View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

Occupational Compensation Survey: Pay and Benefits  Omaha, NE-IA, Metropolitan Area, March 1996  ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 3085-14  ________________________________________________________________ Preface This bulletin provides results of a March 1996 survey of occupational pay and employee benefits in the Omaha, NE-IA Metropolitan Statistical Area. This survey was conducted as part of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Compensation Survey Program. Data from this program are for use in implementing the Federal Employees Pay Comparability Act of 1990. The survey was conducted by the Bureau's regional office in Kansas City, MO under the direction of Stan Suchman, Assistant Regional Commissioner for Operations. The survey could not have been conducted without the cooperation of the many private firms and government jurisdictions that provided pay and benefit data included in this bulletin. The Bureau thanks these respondents for their cooperation.  For additional information regarding this survey or similar surveys conducted in this regional area, please contact the BLS Kansas City Regional Office at (816) 466-2481. You may also write to the Bureau of Labor Statistics at: Division of Occupational Pay and Employee Benefits, 2 Massachusetts Avenue, NE, Washington, D.C. 20212-0001 or call the Occupational Compensation Survey Program information line at (202) 606-6220. Material in this bulletin is in the public domain and, with appropriate credit, may be reproduced without permission. This information will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 606-STAT; TDD phone: (202) 606-5897; TDD message referral phone: 1-800-326-2577.  For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government  For an account of a similar survey conducted in 1994, see  Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, GPO bookstores, and the  Occupational Compensation Survey: Pay Only, Omaha, NE-IA.  Bureau of Labor Statistics, Publications Sales Center, P.O. Box 2145, Chicago, IL 60690-2145.  Occupational Compensation Survey: Pay and Benefits  Omaha, NE-IA, Metropolitan Area, March 1996  ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  U.S. Department of Labor Robert B. Reich, Secretary Bureau of Labor Statistics Katharine G. Abraham, Commissioner July 1996 Bulletin 3085-14  Contents Page  Page  Introduction ...............................................................................................................  2  Establishment practices and employee benefits:  Tables:  All establishments: A-1.  Tables—Continued  Weekly hours and pay of professional and administrative occupations ......................................................... Weekly hours and pay of technical and protective service occupations .................................................................. `  6  A-3.  Weekly hours and pay of clerical occupations ...............................  8  A-4.  Hourly pay of maintenance and toolroom  A-5.  Hourly pay of material movement and custodial occupations ................................................................................  Annual paid holidays for full-time workers .....................................  18  B-2.  Annual paid vacation provisions for full-time workers ....................  20  B-3.  Insurance, health, and retirement plans offered to full-time workers .........................................................................  25  A.  Scope and method of survey ..........................................................  A-1  B.  Occupational descriptions ..............................................................  B-1  3  A-2.  occupations ................................................................................  B-1.  10  11  Appendixes:  Introduction  Pay The A-series tables provide estimates of straight-time weekly or hourly pay by occupation. Tables A-1 through A-5 provide data for selected white- and bluecollar occupations common to a variety of industries. Occupational pay information is presented for all industries covered by the survey and, where possible, for private industry (e.g., for goods- and service-producing industries) and for State and local governments.  This survey of occupational pay and employee benefits in the Omaha, NE-IA Metropolitan Statistical Area (Cass, Douglas, Sarpy, and Washington Counties, NE; and Pottawattamie County, IA) was conducted as part of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Compensation Survey Program. The survey is one of a number conducted annually in metropolitan areas throughout the United States. (See listing of reports for other surveys at the end of this bulletin.) A major objective of the Occupational Compensation Survey Program is to describe the level and distribution of occupational pay in a variety of the Nation's local labor markets, using a consistent survey approach. Another Program objective is to provide information on the incidence of employee benefits among and within local labor markets. The Program develops information that is used for a variety of purposes, including wage and salary administration, collective bargaining, and assistance in determining business or plant location. Survey results also are used by the U.S. Department of Labor in making wage determinations under the Service Contract Act, and by the President's Pay Agent (the Secretary of Labor and Directors of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and the U.S. Office of Management and Budget) in determining local pay adjustments under the Federal Employee Pay Comparability Act of 1990. This latter requirement resulted in: (1) Expanding the survey's industrial coverage to include all private nonfarm establishments (except households) employing 50 workers or more and to State and local governments and (2) adding more professional, administrative, technical, and protective service occupations to the surveys.  Establishment practices and benefit tables The B-series tables provide information on paid holidays; paid vacations; and insurance, health, and retirement plan provisions for full-time, white- and bluecollar employees. Appendixes Appendix A describes the concepts, methods, and coverage used in the Occupational Compensation Survey Program. It also includes information on the area's industrial composition and the reliability of occupational pay estimates. Appendix B includes the descriptions used by Bureau field economists to classify workers in the survey occupations.  2  Table A-1. All establishments: Weekly hours and pay of professional and administrative occupations, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996  Occupation and level  Average Number weekly hours1 of workers (standard)  Weekly pay (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly pay (in dollars) of—  Middle range  300 and under 350  350 400  400 500  500 600  600 700  700 800  800 900  900 1000  1000 1100  1100 1200  1200 1300  1300 1400  1400 1500  1500 1600  1600 1700  1700 1800  1800 1900  1900 2000  2000 2100  2100 2200  2200 and over  PROFESSIONAL OCCUPATIONS Accountants ................................................ Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  935 883 52  39.9 39.9 40.0  $705 701 788  $668 654 776  $545 538 688  – – –  $792 785 896  – – –  5 5 –  10 11 6  24 25 10  17 17 21  21 21 21  7 7 17  5 4 10  5 5 6  1 1 10  2 2 –  1 1 –  2 2 –  ( 3) ( 3) –  ( 3) ( 3) –  – – –  – – –  ( 3) ( 3) –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  127 127  39.7 39.7  443 443  431 431  392 392  – –  485 485  – –  35 35  47 47  17 17  – –  1 1  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  353 339  39.9 39.9  586 585  577 577  529 529  – –  635 635  – –  – –  10 10  55 55  25 25  9 8  1 1  1 1  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 3 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  306 278 28  39.9 39.9 40.0  758 756 775  767 767 –  688 693 –  – – –  798 792 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  4 4 –  23 22 32  49 51 25  18 17 32  5 4 11  1 1 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 4 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  110 102  39.9 39.9  1,006 1,003  1,006 1,005  908 904  – –  1,077 1,077  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  12 13  10 11  25 25  34 34  9 6  7 8  2 2  1 1  1 1  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 5 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  37 35  40.0 40.0  1,351 1,366  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  5 3  11 9  19 20  19 20  38 40  8 9  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Attorneys ..................................................... Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  151 63 88  39.8 39.6 40.0  1,134 1,486 882  1,009 1,452 784  703 1,070 579  – – –  1,452 1,724 1,058  – – –  – – –  – – –  17 – 30  7 2 10  9 5 11  9 13 7  6 3 8  9 5 11  2 – 3  3 2 3  11 11 10  8 17 1  2 3 1  7 13 2  3 6 –  – – –  3 6 –  1 2 1  – – –  Level 2 ...................................................... State and local government ..................  47 35  39.9 40.0  839 839  808 782  708 677  – –  947 1,009  – –  – –  – –  – –  19 26  28 29  21 9  13 11  13 17  – –  6 9  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 3 ......................................................  36  39.7  1,219  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  8  8  19  8  3  42  11  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  5 13 –  4  Level 4 ......................................................  29  39.7  1,626  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  3  28  10  34  10  –  14  –  –  –  Engineers .................................................... Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  803 578 225  40.0 40.0 40.0  1,054 1,030 1,118  1,028 1,019 1,095  876 869 949  – – –  1,211 1,154 1,292  – – –  – – –  – – –  1 2 –  4 6 3 ( )  8 9 5  14 15 12  13 13 15  20 21 20  13 15 9  10 8 15  7 5 12  6 4 9  1 1 2  1 1 1  1 1 –  – – –  ( 3) ( 3) –  ( 3) ( 3) –  – – –  – – –  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  49 43  40.0 40.0  648 636  654 646  600 577  – –  673 667  – –  – –  – –  24 28  57 65  18 7  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  105 72 33  40.0 40.0 40.0  825 815 847  840 823 –  773 747 –  – – –  868 868 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  6 7 3  34 42 18  46 36 67  11 11 12  3 4 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 3 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  272 196 76  40.0 40.0 40.0  994 991 1,000  1,002 1,012 1,002  923 896 951  – – –  1,067 1,079 1,036  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  7 10 –  13 15 5  26 21 38  38 33 49  15 18 7  2 2 1  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 4 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  301 231 70  40.0 40.0 40.0  1,155 1,128 1,242  1,154 1,135 1,244  1,019 1,015 1,180  – – –  1,273 1,273 1,306  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  10 13 –  8 10 –  18 20 10  21 21 21  23 18 41  14 12 20  7 6 7  ( 3) ( 3) –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  See footnotes at end of table.  3  Table A-1. All establishments: Weekly hours and pay of professional and administrative occupations, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 — Continued  Occupation and level  Average Number weekly hours1 of workers (standard)  Weekly pay (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly pay (in dollars) of— 300 and under 350  350 400  400 500  500 600  600 700  700 800  800 900  900 1000  1000 1100  1100 1200  1200 1300  1300 1400  1400 1500  1500 1600  1600 1700  1700 1800  1800 1900  1900 2000  2000 2100  2100 2200  2200 and over  – $1,489 – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  8 17  2 –  5 –  22 3  40 37  14 23  6 10  5 10  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Middle range  Level 5 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  65 30  40.0 40.0  $1,418 1,449  $1,409 –  $1,382 –  Scientists: Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  120 106  40.0 40.0  763 747  737 736  705 704  – –  804 787  – –  – –  – –  – –  17 20  57 63  16 14  9 3  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 4 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  450 450  40.0 40.0  1,045 1,045  1,017 1,017  948 948  – –  1,125 1,125  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  12 12  33 33  30 30  10 10  9 9  5 5  2 2  ( 3) ( 3)  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Scientists, Computer/Engineering: Level 4 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  450 450  40.0 40.0  1,045 1,045  1,017 1,017  948 948  – –  1,125 1,125  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  12 12  33 33  30 30  10 10  9 9  5 5  2 2  ( 3) ( 3)  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Buyer/Contracting Specialists .................. Private industry .........................................  83 72  39.9 39.8  681 654  640 565  500 482  – –  852 812  – –  16 18  7 8  24 28  8 10  16 11  10 10  8 4  6 6  2 3  2 3  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  37 31  39.9 39.8  603 571  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  16 19  43 52  16 19  22 10  3 –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 3 ......................................................  28  39.7  914  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  4  4  18  25  25  14  4  7  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  3  3  3  ADMINISTRATIVE OCCUPATIONS  Computer Programmers ............................ Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  1,361 1,298 63  39.8 39.8 40.0  706 702 804  680 673 820  584 577 720  – – –  798 790 913  – – –  ( ) ( 3) –  7 7 –  22 23 5  26 27 16  20 20 27  12 11 24  6 5 27  5 5 2  1 1 –  1 1 –  ( ) ( 3) –  ( ) ( 3) –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  150 145  40.0 40.0  502 499  495 491  445 445  – –  538 538  – –  1 1  51 52  41 41  6 5  1 1  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  449 436  39.8 39.8  594 592  589 589  558 558  – –  630 628  – –  – –  4 4  50 52  41 40  4 3  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 3 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  546 502 44  39.9 39.8 40.0  746 736 862  753 735 867  681 681 799  – – –  804 790 924  – – –  – – –  – – –  1 2 –  30 32 –  42 44 27  22 21 32  5 2 39  ( 3) – 2  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 4 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  190 189  39.5 39.5  949 950  956 957  878 878  – –  1,036 1,036  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  13 13  21 20  27 27  35 35  5 5  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Computer Systems Analysts ..................... Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  1,937 1,907 30  39.9 39.8 40.0  940 938 1,042  923 920 –  842 839 –  – – –  1,019 1,015 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  1 1 –  5 5 –  13 13 7  25 25 3  26 27 10  16 15 53  7 6 23  3 3 3  2 2 –  1 1 –  1 1 –  – – –  – – –  ( 3) ( 3) –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  378 373  40.0 40.0  766 764  769 769  692 692  – –  846 833  – –  – –  – –  6 6  20 20  41 41  31 31  2 1  1 1  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  1,056 1,038  39.9 39.9  929 927  925 923  875 875  – –  995 990  – –  – –  – –  – –  2 2  8 8  29 30  37 37  18 17  5 5  ( 3) ( 3)  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  See footnotes at end of table.  4  Table A-1. All establishments: Weekly hours and pay of professional and administrative occupations, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 — Continued  Occupation and level  Average Number weekly hours1 of workers (standard)  Weekly pay (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly pay (in dollars) of—  Middle range  300 and under 350  350 400  400 500  500 600  600 700  700 800  800 900  900 1000  1000 1100  1100 1200  1200 1300  1300 1400  1400 1500  1500 1600  1600 1700  1700 1800  1800 1900  1900 2000  2000 2100  2100 2200  2200 and over  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 3 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  462 455  39.8 39.8  $1,081 1,081  $1,043 1,044  $940 937  – $1,200 – 1,200  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  2 2  12 12  25 25  24 24  11 10  10 10  8 9  3 3  4 4  – –  – –  ( 3) ( 3)  Computer Systems Analyst Supervisors/Managers ............................. Private industry .........................................  214 214  39.7 39.7  1,248 1,248  1,231 1,231  1,077 1,077  – –  1,346 1,346  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  9 9  21 21  18 18  19 19  16 16  9 9  1 1  – –  1 1  2 2  1 1  1 1  – –  1 1  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  84 84  39.4 39.4  1,332 1,332  1,308 1,308  1,292 1,292  – –  1,380 1,380  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  11 11  35 35  38 38  13 13  2 2  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  1 1  Personnel Specialists ................................ Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  628 572 56  39.9 39.9 40.0  805 795 906  771 745 914  577 577 745  – – –  1,000 1,000 1,085  1 1 –  1 1 –  10 11 4  17 18 –  16 16 13  9 7 27  12 12 5  9 8 14  10 9 18  7 6 11  7 7 9  1 1 –  1 1 –  1 1 –  ( 3) ( 3) –  – – –  – – –  ( 3) ( 3) –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  216 203  39.9 39.9  576 570  564 551  507 500  – –  621 609  – –  – –  22 22  42 45  29 28  5 2  1 1  1 1  ( 3) ( 3)  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 3 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  175 157  39.9 39.9  817 817  784 804  681 667  – –  929 929  – –  – –  2 2  8 9  19 20  22 19  15 16  20 20  7 7  2 2  5 6  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 4 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  196 172  40.0 39.9  1,051 1,045  1,059 1,026  892 866  – –  1,192 1,185  – –  – –  – –  – –  2 2  3 3  22 24  8 7  26 24  16 16  18 17  2 2  3 3  – –  1 1  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Personnel Supervisors/Managers ............. Private industry .........................................  38 34  39.9 39.9  1,519 1,525  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  5 6  – –  3 3  8 9  3 –  8 9  26 26  11 9  5 3  18 21  – –  11 12  3 3  – –  – –  Director of Personnel .................................  27  39.9  1,190  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  4  11  19  19  19  11  7  –  –  –  –  –  7  –  –  4  1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges.  – –  3  Less than 0.5 percent. Workers were distributed as follows: 6 percent at $2,200 and under $2,300; 2 percent at $2,300 and under $2,400; 2 percent at $2,400 and under $2,500; 2 percent at $2,500 and under $2,600; and 2 percent at $2,800 and under $2,900. 4  NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall occupation or occupational levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  5  Table A-2. All establishments: Weekly hours and pay of technical and protective service occupations, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996  Occupation and level  Average Number weekly hours1 of workers (standard)  Weekly pay (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly pay (in dollars) of—  Middle range  300 and under 325  325 350  350 375  375 400  400 425  425 450  450 475  475 500  500 525  525 550  550 575  575 600  600 625  625 650  650 675  675 700  700 750  750 800  800 850  850 900  900 950  TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS Computer Operators .................................. Private industry .........................................  615 601  40.0 40.0  $495 495  $448 447  $374 372  – –  $632 632  6 6  7 7  14 14  6 6  11 10  7 6  7 7  6 6  2 2  2 2  2 2  3 3  1 1  11 11  1 1  1 1  12 12  1 1  ( 3) ( 3)  ( 3) ( 3)  ( 3) ( 3)  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  338 329  40.0 40.0  404 402  405 400  360 360  – –  441 441  9 10  9 9  23 23  8 8  18 17  10 10  11 11  7 7  2 2  ( 3) –  3 2  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Drafters ........................................................ Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  190 148 42  40.0 40.0 40.0  510 491 576  510 490 595  423 406 496  – – –  594 556 609  3 3 –  4 5 –  5 7 –  – – –  13 17 –  7 8 5  5 5 5  9 7 19  6 7 2  9 11 2  8 9 5  14 8 33  4 4 5  1 1 –  3 1 7  4 2 10  4 3 7  – – –  1 1 –  – – –  – – –  Level 1 ......................................................  41  40.0  381  406  340  –  406  12  20  12  –  46  5  2  2  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  76 52  40.0 40.0  503 481  510 481  454 440  – –  548 536  – –  – –  7 10  – –  8 12  9 13  12 15  13 6  12 15  16 21  4 4  17 4  3 –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 3 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  67 58  40.0 40.0  580 570  575 560  540 529  – –  621 604  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  7 9  – –  10 12  3 3  9 10  18 19  19 17  9 10  1 2  4 3  6 5  12 9  – –  – –  – –  – –  Engineering Technicians ...........................  114  40.0  729  714  666  –  790  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  4  –  4  –  11  5  8  10  14  20  5  16  3  Level 4 ......................................................  53  40.0  752  790  666  –  840  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  9  –  9  –  –  –  8  8  –  30  11  25  –  Engineering Technicians, Civil ................. State and local government ......................  112 51  40.0 40.0  590 679  544 709  450 524  – –  723 846  7 –  – –  5 4  4 2  4 2  2 4  5 4  2 4  10 6  11 –  4 8  2 4  1 2  4 8  8 –  – –  10 14  8 10  7 16  1 2  5 12  Level 2: State and local government ..................  6  40.0  446  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  17  17  33  –  33  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  Level 3 ...................................................... State and local government ..................  38 17  40.0 40.0  577 626  – 596  – 562  – –  – 723  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  29 18  32 –  11 24  5 12  3 6  – –  3 –  – –  18 41  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 4: State and local government ..................  17  40.0  778  784  779  –  846  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  24  –  –  –  29  47  –  –  Level 5 ...................................................... State and local government ..................  7 7  40.0 40.0  917 917  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  14 14  86 86  See footnotes at end of table.  6  Table A-2. All establishments: Weekly hours and pay of technical and protective service occupations, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 — Continued  Occupation and level  Average Number weekly hours1 of workers (standard)  Weekly pay (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly pay (in dollars) of—  Middle range  300 and under 325  325 350  350 375  375 400  400 425  425 450  450 475  475 500  500 525  525 550  550 575  575 600  600 625  625 650  650 675  675 700  700 750  750 800  800 850  850 900  900 950  PROTECTIVE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS Corrections Officers ................................... State and local government ......................  97 97  40.0 40.0  $408 408  $390 390  $378 378  – –  $410 410  – –  – –  5 5  53 53  26 26  6 6  2 2  – –  – –  8 8  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Police Officers ............................................ State and local government ......................  787 787  40.0 40.0  745 745  796 796  682 682  – –  831 831  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  1 1  2 2  1 1  3 3  3 3  4 4  1 1  1 1  3 3  11 11  11 11  10 10  48 48  – –  – –  Level 1 ...................................................... State and local government ..................  787 787  40.0 40.0  745 745  796 796  682 682  – –  831 831  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  1 1  2 2  1 1  3 3  3 3  4 4  1 1  1 1  3 3  11 11  11 11  10 10  48 48  – –  – –  1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and methods used to  compute means, medians, and middle ranges. 3 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall occupation or occupational levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  7  Table A-3. All establishments: Weekly hours and pay of clerical occupations, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996  Occupation and level  Average Number weekly hours1 of workers (standard)  Weekly pay (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  $390 382 462  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly pay (in dollars) of—  Middle range  $330 323 392  – – –  $430 423 493  225 and under 250  250 275  275 300  300 325  325 350  350 375  375 400  400 425  425 450  450 500  500 550  550 600  600 650  650 700  700 750  750 800  800 850  850 900  900 950  950 and over  ( 3) ( 3) –  2 2 –  5 6 –  16 17 5  10 11 6  9 9 2  16 16 19  14 14 6  9 9 11  7 5 31  7 6 13  1 1 3  3 3 5  1 1 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Clerks, Accounting ..................................... Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  1,130 1,022 108  40.0 40.0 40.0  $396 390 450  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  29 29  40.0 40.0  315 315  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  28 28  59 59  3 3  – –  – –  10 10  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  527 509  40.0 40.0  359 359  337 337  320 320  – –  395 395  1 1  4 4  10 10  28 28  17 17  9 9  9 7  8 8  4 4  3 3  6 7  1 1  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 3 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  496 427 69  40.0 40.0 40.0  421 417 448  413 410 466  382 378 408  – – –  442 430 475  – – –  – – –  – – –  3 4 –  5 5 3  10 12 1  27 28 19  19 21 9  15 15 14  10 5 41  7 6 12  ( 3) ( 3) 1  3 3 –  1 1 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 4 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  78 57  40.0 39.9  518 511  524 494  437 422  – –  610 610  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  4 5  17 23  6 5  22 19  15 11  6 5  27 28  3 4  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Clerks, General ........................................... Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  1,650 1,385 265  40.0 40.0 40.0  368 359 418  355 347 431  319 317 363  – – –  377 369 452  ( 3) ( 3) –  3 3 3  8 9 3  17 19 6  18 20 9  27 31 6  7 6 11  3 2 11  5 1 25  3 2 13  4 3 8  2 2 3  1 1 2  1 2 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 1 ......................................................  59  40.0  291  274  260  –  299  5  49  24  7  2  3  10  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  659 537 122  40.0 40.0 40.0  332 317 395  318 317 431  303 300 349  – – –  344 332 436  – – –  4 4 4  19 22 3  38 46 6  18 20 13  6 5 7  3 1 11  2 2 3  8 – 45  2 1 7  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 3: State and local government ..................  97  40.0  428  422  386  –  483  –  –  –  8  8  5  8  25  11  23  10  1  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  Level 4 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  99 71 28  40.0 40.0 40.0  537 536 540  555 555 –  507 514 –  – – –  601 601 –  – – –  – – –  1 1 –  1 1 –  – – –  3 4 –  3 3 4  4 4 4  1 1 –  9 8 11  24 20 36  25 25 25  24 25 21  4 6 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Key Entry Operators ................................... Private industry .........................................  613 607  39.9 39.9  323 323  329 329  280 280  – –  350 350  9 9  6 6  22 22  11 11  24 24  12 12  5 5  9 9  ( 3) ( 3)  1 1  1 1  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  399 395  39.9 39.9  300 300  280 280  277 277  – –  333 333  14 14  9 9  33 33  12 12  22 23  4 4  3 3  2 2  ( 3) ( 3)  ( 3) –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  214 212  39.9 39.9  367 367  354 354  334 334  – –  400 400  – –  – –  2 2  9 9  27 27  27 26  7 8  21 22  – –  2 2  3 3  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Personnel Assistants ................................. Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  314 282 32  39.9 39.9 40.0  425 414 519  435 427 –  370 361 –  – – –  470 470 –  – – –  – – –  2 2 –  8 9 –  11 11 6  7 8 –  10 10 6  6 7 –  10 11 6  37 38 25  4 2 22  2 ( 3) 19  ( 3) ( 3) –  2 – 16  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  27 27  39.7 39.7  335 335  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  22 22  30 30  15 15  – –  33 33  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  90 86  40.0 40.0  372 368  347 347  330 328  – –  400 400  – –  – –  – –  20 21  31 30  14 15  6 6  12 13  4 5  7 7  3 3  2 –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  See footnotes at end of table.  8  Table A-3. All establishments: Weekly hours and pay of clerical occupations, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 — Continued  Occupation and level  Average Number weekly hours1 of workers (standard)  Weekly pay (in dollars)2  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time weekly pay (in dollars) of—  Middle range  225 and under 250  250 275  275 300  300 325  325 350  350 375  375 400  400 425  425 450  450 500  500 550  550 600  600 650  650 700  700 750  750 800  800 850  850 900  900 950  950 and over  Level 3 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  191 169  39.9 39.9  $456 450  $467 456  $431 430  – –  $480 473  – –  – –  – –  – –  1 1  5 6  9 9  4 5  15 15  58 60  5 2  2 1  1 1  1 –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Secretaries .................................................. Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  1,148 976 172  39.9 39.9 40.0  474 473 478  446 444 461  381 381 380  – – –  531 531 577  ( 3) ( 3) –  ( 3) ( 3) –  1 1 1  3 3 3  7 7 12  10 10 8  12 12 8  11 10 11  9 10 3  14 15 10  12 12 12  9 7 18  4 4 5  2 1 8  1 1 1  3 3 –  1 1 –  1 1 –  ( 3) ( 3) –  ( 3) ( 3) –  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  145 132  39.9 39.9  360 361  360 361  336 340  – –  381 381  – –  1 1  4 4  13 13  28 27  20 20  20 21  5 5  8 8  – –  – –  – –  – –  1 1  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  499 411 88  39.9 39.9 40.0  428 428 426  409 409 424  370 374 356  – – –  488 462 518  ( 3) ( 3) –  – – –  ( 3) ( 3) –  3 2 5  9 7 17  15 16 13  13 13 10  19 20 13  9 10 3  11 10 13  17 16 22  3 3 6  – – –  ( 3) ( 3) –  2 2 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 3 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  389 327 62  39.9 39.9 40.0  515 508 552  488 482 579  445 444 458  – – –  569 548 599  – – –  – – –  – – –  1 1 –  – – –  1 1 2  11 12 5  5 3 13  12 13 2  28 31 11  12 13 2  15 10 42  5 4 13  2 1 8  1 1 3  7 9 –  – – –  ( 3) ( 3) –  – – –  – – –  Level 4 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  105 96  39.8 39.8  659 658  616 610  578 575  – –  693 768  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  3 3  9 9  29 31  22 24  14 6  – –  3 3  10 11  10 10  1 1  – –  Switchboard-Operator-Receptionists ....... Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  623 565 58  40.0 40.0 40.0  331 329 347  327 327 325  297 292 312  – – –  360 360 366  ( 3) ( 3) –  13 13 5  13 13 7  24 23 34  21 22 10  9 8 21  12 12 10  6 7 2  – – –  1 1 10  1 1 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Word Processors ........................................ Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  138 115 23  40.0 39.9 40.0  360 355 384  345 339 360  325 320 341  – – –  387 387 384  – – –  – – –  7 9 –  20 24 –  24 23 30  16 12 35  16 16 17  8 10 –  2 3 –  2 3 –  3 1 13  1 – 4  – – –  – – –  – – –  1 1 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  92 86  39.9 39.9  338 336  335 334  310 310  – –  352 352  – –  – –  11 12  30 33  26 28  20 14  2 2  9 9  2 2  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  44 28  40.0 40.0  394 399  385 –  367 –  – –  400 –  – –  – –  – –  – –  20 7  9 7  45 57  7 11  2 4  7 11  7 4  2 –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and  methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges. 3 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall occupation or occupational levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  9  Table A-4. All establishments: Hourly pay of maintenance and toolroom occupations, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 Hourly pay (in dollars)1 Occupation and level  Number of workers  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly pay (in dollars) of— 5.50 and under 5.75  5.75 6.00  6.00 6.50  6.50 7.00  7.00 7.50  7.50 8.00  8.00 8.50  8.50 9.00  9.00 9.50  – $12.00 – 11.20 – 14.38  1 1 –  1 2 –  3 4 –  3 4 –  3 5 –  3 5 –  3 2 3  9 12 –  6 7 3  5 6 3  16 19 9  21 18 31  12 10 16  3 3 3  9 2 27  2 1 4  ( 2) ( 2) 1  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Middle range  9.50 10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 23.00  General Maintenance Workers .................. Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  681 488 193  $10.59 9.91 12.31  $10.83 10.00 12.10  $8.84 8.50 11.40  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  399 339 60  9.34 9.08 10.80  9.23 9.00 10.84  8.00 7.75 9.76  – – –  10.83 10.50 11.94  1 1 –  2 2 –  5 6 –  5 6 –  6 7 –  6 6 –  5 4 10  15 17 –  10 10 10  6 5 10  18 17 20  14 11 30  8 7 15  1 1 –  1 – 5  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  282 149 133  12.37 11.81 12.99  11.88 11.53 12.10  11.40 10.75 11.40  – – –  14.00 12.52 14.38  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  5 9 –  14 22 5  32 34 31  17 17 17  7 9 5  20 5 37  4 3 6  1 1 1  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Maintenance Electricians ........................... Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  269 227 42  15.98 15.33 19.52  15.14 15.14 20.89  14.94 14.94 17.92  – – –  15.69 15.14 20.89  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  ( 2) ( 2) –  1 ( 2) 5  37 44 –  43 50 10  ( 2) ( 2) –  2 ( 2) 12  – – –  3 2 10  10 – 64  2 2 –  – – –  Maintenance Electronics Technicians ...... Private industry .........................................  344 328  16.54 16.25  16.24 15.96  15.14 15.09  – –  18.21 18.21  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  2 2  – –  – –  1 2  6 6  3 3  10 10  28 29  4 4  4 4  38 40  ( 2) ( 2)  – –  – –  5 –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  282 282  16.69 16.69  17.86 17.86  15.17 15.17  – –  18.21 18.21  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  ( 2) ( 2)  5 5  1 1  11 11  27 27  5 5  5 5  47 47  ( 2) ( 2)  – –  – –  – –  Maintenance Machinists ............................ Private industry .........................................  202 173  17.70 17.18  15.75 15.14  14.60 14.60  – –  21.38 21.38  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  4 5  22 26  28 32  2 2  – –  – –  – –  11 –  33 35  – –  Maintenance Mechanics, Motor Vehicle ... State and local government ......................  341 111  13.84 15.51  13.80 15.15  12.00 14.00  – –  14.92 19.04  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  14 –  4 5  24 15  13 5  21 16  10 30  3 4  2 –  1 –  9 26  – –  – –  – –  Skilled Multi-Craft Maintenance Workers .....................................................  111  20.10  20.37  20.37  –  21.38  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  1  1  –  7  5  –  –  –  48  39  –  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges.  2  Less than 0.5 percent.  NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall occupation or occupational levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  10  Table A-5. All establishments: Hourly pay of material movement and custodial occupations, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 Hourly pay (in dollars)1 Occupation and level  Number of workers  Mean  Median  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly pay (in dollars) of—  Middle range  4.25 and under 4.50  4.50 4.75  4.75 5.00  5.00 5.50  5.50 6.00  6.00 6.50  6.50 7.00  7.00 7.50  7.50 8.00  8.00 8.50  8.50 9.00  9.00 9.50  9.50 10.00 10.50 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 10.00 10.50 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00  Guards ......................................................... Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  1,087 999 88  $6.84 6.33 12.65  $6.00 6.00 14.19  $5.50 5.50 11.07  – – –  $7.42 6.50 14.19  1 1 –  1 1 –  4 4 –  15 16 –  24 26 –  24 26 –  2 2 –  5 6 2  2 2 1  5 5 5  3 3 7  2 1 6  2 2 2  1 2 –  1 1 2  3 3 10  ( 2) ( 2) –  1 – 14  3 – 33  1 – 18  – – –  – – –  – – –  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  970 939 31  6.22 6.10 9.69  6.00 5.85 9.15  5.50 5.50 8.67  – – –  6.25 6.00 11.59  1 1 –  1 1 –  4 5 –  16 17 –  27 28 –  27 28 –  2 2 –  6 6 6  2 2 3  5 4 13  3 2 19  1 1 16  1 1 6  1 1 –  1 1 6  2 1 29  ( 2) ( 2) –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Janitors ........................................................ Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  2,518 1,611 907  7.63 6.56 9.55  7.03 6.30 10.33  6.04 5.75 8.51  – – –  9.50 7.00 10.33  – – –  – – –  – – –  4 6 –  16 25 ( 2)  17 25 2  11 15 2  8 10 6  7 6 9  5 5 4  5 3 9  2 ( 2) 3  4 2 7  14 ( 2) 39  5 ( 2) 13  2 1 5  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  Material Movement and Storage Workers ....................................... Private industry ......................................... State and local government ......................  2,718 2,650 68  9.76 9.69 12.57  10.05 9.98 13.75  7.55 7.52 7.89  – – –  11.40 11.40 16.57  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  12 12 –  5 5 –  6 5 18  6 6 12  4 4 –  4 4 6  8 8 –  6 6 –  6 6 –  14 15 –  12 13 3  6 6 6  10 10 19  ( 2) ( 2) 9  1 ( 2) 3  ( 2) ( 2) 1  ( 2) – 18  ( 2) – 6  Level 1 ...................................................... Private industry .....................................  451 426  9.88 9.99  10.13 11.29  7.21 7.21  – –  11.89 11.89  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  10 10  11 12  14 12  2 –  5 6  5 4  – –  1 1  3 4  – –  28 30  – –  20 21  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Level 2 ...................................................... Private industry ..................................... State and local government ..................  2,250 2,224 26  9.68 9.64 13.77  9.91 9.90 –  7.80 7.74 –  – – –  11.26 10.96 –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  – – –  12 12 –  3 4 –  4 4 –  7 7 –  4 4 –  3 3 –  9 9 –  7 7 –  7 7 –  17 18 –  9 9 8  7 7 15  8 7 46  ( 2) ( 2) 23  1 1 8  ( 2) ( 2) –  – – –  – – –  Forklift Operators .................................. Private industry .................................  441 441  10.27 10.27  11.56 11.56  8.00 8.00  – –  12.56 12.56  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  3 3  13 13  7 7  15 15  ( 2) ( 2)  2 2  5 5  1 1  3 3  17 17  30 30  4 4  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  Shipping/Receiving Clerks .................... Private industry .................................  644 640  9.94 9.92  10.10 10.10  7.82 7.81  – –  11.10 10.94  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  4 4  ( 2) ( 2)  5 5  18 18  4 4  1 1  – –  15 15  19 19  9 9  10 10  – –  12 12  ( 2) ( 2)  2 2  1 1  – –  – –  Truckdrivers ................................................ Private industry .........................................  1,009 987  13.05 13.11  14.36 14.36  11.18 11.23  – –  15.35 15.35  – –  – –  – –  – –  – –  6 6  4 4  3 3  1 1  1 1  2 2  2 2  4 2  1 1  7 6  8 8  27 27  10 10  – –  17 17  – –  1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. See Appendix A for definitions and methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges.  2  1 1  8 8  Less than 0.5 percent.  NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual intervals may not equal 100 percent. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Overall occupation or occupational levels may include data for categories not shown separately.  11  Table B-1. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 White-collar workers Number of holidays  All full-time workers (in percent) .........................................  Blue-collar workers  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  100  100  100  100  100  100  1  10  11  ( 1)  90  89  ( 1) 3 ( 1) 1 28 10 2 9 5 ( 1) 14 14 ( 1) 1  ( 1) 1 1 ( ) 13 1 25 12 46 -  In establishments not providing paid holidays ..........................  6  7  ( )  In establishments providing paid holidays ................................  94  93  ( 1) 1 ( ) ( 1) ( 1) 13 1 10 1 ( ) 17 20 1 12 7 5 3 1 1  ( 1) 1 ( ) ( 1) ( 1) 14 2 11 1 18 21 1 12 7 2 3 1 1  ( 1) 2 16 2 20 12 47 -  ( 1) 3 ( 1) 1 25 9 2 8 6 ( 1) 15 14 5 ( 1) 1  2 days or more .................................................................... 3 days or more .................................................................... 4 days or more .................................................................... 5 days or more .................................................................... 6 days or more .................................................................... 7 days or more .................................................................... 8 days or more .................................................................... 9 days or more .................................................................... 10 days or more .................................................................. 11 days or more .................................................................. 12 days or more .................................................................. 13 days or more .................................................................. 14 days or more .................................................................. 15 days or more .................................................................. 16 days or more ..................................................................  94 94 94 94 93 80 68 51 30 17 10 5 2 1 1  93 93 93 93 93 79 66 47 26 14 7 5 2 1 1  99 99 99 99 99 99 99 98 79 60 47 -  90 87 87 87 86 61 52 42 36 21 6 1 1 1 1  88 85 85 85 84 56 46 35 30 16 1 1 1 1 1  99 99 99 99 99 99 98 98 84 58 46 -  Average number of paid holidays where provided (in days) .....  8.8  8.7  10.8  8.3  8.0  10.9  99  99  Number of holidays: 1 half day ...................................................................... 2 holidays ..................................................................... Plus 1 half day ........................................................ 3 holidays ..................................................................... 5 holidays ..................................................................... 6 holidays ..................................................................... Plus 2 half days ...................................................... 7 holidays ..................................................................... Plus 2 half days ...................................................... 8 holidays ..................................................................... 