629.7
216.5

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b l e .




.52

92.2

61
6
30

0.47

28

.99

.10

.37

Table 14. Work stoppages by industry, 1976—Continued
(BOBKBBS I I P PIT S IDLE I » TH0DSA1DS)

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
(ALL STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
INDUSTRY
NUM
BER

M
EAN
DURATION 1 /

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

NUM
BER

PERCENT OF
EST. TOTAL
W
ORKING
TIME 2 /

j/3 ,4 0 6

1 1 .7

1,445.5

13,595.8

0.09

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....................
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION...............................................
AGRICULTURAL SERVICES AND HUNTING AND
TRAPPING.................................................... ..........................
FORESTRY....................................................................................
FISHERIES..................................................................................

10
7

7.7
7.6

2.4
2.2

1 3 .9
1 2 .2

(5)

3

10. 4

.1

1.1

"

"

MINING..............................................................................................
M
ETAL MINING..........................................................................
IRON ORES.............................................................................
COPPER ORES........................................................................
LEAD AND ZINC ORES......................................................
GOLD AND SILVER ORES.................................................
BAUXITE AND ALUMINUM ORES.....................................
FERROALLOY ORES EXCEPT VANADIUM.......... ...........
M
ETAL MINING SERVICES...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS M
ETAL ORES........................................
ANTHRACITE MINING..............................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LIGNITE.....................................
CBUDE PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS............................
CRUDE PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS.......................
NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS....................................................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES...................................
MINING AND QUARRYING OF NONMETALLIC
MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS.............................................
DIMENSION STONE..............................................................
CRUSHED AND BROKEN STONE,
INCLUDING RIPRAP......................................................
SAND AND GRAVEL..............................................................
CLAY, CERAMIC, AND REFRACTORY MINERALS...
CHEMICAL AND FERTILIZER MINERAL MINING...
NONMETALLIC MINERALS (EXCEPT FUELS)
SERVICES..........................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS NONMETALLIC MINERALS,
EXCEPT FUELS................................................................

1,4 25
6

3
1,38 3
12
4
8

5.8
9. 3
9.3
10 .0
11. 4
5. 6
1 2 .9
13. 6
12.5

514.7
1 .7
1.2
.5
.8
506.9
1 .9
.9
1.1

21
1

34.7
11 8 .0

3.4
(4)

99.2
1.4

8
6
3
2

39.2
19 .7
59.6
4. 9

.8
1.3
1.0
.2

31.9
19. 1
45.8
.7

NONMANUFACTURING................................................................

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.........................................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, ELECTRIC, GAS,
AND SANITARY SERVICES....................................................
RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION...............................................
RAILROADS.............................................................................
SLEEPING CAR AND OTHER PASSENGER CAR
SERVICE.............................................................................
RAILW
AY EXPRESS SERVICE..........................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSIT AND INTERURBAN
HIGHW
AY PASSENGER TRANSPORTATION....................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN PASSENGER
TRANSPORTATION............................................................
TAXICABS...............................................................................
INTERCITY AND RURAL HIGHW
AY PASSENGER
TRANSPORTATION............................................................
PASSENGER TRANSPORTATION CHARTER
SERVICE.............................................................................
SCHOOL BUSES.....................................................................
TEEMINAL AND SEHVICE FACILITIES FOB M TO
O fi
VEHICLE PASSENGEE THANSPOBTATION................
M TO FREIGHT TRANSPORTATION AND
O R
WAREHOUSING........................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE..................
PUBLIC NAHEHOUSING.......................................................
TERMINAL AND JOINT TERMINAL MAINTENANCE
FACILITIES FOB M
OTOR FREIGHT
TRANSPORTATION............................................................
W
ATER TRANSPORTATION......................................................
DEEP SEA FOREIGN TRANSPORTATION.......................
DEEP SEA DOMESTIC TRANSPORTATION....................
GREAT LAKES-ST. LAW
RENCE SEAW
AY
TRANSPORTATION............................................................
TRANSPORTATION ON RIVERS AND CANALS.............
LOCAL W
ATER TRANSPORTATION...................................
SERVICES INCIDENTAL TO W TER
A
TRANSPORTATION............................................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR....................................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION, CERTIFICATED
CARRIERS.................................................. ........................
AIR TRANSPORTATION, NONCERTIFICATED
CARRIERS..........................................................................
FIXED FACILITIES AND SERVICES RELATED TO
AIR TRANSPORTATION..................................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTATION.............................................

4
2
~
-

_

_

2,220.1
104. 1
8.9
95.2

1 .1 3

~
6.7
1,980.0
3 0 .1
2 1 .1
8.9

_

1

4.0

. 1

.4

503

21.2

17 2 . 4

3,239.8

.36

354
4
4

11.3
4. 9
4.9

386.4
3.8
3.8

3 , 4 6 1.3
11 .8
11.8

.30

_

_

_

-

_
-

57

29. 1

1 3 .3

21
13

2 5. 1
38. 8

6.6
3. 4

140. 1
1 3 5 .6

10

30.9

2:4

53.5

2
11

42.2
1 0 .5

< *)
<
.8

.9
5.7

_

_

_

335.9

_

174
141
32

10. 0
9.5
24.2

30 6 . 7
296.3
1 0 .4

2 ,2 1 5 .7
2,038.7
17 6. 8

1
20
~

1 6. 0
1 2 .3
~

(«)
2.5
-

.2
28.9
-

_

_

_

_

2
5

48.7
64.3

. 1
. 1

1.8
9 .1

13
15

9.4
5. 1

2.4
33.4

18 .0
171.9

12

5.0

33.3

171. 1

_

_

3
1

1 1. 3
14 .0

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b l e .




_

.6

29

_
. 1
<*>

_
.9
.1

Table 14. Work stoppages by industry, 1976—Continued
(BOBKBBS AM DATS IDLE I I THOPS11DS)
D

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
(ALL STOPPAGES)

INDUSTRY
NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

NUM
BER

-

1 6. 6
-

0.2
-

4
41
21
13

1 6 .6
17. 6
12. 5
50.8

.2
19 .0
16.2
2.2

2.3
396.0
29 0 . 3
83.6

7
38
14
4
2
2
1b
”

3 4 .5
66. 3
72. 2
10 2 .6
61.5
54. 2
10.8
-

.5
7. 5
4.5
1 .8
.7
. 1
.6
-

2 2 .1
298.8
225.8
22.2
28.0
2.8
20.0
_

467
280
31
14
4
44
8
8

29. 0
26.6
26.6
33. 5
13. 2
22. 1
21.6
8. 1

55.8
24.3
5.8
.9
.4
4.2
.4
1 .2

1,311.3
51 1 .0
11 5 .7
21.5
3.9
85.9
10.8
8.3

16
39
118
188

25.3
20. 4
34. 4
30. 8

1.6
2.5
7.2
3 1.5

30.4
43.6
190.9
800.3

24

29. 6

1.5

3 3 .8

22

31. 1

1 .3

30.3

PERCENT OF
EST. TOTAL
W
ORKING
TIME 2 /

2.3
-

M
EAN
DURATION 1/

NONMANUFACTURING - CONTINUED
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, ELECTRIC, GAS,
AND SANITARY SERVICES - CONTINUED
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES...............................................
FREIGHT FORWARDING.......................................................
ARRANGEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...........................
STOCK Y A R D S. ... ..............................................................
RENTAL OF RAILROAD CABS..........................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES INCIDENTAL TO
TRANSPORTATION...........................................................
COMMUNICATION.................................................... ...................
TELEPHONE COHBUNICATION (BINE O RADIO)..
H
TELEGRAPH COMMUNICATION (HIRE OR RADIO)..
RADIO BROADCASTING AND TELEVISION.............
COMMUNICATION SERVICE, NOT ELSEHHERE
CLASSIFIED.....................................................................
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES...............
ELECTRIC COMPANIES AND SYSTEMS.........................
GAS COMPANIES AND SYSTEMS.....................................
COMBINATION COMPANIES AND SYSTEMS..................
HATER SUPPLY.....................................................................
SANITARY SERVICES.........................................................
STEAM SUPPLY...................................................................
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS......................................................
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.............................................
W
HOLESALE TRADE............. ........................................
M
OTOR VEHICLE AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT...
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS....
PIECE GOODS, NOTIONS, APPAREL...........................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS.........................
FARM PRODUCTS- BAH MATERIALS................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS............................................................
HARDW
ARE, AND PLUMEING AND HEATING
EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES........................................
M MINERY, EQUIP M NT, AND SUPPLIES................
AC
E
MISCELLANEOUS WHOLESALERS......................................
RETAIL TRADE........................................................................
BUILDING MATERIALS, HARDW
ARE, AND FARM
EQUIPMENT DEALERS....................................................
LUMBER AND OTHER BUILDING MATERIAL
DEALERS.............................................................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AND AIR CONDITIONING
EQUIPMENT DEALERS...............................................
PAINT, GLASS, ANE W
ALLPAPER STORES..........
ELECTRICAL SUPPLY STORES...................................
HARDW
ARE AND FARM EQUIPMENT DEALERS....
GENERAL MERCHANDISE STORES...................................
DEPARTMENT STORES....................................................
MAIL ORDEB HOUSES....................................................
VARIETY STORES...........................................................
MERCHANDISING MACHINE OPERATORS..................
DIRECT SELLING ESTABLISHMENTS.......................
MISCELLANEOUS GENERAL MERCHANDISE
STORES..........................................................................
FOOD STORES........................................................................
GROCERY STORES............................................................
M
EAT AND FISH (SEA FOOD) MARKETS................
FRUIT STORES AND VEGETABLE MARKETS..........
CANDY, NUTS, AND CONFECTIONERY STORES..
DAIRY PRODUCTS STORES..........................................
RETAIL BAKERIES.........................................................
MISCELLANEOUS FOGE STORES.................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND GASOLINE SERVICE
STATIONS...........................................................................
M
OTOR VEHICLE DEALERS (NEW AND USED
CAES).............................................................................
M TO VEHICLE DEALERS (USED CARS ONLY).
O R
TIRE, BATTERY, AND ACCESSORY DEALERS...
GASOLINE SERVICE STATIONS................................
MISCELLANEOUS AIRCRAFT, MARINE, AND
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS.............................................
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES..............................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND
FURNISHINGS STORES.............................................
WOMEN'S BEAD?-TO-BEAR STORES.........................
WOMEN'S ACCESSORY AND SPECIALTY STORES.
CHILDREN'S AND INFANTS' HEAR STORES..,.
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES........................................
SHOE STORES...................................................................
CUSTOM TAILORS............................................................
FURRIER AND FUR SHOPS..........................................
MISCELLANEOUS APPAREL AND ACCESSORY
STORES..........................................................................




4
-

_

_
2
30
16
3
8
-

21.8
46. 1
46. 3
45. 7
39.4
-

3
41
39
1
1

50. 8
15.7
15. 7
-

38

58.3

3.2

16 0. 3

30
5
2

58.9
51.0
16.0

2.9
0.2
. 1

147.1
7.2
3 .7

1
4

60.0
6.6

. 1
.3

2.3
2.2

i
i
2
-

7.0
6.0
15 .6
-

.3
<4)

-

-

-

-

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b l e .

30

-

-

.2
7.3
6.8
. 1
.2
-

3.6
235.5
22 1 .1
4.0
6.4
-

.1
12.2
12.0
(«)

4.0
177. 4
17 3 .3
1.1
_
3.0

. 1

(4)

-

.1
1.0
1. 1
-

0.03

.02

Table 14. Work stoppages by industry, 1976—Continued
H OBKM S H D DATS IDLE !■ THOUSANDS)

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR

DAIS IDLE DURING YEAR
(ALL STOPPAGES)

INDUSTRY
M
EAN
DURATION J /

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

PERCENT OF
EST. TOTAL
W
ORKING
TIME 2 /

NUM
BER

NONMANUFACTURING - CONTINUED
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE - CONTINUED
RETAIL TRADE - CONTINUED
FURNITURE, H M FURNISHINGS, AND
O E
EQUIPMENT STORES.......................................................
FURNITURE, H M FURNISHINGS, AND
O E
EQUIPMENT STORES, EXCEPT
APPLIANCES...........................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE STORES..............................
RADIO, TELEVISION, AND MUSIC STORES....
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES...................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES.................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES..........
LIQUOR STORES..............................................................
ANTIQUE STORES AND SECONDHAND STORES...
BOOK AND STATIONERY STORES..............................
SPORTING GOODS STORES AND BICYCLE
SHOPS.............................................................................
FARM AND GARDEN SUPPLY STORES......................
JEWELRY STORES...........................................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS.............................................
RETAIL STORES, NOT ELSEW
HERE
CLASSIFIED.................................................................

7

25. 3

0.2

4. 1

7
27
17
4
1
3

25.3
-

.2
1.9
5.0
4 .2
(9)
.2

3.9
.6
44.0
193 .0
129.5
2.7
4 V3
.2
.6

26.5
29.5
28. 9
82. 0
35. 9
15.0

1
3

14. 8

<*0
<
**)

5

29 . 1

.5

10.6

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE.......................
BANKING......................................................................................
FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS...............................................
COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS................
M
UTUAL SAVINGS BANKS..................................................
TRUST COMPANIES NOT ENGAGED IN DEPOSIT
BANKING.............................................................................
ESTABLISHMENTS PERFORMING FUNCTIONS
CLOSELY BELATED TO BANKING..............................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS.........................
REDISCOUNT AND FINANCING INSTITUTIONS
FOR CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN
BANKS.................................................................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS............................
AGRICULTURAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS....................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS..............................
BUSINESS CREDIT INSTITUTIONS..............................
LOAN CORRESPONDENTS AND BROKERS.......................
SECURITY AND COMMODITY BROKERS, DEALERS,
EXCHANGES, AND SERVICES..........................................
SECUEITY BROKERS DEALERS, AND FLOTATION
COMPANIES........................................................................
COMMODITY CONTRACTS BROKERS AND
DEALERS.............................................................................
SECURITY AND COMMODITY EXCHANGES.....................
SERVICES ALLIED W
ITH THE EXCHANGE OF
SECURITIES O COMMODITIES...........................
R
INSURANCE CARRIERS............................................................
LIFE INSURANCE................................................................
ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE............................
FIRE, MARINE AND CASUALTY INSURANCE.............
SURETY INSURANCE............................................................
TITLE INSURANCE..............................................................
INSURANCE CARRIERS NOT ELSEW
HERE
CLASSIFIED.....................................................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS, AND SERVICE..........
REAL ESTATE.............................................................................
HEAL ESTATE OPEBATORS (EXCEPT DEVELOPERS)
AND LESSORS...................................................................
AGENTS, BROKERS, ANE MANAGERS............................
TITLE ABSTRACT COMPANIES........................................
SUBDIVIDERS AND DEVELOPERS...................................
OPERATIVE BUILDERS......................................................
COMBINATIONS OF REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE,
LOANS, L W OFFICES.......................................................
A
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES..........
HOLDING COMPANIES.........................................................
INVESTMENT COMPANIES..................................................
TRUSTS...................................................................................
MISCELLANEOUS INVESTING INSTITUTIONS...........

27

2 5. 4
-

273.0

-

14. 4
-

-

4

2. 9

. 1

.5

1
3
-

2.0
4. 6
»-

. 1
. 1 ’
-

*2
.3
-

1

29. 0

SERVICES.........................................................................................
HOTELS, ROOM
ING HOUSES, CAMPS, AND OTHER
LODGING PLACES.................................................................
HOTELS, TODHIST COURTS, AND HOTELS...............
ROOM
ING AND BOARDING HOUSES.................................
TRAILER PARKS AND CAMPS.............................. ...........
ORGANIZATION HOTELS AND LODGING HOUSES,
O MEMBERSHIP BASIS..................................... ..............
N

-

0.03

-

•
.1

w
-

-

1

~
29. 0

(9)

. 1

4
-

17. 8

1.3
-

1 8 .5

4
1
16

17.8
98.0
11. 9

1 .3
.8
23. 1

1 8 .5
51.8
201. 1

11
2
3

11.9
4. 0
36.8

22.7
.2
.3

193.7
9.7
2 .7

1
~
1
~

29.0
29.0

(9)

.8
.8
~

246

1 6. 8

10 7 .6

1,385.7

23
22
1

1 4. 2
19.2
2.0
-

28.3
28.3
(9)

289.7
28 1 .1
(9)
3.6

-

'

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b l e .




t

31

-

.09

Table 14. W ork stoppages by industry, 1976—Continued
(I Q im S

AID PA IS IDLE I I THOUSANDS)

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
(ALL STOPPAGES)

INDUSTRY
NUM
BER

M
EAN
DURATION

\/

W
ORKERS
IN VOLVED

PERCENT OF
EST. TOTAL
W
ORKING
TIME £ /

NUM
BER

NONMANOFACTURING - CONTINUED
SERVICES - CONTINUED
PERSONAL SERVICE................................................................
LAUNDRIES, LAUNDRY SERVICES, AND CLEANING
AND DYEING PLANTS....................................................
PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDICS, INCLUDING
COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY........................................
BEAUTY SHOPS......................................................................
BARBER SHOPS.....................................................................
SHOE REPAIR SHOPS, SHOE SHINE PARLORS,
AND HAT CLEANING SHOPS........................................
FUNERAL SERVICES ANI CREMATORIES.....................
GARMENT PRESSING, ALTERATION, AND REPAIR.
MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL SERVICES.......................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES............................
ADVERTISING........................................................................
CONSUMER CREDIT REPORTING AGENCIES,
MERCANTILE REPORTING AGENCIES, AND
ADJUSTMENT AND COLLECTION AGENCIES..........
DUPLICATING ADDRESSING, BLUEPRINTING,
PHOTOCOPYING MAILING LIST, AND
STENOGRAPHIC SERVICES..........................................
SERVICES TO DUELLINGS AND OTHER BUILDINGS
NEW SYNDICATES..............................................................
S
PRIVATE EM
PLOYM
ENT AGENCIES................................
BUSINESS SERVICES, NOT ELSEW
HERE
CLASSIFIED.....................................................................
AUTOMOBILE REPAIR, AUTOMOBILE SERVICES AND
GARAGES..................................................................................
AUTOMOBILE RENTALS, W
ITHOUT DRIVERS.............
AUTOMOBILE PARKING.......................................................
AUTOMOBILE REPAIR SHOPS..........................................
AUTOMOBILE SERVICES, EXCEPT REPAIR................
HISCBLJ^NBOUS REPAID SERVICES................................
ELECVRICAL REPAIR SHOPS..........................................
W
ATCH, CLOCK, AND JEW
ELRY REPAIR....................
REUPHOLSTERY AND FURNITURE REPAIR..................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SHOPS AND BELATED
SERVICES..........................................................................
M
OTION PICTURES...................................................................
AM
USEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES, EXCEPT
MOTION PICTURES..............................................................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES.......................
LEGAL SERVICES.....................................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES......................................................
MUSEUMS, ART GALLERIES, BOTANICAL AND
ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS.......................................................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS....................
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS............................................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES..................................................
GOVERNMENT 6 / ............................................................................
FEDERAL.......................................................................................
STATE............................................................................................
COUNTY.........................................................................................
CITY..............................................................................................
SPECIAL DISTRICT.................................................................

19

1. 2

1 4 .8

15.7

1 .0

12.7

_

_
4. 0

2

_

-

_

_

-

-

. 1

.2

_
.2
1 5 .6
.6

.3
1.6
314.8
10 .0

10. 0
35.0

(9)
1.3
-

.2
30.0
-

32

27.7

13.6

274.7

20
12
~
8
16
8

31.4
37. 8

.7
.4
.3
1.9
1.1
~

16 .2
1 1 .3
4 .9

-

2
48
4

1 3 .8
28. 1
23. 2

1
n
-

-

23. 1
8.6
10.4
~
-

-

-

2

6. 1
41.7

(9)

21
71
13

15. 5
15.1
14. 1

4.4
49.5
5. 1

9

1

. 8

-

1 3. 5
7.4
-

6.0
8.4
54.5
609.4
49.9

(9)

(9)

4

1 .0
38.0
5.3

.6
•4

1 7. 3
2 .1

378
1
25
59
177
116

12.1
1.0
4. 5
15. 7
1 0 .5
20. 2

180.7
(9)
33.8
27.2
82.6
37.0

1,690.7
(9)
148. 2
305.5
712.9
524.2

9

1 S e e f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 1.
2 M e a n d u r a t i o n i s c a l c u l a t e d o n ly f o r s t o p p a g e s e n d i n g
in th e y e a r , a n d is w e ig h te d b y m u ltip ly in g th e d u r a tio n of
e a c h s to p p a g e b y th e w o r k e r s in v o lv e d .
3 T h e n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s r e p o r te d f o r a m a jo r in d u s try
g r o u p o r d i v i s i o n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m o f i t s c o m p o n e n t s
b e c a u s e i n d i v i d u a l s t o p p a g e s o c c u r r i n g i n tw o o r m o r e g r o u p s
h a v e b e e n c o u n te d in e a c h . W o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d d a y s id le
h a v e b e e n a llo c a te d a m o n g th e r e s p e c tiv e g ro u p s .
* F e w e r t h a n 5t).




15. 1

15

0.04

* L e s s th a n 0. 005 p e r c e n t .
6 The
s itu a tio n s
re p o rte d h e re h av e, fo r s ta tis tic a l
p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d t o f a l l w i t h i n th e B u r e a u 's d e f i n i t i o n
o f a w o rk s to p p a g e . T h is d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l
d e t e r m in a tio n th a t a w o r k s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p l a c e in v i o l a ­
tio n of a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .

N O T E : B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s
m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d e n o te z e r o s .

32

Table 15. Work stoppages by industry group and occupation, 1976
(■OBKBBS AID DAIS IDLE IM THOUSANDS)

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL

TOTAL

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

NUM
BER

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

CLERICAL

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

ALL INDUSTRIES.................................................... 1 / 5 . 6 4 8

2 ,4 20.0

37,858.9

204

87. 1

1, 111. 1

38

5.0

99. 8

MANUFACTURING........................................................... J / 2 , 2 4 5

97 4 .5

24,263.1

5

0.5

4. 1

5

0.8

4. 1

4 2. 1
1,848.0
3.2
115.0

2
~

0.3

3.7
~

-

*

-

-

1

0. 1

0.9

~

-

.2

.2

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.....................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS.............................................

1
227
1
36

0.8
90. 4
. 1
7.9

APPAHEL, ETC. 2 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND H O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

47

11.6

230.5

69
73
95

10. 8
10 .3
23.0

429. 4
2 6 6 .6
479.0

54
129

13. 1
28.8

225.4
1,116.8

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................

*

-

-

~

“

1. 1

19. 1

120
12
146
197
309

9 3. 1
2.6
28. 0
54.9
63.8

6,082.4
55 . 1
612. 5
1,304.3
1 ,6 3 1 . 5

-

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES.......................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT......................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 5 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

309

14 4 .5

2,7 2 1 .8

204
130
29
60

134. 8
23 8. 1
5.3
11.4

2, 235. 5
4,322.9
128. 1
39 3 . 9

NONMANUFACTURING......................... - ........................ 1 / 3 . 4 0 6

1,445.5

13,595.8

~

(3)

1

(3)

(3)

1

(3)

.6

1
1
-

(3)
.2
-

(3)
.3
-

-

-

-

199

86.6

1,107.0

33

4.2

95.8

_

2.4
514.7
172. 4

13.9
2,220. 1
3,239.8

354
467

386.4
55. 8

3 , 4 6 1 .3
1,311.3

13

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNM
ENT 6 / .........................................................................

27
246
378

2 5. 4
107.6
1 8 0 .7

273. 0
1,385.7
1,690.7

_
38
147




1

1.3

-

10
1, 4 25
503

33

. 4

-

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES. . . .
MINING..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
HHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE................................

ta b le .

1

~

17

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHEB PRODUCTS............................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES......................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS 4 / ............................

S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d of

~

-

_

-

-

1

(3)

_
0.2

8.9
“

132. 5

_

_
2 15 . 1
759. 3

11.0

6 6 .8

-

.9
“

w
.

_

_

_

1

0. 1

4.9

1

(3)
.1

. 1
3. 1

4
10
8
9

2.3
.2
1.5

71.0
5.5
1 1 .3

Table 15. Work stoppages by industry group and occupation, 1976—Continued
{10BKRRS I I P PITS IDLE IN THOUSANDS)

SALES

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
TEAR

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YCAB

CATS

DAYS

ALL INDUSTRIES....................................................
MANUFACTURING............................................................

NOSKNfcS
INVOLVED

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
•Lbi,!: LURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

YEAR (ALL
STCPPAGE5)
NUM
BER

PROTECTIVE

PRODUCTION AND BAINTENANCE

NilBBEB

NUM
BER

HOBKEBS
INVOLVED

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

1 /6

1 2 .2

314.4

4,789

1,871.2

29,0 2 6 .7

48

8. J

33.4

0.8

J/54

26.7

2,037

721.3

19,289. 5

2

0.2

4.1

26.3

0.8
80. 2
.1
7.8

42. 1
1,666.8
3.2
114. 1

-

-

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS..............................................

5
“

0.8
-

*

1
174
1
35

“

_
"

APPAREL, ETC. 1 / .........................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
FURNITURE......................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS....................................

-

-

-

42

8.0

125 .6

-

-

-

_
*

66
71
91

10.3
10. 1
22.2

410. 4
260.4
463.7

_

_

_
-

*

*

1

(3)

.4
-

49
122

12. 2
2b.6

199. 9
1 ,0 2b . 7

~
1

~

0.2

3.6

-

-

-

1

. 1

.5

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................

-

-

-

17

i.i

19. 1

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES............................ ..
FABRICATED HETAL PRODUCTS 4 / . . . . . . . . . . . .

*

-

-

114
12
135
136
294

91.8
2.6
2 2 .6
38.3
49.7

5,984.7
55. 1
440. 5
943.0
1, 346 .8

.

-

-

290

109. 3

2,446.6

-

_

_

2 /.i

192

1,759.7
1,619.2
57.4
300.7

_

_

_

-

~

*

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT......................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 5 / ................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

*

*

NONHANUFACTURING..................................... ..............

1/4 8

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISH ER IES .. ..
MINING..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE...........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNM
ENT 6 / ..........................................................................
S e e fo o tn o te s




2

-

123
26
57

107 .4
11 0 .3
2.4
9.5

11.4

2 8 7 .7

2 ,7 3 3

1,149.9

9,737. 2

46

6. 1

29.3

.
-

-

10

1 ,4 2 2

2.4
514.0
172 .2

13.9
2 ,1 22.9
3 ,2 33.0

-

_
-

_
~

0 .8
2 8 6 .5

267
313

3 6 1 .5

2,862.5
546.6

1
-

(3)
-

(3)

.3
*

10
76

2 2 .4

107

19 4 .0
302.7
461. 8

39

0 .1

45

11. 3

-

•
(31

1

a t en d of ta b le .

34

500

25.4
1 6 .5
35.6

-

_

6

-

1. 1
7 .0

-

1 0 .0
1 9 .2

Table 15. Work stoppages by industry group and occupation,
1976—Continued
(gO B U SB S *BD D A IS

I M J i IH

THO U SBgD S)

S E R V IC E

INDUSTRY GROUP

STO PPA G ES
BEG IN N IN G IN
YEAR^ •

NUMBER

COM BINATIONS

DAYS
ID L E DURING
year
C ll
a
S T O PPA G E S)

WORKERS
INVOLVED

STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G IN
YEAR

DAYS
YEAR (ALL
STO PPA G ES)

NUMBER

WORKERS
INVOLVED

ALL IN D U S T R IE S ................................................................

J /1 0 6

3 4 .9

5 1 3 .0

4 11

4 0 1 .3

6 ,7 6 0 .5

MANUFACTURING.........................................................................

1 /3

0 .4

4 .2

137

250. 6

4 ,9 3 0 .5

ORDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R IE S ..............................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...........................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES..........................................................
T E X T IL E M ILL PRO D U CTS.......................................................

-

_

_

A P P A R E L , E T C . 2 / ......................................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PR O D U C TS, EXCEPT
F U R N IT U R E .....................................................................................
FU RN ITU RE AND F IX T U R E S .....................................................
PA PER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS...........................................

_

_

-

2

0 .3
-

4 .1

44

-

-

-

1

_

-

_

_

_

-

4

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

3
2
3

8 .8

-

. 1
5 .4
.5
. 2
.6

_
147. 2

.9
104. 0
1 9 .0
6. 2
1 5 .1

P R I N T IN G , P U B L IS H IN G , AND A L L IE D
I N D U S T R IE S ..................................................................................
CH EM ICALS AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS...............................
PETROLEUM R E F IN IN G AND RELATED
IN D U S T R IE S ..................................................................................

-

-

-

4
5

.9
1 .6

2 5 .1
83. 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

RUBBER AND M ISCELLANEOUS P L A S T IC S
PRODUCTS.........................................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS..................................
S T O N E , CLAY, AND GLASS P R O D U C T S ..................... *
PRIMARY METAL IN D U S T R IE S ......................................
FA B R IC A TED METAL PRODUCTS 4 / ...........................

-

-

6

1 .3

-

11
10

5 .4
1 6 .6
14. 1

(3)

.1

16

35. 2

274. 4

11
6
3
3

2 7 .6
1 2 7 .6
2. 9

6 7 5 .7
2 .7 0 3 . 6

1.9

9 3 .3

M ACHINERY, EX CEPT E L E C T R IC A L ............................
E L E C T R IC A L MACHINERY, EQ U IPM EN T, AND
S U P P L I E S * .....................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQ U IPM EN T ......................................
IN S T R U M E N T S, E T C . 5 / ...............................................
M ISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING IN D U S T R I E S ..

1

_

_

14

-

-

-

-

NONMANUFACTURING ....................................................

1/101

3 6 .5

5 0 8 .8

276

150. 7

A G R IC U LTU R E, F O R E ST R Y , AND F I S I i E R I E S . . . .
M IN IN G ..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .............................................
T R A N SPO R T A T IO N , COM M UNICATION,
E L E C T R IC , G A S , AND SANITARY S E R V I C E S ..
WHOLESALE AND R E T A IL TRADE ............... ................

_
-

-

-

_
3

_

22
25

3. 5

1. 3

1 1 1 .1
7 2 .1

3
51

. 1
29.7

4 .6
3 2 1 .0

(7)

76

F IN A N C E , IN S U R A N C E , AND REAL E S T A T E ..........
S E R V IC E S .............................................................................
GOVERNMENT 6 / .................................................................

_

1 T h e n u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s r e p o r te d f o r a m a jo r
i n d u s tr y g r o u p o r d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m o f i t s
c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l s to p p a g e s o c c u r r in g in 2 o r
m o r e g r o u p s a r e c o u n te d in e a c h . W o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d
d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d a m o n g th e r e s p e c tiv e g r o u p s .
2 I n c lu d e s o th e r fin is h e d p r o d u c ts m a d e f r o m f a b r ic s
and s im ila r m a te ria ls .
3 F e w e r th a n 50 .
4 E x c lu d e s o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e ry , and tr a n s p o r ta tio n
e q u ip m e n t.
5 In c lu d e s p r o f e s s io n a l,
s c ie n tific , an d c o n tro llin g
in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d
c lo c k s .




35

9 7 .7
-

1 7 2 .0
3 6 0 .3
2 8 2 .2

70.6
1 ,8 3 0 . 0

_

1

0. 8
. 1

9 7 .2
1 .7

68
80

12. 5
1 7 .8

3 5 4 .4
4 0 2 .9

4

.7

66

69. 1
6 9 .9

3 .4
5 3 1 .2
6 3 9 .2

6 T h e s itu a tio n s re p o rte d h e r e h a v e , f o r s ta tis tic a l
p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d t o f a l l w i t h i n t h e B u r e a u 's d e f i n i ­
tio n of a w o rk sto p p a g e . T h is d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te
a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e
in v io la tio n o f a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
7 I d lie n e s s r e s u l t i n g f r o m s t o p p a g e s ( s ) b e g i n n i n g i n
p rio r y e a r(s).

