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F ederal R eserve Bank
OF DALLAS
ROBERT

D. M c T E E R , J R .

p re s id e n t

tn n a

10

JU H 6 IZ , L y y J

1 HOC

AN D CH IE F EX ECU TIV E O F F IC E R

DALLAS, TEXAS
7 5 2 6 5 -5 9 0 6

Notice 95-61

TO:

The Chief Executive Officer of each
state member bank and foreign agency in
the Eleventh Federal Reserve District
SUBJECT
Office of Foreign Assets Control
DETAILS

The Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) has issued General License
Number 2, clarifying funds transfer restrictions on transactions involving Iran, and
General License Number 3, involving operation of bank accounts for the government of
Iran and persons in Iran. According to General License No. 2, transfers not involving
Iranian accounts in the United States are permissible, provided the United States
remitting or beneficiary bank verifies that the underlying transaction is authorized.
Under General License No. 3, effective June 6, 1995, bank accounts for the government
of Iran and persons in Iran cannot be serviced except for payments for exempt transac­
tions, crediting interest, debiting service charges, or closing an account. General License
No. 3 also contains a list of Iranian banks subject to the restrictions. National banks
which do not have access to computer bulletin boards used by the OFAC may obtain
details of the General License by dialing the Comptroller of the Currency’s information
line from a Touch-Tone phone.
ATTACHMENT
Attached is a copy of the Office of Foreign Assets Control’s General License
Nos. 2 and 3 concerning Iranian transactions regulations.
MORE INFORMATION
For more information, please contact the Office of Foreign Assets Control at
(202) 622-2490. For additional copies of this Bank’s notice, please contact the Public
Affairs Department at (214) 922-5254.
Sincerely yours,

For additional copies, bankers and others are encouraged to use one of the following toll-free numbers in contacting the Federal
Reserve Bank of Dallas: Dallas Office (800) 333 -4460; El Paso Branch Intrastate (800) 592-1631, Interstate (800) 351-1012; Houston
Branch Intrastate (800) 392-4162, Interstate (800) 221-0363; San Antonio Branch Intrastate (800) 292-5810.

This publication was digitized and made available by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas' Historical Library (FedHistory@dal.frb.org)

What You Need To Know About U.S. Economic Sanctions
An overview of O.F.A.C. Regulations involving Sanctions against Iran
■ INTRODUCTION - The assets of the Government of Iran in the
United States were blocked in accordance with the International
Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) on November 14,
1979, following the seizure of the American Embassy in Teheran
and the taking of U.S. diplomats as hostages. Under the Iranian
Assets Control Regulations (Title 31 Part 535 of the U.S.
Code of Federal Regulations), some US$12 billion in Iranian
Government bank deposits, gold, and other properties were
effected, including $5.6 billion in deposits and securities held by
overseas branches of U.S. banks. The assets freeze was
eventually expanded to a full trade embargo, which remained in
effect until the Algiers Accords were signed with Iran on January
19, 1981. Pursuant to the Accords, most Iranian assets in the
United States were unblocked and the trade embargo was lifted.
The U.S. Government also canceled any attachments that U.S.
parties had secured against Iranian assets in the United States,
so that the assets could be returned to Iran or transferred to
escrow accounts in third countries. This action was upheld by the
Supreme Court in 1981 in Dames & Moore v. Regan.
Although greatly modified in scope, the Iranian Assets Control
Regulations remain in effect, preserving the IEEPA authorities to
deal with a number of specific problems. Many U.S. nationals
have claims against Iran or Iranian entities for products shipped
or services rendered before the onset of the embargo or for
losses sustained in Iran due to expropriation. These claims are
currently being arbitrated in the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal at The Hague established under the Algiers Accords. Certain
assets related to these claims still do remain blocked in the
United States consisting mainly of military and dual-use property
and a minimal number of obligations to Iran arising from standby
letters of credit which were frozen pending resolution of claims
against Iran in the Tribunal.
As a result of Iran’s continued support for international terrorism
and its aggressive actions against non-belligerent shipping in the
Persian Gulf, President Reagan, on October 29, 1987, issued
Executive Order 12613 imposing an import embargo on Iranianorigin goods and services. Section 505 of the International
Security and Development Cooperation Act (ISDCA) was utilized
as the statutory authority for the embargo. More recently, as a
result of Iranian sponsorship of international terrorism and its
active pursuit of weapons of mass destruction, with effect from
12:01 a.m. on March 16,1995, President Clinton issued Execu­

