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I 2. 3;

ii n

ANALYSIS OF
W O RK
STOPPAGES

1971
Bulletin 1777
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1973




Dayton & Montgomery Co.

Public Library

JUL3 1973




ANALYSIS OF
W ORK
STOPPAGES

1971
Bulletin 1777
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Peter J. Brennan, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ben Burdetsky, Deputy Commissioner
1973

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Preface
This bulletin, continuing an annual feature o f the Bureau o f Labor Statistics in the
field o f industrial relations since 1941, presents a detailed statistical analysis of work
stoppages in 1971. The data provided in earlier bulletins have been expanded by the
addition o f four appendixes: work stoppages by industry group and size, 1971, table
A-6; government work stoppages by occupation, level, and activity, 1971, table A-17;
settlement o f work stoppages by major issue, 1971, table A-26; settlement of work
stoppages by industry group, 1971, table A-27.
Preliminary monthly estimates of the level o f strike (or lockout) activity for the
United States as a whole are issued about 30 days after the end o f the month o f ref­
erence, and are available on request. Preliminary estimates for the entire year are
available at the year’s end; selected final tabulations are issued in the early summer
of the following year. The methods used to prepare work stoppage statistics are de­
scribed in appendix B.
The Bureau wishes to acknowledge the cooperation of employers and employer
associations, labor unions, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and various
State agencies which furnished information for this program.
This bulletin was prepared in the Division o f Industrial Relations by Virginia A.
Bergquist and Sheldon M. Kline, under the supervision o f Albert A. Belman. The
analyses o f the individual work stoppages was prepared by Alroy E. Derr, Douglas E.
Hedger, and Evelyn L. Traylor, under the supervision of James T. Hall, Jr.




iii




Contents
Summary....................................................................................................................................................................................
Work stoppages and the economic stabilization program ...........................................................................................
Trends in work stoppages ...................................................................................................................................................
A n n u a l.................................................................................................................................................................................
Monthly ..............................................................................................................................................................................
Size of stoppages.....................................................................................................................................................................
Affiliation o f u n io n s...............................................................................................................................................................
Contract s t a t u s ........................................................................................................................................................................
Major is s u e s ..............................................................................................................................................................................
Industries a ffe c te d ..................................................................................................................................................................
Government work sto p p a g es...............................................................................................................................................
Stoppages by lo c a tio n ............................................................................................................................................................
R egion s.................................................................................................................................................................................
S ta te s .........................................................................
Metropolitan a r e a s ............................................................................................................................................................
D uration ....................................................................................................................................................................................
M e d ia tio n .................................................................................................................................................................................
Settlem ent.................................................................................................................................................................................
Procedures for handling unsettled is s u e s ..........................................................................................................................

Page
1
1
2
2
2
4
4
4
5
6
7
8
8
9
9
9
11
12
12

Tables:
1. Monthly distribution o f new strikes involving 1,000 workers or more, 1969-71 ........................................
2. Percent of stoppages and idleness by contract status, 1969-71 ......................................................................
3. Percent o f idleness by major issue, 1968-71 ........................................................................................................
4. Work stoppages by mean and median duration, man-days idle per worker,
and number o f prolonged strikes, 1954-71 ........................................................................................................
5. Unresolved issues in work stoppages, 1 9 7 1 ...........................................................................................................

11
12

Charts:
1. Number o f work stoppages and workers involved, 1945-71 ............................................................................
2. Man-days idle in work stoppages, 1945-71 ...........................................................................................................
3. Idleness as a percent of total available working time, in selected industries, 1970 and 1 9 7 1 ...............

3
10
13

Appendixes:
A. Tables
Work stoppages:
A -l. In the United States, 1927-71 ................................................................................................................
A-2. By month, 1970-71......................................................................................................................................
A-3. By size and duration, 1 9 7 1 ......................................................................................................................
A-4. Trend of, involving 10,000 workers or more,1927-71........................................................................
A-5. Involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1 9 7 1 .......................................................................
A-6. By industry group and size, 1 9 7 1 .........................................................................................................
A-7. By affiliation of unions involved, 1 9 7 1 .................................................................................................
A-8. By contract status and major issue, 1971.............................................................................................

14
15
16
17
18
21
22
23




v

4
5
6

Contents-Continued
Appendixes— Continued
A. Tables— Continued
Work stoppages— Continued
^a§e
A-9.
By contract status and size, 1971.......................................................................................................... 24
A-10. By industry group and contract status, 1 9 7 1 ........................................................................................ 25
A - ll. By major issue, 1 9 7 1 ..................................................................................................................................26
A-12. By industry group and major issue, 1 9 7 1 ............................................................................................... 27
A-13. By major issue and size, 1971 ..................................................................................................................29
A-14. By industry, 1 9 7 1 ...................................................................................................................................... 30
A-l 5. Government, by major issue, 1971........................................................................................................... 38
A-l 6. Government, by occupation, 1971........................................................................................................ 39
A-17. Government, by occupation, level and function, 1971.........................................................................40
A-l 8.
By region and State, 1 9 7 1 .....................................................................................................................42
A-19.
In States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1971................................................................... 43
A-20.
By State and metropolitan area, 1 9 7 1 ................................................................................................ 50
A-21. By industry group and duration, 1 9 7 1 ............................................................................................. 52
A-22. By duration and major issue, 1971........................................................................................................ 54
A-23. By duration and contract status, 1 9 71.................................................................................................. 55
A-24. Mediation of, by contract status, 1971.................................................................................................. 56
A-25. Settlement of, by contract status, 1 97 1 ........................
57
A-26. Settlement of, by major issue, 1971...................................................................................................... 58
A-27. Settlement of, by industry group 1 9 7 1 ............................................................................................. 59
A-28.
Procedure for resolving unsettled issues in, by contract status, 1 9 7 1 ...............................................61
B. Scope, definition, and m ethods.......................................................................................................................................... 63




vi

Summary
New York, California, and Pennsylvania led all other
States in man-days of idleness. All three accumulated a
significant proportion of man-days idle during major
stoppages (those involving 10,000 workers or more).
One of few significant indexes to rise in 1971 was
mean duration of strikes, which climbed to a 43-year
high of 27.0 days. Although the number of strikes that
continued for over 90 days also peaked, average days of
idleness-per-worker declined 28 percent, to a 5-year
low.
Strikes by teachers and blue-collar and manual work­
ers in cities, counties, and school districts accounted
for most of the 329 government strikes. These govern­
ment stoppages, although more than twice the number
recorded in 1966, were 20 percent lower than the 1970
level. The percent o f idleness dropped from 0.06 per­
cent in 1970 to 0.03 percent in 1971.
The employment of mediatory assistance in 1971
did not change significantly from 1970 or even from
a decade ago.
Settlement procedures in 1971 mirrored results of
past years; more than 80 percent o f stoppages ended
either with a formal settlement or with the establish­
ment of procedures to settle remaining problems. In
11 percent of the 1971 stoppages, workers returned
to the job before ^all issues were settled.

Marking the end of a 7-year escalation in strike activ­
ity which saw the number of strikes, workers involved,
and man-days of idleness accelerate nearly every year
between 1963 and 1970, major strike indexes declined
significantly in 1971. The number o f strikes1 initiated
in 1971 declined by approximately 10 percent from the
5,716 reported in 1970, the peak o f the present strike
cycle. Because o f the absence o f numerous large and pro­
longed stoppages, man-days off the job was reduced by
nearly 30 percent, the most substantial 1-year reduction
since early in the 1960’s. The number o f workers in­
volved in stoppages also decreased, but by a much
smaller proportion.
A contributory factor in the abatement o f strike
activity was the initiation of the economic stabilization
program in the latter part o f 1971. Even though the
thrust of the new program was directed at controlling
rising prices and inflationary wage settlements, a sec­
ondary concern was the high level o f strike activity.
Quantitatively, the program experienced some meas­
ure of success. Along with a percentage decline in price
and wage increases in the first 4 months o f the “freeze,”
the number o f strikes decreased by nearly 25 percent,
compared with the same period in 1970. An even
greater annual percentage decline in strikes (34 percent)
was experienced in the contract construction industry,
which was singled out in March 1971 for special treat­
ment before the initiation o f the new economic program.
Economic issues— wage changes, supplementary bene­
fits, wage adjustments and hours of work— were the
major causes of strikes, accounting for almost 3 of 4
man-days idle in 1971, significantly higher than the
preceding 2 years.
The contract status of strikes that occurred in 1971
showed little variation from the results o f the past sev­
eral years; about one-half of all stoppages occurred at
contract renegotiations; another one-third took place
during the contract term.
Because o f nearly 16 million fewer man-days idle in
the transportation equipment and the electrical machin­
ery, equipment, and supplies industries in 1971, the
manufacturing sector accounted for the greatest part of
the 28-percent decline in total idleness. Idleness in the
nonmanufacturing sector rose slightly.



Work Stoppages and the Economic
Stabilization Program
On August 15, 1971, President Nixon imposed a sys­
tem of economic controls on wages, prices, and rents,
the first such measure undertaken in the United States
since the Korean conflict. In conjunction with the
establishment of the wage-price guidelines, representa­
tives o f labor and management were urged to end all
strikes in progress and to refrain from engaging in any
new strikes or lockouts during the 90-day period of
the freeze. These efforts appear to have contributed
to the reduction in the number of work stoppages.
1
The term s “work stop page” and “strike” are used inter­
changeably in this bu lletin and include lock ou ts.

1

During the 4 months after the initiation of the freeze,
for example, the Bureau o f Labor Statistics received re­
ports on 1,190 work stoppages compared with 1,571 for
the September—
December period o f 1970, a decline of
nearly 25 percent. For the 8 months before the freeze, on
the other hand, the number of stoppages declined by less
than 5 percent— 3,948 compared with 4,144 in 1970.
Also, the number of strikes beginning in September and
October resulted in the lowest totals for those months
since 1965 and 1962, respectively.
The contract construction industry was singled out for
special attention before the economic stabilization pro­
gram began. In March 1971, the Administration estab­
lished the Construction Industry Stabilization Committee
to review contract settlements in the construction indus­
try in order to reduce the cost o f these settlements.
Negotiated wage increases in the industry had for a
number o f years been higher than the average for all
industries. Under the direction of the Committee, wage
increases, on a percentage basis, were reduced from a
1970 range of 15-18 percent to an average of approxi­
mately 10 percent in 1971.
Work stoppage activity in the construction industry
was particularly affected by these new restraints. In the
9 months subsequent to the creation o f the Committee,
625 strikes were reported, compared with 976 for the
same period in 1970. For the critical April-July period,
when a large proportion o f construction agreements were
either renegotiated or reopened, 388 work stoppages
were recorded in 1971, compared with 671 in 1970.
The entire decline in strike activity, however, cannot
be attributed to the work o f the Committee. Indications
are that the level of strikes in the industry was already
on the decline. In the first 3 months o f 1971, for ex­
ample, the number o f strikes, at 126, represented a
decline of 21 percent from the number during the
comparable 1970 period.
Other factors may have affected the declining in­
cidence o f work stoppages also. Perhaps most signif­
icant of these was the high level of unemployment
that persisted throughout the year. Historically, the
existence o f a large “reserve” labor force, especially
when it includes a great number o f skilled workers,
frequently has been held to have a dampening effect
on strikes. In 1971, the annual rate of unemployment
was at its highest level in 10 years, 5.9 percent.
A decrease in the number o f major collective bar­
gaining agreements renegotiated or reopened during
the year also contributed to the decline in strike activ­
ity. In 1970, the peak of the strike cycle, which began
in 1964, approximately 960 major agreements were
either renegotiated or reopened. In 1971, this number
was reduced to nearly 855 major bargaining situations.



The settlements of these large bargaining groups in
particular industries may serve as pattern setters for
smaller units. In that role, these large units may have
significant effect on the strike propensity for an entire
industry.

Trends in Work Stoppages
Annual
Against this backdrop of high unemployment and
economic controls, nearly all indexes of strike activity
declined markedly in 1971. A reduction of almost 600
strikes from 1970 was accompanied by a slight decrease
in the number o f workers who struck and 19 million
fewer man-days of idleness. The general decline signaled
the end o f the 7-year trend o f annual increases in strike
indexes, which began in 1964 and peaked in 1970. This
annual growth saw the number of strikes rise from 3,400
in 1963 to 5,700 in 1970 before dropping to 5,100 in
1971.
As the number o f strikes declined in 9 o f 12 months
in 1971, the total number o f stoppages fell from 5,716
in 1970 to 5,138; they involved 3.3 million workers and
a total o f 47.6 million man-days. Estimated working time
idle in strikes similarly declined to 2.6 working days per
thousand from 1970’s 11-year high of 3.7 days per
thousand. (See table A -l.) Only in the first 3 months of
1971 did the number of stoppages exceed 1970’s level;
by the last 4 months, man-days of idleness had declined
significantly from the preceding year. This year-to-year
decline was partly attributable to the sizable General
Motors stoppage which began September 15, 1970, and
which continued into 1971. Total annual idleness in 1971
fell almost 30 percent from the preceding year, but ex­
ceeded the 1969 level by almost 5 million man-days.
Although strike measures declined in 1971, the number
of strikes was still higher than it was 3 years earlier; the
number of workers idled and total idleness both exceeded
the level in 1969.
Monthly
Monthly work stoppage movements are affected by
seasonal and institutional factors which inflate or deflate
totals. Of greatest seasonal significance each year are
construction industry stoppages, which occur predom­
inantly in the spring and early summer months. Many
sizable stoppages in other industries occur at the time of
contract expirations, normally in the second or third
quarter of the year. Consequently, the primary metals,
communications, and construction industries were of
2

Chart 1

Number of Work Stoppages and Workers Involved, 1945-71

Workers Involved
(In Thousands)

W
m
.M il

Note: Shaded areas represent NBER Business Cycles.
"P" indicates a peak, "T " a trough.




concern in 1971 due to the large number o f workers
covered by expiring contracts.
In fact, 1971 reflected the typical seasonal spread of
strikes; the greatest number o f stoppages occurred in the
second and third quarters. (See table A-2.) The number
of stoppages in all quarters but the first were moderately
reduced from 1970. Over 600 strikes occurred in both
May and June, the 2 months with the largest number
of strikes recorded in 1970 and 1971. However, idleness
for 2 consecutive months peaked in July and August,
when eight major strikes involving 709,000 workers for
11.2 million man-days began.
The highest number o f strikes involving 1,000 workers
or more was similarly recorded in the second quarter.
(See table 1.) Again, in all but the first quarter o f 1971,
the number o f these strikes was lower than the number
recorded in the comparable 1970 period, resulting in a
22-percent overall drop.

The 29 stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more
that occurred in 1971 idled 1.9 million persons for 23.2
million man-days. (See table A-4.) Although 248,000
more workers were involved in these stoppages than were
involved in strikes in 1970, idleness dropped by more
than 12 million man-days. (See table A-5.) Six of these
stoppages in the communications, construction, mining,
and longshore industries resulted in 14.8 million idle
man-days, almost one-third o f total idleness for 1971.
Nine of the 29 major stoppages were in manufacturing
industries, 23 in nonmanufacturing. 2 (See table A-6.)

Affiliation of Unions
More than three-fifths o f the strikes recorded in 1971
involved unions affiliated with the AFL-CIO, the latest
available membership of which was placed at almost 14.7
million, or 70 percent o f all organized workers in the
United States. 3 However, strikes by AFL-CIO affiliates
accounted for only 55 percent o f all idleness. (See table
A-7.) At the other extreme, less than 2 percent of strikes
involved no unions and contributed less than 1 percent
of idleness. Another third o f all strikes and idleness in­
volved unaffiliated unions, which included the United
Auto Workers; District 50; the United Mine Workers;
and the Teamsters. According to the latest figures
available, unaffiliated unions had a membership o f 4.5
million, 21 percent of all union members in the United
States. 4 Though 8 percent o f all organized workers be­
longed to professional and State employee associations,
only 44,000 workers were involved in the 123 stoppages
by these organizations. In total, these stoppages were
the cause o f 326,000 man-days of idleness (0.7 percent
of total idleness).

Table 1. Monthly distribution of new strikes involving
1f000 workers or more, 1969-71
1971

1970

1969

January ........................................
February ......................................
March.............................................
First quarter ........................

30
19
29
78

12
15
29
56

29
28
32
89

A p r i l .............................................
May .............................................
June .............................................
Second quarter ...................

30
39
31
100

59
57
50
166

44
53
45
142

J u ly ................................................
August .........................................
Septem ber....................................
Third q u a rte r........................

27
23
23
73

41
28
32
101

42
34
35
111

O c to b e r.........................................
N o ve m b e r....................................
December ....................................
Fourth quarter ...................

21
16
10
47

33
18
7
58

38
21
11
70

298

381

412

Month

Total

..................... ..

Contract Status
As in 1970, more than one-half of work stoppages in
1971 occurred after the expiration or during the reopen­
ing of the contract. (See table 2.) Approximately ninetenths of total idleness was attributable to strikes that
occurred during contract renegotiations. Of the 5,138
1971 strikes, 51 percent occurred during contract re­
negotiations, 33 percent during the term o f the agree­
ment, and 13 percent at the negotiation of a first agree­
ment. A comparison of these figures with those of 1961
reveals that they have remained relatively stable over
time.

Size of Stoppages
In every size category in 1971, the number of strikes
fell at least 4 percent from the number in 1970 and in
most categories significantly more. (See table A-3.) The
greatest percentage decline was in stoppages of 1,000
workers or more, the greatest absolute drop, in strikes in
the 20 to 99 workers category. Almost three-fourths of
all stoppages involved fewer than 250 workers. However,
four-fifths o f total idleness resulted from stoppages in­
volving 1,000 workers or more.



2

Because o f interindustry strikes, the sum o f the individ­

ual item s does n o t equal the total.
3 Directory o f National Unions and Employee Associations,
1971, B ulletin 1 7 5 0 (Bureau o f Labor Statistics, 1 9 7 2 ), p. 69.
4

4

Directory o f National Unions, p. 69.

affected by disputes over safety, working conditions,
work rules, and physical facilities, accounted for almost
60 percent of the stoppages during the contract term,
slightly more than in 1970. Less than one-third of these
strikes occurred in manufacturing industries.
As in 1970, about three-fourths of all strikes caused
by issues of union organization and security occurred
during negotiations for a first contract. (See table A-8.)
In this category, the greatest number o f stoppages in­
volved fewer than 100 workers. Fifty-seven percent of
these strikes occurred in nonmanufacturing industries;
contract construction and wholesale and retail trade
accounted for the greatest number o f stoppages.

The percentage o f workers involved in strikes during
contract renegotiations rose to 77 percent in 1971 from
70 percent in 1970; the percent o f idleness resulting
from these strikes varied little from the number in 1970.
(See table A-8.) Over 47 percent o f all man-days of idle­
ness were attributable to strikes involving 10,000 workers
or more. (See table A-9.) In May, June, and July alone,
14 major contract renegotiation strikes occurred, mainly
in the construction, railroad, and communications indus­
tries. Although these were significant stoppages in them­
selves, they were also significant as they may have tended
to set a precedent for strikes at smaller companies in
the same industry. Almost 70 percent o f total idleness
during the year was accounted for by contract renegotia­
tion strikes involving 1,000 employees or more, a per­
centage slightly smaller than the rate in 1970. At the
same time, more than one-third of the total number of
strikes involved stoppages o f fewer than 250 workers
who were renegotiating contracts.
The greatest number o f strikes occurring during the
renegotiation o f a contract were caused by disagreements
over general wage changes. About 2,300 such strikes in­
volved 2.1 million workers for 31.1 million man-days of
idleness. (See table A-8.) These figures represented mod­
erate percentage increases in workers involved and idle­
ness between 1970 and 1971. Similarly causing large
percentages o f strike-related idleness during contract re­
negotiations were problems concerning other contractual
matters, including contract duration and local issues (10
percent), and issues relating to supplementary benefits
(6 percent).
Strikes in manufacturing industries made up threefifths o f the disputes that occurred while contracts were
being renegotiated. (See table A-10.) The primary and

Table 2. Percent of stoppages and idleness by contract
status, 1969-71
Stoppages
Contract status

All stoppages

........................

Negotiation of first agreement
or union recognition.................
Renegotiation of agreement
(expiration or reopening) . . . .
During term of agreement
(negotiation of new
agreement not involved) ..........
Other ................................................
Insufficient information to
classify ........................................

1971

1970

1969

100.0

100.0

100.0

12.8

12.7

14.2

51.3

51.0

48.6

33.1
1.6

33.4
2.0

34.5
2.2

1.3

.9

.5

Man-days

All stoppages..........................

100.0'

100.0

100.0

4.7

3.7

4.8

89.4

90.5

85.4

5.6
.1

5.5
.2

9.5
.2

.2

.1

.1

fabricated metal products industries and the machinery,
except electrical, industry, all o f which experienced
numerous major contract terminations in 1971, had the
largestnumber o f these strikes in manufacturing industries.

Negotiation of first agreement
or union reco gn itio n .................
Renegotiation of agreement
(expiration or reopening) . . . .
During term of agreement
(negotiation of new
agreement not involved) ..........
Other ................................................
Insufficient information to
classify .........................................

Strikes that occurred while the agreement was in effect
remained at the same 33-percent level recorded in 1970;
the percentage level o f idleness also remained approxi­
mately the same. (See table 2.) The greatest percentage
of these strikes involved 20 to 100 workers; however,
more than one-half o f the workers involved in stoppages
that occurred while the agreement was in effect were
part of strikes involving 1,000 workers or more. Most
frequently, the issue cited as the cause o f these strikes
during the term of the contract was plant administration.
This issue was cited in 820 o f a total o f 1,699 strikes.
(See table A-8.) Seventy-seven percent of the strikes dur­
ing the contract term were over in less than 7 days, a
figure only slightly higher than the 1970 level. The min­
ing and contract construction industries, particularly



NOTE:
Because of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal totals.

Major Issues
Economic issues were the cause of almost threefourths of all man-days o f idleness recorded in 1971.
5

(See table 3.) Although this percentage approached a rec­
ord high, the past decade has consistently seen the ma­
jority of idleness attributed to disputes over wages, hours,
and benefits. Only in 1961 and 1964 were economic
issues the major cause of less than 50 percent of all
stoppages. Over the last decade, idleness due to dis­
putes over union organization, job security, and plant
administration has shown an uneven decline; a more
sizable drop occurred from 1968-69, as the infla­
tionary trend brought on increasing concern for eco­
nomic issues. Though economic issues accounted for
proportionately more man-days o f idleness in 1971
strikes than in 1970, the second and third major issues,
other contractual matters, such as contract duration and
local issues, and union organization and security, de­
clined as major causes o f idleness. (See table 3.)
In the category of economic issues, general wage
changes accounted for over one-half o f all strikes that
occurred in 1971 and about two-thirds of the workers
involved and man-days of idleness. (See table A -ll.) Of
these wage-related strikes, about three-fifths continued
from 7 to 59 days, a figure comparable with the sit­
uation in 1970. However, about three-fourths of the mandays of idleness were recorded during strikes that lasted
more than 30 days. Idleness in nonmanufacturing indus­
tries caused by economic issues— predominantly mining,
contract construction, and transportation, communica­
tion, and public utilities industries— accounted for
slightly over two-fifths of the idleness for all industries.
(See table A-12.) This proportion is almost twice the
rate that occurred in 1961. The issue o f wage changes

negotiated during the expiration or reopening of a con­
tract brought on less than one-half of the total number
of strikes but close to two-thirds of idleness. Only 21
strikes (0.4 percent of total strikes) involving 10,000
workers or more were caused by economic disputes;
however, these strikes accounted for one-third of total
idleness. General wage increase issues alone in strikes of
1.000 workers or more caused nearly one-half of the total
man-days idle. (See table A-13.)
Other contractual matters, including the duration of
the contract, local issues, and other unspecified problems,
accounted for only 2 percent o f all strikes but over 10
percent of man-days idle. This level represents a con­
siderable year-to-year drop attributable to this issue; it
also represents a movement back to the more typical
1 percent level of the late 1960’s.
Union security and organization problems ranked third
as a cause o f stoppages; strikes over this issue resulted in
7.0 percent of man-days of idleness in 1971, a 46-percent
reduction from 1970. About two-fifths of these disputes
centered around the issue of certification; nearly half of
the man-days idle were due to union security problems.
Almost three-fourths of the workers involved and threefifths of the idleness in these strikes, most of which
occurred during the negotiation of the first agreement,
were attributed to stoppages of 15 to 29 days. Both of
these figures considerably exceeded levels for 1970.
Accounting for nearly three-fourths o f the workers in­
volved in union organization and security related strikes,
contract construction disputes also resulted in nearly 50
percent of the man-days of idleness attributed to this
issue. These issues ranked third among causes of govern­
ment work stoppages. Although about three-fourths of
all of these union organization and security strikes in­
volved fewer than 100 workers, the majority of workers
involved and man-days idle occurred during strikes in­
volving more than 5,000 workers.

Table 3. Percent of idleness by major issue, 1968-71
Percent of man-days idle
Major issue

1971

1970

1969

1968

All issues..............

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Economic 1 .................

73.8

56.8

67.7

75.1

Other contractual
matters ...................

10.6

27.6

.6

1.6

7.0
2.1

9.2

17.4

.6

5.3

8.5
33.2

5.1

2.6

6.6

9.2

.6

.6

1.0

.9

.7

2.4

1.2

1.4

Union organization
and security
............
Job security ..............
Plant adminis­
tration ........................
Other working
con ditions.................

Industries Affected
Over 60 percent .of all idleness in 1971, nearly 29.1
million man-days, resulted from work stoppages in the
nonmanufacturing sector. (See table A-14.) Although the
absolute level of idleness in this sector increased only
slightly over the year, the relative proportion these
strikes constituted of the total has risen substantially.
In 1970, idleness attributable to stoppages in the non­
manufacturing sector accounted for about 43 percent of
all man-days o f idleness.
Because of a 16 million decline in man-days idle in
the transportation equipment and electrical machinery
industries, idleness in the manufacturing sector decreased

Intra- or interunion
matters........................

Includes wage changes, supplementary benefits, wage
adjustments, and hours of work.
NOTE:
Because of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal totals.




6

from 38.0 million man-days in 1970 to 18.5 million in
1971, the lowest idleness level in this sector since 1966.
An even larger percentage decline occurred in govern­
ment, where idleness was reduced by nearly 56 percent.
This reduction was primarily due to the absence of
large and prolonged stoppages, as had occurred in 1970.
Nearly all other primary strike indexes were lower in
1971 than they were in 1970. The number o f strikes
beginning in the year, for example, declined in each
sector; the most significant reduction occurred in non­
manufacturing (15 percent). Over 80 percent o f this de­
cline of 480 resulted from the curtailment of work
stoppages in the construction industry. (See p. 2.) In
manufacturing, where the number o f strikes was re­
duced by 4 percent, the number o f workers involved in
labor disputes declined by nearly 24 percent, an in­
dication that strikes were smaller in 1971 than they were
in 1970. In the government sector, the number of strikes
decreased by 20 percent and the number o f workers in­
volved by 54 percent. Only in nonmanufacturing did the
number of workers engaging in strikes increase, and in
that sector by about 11 percent.
In 1971, the average duration o f work stoppages was
far higher in the manufacturing sector (35.3 days) than
in either nonmanufacturing (17.3 days) or government
(8.5 days). Nonetheless, each sector registered shorter
average stoppages in 1971 than in 1970— by 11.6 days
in manufacturing, 3.7 days in nonmanufacturing, and 2.7
days in government.
Nearly doubling the 1970 total, idleness in the trans­
portation, communication, and utilities grouping (13.4
million man-days) was the highest experienced by any
industry in 1971. The bulk o f the idleness was attrib­
utable to the occurrence o f nine major stoppages (those
involving 10,000 workers or more), which accounted for
86 percent o f the idleness total and 93 percent of all
workers involved. Among these nine major strikes were
four nationwide stoppages: railway clerks against REA
Express, Inc.; railroad employees against the major
rail operators; telegraph workers against Western Union;
and telephone workers against the Bell Telephone
System. In three other major stoppages, over 1 million
man-days were lost: two longshoring strikes which
closed all major ports on the east, gulf, and west coasts,
and the New York Telephone strike which lasted for 7
months after the nationwide settlement was reached.
Declining 55 percent from 1970 to 1971, idleness in
the contract construction industry reached its lowest
level since 1967. Statistically, this decline was attrib­
utable to the shorter duration and thus lessened impact
of major stoppages in the industry. Although the num­
ber of workers involved in these large strikes increased
since 1970, the number o f man-days idle declined sub­




stantially. In 1971, eight major stoppages, involving
268,000 workers and 3.9 million man-days, were ini­
tiated, compared with 10 stoppages, 258,000 workers
and 7.2 million man-days for 1970. Relatively, major
strikes constituted a higher proportion of the total con­
struction industry idleness in 1971 than in 1970, 57 per­
cent and 47 percent, respectively. Both the major strikes
that accounted for 1 million or more man-days o f idle­
ness involved construction workers in the State of
California.
In contrast to the declines reported for many indus­
tries, strike idleness in mining reached its highest level
since 1959. More than 4.9 million man-days were lost
due to work stoppages in the industry, representing 3.23
percent of estimated available work time, the highest
proportion for any industry in 1971. The preponderance
of strike idleness occurred in the bituminous coal indus­
try, which accounted for 92 percent of all mining strikes,
92 percent of total workers involved, and 85 percent of
all idleness. Two major strikes against the Nation’s bitu­
minous coal companies alone involved 41 percent of all
workers in mining disputes and 76 percent of total idle­
ness. Failure to reach a new contract precipitated one
major stoppage; the other was staged in protest of a
Federal court decision ordering United Mine Workers’
President W . A. Boyle to step down as a trustee of the
union’s Welfare and Retirement Fund.
As a result of reduced collective bargaining activity,
a number of industries experienced fewer days idle in
1971 than they did in 1970. In the rubber industry, for
example, strike-related idleness declined by 1.9 million
man-days, or 82 percent, primarily because all major con­
tracts were renegotiated in 1970. An even more dramatic
reduction in idleness occurred in the transportation
equipment industry, where idleness declined by 11.3
million man-days in 1971. Contracts with the Big Three
auto producers were renegotiated in 1970 after a lengthy
strike at General Motors, which resulted in 12.3 million
man-days of idleness. Strike idleness was also significantly
reduced in the electrical machinery, equipment and
supplies (75 percent), chemicals and allied products (49
percent), and fabricated metals (41 percent) industries.

Government Work Stoppages
For the first time since 1961, the number o f govern­
ment work stoppages 5 declined. The 329 stoppages
in 1971 represented a 20-percent decline from the 412
5
See Work Stoppages in Government, 1958-68, Report 34 8 ,
and
Summary Report, 1960, 1969-70 (Bureau o f Labor
Statistics, 1 9 71).

7

in 1970, the highest number ever recorded. (See table
A-14.) Dropping more than 50 percent from 1970, both
the number o f workers involved and the man-days of
idleness similarly halted the marked upward trend that
began in 1966, when the drive for recognition by public
employees began. Nevertheless, the number o f strikers in
1971 was almost 13 times the 1965 figure; idleness in­
creased more than sixfold. However, this sizable 6-year
increase should not overinflate the significance o f govern­
ment strikes, which made up only 6 percent o f total
stoppages and less than 2 percent of all idleness in 1971.
Local government stoppages constituted the largest
proportion o f government strikes— more than 90 per­
cent— and about the same proportion o f idleness. The
304 local strikes in 1971 represented more than a seven­
fold increase from 1965; idleness in 1971 was more than
five times the level reached in 1965.
In State governments, no new strikes began in 1965;
23 began 1971. These strikes accounted for 14,500 idle
workers and 81,800 man-days o f idleness. The fact that
local governments employed more than two and a half
times the workers o f State governments in 1971 and
consequently carried on a greater proportion o f col­
lective bargaining partly explains the significant varia­
tion in strike occurrence at State and local levels.
Strike-related idleness was significantly reduced in the
Federal sector between 1970 and 1971. Two Federal
strikes idled 1,000 workers for fewer than 10,000 mandays in 1971, compared with three strikes, 15 6,000 work­
ers, and 648,000 man-days o f idleness in 1970. A 10-day
Tennessee Valley Authority strike of 990 workers over
plant administration issues was the cause of almost 8,000
man-days of idleness in 1971. A smaller 6-day stoppage
of 35 employees at the Library of Congress resulted in
less than 150 man-days o f idleness. The 1970 strike by
152,000 Post Office workers was primarily responsible
for the year-to-year difference.
Government strikes in 1971 generally revealed these
characteristics: (1) One-third o f the stoppages occurred
at the negotiation of the first agreement, about two and
a half times the all-industry level. Another 37 percent
were precipitated during contract renegotiations. (2) Over
two-thirds o f government idleness was recorded in
strikes over general wage changes, a level comparable
with the all-industry figure. Over one-fourth of govern­
ment stoppages were brought on by disputes over
plant administration or union organization and security.
(3) More than four-fifths o f all government strikes were
over in 2 weeks or less, a high proportion compared with
the 56 percent o f all strikes settled in 14 days or less.
Only four stoppages lasted 60 days or longer.
Typical o f the general strike pattern, wage issues
accounted for the greatest number o f government strikes




(58 percent) and more than two-thirds of idleness. (See
table A-15.) School district strikes made up the greatest
part of wage-related stoppages: 109 strikes involving
70,000 workers for 521,200 man-days. Plant adminis­
tration problems, particularly in cities and school dis­
tricts, caused another 49 strikes. As unionization and
recognition drives continue, the fact that another 43
strikes were caused by this issue is not surprising.
At the State and county level, strikes occurred among
numerous occupation groups; service (including house­
keeping, maintenance and cafeteria workers) and bluecollar and manual workers accounted for the greatest
proportion of stoppages, workers involved, and mandays idle. (See table A-16.) At the city level, however,
sanitation and blue-collar and manual workers together
were involved in almost three-fifths of the strikes. Strikes
by teachers in public schools and libraries numbered 131
and accounted for the largest proportion of strike activ­
ity in school districts; three-fifths of total government
idleness was attributable to these strikes. (See table A-17.)
Of course almost one-third of all government employees
were engaged in educational occupations at the local
level in 1971.

Stoppages by Location
Regions
In line with the overall reduction in strike activity,
idleness declined in 5 of 9 regions from 1970 to 1971.
(See table A-18.) In the West North Central region, the
absolute level of idleness decreased by 65 percent, the
sharpest reduction for all regions in 1971. A 60-percent
decline occurred in the East North Central region, where
idleness was reduced by 16.8 million man-days. Other
regions experiencing fewer man-days idle were New
England (48 percent), the East South Central (36 per­
cent), and the West South Central (10 percent).
Man-days o f idleness increased by 94 percent in the
Mountain, 53 percent in the Pacific, 21 percent in the
Middle Atlantic, and 5 percent in the South Atlantic
regions.
For the first time since the inclusion o f this measure,
the Middle Atlantic region led the Nation in the per­
centage o f total available working time idled by labor
disputes. This high percentage was principally a result of
the New York Telephone Co. strike, which alone ac­
counted for slightly over 30 percent of the region’s idle­
ness. The east coast longshoring strike of October and
November added 900,000 man-days to the regional total.
Demands for higher wages and improved hours of work
8

politan areas sustained more than 1 million man-days of
idleness each: San Francisco—
Oakland (1.3 million),
Detroit (1.1 million), and Chicago (1.0 million). In 1970,
14 metropolitan areas were in this category.
For the 13th consecutive year, the New York SMSA
had the highest incidence of work stoppages in the
Nation (247). This number, however, represented a 30percent decline from 1970 to 1971. Philadelphia again
ranked second, as it has 11 of the last 12 years,
as a result of 210 stoppages. Pittsburgh (178), Chicago
(145), Los Angeles-Long Beach (132), San FranciscoOakland (125), and Detroit (125) were next.

precipitated the latter stoppage; the New York Telephone
Co. strike, which evolved from the system-wide Bell
Telephone strike, was primarily over wage issues.

States
New York State, experiencing the effects of 11 major
stoppages, sustained the highest absolute level of idle­
ness of any State in 1971. (See tables A-5, A-19.) The
7.3 million man-days o f idleness were an increase o f 24
percent over the 1970 level, and represented the highest
annual idleness for the State in the past two decades.
Nearly 60 percent o f the idleness was due to the New
York Telephone Co. strike in July.
The second highest level o f idleness was experienced
in California. Eleven major stoppages in that State ac­
counted for over 80 percent of the total idleness of 5.1
million man-days; two large construction strikes, each
entailing over 1 million man-days o f idleness, constituted
over half o f the time idle. Pennsylvania, which had 5.1
million man-days idle, was third in the time lost category.
A sizable construction strike in the eastern sector of the
State and the interstate bituminous coal strike which
began in October accounted for approximately onefifth of the total. An additional eight States also experi­
enced more than 1 million man-days of idleness each.
Expressed as a proportion of private nonagricultural
workingtime, 20.9 days per 1,000 were lost due to
work stoppages in West Virginia, the highest level this
year. Eighty-two percent of the total was caused by
strikes in mining. Several other States substantially sur­
passed the national average o f 0.32 percent o f estimated
worktime idle: Montana (1.12 percent), Kentucky (0.65
percent), and Delaware (0.64 percent).

Duration
Although the major measures of work stoppages de­
clined in 1971, the mean duration of strikes rose by 2
days from the 1970 level to a level not equaled since
1928. (See table 4.) Man-days of idleness per worker,
however, declined to 14.5 in 1971 from 20.1 in 1970.
This drop in idleness per worker was heavily weighted by
a 3-day strike of 540,000 railroad workers in May, and a
7-day 440,000-worker telephone stoppage in July. The
workers involved in these two brief strikes accounted for
30 percent of all striking workers in 1971. Median dura­
tion remained at 11, the same level as occurred in 1970,
and the highest recorded since the measure was first
computed in 1950. (See table 4.)
A significant percentage o f stoppages lasting less than
2 weeks accounted for the lower median than mean
length of strikes. (See table A-21.) Though 56 percent of
all stoppages and 59 percent of workers involved could
be accounted for by strikes of less than 2 weeks’ dura­
tion, 89 percent of total idleness occurred in strikes of
longer than 2 weeks’ duration. In 1970, the situation
was very much the same. A decade ago, more than fourfifths of idleness resulted from stoppages lasting more
than 2 weeks.
The industries recording the largest number of 1971
strikes were the mining, contract construction, and
wholesale and retail trade industries. Most of these
strikes were of short to moderate duration (less than 30
days). (See table A-21.) As in past years, stoppages of
longer than 30 days’ duration caused over three-fifths
of idleness in the nonmanufacturing sector. In a com­
parison o f the manufacturing and nonmanufacturing sec­
tors, manufacturing industries experienced proportion­
ately fewer stoppages of less than 7 days (26 compared
with 49 percent) and proportionately more stoppages
that were longer than 30 days (38 compared with 20
percent) than in nonmanufacturing industries.
Accounting consistently for a significant proportion
of strikes of every duration were stoppages caused by

Metropolitan areas
The New York SMSA, as a result o f the New York Tele­
phone Co. strike, which accounted for two-thirds of the
time idle, sustained the highest level o f strike idleness of
any metropolitan area in 1971 (5.4 million man-days).
(See table A-20.) Comparable figures for 1970 indicated
that work stoppage activity in the New York SMSA in­
creased by over 2.7 million man-days, or, in short, dou­
bled. A massive construction dispute, which was pre­
cipitated by a Teamster walkout, cost the Los AngelesLong Beach metropolitan area 1.0 million working days;
in total, workers in the area were away from their jobs
for 1.8 million man-days, the second highest number in
1971. The Philadelphia area experienced the third high­
est level, in part due to a 73-day construction strike
which idled 11,000 workers. Nonetheless, days on strike
in that metropolitan area decreased by 516,000 man-days,
or 23 percent, from the 1970 level. Three other metro­




9

Chart 2.

Man-days Idle In Work Stoppages, 1945-71

PT

P T

1,000

P T

H i

mm
■n

P T

P T

mm

IH B

■

■

m

Ssl

m

umber of Man-Days
of Idleness
(In Millions)

m

/

\

- /

mmam

A
>v / \
V
V

-

/

/ \
\

.

m

W
m

111
:
-

\ \ yy *
■ ......
/*
r
Ipli

fljl

1 (1 M I 1 B P

■

1.00

IIIII m IHI
1945

1950

■

1955

1960

Note: Shaded areas represent NBER Business Cycles.
" F ' Indicates a peak, " T " a trough.




10

1965

*
19701971

changes lasting over 90 days. A considerable number of
1971 strikes of less than 2 weeks were caused by issues
of plant administration and inter- or intraunion matters.
The greatest number of strikes occurred during con­
tract renegotiations in 1971, the largest proportion in
any category lasting 30 to 59 days. (See table A-23.)
Another 10 percent of strikes were 1-day stoppages
occurring during the contract term. In 1970, similar re-t
suits were recorded. Over 90 percent of strikes during
the contract term lasted less than 2 weeks, compared
with approximately one-third of contract renegotiation
stoppages. Almost one-half of total idleness was recorded
during contract renegotiation strikes of more than 90
days, a high percentage figure compared with that of
the previous decade. Showing a 12-percent increase, the
number of prolonged strikes (90 days or longer) rose to
375 in 1971; this level is 96 percent higher than the
number recorded in 1961.
Over 60 percent of all work stoppages involved more
than 20 and less than 250 workers; the greatest pro­
portion of these strikes lasted less than 60 days. (See
table A-3.) Close to the same percentage of workers par­
ticipated in strikes of more than 10,000 workers; most of
these workers were involved in stoppages of less than 30
days. Again, the 3-day major railroad stoppage in May
and the 7-day major telephone stoppage in July weighted
this statistic heavily. More than four-fifths of total idle­
ness was accumulated in strikes involving more than
1,000 workers. The greatest proportion were in strikes
that lasted longer than 30 days.

Table 4. Work stoppages by mean and median duration,
man-days idle per worker, and number of prolonged
strikes, 1954-71
All stoppages ending during year
Year

Mean
duration

1954 ........................................
1955 ........................................
1956 ........................................
1957 ........................................
1958 .........................................
1959 .........................................
1960...........................................
1961 .........................................
1962 .........................................
1963 .........................................
1964 .........................................
1965 .........................................
1966 .........................................
1967 ........................................
1968 ............................................
1969 ........................................
1970 ........................................
1971 ........................................

22.5
18.5
18.9
19.2
19.7
24.6
23.4
23.7
24.6
23.0
22.9
25.0
22.2
22.8
24.5
22.5
25.0
27.0
Man-days
idle per
worker

1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971

1

.........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
.........................................
.........................................
.........................................
.........................................
.........................................
.........................................
.........................................

14.7
10.7
17.4
11.4
11.6
36.7
14.5
11.2
15.0
17.1
14.0
15.1
12.9
14.7
18.5
17.3
20.1
14.5

Median
duration

6
8
8
8
8
10
10
9
9
8
8
9
9
9
10
10
11
11
Number of
prolonged
strikes 1

172
137
132
124
133
221
201
191
224
203
189
221
210
232
261
274
334
375

Mediation
Government mediation, most frequently by the Fed­
eral Mediation and Conciliation Service, was employed
in 46 percent of all 1971 strikes, fractionally higher than
the number in 1970. 6 (See table A-24.)In another 3
percent of 1971’s strikes, private or other mediation
was employed; 51 percent of all strike cases reported
no mediation. In 1961, results were comparable.
Government mediation was called into use most fre­
quently in strikes occurring during the renegotiation of
contracts; 38 percent of all strikes involving 68 percent
of workers idled and 55 percent of total idleness. These
are typically larger strikes of longer duration than those
occurring under other contract circumstances.

Extending 90 days or longer.

disputes over general wage changes and union organiza­
tion and security, a situation similar to that in 1970.
(See table A-22.) Seven strikes brought on by disputes
over other contractual matters lasting over 90 days con­
tributed the greatest number of man-days idle for any
time period, over 18 million, 29 percent o f total idle­
ness. In 1970, the greatest number of man-days o f idle­
ness were accumulated in strikes over general wage




6
T w o agencies, the Federal M ediation and C onciliation
Service and the N ational M ediation Board, co n d u ct m ost o f the
m ediation on the Federal level. O ccasionally, officials o f the
U.S. D epartm ent o f Labor or other persons designated by the
President are directly involved. Several States also have m edia­
tion agencies.

11

Thirty percent o f all strikes used no mediation and
occurred while the contract was in effect. This pheno­
menon is not unexpected in view o f the short duration
of most of these strikes. For the majority o f strikes
occurring during efforts to negotiate an initial agree­
ment, the participants reported that the assistance of
mediators was not required. Only one-fourth o f strikes
that took place during contract renegotiations were
resolved with no mediatory assistance.

issue was union organization and security. Well over half
of the strikes staged as a short protest or sympathy
strike were over plant administration issues, such as the
award of overtime pay, work rules, safety measures, and
work assignments. (See table A-26.)
All areas o f disagreement were resolved in a far greater
proportion of manufacturing than nonmanufacturing
strikes— 81 percent compared with 53 percent. An
additional 22 percent of nonmanufacturing strikes, how­
ever, were settled when the parties agreed on a procedure
to resolve remaining issues. Nearly 41 percent o f all con­
struction strikes and 25 percent o f all mining strikes
were concluded in this manner. (See table A-27.)

Settlement
As in recent years, more than 8 o f every 10 stop­
pages ending in 1971 were terminated by either a formal
settlement or by the establishment of a procedure to re­
solve remaining differences. Nine percent o f all strikes
ended without a formal agreement; workers returned to
their jobs after participating in a short protest or sym­
pathy strike. In an additional 5 percent o f the cases,
employers resumed operations either with new em­
ployees or with returning strikers. Court-ordered in­
junctions terminated 118 stoppages, or 2 percent; over
20 percent of all workers involved in stoppages were in
this group.
A formal settlement concluded seven-tenths of all
strikes that occurred during attempts to establish a col­
lective bargaining relationship and nine-tenths of all
strikes staged during the renegotiation or reopening of
an existing agreement. (See table A-25.) In nearly onequarter o f all strikes that occurred during the term of an
agreement, however, no formal settlement was reached.
Consequently, approximately nine-tenths of all situa­
tions in which no formal settlement was reported oc­
curred during the term o f an existing agreement.
. Workers returned to their jobs with a formal settle­
ment in 85 percent of the strikes caused by economic
issues and 59 percent o f the stoppages when the major

Procedures for Handling
Unsettled Issues
In 550 situations in 1971, the disputing parties
agreed to resume work before all disagreements had been
resolved. In most instances, these agreements occurred
in work stoppages which arose during the contract term
(78 percent). (See table A-28.) Stoppages of this nature
accounted for 73 percent o f all cases submitted to arbi­
tration, 58 percent of all cases in which direct negotiation
was employed, 81 percent o f cases that were referred to
a government agency, and nearly 100 percent of all cases
in which other means o f resolution were attempted. In
over half of the situations involving the negotiation of a
first agreement, unresolved disputes were referred to a
government agency. Direct negotiation was the primary
method of resolution in work stoppages evolving from
the renegotiation or reopening o f an existing agreement.
As was true in past years, interunion or intraunion
discord accounted for the bulk of strike cases in which
issues remained unsettled. (See table 5.) Nonetheless, a
larger proportion of workers and days idle were in­
volved in stoppages in which working conditions were
the primary issue.

Table 5. Unresolved issues in work stoppages, 1971
(Workers and man-days idle in thousands)
Stoppages
Issues

Total stoppages covered 1 ..........................
Wages and hours .......................................................
Fringe benefits .........................................................
Union organization ..................................................
Working con dition s..................................................
Interu nio n ...................................................................
Combinations ............................................................
Other ..........................................................................
1

Number

Workers involved

Man-days idle

Percent

Number

Percent

513

100.0

152.9

100.0

1,381.8

100.0

36
6
32
114
291
28
6

7.0
1.2
6.2
22.2
56.7
5.5
1.2

24.7
.3
4.2
42.9
24.7
21.5
34.7

16.2
.2
2.7
28.0
16.1
14.1
22.7

103.2
2.0
58.5
580.1
121.0
219.8
297.2

7.5
.1
4.2
42.0
8.8
15.9
21.5

Number

Excludes stoppages which have no information on issues unsettled or no agreement for issues remaining.

NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




12

Percent

Chart 3

Idleness as a percent of total available working time, in selected industries; 1970 and 1971

IN D U S T R Y
Ordnance and accessories
Transportation, communication,
electric, gas and sanitary services
Contract construction
Transportation equipment
Fabricated metal products
Paper and allied products
Electrical machinery,
equipment and supplies
Mining
Primary metal industries
Food and kindred products
Apparel
Petroleum refining
Manufacturing
Rubber and miscellaneous
plastic products
4
U

3

2

1

0

Industries selected, ranked in descending order of organization, were the most highly unionized in 1970. (Reference: D ir e c to r y o f N a tio n a l
U n io n s a n d E m p lo y e r A ss o c iatio n s , 1 9 7 1 , Bulletin 1750, Bureau of Labor Statistics, p. 81.)




Appendix A. Tables
Table A-l. Work stoppages in the United States, 1927-711
W o rk s to p p a g e s
Y ear

W o rk e r s in v o lv e d 1
2

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

(4)
(4)
(4)

330
314
289
183
342

1.
1.
1.
.
1.

4
3
2
8
6

D u r a tio n
N um ber
M ean3
707
604
921
637
810

1927 -------------------------------------------------------------------192 8 -------------------------------------------------------------------1929 -------------------------------------------------------------------1930 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 3 1 --------------------------------------------------------------------

26.
27.
22.
22.
18.

5
6
6
3
8

M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g y e a r

P ercen t
of
t o ta l
e m p lo y e d

M e d ia n

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

3

0

P e r c e n t of e s ti m a t e d
t o ta l w o r k in g tim e

Per
w o rk er
in v o lv e d

T o ta l
econom y

P r iv a te
n o n farm

26, 200
1 2 ,6 0 0
5, 350
3, 320
6, 890

(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)

0.
.
.
.
.

37
17
07
05
11

79.
40.
18.
18.
20.

5
2
5
1
2

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1,
1,
2,
2,

841
695
856
014
172

19.
16.
19.
23.
23.

6
9
5
8
3

(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)

324
1, 170
1, 470
1, 120
789

1.
6.
7.
5.
3.

8
3
2
2
1

10, 500
16, 900
19, 600
1 5 ,5 0 0
13, 900

(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)

.
.
.
.
.

23
36
38
29
21

32.
14.
13.
13.
17.

4
4
4
8
6

1937 -------------------------------------------------------------------1938 -------------------------------------------------------------------1939 -------------------------------------------------------------------1940 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 4 1 --------------------------------------------------------------------

4,
2,
2,
2,
4,

740
772
613
508
2 88

20.
23.
23.
20.
18.

3
6
4
9
3

(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)

1, 860
688
1, 170
577
2, 360

7.
2.
3.
1.
6.

2
8
5
7
1

28,
9,
17,
6,
23,

400
150
800
700
000

(4)
(4)
0. 21
. 08
. 23

.
.
.
.
.

43
15
28
10
32

15.
13.
15.
11.
9.

3
3
2
6
8

1942
1943
1944
1945
1946

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2,
3,
4,
4,
4,

968
752
956
750
985

11.
5.
5.
9.
24.

7
0
6
9
2

(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)

1,
2,
3,
4,

840
980
120
470
600

2.
4.
4.
8.
10.

0
6
8
2
5

4,
13,
8,
38,
116,

180
500
720
000
000

.
.
.
.
1.

04
10
07
31
04

.
.
.
.
1.

05
15
09
47
43

5.
6.
4.
11.
25.

0
8
1
0
2

1947 -------------------------------------------------------------------1948 -------------------------------------------------------------------1949 -------------------------------------------------------------------1950 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 5 1 --------------------------------------------------------------------

3,
3,
3,
4,
4,

693
419
606
843
737

25.
21.
22.
19.
17.

6
8
5
2
4

(4)
(4)
(4)
8
7

2,
1,
3,
2,
2,

170
960
030
410
220

4.
4.
6.
5.
4.

7
2
7
1
5

3 4 ,6 0 0
34, 100
50, 500
38, 800
22, 900

.
.
.
.
.

30
28
44
33
18

. 41
. 37
. 59
. 40
.2 1

15.
17.
16.
16.
10.

9
4
7
1
3

1952
1953
1954
1955
1956

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5,
5,
3,
4,
3,

117
091
468
320
825

19.
20.
22.
18.
18.

6
3
5
5
9

7
9
9
8
7

3,
2,
1,
2,
1,

540
400
530
650
900

7.
4.
3.
5.
3.

3
7
1
2
6

59,
28,
22,
28,
33,

100
300
600
200
100

.
.
.
.
.

48
22
18
22
24

.
.
.
.
.

57
26
19
26
29

16.
11.
14.
10.
17.

7
8
7
7
4

1957 -------------------------------------------------------------------1958 -------------------------------------------------------------------1959 ------------------ ------ - - I960 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 6 1 --------------------------------------------------------------------

3,
3,
3,
3,
3,

673
694
708
333
367

19.
19.
24.
23.
23.

2
7
6
4
7

8
8
10
10
9

1,
2,
1,
1,
1,

390
060
880
320
450

2.
3.
3.
2.
2.

6
9
3
4
6

16, 500
23, 900
69, 000
19, 100
1 6 ,3 0 0

.
.
.
.
.

12
18
50
14
11

.
.
.
.
.

14
22
61
17
12

11.
11.
36.
14.
11.

4
6
7
5
2

1962
1963
1964
1965
1966

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3,
3,
3,
3,
4,

614
362
655
963
405

24.
23.
22.
25.
22.

6
0
9
0
2

9
8
8
9
9

1, 230
941
1, 640
1, 550
1, 960

2.
1.
2.
2.
3.

2
1
7
5
0

18, 600
16, 100
2 2 ,9 0 0
23, 300
25, 400

.
.
.
.
.

13
11
15
15
15

.
.
.
.
.

16
13
18
18
18

15.
17.
14.
15.
12.

0
1
0
1
9

1967 -------------------------------------------------------------------1968 - - - - -- - 196 9 -------------------------------------------------------------------1970 -------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 7 1 --------------------------------------------------------------------

4,
5,
5,
5,
5,

595
045
700
716
138

22.
24.
22.
25.
27.

8
5
5
0
0

9
10
10
11
11

2,
2,
2,
3,
3,

4.
3.
3.
4.
4.

3
8
5
7
6

4 2 ,1 0 0
49, 018
4 2 ,8 6 9
66, 414
47, 589

.
.
.
.
.

25
28
24
37
26

. 30
. 32
. 28
. 44
. 32

14.
18.
17.
20.
14.

7
5
3
1
5

1932
1933
1934
1935
1936

870
649
481
305
2 80

1 T h e n u m b e r ' of s to p p a g e s a n d w o r k e r s r e l a t e to t h o s e s to p p a g e s t h a t b e g a n in th e y e a r ; a v e r a g e d u r a tio n , to t h o s e e n d in g in th e y e a r .
M a n -d a y s of i d le n e s s in c lu d e a ll s to p p a g e s in e ff e c t.
A v a ila b le in f o r m a tio n f o r e a r l i e r p e r i o d s a p p e a r s in H a n d b o o k of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s . B L S B u lle tin 1630 (1 9 6 9 ), t a b l e s 1 4 0 -1 4 5 . F o r a
d i s c u s s io n of th e p r o c e d u r e s in v o lv e d in th e c o lle c tio n a n d c o m p ila tio n of w o r k s to p p a g e s t a t i s t i c s , s e e B L S H a n d b o o k of M e th o d s f o r S u rv e y a n d
S tu d ie s , B L S B u lle tin 1458 (1 9 6 6 ), c h a p te r 19. A g r i c u l t u r a l a n d g o v e rn m e n t e m p lo y e e s a r e in c lu d e d in th e t o ta l e m p lo y e d . A n e x p la n a tio n of th e
m e a s u r e m e n t of id le n e s s a s a p e r c e n t a g e of th e to ta l e m p lo y e d f o r c e a n d of th e to ta l tim e w o r k e d is fo u n d in " T o ta l E c o n o m y M e a s u r e of S trik e
I d le n e s s " b y H o w a rd N. F u l le r to n , M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w , V ol. 91, No. 10, O ct. 1968.
2 In t h e s e t a b l e s , w o r k e r s a r e c o u n te d m o r e th a n o n c e if th e y w e r e in v o lv e d in m o r e th a n 1 s to p p a g e d u r in g th e y e a r .
3 F i g u r e s a r e s im p le a v e r a g e s ; e a c h s to p p a g e is g iv e n e q u a l w e ig h t r e g a r d l e s s of i ts s iz e .
4 N ot a v a ila b le .




14

Table A-2. Work stoppages by month, 1970-71
W o rk e r s in v o lv e d

N u m b e r of s to p p a g e s
B e g in n in g in m o n th
M o n th
N um ber

P ercen t

In e ff e c t
d u r in g m o n th
N um ber

B e g in n in g ; in m o n th

P e rce n t

N um ber
P e rce n t
(in
th o u s a n d s )

M a n -d a y s id le

In e ff e c t
d u r in g m o n th
N um ber
P ercen t
(in
th o u s a n d s )

P ercen t
N um ber
of
(in
P e r c e n t e s ti m a t e d
th o u s a n d s )
w o rk in g
tim e

1970
J a n u a r y --------------------------------------------F e b r u a r y -----------------------------------------M a r c h ----------------------------------------------A p r i l -------------------------------------------------M a y --------------------------------------------------J u n e ---------------------------______------—---J u l y -------------------------------------------------A u g u s t --------------------------- — -------------S e p t e m b e r ---------------------------------------O c t o b e r -------------------------------------------N o v e m b e r ---------------------------------------D ecem ber _

5, 716
279
330
427
640
699
657
585
527
560
448
340
224

100. 0
4 .9
5. 8
7. 5
11. 2
12. 2
11. 5
10. 2
9. 2
9 .8
7. 8
5 .9
3 .9

9, 626
458
529
630
884
1, 050
1, 060
989
950
971
881
695
529

100. 0
4. 8
5. 5
6 .5
9. 2
10. 9
11. 0
10. 3
9. 9
10. 1
9. 2
7. 2
5. 5

3, 305
71.
116.
316.
451.
331.
28 8 .
242.
127.
59 1 .
23 1 .
83.
455.

1
3
2
1
1
1
4
3
1
1
6
5

100. 0
2. 2
3. 5
9. 6
13. 6
10. 0
8. 7
7. 3
3 .9
17. 9
7. 0
2. 5
13. 8

6, 557
269. 9
329. 6
40 2 . 5
523. 1
675. 4
53 8 . 0
467. 1
340. 7
785. 0
7 5 3 .9
55 2 . 0
919. 9

100.
4.
5.
6.
8.
10.
8.
7.
5.
12.
11.
8.
14.

0 66, 414
1 3, 710. 8
0 2, 110. 6
1 2, 47 1 . 2
0
5, 4 3 1 . 1
3
6, 650. 7
2
5, 845. 6
1 5, 112. 1
2
3, 851. 8
0
8, 669. 5
5 11, 57 3 . 6
4
7, 798. 0
0
3, 188. 7

100.
5.
3.
3.
8.
10.
8.
7.
5.
13.
17.
11.
4.

1971 J a n u a r y --------------------------------------------F e b r u a r y -----------------------------------------M a r c h ----------------------------------------------A p r i l ------------------------------------------------M a y ------------------------------------------------J u n e ------------------------------------------------J u l y ------------------------------------------------A u g u s t ---------------------------------------------S e p te m b e r O c to b e r
N o v e m b e r ---------------------------------------D ecem ber -

5, 138
416
359
457
550
612
617
499
438
352
304
315
219

100. 0
8. 1
7. 0
8 .9
10. 7
11. 9
12. 0
9. 7
8. 5
6. 9
5 .9
6. 1
4. 3

8, 951
647
632
725
859
957
1, 031
938
891
670
553
562
486

100. 0
7. 2
7. 1
8. 1
9. 6
10. 7
11. 5
10. 5
10. 0
7. 5
6. 2
6. 3
5 .4

3, 280
234.
128.
150.
180.
726.
280.
747.
194.
110.
24 5 .
234.
45.

5
4
0
5
9
4
8
5
5
6
6
8

100. 0
7. 2
3 .9
4. 6
5. 5
22. 2
8. 5
22. 8
5 .9
3. 4
7. 5
7. 2
1 .4

5, 080
319.
206.
260.
269.
817.
42 0 .
93 7 .
501.
330.
326.
452.
238.

100.
6.
4.
5.
5.
16.
8.
18.
9.
6.
6.
8.
4.

0 47, 589
2, 868. 2
3
1
1, 93 4 . 5
1 2, 4 8 9 . 5
3
2, 388. 6
1 4, 000. 1
3 4, 093. 6
5 7 ,8 9 4 .8
5, 036. 8
9
5
3, 229. 7
5, 510. 6
4
5, 0 3 3 .5
9
7
3, 109. 1

100. 0
6. 0
4. 1
5. 2
5. 0
8 .4
8. 6
16. 6
10. 6
6. 8
11. 6
10. 6
6. 5

NO TE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




15

9
0
0
3
7
0
6
8
3
2
6
3

0
6
2
7
2
0
8
7
8
1
4
7
8

0. 3 7 S
. 25
. 15
. 16
. 34
. 46
. 36
. 32
. 26
. 57
. 73
. 54
. 20
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

26
20
14
15
15
28
26
52
32
21
36
33
20

Table A-3. Work stoppages by size and duration,11971
N um ber
N u m b e r of w o r k e r s

A ll
s to p p a g e s

1
day

2 -3
days

7 -1 4
days

4 -6
days

1 5 -2 9
days

3 0 -5 9
days

6 0 -8 9
days

90 d a y s
and o v e r

N u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s
A ll w o r k e r s ----------------------

5, 152

673

6 88

642

886

788

735

365

375

6 a n d u n d e r 2 0 --------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 1 0 0 ----------------------100 a n d u n d e r 25 0 ---------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 ---------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 ----------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5, 000 ------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 -----------10, 000 a n d o v e r ------------------------

684
1, 956
1, 183
699
330
245
27
28

71
227
202
107
43
22
1

71
209
193
122
55
32
4
2

76
215
151
116
41
37
2
4

133
354
185
103
63
39
6
3

107
332
153
92
55
37
3
9

108
313
160
82
38
28
1
5

54
140
80
41
18
24
6
2

64
166
59
36
17
26
5
2

3 ,2 8 7 .1

185. 3

768. 7

8 .4
9 7 .2
187. 8
24 3 . 5
226. 9
452. 1
1 7 1 .5
1, 8 9 9 .9

0. 8
11. 6
32. 6
36. 9
30. 0
44. 8
28. 6

W o rk e r s :in v o lv e d (in th o u s a n d s )
A ll w o r k e r s --------------------6 a n d u n d e r 2 0 --------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 1 0 0 ----------------------100 a n d u n d e r 250 ----------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 --------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 -----------------1 ,0 0 0 a n d u n d e r 5, 000 -------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 1 0 ,0 0 0 -----------10, 000 a n d o v e r ------------------------

0.
9.
31.
42.
38.
56.
30.
55 8.

8
9
3
7
7
6
0
6

2 5 1 .8

740. 8

61 4 . 0

397. 0

176. 6

152. 8

1 .0
10. 8
2 4 .5
40. 8
2 7 .4
63. 3
10. 3
73. 8

1. 5
17. 6
2 9 .5
36. 7
44. 8
68. 3
36. 2
50 6 . 2

1 .4
1 6 .4
23. 6
32. 0
37. 1
81. 1
17. 5
404. 9

1 .4
15. 6
24. 7
27. 7
23. 7
50. 1
5 .7
248. 2

0 .7
7. 0
1 2 .4
1 4 .4
13. 7
46. 1
3 6 .6
4 5 .7

0. 8
8. 1
9. 2
12. 2
1 1 .6
41. 8
35. 2
33. 8

M a n -d a y s id le (in th o u s a n d s )
A ll w o r k e r s ----------------------

62, 2 6 6 .4

185. 3

6 a n d u n d e r 2 0 --------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 1 0 0 ----------------------100 a n d u n d e r 250 ---------------------25 0 a nd u n d e r 500 ---------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1 ,0 0 0 ----------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5, 000 ------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 -----------10, 000 a n d o v e r ------------------------

1 8 8 .2
2, 0 7 9 .4
2, 998. 7
3, 633. 0
3, 3 2 6 .6
9 , 3 9 5 .8
21, 7 0 8 .7
18, 93 5 . 8

0. 8
1 1 .6
32. 6
36. 9
30. 0
44. 8
_
28. 6

1 ,3 7 3 . 6

895. 1

4, 099. 2

7 , 1 9 1 .8

11, 143. 9

7, 5 8 2 .4

29, 79 5 . 1

1. 8
22. 2
66. 9
83. 2
78. 7
1 2 1 .2
6 2 .4
937. 2

3 .5
3 6 .9
8 2 .9
126. 3
95. 0
20 7 . 1
4 3 .2
300. 2

11.
131.
20 8 .
243.
27 4 .
470.
20 2 .
2, 5 5 6 .

2 0. 1
247. 7
356. 8
463. 5
523. 8
1 , 0 5 2 .0
211. 0
4 , 3 1 6 .8

39. 9
461. 8
745. 1
79 8 . 7
6 9 1 .3
1, 347. 7
146. 9
6, 9 1 2 .4

3 4 .4
356. 7
6 3 7 .9
713. 5
608. 8
2, 2 8 1 .7
1, 3 1 5 .0
1, 6 3 4 .4

7 6. 5
810. 6
867. 9
1 ,1 6 7 .8
1 ,0 2 4 .2
3, 8 7 1 .0
1 9 ,7 2 7 .5
2, 249. 5

3
9
6
0
8
3
7
7

P ercen t
N u m b e r of s to p p a g e s
A ll w o r k e r s ----------------------

100. 0

13. 1

1 3 .4

1 2 .5

17. 2

15. 3

14. 3

7. 1

7. 3

6 a n d u n d e r 2 0 --------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 1 0 0 ---------------------100 a n d u n d e r 250 --------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 ---------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 -----------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5 ,0 0 0 -------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 -----------10, 000 a n d o v e r ------------------------

13. 3
38. 0
2 3 .0
13. 6
6 .4
4 .7
.5
.5

1 .4
4 .4
3 .9
2. 1
. 8
.4
_
(2)

1 .4
4. 1
3. 7
2 .4
1. 1
.6
. 1
(2)

1 .5
4 .2
2 .9
2. 3
.8
.7
(2)
.1

2 .6
6. 9
3. 6
2. 0
1. 2
. 8
. 1
. 1

2. 1
6. 4
3. 0
1. 8
1. 1
.7
. 1
.2

2. 1
6. 1
3. 1
1. 6
.7
.5
(2)
.1

1 .0
2 .7
1 .6
.8
.3
.4
.1
(2)

1. 2
3. 2
1. 1
.7
.3
.5
. 1
.1

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d (in th o u s a n d s )
A ll w o r k e r s ----------------------

1 0 0 .0

5. 6

2 3 .4

7 .7

2 2. 5

18. 7

12. 1

5 .4

4 .6

6 a n d u n d e r 2 0 --------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 1 0 0 ----------------------100 a n d u n d e r 250 --------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 --------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 ----------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5, 000 -------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 -----------10, 000 a n d o v e r ------------------------

0. 3
3 .0
5 .7
7 .4
6 .9
13. 8
5 .2
57. 8

(2)
0 .4
1. 0
1. 1
.9
1 .4
_
.9

(2)
0. 3
1. 0
1. 3
1 .2
1 .7
.9
17. 0

( 2)
0. 3
.7
1 .2
.8
1 .9
.3
2. 2

(2)
0 .5
.9
1. 1
1 .4
2. 1
1. 1
1 5 .4

(2)
0 .5
.7
1. 0
1. 1
2 .5
.5
12. 3

(2)
0. 5
. 8
. 8
.7
1 .5
.2
7. 5

( 2)
0 .2
.4
.4
.4
1 .4
1 .1
1 .4

(2)
0. 2
.3
.4
.4
1. 3
1. 1
1. 0

A ll w o r k e r s ---------------------

1 0 0 .0

0. 3

2 .2

1 .4

6 .6

1 1 .6

17. 9

12. 2

47. 8

6 a n d u n d e r 2 0 --------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 1 0 0 ----------------------100 a n d u n d e r 250 --------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 --------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 ----------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5 ,0 0 0 -------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 1 0 ,0 0 0 -----------10, 000 a n d o v e r -------------------------

0. 3
3 .3
4. 8
5. 8
5 .3
1 5 .1
3 4 .9
3 0 .4

(2)
(2)
0. 1
. 1
(2)
. 1
(2)

( 2)
(2)
0. 1
. 1
. 1
.2
. 1
1. 5

( 2)
0. 1
.1
.2
.2
.3
.1
.5

(2)
0 .2
.3
.4
.4
. 8
.3
4. 1

(2)
0 .4
.6
.7
. 8
1 .7
.3
6 .9

0. 1
.6
1 .0
1. 1
1 .0
3 .7
2. 1
2 .6

0. 1
1. 3
1 .4
1. 9
1. 6
6. 2
3 1 .7
3. 6

M a n -d a y s id le ( in th o u s a n d s )

T o t a ls in t h is ta b le d if f e r f r o m th o s e in p r e c e d in g ta b l e s b e c a u s e t h e s e s to p p a g e s e n d e d d u r in g 1971,
in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




16

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

0.
.
1.
1.
1.
2.
.
11.

1
7
2
3
1
2
2
1

a n d th u s in c lu d e d i d le n e s s o c c u r r in g

Table A-4. Trend of work stoppages involving 10,000 workers
or more, 1927-71
W o rk e r s in v o lv e d
Y ear

1927 ---------------------------------------------------1 9 2 8 ---------------------------------------------------192 9 ---------------------------------------------------1 930-....................................... ...........

N um ber

1

5
1
1

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

M a n -d a y s id le

P e r c e n t of
P e r c e n t of
N um be r
(in
to ta l f o r
t o ta l f o r
year
year
t h o u s a n d s )1

165
137
15
30

50. 0
43. 6
5. 2
1 6 .4

9, 737
1 0 , 086

195
270

P e r c e n t of
e s ti m a t e d
to ta l
w o rk in g
tim e

37. 2
80. 0
3 .6
8. 1

0 . 14
. 14
(1
2)
(2)

2 8 .4
50. 8
30. 7
38. 2

. 03
. 12
. 11
. 15
.0 8

_____________ _ _____

6

122

193 2 ---------------------------------------------------193 3 ------ 193 4 ...............1935

7
17
18
9

140
429
725
516

3 7 .7
43. 2
36. 7
4 9 .3
46. 1

1 ,9 5 4
5, 337
5, 199
7 ,4 8 8
4, 523

193 6 ---------------------------------------------------19371938---------------------------------------------------1 9 3 9 ---------------------------------------------------19 4 0 ----------------------------------------------------

8

169
528
39
572
57

2 1 .4
2 8 .4
5. 7
4 8 .9
9 .9

2, 893
9 , 110
171
5, 731
331

32. 1
1 .9
32. 2
4 .9

1 ,0 7 0
74
737
350
1 , 350

45. 3
8. 8
37. 2
1 6 .5
3 8 .9

9, 344
245
9 ,4 2 7
1, 259
1 9 ,3 0 0

40. 6
5 .9
69. 8
1 4 .4
50. 7

. 13
(2)
. 10

2, 920
1 ,0 3 0
870
1, 920
738

63. 6
47. 5
4 4 .5
63. 2
30. 7

6 6 ,4 0 0
1 7 ,7 0 0
18, 900
3 4 ,9 0 0
2 1 ,7 0 0

57. 2
5 1 .2
5 5 .3
5 6 .0

. 82
. 21
. 20
.4 1
.2 5

45 7
1 ,6 9 0
650
43 7
1 , 210

20.
47.
27.
28.
45.

5,
36,
7,
7,
12,

680
900
270
520
300

24. 8
62. 6
25. 7
3 3. 3
4 3 .4

.5 7
. 36
.0 7
.0 7
. 11

19,600

59. 1
18. 5
44. 2
73. 7
3 7 .4

. 17
. 26
. 10
.4 5
. 06

950
800
540
990
070

3 0 .4
25. 8
2 2 .0
3 4. 8
2 6 .0

.0 4
.0 4
.0 3
.0 6
.0 5

7, 290
21, 400
2 0 ,5 1 4
1 7 ,8 5 3
3 5 ,4 4 0
2 3 ,1 5 2

28. 7
50. 7
4 1 .8
4 1 .6
5 3 .4
48. 6

.0 5
. 15
. 12
. 10
. 20
. 13

19 4 1 ---------------------------------------------------1942- - - 1 9 4 3 ---------------------------------------------------1 94 4 .
194 5 ---------------------------------------------------194 6 ---------------------------------------------------194 7 ---------------------------------------------------194 8 ---------------------------------------------------194 9 ---------------------------------------------------195 0 ----------------------------------------------------

26
2
8

4
29
6
10

16
42
31
15
20

18
22

1 9 5 1 ---------------------------------------------------195 2 ---------------------------------------------------1 9 5 3 ---------------------------------------------------195 4 ---------------------------------------------------1955 ...................................................

19
35
28
18

195 6 ---------------------------------------------------1 9 5 7 ---------------------------------------------------195 8 ---------------------------------------------------1 9 5 9 ---------------------------------------------------I 9 6 0 ----------------------------------------------------

12
21

26

6
8

1
5
6

20
17

758
283
823
845
384

3 9 .9
2 0 .4
40. 0
4 5 .0
. 2 9 .2

1961 ---------------------------------------------------196 2 ---------------------------------------------------1 9 6 3 ---------------------------------------------------19 6 4 ---------------------------------------------------196 5 ----------------------------------------------------

14
16
7
18
21

601
318
102
607
387

4 1 .4
25. 8
10. 8
3 7 .0
25. 0

1966---------------------------------------------------196 7 ---------------------------------------------------196 8 ---------------------------------------------------1 9 6 9 ---------------------------------------------------197 0 -----------------------------------=---------------1971----------------------------------------------------

26
28
32
25
34
29

600
1, 340
994
668
1, 653
1 ,9 0 1

3 0 .7
4 6 .5
37. 5
2 6 .9
5 0 .0
5 8 .0




13

1 I n c lu d e s id le n e s s in s to p p a g e s b e g in n in g in e a r l i e r y e a r s .
2 L e s s th a n 0 .0 0 5 p e r c e n t .

17

3, 050
10,600

5 0 ,8 0 0
7, 140
4,
4,
3,
7,
6,

2 9.2
20. 8

6 9.0

. 04
. 14
(2)
.0 9
(2)

.01

. 24

Table A-5. Work stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1971
B e g in n in g
d a te

A p p r o x i­
m a te
d u r a tio n
( c a le n d a r
days}1

E s ta b lis h m e n ts )
and
lo c a tio n ( s )

U n io n ( s )
in v o lv e d 2

A p p r o x i­
m a te
n u m b e r of
w o rk ers
in v o lv e d 2

M a jo r t e r m s of s e t t l e m e n t 3

J a n . 11,
1971

15

N ew Y o rk T e le p h o n e
Co. , i n t r a s t a t e

C o m m u n ic a tio n s
W o rk e r s of A m e r ic a

3 4 ,0 0 0

T h e s to p p a g e , w h ic h r e s u l te d f r o m a d is p u te o v e r o v e r t i m e , w a s
t e r m in a t e d a f t e r th e p a r t i e s a g r e e d to s u b m it th e i s s u e to a r b i t r a t i o n .

J a n . 12,
1971

6

B o a r d of E d u c a tio n ,
C h ic a g o , I llin o is

A m e r ic a n F e d e r a t io n
of T e a c h e r s

2 2 ,0 0 0

2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p r o v id in g : W age i n c r e a s e s of 8 p e r c e n t in J a n u ­
a r y of b o th 1971 a n d 1972. O th e r b e n e f its in c lu d e im p r o v e d v a c a ­
tio n t im e , fu ll h o s p it a li z a ti o n c o v e r a g e , r e d u c e d c l a s s s iz e s a n d
a u to m a tic s te p i n c r e a s e s in s a l a r i e s b a s e d on e x p e r i e n c e .

J a n . 13,
1971

19

I n te r n a t i o n a l H a r ­
v e s t e r Co. , i n t e r ­
s ta t e

I n te r n a tio n a l U n io n ,
U n ite d A u to m o b ile ,
A e ro sp a c e and
A g ric u ltu ra l
I m p le m e n t W o rk e r s
of A m e r ic a (In d . )

4 3 ,0 0 0

3 2 - m o n th a g r e e m e n t p ro v id in g : W age i n c r e a s e of 49 c e n t s - 6 l c e n ts
f o r h o u r ly e m p lo y e e s , in c lu d in g 26 c e n ts p e r h o u r r e t r o a c t i v e to
O c to b e r 19, 1970, r e p r e s e n ti n g th e " s p i l l o v e r " c o s t- o f - l iv i n g a d j u s t ­
m e n ts th a t w o u ld h a v e b e e n m a d e d u r in g th e p r e v i o u s a g r e e m e n t if
i t h a d n o t p r o v id e d f o r a 16 c e n ts m a x im u m ; 13 p e r c e n t m in im u m
($ 8 5 a m o n th ) f o r s a l a r i e d e m p lo y e e s , c o n s is tin g of $ 1 0 .4 0 a w e e k
( e q u iv a le n t to th e 26 c e n ts f o r h o u r ly e m p lo y e e s ) r e t r o a c t i v e to S e p ­
t e m b e r 15, 1970 a n d b a la n c e r e t r o a c t i v e to O c to b e r 19, 1970; a d d i­
tio n a l 12 c e n ts to 22 c e n ts in c lu d e s h o u r ly , a n d e q u iv a le n t a m o u n t—
s a l a r i e d e m p lo y e e s e f f e c tiv e N o v e m b e r 22, 1971 a n d N o v e m b e r 20,
1972.
O th e r t e r m s g e n e r a l ly s i m i l a r to G e n e r a l M o to r s C o r p o r a tio n -U A W s e tt le m e n t, e x c e p t f o r e s ta b l is h m e n t of c o m p a n y - p a id d e n ­
t a l p la n .

J a n . 14,
1971

6

C ity of N ew Y o rk
( P o lic e m e n )
N ew Y o rk , N. Y.

P a t r o l m e n 1s B e n e v o ­
le n t A s s o c ia tio n
(Ind. )

2 1 ,0 0 0

W o rk s to p p a g e r e s u l te d f ro m a p a r i t y i s s u e b e tw e e n P a t r o l m e n a n d
S e r g e a n t s . P a t r o l m e n r e t u r n e d to w o rk a f t e r S ta te S u p r e m e C o u rt
p r o m i s e d to r u le on d is p u te .

F e b . 15,
1971

28

C an M a n u fa c tu r in g
C o s. , in te r s ta te

U n ite d S te e lw o r k e r s
of A m e r ic a

3 0 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g : I m m e d ia te w a g e i n c r e a s e of 50 c e n ts 6 0 .5 c e n ts (50 c e n ts g e n e r a l i n c r e a s e p lu s 0 . 5 - c e n t i n c r e a s e in in ­
c r e m e n t b e tw e e n 22 jo b c l a s s e s ) ; a d d itio n a l 1 2 .5 c e n ts to 2 0 .9 c e n ts
e ff e c tiv e F e b r u a r y
1972 a n d F e b r u a r y , 1973; e s c a l a t o r c la u s e r e ­
e s ta b l is h e d — p r o v id e s u n lim ite d q u a r t e r l y a d ju s t m e n t w ith 1 2 .5 c e n ts
g u a r a n t e e d m in im u m i n c r e a s e b y F e b r u a r y 14, 1973 a n d N o v e m ­
b e r 15, 1973. E s c a l a t o r c la u s e h a d b e e n d is c o n tin u e d in 1962 s e t t l e ­
m e n t.
O th e r i m p r o v e m e n ts in p e n s io n s a n d h e a lth c a r e .

M a r . 1,
1971

2

F o o d E m p lo y e r s
L a b o r R e la tio n s ,
N. J . , P a . , a n d
D el.

A m a lg a m a te d M e a t
C u tte r s a n d B u tc h e r
W o rk m e n of N o rth
A m e ric a

1 9 ,0 0 0

2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p r o v id in g : W e ek ly w a g e i n c r e a s e s of $ 3 0 th e f i r s t
y e a r a n d $ 3 0 th e s e c o n d f o r c h ie f b u t c h e r s ; $ 3 0 f i r s t y e a r a n d $2 5
s e c o n d f o r jo u r n e y m e n m e a t c u t t e r s ; $ 2 0 f i r s t a n d s e c o n d y e a r s
f o r d e l i c a t e s s e n w o r k e r s ; $ 1 8 f i r s t a n d s e c o n d y e a r s f o r w e ig h e r s
and w ra p p e rs .
A ll f i r s t - y e a r i n c r e a s e s r e t r o a c t i v e to M a rc h 1,
1971.
O th e r im p r o v e m e n ts in h e a lth p la n s a n d jo b s e c u r i t y r ig h t s .

A p r. 14,
1971

10

G e n e ra l E le c tr ic
Co. , L o u i s v ille ,
Ky.

I n te r n a tio n a l U nion of
E l e c t r i c a l , R a d io a n d
M a c h in e W o rk e r s

1 3 ,0 0 0

W o rk s to p p a g e r e s u l te d f ro m a d is p u te o v e r th e p a y m e n t of b a c k
p a y . T e r m i n a te d b y a n a g r e e m e n t to s u b m it th e i s s u e to a r b i t r a t i o n .

A p r . 19,
1971

6

R a ilw a y E x p r e s s
A g e n c y , In c.
in te rs ta te

B r o th e r h o o d of R a il­
way, A ir lin e a n d
S te a m s h ip C l e r k s ,
F r e i g h t H a n d le r s ,
E x p r e s s a n d S ta tio n
E m p lo y e e s

1 5 ,0 0 0

T h e s to p p a g e w a s in r e s p o n s e to a m a n a g e m e n t d e c is i o n to a d d new
t r u c k r o u te s in th e N o r t h e a s t a r e a of th e U. S.
D u tie s of 52 e x i s t ­
in g jo b s w o u ld b e r e c l a s s i f i e d u n d e r th e p la n .
W o r k e r s r e s p e c te d
a f e d e r a l c o u r t in ju n c tio n to r e t u r n to w o rk ; i s s u e s w e r e to b e
n e g o tia te d .

C o n s tru c tio n
in d u s t r y , P a .
a n d D el.

I n te r n a tio n a l U n io n of
O p e r a tin g E n g in e e r s

1 1 ,0 0 0

2 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g : 9 p e r c e n t w a g e i n c r e a s e , r e t r o a c t i v e to
M ay 1, 1971; a d d itio n a l 9 p e r c e n t e ff e c tiv e N o v e m b e r 1, 1971 a n d
7 V2 p e r c e n t e ff e c tiv e M ay 1, 1972. F r in g e b e n e f its to ta lin g 95 c e n ts
p e r h o u r w e r e a ls o p r o v id e d in th e new a g r e e m e n t .

R a ilr o a d in d u s t r y ,
in te r s ta te

B r o th e r h o o d of
R a ilr o a d
S ig n a lm e n

5 4 0 ,0 0 0

E m e r g e n c y C o n g r e s s io n a l le g i s la t io n , P u b lic L aw 9 2 - 1 7 , e n d e d th e
w a lk o u t. T h e b i ll p r o v id e d : 5 p e r c e n t g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e r e t r o ­
a c ti v e to J a n u a r y 1, 1970. A d d itio n a l 30 c e n ts p e r h o u r f o r s k ille d
e m p lo y e e s a n d 18 c e n ts f o r o t h e r s , r e t r o a c t i v e to N o v e m b e r 1, 1970;
P u b lic L aw e x te n d e d th ro u g h S e p te m b e r 30, 1971. In t o ta l , a g r e e ­
m e n t p r o v id e s f o r 46 p e r c e n t p a y i n c r e a s e o v e r 42 m o n th s . O th e r
p r o v is i o n s in c lu d e s ic k le a v e b e n e fits e q u a l to 70 p e r c e n t of a w o r k ­
e r 's pay.

C o n s tr u c tio n in d u s t r y ,
S e a ttle a n d T a c o m a ,
W a sh in g to n

U n ite d B r o th e r h o o d of
C a r p e n te r s a n d
J o i n e r s of A m e r ic a ;
I n te r n a t i o n a l U n io n
of O p e r a tin g E n g i­
n e e r s ; U n ite d S la te ,
T ile , a n d C o m p o s i­
tio n R o o f e rs , D am p
an d W a te r p ro o f
W o r k e r s A s s o c ia ­
tio n ; P a i n t e r s a n d
A llie d T r a d e s ; S h e e t
M e ta l W o rk e r s 1
I n te r n a tio n a l A s s o ­
c ia tio n ; L a b o r e r s '
I n te r n a tio n a l U n io n
of N o r th A m e r ic a ;
B r i c k l a y e r s , M a so n s
and P l a s t e r e r s ' I n te r ­
n a tio n a l U n io n of
A m e r ic a ; I n te r n a ­
t i o n a l B r o th e r h o o d of
T e a m s t e r s , C h a u f­
f e u r s , W a re h o u s m e n
a n d H e lp e r s of
A m e r ic a (Ind. )

1 5 ,0 0 0

A lth o u g h c o n tr a c t t e r m s v a r i e d b y u n io n , m o s t a g r e e m e n t s w e r e to
e x te n d f o r 3 y e a r s a n d w e r e to p r o v id e f o r w a g e i n c r e a s e s of b e ­
tw e e n 6 a n d 9 p e r c e n t in e a c h y e a r .

W e s te rn U nion
T e le g r a p h C o. ,
in te r s ta te

U n ite d T e le g r a p h
W o rk e rs and C om ­
m u n ic a tio n s W o r k e r s
of A m e r ic a

1 9 ,0 0 0

2 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g : 14 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in w a g e s a n d f r i n g e s
(10 p e r c e n t in p a y ); a d d itio n a l 9 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in w a g e s e ff e c tiv e
J u n e 1, 1972; jo b s e c u r i t y g u a r a n t e e f o r w o r k e r s w ith ' a t l e a s t 5
y e a r s s e n io r it y . S k ille d te c h n i c ia n s r e c e i v e d 28 c e n ts a n h o u r m o r e
th a n g e n e r a l w a g e a g r e e m e n t in th e f i r s t y e a r of th e c o n tr a c t.

M ay 1,
1971

M ay 17,
1971

73

3

J u ne 1,
1971

50

J u n e 1,
1971

4 103

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b l e .




18

Table A-5. Work stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1971-Continued
B e g in n in g
d a te

A p p r o x i­
m a te
d u r a tio n
(c a le n d a r
d a y s)1

E s ta b lis h m e n t( s )
and
lo c a tio n ( s )

U n io n (s)
in v o lv e d 2

A p p r o x i­
m a te
n u m b e r of
w o rk ers
in v o lv e d 2

M a jo r t e r m s of s e t t l e m e n t 3

J u n e 1,
1971

15

C o n s tru c tio n in d u s t r y ,
B u ffa lo , N ew Y o rk

I n te r n a t i o n a l B r o t h e r ­
h o o d of P a i n t e r s a n d
A llie d T r a d e s

10, 000

1 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id in g : W age i n c r e a s e s a n d im p r o v e d f r in g e
b e n e fits a m o u n tin g to $ 2 . 05 a n h o u r .

J u n e 2,
1971

15

C lo th in g M a n u fa c tu r e r s A m a lg a m a te d C lo th in g
A s s o c ia tio n , P h i l a ­
W o r k e r s of A m e r ic a
d e lp h ia , P a . a n d
v ic in ity

1 1 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g :
20 c e n ts h o u r ly i n c r e a s e e a c h y e a r of
th e c o n tr a c t; V2 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in c o m p a n y c o n tr ib u tio n to w e lf a r e
a n d p e n s io n s , e ff e c tiv e J u n e 1972 a n d J u n e 1973. C lo th in g w o r k e r s
in P h ila d e lp h ia a r e a r e f u s e d a t f i r s t to a c c e p t t h e s e t e r m s w h ic h
w e r e n e g o tia te d n a tio n a lly .

J u n e 14,
1971

7

B itu m in o u s C o al
in d u stry , in te r s ta te

U n ite d M in e W o rk e r s
of A m e r i c a (Ind. )

5 4 ,0 0 0

F o r m a l r e t u r n - t o - w o r k o r d e r w a s i s s u e d by u n io n p r e s i d e n t W. A.
B o y le .
S tr ik e w a s p r e c i p i t a t e d in p r o t e s t of a f e d e r a l c o u r t d e c i ­
s io n o r d e r i n g M r. B o y le to s te p dow n a s a t r u s t e e o f th e U n ite d
M in e W o r k e r s W e lf a re a n d R e t ir e m e n t F u n d .

J u n e 18,
1971

27

C o n s tru c tio n in d u s t r y ,
N o r t h e r n C a lif o r n ia

U n ite d B r o th e r h o o d of
C a r p e n te r s a n d
J o i n e r s of A m e r ic a

2 0, 000

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p ro v id in g : A 9. 8 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in w a g e s a n d
f r i n g e s th e f i r s t y e a r , 9 .2 p e r c e n t in th e s e c o n d y e a r a n d 8 .9 p e r ­
c e n t in th e t h ir d y e a r .

J u n e 28,
1971

16

C o n s tru c tio n in d u s t r y ,
O re g o n a n d S o u th ­
w e s t e r n W a sh in g to n

U n ite d B r o th e r h o o d of
C a r p e n te r s a n d
J o i n e r s o f A m e r ic a

1 2 ,0 0 0

2 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g : P a y i n c r e a s e s of 65 c e n ts p e r h o u r in
w a g e s a n d f r in g e b e n e f its f o r e a c h of th e 2 y e a r s .
The f ir s t in ­
c r e a s e , r e t r o a c t i v e to J u n e 1, w a s n o t to b e r e c e iv e d p e n d in g a p ­
p r o v a l b y th e C o n s tr u c tio n I n d u s tr y S ta b iliz a tio n C o m m itte e .
Im ­
p r o v e d h e a lth a n d w e l f a r e b e n e f its in c lu d e d a new d e n ta l i n s u r a n c e
p la n ; i n c r e a s e d p e n s io n s a n d a d d itio n a l v a c a tio n tim e .

J u ly 1,
1971

84

C o p p e r M in in g in d u s ­
try , in te r s ta te

U n ite d S te e l w o r k e r s of
A m e r i c a a n d 13 A F L CIO u n io n s , a n d th e
I n te r n a t i o n a l B r o t h e r ­
h o o d of T e a m s t e r s ,
C h a u f fe u r s , W a r e ­
h o u se m e n and H e lp e rs
of A m e r ic a (Ind. )

3 5 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c ts p ro v id in g : 50 c e n ts a n h o u r g e n e r a l i n c r e a s e ; p lu s
i n c r e a s e in i n c r e m e n t s b e tw e e n jo b g r a d e s ; a d d itio n a l 1 2 .5 c e n ts
g e n e r a l i n c r e a s e p lu s a v e r a g e 3. 5 c e n ts r e s u ltin g f ro m i n c r e m e n t
i n c r e a s e s , e ff e c tiv e in b o th s e c o n d a n d t h ir d y e a r s ; u n lim ite d c o s to f -liv in g a d ju s tm e n ts e s ta b l is h e d e ff e c tiv e s e c o n d y e a r .
Im p ro v e ­
m e n ts a ls o in p e n s io n s , h e a lth b e n e f i ts , a n d SUB p la n s .

J u ly 1,
1971

(5 )

L o n g s h o r e in d u s t r y ,
W e st C o a s t

I n te r n a t i o n a l L o n g ­
s h o r e m e n 's a n d
W a r e h o u s e m e n 's
U n io n (Ind. )

1 7 ,0 0 0

1 8 -m o n th a g r e e m e n t p r o v id in g : 72 c e n ts p e r h o u r g e n e r a l w a g e i n ­
c r e a s e , r e t r o a c t i v e to D e c e m b e r 25, 1971; a d d itio n a l 42 c e n ts p e r
h o u r , e ff e c tiv e J u ly 1, 1972; s k il l r a t e s d i f f e r e n t ia l s a ls o r e v i s e d ;
g u a r a n t e e d a n n u a l in c o m e p la n e s ta b l is h e d ( re p la c in g m e c h a n iz a tio n
a n d m o d e r n iz a tio n fund) p r o v id in g 36 h o u r s p a y p e r w e e k a t s t r a i g h t tim e r a t e s f o r C la s s A lo n g s h o r e m e n , a n d 18 h o u r s p a y f o r C la s s
B lo n g s h o r e m e n .
I m p r o v e m e n ts a ls o in p e n s io n s , lif e i n s u r a n c e ,
a n d h e a lt h i n s u r a n c e . On M a r c h 16, 1972, P a y B o a r d a n n o u n c e d it
h a d r e d u c e d f i r s t y e a r p a c k a g e to 10 p e r c e n t in w a g e s a n d " in c l u d ­
a b le " b e n e f its p lu s 4 . 9 p e r c e n t in " e x c lu d a b le " b e n e fits ( p e n s io n s ,
h e a lth a n d w e l f a r e , e tc . ).
W o rk s to p p a g e , w h ic h h a d b e e n e n d e d
on O c to b e r 8, 1971 u n d e r T a f t- H a r tl e y in ju n c tio n , w a s r e s u m e d on
J a n u a r y 17, 1972.

J u ly 1,
1971

5

C o n s tr u c tio n in d u s tr y ,
H o u s to n , T e x . a n d
v ic in ity

U n ite d B r o th e r h o o d of
C a r p e n te r s a n d
J o i n e r s of A m e r ic a

1 6 ,0 0 0

1 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g : W age i n c r e a s e of 45 c e n ts p e r h o u r e f ­
f e c tiv e J u ly 8 , 1971 a n d 35 c e n ts p e r h o u r e ff e c tiv e J a n u a r y 1, 1972.

J u ly 14,
1971

7

B e ll T e le p h o n e
S y s te m s , in te r s ta te

C o m m u n ic a tio n s
W o r k e r s of A m e r ic a

4 4 0 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g :
$2 3 to $ 25 a w e e k — p la n t c r a f ts m e n ,
a n d $ 1 6 .5 0 to $ 1 8 .5 0 o t h e r e m p lo y e e s ; a d d itio n a l $ 7 .5 0 a w e e k —
p la n t c r a f ts m e n a n d $ 5 a w e e k — o t h e r e m p lo y e e s , e ff e c tiv e J u ly 16,
1972 a n d $ 8 a w e e k —p la n t c r a f ts m e n , a n d $ 5 .5 0 a w e e k — o t h e r e m ­
p lo y e e s e ff e c tiv e , J u ly 15, 1 9 7 3 . $ 5 to $ 9 a w e e k a llo w e d f o r e m ­
p lo y e e s w o rk in g in 29 s p e c if ie d " b ig c i t i e s " to c o m p e n s a te f o r h i g h e r
c o s t- o f - l iv i n g . O th e r t e r m s in c lu d e d : C o s t - o f - li v in g e s c a l a t o r c la u s e
e s ta b l is h e d p r o v id in g f o r u n lim ite d a d ju s t m e n t s e ff e c tiv e J u ly 16,
1972 a n d J u ly 15, 1973.
I m p r o v e m e n ts a l s o in h e a lth in s u r a n c e
a n d r e t i r e m e n t b e n e f its a n d s c h e d u le .

J u ly 16,
1971

18

R a ilr o a d in d u s t r y ,
in te r s ta te

U n ite d T r a n s p o r t a t i o n
U n io n

1 2 5 ,0 0 0

4 2 - m o n th a g r e e m e n t p r o v id in g : W age i n c r e a s e s of 42 p e r c e n t o v e r
th e p e r i o d of th e c o n tr a c t.
C h a n g e s in s o m e w o rk r u le s w e r e d e ­
s ig n e d to im p r o v e th e o p e r a t io n s of th e in d u s tr y .