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s
m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d e n o te z e r o s .

Table 16. Work stoppages by major issue and level of government, 19761
(■OB M B S BID DAIS IDLE IB THOU SAIDS)

HAJOR ISSUE

FEDERAL

TOTAL

STATE

SPECIAL
DISTRICT

CITI

COUNTY

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
ILL ISSUES...................................................................

378

1

25

59

177

116

GENERAL HAGS CHANGES...............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS..........................................
HAGE ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
HOURS OF W
ORK.................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL BATTERS...................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOE SECURITY...................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER HORNING CONDITIONS......................................
INTERUNION OR INIHAONION BATTERS..................
NOT REPORTED...................................................................

250
3
7
2
7
32
37
32
2

-

14

A7

111
2
6
2
3
22
16
12

78
1
1
“
4
2
19
10
•
1

-

-

•
-

“
4

1

-

1

A
1
1

i

-

6

~
*
4
5

1
1

3
'

HORKBRS INVOLVED
ALL ISSUES...................................................................

180.7

33. 8

27. 2

82.6

3 7 .0

GENERAL RAGE CHANGES...............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS..........................................
HAGE ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
HOURS OF HORN...............................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL BATTERS...................................
ONION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOE SECURITY..................................................................................
PLANT ADHINIST RATION..........................................................
OTHER NORKING CONDITIONS..............................................
INTERUNION OR INTRAUNION MATTERS......................
NOT REPORTED..................................................................................

12 3 .7

26.5
-

2A.2
“

AA.1

28.9

.3

.1
(2 )

'

'

ALL ISSUES ..................................................................................

1,690.7

(2)

GENERAL HAGE CHANGES..........................................................
SUEPLEEENTARY BENEEITS....................................................
HAGE ADJUSTMENTS......................................................................
HOURS OF HORK................................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL BATTERS...........................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOE SECURITY...................................................................
PLANT ADBINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER NORKING CONDITIONS......................................
INTERUNION OR IN1RAUNION MATTERS..................
NOT REPORTED............................................................................... ..

1,317.0

-

.4

2. 1

2.0

*

13.1
30. A

-

8. A

(2)

1. 0
. 6

*

. 6
. 5

“
-

A.5
.5

1. 3
1.0
(2)

1 .5
. 1
1 .0
(2)
.3

.6
. 1

7.0
2A.3
4. 0
.3

.3
.1
5.5

1 .9
(2)

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR

-

1 .2

712.9

52A.2

289.2

A98.2
.5

A25.8

2.0

*
*
-

3 .7
1 .6

*
-

3 .3

109.9
211.3
26.8
3.1
1 0 .5

(2 )

25.6
11.5
2 .1
3.0
(2 )
*

*

i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d t o f a l l w i t h i n t h e B u r e a u 's
d e fin itio n of a w o rk s to p p a g e .
T h is d e c is io n d o e s n o t
c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e
h a s t a k e n p l a c e in v i o l a t i o n o f a n y l a w o r p u b l i c p o l i c y .




305.5

103.8

6.0
1.6

14 8 .2

4.0
1.3
1.5
. 1

9. A
'

.7

.2
“

.4
76.6
1 1 6 .4
1A.6

3.0
3.6
82.2
8.6

*

(2 )

1.0
'

NOTE:
B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l
ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls .
D a s h e s (” ) d e n o te z e r o s .

36

Table 17. Work stoppages in government by major issue and union
participation, 19761
(80B K BIS AMD DAIS IDLE I I THOOSAIDS)

ONION PARTICIPATION
HAJOS ISSUE
CALLED
OR
SUPPORTED
STRIKE

TOTAL

DID NOT
CALL O
R
SUPPORT
STRIKE

N
O
INFORMATION

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
ALL ISSUES..................................................................

378

314

41

23

GENERAL SAGE CHANGES...............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY T^NEPITS..........................................
W E ADJUSTMENTS... . ................................................
AG
HOURS CF W R ................................................................
OK
OTHER CONTRACTUAL HATTERS...................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITI....................
JOB SECURITY..................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS.....................................
INTERUNION O INTRAUNION MATTERS..................
R
NOT REPORTED...................................................................

250
3
7

211
2
4
2
6

26

13

-

3

1
3
1
8
1

4
3
*
*

2

7
32
37
32

1

25
36

21
2

2
6

5

W
ORKERS INVOLVED
ALL ISSUES...................................................................

180.7

169.1

1 0. 3

1 .3

GENERAL HAGE CHANGES...............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS..........................................
W G ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
AE
HOURS OF W RK
O ................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS...................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY....................
JOB SECURITI...................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHEE SOHKIHG CONDITIONS......................................
INTERU MlCN O INTRAUHIOH BAITERS..................
R
NOT REPORTED..................................................................

1 2 3 .7
.4

115.9

6.7

1.1

28.3
7.6

*

“

(2)
.5
2. 1
.8
(2)
“

. 1

.5
13. 1
30.4
8.4

ALL ISSUES...................................................................

1,690.7

1,658.7

30. 1

2.0

GENERAL H
AGE CHANGES...............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS..........................................
RAGE ADJUSTMENTS.........................................................
HOURS OF W R ................................................................
OK
OTHER C08TRACTUAL HATTERS...................................
UNION O ANIZATIO
RG
N AND SECURITY....................
JOB SECURITI...................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...............................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS.....................................
INTERU NIOR O INTRAUNION HATTERS..................
R
NOT REPORTED...................................................................

1#3 1 7 . 0

1,294.6

21.0
.2

1.4
-

5.8

(2)
1 .5
5.6
1. 7
(2)
"

.2
2.0
.6
.4
12.6

2.1
.6

1.0
.6

1.0
.6

.2

“

.1

(2)

*

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR




1.2
6.0
1.6

1.0
1.6

3.3
109.9
211.3
26.8
3. 1
10.5
"

3.3
108 .0
205.7
25. 1
3. 1
10.5

.2
-

.3
(2)
*

2 F e w e r th a n 50.

1 T h e s itu a tio n s r e p o rte d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s ­
t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a l l w i t h i n t h e B u r e a u 's
d e fin itio n of a w o rk s to p p a g e . T h is d e c is io n d o e s n o t
c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e
h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .

ite m s

37

N O T E : B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l
m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d e n o te z e r o s .

Table 18. W ork stoppages by occupation and level of government, 19761




S e e fo o tn o te s

a t e n d of ta b le .

38

Table 18. Work stoppages by occupation and level of government,
1976 —Continued
(■OBKSIS AID DATS IDLE I I THOUSANDS)

OCCUPATION

TOTAL

FEDERAL

STATE

COUNTY

CITY

SPECIAL
DISTRICT

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
ALL OCCUPATIONS......................................................

1 , 6 9 0 .7

TEACHERS.............................................................................
NURSES.................................................................................
TEACHERS AND OTHER PROFESSIONAL AND
TECHNICAL................................................................
PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL.................................
OTHER PROFESSIONAL OR TECHNICAL....................
CLERICAL............................................................................
SALES....................................................................................
SANITATION W
ORKERS....................................................
CRAFT W
ORKERS................................................................
COMBINATION OF BLUE-COLLAR WORKERS.............
BLUE-COLLAR AND MANUAL..........................................
POLICE.................................................................................
FIRE FIGHTERS................................................................
POLICE AND FIREFIGHTERS........................................
OTHER COMBINATIONS OF PROTECTIVE..................
OTHER PROTECTIVE.........................................................
SERVICE W
ORKERS...........................................................
PROFESSIONAL, TECHNICAL, AND CLERICAL...
CLERICAL AND BLUE-COLLAH.....................................
PROFESSIONAL, TECHNICAL AND BLUE-COLLAR.
SALES AND BLUE-COLLAB.............................................
PROTECTIVE AND BLUE-COLLAR................................
PROFESSIONAL, CLERICAL, AND BLUE-COLLAR.
SALES AND CLERICAL....................................................
SALES, BLUE-COLLAR, AND CLERICAL..................
SERVICE AND BLUE-COLLAR........................................

713.5
2 1 .7

-

29.1
11. 3
12.1
1.0
30 3. 8
6 4 .8
3 .2
6. 5
5.2
9. 3
(2)
7 6 .6
58.5
37 .8
15.2
25 1. 1
“

1 T h e s itu a tio n s re p o rte d h e r e h av e , f o r s ta tis tic a l
p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a l l w i t h i n th e B u r e a u 's d e f i ­
n itio n of a w o rk s to p p a g e . T h is d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n ­
s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s
ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n o f a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .




_
-

(2)
-

-

198. 2

305. 5

712.9

529.2

1.8
-

115.6
2 1 .7

286.3

30 9. 7
-

-

(2)

-

-

20.9
. 1
2.9
3.0
-

-

3. 0

-

19. 5
11. 1

-

~
-

-

-

.2
90. 6
-

-

3. 1
.2
3.2
1.6
18.3
. 9
-

.4
(2)
11.1
1.7
2.3
2.0
12 3 .3
-

-

-

“

~

-

-

. 1
1 0 .8
8.9
1.0
206.7
2 5 .8
2.3
6.5
5. 2
-

.1
-

50.7
28.3
35. 2
13.0
3 1 .9
-

-

.1
172.6
17. 8
-

.8
.2
1 7. 9
. 3
-

5.3
-

“

2 F e w e r th a n 50 .

N O T E : B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l
ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d e n o te z e r o s .

39

Table 19. Work stoppages by government level and function, and occupation, 19761
(IOIKKSS AID DATS IDLE I I THOUSANDS)

PROFESSIONAL AND
TECHNICAL
LEVEL AND FUNCTION

PRODUCTION AND
MAINTENANCE

TOTAL

PROTECTIVE

CLERICAL
TEACHERS NURSES

OTHER
SANITA­ CRAFTS
TION

OTHER

OTHER POLICE

FIRE

POLICE
AND
FIRE

OTHER

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
ALL FUNCTIONS...........................................

2/ 3 7 8

ADHINISTRATIVE SERVICES.......................
W
ELFARE SERVICES........................................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION...
W
FIRE PROTECTION..........................................
SANITATION SERVICES................................
EDUCATION.........................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS..............................
PARKS AND RECREATION..............................
LIBRARIES.........................................................
MUSEUMS.................. ...........................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES....
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL..
OTHER UTILITIES..........................................
OTHER....................................................................
COMBINATIONS..................................................

9
a
22
12
16
187
19
2
18
18
9
12
57

FEDERAL..............................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
L W ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
A
FIRE PROTECTION......................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION..........................
LIBRA El ES....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES......................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

1
1
-

138

2

7

9

13

6

88

15

12

3

9

76

i
137
-

1
1
-

1
-

4
3
-

.
13
-

1
1
4

1
22
14
1
1
14
7
4
24

14
1
“

_
12
- •
_

_
3

1
5
1
-

2
4
2

_
-

-

-

1
1
-

*

- .
-

-

~
-

-

1
1
-

_
-

14
~
*

12
12

6
1
1
4

47
1
~
9
4

1
-

3
2

1
-

-

“

-

2

“

-

~
~

~
-

~

-

STATE...................................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
FIRE PROTECTION......................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS ANE RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL *
OTHER UTILITIES......................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBI NATIONS.............................................

25
3
1
5
8
2
1
6
3
1
1

COUNTY.................................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
L W ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
A
FIRE PROTECTIOH......................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS.......................................... ..............
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES......................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

59
2
3
7
1
11
10
8
2
~
2
13

8
8
-

CITY.............................................................. . . .
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
L W ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
A
FIRE PROTECTION......................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS ANE RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES......................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBI NATIONS.............................................

177
4
10
12
15
67
7
1
2

46
1
45

8
9
43

~
1
~

2
“

2
1
1
~
~

~
-

-

~

~

-

-

1
-

1
1

~

~
-

-

~

~
1
2
2
~
_

1
1
-

5
1
3
-

~
-

-

___

S e e fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




-

6
~
3
1
2
-

-

~
~
~
-

-

5
1
3
1

L ^ _

~
-

-

40

~

:

1
9
2
2

1

6
4
22

4
4
-

-

10
10
-

12
12
~
~
-

~
—
~
~
3
-

3

1
2
“

1
23
4
1
11

1

2
2
29

-

.
“

5
3
-

10
2
1
2
2
1
1
5
1

1

1
i
2
2
~
-

21
~
3
1
1
4
1
11

1
1
-

34

-

-

-

1
10
2
' 2
2
1
17

Table 19. W ork stoppages by government level and function, and occupation, 19761
—Continued
(80BKEBS AID DATS IDLE I I THOOSAIDS}

PROFESSIONAL AND
TECHNICAL
LEVEL AND FUNCTION

PRODUCTION AND
MAINTENANCE

PROTECTIVE

CLERICAL

TOTAL

OTHER
R FTS
SANITA­ C A
TION

TEACHERS NURSES j OTHER

OHR
TE

POLICE

FIRE

POLICE
AND
FIRE

OTHER

STOPPAG ES BEGINNING IN IEAB— Continued
SPECIAL DISTRICT........................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
8ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
W
FIRE PROTECTION.....................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

116
~
101
2
12
1
-

_

82
-

-

82
'

_
-

1
1
-

-

I

_
-

~
~
-

I

_
-

21
~

9
1
10
1
-

_
-

_
-

1 .9

1 .6

_
-

1
1
-

-

ii
10
1
-

22.2

6 9 .9

0.1
1.2

4. 2
4. 5
1.9

_
. 1

1 2 .4

W
ORKERS INVOLVED
ALL FUNCTIONS..........................................

180.7

65. 1

1.0

0. 6

1.5

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES.......................
W
ELFARE SERVICES................... ...................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION...
W
FIRE PROTECTION..........................................
SANITATION SERVICES................................
EDUCATION.........................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS..............................
PARKS AND RECREATION..............................
LI E ARIES....................................................
R
MUSEUMS..............................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES.. . .
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL..
OTHER UTILITIES..........................................
OTHER...................................................................
COMBINATIONS..................................................

4.6
4.5
6.0
1.6
4.1
83.0
a.7
1 .5

_
_
0.5
6 4 .6
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
(3)

(3)

0.3
_

_
_
_
_
_
1 .0

_
(3)

FEDERAL..............................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
W
FIRE PROTECTION.....................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION...............................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PiEKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIB3 ARIES........................................ ..
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
OTHER.................................................... ..
COMBINATIONS.............................................

_
27.4
1 3. 0
2. 1

1.1

28.1
(3)

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

(3)
_

-

STATE....................................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
W
FIRE PROTECTION.....................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES.....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

33.8
4 .3
4.0
3.0

COUNTY............. - .................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
W
FIRE PROTECTION......................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS..........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
OTHER.............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

2 7 .2
.2
.5
.9

_

2.7
2.1
1 .5
-

10 .4
1 .8
_

. 1
4.0

_

.4
12.1
2 .5
-

2. 3
.5
.4
7 .6

_

_

_

_
.8
_
_
_
_
(3)

_
_
_
.5
-

_

_

*

. 1
-

_

_
_
.4

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

.5

_
_
_

.5

-

_
-

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_

_

-

-

. 1

.1
. 1

_

_

_

*

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

11.9
-

1.0

_

_
_
_

-

_
_
_

(3)

11 .9

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

-

_

_

_

_
_
_
3.4
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

0.3

_

_
_

0. 1

_
_
_
_
.2

-

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

-

-

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

(3)

_

-

.4

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

.5

1.0

-

.2
.2

. 1

_
_

_

_

_

.4
_
_
_
_

(3)
_
_
5. 2
(3)

_
(3)
11.8
1.2
.4
10.8
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

1.6
_
_

_
_

_

_

_
_
_

31.9

(3)

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

. 2

_

_
1. 9

_

_
_

_
_
_
(3)

_
(3)

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
.
_

(3)

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_

41

_
(3)

25.8

..
1.2

-

15.7

_

_

_
_
_

...

_

_

_

_

_

.

_
_

-

-

-

-

1-6

29.9

-

_

4.0

. 1

8.8

_

(3)

_
_
_

_

_
_

_

_
_

_

-

-

-

1. 4

_
3. 5

_
_
_
_
_

. 1
2.5

..
.7

_

.7

_

-

-

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

.6

-

-

_
_
_
. 5

_

_

_

-

-

_
_

-

_

_

_

(3)

_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

1.2

_

_

_
_

.5

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_

3.4

_
_
_
_
_
_

-

_
_

._
_
_

-

_
_

_
____

7. 1

Table 19. Work stoppages by government level and function, and occupation, 1976 —Continued
{■OBKEBS BIO DATS IDLB IB THOUSANDS)
PROTECTIVE

P R OD U CT I ON AND
M A I NT E NA NC E

LEVEL AND FUNCTION

CLERICAL

POLICE
AND
FIRE

SANITA­
TION

W
ORKERS INVOLVED— Con tinue d
CITY......................................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
W
FIRE PROTECTION.....................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES.....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

82.6
. 1
1.2
1.6
3.7
42.2
. 1
(3)
.~
1 4. 6
2. 1
.6
16 .4

29. 0
.5
28.5
-

SPECIAL DISTRICT........................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
W
FIRE PROTECTION.....................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

37.0
2 6. 1
-

2 3 .7
23.7
-

. 1
1 0.7
. 1
“

_
___ _

_
*

1 .2
(3)
~
.8
.4

~
_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

3.0
-

13)

«3,
(3)

-

-

-

3. 0
~

-

(3)
-

-

“

DAYS

ALL FUNCTIONS...........................................

,690.7

24.1

i

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES.......................
W
ELFARE SERVICES........................................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.••
W
FIRE PROTECTION...........................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION........................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS..............................
PARKS AND RECREATION..............................
LIBRARIES.........................................................
MUSEUMS.................................................. ..
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES....
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL..
OTHER UTILITIES..........................................
OTHER...................................................................
COMBINATIONS..................................................

0. 1

l

148.2
2 2 .6

_
_
-

-

DUR ING

1.1
.4
10.2
10. 8
-

.7
_
_
_
(3)
9.9
.1
_
-

1.2
1.2
~
-

1.6
1.6
-

-

-

1.2
.1.2

_
_
_
_

-

_
_
_
_
_
-

-

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

_

-

J

29. 1
. 1
8 .8
(3)

-

14. 6
1.0
(3)
4 .6

o.u

2. 1
_
_
_
_
1.7

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

-

.

_

. 1
. 1
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

_
_
_

~

___

YEAR

(3)

STATE....................................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
FIRE PROTECTION.....................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LI3RARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

.2

0.4

FEDERAL..............................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
FIRE PROTECTION......................................
SANITATION SERVICES...........................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS..........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.................... ................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

-

16.0
(3)
4. 2
.1
(3)
-

1 1 .3

2 3. 1
1 3. 8
10.9
6.5
1 3. 0
862.3
25.0
4.6

IDLE

.3
. 1
(3)
-

10 5. 0
22 4. 9
1 8. 7
1 1 .5
371.6

13. 8

2. 1

1 .9

9.6

26.2
17.8
13)
1.0

1.2

189 .2
13. 9
.7
199.8

20 -3

.7
- I

.

11 0. 9
7. 1
4.6
80. 9

1
1 2

.

_ I

14. 1
4.8
9 .5

3.0
116 .4
- | 22.5
-

12.1

I

12. 1

7.3

1.7

5.6

14 .3
6.3

,7

11.0
6 2

-

4 .6

30.6
25.8

,20.3

.6

.6

24.0

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




2z. 5

0.1

(3)

42

.

Table 19. Work stoppages by government level and function, and occupation, 19761
—Continued
(W
ORKERS AM DATS IOLI IM THOUSANDS)
O
PRODUCTION AND
MAINTENANCE

PROF ESSIONAL AND
TECHNICAL
LEVEL AND FUNCTION

PROTECTIVE
OTHER

CLERICAL

TOTAL
TEACHERS NURSES

SANITA­ C FTS
RA
TION

OTHER

OHR
TE

POLICE

FIRE

POLICE
AND
FIRE

OTHER

DAYS ILL2 LURING Y£AR— Con tinued
3 0 5. 5
.2
1.7
1.3
3.2
118.0
18.0 •
2 7 .0
.6
9.5
126.0

1 15.6
1 15.6
-

CITY......................................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
L W ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
A
FIRE PROTECTION.....................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
OTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

71 2 .9
.2
2 .3
6.5
9 .8
405 .5
.7
(3)
4 6. 3
18.5
1.4
221.7

2 8 6. 3
“
~
.5
2 85 . 3
-

SPECIAL DISTRICT........................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
LA ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTION.
W
FIRE PROTECTION......................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES......................... ..........................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
CTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

524 .2
-

30 9 .7
-

324.4

309.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.1
198.5

.2
“

-

21.7
(3)
21.7
-

3. 1
1.9
1.2
(3)

.2
.2
-

. 1
. 1

10.8
(3)
9.6
-

-

~
~

-

8.9
-

*

1.2

8.9
-

-

0.1
-

~

-

-

“
-

.

1

~

“
~
~
~
~
~

_

1. 0
.3
. 1
.6
-

~
~
“
•
“
~

19.9
. 3
17 .3
.6
1.8

.9
.9
-

23 2. 4
(3)
19.4
.5
(3)
-

2. 3

-

-

2. 3
-

13.7
.7
198. 1
190. 4

~

-

~
~
~
~
“

_

_

-

-

6. 5
6.5
-

5.2
5.2

-

~
”
“

1.0

“
~

~

183 .6
.2

-

“
~
~
~
~

.4
•4
-

14 0. 4
1.7
.2
.7
4. 1
9.4
1 2 4 .2

. 1
. 1
-

159.2
. 1
9 0 .6
. 1
46.3

0.8

•1
1 7. 2
23. 2
“

“
“

5.7

~

'

“
“
~
“

~
*
“
“

~
~
~
~
~
~

~

9. 1
“
“
14« 1

~
”

'

1 T he s itu a tio n s r e p o r te d h e r e h ave, fo r s t a t is t ic a l p u r p o s e s , b een
d e e m e d to f a ll w ith in the B u r e a u 's d efin itio n of a w ork s to p p a g e . T h is d e ­
c is io n d o e s not c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th at a w ork s to p p a g e h as
tak en p la c e in v io la tio n of any la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
* T he to ta l n u m b e r of sto p p a g e s re p o r ted fo r a ll fu n ctio n s o r an in ­
d iv id u a l l e v e l m a y n ot eq u al th e su m s of its co m p o n en ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l




3.2
3.2
-

C
O

COUNTY.................................................................
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES..................
W
ELFARE SERVICES...................................
L W ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTIONA
FIRE PROTECTION.....................................
SANITATION SERVICES............................
EDUCATION....................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS.........................
PARKS AND RECREATION.........................
LIBRARIES....................................................
MUSEUMS.........................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES..
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FACIL
OTHER UTILITIES.....................................
CTHER..............................................................
COMBINATIONS.............................................

43

s to p p a g e s
o c c u r r in g in 2 o r m o r e gro u p s a r e cou n ted in e a c h . W o rk er s
and d ays id le a r e a llo c a te d am on g the r e s p e c t iv e g ro u p s.
3 F e w e r than 50.
NO TE: B e c a u s e o f rounding,
t o t a ls . D a s h e s (-) d en o te z e r o s .

s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not equ al

Table 2 0. Work stoppages by government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 19761
(B O M I iS I I P DATS IDLE I I THOUSANDS)

STATE

ALL UNIONS
AND
ASSOCIATIONS 2 /

TOTAL
OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NT
O
RECOGNIZED

AFL-CIO

N
O
INFORMATION

OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NO
T
RECOGNIZED

N
O
INFORMATION

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
AIL STATES...................................................................

378

341

20

-

139

13

-

ALABAMA................................................................................
ALASKA..................................................................................
ARIZONA...............................................................................
ARKANSAS.. ........................................................................
CALIFORNIA........................................................................

8
2
23

4
2

2
-

_

2

_

20

4
1
9

COLORADO.............................................................................
CONNECTICUT.....................................................................
DELAW
ARE.............................................................................
DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA................................................
FLORIDA...............................................................................

6
2
4

_
6
1
2

-

GEORGIA...............................................................................
HAWAII..................................................................................
IDAHO.....................................................................................
ILLINOIS.............................................................................
INDIANA................................................................................

2
1
3
43
4

1
1
2
40
2

1

IOWA.......................................................................................
KANSAS..................................................................................
KENTUCKY.............................................................................
LOUISIANA..........................................................................
MAINE.....................................................................................

1
8
1

MARYLAND.............................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS................................................................
MICHIGAN.............................................................................
MINNESOTA..........................................................................
MISSISSIPPI......................................................................

1
4
26
4
1

1
4
26
4

MISSOURI.............................................................................
M
ONTANA........................................ . ....................................
NEBRASKA.............................................................................
NEVADA..................................................................................
N W HAMPSHIRE.................................................................
E

4
3

3
3

1

1

N W JERSEY........................................................................
E
N
EW MEXICO........................................................................
N
EW YORK............................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA..............................................................
NORTH DAKOTA...................................................................

30
3
15
4
~

29
1
15
-

OHIO.......................................................................................
OKLAHOM
A.............................................................................
OREGON..................................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA...................................................................
RHODE ISLAND...................................................................

44
1
6
93
4

40
6
93
4

-

-

4

4

SOUTH CAROLINA..............................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA...................................................................................
TENNESSEE...........................................................................
TEXAS........................................................................................................

1

-

1

1

3
2

1

-

1

7
1

-

3
1
2
1

-

17
1

~
1
*

-

-

~

1
~
~

.
-

2
13
2
-

-

-

2
1

-

-

2
2

-

9
i
8
-

1
1
”
3
-

-

-

4
-

-

1
~
2
1

4
1

~
*

-

-

_

-

-

15

“

2
28
1

-

-

~

-

-

1

-

1

_
-

, -

~

UTAH...........................................................................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

VERMONT.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
V I R G I N I A ..............................................................................................
W A S H I N G T O N . ... ..........................
W
EST V I R G I N I A ............................ ...................................................
W I S C O N S I N . .............................. .. .................. .. .................................
W Y O M I N G . . . . . ...................................................................................

_

-

1
5

1
5

-

5

-

-

'

'

S e e f o o tn o te s




4

2

_
-

10

9

1

-

'

"

"

"

a t en d of ta b le .

44

3
2

-

Table 2 0 . W ork stoppages in government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 19761-Continued
(WOBICBMS AID PUTS IPLB X» THOOStHDS)

OTHER
UNIONS

EMPLOYEE
ASSOCIATIONS
N UNION
O

STATE
OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NT
O
RECOGNIZED

N
O
INFORMATION

OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NT
O
RECOGNIZED

N
O
INFORMATION

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
ALL STATES...................................................................

28

-

-

17b

7

-

17

ALABAMA...............................................................................
ALASKA.................................................................................
ARIZONA...............................................................................
ARKANSAS.............................................................................
CALIFORNIA........................................................................

2

-

*

1

-

-

2
2

COLORADO.............................................................................
CONNECTICUT.....................................................................
DELAW
ARE.............................................................................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA...............................................
FLORIDA...............................................................................

_
1
-

-

-

2
“

i
“

”

GEORGIA...............................................................................
HA A l l ..................................................................................
N
IDAHO....................................................................................
ILLINOIS.............................................................................
INDIANA...............................................................................

a
1

_
-

-

1
2
19
1

1
i

“

1
-

IONA.......................................................................................
KANSAS.................................................................................
KENTUCKY.............................................................................
LOUISIANA..........................................................................
MAINE....................................................................................

_
-

-

~

3
~

-

-

1

MARYLAND.............................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS................................................................
MICHIGAN.............................................................................
MINNESOTA..........................................................................
MISSISSIPPI.....................................................................

1
3
-

-

-

1
1
10
2

“

-

1

MISSOURI.............................................................................
MONTANA..................- ..........................................................
NEBRASKA.............................................................................
NEVADA.................................................................................
N W HAMPSHIRE................................................................
E

i
-

.
-

“

1
i
i

-

“

1
-

NEN JERSEY........................................................................
N
EW MEXICO.......................................................................
NEN YORK.............................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA..............................................................
NORTH DAKOTA...................................................................

3
-

-

-

17

-

7

i

*

1
2

OHIO.......................................................................................
OKLAHOM
A.............................................................................
OREGON..................................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA...................................................................
RHODE ISLAND...................................................................

1
2
6

“

~

24
2
59
3

-

-

1
”

SOUTH CAROLINA..............................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA...................................................................
TENNESSEE..........................................................................
TEXAS....................................................................................
UTAH.......................................................................................

-

-

-

-

“

-

2
~
“

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

i
1

-

-

2

i

-

2
-

VERMONT................................................................................
VIRGINIA.............................................................................
WASHINGTON........................................................................
W
EST VIRGINIA................................................................
WISCONSIN..........................................................................
W
YOM
ING................................................................................

“

'

S e e fo o tn o te s a t en d of ta b le .




45

~

9
-

~
2

"

3

1

1
*

'

Table 2 0. W ork stoppages in government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 19761—Continued
(1Q1KKBS I I P DATS IDLE I » THOUSANDS)

STATE

ALL UNIONS
AND
ASSOCIATIONS 2 /

TOTAL
OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NT
O
RECOGNIZED

AFL-CIO

N
O
INFORMATION

OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

N
O
INFORMATION

W
ORKERS INVOLVED
ALL STATES..............................................................

18 0 .7

177.8

1 .5

-

94.3

0. 7

-

0 .2
. 1

*

2.0
.2
17.1

0.2
. 1

2. 1
2. 1
.1

(3)

_
-

_
.7
2. 1
.1

_
*

_
_
-

. 3
•6
.6
8. 3
.4

. 3
.6
.5
8. 2
.3

(3)
.1
.1

“

.3
2.9

(3)
(3)
. 1

_
-

(3)

(3)
~
9. 9
. i

(3)
-

-

(3)
.4
. 1

(3)

-

1.2
23. 1
9. 1
1.6
(3)

1 .2
2 3. 1
9. 1
1.6

_
-

_
-

_
22.6
4. 1
1. 1
-

MISSOURI.............................................................................
M
ONTANA...............................................................................
NEBRASKA.............................................................................
NEVADA..........................................................................
N
EW HAMPSHIRE................................................................

. 4
.8
.9

.4
.8

_
-

.2
(3)

N
EW JERSEY........................................................................
N
EW MEXICO........................................................................
N
EW YORK............................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA..............................................................
NORTH DAKOTA...................................................................

16. 1
.6
20.6
.3

16. 1
.3
20. 6
-

.
.3
. 1
-

_
-

OHIO.......................................................................................
OKLAHOMA...........................................................................
OREGON.................................................... ............................
PENNSYLVANIA...................................................................
RHODE ISLAND...................................................................

11.6
(3)
.4
23.8
2.6

1 1. 3
.4
23.8
2.6

.4
-

-

SOUTH CAROLINA..............................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA...................................................................
TENNESSEE..........................................................................
TEXAS...................................................................................
UTAH.............................................................. . .....................

2.6
(3)

VERMONT...............................................................................
VIRGINIA.............................................................................
WASHINGTON......................................................... ..
W
EST VIRGINIA................................................................
WISCONSIN..........................................................................
W
YOMING...............................................................................

-

ALABAMA...............................................................................
ALASKA..................................................................................
ARIZONA...............................................................................
AUKANSAS.............................................................................
CALIFORNIA.......................................................................

2. 3
a. 2
21.6

2.0
a. 2
21.9

COLORADO.............................................................................
CONNECTICUT.....................................................................
DELAWARE.............................................................................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA...............................................
FLORIDA...............................................................................