9 holidays ..................................................................... Plus 1 half day ........................................................ 10 holidays ................................................................... 11 holidays ................................................................... 12 holidays ................................................................... 13 holidays ................................................................... 14 holidays ................................................................... 16 holidays ...................................................................  -  -  Total paid holiday time2  1 Less than 0.5 percent. 2 Full and half days are combined. For example, the proportion of workers receiving 10 or more days includes those receiving at least 10 full days, or 9 full days plus 2 half days, or 8 full days and 4 half days, and so on.  NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  12  Table B-2. Annual paid vacation provisions for full-time workers, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 White-collar workers Item  All full-time workers (in percent) .........................................  Blue-collar workers  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  100  100  100  100  100  100  1  1  In establishments not providing paid vacations ........................  1  1  -  ( )  ( )  -  In establishments providing paid vacations .............................. Length-of-time payment ...................................................... Percentage payment .......................................................... Other ...................................................................................  99 98 1 ( 1)  99 98 1 -  100 99 1  99 99 ( 1) ( 1)  99 99 ( 1) -  100 99 ( 1)  Six months of service: Under 1 week ............................................................... 1 week .......................................................................... Over 1 and under 2 weeks ........................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................  1 39 7 1  1 41 7 ( 1)  22 6 5  ( 1) 23 2 ( 1)  ( 1) 25 2 ( 1)  -  1 year of service: 1 week .......................................................................... Over 1 and under 2 weeks ........................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........................................... Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 5 and under 6 weeks ...........................................  13 3 64 11 5 1 2  13 4 67 8 5 1 2  16 29 49 5 1 -  44 6 39 7 3 1 -  48 6 40 1 3 1 -  18 31 51 ( 1) -  2 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... Over 1 and under 2 weeks ........................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........................................... 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... Over 5 and under 6 weeks ...........................................  2 1 73 14 1 4 1 1 2  2 1 76 11 1 4 1 1 2  45 49 5 1 -  25 3 57 12 3 1 -  28 3 58 7 3 1 -  1 47 51 1 ( ) -  3 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........................................... 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... Over 5 and under 6 weeks ...........................................  ( 1) 71 15 4 4 1 1 2  1 73 12 5 4 1 1 2  45 49 5 1 -  6 75 14 1 3 1 -  7 79 10 ( 1) 3 1 -  49 49 2 ( 1) -  By vacation pay provisions for:2  See footnotes at end of table.  13  8 7 2  Table B-2. Annual paid vacation provisions for full-time workers, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 — Continued White-collar workers Item  Blue-collar workers  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  4 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........................................... 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... Over 5 and under 6 weeks ...........................................  ( 1) 71 14 5 5 1 2 2  ( 1) 74 11 5 5 1 1 2  45 49 1 5 -  6 75 14 1 3 1 -  7 79 9 1 4 1 -  49 49 2 1 ( ) -  5 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........................................... 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... 5 weeks ........................................................................ Over 5 and under 6 weeks ...........................................  ( 1) 23 10 50 6 3 5 ( 1) 2  ( 1) 24 9 50 5 3 5 ( 1) 2  -  5 52 6 24 8 1 3 -  5 57 6 22 3 2 4 -  15 5 37 43 ( 1) -  8 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........................................... 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... Over 5 and under 6 weeks ...........................................  ( 1) 11 3 61 13 3 6 2  ( 1) 12 3 61 11 3 6 2  -  5 26 2 50 12 1 4 -  5 29 2 51 7 2 4 -  -  10 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... 5 weeks ........................................................................ Over 5 and under 6 weeks ........................................... 6 weeks ........................................................................  ( 1) 9 42 11 27 6 2 2 ( 1)  ( 1) 10 42 10 27 6 2 2 ( 1)  -  5 12 58 12 10 3 1 ( 1) -  5 13 60 7 10 3 1 ( 1) -  By vacation pay provisions for:2  See footnotes at end of table.  14  8 22 53 11 1 5 -  2 59 33 1 5 -  1 40 33 22 5 -  4 43 52 ( 1) -  1 39 50 10 -  Table B-2. Annual paid vacation provisions for full-time workers, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 — Continued White-collar workers Item  Blue-collar workers State and local government  All industries  Private industries  12 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... 5 weeks ........................................................................ Over 5 and under 6 weeks ........................................... 6 weeks ........................................................................  ( 1) 9 39 10 30 7 2 2 1 ( )  ( 1) 10 39 10 31 6 2 2 1 ( )  -  15 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... 5 weeks ........................................................................ Over 5 and under 6 weeks ........................................... 6 weeks ........................................................................ 7 weeks ........................................................................  ( 1) 9 13 6 54 8 4 4 1 ( ) ( 1)  ( 1) 10 13 6 55 7 3 4 1 ( ) ( 1)  -  20 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... 5 weeks ........................................................................ Over 5 and under 6 weeks ........................................... 6 weeks ........................................................................ 7 weeks ........................................................................  ( 1) 9 8 6 42 6 22 4 ( 1) ( 1)  ( 1) 10 8 6 42 6 21 4 ( 1) ( 1)  -  25 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... 5 weeks ........................................................................ Over 5 and under 6 weeks ........................................... 6 weeks ........................................................................ Over 6 and under 7 weeks ........................................... 7 weeks ........................................................................  ( 1) 9 8 6 24 6 42 2 ( 1) 2 ( 1)  ( 1) 10 8 6 24 6 40 2 ( 1) 2 ( 1)  -  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  5 12 56 11 12 3 1 ( 1) -  5 13 59 7 12 3 1 ( 1) -  ( 1) 39 45 11 5 -  5 12 27 12 37 4 1 2 ( 1)  5 13 29 8 37 3 1 2 ( 1)  ( 1) 14 39 39 7 1 -  5 12 14 11 40 2 13 2 ( 1)  5 13 16 8 40 1 14 2 ( 1)  ( 1) 4 34 46 8 7 -  5 12 14 11 23 2 31 2 ( 1)  5 13 16 8 23 1 30 2 ( 1)  ( 1) 4 34 19 7 36 -  By vacation pay provisions for:2  See footnotes at end of table.  15  1 37 11 25 27 -  1 15 5 37 27 16 -  1 1 4 47 9 38 -  1 1 4 23 6 66 -  Table B-2. Annual paid vacation provisions for full-time workers, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 — Continued White-collar workers Item  Blue-collar workers State and local government  All industries  Private industries  30 years of service: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... 5 weeks ........................................................................ Over 5 and under 6 weeks ........................................... 6 weeks ........................................................................ Over 6 and under 7 weeks ........................................... 7 weeks ........................................................................  ( 1) 9 8 6 24 6 39 2 3 2 ( 1)  ( 1) 10 8 6 24 6 37 2 3 2 ( 1)  -  Maximum vacation available: 1 week .......................................................................... 2 weeks ........................................................................ 