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Occupational Compensation Survey U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 2458   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  S.M.S.U. LIBRARY  National Summary, 1993  FEB 1 5 1995  U.S. DEPOSITORY  Preface This bulletin presents pay data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' 1993 Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP). The Bureau publishes a bulletin for most individual OCSP localities surveyed, and in addition to summarizing these locality survey results, this bulletin presents 1993 national and regional estimates of occupational pay. The primary objective of OCSP surveys is to describe the level and distribution of occupational pay in a variety of the Nation's labor markets, using a consistent survey approach. Another OCSP objective is to provide information on the incidence of employee benefits among and within localities. Although this publication does not include benefits data, locality bulletins (listed in appendix table 4, pages A-9 - A-11) present this information when available. OCSP survey data, which assist in the implementation of the Federal Employees Pay Comparability Act of 1990 and the administration of the Service Contract Act of 1965, have a variety of applications in both the public and private sectors. These include wage and salary administration, collective bargaining, and facility site determination. Part I: Pay in the United States and Regions, July 1993 presents 1993 national and regional estimates of pay levels and distributions based on 1992­ 94 surveys. Part II: Pay Comparisons, 1993 provides of relative pay levels which compare broad occupational groups in individual localities to 1993 national estimates. Part III: Locality Pay, 1993 presents occupational pay averages for localities surveyed by the Bureau in 1993.  For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, GPO bookstores, and the Publication Sales Center, Bureau of Labor Statistics, P.O. Box 2145, Chicago, IL 60690-2145.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The Bureau's Office of Compensation and Working Conditions developed and produced this bulletin. Philip M. Doyle managed the project. Bruce J. Bergman, Gayle C. Griffith, Matthew P. Napolitano, John H. Samonsky, Dolphene F. Williams and Maggie L. Williams of the Division of Occupational Pay and Employee Benefit Levels prepared the tables and text. Carl B. Barsky and Richard W. Maylott of the Directorate of Survey Processing coordinated the data file formation and tabulations. Joan Coleman, Penny L. James, Philip N. Selby, and Glenn Springer of the Statistical Methods Group provided the statistical analysis. Field economists from the Bureau's eight regional offices, under the direction of the Assistant Regional Commissioners for Operations, collected the survey data. Without the cooperation of the many private firms and government jurisdictions that provided pay data, this report would not have been possible. The Bureau thanks all survey respondents for their cooperation. For further information on this program, please call (202) 606­ 6220. Material in this bulletin is in the public domain and, with appropriate credit, may be reproduced without permission. This information will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 606-STAT; TDD phone: (202) 606-5897; TDD message referral phone: 1-800-326-2577.  Occupational Compensation Survey U.S. Department of Labor Robert B. Reich, Secretary  National Summary, 1993  Contents Page  Bureau of Labor Statistics Katharine G. Abraham, Commissioner  Introduction  3  Page  Tables—Continued Average pay in goods-producing industries, United States:  Part I: Pay in the United States and Regions, July 1993  D-1.  Professional and administrative occupations............................  73  D-2.  Technical occupations.........................................................  75  Tables:  D-3.  Clerical occupations...................................................................  76  Pay distributions, United States:  D-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations..................................  77  D-5.  Material movement and custodial occupations.........................  78  December 1994 Bulletin 2458   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-1.  Professional and administrative occupations............................  7  A-2.  Technical and protective service occupations.........................  17  A-3.  Clerical occupations....................................................................  12  A-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations...................................  26  E-1.  Professional and administrative occupations............................  A-5.  Material movement and custodial occupations.........................  26  E-2.  Technical and protective service occupations.........................  81  E-3.  Clerical occupations...................................................................  82  E-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations.......... ......................  83  E-5.  Material movement and custodial occupations.........................  84  Average pay in service-producing industries, United States:  Average pay by size of establishment, United States:  B-1.  Professional and administrative occupations............................  31  B-2.  Technical and protective service occupations.........................  40  B-3.  Clerical occupations....................................................................  44  B-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations...................................  48  B-5.  Material movement and custodial occupations.........................  50  79  Part II: Pay Comparisons, 1993 Pay relatives for occupational groups, selected areas:  Average pay by type of area, United States and regions:  F-1.  All industries, full industrial scope..................................................  87  F-2.  All industries, limited industrial scope............................................  90  C-1.  Professional and administrative occupations............................  52  F-3.  Private industry, full industrial scope..............................................  92  C-2.  Technical and protective service occupations.........................  61  F-4.  Private industry, limited industrial scope.........................................  95  C-3.  Clerical occupations....................................................................  65  F-5.  State and local government...........................................................  99  C-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations...................................  69  C-5.  Material movement and custodial occupations.........................  71  For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Mail Stop: SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-9328  ISBN 0-16-045442-5  Occupational Compensation Survey   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  National Summary, 1993  Contents— Continued Page  Page  Tables—Continued  Tables:  Average pay in private industry, selected areas, limited industrial scope:  Pay relatives for occupational groups, establishment characteristics:  G-1.  All industries..........................................................................................  103  K-1.  Administrative occupations............................................  G-2.  Private industry....................................................................................  104  K-2.  Technical occupations...................................................... .................... 171  G-3.  State and local government................................................................  105  K-3.  Clerical occupations.............................................................................. 175  K-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations..................  179  K-5  Material movement and custodial occupations..................................  183  Part III: Locality Pay, 1993  167  Average pay in State and local government, selected areas:  Average pay in all industries, selected areas, full industrial scope:  H-1.  Professional and administrative occupations.....................................  109  L-1.  Professional and administrative occupations...................................... 187  H-2.  Technical and protective service occupations.................................... 118  L-2.  Technical and protective service occupations.................................. 196  H-3.  Clerical occupations............................................................................  121  L-3.  Clerical occupations................................................... ......................... 200  H-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations............................................ 127  L-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations.................  H-5  Material movement and custodial occupations.................................  L-5.  Material movement and custodial occupations................................. 208  130  204  Appendixes:  Average pay in all industries, selected areas, limited industrial scope:  133  A.  Scope and method of survey............................................................ A-1  B.  Occupational descriptions................................................................  1-1.  Administrative occupations......................................................  I-2.  Technical occupations......................................................................... 135  I-3.  Clerical occupations............................................................................ 137  I-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations........................................... 139  1.  I-5  Material movement and custodial occupations................................. 141  2.  Survey scope by establishment characteristics..............................  3.  Area sample used for national and regional estimates.................... A-9  4.  OCSP publications, calendar year 1993..........................................  A-10  5.  OCSP area definitions............................................  A-13  Average pay in private industry, selected areas, full industrial scope:  J-1.  Professional and administrative occupations....................................  144  J-2.  Technical and protective service occupations................................... 152  J-3.  Clerical occupations............................................................................  J-4.  Maintenance and toolroom occupations............................................ 161  J-5  Material movement and custodial occupations.................................  2  155 164  B-1  Appendix tables: Survey scope by industry........................................................................A-6 A-8  Introduction Part I: Pay in the United States and Regions, July 1993 Part I provides estimates of occupational pay for the United States (excluding Alaska and Hawaii) and its census regions. A total of 160 locality pay surveys, with reference dates ranging from November 1992 to January 1994, comprise the national data. Tables A-l through E-5 provide pay data for selected white- and blue-collar occupations common to a variety of industries. The A-series tables provide U.S. estimates of straight-time weekly or hourly pay by occupation, along with pay distributions for the 134 publishable occupational levels. The B-series tables compare national estimates of average straight-time pay for establishments in four size classifications—under 500 employees, 500-999 employees, 1,000-2,499 employees, and 2,500 employees or more. The C-series tables show regional differences in average pay, for all establishments, and for those located in metropolitan areas, along with national estimates for nonmetropolitan areas. The D -series tables provide occupational pay averages for a variety of goodsproducing industries, while the E-series tables present averages for several service producing industries.  Pay relatives in the F-series tables represent how locality pay levels compare to the national estimates (as summarized in the A-series tables of Part 1). Pay relatives in the G-series tables contrast national data for establishments with certain characteristics against national data for all establishments. All tables show relative pay levels for the following broad occupational groups: Professional, Administrative, Technical, Clerical, Maintenance, Material Movement, and Janitors. In addition, the all industries and State and local government tables display pay relatives for the Protective Service occupational group. Part III: Locality Pay, 1993 The Bureau of Labor Statistics published 160 OCSP area bulletins and summaries in 1993. In addition to pay averages (means), each area OCSP publication presented other pay data such as medians, interquartile ranges, and percentile distributions of pay, by occupation. Part III tables summarize previously-published pay averages from all survey areas with a 1993 month of reference.  "Full industrial scope” vs. "Limited industrial scope" Part II: Pay Comparisons, 1993 Each year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics surveys occupational pay in over 150 different localities. Bulletins which summarize survey results for each area may differ in occupational content and reference month. Individual survey reports may contain wage and salary data for several dozen occupations, making it difficult to make comparisons among localities. To facilitate pay comparisons, the Bureau developed measures of relative pay for broad occupational groups. These measures, or pay relatives, express pay levels as a percent of the national pay level. In other words, an area pay relative is the result of dividing pay for an occupational group in a particular locality by the corresponding national pay level, and multiplying by 100. For example, a pay relative of 105 indicates that pay rates in the locality averaged five percent above national pay levels. Part II presents separate pay relatives for all industries, private industry, and State and local government for all areas in the Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP), where available. Because industrial coverage varied among survey areas, some areas may not appear on each table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Full industrial Parts II and /// present two types of tables for private and aft industries. scope* covers the following additional industries compared to limited industrial scope*: I  Industry group  i ■;: \ < Standard Industrial Classification Code(s)  101-149 Mining: ... ., Construction 152-179 : 412 Taxi cabs Services incidental to water transportation 449 Miscellaneous repair services 762-769 . Amusement and recreation services 791-799 Health services 801-809 Legal services 811 ' Educational services : ■. UU;:: 821-829 : Social services : :. :r: . 832-839 ;::: :: Museums, art galleries, and botanical and zoological gardens 841-842 ■ ' '' Religious organizations ■: ■ ’ ■’’ ■: 866 The. full scope represents all private industry with the exception of agriculture, forestry, and fishing, and private households, which are excluded from all OCSP surveys. See Appendix table 4 for related information. Throughout this bulletin, unless otherwise noted, private and alt industries estimates reflect "full industrial scope" coverage.  3  §t|  appear on each table, however, because industrial coverage varied among survey areas. See Appendix table 4 (pages A-10-A-12), for details about industrial coverage.  Part III tables present straight time average weekly pay by locality for professional and administrative occupations, technical and protective service jobs, and clerical occupations, and straight time average hourly pay for maintenance and toolroom jobs, and material movement and custodial occupations. Straight time weekly pay for white-collar workers relates to regular average (mean) straight time salaries that are paid for standard work weeks. The H- and I-series tables present all-industry occupational pay averages, by area. The J- and K-series tables provide private industry pay data, and the Lseries tables show State and local government averages. Some areas may not   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Appendixes Appendix A describes the concepts, methods, and coverage used in the Occupational Compensation Survey Program. Appendix B includes the descriptions used by Bureau field economists to classify workers into survey occupations.  4   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Part I: Pay in the United States and Regions, July 1993   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200 and under 300  Middle range  1200  1300  1400  1600  300  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100 -  -  -  -  -  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  9 7 5 5 9 10 14  48 50 42 43 54 36 41  33 33 34 34 32 38 35  9 9 17 15 5 13 7  1 1 2 2 (3) 3 2  <3) <3) (3>  (3) <3) <3)  (3) (3) (3)  16 14 10 9 16 9 26  41 42 36 37 47 33 34  30 31 35 35 29 35 22  9 9 15 15 5 16 8  2 2 3 3 1 5 3  (3> <3> 1 1 <3) 1 i3>  (3) (3) <3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  <3) <3i <3i <3i  <3> <3)  _  8 7 6 6 8 5 13  29 29 26 26 31 17 31  34 34 32 33 35 40 33  20 21 25 25 17 24 12  6 6 8 8 5 9 5  2 2 2 2 2 4 1  <3> <3> <3) <3) <3) (3> t3)  (3) (3> <3i <3> <3) 1 (3>  <3) (3) <3) (3> (3)  (3)  1 i3) <3) <3) 1 <3> 4  _ _  _  (3) (3)  _  1 <3> (3) <3> (3> i3) 2  2 1 1 1 1 1 6  11 9 8 8 10 5 18  27 25 24 25 27 21 34  27 29 27 29 30 29 21  18 19 21 21 18 21 14  8 9 10 9 8 13 3  4 5 6 5 4 6 1  1 2 2 1 1 2 i3)  (3i  (3> t3> (3i (3i 1  3 2 1 1 3 2 12  6 5 4 4 6 2 10  15 15 11 12 19 18 18  26 25 26 27 24 20 38  19 20 19 20 20 22 9  (3>  (3>  <3)  1 1 <3i <3) 1  3 2 1 1 3 5  13 9 8 8 10 7  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  3000  3000 and over  Professional Occupations Accountants 18,745 14,352 4,791 4,115 9,561 1,023 4,393  Transportation and utilities ..............  39.2 39.2 39.8 39.8 38.8 39.9 39.5  $497 499 524 517 486 516 491  $488 488 514 503 480 507 490  $442 444 461 460 439 453 421  60,869 51,082 20,172 18,222 30,910 3,821 9,787  39.4 39.4 39.8 39.8 39.1 39.8 39.4  589 594 619 621 578 630 560  578 585 610 610 574 623 554  523 531 550 550 520 555 481  74,083 62,768 29,641 26,936 33,127 5,145 11,315  39.5 39.5 39.8 39.7 39.3 39.8 39.4  741 747 762 761 734 777 709  735 739 757 757 727 763 705  664 672 683 682 657 704 634  35,133 28,963 14,016 12,438 14,947 2,710 6,170  39.5 39.5 39.8 39.8 39.3 39.9 39.5  950 966 982 970 951 995 873  931 949 960 953 934 973 883  849 864 875 872 848 890 788  9,221 8,477 4,049 3,765 4,428 918 744  39.6 39.6 39.7 39.7 39.5 39.7 39.6  1,233 1,245 1,279 1,261 1,214 1,256 1,097  1,198 1,212 1,247 1,234 1,183 1,231 1,119  1,105 1,112 1,133 1,130 1,091 1,111 1,014  1,418 1,303 721 645 582 130  39.4 39.4 39.7 39.7 39.0 39.9  1,522 1,545 1,549 1,501 1,539 1,595  1,484 1,500 1,493 1,466 1,517 1,632  1,351 1,382 1,380 1,363 1,382 1,478  _ _ _ _  _ _  _ _  _  _  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _ _  -  $543 544 584 576 530 576 539  (3)  644 647 679 681 628 691 624  <3) (3> (3) (3i  810 816 830 829 799 844 769 1,033 1,049 1,062 1,049 1,027 1,078 953 1,338 1,348 1,374 1,356 1,317 1,357 1,178 1,642 1,648 1,632 1,613 1,663 1,710  _  _ _ _  1  _ _  _ _ _  _ _  _ _  1 1 <3) <3) 1 6 (3) t3) t3) t3) <3)  _ _  _  (3)  _ _  _  _  _  _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _  _  _ _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  1  _  _ _  _  _ _  (3)  _  _ _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  _ _  _  _ _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _  (3)  7  -  (3>  <3) <3>  -  _  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  _  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  _  1 1 1 <3) 1 1 n  t3> (3i <3i (3) <3)  <3> (3> (3>  (3> <3) <3) i3)  -  -  14 15 18 19 12 15 7  12 13 13 12 12 14 3  3 3 3 2 2 3 1  17 18 21 23 15 6  33 35 35 38 35 25  22 24 22 23 26 48  6 6 7 3 6 2  _  (3t t3)  <3)  <3) <3)  _  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _ -  _  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  2 2 4 3 (3) 1  <3) (3i <3) <3) <3) 2  i3) (3> (3)  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  3 3 4 3 2 2  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  _  _  _  _  _  1 1 1 (3) 1 2  <3) (3) 1  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  (3>  -  -  -  -  _  1 1 1 _  1 2  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200 and under 300  Middle range  300  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  3000  3000 and over  _  Accountants, Public  Private industry.................................... Service producing..............................  1CL308 10,308  39.5 39.5  598 598  586 586  557 557  _ -  641 641  _ -  <3> (3>  6 6  53 53  32 32  7 7  2 2  “  f 31 (3) (3)  Level III.................................................. Private industry....................................  11,784 11,784  39.4 39.4  695 695  682 682  625 625  _  749 749  _  _  -  -  <3) <3>  15 15  42 42  28 28  11 11  3 3  1 1  -  <3> (3) <3>  7 7 7  19 19 19  20 20 20  21 21 21  16 16 16  6  -  6 6  5 5 5  3 3 3  2 2 2  (3) (3i (3)  (3> (3> (3>  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  3  1  5  17 4 5  31 20 22 6 36  26 41 45 12 20  11 13 13 3 10  5 8 9 35 4  3 4 3 22 2  2 6 1 7 1  1 2 1 9 t3)  <3) 1 1 6 -  (3) (3) (3>  — 741  -  — -  -  ~  -  -  -  -  -  1,024 1,088 1,179 1,121 1,063 1,158 939  _ -  (3i  1 (3)  7 <3>  20 22 11 10 25 1 19  22 26 27 31 26 31 18  12 19 25 23 18 27 5  6 9 14 13 8 11 4  5 5 6 5 4 9 4  3 5 10 9 4 5 2  3 4 7 3 3 6 2  (3) n (3) <3> (3>  <3> (3)  _  _  _  _  _  _  (3> (3) 13  18 8 11 9 27  (3)  -  -  -  -  -  “  -  -  1 (3)  2 <3)  4 1  11 4 1 1 5 4 22  16 11 8 7 13 6 22  14 15 7 7 18 16 14  14 18 11 11 20 18 9  11 15 14 15 15 16 6  19 26 46 50 20 31 9  5 7 9 6 6 7 2  1 2 3 2 2 1 t3)  (3) (3> (3) <3) 1 <3)  <3) t3) (3) <3) (3)  3 (3) (3) <3> 1  6 2 1 1 2 (3) 12  13 4 2 3 5 1 27  7 8 4 4 10 6 5  23 28 25 27 29 24 15  22 28 22 22 31 40 12  13 18 27 26 13 22 4  7 9 16 14 5 5 3  Level IV.................................................. Private industry.................................... Service producing..............................  5,273 5,273 5,273  39.4 39.4 39.4  938 938 938  912 912 912  794 794 794  Attorneys Level I.................................................... Private industry.................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  2,780 821 729 68 1,959  38.9 38.7 38.6 40.0 39.0  715 807 777 983 677  691 768 767  614 700 687  657  — 592  Level II................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  7,617 3,610 882 734 2,728 282 4,007  38.9 38.9 39.3 39.2 38.8 39.8 38.9  928 1,007 1,093 1,066 979 1,059 857  907 982 1,035 1,021 950 1,050 826  786 864 993 993 845 910 730  Level III.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  11,095 6,540 1,697 1,507 4,843 530 4,555  39.0 39.0 39.8 39.8 38.7 39.7 39.1  1,224 1,319 1,410 1,397 1,287 1,331 1,087  1,207 1,306 1,438 1,436 1,262 1,335 1,045  1,039 1,152 1,297 1,297 1,142 1,175 948  Level IV.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  9,284 5,816 2,025 1,789 3,791 503 3,468  39.2 39.0 39.7 39.6 38.6 39.3 39.6  1,554 1,684 1,757 1,741 1,644 1,700 1,336  1,555 1,641 1,751 1,728 1,619 1,690 1,290  1,290 1,497 1,569 1,555 1,457 1,551 1,152  -  -  -  _  -  _  “ _  —  1,046 1,046 1,046 778 849 826  1,407 1,454 1,500 1,493 1,416 1,445 1,204  _  -  1,766 1,853 1,952 1,925 1,775 1,824 1,544  _ -  l3)  -  -  22 3  1  _  _  (3i  — -  -  1  (3i (3> 2  (3) (3) 4  1 (3> 9  _  _  _  _  1  2  1  -  -  -  -  3  5  3  (3)  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (3)  5  <3)  8  <3> <3>  9  ~  _  _  _  _  -  -  _ -  _ _ -  _ _ -  2 3 2 2 3 1 (3>  1 1 1 1 2 1 <3)  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  (3i <3i  (3» <3>  <3>  _ <3)  <3)  <3)  -  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours' (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200 and under 300  Middle range  300 400  Level V..................................... Private industry...................... Goods producing................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities .  4,110 2,591 1,187 1,101 1,404 241  39.3 39.1 39.8 39.8 38.5 39.1  $1,870 2,084 2,055 2,040 2,110 2,030  $1,860 2,029 2,025 2,011 2,034 1,966  $1,487 1,866 1,856 1,830 1,884 1,849  -  $2,091 2,260 2,211 2,198 2,300 2,202  Level VI.................................... Private industry...................... Goods producing................. Service producing...............  867 496 208 288  39.3 38.8 38.9 38.8  2,211 2,602 2,607 2,598  2,146 2,544 2,549 2,534  1,644 2,319 2,334 2,319  -  2,618 2,861 2,861 2,857  Engineers Level I..................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing................ Manufacturing................... Service producing............... Transportation and utilities State and local government...  30,598 26,421 16,052 14,776 10,369 1,327 4,177  39.8 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 39.9 38.7  652 659 677 678 630 702 612  651 658 675 677 629 709 612  595 601 625 627 570 669 569  _ -  710 715 730 730 690 734 664  _ -  Level II.................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing................ Manufacturing................... Service producing............... Transportation and utilities State and local government...  88,389 79,290 55,152 52,991 24,138 5,173 9,099  39.9 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 39.2  748 750 758 757 730 775 734  741 743 753 752 714 768 728  683 686 698 698 664 702 645  _ “  808 808 813 809 792 832 826  _ -  <3>  Level III.................................. Private industry..................... Goods producing ................ Manufacturing................... Sen/ice producing............... Transportation and utilities State and local government...  181,620 160,123 118,689 114,804 41,434 9,849 21,497  39.9 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 39.9 39.5  875 879 880 878 878 930 841  861 864 863 861 866 924 840  793 798 801 800 786 854 736  -  943 946 942 939 957 1,000 912  -  -  600  -  <3) (3i n 1  (3>  39.9 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 39.9 39.5  1,058 1,064 1,057 1,054 1,080 1,097 989  1,046 1,053 1,046 1,044 1,069 1,088 995  958 962 958 957 976 1,002 880  _ -  1,146 1,150 1,140 1,136 1,174 1,174 1,071  -  -  Level V................................... Private industry.................... Goods producing ............... Manufacturing.................. Sen/ice producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  140,689 133,398 100,362 97,014 33,036 4,348 7,291  39.9 40.0 40.0 40.0 39.9 39.9 39.5  1,271 1,277 1,272 1,267 1,292 1,282 1,157  1,257 1,264 1,260 1,258 1,275 1,274 1,147  1,148 1,156 1,154 1,153 1,164 1,183 1,058  _  1,375 1,380 1,372 1,366 1,404 1,356 1,214  -  -  —  —  -  -  700  700 800  800 900  900 1000  1000 1100  1100  1200  1300  1400  1200  1300  1400  1600  (3)  3 (3)  5 (3)  26  (3)  (3)  -  4 4 1 1 7 (3i 7  23 21 15 14 29 5 36  44 45 47 47 41 41 43  5  (3)  5  2  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) <3)  <3i (3> i3) <3> <3> i3) 2  5 4 3 3 7 (3> 12  27 27 23 23 36 23 27  20  6  20  6  21 21  6 6 4  <3) (3) t3) <3) (3) (3) <3>  1 t3) <3> (3> <3) (3i 5  4 4 3 4 5 1 9  36 37  10  39 39 31  11  27 28  19  <3i <3> (3> t3)  <3i (3> <3> i3) <3) t3)  (3> <;> <3> <3> <3) <3) 3  10  27 28 29 29 27 29 18  -  —  — <3> <3) (3) -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  600  1600  1800  1800  2000  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  2200  2400  2600  2800  3000  9  (3> (3) (3) (3> (3> "  7 7 3 5  18  29 17  10 10 10  9 5 17 (3)  1  (3)  (3) (3)  (3)  (3)  (!) (3)  1  6  2  10  (3)  17 <19 s15  (3) (3)  2  2  9 9  9  8  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  4 4 4 4 4 5 5  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  19  28  4 4 3 3 5 4  10  2  20 20 20 21  11 11 11 11  21  19  20 21 21  20 20 21  (3)  9 5  4  22  19 23 35  19 26 8  (3) 1  5 3  (3) (3) (3)  1 1 1 1 1  3000 and over  1 1 (3) (3) 2  3  1  -  205,962 189,460 135,551 130,633 53,909 11,787 16,502  "  500  500  1  Level IV.................................. Private industry.................... . Goods producing............... . Manufacturing.................. Sen/ice producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  -  400  (3) (3) (3)  1 1 1  (3) 1 (3)  (3)  (3) (3)  (3)  (3) (3)  (3) (3)  (3)  (3)  (3)  (3)  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Average Occupation and level  of workers  hours1 (stan­ dard)  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200  Mean  Median  300  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  under 300  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  3000  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  i3> <3> (3> (3i <3>  -  -  -  -  -  1 1 1 1 2 <3) 6  3 3 3 3 4 1 10  9 7 6 7 9 6 54  15 15 14 14 18 20 7  41 42 42 43 41 38 9  23 23 25 25 18 25 8  6 6 6 6 6 9 1  2 2 2 1 2 1 t3)  (3) (3) (3) (3) <3) (3)  -  (3> (3> (3> <3> 1 1 3  (3) (3) (3)  -  i3> i3> i3) <3)  <3) (3) (3)  -  (3) <3) (3) <3) <3)  (3> (3) <3) <35  <3)  2 1 1 1  5 3 3 3 4 1  19 19 17 17 25 15  35 36 38 38 31 22  23 24 27 27 18 36  12 12 11 11 14 17  5 3 3 3 5  14 14 11 11 23  27 27 24 24 36  -  Middle range  Level VI........................................ Private industry .......................... Goods producing .... ................ Manufacturing........................ Service producing.................... Transportation and utilities .... State and local government.......  55,155 53,221 40,072 38,204 13,149 952 1,934  40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 39.9 39.8  $1,513 1,521 1,531 1,523 1,488 1,532 1,292  $1,501 1,509 1,522 1,517 1,470 1,530 1,260  $1,379 1,390 1,403 1,401 1,354 1,377 1,205  Level VII....................................... Private industry.......................... Goods producing..................... Manufacturing........................ Service producing..................... Transportation and utilities .....  12,932 12,577 8,850 8,508 3,727 137  40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 39.9  1,756 1,766 1,774 1,766 1,745 1,871  1,731 1,737 1,755 1,748 1,704 1,859  1,592 1,606 1,626 1,623 1,563 1,671  Level VIII....................................... Private industry........................... Goods producing ...................... Manufacturing......................... Service producing.....................  2,099 2,060 1,491 1,457 569  40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0  2,072 2,081 2,117 2,103 1,989  2,032 2,035 2,068 2,064 1,946  1,851 1,863 1,898 1,897 1,780  Budget Analysts Level I........................................... Private industry........................... Service producing.....................  786 382 238  39.5 39.3 38.9  530 513 489  520 502 480  463 447 423  Level II...... ........... ....................... Private industry.... ...................... Goods producing...................... Manufacturing......................... Sen/ice producing..................... Transportation and utilities ..... State and local government........  3,385 2,189 958 916 1,231 197 1,196  39.4 39.3 39.9 39.9 38.8 39.6 39.4  606 607 632 625 588 598 602  590 591 605 605 578 585 586  530 538 560 557 521 488 510  _  Level III......................................... Private industry........................... Goods producing ...................... Manufacturing......................... Service producing..................... Transportation and utilities ..... State and local government........  4,825 2,443 1,125 1,078 1,318 287 2,382  39.6 39.5 39.7 39.7 39.3 39.9 39.7  787 792 832 826 759 795 782  777 774 805 801 737 760 785  702 697 739 739 675 733 705  _  Level IV......................................... Private industry........................... Goods producing...................... Manufacturing......................... Service producing..................... Transportation and utilities ...... State and local government.........  2,887 2,038 1,089 1,041 949 226 849  39.4 39.5 39.8 39.8 39.1 39.4 39.4  909 913 909 889 917 969 899  895 896 896 895 901 948 890  810 810 808 799 810 883 815  _  $1,631 1,635 1,642 1,635 1,601 1,651 1,321 -  -  1,909 1,913 1,910 1,905 1,920 2,003  -  -  -  -  -  <3>  1  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  ■-  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  t3) t3)  (3> 1  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  (3) <3)  (3)  2,274 2,274 2,284 2,274 2,208  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  _  615 558 537  -  (3i <3i  '  2  1 _  _  _ _ _ _  '  —  _ _  3000 and over  <3) -  -  -  -  3 3 2 2 4 5  1 1 1 1 2 3  (3> (3) (3> <3) (3) 1  (3) (3) (3) (3) -  -  23 23 28 29 11  16 16 16 16 17  10 10 11 11 6  5 5 5 4 3  1 1 1 1 1  1 1 1 1 <3)  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Administrative Occupations  -  -  -  —  669 664 680 679 643 716 674 883 883 931 931 825 878 883 993 993 987 977 996 1,041 992  9 7 10  33 41 52  31 36 28  26 13 7  2 3 3  -  1 1  -  -  -  -  15 13 4 4 20 18 17  38 41 43 44 40 28 34  28 29 33 34 27 17 24  1 (3)  1  5 3 1 1 5 2 6 1  _  -  -  1 9 3  _  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  (3>  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  —  -  -  (3) (3) <3) -  2  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  10  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  11 10 12 11 9 24 13  6 4 6 6 3 3 9  (3> 1 1 1 (3)  (3>  <3)  _  (3>  _ _ _ _ _  19 22 16 16 27 16 16  31 34 31 32 37 46 28  27 18 19 19 17 17 37  5 5 8 8 3 (3i 5  14 15 16 17 13 7 14  33 34 34 35 34 20 32  t3)  t3)  <3) (3) (3) 1  <3)  (3> <3) <3>  <3) 1  _ _  12 17 23 24 12 12 6  5 5 8 7 2 8 4  <3) 1 2 (3)  24 24 21 21 26 38  14 13 11 12 15 17 14  6 6 5 5 8 13 7  u  <3i (3i  (3i <3)  (3i  (3>  (3) (3) (3)  _  <3) (3) i3)  _ _  _  _  _ _  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 1 1 1 1 4 2  1 1 2 (3> 1 1 <3>  (3> 1 1  <3> (3i (3)  (3) (3) <3)  (3) (3) (3>  _ _ _  _ _  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours’ (stan-  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200 and  Middle range  300  400  600  700  39.5 39.1 39.6  $969 1,064 943  $974 1,106 937  $837 960 805  363 219 144  39.7 39.7 39.6  1,172 1,219 1,102  1,152 1,160 1,124  1,033 1,068 931  9,940 8,172 5,060 4,835 3,112 215 1,768  39.7 39.7 39.9 39.9 39.5 39.8 39.3  491 497 504 503 484 489 468  482 487 493 490 478 496 461  430 434 432 430 434 434 394  32,045 28,298 21,191 20,110 7,107 894 3,747  39.7 39.7 39.8 39.8 39.4 39.8 39.3  624 628 633 632 615 659 593  618 620 627 624 600 634 595  557 561 566 565 549 576 508  22,974 21,390 17,444 16,763 3,946 1,257 1,584  39.8 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.7 39.8 39.3  828 836 832 831 853 884 717  816 822 816 814 849 882 714  735 746 739 738 768 806 618  7,164 6,880 5,636 5,375 1,244 401 284  39.8 39.9 39.9 39.9 39.8 39.6 39.1  992 996 992 983 1,013 1,044 914  973 977 969 965 1,000 1,020 886  885 888 880 877 923 947 803  — _ _  _ _  $1,106 1,114 1,101 1,228 1,251 1,205  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  963 941 798 778 143  39.7 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.7  1,212 1,211 1,206 1,186 1,242  1,186 1,186 1,186 1,184 1,197  1,075 1,075 1,065 1,062 1,096  —  _ _ _ _ _  _  _ _ _ _ _ _  543 543 556 556 530 500 536 684 685 689 688 677 745 674  _ _  912 916 912 910 930 952 819  _ _ _ _ _ _  1,075 1,077 1,075 1,066 1,081 1,106 1,017  _ _ _ _  _ _ _  _  1,298 1,294 1,290 1,281 1,320  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  -  -  -  2000  1800  —  4  16 16 16  15 14 15  24 38 20  6 13 4  <3) 1 <3)  2 3 1  -  —  -  —  _  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  5  22 13 25  -  _  8 1 10  —  -  3 1 3  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  3  13 8 22  25 35 10  23 18 31  17 17 16  6 9 3  4 3 7  2 4  2 4  1 1  1 1  n <3)  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  3  8  (3> (3)  15 13 13 13 14 12 26  42 43 40 41 47 51 36  32 33 34 33 33 29 28  8 8 10 10 5 5 7  2 2 3 3 1 3 1  <3i <3)  (3)  <3) <3) (3) (3) (3)  (3>  1  9 8 8 8 10 3 17  31 32 30 30 39 33 29  37 38 40 40 31 30 29  16 16 16 16 15 20 16  4 4 4 4 4 7 3  1 1 1 1 1 5 <3>  (*)  2 1 1 1 1  13 12 12 12 9 6 23  29 29 31 31 23 16 25  27 28 27 27 32 34 17  18 18 17 17 22 28 9  8 8 8 8 10 11 2  2 2 3 3 1 3 1  <3i <3)  (3i (3>  (3i <3) 1 2  (3> (3>  (3i  1  7 6 7 7 3 2 20  22 22 23 24 16 10 26  27 28 27 27 31 26 23  23 23 22 22 29 36 12  11 11 11 10 13 14 12  5 5 5 5 5 5 1  3 3 3 2 3 6 1  _  (3i1  _  _  _  6  _  _  _  1 (3) <3> (3) <3) (3) 9  _ _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  (3i  <3>  _ _  -  _  <3>  _  1  13 <3) <3) <3) <3)  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  1  _  (3i  (3) 1 <3> 3  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  _  -  _  _  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  _  3000  1600  _  <3) *  2800  1400  _  _  2400  3000 and over  1300  _  _  2800  1200  -  1  2600  2600  1100  —  1  2400  1000  _  _  2200  2200  900  —  _  2000  800  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  900  700  500  Budget Analyst Supervisors 408 87 321  800  600  400  300  500  11  1 1 1 1 1  2 2 2 2 1  t3) n n  9 9 11 11 3  -  -  n (3) n <3> t3> (3> (3i (3> <3> (3t i3> (3> (3>  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  —  (3) (3>  18 19 18 18 22  _  -  21 22 21 21 25  23 23 24 24 21  (3t  8 8 8 8 8  (3) (3> (3> (3) (3> (3)  1 1 1 1 1 1 -  13 12 12 12 13  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  <3) (3) <3)  <3>  _  <3>  _  _  _  _  (3>  -  -  -  -  i3)  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  i3) <3)  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  2 2 2 1 5  1 1 1 2  -  <3i  -  (3>  1 1 1 -  <3)  n i3) (3i (3i -  -  -  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Computer Programmers Level I.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities ..............  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200 and under 300  Middle range  300  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  3000  300C and over  <3> (3)  _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _  (3> (3) (3) (3) (3) (3 \ (3)  _ -  _ -  _ _ _ -  _ _ -  _ _ _  _ -  _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ -  9,165 7,940 1,987 1,835 5,953 740 1 225  39.6 39.6 39.7 39.8 39.5 39.8 39 6  $522 531 582 573 515 573  $516 524 558 546 515 564  $454 462 496 495 455 523  -  $586 594 665 655 572 633  -  11 7 3 4 8 2 33  33 32 22 23 36 13  36 38 33 35 39 46  17 19 28 28 15 34  3 3 10 7 1 4 ( 3 )  1 1 4 3 (3) (3)  Level II................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing..............................  38,900 33,384 10,878 10,549 22,506  39.5 39.5 39.7 39.7 39.4  607 615 649 647 599  601 608 646 645 594  543 557 584 581 540  -  670 674 709 708 649  <3) (3>  1 t3)  — <3t  r3>  13 10 6 7 12  36 36 26 26 41  34 36 39 39 35  14 14 24 24 10  2 2 4 3 2  State and local government.................  5!516  39.5  559  557  473  -  624  -  5  29  32  24  8  2  1 1 1 1 (3> (3 1 <3)  -  -  Level III.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  55,985 47,262 12,719 12,458 34,543 5,754 8,723  39.4 39.4 39.4 39.4 39.3 39.9 39.5  710 718 730 729 714 766 668  707 712 732 732 706 753 671  643 653 672 672 647 706 582  _ -  771 777 794 794 768 835 742  _ -  t3) <3)  2 1 2 2 1 <3) 9  11 9 7 8 10 5 21  34 35 26 26 38 18 31  35 37 42 43 35 44 27  13 14 18 18 12 16 10  4 4 3 3 5 17 3  (3) (3) 1 (3) (3) <3) 1  <3) (3) (3) (3) (3> <3> <3)  (3> (3) (3) <3)  Level IV.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  23,820 22,741 9,395 9,307 13,346 1,011 1,079  39.4 39.4 39.9 39.9 39.0 39.6 39.1  853 855 854 853 855 936 813  839 839 837 837 843 924 812  776 779 778 777 779 865 697  _ — -  916 915 907 907 919 996 927  _ -  _ -  <3> <3)  1 (3) <3> (3) (3)  4 3 3 3 3 2 18  28 29 28 29 29 7 20  38 39 40 40 38 29 23  20 20 19 19 21 38 19  7 7 7 7 7 15 6  2 2 2 2 2 8 5  Level V................................................... Private industry.................................... Service producing..............................  10,418 10,305 3,861  39.7 39.7 39.3  993 993 980  975 974 972  917 917 910  _ -  1,046 1,046 1,039  _ -  _ -  _ -  _  -  <3) <3) (3)  1 1 1  18 18 21  43 43 42  25 25 25  Computer Systems Analysts Level I.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  42,287 37,321 12,284 11,925 25,037 3,597 4,966  39.5 39.5 39.7 39.7 39.4 39.8 39.6  724 732 743 739 726 784 668  713 719 725 724 714 779 662  650 658 668 667 654 705 569  -  789 793 801 797 789 854 755  -  (3) (3) (3) (3) <3)  1 1 1 1 1 t3) 8  10 8 7 7 8 2 24  33 33 31 31 35 22 29  33 35 37 37 34 33 21  16 16 16 15 16 33 11  5 5 5 5 4 9 4  2 2 3 3 1 2 2  -  -  (3) (3)  -  2  <3) i3) 1  8  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  12  <3) n  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ _ -  _  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ -  (3> (3) (3i <3> <3) 1 -  <3> (3>  (3> (3>  _  _  _  _  _  _  _ <3) <3)  _ (3> -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  7 7 7  4 4 2  2 2 1  (3i (3) 1  t3) (3) (3)  _ _ -  _ _ -  _  _  _  _  _  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  <3) (3) 1 1 (3> (3) (3)  (3) (3> <3) (3) (3) <3)  (3) (3) (3) t3) (3)  (3) <3) (3)  <3) (3) (3)  _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _  _  (3>  _  _  _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _  -  -  -  -  _ -  -  -  -  _ _  _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _  -  -  -  -  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of—  Middle range  Level II.................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing................ Manufacturing................... Service producing............... Transportation and utilities State and local government...  106,990 90,268 24,230 23,453 66,038 12,892 16,722  39.4 39.3 39.5 39.5 39.2 39.3 39.8  $859 861 877 873 855 899 844  $853 851 866 864 847 887 876  $780 782 791 789 779 824 769  -  $927 931 952 947 922 983 927  Level III................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing................ Manufacturing................... Service producing............... Transportation and utilities State and local government...  63,652 59,224 18,736 18,201 40,488 5,309 4,428  39.3 39.3 39.5 39.5 39.2 39.9 39.6  1,018 1,025 1,049 1,045 1,014 1,048 933  1,009 1,014 1,037 1,035 1,006 1,044 965  932 936 952 952 931 973 847  _ -  Level IV................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing................ Manufacturing................... Service producing............... Transportation and utilities State and local government...  19,212 18,855 5,964 5,753 12,891 1,235 357  39.3 39.3 39.8 39.8 39.1 39.8 39.7  1,224 1,226 1,238 1,229 1,220 1,269 1,157  1,210 1,211 1,226 1,220 1,204 1,266 1,163  1,119 1,120 1,130 1,126 1,115 1,200 1,066  _ -  Level V............................... .... Private industry ..................... Goods producing................ Service producing...............  2,457 2,453 588 1,865  39.5 39.5 40.0 39.4  1,487 1,487 1,511 1,480  1,477 1,477 1,529 1,455  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers Level I.................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing ............... . Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  10,169 7,916 1,154 1,034 6,762 753 2,253  39.4 39.3 39.6 39.5 39.3 40.0 39.8  1,086 1,116 1,195 1,189 1,103 1,142 981  Level II................................... Private industry.................... Goods producing ............... Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  9,603 8,844 1,670 1,588 7,174 587 759  39.2 39.2 39.4 39.4 39.1 39.4 39.9  1,278 1,288 1,369 1,357 1,269 1,403 1,165  200 and under 300  300 400  400  500  700  800  2600  2800  2600  2800  3000  <3> t3) (3)  .  _  — +  ~ -  — -  — -  —  _ —  35 36 32 33 37 36 29  24 21 24 23 21 24 35  8 9 11 10 8 18 4  2 2 4 3 2 3 2  1 1 1 1 (3> 1 t3)  (3) (3> (3> (3> t3) (3) <3>  <3) (!) (3) <3) (3)  (3> <3)  3 2 2 2 3 1 7  13 13 12 12 14 9 15  30 30 26 26 31 24 38  29 30 29 29 31 40 15  15 15 18 18 14 16 9  6 6 8 8 5 7 3  2 2 3 3 2 2 (3)  1 1 2 1 1 1 1  (3> <3) (3> (3> (3>  <!> <3) <3)  5  1 <3) (3) <3) (3) <3> 6  ~  -  ” “  _ -  -  <;> (3) i3) <3) (3>  1 1 <3) t3) 1 <3> (3>  5 5 4 4 6 1 6  15 15 13 14 16 6 36  26 26 25 25 26 18 24  25 25 25 26 25 46 23  16 16 20 20 14 17 7  10 10 10 9 10 11 2  2 2 2 1 2 2 2  <3) (3) (s) (3> <3)  <3) <3) <a) (3> (3)  _ -  "  -  -  1 1 1 1  3 3 3 3  10 10 9 10  20 20 13 22  42 42 43 41  20 20 26 18  4 4 5 4  1 1 “ 1  ~  “  2 <3>  4 1 1 (3) 15  5 5 3 3 5 4 7  15 16 9 8 17 14 14  27 27 18 19 29 18 28  22 25 26 26 25 24 12  14 15 18 20 14 31 10  6 6 12 12 5 6 3  3 4 11 10 3 3 2  (3) 1 2 2 (3>  (3) (3) <3)  (3> <3)  _  _  -  ~  —  <3) <3)  3 3 2 2 3 2 6  12 11 6 6 12 7 19  21 19 14 14 21 7 41  22 23 15 15 25 18 10  20 21 22 23 21 20 11  16 17 29 29 14 28 9  5 5 11 10 4 12 <3)  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  1,356 1,356 1,390 1,350  _ -  1,599 1,599 1,625 1,593  _  _  _  ”  —  "  '  1,082 1,106 1,181 1,178 1,093 1,165 1,019  989 1,017 1,064 1,064 1,008 1,059 802  -  1,188 1,205 1,301 1,290 1,187 1,234 1,101  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1,262 1,271 1,359 1,354 1,252 1,374 1,124  1,152 1,164 1,232 1,225 1,155 1,244 1,077  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  (3> (3) (3) (3) (3)  -  2400  2400  23 24 23 23 25 15 18  1,314 1,316 1,326 1,319 1,307 1,312 1,228  -  2200  2200  6 6 5 5 6 2 8  -  _  2000  2000  1 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 5  _  -  1800  1800  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  -  _  1600  1600  1000  _  1,382 1,387 1,487 1,481 1,361 1,536 1,250  1400  1400  900  -  -  1300  1300  800  _  _  1200  1200  700  1,094 1,098 1,130 1,124 1,086 1,101 1,022  -  1100  600  -  -  1000  500  -  _  900  1100  <3)  <3)  t3) -  10  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  (3)  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  1  2  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  600  13  “  ” (3) ~  -  t3)  —  ~  —  “ “ ~ “  ~  — _ ~  _  ~ -  ■ —  ~  — —  —  — _ -  -  ~ ~  -  -  ~ — — ”  — —  — “ -  ~ —  -  ~ ~  —  ~  ~ t3)  -  —  ” —  — —  —  — ■  1 1 1 (3) 1 4  (3) <s) (3)  t3> (3) (3)  ~  “  (3) 1  t3) -  (3) (3)  — -  -  _  _  -  “ ~ “  ~ ~ -  “ (3)  -  t3)  ~  3000 and over  -  -  —  ~ — ~  -  ~  -  -  —  —  ~  -  —  -  -  —  -  —  ~  —  "  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of—  Middle range  200 and under 300  300  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  3000  (3) (3) (3)  Level III.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Sen/ice producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  2,305 2,226 563 497 1,663 154 79  39.0 38.9 38.6 38.4 39.0 39.9 39.5  $1,571 1,575 1,619 1,575 1,561 1,606 1,452  $1,555 1,560 1,607 1,560 1,555 1,558 -  $1,422 1,427 1,440 1,427 1,422 1,505 -  -  $1,696 1,698 1,728 1,690 1,686 1,744 -  -  -  _ -  -  _ _ -  _ _ _ -  _ _ _ -  _ _ _ -  1 t3) (3) (3) 1 _ 3  2 2 (3) t3) 2 5 1  6 6 2 3 7 1 19  14 13 16 18 12 8 30  38 38 31 34 41 46 22  29 29 36 36 27 28 20  8 8 7 5 8 3 3  3 3 4 2 3 6 3  1 1 2 1 <3> 3 -  <3) (3) 1 (3) _ -  Level IV..................................................  312  39.3  1,878  1,855  1,698  -  2,025  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  3  7  32  32  14  7  3  39.5 39.5 40.0 40.0 39.3 40.0 39.5  497 497 512 510 489  436 442 465 465 433 514 426  10 7 <3)  12 9 9 8 9 28 20  1 1 2 1 1 8 (3)  t3) <3)  _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ -  17  29 31 39 41 27 47 26  (3) t3) (3) (3> (3)  t3)  47 51 49 49 52 17 37  (3) (3) 1 <3) (3>  -  550 537 540 537 535 630 564  <3>  498  480 480 500 500 478 566 492  -  State and local government.................  3,524 2,413 863 812 1,550 129 1,111  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Level II.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  26,888 22,276 8,178 7,858 14,098 1,223 4,612  39.5 39.5 39.8 39.8 39.3 39.9 39.4  573 572 592 589 561 606 581  566 564 577 577 557 592 573  494 496 499 499 493 544 493  _ “  630 626 657 653 614 674 656  i3) (3>  3 2 2 2 3 1 3  25 25 26 26 25 15 25  37 38 29 29 42 36 32  25 25 29 29 23 28 25  7 6 8 8 5 14 9  2 2 4 4 1 3 4  1 1 1 1 <3) 1 1  <3) (3) 1 1 <3)  <3) (3> (3) <3> (3>  <3> <3> <3)  <3) t3) <3)  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  Level III.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  42,705 34,571 13,483 12,895 21,088 2,379 8,134  39.5 39.5 39.8 39.8 39.3 39.9 39.5  740 741 769 768 722 817 737  730 730 757 756 710 822 737  653 653 680 680 639 712 634  _ -  818 812 845 841 793 912 853  _ _ -  i3) <3>  1 <3> (3> <3) 1 (3) 5  11 10 5 5 14 7 15  28 29 25 26 32 14 19  31 32 34 34 31 23 24  20 18 22 22 16 28 28  6 6 8 9 5 17 6  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _  _ _  _  _  _  _ _ -  Level IV.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  27,370 23,902 11,585 11,071 12,317 2,178 3,468  39.5 39.5 39.8 39.8 39.3 39.8 39.2  964 973 993 989 954 1,008 902  957 960 977 973 951 993 898  864 872 893 892 855 913 805  _ -  1,056 1,060 1,088 1,079 1,039 1,110 1,004  _ — -  _ -  t3)  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 i3) (3) (3) (3) t3) 4  2 1 (3> (3) 2 <3) 6  10 9 7 7 12 4 13  22 22 21 21 23 16 28  28 28 28 28 29 35 24  Personnel Specialists Level I ................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing..............................  -  -  _ -  11  <3) (3)  _ _ -  <3)  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  14  _ <3)  -  _ _ -  _ _ -  2 2 3 3 2 8 2  1 1 1 1 <3i 1 <3>  (3> (3> (3) <3> (3> <3) <3)  (3> (3) <3> <3) (3) (3>  _ _ -  19 20 21 20 19 17 13  12 13 15 16 10 17 9  4 4 5 5 3 9 3  1 1 2 1 1 1 1  1 1 1 1 (3) (3) <3>  <3>  <3) <3) (3)  <3> <3) (3) (3) (3) ~  _  -  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _  -  -  _  _  300 and ove  -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ -  1  1  -  _ _  _ _  _  _ _  _ _  _ _  _ _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _  _  _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _  _  _  _  -  -  -  _ _ _ _  _ _ _  _  -  -  -  <3)  _  _ _ _  _  _  _  _  _  _ _  _ -  _  -  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours' (stan-  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of—  Middle range  200 and 300  7,382 6,845 3,922 3,738 2,923 363 537  39.4 39.4 39.7 39.7 39.0 39.9 39.7  $1,226 1,235 1,259 1,255 1,204 1,214 1,107  $1,200 1,208 1,232 1,229 1,179 1,211 1,106  $1,091 1,097 1,131 1,132 1,075 1,125 970  767 755 480 465 275  39.8 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.7  1,528 1,533 1,534 1,526 1,531  1,536 1,536 1,539 1,539 1,536  1,382 1,383 1,383 1,378 1,385  2,601 2,045 955 937 1,090 124 556  39.4 39.5 39.9 39.9 39.1 39.9 39.1  1,015 1,045 1,060 1,061 1,032 1,115 906  1,014 1,033 1,066 1,067 1,012 1,104 899  891 936 958 960 925 1,012 766  3,647 3,166 1,344 1,251 1,822 414 481  39.4 39.4 39.6 39.6 39.2 39.8 39.2  1,305 1,331 1,354 1,352 1,315 1,349 1,132  1,291 1,312 1,337 1,337 1,293 1,308 1,124  1,170 1,188 1,181 1,181 1,188 1,208 996  300  400  400  500  39.3 39.4 39.4 39.4 39.3 39.6 39.0  1,647 1,674 1,673 1,663 1,674 1,649 1,269  1,632 1,651 1,651 1,634 1,651 1,619 1,257  1,480 1,500 1,506 1,497 1,498 1,487 1,043  420 420 309 288 111  38.9 38.9 39.0 39.0 38.5  2,082 2,082 2,043 2,015 2,192  2,016 2,016 1,999 1,976 2,179  1,824 1,824 1,814 1,812 1,882  <3> <3)  3 2 2 2 2 (3) 8  8 6 5 5 9 5 23  17 17 14 14 20 14 17  23 22 20 20 26 28 24  18 18 19 20 17 30 12  14 14 17 17 10 13 10  14 15 17 18 12 6 5  4 4 4 4 3 4 -  _  (3)  <3>  _  -  (3i (3> (3> <3i <3) 1 1  _ _  -  -  -  -  3 2 3 3 1  4 3 2 2 5  11 11 13 13 8  11 11 10 10 13  32 33 33 33 33  <3>  2 (3) <3i (3i <3)  9 6 6 6 6 2 18  15 13 13 13 13 4 20  22 22 14 13 28 6 22  22 24 28 28 20 35 16  17 19 21 21 18 32 7  9 11 12 12 10 11 3  3 4 5 5 2 4 1  <3)  1  -  -  5  2 1 (3) (3) 1 (3) 9  3 2 2 1 2 1 11  9 7 6 6 8 6 19  19 18 21 22 17 14 22  18 19 14 14 23 28 11  1 -  (3) (3)  1  -  n  -  (3> (3)  1 1 (3i (3) 1  4 4 3 3 4 3 17  1,437 1,446 1,487 1,487 1,435 1,440 1,261  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _  (3)  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _ -  -  -  _  _ _  _  _ _  _ _  _ _  _ _  _ _  1,820 1,832 1,837 1,826 1,824 1,742 1,517  _  _  _  2000  (3> <3>  — _ _ _ _ _ -  _  1800  -  1800  — _ _ _ _ _ _  _  1600  1600  — _ _ _ _ _ _  _  1400  1400  1,126 1,154 1,171 1,182 1,149 1,177 1,025  _  -  1300  _ _  _ _  1300  -  1200  _ _  _  1200  -  1100  _ _ _  _ _  1100  -  1000  1,675 1,675 1,675 1,670 1,673  _  1000  900  _ _  _  900  800  _ _ _  _  800  700  _ _ _ _  _  700  600  -  _ -  2  _  2,328 2,328 2,288 2,232 2,544  -  10  _  -  19  (3) 6  12  2  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  600  $1,346 1,357 1,382 1,377 1,308 1,286 1,224 _  _ _ _ _ _  Personnel Supervisors/Managers  1,876 1,751 1,022 961 729 108 125  500  15  1 1 1 (3> 1  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  2200  2400  2600  2800  3000  3000 and over  -  -  -  “ -  — — — -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  32 33 32 32 33  6 6 6 5 7  1 1 1 1 1  1 1 1 1 <3) 1 1  (3) <3)  — -  1 4 -  19 20 22 20 20 19 13  21 23 26 27 20 20 8  9 9 10 10 7 10 12 1 1 1 1  (3> <3) (3> 1 1 1 1 -  —  —  —  —  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  6 7 8 8 7 8 1  1 1 2 2 1 1 -  1 1 (3> (3» 1 3 -  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  — -  28 29 28 29 31 34 15  29 30 31 31 27 32 16  18 19 20 19 18 11 1  5 5 5 5 6 7 1  2 2 2 2 2 2  1 1 1 1 2  <3) <3) <3> (3>  _  _  -  4 4 6 6 1  15 15 16 16 14  28 28 29 32 23  16 16 17 18 12  -  -  -  -  -  -  15 15 17 14 10  15 15 9 8 31  5 5 4 4 5  1 1 1 1 4  <3> (3) 1 I_______  Table A-1. Pay distributions, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200 and under 300  Middle range  300  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  400  500  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  1300  1400  1600  1800  2000  2200  2400  2600  2800  3000  3000 and over  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Tax Collectors Level I.................................................... State and local government.................  407 407  39.3 39.3  $464 464  $506 506  $412 412  -  $517 517  4 4  18 18  26 26  49 49  2 2  o <3>  -  -  Level II................................................... State and local government.................  3,221 3,221  38.8 38.8  509 509  523 523  428 428  -  576 576  _  22 22  43 43  15 15  3 3  <3) <3)  _  -  17 17  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Level III.................................................. State and local government.................  2,539 2,539  39.5 39.5  713 713  708 708  653 653  -  769 769  _  _  1 1  3 3  37 37  52 52  6 6  1 1  (3) (3)  <3) <3i  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges, 3 Less than 0.5 percent.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4 Workers were distributed as follows: 8 percent at $3,000 and under $3,200; 11 percent at $3,200 and under $3,400; and 1 percent at $3,400 and under $3,600. 5 Workers were distributed as follows: 3 percent at $3,000 and under $3,200; 7 percent at $3,200 and under $3,400; 1 percent at $3,400 and under $3,600; 3 percent at $3,600 and under $3,800; and 1 percent at $4,200 and under $4,400. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  16  Table A-2. Pay distributions, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 Weekly earnings  Occupation and level  Number of workers  weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 175 and under 200  Middle range  200  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1100  1200  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1100  1200  1300  20 21 17 18 22 19 11  10 9 16 13 7 19 17  4 3 8 8 2 9 7  1 (3> 1 1 (3> 3 3  (3) (3) (3) (3)  t3) <3) (3) (3i  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  12  33 36 44 45 34 34 18  -  -  26 25 13 13 28 16 29  (3)  (3>  6 5 1 1 6  2  (J)  -  -  —  ~  ~  ”  -  —  _ -  (3) (3)  4 4 2 2 4 <3) 8  14 14 10 10 15 3 19  25 25 27 28 24 12 21  24 25 21 21 26 17 21  15 16 18 17 15 11 13  10 9 9 10 9 35 13  4 4 5 6 4 19 3  2 2 5 5 1 2 1  (3> <3) 1 <3) <3) (3> (3>  <3) <3) <3) (3) (3) 1 (3>  (3) <3) (3) (3) (3) <3)  t3) <3) (3> <3) <3)  (3> <3) <3)  <3) (3> 1 1 <3)  <3)  _  “  -  -  (3) <3) (3> <3)  “ (3) (3) 1 1 (3)  1300 and over  Technical Occupations Computer Operators Level I...................................... Private industry...................... Goods producing................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities . State and local government....  5,311 4,531 896 870 3,635 155 780  39.5 39.5 39.7 39.7 39.5 40.0 39.7  $336 333 362 360 326 366 348  $328 329 343 340 320 353 319  $291 291 328 327 284 304 292  Level II................ .................... Private industry...................... Goods producing................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities . State and local government....  37,773 31,739 8,771 8,521 22,968 2,426 6,034  39.3 39.3 39.4 39.4 39.3 39.5 39.5  422 423 441 441 417 493 413  411 412 422 421 410 518 405  361 364 375 375 360 426 342  Level III.................................... Private industry...................... Goods producing ................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities . State and local government....  31,115 25,799 8,353 8,234 17,446 3,347 5,316  39.2 39.2 39.1 39.1 39.2 39.8 39.4  535 539 554 554 532 587 513  528 528 538 537 524 553 521  472 478 483 483 474 521 451  Level IV.................................... Private industry...................... Goods producing................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities . State and local government....  7,028 6,514 2,571 2,550 3,943 750 514  39.2 39.2 39.0 39.0 39.3 40.0 39.1  646 647 671 671 632 672 626  643 645 659 659 631 676 633  580 582 597 597 568 636 546  Level V..................................... Private industry...................... Service producing................  389 387 272  39.1 39.1 39.1  762 762 776  744 744 756  685 685 712  Drafters Level I...................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing ................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing.............. . Transportation and utilities State and local government...  9,760 9,073 5,029 4,710 4,044 1,547 687  39.7 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.6 38.7  383 386 361 361 417 486 343  373 375 360 360 414 507 335  326 332 317 319 344 491 271  -  $368 362 400 392 360 420 413  _ -  470 470 491 492 462 536 472  _ _ -  _ -  -  -  -  588 593 622 622 579 697 582 714 717 747 747 694 728 678 836 836 833 435 436 402 403 497 507 398  (3) <3>  _ -  1 (3) (J) _ -  (3) (3) n t3) t3) 1 1  2 1 i3) (3) 1 1 7  4 3 2 2 4 (3) 6  _  _  -  -  n (3)  _ -  _ -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  ~  “  -  -  -  3 2 3 3 2 20  10 9 11 11 6 1 18  22 23 26 25 19 4 17  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  17  11 11 10 10 12 2 10  20 20 20 20 21 13 16  -  ~  23 24 21 21 26 31 18  18 16 17 17 16 14 28  10 10 10 10 10 11 8  8 9 14 14 7 18 4  2 2 3 3 2 3 1  2 2 1 1 2 8 <3>  <3i <3) 1 1 (3i <3> (3)  (3) (3> <3) (3) (3> (3) <3)  <3> (3> (3) i3) t3)  —  20 20 18 18 21 18 18  19 19 19 19 19 29 22  14 14 13 13 15 23 10  9 9 15 15 5 5 6  3 4 5 5 3 5 2  1 1 2 2 1 1 3  1 1 1 1 <3>  <3> i3) i3) (3>  14 14 17  7 7 9  7 7 5  ~ -  -  —  —  “  -  —  —  “  -  -  —  ~  “  _ ~  “ -  -  -  -  -  -  -  — -  2 2 2 2 1 <3) 2  4 4 1 1 7 (3) 5  10 9 5 5 12 8 17  16 17 17 17 16 10 12  _  _  _  -  -  -  (3) (3)  ”  -  —  —  4 4 1  12 12 7  14 14 14  21 21 26  15 15 17  27 27 34 34 19 3 21  15 16 19 19 11 2 12  11 11 5 5 18 33 3  11 11 2 2 23 55 5  1 1 <3) (3) 1 1 3  (3) (3)  <3> (3) (3) (3) <3) <3)  (3) (3)  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  (3> 1  (3) 1 (3)  (J) t3)  (3)  —  2 2 2  3 3 3  Table A-2. Pay distributions, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of—  Middle range  175 and under 200  200  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1100  1200  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1100  1200  1300  (3)  (3> <3) (3i (3i (3i  14 14 15 16 10 4 18  26 27 30 30 23 8 16  24 25 27 27 21 15 14  17 17 14 12 23 40 16  6 6 5 5 7 5 8  5 5 2 2 10 24 7  1 1 1 1 2 2 2  1 (3) t3) <3) t3) 1 5  t3) <3) <3) <3) (3) <3) 1  (3) <3> (3) <3) (3>  (3) <3> <3) (3) (3i  (3) _  _  _  _ _ -  _ _ _ _ -  _  -  _ _ _ _ -  _  1  _ _ _ _ _ -  _  2  4 4 5 5 2 (3) 9  _  t3)  1 (3) (3) (3) 1 (3> 10  4 3 3 4 3 4 9  9 9 9 8 8 4 7  19 19 20 22 16 6 15  21 22 24 24 18 21 11  19 20 19 18 23 19 8  13 13 12 13 13 17 13  7 7 7 7 6 9 11  4 4 3 3 5 17 10  2 2 2 2 3 3 3  1 1 <3> (3) 1 (3) 1  <3) <3) <3) <3) 1 _ (3)  (3) <3) (3) <3) (3>  (3) (3>  (3> (3)  _ <3)  _ <3)  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _  (3) (3)  1 (3> (3) (3) 1 ~  1 1 (3) (3> 3 1  4 4 3 3 7 3  8 9 8 8 10 9  16 16 18 17 14 19  22 22 25 26 18 9  18 18 20 21 14 20  12 11 11 11 11 26  7 7 7 7 7 6  4 4 4 3 3 7  2 2 2 2 1 (3)  3 3 2 2 6 1  2 2 (3) (3) 4  (3) t3)  -  -  <3) (3> (3) (3)  _ _ _  _ _  _ _  _  _  _  _ _  _  -  Level II................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  24,223 22,096 14,148 13,151 7,948 2,468 2,127  39.8 39.8 39.9 39.9 39.6 38.8 39.4  $471 470 459 457 490 537 481  $462 461 450 447 484 525 469  $416 418 410 410 426 493 387  -  $516 514 496 493 534 617 545  -  <3i  Level III................................................. Private industry................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  24,691 22,598 15,280 13,527 7,318 1,238 2,093  39.9 39.9 40.0 40.0 39.9 39.9 39.6  599 600 594 591 612 645 592  593 593 586 582 601 641 591  531 537 537 530 540 583 493  _ -  655 652 649 648 670 708 706  _ -  _ — — -  Level IV.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities ..............  10,551 10,142 6,784 6,307 3,358 488  39.9 39.9 40.0 40.0 39.8 40.0  759 759 755 754 765 767  743 740 741 740 740 765  682 682 690 693 660 678  _ -  820 815 804 801 847 847  _  _  _  -  -  -  _ -  Engineering Technicians Level I.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing..............................  4,274 4,218 3,277 3,263 941  40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0  381 382 382 382 380  376 377 380 379 372  328 329 328 328 330  -  422 422 423 422 420  -  n  8 7 7 7 7  27 27 27 27 29  25 26 25 25 27  24 24 26 26 19  11 11 11 11 10  4 4 3 3 6  1 1 1 1 1  i3> <3> (3i <3) 1  _ _  _ _  _  _  -  -  Level II................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  13,713 13,588 10,272 10,178 3,316 329 125  39.9 39.9 39.9 39.9 39.8 39.1 39.1  486 486 494 493 463 550 475  475 475 480 480 453 540 476  435 435 441 441 416 469 385  539 539 549 547 498 586 569  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  2 2 1 1 4 1 13  10 10 9 9 12 5 16  21 21 18 18 32 15 12  29 29 30 30 27 7 17  16 16 17 17 13 36 15  12 12 13 13 7 13 21  7 7 9 8 2 5 2  2 2 2 2 2 12 2  1 1 1 1 1 5 1  (3> <3> <3) <3) (3) 1 2  (3) (3> <3)  -  1 1 (3) 1 1  Level III.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  30,922 30,487 23,148 22,768 7,339 1,442 435  39.9 39.9 39.9 39.9 39.9 40.0 39.8  595 596 598 598 588 710 558  586 586 592 592 568 699 573  524 524 531 530 511 610 453  _  _  -  -  (3> (3)  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  11 11 11 11 11 6 9  19 19 17 17 24 6 12  20 20 20 20 21 12 24  17 18 19 19 14 13 9  12 12 13 13 8 16 11  8 8 9 9 5 7 5  3 3 3 3  -  4 4 4 4 3 (3) 10  3 3 4 4 2 6 6  _ -  _ -  -  659 660 664 663 640 823 624  <3>  <3>  -  -  <3)  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  (3>  1 1 1 1 2  -  -  13  _  _  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _ -  18  (3>  4  13 1  (3) 1 -  _ _ _ _ <3)  _  -  <3>  _  -  _  _ _ _  _ _  _  _ _ _  -  -  -  -  (3> t3) (3)  (3) t3) (3)  _  _ _ _ _  _  _  _  _ _ _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  1 1 <3> <3> 2 12  (3) (3) (3) (3> 2 9  (3) (3) (3) <3) (3) <3)  <3) t3)  _ 1  1300 and over  _  _ _ -  _ _ _ _ -  _  _ _  _ _ _  -  -  -  _ _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _ _  -  -  -  _  _  _  (3> -  _ _  _  -  -  -  Table A-2. Pay distributions, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan-  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 175 and  Middle range  Level VI..................................................  40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 39.9  $716 716 707 706 740 856 713  $709 709 702 701 729 883 702  $640 639 637 636 640 769 673  24,769 24,543 18,739 18,395 5,804 1,312  40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0  834 833 823 820 867 942  818 817 814 810 860 967  754 754 746 745 764 849  4,603 4,603 2,887 2,872 1,716  39.9 39.9 40.0 40.0 39.9  974 974 947 945 1,019  945 945 920 920 1,060  863 863 857 857 881  4,807 1,470 1,388 3,337  39.4 40.0 40.0 39.2  330 315 315 336  319 302 302 325  280 268 268 283  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  $781 781 769 768 817 946 793 904 904 883 880 966 1,029 1,079 1,079 1,011 1,008 1,140  11,867 3,028 2,864 8,839  Transportation and utilities ..............  19,756 3,657 3,287 372 16,099 15,812 4,877 698 4,179 362 10,935  39.6 40.0 40.0 39.4 39.5 40.0 40.0 39.8 39.4 39.7 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 39.5  425 415 414 429 528 568 560 579 519 674 710 810 694 700 657  400 408 408 399 509 554 548 555 495 664 687 730 682 682 631  351 352 360 348 439 500 492 509 425 562 620 681 614 682 537  _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _ _  _  375 345 349 392 480 460 460 494 591 614 605 616 585 762 773 943 753 726 756  300  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  _  _  _  _  t3) t3)  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  <3)  (3> (3> t3) (3) (3i  _  -  1 1 <3) t3) 1 (3i 9  4 4 3 3 4 1 3  9 9 9 9 9 1 1  16 16 16 17 14 2 4  17 17 19 19 13 3 29  18 18 20 20 13 9 21  14 14 14 14 15 22 20  9 9 9 9 9 7 3  5 5 5 5 5 11 9  3 3 2 2 7 20 2  _  _  _  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  t3) (3>  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  -  -  1  _  _  _  _  -  _  -  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  _  _  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  13 16 17 12  20 22 20 19  28 38 38 24  17 16 16 17  10 5 5 13  _  3 _ _  5  _ _ _  _  1 1 1 1  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  t3)  (3> (3t (3i <3i 1  (3> <3> 1  (3> (3> (3> <3> 1 (3>  -  (3> (3t 1  2 2 1 1 3 5  -  -  1 1 <3i (3i 2  2 2 <3) (3) 4  2 2 1 1 3  4 4 4 4 4  8 8 9 9 6  21 21 29 29 7  13 13 17 17 6  10 10 12 12 6  18 18 16 16 23  12 12 7 7 22  5 5 2 2 8  4 4 1 1 8  (3) i3) (3> t3)  (3>  <3i  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  .  -  -  -  -  -  -  t3)  <3>  -  -  -  -  1 i3) (3> 1  1 n (3) 1  1 (3i (3) 1  (3)  3 1 1  9 1 1  17 10 10 2 19  17 14 14 3 17  17 25 25 34 15  13 21 20 33 12  9 13 13 7 8  5 5 5 4 5  3 3 3 6 3  3 5 5 7 3  2 2 2 4 1  1 1 1  1 1 1  -  -  -  <3) _  _  _  _  _  _  1 (3>  4 <3)  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  (3)  _  19  6 1 -  _  t3> 1  1  2  -  -  5  8  11 7 4 7 7 14  13 10 3 12 1 14  -  <3> (3> (3> (3> (a)  ■ -  7 7 4 4 15 32  1 1 1 1  11  -  -  7 7 6 6 10 17  2 3 2 2  4  -  -  <3>  10 10 9 9 12 10  6 3 3 7  -  -  -  -  14 14 15 15 11 10  8 5 5 9  -  -  -  <3)  16 16 17 17 12 13  13 17 17 11  <a)  <3) <3)  20 20 20 21 19 5  18 27 27 15  —  (3) i3)  14 14 16 16 10 5  24 21 21 25  -  <3i <3) (3> (3> 1 1  7 7 8 8 4 1  17 15 14 18  —  1 1 (3) (3) 2 5  2 2 2 2 1 1  6 6 6 7  _  2 2 1 1 6 17  1000  (3) t3) (3> <3> <3>  t3)  -  _  7 3 2 9  i3) t3>  1200  1300 and over  1000  400  _  1100  1300  950  350  _  1200  900  300  _  1100  850  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  350  250  Engineering Technicians, Civil or Survey Technicians/Construction Inspectors _  250  950  200  43,270 42,973 31,654 31,217 11,319 3,377 297  200  13 15 6 16 10 12  15 20 22 20 46 13  10 16 19 16 20 8  8 9 10 9 6 8  5 5 5 5 5 4  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  (3)  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  2 5 6 3 7 2 4  .  -  -  t3) 1 (3>  <3> (3) -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  (3>  (3)  —  —  —  4 4 4 4 5 3  1 1 3 1  <3) 1 6  <3i (3> 3  t3> <3) 1  -  -  1  4 3 12 1 -  4  -  -  -  -  -  -  (3)  -  -  Table A-2. Pay distributions, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)1 2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 175 and under 200  Middle range  200  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1100  1200  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1100  1200  1300  1300 and over  -  -  8 (3)  15 6 4 18  7 10 7 6  6 8 8 6  9 15 14 6  9 10 12 8  5 8 9 4  13 14 15 12  8 19 22 4  3 6 6 2  (3>  -  11 2 1 14  1 _  -  5 _ 7  (3>  -  2 1 1 2  (3i  -  -  -  2 2  1  (3)  8 7  7 5  11 9  14 14  12 8  14 13  18 24  10 12  4 6  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  (3>  Level V................................................... Private industry.................................... Service producing.............................. State and local government.................  6,334 1,816 1,461 4,518  39.9 40.0 40.0 39.8  $788 899 908 743  $780 890 908 696  $650 787 812 629  -  $938 1,001 1,008 876  Level VI.................................................. Private industry....................................  965 709  39.8 40.0  1,001 1,029  982 1,040  883 907  -  1,130 1,148  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Corrections Officers................................. 223,313 State and local government................. 221,987  39.9 39.9  516 516  500 500  399 399  -  606 606  _  2 2  9 9  14 14  11 11  12 12  15 15  10 10  10 10  4 4  5 5  2 2  2 2  4 4  (3i  (3)  (3)  <3)  (3)  Firefighters............................................... 111,690 State and local government................. 110,148  49.1 49.2  610 611  614 615  493 493  -  730 733  <a) <3>  2 2  3 3  6 6  7 7  9 9  9 9  11 11  14 14  10 9  7 7  13 13  4 4  3 3  1 1  1 1  1 1  (3>  (3)  (3)  t3)  Police Officers Level I................... ..... .......................... 326,519 Private industry................................... 2,054 Service producing.............................. 2,054 State and local government................. 324,465  40.0 39.9 39.9 40.0  641 515 515 641  636 513 513 636  510 460 460 511  -  773 573 573 773  1  3 2 2 3  5 6 6 5  6 13 13 6  8 22 22 8  9 21 21 9  10 18 18 10  12 13 13 12  9 4 4 9  10 1 1 10  10 <3)  6 (3)  4 <3) (3)  10  6  4  2 _ _ 2  (3>  t3)  1 _ _ 1  t3)  <3)  5 _ 5  39.9 39.9  767 770  798 799  625 625  -  877 880  1 1  2 2  7 7  5 5  5 5  14 12  4 5  8 8  5 5  10 10  19 19  4 4  2 2  -  -  <3)  (3)  11 (3)  -  <3)  Protective Service Occupations  Level II.................. ................................. State and local government.................  9,736 9,571  n <a)  -  (3)  <3)  (3)  (3>  (3)  1  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  11 12  _ -  _  _ _ (3) 3 3  _ (3>  _  (3)  t3)  (3)  <3)  -  methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges. 3 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  20  Table A-3. Pay distributions, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200 and Under under 200 225  Middle range  Clerks, Accounting Level I..................................... Private industry.................... . Goods producing................ Manufacturing................... Service producing............... Transportation and utilities State and local government...  16,879 13,973 2,887 2,688 11,086 2,498 2,906  39.6 39.6 39.8 39.7 39.6 40.0 39.3  $291 291 294 294 291 325 288  $280 280 280 280 280 287 274  $253 255 260 260 253 269 247  Level II................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing............... Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government...  186,650 156,105 49,328 44,636 106,777 13,325 30,545  39.6 39.6 39.7 39.7 39.6 39.7 39.4  352 350 355 354 347 389 363  344 343 350 350 340 371 347  302 301 312 310 300 331 304  Level III .................................. Private industry.................... Goods producing............... Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  134,884 102,296 38,760 35,583 63,536 9,627 32,588  39.5 39.5 39.6 39.6 39.4 39.6 39.4  429 426 433 432 422 469 439  424 420 427 427 416 480 439  374 375 386 386 369 403 371  Level IV.................................. Private industry.................... Goods producing............ . Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  39,347 27,551 9,939 8,807 17,612 3,673 11,796  39.3 39.3 39.7 39.8 39.1 39.6 39.4  513 526 545 543 516 569 482  508 518 525 522 510 571 482  451 460 470 468 457 527 417  Clerks, General Level I.................................... Private industry.................... Goods producing............... Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  17,453 10,939 2,372 2,126 8,567 576 6,514  39.2 39.4 39.9 39.9 39.2 40.0 38.9  263 254 256 254 254 288 277  250 245 237 237 250 274 264  224 220 211 220 220 240 231  Level II................................... Private industry.................... Goods producing............... Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  112,631 68,825 15,052 13,153 53,773 4,681 43,806  39.3 39.4 39.7 39.7 39.4 39.9 39.0  310 302 305 307 301 349 324  298 288 288 290 289 328 316  264 260 261 263 258 284 273  _ _  _  _  -  -  -  -  _ -  $313 310 309 309 310 331 322  1 1 2 n (3)  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1050  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1050  1100  5 6 2 2 7 5 3  16 14 11 12 14 5 26  47 49 57 57 47 51 38  17 18 16 16 18 16 16  8 7 9 8 6 2 13  1 1 1 1 1 1 3  2 2 1 1 3 9 n  2 2 1 2 2 11 <3)  1 1 2 2 1 1 1  3 3 2 2 3 1 2  18 18 14 14 20 12 18  31 31 32 32 31 23 30  24 25 29 29 24 26 19  12 12 13 12 12 13 12  6 5 5 5 5 6 13  3 3 2 2 3 15 2  1 1 1 1 1 2 1  <3> (3) (3) t3> (3) 1 1  <3) (3) <3) (3) (3> (3> (3)  <3> <3) (3) (3) (3) (3> (3)  (3) (3) (3) <3)  -  — -  — “  — -  — -  — -  — —  12 11 7 7 14 9 13  23 24 24 23 24 12 19  27 30 32 33 28 16 19  19 18 20 20 17 18 20  13 10 10 10 10 27 21  3 3 3 3 3 11 4  1 1 2 2 1 1 1  (3) (3) 1 <3) (3) 1 (3)  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 1 (3)  n (3> <3> <3i (3> <3) (3)  (3) (3) <3) (3> <3)  (3> (3> (3>  -  _  “  -  -  (3>  3 1 t3) (J) 1 1 9  7 5 2 2 7 2 12  14 14 14 15 14 5 14  22 22 22 23 23 11 21  21 21 22 22 21 13 21  17 18 15 14 19 40 14  8 9 9 9 10 19 6  4 4 6 6 3 6 2  2 3 5 5 2 1 1  <3) 1 1 1 (3> 1 t3)  1 1 2 2 (3) (3) <3>  "  '  -  -  391 385 389 389 384 443 410  (3> (3)  478 470 473 471 466 535 506  <3>  (3) (3)  (3i (3)  <3)  (3)  (3) (3) t3)  2 2 1 1 2 2 3  (3i (3)  t3) <3)  n (3)  <3)  568 576 599 599 571 614 548  (3) (3)  n  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  289 277 300 294 276 314 305  8 7 5 6 8 7 410  18 23 30 29 20 3 10  24 27 28 30 26 20 21  28 29 11 10 34 35 27  12 10 19 20 7 17 16  5 3 4 3 3 10 7  4 1 2 2 1 5 7  1 1 <3) <3) 1 2 (3)  <3> <3)  345 331 330 331 332 395 361  1 1 (3) <3) 1  5 5 4 4 5 1 4  11 13 11 9 13 8 8  35 39 42 44 37 23 30  26 26 25 26 26 32 26  13 9 9 9 9 11 18  5 4 3 3 4 6 7  3 2 3 3 2 10 4  2 1 1 1 1 8 3  -  (3>  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1100 and over  225  21  —  -  -  (3) (3) (3) (3> 1 3 "  <3> (3) 1 1 (3) '  -  _  <J> 1 (3) (3) (3i (3) <3) (3) (J)  <3) (3> i3) <3> (3)  —  (3) <3) i3) (3) (3> (Jt  (3> (3) (3) (3) (3)  (3> i3) (3i t3> (3>  (3> (3) (3) (3) <3)  —  —  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  —  Table A-3. Pay distributions, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Average weekly hours’ (stan­ dard)  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of—  Middle range  Under 200  (3) (3)  200 and under 225  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  250  300  350  300  350  400  19 26 25 27 26  27 24 24  1100  600  22  24 14 29  8  (3) (*> (3> (3) 1  28 2  (3)  26 24 16 15  1 2 4 4  28  2  62 27  4 (3)  193,866 84,176 21,665 18,357 62,511 12,463 109,690  39.4 39.5 39.8 39.8 39.4 39.7 39.3  $390 384 401 404 378 461 394  $385 364 371 372 362 488 395  $331 320 326 325 318 379 348  $443 427 436 440 422 511 449  Level IV.................................. Private industry.................... Goods producing............... Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  93,257 36,159 11,099 10,133 25,060 8,410 57,098  39.2 39.3 39.6 39.5 39.2 39.5 39.1  462 476 488 488 470 531 454  462 467 466 465 467 531 458  413 412 422 420 407 510 415  524 531 542 543 531 547 519  Clerks, Order Level I.................................... Private industry.................... Goods producing............... Manufacturing.................. Service producing..............  29,753 29,753 13,083 13,000 16,670  39.8 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.8  328 328 334 334 323  320 320 326 326 315  280 280 298 296 270  361 361 361 363 361  Level II................................... Private industry.................... Goods producing............... Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. .  19,992 19,992 12,583 12,362 7,409  39.7 39.7 39.8 39.8 39.4  435 435 430 430 443  421 421 421 421 441  386 386 385 386 390  484 484 462 462 498  (3) (3)  Key Entry Operators Level I.................................... Private industry.................... . Goods producing................ Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. . Transportation and utilities State and local government ...  75,503 65,699 11,512 11,349 54,187 4,330 9,804  39.3 39.3 39.7 39.7 39.2 39.8 39.1  308 307 316 316 305 370 317  299 299 307 307 295 349 301  265 266 280 280 263 302 263  345 342 346 346 342 416 362  10  6  9  5 5  Level II................................... . Private industry..................... Goods producing ............... . Manufacturing................... Service producing.............. . Transportation and utilities State and local government...  44,781 35,280 7,909 7,688 27,371 4,281 9,501  39.2 39.2 39.3 39.3 39.2 39.9 39.0  392 394 407 407 390 443 387  385 385 398 398 381 426 387  340 341 356 354 339 378 327  437 434 449 449 430 531 444  (3) (3)  1  12  14  2 2 1  15 5 11  (3)  4  11 11  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  6  6 4 4 7  11  (3)  1 1  12  1 1 6  7  24 24  33 33  2 2  20  38  20 28  38  3 3 2  1 1  11 11  19 19  10 10  (3) (3) 3  12 12  10  15 15 26  7 15  6 6 10  (3) (3) (3) (3)  (3) (3)  (3)  (3)  (3)  (3)  14  1  13 15 3  6  8  29  5  5  5  9  11  11  1  22  800  850  (3) (3)  1 2  2  4 (3)  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  (3)  (3)  1  1  3 3 (3) (3) (3)  (3) (3)  (3) (3) (3) (3)  (3) (3) (3) (3)  6 7 1  1 2  900  950  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  (3)  (3) (3) (3) (3)  2 1 1  (3) (3)  8  1  1 (3) (3) 1 7 1 8 8  24 24  11 12  1  21  (3>  23 23  7 23 5  22  (3) (3) (3) (3)  1 1 1 1  22  (3) (3) (3)  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  13 6 5  1  (3)  8  700  4 7 5 4  Level III.................................. Private industry.................... Goods producing ............... Manufacturing.................. Service producing.............. Transportation and utilities State and local government..  2 (3) (3)  650  (3)  2  ( ) (3) (3) (3) (3) 4 (3)  () (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  (*> (3)  2 2 2 2 1 5 1  (3) (3) 1 1 (3)  (3) (!) (3) (3) (3)  (3) 1  1  1  (3)  (3)  (3) (3)  (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3)  (3) (3) <3) (3) (3) 1  1000  1050  1100  and over  Table A-3. Pay distributions, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan-  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200 and Under under 200 225  Middle range  Personnel Assistants (Employment) 1,739 1,346 380 378 966 111 393  Goods producing ............................... Transportation and utilities ..............  39.6 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.1  $315 314 314 314 314 362 318  $307 306 315 313 306 371 316  $278 276 274 274 279 297 290  7,692 5,856 1,884 1,839 3,972 554 1,836  39.5 39.6 39.8 39.8 39.5 40.0 39.3  389 390 393 392 388 450 388  380 382 381 380 382 411 378  338 340 354 353 338 376 334  7,912 6,105 2,224 2,151 3,881 406 1,807  39.4 39.4 39.6 39.5 39.3 39.8 39.4  475 473 483 480 467 491 481  466 463 464 464 461 478 479  420 420 422 420 420 427 433  2,535 1,490 783 757 707 85 1,045  39.6 39.5 39.6 39.6 39.4 39.8 39.7  538 542 537 533 547 582 534  545 539 539 534 538 611 554  483 485 480 480 485 472 467  86,448 53,060 14,695 14,050 38,365 3,642 33,388  39.5 39.6 39.7 39.7 39.5 39.8 39.5  367 379 411 410 366 404 347  356 366 395 393 356 389 338  312 323 351 350 315 343 296  136,520 88,920 26,230 24,791 62,690 4,878 47,600  39.4 39.4 39.8 39.8 39.2 39.8 39.5  437 447 467 466 439 474 418  432 440 463 462 433 461 417  380 394 419 419 384 408 351  _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _  _ _  _ _  _  _ _ _  _  _ _ _  _ _  $351 351 351 351 355 406 350 427 426 434 428 423 565 430 518 514 520 514 513 528 533 613 606 620 614 595 655 627  Secretaries _  _ _ _  _  _ _ _ _  407 419 458 455 403 445 388 490 494 511 509 486 532 476  225  250  350  400  450  500  550  600  600  650  -  -  -  -  -  6 6 8 8 5 6 7  4 3 2 2 4 10 6  1 1 1 1 1 1 2  2 2 6 6 <3> 2 t3>  <3) n i3) i3) (3> <3) (3)  — —  — —  — —  — —  — —  — —  — —  21 26 24 25 27 12 15  19 17 15 16 20 2 22  16 19 24 23 14 21 12  10 5 5 5 5 20 16  2 3 4 3 3 14 1  <3) (3i (3> <3i 1  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  (3) (3>  _  5 5 1 1 7 26 4  1 1 (3> (3) 2  _  19 19 24 24 17 17 20  _ 1  (3) (3) 1 1 (3> 4 t3)  (3) <3)  _ _ 15  31 29 28 28 30 22 38  i3) (3>  _ _ 2  31 31 47 47 25 26 28  (3> 4 1  <3) 2  (3) <3)  <3) (3i  _ <3>  _  (3>  _  _  t3>  7 6 1 1 8 4 9  23 23 22 23 23 12 24  29 30 32 32 29 21 27  24 26 27 27 25 25 19  9 8 9 8 8 6 11  5 5 8 8 3 6 5  3 3 1 1 4 25 2  _ _ _ _  _  _  <3) (3i  — _ _  — _ _  — 1 i3) (3)  3 2 2 2 2 2 8  11 12 13 13 11 16 8  26 28 25 26 30 16 17  27 25 27 27 24 21 31  20 20 16 16 22 25 20  4 _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  10 10 20 20 (3>  13 14 7 7 21 25 12  _ _ _ _  _  9  10  4 4 <3) (3) 9 6 4  16 12 5 5 15 6 22  28 27 19 20 30 24 29  25 27 28 28 26 25 23  15 16 20 20 15 25 12  7 8 14 14 6 10 5  3 4 7 6 3 3 1  2 2 3 3 2 4 2  1 1 3 3 1 1 <3)  <3) 1 1 1 t3) 3  (3) <3) t3) <3)  5 1 (3) <3) 2 1 10  10 8 3 3 10 7 14  19 19 14 14 21 12 19  26 27 26 26 27 26 24  20 23 29 29 20 16 14  13 13 18 17 11 16 12  6 7 8 8 6 11 4  2 2 2 2 2 6 1  1 1 1 1 1 4 1  (3i (3i (3) (3) (3> 1 (3>  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  (3)  1 (3>  3 1 (3) <3) 2 <3i 5 C)  _ _ _  _  1  _  <3)  1  _  (3> (3>  <3>  _  _ _  _  (3>  _ _  <3)  _  (3> i3) (3>  23  _  1050  1100 and over  -  10 11  6  1000  1100  -  2 2  2  1050  _ -  550  _  1000  950  -  500  _ (3)  900  950  (3) t3) (3> (3)  450  C)  900  t3) t3) 1 1 (3) 1 1  400  (3)  850  750  350  700  850  700  300  650  800  750 800  250  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  300  t3)  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  t3)  -  -  (3i  -  -  -  -  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  (3>  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  (3) i3) (3) <3> (3) <3)  <3) <3) <3) <3) <3)  (3) (3> (3> t3) (3>  -  <3> i3) (3> (3>  -  -  _  i3) (3i (3) (3> <3) <3) <3>  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Table A-3. Pay distributions, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of200 and Under under 200 225  Middle range  225  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1050  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1050  1100  1100 and over  (3)  1 (3) (3t (3> (3> (3> 2  3 2 2 2 2 3 8  7 6 3 4 8 5 10  14 14 11 11 16 8 16  22 22 21 21 23 18 22  21 22 23 23 21 21 18  15 16 18 18 14 18 11  9 10 12 12 9 12 6  5 5 6 6 5 9 3  2 2 2 2 2 4 2  1 1 1 1 1 1 1  i3> <3) 1 1 (3> 1 (3)  (3) <3) <3) (3) (3> <3) (3)  (3i (3) (3i (3)  <3> <3)  (3)  -  -  -  (3t (3>  1 n (3) (3) (3) (3) 3  2 1 (3) (3) 1 1 7  3 3 2 2 3 2 5  9 8 9 9 8 5 15  15 16 16 17 15 11 13  21 22 21 21 22 19 15  20 20 21 21 20 21 20  13 14 14 14 13 14 12  8 9 10 9 8 12 4  5 5 5 5 5 9 2  2 2 1 1 2 4 2  1 1 1 1 1 2 (3>  (3) <3) (3> i3) f3) (3> (3)  (3) (3> <3) (3i i3) <3> <3)  (3) (3> n (3t (3) <3)  (3i (3> <3) i3> (3) (3)  t3) <3) (a) (3) (3)  -  -  -  1 1 (3) (3) 1 1 2  3 2 2 2 3 <3> 11  10 9 9 9 9 2 20  12 12 10 10 13 8 14  16 16 15 15 17 19 16  14 14 14 14 14 16 9  16 16 18 19 15 15 11  10 10 11 11 10 18 8  6 7 8 8 6 10 3  5 6 7 7 4 4 4  3 3 2 2 4 2 1  1 1 1 1 2 1 (3)  1 1 1 1 1 1 (3)  1 1 2 2 1 (3) (3>  1 1  (3) (3i ( 31 <3) <3) (3) (3>  (3) n  (3) n  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  n (3)  (3) (3)  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  (3> (3) 1 1 -  (3)  -  -  -  _ -  -  -  -  _ -  -  -  _ -  t3)  <3)  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Level III.................................................. 157,486 Private industry.................................... 123,664 Goods producing............................... 47,754 Manufacturing.................................. 45,383 Service producing.............................. 75,910 Transportation and utilities .............. 8,588 State and local government................. 33,822  39.2 39.2 39.5 39.5 39.0 39.7 39.1  $513 520 533 532 512 542 486  $507 513 526 526 504 538 480  $450 459 473 472 449 475 416  -  $571 577 588 588 567 608 546  -  -  (3)  Level IV.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  71,023 57,751 24,318 23,286 33,433 3,755 13,272  39.2 39.2 39.6 39.5 38.9 39.4 39.3  602 611 610 609 611 640 562  599 602 602 601 602 632 570  537 545 545 544 544 570 486  _ — -  662 669 668 666 669 711 636  _ -  _ -  _ -  Level V................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  13,742 12,384 6,182 6,019 6,202 859 1,358  39.0 39.0 39.2 39.2 38.7 39.3 39.4  738 745 753 751 737 763 671  728 732 748 748 722 761 658  646 653 660 660 647 689 569  _ -  811 816 831 826 806 834 756  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  (3) (3)  1  (3) (3t <3> <3> <3) 1 <3>  Switchboard Operator-Receptionists....... 103,356 Private industry.................................... 95,783  39.5 39.5  328 327  320 319  273 272  _ -  372 371  2 2  4 5  8 8  25 25  26 27  17 17  10 10  5 5  2 2  (3) t3)  (3)  /3)  Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  25,875 65,963 4,273 7,573  39.7 39.4 39.8 39.2  335 323 338 339  326 310 330 331  282 266 280 280  _ -  371 371 383 385  1 2 1 (3>  2 6 2 4  6 9 11 8  22 27 21 23  33 24 25 23  20 15 22 21  9 10 10 11  5 5 4 6  2 2 1 3  t3) 1 2 <3)  Word Processors Level I.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing..............................  17,807 10,793 1,333 1,260 9,460  38.8 39.3 39.9 39.9 39.2  361 360 370 369 358  355 354 359 359 352  312 316 331 337 312  -  408 400 372 372 402  -  1 1  4 2  -  1  2  15 14 6 6 16  28 29 29 29 29  24 28 45 47 26  17 15 9 8 16  7 6 7 7 6  4 3 2 2 3  1 1 1 1 1 c4)  State and local government.................  7,014  37.9  363  358  307  -  421  -  1  6  15  26  18  20  8  5  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  24  -  i3) -  Table A-3. Pay distributions, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stan­ dard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of— 200 and Under under 200 225  Middle range  225  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1050  250  300  350  400  450  500  550  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1050  1100  1100 and over  n  9 10 10 12 10 3 7  20 28 22 20 28 13 8  21 22 21 20 23 16 19  28 19 24 22 19 16 44  9 8 9 10 8 22 10  5 6 3 3 6 30 4  2 3 8 9 2 (3) 1  1 1 1 2 1  (3> (3>  (3> (3) (3) (3) <3)  _ _ _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  _ -  _ -  _ _ _ -  _  _  -  _ _ _ _ _ -  _ _ _  _ (3)  t3) 1 _ 1 (3) (3)  (3) (3)  <3)  4 2 1 2 2 (3) 7  5 3 <3)  9 8 4 4 9 11  18 16 9 9 16 27  18 19 21 21 19 15  20 21 21 18 21 14  11 12 18 20 11 7  10 11 16 17 11 2  5 6 8 9 6  2 3 1 1 3  (3) (3)  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  -  -  (3) 1 (3) (3) 1 -  -  -  -  -  -  Level II................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  35,221 22,551 2,185 1,856 20,366 1,107 12,670  38.8 38.6 39.6 39.5 38.5 40.0 39.1  $439 435 444 447 434 487 446  $440 422 433 433 422 520 467  $380 373 382 382 372 440 412  -  $490 477 492 498 477 551 490  -  -  Level III.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. State and local government.................  5,778 4,644 506 464 4,138 1,134  38.6 38.7 39.9 39.9 38.6 38.2  546 564 589 593 561 472  544 557 590 594 557 470  472 496 525 525 492 409  -  610 630 652 666 622 540  _ -  _  _  (3)  -  -  2 1  2  1 9  1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3 13  _ (3>  _ <3)  _ (3>  _  _  _ -  3 Less than 0.5 percent. 4 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 percent at $150 and under $175; and 8 percent at $175 and under $200. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  25  Table A-4. Pay distributions, maintenance and toolroom occupations, United States, July 1993 Hourly earnings (in dollars)1 Occupation and level  Number of workers  124,686 90,589 24,469 23,831 66,120 1,963 34,097  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— 6.00  Mean  $9.91 9.61 10.20 10.22 9.39 11.66 10.72  Median  $9.60 9.27 10.16 10.20 8.94 10.51 10.27  Middle range  $8.00 8.00 8.73 8.75 7.65 8.56 8.70  117,998 104,238 85,667 82,462 18,571 9,904 13,760  16.99 17.03 16.81 16.85 18.04 19.90 16.65  17.45 17.51 17.35 17.45 18.92 19.62 15.80  13.97 14.07 13.74 13.80 15.56 18.92 13.11  9,330 7,932 2,426 2,413 5,506 2,151  11.21 10.90 11.37 11.37 10.69 10.82  10.75 10.56 11.03 11.02 10.30 9.70  9.63 9.62 10.25 10.25 9.28 8.70  $11.42 11.00 11.43 _ 11.43 _ 10.68 _ 14.34 _ 12.30 _ _  _  _ _ _ _ _ _  20.25 20.25 20.25 20.25 20.35 21.50 19.70  Under under 6.00 6.50  2 3 2 2 3 2 1  3 3 (2> <*> 4 <2) 1  66,478 61,402 21,720 21,348 39,682 31,897 5,076  16.47 16.56 15.71 15.72 17.03 17.71 15.35  17.17 17.17 15.77 15.77 17.43 17.87 15.20  14.68 14.86 13.95 13.95 15.83 17.17 12.50  23,633 21,552 7,371 7,261 14,181 8,713 2,081  18.70 18.68 18.21 18.18 18.93 19.86 18.83  18.40 18.40 17.98 17.98 18.90 19.86 18.75  16.67 16.76 16.86 16.84 16.66 17.86 15.73  37,411 36,030 31,107 30,537 4,923 4,209 1,381  16.27 16.16 15.63 15.61 19.45 20.18 19.22  15.91 15.81 15.21 15.09 20.34 20.99 20.30  13.42 13.39 13.18 13.18 18.43 19.44 16.34  _  _ _ _  _ _  _ _ _ _  _  _ _ _ _  12.56 12.10 13.20 13.20 11.85 12.21  7.00  8.00  7.00  8.00  9.00  4 4 1 1 5 2 4  14 16 11 10 18 15 11  18 19 14 14 21 10 13  (2)  11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 23.00 24.00 25.00 26.00 and 10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 23.00 2400 25.00 26.00 over 9.00  10.00  16 16 19 19 15 15 14  14 14 19 19 12 9 15  (2> (2> (2i (2)  (2) (2) (2) (2>  <2) (2) (2i t2)  -  -  -  -  (2) <2) (2) <2) <2> <2i  1 (2i (2i (2> (2i (2i 6  2 1 1 1 1 t2) 7  3 3 3 3 2 1 7  6 5 9 9 4 1 9  8 8 12 12 6 2 7  8 8 11 11 6 4 9  11 11 18 17 6 3 12  10 10 12 12 8 9 11  21 22 14 14 26 32 9  17 18 14 14 20 24 7  10 11 5 5 15 18 2  <2i  (2) (2)  (2> (2)  4 4 7 7 2 1 5  5 5 3 3 6 2 6  7 7 5 5 8 6 10  11 11 12 12 11 6 7  16 16 25 25 12 10 11  11 12 13 13 11 10 4  7 8 8 9 2 (2i 3  12 12 13 13 3 4 4  11 12 13 13 4 1 4  7 7 7 8 3 2 15  7 7 7 7 7 6 3  10 10 10 11 9 10 13  4  4  6 8 4 4 9 18  8 8 4 4 10 13  18 19 13 13 22 23  <2) <2) (2) (2)  <2> (2) <2) (2) <2) <2i 1  _ _  _  _  _  20.12 19.95 19.85 19.79 20.00 21.11 21.45 19.00 18.87 18.25 18.25 22.10 22.10 22.50  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _ _ _  _ _  _  _  _ _  _ _ _  _  _ _  _ _  _ _  _ _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  _  _  (2)  <2)  (2>  1  3  t2)  3 3 3 3 (2>  t2)  1  3 3 3 3 1 i2) 1  4 4 5 5 2 <2> 1  10 11 12 12 1 <2> 2  _  <2) (2> (2)  _  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  4 4 4 4 2  1 (2) 1 1 (2) (2) 3  _  -  2 3 1 1 4 9  2  _  -  1 i2) i2) (2) 1 1  <2>  _  -  (2>  5 1 i2> <2> 1 3  _  _  _  -  (2>  <2) 8 <2)  4 2 1 1 3 5  _  _  _  -  10 9 23 23 4 4  _  _  18.30 18.30 17.59 17.59 18.58 18.97 17.95  -  -  11 12 10 10 12 5  _  _  -  -  12 13 17 17 11 6  -  _  _  -  23 25 27 27 23 14  _  _  _  <2)  -  7  _  (2>  (2>  14 15 16 16 12 22 4  _  _  i2> (2>  10 11 13 13 3 4 4  _  _  i2) (2> i2) <2) <2) 1 <2)  9 9 6 6 22 33 6  _  _  <2) (2> <2) (2) i2) 6 1  9 9 9 9 10 13 4  _  _  1 1 1 1 1 5 2  7 7 7 8 7 6 5  _  _  2 1 1 1 1 3 5  7 7 7 7 6 2 9  _  _  3 2 2 2 2 3 5  8 8 8 8 11 3 10  _  <2) (2>  5 5 5 5 5 9 5  6 6 6 6 8 2 8  _  _  _  7 6 10 10 5 4 9  7 7 8 7 4 (2) 11  4 4 4 4 1  _  _  10 9 15 15 7 10 12  7 7 8 8 3 <2> 7  2 2 2 2 1  1 1 1 1 (2>  _ _  Maintenance Electronics Technicians _ _ _ _  6.50  26  -  -  -  -  -  1 t2) 1 1 t2) <2) 4  <2) (2i (2i <2) (2i  1 (a) !!! :2) <2)  1  <2> <2) (2; <2) (*> <2> <2)  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  2 2 <2i i2) 10 16 5  5  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  2 2 1 1 3 3 5  1 1 (2> <2> 1 2 2  1 (2) (2i (2) (2i (2> 4  (2) (2) (2) (2) <2> <2> 1  <2) (*> (2) t2) (2) <2) 1  (2i  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  <2)  -  18 20 11 11 24 33 4  8 7 9 8 6 6 14  8 7 6 6 8 9 14  4 4 6 6 3 4 5  3 3 2 2 3 4 2  1 1 (2i (2) 1 2 3  1 1 <2> <2) 2 2 1  2 2 (2) t2) 3 4 5  8 9 8 7 14 15 2  8 8 5 5 24 28 18  2 2 2 2 3 4 2  5 4 (2i (2) 25 30 25  1 1 1 1  <2t <2) (2i <2)  i2) <2) <2> (2)  (2i (2i (2> (2)  -  -  -  -  5  3  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Table A-4. Pay distributions, maintenance and toolroom occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued Hourly earnings (in dollars)1 Occupation and level  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery....... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  Number of workers  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—  Middle range  6.00 and Under under 6.00 6.50  162,323 159,159 137,266 134,256 21,893 14,764 3,164  $15.97 16.00 15.66 15.66 18.13 19.76 14.22  $15.64 15.77 15.27 15.27 19.10 19.62 14.28  $12.98 12.98 12.76 12.76 15.11 18.92 12.56  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle ... 101,827 Private industry.................................... 66,858 Goods producing............................... 20,993 Manufacturing.................................. 16,518 Service producing.............................. 45,865 Transportation and utilities .............. 36,699 State and local government................. 34,969  14.77 14.99 13.94 14.34 15.47 15.82 14.35  14.61 15.16 13.23 13.60 16.03 16.81 13.98  12.00 12.15 11.02 11.53 12.94 13.13 11.55  _ -  17.49 17.76 16.72 17.29 17.90 18.04 16.44  _  Maintenance Pipefitters........................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  32,265 30,377 25,105 23,539 5,272 3,122 1,888  18.43 18.51 18.66 18.76 17.80 19.13 17.18  18.70 18.70 18.74 18.93 17.87 18.92 15.03  16.92 16.97 17.45 17.45 15.00 17.26 13.87  _ — “  20.91 20.91 20.91 20.92 19.48 21.58 21.00  _  Tool and Die Makers ............................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing..................................  57,503 57,486 57,480 57,480  17.57 17.57 17.57 17.57  17.40 17.40 17.40 17.40  15.06 15.06 15.06 15.06  _  20.46 20.46 20.46 20.46  -  -  $18.76 18.90 18.61 18.61 20.12 21.26 15.55  -  -  -  6.50  7.00  8.00  9.00  7.00  8.00  9.00  10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 23.00 24.00 25 00 26.00  (2) (2i <2) (2>  1 1 1 1 (2>  2 2 2 2 1  1 1 2 5 6 (2) (2) (2)  -  -  (2> (2> (2>  n  _ -  _ n _  -  _ _ -  14.00 15.00 16.00 1700 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 23.00 24.00 25.00 26.00 and over  13 13 14 14 4 1 14  9 8 9 9 3 (2) 14  11 11 10 10 14 2 22  7 7 7 7 5 1 17  7 7 8 8 3 1 7  7 8 8 7 7 7 2  9 10 10 10 9 12 2  6 6 4 4 23 33 1  8 8 8 8 8 11 1  7 7 6 6 15 22 1  (2) (2) (2> (2> 2 2 2  2 2 2 2 3 4 (2)  (2i (2> (2> (2) 1 1  1  5 5 5 5 1 <2> 9  <2> (zi  3  5 5 6 6 1 t2) 4  2 2 2 1 2 2 2  5 4 7 6 3 3 6  8 7 10 7 6 6 9  9 7 8 7 7 7 11  10 10 16 17 7 6 10  10 9 8 8 10 8 11  9 8 6 4 8 5 12  7 7 7 7 6 5 9  9 10 9 11 10 11 8  10 13 4 5 17 21 5  7 8 5 6 9 10 5  5 6 5 5 7 8 2  4 4 7 9 2 2 4  2 2 1 1 3 4 1  1 (2) (2i (2) (2) (2) 4  (2) (2) (2> (2> (2> (2) <2)  (2) (2i (2) (2) 1 1 (2)  (2) (2) (2)  (2i <2) (2i  <2) (2) <2>  <2)  -  5  t2)  1 1 1 1 1 3  1 1 1 1 1 _ 5  3 2 2 1 2 2 15  9 8 5 4 21 6 21  4 3 2 2 10 3 8  11 11 12 12 8 9 2  10 10 9 10 13 11 2  20 21 21 20 20 31 5  5 5 6 7 1 (2) 3  28 29 35 36 t2) (2) 4  8 8 4 5 24 39 4  (2) <2) (2) <2) (2) <2) 3  (2) (2) (2) i2) (2)  (2) (2) (2) <2) 1  3  5  3  (2) (2i (2) (2)  <2) (2) t2) (2>  2 2 2 2  3 3 3 3  9 9 9 9  8 8 8 8  18 18 18 18  1 1 1 1  (2) (2) <2) (2)  (2) (2) (2) (2)  (2> (2) (2) (2)  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00  7 7 7 7  7 7 7 7  4 4 4 4  5 5 5 5  18 18 18 18  19 19 19 19  _ (2) (2)  <2) (2> i2) (2i  -  <2> (2> <2)  <2» (2) (2>  -  (2)  (2)  _ _  _ _  8  _  -  2 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  27  Table A-5. Pay distributions, material movement and custodial occupations, United States, July 1993 Hourly earnings (in dollars)1 Occupation and level  Number of workers  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—  Middle ranae  4.25 and 4.50  228,063 227,889 191,668 191,343 36,221 5,626  $10.24 10.24 10.07 10.07 11.15 13.31  $9.49 9.49 9.16 9.16 10.70 14.23  $7.64 7.64 7.64 7.64 8.10 10.26  315,408 301,122 19,658 19,206 281,464 1,266 14,286  6.53 6.40 9.18 9.25 6.20 10.44 9.35  6.00 6.00 8.87 8.91 5.86 9.93 9.11  5.00 5.00 7.10 7.14 5.00 7.49 7.36  33,486 27,805 7,593 7,575 20,212 933 5,681  11.34 11.34 13.26 13.26 10.62 15.06 11.35  11.20 11.20 12.85 12.85 10.46 15.30 11.20  9.28 9.28 11.25 11.24 8.86 14.09 9.20  _ _ _ _ _  839,572 597,980 70,768 69,761 527,212 7,739 Transportation and utilities .............. 241,592  7.57 7.04 9.88 9.91 6.65 10.32 8.90  6.75 6.00 8.74 8.77 5.80 10.00 8.91  5.15 5.00 6.93 6.93 4.85 7.21 6.86  90,139 89,208 46,896 46,381 42,312 10,444 931  9.44 9.44 9.15 9.16 9.76 14.38 9.21  8.00 8.00 7.97 7.97 8.10 16.84 9.04  6.67 6.67 7.00 7.00 6.25 12.80 7.38  109,902 109,834 32,601 32,586 77,233  8.90 8.90 8.86 8.86 8.92  8.18 8.18 8.22 8.22 8.13  6.50 6.50 7.50 7.50 6.18  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _  _ _ _ —  _ _  _ _  —  _ _ _ _ _  _ _  _ _ _ _ _  5.00  5.50  6.00  . 5.00  . 5.50  6.00  6.50  6.50 7.00  7.50  8.00  8.00  9.00  10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 and 10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 over 9.00  <2) <!) 1 1 <2)  <2) (2> (2> t2> (2>  1 1 <2) (2) 3 <2)  1 1 1 1 2 1  3 3 2 2 6 3  3 3 3 3 4 2  3 3 3 3 4 3  24 24 28 28 3 1  10 10 10 10 11 8  9 9 9 9 7 3  11 11 11 11 13 10  9 9 9 9 9 14  5 5 5 5 7 2  4 4 4 4 6 <2)  4 4 4 4 5 8  3 3 3 3 3 1  2 2 1 1 8 15  5 5 4 4 6 28  1 1 1 1 3 -  <2) t2) <!> (2>  (2> <2) (2> (2>  <2) <2i i2> (2>  -  -  -  7.35 7.14 10.60 10.61 7.00 13.66 10.98  10 11 3 3 11 1  10 10 1 (2) 11  13 13 5 5 14 3 6  8 8 5 4 8 3 6  8 8 5 4 8 9 8  5 5 11 11 5 4 8  8 7 14 14 7 15 14  4 4 15 16 3 6 14  3 2 9 9 2 4 13  2 1 5 5 1 4 9  1 1 4 4 1 8 5  1 1 3 3 t2) 24 8  1 1 5 6 (2> 2 2  (2) i2) 3 3 <2> 3 1  (2) <2) 2 2 (2i 3 <2)  (!) (2) (2i (2i (2> 2 t2)  (2) (2) (2) (2) <2) (2i  (2)  10 11 8 8 11 7 4  (2) <2> <2> (2> (2) <2)  _  16 17 4 4 18 2 2  -  -  13.39 13.35 15.42 15.42 12.60 16.37 13.43  <2> <2>  (2) (2)  (2> (2)  (2> <2>  _  _  _  -  <2)  (2)  <2)  2 1 <2> n 2  3 2 (2) (2) 3  3 3 (2) i2) 5  3 3 <2) <2> 5  14 14 3 3 18  _  _  _  _  -  —  5 4 7 7 3 23 11  7 7 18 18 3 26 5  <2i <2i <2> (2> <2> 5  2  13 13 13 13 13 6 12  1 1 4 4 (2) 9  1  11 11 18 18 9 3 9  3 3 10 10 1 15  (2>  13 13 18 18 12 2 13  11 12 7 7 14 11  (2)  9 10 1 1 13 1 7  (2) t2) 2 2 <2) 4 (2)  _  1  6  3  3  -  13  —  -  ~ -  t2) (2i <2> {!> (2> 1 ( )  (2> <2> t2) i2)  (2)  <2)  -  -  1 1 11 11 <2> 2 (2)  (2> (2> (2> (2> (2>  (2> (2> (2> (2) (2)  (2) (2>  (2)  ( )  —  (2) (2) (2) (2)  <2) <2i (2) <2)  -  —  —  -  -  -  -  -  — -  9 11 2 2 12 2 4  11 14 4 3 15 6 5  8 10 6 6 10 3 4  8 9 7 7 9 8 7  7 6 7 7 6 3 7  6 6 8 8 5 7 6  5 5 8 8 5 3 6  8 7 11 11 7 12 12  7 4 8 8 3 5 13  7 4 8 8 3 4 14  4 2 5 5 2 7 10  3 3 6 6 2 14 5  4 4 3 3 4 3 3  1 t2) 2 2 <2) 5 2  1 1 2 3 t2) 10  11.35 11.35 10.19 10.24 13.20 17.26 11.05  1 1 <2) <2) 2  3 3 2 2 3  5 5 3 3 8 2 1  8 9 8 8 9 3 3  8 8 8 8 8 1 12  8 8 8 8 7 1 8  13 13 18 18 7 3 6  12 12 15 14 9 4 13  6 6 7 7 4 3 19  6 6 7 7 6 1 5  4 4 3 3 5 3 25  3 3 4 4 2 2 3  3 3 2 2 4 9 1  2 2 2 2 2 5 1  1 1 1 1 2 3 1  3 3 1 1 4 12 (2)  9 9 6 6 13 45  1 1 2 2 1 i2>  —  —  10.93 10.93 10.69 10.69 10.93  9 9 4 4 12  7 7 3 3 8  7 7 5 5 8  7 7 9 9 6  9 9 19 19 4  13 13 23 23 9  7 7 7 7 7  10 10 5 5 12  9 9 12 12 8  3 3 4 4 3  4 4 3 3 4  4 4 2 2 4  1 1 1 1 1  2 2 <2i <2> 3  1 1 <2) <2) 1  i2> (2> (2i (2> <2>  _  _  —  2  <2) <2) <2> <2> <2)  3 3 1 1 4  5 5 2 2 6  28  -  -  10 13 1 1 14 (2) 1  3 3 2 2 5 3 1  <2> (2; <2)  —  9.35 8.08 12.24 12.24 7.55 12.99 10.66  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  7.00 7.50  $11.87 11.87 11.63 11.64 14.07 17.15  Guards _  4.50  ( )  <2) -  ( )  ( )  _  _  -  -  -  -  Table A-5. Pay distributions, material movement and custodial occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued Hourly earnings (in dollars)1 Occupation and level  Number of workers  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—  Middle range  4.25 and under 4.50  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17 00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00  <2> (2) <2) <2> (2)  4 4 3 3 5 1  4 4 3 3 5 3 8  4 4 3 3 7 <2) 4  6 6 5 5 8 2 7  7 7 7 7 8 4 7  17 17 18 18 15 14 17  13 13 13 13 14 8 10  15 15 19 19 9 5 20  8 8 7 7 9 3 9  7 7 8 8 5 1 6  5 5 5 5 4 9 2  2 2 2 2 3 2 2  1 1 1 1 2 9 1  1 1 1 1 1 1 <2)  1 1 2 2 (2)  -  2 2 1 1 3 4  3 4 1 1 4 1 (2)  6 7 1 1 8 1 4  7 7 4 4 7 5 5  8 9 6 6 9 4 6  7 8 7 7 8 7 6  8 8 7 6 8 4 7  7 7 9 7 6 1 5  11 11 14 12 10 1 12  7 6 6 6 6 2 15  6 6 6 6 6 7 6  3 3 6 7 2 2 9  4 3 4 5 3 3 11  5 5 2 3 6 17 8  6 6 19 22 2 8 4  1 1 4 4 (2> (2) 2  1 1 1 1 1 4 <2)  (2> (2) (2>  1 1 1 1 1 <2)  2 2 1 1 2 <2) 1  1 1 1 1 1 <2) 1  1 1 2 2 1 (2> 3  3 3 7 8 2 1 4  3 2 7 6 2 <2> 5  6 6 15 14 4 1 13  5 5 10 8 4 <2> 9  5 5 8 8 5 1 8  5 5 4 4 5 2 8  5 4 4 5 4 3 14  8 7 6 6 7 7 22  6 6 13 14 5 5 5  6 6 3 3 7 8 3  <2) (2) (2' (2) (2) <2) 1  1 1 1 <2> <2) (2) <2i  2 2 3 3 1 1 1  1 1 1 1 1 1 1  2 3 4 2 2 1 1  3 3 3 3 3 2 4  10 10 9 8 11 9 8  10 11 12 13 10 8 8  11 13 9 9 16 17 7  11 9 7 7 11 9 20  10 11 14 15 9 9 8  7 7 6 5 8 7 6  5 5 5 6 5 3 7  (2) <2)  1 1 2 2 1 1  (2> t2) <2) (2> (2> (2> (2>  1 1 (2) (2> 1 (2> 1  1 1 1 1 1 (2) 1  1 1 3 3 1 <2) 2  5 5 8 8 4 1 2  7 7 14 15 4 2 6  7 7 8 7 6 6 4  14 14 15 17 14 10 10  9 10 7 7 10 9 3  8 8 12 13 7 3 8  9 9 12 13 8 6 3  Shipping/Receiving Clerks....................... 105,131 Private industry.................................... 103,538 Goods producing............................... 61,656 Manufacturing.................................. 61,073 Service producing.............................. 41,882 Transportation and utilities .............. 1,214 State and local government................. 1,593  $9.76 9.77 10.01 10.02 9.41 13.62 9.43  $9.38 9.38 9.66 9.70 8.86 14.14 9.35  $7.75 7.75 8.25 8.27 7.26 9.01 7.67  — -  $11.25 11.25 11.36 11.38 11.01 18.18 10.72  (2) (2)  Truckdrivers Light Truck............................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  52,301 48,714 9,698 8,408 39,016 10,285 3,587  9.22 9.19 10.12 10.37 8.96 12.97 9.61  8.06 8.00 9.00 9.52 7.61 13.37 9.32  6.30 6.25 7.35 7.35 6.00 10.00 7.29  -  11.78 11.75 14.40 14.45 10.90 17.23 12.01  2 2 2  Medium Truck........................................ 119,078 Private industry.................................... 113,669 Goods producing............................... 18,163 Manufacturing.................................. 16,376 Service producing.............................. 95,506 Transportation and utilities .............. 67,410 State and local government................. 5,409  13.98 14.11 11.81 12.04 14.55 16.43 11.34  14.87 15.21 10.55 11.00 16.06 17.70 11.52  10.35 10.46 8.15 8.32 11.50 15.28 8.96  _ -  17.73 17.73 14.87 14.87 17.79 17.97 13.48  t2) (2) n (2i (2> <2>  Heavy Truck .......................................... 112,784 Private industry.................................... 88,305 Goods producing ............................... 38,047 Manufacturing.................................. 28,928 Service producing.............................. 50,258 Transportation and utilities .............. 36,061 State and local government................. 24,479  12.37 12.20 12.22 12.47 12.18 12.68 12.98  11.80 11.71 12.00 12.31 11.69 12.10 12.19  9.45 9.30 9.03 9.40 9.50 10.18 10.32  _ -  15.46 15.05 15.18 15.50 14.74 15.83 17.40  (2) <2>  Tractor Trailer........................................ 165,389 Private industry.................................... 164,419 Goods producing............................... 45,693 Manufacturing.................................. 40,350 Service producing.............................. 118,726 Transportation and utilities .............. 63,487 State and local government................. 970  13.48 13.47 12.20 12.05 13.95 15.24 16.31  13.29 13.25 11.69 11.64 14.10 16.74 15.95  11.12 11.12 9.78 9.75 11.40 12.30 11.79  16.63 16.62 14.44 14.44 17.18 17.31 18.66  _  _  -  -  -  _ -  “  1 -  -  (2) (2)  <2) (2)  <2) <2) (2t <2) -  -  — -  _  (2) -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  29  10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 and over  1 1 <2) (2> 2 37 1  (2> (2) (2) <2) <2)  7 8 1 1 9 35 <2)  (2) <2) (2) <2) <2) <2)  _ _ _ _ _ _ -  t2) <2)  2 2 1 1 2 3 <2>  25 26 3 4 30 42 1  16 16 8 8 18 25 2  (2> <2) 1 2 (2>  (2> t2)  8 10 8 11 10 14 4  4 4 4 5 5 6 1  8 5 6 6 4 4 18  6 5 5 4 5 7 7  <2> (2) (2> (2) (2i <2i (2)  (2> t2) (2)  7 7 5 5 8 7 12  7 7 3 2 8 7 11  15 15 5 4 18 34 3  5 5 2 2 6 10 10  2 2 1 1 2 4 1  (2> (2) 1 1 (2) <2) 3  1  <2>  <2) (2> (2> <2) <2)  (2) (2i (2i <2> t2) <2>  <2) <2) <2) <2i  _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _ -  -  _ (2)  _  -  _ <2> <2)  -  (2) (2)  -  _ _ _ _ _  _ -  <2) <2) 3 3 _ _  -  -  <2> <2) <2) <2) (2i i2)  <2) 1 1 1 (2> (2>  <2> (2) !2)  (2) (2>  <2) <2)  t2) (2)  1  319  i2)  Table A-5. Pay distributions, material movement and custodial occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued Hourly earnings (in dollars)1 Occupation and level  Number of workers  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—  Middle range  4.25 and 4.50  210,671 202,062 85,092 82,762 116,970 28,310 8,609  $11.31 11.31 11.32 11.32 11.31 13.43 11.16  $11.00 11.00 11.00 11.00 10.98 14.00 11.53  $8.68 8.68 9.06 9.05 8.50 10.40 9.21  - $13.74 13.80 13.38 13.36 14.13 17.10 13.01  <2) _ _ _  5.00  .  -  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  <2) (2> (2) (2> <2)  1 1 (2> (2> 1 (2> 2  1 1 1 (2) 2 (2) 4  4 4 2 2 6 1 1  _  <2)  1  5.50  6.00  4.50  6.50 7.00  3 3 4 4 3 1 1  7.50  8.00  -  -  -  7.50  8.00  9.00  3 3 3 2 4 4 5  11 11 10 10 13 4 6  4 4 4 4 3 4 3  10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21 00 22.00 and 10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 over 9.00  9 9 10 10 8 6 9  12 12 14 15 11 9 11  12 12 14 15 11 7 14  8 7 9 8 6 8 12  7 7 8 8 6 5 18  8 8 9 8 8 5 6  4 4 4 4 4 6 2  3 3 3 3 4 13 2  5 5 2 2 7 23 3  3 3 3 3 2 2 1  (2> (2) <2> (2> (2> 1 (2>  (2) <2) (2) (2) (!) (2>  <2) (2) (2) <2> (2) i2> -  <2> (2) <2> <2) -  3 All workers were at $24 and under $25.  