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£/3.&:29'

SOUTHWEST

OUR! STATE

Li lARY

^ 2 5 1966

U. S. DEPOSITORY COPY

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
WOMEN'S BUREAU
Mary Dublin Keyserling, Director

Bulletin 291



Analysis of
Coverage and
Wage Rates of
State Minimum
Wage Laws and
Orders
August 1, 1965

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
Bulletin 291

WOMEN’S BUREAU
Mary Dublin Keyserling, Director

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C., 20402 - 40 cents




CONTENTS
Pagt

INTRODUCTION.................................................. ................................... .........

1

ALASKA
Wage fixed in law Feb. 14, 1962____ ___________ ________________

2

ARIZONA
Laundry and Drycleaning Industry, Sept. 12, 1948................. ..............
Retail Trades Industry, Aug. 10, 1954

3
3

ARKANSAS
Wage fixed in law Mar. 20, 1915 (Hour law amended 1943)________

4

CALIFORNIA
Agricultural Occupations, Aug. 28, 1961____ _____ ______ ________
Amusement and Recreation Industry, Aug. 30, 1964______________
Broadcasting Industry, Aug. 30, 1964
Canning, Freezing, and Preserving Industry, Aug. 30, 1964________
Industries Handling Products After Harvest, Nov. 15, 1957________
Industries Handling Products After Harvest on the Farm, Aug.
28, 1961_________ ____ ____________ ____ ____________ ______
Laundry, linen Supply, Drycleaning, and Dyeing Industry, Aug. 30,
1964________________________________ ______ ____ I_________
Manufacturing Industry, Aug. 30, 1964_________________________
Mercantile Industry, Aug. 30, 1964
Motion Picture Industry, Aug. 30, 1964_________________________
Personal Service Industry, Aug. 30, 1964________________________
Professional, Technical, Clerical, Mechanical, and Similar Occupa­
tions, Aug. 30, 1964
Public Housekeeping Industry, Aug. 30, 1964____________________
Transportation Industry, Aug. 30, 1964

9
10
11

COLORADO
Beauty Service Occupations, May 4, 1956
Laundry Industry, May 4, 1956___ _______ ________ ____ _______
Public Housekeeping Industry, May 4, 1956
Retail Trade Industry, May 4, 1956

12
12
13
13

CONNECTICUT
Wage fixed in law Oct. 1, 1961
Beauty Shops, Oct. 1, 1963__________________ __________________
Cleaning and Dyeing Occupations, Oct. 1, 1961-_____ ____________
Laundry Occupation, Oct. 1, 1961
Mercantile Trade, Oct. 1, 1961 (as amended)_____________________
Restaurant and Hotel Restaurant Occupations, May 1, 1962_______

14
14
15
15
15
16




5
5
5
6
6
6
7
7
7
8
8

iii

DELAWARE
Wage fixed in law Sept. 26, 1965______________________ _________

Page
17

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Beauty Culture Occupation, May 23, 1960_______________________
Building Service Occupation, July 24, 1961____________________
Clerical and Semitechnical Occupations, July 24, 1961_______ _____
Hotel, Restaurant, and Allied Occupations, Aug. 15, 1964_________
Laundry and Drycleaning Occupation, July 6, 1963_______________
Manufacturing and Wholesaling Occupation, Aug. 15, 1959________
Retail Trade Occupation, Jan. 27, 1962 ________________________

18
18
19
20
21
21
22

HAWAII
Wage fixed in law July 1, 1962

23

IDAHO
Wage fixed in law May 18, 1963

24

ILLINOIS
(No orders in effect)

25

INDIANA
Wage fixed in law July 1, 1965
KANSAS
(No orders in effect)

27

KENTUCKY
All Industries and Occupations, Nov. 1, 1961____________________
Hotel and Restaurant Industry, Aug. 1, 1962____________________
Laundry, Drycleaning, and Dyeing Industry, Sept. 1, 1961________
LOUISIANA
(No orders in effect)

26

28
28
28

29

MAINE
Wage fixed in law Sept. 12, 1959_______________________________

30

MARYLAND
Wage fixed in law June 1, 1965..

31

MASSACHUSETTS
Wage fixed in law May 24, 1962. Bates effective Sept. 5, 1963_ _
_
Amusement and Recreation Occupations, Sept. 5, 1963____________
Building Service Occupations, Sept. 5, 1963
Clerical, Technical, and Similar Occupations, Sept. 5, 1963_________
Drycleaning Occupation, Sept. 5, 1963_____________________
Food Processing Occupations, Sept. 5, 1963
Laundry Occupations, Sept. 5, 1963
Mercantile Occupations, Sept. 5, 1963
Needle Trade and Garment Occupations, Sept. 5, 1963____________
Personal Services Occupations, Sept. 5, 1963
Public Housekeeping Occupations, Sept. 5, 1963__________________

32
33
34
34
35
35
36
36
37
37
38

IV




Si

MICHIGAN
Wage fixed in law Jan. 1, 1965___
___
________________
MINNESOTA
Amusement Industry, Feb. 17, 1957
Laundry and Drycleaning Industry, Jan. 14, 1957._________
Manufacturing and Processing Industry, Apr. 27, 1962____________
Personal Service Industry, Apr. 22, 1961
Professional, Technical, Clerical, and Similar Occupations, May 6,
1962___________________________ _______ ____________________
Public Housekeeping Industry, July 8, 1959
Retail Merchandising Industry, Jan.14, 1957_____________________
Transportation Industry, Mar. 2, 1962
NEVADA
Wage fixed in law July 1, 1965
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Wage fixed in law Jan. 1, 1964. Rates effective Jan. 1, 1965_______
Beautician Occupation, Jan. 1, 1965
Drycleaning Occupation, Jan. 1, 1965
Hotel, Motel, Cabin, Tourist Home, and Restaurant Occupations,
Apr. 1, 1964_______________________________________________
Laundry Occupation, Jan. 1, 1965
Retail Trade Occupation, Jan. 1, 1965
NEW JERSEY
Beauty Culture Occupations, May 17, 1961
Laundry and Cleaning and Dyeing Occupations, Dec. 3, 1962______
Mercantile Occupations, Oct. 9, 1956
Restaurant Occupations, Feb. 19, 1956
NEW MEXICO
Wage fixed in law June 16, 1965
NEW YORK
Wage fixed in law Oct. 15, 1962
Amusement and Recreation Industry, Oct. 15, 1962_______________
Beauty Service Industry, Oct. 15, 1962
Building Service Industry, Oct. 15, 1962
Cleaning and Dyeing Industry, Oct. 15, 1962_____________________
Confectionery Industry, Oct. 15, 1962
Hotel Industry, Oct. 15, 1962
Laundry Industry, Oct. 15, 1962
Restaurant Industry, Oct. 15, 1962
Retail Trade Industry, Oct. 15, 1962
Miscellaneous Industries and Occupations, Oct. 15, 1962___________
NORTH CAROLINA
Wage fixed in law Jan. 1, 1964___________ ______________________
NORTH DAKOTA
Laundry, Cleaning, and Dyeing Occupation, Sept. 30, 1963________
Manufacturing Occupation, Aug. 9, 1963
Mercantile Occupation, Aug. 29, 1962
Public Housekeeping Occupation, Aug. 20, 1964__________________
Telephone Occupation, July 7, 1953




Page
39
40
40
40
41
41
42
43
43
44
45
45
45
46
46
46
47
47
47
48
49
50
51
52
52
53
54
54
56
56
57
58
59
60
60
60
61
61

v

OHIO

Cleaning and Dyeing Occupations in the Cleaning and Dyeing Trade,
Jan. 2, 1963................................................................... ........... ................
Food and/or Lodging, Occupations Relating to the Furnishing of,
Feb. 1, 1965..................................
Laundry Industry, Oct. 1, 1962
OKLAHOMA
Wage fixed in law Aug. 1, 1965
OREGON
Amusement and Recreation, Mar. 10, 1956
Beauty Operators and Manicurists, Aug. 10, 1954_________________
Canning, Freezing, and Processing, Oct. 12, 1959_________________
Hospitals, Nursing Homes, Homes for the Aged, and Child Care
Agencies, July 1, 1963
Laundry, Cleaning, and Dyeing, Jan. 3, 1958_____________________
Manufacturing, Mar. 15, 1959
Mercantile, Dec. 15, 1962
Minors, July 7, 1964
Office, Oct. 13, 1953
Organized Youth Camps, July 9, 1957
Personal Service, Mar. 10, 1956
Preparing Poultry, Rabbits, Fish, or Eggs for Distribution, Feb. 10,
1953_____________________ ____ _____’________ ______________
Public Housekeeping, Apr. 14, 1964
Telephone and Telegraph, Aug. 4,1956
PENNSYLVANIA
Wage fixed in law Jan. 1, 1962
Candy Stand Attendants in Motion Picture Theater Lobbies, July 18,
1962..________
Hotel Occupations in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Oct. 15, 1962___
Hotel Occupations Outside Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Sept. 9, 1959_
Laundry and Drycleaning Occupations, Oct. 15, 1962______________
Mercantile Occupations, Oct. 15, 1962
Motel and Miscellaneous Lodging Occupations, Oct. 15, 1962_______
Restaurant Occupations in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Oct. 15,1962_
Restaurant Occupations Outside Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Sept.
9, 1959.______ ____________
General Occupations, Oct. 15, 1962
PUERTO RICO*
Wage fixed in law June 14, 1960
Alcoholic Beverage and Industrial Alcohol Industry, Feb. 4, 1965___
Banking, Insurance, and Finance Industry, Feb. 3, 1963___________
Bread, Cracker, Bakery Products, and Alimentary Pastes Industry,
July 17, 1963_______________
Chemical, Petroleum, Rubber, and Related Products Industry for the
Local Trade, June 20, 1964
Coffee Industry in Its Agricultural Phase, Sept. 4, 1963___________

Page

62
62
63
64
65
65
65
66
66
67
67
67
67
68
68
68
69
69
70
71
71
72
73
74
75
76
76
77
78
78
78
79
79
80

* Editor’s Note: For employees in work or service covered by the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act,
rates for Puerto Rico are set by special industry committees. Information in regard to such rates can be
obtained from the Puerto Rico Department of Labor, San Juan, P.R., or from the Wage and Hour and
Public Contracts Divisions, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, D.C., 20210. Rates in this report
are for the local trade and service industries.

VI



PUERTO RICO—Continued
Commercial, Professional, and Personal Service Industry, Aug. 3, 1964.
Construction Industry, Dec. 4, 1964
Dairy and Cattle Industry, Apr. 9, 1965______________ ___________
Food and Related Products Industry, June 3, 1964_______________
General Agricultural Activities Industry, Aug. 20, 1961____________
Hospital, Clinic, and Sanatorium Industry, July 3, 1965___________
Hotel Industry, Feb. 7, 1964
Laundry and Dry cleaning Industry, Jan. 6, 1965_________________
Lumber and Wood Products; Metal Furniture, Doors, and Windows
Industry for the Local Trade, May 9, 1964___________________
Metal, Machinery, Transportation Equipment, Electrical Products,
Instruments, and Related Products for the Local Trade and the
Motor Vehicle and Electric Appliance Repair and Other Service
Industry, Feb. 3, 1965
Needlework Products, Pillow, and Mattress Manufacturing Industry
for the Local Trade, May 8, 1963
Restaurant, Bar, and Soda Fountain Industry, May 25, 1963______
Retail Trade Industry, Jan. 14, 1963
Stone, Clay, Glass, Cement, and Related Products Industry, June 19,
1965--------------Sugar Industry in Its Agricultural Phase, Jan. 17, 1962____________
Theater and Motion Picture Industry, Oct. 12, 1963______________
Tobacco and Food Crops Industry, Jan. 27, 1964_________________
Transportation Industry,May29, 1965
Wholesaling and Warehousing Industry, June 16, 1963____________
Miscellaneous Activities Industry, Oct. 29, 1964, and Mar. 15, 1965--

p|ft

80
83
83
84
84
85
85
85
86

87
88
88
89
90
91
91
92
92
93
94

RHODE ISLAND
Wage fixed in law Sept. 3, 1962. Rates effective Sept. 3, 1963_____
Laundry and Drycleansing Occupations, Sept. 3, 1963_____________
Laundry and Drycleansing Industries, June 1, 1951_______________
Restaurant, Hotel Restaurant, and Public Housekeeping Occupations,
Sept. 3, 1963__________________________________________
Restaurant and Hotel Restaurant Occupations, Jan. 1, 1954_______
Public Housekeeping Occupations, Sept. 15, 1947
Retail Trade Occupations, Sept. 3, 1963
Retail Trade Occupations, July 1, 1958

99
100
100
101
101

SOUTH DAKOTA
Wage fixed in law July 1, 1964

102

UTAH
Laundry, Cleaning, Dyeing, and Pressing Industries, Jan. 1, 1965___
Public Housekeeping Industry, Jan. 1, 1965
Restaurant Industry, Jan. 1,1965
Retail Trade Industry, Jan. 1, 1965

103
103
104
105

VERMONT
Wage fixed in law Sept. 1, 1959
Hotel, Motel, Tourist Place, and Restaurant Industry, Oct. 8, 1959__
Laundry and Drycleaning Industry, Oct. 8, 1959
Retail, Wholesale, and Service Establishments, Oct. 8, 1959________
Summer Camp Industry, Jan. 25, 1960

106
106
106
107
107




98
98
99

vii

WASHINGTON
Pa^
Wage fixed in law June 30, 1961. Rate effective Jan. 1, 1962---------108
Counselor Staff Occupations in Organized Seasonal Recreational
109
Camps, Oct. 14, 1963
Pood Processing Industry, Mar. 1, 1962----------------------------------------109
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Packing Industry, Mar. 1, 1962 ------------109
Health Care Industry, July 1, 1962
110
Laundry, Drycleaning, and Dye Works Industry, Mar. 1, 1962-------110
Manufacturing Industry and General Working Conditions, Mar. 1,
1962____________________________________
Mercantile Industry, Wholesale and Retail, Mar. 1, 1962--------------111
OfRceworkers, Oct. 14, 1963111
Personal Service Industry, Mar. 1, 1962----------------------------------------111
Public Housekeeping Industry, Mar. 6, 1962----------------------------------112
Telephone and Telegraph Industry, Oct. 14, 1963 ------------------------112
Theatrical Amusement and Recreation Industry and General Amuse­
ment and Recreation Industry, Mar. 6, 1962----------------------------113
WISCONSIN
Agriculture, Sept. 1, 1964-----------------------------------------------------------Any Occupation, Trade, or Industry, Sept. 1, 1964-----------------------Canning or First Processing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, Sept. 1,
1964 (hours of work and overtime rate)-----------------------------------Domestic Service in Private Homes, Sept. 1, 1964------------------------Operators in Telephone Exchanges, Sept. 1, 1964 (pay hours and hours
of work)
115
WYOMING
Wage fixed in law May 22, 1965
SELECTED WOMEN’S BUREAU PUBLICATIONS------------------------------

viii




114
114
114
115

116
130

INTRODUCTION
This bulletin presents, in tabular chart form, an analysis of mini­
mum wage rates and coverage established by statute and/or wage
order as of August 1,1965. A total of 36 jurisdictions have established
minimum wage rates. As shown in the bulletin, the rates were set
by statute in 23 jurisdictions and by a total of 159 wage orders in 21
jurisdictions. An additional 3 States—Illinois, Kansas and
Louisiana—have minimum wage laws on the statute books but have
no rates in effect.
Since publication of Bulletin 267, Part II, January 1, 1963, which
this bulletin supersedes, 4 States—Delaware, Indiana, Maryland,
and Michigan—enacted minimum wage laws for the first time, all of
which set a statutory rate; Oklahoma amended its wage board law to
establish a statutory rate; 15 States increased the statutory rate in
existing laws; and 13 jurisdictions increased rates in 85 wage orders.
For the history of State minimum wage legislation and an analysis
of the basic provisions of minimum wage statutes (e.g., authority of
minimum wage administrator, appointment of wage boards, pro­
mulgation of wage orders, and related provisions), see Part I, Bulletin
267 (in process of revision).
The research for this report was done and the report was written
by Regina M. Neitzey and Mary C. Manning, Labor Law Branch,
under the direction of Alice A. Morrison, Chief, Division of Legisla­
tion and Standards.




1

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES

10
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
ALASKA:
Wage fixed in law.1 Rate
effective Feb. 14,1962.
Ch. 2 and Ch. 3 (L. 1962)
amended Ch. 171 (L.
1959), which repealed Ch.
185 (L. 1955).




Occupation or industry covered

Commerce, or other business, or the production
of goods or materials. Exceptions: Agricul­
ture (as defined),3 catching, trapping, cultivat­
ing or farming, netting or taking of any kind
of fish, shellfish, or other aquatic forms of ani­
mal and vegetable life; handpicking of shrimp;
domestic service (including babysitters) in
and about a private home; activities of a non­
profit religious, charitable, cemetery, or edu­
cational organization where employer-em­
ployee relationship does not, in fact, exist and
services rendered are voluntary; delivery of
newspapers to consumer; watchman or care­
taker (solely) of premises, property, or plant
not in productive use 4 months or more; bona
fide executive, administrative, or professional
persons; outside salesmen or salesmen on
straight commission basis; search for minerals
of economic value; persons under 18 years
employed on a part-time basis, not more than
30 hours a week; employees of the United
States, the State, or any political subdivision
thereof.

*

r

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

All employees:2
Until Sept. 3,1963_____ ________ $1.65 an hour....... .........................
On and after Sept. 3,1963.......... ...... $1.75 an hour____ _______ ____
Overtime: Exempt from overtime pro­ lH times regular rate.................. Over 8 a day, 40 a week.4
vision: Persons acting in a super­
visory capacity; those employed by
an employer with less than 4 em­
ployees in regular course of business;
in a bona fide executive, administra­
tive, or professional capacity; out­
side salesmen; persons (1) handling,
canning, processing, curing, or stor­
ing (including cold storage) any kind
of fish, shellfish, or other aquatic
forms of animal or vegetable life, or
any byproducts thereof; (2) han­
dling, packing, storing, pasteurizing,
drying, preparing in their raw or
natural state, or canning agricultural
or horticultural commodities for
market, or making cheese, butter, or
other dairy products; (3) engaged in
agriculture; (4) employed in connec­
tion with the publication of any
weekly, semiweekly, or daily news­
paper with a circulation of less than
1,000; (5) employed as seamen; (6)
employed in forestry or lumbering
operations (as defined) when num­
ber of employees does not exceed 12;
(7) employed as an outside buyer of
poultry, eggs, cream, or milk, in
their raw or natural state; and em­
ployees subject to the Federal Rail­
way Labor Act; any switchboard
operator in a public telephone ex­
change with fewer than 750 stations;
any employee operating a taxicab;
any employee in an otherwise
exempted employment or proprietor
in a retail or service establishment
handling telegraphic, telephone, or
radio messages for the public under
agency or contract arrangement
with a telegraph or communications
company where revenue of such
agency does not exceed $500 a
month; casual employees (as defined
by regulation); any employee of a
nonprofit hospital.

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
ARIZONA:
Laundry and Drycleaning
Industry, No. 2A, Sept.
12, 1948.
(Supersedes Order No. 2,
June 15, 1939.)

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

(1) Cleaning, dyeing, pressing, processing, or any
other work incidental thereto of clothing (in­
cluding hats), household furnishings, rugs, tex­
tiles, fur, leather, or fabric of any kind; (2) the
collection, sale, resale, or distribution at retail
or wholesale of these services; (3) the producing
of such services on their own behalf by estab­
lishments, businesses, institutions, clubs, or
hospitals, which services may be incidental to
their present business; (4) Self-Service Laundries, Automatic Laundries, Ilelp-Yourself
Laundries, U-Do Laundries, and any type of
rental laundries. Exception: Worker under 21
whose chief occupation is that of a student ac­
tually attending public or private school.

Women and minors:1
Experienced (3 months in industry)1—
Full time:
Drycleaning—

Laundry—

All selling of merchandise to consumer and not
for purpose of resale in any form. Exception:
Worker under 21 whose chief occupation is
that of a student actually attending public or
private school.

36 to 40 a week during peri­
ods when weekly mini­
mum need not be paid;2
over 40 a week.3
___ do............................................ Actual hours worked.

90 percent of the applicable min­
imum rate.
(Deductions from minimum
wage for meals, lodging, or
both allowed only on special
permit.)

Women and female minors:1
Full time........... ..................................
Experienced (1 year in industry)..

Inexperienced:5

Experienced (1 year in industry)...
Inexperienced: s
Second 6 months....... .................. 52J4 cents an hour.......................
See footnotes at end of table.




Hours

36 to 40 a week during peri­
ods when weekly mini­
mum need not be paid;2
overf40 a week.3

Learners and apprentices * (less than
3 months in industry).

Retail Trades^ Industry,
No. IB, Aug. 10, 1954.
(Supersedes Order No. 1A,
June 17, 1943.)

Minimum wage rates

Do.

8 a day, 4 or more days a
week.
Standard workweek, i.e.,
48 a week (8 a day, 6
days) or 42 a week (6 a
day, 7 days).
week.
Standard workweek, i.e.,
48 a week (8 a day, 6
days) or 42 a week (6. a
day, 7 days).
week.
8 a day, less than 4 days a
week.
Do.
Do.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
ARKANSAS:
Wage fixed in law. Mar.
20,1915, amended by Act
217 (L. 1953) and Act 34
(L. 1955).
(Hour law amended 1943 to
establish overtime pro­
vision.)




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

Manufacturing, mechanical, or mercantile es­
tablishment, laundry, express or transporta­
tion company, hotel, restaurant, eating place,
bank, building and loan association, insurance
company, finance or credit business, or work
in any capacity other than occupations express­
ly exempted by law. Exceptions: Domestic,
agricultural, or horticultural employment;
cotton factory; gathering of fruits or farm prod­
ucts; switchboard operators in public tele­
phone exchanges havmg less than 750 stations
who are exempt under sec. 13(a) par. 11 of 1949
amendment to the Federal Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act; railroad employees regulated by Fed­
eral laws; and processors or canners of fruits
and vegetables subject to the Fair Labor
Standards Act. Banks and trust companies
complying with provisions of Fair Labor
Standards Act meet requirements of the wage
and hour provisions of the State female labor
law.

Females:
Experienced_____________ _______
Inexperienced (6 months)
Overtime, by permit for overtime of
a permanent nature in excess of 1
hour a day.

$1.25 a day
$1 a day
1J-3 times employee’s regular
rate.
Pro rata

8 a day, 6 days a week.1
Do
Over 8 a day or on 7th con­
secutive day.2
Less than 8 a day.

f

l

Hours

Minimum wage rates

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

The preparation, care, and treatment of farmland, pipeline, or ditches; the sowing, planting,
care, harvesting, assembly, and storage (as
defined) of any agricultural or horticultural
commodity; the raising, feeding, and manage­
ment (as defined) of livestock, fur-bearing
animals, poultry, and bees; the operation,
conservation, improvement, or maintenance
of such farm and its tools and equipment.
Exceptions: Any employee covered by Order
No. 8-57 or Order No. 13-61, or any succeeding
order or orders of the Commission relating to
industries handling products after harvest.
Exempt from minimum wage rates: Employer
of less than 10 persons covered by this order.
(Every provision of order applies to employer
who at any one time in calendar year employs
10 or more persons covered by this order.)

Women and minors paid on an hourly
basis.1

Amusement and Recrea­
tion Industry, No. 10-63.
Rates effective Aug. 30,
1964.*
(Supersedes Order No.
10-57, Nov. 15, 1957.)

Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of furnishing entertain­
ment or recreation to the public, including but
not limited to theaters, nightclubs, dancehalls,
bowling alleys, billiard parlors, skating rinks,
riding academies, racetracks, amusement
parks, athletic fields, swimming pools, gym­
nasiums, golf courses, tennis courts, carnivals,
and wired-music studios. Exceptions: [Per­
formers whose activities involve the exercise
of artistic talent or athletic proficiency.
Exempt from minimum wage rates: Women
employed in administrative, executive, or
professional capacities (as defined);5 appren­
tices regularly indentured under State Divi­
sion of Apprenticeship Standards.

$1.30 an hour_____________
Women and minors 1
Except minors under 18 years
---- $1.05 an hour_____________
Overtime, women 18 and over in em­ 1H times employee’s regular
ployment in which overtime is not
rate.
prohibited by State Labor Code, in Double employee’s regular
emergency and during periods when
rate.
necessary to prevent spoilage of
perishable products.
If employee works a split shift, except $1.30 a day in addition to mini­
employee residing at place of em­
mum wage.
(Deductions permitted from
ployment.
minimum wage for meals and
lodging in amounts specified
in order.)

Broadcasting Industry,
No. 11-63. Rates effec­
tive Aug. 30,1964.*
(Supersedes Order No.
11-57, Nov. 15, 1957.)

Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of broadcasting programs
through the medium of radio or television.
Exempt from minimum wage rates: Women
employed in administrative, executive, or
professional capacities (as defined);5 appren­
tices regularly indentured under State Divi­
sion of Apprenticeship Standards.

Provisions same as for Order No. 10-63, Amusement and Recreation Industry.

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
CALIFORNIA:
Agricultural Occupations,
No. 14-61, Aug. 28,1961.
Editor's Note: Order re­
vised. No. 14-65 sets
minimum hourly rate of
$1.30 for women and $1.10
for minors, effective Sept.
15,1965.

See footnotes at end of table.




$1 an hour.

8 a day, 6 days a week.*
Do. 2
Over 8 through 12, first 8
on 7th day.
Over 12 on any one day
and over 8 on the 7th
consecutive day.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

C\
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of canning soups, or of
cooking, canning, curing, freezing, pickling,
salting, bottling, preserving, or otherwise
processing any fruits or vegetables, seafood,
meat, poultry, or rabbit product, when the
purpose of such processing is the preservation
of the product; includes all operations inci­
dental thereto. Exempt from minimum wage
rates: Women employed in administrative,
executive, or professional capacities (as de­
fined)^ apprentices regularly indentured
under State Division of Apprenticeship
Standards.

Women and minors 1____________
Except minors under 18 years 8
Overtime,6 women 18 and over in
employment in which overtime is
not prohibited by State Labor Code,
in emergency and during periods
when necessary to prevent spoilage
of perishable products.

$1.30 an hour
$1.05 an hour
\A times employee’s regular
rate.
Double employee’s regular
rate.
(Deductions permitted from
minimum wage for meals and
lodging in amounts specified
in order.)

Industries Handling Prod­
ucts After Harvest, No.
8-57, Nov. 15,1957
(Supersedes Order No. 8-52,
Aug. 1, 1952.)
Editor’s Note: Order No.
8-63 setting a rate of $1.25
an hour effective Aug. 30,
1963 ($1.30, Aug. 30,1964),
in court.

Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of grading, sorting, clean­
ing, drying, cooling, icing, packing, dehydrat­
ing, cracking, shelling, candling, separating,
slaughtering, picking, plucking, shucking,
pasteurizing, fermenting, ripening, molding,
or otherwise preparing any agricultural, horti­
cultural, egg, poultry, meat, seafood, rabbit,
or dairy product for distribution; includes all
operations incidental thereto. Exempt from
minimum wage rates: Women employed in ad­
ministrative, executive, or professional capac­
ities (as defined);B apprentices regularly
indentured under State Division of Appren­
ticeship Standards.

Women and minors 1
$1.00 an hour__
8 a day, 6 days a week.8
Except women 18 years and over 85 cents an hour.
Do.8
(first 200 hours of employment in
skilled or semiskilled occupations) .3
Except minors under 18 years.8______ ___ do___ __________________
Do.8
Overtime,6 women 18 years and over IA times employee’s regular
Over 8 through 12, first 8
in employment in which overtime is
rate.
on 7th day.
not prohibited by State Labor Code, Double employee’s regular rate__ Over 12 on any one day
in emergency and during periods
and over 8 on 7th con­
when necessary to prevent spoilage (Deductions permitted from
secutive day.
of perishable products.
minimum wage for meals and
lodging in amounts specified
in order.)

Industries Handling Prod­
ucts After Harvest on
the Farm, No. 13-61,
Aug. 28,1961.
Editor’s Note: Order No.
13-63 setting a rate of $1.25
an hour effective Aug. 30,
1963 ($1.30, Aug. 30,1964),
in court.

Any establishment operated for the purpose of
grading, sorting, cleaning, drying, cooling,
icing, packing, dehydrating, cracking, shell­
ing, candling, separating, slaughtering, pick­
ing, plucking, shucking, pasteurizing, ferment­
ing, ripening, molding, or otherwise preparing
any agricultural, horticultural, egg, poultry,
meat, seafood, rabbit, or dairy product when
such operations are done on the premises
owned or operated by the same employer who
produced the products referred to herein for
distribution and includes all operations inci­
dental thereto. Exceptions: Any place of em-

CALIFORN1 A—Continued
Canning, Freezing, and
Preserving Industry, No.
3-63. Rates effective
Aug. 30, 1964.4
(Supersedes Order No.
3-57, Nov. 15, 1957.)




Hours

8 a day, 6 days a week.2
Do.2
Over 8 through 12, first 8
on 7th day.
Over 12 on any one day
and over 8 on the 7th
consecutive day.

