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AGRICULTURAL NEWS OF THE WEEK
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF DALLAS

Wednesday, October !+, 1961

Number 614

1 I VE S T 0 CK F E E D D0 NAT E D I N T E XAS
C 0 UNT I E S
Six Texas counties that were severely affected by Hurricane Carla have been
made eligible for donation of feed grains from Commodity Credit Corporation-owned
stocks for emergency livestock feeding, according to the u. s. Department of Agriculture. These counties - which have been desigaated as 11major disaster 11 areas - are
Brazoria, Calhoun, Chambers, Galveston, Jackson, and Matagorda.
The free feed grains will be distributed under direction of the State Civil
Defense Director and will be limited to (1) floodMstranded livestock, unidentified
or commingled, for which feed and pasture are not available, and (2) livestock for
which producers have been unable to arrange feed or pasture.
Secretary of Agriculture Freeman has announced that temporary grazing of
livestock will be permitted in Jackson and Matagorda Counties on acreages diverted
to conservation ~· Grazing will be permitted in both counties on lands diverted
under the 1961 feed grain program and in. Jackson County on lands placed in the Conservation Reserve Prograrn. No acreage in Matagorda County is under the Conservation Reserve Program.
ME X I C A N F R U I T F L Y A R E A E X T E N D E D
For the first time since 1939, the USDA has found it necessary to extend
the Mexican fruit i!.Y. federally xegulated ~ in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, where
pests could cause heavy damage to citrus fruit, The extension is limited to~
County, Texas, and was scheduled to become effective on September 30, The area already regulated includes the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron, Dimmit, Hidalgo,
La Salle, Webb, and Willacy, and the southern part of Jim Wells County.

NAT I 0 NAL

P 0 I S 0 N

P R E VE NT I 0 N

WE E K

AUT H0 R I Z E D

On September 26, President Kennedy approved legislation which authorizes
the President to ~ annually a proclarnation designating the ~ week in March
as National Poison Prevention ~. The purpose of the proclamation is to help call
attention to the dangers of accidental poisoning,

F AL L

F A R R 0 WI N G S

L ARGE R

The number of §.QR§. farrowing this fall in the 10 £91:.u Belt states is estimated at nearly 4.5 million ~' or 2% ~ than in 12.§.Q, the same as in 1959, and
16% above the 1950-59 average. These 10 states (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas,
Minnesota, Hissouri, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) accounted for threefourths of the total u. s. pig crop in 1960, according to the Statistical Reporting
Service.

u p
POULTRY
MEAT
~ trade in poultry ~' as indicated by imports of the eight principal
markets (West Germany, Switzerland, Canada, Austria, the United Kingdom, Italy, Hong
Kong, and Trinidad), totaled 416 million lbs, in 1960, points out the Foreign Agricultural Service. The volume represented a 26% increase over the preceding year and
was almost 80% larger than in 1958. West Germany imported 305 millio·1 lbs, of poultry
meat in 1960, accounting for nearly three-fourths of the 8-country total. The Netherlands, the largest supplier, exported 104 million lbs. to West Germany. The United
W0 R L D

T R A D E

I N

States, second largest supplier, shipped 80 million lbs. of poultry meat to the West
German market in 1960, compared with l:.7 millio n lbs. in 1959.
LIVESTOCK
Fort Worth marketin~s of all classes of livestock during the ~ ended
Thursday, September 28, were below those in the preceding week, according to the
Agricultural lfarketing Service. Cattle receipts are placed at 9, 800, compared with
10,100 a week ago and 8,200 during the corresponding period of 1960. Slaughter
steers and heifers sold at prices which were steady with the previous Thursday's
market. Good and Choice 930· to 1,050-lb. slaughter steers brought $24 per cwt,,
and Utility and Commercial cows sold at $14.50 to $17.25. Trading on stockers and
feeders was fairly active, and quotations were mainly steady. Good and Choice 500~
to 700-lb. stocker steers cleared at $22.50 to $25.BO.
Calf offerings of approximately 1,100 reflected decreases of 15% from a
week earlier and 21% from a year ago. Prices of slaughter calves were about steady
with the preceding week's close. Good killing calves brought $22.50 to $24, and
Good and Choice 300- to 500-lb. stocker steer calves sold at $23.50 to $28.
A total of 1, l:.QO hogs_ was received at Fort Worth during the week ended
September 28, which was 200 fewer than in the previous week and 900 below the year
ago figure. Trading was fairly active, and closing quotations on barrows and gilts
were steady to 50¢ higher . tha·~1 the week-earlier level, The bulk of the mixed U. S.
No. 1 through No. 3 Grades of 200- to 250-lb. butchers cleared at $18.25 to $18.75.
Sheep and lamb supplies amounted to 5,l~OO, or 21/~ less than a week earlier
and Bio below a year ago. Trading was moderately active, and Thursday prices for
slaughter spring lambs were mostly steady. Mixed Good and Choice 75- to 96-lb.
slaughter spring lambs sold at $15.50 to $16.
POULTRY
During the week euded Friday, September 29, the major Texas conunercial
broiler markets opened stronger and then became steady on Wednesday, reports the
State Department of Agriculture. The market in south Texas remained steady through
the close, while that in ~ Texas weakened slightly, Compared with the correspond•
ing period in 1960, trading volumes were 20% larger in south Texas but were 20% smal le
in east Texas. Closing guotations in south Texas were 13,5¢ per lb., and the weight ec
average price in east Texas was 12.6¢. During the corresponding period last year,
closing prices in south Texas were 15.5¢; the weighted average in east Texas was 15 . ~.C ·
Texas commercial broiler markets were weaker on Monday, October ~' with tbe
following prices quoted: South Texas, 12.5¢, and east Texas, 10.Li.¢ to 12¢ (32/o of
the sales in the latter area were at undetermined levels).
On October 2, the Southwest Poultry Exchange offered 208,900 broilers. Of
this total, 109,500 brought 10.4¢ to 11.0¢ (farm producers absorbed all rejected
birds). No offerings were reported under contracts by which buyers absorbed all
rejects.

BROILER CHICK
PLACEMENTS

Percent change from
Previous
Comparable
week
week .. 1960

Area

Week ended
Se12tember 23 2 1961

Texas ••••••
Louisiana.,

1,816,000
382,000

-6
l~

18

22 states ••

28,966;i000

-5

1

(')

0