_
2. 1
2.1
•2

GEORGIA...............................................................................
HAWAII..................................................................................
IDAHO....................................................................................
ILL! NOIS.............................................................................
INDIANA...............................................................................
IOWA.......................................................................................
KANS AS..................................................................................
KENTUCKY............................................................................
LOUISIANA..........................................................................
MAINE.......... .........................................................................

9.9
.8
.1

MARYLAND.............................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS................................................................
MICHIGAN.............................................................................
MINNESOTA..........................................................................
MISSISSIPPI.....................................................................

(3)
6.8
.1
4.3
“

.9

-

_

-

-

2.6
-

_

-

-

_

7.8
.3
15.6
4.8
(3)‘
6.3
2.3
_
-

. 1
. 1
- *
_

_
_

-

-

.2
-

_

_

_

. 1

(3)
6. 8
. 1
9. 2

-

-

-

-

-

46

1. 8
. 1
1. 2
*

_
_
-

_

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o t ta b le .




-

-

_
_
*
_
(3)

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

Table 2 0 . W ork stoppages in government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 1976 —Continued
(WORKERS AMD DATS IDLE II THOUSANDS)
OTHER
U NI ON S

EMPLOYEE
ASSOCIATIONS

STATE

NO UNION
OFFICIALLY
RE COGNI ZE D

NOT
RE CO GN IZ ED

NO
I NFO RMA TI ON

O FF ICIA LLY
RE COGNI ZED

NOT
RECOGNI ZED

NO
INFORMATI ON

WORKERS I NVOLVED

ALL STATES...................
ALABAMA..............................
ALASKA.................................
ARIZONA.............................. .
ARKANSAS............................
CALIFORNIA.......................
COLORADO.............................
CONNECTICUT.....................
DELAWARE............................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
FLORIDA..............................
GEORGIA............. ..................
HAWAII..................................
IDAHO................................... .
ILLINOIS............................ .
INDIANA.............................. .

_

4.2

:
:

0 .2

:

MISSOURI.........................
MONTANA................................
NEBRASKA..............................
NEVADA................................. .
N
EW HAMPSHIRE.................
N
EW JERSEY....................... .
N
EW MEXICO.........................
N
EW YORK..............................
NORTH CAROLINA...............
NORTH DAKOTA....................
OHIO........................................
OKLAHOM
A..............................
OREGON...................................
PENNSYLVANIA....................
RHODE ISLAND....................
SOUTH CAROLINA................
SOUTH DAKOTA....................
TENNESSEE............................
TEXAS......................................
UTAH........................................
VERMONT.................................
VIRGINIA..............................
WASHINGTON.........................
W
EST VIRGINIA..................
WISCONSIN............................
W
YOMING.................................

_

1.4
0. 1

4 .0

:

:

. 1

(3)
-

:

:

-

-

-

.6
.5
5 .2
. 1

:

:

.1

-

-

(3)
-

:

(3)
(3)

-

-

9. 5
• 8
-

-

(3)
1.3

“

-

-

.6

:

:
1 .2
. 4
3 .7

-

-

*

. 2
. 1

-

-

(3)
(3)

*

. 9
_

-

-

(3)

. 3

7. 8

_

5 .0

. 5

-

-

.1

(3)

.2
-

.

6 .5

_

.3
(3)

”

:

:

17*. 2
. 3

:

.5

:
:

:

:

:

1.9
(3)

:

:

-

. 1

-

47

-

_

_

“

(3)

-

_

-

See footnotes at end of table.




0 .8

1. 3

:

. 1
.2

7 9 .3

4 .2

.1

IOWA.......................................
KANSAS..................................
KENTUCKY............................ .
LOUISIANA......................... .
MAINE................................... ,
MARYLAND..............................
MASSACHUSETTS.................
MICHIGAN.............................
MINNESOTA......................... .
MISSISSIPPI.................... .

-

5 .0

.1
”

2 .9
“

—
“

_
—
(3)

Table 2 0. W ork stoppages in government by S tate, affiliation, and recognition, 19761
—Continued
( l o a m s IB P DAIS IDLE I » THOPSAMDS)

STATE

ALL UNIONS
AND
ASSOCIATIONS 1 /

TOTAL
OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

AFL-CIO

N
O
INFORMATION

OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

N
O
INFORMATION

ALL STATES...................................................................

1.690.7

1,675.9

9.9

-

903.3

! n>
!

-

ALABAMA................................................................................
ALASKA..................................................................................
ARIZONA...............................................................................
ARKANSAS.............................................................................
CALIFORNIA........................................................................

10.9
24.9
494.2

9.7
2 4 .9
493.7

o
03

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR

_
-

9.7
.9
463.0

0.8
.4

COLORADO.............................................................................
CONNECTICUT......................................................................
DELAWARE.............................................................................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA...............................................
FLORIDA...............................................................................

_
7.6
5.6
1.3

7. 6
5 .6
.1

_
(3)
*

-

_
1.4
5.6
.1

_
-

GEORGIA...............................................................................
HAWAII..................................................................................
IDAHO....................................................................................
ILLINOIS.............................................................................
INDIANA................................................................................

.4
.6
2.1
62.9
2.4

.3
.6
2 .0
62.5
1.9

. 1
.4
.5

-

.3
23.8
-

. 1
. 3
.2

_
_
_
-

IOW
A.......................................................................................
KANSAS..................................................................................
KENTUCKY.............................................................................
LOUISIANA...........................................................................
MAINE....................................................................................

(3)
95.0
1.7
.2

(3)
~
94.7
(3)
.2

. 3
-

-

—
.3
-

-

M RYLAND.............................................................................
A
MASSACHUSETTS................................................................
MICHIGAN.............................................................................
MINNESOTA..........................................................................
MISSISSIPPI.....................................................................

4.8
70. 3
47.2
15.5
. 1

4.8
70.3
47.2
15.5
-

_
-

-

_
67.9
23.6
4.5
“

MISSOURI.............................................................................
M
ONTANA...............................................................................
NEBRASKA.............................................................................
NEVADA..................................................................................
N
EW HAMPSHIRE................................................................

2.4
1.0
-

1.8
.3

_
-

-

-

-

N
EW JERSEY........................................................................
N
EW MEXICO........................................................................
N
EW YORK............................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA..............................................................
NORTH DAKOTA...................................................................

73.6
7.4
1 29 . 4
1 .4
-

_
. 1
. 1
-

-

8.1

2.3
1.0
8.1

_
-

OHIO.......................................................................................
OKLAHOM
A.............................................................................
OREGON..................................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA...................................................................
RHODE ISLAND...................................................................

VERMONT...............................................................................
VIRGINIA.............................................................................
WASHINGTON........................................................................
W
EST VIRGINIA................................................................
WISCONSIN...........................................................................
WYOMING...............................................................................
S e e f o o tn o te s




-

(3)
—
.7
(3)
.2

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

73.6
2.1
129.4
-

5.3
.2

-

46.2
2. 1
53.6
-

8 5 .1
.2
2.2
414.6
4.7

83.5
2.2
4 14.6
4.7

1.6
-

-

35.6
.2
12 7 .7
2.3

-

6.0
-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

.2
-

-

-

-

-

6.0
(3)

-

-

"

-

.5
-

_
_
—
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

(3)
65.6
.5

(3)
65.6
.4
40.6

-

-

-

1 7 .8
.4
1 3. 2

—
-

-

•t
o
00

SOUTH CAROLINA..............................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA...................................................................
TENNESSEE..........................................................................
TEXAS....................................................................................
UTAH.......................................................................................

. 4

.2

~

a t en d of ta b le .

48

Table 2 0 . W ork stoppages in government by S tate, affiliation, and recognition, 1976—Continued
(WOBKBRS AHP DAYS IDLE X I THOUSANDS)

OTHER
UNIONS

EMPLOYEE
ASSOCIATIONS
N UNION
O

STATE
OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

N
O
INFORMATION

OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

N
O
INFORMATION

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
ALL STATES...................................................................

45.7

0. 1

ALABAMA.................................................................- ...........
ALASKA..................................................................................
ARIZONA.......... ....................................................................
ARKANSAS.............................................................................
CALIFORNIA........................................................................

-

■

1. 3

726. 9

-

7.0

-

5.0

24.0
-

•

-

_
-

0.4
~

-

-

29.4

“

COLORADO...........................................................................
CONNECTICUT..................................... ...............................
DELAW
ARE.............................................................................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA...............................................
FLORIDA...............................................................................

. 1
-

-

-

6. 1
*

GEORGIA...............................................................................
HAWAII..................................................................................
IDAHO...................................................................................
ILLINOIS............................................................................
INDIANA............................................................................

.8
.6

-

-

.
. 6
2.0
38. 0
1. 3

IOWA.......................................................................................
KANSAS..................................................................................
KENTUCKY.............................................................................
LOUISIANA...........................................................................
MAINE....................................................................................

-

■

~

94. 1
-

-

MARYLAND.............................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS.................................................................
MICHIGAN.............................................................................
MINNESOTA..........................................................................
MISSISSIPPI......................................................................

. 1
13.0
-

“

_
“

4. 8
2. 3
10. 6
11.0

-

MISSOURI.............................................................................
MONTANA...............................................................................
NEBRASKA.............................................................................
NEVADA..................................................................................
N
EW HAMPSHIRE...............................................................

.6
-

■

_
~

.4
. 1
8. 1

N
EW JERSEY........................................................................
N W MEXICO..................................................................
E
N W YORK.............................................................................
E
NORTH CAROLINA..............................................................
NORTH DAKOTA...................................................................

2.1

-

25. 3

20.3

■

OHIO......................... ............................................................
OKLAHOM
A.............................................................................
OREGON..................................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA...................................................................
RHODE ISLAND...................................................................

.8
.7
3.8

. 1
-

_
-

SOUTH CAROLINA..............................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA...................................................................
TENNESSEE........................................ ................... ..............
TEXAS....................................................................................
UTAH.......................................................................................

1. 6
-

-

-

_

-

-

0.1
.3
-

-

(3)
*

-

1.7

~

. 1

-

. i
"

-

(3)
~
1.2

“

5.2
. 2
“

47. 1
1. 2
283.2
2.4

.9
~

-

.2
-

-

-

(3)

.2

-

-

55.6

4.3

-

—
-

1. 1

“

”

. 1
~

3 Few er

to ta ls .

49

C
O

(3)
-

1 S to p p a g e s e x te n d in g a c r o s s S ta te lin e s w e r e c o u n te d s e p a r a t e l y
in e a c h S ta te a ffe c te d ; w o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d d a y s id le w e r e a llo c a te d
a m o n g th e S ta te s .
‘ E x c l u d e s s t r i k e ( s ) w h e r e t h e r e i s n o u n io n .




(3)
~

“

4?

VERMONT...............................................................................
VIRGINIA............................................................................
WASHINGTON........................................................................
W
EST VIRGINIA.................................................. ..............
WISCONSIN.......................................... ...............................
W
YOM
ING................................................................................

-

-

. 1

27.3
~
th a n

‘

(3)
”

50.

N O T E : B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g ,
D a s h e s ( - ) d e n o te z e r o s .

s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l

.

Table 21. W ork stoppages by region and S tate, 197 6 1
(MOBKEBS A I D OATS I D L E

I B THOUSANDS)

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
(ALL STOPPAGES)

REGION AND STATE
M
EAN
DURATION
(DAYS) 2 /

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

2,4 2 0 .0

PERCENT O
F
EST. NONAGRICULT ORAL
W
ORKING
TIME3/

NUM
BER

UNITED STATES................................................................

5, 6 4 8

19.9

37,858.9

0. 19

REGION I ..................................................................................
CONNECTICUT.....................................................................
MAINE....................................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS................................................................
N W HAMPSHIRE................................................................
E
RHODE ISLAND...................................................................
VERMONT...............................................................................

243
68
19
129
10
27
5

22.5
4 1. 2
16.6
1 6. 5
31 .4
16.6
5 7 .3

10 0 .8
21. 1
7.8
61.2
2.2
7. 3
1.1

1,687.8
621.1
93.0
741 .6
47.4
1 9 1 .8
42.8

. 14
.20
.10
. 13
.06
. 15
.10

REGION I I ...............................................................................
N
EW JERSEY........................................................................
N
EW YORK............................................................................

589
248
395

1 6. 5
29.2
1 3. 3

236.6
69. 4
167.2

3, 323. 1
1,396.6
1,926.5

. 19
.20
. 11

REGION I I I .............................................................................
DELAW
ARE.................................................................. ..
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA..............................................
MARYLAND............................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA...................................................................
VIRGINIA............................................................................
SEST VIRGINIA................................................................

1,661
8
16
52
721
203
692

1 1.9
6.9
1 8. 8
1 8. 3
19.7
12. 1
7.8

544.0
3 .3
4.9
21.0
293. 3
69. 5
206.9

5, 2 0 8 .9
21.5
111.2
390.9
2,890.9
570. 2
1, 279 .3

.22
.09
.08
. 10
.25
. 12
.85

REGION IV. .............................................................................
ALABAMA...............................................................................
FLORIDA...............................................................................
GEORGIA...............................................................................
KENTUCKY.............................................................................
MISSISSIPPI.....................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA..............................................................
SOUTH CAROLINA..............................................................
TENNESSEE...........................................................................

610
150
55
52
211
26
36
12
110

21. 1
29. 5
22.0
23.0
11.6
27 .7
29.2
25.6
29.0

281.5
58. 0
1 7. 4
20 . 1
111.3
6. 7
15. 1
2.4
50.6

9,930.7
1, 31 5. 5
269. 1
3 2 8. 4
1,339.4
126. 5
43 1. 3
43.3
1,077.2

. 16
.93
.04
.07
.46
.07
.08
.02
.27

REGION V.................................................................................
ILLINOIS.............................................................................
INDIANA...............................................................................
MICHIGAN.............................................................................
MINNESOTA..........................................................................
CHIC......................................................................................
WISCONSIN................................................................... ..

1,561
421
193
260
115
549
78

21.8
17.2
21 .9
21.2
25. 1
24.6
2 0. 7

773.7
15 1. 4
88. 1
209. 0
22.8
270.8
31.7

12,624.9
1,891.0
1, 5 9 3 . 2
3, 1 51 .3
4 6 5. 4
4,838.6
685. 3

.29
. 17
.31
.38
. 12
.47
. 16

REGION VI...............................................................................
ARKANSAS............................................................................
LOUISIANA..........................................................................
N W MEXICO....,____W..................................................
E
OKLAHOMA....................................................................... i .
TEXAS....................................................................................

218
23
96
19
32
115

33.3
4 9. 9
19.7
10.9
5 1 .6
33.3

70.3
8.9
8.9
1 0 .8
34.1

1,709.6
27 0 . 8
159. 5
63.3
399.6
816.9

.08
. 14
.05
.06
. 17
.07

REGION V I I ............................................................................
IONA......................................................................................
KANSAS.......................................................................
MISSCURI............................................................................
NEBRASKA............................................................................

269
31
163
14

31. 7
33.6
97.6
25.8
•36.3

1 3 1. 6
9 7. 1
1 5 .2
62.7
6.7

2 ,9 87.5
1,109.6
5 0 9 .6
1,197.3
175.9

.28
.93
.24
.27
.12

REGION V I I I ..........................................................................
COLORADO.............................................................................
MONTANA...............................................................................
NORT H D A K O T A ...................................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA............................................... ...................
UTAH......................................................................................
W
YOM
ING...............................................................................

82
38
23
10
5
14
7

8.6
11.6
6.4
20.0
4.7
8.3
3.0

2 0 .0
7. 7
2. 9
.7
3.5
3. 7
1.6

204.4
91.2
1 4. 8
1 4. 4
16.1
31.7
36.2

.04
.04
.02
.03
.03
. 03
.09

REGION IX...............................................................................
ARIZONA...............................................................................
CALIFORNIA........................................................................
HAWAII.................................................................................
NEVADA..................................................................................

3 84
30
332
20
14

22.5
15 .2
24.6
12.4
15.0

19 3 . 6
16. 8
15 2 . 3
3.0
21.5

3,246.4
181 .7
2 ,7 88.7
35.3
29 0 . 7

. 14
. 10
.14
.09
.34

REGION X.................................................................................
ALASKA.................................................................................
IDAHO....................................................................................
OREGON.................................................................................
WASHINGTON................................................................ .. . .

175
19
13
62
93

24.2
9. 3
22. 1
1 8. 9
31.6

67.8
9.7
9.7
15. 3
38. 1

1,941.1
70.6
171.7
31 2. 3
1,386.5

.30
. 16
.23
.14
.93

7b

1 S to p p a g e s e x te n d e d a c r o s s S ta te lin e s a r e c o u n te d
s e p a r a t e l y in e a c h S t a t e a f f e c t e d ; w o r k e r s in v o l v e d a n d d a y s
id le w e r e a llo c a te d a m o n g th e S ta te s .
2 M e a n d u r a t i o n i s c a l c u l a t e d o n ly f o r s t o p p a g e s e n d i n g
in t h e y e a r , a n d i s w e i g h t e d b y m u l t i p l y i n g t h e d u r a t i o n o f




7 .7

e a c h s to p p a g e b y th e w o r k e r s in v o lv e d .
3 E x c lu d e s p r iv a te h o u s e h o ld w o r k e r s .
N O TE: B ecause
m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls .

50

o f ro u n d in g ,

sum s

of in d iv id u a l ite m s

Table 2 2 . W ork stoppages by region. State, and occupation, 19761
(WORKERS AMD DAYS IDLE IN THOOSAMDS)

OCCUPATION
REGION AND STATE

TOTAL
... .
PROFESSIONAL
AND
TECHNICAL

CLERICAL

•---------------------------

UNITED STATES..............................

PRODUCTION
SALESWORKERS
AND
PROTECTIVE
MAINTENANCE
....
- ....... ~
STOPPAGES BEG INNING IN YEAR

SERVICE

C OMBINATIO

5,648

204

38

54

4 1789

48

104

411

REGION I ...............................................
CONNECTICUT...................................
MAINE..................................................
MASSACHUSETTS..............................
NEH HAMPSHIRE..........................
RHODE ISLAND.................................
VERMONT.............................................

243
68
19
129
10
27
5

9
5
1
1
2
-

1
1
-

5
1
3

1
1
_
-

10
5

1
-

197
54
16
110
8
19
5

20
3
2
10
1
4

REGION I I .............................................
N
EW JERSEY......................................
N W YORK...........................................
E

584
248
345

30
14
16

6
4
2

8
3
6

462
199
269

9
6
3

16
3
13

53
19
36

REGION I I I ..........................................
DELAWARE..........................................
DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA......................................
MARYLAND..........................................
PENNSYLVANIA................................
VIRGINIA..........................................
W
EST VIRGINIA..............................

1,66 1
8

58
-

5
-

5
-

1,9 76
7

6
_

18
_

93
1

16
52
721
203
692

_
1
56
1
-

1
4
-

1
4
1

10
45
567
194
678

_
3
1
2

_
18
_
-

5
5
69
7
11

REGION IV.............................................
ALABAMA.............................................
FLORIDA.............................................
GEORGIA.............................................
KENTUCKY...........................................
MISSISSIPPI...................................
NORTH CAROLINA............................
SOUTH CAROLINA............................
TENNESSEE........................................

610
150
55
52
211
26
36
12
110

11
2
5
2
2

4
1
1
1
1

3
1
1
1

551
138
43
43
194
25
30
10
97

9
2
2
3

7
_
2
1

REGION V................................................
ILLINOIS..........................................
INDIANA.............................................
MICHIGAN...........................................
MINNESOT A........................................
OHIO......................................•.............
WISCONSIN..................................... .

1,561
421
193
260
115
• 549
78

61
26
2
8
5
18
2

9
3
1
4

11

1,306
349
166
207
96
475
58

REGION VI. .................... .....................
ARKANSAS................................... ..
LOUISIANA........................................
N
EW MEXICO.....................................
OKLAHOMA..........................................
TEXAS..................................................

1 218
23
46
19
32
115

5
2
1
1
4

REGION V I I ..........................................
IOWA....................................................
KANSAS............................; ................
MISSOURI..........................................
NEBRASKA...........................................

269
78
31
163
14

4
2
3
-

REGION V I I I ........................................
COLORADO..........................................
MONTANA.............................................
NORTH DAKOTA............................
SOUTH DAKOTA.................................
UTAH....................................................
W
YOM
ING.............................................

82
38
23
10
5
14
7

REGION IX .............................................
ARIZONA.............................................
CALIFORNIA......................................
HAWAII...............................................
NEVADA...............................................
REGION X...............................................
ALASKA................................................
IDAHO..................................................
OREGON................................................
WASHINGTON......................................

I------

F OO TNO TES

AT




END OF

1
1

3
2
1
1
4
*•

0

4

-

i
1
2

1
2
1

186
23
36
15
28
97

_
_
1
3
27
9
_
5
3
5
5

18
5
2
11
_
_
- »
_
_
_
_
-

1

1
-

2
2
-

66
32
14
9
5
14
7

384
30
332
20
14

19
i
16
3
2

6
6
-

8
2
6
*

293
26
250
15
10

2
1

i

1

j

175
19
13
62
93

13
1
2
3
8

3
3
;

6
1
5
_______

128
14
8
54
61

3
_
2
2

____ _

TABLE.

51

_i

18
,

_
2

2
2
-

--

4
3.

1

i

129
26
22
33
10
. 35
12

1

224
70
23
133
12

I
1

25
9
5
6
8
1
2
1
6

2
_
-

•4
3

- SEE

_

5
_
_
-

5
2
3
9

2
_
_
2
2
1
1
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

33
8
5
21
1
9
3
5
1

14
_
12
1
1
4
1

3
____________

_
-

,

42
1
41
1
18
2
3
3
11

Table 22. Work stoppages by region. State, and occupation, 1976— Continued
{1QBKMS AID DAYS IDLE I I

THOUSANDS)

OCCUPATION
TOTAL

REGION AND STATE

PROFESSIONAL
AND
TECHNICAL

CLERICAL

SALESWORKERS

PRODUCTION
AND
MAINTENANCE

PROTECTIVE

SERVICE

COMBINATIONS

87. 1

5.0

1 2. 2

REGION I ..........................................
CONNECTICUT..............................
MAINE.............................................
MASSACHUSETTS.........................
N
EW HAMPSHIRE.........................
RHODE ISLAND............................
VERMONT........................................

100 .8
21- 1
7.8
61.2
2.2
7.3
1. 1

2.9
1 .8
. 1
.9
. 1

0.1

o
i/i

W
ORKERS [EVOLVED

. 1

-3
(2)

REGION I I ........................................
N
EW JERSEY.................................
N
EW YORK.....................................

2 3 6. 6
69.1*
16 7. 2

19 .0
10 .5
8.4

1.6
. 8
.8

REGION I I I ......................................
DELAWARE......................................
DISTRICT OP
COLUMBIA............. - ................
MARYLAND.....................................
PENNSYLVANIA............................
VIRGINIA......................................
REST VIRGINIA.........................

544.0
3.3

1 9 .4

.5

4.9
21.0
2 43 . 3
64.5
20 6 . 9

1. 2
18 .2
(2)

(2)
. 5
-

REGION IV ............. . ........................
ALABAMA........................................
FLORIDA........................................
GEORGIA............ ..........................
KENTUCKY......................................
MISSISSIPPI..............................
NORTH CAROLINA.......................
SOUTH CAROLINA.......................
TENNESSEE...................................

281.5
58. 0
17.4
20. 1
11 1 .3
6.7
15. 1
2.6
50- 6

11 .6

.5
(2)
(2)
.4

REGION V..........................................
ILLINOIS............. .......................
INDIANA........................................
MICHIGAN.....................................
MINNESOTA...................................
OHIO...............................................
WISCONSIN...................................

773.7
15 1 .4
88. 1
209. 0
22.8
27 0 . 8
31.7

16.1
6.2
.1
1.9
.6
4.6
2.8

.3
(2)
(2)
.3

REGION VI........................................
ARKANSAS.......... ..........................
LOUISIANA...................................
OKLAHOMA.....................................
TEXAS.............................................

70 . 3
7.7
8.9
8.9
10 .8
34. 1

1.7
. 1
. 1
.1
1 .5

REGION V I I .....................................
IOWA...............................................
KANSAS..........................................
MISSOURI.....................................
NEBRASKA.....................................

131.6
4 7 .1
1 5 .2
62.7
6.7

REGION V I I I ...................................
COLORADO......................................
MONTANA........................................
NORTH DAKOTA............................
SOUTH DAKOTA............................
UTAH...............................................
W
YOM
ING........................................

20.0
7.7
2.9

REGION I X ........................................
ARIZONA........................................
CALIFORNIA.............................. ..
HAWAII..........................................
NEVADA..........................................

19 3 .6
16.8
15 2 .3
3.0
21.5

REGION X..........................................
ALASKA..........................................
IDAHO.............................................
OREGON............. ............................
WASHINGTON.........................

67.8
9.7
4.7
15. 3
3 8. 1

UNITED STATES..........................

neh

2 ,4 20.0

Me x i c o : ................................

3.5
3.7
1 .6

8.3

34. 9

65.8
15.0
4.9
39. 1
1.2
4.5
1. 1

0. 1
. 1
-

0.6
.3
.2
'

30.8
3.7
2.8
21.6
. 1
2.5

4.7
4.0
.7

12 5. 6
3 9. 6
86.0

1 .8
1.4
.5

1.3
.2
1.1

82.6
1 2 .9
69.7

1.2
*

490.8
3.3

.3
-

1. 8
-

30.0
(2)

3.3
19. 0
19 7 .9
62.0
205.2

_
.2
12)
(2)

_
1 .8
-

1.6
.7
23.6
2.4
1.6

2 3 9 .3
5 5. 2
11 . a
16. 1
89. 1
6.6
1 4. 7
2.4
43.5

.5
.1
.1
.2

4.3
4.0
. 1
(2)
. 1

25.3
2.6
1.2
3.7
1 1 .7
.2
. 2
12)
5.5

2.6
2.2
(2)
(2)
(2)
.3

564.7
11 6 .3
69. 9
11 9 .9
1 7. 9
213.4
27.2

4.7
1.6
1.0
2. 1

3.1
.2
1.1
.7
.9
.2

182.3
24.8
1 8 .0
84. 9
3.6
49.4
1.5

(2)
(2)

2.0

6 1 .5
7.7
7.6
6.0
10. 1
30.3

.3
(2)

4.8
1 .2
1.0
.6
1.9

.5
. 1
.4

(2)
(2)
(2)
“

.6
.6
(2)

1.0
1. 0
-

. 1
. 1
~

-1
.1
“

1 7 .8
6.6
1.9
.6
3.5
3.7
1.6

9.6
. 1
7.9
1.1
.5

1. 4
1. 4
~

.3
(2)
.3
“

144. 4
1 6. 2
12 5 .9
1. 3
1.0

.8
.2
.6

21.9
1 .8
(2)
20.0

1 5 .3
.5
1 4. 9
(2)

5.2
.2
.5
.4
4. 1

.3
-

.1
(2)
~
. 1

46.7
3.5
3.0
14.6
2 5 .6

.3

1 .5
.8

1 3 .8
5. 1
1-2
.2
7.2

-

-

. 1
1 .0
12)

.2
9.9
(2)
1. 4

_

.2
(2)
.1

-

-

(2)

-

(2)
(2)

-

. 3

SEE FOOTNOTES AT END OF TABLE.




.2

52

(2)

(2)
1.8
.2

1.871.2

114.6
4 6 .3
13 .9
47.7
6.7

-

. 1
-

-

-

401.3

-

-

-

.2

-

.3
~
.3

15 .6
.7
1.2
13.7
(2)

(2)
(2)
(2)
-

.9
. 1
.7
. 1
-

_
-

_

-

(2)
.2

_

-

.7

Table 22. Work stoppages by region. State, and occupation, 19761
-Continued
(WORKERS AMD DAIS IDLE IM THOUSANDS)

OCCUPATION
REGION AND STATE

TOTAL
PROFESSIONAL
AND
TECHNICAL

CLERICAL

PRODUCTION
AND
SALESBORKERS MAINTENANCE

PROTECTIVE

SERVICE

COMBINATIONS

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
UNITED STATES..............................

37,858.9

99.8

314.4

29,026.7

33.4

513.0

6,7 6 0 .5

REGION I ...............................................
CONNECTICUT...................................
flAINE..................................................
MASSACHUSETTS..............................
N
EW HAMPSHIRE..............................
RHODE ISLAND.................................
VERMONT.............................................

1,687.8
621 .1
93.3
741.6
4 7 .4
141.8
42.8

2 6 .0
12.3
3.4
8. 1
2 .2

0.1
~
. 1

9.4
4. 3
4. 5
.7

1,439.9
543. 2
40.4
64 5 .6
3 5 .9
132.2
42.8

0.2
.2
-

28.7
19 .3
9.3
-

18 3 .4
42.1
52.5
78.8
3.4
6.6

REGION I I .............................................
N
EW JERSEY......................................
NEB YORK..........................................

3,323.1
1,396.6
1,926.5

144. 4
44.0
10 0. 4

55.0
3.2
51.9

180. 1
152.7
27.4

2,021.9
946. 6
1,075.3

2.6
1 .7
.9

36.2
.7
35.5

882.9
247.7
635.2

REGION I I I ...........................................
DELAW
ARE..........................................
DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA......................................
MARYLAND...........................................
PENNSYLVANIA.................................
VIRGINIA...........................................
BEST VIRGINIA..............................

5 ,2 08.4
21.5

38 2 .3
-

9.7
-

26.2
-

4,3 5 4 .0
16 .0

1. 4
-

24.6
-

410.2
5.5

111.2
390 .9
2,840.4
5 7 0. 2
1,274.3

4.8
377.4
(2)

(2)
9 .7
-

2.8
2 1 .8
1.6

94 .8
369. 0
2, 125 .3
520.5
1,228. 4

1. 3
(2)
(2)

3 / .5
23.4
3 / .7

16.4
1 3. 9
281.4
48.9
44.2

REGION IV.............................................
ALABAM
A.............................................
FLORIDA.............................................
GEORGIA.............................................
KENTUCKY..........................................
MISSISSIPPI...................................
NORTH CAROLINA............................
SOUTH CAROLINA............................
TENNESSEE........................................

4,930.7
1,315.5
269. 1
3 28 . 4
1,339.4
12 6. 5
431.3
43 .3
1,077.2

122 .5
24.9
3 / 1.3
94.6
. 1
3 / 1.6

2.3
.6
. 1
1.3
3/. 3

3.8
.4
2.9
-

4,2 2 8 .9
1,273. 4
19 6. 6
233. 1
94 6 .6
12 4. 6
420.7
39.4
99 4 .4

1 .4
.4
.2

55.8
(3) (2)
35.0
1 2. 4
~
3.8
4.7

516.0
41.1
1 2. 2
78.6
296. 3
1 .9
1 0 .3
. 1
75.6

8,734.8
1,464.5
1,370.0
1,400.4
354. 2
3,519.4
626.3

22.0
7.1
4.4
1 0. 6

66.4
5.1
3 / .8
8 .1
35.5
9.9
7.0

3,6 3 5 .7
356.6
219.7
1,726.1
61.8
1,246.8
24.7

1 , 1 1 1 .1

3 / .6

.6
.2

REGION V...............................................
ILLINOIS..........................................
INDIANA.............................................
MICHIGAN..........................................
MINNESOTA........................................
OHIO....................................................
WISCONSIN........................................

12,624.9
1,891.0
1,593.2
3, 151.3
46 5 .4
4,838.6
68 5 .3

14 7 .9
45.6
1.6
9.5
13 .9
50.2
27.0

3.5
. 5
.4
2. 3
. 1
.2

1 4. 6
11 .6

REGION VI.............................................
ARKANSAS..........................................
LOUISIANA........................................
N
EW MEXICO.....................................
OKLAHOM
A..........................................
TEXAS................................... - ...........