tive Order No. 12947 prohibiting U.S. involvement with petro­
leum development in Iran. On May 6, 1995, President Clinton
signed a new Executive Order which further tightened the
sanctions against Iran.
Corporate criminal penalties underthe IEEPA Regulations range
up to $500,000; individual penalties range up to $250,000 and 10
years in jail. Civil penalties of up to $10,000 may also be imposed
administratively.
This fact sheet provides general information about the Iranian
sanctions program. The sanctions are administered by the U.S.
Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control.
Iranian Transactions Regulations - 31 C.F.R. Part 560
■ BUYING FROM IRAN - Goods or services of Iranian origin
may not be imported into the United States, either directly or
through third countries. Exceptions exist for Iranian-origin
publications and materials imported for news publications or
news broadcast dissemination. U.S. persons are prohibited
from providing financing for prohibited import transactions.
■ SELLING TO IRAN - Goods, technology (including technical
data or other information) or services may not be exported from
the United States, and certain sensitive goods may not be
reexported from a third country, to Iran, the Government of Iran,
or entities owned or controlled by the Government of Iran. The
export prohibitions do not apply if the goods are substantially
transformed in a third country, or incorporated into other prod­
ucts in a third country and constitute less than 10% by value of
the item exported from the third country. No U.S. bank, including
foreign branches, may arrange financing related to prohibited
exports to Iran. The Executive Order of May 6,1995 provides for
a 30-day delayed effective date (until 12:01 a.m. June 6, 1995)
to permit the completion of authorized trade transactions under
contracts in force prior to 12:01 a.m. EDT on May 7,1995 and
permits the performance of financing transactions with respect
to such trade transactions.
■ FINANCIAL DEALINGS WITH IRAN/DEALING IN IRANIAN
ORIGIN GOODS -U.S. persons are prohibited from engaging in
any transactions, including purchase, sale, transportation, swap,
financing or brokering transactions related to goods or services

of Iranian origin or owned or controlled by the Government of
Iran. New investment, including any commitment of funds or
other assets, loans or any other extension of credit, in Iran or in
property (including entities) owned or controlled by the Govern­
ment of Iran is prohibited.
■ TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING U.S. AFFILIATES - No U.S.
person may approve or facilitate the entry into or performance of
transactions or contracts with Iran by a foreign subsidiary of a
U.S. firm that the U.S. person is precluded from performing
directly.
■ IRANIAN PETROLEUM INDUSTRY-Trading in Iranian oil or
petroleum products refined in Iran, or financing such trading, is
prohibited for all U.S. persons. Similarly, the performance of
services or supplying of goods or technology for the benefit of the
Iranian oil industry, as well as the financing of such activities, is
prohibited.
■ EVASION - Evasion and avoidance of the prohibitions of
Executive Order 12959 are prohibited, as are attempts to violate
the Executive Order. It is considered evasion or avoidance for
a U.S. person outside the United States to engage in any
transaction that would be prohibited if done from the United
States.

