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AGRICULTURAL NEWS OF THE WEEK
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF DALLAS

Number 772

Wednesday) October 14J 1964

SIGNUP
FOR
1965
WHEAT
PROGRAM
The fall enrollment for the 1965 winter wheat program began August 24 and
was concluded Friday) October 2J according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
There will be no extension of the fall signup period, but those farmers in predominantly spring wheat areas will have an opportunity to enroll from February 8 to
March 26J 1965. The fall signup included 780,916 farms, or more than the spring
and winter enrollment of 1964 combined. The acreage signed through the fall period
totals ~4.848.504 ~' or 82% of the total effective allotment in the signup area.
There are 24J522 growers in the high crop risk winter wheat areas of six states who
have taken the option of exceeding their allotment acres by as much as 50% and storing under bond any excess production.
The following table shows the respective position of the District states.

State

Total
Wheat
Farms
(Number)

Farms
Signed
Up
(Number)

Arizona
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas

1)155
1,270
4,717
77,708
68,067

443
775
1,716
55,073
40,893

Five states

152,917

98,900

Allotments On
Farms Electing To
Exceed Allotment
(Acres)
(Farms)

Effective Allotment
On Signed
Total
Farms
(Acres)
(Acres)

Total
Intended
Diversion
(Acres)

38,326
39)815
429,728
4,599,471
3,826,368

25)160
34)755
308)314
4,201,032
3,403,554

6,299
9)525
67)816
644)414
528,985

~

0
0
660
265,807
196,220

8)933,708

7J972J815

1)257,039

2)574

462,687

0
0
2
1)918

I NC RE A S E S
P R I CE
EMERGENCY
Dairy farmers in 1J. Federal milk marketing orders have been granted temporary emergency price increases, according to the USDA. Under Federal legislation
authorizing milk marketing orders) price increases cannot be granted solely to compensate producers for higher production costs brought on by drought. An essential
requirement for a price increase is that the increase is needed to assure an adequate supply of fresh milk for consumers in the marketing area. To assist farmers
further in areas affected by drought, the USDA is using other programs) which include permitting farmers to harvest hay and graze cattle on diverted acreage, the
offering of feed grains from Government storage at reduced prices, ar.d the granting
of emergency loans to eligible farmers. A temporary price increase of 10¢ per cwt.
from now through March 1965 was granted to the following milk marketing order markets in Texas: North TexasJ Lubbock-Plainview, San Antonio, Central West Texas,
Austin-Waco) and Corpus Christi.
FARMER
TRAINING
FOR
LONG-TIME
NE E D S
Tomorrow's farm businessman will operate more like any other businessman,
according to the Agricultural Research Service. No one knows better than the U. S.
farmer that modern farming calls for ever-increasing know-how and management ability

on the part of the operator. Over the next decade or two, demand for this special
combination of talents will probably intensify. The need for technical training
and services tailored and oriented to the farmer will be generated. Areas of special emphasis will be tied closely to the increasing importance of management and
marketing, the increased use of science on the farm, and continued growth of agricultural technology, including automation.
LIVESTOCK
Cattle marketings at Fort Worth during the week ended Thursday, October
totaled an estimated 6,750, or 1% ab~ week earlie~d~bove a year ago. According to the Agricultural Marketing Service, slaughter steers and heifers sold at
prices which were weak to lower compared with prices during the previous week.
Prices for Good 800- to 1,105-lb. slaughter steers ranged from $20 to $22.50 per
cwt., and Utility and Commercial cows sold from $11.50 to $14.50. Demand for feeder cattle closed weak, and prices were mostly $1 per cwt. lower. Good 450- to 690lb. yearling steers sold from $17 to $19.70 per cwt.
The calf supply, at 2,500, was 14% above the preceding week and 14% above
the corresponding 1963 period. Demand for slaughter calves was steady to weak,
with those weighing under 400 lb. being difficult to clear. Good grades of 250- t
500-lb. killing calves cleared at $17.50 to $19 per cwt. Good 250- to 500-lb.
stocker steer calf prices ranged from $17.50 to $21.
Hog receipts are placed at 1,025, or 24% above a week earlier but 5% below the sa~period a year ago. Demand was steady to weak, and prices were quoted
50¢ lower than a week ago. The majority of the supply was composed of U. S. No. 1
through No. 3 Grades of 185- to 280-lb. butchers, which cleared at $15.50 to $16.2~
per cwt.
Fort Worth sheep and lamb receipts of an estimated 3,300 were 8% below
the previo'U'S";eek and 60% below--a:-year ago. Prices were mostly steady on all
classes. Good and Choice 74- to 95-lb. slaughter wooled lambs cleared at $20 to
$21 per cwt.
POULTRY
For the week ended Friday, October 9, the major Texas commercial broiler
markets opened weaker i~h south and east Texas, reflecting price declines in
other major producing states, according to the State Department of Agriculture.
Prices at the close of the week were fully steady in south Texas and steady to unsettled in east Texas. Supplies were ample to adequate for the fair demand. The
closing price in south Texas was 14¢ per lb., and quotes in east Texas ranged from
12.8¢ to 14¢. During the corresponding 1963 period, closing prices were 13.5¢ to
14¢ per lb. in south Texas and 12.7¢ to 13.5¢ in east Texas.
Texas commercial broiler markets were about steady with fair demand on
Tuesday, October 11. The price quoted in south Texas was 14.5¢, and quotations in
east Texas ranged-rrom 13.5¢ to 14.8¢ per lb.

Area
BROILER CHICK
PLACEMENTS

Week ended
October 3, 1964

Percent change from
Comparable
Previous
week
week, 1963

Texas ......
Louisiana ..

2,346,ooo
503,000

13
-9

18
25

22 states ..

37,077,000

7

8