1,704.6
270 .8
15 9. 5
63.3
39 4 .6
816.4

31.8
-5
.8
.9
29.5

. 1

36. 4
(3) (2)
2.2
28.8
5.4

1,543.0
270.8
114.3
27.6
381.8
748.5

-

1. 3
.5
3 / .1
.8

92.0
42. 1
6.0
1 1. 8
32. 1

REGION V I I . . . . .................................
IOWA....................................................
KANSAS...............................................
MISSOURI..........................................
NEBRASKA......................................

2,987.5
1,109.6
504 .6
1, 197.3
175.9

1 3 .5
3 / 3.0
1.0
4.5
3 /5 .0

.5

26.6
26.6
. 1

2,592.6
1,090.2
482.7
849.5
170.2

-

23.2
-

.2

331.0
1 6. 4
20.7
293.2

REGION V I I I ........................................
COLORADO..........................................
M
ONTANA.............................................
NORTH DAKOTA.................................
SOUTH DAKOTA.................................
UTAH....................................................
W
YOM
ING.................. ..........................

2 04 . 4
91.2
14.8
14.4
16.1
31 .7
3 6 .2

1 0 .3
1 0. 3
-

173.7
74.4
7.3

-

-

4.2
4.;
-

-

.8
.5
.3
-

REGION I I .............................................
ARIZONA.............................................
CALIFORNIA......................................
HAWAII................................................
NEVADA................................................

3 ,2 46.4
181.7
2,788.7
35.3
24 0 .7

11 3. 2
.9
88.4
1 3 .9
9.9

23.2
21.6
3 / 1.6
~

1 0 .3
1.1
9.2
-

2,437.9
166.0
2.245.3
16.5
10 .0

3.5
2.9
.6
-

250.8
28.1
2.7
220.0

407.6
1 3. 7
393.2
.7

REGION X...............................................
ALASKA...........................................
IDAHO..................................................
OREGON...............................................
WASHINGTON......................................

1 , 9 4 1 .1
7 0. 6
171.7
312 .3
1,386.5

11 9. 2
.9
2. 0
2.4
113 .8

5.2
5.2

2.8
. 1
3 / .9
1.7

1,500.0
29.5
49.5
305.0
1, 116 .0

2.3
.9
1.4

25. 1
1 5 .0
10.2

286.4
25. 1
120. 2
3.0
138. 1

. 1

.5
. 1
1.7

.3

. 1
.1
-

1 S to p p a g e s ex ten d in g a c r o s s S tate lin e s h a v e b e e n cou n ted s e p a r a t e ly
in e a c h S tate a ffe c te d ; w o r k e r s in v o lv e d and d ays id le w e r e a llo c a te d am on g
the S ta te s .
2 F e w e r than 50.




.6

53

8 .6

15.6
3 1 .7
36. 1

23.2
-

.6

1 5 .3
5.9
2.9
5.8
.6

3 /.1

3 I d le n e s s r e s u ltin g fr o m s to p p a g e (s ) in p r io r y e a r (s ).
to t a ls .

NO TE: B e c a u s e of rou n d in g,
D a s h e s ( - ) d en o te z e r o s .

s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n ot eq u al

Table 23. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1976
(10RK1BS AID PATS IDLE I I THOUSANDS)

ALABAM
A

INDUSTRY 3 ROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

ARIZONA

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

ALL INDOSTRIES ] / .............................................

150

58.0

MANUFACTURING \ / ....................................................

52

21.7

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO BANOFECTORES................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS.............................................
APPAREL, ETC. 1 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND W O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES.................. .......................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................
PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND BELATED
INDUSTRIES.................... ..............................................
RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS...........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES............................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS 4 / ............................

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

H0PK2RS
INVOLVED

1,3 1 5 .5

30

1b. 8

1. 109.6

12

.8

.

_

_
.1

.

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

W
OPKERS
INVOLVED

lb 1. 7

332

152 .3

2 .7 88.7

25.6

149

65.7

1 .4 1 4 . 3

_

_

_

3 4 .5

~

14
~
3

399.9
8.9

-

-

-

-

7.5
1. 1
14. 1

8
6
8

.9
.8
3 .7

1 9 .6
1 6 .4

9

1.1

32.8
3 7 .0

2

.5

3.7

-

3

.5
-

1 2 .5
-

3
1
2

. 1
(2)
. 5

1

(21

1 2. 6

1

1

(2)
(2)

1.4
.2

-

*

(2)

.8
-

-

-

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

NUSBEF

2
4

-

.8
-

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

CALIFORNIA

1
-

(2)

-

7

.4

.4

1.2

~
11
7
16

1 0. 6
49. 6

*

5.4

45.5

6
14
8

5.9
.7
2.9
2.5

54 9.2
16 .9
87.0
11 3.2

2
-

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL...........................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.....................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. $ / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

4

•8

3 0. 7

-

3

.7
5.0
.1

1

1

5.0
19 9 .6
9.3

NONBANUFACTORING 1 / .............................................

99

36 .3

2 0 5 .9

19

15.9

156. 1

11 8 .9
37.8

_
1. 3
12.9

1 0. 4

27.5
3.4

_
3
7

1.3

8

5.8
1 4 5 .0

21

6. 9

194. 6

12
9

2 .5
.6

22.0
14.9

6
3

1. 7
(2)

4.2
1.2

45
45

46.4
4. 3

4 49 . 4
129. 1

-

_
1 .5
10.9

_
-

_
-

*

4

23

1.4
3.7
21.6

19. 5
69.7
494. 2

55

1 7. 4

26 9. 1

8

3. 1

8 1. 3

57.6

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
MINING...................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES. .
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.................................

1

4
-

_

59

20

398. 1
8. 2
86.8
105.7

11
-

. 1

-

.5
2.6
3.7

. 3

_

1.3

35. 1

16
9

3.9
5.7

29.3
19 1.7

4

.7

8.9

185

86. 7

1 ,3 7 4 . 5

-

6
7

.9

7.5

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES............................................................................
GOVERNMENT &/................................................................

.

ALL INDUSTRIES l / . . . .................. ..................

38

7. 7

91. 2

68

21 . 1

621. 1

HANUFACTORING 1 / ....................................................

13

1. 4

44. 8

26

1 1. 5

478.6

2

. 1
-

4.5
-

_
-

3

1.0

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

1
-

(2)
-

.3
-

. 5
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.6
-

3
8

.1
2.3
COLORADO

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS.............................................
APPAREL, ETC. 3 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND W O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE................................... .................................
FURNITURE A D FIXTURES...........................................
M
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................
PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
IND0ST8IES...................................................................
RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS.......................................... ............................
LEATHER AM LEATHER PRODOCTS............................
D
STONE, CLAT, AM GLASS PRODOCTS....................
D
PRIBABY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES......................................
FABRICATED M
ETAL PRODOCTS 4/ ............................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL...........................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQOIPHE M A D
T, M
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT......................................
INSTRO BENTS, ETC. 5 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

CONNECTICUT

FLORIDA

.

1

2

—
(2)

.7

30. 1
. 3

-

-

_

1

-

1
-

(2)

~
(2)

—
_

.5

-

2

-

.2
-

(2)

_
-

_
-

1

. 1
. 1

. 5
. 1

4
1
2
6

4.4
. 3
. 2

.9

328.0
3.3
1.2
19.7

-

2

. 3

9.6

5

4.8

113.4

_

_

-

-

-

2

. 2
(2)

1. 7
2. 1

1
1
1
1

. 3
(2)
(2)
(2)

7. 7
(2)
. 1
(2)

1
-

1

(2)
2.0
(2)

2.4
18. 0
2.4

46.3

42

9.6

142.5

47

1 4. 2

18 7 .8

_

_

.

2

-

1

NOMBANOFACTORIMG \ / .............................................

25

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
MINING......................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.................................

_

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL EST AT E. ... .
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVBRM
BEM &/................................................................
T

_

_

5

. 1

6.3

2
7

.5

.8

3.0

12.2

11

_
2.4

7
4

2. 6
.2

19. 4
7.6

13
8

4.6
.4

84.2
12.8

_

1
3
6

(2)
. 1
2.1

. 1
1 7 .7
7.6

i________

6.3
-

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




35

54

2

.

.

_

20.2

22

-

12

5.5

81.5

4

4.3
. 1

61.3
2.9

6
4

4.1
.2

40.9
1.3

_

Table 23. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1976— Continued
(tOlKHS AND PUTS IPL1 IN B I O g M M )
GEORGIA

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAH

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

INDIANA

ILLINOIS

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

NUM
BER

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

DAIS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

HORKEFS
INVOLVED

52

2 0 .1

328.4

421

151.4

1,8 9 1 .0

193

88.1

1,593. 2

MANUFACTURING ) / ....................................................

28

12.4

242.3

159

61.5

1,4 2 6 .3

118

50 .0

1,328. 0

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...........................................
TEXTILE RILL PRODUCTS.............................................

4
i

. 2

.
22
“

3.0
-

70.6

10

.
2.0
-

_
45. 9

.9

6.9
5.0

*

~

APPAREL, ETC. ) / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND W O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AM FIXTURES................................... ..
D
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

1

. 1

.9

1

. 1

.7

-

.

-

2
-

. 1

8. 6
~

3
9
5

. 2
2. 3
.5

5.0
34.9
11 .4

5
2
4

.5
•4
.4

9. 4
53.0
11.9

“

*

1
11

(2)
2 .1

.6
62.4

1
1

(2)
(2)

. 3
. 2

“

*

*

i

.1

.5

9
14
17

7.5
2 .3
2.5

524, 5
44. 0
33. 9

ALL INDUSTRIES J / ........................................ ..

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS......................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................

-

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS.................................................... . .................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES.....................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS 4 / . .........................

2
3
2
3

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES..............................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.....................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 5 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

2
4
3
1

-

1.1

96.5
6. 6
8.3
21.9

4
7
11
27

2.8
1. 0
3.0
3.7

22 8 .9

.4
.2
.8
. i

2.0

23

26.5

290.9

16

8 .5

221. 5

1.0
7. 3
(2)

7.6
76.6
1.5
~

17
7
3
S

4. 9
8.2
.1
3. 0

2 2 3 .3
182.6
1.0
103.8

22
12
1
3

9.1
16.1
.1
.5

17 3 .7
197. 8
4. 9
6. 5

264

89.9

464.7

75

38.1

265.2

_
22
15

_
6.5
1 6. 4

46. 6
80. 3

1 9 .6
8 6 .3
99.4

NONHANOFACTUR IM \ / ............................................
G

26

7.7

86. 1

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISH ER IES....
MINING.................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.................................

-

-

2

.9

3

. 1

45. 1
1.0

135
28

5 8 .1
9.9

,
15 5 .3
14 4 .3

7
7

5.*
.5

16 .9
8.2

18
27

8. 0
4. 3

46.8
42.5

14
16

1 3 .2
1.3

76. 8
51.9

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SE R V IC ES ... ....................................................................
GOVERNMENT $ / • • • • ......................................................

5
2

.4
.3

14. 5
.4

2
11
43

.9
11.9
62.9

4
4

.3
.4

7.3
2.4

ALL INDUSTRIES ) / .............................................

78

4 7. 1

1,109.6

31

15.2

50 4 .6

211

11 1 .3

MANUFACTURING 1 / ....................................................

*3

39.4

1,0 6 1 .6

17

1 1 .9

482.8

60

46.6

873. 1

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES................................... ..
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES................................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS.............................................

1
7
•
"

.8
2 .4

42.1
4 9 .8
*

8

70 . 1

*

_
2.8
*

APPAREL, ETC. } / .........................................................
LUM
BER AM HOOD PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
D
FURNITURE................................ ....................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS........................ ..

-

-

-

4 .4

6

1.6

27. 2

1
1

.1
.1

.8
.7

2
2

.2
.5

2. 9
5. 0

«
5

“
1 .2

«
38.1

*

”

KANSAS

IONA

*

.2
1. 1
8. 3

6
-

1.4

KENTUCKY

29 .1
-

"
1

(2)

2 (

*1

2.9
10.7
1.6

1,339.4

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES........................................ ..........................

3

.2

28.2

1
1

.1
. 1

*

*

"

“

“

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS..................................................................... ..
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS..................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES......................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS g / ...........................

7
1
2
2
5

7 .0
.1
.5
.3
.7

286.9
3.6
2 .8
3.1
1 7 .0

2
1
1

3. 2
.1
. 3

28 7 .4

3

1.9

32.9

3.3
16.9

1
3
3

(2)
4.4
.4

1. 4
16. 3
9. 8

7

*
“

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.....................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 5 / ........................................ ..
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

20 .4

474.9

.

11

1 0 .9

104.2

3

6 .5

2
1

.3

126.8
24.8

“
(2)

2
•

(2)

6.5
*

126.6
“

6
7
1
2

15.0
7.1
.2
.4

345. 5
214.3
.4
4. 9

NONHANUFACTURING £ / .............................................

35

7.7

4 8.0

14

3.2

21.8

151

64.7

466. 4

118
9

46.4
2. 8

182. 1
32.6

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
m i n i n g ..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.................. ..........................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNMENT &/................................................................

_

16

3.4

“
2 1. 6

2

7

4.0

9

.3

17.4
4.5

.
2
1

.
(2)
(2)

.
4.6
(2)

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b l e .




55

(2)

.2

6
4

2.0

7.0
13.8

9

4. 6

5

.5

14 7 . 4
8. 0

1
1
*

(2)

.2
.5

-

.5
9 .9

1. 2
95.0

1.2

(2)
"

*

2
8

Table 23. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1976— Continued
JIOBKIBS.ANP PATS IPLB IB THOUSANDS)

M
ARYLAND

LOUISIANA

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
TEAR

NUM
BER

DAIS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

W
ORKERS
CNYOLYED

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAS

MASSACHUSETTS

DAYS
IDLE DURING

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAIS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES)
NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INYOLYED

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INYOLYED

ALL I HDDS TRIES J / .............................................

46

8. 9

1 5 9 .5

52

2 1 .0

390.9

129

61.2

741.6

H N FACTORI N 1 / ....................................................
A O
G

19

3.5

105.9

34

10.7

291.2

65

18 .8

418.5

_

.

_
1.8
-

_

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
POOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODDCTS.............................................
APPAREL, ETC. 3 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND W O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
PURNITURE.............................................................. .. . .
PURNITURE AND FIXTURES..........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................
PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUH REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES............. .....................................................
RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................ . .............................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS...........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES.....................................
FABRICATED HETAL PRODDCTS 4 / ............................

2
*

•6
"

_

10.6
"

5
-

_

.

8. 8
-

_

2.6
-

31. 1
-

-

-

-

_

_

5
1

.7
.1

12.1
1 3 .4

1
2

1

(2)
. 1
.3

1.2
2. 3
8.7

3

.4

8. 1

-

-

21.2

2
4

.5
2.2

4.9
69.8

1
3

(2)
.3

. 1
16.3

-

.6

-

-

1

.1

.4

(2)
(2)
.1
.9

.8
2.6
1 .2
1 5 .3

12 .5
13.3
4.9
3.4

7
1

2.4
(2)

5
7

.3
.9

180. 3
.4
1 2 .6
29. 1

2
1

1
3

-

_

4
-

2.5
-

2
2
4

.4
. 1
. 3

_

9
_

-

HACHINERT, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL...........................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.....................................
INSTROHENTS, BTC. 5 / ...............................................
HISCELLANEODS HANOFACTORING INDOSTRIBS. .

-

.

-

2

.2

7.6

14

9.9

93.7

1
3

.5
.7

19.2
8.8

2.0
. 1

"

1
2
2

.2

34.0
11 6 .4
3. 4

6
7
1

.9
.9
(2)

41.1
4.8
.4

NONHANOFACTORING J / .............................................

27

5.4

53.7

18

10. 3

99. 7

64

42.4

323. 1

AGRICULTURE, PORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
MINING............. ....................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
BHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.................................

_

_

_

1. 2

27.4

(2)

(2)

_

6

1
2

7. 0

17

_
7.8

76. 0

8
6

2.7
.3

11.0
6. 4

6
6

7. 1
1.5

64.9
16.4

18
19

10.1
1.2

14 4. 8
25 . 8

-

-

.4
.8

7.1
1. 7

FINANCE, INSDRANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES............................................................................
GOVERNHENT £ / ................................................................

-

6
1

-

-

2
1

H NOFACTORING \ / ....................................................
A
ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
POOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.............................. ..
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS.............................................
APPAREL, ETC. 3 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND W O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
PURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................
PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS....................
PETROLEUM REPINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...............................................................
ROBBER AND HISCELLANBOOS PLASTICS
PRODOCTS................................................................... .
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS...........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIHARY HETAL INDOSTRIBS......................................
FABRICATED HETAL PRODOCTS 4 / ..............................

-

-

.2
1. 2

_

6.7
4. 8

6
4

MINNESOTA

MICHIGAN
ALL INDOSTRIES \ / .............................................

.3

_

-

.2
2 3 .1

6.2
70.3

HISSISSIPPI

260

209.0

3,151.3

115

22.8

465.4

26

6.7

12 6 .5

169

163. 2

2,713.9

63

10.4

307.5

14

3.9

83. 2

_

_

_

_

.2

.4

-

-

-

-

.

17
_

3. 8

123. 7
-

-

-

1.3

19.5

-

12

-

-

-

_

1

. 1

.4

-

"

3

5.3

10 3 .0

_

-

3
6
14

. 4
.7
2. 1

23- 5
9.4
77.5

2
2
3

. 1
.1
.8

_

9

1.4

. 7
29.6

1
2

(2)
(2)

1

(2)

.3

~

1

.2

-

-

.8
1.2
21. 1
.7
.3

-

-

1

1
1
1

.1
.2
. 1

2.5
1.9
5.3

-

-

-

-

~

~

38.7
1.0
. 1
2 0 .1

-

9
2
6
15
24

4. 3
.4
1.9
8.5
9.4

3 29 . 0
4.6
70.3
16 6 .3
19 9 .2

-

-

2
4
9

.1
.3
.9

1.3
2.3
11. 1
27.8

3

.9
(2)
(2)
1 .3

HACHINERT, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL.................... ..
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SOPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQOIPHENT......................................
INSTROHENTS, ETC. § / ...............................................
HISCELLANEODS HANOFACTORING INDOSTRIBS..

32

14. 2

148 .3

17

2.3

77.5

1

.4

8. 1

10
18
3
4

10. 1
99. 7
.5
.3

295.2
1,087.8
10.4
34.7

5
3

1.2
3. 1
-

46.6
97.3

1
1

.2
. 1

1.7
1.9

-

-

-

NONHANOFACTORING 1 / .............................................

92

45.7

437.4

53

12.3

AGRICULTURE, PORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
MINING...................................................................... • • • • •
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION....................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
RHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.................................

24

. 1
9.2

. 4
1 7 2 .9

13

12
21

19 .6
3.5

85.6
75.4

15
18

FINANCE, IHSOEANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNHENT £ / .................................................................

_

10
26

4.3
9. 1

56.0
47.2

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b l e .




56

-

1
1

3
4

-

-

1

.2

1.4

157.9

12

2.9

43.2

_

_

1 .7

21.3

6

1. 5

37.2

6.6
2.3

59.4
55.4

3

.8
-

3.5

*

_

_

_

.5
(2)

2.4
. 1

. 1
1 .6

6. 3
1 5 .5

-

-

_

_

-

1
-

2
1

_

_

*
_

Table 23. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1976— Continued
(«O BM BS ABB BATS IBLB IB TBOBSABDS)

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGIRNIMG IN
YEAB

DATS
IDLE DURING

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DORING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES)
RUBBER

BO KERS
P.
INVOLVED

ALL INDUSTHIBS J / .............................................

163

62.7

1,197.3

248

69.4

MANUFACTUBING 1 / ....................................................

82

22. 4

796. 0

122

28.0

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.....................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODDCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................
TEXTILE BILL PRODUCTS...................... ..................

_
11
-

APFAREL, ETC. J / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND W O PRODUCTS, EICEPT
OD
FUPNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

NUM
BER

_

_

5.3
-

-

327.3
-

2

.4

11. 1

2
4
4

. 2
. 4
.3

8. 6
1 0 .2
4.8

1
6

(2)
1.1

PRINTINQ, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODDCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................

f------------------------------------------------- *
NEB YORK

NEB JERSEY

MISSOURI

BORKERS
INVOLVED

_

1,396.6
759. 1

_

2.4
1.2

105.1

5

.4

9.5

_

DAIS
IDLE DURING
STOPPAGES)

NUBBEE

11
6

_

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

-

18.3

_

BORKERS
INVOLVED

345

167. 2

1,926.5

175

44.0

761.8

3

2.6
. 8

31.4
9.2

9

. 3

4.7

_
10
-

_

_

2
4

. 1
.3

.6
5.0

5
6

.9
.7

9.7
9.6

. 1
3 8.6

5
18

1.0
3.6

13. 4
290.3

8
8

2.1
3. 1

20.2
78.9

6. 1

2

. 1

.5

4

. 1

7.5

59.9
1 8 .2
18.0
1 5. 3
1 2. 4

5
10
5
14

.8
1. 2
.6
1.2

25.4
25. 1
7.8
11.0

2
2
a
10
17

. 1
. 3
1 .5
3.6
5. 9

3.2
.4
54.2
40.7
151.7

2

.3

ROBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS.......................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS...........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES.....................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS J / ...........................

4
3
7
3
13

1.4
.7
1. 1
.3
1. 1

MACHINERY, EXCEPT BLECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SU PPL IE S.. .................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.....................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. $ / • • ..........................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

6

.7

41.3

15

3. 0

32.7

46

9.8

104. 1

8
3
2
1

3.0
5. 7
.4
(2)

54.8
15 7 .4
11.6
.3

11
5
2
2

4. 2
7.5
.1
.3

52.8
153.9
5.4
2. 3

26
3
6
4

8. 0
.9
2. 9
.4

132 .3
33.7
64. 5
6.0

NONMANUFACTURING \ / .............................................

83

40.3

401.2

127

41.5

637.5

171

123. 2

1.164.7

(2)
.7
10. 1

.2
4.0
132.4

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
HIRING.................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES. .
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVBBNHEMT § / ................................... ................ ..
.

_

_

_

_

_

5
26

.8
8.8

2. 4
121.5

3
15

.2
1. 2

2.6
11.2

1
2
52

15
26

2 2 .6
6.9

83.3
15 1 .3

29
37

16.1
6.5

329.3
198. 4

27
30

19.9
2.3

230.0
77.9

2
11
30

. 1
1 .3
16.1

. 3
22. 1
73.6

7
37
15

2 3 .4
46.2
20.6

248.9
341.9
12 9. 4

_

_

9
4

_

.8
•4

40.3
2. 4

NORTH CAROLINA

OHIO

OKLAHOM
A

ALL INDUSTRIES 1 / .............................................

36

15.1

431.3

549

270.8

4 ,8 38.6

32

MANUFACTURING ] / ...................................................

15

3.0

267 . 3

259

14 3 .3

■ 4,128.6

20

.

_

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.................. ................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES..............................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS.............................................
APPAREL, BTC. £ / .........................................................
LUBBER AND NOOD PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
FURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND PIXTURES.........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS................................
PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODDCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES..............................................................
RUBBER AND HISCELLANBOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS...........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIHART BETAL INDUSTRIES......................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS J / ............................

-

_
-

-

_

1
2
1

.1
-5
. 1

_

_

-

-

*

-

26.2

1

.2

9.8

. 2
2. 0
1.2

2. 9
66.9
37.8

1
2

1.1
.1

92-4
.5

9
18

1. 4
3.5

28. 2
153.4

3
-

.1
-

1.6
-

1

(2)

.3

-

-

"

21.4
3.3
1 1 .8
11.4

1
3
2
3

2 .0
.9
.4
.6

19 1. 6
22. 2
24.6
4.9
24.0

-

-

-

-

-

_

1
1
1
3

(2)
.3
.1
1. 5

.4
7.7
.9
215.0

26
28
30
29

3

. 1

12.9

37

11. 1

332.9

3

.7

2

5.9
-

20
14
2
11

34.7
34. 7
.4
1.7

3 56 . 1
919.3
5.5
69.3

1
-

(2)

163.9

293

1 2 7 .5

71 0 .1

12

4.7

-

NONHANUFACTUBING J / .............................................

21

12. 1

-

_

_

_

_

1,455.0
—
9 4. 5
294.1
201.5

-

. 1
~
22.9

_

.

2
2

.2
.3

3.6
1. 2

2

. 1

1. 8

123
31

5 5 .9
4. 9

_
238.7
82.5

10

1 1 .0
•6

15 0 .2

33
42

49.7

224. 6

4

4.1

_____ 16. 8

2
18
44

. 1
2.4
11. 6

1.5
33.0
85. 1

_
-

_
(2)

. 1
. 2

1!

_
(2)
.3
___________ L

___ !l

. 1

_____

S e e fo o tn o te * a t e n d o f t a b l e .




84.3
.4

371.7

_

3
7
10

.2
-

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND RFAL ESTATE..........
S ER7ICKS. ........................... ..............................................
GOYBPR BERT $ / ................................................................

4.5
(2)

3 9 4 .6

-

_

-

_

6. 1

1 1. 1
8.0
5.4

_

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.................................. ..
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. § / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

AGRICULTUBE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
MINING.......................................... ......................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
W O BS ALB AND ft Kl ALL TRADE.. . . . . . . . . . . . .
HL

17
1

_

-

-

-

_

1 0 .8

57

1

Table 23. W ork stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1976— Continued
[ I O » n i S AMP PAIS IDLE ! ■ W O IS M D S )

OREGON

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

PENNSYLVANIA

DAYS
IDLE DURING

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DURING

STOPPAGES)
NUM
BER

HORKERS
INVOLVED

RHODE ISLAND

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DOSING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES)
NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

NUM
BER

M
ORKERS
INVOLVED

ALL INDUSTRIES J / .............................................

62

15. 3

312.3

721

243.3

2,8 4 0 .4

27

7.3

1 4 1 .8

HAHUFACTUR ING \ / ....................................................

30

7.3

15 8 .6

280

8 6. 6

1,619.2

9

1. 5

84. 2

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.....................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO HANUFACTUHES...............................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS.............................................

_
4
-

_
.8
~

_
10. 5

_
5.8
1.2

94.7
20. 6

1
-

(2)

~

_
28
9

.
.6
-

APPAREL, ETC. 3 / .........................................................
LUHBER AND M O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

-

-

-

6

.8

9. 9

_

_

_

2
4
5

1.0
.2
2.4

5. 1
5. 9
71.4

6
7
8

.3
.4
2.7

8.7
4.6
39.0

-

-

-

“
1

(2)

.2

6
11

6.5
2.3

58.2
65.2

-

-

-

”

3

.2

2.5

-

-

-

4.9
~
4.2
8.6
4.3

387.5

. 3
32.4
2 .6

11
~
27
41
45

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEHICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCES.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES.................................................. ................

“

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............................
STONE, CLAT, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES.....................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS 4 / ......................... ..

1
2
2

(2)
.9
. 1

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL.................... ..
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.....................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. £ / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

2

. 1

11. 0

28

9.1

2
4
1
*

. 1
1. 5
(2)

3.9
14 .6
.8

29
14
3
3

23. 2
1 0 .7
.4
1. 1

-

. 1
. 1

1
1

. 1
(2)

1 7 9 .8

3

.8

2 7 .8

18 8 .7
1 68 . 1
19. 5
18. 3

3
-

.6
-

.6
55. 1

72.8
176.9
10 4. 3

NONMANUFACTURIMG J / ............................................

32

8. 0

153.7

442

15 6 .7

1,221.2

18

5. 9

57.6

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
MINING..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE........................... .. .

1
6

.1
~
1.6

.9
118 .4

1
171
45

.9
77.2
8.7

1.8
260.8
101 .0

_
3

_
.5

.6
4. 9

6
10

4. 9
1.0

18.8
12.4

47
55

37.6
2.8

324.1
78.8

5
2

2. 1
. 1

18. 6
1.0

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES..................................................................... .. .
GOVERNMENT § / ................................................................

_
3
6

. 1
. 4

1.1
2.2

4
27
93

. 1
5.5
23.8

.5
39. 6
414.6

_
4
4

_
.6
2.6

_
27.8
4.7

ALL INDUSTRIES 1 / ....................... .....................

110

50.6

1,077.2

115

34. 1

816. 4

203

64.5

570.2

MANUFACTURING 1 / ....................................................

63

20.0

493.9

61

1 3. 9

46 9 . 9

26

7.9

277. 8

ORDNANCE AM ACCESSORIES......................................
D
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.............................. .. .
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES.......... ....................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS.............................................

6
~
3

.
1.3

-

29.9

_
9

.4

1

_
52.2
. 3

5
_
1

.5
-

9. 8

2.9
(2)

.2

21.9
1.7

APPAREL, ETC. } / .........................................................
LUHBER AND M O FRODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE.................... ...................................... .. .
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

4

1.4

16.4

1

(2)

. 2

2

.2

1. 9

~
4
1

.4
(2)

13.2
.8

4
2
2

.9
. 1
. 3

9.0
.3
1 9. 4

~
—
1

. 1

5.5

9. 5
107.4

1
5

. 1
.6

8 .3
6.5

~
1

1.3

13. 5

2

2.4

173.9

“
2

.2

~
2. 0

TENNESSEE

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................
CHEHICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................

2
5

. 3
3.0

”

"

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS...................................
.............................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS...........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES.....................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS J / ...........................

6
~
3
3
16

1.5
3.0
.6
3.6

RACHINERT, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES....................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT......................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. § / . . . ........................................
HISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

5
2
2
~
1

(2)

NONHANOFACTURING J / .............................................

09

30.6

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
MINING..................................................................................

_

TEXAS

1

(2)

.2

3
4
4
8

1.3

78. 7
30.5
85.7

.2
.5
1. 1

9. 1
1 1. 5
28.5
25.8

3.5

40.7

6

1.6

24.4

2

. 8

25.3

. 2
.6

2. 4
1 3. 3

3
4
3

.8
3.0

24.2
234.4
15.7

.6
1.6
(2)
~

. 6
31.4
(2)

. 4

7
2
1
~

55

20. 2

346.6

178

5 6. 6

292.4

_

_

_

_

-

55.5

. 1
583.3

_

_

_

2
23

.5
14. 8

1.0
514. 3

15

3.3

TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
RROLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE..............................

9
7

1 0. 6
.6

27.5
6. 9

15
17

14.8
1.3

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES............. ..................................• • • • ...................
GOVERNMENT £ / ................................................................

4
4

1 .5
2.6

27.5
6.0

1
7

(2)
.8
(2)

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b l e .




VIRGINIA

58

1

_

157
2

47.4
2. 4

13 5 . 3
26 . 8

281. 0
30.6

12
5

6.2
. 5

11 2. 6
16. 9

.1
12 .5
(2)

1
1

(2)
(2)

.7
(2)

Table 23. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1976— Continued
COIKBBS AID DAIS IPLB I f THOUSANDS)

W
EST VIRC IN IA

W
ASHINGTON

INDUSTRY GROUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

WISCONSIN

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAIS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

A l l INDUSTRIES \ / .............................................

93

38. 1

1,386.5

692

206.9

1,274.3

78

3 1 .7

68 5 .3

MANUFACTURING 1 / ....................................................

34

6. 5

127 .9

51

13 .3

279.2

37

15. 1

536.9

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES................................................
TEXTILE MILL PPODUCTS.............................................