Provisions same as for Order No. 8-63, Industries Handling Products After Harvest.

x

<1

ployment covered by Order 8-57 or any suc­
ceeding order of the Commission relating to
industries handling products after harvest.
Exempt from minimum wage rates: Women
employed in administrative, executive, or pro­
fessional capacities (as defined);5 apprentices
regularly indentured under State Division
of Apprenticeship Standards.
8 a day, 6 days a week.2
Laundry, Linen Supply,
Any industry, business, or establishment oper­ Women and minors 1............................ $1.30 an hour.
Do.2
Dryeleaning, and Dyeing
ated for the purpose of washing, ironing, clean­ Except women 18 years and over (first $1.05 an hour.
200 hours of employment in skilled
ing, refreshing, restoring, pressing, dyeing,
Industry, No. 6-63.
or semiskilled occupations).8
Rates effective Aug. 30,
storing, fumigating, mothproofing, water­
do.................... .......................
Do.2
proofing, or other processes incidental thereto Except minors under 18 years.
1964.4
(Supersedes Order No.
on articles or fabrics of any kind; includes but Overtime, women 18 years and over V/i times employee’s regular rate. Over 8 through 12, first 8
in employment in which overtime
on 7th day.
6-57, Nov. 15, 1957.)
is not limited to clothing, hats, drapery, rugs,
is not prohibited by State Labor Double employee’s regular rate.. Over 12 on any one day and
curtains, linens, household furnishings, tex­
Code, in emergency and during
over 8 on the 7th con­
tiles, furs, or leather goods; and includes self­
periods when necessary to prevent
secutive day.
service laundries, self-service drycleaning
spoilage of perishable products.
establishments, and similar types of commer­
cial establishments, and the collection, distri­ If employee works a split shift, except $1.30 a day in addition to mini­
employee residing at place of em­
bution, storage, sale, or resale at retail or
mum wage.
(Deductions permitted from
wholesale of the foregoing services. Exempt
ployment.
minimum wage for meals and
from minimum wage rates: Women employed
lodging in amounts specified
in administrative, executive, or professional
in order.)
capacities (as defined);8 apprentices regularly
indentured under the State Division of
Apprenticeship Standards.
Manufacturing Industry,
Any industry, business, or establishment op­ Provisions same as for Order No. 6-63, Laundry, Linen Supply, Drycleaning, and Dyeing Industry.
No. 1-63. Rates effec­
erated for the purpose of preparing, producing,
tive Aug. 30,1964.4
making, altering, repairing, finishing, process­
(Supersedes Order No. 1­
ing, inspecting, handling, assembling, wrap­
57, Nov. 16, 1957.)
ping, bottling, or packaging goods, articles, or
commodities, in whole or in part. Exceptions:
Such activities covered by orders in the Can­
ning, Preserving, and Freezing Industry; Indus­
tries Handling Products After Harvest; In­
dustries Preparing Agricultural Products for
Market, on the Farm; and the Motion Picture
Industry. Exempt from minimum wage rates:
Women employed in administrative, execu­
tive, or professional capacities (as defined);8
apprentices regularly indentured under State
Division of Apprenticeship Standards.
Mercantile Industry, No.
Any industry, business, or establishment op­ Provisions same as for Order No. 6-63, Laundry, Linen Supply, Drycleaning, and Dyeing Industry,
7-63. Rates effective
erated for the purpose of purchasing, selling,
or distributing goods or commodities at whole­
Aug. 30,1964.4
(Supersedes Order No. 7­
sale or retail; or for the purpose of renting goods
57, Nov. 15, 1957.)
or commodities. Exempt from minimum wage
rates: Women employed in administrative,
executive, or professional capacities (as de­
fined) ;8 apprentices regularly indentured under
State Division of Apprenticeship Standarts.
See footnotes at end of table;




ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

CO
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
CALIFORNIA—Continued
Motion Picture Industry,
No. 12-63. Rates effec­
tive Aug. 30,1964.4
(Supersedes Order No. 12­
67, Jan. 1, 1958.)

Personal Service Industry,
No. 2-63. Rates effec­
tive Aug. 30, 1964.4
(Supersedes Order No. 2­
57, Nov. 15, 1957.)




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any industry, business, or establishment op­
erated for the purpose of motion picture or
television film production, including but not
limited to motion pictures for entertainment,
commercial, religious, or educational purposes;
includes all extra players. Exceptions: Pro­
fessional actors and actresses. Exempt from
minimum wage rates: Women employed in ex­
ecutive, administrative, or professional capaci­
ties (as defined);' apprentices regularly inden­
tured under State Division of Apprenticeship
Standards.
"Extra player” defined as any woman or minor
employed in the production motion pictures to
perform any work, including but not limited
to that of a general extra, stand-in, photo­
graphic double, sports player, silent bit, or dress
extra; or as extra employed in dancing, skating,
swimming, diving, riding, driving, or singing;
or as extra employed to perform any other
actions, gestures, facial expressions, or panto­
mime.

Women and minors 1
Except minors under 18 years 3
Overtime,? women 18 years and over
in cases of emergency.

Any industry, business, or establishment op­
erated for the purpose of rendering, directly or
indirectly, any service, operation, or process
used or useful in the care, cleansing, or beauti­
fication of the body, skin, nails, or hair, or in
the enhancement of personal appearance or
health; includes but is not limited to beauty
salons, schools of beauty culture offering
beauty care to the public for a fee, barbershops,
bath and massage parlors, physical condition­
ing and weight control salons, and mortuaries.
Exempt from minimum wage rates: Women
employed in administrative, executive, or pro­
fessional capacities (as defined);3 apprentices
regularly indentured under State Division of
Apprenticeship Standards.

Minimum wage rates

Hours

$1.30 an hour
8 a day, 6 days a week.
$1.05 an hour
Do.
VA times employee’s regular
Over 8 through 12, first
rate.
8 on 7th day.
Double employee’s regular rate.. Over 12 on any one day
and over 8 on 7th con­
secutive day.
$1.30 a day in addition to mini­
mum wage.

If employee works a split shift, except
employee residing at place of busi­
ness.
Extra players for—
Costume fitting, when not given Full day’s agreed wage.
employment for which costume
fitted.
Night work, wet work, or dangerous Applicable minimum hourly
work, when employee, not noti­
rate.
fied at time of call of character of
work, refuses to work.3
Interviews or auditions over 1A hours ------do________________ _____
in length.
(Deductions permitted from
minimum wage for meals
and lodging in amounts speci­
fied in order.)

For all time consumed.

Do.

Provisions same as for Order No. 10-63, Amusement and Recreation Industry.

(

Includes professional, semiprofessional, manage­ Women and minors ..........................
rial, supervisorial, laboratory, research, Except women 18 years and over
technical, clerical, office work, and mechanical
(first 200 hours of employment in
skilled or semiskilled occupations) .3
occupations, including but not limited to
accountants; accounting clerks; appraisers; Except minors under 18 years3______
balers; bond markers; bookkeepers; bundlers; Overtime, women 18 years and over
canvassers; cashiers; checkroom attendants;
in employment in which overtime
is not prohibited by State Labor
checkers; circulation clerks; claims adjusters;
Code, in emergency 0 and during
classified advertising saleswomen; clerks;
periods when necessary to prevent
collectors; compilers; computers; copyholders;
spoilage of perishable products.
copyreaders; copywriters; demonstrators;
distributors; draftsmen; graduate nurses; If employee works a split shift, except
employee residing at place of em­
hostesses; instructors; interviewers; investi­
gative shoppers; librarians and their assistants;
ployment.
linotype operators; messengers; models; office
machine operators; physicians’ and dentists'
assistants and attendants; practical nurses;
proofreaders; research, X-ray, medical, or
dental laboratory technicians and their
assistants; salespersons; secretaries; shipping
clerks; social workers; statisticians; stenog­
raphers; teachers; telegraph, telephone, tele­
type, and teletypesetter operators; telephone
solicitors; tellers; ticket agents; tracers; typists;
vehicle operators; and other related occupa­
tions listed as professional, semiprofessional,
clerical, mechanical, and kindred occupations.
Exceptions: Professional, technical, clerical,
mechanical, and similar occupations performed
in an industry covered by another minimum
wage order; exchange operator of a telephone
company having less than 150 stations operated
under the jurisdiction of the Public Utilities
Commission and where employee’s duties as
operator are incidental to other duties.
Exempt from minimum wage rates: Women
employed in administrative, executive, or pro­
fessional capacities,s where work is predomi­
nantly intellectual, managerial, or creative,
requiring exercise of discretion and independ­
ent judgment and for which remuneration is
not less than $400 per month; or those licensed
or certified by the State to practice law,
medicine, dentistry, architecture, engineering,
teaching, or accounting; apprentices regularly
indentured under State Division of Appren­
ticeship Standards.
See footnotes at end of table.

-S9-—SOS-6 ll

Professional, Technical,
Clerical, Mechanical, and
Similar Occupations, No.
4-63. Rates effective
Aug. 30,1964.4
(Supersedes Order No. 4-57,
Nov. 15, 1957.)

to

vO



$1.30 an hour.
$1.05 an hour.

8 a day, 6 days a week 2
Do.2

Do.2
----- do__________________ ____
Over 8 through 12, first 8
V/i times employee’s regular
on 7th day.
rate.
Double employee’s regular rate.. Over 12 on any one day and
over 8 on 7th consecutive
day.
$1.30 a day in addition to mini­
mum wage.
(Deductions permitted from
minimum wage for meals and
lodging in amounts specified
in order.)

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

M

o

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
CALIFORNIA—Continued
Public Housekeeping In­
dustry, No. 5-63. Rates
effective Aug. 30,1964.4
(Supersedes Order No. 5­
57, Nov. 15, 1957.)




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any industry, business, or establishment that
provides meals, housing, or maintenance
services, whether operated as a primary busi­
ness or when incidental to other operations in
an establishment not covered by another
minimum wage order; includes but is not
limited to restaurants, nightclubs, taverns,
bars, cocktail lounges, lunch counters, cafeterias,
boardinghouses, clubs, and all similar estab­
lishments where food in either solid or liquid
form is prepared and served to be consumed
on the premises; catering, banquet, box lunch
service, and similar food for consumption on
or off premises; hotels, motels, apartment
houses, roominghouses, camps, clubs, trailer
parks, office or loft buildings, and similar
establishments offering rental of living, busi­
ness, or commercial quarters; hospitals, sani­
tariums, rest homes, child nurseries, child
care institutions, homes for the aged, and
similar establishments offering board or lodg­
ing in addition to medical, surgical, nursing,
convalescent, aged, or child care; private
schools, colleges, or universities, and similar
establishments that provide board or lodging
in addition to educational facilities; establish­
ments contracting for development, mainte­
nance, or cleaning of grounds; maintenance
or cleaning of facilities and/or quarters of
commercial units and living units; establish­
ments providing veterinary or other animal
care service. Exceptions: Student nurses in
schools accredited by State Board of Nursing
Education and Nurse Registration or by
Board of Vocational Nurse Examiners or in
schools exempt by law (religious nursing
schools). Exempt from minimum wage rates:
Women employed in executive, administra­
tive, or professional capacities (as defined); 5
apprentices regularly indentured under State
Division of Apprenticeship Standards.

Women and minors ____ ________
Except minors under 18 years 8--_ ..
Overtime. (See Order No. 6-63,
Laundry, Linen Supply, Dryclean­
ing, and Dyeing Industry.)
If employee works a split shift, except
those residing at place of employ­
ment.

Minimum wage rates

Hours

$1.30 an hour______ _________ 8 a day, 6 days a week.2
$1.05 an hour___
Do.2
\X times employee’s regular
A
Over 8 through 12, first 8
rate.
on the 7th day.
Double employee’s regular rate— Over 12 in any one day
and over 8 on 7th con­
secutive day.10
$1.30 a day in addition to mini­
mum wage.
(Deductions permitted from
minimum wage for furnished
meals and lodging in amounts
specified in order.)

r

Any industry, business, or establishment op­
erated for the purpose of conveying persons
or property from one place to another, whether
by rail, highway, air, or water, and all opera­
tions or services in connection therewith; in­
cludes storage or warehousing of goods or
property, and the repairing, parking, rental,
maintenance, or cleaning of vehicles. Exempt
from minimum wage rates: Women employed
in administrative, executive, or professional
capacities (as defined);® apprentices regularly
indentured under State Division of Appren­
ticeship Standards.
See footnotes at end of table.

Transportation Industry,
No. 9-63. Rates effective
Aug. 30,1964.4
(Supersedes Order No. 9­
67, Nov. 15, 1957.)




Provisions same as for Order No. 10-63, Amusement and Recreation Industry.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

INS
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

COLORADO:
Beauty Service Occupa­
tions, No. 13, May 4,
1956.
(Supersedes Order No. 9,
Mar. 4,1951.)
Editor’s Note:
Order revised. New
rates effective Jan. 1,1966.

All services or operations used or useful in the
care, cleansing, or beautification of the skin,
nails, or hair, or in the enhancement of person­
al appearance, and also services or operations
incidental thereto, including the services of
maids, cashiers, and reception or appointment
clerks.

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Women and minors:1
Senior operators—

Up to 8 a day, 44 a week.
Do.

Junior operators 3 (first 12 months
and still in the training period)
and all other employees.
V/i times employee’s regular
rate.

Laundry Industry, No. 10,
May, 4, 1956.
(Supersedes Order No. 10,
Feb. 11,1951.)
Editor’s Note:
Order revised. New
rates effective Jan. 1,1966.




Any trade, business, industry, club, institution,
or branch thereof engaged in (1) washing, iron­
ing, or processing incidental thereto, for comclothing, or fabric of any kind whatsoever; (2)
the collection, sale, resale, or distribution at
retail or wholesale of laundry services; (3) the
producing of laundry service for their own
use by business establishments, hospitals,
clubs, or profitmaking institutions; (4) self­
service laundries, including work performed in
connection with plant maintenance, and by
officeworkers, clerks, curb service employees,
errand and delivery boys. -Exceptions: Laun­
dries in charitable institutions which pay no
wages and in which only inmates are em­
ployed; drycleaning departments in laundries.

Women and minors:1
Zone B 2
Inexperienced 5 (less than 192 hours
in the occupation).

Hours

80 percent of the applicable min­
imum wage rate.
V/i times employee’s regular
rate.

l

Do.
Do.
day, in emergencies.4
Up to 8 a day, 44 a week.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Over 44 a week; over 8
day, in emergencies.4

Public Housekeeping In­
dustry, No. 12, May 4,
1956.
(Supersedes Order No. 8,
Mar. 10, 1951.)
Editor's Note:
Order revised. New
rates effective Jan. 1,1966.

Retail Trade Industry, No.
11, May 4, 1956
(Supersedes Order No. 7,
Feb. 18, 1951.)
Editor's Note:
Order revised. New
rates effective Jan. 1,1966.

Hotels, restaurants, motels, roominghouses, Women and minors:
cottage camps, clubs, hospitals, convalescent
homes, sanitariums, private schools, colleges,
and any establishment that prepares and offers
for sale food or refreshment for consumption
either on or off its premises; lodging accommo­
dation for hire to the public, to employees, or
to members, whether such service is the prin­
cipal business of the employer or merely inci­
dental to another business.
“Public houskeeping occupation” defined as per­
formance of any and every type of work con­
cerned with or incidental to the public house­
keeping industry, including office personnel.
Exceptions: Registered nurses, student nurses,
female internes, dietitians, laboratory tech­
nicians, and student employees in sororities,
Inexperienced6 (less than 192 hours
fraternities, college clubs, or dormitories.
in the occupation).
Students under 16, employed outside school hours or during vacation.
Overtime............. .............. .............. .

Any trade, business, industry, institution, or
branch thereof engaged in, or concerned with,
selling or offering for sale any commodity,
article, goods, wares, or merchandise, to the
consumer, in which 50 percent or more of the
dollar volume of business results from retail
sales.

See footnotes at end of table.




Women and minors:1
Inexperienced 5 (less than 192 hours
in the occupation).
Students under 16, employed outside school hours or during vacation.
Overtime

With no meals:

1
Up to 8 a day, 48 a week.

With one meal:
Do.
With more than one meal:

With full maintenance:
Do.
80 percent of the applicable
minimum wage rate.
80 percent of the applicable zone
rate. (Inexperienced rate not
applicable.)
1^2 times employee’s regular
rate.
(Deductions permitted for lodg­
ing, in other than establish­
ments where full maintenance
is provided as part of wage, in
amounts specified in order.)

Do.
Do.
Over 48 a week; over 8 a
day in emergencies.4

Up to 8 a day, 48 a week.
Do.
Do.
Do.

80 percent of the applicable minimum wage rate.
Do.
80 percent of the applicable zone
rate. (Inexperienced rate not
applicable.)
1% times employee’s regular rate. Over 48 a week; over 8 a
day in emergencies.4

M
if*

ANALYSIS OP STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
CONNECTICUT:
Wage fixed in law. Rates
effective Oct. 1,1961.
Public Act 519 (L. 1961).
(Amending General Stat­
utes as amended by Pub­
lic Act 683 (L. 1959), Oct.
1,1959; Public Act 435 (L.
1957), July 1,1957; Public
Act 352 (L. 1951), July 1,
1951.)
(Supersedes mandatory
rates, Oct. 1, 1959.)

Beauty Shops, No. 1, Oct.
1, 1963.
(Order No. 1 of Mar. 4,
1958, as modified by Act
357 (L. 1963) and Act 519
(L. 1961), effective Oct. 1,
1961, which superseded
Order No. 1, Nov. 1,
1951.)




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any industry or occupation. Exceptions: Agri­
culture; camps or resorts open no more than
6 months of the year; domestic service in or
about a private home; individuals employed
in a bona fide executive, administrative, or
professional capacity, or by a Federal, State,
or municipal government or political subdivi-

All employees,1 except in hotel and
restaurant industries:
Until Oct. 1, 1963.___ ___________

tional, charitable, religious, scientific, histori­
cal, literary, or nonprofit organization where
the employer-employee relationship does not,
in fact, exist, or where the services rendered to
such organization are on a voluntary basis;
any individual subject to the provisions of
the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act, as
amended.
(Statute defines employee to include persons
employed in an industry for which a wage
order has been or may be established, although
employee may be covered by Fair Labor
Standards Act.)
(Resort is defined as an establishment under one
management whose principal function is to
offer lodging by the day, week, month, season,
or part thereof to vacationers or those in
search of recreation.)

In hotel and restaurant industries:

Any shop, store, or place or part thereof in which
is conducted the business of a hairdresser or
cosmetician, as defined by statute.

Between May 1, 1962, and May 1,
1964.

Minimum wage rates

Hours

females in practically all
industries and occupa­
tions as specified in
hours law.8
Do.8
$1.15 an hour................................
(Under regulations of Labor
Commissioner, allowance for
gratuities as part of the mini­
mum fair wage may not exceed
35 cents an hour for hotel and
restaurant industries until
May 1,1962; 40 cents an hour
until May 1,1964; 45 cents an
hour thereafter; not more
than 35 cents an hour in any
other industry.)
(Deductions for board and lodg­
ing permitted in amounts as
specified. From Administra­
tive Regulations.)

Except minor learner clerks4 (first 95 cents an hour..........................
500 hours).
Overtime:
Operators *.......................................... Applicable minimum hourly
rate in addition to, and ex­
clusive of, all other earnings.
All other employees.............. ............ 1M times employee’s regular
rate.

Do.2
Do.8
Do.8

Do.
Over 44 a week.8
Do.8

Cleaning and Dyeing Occu­
pation, Nos. 3A and 3B,
Oct. 1, 1961.
(Orders Nos. 3A and 3B of
June 26,1961, as amended
by Public Act 619 (L.
1961). Previously
amended by Public Act
435 (L. 1957).)

Cleaning, dyeing, redyeing, or pressing garments
(including hats), upholstery, rugs, or any
other fabrics; any process incidental thereto,
including collecting and receiving such articles
for the above purposes, or giving out or col­
lecting such articles after they have been
cleaned, dyed, redyed, or pressed. Exception:
Any process when carried on in establishments
manufacturing textiles or garments (including
hats).

Women and minors; adult males:3
Until Oct. 1, 1963—........................... $1.15 an hour.

Laundry Occupation, Nos.
2A and 2B, Oct. 1,1961.
(Orders Nos. 2A and 2B of
Apr. 17,1951, as amended
by Public Act 519 (L.
1961). Previously a­
mended by Public Act
435 (L. 1957).)

(1) Any activity in the washing, ironing, or
processing incidental thereto of laundry wares
and all other operations carried on in establish­
ments engaged in this business; (2) the col­
lection, sale, resale, or distribution at retail or
wholesale of laundry service and the keeping
of accounts, billing, and any other clerical
work in connection therewith; (3) the pro­
duction of laundry service for their own
use by business establishments, clubs, hos­
pitals, or other public or private institutions
other than institutions completely supported
by the State or municipality. Exception:
Adult males engaged in laundry occupations
in (2) above.
“Laundry establishment" means any place in
which any service in connection with any
activity of the laundry occupation is performed
for compensation. Exception: Domestic serv­
ice.

Women and minors; adult males:3
Until Oct. 1, 1963........... ..............

Mercantile Trade, Nos. 7A Wholesale or retail selling of commodities and
any operation supplemental or incidental
and 7B, Oct. 1, 1961.
thereto, including but not limited to buying,
(Orders Nos. 7A and 7B of
delivery, maintenance, office, stock, and
Oct. 1, 1951, as amended
clerical work. Exceptions: Repair and service
by Public Act 357 (L.
employees (as defined) if major portion of
1963) and Public Act 519
their duties is unrelated to the mercantile
(L. 1961). Previously a­
trade; cooperative students in State-approved
mended by Public Act 435
distributive education programs.
(L. 1957).)
See footnotes at end of table.




Thereafter........................ .................
Learners and apprentices (not over
5 weeks or 225 hours of employ­
ment) f—
Until Oct. 1, 1963.......... .....................
Thereafter_________ __________
Overtime (for women and minors)...

Thereafter___________________
Overtime 7.........................................

Women and minors; adult males:8
Until Oct. 1, 1963----------- ------------

$1.25 an hour.

Up to and including 45
week.
Do.

Do.
85 cents an hour...........................
Do.
95 cents an hour----- --------------Over 45 a week.2
1}4 times employee’s regular rate.
$1.15 an hour................................. Up to and including 44
week.
Do.
$1.25 an hour......... ............—........
1 times employee’s regular rate- Over 44 a week.2
deductions for meals and lodg­
ing constituting a condition
of employment allowed in
accordance with rates set by
the Labor Commissioner.
Such deductions not allowed
during the period employee
is receiving training or new
experience at a place other
than the regular place of
work.)

$1.15 an hour.................................
$1.25 an hour.................. ............

Up to and including 44
week.
Do.

Thereafter.................... .......................
Beginners or learners8—
Do.
Until Oct. 1, 1963 (first 1,000 hours 85 cents an hour............................
in the trade).
Do.
95 cents an hour................... .......
Thereafter (first 500 hours in the
trade).
1 l times employee’s regular rate. Over 44 a week.2
A
Overtime9......... .................. -................

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

3\

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
CONNECTICUT—Con.
Restaurant and Hotel
Restaurant Occupations,
No. 8, May 1, 1962.
(Order No. 8 of Dec. 1,1958,
as modified by Public Act
519 (L. 1961). Order No.
8 was issued in place of
the invalidated Restau­
rant Occupation Orders
Nos. 4A and 4B of May
15, 1950.)




Occupation or industry covered

Includes the preparation and serving of food for
human consumption, or in any operation in­
cidental or supplemental thereto, irrespective
of whether the food is served at or away from
the point of preparation and serving of food is
the sole business of the employing establish­
ment or enterprise. Exceptions: Preparation
and serving of food in a nonprofit educational,
charitable, or religious organization where the
food service is not regularly available to the
general public, or in hospitals, convalescent
homes, or homes for the elderly where the food
service is not regularly available to the general
public and is incidental to the care of the
patients.
Includes but is not limited to employees of
restaurants, cafeterias, that portion of hotel
business involving the preparation and serving
of food, commissaries, dairy bars, grills, coffee
shops, luncheonettes, sandwich shops, tea­
rooms, nightclubs, cabarets, automats, caterers,
frankfurter stands, operators of food vending
machines, and the serving of food in depart­
ment and variety stores, drugstores, candy
stores, bakeries, pizzerias, delicatessens,
places of amusement and recreation, commer­
cial and industrial establishments, and social,
recreational, fraternal, and professional clubs
which either regularly or intermittently serve
food, as well as other establishments or busi­
nesses meeting the conditions as stated.

Class of employees covered

Females, minors, and adult males: 3
Until May 1, 1964______________
Thereafter_________ ____ _
Overtime___ _________ __________

Minimum wage rates

Hours

$1.15 an hour 10
48 a week, 6 days.
$1.25 an hour
Do.
times the minimum rate JI__. Over 48 a week,2 and on 7th
consecutive day.
Allowance for gratuities as part
of the minimum fair wage of
service 12 employee may not
exceed 40 cents an hour, until
May 1, 1964; 45 cents an hour
thereafter. 13
(Deductions and allowances for
reasonable value of board and
lodging permitted in amounts
specified in order.)

r

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
DELAWARE:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective Sept. 26,1965.
H.B. No. 39 (L. 1965).

Occupation or industry covered

Any occupation, service, trade, business, in­
dustry, branch or groups of industries, or
employment or class of employment in which
employees are gainfully employed. Exceptions:
Agriculture; domestic service in or about a
private home; bona fide executive, adminis­
trative, or professional persons; outside sales­
men paid on a commission basis; employees of
the United States; fishing (as defined); activi­
ties of an educational, charitable, religious, or
nonprofit organization where the employ­
ment relationship docs not in fact exist or
where services are rendered gratuitously.
See footnotes at end of table.




Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

Maximum for females, 10 a
day, 55 a week, 6 days a
week.1

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

00
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
DISTRICT OF COLUM­
BIA:
Beauty Culture Occupa­
tion, No. 6, May 23,1960.
(Supersedes Order No. 6,
Mar. 27,1948.)

Occupation or industry covered

All services, operations, or processes used or use­
ful in the care, cleansing, or beautification of
body, skin, nails, or hair, or in the enhance­
ment of personal appearance; and all services,
operations, or processes incidental thereto.
Exception: Schools of cosmetology. (Bona
fide booth renter, as defined, is not deemed an
employee in the beauty culture occupation.)

Class of employees covered




Includes the activities of cleaning and servicing
buildings, institutions, establishments, or of­
fices. Exceptions: Such occupations covered
by other wage orders, e.g., Laundry and Dry­
cleaning; Beauty Culture; Manufacturing and
Wholesaling; Hotel, Restaurant, and Allied
Occupations; Retail Trade.

Hours

Over 36, not more than 42
a week.
Actual time worked.

Employee taking time off at own
request, beginning work after first
of week, or stopping before end of
week.
Learner (licensed operator for less
than 3 months), by permit valid 3
months from issuance.
Employee registered under D.C.
Apprenticeship Law, by permit
valid 1 year from issuance.
If employee works a split shift, or
spread of hours exceeds 10, or both.

Building Service Occupa­
tion, No. 11, July 24,
1961.
(Supersedes Order No. 11,
Nov. 12, 1955.3)
Editor's Note: Order No. 11
revised. Rates effective
Oct. 8, 1965: $50 for 36- to
40-hour week; $1.40 an
hour for part time and
overtime.

Minimum wage rates

Over 36, not more than 42
a week.
80 percent of weekly, part-time,
and overtime minimum rates.

36 or less a week
Over 42 a week.

$1.25 a day in addition to the
minimum wage.

Women and minors:1
Any employee, except in hospitals
and homes for children, the
convalescent, and the aging—
36, not more than 40 a week.
Actual time worked.
Less than 36 a week.

Employees in hospitals and homes
for children, the convalescent,
and the aging—
Weekly wage:
Until July 24, 1962
36, not more than 40 a week.
July 24, 1962, until July 24,1963. $41 a week............................. ......
Do.
July 24,1963....... ................ ........
Do.
Hourly rate (see effective dates of $1, $1.02)-$, and $1.05 an hour___ Actual time worked.
weekly wage).
Part time (see effective dates of $1.10, $1.15, and $1.20 an hour... Less than 36 a week.
weekly wage).
Student under 18 whose employer
Do.
has valid student certificate on file.
Over 40 a week.2
Apprentice (for not more than 1 80 percent of applicable mini­
year) registered under the D.C.
mum wage.
Apprenticeship Law.

f

If employee works a split shift or
spread of hours exceeds 11.

Clerical and Semitechnical
Occupations, No. 9, July
24, 1961.
(Supersedes Order No. 9 of
June 8,1954, which was a
new order issued in place
of the invalidated Office
and Miscellaneous Occu­
pations Order No. 7,
Apr. 25, 1949.)
Editor’s Note: Order No. 9
revised. Rates effective
Oct. 8, 1965: $50 for 36- to
40-hour week; $1.40 an
hour for part time and
overtime.

SO

See footnotes at end of table.




Clerical occupations include: General office clerks,
stenographers, typists, secretaries, file clerks,
mail clerks, bookkeepers, cashiers, tellers,
shipping clerks, receiving clerks, information
clerks, receptionists, checkers, proofreaders,
investigators, examiners, claim adjusters,
messengers, office boys and girls, telephone
operators, office-machine operators, dupli­
cating-machine operators, telegraph messen­
gers, telegraphic-typewriter operators, tele­
graph operators, collection clerks, tracer clerks,
ticket agents, baggage agents, vehicle dis­
patchers, and similar occupations. Semitechnical occupations include: Practical nurses,
nurses’ aides, housemothers, institutional at­
tendants, and assistants to physicians, den­
tists, laboratory technicians, X-ray techni­
cians, personnel counselors, labor-relations
counselors, public-relations counselors, li­
brarians, educators, social workers, writers,
research workers, statisticians, editors, and
other assistants whose work requires similar
training, skill, and supervision. Exceptions:
Employment which is part of required course
of study toward degree or obtaining a license
or certificate to practice a profession; such
occupations covered by other wage orders,
e.g., Retail Trade; Manufacturing and Whole­
saling; Hotel, Restaurant, and Allied Occu­
pations; Laundry and Drycleaning; and
Beauty Culture.

Women and minors:1
Any employee, except practical
nurses, nurses’ aides, house­
mothers, and institutional at­
tendants—
Weekly wage

$1.20 a day in addition to appli­
cable minimum wage.
(In lieu of purchasing, main­
taining, and cleaning re­
quired uniforms, employer
may elect to pay regularly to
employees an additional 3
cents an hour.)
(Order contains provisions in
amount as specified for fur­
nished meals and lodging.)

Each day worked.

$42 a week.. _

32, not more than 40 a
week.
Actual time worked.
Less than 32 a week.

Hourly rate_
$1.05 an hour.
Part time (see students)
$1.20 an hour.
Practical nurses, nurses’ aides,
housemothers, and institutional
attendants—
Weekly wage until July 24,1962___ $40 a week__________ ________
July 24, 1962, until July 24,1963_.__
July 24, 1963
Hourly rate (see effective dates of
weekly wage).
Part time (see effective dates of
weekly wage).
Students under 18 whose employer
has valid {student certificate on
file and those employed by educa­
tional institution they are attend­
ing.
Overtime___ _________ _______
Apprentices (for not more than 1
year) registered under the D.C.
Apprenticeship Law.
If employee works a split shift or
spread of hours exceeds 11.

