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AGRICULTURAL NEWS OF THE WEEK
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF DALLAS

Number 571

Wednesday, December 7, 1960

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R E F E R E N D U M DAY

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December 13, 1960, is an important day for many farmers in the Eleventh
Federal Reser~ District. Growers of rice and both upland and extra-long
staple cotton will ~ in three separate referendums on marketing quotas
for these 1961 crops. A favorab l e~ of at least two-thirds of the producers voting is required in order for marketing quotas to remain in effect.

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S U R P 1 U S
F 0 0 D
D 0 NA T I 0 N S
I N C R E A S E
During the first guarter of the 1961 fiscal year (July-September 1960),
donations of surplus foods by the Q. ~· Department of Agriculture at home and overs eas totaled 933 million lbs,, or almost one-third above the volume distributed in
the corresponding period last year. The gain was a~ted for principally by increased shipments of rice and flour for foreign relief and by donations of dry
beans and lard to domestic welfare outlets that were not receiving these latter
two foods a year earlier.
The following are the numbers of needy persons in family units in the
Eleventh District states who were receiving donated foods in September 1960:
Arizona, 49,536; Louisiana, 79,334; New Mexico, 38,439; Oklahoma, 177,774; and
Texas, 111, 148.

IMPORT
URGED
F RU I T - P E S T
Q UARA NT I NE
A strong quarantine program to prevent entry of ~ citrus and subtropical fruit pests into the United States has been urged by the USDA's Citrus and
Subtropical Fruit Research and Marketing Advisory Committee. In addition, the committee has called for greater emphasis on all phases of research on citrus and subtropical fruits, including research on farm production, utilization, marketing, and
marketing services.

T E XAS
FARM
PRICES
The index of prices received by Texas farmers and ranchers as of November
15 was 247% of the 1910-14 average, reflecting increases of 2% over the month-earlier
figure and 1% over a year ago, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.
Prices for livestock and livestock products advanced 6% from the mid-October level,
while those for crops declined 2%.
H0 G S 1 A UGHT E R E XP E CT E D T 0
R I S E
According to the Foreign Agricultural Service, ~year's hog slaughter
in 29 countries is expected to ris!:_ 2% above the 1960 level. Most of the gain is
expected in Europe, although a slight advance may occur in North America. The increases in Mexico, the United States, and Cuba probably will more than offset the
decline expected in Canada.
W0 R L D

L I VE S T 0 C K
Receipts of all classes of livestock at Fort Worth during the week ended
Thursday, December 1, were substantially above the 3-day trading period of the preceding week, report; the AMS. Cattle marketings totaled an estimated 9,300 head,
or more than double a week ago and 50% greater than the comparable period last year.
Demand was broad for all slaughter cattle, and prices ranged from 50¢ to $1.50 per
cwt. higher than on the previous Wednesday. Standard and low-Good 905- to 1,135lb. slaughter steers brought $23 to $23.50, and Utility and Commercial cows sold at
$14.75 to $17.25. Trading on stockers and feeders was active, and quotations were
$1 to $2.50 higher than in the preceding week. Good and Choice 500- to 775-lb.
stocker steers sold at $22.50 to $28. 30.
The calf run of about 2,000 compared with 900 a week ago and 2,400 a year
earlier. Prices for Good slaughter calves were mainly $22.50 to $24.50, and those
for Good and Choice 275- to 500-lb. stocker steer calves were $24.50 to $29.70.
A total of 2,200 hogs was received at Fort Worth during the week ended
December 1, or 1,000 more than in the previous week but 400 below a year ago. Trading was active, and prices were steady to 50¢ higher than on the preceding Wednesday.
Mixed U. S. No. 1 through No. 3 Grades of 185- to 255-lb. butchers cleared at $17.50
to mostly $18.
Sheep and lamb marketings were approximately 11,100, reflecting gains of
122% over the preceding week and 13% over the corresponding period of 1959. Closing
prices for slaughter lambs were steady to weak, with Good and Choice 80- to 95-lb.
wooled and shorn slaughter lambs with No. 1 and No. 2 pelts quoted at $16.25 to $17.

P 0 ULT RY
During the week ended Friday, December l, commercial broiler markets
opened weaker in south~ and about steady in~ Texas, reports the State
Department of Agriculture. Prices in south Texas held steady throughout the trading period, while those in east Texas fluctuated slightly and closed higher. Friday quotations were 16¢ per lb. in south Texas and 15¢ to 15.9¢ in east Texas, with
34% of the sales in the latter area at undetermined prices. During the corresponding period of 1959, closing quotes were 16¢ in south Texas and 16¢ to 17~¢ in east
Texas.
The Southwest Poultry Exchange offered 75,800 broilers on Friday, of
which 63,300 sold at 15~¢ to 15.7¢ (farm producers absorbed all rejected birds)
and 2,500 brought 15.1¢ (buyers absorbed all rejects).
On Monday, December 2, prices in the south Texas commercial broiler ~­
kets were unchanged, and the east Texas markets were about steady. Prices were:
South Texas, 16¢; and east Texas, 15~¢ to 15.8¢, although 44% of the sales were
at undetermined quotes.

Area
BROILER CHICK
PLACEMENTS

Week ended
November 26, 1960

Percentage change from
Previous
Comparable
week
week, 1959

Texas •.•.•.
Louisiana ••

1,730,000
362,000

-2
-6

3
21

22 states ••

29.692,000

-1

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