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges. 2 Less than 0.5 percent.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  7.00  NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  30   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993  Occupation and level  All establishments  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Mean  1000 - 2499 workers  2500 workers or more  Mean  Median  Accountants Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $497 499 524 517 486 516 491  $488 488 514 503 480 507 490  $474 475 486 479 469 483 463  $470 470 478 475 466 462 463  $510 514 549 547 485 513 452  $503 509 544 544 481 515 462  $495 502 528 523 490 548 458  $488 495 519 519 484 566 429  $517 537 591 573 517 554 499  $516 529 589 581 507 561 494  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  589 594 619 621 578 630 560  578 585 610 610 574 623 554  568 572 586 588 562 582 517  560 564 576 576 557 561 501  606 610 642 641 583 632 564  599 602 634 634 573 622 563  601 603 622 622 594 660 582  599 600 624 625 590 659 587  614 647 686 681 611 720 569  606 635 676 672 595 718 563  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  741 747 762 761 734 777 709  735 739 757 757 727 763 705  736 737 746 746 729 738 718  731 734 747 747 722 730 701  758 761 783 780 736 792 725  741 747 780 776 721 791 730  743 743 760 759 732 797 743  731 732 750 749 727 779 729  742 776 799 792 756 837 700  737 764 790 783 739 831 695  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  950 966 982 970 951 995 873  931 949 960 953 934 973 883  946 951 958 950 945 992 803  933 939 941 931 933 960 801  980 982 1,003 987 948 973 961  953 953 964 953 940 976 941  951 956 978 976 943 968 908  933 937 956 953 925 947 883  940 992 1,013 986 971 1,039 870  926 975 996 983 953 1,044 883  Level V............................................. Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,233 1,245 1,279 1,261 1,214 1,256 1,097  1,198 1,212 1,247 1,234 1,183 1,231 1,119  1,216 1,216 1,263 1,236 1,188 1,256  1,175 1,171 1,242 1,212 1,160 1,167  1,285 1,286 1,322 1,313 1,227 1,206  1,224 1,229 1,269 1,245 1,207 1,149  1,223 1,226 1,232 1,232 1,223 1,265  1,202 1,202 1,221 1,221 1,192 1,256  1,225 1,256 1,280 1,253 1,228 1,272 1,097  1,197 1,231 1,254 1,244 1,208 1,256 1,119  Level VI................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities ..............  1,522 1,545 1,549 1,501 1,539 1,595  1,484 1,500 1,493 1,466 1,517 1,632  1,536 1,536  1,450 1,450  1,486 1,522 1,518 1,487 1,528 1,599  1,454 1,480. 1,469 1,461 1,490  Median  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Professional Occupations  .  -  -  -  -  -  -  See note at end of table.  31   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Mean  Median  Accountants, Public  Median  Mean  Median  $544 544 544  $541 541 541  $533 533 533  $538 538 538  $557 557 557  $557 557 557  $596 596 596  $595 595 595  598 598 598  586 586 586  591 591 591  576 576 576  596 596 596  586 586 586  642 642 642  653 653 653  695 695 695  682 682 682  685 685 685  662 662 662  680 680 680  672 672 672  748 748 748  739 739 739  938 938 938  912 912 912  925 925 925  893 893 893  865 865 865  864 864 864  1,046 1,046 1,046  1,018 1,018 1,018  715 807 777 983 677  691 768 767  737  . .  763 . 717  755  .  Attorneys  Level III...................................................  1000 - 2499 workers  748  .  .  . .  657  . .  900 916  885 907  953 981  949 982  900  883  899  893  928 1,007 1,093 1,066 979 1,059 857  907 982 1,035 1,021 950 1,050 826  801  835  882  848  1,224 1,319 1,410 1,397 1,287 1,331 1,087  1,207 1,306 1,438 1,436 1,262 1,335 1,045  1,238 1,258 1,322  1,212 1,248 1,392  1,302 1,343  1,336 1,361  1,249 1,412 1,071  1,240 1,440 1,013  1,259 1,235 1,166  1,104  1,554 1,684 1,757 1,741 1,644 1,700 1,336  1,555 1,641 1,751 1,728 1,619 1,690 1,290  1,641 1,651 1,679  1,628 1,628 1,618  1,646  1,628  1,631 1,653 1,632 1,604 1,687  1,607 1,607 1,582 1,582 1,649  1,493  1,449  .  .  See note at end of table.  32  .  .  1,261  708  2500 workers or more Mean  Median  -  . -  -  -  -  .  -  -  . -  $706 989  $683 1,018  671  655  912 1,158 -  874 1,133 1,070  . 1,048 1,120 885  955 1,016 . 1,011 1,072 861  1,244 1,291 1,330 1,333 1,284 1,283 1,156  1,217 1,249 1,306 1,326 1,248 1,256 1,133  1,187 1,401 1,506  1,146 1,390 1,485  1,359 1,365 1,067  1,330 1,383 1,033  1,585 1,605 1,693 1,694 1,576 1,652 1,483  1,558 1,581 1,679 1,682 1,544 1,640 1,512  1,511 1,741 1,861  1,493 1,728 1,891  1,665 1,735 1,318  1,623 1,728 1,290  992 1,052  1,104 1,164 855  794  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  1000 - 2499 workers  2500 workers or more  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities ..............  $1,870 2,084 2,055 2,040 2,110 2,030  $1,860 2,029 2,025 2,011 2,034 1,966  $2,160 2,160  $2,034 2,034  $2,018 2,023  -  -  $2,000 2,000 -  $2,017 2,015 2,006  $2,005 1,994 1,987  $1,782 2,124 2,115  $1,604 2,050 2,055  -  -  2,130 2,122  2,041 2,116  Level VI................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Service producing..............................  2,211 2,602 2,607 2,598  2,146 2,544 2,549 2,534  .  . -  .  . -  . •  2,081 2,575  1,773 2,520  2,605  2,520  Engineers Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  652 659 677 678 630 702 612  677 695 698 697 679 705 612  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  -  -  -  651 658 675 677 629 709 612  617 617 637 635 603 689 593  614 614 634 633 600 691 593  655 659 659 657 658 694  654 655 645 645 684 712 *  698 703 713 714 680  697 700 707 710 691  604  582  669 698 701 699 687 710 616  748 750 758 757 730 775 734  741 743 753 752 714 768 728  717 717 725 722 707 754 716  710 711 718 718 701 748 696  759 759 757 752 766 768 769  756 757 751 749 772 769 753  770 770 784 784 738 824 780  759 759 772 772 696 824 766  761 770 772 771 759 768 728  755 759 762 762 739 754 725  Level III ................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  875 879 880 878 878 930 841  861 864 863 861 866 924 840  864 865 871 867 857 900 847  854 854 855 854 852 900 838  889 889 887 883 897 941 882  876 876 875 874 888 937 892  893 892 897 897 883 937 899  875 875 881 881 859 939 873  869 880 874 873 917 938 832  853 859 853 853 910 931 829  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,058 1,064 1,057 1,054 1,080 1,097 989  1,046 1,053 1,046 1,044 1,069 1,088 995  1,060 1,065 1,075 1,072 1,053 1,061 963  1,055 1,056 1,062 1,066 1,039 1,006 953  1,091 1,092 1,088 1,077 1,101 1,111 1,064  1,082 1,083 1,070 1,068 1,096 1,109 1,063  1,081 1,082 1,065 1,063 1,111 1,102 1,068  1,064 1,064 1,048 1,047 1,096 1,097 1,042  1,034 1,043 1,038 1,036 1,076 1,102 980  1,021 1,032 1,027 1,026 1,066 1,102 995  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,271 1,277 1,272 1,267 1,292 1,282 1,157  1,257 1,264 1,260 1,258 1,275 1,274 1,147  1,286 1,289 1,306 1,299 1,273 1,274 1,146  1,270 1,273 1,300 1,299 1,254 1,264 1,111  1,286 1,288 1,286 1,269 1,292 1,325 1,184  1,279 1,281 1,274 1,260 1,294 1,311 1,194  1,300 1,301 1,279 1,277 1,347 1,265 1,261  1,280 1,280 1,263 1,262 1,345 1,246 1,187  1,252 1,261 1,260 1,258 1,266 1,266 1,147  1,240 1,251 1,251 1,250 1,248 1,253 1,147  See note at end of table.  33  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued J'-  •* Occupation and level  All establishments  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  1000 - 2499 workers  2500 workers or more  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Level VI................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $1,513 1,521 1,531 1,523 1,488 1,532 1,292  $1,501 1,509 1,522 1,517 1,470 1,530 1,260  $1,498 1,497 1,551 1,539 1,467 *  $1,479 1,479 1,536 1,523 1,457  $1,525 1,526 1,545 1,524 1,484 -  $1,517 1,516 1,531 1,518 1,476  $1,534 1,535 1,534 1,531 1,536 1,589  $1,512 1,512 1,513 1,517 1,511 1,567  $1,506 1,521 1,524 1,520 1,491 1,442  $1,500 1,514 1,519 1,516 1,466 1,405  Level VII.................................................. Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities ..............  1,756 1,766 1,774 1,766 1,745 1,871  1,731 1,737 1,755 1,748 1,704 1,859  1,725 1,725 1,837  1,704 1,704 1,829  1,790 1,790 1,816 1,798  1,775 1,775 1,732 1,737 1,902  1,710 1,726 1,738 1,737  1,652  1,806 1,805 1,757 1,755 1,898 -  1,721 1,743 1,753 1,748  1,672  1,767 1,767 1,800 1,781 - • -  Level VIII................................................. Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing...............................  2,072 2,081 2,117 2,103 1,989  2,032 2,035 2,068 2,064 1,946  -  2,138 2,138 -  2,146 2,146 -  2,074 2,092 2,096 2,092  2,033 2,049 2,058 2,056  Budget Analysts Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing...............................  530 513 489  520 502 480  -  -  -  542 521  542 516  Level II.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  606 607 632 625 588 598 602  590 591 605 605 578 585 586  632 654 632 589  614 645  621 633 -  614 558  620  603  610  597  801 836 929 929 772  789 786  789 767 770 807  *  -  -  -  Administrative Occupations  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  787 792 832 826 759 795 782  777 774 805 801 737 760 785  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  909 913 909 889 917 969 899  895 896 896 895 901 948 890  574 576  549 555  564 566  570  545  546  749 755  733 733  736  722  764 775 . 745 723  888 860  871 871  913 905 -  See note at end of table.  34  544 544 542 743 751  743  825 843 880 880 781 718  703  895 895  933 949  917 934  731  959  942  853  867  '  775 791 908 912 934 1,016 901  613 624  897 890  908 1,003 913   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  -  -  -  *  Budget Analyst Supervisors Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... State and local government.................  $969 1,064 943  $974 1,106 937  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... State and local government.................  1,172 1,219 1,102  1,152 1,160 1,124  Buyers/Contracting Specialists Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  491 497 504 503 484 489 468  482 487 493 490 478 496 461  $469 469 472 470 461  $461 463 468 463 457  470  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  624 628 633 632 615 659 593  618 620 627 624 600 634 595  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  828 836 832 831 853 884 717  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government................. Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing..............................  -  -  . -  . -  1000 - 2499 workers Median  2500 workers or more Mean  $950  . -  Median  $941  942  937  1,177  1,164  1,102  1,124  $482 490 513 512 468 461  $507 513 559 558 488 479  $496 500 543 536 484  525 573 606 604 533  457  $495 503 516 515 481 464  485  467  526 554 602 598 530 458  609 609 612 611 596 615 601  610 610 616 616 580 599 603  641 644 655 654 605 667 615  632 634 646 646 601 655 606  637 640 655 652 620 716 619  634 636 657 655 593 727 627  643 678 697 695 650 706 578  642 667 688 685 640 695 578  816 822 816 814 849 882 714  806 807 802 800 840 -  795 795 795 794 840  843 845 840 838 870 847 770  836 840 831 829 882 859 779  848 848 845 844 856 889 848  845 845 841 841 849 887 865  830 853 854 851 851 891 692  820 839 834 831 845 892 694  992 996 992 983 1,013 1,044 914  973 977 969 965 1,000 1,020 886  1,016 1,016 1,031 1,018  1,031 1,028 1,050 1,035  1,002 1,002 1,003 998 -  987 987 991 991 -  980 978 970 967 1,015  971 969 962 961 1,012 -  990 997 991 980 1,025 1,045 893  964 970 959 955 1,018 1,020 873  1,212 1,211 1,206 1,186 1,242  1,186 1,186 1,186 1,184 1,197  1,230 1,230  1,188 1,186  -  -  -  See note at end of table.  35  . -  -  *  .  . -  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Mean  Median  Median  1000 - 2499 workers Mean  Median  Computer Programmers Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $522 531 582 573 515 573 461  $516 524 558 546 515 564 452  $474 476 519 520 464  $478 480 505 505 462  $505 511 512 509 510  $499 502 506 500 501 *  $540 553 555 585 449  $546 557  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  607 615 649 647 599 633 559  601 608 646 645 594 634 557  571 573 590 589 568 559 543  576 576 584 584 573 551 535  585 590 596 591 587 586 513  584 587 601 597 582 578 507  Level III ................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  710 718 730 729 714 766 668  707 712 732 732 706 753 671  701 703 703 702 703 703 646  695 697 704 704 695 695 644  713 719 735 734 706 792 655  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  853 855 854 853 855 936 813  839 839 837 837 843 924 812  865 865 923 924 856 -  849 849 912 930 843 *  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing...............................  993 993 980  975 974 972  . -  Computer Systems Analysts Level I ..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  724 732 743 739 726 784 668  713 719 725 724 714 779 662  715 716 735 737 710 705  See note at end of table.  36  2500 workers or more Mean  Median  566 592 443  $557 584 652 641 549 588 469  $550 578 655 651 546 586 467  617 623 632 632 620 638 578  615 619 634 634 616 634 590  638 662 700 697 631 668 562  638 664 701 699 615 666 562  708 713 737 737 685 787 639  709 713 739 739 702 734 686  710 711 732 733 697 743 683  719 742 759 758 738 775 667  719 737 776 774 730 758 671  854 855 871 870 842  855 858 879 879 837  885 883  873 873 824  824 825 809 809 852  -  -  838 - ' 916  836 840 814 814 865  910  785  776  . -  . *  . -  1,067 1,066 -  1,024 1,021 -  971 971 972  964 964 961  710 710 729 729 705 682  708 715 716 712 715 743 607  700 703 710 708 701 733 610  747 750 766 767 744 815 702  731 735 749 749 730 831 671  722 737 745 738 730 774 668  709 717 720 715 717 761 669   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Mean  Median  Median  1000 - 2499 workers Mean  Median  2500 workers or more Mean  Median  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $859 861 877 873 855 899 844  $853 851 866 864 847 887 876  $852 853 889 887 844 839 829  $845 846 868 868 843 826 806  $846 846 875 868 831 833 850  $836 835 847 842 825 835 838  $873 877 894 894 870 947 825  $865 867 885 885 860 954 829  $859 863 866 861 862 898  Level III................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,018 1,025 1,049 1,045 1,014 1,048 933  1,009 1,014 1,037 1,035 1,006 1,044 965  1,020 1,020 1,036 1,030 1,017  1,013 1,013 997 997 1,016 *  1,007 1,008 1,042 1,020 993 1,030  996 998 1,039 1,023 979 1,044 •  1,028 1,029 1,070 1,069 1,010 1,062 1,016  1,014 1,014 1,051 1,050 999 1,048 1,004  1,016 1,030 1,046 1,043 1,020 1,064 923  1,008 1,019 1,037 1,035 1,008 1,055 962  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,224 1,226 1,238 1,229 1,220 1,269 1,157  1,210 1,211 1,226 1,220 1,204 1,266 1,163  1,251 1,251  1,240 1,240  1,254  1,244  1,208 1,208 1,280  1,181 1,181 1,246 1,173  1,190 1,190 1,186 1,186 1,191  -  •  -  ■  -  1,161 1,161 1,166 1,166 1,157 -  1,230 1,232 1,244 1,241 1,223 1,324 1,158  1,215 1,217 1,236 1,234 1,204 1,303 1,163  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Sen/ice producing...............................  1,487 1,487 1,511 1,480  1,477 1,477 1,529 1,455  .  .  -  -  -  *  . -  . -  . *  1,486 1,486 -  1,477 1,478 -  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Sen/ice producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,086 1,116 1,195 1,189 1,103 1,142 981  1,082 1,106 1,181 1,178 1,093 1,165 1,019  1,094 1,096 1,092  1,062 1,124 1,106 1,120 962  1,056 1,106 1,094 1,132 1,006  Level II .................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,278 1,288 1,369 1,357 1,269 1,403 1,165  1,262 1,271 1,359 1,354 1,252 1,374 1,124  1,301 1,301  1,281 1,304 1,353 1,332 1,292 1,468 1,152  1,263 1,286 1,345 1,341 1,275 1,440 1,124  -  1,091 1,091 1,091  1,187  1,109 1,110 1,182  1,101 1,093 1,171  1,094  1,072  1,286 1,286 -  1,259 -  -  1,234 -  See note at end of table.  37  1,265 1,265  1,248 1,248  1,262  1,248 -  . -  1,123 1,126 1,175 1,174 1,114  1,114 1,115 1,162 1,162 1,105  1,105  1,101  1,265 1,264 1,356 1,357 1,239 1,345  1,258 1,256 1,354 1,354 1,221 1,353  -  $858 852 860 855 851 883  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  $1,593 1,593  $1,566 1,566  -  -  $1,558 1,559 1,553 -  $1,530 1,530 1,526  $1,571 1,581 1,621 1,594 1,567  $1,561 1,572 1,608 1,586 1,563  -  1,451  ■  Mean  Median  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $1,571 1,575 1,619 1,575 1,561 1,606 1,452  $1,555 1,560 1,607 1,560 1,555 1,558 -  Level IV...................................................  1,878  1,855  Personnel Specialists Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  497 497 512 510 489 570 498  480 480 500 500 478 566 492  $477 476  472  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  573 572 592 589 561 606 581  566 564 577 577 557 592 573  Level III................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  740 741 769 768 722 817 737  Level IV................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  964 973 993 989 954 1,008 902  Median  -  •  1000 - 2499 workers  2500 workers or more  1,738  1,651  1,900  1,855  1,888  1,851  $465 465  505 488  499 487 -  491 492 510  480 479 490  503 535 -  456  471  461  484  -  -  -  -  474 -  510 547 528 • 487  541 542 541 540 543 551 513  538 541 538 538 545 562 504  576 576 605 602 553 613 573  579 579 617 616 554 627 579  586 589 655 653 567 682 561  576 579 657 654 553 700 563  623 648 734 724 609 665 596  610 618 710 701 595 660 590  730 730 757 756 710 822 737  708 711 732 732 697 744 671  697 701 724 724 686 715 661  748 751 768 761 735 814 708  749 749 768 763 735 817 694  749 751 797 796 733 850 734  736 741 779 779 730 864 713  780 801 861 855 766 881 755  775 785 862 858 745 881 769  957 960 977 973 951 993 898  964 965 963 956 966 1,011 920  960 960 954 941 960 980 969  977 981 1,006 1,001 949 984 936  960 960 969 962 953 977 890  962 964 992 995 941 1,012 944  943 943 984 987 927 1,000 917  959 993 1,049 1,041 944 1,014 888  950 979 1,031 1,028 930 994 885  •  -  See note at end of table.  38  513 490   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 —Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  1000 - 2499 workers  2500 workers or more  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Level V.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $1,226 1,235 1,259 1,255 1,204 1,214 1,107  $1,200 1,208 1,232 1,229 1,179 1,211 1,106  $1,249 1,249 1,239 1,241 1,260  $1,229 1,229 1,229 1,229 1,229  $1,259 1,263 1,287 1,275 1,200  $1,246 1,248 1,250 1,248 1,171 -  $1,218 1,215 1,200 1,199 1,237 1,260  $1,176 1,176 1,176 1,176 1,175 -  $1,201 1,221 1,288 1,283 1,149 1,175 1,091  $1,173 1,192 1,265 1,262 1,137 1,160 1,089  Level VI................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing..............................  1,528 1,533 1,534 1,526 1,531  1,536 1,536 1,539 1,539 1,536  . -  . -  1,469 1,469 -  1,432 1,432 -  1,508 1,517 *  1,539 1,539  Personnel Supervisors/Managers Level I..................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,015 1,045 1,060 1,061 1,032 1,115 906  1,014 1,033 1,066 1,067 1,012 1,104 899  1,062 1,073 -  1,066 1,066 -  979 989 1,078 -  922 960 1,108 -  1,019 1,019 1,029 1,032 1,012  1,016 1,016 1,022 1,024 995  1,010 1,069 1,092 1,092 1,041 1,130 902  1,019 1,063 1,073 1,073 1,030  Level II .................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,305 1,331 1,354 1,352 1,315 1,349 1,132  1,291 1,312 1,337 1,337 1,293 1,308 1,124  1,367 1,366 -  1,334 1,334 -  1,365 -  1,332 -  1,276 1,276 1,269 1,266 1,286 -  1,222 1,222 1,181 1,181 1,245  1,335 1,343 1,399 1,402 1,301 1,334 -  1,333 1,337 1,376 1,385 1,302 1,286 -  1,283 1,333 1,357 1,352 1,318 1,349 1,120  1,266 1,312 1,348 1,348 1,299 1,350 1,117  Level III ................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing.................................. Sen/ice producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,647 1,674 1,673 1,663 1,674 1,649 1,269  1,632 1,651 1,651 1,634 1,651 1,619 1,257  1,721 1,721  1,763 1,763  1,715 1,718 1,683 1,675 1,751  1,684 1,690 1,666 1,666 1,742  1,599 1,640 1,644 1,630 1,633 1,616 1,242  1,593 1,594 1,594 1,594 1,587  Level IV................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing..............................  2,082 2,082 2,043 2,015 2,192  2,016 2,016 1,999 1,976 2,179  2,052 2,052  1,999 1,999  -  . -  -  -  *  -  -  -  -  . -  .  .  -  -  . -  902  1,243  *  See note at end of table.  39   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-1. Average pay by size of establishment, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  Tax Collectors Level I ..................................................... State and local government.................  All establishments Mean  Median  $464 464  $506 506  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Mean  Median  -  Level II.................................................... State and local government.................  509 509  523 523  $436 436  Level III.................................................. State and local government.................  713 713  708 708  660 660  $402 402 632 632  $810 810  1000 - 2499 workers  2500 workers or more Mean  Median  Mean  Median  -  -  -  $474  $517  .  .  .  -  -  -  539 539  542 542  716 716  740 740  $837 837  $751 751  $769 769  Median  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  40   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-2. Average pay by size of establishment, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers Mean  Median  500 - 999 workers Mean  Median  1000 - 2499 workers Mean  Median  2500 workers or more Mean  Median  Technical Occupations Computer Operators Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $336 333 362 360 326 366 348  $328 329 343 340 320 353 319  $320 321 355  $308 314 340  312  303  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  422 423 441 441 417 493 413  411 412 422 421 410 518 405  397 398 399 398 397 436 379  397 398 398 398 397 428 371  437 444 481 482 412 410 381  Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  535 539 554 554 532 587 513  528 528 538 537 524 553 521  518 518 514 514 520 538 514  513 513 509 509 515 519 479  Level IV................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  646 647 671 671 632 672 626  643 645 659 659 631 676 633  642 642  653 653 650 -  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Sen/ice producing...............................  762 762 776  744 744 756  Drafters Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing........................ ....... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  383 386 361 361 417 486 343  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  471 470 459 457 490 537 481  $337 336  $347 341 ■ • 333  ■  * *  • 336 * *  358  341  419 425 473 479 398 408 373  424 425 458 458 415 473 419  417 418 467 467 410 491 408  451 468 509 509 462 542 422  440 454 462 462 451 529 424  543 546 568 567 513 540 508  535 536 569 568 513 540 508  533 533 549 549 522 595 533  526 524 541 541 513 549 533  548 570 604 604 562 605 509  543 553 593 593 542 566 527  636 635 647 • 615 -  634 632 651  •  636 632 662 662 612 636 725  631 628 643 643 611 609  661 673 703 703 650 715 612  655 665 707 707 639 731 619  ■  ■  ■  770 769  752 752  437 442  451 465  424 475  457 500  ' * ■  ■ • ■ '  506 339  507 307  512 515 491 490 546 576 482  503 503 482 482 560 617 468  509 523 521 519 527 544 488  503 513 491 488 525 529 478  $344 349 346  $347 347 338  *  637  617  -  *  ■  373 375 360 360 414 507 335  356 356 341 341 376  354 354 348 340 362  462 461 450 447 484 525 469  456 456 445 442 475 529 459  ' 446 446 440 440 464 518 429  See note at end of table.  41  $348 344  425 428 424 -  420 427 420 *  469 470 458 457 502 491 454  478 478 455 447 491 491 463  342  ■  $331 327  323   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-2. Average pay by size of establishment, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  $609 609 595 594 663  746 746 721 730  Level III ................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $599 600 594 591 612 645 592  $593 593 586 582 601 641 591  $576 576 566 561 591 622 604  $577 577 560 555 596 631 573  $619 622 590 588 690  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities ..............  759 759 755 754 765 767  743 740 741 740 740 765  715 715 708 706 719  700 700 692 697 708 -  774 775 729 721 -  Engineering Technicians Level I ..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing...............................  381 382 382 382 380  376 377 380 379 372  389 389 -  Level II .................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  486 486 494 493 463 550 475  475 475 480 480 453 540 476  464 464 468 468 457  Level III ................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  595 596 598 598 588 710 558  586 586 592 592 568 699 573  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  716 716 707 706 740 856 713  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities ..............  834 833 823 820 867 942  -  384 384 . -  461 461 463 463 448 *  501 502 507 502 . -  500 500 509 505  568 568 571 571 563 656  560 560 562 562 555 679  574 575 568 562  573 574 570 566  . -  -  709 709 702 701 729 883 702  686 686 688 686 682 800  670 669 671 668 668 780  724 725 698 692 814  818 817 814 810 860 967  821 821 813 808 833  808 808 804 797 812  907 908 869 837  -  -  -  See note at end of table.  42  1000 - 2499 workers Mean  2500 workers or more  Median  Mean  Median  $628 625 611 591 651 676 663  $613 609 587 578 636 700 662  $62 B 644 647 646 620 655 584  $630 640 646 646 596 629 583  791 790 769 751 . -  778 771 778 756 .  772 774 776 776  759 756 756 756 . -  369 369 . .  380 380  -  343 . . . ■  494 493 499 499  483 482 487 487  504 504 509 509  508 508 512 511  . -  376  -  -  •  584 584 586 586 578 .  577 577 578 578 572  637 639 635 635 662 781 554  646 647 649 649 643 823 570  701 701 694 692 789  693 693 685 684 722  687 687 676 675 728  747 747 730 730 827 874 719  744 744 730 730 841 899 748  886 886 859 851  826 821 799 799  801 798 780 780  832 832 827 826  817 817 817 817  .   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-2. Average pay by size of establishment, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Mean  Median  Mean  $942 942 -  -  -  -  -  Median  Level VI................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing..............................  $974 974 947 945 1,019  $945 945 920 920 1,060  $940 940 950  975  Engineering Technicians, Civil or Survey Technicians/Construction Inspectors Level I ..................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing.............................. State and local government.................  330 315 315 336  319 302 302 325  313 313 314 313  302 302 302 302  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing............................... State and local government.................  425 415 414 429  400 408 408 399  408 411 412 405  400 405 405 396  421  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  528 568 560 579 519  509 554 548 555 495  533 554 554 512  520 544 540 501  556 663 657  Median  442 -  555  538  523  494  538  523  663  681  682  628  602  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing.............................. State and local government.................  788 899 908 743  780 890 908 696  789 884 898 661  767 879 894 652  Level VI................................................... Private industry.....................................  1,001 1,029  982 1,040  Corrections Officers.................................. State and local government.................  516 516  500 500  397 397  399 399  411 411  388 388  Firefighters................................................ State and local government.................  610 611  614 615  525 525  529 529  612 611  607 607  653  •  379  423  664 682  -  * * 341  379  668 689  *  343  433 433  688  Median  $311  398 398  664 687 730 682 682 631  Mean  $341  $343  $332  2500 workers or more  $344  $329  674 710 810 694 700 657  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1000 - 2499 workers  -  490 659 -  522  493  -  -  516  490  680  662 -  664  645  817  843  -  797  829  521 521  525 525  579 579  576 576  571 573  553 566  690 691  683 683  680  -  652  440  418 416  -  Protective Service Occupations  See note at end of table.  43   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-2. Average pay by size of establishment, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  $538  $629  $614  Mean  Median  Police Officers Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing............................... State and local government.................  $641 515 515 641  $636 513 513 636  $562  Level II.................................................... State and local government.................  767 770  798 799  -  -  -  563  539  630  689 689  663 663  .  771  614  674  1000 - 2499 workers Mean  $607  Median  $599  Mean  Median  $693  $690  601  694  691  . 625  864 864  856 856  -  -  609 .  672  2500 workers or more  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  44   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-3. Average pay by size of establishment, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers Mean  Median  500 - 999 workers Mean  Median  Clerks, Accounting Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $291 291 294 294 291 325 288  $280 280 280 280 280 287 274  $270 269 279 278 266 267 -  $265 265 272 272 260 260 -  $296 291  $283 280  287 320  278 342  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  352 350 355 354 347 389 363  344 343 350 350 340 371 347  341 341 348 346 337 357 343  336 336 343 342 331 353 333  358 357 362 362 353 382 364  348 347 351 350 345 382 355  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  429 426 433 432 422 469 439  424 420 427 427 416 480 439  416 417 420 419 415 431 409  414 415 419 416 410 427 397  438 437 446 445 427 457 443  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  513 526 545 543 516 569 482  508 518 525 522 510 571 482  508 514 515 512 514 532 465  500 507 507 500 508 524 468  518 524 540 537 503 504  484  Clerks, General Level I ..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  263 254 256 254 254 288 277  250 245 237 237 250 274 264  239 241  237 237  267 262  259 253  -  -  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  310 302 305 307 301 349 324  298 288 288 290 289 328 316  1000 - 2499 workers Mean  Median  $314 319 320 322 319  $299 302 309 309 298  279 371 367 373 373 365 441 382  429 430 436 435 421 452 422 502 509 518 518 491 -  2500 workers or more Mean  $311 327  Median  266  322 335 286  $291 300 296 296 270  364 359 361 361 359 454 388  380 395 427 426 389 455 368  365 372 398 397 368 500 350  443 439 443 443 438 505 454  439 432 439 439 426 521 457  446 450 498 491 434 510 443  443 436 479 473 423 536 451  518 522 518 519 524 600 507  514 512 501 501 518 582 514  516 551 618 613 518 577 478  516 551 608 602 523 571 483  255 250 -  246 240  293 294  278 274  -  -  -  -  240  269  258  253  246  288  269  228  226  273  264  272  254  292  278  288 287 287 289 287 321 296  280 280 280 284 280 312 289  319 315 330 330 311 341 324  302 299 308 308 294 335 318  316 311 336 336 307 364 324  308 300 320 318 298 349 320  334 339 363  320 318 317  335 431 331  319 494 321  239  See note at end of table.  45   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-3. Average pay by size of establishment, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers Mean  500 - 999 workers  Median  Mean  Median  1000 - 2499 workers Mean  Median  2500 workers or more Mean  Median  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.............. .  $390 384 401 404 378 461 394  $385 364 371 372 362 488 395  $359 362 361 361 362 404 347  $351 355 355 351 355 396 342  $388 385 402 399 378 474 393  $373 363 399 391 348 445 386  $383 382 391 392 378 469 384  $376 369 380 379 367 491 381  $408 432 543 548 408 515 402  $401 401 526 527 384 507 402  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  462 476 488 488 470 531 454  462 467 466 465 467 531 458  437 460 445 442 469 528 378  429 445 429 429 460 538 376  476 497 507 489 535 440  475 510 507 514 547 455  461 482 511 512 471 519 440  463 482 495 495 472 523 450  467 477 520 520 466 535 464  472 478 503 503 468 531 470  Clerks, Order Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing...............................  328 328 334 334 323  320 320 326 326 315  327 327 326 326 328  320 320 321 321 318  344 344 360 360  330 330 364 364  372 372 379 379  353 353 359 359 -  -  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing...............................  435 435 430 430 443  421 421 421 421 441  432 432 419 419 448  428 428 416 418 450  442 442 444 444  421 421 421 421  449 449 460 460  432 432 441 441  -  -  Key Entry Operators Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  308 307 316 316 305 370 317  299 299 307 307 295 349 301  302 303 314 314 300 318 301  294 294 301 301 292 307 288  309 310 320 319 308 414 296  291 292 330 330 281 392 280  307 301 327 326 299 418 339  295 290 317 317 289 384 332  330 339  318 324 -  338 436 320  324 472 307  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  392 394 407 407 390 443 387  385 385 398 398 381 426 387  382 383 399 399 378 404 363  375 376 386 386 372 400 349  404 408 407 406 409 440 382  401 406 403 403 410 446 370  400 397 397 397 397 449 410  396 391 392 392 389 428 433  403 422 478 480 415 386  398 407 459 461 400  Personnel Assistants (Employment) Level I..................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  315 314 314 314 314 362 318  307 306 315 313 306 371 316  304 304  306 306  312 313  310 310  321 319  318 308  328 334  292  ■  304 300 -  -  317 ■  342  332  320  309  294 •  See note at end of table.  46  -  -  308  -  -  389   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-3. Average pay by size of establishment, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers Mean  Median  500 - 999 workers Mean  $397 412 474 474 401  382  382  366  393  386  464 464 464 462 465 -  463 461 451 449 471  456 455 442 442 456  480 469 484 481 459  465 448 463 463 441  478 483  481 480  473  470  475  461  509  497  473  481  541 538 531  504 497  485 474  563 562  580 566  533 577  547 574  538  -  -  559  536  560  556  565  580  523  530 362 390  $385 385 400 400 378 406 383  $375 373 365 364 380  Level III ................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  475 473 483 480 467 491 481  466 463 464 464 461 478 479  476 477 499 498 467 -  540 -■ -  Secretaries Level I ..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  367 379 411 410 366 404 347  356 366 395 393 356 389 338  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  437 447 467 466 439 474 418  Level III ................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  513 520 533 532 512 542 486  Median  $401 412 481 481 400  $390 391 396 395 388 448 383  554 554  Mean  $382 384 400 400 380  $380 382 381 380 382 411 378  545 539 539 534 538 611 554  Median  $388 391 410 409 386  $389 390 393 392 388 450 388  538 542 537 533 547 582 534  Mean  2500 workers or more  $365 365 363 363 380 366  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  Level IV................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  Median  1000 - 2499 workers  -  -  549 -  351 354 370 365 348 381 342  344 346 361 360 340 378 337  373 383 413 412 364 405 358  364 371 405 405 356 408 349  378 399 419 419 392 430 336  367 384 407 407 376 403 331  375 405 460 459 381 350  442 369 337  432 440 463 462 433 461 417  431 432 449 445 427 445 426  424 426 440 437 422 430 416  446 447 455 457 442 475 443  437 439 446 449 436 468 424  442 445 456 456 440 516 432  436 438 449 449 437 517 423  437 465 491 490 452 489 410  432 460 490 490 443 480 413  507 513 526 526 504 538 480  504 507 504 502 508 525 486  499 500 500 499 500 520 482  515 515 523 522 507 564 517  510 510 519 520 500 555 513  517 520 525 525 518 554 499  512 515 523 523 510 553 496  516 534 561 559 514 547 476  509 526 551 549 506 553 462  See note at end of table.  47  444   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-3. Average pay by size of establishment, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Mean  Median  Median  1000 - 2499 workers Mean  Median  2500 workers or more Mean  Median  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $602 611 610 609 611 640 562  $599 602 602 601 602 632 570  $598 605 593 592 610 609 547  $595 598 595 595 601 591 558  $589 585 579 576 598 626 623  $587 581 581 580 581 620 633  $618 623 625 625 622 639 594  $611 614 617 617 612 625 601  $602 621 635 633 611 666 551  $600 612 620 619 604 653 560  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Sen/ice producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  738 745 753 751 737 763 671  728 732 748 748 722 761 658  743 751 742 741 757  745 745 754 753 730  -  732 738 736 736 739 -  739  716 713 722 720 701 758  712 717 716 714 718 724 681  693 696 693 693 706 710 686  742 752 770 768 734 791 669  743 753 771 771 726 787 658  Switchboard Operator-Receptionists....... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  328 327 335 335 323 338 339  320 319 326 326 310 330 331  325 324 330 329 322 334 337  316 315 323 323 309 326 329  341 342 353 354 333 368 337  331 332 344 344 320 319 320  341 339 364 365 332 396 346  332 331 355 355 319 412 339  347 352  332 330  355 354 359 359 352 389 358  348 349  346 346  355 350  348 336  346  353 351 . 342 -  375 382 . 383 -  372 372  Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  361 360 370 369 358 399 363  382 -  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  439 435 444 447 434 487 446  440 422 433 433 422 520 467  434 438 406 404 441  430 434 399 399 435  463 465  448 447  474  461  365  372  446  453  . 464 439  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... State and local government.................  546 564 589 593 561 472  544 557 590 594 557 470  568 571 571  559 561 561 -  544 547 547  535 538 -  -  Word Processors Level I..................................................... Private industry.....................................  342  -  349 -  341  327  342  337  369 390 . 383  358 377 366  362  344  . 466 445  455 466 510 509 455  471 455 510 509 441  452  474  529 546  528 538  515 564  508 567  540  545  538  -  -  531 476  523 470  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  48   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-4. Average pay by size of establishment, maintenance and toolroom occupations, United States, July 1993  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers Mean  Median  500 - 999 workers  1000 - 2499 workers  2500 workers or more  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  General Maintenance Workers................ Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $9.91 9.61 10.20 10.22 9.39 11.66 10.72  $9.60 9.27 10.16 10.20 8.94 10.51 10.27  $9.46 9.35 10.19 10.21 9.02 9.69 10.03  $9.13 9.00 10.10 10.16 8.52 9.09 9.75  $10.45 10.33 10.25 10.33 10.37 15.51 10.68  $10.32 10.32 10.39 10.39 10.09 16.66 10.33  $11.13 10.99 9.78 9.78 11.22 14.74 11.32  $11.00 10.82 8.00 8.00 11.10 16.30 11.22  $11.33 10.94  $11.12 10.43  10.86  10.30  11.46  11.36  Maintenance Electricians......................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  16.99 17.03 16.81 16.85 18.04 19.90 16.65  17.45 17.51 17.35 17.45 18.92 19.62 15.80  14.85 14.87 13.94 13.75 18.00 19.14 14.43  14.90 14.89 13.88 13.79 18.92 19.62 15.52  16.25 16.36 15.81 15.70 18.30  15.96 16.02 15.59 15.51 18.41  15.17  14.38  16.55 16.71 16.70 16.71 16.78 18.86 15.37  16.73 17.13 17.25 17.25 16.58 19.01 15.39  19.08 19.38 19.50 19.50 18.53 20.56 17.72  20.25 20.34 20.37 20.37 19.42 21.20 16.65  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  11.21 10.90 11.37 11.37 10.69 10.82 -  10.75 10.56 11.03 11.02 10.30 9.70  10.20 10.20  10.00 10.00  11.31 11.34  10.71 10.83  11.24 11.29  10.63 10.69  13.31 13.07  13.20 13.20  13.83  12.98  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  16.47 16.56 15.71 15.72 17.03 17.71 15.35  17.17 17.17 15.77 15.77 17.43 17.87 15.20  15.57 15.58 14.65 14.63 15.97 16.85 15.16  15.50 15.45 14.12 14.04 16.46 17.07 15.83  16.16 16.19 15.41 15.41 16.67 17.87 15.51  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  18.70 18.68 18.21 18.18 18.93 19.86 18.83  18.40 18.40 17.98 17.98 18.90 19.86 18.75  18.01 18.01 17.20 17.01 18.19 18.98  17.57 17.57 17.00 16.79 17.57 18.20 -  Maintenance Machinists.......................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  16.27 16.16 15.63 15.61 19.45 20.18 19.22  15.91 15.81 15.21 15.09 20.34 20.99 20.30  14.46 14.44 13.78 13.68  14.00 13.93 13.40 13.39  -  10.20 9.88  10.00 9.42  -  -  11.00  10.59  16.53 16.53 15.46 15.46 17.17 17.17 15.83  16.59 16.72 15.65 15.65 17.40 17.87 15.01  17.38 17.43 16.26 16.26 18.25 18.26 14.82  17.25 17.52 18.10 18.27 15.43  17.77 17.77 18.30 18.34 15.14  18.14 18.13 17.87 17.87 -  18.00 18.10 18.17 18.17 -  19.25 19.26 18.26 18.28 20.01 21.16 19.19  19.27 19.27 18.48 18.52 19.47 20.61 19.21  19.38 19.50 18.84 18.84 20.03 20.41 18.86  19.85 19.86 17.98 17.98 19.86 19.86 18.82  17.05 17.01 15.93 15.90  16.89 16.89 15.08 15.08  16.86 16.86 16.77 16.77  16.99 16.92 16.80 16.80  18.77 18.66 18.67 18.67 18.57 18.82 19.52  18.96 18.74 18.43 18.43 19.99 20.13 20.30  -  -  -  ■  ■  ■  See note at end of table.  49  • -  ■  ■  -  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-4. Average pay by size of establishment, maintenance and toolroom occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  1000 - 2499 workers  2500 workers or more  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery....... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $15.97 16.00 15.66 15.66 18.13 19.76 14.22  $15.64 15.77 15.27 15.27 19.10 19.62 14.28  $14.34 14.34 13.98 13.95 17.13  $13.70 13.69 13.25 13.19 18.63  $16.36 16.39 16.04 16.02  $16.00 16.02 15.77 15.51  14.51  14.71  $15.76 15.79 15.71 15.70 17.51 18.41 14.39  $15.30 15.28 15.24 15.24 17.76 18.26 15.32  $18.59 18.75 18.77 18.77 18.68 20.69 13.89  $18.61 18.73 18.61 18.61 19.47 21.26 13.96  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  14.77 14.99 13.94 14.34 15.47 15.82 14.35  14.61 15.16 13.23 13.60 16.03 16.81 13.98  13.58 13.81 12.68 12.85 14.33 14.46 12.67  13.30 13.73 12.31 12.50 14.20 14.25 12.39  15.09 15.80 13.31 13.19 16.82 17.34 13.90  15.46 16.89 12.50 12.50 17.37 17.57 13.87  15.56 16.75 15.71 15.73 17.14 17.73 14.19  15.64 17.41 15.04 15.04 17.72 18.02 14.28  16.85 18.28 18.41 18.41 18.20 18.75 15.86  17.07 18.59 19.44 19.44 18.48 18.91 15.46  Maintenance Pipefitters........................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  18.43 18.51 18.66 18.76 17.80 19.13 17.18  18.70 18.70 18.74 18.93 17.87 18.92 15.03  17.53 17.63 17.22 17.29  18.45 18.45 18.45 18.45  17.31 17.32 17.50 17.50  16.97 16.97 16.97 16.97  17.73 17.92 18.14 18.17  18.62 18.62 18.76 18.76  19.55 19.67 19.71 19.71 18.15  20.24 20.24 20.24 20.24 17.89  Tool and Die Makers ................................ Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing...................................  17.57 17.57 17.57 17.57  17.40 17.40 17.40 17.40  15.35 15.35 15.35 15.35  19.30 -  18.92 15.06 15.06 15.06 15.06  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  15.95 15.95 15.94 15.94  15.40 15.40 15.40 15.40  17.49 17.49 17.49 17.49  -  17.97 17.97 17.97 17.97  18.31  17.73  20.63 20.63 20.63 20.63  21.26 21.26 21.26 21.26  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  50   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-5. Average pay by size of establishment, material movement and custodial occupations, United States, July 1993  Occupation and level  All establishments Mean  Median  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  Mean  Mean  Median  Forklift Operators...................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities ..............  $10.24 10.24 10.07 10.07 11.15 13.31  $9.49 9.49 9.16 9.16 10.70 14.23  $9.57 9.57 9.55 9.55 9.63 11.74  $9.34 9.34 9.37 9.44 8.82 11.35  $10.25 10.25 9.84 9.84 13.07  Guards Level I..................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  6.53 6.40 9.18 9.25 6.20 10.44 9.35  6.00 6.00 8.87 8.91 5.86 9.93 9.11  5.95 5.93 7.40 7.45 5.87 9.22 8.09  5.50 5.50 7.24 7.35 5.50 8.10 8.04  6.37 6.30 9.41 9.50 6.08  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  11.34 11.34 13.26 13.26 10.62 15.06 11.35  11.20 11.20 12.85 12.85 10.46 15.30 11.20  9.64 9.76  9.46  Janitors..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  7.57 7.04 9.88 9.91 6.65 10.32 8.90  6.75 6.00 8.74 8.77 5.80 10.00 8.91  6.58 6.23 7.74 7.76 6.06 8.28 8.55  Material Handling Laborers ..................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  9.44 9.44 9.15 9.16 9.76 14.38 9.21  8.00 8.00 7.97 7.97 8.10 16.84 9.04  Order Fillers.............................................. Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing...............................  8.90 8.90 8.86 8.86 8.92  Shipping/Receiving Clerks....................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  9.76 9.77 10.01 10.02 9.41 13.62 9.43  Median $9.85 9.85 9.32 9.32 13.93 -  1000 - 2499 workers Mean  Median  .  _  $13.28  $13.41 •  2500 workers or more Mean  Median  $14.86 14.86 15.62 15.62 13.07 •  $15.85 15.85 16.58 16.58 12.79 *  7.82 7.77 9.44 9.45 7.53  7.50 7.47 7.96 7.96 7.14  9.67 9.70 11.89 11.90 8.90  9.35 9.12 11.82 11.82 8.44  9.37  6.00 6.00 9.60 9.81 5.97 9.49  8.80  7.71  9.62  9.55  9.51 9.55  10.47 10.38  9.56 9.43  9.28  9.86 -  8.70  11.80 11.72 12.04 12.04 11.61  11.80 11.80 11.70 11.69 11.96  12.73 13.33 14.82 14.82 11.99  12.78 13.29 15.42 15.42 11.80  12.53  12.03  11.64  11.56  5.79 5.50 7.15 7.16 5.40 7.83 8.27  7.56 6.64 9.25 9.26 6.28 12.73 9.49  6.83 5.85 8.88 8.90 5.50 12.57 9.43  8.56 8.27 9.92 9.87 8.11 12.55 9.21  7.90 7.60 8.85 8.83 7.35 12.99 9.40  9.32 10.18 14.69 14.69 8.51 11.28 8.75  8.97 9.07 16.21 16.21 8.42 11.37 8.92  8.11 8.11 7.93 7.93 8.34 12.60  7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.00 13.20  11.17 11.17 9.24 9.24 12.98  10.75 10.75 8.15 8.15 13.48  11.01 11.02 12.87 12.90 10.01  10.18 10.18 10.98 11.43 8.86  13.84 14.29 15.54 15.54 13.05  15.64 16.36 16.93 16.93 14.53  8.18 8.18 8.22 8.22 8.13  8.05 8.05 8.49 8.49 7.85  7.58 7.58 8.07 8.07 6.95  10.61 10.61 9.82 9.82 11.05  9.38 9.38 9.66 9.70 8.86 14.14 9.35  9.27 9.28 9.54 9.54 8.86 9.35  9.01 9.01 9.50 9.50 8.43 8.56  -  See note at end of table.  51  -  -  10.90 10.90 9.29 9.29 11.03  9.96 9.96  9.64 9.64  10.29 10.28 10.60 10.60 9.81  9.83 9.83 10.16 10.14 9.00  10.51  10.30  10.00 10.02 10.09 10.09 9.92 13.17 9.20  • 8.90 8.90 8.59 8.59 9.69 13.91 8.38  9.26  9.04  12.50 12.53  11.67 11.67  12.77  11.81  12.80 13.19 14.34 14.34 12.10  12.15 12.76 16.18 16.18 12.00  9.68  9.74   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table B-5. Average pay by size of establishment, material movement and custodial occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Occupation and level  All establishments  50 - 499 workers  500 - 999 workers  1000 - 2499 workers  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Mean  Median  Truckdrivers Light Truck.............................................. Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $9.22 9.19 10.12 10.37 8.96 12.97 9.61  $8.06 8.00 9.00 9.52 7.61 13.37 9.32  $9.06 9.07 9.91 10.17 8.87 12.88 8.87  $7.76 7.75 8.60 9.12 7.50 13.37 8.96  $9.76 9.97 10.12 9.96 9.89 *  $9.32 9.05 10.00 9.85 8.93 -  Medium Truck......................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  13.98 14.11 11.81 12.04 14.55 16.43 11.34  14.87 15.21 10.55 11.00 16.06 17.70 11.52  12.05 12.07 10.08 10.16 12.60 15.36 11.01  11.50 11.55 9.00 9.00 12.31 17.31 9.62  14.05 14.47 14.89 14.91 14.40 15.93 10.99  Heavy Truck ........................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  12.37 12.20 12.22 12.47 12.18 12.68 12.98  11.80 11.71 12.00 12.31 11.69 12.10 12.19  11.76 11.92 11.85 12.19 11.98 12.40 10.39  11.35 11.50 11.49 12.06 11.50 11.74 10.33  12.65 13.33 11.28  11.37  12.17  Tractor Trailer......................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  13.48 13.47 12.20 12.05 13.95 15.24 16.31  13.29 13.25 11.69 11.64 14.10 16.74 15.95  12.93 12.93 12.05 11.82 13.31 14.58  12.74 12.75 11.64 11.64 12.88 15.72  13.97 13.97 11.50 11.50 15.06 16.93  14.23 14.23 10.80 10.80 16.50 17.18  15.05 15.07 12.59 12.56 15.64 16.45  Warehouse Specialists............................ Private industry.................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  11.31 11.31 11.32 11.32 11.31 13.43 11.16  11.00 11.00 11.00 11.00 10.98 14.00 11.53  10.67 10.67 10.73 10.71 10.63 11.86 11.39  10.34 10.34 10.39 10.39 10.20 11.50 11.68  12.52 12.56 11.88 11.86 13.44 16.66 10.34  12.14 12.14 12.02 12.02 13.93 17.15 10.00  Median  Mean  Median  $9.76 9.40 -  $9.23 8.65  $10.81 12.00  $11.31 11.83  8.68 10.39  8.35 11.21  11.72 9.69  11.47  14.28 14.42 13.20 13.20 14.42 15.28 11.17  16.29 16.42 14.99 15.03 16.59 16.80 10.97  17.61 17.61 15.34 15.34 17.64 17.64 11.28  16.93 17.49 18.22 18.22 17.43 17.53 11.73  17.73 17.73 18.28 18.28 17.73 17.73 12.31  11.80 12.28  14.17 15.33  13.91 16.91 -  16.06 18.51 -  17.73 17.39  -  -  -  -  -  Mean  2500 workers or more  -  11.67  -  9.19  -  -  -  15.68 15.68 13.10 13.00 15.68 17.67  16.26 16.20 17.39 17.39 16.04 18.04 17.27  16.58 16.58 17.96 17.96 16.57 18.16 16.22  11.55 11.55 11.05 11.05 11.55 16.65 11.67  12.19 12.54 13.81 13.81 11.91 15.05 11.03  12.15 12.50 14.07 14.07 10.70 15.59 11.57  12.06 12.07 11.82 11.82 12.21 15.68 11.99  -  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  52   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-1. Average pay by type of area, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993  Total  Metro­ politan  South  Northeast  United States Occupation and level  Nonmetro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  West  Midwest Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Professional Occupations Accountants Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $497 499 524 517 486 516 491  $500 500 526 520 488 517 499  $453  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  589 594 619 621 578 630 560  595 599 630 631 581 632 570  528 538 548 554 519  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  741 747 762 761 734 777 709  745 751 770 770 736 780 712  705 709 710 706 705  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Sen/ice producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  950 966 982 970 951 995 873  951 966 982 969 951 998 880  Level V.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,233 1,245 1,279 1,261 1,214 1,256 1,097  Level VI................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities ..............  1,522 1,545 1,549 1,501 1,539 1,595  $497 499 518 507 489 536 489  $523 522 547 548 500 532 526  $534 524 553 555 500 541 558  521  593 592 607 607 585 646 608  597 596 614 614 587 644 612  566 584 610 612 566 600 510  575 591 628 627 568 603 519  594 597 625 626 573 629 572  601 605 638 640 580 634 575  612 609 639 641 591 676 624  616 609 640 642 590 673 649  752 754 764 767 746 817 721  752 753 763 766 746 804 731  720 735 751 746 719 747 643  725 743 773 771 721 750 641  742 747 765 766 728 772 704  746 750 767 768 734 781 705  756 756 770 768 745 806 756  760 759 778 779 745 817 762  922 969  948 950 937 933 962 1,023 915  950 952 938 934 964 1,023 915  955 987 1,021 994 953 955 786  956 983 1,018 986 950 955 797  944 948 962 959 932 979 893  947 951 966 963 934 987 898  949 972 995 994 953 1,082 -  949 971 994 995 954 1,084  1,232 1,244 1,278 1,260 1,214 1,256 1,097  .  1,233 1,239 1,215 1,215 1,261 1,306  1,232 1,238 1,213 1,213 1,261 1,306  1,275 1,290 1,378 1,335 1,197 1,235 1,003  1,275 1,290 1,381 1,337 1,197 1,235 1,003  1,201 1,209 1,238 1,238 1,181 1,213 1,047  1,199 1,207 1,236 1,236 1,181 1,213 1,047  1,214 1,229 1,230 1,232 1,228 1,366 1,146  1,213 1,228 1,229 1,231 1,228 1,366 1,146  1,522 1,545 1,549 1,501 1,539 1,595  .  1,517 1,517  1,647 1,666  1,647 1,666 ■  1,488 1,493  1,488 1,493  1,477 1,534  1,477 1,534  1,473 1,525  1,473 1,525  -  500  684  -  $506 505 518 521 501  $496 497 519 509 486 536 495  521  -  $504 503 518 520 499  $478 484 520 504 463 492 464  $475 483 515 499 463 492 459  -  -  1,517 1,517  ■  *  ■  See note at end of table.  53  ■  -  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-1. Average pay by type of area, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level Total  Metro­ politan  South  Northeast Nonmetro­ politan  Accountants, Public Level I..................................................... Private industry.................................... Service producing...............................  $544 544 544  $545 545 545  Level II ................................................... Private industry.................................... Service producing..............................  598 598 598  599 599 599  _  Level III................................................... Private industry.................................... Service producing..............................  695 695 695  695 695 695  Level IV................................................... Private industry.... .4.............................. Service producing..............................  938 938 938  938 938 938  Attorneys Level I ..................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  715 807 777 983 677  720 819 788 983 678  Level II.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  928 1,007 1,093 1,066 979 1,059 857  Level III................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government................. Level IV.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Midwest Metro­ politan  Total  West  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  $549 549 549  $549 549 549  $543 543 543  $547 547 547  $537 537 537  $537 537 537  $547 547 547  $547 547 547  -  616 616 616  616 616 616  597 597 597  600 600 600  580 580 580  580 580 580  595 595 595  595 595 595  . -  724 724 724  724 724 724  677 677 677  678 678 678  673 673 673  673 673 673  695 695 695  695 695 695  -  983 983 983  983 983 983  906 906 906  906 906 906  869 869 869  869 869 869  984 984 984  984 984 984  -  709 670  713 670  686 853  688 853 608  720 785  722 785  764  781  698  698  744  763  934 1,007 1,093 1,066 979 1,059 864  . *  915 980  914 980 969 854  866 1,018  1,027 1,057  1,042 1,057  1,062  1,062  997  1,024  1,224 1,319 1,410 1,397 1,287 1,331 1,087  1,229 1,319 1,410 1,397 1,287 1,331 1,089  . *  1,222 1,288  1,175 1,354 1,487  1,288 1,354  1,284 1,316 1,050  1,223 1,288 1,284 1,316 1,050  1,213  1,306 1,354 1,344 1,240  1,554 1,684 1,757 1,741 1,644 1,700 1,336  1,556 1,684 1,757 1,741 1,644 1,700 1,338  .  1,637 1,712 1,633 1,627 1,740  1,637 1,712 1,633 1,627 1,740  1,509 1,665 1,702 1,708 1,648  1,513 1,665 1,702 1,708 1,648  1,287  1,287  1,418  1,422  -  •  969 857  See note at end of table.  54  608  -  868 1,018 941 1,033 752  964 1,093 899  955 975 964 1,093 930  1,271 1,340 967  1,180 1,354 1,487 1,271 1,340 968  1,224 1,260 1,326 1,342 1,240 1,261 1,170  1,225 1,260 1,326 1,342 1,240 1,261 1,169  1,569 1,768  1,570 1,768  1,634 1,706 1,128  1,634 1,706 1,127  1,518 1,536 1,591 1,588 1,513 1,670 1,395  1,518 1,536 1,591 1,588 1,513 1,670 1,395  941 1,033 752  938 975  1,344   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-1. Average pay by type of area, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level  South  Northeast  Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities ..............  $1,870 2,084 2,055 2,040 2,110 2,030  $1,870 2,084 2,055 2,040 2,110 2,030  -  Level VI................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing .............................. Service producing...............................  2,211 2,602 2,607 2,598  2,211 2,602 2,607 2,598  . *  Engineers Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  652 659 677 678 630 702 612  653 659 680 681 626 704 615  $647  Level II.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  748 750 758 757 730 775 734  750 751 763 762 725 776 740  723 729 710 709  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  875 879 880 878 878 930 841  878 882 885 883 874 935 849  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,058 1,064 1,057 1,054 1,080 1,097 989  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,271 1,277 1,272 1,267 1,292 1,282 1,157  Total  Metro­ politan  $2,117 2,150  $2,117 2,150  2,219  2,219  2,714 2,757  Midwest  West  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  $2,006 2,109  $2,006 2,109  $1,983 1,993  -  1,977 2,026  1,977 2,026  2,714 2,757  -  Total  Metro­ politan  $1,983 1,993  $2,034  $2,034  1,981  1,981 -  2,093 -  2,093 -  _ -  . -  .  -  -  -  642 643 659 659 616 723 639  643 643 659 660 616 723 643  647 655 689 688 620 677 556  645 653 690 688 611 672 555  654 659 671 673 641 707 598  657 662 677 681 639 711 603  669 680 683 687 668  671 681 686 690 668  630  633  740 739 742 742 734 824 741  743 743 746 746 735 826 744  725 733 751 747 711 752 656  727 735 762 756 701 755 659  749 751 754 753 742 767 718  750 751 756 754 741 767 723  785 779 781 780 770 785 823  790 782 785 786 770 781 834  899 761  871 869 860 860 903 977 886  876 875 866 866 904 980 887  859 871 887 880 850 905 753  860 871 892 885 840 917 763  863 867 862 861 887 919 807  862 865 861 860 885 919 808  907 914 911 911 927 953 882  915 923 922 922 925 949 888  1,062 1,068 1,065 1,061 1,076 1,106 999  1,011 1,022 978 970 1,042 899  1,043 1,044 1,033 1,033 1,083 1,134 1,023  1,045 1,046 1,034 1,034 1,083 1,135 1,024  1,054 1,068 1,071 1,059 1,063 1,057 881  1,050 1,061 1,070 1,056 1,050 1,073 892  1,052 1,056 1,054 1,055 1,064 1,086 972  1,053 1,056 1,054 1,054 1,063 1,089 979  1,076 1,081 1,067 1,065 1,137 1,135 1,045  1,099 1,107 1,098 1,097 1,138 1,140 1,052  1,278 1,284 1,281 1,276 1,291 1,278 1,168  1,160 1,169  1,256 1,257 1,244 1,244 1,300 1,297 1,217  1,259 1,259 1,247 1,247 1,300 1,297 1,218  1,259 1,269 1,273 1,247 1,262 1,301 1,055  1,260 1,267 1,273 1,247 1,257 1,301 1,085  1,276 1,279 1,288 1,290 1,248 1,259 1,157  1,273 1,276 1,286 1,287 1,242 1,238 1,147  1,288 1,299 1,284 1,283 1,381 1,306 1,185  1.311 1,324 1,312 1,312 1,382 1,305  *  673 846 857 839 837  1,020  See note at end of table.  55   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-1. Average pay by type of area, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level  South  Northeast  Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  Level VI................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $1,513 1,521 1,531 1,523 1,488 1,532 1,292  $1,513 1,521 1,533 1,525 1,486 1,528 1,292  Level VII................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities ..............  1,756 1,766 1,774 1,766 1,745 1,871  1,759 1,769 1,781 1,772 1,741 1,871  Level VIII................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing..............................  2,072 2,081 2,117 2,103 1,989  2,072 2,081 2,117 2,103 1,989  . -  Budget Analysts Level I.................................................... Private industry.................................... Service producing..............................  530 513 489  534 516 493  -  Level II.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  606 607 632 625 588 598 602  611 613 637 630 594 616 606  .  Level III................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  787 792 832 826 759 795 782  789 795 832 826 761 818 784  Level IV.................................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  909 913 909 889 917 969 899  907 911 916 895 904 969 899  . -  West  Midwest  Metro­ politan  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  1,365  $1,540 1,542 1,549 1,549 1,517 1,365  $1,490 1,499 1,535 1,493 1,449 1,580 1,199  $1,488 1,497 1,535 1,493 1,443 1,580 1,199  $1,456 1,457 1,460 1,460 1,449 1,524 •  $1,452 1,454 1,457 1,457 1,443 1,485 *  $1,527 1,541 1,539 1,538 1,554 1,490  $1,531 1,545 1,543 1,542 1,554 1,490 ■  1,827 1,828 1,840 1,841 *  1,827 1,828 1,840 1,841 *  1,728 1,736 1,784 1,755 1,661 *  1,724 1,732 1,784 1,755 1,646  1,664 1,664 1,674 1,674  1,664 1,664 1,674 1,674  1,778 1,796 1,773 1,771  1,791 1,809 1,787 1,786 *  2,090 2,090  2,090 2,090 -  -  2,018 2,041  -  * -  2,018 2,041 • -  477  -  Total  $1,540 1,542 1,548 1,548 1,517  .  . -  -  -  ■  Total  ■  Administrative Occupations  *  477 -  ■  ■  "  618 614  613 607  565 588  567 594  633 587  645 601  635 639  658 657  610  602  556  556  583  618  -  625  659  805 766  824 833  826 833  762  762  787  787  -  -  892 894  906 -  651  542  541  .  777 780  779 783  734 773  734 777  -  -  -  762  765  723  721 693  ■ 877 875 876  -  886  886  760  693  . -  945 942  923 911  907 949  -  939  899 960  873  907 951 873  823  823  960  See note at end of table.  56  633  805 767  651  755  583  ■  -  876 944  906  944   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-1. Average pay by type of area, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level Total  Metro­ politan  Northeast Nonmetro­ politan  Budget Analyst Supervisors Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... State and local government.................  $969 1,064 943  $969 1,064 943  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... State and local government.................  1,172 1,219 1,102  1,180 1,239 1,102  Buyers/Contracting Specialists Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  491 497 504 503 484 489 468  497 501 509 507 488 485 476  $441  Level II.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  624 628 633 632 615 659 593  631 636 643 642 619 658 599  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  828 836 832 831 853 884 717  827 835 832 830 849 886 720  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  992 996 992 983 1,013 1,044 914  995 999 995 985 1,019 1,049 914  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing..............................  1,212 1,211 1,206 1,186 1,242  1,212 1,211 1,206 1,186 1,242  South  Total  Metro­ politan  .  .  -  .  Total  . . $811  Midwest Metro­ politan  Total  .  West  Metro­ politan  .  $811  -  -  -  $508 506 501 501 510  476 490 509 505 462  479 492 511 507 464  $481 478 476 476 485  430  541  546  430  436  598 602 604 603  640 639 647 646 618 664  644 642 648 647 628 676  598 608 613 609 594 627 545  839 842 837 836 864 949 775  834 836 830 829 866 949 775  987 989 975 972 1,066  989 991 976 973 1,066  837 843 834 834  *  . . • .  $502 500 498 498 501  541  Metro­ politan  .  -  -  Total  -  $487 485 483 483 491  $521 525 539 543 499  $531 527 542 546 500  . 499  499  504  552  598 611 621 615 594 627 544  621 624 627 626 616 654 583  634 638 642 642 625 669 596  650 652 656 661 642 728 639  655 654 660 665 639 710 658  811 834 829 816 845 848 662  792 812 805 786 829 848 664  836 840 837 837 858 889 710  850 855 854 855 859 889 713  823 829 826 828 848 898 768  823 829 825 828 849 911 768  976 983 978 945 997 -  978 985 978 945 1,005  1,046 1,049 1,056 1,054 1,005  1,047 1,050 1,058 1,055 1,009  970 969 963 962  976 975 968 970  . 989  . 989  . . .  See note at end of table.  57  -  . . . -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-1. Average pay by type of area, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  Computer Programmers Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $522 531 582 573 515 573 461  $529 537 582 574 521 573 469  -  Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  607 615 649 647 599 633 559  611 617 653 651 600 633 566  $556 576  713 721 738 737 715 762 667  666 662 -  Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  710 718 730 729 714 766 668 853 855 854 853 855 936 813  853 855 854 854 856 936 806  _  Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  -  509  678  -  Total  $519 521 522  $521 522 522  Total  612 613 643 643 601 651 609  623 623 662 662 594 642 620  626 623 662 662 593 642 642  716 717 732 732 712 833 705  719 720 736 736 715 796 709  693 716 755 753 702 703 612  694 717 760 759 702 703 610  705 707 685 685 715  710 712 698 697 716  739 745 757 757 738  741 745 756 757 739  690  694  724  851 851 827 827 861  853 853 828 828 864  826 831  826 831  911 909  844  836 839 873 873 831  911 909  844  836 839 873 873 831  902  902  746  738  802  808  948  949  964 964 970  964 964 970  -  -  *  699 716  710 769 611  739 742 770 771 728 786 711  741 743 773 774 729 787 713  755 761 774 774 756 805 733  759 762 774 774 756 805 747  840 853 854 840 853 898 738  848 849 892 892 836 880 835  849 850 894 894 837 881 837  886 890 895 894 887 954  887 890 896 894 888 954  633  706  822  867 866 882 882 861 915 923  867 866 882 882 860 921 927  839 853 854 841 853 898 738  786  520 '  610 611 641 641 599 650 603  Computer Systems Analysts  -  •  601 620 665 659 598 515  706  Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  512  598 618 660 654 598 619 511  701 718 727 717 711 768 609  859 861 878 874 856 900 846  520 582 495  614 615 635 636 607 617 599  720 720 710 710 724  859 861 877 873 855 899 844  521 547 424  •  $537 532 ■  513  720 720 708 708 724  705 -  $528 525  611 611 631 631 603 617 597  *  725 732 744 740 726 785 671  Metro­ politan  498  -  724 732 743 739 726 784 668  Total  $540 544 603  $519 540 597  970 970  Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  Total  Metro­ politan  $530 532 603 603 507 582 498  $514 538 597  970 969  993 993 981  Metro­ politan  519 547 420  *  993 993 980  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing..............................  Metro­ politan  We St  Midwest  South  Northeast  United States Occupation and level  See note at end of table.  58   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-1. Average pay by type of area, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level  Northeast  Total  Metro­ politan  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing............... ................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $1,018 1,025 1,049 1,045 1,014 1,048 933  $1,018 1,025 1,050 1,045 1,013 1,047 935  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,224 1,226 1,238 1,229 1,220 1,269 1,157  1,224 1,226 1,238 1,229 1,220 1,269 1,156  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Service producing...............................  1,487 1,487 1,511 1,480  1,487 1,487 1,511 1,480  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,086 1,116 1,195 1,189 1,103 1,142 981  1,088 1,116 1,196 1,190 1,103 1,142 986  Level II................................................. Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,278 1,288 1,369 1,357 1,269 1,403 1,165  1,278 1,287 1,369 1,357 1,268 1,403 1,165  -  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,571 1,575 1,619 1,575 1,561 1,606 1,452  1,572 1,576 1,619 1,575 1,562 1,628 1,452  Level IV......................................  1,878  1,878  Nonmetro­ politan  . -  . .  -  Total  South  Metro­ politan  Total  $1,027 1,027 1,039 1,039 1,022 1,053  $1,027 1,027 1,040 1,040 1,021 1,053  $999 1,015 1,034 1,019 1,005 1,045 825  1,212 1,211 1,178 1,178 1,224 .  1,212 1,211 1,178 1,178 1,224  1,242 1,242 1,297 1,276 1,219  1,482 1,482  -  -  1,482 1,482  .  . -  1,141 1,141  1,140 1,140  1,133 -  1,133 . -  Midwest Metro­ politan  West  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  $1,000 1,015 1,034 1,018 1,005 1,045 827  $1,008 1,009 1,066 1,066 987 1,025 969  $1,008 1,009 1,067 1,067 986 1,025 969  $1,044 1,057 1,079 1,078 1,047 1,084 990  $1,045 1,058 1,081 1,080 1,047 1,084 990  1,242 1,242 1,297 1,276 1,219  1,189 1,189  1,189 1,189  1,190  1,190  1,257 1,276 1,281 1,282 1,271  1,257 1,276 1,281 1,282 1,271  1,148  1,147  .  -  -  -  -  1,032 1,099 1,213 1,194 1,080  1,033 1,099 1,213 1,194 1,080  1,099 1,100 1,165 1,165 1,083  875  876  -  -  1,099 1,099 1,168 1,168 1,083  1,110 1,139  1,127  1,127  -  1,042  -  1,256 1,264 1,363 1,363 1,247 1,295  1,255 1,262 1,363 1,363 1,245 1,295  1,269 1,289 1,351 1,347 1,255  1,269 1,289 1,351 1,347 1,255  1,179  1,179  1,566 1,598  1,566 1,598  1,833  1,833  1,322 1,322 1,377 1,377 1,311 -  1,322 1,322 1,377 1,377 1,311  1,263 1,273 1,411 1,255 1,324 1,134  1,263 1,273 1,411  . . . -  1,575 1,573 . 1,572  1,577 1,575  1,578 1,579  1,578 1,579  1,561 1,564  1,561 1,564  . 1,575  1,534  1,534  1,550  1,550  -  2,097  1,809  1,809  1,255 1,324 1,134  1,101 1,139  . -  See note at end of table.  59  2,097  -  1,892  1,892   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-1. Average pay by type of area, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  Personnel Specialists $497 497 512 510 489 570 498  $494 497 512 510 489 560 487  .  $504 497  490  490  477  -  -  573  459  608 $523 525  740 741 769 768 722 817 737  745 745 778 776 726 824 746  698 706 728 722 676  964 973 993 989 954 1,008 902  963 972 995 989 953 994 905  975 983 983 984  1,226 1,235 1,259 1,255 1,204 1,214 1,107  1,228 1,237 1,263 1,259 1,204 1,214 1,107  1,528 1,533 1,534 1,526 1,531  1,528 1,533 1,534 1,526 1,531  .  519 .  514  661  .  . _  . .  .  -  $479 489 477  Total  $502 488 498 496 485  Metro­ politan  $498 494 502 500 491 -  Total  Metro­ politan  $537 540  $535 534  528 -  517  465  540  511 596 592 613 614 575 626 630  594 579 598 597 568 568 653  599 581 600 600 570 586 681  582 579 594 595 572 626 631  591 586 598 598 581 626 665  544 550 577 565 536 601 529  548 553 590 578 537 601 533  589 585 597 597 573 626 621  745 743 769 772 727 854 765  748 746 770 771 732 854 765  704 725 754 745 708 740 635  711 730 769 759 710 749 645  745 747 779 779 723 840 721  751 754 789 790 729 846 719  773 750 775 777 735 840  777 752 782 786 736 842  978 983 1,008 1,008 964 997 929  979 983 1,010 1,010 964 997 930  942 965 984 970 944 984 818  942 966 999 983 935 952 822  960 965 989 985 936 1,046 901  956 961 982 977 938 1,027 904  984 985 1,000 1,002 973 1,006 979  979 980 992 993 972 1,007 976  1,217 1,216 1,231 1,228 1,204 1,202  1,217 1,216 1,231 1,228 1,204 1,202  1,254 1,271 1,321 1,308 1,175  1,256 1,275 1,329 1,316 1,175  1,204 1,209 1,220 1,226 1,188 1,272 1,127  1,207 1,213 1,228 1,234 1,188 1,272 1,127  1,232 1,251 1,257 1,256 1,245  1,232 1,251 1,257 1,256 1,245  1,131  1,131  1,530 1,534  1,530 1,534  .  .  .  $477 491 507  Metro­ politan  -  . .  Total  $515 497  .  579 577 601 599 564 611 590  573 572 592 589 561 606 581  Metro­ politan  Total  We St  Midwest  South  Northeast  United States Occupation and level  -  1,012  .  -  .  -  -  .  -  -  .  -  -  -  -  See note at end of table.  60  1,012  -  -  -  -  -■  -  -  -  -  -  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-1. Average pay by type of area, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level Total  Metro­ politan  Personnel Supervisors/Managers Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $1,015 1,045 1,060 1,061 1,032 1,115 906  $1,027 1,057 1,096 1,098 1,030 1,115 917  Level II.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,305 1,331 1,354 1,352 1,315 1,349 1,132  1,306 1,331 1,352 1,352 1,315 1,349 1,138  Level III ................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  1,647 1,674 1,673 1,663 1,674 1,649 1,269  1,647 1,674 1,673 1,663 1,674 1,649 1,269  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing...............................  2,082 2,082 2,043 2,015 2,192  2,082 2,082 2,043 2,015 2,192  Tax Collectors Level I..................................................... State and local government.................  464 464  464 464  Level II .................................................... State and local government.................  509 509  530 530  Level III................................................... State and local government.................  713 713  718 718  Northeast Nonmetro­ politan  . -  -  South  Total  $1,034 1,043  $1,034 1,043  $974 1,029  1,025  $962 1,004 998  1,025  1,009  -  West  Total  1,001  $1,055 1,069 1,075 1,075 1,055  852  849  Total  .  Total  Metro­ politan  $1,057 1,072 1,079 1,079 1,055  $1,058 1,104  $1,080 1,104  1,074  1,074  969  969  941  1,004  .  . -  -  1,342 1,349 1,370 1,370 1,339 -  1,344 1,349 1,370 1,370 1,339 -  1,236 1,287 1,279 1,253 1,291 1,262 1,047  1,239 1,287 1,279 1,253 1,291 1,262 1,054  1,329 1,340 1,368 1,367 1,311 1,385  1,329 1,340 1,368 1,367 1,311 1,385  1,329 1,351 1,383 1,393 1,318 1,431 1,220  1,326 1,349 1,380 1,393 1,318 1,431 1,220  1,660 1,664 1,681 1,682 1,644  1,660 1,664 1,681 1,682 1,644  1,630 1,698 1,679  1,630 1,698 1,679  1,648 1,672 1,653  1,732  1,651 1,661 1,677 1,677 1,633  1,648 1,672 1,653  . 1,732  1,651 1,661 1,677 1,677 1,633  1,690  1,690  2,090 2,090  2,090 2,090  .  -  -  .  .  -  -  .  .  -  Metro­ politan  Metro­ politan  .  Midwest  Metro­ politan  -  -  .  .  -  -  -  -  .  .  _  -  554 725 725  $658 658  -  -  551  440 440  458 458  484  -  550  556  725 725  652 652  658 658  673 673  703 703  723 723  723 723  -  -  NOTE. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  61   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-2. Average pay by type of area, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993  Occupation and level Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  Metro­ politan  Total  Total  WeSt  Midvii est  South  Northeast  United States  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Technical Occupations Computer Operators Level I........................................ Private industry........................ Goods producing .................. Manufacturing..................... Service producing................. Transportation and utilities .. State and local government....  $336 333 362 360 326 366 348  $338 335 365 365 328 374 361  Level II...................................... Private industry........................ Goods producing.................. Manufacturing..................... Service producing.................. Transportation and utilities .. State and local government....  422 423 441 441 417 493 413  427 429 447 447 422 493 417  Level III..................................... Private industry....................... Goods producing.................. Manufacturing.................... . Service producing................. Transportation and utilities .. State and local government....  535 539 554 554 532 587 513  537 541 557 557 534 588 517  Level IV..................................... Private industry...................... . Goods producing.................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing................. Transportation and utilities . State and local government....  646 647 671 671 632 672 626  645 647 671 670 632 672 626  Level V..................................... Private industry....................... Service producing.................  762 762 776  762 762 776  Drafters Level I...................................... Private industry...................... Goods producing................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing................. Transportation and utilities . State and local government....  383 386 361 361 417 486 343  390 394 372 373 418 488 342  Level II..................................... Private industry...................... Goods producing ................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities . State and local government ....  471 470 459 457 490 537 481  483 483 477 475 490 542 485  .  $359 358  . .  . .  332 .  380 464 . _ _ .  454  $326 330  -  327 379 306  $330 321 363 363 306 394  $336 325 370 370 310  $353 341  • 333  333  •  '  436 430 456 455 422 512 463  440 432 459 458 425 512 476  447 447 478 479 431 492 459  454 453 484 484 438 492 478  402 410 419 419 407 471 377  405 412 425 425 409 471 379  417 414 415 414 413 442  425 422 421 421 423 448  561 560 582 582 545 629 568  564 563 585 585 548 640 574  498 514 539 538 505 538 448  498 513 543 543 505 537 448  530 530 517 517 536 596 528  533 534 519 519 541 596 528  551 548 552 552 546 651 560  555 548 552 552 546 651 572  684 684 707 707 664  684 684 707 707 664  593 600  587 594  637 638 640 640 637 724 633  637 634 639 639 630  637 634 639 639 630  661  662  -  -  404 397  356  -  -  .  -  -  -  *  638 638 641 641 637 724 633  -  -  •  -  -  •  •  392 404 349 346 435 483  399 414 366 361 434 483  377 377 352 355 430  376 375 347 349 435  402 396  388  388  453  464 464 464 461 465 511 455  496 472 480 478 452 500 579  . .  . .  -  364 363 361 -  408 407 400  $352 339  326 366 305  355 $357 348  $324 329  -  -  . .  .  $362 361  384 383 -  368  371  -  -  481 482 451 449 547 618 456  527 529 512 513 550 618 453  See note at end of table.  62  -  578  463 468 457 456 482 507 413  578  467 473 466 463 481 510 413  459 460 458 456 465 501 444  497 473 481 479 451 496  581   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-2. Average pay by type of area, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level  Metro­ politan  Level III ................................... Private industry....... .............. Goods producing ................ Manufacturing................... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities State and local government...  $599 600 594 591 612 645 592  $601 602 602 599 601 649 592  Level IV....... ............................ Private industry..................... Goods producing................ Manufacturing.................... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities .  759 759 755 754 765 767  759 759 757 755 765 767  Engineering Technicians Level I....................................... Private industry...................... Goods producing................. Manufacturing.................... Service producing.................  381 382 382 382 380  381 382 382 382 380  Level II................... .................. Private industry..................... . Goods producing................. Manufacturing................... . Service producing................ Transportation and utilities . State and local government....  486 486 494 493 463 550 475  486 487 494 493 463 550 458  Level III ................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing................ Manufacturing................... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities State and local government ....  595 596 598 598 588 710 558  600 600 604 603 588 719 556  Level IV.......... ......................... Private industry............... ..... Goods producing................ . Manufacturing................... . Sen/ice producing............... . Transportation and utilities . State and local government....  716 716 707 706 740 856 713  Level V..................................... Private industry..................... Goods producing................ Manufacturing............. ...... Service producing................ Transportation and utilities .  834 833 823 820 867 942  Northeast Nonmetro­ politan  $586 586  Total  South  Metro­ politan  $606 604 588 590 649  $623 622 610 615 649  649  653  766 766 760 757 783  768 768 763 759 783  Total  Midwest Metro­ politan  West  detroolitan  Total  Metro­ politan  $595 610 604 595 620 602 488  $582 597 607 597 579 585 486  $590 589 590 589 589 644 605  $592 592 594 593 588 653 605  $619 603 600 592 608 675  679  772 777 735 721 822 744  773 779 737 722 822 744  745 746 765 768 706 784  745 745 765 768 705  759 746 744 744 ■  761 748 746 746  352 354  352 354  421 421  421 421  406 406 405 405  406 406 405 405  $622 606 604 597 608  364  364  500 500 507 507  501 501 509 509  450 450 448 443 454  449 450 449 443 453  502 503 518 518 455  502 503 518 519 455  500 499 499 499  498 497 497 497  604 604 609 609  607 607 611 611  568 571 572 566 569 648  574 577 580 574 572 669  600 600 601 602 598 724  606 606 612 612 592 725  604 603 600 601 628  606 605 602 603 628 -  718 718 710 708 740 860 737  692 692 685 685 710  692 692 685 685 710  683 684 676 665 698 736  683 683 674 662 697 737  750 750 732 732 790 879  755 755 738 738 791 882  731 730 725 724 771  735 734 729 728 771  834 833 823 820  819 819 809 809  819 819 809 809  786 786 761 745 853  784 784 761 745 848  838 838 825 824  838 838 825 824 868  891 890 887 886 904  891 890 887 886 904  535 534  866  941  See note at end of table.  63  868   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-2. Average pay by type of area, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993  Occupation and level Total  Engineering Technicians, Civil or Survey Technicians/Construction Inspectors  Metro­ politan  $974 974 947 945 1,019  $974 974 947 945 1,019  330 315 315 336  337 323 322 344  425 415 414 429  440 420 420 448  Nonmetro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  -  -  ■ ■ ■  -  -  -  $305  $383  $383  376  485  488  478  482  378  We St  Midwest  South  Northeast  United States  Continued  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  ■  $305 307 305 305  $307  $352  $355  $350  $409  305 308  356  361  404  ArA  417  382 393 390 377  385 393 390 380  433 437 437 432  448  505  548  622  659 600 602  572  451  533  535  472  -  475 562 538  480 564 538  528 557 560  534 563  520  521  456  458  524  530  638  675  580  666  666  600 708  609 711  652 673  669 681  757  785  -  -  648  648  557  559  647  665  763  .  .  748  785  911  916  737  779  891  898  412 414  487 487  479 479  675  696  524 523  617 617  628  730  753  479  528 568 560 579 519  539 576 567 653 531  674 710 810 694 700 657  689 716 836 698 734 675  788 899 908 743  817 905 908 771  1,001 1,029  1,002 1,031  516 516  537 539  478 478  604 604  604 604  403 404  610 611  630 630  459 455  676 676  682 682  500 499  567  661  -  -  656  667  -  ■  619  615  '  .  *  Protective Service Occupations  State and local government................ See note at end of table.  64   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-2. Average pay by type of area, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level Total  Metro­ politan  Police Officers Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Service producing............................... State and local government.................  $641 515 515 641  $666 526 526 667  Level II.................................................... State and local government.................  767 770  782 785  South  Northeast Nonmetro­ politan  $499  Total  Metro­ politan  $721  $730  Total  $516  Metro­ politan  $534  -  Total  $618 -  -  500  724  645  760  West  Midwest Metro­ politan  $652  Total  $758  Metro­ politan  $785  -  -  -  732  517  534  .  .  .  788  624  638  618  763  -  652  758  785  .  935 935  940 940  770  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  65   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-3. Average pay by type of area, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 Northeast  United States Occupation and level Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  Total  Clerks, Accounting Level I ..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $291 291 294 294 291 325 288  $292 292 297 296 291 325 290  Level'll.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing..................... .......... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  352 350 355 354 347 389 363  357 354 361 360 351 390 371  $315 311 326 325 298 334 327  363 361 384 381 352 384 383  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  429 426 433 432 422 469 439  434 430 440 439 425 471 447  389 390 399 399 374  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  513 526 545 543 516 569 482  517 528 547 546 517 570 487  Clerks, General Level I .................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  263 254 256 254 254 288 277  268 258 271 272 256 284 288  232  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  310 302 305 307 301 349 324  314 305 309 312 304 355 330  279 269 279  South  Metro­ politan  Total  West  Midwest Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  $291 296 292 283 297 370 277  $291 297 292 283 298 370 275  $283 279 283 283 278 302  $283 280 285 286 279 300  $288 287 287  371 369 388 384 361 386 393  339 341 345 345 339 390 328  343 345 354 353 341 393 333  348 344 346 345 342 401 384  353 348 349 347 348 401 395  369 361 365 365 360 373 392  372 363 366 366 362 374 402  439 436 437 436 436 468 458  444 441 445 444 439 477 466  410 420 435 431 410 461 386  417 425 446 443 415 467 393  424 417 416 417 417 483 451  427 420 421 421 419 481 459  446 433 445 446 427 458 472  448 434 445 446 428 459 479  532 531 516 516 537 615 536  535 534 520 520 540 615 541  492 539 580 584 512 555 426  498 541 590 593 512 555 429  518 518 551 552 503 571 516  520 520 551 552 504 576 524  518 519 529 527 513 576 516  519 519 529 526 513 576 520  301 279  301 279  247 242  250 245  263 251  271 255  266 262  275  275  -  -  247  243  248  265 262 259  260  238  346  -  252  256  288  304  281  283  336 328 341 342 325 336 352  338 329 342 342 326 336 356  291 285 296 294 281 325 298  292 288 298 296 285 324 297  309 299 294 298 301 369 325  315 303 294 299 306 379 336  323 306 312 316 304 347 356  328 308 325 327 305 359 369  -  $315 316 316  $319 317  315  316 -  -  -  389 460 -  -  451  -  263 290  See note at end of table.  66  248  $290 288  288 355   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-3. Average pay by type of area, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level Total  Metro­ politan  Northeast Nonmetro­ politan  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................. .............. Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $390 384 401 404 378 461 394  $396 390 412 415 383 466 400  $339 338 347  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  462 476 488 488 470 531 454  468 479 501 502 471 532 462  398  Clerks, Order Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing...............................  328 328 334 334 323  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing..............................  Total  South  Metro­ politan  Total  Midwest Metro­ politan  Total  West  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  $389 384 391 390 382 491 394  $392 388 400 400 385 491 395  $351 373 356 346 379 451 327  $359 384 365 351 389 452 334  $386 390 449 456 365 443 379  $391 395 460 468 368 456 385  $415 390 393 395 390 490 424  $418 391 394 398 390 494 429  456 472 494 468 528 446  457 472 494 468 528 447  420 473 475 469 473 515 350  437 486 518 518 476 516 363  459 483 527 530 460 546 434  462 482 527 530 460 549 435  490 474 469 468 477 589 495  490 474 469 470 477 589 495  331 331 337 337 326  357 357 355 355 358  361 361 357 357 364  308 308 324 325 298  310 310 329 329 300  316 316 326 326 304  318 318 327 327 307  341 341 338 338 345  341 341 337 338 345  435 435 430 430 443  443 443 440 440 446  467 467 460 460  468 468 460 460  404 404 407 408 -  420 420 431 432 -  427 427 415 414 -  427 427 413 412 -  451 451 461 462 438  451 451 461 462 438  Key Entry Operators Level I ..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  308 307 316 316 305 370 317  311 309 317 317 308 372 320  328 324 336 336 322 408 392  329 324 337 337 322 409 393  297 298 311 310 295 350 296  298 299 310 309 296 353 297  303 300 299 299 300 376 332  310 307 300 300 308 376 340  314 311 331 331 307 382 383  315 312 331 331 308 384 390  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  392 394 407 407 390 443 387  394 395 413 413 391 441 391  411 410 433 433 402 485 418  413 411 435 435 402 481 429  364 378 379 376 377 429 334  366 383 393 390 381 423 334  387 376 389 389 372 443 424  385 374 385 384 371 430 423  411 410 440 441 406 441 415  415 410 440 441 406 441 452  Personnel Assistants (Employment) Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  315 314 314 314 314 362 318  323 325 323 322 326 362 317  306 300  305 300  304 303  320 322  330 332  354  292  315  313  303 -  -  292  331 339  -  384  -  281 279 -  268 289 367 368 365  -  -  See note at end of table.  67  322  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-3. Average pay by type of area, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Total  Metro­ politan  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $389 390 393 392 388 450 388  $393 391 407 406 384 415 400  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  475 473 483 480 467 491 481  480 480 495 492 472 494 479  Level IV................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  538 542 537 533 547 582 534  549 563 586 583 547 582 533  Secretaries Level I.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing...................... :....... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  367 379 411 410 366 404 347  372 382 418 417 370 405 352  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  437 447 467 466 439 474 418  439 448 467 466 441 478 420  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  513 520 533 532 512 542 486  515 521 536 535 513 540 490  South  Northeast  United States Occupation and level  Nonmetro­ politan  $372 348 434 -  * 340 351 334 331 416 430 377 402 473 490 494 483 578 444  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  $416 402  $427 410  400  409  395  $384 379 401 402 370 419  452  481  469 483 538 532 453 470 439  457 444 451 451 440 495  457 445 452 452 440 493  490 478 479 478 477  492 483 485 484 481  526  522  477 553  563 530  571 538  568 547  571 552  • -  544  544  589  ■ 588  $411 410 452 452 397 421  $412 411 452 452 398 421  $373 379 367 364 388 456 359  $372 374 382 377 370 382 367  $382 379 399 399 368  496 495 500 500 493  504 503 501 501 503  504  524  461 471 496 488 453 470 438  544  595 594 601 601 582 •  582  459 499 544  ■  •  '  395 402 428 428 390 366  405 409 438 438 396 379  351 366 393 386 357 389 337  354 367 392 386 359 389 340  373 376 421 421 357 435 366  382 383 442 442 361 439 380  386 390 407 412 385 427 373  391 393 405 415 391 424 385  464 467 482 482 461 439 448  467 469 481 482 463 435 457  412 440 458 452 431 484 382  413 441 460 453 433 495 382  431 428 449 449 421 459 438  433 429 451 451 422 459 442  462 459 478 481 447 483 468  464 457 476 480 449 483 476  536 537 539 540 536 592 529  537 538 540 541 536 587 535  484 502 521 515 492 519  488 506 533 528 492 518 436  508 510 529 529 496 539 497  509 511 528 528 497 537 502  529 529 547 549 517 547 530  529 527 545 546 517 545 533  See note at end of table.  68  594 594 601  West  Midwest Metro­ politan  434  *   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-3. Average pay by type of area, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued Northeast  United States Occupation and level Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  Total  South  Metro­ politan  Total  West  Midwest Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  $626 626 613 612 635 687 627  $628 628 614 614 636 687 630  $568 604 635 630 587 622 473  $577 607 639 635 589 621 488  $584 590 594 595 586 613 556  $584 590 594 595 585 606 554  $611 609 605 605 614 648 615  $611 609 605 605 614 648 616  •  756 756 744 744 767 792 742  756 757 744 744 768 792 742  722 744 804 796 705 745 619  724 744 804 796 705 745 615  722 724 729 730 715 752 -  721 723 728 729 715 752  736 747 773 772 727 751 698  736 747 773 772 727 751 698  296 293 305 306 278 306  359 358 360 359 357 376 381  362 360 361 360 360 371 387  307 308 319 318 303 319 301  309 310 327 325 304 309 303  313 310 318 318 306 343 342  317 314 321 322 311 334 355  342 340 349 348 337 342 366  344 342 352 351 339 343 402  363 363 370 369 362 404 364  383 369  386 372  331 361 362  367 359 356 416 387  383 365 -  359 296  362 354 349 416 385  383 364 -  367 -  370 -  330 358 *  364 432  365 432  439 435 444 447 434 487 446  449 447 448 451 447 488 451  440 463 463  471 473 472 473  396 419  399 420 420  445 439 455 465 435  464 456 431 434 461  467 457 431 434 461  466  467  419 340  443 436 449 458 433  345  457  458  546 564 589 593 561 472  549 565 589 593 563 480  568 589 590 508  571 589  492 523  521 526  521 526  586 596  586 596  590 516  521 399  498 *  498  599 526  599 526  Level IV................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $602 611 610 609 611 640 562  $604 612 611 610 612 640 570  Level V.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  738 745 753 751 737 763 671  738 745 753 751 737 763 672  Switchboard Operator-Receptionists....... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  328 327 335 335 323 338 339  331 330 340 340 326 334 351  Word Processors Level I..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  361 360 370 369 358 399 363  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government................. Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... State and local government.................  $521 480  -  395 .  •  296  498 527 * 525 407  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  69   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-4. Average pay by type of area, maintenance and toolroom occupations, United States, July 1993 United States Occupation and level  Northeast  Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  General Maintenance Workers................ Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $9.91 9.61 10.20 10.22 9.39 11.66 10.72  $10.16 9.76 10.41 10.44 9.55 11.72 11.39  $9.15 9.04 9.66 9.67 8.69  Maintenance Electricians......................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  16.99 17.03 16.81 16.85 18.04 19.90 16.65  17.54 17.61 17.63 17.69 17.54 19.68 17.11  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Level I.................................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Sen/ice producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  11.21 10.90 11.37 11.37 10.69 10.82 -  11.21 10.88 11.51 11.51 10.60 10.60  Level II ................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  16.47 16.56 15.71 15.72 17.03 17.71 15.35  16.56 16.65 15.80 15.81 17.08 17.79 15.44  15.41 15.51  Level III................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  18.70 18.68 18.21 18.18 18.93 19.86 18.83  18.77 18.77 18.28 18.29 19.01 20.11 18.77  . -  Maintenance Machinists.......................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  16.27 16.16 15.63 15.61 19.45 20.18 19.22  16.34 16.19 15.96 15.95 18.38 19.22  -  South  Metro­ politan  Total  $8.82 8.71 9.48 9.48 8.54 9.63 9.19  $9.91 9.65 10.52 10.55 9.23 11.59 10.55  $10.13 9.79 10.57 10.60 9.42 11.23 11.29  $9.85 9.16 9.88 9.89 8.96 10.90 11.59  $9.89 9.24 9.94 9.95 9.07 11.00 12.16  14.86 15.06 14.57 14.65 16.96 13.09  15.29 15.62 15.53 15.71 15.94 18.36 13.42  18.51 18.54 18.52 18.52 18.69 19.76 18.04  18.77 18.80 18.80 18.80 18.82 19.95 18.30  18.08 17.99 17.02 16.70 20.45 21.88 18.37  18.10 17.68 17.20 17.18 19.18 21.34 18.95  10.17 10.17 -  11.54 11.56 -  10.23  10.14  11.31  11.52 11.51 11.52 11.66  11.20 11.04  10.22  10.10 10.10 10.06  11.40 12.90  11.21 11.04 11.40 13.96  16.61 16.89  16.68 16.77 15.99 15.98 17.00 17.73 14.93  16.49 16.24 14.83 14.83 16.95 17.24 18.00  16.51 16.22 14.84 14.84 16.98 17.31 18.16  Metro­ politan  Total  9.34  $11.61 11.11 10.64 10.66 11.34 13.37 13.02  $11.96 11.40 11.17 11.21 11.48 14.13 13.48  $8.74 8.69 9.46 9.46 8.49 9.64 8.86  15.25 15.38 14.42 14.25 13.26  17.22 17.02 16.87 16.80 17.51 20.62 18.22  17.44 17.22 17.10 17.02 17.55 20.65 18.55  12.29 11.40 -  12.29 11.39  -  -  -  -  -  -  14.43  16.03 16.03 14.22 14.04  -  Metro­ politan  -  11.58 13.50  Metro­ politan  16.27 16.27 15.26 15.26 17.37 18.54 16.23  16.30 16.30 15.14 15.14 17.46 18.54 16.36  16.48 16.76 16.24 17.05 17.79 12.87  17.07 17.83 12.83  16.57 16.66 15.87 15.86 16.91 17.60 14.98  18.21 18.22 18.20 18.20 18.25 -  18.30 18.31  17.69 18.04 17.31 17.32 18.31 18.72 14.32  17.65 18.03 17.31 17.32 18.33 18.85 14.32  18.08 18.11 17.72 17.72 18.20 19.04 17.63  18.14 18.23 17.78 17.78 18.35 19.82 16.66  19.59 19.40 18.64 18.60 19.81 20.82 21.32  19.67 19.48 18.78 18.78 19.81 20.82 21.41  16.36 16.28 15.71 15.68  16.76 16.68 16.06 16.02  14.42 14.38 14.07 14.10 17.21  14.79 14.74 14.54 14.54 16.55  16.73 16.56 16.42 16.44  16.82 16.63 16.61 16.61  18.51 18.41 17.36 17.21  17.66 17.38 17.58 17.56  17.02  17.02  18.21 19.87  17.24 19.87  20.41  20.41  -  ■  West  Total  Total  -  Midwest  18.28  -  18.46  See note at end of table.  70  -  18.46  -   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-4. Average pay by type of area, maintenance and toolroom occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued United States Occupation and level Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery....... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $15.97 16.00 15.66 15.66 18.13 19.76 14.22  $16.22 16.26 16.04 16.06 17.72 20.01 14.27  $15.15 15.16 14.44 14.33  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle..................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  14.77 14.99 13.94 14.34 15.47 15.82 14.35  15.31 15.36 14.66 14.88 15.64 16.00 15.22  11.80 12.03 10.94  Maintenance Pipefitters........................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  18.43 18.51 18.66 18.76 17.80 19.13 17.18  18.70 18.76 18.87 18.93 18.09  Tool and Die Makers ............................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing...................................  17.57 17.57 17.57 17.57  18.12 18.12 18.12 18.12  17.76  South  Northeast  -  13.33 13.66 11.59 . -  -  * .  *  Total  Metro­ politan  $15.04 15.06 14.91 14.94 16.58 20.72  $15.28 15.30 15.15 15.13 16.58 20.72  Midwest  West  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  $17.19 17.24 16.99 17.01 19.29  $17.54 17.58 17.38 17.40 19.44  $16.41 16.40 15.71 15.59 19.10  $16.52 16.51 15.91 15.91  12.96  $14.83 14.89 14.69 14.73 15.95 18.50 13.00  14.48  14.51  17.09  16.94  Total  $15.01 15.06 14.67 14.69 17.20  Metro­ politan  Metro­ politan  15.70 15.64 15.05 15.33 15.74 16.20 15.83  15.89 15.70 15.54 16.07 15.73 16.10 16.25  12.72 13.02 11.29 11.60 14.08 14.31 12.16  13.34 13.59 11.90 12.03 14.39 14.72 12.77  15.54 16.22 16.60 16.88 16.02 16.27 13.90  15.89 16.32 16.65 16.91 16.13 16.34 14.57  16.14 16.07 15.14 15.62 16.53 17.16 16.26  16.73 16.37 15.64 15.76 16.71 17.27 17.41  18.17 18.34 17.65 17.67  18.30 18.45 17.65 17.67  17.48 17.76 18.60 18.72  19.17 19.13 19.23 19.22  18.31 18.21 18.20 18.31  18.81 18.71 18.69 19.02  17.25  19.26 19.22 19.29 19.27 17.60  16.98  17.39 17.66 18.26 18.61 13.27  20.44  20.52  16.42 16.42 16.42 16.42  17.11 17.11 17.11 17.11  16.87 16.87 16.87 16.87  16.10 16.10 16.10 16.10  18.28 18.28 18.28 18.28  18.94 18.94 18.94 18.94  18.96 18.96 18.96 18.96  18.99 18.99 18.99 18.99  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  71   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-5. Average pay by type of area, material movement and custodial occupations, United States, July 1993 United States Occupation and level  South  Northeast Total  Metro­ politan  $8.53 8.53 8.56 8.56 -  $11.60 11.79 11.57 11.56 12.72  $11.90 11.90 11.62 11.62 12.79  -  -  7.59 7.49 7.11 8.71  7.07 6.85 9.66 9.77 6.65  Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  Forklift Operators...................................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities ..............  $10.24 10.24 10.07 10.07 11.15 13.31  $11.38 11.38 11.35 11.36 11.46 13.65  Guards Level I.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  6.53 6.40 9.18 9.25 6.20 10.44 9.35  6.48 6.35 9.74 9.84 6.18 9.81 9.41  Level II.................................................... Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  11.34 11.34 13.26 13.26 10.62 15.06 11.35  11.38 11.33 13.49 13.49 10.61 15.06 11.61  Janitors..................................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  7.57 7.04 9.88 9.91 6.65 10.32 8.90  7.64 7.07 10.45 10.50 6.70 10.57 9.30  Material Handling Laborers ..................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  9.44 9.44 9.15 9.16 9.76 14.38 9.21  9.99 10.00 10.00 10.02 9.99 14.39 9.21  Order Fillers............................................. Private industry.................................... Goods producing............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing..............................  8.90 8.90 8.86 8.86 8.92  9.30 9.30 9.55 9.55 9.23  Shipping/Receiving Clerks....................... Private industry.................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing.................................. Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  9.76 9.77 10.01 10.02 9.41 13.62 9.43  10.00 10.01 10.38 10.39 9.55 13.82 9.83  Total  Midwest Metro­ politan  West  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  $11.31 11.31 11.02 11.03 11.91 13.30  $11.40 11.40 11.01 11.02 12.00 13.30  $8.77 8.76 8.68 8.68 9.39 11.33  $9.92 9.90 9.94 9.95 9.77 11.42  $12.28 12.28 12.32 12.32 12.11  $12.62 12.62 12.70 12.71 12.27  -  -  11.28  7.04 6.82 10.31 10.48 6.64 11.26  6.19 6.09 8.58 8.63 5.88 10.13 7.75  6.07 5.97 8.65 8.71 5.83 10.13 7.78  6.31 6.19 10.82 10.87 5.92 10.87 9.44  6.26 6.15 11.17 11.22 5.88 9.27 9.49  6.71 6.59 8.48 8.52 6.49 9.62 10.81  6.72 6.60 9.45 9.55 6.50 9.62 11.25  11.57 11.28 11.66 11.66 11.14 13.17  10.67 11.13  10.85 11.12  8.36  8.95  11.17 11.24 14.12 14.14 10.15 10.89  11.17 11.27 14.12 14.14 10.17 10.77  11.86 11.64 10.10 13.07  12.03 11.77  -  11.64 11.37 11.93 11.93 11.14 13.17  7.12 6.75 8.17 8.13 6.15 9.07 7.52  9.25 8.75 10.01 10.01 8.63 12.57 10.73  9.40 8.89 10.03 10.03 8.78 12.72 10.96  6.03 5.67 8.07 8.13 5.39 9.43 6.86  5.96 5.55 8.41 8.55 5.38 9.84 7.07  7.80 7.15 11.34 11.36 6.25 11.53 9.47  7.92 7.26 11.90 11.92 6.29 11.41 9.95  7.73 6.79 9.51 9.48 6.50 7.98 9.78  7.70 6.77 9.39 9.39 6.52 7.96 10.27  7.22 7.21  11.07 11.07 10.53 10.53 11.55  11.17 11.17 10.55 10.55 11.70 -  8.02 8.03 8.01 8.03 8.05 12.94  8.63 8.65 8.80 8.82 8.51 12.94 -  10.46 10.45 10.49 10.52 10.42 14.51  10.70 10.70 11.00 11.03 10.45 14.51  8.86 8.86 -  -  9.28 9.28 8.65 8.65 9.50 -  10.15 10.15 9.50 9.50 10.47  10.17 10.17 9.50 9.50 10.49  7.80 7.79 8.20 8.20 7.58  8.26 8.26 9.22 9.22 8.01  9.42 9.42 9.50 9.50 9.39  9.69 9.70 10.09 10.09 9.57  9.39 9.39 9.26 9.26 9.41  9.39 9.39 9.26 9.26 9.41  9.96 9.94 10.01 10.01 9.88  10.07 10.06 10.14 10.14 9.98 12.76  9.11 9.12 9.43 9.44 8.38 10.20 8.45  9.53 9.54 10.14 10.15 8.59 10.19 8.92  10.23 10.23 10.74 10.78 9.41  10.40 10.41 10.92 10.97 9.60  10.04 10.02 10.14 10.14 9.93  9.85  9.95  10.09 10.09 10.27 10.25 9.91 10.11 10.48  _  -  -  -  8.38 8.40 8.66 8.63 6.92 -  12.66  See note at end of table.  72  -  9.54  9.90 13.16  11.01   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table C-5. Average pay by type of area, material movement and custodial occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued  Total  Metro­ politan  Nonmetro­ politan  T ruckdrivers Light Truck.............................................. Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  $9.22 9.19 10.12 10.37 8.96 12.97 9.61  $9.24 9.21 10.19 10.43 8.98 12.97 9.74  $8.48  13.98 14.11 11.81 12.04 14.55 16.43 11.34  13.99 14.11 12.16 12.38 14.46 16.34 11.50  13.80  Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government................. Private industry..................................... Goods producing ................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  12.37 12.20 12.22 12.47 12.18 12.68 12.98  12.64 12.36 12.40 12.69 12.33 12.69 13.80  10.42 10.70  Private industry..................................... Goods producing................................ Manufacturing................................... Service producing.............................. Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  13.48 13.47 12.20 12.05 13.95 15.24 16.31  13.87 13.86 12.92 12.82 14.16 15.47 16.70  9.71 9.71 9.45  Warehouse Specialists............................. Private industry..................................... Goods producing ............................... Manufacturing................................... Service producing............................... Transportation and utilities .............. State and local government.................  11.31 11.31 11.32 11.32 11.31 13.43 11.16  11.39 11.40 11.52 11.55 11.32 13.32 11.29  10.53 10.55 10.49 10.35 10.80 15.25 9.93  -  -  -  -  9.97  -  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  $12.23 12.22 11.57 11.84 12.37  $12.33 12.31 11.64 11.95 12.46  $7.20 7.14 8.10 8.32 7.01  $7.21 7.13 8.38 8.65 7.00  12.58  12.72  7.76  7.84  9.04 ■ 10.65  15.10 15.26 13.85 13.82 15.52 17.13 12.74  15.01 15.17 13.87 13.85 15.42 17.04 12.77  12.43 12.60 9.14 9.25 13.15 15.78 8.47  12.41 12.57 9.49 9.64 12.94 15.56 8.55  13.77 13.03 14.09 14.82 12.03 12.10 -  13.90 13.14 14.20 14.84 12.12 12.22  9.62 9.70 9.27 9.39 10.17 10.45 9.35  14.79 14.74 13.75 13.84 14.94 15.82  15.40 15.35 13.83 13.84 15.70 16.58 -  12.32 12.30 11.65 11.64 13.00 15.80 13.22  12.64 12.62 12.20 12.21 12.97 15.75 13.50  We st  Midwest  South  Northeast  United States Occupation and level  Total  Metro­ politan  Total  Metro­ politan  9.07  $8.24 8.09 8.13 8.05 8.08  $8.18 8.01 7.74 7.60 8.10  10.83  11.12  11.50  14.37 14.47 12.66 12.78 14.85 16.39 11.82  14.33 14.44 12.79 12.91 14.78 16.36 11.80  14.47 14.53 11.77 12.15 15.15 16.57 12.71  14.54 14.58 11.89 12.17 15.15 16.57 13.10  9.75 9.74 9.18 9.36 10.21 10.45 9.80  12.48 12.15 13.13 13.04 11.44 12.64 13.44  12.90 12.44 13.23 13.14 11.81 12.51 14.80  13.74 13.80 13.90 13.67 13.76 14.10 13.22  13.89 13.90 13.85 13.82 13.93 14.24 13.78  12.01 12.01 10.07 10.08 12.79 14.51 10.23  12.47 12.48 11.00 11.16 12.88 14.64 10.25  14.20 14.20 13.13 12.70 14.57 15.77  14.57 14.57 13.99 13.67 14.73 15.82  13.59 13.56 12.90 12.77 13.91 14.88 16.92  13.77 13.75 13.22 13.10 13.98 14.97 16.92  10.87 10.98 11.17 11.20 10.83 13.69 8.57  10.98 11.09 11.60 11.62 10.77 13.57 8.60  10.98 10.98 10.91 10.90 11.04 12.84 10.94  11.13 11.13 11.04 11.06 11.19 12.72 10.94  11.68 11.60 11.89 11.87 11.45 13.36 12.71  11.59 11.50 11.68 11.73 11.42 13.26 12.78  $9.75 9.69 11.54  $9.78 9.72  "  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall industry or industry levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  73  Table D-1. Average pay in goods-producing industries, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 Manufacturing Durable goods Occupation and level  All goodsproducing  Construc­ tion  All manu­ facturing  All durable goods  Nondurable goods  Industrial Fabricated and Transpor­ Measuring All Electronic metal tation instru­ nondurable commer­ equipment products cial equipment goods ments machinery  Food and kindred products  Printing and publishing  Chemicals and allied equipment  Professional Occupations Accountants Level I.................................................... Level II ................