3 weeks ........................................................................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks ........................................... 4 weeks ........................................................................ Over 4 and under 5 weeks ........................................... 5 weeks ........................................................................ Over 5 and under 6 weeks ........................................... 6 weeks ........................................................................ Over 6 and under 7 weeks ........................................... 7 weeks ........................................................................  ( 1) 9 8 6 24 6 39 2 3 2 1 ( )  ( 1) 10 8 6 24 6 37 2 3 2 1 ( )  -  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  5 12 14 11 23 2 31 ( 1) 2 ( 1)  5 13 16 8 23 1 30 ( 1) 2 ( 1)  ( 1) 4 34 19 7 36 -  5 12 14 9 25 2 31 ( 1) 2 ( 1)  5 13 16 6 26 1 30 ( 1) 2 ( 1)  ( 1) 4 34 19 7 36 -  By vacation pay provisions for:2  1  1 1 4 23 6 66 -  1 1 4 23 6 66 -  Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 weeks’ pay for 20 years include those eligible for at least 3 weeks’ pay after fewer years of service.  Less than 0.5 percent. 2 Payments other than "length of time" are converted to an equivalent time basis; for example, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 week’s pay. Periods of service are chosen arbitrarily and do not necessarily reflect individual provisions for progression; for example, changes in proportions at 20 years include changes between 15 and 20 years. Estimates are cumulative.  NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  16  Table B-3. Insurance, health, and retirement plans offered to full-time workers, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 White-collar workers Type of plan  Blue-collar workers  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  All industries  Private industries  State and local government  All full-time workers (in percent) .........................................  100  100  100  100  100  100  In establishments offering at least one of the benefits shown below1 .................................................................................  99  99  100  99  99  100  Life insurance ..................................................................... Wholly employer financed ............................................  97 80  97 79  99 96  92 73  91 70  99 92  Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ............... Wholly employer financed ............................................  76 66  76 67  76 54  64 55  63 53  78 73  Sickness and accident insurance or sick leave or both ...... Sickness and accident insurance ................................. Wholly employer financed ...................................... Sick leave (full pay, no waiting period) ......................... Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ......................  91 48 38 79 3  90 50 39 77 3  100 21 21 96 4  77 45 38 52 5  75 48 39 47 4  100 25 25 92 8  Long-term disability insurance ............................................ Wholly employer financed ............................................  66 53  65 52  73 69  54 46  53 46  59 51  Hospitalization, surgical, and medical insurance ................ Wholly employer financed ............................................  86 22  85 20  95 47  80 28  79 24  88 56  Health maintenance organizations ..................................... Wholly employer financed ............................................  70 22  71 22  52 15  63 21  66 21  44 19  Dental care ......................................................................... Wholly employer financed ............................................  82 24  82 23  77 46  78 33  77 33  93 31  Vision care .......................................................................... Wholly employer financed ............................................  31 12  32 13  28 6  25 15  27 16  10 5  Hearing care ....................................................................... Wholly employer financed ............................................  18 5  20 5  -  9 5  10 6  -  Alcohol and drug abuse treatment ...................................... Wholly employer financed ............................................  94 25  93 23  99 51  93 33  93 28  98 66  Retirement benefits2 ........................................................... Wholly employer financed ............................................  92 58  92 61  100 19  81 49  79 49  100 48  Defined benefit ............................................................. Wholly employer financed ......................................  46 44  46 46  39 19  40 37  36 36  71 48  Defined contribution ...................................................... Wholly employer financed ......................................  80 16  82 17  62 -  59 12  62 13  33 -  1 Estimates listed after type of benefit are for all plans for which the employer pays at least part of the cost. Excluded are plans required by the Federal Government such as Social Security and Railroad Retirement. 2 Establishments providing more than one type of retirement plan may cause  the sum of the separate plans to be greater than the total for all retirement plans. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  17  Scope and Method of Survey Sampling procedures The survey was conducted on a sample basis, using a listing of establishments (sampling frame) which fell within the designated scope of the survey. The sampling frame was developed using data from unemployment insurance reports and checked for accuracy and completeness. Establishments known to be missing were added; out-of-business and out-of-scope establishments were removed; some units were combined or split to meet the establishment/collection unit definitions; and, for some, address, employment, type of industry, or other information was corrected. A sample of establishments was selected after a detailed stratification by industry and number of employees of all establishments within the scope of the survey. From this stratified universe, a probability sample was selected, with each establishment having a predetermined chance of selection. To obtain optimum accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large than small establishments was selected. When data were combined, each establishment was weighted according to its probability of selection so that unbiased estimates were generated. If data were not available for an establishment originally selected, the weights of other similar establishments were increased to account for the missing unit. Data for the survey were obtained primarily by personal visits of Bureau field economists. Collection of the survey was from START through FINISH and reflects an average payroll reference of REFDATE1. Data obtained for a payroll period prior to the end of PAYROLL were updated to include general wage changes, if granted, scheduled to be effective through that date.  the workers receive the same as or more and one-half receive the same as or less than the rate shown. The middle range is defined by two rates of pay; one-fourth of the workers earn the same as or less than the lower of these rates and onefourth earn the same as or more than the higher rate. Medians and middle ranges are not provided when they do not meet reliability criteria. Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actually studied, and are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the labor force rather than as precise measures of employment. Each group of establishments of a certain size, however, is given its proper weight in the combined data. Employee Benefits The incidence of employee benefits is studied for full-time, year-round permanent white-collar and blue-collar workers. Provisions which apply to a majority of the white- and blue-collar categories are considered to apply to all white- and blue-collar workers in the establishment. Similarly, if fewer than half of the workers are covered, the benefits are considered nonexistent in the establishment. Holidays, vacations, insurance and health plans are considered applicable to employees currently eligible for the benefits. Retirement plans are considered applicable to employees currently eligible for participation and those who will eventually become eligible. Paid holidays (table 3). Holidays are included if workers who are not required to work are paid for the time off and those required to work receive premium pay or compensatory time off. They are included only if they are granted annually on a formal basis (provided for in written form or established by custom). Holidays are included even though in a particular year they fall on a nonworkday and employees are not granted another day off. Data are tabulated to show the percent of workers who are granted specific numbers of whole and half holidays.  