_
4
-

_

_

_

_

. 4
-

8. 1
-

5
1
*
*

.4
. 1

APPAREL, ETC. 3 / .........................................................
LUM
BER AND W O FFODUCTS, EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE.....................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...........................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
2
4

.7
.1
2.6

7. 3
5. 1
29 . 9

1
1

.2
(2)

5.9
.2

2
1
4

.3
. 1
. 6

1 0 .9
12. 1
8.6

1
1

(2)
. 1

(2)
1. 1

2
4

. 1
.5

8. 6
12.3

3

.3

5.2

2
2
11
3
6

.4
.9
6. 1
.2
1 .0

7.2
20. 1
79. 6
40. 0
20.8

3
2
5
7

3.8
(2)
.6
1.8

189.4
.3
19. 1
36.2

-

PRINTING* PUBLISHING* AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES................................................................ ..
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES...................................................................

-

-

1
2
4
2

(2)
(2)
1. 5
.2

3.2
.2
53.3
1.0

_

2

(2)

40. 1
-

~
-

-

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS...........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PPODUCTS....................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES......................................
FABRICATED M
ETAL PRODUCTS 4 / ............. .............

_
5.8
3.2

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL.......... ................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT......................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 5 / ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

3

.2

8.9

7

1.7

54. 8

4

.6

17 5. 6

1
1
2

.3
. 1
. 1

5.3
1.0
3. 0

3
1
2

.8
(2)
.9

9. 7
2.0
8.9

2
2

6.0
1. 0

6.0
33.2

N0NMANDF7CTUEING 1 / .............................................

59

31. 6

1,259. 1

41

193 .6

995.0

41

16. 6

148. 3

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES....
MINING..................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION................................ ..
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........
SERVICES.............................................................................
GOVERNMENT £ / .................................................. .............

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

8

~
9.2

8 0 9 .9

07
10

187 .7
1.9

90 2. 3
21. 9

13

4.5

~
55.8

14
19

3.7
3.7

23.2
100. 1

7
7

2.8
. 5

30.7
29. 3

8
6

7.3
.3

29.3
1 5 .3

i
3
10

(2)
.3
4. 3

.2
7. 1
4 0 .8

1
12
5

(2)
8.2
6.8

.2
260.0
65. 6

1 T h e n u m b er of sto p p a g e s r e p o r te d fo r a m a jo r in d u s tr y group o r d iv is io n
m a y n ot eq u a l the su m of it s co m p o n en ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l sto p p a g e s o c c u r r in g
in two o r m o r e g ro u p s h a v e b e e n cou n ted in ea c h . W o rk er s in v o lv e d and d ays
id le h ave b e e n a llo c a te d am on g the r e s p e c t iv e g ro u p s.
2 F e w e r than 50.
3 In clu d es o th e r fin is h e d p r o d u c ts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s and s im ila r m a t e 4 E x c lu d e s o rd n a n c e, m a c h in e r y , and tr a n s p o r ta tio n eq u ip m en t.
5 In clu d es p r o f e s s io n a l, s c i e n t i f i c , and c o n tr o llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to ­




_

59

-

-

-

6
4

.4
.1

10.4
.5

g ra p h ic and o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s and c lo c k s .
6
T h e s itu a tio n s r e p o r te d h e r e h a v e , fo r s t a t is t ic a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d eem ed
to fa ll w ith in the B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o rk sto p p a g e . T h is d e c is io n d o es
n ot c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th at a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s tak en p la c e in
v io la tio n of an y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
N O T E: B e c a u s e o f rou n din g,
to t a ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d en o te z e r o s .

su m s

of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u al

Table 24. W ork stoppages by State and metropolitan area, 19761
(■OBOHS AID DATS IDLE XI TB0USA1BS)

STATE A D METROPOLITAN AREA
M

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR
NUM
BER

ALL STATES.......................................................

2,4 2 0 .0

19
11
30
22

2. 8
9.7
4. 0
16.8
9. 7

STATE AND METROPOLITAN AREA

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

5,648

DAIS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR
NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

FORT W
AYNE.......................................................
GARY-HAMMOND-EAST CHICAGO 2 / . . . .

28
16

13.3
9 .6

183 .2
70.6
21.5
18 1 .7
102.8

7

5 .6

DAVENPORT-BOCK ISLAND-MOLINE#
IA -I L ..............................................................

15

18.8

9
22
8

17 .5
12. 9
6. 1

DATS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

37,858.9

216. 7
35.1

275. 8
ALASKA......................................................................
ANCHORAGE.........................................................

7. 7

24 0 . 0
14.2
2 25 . 8
138. 5

LITTLE ROCK-NORTH LITTLE ROCK....

10

4. 5

57. 7

TOPEKA.................................................................

6

3.7

290.0

ANAHEIM-SANTA ANA-GARDEN GROVE...

18

2. 6
1.3

20.8

KENTUCKY.................................................................

211
12

111 .3
2. 5

1,339. 4
103.5

53

23. 4

13

3. 5
5. 9

27.2
75.9

LOUISIANA..............................................................

RIVERSIDE-SAN BEBNABDINO-ONTARIO.

5

.3

7
46
10

8 .9
1. 1

11
52

5. 6

21.0

159. 5

7.8
1 6 .5

68

3.7
.2
21.1

16
12
6

3. 5
2.5
1.0

65.4
8.7
55.8
91.2
2.3
65.2
1 .6
621. 1
53.8
75.3
44.9
1 1 .3

3.9
3.3

21.5
23. 4
1 6. 7

16

4. 9

111. 2

13

3. 2
6.2

55.0
88.9

5. 1
7. 7

N
EW HAVEN-VEST HAVEN..............................
N W LONDON—
E
NORW
ICH# CT-RI..................

DISTRICT OP COLOMBIA PORTION...

69
7

PITTSFIELD.......................................................
SPRINGFIELD-CHICOPEE-HOLYOKE#

8

FLINT....................................................................

14

1 7 .8
100. 1

7.8

53.7

22.8

465.4

10
80
80

151. 4

MINNESOTA..............................................................

1,891.0

115

17. 9
17.9

129

42. 2

787.3

88. 1

1,593. 2

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .

60

9

1.3

12. 2

KANSAS CITY# MO-KS...................................

193




3. 1

15

2.0

CHICAGO NORTHW
ESTERN INDIANA
CHICAGO 2 / ....................................................

11. 1

209. 0

33.5
171 .7

5

1.7
1.5

354.4

5

13.2

W
EST PALM BEACH-BOCA RATON................

35.4
1. 3
.7
.7
1.2

44

3 0 .0

' 406.3

KANSAS PORTION........................................

10

2.0

47.5

30

38.2

Table 24. W ork stoppages by State and metropolitan area, 1976— Continued
(IO IK K IS AID DATS IDLE I I THOOSAIOS)

STATE AND METROPOLITAN AREA

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR
NUM
BER

3. 3

STATE AND METROPOLITAN AREA

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

11

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR
NUM
BER

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED
243.3

OMAHA, NE-IA..................................................

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

2 ,8 40.4

ALLENTOWN-BETHLEHEM-EASTON,

17 .9

N
EW BRUNSWICK—
PERTH

PENNSYLVANIA PORTION..........................

133

48.9

27
ALBUQUERQUE....................................................

9

6. 0

58

42.6

800. 1

14 1 .8

PROVIDENCE-WARWICK-PAWTUCKET,

11.7

NEB YORK-NORTHEASTERN NEB JERSEY

MEMPHIS, TN-MS-AR......................................

17. 9

473.9

SAN ANTONIO............................................... . .

12

27

8

2.1

32.9

8 0 .0

GREENSBORO-WINSTON-SALEM-

2.8
203
CANTON................................................................

18

5. 3

64. 5

570.2

NORFOLK-VIRGINIA EEACH—

'108.5

3. 6

31.7

WYOMING................................................................
1 In clu d es d ata fo r ea c h m e tr o p o lita n a r e a in w h ich fiv e sto p p a g e s
o r m o r e b eg a n in 1976. S om e m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s in c lu d e the co u n tie s
in m o r e than one S ta te , and h e n c e , an a r e a m a y eq u al or e x c e e d the
to ta l fo r the S ta te in w h ich th e m a jo r c it y i s lo c a te d . S to p p a g e s in the
lo g g in g and m in in g in d u s tr ie s a r e e x c lu d e d . S top p ages o c c u r r in g in m o r e
than one m e tr o p o lita n a r e a a r e cou n ted s e p a r a t e ly in e a c h a r e a a ffe c te d ;
the w o r k e r s in v o lv e d and d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d to the r e s p e c t iv e a r e a s .
2 In clud ed in the C h ica g o , 111.— o r th w e ste r n Indiana S tandard C o n ­
N
so lid a te d A r e a .




7

1.6

36.2

3 In clud ed in the N ew Y ork — o r th e a s te r n N ew J e r s e y Standard
N
C o n so lid a te d A r e a .
4 In clud ed in the N ew Y ork C ity SMSA and N ew Y o rk — o r th e a s te r n
N
N ew J e r s e y Stan dard C o n so lid a te d A r e a .
NO TE: B e c a u s e o f rou n din g,
eq u a l to ta ls .

61

su m s

of in d iv id u a l ite m s

m ay

not

Table 25. Work stoppages by industry group and duration, 19761
(HOBKEBS AMD DAIS IDLE I I TBOOSAIDS)

INDUSTRY GROUP

TOTAL

1
DAY

7-14
DAIS

4-6
DAYS

2-3
DAYS

15-29
CAYS

30-5 9

60-89
DAYS

90 DAYS
AND OVSP

STOPPAGES ENDING IN YEAr
ALL INDUSTRIES......................................................... 2/5,6511

1. 113

672

564

893

842

769

370

431

MANUFACTURING................................................................ 2 / 2 , 232

98

155

199

397

435

445

243

26 0
22
2

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES..........................................
FCOE AND KINCAID PRODUCTS........................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES....................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS.................................................
AEPABEL, ETC 3 / ..............................................................
LUM
BER AND H O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT FURNITURE
OD
FUPNITURE AND FIXTURES...............................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS........................................

46
67
76
97

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES........................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..............................
FETROLEUS REFINING AND RELATEI INDUSTRIES

_

1
219
1
35

_

_

_

4

13
4

46
10

49
8

44
6

1
16
1
1

2
4

7
6
3
9

9
8
4
9

11
7
13
15

7
13
22
20

4
13
21
19

6
12
8
11

2
B
3
1C

51
133
17

1
5

4
6
1

5
8
3

6
29
3

11
31
7

9
21
-

3
14
-

12
19
3

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES..........................................
FABRICATED MErAL PRODUCTS 4 / ................................

115
12
152
197
307

2
5
8
8

6
2
9
8
S

14
10
15
24

24
1
26
34
72

18
3
36
25
71

22
5
33
42
68

15
20
36
25

14
1
13
29
30

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL................................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES.............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT..........................................
INSTRUMENTS, x.TC 5 / ..................................... ..............
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES....

303

17

30

34

35

46

63

37

41

205
134
29
55

22
13
2

1

23
6
3
1

24
8
3
6

32
23
3
7

32
19
5
19

31
27
7
1C

23
15
2
5

18
23
4
6

NONMANUFACTURING......................................................... 2 /3 ,H 2 5

1,015

517

366

496

408

324

128

171

5
69
111

1
30
107

77

3
23

1
5
16

64
97

30
41

47
64

2
41
39

27

2
32

6

*

11

18

-

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES.............
MINING.......................................................................................
CONTPACT CONSIRUCTTON..................................................
TRANSPORTA1ION, COMMUNICATION, ELECTRIC,
GAS, AND SAaITAF.Y SERVICES................................
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.....................................

11
1,925
507

864
35

313
58

*
137
80

357
471

16
3

40
22

36
42

60
94

64
104

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE...............
SERVICES ...............................................................................
GOVERNM
ENT 6 / .....................................................................

26
299
383

1
20
72

3
17
60

2
20

8
43
106

8
49
47

_

_

"

1

W
ORKERS INVOLVED
ALL INDUSTRIES......................................................... 2 / 2 , 4 2 1 . 2

342.0

464 .4

227. 4

113.8

3 9. 4

94. 4

r

13 7 .3

MANUFACTURING................................................................

2/975. 1

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES..........................................
FGOD AND KINDaED PRODUCTS........................................
TOEACCO MANUFACTURES....................................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS..................................................

0. 8
88.7
.1
7.6

1. 5
*

5.4
.9

2.7
1.7

44.4
3.0

APPAREL, ETC.
..............................................................
LUM
BER ADD W O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT FURNITURE
OD
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES................................... ..
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..................................

1 1 .4
1 0 .8
12. 1
23.9

•2
.4

1.0
.8
.5
2.2

1 .4
.9
1 .2
1.9

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES........................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..............................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED INDUSTRIES.

14. 1
28. 5
1.2

(7)
1 .8

.7
2 .7
.1

1.1

1. 1

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES..........................................
FABRICATED MEIAL PRODUCTS 4 / ................................

91.7
2.6
26.3
5 6 .4
67. 2

.5
.5
5.0
7. 1

13 9 .4
134. 1
2 41 . 7
5.6
11.0

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL................................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT..........................................
INSTRUMENTS, nTC. 5 / ....................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTBIES. . . .

_

_

308. 6

321.3

26 5 .3

160.''

11 8 .2

332. 1

127. 1

21 4. 6

130. 3

9.7

11.3

1 .0

. 9
1.9
1 .4
5.7

.1

1.2
.3
2 .4
5 .8
.9

6 .9
3.0
2 .8
3 .5

1 2 .5

8.5

29.8

32.7
51.5
. 1
(7)

3.6
2 .0
.3
(7)

12. 1
2 2 .8
.2
1.3

•1

0.8
3.0
.1
.1

10.7
.2

1.4
1 .5
2.9
5. 6

1.0
1 .3
3 .4
3.2

5 .6
.8
2.2
1.7

.1
3. 5
.3
3.3

1 .6
3 .6
.3

7.8
4.6
.5

.6
2. 6
_

.1
7.3
-

2. 1
4. 8
.1

3.8
.3
3.6
5. 7
9.0

8.4
.6
5. 2
4. 1
1 0. 4

5.9
1 .4
3.0
6. 1
14.6

6 .9
6.2
2 1 .2
15.6

5 8 .2
.1
2. 5
5.7
6. 1

9.3

17. 5

44. C

6.5

9.3

26.6
13 .7
.2
2.5

28. 1
5. 5
.6
2.5

5.9
1 8 .0
3.5
.9

14.9
118.8
.1
•7

10. 1
9.4
.5
3. 2

NCNM
ANUFACTU PING......................................................... 2 / 1 , 4 4 6 . 1

228.3

425 .0

133 .0

1 9 4 .8

19 0 .4

194.1

50.8

2 9. 7

2.4
5 14 . 4
164.0

_
174. 5
4.9

1.1
103.0
2 2 .7

60.8
14 .2

1.3
48.9
32. 3

(7)
1 5 .3
44.7

110.6
28.3

0.9
14.4

(7)
0. 3
2.4

392.8
55.7

25. 1
.3

255.1
2.4

10.6
7' 2

11.4
7. 8

48.6
1 3. 8

7.0
1 2. 7

19.8 !
8.6

15. 2
2.9

25.2
10 4 .6
186. 9

(7)
4.6
18 .8

.1
4.3
3 6. 2

.4
3. 1
3 6 .6

.4
46.2
46.4

23. 4
29. 9
14.7

. 1
3.4
3 2. 0

6.0
1. 1

.8
7.0
1.0

AGBICULTUBE, FORESTRY, ASD FISHERIES.............
MINING..................................... ................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION..................................................
TEA NSPOBIATICfl, COMMUNICATION, ELECTRIC,
GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES................................
W
HOLESALE ADD RETAIL TRADE.....................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE...............
SERVICES ...............................................................................
GOVERNM
ENT 6 / .....................................................................

I

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




62

Table 25. Work stoppages by industry group and duration, 19761-Continued
fO BK BBS AMD DAIS IDLE IB THOUSAMDS)

INDUSTRY GBOUF

TOTAL

1
DY
A

4-6
DAYS

2-3
DAYS

7-1 4
DAYS

15-29
DAYS

3 0 -5 9
DAYS

60-89
DAYS

90 DAYS
AND OVE®

DAYS IDLE
ALL INDUSTRIES......................................................... 2 / 3 8 , 1 0 6 . 6

342.0

995.3

682.0

2 ,2 53.6

3,682.6

6,8 5 7 .2

8,501.1

14,792.6

MANUFACTURING................................................................ 2 / 2 4 , 7 5 2 . 9

11 3 .8

70.8

258.0

999. 2

1,423.8

3,382.7

6 ,1 18.8

12,385.9

13.3

9. 3

360. 5

146. 0

32 2 .0

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES..........................................
FCOD AND KIN Cb ED PRODUCTS.......................................
TEXTILE MILL FHODUCIS.................................................

42. 1
2,0 2 5 .5

_

_

1.5

_

_

42. 1
141.3

_
1,031.7

80. 5

-

1.3

6.0

17. 1

1 3 .6

2 2 .1

6.4

14.0

APPAREL, ETC. j / ..............................................................
LUM
BER AND W O PRODUCTS, EXCEPT FURNITUBE
OD
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...............................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS........................................

213. 4
4 3 0. 0
293.6
561.4

-

.2
.4

2.1
2.0
.9
4 .6

5.3
3 .0
5. 1
7. 3

5.6
1 2. 3
10.0
41.6

21.9
2 1 .1
43. 6
75. 7

3 1 .6
4 6. 9
9 9 .9
103.7

116.2
40.9
84.0
85.7

30.7
303 .8
5 4 .8
242. 3

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES.......................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..............................
PETROLEUM REFxNING AND RELATED INDUSTRIES.

279.4
967.9
3 0 .8

(7)
1.8

.9
3.8
.4

4.6
4.3
.4

1 2. 4
25.4
1.6

36.8
57.7
9.2

19.0
60.9

5.2
34 1 .9
-

20 0 .5
472. 1
19. 2

•5
.5
5. 0
7. 1

2.3
.4
7.2
7 .2
1.9

25. 4
10.9
9. 9
12 .9

24.9
2.8
28. 6
41.3
69.8

115. 3
7.9
65. 5
52. 7
1 6 1 .2

174 .9
33.2
8 9 .3
17 2 .2
408.0

304.1
205.5
660.5
429.7

5,382.3
10.8
28 2 .3
44 8 .4
878.
1,030.7

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........................
PRIMARY M
ETAL INDUSTRIES..........................................
FABRICATED MElAL PRODUCTS 4 / ................................

6,029.7
55. 1
689.9
1 ,3 97.2
1,969. 0

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL................................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES............................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT..........................................
INSTRUMENTS, i-TC. 5 / ....................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES....

2,778.3

1 2 .5

12.3

67.0

64. 5

1 9 2 .0

1,023.3

375.9

1,911.2
4,478. 1
15 2. 8
35 9 .0

32.7
51.5
.1
(7)

6.1
3. 2
.8
(7)

2 1 .2
59. 1
.6
5.7

163. 6
95. 3
1 .4
20.5

272.5
84. 9
8.6
37.8

15 8. 3
50C.C
89.5
27.8

4 6 7 .2
2,775.5
6.8
2 6 .7

789. 5
908 .6
45. 1
240. 4

N NM NUFACTU BING......................................................... 2 / 1 3 , 3 5 3 . 6
G A

22 8 .3

92 4 .5

424. 0

1,254.5

2,258.8

3,474.5

2,382.3

2 ,4 06.8

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES.............
MINING......................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.................................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, ELECTRIC,
GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES................................
W
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.....................................

16. 7
2,117.7
2 ,4 47.0

174 .5
4.9

2 .4
214.1
6 3 .3

190.0
45. 6

1 0. 5
184. 4
205. 7

0.4
139 .9
592. 6

1, 144.4
734.5

4 4. 4
6^ 8 .9

3. 4
25.9
191 .5

3,973.7
1,328.4

25.1
.3

53 2. 9
4.3

3 0 .0
2 7 .5

92.7
52.0

544.2
195.7

216.0
421 .6

1,14".5
300.9

1,392.3
325.9

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE................
SERVICES ...............................................................................
GOVERNM
ENT 6 / .....................................................................

2 81 . 8
1,392.3
1,7 9 6 .0

(7)
4.6
18.8

.3
8.8
9 8 .5

1. 3
5 .6
119.9

2. 5
337.6
368. 9

208. 3
36 2 . 3
215. 4

2.0
101 .8
854.2

_

24 2 .6
4 4 .9

67.4
32 5 .0
75.3

1 Totals in this table differ from those in tables 1 and 2 and 6-24
because these stoppages ended during the year, and thus include idleness
occurring in prior yea rs,
2 The number of stoppages reported for a major industry group or
division may not equal the sum of its components because individual stop­
pages occurring in 2 or more groups are counted in each. Workers in­
volved and days idle are allocated among the respective groups.
3 Includes other finished products made from fabrics and similar
materials.
4 Excludes ordnance, machinery, and transportation equipment.




63

5 Includes professional, scientific, and controlling instruments; pho­
tographic and optical goods; watches and clocks.
6 The situations reported here have, for statistical purposes, been
deemed to fall within the Bureau's definition of a work stoppage. This de­
cision does not constitute a legal determination that a work stoppage has
taken place in violation of any law or public policy.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal
totals. Dashes (-) denote zero s.

Table 26. Work stoppages by major issue and duration, 19761
f0 1 K B B S I I P PAIS IDLE I I THOUS11DS)

M
AJOR ISSUE

TOTAL

1
DAI

2-3
DAYS

4-6
DAIS

15-29
DAIS

7-14
DAIS

3 0- 59
DAYS

6 0 -8 9
DAIS

90 DAYS
AND OVER

STOPPAGES ENDING IN YEAR
ALL ISSUES..............................................................

5 .6 5 9

1. 1 1 3

672

564

893

842

769

370

931

GENERAL 8AGE CHANGES..........................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS......................................
W E ADJUSTMENTS....................................................
AG
HOURS OF W
ORK............................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS..............................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY...............
JCB SECURITY..............................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION...........................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS................................
INTERUNION OR INTFAUNION MATTERS.............
NOT REPORTED..............................................................

2,874
49
147
7
127
330
317
1,291
186
288
38

95
3
95

161
2
22
4
18
24
45
28 3
48
63
2

224
4
29
15
23
29
146
29
58
7

587
10
19
36
52
44
83
23
29
10

639
19
7
23
52
35
36
9
26
6

592
11
12

280
3
4
5
39
22
11
2
2
2

301
2
9
3
10
54
26
14
2
5
5

33 2. 1

3 0 8 .6

321.3

265.3

160. 0

210.9
2.5
5.2
4.6
1 3 .3
30. 9
99.6
7.3
7.9
.9

2 2 6 .5
3.0
12 .7
1 .4
7.1
39.9
1 0 .5
2.9
9.4
.3

19 8 .2
2.3
1 .9
3.7
6 .9
38.0
118.7
.5
1.3
.3

56.7
.4
.2
.4
9.9
191.8
5.5
.2
. 1
(2)

1 4 1 .5
.1
3.0
.5
.4
6.9
4.0
2. 1
.8
.6
. 1

5
22
79
6 97
70
96

1

-

15
64
37
21
3
9
5

W
ORKERS INVOLVED
ALL ISSUES..............................................................

2,921.2

342.0

464.4

GENERAL W G CHANGES...........................................
AE
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS......................................
W E ADJUSTMENTS....................................................
AG
HOURS OF W
ORK...........................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS..............................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY...............
JCE SECURITY..............................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION..........................................
OTHER W
ORKING CONDITIONS................................
INTERUNION OR INTEAUNION HATTERS.............
NOT REPORTED..............................................................

1,225.9
9.5
49.9
2. 3
16.2
1 18. 8
402.3
488.0
50.9
54.8
2.6

67.9
.3
1 1. 0
1.5
69.6
23.3
137.0
14. 3
16 .9
.3

316.3
.1
5.3
1 .7
1.0
2.1
20.8
92.5
1 3. 3
11.1
.1

227.9
58.3
.9
10. 6
3.1
3.5
59. 1
72. 1
11.6
7.6
.6

DAYS IDLE
ALL ISSUES..............................................................
GENERAL W
AGE CHANGES..........................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS......................................
W
AGE ADJUSTMENTS....................................................
HOURS OF W
ORK............................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS..............................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY...............
JOE SECUFITY..............................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION..........................................
OTHER W
ORKJNG CONDITIONS.................................
INTERUNION OR INTEAUNION MATTERS............
NOT REPORTED..............................................................

8,106.6

392.0

995.3

682.0

2,253.6

3,682.6

6, 8 5 7 . 2

8 ,5 01.1

14,792.6

5,029.6
1 59 . 3
630.0
60.2
236.7
1,5 9 0 .9
7,252. 1
2,5 6 1 .5
258.9
289.4
9 9 .0

67.9
.3
1 1. 0
1.5
69.6
23.3
13 7. 0
1 4. 3
16.9
.3

699.5
.2
9.5
4 .1
1.5
9.5
3 8 .0
191 .0
27.9
23.9
.2

210.7
9.0
38. 0
8. 5
1 0 .7
138. 5
217.6
29.2
22.5
2.2

1,595.5
13 .6
37.5
35.7
102.9
151 .7
229.1
35.3
97. 6
5.3

2,799.6
97.0
88.3

4,2 0 5 .3
65.6
5 5 .9

2,575.8
17.3
11 . 1

12,880.3
6.3
379.2
56. 1
98.3
606.9
95 9. 7
209.2
91.8
97.9
18.1

1 T o ta ls in th is ta b le d if fe r fr o m th o se in ta b le s 1 and 2 and 6 -2 4
b e c a u s e th e s e s to p p a g e s en d ed d u r in g the y e a r , and thus in c lu d e id le n e s s
o c c u r r in g in p r io r y e a r s .
2 F e w e r than 50.




64

-

-

20.6
101 .8
387.9
111 .8
3 9 .9
85.9
5.2

99.8
170 .7
9 6 7 .5
1,226.9
14.5
91.3
1 0 .7

N O T E: B e c a u s e of rou n din g,
to t a ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d en o te z e r o s .

-

2 0 .8
52 9. 9
5 ,0 90.6
299.3
11 .0
3.8
2.0

s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n ot eq u al

Table 27. W ork stoppages by contract status and duration, 19761
(BQBKB13 IBP PAt3 ID11 II THODSANDS)_____________ _______ ______________ _________________ _
STOPPAGES ENDING IN YEA2
NUM
BER
CONTRACT STATUS A D DURATION
M

PERCENT

STOPPAGES

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

DAIS IDLE

STOPPAGES

W
ORKERS
INVOLVED

DAYS IDLE

2,421.2

38,106.6

ALL STOPPAGES................................................................

5, 6 54

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

1 DAT.........................................................................................
2 TO 3 DAIS..........................................................................
a TO 6 DAYS..........................................................................
7 TO 14 EATS.......................................................................
15 TO 29 DATS.....................................................................
30 TO 59 DAIS.....................................................................
60 TO 89 DAIS.....................................................................
90 DAIS A D OTEB..............................................................
M

1, 1 13
672
564
693
842
769
370
431

342.0
464.4
227.4
332. 1
308. 6
321.3
265.3
160 .0

342.0
995.3
682.0
2,253.6
3,682.6
6,857.2
8,501. 1
1 4 , 7 9 2 .6

19.7
11 .9
1 0 .0
1 5 .8
1 4 .9
13 .6
6. 5
7.6

14 .1
1 9 .2
9.4
13.7
1 2. 7
13.3
11.0
6.6

0.9
2.6
1.8
5.9
9.7
1 8. 0
22.3
38.8

NEGOTIATION OF PIRST AGREEMENT O ONION
R
RECOGNITION.....................................................................
1 DAI....................................................................................
2 TO 3 DATS.....................................................................
4 TO 6 DAIS.....................................................................
7 TO 14 DAIS...................................................................
15 TO 29 DAIS................................................................
30 TO 59 DAIS................................................................
60 TO 89 DAIS................................................................
90 DAIS A D OTER.........................................................
M

450
18
28
29
71
79
86
48
91

57.4
3.0
23. 4
3. 1
6.3
9.5
4.0
2.9
5.2

1,060.4
3.0
67.7
1 0. 3
48.4
13 8 .2
107 .8
13 9. 2
545.2

8. 0
.3
.5
.5
1.3
1 .4
1. 5
.8
1 .6

2 .4
.1
1.0
.1
.3
.4
.2
.1
.2

2.8
(3)
.2
(3)
. 1
.4
.3
.4
1 .4

RENEGOTIATION OP AGREEMENT (EXPIRATION
OB REOPENING)................................................................
1 DAI....................................................................................
2 TO 3 DATS.....................................................................
4 TO 6 DATS.....................................................................
7 TO 14 DATS..................................................................
15 TO 29 DATS................................................................
30 TO 59 DATS................................................................
60 TO 89 DATS................................................................
90 DAIS AND OVER.........................................................

3 ,0 8 0
89
173
241
644
672
641
3 06
314

1,654.2
133.4
305.8
96.6
246.5
264. 9
195 .7
260.3
151. 1

33,744.7
133 .4
648.2
2 9 5 .0
1,824.9
3,234.2
5,432.1
8,263.6
13,913.2

54.5
1.6
3. 1
4. 3
1 1 .4
11.9
11.3
5.4
5.6

68.3
5. 5
1 2 .6
4.0
1 0.2
10 .9
8.1
10 .8
6.2

88.6
.4
1.7
.8
4.8
8.5
14.3
21.7
36.5

DURING TERM OP AGREEM
ENT (NEGOTIATION
OF NEB AGREEMENTS NOT INVOLVED) ....................
1 DAY....................................................................................
2 TO 3 DAIS.....................................................................
4 TO 6 DAIS........................................................... ..
7 TO 14 DAIS...................................................................
15 TO 29 DAIS................................................................
30 TO 59 DAIS................................................................
60 TO 89 DATS................................................................
90 DAIS AND OVER.........................................................

1,9 53
993
447
267
140
66
24
6
10

692.7
204.5
132. 2
123.6
75.3
32.5
12 0 .5
1.7
2.3

3,059.3
204.5
273.2
361.7
354.0
285.0
1,281.6
74.9
224.4

34.5
17. 6
7.9
4.7
2.5
1.2
.4
.1
.2

28.6
8.4
5.5
5.1
3. 1
1 .3
5.0
.1
.1

8.0
.5
.7
.9
.9
.7
3.4
.2
.6

NO CONTBACT OB OTHER CONTRACT STATUS.............
1 DAI....................................................................................
2 TO 3 DAIS.....................................................................
4 TO 6 DAIS.....................................................................
7 TO 14 DAIS...................................................................
15 TO 29 DAIS................................................................
30 TO 59 DATS................................................................
60 TO 89 DAIS................................................................
90 DAIS AND OTEB.........................................................

59
11
16
10
12
5
2
1
2

4.8
.8
1.9
.7
.7
.6
(2)
(2)
.1

28.3
.8
3.8
2.6
4. 9
6.9
.3
2.3
6.7

1.0
.2
.3
.2
. 2
. 1
(3)
(3)
(3)

.2
(3)
.1
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

.1
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

NO INFORMATION O CONTRACT STATUS....................
N
1 DAT....................................................................................
2 TO 3 DATS.....................................................................
4 TO 6 CATS.....................................................................
7 TO 14 DAIS..................................................................
15 TO 29 DAIS................................................................
30 TO 59 DAIS................................................................
60 TO 89 DAIS................................................................
90 DATS AND OVER.........................................................

112
2
8
17
26
20
16
9
14

12. 1
.4
1 .1
3.5
3.2
1.2
1 .1
.4
1. 3

213.8
.4
2.4
1 1 .9
21.4
18 .2
3 5 .3
21.0
10 3 .2

2.0
(3)
. 1
.3
.5
.4
.3
.2
.2

0.5
(3)
(3)
.1
.1
(3)
(3)
(3)
.1

0 .6
(3)
(3)
(3)
.1
(3)
.1
.1
.3

1 T o ta ls in th is ta b le d if fe r fr o m th o s e in ta b le s 1 and 2
and 6 -2 4 b e c a u s e th e s e sto p p a g e s en d ed d u rin g the y e a r , and
th u s in c lu d e i d l e n e s s o c c u r r in g in p r io r y e a r s ,
2 F e w e r than 50,




3

L e s s than 0. 05

N O T E: B e c a u s e of rou n din g, su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m ay
n ot eq u a l to ta ls .