J u ly 21,
1971

(6 )

N ew Y o rk T e le p h o n e
C o. , N ew Y o rk

C o m m u n ic a tio n s
W o rk e r s of A m e r ic a

A ug. 2,
1971

33

C o n s tr u c tio n i n d u s t r y , I n te r n a t i o n a l B r o t h e r ­
N o r t h e r n a n d C e n tr a l
hood of T e a m s te rs ,
C a lif o r n ia
C h a u f fe u r s , W a r e ­
h o u se m e n and H e lp e rs
of A m e r ic a (Ind. )

6 5 ,0 0 0

2 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g : W age a n d f r i n g e b e n e fit i n c r e a s e s of
80 c e n ts a n h o u r e a c h y e a r ; f i r s t y e a r i n c r e a s e r e t r o a c t i v e to J u n e 16,
1971. C o n t r a c t o r s a ls o a g r e e d to c la s s if y in d e p e n d e n t t r u c k o w n e r o p e r a t o r s a s " e m p lo y e e s " a s th e u n io n h a d d e m a n d e d .

8 39

L itto n S y s t e m s ,
M e ta l T r a d e s C o u n c il; 9
In c . , I n g a lls N u c l e a r
I n te r n a t i o n a l B r o t h e r ­
h o o d of E l e c t r i c a l
S h ip b u ild in g D iv is io n
W o r k e r s ; a n d O ffic e
a n d L itto n S h ip S y s ­
t e m s D iv is io n
and P ro fe s s io n a l E m ­
P a s c a g o u l a , M is s .
p lo y e e s I n te r n a tio n a l
U n io n

1 2 ,0 0 0

M e ta l T r a d e s C o u n c il:
S e p a r a t e 3 - y e a r c o n tr a c ts p ro v id in g :
A
w a g e i n c r e a s e of 38 c e n ts a n h o u r e f f e c tiv e N o v e m b e r 14, 1971
a n d 20 c e n ts a n h o u r on N o v e m b e r 13, 1972 a n d N o v e m b e r 12,
1973; a n d i m p r o v e d s u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f i ts . E m p lo y e e s m a y t r a n s ­
f e r b e tw e e n p la n ts in th e e v e n t of la y o f f s .

A ug. 26,
1971

O c t. 1,
1971

10 57

L o n g s h o r e in d u s t r y ,
E a s t a n d G u lf
C o a s ts

I n te r n a t i o n a l L o n g ­
s h o re m e n ' s
A s s o c ia tio n

(7 ) 3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g : G e n e r a l t e r m s s i m i l a r to B e ll S y s te m s
n a tio n a l c o n tr a c t.
T h e s e tt le m e n t p a c k a g e a ls o in c lu d e d a n a d d i­
tio n a l $1 to $ 1 .5 0 i n c r e a s e a b o v e m a s t e r a g r e e m e n t in f i r s t y e a r ;
e s ta b l is h e d a g e n c y sh o p ; 10 p e r c e n t p r e m i u m p a y f o r S a tu rd a y
w o r k a s p a r t of 5 - d a y w e e k , i n c r e a s e to 15 p e r c e n t e ff e c tiv e J u ly
1972; $ 9 p e r w e e k " C e n t r a l C ity A llo w a n c e ."

S e ttle m e n t t e r m s w e r e n o t a v a il a b le f o r e i t h e r th e IB EW o r O P E IU .
5 2 ,0 0 0

F o llo w in g t e r m s r e l a t e s p e c i f ic a ll y to th e N ew Y o rk C ity a r e a s e t t l e ­
m e n t.
T e r m s of o t h e r s e tt le m e n ts a r e g e n e r a l ly s i m i l a r .
3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p r o v id in g : 70 c e n ts p e r h o u r g e n e r a l w a g e in ­
c r e a s e r e t r o a c t i v e to N o v e m b e r 14, 1971 (s u b s e q u e n tly r e d u c e d to
55 c e n ts a n h o u r b y P a y B o a r d ); a d d itio n a l 40 c e n ts p e r h o u r e ff e c ­
tiv e b o th O c to b e r 1, 1972 a n d O c to b e r 1, 1973, (P a y B o a r d a p p ro v e d
s e c o n d y e a r i n c r e a s e , b u t d id n o t r u le on t h i r d y e a r p r o v is i o n . )
I m p r o v e m e n ts a ls o in p e n s io n f in a n c in g a n d b e n e f i ts .

S e e fclo tn o te s a t e n d of ta b le .




19

Table A-5. Work stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1971-Continued
B e g in n in g
d a te

O c t. 1,
1971

A p p r o x i­
m a te
d u r a tio n
( c a le n d a r
d a y s)1
57

N ov. 22,
1971

1

N ov. 28,
1971

15

E s ta b lis h m e n t( s )
and
la c a tio n ( s )

U n io n (s)
in v o lv e d 2

A p p r o x i­
m a te
n u m b e r of
w o rk ers
in v o lv e d 2

M a jo r t e r m s of s e t t l e m e n t 3

B itu m in o u s C o al
in d u s t r y , i n t e r s t a t e

U n ite d M in e W o r k e r s
of A m e r i c a (Ind. )

1 0 5 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g : I n c r e a s e d d a ily p a y to $ 5 0 , f ro m $ 3 7 ,
f o r s k il le d w o r k e r s a n d to $ 4 2 . 25, f r o m a b o u t $ 3 4 f o r th e u n s k ille d .
E m p l o y e r 's c o n tr ib u tio n to th e w e l f a r e fu n d w a s d o u b le d , i n s t e p s ,
to 80 c e n ts f o r e a c h to n of c o a l p r o c e s s e d . (T h e 4 0 - c e n t r a t e h a d
b e e n in e ff e c t s in c e 1952. )

M e a t P a c k in g C o m ­
p a n ie s a n d S to c k y a rd s , in te rs ta te

A m a lg a m a te d M e a t
C u t te r s a n d B u tc h e r
W o rk m e n of N o rth
A m e ric a

2 9 ,0 0 0

W o r k e r s r e t u r n e d to t h e i r jo b s a f t e r s ta g in g on e d a y s to p p a g e in
p r o t e s t o v e r A d m i n i s t r a t i o n 's d e c is io n to d is a llo w th e r e t r o a c t i v e
p a y m e n t of w a g e i n c r e a s e s w ith h e ld d u r in g th e 9 0 - d a y w a g e - p r i c e ren t fre e z e .

1 2 0 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t p ro v id in g : 85 c e n ts a n h o u r i n c r e a s e e a c h y e a r .
S to p p a g e b y 3 ,5 0 0 T e a m s t e r s w a s s u p p o r te d b y th e o t h e r c o n s t r u c ­
tio n w o r k e r s in th e a r e a .

C o n s tr u c tio n in d u s t r y , I n te r n a t i o n a l B r o t h e r ­
h o o d of T e a m s t e r s ,
S o u th e rn C a lif o r n ia
C h a u f fe u r s , W a r e ­
h o u se m e n and H e lp e rs
(In d .)

1 I n c lu d e s n o n w o r k d a y s , s u c h a s S a tu r d a y s , S u n d a y s a n d e s ta b l is h e d h o lid a y s .
2 T h e u n io n s l i s t e d a r e th o s e d i r e c t l y in v o lv e d in th e d i s p u te , b u t th e n u m b e r of w o r k e r s in v o lv e d m a y in c lu d e m e m b e r s o f o t h e r u n io n s o r
n o n u n io n w o r k e r s id le d b y d is p u te s in th e s a m e e s ta b l is h m e n t s .
T h e u n io n s a r e a f f i li a te d w ith th e A F L -C IO , e x c e p t w h e r e th e y a r e n o te d a s i n ­
d e p e n d e n t (Ind. ).
T he n u m b e r of w o r k e r s in v o lv e d is th e m a x im u m n u m b e r m a d e id le f o r 1 s h if t o r lo n g e r in e s ta b l is h m e n t s d i r e c tl y in v o lv e d in a s to p p a g e . T h is
f ig u r e d o e s n o t m e a s u r e th e i n d i r e c t o r s e c o n d a r y e ff e c t on o t h e r e s ta b l is h m e n t s o r i n d u s t r i e s w h o s e e m p lo y e e s a r e m a d e id le a s a r e s u l t of m a ­
te r i a l o r s e rv ic e s h o rta g e .
3 A d o p te d l a r g e l y f r o m C u r r e n t W age D e v e lo p m e n ts , p u b lis h e d m o n th ly b y th e B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s .
4 A p p r o x im a te ly 1 6 ,0 0 0 T e l e g r a p h e r s s e tt le d a n d r e t u r n e d to w o rk on J u ly 2 8 , 1971; C o m m u n ic a tio n w o r k e r s r e m a in e d on s t r i k e u n til S e p te m ­
b e r 12, 1971.
5 S t r i k e w a s s t i l l in p r o g r e s s a t e n d of y e a r ; s e tt le d F e b r u a r y 18, 1972.
6 S t r i k e w a s s t i l l in p r o g r e s s a t e n d o f y e a r ; s e tt le d F e b r u a r y 16, 1972.
7 W o r k e r s w e r e c o u n te d in B e ll T e le p h o n e S y s te m s t o ta l.
8 In g a lls p l a n t w a s id le d A u g u s t 31— e p te m b e r 1. W o rk e r s a t b o th p la n ts a g r e e d to r e t u r n to w o rk a n d c o n tin u e n e g o tia tio n s f o r new c o n tr a c ts .
S
9 M e ta l T r a d e s C o u n c il r e p r e s e n t e d th e B r o th e r h o o d of B o i l e r m a k e r s , I r o n S h i p b u ild e r s , B l a c k s m i th s , F o r g e r s a n d H e l p e r s ; U n ite d B r o t h e r ­
hoo d of C a r p e n te r s a n d J o i n e r s of A m e r i c a ; I n te r n a t i o n a l A s s o c ia t io n of M a c h in is ts a n d A e r o s p a c e W o r k e r s ; P a i n t e r s a n d A llie d T r a d e s ; U n ite d A s ­
s o c ia t io n of J o u r n e y m e n a n d A p p r e n tic e s of th e P lu m b in g a n d P ip e F ittin g I n d u s tr y of th e U n ite d S ta te s a n d C a n a d a ; S h e e t M e ta l W o r k e r s ' I n t e r n a ­
tio n a l A s s o c ia tio n ; I n te r n a t i o n a l B r o th e r h o o d of T e a m s t e r s , C h a u f fe u r s , W a re h o u s e m e n a n d H e l p e r s o f A m e r ic a ( In d .); L a b o r e r s ' I n te r n a t i o n a l U n io n
of N o r th A m e r i c a ; a n d I n te r n a t i o n a l U n io n of O p e r a tin g E n g i n e e r s .
10 S to p p a g e w a s t e r m in a t e d by 8 0 - d a y in ju n c tio n .




20

Table A-6. Work stoppages by industry group and size, 1971
N u m b e r of w o rk s to p p a g e s
100
and u n d e r
250
w o rk e rs

6
and u n d e r
20
w o rk ers

20
and u n d er
100
w o rk e rs

‘5, 138

673

1, 943

391

226

945

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s ------------ __________---F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s - — ■
■
■
...........—
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s ............................
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s — , ----------- --------------------

5
215
5
36

18
7

1
77
1
13

A p p a r e l, e tc
...— — - .... —
—..................................
L u m b e r and w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t
f u r n i tu r e ................
...................................... ........
F u r n i t u r e a nd f i x t u r e s ------------------------------------

75

15

66
73
98

8
9
4

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s —

81
132
13

250
and u n d er
500
w o rk ers

570

I n d u s tr y g ro u p
T o ta l

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------------................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ..... .................. —

5, 000
and u n d e r
10, 000
w o rk ers

10, 000
w o rk ers
or
m o re

9

2
50
1
11

35
1
3

1
24
2

1
10
1
"

.
1
“

.
1
-

38

12

6

1

2

_

1

32
36
38

22
14
32

3
10
10

1
3
8

1
4

_
2

_
-

14
17
-

33
57
6

17
30
5

5
19
1

1
8
-

10
1
-

1
1

_
-

5
18
11
25

38
5
73
71
162

20
4
35
68
88

8
4
16
36
42

10
5
29
24

7
3
9
19
8

_
-

_
_
1
1

47

123

74

43

21

21

2

1

16
7
2
3

56
52
12
21

40
32
6
7

28
31
5
9

16
23
1
4

14
17
3
-

2
4
"

2
2
"

761

447

1, 001

626

387

150

114

13

23

1
21
158

3
146
287

2
244
140

_
172
79

1
45
35

_
22
40

.
4
4

.
3
8

47
137

127
241

60
67

40
25

15
18

17
11

2
1

8
2

23
176
329

l Z,

13

316
502

I n s t r u m e n t s , e tc ......... ... ....■■
■-------------- - ------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s -------

26

132

7
657
751

M a c h in e ry , |e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -----------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, an d
s u p p l i e s ------------------------------------------------------

243

181

174
168
29
44

S to n e , c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s -----------------------------

329

315

332

P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s -----

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s ta t e ------------S e r v ic e s ---- ------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t -----------------------------------------------------

1, 000
and u n d e r
5, 000
w o rk e rs

88
16
156
235
350

l2,

R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —

M i n i n g -------------------------------------------------------------C o n t r a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n
-------------- ■---------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n s , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , an d s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s -----------------------

500
and u n d e r
1, 000
w o rk e rs

10
41
32

8
81
108

3
31
79

1
15
55

1
4
31

_
4
20

_
2

_
_
2

1, 194 ________ 70_1_

29

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d (in th o u s a n d s )
3, 279. 6
M a n u fa c tu r in g

—
........ -

------------

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ----------------------------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c ts -----------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts -------------------------------------A p p a r e l, e tc ----------------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e ----------------------------------------------------F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ------------------------------P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s —
C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ----------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s —
R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s ------------------------------M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p lie s ---------------------------------------------------------

8. 2

96. 8

189. 6

244. 1

229. 4

453. 0

163. 8

1, 894. 7

86 2 . 7

2. 9

47. 8

89. 4

109. 8

126. 3

23 6 . 9

81. 9

167. 8

2.
85.
9.
5.
19.

7
4
2
0
3

_
.2
_
(3 )
.2

(3 )
3. 7
(3)
.6
1. 7

.
8.
.
1.
1.

7
3
9
1

.5
15. 6
_
1 .9
.7

1. 7
16. 5
3. 6
_
2. 2

_
5. 1
_
_

28. 6
_
_
10. 6

7. 3
10. 9
34. 9

. 1
. 1
(3)

1. 6
1. 8
2. 1

3. 4
2. 3
4. 9

1. 1
3. 2
3. 4

1. 0
1. 7
5. 8

_
1. 7
7. 8

_
10. 8

-

28. 7
21. 3
7. 6

.2
.2
-

1. 4
2. 8
. 3

2. 7
4. 7
. 7

1. 8
6. 8
.4

.6
5. 5
-

17. 0
1. 3
-

9
5
9
9
2

(3)
.2
.2
. 3

2.
.
3.
4.
7.

124. 1

. 6

6. 4

27.
6.
29.
100.
95.

1
2
4
3
8

3.
.
5.
10.
14.

4
0
1
7
8

3
7
3
5
0

11. 2

12.
.
.
2.

.

3.
1.
5.
11.
14.

5. 0
6. 2

_

_
-

0
5
5
8
3

7. 6
_
3. 2
2 1. 8
16. 9

11.
4.
12.
34.
12.

-

_
_
18. 3
29. 2

15. 1

13. 6

42. 4

14. 0

20. 8

9.
11.
2.
3.

10.
16.
.
2.

5
3
7
4

33. 7
29. 2
4. 8
-

14. 2
26. 5
_

31. 9
28. 4
_

9
1
3
1
6

_

1
6
3
7

.2
(3 )
(3)
(3 )

2.
2.
.
1.

----------------------------------------

2, 416. 8

5. 3

49. 0

100. 2

134. 3

103. 1

216. 1

81. 8

1. 726. 9

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s --------------M i n i n g --------------------------------------------------------------C o n t r a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n --------------- --------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n s , e le c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------— - ..—

1. 5
383. 2
451. 3

(3)
. 3
. !• 8

.2
8. 2
13. 3

. 3
41. 5
21. 4

_
60. 0
26. 2

1. 0
29. 0
24. 7

_
41. 3
72. 3

.
27. 4
24. 0

.
175. 6
267. 5

1, 266. 7
134. 0

.5
1. 6

5 .9
11. 0

9 .5
9. 9

13. 8
8. 9

10. 0
12. 5

37. 3
22. 5

10. 9
6. 0

1, 178. 7
61. 5

2. 1
25. 4
152. 6

. i
;5
. 4

.4
4. 0
6 .0

. 6
4. 6
12. 4

. 3
5. 6
1 9 .5

.6
2 .9
22. 4

_

_

7 .9
34. 8

-

_

13. 5

43. 7

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s -------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s t a t e --------------S e r v ic e s
------------■■ ........................
■

109.
119.
9.
7.

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b le .




21

8
7
6
2

6.
5.
1.
1.

2
3
2
1

7
0
1
0

-

-

_

Table A-6. Work stoppages by industry group and size, 1971-Continued
M a n -d a y s of i d le n e s s (in th o u s a n d s )
6
and u n d e r
20
w o rk ers

I n d u s t r y g ro u p
T o ta l

20
and u n d e r
100
w o rk ers

100
and u n d e r
250
w o rk ers

250
and u n d er
500
w o rk ers

500
and u n d e r
1, 000
w o rk ers

1, 000
and u n d e r
5, 000
w o rk ers

5, 000
and u n d e r
10, 000
w o rk ers

10, 000
w o rk e rs
or
m o re

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------------------

47, 589. 1

185. 3

6, 321. 8

3, 08 3 . 1

3, 601. 1

3, 299. 0

8, 862. 4

3, 509. 9

1 8, 726. 5

M a n u f a c tu r i n g -----------------------------------------------

18, 484. 8

80. 5

1, 442. 3

2, 202. 3

2, 459. 3

2, 379. 3

5, 457. 2

2, 43 8 . 0

2, 02 6 . 0

13. 5
160. 4

20. 0
190. 9
118. 1

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------------------F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s -------------------------------------T e x tile m il l p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------

41.
868.
347.
70.

A p p a r e l, e t c ------------------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e ------------- -------- —------------------ —-------F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s -------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s --------------------------------

197. 4

5. 2

194. 8
316. 2
1, 006. 2

2. 7
3. 5
2. 4

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s ---C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s -----------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ------

793. 7
687. 5
99. 9

3. 2
5. 7
(3 )

53. 4
53. 4
6. 6

R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c ts —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s --------------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ---------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c t s -------------------------------

10. 4
-

1. 3

4
6
9
6
2

3. 5
2. 9
10. 4

3, 29 3 . 2

20. 4

------------

1, 549. 4
2, 742. 9
402. 0
156. 4

3. 7
2. 2
. 6
. 5

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------------------------------

29, 104. 3

104. 8

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s -----------------M in i n g -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4. 2
4, 934. 4
6, 849. 6

(3 )
4. 5
22. 4

13, 41 9 . 9
2, 0 8 6 . 4
61. 7
846. 6
901. 4

E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p l i e s --------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t -------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s

426.
95.
544.
2, 622.
2, 028.

6
0
6
3

1. 8

.
59.
5.
19.

7
5
2
8

200. 8
1. 6
24. 3

35. 6

11. 9

46. 4

9. 1

54. 5
30. 4
62. 0

92. 8
43. 6
88. 1

41. 5
87. 2
51. 1

3. 3
44. 4
241. 3

49. 8
125. 3
14. 4

48. 1
157. 2
1. 8

5. 2
143. 1
-

613. 9
202. 8

128.
8.
129.
255.
315.

87.
20.
148.
274.
286.

91.
31.
43.
511.
338.

58.
28.
135.
860.
306.

58.
6.
83.
97.
188.

3
4
4
2

7
0
5
4
1

7.
217.
4.
14.

3
7
4
4
4

0
5
8
1
2

-

-

218. 3
-

10. 7

28. 6
-

-

17. 2

-

71. 9

-

-

-

107. 1
253. 8

-

20. 0
77. 1

-

7
5
8
9
3

-

307. 5

-

_

9
9
9
9
2

_
-

-

-

620. 0
58 3 . 5

198. 7

357. 5

347. 5

263. 9

9 8 3 .0

851. 3

270. 9

294.
89.
14.
31.

127.
138.
44.
27.

2
0
2
8

1 9 9 .5
350. 1
20. 8
64. 8

96. 8
337. 7
. 7
32. 0

490. 3
748. 5
320. 7
-

210. 9
753. 0

127. 0
324. 0

4, 879. 5

880. 8

1. 141. 9

919. 7

3, 4 0 5 .2

1, 071. 9

1 6 ,7 0 0 .5

1. 4
45. 7
148. 5

1 .9
111. 9
247. 0

152. 8
430. 4

76. 8
377. 7

20 0 . 7
1, 194. 9

98. 9
378. 0

4, 243. 2
4, 050. 7

10. 3
50. 8

3, 739. 5
787. 3

121. 1
180. 1

168. 8
163. 2

110. 8
116. 3

826. 7
478. 9

499. 8
42. 0

7, 942. 9
267. 9

1. 5
13. 3
2. 1

11. 2
112. 5
33. 6

27. 2

12. 5
84. 9
129. 7

9 .4
47. 4
180. 2

_

_

478. 8
22 5 . 1

1
3
9
2

1

.

-

-

"

0

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n s , e l e c t r i c ,

F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s t a t e -------------------S e r v i c e s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 1 0

.

1

81. 6

-

53. 2

-

195. 9

1 T h e n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s r e p o r t e d f o r a m a j o r in d u s t r y g ro u p o r d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m of i t s c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l s to p p a g e s
o c c u r r in g in 2 o r m o r e g r o u p s h a v e b e e n c o u n te d in e a c h . T h e m a j o r i n d u s tr y g r o u p a n d d i v is io n t o ta l s h a v e b e e n a d ju s t e d to e li m in a te d u p lic a tio n .
W o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d m a n - d a y s id le h a v e b e e n a ll o c a te d a m o n g th e r e s p e c ti v e g r o u p s .
2 T h e s it u a ti o n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a l l w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o r k s to p p a g e . T h is d e ­
c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a l e g a l d e te r m i n a ti o n t h a t a w o r k s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
3 F e w e r th a n 50.
NO TE:

B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g ,

s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

Table A-7. W ork stoppages by affiliation of unions involved, 1971
S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g in y e a r

M a n -d a y s id le
d u r in g y e a r

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d

A f f ilia tio n
N um ber

P e rce n t

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

P e rce n t

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

P ercen t

100. 0

5, 138

T o ta l
A F L - C I O ------------------------------------------------U n a f f ilia te d u n io n s "
—
S in g le f i r m u n io n s — - —
D if f e r e n t a f f i l i a t i o n s 1 — P r o f e s s i o n a l e m p lo y e e s a s s o c i a ti o n s —
No u n io n in v o lv e d ~ —

100. 0

3 ,2 7 9 .6

100. 0

4 7 .5 8 9 .1

3, 123
1, 697
35
72
123
88

60. 8
33. 0
.7
1. 4
2 .4
1. 7

1, 788. 6
889. 6
13. 8
534. 0
44. 1
9 .5

54. 5
27. 1
.4
16. 3
1. 3
.3

26, 042. 2
16, 363. 5
327. 9
4, 48 8 . 3
326. 1
41. 2

54. 7
34. 4
. 7
9 .4
.7
. 1

1 I n c lu d e s w o r k s to p p a g e s in v o lv in g u n io n s of d i f f e r e n t a ff i li a ti o n s — e i t h e r 1 u n io n o r m o r e a f f i li a te d w ith A F L — IO a n d
C
1 u n a f f ilia te d u n io n o r m o r e , o r 2 u n a f f ilia te d u n io n s o r m o r e .
N O T E : B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g ,




s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o ta l s .

22

Table A-8. Work stoppages by contract status and major issue, 1971
M a n -d a y s id le
d u rin g y e a r

S to p p a g e s b e g i n n i n g i n y e a r
W o r k e r s in v o lv e d

C o n tr a c t s ta tu s an d m a jo r is s u e
P e rc e n t

N um ber

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

A l l s t o p p a g e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5 , 138

100. 0

N e g o t i a t i o n o f f i r s t a g r e e m e n t _______ ____
_
_ _
G e n e r a l w a g e c h a n g e s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------- —
—
S u p p l e m e n t a r y b e n e f i t s — ----- W age a d ju s tm e n ts
_ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ ----- _ --------__ __
O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s
_ ----- _ __
__
_ __
U n io n o r g a n iz a tio n a n d s e c u r i t y _ _
_ ____
J o b s e c u r i t y - __
_
_ _ _
- - - - - ----P la n t a d m in is tr a tio n — _
- ___ _ _
_ _ _ _
____ _
O t h e r w o r k i n g c o n d i t i o n s - _______ _
------------- _ _
_______
I n t e r u n i o n o r i n t r a u n i o n m a t t e r s __ __
_ _ _ _
- ___

657
240
2
6
4
363
10
25
2
5

1 2 .8
4. 7
P)
. 1
. 1
7. 1
. 2
.5
P)
. 1

79. 1
3 5 .6
. 2
1. 4
. 9
3 5 .4
. 4
3. 4
. 2
1. 7

R e n e g o tia tio n o f a g r e e m e n t (e x p ir a tio n
___ _ _ _
____ — __
__
o r re o p e n in g ) _
_
- - - - G e n e ra l w age c h a n g e s- - - _ —
_ _
S u p p l e m e n t a r y b e n e f i t s ____ - __ —--------------------- -------- --------------------W age a d ju s tm e n ts
- - - - - __ __ _ _
___ _____ __
H o u rs of w o rk _ _ _ _ _
__
__
_ ___ _
______ _ ________
O t h e r c o n t r a c t u a l m a t t e r s - ________ —
U n io n o r g a n iz a t i o n a n d s e c u r i t y
_ _ _ ______ __
Jo b s e c u rity _
- - - - ___ _
___ ___ _________
P la n t a d m in is tr a tio n _
_
_
______ __ ___ __ __
O th e r w o r k in g c o n d itio n s _
_
_
- _ - _ __
I n t e r u n i o n o r i n t r a u n i o n m a t t e r s _______________________________ :___

2, 6 3 5
2, 3 1 2
37
20
1
102
74
39
39
9
2

51. 3
45. 0
.7
.4
P)
2. 0
1. 4
.8
.8
. 2
P)

2, 5 2 9 . 7
2, 0 9 6 . 2
77. 0
8. 6
( 2)
38. 5
138. 4
16. 4
147. 6
6. 2
.8

77. 1
63. 9
2. 3
. 3
P)
1. 2
4. 2
.5
4. 5
. 2

1 ,6 9 9
131
3
8
35
157
820
141
404

33. 1
2. 6
. 1
. 2
.7
3. 1
16. 0
2 .7
7. 9

654.
83.
1.
1 0.
3.
87.
365.
34.
68.

1 9 .9
2. 6
P)
. 3
. 1
2. 7
1 1. 1
1. 0
2. 1

D u r in g t e r m o f a g r e e m e n t (n e g o tia tio n o f
n ew a g r e e m e n t n o t in v o lv e d ) ___ — —
— _ ______
W age a d ju s tm e n ts
—
- _ ---------—
_____ _
___
—
H o u rs of w o rk
_ —
_____
_ — __
___
__
O th e r c o n tra c tu a l m a t t e r s
_
_ _
__
_ ___ - U n io n o r g a n i z a t i o n a n d s e c u r i t y
___ _ _
—
Jo b s e c u rity
___
____ _ ___ _
_
- _ _
___
P la n t a d m in is tr a tio n ___
__
___ _____ __
O th e r w o r k in g c o n d itio n s _
__
- __
In te ru n io n o r in tra u n io n m a tte r s _ _ _ _ _ _ _
N o t r e p o r t e d - — _ - ___ _ _
— _ _
___ - - - - -

3. 2 7 9 .6

P e rc e n t

0
9
3
1
5
0
5
2
5

-

-

-

N o c o n t r a c t o r o t h e r c o n t r a c t s t a t u s __ __
__
_ _ _
G e n e r a l w a g e c h a n g e s —— — — —— — ___ _____,___________ __ ________
S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f its —
- - - - ______________ __ - —
W age a d ju s tm e n ts - ----- -------- _ - ___ ____
H o u rs of w o rk _ _ _ _
_
_______
O t h e r c o n t r a c t u a l m a t t e r s __________________________________________
U n i o n o r g a n i z a t i o n a n d s e c u r i t y ____________________________________
Jo b s e c u rity - —
- - _
_ _ _
P la n t a d m in is tr a tio n —
_ _
_ _ _
—
O t h e r w o r k i n g c o n d i t i o n s ___________________________________________
I n t e r u n i o n o r i n t r a u n i o n m a t t e r s ----------------------------------------------------N ot re p o rte d
- __ —

80
39
1
2
1
1
7
3
20
3
2

1 .6
.8
P)
( )
P)
P)
. i
. i
. 4
. 1

8. 8
2. 5
. 1
(2 )
. 2
. 1
.7
. 9
2. 9
. 2

P)
P)

1. 1
( 2)

N o i n f o r m a t i o n -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

67

1. 3

8. 0

1
2

1

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,




sum s

o f in d iv id u a l ite m s

m ay not eq u al to ta ls .

23

D a s h e s d e n o te

2. 4
1. 1
P)
( )
P)
1. 1
P)
. 1
P)
. 1

P)

-

L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t.
L e s s t h a n 100 w o r k e r s o r m a n - d a y s .

NOTE:

1 0 0 .0

ze ro s.

. 3
. 1

III

P)
P)
P)

P)

. 1

P)
P)
P)
. 2

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )
4 7 ,5 8 9 .1

P e rc e n t

100. 0

2, 2 6 0 . 1
605. 7
1. 0
43. 3
3. 5
1 ,4 6 5 .0
9. 3
48. 1
1. 8
82. 5

4. 7
1. 3
P)
. 1

42, 544. 9
31, 0 9 6 . 3
2 ,7 9 8 .8
192. 6
.5
4, 862. 6
1, 8 4 0 . 0
3 9 8 .9
1, 1 9 3 .4
148. 9
12. 9

89. 4
65. 3
5 .9
.4
P)
10. 2
3. 9
.8
2. 5
. 3

2 ,6 4 9 .8
338. 9
2. 8
1 8 1 .4
1 3. 2
5 9 5 .6
1 ,1 5 6 .4
115. 6
2 4 6 .0

5. 6
.7
P)
.4

P)
3. 1
P)
. 1
P)
. 2

P)

P)
1. 3
2. 4
. 2
.5

-

-

35. 5
9. 3
. 3
P)
.4
.4
2. 4

P)
P)
P)
P)
P)
P)

1. 0
12. 8
.4
8. 3
(2)
98. 8

!

p)

1

( )

P)
p)
P)
. 2

Table A-9. Work stoppages by contract status and size, 1971
M a n -d a y s idl<2 d u r in g y e a r
( a ll sto i p p a g e s)

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g in y e a r
C o n t r a c t s ta t u s a n d .siz e o f s to p p a g e
( n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d )

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d
N um ber

P e rce n t

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

P e rce n t

N um be r
(in
th o u s a n d s )

P e rce n t

---------------------------------

5 , 138

100. 0

3, 2 7 9 . 6

100. 0

47, 58 9 . 1

1 0 0 .0

6 a n d u n d e r 20 -----------------------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 100 ------------------------------------100 a nd u n d e r 250 -----------------------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 -----------------------------------5 00 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 --------------------------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5 ,0 0 0 ----------------------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 --------------------------10, 000 a n d o v e r ---------------------------------------

673
1, 943
1, 194
701
329
243
26
29

13. 1
37. 8
2 3 .2
1 3 .6
6. 4
4 .7
.5
.6

8 .2
96. 8
189. 1
24 3 . 8
225. 9
4 5 0 .5
163. 8
1, 9 0 1 .4

0. 3
3. 0
5. 8
7 .4
6 .9
1 3 .7
5. 0
5 8 .0

185. 3
1 ,9 9 2 .2
3, 071. 0
3, 596. 9
3 ,2 0 6 .2
8, 875. 2
3 ,5 0 9 . 9
2 3, 1 5 2 .4

0 .4
4. 2
6. 5
7. 6
6. 7
18. 6
7 .4
48. 7

N e g o tia tio n o f f i r s t a g r e e m e n t o r
u n io n r e c o g n i ti o n ---------------------------------6 a n d u n d e r 20 ------------------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 100 --------------------------------100 a n d u n d e r 25 0 ------------------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 ------------------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 --------------------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5, 000 ----------------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 ---------------------10, 000 a n d o v e r ----------------------------------

657
176
317
91
48
14
10
1
"

12. 8
3 .4
6 .2
1 .8
.9
.3
.2

79. 1
2. 1
1 4 .6
1 3 .9
1 6 .4
10. 1
13. 0
9 .0
-

2 .4
. 1
.4
.4
.5
.3
.4
.3
~

2 ,2 6 0 . 1
73. 2
50 4 . 1
3 85. 6
323. 7
188. 2
27 2 . 3
513. 0
-

4. 7
.2
1. 1
. 8
.7
.4
.6
1. 1
-

R e n e g o tia tio n of a g r e e m e n t
( e x p r i a t i o n o r r e o p e n in g ) ---------------------6 a n d u n d e r 20 ------------------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 100 --------------------------------100 a n d u n d e r 250 ------------------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 ------------------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 --------------------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5, 000 ----------------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 ---------------------10, 000 a n d o v e r ----------------------------------

2, 635
272
1, 050
610
331
178
152
19
23

51. 3
5 .3
2 0 .4
1 1 .9
6 .4
3 .5
3. 0
.4
.4

2, 529. 7
3 .5
54. 1
94. 8
114. 1
1 2 1 .6
2 9 1 .4
113. 9
1, 7 3 6 .4

77. 1
.1
1 .6
2 .9
3 .5
3 .7
8 .9
3 .5
5 2 .9

4 2 , 5 4 4 .9
9 1 .6
1 ,3 0 7 .9
2, 396. 3
2, 913. 0
2, 6 8 2 .4
7, 8 6 4 .4
2, 8 0 6 .8
2 2 ,4 8 2 . 5

8 9 .4
.2
2. 7
5. 0
6. 1
5. 6
1 6 .5
5 .9
47. 2

D u r in g t e r m o f a g r e e m e n t (n e g o tia tio n
o f n e w a g r e e m e n t n o t in v o lv e d ) -----------6 a n d u n d e r 20 ------------------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 100 --------------------------------100 a n d u n d e r 250 ------------------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 ------------------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 --------------------------1 ,0 0 0 a n d u n d e r 5, 000 -----------------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 ---------------------10, 000 a n d o v e r ----------------------------------

1, 699
182
513
472
310
130
80
6
6

33. 1
3 .5
10. 0
9 .2
6. 0
2 .5
1 .6
. 1
. 1

654. 0
2. 1
2 5 .5
7 7 .5
1 0 8 .6
8 9 .2
1 4 5 .2
40. 9
164. 9

1 9 .9
.1
. 8
2 .4
3. 3
2 .7
4 .4
1 .2
5 .0

2, 64 9 . 8
17. 3
146. 5
266. 3
325. 9
3 0 1 .4
732. 6
190. 0
6 6 9 .9

5. 6
O
.3
.6
.7
.6
1 .5
.4
1 .4

No c o n t r a c t o r o t h e r c o n tr a c t s ta t u s -----6 a n d u n d e r 20 ------------------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 100 --------------------------------100 a n d u n d e r 250 ------------------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 ------------------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 --------------------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5, 000 ----------------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 ---------------------10, 000 a n d o v e r ----------------------------------

80
29
31
9
7
3
1

1 .6
.6
.6
.2
. 1
.1

8. 8
.3
1 .3
1 .2
2 .4
2 .6
1 .0

.3

3 5 .5
1 .2
4. 6
4 .4
9. 9
9 .4
6. 0
-

No i n f o r m a t io n on c o n tr a c t s ta t u s --------6 a n d u n d e r 20 ------------------------------------20 a n d u n d e r 100
------------------------------100 a n d u n d e r 250 ------------------------------250 a n d u n d e r 500 -------------------------------500 a n d u n d e r 1, 000 --------------------------1, 000 a n d u n d e r 5, 000 ----------------------5, 000 a n d u n d e r 10, 000 --------------------10, 000 a n d o v e r ----------------------------------

67
14
32
12
5
4

A ll s to p p a g e s

-

-

-

(')

(*)
n
(i )

i
i
(*)
.
.

~

-

-

-

1 .3
.3
.6
.2
. 1
.1

8. 0
.2
1 .3
1. 8
2. 3
2 .4

.2

98. 8
1. 9
2 9 .2
18. 5
2 4 .4
24. 8
_

"

"

C)
C)

.1
.1
.1
-

■

1 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
N O TE:

B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




24

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

"

1

(*)
C)
C)

(1)
C)
C)
-

.2

o

. 1

C)

. 1
. 1
_
-

■

Table A -10. Work stoppages by industry group and contract status, 1971
( W o r k e r s a nd m a n - d a y s in th o u sa n d s )
T o ta l
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

A ll i n d u s t r ie s ------------------------------------ -—
M a n u f a c tu r i n g ---------------------------------------------

...... ... -

F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s ta t e ------------S e r v ic e s ---------------------------------------------------------G o v e rn m e n t6 ■
■
....................... - ..... - ------------

K e n e g o tia tio n of ag r e e m e n t
( e x p ir a tio n o r r e o pening)
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
year
y e a r ( a ll
W o rk e r s
N um ber
s to p p a g e s)
in v o lv e d

15, 138

3. 279. 6

47. 589. 1

657

79. 1

2, 260. 1

2, 652

2, 529. 7

42. 544. 9

862. 7

18, 484. 8

288

36. 0

1, 749. 3

1, 582

594. 8

1 5 ,7 0 9 .6

2. 7
85. 4
9. 2
5 .0

.
30
1
13
23
11
10
12
16
15
13

5
215
5
36
75

7. 3
10. 9
34. 9
28. 7
21. 3
7. 6
2 7 .9
6. 5
2 9 .9
100. 9
9 5 .2
124. 1

194. 8
316. 2
1, 006. 2
793. 7
687. 5
9 9 .9
426. 4
95. 6
544. 9
2, 6 2 2 .6
2, 028. 2
3, 2 9 3 .2

174
168
29
44
l2,

19. 3

41. 6
8 6 8 .0
347. 6
70. 3
197. 4

66
73
98
81
132
13
88
16
156
236
350
333

A p p a re l, e tc . 3 - --------- -------- —-------------L u m b e r a nd w ood p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u r n i tu r e -------------------------------------------------------F u r n it u r e a nd, fix tu re ls ..... .
.......................
P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c ts -----------------P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s t r ie s —
C h e m ic a ls a nd a llie d p r o d u c ts --------------^ P e tro le u m , r e f in in g and r e l a te d i n d u s t r ie s ---R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p l a s t ic s p r o d u c ts —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c ts -----------------------S to n e , c la y , a nd g la s s p r o d u c ts -------------------P r i m a r y m e ta l in d u s t r ie s -----------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c ts 4 ---------------------------M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ---------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t an d
s u p p lie s --------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t -----------------------------I n s tr u m e n ts , e t c / ...... —.....■ - -----— ....
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r ie s
■ ■
■
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

N e g o tia tio n ol t i r s t a g r e e m e n t
o r u n io n r e c o g n itio n
S to p p a g es
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
id le d u r in g
year
y e a r ( a ll
W o rk e r s
N um ber
s to p p a g e s )
in v o lv e d

l2, 391

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s -----------------------------F o o d a nd k in d re d p r o d u c ts ■ ■■ — .....
■ ■.
■
■
T obacco] m a n u f a c tu r e s —
---- ■ —
■ ................
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts ■
■
■ - .......... - . .
■

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , a nd f i s h e r i e s — —
——
M in in g --------------------------------------------------- ----------C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c tio n — ..........
' ......
T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , and s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s --------------------------W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e
.......... ......... ......... ■

M a n -d a y s
id le d u rin g
y e a r (a ll
s to p p a g e s)

109.
119.
9.
7.

1
6
3
7

761
7
657
751
316
503

3. 3
(2)
.3
1. 8

90.
5.
16.
54.

6
4
8
7

5
137
4
15
26

2.
38.
9.
2.
13.

7
5
1
8
3

41. 6
6 9 3 .0
342. 2
43. 2
1 2 3 .0

5.
6.
30.
24.
14.
7.
16.
5.
18.
81.
79.
93.

7
8
2
2
8
4
4
5
9
0
4
7

159. 4
230. 9
961. 0
598. 2
5 7 2 .0
9 9 .2
300. 4
94. 5
457. 5
2, 4 4 1 .9
1, 854. 0
2, 616. 6

15
17
35
37

.6
1. 4
1. 3
2. 1
1. 7
1. 1
_
1. 0
1. 3
2. 1
10. 7

27. 2
6 3 .0
26. 1
181. 4
76. 3
79. 6
_
53. 6
5 6 .0
78. 4
593. 7

44
45
67
56
96
11
54
14
111
163
257
241

1, 549. 4
2, 7 4 2 .9
402. 0
156. 4

6
24
5
5

.
4.
.
.

8
7
8
8

6 4 .5
2 1 1 .5
29. 7
40. 8

92
96
19
29

46. 6
85. 9
7 .0
5. 0

1, 316. 1
2, 294. 6
367. 4
102. 8

2, 416. 8

29, 104. 3

369

43. 1

510. 9

1, 070

1, 934. 9

26. 835. 3

1. 5
383. 2
451. 3

4. 2
4, 934. 4
6, 849. 6

3
8
47

0. 1
.4
5. 7

0. 8
7 .0
40. 6

1
39
286

0. 1
144. 0
385. 7

1. 3
4, 323. 1
6, 509. 6

1, 266. 7
13, 419. 9
134. 0 . 2 ,0 8 6 .4

35
105

2. 4
5. 1

47. 3
123. 5

172
341

1, 186. 6
119. 4

12, 778. 2
1, 907. 4

6
55

.2
3. 3
2 5 .9

4 .0
89. 3
198. 5

17
91
123

1. 8
1 9 .5
77. 8

57. 8
745. 6
512. 4

2. 1
23
61. 7
25. 4
176
846. 6
152. 6
901. 4
329
D u rin g t e r m of a g r e e m e n t
( n e g o tia tio n ot n ew a| j r e e m e n t
n o t in v o lv e d

no

No c o n tr a c t o r o th e r
c o n tr a c t s ta tu s

No in fo r m a tio n on
c o n tr a c t s ta tu s

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------------------- -------

1. 698

6 5 3 .9

2, 6 4 9 .4

80

8. 8

35. 5

67

8. 0

98. 8

M a n u fa c tu rin g ---------------------------------------------

488

226. 6

993. 7

10

2 .0

6. 3

25

3. 4

26. 0

44

42. 6

83. 1

2

.9

.9

2

.2

.5

10. 1
16. 1

_

_

-

1
4

.2
.2

.2
3. 6

_
1. 0
( 2)
(2)
-

_
10. 8
.9
. 1
.4
-

O rd n a n c e and a c c e s s o r i e s -----------------------------F o o d a nd k in d re d p r o d u c ts ----------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s
----------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts ------------------------------------A p p a re l, e t c . 3
----- --------- ---------------- —
—
L u m b e r a nd w ood p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u r n i tu r e -------------------------------------------------------F u r n it u r e a nd f ix t u r e s -----------------------------------P a p e r a nd a llie d p r o d u c t s ------------------------------P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d i n d u s t r ie s —
C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p r o d u c ts ----------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a te d i n d u s t r ie s —
—

7
22

1. 7
3 .9

10
13
18

.9
1. 7
3. 3
2. 4
4. 8
.2
10. 2
1. 1
10. 0
18. 6
13. 6

9
19
2

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p l a s t ic s p r o d u c ts —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c ts ------------------------S tone, c la y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts -------------------P r i m a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r ie s ------ ■
----------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c ts 4' -----------------------------

19
2
29
54
53

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l
----- . ----- —
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p lie s
-------------- ----------- --------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t
.................
I n s tr u m e n ts , e tc . -------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r ie s -------

52

18. 9

75
45
5
10

61.
27.
1.
1.

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

--------------------------------------

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , a nd f i s h e r i e s ------------M in in g
—
—
■—
■
■
----C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c tio n
........
—
T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c t r i c ,
g a s , and s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s
-------——
W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e ----------------------------F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s ta t e ■ 1 -----S e r v ic e s
— ---- - -----------------------------------G o v e rn m e n t6
------------■
6
5
4
3
2
1

7
5
5
9

8.
11.
18.
14.
39.
.

-

-

-

1
1
1
1
_
_
1
1

(2)
(2)
(')
-

(2)
.3
(*)
.2

( 2)

4
1
1
1
1
2
4
2

8
9
8
9

1
1
-

(2)
.9
-

(2)
4. 7
“

2
"

.5
~

3. 1
■

2
2
3
1
0
7

45. 9
1. 1
33. 8
124. 5
9 3 .2
79. 0
168.
228.
4.
12.

(2)
(2)
(2)

-

. 1

_
*

(2)
0
(2)
.2
.9

4 2 7 .4

1. 656. 1

70

6. 8

29. 3

42

4. 6

72. 7

j
607
394

1 .0
238. 6
5 6 .0

1 .0
603. 3
245. 0

1
2
11

(2)
0. 1
2. 4

0. 6
.2
14. 4

1
1
13

0. 2
( 2)
1. 5

0. 6
•8
40. 1

98
42

76. 4
8 .9

577. 6
44. 7

6
3

.2
.4

.4
.6

5
12

1. 2
.2

16. 4
10. 3

19
50

2. 0
44. 5

8. 1
176. 4

5
42

.4
3. 3

1 .0
12. 1

6
4

.3
1. 2

2 .5
2. 0

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o ta l s .




-

1, 211

1 S e e fo o tn o te 2, ta b le A - 14.
2 F e w e r th a n 100.
3 I n c lu d e s o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c ts m a d e f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s .
4 E x c lu d e s o r d n a n c e , m a c h in e ry , a n d t r a n s p o r t a ti o n e q u ip m e n t.
5 I n c lu d e s p r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tr o llin g in s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .
6 T he s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a ll w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o rk s to p p a g e .
i d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a l e g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of a n y law o r p u b lic p o lic y .
NO TE:

( *)

. 1
2. 5
3 .9

25

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

Table A -11. Work stoppages by major issue, 1971
M a n -d a y s id le
d u r in g y e a r

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g in y e a r
M a jo r i s s u e
N um ber

P e rce n t

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d
N um ber
(in
P e rce n t
th o u s a n d s )

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

P e rce n t

5, 138

100. 0

3, 279. 6

100. 0

4 7 ,5 8 9 . 1

100. 0

G e n e r a l w a g e c h a n g e s _______________________________________________
G e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e ----------------------------------------------------------------G e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e p lu s s u p p le m e n ta r y
b e n e f i t s ______ ______ _____ ____ _______________ ___ ____________
G e n e ra l w age in c re a s e , h o u r d e c re a s e _ _ _ ___
G e n e ra l w age d e c re a s e — - _ _
—
— - - - - - —
E s c a la tio n c o s t-o f-liv in g in c r e a s e
_ _ _ _
___
G e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e a n d e s c a l a t i o n --------------------------------------W a g es a n d w o r k in g c o n d itio n s -----------------------------------------------------

2 ,6 0 0
652

5 0 .6
12. 7

2 , 1 3 7 .0
136. 1

65. 2
4. 2

3 1 ,7 5 4 .8
2, 351. 5

6 6. 7
4 .9

1, 539
18
2
12
19
358

30. 0
.4
t 1)
.2
.4
7 .0

1, 72 6 . 5
3 .5
.3
7. 4
5. 2
257. 9

5 2 .6
. 1
n
.2
.2
7 .9

22, 4 4 8 .
6 4.
.
109.
92.
6, 6 8 8 .