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V................................................... Level VI..................................................  $524 619 762 982 1,279 1,549  Attorneys Level II ............................................ ....... Level III .................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V................................................... Level VI..................................................  1,093 1,410 1,757 2,055 2,607  Engineers Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V................................................... Level VI.................................................. Level VII................................................. Level VIII................................................  677 758 880 1,057 1,272 1,531 1,774 2,117  -  $517 621 761 970 1,261 1,501  $519 622 755 953 1,209 1,471  -  1,066 1,397 1,741 2,040 -  1,244 1,580 1,960  678 757 878 1,054 1,267 1,523 1,766 2,103  661 749 871 1,043 1,261 1,523 1,753 2,090  625 826 889  621 820 878  503 632 831 983 1,186  496 627 824 971 1,167  573 647 729 853  591 654 711 849  $559 736 979  632 710 867 1,050 1,269 -  $587 733 921 -  $524 640 772 949 1,232 -  $530 634 766 947 1,187 -  .  $526 642 757 970 1,239 .  $520 628 776 944 1,211  -  . -  -  708 839 1,000 1,190 -  653 754 897 1,061 1,272 1,548 -  682 768 870 1,061 1,270 1,544 1,816  660 742 853 1,017 1,247 1,493 1,702  -  $492 589 741 983 .  -  -  $515 619 768 997 1,336  663 742 887 1,054 1,270 1,529 1,758  $563 711 937  $691 822 1,017 1,373  -  1,475 1,832 2,095  731 792 924 1,122 1,317 1,532 1,835  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 917 1,122  . . . . .  821 975 1,143 1,325 1,558  -  Administrative Occupations Budget Analysts Level II ................................................... Level III .................................................. Level IV..................................................  632 832 909  Buyers/Contracting Specialists Level I .................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V...................................................  504 633 832 992 1,206  Computer Programmers Level I .................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV..................................................  582 649 730 854  620 818  .  629 768 -  -  546 670 853 919 -  697 757  648 761  612 703  -  -  -  535 650 819 1,000  -  -  74  842  . .  .  -  533 632 819 958  519 645 862 1,042  622 705  548 636 746 881  -  See note at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  476 610 830 969  . . -  639 866  784  644  597 714  507 674 872 1,057  701 786  Table D-1. Average pay in goods-producing industries, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued Manufacturing Nondurable goods  Durable goods Occupation and level  All goodsproducing  Computer Systems Analysts Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V...................................................  $743 877 1,049 1,238 1,511  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III..................................................  1,195 1,369 1,619  Personnel Specialists Level I.................................................... Level II ................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V................................................... Level VI..................................................  512 592 769 993 1,259 1,534  Personnel Supervisors/Managers Level I.................................................... Level II ................................................... Level III................................................... Level IV..................................................  1,060 1,354 1,673 2,043  Construc­ tion  .  -  -  -  -  All manu­ facturing  $739 873 1,045 1,229  All durable goods  Fabricated metal products  $716 846 1,014 1,209  -  $958  $738 924 1,089  1,189 1,357 1,575  1,156 1,341 1,536  510 589 768 989 1,255 1,526  537 590 775 988 1,214  1,061 1,352 1,663 2,015  1,070 1,345 1,623 •  $761 885 1,090 '  -  * *  -  $724 * -  583 770 992 1,158 ■  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Industrial Transpor­ Measuring All and Electronic nondurable instru­ tation commer­ equipment goods equipment cial ments machinery  75  -  616 790 980 1,221 •  •  -  628 805 1,018 1,265  $732 858 *  -  614 765 1,023 1,228  $778 909 1,079 1,260  Food and kindred products  $948  Printing Chemicals and allied and publishing equipment  $716 899 ■  ■  * ■  1,238 1,379 ■  •  *  488 587 757 990 1,306  590 733 966  514 717 955  720 801 1,063 1,364 "  • 1,322 ■  $804 950 1,098  1,361  1,365 1,710 ‘  * -  '  Table D-2. Average pay in goods-producing industries, technical occupations, United States, July 1993 Manufacturing Durable goods Occupation and level  All goodsproducing  Construc­ tion  Computer Operators Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV..................................................  $362 441 554 671  Drafters Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV..................................................  361 459 594 755  Engineering Technicians Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V................................................... Level VI..................................................  382 494 598 707 823 947  -  Engineering Technicians, Civil or Survey Technicians/Construction Inspectors Level IV..................................................  810  *  $472 614 *  All manu­ facturing  All durable goods  $360 441 554 671  $354 445 558 673  361 457 591 754  362 458 586 755  382 493 598 706 820 945  381 498 597 705 818 939  -  -  '  -  '  -  $426 546  $488 580 -  $437 528  $364 436 548 665  384 476 611 724  454 611 772  482 593 -  482 609 743  642 737  440 560 690 834  417 502 608 708 831  519 609 734 821  537 617 687 798  602 718 898  -  *  -  $473  $448 529  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Nondurable goods  Industrial and Fabricated Transpor­ Measuring All Electronic metal tation instru­ nondurable commer­ equipment products cial equipment goods ments machinery  76  •  *  Food and kindred products  $428 529  -  Printing and publishing  $434 583  Chemicals and allied equipment  $473 596  . -  -  -  -  Table D-3. Average pay in goods-producing industries, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 Manufacturing Nondurable goods  Durable goods Occupation and level  All goodsproducing  Construc­ tion  All manu­ facturing  All durable goods  Fabricated metal products  Industrial All and Transpor­ Measuring Electronic tation instru­ nondurable commer­ equipment goods cial equipment ments machinery  Food and kindred products  Printing and publishing  Chemicals and allied equipment  Clerks, Accounting $294 354 432 543  $297 359 425 541  254 307 404 488  246 314 420 501  334 430  334 430  316 407 314 393 483 537  $294 355 433 545  $365 429 517  $290 350 439 546  $347 432 502  $352 423  $371 478 630  299 379  294 405  401  .  -  $373 436 512  $374 439 563  $346 455 598  $380 445 539  . _ .  283 351  380 533 513  341 443 532  333 398  326 443  .  452  _  438  339 419  .  .  316 407  313 405  347  319 426  320 427  470  428  318 409  330 396  307 430  434  314 392 480 533  396 468 557  .  .  _  .  . .  . .  . .  387 491 515  -  . _  . .  . .  423 446 516 628  466 441 527 591 757  423 481 561 615 757  422 498 546 626 746  389 466 535 605 745  377 456 518 598 .  385 459 512 592 708  480 572 665 795  332  347  335  335  335  353  $346 411 .  Clerks, General 256 305 401 488  279 359  302 379 476  Clerks, Order 324  Key Entry Operators  Personnel Assistants (Employment)  . .  Secretaries  Level IV.................................................. Switchboard Operator-Receptionists.......  411 467 533 610 753  434 499 592  410 466 532 609 751  426 467 530 613 757  _  335  334  335  335  322  355  349  369 447 593  377 493 592  .  . .  .  472  Word Processors 370 444 589  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  77  411  . .  .  -  Table D-4. Average pay in goods-producing industries, maintenance and toolroom occupations, United States, July 1993 Manufacturing Durable goods Occupation and level  All goodsproducing  Construc­ tion  All manu­ facturing  All durable goods  Industrial Fabricated and metal commer­ products cial machinery  Nondurable goods  Electronic equipment  Transpor­ tation equipment  $10.59  $10.40  All Measuring instru­ nondurable goods ments  Food and kindred products  Printing Chemicals and allied and publishing equipment  General Maintenance Workers................  $10.20  $10.22  $10.42  $9.89  $10.70  Maintenance Electricians.........................  16.81  16.85  17.32  15.76  17.00  -  19.69  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III..................................................  11.37 15.71 18.21  11.37 15.72 18.18  11.40 14.54 18.16  14.56  14.55 17.95  18.67  13.75 *  16.96 18.30  14.70  16.75  16.99  16.93  17.42  17.55  18.27  14.45  15.71  14.33  14.47  17.63  13.85  12.78  -  Maintenance Machinists..........................  15.63  15.61  14.90  13.41  13.96  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery.......  15.66  15.66  15.63  15.23  15.83  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle....................................................  13.94  $12.49  14.34  14.70  Maintenance Pipefitters...........................  18.66  •  18.76  Tool and Die Makers ...............................  17.57  -  17.57  -  -  -  19.43  -  -  -  17.76  15.96  16.17  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  17.63  78  17.65  -  18.02  $9.86  $9.95  $9.77  $10.15  $10.78  -  15.80  13.98  18.01  17.31  -  20.04  -  17.90  20.08  16.24  15.39  16.25 *  -  -  -  -  -  17.84 -  Table D-5. Average pay in goods-producing industries, material movement and custodial occupations, United States, July 1993 Manufacturing Nondurable goods  Durable goods All goodsproducing  Construc­ tion  Forklift Operators.....................................  $10.07  -  Guards Level I.................................................... Level II...................................................  9.18 13.26  Janitors....................................................  9.88  Material Handling Laborers .....................  9.15  Occupation and level  -  $6.65  All manu­ facturing  Industrial All and T ranspor- Measuring Electronic nondurable tation instru­ commer­ equipment goods equipment cial ments machinery  All durable goods  Fabricated metal products  $10.07  $11.17  $10.48  9.25 13.26  9.21 13.76  9.91  10.89  8.65  8.90  11.97  14.53  9.16  10.13  9.20  9.03  11.41  $11.18  $9.35  $10.41  $11.41  9.29 12.42  8.70  8.74  14.21 -  $14.28  9.27  12.53  8.86  8.86  9.05  10.01  10.02  10.15  9.55  Truckdrivers Light Truck............................................. Medium Truck........................................ Heavy Truck .......................................... Tractor Trailer........................................  10.12 11.81 12.22 12.20  8.38 9.55 10.87 13.43  10.37 12.04 12.47 12.05  11.08 9.91 12.26 11.32  8.23  -  -  -  Warehouse Specialists............................  11.32  10.32  11.32  11.03  10.60  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.  79  10.80  10.86  9.76  10.90  12.35  $9.90  Chemicals and allied equipment  $11.79  11.06  8.82  8.92  10.59  8.44  9.11  -  -  8,76  9.53  9.56  9.87  10.71  10.44  9.29 12.90 13.29 12.32  11.36 12.39 12.47  9.89 15.23  11.60  11.15  10.49  9.94  16.97 12.75  Printing and publishing  -  -  Shipping/Receiving Clerks.......................   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  $11.44  Order Fillers.............................................  Food and kindred products  11.69  -  12.36  14.96  Table E-1. Average pay in service-producing industries, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 Transportation and public utilities Occupation and level  All serviceproducing  All  Communi­ cations  Finance, insurance, and real estate Wholesale trade  Retail trade All  Depository institutions  Insurance carriers  $483 559 709 917 1,151  $523 586 726 897 1,171 -  Services  All  Business services  Education­ al services  $462 565 734 912 1,200  $464 556 715 957 1,188 -  Health services  Engineer­ ing and manage­ ment services  Professional Occupations Accountants Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III .................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V................................................... Level VI..................................................  $486 578 734 951 1,214 1,539  Accountants, Public Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV..................................................  544 598 695 938  Attorneys Level I .................................................... Level li................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V................................................... Level VI.................................................. Engineers Level I.................................................... Level II ................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V................................................... Level VI.................................................. Level VII................................................. Level VIII................................................  $516 630 777 995 1,256 1,595  $610 764 981 *  -  . -  777 979 1,287 1,644 2,110 2,598  1,059 1,331 1,700 2,030 -  •  630 730 878 1,080 1,292 1,488 1,745 1,989  702 775 930 1,097 1,282 1,532 -  911 1,070 1,305  489 588 759 917  795 969  -  $488 582 734 956 1,229 -  -  $490 558 718 942 1,248 *  $491 579 732 919 1,198 1,463  -  -  .  -  773 991 1,274 1,618 2,098  920 1,305 1,599 2,144  773 992 1,230 1,541 1,965  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  570 765  -  -  -  -  -  -  812 1,030 1,241  $465 562 721 954 1,192 544 598 695 938  927 1,291 1,701 2,242 619 716 863 1,075 1,295 1,484 1,739 1,994  . -  1,269 1,822 -  886 .  . *  1,346 -  $473 575 709 908  $487 582 752 977 1.175  . . -  544 598 695 938  -  . 1,329 1,625  618 716 860 1,070 1,284 1,474 1,705  .  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  576 738 829  .  594  -  -  *  -  Administrative Occupations Budget Analysts Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV..................................................  ■  -  •  -  See note at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  80  589 744 903  -  Table E-1. Average pay in service-producing industries, professional and administrative occupations, United States, July 1993 — Continued Transportation and public utilities Occupation and level  All serviceproducing  All  Communi­ cations  Wholesale trade  Retail trade All  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  Level IV.................................................. Level V...................................................  $484 615 853 1,013 1,242  $509 625 838  $632  $659 884 1,044  -  *  •  -  Computer Programmers  Level IV.................................................. Level V...................................................  515 599 714 855 980  573 633 766 936  507 608 713 812  -  -  -  $604 688  499 588 695 846  Depository institutions  $475 576 ■ 491 586 696 -  -  Insurance carriers  $646 ■  Level IV.................................................. Level V.................. «...............................  784 899 1,048 1,269 -  1,103 1,269 1,561  1,142 1,403  489 561 722 954 1,204 1,531  570 606 817 1,008 1,214  1,032 1,315 1,674 2,192  1,115 1,349 1,649  $903  -  743 861 1,032 1,183 -  704 810 951  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers Level II................................................... Level III..................................................  -  1,091 . -  -  Personnel Specialists Level III.................................................. Level V.................................................... Level VI...................................................  -  600 794 1,001  601 725 983 1,234  525 708 943 1,231  Level III.................................................. Level IV..................................................  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  81  -  *  473 597 740 890  $482 593 -  '  '  705 838 966 1,152  717 843 1,018 1,250 1,498  726 836 1,016 1,233 ■  698 840 1,009  667 794 967  1,116 1,261 *  1,056 1,263 1,535  1,041 1,259 1,514  1,098 1,282  ■ -  477 569 724 930 1,156  455 555 707 923 1,103  511 585 736 930 1,175  480 552 700 942 1,244  482 566 714 946 1,325  474 552 694 920 1,170  534 684 917 •  1,012 1,290 1,765  -  1,006 1,284  1,291 -  $468 624 872 995  561 618 727 872  1,271  '  Engineer­ ing and manage­ ment services  474 565 642  512 590 713 855  1,133 1,252 1,582  1,028 1,294 1,622  ■  $475 593 783  515 592 708 860 1,016  691 870 1,021  ■ -  491 571 733 972 1,210  ■  Personnel Supervisors/Managers -  $631 832  Health services  714 855 1,048  *  -  $475 603 842 997  Education­ al services  712 849 1,000 1,160 ■  -  All  Business services  509 597 683 •  Computer Systems Analysts 726 855 1,014 1,220 1,480  Services  Finance, insurance, and real estate  1,273  * •  1,330 *  Table E-2. Average pay in service-producing industries, technical and protective service occupations, United States, July 1993 Transportation and public utilities Occupation and level  All serviceproducing  All  Communi­ cations  Finance, insurance, and real estate Wholesale trade  Retail trade All  Depository institutions  Insurance carriers  Services  All  Business services  Education­ al services  Health services  Engineer­ ing and manage­ ment services  Technical Occupations  Computer Operators Level I.................................................... Level II ............................................................................ Level III........................................................................... Level IV.................................................. Level V...................................................  $326 417 532 632 776  $493 587 672 -  Drafters Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV..................................................  417 490 612 765  486 537 645 767  Engineering Technicians Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V................................................... Level VI..................................................  380 463 588 740 867 1,019  710 856  -  -  -  Engineering Technicians, Civil or Survey Technicians/Construction Inspectors Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV.................................................. Level V...................................................  315 414 560 694 908  $513 590 -  552  *  $398 484 -  -  -  -  $416 531 647  -  -  $323 406 517 624  $315 392 517 600  $422 511 652  $332 408 521 614  $345 422 524 609  $401 500  . $383 513  . $387 549 646  -  . -  . -  374 470 608 765  . . . -  . . . -  -  . . -  . . -  373 450 558 691 845 983  .  . . . . . -  315 410 558 693 911  .  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  . -  377 471 610 766  . . . . .  -  . -  .  -  504  380 451 561 696 845 982  318 412 558 697 911  Protective Service Occupations  Police Officers Level I....................................................  515  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  82  511  -  Table E-3. Average pay in service-producing industries, clerical occupations, United States, July 1993 Transportation and public utilities Occupation and level  All serviceproducing  All  Communi­ cations  Services  Finance, insurance, and real estate Wholesale trade  Retail trade All  Depository institutions  Insurance carriers  All  Business services  Education­ al services  Health services  Engineer­ ing and manage­ ment services  Clerks, Accounting Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III.................................................. Level IV..................................................  $291 347 422 516  $325 389 469 569  $431 476 556  $303 349 432 534  $270 326 403 481  $278 342 406 501  $319 381 461  $365 423 510  $286 347 417 498  $345 412 487  $343 406 471  $352 420 475  Clerks, General Level I .................................................... Level II................................................... Level III................................................... Level IV..................................................  254 301 378 470  288 349 461 531  432 473 522  295 377 489  289 348 448  258 293 348 426  257 282 332 404  269 307 364 442  250 300 366 445  280 369 491  287 314 358 452  306 346  Clerks, Order Level I.................................................... Level II...................................................  323 443  -  *  334 444  •  -  * ■  '  '  305 390  370 443  380  Level II...................................................  -  323 391  284 358  303 382  304 351  299 403  298 379  285 367  303 383  Personnel Assistants (Employment) Level I .................................................... Level II................................................... Level III .................................................. Level IV..................................................  314 388 467 547  450 491  376  385 467 545  395 450  372 485 -  307 379 462 534  383 470  302 385 453  Level IV.................................................. Level V...................................................  366 439 512 611 737  404 474 542 640 763  490 556 641 750  374 448 525 629 760  365 432 476 560 700  375 429 513 613 739  344 399 482 581 680  410 452 517 601 750  354 440 504 604 721  352 431 516 608 713  354 452 503 590 734  334 406 473 576  416 461 525 634 734  Switchboard Operator-Receptionists.......  323  338  338  333  278  334  294  346  328  333  306  326  364  Word Processors Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III...................................................  358 434 561  399 487  -  -  357 430 529  338 412  366 420  349 431 572  367 446  * 405  336 -  "  ‘  367 441 532  Key Entry Operators  -  Secretaries Level II...................................................  -  '  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  83  $309 365 431 521  236 309 377 439  *  327 357  300 387  401 508 '  Table E-4. Average pay in service-producing industries, maintenance and toolroom occupations, United States, July 1993 Transportation and public utilities Occupation and level  All serviceproducing  Finance, insurance, and real estate Wholesale trade  All  Communi­ cations  $10.95  $10.37  -  16.19  General Maintenance Workers................  $9.39  $11.66  Maintenance Electricians.........................  18.04  19.90  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Level I.................................................... Level II................................................... Level III ..................................................  10.69 17.03 18.93  10.82 17.71 19.86  Maintenance Machinists..........................  19.45  20.18  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery.......  18.13  19.76  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle....................................................  15.47  15.82  Maintenance Pipefitters...........................  17.80  19.13  10.17 17.73 19.57 -  Retail trade All  Depository institutions  Insurance carriers  All  Business services  Education­ al services  Health services  Engineer­ ing and manage­ ment services  $9.48  $9.18  $9.70  $10.48  $9.30  $9.35  $10.87  $9.34  $10.93  -  18.46  15.92  14.90  16.18  -  -  -  -  14.45 17.60  14.14  14.64  -  15.38  10.45 14.22  *  10.50 14.34 17.40  -  -  15.05  -  -  -  -  .  .  13.69  -  15.92  -  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Services  84  -  -  10.72 15.08 17.46 -  13.62  13.22 -  .  14.73 -  Table E-5. Average pay in service-producing industries, material movement and custodial occupations, United States, July 1993 Transportation and public utilities Occupation and level  All serviceproducing  All  Communi­ cations  -  Retail trade All  $5.76 10.18  $9.16 9.84  $8.38 10.96  $8.47  $8.31  6.44  6.01  8.35  6.92  9.12  8.02  7.80  7.77  -  8.62  -  9.92  -  -  -  6.81  -  10.26  8.75  9.22  -  -  9.02  9.33  8.47  9.93  6.97 10.29  9.50  -  -  13.36  -  -  -  7.84 9.28 10.69 10.47  6.98  -  -  7.68 10.06 11.11 12.28  13.21  11.56  10.10  9.28  -  -  6.97  9.10  7.44  8.59 -  8.75  -  12.97 16.43 12.68 15.24  -  13.43  10.32  Material Handling Laborers .....................  9.76  14.38  Order Fillers..............................................  8.92  Shipping/Receiving Clerks.......................  9.41  13.62  Heavy Truck........................................... Tractor Trailer........................................  8.96 14.55 12.18 13.95  Warehouse Specialists............................  11.31  Engineer­ ing and manage­ ment services  6.05 10.36  8.85  6.65  Health services  -  $9.01  Janitors.....................................................  Education­ al services  -  $8.19 10.65  10.44 -  All  Business services  $7.90  7.58 -  6.20 10.62  Insurance carriers  -  8.15  $13.31  $10.86  NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Depository institutions  $10.92  $11.15  Truckdrivers Light Truck..............................................  Wholesale trade  $10.81  Forklift Operators..................................... Guards Level I.................................................... Level II...................................................  Services  Finance, insurance, and real estate  85  -  8.46  -  -  -  -  *  8.14  -  -  '  ■  -  9.90   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Part II: Pay Comparisons, 1993  Table F-1. Pay relatives for occupational groups, all industries, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 (For each occupational group, average pay level for all industries in the United States = 100)  Occupational group Professional  State and area  Alabama Huntsville ............................................................... California Los Angeles-Long Beach ...................................... Oakland................................................................. Riverside-San Bernardino ..................................... Sacramento...... .................................................... San Diego.............................................................. San Francisco........................................................ San Luis Obispo County........................................ Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc .......... .....................................................  Administrative  Clerical Technical  Protective service  Maintenance  Material movement  Janitors  90  92  88  75  116 111 107 103 105 115 110  111 114 103 103 104 -  105  125 125  113 116 105 107 103 119 109  -  96 122 116 119 104 138 136  Overall  Accountants  Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Systems analysts  98  98  98  98  104  97  91  77  90  104 112 99 94 98 106  104 112 98 94 97 105  105 113  110 110  107 111  101 102 112  102  139 141 133  -  -  -  104 115 101 100 104 112  -  105 115 102 99 102 109 99  Overall  Secretaries  119 109 101  -  104 100 -  -  97  -  124  107  110  103  -  112  105  103  106  101  Colorado Denver...................................................................  104  100  105  99  104  98  99  106  98  97  99  110  85  Connecticut New Britain ............................................................  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  109  109  116  110  122  District of Columbia Washington ....... ............ .......................................  101  102  100  100  101  99  102  101  108  109  105  110  90  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral.......................................... Miami-Hialeah ......................................................  100  100  99  100  103  101  -  80 113  95  87 95  90  79 -  82 76  Georgia Atlanta ...................................................................  97  97  97  99  96  100  101  78  101  98  96  -  81  Illinois Chicago ................................................................. Livingston County..................................................  102 -  101  101 -  106 -  109 -  107  103 -  118 81  105  107  -  -  -  112 -  116 -  108 80  Indiana Indianapolis ...........................................................  96  97  96  96  94  95  93  -  95  95  101  108  91  Kansas Finney County .......................................................  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  89  -  Louisiana New Orleans..........................................................  106  96  109  96  94  99  104  -  89  91  91  79  68 69  Maryland Baltimore ...............................................................  98  97  99  96  -  95  95  96  96  95  96  102  94  101  99 97  102 98  101 99  100  100 100  103  103  -  -  107 105  106 104  105 103  111 108  114 112  Massachusetts Boston ................................................................... Lawrence-Haverhill................................................  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  87  Table F-1. Pay relatives for occupational groups, all industries, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for all industries in the United States = 100)  Occupational group Clerical  Administrative  Professional  State and area  Maintenance  Material movement  Janitors  110  113  128  125  95 96  95 97  102 100  -  95 86  80  84  84  79  90  77  106 -  146 120  110 112  110 116  110 125  120  136 156  105 94 96 98  94 93 97 94  91 95 94  101 100 98 100  111 109 102 110  ~  -  81  94 99 100 95  -  96 100 99 94 ~  -  -  —  93 98 100 93  93  89  93  -  68  92  91  87  87  77  98  98  -  99  93  122  98  96  98  108  97  98 98  102  102  102  103  103  106  100  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  101 98  101 91  119 100  118 122  -  -  -  -  -  -  63  -  -  ~  -  80  Tennessee Chattanooga.......................................................... Memphis................................................................ Obion County.........................................................  97 -  93 97 -  97 -  97 -  97 -  68 -  88 94 -  90 95  -  -  “  80 95 ”  91 100 —  80 73 108  Texas Dallas..................................................................... Houston ................................................................. San Antonio...........................................................  98 106 100  101 107 96  97 105 101  100 110 93  99 112 93  100 111 93  108 -  87 -  100 105 93  103 108 94  94 99 81  93 90 78  74 70 73  -  -  97  95  98  96  101  97  94  -  90  90  89  —  128 78  -  96  -  -  -  -  -  80  “  86  -  —  101  Technical  Overall  Accountants  Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Systems analysts  Michigan Detroit....................................................................  103  104  103  103  102  101  106  Missouri Kansas City ........................................................... St. Louis.................................................................  96 94  98 98  96 92  99 97  100 96  99 97  New Mexico Albuquerque ...................................... ...................  94  89  96  87  -  New York Nassau-Suffolk ...................................................... New York..............................................................  101 107  106 105  100 107  106 106  Ohio Cincinnati............................................................... Cleveland.............................................................. Columbus ......................................... ................... Dayton-Springfield................................................. Scioto County............. .................. ........................  97 95 101 98 ~  97 96 97 99 -  98 94 102 98  103 95 97 99  -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City.......................................................  99  95  Oregon Portland.................................................................  97  101  Protective service  Overall  Secretaries  107  107  97 97  88 93  85  -  109 106  105 105  -  95 97 103  -  100  99  -  South Carolina Beaufort County.....................................................  Pennsylvania Philadelphia........................................................... Reading .................................................................  Utah Box Elder County................................................... Salt Lake City-Ogden ............................................ Vermont Burlington ..............................................................  98 97  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  88  -  Table F-1. Pay relatives for occupational groups, all industries, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for all industries in the United States = 100)  Occupational group Professional  State and area  Administrative  Clerical Technical  Protective service  Overall  Accountants  Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Systems analysts  96 101  94 100  97 103  92 97  89 92  91 98  96  90  101  100  101  96  -  94  _  _  -  91  101  -  -  -  -  Maintenance  Material movement  Janitors  Overall  Secretaries  91 97  89 96  92 106  100  87 77  103  104  113  115  122  86  89  90  -  83  Virginia  Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News..................................................... Richmond-Petersburg............................................ Washington  Seattle ................................................................... West Virginia  Parkersburg-Marietta.............................................  67  NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or that data did not meet publication criteria. Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupational groups or for this level of industry detail.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  89   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table F-2. Pay relatives for occupational groups, all industries, selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 (For each occupational group, average pay level for all industries in the United States = 100)  Occupational group State and area  Clerical  Administrative Programmers  Systems analysts  Maintenance  Technical Overall  Secretaries  Material movement  Janitors  Arizona Phoenix...................................................................  93  98  97  89  89  95  90  81  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock...................................  88  89  -  91  85  84  91  66  San Jose................................................................. Visalia-Tulare-Porterville ........................................  106 -  107 106 -  107 107 -  111 116 98  112 114 95  108 113 92  108 108 -  94 120 112  Connecticut Danbury..................................................................  107  99  105  105  103  -  -  121  Delaware Wilmington..............................................................  103  105  -  103  104  106  114  Florida Bradenton ...................................... ........................ Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater............................................................  _  _  94  96  _  -  94  98  103  96  89  93  94  86  77  Georgia Augusta ..................................................................  85  -  -  93  99  95  99  76  Indiana Elkhart-Goshen.............. ........................................ South Bend-Mishawaka..........................................  94 96  100 96  _ 93  94 95  _  92 97  86  94  —  114 93  iowa Davenport-Rock IslandMoline...................................................................  _  _  _  103  103  101  111  123  Kentucky Louisville....... .........................................................  92  97  -  94  96  92  98  86  Massachusetts Worcester...............................................................  -  94  -  102  99  95  100  122  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul............................................... St. Cloud........................... .....................................  99 99  98  96 -  103 98  100 95  105 96  116  -  -  102 112  Mississippi Jackson ..................................................................  84  84  -  85  82  88  87  64  Montana Billings....................................................................  -  -  -  86  79  91  -  77  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic ......................................................  104  100  -  111  109  103  122  112  California  See footnotes at end of table.  90  97   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table F-2. Pay relatives for occupational groups, all industries, selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for all industries in the United States = 100)  Occupational group Administrative  State and area  Monmouth-Ocean............................................... Newark ................................................  Clerical Maintenance  Material movement  Janitors  112 115  104 111  103 110  131 118  103 107  107  103  107  122 101  98 -  97 88  96 84  97 87  106 102  100  87  -  91  92  89  94  83  -  -  -  89  82  82  79  80  96 97  96 96  93 98  92 99  92 103  93 103  96 108  88 96  Technical  Programmers  Systems analysts  104 103  104 102  102  _ 95  101  _  _  95 90  Overall  Secretaries  107 113  -  95 -  89  New York  Poughkeepsie....................................... Rochester.............................................................. Pennsylvania  Pittsburgh ...................................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre...................................... Tennessee  Nashville..................................................... Texas  Longview-Marshall.................................................. Wisconsin  Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah ................................... Milwaukee.................................... .................  NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or that data did not meet publication criteria. Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupational croups or for this level of industry detail. *  91  Table F-3. Pay relatives for occupational groups, private industry, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 (For each occupational group, average pay level for private industry in the United States = 100)  Occupational group  Overall  Alabama California  Accountants  Engineers  Overall  Maintenance  Technical Overall  Secretaries  92  94  87  78  104 115  106 107 99  109 113 102 101 101 115  110 106  92 115  109 101  110 101  -  -  -  -  -  100 102 108 “  107 110 102 97 105 — “  104  100 101 110  107 109 101 _  _  _  105  108  102  -  99  100  97  95  99  110  82  _  _  111  102 110 94 97 98 106  103 113 101 98 101 _ _  102 109 93 97 97 106  104 113  -  103  100  103  104  100  105  -  99  104  98 103 114  98  -  Connecticut  100  101  100  99  100  98  102  108  107  109  111  88  _  _  98  101  99  102  99  _ -  _ 95  88 92  89  80  101  85 74  98  97  98  99  97  101  102  104  100  98  _  83  101  100  101 _  105 -  108 -  106  103  104 “  114  -  103 -  108  -  —  “  103 88  98  95  96  98  96  103  109  89  .  _  78  Florida  Georgia Illinois  _ Indiana 98  99  Kansas Louisiana _  108  98  110  97  99  99  99  96  101  98 96  102 97  100 99  Maryland  Massachusetts Lawrence-Haverhill................................. ..............  96  99  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Janitors  91  97  District of Columbia  movement  91  98  Colorado  Programmers  Systems analysts  96  97  Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-  Cler cal  Administrative  Professional  92  _ 100  _ 105  _ 96  96  94  81  64 72  95  96  100  99  98  103  87  100 99  102  107 105  104 102  104 104  111 109  116 107  "  Table F-3. Pay relatives for occupational groups, private industry, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for private industry in the United States = 100) Occupational group Professional  State and area Overall  Accountants  103  105  Administrative Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Clerical Systems analysts  Technical Overall  Secretaries  105  106  Maintenance  Material movement  113  129  —  -  123 138  Janitors  Michigan  Detroit.........................................  107  ~ Missouri  Kansas City ....................................................... St. Louis ......................................  96 93  98 97  96  94  96  107  102 104  107  99  96  95 95  103 101  -  89 84  —  85  85  81  -  75  104  106 114  103 114  118  —  ~  111 116 91  -  113 170 101  94  92 96 98 91  101 100 100 101  111 110 103 111  93 87 96  —  “  —  -  97  98  New Mexico  New York  Nassau-Suffolk...................................................... New York.............................................. Utica-Rome...................... .................................... Ohio  Dayton-Springfield................................  97 94 101 98  96 96 96  94 94  98  94 92 96 94  92  Texas  Dallas............................................................ Oklahoma  Oklahoma City............................................  101  96  97  98  101  97 97  102  95  “  97  99  89  89  77  100  92  97  93  97  108  97  103  100 99  96  101 90  119 100  123 123  ~  “  -  —  82  90 95  94 “  80 94  100  -  —  80 74 124  “ 95 100 79 90  94 90 “ 94  70 75 68 68 79  Oregon  Portland ............................................................ Pennsylvania  Philadelphia........................................  —  South Carolina  Beaufort County..................................................... Tennessee  Chattanooga....................................... Memphis................................................ Obion County.....................................................  97  93 96  97  97  —  Texas  Abilene.......................................................... Dallas.......................................................... Houston ...................................................  97 106 102 98  100 106 96 97  106 103 98  109 94  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  93  102 106 93 92  — 107 91  Table F-3. Pay relatives for occupational groups, private industry, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993  Continued  (For each occupational group, average pay level for private industry in the United States = 100) Occupational group  Overall  Accountants  Clerical  Administrative  Professional  State and aiea  Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Systems analysts  Maintenance  Technical Overall  Vermont  Secretaries  movement  100  91  95  Janitors  Virginia  Norfolk-Virginia Beach97 107  93 103  97 109  92 99  101  99  102  95  -  -  -  -  88 95  91 100  -  Washington  94  West Virginia  Parkersburg-Marietta.............................................  -  -  -  87 98  93 109  101  102  102  112  114  123  87  89  91  -  86  NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or that data did not meet publication criteria. Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupational groups or for this level of industry detail.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  94  91  89 99   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table F-4. Pay relatives for occupational groups, private industry, selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 (For each occupational group, average pay level for private industry in the United States = 100)  Occupational group  Administrative  State and area  Programmers  Systems analysts  Clerical Technical  Maintenance Overall  Secretaries  Material movement  Janitors  -  -  Alabama  Dothan........................... ~  82  Alaska  Statewide Alaska........................  132  ~  —  96  90  109  Arizona  Phoenix.......................................  95  76  Arkansas 90  97  Pine Bluff ........................................  86  91  -  —  107  107  88  107  108  66 83  California  Anaheim-Santa Ana ....................... Bakersfield................................. San Jose.................................. Stockton............. ..................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville .....................  105  107 97  100  111  110  100  98  —  96  117  —  101  Connecticut  CVS  101  ~  —  107  114  — “  ~  102  Delaware  Wilmington...... .  105  96  Florida  Bradenton ............................ Daytona Beach .................... Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach and West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Delray Beach..... Gainesville................................... Melbourne-TitusvillePalm Bay................................... Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater..............................  95 83  -  99  -  96  88  102  103  93  or>  —  101  86  93  78  —  -  91  98  88  93  96  86  73  97  104  77  -  89  ——  84  Georgia  Augusta .............................. — Illinois  Peoria .......................... Decatur..................................... Peoria ............................................. Springfield............................  — 97 91  — — ~  90 80  Indiana  Bloomington-Vincennes............. Elkhart-Goshen..................................  86  See footnotes at end of table.  95  “  —  86  117 113   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table F-4. Pay relatives for occupational groups, private industry, selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for private industry in the United States = 100) Occupational group  Clerical  Administrative  Maintenance  Technical Systems Programmers  Overall  Janitors movement  Secretaries  analysts  Iowa  239  _  _  -  99  100  Iowa  98  100  Davenport-Rock Island-  _ _  93 107  _ -  102 91  _ 89  -  -  _  101  112  97  96  -  ”  98 113 90 144  Kentucky Evansville-Clarksville-Hopkinsville-  _  91  98  _  -  93 -  Michigan 93  97  95  89  95  -  98  99  Louisiana  . Maryland 96  92  98  Massachusetts  90  115 73  85  80  92  119  118  97  94  99  99  97  92  107  96  102  96  95  100  111  -  -  -  —  -  -  -  108  99  97  105  116  91  -  89  90  84  92  _ _  95  94  -  98 -  Michigan Alpena-Standish-  100  _ _ Minnesota 97  97  95  92  _  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.  96  101 99  90  92  88  65  86  86  82  91  87  87  79  95  86  84  98  Montana  -  168  “  Missouri  -  158  94  Mississippi  Statewide Montana........................................................................  -  .  100  74 89   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table F-4. Pay relatives for occupational groups, private industry, selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for private industry in the United States = 100) Occupational group Administrative  State and area  Programmers  Systems  Clerical Technical  Maintenance  Material  Janitors  movement  Overall  Secretaries  -  -  96  91  96  96  _  110  _  109  102  109  111  103  103  114  112  112  110  110  101  -  101  102  95  99  110  103  analysts  Nebraska Grand Island-Hastings..................................................................  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  92  95  75  -  97  104  91  90  103  98  107  101  121  109  106  Nevada Reno...........................................................................................................  -  New Hampshire Statewide New Hampshire....................................................... New Jersey Bergen-Passaic.................................................................................  103  100  96  100  Middlesex-SomersetHunterdon............................................................................................ Monmouth-Ocean............................................................................ Newark .....................................................................................................  102  Trenton .....................................................................................................  103  101 -  -  -  92  _ 97  _  _  _  93  -  _  -  -  94  _ 92  -  -  _ _ _ _  96  102  New York Albany-Schenectady-Troy ......................................................... Buffalo ...................................................................................................... Northern New York......................................................................... Poughkeepsie...................................................................................... Rochester...............................................................................................  -  100 93  _ _  112  _ _  105  105  _ 98  _ 92  _  _  105  101  107  93  86  85  113  85  88  89  92  74  -  78  North Carolina Asheville ................................................................................ Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill................................................... Fayetteville .................................................................................... Jacksonville-New Bern ................................................................. Raleigh-Durham .....................................................................  _ -  _ 99  -  98  _  81  -  98  96  89  -  -  87  89  95  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  95  -  92  93  95  -  -  86  87  87  -  97  North Dakota Statewide North Dakota............................................................... Ohio Lima...................................................................................... Portsmouth-ChillicotheGallipoli's................................................................................  99 96  143 96  142  Oklahoma Tulsa................. ........................................................................................  -  83  Oregon Eugene-Springfield-MedfordRoseburg-Klamath FallsGrants Pass.......................................................................................  -  -  93  Pennsylvania Harrisburg-LebanonCarlisle ..................................................................................................  89  -  See footnotes at end of table.  97  99  107  84   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table F-4. Pay relatives for occupational groups, private industry, selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for private industry in the United States = 100) Occupational group Clerical  Administrative Systems Programmers  Maintenance  Technical Secretaries  Overall  Material  94  95  98  89  _  -  96  93  95  105  85  86  82  86  102  94  66  61  57  64  70  78  South Carolina 78  87  89  South Dakota 86  85  77  89  88  93  80  96  93  90  89  96  83  88  86  76  87  101  95  94  79  70  111  127  Tennessee  _  94  91  92  -  Northeastern Tennessee-  Texas 94  94 Beaumont-Port Arthur and  107  El Paso-Las Cruces-  _ _ _ _  97  -  84  87  89  98  100  83  -  _  -  -  _  _ -  89  -  _  88  85  90  93  _  _  -  80  82  79  74  85  -  94  86  93  89  85  95  103  83  -  95  110  100  -  98  92  130  92  97  85  83  108  -  92  _  Wisconsin  _ 96  74  89  63  Washington  _ 96  66  73  Virginia  Yakima-Richland-Kennewick-Pasco-Walla-Walla-  Janitors  movement  analysts  93  91  89  97  97  100  101  79  93  89 91  I  NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or that data did not meet publication criteria. Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupational groups or for this level of industry detail.  98  Table F-5. Pay relatives for occupational groups, State and local government, selected areas, 1993 (For each occupational group, average pay level for State and local government in United States = 100)  Occupational group  Professional  State and area Overall  Accountants  Administrative Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Clerical Systems analysts  Technical  Protective service  Maintenance  Material movement  Janitors  89  82  -  70  79  81  92  96  97  —  —  73  -  66  118 126 125 107 111 107 131 124 115  121 136 127 113 110 113 141 127 121  122 128 134 112 117 115 141 137 117  109 97  112 102  111 98  “  119 102  106  102  104  100  114  — —  ”  —  133 136  102  94  ~  105  96  110  Overall  Secretaries  Alabama 95 Arizona 93  94  91  92  Arkansas 81 California Anaheim-Santa Ana ..............................................  119 118 129 111 100 107 116 124  125 118 130 109 105 109 130 128  91 116 117 126 110 100 104 107 122  73  115 136 108  108  146 138 141 132 129 125  123 143  Santa Barbara-Santa Maria108 114  123 “ 101 113  ——  127 121 131 116 115 114 145 138 119  Colorado Connecticut 112 Delaware 98 District of Columbia 103  106  103  105  96  96  103  107  109  100  105  116  105  110  80 113  86  107  92 103  81 99  91  81 75 82  96  97  98  89  96  85  90  85  91  93  90  96  92 81  “ “  81 69  106  105  108  114  123  134  Florida  Tampa-St. Petersburg-  ~  Georgia 93  78 59  —  Illinois 106  106  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  99  131  Table F-5. Pay relatives for occupational groups, State and local government, selected areas, 1993 — Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for State and local government in United States = 100) Occupational group  Professional Overall  Accountants  Cler cal  Administrative Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Systems analysts  Technical  Indiana _  81  83  -  86  90  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  Iowa Davenport-Rock Island-  service  79 87 73  Maintenance Overali  83 -  Secretaries  84 86  84 92  Material movement  — ~  110 93 107  119  94  Kansas  86  Kentucky  90  _  73  86  95  89  -  Louisiana _  77  _  97  92  100  Maryland  _  97  _  _  -  65  77  83  73  -  103  95  96  95  93  98  91  94  103  107 109  111 101  -  -  -  126 121 118  103  103  -  -  -  -  -  99  -  107 _  -  _  _  _  _  89  96  83  98  108  99  104  107  115  125  113  110  112  106  108  109  108  115  104  _  -  -  -  109 103  112  _  -  -  113 106  83  71  94 104  88 94  Michigan Minnesota  Mississippi  64  69  Missouri 98 95  96 102  97 93  96 _  98 101  94 93  94 -  Montana  88 93  89 94  133  -  New Jersey 107  108  99 106  89  84  94  _  New Mexico  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  84  88  79  See footnotes at end of table.  100  147 128 130 80  122 110  65  81 -  99 96  85  80  _  65 67  86  99  101  88  87  Massachusetts   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Janitors  _  104 112  115 114 113  117 112 117  79  _  83  143 125 147  79  Table F-5. Pay relatives for occupational groups, State and local government, selected areas, 1993 — Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for State and local government in United States = 100)  Occupational group Professional  State and area  Administrative  Overall  Accountants  Engineers  Overall  Programmers  New York Nassau-Suffolk...................................................... New York ........ ....................................................... Poughkeepsie........................................................ Rochester..............................................................  107  137 108  109  -  -  -  -  111  Ohio Cincinnati............................................................... Cleveland ............................................................... Columbus .............................................................. Dayton-Springfield........ ........ ................................ Scioto County .........................................................  91 105 104  91  97 90 107 105  107 104 108  -  101 107 99 -  Clerical Systems analysts  Technical  Protective service  Maintenance  Material movement  Overall  Secretaries  125 107 _ 111  133 111 102 113  120 149 95 103  101 104 107 99  101 111 109 107  97 104 89 97  _ 104  -  _ -  93 95 96 94 81  -  -  132 105 100 104 95  _ -  _ 101 106  137 120 106 112  _ _ -  Janitors  151 117 108 102  104 110 110 108  -  -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City ................... ....................................  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  68  -  -  77  77  75  Oregon Portland ......... ........................................................  101  104  99  -  -  92  -  122  102  104  107  -  104  97 -  100  103  100 -  104 -  104 -  105  -  104 97 -  103 98 _ 92  103 106 94 89  98 103 _ -  114 119 114 100  Pennsylvania Philadelphia ............................................................ Pittsburgh .... .......................................................... Reading ................................................................. Scranton-Wilkes Barre ............................................  -  _ _ -  -  -  97 91 -  South Carolina Beaufort County ..... ................................................  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  63  -  -  -  -  69  Tennessee Chattanooga.......................................................... Memphis................................................................ Nashville................................................................  97 82  96 81  101 83  -  102 -  110  _ 99  -  102 70  68 82 69  86 91 90  94 95 98  81 100 81  68 _ -  79 80 78  92 91  96 99  89 88  96 106  96 102  97  90  99  _ 96  _ -  87 89 74 83  90 92 _ 88  96 99 _ 101  78 82  -  _ 96  83 92  -  96 101 -  _ 85  _ -  77 81 76 75  Utah Box Elder County................................................... Salt Lake City-Ogden ............................................  94  92  _ 96  _ 97  _ 104  _ 99  _ -  _ 83  _ 86  _ 95  _ -  _ 67  109 80  Vermont Burlington .  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  79  -  87  91  -  92  95 91  101 98  93 87  96 93  97 93  92 92  94 90  79 90  93 95  97 98  88 86  Texas Dallas......... ............................................................ Houston .................................................................. Longview-Marshall................................................. San Antonio .............................. .............................  .....................................................  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News..................................................... Richmond-Petersburg............................. ...............  -  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  101  98  _ 96 96  _  _  75  78 75  Table F-5. Pay relatives for occupational groups, State and local government, selected areas, 1993 — Continued (For each occupational group, average pay level for State and local government in United States = 100) Occupational group  State and area  Clerical  Administrative  Professional  Technical  Overall  Accountants  Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Systems analysts  103  108  101  104  116  96  118  -  -  -  -  -  -  102  105  97  107  105  104  Protective service  Maintenance  Material movement  Janitors  108  124  123  120  -  -  75  -  80  113  99 117  _  111  Overall  Secretaries  122  110  -  67  110  94 99  Washington  Seattle ............................... West Virginia  Parkersburg-Marietta........ Wisconsin  Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah Milwaukee.........................  NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or that data did not meet publication criteria. Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupational groups or for this level of industry detail,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  102  —  103 125  Table G-1. Pay relatives for occupational groups, all industries, establishment characteristics, 1993 (For each occupational group, average pay level for all industries in the United States = 100)  Occupational group Professional  Establishment characteristic  Industry All industries.......................................................... Private industry.................................................... Goods producing............................................... Construction.................................................... Manufacturing ................................................. Durable goods............................................... Nondurable goods......................................... Sen/ice producing ............................................. Transportation and utilities.............................. Wholesale trade.............................................. Retail trade...................................................... Finance, insurance, and real estate................ Services .......................................................... State and local government.................................  Administrative  Clerical Technical  Overall  Accountants  Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Systems analysts  100 101 102 99 101 100 105 101 104 97  100 101 101 99 100 99 105 101 103 96 100 93  100 101 103  100 101 104  100 100 102  —  —  103 101 105 100 106 100 96 98 99 94  103 103 105 100 107 99  100 93  100 101 104 99 103 102 105 99 105 99 97 98 97 94  98 98  100 99 99 102  101 98 100 102  99 99 99 102  100 95  101 94  99 102 102 99  98 103 101 101  Protective service  Maintenance  Material movement  Janitors  Overall  Secretaries  100 102 105 98 105 106 104 100 107 103 95 100 99 95  100 100 98 99 99 98 106 115 95 91 97  100 100 96  _ 100  100 100 103 98 103 104 102 99 111 101 93 97 98 99  97 96 97 102 123 94 93 78 102  100 93 131 88 131 144 115 88 136 117 92 120 85 118  100 100 100  100  -  -  -  100 100 103 101 114  98 100 94  102 99 106 100 105 101 94 98 99 95  101 98 100 103  100 98 99 104  100 98 99 103  101 96 101 103  114 80 97 122  104 94 99 104  105 95 99 104  102 91 105 104  112 88 106 104  122 80 103 102  100 95  100 96  100 93  100 96  101 89  104 82  101 90  101 92  102 91  104 85  101 94  99 102 102 99  99 100 101 101  98 99 102 101  100 99 101 100  96 102 101 104  84 93 96 110  97 101 102 103  98 101 101 101  91 100 102 113  93 106 111 127  87 100 113 123  -  -  -  -  Region  Northeast............................................................... South ..................................................................... Midwest ................................................. ............... West ...................................................................... Area classification  Metropolitan ............................................................ Nonmetropolitan .................................................... Establishments employing  50-499 workers...................................................... 500-999 workers.................................................... 1,000-2,499 workers.............................................. 2,500 workers or more...........................................  NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  103  Table G-2. Pay relatives for occupational groups, private industry, establishment characteristics, 1993 (For each occupational group, average pay level for private industry in the United States = 100) Occupational group  Overall  Accountants  Engineers  Overall  Programmers  100 101 98 100 99 104 100 103 96  100 100 98 100 99 104 100 103 96  100 102  100 103  99  100 103 98 102 101 104 98 104 98 96 97 96  — 99  — 102 100 104 99 105 100 98 98  West ......................................................................  99 99 99 102  100 100 99 101  99 99 99 102  Area classification Metropolitan........................................................... Nonmetropolitan ....................................................  100 95  100 95  99 101 102 100  98 102 100 105  Industry Goods producing................................................. Manufacturing ................................................... Nondurable goods...... .................................... Transportation and utilities................................ Retail trade........................................................ Finance, insurance, and real estate.................. Services ............................................................  _ -  Clerical  Administrative  Professional  Establishment characteristic  Systems analysts  1,000-2,499 workers.............................................. 2,500 workers or more...........................................  Material movement  Janitors  100 98 99 99 98 107 116 95 -  100 96  100 140  —91  —78  Maintenance Overall  Secretaries  100 103 98 102 103 101 99 109 101 93 97 98  100 103 97 103 103 102 99 105 101 93 98 97  100 100  102 102 104 99 106 98 97 99  98  100 — — — 100 — 99  100 99 99 103  99 99 99 103  100 99 99 103  101 97 101 102  _ “  104 97 98 102  104 98 97 102  100 92 105 103  111 89 106 104  124 81 102 96  100 95  100  100  100  101  102  -  “  —  —  101 92  100 95  102 92  103 84  100 96  99 101 102 99  98 99 101 102  97 99 102 103  96 103 100 106  — -  97 101 102 107  97 99 101 103  91 101 102 114  93 107 112 131  88 94 117 145  -  NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Protective service  100 102 — 101 98 105 99 104 100 94 98 99  Region  Establishments employing 50-499 workers......................................................  Technical  104  99 98 101 100  100 100 103 101 114 -  —  —97 96 96 102 123 95 93  141 155 124 94 147 99  Table G-3. Pay relatives for occupational groups, state and local government, establishment characteristics, 1993 (For each occupational group, average pay level for State and local government in United States = 100)  Occupational group  State and local government.......................................  Clerical  Administrative  Professional  Establishment characteristic  Technical  Overall  Accountants  Engineers  Overall  Programmers  Systems analysts  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  103 90 100 107  105 91 101 108  104 90 98 106  108 90 102 -  106 92 105 110  109 88 101 -  101 91  101 -  101 90  100 93  100 98  98 105 106 99  96 103 103 100  99 105 107 99  -  97 96 103 100  Maintenance  Material movement  Janitors  100  100  100  100  105 86 101 109  108 91 103 110  113 83 100 112  — 75 103 107  121 77 106 110  104 82  101 89  101 93  105 83  104 80  104 84  84 93 96 110  92 101 101 101  100 106 102 99  91 97 100 107  87 90 98  96 107 103 98  Protective service  Overall  Secretaries  100  100  109 88 103 113  113 80 97 123  100 93  101 -  99 101  97 96 104 100  Region  Northeast............................................................... South ..................................................................... Midwest ................................................................. West...................................................................... Area classification  Metropolitan........................................................... Nonmetropolitan .................................................... Establishments employing  50-499 workers...................................................... 500-999 workers.................................................... 1,000-2,499 workers.............................................. 2,500 workers or more...........................................  98 102 100  NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or that data did not meet publication criteria.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  105  —  '   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Sin  ■ggani  HH   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Part III: Locality Pay, 1993   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Ml  Table H-1. Average weekly pay' in all industries, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 Professional  I  Alabama Huntsville (February)............................  II  III  IV  V  VI  I  II  III  IV  I  II  III  IV  V  VI  $963  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $453  $564  $711  570 566  642 -  628 688 626 628 624 639 583  785 880 741 740 755 789 755  -  608  772  933  1,235  Colorado Denver (December)..............................  481  584  763  980  Connecticut New Britain (November).......................  -  607  777  -  District of Columbia Washington (February)......... ...............  481  603  746  962  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December)..... Miami-Hialeah (September) .................  454  533 593  703 736  993  Georgia Atlanta (April)........................................  487  561  715  940  Illinois Chicago (May)..................................... Livingston County (August)..................  513  610  739  Indiana Indianapolis (June)...............................  428  572  Kansas Finney County (October)......................  -  Louisiana New Orleans (May) ..............................  California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October)..... Oakland (December)............................ Riverside-San Bernardino (April).......... Sacramento (December)...................... San Diego (August).............................. San Francisco (March)......................... San Luis Obispo County (July)............. Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April)....................................  536  996 $1,247 $1,550 1,311 1,114 944 1,111 891 1,215 971 1,247 1,010 889 ~  $557  592 566  $597  616  $1,124 $1,388 $1,699 $1,843 1,487 1,792 1,599 1,468 $1,657 1,153 1,300 848 1,604 1,373 999 1,954 1,893 1,371 1,631 1,196  $726 $1,077  749 722  959 948  “  —  ~  —  “  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1,217  -  -  -  -  -  -  941  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  545  599  686  917  -  616  654  784  1,050  -  1,148  -  -  569  -  -  -  957  1,206  1,545  562  610  714  -  -  722  932  1,161  -  554  -  647  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  422  522  716  976  -  -  488  524  Maryland Baltimore (May).....................................  510  582  702  884  1,229  -  563  Massachusetts Boston (May)........................................ Lawrence-Haverhill (September)..........  505  583 594  733 723  920 898  1,265  539  1,244  -  -  $716  I  IV  III  II  V  VI  VII  $830 $1,053 $1,238 $1,445 $1,608  $623  $692  658 744 669 696 697  795 849 799 782 768 802  928 1,016 889 850 875 885  1,121 1,214 1,028 1,003 1,032 1,112  1,322 1,407 1,200 1.191 1.192 1,338  1,544 1,643 1,396 1,343 1,426 1,506  VIII  -  1,743 $2,081  1,520 1,661 1,764  -  -  -  678  743  857  1,103  1,379  1,782  1,257  1,666  -  -  649  767  950  1,136  1,362  1,607  1,784  -  -  -  -  -  -  717  845  -  -  -  -  -  -  589  719  869  1,062  1,278  1,493  1,730  -  595  730  817 904  993 1,060  1,243  -  -  -  895  1,209  1,589  850  -  1,545 1,863  1,942  -  -  -  878  1,194  1,590  1,962  -  596  702  868  1,015  1,240  1,460  1,651  -  1,043  1,340  1,657  2,148  -  683  737  878  1,067  1,292  1,525  1,745  -  -  950  1,188  -  -  -  619  778  827  1,005  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  821  -  -  -  -  -  623  -  -  801  1,024  -  -  -  749  808  920  1,155  1,407  1,650  -  -  599  661  849  -  971  1,137  1,383  -  -  637  711  847  1,066  1,279  1,430  -  -  593  648  709  899  1,251  1,681  -  644 615  748 736  854 865  1,046 1,031  1,317  1,640  1,905 1,905  2,277  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Engin eers  Attorneys  Accountants, Public  Accountants  State, area,3 and reference month  109  2,156  Table H-1. Average weekly pay' in all industries, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative  State, area,3 and reference month  Alabama Huntsville (February)............................ California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October)..... Oakland (December)............................ Rrverside-San Bernardino (April).......... Sacramento (December)...................... San Diego (August).............................. San Francisco (March)......................... San Luis Obispo County (July)............. Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April)....................................  Budget Analyst Supervi­ sors  Budget Analysts  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  I  II  Ill  IV  II  -  “  -  -  -  $461  III  IV  $562  $748  $973  $532  $607  957  II  I  II  Ill  Computer Systems Analysts  IV  V  I  $748  -  -  $688  625 656 610 609 621 684 624  796 806 735 719 707 819 782  $1,009 941 927 -  -  753 830 787 742  II  III  IV  V  $824  $968  -  -  -  917 998 885 886 902 960 884  1,065 1,214 998 1,000 1,066 1,113 -  $1,243 1,377 1,141 1,386 -  -  -  704  828  979  -  -  $1,028  726  850  999  “  891  -  687  858  993  $789  $937  -  841  -  558 592 520 509 -  676 720 609 659 657 676 601  812 888 809 852 781 851 -  941 1,094  -  946 -  -  532 -  -  -  -  -  -  571  663  862  “  -  “  755  -  Colorado Denver (December)..............................  -  638  770  -  -  477  611  831  983  567  641  765  851  Connecticut New Britain (November).......................  -  -  -  “  -  -  701  “  -  571  776  -  618  740  888  -  528  625  793  940  527  613  710  831  -  428 481  565 615  756  “  -  561 591  712 743  944  “  696  847 869  1,067  498  611  776  925  -  581  690  803  945  727  884  997  1,132  531 -  638 “  834  1,013 -  573 “  666 “  785 ~  866 “  “  795 -  928 “  1,063 “  1,237  ~  467  612  802  -  482  573  667  -  -  681  805  995  -  -  “  ~  -  -  -  “  -  “  “  “  -  460  554  769  -  -  -  498  603  771  952  -  -  517  628 623  816 776  1,012 975  District of Columbia Washington (February).........................  -  $529  $647  I  Computer Programmers  -  798  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December)..... Miami-Hialeah (September) .................  -  -  -  -  Georgia Atlanta (April)........................................  498  598  721  889  Illinois Chicago (May)...................................... Livingston County (August) ..................  786  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Indiana Indianapolis (June)...............................  -  -  -  -  Kansas Finney County (October)......................  -  ~  -  -  “  Louisiana New Orleans (May) ..............................  -  -  -  -  -  Maryland Baltimore (May)....................................  “  560  733  -  Massachusetts Boston (May)........................................ Lawrence-Haverhill (September)..........  -  -  588  725  913  -  -  -  $887  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  110  -  1,219  -  1,169  -  -  ~  -  “  575  648  834  “  648  863  1,029  583  695  “  “  677  804  995  1,091  516  608 -  702 688  851  -  -  -  705 689  855 885  1,025 1,039  1,228 1,154  -  -  Table H-1. Average weekly pay’ in all industries, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative  State, area,3 and reference month  Computer Systems Analyst  Personnel Specialists  Supervisors/Managers  1  II  Ill  I  -  -  -  -  $1,214  $1,360  $1,637  II  III  IV  Personnel Supervisors/Managers  Tax Collectors  V  VI  1  II  Ill  I  II  Ill  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  -  Alabama Huntsville (February)..........................................  $573  $687  $939  California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October)........ Oakland (December).......................................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April)............... Sacramento (December)................................. San Diego (August)............................................. San Francisco (March)...................................... San Luis Obispo County (July)....................  -  1,425  -  -  1,053  1,185  -  -  1,296  1,339  -  -  -  -  -  1,353 -  -  -  -  778  1,008  $1,233  647  855  1,101  1,377  620  736  963  618  829  988  592  753  686  813  482  749  626  760  994  583  726  943  -  806  -  577  750  941  610  $1,114  $1,323  $1,658  -  -  -  -  1,235  -  -  -  -  957  1,140  -  -  1,050  1,271  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  -  -  $540  $709  $745  613  733  525  562  717  -  501  671  754  -  -  -  786  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1,239 1,335  -  713  Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April)......................................................  -  ~  -  Colorado Denver (December).............................................  1,096  1,219  1,547  -  1,057  1,362  -  Connecticut New Britain (November)...................................  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  District of Columbia Washington (February)......................................  1,090  1,259  1,513  $497  1,108  974  1,240  -  439  526  701  -  -  470  463  -  -  -  -  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December)........ Miami-Hialeah (September) ..........................  -  -  -  - -  -  “  -  473  649  569  730  962  573  729  966  1,116  1,234  -  -  -  -  -  -  Georgia Atlanta (April)............................................................  1,002  1,232  1,171  1,359  “  “  -  -  1,222  542  -  Illinois Chicago (May)......................................................... Livingston County (August) ...........................  -  -  1,653  -  -  625  769  943  -  -  -  622  748  -  -  1,109  1,339  -  1,710  -  -  758  -  -  -  -  -  -  Indiana Indianapolis (June)...............................................  991  1,113  -  461  936  1,170  “  “  -  -  -  Kansas Finney County (October).................................  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ' “  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Louisiana New Orleans (May) .............................................  510  706  879  561  722  910  256  337  423  510  447  Maryland Baltimore (May)......................................................  1,128  1,276  1,508  1,157  1,372  1,590  -  -  -  Massachusetts Boston (May)............................................................ Lawrence-Haverhill (September)...............  -  “  607  765  974  582  718  985  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  111  1,189  -  -  1,268  -  1,557  -  -  582  _  -  -  -  Table H-1. Average weekly pay1 in all industries, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Professional  I  II  III  IV  V  VI  1  II  Engineers  Attorneys  Accountants, Public  Accountants  State, area,3 and reference month  Ill  IV  -  -  II  Ill  IV  $784  $1,007  $1,247  $1,474  735  931  1,207  1,599  886  1,174  1,550  I  V  VI  -  -  _ $1,914  _  -  -  I  II  III  IV  V  VI  VII  $1,898  VIII  Michigan $494  $652  $779  $987  $1,217  Kansas City (July)........................  489  578  737  916  1,145  St. Louis (February)..................... .  526  565  717  927  1,156  474  537  666  824  Nassau-Suffolk (November)  488  617  803  1,028  New York (May).............................. .  515  612  770  1,013  Cincinnati (April)............................. .  474  580  713  Cleveland (June)........................... .  485  567  709  929  Detroit (November)........................  -  $605  $658  $681  $766  $889  $1,089  $1,336  $1,602  655  737  847  1,000  1,213  1,417  626  713  793  1,159  1,347  623  720  849  1,023  1,227  1,449  651  757  902  1,082  1,268  1,494  690  814  957  1,125  1,320  1,564  -  Missouri .  $1,479  $633  $779  540  566  “  -  -  514  627  646  776  1,093  551  579  648  773  549  578  671  922  ~  “  _  1,536  _ “  New Mexico Albuquerque (September).......  -  -  -  -  -  -  813  -  -  -  New York 1,292  ~  599  937  1,158  1,467  791  913  1,228  1,753  _  _  -  857  1,214  m  1,201  2,252  $2,806  .  .  “  -  .  .  Ohio 911  Columbus (November).............. .  472  558  732  959  Dayton-Springfield (February)  520  602  707  946  1,139 1,083  Scioto County (August) ..............  _ -  -  -  -  -  ~  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  468  499  586  727  1,176 1,184  _  1,531 ~  _  _  -  -  —  -  658  772  869  635  722  833  995  _ 1,179  _ 1,416  650  791  905  1,110  990  1,285  1,523  619  706  825  1,066  1,227  1,475  :  1,526  -  -  -  :  -  -  -  -  -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February)........  468  548  675  929  471  564  731  965  494  576  741  929  567  768  920  488  655  1,176  -  -  -  -  911  1,076  886  1,161  1,438  872  1,161  1,516  -  -  -  -  -  621  719  866  1,053  1,287  1,490  651  710  858  1,036  1,234  1,469  927  1,080  1,304  1,519  Oregon Portland (June).................................  -  -  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October)................. Reading (December).................. .  550  637  ~  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  “  “  1,195  939  606 ~  —  -  -  -  _  _  _  664  743  “  "  “  754  “  1.857  _  ~  ~  -  ~  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  ”  “  “  South Carolina Beaufort County (November)  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _ -  _  .  “  -  840  Tennessee 547  687  902  475  569  711  966  Dallas (December) ........................  499  586  758  991  1,288  1,595  571  Houston (March)..............................  522  617  756  1,043  1,372  1,871  566  Chattanooga (August)................. Memphis (October)....................... .  .  .  -  “  “  630  692  883  616  684  890  916  1,198  -  604  756  941  570  703  838  1,044  _ 1,296  641  724  848  1,031  1,263  1,531  1,752  715  785  914  1,111  1,337  1,541  1,783  614  725  862  1,075  1,342  Texas  San Antonio (July)........................ .  428  542  717  950  -  “  -  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _  1,004  112  1,044  1,279  1,666  2,029  1,171  1,431  1,832  2,104  -  ~  . ~  “  _ “  Table H-1. Average weekly pay' in all industries, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative  State, area,3 and reference month  Budget Analyst Supervi­ sors  Budget Analysts  1  II  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  1  II  III  Computer Programmers  IV  1  III  IV  II  $813  -  -  $51 a  $692  $913  $1,125  $528  -  -  463 461  614 591  804 816  963 996  -  II  Computer Systems Analysts  III  IV  V  I  $611  $721  $926  -  $759  499 467  611 555  711 672  840 863  -  -  530  646  -  II  III  IV  V  $859  $1,062  $1,241  -  738 710  859 819  987 973  1,229 1,128  -  -  617  741  868  “  -  Michigan Detroit (November)...............................  -  Missouri Kansas City (July) ................................ St. Louis (February)..............................  -  -  714 “  New Mexico Albuquerque (September)....................  -  -  -  -  -  471  576  774  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November)................. New York (May)....................................  -  646  871 809  ~  -  528 553  687 673  867 899  944 1,117  520 544  662 642  795 753  935 903  ~  817 776  931 888  1,039 1,072  1,192 1,258  -  Ohio Cincinnati (April)................................... Cleveland (June).................................. Columbus (November)......................... Dayton-Springfield (February).............. Scioto County (August) ........................  -  -  893  $1,220  487 487 500 539 “  611 595 623 643 -  814 759 771 -  1,065 963  -  “  -  501 523 581 -  595 570 606 611 -  693 686 708 720 -  800 800 886 “  -  732 735 719 720 -  866 789 830 850 -  1,059 953 979 991 -  1,553 1,105 1,195 1,078 -  -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February)....................  -  -  -  -  -  531  587  820  -  431  532  631  -  -  685  787  941  Oregon Portland (June).....................................  -  -  -  -  “  514  641  810  559  680  -  681  842  1,043  -  -  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October).......................... Reading (December)............................  -  659  772  507 -  645 725  837 829  -  820 748  894 881  1,020  -  “  -  -  -  -  -  South Carolina Beaufort County (November) ...............  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  449  -  699  862 844  968 999  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  507 522 434  -  767 792 637  852 946 762  1,048 1,118 1,014  Tennessee Chattanooga (August).......................... Memphis (October)............................... Texas Dallas (December) ............................... Houston (March)................................... San Antonio (July)................................  $669  -  573  -  -  “  “  696 843  $902  927 1,090  -  -  -  -  638 653  715 744  -  -  -  490  -  535 582  729 845  -  513  -  586  659 705  -  642 655 579  824 884 778  -  611 693 565  715 789 670  846 882 796  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  113  1,131  969 1,158  561  629 464  879 -  -  “  -  1,237 1,334 1,210  $1,442 1,524 ~  Table H-1. Average weekly pay* in all industries, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative  State, area,3 and reference month  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers  V  VI  I  II  Ill  1  $774  $1,028  $1,288  $1,583  $1,003  $1,284  $1,699  -  557 571  733 718  931 953  1,154 1,198  _  _ —  _  1,289  _  —  -  507  657  882  -  -  -  -  _  617 628  821 774  1,010 973  _ 1,263  _  626 571 611 572 “  733 737 730 691 834  981 936 885 —  1,343 1,199 1,139 —  _  508  —  -  -  514  641  898  -  -  -  572  726  924  478  583 625  721 776  954 1,051  498 549  676 706  870 956  581 623 508  737 783 693  937 1,041 940  II  Ill  Michigan Detroit (November)................  $1,100  $1,335  _  $537  $669  Missouri Kansas City (July)................ . St. Louis (February)...............  1,094 1,059  1,256 1,257  -  492  New Mexico Albuquerque (September)....  -  -  -  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ... New York (May)....................  1,286 -  1,422 1,415  $1,618  533  Ohio Cincinnati (April)................... Cleveland (June).................. Columbus (November)......... Dayton-Springfield (February) Scioto County (August) ........  1,011 1,071 1,130 1,098 “  1,180 1,294  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February).... .  1,039  -  Oregon Portland (June)..................... .  1,100  -  1,099  1,291  “  -  “  1,093 1,149  1,289 1,360  1,719 1,681  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October)........... Reading (December).............  •  Tax Collectors  IV  I  1,136 1,203 “  Personnel Supervisors/Managers  Personnel Specialists  I  ~  II  III  _  1,059  _  1,421  -  $318 310  II  $537  -  453  _  —  -  -  -  -  _  _  572 558  1,656  ~  III  $471  _  697  _ -  _  _  _  '  “  335  656 539  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1,139  -  -  -  -  -  599  -  1,201  _  _  1,264  _  _  525  _  ~  1,383  -  451  —  .  1,308 1,304 -  _  South Carolina Beaufort County (November) . Tennessee Chattanooga (August)........... Memphis (October)................ Texas Dallas (December)................ Houston (March).................... San Antqnio (July).................  -  -  -  528 534 -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  114  “ 1,253 1,372 -  1,600 -  “  1,054 -  1,732 1,733  _  408 365  552  573  -  -  ~  _  Table H-1. Average weekly pay1 in all industries, professional and administrative occupations,: selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Professional  State, area,3 and reference month  Accountants  I  Utah Box Elder County (September) ............ Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).................  $490  II  Accountants, Public  III  IV  V  $562  $700  $900 $1,110  Attorneys  VI  I  II  Ill  IV  I  II  III  IV  V  VI  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $1,058  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $1,573 1,535  -  655 683  711 713  851 930  1,015 1,092  -  -  676  761  892  1,074  -  -  717  752  901  1,036  Vermont Burlington (December) .........................  -  574  715  944  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August)..................... Richmond-Petersburg (July).................  479 502  564 596  699 745  893 916  1,348  -  $512  $549 543  $643 618  $925  Washington Seattle (October)..................................  494  592  749  966  1,296  -  495  554  625  868  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July)..................  -  514  685  896  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $666  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Engineers  115  $873 -  1,006 $1,407  -  -  1,174  -  -  -  1,622  -  1  $624  II  $711  III  IV  V  VI  VII  VIII  -  -  -  -  _  1,243 1,299  1,531 -  -  -  1,298  _  _  _  -  -  -  $848 $1,040 $1,232 $1,458  -  -  -  Table H-1. Average weekly pay' in all industries, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative Budget Analyst Supervi­ sors  Budget Analysts  State, area,3 and reference month  I  II  III  IV  II  $863  _  I  II  Utah $748  $468  $584  III  $727 765  Computer Systems Analysts  Computer Programmers  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  IV  _  I  $483  III  IV  $597  $718  $873  595  609  525 557  649 651  577  681  II  V  _  I  II  III  $706  $817  $999  610  771  636 734  790 835  939 958  704  809  960  IV  V  _  _  $1,299  -  Vermont 616 Virginia Norfolk-Virginia Beach$547  739 719  _  _  469 501  596 619  $1,061  536  622  777 855  _  482 479  _  _  Washlngton 624 West Virginia 566  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  868  605  838  Table H-1. Average weekly pay' in all industries, professional and administrative occupations," selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative  State, area,3 and reference month  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers  I  Utah Box Elder County (September) ............ Salt Lake City-Ogden (April)................. Vermont Burlington (December).........................  $990  -  II  Ill  -  -  -  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ..................... Richmond-Petersburg (July).................  1,013 1,140  $1,254  Washington Seattle (October)..................................  1,064  1,199  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July)..................  -  -  Personnel Specialists  I  $427  -  “ -  -  -  -  II  III  IV  V  VI  $1,042 901  -  -  -  _  -  $522  $681  515  667  -  557 573  708 697  958 935  $1,170  589  746  938  -  _  601  659  1,032  -  -  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Pay data for the following occupational levels did not meet publication criteria in any area: Buyers/Contracting Specialists V, Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers IV, and Personnel Supervisors/Managers V. For two   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Personnel Supervisors/Managers  I  Tax Collectors  II  Ill  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  "  -  -  -  541  -  1,042  $1,365  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  $901  1  $391  II  $474  Ill  -  occupations, only a single area published average pay data: Budget Analyst Supervisors I averaged $1,082 in Columbus, OH; and Personnel Supervisors/Managers IV averaged $2,404 in New York, NY. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  117  Table H-2. Average weekly pay' in all industries, technical and protective service occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 Protective service  Technical  I  Alabama Huntsville (February)........................  II  Ill  $383  $514  _ -  455 507 443 472 441 480 467  564 604 550 569 534 576 -  -  456  Colorado Denver (December).........................  370  Connecticut New Britain (November)..................  California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) . Oakland (December)....................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April)..... . Sacramento (December)................. . San Diego (August)......................... San Francisco (March).................... . San Luis Obispo County (July)........ Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April)...............................  _  Engineering Technicians  Drafters  Computer Operators  State, area,3 and reference month  IV  _  $661 632  I  $353  II  Engineering Technicians, Civil  III  IV  I  $333  Ill  IV  $416  $504  $608  n  VI  I  II  III  IV  V  VI  $770  -  -  -  $455  -  -  -  V  $457  $534  $708  665 710 603 679 619 665 651  833 811 719 746 -  -  514 522 487 -  651 618 595 557 “  765 772 684 701 712 742 “  884 907 877 -  _ -  $586 684 460 503 591 -  $673 645 538 535 566 719 544  784 799 668 668 685 837 -  $1,077 $892 _ 926 $1,011 836 778 792 914 773 904 1,002 905 -  Correc­ Fire­ tions fighters Of­ ficers  Police Officers I  II  $386  $491  $488  $585  720 745 777 681 818  894 880 819 696 738 835 671  886 915 780 786 789 842 723  1,035 1,001 853 858 886 858  657 -  _  -  561 623 443 542 494 578 -  566  -  -  -  608  774  -  -  624  820  -  -  -  -  712  837  -  -  658  -  774  -  442  -  589  393  474  572  -  -  506  623  696  854  -  -  503  534  691  872  -  534  655  696  -  -  452  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  786  -  -  -  738  738  -  District of Columbia Washington (February)....................  344  443  528  579  387  483  588  763  460  515  597  706  858  -  348  429  534  641  -  -  541  623  614  798  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December). Miami-Hialeah (September) ............  365 433  603  440  553  -  -  -  -  . “  _ 517  . 497  _  534  430 511  _  -  “  411 554  495 795  530 724  614 789  Georgia Atlanta (April)...................................  348  445  527  641  384  502  575  698  399  492  592  707  873  -  329  418  522  599  -  -  398  477  496  -  375  447  523 “  611 “  477 -  591 -  727 -  484  762 “  _  377  _  _  -  597 -  921  -  _ “  871 —  _ “  556 529  734 ~  777 444  900 —  Illinois Chicago (May)................................. Livingston County (August).............  _ _ $408  _  605  _  _ _ _  _  “  Indiana Indianapolis (June)..........................  338  394  467  -  -  432  568  720  -  -  561  662  -  -  -  370  451  631  -  -  -  599  583  499  Kansas Finney County (October).................  -  -  -  -  -  441  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  459  588  -  -  -  443  456  -  Louisiana New Orleans (May) .........................  -  379  477  -  399  477  575  670  -  -  663  782  1,006  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  402  -  Maryland Baltimore (May)...............................  354  412  514  557  375  443  559  734  -  -  597  676  730  -  334  410  523  612  679  -  500  603  607  456  Massachusetts Boston (May).............. .................... Lawrence-Haverhill (September).....  367  439  _ -  . “  835 $1,035  559  —  “  635 587  639 612  _  —  811 ~  _  ~  _ -  _  -  _ ~  601  -  642 575  716  -  486 450  600  -  539 542  494  -  684  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  118  —  “  Table H-2. Average weekly pay in all industries, technical and protective service occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Technical Computer Operators  State, area,3 and reference month I  II  Drafters  III  IV  $703  $346  633  I  II  Protective service  Engineering Technicians  III  IV  I  $491  $602  $787  -  $536  $670  $816  II  Ill  IV  Engineering Technicians, Civil V  VI  1  $898  -  -  Correc­ tions Fire­ Of­ fighters ficers  Police Officers  III  IV  V  VI  $484  $588  $691  -  -  $580  $656  $677  -  409 420  515 522  661 641  _ -  _ -  409 441  572 603  590 601  II  I  II  Michigan Detroit (November)...............................  $305  $439  $574  Missouri Kansas City (July) ................................ St. Louis (February)..............................  305  406 386  507 495  -  449 427  453 491  576 563  724 699  -  491 443  564 523  709 678  926  -  New Mexico Albuquerque (September)....................  -  371  510  -  -  469  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  537  -  -  386  471  546  -  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November)................. New York (May)....................................  -  458 488  582 593  685 687  -  527 603  676 651  782 -  -  503  649 -  740 -  846  -  -  -  472 -  581 610  560 625  714 696  _ -  _ $1,158  781 669  _ 751  932 733  _ 594  306 344 -  426 411 429 404 -  511 504 512  353  551 583 551  747 751 792 720  _  _  -  481 _ 481 _ -  -  -  _ _ -  409 413 475  -  _ _ 362 _ -  674 593 662 647  -  _ _ _ -  587 552 563 561  -  442 475 443 _ ■-  686 648 695 668  -  -  536 548 590 563  -  686 759 -  _  -  428 430 494 474  _  -  617 598 600  Ohio Cincinnati (April)................................... Cleveland (June) .................................. Columbus (November) ......................... Dayton-Springfield (February).............. Scioto County (August) ........................  $320  $637  -  478  _ 439  622 641 621 610 498  _ _ _  655  $586 766  674 618 787  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February)....................  294  353  464  -  -  424  509  -  -  456  555  -  -  -  -  388  485  -  -  -  322  472  434  403  Oregon Portland (June).....................................  -  425  511  -  -  456  546  -  -  451  530  643  765  -  -  448  551  692  806  -  676  784  742  773  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October).......................... Reading (December)............................  350 -  442 442  540 583  631 -  -  516 432  601 “  764 -  -  554 -  620 -  740 -  878  $1,098  490 -  521 -  _ -  _ -  _ "  564 516  642 562  818  -  _ -  676  -  South Carolina Beaufort County (November) ...............  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  337  429  386  -  Tennessee Chattanooga (August).......................... Memphis (October)............................... Obion County (October) .......................  312 -  365 401  446 524  453  531  _  317  _ -  302 _ -  _  _ -  _  _  _  -  -  -  495 526 423  438 555 458  _ 611  -  _ _ -  _  -  _ _ -  393 445  -  _ -  _  -  _ -  _ _  -  -  _ 603  -  -  424  438 422 372  510 511  587 645  440 467  _  _  591 752  597 558 583  _  _  667 844 557  _  -  572 653 594  -  —  480 537 406  Texas Dallas (December) ............................... Houston (March)................................... San Antonio (July) .................................  379 373 -  580 634  -  -  503 526  -  889  771  929  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  119  1,144 -  335 “  426 446  516 564 469  -  _  392 _  -  582 ■ _  568  .  _  -  Table H-2. Average weekly pay1 in all industries, technical and protective service occupations,11 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Protectiv service  Technical  I  Utah Box Elder County (September) . Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).....  $303  III  IV  $397  $540  $616  II  I  $326  Ill  IV  I  $461  $557  -  -  II  II  $426  Vermont Burlington (December) .............  -  365  427  -  -  -  552  -  -  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ........ . Richmond-Petersburg (July).....  315 347  398 419  482 487  336 -  -  437 430  525 505  -  -  -  Ill  IV  V  VI  I  $529  $663  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  593  721  —  $295  -  432  533  -  -  474  597  -  -  -  -  747  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July)......  -  396  497  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  II  -  III  IV  $459  $563  V  VI  -  — -  -  -  -  "  —  —  $377 412  478 460  589  -  -  -  509  657  759  -  -  383  424  547  674  459  Washington Seattle (October)......................  -  — $391  Police Officers I  $544  $530 538  541  516  II  -  $608  _  “  410  531 663  516 573  -  -  804  801  -  -  305  448  448  -  .  $858  Correc­ Fire­ tions Of­ fighters ficers  2 Pay data for Computer Operators V did not meet publication criteria in any area. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Engineering Technicians, Civil  Engineering Technicians  Drafters  Computer Operators  State, area,3 and reference month  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  120  Table H-3. Average weekly pay' in all industries, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 Clerks,  ccounting  Clerks, General  Clerks, Order  Key Entry Operators  State, area,3 and reference month I  Alabama Huntsville (February)................................ California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) .........  $257  II  III  IV  I  II  III  IV  I  II  $286  $328  $398  -  -  393 396 346 341 307 393 357  450 474 404 423 397 460 435  509 550 458 503 474 546 502  $356 418 328  426  496  -  305  374  455  341  —  -  —  —  358  494  353  416  400  302  406  320 323  399  -  386  341  398  -  428  303  381  $311  $411  $529  405 434 379 428 374 415 380  453 505 436 479 427 505 454  531  361  452  356  420  373  441  319  463  383  451  322  374  272  320 345  389 423  315  375  277  382 378  -  Riverside-San Bernardino (April)..............  San Francisco (March)............................. Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April) ........................................  -  498 518 $369 591  ~ 369  1  II  $297  $355  349 348 334 338 384 313  425 430 418 417 400 478 448  -  295  388  —  311  -  $461 522 424 474 419 494  Colorado 317 Connecticut New Britain (November) ........................... District of Columbia Washington (February)............................. Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December).........  271  497  267  _  366  .  —  446  Georgia  Illinois Chicago (May) ......................................  Indiana Indianapolis (June) .................................  283  Kansas Finney County (October) ..........................  426 400  521  303  429  382  514  332  391  475  284  342  455  323  430  306  353  292  318  —  —  —  —  —  341 283  Louisiana Acadia Parish (August).............................  342  246  320  350 390  200  237 262  292 346  —376  —315  -  288  319  333  366  411  269  290  359  411  -  371  319  371  396 359  442 433  326  398 415  456 520  376 353  463 -  361 356  455 415  370  455  408  495  334  -  Maryland  Massachusetts Boston (May) ............................................  Michigan 265  618  334  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  121  Table H-3. Average weekly pay1 in all industries, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993  State, area,3 and reference month IV  III  Alabama Huntsville (February) ................................. California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) ......... Oakland (December) ................................ Riverside-San Bernardino (April).............. Sacramento (December) .......................... San Diego (August) .................................. San Francisco (March) ............................. San Luis Obispo County (July)................. Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April)........................................  _  $458 409 “ 490 421  $522 558 484 480 537 529  $641  II  I  III  IV  V  OperatorReceptionists  III  II  I  $341  $384  $464  $533  $607  $280  $291  $368  495 410  523 509  586 578  647 661 628  778 769 743 667 709 777  357 397 338 333 328 423 324  471 467  491 507 436 471 456 538  — -  Word Processors  Switch-  Secretaries  Personnel Assistants (Employment) II  Continued  344 380  $616 629 -  580 663  432  516  524  610 633 638  -  -  549  656  689  338  384  482  513  _  -  365  -  -  471  463  Colorado Denver (December)..................................  392  449  372  439  489  590  667  338  -  435  485  -  Connecticut New Britain (November) ...........................  -  -  -  488  569  650  -  377  -  -  -  -  District of Columbia Washington (February).............................  415  495  550  424  488  545  614  737  380  395  472  522  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) ......... Miami-Hialeah (September)......................  407 -  -  -  317  396  454 470  524 563  682  285 316  304 342  419  598  Georgia Atlanta (April)............................................  412  465  531  359  415  507  581  697  344  -  447  523  Illinois Chicago (May) .......................................... Livingston County (August) ......................  479  427  469  538 544  616  354 295  395  457  533  -  729  _  Indiana Indianapolis (June) .............................. ....  -  331  392  490  612  330  -  368  -  735  -  -  Kansas Finney County (October) ............ ..............  -  -  -  329  -  -  -  -  279  -  -  -  Louisiana Acadia Parish (August)............................. New Orleans (May)...................................  377  335  393  389 457  - '  340  581  248 289  296  317  -  Maryland Baltimore (May) ........................................  414  472  380  421  484  533  599  332  396  435  -  -  Massachusetts Boston (May) ............................................ Lawrence-Haverhill (September).............  440  490  591  426 420  472 464  528 516  613 615  718  390 372  448  551  -  Michigan Detroit (November)................................ .  432  502  478  481  571  615  765  363  357  481  588  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  122  Table H-3. Average weekly pay' in all industries, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Clerks, ^ ccounting I  Missouri Kansas City (July).................................. St. Louis (February)..................................  $298  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) ..................... New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ............ New York (May)........................ Ohio Cincinnati (April) ............................... Cleveland (June) ................... Columbus (November) ..................... Dayton-Springfield (February) ..................  II  $346 350  Clerks, General  III  IV  <Evin-7  291 359 316  405  316 291 334 310  332 357 351 337 257  313  318  I  II  Cierks, Order III  IV  I  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October)....................... Reading (December) ......................  353 319  South Carolina Beaufort County (November)................ Tennessee Chattanooga (August) ........................ Memphis (October)........................ Obion County (October) ................  $358 361  $436 433  — -  427  237  270  317  369  -  -  312  353 362  425 395  432 445  -  300 332 321 307 248  375 400 391 344 ~  451 475 434 419 -  $293 315 315 -  423 397 445 387  359 365 421 335  -  291 309 298 305 297  — 270 ~  285 “  Texas Dallas (December)......................... Houston (March)...........................  320  274  318 330 270  369 360 348  08H  $363 363  269  327  428  365  -  _  436 439  ~  276  350  510  308  -  295  310  526  248  292  375  439  351  442  341  404  506  320 “  339 299  380  406  -  471  _  -  -  336  395 398  —  270  —  —  _  —  313 379  388  274 325  425  279 327  -  282 282 260  393 358  —  _  _  273 288 246  324 325 273  385 408 360  418 453 479  314 391  448  307 307 281  373 373 328  420 516  503 551 484  —  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $290 291  $384  471  335 253 278  II  $293 304  495 518 512 486  361 370  I  $256 241  581 579  5  II  $486 491  Oklahoma  Oregon Portland (June) .............  