65

Table 2 8 . W ork stoppages by contract status and m ediation, 19761
(WORKERS AID DATS IDLE IB THOUSANDS)
STOPPAGES ENDING IN

YEAR
PERCENT

NUMBER

STOPPAGES

WORKERS
I NVOLVED

CONTRACT STATUS AND ME DI AT IO N AGENCY

ALL S T O P P A G E S ............................................................................

days

id l e

5,6 5 4

2 ,4 2 1 .2

3 8 ,1 0 6 .6

GOVERNMENT MEDI AT IO N 2 / ....................................................
FE DE RAL M ED I A T I O N ................................................................
ST AT E M E D I A T I O N ......................................................................
FE DE RA L AND S TATE ME DI AT IO N C O M B I N E D . . .
OTHER M E D I A T I O N ......................................................................
P R I V A T E M E D I A T I O N ......................................................................
NO M E DI AT I ON R E P O RT E D..........................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N ...............................................................................

2,532
2,046
286
124
76
102
2,973
47

1 ,4 2 7 .4
1,224. 1
144.6
3 1 .3
27. 3
37.9
997.3
8 .6

3 0 ,2 9 7 .6
2 7 ,5 9 0 .7
1 ,8 5 1 .9
6 9 0 .7
2 1 9 .3
185. 1
7 ,1 5 1 .7
472. 1

N E G O T I AT I O N OF F I R S T AGREEMENT...............................
GOVER NM ENT ME DI AT IO N 2 / ..............................................
FE DE RA L M E D I A T I O N ..........................................................
ST A TE M ED I A T I O N ............................... .. .............................
F E DE RA L AND S TA T E ME DI ATI ON COMBI NE D.
OTHER M E D I A T I O N ................................................................
P R I V A T E M E D I A T I O N ................................................................
NO M E DI A TI O N RE PO RT E D....................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N .........................................................................

450
222
184
24
8
6
21
197
10

57.4
17. 1
12.9
3. 3
.4
.4
23.1
16.9
.3

R E N E G O T I A T I O N OF AGREEMENT ( E X P I R A T I O N
OR R E O P E N I N G ) ............................................................................
G OVERNHENI ME DI AT IO N 2 / ..............................................
FE DE RAL M ED I A T I O N ..........................................................
S TA TE ME D IA T IO N................................................................
FE DE RA L AND ST A TE MEDI AT IO N COMBI NED.
OTHER M ED I A T I O N ................................................................
P R I V A T E M ED I A T I O N ................................................................
NO ME D IA T IO N RE PO RT E D....................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N ............................ ............................................

3,080
2 , 18 4
1,762
250
114
58
62
815
19

DURING TERM OF AGREEMENT ( N EGOT IAT ION
OF NEH AGREEMENT NOT I N V O L V E D ) .........................
GOVERNMENT ME DI AT IO N 2 / ..............................................
FEDERAL M ED I A T I O N ..........................................................
ST A TE ME D IA T IO N ................................................................
FE DE RA L AND ST A TE ME DI ATI ON COMBI NED.
OTHER M ED I A T I O N ................................................................
P R I V A T E M ED I A T I O N ................................................................
NO ME D IA T IO N R E P O RT E D....................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N .........................................................................
NO CONTRACT OB OTHER CONTRACT S T A T U S .............
GOVERNMENT M ED IA TI ON 2 / ..............................................
FEDERAL M E D I A T I O N . . ....................................................
S TA T E M ED I A T I O N ................................................................
FE DE RA L AND ST AT E ME DI AT IO N COMBI NED.
OTHER M ED I A T I O N ................................................................
P R I V A T E M E D I AT I O N................................................................
NO M E DI AT I ON R EP OR TE D ....................................................
NO I N F O R MA T I O N ..........................................................................

go

I N F O S H ATION 0 » COHTBACT S T A T US......................
GOVERNMENT M ED IA TI ON 2 / .........................................
FE DE RAL M ED I A T I O N..........................................................
ST A TE M ED I A T I O N ................................................................
FE DE RAL AND S TA TE ME DI ATI ON COMBI NE D.
OTHER M ED I A T I O N ................................................................
P R I V A T E ME D IA T IO N................................................................
NO M E DI AT I ON R EP ORT ED....................................................
NO I N F O R MA T I O N ..................................... .. ................................

STOPPAGES

100.0

WORKERS
INVOLVED

DAYS ID L E

100. 0

1 0 0.0

44. 8
3 6 .2
5. 1
2.2
1. 3
1.8
52.6
.8

59. 0
5 0 .6
6 .0
1. 3
1. 1
1.6
39. 1
. 4

7 9 .5
7 2 .9
4.9
1.7
.6
.5
18.8
1.2

1 ,0 6 0 .4
6 2 7.6
5 9 9 .0
46.3
2 9 .9
2.9
93.3
318.0
21.9

8. 0
3 .9
3. 3
.4
. 1
. 1
.4
3.5
.2

2.4
.7
. 5
. 1
(9)
(9)
1. 0
.7
(9)

1 ,6 5 4 .2
1 .3 6 2 .9
1 ,1 7 9 .9
190.3
30.4
11.8
10.3
275.9
6. 1

3 3 ,7 4 4 .7
2 9 ,2 1 6 .0
2 6 ,6 9 9 .0
1 ,7 9 3 .4
6 0 1 .5
172.0
76.3
4 ,0 1 9 .2
933.3

5 4.5
3 8.6
31.2
4. 4
2.0
1.0
1. 1
19. 9
.3

68. 3
56. 3
48. 7
5.8
1.3
. 5
. 4
1 1.4
.3

1,953
61
41
8
2
10
16
1,871
5

69 2 .7
42.6
26.2
.9
.5
15.0
4. 1
64 4 .9
1.0

3 ,0 5 9 .3
298.6
2 9 2 .2
7 .5
9 .3
39.6
13.8
2 ,7 3 9 .9
7 .0

3 4.5
1. 1
.7
. 1
(9)
.2
.3
33. 1
. 1

28.6
1. 8
1. 1
(9)
(9)
.6
. 2
2 6 .6
(9)

59
8
3
3

4.8
.5
.3
. 1

28.3
9 .8
3 .3
1.2

.2
(9)
(9)
(9)

. 1
(9)
(9)
( 9)

2 .8
1.6
1.4
. 1
. 1
(9)
.2
.8
. 1

88.6
76.7
69.9
4.7
1.6
.5
.2
1 0.5
1.1

-

1.0
. 1
. 1
. 1
-

2
3
48

. 1
.4
3.9
-

.3
1.7
21.8
-

(9)
. 1
.8
-

(9)
(9)
. 2
-

( 9)
(9)
. 1
*

112
57
56
1

12. 1
4 .7
4 .7
(3)
6 .2
1.2

213.8
150.7
1 4 7.3
3.4

2.0
1.0
1.0
(9)
.7
. 2

. 5
.2
.2
(9)
-

.6
.4
.4
(9)

. 3
(9)

. 1
(9)

-

-

-

92
13

-

52.7
10.4

1 T o ta ls in th is ta b le d if f e r f r o m th o s e in ta b le s 1 a n d 2 a n d
3 F e w e r th a n 50.
6 - 2 4 b e c a u s e th e s e s to p p a g e s e n d e d d u r in g th e y e a r , a n d th u s i n ­
4 L e s s th a n 0 . 05 p e r c e n t.
c lu d e id le n e s s o c c u r r in g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2
In c lu d e s s to p p a g e s in w h ic h p r i v a t e m e d ia tio n w a s a ls o e m ­ N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s
p lo y e d .
n o t e q u a l to ta ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d e n o te z e r o s .




8.0
.8
.6
(9)
(9)
. 1
(9)
7.2
(9)

66

-

m ay

Table 2 9 . W ork stoppages by contract status and type of settlem ent, 1976 1
(WORKERS AMO DATS IDLE II TfiOOSAIDS)
STOPPAGES ENDING IN

CONTRACT S TA TU S ANE
TYPE OP SE TT LE ME NT

NUMBER

PERCENT

ST OP PA G ES

ALL S T O P P A G E S ....................................................................................................
FORMAL SE TTLEMENT REACHED, ALL I S S U E S R ES O L V E D ,
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING U N EE SC LV I D I S S U E S ...................
NO FORMAL S ET T LE ME N T, SHORT P R C TE ST OR STMPATHV
S T R I K E .........................................................................................................................
S T R I K E BROKEN..........................................................................................................
WORK RESUMED UNDER COURT I N J U N C T I O N ........................................
EMPLOYER OUT OF E U S I N E S S .........................................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N .......................................................................................................
N EG OT IA TI ON OF F I R S T AGREEMENT OE UNION
R E C O G N I T I O N ..........................................................................................................
FORMAL SETTLEMENT BE ACHE D, ALL I S S U E S R E SO L VE D ,
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING UNRESOLVED I S S U E S .............
NO FORMAL SE TT LE ME NT , SHORT F F C 1 E S T OR SYMPATHY
S T R I K E ...................................................................................................................
S I E I K I BROKEN....................................................................................................
WORK RESUMED UNDER COURT I N J U N C T I O N ..................................
EMPLOYEE OUT OF B U S I N E S S ...................................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I C N .................................................................................................
RE NE GO T IA T IO N OF AGREEMENT ( E X P I R A T I O N OR
R E O P E N I N G ) .............................................................................................................
FORMAL SE TTLEMENT REACHED, ALL I S S U E S RE SO L VE D ,
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING UNRESOLVED I S S U E S .............
NO FORMAL S ET TL EME NT , SHORT P RCT EST OR SYMPATHY
S T R I K E ...................................................................................................................
S T R I K E BROKEN....................................................................................................
WORK RESUMED UNDER COURT I N J U N C T I O N ..................................
EMPLOYEP OUT OF B U S I N E S S ...................................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N .................................................................................................
DURING TERM CF AGREEMENT ( N E G O T I A T I O N OF NEW
AGREEMENT NOT I N V O L V E D ) ......................................................................
FORMAL SETTLEMENT REACHED, ALL I S S U E S R E SO L VE D ,
PROCEDURE FOB HANDLING UNEESOLVED I S S U E S .............
NO FORMAL SE TT LE ME NT , SHORT P RCT EST OB SYMPATHY
S T R I K E ...................................................................................................................
S T R I K E BROKEN....................................................................................................
WORK BESUMED UNDER COURT I N J U N C T I O N ..................................
EMPLOYER OUT OF B U S I N E S S ...................................................................
NO I N F O R MA T I O N .................................................................................................
NO CONTRACT CB OTHEE CONTRACT ST A TU S.....................................
FORMAL SETTLEMENT REACHED, ALL I S S U E S R E SO L VE D ,
PROCEDURE FOE HANDLING UNRESOLVED I S S U E S .............
HO FORMAL S ET T LE ME N T, SHORT PROT EST OR SYMPATHY
S T R I K E ...................................................................................................................
S T R I K E BROKEN.............................................. .. ................. .................................
WORK RESUMED UNDER COURT I N J U N C T I O N ..................................
EMPLOYER OUT OF B U S I N E S S ...................................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N .................................................................................................
NO I NFO RMA TI ON ON CONTRACT S T A T U S .............................................
FORMAL SETT LE ME NT REACHED, ALL I S S U E S R ES OL VE D,
PROCEDURE FOB HANDLING UNRESOLVED I S S U E S .............
NO FOFMAL SE TT L EME NT , SHORT PRC TE ST OR SYMPATHY
S T R I K E ....................................................................................................................
S T R I K E BROKEN....................................................................................................
WORK RESUMED UNDER COURT I N J U N C T I O N ..................................
EMPLOYEP. OUT OF B U S I N E S S ...................................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N .................................................................................................

WORKERS
INVOLVED

DAYS I D L E

S TO PPA GE S

WORKERS
I NVOLVED

5 ,654

CAYS I D L E

2 ,4 2 1 .2

3 8 ,1 0 6 .6

1 00.0

10C .0

100.0

4,104

1 ,9 1 8 .2

3 4 ,1 1 8 .9

72.6

79.2

89.5

1,086
226
169
38
31

275.9
130.1
90.7
1.9
4.3

558.4
2 ,5 1 8 .8
5 6 7 .9
7 8 .7
263.8

19.2
4.0
3.0
.7
.5

11.4
5.4
3. 7
. 1
.2

1.5
6.6
1.5
.2
.7

450

57.4

1 ,0 6 0 .4

8 .0

2.4

2.8

342

4d.9

845.9

6 .0

2.0

2.2

11
82
7
6
2

3.6
3.7
.3
.2
.6

11.3
178. 1
7 .6
8 .6
8. 9

.2
1.5
. 1
. 1
(3)

. 1
.2
(3)
(3)
(3)

( 3)
.5
( 3)
( 3)
( 3)

3,080

1 ,6 5 4 .2

,3 3 ,7 4 4 .7

5 4 .5

68.3

8 8 .6

2 ,871

1 ,6 1 9 .1

3 2 ,0 8 5 .3

5 0 .8

66.9

84.2

19
109
42
28
11

3.2
12.6
15.8
1.2
2.2

4 .8
1 ,1 9 2 .6
1 6 3.3
6 3 .6
235.2

.3
1.9
.7
.5
.2

. 1
.5
.7
. i
. 1

(3)
3.1
.4
.2
.6

1,9 5 3

6 92.7

3 ,0 5 9 .3

34.5

28.6

8.0

760

236.7

984.8

13.4

9 .8

2.6

268.5
113.1
74.1
.2
.1

541.7
1 ,1 3 7 .0
395.0
.2
.6

18.6
•4
2.1
(3)
(3)

11.1
4 .7
3. 1
(3)
(3)

1.4
3.0
1.0
(3)
(3)
. 1

1,052
22
117
1
1
59

4.8

2 8 .3

1.0

. 2

44

4.2

19.7

.8

.2

.1

3
10
2
-

.1
.4
(2)

.2
8.4
(2)

.1
.2
(3)

(3)
(3 )
(3)

(3)
(3)
(3)

-

-

-

*

112

12.1

2 1 3 .8

2.0

.5

.6

87

9.3

1 8 3.3

1 .5

.4

.5

1
3
1
3
17

•4
.3
.5
.3
1.3

•4
2 .7
2 .0
6 .4
19.1

(3)
. 1
(3)
.1
.3

(3 )
(3)
(3)
(3)
.1

( 3)
( 3)
( 3)
( 3)
.1

1 T o t a l s in t h i s t a b l e d i f f e r f r o m t h o s e i n t a b l e s 1 a n d 2 a n d
6 -2 4 b e c a u s e t h e s e s to p p a g e s e n d e d d u r in g th e y e a r , a n d th u s in c lu d e
i d l e n e s s o c c u r r i n g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 F e w e r th a n 50.




TEAB

67

3 L e s s t h a n 0 . 05 p e r c e n t .
N O T E : B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,
su m s
n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o t e z e r o s .

of

in d iv id u a l

ite m s m a y

Table 3 0 . Work stoppages by major issue and type of settlem ent, 19761
( 1 Q M B 3 AMD DAI S I D U XI THOUSANDS)
FORMAL
SETTLEMENT REACHED

MAJOR I S S U E

NO FORMAL
SETTLEMENT REACHED

TOTAL
ALL I S S U E S
RESOLVED

PROCEDURE
SHORT
FOR
P RO T E S T OR
HANDLING
SYMPATHY
UNRESOLVED
STRIKE
ISSUES

STRIK E
BROKEN

S T OP PA G ES ENDI NG I N

WORK
RESUMED
UNDER
COURT
IN JU N CTIO N

EMPLOYER
OUT OF
BUSINESS

NO
I NFORMAT ION

YEAR

ALL I S S U E S ..................................................................................

5 ,6 5 4

3 ,5 6 4

540

1 ,0 8 6

226

169

38

31

GENERAL WAGE CHANGES...........................................................
SUPPLEMENTARY B E N E F I T S ....................................................
WAGE A D J U S TM E NT S......................................................................
HOUBS OP HOBK....................................................... .......................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL H A T T E R S ...........................................
UNI ON O R GA NI Z AT I ON AND S E C U R I T Y .........................
J O B S E C U R I T Y ...................................................................................
PLANT A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..........................................................
OTREB WORKING C O N D I T I O N S ..............................................
I N T E R UN I O N OB I N TB AU N IO N MA TT E RS ......................
NOT BE PO BT E D..................................................................................

2 ,8 7 4
49
147
7
127
330
317
1 ,2 9 1
186
288
38

2 ,4 6 7
47
75
4
109
198
190
372
68
13
21

194
2
12
1
5
38
27
100
4
157
“

21
35
3
16
79
723
99
110
*

118
10
3
64
6
22
2
1

37

26

11

-

-

-

15
2
2
9
13
72
12
7
-

3
4
2
2

2
1
1

-

—
1

-

16

WORKERS I NVOLVED

ALL I S S U E S ..................................................................................
GENERAL WAGE CHA NG ES..........................................................
SUPPLEMENTARY B E N E F I T S ....................................................
WAGE A D JU ST ME NT S......................................................................
HOUBS OF i O B K ................................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS...........................................
UNION O R G A NI Z A T I O N AND S E C U R I T Y .........................
J O B S E C U R I T Y ..................................................................................
PLANT A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..........................................................
OTHER NORKI NG C O N D I T I O N S ..............................................
I N T S B UNI ON OB I NT RA U NI O N MATTERS......................
NOT R EP OR TE D..................................................................................

2 ,4 2 1 .2

1 ,7 5 9 .3

1 5 9 .0

1 ,2 2 5 .9
9. 5
4 9 .9
2. 3
1 6 .2
1 1 8 .8
4 0 2 .3
488. 0
5 0 .9
5 4 .8
2 .6

1 ,1 1 2 .0
9 .3
1 9 .3
1. 5
1 5 .4
104. 2
3 6 1 .0
1 1 5 .5
1 7 .4
2 .4
1 .2

8 0 .7
.3
3 .5
.2
.3
5 .9
8 .3
3 8 .2
.4
2 1 .2
-

2 7 5 .9

1 3 0 .1

9 0 .7

1 .9

4 .3

4. 8
7 .9
~
.1
4. 1
2 6 .2
1 7 5 .0
2 9 .3
2 8 .5
*

1 1 .8
1. 3
. 1
3 .3
.4
1 1 2 .8
. 2
(3 )
*

1 3 .1
1 7 .8
.6
. 2
• 4
6 .2
4 6 .3
3 .5
2 .7
-

1 .2
. 1
.2
.2
. 2
12)

2 .3
-

DAYS

ALL I S S U E S ..................................................................................
GENERAL RA G E. C HA N GE S..........................................................
SUPPLEMENTARY B E N E F I T S ....................................................
RAGE A D J U ST S E NT S......................................................................
HOUBS OF VORK...............................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS...........................................
UNI ON O RG A NI Z AT I ON AND S E C U R I T Y .........................
J O B S E C U R I T Y ..................................................................................
PLANT A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..........................................................
OTHER NORKI NG C O N D I T I O N S ..............................................
I N TE R U N I O N OB I N TR AU N IO N MA TT ERS......................
NOT R E P O RT E D...................................................................................

-

.1
1 .3

IDLE

3 8 ,1 0 6 .6

3 1 ,6 5 2 .2

2 ,4 6 6 .7

5 5 8 .4

2 ,5 1 8 .8

5 6 7 .9

7 8 .7

263. 8

2 5 ,0 2 9 . 6
1 5 4 .3
6 3 0 .0
6 0 .2
2 3 6 .7
1 ,5 9 0 .4
7 ,2 5 2 .1
2 ,5 6 1 .5
258. 4
2 8 9 .4
4 4 .0

2 1 ,8 9 1 .2
1 5 0 .1
2 9 1 .4
4 6 .3
2 0 7 .8
1 ,2 7 4 . 8
6 ,9 6 5 .8
690. 1
9 7 .7
1 2 .2
2 4 .8

1 ,7 4 2 .6
4 .2
1 0 .5
1 2 .4
1 .6
153. 1
1 6 3 .2
2 1 3 .3
1 .5
1 6 4 .2
*

5 .5
1 1 .5
- 1
1 2 .5
4 4 .4
3 3 5 .6
5 6 .8
9 2 .0

9 6 2 .7
~
2 1 0 .5
24. 1
1 2 9 .6
2 3 .6
1 ,1 6 2 . 1
.7
5 .6

1 3 5 .7
1 0 6 .1
1 .6
. 4
1 2 .3
3 5 .3
1 6 0 .0
1 0 1 .1
1 5 .4

5 2 .9
1 .1
3 .9
1 9 .8
.3
.7

2 3 8 .9
1 .6
4 .2
.6
1 8 .5

1 T o t a l s i n t h i s t a b l e d i f f e r f r o m t h o s e i n t a b l e s 1 a n d 2 a n d 6 -2 4
b e c a u s e t h e s e s to p p a g e s e n d e d d u r in g th e y e a r , a n d th u s in c lu d e id le n e s s
o c c u r r in g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 F e w e r th a n 5 0 .




(2 )
•6
-

N O T E : B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s
e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o t e z e r o s .

68

of

in d iv id u a l

ite m s

m ay

not

Table 31. W ork stoppages by industry group and type of settlem ent, 19761
( I 0 B K 8 S AID DATS IDLE I I

THOUSANDS)
FORMAL
SETTLEM ENT REACHED

NO FORMAL
SETTLEMENT REACHED
WORK

IHDUSTHY

GROUP

TOTAL
PROCEDURE
FOR
HANDLING
NRESOLVED
IS S U E S

ALL
IS S U E S
RESOLVED

SHORT
P R O TEST
OR
SYMPATHY
S T R IK E

S T R IK E
BROKEN

ST O PPA G E S ENDING I N

UNDER
COURT
IN JU N C T IO N

EMPLOYER
NO
OUT OF
B U S IN E S S INFORM ATION

YEAR

ALL I N D U S T R IE S ......................................................................

2 /5 ,6 5 4

3 ,5 6 4

540

1 ,0 8 6

226

169

38

31

MANUFACTURING...............................................................................

2 /2 ,2 3 2

1 ,8 8 7

132

46

101

31

21

14

ORDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R IE S ....................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES................................................................
T E X T IL E M ILL PR O D U CTS.............................................................

1
219
1
35

1
181
1
30

_

_

_

_

_

_

19
3

2

10
1

2
1

5
_

*

& PP& BEL, E T C . 3 / ...............................................................................
LUMBER AND SIOOD P R O D U C TS, EXCEPT FU RN ITU RE
FU R N IT U R E AND F IX T U R E S ..........................................................
PA PER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS.................................................

47
67
76
97

35
57
65
87

4
5
4
5

-

3
2
5
2

-

2
i

2
-

P R I N T I N G , P U B L IS H IN G , AND A L L IE D
I N D U S T R IE S ........................................................................................
CH EM ICA LS AND A L L IE D PRO D U CTS.....................................
PETROLEUM R E F IN IN G AND BELATED IN D U S T R IE S -

51
133
17

38
120
14

2
7
1

8
2
2

1

1
1
-

2
2

RUBBER AND M ISC ELLANEOUS P L A S T IC S PRODUCTS
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS........................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND GLASS PRODUCTS...............................
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R IE S ....................................................
F A B R IC A T E D METAL PRODUCTS 4 / ........................................

115
12
152
197
307

100
9
130
170
270

5
11
10
20

2
1
2
7
4

_

_

3
1

7
3
4
9

1
1
1

2
2

MACHINERY, E X C E PT E L E C T R IC A L ........................................
E L E C T R IC A L MACHINERY, E Q U IPM EN T, AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T RA N SPO RTA TIO N EQ U IPM EN T....................................................
IH S T B U B E H T S , E T C . 5 / ...................................................................
M ISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S - .- -

303

26 0

12

8

18

3

_

2

20 5
134
29
55

167
102
23
47

7
11
2
4

20
9
-

6
7
3
4

3
1
-

-

2
-

~

1

1
1
2

1

1

1

”

2
4
i
*

NONMANUFACTURING......................................................................

2 /3 ,4 2 5

1 ,6 8 0

408

1 , 0 40

125

138

17

17

A G R IC U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S ................
M IN IN G ..........................................................................................................
CONTRACT C O N STRU CTION .............................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C OM M UNICATION, E L E C T R IC ,
G A S , AND SANITARY S E R V IC E S ........................................
WHOLESALE AND R E T A IL TRA D E..............................................

11
1 ,4 2 5
507

6
285
318

1
74
162

_

_

986
5

3
4
11

76
8

_
-

1
3

357
471

270
387

38
35

7
2

19
35

9
2

9
5

5
5

F IN A N C E , IN S U R A N C E , AND REAL E ST A T E ...................
S E R V IC E S .................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 6 / ............................................................. .......................

26
249
383

21
193
204

2
24
72

-

2
26
25

2
41

-

40

3
~

1
1
1

WORKERS INVOLVED

ALL I N D U S T R IE S ......................................................................
MANUFACTURING................................................................................

2 /2 ,4 2 1 .2
2 /9 7 5 . 1

1 ,7 5 9 .3

1 5 9 .0

2 7 5 .9

1 3 0 .1

9 0 .7

1 .9

4 .3

8 9 5 .5

3 5 .4

1 5 .8

1 0 .9

1 5 .2

1 .3

1 .0

-

_

_

_

-

4 .2

0 .7
-

0 .8

1 .2

0 .4
-

_
-

ORDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R IE S ....................................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.................................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES................................................................
T E X T IL E M ILL PRO D UCTS.............................................................

0 -8
8 8 .7
.1
7 .6

0 .8
8 1 .3
.1
5 .8

1 .5

*

.2

.2

A P P A 8 E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND MOOD PRO D U C TS, EXCEPT FU RN ITU RE
F U R N IT U R E AND F IX T U R E S ..........................................................
PA PER AND A L L IE D PRODUCTS.................................................

1 1 .4
1 0 .8
12. 1
2 3 .9

1 0 -8
9 .3
11. 1
2 1 .9

• 4
.7
.6
1 .5

. 4
“

.2
. 1
.2
.2

.3
(7 )

P R IN T IN G , P U B L IS H IN G , AND A L L IE D
I N D U S T R IE S .........................................................................................
C H EM IC A LS AND A L L IE D PR O D U C T S....................................
PETROLEUM R E F IN IN G AND RELATED IN D U S T R IE S .

14. 1
2 8 .5
1 .2

1 2 .1
26. 1
1 .1

.3
1 .8

P)

"

RUBBER AND M ISC ELLANEOUS P L A S T IC S PRODUCTS
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS........................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND GLASS PRO D U CTS...............................
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R IE S ....................................................
FA B H IC A TED BETAL PBODOCTS 4 / * - ..................................

9 1 .7
2 .6
2 6 .3
5 6 .4
6 7 .2

8 8 .1
2 .2
2 2 .3
5 0 .3
6 1 .8

.8
2 .2
1 .8
2 .3

M ACHINERY, E X C E PT E L E C T R IC A L ......................... ..
E L E C T R IC A L M ACHINERY, E Q U IP M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T RA N SPO RTA TIO N EQ U IPM EN T............................ .......................
IH S T B U H E N T S , E T C . 5 / ................................................................
M ISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S . . . .

1 3 9 .4

123. 1

1 0 .2

134. 1
241. 7
5 .6
1 1 .0

1 2 2 .0
2 3 0 .2
5 .2
1 0 .1

2 .2
4 .1
. 1

.3

(7 )
.1

1 .6
.1
(7 )

.1

.1
(7 )

(7 )
.4

.2
.1
(7 )

.3
.7
.2
2. 2

2. 1
. 4
.9
3 .8
. 8

3 .0

2. 1

7 .3
4 .1
-

.9
.4
.2
. 4

260. 1

1 1 9 .2

_

.5

NONMANUFACTURING......................................................................

2 /1 ,4 4 6 .1

8 6 3 .7

1 2 3 .6

A G R IC U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S ................
M IN IN G ..........................................................................................................
CONTRACT CO N STR U C TIO N .............................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COM M UNICATION, E L E C T R IC ,
GAS, AND SANITARY S E R V IC E S ........................................
WHOLESALE AND R E T A IL T R A D E ..............................................

2 .4
5 1 4 .4
1 6 4 .0

2 .2
8 9 .i
1 3 1 .3

(7 )
1 8 .7
2 6 .3

2 4 9 .9
1 .2

0 .1
1 1 0 .1
2 .7

3 9 2 .8
5 5 .7

3 6 3 .7
5 1 .8

1 2 .1
2 .1

1 .4
.2

.8
1 .0

F IN A N C E , IN S U R A N C E , AND REAL E S T A T E ...................
S E R V IC E S .................................................................................................
GOVEBHHENT & / .....................................................................................

2 5 .2
1 0 4 .6
1 8 6 .9

2 5 .0
9 6 .0
1 0 4 .3

. 1
6 .4
5 7 .9

7 .5

S e e fo o tn o te s




at end o f ta b le .

69

0 .1
~

-

. 1
1 .0
3 .4

(7 )

(7 )
(7 )

_
. i
.1
. 1
-2

.8

-

. 1

1 -4
2 .7
-

.3
.2
(7 )

-

75.6

.6

3 .3

_

_

4 6 .5
2. 3

~

0 .1
.1

13. 1

0 .3
•2

1 .4
.4

(7)
-

.5
13. 1

(7 )

-

(7)

.1

.6
.7

Table 31. W ork stoppages by industry group and type of settlem ent, 19761
-Continued
fW O W lS IB P P U S IDLE XI THODS11P3)
FORMAL
SETTLEMENT REACHED
IMDOSTBY GROUP

NO FORMAL
SETTLEMENT REACHED
HORK
RESUMED EMPLOYER
UNDER
OUT OF
COURT
BUSINESS
INJUNCTION

TOTAL
PROCEDURE
SHORT
FOR
PROTEST
ALL
ISSUES
HANDLING
OR
RESOLVED UNRESOLVED SYMPATHY
ISSUES
STRIKE

STRIKE
BROKEN

NO
INFORMATION

DAIS IDLE
ALL INDUSTRIES.............................................................. £ / 3 8 , 1 0 6 . 6

3 1 ,652.2

2,466.7

558.4

2 ,518.8

567.9

7 8.7

263.8

MANUFACTURING...................................................................... 2 / 2 4 , 7 5 2 . 9

2 2 ,5 4 4 .1

78 0 .4

58.4

1,0 5 4 .2

22 6 .6

61.2

28.1

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.............................................
FOOD AH D KINDRED PBODUCTS...........................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES.........................................................
TEXTILE BILL PRODUCTS......................................................

42. 1
2 ,0 2 5 .5
3.2
80.5

APPAREL, ETC. 3 / ........... .. ....................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS, EXCEPT FURNITURE
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...................................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...........................................

213. 4
430.0
298.6
561.4

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES..............................................................................

279.4

PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED INDUSTRIES.

30.8

_

42.1
1,7 8 0 .5
3.2
68.9

104.4

24 . 1

_
1 0 7 . ol

_

_

-

•4
.9
19.2

8. 2

10.7
4.7

. 2

. 1

50.2
4.4
89. 6
2 9.8
8.3

.4
.7
1.8

. 2
1.9
7 .7
,7

-

8.4

8.4

*

1.4

201.3
412.8
288.4
530.7

2.1
9.9
4.9
10.1

1.4
1.3
-

1. 1
4.6
3.8
1.0

1.4
. 5
.5

110.2
801.3
26.0

10.9
156.9
.5

-

13.9

.7

-

-

-

.2
(7)

64.5
13.7
276.1

-

-

147.5

6 ,0 2 9 .7
55. 1
689.9
1,397.2
1,969.0

5 ,9 2 5 .9
5 0 .1
505.4
1,314.2
1,6 1 1 .9

28.5
31.0
70.2

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL...................................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES ...................................................................................