32, not more than 40 a
week.
$41 a week
Do.
$42 a week
Do.
$1, $1.02^2, and $1.05 an hour___ Actual time worked.
$1.10, $1.15, and $L20 an hour... Less than 32 a week.
90 cents an hour.

Do.

$1.20 an hour Over 40 a week.2
80 percent of applicable mini­
mum wage.
$1.10 a day in addition to applicable minimum wage.
(In lieu of purchasing, main­
taining, and cleaning required
uniforms, employer may elect
to pay 3 cents an hour in ad­
dition to minimum wage.)
(Order contains provisions in
amount as specified for fur­
nished meals and lodging.)

Each day worked,

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
DISTRICT OF COLUM­
BIA—Continued
Hotel, Restaurant, and
Allied Occupations, No.
10, Aug. 15, 1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 10,
Sept. 10,1960.)




Occupation or industry covered

(1) Any business or part thereof engaged in pro­
viding lodging for hire, including, among other
types of businesses, apartment houses and
clubs; (2) any business or part thereof engaged
in preparing and serving food or beverages or
providing catering or carryout services; and
(3) all activities connected with or incidental
to the operation of such business or part
thereof included in (1) and (2). Exceptions:
Beauty culture, laundry, and drycleaning
activities.

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

Women and minors:
Until Aug. 15, 1965—
Nonservice:

Service:

36, not more than 40 a week
Less than 36 a week.

Between Aug. 15, 1965, and Aug. 15,
1966—
Nonservice:

36, not more than 40 aweek.

Service:

36, not more than 40 a week.

On and after Aug. 15, 1966—
Nonservice:

36, not more than 40 a week.

Service:
Apprentices (for not more than 1 year)
registered under the D.C. Appren­
ticeship Law.
If employee works a split shift or
spread of hours exceeds 11.

36, not more than 40 a week.
80 percent of applicable mini­
mum wage.
75 cents a day in addition to
minimum wage.
(Employer must pay cost of
purchase, maintenance, and
cleaning of uniforms and spe­
cial costumes. In lieu of
purchasing, maintaining, and

Over 40 a week.2

cleaning plain and washable
uniforms, employer may elect
to pay regularly to employees
an additional 3 cents an hour.
Such payment may not be
made for costumes or uni­
forms which are not plain and
washable.)
(Order contains provisions in
specified amounts for fur­
nished meals and lodging.)
Laundry and Drycleaning
Occupation, No. 5, July
6, 1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 5,
Oct. 20, 1958.)

Manufacturing and Whole­
saling Occupation, No.
8, Aug. 15, 1959.
(Supersedes Order No. 8,
Nov. 17. 1948.)

Includes any business or part thereof engaged in:
(1) the washing, cleaning, finishing, refreshing,
pressing, mending, or dyeing of any article of
wearing apparel (including hats and shoes),
household furnishings, textiles, fur, leather, or
fabric of any kind whatsoever; (2) the collec­
tion, sale, resale, or distribution at retail or
wholesale of any laundry or drycleaning serv­
ice; and (3) all activities connected with or in­
cidental to the operation of such business or
parts thereof.
(The activities mentioned above in (1), (2), and
(3) are covered by this order whether they are
performed by a business for its own use or for
others.)

Preparing, producing, or processing, and selling,
at wholesale, articles, commodities, or mer­
chandise; any business engaged in selling, at
wholesale, articles, commodities, or merchan­
dise; and activities connected therewith or
incidental to the operation of such business.

See footnotes at end of table.




Women and minors:
Until Sept. 3,1965­
Weekly wage............................... .

$42.00 a week

----- -----------

Part time
Overtime
On and after Sept. 3, 1965—
Weekly wage__________ _____

$1.10 an hour_____________
$1.12^6 an hour____________

Part time........................ ............ .
Overtime
Students under 18 whose employer
has a student certificate on file.4
Apprentices (for not more than 90
days) registered under the D.O.
Apprenticeship Law.
If employee works a split shift or
spread of hours exceeds 11.

$1.25 an hour______________
$1.25 an hour______________
$1.00 an hour_____________
80 percent of applicable mini­
mum wage.

Women and minors: i___________ _
Part time----------------------------- —
Employees beginning work after the
beginning of a workweek or re­
signing before the end of a work­
week, or voluntarily absent in any
week.
Overtime
Employee registered under the Dis­
trict of Columbia Apprenticeship
Law for whom employer has ap­
prentice wage permit (valid for
12 months following date of appli­
cation) .
If employee works a split shift

$46.00 a week...........................

Over 36, not more than 40
a week.
36 or less a week.
Over 40 a week.
Over 36, not more than 40
a week.
36 or less a week.
Over 40 a week.
36 or less a week

$1.15 a day in addition to appli­
cable minimum wage
$44 a week
$1.25 an hour
$1.10 an hour

Over 32, not over 40 a week.
32 or less a week.
Actual time worked.

$1.65 an hour
80 percent of weekly minimum
rate.

Over 40 a week.2

$1.10 a day in addition to the
minimum wage

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
DISTRICT OF COLUM­
BIA—Con tinned
Retail Trade Occupation,
No. 3, Jan. 27, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 3,
Retail Trade, Oct. 8,
1957, which superseded
Order No. 3 of May 25,
1953, and amended Order
No. 11, Building Service
Occupation, Nov. 12,
1955.5)




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Includes any business engaged in selling or offer­
ing for sale not for resale any goods, wares,
merchandise, articles, or things, and all activi­
ties connected with or incidental to the operation
of such business. Exceptions: Hotel, restau­
rant, beauty culture, laundry, and drycleaning
activities, and any employee employed in a
bona fide executive, administrative, or profes­
sional capacity or in the capacity of outside
salesman, as such terms were defined on
Sept. 9,1961, by the Secretary of Labor in con­
nection with the Federal Fair Labor Standards
Act.

Women and minors: i
Until Sept. 3, 1963­
Weekly wage
Part time........................................
Overtime
Between Sept. 3, 1963, and Sept. 3,
1964­
Weekly wage
Part time........................................
Overtime.............................. ...........

Minimum wage rates

Hours

$42 a week...
$1.05 an hour.
$1.05 an hour.

36, not over 40 a week.
Less than 36 a week.
Over 40 a week.8

$44 a week........... ......
$1.10 an hour_______
$1.10 an hour______
1H times regular rate.

36, not over 40 a week.
Less than 36 a week.
Over 40 through 44 a week.
Over 44 a week.2

Between Sept. 3, 1964, and Sept. 3,
1965—
Weekly wage
$46 a week...............
Part time
$1.15 an hour_______
Overtime........... ............................. $1.15 an hour_______
1J4 times regular rate.
On and after Sept. 3, 1965­
Weekly wage_________ ________ $50 a week_________
Part time_____ _______________ $1.25 an hour_______
Overtime____________________ V/& times regular rate.
Student under 18 for whom certifi­ $1 an hour_________
cate is in employer’s file (9 months
following original issuance of cer­
tificate).
If employee works a split shift
$1.25 a day in addition to the
minimum wage.
(In lieu of purchasing, main­
taining, and cleaning uni­
forms, employer may elect to
pay regularly to employees
an additional 3 cents an
hour.)
(Order contains provisions in
amount as specified for fur­
nished meals and lodging.)
|

f

36, not over 40 a week.
Less than 36 a week.
Over 40 through 42 a week
Over 42 a week.2
36, not over 40 a week.
Less than 36 a week.
Over 40 a week.2
Less than 36 a week.

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
HAWAII:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective July 1, 1962.
Act 67, Laws of 1965; Acts
15, 16, and 19 (L. 1962),
amending Ch. 94, revised
Laws of 1955, as pre­
viously amended by Acts
89 and 164 (L. 1959) and
Act 256 (L. 1957).

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any trade, business, industry, or branch thereof, All employees: 1
or group of industries. Exceptions: Public g Until Jan. 1, 1964______
employment; persons with guaranteed month­
On and after Jan. 1, 1964.
ly salary of $450 or more; agricultural work in Overtime............... ............
any workweek in which employer has fewer
than 20 employees or in agriculture for any
workweek in which employee is engaged in
coffee harvesting; the home of employer, or
house parent in or about any home or shelter
maintained by a charitable organization for
child welfare exempt from income tax; employ­
ment by relatives as specified in the act; work
in a bona fide executive, administrative, super­
visory, or professional capacity, or in the capac­
ity of outside salesman or as outside collector;
the propagating, catching, cultivating, etc., of
fish, shellfish, Crustacea, sponges, seaweeds,
or other aquatic forms of animal or vegetable
life (including the going to and returning from
work and the loading and unloading of such
products prior to first processing); seamen;
drivers of vehicles carrying passengers for hire,
operated on call from a fixed stand; golf cad­
dies; employment by a nonprofit school during
the time the individual is an attending student;
employees covered by the Federal Fair Labor
Standards Act.3
See footnotes at end of table.




Minimum wage rates

$1.15 an hour...............................
$1.25 an hour__.............................
lj^ times regular rate
(“Wages" defined to include the
reasonable cost to the em­
ployer, as determined by the
Commission of Labor and
Industrial Relations, of fur­
nishing an employee with
board, lodging, or other facil­
ity customarily furnished.)

Hours

40 a week.
Do.
Over 40 a week.3

M

if*

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

_______________ ______________________ ________________________________ ____________________________________________________________
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
IDAHO:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective May 18, 1963.
Idaho Code, Secs. 44-1601
to 44-1510, as amended by
Ch. 184 (L. 1957), Ch. 59
(L. 1959), and Ch. 9 (L.
1963).




Occupation or industry covered

Any employment. Exceptions: Persons em­
ployed in a bona fide executive, administrative,
or professional capacity; in domestic service;
in agricultural labor fas defined); and as out­
side salesmen.

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

(By definition, “wages” include
commissions of every kind;
reasonable cost3 of furnishing
board, lodging, or other facili­
ties customarily furnished and
used by employee.)

f

Hours

For females, 8 in any 24hour period, 48 a week.2

State, law or title of order,
and effective date

779-502 — 6;

ILLINOIS: No orders in effect.
See footnotes at end of table.

I

05




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

M

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
INDIANA:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective July 1, 1965.
Ch. 134, Laws of 1965, Apr.
1,1965.




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Any industry, trade, business or class of work
(including the State or other governmental
agency or political subdivision) in which em­
ployees 18 years of age and over are gainfully
employed by an employer of 4 or more em­
ployees during a workweek. Exceptions:
Agriculture (as defined); domestic service;
services performed not in the course of the
employing unit’s trade or business; insurance
agents, insurance solicitors and outside sales­
men paid on commission basis only; camps,
recreational or guidance facilities operated by
a charitable, religious, or educational nonprofit
organization; student nurses in the employ of
a hospital or nurses training school who are en­
rolled and regularly attending classes in a
nurses training school chartered or approved
by law; interns or resident physicians who
have completed 4 years’ course in approved
medical school, employed by any duly ac­
credited hospital; students employed by any
school, college, or university in which they are
enrolled and regularly attending classes; physi­
cally or mentally handicapped persons em­
ployed by a nonprofit organization organized
primarily to provide employment for such
handicapped persons or to assist in their
therapy and rehabilitation; members of any
religious order performing service for such
order; any duly ordained commissioned or
licensed ministers, priests, rabbis, sextons, or
Christian Science readers, and volunteers per­
forming services for any religious or charitable
organization; those engaged in an indepen­
dently established trade, occupation, profes­
sion, or business and free from control or
direction both under contract and in fact; and
a person employed by his or her own parent,
spouse, or child; those less than 18 years of age;
and employers of less than 4 employees during
a workweek.

All employees (except persons under
18 years of age, see Exceptions).

$1.00 an hour___
Permissible deductions for gra­
tuities by regulation of Wage
Adjustment Board:
Waiters and waitresses in
establishments serving food
and alcoholic beverages, car
waiters and waitresses, bell­
men and doormen: 50 cents
an hour.
Waiters and waitresses in
establishments serving food
only: 35 cents an hour.
Counter waitresses (not in­
cluding counter attendants in
cafeterias): 10 cents an hour.
(Also, amount of deductions
has been determined for
meals, lodging, and uniforms.)
(Maximum deduction 50 cents
an hour as credit against the
statutory minimum.)

Hours

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
KANSAS: No orders in effect.




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
KENTUCKY:
All Industries and Occu­
pations, Nov. 1,1961.
(Supersedes order of May
27,1947, which super­
seded order of Juno 1,
1939.)

Hotel and Restaurant In­
dustry, Aug. 1,1962.
(Supersedes order of July
15, 1954.)

Occupation or industry covered

All occupations. Exceptions: Labor on a farm;
domestic service in home of the employer; firms
ice Commission; employment under any spe­
cial State wage order. (Two special minimum
wage orders are currently in effect: Laundry,
Drycleaning, and Dyeing Order and Hotel and
Restaurant Order.)
All establishments offering lodging accommoda­
tions for hire to the general public, including
motels, and establishments preparing and of­
fering for sale food for consumption, including
private clubs. Exception: Establishments
having no more than 10 guestrooms, none of
which are for transient guests.

Class of employees covered

Women and minors: i2

Overtime (except for occupations under Fair Labor Standards Act when
overtime provisions of order shall be
extended to conform with Federal
regulations.)




The process of receiving, marking, washing,
cleaning, dyeing, ironing, or distributing clothing or any washable or cleanable materials.
ployer; labor on a farm; services performed
in a penal or other institution by the inmates
thereof

1J4 times minimum rate

(Deductions for meals and lodging permitted in amounts
specified. From supplement
to order.)

Hours

Up to 44 a week.
Do.
Do.
Over 44 a week.*

Women and minors:2

Overtime.______________ ________
Learners 1 (90 days on permit).
If spread of hours exceeds 12, or em­
ployee has more than 1 interval off
duty (excluding any meal period of
1 hour or less), or if both situations
occur

Laundry, Drycleaning, and
Dyeing Industry, Sept. 1,
1961.
(Supersedes order of Apr. 1,
1942.)

Minimum wage rates

1 r times applicable minimum
A
rate.
10 cents less than applicable
minimum wage rate.
75, 70, 65 cents a day, dependent
on the zone, in addition to the
hourly wages earned.

Do.
Do.
Over 48 a week.

Women and minors; w
Up to 44 a week.
Do.
Do.
Over 44 a week.4

Zone 3 3____ ___________________

f

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
LOUISIANA: No orders in effect.
See footnotes at end of table.

VC




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

w

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

o
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
MAINE:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective Sept. 12,1959.
Ch. 362 (L. 1959), as
amended by Chs. 92 and
277 (L. 1961).
Editor’s Note: S.B. No.
526 (L. 1965) increases
the statutory rate to
$1.15 an hour, effective
Oct. 15,1965, and to
$1.25 an hour, effective
Oct. 15,1966. It also
provides for 1J4 times
the regular rate for each
hour over 48 a week. It
provides for a statutory
rate for employees of
nursing homes and hospi­
tals of $1.00 an hour,
effective Oct. 15,1965;
$1.15 an hour, effective
Oct. 15,1966; and $1.25
an hour, effective Oct. 15,
1967.




Occupation or industry covered

Any industry, trade, or business or branch
thereof or class of work therein with 4 or more
employees (applicable for that week in
which employer has 4 employees or more in
any day of week). Exceptions: Agriculture,
not including commercial greenhouses; domes­
tic service in or about a private home; waiter,
waitress, carhop (not to include counter wait­
ers or waitresses, or those whose tips are di­
vided with others), doorman, bellhop, cham­
bermaid in resort establishment; employees
whose earnings are derived in whole or in part
from sales commissions and employees whose
hours and places of employment are not sub­
stantially controlled by employer; taxicab
driver; activities of a public-supported non­
profit organization or program controlled by
an educational nonprofit organization; private
nursing home or hospital; counselors or junior
counselors in summer camps for boys or girls;
employees under 19 years of age regularly
enrolled in an educational institution or on
vacation therefrom; catching, taking, harvest­
ing, cultivating, or farming of any kind of fish,
shellfish, Crustacea, sponges, seaweeds, or
other forms of animal and vegetable life,
including going to and returning from work;
loading, unloading, packing for shipment,
propagating, processing (other than canning),
marketing, freezing, curing, storing, or dis­
tributing the above products or byproducts
thereof; smoked-fisli worker; switchboard
operator in public telephone exchange with
less than 750 stations; homeworker riot sub­
ject to any supervision or control who buys
raw material, makes and completes any article,
and sells same, even though made to specifica­
tions of single purchaser; members of the
family of the employer who reside with and are
dependent upon the employer; any individual
employed in a bona fide executive, adminis­
trative, or professional capacity.

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Any employee 1...................................... $1 an hour..........

Hours

Maximum for females, 9 a
day, 50 a week; 9 a day
54 a week in specified
industries.*

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
MARYLAND:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective June 1, 1965.
Ch. 697, Laws of 1965.

Occupation or industry covered

Any occupation, service, trade, business, in­
dustry, or branch or group of industries or
employment or class of employment in which
7 or more individuals are gainfully employed
at any one time. Exceptions: Agriculture;
domestic service in or about a private home;
any bona fide executive, administrative, or
professional person (as defined and delimited
by regulation of the Commissioner); activities
of an educational, charitable, religious, or
nonprofit organization where the employeremployee relationship does not in fact exist
and services are rendered gratuitously, and
with no expectation of gain; restaurant, cafe,
tavern, drive-in, or drugstore which sells food
or drink for consumption on the premises and
other similar establishments which sell food
or drink for consumption on the premises;
hospital, nursing and convalescent home, ex­
cept laundry service in said hospital or home;
motion picture theater, including drive-in
theater and legitimate theater; student regu­
larly enrolled in primary or secondary school em­
ployed after school hours or during vacation; out­
side salesman or an individual compensated
on a commission basis; first processing of, or
canning, packing, or freezing perishable or
seasonal fresh fruits, vegetables, or horticul­
tural commodities, poultry, or seafood; hotel,
motel, parking lot, car wash, or taxicab com­
pany, except laundry service in hotel, motel,
and ambulance service; an individual 62 years
of age and over who works not more than 25
hours a week; employers of less than 7 em­
ployees at any one time.
See footnotes at end of table.

CO




Class of employees covered

All employees (except persons 62 years
of age and over who work 25 or less
hours a week, see Exceptions).

Minimum wage rates

Hours

$1.00 an hour._______ ________ Maximum for females, 10
(The Commissioner, with apa day, 60 a week.1
proval of a committee, may
make regulations including
allowances for board, lodging,
or other facilities or services
customarily furnished; a scale
of wages for learners and ap­
prentices which may not be
less than 80 percent of the
fixed minimirm wage.)

CO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
MASSACHUSETTS:
Wage fixed in law May 24,
1962. Rates effective
Sept. 5, 1963.2
Ch. 686 (L. 1963) and as
amended by Ch. 416 (L.
1965), Chs. 134,153, 363,
and 371 (L. 1962) amend­
ing the General Law,
Ch. 151.
(Supersedes rates effective
Dec. 2, 1959.)
Editor’s Note: Ch. 644 (L.
1964) increases statutory
rate to $1.30 an hour,
effective Sept. 5, 1965,
and to $1.35 an hour,
effective Sept. 5, 1966.
Ch. 334 (L. 1965) pro­
vides that no wage board
may set a rate for service
workers below 90 cents an
hour, effective Sept. 5,
1966; 93 cents an hour,
effective Sept. 5, 1967.




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any industry, trade, or business or branch
thereof or class of work therein, whether oper­
ated for profit or otherwise, and any other class
of work in which persons are gainfully em­
ployed. Exceptions: Professional service;
domestic service in the home of employer; labor
on a farm; growing and harvesting of agricul­
tural, floricultural, and horticultural com­
modities; work by persons being rehabilitated
or trained under rehabilitation or training pro­
grams in charitable, educational, or religious
institutions; work by members of religious
orders; outside salesmen.

All employees:1
In manufacturing and other occupa­
tions not covered by mini mum fanwage order.
In occupations for which minimum
wage board may make recom­
mendations. Except: Learners
and apprentices,1 golf caddies,
and—
Service people regularly receiv­
ing gratuities.
Ushers, ticket sellers, and ticket
takers.
Janitors and caretakers of resi­
dential properties, when fur­
nished with living quarters.
Overtime: Exempt from overtime provi­
sion: Janitor or caretaker of resi­
dential property, furnished living
quarters and paid not less than $36
a week; golf caddy, newsboy, child
actor or performer; bona fide execu­
tive, administrative, or professional
person or qualified trainee for such
position earning more than $80 a
week; outside salesman or buyer;
learner, apprentice, or handicapped
person, under special license; fisher­
man or person employed in catching
or taking of any kind offish, shellfish,
or other aquatic forms of animal and
vegetable life; switchboard operator
in telephone exchange; truck driver
or helper whose employment is
regulated by the Interstate Com­
merce Commission or employee of
employer subject to provisions of
Part I of Interstate Commerce Act
or to Title II of Railway Labor Act;
business or specified operation of
business carried on during period or
accumulated periods not in excess of
120 days in any year and determined

Minimum wage rates

$1.25 an hour.

Hours

Up to 40 a week.

85 cents an hour.

Do.

$1 an hour..........

Do.

$36 a week____

Do.

1%, times regular rate.

1

Over 40 a week.8

as seasonal by Commissioner; sea­
man; employers licensed and regu­
lated pursuant to Ch. 159-A; hotel,
motel, motor court, or like establish­
ment; gasoline station; restaurant;
garageman, not including a parking
lot attendant; hospital, sanatorium,
convalescent or nursing home, in­
firmary, or rest home; nonprofit
school or college; summer camp
operated by a nonprofit charitable
corporation.
Amusement and Recrea­
tion Occupations, No.
27B, Sept. 5, 1963.2
(Supersedes rates effective
May 24, 1962.)
(Order No. 27B of Oct. 1,
1957, as amended by
mandatory order issued
in accordance with Ch.
134 (L. 1962).)
(Order No. 27B superseded
Order No. 27A, Aug. 18,
1952; partially superseded
by Building Service Oc­
cupations, No. 28B, Feb.
1, 1960.)
Editor's Note: Ch. 644 (L.
1964) provides that $1.25
an hour rate shall auto­
matically increase to $1.30
Sept. 5,1965; to $1.35 Sept.
5, 1966.

All activities and services performed in con­
nection with a business or enterprise engaged
in or operated for the purpose of furnishing
entertainment or recreation to the public, in­
cluding but not limited to motion picture and
other theaters, nightclubs, dancehalls, bowling
alleys, billiard parlors, skating rinks, riding
academies, racetracks, amusement parks and
centers, athletic fields, ball parks and sta­
diums, swimming pools and beaches, gym­
nasiums, golf courses, tennis courts, carnivals,
circuses, broadcasting studios, boathouses,
arenas, and all other similar establishments.
Includes the work performed by ushers; game,
parking lot, ramp, and other attendants; an­
nouncers; barkers; ticket collectors; ticket
sellers; change makers; ticket punchers;
billiard rack men; amusement machine oper­
ators; pinboys; caddies; stage and other door­
men; and special officers; including all non­
professional workers in the amusement and
recreation industries. Exceptions: Above
activities specifically governed by another
minimum wage order; performers whose
activities involve the exercise of artistic talent
or athletic proficiency; students or members
participating in any activities conducted by
such nonprofit organizations as summer camps
for children under 18, schools, colleges,
religious organizations, or other nonprofit
organizations declared exempt by the Mini­
mum Wage Commission.

See footnotes at end of table.

CO
co




All employees,1 except ticket takers,
ticket sellers, ushers, and caddies.
Ticket takers, ticket sellers, ushers___
Overtime_________________ ______
Caddies carrying 1 bag------------------Caddies carrying 2 bags................. ......

$1.25 an hour.

Up to 40 a week.

$1 an hour____________ ______
Do.
times employee’s regular rate. Over 40 a'week.3
75 cents, 9 holes; $1.50,18 holes..
$1.25, 9 holes; $2.50, 18 holes.
(Deductions for furnished meals
and lodging permitted in
amounts specified in order.)

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

CO

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
MASSACHUSETTS—Con.
Building Service Occupa­
tions, No. 28B, Sept. 5,
1963.2
(Supersedes rates effective
May 24,1962.)
(Order No. 28B of Feb. 1,
1960, as amended by
mandatory order issued
in accordance with Ch.
134 (L. 1962).)
(Order No. 28B superseded
Order No. 28A of Dec. 1,
1952, and partially super­
seded Amusement and
Recreation Occupations,
No 27B, Oct. 1, 1957.)
See Editor's Note under
Amusement and Recrea­
tion Occupations Order,
p. 33.

Occupation or industry covered

Includes but not limited to the work or service
performed by cleaning women, window
cleaners, sweepers, janitors, caretakers, eleva­
tor operators and starters, watchmen, guards,
helpers, attendants, doormen, and all other
employees engaged in or concerned with the
cleaning, servicing, maintenance, protection,
and upkeep of buildings and establishments,
including building service in Amusement and
Recreation Occupations and in Housekeeping
Occupations Orders in establishments covered
by Building Service Occupations Order.
Exceptions: Churches; employees affected by
this order where it applies to establishments
covered by Public Housekeeping Occupations
Order.

Clerical, Technical, and
Includes all occupations in any general, busi­
Similar Occupations, No.
ness, professional, or technical office; and in
24D, Sept. 5, 1963.2
any laboratory; hospital; museum; historical
(Supersedes rates effective
building; library; school; telephone, telegraph,
May 24, 1962.)
broadcasting, or televising establishment;
(Order No. 24D of Dec. 1,
photographer's and photographic establish­
1958, as amended by man­
ment; funeral director’s establishment; in mes­
datory orders issued in
senger service; or other establishment wherein
accordance with Ch. 134
workers are employed in any capacity in
(L. 1962).)
which the services of any kind and wheresoever
(Order No. 24D superseded
performed are of a clerical or technical charac­
Order No. 24C of July 1,
ter.
1954.)
Includes persons whose duties are related to
See Editor’s Note under
general office, professional, or technical work
in any establishment, whether business,
Amusement and Recrea­
medical, dental, funeral, technical, or legal,
tion Occupations Order,
such as office boys or girls, file clerks, general
p. 33.
office clerks, stenographers, typists, book­
keepers, cashiers, various machine operators,
telephone and switchboard operators, recep­
tionists, guides, library workers, draftsmen,




Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

All employees 1 with workweek of 28 $1.25 an hour.
Up to 40 a week.
hours or more, except those fur­
nished living quarters.
Overtime
1H times employee's regular rate_ Over 40 a week.1
Employees furnished living quarters. _ $36 a week____ ______________ Basic workweek of 28 hours
(Deductions for furnished meals
or more.
and lodging permitted in
amounts specified in order.
Deductions for living quarters
limited to “a reasonable rental
for such space.”)

it

.*

I KS&
All employees 14_.......................... .......
Overtime: Exempt from overtime pro­
vision: Bona fide executive, admin­
istrative, or professional persons;
qualified trainees for such positions
earning more than $80 a week.

$1.25 an hour 5 8
Up to 40 a week.
V/z times employee’s regular rate. Over 40 a week.*
(Deductions for furnished meals
and lodging permitted in
amounts specified in the
order.)

*

technicians, including dental and medical
technicians and laboratory assistants. Ex­
cluded from basic wage rates of this order:
Students working for the whole or part of
their tuition and/or maintenance at school,
college, or summer camp which they are
attending.
Any activity connected with the cleaning, dye­ All employees V
Drycleaning Occupation,
ing, wet-cleaning, spotting, finishing,'^pressing, Overtime..........
No. 29B, Sept. 5, 1963.2
(Supersedes rates effective
repairing, altering, refreshing, restoring,
fumigating, mothproofing, waterproofing, or
May 24,1962.)
other processes incidental thereto on articles
(Order No. 29B of May 1,
or fabrics of any kind, or storing of any fabric
1958, as amended by man­
incidental to this industry, or any other
datory orders issued in
employment connected with the cleaning and
accordance with Ch. 134
dyeing industry. Exceptions: Above occupa­
(L. 1962).)
tions covered by another minimum wage
(Order No. 29B superseded
order; salespersons in this industry who are
Order No. 29A, of May 1,
connected with: soliciting of sales or oppor­
1955.)
tunities for sales; collection, distribution, sale,
See Editor’s Note under
or resale of merchandise for drycleaning
Amusement and Recrea­
service; or services rendered incidental to the
tion Occupations Order,
sale or resale of drycleaning services.
p. 33.
The preparation, processing, or packaging of food All employees: 14
Food Processing Occupa­
Experienced (600 hours in the oc­
for human or other consumption, including
tions, No. 31, Sept. 5,
cupation).
but not limited to canning, preserving, and the
1963.2
Inexperienced (less than 600 hours
(Supersedes rates effective
production of candy, confectionery, bakery
in the occupation).
products, dairy products, malt beverages, or
May 24, 1962.)
Overtime: Exempt from overtime pro­
(Order No. 31 of Oct. 20,
soft drinks. Exceptions: Above occupations
vision: Operations declared sea­
covered by another minimum wage order.
1951, as amended by
sonal by the Commissioner of
mandatory order issued
Labor and Industries.
in accordance with Ch.
134 (L. 1962).)
(Order No. 31 superseded
three orders—Canning
and Preserving, etc., No.
19, Mar. 2, 1939; Candy,
No. 6, Mar.19, 1943; and
Bread and Bakery Prod­
ucts, No. 15A, Oct. 1,
1944.)
See footnotes at end of table.




$1.25 an hour................... .......... Up to 40 a week.
ll i times employee’s regular rate. Over 40 a week.3
/

$1.25 an hour».
80 cents an hour«.
\l times employee’s regular
A
rate.
(Deductions for furnished
meals and lodging permitted
in amounts specified in the
order.)

Up to 40 a week.
Do.
Over 40 a week.3

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

w
ON
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
MASSACHUSETTS—Con.
Laundry Occupations, No.
30B, Sept. 5, 1963.2
(Supersedes rates effective
May 24, 1962.)
(Order No. 30B of Sept.
16,1957, as amended by
mandatory order issued
in accordance with Ch.
134 (L. 1962).)
(Order No. 30B superseded
Order No. 30A, Feb. 16,
1953.)
See Editor's Note under
Amusement and Recrea­
tion Occupations Order,
p. 33.