47. 2
. 1
(M
.2
.2
14. 1

S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f i ts — ---- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ ---- —
P e n s io n s , i n s u r a n c e , a n d o t h e r w e l f a r e
p r o g r a m s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------S e v e ra n c e o r d is m is s a l pay; o th e r
p a y m e n ts o n la y o ff o r s e p a r a ti o n
- _ - - —
P r e m i u m p a y ------------------------------------------------------------------------------O th e r
_ ---- — - ----- - - - ----- - - - - - - —

40

.8

77. 3

2. 4

2, 80 0 . 1

26

.5

20. 2

.6

940. 5

2. 0

3
4
7

. 1
. 1
. 1

51. 7
1. 2
4. 2

1 .6
(M
. 1

1, 75 0 . 9
21. 8
8 7. 0

3. 7
(*)
.2

W age a d ju s t m e n t s - _ _ _ _ _
__
_ —
I n c e n tiv e p a y r a t e s o r a d m i n i s t r a t io n _ --------------- ----_ _
_
------J o b c la s s i f i c a t i o n o r r a t e s — - ---- - D o w n g ra d in g --------------------------------------------------------------------------------_ _
— -------- - - R e t r o a c t iv i ty - ---------------------M e th o d of c o m p u tin g p a y ------- - ----_
_ _ _ _

159
33
32
3
14
77

3. 1
.6
.6
. 1
.3
1. 5

94.
13.
10.
2.
4.
63.

2. 9
.4
.3
. 1
. 1
1. 9

57 4 .
188.
110.
5.
4 6.
223.

1. 2
.4
.2
(*)
. 1
.5

H o u r s of w o r k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------I n c r e a s e — ---- _ _ _ _
__ _ _ _
_
_ _ _ _ _ _ ---D e c r e a s e ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5
2
3

. 1
(M
. i

1 .6
1. 2
.4

O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s --------------------------------------------------------------D u r a tio n of c o n t r a c t -------------------------------------------------------------------L o c a l i s s u e s s u p p le m e n tin g n a tio n a l
c o n t r a c t -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------U n s p e c if i e d - - _
- —
_ — _

116
17

2. 3
.3

4 9. 6
2 .9

1 .5
. 1

5 , 0 4 8 .0
50. 5

10. 6
. 1

11
88

.2
1 .7

19. 9
26. 9

.6
.8

4, 7 7 3 . 2
224. 3

10. 0
.5

U nion o r g a n i z a ti o n a n d s e c u r i t y ------------------------------------------------------R e c o g n itio n ( c e r ti f ic a ti o n ) — - - - R e c o g n itio n a n d jo b s e c u r i t y i s s u e s _
_ _ _
- _ _
R e c o g n itio n a n d e c o n o m ic i s s u e s ----------------------------------------------S tre n g th e n in g b a r g a in in g p o s itio n o r
u n io n s h o p a n d e c o n o m ic i s s u e s ----------------------------------------------U nio n s e c u r i t y -----------------------------------------------------------------------------R e f u s a l to s ig n a g r e e m e n t ______________________________________
O th e r u n io n o r g a n i z a ti o n m a t t e r s __
_ _ ___ — —

482
198
12
71

9 .4
3 .9
.2
1. 4

178.
12.
1.
15.

6
4
7
8

5.
.
.
.

3 ,3 2 6 .8
322. 2
1 5 8 .4
740. 4

7. 0
.7
.3
1. 6

98
27
35
41

1. 9
.5
.7
.8

15.
122.
6.
3.

8
5
6
8

.5
3. 7
.2
. 1

398.
1, 58 5 .
106.
15.

4
4
7
3

.8
3. 3
.2

J o b s e c u r i t y - __ _ __
- _ _
_
_ - - —
S e n io r ity a n d / o r la y o ff — — — _____ ______ ______________ __ _
D iv is io n of w o r k —
__
__ _
______ _ _ —
S u b c o n tra c tin g
_ _
- _ _ _
__
New m a c h i n e r y o r o t h e r te c h n o lo g ic a l
i s s u e s ___ __ __________________________________ _________________

210
98
9
19

4. 1
1 .9
.2
.4

104.
37.
.
10.

7
4
8
9

3. 2
1. 1
(M
.3

1 ,0 0 7 .2
303. 7
9. 2
22 3 . 6

2. 1
.6

8
13

.2
.3

1. 2
3. 2

9
54

.2
1. 1

3. 6
47. 6

P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t io n
_
—
_ _ _ _ _ _
P h y s i c a l f a c i l i t i e s , s u r r o u n d i n g s , e tc
------S a fe ty m e a s u r e s , d a n g e ro u s
e q u ip m e n t, e t c --------------- ------------- --------- --- ------------------------------S u p e r v is i o n ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------S h iftw o rk — _ _ _ _ _
_ _
- - --------W o rk a s s i g n m e n t s - ---- _ _ _ _ _
__
—
_ _ _
S p e e d u p (w o rk lo a d ) _ ------- _ _ _ _ _
- —
W o rk r u l e s _ _ _ _ _
—
_
__ __
_ _
O v e r tim e w o r k __________________________________________________
D is c h a r g e a n d d i s c i p li n e _ _
- - __ _ _
O t h e r ---_ _ _ _ _ _ _
- _
_ _
_ _

905
72

17. 6
1. 4

75
39
15
85
33
18
27
257
284

O th e r w o r k in g c o n d it i o n s ________________ ! _________________________
_
A r b i tr a ti o n _ _ _ ---------------_
_ _ _
G r ie v a n c e p r o c e d u r e s —
_ _
__ _ _
____
U n s p e c if ie d c o n tr a c t v io la tio n s - _ „
_ - _ _
I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n m a t t e r s ____

A ll i s s u e s

—

-

__ . . .

. . .

___ . . .

T r a n s f e r o f o p e r a t io n s o r p r e f a b r i c a t e d
goods _
____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________ _ _ _ O t h e r ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_ _ _ _ _

__

__

J u ris d ic tio n - r e p r e s e n ta tio n
of w o r k e r s 3
_
- J u r i s d i c t i o n a l - w o r k a s s i g n m e n t - - - ___ _
U nio n a d m i n i s t r a t io n 4____ _
_ _
_
_ _
__
Sym p a th y — — ——— — — —— — — — _____________________
O th e r _
— _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _
N ot r e p o rte d -

_ _ _ _ _

_ —

_ _ _

—

0
7
6
1
5
1

6
4
7
5
0
2

8
6
5
9
4
5

3. 8
2. 3
1. 5

n
(*)
(*)

4
4
1
5

B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g ,




n
(M
( l )

i 1)

( l )

.5

. 1

77. 8
16. 4

.2
(*)

. 1
1. 5

58. 7
317. 9

. 1
.7

51 9 . 4
14. 5

15. 8
.4

2, 41 0 . 7
46. 4

5. 1
. 1

1. 5
.8
.3
1. 6
.6
.4
.5
5 .0
5. 5

27. 3
7 .7
3. 7
43. 8
1 2 .8
144. 7
7. 4
79. 9
1 7 7 .5

.8
.2
. 1
1. 3
.4
4. 4
.2
2. 4
5 .4

86. 7
19. 0
50. 9
227. 8
56. 8
977. 6
1 7 .7
3 9 2 .6
535. 2

.2
(l )
. 1
.5
. 1
2. 1

155
10
24
121

3 .0
.2
.5
2. 4

40.
7.
5.
28.

8
1
0
7

1. 2
.2
.2
.9

266.
146.
24.
96.

8
1
4
2

.6
.3
. 1
.2

415
5

8. 1
. 1

72. 1
1. 7

2. 2
. 1

3 5 0 .4
85. 8

.7
.2

9
316
12
70
3

. 2
6. 2
.2
1 .4

.
28.
5.
36.
.

(M
.9
.2
1. 1

4 .5
124. 9
1 0 .4
113. 4
1 1 .4

51

1. 0

•1

8
2
1
1
2

4. 3

(l )

(*)

- 1

4 5 .6

* L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t
In c lu d e s d i s p u te s b e tw e e n u n io n s of d i f f e r e n t a f f ilia tio n , s u c h a s th o s e of A F L -C IO a f f i li a te s a n d in d e p e n d e n t o r g a n i z a ti o n s .
I n c lu d e s d is p u te s b e tw e e n u n io n s , u s u a lly th e s a m e a ff ilia tio n , o r 2 l o c a ls of th e s a m e u n io n o v e r r e p r e s e n t a t i o n of w o r k e r s .
4 In c lu d e s d is p u te s w ith in a u n io n o v e r th e a d m i n i s t r a t io n o f u n io n a f f a i r s o r r e g u l a ti o n s .
NOTE:

5 .9

s u m s 'o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o ta l s .

26

(')

.8
1. 1

(l )

.3

(

1
)

.2

(*)

. 1

Table A -12. Work stoppages by industry group and major issue, 1971
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s w¥,iflio u s a n d s )
T o ta l
I n d u s tr y g ro u p

SuppLe m e n t a r y b e n e f its

G e n e ra l w age ch an g es

S topp a g e s
b e g in n in g in
ye a r
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

15, 138

3, 279. 6

47, 589. 1

2, 615

2, 137. 0

31, 754. 8

40

77. 3

2, 800. 1

391

862. 7

18, 484. 8

1, 514

514. 5

13, 349. 0

26

24. 2

1, 029. 8

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------------------F o o d a nd k in d r e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s -------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts ---------------------------------------

5
215
5
36

2.
85.
9.
5.

7
4
2
0

41.
868.
347.
70.

6
0
6
3

4
140
4
14

2.
3 8.
5.
2.

5
9
6
6

36.
724.
229.
42.

7
1
5
5

1
_

0. 1
_

0. 7
_

-

-

A p p a r e l, e t c . 3 ----------------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i tu r e —
F u r n i t u r e a nd f ix t u r e s -------------------------------------P a p e r a nd a llie d p r o d u c ts ---------------------------------

75
66
73
98

19.
7.
10.
34.

3
3
9
9

197.
194.
316.
1, 006.

4
8
2
2

21
48
48
64

13.
5.
7.
26.

2
6
8
2

120.
155.
264.
824.

5
6
5
9

1
_
1
3

(2)
(2)
_
2. 9

.2
_
. 8
134. 3

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a nd a llie d i n d u s t r i e s ----C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c ts ----------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a te d i n d u s t r i e s ------

81
132
13

793. 7
687. 5
99. 9

49
100
10

19. 1
15. 0
7. 3

355. 9
625. 8
98. 0

3
2
1

2. 7
.3
(2)

147. 5
2. 8
1. 2

R u b b e r and m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c ts —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c ts --------------------------S to n e , c la y , a nd g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 -------------------------------

88
16
156
236
350

4
6
9
6
2

48
14
103
145
250

7.
5.
17.
66.
71.

_

_
_
.2
5. 8
1. 6

_
.3
146. 0
72. 1

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, an d
s u p p lie s ----------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t --------------------------------I n s t r u m e n t s , e t c . -----------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r ie s ---------

333

124. 1

3, 293. 2

234

174
168
29
44

109.
119.
9.
7.

1
6
3
7

1, 549. 4
2, 7 4 2 .9
402. 0
156. 4

85
88
18
27

762

2, 41 6 . 8

29. 104. 3

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s -------------M ining ---------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n --------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------------------W h o le s a le and r e t a i l t r a d e --------------------------------

7
657
751

1. 5
383. 2
451. 3

316
503

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ---------------S e r v ic e s -------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t7 ------------------------------------------------------

23
176
329

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------------------M a n u fa c tu r in g -----------------------------------------------

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g -----------------------------------------

l Z,

12 .

28. 7
21. 3
7. 6
27.
6.
29.
100.
95.

9
5
9
9
2

426.
95.
544.
2, 622.
2, 028.

2
5
8
5
2

249.
94.
432.
2, 101.
1, 668.

5
5
9
0
9

_
1
6
2

-

_

88. 7

2, 458. 5

1

(2)

44.
5 8.
5.
5.

3
4
9
0

1, 085. 0
1, 403. 8
281. 0
95. 9

2
2
_
-

1. 5
8. 9
_

1. 101

1, 622. 5

18, 405. 9

14

53. 1

4. 2
4, 934. 4
6, 849. 6

3
36
253

.4
130. 1
256. 2

2. 5
4, 283. 0
4, 8 4 2 .2

_

_

2

. 8

10. 3

1, 266. 7
134. 0

13, 419. 9
2, 086. 4

162
345

1, 002. 2
120. 2

6, 498. 9
1, 407. 8

5
4

51. 9
(2)

1, 756. 0
2. 8

2. 1
25. 4
152. 6

61. 7
846. 6
9 0 1 .4

15
96
191

1. 5
17. 2
94. 8

45. 2
696. 3
630. 1

1
_
2

(2)

W age a d ju s tm e n ts

H o u rs of w o rk

A ll i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------------------

159

94. 0

574. 8

M a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------------------------------

80

51. 2

1

(2)
_

0. 3

2

0. 3

2. 4

A p p a r e l, e t c . 3 -----------------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e —
F u r n i t u r e a nd f ix t u r e s -------------------------------------P a p e r a nd a llie d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------

5
3
3
2

.
.
.
.

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d i n d u s t r i e s ---C h e m ic a ls a nd a ll i e d p r o d u c ts ----------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g and r e l a t e d i n d u s t r ie s ------

1
1
1

(2)
. 1
(2)

R u b b e r a nd m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s --------------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 -------------------------------

3
1
1
8
8

3.
1.
.
1.
1.

8
4
2
6

_

-

1, 770. 2
_

(2)

.3

1. 1

O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s

340. 7

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------------------F o o d a n d k i n d re d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s -------------------------------------T e x tile m il l p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------

5

. 6
9. 9
513. 1

_

_

3. 8

118

4 9. 6

5, 048. 0

62

1. 6

22. 4

797. 1

_

2

.2

. 8

(2)

1. 2

-

-

-

2

5
2
5
3

_
_
_
-

_

.

_
_
-

_
_
-

4
_
_
4

.2
_
_
.5

2. 9
_

2. 2
8. 8
. 5

_

_

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
-

(2)
. 1
-

.6
2. 4
-

.

.
_
_
_

_

_

.6
1. 4
5. 6

14. 2
30. 5
77. 5

2.
11.
.
1.

_

3. 4

-

_
_
_
-

-

_
5
7
10

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p l i e s --------------------------------- "
r-----------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t --------------------------------I n s t r u m e n t s , e tc . ----------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r ie s ---------

12

6. 1

32. 3

-

-

-

13

4. 4

143. 1

18
7

28. 9
5. 6

84. 0
87. 3

_

_

_

-

-

-

3
6

.4
8. 7

245. 1
265. 9

3

.3

. 8

"

-

-

2

.2

9 .2

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------------------------

79

42. 8

234. 2

5

1. 6

3. 8

56

27. 3

4, 251. 0

34
16

8. 0
1. 9

24. 5
9. 0

1
2

. 1
. 1

. 1
.5

4
16

13. 9
6. 2

36. 2
72. 3

9
3

4. 5
(2)

65. 4
1. 6

_

_

-

6. 5
-

8
16

4. 5
. 6

3, 609. 1
■5 2 2 .3

4
13

1. 3
27. 0

7. 4
126. 2

■

-

-

2

1. 3

2. 6

5
7

. 51. 6

5. 4
5. 6

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s -------------M in in g ---------------------------------------------------------- -—
C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n --------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------------------W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e -------------------------------F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s t a t e ---------------S e r v i c e s -------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t7 ------------------------------------------------------

0
0
1
8
8

19.
1.
.
69.
17.

S ee fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




27

0
0
2
2
1

_

Table A-12. Work stoppages by industry group and major issue, 1971-Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s)
U n io n o r g a n i z a ti o n a n d s e c u r i t y
S topp a g e s
b e g in n in g in
ve i r
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

A ll i n d u s t r ie s ■

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

Job s e c u r i t y
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e rs
N um ber
in v o lv e d

P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t io n
M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r (a ll
s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

482

178. 6

3. 326. 8

210

104. 7

1, 007. 2

905

5 1 9 .4

2, 410. 7

207
_
24

34. 4
_
2. 7

1. 398. 9
_
50. 4

99

40. 4

548. 3

147. 1

1
10

. 1
3. 4

4. 9
17. 5

2 94
_
28

39. 2

696. 6
_
71. 6

12

.3

16. 8

2

.3

2. 1

1

. 9

5. 0

A p p a r e l, e tc .3 ----------------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i tu r e —
F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s -------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------

21
6
7
3

53.
20.
38.
5.

9
2
7
1

2
4
1
3

(2)
.2
(2)
.2

2. 5
2. 6
(2)
1. 2

7
5
7
15

1.
.
1.
3.

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s ---C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ----------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ------

13
6

1. 7
.5
1. 0
(2)
2. 0
1. 0

170. 0
14. 0

4
5
1

.4
1. 7
. 1

14. 0
16. 6
. l

9
10

4. 4
1. 8

103. 5
14. 9

R u b b e r a nd m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c ts
S to n e , c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ■
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ---------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 -------

15

M a n u fa c tu r in g
O r d n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------------------F o o d a nd k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s --------------------------------------T e x t il e m ill p r o d u c t s -----------------------------------------

_

8.
4.
7.
23.

9
6
1
6

6
5
4
3

5. 0

97. 2

4

.9

5. 9

13

10. 2

50. 6

14
11
23

. 9
1. 4
3. 2

57. 6
54. 4
33. 7

9
10
7

2. 0
8 .4
1. 2

10. 8
116. 1
73. 0

14
42
35

6. 9
14. 0
8. 7

16. 8
97. 9
80. 4

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ------- --------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, and
s u p p lie s
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ----------------------------I n s t r u m e n t s , e t c . ------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r ie s -----

23

10. 4

568. 7

10

4. 3

46. 3

29

7. 3

25. 7

9
12
3
5

.
2.
.
.

29.
125.
24.
38.

9
0
9
4

12
11
2
1

47.
95.
90.
.

8
9
6
1

39
34
3
3

1 9 .3
25. 9
.6
.6

45 8 . 9

611

372. 3

1, 714. 1

32. 7
54. 8

1
3 94
43

1. 0
169. 5
17. 4

1. 0
412. 9
77. 9

8
6
2
5

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------------

275

144. 2

1. 927. 9

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s ---------M i n i n g -----------------------------------------------------------C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n ----------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a nd s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s -----------------------W h o le s a le and r e t a i l t r a d e ----------------------------

3
8
77

. 1
.5
129. 1

. 8
6. 9
1, 628. 2

111
_
62
13

11. 2
4. 1
1. 6
(2)
64. 3
_
13. 8
7. 2

23
74

1. 3
3. 6

24. 3
95. 2

14
6

40. 0
. 7

348. 4
10. 4

68
36

155. 9
7. 4

1, 094. 3
33. 6

F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ----S e r v ic e s ---------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t7 --------------------------------------------

6
41
43

.2
3. 7
5. 6

4. 0
120. 8
4 7. 7

3
13

. 8
1. 8

3. 7
8. 9

1
19
49

.3
1. 6
19. 3

12. 5
12. 0
69. 9

_

_

_

I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n m a t t e r s

O th e r w o rk in g c o n d itio n s

39.
141.
2.
4.

3
0
2
1

N ot r e p o r te d

155

40. 8

266. 8

415

72. 1

350. 4

51

4. 3

45. 6

61

17. 8

203. 5

29

8. 2

107. 6

21

2. 5

13. 3

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ------------------------------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------

2
1
2

.5
3. 6
.2

. 7
118. 1
.6

5
_
-

.4
_
-

1. 0
_
-

2

1

.2
_
.2

.5
_
.2

A p p a r e l, e t c . 3 ----------------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i tu r e —
F u r n i t u r e a nd f i x t u r e s ------------------------------------P a p e r and a ll i e d p r o d u c t s --------------------------------

9

1. 1

_

4. 3

_

2

(2)

_

.2

_

1. 2 >

.5
. 8

3. 4
11. 7

-

_

.9
6. 8
-

3

4
3

2
1

.2
(2)

.6
.9

6

1. 3

2. 0

-

-

"

-

-

.7

3

1. 5

3. 2

1

(2)

.4

11. 3
5. 5
2. 1

4
1
4

(2)
. 9
. 7

. 8
1. 8
. 9

1
2
4

(2)
(2)
.2

(2)
. 1
2. 5

.9

3. 9

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ■
M a n u fa c tu r in g —

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a llie d i n d u s t r i e s —
C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c ts ---------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ----R u b b e r a nd m i s c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s L e a th e r a nd l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s -------------------------S to n e , c la y , a nd g l a s s p r o d u c t s ---------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 ------------------------------

1

(2)
/2\

4
4
7

1. 4
.6
. 9

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -----------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p l i e s -------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ----------------------I n s t r u m e n t s , e t c . -------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r ie s ■

4
3
3
3

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s ----M in in g
C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n ---------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------------W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e -------------------------F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s ta t e ■
S e r v ic e s -----------------G o v e r n m e n t7 ----------

_
-

_

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,




-

{ )

4

94

.9
2.
2.
1.
1.

1
0
0
0

23. 0

1. 4

5

1. 0

12. 6

2

7
6
3
9

2
3
_
-

.6
2. 9
_
-

2. 6
83. 1
.
-

_
2
_
-

_

.

.5
_
-

3. 1
_
-

63. 3

386

64. 0

242. 8

30

1. 8

32. 3

-

-

5.
24.
3.
7.

-

61
12

18. 2
2. 0

43. 6
9. 4

57
306

29. 1
29. 5

94. 5
124. 7

11

1. 0

20. 3

11
2

1. 1
. 7

4. 1
1. 2

13
7

4. 7
. 5

17. 5
1. 9

3
10

.5
.2

1. 5
9. 5

:
1 .1

:
5. 0

3

.2
-

. 3
63. 9

5
1

:
8

(2)
(2)

1 S ee fo o tn o te 2, ta b le A - 14.
2 F e w e r th a n 100.
3 In c lu d e s o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s .
4 E x c lu d e s o r d n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t.
5 In c lu d e s p r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n t if ic , an d c o n tr o llin g i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .
6 I d le n e s s in 1971 r e s u l ti n g f r o m s to p p a g e t h a t b e g a n in 1970.
7 T h e s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a l l w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o r k sto p p a g e .
d e c is i o n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m i n a ti o n th a t a w o r k s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
NOTE:

_

s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o ta l s .

28

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

. 7
.2

T h is

Table A-13. Work stoppages by major issue and size, 1971
N u m b e r of s to p p a g e s
M a jo r i s s u e

6 -1 9
w o rk ers

T o ta l

T o ta l — ■ ---------- -—------------—

5. 138

673

2 0 -9 9
w o rk ers

1 ,0 0 0 - 4 ,9 9 9 5 ,0 0 0 - 9 ,9 9 9
w o rk e rs
w o rk e rs

10,000
w o rk ers
and o v e r

5 0 0 -9 9 9
w o rk ers

1. 194

1. 943

2 5 0 -4 9 9
w o rk e rs
701

329

243

26

29

1 0 0 -2 4 9
w o rk e rs

2, 600
S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f i ts , no
g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e ------------H o u r s of w o r k -----------------------------O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s --------U nion o r g a n iz a tio n a n d s e c u r i ty —
J o b s e c u r i t y --------------------------------P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ------------------O th e r w o rk in g c o n d it i o n s -----------I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n
m a t t e r s -----— --------------------------N ot r e p o r t e d --------------------------------

303

1, 041

594

332

170

126

16

18

40
159
5
116
482
210
905
155

5
12
1
12
136
13
56
14

13
50

3
24

2
14

1
2

-

-

-

-

13
29
40
188
33

9
8
12
89
10

7
14
1
7
8
16
45
6

1
1

50
238
65
250
44

8
42
3
21
61
63
269
48

3
1
3

1
1
1
5

-

-

415
51

107
14

169
23

75
10

36
3

14
1

13
-

1

-

-

W o rk e r s in v o lv e d (in th o u s a n d s )

G e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e ---------------S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f its , no
g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e ------------W age a d ju s t m e n t s ----------------------H o u r s of w o r k ----------------------------O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s --------U nion o r g a n iz a tio n a n d s e c u r i ty —
J o b s e c u r i t y --------------------------------P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n -------------------I n te r u n io n o r in tr a u n io n
m a t t e r s -------------------------------------N ot r e p o r t e d --------------------------------

3 ,2 7 9 .6

8. 2

96. 8

189. 1

24 3 . 8

225. 9

450. 5

163. 8

1, 901. 4

2, 137. 0

3. 9

53. 2

92. 6

114. 3

115. 3

23 8 . 5

91. 8

1, 427. 3

77.
94.
1.
49.
178.
104.
51 9 .
40.

(*)
. 1
1
6
2
7
2

.7
2. 4
2. 7
10. 5
3. 3
13. 4
2. 1

1.
6.
.
3.
9.
10.
44.
8.

1.
9.
7.
5.
8.
61.
6.

13.
25.
1.
13.
11.
34.
76.
12.

8. 3
7. 6
18. 8
9. 0

51. 7
34. 3
( 2)
120. 0
33. 7
234. 4
-

1. 2
.2

7. 6
.8

11. 2
1. 5

4 7 ,5 8 9 .1

185. 3

1, 9 9 2 .2

3, 071. 0

3, 5 9 6 .9

31, 754. 8

T o t a l ----------------------------------

105. 7

1, 3 1 2 .6

2, 3 5 5 .2

2, 800. 1
574. 8
3. 8
5, 048. 0
3, 326. 8
1, 007. 2
2, 4 1 0 .7
26 6 . 8

1. 1
.8
(*)
3. 7
53. 2
2. 0
3. 8
2. 7

8.
18.
3.
66.
357.
44.
98.
10.

16.
49.
1.
47.
272.
84.
130.
41.

350. 4
45. 6

10. 5
1. 7

3
0
6
6
6
7
4
8

72. 1
4. 3

0

.
1.
.
.
.

1
5
5
0
4
4
9
1

1. 1
8. 0
-

4.
10.
13.
66.
11.

7
4
8
9
2

12. 1
1. 3

3
4
1
7
7
5
8

1
6
1
3
9
6
8
4

-

21. 0
-

23. 2

7. 3
“

3, 206. 2

8, 875. 2

3, 509. 9

23, 152. 4

6, 470. 8

9. 5
.5

“

M a n -d a y s id le (in th o u s a n d s )
T o t a l ---------------------------------

2, 865. 0

2, 549. 0

5
1
1
8
9
5
9
8

17. 8
87. 1
35. 5
249. 9
52. 6
22 6 . 6
2 7. 8

3 2 .9
83. 2
104. 8
102. 1
61. 0
214. 9
17. 6

53. 5
17. 7

30. 4
4. 3

37. 8
3. 0

2, 192. 2

13, 904. 4

0
4
2
9
1
0
7
7

489. 7
22. 8
200. 0
513. 0
46. 2
-

1, 750. 1
138. 9
4, 329. 6
1, 520. 0
282. 5
1, 226. 8
-

116. 5
“

46. 0

S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f its , no
W age a d j u s t m e n t s ---------------------H o u r s of w o r k ---------------------------O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s -------U nion o r g a n iz a tio n a nd s e c u r i t y —
P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ----------------O th e r w o rk in g c o n d itio n s --------I n te r u n io n o r in tr a u n io n
m a t t e r s -----------------------------------N ot r e p o r t e d -------------------------------

0
5
5
8
6
6
7
1

55. 8
18. 9

1 F e w e r th a n 100.
2 W o r k e r s w e r e in c lu d e d in te le p h o n e in d u s t r y s to p p a g e .
3 I d le n e s s in 1971 r e s u l t e d f r o m a s to p p a g e th a t b e g a n in 1970.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




29

Dashes denote zeros.

484.
174.
2.
259.
258.
480.
462.
166.

"

-

"

Table A -14. Work stoppages by industry, 1971
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g e s
In d u stry N um ber

M ean
d u r a tio n 1

M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g y e a r
( a l l s to p p a g e s )
W o rk e rs
in v o lv e d

P e r c e n t of
t o ta l w o rk in g
tim e

N um ber

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------

z5, 138

22. 1

3, 27 9 . 6

47, 5 8 9 . 1

0. 26

M a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------------------

22, 391

35. 3

862. 7

18, 4 8 4 . 8

. 39

5

21. 2

2. 7

41. 6

. 08

4

30. 7

.9

2 1. 6

1

16. 0

1. 7

20. 0

F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------M e a t p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------D a ir y p r o d u c t s -----------------------------------C a n n e d a n d p r e s e r v e d f r u i ts ,
v e g e ta b le s , a n d s e a f o o d s ---------------G r a in m il l p r o d u c t s ---------------------------B a k e r y p r o d u c t s --------------------------------S u g a r ---------------------------------------------------C o n f e c tio n e ry a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s —
B e v e r a g e s ------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s fo o d p r e p a r a t i o n s a n d
k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------

215
57
16

1 3 .2
1 0 .9
2 .9

8 5 .4
43. 6
6. 8

868. 0
34 3 . 5
14. 5

1
5
4
3
1
8

6. 8
2. 8
6 .6
4. 7
5. 0
7. 8

51. 4
6 2. 3
6 9 .9
40. 1
5 9 .5
177. 9

11

34. 9

1. 3

48. 9

T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ---------------------------C i g a r e t t e s ------------------------------------------C i g a r s -------------------------------------------------T o b a c c o s te m m in g a n d r e d r y i n g --------

5
3

52. 7
52. 7

9. 2
9. 0

347. 6
33 8 . 0

2

57. 0

.2

9 .6

T e x tile m il l p r o d u c t s ------------------------------B ro a d w o v e n f a b r i c m il ls , c o tto n ------B ro a d w o v e n f a b r i c m il ls ,
m a n - m a d e f ib e r a n d s i l k ------------------B ro a d w o v e n f a b r i c m il ls , w ool
in c lu d in g d y e in g a n d f in is h in g ---------N a r r o w f a b r i c s a n d o t h e r s m a l lw a r e s
m il ls : C o tto n , w o o l, s ilk , a n d
m a n - m a d e f i b e r --------------------------------K n ittin g m i l l s -------------------------------------D y e in g a n d f in is h in g t e x t i le s , e x c e p t
w o o l f a b r i c s a n d k n it g o o d s ------------F l o o r c o v e rin g m i l l s -------------------------Y a r n a n d t h r e a d m i l l s -----------------------M is c e lla n e o u s t e x t i le g o o d s ---------------

36
2

19. 2
7. 3

5. 0
1. 1

70. 3
5 .4

-

86. 0

-

311. 7

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ---------------------G uns, h o w i t z e r s , m o r t a r s , a n d
r e l a t e d e q u i p m e n t ----------------------------A m m u n itio n , e x c e p t f o r s m a l l a r m s —
T a n k s , a n d t a n k c o m p o n e n t s --------------S ig h tin g a n d f i r e c o n tr o l e q u ip m e n t —
S m a ll a r m s -----------------------------------------S m a ll a r m s a m m u n i t i o n --------------------O rd n an ce and a c c e s s o r ie s not e ls e ­
w h e r e c l a s s i f i e d -------------------------------

A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c ts
m ad e fro m f a b r ic s and s im ila r
m a t e r i a l s ----------------------------------------------M e n 1 s, y o u th s ' , a n d b o y s ' s u its ,
c o a ts , a n d o v e r c o a t s ----------------------M en' s y o u th s' , a n d b o y s ' f u r n i s h ­
in g s , w o r k c lo th in g , a n d a ll i e d
g a r m e n t s ------------------------------------------W om en' s, m i s s e s ' , a n d j u n i o r s '
o u t e r w e a r -----------------------------------------W om en' s, m i s s e s ' , c h ild r e n ' s, a n d
i n fa n ts ' u n d e r g a r m e n t s -------------------H a ts , c a p s, a n d m i l l i n e r y -----------------G i r ls ' , c h ild r e n ' s, a n d in fa n ts '
o u t e r w e a r -----------------------------------------F u r g o o d s -------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s a p p a r e l a n d
a c c e s s o r i e s -----------------------------------—
M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r i c a t e d t e x t i le
p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e -----------------------------------------------L o g g in g c a m p s a n d lo g g in g
c o n tr a c to r s — — — — — — — — —
—
S a w m ills a n d p la n in g m i l l s ---------------M illw o rk , v e n e e r , p ly w o o d , a n d
p r e f a b r ic a te d s tr u c tu r a l wood
p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------------W ooden c o n t a i n e r s ------------------------------M is c e ll a n e o u s w o o d p r o d u c t s ------------F u r n i t u r e a n d f ix t u r e s ---------------------------H o u s e h o ld f u r n i t u r e ---------------------------O ffic e f u r n i tu r e ---------------------------------P u b lic b u ild in g s a n d r e l a t e d
f u r n i t u r e ------------------------------------------P a r t i t i o n s , s h e lv in g , l o c k e r s , a n d
o ffic e a n d s t o r e f i x t u r e s -----------------M is c e lla n e o u s f u r n i t u r e a n d
f i x t u r e s ---------------------------------------------

15
15
35
9
7
50

7.
28.
14.
10.
14.
32.

21

9. 1

1. 3

3
1
2
7

64. 1
12. 0
5 .8
1 7 .9

.4
( 4)
.6
1. 7

75

1. 85

. 03

9 .8
18.
.
2.
21.

3
4
8
8

1 9 .9

19. 3

197. 4

6

1 4 .9

11. 0

75. 6

14

30. 4

4. 3

12. 3

1. 8

15. 2

2
1

4 8 .8
3. 0

.2
( 4)

1 .4
.3

4

12. 7

. 3

. 06

72. 3

25

3. 1

2

2 .4

( 4)

26. 6

1 .5

29. 3

66

41. 1

7. 3

1 9 4 .8

1
17

13. 0
61. 8

1. 0
1. 8

2 .9
61. 6

33
1
14

34. 5
79. 0
44. 3

3 .4
. 1
.9

90. 7
8. 2
3 1 .5

73
39
11

43. 8
37. 6
62. 2

10. 9
5. 6
3. 1

3 1 6 .2
139. 1
124. 3

'

.2

21

3

9 6 .8

.4

28. 3

17

26. 6

1 .4

22. 7

3

5 .9

.4

1 .8

• S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d o f t a b l e .




. 19

30

. 13

. 27

Table A-14. Work stoppages by industry, 1971-Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g y e a r
( a l l s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
I n d u s tr y
N um ber

M e an
d u r a tio n 1

W o rk e rs
in v o lv e d

N um ber

P e r c e n t of
t o ta l w o rk in g
tim e

M a n u fa c tu r in g — C o n tin u e d
P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------P u lp m i l l s -------------------------------- -------- —
P a p e r m il ls e x c e p t b u ild in g
p a p e r m ills — ------------ -----------------------P a p e r b o a r d m il ls — --------------------------C o n v e r te d p a p e r a n d p a p e r b o a r d
p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t c o n ta i n e r s a n d
b o x e s ------------------------------------------------P a p e r b o a r d c o n ta i n e r s a n d b o x e s -----B u ild in g p a p e r a n d b u ild in g
b o a r d m i l l s --------------------------------------P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d
i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------------------------------N e w s p a p e r s : P u b lis h in g a n d
p r i n t i n g -------------------------------------------P e r i o d i c a l s : P u b lis h in g a n d
p r i n t i n g -------------------------------------------B o o k s -------------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s p u b lis h in g ------------------C o m m e r c ia l p r i n t i n g ------------------------M a n ifo ld b u s in e s s f o r m s -------------------G r e e tin g c a r d p u b l i s h i n g -------------------B la n k b o o k s, l o o s e l e a f b i n d e r s a n d
b o o k b in d in g w o r k ----------------------------S e r v ic e i n d u s t r i e s f o r th e p r in t in g
t r a d e --------------------------------------- -------C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s --------------I n d u s t r ia l in o r g a n ic a n d o r g a n ic
c h e m i c a l s ----------------------------------------P l a s t i c s m a t e r i a l s a n d s y n th e tic
r e s i n s , s y n th e tic r u b b e r , a n d o t h e r
m a n -m a d e f ib e r s , e x c e p t g l a s s -------D r u g s -------------------------------------------------Soap, d e te r g e n ts a n d c le a n in g p r e ­
p a r a t io n s , p e r f u m e s , c o s m e t ic s ,
a n d o t h e r t o il e t p r e p a r a t i o n s ---------P a i n ts , v a r n i s h e s , l a c q u e r s ,
e n a m e ls , a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s --------G u m a n d w ood c h e m i c a l s ------------------A g r i c u l t u r a l c h e m i c a l s --------------------M is c e lla n e o u s c h e m ic a l p r o d u c t s ----P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d
p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g ----------------------------P a v in g a n d ro o fin g m a t e r i a l s ------------M is c e lla n e o u s p r o d u c t s o f
p e tr o l e u m a n d c o a l -------------------------R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s
p r o d u c ts ------------------------------------------------T i r e s a n d i n n e r t u b e s -----------------------R u b b e r f o o t w e a r --------------------------------R e c la im e d r u b b e r -----------------------------F a b ric a te d ru b b e r p ro d u c ts not
e ls e w h e r e c l a s s i f i e d -----------------------M is c e lla n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s -------L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ---------------L e a th e r ta n n in g a n d f i n i s h i n g ------------I n d u s t r ia l l e a t h e r b e ltin g a n d
p a c k i n g --------------------------------------------B oot a n d sh o e c u t s to c k a n d
f in d in g s -------------------------------------------F o o tw e a r , e x c e p t r u b b e r ------------------L e a th e r g lo v e s a n d m it te n s --------------L u g g a g e ----------------------------------------------H andbags and o th e r p e rs o n a l
l e a t h e r g o o d s —--------------------------------L e a th e r g o o d s n o t e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d -----------------------------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ------------F l a t g l a s s ------------------------------------------G la s s a n d g l a s s w a r e , p r e s s e d o r
b l o w n -----------------------------------------------G la s s p r o d u c t s , m a d e f r o m
p u r c h a s e d g l a s s -------------------------------C e m e n t, h y d r a u l i c ----------------------------S t r u c t u r a l c la y p r o d u c t s -------------------P o t t e r y a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ------------C o n c r e te , g y p s u m , a n d p l a s t e r
p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------C u t s to n e a n d s to n e p r o d u c t s ------------A b r a s iv e s , a s b e s t o s , a n d m i s c e l ­
la n e o u s n o n m e ta llic m i n e r a l
p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------------

98
5

50. 5
25. 4

34. 9
5. 5

1, 00 6 . 2
9 8 .8

21
8

4 9 .8
101. 3

14. 3
6. 7

462. 8
26 8 . 3

26
35

24. 8
2 9. 7

2. 6
5. 2

48. 0
117. 1

3

32. 1

.5

11. 2

81

40. 7

28. 7

793. 7

24

60. 0

9. 2

376. 2

3
3
6
29
5

4. 7
5 1 .9
56. 5
18. 6
27. 7

5.
.
6.
4.
.

7
5
8
6
8

25. 3
18. 5
2 5 4 .4
59. 0
1 5 .9
40. 2

5

75. 3

.8

6

2 3 .9

.3

6 2 .8

2 1. 3

687. 5

48

77. 0

7. 0

279. 1

23
5

25. 5
153. 5

5. 3
.6

115. 6
1 8 .9
44. 0

. 27

13

23. 3

2. 7

12
1
13
17

38.
13.
59.
62.

0
0
3
1

1. 0
( 4)
.7
3 .9

13
8
5

5 5 .8
57. 6
38. 5

7. 6
7. 1
.5

9 9 .9
90. 8
9. 0

. 21

88
19

27. 3
15. 8

27. 9
16. 2

4 2 6 .4
98. 8

. 29

29.
.
27.
172.

0
3
6
8

1

70. 6

( 4)
’

23
45

4 0 .9
43. 1

5. 5
6. 2

1 2 8 .9
194. 7

16
1

22. 8
15. 0

6. 5
.2

9 5 .6
1. 8

2
10

55. 6
23. 1

( 4)
5. 6

1. 8
8 0 .9

9. 3

4. 1

2

17. 4

.7

1

83. 0

( 4)

156

38. 7

2 9 .9

544. 9

14

2 4 .4

10. 5

1 0 4 .4

7
1
14
12

30.
9.
42.
7.

7
0
3
1

.8
( 4)
1 .4
5 .9

1 9 .5
.5
4 1 .0
55. 7

81
5

72. 1
3 6 .9

7. 1
.4

208. 7
11. 3

22

4 0 .6

3. 7

1 0 4 .0

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b l e .




. 29

4. 2

132

. 58

31

. 12

1 .8
. 34

Table A-14. Work stoppages by industry, 1971-Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s in th o u sa n d s )
S to p p a g e s
In d u stry N um ber

M e an
d u ra tio n 1

M a n -d a y s id le d u rin g y e a r
( a l l s to p p a g e s )
W o rk e rs
in v o lv e d

N um ber

P e r c e n t of
t o ta l w o rk in g
tim e

M a n u fa c tu r in g — C o n tin u e d
235

2, 62 2 . 6

26. 2
22. 6

4 5 6 .4
66 3 . 3

74. 2

2 3 .4

742. 8

9

46. 3

1. 7

5 0 .4

44
25

26. 6
43. 3

17. 1
5 .4

3 7 0. 3
1 5 7 .4

23

58. 5

4 .4

1 8 1 .9

350
11

31. 8
27. 7

9 5 .2
31. 0

2, 028. 2
60 9 . 1

19

3 9 .4

3. 8

64. 2

7. 0

31. 1

24. 6

519. 2

10
32

30. 3
36. 3

2. 1
5. 3

44. 1
139. 5

26

11. 7

8. 0

7 3 .4

27

34. 1

3. 8

90. 3

44

124. 1
21. 6
30. 6

36. 3

20. 9

505. 3

61

94. 6

9 .2

405. 1

33

24. 0

5. 7

121. 3

58

17. 7

15. 7

21 1 . 2

7
29

55. 7
34. 8

10. 0
5. 5

548. 2
135. 3

25

95. 6

5. 0

316. 8

174

21. 0

109. 1

1, 5 4 9 .4

55
27
25

5. 2
30. 6
31. 1

14. 0
5 .8
4 5 .8

95. 0
128. 8
73 3 . 5

18

32. 5

3. 3

71. 6

3
9

3. 3
6 .6

2. 1
23. 5

6. 3
34 0 . 1

24

4. 4

8. 6

2 9 .6

13

38. 1

6. 1

144. 5

168

42. 3

1 1 9 /6

2, 7 4 2 .9

95
24
26
6
2

42. 9
6 6 .8
36. 0
19. 1
2. 2

71. 1
17. 2
23. 8
5 .2
( 4)

1, 76 3 . 6
465. 5
37 7 . 1
6 6 .6
.2

15

48. 1

2. 3

6 9 .9

29

61. 3

9. 3

402. 0

6

68. 3

2. 3

1 0 9 .4

12
2

I

44. 5
67. 9
20. 9

74

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ----------------------M o to r v e h ic l e s a n d m o to r v e h ic le
e q u ip m e n t ----------------------------------------A i r c r a f t a n d p a r t s ----------------------- ——
S h ip a n d b o a tb u ild in g a n d r e p a i r i n g —
R a i lr o a d e q u i p m e n t -----------------------------M o to r c y c le s , b i c y c le s , a n d p a r t s -----M is c e lla n e o u s t r a n s p o r t a t i o n
e q u ip m e n t ------------------------------------------

32. 8

332
29
17

E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p l i e s ------------------------------------------------E le c tr ic tra n s m is s io n and d is tr ib u ­
tio n e q u i p m e n t --------------------------------E l e c t r i c a l i n d u s t r i a l a p p a r a t u s --------H o u s e h o ld a p p l i a n c e s -------------------------E l e c t r i c lig h tin g a n d w ir in g
e q u i p m e n t ----------------------------------------R a d io a n d te l e v is i o n r e c e i v in g s e ts ,
e x c e p t c o m m u n ic a tio n ty p e s -----------C o m u n ic a tio n e q u i p m e n t --------------------E l e c t r o n ic c o m p o n e n ts a n d
a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s e l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y ,
e q u ip m e n t, a n d s u p p l i e s ------------------

6 7. 8
5 2 .6

5 .8
( 4)

2’ 2
?5.
3. 0

26. 8

.4

6 .9

5

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d o f t a b l e .