The following General Licenses with regard to E.O. 12959 have
been issued by the Treasury Department:
General License No. 1:
30-Day Delayed Effective Date for Pre-May 7, 1995 Trade
Contracts Involving Iran (issued 05-19-95)
(a) All transactions necessary to complete performance of a
trade contract entered into prior to May 7, 1995, and involving Iran (a
“pre-existing trade contract”), including the exportation of goods, ser­
vices (including financial services), or technology from the United States
that were authorized pursuant to Federal regulations in force immedi­
ately prior to May 7, 1995, or performance under a contract for transac­
tions in Iranian-origin or GOI-owned or controlled goods or services not
involving importation into the United States, are authorized without
specific licensing by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC") if the
conditions in subsection (a)(1) or subsection (a)(2) are met: (1) If the pre­
existing trade contract is for exportation of goods or technology from the
United States that were authorized pursuant to Federal regulations in
force immediately prior to May 7,1995, the goods or technology must be
exported from the United States prior to 12:01 a.m. EDT, June 6, 1995,
and all other activity by U.S. persons that is necessary and incidental to
the performance of the pre-existing trade contract (other than payment
under a financing contract) must be completed prior to 12:01 a.m. EDT,
August 6, 1995; or (2) If the pre-existing trade contract is for (i) the
provision of services benefitting a person in Iran, the Government of Iran,
or an entity owned or controlled by the Government of Iran, or (ii) the
reexportation of goods or technology to Iran, the Government of Iran, or
an entity owned or controlled by the Government of Iran that were
authorized pursuant to Federal regulations in force immediately prior to
May 7, 1995, or (iii) transactions relating to goods or services of Iranian
origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Iran other than
transactions relating to importation into the United States of such goods
or services, all obligations under the pre-existing trade contract must be
fully completed prior to 12:01 a.m. EDT, June 6, 1995.
(b) In order to complete performance of a pre-existing trade
contract, and consistent with section 8(a) of Executive Order 12959, the
arrangement or renegotiation of contracts for transactions necessary
and incidental to performance of the pre-existing trade contract is
authorized. Such incidental transactions may include, for example,

financing, shipping and insurance arrangements. Amendments to pre­
existing trade contracts for the purpose of accelerating a previouslyspecified delivery schedule under a contract for a fixed quantity or value
of goods, technology or services, or curtailing or cancelling required
performance, are authorized without specific licensing. Any other
alteration of the trade contract must be specifically licensed by OFAC.
(c) The existence of a contract will be determined with
reference to the principles contained in Article 2 of the Uniform Commer­
cial Code.
(d) No U.S. person may change its policies or operating
procedures in orderto enable a foreign entity owned or controlled by U.S.
persons to enter into a transaction that could not be entered into directly
by a U.S. person located in the United States pursuant to Executive
Order 12959.

General License No. 2:
Payment and U.S. dollar clearing transactions involving
Iran (issued 06-01-95)
The following general license is issued pursuant to the authority del­
egated to the Secretary of the Treasury in Executive Order 12959 of May
6, 1995, 60 FR 24757 (May 9, 1995 -- the “Order). Section 1(b) of the
Order prohibits the exportation of services (including financial services)
to Iran. This General License provides guidance to U.S. banking
institutions for the transfer of funds not involving accounts of persons
located in Iran, the Government of Iran, or entities owned or controlled
by the Government of Iran maintained on the books of a U.S. banking
institution (“Iranian Accounts”). Iranian Accounts must be operated in
accordance with General License No. 3, issued contemporaneously with
this license.
Transfer instructions directing the movement of funds or the perfor­
mance of other banking services that would directly or indirectly benefit
persons in Iran or the Government of Iran are requests for the exportation
of services. Such services may not be performed by a U.S. banking
institution, and thus the transfer instructions must be rejected, unless the
transfer is authorized by the general license below or by a specific or
another general license issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control
(“OFAC”). Pursuant to section 8(a)(i) of the Order, contracts for the
provision of financial services in force on May 6, 1995 (including the
account contracts for Iranian Accounts) may continue to be performed
through 12:01 a.m. EDT, June 6, 1995.
(a) United States banking institutions (“U.S. banking institu­
tions”) are authorized to process transfers of funds to or from Iran, or for
the direct or indirect benefit of persons in Iran, the Government of Iran,
or entities owned or controlled by the Government of Iran, if the transfer
is covered in full by any of the following conditions and does not involve
debiting or crediting an Iranian Account: (1) The transfer arises from an
underlying transaction that is not prohibited by or not subject to the Order
(such as a third-country transaction not involving a United States person
or not otherwise prohibited by the Order); or (2) The transfer arises from
an underlying transaction that has been authorized by a specific or
general license issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control; or(3) The
transfer arises from an underlying transaction that is exempted from
regulation pursuant to Section 203(b) of the International Emergency
Economic Powers Act, 50 U.S.C. 1702(b), such as an exportation of
information or informational materials to Iran, a travel-related remit­
tance, or payment for the shipment of a donation of articles to relieve
human suffering; or (4) The transfer is a non-commercial remittance to
or from Iran, such as a family remittance not related to a family-owned
enterprise.
(b) Before a U.S. banking institution initiates a payment
subject to the Order on behalf of a customer, or credits a transfer subject
to the Order to the account on its books of the ultimate beneficiary, the
U.S. banking institution must determine that the transfer is not prohibited
by the Order.
(c) Pursuant to the prohibitions in section 1(f) of the Order, a
United States banking institution may not make transfers to or for the
benefit of a foreign-organized entity owned or controlled by it if the