2,778.3

2,388.9

9 3.0

5.4

276.4

6.1

1,911.2
4,978. 1
' 152.8
3 59.0

1,800.2
4 ,1 9 7 .2
'1 4 9 .2
335.6

18.5
2 06.2
1.7
9.2

21.8
4. 9

5 4.3
3 9.4

10 . 2
21.6

NONHANUFACTURING.............................................................. 2 / 1 3 , 3 5 3 . 6

9 ,1 0 8 .1

1,6 8 6 .4

16.7
2 ,1 17.7
2,447.0

12.0
348.1
2 ,157.5

17)
4 2.2
2 21.6

HHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE........................................

3,973.7
1^328.4

1^ 1 8 5 . 4

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE................
SERVICES .....................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 6 / . ......................................... ..

281.8
1 ,3 9 2 .3
1,796.0

265.0
1,184.1
966.3

AGBICULTUBE, FORESTRY, AND FI SH ER IE S ..............
MINING..............................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION......................................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, ELECTRIC,

1 T o t a l s in t h i s t a b l e d i f f e r f r o m t h o s e i n t a b l e s 1 a n d Z a n d 6 - 2 4
b ecau se
th e s e s to p p a g e s e n d e d d u r in g th e y e a r , a n d th u s in c lu d e
id le n e s s o c c u r r in g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 T h e n u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s r e p o r te d f o r a m a jo r in d u s try g ro u p
o r d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m o f its c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e in d iv id ­
u a l s t o p p a g e s o c c u r r i n g i n tw o o r m o r e g r o u p s a r e c o u n t e d i n e a c h .
W o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d a m o n g th e r e s p e c tiv e
g ro u p s.
3 I n c lu d e s o th e r f in is h e d p r o d u c ts m a d e f r o m f a b r ic s a n d s i m i l a r
m a te ria ls .
4 E x c lu d e s o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , an d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t.




-

“

*

4 .3

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS...................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PBODUCTS............................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES..............................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS 4 / ...................................

INSTRUMENTS, BTC. £ / ........................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S . . . .

-

7 .3

2.1
1.7

3 9.0

1 .8
1 4 .1

1,4 6 4 .6

341.3

465.9
1 2 .2

3.9
1,122.3
34.0

1 39 . 1
13 . 1

665.7
26.2

3. 1
.5

5 0.2
104.0

85.9
. 1

.6
121.9
608.2

18.3

15.7
7 8.2
5 6.4

-

-

500.1

-

6.3
8.8
. 1

101.4

17.5

235.7

_

1 .6

0.9
8 .5

-

5.8

1 69.7
6 .4

2.3

.5

4 .2
4 5.5

4 I n c lu d e s p r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tr o llin g in s tr u m e n ts ;
p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .
4 T h e s itu a tio n s re p o rte d h e r e h a v e , f o r s ta tis tic a l p u rp o s e s ,
b e e n d e e m e d to f a l l w i t h i n t h e B u r e a u 's d e f i n i t i o n o f a w o r k s t o p p a g e .
T h is d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o rk
s to p p a g e h a d ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n o f a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .

N O T E : B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s
e q u a l to ta ls . D a s h e s ( - ) d e n o te z e r o s .

70

o f in d iv id u a l ite m s

m ay not

Table 3 2 . Wovfc stoppages by contract status and procedure for handling
unsettled issues, 19761
(WORKERS AND OATS I OLA I B THOUSANDS)
STOPPAGES EBOIBG I B

YEAR

NUMBER

PERCENT

CONTRACT STATUS AND PROCEDURE FOB
nA K C LISG UNSETTLED IS SU ES
STOPPAGES

ALL STOPPAGLS £ / ................................................................................

BOBBERS
INVOLVED

OATS ID L E

1 .8 9 8 .1

WORKERS
INVOLVED

DAYS ID L E

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 8 .9
3 9 .5
2 6 .6
2 0 .5

2 5 .6
2 8 .9
1 1 .2
3 9 .9

3 9 .3
2 3 .5
16. 1
2 6 .1

STOPPAGES

516

1 5 2 .2

A B B ITR n II G S I ...................................................................................................
D IR E C T N E G O T ia IIC N S ..............................................................................
REFERRAL TO A GOVERNMENT AGENCY..............................................
OTHER HEARS...................................................................................................

95
170
137
106

3 8 .9
9 3 .9
1 7 .1
5 2 .3

6 3 9 .8
9 3 3 .6
298. 1
9 8 1 .7

N E G O TIA TIO N O i F IR S T AGREEMENT OB JNION
R EC O G N ITIO N ..............................................................................................
A R B IT R A T IO N ..............................................................................................
d i r e c t n e g o t i a t i o n s .........................................................................
REFERRAL TO A GOVERNMENT AGENCY........................................
OTHER MEANS............................................................................. ...............

93
3
1U
22
4

2 5 .1
.4
1 .0
1 .8
2 1 .8

19 5 . 8
2 1 .1
2 0 .2
3 3 .0
7 1 .5

8 .3
.6
2 .7
9 .3
•8

1 6 .5
.3
.7
1 .2
1 9 .3

7 .9
1 .1
1. 1
1 .8
3 .9

BE N E G O TIA TIO N OF AGHEEHENT (E X P IR A TIO N
OR fic .O P S N IN u ).........................................................................................
A R B IT R A T IO N ..............................................................................................
D IR E C T N E G O T IA T IO N S ........................................................................
REFERRAL TO A GOVERNMENT AGENCY........................................
OTHER HEANS..............................................................................................

180
*6
96
16
22

6 9 .0
2 5 .1
2 9 .9
1 .6
1 2 .3

1 ,3 9 8 .0
5 9 5 .7
3 7 1 .6
129. 9
300. 8

3 9 .9
8 .9
1 8 .6
3 .1
9 .3

9 2 .0
1 6 .5
1 6 .4
1 .0
8 .1

7 2 .9
2 9 .5
20. 1
7 .0
1 6 .3

CUBING TERN O AGREEMENT (N E G O TIA TIO N OF
t
NEW A G B iE M E .I NOT IN V O L V E C )...................................................
A R B IT R A T IO N ..............................................................................................
D IR EC T N E G O T IA T IO N S ........................................................................
REFERRAL TO A GOVERNMENT AGENCY.........................................
OTHER MEANS..............................................................................................

283
95
66
95
77

6 2 .5
1 3 .0
1 7 .9
1 3 .5
1 8 .1

3 9 7 .5
6 6 .6
38. 1
1 3 9 .2
1 0 8 .5

5 9 .8
8 .7
1 2 .8
1 8 .9
1 9 .9

9 1 .0
8 .6
1 1 .7
8 .9
1 1 .9

1 8 .8
3 .6
2 .1
7 .3
5 .9

NO CONTRACT Oa OTHER CONTRACT STATUS.................................
A R E !IB A T IO N .............................................................................................
D IR E C T N E G O TIA TIO N S.........................................................................
REFERRAL TO A GOVERNMENT AGENCY........................................
OTHER MEANS.........................................- ..................................................

8
1
1
3
3

.6
.3
.1
. 1
.1

3. 1
1 .3
. 1
.9
.8

1 .6
.2
.2
• 6
.6

.4
.2
(9 )
. 1
.1

.2
.1
C)
(9 )
(*)

NO IN FORM ATION ON CONTBACT STATUS........................................
A R B IT R A T IO N ..............................................................................................
d i r e c t n e g o t i a t i o n s .........................................................................
REFERRAL 10 A GOVERNMENT AG ENCI........................................
OTHER M E A N S . . . . . ................................................. ......................... ..

2
1
1
*

.1

3 .7
3 .6
(3 )
*

.9
.2
.2

(9 )

.2

.1
(3 )
“

(9 )
(9 )

.2
(9 )

* T o t a l s i n t h i s t a b l e d i f f e r f r o m t h o s e In t a b l e s 1 a n d 2 a n d 6 - 2 4
b e c a u s e t h e s e s t o p p a g e s e n d e d d u r i n g th e y e a r , a n d t h u s i n c l u d e i d l e ­
n e s s o c c u r in g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 E x c lu d e s s to p p a g e s o n w h ic h t h e r e w a s n o in f o r m a tio n o n u n ­
s e ttle d is s u e s o r n o a g r e e m e n t on a p r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g th e s e
is s u e s .




3 F e w e r th a n 50.
4 L e s s th a n 0 . 05 p e r c e n t .

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s
e q u a l to ta ls . D a s h e s ( • ) d e n o te z e r o s .

71

m ay

not

Appendix A
W ork stoppages by industry group, 1937-76
( W o r k e r s an d d a y s id l e in th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g
in r e a r

Y ear

D a y s id le
S to p p a g e s
D ay s id le
S to p p a g e s
D ay s id le
d u rin g y e a r
b e g in n in g
d u rin g y e a r
b e g in n in g
d u rin g y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
in y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
in y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
P ercen t
P e rc e n t
P ercen t
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
W o rk e rs
W o rk e rs
W o rk ers
N um ber
N u m b e r m a te d
N um ber
N um ber
m a te d
N um ber
N um ber
m a te d
in v o lv e d
in v o lv e d
w o rk in g s
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
tim e
tim e
M a n u fa c tu rin g

O rd n an ce

193719381939-

2 , 779
1 ,4 3 6
1 ,3 8 9

1 ,2 3 0
410
3 94

2 0 , 000
5, 820
7 , 180

0 . 79
.2 7
.3 1

19401941194219431944-

1 , 4 IQ
2 , 652
1, 8 7 9
2 ,4 9 1
3 ,2 5 7

352
1 ,2 7 0
616
1 ,2 2 0
1, 6 8 0

4, 400
12, 500
2, 680
3 ,4 3 0
6 , 150

. 17
.4 9
. 08
. 07
. 14

19451946194719481949-

3 , 185
2 . 887
1 ,9 9 3
1 ,6 7 5
1 ,6 6 1

2 ,5 1 0
2 ,2 1 0
801
959
1 ,2 2 0

28, 800
81, 700
15, 700
17, 600
2 4 ,2 0 0

19501951195219531954-

2,
2,
2,
2,
1,

705
548
665
612
703

1 ,4 5 0
1 ,3 7 0
1, 8 8 0
1 ,3 2 0
772

19551956195719581959-

2 ,4 0 6
1, 9 8 6
1, 9 6 5
1 ,9 5 5
2 , 043

19601961196219631964-

0

0

8

( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

<2)
( 2>

( 2)
( 2)

n
( 2)
7
20
37

( 2)
( 2)
3 .4
7 .9
30. 5

( 2)
8. 9
19. 8
83. 8

0

f 2)
( 2)
( 2)

. 78
2 .4 2
.4 3
.4 6
. 73

27
3
i
1
i

1 4 .3
.2
. 1
. 1
.5

236. 0
27. 6
.3
.2
9 .2

( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
0 . 16

2 2 , 900
17, 500
4 2 ,3 0 0
15, 600
13, 700

. 66
.4 3
1. 03
.3 6
.3 3

2
6
30
23
11

.5
2. 0
1 8 .3
2 1 .4
4 .3

6 .2
15 . 5
245. 0
164. 0
57. 8

2 ,0 0 0
1 ,3 6 0
778
1 ,4 9 0
1 ,2 8 0

1 8 ,8 0 0
2 7 , 100
9 ,3 9 0
1 5 ,4 0 0
55, 500

.4 5
. 63
.2 2
.3 9
1 ,3 4

13
15
11
12
13

10. 8
1 1 .2
7. 7
12. 8
8 .3

140.
90.
121.
94.
125.

1, 5 9 8
1, 6 7 7
1 ,7 8 9
1, 6 8 5
1, 7 9 4

707
897
638
555
994

1 1 ,2 0 0
9, 780
1 0 , 100
1 0 ,4 0 0
15, 700

.2 7
. 24
. 24
.2 4
.3 5

3
6
7
9
8

19651966196719681969-

2, 080
2 ,2 9 6
2 ,3 2 8
2 , 664
2 ,8 2 2

913
922
1, 3 5 0
1, 180
1 ,3 0 8

14, 3 0 0
1 3 ,7 0 0
2 7 , 800
2 4 ,0 0 0
2 4 ,1 0 7

.3 1
. 28
. 57
.4 7
.4 7

19701971 —
197219731974-

2 ,4 8 1
2 ,3 9 1
2 ,0 5 6
2 ,2 8 2
2 , 823

1, 128
863
646
963
1, 145

3 8 ,0 0 6
1 8 ,4 8 5
1 2 ,2 8 3
1 4 ,3 1 9
2 3 ,5 9 9

1975-

1, 8 9 7
2 ,2 4 5

464
975

14, 8 7 6
2 4 , 2 63

1976-

19 3 7

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1940

------------------------------------------------------

p r dd u c t s

266
168
148

5 2 .4
55. 5
29. 6

673. 0
670. 0
3 95. 0

152
261
178
135
160

16.
69.
29.
26.
36.

155.
988.
210.
98.
178.

2 12
278
183
162
199

83. 9
9 5 9 .0
167. 0 2 ,2 2 0 . 0
5 4 .2
648. 0
133. 0 4 ,7 2 0 . 0
5 0 . 8 1 ,4 9 0 . 0

.3 0
. 70
. 19
1 .2 7
.4 2

. 11
. 13
1 .2 3
.3 2
. 13

185
197
206
2 13
157

57.
77.
127.
98.
73.

0
7
0
7
0

.4 2
. 27
.3 8
.2 9
.3 4

9 .5
6 .2
2 9 .9
8. 7
6 .8

136. 0
5 1 .4
202. 0
2 5 .4
154. 0

12
13
15
20
18

1 0 .3
8. 7
18. 8
3 1 .3
1 9 .3

121.
62.
224.
334.
480.

. 77
.3 9
.2 6
.2 9
.4 7

8
5
6
5
6

7 .4
2. 7
8. 3
4 .4
2 .4

103.
41.
266.
222.
153.

.3 2
.5 1

9
1

6 .9
. 8

T e x tile m ill

8

9
8
6
6
0

( 2)
Q
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
0 . 08
. 03
. 05

0
691.
5
819.
0 1 ,2 5 0 .
4 1 ,2 1 0 .
8
694.

0
0
0
0
0

. 19
.2 1
. 32
.3 0
. 18

169
160
155
176
169

4 0 .4
974.
71. 3
513.
574.
47. 9
60. 6
661.
8 0 . 0 1 ,7 2 0 .

0
0
0
0
0

.2 5
. 13
. 15
. 18
.4 5

.3 6
. 10
.3 7
. 04
.2 3

184
177
206
158
186

65.
80.
54.
53.
54.

0
0
0
0
0

.
.
.
.
.

0
5
0
0
9

.2 0
. 10
.3 0
.3 8
. 57

227
187
187
209
222

5 7 .3
9 2 8 .0
46. 6
528. 0
63. 7
770. 0
6 8 . 1 1 ,1 7 0 . 0
7 4 . 0 1 ,5 1 6 . 7

.2 1
. 12
. 17
.2 6
.3 3

6
6
8
2
2

. 16
. 08
. 56
.4 6
.3 3

212
215
190
186
265

50. 8
985. 5
8 5 .4
868. 0
7 5 . 0 1 ,2 8 2 . 9
6 9 . 5 1 ,0 0 7 .9
6 8 . 2 1 ,5 3 9 . 1

.2 2
. 19
.2 9
.2 3
.3 5

193. 7

.4 5
. 11

166
277

8 3 8 .4
29. 1
9 0 . 4 1, 8 4 8 . 0

.2 0
.4 3

42.A

7
0
5
1
9

651.
589.
614.
444.
866.

17
13
14
10
19

A p p a r e l a n d o th e
fin is h e d p ro d u c ts

p ro d u c ts 3

30
9
4

1 0 .2
2 .6
4 .8

197. 0
147. 0
73. 7

( 2)
( 2)
<2)

231
108
92

89. 7
4 1 .0
3 0 .5

1 ,6 6 0 . 0
661. 0
6 0 6 .0

<2)

8

449
42 8
447

5 .0
8. 5
3 .6
24. 9
7. 1

78. 8
106. 0
25. 1
9 1 .2
5 9 .5

O
( 2)
0 . 10
.3 8
.2 1

91
198
198
177
184

2 6 .2
82. 0
9 3 .5
54. 4
5 5 .3

273.
874.
464.
3 06.
471.

0
0
0
0
0

Q
( 2)
0 . 14
. 10
. 13

257
309
175
142
100

51.
62.
25.
54.
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0
8
7
5
5

406.
810.
193.
175.
70.

0
0
0
0
5

( 2)
( 2)
0 . 08
. 08
. 02

284.
255.
195.
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13.

0
0
0
3
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1. 12
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. 78
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. 06

187
188
82
82
85

107. 0
50. 7
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1 ,4 6 0 .
1 ,3 6 0 .
976.
719.
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0
0
0
0
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.4 4
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. 19
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118
173
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13 1
162

1 5 .4
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177.
574.
199.
267.
173.

0
0
0
0
0

. 07
. 19
. 06
.0 8
. 07

.2 3
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. 34
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187
2 10
201
193
135

17 . 9
54. 0
17 . 6
35. 6
1 2 .2

228. 0
354. 0
2 1 3 .0
296. 0
145. 0

1941

--------------------------------------------------------------

1942

------------------------------------------------------

1943
1944

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

9
10
9
16
19

1945
1946
1947
1948
1949

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

22
14
9
3
4

15. 8
4 .2
9. 6
.6
. 9

1950

------------------------------------------------------

1951
1952
1953
1954

-------------------------------------- .-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5
5
5
4
2

2 .9
1. 6
1 .3
.5
. 1

33. 0
14 . 1
5 3 .2
20. 8
. 1

. 16
. 06
.2 3
. 08
( 5)

147
121
95
88
65

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1 5 3 .0
3 6 .5
2 6 .6
2 8 .4

686.
3 ,4 9 0 .
1 ,0 7 0 .
593.
573.

0
0
0
0
0

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

-----------------------------------------------------------------------r------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------

3
4
i
4
i

.3
. 8
.2
.3
.9

1 .2
20. 6
.4
2 .2
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. 08

96
70
47
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1 8 .2
14. 0
6 .4
23. 5

1 ,4 0 0 .
426.
212.
111.
229.

0
0
0
0
0

1960 ---------------------------------------------------

2

1961
1962
1963
1964

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------

2 .2
1 .0
1 .6
.6

1 1 .3
20. 6
8. 6
1. 7

. 05
-

3
2
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30
35
50
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37

4 .8
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1 3 .0
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34.
39.
99.
193.
124.

0
1
9
0
0

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
5
3
2

*
6 .6
9. 1
4. 1

_
84. 6
170. 0
8 .5

_
.3 9
. 77
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44
56
54
48
41

2 1 .3
25. 7
1 5 .9
1 4 .4
1 7 .5

174.
195.
328.
404.
138.

0
0
0
0
5

1970
1971
1972

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3. 7
9 .2
. 1
•
6. 0

15 . 5
347. 6
1. 8
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.0 8
1 .8 5
. 01
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43
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47
46
45

8 .2
5 .0
13. 8
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22. 7

.1

3 .2

21
36

2 .2
7 .9

19 73

------------------------------------------------

1974

--------------------------------------------------------------

3
5
2
.
3

1975
1976

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------- --------------------------

1

-

( 5)
n
. 02

. 02

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




F o o d a n d k in d r e d

0
0
0
6
0

T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s

1938
1939

( 2)

and a c c e s s o rie s 1

72

13 7 . 0 2 ,1 9 0 . 0
6 8 .3
764. 0
715. 0
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( 2)
( 2)

.
.
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.

08
12
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12. 1
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134. 0
146. 0
130. 0
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100
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W ork stoppages by industry group, 1937-76—Continued
( W o r k e r s a nd c la ys i d l e in th o u s a n d s )
S to p s a g e s
b e g i n n in g
in r e a r

D a y s id le
S to p p a g e s
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d u rin g y e a r
b e g in n in g
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in y e a r
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( a ll s to p p a g e s )
P erc e n t
P e rc e n t
P e rc e n t
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
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dum ber
N um ber
m a te d
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N u m b e r m a te d
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in v o lv e d
in v o lv e d
in v o lv e d
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
tim e
tim e
tim e
L u m b e r an d w ood p ro d u c ts 6
193719381939-

168
75
103

50 1
15 1
22 9

1940 —
1941 —
194219431944-

119
181
88
72
81

40
50
17
11
43

1
2
6
4
5

572
1, 0 1 0
115
55
299

0
0
0
7
0

1945 —

1948 —
1949—

67
61
109
100
84

57
16
23
24
20

6
4
9
6
0

2 ,2 3 0
959
850
493
703

1950—
1951 —
1952 —
1953 —
1954 —

119
118
131
125
70

23
22
64
19
87

6
8
5
8
3

1955—
1956 —
1957 —
1958 —
1959 —

81
47
66
69
58

11
4
12
18
14

1962 —
1963 —
1964 —

39
75
72
64
56

1965 —
1966 —
1967 —
1968 —
1969—

(*)
(2
)

1 ,3 4 0 0
598 0
655 0

F u rn itu re

and fix tu re s 7

P a p e r an d a llie d
14. 1
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203 0
144 0
130. 0

56
93
44
38
49

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287.
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13
16
18
14
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69
81
76
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10
16
16
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1970—
1971—
1972 —
1973 —
1974—

63
66
76
65
87

8
7
13
16
19

8
3
9
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306
194
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248
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85
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22
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1 9 7 5 --------------------------------------------------------

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69

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282 6
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73

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mo­
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p u b lis h in g , a n d
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67
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20
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.
.
.

08
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92
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24
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780
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81
65
83
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22
28
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23
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20
133
61
8
9

8
0
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0 . 07
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1945 —
1946—
1947—
1948—
1949—

47
67
66
43
53

13 .
14
9
10
5

2
2
5
9
7

221
326
171
587
212

0
0
0
0
0

1950—
1951 —
1952 —
1953 —
1954 —

54
27
32
44
30

10
1
4
21
6

4
2
1
3
0

240
29
92
245
103

1955—
1956—
1957 —
1958 —
1959 —

29
31
52
46
58

7
6
21
22
24

7
0
6
3
4

19601961 —
1962 —
1963 —
1964—

38
50
53
58
50

4
8
45
14
8

1965—
1966—
1967—
1968—
1969—

33
66
58
56
89

1970—
1971 —
1972 —
1973 —
1974—
19751976-

!?

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b l e .

73

$
to

1. 8
1. 1
5

35
83
67
76
116

1940 —
m i 1942—
1943 —
1944 —

( 2)
f 2)
( 2)

0
( 2)
n

P e tr o le u m re fin in g an d
r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s 11

o
( 2)
( 2)

278 0
97 3
51 5

62
30
21




h

0 . 15
. 04
. 07

7
3
3

9 5
2 9
13 2

11 2
9 4
8

0
0

<)
2

p r o d u c t s 10

262. 0
52. 2
36. 0

1937 —
1938 —
1939—

p ro d u c ts 8

99
43
37

461 0
185 0
144. 0

158
67
67

59
35
36

0
3
6
1
5

105 0
50. 6

( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

W ork stoppages by industry group, 1937-76—Continued
[W o rk e rs

a n d d a y s id le in th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g
in y e a r

Y ear

D a y s id le
d u rin g y e a r
( a ll sto p p a g e s )
P e rc e n t
of e s ti­
W o rk e rs
N u m b e r m a te d
N um ber
in v o l v e d
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tim e
R u b b e r an d m is c e lla n e o u s
p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s 12

193 7 __ ________________________________________

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1962
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1 9 6 4 - .................................................

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1 9 7 0 -------------------------------------------------------------------19711972- .....................................
1973..................................
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214
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S e e fo o tn o te s




( 13)
C 3)

O3
<13

9. 3
55. 1

F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts ,
e x c e p t o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e ry ,
an d tra n s p o rta tio n eq u i p m en t

m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s 13

1 9 3 7 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 3 8 --------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 3 9 --------------------------------------------------------------------

1 9 4 5 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 4 6 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 4 7 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 4 8 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 4 9 --------------------------------------------------------------------

S to p f a g e s
D ay s id le
D a y s W e -------b e g i n n in g
d u rin g y e a r
d u rin g y e a r
( a l l s t o ’p a g e s )
in r e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
P e rc e n t
P ercen t
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
W o rk e rs
W o rk e rs
dum ber
N u m b e r m a te d
Mum b e r
N u m b e r m a te d
in v o lv e d
in v o l v e d
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
tim e
tim e

0
0
0

39
29
19

1 9 7 6 ---------------------------------------------------------------------

S to p p a g e s
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in y e a r

188

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at end o f ta b le .

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51
80

79
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. 72
. 72

.49
.39
. 55

W ork stoppages by industry group, 1 937-76—Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d d a y s id le in th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g
in y e a r
W o rk ers
In v o lv e d

D ay s id le
S to p i a g e s
D ay s id le
b e g ir i n in g
d u rin g y e a r
d u rin g y e a r
(a ll s to p p a g e s )
(a ll s to p p a g e s )
in
ear
P e rc e n t
P e rc e n t
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
W o rk e rs
m a te d
N u m b e r m a te d
N um ber
N um be r
in v o lv e d
w o r k in g
w o rk in g
tim e
tim e

S to p p a g e s
D a y s id le
b e g in n in g
d u rin g y e a r
in ^ e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e
P ercen t
of e s ti­
W o rk e r
N um ber
m a te d
in v o lv e c
w o rk in g
tim e

E le c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry ,
e q u ip m e n t, a n d s u p p lie i
193719381939-

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19401941194219431944-

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In s tru m e n ts ,

T r a n s p o r t a tic in e q u i p m e n t 18

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19651966196719681969-

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268. 8

795.
2 ,4 1 0 .
2, 630.
1, 7 6 0 .
5 ,4 7 8 .

0
0
0
0
9

. 19
. 50
. 54
.3 5
1. 05

140
162
165
241
202

196.
150.
347.
255.
263.

0
0
0
0
9

2 ,6 3 0 . 0
1 ,3 3 0 . 0
5, 530. 0
2 , 990. 0
4 . 5 0 0 .4

. 60
.2 7
1. 13
. 58
. 87

28
37
24
37
26

7. 6
5 .9
2. 7
1 3 .2
8 .7

109. 0
148. 0
5 1 .2
8 4 .4
3 1 4 .2

. 11
. 14
. 04
. 07
.2 6

19701971197219731974-

191
174
161
173
220

1 3 3 .2
109. 1
9 5 .4
87. 1
182. 8

6 ,2 0 8 . 1
1, 5 4 9 . 4
6 9 5 .4
1, 2 3 4 . 2
3 ,6 4 3 .0

1 .2 7
. 34
. 15
.2 5
. 72

158
168
133
160
197

326. 8
119. 6
116. 8
2 0 6 .2
181. 0

1 4 ,0 3 3 .9
2 ,7 4 2 .9
1, 7 3 4 . 2
1 .4 3 7 . 9
3, 7 3 9 . 3

3 . 02
. 62
.3 9
.3 1
. 83

31
29
22
35
41

10. 1
9 .3
4. 9
13 . 8
14. 0

223. 3
402. 0
1 3 4 .3
278. 3
1 6 5 .3

. 10
.3 7
. 12
.2 2
. 12

1975-

120
204

34. 0
134. 8

850. 7
2 ,2 3 5 .5

. 19
.4 8

137
130

77. 9 3 ,4 0 4 . 9
23 8 . 1 4 ,3 2 2 .9

. 82
.9 9

32

1976 -

10. 7
5 .3

287. 9
128. 1

. 10

122
137
116

100.
93
96
114
99
109
105

19 1.0

n

29

M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g 20
1937
1938
1939

----------------------------------------------------------------------

1940
1941
1942
1943
1944

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1945
1946
1947
1948
1949

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

0
H

0
0
0
45

0
0
(! )

0

0

0

!!>
(!>

.2 3

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g 21

00

0
0
0
0
0

n o. o

1, 9 6 1
1 ,3 3 6
1 ,2 2 4

663
278
777

8 ,4 5 0
3, 3 3 0
10, 600

0 .2 0
. 08
.2 5

1, 0 9 8
1, 6 4 2
1, 0 8 9
1 ,2 6 1
1, 7 0 0

225
1, 0 9 0
224
763
434

2 ,3 0 0
10, 600
1, 5 0 0
1 0 ,1 0 0
2 , 570

. 05
.2 3
. 03
.2 1
. 05

1,
2,
1,
1,
1,

569
108
700
744
945

958
2 ,3 6 0
1 ,3 7 0
996
1, 8 2 0

9 ,2 7 0
3 4 ,1 0 0
18, 900
16 , 5 0 0
2 6 ,3 0 0

.2 1
. 72
.3 9
.3 1
.3 9

34
29

55. 0
5. 9
3. 5

60. 5
42. 1
1 5 .2

52
86
92
72
69

1 5 .4
12 . 7
1 6 .0
1 5 .3
9. 9

4 1 8 .0
346. 0
403. 0
339. 0
1 6 6 .0

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

96
92
94
105
85

18. 6
12. 7
1 3 .2
21. 0
1 4 .2

237.
195.
224.
280.
186.

0
0
0
0
0

.2 2
. 16
. 18
. 22
. 15

2 , 138
2 , 189
2 ,4 5 2
2 ,4 7 9
1, 7 6 2

959
844
1, 6 6 0
1, 0 9 0
761

15, 900
5 ,4 7 0
1 6 ,8 0 0
12, 700
8, 900

.3 0
. 11
.2 7
. 19
. 14

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

99
89
80
58
68

1 4 .3
1 6 .2
15 . 0
8 .3
1 1 .3

191.
295.
201.
141.
179.

0
0
0
0
0

. 16
.2 3
. 16
. 12
. 14

1, 913
1, 8 5 6
1, 7 1 1
1 ,7 3 9
1, 672

646
544
610
574
600

9 , 3 90
6, 020
7, 080
8, 520
13, 500

.
.
.
.
.

1960

---------------------

1961
1962
1963
1964

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

54
56
54
47
49

4. 7
1 0 .4
7 .4
7 .9
9 .0

7 4 .4
125. 0
178. 0
9 5 .2
1 4 6 .0

.
.
.
.
.

06
13
18
09
14

1, 7 4 0
1, 6 9 4
1 ,8 2 5
1, 6 7 8
1, 8 6 5

610
555
596
386
646

7, 900
6, 500
8 ,4 6 0
5, 730
7 ,2 1 0

. 11
. 08
. 11
. 07
.0 9

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

54
48
56
63
71

7. 5
8. 5
8 .3
10 . 5
14. 5

164.
181.
240.
216.
224.