. 60

2 2 7 .0

154

. 84

106. 7

27

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ----------------E n g in e s a n d t u r b i n e s -------------------------F a r m m a c h i n e r y a n d e q u ip m e n t -------C o n s tru c tio n , m in in g , a n d m a t e r i a l
h a n d lin g m a c h i n e r y a n d
e q u i p m e n t ----------------------------------------M e ta lw o r k in g m a c h i n e r y a n d
e q u i p m e n t ----------------------------------------S p e c ia l i n d u s t r y m a c h i n e r y a n d
e q u i p m e n t -----------------------------------------G e n e r a l i n d u s t r ia l m a c h i n e r y a n d
e q u ip m e n t -----------------------------------------O ffic e , c o m p u tin g , a n d a c c o u n tin g
m a c h i n e s -----------------------------------------S e r v ic e i n d u s t r y m a c h in e s ----------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a c h in e r y , e x c e p t
e l e c t r i c a l ------------------------------------------

P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s ; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s -------------------E n g in e e r in g , la b o r a to r y , a n d
s c ie n t if ic a n d r e s e a r c h i n s t r u m e n t s
a n d a s s o c i a te d e q u ip m e n t ----------------I n s t r u m e n t s f o r m e a s u r in g , c o n ­
t r o l li n g , and in d ic a tin g p h y s ic a l
c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s --------------------------------O p tic a l i n s t r u m e n t s a n d l e n s e s --------S u r g ic a l, m e d ic a l, a n d d e n ta l
i n s t r u m e n t s a n d s u p p lie s -----------------

100. 9

23. 5
34. 2

10

F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t
o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a ­
tio n e q u i p m e n t --------------------------------------M e ta l c a n s ------------------------------------------C u tle r y , h a n d to o ls , a n d g e n e r a l
h a r d w a r e -----------------------------------------H e a tin g a p p a r a t u s ( e x c e p t e le c t r i c )
a n d p lu m b in g f i x t u r e s ---------------------F a b r ic a te d s tr u c tu r a l m e ta l
p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------- :—
S c r e w m a c h in e p r o d u c ts , b o lts ,
n u ts , s c r e w s , a n d r i v e t s ----------------M e ta l s t a m p i n g s -------------------------------C o a tin g , e n g ra v in g , a n d a ll i e d
s e r v i c e s -------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r i c a t e d w i r e
p r o d u c t s -------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r i c a t e d m e t a l
p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------------

41. 6

64
61

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------B la s t f u r n a c e s , s te e l w o r k s , a n d
r o llin g a nd f in is h in g m i l l s -------------I r o n a n d s te e l f o u n d r i e s --------------------P r i m a r y s m e ltin g a n d r e f in in g of
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a ls --------------------------S e c o n d a ry s m e ltin g a n d r e f in in g of
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ---------------------------R o llin g , d r a w in g , a n d e x tr u d in g of
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ---------------------------N o n f e r r o u s f o u n d r i e s -------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s p r i m a r y m e ta l
p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------------

32

9 .5

219. 0
3, 2 9 3 . 2
606. 5
443. 5

. 72

. 34

. 62

. 37

Table A -14. Work stoppages by industry, 1971-Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n -d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g e s
■
Ind u stry N um ber

M e an
d u r a tio n 1

W o rk e rs
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s id l e d u r in g y e a r
( 3.11 stc >ppages)
N um ber

P e r c e n t of
to ta l w o rk in g
tim e

M a n u fa c tu r in g — C o n tin u e d
P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s — C o n tin u e d
O p h th a lm ic g o o d s -------------------------------P h o to g r a p h ic e q u ip m e n t a n d
s u p p l i e s ------- ------------------------------------W a tc h e s, c lo c k s , c lo c k w o rk
o p e r a t e d d e v ic e s a n d p a r t s -------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g
i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------------------J e w e lr y , s il v e r w a r e , a n d p la te d
w a r e --------------------------------------------------M u s ic a l i n s t r u m e n t s --------------------------T o y s, a m u s e m e n t, s p o r tin g a n d
a th l e ti c g o o d s -----------------------------------P e n s , p e n c ils , a n d o t h e r o ffic e a n d
a r t i s t s ' m a t e r i a l s ---------------------------C o s tu m e j e w e lr y , c o s tu m e n o v e ltie s ,
b u tto n s , a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s n o tio n s ,
e x c e p t p r e c i o u s m e t a l s -------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g
i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------------------------

3

11. 7

.6

5. 8

1

9. 0

.2

1. 6

44

29. 7

7. 7

1 5 6 .4

2
5

51. 6
25. 7

. 1
1. 3

3. 7
24. 5

12

37. 9

2. 5

63. 2

4

27. 5

.9

1 6 .9

. 15

2

31. 5

.2

4. 2

19

23. 8

2. 8

43. 8

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------

z2, 762

17. 3

2, 4 1 6 . 8

29, 104. 3

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s ---A g r i c u l t u r a l p r o d u c t i o n ---------------------A g r i c u l t u r a l s e r v i c e s a n d h u n tin g
a n d t r a p p i n g -------------------------------------F o r e s t r y ----------------------------------------------F i s h e r i e s --------------------------------------------

7

4. 7

1. 5

4. 2

4

3. 7

1. 1

1. 8

3

7. 7

.4

2. 5

657
15
5
2
4

23. 8
57. 9
6. 1
80. 3
5 5 .9

1
1

32. 0
71. 0

. 1
.3

2. 3
15. 8

2
2
606
2
2

1 .0
5. 6
20. 8
8. 1
8. 1

.3
.2
350. 7
( 4)
( 4)

1 6 .9
.5
4, 215. 1
.3
.3

32
4

3 8 .0
40. 3

2. 1
.4

47. 5
12. 3

18
6

26. 5
45. 2

.8
.4

14. 9
12. 8

4

48. 3

.4

7. 6

751

27. 6

451. 3

6, 84 9 . 6

. 83

316
9
6

12. 0
5. 8
5 .8

1. 266. 7
68 1 . 9
66 7 . 2

13, 4 1 9 . 9
1, 84 5 . 7
1, 77 2 . 3

1. 18

3

6. 0

14. 7

73. 4

59

25. 0

11. 6

1 8 4 .0

28
12

2 8 .4
32. 9

2 .8
4. 6

6 7 .9
8 3 .0

10

1 6 .5

1. 5

23. 1

2
7

4 0 .4
6. 2

.4
2. 2

1 .5
8 .6

93
81

2 6 .8
27. 2

18. 9
18. 2

30 3 . 7
29 5 . 1

M i n i n g ------------------------------------------------------M e ta l m i n i n g --------------------------------------I r o n o r e s ----------------------------------------C o p p e r o r e s -----------------------------------L e a d a n d z in c o r e s ------------------------G old a n d s i l v e r o r e s ---------------------B a u x ite a n d a lu m in im o r e s -----------F e r r o a l l o y o r e s e x c e p t v a n a d iu m —
M e ta l m in in g s e r v i c e s -----------------M is c e lla n e o u s m e t a l o r e s ------------A n th r a c ite m i n i n g ------------------------------B itu m in o u s c o a l a n d l i g n i t e ---------------C ru d e p e tr o l e u m a n d n a tu r a l g a s ------C r u d e p e tr o l e u m a n d n a t u r a l g a s —
N a t u r a l g a s l i q u i d s ------------------------O il a n d g a s f ie ld s e r v i c e s -------------M in in g a n d q u a r r y i n g o f n o n m e ta llic
m in e r a l s , e x c e p t f u e l s --------------------D im e n s io n s t o n e ---------------------------C r u s h e d a n d b r o k e n sto n e ,
in c lu d in g r i p r a p --------------------------S an d a n d g r a v e l -----------------------------C lay, c e r a m ic , a n d r e f r a c t o r y
m i n e r a l s ------------------------------------ —
C h e m ic a l a n d f e r t i l i z e r m in e r a l
m i n i n g ------------------ -----------—■ ------—
N o n m e ta llic m i n e r a l s ( e x c e p t
fu e ls ) s e r v i c e s ---------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m e ta llic
m i n e r a l s , e x c e p t f u e l s ---------------C o n tr a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n ----------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
e l e c t r i c , g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ----R a i lr o a d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ---------------------R a i l r o a d s --------------------------------------S le e p in g c a r a n d o t h e r p a s s e n g e r
c a r s e r v i c e ---------------------------------R a ilw a y e x p r e s s s e r v i c e ---------------L o c a l a n d s u b u rb a n t r a n s i t a n d
i n t e r u r b a n h ig h w a y p a s s e n g e r
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n --------------------------------L o c a l a n d s u b u rb a n p a s s e n g e r
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -----------------------------T a x i c a b s -----------------------------------------I n t e r c i t y a n d r u r a l h ig h w a y
p a s s e n g e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -----------P a s s e n g e r tra n s p o rta tio n c h a rte r
s e r v i c e ----------------------------------------S c h o o l b u s e s ----------------------------------T e rm in a l and s e rv ic e f a c ilitie s fo r
m o to r v e h ic le p a s s e n g e r
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -----------------------------M o to r f r e i g h t t r a n s p o r t a t i o n a n d
w a r e h o u s i n g -------------------------------------T r u c k in g , lo c a l a n d lo n g d i s t a n c e —
S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b l e .




33

383.
30.
8.
19.
2.

2
2
2
3
0

4, 93 4 .
671.
30.
591.
14.

4
0
6
1
3

. 22
( 5h

3. 23

Table A -14. Work stoppages by industry, 1971-Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g e s
In d u stry
N um ber

M e an
d u r a tio n 1

M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g y e a r
(3-11 s to p p a g e s )
W o rk e rs
in v o lv e d

P e r c e n t of
to ta l w o rk in g
tim e

N um ber

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g — C o n tin u e d
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
e le c t r i c , g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s —
C o n tin u e d
P u b lic w a r e h o u s i n g ----------------------T e r m i n a l a n d j o in t t e r m i n a l
m a in te n a n c e f a c i l i t i e s f o r m o to r
f r e i g h t t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------W a te r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -------------------------D e e p s e a f o r e ig n t r a n s p o r t a t i o n —
D e e p s e a d o m e s tic
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------------------G re a t L akes—
St. L a w r e n c e S e a w a y
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -----------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n on r i v e r s a n d
c a n a l s -----------------------------------------L o c a l w a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -----------S e r v ic e s i n c id e n ta l to w a t e r
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -----------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n by a i r -----------------------A i r t r a n s p o r t a ti o n , c e r t if i c a t e d
c a r r i e r s ---------------------------------------A i r t r a n s p o r t a ti o n , n o n c e r t if i c a t e d
c a r r i e r s —=
----------------------------------F ix e d f a c i l i t i e s a n d s e r v i c e s r e l a te d
to a i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ------------------P i p e li n e t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------------P i p e li n e s , e x c e p t n a t u r a l g a s -------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n s e r v i c e s ---------------------F r e ig h t f o r w a r d i n g -----------------------A r r a n g e m e n t o f t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -----S to c k y a r d s ------------------------------------R e n ta l of r a i l r o a d c a r s ----------------M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s in c id e n ta l
to t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -------------------------C o m m u n i c a t i o n -----------------------------------T e le p h o n e c o m m u n ic a tio n ( w ir e o r
r a d i o ) --------------------------------------------T e le g r a p h c o m m u n ic a tio n ( w i r e o r
r a d i o ) -------------------------------------------R a d io b r o a d c a s ti n g a n d
t e l e v i s i o n ------------------------------------C o m m u n ic a tio n s e r v i c e , n o t
e l s e w h e r e c l a s s i f i e d ------------------E l e c t r i c , g a s , a n d s a n it a r y
s e r v i c e s -------------------------------------------E l e c t r i c c o m p a n ie s a n d s y s te m s —
G a s c o m p a n ie s a n d s y s t e m s --------C o m b in a tio n c o m p a n ie s a n d
s y s t e m s ---------------------------------------W at e x s u p p l y ----------------------------S a n i ta r y s e r v i c e s --------------------------S te a m s u p p l y ----------------------------------I r r i g a t i o n s y s te m s
W h o le s a le a n d r e t a i l t r a d e ---------------------W h o le s a le t r a d e ----------------------------------M o to r v e h ic le a n d a u to m o tiv e
e q u i p m e n t -----------------------------------D ru g s , c h e m ic a ls , a n d a ll i e d
p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------P i e c e g o o d s, n o tio n s , a p p a r e l -----G r o c e r i e s a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ---F a r m p r o d u c t s — R aw m a t e r i a l s ----E l e c t r i c a l g o o d s ------- ;-------------------H a r d w a r e , a n d p lu m b in g a n d
h e a tin g e q u ip m e n t a n d s u p p lie s —
M a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p l i e s --------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s w h o l e s a l e r s -----------R e ta il t r a d e ----------------------------------------B u ild in g m a t e r i a l s , h a r d w a r e ,
a n d f a r m e q u ip m e n t d e a l e r s ------L u m b e r a n d o t h e r b u ild in g
m a t e r i a l d e a l e r s --------------------P lu m b in g , h e a tin g , a n d a i r
c o n d itio n in g e q u ip m e n t
d e a l e r s -----------------------------------P a in t, g l a s s , a n d w a llp a p e r
s t o r e s -------------------------------------E l e c t r i c a l s u p p ly s t o r e s ----------H a r d w a r e a n d f a r m e q u ip m e n t
d e a l e r s -----------------------------------G e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e s t o r e s --------D e p a r tm e n t s t o r e s -------------------M a il o r d e r h o u s e s --------------------V a r ie t y s t o r e s --------------------------M e r c h a n d is in g m a c h in e
o p e r a t o r s --------------------------------D i r e c t s e llin g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ----M is c e lla n e o u s g e n e r a l m e r c h a n , d i s e s t o r e s ------------------------------S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .




11

20. 1

.6

8. 1

1
18

5. 0
51. 7

.2
7 4 .4
-

.5
2 , 9 4 8 .3
-

1

150. 0

(4)

7 .9
-

-

-

-

1
1

1. 0
5. 0

( 4)
(4)

( 4)
(4)

15
8

51. 7
1 0 4 .8

74. 3
4 .4

2, 940. 3
214. 0

2

144. 7

3 .4

20 9 . 0

-

-

-

-

6
8
1

6. 5
29. 3
5. 0

1. 0
_
.6
( 4)

5. 0
1 4 .4
(4)

3
1

2. 2
100. 0

.3
( 4)

8. 2
3 .5

3
73

20. 2
11. 7

.2
44 6 . 7

2. 6
6, 8 8 2 .4

54

7. 6

4 2 7 .4

6, 00 8 . 1

2

103. 0

1 8 .9

85 4 . 5

14

80. 2

.3

17. 8

3

28. 6

. 1

2. 0

48
17
15

55. 1
65. 2
2 2. 8

28. 2
8. 7
7. 1

1, 0 2 7 .4
382. 8
114. 3

5
1
9
1
"

67. 6
74. 4
4. 8
8. 0
"

11. 8
( 4)
.5
( 4)
“

5 2 2 .4
6. 1
1. 7
(4)
-

502
271

16. 7
17. 8

134. 0
73. 1

2, 0 8 6 .4
1, 4 1 0 . 0

35

3 1 .4

2. 7

62. 8

10
6
53
11
21

20. 7
24. 7
11. 0
69. 7
6 .9

.4
.4
7 .5
.6
47. 9

4 .6
7 .3
6 7 .4
34. 1
755. 0

11

2 6 .9

1. 1

21. 1

27
97
232

7 3 .6
4 5 .4
15. 5

5. 1
7. 3
6 0 .9

26 7 . 2
190. 6
67 6 . 3

20

1 9 .4

2. 6

3 2 .9

16

2 6 .5

1. 3

2 1 .9

-

55. 0

-

( 3)

2
-

4 5 .5
-

.2
-

6 .7
-

2
28
19
1
1

4. 6
25. 7
20. 1
1 0 8 .0
1 3 2 .5

1. 0
4. 6
4 .0
( 4)
(4)

7

33. 1

.6

12. 5

-

128. 0

-

34 . 7

34

4.
84.
56.
8.
2.

2
3
6
3
2

. 05

Table A-14. Work stoppages by industry, 1971-Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n -d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g e s
“
I n d u s tr y
N um ber

M e an
d u r a tio n 1

W o rk e rs
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s id l e d u r in g y e a r
( 3,11 stc jp p a g e s )
P e r c e n t of
t o ta l w o rk in g
t im e

N um ber

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g — C o n tin u e d
W h o le s a le a n d r e t a i l t r a d e — C o n tin u e d
R e ta il t r a d e — C o n tin u e d
F o o d s t o r e s ---------------------------------G r o c e r y s t o r e s -----------------------M e a t a n d f is h (se a fo o d )
m a r k e t s --------------------------------F r u i t s t o r e s a n d v e g e ta b le
m a r k e t s --------------------------------C andy, n u ts , a n d c o n f e c tio n e r y
s t o r e s ------------------------------------D a iry p r o d u c t s s t o r e s ------------R e t a il b a k e r i e s ------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s fo o d s t o r e s ------A u to m o tiv e d e a l e r s a n d g a s o lin e
s e r v i c e s t a t i o n s -------------------------M o to r v e h ic le d e a l e r s (n ew
a n d u s e d c a r s ) ------------------------M o to r v e h ic le d e a l e r s ( u s e d
c a r s o n l y ) ------------------------------T i r e , b a tt e r y , a n d a c c e s s o r y
d e a l e r s -----------------------------------G a s o lin e s e r v i c e s t a t i o n s -------M is c e lla n e o u s a i r c r a f t , m a r i n e ,
a n d a u to m o tiv e d e a l e r s --------A p p a r e l a n d a c c e s s o r y s t o r e s -----M en' s a n d b o y s' c lo th in g a n d
f u r n is h in g s s t o r e s ----------------W om en' s r e a d y - to - w e a r
s t o r e s ------------------------------------W om en' s a c c e s s o r y a n d
s p e c i a lt y s t o r e s ----------------------C h ild r e n ' s a n d in f a n ts ' w e a r
s t o r e s ------------------------------------F a m ily c lo th in g s t o r e s -----------Shoe s t o r e s ------------------------------C u s to m t a i l o r s ------------------------F u r r i e r a n d f u r s h o p s ------------M is c e lla n e o u s a p p a r e l a n d
a c c e s s o r y s t o r e s -------------------F u r n it u r e , h o m e f u r n is h in g s , a n d
e q u ip m e n t s t o r e s ----------------------F u r n it u r e , h o m e f u r n is h in g s ,
a n d e q u ip m e n t s t o r e s , e x c e p t
a p p l i a n c e s -----------------------------H o u s e h o ld a p p lia n c e s t o r e s -----R a d io , t e le v is io n , a n d m u s ic
s t o r e s ------------------------------------E a tin g a n d d rin k in g p l a c e s ----------E a tin g a n d d r in k in g p l a c e s - -----M is c e lla n e o u s r e t a i l s t o r e s ---------D ru g s t o r e s a n d p r o p r i e t a r y
s t o r e s ------------------------------------L iq u o r s t o r e s --------------------------A n tiq u e s t o r e s a n d s e c o n d h a n d
s t o r e s -----------------------------------B ook a n d s ta t io n e r y s t o r e s -----S p o rtin g g o o d s s t o r e s a n d
b ic y c le s h o p s ------------------------F a r m a n d g a r d e n s u p p ly
s t o r e s ------------------------------------J e w e lr y s t o r e s ------------------------F u e l a n d ic e d e a l e r s ---------------R e ta il s t o r e s , n o t e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d ------------------------------F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s ta t e ---B a n k i n g ----------------------------------------------F e d e r a l r e s e r v e b a n k s ----------------C o m m e r i c a l a n d s to c k s a v in g s
b a n k s ------------------------------------------M u tu a l s a v in g s b a n k s --------------------T r u s t c o m p a n ie s n o t e n g a g e d in
d e p o s it b a n k i n g --------------------------E s t a b l i s h m e n ts p e r f o r m i n g
fu n c tio n s c lo s e l y r e l a t e d to
b a n k in g ---------------------------------------C r e d it a g e n c ie s o t h e r th a n b a n k in g —
R e d is c o u n t a n d f in a n c in g i n s t i t u ­
t io n s f o r c r e d i t a g e n c ie s o t h e r
th a n b a n k s ----------------------------------S a v in g s a n d lo a n a s s o c i a ti o n s -----A g r ic u ltu ra l c r e d i t i n s t it u t io n s ----P e r s o n a l c r e d i t i n s t i t u t i o n s ----------B u s in e s s c r e d i t i n s t i t u t i o n s ----------L o a n c o r r e s p o n d e n ts a n d
b r o k e r s ---------------------------------------S e c u r i t y a n d c o m m o d ity b r o k e r s ,
d e a le r s , e x c h an g e s, and s e rv ic e s —

53
50

9 .2
9. 1

1

62. 0

2 9 3 .3
29 2 . 2
.4

(4)

_

.
-

-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
_

8. 7
_

. 1
_

.7
.

63

39. 1

4 .9

53

38. 2

3. 1

1

9 .0

( 4)

( 4)

7
-

1 7 .4
_

.9
_

9 .5
_

2
5

6 3 .4
39. 3

.9
.5

36. 7
12. 9

140. 8
94. 6

2

26. 6

.2

4. 1

-

92. 0

.

3. 3

-

-

_

_
.3
8. 1
_
_

-

-

1
2
_

_
2 1 .0
52. 6
_
-

(4)
.2
_
-

-

-

_

14

49. 2

.6

21. 6

12
1

47. 6
51. 1

.6
(4)

18. 7
2. 1

1
40
40
9

78.
35.
35.
40.

0
1
1
5

( 4)
3 .0
3 .0
.7

.
74.
74.
16.

2
-

35. 0

.5
_

10. 6
_

-

-

-

_
_

-

-

-

2
1
4

6 7 .5
140. 0
8 .6

-

-

_

8
3
3
3

-

.

( 4)
( 4)
( 4)

3 .4
2. 0
.4

-

-

23
1
-

38. 5
119. 0
_

2. 1
( 4)

61. 7
3. 3

1

119. 0

( 4)

3. 3

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

1

3 .0

(4)

_

_
_

_
_

_

-

_

_

_

1

3. 0

( 4)

-

_

"
"

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b l e .




44. 1
4 4 .0

35

.2

.2
_

_
-

. 01

Table A-14. Work stoppages by industry, 1971-Continued
( W o r k e r s a nd m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g e s
I n d u s tr y
N um ber

M e an
d u r a tio n 1

1
1

6 6 .0
6 6 .0

M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g y e a r
( a l l s to p p a g e s )
W o rk e rs
in v o lv e d

P e r c e n t of
to ta l w o rk in g
tim e

N um ber

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g — C o n tin u e d
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l
e s ta t e — C o n tin u e d
S e c u rity b r o k e r s d e a le r s , and
f lo ta tio n c o m p a n i e s ——
-------- —------C o m m o d ity c o n tr a c ts b r o k e r s an d
d e a l e r s ----------------------------------------S e c u r i t y a n d c o m m o d ity
e x c h a n g e s ------------------------------------S e r v ic e s a ll i e d w ith th e e x c h a n g e
o f s e c u r i t i e s o r c o m m o d itie s -----I n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r s ----------------------------L ife i n s u r a n c e ------------- -----------------A c c id e n t a n d h e a lt h i n s u r a n c e ------F i r e , m a r i n e a n d c a s u a l ty
i n s u r a n c e ------------------------------------S u r e ty i n s u r a n c e ---------------------------T itle i n s u r a n c e ------——— — ——
I n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r n o t e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d -------------------------------------I n s u r a n c e a g e n ts b r o k e r s a n d
s e r v i c e ----------------------------------------------I n s u r a n c e a g e n ts b r o k e r s , a n d
s e r v i c e ----------------------------------------R e a l, e s t a t e -------—--------------- --------------R e a l e s t a t e o p e r a t o r s (e x c e p t
d e v e lo p e r s ) a n d l e s s o r s ---------------A g e n ts , b r o k e r s , a n d m a n a g e r s —
T itle a b s t r a c t c o m p a n ie s --------------S u b d iv id e r s a n d d e v e lo p e r s ----------O p e r a tiv e b u i ld e r s ----------------- —----C o m b in a tio n s of r e a l e s ta t e ,
i n s u r a n c e -----------------------------------------L o a n s , la w o f fic e s ------------------------C o m b in a tio n s o f r e a l e s ta t e ,
in s u r a n c e lo a n s , la w o f f i c e s ------H o ld in g a n d o t h e r i n v e s tm e n t
c o m p a n i e s -----------------------------------------H o ld in g c o m p a n i e s -----------------------I n v e s tm e n t c o m p a n ie s ------------------T r u s t s -------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s in v e s tin g
i n s t i t u t i o n s -----------------------------------S e r v ic e s ---------------------------------------------------H o te ls , ro o m in g h o u s e s , c a m p s , a n d
o t h e r lo d g in g p l a c e s -------------------------H o te ls , t o u r i s t c o u r t s , a n d m o te l s —
R o o m in g a n d b o a rd in g h o u s e s ------T r a i l e r p a r k s a n d c a m p s -------------O r g a n iz a tio n h o t e l s a n d lo d g in g

.3
.3

12. 5
12. 5

1

19. 8

( 4)

. 1

1
19

19. 8
33. 8

( 4)
1. 7

. 1
45. 6

10
3

24. 0
5. 5

1 .0
. 1

17. 3
.6

6

60. 2

.5

27. 7

177

4 5 .4

25. 7

847. 1

7
7

6 6 .5
6 6 .5

.4
.4

1 8 .8
1 8 .8

19

103. 3

4. 7

4 4 5 .6

13

1 0 4 .4

4 .4

420. 0

1
1
1

1 4 .0
(6 )
5 .0

(4)
(4)
( 4)

.2
1. 0
( 4)

3

80. 0

.3

2 4 .2

44
12

3 5 .9
4 3 .4

3. 1
.6

8 1 .2
1 6 .6

houses, on membership b asis ------

P e r s o n a l s e r v i c e -------------------------------L a u n d r ie s , l a u n d r y s e r v i c e s , a n d
c le a n in g a n d d y e in g p l a n t s ----------P h o to g ra p h ic s tu d io s , in c lu d in g
c o m m e r c i a l p h o to g ra p h y ------------B e a u ty s h o p s ---------------------------------B a r b e r s h o p s ---------------------------------S hoe r e p a i r s h o p s , sh o e s h in e
p a r l o r s , a n d h a t c le a n in g s h o p s —
F u n e ra l s e rv ic e s and c re m a to r ie s —
G a r m e n t p r e s s i n g , a l t e r a t io n , a n d
r e p a i r ------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s —
M is c e lla n e o u s b u s in e s s s e r v i c e s ------A d v e r t i s i n g ------------------------------------C o n s u m e r c r e d i t r e p o r t in g
a g e n c ie s , m e r c a n t i l e r e p o r t in g
a g e n c ie s , a n d a d ju s tm e n t a n d
c o lle c tio n a g e n c i e s ---------- - ---------D u p lic a tin g a d d r e s s in g , b l u e p r i n t ­
ing, p h o to c o p y in g m a ilin g l is t,
a n d s te n o g r a p h ic s e r v i c e s ----------S e r v ic e s to d w e llin g s a n d o t h e r
b u i l d i n g s --------------------------------------N e w s s y n d ic a te s ---------------------------P r i v a t e e m p lo y m e n t a g e n c i e s ------B u s in e s s s e r v i c e s , n o t e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s if i e d ----------------------------- ------A u to m o b ile r e p a i r , a u to m o b ile
s e r v i c e s a n d g a r a g e s ------------------------A u to m o b ile r e n t a l s , w ith o u t
d r i v e r s ---------------------------------------A u to m o b ile p a r k i n g -----------------------A u to m o b ile r e p a i r sh o p s -------------A u to m o b ile s e r v i c e s , e x c e p t
r e p a i r -------------------------------------------

2

4 6 .8

.4

1 2 .8

11
-

20. 9
-

1 .2
-

1 7 .4
-

19

46. 1

.9

3 4 .5

10

14. 1

3 .4

3 5 .4

4
3
3

1 9 .2
1 3 .0
3 5 .7

. 1
3 .2

1 .5
3 0 .9
3 .0

-

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f t a b l e .




36

-1
-

,

-

. 03

Table A -14. Work stoppages by industry, 1971-Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s m tn o u s a n a s ;
M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g y e a r
( a l l s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
I n d u s tr y
N um ber

M e an
d u r a tio n 1

W o rk e rs
in v o lv e d

N um ber

P e r c e n t of
t o ta l w o rk in g
tim e

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g — C o n tin u e d
S e r v ic e s — C o n tin u e d
M is c e lla n e o u s r e p a i r s e r v i c e s ----------E l e c t r i c a l r e p a i r s h o p s ----------------W a tc h , c lo c k , a n d j e w e lr y
r e p a i r ------------------------------------------R e u p h o ls te r y a n d f u r n i t u r e
M is c e lla n e o u s r e p a i r s h o p s a n d
r e l a t e d s e r v i c e s --------------------------M o tio n p i c t u r e s ---------------------------------A m u sem en t and r e c r e a tio n s e rv ic e s ,
e x c e p t m o tio n p i c t u r e s --------------------M e d ic a l a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s -----L e g a l s e r v i c e s -----------------------------------E d u c a tio n a l s e r v i c e s --------------------------M u s e u m s , a r t g a l l e r i e s , b o ta n ic a l
a n d z o o lo g ic a l g a r d e n s --------------------N o n p r o f it m e m b e r s h i p
o r g a n i z a ti o n s -----------------------------------P r i v a t e h o u s e h o ld s ----------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s ---------------------G o v e r n m e n t 7 -------------------------------------------F e d e r a l -----------------------------------------------S ta te ----- _
----------------------------------------------C o u n ty ---------------------------------------------------C ity -----------------------------------------------------S c h o o l d i s t r i c t ------------------------------------O th e r lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t ----------------------

5
1

56. 0
84. 0

-

-

.2
. 1

9 .0
7. 7

-

-

4
2

18. 1
155. 0

(4)
.3

1 .3
8. 3

18
36

2 8 .4
14. 7

2. 5
3. 7

60. 0
46. 9

-

-

-

13

3 0 .4

-

3. 6

7 1 .0

3

16. 2

.3

3 .5

16

26. 6

2 .4

39. 1

-

-

3

55. 0
8.
6.
7.
7.
5.
10.

329
2
23
29
115
159
1

1

.

-

-

5
3
6
0
9
3
0

.7

2 7 .9

152. 6

9 0 1 .4
8. 1
81. 8
30. 1
205. 0
5 7 6 .4
.1

1

.

0

14. 5
6. 7
4 7 .4
82. 9
. 1

. 03

1 W e ig h te d b y m u ltip ly in g th e d u r a t i o n o f e a c h s to p p a g e b y th e w o r k e r s in v o lv e d .
2 T h e n u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s r e p o r t e d f o r a m a j o r in d u s t r y g ro u p o r d i v is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m o f i ts c o m p o n e n ts
b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l s to p p a g e s o c c u r r in g in tw o o r m o r e g r o u p s h a v e b e e n c o u n te d in e a c h .
T h e m a j o r i n d u s t r y g ro u p a n d
d iv is io n t o ta l s h a v e b e e n a d ju s t e d to e li m in a te d u p lic a tio n .
W o rk e r s in v o lv e d a n d m a n -d a y s id le h a v e b e e n a ll o c a te d am o n g
th e r e s p e c ti v e g r o u p s .
3 I d le n e s s in 1971 r e s u l ti n g f r o m s to p p a g e th a t b e g a n ift 1970.
4 F e w e r th a n 100.
5 L e s s th a n 0. 005 p e r c e n t .
6 D id n o t e n d in 1971.
7 T h e s it u a ti o n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a l l w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a
w o r k s to p p a g e . T h is d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m i n a ti o n t h a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n o f
a n y law o r p u b lic p o lic y .
NO TE:

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .




37

Table A -15. Government work stoppages by major issue, 1971
N u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s
M a jo r i s s u e
T o ta l

T o ta l

■ .

F e d e ra l

S ta te

C o u n ty

School
d is tric t

C ity

.. ■■ --------------------- ------------■■

329

2

23

29

115

159

W a g e s ------------------------------------------------------------------S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f i t s ---------------------------------------W ag e a d j u s t m e n t s ------------------------------------------------

191
2
13
2
7
43
13
49
9
-

1

12

15

54

-

-

-

-

-

1

7
2
2

2
5
1
6

-

-

-

-

"

“

4
1
2
18
3
27
6
“

O ther.
lo c a l
g o v e rn m e n t

109
2
7
1
5
13
7
12
3
-

U nion o r g a n iz a tio n a nd s e c u r i t y -----------------------J o b s e c u r i t y --------------------------------------------------------P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ------------------------------------------O th e r w o r k in g c o n d itio n s -----------------------------------I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n m a t t e r s -----------------------

-

1

-

-

_
1
-

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d (in th o u s a n d s )
T o t a l -----------------------------------------------------------W a g e s ------------------------------------------------------------------S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f its ---------------------------------------W a g e a d ju s t m e n t s -----------------------------------------------H o u r s of w o r k ------------------------------------------------------J o b s e c u r i t y --------------------------------------------------------P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t io n ------------------------------------------I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n m a t t e r s

— ............... .—

152. 6
94. 8
. 3
27. 0
i. 3
1. 6
5. 6
1. 8
19. 3
1. 1
“

1. 0

14. 5

6. 7

4 7 .4

82. 9

0. 1

( 2)
-.

12. 6
-

4. 2
1. 2
-

-

-

7 .9
21. 4
.2
.2
1. 7
.2
15. 2
.6
“

70. 0
. 3
4. 4
1. 1
1. 3
2. 5
.5
2. 3
.5
“

_
. 1
"

1 .0
-

.7
1. 0
. 1
“

.6
(2)
.6
“

M a n -d a y s id le ( in th o u s a n d s )
-------------- ------

901. 4

8. 1

81. 8

30. 1

205. 0

57 6 . 4

0. 1

W a g e s - -----------—-------------------------------------------------S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f its ----- - -------------------------------W age a d j u s t m e n t s -----------------------------------------------H o u r s of w o r k ..
— ■—. —......... ........ — — -----------O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s ----------------------------------U n io n o r g a n i z a ti o n a n d s e c u r i t y -----------------------J o b s e c u r i t y -------------- —---------------------------------------P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n --------------------------------------------O th e r w o rk in g c o n d it i o n s ---- ------------ -------- — ---I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n m a t t e r s ----------------------

630. 1
1. 1
126. 2
2. 6
5. 6
47. 7
8 .9
6 9 .9
5. 2
3 3. 9

. 1

72. 2
2. 9
6. 4
.2

14. 2
8. 4
4 .9
(2)
2. 4

22. 3
106. 5
.4
.7
15. 7
.8
52. 1
2. 5
3 3. 9

521. 2
1. 1
11. 3
2. 2
4 .9
24. 1
1. 5
7. 2
2. 8
"

.
. 1

T o ta l — ----------------- - ■ ■
!..

-

7 .9
-

-

-

”

"

“

1 T he s it u a ti o n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a l l w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o r k s to p p a g e .
n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m i n a ti o n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
2 F e w e r th a n 100.
3 I d le n e s s in 1971 r e s u l ti n g f r o m a s to p p a g e t h a t b e g a n in 1970.
N O TE:

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o ta l s .




38

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

-

"
T h is d o e s

Table A -16. Government work stoppages by occupation, 1971
N u m b e r of w o rk s to p p a g e s
O c c u p a tio n
T o ta l
A ll o c c u p a t i o n s -----------------------------------------------

C o u n ty

S ta te

C ity

School
d is tric t

O th e r
g o v e rn m e n t

2

135
2
15
9
31

23

29

115

159

1

_
_
1
-

329

T e a c h e r s ------------------------------------------------------------------N u r s e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------O th e r p r o f e s s i o n a l s ------------------------------------------------C l e r i c a l -------------------------------------------------------------------S a n ita tio n w o r k e r s --------------------------------------------------C r a f t s m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------B lu e c o ll a r a nd m a n u a l ------------------------------------------P o l i c e -----------------------------------------------------------------------F i r e m e n ------------------------------------------------------------------C o m b in a tio n s , p o lic e , f ir e m e n a n d o t h e r s -----------O th e r p r o te c ti v e -----------------------------------------------------S e r v ic e w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l , te c h n i c a l a nd c l e r i c a l ---------------------C l e r i c a l a nd b lu e c o ll a r -----------------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l , te c h n i c a l a nd b lu e c o l l a r -----------------

F e d e ra l

1
_
2
2
-

3
2
4
1
2

8
1
28

131
_
1
4
-

_
_
1

5
1
_
1
3
5
_
2
1

6
1
_
_
_
4
_
_
6

38
15
3
4
2
3
3
8
1

6
_
_
_
_
10
2
3
1

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

82. 9

0. 1

“
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

55
17
3
5
5
22
5
13
9

"

A ll o c c u p a t i o n s ----------------------------------

152. 6

1. 0

14. 5

6. 7

T e a c h e r s -----------------------------------------------------N u r s e s --------------------------------------------------------O th e r p r o f e s s i o n a l s -----------------------------------C l e r i c a l ------------------------------------------------------S a n ita tio n w o r k e r s ------------------------------------C r a f ts m e n --------------------------------------------------B lu e c o ll a r a n d m a n u a l -----------------------------P o l i c e ----------------------------------------------------------F i r e m e n ------------------------------------------------------C o m b in a tio n s , p o lic e , f ir e m e n a n d o t h e r s
O th e r p r o t e c t i v e ----------------------------------------S e r v ic e w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l , te c h n i c a l a nd c l e r i c a l --------C l e r i c a l a n d b lu e c o ll a r ----------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l , te c h n ic a l a n d b lu e c o l l a r —

76. 6

-

.3

.7

-

4. 0
1. 2
4. 4
1. 7
20. 3
23. 4
.6
.4
.4
13. 8
. 8
1. 9
3. 0

I

2. 9
. 7
_
3. 4
. 1
_
(2)
.4
5. 9
_
.3
.5

.3
(2)
(2)

. 7
.2
4. 2
(2)
16. 0
23. 2
. 6
.3
(2)
.5
. 1
1. 4
(2)

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d (in th o u s a n d s )

(13
2)
-

1. 0
_
_
_
-

47. 4

.5
(2)
_
_
2. 5
_
_
2. 4

75. 6
. 1
.2
_
.6
.4
_
_
_
5. 0
. 7
. 2'
(2)

I
_
. 1
.
_
_
_
_
_
_

M a n -d a y id le (in th o u s a n d s )
A ll o c c u p a t i o n s -----------------------------------------------

901. 4

T each ers
N u r s e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------O th e r p r o f e s s i o n a l s ------------------------------------------------C l e r i c a l -------------------------------------------------------------------S a n ita tio n w o r k e r s --------------------------------------------------C r a f ts m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------B lu e c o ll a r a nd m a n u a l ------------------------------------------P o l i c e -----------------------------------------------------------------------F i r e m e n -------------------------------------------------------------------C o m b in a tio n s , p o lic e , f ir e m e n a n d o t h e r s -----------O th e r p r o t e c t i v e ------------------------------------------------- *—
S e r v ic e w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l , te c h n i c a l a n d c l e r i c a l ---------------------C l e r i c a l a nd b lu e c o l l a r -----------------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l , t e c h n ic a l a n d b lu e c o l l a r -----------------

551. 4
.6
18. 1
3. 1
8. 2
24. 4
93. 8
110. 6
.
1.
59.
5.
11.
12.

7
7
3
7
2
3

8. 1

81. 8

30. 1

205. 0

576. 4

_
_
. 1
7. 9
_

2. 7
_
11. 9
1. 0
24. 0
. 1

4. 8
.6
1. 4
.5
(2)
1. 1
. 1

3 1. 2
_
2. 9
. 5
7. 8
.3
67. 3
110. 2

542. 7
_
1. 9
.9
16. 2
1. 4
-

_
_
_
. 1
_
_

(2)
1. 7
38. 2
_
. 7
1. 4

_
_
11. 1
_
_
10. 4

!6
(2)
.9
2. 1
10. 1
.4

_

_

_
9. 2
3. 6
.4
(2)

_
_
_
_

-

_
_
_
-

1 T h e s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a l l w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o r k s to p p a g e .
d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m i n a ti o n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s v io la te d a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
2 F e w e r th a n 100.
3 I d le n e s s in 1971 r e s u l t e d f r o m a s to p p a g e th a t b e g a n in 1970.
NOTE:

B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o ta l s .




39

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

0 .1

-

T h is

Table A -17. Government work stoppages by occupation, level and function, 1971
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n -d a y s in th o u sa n d s )
O c c u p a tio n
P r o f e s s io n a l a n d
te c h n ic a l

P r o d u c tio n a n d
m a in te n a n c e

L e v e l a n d fu n c tio n
T o ta l

T each­
N u r s e s O th e r
e rs

C le ri­
cal

P r o te c t iv e

S a n i ta ­
C ra fts ­
tio n
O th e r
m en
w o rk e rs

P o lic e ­
m en

F ire ­
m en

C o m b in a ­
tio n o f
p o lic e m e n , O th e r
f ir e m e n ,
and o th e rs

O th e r1

N u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s
A ll f u n c t i o n s ---------------------------------

329

135

2

15

9

A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s
S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s -------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ----------------P u b lic o w ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------P u b lic ow ned u t i l i t i e s ----------------------------S t r e e t a n d h i g h w a y --------------------------------H o s p ita ls a nd o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s ----M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s -------------------------

54
40
174
5

.
135
-

.
-

6

2

3
5

5
-

1

1

F e d e r a l ----------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s
P u b lic o w ned u t i l i t i e s -----------------------------

2
1

-

1
1

S t a t e ---------------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s
P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ---------------P u b lic ow n e d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------S t r e e t a n d h i g h w a y --------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s -----M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s -------------------------

23
5

C o u n ty ------------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s
S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s -------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ----------------P u b lic o w ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------S t r e e t a n d h i g h w a y --------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lth s e r v i c e s ----M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s -------------------------

29
5

C i ty ----------------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v ic e s S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s -------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ----------------P u b lic ow n ed t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------P u b lic ow ned u t i l i t i e s ---------------------------S t r e e t a nd h i g h w a y --------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s ----M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s -------------------------

115
43
37

12

17
18
9

2

“

-

31

2

54

17

3

5

5

30
-

1

10
10
10

-

-

1

1

1

8
11

-

-

-

3

17
_
_
-

3
_
_
_
_
_

5
_
_
_
_
_

3
_
_
_
_
_

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

_

51
8

_

20

5
3
4
8

3
1
1

1

2

-

1

-

-

1

5
4

2

1

-

11
1
1

'

-

1
1

3
3

1
1

_

8

_
4

:

1

1

3

2

3
"

2

3

4

1

-

2

1

1

-

-

1

3

-

-

_

_

1

12
1

-

2

_
3

-

'

_
-

_
-

6

-

-

1

S c h o o l d i s t r i c t ----------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s -----------------

159
159

131
131

_

1
1

O t h e r -------------------------------------------------S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s ---------------------------------

1
1

2

1
1

5
1

_ •
-

-

-

i

1

-

-

-

6
1

15
15
-

38
9

I

3
3
-

4
4

_
_

_
_

1

1

28
27

-

_

3

“

-

8

1
2
11
12
3

_

_

-

_

1

-

1
1

5
-

-

10

-

11
2

-

2

15

_

6

-

-

_
_

2
2

4

_
-

1

8

_
_

1

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

4
4

-

_

:

2
1

-

2
2

-

4

-

_

1
1

6
6

_

-

1
1

-

1

16
16

-

-

_

_

N u m b e r of w o rk e rs
A ll f u n c t i o n s ----------------------------------

152. 6

76. 6

0. 1

4 .0

r. 2

A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s
S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s ---------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ----------------P u b lic o w ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------P u b lic ow n e d u t i l i t i e s ---------------------------S t r e e t a n d h i g h w a y --------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s ----M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s -------------------------

3 0 .4
7 .4

_
7 6 .6
-

_
.1
-

.5
_
1. 1
2. 3
(2)

.2
.6
(2)

F e d e r a l ---------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s
P u b lic o w ned u t i l i t i e s ----------------------------

1.0

88.6
8. 3

2 .5
9 .4
5 .2
.7

-

1.0

-

S t a t e ---------------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ----------------P u b lic o w ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------S t r e e t a n d h i g h w a y --------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lth s e r v i c e s ----M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s -------------------------

1 4 .5
.5
4 .9
5 .5
.4
2. 8
.3

.3
.3
-

"

C o u n t y -----------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s
S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s --------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ----------------P u b lic ow ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------S t r e e t a n d h i g h w a y --------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s -----M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s -------------------------

6 .7
1. 1
(2)
.7
2 .3

.7
.7

. 1
-

2. 1

-

.3

“

(2)

-

-

4 .3
(2)

(2)
.7
.4
.3

2.0

-

0. 7
_
.6

(*)

20. 1

2 3 .4

0. 6

0 .4

0 .4

3. 2
3 .0
3 .4
-

2 3 .4
_
_
-

.6

.4
_
_
_
_
_

.4
_
_
_
_
_
_

1.0

-

9 .0
.4
(2)

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

3 .4
3 .0
.4

-

.3

2 .9
.9
-

-

_
_
_

2 0. 7
1.8

_

6. 2

8 .3
1 .4
.3
2 .4
.3

-

-

(2)

-

_
-

_
-

1.0

(2)
(2)

.4
.4
_
-

6.6

_

. 1
.1
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

1.0

_

.3
5 .5

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(2)

_
-

_
-

_
-

5. 1

(2)
-

-

-

-

_

_

_
2 .3

.3
(2)
-

(2)
-

(2)
(2)

-

.3
(2)
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

. 1
“

_

_

_

_

■

“

_
.8

_
-

“

-

. 1
"

.2

K

)
“

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b l e .




4 .4

40

"

1.0

-

1 .6
.3

Table A -17. Government work stoppages by occupation, level and function, 1971-Continued
^ W o r k ^ r ^ jin d jn n a n -^

O c c u p a tio n
P r o d u c tio n a n d
m a in te n a n c e

P r o fe s s io n a l and
t e c h n ic a l
L e v e l a n d fu n c tio n
T o ta l

T each­
N u r s e s O th e r
e rs

C le ri­
cal

T tD

S a n i ta ­
C ra fts ­
O th e r
tio n
m en
w o rk ers

P o lic e ­
m en

F ire ­
m en

(-•

C o m b in a ­
tio n of
p o lic e m e n , O th e r
f ir e m e n ,
and o th e rs

O th e r1

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s — C o n tin u e d
C i t y ---------------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s
S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s -------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ----------------P u b lic ow ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ----------------P u b lic ow ned u t i l i t i e s ---------------------------S t r e e t a nd h i g h w a y --------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s ----M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s -------------------------

4 7 .4
2 8 .8
7. 2
.1
.6
1 .5
8 .8
.3
. 1

S c h o o l d i s t r i c t ----------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a nd l i b r a r i e s -----------------

8 2 .9
8 2 .9

O t h e r -------------------------------------------------S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s ---------------------------------

-

-

.2
.2

.1
"

-

-

. i
. i

7 5 .6
7 5 .6

(13
2)
-

"

-

4. 2
4. 2

(2)
(2)

9
(2)

-

.1
. 1

.7
.5

.2
.2

.6
.6

1 6 .0
3. 2
3. 0
1 .0
8 .5
.2
(2)

.6
.6
-

.3
.3
-

-

-

-

(2)
"
"

:

(2)

.

.4
.4

.1
. 1

-

23. 2
23. 2
"

-

-

-

2. 1
.8
“
.6
.4
.3
(2)
5 .9
5 .9

-

N u m b e r of m a n -d a y s
0 .6

18. 1

3. 1

8 .0

16. 5

9 3 .3

110. 5

0 .6

0. 7

1 .7

96. 9

.6
1 .3
.5
.6

.
7. 8
_
.2
-

_
_
16. 2

.6
_
_
-

.7
_
-

-

18. 8
15. 8
16. 7
33. 9
6 .0
2 5 .9
5 .9
(2)

110. 5
_
-

-

_
_
_
.6
-

3. 0
_
8 .4
6 .4
.3

1 .7
(2)

1 1 .0
14. 3
46. 0
9 .9
.6
14. 5
.6

-

-

-

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 .9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 .9

-

1 1 .9

1 .0

-

-

1 .7

40. 3

_

-

.4
-

_
-

9
/2\

6. 3
5. 6

.6
-

1 .4
.7

.5
-

_

_

_

\ )

_
.6

.7

.5
-

-

-

2 .9
2. 3
.2
. 1
.3

.5
.5
-

7 .8
7. 6
_
.2
-

A ll f u n c t i o n s -------------------------------------

9 0 1 .4

5 5 1 .4

A d m i n is tr a tio n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s —
S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s ------------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s --------------------P u b lic ow ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n --------------------P u b lic ow ned u t i l i t i e s -------------------------------S t r e e t a nd h ig h w a y -------------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s --------M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s ------------------------------

1 4 7 .0
23. 6
6 0 8 .4
4 9 .9
1 6 .2
2 7 .2
2 7 .4
1 .7

.
5 5 1 .4
-

F e d e r a l ——
---------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s —
P u b lic ow ned u t i l i t i e s ---------------------------------

8. 1
7 .9

-

S t a te -------------------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s —
P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ---------------------P u b lic o w ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ---------------------S t r e e t a nd h ig h w a y -------------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lth s e r v i c e s --------M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s ------------------------------

8 1 .8
1 7
1• O
25. 8
37. 2
8. 6
7. 6
.7

2. 7

C o u n ty ----------------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a tio n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s —
S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s ------------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s --------------------P u b lic ow ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ---------------------S t r e e t a nd h ig h w a y -------------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lth s e r v i c e s ---------M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s -----------------------------

30. 1
2 .4
/Z\
4 .8
7. 6
.7
1 4 .0
.6

4. 8
4 .8
_

C ity --------------------------------------------------------A d m i n is tr a t io n a n d p r o te c ti o n s e r v i c e s —
S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s ------------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ---------------------P u b lic ow ned t r a n s p o r t a t i o n --------------------P u b lic o w ned u t i l i t i e s --------------------------------S t r e e t a n d h ig h w a y -------------------------------------H o s p ita ls a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s --------M is c e lla n e o u s s e r v i c e s ------------------------------

2 0 5 .0
1 4 2 .6
2 3 .4
1 .4
5 .2
8. 3
17. 8
5. 8
.5

31 .2
31 .2
_
-

S c h o o l d i s t r i c t ---------------------------------------P u b lic s c h o o ls a n d l i b r a r i e s ---------------------

5 7 6 .4
5 7 6 .4

542. 7
542. 7

O t h e r ------------------------------------------------------S a n ita tio n s e r v i c e s -------------------------------------

. 1
.1

2 .7
-

_
_

_
-

-

-

.6

1 .9
1 .9
:

-

(2)
/2\

.3
-

-

.