Mercantile Occupations,
No. 26D, Sept. 5, 1963.2
(Supersedes rates effective
May 24, 1962.)
(Order No. 26D of June 1,
1957, as amended by
mandatory order issued
in accordance with Ch.
134 (L. 1962) and amended
by Ch. 586 (L. 1963).)
(Order No. 26D superseded
Order No. 26C, July 1,
1954.)
See Editor’s Note under
Amusement and Recrea­
tion Occupations Order,
p. 33. By Ch. 334 (L.
1965) rate for service
workers 90 cents an hour,
effective Sept. 5,1966; 93
cents an hour, effective
Sept. 5, 1967.




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any activity connected with the washing, iron­
ing, or processing incidental thereto, for com­
pensation, of clothing, napery, blankets, bed
clothing, or fabric of any kind, or any other
employment connected with the laundry in­
dustry. Exceptions: Above occupations
covered by another minimum wage order;
salespersons in this industry who are con­
nected with (1) the soliciting of sales or oppor­
tunities for sales; (2) the collection, distribu­
tion, or sale of laundry services or merchandise;
(3) services rendered incidental to the sale or
resale of laundry services or merchandise. In­
cludes the producing of laundry service in
wholesale and retail laundries, clubs, hospi­
tals, colleges, private schools, and any other
establishments in which laundry occupations
are performed, including self-service laundries,
automatic laundries, and rental laundries.

All employees: 1
Experienced (after 320 hours in par­
ticular establishment).
Inexperienced (first 320 hours in
particular establishment).
Overtime..................... .............. .......

Any industry or business connected with or op­
erated for the purpose of selling, purchasing, or
distributing merchandise, wares, goods, arti­
cles, services, or commodities to retailers,
wholesalers, or industrial, commercial, or indi­
vidual users; including all work connected
with the soliciting of sales, or opportunities for
sales, or the distributing of such merchandise,
wares, goods, articles, or commodities, and the
rendering of services incidental to the sales,
use, upkeep, or servicing of same, whether per­
formed on employer’s premises or elsewhere;
the selling of ice cream and nonalcoholic bev­
erages in mercantile establishments where the
selling of such commodities is incidental to the
principal business of the establishment; all
functions within mercantile occupations not
specifically governed by any other minimum
wage order; salespersons specifically exempted
from coverage under the Drycleaning and
Laundry Occupations Orders. Exceptions: (1)
outside salespersons who regularly sell away
from employer’s place of business, or whose

All employees:11
Experienced (600 hours in the occu­
pation) .
Inexperienced (less than 600 hours
in the occupation).
Service—
Between July 31, 1963, and Sept. 4,
1964.
Effective Sept. 4,1964.......... ...........
Overtime____________ _________

Minimum wage rates

Except gasoline stations
Exempt from overtime provision:
Newsboys, outside salesmen, buy­
ers.

*

$1.25 an hour.._.......................... .
90 cents an hour

Hours

Up to 40 a week.
Do.

\l> times employee’s regular
/
rate.
(Deductions for furnished
meals and lodging permitted
in amounts specified in order.)

Over 40 a week.3

$1.25 an hour___

Up to 40 a week.

85 cents an hour.

Do.

80 cents an hour___ _____
85 cents an hour__________
1J4 times employee’s regular
rate.
$1.35 an hour_____________

Do.
Over 40 a week .3
Over 44 a week.

hours cannot readily be determined, and who
do not make daily reports or visits to the office
or plant of employer; (2) outside salesmen em­
ployed at other than a fixed location whose
working time, efforts, activities, mode of opera­
tion, and process of effecting sales are not in
any material manner managed, regulated,
supervised, directed, controlled, or prescribed
by the employer.
Needle Trade and Garment All activities, services, and processes concerned All employees 14.
with the manufacture, production, processing, Overtime............
Occupations, No. 32,
or finishing of all clothing for human or other
Sept. 5, 1963.2
use, including but not limited to outer wearing
(Supersedes rates effective
apparel, millinery, undergarments, acces­
May 24, 1962.)
sories, or trimmings incidental to the manufac­
(Order No. 32 of Sept. 1,
ture, production, processing, or finishing of
1953, as amended by man­
such items. Exceptions: Staple lines of hosiery;
datory order issued in ac­
above occupations when subject to another
cordance with Ch. 134
minimum wage order.
(L. 1962).)
All employees:1
Personal Services Occupa­ All establishments which perform, directly or in­
Barbering, hairdressing, and other
directly, any service, operatfon, or process used
tions, No. 23C, Sept. 5,
personal service occupations—
or useful in the care, cleansing, or beautifica­
1963.
Experienced (after 1,040 hours in
tion of the body, skin, nails, or hair, or in the
(Supersedes rates effective
occupation).?
.
enhancement of personal appearance or health;
May 24, 1962.)
Inexperienced (first 1,040 hours m
including but not limited to barber and beauty
(Order No. 23C of Apr. 1,
occupation).?
shops, scalp treatment shops, bath and mas­
1956, as amended by
Maids in personal service estab­
sage parlors, physical conditioning and wTeight
mandatory order issued
lishments.
control salons. Exceptions: Cashiers, recep­
in accordance with Ch.
Overtime........ ...................................
tionists, appointment clerks, and clerical
134 (L. 1962).)
workers covered by the Clerical, Technical,
(Order No. 23C superseded
and Similar Occupations Order.
Order No. 23B, Dec. 14,
1950.)
See Editor's Note under
Amusement and Recrea­
tion Occupations Order,
p. 33.
See footnotes at end of table.

CO
-a




$1.25 an hour 0..............................
lJ4t times employee’s regular
rate.

Up to 40 a week.
Over 40 a week.3

$1.25 an hour..................-............. Up to 40 a week.
85 cents an hour_.............. ...........
$1.25 an hour
1)4 times employee’s regular
rate.

Do.
Do.
Over 40 a week. *

CO

ANALYSIS OP STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

09

State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

MASSACHUSETTS—Con.
Public Housekeeping
Includes waitresses, cooks, counter and salad
Occupations, No. 25C,
workers, food checkers, bus and vegetable
Sept. 5, 1963.2
workers, dish and glass washers, kitchen help,
(Supersedes rates effective
carhops, maids, chambermaids, housekeepers,
May 24, 1962.)
practical nurses, ward aides, housemen, house­
(Order No. 25C of July 1,
mothers, stewards, parlormaids, linenroom
1961, as amended by
girls, checkroom attendants, nursery school
mandatory order issued
attendants, matrons, hosts, hostesses, shippers
in accordance with Ch.
and receivers, bellmen, doormen who are serv­
134 (L. 1962) and amended
ice employees, and baggage porters; all non­
by Ch. 586 (L. 1963).)
professional workers engaged in public house­
(Order No. 25C superseded
keeping establishments. Exceptions: Non­
Order No. 25B, Dec. 2,
professional workers engaged in public house­
1959.)
keeping occupations specifically included un­
See Editor’s Note under
der another minimum wage order.
Amusement and Recrea­ Any activity in establishments directly or in­
directly connected with the preparation of
tion Occupations Order,
and offering of food or beverages, and the offer­
p. 33. By Ch.334 (L. 1965)
ing or furnishing of rooms or lodging for re­
rate for service workers 90
muneration, or other services rendered, to
cents an hour, effective
either the public, employees, members or guest
Sept. 5,1966; 93 cents an
of members, paying guests, students, or others;
hour, effective Sept. 5,
whether such service is operated as the princi­
1967.
pal business of the employer or as a unit of
another business.
Includes restaurants, fountain lunch counters,
cafeterias, caterers, dairy bars, banquet serv­
ice, box lunch, curb service, and all other estab­
lishments whatsoever where lunches, meals, or
food in either solid or liquid form is prepared
for and served to the public to be consumed
on the premises; motels, tourist houses, hotels,
seasonal hotels, camps, clubs, hospitals, conva­
lescent homes, private schools, colleges, and
other establishments offering rooms for rent;
animal hospitals and kennels.




Class of employees covered

All employees;1
Nonservice (including counter
workers, unless special permission
is granted by the Minimum Wage
Commission).
Service—
Between July 31, 1963, and Sept.
4, 1964.
Effective Sept. 4,1964
Students,» provided evidence of
school enrollment is made avail­
able.
Overtime: Exempt from overtime
provision: Hotels, motels, motor
courts, restaurants, hospitals, sanatoriums, convalescent or nursing
homes, nonprofit schools and col­
leges, summer camps operated by
nonprofit charitable organizations,
rest homes, and infirmaries.

Minimum wage rates

$1.25 an hour.

Hours

Maximum for"women
and minors,[9 a day,
48 a week .3 "

80 cents an hour......... ...............

Do.3

85 cents an hour____________
20 percent lower than the ap­
plicable minimum hourly
rate.
1M times employee’s regular
rate.
(In lieu of laundering, clean­
ing, and maintaining uni­
forms, employer may elect to
ay an additional 5 cents an
our, not to exceed $1.50 a
week.)
(Deductions for furnished
meals and lodging permitted
in amounts specified in
order.)

Do.a
Do.3

E

*

Over 40_a week. 3

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any person, firm, or corporation, including the
State and its political subdivisions, agencies,
and instrumentalities, that employs 4 or more
employees at any one time; includes any
person acting in the interest of the employer.
(Applicable to employer employing any em­
ployee more than 13 weeks in any 4 consecu­
tive 3-month periods.) Exceptions: Employer
subject to FLSA; employees harvesting for
agricultural fruit, pickle, and tomato growers,
or other agricultural employers traditionally
contracting for harvesting on a piecework
basis, until determination of a scale of piece­
work equivalent to the prevailing minimum
wage for such employment (determination to
be made no later than July 31, 1966).

All employees between 18 and 65
years of age:
Between Jan. 1, 1965, and Jan. 1,
1966.

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
MICHIGAN:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective Jan. 1, 1965.
Act 154 (L. 1964), Aug. 28,
1964, as amended by Act
296 (L. 1965), July 22,
1965.

See footnotes at end of table.

CO
VO




Minimum wage rates

Hours

Maximum for females, 10
a day (9 average), 54 a
week.*
Do.i
Between Jan. 1,1966, and Jan. 1,1967- $1.15 an hour
Do.i
On and after Jan. 1, 1967 2................. $1.25 an hour-------- ------ ---------Permissible deductions for gra­
tuities by regulation of
Wage Deviation Board:
Drive-ins, lunch counters, and
luncheonettes: 10% of mini­
mum rate.
Hotels, motels, and other
establishments where com­
plete meals are served: 25%
of minimum rate.
(Also, amount of deductions has
been determined for meals
and uniforms by regulation.)
(Maximum deduction 40% of
minimum rate.)
$1 an hour.

ANALYSIS OP STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

MINNESOTA:
Amusement Industry, No.
23, Feb. 17,1957.
(New order separating this
industry from All Occu­
pations Order No. 13,
July 11, 1938, as amended
Apr. 1, 1939.)

All establishments engaged in providing enter­
tainment or recreation for the public, such as
motion picture theaters, bowling alleys, skat­
ing rinks, dancehalls, amusement parks, and
baseball clubs.

Women and minors:
Women and minors 18 years and
over—
In cities, towns, and villages with
a population of—
More than 25,000 and cities,
towns, and villages adjacent
or contiguous thereto.
2,500 to 25,000
Less than 2,500_______ _____
Minors under 18 years____________

Laundry and Drycleaning
Industry, No. 21, Jan. 14,
1957.
(Supersedes Order No. 17,
May 1,1939.)

Any firm engaged in laundry, drycleaning, dye­
ing, self-service laundry, and similar activities
incidental thereto.

Women and minors:
In cities, towns, and villages with a
population of—
More than 50,000 and cities, towns,
and villages adjacent and con­
tiguous thereto.
25,000 to 50,000
5,000 to 25,000..................................
Less than 5,000________________

Manufacturing and Processing Industry, No. 28,
Apr. 27, 1962.
(Supersedes Needle Craft
Order No. 15, Mar. 1,
1939; partially supersedes
All Occupations Order
No. 13, July 11, 1938, as
amended Apr. 1, 1939.)




Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of preparing, producing,
making, altering, repairing, finishing, process­
ing, inspecting, handling, assembling, wrap­
ping, bottling, or packaging goods, articles,
agricultural produce or commodities, in whole
or in part.

Minimum wage rates

Hours

Maximum for minors un­
der 16 years, 8 a day, 48
a week.1

years and over, 54 a week;
for minors under 16
years, 8 a day, 48 a week.*
Do.1
Do.1

Women and minors 2_____ _________
and over, 54 a week.1

m 9-502 — 65£>-

Personal Service Industry,
No. 26, Apr. 22, 1961.
(Partially supersedes All
Occupations Order No.
13, July 11,1938, as
amended Apr. 1, 1939.)

Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of rendering, directly or
indirectly, any service, operation, or process
used or useful in the care, cleansing, or beauti­
fication of the body, skin, nails, or hair, or in
the enhancement of personal appearance or
health; including but not limited to beauty
salons, barbershops, bath and massage par­
lors, physical conditioning and weight control
salons.

Professional semiprofessional, managerial, su­
pervisory, laboratory, research, technical, cler­
ical, and office occupations; including but not
limited to accountants; accounting clerks; ap­
praisers; board markers; bookkeepers; canvass­
ers; cashiers; checkroom attendants; checkers;
circulation clerks; claims adjusters; classified
advertising saleswomen; clerks; collectors;
compilers; computers; copyreaders; copywrit­
ers; demonstrators; elevator operators; in­
structors; interviewers; investigative shoppers;
librarians and their assistants; messengers;
office machine operators; physicians’ and den­
tists’ assistants and attendants; research,
X-ray, medical, or dental laboratory techni­
cians and their assistants; secretaries; social
workers; statisticians; stenographers; teachers;
telephone, teletype, and telegraph operators;
telephone solicitors; tellers; ticket agents;
tracers; typists; and other related occupations.
Exceptions: Such occupations performed in an
industry covered by another minimum wage
order.
Seef ootnotes at end of table.

Professional, Technical,
Clerical, and Similar
Occupations, No. 29,
May 6, 1962.
(Supersedes Telegraph
Order No. 14, Jan. 10,
1939; partially supersedes
All Occupations Order
No. 13, July 11, 1938, as
amended Apr. 1,1939.)




Women and minors2 in cities, towns,
villages, boroughs, and govern­
mental subdivisions with a popu­
lation of —
More than 2,500
Less than 2,500. .................................
Learner or apprentice operators (less
than 300 hours of experience in
occupations) in cities, towns, vil­
lages, boroughs, and governmental
subdivisions with a population of—
More than 2,500_.............................—
Less than 2,500...................................
Women and minors2.

$1 an hour..........
90 cents an hour.

95 cents an hour.
85 cents an hour.
$1.15 an hour.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
MINNESOTA—Continued
Public Housekeeping In­
dustry, No. 25, July 8,
1959.
(Order separates this in­
dustry from All Occupations Order No. 13, July
11,1938, as amended Apr.
1, 1939; superseded Restaurant Order No. 16,
Mar. 1, 1939.)




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any industry, business, or establishment,
either profit or nonprofit making, which pro­
vides meals, housing, or maintenance services,
whether operated as a primary business or
incidental to other operations in an establishment not covered by an industry order of the
Commission.
Includes but is not limited to restaurants, night­
clubs, taverns, bars, cocktail lounges, lunch
counters, cafeterias, boardinghouses, clubs,
and similar establishments where food in
either solid or liquid form is prepared and
served to be consumed on the premises; cater­
ing, banquet, box lunch service, drive-ins, and
similar establishments which prepare food for
consumption on or off the premises; hotels
motels, apartment houses, roominghouses,
resorts, camps, clubs, trailer parks, office or
loft buildings, and similar establishments
offering rental of living, business, or com­
mercial quarters; hospitals, sanitariums, rest
homes, child nurseries, child care institutions,
homes for the aged, and similar establishments
offering board or lodging in addition to medi­
cal, surgical, nursing, convalescent, aged, or
child care; schools, colleges, or universities,
and similar establishments providing board
or lodging in addition to educational facilities;
establishments contracting for maintenance
or cleaning of commercial or living quarters;
establishments providing veterinary or other
animal care services.

Women and minors under 21 years,
except in resorts;
In cities, towns, and villages with a
population of—
More than 50.000 and cities, towns,
and villages adjacent and con­
tiguous thereto.
2,500 to 50,000
Less than 2,500 and all other areas.
Learners or apprentices (less than
300 hours in the occupation):
In cities, towns, and villages with
a population of—
More than 50,000 and cities, towns,
and villages adjacent and con­
tiguous thereto.
2,500 to 50,000
Women and minors under 21 years in
resorts.
Learners or apprentices (less than 300
hours in the occupation).

Minimum wage rates

Hoars

and over, 54 a week.1
Do.'
Do.1

Do.1
Do.1
Do.1
Do.1
Allowance for gratuities as part
of the minimum wage may not
exceed 10 cents an hour for
“service employees.” 3
(Deduction from minimum
wage permitted for furnished
lodging and meals in amounts
as specified in order.)

Do.1

Ketail Merchandising In­
dustry, No. 22, Jan. 14,
1957.
(Supersedes Order No. 18,
June 30, 1947.)

All firms selling any type of goods, merchandise,
articles, wares, or commodities to the con­
sumer, and not for the purpose of resale in any
form.

Women and minors (over 500 hours
of experience in the industry)
in cities, towns, and villages with
a population of:
More than 25,000 and cities, towns,
and villages adjacent and contigu­
ous thereto.
2,500 to 25,000. ............................... —
Less than 2,500
Learners (first 500 working hours in
the industry) in cities, towns, and
villages with a population of:
More than 25,000 and cities, towns,
and villages adjacent and contigu­
ous thereto.
2,500 to 25,000..
Less than 2,600.

Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of conveying persons or
property from one place to another, whether by
rail, highway, air, or water, and all operations
or services connected therewith, including
storing or warehousing of goods or property, and
the repairing, parking, rental, maintenance, or
cleaning of vehicles.
See footnotes at end of table.

Transportation Industry,
No. 27, Mar. 2, 1962.
(New order separating this
industry from All Occu­
pations Order No. 13,
July 11,1938, as amended
Apr. 1, 1939.)




Women and minors 2.

85 cents an hour.

75 cents an hour.
70 cents an hour.

Maximum for females 16
years and over, 54 a
week; for minors under
16 years, 8 a day, 48 a
week.1
Do.1
Do.1

70 cents an hour.

Do.1

65 cents an hour
60 cents an hour.

Do.1
Do.1

$1. 15

an hour.

Maximum for females 16
and over, 64 a week.1

if*

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
NEVADA:
Wage fixed in law. Rates
effective July 1, 1965.
Rev. Stat. Ch. 609, secs. 20
to 80, as amended by Ch.
333, Laws of 1965; sec. 608,
secs. 2 to 6, as added by
Ch. 333, Laws of 1965.
(Ch. 609 as previously
amended by Ch. 430 (L.
1963), July 1,1963, estab­
lished hourly rates of $1
for females under 18; of
$1.12H for females 18 and
over with increase to $1.15
effective Sept. 3, 1964.)




Occupation or industry covered

Private employment. Exceptions: Domestic
service; agriculture; and males governed by
provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Class of employees covered

Females:1
18 years and over
Under 18 years

Minimum wage rates

Hours

$1.25 an hour, $10 a day, $60 a
week.
$1.10 an hour, $8.80 a day, $52.80
a week.

Maximum, 8 a day, 48 a
week, 6 days a week.
Do.

Probationary period (not to exceed
3 months in type of work)—
18 years and over............................ $8 a day, $48 a week....................
Do.
t
Under 18 years _________
____ $7 a day, $42 a week. _
Do.
Overtime
1M times employee’s regular
Over 8 up to 12 a day; over
wage rate.
48 up to 56 a week (in
(Deductions for meals and lodg­
emergency as specified) .2
ing permitted in amounts as
specified in law.)
Males:
18 years and over
$1.25 an hour, $10 a day, $60 a
8 a day, 48 a week, 6 days a
week.
week.
Under 18 years............................. ...... $1 an hour, $8 a day, $48 a week—
Do.

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
NEW HAMPSHIRE:
Wage fixed in law Jan. 1,1964.
Rates effective Jan. 1,1965.1
Rev. Stat. Anns. 1955,
secs. 279:21-279:26, as
amended by Ch. 203 (L.
1963).
(Previously amended by
Ch. 275 (L. 1959), effec­
tive Nov. 30,1959.)

Beautician Occupation,
No. 4-A. Rates effec­
tive Jan. 1,1965.1
(Order No. 4-A, as amend­
ed by Ch. 203 (L.
1963).)
(Previously amended by
Ch. 275 (L. 1959), effec­
tive Nov. 30, 1959.)

Class of employees covered

Any industry, trade, or business or branch
thereof or class of work therein. Exceptions:
Household, domestic, or farm labor; outside
salesmen; employees of summer camps for
minors, restaurants, hotels, inns, and cabins;
newsboys and golf caddies; employees (other
than laundry employees, nurse aides, and
practical nurses) of nonprofit hospitals, or­
phanages, and homes for the aged; employees
subject to provisions of the Federal Fair Labor
Standards Act and regulations issued there­
under.

All employees, with specified excep­
tions.

Any activity directly concerned with hairdress­
ing, manicuring, or any other branch of
cosmetology.

Women and minors under 21...............

$1.25 an hour___

Apprentices (not over 6 months in
occupation);4 persons 18 years and
under.
Students in registered schools who
work on paying customers.
Handicapped workers 8

95 cents an hour.
50 percent of the charge made
for the service.
80 cents an hour___________

Do.a

Women and minors under 21
Learners or apprentices (not over 6
months in the occupation); a per­
sons 18 years and under.
Handicapped workers s.......... ...........

$1.25 an hour___
95 cents an hour.

Do .2
Do.2

80 cents an hour.

Do.2

Any activity directly connected with cleaning,
Drycleaning Occupation,
dyeing, pressing, or processing of any article
Directory Order No. 7.
of wearing apparel, household furnishings, or
Rates effective Jan. 1,
fabrics of any kind whatsoever; and any proc­
1965.1
ess incidental thereto, including collecting and
(Order No. 7, as amended
receiving such articles for the above purposes,
by Ch. 203 (L. 1963).)
or giving out or collecting such articles after
(Previously amended by
they have been cleaned, dyed, or pressed.
Ch. 275 (L. 1959), effec­
tive Nov. 30,1959.)
See footnotes at end of table.




Hours

Minimum wage rates

Occupation or industry covered

$1.25 an hour.

Laundry employees, nurse aides, 95 cents an hour.
and practical nurses in nonprofit
hospitals, orphanages, and homes
for the aged; learners (not over 6
months in occupation); persons 18
years and under.
Theater ushers and pinboys.............. 90 cents an hour.
80 cents an hour.
Handicapped workers s

Maximum for females
and minors, 10 a day,
48 a week, or 10H a day,
54 a week, as specified
in hours law.2
Do.2

Do.2
Do.2
Maximum for females
and minors, 10J4 a day,
54 a week.2
Do.2
Do.2

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any establishment, including tourist homes,
motels, inns, and cabins, which as a whole or
a part of its business activities offers lodging
and accommodations for hire to the public, to
employees, or to members or guests of its
members, and services in connection there­
with or incidental thereto (covers both resort
hotels, as defined, and all-year hotels); and
any establishment which prepares and offers
for sale food for consumption either on any of
its premises or by catering and banquet serv­
ice, box lunch, or curb service. The term
“food” includes nutritive material intended
for human consumption, in solid or liquid
form, whether cooked or uncooked or other­
wise prepared, excluding, however, medicinal
preparations. Exception: Order does not ap­
ply to any student employed while attending
school and receiving meals and/or room in
lieu of pay.fl

Women and minors under 21:
Nonservice—
Until Apr. 1, 1965
On and after Apr. 1, 1965
Service—
Until Apr. 1, 1965......... .................
On and after Apr. 1, 1965
Resort hotel chambermaids and ele­
vator operators—
Until Apr. 1,1965
On and after Apr. 1,1965
Busboys.______ _______________

Laundry Occupation, No.
2. Rates effective Jan.
1, 1965.1
(Order No. 2, as amended
by Ch. 203 (L. 1963).)
(Previously amended by
Ch. 275 (L. 1959), effec­
tive Nov. 30, 1959.)

Any activity directly concerned with the wash­
ing, ironing, or processing of laundry wares;
collection, distribution, or sale of laundry serv­
ices; producing of laundry services either on
their own behalf or for others by business
establishments, clubs, institutions, and over­
night camps.
Includes any place in which any phase of laun­
dry service is conducted.

Women and minors under 21.

Retail Trade Occupation,
No. 5-A. Rates effec­
tive Jan. 1, 1985.1
(Order No. 5-A, as
amended by Ch. 203 (L.
1963).)
(Previously amended by
Ch. 275 (L. 1959), effec­
tive Nov. 30, 1959.)

Any retail establishment or any retail activity,
unless and until the specific employment is
governed by a minimum wage order other
than this general retail order.

Women and minors under 21_______ $1.25 an hour_
_
Learners (not over 6 months in the 95 cents an hour.
industry);7 persons 18 years and
under.
Handicapped workers3........ ............ 80 cents an hour.

NEW HAMPSHIRE—Con.
Hotel, Motel, Cabin,
Tourist Home, and Res­
taurant Occupations,
No. 7, Apr. 1, 1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 6,
June 1,1960, which
superseded Restaurant
Occupation Order No.
3-A, Oct. 1? 1950, and
Hotel, Cabin, and
Tourist Home Occupa­
tions, No. 8, Jan. 1,
1952.)




Learners or apprentices (not over 6
months in occupation); persons 18
years and under.
Handicapped workers 3.....................

Minimum wage rates

Hours

90 cents an hour.
$1.00 an hour___

(2)

56 cents an hour.
62 cents an hour.

(*)

65 cents an hour
75 cents an hour
75 cents an hour
(Deductions for meals and/or
lodging permitted in amounts
specified in order.)

(2)
(2)

$1.25 an hour.
95 cents an hour.
80 cents an hour
(Deduction of a fair chargeno more than actual costpermitted for required uni­
forms.)
(Allowance for furnished meals
or lodging permitted in
amounts specified in order.)

(?)

(2)

(2)

Maximum for females
and minors, 103^ a day,
54 a week.2
Do.2
Do.2

Do.2
Do.2
Do.2

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
NEW JERSEY:
Beauty Culture Occupa­
tions, No. 12, May 17,
1961.
(Supersedes Order No. 6 of
Jan. 10,1943.)

Laundry and Cleaning and
Dyeing Occupations,
No. 13, Dec. 3,1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 10,
May 6, 1956, which su­
perseded Order No. 7,
Oct. 23, 1946.)

Mercantile Occupations,
No. 11, Oct. 9. 1956.
(Supersedes Order No. 8,
June 6, 1949.)

<1

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Includes services, operations, or processes used or
useful in care, cleansing, beautification, or
enhancement of personal appearance; and all
services, operations, or processes incidental
thereto, including work of demonstrators,
maids, cashiers, and reception or appoint­
ment clerks. Exception: Hotels.
Beauty culture establishment includes any
shop, store, place, room, or part thereof in
which services are rendered in the beauty
culture occupation, or any branch thereof, and
a charge is made to the public for such services.

Women and minors:1
Operators—
After 6 months in establishment. _.
First 6 months in establishment....
Other beauty culture occupations__
Maids, cleaning women, porters, or
shoeshine boys.
On senior student or temporary
permit.
Overtime: Exempt from overtime
provision: Employees in a bona
fide managerial, executive, or su­
pervisory capacity on a salary
basis of $80 or more a week.

Any activity in any capacity in the marking,
sorting, washing, cleansing, collecting, ironing,
assembling, packaging, pressing, receiving,
shipping, or delivery or any other activity,
including clerical work, directly incidental
or essential to the laundering, cleansing, or
renovating of any articles of clothing, napery,
blankets, rugs, carpets, draperies, bedclothing,
fabric, textile, fur, or leather, when such
activity is not performed in the original proc­
ess of manufacturing. Exception: Hotel
employees.3

Women and minors:1
Until May 1, 1963_____ ________
Between May 1, 1963, and Dec. 3,
1963.
On and after Dec. 3, 1963
Learners (beginners for first 4 weeks
of employment with an employer).
Overtime: Exempt from overtime pro­
vision: Bona fide supervisory or
executive employees on a salary
basis of $75 or more a week.

Includes all employment in or for any industry
or business selling or offering for sale any type
of merchandise, wares, goods, articles, or com­
modities; all work connected with the solic­
iting of sales or opportunities for sales and the
distributing of such merchandise, wares,
goods, articles, or commodities, and the
rendering of services incidental to the sale, use,
or upkeep of the same, whether performed on
the employer’s premises or elsewhere; work per­
formed in the manufacturing of merchandise
sold at retail upon the premises where it is
manufactured. Exceptions: Newsboys; casual
employment (as defined) of persons under 16
years of age; work performed in the manu­
facturing of merchandise sold at wholesale by
the manufacturer.

Women and minors 1.... ............. ........... $1 an hour...............................
40 a week.
Students under 21 years
85 cents an hour___________
Do.
Learners (new employees first 180 85 cents an hour___________
Do.
days of employment by employer).
Overtime: Exempt from overtime pro­ 1^> times the regular hourly rate. Over 40 a week.2’*
vision: Persons with hourly rate in
excess of $2.

Minimum wage rates

Hours

$1.50 an hour..
$1.25 an hour..
$1.35 an hour..
$1.25 an hour..
$1.25 an hour..................... .
1Y* times the regular rate..

Over 40 a week.

$1.15 an hour..
$1.20 an hour..

40 a week.
Do.

$1.25 an hour
5 cents an hour less than basic
minimum wage.
1% times regular hourly rate___

Do.
Do.
Over 40 a week.2

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
NEW JERSEY—Con.
Restaurant Occupations,
No. 9, Feb. 19, 1956.
(Supersedes Order No. 6,
Aug. 13, 1943.)