0
0
0
0
7

. 15
. 16
.2 2
. 19
.2 0

1, 8 8 6
2 , 110
2 ,2 6 7
2 , 3 96
2 ,8 9 3

633
1, 0 4 0
1 ,5 3 0
1 ,4 7 0
1, 174

9, 020
11, 700
1 4 ,3 0 0
2 5 , 000
1 8 , 763

. 11
. 14
. 15
.2 0
. 14

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

73
44
44
43
69

11 . 7
7. 7
6 .0
8. 9
10. 7

3 0 5 .5
1 5 6 .4
111. 9
200. 0
209. 7

.2 8
. 15
. 10
. 18
. 19

3 ,2 4 0
2 , 762
2 ,9 5 4
3 ,0 7 2
3 ,2 5 3

2 , 177
2 ,4 1 7
1 ,0 6 8
1 ,2 8 7
1, 6 3 2

2 8 ,4 0 7
2 9 , 104
14, 7 8 4
1 3 ,6 3 0
2 4 ,3 9 2

.2 1
.2 2

1975
1976

-----------------------------------------------

37
60

5 .8
1 1 .4

255. 6
393. 9

.2 5
.3 7

3 , 134
3 ,4 0 6

1 ,2 8 2
1, 4 4 6

1 6 ,3 6 1
1 3 ,5 9 6

. 11
.0 9

_________
S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f t a b l e .




75

0
0
0
0

8

0
0 . IT

_________

14
09
10
12
19

. n
.0 9
. 17

Work stoppages by industry group, 1937-76—Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d d a y s i d l e in th o u s a n d s )
S to p ’> a g e s
b e g i n n in g
in r e a r

Y ear

D a y 8 id le
S to p s a g e s
d u rin g y e a r
b e g i n n in g
in r e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
P e rc e n t
of e s ti­
W o rk ers
W o rk e rs
N um ber
N u m b e r m a te d
N um ber
in v o lv e d
in v o lv e d
w o rk in g
tim e
A g ric lu tu re , fo re s try ,
and fis h e rie s

D a y s id le
S to p p a g e s
D a y s id le
d u rin g y e a r
b e g in n in g
d u rin g y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
in y e a r
(a ll s to p p a g e s )
P ercen t
P ercen t
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
W o rk ers
N u m b e r m a te d
N u m b e r m a te d
N um ber
in v o lv e d
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
tim e
tim e

M i n i n g 25
163. 0 2 ,6 2 0 .0
37. 5
529. 0
3 8 3 . 0 7 ,4 6 0 . 0

65
143
156
463
893

4 2 .3
269. 0
7 37. 0 7 ,2 3 0 . 0
83. 3
516. 0
6 10. 0 9 ,3 7 0 .0
2 7 8 . 0 1 ,4 1 0 . 0
6 ,2 3 0 .0
.1 ,4 0 0 .0
2 ,4 4 0 . 0
0, 4 0 0 . 0
1 9 ,2 0 0 . 0

-------

40
48
39

7 .7
2 4 .3
3 6 .8

6 1 .2
410. 0
4 7 7 .0

( 2)

1940
1941
1942
1943
1944

-----------

24
32
21
16
18

5 .8
1 4 .4
4. 7
8. 7
9 .9

1 7 4 .0
4 9 4 .0
110. 0
9 6 .4
2 7 4 .0

( 2)

1945
1946
1947
1948
1949

---------

-

20
28
22
23
24

5 .0
17. 5
1 2 .2
23. 1
18. 1

4 7 .0
2 1 9 .0
2 8 7 .0
5 3 1 .0
2 8 9 .0

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

-----------

12
21
14
14
10

2 0 .7
1 7 .2
4. 7
8. 1
2 .9

1 5 2 .0
3 4 8 .0
5 6 .0
1 1 3 .0
5 9 .9

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

-----------

11
6
6
6
10

3. 1
2. 0
1 .9
4 .0
2 .2

1 4 .2
1 0 .4
3 3 .7
1 4 .3
6 5 .7

1960
1961
1962
1963
1964

-----------

81
31
16
25
18

7 .6
10. 6
2 .6
16. 0
3 .0

1 6 0 .0
80. 0
5 9 .0
84. 6
44. 1

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

-----------

21
20
18
17
16

4 .3
5 .5
7 .7
6 .7
1 4 .6

6 0 .3
50. 9
7 0 .4
1 4 7 .0
2 2 8 .5

to
0 . 04
.0 8

188
194
254
301
495

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974

-----------

27
7
12
11
13

1 1 .2
1 .5
5 .3
2 3 .2
21. 5

2 5 0 .3
4 .2
9 0 .9
4 7 9 .0
4 5 9 .7

.0 9
( ’>
. 03
. 15
. 14

1975
1976

-----

7
10

.7

3 5 .9
1 3 .9

.0 1

2 .4

to

( 2)

to
2
to
( 2)
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
0

to

to
to
to
(2
to
to
<2)

0
to
to
3

(“ )

C o n tra c t c o n s tru c tio n

111
63
64

1937
1938
1939

0
0
0
0
0

(2
)
(*)

328
315
320

71. 9
4 4 .4
70. 1

<2)

0 .3 1
4 .2 5
. 56

(2
)

310
395
239
188
168

7 1 .3
186. 0
31. 0
35. 7
22. 5

2 . 88
1 0 .3 5
1. 12
4 . 51
8 .3 9

206
351
3 82
380
615

45.
146.
175.
108.
197.

8
0
0
0
0

0

848. 0
405. 0
633. 0
493.
923.
164.
141.
120.

<2)

to
( 2)

0
0
0
0
0

to
( 2)
0 . 04
. 04
. 06

4 4 7 .0
,4 5 0 . 0
, 770. 0
,4 3 0 . 0
,7 6 0 .0

.2 0
.4 0
. 66
.2 9
.5 3

670
570
478
614
476

678.
974.
517.
651.
1 ,3 8 0 .

508
622
650
460
248

196.
284.
547.
156.
111.

0
0
0
0
0

4 .3 7
. 55
1 .9 2
.4 0
.4 4

611
651
794
1 ,0 3 9
804

237.
232.
634.
574.
437.

0 , 460.
0 , 190.
0 6, 70 0 .
0 8 ,0 0 0 .
0 , 800.

0
0
0
0
0

.4 4
. 18
1. 03
1 .2 2
. 71

343
321
198
168
187

1 1 4 . 0 1, 0 8 0 . 0
129. 0 1 ,3 2 0 . 0
5 6 .3
240. 0
302. 0
38. 6
1 2 0 .0 5, 6 5 0 .0

. 57
. 65
. 11
. 16
3 .2 6

733
784
785
844
771

204.
231.
308.
326.
251.

0 ,
0 ,
0 ,
0 ,
0 4,

0
0
0
0
0

.2 8
.3 5
. 51
.7 1
. 58

4, 4 7 0 . 0
3 ,4 9 0 . 0
4 , 150. 0
, 930. 0
2 ,7 9 0 .0

. 63
. 50
. 60
.2 5
.3 5

0 9, 700.
0 1 ,2 9 0 .
0 4 ,3 1 0 .
846.
0
845.
0

700.
310.
983.
481.
808.

0
0
0
0
0

.4 1
. 18
. 60
.3 0
.4 9

773
824
913
840
944

269. 0
2 1 7 .0
2 84. 0
208. 0
248. 0

71. 6
431.
794.
96. 1
102. 0 3 ,0 3 0 .
213. 0 2, 550.
2 2 0 . 4 1, 1 5 6 .

0
0
0
0
9

.2 7
.5 0
1 .9 5
1. 60
. 72

943
977
867
912
973

301.
455.
305.
3 64.
433.

544
657
1 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 7 9
1 ,0 5 0

2 1 1 .4
849. 6
3 8 3 .2 4 , 9 3 4 .4
267. 1
7 2 4 .3
301. 0
8 6 5 .4
5 0 1 .3 4 , 0 6 1 .0

. 54
3 .2 3
.4 7
. 55
2 .4 0

1, 1 6 5
1 ,4 2 5

3 9 1 . 6 1, 6 4 2 . 8
5 1 4 .7 2 ,2 2 0 . 1

. 88
1. 13

154
154
159
153
155

48. 5
37. 7
51. 8
45. 8
8 3 .4

T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
e le c tric , g a s, and
s a n ita ry s e rv ic e s
193719381939-

379
216
256

19401941194219431944-

185
280
221
284
335

19451946194719481949-

342
479
2 82
293
347

19501951195219531954-

1 3 8 . 0 1, 8 9 0 . 0
76. 7
730. 0
8 7 .4
8 6 7 .0
4 5 .4
5 1 .5
4 2 .3
55. 6
7 3 .4

(2
)

8

0
0
0
0
8

.5 7
. 73
. 62
1. 05
1. 19

1 ,1 3 7
751
701
538
688

6 2 1 . 0 1 5 , 2 4 0 .4
451. 3 6, 849. 6
4 5 4 . 2 7, 8 4 3 . 7
3 6 6 . S 5, 6 5 8 . 8
6 2 9 . 8 12, 7 2 1 . 0

1 .7 9
. 83
. 88
.4 0
1 .2 7

600
503

3 0 8 . 0 7 ,3 0 7 .3
172. 4 3 ,2 3 9 .8

. 84
.3 6

W h o le s a le

()
b)
to
R

0 4 , 630.
0 S, 1 4 0 .
0 5, 1 6 0 .
0 8, 720.
1 1 0 ,3 8 5 .

a n d r e t a i l t r a d e 25

(“)
b
(to
R

to
0 . 03

260
119
139

30.
25.
31.

(2
)

(to

to

(2
)

to

to )

R

3 04. 0
90. 0
270. 0

p
(>
2
<
2
)
0 . 01

0
0
0
0
0

1 ,5 5 0 .
9, 020.
1 1 ,5 0 0 .
3 ,2 9 0 .
2 ,3 2 0 .

0
0
0
0
0

. 15
. 94
1 . 19
.3 4
.2 5

182
385
336
241
329

3 4 .8
336.
64.
882.
6 0. 6 1 ,0 1 0 .
3 0 .2
557.
4 6 .2 1 ,4 4 0 .

0
0
0
0
0

.
.
.
.
.

386
387
406
372
282

405. 0
231. C
3 7 2 .0
2 5 6 .0
146. 0

2 ,3 8 0 .
1, 7 9 0 .
4 , 170.
2 ,3 8 0 .
1 ,4 1 0 .

0
0
0
0
0

.2 5
. 17
.3 9
.2 2
. 14

381
277
397
408
2 98

70.
927.
40.
289.
7 5 . 8 1, 0 5 0 .
7 1 .2 1, 0 5 0 .
53.
1, 6 9 0 .

0
0
0
0
0

. 04
. 01
. 04
. 04
.0 6

19551956195719581959-

275
243
209
242
233

253.
130.
169.
132.
140.

0
C
0
C
0

4 , 860.
1, 1 7 0 .
2 ,0 1 0 .
2 ,2 7 0 .
1, 9 1 0 .

0
0
0
0
0

.4 7
. 11
. 19
.2 3
. 19

409
336
3 72
358
311

5 2 .2 1 , 0 9 0 .
37.
558.
63. 0
654.
57. 0
942 .
7 2 .2 1, 5 7 0 .

0
0
0
0
0

.
.
.
.
.

196019631964-

266
243
213
205
257

200. 0
211. 0
182. C
6 3 .4
205. 0

3, 000.
1, 7 1 0 .
2 ,4 9 0 .
2, 540.
1, 9 0 0 .

0
0
0
0
0

. 18
. 17
.2 5
.2 5
19

.

290
308
364
2 93
309

32. 6
451. 0
6 2 .4
7 1 6 .0
535. 0
29. 7
34.
498. 0
61 . 6 1 ,3 4 0 . 0

. 02
.0 2
.0 2
.0 2
04

1965.
1966196719681969-

216
240
345
303
320

185.
312.
866.
571.
212.

0
C
C
C
0

1 ,7 5 0 .0
3 ,3 9 0 . 0
3 ,4 5 0 . 0
9 ,3 1 0 . 0
4 , 0 3 0 .9

.2 9
.3 2
.3 2
84
.3 6

336
365
431
417
470

42. 6
570. 0
4 2 .2
508. 0
8 7 .2
9 9 4 .0
75. 1
972. 0
92. 6 1 ,3 0 9 .9

.0 2
.0 2
03
.0 3
.0 3

19701971197219731974-

400
316
256
324
320

858. 5
1 ,2 6 6 .7
114. 6
192. 7
1 4 0 .2

7 ,2 1 2 . 8
1 3 ,4 1 9 . 9
3 ,2 4 5 .0
3 ,2 9 6 .5
3 ,2 2 5 .5

63
1. 18
.2 9
.2 8
.2 7

.

487
502
389
499
549

1975-

268
354

1 6 6 .8 3 , 0 8 9 . 0
3 8 6 .4 3 ,4 6 1 .3

.2 7
.3 0

1961-

1962 -

1976-

157.
1, 0 2 0 .
468.
160.
154.

5 9 6 .0
433. 0
171. 0
183. 0
345. 0

to
(2
)

(2
)

810.
680.
970.
790.
120.

.

371
467

73. 6
134. 0
5 2 .:
1 3 6 .0
137. 0

6 3 .4 1 ,4 2 6 .0
5 5 .8 1 ,3 1 1 .3

J_____ J______
S e e fo o tn o te s a t en d o f t a b l e .




76

1, 8 7 5 . 8
2 ,0 8 6 .4
1, 1 3 1 . 6
2, 1 2 3 .6
1 ,7 5 7 .8

02
05
05
03
07

04
02
02
03
05

.

.

.0 5
05
.0 3
05
04

.
.
.
. 03

.0 3

J
_____

W ork stoppages by industry group, 1937-76—Continued
Days id le
Days idle
Stop sages
Days idle
Stop sages
begi nning
d u rin g y e a r
d u rin g y e a r
d u rin g y e a r
begi nning
(all stoppages)
(a ll stoppages)
in /e a r
(a ll stoppages)
in /e a r
P e rce p t
P e rce n t
P ercen t
of e s t i ­
of e s ti ­
of e s ti ­
N um ber W o rk e rs N um ber m ated N um ber W orkers XTum ber m ate d N um ber W o rk e rs Num be r m ated
N
involved
involved
involved
w orking
w orking
w orking
tim e
tim e
tim e
F in a n ce , in su ra n c e , and
S e r v ic e s 25
G o v e rn m e n t26
r e a l e s ta te
Stop sages
begi nning
in /e a r

Y ear

1937 ------------------------------------------------------------------1938----------------------------------------------------1939 ------------------------------------------------------------------1940 -----------------------------------------------------------------1941 -----------------------------------------------------------------1942 ------------------------------------------------------------------19431944- 1945- 1946.........................
1947- 1948-----------------------------------------------------1949-----------------------------------------------------19501951
1952...................
19531954-----------------------------------------------------19551956----------------------------------------------------1957-----------------------------------------------------1958-----------------------------------------------------1959-----------------------------------------------------I960-----------------------------------------------------19611962-----------------------------------------------------1963-----------------------------------------------------1964
1965-----------------------------------------------------1966-----------------------------------------------------1967-----------------------------------------------------1968-----------------------------------------------------1969-----------------------------------------------------1970-----------------------------------------------------1971-----------------------------------------------------1972----------------------------------------------------1973----------------------------------------------------1974----------------------------------------------------1975-----------------------------------------------------1976------------------------------------------------------

0
0
0

0
0
0

(0
0
(0

0
0
20 4
14 1
11 8

(0
(0
190. 0
122. 0
74. 0

0
<3
0
0
0

(0
<0
39
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16 D a y s i d l e i n t h e p r i m a r y m e t a l s i n d u s t r y g r o u p d u r i n g t h e
s t e e l s t r i k e h a v e b e e n c o m p u te d on th e b a is s o f a v e r a g e e m p lo y ­
m e n t th ro u g h o u t th e a f f e c te d m o n th s , r a t h e r th a n on th e u s u a l b a s is
o f e m p l o y m e n t i n t h e p a y p e r i o d e n d i n g n e a r e s t t o t h e 1 5 th o f e a c h
m o n th . If th e p e r c e n ta g e o f tim e lo s t w a s c a lc u la te d on th e b a s is of
r a t i o o f t i m e l o s t t o t i m e w o r k e d p l u s t i m e l o s t , i t w o u ld h a v e b e e n
1 2 . 12 f o r t h e p r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r y g r o u p .
17 F o r t h e p e r i o d 1 9 3 7 - 4 1 , r a d i o s a n d p h o n o g r a p h s w e r e a d d e d
to th e p u b lis h e d f ig u r e s f o r e l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y ,
e q u ip m e n t,
and
s u p p lie s , to m a k e th o s e y e a r s c o m p a r a b le w ith s u b s e q u e n t y e a r s .
18 F o r t h e p e r i o d 1 9 4 2 - 4 6 , t r a n s p o r a t i o n
e q u ip m e n t
(ex cep t
a u to m o b ile s ) a n d a u to m o b ile s a n d a u to m o b ile e q u ip m e n t h a v e b e e n
c o m b in e d .
19 I n f o r m a t i o n f o r y e a r s p r i o r t o 1 9 4 7 i s n o t c o m p a r a b l e w i t h
l a t e r y e a r s . S o m e of th e c o m p o n e n ts o f th is g ro u p w e r e
in c lu d e d
in " N o n f e r r o u s m e ta ls a n d t h e i r p r o d u c ts , " " M a c h in e r y ,
except
e l e c t r i c a l ," a n d " M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ." " I n s t r u ­
m e n ts ,
e t c ." in c lu d e s p r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tro llin g in ­
s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .
20 F o r t h e p e r i o d 1 9 4 2 - 4 6 , p r o f e s s i o n a l i n s t r u m e n t s , e t c . , w a s
o m itte d to m a k e th e d a ta c o m p a r a b le w ith s u b s e q u e n t y e a r s .
21 I d l e n e s s a s a p e r c e n t o f e s t i m a t e d w o r k i n g t i m e d o e s n o t
in c lu d e g o v e r n m e n t w o r k e r s .
22 L e s s t h a n 0 . 0 0 5 p e r c e n t .
23 F o r 1 9 3 7 -4 1 t h e t i t l e w a s " E x t r a c t i o n o f m i n e r a l s . "
34 D a t a f o r 1 9 3 7 -4 1 i n c l u d e e l e c t r i c l i g h t , p o w e r , a n d m a n u ­
f a c tu r e d g a s w h ic h w a s p u b lis h e d in th o s e y e a r s u n d e r " M i s c e l l a ­
n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s . " F o r th e 1 9 3 7 -5 8 p e r io d , th e g ro u p
in c lu d e s m u n ic ip a lly o p e r a te d u tilitie s .
25 D a t a f o r 1 9 3 7 -4 1 a r e n o t e n t i r e l y c o m p a r a b l e w i t h s u b s e ­
q u e n t y e a r s a n d h a v e b e e n o m itte d f o r th is r e a s o n .
26 D u r i n g t h e p e r i o d 1 9 3 7 - 4 1 , g o v e r n m e n t s t r i k e s w e r e i n c l u d e d
in " O th e r n o n m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s . "

1 D a ta f o r 1 9 4 2 -4 6 w e r e o r ig in a lly p u b lis h e d a s p a r t o f th e i n ­
g ro u p " Iro n a n d s te e l an d th e ir p r o d u c ts ."
2 N o t a v a ila b le .
3 D a t a f o r 1 9 3 7 -4 1 w e r e o r i g i n a l l y p u b l i s h e d u n d e r " T e x t i l e s
an d th e ir p ro d u c ts : F a b r i c s ."
4 D a t a f o r 1 9 3 7 -4 1 w e r e o r i g i n a l l y p u b l i s h e d u n d e r " T e x t i l e s
a n d t h e ir p r o d u c ts : W e a rin g a p p a r e l."
5 L e s s th a n 0 .0 0 5 p e r c e n t .
6 D a t a f o r 1 9 3 7 -4 1 e x c l u d e f u r n i t u r e w h i c h h a d b e e n i n c l u d e d
in th is g r o u p w h e n p u b lis h e d in a n n u a l r e p o r t s f o r th o s e y e a r s .
7 D a t a f o r 1 9 3 7 -4 1 w e r e o r i g i n a l l y p u b l i s h e d a s p a r t o f t h e
lu m b e r an d a llie d p ro d u c ts in d u s try .
8 D a ta f o r 1 9 3 7 -4 1 a p p e a r e d in e a r l i e r p u b l i c a t i o n s u n d e r " P a ­
p e r and p r in tin g ." T h e se fig u re s a r e fo r b o x e s, p a p e r; p a p e r and
p u lp .
9 D a ta f o r 1 9 3 7 -4 1 w e r e o r i g i n a l l y p u b l i s h e d u n d e r " P a p e r a n d
p r in tin g ." T h e s e f ig u r e s a r e f o r p r in tin g a n d p u b lis h in g ; b o o k an d
jo b , a n d n e w s p a p e r s a n d p e r i o d i c a l s .
10 D a t a f o r 1 9 3 7 - 4 1 e x c l u d e p e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g w h i c h h a d b e e n
in c lu d e d in t h i s g r o u p w h e n p u b lis h e d in a n n u a l r e p o r t s f o r th o s e
y e a rs.
11 P r i o r t o
1942,
p e tro le u m
r e f in in g w a s in c lu d e d
under
" C h e m ic a ls a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s . " B e g in n in g w ith 1 9 5 8 , e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n ts p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in p r o d u c in g c o k e a n d b y p r o d u c ts w e r e
in c lu d e d in " P r i m a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ."
12 P r i o r t o 1 9 5 8 , m i s c e l l a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s w e r e i n ­
c lu d e d u n d e r " M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s . "
13 I n d u s t r y g r o u p s w h i c h i n c l u d e s o m e o f t h e c o m p o n e n t s o f t h e
p r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s g r o u p a r e n o t e n t i r e l y c o m p a r a b le in y e a r s
p r i o r to 194 7 . S e e " I r o n a n d s te e l a n d th e ir p r o d u c ts " a n d " N o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s a n d t h e i r p r o d u c ts " in a n n u a l b u lle tin s f o r th e e a r l i e r
y e a rs.
14 I n d u s t r y g r o u p s w h i c h i n c l u d e s o m e o f t h e c o m p o n e n t s o f t h e
f a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c ts g ro u p a r e n o t e n tir e ly c o m p a r a b le in y e a r s
p r i o r t o 1 9 4 7 . S e e ,lI r o n a n d s t e e l a n d t h e i r p r o d u c t s " a n d " N o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s a n d t h e i r p r o d u c ts " in a n n u a l b u lle tin s f o r e a r l i e r
y e a rs.
15 F o r t h e p e r i o d 1 9 3 7 - 4 1 , e l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , a p p a r a t u s ,
a n d s u p p lie s ,
r a d i o s , a n d p h o n o g r a p h s w e r e in c lu d e d in th e p u b ­
l i s h e d f i g u r e s f o r t h e m a c h i n e r y g r o u p . In t h i s t a b l e t h e s e 2 i n ­
d u s t r i e s h a v e b e e n e x c l u d e d f r o m 1 9 3 7 -4 1 t o m a k e t h e f i g u r e s c o m ­
p a r a b le w ith s u b s e q u e n t y e a r s .

d u s try




0

(0
(0
(0

0

N O T E : T h e n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s r e p o r te d f o r a m a jo r in d u s try
g ro u p o r d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m o f its c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e
in d iv id u a l s to p p a g e s o c c u r r i n g in 2 o r m o r e in d u s tr y g r o u p s h a v e
b e e n c o u n te d in e a c h . T h e m a jo r in d u s tr y g ro u p a n d d iv is io n to ta ls
h a v e b e e n a d ju s te d to e lim in a te d u p lic a tio n . W o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d
d a y s id le h a v e b e e n a llo c a te d a m o n g th e r e s p e c tiv e in d u s tr y g r o u p s .

to ta ls .

77

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s
D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y

not equal

A p p e n d ix B.

S cope, D e fin itio n s , and M e th o d s

Methods

From 1 9 2 7 to 1950, all employed workers were in­
cluded in the base, except those in occupations and
professions in which little, if any, union organization
existed or in which stoppages rarely, if ever, occurred. In
most industries, all wage and salary workers were included
in total employment except those in executive, managerial,
or high supervisory positions, or those performing profes­
sional work the nature of which made union organization
or group action unlikely. This measure of employment also
excluded all self-employed persons; domestic workers;
workers on farms employing fewer than six persons; all
Federal and State government employees; and officials,
both elected and appointed, in local government.
From 1951 to 1966, the Bureau’s estimates of total
employment in nonagricultural establishments, exclusive of
government, were used as a base. Days of idleness com­
puted on the basis of nonagricultural employment (exclu­
sive of government) usually differed by less than one-tenth
of a percentage point from that obtained by the former
method, while the percentage of workers idle (compared
with total employment) differed by about 0.5 of a point.
For example, the percentage of workers idle during 1950
computed on the base used for the earlier years was 6.9,
and the percentage for days of idleness was 0.44, compared
with 6.3 and 0.40, respectively, computed on the new base.
From 1 9 6 7 to 1973, two estimates of employment were
used, one based on the wage and salary workers in the
civilian work force, and the other on those in the private
nonfarm sector.1 The new private nonfarm series closely
approximated the former BLS series which, as noted,
excluded government and agricultural workers from em­
ployment totals, but accounted for idleness by such
workers while on strike. The old method had resulted in an
increasingly distorted measure of the severity of strikes; the
likely growth of strike activity among government and
farmworkers would have distorted the measure even more
in the future. The “total economy” measure of strike
idleness now included government and agricultural workers
in its employment count as well as in the computation of
idleness ratios, but excluded forestry, fishery, and private
household workers from the base. To facilitate comparisons
over time, the figure for the total economy had been carried
back to 1939 (see table 1). The “private nonagricultural”

The relative measures. In computing the number of workers
involved in strikes as a percent of total employment and
idleness as a percent of total working time, the following
employment figures have been used:

For further information, see “ ‘Total Economy ’ Measure of
Strike Idleness, ” M onthly Labor Review, October 1968, pp. 54-56.

Scope

It is the purpose of this statistical series to report all
work stoppages in the United States that involve six workers
or more and continue for the equivalent of a full day or
shift or longer.
Definitions

Strike or lockout. A strike is defined as a temporary

stoppage of work by a group of employees (not necessarily
members of a union) to express a grievance or enforce a
demand. A lockout is a temporary withholding or denial of
employment during a labor dispute to enforce terms of
employment upon a group of employees. Because of the
complexity of most labor-management disputes, the Bureau
makes no attempt to distinguish between strikes and
lockouts in its statistics; both types are included in the term
“work stoppage” and are used interchangeably. The terms
“dispute” , “labor-management dispute,” and “walkout”
are also used interchangeably.
Workers and idleness. The figures on the number of
“workers involved” and “ days idle” include all workers
made idle for one shift or longer in establishments directly
involved in a stoppage. They do not account for secondary
idleness—
that is, the effects of a stoppage on other
establishments or industries whose employees may be made
idle as a result of material or service shortages.
The total number of workers involved in strikes in a
given year may include double counting of individual
workers if they were involved in more than one stoppage
during that year. (Thus, in 1974, the Bureau recorded some
460,000 bituminous coal and lignite mining workers as
participating in strikes, while 165,000 workers were em­
ployed in the industry.)
In some prolonged stoppages, the total days of idleness
are estimated if the number of workers idle each day is not
known. Significant changes in the number of workers idle
are secured from the parties for use in computing days of
idleness.




78

Table B-1. Methods of computing relative measures of idleness
Component
Employment

.................................

Estimated working time

..............

Days of idleness as a percent
of estimated total
working t i m e .............................

Total economy
measure

Nonagricultural sector
measure

Establishment series plus wage
and salaried farm workers.
Above employment times
working days.

Above employment times
working days.

Total idleness
Above working time

Total idleness less farm .
Ai
i•
.
X 100
Above working time

^

n 'w

measure excluded agricultural and government workers
from employment totals and these groups were also
removed from strike figures in arriving at a percentage of
nonagricultural working time idle.

Establishment series less
government.
Above employment times
working days.

Total idleness less farm
and government
Above working time

v 100

industries are excluded from metropolitan area data but are
reported by industry and State.
U nions involved. For this purpose, the union is the
organization whose contract was involved or which has
taken active leadership in the stoppage. Disputes involving
more than one union are classified as jurisdictional or rival
union disputes or as involving cooperating unions. If
unorganized workers strike, a separate classification is used.
However, the tabulations of “workers involved” include all
who are made idle for one shift or longer in establishments
directly involved in the dispute, including members of other
unions and nonunion workers. Information is presented by
major affiliation of the union, i.e., AFL-CIO, or, if there is
no affiliation, by the designations “independent,” “single
firm,” or “no union.”

Beginning in 1974, government workers have been added
to employment and idleness ratios. (See table 21.)
The differences in the various measures are illustrated in
table B-1 in which the components of each measure and the
methods of computation are set forth.
“ Estimated working time” is computed by multiplying
the average employment for the year by the number of
days typically worked by most employed workers during
that year. In these computations, Saturdays (when custom­
arily not worked), Sundays, and established Federal holi­
days are excluded.2
Duration. Although only workdays are used in computing
total days of idleness, duration is expressed in calendar
days, including nonworkdays.

Sources of information

Occurrence o f strikes. Information on the actual or
probable existence of work stoppages is collected from a
number of sources. Clippings on labor disputes are obtained
from a comprehensive coverage of daily and weekly
newspapers throughout the country. Information also is
received regularly from the Federal Mediation and Concilia­
tion Service. Other sources of information include State
boards of mediation and arbitration; research divisions of
State labor departments; local offices of State employment
security agencies; and trade and union journals. Some
employer associations, companies, and unions also furnish
the Bureau with work stoppage information on a voluntary
cooperative basis, either as stoppages occur or periodically.

State data. Stoppages occurring in more than one State are
listed separately in each State affected. The workers and
days of idleness are allocated among each of the affected
State.3 The procedures outlined in the section on relative
measures also have been used in preparing estimates of
idleness by State.
Metropolitan area data. Information is tabulated separately
for the areas that currently comprise the list of Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSA’s) as defined by the
Office of Management and Budget and, in addition, for a
few communities historically included in the strike series
before the current list of areas was compiled. Information is
published only for those areas in which at least five
stoppages were recorded during the year.
Some metropolitan areas include counties in more than
one State, and hence, statistics for an area may occasion­
ally equal or exceed totals for the State in which the major
city is located. Stoppages in the mining and logging



Establishment series.

Private nonagricultural sector
measure

2

For example, the total economy figure for 1974 was
computed by multiplying the average employment for the year by
the number of working days (79,683,000x252=20,080,116,000)
and^ividing this figure into the total number of days of idleness.
The same procedure is followed in allocating data on
stoppages occurring in more than one industry, industry group, or
metropolitan area.
79

Respondents to questionnaire. A questionnaire is mailed to
each of the parties reported as involved in work stoppages
to obtain information on the number of workers involved,
duration, major issues, location, method of settlement, and
other pertinent information.

Limitations o f data. Although the Bureau seeks to obtain
complete coverage, i.e., a “census” of all strikes involving
six workers or more and lasting a full shift or more,
information is undoubtedly missing on some strikes involv­




ing small numbers of workers. Presumably, these missing
strikes do not substantially affect the number of workers
and days of idleness reported.
To improve the completeness of the count of stoppages,
the Bureau has constantly sought to develop new sources of
information on the probable existence of stoppages. Over
the years, these sources have probably increased the
number of strikes recorded, but have had little effect on the
number of workers or total idleness. As new agencies or
organizations having knowledge of the existence of work
stoppages are established or identified, every effort is made
by the Bureau to establish cooperative arrangements.

80

j*<J.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1 9 7 8

2 6 1-0 17 /8 0

1-3

The Compleat Journal
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Book reviews and notes
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Major agreements expiring next month
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Significant decisions in labor cases

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Analysis of price changes
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Htjt)- - - - - - - - - Trends in wages and compensation
Union convention reports
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Name
Address
 City, State, and Zip Code


Bureau of Labor Statistics
Regional Offices

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
G overnm en t C enter
Boston. Mass. 0 2 2 0 3
Phone: (617) 2 2 3 -6 7 6 1

Region IV
1371 Peachtree S treet, NE.
Atlanta. Ga 3 0 3 0 9
Phone: (4 0 4 )8 8 1 -4 4 1 8

Region V
Region II
S u ite 3 4 0 0
1515 Broadw ay
N e w York, N Y. 100ow

9th Floor
Federal O ffice Building
2 3 0 S Dearborn S treet
Chicago, III. 6 0 6 0 4

Phone: (212)399-5405

Regions VII and VIII*
911 Walnut S tre e t
Kansas City, Mo. 6 4 1 06
Phone: (816) 3 74-2481

Regions IX and X**

Phone: (312) 353-1880

Region III
3535 Market Street
P O Box 13309
Philadelphia. Pa 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154




Region VI
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214) 749-3516

4 5 0 G olden G ate A venue
Box 3 6 0 1 7
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
P h o n e :(4 1 5 )5 5 6 -4 6 7 8

* Regions VII and VII are serviced
by Kansas City
•‘ Regions IX and X are serviced
by San Francisco

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212

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