underlying transaction would be prohibited if engaged in directly by the
U.S. banking institution.
(d) This general license does not authorize transactions
with respect to property blocked pursuant to residual provisions of the
Iranian Assets Control Regulations, 31 C.F.R. Part 535.
(e) For the purposes of this general license: (1) the term
“United States banking institution” or “U.S. banking institution” means-(i) any entity organized under the laws of any jurisdiction within the
United States (including its foreign branches), and (ii) any agency,
office, or branch located in the United States of a foreign entity--that
is engaged primarily in the business of banking, including accepting
deposits and making, granting, transferring, holding, or brokering
loans or credits. The term includes, among others, depository
institutions, banks, savings banks, savings associations, mortgage
companies, credit unions, and trust companies; (2) the term “United
State person” means any United States citizen, permanent resident
alien, juridical person organized under the laws of the United States
orany jurisdiction within the United States (including foreign branches),
or any person in the United States, and vessels and aircraft of U.S.
registration.
For further information concerning this general license contact the
Compliance Programs Division of the Office of Foreign Assets Control
at (202)622-2490.

General License No. 3:
Exportation of Services: Iranian Accounts at U.S. Finan­
cial Institutions (issued 06-01-95)
The following general license is issued pursuant to the authority
delegated to the Secretary of the Treasury in Executive Order 12959
of May 6, 1995, 60 FR 24757 (May 9, 1995 -- the “Order).

kers and dealers, commodity futures and options brokers and dealers,
forward contract and foreign exchange merchants, securities and com­
modities exchanges, clearing corporations, investment companies, em­
ployee benefit plans, insurance companies, credit card issuers, and U.S.
holding companies, U.S. affiliates, or U.S. subsidiaries of any of the
foregoing.
For further information concerning this general license contact the Compli­
ance Programs Division of the Office of Foreign Assets Control at (202)6222490.
Annex to General License No. 3 - Banks Controlled by the Govern­
ment of Iran
AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVE BANK OF IRAN (a.k.a. BANK TAAVON
KESH AVARZII RAN), No. 129 Patrice Lumumba Street, Jalal-AI-Ahmad Expressway,
P.O. Box 14155/6395, Tehran, Iran
AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT BANK OF IRAN (a.k.a. BANK JOSIAIYI
KESHAHVARZI), Farahzad Expressway, Tehran, Iran
BANK JOSIAIYI KESHAHVARZI (a.k.a. AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT BANK
OF IRAN), Farahzad Expressway, Tehran, Iran
BANK MARKAZI JOMHOURIISLAMI IRAN (a.k.a. THE CENTRAL BANK OF IRAN),
Ferdowsi Avenue, P.O. Box 11365-8551, Tehran, Iran
BANK MASKAN (a.k.a. HOUSING BANK (of Iran)), Ferdowsi St., Tehran, Iran
BANKMELLAT, ParkShahr, Varzesh Avenue, P.O. Box 11365/5964, Tehran, Iran, and
all offices worldwide, including, but not limited to:
» BANK MELLAT (Branch), Ziya Gokalp Bulvari No. 12, Kizilay, Ankara, Turkey
> BANK MELLAT (Branch), BinbirCicekSokak, BuyukdereCaddesi, P.O. Box
67, Levant, Istanbul, Turkey
• BANK MELLAT (Branch), 48 Gresham Street, London EC2V 7AX, England
BANK MELLI, P.O. Box 11365-171, Ferdowsi Avenue, Tehran, Iran, and all offices
worldwide, including, but not limited to:

t BANK MELLI (Branch), 4 Moorgate, London EC2R 6AL, England
(a) Until 12:01 a.m. EDT, June 6, 1995, U.S. financial
institutions are authorized to perform services with respect to ac­
counts held on their books for persons located in Iran, the Government
of Iran, or entities owned or controlled by the Government of Iran,
pursuant to contracts in force as of May 6,1995 (“Iranian Accounts”).
(b) After 12:01 a.m. EDT, June 6, 1995, U.S. financial
institutions are prohibited from performing services with respect to
Iranian Accounts at the instruction of the Government of Iran, entities
owned or controlled by the Government of Iran, and persons located
in Iran, except that U.S. financial institutions are authorized to provide
and be compensated for services and incidental transactions with
respect to (i) the maintenance of Iranian Accounts, including the
payment of interest and the debiting of service charges, (ii) the
processing of transfers arising from underlying transactions that are
exempted from regulation pursuant to Section 203(b) of the Interna­
tional Emergency Economic Powers Act, 50 U.S.C. 1702(b), such as
an exportation of information or informational materials to Iran, a
travel-related remittance, or payment for the shipment of a donation
of articles to relieve human suffering, and (iii) at the request of the
account party, the closing of Iranian Accounts and the lump sum
transfer only to the account party of all remaining funds and other
assets in the account.
(c) Specific licenses may be issued with respect to the
operation of Iranian Accounts that constitute accounts of (i) foreign
government missions and their personnel in Iran, or (ii) missions of the
Government of Iran in the United States.
(d) For the purposes of this general license the term “United
States financial institution” means-(1) any entity organized under the
laws of any jurisdiction within the United States (including its foreign
branches), and (2) any agency, office, or branch located in the United
States of a foreign entity—
that is engaged primarily in the business of
accepting deposits, making, granting, transferring, holding, orbrokering
loans or credits, or purchasing or selling foreign exchange, securities,
commodity futures or options, or procuring purchasers and sellers
thereof, as principal or agent. The term includes, among others,
depository institutions, banks, savings banks, savings associations,
mortgage companies, credit unions, trust companies, securities bro­

I BANK MELLI (Branch), Schadowplatz 12, 4000 Dusseldorf 1, Germany
I BANK MELLI (Branch), Friedenstrasse 4, P.O. Box 160154,6000 Frankfurt
am Main, Germany
» BANK MELLI (Branch), P.O. Box 112129, Holzbruecke 2,2000 Hamburg 11,
Germany
> BANK MELLI (Branch), Odeonsplatz 18,8000 Munich 22, Germany
I BANK MELLI (Branch), 43 Avenue Montaigne, 75008 Paris, France
> BANK MELLI (Branch), 601 Gloucester Tower, The Landmark, 11 Pedder
Street, P.O. Box 720, Hong Kong
I BANK MELLI (Representative Office), 333 New Tokyo Building, 3-1
Marunouchi, 3-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan
I BANK MELLI (Agency), 818 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California
90017, U.S.A
I BANK MELLI (Agency), 767 Fifth Avenue, 44th Floor, New York, New York
10153, U.S.A
t BANK MELLI (Representative Office), Smolensky Boulevard 22/14, Kv. S.,
Moscow, Russia
I BANK MELLI (Branch), Flat No. 1, First Floor, 8 Al Sad El-Aaly, Dokki, P.O.
Box 2654, Cairo, Egypt
I BANK MELLI (Branch), Ben Yas Street, P.O. Box No. 1894, Riga Deira,
Dubai, U.A.E
I BANK MELLI (Branch), P.O. Box 2656, Shaikha Maryam Building, Liwa
Street, Abu Dhabi, U.A.E
* BANK MELLI (Branch), B.P.O. Box 1888, ClockTower, Industrial Road, AlAin Club Building in from Emertel Al Ain, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, U.A.E
» BANK MELLI (Branch), P.O. Box 1894, Riqa, Ban Yas Street, Deira, Dubai,
U.A.E
> BANK MELLI (Branch), Mohd-Habib Building, Al-Fahidi Street, P.O. Box
3093, Bur Dubai, Dubai, U.A.E.
I BANK MELLI (Branch), P.O. Box 248, Fujairah, U.A.E

t BANK MELLI (Branch), Sami Sagar Building Oman Street Al-Nakheel, P.O.
Box 5270, Ras-AI Khaimah, U.A.E
> BANK MELLI (Branch), P.O. Box 459, Al Bory Street. Sharjah, U.A.E.
I BANK MELLI (Branch), P.O. Box 785, Government Road. Shaikh Mubarak