.1
. 1

B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




41

15. 3
8 .6
"

-

. 1

-

_

_

“

_
“

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

\ )

-

1. 1
37. 2
2 .0
(2)

.6
. 1

. 1
. 1

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

.2
.2

-

-

-

-

7. 6
12. 5
.6

.6
.6
_
_
_
_
_

.6
.6
_
_
_
_
_

(2)

1 3 .4
9 .6
_
1 .2
2 .0
.6

-

-

.3
_
.3
-

-

1 I n c lu d e s c o m b in a tio n s o f o c c u p a tio n s .
2 L e s s th a n 100.
3 I d le n e s s in 1971 r e s u l ti n g f r o m s to p p a g e t h a t b e g a n in 1970.
N O TE:

2 4 .0

-

-

16. 2
16. 2

.9
.9

:

_

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

67. 3
1 8 .7
1 5 .8
33. 9
6 .0
1 7 .0
5 .7
(2)
1 .4
1 .4

110. 2
no. 2
-

_
_
_
_
-

2 2 .0
1 .4

_

(2)
-

(2)
13. 2
13. 2

-

-

“

:

:

:

:

Table A-18. Work stoppages by region and State, 1971
W o rk s to p p a g e s
R e g io n a n d S ta te

M a n -d a y s of i d le n e s s

N um be r

M e an
d u ra tio n 1
2

W o rk e r s
in v o lv e d
(in th o u s a n d s )

N um ber
(in th o u s a n d s )

As a p e rc e n t
of p r iv a t e
n o n a g r i c u lt u r a l
w o r k in g tim e

U n ite d S ta te s --------------

5 ,1 3 8

22. 1

4 7 , 58 9 . 1

0. 32

N ew E n g l a n d ------------------------M a i n e ------------------------------N ew H a m p s h i r e ---------------V e r m o n t --------------------------M a s s a c h u s e t t s -----------------R h o d e I s la n d ---------------------C o n n e c tic u t — ---------------—

290
14
17
5
154
29
71

24. 5
32. 7
16. 6
1 3 0 .9
2 3 .4
20. 2
20. 3

8 4 .4
6 .5
1 .9
.6
42. 2
3. 8
2 9 .4

1 ,3 9 0 .2
154. 7
2 1 .8
1 9 .7
67 5 . 2
47. 5
4 7 1 .3

. 14
.2 3
. 04
.0 6
. 14
.0 6
. 18

M id d le A t l a n t i c ---------------------N ew Y o rk ------------------------N ew J e r s e y ---------------------P e n n s y lv a n ia ------------------

1, 354
399
281
674

2 2 .4
18. 7
2 7 .4
23. 6

7 0 3 .4
25 3 . 2
1 1 4 .0
336. 2

1 4 ,2 2 3 .8
7, 2 5 6 .4
1 ,9 1 0 .8
5, 0 5 6 .6

.4 8
.4 9
.3 2
. 52

E a s t N o r th C e n t r a l --------------O h io ----------------------------------I n d ia n a ------------------------------I llin o is — -------------------------M ic h ig a n — —
-------------------W i s c o n s i n -------------------------

1 ,4 7 5
524
197
356
282
116

24. 1
24. 9
26. 5
1 6 .3
3 5 .8
20. 6

7 5 4 .3
250. 5
9 6 .6
22 8 . 8
126. 3
5 2. 1

1 1 ,3 9 8 . 5
3, 8 7 2 .6
1 , 4 6 7 .9
2 , 4 1 9 .4
2, 9 4 2 . 8
6 9 5 .9

.3 7
.4 7
.3 8
.2 5
. 46
. 21

W e st N o r th C e n t r a l --------------M in n e s o ta -------------------------I o w a --------------------------------M i s s o u r i ------------------------N o r th D a k o t a -------------------S o u th D a k o ta --------------------N e b r a s k a -------------------------K a n s a s -------------------------------

421
75
84
171
12
10
37
32

1 6 .4
1 4 .3
2 1 .0
19. 0
6. 2
12. 1
10. 2
1 6 .0

24 9 . 5
5 8 .4
45. 6
7 3. 7
6 .6
5. 6
28. 8
3 0 .9

2, 61 3 . 5
55 7 . 2
71 0 . 6
8 2 4 .4
25. 5
53. 2
204. 1
23 8 . 5

. 24
. 21
.4 0
. 24
.0 9
. 17
. 21
. 18

S o u th A t l a n t i c ----------------------D e la w a r e ---------------------------M a r y l a n d -------------------------D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a ------V ir g in i a --------------------------W e st V i r g i n i a -----------------N o r th C a r o l i n a ----------------S o u th C a r o l i n a ----------------G e o r g i a ---------------------------F l o r i d a ------------------------------

881
36
79
31
120
426
38
13
56
82

1 9 .3
3 4 .0
18. 3
13. 1
1 7 .9
1 9 .2
16. 2
20. 7
2 8 .4
1 4 .4

4 7 1 .2
12. 6
46. 3
16. 7
76. 5
2 0 2 .9
2 6 .6
9 .4
35. 8
44. 3

5, 2 1 4 .7
2 9 2 .9
5 5 8 .4
126. 6
777. 6
2 ,2 4 4 .1
2 7 6 .5
103. 5
38 9 . 8
4 4 5 .4

. 24
.6 4
.2 1
. 16
. 26
2 .0 9
.0 7
.0 6
. 12
. 10

E a s t S o u th C e n t r a l -------------K e n t u c k y ------------------------T e n n e s s e e ------------------------A l a b a m a --------------------------M i s s i s s i p p i -----------------------

351
150
97
79
25

26. 9
1 6 .9
18. 2
5 1 .6
24. 8

22 6 . 8
1 1 2 .4
46. 7
44. 5
23. 1

2 , 8 3 6 .2
1, 2 2 8 .5
58 9 . 5
77 7 . 2
24 0 . 9

. 36
.6 5
. 21
. 38
. 21

W e s t S o u th C e n t r a l -------------A r k a n s a s ------------------------L o u i s i a n a -------------------------O k l a h o m a -------------------------T e x a s --------------------------------

242
25
52
31
134

1 9 .9
1 5 .3
1 9 .7
16. 1
20. 7

1 6 8 .0
9 .7
35. 1
13. 1
110. 1

1, 5 3 7 .6
7 8 .9
39 6 . 5
139. 7
922. 5

. 12
.0 7
. 19
.0 9
. 12

M o u n t a i n ------------------------------M o n ta n a ----------------------------Id ah o ------------------------------W y o m in g --------------------------C o l o r a d o --------------------------N ew M e x i c o --------------------A r i z o n a ----------------------------U t a h --------------------------------N e v a d a -------------------------------

217
25
20
16
54
24
37
19
22

29. 8
43. 7
20. 3
12. 6
1 3 .4
20. 8
45. 2
37. 8
2 1 .0

125. 8
1 4 .0
9 .7
8. 1
2 4 .4
1 1 .8
3 0 .4
1 9 .9
7 .6

1 , 6 1 0 .8
428. 5
6 6 .2
53. 8
193. 8
108. 7
4 6 1 .2
238. 8
5 9 .7

.3 1
1. 12
. 16
. 26
. 13
. 20
.4 0
. 35
. 14

P a c if i c -----------------------------------W a s h i n g t o n ---------------------O r e g o n ------------------------------C a l i f o r n i a -----------------------A la s k a ----------------------------H a w a i i -------------------------------

454
67
43
315
8
21

20. 2
30. 8
1 6 .4
1 8 .8
3 9 .2
12. 7

496. 1
6 6 .0
38. 1
3 8 7 .9
.4
3. 7

6 ,7 6 3 .9
1 ,0 7 1 .5
5 1 2 .9
5, 135. 9
1 1 .4
32. 2

. 37
.5 3
.3 5
.3 7
.0 8
.0 5

3 ,2 7 9 .6

1 S to p p a g e s e x te n d in g a c r o s s S ta te l in e s h a v e b e e n c o u n te d s e p a r a t e l y in e a c h S ta te a ff e c te d ; w o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d m a n - d a y s
id le w e r e a ll o c a te d a m o n g th e S t a te s .
2 W e ig h te d b y m u ltip ly in g th e d u r a t i o n of e a c h s to p p a g e b y th e w o r k e r s in v o lv e d . D u r a tio n c a lc u l a t e d f o r s t r i k e s e n d in g in
th e y e a r o n ly .
NO TE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




42

Table A-19. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 19711
( W o r k e r s a n d .m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

A rk a n sa s

A r iz o n a

A la b a m a
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r (a ll
s to p p a g e s )

79

44. 5

777. 2

37

30. 4

461. 2

25

9. 7

78. 9

_ __

40

12. 7

292. 0

9

4. 6

83. 8

11

1. 5

43. 5

O rd n a n c e and a c c e s s o r i e s ------- _
---- ~
F o o d a nd k in d re d p r o d u c t s ------------- ~ ------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s ----- ------------- --- T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------A p p a r e l a nd o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
f r o m f a b r i c s a nd s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s -------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e “
F u r n it u r e a nd f ix t u r e s — —
- — ---- ---P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s ---- “
“ -------P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a nd a llie d p r o d u c t s - -------- ------- P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s -----R u b b e r a nd m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c ts —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c ts --------------------------S tone, c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r ie s -------- ”
-------- " F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , and t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E l e c t r ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t, an d
s u p p lie s
------- — -----"
------------- “
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t -----~ — — ---P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , and c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s ---------------- ------ —
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s ---------

1
4
1

.2
. 8
. 1

2. 8
4. 5
.4

-

_

-

-

_
-

-

2
1
1
1
2
3
3
7

. 8
(2)
2. 6
. 1
(Z)
. 7
. 6
2. 8

20. 2
.4
_
132. 6
3. 2
. 8
27. 2
3. 6
2 8. 0

_
_
1
2
3

_
.2
(2)
3. 3

.5
10. 5
1. 1
61. 6

2
1
1
_
1
1
1
1
1

.2
(2)
(2)
(2)
. 1
(2)
. 1

16. 1
.6
. 8
1. 0
3. 2
. 1
1. 5
13. 4

7
4

2. 1
. 9

27. 0
23. 1

1
_

(2)
-

7. 9
-

1
-

.5
-

5. 5
-

1
1

.5
(2)

9. 6
4. 7

2
-

1. 0
-

2. 1
-

1

.2

1. 2

1

_
. 1

3. 7

-

-

-

-

-

(4)

40

31. 9

4 8 5 .2

31

25. 8

377. 4

14

8. 2

35. 4

(2)
11. 7
2. 0

.2
294. 9
17. 7

1
6

. 1
.3

9. 3
3. 4

10. 4
.9
(2)
. 8

50. 9
8. 8
_
(2)
4. 9

6
_
1

7. 7
. 1

21. 7
_
_
1. 0

A ll i n d u s t r ie s

------- —

M a n u fa c tu r in g — ----

~

---------

“
_ _ —

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s -------------M ining
------- — — - -__ _ _
C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n “
------- -----------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a nd s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s — ------”
“
W h o le s a le a n d r e t a i l t r a d e — - ---F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s ta t e — - ------S e r v ic e s
-------------_ _ _ _ _ _
- - ----- ~
G o v e r n m e n t3 --------- — -------

12
7

9. 9
1. 2

168. 0
130. 3

1
3
9

10
3
_
4
4

20. 0
.5
_
(2)
.3

162. 8
12. 1
_
3. 1
9. 0

9
7
_
1
1

C a lif o r n ia
A ll i n d u s t r i e s --------M a n u fa c tu rin g --

-

- —
-

------------

- —

— ------

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s “ ------- — -------- F o o d a nd k in d re d p r o d u c ts “
" — _____
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s - ------ - - — — — T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s -- - ------------ — - —
A p p a r e l and o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
fro m fa b ric s and s im ila r m a te ria ls
— -----L u m b e r a nd w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ~
F u r n it u r e a nd f ix t u r e s
" — --------- P a p e r a nd a llie d p r o d u c ts — ----- ---- -------- P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s ---C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s —
P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d i n d u s t r ie s -----R u b b e r a nd m i s c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c p r o d u c t s ---L e a th e r a nd l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s — —
S tone, c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ---- — ~ P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r ie s - ----------- ------- ~ ~
F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h in e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -------- — - E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p l i e s ------ ---- ~ ---------- — “
-------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---- - "
------- P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , a nd c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a nd o p tic a l
----- —
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s ---M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s --------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g —

---------

_ _ _ _ _

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s -------------M ining ~
— - - ---— C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n
~ — ---—
- T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ---- - - - W h o le s a le and r e t a i l t r a d e ~ ---~
— —
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s ta t e ~
- ~
S e r v ic e s — “ —
__
_
G o v e r n m e n t3— - —
" —
~ “

315

387. 9

5, 135. 1

54

24. 4

193. 8

71

29. 4

471. 3

167

35. 8

659. 9

13

4. 4

37. 8

28

4. 4

124. 7

.
10
_
_

.
1. 7
-

.
38. 5
-

2
-

3. 8
_
-

18. 9
-

_
3
-

.4
-

2. 5
_
-

12
5
9
8
4
6
9
11
12

. 8
.3
. 8
2. 4
.4
.4
2. 6
.9
1. 4

8. 4
13. 6
8. 5
54. 4
13. 6
10. 7
44. 2
15. 3
22. 1

_
1
2
1
_
1
1
-

(2)
(!)
(2)

4. 6
3. 6
1. 4
_
1. 8
.5
-

1
1
1
2
3
1
2
2

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
. 3
. 1
. 3
. 9

1. 9
(2)
(2)
.3
15. 8
.2
4. 2
6. 0

24
21

6. 6
2. 9

142. 2
73. 8

2
_

.2
-

4. 5
-

5
2

1. 3
.2

11. 6
36. 5

12
19

1. 3
12. 2

15. 6
177. 4

1
1

. 1
(2)

.6
.5

2
2

.2
.4

1. 6
39. 3

2
3

. 1
1. 0

3. 3
18. 6

1
-

(2)
"

1. 3
-

1

_
.2

_
4. 4

151

352. 1

4, 475. 2

42

19. 9

156. 0

44

24. 9

346. 7

4

2
33

.2
.4
209. 5

2. 4
16. 0
2, 940. 7

.
3
9

_
1. 8
. 9

38. 9
10. 1

15

3. 2

117. 4

28
43
2
23
16

126.
9.
.
1.
4.

1, 330.
104.
19.
29.
31.

14
7
2
3

14. 8
1. 5
. 3
(2)
.5

72.
20.
12.
.
1.

8
11
1
6
3

17. 0
1. 3
(2)
1. 3
2. 2

166. 5
9. 7
(2)
46. 0
6. 9

1
7
2
4'
5

S ee f o o tn o te s a t e nd of ta b le .




C o n n e c tic u t

C o lo r a d o

43

7
8
7
0
9

4

_
(2)
-

7
5
5
3
1

Table A -19. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1971-Continued

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

A ll i n d u s t r i e s

- - - - -

—

— -

16
7

“ O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s
- -------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s
------- ~
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s ----- “
— - T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ~ —
~
— " A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s -------------L u m b e r and w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e —
F u r n i t u r e a n d f ix t u r e s
—
_ P a p e r a nd a llie d p r o d u c t s
- - — - —
P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a nd a llie d i n d u s t r ie s ---C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s - -- - ------- -P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s -----R u b b e r a n d m i s c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c ts
— - - —
S to n e, c la y , a nd g l a s s p r o d u c t s ------ ~ P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r ie s — F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c ep t o rd n an ce,
m a c h in e r y , and t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ------- ~
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, an d
s u p p lie s - - - - - - - - T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t —
P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , a nd c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic an d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s ---- —
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s --------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g — —

_ _

__

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a nd f i s h e r i e s ---M ining ---- -_ _
_
C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n -- ~ —
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
gas, and s a n ita ry s e rv ic e s — - “ —
W h o le s a le and r e t a i l t r a d e — ~
F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e -- S e r v ic e s
“ 3 ------- _ - - —
„
_ _
G o v e rn m e n t —
— __ _ _

.

1 2 .6
0. 8

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )
.

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e rs
N um ber
in v o lv e d

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

31

16. 7

126. 6

82

44. 3

44 5 . 4

16. 5

3

2. 7

12. 8

28

6. 4

173. 6

.
2
-

.
. 6
-

.
7. 5
-

2
-

.4
-

1. 6
-

1
-

0. 6
-

.
1. 2
-

1
1
1
1

(2)
(2)
. 1
.2

. 1
.5
2. 8
9. 9

2
-

2. 1
-

11. 6
-

2
1
4
3
4
1
2
-

(2)
.6
1. 5
. 1
.2
.2
(2)
-

6. 1
9. 7
94. 3
1. 6
2. 8
2. 6
3. 4
-

1
-

(2)
-

1. 7
-

-

-

-

3
1

1. 5
(2)

32. 3
(2)

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

. 9

7. 8

-

-

-

-

-

'

1
1

. 5
(2)

4. 4
.9

37. 9

271. 8

-

-

-

29

11. 8

276. 4

29

14. 0

113. 8

56

_
13

.
5. 4

_
247. 6

_
5

.
. 6

_
13. 3

_
1
26

(2)
7. 7

_
1. 5
41. 9

10
4
1
1

_

4. 7
1. 0
_
(2)
. 8

25. 5
2. 5
(2)
. 8

6
7
6
5

8. 3
3. 1
_
. 7
1. 3

53. 1
33. 5
_
11. 4
2. 7

14
7
_
3
5

20. 7
2. 2
_
.5
. 6

207. 4
11. 9
_
5. 7
3. 4

I llin o is

_

In d ia n a

56
—

~

O r d n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s ------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c ts —
—
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s - -- T e x tile m il l p r o d u c t s —
_
A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
f r o m f a b r i c s a nd s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s ~
L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e -F u r n i t u r e a n d f ix t u r e s -— "
- P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c ts — - — —
P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s ---C h e m ic a ls a nd a ll i e d p r o d u c ts
— - - —
P e t r o l e u m r e f i n in g a n d r e l a te d i n d u s t r i e s -----R u b b e r a nd m i s c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s --------------------------S tone, c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c ts - -~
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r ie s — ------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c ep t o rd n an c e ,
m a c h in e r y , a nd t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t
M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ----- “
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p lie s
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t
P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n t if ic , a n d c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s -M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s ---------

---

--—
—

-

- -

A g ric u ltu re , f o re s tr y , and f is h e rie s
M ining
C o n t r a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g as, and s a n ita ry s e rv ic e s
W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e — S e r v ic e s
_ “
G o v e r n m e n t 3--

35. 8

389. 8

356

228. 8

2. 41 9 . 4

197

96. 6

1. 467. 9

26

A ll i n d u s t r ie s

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

292. 9

G e o r g ia

M a n u fa c tu r in g —

F lo rid a

D i s t r i c t of C o lu m b ia

D e la w a r e
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e rs
N um ber
in v o lv e d

4. 9

180. 9

179

73. 1

1. 479. 2

126

51. 4

1. 123. 6

3
2

.5
1. 0

20. 5
17. 4

22
2

10. 4
1. 1

214. 3
8. 6

5
_

. 7
-

3. 0
_
_

4

.3

3
2
1

1. 4
(2)
. 5

14. 6
4 2. 0
19. 2
.9
7. 6

.
.
1.
.
1.
1.
2.
5.

3.
14.
1.
29.
13.
20.
27.
7.
3.
14.
139.

1
1
2
3
1
2

(2)
.2
(2)
.4
.2
.2

1. 1
10. 8
(2)
12. 2
.6
5. 0
2. 2

-

1
1
5
2
2

-

31

_
-

-

-

(2)

4. 3
. 7

2
5
3
6
4
7
4
4
2
13
21

7. 4
9

29
31

11. 0
29. 3

253. 8
464. 5

30
13

11. 3
3. 0

186. 9
77. 9

7. 4
4 77. 9

10
8

3. 8
3. 0

94. 4
156. 2

26
13

11. 5
16. 4

282. 6
331. 5

3
3

.1
.5

2. 7
9. 5

1
1

(2)
4

5
4. 3

180

155. 8

940. 3

73

45. 1

344. 2

-

.5
.3
.2
-

.

-

30. 9

208. 9

10

.
16
.

17. 9

7
9

26. 9
1. 7

175. 0
14. 6

_

3
2

(2)
.6

.
-

(2)
1. 3.

S e e f o o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




44

.

.2
. 3

.1
7
3
1
7
1
1
7
6

6
5
5
5
8
2
8
2
2
4
6

1

(2)

8
18

. 7
6. 3

22. 5
182. 4

_
-

_
-

.

-

.

.

50
47

20. 9
7. 3

362. 5
43. 4

10
32

3. 4
8. 6

82. 1
123. 8

19
20
1
11
31

91. 8
4. 9
2
8
29. 7

348. 9
42. 4
7
6. 5
135. 7

12
12

30. 5
2. 1

109. 3
23. 9

.
.

.

_

4
3

_
.3
.3

_
.

4. 6
5

1

Table A -19. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1971 -Continued
( W o r k e r s a nd m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
K an sas

Iow a
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

A ll i n d u s t r ie s —

"

M a n u fa c tu r in g -------

—

—

— "

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , a nd f i s h e r i e s -- - - M ining ------ _ ------ ----- _ _ _ _ _
__ _
- - _ —
C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n ---- — —
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a nd s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s —
W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e —
~
---F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e - - - - - S e r v ic e s - - - - _
__ __
-----G o v e r n m e n t3 —

A ll i n d u s t r ie s

—
-

710. 6

32

30. 9

238. 5

150

112. 4

1, 228. 5

23. 4

557. 7

15

3. 6

151. 2

59

58. 9

698. 4

.
1. 2
6. 2
. 1

.
10. 1
241. 8
. 1

n

9
-

12. 1
-

91. 2
-

4
-

.2
-

4. 8
_
-

_
4
3
1

1
1
_
1
2
1
1
1
2

(2)
(2)
_
(2)
. 8
(2)
.4
(2)
.2

2. 9
1. 5
1. 0
7. 7
1. 3
7. 8
. 1
9. 7

1
4
-

(2)
. 7
-

1. 9
4 7. 5
4. 1
33. 5
-

1
5
4
1
2
1
2
4
2

. 9
.5
(')
1. 2
.2
1. 9
.9
.6

2. 8
26. 2
8. 0
1. 9
36. 3
5. 8
3. 8
48. 0
1. 3

4
18

. 7
5. 7

24. 2
113. 9

1
3

1. 9
. 7

61. 9
35. 6

8
8

1. 9
8. 5

61. 9
127. 5

2
2

2. 7
.2

280. 6
12. 5

2

(2)

6. 0

7
4

33. 3
1. 2

110. 6
5. 7

1
1

(2)
.4

. 1
3. 1

-

-

-

2

.3
-

3. 4
4 3. 1

38

22. 2

152. 9

18

27. 2

87. 3

92

53. 6

530. 2

17

3. 9

37. 2

2
7

0. 4
.4

7. 8
4. 9

56
10

28. 9
2. 8

.
376. 3
59. 3

10
8
3

17. 3
. 8
_
.2

78. 8
36. 5
_
.3

8
1
-

26. 0
.4
-

72. 3
2. 2
-

12
8
1
3
2

19.
1.
n
.
.

“

M a ry la n d

2
6
4
6

61. 3
23. 1
.2
9. 4
.6

M as s a c h u s e t ts

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------------------A g ric u ltu re , f o re s tr y , and f is h e r ie s M ining
“
—
C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n —
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g as, and s a n ita ry s e rv ic e s —
W h o le s a le a n d r e t a i l t r a d e - — F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e —
S e r v ic e s
-- G o v e r n m e n t3 -----— _
”
-

_ -

35. 1

396. 5

80

46. 3

558. 4

154

42. 2

675. 2

17

- ----

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s ----F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s
- - —
— T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s -------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s - — A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
f r o m f a b r i c s a nd s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s ---L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e —
F u r n i t u r e a n d f ix t u r e s ~
P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s —
P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s -----R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s --------— —
S to n e , c la y , a nd g l a s s p r o d u c t s - - - — —
P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s trie s
- - - - _
F a b r i c a t e d m e ta l p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h in e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l —
~ E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p lie s “
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t —
P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n t if ic , a nd c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a nd o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s —
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s ---------

4. 7

102. 0

33

10. 5

237. 6

74

17. 1

239- 3

5
-

1. 2
-

29. 9
-

4
-

2. 1
-

15. 2
-

1
9
2

. 5
2. 0
.2

13. 5
12. 7
2. 6

1
2
2
2
_

. 3
.6
.4
.4
-

1. 3
11. 3
16. 2
( 3)

(2)
(2)
. 5
.2
1. 7
.4
.5
2. 3

2. 1
.5
6. 8
1. 2
35. 8
11. 9
14. 4
70. 0

4
3
3
1
4
-

. 1
. 3
.3
(2)
.3
-

-

-

15. 0
-

1
1
4
4
5
4
3
3

4
2

.4
.2

2. 7
5. 4
5. 0
1. 2
8. 1
_
9. 9
4. 6

3
1

1. 2
.2

24. 8
1. 8

1
1

2. 2
(2)

43. 4
.2

10
13

1. 6
2. 2

23. 7
17. 2

1

.4

1. 6

1

(2)

2. 0

14
3

7. 7
1. 3

49. 2
82. 5

-

-

-

1

.4

34. 0

1

36

30. 4

294. 5

47

35. 9

320. 8

82

25. 1

435. 9

_
2. 0
13. 0

_
12

_
6. 5

_

13. 5

30

_
2. 7

50. 7

13
13
_
7
2

26. 1
2. 4
_
.6
.3

252. 2
22. 1
_
32. 0
1. 1

15
24
1
7
5

16. 3
5. 1
(2)
.6
.5

_
1
13

_
(2)
5. 2

10
6
2
3
1

24. 0
.9
(*)
(2)
. 1

-

262.
7.
.
6.
2.

See f o o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b le .




M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

52

----

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

45. 6

L o u is ia n a

M a n u fa c tu rin g

K e n tu c k y
M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

47

- — — ----------

------

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

84

-

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s - - - - - - F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s —
— —
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s
— — - _
- T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s — —
_ _ _ _ _ _
A p p a r e l a nd o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
fro m fa b ric s and s im ila r m a te ria ls ~
— "
L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e —
F u r n it u r e and f ix t u r e s —
_ _ _ _ _
— P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c ts
— - -------P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s ---C h e m ic a ls a nd a ll i e d p r o d u c ts ----------- ------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a te d i n d u s t r i e s ------R u b b e r and m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a nd l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ------ - - —
Stone, c la y , a nd g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------- —
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ---- ~
-----F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , a nd t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l — — — ~ “
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p lie s ---- ----- --------“ — — —
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t — — - -------P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n t if ic , a nd c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a nd c lo c k s ---- "
_ _ _
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s --------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g —

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

45

4
6
2
3
9

.

(2)

4. 9
. 1

_
258.
84.
.
41.
.

0
7
3
3
9

Table A -19. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1971 -Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
M ic h ig a n
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ------

-

126. 4

2, 943. 6

75

58. 4

557. 2

25

23. 1

240. 9

173

—

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s -- - - —
F o o d and k in d re d p ro d u c ts —
"
—
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s —
_ _ _ _ _
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ~ “
A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
fro m f a b r ic s and s im ila r m a te ria ls
L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i tu r e —
F u r n i t u r e a nd f ix t u r e s ---- ------P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ---P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a nd a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ------C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s -----R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s — —
— — —
S to n e, c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s — --------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ------ - —
F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c ep t o rd n an ce,
m a c h i n e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, an d
s u p p lie s
_ _
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t ----— - -------P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c ie n t if ic , a nd c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s — -----M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s ---------

48. 6

1, 640. 5

35

18. 3

158. 5

13

14. 0

188. 0

1. 7
_

15. 2
_

20. 0
22. 0
_
-

1
_
_

(2)

-

1. 7
11. 8
_
-

(2
")

-

1
9
_
_

_

_

_
3. 3
_
4. 6
_
28. 6
_
8. 9
11. 6

_
1
2
1
_
1
_
_
-

_
(2)
(2)
. 1
_
. 1
_
-

_
1. 6
2. 8
_
_
8. 0
_
13. 6
_
_
-

7
_
-

-

1
3
2
11
6
3
2
_
7
27

(2)
.5
.5
2. 8
4. 8
.5
3. 1
_
.5
5. 7

0. 9
8. 4
2 1 .4
81. 2
157. 8
5. 3
33. 6
_
16. 4
179. 7

_
2
1
2
_
1
2

_
. 1
_
.2
. 5
_
. 3
.5

24
42

2. 5
9. 8

70. 0
598. 9

11
4

2. 0
.2

37. 1
9. 1

1
3

(2)
.4

1. 1
15. 2

6
26

2. 0
12. 9

69. 2
344. 2

2
-

1. 0
-

13. 4
-

_
3

_
13. 0

_
145. 6

2
4

. 6
. 8

17. 4
21. 0

_
-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

112

— -

A g ric u ltu re , f o re s tr y , and fis h e rie s
~
_
M in in g ---- — —
C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n
— —
- - - - T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a nd s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s —
_ - _
W h o le s a le and r e t a i l t r a d e —
— F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s t a t e —
S e r v ic e s — — —
- - — G o v e r n m e n t3 - — -

77. 7

1, 303. 1

41

40. 1

398. 6

12

9. 2

52. 9

4
23

4. 4
6. 3

95. 3
37. 0

1
12

6. 0
. 8

25. 6
7. 1

4

_
0. 6

_
14. 8

13
12
_
3
"

29. 4
3. 8
_
(2)

132. 0
233. 8
_
. 1
-

8
_
_
_

8. 6
_
_
_

38. 1
_
_
_

-

-

13
30
3
11
28

46.
4.
.
3.
12.

7
0
2
6
5

598.
46.
12.
423.
88.

7
9
7
6
8

-

M is s o u r i
A ll i n d u s t r i e s

M is s i s s i p p i
M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

282

A ll i n d u s t r i e s
M a n u fa c tu r in g —

M in n e s o ta
M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

- — —

M a n u fa c tu r in g — — —

-

_

— _

A g ric u ltu re , f o re s tr y , and f is h e rie s
M in in g —
C o n t r a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s, and s a n ita ry s e rv ic e s
- W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e —
F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e —
S e r v ic e s - G o v e r n m e n t3
- —

73. 7

824. 4

25

14. 0

42 8. 5

37

28. 8

204, 1

71

26. 2

41 1 . 1

2

3. 8

237. 0

16

4. 3

42. 9

11
_
1

1. 4
_
(2)

16. 6
_
. 1

1
_
-

(*)

2. 2
_
-

8
_
_

3. 9
_
_

27. 1
_
_

1
2
2
3
6
5
_
1

1. 9
4. 7
10. 7
14. 8
2. 9
4. 3
_
21. 5
87. 7

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

-

-

_
_
1
_
-

_
_
3. 8
_
_

_
416. 0
_
_
_
_
217. 8
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
2
_
_
_
_
1
1

_
_
_
_
(2)

2

. 1
(2)
.4
. 3
.4
.3
_
(2)
1. 7

8
11

2. 6
2. 4

46. 3
98. 1

-

-

4. 9
_

3
1

.2
. 1

5. 5
6. 3

9
7

13. 6
2. 7

73. 9
24. 3

_
-

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

1
1

(2)
(2)

1 .4
1. 8

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
_
(2)
(2)

_
_
_
_
1. 3
_
_
_
(2)
2. 7

-

102

47. 6

41 3 . 3

24

10. 1

191. 6

22

24. 4

161. 2

_
2
31

_
.2
4. 3

_
3. 9
75. 7

_
2
9

.
2. 8
. 5

160. 1
16. 4

_
12

_
4. 0

_
61. 4

18
30
3
9
9

35. 6
5. 7
(2)
.2
1. 6

5
4
_
2
2

6. 0
(2)

11. 3
.9
_
. 8
2. 0

5
3
_
2
-

19. 6
. 8
_

93. 0
4. 8
_
2. 0
-

272.
43.
3.
6.
7.

S ee fo o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b le .




N e b ra sk a

171
_ _ _ _ _

O rd n a n c e and a c c e s s o r ie s
F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ~
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s - T e x tile m il l p r o d u c t s “ ------ — —
A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
fro m f a b r ic s and s im ila r m a te ria ls —
L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e —
F u r n i t u r e a n d f ix t u r e s —
P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s - — _
P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s - - - - P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ------R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s
- — S to n e , c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s — P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s trie s
—
— F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , ex c ep t o rd n an ce,
m a c h in e r y , and t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t ----M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l —
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p lie s — —
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t - —
P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c ie n t if ic , a nd c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c l o c k s ------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s --------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g —

M o n ta n a

_

46

8
9
4
6
1

(*)
. 8

(2)

Table A-19. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1971 -Continued
( W o r k e r s a nd m a n - d a y s in th o u sa n d s )
N ew J e r s e y
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e rs
N um ber
in v o lv e d

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

N ew Y o rk
M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

N o rth C a r o lin a
M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

281

114. 0

1, 910. 8

399

253. 2

7, 256. 4

38

26. 6

276. 5

140

37. 3

938. 4

191

43. 3

9 8 9 .4

20

9. 9

162. 6

1
6
_
9

(2)
.5
.4

.3
16. 6
_
3. 7

15
_
10

7. 8
_
. 5

55. 6
_
4. 1

2
3
-

.2
2. 5
-

5. 0
83. 1
-

4
2
8
6
28
2
14
10

.2
.3
1. 2
1. 6
5. 3
.2
4. 7
6. 2

2. 4
_
7. 7
30. 0
149. 6
139. 2
5. 9
66. 8
197. 2

15
9
8
6
4
_
6
1
8
19

1. 4
. 7
. 7
. 2
1. 0
_
.4
. 5
2. 5
5. 5

15. 4
8. 6
6. 7
7. 2
120. 6
7. 6
8. 8
31. 8
93. 2

1
2
1
1
2
1

(2)
.2
(2)

-

(2)
_
. 5
_
(2)
-

(2)
6. 5
.3
.9
_
2. 9
1. 1
-

19
11

6. 6
6. 9

125. 2
152. 8

26
27

4. 5
6. 4

138. 0
71. 5

2
2

.2
. 5

5. 8
20. 6

15
3

2. 3
.5

28. 5
8. 1

24
8

8. 0
1. 5

283. 3
18. 8

1
2

5. 2
.4

26. 1
10. 3

-

. 3

4. 3

3
2

1. 8
. 1

114. 5
3. 6

-

_

2

-

-

_

143

76. 7

972. 4

213

209. 9

6, 267. 0

20

16. 7

113. 8

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h e r i e s — ------ ---M ining ------ - —
__ __
- - -C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n ----------- _ _ _ _
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a nd s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ~ -------- — ---W h o le s a le and r e t a i l t r a d e ------— —
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e --------- —
S e r v i c e s ---~ _____ — _ _ —
G o v e r n m e n t3 ------- -------------- — ~ - — -

_
3
28

.2
6. 8

.4
134. 5

.
1
53

.
.2
25. 4

.
16. 8
257. 5

_
1
3

.
.3
. 7

.
3. 6
5. 4

33
40
2
14
23

49. 8
9. 2
(2)
1. 0
9. 8

620.
63.
1.
29.
122.

52
54
2
32
19

10
5
_
1
-

14. 0
1. 7
_
(2)

98. 3
6. 5
.

A ll i n d u s t r ie s ~ ------M a n u fa c tu rin g --------

~

~

“ ~
O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s ---F o o d and k in d re d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s ------ ---- -----T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts —
”
—
A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
f r o m f a b r i c s a nd s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s -------------L u m b e r and w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ~
F u r n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s ------ - - -------- - — P a p e r a nd a llie d p r o d u c t s ---- ~
- - -- - - P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a nd a llie d p r o d u c ts — -----P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ------R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r and l e a t h e r p r o d u c ts —
- S tone, c la y , a nd g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ------ _ - — _
F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h in e r y , a nd t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ---- ----- _ _ _ _
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p lie s —
_ _ _ _ _ —
~ —
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---- ~
P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , and c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic an d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s
----------- ~ —
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s --------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ------ _ _ _ _ _

_

_

.

.

9
0
6
4
6

O hio
A ll i n d u s t r ie s

— —

- _

-

M a n u fa c tu r in g -------------

-

—

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s -------------M in in g — “ ~
“
" “
“
_ - _
C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n
_
— _
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g as, and s a n ita ry s e r v i c e s W h o le s a le and r e t a i l t r a d e — — F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s ta t e ~
S e r v ic e s - - - - _____
G o v e r n m e n t3 - - --

5, 063.
665.
9.
118.
136.

1
8
4
1
3

O k la h o m a

-

(2)

O re g o n

250. 5

3, 872. 6

31

13. 1

139. 7

43

38. 1

512. 9

315

117. 2

3, 029. 0

14

3. 5

88. 8

13

4. 7

87. 7

18
_
2

1. 8
_
.4

29. 6
_
10. 2

2
_
-

1. 1
_
_

7. 8
_
-

2
_
-

<*)

0. 2
_
_

-

1
1
_
1
_

_
_
_
. 3
_
_
(2)
. 1
_
. 1
-

_
_
4. 9
_
_
3. 1
2. 3
_
2. 1
_

_
3
_
3
_
_
_
_
_
2
_

_
0. 8
_
1. 7
_
_
_
_
.4
_

7. 6
_
23. 3
_

_

_
4. 1
_
52. 2

3
6
7
8
7
20
4
20
2
20
51

.
.
2.
.
7.
2.
.
6.
1.
4.
19.

4
9
3
8
9
4
9
0
3
9
8

3. 5
20. 9
119. 7
11. 9
124. 0
83. 5
1 1 .4
65. 8
19. 3
90. 3
490. 6

37
49

9. 1
18. 5

127. 5
878. 0

3
3

. 7
1. 0

27. 0
36. 9

2
_

1. 8
_

18
35

8. 0
30. 3

93. 0
835. 9

1
-

. 1
-

4. 7
_

1
_

(2)

.2
_

2
6

.6
. 7

1. 3
12. 7

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

210

133. 2

843. 4

17

9. 6

50. 9

31

33. 3

425. 3

.
55
33

.
30. 6
11. 5

276. 6
106. 6

1
9

(2)
1. 3

. 7
15. 3

_
10

_
12. 9

_
152. 8

28
42
13
40

72. 9
9. 3
_
1. 9
7. 1

311. 9
107. 6
_
15. 7
25. 2

6
1
_
_

8. 3
(2)

31. 3
3. 6
_
_

12
9
_

19. 7
. 7

253. 9
18. 6

-

See f o o tn o te s a t e nd of ta b le .




6
9
6
2
9

_

524
------

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s — - ~
----F o o d and k i n d re d p r o d u c t s
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s ---__ _ _ ----T e x tile m il l p r o d u c t s -------- A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s ~ ------ ~
L u m b e r a nd w ood p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e —
F u r n it u r e and f i x t u r e s -----~ — ~ — P a p e r a nd a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------------------------P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a nd a ll i e d p r o d u c t s —
—
P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ------R u b b e r a nd m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ---------------------------S tone, c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ---- — -----P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s trie s
— ------ ~ ----F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h in e r y , and t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l — — - E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, an d
s u p p l i e s ------- " — ~
" ~
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t ~
P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , and c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a nd o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s — — _ _
__
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s --------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g — ----

125.
16.
.
8.
32.

-

47

_
_
2
-

-

_

_

_
_
_

-

_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

I

Table A -19. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1971 -Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
P e n n s y lv a n ia
Sto p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
ye i r
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

R h o d e I s la n d
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

T en n es see
M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e rs
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

A ll i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------------------

674

336. 2

5. 056. 6

29

3. 8

47. 5

97

46. 7

589. 5

M a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------------------------------

328

104. 2

2, 106. 5

10

1. 5

28. 0

63

18. 7

41 4 . 8

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------------------F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s -------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------A p p a r e l a nd o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s -------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t f u r n i tu r e ~
F u r n i t u r e and f ix t u r e s -------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s --------------------------------P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s -----R u b b e r and m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ---------------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c ep t o rd n an ce,
m a c h in e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p l i e s ----------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t --------------------------------P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c ie n t if ic , a nd c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c l o c k s ------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s ---------

1
18

. 1
5. 1

4. 9
41. 4

-

-

-

6

. 7

21. 2

4

. 8

4. 1

-

-

-

1

.2

1

. . 1

.4

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

3
3
7
2
2
2

1.
.
1.
.
.
.

5
2
4
5
1
2

14.
9.
29.
2.
11.
.

5
1
1
2
2
8

4
1
4
2

1.
2.
.
.

9
1
6
4

16.
14.
25.
15.

5
8
1
8

15
10
12
11
13
13

83.
13.
16.
48.
224.
84.

3
3
0
2
5
9

6!
.
3.
17.

6
7
0
0

102.
5.
55.
464.

6
1
9
1

58
42

11. 5
14. 6

226. 4
232. 9

_

_

2

. 3

17
13

4. 6
7. 5

39. 9
199. 2

1
1

8
8

4. 7
1. 6

242. 0
16. 2

348

232. 0

67
67
44
61
2
20
87

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a nd f i s h e r i e s -------------M i n i n g ---------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n --------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------------------W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e -------------------------------F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s t a t e ---------------S e r v ic e s -------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t3 ------------------------------------------------------

0
6
1
5
2
9

15
5
23
41

N o n m a n u f a c tu r in g ------------------------------------------

12.
.
1.
2.
8.
1.

-

-

-

1

(2
")

2. 1

_

1
1

_

(2)
.3

_

.4
13. 4
_

1. 7

10
7

2. 3
2. 5

69. 0
50. 2

(2)
(2)

.2
.4

4
1

1. 2
1. 9

21. 5
98. 7

1
1

.4
(2)

8. 3
1. 0

4

. 8

12. 5

2, 950. 2

19

2. 3

19. 5

35

28. 0

174. 7

51. 0
29. 7

630. 2
1, 149. 1

-

-

4

. 3

l.~6

4
10

. 8
3. 3

7. 4
33. 2

89. 7
23. 5
(2)
1. 9
36. 1

724.
164.
.
23.
257.

7
3

1. 3
.2

9. 0
6. 5

10
9

21. 7
1. 8

109. 6
16. 6

_

_

_

_

_

_

3
2

. 5
. 1

1. 9
.5

1
1

(2)
1. 0

(2)
7. 9

9
3
7
2
8

-

T exas
A ll i n d u s t r i e s —
M a n u fa c tu r in g

“

— - - - - -

- -

—

_

_

_

------

_

_

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

_

_

_ —

—

-

-

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s
_ _ _ _ _
— __ _ _ — -----F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c ts — _
— —
__ _
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s
~
—
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s — —
"
~
—
— --------- “ " — —
A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s — ------ ~
—
— L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e “ - — — — F u r n i t u r e a n d f ix t u r e s — - - — - — --- — P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s — — ~
~~ ~ --------_
__
_
P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a nd a llie d i n d u s t r i e s
— ~
-------— "
C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c ts - - - - —
_ _ _ _ _
P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g and r e l a te d i n d u s t r i e s ---------" '
“ ~
R u b b e r a nd m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s ------- ~
—
—
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c ts ~ — "
"
~~
—
~
S to n e, c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c ts
~
_
—
_
__ _
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r ie s
'
~
- - _ _ _ _
F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h in e r y , and t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t — - - _ _ _ _
M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l — —
__
_
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p lie s '
- — —
- - —
— —
_ _
_
__
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t —
----- — __
_
P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , and c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s - - - - - - —
“
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c lu r in g i n d u s t r i e s
_ _ _ _ _
_
N o n m a n u f a c tu r in g ------

-

-

_

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h e r i e s —
M in in g —
----“
C o n t r a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n —
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g as, and s a n ita ry s e rv ic e s — “
W h o le s a le a n d r e t a i l t r a d e — _ _ _ _ _
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e —
—
S e r v ic e s
— __
_ _ _ _ _
G o v e r n m e n t3 — _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _ _ _

_

_

_

_

_

V ir g in ia

134

1 10. 1

922. 5

120

76. 5

777. 6

58

17. 8

299. 9

19

3. 3

107. 5

6

1. 6

-

-

8. 2
-

3
1
1

.2
.4
.2

4. 6
17. 3
5. 1

1
3
4
3
3
6
1
3

. 7
.4
. 4
- 9
. 4
1. 4
5. 0
. 3

2
1
1
2
1

. 2
5
(2)
. 2
. 4

1. 5
12. 5
. 3
7. 9
17. 4

-

.

-

9.
7.
24.
18.
36.
36.
42.
7.

1
9
4
2
2
0
1
9

-

.

-

-

-

2
6

1
2. 5

.

8
53. 3

_
-

7
6

2. 2
. 5

35. 9
13. 4

1
3

(2)
. 6

2. 1
37. 4
. 4

-

-

-

6

1. 5

6. 2

2
1

. 2
(2)

-

-

-

1

(2)

.

77

_

92. 3

-

-

5

-

-

622. 6

102

_

.

0

-

670. 1

-

.

. 2
238. 6

73
10

33. 7
1. 8

375. 7
36. 2

_

-

.

. 2
27. 6

13
10

56. 4
7. 2

32 8. 3
46. 8

11
3

36. 7
. 9

253. 0
4. 2

-

_

.

1
44

-

-

7
2

.2
. 6

—

_

"

-

-

-

48

.

73. 5

1

.

"

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e nd of ta b le .




2. 2

_

-

-

-

-

4. 8
3. 9

3
2

(2)
.3

‘ . 3
. 6

Table A -19. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1971 -Continued
( W o r k e r s a nd m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
W a sh in g to n
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

W e s t V ir g in ia
M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

Sto p p a g e s
b e g in n ing in
ye. a r
W o rk e rs
N um ber
in v o lv e d

W is c o n s in
M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
W o rk e r s
N um ber
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r (a ll
s to p p a g e s )

A ll i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------------------

67

66. 0

1, 071. 5

426

202. 9

2, 244. 1

116

52. 1

695. 9

M a n u f a c tu r i n g ------------------------------------------------

20

13. 7

311. 6

43

10. 1

196. 7

52

23. 2

430. 2

2

.5

2. 6

4

.4

56. 7

-

-

-

-

-

_
3
1
3
_

_
.6
.4
9. 1
_

_

1
_

. 1

-

-

-

-

1
4

1
1. 2

2
2
1
1

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------------------F o o d a nd k i n d re d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s -------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------A p p a r e l a nd o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e
f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s -------------L u m b e r a nd w ood p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e —
F u r n it u r e a nd f ix t u r e s
P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------------------------P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a nd a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ------R u b b e r and m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s —
L e a th e r a nd l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ---------------------------Stone, c la y , and g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, an d
s u p p l i e s ------------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t --------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n tif ic , and c o n tr o llin g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c l o c k s ------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s ---------N o n m a n u f a c tu r in g -----------------------------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s -------------M in in g -----------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n --------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a nd s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------------------W h o le s a le and r e t a i l t r a d e -------------------------------F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s t a t e ---------------S e r v i c e s -------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t3 ------------------------------------------------------ 1
4
3
2

-

3. 1
2. 8
233. 6

1. 6

8

2. 0

* 1 1 .7

-

-

13. 3

_
2
2
2
1

_

.3
. 7
. 1
(2)

-

-

-

4
1
4

. 5
.2
. 7

12. 8
4. 7
2. 4

-

2

. 3

2. 6

-

-

-

.3
45. 4

5
9

2. 6
3. 6

28. 0
45. 6

3
3

1. 4
1. 9

13. 8
19. 6

.4
(2)

14. 0
1. 2

6
3

. 7
. 3

68. 6
. 8

10
12

2. 7
4. 9

68. 4
114. 2

(2)
1. 4

.5
8. 1

1
1

.4
(2)

-

-

.

-

1
1

-

_
2. 2
21. 2
. 8
(2)

3. 2
1

(2)
(2)

6

.

.

8

9. 1

.4
.5

1

(2)

.

132. 7

.5

48

52. 2

759. 9

383

192. 8

2, 047. 4

65

1
1
14

.2
(2)
25. 7

.6
.4
334. 8

321
27

167. 2
6. 5

1, 848. 5
101. 7

23

4. 2

111. 7

9
18

22. 5
3. 7

327. 0
95. 2

16
7

17. 6
. 2

76. 2
3. 8

12
11

18. 8
. 9

70. 9
43. 6

1

1. 9

6
6

6
7

1. 0
7. 0

4
15

. 2
4. 9

4. 4
35. 1

5

.

“

-

-

.
.

