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AGRICULTURAL NEWS OF THE WEEK
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF DALLAS

Number 648

Wednesday, May 30, 1962

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THE
PITCHER
OF
HEALTH
MILK
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JUNE
I S D A I R Y M0 N T H !
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EXTENSION WORKERS
TO
STUDY MARKETS
ABROAD
The U. S. Department of Agriculture recently announced that teams of selected Federal and state cooperative extension workers from this country will visit four
major world areas in order to make studies designed to facilitate foreign marketing-of U. S. agrIC'Uitural products. The extension teams will conduct firsthand studies
in Western Europe, Africa and the Middle East, south Asia, and the Caribbean area.
The purpose of the studies will be to obtain information which will enable U. S. farmers and professional agricultural workers to gain a better understanding of (1) foreign food and fiber needs, (2) problems of modern export marketing, and (3) the background for a successful foreign trade policy.
The teams are scheduled to leave the United States around June 15 and return about July 23. Following their observations abroad, the extension specialists
plan to develop discussion material to be transmitted to urban and rural people - as
well as professional agricultural workers - throughout the Nation.
WORLD
HOG
POPULATION
AT
NEW
PEAK
The world hog population reached an all-time high of 483 million head in
January 1962, according to the USDA. The number was 4% above a year earlier and 40%
larger than the 1951-55 average.

F A R M F I R E L 0 S S E S REDUCED
A recent Economic Research Service report estimates U. S. farm fire losses
in 1961 at $163 million, or 1% less than the 1960 figure and
below the all-time
high of $174 million for 1959· Farm fire losses accounted for about one-seventh of
the total national fire losses in 1961. On the average, fires occur on about 2 out
of every 100 U. S. farms each year.

6%

P E R P E RS 0 N
AC RE
0 NE
At 4:30 p.m. on May 16, the population of the United States was the same
as the number of acres of forestland in this country. As registered on the population clock in the U. S:- Department of Commerce, each person owned, theoretically,
one acre of forestland at that time. This ratio is constantly changing, however,
because of the increasing population and the relatively fixed number of forest acres.
Research by the USDA's Forest Service is conducted to provide better protection and
management of these areas.

L I VE S T 0 C K
Fort Worth cattle and calf receipts rose for the fifth consecutive time
during the week ended Thursday, May 24, reflecting the continuing inadequate moisture condition in the marketing territory. According to the Agricultural Marketing
Service, the cattle~ totaled an estimated 7,100, compared with 6,700 in the preceding week and 11,000 a year earlier. Trading on slaughter steers and heifers was
generally slow throughout the week, and prices were mostly 50¢ to $1 lower than on
the previous Thursday. Good and low-Choice 800- to 1,050-lb. slaughter steers were
quoted at $23 to $25.25 per cwt., and Utility and Commercial cows brought $13.25 to
$16. Prices for feeder cattle were steady to $1 lower; Good 500- to 700-lb. steers
sold at $21 to $24.50.
The calf supply was about 1,400, or 300 more than a week ago and 100 larger
than the year-earlier figure. Trading on slaughter calves was moderately active, and
prices were lower. Good grades of killing calves brought $23 to $24.50 per cwt., and
250- to 500-lb. feeder steer calves cleared at $22 to $26.50.
At an estimated 2,000, hog marketings were 300 more than both a week ago
and a year ago. Trading opened slowly on most days but became active later in the
day, and closing quotations were generally steady. The majority of the U. S. No. 1
through No. 3 Grades of 190- to 250-lb. barrows and gilts sold at $15 to $15.85 per
cwt.
Sheep and lamb offerings declined during the week ended May 24 but remained
seasonally large-.~Receipts, at 41,800, were 21% below a week ago but 10% higher than
the year-earlier level. The local run on Monday, May 21, was the largest in a year.
Good and Choice 65- to 105-lb. slaughter spring lambs brought $17 to $19; most Good
and Choice 55- to 75-lb. feeder lambs ranged from $11 to $14.25.
POULTRY
During the w~ek end.ed Friday, May 25, commercial broiler markets opened
steady in both south and east Texas, according to the State Department of Agriculture. Prices-reniained--cc;nstant throughout the week, and supplies were adequate
for the fair demand in the two areas. Both areas closed with a firm undertone.
Closing prices per lb. were: South Texas, 14¢; and east Texas, 13.5¢ to 14¢. During the corresponding period in 1961, the closing quotation in south Texas was 14¢,
and the weighted average price in east Texas was 13.11¢.
Commercial broiler markets were steady in both south and east Texas on
Monday, May 28. Prices in south Texas were 14¢ per lb., and those in east Texas
ranged from 13.3¢ to 14¢.

BROILER CHICK
PLACEMENTS

Percent change from
Comparable
Previous
week, 1961
week

Area

Week ended
May 19, 1962

Texas •.••.•
Louisiana ..

2,911,000
553,000

-1
-7

-3
-12

22 states ..

42,333,000

-1

0