Building, Manama, Bahrain
I BANK MELLI (Branch), P.O. Box23309, Shaikh Salman Street, Road No.
1129, Muharraq 211, Bahrain
►BANK MELLI (Branch), P.O. Box 5643, Mossa Abdul Rehman Hassan
Building, 238 Al Burj St., Ruwi, Muscat, Oman
BANK OF INDUSTRY AND MINE (of Iran) (a.k.a. BANK SANAT VA MADAN), Hafez
Avenue, P.O. Box 11365/4978, Tehran, Iran

BANK SANAT VA MADAN (a.k.a. BANK OF INDUSTRY AND MINE (of Iran)), Hafez
Avenue, P.O. Box 11365/4978, Tehran, Iran
BANK SEPAH, Emam Khomeini Square, P.O. Box 11364, Tehran, Iran, and all
office worldwide, including, but not limited to:
I BANK SEPAH (Branch), Muenchener Strasse 49, P.O. Box 10 03 47, W6000 Frankfurt am Main 1, Germany
t BANK SEPAH (Branch), 5/7 Eastcheap, EC3M 1JT London, England

BANKREFAH KARGARAN (a.k.a. WORKERS WELFAREBANK(of Iran)), Moffettah
No. 125, P.O. Box 15815 1866, Tehran, Iran

I BANK SEPAH (Branch), 650 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10019,

BANK SADERAT IRAN, Bank Saderat Tower, P.O. Box 15745-631, Somayeh
Street, Tehran, Iran, and all offices worldwide, including, but not limited to:

» BANK SEPAH (Branch), 17 Place Vendome, 75001 Paris, France.

►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Hamdam Street, Airport Road Intersec­
tion, P.O. Box 700, Abu Dhabi, U.A.E
I BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Al-Am Road, P.O. Box 1140, Al Ein, Abu
Dhabi, U.A.E
I BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Liwara Street, P.O. Box 16, AJman,
U.A.E
I BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), 3rd Floor Dom Dasaf Building, Mejloka
Street 7A, Ashkhabad, Turkmenistan

t BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), 25-29 Panepistimiou Street, P.O. Box
4308, GR-10210, Athens 10672, Greece
I BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Imam Ali Street, Sahat Yaghi, Ras ElainAlektisad Building 2nd Floor, Baalbeck, Lebanon
►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch and Offshore Banking Unit), 106 Govern­
ment Road, P.O. Box 825, Manama Town 316, Bahrain
ft BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Hamra Pavillion Street, Sawagh and
Daaboul Building 1st Floor, P.O. Box 113-6717, Beirut, Lebanon
t BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Alghobairi Boulevard, Beirut, Lebanon
» BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), 28 Sherif Street, P.O. Box 462, Cairo,
Egypt
►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Old Ben-Ghanem Street (next to God
Market), P.O. Box 2256, Doha, Qatar
» BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Almaktoum Road, P.O. Box 4182, Deira,
Dubai, U.A.E
►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Bazar Murshid, P.O. Box 4182, Deira,
Dubai, U.A.E
» BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Alfahid Road, P.O. Box 4182, Bur Dubai,
Dubai, U.A.E