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any activity in the restaurant industry, i.e., any
eating or drinking place which prepares and
offers food or beverage for human consumption
either in any of its premises or by such service
as catering, banquet, box lunch, or curb serv­
ice, to the public, to employees, or to members
or guests of members. Exceptions: Person
working in a nonprofit institution who, while
so working, shall be receiving from such insti­
tution benefits of a charitable or educational
nature, or instruction and training in a recog­
nized profession, and whose work for such institution is an incident of his or her receipt of such
benefits; hotel employees (not including those
in hotel restaurant catering to nonresident
guests) .3

Women and minors:1
Nonservice (except those serving
persons in automobiles).

Minimum wage rates

$1 an hour (less than 2 meals a
day).
87 cents an hour (2 or more
meals a day).
84 cents an hour (full board and
lodging).
Nonservice (serving persons in auto- 80 cents an hour (less than 2
meals a day).
mobiles).
67 cents an hour (2 or more
meals a day).
Service employees (as defined)------- 66 cents an hour (less than 2
meals a day).
53 cents an hour (2 or more
meals a day).
50 cents an hour (full board and
lodging).
Overtime: Exempt from overtime pro­ 1 Yz times the regular hourly
vision: Bona fide supervisory or
rate.
executive employees on a salary
basis in excess of $60 a week.
If employee has more than one in­ 50 cents a day in addition to
wages otherwise earned.
terval off duty or spread of hours
exceeds 10.

Hours

40 a week.

Do.

Do.

Over 40 a week.2

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
NEW MEXICO:
Wage fixed in law. Rates
effective June 16,1965.
Stat. Anns. 1953 secs. 59-3­
20 to 59-3-27, as amended
by Ch. 121 (L. 1965).
(Previously amended by Ch.
227 (L. 1963), June 7,1963,
to establish an hourly
rate of 80 cents; except 70
cents for service employ­
ees.)

Occupation or industry covered

Any employment by employers of 4 or more per­
sons at any one time. Exceptions: Persons
employed in agriculture; in domestic service in
or about a private home; in a bona fide execu­
tive, administrative, or professional capacity;
by the United States, the State, or any politi­
cal subdivision; in hospitals, mortuaries, and
ambulance services; in activities of an educa­
tional, charitable, religious, or nonprofit or­
ganization where no employer-employee rela­
tionship exists, or where services are volun­
tary; foremen, superintendents, or supervisors;
salesmen or individuals paid on piecework,
flat-rate schedule, or commission basis; pri­
mary or secondary school students working
after school hours or on vacation; apprentices
and learners otherwise provided by law; G.I.
bill trainees while under training; inexpe­
rienced workers who have worked less than 3
months for any one employer.2
See footnotes at end of table.




Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

All employees,1 except service employees.

90 cents an hour,

Service employees, that is, persons
employed in restaurants, cafes, drug­
stores,1 and other establishments
furnishing food or drink for con­
sumption on the premises; laun­
dries; cleaning establishments
engaged in cleaning or repairing gar­
ments at retail; hotels, motels, tour­
ist courts, and other establishments
furnishing lodging for hire to the
public; gasoline and automotive
service stations; and bakeries.

80 cents an hour,

Hours

Maximum for females, 8 a
day, 48 a week, in speci­
fied occupations.2
Do.2

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

cn
O
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
NEW YORK:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective Oct. 15,1962.
Ch. 619 (L. 1960), as amend­
ed by Ch. 440 (L. 1961),
Apr. 11,1961, and Chs.
439 and 440 (L. 1962),
May 1,1962.




Occupation or industry covered

Any industry, trade, business, or class of work
in which employees are gainfully employed.
Exceptions: Domestic service in the home of
employer; labor on a farm; bona fide executive,
administrative, or professional employees; out­
side salesmen or taxicab drivers; volunteer,
learner, or apprentice of a corporation, unin­
corporated association, community chest fund,
or foundation organized and operated exclu­
sively for religious, charitable, or educational
purposes, no part of net earnings of which
inures to benefit of any private shareholder
or individual;3 a member of a religious order,
or duly ordained, commissioned, or licensed
minister, priest, or rabbi, or sexton, or Chris­
tian Science reader; work for such a religious or
charitable institution (1) which is incidental
to or in return for charitable aid conferred
upon an individual and not under an express
contract of hire, (2) at which institution indi­
vidual is a student, (3) in or for such institu­
tion if the earning capacity of individual is im­
paired by age, physical or mental deficiency,
or injury, (4) in or for a summer camp or con­
ference of such institution for not more than 3
months annually; staff counselor in a chil­
dren's camp; student employed in or for a col­
lege or university fraternity, sorority, student
associations, or faculty associations, no part of
net earnings of which inures to benefit of any
shareholder or individual, and which is recog­
nized by such college or university if such indi­
vidual is a student; Federal, State, or mu­
nicipal government or political subdivision
thereof; work to which the minimum wage
provisions of the Federal Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act, as amended, apply, except the stat­
utory minimum wage established by Ch. 619,
as amended, shall apply.4

Class of employees covered

All employees:
Until Oct. 15, 1964........... .
On and after Oct. 15, 1964.

Minimum wage rates

$1.15 an hour 1
$1.25 an hour i.

Hours

(2)
(2)

Amusement and Recrea­
tion Industry, No. 8-b,
Oct. 15,1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 8-a
of Mar. 1,1959, as modi­
fied by Ch. 619 (L. 1960),
Oct. 1, 1960. Order No.
8-a superseded Order No.
8, Apr. 21, 1951.)

See footnotes at end of table.




Includes all establishments whose primary serv­
ice is to provide amusement, entertainment, or
recreation, including establishments which
produce and distribute motion pictures and
services allied to this, such as casting and
rental of motion picture film or equipment.
Includes owners, lessees, and concessionaires
whose business is incidental thereto or in con­
nection therewith, or a part thereof, and
such services as are allied therewith.
Includes, but not limited to, motion picture and
other theaters, dancehalls and studios, ball­
rooms, bowling alleys, billiard parlors, skating
rinks, riding academies, racetracks and
stables, amusement parks and centers, penny
arcades and other coin-operated amusementdevice parlors, athletic fields, arenas, ball
parks and stadiums, swimming pools, beaches,
gymnasiums and slenderizing salons, golf
courses, tennis courts, carnivals, circuses,
boathouses, card clubs, and other similar es­
tablishments, as well as play-producing or
other entertainment-producing companies,
theatrical agents, ticket brokers, and profes­
sional sports promoters; allied services oper­
ated in connection with amusement and recre­
ation establishments, such as checkrooms and
parking lots. Exceptions: Establishments en­
gaged in the operation of radio or television
broadcasting stations; summer theater ap­
prentice actors; actors in New York City
theaters with less than 300 seats; rolling-chair
pushers.7

All employees,*8 except pinsetters,
ushers at sports exhibitions, and
golf caddies:
Until Oct. 15, 1964......... .................... $1.15 an hour....... ........ .................
On and after Oct. 15, 1964__.............. $1.25 an hour
Order prohibits the counting of
tips as part of the minimum
wage, except a tip allowance of
35 cents an hour may be con­
sidered as part of the minimum
wage for cabana boys and
beach chair, umbrella, and
locker room attendants in
beach clubs.
For every day spread of hours ex­
1 additional hour's pay at
ceeds 11.
times the minimum hourly
rate.
Until Oct. 15, 1964:
Pinsetters............................................ 14 cents a line...................... ..........
Ushers at sports exhibitions
$4.40 per event.............................
Golf caddies............. .......................... $1.40 per bag for each round of 9
holes or less.
$2.50 per bag for each round of
10 to 18 holes.
On and after Oct. 15, 1964:
Pinsetters_______________
15 cents a line
Ushers at sports exhibitions.
$4.75 per event
Golf caddies......................... .
$1.50 per bag for each round of 9
holes or less..
$2.70 per bag for each round of
10 to 18 holes.
(Furnished meals and lodging
may be considered as part of
minimum wage in amounts as
specified in order.)
(In lieu of laundering or main­
taining required uniforms, em­
ployer must pay, in addition
to the minimum wage, $1.50
a week if employee works
more than 30 hours a week; or
$1 a week for 30 or less hours of
work a week.)

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

VI
IV
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
New York—Continued
Beauty Service Industry,
No. 2-d, Oct. 15, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 2-c
of Jan. 6, 1958, as
modified by Ch. 619 (L.
1960), Oct. 1, 1960.)

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

All establishments which perform services or op­ All employees, except maids, cleaning
women, porters:
erations in the care, cleansing, or beautification
Until Oct. 15,1964of the skin, scalp, nails, or hair, or in the en­
Pull time (over 28 hours a week):
hancement of personal appearance, and also
Hourly rate........—..........-........ services or operations in connection therewith
Weekly rate 8......................-.......
or incidental thereto; including, but not lim­
ited to, maids, cloakroom attendants, cleaning
Overtime.................-...................
women, cashiers, receptionists, appointment
Part time (28 hours or less a week)®.
clerks, and clerical workers. Exceptions: Bar­
On and after Oct. 15,1964—
bers, manicurists, and other workers in bar­
Full time (over 28 hours a week):
bershops which perform services primarily for
Hourly rate
men.7 (Bona fide booth renter, as defined, is
not deemed an employee in the beauty service
Weekly rate 8
industry.)
Overtime......................................
Part time (28 hours or less a week)9.
Maids, cleaning women, porters:
Until Oct. 15, 1964...............................

Minimum wage rates

$1.15 an hour.
$46 a week__
$1.72% an hour.
$1.45 an hour...
$1.25 an hour.
$50 a week__
$1.87% an hour
$1.55 an hour
$1.15 an hour............................. .

On and after Oct. 15, 1964-------------- $1.25 an hour........................ —
(Meals and lodging furnished
may be considered as part of
the minimum wage, in
amounts specified in order.)
Building Service Industry,
No. 9-b, Oct. 15,1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 9-a
of May 29,1961. Order
No. 9-a superseded Order
No. 9 of Feb. 15, 1953, as
modified by Ch. 619 (L.
1960), Oct. 1,1960.)




Includes any person, corporation, or establish­
ment engaged in whole or in part in rent­
ing, servicing, cleaning, maintaining, or man­
aging buildings or building space, and all
occupations, operations, and services in con­
nection therewith or incidental thereto. The
industry includes, but is not limited to, real
estate owners, building owners, operators,
lessors, managing agents, and independent
contractors. Exceptions: Building trades con­
tractors engaged exclusively in the field of
construction; establishments engaged exclu­
sively in real estate sales; employees of an
owner or lessee of a building occupying the
entire building for his own use if they work
exclusively in "that building; clerical and non­
manual workers employed in the offices of
managing agents or in central offices, whose
wages are not directly chargeable to the opera­
tions of a specific building or building space;
individuals working in or in connection with
a bungalow colony.7 Order provides that the

All employees,s« except janitors in
residential buildings:
Until Oct. 15,1964—.......................... $1.15 an hour...
Oct. 15, 1964............... ......................... $1.25 an hour...
Overtime—
Until Oct. 15, 1964.......................... $1.72% an hour.

Oct. 15, 1964................... ................
Janitors in residential buildings:
Until Oct. 15,1964Resident janitors in buildings:
Centrally heated—
By coal (hand fired).................
By automatic heat (all fuels)._
Nonccntrally heated—
Hot water
Cold water
Nonresident janitors in buildings:
Centrally heated—
By coal (hand fired)

$1.87% an hour.

$1 per unit per week.........
85 cents per unit per week.
70 cents per unit per week.
65 cents per unit per week.
75 cents per unit per week.

Hours

Actual working time.
More than 28, not over 40
a week.
Over 40 a week.2
Actual working time.
Actual working time.
More than 28, not over 40
a week.
Over 40 a week.2
Actual working time.
Maximum for females, 8 a
day, 48 a week.2
Do.2

Over 40 a week. (Until
Jan. 1,1963, over 42 a
week in residential build­
ings.)
Do.2

prescribed unit rates do not apply to janitors
paid at least $62 a week by a building owner
or managing agent.

Cleaning and Dyeing In­
dustry, No. 4-d, Oct. 15,
1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 4-c
of Apr. 15,1957, as modi­
fied by Ch. 619 (L. 1960),
Oct. 1.1960. Order No.
4-c superseded Order No.
4-b of Feb. 15, 1953.)

cn
CO

See footnotes at end of table.




(a) All types of cleaning, dyeing, pressing, or
processing incidental thereto, including mend­
ing and altering in connection therewith, of
materials belonging to the ultimate consumer,
i.e., clothing, hats, household furnishings,
rugs, textiles, furs, leather, upholstered goods,
or fabrics of any kind whatsoever; (b) the
soliciting, collecting, selling, reselling, or dis­
tributing at retail or wholesale of cleaning,
dyeing, and pressing services; (c) all office,
clerical, packing, or other occupations (includ­
ing plant maintenance) incidental or
related to the processes described above.
Exceptions: Cleaning, dyeing, or pressing when
a process in the manufacture of new materials
or of secondhand materials being processed
for resale; establishments insofar as they are
covered by the Laundry Industry Order.7

By automatic heat (allf uels)__
Noncentrally heated (all types)..
Oct. 15,1964Resident janitors in buildings*
Centrally heated—
By coal (hand fired)................
By automatic heat (all fuels)_.
Noncentrally heated—
Hot water______ ___________
Cold water
Nonresident janitors in buildings:
Centrally heated—
By coal (hand fired)
By automatic heat (all fuels)
Noncentrally heated (all types).

All employees:«
Until Oct. 15, 1964Full time (24 hours or more a
week):
Hourly rate
Weekly rate 8________ _______
Overtime_____ ____ _________
Part time (less than 24 hours a
week).®
On and after Oct. 15, 1964Full time (24 hours or more a week):
Hourly rate.................................
Weekly rate 8
Overtime........ ............................
Part time (less than 24 hours a
week).®
On any day employee works a split
shift, excluding meal period of 1
hour or less.

60 cents per unit per week..
___ do--------- -------------—

$1.09 per unit per week___
92 cents per unit per week..
76 cents per unit per week..
71 cents per unit per week..
82 cents per unit per week
65 cents per unit per week
___ do____ _________________
(The value of an apartment and
utilities where furnished by
employer to employee in a resi­
dential building may be con­
sidered part of the minimum
wage. Order specifies maxi­
mum allowances for apart­
ment and utilities furnished.)

$1.15 an hour...
$34.50 a week...
$1.72}$ an hour.
$1.20 an hour...

Actual working time.
24, not over 30 a week.
Over 40 a week.2
Actual working time.

$1.25 an hour....... .........................
Do.
24, not over 30 a week.
$37.60 a week
$1.87}$ an hour............. .............. Over 40 a week.®
$1.30 an hour......... ....................... Actual working time.
Overtime rate................. .............
(Meals and lodging actually fur­
nished may be considered part
of the minimum wage, in
amounts specified in order.)
(In lieu of laundering or main­
taining required uniforms, em­
ployer must pay, in addition
to the minimum wage, $1.50 a
week to employee working
more than 30 hours; $1 a week
for 30 hours or less.)

Do.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

ca

Minimum wage rates

State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

NEW YORK—Continued
Confectionery Industry,
No. 3-c, Oct. 15, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 3-b
of Mar. 3,1952, as modi­
fied by Ch. 619 (L. 1960),
Oct. 1, 1960. Order No.
3-b superseded Order No.
3-aof Nov. 30, 1947.)

All activities, services, and processes in the
manufacture, preparation, and packaging of
candy, confections, sweetmeats, chewing gum,
sweetened cough drops, and sugared nuts.
All occupations necessary to the production of
the articles specified, including but not limited
to office, clerical, maintenance, wrapping,
packaging, and shipping. Exceptions:7

All employees:5 8
Until Oct. 15, 1964Full time (over 32 hours a week):
Hourly rate............................... .
Weekly rate 10._.........................

$1.15 an hour...
$46 a week........

Overtime................................... .

$1.72H an hour.

Part time (32 hours or less a
week).® ii
Overtime............... ............ .........
On and after Oct. 15,1964Full time (over 32 hours a week):
Hourly rate...............................
Weekly rate 10

Hours

$1.20 an hour.

Actual working time.
More than 32, up to 40 a
week.
Over 8 a day, over 40 a
week.2
Actual working time.

$1.80 an hour.

Over 3 a day.

$1.25 an hour.
$50 a week...

Overtime.....................................

Hotel Industry, No. 6-g,
Oct. 15, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 6-f,
Nov. 3,1961, which su­
perseded Order No. 6-e
of June 20,1958, as modi­
fied by Ch. 619 (L. 1960),
Oct. 1,1960.)




Any establishment which, as a whole or part of
its business activities, offers lodging accommo­
dations for hire to the public, to employees, or
to members or guests of members, and serv­
ices in connection therewith or incidental
thereto; including, but not limited to, com­
mercial hotels, apartment hotels, resort hotels,
lodginghouses, boardinghouses, furnishedroom houses, children’s camps, adult camps,
tourist camps, tourist homes, motels, auto
camps, residence clubs, membership clubs,
dude ranches, Turkish baths, and Russian
baths. Exceptions: Eating or drinking places
customarily offering lodging accommodations
only to their own employees or, with less than
5 rooms, to the public, to employees, or to
members or to guests of members; establish­
ments in which lodging accommodation is not
available to the public or to members or guests
of members, but is incidental to instruction,
medical care, religious observance, or the care

$1.87M an hour.

Part time (32 hours or less a
week).® ii
Overtime

$1.30 an hour...

Actual working time.
More than 32, up to 40 a
week.
Over 8 a day, over 40 a
week.2
Actual working time.

$1.95 an hour...

Over 8 a day.

$1.15 an hour with allowance
for tips of 35 cents an hour
for service employees.

Nonresidential employees:
over 30, including 40 a
week in New York
City; over 30, including
42 a week outside New
York City. Residen­
tial: 18 up to and in­
cluding 44 a week.
Nonresidential employees:
over 30, including 40 a
week in New York
City; over 30, including
42 a week outside New
York City. Residen­
tial: 13 up to and in­
cluding 44 a week.
30 or less a week.

All employees:8 812
All-year hotels—
Full time:
Until Oct. 15,1964.

On and after Oct. 15,1964.

Part time ®14.

$1.25 an hour with allowance
for tips of 35 cents an hour
for service employees.

6 cents an hour more than basic
hourly rate.

of handicapped or destitute persons, or other
public charges; golf caddies; Turkish bath
workers employed by concessionaires in hotels,
or Turkish baths operated independently of
hotels, unless employed in connection with
lodging facilities of the establishment; campers
who work no more than 4 hours a day in a
children’s camp.?
Resort hotel defined as one which offers lodging
accommodations of a vacational nature to the
public or to members or guests of members
and which operates not more than 7 months
in any calendar year or, being located in a
rural community or in a city or village of less
than 15,000 population, increases either its
number of employee workdays or its number
of guest days in 4 consecutive weeks by at
least 100 percent over the number of such days
in any other 4 consecutive weeks in preceding
calendar year.

See footnotes at end of table.
ca




Overtime.

V/i times basic hourly rate
before allowance for meals
and lodging, but after allow­
ance, if any, for tips.

On any day employee has more
than one interval off duty (ex­
cluding meal period of 1 hour
or less), or spread of hours ex­
ceeds 10, or both situations
occur.

$1 a day in addition to hourly
wages earned.
(Furnished meals and lodging
in all-year hotels may be con­
sidered part of minimum
wage, in amounts specified in
order.)
(In lieu of laundering and
cleaning required uniforms,
employer must pay an addi­
tional 5 cents an hour.)

•

Resort hotels—
Until Oct. 15,1964.

$1.15 an hour with allowance
for tips of 15 cents an hour
for chambermaids, 35 cents
an hour for service workers.
On and after Oct. 15,1964.
$1.25 an hour with allowance
for tips of 16 cents an hour
for chambermaids, 35 cents
an hour for service workers.
Students employed as service Up to 20 percent lower than the
workers for not more than 17
minimum hourly rate after
weeks in resort hotel (as de­
allowance for tips, meals, and
fined), by certificate.
lodging.
Overtime........ ........... ................... . V/i times basic hourly rate
before allowance for meals
and lodging, but after allow­
ance, if any, for tips.
(Furnished meals and lodging
may be considered a part of
the minimum wage. For
nonresidential employees:
meals valued at not more
than 50 cents each; lodging,
14 cents an hour; lodging
and 3 meals a day, $3 a day
for each day worked.)
(In lieu of laundering and
cleaning required uniforms,
employer must pay an addi­
tional 5 cents an hour, not
over $2.40 a week.)

Nonresidential employees:
over 40 a week in New
York City, over 42 out­
side New York City.
Residential:13 over 44 a
week.

Up to 48 a week.*3

Do.M

Do.M

Over 48 a week and hours
worked on 7th consecu­
tive day.2

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

CA
ON

Occupation or industry covered

State, law or title of order,
and effective date

NEW YORK—Continued
(a) Washing of fabrics or textiles of any kind and
Laundry Industry, No.
the ironing, pressing, repairing, or processing
1-d, Oct. 15, 1962.
incidental to such washing; (b) soliciting col­
(Supersedes Order No. 1-c
lection, distribution, or rental at wholesale or
of Apr. 15, 1957, as modi­
retail of the articles so processed; (c) engaging
fied by Ch. 619 (L. 1960),
in any of the processes mentioned in (a) or (b)
Oct. 1, 1960. Order No.
for their own use by business establishments,
1-c superseded Order No.
except where the processing is incidental to the
1-b, Feb. 15,1953.)
manufacture or sale of a commodity; (d) all
occupations, operations, and services in con­
nection with or incidental to the processes
mentioned above; launderettes and automatic
and coin-operated laundries. Exceptions:7

Class of employees covered

All employees:6 a
Until Oct. 15, 1964Full time (over 30 hours a week):




Any eating or drinking place which prepares and
offers food or beverage for human consumption
either on any of its premises or by such service
as catering, banquet, box lunch, or curb or
counter service, to the public, to employees, or
to members or guests of members; and services
in connection therewith or incidental thereto;
including, but not limited to, restaurant opera­
tions of other types of establishments, restau­
rant concessions in any establishment, and
concessions in restaurants. Exceptions: Eat­
ing or drinking places operated by establish­
ments customarily offering lodging accommo­
dations of 5 or more rooms to the public, to
employees, or to members or guests of mem­
bers ,not including eating and drinking places

■«

Hours

Actual working time.
Over 30, including 37H a
week.
Over 40 a week.2
Actual working time.

Part time (30 hours or less a
week).6
On and after Oct. 15,1964Full time (over 30 hours a week):

Part time (30 hours or less a
week).9

Restaurant Industry, No.
5-e, Oct. 15, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No.
5-d of Apr. 1, 1962.15
Order No. 5-d super­
seded Order No. 5-c of
Sept. 17,1957, as modi­
fied by Ch. 619 (L. 1960)
Oct. 1, 1960.)

Minimum wage rates

(Meals and lodging furnished
may be considered a part of
the minimum wage, in
amounts as specified in order.)
(An allowance not exceeding onehalf of the actual purchase
cost of required uniform per­
mitted as part of minimum
wage.)

All employees: 5 a
Until Sept. 3, 1963Full time (over 30 hours a week).. $1.15 an hour with an allowance
for tips of 30 cents an hour for
service employees.
Overtime:
$1.27^6 an hour after allowance
for tips.
Part time (30 hours or less a week)9 H. $1.20 an hour with an allowance
for tips of 30 cents an hour for
service employees.
On and after Sept. 3. 1963Full time (over 30 hours a week).. $1.25 an hour with an allowance
for tips of 35 cents an hour for
service workers.

Actual working time.
Over 30, including 37H» a
week.
Over 40 a week.2
Actual working time.

Over 30, up to 40 a week.
Over 40 a week.2
Do.2
Actual working time.

Over 30, up to 40 a week.

'

e— — G9— S0Sr-6Ii

offering lodging only to their own employees;
establishments where service of food or bever­
ages is not available to the public but is inci­
dental to instruction, medical care, religious
observance, or the care of handicapped or
destitute persons or other charges.7

Ketail Trade Industry, No.
7-c, Oct, 15, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 7-b
of Feb. 15, 1959, as modi­
fied by Ch. 619 (L. 1960),
Oct. 1, 1960. Order No.
7-b superseded Order No.
7-a, Dec. 28, 1953.)

See footnotes at end of table.

Ol




Selling or offering for sale at retail and/or whole­
sale any goods, wares, merchandise, articles,
or things, and all occupations, operations, and
services in connection therewith or incidental
thereto. Exceptions: Establishments engaged
solely in wholesale trade, or employment
exclusively at wholesale in an establishment
engaged in both wholesale and retail trade
which realizes less than 25 percent of its gross
annual receipts from retail sales.7

Overtime:
Over 40 a week.2
Nonservice............................. ...... $1.87^ an hour
Do.2
Service......................... ................. $1.35 an hour after allowance for
tips.
Part time (30 hours or less a week)»14_ $1.30 an hour with an allowance Actual working time.
for tips of 35 cents an hour for
service workers.
On any day employee has more An additional hour’s pay at the
full-time hourly rate in addi­
than one interval off duty (ex­
tion to minimum wages other­
cluding meal period of 1 hour
wise required.
or less), or spread of hours ex­
ceeds 10, or both situations occur. (Furnished meals and lodging
may be considered part of
minimum wage, in amounts
specified in order.)
(In lieu of laundering and m ain­
taining required uniform, em­
ployer may pay 4 cents an hour
in addition to minimum
wage.)
All employees:5 6
Until Oct. 15, 1964—
Hourly rate
Weekly wage 16
Overtime
On and after Oct. 15, 1964—
Hourly rate
Weekly wage 16
Overtime__________ ____ _______
If employee works a split shift, exclud­
ing a meal period of ll hours or less,
A
or spread of hours exceeds 10. or both
situations occur. Except: Students
on days attending school.

$1.15 an hour...
$43.13 a week...
$1.72)^ an hour.

Actual working time.
Over 30, not over 37J-3 a
week.
Over 40 a week.2

$1.25 an hour....... ........ ................ Actual working time.
$46.88 a week________________ Over 30, not over 37H a
week.
Over 40 a week.2
$1.87H an hour
1 hour’s pay at the basic hourly
rate in addition to minimum
wages, otherwise required.
(Meals and lodging actually
furnished may be considered
part of the minimum wage, in
amounts as specified in order.)
(In lieu of laundering or main­
taining required uniforms,
employer must pay in addi­
tion to the minimum wage
$1.50 a week to employee
working more than 30 hours;
$1 a week, for 30 hours or less.)

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

01
00
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

NEW YORK—Continued
Miscellaneous Industries
and Occupations, No.
11-a, Oct. 15, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 11,
Oct. 1,1960, issued pursu­
ant to Ch. 619 (L. I960).)




Class of employees covered

Miscellaneous industries and occupations. Ex­
ceptions: Occupations or industries covered
by another minimum wage order; nonprofit­
making institutions which have elected to be
exempt from coverage of a minimum wage
order under provisions of the Minimum Wage
ActJ

All employees,13 except those in nonprolitmaking institutions:
Until Oct. 15, 1964
On and after Oct. 15, 1964

Minimum wage rates

$1.15 an hour
$1.25 an hour
(Maximum hourly allowance for
tips (under conditions speci­
fied in order) as part of mini­
mum wage : 15 cents, if em­
ployee’s weekly tips average
between 15 cents and 30 cents
an hour; 30 cents, if average is
30 cents or more an hour. No
allowance for tips if weekly
average is less than 15 cents
an hour.)
(Furnished meals and lodging
may be considered a part of
minimum wage, in amounts
as specified in order.)
Not less than 75 percent of the
applicable minimum wage
after allowance.

Learners, apprentices, and handi­
capped workers, by certificate from
Commissioner. (Order defines
learners, apprentices, handicapped
workers.)
All employees13 in nonprofitmaking
institutions (as defined) not elect­
ing to be exempt from coverage
under a minimum wage order:
Until Oct. 15, 1964
$1.15 an hour
On and after Oct. 15, 1964
$1.25 an hour
(Furnished meals and lodging
may be considered a part of
minimum wage, in amounts
as specified in order.)
(In lieu of furnishing laundry
facilities to employees in chil­
dren’s camps, employer may
pay $1 a week in addition to
minimum wage.)

*

Hours

Actual working time.2
Do2

Do.2

Do.2
Do.3

«l

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
NORTH CAROLINA:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective Jan. 1,1964.
Qen. Stats., secs. 95-85 to
95-97, as amended by
Ch.816 (L. 1963).
(Enacted by Ch. 475 (L.
1959), effective Jan. 1,
I960, and amended by
Chs. 602 and 652 (L.
1961).)
Editor’s Note: Ch. 229 (L.
1965) increased the min­
imum wage rate to $1.00
an hour effective Jan. 1,
1966.

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupation or industry covered

All employment. Exceptions; Any establishment with 3 or less employees; 2 persons em­
ployed: as farm laborer or farm employee; in
domestic service or in or about a private home,
public or private nursing home for the aged
and/or infirm, public or private hospital, or
eleemosynary institution primarily supported
by private funds; in activities of an educational,
charitable, religious, or nonprofit organization
where employer-employee relationship does
not, in fact, exist or where services rendered
are voluntary; as newsboys, shoeshine boys,
caddies on golf courses, babysitters, ushers,
doormen, concession attendants, cashiers in
theaters, pinboys in bowling alleys, traveling
or outside salesmen on commission basis; on a
part-time basis during school year who are
students at any recognized school or college; or
in the seafood or fishing industry on a part­
time basis or who normally work and are paid
for in the amount of work accomplished; and
persons under 21 years employed by father or
mother; those receiving tips or gratuities as the
principal part of their wage; those confined to
any penal, corrective, or mental institution of
the State or any political subdivision thereof;
employees of boys' and girls’ summer camps;
persons under the age of 16 or 65 years of age
and over; taxicab drivers and operators.

Class of employees covered

All employees 16 to 65 years of age.1

Learners (160 hours in the industry) in
hotels, motels, laundries and drycleaners, cafes and restaurants, sand­
wich and pastry manufacturers, and
cosmetologists. (Regulations of the
Commissioner of Labor.)

Minimum wage rates

Hours

85 cents an hour................. ......... Maximum for females, 948-hour week, 10-55-hour
week, and 11-55-hour
week in industries and
occupations specified in
hours law.3
65 cents an hour...........................
Do.3

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

a

©
Occupation or industry covered

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
NORTH DAKOTA:
Laundry, Cleaning, and
Dyeing Occupation, No.
4, Sept. 30, 1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 4,
Sept. 18, 1961.)

