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AGRICULTURAL NEWS OF THE WEEK
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF DALLAS

Number 707

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

P L A NT E D C 0 T T 0 N A CRE A GE
1 9 6 3
The acreage planted to 1963-crop cotton in the United States, as of July 1,
is estimated at 14.9 million acres, points out the Statistical Reporting Service.
This acreage is 9% below the 1962 seedings and 1% less than the 5-year (1957-61)
average but is well in line with reduced allotments.
The following table shows cotton acreage planted in 1963 for the states
of the Eleventh Federal Reserve District and comparable data for 1962 and the 1957-61
average.
COTTON ACREAGE PLANTED
Five Southwestern States
(In thousands of acres)

1963

1962

Average
1957-61

Arizona •.....•..•.
Louisiana .•...•...
New Mexico ...•....
Oklahoma ...•••••.•
Texas .........•...

394
525
201
625
6_,250

412
581
212
675
6,920

395
497
201
606
6,518

Five states •.•..

7,995

8,800

8,217

Area

SOURCE:

U. S. Department of Agriculture.

STANDARDS
FOR
MILK AVAILABLE
Uniform, minimum quality standards for milk used in manufacturing dairy
products and minimum requirements for dairy plant operations are now officially
available for voluntary state adoption. The standards provide for farm inspection
and certification_, platf'()'TI!linspection of the raw milk supply, plant approval and
licensing, and plant quality control service. The U. S. Department of Agriculture
says that the standards will be enforced by state agencies.
MEAT
PRODUCTION
Commercial production of red meat in the 48'""CO'nterminous states during
January-May 1963 totaled an estimated 12,223 million-lbs., representing a 5% gain
over the corre8'Ponding period last year, according to the SRS. A 6% increase was
shown for both beef and pork, while veal production was down 10% and lamb and mutton
outturn was 8% smaller.

L I VE S T 0 CK
Fort Worth marketings of all classes of livestock during the week ended
Thursday, July 11, were substantially above the previous week's 3-day trading period,

according to the Agricultural Marketing Service. The cattle run of an estimated 9,000
was about triple the week-earlier supply and 17% larger than a year ago. Trading was
moderately active on all slaughter classes. Prices for slaughter steers were mostly
25¢ to 50¢ per cwt. higher than the preceding week's close. Good 910- to 1,060-lb.
slaughter steers sold at $22 to $24 per cwt., and Utility and Commercial cows brought
$16 to $16.50. Demand was fairly broad for feeder offerings, and prices held generally
steady throughout most of the trading period. Good and Choice 500- to 700-lb. feeder
steers cleared at $22 to $27.70.
Calf receipts are placed at 2,100, compared with 900 a week earlier and
1,300 a yeirago. Slaughter calves sold at prices which were steady to 50¢ per cwt.
higher than in the preceding week. Good grades of killing calves brought $23 to $25
per cwt., and quotations on Good and Choice feeder steer calves ranged from $23.50
to $31.
A total of 1,550 hogs was received at Fort Worth during the week ended
July 11, or 350 more than i'Dthe previous week but ~-50 fewer than a year earlier.
Thursday prices for barrows and gilts showed very little net change from a week ago.
The majority of the U. S. No. 1 through No. 3 Grades of 190- to 250-lb. butchers
cleared at $18 to $18.50 per cwt.
Sheep and lamb offerings of approximately 8,000 were 82% above the preceding week but 41% below . the corresponding period in 1962. Demand was broad for practically all classes; however, the closing undertone was weak, and Thursday prices
were mainly $1 per cwt. lower than the previous week's close. The bulk of the Good
and Choice 69- to 91-lb. wooled spring slaughter lambs brought $18 to $20 per cwt.
POULTRY
During the week ended Friday, July 12, the major Texas commercial broiler
markets opened slightly stronger, with south Texas prices O~er lb. higher than
Ii1the preceding week, reports the State Department of Agriculture. The south Texas
market continued steady throughout the trading period, while east Te~ms broiler
prices fluctuated slightly. At Friday's close, markets in both areas were steady,
but the undertone was unsettled. Trading ranged from light to brisk. Closing
prices per lb. were 15¢ in south Texas and 14¢ in east Texas. During the corresponding period in 1962, the closing quotation in south Texas was 14.5¢, and prices in
east Texas ranged from 14¢ to 14.5¢.
On Monday, July 15, commercial broiler markets were weaker in south Texas
and about steady in eas-:r-Texas. The following prices per lb. were quoted: South
Texas, 14.5¢; and east Texas, 13¢ to 14.5¢.

Area
BROILER CHICK
PLACEMENTS

Week ended
July 6_, 1963

Percent change from
Comparable
Previous
week
week, 1962

Texas ••....
Louisiana ..

2,828,000
588,000

-5
-5

7
28

22 states ..

41,350,000

-4

6