U.S.A

I BANK SEPAH (Branch), Via Barberini 50, 00187 Rome, Italy

t BANK SEPAH (Representative Office), Ufficio di Rappresentan Za, Via
Ugo Foscolo 1,20121 Milan, Italy
BANK TAAVON KESHAVARZI IRAN (a.k.a. AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVE
BANK OF IRAN) No. 129 Patrice Lumumba Street, Jalal-AI-Ahmad Expressway,
P.O. Box 14155/6395, Tehran, Iran
BANK TEJARAT, 130 Taleghani Avenue, Nejatoullahie, P.O. Box 11365-5416,
Tehran, Iran, and all offices worldwide, including, but not limited to:
I BANK TEJARAT (Branch), 6/8 Clements Lane, London EC4N 7AP,
England
►
BANK TEJARAT (Branch), 44 Avenue des Champs Elysees, 75008 Paris,
France
DEUTSCH-IRANISCHE HANDELSBANKAG(n.k.a. EUROPAEISCH-IRANISCHE
HANDELSBANK AG) Depenau 2, W-2000 Hamburg 1, Germany, and all offices
worldwide, including, but not limited to:
» DEUTSCH-IRANISCHE HANDELSBANK AG (n.k.a. EUROPAEISCHIRANISCHE HANDELSBANK AG) (Representative Office), 23 Argentine
Square, Beihaghi Bulvard, P.O. Box 15815/1787, Tehran 15148, Iran
EUROPAEISCH-IRANISCHE HANDELSBANK AG (f.k.a. DEUTSCH-IRANISCHE
HANDELSBANK AG) Depenau 2, W-2000 Hamburg 1, Germany, and all offices
worldwide, including, but not limited to:
» EUROPAEISCH-IRANISCHE HANDELSBANK AG (f.k.a. DEUTSCHIRANISCHE HANDELSBANK AG) (Representative Office), 23 Argentine
Square, Beihaghi Bulvard, P.O. Box 15815/1787, Tehran, 15148, Iran
HOUSING BANK (of Iran) (a.k.a. BANK MASKAN), Ferdowsi St., Tehran, Iran
IRAN OVERSEAS INVESTMENT BANK LIMITED (f.k.a. IRAN OVERSEAS IN­
VESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED), 120 Moorgate, London EC2M 6TS, En­
gland, and all offices worldwide, including, but not limited to:

» BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Sherea Shekikh Zayad Street, P.O. Box
55, Fujairah, U.A.E

» IRAN OVERSEAS INVESTMENT BANK LIMITED (Representative Of­
fice), 1137 Avenue Vali Asr off Park-e-SAII, P.O. Box 15115/531, Tehran,
Iran

I BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Wilhelm Leuschner Strasse 41, P.O.
Box 160151, W-6000 Frankfurt am Main, Germany

» IRAN OVERSEAS INVESTMENT BANK LIMITED (Agency), Suite 3c
Olympia House, 61/63 Dame Street, Dublin 2, Ireland

►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), P.O. Box 112227, Hopfenhof Passage,
Kleiner Bustah 6-10, W-2000 Hamburg 11, Germany

» IRAN OVERSEAS INVESTMENT BANK LIMITED (Agency), Improgetti,
Via Germanico 24,00192 Rome, Italy

►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Lothbury, London EC2R 7HD, England

I IRAN OVERSEAS TRADING COMPANY LIMITED (Subsidiary), 120
Moorgate, London EC2M 6TS, England

►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Representative Office), 707 Wilshire Boulevard,
Suite 4880, Los Angeles, California 90017, U.S.A
►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Agency), 375 Park Avenue, New York, New York
10152, U.S.A
►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), P.O. Box 4269, Mutrah, Muscat, Oman
►
BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), 16 rue de la Paix, Paris 2eme, 75002
Paris, France
» BANK SADERAT IRAN (Branch), Alaroba Road, P.O. Box 316, Sharjah,
U.A.E

►
IRAN OVERSEAS INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED (n.k.a. IRAN
OVERSEAS INVESTMENTBANK LIMITED), 120Moorgate, London EC2M
6TS, England
THE CENTRAL BANK OF IRAN (a.k.a. BANK MARKAZI JOMHOURI ISLAMI
IRAN), Ferdowsi Avenue, P.O. Box 11365-8551, Tehran, Iran
WORKERS WELFARE BANK (of Iran) (a.k.a. BANK REFAH KARGARAN), Moffettah
No. 125, P.O. Box 15815 1866, Tehran, Iran

The Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control also administers sanctions programs involving Libya, the Federal
Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro), Cuba, the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), North
Korea, and Terrorists who threaten to disrupt the Middle East peace process. It has certain residual authoriity with regard to
sanctions against Cambodia. For additional information about these programs or about the Iranian sanctions programs, please
contact the:
OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL
U.S. Department of the Treasury
Washington, D.C. 20220
202/622-2520

(06-02-95)


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102