Any establishment where clothes are washed,
cleaned, or dyed by any process, by any per­
son, firm, institution, corporation, or associa­
tion; includes all the processes connected with
receiving, marking, washing, cleaning, ironing,
and distributing washable or cleanable ma­
terials, including work performed in laundry
departments in hotels and factories, coinoperated laundries and cleaners.

Class of employees covered

Women and minors:1
Experienced—

Learners3—
Cleaning and dyeing (first 6
months in establishment).
Laundry (first 60 days in estab­
lishment).

Manufacturing Occupation,
No. 2, Aug. 9, 1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 2,
Sept. 1, 1949.)

Establishments operated for the purpose of trade
in the purchase or sale of any goods or mer­
chandise, including the sales force, wrapping
force, auditing or checking force; shippers in
the mail-order department; receiving, mark­
ing, and stockroom employees; and all other
work. Exception: Employees performing of­
fice duties solely.

Maximum for women,
8X a day, 48 a week.*
A
Do.3
Do.2
Do.2
Applicable hourly minimum___ For each hoar worked.

All processes in the production of commodities, Women and minors:1
including work in dressmaking shops; whole­
sale millinery houses; workrooms of retail mil­
Learners (first 3 months in estab­
linery shops; drapery and furniture-covering
lishment).
workshops; and garment alteration, art, needle­
work, fur-garment making, and millinery
workrooms in mercantile stores; employees of
creameries and produce houses and the candy­
making departments of retail candy stores and
of restaurants, and in bakery and biscuit­
manufacturing establishments, in candy­
manufacturing, and in bookbinding and jobpress-feeding establishments.

Mercantile Occupation,
No. 3, Aug. 29, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 3,
Mar. 6,1957, which
superseded order of Aug.
14, 1951.)
Editor’s Note:
Order No. 3 revised ef­
fective Nov. 17, 1965.




*

Maximum for women,
814 a day, 48 a week.2 *
Do.2*

Women and minors:1
$156 a month.

Learners (6 months’ apprenticeship
in occupation).

Hours

Minimum wage rates

55 cents an hour; $26.40 a week;
$114.40 a month.

Maximum for women, 8)4
a day, 48 a week, in
cities and towns of 500
or more population as
specified in hours law;
9 a day, 54 a week, in
towns under 500 popu­
lation.2
Do 2

Public Housekeeping
Occupation, No. 1, Aug.
20, 1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 1,
Aug. 21,1961.)

Telephone Occupation,
No. 5, July 7, 1953.
(Supersedes Order No. 5,
Apr. 4, 1922, reprinted
Aug. 15, 1939.)

Includes waitresses in restaurants, hotel dining
rooms, boardinghouses, bars, and taverns; all
attendants employed at ice cream, light lunch,
and refreshment stands; steamtable or counter
work in cafeterias and delicatessens where
freshly cooked foods are served; chamber­
maids in hotels, lodginghouses, and boarding­
houses; janitresses, car cleaners, elevator op­
erators; kitchen workers in hotels and restau­
rants.

Women and minors:18
Experienced or qualifiedwaitress or counter girl

All telephone exchanges-------------------- --------

Women and minors:1
Experienced workers in exchanges
with main stations numbering—
More than 750

Chambermaid or kitchen help......
Inexperienced or unqualified (less
than 3 months or 72 working days
in this type of employment).
Part time •

Less than 750, more than 500
Less than 500, more than 250
Less than 250
Learners (1,248 hours of apprentice­
ship) in exchanges with main
stations numbering—
More than 750................. ................

Less than 750, more than 500.
Less than 500, more than 250.
Less than 250_______ ______
See footnotes at end of table.




75 cents an hour; $36.00 a week;
$156.00 a month.
65 cents an hour; $31.20 a week;
$135.20 a month.
50 cents an hour, with meals
(as defined).

8M a day, 48 a week, 6
days a week.
Do.
Do.

14s of applicable weekly wage... For each hour worked.
(Allowance for meals as part
payment of the wage, 55
cents a meal. “Board" con­
sidered as 12 meals in each
week. If less than 12 meals
a week are furnished where
meals are part payment of a
wage, 55 cents a meal shall be
allowed to employee for each
meal not furnished.)

75 cents an hour.

60 cents an hour.
50 cents an hour.
(No rate set)___

60 cents an hour.

50 cents an hour...
42^ cents an hour.
(No rate set).........

Maximum for women,
8M a day, 48 a week,
in cities or towns of
600 or more population
as specified in hours
law.2
Do.2
Do.2
C)

Maximum for women,
8Vi a day, 48 a week, in
cities or towns of 500 or
more population as
specified in hours law.2
Do.2
Do.2
(7)

C\
to

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

OHIO:
Cleaning and Dyeing Oc­
cupations in the Clean­
ing and Dyeing Trade,
No. 4, Jan. 2, 1963.
(Directory Order No. 4 of
Jan. 19,1959, made man­
datory; superseded Order
No. 2, Jan. 7, 1935.)

Food and/or Lodging, Oc­
cupations Relating to the
Furnishing of, No. 3,
Feb. 1, 1965.
(Amends Mandatory
Order No. 3 of Sept. 1,
1961. Directory Order
No. 3 of Dec. 5,1956,
made mandatory, Sept.
1,1961, superseded Order
No. 3, as amended, Dec.
15,1950.)




f

Cleaning, dyeing, pressing, or processing inci­
dental thereto, for compensation, of clothing
(including hats), household furnishings, rugs,
textiles, fur, leather, or fabric of any kind
whatsoever; the collection, sale, resale, or
distribution at retail or wholesale of cleaning,
dyeing, and pressing services by cleaning, dye­
ing, and pressing establishments; laundries;
department stores; hotels; or any other type
of establishment or institution.
Includes all processes directly concerned with
the cleaning, dyeing, pressing, soliciting, col­
lection, and distribution of cleaning work.
Exceptions: Plant maintenance, office work.
(a) All restaurants, licensed or unlicensed, op­
erated as the principal business of the em­
ployer, or as a department or unit of another
business; all restaurants operated by govern­
mental subdivisions, including boards of edu­
cation, wherein food in liquid and/or solid form
is prepared and served for human consump­
tion; catering and banquet service, box lunch
service, or curb service; (b) transit and resi­
dential or apartment hotels, motels, apartment
houses, tourist homes, and tourist cabin reser­
vations offering lodging or living accommoda­
tions; (c) boardinghouses serving one meal or
more a day; (d) roominghouses; (e) hospitals,
sanitariums, and rest homes; (f) clubs, private
and public. Exceptions: Establishments op­
erating "soda fountains” where only non­
alcoholic beverages, such as carbonated bever­
ages, soft drinks, milk drinks, ice creams,etc.,
are sold; inmates of institutions; members of
religious organizations who receive no com­
pensation for their services; women taking a
course of training in housework or preparing
and serving food in training establishments;
students, while regularly enrolled in a recog­
nized or accredited school,college, university,or

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Women and minors 1

90 cents an hour____________

Learners and apprentices (less than
90 days in an occupation).
Handicapped whose earning capacity
is impaired.

75 cents an hour____________

Women and minors:
Full time *—
Nonservice
Service______________________
If employed 30 hours or less a
week, at direction of employer.
Part time
Nonservice
Service
Learners and apprentices (first 60
days of employment).
Handicapped whose earning capac­
ity is impaired.

Hours

Maximum for females, 8
a day, 48 a week.2
Do.8

Not less than 80 percent of the
established minimum fair
wage standards, by special
license.

75 cents an hour................
55 cents an hour________
5 cents an hour additional.
80 cents an hour
60 cents an hour
15 cents an hour less than ap­
plicable minimum rate.
Not less than 80 percent of the
established minimum fair
wage standards, by special
license.
(No deduction from basic mini­
mum wage may be made for
meals furnished employee
engaged in the preparation or
serving of food. By em­
ployer-employee agreement,
employer may: (1) deduct
from wages for lodging fur­
nished; and (2) charge em­
ployee, not entitled to meals

Over 30, including 48 a
week.
Do.
Each hourup"to24 a week.
30 a week or less.
Do.

*_

under regulations, for meals
furnished, in amounts speci­
fied in order.)

other institution of learning, employed as part­
time workers in a restaurant, cafeteria, or
lunchroom operated on a nonprofit basis by a
board of education, school, college, university,
hospital, or institution; or employed on a part­
time basis as nurses’ aides in a hospital.
Laundry Industry, No. 1,
Oct. 1, 1962 (Directory).
(Supersedes Order No. 1,
July 26, 1934.)

Washing of fabrics or textiles of any kind, and
ironing, pressing, repairing, or processing inci­
dental thereto; solicitation, collection, distri­
bution, rental, or sale at retail or wholesale of
articles so processed; producing of laundry
service for their own use by business establish­
ments, clubs, or institutions; including laun­
derettes and automatic and coin-operated
laundries.

See footnotes at end of table.

Cs
W




Learners and apprentices (less than 90
days in an occupation).
Handicapped whose earning capacity
is impaired.

$1 an hour„....... ............ ............ Maximum for females, 8 a
day, 48 a week.2
Do.2
15 cents an hour less than the
prescribed minimum wage
rate.
N ot less than 80 percent of estab­
lished minimum wage stand­
ard, by special license.
(Credit for furnished board and
lodging permitted in amounts
specified.)

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
OKLAHOMA:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective Aug. 1,1965.
Statutes 1951, as amended
by H.B. 697 (L. 1965).




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any industry or occupation, including State
employment. Exceptions: Employment on a
farm (as defined); in domestic service in or
about a private home; by U.S. Government;
as volunteer in a charitable, religious, or non­
profit organization; newspaper vendor or
carrier; carrier subject to regulation by Part I
of Interstate Commerce Act; employees
subject to Federal Fair Labor Standards Act;
bona fide executive, administrative, or pro­
fessional employee; outside salesman; taxicab
operator; theater employee, including driveins; hotels or motels and services ordinarily
connected with and forming part of the usual
operation of a hotel or motel; serving of food
in public eating places, such as restaurants
and cafeterias; nursing homes; soda fountains;
laundries; part-time employees; bakeries
and/or sweetshops; persons receiving benefits
under the Federal Social Security Act; and
persons under 18 years of age or 65 years of
age and over.

Men and women (18 to 65 years of age).

4

Minimum wage rates

Hours

years of age and over, 9 a
day, 54 a week.

f

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
OREGON:
Amusement and Recrea­
tion, No. 4, Mar. 10, 1956.

Beauty Operators and
Manicurists, No. 1, Aug.
10, 1954.
(Supersedes Order No. 1,
July 22,1941, supple­
mented Aug. 6, 1941.)

Canning, Freezing, and
Processing, No. 2, Oct.
12, 1959.
(Supersedes Order No. 2,
Aug. 13, 1955.)

Occupation or industry covered

Studio operators in wired-music services; assist­
ants in radio broadcasting and television
studios; cashiers, ushers, and checkroom at­
tendants in theaters and other places of amuse­
ment, including but not limited to such
occupations in dancehalls, bowling alleys, bil­
liard parlors, skating rinks, riding academies,
shooting galleries, racetracks, amusement
parks, athletic fields, public swimming pools,
private and public gymnasiums, golf courses,
tennis courts, carnivals, concessions in any
and all amusement establishments, and all
similar occupations. Exceptions: Women em­
ployed in administrative, executive, or profes­
sional capacities (as defined) and for which
remuneration is not less than $250 a month.

Women and minors:1
Women.___ ______

Services or operations used or useful in the care,
cleansing, or beautification of the skin, scalp,
nails, or hair, or in the enhancement of per­
sonal appearance, and all services or operations
incidental thereto, including services of maids,
cashiers, reception or appointment clerks.
Exceptions: Women employed in administra­
tive, executive, or professional capacities (as
defined) and for which remuneration is not less
than $250 a month.

Women and minors.

Includes fresh fruit, berries, vegetables, meat,
fish, shellfish, or Crustacea processing opera­
tions. Exceptions: Farmer who processes only
the product of his own farm; women employed
in administrative, executive, or professional
capacities (as defined).
See footnotes at end of table.

ON
or




Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

75 cents an hour.

60 cents an hour____
Minors 2
Overtime in emergency, on permit 3__ V/l times regular rate.

75 cents an hour.

Overtime in emergency, on permit.. V/2 times the regular rate.

Women and minors_____
Overtime4__________
On 7th consecutive day.

$1 an hour......... ........
V/2 times regular rate.
___do_____ _______
Twice regular rate_
_

Hours

8 a day, 44 a week, 6 days a
week.
Do.
Over 8 a day, over 44 a
week.

For female beauticians, 10
a day, 44 a week, 6 days
a week; for other women
and minors, 8 a day, 44
a week, 6 days a week.
Over hours specified above.

10 a day.
Over 10 a day.
First 8 hours.
Over 8.

ON

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

____________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
State, law ort itle of order,
and effective date
OREG ON—Continued
Hospitals, Nursing Homes,
Homes for the Aged, and
Child Care Agencies,
No. 5, July 1, 1963.
(Modifies Order No. 5 of
Jan. 7, 1951, which super­
seded Orders Nos. 5 and
5a, July 22, 1941, as
amended Nov. 26, 1941.)

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Includes cooks, kitchen helpers, waitresses, jani­ Women and minors:
tors, charwomen, and all other women and
Hospitals and nursing homes a—
Between July 1, 1963, and July 1,
minors employed in such institutions. Excep­
1964:
tions: Trained nurses, student nurses, licensed
practical nurses, or other professional or
executive help.
Inexperienced—

8 a day, 44 a week, 6 days
a week.6
Do.6
Do.6

On and after July 1, 1964:

Do.6

Inexperienced—

Do.6
Do.6

Homes for the aged and child care
agencies—

8 a day, 44 a week, 6 days
a week.6

Inexperienced:

V/i times regular rate or 1)4

times applicable minimum,
whichever is greater.

Laundry, Cleaning, and
Dyeing, No. 7, Jan. 3,
1958.
(Supersedes Order No. 7,
Aug. 29, 1950.)




The process of receiving, marking, washing
cleaning, dyeing, finishing, and distributing
clothing and materials. Exceptions: Women
employed in administrative, executive, or pro­
fessional capacities (as defined), and for which
remuneration is not less than $250 a month.

Women and minors:3

Overtime in emergency 3—

Hours

Do.6
Do.6
Over 8 a day, over 44 a
week.

8 a day, 44 a week, 5)4
days.
Do.
Over 8 to 8)4 a day, over
44 a week.
Over 8)4 up to 10 a day,
over 44 up to 50 a week.

Manufacturing, No. 8,
Mar. 15, 1959.
(Supersedes Order No. 8,
Oct. 19, 1948.)

Mercantile, No. 9, Dec. 15,
1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 9,
May 0, 1952, which super­
seded order of May 5,
1948.)

Includes any industry, business, or establish­
ment operated for the purpose of preparing,
producing, making, altering, repairing, finish­
ing, processing, inspecting, handling, assem­
bling, wrapping, bottling, or packaging goods,
articles, or commodities, in whole or in part.
Exceptions: Such activity covered by other
orders, including the order in the canning,
packing, preserving, freezing, or other proc­
essing operation; women employed in adminis­
trative. executive, or professional capacities
defined as: (1) work predominantly intellec­
tual, managerial, or creative which requires
exercise of discretion and independent judg­
ment, and for which remuneration is not less
than $300 a month; or (2) employees licensed or
certified by the State who are engaged in the
practice of any of the recognized professions.

$1 an hour____________
Women and minors
Overtime in emergency, on permit, _ 1 K times the regular rate.

Any business or establishment operated for the
purpose of purchasing, selling, or distributing
goods or commodities at wholesale or retail.

Women and minors:
Experienced........................................ $1 an hour__
Overtime in emergency, on permit.. $1.50 an hour.

Regular employees.

IK times the regular rate or IK
times the minimum rate,
whichever is greater.

Learners h

Less than the established mini­
mum, by permit.

Persons with less than 400 hours’ 85 cents an hour,
experience; college and high school
students employed less than 800
hours after school and on Satur­
days.
Overtime......................................... — $1.28 an hour-----

60 cents an hour.

Minors, No. 10, July 7, 1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 10,
May 10, 1957, which
superseded Order No. 10,
Oct. 11, 1951.)

Minors (persons under 18 years)

Office, No. 12, Oct. 13,1953.
(Supersedes Order No. 11,
July 22, 1941.)
Editor's Note: Order re­
vised Aug. 9, 1965, sets
rate of $1.25 an hour
($1.00 for minor learner)
and requires overtime
pay after 40 hours a week.
0\

Industries for which the Wage and Hour Com­
mission has not established a different wage
by individual or special order. Exceptions:
Domestic work and chores in or about private
residences; newspaper carriers and vendors.
Exempt from wage section: Agricultural har­
vesting on a piecework or unit basis.
Includes stenographers, bookkeepers, typists,
billing clerks, filing clerks, cashiers, checkers,
invoicers, comptometer operators, auditors,
library attendants, and all types of clerical
work not covered by other orders of the Com­
mission. Exceptions: Women employed in
administrative, executive, or professional ca­
pacities (as defined) and for which remunera­
tion is not less than $250 a month.

Women and minors:
Women and experienced minors
75 cents an hour___ ____
Minors with less than 90 days’ expe­ 60 cents an hour...............
rience.
Overtime in emergency, on permit__ IK times the regular rate.

See footnotes at end of table.




Regular employees.

IK times employee’s regular
rate or IK times the mini­
mum rate.

8 a day, 44 a week.7
Over 8 a day, over 44 a
week.
Sundays (unless Sunday
is in regularly scheduled
workweek) and legal
holidays.

8 a day, 44 a week.7
Over 8 a day, over 44 a
week, and Sundays and
legal holidays.
8 a day, 44 a week.7

Over 8 a day, over 44 a
week, and Sundays and
holidays.
8 a day, 44 a week, 6
days a week.

8 a day, 44 a week.7
Do.7
Over 8 a day, over 44 a
week.
Sundays (unless Sunday
is in regularly sched­
uled workweek) and
legal holidays.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

05

State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

A day or resident camp, whether or not operated
for profit, established to give campers a recre­
ational, creative, educational experience in
cooperative group living wherein the activities
are conducted on a closely supervised basis,
whether or not the camp is used primarily by
an organized group or by members of the
public and whether or not the activities or
facilities are furnished free of charge or by the
payment of a fee. Exceptions: Mining, lum­
bering, labor, hunting, and fishing camps;
dude ranches, resorts, auto courts, tourist
camps, year-round schools, convalescent
homes, and correctional camps. Includes
counselor, such as head counselor, assistant,
specialist counselor or instructor, camp
mother, teacher, supervisor, group or division
leader, senior or junior assistant and trainee
counselor, cocounselor and counselor aide; and
cook, kitchen assistant, maintenance worker
or other person working primarily for financial
remuneration in an organized youth camp.
Exceptions: Camp director; camper who re­
ceives all or a portion of his camping or remu­
neration in addition to his camping for the
performance of routine tasks in connection
with the camp; any bona fide volunteer 11 (as
defined) under specified conditions.

Women and minors:2
Women______ ____ _____ ________
Minors under 18 years
Nonresident or day camp coun­
selor: Jo
Special activities
Senior
Junior_______________ ________
First-year trainee...........................
Resident counselor:10
Special activities
Senior____ _________ __________
Junior
First-year trainee
Overtime in emergency, on permit 3__

$5.37 a day...................................
$4.20 a day
$3.53 a day____________ _____
$2.87 a day

Personal Service, No. 13,
Mar. 10,1956.
(Supersedes Order No. 13,
July 22, 1941.)

Masseurs, doctor and dental and laboratory as­
sistants, mortuary attendants, taxi drivers,
busdrivers, chauffeurs, and dispatchers, and
all similar occupations. Exceptions: Women
employed in administrative, executive, or pro­
fessional capacities (as defined) and for which
remuneration is not less than $250 a month.

Women and minors 12.

75 cents an hour.

Preparing Poultry, Rab­
bits, Fish, or Eggs for
Distribution, No. 6, Feb.
10, 1953.

Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of grading, sorting, clean­
ing, packing, candling, separating, slaughter­
ing, plucking, or otherwise preparing poultry,
rabbits, fish, or eggs for distribution. Order
not applicable to the canning of fresh fruits,
vegetables, fish, shellfish, or Crustacea, or to
the barreling or preserving of fresh fruit and

Women and minors:
Women and experienced minors
75 cents an hour____
Overtime (i.e., over 8 a day, over 44 ll times regular rate
A
a week) in emergency, on permit.
Regular employees______ ______
___ do_____ _______

OREGON—Continued
Organized Youth Camps,
No. 3, July 9, 1957.




Minimum wage rates

75 cents an hour.
65 cents an hour.

Hours

8 a day. 3
Do.® ®
(')
(;)
(f)
(')

(”)
(“>
(“)
(“)

$25 a week 12
(•) (»)
$18 a week 12_______________
(») (“)
$14 a week 12
(!) (“)
$10 a week 12
(8) <“)
1A times regular hourly rate___ Over hours specified above;
(Charge may be made for meals
and lodging through mutual
agreement between employer
and employee, other than res­
ident counselor, in amounts
as specified.)
(Initial and terminal transpor­
tation to and from camp from
a mutually agreed location
shall be furnished employees
of resident organized youth
camps.)

Overtime in emergency, on permit 3„ 1>2 times regular rate.

8 a day, 44 a week, 6 days
a week.
Over 8 a day, over 44
a week.

8 a day, 44 a week.
Over 8 a day, over 40 a
week.
Sundays and legal holi­
days (unless establish­
ment is regularly open
such days).

berries, nor to operations on a farm incident
to production or preparation for market in
their raw, live, or natural state of products of
that farm. Exceptions: Women employed in
administrative, executive, or professional ca­
pacities (as defined).
Public Housekeeping, No.
14, Apr. 14, 1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 14,
Nov. 9,1956, which super­
seded Order No. 14, Jan.
13, 1948.)

Waitresses, cooks, counter and salad workers,
food checkers, bus and vegetable workers, dish
and glass washers, kitchen help, maids,
chambermaids, housekeepers, barmaids, linen
room girls, cleaners, janitresses and janitors,
charwomen and housemen, checkroom at­
tendants, matrons, elevator operators, and all
other persons employed in public housekeep­
ing establishments; that is, hotels; motels;
trailer parks; restaurants; boardinghouses;
roominghouses; apartment houses; catering,
banquet, or box lunch services; cafeterias; light
lunch stands; ice cream and soft drink stands,
beer taverns; cocktail lounges; clubs (public
and private); private schools, colleges, univer­
sities, and similar establishments which pro­
vide board or lodging in addition to educa­
tional facilities; establishments contracting
for maintenance or cleaning of commercial or
living quarters; transportation industries em­
ploying matrons and car cleaners; and other
work of like nature. Exceptions: Domestic
help in private homes where food and lodging
are not offered for sale to the public; enrolled
students employed by educational institu­
tions, and persons who, for religious, chari­
table, fraternal, or similar reasons, voluntarily
donate services to such educational institu­
tions; women employed in administrative,
executive, or professional capacities (as de­
fined) and for which remuneration is not less
than $250 a month.

Telephone, telegraph, or similar communica­
tions occupations. Exceptions: Women em­
ployed in administrative, executive, or pro­
fessional capacities (as defined) and for which
remuneration is not less than $250 a month.
See footnotes at end of table.

Telephone and Telegraph,
No. 18, Aug. 4, 1956.
(Supersedes Order No. 17,
July 22, 1941.)




Women and minors:
Women................... ............................ $1.00 an hour................................. 8 a day, 44 a week, 6 days a
week.
Do.
Minors under 18 years 2 85 cents an hour....... ....................
Overtime in emergency, on permit 3-_- V/2 times regular rate or l1^ times Over 8 a day, over 44 a
applicable minimum, which­
week.
ever is greater.
___ do............................................. Sundays and legal holidays
Regular employees.
(in establishments not
regularly open such
days).

Women and minors213

75 cents an hour____

A
Overtime in emergency, on permit-. \l times regular rate.

8 a day, 44 a week, 6 days
a week.14
Over 8 a day, over 44 a
week.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
PENNSYLVANIA:
Wage fixed in law. Rates
effective Jan. 1,1962.
Act 582 (L. 1961), amended
by regulations of General
Occupations Order No.
6, Oct. 15,1962.




Occupation or industry covered

Any industry, trade, business, or class of work
in which employees are gainfully employed.
Exceptions: Domestic service in home of em­
ployer; labor on a farm; boys lawfully em­
ployed in sale or delivery of newspapers and
magazines; any individual employed: (a) in a
bona fide executive, administrative, or profes­
sional capacity (as defined) or as an outside
salesman; (b) by the United States or the
Commonwealth; (c) in or for a religious or
charitable institution on work incidental to
or in return for charitable aid, not under an
express contract for hire, or services are ren­
dered gratuitously; (d) in a nonprofit educa­
tional institution in which he is enrolled as a
student, or in a related nonprofit facility, such
as a fraternity, with wages and working condi­
tions controlled by the institution (exemption
does not apply when student is engaged in
activity which is not part of a school function
or is open to the public or a substantial por­
tion thereof apart from the school community);
(e) as a taxicab driver, for a certified taxi
firm, who receives the major part of income as
a taxi driver from gratuities and commissions;
(f) by amusement parks operating on seasonal
basis; (g) by a resort hotel (as defined); (h) by
a motion picture theater; (i) seasonably by a
nonprofit health or welfare agency dealing
with handicapped or exceptional children, or
by a day or resident seasonal recreation camp
for children under 18 which operates less than
3 months in any 1 year; (j) by a nonprofit hos­
pital or nursing home, religious or charitable
organization, or an institution caring for the
mentally deficient, aged, or infirm; and (k) in
a hotel or restaurant in cities other than
Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

All employees K

$1 an hour.

Learners (200 hours or less in occupa­
tion) .3

85 cents an hour
Allowance for gratuities as part
of minimum wage, 35 cents
an hour, except 26 cents an
hour for learners.
(In lieu of providing and laun­
dering or cleaning required
uniform, employer shall pay
an additional 5 cents an hour
or $1.50 for a full week of 40
hours or more, whichever is
less.)
(Deduction for board and lodg­
ing permitted in amounts
specified.)

Hours

Maximum hours for
women, 10 a day, 48 a
week; for minors, 8 a
day, 44 a week.2
Do.2

Candy Stand Attendants
in Motion Picture Thea­
ter Lobbies, No. 7, July
18, 1962.

Selling or offering for sale of candy, popcorn,
packaged ice cream, or kindred products, under
concession, in lobby or other premises of an
indoor motion picture theater. Exception:
Drive-in motion picture theater.

All employees.

90 cents an hour.

Hotel Occupations in Phil­
adelphia and Pittsburgh,
No. 1-61, Oct. 15, 1962.
(Partially supersedes Di­
rectory Order No. 1 of
Jan. 1, 1959, Hotel Occu­
pations, as amended by
regulations May 4, 1959,
made mandatory Sept.
9,1959.)

Includes any activity in the cities of Philadel­
phia and Pittsburgh in an establishment
commonly known as a hotel which engages
primarily in providing lodging and meals to
the general public on a fee basis, with service
available 24 hours a day, including work in a
laundry operated for use of the hotel and its
guests. Exceptions: Any individual em­
ployed: (a) in a bona fide executive, adminis­
trative, or professional capacity (as defined):
(b) in a nonprofit educational institution in
which he is enrolled as a student, or in a related
nonprofit facility, such as a fraternity, with
wages and working conditions controlled by
the institution; (c) by amusement parks oper­
ating on seasonal basis; and (d) by a religious
or charitable organization.

All employees 1

$1 an hour....................................

See footnotes at end of table.




85 cents an hour
Allowance for gratuities as part
of minimum wage: 35 cents
an hour, except 26 cents an
hour for learners.
On any day spread of hours exceeds 10. _ $1 in addition to wages other­
wise payable.
Exception: Full-time students on
(In lieu of providing, launder­
days school is in session.
ing, and cleaning required
uniform, employer shall pay
an additional 5 cents an hour
or $1.50 a week, whichever is
less.)
(Furnished meals may be con­
sidered part of remuneration
at rate of 15 cents an hour
through Dec. 31,1962. De­
ductions for lodging and, effec­
tive Jan. 1, 1963, for meals in
amounts specified in order.)
Women and minors:
114 times minimum hourly rate.,
Overtime........ ......
Learners (200 hours or less in occupa­
tion) .3

(2)

For women and minors,
40 a week.
Do.

Over 40 a week.2

<1

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
PENNSYLVANIA—Con.
Hotel Occupations Outside
Philadelphia and Pitts­
burgh, No. 1-37, Sept. 9,
1959.
(Partially supersedes Di­
rectory Order No. 1 of
Jan. 1, 1959, Hotel Occu­
pations, as amended by
regulations May 4, 1959,
made mandatory Sept. 9,
1959.)




Occupation or industry covered

Includes any activity outside Philadelphia and
Pittsburgh in an establishment commonly
known as a hotel, which engages primarily in
providing lodging and meals to the general
public on a fee basis with service available 24
hours a day; and in any resort hotel, including
work in a laundry operated for use of the hotel
and its guests. Exceptions: Managerial em­
ployees earning a guaranteed salary of at least
$60 a week; caddies in resort hotels. Resort
hotel defined as one that (1) provides accom­
modations of a vacational and recreational
nature and meals and lodging to the public
or to members or guests of members; (2) pro­
vides without charge, on a weekly basis,
lodging accommodations and meals to the
majority of its employees; and (3) meets one of
three criteria of seasonal nature: (a) operates
not more than 7 months in any calendar year;
(b) being located in a rural community, or in
a city, borough, town, or township of less than
15,000 population, increases its number of em­
ployee workdays (including adult males) in 4
consecutive weeks by 100 percent over the
number of such days in any 4 consecutive
weeks in the preceding calendar year; or (c)
similar to (b) but applicable to number of
guest days.

Class of employees covered

Women and minors: *
Hotels other than resort—
Nonservice:
Food occupations____
Other occupations___
Service............................
Overtime:
Nonservice—
Food occupations...
Other occupations...
Service_____________

Learners Oess than 600 hours in
occupation).*
On any day spread of hours ex­
ceeds 10, except with respect to
hotel dining room employees for
any day, regardless of spread of
hours, when there is more than
one interval off duty (excluding
meal period of 1 hour or less).
Exception: Full-time students
on days school is in session.
Resort hotels—
Nonservice................. ....................
Chambermaids.
Service.
Overtime.
Part time.