_

28. 9
_

265. 8
_

1 No w o r k s to p p a g e s w e r e r e c o r d e d d u r in g 1971 f o r th e in d u s t r y g r o u p s f o r w h ic h no d a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d .
S to p p a g e s a ff e c tin g m o r e th a n 1 in d u s t r y g ro u p h a v e b e e n c o u n te d in e a c h g ro u p :
W o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d m a n - d a y s
id le w e r e a ll o c a te d to th e
r e s p e c ti v e g ro u p s .
2 F e w e r th a n 100.
3 T h e s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n
d e e m e d to f a ll w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o rk s to p p a g e . T h is
d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m i n a ti o n th a t a w o r k s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
4 I d le n e s s in 1971 r e s u l t e d f r o m a s to p p a g e th a t b e g a n in 1970.
NO TE:

B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g ,




s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

49

Table A-20. W ork stoppages by State and m etropolitan a re a ,1 1971
^ W o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
S ta te a nd m e t r o p o li ta n are^ i

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in y e a r
N um ber

A ll s t a t e s ----------------------B ir m in g h a m
H u n ts v ille —
M o b i l e ---------M o n tg o m e ry
A la s k a -------------A r i z o n a -------------------------------------------------P h o e n ix -------------------------------------------T u c s o n --------------------------------------------A r k a n s a s ----------------------------------------------F t. S m ith , A rk . — k l a -------------------O
( A r k a n s a s p o r t i o n ) --------------------L i tt le R o c k — o r th L ittle R o c k ------N
C a l i f o r n i a ---------------------------------------------A n a h e im — a n ta A na— a r d e n G ro v e •
S
G
B a k e r s f i e l d -------------------------------------F r e s n o --------------------------------------------L o s A n g e le s —Long B e a c h ----------------O x n a rd —V e n tu ra -------------------------------S a c r a m e n t o ---------------------------------------S a lin a s — o n te r e y ----------------------------M
San B e r n a r d i n o — i v e r s i d e — n ta rio —
R
O
San D i e g o ------------------------------------------San F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d -------------------O
M a r in C o u n t y -------------------------------O a k la n d — a s t B a y -----------------------E
San F r a n c i s c o -----------------------------San M a te o -------------------------------------S a n ta B a r b a r a ----------------------------------S to c k to n ---------------------------------------------V a l le j o H N a p a -----C o lo r a d o -----------------C o lo r a d o S p r in g s
D e n v e r ----------------P u e b lo ----------------C o n n e c t i c u t -------------B r i d g e p o r t --------H a r t f o r d -------------N ew H a v e n ----------N ew L o n d o rr-G ro to n — o rw ic h
N
N o rw a lk ---------------------------------S t a m f o r d --------------------------------D e la w a r e ------------------------------------------W ilm in g to n , D e l. — d. — J -------M
N.
( D e la w a re p o r tio n ) -----------------(N ew J e r s e y p o r tio n ) -------------D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a ------------------------W a sh in g to n , D. C. — d. — a --------M
V
( D i s t r i c t of C o lu m b ia p o r tio n )
( M a r y la n d p o r t i o n ) -----------------( V ir g in ia p o r t i o n ) --------------------F l o r i d a ----------------------------------------------F t. L a u d e r d a le —H o lly w o o d ----------J a c k s o n v ille ■
M i a m i ---------T am pa—
St. P e t e r s b u r g W e st P a l m B e a c h --------G e o r g ia A t l a n t a --------------------A u g u s ta , G a. — C N.
C o lu m b u s , G a .— la •
A
M a co n --------------------Savannah
H a w a ii -------H o n o lu lu I d a h o ----------B o i s e -----I l l i n o i s -------C h a m p a ig n —U r b a n a ------------------C h ic a g o — o r t h w e s te r n In d ia n a
N
S ta n d a r d C o n s o lid a te d A r e a C h i c a g o -------------------------------------D e c a t u r -------------------------------------P e o r i a --------------------------------------R o c k f o r d ----------------------------------S p r in g f ie ld ■
I n d i a n a ----------E v a n s v ille , Ind. — y ---------------K
(In d ia n a p o r t i o n ) ----------------F t. W a y n e -------------------------------G a ry — a m m o n d — a s t C h ic a g o 2
H
E
I n d i a n a p o l i s -----------------------------L a f a y e tte — e st L a f a y e t t e ------W
M u n c i e ---------------------------------------

W o rk e r s
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

5, 138

3, 279. 6

47, 589. 1

79
28
5
9
7
8
37
21
11
25
8
6
7
315
12
7
14
132
9
16
5
22
21
125
6
59
41
19
25
6
12
7
54
10
35
5
71
15
13
22
11
5
6
7
36
41
32
5
31
45
29
10
6
82
8
9
30
10
19
6
56
30
5
5
6
10
21
12
20
8
356
6

44. 5
7. 7
.4
6. 7
1. 6
.4
30. 4
8. 2
4. 8
9. 7
1. 2
. 9
2. 7
387. 9
21. 2
15. 9
6. 0
137. 2
4. 5
18. 4
2. 0
22. 8
12. 5
80. 8
. 8
33. 3
44. 6
2. 1
13. 9
3. 2
5. 2
1. 9
24. 4
1. 4
10. 2
. 7
29. 4
1. 5
2. 5
6. 6
1. 2
.4
1. 9
2. 3
12. 6
11. 9
10. 4
1. 0
16. 7
22. 9
15. 7
3. 2
4. 0
44. 3
1. 8
5. 4
7. 5
3. 7
6. 2
.3
35. 8
9. 1
.4
.5
. 7
2. 9
3. 7
1. 0
9. 7
.3
228. 8
1. 7

777. 2
207. 4
9. 5
217. 5
5. 0
1 1 .4
461. 2
53. 6
81. 9
78. 9
6. 1
5. 5
20. 3
135. 9
253. 7
238. 3
87. 5
836. 6
54. 4
174. 7
27. 8
209. 6
102. 4
272. 2
8. 7
461. 9
762. 3
39. 4
202. 1
40. 1
84. 2
29. 8
193. 8
10. 0
82. 2
2. 3
471. 3
7. 2
92. 6
88. 7
30. 1
7. 6
6. 9
54. 7
292. 9
278. 3
261. 0
13. 2
126. 6
131. 9
100. 8
15. 0
16. 2
445. 4
14. 2
37. 3
75. 2
19. 6
67. 3
. 8
389. 8
160. 9
1. 2
1. 5
2. 2
46. 9
32. 2
27. 8
66. 2
4. 9
419. 4
8. 6

177
145
9
25
14
11
197
5
13
9
35
32
22
5
11
10

134.
120.
3.
4.
9.
4.
96.
.
3.
2.
19.
13.
16.
1.
1.
1.

1
6
9
9
7
9
6
5
2
9
9
5
9
0
9
6

5,

1,

1,

2,

1, 181. 6
1, 016. 7
31. 7
111. 2
254. 5
37. 1
1 ,4 6 7 . 9
28. 1
200. 4
199. 9
190. 4
164. 9
199. 9
19. 4
2 5 .9
18. 8

S ta te a n d m e t r o p o li ta n a r e a

N um ber
In d ia n a — o n tin u e d
C
T e r r e H a u t e ---I o w a ---------------------C e d a r R a p i d s ----------------------------D a v e n p o r t— o c k Is la n d — o lin e ,
R
M
Iow a—
111------------------------------------(Iow a p o r t i o n ) ---(Illin o is p o r tio n )
D es M o i n e s ------------D ubuque
S io u x C ity , Iow a— eb N
(Iow a p o r tio n ) -------W a t e r l o o -------------------K a n s a s ----------------------------T o p e k a -----------------------W i c h i t a ----------------------K e n tu c k y
L e x in g to n
L o u is v ille , Ky. —
Ind (K e n tu c k y p o r tio n ) *
(In d ia n a p o r tio n ) —
P a d u c a h ----------------------L o u is ia n a -----------------------B a to n R o u g e --------------L a k e C h a r le s ------------N ew O r l e a n s --------------S h r e v e p o r t ----------------M a in e -----------------------------M a r y l a n d ------------------------B a l t i m o r e ------------------M a s s a c h u s e t t s ----------------B o s t o n -----------------------F a l l R iv e r, M a s s . — I . ---------------R.
( M a s s a c h u s e t ts p o r tio n ) ----------F i tc h b u r g ---------------------------------------L a w r e n c e — a v e r h ill, M a s s . — H~
H
N.
N ew B e d f o rd ---------------------------------P i t t s f i e l d ----------------------------------------S p r in g f ie ld — h ic o p e e — o ly o k e,
C
H
M a s s . — onn C
( M a s s a c h u s e t ts p o r tio n )
W o r c e s t e r --------------------------M ic h ig a n
A nn A r b o r -------------B a y C i t y -----------------D e t r o i t ------------------F l in t ----------------------G ra n d R a p i d s --------J a c k s o n ------------------K a l a m a z o o -------------L a n s in g M u sk eg o n — u sk e g o n H e ig h ts ■
M
S a g i n a w ----------------------------------M in n e s o ta ----------------------------------D u lu th — u p e r io r , M in n .—W is S
M in n e a p o lis —
St. P a u l ------------M is s i s s i p p i --------------------------------J a c k s o n ---------------------------------M is s o u r i -------------------------------------K a n s a s C ity , M o. — a n s
K
( M i s s o u r i p o r tio n ) ---( K a n s a s p o r t i o n ) -------St. L o u is , M o .—
Ill
( M i s s o u r i p o r tio n ) ■
( Illin o is p o r tio n ) —
S p r i n g f i e l d ----------------M o n t a n a -------------------------B i l l i n g s ----------------------B u tte --------------------------G r e a t F a l l s ----------------N e b r a s k a -------------------------O m a h a , N e b .— o w a ---I
( N e b r a s k a p o r tio n )
N e v a d a ---------------------------L a s V eg as
R en o -------N ew H a m p s h ir e
M a n c h e s te r —
N ew J e r s e y ■
A tla n tic C it’
J e r s e y C ity: 3 T .
N e w a rk 3
P a t e r s o n —C lifto n — a s s a i c 3 -----------P
P e r t h A m b o y 3 -------------------------------T r e n to n -----------------------------------------N ew M e x i c o ----------------------------------------A lb u q u e rq u e ----------------------------------N ew Y o rk -------------------------------------------A lb an y — c h e n e c ta d y — r o y ------------S
T
B in g h a m to n , N. Y. — a ------------------P

S ee f o o tn o te s a t e nd of ta b le .




S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in y e a r

50

W o rk e rs
in v o lv e d

15
84
9

5 .6
45. 6
4. 9

33
14
19
22
5
13
11
6
32
10
6
150
5
56
46
10
9
52
8
7
26
6
14
79
57
154
80
6
9
9
6
5
11
11

8. 0
1. 8
6. 2
8. 1
1. 3
1. 9
1. 8
4. 9
30. 9
6. 8
2. 6
112. 4
1. 9
62. 2
5 8. 5
3. 7
1. 1
35. 1
1. 2
1. 1
14. 8
1. 8
6. 5
46. 3
33. 6
42. 2
2 1 .4
1. 0
.2
.2
.3
6. 7
1. 6
. 8

14
14
15
2 82
10
13
125
15
30
8
11
10
15
14
75
5
51
25
6
171
56
46
10
93
68
25
15
25
5
6
8
37
24
21
22
10
12
17
9
281
11
42
67
62
31
24
24
5
399
58
19

4. 2
4. 2
1. 3
126. 3
5. 3
2. 6
49. 7
3. 2
6. 2
1. 6
1. 3
5. 5
5. 5
3. 2
5 8 .4
4. 6
28. 7
23. 1
13. 2
73. 7
29. 4
2 3. 6
5. 8
4 3. 1
29. 6
13. 5
6. 4
14. 0
.6
3. 2
2. 5
28. 8
15. 3
14. 0
7. 6
2. 0
2. 0
1. 9
. 8
114. 0
2. 7
22. 2
31. 7
13. 6
10. 6
5. 9
11. 8
2. 3
253. 2
13. 9
2. 0

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

3 8 .0
710. 6
19. 3
59.
15.
43.
128.
5.
39.
36.
18.
238.
30.
66.
1, 228.
41.
718.
570.
147.
20.
396.
20.
5.
255.
8.
154.
558.
47 2 .
675.
372.
5.
6.
6.
4.
33.
28.
2.

2,
1,

1,

7,

7
8
9
7
7
5
7
5
5
0
9
5
9
1
2
9
9
5
3
9
1
7
7
4
4
2
1
5
0
0
2
9
4
0

116. 9
116. 9
24. 1
942. 8
2 8. 3
73. 6
077. 0
71. 1
141. 5
4 6. 4
32. 9
147. 9
359. 1
53. 3
557. 2
12. 9
43 1 . 5
240. 9
116. 3
824. 4
331. 9
261. 8
70. 1
40 5 . 7
310. 3
95. 3
72. 0
42 8. 5
4. 4
170. 2
94. 7
204. 1
90. 5
87. 9
59. 7
9. 9
9. 0
21. 8
1 1 .4
910. 8
31. 2
344. 2
712. 1
157. 7
312. 9
110. 1
108. 7
16. 6
256. 4
331. 2
36. 6

Table A-20. Work stoppages by State and metropolitan area,1 1971-Continued
( W o r k e r s in v o lv e d a nd m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s
S ta te a nd m e t r o p o li ta n a r e a

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in y e a r
N um ber

N ew Y o rk — C o n tin u e d
(N ew Y o rk p o r t i o n ) -----------------------B u f f a l o ------------------------------------------------E l m i r a ------------------------------------------------K in g sto n — e w b u rg h — o u g h k e e p s i e ---N
P
N ew Y o rk — o r t h e a s t e r n N ew J e r s e y N
N ew Y o rk , N. Y. SM SA3 --------------------N a s s a u and S uffolk C o u n t i e s --------N ew Y o rk C ity 4 ------------------------------R o c k la n d C o u n ty 4
W e s t c h e s t e r C o u n ty 4
R o c h e s t e r --------------------S y racu se
U tic a - R o m e ----------------------------------N o rth C a r o lin a ----------------------------------A s h e v i l l e ---------------------------------------C h a r l o t t e ---------------------------------------D u r h a m ------------------------------------------G r e e n s b o rc r-H ig h P o i n t — in s to n W
S a le m —
R a le ig h
W ilm in g to n -----------------------------------------N o rth D a k o t a -------------------------------------------F a r g o — o o rh e a d , N. D a k .— in n -----M
M
( N o rth D a k o ta p o r tio n ) -----------------O hio ---------------------------------------------------------A k ro n ------------------------C an to n -----------------------C in c in n a ti, O h io —
Ky. —
(O hio p o r t i o n ) ------(K e n tu c k y p o r tio n ) (In d ia n a p o r tio n ) —
C le v e la n d -------------------C o lu m b u s -------------------D a yton -----------------------H a m ilto n — id d le to w n M
L im a -------------------------L o r a in — l y r i a --------------------------E
M a n s f ie ld ---------------------------------S p r i n g f i e l d --------------------------------S te u b e n v ille — e irto n , O hio—
W
W.
(O hio p o r tio n ) ■
(W e st V ir g in ia p o r tio n )
T o le d o , O h ic r- M ic h -----------(O hio p o r tio n ) ■
(M ic h ig a n p o r tio n ) Y oungstow n— a r r e n ~
W
O k la h o m a -----------------------O k la h o m a C i t y ----------T u l s a -------------------------O re g o n E u g e n e --------------------------P o r tl a n d , O r e g . — a sh W
(O re g o n p o r tio n ) -----(W a s h in g to n p o r tio n ) S a l e m -----------------------------P e n n s y l v a n i a --------------------------------A lle n to w n — e th le h e m —E a s to n ,
B
P a . - N . J.
( P e n n s y lv a n ia p o r tio n )
(N ew J e r s e y p o r tio n ) —
A lto o n a ----------------------------E r ie ---------------------------------H a r r i s b u r g ----------------------J o h n s to w n -------------------------L a n c a s t e r --------------------------

W o rk e r s
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

17
58
9
16
449
247
69
135
9
34
22
20
14
38
5
11
5

1.
30.
2.
3.
243.
165.
18.
136.
.
9.
4.
8.
5.
26.
.
2.
.

8
8
8
0
5
5
8
8
4
5
9
0
0
6
3
7
3

33.
72 7.
30.
75.
> 883.
,
> 356.
,
751.
[ , 253.
4.
348.
56.
170.
276.
' 1.
19.
2.

5
0
4
9

17
6
5
12
8
5
524
30
35
59
47
7
5
86
44
22
12
7
13
8
13
18
9
9
45
35
10
45
31
13
12
43
7
28

140.
1.
29.
25.

8
8
1
5

7
7
674

9. 7
. 8
1. 2
6. 6
1. 9
1. 4
250. 5
4. 9
12. 8
20. 5
17. 1
2. 6
. 8
33. 9
10. 8
23. 4
2. 6
1. 7
4. 4
3. 6
8. 5
3. 9
1. 6
2. 3
13. 3
12. 0
1. 3
28. 8
13. 1
6. 1
3. 2
38. 1
3. 3
22. 5
18. 5
4. 0
2. 7
336. 2

7. 0
1, 872. 6
106. 6
141. 1
277. 9
232. 4
15. 6
29. 9
548. 7
89. 6
683. 2
35. 6
6. 3
39. 9
48. 9
1 5 1 .4
25. 8
9. 9
15. 9
174. 7
143. 8
30. 9
652. 2
139. 7
40. 4
72. 2
512. 9
43. 2
364. 7
273. 8
90. 9
15. 2
, 056. 6

43
36

13. 2
10. 5

88. 6
76. 5

7

2. 7

2 l

9
21
12
17
8

6.
5.
5.
2.
2.

9
6
4
2
4

0
3
8
4
5
6
0
4
0
3
6
3

210. 1

12. 1

12. 1

28.
124.
33.
19.

0
6
0
5

22. 0

S ta te a n d m e t r o p o li ta n a r e a

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in y e a r
N um ber

P e n n s y lv a n ia — C o n tin u e d
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a . - N . J. —■
( P e n n s y lv a n ia p o r tio n ) ■
(N ew J e r s e y p o r tio n ) —
P i t t s b u r g h ------------------------R e a d in g ----------------------------S c r a n to n ---------------------------W i l k e s - B a r r e — a z le to n
H
Y o r k ------------------------------R h o d e Is la n d ------------------------------P r o v id e n c e — a w tu c k e t, R. I . P
(R h o d e I s la n d p o r tio n ) ----So u th C a r o lin a --------------------------C h a r le s t o n ----------------------------C o lu m b ia ------------------------------So u th D a k o t a ------------------------------S io u x F a l l s ----------------------------T e n n e s s e e ----------------------------------C h a tta n o o g a , T en n . —
Ga ------( T e n n e s s e e p o r tio n ) --------K n o x v ille ------------------------------M e m p h is , T e n n . — r k ----------A
( T e n n e s s e e p o r tio n ) --------N a s h v i l l e -------------------------------T e x a s ------------------------------------------B e a u m o n t- P o r t A r t h u r C o rp u s C h r i s t i --------------D a lla s ----------------------------E l P a s o -------------------------F t. W o r t h ----------------------G a lv e s to n — e x a s C i t y ---T
H o u s t o n --------------------------S a n A n to n io --------------------T e x a r k a n a , T e x . — rk —
A
U t a h -------------------------------------S a lt L a k e C i t y ---------------V e r m o n t -----------------------------V i r g i n i a ------------------------------N e w p o rt N ew s— a m p to n J
H
N o rfo lk — o r t s m o u t h -----P
R i c h m o n d -----------------------R o a n o k e --------------------------W a s h in g to n S e a ttle — v e r e t t
E
S p o k a n e -----------T a c o m a -----------W e s t V ir g in ia ------------C h a r l e s t o n ------------Ky. —
H u n tin g to n — s h la n d , W. Va. —
A
O h i o ---------------------(W e s t V ir g in ia p o r tio n ) ■
(K e n tu c k y p o r tio n ) ------(O h io p o r tio n ) --------------W h e elin g , W. Va. —
O h i o ---------------------------------(W e s t V ir g in ia p o r tio n ) (O h io p o r tio n ) --------------W i s c o n s i n ------------------------------G r e e n B a y -------------------------K e n o s h a -----------------------------L a C r o s s e -------------------------M a d i s o n -----------------------------M il w a u k e e -------------------------R a c i n e --------------------------------W y o m in g ----------------------------------

W o rk e r s
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
y e a r ( a ll
s to p p a g e s )

210
155
55
179
28
14
27
9
29
29
26
13
5
5
10
9
97
15
13
15
26
25
20
134
6
31
5
17
12
10
11
40
11
5
19
11
5
120
5
12
8
5
67
32
10
11
426
16

111. 4
100. 6
10. 8
61. 4
7. 0
2. 0
5. 5
4. 4
3. 8
3. 7
3. 7
9. 4
1. 3
1. 2
5. 6
4. 3
46. 7
3. 1
3. 1
2. 3
7. 9
7. 9
6. 7
110. 1
.2
20. 2
. 7
8. 2
4. 5
5. 5
1. 5
35. 3
2. 9
.4
19. 9
11. 5
.6
76. 5
2. 3
6. 2
4. 4
5. 2
66. 0
22. 6
4. 1
4. 2
202. 9
7. 2

1, 679. 8
1, 560. 9
118. 9
841. 1
37. 1
29. 7
43. 0
48. 0
47. 5
44. 8
44. 4
103. 5
31. 6
3. 9
53. 2
4 9. 2
589. 5
29. 4
29. 4
35. 5
80. 6
80. 6
147. 4
922. 5
1. 6
234. 9
18. 2
107. 1
57. 4
48. 1
23. 6
200. 4
10. 7
1. 0
238. 8
160. 7
19. 7
777. 6
4 1 .4
113. 9
29. 5
12. 3
1, 071. 5
450. 4
16. 2
69. 8
2, 244. 1
48. 4

30
15
7
8

10.
5.
1.
2.

4
8
9
6

112.
32.
48.
31.

1
2
2
8

25
17
9
116
9
7
11
9
37
12
16

3.
2.
1.
52.
2.
1.
2.
1.
19.
3.
8.

5
3
2
1
0
7
1
4
9
7
1

95.
55.
39.
695.
24.
8.
28.
10.
227.
60.
53.

0
1
9
9
8
0
6
4
4
0
8

1 In c lu d e s d a ta f o r e a c h m e t r o p o li ta n a r e a in w h ic h 5 s to p p a g e s o r m o r e b e g a n in 1971.
S o m e m e t r o p o li ta n a r e a s in c lu d e th e c o u n tie s in m o r e th a n 1 S ta te , a n d h e n c e , an a r e a m a y e q u a l o r e x c e e d th e to ta l f o r th e S ta te in w h ic h
th e m a j o r c ity is lo c a te d . S to p p a g e s in th e m in in g an d lo g g in g i n d u s t r i e s a r e e x c lu d e d . I n te r m e t r o p o l it a n a r e a s to p p a g e s a r e c o u n te d s e p a r a t e l y in
e a c h a r e a a ff e c te d ; th e w o r k e r s in v o lv e d and m a n - d a y s id le w e r e a ll o c a te d to th e r e s p e c ti v e a r e a s .
2 In c lu d e d in th e C h ic a g o , 111.— o r t h e r n I n d ia n a S ta n d a r d C o n s o lid a te d A r e a .
N
3 In c lu d e d in th e N ew Y o rk — o r t h e a s t e r n N ew J e r s e y S ta n d a r d C o n s o lid a te d A r e a .
N
4 In c lu d e d in th e N ew Y o rk SMSA.




51

Table A-21. Work stoppages by industry group and duration, 1971
N u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s
I n d u s tr y g ro u p

1
day

T o ta l

2-3
days

4-6
days

7-14
days

15-29
days

30-59
days

90 d a y s
and o v e r

60-89
days

A ll i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------------------

25, 167

673

688

642

888

795

740

366

375

M a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------------------------------

22 , 397

167

219

247

408

43 4

441

233

248

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s --------------------------------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s --------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ------------------ ----- ------------------

5
209
4
35

19

33

22

-

-

3

8

3

1
42
1
13

2
37

-

-

2
26
2
5

15
1
2

15
_
1

A p p a r e l, e t c . 4 --------------------------------------------------L u m b e r a nd w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e ----------------------------------------------------------F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s --------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------

79

6

14

12

13

12

7

7

8

67
75
101

2
5
6

4
6
8

4
5
11

9
18
12

14
12
22

16
16
21

10
6
9

8
7
12

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s -------

79
136
14

7
8
1

6
9
2

7
14
-

14
23
1

12
30
2

11
22
4

11
15
4

11
15
-

R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s
p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------------------------L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ---------------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s ----------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e ta l p r o d u c t s 5 -------------------------------

92
18
147
229
347

2
1
4
13
20

4
2
12
. 26
18

10
1
15
25
30

17
2
26
33
63

22
7
38
42
63

18
1
29
51
91

9
2
13
18
36

10
2
10
21
26

-

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -----------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p lie s
---------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t --------------------------------I n s t r u m e n t s , e t c . 6 -------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s -----------

333

20

22

37

52

54

55

36

57

178
175
28
46

31
17
1
1

25
18
1
1

25
17
4
5

25
26
5
12

23
26
6
10

25
27
3
9

13
16
6
4

11
28
2
4

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------------------

22 , 770

506

469

395

480

361

299

133

127

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s -------------M in in g --------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n ----------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ------------------------------W h o le s a le a n d r e t a i l t r a d e ---------------------------------

7
657
754

299
59

3
147
118

110
128

3
53
183

1
23
117

15
93

6
34

4
22

316
505

53
23

44
57

34
39

45
95

43
98

52
91

21
46

26
56

F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s t a t e ---------------S e r v i c e s ----------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t7 — — ----------------------------------------------

23
176
332

1
12
59

8
17
75

2
19
63

1
25
75

3
33
43

3
32
13

3
20
3

2
18
1

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d (in th o u s a n d s )
A ll i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------------------

3, 287. 1

185. 3

768. 7

2 5 1 .8

74 0 . 8

6 1 4 .0

3 9 7 .0

176. 6

152. 8

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------------------

87 0 . 8

80. 7

80. 3

81. 8

133. 0

193. 2

1 0 6 .4

1 0 2 .4

93. 0

.

.

2 .0
8 .6
-

0 .7
4. 1
3. 7
.7

2 .0
5. 1
.3

3. 2
_
(3)

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s -----------------------------------

2.
85.
9.
5.

A p p a r e l, e t c . 4---------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e -------------------------------------------------F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ------------------------------P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------

7
6
1
3

.
-

-

.6

.7

(3)

(3 )
1 2 .0
.3
2 .9

2 0 .4

1 .0

1 .2

1 .2

2 .9

12. 2

.3

.6

.9

7 .9
11. 1
3 5 .4

(3)
.2
.5

.4
.6
1 .7

. 1
.7
1 .7

1 .8
1 .8
3 .0

1 .2
1 .6
7 .0

1 .5
3. 2
9 .4

2. 1
.9
4 .4

.6
2. 2
7. 6

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s
C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ...............
P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s -

2 8 .9
25. 6
7. 9

2 .4
1. 1
. 1

.5
1 .6
.5

6. 5
2. 3
"

6. 7
2. 8
(3)

2. 8
4. 6
. 1

.9
3. 2
.4

5. 3
2 .9
6 .6

3 .8
7 .0
-

R u b b e r a n d m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t i c s
p r o d u c ts ---------------------------------------------------L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s -------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c ts ---------------P r i m a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 5 -----------------------

2 9 .5
7 .4
3 1 .3
9 1 .6
9 4 .4

1 .0
1 .0
3. 7
2. 8
3 .9

3. 1
.3
2 .2
7 .4
6 .9

4 .4
.3
4. 1
9 .3
6 .0

8 .6
2. 3
3 .4
7 .9
7. 7

4. 0
2 .6
5 .9
1 9 .3
42. 8

5. 2
(3)
5 .0
15. 2
14. 2

1 .7
.2
3. 6
26. 1
8 .3

1 .6
.7
3. 5
3. 5
4. 7

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p l i e s ---------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ------------—— ------I n s t r u m e n t s , e t c . 6 --------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s —

123. 1

6. 1

7 .7

1 6 .4

1 4 .4

3 6 .0

8 .3

1 1 .2

23. 2

116. 1
1 2 0 .3
9 .3
7 .9

1 4 .4
5 .5
.7
(3)

2 3 .9
7. 8
.4
(3)

8. 5
1 1 .5
.5
1 .3

3 9 .8
10. 3
2. 5
1 .7

10. 5
2 8 .4
1 .3
2. 5

6. 5
22. 7
(3)
1 .3

1 .2
17. 5
1 .9
.5

1 1 .3
16. 5
2 .0
.5

104. 6

6 8 8 .4

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------------

2 ,4 1 6 . 3

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a nd f i s h e r i e s --------M i n i n g --------------------------------------------------------C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n --------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s -------------------W h o le s a le a n d r e t a i l t r a d e ------------------------

1 .5
383. 2
4 6 4 .4
1, 2 5 0 .9
1 3 3 .8

F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s t a t e --------S e r v ic e s -------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t7 ------------------------------------------------

2 .0
26. 5
154. 0

3 5 .4

1 3 .4

-

170. 1

607. 8

4 2 0 .8

2 9 0 .6

7 4 .2

5 9 .8

1 .2
5 5. 1
2 4 .4

39. 1
34. 5

.2
9 0 .3
40. 3

(3)
1 1 .9
1 9 6 .4

108. 1
101. 1

1 9 .0
3 9 .3

.2
18. 7

18. 1
4. 1

54 7 . 8
30. 8

22. 1
7 .0

38 4 . 8
5 6 .8

177. 7
14. 7

62. 3
1 1 .4

9 .2
2. 8

2 8 .8
'6 .0

(3)
1 .3
1 2 .0

.5
2 .0
26. 7

(3 )
1 .7
6 5 ,5

(3)
7. 2
2 8. 1

.6
2.s6
16. 7

(3)
4 .4
3. 1

.5
1 .7
1 .7

.

5 9 .5
9 .6

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e nd o f ta b l e .




7. 0

52

.

.3
5 .6
. 1

Table A-21. Work stoppages by industry group and duration, 1971-Continued
M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g y e a r (in th o u s a n d s )
I n d u s tr y g ro u p
T o ta l

1
day

2-3
days

4-6
days

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------------

62, 2 6 6 .4

185. 3

1 ,3 7 3 .6

895. 1

4 , 0 9 9 .2

7, 1 9 1 .8

11, 1 4 3 .9

7, 5 8 2 .4

2 9 ,7 9 5 .1

8 0. 7

1 8 3 .2

295. 8

844. 6

2, 85 2 . 2

2, 840. 1

4 , 4 9 3 .4

25, 2 8 7 .8

2 8. 8
. 1

.3
9 3 .4
1 .6
1 9 .4

22. 8
142. 6
-

1 8 .4
1 1 1 .5
122. 3
2 0 .5

6 5 .4
218. 3
2 0 .4

30 2 . 1

7-14
days

15-29
days

30-59
days

60-89
days

90 d a y s
and o v e r

M a n u f a c tu r i n g ------------------------------------------

3 6 ,8 7 7 .8

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s -----------------------F o o d a nd k in d re d p r o d u c t s ------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s ------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s -----------------------------------

4 1 .6
80 9 . 8
34 2 . 2
7 5 .5

3 5 .4
.6

30. 6
2. 0

A p p a r e l, e t c . 4 --------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t
f u r n i tu r e -------------------------------------------------F u r n it u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ---- ----------------------------P a p e r and a ll i e d p r o d u c t s --------------------------

2 4 5 .4

1 .0

3. 1

4 .4

23. 3

94. 1

8. 3

33. 3

77. 8

192. 6
3 2 7 .9
1 ,0 3 0 .3

(3)
.2
.5

1 .2
1 .5
3. 7

.5
2. 1
7 .0

8. 7
13. 0
2 1 .5

20. 6
22. 7
115. 1

48. 1
8 9 .6
27 2 . 6

6 9 .4
44. 9
213. 6

44. 1
1 5 4 .0
3 9 6 .4

P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a ll i e d i n d u s t r ie s
C h e m ic a ls a nd a ll i e d p r o d u c t s -----------------P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s

815. 8
1, 1 2 1 .2
1 1 0 .4

2 .4
1. 1
.1

.9
3. 3
.6

26. 8
8. 1
-

49. 6
22. 3
.5

33. 1
6 4 .4
1 .6

33. 2
86. 9
1 0 .4

272. 5
153. 0
97. 1

397. 2
7 8 2 .0
"

R u b b e r and m is c e ll a n e o u s p l a s t ic s
p r o d u c ts ---------------------------------------------------L e a th e r and l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s --------------------S to n e , c la y , a nd g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------------P r i m a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c t s 5 ------------------------

467. 5
1 1 9 .4
757. 8
2, 22 5 . 9
2, 0 4 5 .4

1 .0
1 .0
3. 7
2. 8
3 .9

6 .9
.7
4. 5
15. 8
1 5 .0

1 0 .0
.9
1 1 .8
37. 8
21. 1

59. 1
16. 3
27. 3
5 2 .0
49. 3

59. 0
3 7 .5
9 1 .8
27 4 . 7
78 9 . 5

"

100.
2.
125.
468.
416.

5
2
8
8
6

87. 6
1 2 .4
1 2 1 .8
1 ,0 3 9 .7
363. 1

_

1 2 .4

143.
48.
371.
33 4 .
386.

5
5
1
2
9

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t, a n d
s u p p l i e s -----------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ------------------------I n s t r u m e n t s , e t c . 6 --------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s —

3, 38 5 . 6

6. 1

15. 3

5 9 .0

99. 2

4 9 5 .0

24 2 . 1

5 5 4 .4

1 ,9 1 4 .5

1, 6 7 1 .3
2 0 ,5 2 7 .9
402. 3
1 6 1 .9

1 4 .4
5. 5
.7
(3)

5 9 .3
17. 7
.8
.2

3 2 .0
40. 8
1 .5
3. 3

1 9 1 .7
6 3 .4
17. 8
1 5 .0

140. 1
3 9 3 .7
18. 2
35. 8

2 0 5 .0
420. 7
3 .5
32. 8

62. 3
923. 5
115. 9
2 5 .0

9 6 6 .6
18, 662. 6
244. 0
4 9 .9

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------------

25, 3 8 8 . 6

104. 6

1, 1 9 0 .4

5 9 9 .3

3, 2 5 4 .6

4 , 3 3 9 .6

8, 30 3 . 8

3 , 0 8 9 .0

4 , 5 0 7 .3

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s --------M i n i n g ---------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n ----------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , and s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------------W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e --------------------------

4. 2
4 ,9 2 9 .8
8, 2 2 1 .4

5 9 .5
9 .6

1 .6
9 0 .9
54. 1

107. 3
94. 8

2 .0
31 5 . 9
257. 0

.6
8 2 .4
2, 36 7 . 2

3, 708. 3
2, 0 4 4 .2

5 4 1 .8
1 ,7 2 0 .7

23. 6
1 , 6 7 3 .6

8, 82 2 . 1
1 ,5 8 3 .5

18. 1
4. 1

916. 7
6 6 .0

1 0 1 .9
20. 6

2 ,1 0 1 . 1
328. 9

1 ,4 2 0 . 6
21 5 . 1

2, 0 4 3 . 7
3 1 1 .8

486. 5
137. 7

1 ,7 3 3 .5
499. 3

56. 2
861. 1
9 1 0 .4

(3)
1 .3
12. 0

1 .3
4. 2
5 5 .7

.3
5. 8
268. 7

. 1
55. 5
1 9 4 .0

9. 8
3 7. 5
2 0 6 .4

.9
124. 1
70. 8

20. 9
8 6 .4
9 4 .9

2 2 .9
546. 3
8 .0

F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s ta t e -------S e r v i c e s -------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t7 ------------------------------------------------ 1

1 T h e t o ta ls in th is ta b le d i f f e r f r o m t h o s e in p r e c e d i n g ta b le s a s t h e s e r e l a t e to s to p p a g e s e n d in g d u r in g th e y e a r , a n d th u s m a y in c lu d e i d le n e s s
o c c u r r in g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 S to p p a g e s e x te n d in g in to 2 o r m o r e i n d u s t r i e s o r in d u s t r y g r o u p s h a v e b e e n c o u n te d in e a c h i n d u s t r y o r in d u s t r y g ro u p ; w o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d
m a n -d a y s id le w e r e a ll o c a te d to th e r e s p e c ti v e i n d u s t r i e s .
3 F e w e r th a n 100.
4 In c lu d e s o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c ts m a d e f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s .
5 E x c lu d e s o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t.
6 In c lu d e s p r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n t if ic , a n d c o n tr o llin g i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .
7 T he s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a ll w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o rk s to p p a g e . T h is d o e s
not c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m i n a ti o n th a t a w o r k s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
N O T E : B e c a u s e of r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




53

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

Table A-22. Work stoppages by duration and major issue,

1971
N u m b e r of s to p p a g e s

M a jo r i s s u e

T o ta l

1
day

2-3
days

4-6
days

7-14
days

15-29
days

30-59
days

60-89
days

90 d a y s
and o v e r

A ll s to p p a g e s ■ - .........— --------------- ----------

5, 152

673

688

642

886

788

735

365

375

W age a d j u s t m e n t s ---------------------------------------------H o u r s of w o r k ----------------------------------------------------O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s --------------------------------U n io n o r g a n i z a ti o n a n d s e c u r i ty ------------------------J o b s e c u r i t y -------------------------------------------------------P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n -------- -------------------------------O th e r w o r k in g c o n d it i o n s -----------------------------------I n te r u n io n o r in tr a u n io n m a t t e r s ----------------------N o t r e p o r t e d --------------------------------------------------------

2, 596
40
162
6
112
505
205
904
155
414
53

80
3
34
2
9
25
61
321
58
73
7

166
5
37

223
2
31
3
14
44
32
179
25
84
5

477
8
34

572
6
9

569
8
7
1
16
77
10
16
5
21
5

262
7
6
11
54
6
8
2
6
3

247
1
4
_
7
92
7
8
2
4
3

-

17
47
34
241
30
100
11

-

-

25
90
33
94
21
91
13

13
76
22
37
12
35
6

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d (in th o u sa n d s )
A ll s t o p p a g e s -------------------------------------------

3, 28 7 . 1

G e n e r a l w a g e c h a n g e s -------------------------------------S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e f i t s -------------------------------------W a g e a d j u s t m e n t s ---------------------------------------------H o u r s of w o r k ----------------------------------------------------O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s --------------------------------U nion o r g a n i z a ti o n a n d s e c u r i t y ----------------------J o b s e c u r i t y -------------------------------------------------------P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ----------------------------------------O th e r w o r k in g c o n d it i o n s -----------------------------------I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n m a t t e r s ----------------------N o t r e p o r t e d --------------------------------------------------------

2, 142. 6
77. 3
9 5 .5
1. 6
57. 1
171. 1
102. 1
522. 9
40. 8
71. 7
4. 4

185. 3

768. 7

19.
.
9.
.
3.
1.
16.
106.
13.
13.
.

598. 0
.4
19. 8

5
1
7
1
3
4
3
8
8
5
8

25 1 . 8

-

614. 0

397. 0

176. 6

152. 8

106. 2
1. 3
33. 5
1. 5
5 .9
3. 5
8. 4
72. 5
6. 0
12. 9
.3

10. 6
7. 5
13. 3
87. 5
4. 9
25. 6
1 .2

740. 8
565. 1
. 8
24. 7

278. 5
3. 7
1. 2

301. 9
55. 7
2. 5
( 2)
3. 2
9 .0
4. 0
15. 4
4. 1
.7
.4

142. 3
15. 3
2. 2
2. 7
3 .9
2. 5
7. 4
( 2)
.2
0

131. 1
0
1. 9
9. 7
6. 5
1. 6
.6
( 2)
1. 2
. 1

-

-

11.
9.
11.
95.
6.
15.
1.

6
1
5
4
3
1
3

10. 0
130. 3
44. 5
137. 3
5. 7
2 .5
. 3

-

M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g y e a r ( in th o u sa n d s )
A ll s t o p p a g e s -------------------------------------------

62, 2 6 6 .4

185. 3

1, 373. 6

895. 1

4, 09 9 . 2

7, 191. 8

1 1 ,1 4 3 .9

7, 58 2 . 4

2 9 r 795. 1

G e n e r a l w a g e c h a n g e s —--------------------------------------

33, 23 0 . 7
2, 7 9 9 .6
669. 3
4. 3
18, 51 3 . 9
2, 90 4 . 3
98 5 . 9
2, 4 8 8 . 6
270. 4
352. 5
47. 0

1 9 .5
. 1
9. 7
. 1
3. 3
1 .4
16. 3
106. 8
13. 8
13. 5
. 8

1, 0 2 2 . 8
.7
49. 4

371. 5
6 .4
149. 3
3. 2
23. 5
11. 4
2 6. 7
25 1 . 6
17. 3
33. 4
. 8

3, 26 8 . 8
6. 7
102. 2

3, 837. 6
57. 1
17. 6
139. 6
1, 664. 3
41 7 . 9
9 7 5 .4
50. 8
28. 0
3. 5

8, 423. 2
1, 880. 3
46. 7
1. 0
105. 1
20 7 . 1
125. 5
188. 0
134. 5
18. 0
14. 4

5, 770. 8
8 4 6 .0
122. 5
_
120. 3
20 2 . 2
138. 2
370. 0
1 .9
7. 3
3. 2

10, 516. 4
2. 2
171. 9
_
18, 05 1 . 9
734. 2
158. 3
44. 8
5. 1
97. 5
12. 7

W age a d ju s t m e n t s -----------------------------------------------H o u r s of w o r k ----------------------------------------------------O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s --------------------------------U nion o r g a n i z a ti o n a n d s e c u r i t y ----------------------J o b s e c u r i t y ----------------------------------------------------O th e r w o rk in g c o n d i t i o n s ------------------------------I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n m a t t e r s ----------------------N o t r e p o r t e d --------------------------------------------------------

-

16. 1
14. 7
31. 4
174. 8
1 1 .5
4 9 .9
2. 3

-

54. 2
6 8 .9
71. 6
377. 2
35. 4
104. 9
9 .2

1
T o ta ls in t h is ta b le d i f f e r f r o m th o s e in p r e c e d i n g t a b l e s b e c a u s e t h e s e s to p p a g e s e n d e d d u r in g 1971, a n d th u s in c lu d e i d le n e s s o c c u r r in g in
p rio r y e a rs .
* F e w e r th a n 100.
NOTE:

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




54

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

Table A-23. Work stoppages by duration and contract status/ 1971
W o r k e r s in v o lv e d

S to p p a g e s
D u r a tio n a n d c o n t r a c t s ta tu s
N um ber

P e rce n t

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

M a n -d a y id le

P e rce n t

100. 0

3, 287. 1

673
688
642
886
788
735
365
375

13. 1
13. 4
12. 5
1 7 .2
15. 3
14. 2
7. 1
7. 3

185. 3
768. 7
251. 8
740. 8
6 1 4 .0
397. 0
176. 6
152. 8

5.
23.
7.
2 2.
18.
12.
5.
4.

6
4
7
5
7
1
4
6

1 d a y ------------------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------15 to 29 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------30 to 59 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s -------------------------------------- ---------------90 d a y s an d o v e r -----------------------------------------------

682
24
62
63
133
106
105
67
122

13.
.
1.
1.
2.
2.
2.
1.
2.

2
5
2
2
6
1
0
3
4

72. 6
3. 1
10. 6
8. 6
17. 1
11. 3
6 .4
5. 3
10. 0

2.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

2
1
3
3
5
3
2
2
3

R e n e g o tia tio n of a g r e e m e n t ( e x p i r a t i o n o r
r e o p e n i n g ) ------------------------------------------------------------1 d a y ------------------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------15 to 29 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------30 to 59 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------90 d a y s and o v e r -----------------------------------------------

2, 628
84
169
215
483
575
582
280
240

51.
1.
3.
4.
9.
11.
11.
5.
4.

0
6
3
2
4
2
3
4
7

2, 540.
20.
608.
108.
577.
539.
382.
163.
141.

7
0
0
3
3
3
5
4
9

1, 693
532
425
341
244
90
39
13
9

32.
10.
8.
6.
4.
1.
.
.
.

9
3
2
6
7
7
8
3
2

657.
158.
147.
132.
142.
61.
7.
7.
.

A ll s to p p a g e s -----------------------------------------------1 d a y -----------------------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 d a y s ------------------------------------------------------------15 to 29 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------------30 to 59 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------90 d a y s a n d o v e r ----------------------------------------------------

5. 152

100. 0

N um ber
(in
th o u sa n d s )
62, 26 6 . 4

P e rce n t

100. 0

185.
373.
895.
099.
191.
143.
582.
795.

3
6
1
2
8
9
4
1

1, 883.
3.
26.
35.
129.
167.
180.
283.
1, 058.

7
1
0
1
0
9
3
6
6

3. 0

77. 3
. 6
18. 5
3. 3
17. 6
16. 4
11. 6
5 .0
4. 3

57, 487. 0
20. 0
1, 034. 4
377. 4
3, 330. 6
6, 413. 5
10, 745. 3
6 , 9 1 1 .9
28, 653. 9

92. 3
(2)
1. 7
.6
5. 3
10. 3
17. 3
11. 1
46. 0

1
1
4
4
3
6
1
3
8

20. 0
4. 8
4. 5
4. 0
4. 3
1. 9
.2
.2
( 2)

2, 760. 0
158. 1
307. 6
474. 3
615. 0
581. 7
195. 8
3 6 0 .0
67. 5

4. 4
.3
.5
. 8
1. 0
.9
. 3
. 6
. 1

8. 8
2. 7
1 .2
1. 5
2. 7
.3
.4

. 3
. 1

1,
4,
7,
11,
7,
29,

.
2.
1.
6.
11.
17.
12.
47.

3
2
4
6
6
9
2
8

N e g o tia tio n of f i r s t a g r e e m e n t o r u n io n

D u rin g t e r m of a g r e e m e n t ( n e g o tia tio n of
n ew a g r e e m e n t n o t i n v o l v e d ) ------------------------------1 d a y ------------------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s — .....- ■ ----------------- --------------—----...—
...... ■ ■
■
■ — -----------------------■ ■
■
7 to 14 d a y s
15 to 29 d a y s ---------— ----------- ■
■ -------------—
30 to 59 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------90 d a y s a n d o v e r ----------------------------------------------No c o n tr a c t o r o t h e r c o n tr a c t s t a t u s -------------------1 d a y -----------------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------30 to 59 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s ------ -------- ----------------------------------90 d a y s and o v e r -------------------------- ;-------------------1 d a y ------------------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------15 to 29 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------90 d a y s a n d o v e r -----------------------------------------------

80
24
19
15
12
9
1

1. 6
.5
.4
. 3
.2
.2
(2)
-

-

Q
C)

. i
0
(2)

-

-

5
7
4
0
5
6
3

1.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

69
9
13
8
14
8
8
5
4

3
2
3
2
3
2
2
1
1

8. 0
1. 4
1 .5
1 .0
1 .4
1. 5
.5
.6
. 1

.2
0
)
0
o

0

0

0
(2)

N O T E : B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

55

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

100.
1.
3.
2.
10.
24.
17.
26.
15.

.
.
.
.
.
1.

1
2
3
3
4
7

. 1

0
0
0
0
0
( 2)
-

-

-

1 S e e fo o tn o te 1, t a b le A -2 2 .
2 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .




35.
2.
2.
6.
14.
4.
5.

0
(2)

2
4
1
3
1
1
2
9
1

.2

0
0
0
o
0
o
()
(2)

Table A-24. Mediation o f work stoppages by contract status, 1971
S to p p a g e s

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d

M e d ia tio n a g e n c y a n d c o n tr a c t s ta tu s
N um ber

P ercen t

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

M a n -d a y s id le
N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

P e rce n t

5, 152

1 0 0 .0

3, 28 7 . 1

100. 0

2, 382
1, 781
313
209
79
74
2, 623
73

46,
34.
6.
4.
1.
1.
50.
1.

2
6
1
1
5
4
9
4

2, 47 8 . 6
1, 7 6 9 .5
119. 5
538. 3
51. 3
7. 1
782. 7
18. 7

75.
53.
3.
16.
1.
.
23.
.