Key Entry Operators  123  -  Table H-3. Average weekly pay' in all industries, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993  II  Missouri Kansas City (July).... St. Louis (February) .  $376 379  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) .  -  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) . New York (May)...................  418  Ohio Cincinnati (April) ..................... Cleveland (June) .................... Columbus (November) ........... Dayton-Springfield (February) . Scioto County (August)...........  III  IV  $451 458  $527  -  -  494 526  617  480 419 361  Switchboard OperatorReceptionists  Secretaries  Personnel Assistants (Employment) State, area,3 and reference month  Continued  455 444 -  590 _ -  II  I  III  IV  V  Word Processors III  II  I  $332 323  $401  $364 364  $423 415  $482 489  $558 570  $666 698  $318 323  323  388  426  476  635  296  -  361  -  436 453  510 501  560 583  629 683  729 826  366 407  415  515 502  _  -  345  417 446 450 407  582 575 557 546  640 696 668  —  313 317 317 294 -  -  434 444 470 414 “  _  -  473 502 522 480 499  _ 396 364  356 334 409 347  $512  _  586  458 -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) .  453  -  -  352  -  393  326  -  -  354  279  -  Oregon Portland (June)................ .  430  477  -  316  410  -  360  318  -  -  572  -  452 430  512 495  599 599  678  348 326  364  436  -  -  395 397  -  356  386  -  -  -  332 378  400 428  461 474  534 562  355  407  -  -  556 “  399 403 358  445 461 353  532 515  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October) . Reading (December) ... South Carolina Beaufort County (November) . Tennessee Chattanooga (August) .... Memphis (October)....... Obion County (October) Texas Dallas (December). Houston (March) .... San Antonio (July) .  448 348  481  .  -  -  .  -  -  _  .  428 390  462 511 461  469 475 432  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  124  525 533 459  605 639 546  724 804 “  295 302 267  -  346 321 288  424 360 374  Table H-3. Average weekly pay’ in all industries, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Clerks, A ccounting I  Utah Box Elder County (September)................. $269 Vermont Burlington (December) .......................... Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) .... Richmond-Petersburg (July).......... Washington Seattle (October) ...................... West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July)....................  265 292  II  III  $378 331  $468  316  379  Clerks, General IV  $479  I  $251  — $279  III  $319  IV  -  $364  I  -  $321  Key Entry Operators II  -  $370  I  456  —  288 317  347 356  -  -  467  346  370  514  295  307  393  470  250  307  419  125  $354  346  333 351  304  II  _  $282  368  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  II  Clerks, Order  _  '  —  _  307  393 369  340  422  278  -  State, area,3 and reference month II  Utah Box Elder County (September). Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).... Vermont Burlington (December)  $341  Ill  $423  IV  -  II  I  III  IV  V  $541  -  -  $345  $385  $455  OperatorReceptionists  $287  -  -  353  364  445  -  387  -  -  337 376  411 430  454 496  506 533  $681  285 312  Washington Seattle (October) .................  434  474  516  351  -  710  -  604  -  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July) .  466  298  393  -  -  265  -  471  -  i Excludes premium pay for overtime and tor work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profrt sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-ot-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $310  $415  318 365  381 425  324  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) .... Richmond-Petersburg (July) .  Word Processors  Switch-  Secretaries  Personnel Assistants (Employment)  $552  2 Pay data for Personnel Assistants (Employment) I did not meet publication criteria in any area 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  126  Table H-4. Average hourly pay' in all industries, maintenance and toolroom occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 State, area,2 and reference month  General Workers  Maintenance Electricians  $9.06  $14.94  Maintenance Electronics Technicians 1  II  $10.18  $15.10  III  Machinists  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  $15.92  $14.42  $13.38  17.76 19.26 18.45 16.62  17.12 18.13 15.54 15.84 16.69  Maintenance Pipefitters  Tool and Die Makers  _  _  $20.37 19.73 _ _  $19.05 19.81 17.39  -  18.25 19.39 16.16 16.36 16.60 19.5C 15.11  Alabama  Huntsville (February) ................... California  Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) ........... Riverside-San Bernardino (April) ............ San Diego (August) ............................. San Francisco (March) .............................. San Luis Obispo County (July) ................... Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April) ..............................  10.42 10.06 11.47 10.63 9.05 10.46 11.31  19.64 19.94 16.84 17.93 19.20 25.64 17.21  9.88  17.37  13.43 10.19  17.97 18.41 16.36 15.15 16.53 18.92  $19.53 21.40 18.81 20.53 18.04  -  18.33  -  16.61  14.86  -  _  20.27  17.16  15.12  15.61  _  _  -  19.41  18.08  -  18.34  16.10  14.58  _  ~  -  14.52  11.70 13.64  _ 14.88  _ _  16.52  18.81  17.49  13.55  14.88  18.89  16.72  17.81  21.26  18.57  16.93  17.67  20.93  _  -  16.81  16.03  15.06  19.52  _  -  -  -  14.38  -  _  —  17.25  15.78  9.57 12.11  -  -  “  _  Colorado  Denver (December) ...................................  9.24  17.55  11.87  18.21  Connecticut  New Britain (November) .........................  18.23 _ -  —  ~  -  -  -  16.46  District of Columbia  Washington (February)...............................  8.97  16.77  8.56  14.29 15.12  9.82  .c  20.12  Florida  Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) ........... Miami-Hialeah (September).............  16.90  Georgia  11.28  Illinois  10.99 Indiana  Indianapolis (June) ........................  9.16  15.00  Kansas  Finney County (October) ......................  8.03  Louisiana  Acadia Parish (August)................. New Orleans (May)........................  7.29 8.03  14.20  15.56  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  127  _  Table H-4. Average hourly pay' in all industries, maintenance and toolroom occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 General Maintenance Workers  State, area,2 and reference month  Maryland Baltimore (May) Massachusetts  Boston (May) .............................. Lawrence-Haverhill (September) .  Kansas City (July) .... St. Louis (February) . Albuquerque (September)  Nassau-Suffolk (November) . New York (May).............. .... Ohio  Cincinnati (April) ..................... Cleveland (June)..................... Columbus (November)........... Dayton-Springfield (February) Scioto County (August)..........  $14.18  $18.40  $18.12  15.58 14.78  18.52 20.77  17.57 17.55  16.50 16.12  16.23 14.86  18.19 18.14  18.31  16.27  19.37  17.10  19.25  17.04  20.41  19.84  17.54 16.34  17.25 16.73  15.93 18.21  17.09 15.13  15.74 14.48  18.14 17.83  19.06 18.85  14.56  -  15.36  11.78  -  -  -  11.92  18.19  -  17.69 19 15  16.89 17.88  17.61 19.14  16.67 21.25  10.64 11.53 9.26  14.51 15.82 14.31  17.96 17.32 15.69  13 60 15.19 15.78 13.97  16.27 16.28 16.06 17.27  14.96 15.17 14.89 14.07 13.23  _ 19.39 17.70  17.09 14.84 19.70 19.02  10.73  16.14  14.78  13.14  13.19  12.89  -  17.25  14.74  17.57  16.49  15.43  14.83  -  18.28  17.85  15.72  15.91 13.50  15.92 13.90  17.46  16.48  -  -  -  -  10.01  -  -  20.22  -  8.36 9.77  18.17 17.93  -  8.03  12.99  -  13.04 13.78  18.46 22.77  10.02 10.24 9.73 9.70 7.67  17.17 17.40 17.11 18.03 -  Oregon  -  9.84  17.44  9.46  . .  10.92 10.87  16.08 15.03  -  .  -  -  -  Portland (June) ................ Pennsylvania  Philadelphia (October) . Reading (December) ...  $14.86  11.33  8.55  Oklahoma City (February)  South Carolina  Beaufort County (November) .  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Tool and Die Makers  $16.24  $11.72  Oklahoma  Maintenance Pipefitters  $17.14  17.83 18.69  New York  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  $16.56  11.12 11.51  New Mexico  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Ill  $15.64  Missouri  Maintenance Machinists  II  I  $9.66  Michigan  Detroit (November) ....................  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Electricians  Continued  128  18.02  17.13  Table H-4. Average hourly pay1 in all industries, maintenance and toolroom occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Electricians  Tennessee Chattanooga (August)................................. Memphis (October).....................................  $8.54 9.07  $12.31 16.10  Texas Dallas (December)...................................... Houston (March) ......................................... San Antonio (July) ......................................  9.20 8.70 7.36  14.70 17.27 13.39  Utah Box Elder County (September)................... Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).......................  -  15.86 13.48  _  _  8.87  -  -  18.31  14.71  13.64  Vermont Burlington (December)................................  10.68  14.49  -  -  -  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August)............................ Richmond-Petersburg (July).......................  8.62 9.66  15.53 19.12  10.67  16.22 16.25  16.30 17.88  15.38  -  Washington Seattle (October) ........................................  10.75  19.26  -  16.31  21.14  18.29  10.02  15.03  -  16.70  -  State, area,2 and reference month  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July)........................  Maintenance Electronics Technicians I  II  _  $11.38  $15.04 16.29  11.10 12.48 9.44  16.64 16.56 15.69  III   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  Maintenance Pipefitters  Tool and Die Makers  -  -  _  $17.77  $15.48 15.29  12.94 15.05  -  15.21  -  12.19  -  -  15.04 19.28  13.50 12.61  15.38 19.71  -  18.86  18.28  -  -  13.19  12.88  -  -  -  $12.61 15.44  $12.30 14.59  $12.67 15.85  $18.87 17.45 17.03  15.53 18.71 15.47  15.01 15.87 11.71  14.97 13.68 12.08  _  _  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.  Machinists  _  -  _  2 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  129  Table H-5. Average hourly pay' in all industries, material movement and custodial occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 Guards State, area,2 and reference month  Operators  Janitors II  I  Alabama  Huntsville (February) .  $8.89  $6.73  11.46 14.00 14.09 13.50 12.25  6.83 7.23 5.98 6.71 6.15 7.13  California  Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) , Oakland (December) ...................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April)..... Sacramento (December) ................. San Diego (August) ......................... San Francisco (March) ................... San Luis Obispo County (July) ........ Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April)...............................  -  6.36  $5.65  $11.62 13.56 8.66 13.63 11.73 -  7.35 9.35 8.76 9.10 7.88 10.37 10.27  13.64 8.68 7.60 12.54 -  -  8.46  -  12.55  6.48  -  -  9.29  9.02  -  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  Warehouse Specialists  $10.07  $11.29  $9.78  8.11 10.85 7.19 8.33 7.67 8.64  14.18 15.73 14.42 14.24 —  13.48  14.52 15.86 12.87 14.50 13.48 19.05 “  11.67  -  9.99 11.69 9.44 10.39 8.77 11.93 10.73  -  9.94  7.73  -  -  14.77  10.65  _ $9.98 13.69 8.39 -  -  14.09 14.03 -  —  12.30 11.04 13.09 11.68  13.48  13.52  -  9.94  9.48  12.83  16.36  16.12  -  13.36  9.27  9.31  14.56  -  17.25  11.53  6.40 6.73  '  8.38 9.98  10.15 13.00  8.38  7.99  9.13 8.85  14.18  -  6.12  8.36  -  9.99  8.05  -  -  11.89  8.16 6.08  12.68  _ -  10.02 ~  _  -  11.36  6.85  13.29  7.09  9.80  -  -  -  -  6.81  -  -  -  -  5.16  -  5.16 5.20  _  -  5.71  -  8.19  _ 7.06  11.78  -  10.41  7.58  11.31  6.74  7.37  8.15 8.24  5.62 6.07  7.61  6.29 5.75  10.25  6.19  -  11.51 -  6.52  12.68  -  Indiana  Indianapolis (June) ............  Medium Truck  $14.35  11.06  10.65  -  Illinois  Chicago (May) ................... Livingston County (August)  Light Truck  $8.32  Georgia  Atlanta (April) .  Truckc rivers  $9.11  -  Florida  Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) . Miami-Hialeah (September).............  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  15.41  6.14  District of Columbia  Washington (February) ..  Order Fillers  -  12.12  Connecticut  New Britain (November) .  $6.76  _  Colorado  Denver (December) .  Material Handling Laborers  -  -  16.58  15.68  16.42  11.63  14.59  11.91  16.15  10.25  -  -  -  Kansas  Finney County (October) .  -  Louisiana  Acadia Parish (August) .... New Orleans (May)......... See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  130  _  11.48  _  8.85  -  11.18  -  9.12  Table H-5. Average hourly pay1 in all industries, material movement and custodial occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued State, area,2 and reference month  Forklift Operators  Guards Janitors I  II  Material Handling Laborers  Order Fillers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Light Truck  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  $6.57  $12.82  $10.23  $13.11  $11.51  15.14  13.87 11.91  14.90 13.80  11.20 13.76  -  15.30  14.70  13.62  Truckdrivers  Warehouse Specialists  Maryland Baltimore (May) ........................................  $12.80  $6.69  -  $7.09  $9.30  $10.28  $9.86  Massachusetts Boston (May) ........................................... Lawrence-Haverhill (September)..............  12.30 10.76  7.17 7.52  $12.30  8.60 8.54  10.87 10.66  9.75 9.35  11.07 11.07  _  -  Michigan Detroit (November) ..................................  15.98  6.16  12.33  9.56  13.55  -  12.60  -  Missouri Kansas City (July)..................................... St. Louis (February)..................................  13.20  5.86 6.11  9.94 11.22  7.17 6.43  _ -  _ -  9.94  _ 7.87  12.85  11.54 12.09  14.46 15.03  -  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) ........................  _  -  -  5.22  -  5.88  7.60  -  10.31  6.94  10.95  9.35  14.08  10.92  -  7.48 -  13.93 11.09  10.36 11.76  8.99  _ -  11.02  10.87 12.31  16.09  19.22  18.33 18.36  11.72  Ohio Cincinnati (April)....................................... Cleveland (June) ...................................... Columbus (November) ............................. Dayton-Springfield (February) .................. Scioto County (August).............................  12.28 12.37 11.44 14.31 -  5.88 5.94 6.27 7.90 7.61  10.27 11.34 7.88  12.21 9.03 7.95 10.08  15.07  10 05  -  _ 7.01 7.50 7.47 7.04  _ -  14.75 13.22  11.17 10.93  -  -  7.71 6.93 10.25  13.77 15.42 13.16  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ........................  9.33  6.22  8.54  5.73  6.98  8.53  -  6.07  12.43  10.62  11.20  9.99  Oregon Portland (June) .........................................  13.54  6.49  11.02  7.31  6.93  -  -  9.94  15.15  12.82  13.20  12.25  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October).............................. Reading (December) ................................  13.13 11.38  7.47 10.18  10.82 -  9.03 9.34  12.73 8.64  _ 11.56  _  17.83  13.39 11.52  15.94 12.78  12.86 10.68  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ..................... New York (May)........................................  South Carolina Beaufort County (November)....................  -  7.22  -  6.15  -  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  11.36 10.48 9.54  131  9.69 10.41 11.64 12.28  10.19 9.51 8.20  _  8.91  -  -  -  -  9.89  Table H-5. Average hourly pay' in all industries, material movement and custodial occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued  State, area,2 and reference month  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) ............ Memphis (October)................. Obion County (October) .........  Forklift Operators  Guards Janitors I  $10.04 9.06  $5.68 5.66  -  “  Texas  Dallas (December).................. Houston (March)..... ............... San Antonio (July) ..................  II  _  $6.06 5.60 8.24  Material Handling Laborers  $11.24 11.06 ~  10.28 9.82 8.61  6.49 6.02 5.15  $11.28 12.44  9.07  5.30  9.04  9.76 5.85  10.22  -  8.58  -  7.72  -  8.94 11.61  5.99 6.46  -  6.58 5.86  10.40  13.58  6.80  -  9.33  12.62  -  -  6.25  5.70 5.24 5.50  5.87 -  Order Fillers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  $8.99 $8.50  -  Truckdrivers Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  $5.85 -  $11.20 15.57  $10.61 9.86  $12.26 14.83  $12.13  9.20 9.79 6.91  14.08 12.98 12.45  9.68 10.58 8.58  —  —  8.85 7.76  9.41 8.67 7.40  _ 7.06 6.39  _ 9.49  _  7.71  -  8.63  -  -  _  9.41  Utah  Box Elder County (September) Salt Lake City-Ogden (April) .... Vermont  Burlington (December) ...........  Warehouse Specialists  Light Truck  —  _  12.30  _  -  13.06  12.44  -  9.52  -  9.77  Virginia  Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ....... Richmond-Petersburg (July) ....  9.99  9.68 10.44  7.19  7.33 13.32  7.96 8.97  13.21  11.19  -  -  11.11  9.39  11.34  15.67  16.19  13.00  7.09  -  9.57  Washington  Seattle (October) .................... West Virginia  Parkersburg-Marietta (July)....  -  -  -  _  -  2 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  _  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  132  Table 1-1. Average weekly pay' in all industries, administrative occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Computer Programmers  Computer Systems Analysts  State, area,3 and reference month I  II  Ill  IV  Arizona Phoenix (March)..............................................  -  $567  $651  -  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October) ...........  -  507  656  -  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July).............................. San Jose (June).............................................. Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July).......................  -  618 571  758 787  -  Connecticut Danbury (January) .......................................... Delaware Wilmington (October) ...................................... Florida Bradenton (April)............................................. Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July)...........................................  $924  I  $703  II  III  IV  $841  $997  $1,159  -  761  939  -  806 739  1,071 1,088  -  _ -  -  940 911 824  642  743  -  -  836  995  -  -  634  731  -  810  890  1,069  -  -  -  681  _  _  850  616  680  825  750  877  1,046  -  $535  1,147 1,291  Georgia Augusta (May).................................................  -  505  611  -  624  -  -  -  Indiana Elkhart-Goshen (October)............................... South Bend-Mishawaka (August)....................  -  566 587  676 681  _  -  704 725  874 821  -  -  Iowa Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January) ...........................................  -  624  -  -  705  -  -  -  Louisville (June) ..............................................  -  541  666  -  720  830  976  -  Massachusetts Worcester (July)..............................................  -  -  688  -  659  811  970  1,156  Kentucky  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  133  Table 1-1. Average weekly pay' in all industries, administrative occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Computer Systems Analysts  Computer Programmers State, area,3 and reference month I  Minneapolis-St. Paul (February) ..................... St. Cloud (February)........................................  II  III  IV  $820  899 914  716 691 755  861 912 870  740 671  - . 773  ” 795  909 856  —  558 513  670 682  846  671  815  976  ■  -  507  649  579  734  910  -  572 594  690 689  669 718  833 824  972  “  -  608 599 627  737 754 745  -  615  462 428  -  -  840  —  —  industrial scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies how this limited list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 For two occupations, only a single area published average pay data: Computer Programmers V averaged $964 in Newark, NJ; and Computer Systems Analysts V averaged $1,482 in San Jose, CA. In addition, limited   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1,264  737  “  Wisconsin  Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May)................... Milwaukee (September) ..................................  1,062  ”  -  Tennessee  Nashville (February)........................................  1,159  —  600  Pennsylvania  Pittsburgh (May).............................................. Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November) ................  1,022  719  521  ■  New York  Poughkeepsie (September) ............................ Rochester (October)........................................  $1,088  642  444  IV  $969  —  $693 694  New Jersey  Bergen-Passaic (April) .................................... Monmouth-Ocean (June) ................................ Newark (December)........................................  III  $851  $596 612  Montana  Billings (September)...... ..................................  II  $715  $515 463  Mississippi  Jackson (December).......................................  I  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  134  Table 1-2. Average weekly pay' in all industries, technical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Computer Operators I  Arizona Phoenix (March) ....................................... Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)..... California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July)........................ San Jose (June) ....................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July)................. Connecticut Danbury (January).................................... Delaware Wilmington (October)................................  $338  II  III  Drafters IV  $408  $485  -  347  443  _  -  459 499 401  567 597  626 666  -  -  464  $647  I  $414  II  Engineering Technicians III  IV  I  II  $448  $554  _  444  555  _  _  _  487 566 438  644 673 -  764 739  430  -  395  -  569  _  _  514  588  _  549  _  _  484  _  487  $711  $438  $483  III  VI  $688  545 522  638 608  753 727  .  _  598  722  _  _  _  621  798  -  -  _  490  567  705  _  _  698 637  -  -  703  882  648  -  -  458  391  519  321  387  488  -  350  Georgia Augusta (May) ..........................................  -  342  _  _  _  459  _  _  _  _  .  Indiana Elkhart-Goshen (October) ........................ South Bend-Mishawaka (August) .............  -  396 354  521 526  -  -  421 445  526 614  -  -  -  570  Iowa Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January).....................................  _  385  550  Kentucky Louisville (June)........................................  327  424  521  _  _  446  543  _  _  _  656  -  413  517  -  -  504  -  -  -  -  592  $913 854  $1,087 1,009  387  447  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  V  $576  Florida Bradenton (April) ...................................... Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ....................................  Massachusetts Worcester (July) .......................................  IV  135  -  Table 1-2. Average weekly pay' in all industries, technical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued  II  I  Engineering Technicians  Drafters  Computer Operators State, area,3 and reference month III  IV  $614  III  IV  $461 496  $552 493  $693  II  I  I  Minnesota  $367 “  II  $478  III  IV  $566  $661  V  VI  $745  -  $437 373  $507 509  -  431  405  -  -  458  558  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  391  -  -  -  -  547  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  395  539 539 563  682 _ 680  _ -  486 577 547  620 619 616  _ 727  _ —  522  — 627  775 680  “  —  -  477 419 450  576 478  446  _ —  _ "  708  -  -  _ 713  -  534  _ 596  _  -  407 377  508 -  480  577  701  -  -  333  629 536  _  -  478 410  689  -  —  -  385  471  -  332  426  480  -  -  -  556  -  -  -  .  -  -  -  -  -  426  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  466 537  371 392  433 464  521 583  _ 650  442 495  577 612  689 715  -  -  317  402 400  _  .  $385  Minneapolis-St. Paul (February).... St. Cloud (February)...................... Mississippi  Jackson (December) ..................... Montana  Billings (September) ...................... New Jersey  Bergen-Passaic (April)................... Monmouth-Ocean (June)............... Newark (December) ...................... New York  Poughkeepsie (September)........... Rochester (October)...................... Pennsylvania  Pittsburgh (May) ............................ Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November) Tennessee  Nashville (February) ...................... Texas  Longview-Marshall (July)............... Wisconsin  Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May) . Milwaukee (September)................  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Pay data for Computer Operators V did not meet publication criteria in any area. In addition, limited industrial   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  "  scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies how this limited list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  136  Table 1-3. Average weekly pay’ in all industries, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Clerks, Order  Clerks, General  Clerks, Accounting  Key Entry Operators  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month I  II  III  IV  $432  1  III  IV  $274  $308  $344  II  1  Arizona Phoenix (March)...................................  $288  $342  $387  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)..  231  327  366  -  -  286  451  -  -  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July) ................... San Jose (June) ................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July) ............  349 _ -  410 417 329  470 509 410  541 588 460  -  308 390 330  429 448 425  487 517 492  414 -  Connecticut Danbury (January)................................  -  396  424  498  -  333  368  468  Delaware Wilmington (October) ...........................  -  366  475  602  285  333  370  433  346  379 379  457  -  270  323  $238  II  -  II  1  II  IV  $434  $522  V  $617  $306  Word Processors  I  $369  II  Ill  $345  .  -  347  -  437  500 486  $273  $367  $360  -  283  368  310  -  405  595  -  272  466 456  452 432 374  416 406 -  515 511 464  566 587 468  648 668 526  738 785  -  353 354 264  -  375 403 310  “  “  388  483  332  431  -  474  528  561  653  370  -  458  -  426  -  326  373  373  451  546  645  816  357  352  457  -  293  .  341  402  498  600  _  284  _  387  -  399  274  327  368  408  460  577  -  292  294  357  -  -  -  _  _  $293  $469  $396  III  Switch­ board Opera­ torRecep­ tionists  $568 540 —  Florida Bradenton (April).................................. Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July)................................  -  321  Georgia Augusta (May)......................................  -  315  396  -  -  304  319  -  -  -  280  -  345  406  538  -  -  274  -  Indiana Elkhart-Goshen (October) .................... South Bend-Mishawaka (August).........  269 -  330 332  407 403  511 529  283 289  354 354  374 -  286 351  348 391  351 352  449 401  .  -  316 -  .  -  493  -  307 311  _ —  Iowa Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January) .................................  .  321  480  568  .  325  384  469  347  _  314  _  408  410  _  625  _  317  331  449  -  Kentucky Louisville (June) ...................................  -  327  407  520  224  267  420  363  321  -  246  358  355  411  487  593  -  283  -  -  -  Massachusetts Worcester (July) ...................................  -  371  454  485  -  323  393  -  -  454  344  399  405  434  508  557  645  359  -  -  -  259  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  137  ._  _  ~  Table 1-3. Average weekly pay1 in all industries, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Clerks, Accounting  Clerks, General  Clerks, Order  Key Entry Operators  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month 1  II  III  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul (February)........... St. Cloud (February).............................  $300 291  $369 359  $438 431  Mississippi Jackson (December) ............................  291  323  380  Montana Billings (September).............................  -  324  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April) ......................... Monmouth-Ocean (June) ..................... Newark (December) .............................  322 -  New York Poughkeepsie (September).................. Rochester (October).............................  IV  $516 466  I  $339  II  III  IV  I  $462 469  II  -  $347 304  $398 385  -  -  265  324  -  314  -  286  402  478  -  277  -  -  -  ~  291  405 361 403  464 463 475  544 503 557  283 351  343 337 353  425 401 432  503 448 546  387 374 -  436 426 496  -  362 371  442 454  569  -  336 409  392 411  495  385  Pennsylvania Pittsburgh (May) ................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November) .....  282 255  336 328  428 358  ~  263 -  293 286  376 383  487 -  Tennessee Nashville (February).............................  239  316  387  473  250  272  341  -  Texas Longview-Marshall (July)......................  -  309  398  -  -  269  397  '-  Wisconsin Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May)........ Milwaukee (September) .......................  314 289  331 344  400 422  439 500  297  288 337  350 382  $282  446  $348 -  II  $381 355  I  $377 -  II  $448 452  III  IV  $493 448  $572  V  Word Processors  I  II  III  $346 301  $337  -  -  -  -  $695  $440  $516  329  -  424  474  -  288  313  344  -  -  317  339  400  -  -  279  358  406  -  360 350 366  424 457  415 418 470  471 514 510  558 552 591  642 655 672  731 745  387 338 393  406 -  489 — 467  562  456  410 336  380  417  417 -  564  616  719  322 345  -  470 -  -  293 298  -  302 269  329 372  410 322  432 349  459 439  555 531  653 -  303 292  354 -  471 -  -  291  372  304  361  346  425  443  521  -  311  -  388  -  334  -  405  -  -  277  -  -  -  386 411  401 462  444 517  _  _  -  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Limited industrial scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $433 345  I  Switch­ board Opera­ torRecep­ tionists  360 300  -  391  271 296  346 369  _  602  _  -  302 322  353  405  _  ~  how this limited list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  138  Table 1-4. Average hourly pay' in all industries, maintenance and toolroom occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 State, area,3 and reference month  General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Electricians  I  II  $15.12  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  $18.80  $13.90  $14.68  _  14.93  13.27  13.41  _  _  16.39 17.79 14.55  17.02 17.82 14.65  _  18.23 22.06  -  -  III  Machinists  Pipefitters  Makers  Arizona  Phoenix (March) .........................................  $7.89  $17.23  $10.92  7.60  14.02  10.64  -  10.87 10.48 10.21  18.60 21.31 13.90  11.15 -  17.08 15.55 14.94  $18.47 19.10 16.39  19.76 18.37 14.22  13.47  -  -  16.60  -  16.56  -  15.49  _  _  10.54  19.04  18.85  -  17.19  16.03  16.07  $19.66  _  -  15.62  14.70  -  15.08  _  16.05  15.17  _  _  13.63 15.99  14.91 15.49  16.50  16.53  14.66  17.40  $16.91  Arkansas  Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)....... California  Anaheim-Santa Ana (July).......................... San Jose (June).......................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July)................... Connecticut  Danbury (January)...................................... Delaware  Wilmington (October)..................................  -  Florida  Bradenton (April)......................................... Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ......................................  7.99  15.55  13.72  11.62  8.83  15.44  10.86  9.87  13.47  10.76  10.37 9.42  15.14 16.44  9.09  17.58  9.00  17.66  -  15.30  _  _  13.49  13.37  11.69  15.82  -  13.70  -  14.71  14.24  14.98  13.70  18.38  Georgia  Augusta (May) ............................................  _  _  -  -  Indiana  Elkhart-Goshen (October)........................... South Bend-Mishawaka (August) ...............  -  15.42 14.12  15.54  Iowa  Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January).......................................  15.88  Kentucky  Louisville (June)..........................................  _  17.39  Massachusetts  Worcester (July)..........................................  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  139  15.85  15.02  Table 1-4. Average hourly pay' in all industries, maintenance and toolroom occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued State, area,3 and reference month  General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Machinists  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  $15.48 14.30  $15.25 13.45  13.96  12.94  14.29  14.15  18.67  15.87 14.61 17.09  15.55 16.33 16.39  — 19.43  17.11 15.51 17.20  13.85  15.42 15.34  ” 20.11  —  14.25 12.60  15.77 13.09  14.55 14.34  15.50  -  13.79  12.96  13.37  —  “  15.26  12.72  11.14  ~  14.55 18.53  14.41 15.00  14.28 15.78  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Electricians  I  II  Ill  $13.94  $16.88 —  $17.40 16.01  Maintenance Pipefitters  Tool and Die Makers  $19.07  $17.54 14.05  Minnesota  Minneapolis-St. Paul (February)................. St. Cloud (February) ...................................  $11.04 10.47  $19.05 17.22  -  8.52  15.78  -  —  ~  7.34  17.04  -  -  ”  11.78 14.15 12.79  16.59 15.40 19.49  -  -  —  -  10.18 11.63  17.89 18.61  -  10.71 10.18  15.88 14.05  -  14.96 14.57  8.73  15.53  -  15.46  8.15  14.89  -  9.91 11.38  15.14 18.61  -  -  Mississippi  Jackson (December).................................. Montana  Billings (September) ...................................  .  '  New Jersey  Bergen-Passaic (April)................................ Monmouth-Ocean (June)............................ Newark (December)....................................  -  17.52 -  -  15.23 17.40  New York  Poughkeepsie (September)........................ Rochester (October)...................................  -  18.66  -  -  —  —  Pennsylvania  Pittsburgh (May) ......................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)............  17.46 “  ■  18.04 14.63  Tennessee  Nashville (February) ...................................  13.81  Texas  Longview-Marshall (July)............................  -  14.51  Wisconsin  Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May) .............. Milwaukee (September)..............................  15.93  17.47  —  3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  Limited industrial scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies how this limited   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  14.75 18.09  list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys.  1  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for negotiated work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded areprofit performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.  2  14.91 18.12  140  Table 1-5. Average hourly pay1 in all industries, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 State, area,3 and reference month  Forklift Operators  Guards Janitors I  II  Material Handling Laborers  Order Fillers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Light Truck  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  Truckdrivers Specialists  Arizona Phoenix (March) .......................................  $9.21  $5.47  $11.50  $6.05  $8.38  $7.53  $8.04  $6.72  $13.35  $11.50  $13.66  $8.91  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October).....  8.65  4.93  -  5.01  7.84  8.54  8.30  -  -  _  12.61  11.33  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July)........................ San Jose (June) ....................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July).................  12.92 10.64 7.60  6.52 8.00 6.79  -  7.12 9.03 8.48  7.21 10.13 6.41  14.16 16.29 12.98  12.38 11.77 10.89  -  9.01 7.41  14.23  -  9.54 10.25 9.27  -  10.61  9.63  9.43  10.51  12.15  7.10 7.81 -  14.47  -  _  _  Connecticut Danbury (January)....................................  -  Delaware Wilmington (October)................................  13.40  Florida Bradenton (April) ...................................... Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ....................................  7.24  7.09  8.77  5.35  -  5.81  8.00  8.60  8.27  -  11.83  9.45  -  -  5.72  6.87  _  8.22  9.57  9.09 9.80  -  -  8.69 7.07  7.75 6.87  9.43 -  9.46 8.60  8.19 -  13.98  9.19  8.00  8.31  10.26  -  7.60  13.06  _  8.80  14.69  -  _  10.75  15.81  13.94  10.59  12.50  8.84  14.56  7.83  14.53  14.25  10.88 -  10.06 12.29  9.48  13.38  11.87  14.97  14.05  14.95  11.10  8.26  Georgia  Augusta (May) .......................................... Indiana  Elkhart-Goshen (October) ........................ South Bend-Mishawaka (August) .............  -  Iowa  Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January).....................................  12.26  4.92  11.90  5.68  -  6.49  11.26  11.32  12.02  7.84  10.70  9.04  11.52  10.69  10.66  7.64  -  9.20  7.78  10.83  10.93  7.94  12.12  -  14.31  10.69  Kentucky  Louisville (June)........................................ Massachusetts  Worcester (July) ....................................... See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  141  Table 1-5. Average hourly pay1 in all industries, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued State, area,3 and reference month  Forklift Operators  Guards Janitors I  II  Material Handling Laborers  Order Fillers  T ruckdrivers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Light Truck  Medium Truck  Heavy T ruck  Tractor Trailer  $11.78 9.61  $9.11 9.08  $13.93 ■  $14.42  $13.77 11.44  $14.35  9.02  5.53  —  ■  13.13  9.00  —  ■  13.76  Warehouse Specialists  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul (February)............... St. Cloud (February).................................  $13.26 9.51  $6.98 -  $9.58 -  $7.60 8.38  $10.49 8.58  $8.95  Mississippi Jackson (December) ................................  8.84  4.72  -  4.89  8.83  8.51  Montana Billings (September) .................................  9.38  -  -  5.89  6.28  -  10.25  9.07  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April)............................. Monmouth-Ocean (June).......................... Newark (December) .................................  12.43 9.86 10.81  8.41 9.89 9.05  11.04 9.98 9.75  11.02  12.52 10.28 10.71  11.74  15.29 16.25 12.79  15.46 12.58 12.85  14.94 11.75 15.78  15.24 12.65 14.52  New York Poughkeepsie (September)...................... Rochester (October).................................  6.39 6.52  12.63  9.31 7.69  10.06  -  9.23  10.50  13.80  12.56  12.93 14.58  -  10.46  Pennsylvania Pittsburgh (May) ....................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)..........  12.39 11.86  5.43 6.02  9.36 -  7.23 7.67  10.68 9.81  — 10.36  9.82 9.72  7.87 10.45  14.02  13.24 10.43  14.21 11.91  10.74 12.33  Tennessee Nashville (February).................................  9.51  6.34  -  6.22  10.29  9.42  9.68  7.54  12.67  9.49  12.35  10.61  Texas Longview-Marshall (July)..........................  10.31  -  -  6.07  6.64  -  8.82  “  8.69  9.33  Wisconsin Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May)............ Milwaukee (September)............................  10.75 11.87  7.89 6.45  -  6.62 7.30  7.50 8.75  9.93 9.81  9.68  12.68 15.06  11.71 14.53  -  7.48 7.27 7.52  13.46 -  -  -  -  8.71 10.18  —  _  8.70  12.68  — 8.71 11.03  list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Limited industrial scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies how this limited   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  142  Table J-1. Average weekly pay' in private industry, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 Professional State, area,3 and reference month  Accountants I  Alabama Huntsville (February) ................................ California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) ......... Oakland (December) ................................ Riverside-San Bernardino (April).............. Sacramento (December) .......................... San Diego (August) .................................. San Francisco (March) ............................. San Luis Obispo County (July)................. Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April) ........................................ Colorado Denver (December).................................. Connecticut New Britain (November) ...........................  II  III  Accountants, Public V  VI  I  II  Ill  IV  II  III  IV  V  $965  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $456  $569  $710  550 550 -  618 674 588 620 624 -  779 872 743 749 754 768 696  -  591,  773  889  -  480  584  767  993  997 $1,247 $1,563 1,110 1,325 987 900 970 1,220 1,017 1,259 u-  I  II  III  IV  V  $623  $693  649 755  913 966 842 890 881 919 848  1,113 1,202 969 996 1,032 1,137  1,320 1,405 1,160  707 703 694  758 821 729 778 764 762  VI  VII  $830 $1,054 $1,238 $1,443 $1,608 ■  VIII  -  $557  $597  592 566 _  _ 616  _ _ 749 722  _  _  _ _ 959 948 _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  666  726  844  1,107  1,390  1,239  -  -  -  -  -  -  1,299  1.713  -  652  766  960  1,138  1,366  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  716  845  1,246  -  545  599  686  917  892  1,264  1,704  1,944  590  714  869  1,065  1,283  _ -  _ 616  _ 654  _ 784  _ 1,050  _  716  804 919  1,077  1,325  -  -  -  -  -  569  -  -  562  610  714  -  609  788  -  479  599  746  974  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) ......... Miami-Hialeah (September)......................  473  569  718 730  _ 1,022  Georgia Atlanta (April)............................................  486  559  718  950  1,171  Illinois Chicago (May) ..........................................  510  609  738  960  1,213  Indiana Indianapolis (June) ...................................  464  603  739  937  1,171  -  554  -  Louisiana New Orleans (May)...................................  449  555  741  995  -  -  488  Maryland Baltimore (May) ........................................  515  585  734  961  1,228  -  492  580 592  734 724  924 897  1,265 -  _  _  1,545  $726 $1,077  $1,760 $1,959 _ _ 1,809 _ _ _ _ _ _ $1,387 _ _ _ $954 1,372 2,249 _ _ _ _ _ _  -  1,194 1,379  -  1,546 1,649  1,743 $2,083  1,485 1,427 1,531  1,683 1,671 1,786  1,608  1,497  _  _  1,784  -  -  -  1,733  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  598  918  1,311  1,735  -  603  710  881  1,029  1,249  1,487  1,651  -  -  1,057  1,384  1,662  2,148  684  735  877  1,068  1,294  1,526  1,746  -  647  -  966  1,185  -  -  619  791  855  1,014  -  -  -  -  524  623  -  -  1,276  -  -  754  816  924  1,163  1,461  1,692  -  -  563  599  661  849  -  1,334  1,560  -  ’650  709  845  1,071  1,283  1,432  -  -  539  593  648 -  _  _  1,289  657 616  748 738  855 865  1,051 1,031  1,320  1,641  1,907 1,905  2,277  -  1,698 -  2,156  -  _  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Engineers  IV  District of Columbia Washington (February).............................  Massachusetts Boston (May) ............................................ Lawrence-Haverhill (September)..............  Attorneys  143  -  Table J-1. Average weekly pay1 in private industry, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative  II  Alabama Huntsville (February) ...................... California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) Oakland (December) ...................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April).... Sacramento (December) ................ San Diego (August) ....................... . San Francisco (March) .................. . San Luis Obispo County (July)...... . Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April).............................  $630  III  IV  .  .  $780 _  $912 _  _  _  -  789 -  Computer P ogrammers  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  Budget Analysts  State, area,3 and reference month  _ _  II  I  III  IV  $973  III  IV  -  -  $547  $620  956  530  —  -  -  603 657 617 576 618 655  —  —  -  -  -  -  $456  $566  $749  551 583 _ _ 496 507  672 712 599 682 656 654 “  809 895 810 852 783 843 -  661  860  -  -  II  i  -  938 1.097 _  $790 804 — 764 703 797 —  $1,001 938 — 900 — “  -  -  -  568  Colorado Denver (December)........................  -  -  -  473  609  840  992  570  649  771  852  Connecticut New Britain (November) .................  -  -  -  -  701  -  -  -  571  776  -  District of Columbia Washington (February)..................  -  718  878  530  616  827  537  613  709  829  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) Miami-Hialeah (September)...........  -  -  456  621  -  _ -  _ -  _ 580  _  -  741  _ 939  Georgia Atlanta (April)................... ,............  -  -  -  506  619  782  927  -  586  694  824  Illinois Chicago (May)...............................  -  -  -  534  639  839  1,023  576  671  786  864  Indiana Indianapolis (June) ........................  -  -  -  -  631  860  -  485  585  686  -  Louisiana New Orleans (May)........................  -  -  -  471  587  769  -  -  596  663  853  Maryland Baltimore (May).............................  551  709  -  501  610  787  952  -  583  696  -  724  899  519 -  628 623  823 776  1,012 975  515  605 "  702 688  851  —  Massachusetts Boston (May) ................................. Lawrence-Haverhill (September)....  593  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  144  1,029  Table J-1. Average weekly pay' in private industry, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative  State, area,3 and reference month 1  Alabama Huntsville (February) ................................  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers  Computer Systems Analysts II  III  IV  V  I  II  Ill  1  -  -  -  -  -  $586  $1,265 1,384 _ 1,415 -  _ _ _ _ _ -  $1,255  $1,358 1,453 _ _ 1,360 _  . _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _ -  603 631  -  -  -  1,262  V  VI  I  ii  $705  $963  -  -  -  -  1,007 1,111 961 1,003 954 1,033  $1,231 1,398  _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $1,110  $1,355  588 581 606 _  767 833 706 786 739 795 643  _ _ _  _ 1-.325  _ _ _  -  620  762  1,014  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  580  730  948  -  -  -  1,378  -  -  -  803  -  -  -  -  -  -  570  746  951  1,133  -  968  1,247  -  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  _ -  $968  1,071 1,218  -  921 1,005 852 840 898 981 -  -  863  -  -  -  Colorado Denver (December)..................................  728  853  1,012  1,221  -  Connecticut New Britain (November) ...........................  -  890  -  -  -  -  -  -  District of Columbia Washington (February).............................  681  856  992  1,169  -  1,091  1,265  $1,513  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December)......... Miami-Hialeah (September)......................  698  848  1,064  _ -  _ -  Georgia Atlanta (April)............................................  745  889  1,006  1,132  -  1,003  Illinois Chicago (May) ..........................................  797  928  1,062  1,237  -  1,174  Indiana Indianapolis (June) ...................................  706  817  993  -  -  1,034  Louisiana New Orleans (May)...................................  676  873  1,031  -  -  Maryland Baltimore (May) ........................................  668  827  995  1,091  Massachusetts Boston (May) ............................................ Lawrence-Haverhill (September)..............  704 689  854 886  1,025 1,039  1,228 1,154  California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) ......... Oakland (December) ................................ Riverside-San Bernardino (April).............. Sacramento (December) .......................... San Diego (August).................................. San Francisco (March) ............................. San Luis Obispo County (July)................. Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April) ........................................  $750 848 739 740  1,022 1,064 1,125 -  _ -  _ _ 1,306 -  1,104  $495  II  III  _ 1,138 1,258  _  _ _ _  hi  ■  $1,658 _  _ _  _ _  _ -  _ -  _ 543  662 723  _ 977  1,243  -  -  575  734  984  1,162  -  -  1,223  1,359  1,656  -  624  769  945  1,234  -  1,129  1,343  1,710  -  -  -  650  756  955  1,182  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  517  726  909  -  -  -  -  -  -  1,127  1,278  1,508  -  554  735  970  -  -  -  -  -  -  1,157  1,372  1,590  -  601 584  765 718  975 987  _  _  -  -  -  _ -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Personnel Supervisors/Managers  IV  $824  -  Personnel Specialists  145  -  -  1,189 -  1,275  1,557  Table J-1. Average weekly pay' in private industry, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Professional State, area,3 and reference month I  II  III  IV  Michigan Detroit (November) ....................... Saginaw-Bay City-Midland (March)  $497 -  $662  Missouri Kansas City (July)......................... St. Louis (February)......................  498 527  584 565  747 715  916 934  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) ............  -  573  703  904  477 518  597 612 505  778 773 716  1,013 1,016  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November)......... New York (May)............................ Utica-Rome (July).........................  -  $795 731  V  $1,011 $1,265 986 -  VI  $605 -  1,144 1,159 $1,479  -  I  540  II  Ill  IV  II  -  ~  $1,059 —  $658 ~  566  -  $633  -  -  -  -  514  627  _  599  776 -  1,093 773 922  -  _  551 549  579 578  648 671  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  ~  1,216  -  -  -  974  -  -  468  499  744 768  935 921  1,218  499  648  474  554 572  505 529 424  541 588 621 551  475 486 472 520 -  580 572 555 602 -  706 718 740 707 -  905 942 961 945 -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ............  -  568  681  941  Oregon Portland (June).............................  462  557  735  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October).................. Reading (December) ....................  494 -  576 564  South Carolina Beaufort County (November)........  -  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) .................. Memphis (October)....................... Texas Abilene (December)...................... Dallas (December)........................ Houston (March)........................... San Antonio (July) ........................  -  1,140  -  _  1,083 -  550  -  _  -  -  -  695 719  906 969  -  672 761 759 726  997 1,050 961  1,296 1,389 -  1,595 1,885 -  -  571 566 -  996 -  “ 1,254 1,253  -  1,319  $686  1,597 1,605  -  “  II  $768  —  III  IV  V  VI  $1,341  1,213 1,162  1,416 1,347  1,536  -  674 632  744 715  852 794  1,001  -  620  724  851  1,030  1,253  1,472  655 661 610  717 808 723  887 958 756  1,077 1,145  1,267 1,349  1,493 1,571  780 725 802 707  871 837 897 824 "  997 999 1,111 1,065  1,180 1,290 1,227  1,421 1,523 1,475  1,462 _ 1,845 $2,299 ~  '  VIII  $1,623 $1,898  $896 $1,091 834  ~  _  VII  _  _  -  _  -  -  ”,  _  -  "  -  -  -  1,083  -  -  633  732  878  1,069  1,307  1,552  -  -  -  -  -  685  707  860  1,044  1,247  1,471  -  -  _  670  1,083  1,308  1,523  1,857  -  "  748 754  933  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  .  _ —  _  _  983 1,046  _  _  _  703  765 830  _  560  _  _  _  -  728 787 738  842 851 922 871  _  643 720 “*  1,034 1,120 1,097  -  -  -  “  1,215  -  -  -  -  586  -  _  _  1,535  _ -  —  637  727  939  ~  -  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  1,317  630 616 -  692 684 -  883 890  .  _ 1,329 1,476  -  -  146  —  i  -  -  1,194  1,596  —  1,090 1,209  V  662 640 678 624  1,188 -  -  IV  $1,298 $1,530  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  986  Ill  _  -  -  Ohio Cincinnati (April) ........................... Cleveland (June) .......................... Columbus (November) ................. Dayton-Springfield (February) ...... Scioto County (August).................  $779  -  646 -  1,295  Engineers  Attorneys  Accountants, Public  Accountants  -  “ _  1,676 1,847 “  2,029 2,104 —  -  _  _  _  1,526 -  -  1,308  _  1,264 1,341 1,376  _  1,534 1,547 “  1,752 1,783 "  -  Table J-1. Average weekly pay' in private industry, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative State, area,3 and reference month  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  Budget Analysts II  III  IV  Michigan Detroit (November)................................... Saginaw-Bay City-Midland (March)..........  -  $854  -  Missouri Kansas City (July)..................................... St. Louis (February)..................................  -  -  461 459  615 591  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) ........................  -  -  -  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ..................... New York (May)........................................ Utica-Rome (July).....................................  -  $906  $637  $701  $1,132  i  $529  II  $613  III  IV  $720  $931  “  -  -  804 816  963 996  507 470  616 555  715 671  844 864  589  -  -  -  559  654  -  681 675 628  867 913 -  944 1,117 -  520 546 -  654 645 507  782 757 643  935 903  484 477 552 -  609 604 623 644 -  813 760 778 -  1,065 962 -  507 581 -  591 568 586 610 -  691 683 705 727 - _  808 889 “  550  619  831  -  426  545  650  -  515  641  812  -  -  556  680  -  505 -  642 729  841 -  1,141 -  560 -  640 652  717 744  884 “  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  541 584  -  -  -  -  456  655 674  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ........................  -  -  -  Oregon Portland (June) .........................................  -  -  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October).............................. Reading (December) ................................  674 -  792 -  South Carolina Beaufort County (November)....................  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  873 -  957 1,103 -  514 526  647 661 581  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $920  -  IV  521 547 -  ~  -  $519  III  -  -  Texas Abilene (December).................................. Dallas (December).................................... Houston (March)....................................... San Antonio (July) ....................................  II  864 802 -  Ohio Cincinnati (April) ....................................... Cleveland (June) ...................................... Columbus (November) ............................. Dayton-Springfield (February) .................. Scioto County (August).............................  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) .............................. Memphis (October)...................................  I  Computer Programmers  147  851  831 895 -  969 1,160 -  516  -  634 -  581  -  612 700 587  639 719 794 686  -  -  849 881  Table J-1. Average weekly pay1 in private industry, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative  State, area,3 and reference month  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers  Computer Systems Analysts I  II  III  IV  Michigan Detroit (November)....................... Saginaw-Bay City-Midland (March)  $762 -  $859 742  $1,066  $1,242  -  -  Missouri Kansas City (July)......................... St. Louis (February)......................  741 712  863 820  987 976  New Mexico Albuquerque (September)............  -  812  -  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ......... New York (May)............................ Utica-Rome (July).........................  801 776 -  917 887 -  1,018 1,071 -  Ohio Cincinnati (April) ........................... Cleveland (June) ......................... Columbus (November) ................. Dayton-Springfield (February) ...... Scioto County (August).................  732 736 680 723 -  867 786 820 851 -  1,059 953 978 992 -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ............  684  805  953  -  Oregon Portland (June).............................  689  852  1,048  -  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October).................. Reading (December) ....................  823  895 883  1,022  -  South Carolina Beaufort County (November)........  -  -  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) .................. Memphis (October).......................  701  Texas Abilene (December)...................... Dallas (December)........................ Houston (March)........................... San Antonio (July) ........................  769 798 639  V  -  1  II  $1,104  $1,344  -  -  V  VI  I  II  111  $788 713  $1,049 973  $1,308 “  $1,591  $1,041  $1,340  $1,771  "  '  557 567  733 720  934 954  1,155 1,196  _  _  1  -  ~  ~  _  $673  III  -  1,097 1,059  1,256 1,263  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  497  652  941  1,286  1,422 1.414 -  $1,616  _  _  604 624 466  786 774 633  —  1,008 1,074 1,099 1,100 “  1,177  _  627 565 547 568  993 946 881  ~  736 746 713 685 834  —  -  1,045  -  -  -  -  653  -  1,111  -  -  -  568  .  473  _ -  1,553 1,105 1,204 1,078  -  -  _  -  1,094  -  -  -  -  870 840  1,001  -  853 950 773  1,051 1,121 1,026  1,237 1,334 1,214  1,113 1,203  1,290  1,294 ~  —  “  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  $1,442 1,524 -  1,095 1,152 ~  1,292 1,365 -  148  $489  531  -  ~  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  IV  II  Ill  1,229 1,128  1,257 -  1,719 1,681  Personnel Supervisors/Managers  Personnel Specialists  _  547 —  -  531 546 -  997 980  ~  _  _  —  "  1,296  -  -  -  -  _  _ -  1,263 —  1,346 1,201 1,139  —  _  1,059  _ 1,417  1,658  ~  _  _  _  -  -  '  "  930  -  -  -  -  -  723  931  1,138  -  -  -  -  576 627  718 780  952 1,059  1,200 “  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  508 551  684 697  _  _  _  _  _  _  974  —  ~  "  582 634 496  740 792 696  _  939 1,060 936  _  1,251 1,378 —  1,263  _ -  -  '  _  1,600 —  _  1,053 '  _  1,317 1,351 '  _  1,736 1,751  Table J-1. Average weekly pay' in private industry, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Professional State, area,3 and reference month  Accountants I  Utah Box Elder County (September)................. Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).....................  $513  II  III  IV  Accountants, Public V  Engineers  VI  I  II  Ill  IV  II  III  IV  V  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  1  II  III  IV  V  VI  VII  VIII  -  -  _  _  -  -  $579  $718  -  569  721  943  463 503  558 604  691 779  902 990  -  $512  $549 543  $643 618  $925  -  -  -  -  661 718  714 800  862 1,010  1,030 1,163  1,247 1,315  1,531  1,352  Washington Seattle (October) ......................................  489  586  747  967  1,319  _  495  554  625  868  _  _  _  _  668  765  897  1,090  1,327  _  _  _  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July)......................  -  -  674  896  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  771  905  1,041  -  -  -  Vermont Burlington (December) ............................. Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ......................... Richmond-Petersburg (July).....................  $914 $1,116  Attorneys  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  149  $635  $713  $853 $1,045 $1,240 $1,472  _  _  _  -  _  Table J-1. Average weekly pay' in private industry, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative State, area,3 and reference month  IV  $632  $724  $877  -  595  609  497 486  522 579  646 688  -  -  573  675  -  -  -  -  653  -  -  Utah Box Elder County (September)................. Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).....................  -  -  -  Vermont Burlington (December) .............................  -  -  -  -  627  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ......................... Richmond-Petersburg (July).....................  -  -  -  487  595 620  775 “  Washington Seattle (October) ......................................  -  -  -  528  615  -  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July) ......................  -  -  -  -  571  868  $592  Ill  $727 770  IV  $469  II  IV  III   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  I  III  II  See footnotes at end of table.  Computer Programmers  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  Budget Analysts  -  1  $477  II  -  Table J-1. Average weekly pay' in private industry, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Administrative State, area,3 and reference month  Computer Systems Analysts I  II  IV  V  I  II  Ill  1  $1,012  -  -  $1,022  -  -  -  $523  $700  _  _  _  _  _  _  505  667  $712  $816  Vermont Burlington (December) .............................  614  768  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ......................... Richmond-Petersburg (July).....................  637 735  797 875  949 988  $1,299  Washington Seattle (October) ......................................  710  809  964  -  838  -  II  III  Personnel Supervisors/Managers  IV  V  VI  I  II  Ill  $1,042 911  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1,010 1,244  -  -  -  544 577  701 727  979 965  $1,215  _  _  1,062  _  _  _  575  732  935  _  _  $1,054  $1,368  .  -  -  -  -  -  -  670  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Pay data for the following occupational levels did not meet publication criteria in any area: Attorneys I, Budget Analysts I, Budget Analyst Supervisors I and II, Buyers/Contracting Specialists V, Computer Systems Analysts Supervisors/Managers IV, and Personnel Supervisors/Managers V. In addition, for three occupations, only a single area   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Personnel Specialists  III  Utah Box Elder County (September)................. Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).....................  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July) ......................  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers  published average pay data: Attorneys VI averaged $2,836 in New York, NY; Computer Programmers V averaged $945 in Atlanta, GA; and Personnel Supervisors/Managers IV averaged $2,404 in New York, NY. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  151  Table J-2. Average weekly pay’ in private industry, technical and protective service occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 Technical  1  Alabama Huntsville (February)...................... California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) Oakland (December)...................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April).... Sacramento (December)................ San Diego (August)........................ San Francisco (March).............. .... San Luis Obispo County (July)....... Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April).............................. Colorado Denver (December)........................  _  _ _ _  _ $370  II  Ill  IV  $383  $519  _  447 486 418 458 419 455  556 591 509 573 527 566 -  447  567  443  _  $654 630  II  I  $358  $460  Engineering Technicians , Civil  Engineering Technicians  Drafters  Computer Operators  State, area,3 and reference month  III  IV  $535  $708  _ _ -  503 ' 440 -  643 648 597 614 600  -  -  -  1  $334  i  II  Ill  IV  $770  -  -  -  -  -  765 772 683 712 742 “  884 907 — 877 ~  _  — -  _ — -  —  —  _ — ■  IV  $417  $505  $604  514 521 — 487 -  651 613  V  _ — $738  _ $883  -  -  -  _ 722 748 -  -  -  -  611  774  -  -  624  820  -  -  -  -  -  -  393  476  570  -  -  506  623  696  854  -  -  -  -  738  -  -  -  -  536  637  _  595 653 -  — -  VI  Ill  II  — 557 -  _ ”  867 “ _  “  Connecticut New Britain (November)................ .  -  451  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  District of Columbia Washington (February)..................  343  442  524  580  387  483  598  763  460  515  597  706  858  -  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) Miami-Hialeah (September) ..........  _  _  _  -  -  -  450  560  _  _ —  _  522  _ —  _  425  427 519  _  “  Georgia Atlanta (April).................................  348  449  529  663  -  516  600  702  399  492  592  707  873  -  -  -  -  -  Illinois Chicago (May)...............................  358  445  521  598  -  475  590  727  -  484  598  762  923  -  -  -  -  -  Indiana Indianapolis (June)........................  337  402  -  -  444  567  721  -'  -  -  561  662  -  -  -  398  517  658  Louisiana New Orleans (May) .......................  -  384  488  -  401  494  580  670  -  -  663  782  1,006  -  -  -  -  -  Maryland Baltimore (May).............................  353  413  530  -  370  435  559  734  -  -  597  676  741  -  315  408  526  603  Massachusetts Boston (May)................................. Lawrence-Haverhill (September)....  362  435 -  539 542  _ —  835 $1,035  -  -  -  740  —  600 ~  716  -  641 575  494  -  488 450  _  -  '  685  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  152  $354  $413  Table J-2. Average weekly pay' in private industry, technical and protective service occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope 1993 — Continued r Technical State, area,3 and reference month  CComputer Operato rs I  li  III  Drafters IV  I  II  Engineering Technicians  Ill  IV  1  II  III  IV  Engineering Technicians, Civil V  VI  ,  II  III  IV  —  —  Michigan  Detroit (November)...............................  $304  $438  $581  $724  $345  406 385  508 497  633  451 438  358  559  448 485 325  559 592 469  429 407 415 400  518 504 509  352  470  433  416  505  453  440  541 586  $788  $537  $671  $817  $898  —  —  724 699  491 443  564 523  709 678  ~ -  ~  926  773  503  649  740  846  —  —  —  —  —  — —  529 548 590 563  686 648 695 668  747 751 795 720  — — —  -  -  -—  —  ~  —  —  "*  451  530  643  765  -  621  740  879 $1,098  Missouri  305  461  592  —  $561 —  —  -  New Mexico  Albuquerque (September)....................  469  New York  New York (May)..............................  659 687  521 oUU  —  Ohio  Cincinnati (April).................................. Cleveland (June).................................. 321  615 613 603  349 763  — 438 475 443  483  ~  —  ”  ~  -  “ —  —  “  -  $477 ~  —  -  —  —  —  —  -  —  —  —  Oklahoma  288 Oregon  uu 1  Pennsylvania  Reading (December)............................  633  o10  “  -  Tennessee  Chattanooga (August) .......................... 312  399  443 525  421 371  509 516 561  . .  ~ -  Do 1  — —  -  —  —  ~  “  “ —  —  631  -  Texas  Dallas (December) ...............................  387 378  __l  587 646  443 654  890  503 526  580 635  ~  771  929  ~  1,144  $322  432  -  — See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  153   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table J-2. Average weekly pay' in private industry, technical and protective service occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 Continued  _________________ _ Technical  I  $558  -  -  552  -  -  -  555 578  -  -  -  474  597  -  -  -  -  -  II  IV  $398  $560  _  -  365  435  -  -  391 449  478 507  326  433  347  -  -  -  423  517  -  -  396  497  -  Utah  Salt Lake City-Ogden (April)  IV  I  III  I  $300  II  $333  $462  Vermont  Burlington (December) .......  -  Enginejering Teclinicians , Civil  Engineering Technicians  Drafters  Computer Operators  State, area,3 and reference month  Ill  II  $426  Ill  IV  V  VI  I  II  III  IV  $529  $663  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  459  _ 593  _ 721  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  747  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Virginia  Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) .... Richmond-Petersburg (July) Washington  Seattle (October)................ West Virginia  Parkersburg-Marietta (July).  ' Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Pay data for the following occupational levels did not meet publication criteria in any area: Computer Operators V, Engineering Technicians, Civil VI, Corrections Officers, Firefighters, and  $470  -  Police Officers II. In addition, for two occupations, only a single area published average pay data: Engineering Technicians, Civil V averaged $709 in Baltimore, MD; and Police Officers I averaged $562 in Boston, MA. . . 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or tor this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  154  Table J-3. Average weekly pay1 in private industry, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope,1993 Clerks, Accounting  Clerks, General  Clerks, Order  Key Entry Operators  State, area,3 and reference month I  Alabama Huntsville (February) ..................... California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) Oakland (December) ..................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April).... Sacramento (December) ............... San Diego (August)....................... San Francisco (March) .................. San Luis Obispo County (July)...... Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April)............................. Colorado Denver (December)....................... Connecticut New Britain (November) ................ District of Columbia Washington (February)................... Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) Miami-Hialeah (September)............ Georgia Atlanta (April)................................. Illinois Chicago (May) ................................ Livingston County (August) ............ Indiana Indianapolis (June) ......................... Kansas Finney County (October) ................ Louisiana Acadia Parish (August)................... New Orleans (May)......................... Maryland Baltimore (May).............................. Massachusetts Boston (May).................................. Lawrence-Haverhill (September)....  $256  II  III  IV  I  II  IV  ,  II  $406  _  _  1  II  $309  $400  $531  -  $283  $325  395 428 359 395 367 414 335  443 494 413 422 418 492 387  524 545  _  -  -  349 398 316 312 301 390 334  434 438 402 -  383 437 455  465 476 509 -  -  -  369 305  -  355  447  -  -  319  401  549  -  -  286  374  314  353  416  526  -  312  372  480  341  -  303  -  -  371  440  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  379  449  530  248  319  378  -  358  494  350  415  _  271  313 344  369 420  499  -  -  -  473  302  406  311  396  312  376  457  543  -  306  463  427  -  386  344  413  276  381  423  511  278  316  382  475 -  -  428 -  302 -  374 -  ~  _ -  488 516 533  -  $369  “  ~  510 -  $356 418 328 _  369 -  $461 522 424 474 419 494  $292  $354  346 345 333  419 417 395 373 384 478  _  -  290  343  452  561  253  281  350  466  323  430  311  362  -  276  320  -  -  -  306  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  253  325  403  524  _  -  225 270  419  483  315  -  306  358  313  366  408  512  -  286  374  478  -  371  330  386  395 358  439 430  514  _  320  -  -  404 418  473 540  376 353  463 -  361 356  413  -  _  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  III  155  Table J-3. Average weekly pay1 in private industry, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope,1993  Continued  State, area,3 and reference month  Alabama Huntsville (February) , California  Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) . Oakland (December) ...................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April).... Sacramento (December) ................ San Diego (August) ........................ San Francisco (March) ................... San Luis Obispo County (July)....... Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April)..............................  $450  $509 537 522 489 475 539  $337  $402  $473  $560  496 416  501 488  421 428 426  458 464 482  563 562 524 522 523 556 455  638 647 621 592 601 628  Colorado  Denver (December) . Connecticut  $277  $763 770  691 774  District of Columbia  $546  Washington (February) ... Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) . Miami-Hialeah (September).............. Georgia Atlanta (April) .  476  532  399 439  376  liiinois Chicago (May)..................... Livingston County (August) Indiana Indianapolis (June).............  349  377  $374  535 413 420 441 562  332  475  498  338  435  $640  371  613  735  380  392  475  537  464 460  567  718  281 316  342  429  615  528  600  700  345  450  523  537  619  729  352 295  457  533  500  615  737  331  379  431  329 359  355 392 326 329 326 423 319  $334  550  491  New Britain (November) .  Word Processors  Switch­ board OperatorReceptionists  Secretaries  Personnel Assistants (Employment)  Kansas Finney County (October) . Louisiana Acadia Parish (August).... New Orleans (May)..........  251 357  422  Maryland Baltimore (May) . Massachusetts Boston (May).................................  Lawrence-Haverhill (September).  521  440  423 413  473 471  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  363  498  156  531 517  614 615  332  451  390 372  455  551  Table J-3. Average weekly pay’ in private industry, clerical occupations,' selected areas, full industrial scope,1993 — Continued Clerks, A ccounting I  Michigan Detroit (November)...................... Saginaw-Bay City-Midland (March) .......... Missouri Kansas City (July)................... St. Louis (February)..............................  $261  299  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) ........................ New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) .............. New York (May)....................... Utica-Rome (July)...... Ohio Cincinnati (April) ........................... Cleveland (June) .............. Columbus (November) ............... Dayton-Springfield (February) ......... Scioto County (August)......"..................  II  Clerks, General  III  IV  $364 360  $638  ,_  483 496  278  433  394  318 281 334 311  461 375 413  537 579  II  $331  III  IV  II  _ -  $532 -  -  291 294  391 376  488 464  -  281  331  405  -  335 356 -  385 412 -  -  -  475 -  _ -  269  294 317 310 305 245  353 409 389 344 —  455 503 456 420 _  $293 315 315  $257 237  ~  312 —  ~  Key Entry Operators  ,  $387 386  ~  350  313  I  Clerks, Order  I  II  $332 280  $358 374  _ $384  290 290  368 364  -  257  _  428  346  -  264  428 442 533  423 397 445 387  288 280 285 293  354 362 395 334  _  420  479 519 499 488 -  388  473  —  “  397  510  308  _  296  525  248  288  358  437  351  442  335  404  320  332 290  -  402 -  -  471 -  _  330  392 398  -  -  -  _  425  280 338  396 358  -  -  _  _  334 246  270 ~  Oklahoma  Oklahoma City (February) ............  331  319  Oregon  Portland (June)...............................  420  Pennsylvania  Philadelphia (October)............... Reading (December) ......................  318  515 361  ~  South Carolina  Beaufort County (November)............  340 —  Tennessee  Chattanooga (August) .......... Memphis (October).................... Obion County (October) ......  258 276  ~ —  331  279  309 "  Texas  Abilene (December)......................... Houston (March)................. San Antonio (July) .....................  318 272  286 370 360  507 558 491  ~ 274 284  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  157  338 326 267  349 414 422 385  -  — 461 488  274 325  -  314 391  448  -  307 303 295  .  . ' 382 354  Personnel Assistants (Employment) State, area,3 and reference month II  Michigan  $423  Detroit (November) ......................... Saginaw-Bay City-Midland (March) . Missouri  378 368  Kansas City (July).... St. Louis (February) .  III  IV  -  -  $446 457  _  New Mexico  Albuquerque (September) .  _  421 417  486 526  397 420  478  New York  Nassau-Suffolk (November) . New York (May)................... Utica-Rome (July)................ Ohio  Cincinnati (April) ..................... Cleveland (June) .................... Columbus (November) ........... Dayton-Springfield (February) . Scioto County (August)..........  -  _  $617  -  355  _  Pennsylvania  ..  $355 268  $357  $475  373 353  436 413  490 488  563 572  661 699  317 321  331 314  403  324  403  439  504  -  296  -  430 454 302  481 504  529 586 455  617 686 541  724 828  361 406 290  388  338 394 358  412 424 451 397  476 501 517 474  583 577 590 526  641 696 664  312 315 315 291  513  361  -  471 536  607  351 323 365 323  410 456 399 400  471  306  386  -  429  471  -  301  406  357  316  -  -  576  _  400 405  455 419  513 495  603 596  678  347 323  362  439  390  390  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  328 380  440  471 481  531 563  293 301 267  386  -  -  256 346 321 287  425 360 375  467 470  -  -  -  -  -  477 530  566  349 411 422 355  476 481 432  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $590  351  -  388 435  $778  280  -  .. ..  $613  -  Texas  Abilene (December). Dallas (December) ... Houston (March)..... San Antonio (July) ...  $570 583  581  Tennessee  Chattanooga (August) .... Memphis (October)....... Obion County (October)  $465  490  _ -  $443  460  South Carolina  Beaufort County (November).  IV  . Ill  II  |  383  471  Philadelphia (October) . Reading (December) ...  III  OperatorReceptionists  Word Processors  _  Oregon  Portland (June).................  Switch-  _  Oklahoma  Oklahoma City (February) .  II  I  Secretaries  158  488 534 538 459  617 649 550  731 806  549  Table J-3. Average weekly pay1 in private industry, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, full industrial scope,1993 — Continued Clerks, A ccounting I  II  III  Clerks, General IV  I  II  Clerks, Order III  IV  I  Key Entry Operators II  i  II  Utah  Box Elder County (September)........... Salt Lake City-Ogden (April) ..........  $379 $262  $483  335  ” $479  $277  $355  $321  $370  $287  _  $355  Vermont  Burlington (December) .......................  316 347  Virginia  Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ............... Richmond-Petersburg (July)..........  246  318  291  353  4CT  592  —  267  347  -  372  346  -  _ 304  _  339  424  369  Washington  Seattle (October) ......................  368  514  302  371  246  349  $454  West Virginia  Parkersburg-Marietta (July).................  302  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  159  '  ~  ~  278  -  Table J-3. Average weekly pay' in |  Operator-  State, area,3 and reference month  II  I  Utah Box Elder County (September). Salt Lake City-Ogden (April)......  $340  $419  Vermont Burlington (December)  Richmond-Petersburg (July) .  Washington Seattle (October) ..........................  1  Excludes premium pay lor overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  III  IV  V  $552  _  $283  $303  $463  366  404  473  518  374  447  315  411  282  330  602  $680  425  495  366  456  310  392  482  519  599  707  349  434  -  399  481  -  -  263  290  -  -  -  Pay increases, but not  in  316  -  -  482  -  -  -  -  $573  -  ! Pay data for Personnel Assistants (Employment) I did not meet publication criteria in any area. .. i Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  Also excluded are performance  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $415  $382  bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses.  II  I  Receptionists  $330  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ......  Word Processors  Switch-  Secretaries  Personnel Assistants (Employment)  160  Table J-4. Average hourly pay' in private industry, maintenance and toolroom occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 General State, area,2 and reference month  Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Electronics Technicians  Maintenance Electricians  Maintenance  Maintenance  Mechanics,  Mechanics, Motor  Machinery  Vehicle  $15.92  $14.39  $14.20  Maintenance I  II  $10.18  $15.44  III  Machinists  Maintenance  Tool and Die  Pipefitters  Makers  -  -  Alabama Huntsville (February) ...................................................  $9.25  $15.40  -  California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) .................  9.70  19.20  Oakland (December) ...................................................  9.21  18.90  Riverside-San Bernardino (April)........................  10.62  17.06  Sacramento (December) ..........................................  9.62  16.24  San Diego (August) ...................................................... San Francisco ^March) ............................................... San Luis Obispo County (July) .............................  8.83  19.77  10.22  25.75  8.93  -  Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April) ...............................................................  9.21  17.58  13.42 10.07 -  16.59  $19.42  17.54  17.05  17.44  21.32  19.09  17.92  19.42  15.83  18.76  16.47  14.12  20.37  _ 17.17  15.55 15.81  15.63  16.55  18.03  16.59  16.78  16.55  18.10  17.26  $19.05 $19.42  19 81  19.10  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  16.61  14.20  15.12  15.80  -  -  -  -  Colorado Denver (December) ......................................................  8.51  18.13  20.59  17.15  Connecticut New Britain (November) ...........................................  11.25  18.26  -  -  -  18.31  -  16.46  District of Columbia Washington (February)..............................................  8.80  17.44  12.31  20.40  -  18.60  16.02  14.67  13.42  17.57  13.53  15.55  18.89  17.22  16.90  17.71  19.31  16.94  16.14  15.51  19.52  -  -  -  -  -  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) .................  8.08  16.59  Miami-Hialeah (September)....................................  8.12  14.04  _ -  _ 16.75  -  17.15  _  _  -  -  11.91  Georgia Atlanta (April).....................................................................  9.83  17.41  10.30  18.29  -  16.72  Illinois Chicago (May) ..................................................................  10.27  17.82  21.20  -  Indiana Indianapolis (June) .......................................................  9.18  19.09  -  15.22  -  -  Kansas Finney County (October) ..........................................  7.47  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Louisiana Acadia Parish (August)...............................................  7.62  New Orleans (May).......................................................  7.90  15.43  -  16.44  -  16.73  17.29  15.84  12.57  17.77  16.26  15.09  14.67  18.74  18.12  15.58  18.52  16.99  16.52  16.48  17.39  18.33  14.70  20.77  18.22  16.14  15.24  18.25  -  Maryland Baltimore (May) ...............................................................  9.52  16.69  Boston (May) .....................................................................  10.93  17.90  Lawrence-Haverhill (September)........................  11.43  18.88  Massachusetts 11.67 -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  161  Table J-4. Average hourly pay1 in private industry, maintenance and toolroom occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued General  State, area,2 and reference month  Maintenance  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Maintenance  Maintenance  Electricians  Machinists  Workers  I  II  III  $16.19  $19.40  $17.12  —  '  Michigan Detroit (November)...................................  $10.56  Saginaw-Bay City-Midland (March)  10.75  $20.26 -  -  -  Maintenance  Maintenance  Mechanics,  Mechanics, Motor  Machinery  Vehicle  $19.39  Missouri Kansas City (July).....................................  7.91  18.76  St. Louis (February).................................  9.80  18.18  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) !.................  7.74  14.07  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ..............  11.65  19.93  New York (May)..........................................  13.19  18.54  9.61  14.83  Cincinnati (April) .........................................  9.87  17.29  Cleveland (June).........................................  9.97  17.26  Columbus (November)...........................  9.43  17.73  Dayton-Springfield (February) .........  9.49  Utica-Rome (July)......................................  -  -  16.46  14.95  -  -  -  Scioto County (August)..........................  18.14 -  9.22 -  8.52  -  10.75  $18.13  $20.43  $19.84  16.04  17.10  16.38  18.24  19.06  18.24  15.29  14.63  17.77  18.85  15.36  11.78  17.70  16.89  _ 17.36  -  -  17.40  17.89  17.90  14.79  13.24  -  -  13.60  16.30  15.30  14.40  17.96  15.25  16.32  15.80  19.40  16.57  17.61  16.09  16.07  15.66  17.89  17.28  14.26  -  14.01  ~  13.88  -  -  .  15.47  14.30  “  -  13.97 ”  —  16.48  14.80  13.27  13.19  14.56  17.57  16.45  15.42  14.55  15.73  16.02  16.22  13.50  13.89  ‘  12.61  12.30  12.76  _  15.17  14.57  15.83  Oregon 9.42  16.93  Philadelphia (October)...........................  10.71  16.28  Reading (December) ..............................  10.78  15.17  Chattanooga (August).............................  8.82  12.27  Memphis (October)..................................  8.43  16.13  Portland (June)...........................................  -  Pennsylvania 18.47 -  -  -  Tennessee 15.18 -  16.81  -  -  18.02 “ '  —  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ......... ........  Makers  16.66  Ohio  _ $11.82  Tool and Die  Pipefitters  17.24  -  18.00 _  Maintenance  17.63  17.09 14.84 19.70 19.02  17.25  17.13  16.48  -  Texas Abilene (December)................................  7.75  Dallas (December)...................................  9.23  15.20  Houston (March).......................................  8.60  18.05  _  San Antonio (July) ...................................  7.25  12.88  ~  11.15  16.81  19.18  15.60  _ 15.01  _ 16.09  16.62  17.71  18.72  15.89  13.67  16.07  17.06  11.77  11.51  _  .  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  162  _  —  17.77  15.48 15.29  Table J-4. Average hourly pay1 in private industry, maintenance and toolroom occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Electronics Technicians  Maintenance Electricians I  II  -  -  -  _  III  Machinists  Maintenance  Maintenance  Mechanics,  Mechanics, Motor  Machinery  Vehicle  $13.64  $15.42  Maintenance Pipefitters  Makers  -  $15.21  Utah Box Elder County (September)............................. Salt Lake City-Ogden (April)...................................  $15.86 $8.84  14.30  $18.62  -  Vermont Burlington (December)................................................  10.57  -  _  11.91  _  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August)..........................................  8.47  15.79  Richmond-Petersburg (July)...................................  9.54  19.44  $16.50 -  16.82  -  15.82  -  16.74  $15.48 20.15  15.25  13.84  $15 38  19.28  12.81  19.71  19.00  18.20  -  Washington Seattle (October) ............................................................  10.33  18.94  10.51  15.21  21.05  18.02  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July)....................................  1  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for worft on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  -  Also excluded are performance  -  13.19  -  Pay increases, but not  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  163  -  2 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses.  -  Table J-5. Average hourly pay1 in private industry, material movement and custodial occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993  Operators  Janitors I  Handling  Order Fillers  Alabama Huntsville (February).................................  California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October)  $8.89  $6.70  _  11.45  6.69  $11.26  Oakland (December).................................  14.00  7.18  _  Riverside-San Bernardino (April)......  14 09  5.97  _  Sacramento (December) ........................  13.50  6.46  San Diego (August)....................................  12.25  6.10 7.06  San Francisco (March)............................. San Luis Obispo County (July)...........  _ _ 11.49  $5.41  6.51 8.18 _ 7.81  . 13.64 8.63  7.12  7.60  9.75  12.54  8.75  -  $6.76  -  _ $9.98 13.69 8.39 -  -  Warehouse  Receiving Clerks  Laborers  II  T ruckc rivers  Shipping/  Material  Guards Forklift State, area,2 and reference month  $9.11  Specialists Light Truck  $8.31  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  -  -  $13.26  9.98  7.96  $14.17  11.65  10.55  15.75  9.44  7.07  10.39  8.26  14.54 14.25  8.75  7.18  11.92  7.84  -  10.74  -  -  13.83 -  Lorn poc (April)............................................  -  6.34  -  6.94  -  5.86  -  7.88  9.02  6.12  7.37  -  9.90  Colorado 13.09  12.12  6.11  11.78  -  Washington (February)............................  10.38  7.53  Florida Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December)  8.15  5.39  Miami-Hialeah (September).................  8.24  5.94  7.61  10.25  6.13  -  11.49  6.37  Denver (December)....................................  11.06  Connecticut New Britain (November) ........................ .  -  10.61  -  -  15.43  9.94  9.48  -  9.25  9.30  -  9.11  6.40  8.85  6.70  10.00  8.22  10.00  _  7.07  9.80  -  -  -  -  _  _ 8.18  _ 6.87  9.88  6.56  -  -  6.02  13.36  _ 7.99  5.27  “  5.80  8.42  7.20  12.70  Georgia Atlanta (April)..................................................  -  Illinois Chicago (May)............................................... Livingston County (August) .................  -  -  11.63 -  6.18  _  12.68  -  12.89  6.23  —  -  16.55  14.44  11.62  15.86 12.87  “ 12.87  14.50  12.03  13.46  10.96  19.05  12.93  14.68  13.51  16.36  16.12  10.25 10.53  -  -  17.26  11.44  8.38  10.15  8.55  8.77  13.00  -  -  13.93  -  -  16.42  11.61  16.16  10.25  “  -  Indiana Indianapolis (June)....................................  14.18  $9.81  13.39  District of Columbia 11.30  $11.29  —  Santa Barbara-Santa Maria7.69  Tractor Trailer  13.30  14.74  -  Kansas Finney County (October).......................  -  -  -  -  5.03  -  5.56  -  -  -  -  -  11.75  _  _ 8.85  _ 11.18  9.86  12.87  10.15  13.11  11.56  Louisiana 4.52  Acadia Parish (August)........................... New Orleans (May)....................................  5.02  5.70  6.10  9.26  Maryland Baltimore (May)............................................  12.80  6.56  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  164  10.28  Table J-5. Average hourly pay' in private industry, material movement and custodial occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued State, area,2 and reference month  Gu ards  Forklift Operators  Material Janitors  1  II  Handling  Shipping/ Order Fillers  Laborers  Truckdrivers Warehouse  Receiving Clerks  Light Truck  Specialists  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  $15.15  $13.87  $14.90  $11.05  12.49  13.81  13.76  15.30  14.70  13.70  Massachusetts Boston (May) ..................................................................  $12.30  $7.13  Lawrence-Haverhill (September).....................  10.76  7.47  $12.26 -  $8.11  $10.87  $9.75  $11.05  7.54  10.66  9.35  11.07  8.77  13.55  _  12.60  _ -  Michigan Detroit (November)..................................................... Saginaw-Bay City-Midland (March)...............  15.98 -  6.03 -  12.41 -  9.66  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  14.70  Missouri Kansas City (July)........................................................ St. Louis (February)...................................................  13.20  5.82 5.93  12.21  6.24 5.84  _  _  9.94  $7.83  10.30  6.91  10.95  10.36  _  12.96  12.12  14.46  12.20  15.03  8.96  14.48  11.02  19.40  18.35  11.46  -  New Mexico Albuquerque (September)....................................  -  5.01  -  5.29  7.60  8.99  _  _  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November)................................ New York (May)............................................................ Utica-Rome (July)........................................................  9.88  6.99  12.62  8.04  -  10.63  11.89  -  -  7.13  _ 8.75  _ -  _  16.09  12.09  9.66  6.36  -  -  8.80  Ohio Cincinnati (April) ...........................................................  12.28  5.84  10.79  11.36  9.67  12.37  5.87  11.84  _ 6.56  12.50  Cleveland (June) .........................................................  9.03  10.48  10.41  Columbus (November) ............................................  11.44  6.10  7.80  6.21  7.95  9.54  11.68  Dayton-Springfield (February) ...........................  14.31  7.85  -  6.67  10.08  _  12.28  Scioto County (August)............................................  -  -  9.33  6.16  ~  6.84  -  -  5.33  6.98  8.53  6.81  6.93  -  15.07  _ _ 7.54  13.06  15.84  14.90  11.17  13.77  6.93  13.23  10.93  15.42  _  10.25  13.16  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February)....................................  -  -  -  -  -  12.68  11.09  11.20  10.12  15.16  12.82  13.20  12.25  17.88  13.70  15.97  11.52  12.78  Oregon Portland (June)..............................................................  13.54  6.25  10.98  10.72  -  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October).............................................  13.13  7.31  Reading (December) ................................................  11.38  10.05  8.70  12.73  -  8.79  8.64  -  5.84  i. 11.56  10.18 9.52  _ 8.69  10.68  South Carolina Beaufort County (November)..............................  -  7.24  -  -  8.20  -  -  -  -  9.89  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) .............................................  10.03  5.42  Memphis (October).....................................................  9.07  5.53  Obion County (October) .........................................  -  -  -  5.62  11.24  5.26  11.08  8.80  _ 8.50  9.01 _  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  _ 8.85  9.42  _ _  _ _ _  _  11.20  10.98  12.30  9.91  14.83  9.08  14.17  9.68  9.74  12.99  10.63  Texas Abilene (December)...................................................  7.91 10.28  6.44  11.76  4.96  Dallas (December)...................................................... Houston (March)...........................................................  9.82  5.95  13.72  4.71  San Antonio (July) ......................................................  8.61  5.00  6.50  “  5.35  4.82  5.AT -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  165  7.76  8.98  _  7.38  7.01 6.44  9.41  9.30  12.50  Table J-5. Average hourly pay' in private industry, material movement and custodial occupations, selected areas, full industrial scope, 1993 — Continued  Utah Salt Lake City-Ogden (April)...........  Operators  $9.06  Vermont Burlington (December) ......................  -  Janitors  I  $5.28  8.53  Order Fillers  Handling  $5.54  $9.02  7.12  -  $10.30  $7.71  -  -  Warehouse  Receiving Clerks  Laborers  II  Truckdrivers  Shipping/  Material  Guards Forklift State, area,* and reference month  $9.50  8.66  Specialists Light Truck  -  -  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  $12.54  -  -  $9.52  Tractor Trailer  $13.06  -  -  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ............... . Rlchmond-Petersburg (July).........  5.87 6.42  -  13.58  6.70  -  -  -  5.47  Washington Seattle (October) ..................................  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July)............  1  12.62  Excludes premium pay for overtime and tor work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  7.32  7.80  10.44  $7.24  13.32  8.89  13.21  $11.44  10.94  8.82  11.02  15.66  16.13  12.96  9.66  6.41  8.94 11.61  9.99  10.90  8.74  -  -  6.06  7.09  -  9.62  -  -  Pay increases, but not  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  _  -  1 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  Also excluded are performance  bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses.  -  _  166  Table K-1. Average weekly pay in private industry, administrative occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Computer Programmers I  II  Alaska Statewide Alaska (May)................................  -  $577  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October) ......... Pine Bluff (December)...................................  -  542  -  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July)............................ San Jose (June)............................................ Visalla-Tulare-Porterville (July).....................  616 -  -  756 785  Connecticut Danbury (January)........................................  -  642  Delaware Wilmington (October)....................................  -  638  Georgia Augusta (May)...............................................  IV  $774  Arizona Phoenix (March)............................................  Florida Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach and West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Delray Beach (May) ......................... Melbourne-TitusvillePalm Bay (February)................................... Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July).........................................  Computer Systems Analysts  III  652  $535 -  II  III  IV  $1,159  $898  $1,121  -  732  866  $1,030  -  -  780 812  939 944  1,082 1,085  657  $924 -  805 740 -  948 911 783  743  _  _  836  995  740  _  810  903  1,069  1,140 1,291  _  _  761  752  865  960  607  736  674  874  996  623  691  -  757  882  1,048  -  -  655  _  726 746 -  _  679 687 641  _  _  _  _  732  900  708 725  874 821  _  _  -  -  -  548  Illinois Champaign-UrbanaRantoul (October) ....................................... Decatur (November) ..................................... Peoria (February).......................................... Springfield (November).................................  -  547 616 658 -  Indiana Bloomington-Vincennes (November)............ Elkhart-Goshen (October)............................. South Bend-Mishawaka (August) .................  -  566 587  _  _  _  784 -  -  601 676  _  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  I  167  -  Table K-1. Average weekly pay' in private industry, administrative occupations,' selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Computer Systems Analysts  Computer Programmers State, area,3 and reference month I  Iowa Cedar Rapids (May).......................... Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January)............................. Des Moines (June)............................ Waterloo-Cedar Falls (May)..............  II  $563  _  -  IV  III  $639  $694  636 565 615  _  524  _  638  -  ~  -  -  -  -  -  $1,156  _  640 551 -  -  _  -  Michigan Ann Arbor (January)..........................  -  -  669 769 697 686  -  -  -  -  910 978  715  -  -  -  -  546  .  $935 1,056  808 866 833  -  IV  801 947  -  Maryland Hagerstown-Cumberland (February) . Massachusetts Southeastern Massachusetts (March) Western Massachusetts (October) .... Worcester (July)................................  -  -  635  III  $832  ”  625 711 682  _  705 709  II  "  Kentucky Evansville-Clarksville-HopkinsvilleOwensboro-Bowling Green (April) ... Lexington-Fayette (October)............. Louisville (June)................................  _  1  .  -  650 659  751 810  1,003 970  -  709  835  986  -  712  845 805  968 '  1,088  ~  -  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul (February) ....... St. Cloud (February) .........................  $515 463  595 601  684 624  $821 “  Mississippi Jackson (December).........................  459  557  653  -  708  829  -  -  Missouri Southern Missouri (February)...........  362  490  628  -  -  779  -  -  Montana Billings (September).......................... Statewide Montana (September)......  _  493  601  -  -  737 752  _  -  ~  —  Nevada Reno (October) ............. ....................  -  -  668  -  -  825  -  -  New Hampshire Statewide New Hampshire (January)  -  542  649  -  -  787  _  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  168  904  -  Table K-1. Average weekly pay1 in private industry, administrative occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Computer Systems Analysts  Computer Programmers State, area,3 and reference month 1  New Jersey Bergen-Passalo (April).................................. Middlesex-SomersetHunterdon (March)...................................... Monmouth-Ocean (June).............................. Newark (December)...................................... Trenton (October) ......................................... New York Albany-Schenectady-Troy (May) .................. Buffalo (September)...................................... Northern New York (August)......................... Rochester (October) ..................................... North Carolina Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill (August).......... Raleigh-Durham (June).................................  -  II  $610  III  IV  $738  $899  II  I  $861  $1,022  $1,159  1,014 1,061 —  1,131  -  583 630 639  687 779 748 737  808 915 904  710 691 755  872 911 870 936  -  550 609  693 647 666  768  681 795  794 783 773 853  963  811 861  921 1,001  -  681 710  -  658 698  North Dakota Statewide North Dakota (June).....................  -  478  592  -  _  Ohio Lima (September) .........................................  -  603  692  -  “  Oklahoma Tulsa (May)...................................................  -  693  704  Oregon Eugene-Springfield-MedfordRoseburg-Klamath FallsGrants Pass (March)...................................  “  -  684  -  Pennsylvania Harrisburg-LebanonCarlisle (November).................................... Pittsburgh (May)............................................ Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)..............  465 424  598 507  648 672 683  846 ~  -  409  516  South Carolina Florence (December)....................................  “  782  South Dakota Statewide South Dakota (April).....................  523  “  $502  579  556  711  -  691 674  — 545  —  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  IV  $721  -  Puerto Rico (July) ............................................  III  169  1,264 — -  —  723  -  — — 1,224  792  967  709  —  782 815 731  918 983  682  794  -  “  —  759  —  —  — 1,040 ~ ~  -  Table K-1. Average weekly pay1 In private industry, administrative occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Computer Programmers  Computer Systems Analysts  State, area,3 and reference month I  Tennessee Knoxville (November).................................... Nashville (February)...................................... Northeastern TennesseeWestern Virginia (February)........................ Texas Austin (August) ............................................. Beaumont-Port Arthur and Lake Charles (April) .................................... El Paso-Las CrucesAlamogordo (February)............................... Fort Worth-Arlington (October) ..................... Waco and Killeen-Temple (July)...................  -  $585  II  $603 550  III  IV  1  II  III  $644 690  -  -  $679  $802 783  -  649  -  638  765  -  -  $986 910  IV  _  _ -  -  680  -  707  820  952  -  694  715  -  _  _  _  -  675 693 724  -  -  -  550 633 599  -  -  800 827 -  _ 1,020 -  Virginia Southwest Virginia (January)........................  471  548  606  -  653  721  822  -  Washington Spokane (May).............................................. Tacoma (February).......................................  -  571  703  -  -  743 811  _ -  _ -  Wisconsin Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May) ................ La Crosse-Sparta (June)............................... Milwaukee (September)................................  ”  572 590  696 617 689  668  843 821 822  _  $843  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 For two occupations, only a single area published average pay data: Computer Programmers V averaged $964 in Newark, NJ; and Computer Systems Analysts V averaged $1,482 in San Jose, CA. In   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  706  _ 980  _  _ $1,233 -  _  _ 1,226  addition, limited industrial scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies how this limited list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  170  Table K-2. Average weekly pay' in private industry, technical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Engineering Technicians  Drafters  Computer Operators State, area,3 and reference month I  II  III  IV  I  II  III  IV  -  -  -  ~  $654  $848  576  729  565  Alaska Statewide Alaska (May)............................  -  $464  Arizona Phoenix (March) .......................................  -  403  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)..... Pine Bluff (December) ..............................  -  353 368  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July)........................ Bakersfield (May)...................................... San Jose (June) ....................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July).................  -  455 373 489 392  -  -  Connecticut Danbury (January)....................................  -  464  568  -  Delaware Wilmington (October)................................  -  465  560  -  412 -  535  -  -  -  447  -  Florida Bradenton (April) ...................................... Daytona Beach (July) ............................... Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach and West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Delray Beach (May)..................... Melboume-TitusvillePalm Bay (February) .............................. Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ....................................  -  $319  $489  $644  $444  III  IV  V  VI  “  “  “  _  ■  —  “  _ ~  -  $483  “  —  446 406  -  —  —  “  566 438 593  624  393  478 566  643 631 673  766  665  739  430  545 520  ~  ~  ~  “  464  $576  ~  $688  —  $913  $1,067 “ 1,009  “  854 ~  598  722  “  621  798  "  ~  -  ~  638 608  753 727  520  576  -  484  “  -  ~  -  -  391 465  617  -  -  -  -  -  495  -  -  497  619  -  -  -  -  642  392  567  -  -  451  544  -  -  -  -  385  480  -  349  497  —  ~  “  490  573  “  “  “  —  ■  ~  496  “ 640 574  “ -  ~ “ —  533  ~ 686  _  591 526 614  “  342  Illinois Champaign-UrbanaRantoul (October)................................... Decatur (November)................................. Peoria (February) ..................................... Springfield (November).............................  271  391 353 362  625 467 508  -  -  347 396 353  524  -  ~  .  _ ' -  422 451  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $439  II  -  Georgia Augusta (May)..........................................  Indians Bloomington-Vincennes (November)........ Elkhart-Goshen (October) ........................ South Bend-Mishawaka (August).............  $403  1  171  714 -  —  — _  "  .  _ "  ~  ~  “  —  710  ■  ■  “  —  ~ “ ■  _ 570  628 698 637  _ -  “  •“  — ■  _ ~  Table K-2. Average weekly pay1 in private industry, technical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Computer Operators  Drafters  Engineering Technicians  State, area,3 and reference month 1  11  III  IV  I  $356  $431  -  -  Iowa Cedar Rapids (May) ................................. Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January)..................................... Des Moines (June) ...................................  $303  384 379  550 460  Kentucky Evansville-Clarksville-HopkinsvilleOwensboro-Bowling Green (April).......... Lexington-Fayette (October)..................... Louisville (June)........................................  326  349 373 429  530  Maryland Hagerstown-Cumberland (February)........  -  389  537  Massachusetts Southeastern Massachusetts (March)...... Western Massachusetts (October)........... Worcester (July) .......................................  -  401 390 403  509 513 516  Michigan Ann Arbor (January) ................................. Battle Creek (May)....................................  -  432 424  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul (February)............... St. Cloud (February).................................  358 -  Mississippi Jackson (December) ................................ Missouri Southern Missouri (February)...................  -  II  III  _  _  IV  1  II  III  _  _  _  _  -  $445 462  $535  -  -  -  -  -  435 377 444  599 543  -  -  -  429  472  -  ~  -  462 504  568 623 -  524 -  -  — -  —  -  429 360  491 499  609 -  459 477  548 493  “  450  461  -  -  458  -  330  383  -  363  Montana Billings (September) ................................. Statewide Montana (September)..............  “  398 405  466  “  Nevada Reno (October).........................................  -  373  458  391  488  New Hampshire Statewide New Hampshire (January).......  472  $576  -  $624  _ $703  V  VI  _  _  $882  -  -  _ -  735  -  -  _ -  _ -  _ _ -  -  -  569  717  -  -  _ -  _ -  _ -  537 579 592  646 666 648  737 771 -  _  -  -  -  -  _ 670  _ -  _ -  -  478  -  -  565 -  661 -  745 -  _ -  558  -  -  -  -  -  -  407  526  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  341  433  572 542  -  -  -  _ -  _  _ -  _ -  -  -  -  “  -  -  -  -  754  -  -  571  ~  435  557  -  “  443  590  673  -  -  $367  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $480  IV  172  $692  _ -  Table K-2. Average weekly pay1 in private industry, technical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Computer Operators I  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April).............................. Middlesex-SomersetHunterdon (March) ................................. Monmouth-Ocsan (June).......................... Newark (December) ................................. Trenton (October)..................................... New York Albany-Schenectady-Troy (May).............. Buffalo (September) ................................. Northern New York (August) .................... Rochester (October).................................  $395 _  -  -  -  II  Drafters  III  IV  $479  $533  $681  495 420 448 440  555 532 563 586  661 679 -  369 432 331 474  506 576 532  - .  North Carolina Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill (August) ..... Raleigh-Durham (June) ............................  “  428 392  497 512  North Dakota Statewide North Dakota (June) ................  -  362  -  I  II  I  $620  585 549  _ $728  -  622 621 620  -  _ _ -  -  515 446  559 _ 596  _ _ 713  -  -  505 530  -  -  -  461  548  -  -  $377  II  _ $522  III  _ $627  IV  V  $775 680 714  _  VI  _  -  -  _ _ -  _ _ -  558  686  -  708  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  $737  546  -  417  Oregon Eugene-Springfield-Medford-. Roseburg-Klamath FallsGrants Pass (March) .............................. Pennsylvania Harrisburg-LebanonCarlisle (November) ............................... Pittsburgh (May) ....................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)..........  IV  $487  Ohio Portsmouth-ChillicotheGallipolis (January)................................. Oklahoma Tulsa (May)........ .......................................  Engineering Technicians III  510  -  421  486  590  690  _  _  _  _  _  701  _  456  -  421 410 376  550 510 -  -  333  478 409  562 629 536  689 -  _ -  480 -  577  -  -  Puerto Rico (July)........................................  258  286  372  -  -  436  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  South Carolina Florence (December)................................  -  360  -  _  _  455  _  _  _  _  653  _  .  .  -  -  -  379  454  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  South Dakota Statewide South Dakota (April) ................  -  324  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  173  Table K-2. Average weekly pay in private industry, technical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Engineering Technicians  Drafters  Computer Operators State, area,3 and reference month I  I  III  II  IV  I  -  -  II  III  IV  $544 556  $688 -  V  VI  III  IV  $369 400  $500 471  _  376  464  400  509  377  660  348 388 351  465 526 455  _ _  « _  493 388  _ _  _ _  _ -  -  -  -  -  367  508  -  -  411  -  692  -  481  565  583  728  -  350 441  455 543  _  _  403 _  629  -  -  -  -  463  621  432  521  II  Tennessee  $439 458  $585 480  456  561  411  455  564  $685  405  493  670  793  $410  $441 -  $731 -  -  .  .  Northeastern Tennessee-  Texas  $401  485  569  662  738  Beaumont-Port Arthur and .  .  El Paso-Las Cruces-  Vlrglnla Southwest Virginia (January)....................  $320  570 .  -  Washington Yakima-Richland-Kennewick-Pasco-Wal-  _  Wlsconsln 401 335 394  371  463 538  _ _  392  455  644  _ -  -  -  _  _  _  •  _  442 495  577 612  689 715  -  -  scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies how this limited list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Pay data for Computer Operators V did not meet publication criteria in any area. In addition, limited industrial   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  574  _  -  _  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  174  Table K-3. Average weekly pay' in private industry, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Clerks, Accounting  Clerks, General  Clerks, Order  Key Entry Operators  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month I  II  III  IV  -  -  Alabama Dothan (November)..............................  -  $291  Alaska Statewide Alaska (May)........................  -  452  $592  $676  342  398  456  Arizona Phoenix (March)...................................  $287  I  $236  -  335 300  361 424  -  -  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July) ................... Bakersfield (May) ................................. San Jose (June) ................................... Stockton (April)..................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July) ............  349 -  404 335 410 355 314  460 427 500 398 412  525 436 577 460 453  “  Connecticut Danbury (January)................................  -  396  423  506  —  Delaware Wilmington (October) ...........................  -  359  490  620  - . -  330 297  385 383  -  366 342  -  -  Georgia Augusta (May)...................................... Illinois Champaign-UrbanaRantoul (October)............................... Decatur (November)............................. Peoria (February)................................. Springfield (November) ........................  241 -  274 ~  III  IV  I  II  $377  -  -  -  -  442  -  -  -  276  327  284  451 346  -  -  399 441 408 330  450 514  414 -  $305  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October).. Pine Bluff (December)..........................  Florida Bradenton (April) .................................. Daytona Beach (July)........................... Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach and West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Delray Beach (May)................. Gainesville (October)............................ Melbourne-TitusvillePalm Bay (February).......................... Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ................................  II  -  $441  $293  299 295 356 271 421  -  -  -  356  -  388  -  335  374  433  426  -  -  252 -  -  -  395 388  -  -  -  -  -  -  319  -  -  -  315  390  453  328  398  -  292 377 312 299  355 -  435 394  368 -  ■  I  $258  -  -  $397  342  -  -  648  $659  $769  273  II  III  IV  V  -  -  "  -  II  III  $298  -  -  -  440  -  $512  -  304  -  434  -  -  278 238  -  343 -  -  737  -  $374  $365  447  487  550  373  362 306  456 436  488 465  ~  508 453 507 485  649 562 669 549 529  787  -  568 497 580 510 496  -  374 336 396 327 305  475  533  551  653  367  828  357 279 273  $642  298 245  -  466 464 456 484 -  351 300 354 264  427  417  426 382  404 -  483  -  -  324  372  384  482  552  647  -  363 324  397 388  509 417  -  -  -  -  471 456  565 565  -  -  -  -  -  ■  -  624  Word Processors  I  -  489  $574  464  525  -  -  458  -  455  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  310 291  -  385 385  -  -  $352  437  -  -  377  -  -  306 273  376  -  -  -  415 381  -  -  282  -  -  420  460  523  -  282  -  -  271  304  368  427  457  583  -  288  332  -  -  271  “  373  -  566  -  “  274  -  -  -  266 227 285 272  -  -  -  -  -  _  353 287  -  -  303  333  396  256  309  410  -  399  “  ~  346  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  258 301  320  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  256  303  “  ~  -  II  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $469  1  Switch­ board Opera­ torRecep­ tionists  175  318 -  277 283  -  344  -  -  -  446 356 332  -  -  -  -  -  305  466 385  462 516  435  664 518  -  337  381  -  -  Table K-3. Average weekly pay’ in private industry, clerical occupations,’ selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Clerks, General  Clerks, Accounting  Clerks, Order  Key Entry Operators  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month I  Indiana Bloomington-Vincennes (November) ....  $256 267  II  III  IV  I  $515 568 529  _  328  $395 410 332 408  308  396  _  316 331 330  490 382 453  580 448  308 327 327  368 368 412  497 531  _  272  436  _  _  $332 330  _ _  II  $267 284 242 297  III  IV  $296 371  _  I  $277 316 306  _  375  _  _  331  _  347  _  II  $374 _ _  1  $285 253 362  II  $347 _ 393  II  I  $356 375 _ 387  $348 456 _ 436  Iowa Davenport-Rock Island-  Kentucky Evansville-Clarksville-HopkinsvilleOwensboro-Bowling Green (April) ..... Lexington-Fayette (October) ................  _  _  _  _  _  287 276  384  _ _  273 257  _  _  271  _ _  313  III  IV  V  $472  — _ _  — _ _  $323 307 333 312  —  — _ 529  —  281  — 456 505  $625 554 _  — _ _  317 311 295  414  _  — 400 388  459  _ 347 558  408 354 _  _  Switch­ board Opera­ torRecep­ tionists  Word Processors  I  II  III  — _  — _ _  — _ _  $354  —  _  — 390 -  — _ -  — $331 311  _  _  280  —  —  321  —  299 317 245  326 360 361  447 418 420  474 493  661 593  —  337 300 283  -  -  —  —  -  —  —  _  _  —  —  _  —  —  —  472  —  —  —  —  —  —  _  367  Louisiana _  Maryland Hagerstown-Cumberland (February)....  _  341  473  -  _  269  422  -  288  376  289  -  368  372  464  608  -  276  -  -  -  Massachusetts Southeastern Massachusetts (March)... Western Massachusetts (October).......  -  336 351 370  414 420 456  485  _  313 336 321  356 381 395  _  287 309  476 454  293 319 344  364 361 397  339 400 392  428 442 434  512 508 508  575 563 555  $648  347 344 358  —  389  —  408 364 411  —  —  _  —  —  _  _  _  _  _  _  326 560 351  —  456 479  299 278  355 336  421 389  503 466  291 270  366 361  281  321 311  377 401  _  _  274  _  _  _  —  Michigan Alpena-Standish_  — $568  —  —  —  —  553  553  -  501  _  -  -  330 352  -  452 432  490 429  568  695  -  -  337 289  -  _  —  —  —  —  —  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  322  _  _  _  458  -  369 _  Minnesota $257  449  —  _  282  433 345  _  367 335  _  _  314  —  291  —  _  _  373  Mississippi _  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  176  _  340  337  400  467  579  —  289  325  _  _  _  _  _  _  418 -  372 _  — _  $505 -  — _  Table K-3. Average weekly pay' in private industry, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Clerks, Order  Clerks, General  Clerks, Accounting  Key Entry Operators  Switch­ board  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month I  Missouri Southern Missouri (February)............... Montana Billings (September)............................. Statewide Montana (September)..........  -  $245  Nebraska Grand Island-Hastings (August)........... Nevada Reno (October).....................................  IV  $270  $333  $442  -  287 260  294  “  293  289  -  235  -  “  -  254  357  402  “  318  341  -  -  348  327  383  “  287  322  “  ~  325  IV  I  $296  $357  -  -  327 306  423 403  270  -  New Hampshire Statewide New Hampshire (January)....  $486  448  II  I  II  II  III  III  II  $275  $354  -  449  I  II  I  Word Processors  III  IV  V  torRecep­ tionists  “  —  $269  $233  “  272 258  368 347  I  II  $262  $298  $301  $398  $432  295 285  316  308 303  359 325  404 485  “  338  368  —  “  272  “  415  400  374  498  518  ~  340  “  396  379  438  498  525  333  332  $529  $609  III  ~ $415 397  —  — “  “  —  — -  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April) ......................... Middlesex-SomersetHunterdon (March)............................. Monmouth-Ocean (June) ..................... Newark (December)............................. Trenton (October).................................  321  406  466  535  -  344  428  505  387  436  353  419  423  469  558  640  730  381  -  492  -  387 369 400 395  457 467 471 437  544 512 560 504  -  309 357 329 -  398 469 431 393  520 469 585 -  470 374 -  492 426 496 -  331 350 343 -  449 418  487 470  470 543 520 453  557 558 591 530  620 630 666 630  758 743 “  358 330 390 392  -  464 455 “  New York Albany-Schenectady-Troy(May).......... Buffalo (September) ............................. Northern New York (August) ................ Poughkeepsie (September).................. Rochester (October).............................  -  388 327 315 346 368  459 385 452 454 454  544 564  -  279 309 337  346 354  359 334  414  479  385  456  308 246 321  380 365 372  423  432 483  499 489 449  “  563  555 567 609  721  326 277 295 310 338  -  -  393 446 466 412  525 — 529  -  304 259 311  356 375 319 409  448  “  -  -  330 371 264 363  384 311 256 286  361 337  396 361 343 327 399  424 427  467 450 491 485  608 590  725  308 335 248 246 329  ~  442 403  -  321  341  -  -  265  326  261  -  275  -  387  420  653  “  268  275  “  —  -  346  444  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  429  571  -  -  305  -  -  -  “  “  246  264  —  —  “  —  278  '  North Carolina Asheville (March).................................. Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill (August) .. Fayetteville (March)............................... Jacksonville-New Bern (November)..... Raleigh-Durham (June)........................ North Dakota Statewide North Dakota (June)............ Ohio Lima (September)................................. Portsmouth-ChillicotheGallipolis (January) ............................ Oklahoma Tulsa (May) ..........................................  —  —  -  384  434  -  -  319  331  390  467  -  -  341  271  ~  -  454  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  177  349  -  _  -  —  -  -  348  411  475  598  “  -  —  —  $557  — ~  -  “ 530  ■ 372  Table K-3. Average weekly pay1 in private industry, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued Clerks, Accounting  Clerks, General  Clerks, Order  Key Entry Operators  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month 1  Oregon Eugene-Springfield-MedfordRoseburg-Klamath FallsGrants Pass (March)..........................  -  II  III  IV  I  $319  $366  $437  -  Pennsylvania Harrisburg-LebanonCarlisle (November) ........................... Pittsburgh (May)................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November) .....  $295 282 255  357 330 315  420 431 356  -  II  III  $240  $298  “  294 294 263  375 373 378  $265  IV  I  “  -  $509 ~  II  II  I  II  III  IV  V  -  -  Word Processors  1  II  III  -  -  -  $249  $307  $288  $426  $435  ~  324 302 268  328 372  ■ 419 319  462 430 343  502 457 436  T$554 522  $654 “  344 294 290  -  -  224  317  270  279  348  383  515  230  -  -  -  -  390  “  -  428  421  -  -  298  -  -  -  $293 298  $398  1  Switch­ board Opera­ torRecep­ tionists  $298  $320 354 -  $375 471 -  $459 -  Puerto Rico (July)....................................  251  260  306  -  -  -  -  South Carolina Florence (December) ...........................  -  335  -  -  -  300  393  South Dakota Statewide South Dakota (April) ............  -  296  366  -  -  263  348  -  286  333  255  334  316  348  454  533  "  287  -  371  -  251  315 317  336 403  490  236 246  281 290  344 356  -  292 291  409 372  295 310  397 369  365 344  383 417  460 451  536  -  305 310  305 285  396 393  _ -  -  319  387  425  -  252  317  -  279  -  292  ~  315  422  417  -  -  275  -  -  -  288  312  381  495  -  295  433  482  -  -  309  401  362  421  480  587  675  287  361  -  _  -  352  452  -  -.  -  441  -  -  -  264  447  454  569  663  -  -  277  _  -  _  251 ~  253 316 303 249 296  350 442 400 304 341  487 -  240 -  298 282 258 323  336 469 402 328 408  309 -  -  249 305 234 259  343 336  308 459 347 323 356  362 445 -  414 498 399 441  631 607 -  768 -  250 316 280 215 305  -  412 -  -  228  337  363  -  -  266  341  293  -  289  407  398  403  483  532  -  294  -  374  -  289 -  319 375  360 414  512  -  -  267 285  393 -  • -  346  -  311 286  390 -  -  387 396  427 499  535 -  -  283 334  -  353 -  -  -  321  398  460  -  308  352  -  -  -  319  -  -  392  437  -  298  “  373  -  280 288  322 297 335  392  497  267  269 305  335 366  443  360 300  -  269 265 296  345 342 365  377  400 348 454  440 436 513  -  _  -  -  -  347  401  Tennessee Knoxville (November)........................... Nashville (February)............................. Northeastern TennesseeWestern Virginia (February)............... Texas Austin (August)..................................... Beaumont-Port Arthur and Lake Charles (April) ........................... El Paso-Las CrucesAlamogordo (February)...................... Fort Worth-Arlington (October)............. Longview-Marshall (July)...................... Rio Grande Valley (November)............ Waco and Killeen-Temple (July) .......... Virginia Southwest Virginia (January) ............... Washington Spokane (May)..................................... Tacoma (February)............................... Yakima-Richland-Kennewick-PascoWalla-Pendleton (March) ................... Wisconsin Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May)........ La Crosse-Sparta (June)...................... Milwaukee (September) .......................  399 405  -  440 -  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Limited industrial scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  391  401  -  -  -  -  603  300 272 318  -  _ -  -  how this limited list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  178  Table K-4. Average hourly pay' in private industry, maintenance and toolroom occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Slate, area,2 and reference month  General Maintenance Workers  Alabama Dothan (November) ....................................  $11.04  Alaska Statewide Alaska (May)..............................  13.20  Arizona Phoenix (March) .........................................  7.55  7.91  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Electricians  1  II  III  $14.30  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  $13.64  $11.73  $11.37  -  -  Machinists  Pipefitters  Makers  18.77  -  -  -  $19.71  -  18.57  -  15.18  -  18.66  13.89  14.92  -  $16.91  14.70 12.82  $10.67  -  -  14.93  -  13.29 10.82  14.06 11.75  -  -  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July).......................... Bakersfield (May)........................................ San Jose (June).......................................... Stockton (April)........................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July)...................  10.14 8.47 10.06 10.22 9.26  18.47 16.80 20.36 15.91 13.82  11.15 -  16.98 15.41 15.95  $19.08 -  19.74 17.80 18.37 15.21 14.22  16.30 16.06 17.38 15.70 14.57  16.67 15.44 17.51 14.91 14.70  -  18.23 22.06 -  Connecticut Danbury (January)......................................  12.86  -  “  16.60  -  16.56  15.37  ~  Delaware Wilmington (October)..................................  10.55  19.21  “  18.96  -  17.19  16.14  16.90  $19.66  10.12  12.38 12.62  -  13.64  -  13.96 10.21  -  -  16.15  13.37  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)....... Pine Bluff (December) ................................  Florida Bradenton (April)......................................... Daytona Beach (July) ................................. Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach and West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Delray Beach (May)....................... Gainesville (October).................................. Melbourne-TitusvillePalm Bay (February) ................................ Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ......................................  -  .  -  -  -  • 7.90 6.51  -  9.94 7.58  16.90  8.87  13.72  -  15.86 16.03  -  11.97  15.68  19.05  16.70  -  -  -  16.20  -  15.91  -  -  -  8.59  16.10  10.99  13.87  19.21  -  15.70  15.92  -  15.08  Georgia Augusta (May) ............................................  10.17  13.46  -  -  16.11  16.57  “  -  Illinois Champaign-UrbanaRantoul (October)..................................... Decatur (November)................................... Peoria (February)........................................ Springfield (November)...............................  9.14 8.61 7.50 8.25  _  _  17.57 18.25 “  -  “  13.02 17.04  -  -  -  16.30  o _  “  _  17.22 “  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  179  _  14.09 16.23 12.65  _  “  14.74 “  Table K-4. Average hourly pay' in private industry, maintenance and toolroom occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued State, area,3 and reference month  General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Electricians  Machinists  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  $17.90 13.63 20.97 15.99  $13.35 15.48  Maintenance Pipefitters  Tool and Die Makers  $16.50  $15.54  -  -  I  II  III  -  -  $17.70 -  $14.08 15.42  9.40  $15.14 21.15 16.44  9.99  16.79  -  -  -  -  16.10  14.48  8.29 9.60 -  17.57 16.18 -  -  $15.84  -  15.22 16.72  16.61 15.56 17.07  15.00 14.24 -  -  Kentucky Evansville-Clarksville-HopkinsvilleOwensboro-Bowling Green (April)............ Lexington-Fayette (October)....................... Louisville (June)..........................................  8.26 7.72 8.56  16.59 15.06  -  13.20 15.53 15.32  17.12 -  15.81 -  15.18 14.97 13.37  14.28 12.44 13.49  “  Louisiana Alexandria-Leesville (April).........................  6.86  16.13  -  -  -  ~  “  “  Maryland Hagerstown-Cumberland (February)..........  9.13  16.46  -  14.65  17.98  13.20  12.64  Massachusetts Southeastern Massachusetts (March)........ Western Massachusetts (October) ............. Worcester (July)..........................................  11.01 10.29 11.76  15.77 15.21 16.13  -  14.20 13.70  16.58 -  14.10 14.12 14.24  14.90 15.77 15.54  13.16  13.77 14.71  16.16  15.21 14.48 15.02  -  12.40 19.40 19.00  18.49 16.96  18.40  18.52 16.61  17.54 14.05  Indiana Bloomington-Vincennes (November).......... Elkhart-Goshen (October)........................... Kokomo (December)................................... South Bend-Mishawaka (August) ............... Iowa Cedar Rapids (May)................................... Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January)....................................... Des Moines (June)...................................... Waterloo-Cedar Falls (May)........................  $8.30 10.36  -  -  -  14.12  -  15.99  17.40  ~  -  14.20 17.71 17.39  — 14.92  Michigan  Alpena-StandishTawas City (January)................................ Ann Arbor (January) ................................... Battle Creek (May)......................................  -  12.62  -  8.77 8.70  17.01  -  10.82 9.35  18.68 17.68  -  9.50 -  16.59 17.32  -  8.09  13.33  -  7.06 7.74  17.71 15.52  “  “  -  Minnesota  Minneapolis-St. Paul (February)................. St. Cloud (February) ...................................  -  17.42 16.01  15.49 14.29  15.08 12.74  19.08  -  -  -  14.27 16.01  13.67  -  15.77  -  12.87  12.21  11.90  15.95  14.92 17.37  15.29 13.60  13.90  -  Mississippi  Jackson (December)................................... Meridian (October)......................................  -  —  Missouri  Southern Missouri (February).....................  ~  13.15  Montana  Billings (September) ................................... Statewide Montana (September)................  -  -  -  17.46  20.17  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  180  18.67 17.80  -  —  Table K-4. Average hourly pay' in private industry, maintenance and toolroom occupations,' selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued State, area,3 and reference month  General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Electricians  I  II  III  $16.16  -  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  -  $11.39  Machinists  Pipefitters  Makers  -  -  $14.38  Nebraska Grand Island-Hastings (August) .................  $7.48  $11.30  -  Nevada Reno (October)...........................................  9.84  -  $10.25  14.07  -  -  15.07  $16.82  -  -  New Hampshire Statewide New Hampshire (January) .........  10.14  14.46  9.78  13.44  $18.53  $13.83  13.23  14.90  -  14.84  11.29  16.49  -  _  17.52  15.23  15.90  15.25  _  17.11  12.50 13.99 11.91 10.57  17.62 15.39 19.46 17.75  -  -  -  18.35  15.97 14.55 17.09 16.32  15.41 17.69 16.52 13.39  $17.92  17.40 18.74  9.62 10.22  16.66 18.62 14.80  -  _ _ -  _ _ _ -  15.41 16.17 13.33  15.10 17.63 14.52  16.56  18.20  _ -  _ 13.87  15.44 14.59 16.65 16.07 16.79  _ 17.24 _ _ 17.93  12.13 _ _ -  13.10 12.92 14.22 12.08 12.97  13.62  18.73  16.86  14.83  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April)................................ Middlesex-SomersetHunterdon (March) ................................... Monmouth-Ocean (June)............................ Newark (December).................................... Trenton (October) ....................................... New York Albany-Schenectady-Troy (May) ................ Buffalo (September).................................... Northern New York (August)....................... Poughkeepsie (September)........................ Rochester (October) ...................................  11.36  19.00  North Carolina Asheville (March)........................................ Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill (August)........ Fayetteville (March) .................................... Jacksonville-New Bern (November) ........... Raleigh-Durham (June) ..............................  8.76 8.68 7.51 7.73 7.99  13.89 13.95 13.84 15.65  -  North Dakota Statewide North Dakota (June)...................  6.81  17.98  -  17.03  Ohio Lima (September)....................................... Portsmouth-ChillicotheGallipolis (January)...................................  9.98  18.01  -  14.09  10.04  15.75  -  16.10  17.10  Oklahoma Tulsa (May).................................................  8.54  17.03  -  16.69  -  Oregon Eugene-Springfield-MedfordRoseburg-Klamath FallsGrants Pass (March) ................................  8.90  14.26  -  16.60  -  Pennsylvania Harrisburg-LebanonCarlisle (November).................................. Pittsburgh (May) ......................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)............  10.45 9.91 9.90  16.08 16.02 14.13  -  16.16 14.88 14.57  17.46  -  -  _  _  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  181  _ 16.38 16.83 15.76  13.37 14.19 12.29 _  _ 19.31 19.21  _  15.51 17.20  _  14.52  19.67 13.29  20.53  17.79  _  _  14.61  _ _  -  -  12.36  -  -  16.36  13.53  18.38  17.47  15.78  14.28  15.05  -  12.97  -  14.51  14.21  17.00  16.16  13.07  12.93  -  14.65 15.77 13.09  16.14 13.66 14.88  15.34  _  12.89  _  14.26 12.60  _  -  -  _  18.04 14.63  Table K-4. Average hourly pay' in private industry, maintenance and toolroom occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued State, area,3 and reference month  General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Electricians  I  Maintenance Machinists  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  $10.71  $13.18  $9.11  $9.65  $9.24  10.44  11.55  -  15.09  11.98  —  —  14.60  $9.17  9.26  14.20  _  15.06  —  -  7.96  13.88  —  10.66  —  -  9.81 8.36  16.60 16.32  _  14.05  —  _  8.84  12.51  _  —  South Carolina  South Dakota  7.38  18.34  _  6.92 7.91 7.87 6.26 8.34  13.66  —  16.69 13.79  14.74 13.09  13.32 13.83  — -  13.42 13.81  13.31  —  11.24  11.28  11.09  -  13.30  15.85  —  13.09  12.52  -  —  17.73  15.83  $18.48  -  14.81 16.92 11.22 9.20 12.84  —  12.35  14.98 14.58 12.72 12.17 13.47  8.45  13.78  13.32  13.62  13.14  15.11  13.53  8.50 9.07  18.44 17.77  13.65 13.88  14.64 14.23  -  -  7.58  —  ~  9.51 9.57 10.47  18.90  —  —  18.80  El Paso-Las Cruces14.94 13.94 14.64  _ _ _  —  —  -  -  _  15.11  -  Virginia  17.23  Washington  —  15.26 -  17.27 -  _  _  -  18.12  —  —  —  17.31  15.02  14.45  15.12 12.98 18.42  _  —  14.55  14.48 12.86 15.01  14.68 11.79 15.93  Yakima-Richland-Kennewick-Pasco-Walla-  16.27  _  _  _  _  17.79 18.06  -  17.90  -  14.78 17.68  — 18.05 14.51 -  14.75 18.09  list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Limited industrial scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies how this limited   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $11.01  -  _  Northeastern Tennessee-  _  Tool and Die Makers  Ill  $6.94  8.57  Maintenance Pipefitters  li  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  182  Table K-5. Average hourly pay1 in private industry, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Guards State, area,3 and reference month  Operators  Janitors I  Alabama Dothan (November)..................................  $8.63  Alaska Statewide Alaska (May)............................  11.86  $7.93  Arizona Phoenix (March) .......................................  9.21  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)..... Pine Bluff (December) .............................. California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July)........................ Bakersfield (May)...................................... San Jose (June) ....................................... Stockton (April) ......................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July)................. Connecticut Danbury (January).................................... Delaware Wilmington (October)................................ Florida Bradenton (April) ...................................... Daytona Beach (July) ............................... Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach and West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Delray Beach (May)..................... Melboume-TitusvillePalm Bay (February) .............................. Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ........................:.......... Georgia Augusta (May) .......................................... Illinois Champaign-UrbanaRantoul (October)................................... Decatur (November) ................................. Peoria (February) ..................................... Springfield (November).............................  II  Material Handling Laborers  $6.10  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  $7.66  5.44  -  5.28  8.40  $7.53  7.97  8.65 10.72  4.68 7.83  -  4.66 5.93  7.84 -  8.54 -  8.39 7.49  12.92 7.57 10.64 12.84 7.60  6.43 6.14 7.95 5.78 6.45  -  6.20 6.76 7.57 8.18 7.11  10.13 9.27 6.41  -  -  7.10  7.41  -  7.24 4.99  -  12.94  11.23  6.20  9.17  4.97  .  8.77  5.20  -  9.45  -  9.50 13.02 11.60 -  Medium Truck  -  7.13  -  9.53 -  -  $6.65  6.96 8.94 7.59  -  -  10.61  9.63  6.79  9.43  10.51  12.18  8.43  7.07 6.07  -  10.91  -  -  -  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  $8.26  10.17 12.81 9.28  5.45  -  $13.37  14.48 _ -  “  -  -  15.16  -  Specialists  $11.58 $17.06  15.87  11.28  13.66  8.86  -  12.61 8.34  11.44 -  14.09 11.11 16.29 12.58 12.98  12.43 10.35 11.67 12.52 10.83  -  14.67 13.62 -  -  10.97  -  -  15.82  -  10.75 14.03  7.22  6.90  9.48  11.97  11.07  14.33  8.31  6.31  9.61  13.54  9.03  10.03  11.11  10.12  12.64  8.81  14.56  14.41  5.13  8.01  8.60  8.13  -  11.86  -  5.37  6.87  _  8.22  _  14.93  -  6.33 6.39 5.84 5.65  8.15  7.62 8.78 7.55  -  7.93 -  -  Truckdrivers Light Truck  $8.74  -  7.77 -  10.57 -  -  See footnotes at end ot table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Order Fillers  183  -  -  _  _ -  12.23 12.31 -  9.38 13.27 -  -  Table K-5. Average hourly pay' in private industry, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued State, area,3 and reference month  Forklift Operators  Guards Janitors  Material Handling Laborers  Order Fillers  Truckdrivers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Light Truck  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  $10.71 —  $11.01 10.06 18.44 12.29  $9.48 13.87  -  -  11.46  1  II  -  $8.33 8.04 17.05 5.77  $6.64 7.75  $9.43  $9.56 9.47  $7.85  9.80  -  6.87  _  8.55  -  $13.52  13.51  -  -  6.87  10.53  11.49  -  -  12.26 11.55 13.62  $4.92  $13.98  -  -  7.82 6.32 10.13  8.00 -  8.31 8.52  10.28 9.05 8.81  -  -  —  —  Kentucky Evansville-Clarksville-HopkinsvilleOwensboro-Bowling Green (April).......... Lexington-Fayette (October)..................... Louisville (June)........................................  9.94 10.24 11.90  7.20 6.30 5.64  -  8.06 5.20 5.95  8.03 11.26  12.33  8.69 7.53 12.06  7.03 7.05  Louisiana Alexandria-Leesville (April).......................  7.50  4.89  -  5.60  -  _  10.01  -  Maryland Hagerstown-Cumberland (February)........  10.65  11.00  8.30  9.92  8.22  9.25  Massachusetts Southeastern Massachusetts (March)...... Western Massachusetts (October)........... Worcester (July) .......................................  11.35 11.34 10.66  8.22 6.75 7.61  10.42 -  8.20 6.82 7.83  7.76 10.42 7.78  12.36 10.71 10.83  10.11 11.14 10.93  9.62 7.94  Michigan Alpena-StandishTawas City (January) ............................. Ann Arbor (January) ................................. Battle Creek (May)....................................  16.27 11.55  -  -  6.93 10.97 11.80  -  -  10.55 10.66  -  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul (February)............... St. Cloud (February).................................  13.26 9.51  6.94  -  7.04 6.89  10.44 8.58  8.95 “  11.78 9.61  8.63 8.25  Mississippi Jackson (December) ................................ Meridian (October)....................................  8.84 9.07  4.59 4.99  -  4.64 -  8.83  8.51 ”  9.02 8.04  5.52  Missouri Southern Missouri (February)...................  8.99  5.15  -  6.02  9.29  9.77  8.33  Montana Billings (September) ................................. Statewide Montana (September)..............  9.38 9.97  -  -  7.30  “  5.26 6.31  6.28 9.10  11.76  10.25 8.96  Indiana Bloomington-Vincennes (November)........ Elkhart-Goshen (October) ........................ Kokomo (December) ................................ South Bend-Mishawaka (August)............. Iowa Cedar Rapids (May) ................................. Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January)..................................... Des Moines (June) .................................. Waterloo-Cedar Falls (May) .....................  $12.21 9.09  ~  ~  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  184  11.32  _  12.74 10.92  ~  Warehouse Specialists  ■  11.63 -  14.97 11.72 13.45  14.06 10.16  9.03  12.61 13.45 11.52  10.54 10.67  "  -  —  10.92  8.70  13.16  9.09  9.46 10.80 12.14  11.30 13.84  13.79 15.30 14.31  10.13 12.64 10.69  9.42 17.00 14.25  10.04 11.76 15.05  -  — -  ~  13.77 11.44  14.40  — —  -  13.13 —  9.28 7.08  8.14  -  9.43  12.31  9.66  8.79  -  -  13.76 12.20  11.77  —  13.94  14.42  —  ■  Table K-5. Average hourly pay' in private industry, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 — Continued State, area,3 and reference month  Forklift Operators  Gu ards Janitors I  II  Material Handling Laborers  Order Fillers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Truckdrivers  Warehouse Specialists  Light Truck  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  —  -  —  $11.30  —  —  —  12.56  $9.52  13.10  11.00  $14.81  14.94  15.24  ~  16.28 11.75 15.78  12.65 14.52 —  Nebraska $10.17  $6.83  $7.33  $7.77  Nevada  New Hampshire Statewide New Hampshire (January).......  14.22  $7.21  11.45  6.26  12 43  6.78  6.43  -  6.83  9.52  6.70  11.04  7.13 7.98 7.20  12.63  $9.22  9.83  8.75  9.56  $14.27  _  New Jersey Middlesex-Somerset11.09 9 86 1081 12.88  7.04 9.46  12.52 9.66  9.72  12.29 10.28 10.71 10.14  New York 11.72 14 15 12 10  6.31 5.73 10.48  10.46  6.43  $12.76  9.87 7.42 6.59  6.59  -  7.87 6.27  7.25  11.90 10.31  15.29  $11.74  —  ~ 16.58 12.66  —  12.92  —  -  10.36 8.66 8.12  13.05 15.14 —  _ 13.24  15.64 14.19  9.22  10.46  14.14  — 12.83  13.01 14.58  8.73 8.94  7.59  13.11 11.87  10.41  12.04 11.85  10.16  6.34  12.85  12.06 11.44 9.94 14.38  North Carolina Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill (August) .....  8.81 9.46 11.63 9.11 10.45  7.90  8.18  —  6.52 5.17  “  ~ 12.57  7.88 10.17 8.15 8.21 10.14  ~  11.60  14.04  North Dakota 9.28  5.50  9.16  8.26  —  Ohio 12 01  9.06  12.09  8.61  13.04  5.67  10.92  5.79  13.63 12.39 11.86  6.08  10.17  Portsmouth-Chillicothe9.87  11.61  9.47  )  8.39  -  10.72  7.85  9.29  -  10.40  —  -  10.55  9.34  14.42 14.21 11.91  11.24 10.73 12.34  Oklahoma 7.23  ~  Oregon Eugene-Springfield-MedfordRoseburg-Klamath Falls6.48  10.15  Pennsylvania Harrisburg-Lebanon-  Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)..........  9.27 5.77  5.97 5.95 6.68  9.37 10.61 9.81  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  185  10.36  9.53 9.69 9.73  7.52 10.45  14.04  10.77 13.15 10.05  Table K-5. Average hourly pay1 in private industry, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, limited industrial scope, 1993 Guards State, area,3 and reference month  Operators  $6.56  Janitors I  $4.20  II  $4.97  South Carolina  $4.49  Material Handling Laborers  Order Fillers  $6.13  8.90  8.75  8.77  6.20  8.55  $7.72  8.28  6.81 5.78  6.80 10.29  8.24 9.42  8.31 9.67  Heavy Truck  9.21  _  _  _  9.66  9.28 —  9.72 12.35  9.65 10.70  11.78  11.57  8.42  8.77  9.95  8.54  -  9.67  12.48  11.32 12.61 8.43 9.36  9.02 9.89 9.35 6.54 9.30  7.19  7.00  8.55  8.42  9.49  -  8.57  6.12  4.93  7.23  9.16  8.42  6.71  12.02  7.05  -  5.11 -  -  13.09 8.70 12.42 ”  — ~  Texas Beaumont-Port Arthur and 12.54  4.63  7.69 8.90 10.31 5.46 7.40  5.15 5.85  _  _  6.52  _  8.69  5.82  12.74 13.49  5.38  8.90  7.45  10.75 11.39 11.87  7.89  El Paso-Las Cruces4.83 5.33  _ _  Virginia  Washington _  _  _  .  8.41 6.33  _  _  6.36  -  -  10.54  8.53 12.59  -  8.74 6.64  5.23 5.57  -  -  8.21 8.24 8.82 6.62 8.56  6.43  7.34  7.57  7.75  9.33  16.31  10.46  12.37  10.71  5.81 6.98  8.43  _  -  9.96 10.91  _  -  7.58  11.86 —  14.40  14.31 13.88  10.75 10.26  9.10  _  _  9.68  _  11.11  13.81  11.27  11.07  5.94 6.25 6.41  7.50  8.71  9.95 8.49 9.72  8.71 12.64  12.68 10.52 15.06  11.74  9.64  Yakima-Richland-Kennewick-Pasco-Wal-  Wisconsin  12.67  $6.26  _  8.38  $6.89  Warehouse Specialists  $6.17  5.80  _  Tractor Trailer  $6.34  8.53 9.51 Northeastern Tennessee-  -  8.74  10.18  — 10.83  “ 14.57  list differs from that used in other OCSP surveys. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Limited industrial scope surveys publish pay data for an abridged list of occupations. Appendix B identifies how this limited   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Medium Truck  $8.78  6.18  Tennessee  Truckdrivers Light T ruck  $5.69  8.74 South Dakota  Milwaukee (September)............................  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Continued  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  186  Table L-1. Average weekly pay1 in State and local government, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 Professional State, area,3 and reference month  Accountant I  II  III  Attorneys IV  V  I  II  III  Engineers IV  V  I  II  Alabama Huntsville (February) ................................  III  IV  V  VI  ~  -  —  —  $804  -  699  $944  $1,119  -  $1,013 900 970 831 795 794 906 860  940 990 1,110 916 835 859 861 1,017  1,128 1,180 1,285 1,093 1,008 1,034 1,054 1,247  1,270 1,338 1,425 1,268 1,138 1,177 1,215  $1,504 1,490 1,493 1,269 1,415 1,284  793 —  927 806  1,056 900  —  777  —  1,114  1,246  —  775 ~  —  —  710  860  1,255  576  760  875  1,013  1,545 1,929  589  757  845 832  968 1,001  — 1,058  594  721  825  958  1,044  -  549  665  783  897  1,006  —  675  754  897  1,049  1,223  Arizona $543 Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)..... California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July)........................ Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) ......... Oakland (December) ............................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April)..............  -  $628 679  San Diego (August) .................................  $653  $816  461  596  697  771 708 769 672 641 629  867 833 920 738 737 759 916 895 862  1,021 988 1,135 902 890 973 960 1,088  690 San Jose (June) ....................................... San Luis Obispo County (July)................. Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April) ........................................  751 622  $1,205  _  $1,234 1,247 1,261  _  $780  _  $1,147 1,210 □40  968  $1,213  —  1,004  1,366 1,356 1,527 1,265 1,050 1,327 1,369  1,676 1,648 1,754 1,523 1,277 1,554 1,640 1,582  $1,717 1,802  $690 669  1,468 659 2,009  762 735  ~ —  Colorado 589  742  1,210  —  Connecticut New Britain (November) ...........................  722  890  ~  1,012  — —  —  -  —  1,155  —  —  Delaware  District of Columbia Washington (February).............................  506  642  757  650  744  859  542  687 768  859  579  641  863  566  689  832  621  750  902  707  898  1,092  -  Florida  Miami-Hialeah (September)...................... Tampa-St. Petersburg-  432 440  1,068  793  -  —  ~  Georgia 1,297  Illinois 532  1,225  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  187  Table L-1. Average weekly pay’ iiVState and local government, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Administrative  Budget Analyst Supervisors  Budget Analysts  State, area,3 and reference month  IV  III  II  ,  II  1  II  I  Alabama Huntsville (February) ..........................  $505  _  Arizona Phoenix (March).................................  -  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)  -  -  -  729 762  856 779  635  836 763  671  -  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July).................. Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) .... Oakland (December) .......................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April)....... . Sacramento (December) ................... San Diego (August)........................... San Francisco (March) ...................... San Jose (June) ................................ San Luis Obispo County (July).......... Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLorn poc (April)................................. Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July)..........  -  Colorado Denver (December)...........................  $781  $738  $791  -  -  -  -  -  1,013 1,069 1,078 943 946 931 -  $1,288  $426  -  590 622  _  579 -  _  534  717 724 760 629 629 659 812  III  IV  _  _  $553  -  III  II  I  $425  $528  $630  IV  I  II  III  -  -  -  -  -  -  500  -  -  -  -  470  644  -  557  778  876 863  $979  852  1,074  884  601  Compute r Systems Z1analysts  Computer Programmers  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  -  $613  -  $773  853 906 960 905 891 910 892 916 894  648  784 851 840 744 708  762  903  624  -  -  -  _  _ ~  749 846  $1,116  797 762 833 745 925  $794  984 1,035 1,170 1,023 985 1,072 1,016 1,129  939  -  -  -  “  -  _ “  -  -  587  -  -  697  “  -  -  565  663  -  -  723  -  765  901  1,021  565  _  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  779  -  -  -  -  621  776  _  _  726  -  996  521  648  692  836  461  612  721  895  _  _  _  -  -  -  595  _ -  -  _ 569 620  542  432 526  “  839 903  -  456  575  -  -  -  553  651  -  699  829  474  588 -  _  _  _  560 468  659  739  610  755  803  619  741  585  -  888  701  861  1,132  —  Connecticut Danbury (January)............................. New Britain (November) .................... Delaware Wilmington (October)......................... District of Columbia Washington (February)..................... .  $529  Florida Bradenton (April) ............................... Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) Miami-Hialeah (September)............... Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) .............................  -  Georgia Atlanta (April).................................... Augusta (May) ................... ............... Illinois Chicago (May) ..................................  .  633  758  765  -  -  576  749  498  591  670  -  593  747  896  944 791  -  $939  -  -  -  911  -  -  489  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  188  -  —  893  -  746  -  -  1,099  Table L-1. Average weekly pay1 in State and local government, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Administrative State, area,3 and reference month  Computer Sy stems Analyst Supervisor s/Managers I  II  Personnel Specialists I  II  III  Personnel Supervisors/Managers IV  V  1  II  Tax Collectors  Ill  ,  II  ~  ~  III  Alabama Huntsville (February) ........ Arizona Phoenix (March) ................................. Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October).....  $968  $632  -  -  -  -  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July)................ Los Angeles-Long Beach (October)......... Oakland (December) ............................  1,052 1,100  $1,373 1,323  -  685  Sacramento (December) ......................  1,069  1,149  San Francisco (March) ........................... San Jose (June) .................... San Luis Obispo County (July) ................. Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April) .................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July)................  1,271  0GB  595  -  -  801 868 928 772 843 814 914 920 862  1,017 1,065 967 971 970 1,149 1,106  $1,241 1,200 “ —  862  Colorado Denver (December) ......................  G05  696  Connecticut Danbury (January).......................... New Britain (November) ....................... Delaware Wilmington (October)......................... District of Columbia Washington (February).......................... Florida Bradenton (April) ........................... Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) ......... Miami-Hialeah (September)...................... Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ............................ Georgia Atlanta (April)........................................ Augusta (May) ......................................  $958  1,210  _  463  _  $409 997  ~  -  -  -  -  $412  -  -  -  -  _  300  _  $1,200 1,380  $1,660  :  552 709 613  ~ -  “ ~ “  ~  “  -  — 1,199 — -  562 671 588  $709 745 733 713 717 754 786 717  -  -  "  —  -  $540  1,336 -  525 501 -  -  -  -  914  —  —  —  —  —  _  _  ~  —  -  -  -  —  ~  —  —  —  _  _  -  439  526  701  657  900  —  —  776  901  1,014  ~  616 764  888  644  943  708  817  ”  —  — 1,217  —  ~  -  “  1,331  -  470  — 463  — -  425  _  —  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  542 —  Illinois Chicago (May)...................................  525  771  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  189  913  1,257  $917  ~  '  —  -  “ 758  Table L-1. Average weekly pay' in State and local government, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, 1993  Continued  Professional  Indiana Elkhart-Goshen (October) .......... Indianapolis (June) .................... South Bend-Mishawaka (August)  $373  IV  III  II  I  $466  $576  Engin eers  Attorneys  Accountants  State, area,3 and reference month  v  -  -  -  -  -  -  720  860  -  745  $1,481  501  -  606  -  -  -  -  970  -  577  672 685  800 772  972 917  1,204 1,053  672 718  839 878  992 1,032  1,499  700  831  923  1,012  1,007  1,231 1,028 1,094  1,227  Louisiana New Orleans (May)....................  382  440  531  -  -  -  $677  $669  -  -  Maryland Baltimore (May) .........................  503  570  618  $757  -  -  889  1,041  $1,151  -  Massachusetts Boston (May) .............................  551  640  -  841  -  $704  886  1,022  -  -  Michigan Detroit (November)................... .  465  548  693  873  661  842  1,164  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul (February) . St. Cloud (February).................  572  630 611  776  972  797  1,208  1,335  Mississippi Jackson (December) ................  -  489  -  -  -  -  -  Missouri Kansas City (July)..................... St. Louis (February)..................  426 512  538 572  650 743  916 834  -  666 615  825 808  659  772  893  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  792  -  754  922 831  463  503  573  707  .  595  784  1,015 736 718  985  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ..... New York (May)........................ Poughkeepsie (September)...... Rochester (October)................ .  1,127 1,010  -  -  971  1,146  -  839  975  1,127  -  542  709  874  1,017  $1,035  783  879  1,050  1,252  -  1,612  -  857  582  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  -  617  $574  $911  -  -  .  -  -  -  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) ........  -  -  -  .  -  -  -  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April).............. Monmouth-Ocean (June).......... Newark (December) .................  -  788  622  1,365  $885  649  517  $909  VI  -  -  -  V  $768 680 723  Kentucky Louisville (June).........................  -  IV  $527  -  -  -  i  -  -  -  III  II  V  IV  III  II  i  190  1,214 1,036 1,065  -  -  -  -  948  705  1,343  -  671  930 962  -  1,187  -  -  -  -  -  Table L-1. Average weekly pay1 in State and local government, professional and administrative  occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Administrative  State, area,3 and reference month  Budge Analyst  Budget Analysts  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  Supe rvisors I  II  III  IV  I  II  I  II  Computer Programmers  III  IV  I  -  -  -  “  -  -  II  III  Computer Systems Analysts  IV  I  ||  Indiana Elkhart-Goshen (October) ............................. ”  Indianapolis (June) ...................................  $887  South Bend-Mishawaka (August)..................  ~  $493  $477  $573  -  _ $621  _ $750  _  " Kentucky Louisville (June).......................................... 515  595  "  ~  593  555  732  686  698  754  724  901  639  857  747  897  -  Louisiana New Orleans (May)......................................... 467  -  Maryland Baltimore (May) ................................  $620  574  583  $987  Massachusetts Boston (May) ................................................  569  632  $724  580  720  645  Michigan $479  603  $499  $798  588  744  610  723  "  929  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul (February)......  718 —  St. Cloud (February)...................................  660  -  -  $515  _  "  -  Mississippi Jackson (December) ........................... 480  421  "  545  _  645  569  Missouri  “  Kansas City (July)............................................ 471  609  -  -  474  539  662  552  675  773  952  782  863  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April)............................................. Monmouth-Ocean (June)............ —  Newark (December) ................................  —  -  -  -  -  ~ 635  -  -  -  -  660  -  691  _  _  _  _  "  -  ~  560  643  843  1,110  1,319  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) ................................. 455  525  493  598  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ...............  1,198  ~  736  -  -  -  855  Poughkeepsie (September).................................  ~  ”  “  -  -  -  -  Rochester (October)....................................  —  “ 708  -  -  -  New York (May)...................................  627  700  1,063 802  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  191  -  "  663  732  -  _  -  _  -  _  950 979  Table L-1. Average weekly pay in State and local government, professional and administrative occupations,* selected areas, 1993 - Continued Administrative Computer Systems Analyst  I  V  IV  Ill  II  I  II  I  Tax Collectors  Personnel Supervisors/M anagers  Personnel Specialists  State, area,3 and reference month  II  III  Indiana Elkhart-Goshen (October) .................  I  II  III  _  _  -  $479  Indianapolis (June) ................................. South Bend-Mishawaka (August) .  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  Kentucky Louisville (June)........................................  Louisiana New Orleans (May).  Maryland  $1,134  Baltimore (May) ........  -  -  _  _  $1,128  -  Massachusetts Boston (May) .  Michigan Detroit (November) .  _  Minnesota  $615  1,087  Minneapolis-St. Paul (February) . St. Cloud (February)...........................  477  $633  596  667  -  -  $787  -  584  673  828  690  741  945  -  Mississippi Jackson (December) .  _  -  Missouri  -  487  Kansas City (July).... St. Louis (February) .  -  :  -  -  495  598  558  727  594  -  -  $964  $855  $973  $1,169  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Bergen-Passaic (April)...... •  Albuquerque (September) .  .  -  -  Newark (December) ...........  New Mexico  858  _  -  _  -  -  _  Poughkeepsie (September) .  _  677  -  931 776  _925  -  674  510  -  582  -  537  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  192  713  453  310  -  _450  -  898  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _ -  600  812  601  682  486  832  -  471  572 558  697  —  : ..  -  318  -  -  622  -  729  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  671  Nassau-Suffolk (November) . New York (May)............................  -  -  540  New York  Rochester (October).................  423  400  New Jersey Monmouth-Ocean (June).  $337  549 -  $447  $256  -  -  -  -  599  “  Table L-1. Average weekly pay’ in State and local government, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Professional  State, area,3 and reference month  Accountants  I  II  III  Attorneys  IV  V  I  II  Engineers  III  IV  V  _ $1,030  _ _  _ _  _ 1,138  _  _  I  II  III  IV  V  VI  Ohio Cincinnati (April) ........................................................... Cleveland (June) ......................................................... Columbus (November) ............................................ Dayton-Springfield (February) ...........................  -  $578  $789  495  645  577  652  -  597  714  -  512  -  $803 -  $1,131 -  $715  $636  855  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  911  -  -  -  593  821  $719  $837  $522  679  759  893  $1,043  598  735  936  1,104  1,223  586  699  858  1,102  -  770  870  721  846  974  1,096  667  808  1,015  1,172  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $922  -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ....................................  639  -  -  -  Oregon Portland (June)..............................................................  $520  596  712  922  1,145  -  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October).............................................. Pittsburgh (May) ........................................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)...............  —  584 548  705  873  — 680  —  _  _  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  757  _  -  -  591  765  1,160  1,042  1,460  -  605  -  513  -  524  664  _ 931  464  575  681  -  757  1,039  $1,253  _  553  -  -  -  $1,323  636  _ -  -  -  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) .............................................. Memphis (October)..................................................... Nashville (February) ..................................................  656  853  579  _  _  _  593  -  880  706  865  1,033  607  681  835  982  -  Texas Dallas (December)......................................................  444  551  699  843  Houston (March)...........................................................  465  562  697  859  San Antonio (July) ......................................................  437  499  651  -  834  _  _  -  -  _  991  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  941  -  -  -  -  612  766  875  1,094  570  667  724  878  992  620  692  830  991  -  812  953  -  -  -  -  600  688  774  910  640  740  859  649  754  879  1,003  1,112  582  733  820  959  1,158  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Utah Salt Lake City-Ogden (April)................................  453  522  630  822  1,088  -  Vermont Burlington (December) ............................................  -  -  676  Newport News (August) ......................................  493  577  730  858  Richmond-Petersburg (July)................................  501  578  667  834  -  -  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia Beach-  668  873  987  -  -  963  -  -  -  1,326 -  $1,573 1,420  1,136 -  Washington Seattle (October) .......................................................  533  626  764  944  -  -  -  -  Wisconsin Milwaukee (September)...........................................  536  647  708  919  -  1,011  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  193  1,245  1,563  -  -  Table L-1. Average weekly pay1 in State and local government, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, 1993  Continued  Administrative Budget Analyst Budget Analysts  State, area,3 and reference month I  II  Ill  IV  I  II  _ $1,082  $1,220  II  I  III  IV  II  I  Ohio $911  $635  Cincinnati (April) ...... ................................... Cleveland (June) ........................ ................  $499  655  Columbus (November) ...........................  610  743 625  Dayton-Springfield (February) ..........  _ $922 -  928 _ -  $520  $523  509  621  469  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $744  -  $473 -  -  -  637  “  *  526  -  -  -  -  -  -  635  824  -  -  -  579  692  922  _  _  708  746  -  -  729  _  578  —  —  —  —  -  -  -  —  -  -  -  “ .  —  _ 686  _  -  560  789  “  -  -  -  -  Philadelphia (October).............................  445  Pittsburgh (May) ..........................................  _  638  Pennsylvania  Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)  -  -  704  $746  658  711  783  508  -  580  397  Memphis (October).................................... Nashville (February) .................................  -  458  _ -  _ • 767  505  540  Dallas (December).................................... .  646  Houston (March)......................................... San Antonio (July) ...................................*  Utah Salt Lake City-Ogden (April)..............  -  -  515  -  855 _  _  -  -  _ .  -  473  586  493  581  403  575  535  756  _  _  -  -  _ -  668  $1,057  $719  837  924 -  773  864  601  807  625  774  732  881  -  -  -  -  -  —  _ 644  460 448  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  553  699  796  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  490  604  792  812  -  “  618  —  —  ~  -  -  -  821  -  -  683  818  _ 661  879  542  459  589  544  654  681  821  893  582  717  693  852  -  —  _  680  III  558  -  Texas  -  II  I  $862  $710  587  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) ..... .......................  IV  $609  Oregon Portland (June).............................................  III  636  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ....................  Computer Systems Analysts  Computer P ogrammers  Buyers/Contracting Specialists  Supervisors  734  538  644  559  707  -  -  -  -  -  -  699  696  825  -  —  — -  Vermont Burlington (December) ..........................  -  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) .................... Richmond-Petersburg (July)..............  -  581  767  523  683  -  634  805  916  415  535  662  523  620  635  795  633  687  Washington Seattle (October) .......................................  -  -  1,061  -  -  -  680  Wisconsin Milwaukee (September)........................  -  -  775  -  1,106  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  194  690  _  769  889  761  898  674  809  938  840  849  632 “  -  803  -  Table L-1. Average weekly pay' in State and local government, professional and administrative occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Administrative  3 2and reference month State, area,1  Computer Systems Analyst Personnel Specialists  Supervisors/Managers  I  II  I  $1,050  -  -  -  -  II  Personnel Supervisors/Managers  III  IV  V  I  -  Tax Collectors  II  Ill  1  -  -  -  -  _  _  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  _  _  -  -  _  -  -  572  -  567  _ 451  II  III  Ohio Cincinnati (April)........................................................... Cleveland (June) ......................................................... Columbus (November) ............................................ Dayton-Springfield (February) ...........................  1,045  -  $398  $884  $630  $681  737  779  1,036  620  736  921  494  613  602  744  648  753  889  $656  $335  _  539  _  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ....................................  -  -  -  ~  -  -  -  ' -  -  -  673  -  -  -  782  -  -  -  466  -  -  -  530  766  -  -  -  508  602  -  -  578  695  901  -  -  546  670  899  538  677  642  Oregon Portland (June)..............................................................  599  -  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October)............................................. Pittsburgh (May)...........................................................  -  Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)...............  990 -  -  807  -  -  -  -  -  525  _ -  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) ............................................. Memphis (October)..................................................... Nashville (February) ..................................................  $914  -  741  -  _  _  -  _  _  -  -  "  _  _ 408  _ _  413  -  Texas Dallas (December)...................................................... Houston (March)........................................................... San Antonio (July) .......................................................  1,023 -  -  -  -  -  -  520  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  873  -  -  $1,138 -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ' “  -  $573  552  365  -  686  -  -  Utah Salt Lake City-Ogden (April)................................  391  474  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  _ 541  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  526  609  -  Vermont Burlington (December) ............................................  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ......................................  1,018  Richmond-Petersburg (July)................................  1,037  583  723  916  571  667  847  698  811  958  745  795  973  -  Washington Seattle (October)..........................................................  -  •  Wisconsin Milwaukee (September)...........................................  1  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excluded are  $1,657  in  -  Sacramento,  performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well  Programmers  as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses.  Angeles-Long Beach,  Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.  V  CA;  averaged  Engineers  $1,093  in  VII  -  averaged  Chicago,  IL;  $1,728  in  Los  Computer Systems  Angeles-Long Analysts  Beach,  CA;  Computer  averaged $1,200  CA; and Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers III averaged $1,591  in  Los  in Los  Angeles-Long Beach, CA.  2 Pay data for the following occupational levels did not meet publication criteria in any area: Engineers VIII,  3  Buyers/Contracting Specialists V, Computer Systems Analysts V, Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers  Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of  industry detail.  IV, Personnel Specialists VI, and Personnnel Supervisors/Managers IV and V. In addition, for six occupations, only a single area published average pay data: Accountants VI averaged $1,030 in Detroit, Ml; Attorneys VI averaged   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  IV  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  195  Table L-2. Average weekly pay' in State and local government, technical and protective service occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 Protectiv  Technical  State, area,3 and reference month  Correc­  Engineering Technicians, Civil  Drafters  Computer Operators  tions I  II  Ill  IV  I  II  Ill  I  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  II  Ill  IV  V  VI  -  -  Officers  Fire­ fighters  service Police Officers 1  II  Alabama Huntsville (February)..........................................  _  $381  $375  $455  $547  $326  453  489  564  382  486  512  582  $386  $491  $488  $565  407  614  669  716  394  426  477  722  1,012  922  720  902  886  1,035  745  880  915  1,001  777  853  Arizona Phoenix (March)....................................................  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)..  -  -  419  -  $468  408  $461  -  $512  -  $570  -  $876  -  -  California Los Angeles-Long Beach (October)........ Oakland (December).......................................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April)............... Sacramento (December)................................. San Diego (August)............................................. San Francisco (March)...................................... San Jose (June)..................................................... San Luis Obispo County (July)....................  443  652  764  939  998  704  817  586  734  811  931  1,019  764  803  684  645  815  940  1,004  -  585  Anaheim-Santa Ana (July) ............................  _ _  521  616  589  643  _ _  503  596  502  568  _  _  492 545  _ -  -  -  -  $690  $551  _ _  -  _  _ _ _ _ _ _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  412 -  -  -  _  605  611  -  _ _ _  694  _  569 555  .  1,077  461  539  668  779  837  -  710  460  535  643  771  919  -  643  503  566  692  771  934  -  591  719  839  1,023  828  958  1,067  -  707  _  544  -  -  -  905  -  856  819  780  804  696  786  858  681  740  790  886  835  842  889  753  840  921  965  818  671  723  858  797  Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April)...................................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July) ..................  -  611  712  837  _  _  -  -  -  -  “  468  532  -  -  -  -  “  -  -  635  643  658  638  774  852  840  464  638  856  557  655  696  565  705  711  738  738  398  697  685  541  623  615  798  Colorado Denver (December).............................................  -  430  500  -  Connecticut Danbury (January)................................................ New Britain (November) ...................................  -  -  681  809  -  730  —  Delaware Wilmington (October) .........................................  -  422  366  406  517  635  325  458  533  642  401  459  573  360  429  484  -  -  District of Columbia Washington (February)......................................  -  451  570  516  Florida Bradenton (April)................................................... Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December)....... Miami-Hialeah (September) ..........................  _ -  363  501  _  _  499  594  426  562  _  311  451  519  481  -  354  428  498  554  848  493  343  421  527  -  -  -  _ -  386  373  431  467  411  495  530  614  554  795  724  789  470  509  586  398  475  499  334  300  379  737  778  Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July)................................................  -  401  523  550  -  -  Georgia 427  Atlanta (April)............................................................ Augusta (May).........................................................  -  -  512 -  509  594  _  _  _  _ —  Illinois Chicago (May)......................................................... Livingston County (August)...........................  $439 -  485 -  548  716  -  -  508 -  604 -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  196  377 -  439  568  718  871  -  -  “  _  556 529  —  444  900  —  Table L-2. Average weekly pay1 in State and local government, technical and protective service occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Technical State, area,3 and reference month  Computer Operators  Protective service  Drafters  Engineering Technicians, Civil  Corrections  I  II  III  IV  I  -  -  -  -  -  -  II  III  I  -  -  -  -  II  III  IV  V  VI  $582  -  -  -  -  Officers  Police Officers fighters  I  II  Indiana Elkhart-Goshen (October) .............................. Indianapolis (June).................. ........................... South Bend-Mishawaka (August)..............  -  $366  $369  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  -  -  $340  $418 397 394  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $395  $514  $514  388  599  583  357  484  472  522  566  574  443  456  368  369  494  336  424  402  500  603  607  559  635  642  585  612  $499 "  Iowa Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January) ................................................  401  513  631  -  459  588  398  426  452  354  394  477  $594  412  520  619  669  -  Kansas Finney County (October).................................  -  -  Kentucky Louisville (June) .....................................................  -  388  -  $243  -  Louisiana New Orleans (May) .............................................  -  358  -  -  -  -  -  -  Maryland Baltimore (May)......................................................  $360  408  $482  $524  -  479  $563  352  $939  456  Massachusetts Boston (May)............................................................ Lawrence-Haverhill (September)............... Worcester (July) .....................................................  479  553  -  -  -  -  433  534  612  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _ 567  _  -  466  -  -  -  -  -  461  543  624  449  484  589  686  766  512  627  720  773  495  562  -  -  276  348  438  539  638  -  917  _ 527  -  619  _ -  Michigan Detroit (November)...............................................  $382  473  566  -  580  656  678  532  714  698  796  580  622  628  720  339  385  416  -  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul (February)................. St. Cloud (February)............................................  480  564  -  -  -  -  -  -  720  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  391  468  -  -  -  -  -  _ -  Mississippi Jackson (December) ..........................................  359  -  -  -  Missouri Kansas City (July) ................................................ St. Louis (February).............................................  300  405  492  508  -  -  459  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  590  -  -  298  383  500  645  369  406  522  644  308  391  . 326  489  780  -  409  572  590  586  -  441  600  601  766  -  -  386  510  536  -  -  869  945  -  -  Montana Billings (September)............................................  -  486  -  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April) ...................................... Monmouth-Ocean (June) ................................ Newark (December) ............................................  -  ~  -  -  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  197  -  498  626 624 -  609 675  -  -  779 586 702  845  872 828  964 820  Table L-2. Average weekly pay1 in State and local government, technical and protective service occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Protective service  Technical Drafters  Computer Operators  State, area,3 and reference month  Correc­  Engineering Technicians, Civil  tions I  II  III  IV  1  II  III  -  -  -  -  1  II  III  IV  V  VI  -  -  Officers  Fire­ fighters  Police Officers I  II  New Mexico Albuquerque (September)..............................  -  $421  $447  $338  $385  $473  $537  $386  $471  $546  781  616  932  669  751  733  594  585  544  701  616  728  698  656  “  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November).......................... New York (May)...................................................... Poughkeepsie (September)........................... Rochester (October)...........................................  537  683  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  527  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $594  472  597  555  713  439  494  571  675  307  363  475  574  -  -  391  535  647  -  ~  -  $993  $1,158  $977  Ohio Cincinnati (April).................................................... Cleveland (June)................................................... Columbus (November)..................................... Dayton-Springfield (February)..................... Scioto County (August) ....................................  _ -  489  447  500  487  519  439 -  -  $403  -  -  -  -  447  -  ~  -  -  _  $439  -  521  593  700  829  -  419  444  550  591  637  -  417  486  557  609  687  -  423  571  614  -  -  ~  ~  -  —  —  359  404  486  592  742  443  543  694  804  545  549  695  750  429  479  678  718  -  705  -  -  489  —  —  -  “  ~  -  446  466  -  439  -  -  -  “  -  -  -  -  -  457 372 341  470  -  -  629  622  643  413  655  642  674  475  659  621  618  438  599  614  478  439  498  322  472  434  403  676  784  742  773  564  642  677  818  503  658  516  562  628  527  599  608  337  429  386  -  317  495  438  611  409  787 —  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February)..............................  -  -  Oregon Portland (June)........................................................  -  486  856  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October)....................................... Pittsburgh (May)..................................................... Reading (December).......................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November) ........  482  514  —  -  445  601  -  386  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  -  -  -  -  480  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  517  435  -  660 -  South Carolina Beaufort County (November) .......................  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) ....................................... Memphis (October)............................................... Nashville (February)............................................ Obion County (October)...................................  -  397 417  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  234  302  393  -  344  417  553  -  249  345  456  624  820  -  244 -  -  -  -  -  667  -  -  -  383  525  555  335  441  445  423  458  ~  -  Texas Dallas (December) ............................................... Houston (March)..................................................... Longview-Marshall (July)................................. San Antonio (July)................................................  _ $364 314  432  516  431  458  378  540  -  -  -  -  -  -  466 392  523 -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  198  339  386  520  560  371  404  458  531  652  -  377  437  515  615  465  469  501  557  -  —  392  582  439  624  558  382  428  481  599  324  568  585  494  —  Table L-2. Average weekly pay1 in State and local government, technical and protective service occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Protective service  Technical State, area,3 and reference month  Computer Operators I  II  III  IV  I  II  III  I  $463  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  II  III  IV  $459  $545  V  Police Officers  Correc­ tions Officers  Firefighters  $399  $544  $530 538  -  391  541  516  ~  377 410  532 663  519 573  $608 631  595  814  801  850  305  448  448  -  465 478  631 635  595 659  Engineering Technicians, Civil  Drafters  VI  I  II  Utah  Box Elder County (September) ............ Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).................  -  $393  $358  $678  Vermont  Burlington (December) .........................  -  -  -  -  395 410  477 455  581 581  787 679  -  576  712  752  869  -  383  424  547  674  -  -  687  375  508 498  599  767  852  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  417 392  492 466  -  -  -  $473 451  -  509  605  -  -  -  670  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  487  523  ~  -  547  -  Virginia  Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ..................... Richmond-Petersburg (July).................  $441  $343 347  Washington  Seattle (October)..................................  $996  West Virginia  Parkersburg-Marietta (July).................. Wisconsin  Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May)........ Milwaukee (September) .......................  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Pay data for the following occupational levels did not meet publication criteria in any area: Computer Operators V, Engineering Technicians I, II, IV, and VI. In addition, for three occupations, only a single area published average pay data:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  634 -— ■  Draters IV averaged $861 in Oakland, CA; Engineering Technicians III averaged $379 in Tampa-St, Petersburg-Clearwater, FL; and Engineering Technicians V averaged $953 in Sacramento, CA. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  199  Table L-3. Average weekly pay' in State and local government, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 Key Entry Operators  Clerks, General  Clerks, Accounting  Personnel Assistants (Employment)  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month I  II  III  IV  1  II  -  -  -  Alabama Huntsville (February)............................  -  $324  $434  Arizona Phoenix (March) ...................................  -  328  353  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)..  -  313  -  -  -  494 535 471 413 448 399 455 479 421  508 528 543 449 506 471 548 540 485  565 569 626 510 541 551 587 631 -  -  408 440 389 371 367 340 421 444 366  -  393 337  461 409  502 465  -  -  -  436  -  Danbury (January)................................ New Britain (November) .......................  -  -  455  Delaware Wilmington (October) ...........................  -  379  Washington (February).........................  -  Florida Bradenton (April) .................................. Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December)..... Miami-Hialeah (September) ................. Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July)................................  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July) ................... Los Angeles-Long Beach (October)..... Oakland (December)............................ Riverside-San Bernardino (April).......... Sacramento (December)...................... San Diego (August).............................. San Francisco (March)......................... San Jose (June) ................................... San Luis Obispo County (July)............. Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April).................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July) ............  $371  $266  $265  Ill  $352  288  IV  $318  I  $318  286  Ill  IV  V  $338  $439  -  -  310  341  361  288  -  369  564 455  536 596 546 469 486 483 596 532 520  554 677 622 551 531 543 636 635 553  -  472 464  378  II  Ill  IV  -  -  -  -  $348  -  -  -  -  -  -  $329  II  $449  $547  $341  Word Processors  1  II  Ill  -  -  -  $294  $322  -  -  247  -  -  647 699 700 631 586 642 687 660 632  865 766 754 644 789 765 -  490 529 401 419 494 371  508 399 -  509 534 479 467 564 -  548 457  601 523  -  -  -  -  -  438  -  617  -  335  -  -  -  -  479  511 566  651  -  -  -  -  -  “  367  421  497  613  -  364  ~  -  -  480  -  414  488  554  620  746  373  -  430  460  418  -  -  -  -  311 372  396 444  429 449 499  526 555  627  321 348  343  414  -  396  515  -  368  371  465  558  -  307  281  349  -  360 -  402 -  452 -  —  348 338  401 “  458 448  529  -  329 -  -  423 -  -  -  416  449 “  -  -  421  482  -  395 “  384  457  -  -  276  -  449 456 490 404 430 402 481 469 434  506 509 574 448 506 474 569 520 -  551 477 516 -  518 511 506 434 476 426 423  376 281  432 356  454 501  -  -  -  -  274  295  376  436  -  427  -  -  -  -  -  391 501  465 -  -  “  ~  -  -  433  567  -  328  366  -  390  375  -  -  411  458  506  274  328  367  436  380  425  417  -  374 356 366  367 402 429  -  -  270  306  -  -  -  308 341  -  -  364  362  462  294  298  335  367  291  356  — -  351 287  401 394  451 -  246 -  282 -  330 309  363 “  332 -  -  393 427  471  543 ”  330 -  358  -  407 -  474 “  320 -  -  1  II  Switch­ board Opera­ torRecep­ tionists  $479 515 501 589 -  $554 589 499 580  $651 609 -  486  $547 -  Colorado  Denver (December).............................. Connecticut  District of Columbia  -  -  Georgia  Atlanta (April)........................................ Augusta (May)...................................... Illinois  Chicago (May)...................................... Livingston County (August)..................  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  200  -  541 ~  598 -  -  Table L-3. Average weekly pay' in State and local government, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Personnel Assistants (Employment)  Key Entry Operators  Clerks, General  Clerks, Accounting  Switch­ board  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month II  I  III  IV  II  I  Indiana $341 325 353  $386 377  Iowa Davenport-Rock Island-  _ _  _ _  $281 287  _ 356  III  IV  $316 319 303  $358  384  465  -  II  I  $274  -  _  II  -  III  -  IV  -  Kansas  II  I  IV  $421 340 379  $432 377  351  388  455  305  345  390  $475  377  414  452  493  471 441 432  498 508  584  437 427 543  $336 281 325  V  -  -  _  _  torRecep­ tionists  $305 301 307  I  II  III  -  --  -  _  -  -  354  Kentucky 335  373  281 300  335 359  $232  274  318  338  268  196  259  287  317  239  _  _  _  _  -  -  Louisiana $230  _  $284  Maryland  346  363  427  $465  417  468 467  538  286  363  $415  $490  $546  296  350  378  336  430  _461  _ _  _ _  -  -  -  467  563  564  578  582  -  -  Massachusetts  _  _  _  388 409 391  _  Michigan  408  477  500  531  298  347  454  446  358  511  452 421  479 515  554  390  413 332  444 391  469 469  399  445  _  _  329  384  336 346  380 396  307  366  390 344 431  441 456 509  -  -  519  573  626  435  501  588  —  -  -  -  323  344  393  355 396  386 424  444 493  324  392  483 471 427  557 546 589  Minnesota  312  Mississippi  -  242  Missouri  516 454  256  296 327  325 343  386 379  290 315  Montana  338 356  475  _  -  _  New Jersey  593 494 543  290 367  l _  329 368  411 369 434  _497  396 344 405  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  III  Word Process ors  201  _496 _  -590 -—  378  - I___  -  287  282  $262  $307  -  319  $591  -  --  -  462 487  408  -  --  -  -  -  -  278  523 544  648 704 744  _ -  332 354  457 375 426  -  379 386  -  _  _  _  -  -  -  388  Table L-3. Average weekly pay' in State and local government, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Clerks, Accounting  Key Entry Operators  Clerks, General  Personnel Assistants (Employment)  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month I  II  III  IV  I  II  III  IV  $263  $314  -  New Mexico Albuquerque (September)....................  -  $339  $357  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ................. New York (May).................................... Poughkeepsie (September).................. Rochester (October).............................  -  496 380 388  548 546 434 451  $654 580 546 -  -  418 378 455  445 391 393 410  $581 442  356 367 423 357 -  437 456 482 429 -  541 509 527 477 -  -  339 360 361 315 -  Ohio Cincinnati (April)................................... Cleveland (June) .................................. Columbus (November) ......................... Dayton-Springfield (February).............. Scioto County (August) ........................  $347 -  -  $237  I  $294  II  II  Ill  IV  I  II  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _ -  $389  470 -  -  -  $467  516  386 -  402 385 395 350 “  446 443 -  391 375 372 -  401 398 428 347 ' 302  442 420  $415 438 410 -  III  Switch­ board Opera­ torRecep­ tionists  Word Processors  IV  V  $385  $419  -  $571 450 424 471  684 555 502 575  672 624 620 647  $763 _ _ -  $468 _ 358 422  _ _ _ $418  $527 _ 470 -  _ _ _ -  379 427 415 378 -  425 472 449 445 -  461 506 528 505 521  563 564 608 -  _ _ _ _ -  331 373 355 319 -  364 _ 421 401 -  437 425 481 _ -  _ _ _ _ -  -  -  377  -  -  -  -  312  -  -  -  -  -  441  510  546  -  395  -  428  -  369 288  506 481 497 444  559 _ 573  _ -  383 382  432  _ 330  _ _ -  _ -  _ _ -  $519  -  I  II  Ill  -  -  -  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February)....................  264  316  -  -  -  308  -  293  Oregon Portland (June).....................................  -  399  453  529  320  391  446  398  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October).......................... Pittsburgh (May)................................... Reading (December)............................ Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November) .....  -  386 420 433 402  454 396 452 -  480 -  255  356 287  -  -  411 379 408 -  -  414 -  449 -  -  -  -  _ 325  444 442 443 378  South Carolina Beaufort County (November) ...............  -  312  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  378  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) .......................... Memphis (October)............................... Nashville (February).............................  -  292 319 314  281 291 269  317 343 331  -  274 298 289  357 342  347  408  -  341 372 348  394 392 455  444 445 429  538 555 478  _ _ -  _ 337 313  _ _ -  _ _ -  _ _ -  334  344 360 342 315  278 323  339 375  364 393  363 360 318 368  416 451 _ 430  491 463  _  391 415  404 402  _ 461  _ -  597 _ _ -  336 336  “  _ _ _ -  451 450  280  414 423 _ -  _  _  -  -  -  -  Texas Dallas (December) ............................... Houston (March)................................... Longview-Marshall (July)...................... San Antonio (July)................................  -  283  343 393 362  384 434  251  397 417  450 422  295  292 323  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  255  289  324  358  243  393  —  345 346  374 333  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  202  -  . 441  $458  Table L-3. Average weekly pay1 in State and local government, clerical occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Key Entry . Operators  Clerks, General  Clerks, Accounting  Personnel Assistants (Employment)  Secretaries  State, area,3 and reference month ill  IV  I  $386  _  _  -  430  -  -  -  354 347  401 395  $457 445  -  435  497  -  -  -  404 423  1  II  II  III  IV  $304  $350  I  II  II  Ill  IV  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Utah  Salt Lake City-Ogden (April)........  _  $316  $282  1  II  III  IV  V  $520  -  Switch­ board Opera­ torRecep­ tionists  $343  $356  $397  $442  -  344  356  408  -  -  -  —  360 344  411 417  473 498  469 464  _  —  326 331  Word Proces sors  I  II  III  -  -  -  -  -  -  Vermont  Burlington (December)................  -  -  364  -  $269  301 316  346 352  -  514  340  389  441  473  -  408  -  -  -  -  461  509  642  -  403  413  -  -  -  288  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  389  446  -  -  433 472  321  326 391  385 412  _  -  ~  _ 436  _ 501  _ —  _ 431  _  571  454 532  _ 587  _ "  Virginia  Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ............ Richmond-Petersburg (July)........  $317  $331 336  $363 367  $435  $517  $339  $409  _  -  458  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  Washington  Seattle (October)................. ....... West Virginia  Parkersburg-Marietta (July)......... Wisconsin  Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May) Milwaukee (September) ..............  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Pay data for the following occupational levels did not meet publication criteria in any area: Order Clerks I and II,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  489  374  and Personnel Assistants (Employment) I. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  203  Table L-4. Average hourly pay’ in State and local government, maintenance and toolroom occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Electricians  Alabama Huntsville (February) ..................................  $8.81  Arizona Phoenix (March) ......................................... Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October).......  State, area,3 and reference month  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July).......................... Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) ........... Oakland (December) .................................. Riverside-San Bernardino (April)................ Sacramento (December) ............................ San Diego (August) .................................... San Francisco (March) ............................... San Jose (June).......................................... San Luis Obispo County (July) ................... Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April) .......................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July)...................  Maintenance Electronics Technicians  Maintenance Machinists  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  Maintenance Pipefitters  -  -  -  $12.47  -  $14.58  -  -  -  13.80  -  -  -  -  -  -  11.50  -  18.90 20.62 22.13 16.50 19.36 17.69 25.59 22.92 17.21  $15.71  18.14 19.79 20.79 17.92 17.05 16.37 20.73 20.66 -  $19.32 21.04 19.51 21.06 18.21 28.38 -  $20.93  _ $21.77  -  21.39 -  17.88 19.78 19.33 15.73 17.03 16.65 21.01 18.80 16.36  _ _ -  12.73 11.02  16.95 13.99  -  16.02  18.87  -  -  -  -  15.89 14.55  _ -  11.38  15.95  -  15.78  -  -  -  15.02  -  14.34 14.64  17.63  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  10.51  15.12  -  -  -  -  -  13.80  -  11.07  15.69  -  15.99  16.79  -  -  16.19  $14.03  9.51 11.01  12.41 16.37  -  17.48  -  _ -  10.05 11.57 13.89  14.89  9.60  12.06  10.38  13.45  14.35  -  -  12.45  -  9.73 9.61  13.65  10.63  14.14  15.28  -  13.83 10.69  _ -  I  II  Ill  $11.75  -  -  9.43  14.78  -  7.22  11.48  13.55 13.44 14.94 13.04 13.34 13.33 13.57 15.25 13.92  -  23.18  Colorado  Denver (December) .................................... Connecticut  Danbury (January)...................................... New Britain (November) ............................. Delaware  Wilmington (October).................................. District of Columbia  Washington (February)............................... Florida  Bradenton (April)......................................... Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December) ........... Miami-Hialeah (September)........................ Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ......................................  -  -  -  -  -  Georgia  Atlanta (April) .............................................. Augusta (May) ............................................  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  204  -  13.84 -  Table L-4. Average hourly pay' in State and local government, maintenance and toolroom occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued State, area,3 and reference month  General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Electricians  Illinois Chicago (May) ............................................  $12.60  $22.12  Indiana Elkhart-Goshen (October)........................... Indianapolis (June) ..................................... South Bend-Mishawaka (August) ...............  8.93 9.45  12.63 16.41  Iowa Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (Januaiy).......................................  _  Kentucky Louisville (June).......................................... Louisiana New Orleans (May).....................................  1  II  Ill  Machinists  Machinery  $22.16  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  Maintenance Pipefitters  $17.52  $24.82  -  -  -  -  $14.83  12.85 12.48 13.20  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  13.72  _  9.66  13.91  -  -  -  -  -  13.05  8.17  11.33  -  $11.45  -  -  -  10.44  -  Maryland Baltimore (May) ..........................................  10.79  13.08  -  13.52  $15.56  -  12.88  -  Massachusetts Boston (May) .............................................. Lawrence-Haverhill (September) ................ Worcester (July)..........................................  11.90 12.37 11.54  -  -  -  -  15.71 14.14  20.17  14.47 -  -  -  -  -  Michigan Detroit (November) .....................................  13.79  19.50  $13.16  16.91  -  Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul (February)................. St. Cloud (February) ...................................  12.68 12.35  20.32 15.74  -  15.66 -  Mississippi Jackson (December)...................................  8.08  -  -  Missouri Kansas City (July)....................................... St. Louis (February)....................................  9.88 9.59  14.11 15.08  11.84  Montana Billings (September) ...................................  -  -  -  -  -  16.80  15.56  15.11  18.17  17.05 -  16.96 -  -  15.66 14.93  19.05 -  10.83  -  -  -  9.96  -  -  13.06 15.54  -  ~  12.72  12.32 13.97  -  -  -  -  -  -  12.68  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  13.74  -  205  Table L-4. Average hourly pay1 in State and local government, maintenance and toolroom occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued General Maintenance Workers  Maintenance Electricians  Maintenance Machinists  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  Maintenance Pipefitters  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April)................................ Monmouth-Ocean (June)............................ Newark (December)....................................  $13.60 14.42 13.92  -  -  -  $16.82 15.09 15.90  -  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) .......................... New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ....................... New York (May).......................................... Poughkeepsie (September)........................ Rochester (October)...................................  $12.66  -  -  -  11.81  -  -  18.92  -  -  -  17.78 21.04 14.02 14.81  $16.15  -  16.01 19.77 13.22 15.66  $13.43  -  -  $14.61  -  16.11 13.28 -  -  13.78 13.88 12.88 13.76  19.30 -  8.68  11.96  -  12.40  -  -  -  10.88  Oregon Portland (June)...........................................  11.39  18.19  -  15.48  -  $16.62  -  15.38  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October)................................ Pittsburgh (May) ......................................... Reading (December) .................................. Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)............  11.69 12.41 11.13 10.77  15.27 14.25 13.06 12.84  -  15.42 -  -  -  -  15.36 15.62 13.99 12.80  -  -  -  -  ~  -  -  -  -  12.32 15.93 11.74  -  12.43 13.70 10.96 12.56  “  State, area,3 and reference month  Maintenance Electronics Technicians I  II  III  $16.87 15.40 19.74  -  -  8.53  12.08  -  14.63 15.11 10.82 12.10  16.27 27.26 14.00 15.13  Ohio Cincinnati (April) ......................................... Cleveland (June)......................................... Columbus (November)................................ Dayton-Springfield (February) ....................  10.49 11.23 10.73 10.49  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ..........................  -  -  South Carolina  Beaufort County (November)......................  8.22  -  -  Tennessee  Chattanooga (August)................................. Memphis (October)..................................... Nashville (February) ...................................  8.23 10.08 9.22  13.20 16.03 11.93  8.97 9.29 8.89  13.26 14.89 14.02  -  -  14.29 11.59  -  -  9.45  12.66 13.21 11.93  “  -  Texas  Dallas (December)...................................... Houston (March) ......................................... Longview-Marshall (July)............................ San Antonio (July) ......................................  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  206  -  14.06 -  Table L-4. Average hourly pay1 in State and local government, maintenance and toolroom occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued State, area,3 and reference month  General Maintenance Workers  Utah Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).........................  Maintenance Electronics Technicians Electricians  I  III  II  Machinists  Maintenance Mechanics, Machinery  $12.31  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle  Maintenance Pipefitters  $12.59  .  12.70  -  12.85 12.13  —  Vermont Burlington (December)...................................  $11.39  12.93  -  -  -  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August)............................... Richmond-Petersburg (July).........................  10.04 9.91  14.27 13.71  $12.78 11.60  $14.53  $13.76  -  “  ~  -  Washington Seattle (October) ............................................  13.64  19.81  -  19.01  21.81  -  -  18.37  -  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July) ..........................  8.20  -  -  -  -  -  -  10.53  -  Wisconsin Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May) ............... Milwaukee (September).................................  11.63 14.68  20.32  _ $14.77  13.19 15.29  $20.45  19.72  -  17.15  _  3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail.  ' Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. 2 Pay data for Tool and Die Makers did not meet publication criteria in any area.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  —  -  NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  207  Table L-5. Average hourly pay' in State and local government, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 Guards State, area,3 and reference month  Janitors I  II  Material Handling Laborers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Truckdrivers Light Truck  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  -  -  $10.95  -  -  -  12.90  -  $10.07  -  8.68  -  -  $14.51  16.37  $16.86  12.99 14.82 -  -  11.36 13.34 15.02 11.67 13.05 11.66 14.24 13.67 12.68  -  -  11.42 12.37  -  11.67  Alabama Huntsville (February) ...................................  $7.42  -  $6.15  -  -  Arizona Phoenix (March) ...........................................  8.25  -  8.56  -  $8.90  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock (October)......  7.58  -  5.96  -  -  10.63 12.71 12.42  $14.06 14.61 10.39 14.04 -  11.29 10.86 11.82 10.33 10.44 10.17 12.83 12.24 10.56  -  -  -  10.57 9.10  -  -  9.07  -  -  11.76 12.32  -  -  -  -  9.48  -  -  -  9.72  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  California Anaheim-Santa Ana (July).......................... Los Angeles-Long Beach (October) .......... Oakland (December) ................................... Riverside-San Bernardino (April)................ Sacramento (December) ............................. San Diego (August) ..................................... San Francisco (March) ................................ San Jose (June) ........................................... San Luis Obispo County (July) ................... Santa Barbara-Santa MariaLompoc (April) ............................................ Visalia-Tulare-Porterville (July)...................  10.75 10.48 13.18 13.51 -  Colorado Denver (December).....................................  7.78  Connecticut Danbury (January)....................................... New Britain (November) ..............................  -  Delaware Wilmington (October)...................................  10.59  District of Columbia Washington (February)................................  8.64  Florida Bradenton (April) .......................................... Fort Myers-Cape Coral (December).......... Miami-Hialeah (September)........................ Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater (July) ........................................ Georgia Atlanta (April)................................................ Augusta (May) ...............................................  10.99  11.35  11.26  -  12.31 13.97  -  -  -  -  “  -  12.19  13.48  13.75  -  -  11.77  -  -  11.86  -  12.06  -  12.49  -  7.60 8.49  -  11.13  -  -  -  7.71 8.89  -  7.15 6.76 7.37  $8.52  7.95  -  7.54  -  9.56  -  -  11.81  -  9.57  8.05  -  7.15 6.09  -  9.79  7.83 6.56  -  6.71  -  9.02  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $7.85  Warehouse Specialists  208  -  Table L-5. Average hourly pay1 in State and local government, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Guards Janitors  State, area,3 and reference month  Illinois Chicago (May).............................................. Indiana Elkhart-Goshen (October) ........................... Indianapolis (June) ....................................... South Bend-Mishawaka (August)..............  Material Handling Laborers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Truckdrivers Light Truck  Medium Truck  Heavy T ruck  Tractor Trailer  $18.11  .  _  _  I  II  $10.01  $12.30  $11.64  _  _  8.03  .  _  8.92  -  -  —  -  9.47  12.32  $10.95  Warehouse Specialists  $12.90  -  -  9.93 8.29 9.53  Iowa Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (January).........................................  _  _  10.47  _  _  _  _  Kansas Finney County (October) .............................  -  -  7.75  -  -  -  -  -  -  Kentucky Louisville (June)............................................  7.56  -  7.85  -  -  -  -  -  -  11.48  Louisiana Acadia Parish (August)................................ New Orleans (May).......................................  -  5.82 5.97  .  6.45  -  -  -  -  _  _ 6.86  Maryland Baltimore (May) ............................................  8.72  9.16  $9.59  9.56  -  12.11  -  10.59  -  11.19 10.86 10.49  -  -  -  11.03  12.11  12.04  -  -  $11.46  14.64  9.85  12.20  10.81 9.69  12.23  13.71  Massachusetts Boston (May) ................................................ Lawrence-Haverhill (September)................ Worcester (July) ........................................... Michigan Detroit (November).......................................  10.69  12.03 -  -  $8.65  -  —  _ —  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  “  -  -  11.82  Minnesota St. Cloud (February).................................... Mississippi Jackson (December) ....................................  7.17  7.90  5.88  Missouri Kansas City (July)......................................... St. Louis (February)......................................  7.32 9.10  9.87 7.51  8.78 8.46  Montana Billings (September)....................................  -  -  7.65  11.39  -  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  209  12.66  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  8.88  8.31  _  -  -  -  -  9.45 9.78  -  -  -  -  -  -  10.03  10.05  Table L-5. Average hourly pay1 in State and local government, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Guards State, area,3 and reference month  Janitors 1  II  Material Handling Laborers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Truckdrivers Light T ruck  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  -  $13.17 12.18  -  -  10.45  -  $10.83  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic (April)................................. Monmouth-Ocean (June)............................ Newark (December) ....................................  $9.88 9.77 12.35  -  $12.73 11.08 13.30  -  -  -  New Mexico Albuquerque (September) ...........................  8.80  -  7.10  -  -  -  $9.39  13.21 12.17  $15.18  13.66 10.42 9.76 9.23  -  -  -  13.63  -  -  -  -  -  -  $9.86  -  9.23 9.74 9.90 9.56  -  6.61  -  9.23  9.95  -  South Carolina Beaufort County (November)......................  -  Tennessee Chattanooga (August) ................................. Memphis (October)....................................... Nashville (February) .....................................  New York Nassau-Suffolk (November) ....................... New York (May)............................................ Poughkeepsie (September)........................ Rochester (October)....................................  10.29  Ohio Cincinnati (April) ........................................... Cleveland (June) .......................................... Columbus (November) ................................ Dayton-Springfield (February) ....................  8.44 10.63 10.39 9.69  Oklahoma Oklahoma City (February) ..........................  7.30  Oregon Portland (June).............................................  11.52  Pennsylvania Philadelphia (October)................................. Pittsburgh (May) ........................................... Reading (December) .................................... Scranton-Wilkes Barre (November)...........  Texas Dallas (December)........................................ Houston (March)........................................... Longview-Marshall (July)............................. San Antonio (July) ........................................  -  -  -  -  -  -  12.33  12.18 11.94  13.38  -  -  -  8.92  9.23  9.63  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  10.30 10.55 10.28 9.02  -  -  -  -  8.64 8.78 8.18  8.82 8.69  11.03 9.53  7.96  11.65  -  -  -  -  -  6.23  -  -  -  -  -  7.04 7.23 6.93  -  -  8.49  -  9.18  6.99 7.18 6.75 6.65  -  8.16 8.39  ~  .  ~  -  10.21 -  -  210  7.58 7.85 “  -  -  -  -  -  $9.34  -  11.19  -  10.69  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  Warehouse Specialists  12.54 13.45 -  -  11.56 10.26  .  .  12.31  11.93 10.97  -  -  ~  -  -  8.11  -  9.77 8.27  -  9.91 9.52  11.72  9.71 10.82 -  -  - • 11.00  Table L-5. Average hourly pay1 in State and local government, material movement and custodial occupations,2 selected areas, 1993 — Continued Guards  Material Handling Laborers  Shipping/ Receiving Clerks  Light Truck  Medium Truck  Heavy Truck  Tractor Trailer  $9.77 7.09  -  -  -  -  $8.48  -  -  8.28  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  $7.06  -  9.51  -  9.07  12.89  $14.87  15.97  $18.05  13.75  • Janitors  State, area,3 and reference month 1  II  Utah Box Elder County (September)................... Salt Lake City-Ogden (April).......................  -  -  Vermont Burlington (December) ................................  -  Virginia Norfolk-Virginia BeachNewport News (August) ............................ Richmond-Petersburg (July).......................  $9.64 6.94  -  6.94 6.70  -  -  Washington Seattle (October) ..........................................  11.35  -  10.80  -  -  -  7.08  -  -  West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta (July) ........................  -  Wisconsin Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah (May).............. Milwaukee (September)...............................  9.35  -  9.16 11.25  $11.75  -  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Truckdrivers  -  11.53  -  -  -  “  -  “  Specialists  $7.92  -  12.10  2 Pay data for Folklift Operators, and Order Fillers did not meet publication criteria in any area. 3 Areas do not appear on this table if they had no publishable data for these occupations or for this level of industry detail. NOTE: Dashes indicate that collected data, if any, did not meet publication criteria.  211  Appendix A. Scope and Methodology  The Occupational Compensation Survey Program  with 50 workers or more during the sampling frame's reference period are included in the survey sampling frame, even if they employ fewer than 50 workers at the time of the survey. Prior to survey collection, review of the sampling frame uncovers any necessary corrections, which typically involve adding missing establishments, removing out-of-business and out-of-scope units, and updating addresses, employment levels, industry classification, and other information. The expected number of employees to be found (based on previous occupational pay surveys) in professional, administrative, technical, protective service, and clerical occupations determines the establishment sample size in a stratum. In other words, the larger the number of employees expected to be found in designated occupations, the larger the establishment sample in that stratum. Upward adjustments to establishment sample size are necessary in strata expected to have relatively high sampling error for certain occupations, based on previous survey experiences. After sample size determination, the Bureau selects a probability sample, with each establishment having a predetermined chance of selection. To obtain optimum accuracy at minimum cost, the Bureau selects a greater proportion of large than small establishments. Combining the data from each establishment, weighted according to its probability of selection, results in the formation of unbiased estimates.  The data in this report are based on surveys conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP). Surveys cover establishments employing 50 workers or more, but exclude private households, agriculture, the Federal Government, and the self-employed.1 The Bureau conducts OCSP surveys throughout the year on a sample basis. Individual survey area bulletins and summaries (listed in appendix table 4) provide detailed survey information for each area, including industrial coverage and sample size. In addition to individual survey area bulletins, the Bureau uses locality data to estimate national and regional pay levels and distributions. These estimates, published in Part I of this bulletin, provide the basis for computing the nationwide average used for comparing locality pay levels for different occupational groups to an identical group of employees throughout the nation. Part II of this bulletin presents these pay comparisons, or pay relatives, for each OCSP locality with a 1993 reference month. Published occupational pay averages from all 1993 OCSP localities appear in Part III. Establishment samples To present compensation data on a locality basis, statisticians draw establishment samples for each area surveyed in the OCSP. Sampling design involves: Organizing the sampling frame (the list of all area establishments) into strata based on industry and employment size; determining the size of the sample for each stratum; and selecting an establishment sample from each stratum. The Bureau develops sampling frames from State unemployment insurance reports for the 48 contiguous States and the District of Columbia. Establishments  Survey occupations OCSP surveys cover occupations which are common to a variety of public and private industries, and which are representative of the following employment groups: (1) Professional and administrative; (2) technical and protective service; (3) clerical; (4) maintenance and toolroom; and (5) material movement and custodial. Occupational classification involves the use of a uniform set of job descriptions which were designed to take account of interestablishment variation in duties within the same job. Appendix B lists and describes the occupations selected for study, along with corresponding occupational codes and titles from the 1980 edition of the Standard Occupational Classification Manual.  1 For this survey, an establishment is an economic unit which produces goods or services, a central administrative office, or an auxiliary unit providing support services to a company. In manufacturing industries, the establishment is usually at a single physical location. In service-producing industries, all locations of an individual company in a Metropolitan Statistical Area or nonmetropolitan county are usually considered an establishment. In government, an establishment is usually defined as all locations of a government entity.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-1  Occupational pay OCSP survey data correspond to full-time workers, i.e,, those hired to work a regular weekly schedule. The data exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases—but not bonuses—under cost-ofliving allowance clauses and incentive payments, however, are included in the pay data. Weekly hours for professional, administrative, technical, protective service, and clerical occupations refer to the standard workweek (rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour) for which employees receive regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates). Average weekly earnings for these occupations are rounded to the nearest dollar. A-series tables provide distributions of workers by earnings intervals. The mean (average) is computed for each job by totaling pay of all workers and dividing by the number of workers. The median designates position—one-half of the workers receive the same as or more and one-half receive the same as or less than the rate shown. The middle range is defined by two rates of pay; one-fourth of the workers earn the same as or less than the lower of these rates and one-fourth earn the same as or more than the higher rate. Medians and middle ranges are not provided when they do not meet reliability criteria. For some occupations, pay data may not be available at the industry or all­ industry (overall) level because either (1) data do not provide statistically reliable results, or (2) data possibly disclose individual establishment data. All-industry estimates combine data from each industry, even though pay data may not appear separately for each industry division.  Reliability of the estimates—sampling errors Two types of error, sampling and nonsampling affect the reliability of OCSP survey estimates. Sampling errors occur because observations are from a sample, not the entire population. The particular sample used in this survey was one of a number of all possible samples of the same size that could have been selected using the same sample design. Estimates derived from different samples differ from each other. A measure of the variation among differing estimates is called the standard error or sampling error. This measure indicates the precision with which an estimate from a particular sample approximates the average result of all possible samples. The relative standard error is the standard error divided by the estimate. The smaller the relative error, the greater the reliability of the estimate. This information is available in selected individual survey area bulletins. Reliability of the estimates—nonsampling errors A variety of sources may cause nonsampling errors, the second type of sample survey error. Nonsampling errors may originate in collection, response, coverage, and estimation of data. Typical sources of nonsampling error include the inability to obtain information from some establishments; difficulties in interpreting and applying survey occupational definitions; failure of respondents to provide correct information; and inaccuracies in recording or coding the collected data. Although not specifically measured, OCSP nonsampling errors are expected to be minimal due to high response rates; the extensive and continuous training of field economists; careful screening of data at several levels of review; periodic evaluations of job definition suitability; and thorough field testing of new or revised job definitions. The OCSP Job Match Validation process helps measure and control nonsampling errors occurring during data collection. Introduced in 1983, this quality control procedure identifies the frequency, reasons for, and sources of incorrect decisions made by Bureau field economists in matching establishment occupations to OCSP occupations. Reviewers examine data from a sample of survey participants and reinterview the original respondents to verify the accuracy of the job match decisions. Among OCSP areas surveyed, the process typically results in data changes for less than 10 percent of all sampled job match decisions.  Survey nonresponse If a sample member in an OCSP survey refuses to participate or cannot provide data, BLS adjusts the weights (based on the probability of selection in the sample) of responding sample establishments to account for the missing data. Weights for establishments which were out of business or outside the scope of the survey change to zero. Some sampled establishments have a policy of not disclosing salary data for certain employees. No adjustments were made to pay estimates to account for these missing data. The proportion of employees for whom pay data were not available was less than 2 percent. Individual survey bulletins (with type 1 industrial coverage) provide exact measurements of data not available on a locality basis.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Part I: Pay in the United States and Regions Survey coverage The July 1993 national and regional estimates in Part 1 are based on occupational compensation surveys conducted in 1992-94 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Surveys covered establishments employing 50 workers or more in goods producing industries (mining, construction, and manufacturing); service producing industries  A-2  Survey occupations are limited to employees meeting the specific criteria in each job definition. Estimates of occupational employment do not include employees whose salary data are not available, as well as those for whom there is no satisfactory basis for classification by work level. For these reasons, and because occupational structures among establishments differ, OCSP estimates of occupational employment derived from an establishment sample serve only as a general guide to the size and composition of the labor force, rather than a precise measurement of employment.  (transportation, communications, electric, gas, and sanitary services; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services industries); and State and local governments. Tables 1 and 2 in this appendix show the estimated number of U. S. establishments and workers covered by the OCSP scope along with the number actually included in the survey samples used to develop national estimates. Area sample To permit presentation of national and regional data in Part I, the Bureau developed a sample consisting of 90 metropolitan areas and 70 nonmetropolitan counties. These localities represent the Nation's 326 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget in 1984) and the remaining portions of the 48 contiguous States. Table 3 of this appendix lists the OCSP locality surveys which were used to obtain national and regional estimates. The area sample involves the selection of areas from strata (groups) of similar areas. Criteria for area stratification (grouping) are nonagricultural employment level, geographic region, and type of industrial activity. For estimates of all areas combined, data from each area are weighted by the ratio of total nonagricultural employment in the stratum to that in the sample area. For example, if total nonagricultural employment in a stratum is 500,000 and the sample area has employment of 100,000, the sample area would be assigned a weight of 5.  Survey nonresponse Data were not available from 11.0 percent of the sample establishments (representing 4,494,409 employees covered by the survey). An additional 6.2 percent of the sample establishments (representing 1,728,708 employees) were either out of business or outside the scope of the survey. Sampling error Estimates of relative errors for the 1993 national and regional estimates in Part l this bulletin vary among the occupational work levels depending on such factors as the frequency with which the job occurred, the dispersion of salaries for the job, and survey design. For the 134 publishable work levels, the distribution of one relative standard error is as follows:  Updating area data Unlike last year's national and regional estimates (published in Part I: Pay in the United States and Regions, June 1992), the 1993 estimates include updated survey data from last year. Faced with budget constraints, the Bureau used the Employment Cost Index to age selected locality data by 12 months. In addition to alleviating collection resources, the update has reduced respondent burden. Table 3 in this appendix indicates the 63 area sample members for which all- or private industry data were updated.  Percent ofpublished occupational work levels  Less than 1 percent 1 and under 3 percent 3 and under 5 percent 5 percent and over  27.7 63.5 8.0 0.8  Computation of the standard error aids in the determination of a "confidence interval" around a sample estimate. A 95 percent confidence interval is centered around a sample estimate and includes all values within 2 times the estimate's standard error. If all possible samples were selected to estimate the population value, the confidence interval from each sample would include the true population value approximately 95 percent of the time.  Data collection and payroll reference Bureau field economists obtain survey data from a sample of establishments throughout the United States, primarily by personal visit. The combined average payroll reference month for all surveys (including those updated) which contributed to the 1993 national estimates is July. Part I data limitations  Part 11: Pay Comparisons  The average pay data presented in this report reflect nationwide and regional estimates. Industries and establishments differ in pay levels and job staffing, and thus contribute differently to the estimates for each job. Therefore, average pay does not necessarily reflect the pay differential among jobs within individual establishments.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Relative Standard Error  Description The Bureau designed pay relatives to facilitate pay comparisons for broad occupational groups. Pay relatives express pay levels as a percent of the national pay level. In other words, pay relatives are the result of dividing pay for an  A-3  occupational group in a particular area or for a particular industry by the corresponding national pay level, and multiplying by 100. F-series tables show area pay relatives, comparing each OCSP area to the  national estimates; the G-series tables show establishment characteristics pay relatives, contrasting national data for establishments with certain characteristics against national data for all establishments.  warn  Part II: Pay Comparisons~ Occupational groups Pay  ■  Occupational group  ■Bugi  .  |||S  Occupational levels  Occupational group  vailabie:  Occupational levels  Protective Service  Corrections Officers -1 level ; mam Firefighters -1 levet Police Officers, Uniformed - 2 levels WMI  .y;--.,T'--'vs*-'■■■■  mjM | Hi  $$$$$$ P i m  ■■B Mc^nM  :  I  ■  fePt^5ffset|S5 ■  . ..  • C ■ li^rc  ^  ' .:■■■■■.■'■ ■  ,  ■ "  ■  ■:  ■ • - >: ■ ■:  Smm NMW  Wmmm  ■ ■ ■ •  • . \/ - ■  ■ .  -V-: ~  '? ■  •  mmiSSmSm :  ;,  ■  '<■} ^ *1 *f SW? ■r * 3 . vh ..jSy*  ^  .  ■  '  eiWWIM .. .. ■■■.ffpgT ■■■■• . %W\ Ps  w£\  Itni mM^mrn  .  .  ,  v  »  .  -  '*  ■$,  1 ■' '■  --  "  :  ■  ,  ■  y:'<  MBmiiSHi ■BE  ■•: ,'t'r  mm bB Ipi ? rwipSwft  .  ,  . .  :i$p::m;e:  Drafter ■  mil  *  v\ IvC'i,'>  »j k si «■ i  i b >,«  t» ;»h  LrnmH  Clerks, Order - 2 levels Key Entry Operators - 2 lev Secretaries - 5 levels Switchboard Operator-Rece Word Processors - 3 levels  wm m  .:::l,.iV,;.;.  '  iiiitsi v vAy v % ■  •' .Ar .........................  Interarea pay relative computation  ................ C c •• - , N /  f  ____ :___ '—ll  occupation included in the occupational group equals the area base (numerator) for that occupational group.  The following procedure, which reduces interarea differences in occupational composition as a factor in pay levels, is used to construct pay relatives.  2. National base computation (denominator). National average pay for comparable occupational levels multiplied by the corresponding national employment results in aggregate pay levels. The sum of these products for these jobs produces a national base (denominator) for each occupational group.  1. Area base computation (numerator).  Multiplying average pay for each publishable occupational level in an area with the corresponding national employment results in aggregate pay levels. The sum of these products for each   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  s&  A-4  3. Reference month adjustment. Because the Bureau collects data for individual areas at different times throughout the calendar year, the use of appropriate Employment Cost Index components may be necessary to adjust the July 1993 national base (denominator) to match the survey area reference month.  Part II data limitations The pay data presented in this report are based on locality averages for specific occupations. Industries and establishments differ in pay levels and job staffing, and thus contribute differently to the estimates for each job. Therefore, pay relatives do not necessarily reflect the pay differential among occupational groups within individual establishments. Weekly pay data used in computing pay relatives for white-collar and protective service occupations refer to the standard workweek (rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour) for which employees receive regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates). Hourly pay differentials may be more significant than that reflected in the weekly averages. For example, New York, NY, and Los Angeles, CA, both had pay relatives of 116 for Secretaries in all industries (table F-l). However, in 1993, the average workweek for Secretaries was 3 hours shorter in New York than in Los Angeles. When based on hourly pay, the Los Angeles Francisco pay relative for Secretaries in all industries remains unchanged, but the New York pay relative jumps 8 points to 124. Consult individual area bulletins and summaries for standard workweek data.  4. Pay relative computation. Dividing the area base by the corresponding national base and multiplying the result by 100 yields the area pay relative. The national pay relative corresponds to 100. If, for example, the relative for an area is 90, this indicates that the area's pay level is 90 percent of the nationwide pay level, or 10 percent below the national level. Part II tables show area pay relatives only if the national employment which corresponds to the area’s published occupations equals at least 70 percent of the national total employment of the entire occupational group. For example, in the 1993 Visalia, CA, OCSP survey, data from only three of five levels of Secretaries met publication criteria for all industries. Table F-2 includes a Secretaries pay relative for Visalia, because national employment for those three levels is 78 percent of the national employment for all levels of Secretaries. Longview-Marshall, TX, lacks a pay relative on table F-2 because only two levels of Secretaries met publishability criteria, and nationally, those two levels account for just 52 percent of all Secretaries.  Part III: Locality Pay  Industry-specific data  Data collection and payroll reference  The F-series tables present pay relatives for private industry, State and local government, and all industries, combined. The tables make a further distinction between types of survey coverage, whether full or limited (see page 3). Area pay for an occupational group and industry level is divided by national pay for the same occupational group and industry level, for all areas. Thus, numerators and denominators, used to calculate pay relatives, may differ from each other in the tables. For some areas, pay relatives may not be available at the industry or all-industries level because (1) the data do not provide statistically reliable results, (2) the data possibly disclose individual establishment data, or (3) the survey has a limited industrial scope. All-industries estimates used for pay relatives combine data from private industry with State and local governments, in selected areas (types 1 and 2, as indicated in appendix table 4), even though pay data may not appear separately for each industry division.  BLS published 152 OCSP surveys with a 1993 month of reference. Published survey data reflect an average payroll reference month, and the typical collection period for each area is 3 months. Part III tables identify the survey reference month alongside the locality name. Bureau field economists obtained survey data from a sample of establishments within each OCSP survey area (as defined in appendix table 5), usually by personal visit. Data obtained for a payroll period prior to the end of the reference month include general wage changes which became effective through that date. Part III data limitations The pay data in Part III reflect locality averages. Industries and establishments differ in pay levels and job staffing, and thus contribute differently to the estimates for each job. Therefore, average pay does not necessarily reflect the pay differential among jobs within individual establishments. Also, note that although tables may present pay data for a particular industry division, the extent of industrial coverage may vary among areas included on the same table. Appendix table 4 summarizes these differences in industrial coverage. Weekly pay data for white-collar and protective services workers refer to the standard workweek for which employees receive regular straight-time salaries. Hourly pay differentials may be more or less significant than those reflected in the weekly averages. Consult individual area bulletins and summaries for standard workweek data.  Establishment characteristics  The G-series tables present pay relatives which compare the national occupational estimates for specific industries, sizes, regions, and area classifications (metropolitan and nonmetropolitan) to the national estimates for all areas. This is essentially a comparison of data from the B- through E- series tables in Part 1 to the A-series tables. Here, computing pay relatives for occupational groups involves the same procedure as above, but no reference month adjustment is needed.  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-5   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Appendix table 1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied, United States1, July 1993 Number of establishments  Workers in establishments  Industry division2 Within scope of survey®  Within scope of survey4 Studied  Studied Number  Percent  15,794 4,026 168 683 3,175 1,663 69 40 171 118  49,577,892 15,723,487 260,510 1,003,394 14,459,583 7,885,305 609,580 252,574 386,746 567,038  79 25 (6> 2 23 13 1 (6) 1 1  9,672,635 2,499,459 46,831 112,998 2,339,630 1,562,673 14,341 10,008 44,744 84,131  6,191  224  805,496  1  60,091  5,525  302  1,384,195  2  200,699  3,608 2,931  257 227  1,269,865 1,598,553  2 3  235,596 652,636  2,426 1,414 28,967 6,132 48 2,985  202 53 1,512 379 9 53  772,298 238,960 6,574,280 1,495,495 36,355 743,739  1 <6) 10 2 (6> 1  240,725 19,702 776,957 171,674 14,543 20,233  4,086 2,160 6,243 2,891 553 3,341 528  113 218 296 220 46 157 21  630,080 625,755 1,172,241 951,761 129,123 661,648 128,083  1 1 2 2 («) 1 (6)  30,097 89,192 175,844 175,837 39,769 48,028 11,740  269,107 Private industry................................................................................... Goods producing industries.......................................................... Mining5.................................................................................... Construction5.......................................................................... Manufacturing......................................................................... Durable goods.................................................................. Lumber and wood products........................................ Furniture and fixtures.................................................. Stone, clay, glass, and concrete products................. Primary metal industries............................................. Fabricated metal products, except machinery and transportation equipement..................................... Industrial and commercial machinery and computer equipment............................................................... Electronic and other electrical equipment and components, except computer equipment............. Transportation equipment........................................... Measuring, analyzing, and controlling instruments; photographic, medical and optical goods; watches and clocks............................................................... Miscellaneous manufacturing industries.................... Nondurable goods............................................................ Food and kindred products......................................... Tobacco products....................................................... Textile mill products.................................................... Apparel and other finished products made from fabrics and similar materials.................................. Paper and allied products........................................... Printing, publishing, and allied industries .................. Chemicals and allied products................................... Petroleum refining and related industries.................. Rubber and miscellaneous plastic products.............. Leather and leather products.....................................  243,277 74,821 1,830 11,200 61,791 32,824 4,592 1,491 2,101 2,545  See footnotes at end of table.  A-6   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Appendix table 1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied, United States1, July 1993 — Continued Number of establishments  Workers in establishments  Industry division2  Within scope of survey4  Within scope of survey3  Studied  168,456  11,768  Studied Number  Percent  33,854,405  54  7,173,176  5 1 3 16 6 3 2 23 5 2 9  1,158,288 262,913 246,532 1,252,649 1,016,141 537,703 296,359 3,499,566 735,444 411,301 1,378,491  Transportation, communication, electric, gas, and sanitary 14,223 3,000 15,419 52,897 16,547 5,915 3,262 69,370 15,926 3,515 19,455  1,400 282 929 1,435 1,242 418 288 6,762 1,897 400 1,711  3,455,040 876,513 1,752,253 10,019,005 3,811,143 1,614,253 1,009,803 14,816,964 3,145,594 1,053,073 5,850,812  6,058  976  1,080,285  2  411,301  13,487,754  21  4,481,955  Engineering, accounting, research, management, 2,159  25,830  1 The "workers within scope of survey” estimates provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey. Estimates are not intended, however, for comparison with other statistical series to measure employment trends or levels since (1) planning of wage surveys requires establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) establishments employing fewer than 50 workers are excluded from the scope of the survey. 2 The Standard Industrial Classification Manual was used in classifying establishments by industry. 3 Includes all establishments with at least 50 total employees. In goods producing, an establishment is defined as a single physical location where industrial operations are performed. In service producing industries, an establishment is defined as all locations of a company in the area within the same industry division. In government, an establishment is typically defined  as all locations of a government entity. 4 Includes all workers in all establishments with at least 50 total employees. 5 Separate data for this division are not shown in the A-, B-, and C-series tables, but the division is represented in the "all industries’ and "goods producing" estimates. 6 Less than 0.5 percent. 7 Abbreviated to "Transportation and utilities" in the A-, B-, C-, and E-series tables. This division is represented in the "all industries" and "service-producing" estimates. 8 Separate data for this division are not shown in the A-, B-, C-, and E-series tables, but the division is represented in the "all industries" and "service-producing” estimates.  A-7   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Appendix table 2. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied, United States1, July 1993 Number of establishments Establishment characteristics  Workers in establishments Within scope of survey3  Within scope of survey2  Studied  269,107  Region: Northeast..................................................................... South .................................................... Midwest ...................................................... West ..............................................................  Studied Number  Percent  17,953  63,065,646  100  14,154,590  57,327 90,819 69,176 51,785  3,792 5,547 4,411 4,203  13,441,685 21,482,155 15,523,427 12,618,379  21 34 25 20  3,083,749 4,027,782 3,533,389 3,509,670  Area classification: Metropolitan areas........................................................ Nonmetropolitan areas ................................  212,877 56,230  16,597 1,356  53,485,303 9,580,343  85 15  13,829,881 324,709  Establishments employing: Less than 500 workers ............................................. 500-999 workers....................................................... 1,000-2,499 workers......................................... 2,500 workers or more.....................................................  247,824 12,638 6,064 2,581  13,095 2,043 1,663 1,152  30,695,110 8,546,536 9,052,708 14,771,292  49 14 14 23  2,104,108 1,413,280 2,557,528 8,079,674  All establishments..................................................  1 The ’’workers within scope of survey” estimates provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey. Estimates are not intended, however, for comparison with other statistical series to measure employment trends or levels since (1) planning of wage surveys requires establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) establishments employing fewer than 50 workers are excluded from the scope of the survey. 2 Includes all establishments with at least 50 total employees. In goods  A-8  producing, an establishment is defined as a single physical location where industrial operations are performed. In service producing industries, an establishment is defined as all locations of a company in the area within the same industry division. In government, an establishment is defined as all locations of a government entity. 3 Includes all workers in all establishments with at least 50 total employees.  Appendix table 3: Area sample used for national and regional estimates, July 1993  NORTHEAST Connecticut Danbury............... PMSA Hartford.............................. PMSA1 Maine Oxford...................................NMET Portland.................................MSA1 Massachusetts Boston..................................PMSA Lawrence-Haverhill............. PMSA Worcester............................... MSA New Hampshire Carroll................................. NMET2 New Jersey Bergen-Passaic.................. PMSA1 Middlesex-SomersetHunterdon......................... PMSA1 Monmouth-Ocean.................PMSA Newark.................................PMSA Trenton.................................PMSA New York Buffalo................................ PMSA1 Clinton................................ NMET2 Delaware............................ NMET2 Nassau-Suffolk.....................PMSA New York..............................PMSA Poughkeepsie......................... MSA Rochester............................. MSA1 Tompkins..............................NMET Pennsylvania McKean................................NMET Philadelphia..........................PMSA Pittsburgh........................... PMSA1 Scranton-Wilkes Barre........... MSA Warren..................................NMET York.......................................MSA1 Rhode Island Pawtucket-WoonsocketAttleboro........................... PMSA1 Vermont Orleans.................................NMET SOUTH Alabama Hunstville.................................. MSA  SOUTH-Continued Alabama (Continued) Limestone............................NMET2 Mobile ................................... MSA1 Sumter.................................. NMET Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock............................ MSA1 Delaware Wilimington..........................PMSA1 District of Columbia Washington.............................MSA Florida Bradenton.............................. MSA1 Gainesville............................. MSA1 Miami-Hialeah....................... PMSA Monroe................................NMET2 Orlando....................................MSA Tampa-St. PetersburgClearwater.............................MSA Georgia Atlanta.....................................MSA Augusta.................................MSA1 McIntosh............................. NMET2 Murray.................................NMET2 Talbot...................................NMET2 Kentucky Louisville..................................MSA Louisiana Acadia.................................. NMET Natchitoches...................... NMET2 New Orleans...........................MSA Shreveport............................. MSA1 Maryland Baltimore.................................MSA Mississippi Franklin................................. NMET Jackson...................................MSA Marion................................... NMET North Carolina Charlotte-GastoniaRock Hill................................MSA Harnett.................................NMET2 Martin.................................... NMET McDowell.............................. NMET  SOUTH-Continued Oklahoma Pittsburg..............................NMET2 South Carolina Beaufort................................ NMET Charleston............................. MSA1 Florence..................................MSA Greenwood..........................NMET2 Tennessee Dyer...................................... NMET Hardin..................................NMET2 Memphis..................................MSA Nashville..................................MSA Obion.................................... NMET Trousdale............................NMET2 Texas Austin......................................MSA Childress.............................. NMET Corpus Christi.........................MSA Dallas................................... PMSA Eastland............................... NMET Gillespie................................ NMET Houston................................ PMSA Longview-Marshall................MSA1 Nacogdoches......................NMET2 Polk.....................................NMET2 San Angelo..............................MSA San Antonio.............................MSA Scurry................................... NMET Virginia Giles....................................NMET2 Richmond-Petersburg............ MSA West Virginia Grant.................................... NMET Mason..................................NMET2 MIDWEST Illinois Champaign-UrbanaRantoul............................... MSA1 Chicago................................ PMSA Decatur.................................. MSA1 Franklin................................. NMET Joliet......................................PMSA Livingston............................. NMET Vermilion..............................NMET2 White.................................... NMET  MIDWEST-Continued Indiana F.lkhart-Goshen................ MSA Gary Hammond.................. PMSA1 Indianapolis.............................MSA Kokomo...................................MSA South Bend-Mishawaka........ MSA Iowa Carroll............................ ,....NMET2 Cass..................................... NMET Davenport-Rock IslandMoline....................................MSA Monona................................. NMET Kansas Finney................................... NMET Lane...................................... NMET Wabaunsee.........................NMET2 Michigan Detroit....................................PMSA Gladwin...............................NMET2 Van Buren...........................NMET2 Minnesota Blue Earth............................NMET2 Minneapolis-St. Paul.............MSA1 St. Cloud................................ MSA1 Missouri Butler...................................NMET2 Kansas City............................ MSA St. Louis..................................MSA Nebraska Dodge..................................NMET2 Omaha.....................................MSA Scotts Bluff......................... NMET2  MIDWEST-Continued Wisconsin (Continued) Milwaukee............................PMSA Oconto..................................NMET Sawyer............................... NMET2 WEST Arizona Apache............................... NMET2 Phoenix..................................MSA California Anaheim-Santa Ana.............PMSA Fresno...................................MSA1 Los Angeles-Long Beach.....PMSA Oakland................................PMSA Riverside-San Bernadino.....PMSA Sacramento............................ MSA San Diego............................... MSA San Francisco......................PMSA San Jose............................ PMSA1 San Luis Obispo...................NMET Trinity.................................. NMET2 Visalia-Tulare-Porterville.......MSA1 Colorado Denver..................................PMSA Idaho Bannock............................. NMET2 Boise City............................... MSA Bonner..................................NMET Montana Billings.................................... MSA Teton....................................NMET New Mexico San Juan............................ NMET2  Ohio Cincinnati.............................. PMSA Cleveland............................. PMSA Columbus................................MSA Gallia...................................NMET2 Mercer.................................NMET2 Scioto................................... NMET Toledo.................................... MSA1 Williams................................ NMET  Oregon Portland................................PMSA Umatilla.................................NMET  Wisconsin Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah.. MSA1 Manitowoc............................ NMET  Wyoming Sweetwater......................... NMET2  Utah Box Elder..............................NMET Salt Lake City-Ogden............. MSA Washington Seattle................................ PMSA1  1 For the 1993 survey, data collected from private industry establishments in 1992 were adjusted to a 1993 reference month using factors from the Employment Cost Index. 2 For the 1993 survey, data collected from private industry and State and local governments in 1992 were adjusted to a 1993 reference month using factors from the Employment Cost Index. Note: Area designations are defined as Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) and Primary Metropolitan Statistical Areas (PMSA), as defined by the Office of Management and Budget, 1984; and nonmetropolitan counties (NMET). Some MSA's and PMSA's cross State lines; in these instances the area is listed under the State where the central city is located.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-9  Appendix table 4: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) publications, calendar year 1993  State and area  Publication1  industrial coverage2  Benefits3  Publication1  State and area  Alaska  Industrial coverage2  Benefits3  Florida (continued)  Statewide Alaska................................  Miami-Hialeah................................ Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater........... ....  Alabama Dothan.....................................  SUM  3  NO  Huntsville.................................  3070-6  1  NO  NO NO  Atlanta...............................................  ....  3070-30  1  NO  Augusta..................................  ....  3070-17  2  NO  SUM  3  NO  Chicago...................................  ...  3070-41  1  NO  Decatur....................................  ....  SUM  3  NO  3070-15 Illinois  Arkansas Little Rock-North Little Rock........................  1  2  Georgia  Arizona  Phoenix.................................  3070-27  Champaign-Urbana-Rantoul.................. 3065-64  Pine Bluff...................................  Livingston County................................ Peoria....................................  NO  Springfield...................................  YES Los Angeles-Long Beach........................ Oakland................................  3070-78  1  NO  3070-81  1  NO NO  3070-24  Indiana Bloomington-Vincennes............ Indianapolis...........................  NO 3070-20  1  Kokomo..................................  NO  San Luis Obispo County................  SUM  1  NO  3070-25  3  YES  Stockton..........................  SUM  3  YES  3070-33  Cedar Rapids......................................  NO  3070- 79  1  NO  Danbury................................  3070-2  2  NO  New Britain....................................  3065-9  1  NO  3070-14  2  NO  3070-1  Waterloo-Cedar Falls.....................  SUM  ....  Finney County..................................  3  NO  3  YES  3  NO  1  NO  NO  Kentucky  Delaware  Evansville-Clarksville-HopkinsvilleOwensboro-Bowling Green...........  District of Columbia Washington...........................  Davenport-Rock Island-Moline................. .... Des Moines...................................  Kansas  Connecticut  Wilmington.......................  NO  Iowa  Colorado Denver........................  3  South Bend-Mishawaka............................  NO Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-Lompoc............  NO  Elkhart-Goshen........................  NO San Francisco................................  SUM  3070-13  1  NO  3070-14  2  NO  SUM  3  NO  SUM  3  NO  1  NO  3  YES  SUM  3  YES  Lexington-Fayette........................  .  SUM  3  YES  Louisville.................................  ....  3070-42  2  NO  1  NO  Louisiana  Florida Bradenton.............................  Acadia Parish................................... Alexandria-Leesville.................. New Orleans........................  Fort Lauderdale-HollywoodPompano Beach and Boca Raton..... Fort Myers-Cape Coral..............................  3070-73  Gainesville......................................  SUM  Melbourne-Titusville-Palm Bay............  SUM   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3070-31  Maryland Baltimore....................... Hagerstown-Cumberland........................  A-10  3070-29 ......... SUM  1  NO  3  YES  Appendix table 4: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) publications, calendar year 1993 (continued)  State and area  Publication1  Industrial coverage2  Benefits3  Boston..................................................... ..  3070-35  1  NO  Lawrence-Haverhill.................................. ...  3070-56  NO YES  Southeastern Massachusetts...................  SUM  1 3  Western Massachusetts...........................,.. Worcester................................................ ..  SUM  3  NO  3070-43  2  NO  Battle Creek.................................... ....... .... Detroit..................................................... .... Saginaw-Bay City-Midland...................... ... Minnesota Minneapolis-St. Paul............................... .... St. Cloud................................................. ...  3  NO  SUM  3  NO  SUM  3  NO  3070-75  1  NO  14  NO  SUM  3070-18  3070-8  2  NO  3070-9  2  NO  3070-71  2  NO5  SUM  3  YES  St. Louis.................................. .............. ....  Nebraska Grand Island-Hastings................................  3070-51  1  NO  SUM  3  NO  1  NO  3070-11  3070-58  2  YES  SUM  3  YES  SUM  NO  Nassau-Suffolk..................................-..... .. New York.................................................. ..  3070-74  1  NO  3070-38  1  NO  Northern New York................................... .. Poughkeepsie........................................... ...  SUM  3  NO  3070-50  2  NO  Rochester................................................. .. Utica-Rome.............................................. ....  3070-62  2  NO  14  NO  3070-32  Asheville................................................... . Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill..........  SUM  3  NO  SUM  3  NO  Fayetteville..............................................  SUM  3  NO  Jacksonville-New Bern...........................  SUM  3  YES  Raleigh-Durham....................................... .  SUM  3  YES  SUM  3  YES  Cincinnati................................................. .... Cleveland................................................. ....  3070-28  1  NO  3070-52  1  NO  Columbus................................................ .... Dayton-Springfield................................... ,..  3070-69  1  NO  3070-7  1  NO  Lima........................................................ Portsmouth-Chillicothe-Gallipolis...........  SUM  3  NO  SUM  3  NO  Scioto County............. ..................................  SUM  1  NO  Ohio  3  Oklahoma  Oklahoma City........................................ .  3070-12  1  NO  Tulsa............... ..... .................................. ..  SUM  3  NO  SUM  3  YES  3070-40  2  YES  Harrisburg-Lebanon-Carlisle..................  SUM  3  NO  Philadelphia.................................. —..... - .... Pittsburgh................................................ ....  3070-67  1  NO  3070-23  2  NO  3070-70  1  NO  3070-72  2  NO  SUM  3  NO  SUM  1  NO  SUM  3  NO  Oregon  NO  35  NO  3  YES  Portland.................................................. Pennsylvania  New Jersey Bergen-Passaic..................................... ....  3070-22  2  NO  Middlesex-Somerset-Hunterdon............ .. Monmouth-Ocean.................................. ....  SUM  3  NO  3070-26  2  NO  Newark.................................................. .... Trenton.................................................. .....  3070-76  2  NO  SUM  3  NO  Reading.................................................. .... Scranton-Wilkes-Barre........................... .... Puerto Rico............................................. .  3070-61  1  ........  South Carolina  Beaufort County..................................... ... Florence................................................. ...  New Mexico   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  YES  3  Roseburg-Klamath Falls................... SUM  New Hampshire Statewide New Hampshire..................... ............ SUM  Albuquerque......................................... ...  3  SUM  Eugene-Springfield-Medford-  Nevada Reno...............................................  SUM  Statewide North Dakota........................... ...  Montana Billings................................................... .... Statewide Montana................................. ....  Albany-Schenectady-Troy......................... .... Buffalo...................................................... ...  North Carolina  Missouri Kansas City............................................. ... Southern Missouri................................... ....  Benefits3  North Dakota  Mississippi Jackson.................................................. .. Meridian.................................................. ..  Industrial coverage2  New York  Massachusetts  Michigan Alpena-Standish-Tawas City....................,.. Ann Arbor................................................ .....  Publication1  State and area  YES  A-11  Appendix table 4: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) publications, calendar year 1993 (continued)  State and area  Publication1  Industrial coverage  Benefits3  State and area  South Dakota  Publication1  Industrial coverage*2  Benefits3  Utah  Statewide South Dakota.............................  SUM  3  Box Elder..................................  ..  Salt Lake City-Ogden.................... Tennessee Chattanooga.....................................  3070-47  1  NO  Knoxville.....................................  SUM  3  NO  Memphis....................................  3070-63  1  NO  Nashville.............................  3070-4  2  NO  Northeastern Tennessee-West Virginia  SUM  3  YES  SUM  1  NO  Obion County...............................  SUM  1  NO  3070-21  1  NO  3070-60  1  NO  Vermont Burlington.......................... Virginia Norfolk-Virginia Beach-Newport News....  3070-49  1  NO  Richmond-Petersburg...................  3070-48  1  YES  3  YES  Southwest Virginia............................  Texas  Washington  Abilene..............................  3070-59  14  Austin............................................  SUM  3  Beaumont-Port Arthur and Lake Charles  SUM  Dallas......................................  3070-80  El Paso-Las Cruces-Alamogordo.......... Fort Worth-Arlington.............................. Houston.........................................  3070-16  Longview-Marshall......................... Rio Grande Valley.........................  NO  Seattle................................  3070-57  1  NO  NO  Spokane.................................  SUM  3  YES  3  NO  Tacoma.........................................  SUM  3  YES  1  NO  Yakima-Rchland-Kennewick-  SUM  3  NO  SUM  3  YES  SUM  3 1  NO NO  3070-34 SUM  2  NO  3070-37  1  NO  3  NO  San Angelo......................  SUM  14  San Antonio.........................  3070-44 SUM  NO  Waco and Killeen-Temple.......................  Pasco-Walla Walla- Pendleton West Virginia Parkersburg-Marietta....................... Wisconsin  NO  Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah........................  1  NO  3  3070-19 SUM  2  La Crosse-Sparta.............................  NO  3  NO  Milwaukee.......................................  3070-53  2  NO  -SUM- indicates that a free survey summary is available from Regional Offices, listed on the back cover of this publication. Otherwise, bulletin numbers identify those locality paysurveys which are availablefor a nominal fee from the Government Printing Office (GPO), Washington, DC 20402, GPO Bookstores, or the Bureau of Labor Statistics Publications Sales Center, PO Box 2145, Chicago, IL 60690. Limited industrial scope (type 3) covers: all Manufacturing (Standard Industrial Classification (SIC's ) 201-399): most Transportation, communications, electric, gas, and sanitary services (SIC's 401-411, 413-423, 441-448 451-497)- all Wholesale trade (SIC's 501-519); all Retail trade (SIC's 521-599); all Finance, insurance, and real estate (SIC's 601-679); and Selected Services (SIC's 701-754, 781-784, 861-865, 869-874, and 899). Type 2 industrial scope also covers State and local government operations of all SIC's, 011-972. In addition to the type 2 scope, type 1 (full industrial scope) surveys also include the following industries : all Mining (SIC's 101-149), all Construction (SIC's 152-179), additional Transportation, communications, electric gas and sanitary services (SIC s 412 and 449); and additional Selected Services (SIC's 762-769, 791-842, and 866). 3 A" 'yPeS °' °CSP industrial  e«lude Agriculture, forestry and fishing (SIC's 011-097), the US. Postal Service (SIC 431), private households (SIC 881), and federal, foreign,  4 Beneflt dala include paid holidays and vacations; and health insurance, retirement and other benefit plan provisions for full-time employees. This survey did not cover State and local governments. This survey also covers gambling establishments (part of SIC's 7993 and 7999)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-12  and international governments.  Appendix table 5: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) area definitions  State and area1  Area type2  Alabama  Dothan........................................................—MSA Huntsville......................................................... MSA Limestone County........................................... NMET Mobile.............................................................. MSA Sumter County............................................... NMET  Arizona  Apache County.............................................. Phoenix...........................................................  NMET MSA  Arkansas  Definition  Cale and Houston Counties Madison County Limestone County Baldwin and Mobile Counties Sumter County Apache County Maricopa County Faulkner, Lonoke, Pulaski, and Saline Counties Jefferson County  Little Rock-North Little Rock. Pine Bluff.............................. California  PMSA MSA MSA PMSA PMSA PMSA MSA MSA PMSA PMSA NMET MSA MSA NMET MSA  Orange County Kern County Fresno County Los Angeles County Alameda and Contra Costa Counties Riverside and San Bernardino Counties El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, and Yolo Counties San Diego County Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties Santa Clara County San Luis Obispo County Santa Barbara County San Joaquin County Trinity County Tulare County  MSA PMSA  El Paso County Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, Douglas, and Jefferson Counties  Danbury..........................................................  PMSA  Danbury city, and Bethel, Brookfield, New Fairfield, Newtown, Redding, Ridgefield, and Sherman towns in Fairfield County; Bridgewater and New Milford towns in  Hartford..........................................................  PMSA  Anaheim-Santa Ana...................................... Bakersfield..................................................... Fresno............................................................ Los Angeles-Long Beach............................. Oakland.......................................................... Riverside-San Bernardino.............................. Sacramento.................................................... San Diego........................................................ San Francisco................................................. San Jose......................................................... San Luis Obispo County..................................... Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-Lompoc.............. Stockton............................................................ Trinity County.................................................... Visalia-Tulare-Porterville................................ Colorado  Colorado Springs Denver................. Connecticut   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Litchfield County Hartford city, and Avon, Bloomfield, Canton, East Granby, East Hartford, East Windsor, Enfield Farmington, Glastonbury, Granby, Manschester, Marlborough, Newington, Rocky Hill, Simsbury, South Windsor, Suffield, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Windsor, Windsor Locks towns in Hartford County; Barkhamsted and New Hartford towns in Litchfield County; East Haddam town in Middlesex County; Colchester town in New London County; Andover, Bolton Columbia, Coventry, Ellington, Hebron, Somers, Stafford, Tolland, Vernon, and Willington towns in Tolland County  A-13  Appendix table 5: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) area definitions (continued)  State and area1  Area type2  Definition  Connecticut (Continued)  New Britain.....................................................  PMSA  New Britain city, and Berlin, Plainville, and Southington towns in Hartford County  PMSA  New Castle County, DE; Cecil County, MD; Salem County, NJ  MSA  District of Columbia; Calvert, Charles, Frederick, Montgomery, and Prince Georges Counties, MD; Alexandria, Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park cities, and Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, and Stafford Counties, VA  MSA MSA  Manatee County Volusia County  2 MSA's MSA MSA MSA PMSA NMET MSA MSA  Broward and Palm Beach Counties Lee County Alachua and Bradford Counties Brevard County Dade County Monroe County Orange, Osceola, and Seminole Counties Hernando, Hillsborough, Pasco, and Pinellas Counties  Atlanta............................................................  MSA  Augusta.......................................................... Brunswick...................................................... Columbus........................................................ Macon-Warner Robins................................... McIntosh County............................................. Talbot County..................................................  MSA ESA MSA MSA NMET NMET  Barrow, Butts, Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, De Kalb, Douglas, Fayette, Forsyth, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, Newton, Paulding, Rockdale, Spalding, and Walton Counties Columbia, McDuffie, and Richmond Counties, GA; Aiken County, SC Glynn County Chattahoochee and Muscogee Counties, GA; Russell County, AL Bibb, Houston, Jones, and Peach Counties McIntosh County Talbot County  MSA MSA PMSA MSA NMET PMSA NMET MSA MSA NMET NMET  McLean County Champaign County Cook, Du Page, and McHenry Counties Macon County Franklin County Grundy and Will Counties Livingston County Peoria, Tazewell, and Woodford Counties Menard and Sangamon Counties Vermilion County White County  Delaware  Wilmington...................................................... District of Columbia  Washington...................................................  Florida  Bradenton....................................................... Daytona Beach............................................... Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach and Boca Raton............................. Fort Meyers-Cape Coral................................ Gainesville...................................................... Melbourne-Titusville-Palm Bay...................... Miami-Hialeah................................................ Monroe County................................................ Orlando.......................................................... Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater................ Georgia  Illinois  Bloomington-Normal...................................... Champaign-Urbana-Rantoul.......................... Chicago.......................................................... Decatur........................................................... Franklin County............................................... Joliet............................................................... Livingston County......................................... Peoria............................................................. Springfield...................................................... Vermilion County.......................................... White County.................................................   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-14  Appendix table 5: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) area definitions (continued)  State and area1 Indiana  Bloomington-Vincennes............................... Elkhart-Goshen............................................. Evansville........................................ .............. Fort Wayne.................................................... Gary-Hammond............................................ Indianapolis.................................................... Kokomo.......................................................... South Bend-Mishawaka................................  Area type2  Definition  ESA MSA MSA MSA PMSA MSA MSA MSA  Daviess, Greene, Knox, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, and Orange Counties Elkhart County Posey, Vanderburgh, and Warrick Counties, IN; Henderson County, KY Adams, Allen, DeKalb, Wells, and Whitley Counties Lake and Porter Counties Boone, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Johnson, Marion, Morgan, and Shelby Counties Howard and Tipton Counties St. Joseph and Marshall Counties  NMET NMET MSA MSA MSA NMET  Carroll County Cass County Linn County Henry and Rock Island Counties, IL; Scott County, IA Dallas, Polk, and Warren Counties Monona County  Iowa  Carroll County................................................. Cass County................................................... Cedar Rapids.................................................. Davenport-Rock Island-Moline...................... Des Moines..................................................... Monona County............................................... Kansas  Finney County................................................. NMET Lane County............................................................NMET Wabaunsee County........................................ NMET  Finney County Lane County Wabaunsee County  Kentucky  Evansville-Clarksville-HopkinsvilleOwensboro-Bowling Green...................  ESA  Lexington-Fayette........................................... Louisville..........................................................  MSA MSA  Butler, Christian, Daviess, Hopkins, Logan, McLean, Muhlenburg, Ohio, Todd, Union, Warren, and Webster Counties, KY; Posey, Vanderburgh and Warrick Counties, IN; and Montgomery County, TN Bourbon, Clark, Fayette, Jessamine, Scott, and Woodford Counties Bullitt, Jefferson, Oldham, and Shelby Counties, KY; Clark, Floyd, and Harrison Counties, IN  Louisiana  Acadia Parish................................................. Alexandria-Leesville...................................... Baton Rouge.................................................. Natchitoches Parish...................................... New Orleans................................................. Shreveport.....................................................  NMET ESA MSA NMET MSA MSA  Acadia Parish Grant, Rapides, and Vernon Parishes Ascension, East Baton Rouge, Livingston, and West Baton Rouge Parishes Natchitotches Parish Jefferson, Orleans, St. Bernard, St. Charles, St. John the Baptist, and St. Tammany Parishes Bossier and Caddo Parishes  NMET MSA  Oxford County Portland, South Portland, and Westbrook cities; and Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland,Falmouth, Freeport, Gorham, Gray, North Yarmouth, Raymond, Scarborough, Standish, Windham, and Yarmouth towns in Cumberland County; Buxton, Hollis, and Old Orchard Beach towns in York County  Maine  Oxford County................................................ Portland...........................................................   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-15  Appendix table 5: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) area definitions (continued)  State and area1  Area type2  Definition  Maryland  Baltimore....................................................... Cumberland................................................... Hagerstown-CumberlandChambersburg........................................  MSA MSA  Baltimore city, and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, Howard, and Queen Anne's Counties Allegany County, MD; and Mineral County, WV  ESA  Alleghany and Washington Counties, MD; Bedford, Franklin, and Fulton Counties, PA; and Mineral County, WV  Boston........  PMSA  Mansfield, Norton, and Raynham towns in Bristol County; Lynn city and Lynnfield, Nahant, and Saugus towns in Essex County; Cambridge, Everett, Malden, Marlborough, Medford, Melrose, Newton, Somerville, Waltham, and Woburn cities, and Acton, Arlington, Ashland, Ayer, Bedford, Framingham, Groton, Holliston, Hopkinton, Belmont, Boxborough, Burlington, Carlisle, Concord, Hudson, Lexington, Lincoln, Littleton, Maynard, Natick, North Reading, Reading, Sherborn, Shirley, Stoneham, Stow, Sudbury, Townsend, Wakefield, Watertown, Wayland, Weston, Wilmington, and Winchester towns in Middlesex County; Quincy city, and Bellingham, Braintree, Brookline, Canton, Cohasset, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Franklin, Holbrook, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Milton, Needham, Norfolk, Norwood, Randolph, Sharon, Stoughton, Walpole, Wellesley, Westwood, Weymouth, and Wrentham towns in Norfolk County; Carver, Duxbury, Hanover, Hanson, Hingham, Hull, Kingston, Lakeville, Marshfield, Middleborough, Norwell, Pembroke, Plymouth, Plympton, Rockland, and Scituate towns in Plymouth County; All of Suffolk County; Berlin, Bolton, Harvard, Hopedale, Lancaster, Mendon, Milford, Southborough, and Upton towns in Worcester County  Lawrence-Haverhill........................................  PMSA  Haverhill, Lawrence, and Newburyport cities, and Amesbury, Andover, Boxford, Georgetown, Groveland, Merrimac, Methuen, Newbury, North Andover, Salisbury, and West Newbury towns in Essex County, MA; Atkinson, Brentwood, Danville, Derry, East Kingston, Hampstead, Kingston, Newton, Plaistow, Salem, Sandown, Seabrook, and Windham towns in Rockingham County, NH  Southeastern Massachusetts.........................  ESA  Western Massachusetts.................................  ESA  Worcester......................................................  MSA  Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Nantucket, Norfolk, and Plymouth Counties, excluding cities and towns included in the Boston and Pawtucket-Woonsocket-Attleboro metropolitan areas. Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, and Worcester Counties, except cities and towns included in the Boston, Pawtucket, and Worcester metropolitan areas Worcester city, and Auburn, Barre, Boylston, Brookfield, Charlton, Clinton, Douglas, Dudley, East Brookfield, Grafton, Holden, Leicester, Millbury, Northborough, Northbridge, North Brookfield, Oxford, Paxton, Princeton, Rutland, Shrewsbury, Spencer, Sterling, Sutton, Uxbridge, Webster, Westborough, and West Boylston towns in Worcester County  ESA PMSA MSA  Alcona, Alpena, Arenac, and Iosco Counties Washtenaw County Calhoun County  PMSA NMET MSA NMET  Lapeer, Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, and Wayne Counties Gladwin County Bay, Midland, and Saginaw Counties Van Buren County  Massachusetts  Michigan  Alpena-Standish-Tawas City...................... Ann Arbor..................................................... Battle Creek.................................................... Michigan (Continued)  Detroit............................................................. Gladwin County............................................ Saginaw-Bay City-Midland........................... Van Buren County........................................   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-16  Appendix table 5: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) area definitions (continued)  Area type2  State and area1  Definition  Minnesota  MSA  Blue Earth County Anoka, Carver, Chisago, Dakota, Hennepin, Isanti, Ramsey, Scott, Washington, and Wright Counties, MN; St. Croix County, Wl Benton, Sherburne, and Stearns Counties  NMET MSA NMET ESA  Franklin County Hinds, Madison, and Rankin Counties Marion County Lauderdale County  Butler County.................................. .............. Kansas City.................................... ..............  NMET MSA  Southern Missouri.......................... ...............  ESA  St. Louis.  MSA  Butler County Johnson, Leavenworth, Miami, and Wyandotte Counties, KS; Cass, Clay, Jackson, Lafayette, Platte, and Ray Counties, MO Barry, Barton, Benton, Bollinger, Butler, Camden, Cape Girardeau, Carter, Cedar, Christian, Dade, Dallas, Dent, Douglas, Dunklin, Greene, Hickory, Howell, Iron, Jasper, Laclede, Lawrence, Madison, Maries, McDonald, Miller, Mississippi, Moniteau, Morgan, New Madrid, Newton, Oregon, Ozark, Pemiscot, Perry, Phelps, Polk, Pulaski, Reynolds, Ripley, Scott, Shannon, St. Clair, Stoddard, Stone, Taney, Texas, Vernon, Wayne, Webster, and Wright Counties Clinton, Jersey, Madison, Monroe, and St. Clair Counties, IL; St. Louis city, and Crawford County in Sullivan city, Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles, and St. Louis Counties, MO  Blue Earth County.......................... .............. Minneapolis-St. Paul...................... .............. ..............  NMET MSA  Mississippi  Franklin County.............................. .............. Jackson........................................... ............. Marion County................................ .............. Meridian.......................................... .............. Missouri  Montana  Billings............................................................ Teton County..................................................  MSA NMET  Yellowstone County Teton County  NMET ESA MSA NMET  Dodge County Adams and Hall Counties Douglas, Sarpy, and Washington Counties, NE; Pottawattamie County, IA Scotts Bluff County  MSA  Washoe County  NMET  Carroll County  MSA PMSA PMSA PMSA PMSA PMSA  Atlantic and Cape May Counties Bergen and Passaic Counties Hunterdon, Middlesex, and Somerset Counties Monmouth and Ocean Counties Essex, Morris, Sussex, and Union Counties Mercer County  Nebraska  Dodge County............................................... Grand Island-Hastings.................................. Omaha............................................................ Scotts Bluff County.................................... Nevada  Reno.............................................................. New Hampshire  Carroll County.................................................. New Jersey  Atlantic City................................................... Bergen-Passaic............................................. Middlesex-Somerset-Hunterdon.................. Monmouth-Ocean......................................... Newark.......................................................... Trenton...........................................................   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-17  Appendix table 5: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) area definitions (continued)  State and area*  Area type2  Definition  New Mexico  Albuquerque................................................... San Juan County...........................................  MSA NMET  Bernalillo County San Juan County  MSA MSA PMSA NMET NMET MSA PMSA PMSA ESA MSA MSA NMET MSA  Albany, Greene, Montgomery, Rensselaer, Saratoga, and Schenectady Counties Broome and Tioga Counties Erie County Clinton County Delaware County Chemung County Nassau and Suffolk Counties Bronx, Kings, New York, Putnam, Queens, Richmond, Rockland, and Westchester Counties Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis, and St. Lawrence Counties Dutchess County Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Orleans, and Wayne Counties Tomkins County Herkimer and Oneida Counties  MSA MSA MSA NMET ESA NMET NMET MSA  Buncombe County Cabarrus, Gaston, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, Rowan, and Union Counties, NC; York County, SC Cumberland County Harnett County Craven, Jones, and Onslow Counties Martin County McDowell County Durham, Franklin, Orange, and Wake Counties  Cincinnati........................................................  PMSA  Cleveland....................................................... Columbus....................................................... Dayton-Springfield........................................ Gallia County................................................. Lima................................................................ Mercer County................................................ Portsmouth-Chillicothe-Gallipolis................... Scioto County.............................................. Toledo........................................................... Williams County............................................  PMSA MSA MSA NMET MSA NMET ESA NMET MSA NMET  Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, OH; Boone, Campbell, and Kenton Counties, KY; Dearborn County, IN Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, and Medina Counties Delaware, Fairfield, Franklin, Licking, Madison, Pickaway, and Union Counties Clark, Greene, Miami, and Montgomery Counties Gallia County Allen and Auglaize Counties Mercer County Adams, Gallia, Highland, Hocking, Jackson, Lawrence, Pike, Ross, Scioto, and Vinton Counties Scioto County Fulton, Lucas, and Wood Counties Williams County  New York  Albany-Schenectady-Troy............................ Binghamton..................................................... Buffalo............................................................ Clinton County............................................... Delaware County......................................... Elmira............................................................. Nassau-Suffolk............................................. New York....................................................... Northern New York....................................... Poughkeepsie............................................... Rochester...................................................... Tompkins........................................................ Utica-Rome..................................................... North Carolina  Asheville....................................................... Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill....................... Fayetteville.................................................... Harnett County............................................. Jacksonville-New Bern................................. Martin County................................................ McDowell County........................................... Raleigh-Durham............................................. Ohio  Oklahoma  Oklahoma City............................................ Pittsburg County......................................... Tulsa............................................................   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  MSA NMET MSA  Canadian, Cleveland, Logan, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties Pittsburg County Creek, Osage, Rogers, Tulsa, and Wagoner Counties  A-18  Appendix table 5: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) area definitions (continued)  State and area'  type2  Definition  Oregon  Eugene-Springfield-MedfordRoseburg-Klamath Falls...................... Portland....................................................... Salem.......................................................... Umatilla..........................................................  ESA PMSA MSA NMET  Douglas, Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, and Lane Counties Clackamas, Multnomah, Washington, and Yamhill Counties Marion and Polk Counties Umatilla County  Harrisburg-Lebanon-Carlisle....................... McKean County............................................ Philadelphia..................................................  MSA NMET PMSA  Pittsburgh..................................................... Reading......................................................... Scranton-Wilkes-Barre................................. Warren County.............................................. York................................................................  PMSA MSA MSA NMET MSA  Cumberland, Dauphin, Lebanon, and Perry Counties McKean County Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties, PA; Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, NJ Allegheny, Fayette, Washington, and Westmoreland Counties Berks County Columbia, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Monroe, and Wyoming Counties Warren County Adams and York Counties  Pennsylvania  Rhode Island  Pawtucket-Woonsocket-Attleboro.............  PMSA  Providence.  PMSA  Central Falls, Pawtucket, and Woonsocket cities; and Burrillville, Cumberland, Lincoln, North Smithfield, and Smithfield towns in Providence County, Rl; Attleboro city and North Attleborough, Rehoboth, and Seekonk towns in Bristol County, MA; Plainville town in Norfolk County, MA; Blackstone and Millville towns in Worcester County, MA Barrington, Bristol, and Warren towns in Bristol County; Warwick city, and Coventry, East Greenwich, and West Warwick towns in Kent County; Jamestown town in Newport County; Cranston, East Providence, and Providence cities and Foster, Glocester, Johnston, North Providence, and Scituate towns in Providence County; Exeter, Narragansett, North Kingston, Richmond, and South Kingstown towns in Washington County  NMET MSA MSA NMET  Beaufort County Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester Counties Florence County Greenwood County  Chattanooga................................................. Dyer County.................................................... Hardin County................................................ Knoxville......................................................... Memphis...................................................... Nashville....................................................... Northeastern Tennessee-Western Virginia  MSA NMET NMET MSA MSA MSA ESA  Obion County................................................ Trousdale County..........................................  NMET NMET  Hamilton, Marion, and Sequatchie Counties, TN; Catoosa, Dade, and Walker Counties, GA Dyer County Hardin County Anderson, Blount, Grainger, Jefferson, Knox, Sevier, and Union Counties Shelby and Tipton Counties, TN; Crittenden County, AR, and DeSoto County, MS Cheatham, Davidson, Dickson, Robertson, Rutherford, Sumner, Williamson, and Wilson Counties Carter, Cocke, Greene, Hancock, Hawkins, Johnson, Sullivan, Unicoi, and Washington Counties,TN; Buchanan, Dickenson, Grayson, Lee, Russell, Scott, Smyth, Tazewell, Washington, and Wise Conties, VA; and the cities of Bristol and Norton, VA Obion County Trousdale County  South Carolina  Beaufort County.......................................... Charleston................................................... Florence....................................................... Greenwood County........................................ Tennessee   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-19  Appendix table 5: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) area definitions (continued)  State and area1  Area type2  Definition  Texas Abilene......................................................... Austin........................................................... Beaumont-Port Arthur and Lake Charles. Childress County......................................... Corpus Christi.............................................. Dallas............................................................ Eastland County.......................................... El Paso-Las Cruces-Alamogordo............ Fort Worth-Arlington................................... Gillespie County.......................................... Houston........................................................ Longview-Marshall...................................... Nacogdoches County................................. Rio Grande Valley....................................... San Angelo................................................... San Antonio.................................................. Scurry County.............................................. Waco and Killeen-Temple.......................... Wichita Falls-Lawton-Altus........................  MSA MSA 2 MSA's NMET MSA PMSA NMET ESA PMSA NMET PMSA MSA NMET ESA MSA MSA NMET 2 MSA's ESA  Taylor County Hays, Travis, and Williamson Counties Hardin, Jefferson, and Orange Counties, TX; Calcasieu Parish, LA Childress County Nueces and San Patricio Counties Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Kaufman, and Rockwall Counties Eastland County El Paso County, TX; and Dona Ana and Otero Counties, NM Johnson, Parker, and Tarrant Counties Gillespie County Fort Bend, Harris, Liberty, Montgomery, and Waller Counties Gregg and Harrison Counties Nacogdoches County Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, Webb, and Zapata Counties Tom Green County Bexar, Comal, and Guadalupe Counties Scurry County Bell, Coryell, and McLennan Counties Archer, Baylor, Clay, Wichita, and Wilbarger Counties, TX; and Comanche, Cotton, Greer, Harmon, Jackson, Kiowa, and Tillman Counties, OK  NMET MSA  Box Elder County Davis, Salt Lake, and Weber Counties  Burlington....................  MSA  Orleans County.......................................  NMET  Burlington, South Burlington, and Winooski cities, and Charlotte, Colchester, Essex, Hinesburg, Jericho, Milton, Richmond, St. George, Shelburne, and Williston towns in Chittenden County; Georgia town in Franklin County; and Grand Isle and South Hero towns in Grand Isle County Orleans County  Utah Box Elder County....... Salt Lake City-Ogden.  Vermont  Virginia Giles County............................................ Norfolk-Virginia Beach-Newport News.  NMET MSA  Richmond-Petersburg............................  MSA  Southwest Virginia..................................  ESA  Giles County Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Poquoson, Portsmouth, Suffolk, Virginia Beach and Williamsburg cities, and Gloucester, James City, and York Counties Colonial Heights, Hopewell, Petersburg, and Richmond cities, and Charles City, Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, New Kent, Powhatan, and Prince George Counties Buena Vista, Clifton Forge, Covington, Danville, Galax, Lexington, Lynchburg, Martinsville, Radford, Roanoke, Salem, South Boston, Staunton, and Waynesboro cities; and Alleghany, Amherst, Appomattox, Augusta, Bath, Bedford, Bland, Botetourt, Campbell, Carroll, Craig, Floyd, Franklin, Giles, Halifax, Henry, Highland, Montgomery, Nelson, Patrick, Pittsylvania, Pulaski, Roanoke, Rockbridge, and Wythe Counties  Washington Seattle.................................................... Spokane................................................. Tacoma................................................... Yakima-Richland-Keneewick-PascoWalla Walla- Pendleton.............   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  PMSA MSA PMSA  King and Snohomish Counties Spokane County Pierce County  ESA  Benton, Franklin, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties, WA; and Umatilla County OR  A-20  Appendix table 5: Occupational Compensation Survey Program (OCSP) area definitions (continued)  State and area1  Area type2  Definition  Wisconsin Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah............................ La Crosse-Sparta............................................. Madison............................................................ Manitowoc County............................................ Milwaukee....................................................... Oconto County................................................... Sawyer County..................................................  MSA MSA MSA NMET PMSA NMET NMET  Calumet, Outagamie, and Winnebago Counties La Crosse and Monroe Counties Dane County Manitowoc County Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Washington, and Waukesha Counties Oconto County Sawyer County  NMET NMET MSA  Grant County Mason County Wood County, WV, and Washington County, OH  NMET  Sweetwater County  West Virginia Grant County..................................................... Mason County.................................................... Parkersburg-Marietta......................................  Wyoming  Sweetwater County.......................................  1 The Bureau did not survey all of these defined localities in 1993. Appendix table 4 lists all OCSP publications with a 1993 survey reference month. 2 Area designations are defined as: metropolitan statistical areas (MSA) and primary metropolitan statistical areas (PMSA), as defined by the Office of Management and Budget, 1984; nonmetropoiitan counties (NMET); and additional areas surveyed for the Employment Standards Administration (ESA) for use in administering the Sen/ice Contract Act. Some MSA's and PMSA's cross State lines; in these instances, the area is listed under the State where the central city is located.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  A-21  Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions  accounting or, in rare instances, equivalent experience and education combined. Positions covered by this definition are characterized by the inclusion of work that is  The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's occupational pay surveys is to assist its field economists in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This permits grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learners, beginners, and trainees; and part-time, temporary, and probationary workers, unless specifically included in the job description. Handicapped workers whose earnings are reduced because of their handicap are also excluded. The titles and numeric codes below the job titles in this appendix are taken from the  analytical, creative, evaluative, and advisory in nature. The work draws upon and requires a thorough knowledge of the fundamental doctrines, theories, principles, and terminology of accountancy, and often entails some understanding of such related fields as business law, statistics, and general management. (See also chief accountant.) Professional responsibilities in accountant positions above levels I and II include several such duties as: Analyzing the effects of transactions upon account relationships; Evaluating alternative means of treating transactions;  1980 edition of the Standard Occupational Classification Manual (SOC), issued by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards. In general, the occupational descriptions of the Bureau of Labor Statistics are much more specific than those found in the SOC manual. The BLS occupation, "Attorney," for example, excludes workers engaged in patent work; the SOC occupation (code 211) includes patent lawyers. Thus, in comparing the results of this survey with other sources, factors such as differences in occupational definitions and survey scope should be taken into consideration............................ ............................ .............. ......................  Planning the manner in which account structures should be developed or modified; Assuring the adequacy of the accounting system as the basis for reporting to management; Considering the need for new or changed controls; Projecting accounting data to show the effects of proposed plans on capital investments, income, cash position, and overall financial condition;  The Bureau uses the following list of occupational job descriptions when classifying employees for full industrial scope pay surveys (see page 3). For limited industrial scope surveys, the Bureau collects pay data for the shaded occuaptions, only. : ; ;;  Interpreting the meaning of accounting records, reports, and statements; Advising operating officials on accounting matters; and  Professional  Recommending improvements, adaptations, or revisions in the accounting system and procedures.  ACCOUNTANT (1412: Accountant and auditor)  Accountant I and II positions provide opportunity to develop ability to perform professional duties such as those enumerated above.  Performs professional operating or cost accounting work requiring knowledge of the theory and practice of recording, classifying, examining, and analyzing the data and records of financial transactions. The work generally requires a bachelor's degree in   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  In addition to such professional work, most accountants are also responsible for  B-1  Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety of accounting tasks such as: examining a variety of financial statements for completeness, internal accuracy, and conformance with uniform accounting classifications or other specific accounting requirements; reconciling reports and financial data with financial statements already on file, and pointing out apparent inconsistencies or errors; carrying out assigned steps in an accounting analysis, such as computing standard ratios; assembling and summarizing accounting literature on a given subject; preparing relatively simple financial statements not involving problems of analysis or presentation; and preparing charts, tables, and other exhibits to be used in reports. In addition, may also perform some nonprofessional tasks for training purposes.  assuring the proper recording and documentation of transactions in the accounts. They, therefore, frequently direct nonprofessional personnel in the actual day-to-day maintenance of books of accounts, the accumulation of cost or other comparable data, the preparation of standard reports and statements, and similar work. (Positions involving such supervisory work but not including professional duties as described above are not included in this description.) Some accountants use electronic data processing equipment to process, record, and report accounting data. In some such cases the machine unit is a subordinate segment of the accounting system; in others it is a separate entity or is attached to some other organization. In either instance, provided that the primary responsibility of the position is professional accounting work of the type otherwise included, the use of data processing equipment of any type does not of itself exclude a position from the accountant description nor does it change its level.  Responsibility for the direction of others. Usually none.  Accountant II General characteristics. At this level, the accountant makes practical application of  Excluded are; a.  Top technical experts in accounting, for an organization, who are responsible for the overall direction of an entire accounting program which includes general accounting and at least one other major accounting activity such as cost, property, sales, or tax accounting;  technical accounting practices and concepts beyond the mere application of detailed rules and instructions. Initial assignments are designed to expand practical experience and to develop professional judgment in the application of basic accounting techniques to simple problems. Is expected to be competent in the application of standard procedures and requirements to routine transactions, to raise questions about unusual or questionable items, and to suggest solutions.  b.  Accountants above level VI who are more concerned with administrative, budgetary, and policy matters than the day-to-day supervision of an operating accounting program; and  Direction received. Work is reviewed to verify general accuracy and coverage of  c.  unusual problems, and to insure conformance with required procedures and special instructions.  Accountants primarily responsible for 1) designing and improving accounting systems or 2) performing nonoperating staff work such as budget or financial analysis, financial analysis, or tax advising.  Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety of accounting tasks, e.g., prepares routine working papers, schedules, exhibits, and summaries indicating the extent of the examination and presenting and supporting findings and recommendations. Examines a variety of accounting documents to verify accuracy of computations and to ascertain that all transactions are properly supported, are in accordance with pertinent policies and procedures, and are classified and recorded according to acceptable accounting standards.  Accountant I General characteristics. At this beginning professional level, the accountant learns to apply the principles, theories, and concepts of accounting to a specific system. The position is distinguishable from nonprofessional positions by the variety of assignments; rate and scope of development expected; and the existence, implicit or explicit, of a planned training program designed to give the entering accountant practical experience. (Terminal positions are excluded.)  Responsibility for the direction of others.  Usually none, although sometimes  responsible for supervision of a few clerks.  Accountant III Direction received. Works under close supervision of an experienced accountant whose General characteristics.  guidance is directed primarily to the development of the trainee's professional ability and to the evaluation of advancement potential. Limits of assignments are clearly defined, methods of procedure are specified, and kinds of items to be noted and referred to supervisor are identified.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The accountant at this level applies well established accounting principles, theories, concepts, and practices to moderately difficult problems. Receives detailed instructions concerning the overall accounting system and its objectives, the policies and procedures under which it is operated, and the nature of  B-2  the need to provide and coordinate separate or specialized accounting treatment and reporting (e.g., cost accounting using standard cost, process cost, and job order techniques) for different internal operations or divisions.  changes in the system or its operation. Characteristically, the accounting system or assigned segment is stable and well established (i.e., the basic chart of accounts, classifications, the nature of the cost accounting system, the report requirements, and the procedures are changed infrequently).  Depending upon the work load and degree of coordination involved, the accountant IV may have such assignments as the supervision of the day-to-day operation of: (a) an entire accounting system which has a few relatively stable accounting segments; (b) a major segment (e.g., general accounting, cost accounting, or financial statements and reports) of an accounting system serving a larger and more complex organization; or (c) in a complex system, may be assigned to a relatively narrow and specialized segment dealing with some problem, function, or portion of work which is of the level of difficulty characteristic of this level.  Depending upon the work load involved, the accountant may have such assignments as supervision of the day-to-day operation of: (a) the entire system of a relatively small organization; (b) a major segment (e.g., general accounting, cost accounting, financial statements and reports) of a somewhat larger system; or (c) in a complex system, may be assigned to a relatively narrow and specialized segment dealing with some problem, function, or portion of work which is appropriate for this level.  Direction received. A higher level professional accountant normally is available to furnish advice and assistance as needed. Work is reviewed for technical accuracy, adequacy of professional judgment, and compliance with instructions through spot checks, appraisal of results, subsequent processing, analysis of reports and statements, and other appropriate means.  Direction received. A higher level accountant normally is available to furnish advice  Typical duties and responsibilities. The primary responsibility of most positions at this level is to assure that the assigned day-to-day operations are carried out in accordance with established accounting principles, policies, and objectives. The accountant performs such professional work as: developing nonstandard reports and statements (e.g., those containing cash forecasts reflecting the interrelations of accounting, cost budgeting, or comparable information); interpreting and pointing out trends or deviations from standards; projecting data into the future; predicting the effects of changes in operating programs; or identifying management informational needs, and refining account structures or reports accordingly.  Typical duties and responsibilities. As at level III, a primary characteristic of most positions at this level is the responsibility of operating an accounting system or major segment of a system in the intended manner.  and assistance as needed. Work is reviewed by spot checks and appraisal of results for adequacy of professional judgment, compliance with instructions, and overall accuracy and quality.  The accountant IV exercises professional judgment in making frequent, appropriate recommendations for: new accounts; revisions in the account structure; new types of ledgers; revisions in the reporting system or subsidiary records; changes in instructions regarding the use of accounts, new or refined account classifications or definitions; etc. Also makes day-to-day decisions concerning the accounting treatment of financial transactions and is expected to recommend solutions to complex problems beyond incumbent's scope of responsibility.  Within the limits of delegated responsibility, makes day-to-day decisions concerning the accounting treatment of financial transactions. In expected to recommend solutions to moderately difficult problems and propose changes in the accounting system for approval at higher levels. Such recommendations are derived from personal knowledge of the application of well-established principles and practices.  Responsibility for the direction of others. Accounting staff supervised, if any, may include professional accountants.  Accountant V Responsibility for the direction of others.  In most instances is responsible for supervision of a subordinate nonprofessional staff; may coordinate the work of lower level professional accountants.  General characteristics. The accountant V applies accounting principles, theories, concepts, and practices to the solution of problems for which no clear precedent exists or performs work which is of greater than average responsibility due to the nature or magnitude of the assigned work. Responsibilities at this level, in contrast to accountants at level IV, extend beyond accounting system maintenance to the solution of more complex technical and managerial problems. Work of accountants V is more directly concerned with what the accounting system (or segment) should be, what operating policies and procedures should be established or revised, and what is the managerial as well as the accounting meaning of the data included in the reports and statements for which they are responsible.  Accountant IV General characteristics.  At this level the accountant applies well-established accounting principles, theories, concepts, and practices to a wide variety of difficult problems. Receives instructions concerning the objectives and operation of the overall accounting system. Compared with level III, the accounting system or assigned segment is more complex, i.e., (a) is relatively unstable, (b) must adjust to new or   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-3  Direction received. A higher level professional accountant is normally available to  Examples of assignments characteristic of this level are supervision of the day-to-day operation of: (a) an entire accounting system which has a few relatively complex  furnish advice as needed. Work is reviewed for adequacy of professional judgment, compliance with instructions and policies, and overall quality.  accounting segments; (b) a major segment of a larger and more complex accounting system; (c) an entire accounting system (or major segment) that is relatively stable and conventional when the work includes significant responsibility for accounting system design and development; or (d) in a complex system, may be assigned to a relatively narrow and specialized segment dealing with some problem, function, or portion of work which is itself of the level of difficulty characteristic of this level.  Typical duties and responsibilities.  Accountants at this level are delegated completeresponsibility from higher authority to establish and implement new or revised accounting policies and procedures. Typically, accountants VI participate in decision­ making sessions with operating managers who have policy-making authority for their subordinate organizations or establishments; recommend management actions or alternatives which can be taken when accounting data disclose unfavorable trends, situations, or deviations; and assist management officials in applying financial data and information to the solution of administrative and operating problems.  Direction received. An accountant of higher level normally is available to furnish advice and assistance as needed. Work is reviewed for adequacy of professional judgment, compliance with instructions, and overall quality.  Responsibility for the direction of others.  Typical duties and responsibilities. The accountant V performs such professional work as: participating in the development and coordinating the implementation of new or revised accounting systems, and initiating necessary instructions and procedures; assuring that accounting reporting systems and procedures are in compliance with established administrative policies, regulations, and acceptable accounting practices; providing technical advice and services to operating managers, interpreting accounting reports and statements, and identifying problem areas; and evaluating complete assignments for conformance with applicable policies, regulations, and tax laws. Responsibility for the direction of others.  Accounting staff supervised generally  includes professional accountants.  ACCOUNTANT, PUBLIC (1412: Accountant and auditor) Performs professional auditing work in a public accounting firm. Work requires at least a bachelor's degree in accounting. Participates in or conducts audits to ascertain the fairness of financial representations made by client companies. May also assist the client in improving accounting procedures and operations.  Accounting staff supervised generally  includes professional accountants. Examines financial reports, accounting records, and related documents and practices of clients. Determines whether all important matters have been disclosed and whether procedures are consistent and conform to acceptable practices. Samples and tests transactions, internal controls, and other elements of the accounting system(s) as needed to render the accounting firm's final written opinion.  Accountant VI General characteristics. At this level, the accountant applies accounting principles, theories, concepts, and practices to specialized, unique, or nonrecurring complex problems (e.g., implementation of specialized automated accounting systems). The work is substantially more difficult and of greater responsibility than level V because of the unusual nature, magnitude, importance, or overall impact of the work on the accounting program.  Excluded are positions which do not require full professional accounting training. Also excluded are specialist positions in tax or management advisory services.  Accountant, Public I At this level the accounting system or segment is usually complex, i.e., (a) is generally unstable, (b) must adjust to the frequent changing needs of the organization, or (c) is complicated by the need to provide specialized or individualized reports.  General characteristics. As an entry level public accountant, serves as a junior member of an audit team. Receives classroom and on-the-job training to provide practical experience in applying the principles, theories, and concepts of accounting and auditing to specific situations. (Positions held by trainee public accountants with advanced degrees, such as MBA's are excluded at this level.)  Examples of assignments at this level are the supervision of the day-to-day operation of: (a) a large and complex accounting system; or (b) a major segment (e.g., general accounting, property accounting, etc.) of an unusually complex accounting system requiring technical expertise in a particular accounting field (e.g., cost accounting, tax accounting, etc.).   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Direction received. Complete instructions are furnished and work is reviewed to verify its accuracy, conformance with required procedures and instructions, and usefulness in  B-4  facilitating the accountant's professional growth. Any technical problems not covered by instructions are brought to the attention of a superior.  one at a time and are typically carried out at a single location. The firms audited are typically moderately complex, and there is usually previous audit experience by the firm. The audit conforms to standard procedural guidelines, but is often tailored to fit the client's business activities. Routine procedures and techniques are sometimes inadequate and require adaptation. Necessary data are not always readily available. When assigned to more difficult and complex audits (see level IV), the accountant may run the audit of a major component or serve as the primary assistant to the accountant in charge.  Typical duties and responsibilities. Carries out basic audit tests and procedures, such as: verifying reports against source accounts and records; reconciling bank and other accounts; and examining cash receipts and disbursements, payroll records, requisitions,receiving reports, and other accounting documents in detail to ascertain that transactions are properly supported and recorded. Prepares selected portions of audit working papers.  Direction received.  