Occupations and pay Occupational employment and pay data are shown for full-time workers, i.e., those hired to work a regular weekly schedule. Pay data exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or year-end bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Pay increases, but not bonuses, under cost-of-living allowance clauses, and incentive payments, however, are included. Weekly hours in table 1 and 3 refer to the standard workweek (rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour) for which employees receive regular straight-time pay. Average weekly pay are rounded to the nearest dollar. Tables 1 through 4 provide distributions of workers by pay. The mean is computed for each job by totaling the pay of all workers and dividing by the number of workers. The median designates position—one-half of  Paid vacations (table 4). Establishments report their method of calculating vacation (time basis, percent of annual pay, flat-sum payment, etc.) and the amount of vacation pay granted. Only basic formal plans are reported. Vacation bonuses, vacation-saving plans, and "extended" or "sabbatical" benefits beyond basic plans are excluded. For tabulating vacation pay granted, all provisions are expressed on a time basis. Vacation pay calculated on other than a time basis is converted to its equivalent time period. Two percent of annual pay, for example,  5  not choose to participate in it because they are required to bear part of its cost (provided the choice to participate is available to the majority). Federally required plans such as Social Security and railroad retirement are excluded. Benefit plans legally required by State governments, however, are included.  is tabulated as 1 week's vacation pay. Periods of service are chosen arbitrarily and do not necessarily reflect individual provisions for progression ; for example, changes in proportions at 20 years include changes between 15 and 20 years. Estimates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 week's pay after 20 years includes those eligible for at least 3 week's pay after fewer years of service. Provisions after each specified length of service are related to all white- or blue-collar workers in an establishment regardless of length of service. Counts of white- or blue-collar workers by length of service were not obtained. The tabulations present, therefore, statistical measures of these provisions rather than proportions of workers actually receiving specific benefits.  Labor-Management coverage This survey collected the percent of workers covered by labor-management agreements in this area. An establishment is considered to have an agreement covering all white-collar or blue-collar workers if a majority of such workers is covered by a labor-management agreement determining wages and salaries. Therefore, all other white- or blue-collar workers are employed in establishments that either do no have labor-management agreements in effect, or have agreements that apply to fewer than half of their white- or blue-collar workers. Because establishments with fewer than 50 workers are excluded from the survey, estimates are not necessarily representative of the extent to which all workers in the area may be covered by the provisions of labor-management agreements.  Insurance, health, and retirement plans (table 5). Plans are included for which the employer pays either all or part of the cost. The benefits may be underwritten by an insurance company, paid directly by an employer or union, or provided by a health maintenance organization (HMO). Workers provided the option of an insurance plan or an HMO are reported under both types of plans. A plan is included even though a majority of the employees in an establishment do  6  Appendix table 1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied, Omaha, NE-IA1, April 1996 Number of establishments  Workers in establishments Within scope of survey  Industry division2 Within scope of survey3  Total4  Studied Number  Percent  Full-time white-collar workers  Full-time blue-collar workers  Studied4  All divisions .........................................................................................  922  157  225,368  100  98,853  57,951  104,765  Private industry ............................................................................. Goods producing .................................................................... Manufacturing ................................................................... Construction5 .................................................................... Service producing ................................................................... Transportation, communication, electric, gas, and sanitary services6 ....................................................... Wholesale trade7 .............................................................. Retail trade7 ...................................................................... Finance, insurance, and real estate7 ................................ Services7 ..........................................................................  866 182 135 47 684  134 20 16 4 114  193,139 31,484 27,432 4,052 161,655  86 14 12 2 72  91,714 8,511 8,190 321 83,203  51,562 19,604 18,257 1,347 31,958  86,963 8,375 8,074 301 78,588  66 107 163 78 270  14 6 16 15 63  13,867 9,817 36,415 24,170 77,386  6 4 16 11 34  7,817 5,829 7,385 21,561 40,611  5,056 3,624 11,145 383 11,750  8,804 1,467 11,039 13,138 44,140  State and local government ..........................................................  56  23  32,229  14  7,139  6,389  17,802  1 The Omaha, NE-IA Metropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the Office of Management and Budget through June 1994, consists of Cass, Douglas, Sarpy and Washington Counties, NE; and Pottawattamie County, IA. The "workers within scope of survey" estimates provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey. Estimates are not intended, however, for comparison with other statistical series to measure employment trends or levels since (1) planning of wage surveys requires establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) establishments employing fewer than 50 workers are excluded from the scope of the survey. 2 The Standard Industrial Classification Manual was used in classifying establishments by industry. 3 Includes all establishments with at least 50 total employees. In manufacturing, an establishment is defined as a single physical location where industrial operations are performed. In service producing industries, an establishment is defined as all locations of a company in the area within the same industry division. In government, an establishment is generally defined as all locations of a government entity.  4 Includes part-time, seasonal, temporary, and other workers excluded from separate white- and blue-collar categories. 5 Separate data for this division are not shown in the A- and B-series tables. This division is represented in the "all industries" and "goods producing" estimates. 6 Abbreviated to "Transportation and utilities" in the A-series tables. Separate data for this division are not presented in the B-series tables, but the division is represented in the "all industries" and "service producing" estimates. 7 Separate data for this division are not shown in the A- and B-series tables. This division is represented in the "all industries" and "service producing" estimates.  Note: Overall industries may include data for industry divisions not shown separately.  A-5  Appendix table 2. Percent of workers covered by labor-management agreements, Omaha, NE-IA, April 1996 White-collar workers  Blue-collar workers  Private industry Labor-management status  All full-time workers (in percent) .........................................  All industries  100  Private industry  Total  Goodsproducing industries  Serviceproducing industries  100  -  -  State and local government  All industries  100  100  Total  Goodsproducing industries  Serviceproducing industries  100  -  -  State and local government  100  Majority of workers covered ......................................................  6  2  -  -  55  29  25  -  -  57  None or Minority of workers covered ........................................  94  98  -  -  45  71  75  -  -  43  NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  A-6
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102