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·-A_G_R_IC_U_LT_U_R_A_L_N_E_w_s_o_F_T_H_E_W_E_E_K_ _

~

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF DALLAS

Number 840

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

FARM NUMBERS
CONTINUE
DOWNWARD
The number of farms in operation during 1965 decreased from a year earlier
in 47 states and remained unchanged in the other 3--stites, points out the Statistical Reporting Service. The national total is placed at 3.4 million farms, or 3% below 1964. However, the total land in U.S. farms, at about 1,155 million acres, declined less than l"/o from 1964. The decline results, in part, from the gradual
encroachment of urban and suburban extensions, wider highways, and other nonfarm
uses of the land. The total of 3.3 million farms in prospect for operation in 1966
continues the downward trend from earlier years, with little change in the rate of
reduction. The reduction in the total land in farms also continues at practically
the same rate as in previous years.
The changes in estimated national totals have been much greater for the
number of farms than for the land in farms. Farm numbers during the period from
1959 to 1966 declined 20"/o, while the land in farms decreased only 3°/o. The "average farm operator" in 1966 manages a farm unit of 350 acres, which is one-fifth
larger than 7 years earlier. The discontinuance of'S"m~arming enterprises and
the mergence of larger units with existing farms continue as important influences
in the change in farm numbers, according to the SRS.
The table below shows the number of farms and land in farms for the
Eleventh District states for 1964, 1965, and 1966.
NUMBER OF FARMS AND LAND IN FARMS
Five Southwestern States

LAND IN FARMS
(In thousands of ac r es)
1964
1965
19661/

NUMBER OF FARMS
Area

____.

-

-------

Arizona ••••••••
7,000
Louisiana •••••• 68,ooo
New Mexico ••••• 15,400
Oklahoma ••••••• 88,ooo
Texas •••••••••• 210,000

6,700
65,000
14,900
86,ooo
202,000

6,400
62,000
14,600
84,000
196,ooo

45,000
10,200
51,700
37,300
154,000

45,000
10,100
51,600
37,300
154,ooo

45,000
10,100
51,500
37,300
154,ooo

Five states •• 388,400

374,600

363,000

298,200

298,000

297,900

y

Preliminary.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Agriculture.

COTTON EXPORT MARKET ACREAGE ALLOTMENTS
Preliminary reports of county Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
(ASC) committees show that cotton farmers in eight states have requested a 100,096acre share of the total acreage reserved for the production of cotton for export

only. Under the provisions of the new cotton program, a national export acreage
re'Serve of 250,000 acres was established for 1966, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The preliminary list of the cotton export acreage applied
for, by states, is as follows: Alabama, 984 acres; Arizona, 17,075 acres; California, 69,732 acres; Louisiana, 4,100 acres; Missouri, 1,708 acres; New Mexico,
2,223 acres; Tennessee, 253 acres; and Texas, 4,021 acres.

L I VE S T 0 CK
The Fort Worth livestock market report is no longer issued from the Fort
Worth office but is included with other major Texas markets in a combined Texas
livestock market news report. Persons who have not been receiving any of the individual market reports may wish to be placed on the mailing list for this report.
The report, entitled Texas Livestock Market News, may be obtained from the Texas
Department of Agriculture, John Reagan Building, Austin, Texas 78701.
C R 0 P S FOR DIVERTED ACREAGE
ALTERNATE
The USDA recently named the alternate nonsurplus crops that may be grown
on the acreage diverted for payment from the 1966 production of wheat, feed grains,
or cotton. Farmers participating in any of the three commodity programs-c8:'n plant
the following alternate crops: Guar, sesame, safflower, sunflower, castor beans,
plantago ovata, mustard seed, and crambe. As was the case in 1965, the plantings
can be made only on program acreage diverted for payment. Under the 1966 feed grain
and wheat programs, no payment is made for minimum diversion except to farmers having small feed grain bases. In the cotton program, payment is made for all acreage
diverted.

BROILER CHICK
PLACEMENTS

Percent change from
Previous
Com:Parable
week
week, 1965

Area

Week ended
January 22, 1966

Texas ••••••
Louisiana ••

2,715,000
688,ooo

-5
2

16
21

23 states ••

46,434,ooo

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