Minimum wage rates

Hours

95 cents an hour (no meals)
85 cents an hour (no meals).
65 cents an hour (no meals).

42 a week.
Do.
Do.

$1.43 an hour (no meals)
$1.28 an hour (no meals)
98 cents an hour (no meals)
Order specifies rates with 15, 20,
and 25 eent-an-hour meal
allowance for 1, 2, and 3 meals,
respectively.
25 percent less than the appli­
cable rate.
($5-a-week allowance for lodging
furnished.)
$1 in addition to wages other­
wise payable.

Over 42 a week.
Do.2
Do.2

$35 a week (with lodging, $30;
with meals, $27; with meals
and lodging, $22).
$30 a week (with lodging, $25;
with meals. $22; with meals
and lodging, ,$17).
$25 a week (witn lodging, $20;
with meals, $17; with meals
and lodging, $12).
\l times Hs of the applicable
A
minimum rate.
J4o of the applicable minimum
weekly rate.

48 or less a week, but
more than 3 days or 24
hours.
Do.

O ver 48 a week or on 7th
consecutive day.2 s
Less than 3 days or 24
hours a week.

-S 9
>

‘

— S0S-6AZ

Learners (less than 600 hours in
occupation) .4 a

Laundry and Drycleaning
Occupations, No. 2, as
supplemented by Gen­
eral Occupations Order
No. 6, Oct. 15, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 2 of
Feb. 15,1959, which
superseded Order No. 2,
Feb. 1,1941.)

d

Includes any activity in any capacity in the All employees:1
Experienced..
washing, ironing, cleaning, finishing, refresh­
ing, pressing, dyeing, mothproofing or process­
Learners (200 hours or less in occu­
ing incidental thereto, mending and altering
pation).3
in connection therewith of any article of wear­
ing apparel (including hats), household fur­
nishings, textiles, fur, leather upholstered
goods, or fabric of any kind whatsoever; the
soliciting, collecting, selling, reselling, or dis­
tributing at retail or wholesale of any laundry
or drycleaning service; all occupations, opera­
tions, and services in connection with or inci­
dental to the processes mentioned above, in­
cluding office, clerical, packing, and mainte­
nance work; including the above occupations Women and minors:
in launderettes, automatic and coin-operated
Overtime........... —
launderies, and drycleaning establishments.
Exceptions: Executive, administrative, or pro­
fessional employees and outside salesmen (as
defined); persons employed by the United
States or the Commonwealth, a resort hotel, or
a religious or charitable institution or organiza­
tion; students employed in nonprofit educa­
tional institution in which enrolled; domestic
service in home of employer.

See footnotes at end of table.

CQ




Not less than 75 percent of the
applicable rate.
(In lieu of providing and laun­
dering or cleaning uniforms,
except those made of mate­
rials that do not require press­
sing, employer may elect to
pay regularly an additional 5
cents an hour or $1.50 for a
full workweek of 40 hours or
more, whichever is less.)
$1 an hour.
85 cents an hour
(In lieu of providing and laun­
dering or cleaning required
uniform, employer shall pay
an additional 5 cents an hour
or $1.50 for a full week of 40
hours or more, whichever is
less.)
(Deduction for meals permitted
in amounts specified in Gen­
eral Occupations Order No. 6.)

For women and minors, 44
a week.
Do.

1 Vi times regular hourly rate----- Over 44 a week.2

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

•'I

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
PENNSYLVANIA—Con.
Mercantile Occupations,
No. 4, as supplemented
by General Occupations
Order No. 6, Oct. 15,
1962.
(Supersedes Order No.
4-a, Jan. 19, 1959, as
amended Sept. 24,1962.)




Occupation or industry covered

Selling or offering for sale or distribution at re­
tail or wholesale any goods, wares, merchan­
dise, articles, or things, or the renting or leas­
ing of such, and all occupations, operations,
and services connected therewith or incidental
thereto; including manufacturing, processing,
assembling, repairing or reconditioning, or
otherwise producing of goods, wares, mer­
chandise, articles, or things sold, rented, or
leased at retail on the premises where produced
(except such activities covered by Fair Labor
Standards Act); soda fountain employee not
serving meals in a mercantile establishment J
Exceptions: Boys lawfully employed in the
sale of and delivery of newspapers and maga­
zines; executive, administrative, or profes­
sional employees (as defined) and outside
salesmen; persons employed by the United
States or the Commonwealth of Pennsyl­
vania; amusement park which operates on a
seasonal basis, motion picture theater, or re­
ligious or charitable institution or organization;
students employed in nonprofit institution
in which enrolled, or in a related nonprofit
facility, such as a fraternity, where the place­
ment, wages, and working conditions are con­
trolled by the institution, or by such related
nonprofit facility.
Occupations defined as any work in (1) gasoline
service station or automotive establishment;
(2) food establishment; (3) drug or variety
establishment; (4) department, apparel, or
dry goods establishment; (5) any other mer­
cantile establishment.

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

All employees:1
Learners (200 hours or less in occupation) .3

Women and minors:
Overtime_________ _____ ______

85 cents an hour
(In lieu of providing and laundering or cleaning required
uniform, employer may pay
an additional 5 cents an hour
or $1.50 for a full week of 40
hours or more, whichever is
less.)
(Deduction for meals permitted
in amounts specified in Gen­
eral Occupations Order No.
6.)

For women and minors,
40 a week.
Do.

1X times minimum hourly rate _ Over 40 a week.2
A

Motel and Miscellaneous
Lodging Occupations,
No. 5, as supplemented
by General Occupations
Order No. 6, Oct. 15,
1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 5,
Sept. 9,1959, as amended
Sept. 24, 1962.)

Includes any activity, not in a hotel, connected
with or incidental to the provision of lodging,
whether operated as the principal business
of the employer or as a unit of another busi­
ness, and whether offered to the public, em­
ployees, members or guests of members, or
residents.
Includes but is not limited to motels, tourist
homes, residence halls, apartment hotels,
lodginghouses, and clubs, unless they specifi­
cally qualify as a hotel. Exceptions: Estab­
lishments where lodging services are not avail­
able to the public but are incidental to the
care, instruction, or medical treatment of chil­
dren, the sick, or infirm; executive, adminis­
trative, or professional employees (as defined);
persons employed by amusement parks which
operate on a seasonal basis or by a religious or
charitable organization; students employed by
nonprofit institution in which enrolled.

All employees:1
Experienced-

Learners (200 hours or less in occu­
pation)^

On any day spread of hours exceeds
10. Exception: Full-time students
on days school is in session.

Women and minors;
Overtime. .............

See footnotes at end of table.




For women and minors,
40 a week in metro­
politan Philadelphia
and Pittsburgh;8 42 a
week in remainder of
State.
85 cents an hour___ __________
Do.
Allowance for gratuities as part
of minimum wage: 35 cents
an hour, except 26 cents for
learners.
$1 in addition to wages payable.
(In lieu of providing and laun­
dering or cleaning required
uniform, employer shall pay
5 cents additional an hour or
$1.50 for a full week of 40
hours or more, whichever is
less.)
(Deductions for board and lodg­
ing permitted in amounts
specified.)
$1 an hour.

V/2 times minimum hourly rate. Over 40 a week in metro­
politan Philadelphia
and Pittsburgh;8 over
42 a week in remainder
of State.

<1
C\

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
PENNSYLVANIA—Con.
Restaurant Occupations in
Philadelphia and Pitts­
burgh, No. 3-61, Oct. 15,
1962.
(Partially supersedes Order
No. 3, Restaurant Occu­
pations, of Sept. 9, 1959,
which superseded Order
No. 3, Oct. 1, 1947.)

Restaurant Occupations
Outside Philadelphia and
Pittsburgh, No. 3-37,
Sept. 9, 1959.
(Partially supersedes Order
No. 3, Restaurant Occu-




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Includes any activity in the cities of Philadelphia
and Pittsburgh connected -with or incidental
to the preparation of or offering of food or bev­
erage for human consumption, either on the
employer’s premises or elsewhere by such serv­
ices as, but not limited to, catering, banquet,
box lunch, or curb service, whether such serv­
ice or services are operated as the principal
business of the employer or as a unit of another
business, and whether they are offered to the
public, to employees, to members or guests of
members, or to residents. Exceptions: Activi­
ties in establishments where food or lodging
services are not available to the public but are
incidental to the care, instruction, or medical
treatment of children, the sick, or infirm; activ­
ities in the operation of refreshment stands in
amusement places where food and beverages
are prepared or served with no seats provided
for customers; hotels; executive, administra­
tive, or professional employees (as defined);
persons employed by the United States or the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; amusement
parks which operate on a seasonal basis, non­
profit health or welfare agency (seasonably)
engaged in activity dealing with handicapped
or exceptional children, a day or resident sea­
sonal recreational camp for children under 18
which operates less than 3 months in year; non­
profit hospital or nursing home, religious or
charitable organization, or institution caring
for the mentally deficient, aged, or infirm; stu­
dents employed in nonprofit educational insti­
tution in which enrolled; men over 21 em­
ployed by a motion picture theater in a restau­
rant occupation.

All employees:1
Experienced................... .................. . $1 an hour
Learners (less than 200 hours in oc­ 85 cents an hour____ ________
cupation) .3
Allowance for gratuities as part
of minimum wage: 35 cents an
hour, except 26 cents an hour
for learners.
On any day spread of hours exceeds 10. $1 in addition to wages payable.
Exception: Full-time students on (In lieu of providing and laun­
day school is in session.
dering or cleaning required
uniform, employer may pay 5
cents additional an hour or
$1.50 a week, whichever is
less.)
(Furnished meals may be con­
sidered part of remuneration
at rate of 15 cents an hour
through Dec. 31,1962. De­
ductions for lodging and, effec­
tive Jan. 1, 1963, for meals in
amounts specified in order.)
Women and minors:
Overtime_______
1J4 times the minimum wage
rate.

Includes any activity outside Philadelphia and
Pittsburgh connected with or incidental to the
preparation of or offering of food or beverage for
human consumption, either on the employer’s
premises or elsewhere by such services as, but
not limited to, catering, banquet, box lunch, or

Women and minors: *
Experienced—
Nonservice...........
Service..................

95 cents an hour (with meals, 80
cents).
65 cents an hour (with meals, 50
cents).

*•

Hours

40 a week.
Do.

Over 40 a week.2

42 a week.
Do.

pations, of Sept. 9, 1959,
which superseded Order
No. 3, Oct. 1, 1947.)

General Occupations, No.
6, Oct. 15, 1962.

See footnotes at end of table




curb service, whether such service or services
are operated as the principal business of the
employer or as a unit of another business,
whether they are offered to the public, to em­
ployees, to members or guests of members, or
to residents of colleges or universities. Excep­
tions: Domestic service in employer’s home;
services in a religious community or charitable
institution; activities in establishments where
food or lodging services are not available to the
public but are incidental to the care, instruc­
tion, or medical treatment of children, the sick
or infirm; activities in the operation of refresh­
ment stands in amusement places where food
and beverages are prepared or served with no
seats provided for customers; and hotels as de­
fined in minimum wage order No. 1-37; man­
agerial employees earning a guaranteed salary
of at least $60 a week; students employed in an
educational institution in which they are en­
rolled, or in a related nonprofit facility, such as
a fraternity, where the placement, wages, and
working conditions are controlled by the insti­
tution or the related nonprofit facility.
All employments and occupations. Exceptions:
Hotel Occupations; Laundry and Drycleaning
Occupations; Restaurant Occupations; Mer­
cantile Occupations; Motel and Miscellaneous
Lodging Occupations; employment exempt
from wage fixed in law; and candy stand at­
tendants in indoor theater lobbies who are
subject to Order No. 7.

Overtime—
Nonservice-----------------------------Service..........................................
Learners (less than 600 hours in the
occupation) .4
On any day spread of hours exceeds
10. Exception: Full-time students
on days school is in session.

All employees:
Experienced,
Learners (200 hours or less in occu­
pation) .3

$1.43 an hour (with meals, $1.28).
98 cents an hour (with meals,
83 cents).
25 percent less than the appli­
cable rates.
$1 in addition to wages otherwise
payable.
($5-a-week allowance for lodging
furnished.)
(In lieu of laundering required
uniforms, except those that are
made of materials that do not
require pressing, employer
may elect to pay 5 cents addi­
tional an hour or $1.50 for a
full workweek of 40 hours or
more, whichever is less.)

Over 42 a week.2
Do.2

$1.00 an hour.

Maximum hours for wom­
en, 10 a day, 48 a week;
for minors, 8 a day, 44 a
week.2
Do.*

85 cents an hour--------- ----------Allowance for gratuities as part
of minimum wage, 35 cents an
hour, except 26 cents an hour
for learners.
(In lieu of providing and laun­
dering or cleaning required
uniform, employer shall pay
an additional 5 cents an hour
or $1.50 for a full week of 40
hours or more, whichever is
less.)
(Deductions for board and lodg­
ing permitted in amounts
specified.)

*4
00

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
PUERTO RICO
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective June 14, 1960.
(Act 81 (L. 1960) amended
Act 96 (L. 1956), effective
June 26,1956, which re­
pealed Act 45 (L. 1919)
and Act 8 (L. 1941).)
Rates for agricultural
workers as provided by
Act 96 superseded by
Order Nos. 69 (Tobacco),
50 (Sugar), and 57 (Gen­
eral Agricultural
Activities).
Note: Analysis of rates and
coverage limited to work
or service not covered by
Federal Fair Labor
Standards Act, as amend­
ed. See Editor’s Note in
CONTENTS.

Occupation or industry covered

All employment. Exceptions: Domestic service
in a family residence, other than chauffeurs;
employment by the governments of the
United States, Puerto Rico (with the excep­
tion of those agencies or instrumentalities
which operate as private businesses or enter­
prises), the capital, or municipalities; mana­
gers, executives, and professionals. (See
Note in previous column.)

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

All employees:1 Sugar manufacturing; $1.00 an hour..
banking, insurance, and finance;
cement; shipping; drydock division
of the metal, machinery, transporta­
tion equipment, and allied indus­
tries; agent, broker, sales branch,
mail order, and petroleum bulk
station division of warehousing,
wholesaling, and other distribution
industry; fertilizer, hormones, anti­
biotics, and related products divi­
sion of the chemical, petroleum, and
related products industry; airline,
cable and radio-telephone, tourist
bureau, and ticket agency divisions
of communications, utilities, and
miscellaneous transportation indus­
tries; concrete pipe, glass and glass
products, and hot asphaltic plant
mix divisions of stone, glass, and
related products industry.
Work or service covered by a manda­ 25 percent above minimum
tory ordcr.3 Exceptions: Agricul­
wage required Jan. 1, 1956, up
ture, tobacco stemming, handmade
to maximum of $1.25 an hour.
homework of needlework industry,
work or service which by manda­
tory order has had increase of 25
percent or over after Jan. 1, 1955,
railroad passenger and freight
transportation.

Alcoholic Beverage and
Industrial Alcohol Indus­
try, No. 72, Feb. 4, 1965.
(Supersedes Alcoholic Bev­
erage and Industrial
Alcohol Industry, No. 64,
Mar. 22, 1963, and Alco­
holic Beverage Industry
for Local Commerce, No.
65, Feb. 2, 1962.)

The manufacture, including but not limited to
the distilling, rectifying, blending or bottling
of rum, gin, vodka, whisky, brandy, cordials,
liqueurs, wines, ale, beer, malt, malt beverages,
other alcoholic beverages, industrial alcohol,
acetone, antifreeze, related byproducts; and
the sales made by manufacturer of these
products as well as any work or service neces­
sary or related to these activities. Exception:
Bona fide traveling salesmen.

All employees:
Ale, beer, malt, and malt beverages- $1.25 an hour__
Overtime________________ ______ Double time_
_

Banking, Insurance, and
Finance Industry, No.
60, Feb. 3, 1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 60,
Jan. 8,1961, which super-

Includes all business, whether or nor for profit,
carried on by any banking, insurance, or other
financial institution or enterprise; any work
or service necessary or related to the above
activities. Exception: Credit union or savings

All employees:
Banks, savings and loan associations. $1.25 an hour..
Finance businesses except credit $1.25 an hour..
unions and agricultural credit
associations.




Rum and vodka________________ $1.25 an hour__
Other alcoholic beverages.................. 95 cents an hour.
Overtime____________ __________ Double time_
_

Hours

(2)

(2)

8 a day, 48 a week.
Over 8 a day, 48 a week;
work on day of rest.
<*>

(!)

m

and loan association organized to serve specific
groups of persons and not the general public.

eeded rates set by law,
June 26, 1956; partially
superseded by Miscella­
neous Activities Indus­
try, No. 70, Oct. 18,1964.)

Insurance.

$1.25 an hour.

(2)

93

Bread, Cracker, Bakery
Products, and Alimen­
tary Pastes Industry,
No. 28, July 17, 1963.
Supersedes Order No. 28,
June 25, 1957, revised
July 14, 1959, and June
13,1961, which super­
seded rates 3 of Order
No. 9 (amended), July
1945.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No. 9
are still in effect.
Editor’s Note: Order re­
vised effective Aug. 28
1965.

Includes but without limitation every act, proc­
ess, operation, work, or service that is neces­
sary or incidental or is related to the processing,
preparation, packing, transportation, distri­
bution, or sale (by manufacturer) of bread,
crackers, bakery products, and alimentary
pastes.

Chemical, Petroleum,
Rubber, and Related
Products Industry for
the Local Trade, No. 32,
June 20, 1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 32,
Oct. 25, 1957, revised
Oct. 13, 1959, and Feb.
13 and Apr. 12,1962.)

The manufacture or packaging of chemicals,
drugs, medicines, toilet preparations, cosmet­
ics. and related products; mining or other
extraction or processing of any mineral used in
the production of the foregoing; mining or other
extraction of petroleum, coal, or natural gases,
and the manufacture of products therefrom;
manufacture of all products made chiefly of
natural, synthetic, or reclaimed rubber or
latex; manufacture or partial manufacture of
footwear by vulcanizing the entire article or
by vulcanizing the sole to a nonleather upper;
the sales made by manufacturer of his prod­
ucts; and any work or service necessary to
above activities. Exceptions: Bona fide trav­
eling salesmen; activities covered by Federal
and specified wage orders; public utilities.

Bread—
Dough-brake-machine operator__
Bakery products—

Alimentary pastes—

Twice applicable minimum
wage rate.
All employees:
Industrial inorganic chemical prod­
ucts—
Sulphuric acid, ammonia, sulphate
of ammonia, and byproducts
thereof.
Sulphate of potash, muriatic acid,
and byproducts.
Tire retreading, recapping, and
revulcanizing.
Miscellaneous chemical products—
Paints, varnishes, and similar
products; herbicides.
Salt:

Over 8 a day, 48 a week.
(2)
(2)
(2)

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

<1

SO

Drugs, medicines, aromatic alcohol,
bay rum, bay oils, and toilet
preparations.
Distilling and/or bottling natural
spring water.
See footnotes at end of table.




J

mm
8 a day, 48 a week.

(2)

(2)

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
PUERTO RICO—Con.
Coffee Industry in its
Agricultural Phase, No.
58, Sept. 4, 1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 58,
Oct. 3, 1959, revised
Sept. 24, 1961, which
superseded rates 3 of
Order No. 19, Dec. 1954.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No. 19
are still in effect.
Commercial, Professional,
and.Personal Service
Industry, No. 39, Aug. 3,
1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 39,
Peb. 18, 1958, revised
May 22, 1960, and Apr.
3, 1962.)




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Includes the planting and replanting of coffee (in­
cluding preparation of the soil), its cultivation
and harvesting; removal of pulp from coffee
beans, and washing, drying, hulling, and pack­
ing of beans, whether these activities are car­
ried on at the farms or their dependencies; con­
ditioning of shade trees; and any work or
service necessary or related to the activities
mentioned.5

All employees:

Includes (a) commercial services rendered by
natural or artificial persons to enterprises,
entities, or private individuals, such as real
estate agency, brokerage, or management;
advertising, adjustment or collection, and em­
ployment agencies; records and tape recording;
mimeographie, stenographic, stenotypic, or
similar work; disinfection of buildings or
extermination of insects, rodents, or any
other pest; irrigation of weed killers, insecti­
cides, fertilizers or other matter in any form
by plane, motor vehicle, or any other analo­
gous means; making of blueprint copies; de­
signing or painting of posters and signs; rental
of coin-operated machines; transportation

Minimum wage rates

For works or services for local com­
merce, including those newly
covered by Fair Labor Standards
Act 1961 amendments:
All employees—
Commercial services:
Weedkilling, insecticide spray­
ing,
fertilizer
spreading,
spreading of other matter in
any form by plane; music
service to establishments; in­
dustrial, commercial, or agri­
cultural machinery rental.
Messenger service and garbage
collection; janitorial service.
Maintenance of gardens and
grounds.
Professional services:
Veterinary offices and labora­
tories, animal hospitals.
Commercial services—
Private detective and watching
agencies:

or consumer credit reporting agencies; private
detective, guard, or investigation services;
care of gardens and grounds; interior decora­
tion; rental of industrial, commerical, or agri­
cultural machinery; buying and selling or
leasing of real property; (b) professional serv­
ices rendered in offices, clinics, laboratories,
or studios of lawyers, notaries, physicians,
surgeons, dentists, optometrists, chiropractors,
chiropodists, veterinarians, engineers, archi­
tects, surveyors, chemists, accountants, audi­
tors, bookkeepers, psychologists, social
workers, economists, or business administra­
tors; nurse service agencies or centers; or ani­
mal hospitals; and (c) personal services
involving the care or appearance of the person
or his apparel or footwear, such as beauty
shops and schools; shoe repair shops; shoe-

72 cents an alinud (measure
equivalent to 2 decaliters or 20
liters).

Hours

8 a day, 48 a week.

Over 8 a day, 48 a week,
and on day of rest.

Other employees except messen­
gers, etc.
Messengers, janitors, and por­
ters.
Septic tank cleaning:
Wood preserving:
Craft masters and supervisors ..
O ther employees _ _
____
85 cents an hour....... ........ ...........

shine parlors; hat cleaning and blocking shops
or funeral services; alteration and garment
repair shops; adult or baby care centers ex­
cluding hospitals, infirmaries, and sanatoriums for patients; photographic studios and
shops engaged in binding, framing, lami­
nating, and restoring photographs or paint­
ings. Exceptions: Establishments covered by
another wage order.

CO

See footnotes at end of table.




Boat rental:
All employees except cleaners-_
Cleaning employees---------------Professional services—
Offices of engineers, architects,
and surveyors:
Draftsmen
Other employees except mes­
sengers, etc.
Messengers, janitors, and por­
ters.
Personal services—
Beauty shops and schools, scalp
massages:
Teachers______________ _____
Other employees except messen­
gers, etc.
Messengers, janitors, and por­
ters.
All employees, except messengers,
janitors, and porters—
Commercial services:
Advertising, credit reporting,
and collection agencies; real
estate and real estate appraiser
agencies; recording of an­
nouncements on records and
tape recorders; armored car
service.
Photostating service; interior
decoration service.
Extermination of insects and
other plagues.
Buying and selling or leasing of
real property.
Other commercial services
Professional services:
Accounting, business adminis­
tration, and research offices.
Law offices__________ _______
Offices of physicians, dentists,
optometrists, chiropractors,
and chiropodists; medical and
dental laboratories.
Other professional services------Personal services:
Funeral services
Photographic studios and cloth­
ing rental.
Homes for the care of the aged
and children.
Other personal services------------

$1.25 an hour.
$1.10 an hour.

$1.25 an hour.
$1.15 an hour.
$1.00 an hour.

$1.25 an hour_
_
95 cents an hour.
85 cents an hour.

$1.25 an hour.

$1.15 an hour___
$1.10 an hour___
$1.00 an hour___
$1.12 an hour---$1.25 an hour___
$1.20 an hour___
$1.15 an hour___

$1.05 an hour___
$1.15 an hour___
95 cents an hour.
75 cents an hour.
80 cents an hour.

00

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order
and effective date
PUERTO RICO—Con.
Commercial, Professional,
and Personal Service
Industry, No. 39, Aug. 3,
1964—Continued




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Messengers, janitors, and porters—
Commercial services:
Recording of announcements on
records and tape recorders;
armored car service.
Advertising, credit reporting,
and collection agencies.
Real estate and real estate ap­
praiser agencies; photostating
service.
Buying and selling or leasing of
real property.
Interior decoration service; ex­
termination of insects and
other plagues; other commer­
cial services.
Professional services:
Accounting, business adminis­
tration, and research offices.
Law offices; offices of physicians,
dentists, and optometrists;
medical and dental labora­
tories.
Offices of chiropractors and chi­
ropodists; other professional
services.
Personal services:
Funeral services
Photographic studios and cloth­
ing rental.
Homes for the care of the aged
and children.
Other personal services

Minimum wage rates

$1.15 an hour__
$1.10 an hour_
_
$1.05 an hour_
_
80 cents an hour.
$1.00 an hour_
_

$1.10 an hour_
_
$1.00 an hour_
_

90 cents an hour.
$1.00 an hour_
_
85 cents an hour.
65 cents an hour.
70 cents an hour.

Hours

*

Construction Industry,
No. 44, Dec. 4, 1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 44,
June 16,1958, revised
Sept. 6,1960, and May
21,1962, which super­
seded rates of Order No.
11 (amended), Mar.
1956.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No.
11 are still in effect.

Includes without limitation every act, process,
operation, work, or service necessary or inci­
dental or related to the designing, project,
fabrication, reconstruction, alteration, repair,
conservation, or maintenance of buildings,
works, or constructions; assembling, installa­
tion, or removal of any machinery, device, or
equipment at the site of the work, construc­
tion, or building, before or after termination;
and dismantling, wrecking, or demolition of
said work, construction, or building. Ex­
ceptions: Works, buildings, or constructions
on farms, for their own purely agricultural
purposes, as well as repair, alteration, conser­
vation, or maintenance of the same, when
made by force account; repair, conservation,
maintenance, dismantling, wrecking, or demo­
lition of works, constructions, or buildings
used or until recently being used or to be used
again by the same employer in relation to any
industry already covered by a wage order.

All employees (as defined):
Group A.......................... .
Groups B, C, D, E, and F.
Group G____ __________
Overtime______________

Dairy and Cattle Indus­
try, No. 27, Apr. 9, 1965.
(Supersedes rates of Order
No. 27, May 7, 1962.
Order No. 27 of July 2,
1957, previously revised
Apr. 9, 1960, superseded
rates 8 of Order No. 18
of Jan. 1,1951.)

Comprises in its agricultural phase the produc­
tion, handling, packing, bottling, or storage of
fresh milk; the breeding of bovine cattle for
the production of milk or meat; and, in its
industrial phase, the receipt, delivery, han­
dling, elaboration, pasteurization, homogeni­
zation, refrigeration, preparation, packing,
bottling, sale, disposal, and distribution of
milk or its products, such as cheese, butter,
or chocolate milk; any work or service neces­
sary or related to activities mentioned. Ex­
ceptions: Production of fresh milk for con­
sumption by farmer or his family; sale of milk
at any stand, place, or establishment, unless
owned by employer of industrial phase and
located where pasteurization plant operates.

All employees:
Agricultural phase—
Dairy farms:
Driver and arts and crafts
worker.
Tractor operator
Other employees
Cattle raising for meat production.
Industrial phase—
Pasteurization and homogeniza­
tion of milk.

See footnotes at end of table,




$1.50 an hour________
$1.25 an hour________
$1.10 an hour________
Twice the regular rate.

8 a day, 44 a week.
Do.
Do.
Over 8 a day, 44 a -week,
and on day of rest.

95 cents an hour____________

8 a day, 48 a week.

80 cents an hour.......................
47 cents an hour____________
45 cents an hour____________

Do.
Do.
Do.

95 cents an hour, except mini­
mum wage rate for driversalesman and assistant sales­
man are based on wage per
hour or piece rate (as shown
on order), whichever is
higher.
Elaboration of other milk products. 80 cents an hour____________
Overtime........ ..................................... Twice employee’s wage rate...

Do.

Do.
Over 8 a day, over 48 a
week, and on day of rest.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

00

State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

General Agricultural Ac­
tivities Industry, No. 57,
Aug. 20,1961.
(Supersedes Order No. 57,
Sept. 18, 1959, which su­
perseded rates set by
law, June 26, 1956.)




H

Canning, preserving (including freezing, drying,
dehydrating, curing, pickling, and similar proc­
esses), or any other manufacturing or proc­
essing, and the packaging in conjunction
therewith of foods; ice; ices, ice cream, and
similar frozen products; and refreshing bever­
ages; and including, but without limitation,
meat animals and meat animal products; poul­
try and poultry products; fish and seafoods
and fish and seafood products; fruits, vegeta­
bles, and their products; grains and grain
products; candy, confectionery, and related
products; miscellaneous foods and food prod­
ucts; handling, grading, packing, or preparing
in their raw or natural state of fresh vegetables,
fresh fruits, or nuts; any work or service neces­
sary or related to the activities mentioned;
and the sales made by any manufacturer of
the products manufactured. Exceptions: Pro­
duction of food and related products covered
by Fair Labor Standards Act; agriculture (as
defined) except citron brining on the farm;
traveling salesmen; and activities in the follow­
ing industries: sugar manufacturing; chemi­
cal, petroleum, rubber, and related products
for the local trade; alcoholic beverage and in­
dustrial alcohol; bread, crackers, bakery prod­
ucts, and alimentary pastes; and dairy and
cattle.

All employees:
Processing or packaging of lard; of
rice.

Comprises (a) cultivation and tillage of the soil;
(b) sowing, cultivation, and harvesting of any
farm or horticultural crop; (c) sowing, culti­
vation, and felling of lumber trees; (d) sowing,
cultivation, and production of flowers; (e)
raising of any kind of cattle, including swine,
goats, horses, sheep, or furbearing animals; (f)
aviculture and apiculture; (g) sowing, cultiva­
tion, and mowing of pastures; (h) growing of
any crop with aqueous solutions in gravel or
washed sand, without the use of soil; and any
work or service necessary or related to the ac­
tivities mentioned. Exceptions: Raising of
bovine cattle; agricultural activities related to
coffee, sugarcane, tobacco, and the production
of milk, currently covered by other mandatory
decrees.