Works under the general supervision of a higher level public accountant who oversees the operation of the audit. Work is performed independently, applying generally accepted accounting principles and auditing standards, but assistance on difficult technical matters is available. Work may be checked occasionally during progress for appropriateness and adherence to time requirements, but routine analyses, methods, techniques, and procedures applied at the work site are expected to be correct.  Accountant, Public II General characteristics. At this level, the public accountant carries out routine audit functions and detail work with relative independence. Serves as a member of an audit team on assignments planned to provide exposure to a variety of client organizations and audit situations. Specific assignments depend upon the difficulty and complexity of the audit and whether the client has been previously audited by the firm. On moderately complex audits where there is previous audit experience by the firm, accomplishes complete segments of the audit (i.e., functional work areas such as cash, receivables, etc.). When assigned to more complicated audits, carries out activities similar to public accountant I.  Typical duties and responsibilities. Is responsible for carrying out the technical features of the audit, leading team members and personally performing the most difficult work. Carries out field work in accordance with the general format prescribed in the audit program, but selects specific methods and types and sizes of samples and tests. Assigns work to team members, furnishes guidance, and adjusts work loads to accommodate daily priorities. Thoroughly reviews work performed for technical accuracy and adequacy. Resolves anticipated problems with established guidelines and priorities but refers problems of unusual difficulty to superiors for discussion and advice. Drafts financial statements, final reports, management letters, and other closing memoranda. Discusses significant recommendations with superiors and may serve as technical resource at "closing" meetings with clients. Personal contacts are usually with accounting directors and assistant controllers of medium size companies and divisions of large corporations to explain and interpret policies and procedures governing the audit process.  Direction received. Works under the supervision of a higher level public accountant who provides instructions and continuing direction as necessary. Work is spot checked in progress and reviewed upon completion to determine the adequacy of procedures, soundness of judgment, compliance with professional standards, and adherence to clearly established methods and techniques. All interpretations are subject to close professional review.  Typical duties and responsibilities. Carries out a variety of sampling and testing procedures in accordance with the prescribed audit program, including the examination of transactions and verification of accounts, the analysis and evaluation of accounting practices and internal controls, and other detail work. Prepares a share of the audit working papers and participates in drafting reports. In moderately complex audits, may assist in selecting appropriate tests, samples, and methods commonly applied by the firm and may serve as primary assistant to the accountant in charge. In more complicated audits concentrates on detail work. Occasionally may be in charge of small, uncomplicated audits which require only one or two other subordinate accountants. Personal contacts usually involve only the exchange of factual technical information and are usually limited to the client's operating accounting staff and department heads.  Accountant, Public IV General characteristics.  At this level, the public accountant directs field work including difficult audits—e.g., those involving initial audits of new clients, acquisitions, or stock registration—and may oversee a large audit team split between several locations. The audit team usually includes one or more level III public accountants who handle major components of the audit. The audits are complex and clients typically include those engaged in projects which span accounting periods; highly regulated industries which have various external reporting requirements; publicly held corporations; or businesses with very high dollar or transaction volume. Clients are frequently large with a variety of operations which may have different accounting systems. Guidelines may be general or lacking and audit programs are intricate, often requiring extensive tailoring to meet atypical or novel situations.  Accountant, Public III General characteristics. At this level the public accountant is in charge of a complete audit and may lead a team of several subordinates. Audits are usually accomplished   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Direction received. Works under general supervision. The supervisor sets overall B-5  ATTORNEY  technical phases of the audit. Issues not covered by guidelines or known precedents are discussed with the supervisor, but the accountant's recommended approaches and courses of action are normally approved. Work is reviewed for soundness of approach, completeness, and conformance with established policies of the firm.  (211: Lawyer) Performs consultation and advisory work and carries out the legal processes necessary to effect the rights, privileges, and obligations of the organization. The work performedrequires completion of law school with an L.L.B. degree (or the equivalent)  Typical duties and responsibilities. Is responsible for carrying out the operational and technical features of the audit, directing the work of team members, and personally performing the most difficult work. Often participates in the development of the audit scope, and drafts complicated audit programs with a large number of concurrently executed phases. Independently develops audit steps and detailed procedures, deviating from traditional methods to the extent required. Makes program adjustments as necessary once an audit has begun; selects specific methods, types and sizes of samples, the extent to which discrepancies need to be investigated, and the depth of required analyses. Resolves most operational difficulties and unanticipated problems.  and admission to the bar. Responsibilities or functions include one or more of the following or comparable duties: Preparing and reviewing various legal instruments and documents, such as contracts, leases, licenses, purchases, sales, real estate, etc.; Acting as agent of the organization in its transactions; Examining material (e.g., advertisements, publications, etc.) for legal implications; advising officials of proposed legislation which might affect the organization;  Assigns work to team members; reviews work for appropriateness, conformance to time requirements, and adherence to generally accepted accounting principles and auditing standards. Consolidates working papers, draft reports, and findings; and prepares financial statements, management letters, and other closing memoranda for management approval. Participates in "closing” meetings as a technical resource and may be called upon to sell or defend controversial and critical observations and recommendations. Personal contacts are extensive and typically include top executives of smaller clients and mid- to upper-level financial and management officers of large corporations, e.g., assistant controllers and controllers. Such contacts involve coordinating and advising on work efforts and resolving operating problems.  Note:  Applying for patents, copyrights, or registration of the organization's products, processes, devices, and trademarks; advising whether to initiate or defend law suits; Conducting pretrial preparations; defending the organization in lawsuits; and Advising officials on tax matters, government regulations, and/or legal rights.  Excluded are:  Excluded from this level are public accountants who direct field work associated with the complete range of audits undertaken by the firm, lead the largest and most difficult audits, and who frequently oversee teams performing concurrent audits. This type of work requires extensive knowledge of one or more industries to make subjective determinations on questions of tax, law, accounting, and business practices. Audits may be complicated by such factors as: the size and diversity of the client organizations (e.g., multinational corporations and conglomerates with a large number of separate and distinct subsidiaries); accounting issues where precedents are lacking or in conflict; and, in some cases, clients who are encountering substantial financial difficulties. They perform most work without technical supervision and completed audits are reviewed mainly for propriety of recommendations and conformance with general policies of the firm. Also excluded are public accountants whose principal function is to manage, rather than perform accounting work, and the equity owners of the firm who have final approval authority.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  a.  Patent work which requires professional training in addition to legal training (typically, a degree in engineering or in a science);  b.  Claims examining, claims investigating, or similar work for which professional legal training and bar membership is not essential;  c.  Attorneys, frequently titled "general counsel" or "attorney general" (and their immediate full associates or deputies), who are responsible for participating in the management and formulation of policy for the overall organization in addition to directing its legal work. (The duties and responsibilities of such positions exceed level VI as described below);  d.  B-6  Attorneys in legal firms; and,  e.  Attorneys primarily responsible for: prosecuting defendants; drafting legislation; defending the general public (e.g., public defenders, student's attorneys); and planning and producing legal publications.  Attorney jobs which meet the above definitions are to be classified and coded in accordance with the chart below,  Criteria for matching attorneys by level Level  Difficulty level of legal work  I  This is the entry level. The duties and responsibilities after initial orientation and training are those described in D-l and R-l.  11  D-l  Responsibility level of job  Experience required Completion of law school with an L.L.B. or J.D. degree plus admission to the bar. Sufficient professional experience (at least 1 year, usually more) at the "D-l" level to assure competence as an attorney.  R-2 or  D-2  R-l  III  D-2  R-2  At least 1 year, usually more, of professional experience at the "D-2" level.  IV  D-2  R-3  Extensive professional experience at the "D-2" or a higher level.  or D-3 V  R-2  D-2  R-4  Extensive professional experience at the "D-3" or "R-3" levels.  or VI  D-3  R-3  D-3  R-4  Extensive professional experience at the "D-3" and "R-3" levels.  D-l, -2, and -3, and R-l, -2, -3, and -4 are explained on the following pages.  Difficulty D-l Legal questions are characterized by: facts that are well-established; clearly applicable legal precedents; and matters not of substantial importance to the organization. (Usually relatively limited sums of money, e.g., a few thousand dollars, are involved.)  facts can be firmly established and there are precedent cases directly applicable to the situation; b.  searching case reports, legal documents, periodicals, textbooks, and other legal references, and preparing draft opinions on employee compensation or benefit questions where there is a substantial amount of clearly applicable statutory, regulatory, and case material; and  c.  drawing up contracts and other legal documents in connection with real property  Examples of D-l work are: a.  legal investigation, negotiation, and research preparatory to defending the organization in potential or actual lawsuits involving alleged negligence where the   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-7  franchise cases involving a geographic area including parts or all of several States;  serious questions regarding titles to property or other major factual or legal issues. D-2 Legal work is regularly difficult by reason of one or more of the following: the absence of clear and directly applicable legal precedents; the different possible interpretations that can be placed on the facts, the laws, or the precedents involved; the substantial importance of the legal matters to the organization (e.g., sums as large as $100,000 are generally directly or indirectly involved); or the matter is being strongly pressed or contested in formal proceedings or in negotiations by the individuals, corporations, or government agencies involved. Examples of D-2 work are: a.  advising on the legal implications of advertising representations when the facts supporting the representations and the applicable precedent cases are subject to different interpretations;  c.  preparing and presenting a case before an appellate court where the case is highly important to the future operation of the organization and is vigorously contested by very distinguished (e.g., having a broad regional or national reputation) legal talent;  d.  serving as the principal counsel to the officers and staff of an insurance company on the legal problems in the sale, underwriting, and administration of group contracts involving nationwide or multi-state coverages and laws; and  e.  performing the principal legal work in nonroutine, major revision of a company's charter or in effectuating new major financing steps.  Responsibility R-l  b.  reviewing and advising on the implications of new or revised laws affecting the organization;  c.  presenting the organization's defense in court in a negligence lawsuit which is strongly pressed by counsel for an organized group; and  d.  providing legal counsel on tax questions complicated by the absence of precedent decisions that are directly applicable to the organization's situation.  Responsibility for final action is usually limited to matters covered by legal precedents and in which little deviation from standard practice is involved. Any decisions or actions having a significant bearing on the organization's business are reviewed. Is given guidance in the initial states of assignment, e.g., in planning and organizing level research and studies. Assignments are then carried out with moderate independence, although guidance is generally available and is sought from time to time on problem points.  D-3  R-2  Legal work is typically complex and difficult because of one or more of the following: the questions are unique and require a high order of original and creative legal endeavor for their solution; the questions require extensive research and analysis and the obtaining and evaluation of expert testimony regarding controversial issues in a scientific, financial, corporate organization, engineering, or other highly technical area; the legal matter is of critical importance to the organization and is being vigorously pressed or contested (e.g., sums such as $1 million or more are generally directly or indirectly involved.)  Usually works independently in investigating the facts, searching legal precedents, defining the legal and factual issues, drafting the necessary legal documents, and developing conclusions and recommendations. Decisions having an important bearing on the organization's business are reviewed. Receives information from supervisor regarding unusual circumstances or important policy considerations pertaining to a legal problem. If trials are involved, may receive guidance from a supervisor regarding presentation, line of approach, possible line of opposition to be encountered, etc. In the case of nonroutine written presentations, the final product is reviewed carefully, but primarily for overall soundness of legal reasoning and consistency with organization policy. Some, but not all, attorneys make assignments to one or more lower level attorneys, aides, or clerks.  Examples of D-3 work are: a.  b.  advising on the legal aspects and implications of Federal antitrust laws to projected greatly expanded marketing operations involving joint ventures with several other organizations;  R-3 Carries out assignments independently and makes final legal determination in matters of substantial importance to the organization. Such determinations are subject to review  planning legal strategy and representing a utility company in rate or government   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-8  Engineer I  only for consistency with organization policy, possible precedent effect, and overall effectiveness. To carry out assignments, deals regularly with officers of the organization and top level management officials and confers or negotiates regularly with senior attorneys and officials in other organizations on various aspects of assigned work. Receives little or no preliminary instruction on legal problems and a minimum of technical legal supervision. May assign and review work of a few attorneys, but this is not a primary responsibility.  General characteristics. At this beginning professional level, performs assignments designed to develop professional work knowledge and abilities. May also receive formal classroom or seminar-type training. (Terminal positions are excluded.) Direction received. Works under close supervision. Receives specific and detailed instructions as to required tasks and results expected. Work is checked during progress and is reviewed for accuracy upon completion.  R-4  Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety of routine tasks that are planned to provide experience and familiarization with the engineering staff, methods, practices, and programs of the employer.  Carries out assignments which entail independently planning investigations and negotiations on legal problems of the highest importance to the organization and developing completed brief, opinions, contracts, or other legal products. To carry out assignments, represents the organization at conferences, hearings, or trials, and personally confers and negotiates with top attorneys and top-ranking officials in other organizations. On various aspects of assigned work, may give advice directly and personally to organization officials and top level managers, or (in extremely large and complex organizations) may work through a higher level attorney in advising officials. Generally receives no preliminary instructions on legal problems. On matters requiring the concentrated efforts of several attorneys or other specialists, is responsible for directing, coordinating, and reviewing the work of the attorneys involved.  Responsibility for the direction of others. Usually none.  Engineer II General characteristics. Performs routine engineering work requiring application of standard techniques, procedures, and criteria in carrying out a sequence of related engineering tasks. Limited exercise of judgment is required on details of work and in making preliminary selections and adaptations of engineering alternatives. Requires work experience acquired in an entry level position, or appropriate graduate level study. For training and developmental purposes, assignments may include some work that is typical of a higher level.  OR As a primary responsibility, directs the work of a staff of attorneys, one, but usually more, of who regularly perform either D-3 or R-3 legal work. With respect to the work directed, gives advice directly to organization officials and top managers, or (in extremely large and complex organizations) may give such advice through counsel. Receives guidance as to organization policy but not technical supervision or assistance except when requesting advice from or briefing by a higher level attorney on the overall approach to the most difficult, novel, or important legal questions.  Direction received. Supervisor screens assignments for unusual or difficult problems and selects techniques and procedures to be applied on non-routine work. Receives close supervision on new aspects of assignments. Typical duties and responsibilities. Using prescribed methods, performs specific and limited portions of a broader assignment of an experienced engineer. Applies standard practices and techniques in specific situations, adjusts and correlates data, recognizes discrepancies in results, and follows operations through a series of related detailed steps or processes.  ENGINEER (162-3: Engineer) Performs professional work in research, development, design, testing, analysis, production, construction, maintenance, operation, planning, survey, estimating, application, or standardization of engineering facilities, systems, structures, processes, equipment, devices, or materials, requiring knowledge of the science and art by which materials, natural resources, and power are made useful. Work typically requires a B.S. degree in engineering or, in rare instances, equivalent education and experience combined. (Excluded are: safety engineers, industrial engineers, quality control engineers, sales engineers, and engineers whose primary responsibility is to be in charge of nonprofessional maintenance work.)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Responsibility for the direction of others. May be assisted by a few aids or technicians.  Engineer III General characteristics. Independently evaluates, selects, and applies standard engineering techniques, procedures, and criteria, using judgment in making minor adaptations and modifications. Assignments have clear and specified objectives and  B-9  Engineer V  require the investigation of a limited number of variables. Performance at this level requires developmental experience in a professional position, or equivalent graduate level education.  General characteristics. Applies intensive and diversified knowledge of engineering principles and practices in broad areas of assignments and related fields. Makes decisions independently on engineering problems and methods and represents the organization in conferences to resolve important questions and to plan and coordinate work. Requires the use of advanced techniques and the modification and extension of theories, precepts, and practices of the field and related sciences and disciplines. The knowledge and expertise required for this level of work usually result from progressive experience, including work comparable to engineer IV.  Direction received. Receives instructions on specific assignment objectives, complex features, and possible solutions. Assistance is furnished on unusual problems and work is reviewed for application of sound professional judgment. Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs work which involves conventional types of plans, investigations, surveys, structures, or equipment with relatively few complex features for which there are precedents. Assignments usually include one or more of the following: equipment design and development, test of materials, preparation of specifications, process study, research investigations, report preparation, and other activities of limited scope requiring knowledge of principles and techniques commonly employed in the specific narrow area of assignments.  Direction received. Supervision and guidance relate largely to overall objectives, critical issues, new concepts, and policy matters. Consults with supervisor concerning unusual problems and developments. Typical duties and responsibilities include one or more of the following:  Responsibility for the direction of others. May supervise or coordinate the work of drafters, technicians, and others who assist in specific assignments.  1.  In a supervisory capacity, plans, develops, coordinates, and directs a large and important engineering project or a number of small projects with many complex features. A substantial portion of the work supervised is comparable to that described for engineer IV.  2.  As individual researcher or worker, carries out complex or novel assignments requiring the development of new or improved techniques and procedures. Work is expected to result in the development of new or refined equipment, materials, processes, products, and/or scientific methods.  3.  As staff specialist, develops and evaluates plans and criteria for a variety of projects and activities to be carried out by others. Assesses the feasibility and soundness of proposed engineering evaluation tests, products, or equipment when necessary data are insufficient or confirmation by testing is advisable. Usually performs as a staff advisor and consultant in a technical specialty, a type of facility or equipment, or a program function.  Engineer IV General characteristics. As a fully competent engineer in all conventional aspects of the subject matter or the functional area of the assignments, plans and conducts work requiring judgment in the independent evaluation, selection, and substantial adaptation and modification of standard techniques, procedures, and criteria. Devises new approaches to problems encountered. Requires sufficient professional experience to assure competence as a fully trained worker; or, for positions primarily of a research nature, completion of all requirements for a doctoral degree may be substituted for experience. Direction received. Independently performs most assignments with instructions as to the general results expected. Receives technical guidance on unusual or complex problems and supervisory approval on proposed plans for projects. Typical duties and responsibilities. Plans, schedules, conducts, or coordinates detailed phases of the engineering work in a part of a major project or in a total project of moderate scope. Performs work which involves conventional engineering practice but may include a variety of complex features such as conflicting design requirements, unsuitability of standard materials, and difficult coordination requirements. Work requires a broad knowledge of precedents in the specialty area and a good knowledge of principles and practices of related specialties.  Responsibility for the direction of others. Supervises, coordinates, and reviews the work of a small staff of engineers and technicians; estimates personnel needs and schedules and assigns work to meet completion date. Or, as individual researcher or staff specialist, may be assisted on projects by other engineers or technicians.  Responsibility for the direction of others. May supervise a few engineers or technicians on assigned work.  General characteristics. Has full technical responsibility for interpreting, organizing, executing, and coordinating assignments. Plans and develops engineering projects   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Engineer VI  B-10  Engineer VII  major programs. This involves exploration of subject area, definition of scope and selection of problems for investigation, and development of novel concepts and approaches. Maintains liaison with individuals and units within or outside the organization with responsibility for acting independently on technical matters pertaining to the field. Work at this level usually requires extensive progressive experience including work comparable to engineer V.  General characteristics. Makes decisions and recommendations that are recognized as authoritative and have an important impact on extensive engineering activities. Initiates and maintains extensive contacts with key engineers and officials of other organizations, requiring skill in persuasion and negotiation of critical issues. At this level, individuals will have demonstrated creativity, foresight, and mature engineering judgment in anticipating and solving unprecedented engineering problems, determining program objectives and requirements, organizing programs and projects, and developing standards and guides for diverse engineering activities.  Direction received. Supervision received is essentially administrative, with assignments given in terms of broad general objectives and limits. Typical duties and responsibilities include one or more of the following:  Direction received. Receives general administrative direction. 1.  2.  3.  In a supervisory capacity, a) plans, develops, coordinates, and directs a number of large and important projects or a project of major scope and importance, or b) is responsible for the entire engineering program of a company or government agency when the program is of limited complexity and scope. Extent of responsibilities generally requires a few (3 to 5) subordinate supervisors or team leaders with at least one in a position comparable to level V.  Typical duties and responsibilities include one or both of the following:  As individual researcher or worker, conceives, plans, and conducts research in problem areas of considerable scope and complexity. The problems must be approached through a series of complete and conceptually related studies, are difficult to define, require unconventional or novel approaches, and require sophisticated research techniques. Available guides and precedents contain critical gaps, are only partially related to the problem, or may be largely lacking due to the novel character of the project. At this level, the individual researcher generally will have contributed inventions, new designs, or techniques which are of material significance in the solution of important problems. As a staff specialist, serves as the technical specialist for the organization in the application of advanced theories, concepts, principles, and processes for an assigned area of responsibility (i.e., subject matter, function, type of facility or equipment, or product). Keeps abreast of new scientific methods and developments affecting the organization for the purpose of recommending changes in emphasis of programs or new programs warranted by such developments.  Responsibility for the direction of others. Plans, organizes, and supervises the work of a staff of engineers and technicians. Evaluates progress of the staff and results obtained, and recommends major changes to achieve overall objectives. Or, as individual researcher or staff specialist, may be assisted on individual projects by other engineers or technicians.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1.  In a supervisory capacity, is responsible for a) an important segment of the engineering program of a company or government agency with extensive and diversified engineering requirements, or b) the entire engineering program of a company or agency when it is more limited in scope. The overall engineering program contains critical problems the solution of which requires major technological advances and opens the way for extensive related development. Extent of responsibilities generally requires several subordinate organizational segments or teams. Recommends facilities, personnel, and funds required to carry out programs which are directly related to and directed toward fulfillment of overall objectives.  2.  As individual researcher and consultant, is a recognized leader and authority in the company or government agency in a broad area of specialization or in a narrow but intensely specialized field. Selects research problems to further program objectives. Conceives and plans investigations of broad areas of considerable novelty and importance, for which engineering precedents are lacking in areas critical to the overall engineering program. Is consulted extensively by associates and others, with a high degree of reliance placed on incumbent's scientific interpretations and advice. Typically, will have contributed inventions, new designs, or techniques which are regarded as major advances in the field.  Responsibility for the direction of others. Directs several subordinate supervisors or team leaders, some of who are in positions comparable to engineer VI; or as individual researcher and consultant, may be assisted on individual projects by other engineers and technicians.  B-11  Engineer VIII  performing at level VIII; 2) individuals whose decisions have direct and substantial effect on setting policy for the organization (included, however, are supervisors deciding the "kind and extent of engineering and related programs” within broad guidelines set at higher levels); and 3) individual researchers and consultants who are recognized as national and/or international authorities and scientific leaders in very broad areas of scientific interest and investigation.  General characteristics. Makes decisions and recommendations that are recognized as authoritative and have a far-reaching impact on extensive engineering and related activities of the company or government agency. Negotiates critical and controversial issues with top level engineers and officers of other organizations. Individuals at this level demonstrate a high degree of creativity, foresight, and mature judgment in planning, organizing, and guiding extensive engineering programs and activities of outstanding novelty and importance.  Administrative  Direction received. Receives general administrative direction.  BUDGET ANALYST Typical duties and responsibilities include one or both of the following:  (141: Accountant, auditor, and other financial specialist)  1.  Formulates and analyzes and/or administers and monitors an organization's budget. Typical duties include: Preparing budget estimates to support programs; presenting and justifying budget estimates; administering approved budgets and determining funding requirements within authorized limits; evaluating and administering requests for funds and monitoring and controlling obligations and expenditures; and developing and interpreting budget policies.  2.  In supervisory capacity, is responsible for a) an important segment of a very extensive and highly diversified engineering program of a company or government agency, or b) the entire engineering program of a company or agency when the program is of moderate scope. The programs are of such complexity and scope that they are of critical importance to overall objectives, include problems of extraordinary difficulty that often have resisted solution, and consist of several segments requiring subordinate supervisors. Decides the kind and extent of engineering and related programs needed to accomplish the objectives of the company or agency, chooses scientific approaches, plans and organizes facilities and programs, and interprets results.  In addition to the technical responsibilities described in levels I through IV, budget analysts may also supervise subordinate staff members. At levels I and II, the subordinate staff typically consists of clerical and paraprofessional employees; level III may also coordinate the work of lower level analysts; and level IV may supervise one or two analysts. Positions responsible for supervising three or more budget analysts and support staff should typically be matched to the budget analyst supervisor definition.  As individual researcher and consultant, formulates and guides the attack on problems of exceptional difficulty and marked importance to the company, industry, or government. Problems are characterized by their lack of scientific precedents and source material, or lack of success of prior research and analysis so that their solution would represent an advance of great significance and importance. Performs advisory and consulting work as a recognized authority for broad program areas or in an intensely specialized area of considerable novelty and importance.  Excluded are: a. b.  Responsibility for the direction of others. Supervises several subordinate supervisors or team leaders, some of whose positions are comparable to engineer VII, or individual researchers some of whose positions are comparable to engineer VII and sometimes engineer VIII. As an individual researcher and consultant may be assisted on individual projects by other engineers or technicians. Note:  Individuals in charge of an engineering program may match any of several of the survey job levels, depending on the program's size and complexity. Excluded from the definition are: 1) engineers in charge of programs so extensive and complex (e.g., consisting of research and development on a variety of complex products or systems with numerous   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Budget clerks and assistants performing clerical work in support of budget analysts; Program analysts evaluating the success of an organization's operating programs;  c.  Financial analysts evaluating the financial operations, transactions, practices and structure of an organization; and  d.  Budget analysts (above level IV) responsible for analyzing and administering highly complex budgets requiring frequent reprogramming and evaluating the impact of complicated legislation or policy decisions on the organization's budget.  Budget Analyst I As a trainee, performs a variety of clearly-defined tasks assigned to increase the employee's knowledge and understanding of budget concepts, principles, practices, and  B-12  rocedures. Assists in the development of budgets by comparing projected costs to schedules; or assists in budget administration by examining and highlighting obvious deviations in reports listing the status of financial obligations and expenditures. (Terminal positions are excluded.)  Budget development'. Reviews and verifies budget data for consistency with financial and program objectives; formulates and revises budget estimates; validates justifications through comparisons with operating reports; and explores funding alternatives based on precedents and guidelines; and/or  Work is performed under close supervision. Assignments are clearly defined, methods are specified, and items to be noted and referred to supervisor are identified.  Budget administration: Certifies obligations and expenditures, monitors trends in spending, and anticipates funding and reprogramming needs; within established limits, recommends transfer of funds within accounts to cover increased expenditures; assembles data for use in preparing budget and program evaluations; and recommends the approval of or revises requests for allotments.  Budget Analyst II Performs routine and recurring budget analysis duties which typically facilitate more complex review and analysis performed by supervisors or higher-level budget analysts. Initial assignments are designed to expand practical experience and to develop judgment in applying basic budget analysis techniques. Follows specific guidelines and previous budget reports in analyzing budgets for operating programs which are uniform and repetitive. Typical duties include:  Carries out assignments independently in accordance with standard procedures and practices. Supervisor provides assistance on unfamiliar or unusual problems. May perform more complex assignments to assist supervisor or higher level analyst.  Budget Analyst IV Budget development. Assisting operating officials in preparing budget requests and justifications by gathering, extracting, reviewing, verifying, and consolidating a variety of narrative and statistical data; examining budget requests for accuracy and conformance with procedures and regulations; and comparing budget requests with prior year estimates and current operating reports; and/or  Provides analytical support for budgets which require annual modifications due to  changing work processes, resource needs, funding requirements, or fluctuating revenue. Interprets guidelines and precedents and advises operating managers concerning budgeting policies. May recommend new budgeting techniques. Typical duties include; Budget development: Performs in-depth analysis of budget requests using techniques such as cost-benefit analysis and program trade-offs, and by exploring alternative methods of funding; writes and edits justifications for higher level approval; coordinates the compilation and evaluation of information required for executive level budget meetings; confers on modifications to budget requests; and interprets, revises, and develops procedures and instructions for preparing and presenting budget requests; and/or  Budget administration: Screening requests for allocations of approved budgets and recommending approval, disapproval, or modification based on availability of funds and conformance with regulations; analyzing operating reports to monitor program expenditures and obligations; and summarizing narrative and statistical data in budget forms and reports. Applies previously learned skills to perform routine work independently. Supervisor provides information regarding budgetary actions to be performed, organizational functions to be covered, and specific instructions for unfamiliar work or complex problems.  Budget administration: Prepares a variety of reports detailing the status of funds, expenses, and obligations; identifies trends and recommends adjustments in program spending; advises management on budgeting deadlines and alternative means of accomplishing budgetary objectives; and serves as budgeting liaison between managers and staff of various organizational programs.  Budget Analyst III Uses a knowledge of commonly used budgetary procedures and practices, regulations, and organizational policies to analyze budgets for relatively stable operations (e.g., minor budget reprogramming is required two or three times a year). Forecasts funding needs for operating programs with varying annual requirements for goods, services, equipment, and personnel. Typical duties include:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Participates with supervisor in determining deadlines for assigned projects, which are linked to the budget cycle and typically require more than a year for completion. Works independently for several months at a time, with little review, while work  B-13  Purchases items and services or negotiates contracts at the most favorable price consistent with quality, quantity, specification requirements, and other factors. Prepares or supervises preparation of purchase orders from requisitions. May expedite delivery and visit vendors’ offices and plants.  progresses.  BUDGET ANALYST SUPERVISOR (141: Accountant, auditor, and other financial specialist)  Normally, purchases are unreviewed when they are consistent with past experience and are in conformance with established rules and policies. Proposed purchase transactions that deviate from the usual or from past experience in terms of prices, quality of items, quantities, etc., or that may set precedents for future purchases, are reviewed by higher authority prior to final action.  As a. first-line supervisor, supervises 3-14 budget analysts and support staff. Work requires substantial knowledge of budget formulation, analysis, and execution. Duties include planning and delegating work; monitoring performance; providing technical counsel; and evaluating work products. Recommends hirings and promotions, resolves complaints, effects minor disciplinary action, and arranges training. May direct staff through subordinate team leaders.  Contract administration includes determining allowable costs, monitoring contractor compliance with contract terms, resolving problems concerning obligations of the parties, explaining and renegotiating contract terms, and ensuring satisfactory contract completion.  Excluded are second-line budget analyst supervisory positions.  Budget Analyst Supervisor I In addition to work described above, some (but not all) buyers or contracting specialists direct the work of one or a few clerks who perform routine aspects of the work. As a secondary and subsidiary duty, some buyers may also sell or dispose of surplus, salvage, or used materials, equipment, or supplies.  Budget analyst III represents the full performance level of subordinate staff supervised. In addition, at least two staff members, as well as 25% of the total subordinate staff performs at the Budget Analyst III (or equivalent) level.  Note:  Budget Analyst Supervisor II Budget analyst IV represents the full performance level of subordinate staff supervised. In addition, at least two staff members, as well as 25% of the total subordinate staff performs at the Budget Analyst IV (or equivalent) level.  Some buyers or contracting specialists are responsible for the purchasing or contract administration of a variety of items and materials. When the variety includes items and work described at more than one of the following levels, the position should be considered to equal the highest level that characterizes at least a substantial portion of the buyer's time.  Excluded are:  BUYER/CONTRACTING SPECIALIST  a.  Buyers of items for direct sale, either wholesale or retail;  b.  Brokers and dealers buying for clients or for investment purposes;  c.  Positions that specifically require professional education and qualifications in a physical science or in engineering (e.g., chemist, mechanical engineer);  d.  Buyers who specialize in purchasing a single or a few related items of highly variable quality such as raw cotton or wool, tobacco, cattle, or leather for shoe uppers, etc. Expert personal knowledge of the item is required to judge the relative value of the goods offered, and to decide the quantity, quality, and price of each purchase in terms of its probable effect on the organization's profit and competitive status;  (1449: Purchasing agent and buyer, not elsewhere classified) Purchases materials, supplies, equipment, and services (e.g., utilities, maintenance, and repair) and/or administers purchase contracts (assuring compliance after contract is awarded). In some instances items purchased are of types that must be specially designed, produced, or modified by the vendor in accordance with drawings or engineering specifications. Solicits bids, analyzes quotations received, and selects or recommends suppliers. At levels III and higher, formal contract negotiation methods are typically used where knowledge of market trends and conditions is required. May interview prospective vendors.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-14  e.  Buyers or contracting specialists whose principal responsibility is the supervision of a purchasing or contracting program;  f.  Persons whose major duties consist of ordering, reordering, or requisitioning  Buyer/Contracting Specialist II Purchases "off-the-shelf" types of standard, generally available technical items, materials, and services. Transactions may involve occasional modification of standard and common usage items, materials, and services, and include a few stipulations about unusual packing, marking, shipping, etc.  items under existing contracts; g.  Positions restricted to clerical functions or to purchase expediting work;  h.  Positions not requiring: 1) three years of administrative, technical, or substantive clerical experience; 2) a bachelor's degree in any field; or 3) any equivalent combination of experience and education yielding basic skills in problem analysis and communication; and  i.  Contracting specialists above level V having broad responsibilities for resolving  Transactions usually involve dealing directly with manufacturers, distributors, jobbers, etc. Limited contract negotiation techniques may be used, primarily for developmental purposes to increase employee's skill and knowledge. Quantities of items and materials purchased may be relatively large, particularly in the case of contracts for continuing supply over a period of time. May be responsible for locating or promoting possible new sources of supply. Usually is expected to keep abreast of market trends, changes in business practices in the assigned markets, new or altered types of materials entering the market, etc.  critical problems on major long-term purchases, developing new approaches or innovative acquisition plans, and/or developing procurement policies and procedures. These specialists use extensive judgment and originality to plan  Examples of items purchased or under contract include: standard industrial types of  procurement strategies for large scale acquisition programs or systems.  hand tools, gloves, and safety equipment; standard electronic parts, components, and component test instruments; electric motors; gasoline service station equipment; PBX or other specialized telephone services; special purpose printing services; custodial services for a large building; and routine purchases of common raw materials such as standard grades and sizes of steel bars, rods, and angles.  Buyer/Contracting Specialist I Purchases "off-the-shelf" types of readily available, commonly used materials, supplies, tools, furniture, services, etc.  Also included at this level are buyers of materials of the types described for Buyer I when the quantities purchased are large, so that local sources of supply are generally inadequate and the buyer must deal directly with manufacturers on a broader than local scale.  Transactions usually involve local retailers, wholesalers, jobbers, and manufacturers' sales representatives. Quantities purchased are generally small amounts, e.g., those available from local  OR  sources.  In a developmental position, assists higher level buyers or contracting specialists in purchasing, and/or negotiating contracts for items, materials, or services of a technical and specialized nature. Assigned work is designed to provide diversified experience, as a background for future higher level work. Examples of duties include: reviewing requisitions and drafting solicitations; evaluating bids and the dependability of suppliers; meeting with commercial representatives; and monitoring the progress of contractors. Supervisor provides general instructions, monitors work, and reviews recommendations. Standard or routine aspects of work are performed with greater independence.  Examples of items purchased include: common stationery and office supplies; standard types of office furniture and fixtures; standard nuts, bolts, screws; janitorial and common building maintenance supplies; or common utility services or office machine repair services.  OR As a trainee, performs various clearly defined procurement tasks designed to increase the employee's knowledge and understanding of procurement and contracting concepts, principles, practices, and procedures. Examples of duties include: assisting in the preparation of solicitation documents; analyzing prices, discounts, and delivery dates; making procurement recommendations; and drafting simple contract provisions and supporting documentation. Work is performed under close supervision.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Buyer/Contracting Specialist III Purchases items, materials, or services of a technical and specialized nature, usually by negotiating a standard contract based on reimbursement of costs and expenses or a  B-15  fixed price ceiling. May be responsible for overseeing the postaward (contract administration) functions (e.g., monitoring contract compliance, recommending action on problem situations, and negotiating extensions of delivery schedules) of such contracts. The items, while of a common general type, are usually made, altered, or customized to meet the user's specific needs and specifications. The number of potential vendors is likely to be small and price differentials often reflect important factors (quality, delivery dates and places, etc.) that are difficult to evaluate. The quantities purchased of any item or service may be large. Many of the purchases involve one or more such complications as: specifications that detail, in technical terms, the required physical, chemical, electrical, or other comparable properties; special testing prior to acceptance; grouping of items for lot bidding and awards; specialized processing, packing, or packaging requirements; export packs; overseas port differentials; etc. Is expected to keep abreast of market and product developments. May be required to  Negotiations and contract administration are often complicated by the following: requirements for spare parts, preproduction samples and testing, or technical literature; patent and royalty provisions; or renegotiation of contract terms. In reviewing contract proposals, extensive cost analysis is required to evaluate the cost of such factors as 1) numerous technical specifications, and 2) potential changes in manufacturing processes that might affect projected cost figures. These complications result in the incorporation of numerous special provisions and incentives in renegotiated contracts. In addition to the work described above, a few positions may also require supervision of a few lower level buyers, contracting specialists or clerks. (No position is included in this level solely because supervisory duties are performed.)  Examples of items purchased include: special purpose high-cost machine tools and production facilities; specialized condensers, boilers, and turbines; raw materials of critically important characteristics or quality; and parts, subassemblies, components, etc., specially designed and made to order (e.g., communications equipment for installation in aircraft being manufactured; component assemblies for missiles and rockets; and motor vehicle frames).  locate new sources of supply.  Buyer/Contracting Specialist V Some positions may involve assisting in the training or supervision of lower level buyers or clerks.  Performs one of the following: 1.  Examples of items purchased include: castings; special extruded shapes of normal size and material; special formula paints; electric motors of special shape or speeds; production equipment; special packaging of items; raw materials in substantial quantities or with special characteristics; and protective services where security presents an especially significant problem.  Buyer/Contracting Specialist IV  special equipment.  Negotiates and/or administers purchase contracts for complex and highly technical items, materials, or services, frequently specially designed and manufactured  2.  exclusively for the purchaser. Transactions require dealing with manufacturers and often involve persuading potential vendors to undertake the manufacture of custom designed items according to complex and rigid specifications. Negotiation techniques are also frequently involved with convincing the vendor to reduce costs.  Performs large-scale centralized purchasing or contract administration for a multi-unit organization or large establishment that requires either items with unique requirements as to construction, testing, durability, or quality characteristics, or organization-wide services. Examples of contracts include organization-wide software or communication systems, and industry-specific testing equipment with unique specifications.  May persuade suppliers to expand their plants or convert facilities to the production of new items or services.  Quantities of items and materials purchased are often large in order to satisfy the requirements for an entire large organization for an extended period of time. Complex schedules of delivery are often involved. Contracting specialists determine appropriate quantities to be contracted for at any given period of time and negotiate with vendors to establish or adjust delivery schedules.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Serves as lead negotiator or contract administrator for: new or unique equipment; extensive technical or professional services; or complex construction projects where there is a lack of previous experience or competition, extensive subcontracting, or similar complications. Examples of contracts include prototype development of sophisticated research and testing equipment, software systems development, scientific studies involving waste and transportation systems, facilities for production of weapons systems, and research laboratories requiring  Transactions are often complicated by technological changes, urgent needs to override normal production, great volume of production, commodity shortages, and lack of competition among vendors. Frequent technological changes require delays or  B-16  modifications to contract proposals or to existing contracts. In-depth cost analysis is required, often with little pricing precedent due to the unique aspects of the products.  d  Workers who primarily analyze and evaluate problems concerning computer equipment or its selection or utilization;  Contracts are usually long-term (exceeding 2 years) and involve numerous subcontracts and special provisions that must be changed and renegotiated throughout the duration of the contract.  e.  Computer systems programmers or analysts who primarily write programs or analyze problems concerning the system software, e.g., operating systems, compilers, assemblers, system utility routines, etc., which provide basic services for the use of all programs and provide for the scheduling of the execution of programs; however, positions matching this definition may develop a "total package which includes not only writing programs to process data but also selecting the computer equipment and system software required;  f.  Employees who have significant responsibility for the management or supervision  COMPUTER PROGRAMMER (397: Programmer) Performs programming services for establishments or for outside organizations who may contract for services. Converts specifications (precise descriptions) about business or scientific problems into a sequence of detailed instructions to solve problems by electronic data processing (EDP) equipment, i.e., digital computers. Draws program flow charts to describe the processing of data and develops the precise steps and processing logic which, when entered into the computer in coded language (COBOL, FORTRAN, or other programming language), cause the manipulation of data to achieve desired results. Tests and corrects programs and prepares instructions for operators who control the computer during runs. Modifies programs to increase operating efficiency or to respond to changes in work processes; maintains records to document program development and revisions.  of workers (e.g., systems analysts) whose positions are not covered in this definition; or employees with significant responsibility for other functions such as computer operations, data entry, system software, etc.; and g.  Positions not requiring: 1) three years of administrative, technical, or substantive clerical experience; 2) a bachelor's degree in any field; or 3) any equivalent combination of experience and education yielding basic skills in problem analysis and communication. Positions are classified into levels based on the following definitions.  At levels I, II, and III, computer programmers may also perform programming analysis such as: gathering facts from users to define their business or scientific problems and to investigate the feasibility of solving problems through new or modified computer programs; developing specifications for data inputs, flow, actions, decisions, and outputs; and participating on a continuing basis in the overall program planning along with other EDP personnel and users. In contrast, at levels IV and V, some programming analysis must be performed as part of the programming assignment. The analysis duties are identified in a separate paragraph at levels I, II, III, and IV, and are part of each alternative described at level V. However, the systems requirements are defined by systems analysts or scientists.  Positions which require a bachelor's degree in a specific scientific field (other than computer science), such as an engineering, mathematics, physics, or chemistry degree; however, positions are potential matches where the required degree may be from any of several possible scientific fields;  b.  Positions responsible for developing and modifying computer systems;  c.  Computer programmers who perform level IV or V duties but who perform no programming analysis;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  At this trainee level, assignments are usually planned to develop basic programming skills because incumbents are typically inexperienced in applying such skills on the job. Assists higher level staff by performing elementary programming tasks which concern limited and simple data items and steps which closely follow patterns of previous work done in the organization, e.g., drawing flow charts, writing operator instructions, or coding and testing routines to accumulate counts, tallies, or summaries. May perform routine programming assignments (as described in level II) under close supervision. In addition, as training and to assist higher level staff, may perform elementary fact finding concerning a specified work process, e.g., a file of clerical records which is treated as a unit (invoices, requisitions, or purchase orders, etc.); reports findings to higher level staff.  Excluded are: a.  Computer Programmer 1  Receives classroom and/or on-the-job training in computer programming concepts, methods, and techniques and in the basic requirements of the subject matter area. May receive training in elementary fact-finding. Detailed, step-by-step instructions are given for each task and any deviation must be authorized by a supervisor. Work is closely monitored in progress and reviewed in detail upon completion.  B-17  Computer Programmer It  Silt  At this level, initial assignments are designed to develop competence in applying established programming procedures to routine problems. Performs ■ routine programming assignments that do not require skilled background experience but do require knowledge of established programming procedures and data processing requirements. Works according to clear-cut and complete specifications. The data are refined and the format of the final product is very similar to that of the input or is well defined when significantly different, i.e., there are few, if any, problems with interrelating varied records and outputs. Maintains and modifies routine programs. Makes approved changes by amending program flow charts, developing detailed processing logic, and coding changes. Tests and documents modifications and writes operator instructions. May write routine new programs using prescribed specifications; may confer with EDP personnel to clarify procedures, processing logic, etc. In addition, and as continued training, may evaluate simple interrelationships in the immediate programming area, e.g., whether a contemplated change in one part of a simple program would cause unwanted results in a related part; confers with user representatives to gain an understanding of the situation sufficient to formulate the needed change; and implements the change upon approval of the supervisor or higher level staff. The incumbent is provided with charts, narrative descriptions of the functions performed, an approved statement of the product desired (e.g., a change in a local establishment report), and the inputs, outputs, and record formats. Reviews objectives and assignment details with higher level staff to insure thorough understanding; uses judgment in selecting among authorized procedures and seeks assistance when guidelines are inadequate, significant deviations are proposed, or when unanticipated problems arise. Work is usually monitored in progress; all work is reviewed upon completion for accuracy and compliance with standards.  As a fully qualified computer programmer, applies standard programming procedures and detailed knowledge of pertinent subject matter (e.g., work processes, governing rules, clerical procedures, etc.) in a programming area such as: a recordkeeping operation (supply, personnel and payroll, inventory, purchasing, insurance payments, depositor accounts, etc.); a well-defined statistical or scientific problem; or other standardized operation or problem. Works according to approved statements of requirements and detailed specifications. While the data are clear cut, related, and equally available, there may be substantial interrelationships of a variety of records and several varied sequences of formats are usually produced. The programs developed or modified typically are linked to several other programs in that the output of one becomes the input for another. Recognizes probable interactions of other related   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  programs with the assigned program(s) and is familiar with related system software and computer equipment. Solves conventional programming problems. (In small organizations, may maintain programs which concern or combine several operations, i.e., users, or develop programs where there is one primary user and the others give input.) Performs such duties as: develops, modifies, and maintains assigned programs; designs and implements modifications to the interrelation of files and records within programs in consultation with higher level staff; monitors the operation of assigned programs and responds to problems by diagnosing and correcting errors in logic and coding; and implements and/or maintains assigned portions of a scientific programming project, applying established scientific programming techniques to well-defined mathematical, statistical, engineering, or other scientific problems usually requiring the translation of mathematical notation into processing logic and code. (Scientific programming includes assignments such as: using predetermined physical laws expressed in mathematical terms to relate one set of data to another; the routine storage and retrieval of field test data; and using procedures for real-time command and control, scientific data reduction, signal processing, or similar areas.) Tests and documents work and writes and maintains operator instructions for assigned programs. Confers with other EDP personnel to obtain or provide factual data. In addition, may carry out fact-finding and programming analysis of a single activity or routine problem, applying established procedures where the nature of the program, feasibility, computer equipment, and programming language have already been decided. May analyze present performance of the program and take action to correct deficiencies based on discussion with the user and consultation with and approval of the supervisor or higher level staff. May assist in the review and analysis of detailed program specifications and in program design to meet changes in work processes. Works independently under specified objectives; applies judgment in devising program logic and in selecting and adapting standard programming procedures; resolves problems and deviations according to established practices; and obtains advice where precedents are unclear or not available. Completed work is reviewed for conformance to standards, timeliness, and efficiency. May guide or instruct lower level programmers; may supervise technicians and others who assist in specific assignments.  OR Works on complex programs (as described in level IV) under close direction of higher level staff or supervisor. May assist higher level staff by independently performing moderately complex tasks assigned, and performing complex tasks under close supervision.  Computer Programmer IV  _________  Applies expertise in programming procedures to complex programs; recommends the redesign of programs, investigates and analyzes feasibility and program requirements,  B-18  and develops programming specifications. Assigned programs typically affect a broad multi-user computer system which meets the data processing needs of a broad area (e g., manufacturing, logistics planning, finance management, human resources, or material management) or a computer system for a project in engineering, research, accounting, statistics, etc. Plans the full range of programming actions to produce several interrelated but different products from numerous and diverse data elements which are usually from different sources; solves difficult programming problems. Uses knowledge of pertinent system software, computer equipment, work processes, regulations, and management practices. Performs such duties as: develops, modifies, and maintains complex programs; designs and implements the interrelations of files and records within programs which will effectively fit into the overall design of the project; working with problems or concepts, develops programs for the solution to major scientific computational problems requiring the analysis and development of logical or mathematic descriptions of functions to be programmed; and develops occasional special programs, e.g., a critical path analysis program to assist in managing a special project. Tests, documents, and writes operating instructions for all work. Confers with other EDP personnel to secure information, investigate and resolve problems, and coordinate work efforts. In addition, performs such programming analysis as: investigating the feasibility of alternate program design approaches to determine the best balanced solution, e.g., one that will best satisfy immediate user needs, facilitate subsequent modification, and conserve resources; on typical maintenance projects and smaller scale, limited new projects, assisting user personnel in defining problems or needs and determining work organization, the necessary files and records, and their interrelation with the program; or on large or more complicated projects, participating as a team member along with other EDP personnel and users and having responsibility for a portion of the project. Works independently under overall objectives and direction, apprising the supervisor about progress and unusual complications. Modifies and adapts precedent solutions and proven approaches. Guidelines include constraints imposed by the related programs with which the incumbent's programs must be meshed. Completed work is reviewed for timeliness, compatibility with other work, and effectiveness in meeting requirements. May function as team leader or supervise a few lower level programmers or technicians on assigned work.  Computer Programmer V_________ __________________ ______ At level V, workers are typically either supervisors, team leaders, staff specialists, or consultants. Some programming analysis is included as a part of the programming assignment. Supervision and review are similar to level IV.  Typical duties and responsibilities include one or more of the following:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-19  1.  2.  In a supervisory capacity, plans, develops, coordinates, and directs a large and important programming project (finance, manufacturing, sales/marketing, human resources, or other broad area) or a number of small programming projects with complex features. A substantial portion of the work supervised (usually 2 to 3 workers) is comparable to that described for level IV. Supervises, coordinates, and reviews the work of a small staff, normally not more than 15 programmers and technicians; estimates personnel needs and schedules, assigns and reviews work to meet completion date. These day-to-day supervisors evaluate performance, resolve complaints, and make recommendations on hiring and firing. They do not make final decisions on curtailing projects, reorganizing, or reallocating resources. As team leader, staff specialist, or consultant, defines complex scientific problems (e.g., computational) or other highly complex programming problems (e.g., generating overall forecasts, projections, or other new data fields widely different from the source data or untried at the scale proposed) and directs the development of computer programs for their solution; or designs improvements in complex programs where existing precedents provide little guidance, such as an interrelated group of mathematical/statistical programs which support health insurance, natural resources, marketing trends, or other research activities. In conjunction with users (scientists or specialists), defines major problems in the subject-matter area. Contacts co-workers and user personnel at various locations to plan and coordinate project and gather data; devises ways to obtain data not previously available; arbitrates differences between various program users when conflicting requirements arise. May perform simulation studies to determine effects of changes in computer equipment or system software or may assess the feasibility and soundness of proposed programming projects which are novel and complex. Typically develops programming techniques and procedures where few precedents exist. May be assisted on projects by other programmers or technicians.  COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST  ________________  (1712: Computer systems analyst) Analyzes business or scientific problems for resolution through electronic data processing. Gathers information from users, defines work problems, and, if feasible, designs a system of computer programs and procedures to resolve the problems. Develops complete specifications to enable computer programmers to prepare required programs: analyzes subject-matter operations to be automated; specifies number and types of records, files, and documents to be used and outputs to be produced; prepares work diagrams and data flow charts; coordinates tests of the system and participates in trial runs of new and revised systems; and recommends computer equipment changes to obtain more effective operations. May also write the computer programs.  Excluded are: a.  Trainees who receive detailed directives and work plans, select authorized procedures for use in specific situations, and seek assistance for deviations and problems;  b.  c.  assignments.  Positions which require a bachelor's degree in a specific scientific field (other than computer science), such as an engineering, mathematics, physics, or chemistry degree; however, positions are potential matches where the required degree may be from any of several possible scientific fields; Computer programmers who write computer programs and solve user problems not requiring systems modification;  d.  Workers who primarily analyze and evaluate problems concerning computer equipment or its selection or utilization; and  e.  Computer systems programmers or analysts who primarily write programs or analyze problems concerning the system software, e.g., operating systems, compilers, assemblers, system utility routines, etc., which provide basic services for the use of all programs and provide for the scheduling or the execution of programs; however, positions matching this definition may develop a "total package” which includes not only analyzing work problems to be processed but also selecting the computer equipment and system software required. Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.  Computer Systems Analyst I  The supervisor defines objectives, priorities, and deadlines. Incumbents work independently; adapt guides to specific situations; resolve problems and deviations according to established practices; and obtain advice where precedents are unclear or not available. Completed work is reviewed for conformance to requirements, timeliness, and efficiency. May supervise technicians and others who assist in specific  ^  At this level, initial assignments are designed to expand practical experience in applying systems analysis techniques and procedures. Provides several phases of the required systems analysis where the nature of the system is predetermined. Uses established fact finding approaches, knowledge of pertinent work processes and procedures, and familiarity with related computer programming practices, system software, and computer equipment. Carries out fact finding and analysis as assigned, usually of a single activity or a routine problem; applies established procedures where the nature of the system, feasibility, computer equipment, and programming language have already been decided; may assist a higher level systems analyst by preparing the detailed specifications required by computer programmers from information developed by the higher level analyst; may research routine user problems and solve them by modifying the existing system when the solutions follow clear precedents. When cost and deadline estimates  Computer Systems Analyst II Applies systems analysis and design skills in an area such as a recordkeeping or scientific operation. A system of several varied sequences or formats is usually developed, e.g., systems for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank, maintaining accounts receivable in a retail establishment, maintaining inventory accounts in a manufacturing or wholesale establishment, or processing a limited problem in a scientific project. Requires competence in most phases of system analysis and knowledge of pertinent system software and computer equipment and of the work processes, applicable regulations, work load, and practices of the assigned subjectmatter area. Recognizes probable interactions of related computer systems and predicts impact of a change in assigned system. Reviews proposals which consist of objectives, scope, and user expectations, gathers facts, analyzes data, and prepares a project synopsis which compares alternatives in terms of cost, time, availability of equipment and personnel, and recommends a course of action; and upon approval of synopsis, prepares specifications for development of computer programs. Determines and resolves data processing problems and coordinates the work with program, users, etc.; orients user personnel on new or changed procedures. May conduct special projects such as data element and code standardization throughout a broad system, working under specific objectives and bringing to the attention of the supervisor any unusual problems or controversies. Works independently under overall project objectives and requirements; apprises supervisor about progress and unusual complications. Guidelines usually include existing systems and the constraints imposed by related systems with which the incumbent's work must be meshed. Adapts design approaches successfully used in precedent systems. Completed work is reviewed for timeliness, compatibility with other work, and effectiveness in meeting requirements. May provide functional direction to lower level assistants on assigned work.  OR Works on a segment of a complex data processing scheme or broad system, as described for computer systems analyst level III. Works independently on routine assignments and receives instructions and guidance on complex assignments. Work is reviewed for accuracy of judgment, compliance with instructions, and to insure proper  are required, results receive close review.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-20  alignment with the overall system.  As team or project leader, provides systems design in a specialized and highly complex design area, e.g., interrelated business statistics and/or projections,  Computer Systems Analyst HI  scientific systems, mathematical models, or similar unprecedented computer systems. Establishes the framework of new computer systems from feasibility studies to post-implementation evaluation. Devises new sources of data and develops new approaches and techniques for use by others. May serve as technical authority for a design area. At least one or two team members perform work at level III; one or two team members may also perform work as a level IV staff specialist or consultant as described below.  Applies systems analysis and design techniques to complex computer systems in a  broad area such as manufacturing; finance management; engineering, accounting, or statistics; logistics planning; material management, etc. Usually, there are multiple users of the system; however, there may be complex one-user systems, e.g., for engineering or research projects. Requires competence in all phases of systems analysis techniques, concepts, and methods and knowledge of available system software, computer equipment, and the regulations, structure, techniques, and management practices of one or more subject-matter areas. Since input data usually come from diverse sources, is responsible for recognizing probable conflicts and integrating diverse data elements and sources. Produces innovative solutions for a variety of complex problems. Maintains and modifies complex systems or develops new subsystems such as an integrated production scheduling, inventory control, cost analysis, or sales analysis record in which every item of each type is automatically processed through the full system of records. Guides users in formulating requirements; advises on alternatives and on the implications of new or revised data processing systems; analyzes resulting user project proposals, identifies omissions and errors in requirements, and conducts feasibility studies; recommends optimum approach and develops system design for approved projects. Interprets information and informally arbitrates between system users when conflicts exist. May serve as lead analyst in a design subgroup, directing and integrating the work of one or two lower level analysts, each responsible for several  As staff specialist or consultant, with expertise in a specialty area (e.g., data security, telecommunications, systems analysis techniques, EDP standards development, etc.), plans and conducts analyses of unique or unyielding problems in a broad system. Identifies problems and specific issues in assigned area and prepares overall project recommendations from an EDP standpoint including feasible advancements in EDP technology; upon acceptance, determines a design strategy that anticipates directions of change; designs and monitors necessary testing and implementation plans. Performs work such as: studies broad areas of projected work processes which cut across the organization's established EDP systems; conducts continuing review of computer technological developments applicable to system design and prepares long range forecasts; develops EDP standards where new and improved approaches are needed; or develops recommendations for a management information system where new concepts are required.  Computer Systems Analyst V  programs. Supervision and nature of review are similar to level II; existing systems provide precedents for the operation of new subsystems.  As a top technical expert, develops broad unprecedented computer systems and/or conducts critical studies central to the success of large organizations having extensive technical or highly diversified computer requirements. Considers such requirements as  Computer Systems Analyst IV  broad organization policy, and the diverse user needs of several organizational levels and locations. Works under general administrative direction.  Applies expert systems analysis and design techniques to complex system development in a specialized design area and/or resolves unique or unyielding problems in existing complex systems by applying new technology. Work requires a broad knowledge of data sources and flow, interactions of existing complex systems in the organization, and the capabilities and limitations of the systems software and computer equipment. Objectives and overall requirements are defined in the organization's EDP policies and standards; the primary constraints typically are those imposed by the need for compatibility with existing systems or processes. Supervision and nature of review are similar to levels II and III.  Typical duties and responsibilities include one or more of the following: 1.  As team or project leader, guides the development of broad unprecedented computer systems. The information requirements are complex and voluminous. Devises completely new ways to locate and develop data sources; establishes new factors and criteria for making subject-matter decisions. Coordinates fact finding, analysis, and design of the system and applies the most recent developments in data processing technology and computer equipment. Guidelines consist of stateof-the-art technology and general organizational policy.  member performs work at level IV. Typical duties and responsibilities include one or more of the following:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  At least one team  2.  To determine the base level of nonsupervisory, nonclerical work: 1) array the positions by level of difficulty; 2) determine the number of workers in each position; and 3) count down from the highest level (if necessary) until at least 25 percent of the  As staff specialist or consultant, is a recognized leader and authority in a large organization (as defined above). Performs at least two of the following, a) has overall responsibility for evaluating the significance of technological advancement and developing EDP standards where new and improved approaches are needed, e.g., programming techniques; b) conceives and plans exploratory investigations critical to the overall organization where useful precedents do not exist and new concepts are required, e.g., develops recommendations regarding a comprehensive management information system; or c) evaluates existing EDP organizational policy for effectiveness, devising and formulating changes in the organization's position on broad policy issues. May be assisted on individual  total nonsupervisory, nonclerical staff are represented.  Level of supervision Supervisors and managers should be matched at one of the three LS levels below which best describes their supervisory responsibility. LS-1  projects by other analysts.  COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST SUPERVISOR/MANAGER (1712: Computer systems analyst) Supervises three or more employees, two of whom perform systems analysis. Work requires substantial and recurring use of systems analysis skills in directing staff. May also supervise programmers and related clerical and technical support personnel.  employees. LS-2  Excluded are: a.  b.  Positions also having significant responsibility for the management or supervision of functional areas (e.g., system software development, data entry, or computer operations) not related to the Computer Systems Analyst and Computer Programmer definitions; Supervisory positions having base levels below Computer Systems Analyst II or Computer Programmer IV; and  c.  Managers who supervise two or more subordinates performing at Computer  Note:  Systems Analyst Supervisor/Manager level IV.  Classification by level  Directs a sizable staff (normally 15-30 employees), typically divided into sub-units controlled by subordinate supervisors; advises higher level management on work problems of own unit and the impact on broader programs; collaborates with heads of other units to negotiate and/or coordinate work changes; makes decisions on work or training problems presented by subordinate supervisors; evaluates subordinate supervisors and reviews their evaluations of other employees; selects nonsupervisors (higher level approval is virtually assured) and recommends supervisory selections; hears group grievances and serious or unresolved complaints. May shift resources among projects and perform long range budget planning. In rare instances, supervisory positions responsible for directing a sizable staff (e.g., 20-30 employees) may not have subordinate supervisors, but have all other LS-2 responsibilities. Such positions should be matched to LS-2.  Supervisory jobs are matched at one of four levels according to two factors, a) base level of work supervised; and b) level of supervision. The table following the explanations of these factors indicates the level of the supervisor for each combination  LS-3  Directs two subordinate supervisory levels and the work force managed typically includes substantially more than 30 employees. Makes major decisions and recommendations (listed below) which have a direct, important, and substantial effect on own organization and work. Performs at least three of the following:  -  decides what programs and projects should be initiated, dropped, expanded, or  of factors.  Base level of work  curtailed;  The base level of work is the highest level of nonsupervisory work under the direct or indirect supervision of the supervisor/manager which (when added to the nonsupervisory levels above it) represents at least 25 percent of the total nonsupervisory, nonclerical staff and at least two of the full-time positions supervised.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Plans, coordinates, and evaluates the work of a small staff, normally not more than 15 programmers, systems analysts, and technicians; estimates personnel needs and schedules, assigns, and reviews work to meet completion date; interviews candidates for own unit and recommends hires, promotions, or reassignments; resolves complaints and refers group grievances and more serious unresolved complaints to higher level supervisors; may reprimand  -  B-  determines long range plans in response to program program goals, and redefines objectives;  changes, evaluates  determines changes to be made in organizational structure, delegation of authority, coordination of units, etc.;  Recruitment and Placement'. Recruiting applicants through various sources (e.g., schools, colleges, employment agencies, newspapers, professional societies); evaluating applicants using qualification ratings, test scores, interviews, and reference checks; and recommending applicant placement.  decides what compromises to make in operations in view of public relations implications and need for support from various groups;  Employee Development'. Planning, evaluating, and administering employee  decides on the means to substantially reduce operating costs without impairing overall operations; justifies major equipment expenditures; and  training and development programs to achieve both organizational goals and personnel management objectives.  resolves differences between key subordinate officials; decides, or significantly affects final decisions, on personnel actions for supervisors and other key officials.  Employee Relations and Services: Providing guidance, advice, and assistance on such matters as employee services and benefits; management-employee communications; performance appraisals, grievances and appeals; equal employment opportunity; and employee conduct and discipline.  CRITERIA FOR MATCHING COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST SUPERVISORS/MANAGERS  Equal Employment Opportunity: Base level of nonsupervisory job(s) Matched in the Computer Programmer Definition  IV V  Matched in the Computer Systems Analyst Definition II III IV V  Planning, evaluating, and administering  equal opportunity provisions.  Level of supervisor  Labor Relations: Advising and assisting management on a variety of labor LS-1  I II III IV  LS-2  II III IV Exclude  relations matters, and negotiating and administering labor agreements on behalf of management.  LS-3  In addition to the technical responsibilities described in levels I through VI, personnel specialists may also manage personnel functions and supervise subordinate staff. At levels I and II, the subordinate staff typically consists of clerks and paraprofessionals; level III may coordinate the work of lower level specialists; and levels IV and above  III IV Exclude Exclude  may supervise subordinate specialists. Positions which are primarily supervisory, rather than technical, in nature (i.e., they are not readily matchable to the level-to-level distinctions in this definition) should be matched to the personnel supervisor/manager definition. This broad, generic occupation includes specialists: (1) working in personnel  PERSONNEL SPECIALIST  operations', (2) reviewing and evaluating the quality of personnel programs; and  (143: Personnel, training, and labor relations specialist)  (3) developing and revising personnel programs and procedures. Plans, administers, advises on, or performs professional work in one or more personnel specialties, such as:  Excluded are:  Job Analysis/Evaluation: Analyzing, evaluating, and defining occupations or positions based on duties, responsibilities, and qualification requirements in order to establish or maintain a framework for equitable compensation.  a.  Positions matched to the personnel supervisor/manager definition;  b.  Directors of personnel, who service more than 2b0 employees and have significant responsibility for administering all three of the following functions: Job evaluation, employment and placement, and employee relations and services. In addition, workers in these excluded positions serve top management of their organization as the source of advice on personnel matters and problems;  c.  Clerical and paraprofessional positions;  Salary and Benefit Administration'. Analyzing and evaluating compensation practices, participating in compensation surveys, and recommending pay and benefit adjustments.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-23  d.  Typical duties include: analyzing and evaluating nonexempt jobs using standard procedures; participating in recruitment or compensation surveys for nonexempt jobs; rating applicants using established guides; explaining established policies, procedures, or regulations to employees or management; and performing limited tasks to assist higher level specialists in employee development, employee relations, and labor  Labor relations specialists who negotiate with labor unions as the principal representative of their overall organization;  e.  Specialists with matchable titles (e.g., labor relations specialist, equal opportunity specialist) which are not part of the establishment's personnel program;  relations programs. f.  Specialists in other occupations (e.g., nursing, organizational development,  Personnel Specialist III  payroll, safety and health, security, and training), even if these positions are part of the establishment’s personnel program; g.  h.  Operations. Performs moderately complex assignments following established policies and guidelines. Work requires experience both in a personnel specialty and in the organization serviced. Advises management on the solution to personnel problems of limited scope for which there are precedents. Renders advice concerning own specialty, but discusses impact on other personnel areas. Works independently under specified objectives; closer supervision is provided for complex assignments, precedent-setting actions, and actions that impact either other functional areas or key working  Positions not requiring: (1) three years of administrative, technical, or substantive clerical experience; (2) a bachelor's degree in any field; or (3) any equivalent combination of experience and education yielding basic skills in problem analysis and communication; and Positions employed by personnel supply service establishments (S.I.C. 736).  relationships.  Classification by level  Program evaluation and development. Assists higher level specialists or managers by  Establishment positions which meet the above criteria are matched at one of six  studying less complex aspects of personnel programs (e.g., merit promotions, incentive awards), resolving problems of average difficulty, and reporting findings to be included  levels. Primary leveling concepts are presented for each of the three options: (1) operations, (2) program evaluation, and (3) program development. These leveling  in evaluation reports.  concepts take precedent over typical duties and responsibilities in determining the level of a match. Job duties that are "moderately complex" in one establishment may be  Typical duties include: analyzing, evaluating, and defining both exempt and nonexempt jobs in various occupational groups using established procedures; participating in surveys of broad compensation areas; recruiting and screening applicants for both exempt and nonexempt jobs, checking references and recommending placement, assisting in identifying training needs and arranging training, initiating personnel actions or awards, and interpreting established personnel policy, regulations, and precedents; or participating in preparing for and conducting labor negotiations.  "procedural" in another establishment.  Personnel Specialist I (operations only) As a trainee, receives classroom and/or on-the-job training in the principles, procedures, and regulations of the personnel program and in the programs, policies, and objectives of the employing organization. Assignments provide experience in applying personnel management principles, procedures and techniques, while performing a variety of uncomplicated tasks under close supervision.  Personnel Specialist IV Operations. Applies to three different work situations. In situation (1), specialists use technical knowledge, skills, and judgment to solve complex technical problems. Advisory services to management are similar to those described at level III. Situation (2) combines typical level III operating skills with comprehensive management advisory services. Advisory services require high technical skills, along with broad personnel knowledge, to solve problems from a total personnel management perspective. In situations (1) and (2), specialists plan and complete work following established program goals and objectives. Their judgments and recommendations are  Personnel Specialist II Operations. Performs standard procedural duties which require the use of personnel management principles and techniques to identify and analyze personnel problems. Provides limited advice to management, such as informing departmental supervisors of typical duty patterns which comprise an occupational level or of types of candidates available for a particular type of job. Receives specific instructions with each new assignment.  relied on for management decisions.  Program evaluation and development. Assists higher level specialists in preliminary  Situation (3) applies to specialists who are solely responsible for performing moderately complex assignments (as described in level III) and for rendering final  phases of evaluation or development. Receives increasingly difficult assignments under close supervisory guidance and review.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-  decisions on assigned personnel matters under general administrative supervision. Responsibilities include planning and scheduling work and coordinating and integrating program(s) with other personnel, management, and operational activities.  relations where the underlying issues are difficult to identify; planning and administering a comprehensive employee development program; or performing labor relations assignments for a large conglomerate.  Program evaluation.  Personnel Specialist VI  Conducts on-site review of personnel actions in several organizational units; determines factual basis for personnel actions, evaluates actions for consistency with established guidelines, and reports significant findings.  Program evaluation.  Typical duties include: analyzing, evaluating, and defining difficult exempt jobs, i.e., those in research and development, administration, law, and computer science; planning and conducting broad compensation surveys and recommending pay and benefit adjustments; developing training plans and procedures for an organizational segment; participating in complex employee-management relations issues such as controversies, poor morale, and high turnover; or developing plans and procedures for labor negotiations in a moderately complex organization.  Applies to three different work situations. In situation (1), specialists evaluate the personnel management program of large, complex organizations. Such evaluations require broad understanding and sensitivity both to the interrelationships between different personnel programs and to complex organizational and management relationships. In situation (2), specialists provide advice to management in improving personnel programs in unusually complex organizations. Such expertise extends beyond knowledge of guidelines, precedents, and technical principles into areas of program management and administration. In situation (3), specialists serve as evaluation experts assigned to uniquely difficult and sensitive personnel problems, e.g., solutions are unusually controversial; specialists are required to persuade and motivate key officials to change major personnel policies or procedures; or problems include serious complaints where facts are vague.  Personnel Specialist V  Program development.  Operations. Applies to two different work situations. In situation (1), specialists solve unusually complex and unprecedented problems which require creative solutions. In situation (2), specialists are assigned complex technical problems (as described in level IV - situation (1) combined with responsibility for providing comprehensive advice to management. Management advisory services are complicated by jobs and organizations that are complex, new, or dynamic, and by the abstract nature of the work processes. Supervision and guidance relate largely to program goals and time schedules. Specialists are authorized to make decisions for their organizations and consult with their supervisors concerning unusual problems and developments.  Supervision received is essentially administrative, with assignments given in terms of broad general objectives and limits.  Program evaluation. Independently evaluates personnel programs to determine the  Supervises three or more personnel specialists and/or clerks and paraprofessionals. Although the work is supervisory in nature, it requires substantial knowledge of personnel policies, procedures, and practices.  Program development. Independently develops supplemental guidelines for existing procedures.  degree to which they are achieving goals and objectives, ascertaining weaknesses in programs and guidelines, and making recommendations for improvements. Conclusions are reported to top management.  PERSONNEL SUPERVISOR/MANAGER (143: Personnel, training, and labor relations specialist)  Excluded are:  Program development.  Applies expertise in modifying procedures and guidelines. Projects are usually narrow in scope, i.e., limited to an occupational field or to a specific program area. May have full technical responsibility for personnel projects, studies, policies, or programs that are less complex than described at level VI.  Typical duties include'. Participating in the development of personnel policies and procedures; analyzing, evaluating, and defining unusually difficult jobs, e.g., those in emerging occupations which lack applicable guidelines, or in organizations so complex and dynamic that it is difficult to determine the extent of a position's responsibility; recruiting candidates for one-of-a-kind jobs; participating in employee-management   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Specialists have full technical responsibility for unusually complex personnel projects, studies, policies, or programs. The scope and impact of these assignments are broad and are of considerable importance to organizational management.  a.  Positions matched to the personnel specialist definition;  b.  Directors of personnel, who service more than 250 employees and have significant responsibility for administering all three of the following functions: Job evaluation, employment and placement, and employee relations and services. In addition, workers in these excluded positions serve top management of their organization as the source of advice on personnel matters and problems;  c.  Labor relations positions which are primarily responsible for negotiating with labor unions as the principal representative of their overall organization;  B-25  d.  Supervisory positions having both a base level below personnel specialist III and requiring technical expertise below personnel specialist IV; and  e.  Positions also having significant responsibility for functional areas beyond personnel (e.g., payroll, purchasing, or administration).  meet completion date; interviews candidates for own unit and recommends hires, promotions, or reassignments; and resolves complaints, referring group grievances and more serious unresolved complaints to higher level supervisors; may reprimand employees. LS-2  Directs a sizable staff (normally 10-20 employees), typically divided into sub-units controlled by subordinate supervisors; advises higher level management on work problems of own unit and the impact on broader programs; collaborates with heads of other units to negotiate and/or coordinate work changes; makes decisions on work or training problems presented by subordinate supervisors; evaluates subordinate supervisors and reviews their evaluations of their employees; selects nonsupervisors (higher level approval is virtually assured) and recommends supervisory selections; and hears group grievances and serious or unresolved complaints. May shift resources among projects and perform long range budget planning.  Note:  In rare instances, supervisory positions responsible for directing a sizable staff (e.g., 10-20 professional employees) may not have subordinate supervisors, but have all other LS-2 responsibilities. Such positions should be matched to LS-2.  LS-3  Directs 2 subordinate supervisory levels and the work force managed typically includes substantially more than 20 employees. Makes major decisions and recommendations (listed below) which have a direct, important,  Classification by Level Supervisory jobs are matched at one of five levels according to two factors: a) base level of work supervised, and b) level of supervision. The table following the explanations of these factors indicates the level of the supervisor for each combination of factors.  Base Level of Work Conceptually, the base level of work is the highest level of nonsupervisory work under the direct or indirect supervision of the supervisor/manager which (when added to the nonsupervisory levels above it) represents at least 25 percent of the total nonsupervisory, nonclerical staff and at least two of the full-time positions supervised. To determine the base level of nonsupervisory, nonclerical work: 1) array the positions by level of difficulty; 2) determine the number of workers in each position; and 3) count down from the highest level (if necessary) until at least 25 percent of the total nonsupervisory, nonclerical staff are represented.  and substantial effect on own organization and work. Performs at least three of the following:  Establishment supervisory positions matched in the personnel specialist series should be counted as "non-supervisory" in computing the base level for personnel supervisor/ manager matches. Due to the unique nature of this particular occupation series, the mechanics of the base level concept are often not applicable in determining the appropriate job level of a personnel supervisor/manager. See Alternative Criteria For Matching Personnel Supervisors/Managers at the end of this definition for assistance in assuring correct job matches.  Level of Supervision Supervisors and managers should be matched at one of the three LS levels below which best describes their supervisory responsibility. LS-1  Plans, coordinates, and evaluates the work of a small staff, normally not more than 10 personnel specialists, paraprofessionals, and clerks; estimates staffing needs for personnel unit and schedules, assigns, and reviews work to   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-26  -  decides what programs and projects should be initiated, dropped, expanded, or curtailed;  -  determines long range plans in response to program changes, evaluates program goals, and redefines objectives;  -  determines changes to be made in organizational structure, delegation of authority, coordination of units, etc.;  -  decides what compromises to make in program operations in view of public relations implications and need for support from various groups;  -  decides on the means to substantially reduce program operating costs without impairing overall operations; justifies major equipment expenditures; and  -  resolves differences between key subordinate officials; decides, or  supervisors and other key subordinates.  