682
291
191
61
18
21
19
359
13

13. 2
5 .6
3. 7
1. 2
.3
.4
.4
7. 0
.3

72. 6
36. 8
22. 6
8. 5
1 .9
3. 8
1 .2
32. 7
1. 8

2, 628
1, 960
1, 528
221
179
32
22
619
27

5 1 .0
38. 0
29. 6
4. 3
3. 5
.6
.4
12. 0
.5

2, 5 4 0 . 7
2, 26 2 . 5
1, 64 8 . 4
49. 5
5 3 2 .0
32. 6
1. 7
26 8 . 9
7. 5

No i n f o r m a t i o n ---------------------------------------------

1, 693
111
52
29
10
21
26
1, 533
22

32. 9
2. 2
1 .0
.6
.2
.4
.5
29. 8
.4

657. 1
1 7 6 .0
9 6 .0
61. 2
4. 3
14. 6
4. 0
46 8 . 8
8. 2

G o v e r n m e n t m e d i a t i o n -------------------------------F e d e r a l m e d i a t i o n ----------------------------------S ta te m e d i a t i o n ............. - - -------------------F e d e r a l an d S ta te m e d ia tio n c o m b in e d —
O th e r m e d i a t i o n -------------------------------------P r i v a t e m e d i a t i o n ---------------------------------------No m e d ia tio n r e p o r t e d -------------------------------No in f o r m a tio n ---------------------------------------------

80
11
2
2
2
5
6
61
2

1. 6
.2
0
(!)
(3)
. 1
. 1
1. 2
(3)

8. 8
.6
(4)
.3
(4)
.2
. 1
8. 0
(4)

69
8
8

1. 3
.2
.2

8. 0
2 .5
2 .5

-

-

-

(3)

<4)

100. 0

( 3)

4. 4
1. 1

62, 266. 4

-

1. 0
.2

P e rce n t

( 3)

G o v e r n m e n t m e d ia tio n 2 ----------------------------------F e d e r a l m e d ia tio n ■ ■ - .......... -■ ■ ........ ■
F e d e r a l a n d S ta te m e d ia tio n c o m b i n e d -----O th e r m e d ia tio n ------------------------— ....... No i n f o r m a tio n —

--------------------------

N e g o tia tio n of f i r s t a g r e e m e n t -----------------------G o v e r n m e n t m e d i a t i o n -------------------------------S ta te m e d ia tio n -------------------------------------F e d e r a l a n d S ta te m e d ia tio n c o m b in e d —
O th e r m e d i a t i o n -------------------------------------P r i v a t e m e d i a t i o n ---------------------------------------No m e d ia tio n r e p o r t e d -------------------------------N o i n f o r m a tio n ■ — ---------------■
---------R e n e g o tia tio n of a g r e e m e n t ( e x p i r a t i o n
o r re o p e n in g ) - ...... . - ---------------- ■ ----------—
F e d e r a l m e d i a t i o n ----------------------------------F e d e r a l a n d S ta te m e d ia tio n c o m b in e d —
O th e r m e d i a t i o n -------------------------------------P r i v a t e m e d i a t i o n --------------------------------------No i n f o r m a tio n ■ ------- ---- -..... .

—

------------

4
8
6
4
6
2
8
6

36,
28,
1,
6,

630.
745.
128.
442.
313.
45.
25, 189.
40 1 .

2
4
9
8
1
4
5
2

58. 8
46. 2
1. 8
10. 3
.5
. 1
40. 5
.6

1, 883. 7
1, 113. 9
92 7 . 4
90. 4
49. 0
47. 1
14. 3
613. 7
1 4 1 .9

3. 0
1. 8
1 .5
. 1
. 1
. 1
(3)
1. 0
.2

3
4
8
5
1
0
1
2
2

57, 4 8 7 .0
34, 2 9 5 . 4
27, 22 5 . 9
582. 4
6, 25 8 . 6
22 8 . 5
15. 4
22, 950. 5
225. 6

92. 3
54. 8
43. 5
.9
10. 0
.4
( 3)
3 6 .9
.4

20. 0
5. 4
2 .9
1. 9
. 1
.4
. 1
14. 3
.3

2, 760. 0
1, 174. 5
548. 9
454. 5
135. 1
36. 4
14. 5
1, 548. 9
21. 7

4. 4
1. 9
.9
.7
.2
. 1
(3)
2. 5
(3)

. 3

35. 5
3. 0
.2
1. 6
. 1
1. 1
.4
3 2 .0
(4)

2. 2
1. 1
. 7
.3
. 1
. 1
( 3)
1 .0
. 1
77.
68.
49.
1.
16.
1.
.
8.
.

D u rin g t e r m of a g r e e m e n t ( n e g o tia tio n
G o v e r n m e n t m e d ia tio n -------------------------------F e d e r a l m e d ia tio n --------------------------------S ta te m e d ia tio n ----------------------- ——-----—
F e d e r a l a n d S ta te m e d ia tio n c o m b in e d —
O th e r m e d i a t i o n ------------------------------------P r i v a t e m e d ia tio n ■■ —■—.... —■■
■
■—
... -------

F e d e r a l m e d ia tio n --------------------------------S ta te m e d i a t i o n ----------------.... — ... ...
F e d e r a l a n d S ta te m e d ia tio n c o m b in e d —
O th e r m e d i a t i o n -----------------------------------------P r i v a t e m e d ia tio n ------------------------------------------No m e d ia tio n r e p o r t e d ----------------------------------N o in f o r m a tio n ------------------------------------------------1
2
3
4

_
1

51
9

Q

( )
(!)
(!)
0
(3)
.2
(3)
. 2

. 1
. 1

. 1

S ee f o o tn o te 1, t a b le A -2 2 .
I n c lu d e s s to p p a g e s in v o lv in g w o r k e r s in w h ic h p r iv a t e m e d ia tio n a ls o w a s e m p lo y e d .
L e s s th a n 0 . 05 p e r c e n t .
F e w e r th a n 100.

NOTE:

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




56

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

1 0 0 .2
4 3. 0
4 3 .0
. 8
4 4 .4

11. 9

. 1

Q
(!)
o
()
)
(3)

. i
( 3)

.2
. 1
. 1
-

(3)
. 1

( 3)

Table A-25. Settlement of work stoppages by contract status,1 1971
S to p p a g e s
N um ber

-------- - —
A ll s t o p p a g e s ---- ------ ——

...............

F o r m a l s e tt le m e n t r e a c h e d , a ll i s s u e s r e s o lv e d ,
p r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g u n r e s o l v e d i s s u e s ----------No f o r m a l s e tt le m e n t, s h o r t p r o t e s t o r s y m p a ­
th y s t r i k e --------------------------------------------------------------S tr ik e b r o k e n -----------------------------------------------------------W o rk r e s u m e d u n d e r c o u r t i n j u n c t i o n ------------------E m p lo y e r o u t of b u s i n e s s --------------------------------------O th e r -----------------------------------------------------------------------No i n f o r m a t i o n --------------------------------------------------------N e g o tia tio n of f i r s t a g r e e m e n t o r u n io n
r e c o g n i t i o n ------------------------------------------------------------F o r m a l s e tt le m e n t r e a c h e d , a ll i s s u e s r e s o lv e d ,
p r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g u n r e s o l v e d i s s u e s -----No f o r m a l s e tt le m e n t, s h o r t p r o t e s t o r
s y m p a th y s t r i k e -----------------------------------------------S tr ik e b r o k e n -----------------------------------------------------W o rk r e s u m e d u n d e r c o u r t i n j u n c t i o n -------------E m p lo y e r o u t of b u s i n e s s ---------------------------------O t h e r -------------------------------------------------------------------No i n f o r m a t i o n ---------------------------------------------------R e n e g o tia tio n o f a g r e e m e n t ( e x p ir a tio n o r
r e o p e n in g ) --------------------------------------------------------------F o r m a l s e tt le m e n t r e a c h e d , a ll i s s u e s r e s o lv e d ,
p r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g u n r e s o l v e d i s s u e s -----No f o r m a l s e tt le m e n t, s h o r t p r o t e s t o r
s y m p a th y s t r i k e -----------------------------------------------S t r ik e b r o k e n -----------------------------------------------------W o rk r e s u m e d u n d e r c o u r t i n j u n c t i o n -------------E m p lo y e r o u t of b u s i n e s s ---------------------------------O t h e r -------------------------------------------------------------------No i n f o r m a t io n ----------------------------------------------------D u rin g t e r m of a g r e e m e n t ( n e g o tia tio n of new
a g r e e m e n t n o t in v o lv e d ) ----------------------------------------F o r m a l s e tt le m e n t r e a c h e d , a ll i s s u e s r e s o lv e d ,
p r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g u n r e s o l v e d i s s u e s -----No f o r m a l s e tt le m e n t, s h o r t p r o t e s t o r
s y m p a th y s t r i k e -----------------------------------------------S tr ik e b r o k e n -------------------------------------------------------W o rk r e s u m e d u n d e r c o u r t i n j u n c t i o n -------------E m p lo y e r o u t of b u s i n e s s ---------------------------------O t h e r -------------------------------------------------------------------No i n f o r m a t io n ----------------------------------------------------No c o n tr a c t o r o t h e r c o n tr a c t s t a t u s ---------------------F o r m a l s e tt le m e n t r e a c h e d , a ll i s s u e s r e s o lv e d ,
p r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g u n r e s o l v e d i s s u e s -----No f o r m a l s e tt le m e n t, s h o r t p r o t e s t o r
s y m p a th y s t r i k e ------------- ----------------------------------S tr ik e b r o k e n -------------------------------------------------------W o rk r e s u m e d u n d e r c o u r t i n j u n c t i o n -------------E m p lo y e r o u t of b u s i n e s s ---------------------------------O t h e r -------------------------------------------------------------------No i n f o r m a t io n ----------------------------------------------------No in f o r m a tio n on c o n tr a c t s t a t u s --------------------------F o r m a l s e tt le m e n t r e a c h e d , a ll i s s u e s r e s o lv e d ,
p r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g u n r e s o l v e d i s s u e s -----No f o r m a l s e tt le m e n t, s h o r t p r o t e s t o r
s y m p a th y s t r i k e -----------------------------------------------S tr ik e b r o k e n -------------------------------------------------------W o rk r e s u m e d u n d e r c o u r t i n j u n c t i o n --------------E m p lo y e r o u t of b u s i n e s s -----------------------------------O t h e r -------------------------------------------------------------------No i n f o r m a t io n -----------------------------------------------------

M a n -d a y s id le

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d

C o n t r a c t s ta t u s a n d s e tt le m e n t
P e rce n t

N um ber
(in
th o u sa n d s )

P e rce n t

100. 0

3, 287. 1

100. 0

62, 266. 4

100. 0

4, 193

70. 6

56, 75 6 . 2

91. 2

593.
827.
3084.
131.
760.
112.

1.
1.
5.
.
1.
.

81. 4

2, 320. 2

465
236
118
51
83
6

9.
4.
2.
1.
1.
.

251.
22.
669.
4.
17.
1.

682

0
6
3
0
6
1

7
0
3
4
6
9

7.
.
20.
.
.
.

7
7
4
1
5
1

8
1
6
8
5
4

0
3
0
2
2
2

13. 2

72. 6

2. 2

1, 883. 7

3. 0

485

9. 4

53. 4

1. 6

1, 324. 5

2. 1

14
122
25
16
19
1

. 3
2. 4
.5
. 3
.4
( 2)

3. 0
6. 5
7. 2
1. 3
1. 1
( 3)

. 1
.2
.2
(2)
0
(2)

26.
385.
52.
41.
51.
2.

5
9
2
2
2
2

(1
2)
.6
. 1
. 1
. 1
(2)

2, 628

51. 0

2, 54 0 . 7

77. 3

57, 487. 0

92. 3

2, 407

46. 7

1, 873. 1

57. 0

53, 309. 6

85. 6

.
1.
.
.
1.
.

21.
7.
617.
2.
16.
1.

57.
383.
2, 829.
88.
708.
110.

.
.
4.
.
1.
.

20
74
30
30
63
4

4
4
6
6
2
1

1
8
8
6
4
8

.
.
18.
.
.
.

6
2
8
1
5
1

8
1
3
8
3
1

1
6
5
1
1
2

1, 693

32. 9

657. 1

20. 0

2, 760. 0

4. 4

1, 185

23. 0

380. 4

11. 6

2, 00 2 . 4

3. 2

412
29
60
5
1
1

8 .0
.6
1. 2
. 1
( 2)
( 2)

3
5
1
5
1
1

6. 9
.2
1. 3
(2)
(2)
(2)

501.
50.
202.
1.
.
.

4
5
9
8
9
1

. 8
. 1
. 3
(2)
(2)
(2)

80

1. 6

8. 8

. 3

35. 5

. 1
(2)
(2)
( 2)
( 2)
-

225.
6.
44.
.
.
.

52

1. 0

6. 0

.2

25. 0

18
7
3
-

. 3
. 1
. 1
-

2. 2
.5
. 1
-

. 1
(2)
( 2)
-

7. 9
2. 3
.3
~

69

1. 3

8. 0

.2

100. 2

.2

64

1. 2

7. 2

.2

94. 7

.2

1
4
“

( 2)
. 1
-

( 3)
.7
“

-

"

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o ta l s .




P e rce n t

5, 152

Q

( 2)
“

1 S e e fo o tn o te 1, ta b l e A - 2 2 .
2 L e s s th a n 0. 05 p e r c e n t .
3 F e w e r th a n 100.
NOTE:

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

57

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

( 3)
5. 4
-

-

0
( 2)
“

Table A-26. Settlement of work stoppages by major issue, 1971
( W o r k e r s a nd m a n -d a y s in th o u sa n d s^
S e ttle m e n t
M a jo r i s s u e

F o rm a l s e ttle ­
m ent reach ed
P ro ced u re
A ll i s s u e s
f o r h a n d lin g
re s o lv e d
u n r e s o lv e d
issu e s

T o ta l

No f o r m a l
s e tt le m e n t r e a c h e d
S h o rt p r o ­
te s t or
S tr ik e
s y m p a th y
b ro k en
s trik e

W o rk r e ­
su m ed u n d er
c o u rt
in ju n c tio n

E m p lo y e r
ou t of
b u s in e s s

No i n f o r ­
m a tio n

O th e r

N u m b e r of w o r k s to p p a g e s 1
A ll s t o p p a g e s ---------------------

5, 152

3, 408

785

465

236

118

51

6

83

G e n e r a l w a g e c h a n g e s ---------------S u p p le m e n ta l b e n e f i ts , no
g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e --------- ~
W age a d j u s t m e n t s ----H o u r s of w o r k ----------- O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s --------U nion o r g a n i z a ti o n a nd
----" ~ ---s e c u r i t y ----— — Job s e c u r i t y ------P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n -----------------O th e r w o r k in g c o n d itio n s ----------I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n
m a tte rs —
------"
---N ot r e p o r t e d --------------- - ------

2, 596

2, 237

108

22

85

40

32

3

69

40
162
6
112

32
104
2
81

1
30
1
12

3
16
2
6

2
5

1
2

-

-

6

1
5
1
3

3

1

_

505
205
904
155

297
122
376
60

63
38
204
32

12
31
266
46

102
2
19
9

10
11
36
5

8

1

-

-

3
2

_
-

12
1
_
1

414
53

47
50

295
1

61
-

4
2

6
-

_

1
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s in v o lv e d 1
A ll s to p p a g e s —

— —

G e n e ra l w age ch an g es —
S u p p le m e n ta l b e n e f i ts , no
g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e -------W age a d j u s t m e n t s ----------------------H o u r s of w o r k ------ ------ - O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s --------U nion o r g a n i z a ti o n and
s e c u rity
— Job s e c u r i t y — - ------------ —
P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t io n — O th e r w o rk in g c o n d itio n s —
I n te r u n io n o r i n tr a u n io n
m a tte rs
— —
— —
- N ot r e p o r t e d -------------- — --------

3, 287. 1

2, 095. 1

225. 1

251. 7

22. 0

669. 3

4. 4

1. 9

17. 6

2, 1 4 2 .6

1, 508. 4

31. 5

4. 7

6. 6

570. 7

2. 7

1. 7

16. 2

(2)
1. 2

7
2
1
6

(2)
.2

-

-

.5

(2)

_

7
0
2
0

.3
.5
(2)

(2)
_
_
-

. 9
.4
_
. 1

77.
95.
1.
57.

3
5
6
1

171.
102.
522.
40.

1
1
9
8

71. 7
4. 4

25. 0
61. 2
(2)
31. 3
155.
45.
237.
14.

7
8
3
8

11. 1
4. 3

.
5.
.
17.

5.
41.
85.
6.

24. 7
(2)

2. 5

8
2
1
7

5. 7
(2)
2. 2
. 9

1.
6.
32.
2.

31. 9
-

9
6
6
2

51.
3.
.
.

.
8.
165.
16.

(2)
23. 9
1. 1
4. 5

4
8
3
7

2. 8
(2)

-

1. 1

-

_

. 1
-

-

_

N u m b e r of m a n - d a y s of i d l e n e s s 1
62. 26 6 . 4

A ll s t o p p a g e s ----- ~
G e n e ra l w age c h a n g es —
S u p p le m e n ta l b e n e f i ts , no
g e n e ra l w age in c re a s e —
W age a d j u s t m e n t s ----------------------H o u r s of w o r k —
— —
O th e r c o n tr a c tu a l m a t t e r s ---------U nion o r g a n i z a ti o n a nd
security

---------- —

-----

Jo b s e c u r i t y “ ------- — ---------- "
P l a n t a d m i n i s t r a t io n O th e r w o rk in g c o n d itio n s ----------I n te r u n io n o r in tr a u n io n
m a t t e r s — ---— -----N ot r e p o r t e d — — "

5 5 .1 2 5 .3

1. 630. 9

593. 8

82 7. 1

3. 084. 6

33, 230. 7

30, 116. 8

653. 9

19. 0

408. 8

1, 108. 5

2, 799.
66 9 .
4.
18, 513.

1, 045.
511.
1.
18, 408.

1
5
0
6

.
72.
2.
25.

2
8
2
6

1.
8.
.
41.

8
5
6
5

2, 9 0 4 .3
985. 9
2, 488. 6
270. 4

2, 462. 7
590. 8
1, 6 4 2 .4
185. 2

91.
341.
309.
16.

2
3
3
7

5.
17.
357.
35.

3
7
8
4

352. 5
47. 0

115. 2
46. 0

6
3
3
9

116. 7
1. 0

106. 4
-

2. 3
61. 9
32. 8
263.
3.
32.
16.

1
1
4
4

6. 4
(2)

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,




s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

58

760. 5

109. 6

715. 1

_
.5

_

2. 2
_

42. 4
2. 0

1, 750.
13.
.
2.

1
5
5
9

. 1
1. 1
_
2. 1

17.
30.
137.
15.

9
9
0
6

19. 6
_
9. 7
.2

7. 7
-

1 S ee fo o tn o te 1, t a b le A -2 2 .
2 L e s s th a n 100.
NOTE:

112. 4

99. 0

m , 8 _ ,,

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

_
-

-

_
_

. 1
-

_
_

_

.9

_
-

Table A-27. Settlement of work stoppages by industry group, 19711
( W o r k e r s a nd m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

F o r m a l s e tt le m en t reach ed
P ro ced u re
A ll i s s u e s
f o r h a n d lin g
u n r e so lv e d
r e s o lv e d
iss u e s

T o ta l

No to r m a l
s e tt le m e n t r e a c h e d
S h o rt p r o ­
te st or
S tr ik e
s y m p a th y
b ro k en
s trik e

W o rk r e su m ed u n d e r
c o u rt
in ju n c tio n

E m p lo y e r
o u t of
b u s in e s s

No i n f o r ­
m a tio n

O th e r

N u m b e r of w o r k s to p p a g e s
A ll i n d u s t r i e s --------------------. . .

25, 167

3, 408

785

465

236

118

51

z2, 397

1. 947

O rd n a n c e a nd a c c e s s o r i e s --------F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s --------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s — ---------

5
209
4
35

5
174
3
34

181
_
16
-

99
_
9
-

26
_
4

-

59
_
5
“

29
_
1
-

5
7

«

,

i. ^

7
,

6

83
53
_
1

"

_

-

2

-

5

-

.
"

2

3
2
2

*
2

79

L u m b e r a nd w ood p r o d u c ts ,
e x c e p t f u r n i tu r e " — — ~ ----

67
75
101

52
61
82

3

2

6

3

79
136

56
113

8
12

1

14

13

“

92
18
147
229
347
333

71
14
114
191
283
2 80

10
2
16
17
27
16

178
175
28

143
139
22

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a nd
C h e m ic a ls and a ll i e d p r o d u c t s —
P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a n d r e l a te d

11
7

3
"

”

1

2

”

~

“

~

“

1
4
5
1
1

~
1
1
3
4
4

~
~

7
8

5
6
6
11
13

1
1

2
1
4
3
13
10

18
17
1

10
-

5
2

-

2
2
2

-

3
2
1

3

30

R u b b e r and m is c e ll a n e o u s
L e a th e r a nd l e a t h e r p r o d u c ts ---S tone, c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c ts —
F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 -------M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ---E l e c t r ic a l m a c h in e r y ,
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ----------I n s tr u m e n ts , e tc . ------------------ M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g

3
2

2

46
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

----

— —

41

z2, 770

1, 476

604

406

137

92

22

A g ric u ltu re , f o re s tr y , and
f i s h e r i e s ---------------- “ —
M ining ---------------- --------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n -------—
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
e le c t r i c , g a s , a nd s a n it a r y
— -----s e r v i c e s ~ — -------W h o le s a le and r e t a i l t r a d e ---------

7
657
754

146
3 80

166
306

323
20

3
5
23

14
17

2
3

316
505

.221
390

32
33

15
10

20
50

12
4

9
3

2

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and
r e a l e s ta t e ------------ —
~ ---S e r v ic e s ------------------ —
G o v e r n m e n t6---------------------------------

23
176
332

19
133
183

2
13
52

22
13

1

44

5
-

_

38

-

2

3. 287. l '

2, 095. 1

225. 1

251. 7

22. 0

669. 3

4. 4

1. 9

17. 6

870. 8

700. 0

2.
85.
9.
5.

2.
50.
9.
5.

77. 4
_
3. 5

49. 7
_
29. 8

9. 6
_
.9
~

22. 6
_
1. 2

2. 6
_

1. 3
_

7. 7
_

(7)
"

"

.2

10. 6

"

“

"
_

"
5
7
13

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s in v o lv e d
A ll i n d u s t r ie s ------------- ---M a n u fa c tu r in g -------- ------ ~
O rd n a n c e and a c c e s s o r i e s --------F o o d a nd k in d r e d p r o d u c t s --------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s -------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts ~ -----A p p a r e l, e tc .3 — ----------------- —
L u m b e r a nd w ood p r o d u c ts ,
e x c e p t f u r n i tu r e —
— ---- F u r n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s ---------------P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s ----------P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , a nd
a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s —
P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d
i n d u s t r ie s — ------- — -----R u b b e r a nd m is c e ll a n e o u s
p l a s t i c s p r o d u c ts — — —
L e a th e r a nd l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ---S tone, c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s —
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r ie s
F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 -------M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ---E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y ,
e q u ip m e n t, a n d s u p p l i e s ----------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ----------I n s t r u m e n t s , e tc . — —
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g
in d u s trie s —
-

7
6
1
3

7
2
0
2

"

\

2. 0

. 8

7. 9
11. 1
35. 4

6. 8
9. 5
31. 6

.3
.2
1. 5

( 7)
. 1
•9

.2
1. 1
( 7)

1. 2

. 1
_
( 7)

28. 9
25. 6

25. 0
22. 7

1. 7
1. 7

. 8

.5
.3

.6
"

"

7. 9

7. 7

-

. 1

-

-

-

-

.2
2. 3
2. 4
.6
.5

.2
( 7)

“

. 1
. 7

( 7)
1. 1

(7)
.2
.2
.5
2. 1
1. 2

_

. 8
.2
(7)

2
4
0
9
5
1

3. 6
. 6
1 .4
5. 7
8. 2
4. 2

2. 1
1. 8

2. 4
.5

2. 0
1. 4

. 8
1. 0

116. 1
120. 3
9. 3

84. 3
95. 8
8. 8

24. 8
17. 8
( 7)

2. 5
5. 6

.2
. 8
.4

7. 9

7. 4

29.
7.
31.
91.
94.
123.

5
4
3
6
4
1

21.
6.
25.
80.
80.
113.

.2

l 7\
( )

See f o o tn o te s a t e nd of ta b le .




20. 4

)

6. 1

59

/7\
( )

3. 0

_

.5
~

.3
(7)
.2

-

1. 1

. 1

C)

-

.5
n
(
i A)

-

Table 27. Settlement of work stoppages by industry group, 1971 ‘-Continued
( W o r k e r s a n d m a n - d a y s in th o u s a n d s )
F o rm a l s e ttle m en t rea c h e d
P ro ced u re
A ll i s s u e s
f o r h a n d lin g
re s o lv e d
u n r e s o lv e d
iss u e s

T o ta l

I n d u s tr y g ro u p

No f o r m a l
s e tt le m e n t r e a c h e d
S h o rt p r o ­
te s t or
S trik e
s y m p a th y
b ro k en
s trik e

W o rk r e su m ed u n d er
c o u rt
in ju n c tio n

E m p lo y e r
o u t of
b u s in e s s

No i n f o r ­
m a tio n

O th e r

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s in v o lv e d — C o n tin u e d
2, 41 6 . 3

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a nd
f is h e rie s —
__ _
_
M in in g " -----C o n t r a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
e le c tric , g as, and s a n ita ry
se rv ic e s —
W hole s a le a n d r e t a i l t r a d e --------F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d
r e a l e s t a t e -----S e r v ic e s — — G o v e r n m e n t6 - —

—

1, 395. 1

147. 7

1. 5
383. 2
464. 4

1. 4
159. 5
40 9 . 4

41. 0
32. 6

1, 250. 9
133. 8

581. 9
123. 7

2. 0
26. 5
154. 0

1. 3
23. 7
94. 3

202. 0

12. 5

646. 8

1. 8

. 6

171. 8
7. 2

. 1
.4
6 .4

_
10. 4
5. 4

_
(7)
.2

_
_
_

42. 7
4. 2

8. 6
2. 4

1. 3
1. 6

609. 9
.7

. 8
. 1

.5

5. 8
. 6

.7
.9
25. 6

-

_
12. 1

o
1. 2
1. 5

( 7)
20. 4

. 6
"

_
. 1
-

( 7)
( 7)
.2

-

-

-

-

-

9. 8
_
n

3. 1

N u m b e r of m a n - d a y s of i d le n e s s
A ll i n d u s t r i e s --------------------M a n u fa c tu r in g --------

- —

62. 266. 4

55, 125. 3

1, 630. 9

593. 8

82 7. 1

3, 084. 6

131. 8

112. 4

760. 5

36, 877. 8

35, 254. 6

587. 1

83. 3

45 3 . 9

119. 1

85. 2

73. 5

22 1 . 1

6
9
0
1

17. 1
-

33. 0
-

19. 8
_

4. 7
_

. 3
_

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s --------F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s --------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s ---------------T e x tile m il l p r o d u c ts

41.
809.
342.
75.

-

-

-

-

A p p a r e l, e t c . 3 - - --------L u m b e r a n d w ood p r o d u c t s ,
ex cep t fu rn itu re —
F u r n i t u r e a nd f ix t u r e s
P a p e r a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s ----

245. 4

140. 1

9. 8

2. 5

8. 1

71. 9

1. 2

192. 6
327. 9
1, 030. 3

148. 8
302. 0
994. 3

12. 6
.8
14. 8

.2
1. 2
2. 0

11. 5
22. 9
1. 8

_
_
4. 2

4. 5
_
5. 0

_
_
-

15. 0
1. 0
8. 1

8 1 5 .8
1, 121. 2

757. 6
1, 079. 3

14. 8
21. 0

_
. 8

35. 5
15. 1

1. 3
_

_
_

_
3. 7

6. 6
1. 5

110. 4

110. 3

-

. 1

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
_
_
.5
69. 3

—

P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , and
a ll i e d i n d u s t r i e s ~
- — C h e m ic a ls a n d a ll i e d p r o d u c t s —
P e t r o l e u m r e f in in g a nd r e l a t e d
in d u s trie s ~
R u b b e r a n d m i s c e ll a n e o u s
p la s tic s p ro d u c ts
L e a th e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ---S to n e , c la y , a nd g l a s s p r o d u c t s P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s trie s ~
F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 -------M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ---E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y ,
e q u ip m e n t, a n d s u p p l i e s ----------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t
Instruments, e t c . -----

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g
in d u s trie s
—
-

-

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g —
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a nd
f is h e rie s _
__
_
M in in g
— C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c ti o n
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
e le c tric , g as, and s a n ita ry
s e rv ic e s
W h o le s a le a nd r e t a i l t r a d e --------F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d
r e a l e s ta te
S e r v ic e s —
G o v e r n m e n t6 -- -

467.
119.
757.
2, 225.
2, 045.
3, 385.

6
8
2
5

5
4
8
9
4
6

41.
734.
338.
63.

382.
99.
694.
2, 131.
1, 824.
3, 072.

2
8
1
5
4
7

21.
8.
8.
51.
101.
63.

_
_
-

_
4. 2
12. 4

_

11. 7

1
5
6
8
4
0

8. 7
1. 9
2. 8
5. 3
8. 9

50. 5
27. 8
15. 4
32. 4
111. 8

2. 6
14. 0
6. 4
3. 1
1. 8

_
10. 6
1. 5
2. 3
10. 9
25. 4

9. 0
_
_

15. 6
2. 8
4. 0

_
-

-

1. 0

-

2.
.
9.
15.
67.
32.

4
6
9
6
5
6

1, 671. 3
20, 527. 9
402. 3

1, 5 4 6 .4
20, 264. 6
372. 2

66. 4
172. 1
.5

2. 5
12. 9
_

14. 0
60. 8
25. 5

161. 9

156. 7

2. 7

.5

1. 0

25, 388. 6

19. 870. 7

1. 043. 8

510. 4

373. 2

2, 965. 6

46. 6

4. 2
4, 929. 8
8, 221. 4

3. 4
4, 341. 3
7, 812. 9

9 3. 5
179. 3

435. 9
19. 1

. 8
8. 5
94. 7

_
48. 8
26. 8

_
1. 6
2. 2

8, 822. 1
1 ,5 8 3 .5

4, 903. 5
1, 383. 2

601. 3
29. 8

14. 0
5. 2

99. 8
85. 2

2, 7 3 0 .6
24. 0

37. 9
3. 5

_
38. 8

434. 9
13. 8

56. 2
861. 1
910. 4

43. 0
77 9 . 1
604. 2

9. 7
8. 9
121. 3

_
_
36. 2

.2
71. 0
13. 0

. 1
135. 3

_
1. 4
-

_
. 1
-

3. 3
. 5
. 5

_

_

38. 9
_
_
_

17. 3
14. 7

( 7)
539. 4
_
.2
86. 2

1 T h e t o ta l s in t h is ta b le d i f f e r f r o m th o s e in p r e c e d i n g ta b l e s a s t h e s e r e l a t e to s to p p a g e s e n d in g d u r in g th e y e a r , a n d th u s m a y in c lu d e
i d le n e s s o c c u r r in g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 S to p p a g e s e x te n d in g in to 2 o r m o r e i n d u s t r i e s o r i n d u s t r y g r o u p s h a v e b e e n c o u n te d in e a c h i n d u s t r y o r i n d u s t r y g ro u p ; w o r k e r s in v o lv e d
a n d m a n - d a y s id le w e r e a ll o c a te d to th e r e s p e c ti v e i n d u s t r i e s .
3 I n c lu d e s o t h e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s .
4 E x c lu d e s o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t.
5 I n c lu d e s p r o f e s s io n a l , s c ie n t if ic , a n d c o n tr o llin g i n s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .
6 T h e s it u a ti o n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a l l w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o r k s to p p a g e . T h is
d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a l e g a l d e te r m i n a ti o n t h a t a w o r k s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p l a c e in v io la tio n of a n y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
7 F e w e r th a n 100.
NOTE;

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

60

D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

Table A-28. Procedure for resolving unsettled issues in work stoppages
by contract status,' 1971
W o r k e r s in v o lv e d

S to p p a g e s
P r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g u n s e tt le d
i s s u e s a n d c o n tr a c t s ta t u s

N um ber

P e rce n t

N um ber
(in
th o u s a n d s )

M a n -d a y s id le

P ercen t

N um be r
(in
th o u s a n d s )

P e rce n t

A ll s to p p a g e s 1
2-----------------------------------

550

1 0 0 .0

1 6 5 .6

1 0 0 .0

1, 8 1 7 .9

1 0 0 .0

A r b i t r a t i o n -------------------------------------------------D i r e c t n e g o t i a t i o n s -----------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e rn m e n t a g e n c y ------------O th e r m e a n s ------------------------------------------------

85
126
230
109

15. 5
2 2 .9
4 1 .8
19. 8

7 3. 8
5 8 .4
2 3. 1
10. 3

44. 6
3 5 .3
1 3 .9
6. 2

7 3 1 .3
8 5 8 .6
186. 3
4 1 .6

40. 2
47. 2
10. 3
2 .3

N e g o tia tio n of f i r s t a g r e e m e n t o r u n io n
r e c o g n i ti o n -----------------------------------------------A r b i t r a t i o n --------------------------------------------D i r e c t n e g o t i a t i o n s ----------------------------- —
R e f e r r a l to a g o v e rn m e n t a g e n c y --------O th e r m e a n s -------------------------------------------

47
6
16
25
"

8 .5
1. 1
2 .9
4. 5
"

5 .0
.4
2 .9
1 .8
“

3 .0
.3
1 .7
1. 1
~

130. 6
4 .4
90. 2
36. 0

7 .2
.2
5 .0
2 .0

R e n e g o tia tio n of a g r e e m e n t ( e x p ir a tio n
o r r e o p e n in g ) -------------------------------------------A r b i t r a t i o n -------------------------------------------D i r e c t n e g o t i a t i o n s ------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e rn m e n t a g e n c y -------O th e r m e a n s -----------------------------------------

68
16
36
15
1

1 2 .4
2 .9
6 .5
2. 7
.2

38. 1
7 .6
24. 8
5. 6
(3)

23. 0
4. 6
1 5 .0
3 .4
(4)

1, 0 4 9 .9
3 2 9 .5
6 5 8 .7
6 1 .5
.3

5 7 .7
18. 1
36. 2
3 .4
(4)

D u rin g t e r m of a g r e e m e n t ( n e g o tia tio n of
n ew a g r e e m e n t n o t in v o lv e d ) -----------------A r b i t r a t i o n -------------------------------------------D i r e c t n e g o ti a ti o n s -------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e rn m e n t a g e n c y -------O th e r m e a n s -----------------------------------------

430
62
73
187
108

7 8. 2
1 1 .3
13. 3
3 4 .0
1 9 .6

122. 3
6 5 .7
30. 8
15. 5
10. 3

73. 8
3 9 .7
1 8 .6
9 .4
6. 2

6 3 3 .7
3 9 7 .4
1 0 9 .5
8 5 .4
4 1 .3

3 4 .9
2 1 .9
6. 0
4 .7
2. 3

No c o n tr a c t o r o t h e r c o n tr a c t s t a t u s -------A r b i t r a t i o n --------------------------------------------D i r e c t n e g o ti a ti o n s -------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e rn m e n t a g e n c y -------O th e r m e a n s -----------------------------------------

4
1
1
2
-

.7
.2
.2
.4
"

.2
(3)
(3)
. 1
-

.1
(4)
(4)
.1
-

2. 8
.1
. 1
2. 6

.2
(4)
(4)
. 1
-

No i n f o r m a tio n on c o n tr a c t s t a t u s ------------A r b i t r a t i o n ----------------- —— ■■ — ---------—
■
D i r e c t n e g o ti a ti o n s -------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e rn m e n t a g e n c y -------O th e r m e a n s -----------------------------------------

1
-

.2
-

(3)
-

(4)
-

.8
-

-

-

-

-

(4)
-

1

.2

(3)

(4)

'

'

-

.8
~

(4)
“

1 S e e fo o tn o te 1, ta b le A -22.
2 E x c lu d e s s to p p a g e s o n w h ic h t h e r e w a s no in f o r m a t io n o n u n s e tt le d i s s u e s o r no a g r e e m e n t o n a p r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g
th e se is s u e s .
3 L e s s th a n 100.
4 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .




#

61




I

Appendix B. Scope, Definition, and Methods 1
Work stoppage statistics
It is the purpose of this statistical series to report all
work stoppages in the United States that involve six
workers or more and last the equivalent of a full day or
shift or longer.
Definitions
Strike or lockout. A strike is defined as a temporary
stoppage of work by a group of employees (not neces­
sarily members of a union) to express a grievance or
enforce a demand. A lockout is a temporary with­
holding or denial of employment during a labor dispute
to enforce terms of employment upon a group of em­
ployees. Because of the complexity of most labormanagement disputes, the Bureau makes no attempt to
distinguish between strikes and lockouts in its statistics;
both types are included in the term “work stoppage”
and are used interchangeably.
Workers and idleness. The figures on the number of
“workers involved” and “man-days idle” include all
workers made idle for one shift or longer in establish­
ments directly involved in a stoppage. They do not
account for secondary idleness— that is, the effects of
a stoppage on other establishments or industries whose
employees may be made idle as a result of material or
service shortages.

From 1951 to 1966, the Bureau’s estimates of total
employment in nonagricultural establishments, exclusive
of government, were used as a base. Man-days of idleness
computed on the basis of nonagricultural employment
(exclusive of government) usually differed by less than
one-tenth of a percentage point from that obtained by
the former method, while the percentage of workers
idle (compared with total employment) differs by about
0.5 of a point. For example, the percentage of workers
idle during 1950 computed on the base used for the
earlier years was 6.9, and the percent of man-days of
idleness was 0.44, compared with 6.3 and 0.40, respec­
tively, computed on the new base.
New series 2 — beginning with 1967, two estimates
of employment have been used, one based on the wage
and salary workers in the civilian work force, and the
other on those in the private nonfarm sector. The new
private nonfarm series closely approximates the former
BLS series which, as noted, excluded government and
agricultural workers from employment totals, but ac­
counted for time lost by such workers while on strike.
In recent years, the old method has resulted in an increas­
ingly distorted measure of the severity of strikes; with
the likely growth of strike activity among the two groups,
it may distort the measure even more in the future.

The total number of workers involved in strikes in
a given year may include double counting of individual
workers if they were involved in more than one stoppage
during that year. (Thus, in 1949, 365,000 to 400,000
coal miners struck on three different occasions; they
accounted for 1.15 million of the year’s total of 3.03
million workers.)
In some prolonged stoppages, the total man-days of
idleness are estimated if the number of workers idle each
day is not known. Significant changes in the number
of workers idle are secured from the parties for use in
computing man-days of idleness.
The relative measures. In computing the number of
workers involved in strikes as a percent of total employ­
ment and idleness as a percent of total working time,
the following employment figures have been used:



Old series— from 1927 to 1950, all employed workers
were included in the base, except those in occupations
and professions in which little, if any, union organization
existed or in which stoppages rarely, if ever, occurred.
In most industries, all wage and salary workers were
included in total employment except those in executive,
managerial, or high supervisory positions, or those
performing professional work the nature of which made
union organization or group action unlikely. This mea­
sure of employment also excluded all self-employed per­
sons; domestic workers; workers on farms employing
fewer than six persons; all Federal and State Govern­
ment employees; and officials, both elected and ap­
pointed, in local government.

63

1 More detailed information is available in B L S H a n dbook
o f M eth ods, BLS Bulletin 1711 (1972), ch. 19.
For further information, see “ ‘Total Economy* Measure
o f Strike Idleness,** M o n th ly L a b o r R eview , October 1968,
pp. 54-56.

The new “total economy” measure of strike idleness
now includes government and agricultural workers in its
employment count as well as in the computation of
idleness ratios. On the other hand, data for the private
nonfarm sector excludes agricultural and government
workers from employment totals, and these groups will
also be removed from strike figures in arriving at a per­
centage of working time lost. To facilitate comparisons
over time, the private nonfarm series has been re­
calculated for all years beginning with 1950, while the
figure for the total economy has been carried back to
1939. The differences resulting from the use of the new
methods are illustrated in table 1; the various components
of each series and the methods of computation are set
forth in the tabulation.
Components and method

standard metropolitan areas was compiled. The counties
or other political districts include in each SMSA to which
the strike statistics apply are those established by the
Office of Management and Budget. Information is pub­
lished only for those areas in which at least five stoppages
were recorded during the year.
Some metropolitan areas include counties in more
than one State, and, hence, statistics for an area may oc­
casionally equal or exceed the total for the State in
which the major city is located. Stoppages in the mining
and logging industries are excluded from metropolitan
area data, but are reported by industry and State.
Unions involved. For this purpose, the union is the
organization whose contract was involved or which has
taken active leadership in the stoppage. Disputes in-

Total economy

Private sector

Old series

Employment

Establishment series
plus wage and
salaried farm workers.

Establishment series
less government.

Establishment series
less government.

Working time

Above employment times
working days.

Above employment times
working days.

Above employment
times working
days.

Total idleness
---------------------- x 100
Above working
time

Total idleness
less farm
' and government
------------------------------ x 100
Above working
time

Total idleness
---------------------- x 100
Above working
time

Man-days o f idleness as a percent
o f estimated total
working t i m e ..........................

“Estimated working time” is computed by multi­
plying the average employment for the year by the
number of days typically worked by most employed
workers during that year. In these computations, Satur­
days (when' customarily not worked), Sundays, and estab­
lished holidays as provided in most union contracts are
excluded.3
Duration. Although only workdays are used in com­
puting total man-days of idleness, duration is expressed
in calendar days, including nonworkdays.
State data. Stoppages occurring in more than one
State are listed separately in each State affected. The
workers and man-days of idleness are allocated among
each of the affected States. 4 The procedures outlined
on the preceding page also have been used in preparing
estimates of idleness by State.
Metropolitan area data. Information is tabulated
separately for the areas that currently comprise the list
of standard metropolitan statistical areas issued by the
Office of Management and Budget, formerly Bureau of
the Budget, in addition to a few communities historically
included in the strike series before the current list of




volving more than one union are classified as jurisdictional
or rival union disputes or as involving cooperating unions.
If unorganized workers strike, a separate classification
is used. However, the tabulations of “workers involved”
include all who are made idle for one shift or longer in
establishments directly involved in the dispute, including
members of other unions and nonunion workers. For
publication purposes, union information is presented by
major affiliation of the union* i.e., AFL-CIO, or nonaffili­
ation such as “independent,” “single firm,” or “no
union.”
Sources of information

Occurrence o f strikes. Information on the actual or
probable existence of work stoppages is collected from
3 For exam ple, the total econom y figure for 1968 was com ­
puted by m ultiplying the average em ploym ent for the year by
the num ber of working days (69,430,000 x 256= 17,774,080,000)
and dividing this figure into the total num ber o f man-days lost
of 0.28. States and industries are in a similar m anner.
4 The same procedure is follow ed in allocating data on stop­
pages occurring in more than one industry, industry group, or
m etropolitan area.

64

a number of sources. Clippings on labor disputes are
obtained from a comprehensive coverage o f daily and
weekly newspapers throughout the country. Information
also is received regularly from the Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service. Other sources o f information in­
clude State boards of mediation and arbitration; research
divisions of State labor departments; local offices of
State employment security agencies, channeled through
the Manpower Administration of the U.S. Department
of Labor; and trade and union journals. Some employer
associations, companies, and unions also furnish the
Bureau with work stoppage information on a volun­
tary cooperative basis, either as stoppages occur or
periodically.
Respondents to questionnaire . A questionnaire is
mailed to each of the parties reported as involved in
work stoppages to obtain information on the number
of workers involved, duration, major issues, location,
method o f settlement, and other pertinent information.
Lim itations o f data . Although the Bureau seeks to
obtain complete coverage, i.e., a “census” o f all strikes
involving six workers or more and lasting a full shift
or more, information is undoubtedly missing on some
strikes involving small numbers of workers. Presumably,
these missing strikes do not substantially affect the num­
ber of workers and man-days o f idleness reported.




To improve the completeness of the count of stop­
pages, the Bureau has constantly sought to develop new
sources of information on the probable existence of
stoppages. Over the years, these sources have probably
increased the number of strikes recorded, but have had
little effect on the number of workers or total idleness.
Beginning in mid-1950, local offices of State em­
ployment security agencies would report5 monthly on
work stoppages coming to their attention. It is esti­
mated that this additional source increased the number
of strikes reported in 1950 about 5 percent, and in
1951 and 1952, approximately 10 percent. Because most
of these stoppages were small, they increased the num­
ber of workers involved and man-days of idleness less
than 2 percent in 1950 and less than 3 percent in 1951
and 1952. In 1966, State employment security agencies
were the sole source of information for 17 percent of
the strikes recorded.
As new local agencies having knowledge of the exis­
tence of work stoppages are established or changes are
made in local collection methods, every effort is made
by the Bureau to establish cooperative arrangements.

5
Until 1969, the compilation of these reports was directed
by the Bureau of Employment Security.

65

Recent Publications in Industrial Relations
Analysis o f Work Stoppages, 1970 (BLS Bulletin 1727, 1972), price 65 cents.
Analysis o f Work Stoppages, 1969 (BLS Bulletin 1687,1971), price 65 cents.
Analysis o f Work Stoppages, 1968 (BLS Bulletin 1646,1970), price 65 cents.
Analysis o f Work Stoppages, 1967 (BLS Bulletin 1611,1969), price 60 cents.
Analysis o f Work Stoppages, 1966 (BLS Bulletin 1573,1968), price 35 cents.
Work Stoppages in Contract Construction, 1946-66 (BLS Report 346,1968), price 35 cents.
National Emergency Disputes, Labor Management Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act, 1947-68 (BLS Bulletin 1633,
1969), price $1.

Airline Experience Under the Railway Labor A ct (BLS Bulletin 1683,1971), price 55 cents.
Work Stoppages in Electrical Machinery Industry, 1927-68 (BLS Report 374,1970), free.
Work Stoppages in Government, 1958-68 (BLS Report 348,1970), free.
Directory o f National and International Labor Unions in the United States (BLS Bulletin 1596, 1968), price
60 cents.

Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Grievance Procedures (BLS Bulletin 1425-1,1964), price 45 cents.
Severance Pay and Layoff Benefit Plans (BLS Bulletin 1425-2,1965), price 60 cents.
Supplemental Unemployment Benefit Plans and Wage-Employment Guarantees (BLS Bulletin 1425-3,
1965), price 70 cents.

Deferred Wage Increase and Escalator Clauses (BLS Bulletin 1 4 2 5 4 ,1 9 6 6 ), price 40 cents.
Management Rights and Union-Management Cooperation (BLS Bulletin 1425-5,1966), price 60 cents.
Arbitration Procedures (BLS Bulletin 1425-6,1966), price $1.
Training and Retraining Provisions (BLS Bulletin 1425-7, 1969), price 50 cents.
Subcontracting (BLS Bulletin 1425-8,1969), price 55 cents.
Paid Vacation and Holiday Provisions (BLS Bulletin 1425-9, 1969), price $1.25.
Plant Movement, Transfer, and Relocation Allowances (BLS Bulletin 1425-10,1969), price $1.25.
Seniority in Promotion and Transfer Provisions (BLS Bulletin 1425-11,1970), price 75 cents.
Administration o f Negotiated Pension, Health, and Insurance Plans (BLS Bulletin 1425-12,1970),
price 60 cents.

Characteristics o f Agreements Covering 2,000 Workers or More (BLS Bulletin 1729,1972), price 75 cents.
Municipal Public Employee Associations (BLS Bulletin 1702,1971), price 50 cents.
Negotiation, Impasse, Grievance, and Arbitration in Federal Agreements (BLS Bulletin 1661,1970), price 75 cents.

☆ U. s. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1973 O - 512-382 (90)




B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)

Region II
1515 Broadway
New York, N .Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region V I
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Region IN
P. O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)

Region V II and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)




Regions V II and V III are serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco.

U.S. DEPARTM EN T OF LABO R

T H IR D CLASS M A IL

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W ASHING TO N, D.C. 20212
POSTAGE A N D FEES PA ID
O F F IC IA L BUSINESS

U.S. D EP A R TM E N T OF LABOR

PENALTY FOR PRIV A TE USE, $300




LAB-441