financial information, selects appropriate administrative or judicial remedy, and liquidates tax liability through such measures as compromise, installment agreements, and seizure and sale of property or other assets. Establishes liability for and imposes various penalties under State or County revenue codes. Serves summonses, takes testimony under oath, and testifies in court.  Table B-2. Criteria for matching personnel supervisors/managers Base level of nonsupervisory job(s) matched in the personnel specialist definition III IV V VI  LS-1  Level of supervisor LS-2 LS-3  I II III IV  II III IV V  Work typically requires at least three years experience in general business or financial practices or the equivalent in education and experience combined. Level I is primarily for training and development. Level II is the full working level for tax collectors who follow standard procedures and level III includes specialists, team leaders, and quasi­ supervisors solving moderately complex tax collection problems.  III IV V Exclude  Tax collection involves two overlapping functions - returns investigation and Returns investigations involve analyzing financial records, examining taxpayer's situation or business operations, and counseling taxpayers on statutory requirements and preparation of delinquent returns. Tax collectors primarily performing returns investigation work are not typically found above level II.  collection of delinquent taxes. Table B-3. Level equivalents of personnel professional occupations Personnel Specialist I II III IV V VI  Personnel Supervisor/Manager  I II III IV V  Director of Personnel  Collection of delinquent taxes involves analyzing a taxpayer's financial worth and ability to pay. In resolving delinquency, tax collectors evaluate (or use appraisers to evaluate): market value of assets; equity shares of other creditors; liens and ownership rights; taxpayer earning capacity; and the potential of taxpayer businesses. If bankruptcy is imminent, tax collectors file notices of lien to give their agency priority over subsequent creditors. If necessary, collectors take action for seizure and make arrangements for selling property. However, before resorting to enforced collection procedures, they may recommend alternatives such as installment payments, appointing escrow agents, or accepting collateral or mortgage arrangements to protect their agency's equity.  I II III IV V  Excluded are:  Alternative criteria for matching Personnel Supervisor/Managers a.  a.  Tax collection supervisors. Incumbents in these full supervisory positions typically assign, coordinate, and review work; estimate personnel needs and schedules; evaluate performance; resolve complaints; and make recommendations for hiring and firing; and  b.  Tax auditors responsible for determining taxpayer liability.  Base level artificially low. The leanness of subordinate staff often combines with the appropriate LS level to produce a level of supervisor/manager which is below the supervisor/manager's level of technical expertise, as measured by the personnel specialist definition. In these instances, raise the level of the supervisor/manager match to correlate to the equivalent level of personnel specialist (see chart above).  Tax Collector I  TAX COLLECTOR (1139: Officials and administrators, public administration, not elsewhere classified)  Receives formal training in: internal revenue laws, regulations, and procedures; collection enforcement techniques and laws of evidence and procedures; and business fundamentals. On-the-job training is provided and progressively broader assignments are given for development purposes. Most assignments are simple, although more difficult work such as that encountered at level II may be performed under close supervision and guidance. Individuals hired typically have 1-2 years experience in  Collects delinquent taxes, canvasses for unreported taxes due, secures delinquent tax returns, and counsels taxpayers on filing and paying obligations. Tax collection typically begins after office examination of tax returns and financial records and subsequent notices of tax liability fail to collect full payment. Obtains and analyzes   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-27  business law, or related field of study.  May test run new or modified programs and assist in modifying systems or programs. Included within the scope of this definition are fully qualified computer operators, trainees working to become fully qualified operators, and lead operators providing  Tax Collector II  technical assistance to lower level positions.  Follows standard procedures to collect delinquent tax accounts and secure delinquent returns. Receives specific assignments from supervisor and works out details independently. Explains to tax debtors sanctions which may be used in the event of nonpayment and procedures for appealing tax bills or assessments. Compiles prescribed records and reports. Refers problems to supervisor which cannot be resolved by applying standard procedures.  Excluded are:  accounting, loan, collection, or related area or equivalent education in accounting,  a.  Workers operating small computer systems where there is little or no opportunity for operator intervention in program processing and few requirements to correct equipment malfunctions;  b.  Peripheral equipment operators and remote terminal or computer operators who do not run the control console of either a mainframe digital computer or a group of minicomputers;  Tax Collector III As a tax collection specialist, team leader, or quasi-supervisor, conducts moderately complex investigations to detect or verify suspected tax violations according to established rules, regulations, and tax ordinances. Selects methods of approach, resolves problems referred by lower level tax collectors, and applies all remedies available to collect delinquent taxes. Prepares comprehensive records and reports. Trains lower level tax collectors and assists them in uniformly enforcing tax laws. May also assign, review, and coordinate work of lower level tax collectors.  c.  Workers using the computer for scientific, technical, or mathematical work when a knowledge of the subject matter is required; and  d.  Positions above level V; in addition to level V responsibilities, workers in these excluded positions use a knowledge of program language, computer features, and software systems to assist in (1) maintaining, modifying, and developing operating systems or programs; (2) developing operating instructions and techniques to cover problem situations; and (3) switching to emergency backup  Technical COMPUTER OPERATOR  procedures.  .  Computer Operator I  (4612: Computer operator)  -  Studies operating instructions to determine equipment setup needed;  Receives on-the-job training in operating the control console (sometimes augmented by classroom training). Works under close personal supervision and is provided detailed written or oral guidance before and during assignments. As instructed, resolves common operating problems. May serve as an assistant operator working under close supervision or performing a portion of a more senior operator's work.  -  Loads equipment with required items (tapes, cards, paper, etc.);  Computer Operator It_________  -  Switches necessary auxiliary equipment into system;  -  Starts and operates control console;  -  Diagnoses and corrects equipment malfunctions;  Processes scheduled routines which present few difficult operating problems (e.g., infrequent or easily resolved error conditions). In response to computer output instructions or error conditions, applies standard operating or corrective procedure. Refers problems which do not respond to preplanned procedure. May serve as an assistant operator, working under general supervision.  -  Reviews error messages and makes corrections during operation or refers  Monitors and operates the control console of either a mainframe digital computer or a group of minicomputers, in accordance with operating instructions, to process data. Work is characterized by the following:  Computer Operator III  -  - -_____________________ ,  .1  ________  problems; -  Processes a range of scheduled routines. In addition to operating the system and resolving common error conditions, diagnoses and acts on machine stoppage and error  Maintains operating record.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-28  conditions not fully covered by existing procedures and guidelines (e.g., resetting switches and other controls or making mechanical adjustments to maintain or restore equipment operations). In response to computer output instructions or error conditions, may deviate from standard procedures if standard procedures do not provide a solution. Refers problems which do not respond to corrective procedures.  b.  Illustrators or graphic artists using artistic ability to prepare illustrations;  c.  Office drafters preparing charts, diagrams, and room arrangements to depict statistical and administrative data;  d.  Cartographers preparing maps and charts primarily using a technical knowledge of cartography;  e.  Positions below level I; workers in these trainee positions either (1) trace or copy finished drawings under close supervision or (2) receive instruction in the elementary methods and techniques of drafting; and  f.  Supervisors.  Computer Operator IV Adapts to a variety of nonstandard problems which require extensive operator intervention (e.g., frequent introduction of new programs, applications, or procedures). In response to computer output instructions or error conditions, chooses or devises a course of action from among several alternatives and alters or deviates from standard procedures if standard procedures do not provide a solution (e.g, reassigning equipment in order to work around faulty equipment or transfer channels); then refers problems. Typically, completed work is submitted to users without supervisory review.  Positions are classified into levels based on the following definitions.  Computer Operator V Prepares drawings of simple, easily visualized structures, systems, parts or equipment from sketches or marked-up prints. Selects appropriate templates or uses a compass and other equipment needed to complete assignments. Drawings fit familiar patterns and present few technical problems. Supervisor provides detailed instructions on new assignments, gives guidance when questions arise, and reviews completed work for accuracy. Typical assignments include:  Resolves a variety of difficult operating problems (e.g., making unusual equipment connections and rarely used equipment and channel configurations to direct processing through or around problems in equipment, circuits, or channels or reviewing test run requirements and developing unusual system configurations that will allow test programs to process without interfering with on-going job requirements). In response to computer output instructions and error conditions or to avoid loss of information or to conserve computer time, operator deviates from standard procedures. Such actions may materially alter the computer unit's production plans. May spend considerable time away from the control station providing technical assistance to lower level operators and assisting programmers, systems analysts, and subject matter specialists in resolving problems.  From marked-up prints, revises the original drawings of a plumbing system by increasing pipe diameters. From sketches, draws building floor plans, determining size, spacing, and arrangement of freehand lettering according to scale. Draws simple land profiles from predetermined structural dimensions and reduced survey notes. Traces river basin maps and enters symbols to denote stream sampling locations, municipal and industrial waste discharges, and water supplies.  DRAFTER_____________________________________________________ (372: Drafting occupation) Performs drafting work, manually or using a computer, requiring knowledge and skill in drafting methods, procedures, and techniques. Prepares drawings of structures, facilities, land profiles, water systems, mechanical and electrical equipment, pipelines, duct systems, and similar equipment, systems, and assemblies. Drawings are used to communicate engineering ideas, designs, and information. Uses recognized systems of symbols, legends, shadings, and lines having specific meanings in drawings.  Drafter II Prepares various drawings of such units as construction projects or parts and assemblies, including various views, sectional profiles, irregular or reverse curves, hidden lines, and small or intricate details. Work requires use of most of the conventional drafting techniques and a working knowledge of the terms and procedures of the occupation. Makes arithmetic computations using standard formulas. Familiar or recurring work is assigned in general terms. Unfamiliar assignments include information on methods, procedures, sources of information, and precedents to follow.  Excluded are: a.  Designers using technical knowledge and judgment to conceive, plan, or modify designs;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-29  drawings of printed circuit boards.  Simple revisions to existing drawings may be assigned with a verbal explanation of the desired results. More complex revisions are produced from sketches or specifications which clearly depict the desired product. Typical assignments include: From a layout and manual references, prepares several views of a simple gear system. Obtains dimensions and tolerances from manuals and by measuring the layout.  From precedents, drafting standards, and established practices, prepares final construction drawings for floodgates, navigation locks, dams, bridges, culverts, levees, channel excavations, dikes, and berms; prepares boring profiles, typical cross-sections, and land profiles; and delineates related topographical details as required.  Draws base and elevation views, sections, and details of new bridges or other structures; revises complete sets of roadway drawings for highway construction projects; or prepares block maps, indicating water and sewage line locations.  Prepares final drawings for street paving and widening or for water and sewer lines having complex trunk lines; reduces field notes and calculates true grades. From engineering designs, lays out plan, profile and detail appurtenances required; notifies supervisor of conflicting details in design.  Prepares and revises detail and design drawings for such projects as the construction and installation of electrical or electronic equipment, plant wiring, and the manufacture and assembly of printed circuit boards. Drawings typically include details of mountings, frames, guards, or other accessories; conduit layouts; or wiring diagrams indicating transformer sizes, conduit locations and mountings.  Note:  Drafter IV  ~  Works closely with design originators, preparing drawings of unusual, complex, or original designs which require a high degree of precision. Performs unusually difficult  Drafter III  assignments requiring considerable initiative, resourcefulness, and drafting expertise. Assures that anticipated problems in manufacture, assembly, installation, and operation are resolved by the drawings produced. Exercises independent judgment in selecting and interpreting data based on a knowledge of the design intent. Although working primarily as a drafter, may occasionally interpret general designs prepared by others to complete minor details. May provide advice and guidance to lower level drafters or serve as coordinator and planner for large and complex drafting projects.  Prepares complete sets of complex drawings which include multiple views, detail drawings, and assembly drawings. Drawings include complex design features that require considerable drafting skill to visualize and portray. Assignments regularly require the use of mathematical formulas to draw land contours or to compute weights, center of gravity, load capacities, dimensions, quantities of material, etc. Works from sketches, models, and verbal information supplied by an engineer, architect, or designer to determine the most appropriate views, detail drawings, and supplementary information needed to complete assignments. Selects required information from precedents, manufacturers' catalogs, and technical guides. Independently resolves most of the problems encountered. Supervisor or design originator may suggest methods of approach or provide advice on unusually difficult problems. Typical assignments include:  ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN_________  ,,  •__________  (371: Engineering technologist and technicians) To be covered by these definitions, employees must meet all of the following criteria:  From layouts or sketches, prepares complete sets of drawings of test equipment to be manufactured. Several cross-sectional and subassembly drawings are required. From information supplied by the design originator and from technical handbooks and manuals, describes dimensions, tolerances, fits, fabrication techniques, and standard parts to use in manufacturing the equipment. From electronic schematics, information as to maximum size, and manuals giving dimensions of standard parts, determines the arrangement and prepares   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Excludes drafters performing work of similar difficulty to that described at this level but who provide support for a variety of organizations which have widely differing functions or requirements.  1.  Provides semiprofessional technical support for engineers working in such areas as research, design, development, testing, or manufacturing process improvement.  2.  Work pertains to electrical, electronic, or mechanical components or equipment.  3.  Required to have some practical knowledge of science or engineering; some positions may also require a practical knowledge of mathematics or computer science.  Included are workers who prepare design drawings and assist with the design,  B-30  Technical adequacy of routine work is reviewed on completion; nonroutine work may also be reviewed in progress. Performs at this level one or a combination of such typical duties as:  evaluation, and/or modification of machinery and equipment. Excluded are: a.  Production and maintenance workers, including workers engaged in calibrating, repairing, or maintaining electronic equipment (see Maintenance Electronics Technician);  b.  Model makers and other craft workers;  c.  Quality control technicians and testers;  d.  Chemical and other nonengineering laboratory technicians;  e.  Civil engineering technicians and drafters;  f.  Positions (below level I) which are limited to simple tasks such as: Measuring items or regular shapes with a caliper and computing cross-sectional areas; identifying, weighing, and marking easy-to identify items; or recording simple instrument readings at specified intervals; and  g.  Following specific instructions, assembles or constructs simple or standard equipment or parts; may service or repair simple instruments or equipment; Conducts a variety of tests using established methods. Prepares test specimens, adjusts and operates equipment, and records test data, pointing out deviations resulting from equipment malfunction or observational errors. Extracts engineering data from various prescribed but nonstandardized sources; processes the data following well-defined methods including elementary algebra and geometry; presents the data in prescribed form.  Engineering Technician Hi  Performs assignments that are not completely standardized or prescribed. Selects or adapts standard procedures or equipment, using precedents that are not fully applicable. Receives initial instruction, equipment requirements, and advice from supervisor or engineer as needed; performs recurring work independently; work is reviewed for technical adequacy or conformity with instructions. Performs at this level one or a combination of such typical duties as:  Engineers required to apply a professional knowledge of engineering theory and principles.  ( V-.- V ■■ • -• V -.  .VO.... - ^  y  _____________ !  mMm  Constructs components, subunits, or simple models and adapts standard equipment. May troubleshoot and correct malfunctions requiring simple solutions.  Performs simple routine tasks under close supervision or from detailed procedures. Work is checked in progress or on completion. Performs one or a combination of such typical duties as:  Follows specific layout and scientific diagrams to construct and package simple devices and subunits of equipment.  Assembles or installs equipment or parts requiring simple wiring, soldering, or connecting.  Conducts various tests or experiments which may require minor modifications in test setups or procedures as well as subjective judgments in measurement; selects, sets up, and operates standard test equipment and records test data.  Performs simple or routine tasks or tests such as tensile or hardness tests; operates and adjusts simple test equipment; records test data.  Extracts and compiles a variety of engineering data from field notes, manuals, lab reports, etc.; processes data, identifying errors or inconsistencies; selects methods of data presentation.  Gathers and maintains specified records of engineering data such as tests, drawings, etc.; performs computations by substituting numbers in specified formulas; plots data and draws simple curves and graphs.  Assists in design modification by compiling data related to designs, specifications, and materials which are pertinent to specific items of equipment or component parts. Develops information concerning previous operational failures and modifications. Uses judgment and initiative to recognize inconsistencies or gaps in data and seek sources to clarify information.  Engineering Technician II Performs standardized or prescribed assignments involving a sequence of related operations. Follows standard work methods on recurring assignments but receives explicit instructions on unfamiliar assignments. May become familiar with the operation and design of equipment and with maintenance procedures and standards.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-31  Performs nonroutine assignments of substantial variety and complexity, using operational precedents which are not fully applicable. Such assignments, which are typically parts of broader assignments, are screened to eliminate unusual design problems. May also plan such assignments. Receives technical advice from supervisor or engineer; work is reviewed for technical adequacy (or conformity with instructions). May be assisted by lower level technicians and have frequent contact with professionals and others within the establishment. Performs at this level one or a combination of such typical duties as: Develops or reviews designs by extracting and analyzing a variety of engineering data. Applies conventional engineering practices to develop, prepare, or recommend schematics, designs, specifications, electrical drawings, and parts lists. Examples of designs include: detailed circuit diagrams; hardware fittings or test equipment involving a variety of mechanisms; conventional piping systems; and building site layouts. Conducts tests or experiments requiring selection and adaptation or modification of a wide variety of critical test equipment and test procedures; sets up and operates equipment; records data, measures and records problems of significant complexity that sometimes require resolution at a higher level; and analyzes data and prepares test reports. Applies methods outlined by others to limited segments of research and development projects; constructs experimental or prototype models to meet engineering requirements; conducts tests or experiments and redesigns as necessary; and records and evaluates data and reports findings.  Engineering Technician V^-  ! • —u#. •• y-;  Performs nonroutine and complex assignments involving responsibility for planning and conducting a complete project of relatively limited scope or a portion of a larger and more diverse project. Selects and adapts plans, techniques, designs, or layouts. Contacts personnel in related activities to resolve problems and coordinate the work; reviews, analyzes, and integrates the technical work of others. Supervisor or professional engineer outlines objectives, requirements, and design approaches; completed work is reviewed for technical adequacy and satisfaction of requirements. May train and be assisted by lower level technicians. Performs at this level one or a combination of such typical duties as:  Plans or assists in planning tests to evaluate equipment performance. Determines test requirements, equipment modification, and test procedures; conducts tests using all types of instruments, analyzes and evaluates test results, and prepares reports on findings and recommendations.  Engineering Technician VI  __________ ■  .  ■  ;;  Independently plans and accomplishes complete projects or studies of broad scope and complexity. Or serves as an expert in a narrow aspect of a particular field of engineering, e.g., environmental factors affecting electronic engineering. Complexity of assignments typically requires considerable creativity and judgment to devise approaches to accomplish work, resolve design and operational problems, and make decisions in situations where standard engineering methods, procedures, and techniques may not be applicable. Supervisor or professional engineer provides advice on unusual or controversial problems or policy matters; completed work is reviewed for compliance with overall project objectives. May supervise or train and be assisted by lower level technicians. Performs, at this level, one or a combination of such typical duties as: Prepares designs and specifications for various complex equipment or systems (e.g., a heating system in an office building, or new electronic components such as solid state devices for instrumentation equipment). Plans approach to solve design problems; conceives and recommends new design techniques; resolves design problems with contract personnel, and assures compatibility of design with other parts of the system. Designs and coordinates test set ups and experiments to prove or disprove the feasibility of preliminary design; uses untried and untested measurement techniques; and improves the performance of the equipment. May advise equipment users on redesign to solve unique operational deficiencies. Plans approach and conducts various experiments to develop equipment or systems characterized by (a) difficult performance requirements because of conflicting attributes such as versatility, size, and ease of operation; or (b) unusual combination of techniques or components. Arranges for  Designs, develops, and constructs major units, devices, or equipment; conducts tests or experiments; analyzes results and redesigns or modifies equipment to improve performance; and reports results.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  From general guidelines and specifications (e.g., size or weight requirements), develops designs for equipment without critical performance requirements which are difficult to satisfy such as engine parts, research instruments, or special purpose circuitry. Analyzes technical data to determine applicability to design problems; selects from several possible design layouts; calculates design data; and prepares layouts, detailed specifications, parts lists, estimates, procedures, etc. May check and analyze drawings or equipment to determine adequacy of drawings and design.  B-32  fabrication of pilot models and determines test procedures and design of special test equipment.  ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN, CIVIL OR SURVEY TECHNICIAN/CONSTRUCTION INSPECTOR (1472: Construction inspector) (3733: Surveying technician)  Engineering Technician, Civil or Survey Technician/Construction Inspector I Performs simple, routine tasks under close supervision or from detailed procedures. Work is checked in progress and on completion. Performs a variety of such typical duties as: Data compilation - compiles engineering data from tests, drawings, specifications or field notes; performs arithmetic computations by substituting values in specified formulas; plots data and draws simple curves and graphs.  Provides semiprofessional support to engineers or related professionals engaged in the planning, design, management, or supervision of the construction (or alteration) of such structures as buildings, streets and highways, airports, sanitary systems, or flood control systems. Applies knowledge of the methods, equipment, and techniques of several of the following support functions:  Testing - conducts simple or repetitive tests on soils, concrete and aggregates; e.g. sieve analysis, slump tests and moisture content determination. Surveying - performs routine and established functions such as holding range poles or rods where special procedures are required or directing the placement of surveyor's chain or tape and selecting measurement points.  Data compilation and analysis/design and specification - gathering, tabulating and/or analyzing hydrologic and meteorologic information, quantities of materials required, traffic patterns, or other engineering data; preparing detailed site layouts and specifications; and reviewing and analyzing design drawings for feasibility, performance, safety, durability, and design content.  Construction inspection - makes simple measurements and observations; may make preliminary recommendations concerning the acceptance of materials or workmanship in clear-cut situations.  Testing - measuring the physical characteristics of soil, rock, concrete or other construction materials to determine methods and quantities required or to comply with safety and quality standards;  Engineering Technician, Civil or Survey Technician/Construction Inspector II  Surveying - measuring or determining distances, elevations, areas, angles, land boundaries or other features of the earth's surface; or  Performs standard or prescribed assignments involving a sequence of related operations. Follows standard work methods and receives detailed instructions on unfamiliar assignments. Technical adequacy of routine work is assessed upon completion; nonroutine work is reviewed in progress. Performs a variety of such typical duties as:  Construction inspection and monitoring - performing on-site inspection of construction projects to determine conformance with contract specifications and building codes. Levels V and VI include positions responsible for monitoring and controlling construction projects.  Data compilation and analysis - compiles and examines a variety of data required by engineers for project planning (e.g., hydrologic and sedimentation data; earthwork quantities), applying simple algebraic or geometric formulas.  Excluded are building, electrical, and mechanical inspectors; construction, maintenance, and craft workers; chemical or other physical science technicians; engineers required to apply professional rather than technical knowledge of engineering to their work; and technicians not primarily concerned with civil or construction engineering.  Testing - conducts a variety of standard tests on soils, concrete and aggregates, e.g., determines the liquid and plastic limits of soils or the flexural and compressive strength, air content and elasticity of concrete. Examines test results and explains unusual findings.  Also excluded are technicians below level I whose work is limited to very simple and routine tasks, such as identifying, weighing and marking easy-to-identify items or recording simple instrument readings at specified intervals.  Surveying - applies specialized knowledge, skills or judgment to a varied and complex sequence of standard operations, e.g., surveys small land areas using rod, tape and hand level to estimate volume to be excavated; or records data  Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-33  Engineering Technician, Civil or Survey Technician/Construction Inspector IV  requiring numerous calculations. Construction inspection - Applies a variety of techniques in inspecting less complex projects, e.g., the quality, quantity, and placement of gravel for road construction; excavations; and concrete footings for structures. Determines compliance with plans and specifications. May assist in inspecting more complex projects.  Plans and performs nonroutine assignments of substantial variety and complexity. Selects appropriate guidelines to resolve problems which are not fully covered by precedents. Performs recurring work independently, receiving technical advice as needed. Performs a variety of such typical duties as:  Engineering Technician, Civil or Survey Technician/Construction Inspector III  Design and specification - prepares site layouts for projects from such information as design criteria, soil conditions, existing buildings, topography and survey data; sketches plans for grading sites; and makes preliminary cost estimates from established unit prices. OR Reviews and develops plans, specifications, and cost estimates for standard modifications to the interior system (e.g. electrical) of a small, conventional building.  Performs assignments which include nonstandard applications, analyses or tests; or the use of complex instruments. Selects or adapts standard procedures using fully applicable precedents. Receives initial instructions, requirements and advice as needed; performs recurring work independently. Work is reviewed for technical adequacy and conformance with instructions. Performs a variety of such typical duties as:  Testing - conducts tests which require the selection and substantial modification of equipment and procedures. Recognizes and interprets subtle, i.e., fluctuating, test reactions.  Data compilation and analysis - applies knowledge and judgment in selecting sources, evaluating data and adapting methods, e.g., computes, from file notes, quantities of materials required for roads which include retaining walls and culverts; plots profiles, cross sections and drainage areas for a small earthwork dam.  Surveying - makes exacting measurements under difficult conditions e.g., leads detached observing unit on surveys involving unusually heavy urban, rail or highway traffic; serves as party chief on conventional construction, property, topographical, hydrographic or geodetic surveys. Excluded are party chiefs responsible for unusually difficult or complex surveys.  Design and specification - assists in preparing plans and layouts for modifying specific structures, systems, or components by compiling pertinent design, specifications, and survey data. From detailed notes and instructions, prepares simple sketches or drawings for excavation, embankment, or structures to assist survey team in staking out work and in computing quantities.  Construction inspection - performs inspections for a variety of complete projects of limited size and complexity or a phase of a larger project, e.g., conventional one or two story concrete and steel buildings; park and forest road construction limited to clearing, grading and drainage. Interprets plans and specifications, resolves differences between plans and specifications, and approves minor deviations in methods which conform to established precedents.  Testing - conducts tests for which established procedures and equipment require either adaptation or the construction of auxiliary devices. Uses judgment to interpret precise test results.  Engineering Technician, Civil or Survey Technician/Construction Inspector V  Surveying - uses a variety of complex instruments to measure angles and elevations, applying judgment and skill in selecting and describing field information. Assignments include: recording complete and detailed descriptive data and providing sketches of relief, drainage and culture; or running short traverse lines from specified points along unobstructed routes.  Performs nonroutine and complex assignments involving responsibility for planning and conducting a complete project of limited scope or a portion of a larger, more complex project. Selects and adapts techniques, designs, or layouts. Reviews, analyzes and interprets the technical work of others. Completed work is reviewed for technical adequacy. Recommendations for major changes or costly alterations to basic designs are approved by supervisor. Performs a variety of such typical duties as:  Construction inspection - independently inspects standard procedures, items or operations of limited difficulty, e.g., slope, embankment, grading, moisture content, earthwork compaction, concrete forms, reinforcing rods or simple batching and placement of concrete on road construction.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Design and specification - prepares plans and specifications for major projects  B-34  such as roads and airport runways, bridge spans, highway structures, or electrical distribution systems. Applies established engineering practice; calculates dimensions, elevations, and quantities; and selects and adapts precedents to meet specific requirements. Applies applicable standards and guidelines in resolving design problems; refers difficult or novel requirements to supervisor. Construction inspection - Inspects projects of unusual difficulty and complexity, e.g., large multi-story hospitals or laboratories which include sophisticated electrical and mechanical equipment; airport runways for jet aircraft with exacting requirements. Independently interprets plans and specifications to resolve complex construction problems. Construction monitoring - Monitors progress of specialized phases of construction projects. For example, develops or revises specifications for clearing land for excavation; and building access roads, utilities, construction offices, testing facilities, and maintenance and storage facilities. OR Investigates prospective contractor's capabilities, operating methods, and equipment; or reviews contractor's cost estimates and operating reports for use in computing periodic payments.  Protective Service CORRECTIONS OFFICER (5133: Correctional institution officer) Maintains order among inmates in a State prison or local jail. Performs routine duties in accordance with established policies, regulations, and procedures to guard and supervise inmates in cells, at meals, during recreation, and on work assignments. May, if necessary, employ weapons or force to maintain discipline and order. Typical duties include: Taking periodic inmate counts; searching inmates and cells for contraband articles; inspecting locks, window bars, grills, doors, and grates for tampering; aiding in prevention of escapes and taking part in searches for escaped inmates; and escorting inmates to and from different areas for questioning, medical treatment, work, and meals. May act as outside or wall guard, usually on rotation. Excluded are: a.  Workers receiving on-the-job training in basic correctional officer activities; and  b.  Positions responsible for providing counselling or rehabilitation services to inmates.  Engineering Technician, Civil or Survey Technician/Construction Inspector VI  FIREFIGHTER Independently plans and accomplishes complete conventional projects or serves as an expert in a narrow aspect of a civil engineering field. Applies creativity and judgment to plan projects, resolve design problems, and adapt equipment, procedures, or techniques. Recommendations, plans, designs, and reports are reviewed for general adequacy and soundness of engineering judgment. Supervisor provides advice on unusual or controversial problems or policy matters. May direct or train lower level technicians. Design and specification - Develops cost estimates for competitive bidding for a variety of multiple-use construction projects. Determines the construction processes involved, along with coordination and scheduling requirements. Compares types and capacities of construction equipment and calculates detailed cost estimates. OR Prepares designs and specifications for various utility systems of complex facilities; resolves design problems by adapting precedents or developing new design features.  (5123: Firefighting occupation) As a full-time paid member of the fire department, combats, extinguishes, and prevents fires and performs rescue operations in structural and airfield environments. Performs maintenance on own equipment and quarters. Wears protective clothing and breathing devices; drives fire and crash equipment; and operates a variety of firefighting equipment such as hoses, extinguishers, ladders and axes. May hold national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician. Excluded are: a.  Fire academy cadets;  b.  Positions receiving additional compensation for driving and operating structural pumpers and crash vehicles; and  c.  Work leaders and supervisors.  Construction inspection and monitoring - Inspects and monitors progress of multi-use construction projects typically requiring more than a year for completion. Uses a knowledge of construction systems, practices, and processes to determine if projects are progressing according to contract requirements and organizational policies.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  POLICE OFFICER (5132: Police and detective, public service) Enforces laws established for the protection of persons and property, by detaining,  B-35  arresting, interrogating, and incarcerating suspected violators, and appearing as a witness at trials. Work is performed in uniform or civilian clothes and officers are typically armed.  distribution codes; examining and verifying the clerical accuracy of various types of reports, lists, calculations, postings, etc.; preparing journal vouchers; or making entries or adjustments to accounts.  Excluded are:  Levels I and II require a basic knowledge of routine clerical methods and office practices and procedures as they relate to the clerical processing and recording of transactions and accounting information. Levels III and IV require a knowledge and understanding of the established and standardized bookkeeping and accounting procedures and techniques used in an accounting system, or a segment of an accounting system, where there are few variations in the types of transactions handled. In addition, some jobs at each level may require a basic knowledge and understanding of the terminology, codes, and processes used in an automated accounting system.  a.  Supervisory positions;  b.  Criminal investigators;  c.  Police detectives and specialists performing duties above those described for Police Officer II;  d.  Positions requiring the operation of an aircraft: and  e.  Police academy cadets and positions receiving on-the-job training and experience in basic police activities.  Performs very simple and routine accounting clerical operations, for example, recognizing and comparing easily identified numbers and codes on similar and repetitive accounting documents, verifying mathematical accuracy, and identifying discrepancies and bringing them to the supervisor's attention. Supervisor gives clear and detailed instructions for specific assignments. Employee refers to supervisor all matters not covered by instructions. Work is closely controlled and reviewed in detail for accuracy, adequacy, and adherence to instructions.  Police Officer I Carries out general and specific assignments from superior officers in accordance with established rules and procedures. Maintains order, enforces laws and ordinances, and protects life and property in an assigned patrol district or beat by performing a combination of such duties as: patrolling a specific area on foot or in a vehicle; directing traffic; issuing traffic summonses; investigating accidents; apprehending and arresting suspects; processing prisoners; and protecting scenes of major crimes. May participate with detectives or investigators in conducting surveillance operations.  Clerk, Accounting II Performs one or more routine accounting clerical operations, such as: examining, verifying, and correcting accounting transactions to ensure completeness and accuracy of data and proper identification of accounts, and checking that expenditures will not exceed obligations in specified accounts; totaling, balancing, and reconciling collection vouchers; posting data to transaction sheets where employee identifies proper accounts and items to be posted; and coding documents in accordance with a chart (listing) of accounts. Employee follows specific and detailed accounting procedures. Completed work is reviewed for accuracy and compliance with procedures.  Police Officer II In addition to the basic police duties described at level I, receives additional compensation to specialize in one or more activities, such as: canine patrol; special reaction teams (e.g., special weapons assault team, special operations reaction team); juvenile cases; hostage negotiations; and participating in investigations (e.g., stakeout, surveillance) or other enforcement activities requiring specialized training and skills.  Clerk, Accounting IIIi  Clerical  Uses a knowledge of double entry bookkeeping in performing one or more of the following: posts actions to journals, identifying subsidiary accounts affected and debit and credit entries to be made and assigning proper codes; reviews computer printouts against manually maintained journals, detecting and correcting erroneous postings, and preparing documents to adjust accounting classifications and other data; or reviews lists of transactions rejected by an automated system, determining reasons for rejections, and preparing necessary correcting material. On routine assignments, employee selects and applies established procedures and techniques. Detailed instructions are provided for  CLERK, ACCOUNTING (4712: Bookkeeper and accounting and auditing clerk) Performs one or more accounting tasks, such as posting to registers and ledgers; balancing and reconciling accounts; verifying the internal consistency, completeness, and mathematical accuracy of accounting documents; assigning prescribed accounting   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-36  difficult or unusual assignments. Completed work and methods used are reviewed for technical accuracy.  operation, or filing; and other workers, such as secretaries, messengers, receptionists or public information specialists who perform general clerical tasks incidental to their primary duties.  Clerk, Accounting IV Clerk, General I Maintains journals or subsidiary ledgers of an accounting system and balances and reconciles accounts. Typical duties include one or both of the following: reviews invoices and statements (verifying information, ensuring sufficient funds have been obligated, and if questionable, resolving with the submitting unit, determining accounts involved, coding transactions, and processing material through data processing for application in the accounting system); and/or analyzes and reconciles computer printouts with operating unit reports (contacting units and researching causes of discrepancies, and taking action to ensure that accounts balance). Employee resolves problems in recurring assignments in accordance with previous training and experience. Supervisor provides suggestions for handling unusual or nonrecurring transactions. Conformance with requirements and technical soundness of completed work are reviewed by the supervisor or are controlled by mechanisms built into the accounting system. Note:  Excluded from level IV are positions responsible for maintaining either a general ledger or a general ledger in combination with subsidiary accounts.  CLERK, GENERAL_____________________________________________ (463: General office occupation) Performs a combination of clerical tasks to support office, business, or administrative operations, such as: maintaining records; receiving, preparing, or verifying documents; searching for and compiling information and data; responding to routine requests with standard answers (by phone, in person, or by correspondence). The work requires a basic knowledge of proper office procedures. Workers at levels I, II, and III follow prescribed procedures or steps to process paperwork; they may perform other routine office support work, (e.g., typing, filing, or operating a keyboard controlled data entry device to transcribe data into a form suitable for data processing). Workers at level IV are also required to make decisions about the adequacy and content of transactions handled in addition to following proper procedures.  Follows a few clearly detailed procedures in performing simple repetitive tasks in the same sequence, such as filing precoded documents in a chronological file or operating office equipment, e.g., mimeograph, photocopy, addressograph or mailing machine.  Clerk, General H Follows a number of specific procedures in completing several repetitive clerical steps performed in a prescribed or slightly varied sequence, such as coding and filing documents in an extensive alphabetical file, simple posting to individual accounts, opening mail, running mail through metering machines, and calculating and posting charges to departmental accounts. Little or no subject-matter knowledge is required, but the clerk needs to choose the proper procedure for each task.  Clerk, General III Work requires a familiarity with the terminology of the office unit. Selects appropriate methods from a wide variety of procedures or makes simple adaptations and interpretations of a limited number of substantive guides and manuals. The clerical steps often vary in type or sequence, depending on the task. Recognized problems are referred to others. Typical duties include a combination of the following: maintaining time and material records, taking inventory of equipment and supplies, answering questions on departmental services and functions, operating a variety of office machines, posting to various books, balancing a restricted group of accounts to controlling accounts, and assisting in preparation of budgetary requests. May oversee work of lower level clerks.  Clerk, General IV Uses some subject-matter knowledge and judgment to complete assignments consisting of numerous steps that vary in nature and sequence. Selects from alternative methods and refers problems not solvable by adapting or interpreting substantive guides, manuals, or procedures.  Clerical work is controlled (e.g., through spot checks, complete review, or subsequent processing) for both quantity and quality. Supervisors (or other employees) are available to assist and advise clerks on difficult problems and to approve their suggestions for significant deviations from existing instructions.  Typical duties include: assisting in a variety of administrative matters; maintaining a wide variety of financial or other records; verifying statistical reports for accuracy and completeness; and handling and adjusting complaints. May also direct lower level  Excluded from this definition are: workers whose pay is primarily based on the performance of a single clerical duty such as typing, stenography, office machine   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-37  clerks.  KEY ENTRY OPERATOR_______  -___________  (4793: Data entry keyer)  Positions above level IV are excluded. Such positions (which may include supervisory responsibility over lower level clerks) require workers to use a thorough knowledge of an office's work and routine to: 1) choose among widely varying methods and procedures to process complex transactions; and 2) select or devise steps necessary to complete assignments. Typical jobs covered by this exclusion include administrative assistants, clerical supervisors, and office managers.  Operates keyboard-controlled data entry device such as keypunch machine or keyoperated magnetic tape or disc encoder to transcribe data into a form suitable for computer processing. Work requires skill in operating an alphanumeric keyboard and an understanding of transcribing procedures and relevant data entry equipment. Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions:  CLERK, ORDER  __  (4664: Order clerk)  Key Entry Operator I___________________________________________  Receives written or verbal customers' purchase orders for material or merchandise from customers or sales people. Work typically involves some combination of the following duties: quoting prices; determining availability of ordered items and suggesting substitutes when necessary; advising expected delivery date and method of delivery; recording order and customer information on order sheets; checking order sheets for accuracy and adequacy of information recorded; ascertaining credit rating of customer; furnishing customer with acknowledgment of receipt of order; following up to see that order is delivered by the specified date or to let customer know of a delay in delivery; maintaining order file; checking shipping invoice against original order. Exclude workers paid on a commission basis or whose duties include any of the following: receiving orders for services rather than for material or merchandise; providing customers with consultative advice using knowledge gained from engineering or extensive technical training; emphasizing selling skills; handling material or merchandise as an integral part of the job.  Work is routine and repetitive. Under close supervision or following specific procedures or detailed instructions, works from various standardized source documents which have been coded and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be entered. Refers to supervisor problems arising from erroneous items, codes, or missing information.  Key Entry Operator II__________________________ ___________ Work requires the application of experience and judgment in selecting procedures to be followed and in searching for, interpreting, selecting, or coding items to be entered from a variety of source documents. On occasion may also perform routine work as described for level I. Note:  Positions are classified into levels according to the following definitions:  Clerk, Order 1 Handles orders involving items which have readily identified uses and applications. May refer to a catalog, manufacturer's manual, or similar document to insure that proper item is supplied or to verify price of ordered item.  PERSONNEL ASSISTANT (Employment) (4692: Personnel clerk, except payroll and timekeeper) Personnel assistants (employment) provide clerical and technical support to personnel professionals or managers in internal matters relating to recruiting, hiring, transfer, change in pay status, and termination of employees. At the lower levels, assistants primarily provide basic information to current and prospective employees, maintain personnel records and information listings, and prepare and process papers on personnel actions (hires, transfers, changes in pay, etc.). At the higher levels, assistants may perform limited aspects of a personnel professional's work, e g., interviewing  Clerk, Order H Handles orders that involve making judgments such as choosing which specific product or material from the establishment's product lines will satisfy the customer's needs, or determining the price to be quoted when pricing involves more than merely referring to a price list or making some simple mathematical calculations.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Excluded are operators above level II using the key entry controls to access, read, and evaluate the substance of specific records to take substantive actions, or to make entries requiring a similar level of knowledge.  B-38  candidates, recommending placements, and preparing personnel reports. Final decisions on personnel actions are made by personnel professionals or managers. Some assistants may perform a limited amount of work in other specialties, such as benefits, compensation, or employee relations. Typing may be required at any level.  Detailed rules and procedures are available for all assignments. Guidance and assistance on unusual questions are available at all times. Work is spot checked, often on a daily basis.  Personnel Assistant (Employment) II Excluded are: a.  Workers who primarily compute and process payrolls or compute and/or respond to questions on benefits or retirement claims;  b.  Workers who receive additional pay primarily for maintaining and safeguarding personnel record files;  c.  Workers whose duties do not require a knowledge of personnel rules and procedures, such as receptionists, messengers, typists, or stenographers;  d.  Workers in positions requiring a bachelor’s degree;  e.  Workers who are primarily compensated for duties outside the employment specialty, such as benefits, compensation, or employee relations; and  f.  Positions above level IV. Workers in these excluded positions perform duties which are similar to level IV, but which are more complicated because they include limited aspects of professional personnel work for a variety of conventional and stable occupations.  Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions. The work described is essentially at a responsible clerical level at the low levels and progresses to a staff assistant or technician level. At level III, which is transitional, both types of work are described. Jobs which match either type of work described at level III, or which are combinations of the two, can be matched.  Personnel Assistant (Employment) I Performs routine tasks which require a knowledge of personnel procedures and rules, such as: providing simple employment information and appropriate lists and forms to applicants or employees on types of jobs being filled, procedures to follow, and where to obtain additional information; ensuring that the proper forms are completed for name changes, locator information, applications, etc. and reviewing completed forms for signatures and proper entries; or maintaining personnel records, contacting appropriate sources to secure any missing items, and posting items such as dates of promotions, transfer, and hire, or rates of pay or personal data. (If this information is computerized, skill in coding or entering information may be needed as a minor duty.) May answer outside inquiries for simple factual information, such as verification of dates of employment in response to telephone credit checks on employees. Some receptionist or other clerical duties may be performed. May be assigned work to provide training for a  Examines and/or processes personnel action documents using experience in applying personnel procedures and policies. Ensures that information is complete and consistent and determines whether further discussion with applicants or employees is needed or whether personnel information must be checked against additional files or listings. Selects appropriate precedents, rules, or procedures from a number of alternatives. Responds to varied questions from applicants, employees, or managers for readily available information which can be obtained from file material or manuals; responses require skill to secure cooperation in correcting improperly completed personnel documents or to explain regulations and procedures. May provide information to managers on availability of applicants and status of hiring actions; may verify employment dates and places supplied on job applications; may maintain personnel records; and may administer typing and stenography tests. Completes routine assignments independently. Detailed guidance is available for situations which deviate from established precedents. Clerks/assistants are relied upon to alert higher level clerks/assistants or supervisor to such situations. Work may be spot checked periodically.  Personnel Assistant (Employment) III Type A Serves as a clerical expert in independently processing the most complicated types of personnel actions, e.g., temporary employment, rehires, and dismissals and in providing information when it is necessary to consolidate data from a number of sources, often with short deadlines. Screens applications for obvious rejections. Resolves conflicts in computer listings or other sources of employee information. Locates lost documents or reconstructs information using a number of sources. May check references of applicants when information in addition to dates and places of past work is needed, and judgment is required to ask appropriate routine follow-up questions. May provide guidance to lower level clerks. Supervisory review is similar to level II.  AND/OR Type B Performs routine personnel assignments beyond the clerical level, such as: orienting new employees to programs, facilities, rules on time and attendance, and leave policies; computing basic statistical information for reports on manpower profiles, EEO progress and accomplishments, hiring activities, attendance and leave profiles, turnover, etc.; and screening applicants for well-defined positions, rejecting those who do not qualify for  higher level position.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-39  available openings for clear cut reasons, referring others to appropriate employment interviewer. Guidance is provided on possible sources of information, methods of work, and types of reports needed. Completed written work receives close technical review from higher level personnel office employees; other work may be checked occasionally.  d.  Assistants or secretaries performing any kind of technical work, e.g., personnel, accounting, or legal work;  e.  Administrative assistants or supervisors performing duties which are more difficult or more responsible than the secretarial work described in LR-1 through LR-4;  f.  Secretaries receiving additional pay primarily for maintaining confidentiality of payroll records or other sensitive information;  g.  Secretaries performing routine receptionist, typing, and filing duties following detailed instructions and guidelines; these duties are less responsible than those described in LR-1 below; and  h.  Trainees.  Personnel Assistant (Employment) IV Performs work in support of personnel professionals which requires a good working knowledge of personnel procedures, guides, and precedents. In representative assignments: interviews applicants, obtains references, and recommends placement of applicants in a few well-defined occupations (trades or clerical) within a stable organization or unit; conducts post-placement or exit interviews to identify job adjustment problems or reasons for leaving the organization; performs routine statistical analyses related to manpower, EEO, hiring, or other employment concerns, e.g., compares one set of data to another set as instructed; and requisitions applicants through employment agencies for clerical or blue-collar jobs. At this level, assistants typically have a range of personal contacts within and outside the organization and with applicants, and must be tactful and articulate. May perform some clerical work in addition to the above duties. Supervisor reviews completed work against stated objectives.  Classification by level Secretary jobs which meet the required characteristics are matched at one of five levels according to two factors: (a) level of the secretary's supervisor within the overall organizational structure, and (b) level of the secretary's responsibility. The table following the explanations of these factors indicates the level of the secretary for each combination of factors.  SECRETARY (4622: Secretary)  Level of secretary's supervisor (LS)  Provides principal secretarial support in an office, usually to one individual, and, in some cases, also to the subordinate staff of that individual. Maintains a close and highly responsive relationship to the day-to-day activities of the supervisor and staff. Works fairly independently receiving a minimum of detailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied clerical and secretarial duties requiring a knowledge of office routine and an understanding of the organization, programs, and procedures related to the work of the office.  Secretaries should be matched at one of the three LS levels below best describing the organization of the secretary's supervisor. LS-1  Organizational structure is not complex and internal procedures and administrative controls are simple and informal; supervisor directs staff through face-to-face meetings.  LS-2  Exclusions.  Organizational structure is complex and is divided into subordinate groups that usually differ from each other as to subject-matter, function, etc.-,  a.  Clerks or secretaries working under the direction of secretaries or administrative assistants as described in e;  supervisor usually directs staff through intermediate supervisors; and internal procedures and administrative controls are formal. An entire organization (e.g., division, subsidiary, or parent organization) may contain a variety of subordinate groups which meet the LS-2 definition. Therefore, it is not unusual for one LS-2 supervisor to report to another LS-2 supervisor.  b.  Stenographers not fully performing secretarial duties;  c.  Stenographers or secretaries assigned to two or more professional, technical, or managerial persons of equivalent rank;  Not all positions titled "secretary" possess the above characteristics. Examples of positions which are excluded from the definition are as follows:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  The presence of subordinate supervisors does not by itself mean LS-2 applies, e.g., a clerical processing organization divided into several units, each performing very similar work is placed in LS-1.  B-40  In smaller organizations or industries such as retail trade, with relatively few organizational levels, the supervisor may have an impact on the policies and major programs of the entire organization, and may deal with important outside contacts, as described in LS-3.  e.  LR-2 LS-3  Organizational structure is divided into two or more subordinate supervisory levels (of which at least one is a managerial level) with several subdivisions at each level. Executive's program(s) are usually inter-locked on a direct and continuing basis with other major organizational segments, requiring constant attention to extensive formal coordination, clearances, and procedural controls. Executive typically has: financial decision making authority for assigned program(s); considerable impact on the entire organization's financial position or public image; and responsibility for, or has staff specialists in, such areas as personnel and administration for assigned organization. Executive plays an important role in determining the policies and major programs of the entire organization, and spends considerable time dealing with outside parties actively interested in assigned program(s) and current or controversial issues.  Requisitions supplies, printing, maintenance, or other services. Types, takes and transcribes dictation, and establishes and maintains office files.  Handles differing situations, problems, and deviations in the work of the office according to the supervisor's general instructions, priorities, duties, policies, and program goals. Supervisor may assist secretary with special assignments. Duties include or are comparable to the following: a.  Screens telephone calls, visitors, and incoming correspondence; personally responds to requests for information concerning office procedures; determines which requests should be handled by the supervisor, appropriate staff member, or other offices. May prepare and sign routine, non-technical correspondence in own or supervisor’s name.  b. Schedules tentative appointments without prior clearance. Makes arrangements for conferences and meetings and assembles established background materials, as directed. May attend meetings and record and report on the proceedings.  Level of secretary's responsibility (LR) c. This factor evaluates the nature of the work relationship between the secretary and the supervisor or staff, and the extent to which the secretary is expected to exercise initiative and judgment. Secretaries should be matched at the level best describing their level of responsibility. When the position's duties span more than one LR level, the introductory paragraph at the beginning of each LR level should be used to determine which of the levels best matches the position. (Typically, secretaries performing at the higher levels of responsibility also perform duties described at the lower levels.)  d. Collects information from the files or staff for routine inquires on office program(s) or periodic reports. Refers nonroutine requests to supervisor or staff. e.  LR-1  Carries out recurring office procedures independently. Selects the guideline or reference which fits the specific case. Supervisor provides specific instructions on new assignments and checks completed work for accuracy. Performs varied duties including or comparable to the following: a.  Responds to routine telephone requests which have standard answers; refers calls and visitors to appropriate staff. Controls mail and assures timely staff response; may send form letters.  b.  As instructed, maintains supervisor's calendar, makes appointments, and arranges for meeting rooms.  c.  Reviews materials prepared for supervisor's approval for typographical accuracy and proper format.  LR-3  d. Maintains recurring internal reports, such as: time and leave records, office equipment listings, correspondence controls, training plans, etc.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Reviews outgoing materials and correspondence for internal consistency and conformance with supervisor's procedures; assures that proper clearances have been obtained, when needed.  B-41  Explains to subordinate staff supervisor's requirements concerning office procedures. Coordinates personnel and administrative forms for the office and forwards for processing.  Uses greater judgment and initiative to determine the approach or action to take in nonroutine situations. Interprets and adapts guidelines, including unwritten policies, precedents, and practices, which are not always completely applicable to changing situations. Duties include or are comparable to the following: a.  Based on a knowledge of the supervisor's views, composes correspondence on own initiative about administrative matters and general office policies for supervisor's approval.  b.  Anticipates and prepares materials needed by the supervisor for conferences, correspondence, appointments, meetings, telephone calls, etc., and informs supervisor on matters to be considered.  LR-4  c.  Reads publications, regulations, and directives and takes action or refers those that are important to the supervisor and staff.  d.  Prepares special or one-time reports, summaries, or replies to inquires, selecting relevant information from a variety of sources such as reports, documents, correspondence, other offices, etc., under general direction.  Acts as office manager for the executive's organization, e.g., determines when new procedures are needed for changing situations and devises and implements alternatives; revises or clarifies procedures to eliminate conflict or duplication; identifies and resolves various problems that affect the orderly flow of work in transactions with parties outside the organization.  e.  Advises secretaries in subordinate offices on new procedures; requests information needed from the subordinate office(s) for periodic or special conferences, reports, inquires, etc. Shifts clerical staff to accommodate work load needs.  b. Prepares agenda for conferences; explains discussion topics to participants; drafts introductions and develops background information and prepares outlines for executive or staff member(s) to use in writing speeches.  a.  Handles a wide variety of situations and conflicts involving the clerical or administrative functions of the office which often cannot be brought to the attention of the executive. The executive sets the overall objectives of the work. Secretary may participate in developing the work deadlines. Duties include or are comparable to the following; a.  b.  Composes correspondence requiring some understanding of technical matters; may sign for executive when technical or policy content has been authorized.  c.  Criteria for matching secretaries by level  Notes commitments made by executive during meetings and arranges for staff implementation. On own initiative, arranges for staff member to represent organization at conferences and meetings, establishes appointment priorities, or reschedules or refuses appointments or invitations.  Level of secretary's supervisor  c.  Reads outgoing correspondence for executive's approval and alerts writers to any conflict with the file or departure from policies or executive's viewpoints; gives advice to resolve the problems.  LS-1 LS-2 LS-3  d.  Summarizes the content of incoming materials, specially gathered information, or meetings to assist executive; coordinates the new information with background office sources; draws attention to important parts or conflicts.  e.  Level of secretary's responsibility LR-1  I* I* I*  LR-2  LR-3  LR-4  II III IV  III IV V  IV V V  *Regardless of LS level.  SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST (4645: Receptionist)  In the executive's absence, ensures that requests for action or information are relayed to the appropriate staff member; as needed, interprets request and helps implement action; makes sure that information is furnished in timely manner; decides whether executive should be notified of important  Operates a single-position telephone switchboard or console, used with a private branch exchange (PBX) system to relay incoming, outgoing, and intrasystem calls and acts as a receptionist greeting visitors, determining nature of visits and directing visitors to appropriate persons. Work may also involve other duties such as recording and transmitting messages; keeping records of calls placed; providing information to callers  or emergency matters.  Exclude secretaries performing any of the following duties:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Advises individuals outside the organization on the executive's views on major policies or current issues facing the organization; contacts or responds to contacts from high-ranking outside officials (e.g., city or State officials, Member of Congress, presidents of national unions or large national or international firms, etc.) in unique situations. These officials may be relatively inaccessible, and each contact typically must be handled differently, using judgment and discretion.  B-42  and visitors; making appointments; keeping a log of visitors; and issuing visitor passes. May also type and perform other routine clerical work, usually while at the switchboard or console, which may occupy the major portion of the worker's time.  -  WORD PROCESSOR  -  Editing and reformatting written or electronic drafts. Examples include: Correcting function codes; adjusting spacing and formatting; and standardizing headings, margins, and indentations.  ...........  (4624: Typist)  Transcribing scientific reports, lab analyses, legal proceedings, or similar material from voice tapes or handwritten drafts. Work requires knowledge of specialized, technical, or scientific terminology.  Uses automated systems, such as word processing equipment, or personal computers or work stations linked to a larger computer or local area network, to produce a variety of documents, such as correspondence, memos, publications, forms, reports, tables and graphs. Uses one or more word processing software packages. May also perform routine clerical tasks, such as operating copiers, filing, answering telephones, and sorting and distributing mail.  Work requires familiarity with office terminology and practices; incumbent corrects copy and questions originator of document concerning missing information, improper formatting, or discrepancies in instructions. Supervisor sets priorities and deadlines on continuing assignments, furnishes general instructions for recurring work, and provides specific instructions for new or unique projects. May lead lower level word processors.  Excluded are: a.  Typists using automatic or manual typewriters with limited or no text-editing capabilities; workers in these positions are not typically required to use word processing software packages;  b.  Key entry operators, accounting clerks, inventory control clerks, sales clerks, supply clerks, and other clerks who may use automated word processing equipment for purposes other than typing composition; and  c.  Positions requiring subject-matter knowledge to prepare and edit text using automated word processing equipment.  Word Processor Hi Requires both a comprehensive knowledge of word processing software applications and office practices and a high degree of skill in applying software functions to prepare complex and detailed documents. For example, processes complex and lengthy technical reports which include tables, graphs, charts, or multiple columns Uses either different word processing packages or many different style macros or special command functions. Independently completes assignments and resolves problems.  Maintenance and Toolroom GENERAL MAINTENANCE WORKER  ., ■ :  Performs general maintenance and repair of equipment and buildings requiring practical skill and knowledge (but not proficiency) in such trades as painting, carpentry, plumbing, masonry, and electrical work. Work involves a variety of the following duties: Replacing electrical receptacles, switches, fixtures, wires, and motors; using plaster or compound to patch minor holes and cracks in walls and ceilings; repairing or replacing sinks, water coolers, and toilets; painting structures and equipment; repairing or replacing concrete floors, steps, and sidewalks; replacing damaged panelling and floor tiles; hanging doors and installing door locks; replacing broken window panes; and performing general maintenance on equipment and machinery.  Produces a variety of standard documents, such as correspondence, form letters, reports, tables and other printed materials. Work requires skill in typing; a knowledge of grammar, punctuation, and spelling; and ability to use reference guides and equipment manuals. Performs familiar, routine assignments following standard procedures. Seeks further instructions for assignments requiring deviations from established procedures.  Word Processor II  Excluded are:  Uses a knowledge of varied and advanced functions of one software type, a knowledge of varied functions of different types of software, or a knowledge of specialized or technical terminology to perform such typical duties as:   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _______ *  (6179: Mechanic and repairer, not elsewhere classified)  Word Processor 1  a.  B-43  Craft workers included in a formal apprenticeship or progression program based on training and experience;  b.  Skilled craft workers required to demonstrate proficiency in one or more trades; and  c.  Workers performing simple maintenance duties not requiring practical skill and knowledge of a trade (e.g., changing light bulbs and replacing faucet washers).  c.  Workers primarily responsible for servicing electronic test instruments; and  d.  Workers providing technical support for engineers working in such areas as research, design, development, testing, or manufacturing process improvement (see Engineering Technician).  MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIAN  Maintenance Electronics Technician I  (615: Electrical and electronic equipment repairer) (6432: Electrician)  Applies technical knowledge to perform simple or routine tasks following detailed instructions. Performs such tasks as replacing components and wiring circuits; repairing simple electronic equipment; and taking test readings using common instruments such as digital multimeters, signal generators, semiconductor testers, curve tracers, and oscilloscopes.  Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the installation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric energy. Work involves most of the following: installing or repairing any of a variety of electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems, or other transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working standard computations relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of electrician's handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In general, the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.  Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher level technician. Work is spot-checked for accuracy.  Maintenance Electronics Technician II  (615: Electrical and electronic equipment repairer)  Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher level technician, and work is reviewed for compliance with accepted practices. May provide technical guidance to lower level technicians.  Maintains, repairs, and installs various types of electronic equipment and related devices such as electronic transmitting and receiving equipment (e.g., radar, radio, television, telecommunication, sonar, and navigational aids); personal and mainframe computers and terminals; industrial, medical, measuring, and controlling equipment; satellite equipment; and industrial robotic devices. Applies technical knowledge of electronics principles in determining equipment malfunctions, and applies skill in restoring equipment operations.  Maintenance Electronics Technician III Applies advanced technical knowledge to solve unusually complex problems that typically cannot be solved solely by referencing manufacturers' manuals or similar documents. Examples of such problems include determining the location and density of circuitry, evaluating electromagnetic radiation, isolating malfunctions, and incorporating engineering changes.  Excluded are:  b.  Repairers of such standard electronic equipment as household radio and television sets, and common office machines and telecommunication equipment such as typewriters, calculators, facsimile machines, telephones, and telephone answering machines;  Work typically requires a detailed understanding of the interrelationships of circuits. Exercises independent judgment in performing such tasks as making circuit analyses, calculating wave forms, and tracing relationships in signal flow. Uses complex test instruments such as high frequency pulse generators, frequency synthesizers, distortion analyzers, and complex computer control equipment.  Production assemblers and testers;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _______ _  Applies comprehensive technical knowledge to solve complex problems by interpreting manufacturers' manuals or similar documents. Work requires familiarity with the interrelationships of circuits and judgment in planning work sequence and in selecting tools and testing instruments.  MAINTENANCE ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN................................. ........  a.  __________  B-44  Work may be reviewed by supervisor for general compliance with accepted practices. May provide technical guidance to lower level technicians.  rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.  MAINTENANCE MACHINIST  This classification does not include mechanics who repair customers' vehicles or who only perform minor repair and tuneup of motor vehicles. It does, however, include fully qualified journeymen mechanics even though most of their time may be spent on minor repairs and tuneups.  _  _____  ~ "  (613: Industrial machinery repairer) Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of metal parts of mechanical equipment. Work involves most of the following', interpreting written instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist's handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds, and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties of the common metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and equipment required for this work; and fitting and assembling parts into mechanical equipment. In general, the machinist's work normally requires a rounded training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.  MAINTENANCeTmECHANIC, MACHINERY (613: Industrial machinery repairer) Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment. Work involves most of the following: examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a machine shop or sending the machine to a machine shop for major repairs; preparing written specifications for major repairs or for the production of parts ordered from machine shops; reassembling machines; and making all necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the work of a machinery maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. Excluded from this classification are workers whose primary  duties involve setting up or adjusting machines. MAINTENANCE MECHANIC. MOTOR VEHICLE" (611: Vehicle and mobile equipment mechanics and repairers) Repairs, rebuilds, or overhauls major assemblies of internal combustion automobiles, buses, trucks, or tractors. Work involves most of the following: Diagnosing the source of trouble and determining the extent of repairs required; replacing worn or broken parts such as piston rings, bearings, or other engine parts; grinding and adjusting valves; rebuilding carburetors; overhauling transmissions; and repairing fuel injection, lighting, and ignition systems. In general, the work of the motor vehicle mechanic requires   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  MAINTENANCE PIPEFITTER__________________________________________ (645: Plumber, pipefitter, and steamfitter) Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and pipefittings. Work involves most of the following: laying out work and measuring to locate position of pipe from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machines; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven machines; assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard tests to determine whether finished pipes meet specifications. In general, the work of the maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.  Workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating systems are excluded. TOOL AND DIE MAKER  ...  (6811: Tool and die maker) Constructs and repairs jigs, fixtures, cutting tools, gauges, or metal dies or molds used in shaping or forming metal or nonmetallic material (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work typically involves: planning and laying out work according to models, blueprints, drawings, or other written or oral specifications; understanding the working properties of common metals and alloys; selecting appropriate materials, tools, and processes required to complete task; making necessary shop computations; setting up and operating various machine tools and related equipment; using various tool and die maker's handtools and precision measuring instruments; working to very close tolerances; heat-treating metal parts and finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities; fitting and assembling parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances. In general, the tool and die maker's work requires rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not include tool and die makers who (1) are employed in tool and die jobbing shops or (2) produce forging dies (die sinkers).  B-45  Material Movement and Custodial Excluded are:  FORKLIFT OPERATOR  ,  -  '  Workers who specialize in window washing;  (8318: Industrial truck and tractor equipment operator)  Housekeeping staff who make beds and change linens as a primary responsibility; Operates a manually controlled gasoline, electric or liquid propane gas powered forklift to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing  Workers required to disassemble and assemble equipment in order to clean machinery; and  plant, or other establishment.  GUARD___________ . :  v'.--  .  •  ' - - .  • '  '  i  d.  equipment.  (5144: Guard and police, except public service) Protects property from theft or damage, or persons from hazards or interference. Duties involve serving at a fixed post, making rounds on foot or by motorized vehicle, or escorting persons or property. May be deputized to make arrests. May also help visitors and customers by answering questions and giving directions. May be required to demonstrate 1) proficiency in the use of firearms and other special weapons and 2)  Workers who receive additional compensation to maintain sterile facilities or  MATERIAL HANDLING LABORER (8726: Freight, stock, and material mover, not elsewhere classified) Performs physical tasks to transport or store materials or merchandise. Duties involve  one or more of the following: manually loading or unloading freight cars, trucks, or  continuing physical fitness.  other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving, or placing items in proper storage locations; or transporting goods by handtruck, cart, or wheelbarrow.  Guardi  Excluded from this definition are workers whose primary function involves:  Carries out instructions primarily oriented toward insuring that emergencies and security violations are readily discovered and reported to appropriate authority. Intervenes directly only in situations that require minimal action to safeguard property or persons. Duties require minimal training.  a.  participating directly in the production of goods (e.g., moving items from one production station to another or placing them on or removing them from the production process);  b.  stocking merchandise for sale;  Guard II  c.  counting or routing merchandise;  Enforces regulations designed to prevent breaches of security. Exercises judgment and uses discretion in dealing with emergencies and security violations encountered. Determines whether first response should be to intervene directly (asking for assistance when deemed necessary and time allows), to keep situation under surveillance, or to report situation so that it can be handled by appropriate authority. Duties require specialized training in methods and techniques of protecting security areas.  d.  operating a crane or heavy-duty motorized vehicle such as forklift or truck;  e.  loading and unloading ships (longshore workers); or  f.  traveling on trucks beyond the establishment's physical location to load or unload  JANITOR__________ :  ORDER FILLER"  (5244: Janitor and cleaner)  (4754: Stock and inventory clerk)  Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial or other establishment. Duties  Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips, customers' orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to filling orders and indicating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requisition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other related duties.  merchandise.  involve a combination of the following: Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor maintenance services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  B-46  SHIPPING/RECEIVING CLERK  unload truck with or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep truck in good working order. Routesales and over-the-road drivers are excluded.  (4753: Traffic, shipping and receiving clerk) Performs clerical and physical tasks in connection with shipping goods of the establishment in which employed and/or receiving incoming shipments. In performing day-to-day, routine tasks, follows established guidelines. In handling unusual nonroutine problems, receives specific guidance from supervisor or other officials. May direct and coordinate the activities of other workers engaged in handling goods to be shipped or being received. Shipping duties typically involve the following: Verifying that orders are accurately filled by comparing items and quantities of goods gathered for shipment against documents; insuring that shipments are properly packaged, identified with shipping information, and loaded into transporting vehicles; and preparing and keeping records of goods shipped, e.g., manifests, bills of lading. Receiving duties typically involve the following: Verifying the correctness of incoming shipments by comparing items and quantities unloaded against bills of lading, invoices, manifests, storage receipts, or other records; checking for damaged goods; insuring that goods are appropriately identified for routing to departments within the establishment; and preparing and keeping records of goods received.  TRUCKDRIVER__________________________________________  -  ;  (821: Motor vehicle operator) Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport materials, merchandise, equipment, or workers between various types of establishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail establishments and customers' houses or places of business. May also load or   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by type and rated capacity of truck, as follows: Truckdriver, light truck (straight truck, under 1 1/2 tons, usually 4 wheels) Truckdriver, medium truck (straight truck, 1 1/2 to 4 tons inclusive, usually 6 wheels) Truckdriver, heavy truck (straight truck, over 4 tons, usually 10 wheels) Truckdriver, tractor-trailer  WAREHOUSE SPECIALIST (4754: Stock and inventory clerk) As directed, performs a variety of warehousing duties which require an understanding of the establishment's storage plan. Work involves most of the following: Verifying materials (or merchandise) against receiving documents, noting and reporting discrepancies and obvious damages; routing materials to prescribed storage locations; storing, stacking, or palletizing materials in accordance with prescribed storage methods; rearranging and taking inventory of stored materials; examining stored materials and reporting deterioration and damage; removing material from storage and preparing it for shipment. May operate hand or power trucks in performing warehousing duties. Exclude workers whose primary duties involve shipping and receiving work (see Shipping/Receiving Clerk), order filling (see Order Filler), or operating forklifts (see Forklift Operator).  B-47  Occupational Compensation Survey Summaries The following areas are surveyed periodically under contract to the Employment Standards Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor for its use in administering the Service Contract Act of 1965. Reports on the surveys shown below are available from any of the Bureau's regional offices while supplies last.  Alaska (statewide) Albany, GA Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY Alexandria-Leesville, LA Alpena-Standish-Tawas City, MI Ann Arbor, MI Asheville, NC Atlantic City, NJ Austin, TX Bakersfield, CA Baton Rouge, LA Battle Creek, MI Beaumont-Port Arthur and Lake Charles, TX-LA Biloxi-Gulfport and Pascagoula, MS Binghamton, NY Birmingham, AL Bloomington-Vincennes, IN Bremerton-Shelton, WA Bmnswick, GA Buffalo, NY Cedar Rapids, IA Champaign-Urbana-Rantoul, IL Charleston, SC Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC Cheyenne, WY   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Clarksville-Hopkinsville, TN-KY Columbia-Sumter, SC Columbus, GA-AL Columbus, MS Connecticut (statewide) Corpus Christi, TX Daytona Beach, FL Decatur, IL Des Moines, IA Dothan, AL Duluth, MN-WI El Paso-Las Cruces-Alamogordo, TX-NM Eugene-Springfield-Medford-RoseburgKlamath Falls-Grants Pass, OR Evansville-Clarksville-HopkinsvilleOwensboro-Bowling Green, KY-IN-TN Fayetteville, NC Florence, SC Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach and West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Delray Beach, FL Fort Smith, AR-OK Fort Worth-Arlington, TX Fresno, CA Gadsden and Anniston, AL Gainesville, FL Goldsboro, NC Grand Island-Hastings, NE Green Bay, WI Greensboro-Winston-SalemHigh Point, NC Greenville-Spartanburg, SC Hagerstown-CumberlandChambersburg, MD-PA-WV Harrisburg-Lebanon-Carlisle, PA Jacksonville, FL Jacksonville-New Bern, NC * U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:  Joliet, IL Kokomo, IN Knoxville, TN La Crosse-Sparta, WI Las Vegas-Tonopah, NV Lexington-Fayette, KY Lima, OH Logansport-Peru, IN Lorain-Elyria, OH Lower Eastern Shore, MD-VA-DE Macon-Wamer Robins, GA Madison, WI Maine (statewide)  Mansfield, OH Melboume-Titusville-Palm Bay, FL Meridian, MS Middlesex-Somerset-Hunterdon, NJ Mobile, AL Montana (statewide) Montgomery, AL New Hampshire (statewide) North Dakota (statewide) Northeastern Tennessee-Western Virginia Northern New York Northwest Texas Northwestern Florida Omaha, NE-IA Orlando, FL Oxnard-Ventura, CA Peoria, IL Pine Bluff, AR Portsmouth-Chillicothe-Gallipolis, OH Poughkeepsie-Orange CountyKingston, NY Providence, RI Pueblo, CO Puerto Rico 1995 - 387-198 - 814/24365  Raleigh-Durham, NC Reno, NV Rhode Island (statewide) Rio Grande Valley, TX Salinas-Seaside-Monterey, CA Sandusky, OH Savannah, GA Selma, AL Shreveport, LA Southeastern Massachusetts South Dakota (statewide) Southern Missouri Southwest Virginia Spokane, WA Springfield, IL Stockton, CA Syracuse and Utica-Rome, NY Tacoma, WA Toledo, OH Topeka, KS Trenton, NJ Tucson-Douglas, AZ Tulsa, OK Upper Peninsula, MI Vallejo-Fairfield-Napa, CA Vermont (statewide) Virgin Islands of the U.S. Waco and Killeen-Temple, TX Waterloo-Cedar Falls, IA West Virginia (statewide) Western Massachusetts Wichita, KS Wichita Falls-Lawton-Altus, TX-OK Yakima-Richland-Kennewick-PascoWalla Walla-Pendleton, WA-OR York, PA  Occupational Compensation Surveys Available by Subscription and Individually  Occupational Compensation Surveys may be ordered individually. A subscription, at $226.00, will bring you all the surveys published during the following 12 months.  Bulletin No.  Area___________________________________  Abilene, TX, Dec. 1993 ........................................................ Albuquerque, NM, Sept 1993 ............................................... Anaheim—Santa Ana, CA, July 1993 .................................. Appleton—Oshkosh—Neenah, Wl, May 1994 ...................... Atlanta, GA, Apr. 1993 ......................................................... Augusta, GA-SC, June 1994 ............................................... Baltimore, MD, Mar. 1994 .................................................... Bergen-Passaic, NJ, Apr. 1993............................................. Billings, MT, Sept. 1993 ....................................................... Boston, MA, May 1993 ......................................................... Bradenton, FL, Apr. 1994 ...................................................... Burlington, Vt, Dec. 1993 .................................................... Chattanooga, TN-GA, Aug. 1993 ......................................... Chicago, IL, May 1993 ......................................................... Cincinnati, OH—KY—IN, Apr. 1993 ...................................... Cleveland, OH, June 1993 .................................................... Colorado Springs, CO, June 1992 ........................................ Columbus, OH, Nov. 1993 .................................................... Cumberland, MD-WV, Dec. 1992 ......................................... Dallas, TX, Dec. 1993........................................................... Danbury, CT. Feb. 1994 ...................................................... Davenport—Rock Island—Moline, IA—IL, Feb. 1994 ........... Dayton—Springfield, OH, Fwb. 1994 .................................. Denver, CO, Dec. 1993 ........................................................ Detroit, Ml, Nov. 1993 ........................................................... Elkhart—Goshen, IN, Oct. 1993 ........................................... Elmira, New York, Aug. 1992................................................. Evansville, IN—KY, Feb. 1992 ............................................. Fort Myers-Cape Coral, FL, Dec. 1993 ...............................  Where to send order: New Orders Superintendent of Documents P O Prtv Q71 QC4 I .U. UUA Jr I  Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954  Area________ ____________________________  3070-59 3070-61 3070-46 3075-15 3070-30 3075-14 3075-19 3070-22 3070-58 3070-35 3075- 8 3070-60 3070-47 3070-41 3070-28 3070-52 3065-42 3070-69 3065-69 3070-80 3075-32 3075- 3  Fort Wayne, IN, June 1992 ................................................... Gary—Hammond, IN, Feb. 1994 .......................................... Hartford, CT, July 1990 .......................................................... Houston, TX, Mar. 1994 ........................................................ Huntsville, AL, Jan. 1994 ...................................................... Indianapolis, IN, June 1993 ................................................... Jackson, MS, Dec. 1993 ...................................................... Kansas City, MO—KS, July 1993 .......................................... Lawrence-Haverhill, MA—NH, Sept. 1993 ........................... Little Rock—North Little Rock, AR, Oct. 1993 ...................... Longview-Marshall, TX, July 1994........................................ Los Angeles-Long Beach, CA, Oct. 1993 ............................. Louisville, KY—IN, June 1993 ............................................... Memphis, TN—AR—MS, Oct. 1993...................................... Miami-Hialeah, FL, Sept. 1993 ............................................. Milwaukee, Wl, Sept. 1993 ................................................... Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN—Wl, January 1994 .................... Monmouth-Ocean, NJ, June 1993........................................ Nashville, TN, Jan. 1994 ...................................................... Nassau-Suffolk, NY, Nov. 1993 ........................................... Newark, NJ, Dec. 1993 ......................................................... New Britain, CT, Nov. 1993 ................................................... New Orleans, LA, May 1993 ................................................. New York, NY, May 1994 ...................................................... Norfolk-Virginia Beach-Newport News, VA, Aug. 1993 ....... Oakland, CA, Dec. 1993 ...................................................... Oklahoma City, OK, Feb. 1994 ............................................. Parkersburg-Marietta, WV—OH, July 1993 ......................... Philadelphia, PA—NJ, Oct. 1993 ..........................................  3075-11  3070-79 3070-75 3070-54 3065-32 3065-8 3070-73  Order form:  Bulletin No.  3065-41 3075- 6 3055-27 3075-18 3075- 9 3070-36 3070-71 3070-51 3070-56 3070-64 3075-17 3070-78 3070-42 3070-63 3070-66 3070-53 3075-4 3070-26 3075- 5 3070-74 3070-76 3070-68 3070-31 3075-16 3070-49 3070-81 3075-10 3070-37 3070-67  IkiB  Area________________________________________  Phoenix, AZ, Mar. 1993 ........................................................ 3070-15 Pittsburgh, PA, May 1993 .................................................... 3070-23 Portland, OR, June 1993 ...................................................... 3070-40 Poughkeepsie, NY, Sept. 1993 ............................................. 3070-50 Reading, PA, May 1993 ........................................................ 3070-70 Richmond-Petersburg, VA, July 1993 .................................. 3070-48 Riverside—San Bernardino, CA, Apr. 1993 ......................... 3070-24 Rochester, NY, Oct. 1993 ...................................................... 3070-62 Sacramento, CA, Dec. 1993 ................................................. 3070-77 Saginaw-Bay City-Midland Ml, Mar. 1993 ........................... 3070-18 St. Cloud, MN, March 1994 ................................................. 3075-12 St. Louis, Missouri-lllinois March 1994 ............................... 3075-13 Salem, OR, Jan. 1994 .......................................................... 3075- 1 Salt Lake City-Ogden, UT, Apr. 1993 .................................. 3070-21 San Antonio, TX, July 1993 .................................................. 3070-44 San Diego, CA, Aug. 1993.................................................... 3070-55 San Francisco, CA, Apr. 1994 ............................................... 3075-20 San Jose, CA, June 1993 .................................................... 3070-39 Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-Lompoc, CA, Apr. 1993 ......... 3070-25 Scranton-Wilkes Barre, PA, Nov. 1993 ................................. 3070-72 Seattle, WA, Oct. 1993 ...................................................... 3070-57 South Bend-Mishawaka, IN, Aug. 1993 ............................... 3070-45 Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL, July 1993 .............. 3070-27 Utica-Rome, NY, July 1993 ................................................... 3070-32 Visalia-Tulare-Porterville, CA, July 1993 ............................. 3070-33 Washington, DC—MD-VA, Jan. 1994 .................................. 3075- 7 Wilmington, DE—NJ—MD, Oct. 1993 .................................. 3070-65 Worcester, MA, July 1993 .................................................... 3070-43  □ please enter a 1-year subscription for Occupational Compensation Surveys, at a price of $146.00 per year (outside U.S. add $36.50).  D Enclosed is a check or money order payable to Superintendent of Documents D Charge to my GPO account no. □ Charge to my  □  Account no---------------------------------- --------------------- ------------------------------------------- Expiration date  or Prices of individual surveys vary by area. For current price information, call GPO Telephone order/inquiries (412) 644-2721.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Name Organization (if applicable) Street address City, State Zip code  Bulletin No.  U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Washington, DC 20212  Third Class Mail Postage & Fees Paid U.S. Department of Labor Permit No. G-738  Official Business Penalty for private use, $300  Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional Offices Region 1 1 Congress Street, 10th Floor Boston, MA 02114-2023 Phone: (617) 565-2327  Region V 9th Floor Federal Office Building 230 S. Dearborn Street Chicago, IL 60604-1595 Phone: (312) 353-1880  Region II Room 808 201 Varick Street New York, NY 10014-4811 Phone: (212) 337-2400  Region VI Federal Building 525 Griffin Street, Room 221 Dallas, TX 75202-5028 Phone:(214)767-6970  Region III 3535 Market Street, 8th Floor Gateway Building, Suite 8000 Philadelphia, PA 19104-3309 Phone: (215) 596-1154  Regions VII and VIII City Center Square 1100 Main, Suite 600 Kansas City, MO 64105-2112 Phone: (816) 426-2481  Region IV 1371 Peachtree Street, N.E. Atlanta, GA 30367-2302 Phone: (404) 347-4416  Regions IX and X 71 Stevenson Street P.O. Box 193766 San Francisco, CA 94119-3766 Phone: (415) 744-6600  Ragkxill   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Rtglon VI
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102