PUERTO RICO—Con.
Food and Related Prod­
ucts Industry, No. 33,
June 3, 1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 33,
Nov. 16,1957, revised
Jan. 15, 1960, and Feb. 2,
1962, which superseded
rates3 of Order No. 23,
Feb. 1953, and partially
superseded rates of Order
No. 5, June 1944, and
Order No. 17, Sept. 1950.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order Nos. 17
and 23 are still in effect.

Class of employees covered

All employees:
PineappleDriver, tractor operator or opera­
tor of other agricultural ma­
chinery, arts and trades work­
er, and similar occupations:
Zone I®
Zone II«
All other wurkers:
Zone I®
Zone II6......................................
Aviculture
Floriculture
Minor crops, citron, and other agri­
cultural activities.

Minimum wage rates

$1.25 an hour
Following rates are for office
clerks, chauffeurs, and other
employees, respectively.
$1.15, $1.00, 85 cents an hour___

Hours

(2)

Ices, ice cream, and similar frozen
8 a day, 48 a week.
products.
Processing and canning of pineapple $1.15, $1.05, $1.00 an hour
and pineapple juice.
Carbonated waters and soft drinks.. $1.15, $1.00, 80 cents an hour.......
Do.
Overtime_______ _
Twice employee’s wage rate
Over 8 a day, 48 a week
and on day of rest.
Mixed feeds for cattle and poultry... $1.20, $1.10, 90 cents an hour...
(2)
Packaging of frozen fish; canning or $1.15, $1.05, 95 cents an hour...
(2)
bottling of olives, capers, and oils.
Chocolate and cocoa products; cof­ $1.15, $1.00, 80 cents an hour...
(2)
fee roasting.
Processing and canning of fruits, $1.15, 90 cents, and 75 cents an
(2)
fruit juices, and nectars (except
hour.
pineapple and pineapple juice)
and other products.
(2)
Candy and confectionery products; $1.15, $1.00, 75 cents an hour.......
popcorn.
(2)
Citron brining
$1.10, 85 cents, 81 cents an hour .
(2)
Banana ripening
$1.05, 80 cents, 70 cents an hour..
Ice plants
(2)
$1.00, 60 cents, 55 cents an hour_.
Other food products_____________ $1.15, 80 cents, 45 cents an hour..
(2)

50 cents an hour.
60 cents an hour.
42 cents an hour.
44 cents an hour.
42 cents an hour.
40 cents an hour.
30 cents an hour.

Hospital, Clinic, and Sana­
torium Industry, No. 41,
July 3,1965.
(Supersedes Order No. 41
of July 10,1958, revised
Dec. 18,1960 and Feb. 16,
1963, which superseded
rates 3 of Order No. 4,
July 1,1951.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No. 4
are still in effect.

Includes every hospital, clinic, sanatorium, and
similar establishment where medical care or
hospital services are provided for sick persons;
every independent employer (not operat­
ing said establishments) providing ambulance
services or services such as the administration
of oxygen, anesthesia, or serum to a person or
the care and attendance of sick persons; in­
cludes any work or service necessary or related
to the above activities. Exceptions: Hos­
pitals, clinics, or sanatorium^ operated by the
Federal Government, the state government,
the government of the capital, the munici­
pal governments, and charitable institutions;
student nurses in schools accredited by the
government.

All employees:
Medical technologists; laboratory
technicians.
Registered nurses...............................
X-ray technicians.._____ ________
Laboratory assistants.......................
Practical nurses; ward attendants
for mental patients.
Hospital attendants in nursing
services.
Arts and crafts employees: skilled
and semiskilled.
Drivers------------ ------ ----------------Office clerks.......................... .............
Cooks....... .............................. ......... .
All other. ............................................
Overtime...................................... ......

Hotel Industry, No. 46,
Feb. 7, 1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 46,
Aug. 5, 1958, revised
Jan. 1,1961, which super­
seded rates 3 of Order
No. 22, Sept. 1,1952.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No.
22 are still in effect.

Every establishment open to the public wholly
or partially engaged in furnishing, for or with­
out profit, lodging or room, with or without
board, to permanent or transient guests; activ­
ities operated jointly or in connection with
the hotel industry by hotel or independent
employers, such as gambling houses, ball­
rooms, bathing beaches, swimming pools, ten­
nis courts, golf links, barbershops, bars,
restaurants, soda fountains, and any work or
service necessary or related to the above activ­
ities. Exceptions: Establishments with 5 or
less rooms accommodating not more than 8
guests; establishments not open to public,
furnishing lodging or rooms for educational,
religious, or medical help and to students;
beauty parlors and retail stores operated in
hotels; services a laundry and drycleaning
plant renders hotel industry.

All employees:
Hotels with casino or gambling
hall—
Arts and crafts workers
Waiters, bartenders, and bellboys.
All other employees_________
All other hotels—
Arts and crafts workers..........
Waiters, bartenders, and bellboys.
All other employees__________

Every act, process, operation, service, or work
performed in relation to washing, cleaning,
starching, pressing, and dyeing of clothes or
fabrics of any kind whatsoever; includes, but
without limitation, the fixing, preparation,
wrapping, collection, delivery, return, trans­
portation, and distribution of said clothes or
fabrics.

All employees:
Drivers............................................... .
All other employees.......................... .
Piece rates 8—
Hand washing:
Woolen and linen suits, wom­
en's dresses.
Shirts and small items............... .
Hand ironing:
Women’s dresses...................... .
Woolen or linen suits...................
Shirts
Small items_______ _________
Powerpressing (woolen or linen
suits).
Overtime.............................................

Laundry and Drycleaning
Industry, No. 37, Jan. 6,
1965.
(Supersedes rates of Order
No. 37, June 18,1962.
Order No. 37 of Jan. 18,
1958, previously revised
May 1, 1960, superseded
rates 8 of Order No. 13 of
July 1947.)

CO

See footnotes at end of table.




Overtime........... ......... ......... .........

$1.15 an hour

8 a day, 48 a week.

$1.10 an hour_____ __________
95 cents an hour
90 cents an hour
73 cents an hour

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

66 cents an hour

Do.

$1.00 and 78 cents an hour,
respectively.
$1.00 an hour.................... ..........
80 cents an hour
75 cents an hour---- ------ -------63 cents an hour
Twice employee’s wage rate___

$1.25 and $1.10 an hour
67 cents and 65 cents an hour...
873^ cents and 80 cents an hour.
$1.20 and $1.00 an hour
65 cents and 56 cents an hour_
_
74 cents and 60 cents an hour__
Rates specified are for Zones I
and II,7 respectively.
Twice employee’s regular rate...

85 cents an hour....... ..................
66 cents an hour

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Over 8 a day, 48 a week,
and on day of rest.

8 a day, 48 a week.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Over 8 a day, 48 a week,
and on day of rest.

8 a day, 48 a week.
Do.

9 cents per piece.........................

Do.

7 cents per piece.........................

Do.

22 cents per piece....... ................
18 cents per piece........................
8 cents per piece____ ________
6 cents per piece..........................
10 cents per piece_______ ____

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Twice the employee’s wage rate.

Over 8 a day, over 48 a
week, and on day of rest.

03

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

ON
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

PUERTO RICO—Con.
Lumber and Wood Prod­
ucts; Metal Furniture,
Doors, and Windows
Industry for the Local
Trade, No. 25, May 9,
1964.
(Supersedes Order No. 25,
May 19, 1957, revised
Jan. 26, 1960, and Dec. 5,
1961, which superseded
rates3 of Order No. 14,
Sept. 1948.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No. 14
are still in effect.




Includes sawmills, planing and plywood mills;
the manufacture of every product made
wholly or chiefly from wood, osier, bamboo,
rattan, excelsior, cork, maguey, straw, hair,
raffia, henequen, palm leaves, rushes,
bristles, grass, feathers, and similar materials;
the manufacture of specified products made
wholly or chiefly from metal; the processes of
design, assembly, alteration, and repair related
to or connected with the above manufacturing
activities; any work or service necessary or re­
lated to activities mentioned. Exceptions:
Activities covered by Federal and any other
specified wage orders.

Class of employees covered

All employees.

Wood doors and windows
Metal furniture____ _____________
Spring mattresses and bedsprings___
Wire beds
Wood furniture__________________
Kitchen cabinets................................
Other wood products

Minimum wage rates

Following hourly rates in 7 clas­ 8 a day, 48 a week.
sifications are for crafts
masters and supervisors,
office clerks, skilled workers,
and other employees, respec­
tively.
$1.25, $1.13, $1.13, 88 cents
Do.
$1.25, $1.25, $1.05, 90 cents
Do.
$1.25, $1.25, $1.10, $1.00
Do.
$1.25, $1.00, 90 cents, 75 cents
Do.
$1.25, $1.15, $1.10, 88 cents...........
Do.
$1.25, $1.25, $1.15, 98 cents
Do.
$1.25, $1.15, $1.00, 85 cents.........
Do.
Following hourly rates in 4 clas­
sifications are for crafts
masters and supervisors, office
clerks, and other employees,
respectively.
$1.25, $1.20, $1.20........... ..............
Do.
$1.25, $1.15, $1.00................ ..........
Do.

Billiard tables
Metal awnings___ _______________
Straw, hair, and similar material
products—
Brooms..................... ...................... $1.25, $1.15, 75 cents...... ...........
Other straw, hair, and similar $1.25, $1.15, 72 cents.................
products.
Following hourly rates are for
office clerks and other em­
ployees, respectively.
Metal doors, windows, and screens.
$1.25, $1.18................ .............. .
Overtime............................................. Twice employee’s wage rate...

4

Hours

Do.
Over 8 a day, 48 a week.

Metal, Machinery, Trans­
portation Equipment,
Electrical Products, In­
struments, and Related
Products for the Local
Trade and the Motor Ve­
hicle and Electric Ap­
pliance Repair, and
Other Service Industry,
No. 71, Feb. 3, 1965.
(Supersedes Metal, Machin­
ery, Transportation
Equipment, Electrical
Products, Instruments,
and Related Products In­
dustry for the Local
Trade, No. 45, Oct. 28,
1962, and Motor Vehicle
and Electric Appliance
Repair and Other Service
Industry, No. 40, July 29,
1962.)
(Order No. 45 of July 6,1958,
previously revised Oct.
14, 1960, superseded Elec­
trical Instruments and
Related Products Indus­
try, No. 29, Sept. 10,1957.
Order No. 40 of Mar. 2,
1958, previously revised
May 26, 1960.)

The mining or any other extraction of ore and
the further processing of such ore into metal;
the manufacture of any product or part made
chiefly of metal; and the manufacture with any
material of machinery, tools, transportation
equipment, and ordnance; the manufacture
and assembly of machinery, apparatus,
equipment, and supplies for the generation,
storage, transmission, transformation, and
utilization of electric energy; manufacture and
assembly of instruments, lenses, apparatus,
and equipment for scientific, professional, in­
dustrial measurement, photographic, oph­
thalmic, musical, and horological, purposes.
The repair (including painting) of motor ve­
hicles of any kind, such as automobiles, air­
planes, trucks, tractors, motorboats, and
motorcycles; motors, radios, television sets,
jukeboxes, batteries, refrigerators, and other
electric appliances; cash registers, scales, type­
writers, adding or calculating machines, sew­
ing machines, and stoves; bicycles, firearms,
and photographic cameras; clocks, watches,
and jewelry; repair or upholstering of furniture;
storage and custody of motor vehicles in
garages, parking lots, or premises used for such
purposes; and the saddlery, tinsmith, lock­
smith, and blacksmith services; any work or
service necessary or related to activities
mentioned above. Exceptions: Production
and further processing of any basic material
other than metal, except when manufactured,
by an establishment producing from such
basic materials a product of this industry or
the subassembly of such products; manufac­
ture of ophthalmic frames other than metal;
activities covered by Orders Nos. 25, 51, 52,
and 67; work or service covered by the Federal
Fair Labor Standards Act, except local trade
activities brought under coverage by 1961
amendments. Retreading, recapping, and
vulcanizing of tires and tubes; such repair
services not available to the public in general
which are covered by another mandatory or by
a Federal wage order.

All employees:
Metal, machinery, transportation
equipment, and related prod­
ucts—
Gate, fence and grating:

CO

See footnotes at end of table.




00

(2)
(2)
(2)

Metal casket:

(2)
(2)

(2)

Electrical, instrument, and related
products—
General:

(2)
(2)

Shaver, storage battery, drafting
machine, electric terminal and
connector, television antenna
and lead-in cable.
Radio and television component;
resistance type household ap­
pliance; lens.
Motor vehicle and electric appliances
repair and other services—
Repair services:
Agricultural or industrial ma­
chinery repair shops; black­
smith shops.
Electric appliance, typewriter,
adding or calculating ma­
chine repair shops—
Furniture; clock, watch, jew­
elry; and miscellaneous re­
pair shops—
Motor vehicle repair shops;
saddleries; tinsmith shops;
paint shops—
Motor vehicle storage, custody or
parking services.

•<1

(2)

(2)

(2)

(2)

0

0
0
0

0
0

0
0

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
PUERTO RICO—Con.
Needlework Products, Pil­
low, and Mattress Manu­
facturing Industry for
the Local Trade, No. 35,
May 8, 1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 35,
Dec. 12, 1957, revised
Dec. 27, 1960, which
superseded rates 3 of
Order No. 21, Jan. 1953.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No. 21
are still in effect.
Editor’s Note: Order
revised effective Aug. 12,
1965.

Restaurant, Bar, and Soda
Fountain Industry, No.
47, May 25, 1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 47,
Aug. 28, 1958, revised
Mar. 2, 1961, which
superseded rates 3 of
Order 6 (amended), Jan.
1, 1955.)
Editor’s Note: Order
revised effective Oct 13,
1965.




Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Every work or service, including homework,
necessary or related to the manufacture (and
transportation, distribution, and sale carried
out by the manufacturer) of pillows; cushions;
mattresses without springs; apparel; apparel
furnishings and accessories; any other product
made by sewing, knitting, embroidery, or
crocheting processes, or made by similar proc­
esses, from cloth or any other material; and

All employees:
In factory or shop—
Canvas awnings, other products
of canvas or other similar ma­
terials.
Men’s and boys’ clothing and re­
lated products:
Suits, coats, and similar items...

brought under coverage of the Fair Labor
Standards Act in 1961. Exceptions: Traveling
salesmen; articles manufactured from leather
or skin or imitation thereof, and those pri­
marily made from felt, straw, maguey, or raf­
fia; hosiery, hair nets, jewelry, buttons, buck­
les, flowers, rugs, and mattresses with springs;
work or services covered by Federal Fair Labor
Standards Act as it read prior to the 1961
amendment.

Minimum wage rates

8 a day, 44 a week.

Do.
Do.
Do.

all other.
Children’s clothing and related
products.
Women’s, men’s, boys’, children’s,
and infants’ underwear, and
similar or related products,
whether or not manufactured
from knitted fabrics.

Do.
Do.

Do.
Do.

Women’s dresses and related prod­
ucts.
Mattresses without springs, quilts,
pillow's, and related products.

Do.
Twice the employee’s regular
rate.

Every establishment open to the public where
foods, coffee, alcoholic beverages, soft drinks,
ices, and sweets or any of said articles are
served or sold, with or without profit; any
establishment which, without being open to
the public, serves or sells to its members and
guests, with or without profit, any of the fore­
going articles; any work or service necessary or
related to above activities. Exceptions: Es-

All employees:
Zone III a

Hours

Do.
Over 8 a day, 44 a week,
and on day of rest.

8 a day, 48 a week.
Do.
Do.
Twice employee’s regular rate... Over 8 a day, 48 a week
and on day of rest.

.t

4

Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No. 6
are still in effect.

Retail Trade Industry, No.
42, Jan. 14,1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 42,
May 10, 1958, revised
Nov. 5, 1960, and Feb. 23,
1961, which superseded
rates 3 of Order No. 8
(amended), Aug. 1955.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No. 8
are still in effect.

See footnotes at end of table.




tablishments exclusively devoted to educa­
tional, religious, or medical purposes that
operate on force account any of the activities of
the industry; activities comprised in the hotel
industry as recently defined by the Minimum
Wage Board; private homes engaged in pro­
viding meals to private residences or having
not more than 10 guests for board.
Comprises but not as a limitation every act, proc­ All employees:
ess, operation, work, or service necessary, in­
Supermarkets—
cidental, or related to the sale or transfer to
Butchers
consumers, with or without profit, of any kind
Messengers and/or cleanup men
of merchandise or goods, carried out at any es­
and baggers.
tablishment or place; also comprises estab­
All other employees
lishments engaged in retail and wholesale
trade using not more than two employees part
Motor vehicles and agricultural and
of the time in wholesale activities and estab­
industrial machinery.
lishments engaged in retail trade that were
Gasoline service stations....................
brought under coverage of the 1961 amend­
ments to the Federal Fair Labor Standards
Building material and hardware
Act. Exception-s: Soda fountains, restaurants,
stores.
bars, hotels; traveling salesmen.10
General dry goods, apparel and ac­
cessories.
Department stores..............................

$1.25, $1.10, $1.00 an hour_____
67 cents, 60 cents, 55 cents an
hour.
75 cents, 65 cents, 60 cents an
hour.
$1.15, $1.05, 95 cents an hour......

62 cents, 55 cents, 50 cents an
hour.
75 cents, 65 cents, 60 cents an
hour.
65 cents, 60 cents, 55 cents an
hour.
70 cents, 65 cents, 60 cents an
hour.
Variety and/or discount stores
80 cents, 75 cents, 70 cents an
hour.
Furniture and household articles___ 65 cents, 60 cents, 55 cents an
hour.
Grocery stores—
Messengers and/or cleanup men.__ 55 cents, 50 cents, 45 cents an
hour.
All other employees
60 cents, 55 cents, 50 cents an
hour.
Other retail trade—
Messengers and/or cleanup men.__ 60 cents, 55 cents, 50 cents an
hour.
All other employees......................... 65 cents, 60 cents, 55 cents an
hour.
Specified rates are for Zones I, II,
and III,11 respectively.
Overtime.
Twice employee’s regular wage
rate.

8 a day, 48 a week.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Over 8 a day, 48 a week,
and on day of rest.

©

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

PUERTO RICO—Con.
Stone, Clay, Glass, Ce­
ment, and Related Prod­
ucts Industry, No. 67,
June 19, 1965.
(Supersedes rates of Stone,
Clay, Glass, Cement, and
Related Products Indus­
try, No. 67, Sept. 28,1962,
which superseded rates
of Clay and Clay Prod­
ucts Industry in the
Local Trade, No. 43,
June 13,1958, as amended
by Order No. 61, Feb. 2,
1961, and of Stone, Glass,
and Related Products
Industry, No. 36, May
21, 1960.)
(Order No. 36 of May 21,
1960, superseded Order
No. 36, Dec. 15, 1957,
which superseded rates3
of Order No. 15 of Nov.
1948.)




Mining, quarrying, or other extraction and the
further processing of any mineral (other than
metal ores, chemical and fertilizing minerals,
coal, petroleum, or natural gases); includes the
manufacture of products from such minerals,
as defined; any work or service necessary or re­
lated to activities mentioned. Exceptions:
Specified occupations and industries; work or
service covered by Federal Fair Labor Stand­
ards Act.

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

All employees:
ClayClay blocks:

Handmade art pottery products. -.
Vitreous and semi vitreous

Stone, glass, cement, and related
products—

Stone, sand, gravel, and similar
products quarries:
Heavy machinery operator, me­
chanic, and driver.

Mirror and glass products except
containers.
Asbestos and cement products___
Other stone and cement products-Mica 85 cents an hour.......... ............

4

Hours

8 a day, 44 a week.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Over 8 a day, 44 a week.

Sugar Industry in Its Agri­
cultural Phase, No. 60,
Jan. 17, 1962.12
(Supersedes Order No. 50,
June 19, 1959.)

Theater and Motion Pic­
ture Industry, No. 48
Oct. 12, 1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 48
of Sept. 12,1958, revised
Apr. 30, 1961, which su­
perseded rates 3 of Order
No. 7 (amended) Nov.
16, 1953.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No. 7
are still in effect.

Comprises the preparation of the land; the plant­
ing, cultivating, and harvesting of sugarcane,
its transportation when performed by farmeremployer by force account; any work or service
necessary or related to the above activities.
Exceptions: Cane transportation activities
covered by specified Federal wage orders.

Every establishment or place where, for profit,
motion pictures are exhibited or shown or art
productions are presented by actors, musicians,
or singers; any work or service necessary or re­
lated to the above activities.

All employees:
Principal operators of mechanical
loaders, harvesters, and sowers.
Carpenters, masons, mechanics,
painters, electricians, and other
arts and trades workers.
Operators of mechanical equipment.
Arts and trades helpers
Cartmen in harvest work, portable
track handlers, railroad or port­
able track car loaders, wagon
drivers and conductors.
Cane dumpers or loaders of cane
carts, trucks, or other vehicles.
Plow steermen and operators of irri­
gation pumps, cane sowers, work
connected with mixing and apply­
ing chemical weed killers and
fixers, sugarcane seed spreaders,
cutters and arrangers in furrows,
sugarcane cutters (for grinding
or planting), seed cutters, crane
operators, cane pilers.
Ditchdiggers, ditch cleaners, and
water irrigators.
Cartmen in cultivation work
Other employees______ _________
All employees:
Motion picture projectionists and
managers—
First-class theaters 12
Second-class theaters 13
Third-class theaters 13
Electricians, plumbers, drivers,
painters, and other arts and crafts
employees.
Assistant motion picture projec­
tionists, assistant managers,
ticket takers, box office cashiers,
porters, and other employees—
First-class theaters *3
Second-class theaters 13...................
Third-class theaters 13____ ______

Overtime.
See footnotes at end of table.




$6.40 a day.

First 8 in 24.2

$5.29 a day.

Do.*

$5.00 a day.
$4.09 a day.
$3.40 a day.

Do.2
Do.2
Do.2

$3.29 a day.

Do.2

$3.19 a day.

Do.2

$3.19 a day.

First 7 in 24.2

$2.93 a day.
$2.92 a day.

First 8 in 24.2
Do.2

$1.25 and $1.15 an hour_
_
$1.10 and 95 cents an hour.
$1.00 and 90 cents an hour.
$1.00 and 90 cents an hour.

8 a day, 40 a week.
Do.
Do.
Do.

75 and 65 cents an hour...............
70 and 60 cents an hour
65 and 55 cents an hour.............
Specified rates are for Zone I
(capital of Puerto Rico) and
Zone II (remainder of Puerto
Rico), respectively.
Twice employee’s regular wage
rate.

Do.
Do.
Do.

Over 8 a day, 40 a week,
and on day of rest.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued

VO

li
Occupation or industry covered

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
PUERTO RICO—Con.
Tobacco and Food Crops
Industry, No. 69, Jan. 27,
1964.
(Supersedes Tobacco In­
dustry in Its Agricul­
tural Phase Order No.
49, Oct. 2, 1958, revised
June 30,1961, which
superseded rates set by
law June 26, 1956.)

Minimum wage rates

The preparation of land, planting, transplanting, All employees:
Tobacco in its industria phase for 50 cents an hour................... ......
cultivating, harvesting, sewing, drying, packlocal trade.
ing, preparation, and delivery of tobacco in
nonprocessed state; the processing of leaf
Food crops—
tobacco, including but without limitation the
Other food crops
..... ........ ........ 35 cents an hour----- ------- ------receipt, weighing, bulking, grading, sorting,
Tobacco in its agricultural phase—
fermenting, stemming, chopping, packing,
Tobacco stringing by hand......... . One-tenth of a cent per lath, not
storing, drying, and any operation related to
to exceed 20 pairs. For each
the handling of leaf tobacco prior to its use in
5 pairs of leaves or fraction
the manufacture of cigars, little cigars, ciga­
over the first 20 pairs, an
rettes, snuff, chewing tobacco, cut tobacco,
additional one-fourth of a
and other similar products; the manufacture
cent.
of cigars, little cigars, cigarettes, snuff, chew­
ing tobacco, cut tobacco, and other similar
products; the preparation of land, planting,
cultivating, transplanting, harvesting, storing,
packing, and preparation of grains, vegetables,
cereals, and farinaceous products for market
in nonprocessed state and their delivery by the
farmers to the warehouse or market or to
carriers to be transported to the marketplace;
any work or service necessary or related to the
above activities. Exceptions: Activities
covered by the Federal Fair Labor Standards
Act as it read prior to the approval of Public
Law 87-30.
Comprises, but without limitation, every act,
process, operation, work, or service necessary,
incidental, or related to transportation or con­
veyance of persons or things, from one place to
another, in Puerto Rico, by water, air, and
land in any kind of motor vehicle including
those run by rails. Exceptions: Transporta-

Transportation Industry,
No. 38, May 29,1965.
(Supersedes Transportation
Industry, No. 38, Sept.
23,1962, which previously
superseded rates of Aug.
16, 1960. Order No. 38,




Class of employees covered

4

Hours

«

m
m

(2)

All employees:
Motor carrier transport not covered
by FLSA prior to 1961 amend­
ment—
Drivers, skilled workers, and $1.25 an hour................... ............. 8 a day, 48 a week.
office clerks.
Do.
Other workers.................. .............. $1.05 an hour________ _______

«

V
tion carried on by any employer in vehicles of
his property and on his own account for pur­
poses of, or in relation to, his industry if
another mandatory or Federal order is ap­
plicable; transportation activities carried on
by water and air covered by the Fair Labor
Standards Act as it read prior to the amend­
ments of 1961.

Jan. 6,1958, superseded
rates 3 of Order No. 12
(amended) of Feb. 1948.)

Public service automobile—
Passenger automobile line:
Drivers........... .................
Skilled workers.
Office clerks_
_
Other workers..
Taxicab:
Drivers.............

80 cents an hour or 30 percent
of gross income of workday,
whichever is higher.
$1.10 an hour______________
$1.00 an hour______________
75 cents an hour---------- ------ -

85 cents an hour or 30 percent
of gross income of workday,
whichever is higher.
Skilled workers______________ $1.25 an hour______________
Office clerks---------- ---------- ----- $1.00 an hour______________
75 cents an hour................
Other workers
Bus enterprise:
Zone 114__________________ - $1.25 an hour..____ _______
Zone II44—
Drivers............. ............ .......... 75 cents an hour......................
Skilled workers....................... $1.00 an hour___ __________
70 cents an hour--------- ------Other workers
Private service automobile drivers.. $1.00 an hour______________
Motor vehicle rental enterprise—
Tour and sightseeing enterprise:
Drivers, skilled workers, and $1.20 an hour________
office clerks.
Other workers----------------------- $1.15 an hour___ ____
Motor vehicle rental, without $1.25 an hour________
drivers.
Limousine enterprise-------------------- $1.15 an hour___ ____
Other transportation enterprise—
Skilled workers and office clerks. _. $1.25 an hour..............
Other workers.................................. $1.00 an hour________
Overtime--------------------- ---------— Twice the regular rate.
V/2 times wage rate.
Wholesaling and Ware­
housing Industry, No.
68, June 16, 1963.
(Supersedes Order No. 34,
Oct. 30, 1957, revised
Nov. 13, 1959, and Oct.
5,1961, which super­
seded rates 3 of Order
No. 16, Oct. 1949.)
Note: Working conditions
specified in Order No. 16
are still in effect.

vO

Includes but without limitation the whole­
saling, warehousing, and other distribution
activities of jobbers, importers and exporters,
manufacturers' sales branches and offices
established for wholesale distribution of their
products, industrial distributors, mail order
establishments, brokers and agents, and public
warehouses, and any work or service neces­
sary or related to these activities. Exceptions:
Bona fide traveling salesmen; industrial
wholesaling and warehousing of products
manufactured in Puerto Rico; other specified
occupations and industries.

See footnotes at end of table.




All employees.
Overtime........

$1.25 an hour--------Twice the wage rate.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
During 9th hour and on
day of rest.
Over 9 a day.
8 a day, 44 a week.
Over 8 a day, 44 a week,
and on day of rest.

VO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
PUERTO RICO—Con.
Miscellaneous Activities
Industry, No. 70, Oct.
29,1964, as amended
Mar. 15,1965.
(Supersedes Paper, Paper
Products, Printing and
Publishing Industry for
the Local Trade, No. 31,
Apr. 5, 1962, and Plastic
Products Industry, No.
26, Aug. 3, 1957, and
partially supersedes
Banking, Insurance, and
Finance Industry, No.
60, Feb. 3, 1963.)
"“Indicates rates effective
Mar. 15, 1965.




Occupation or industry covered

Includes the activities necessary or incidental
to the support, operation, or functioning of
centers, enterprises, establishments, or organi­
zations, whether operated for profit or non­
profit purposes (see class of employees covered
for covered activities.) Exceptions: Religious
personnel invested with ecclesiastical power
engaged in teaching or in other religious or
charitable activities.

Class of employees covered

employees:
L Recreation or amusement serv­
ices—
Motion picture production and
distribution.
Activities related to the racing
sport:
Race tracks____________
Horse racing agencies__

Minimum wage rates

$1.25 an hour________ _

95 cents an hour, Zone I; is
85 cents an hour, Zone II. is
Racing stables—
Horse trainers..........
Exercise boys..............
Grooms......... ..........
Watchmen............
Groom helpers________
65 cents an hour _
Stall boys and other employees... 62 cents an hour*____
Horse farms______
Sports clubs:
Yacht and boat clubs........ ...... $1.00 an hour, Zone I; is 65
cents an hour, Zone II. n
Other sports clubs—
Drivers_____ ....
Other employees___
Other recreation or amusement
services:
Cockpits_____________
Truck drivers___ _
Other employees _.
. Educational or learning serv­
ices—
Universities:
Teachers___________
Office clerks__________
Arts and crafts employees_
_
Truck drivers................
Other drivers__
Kitchen, dining room, and cafe- 62 cents an hour____
teria employees.
Messengers and janitors... .
Other employees___ .
70 cents an hour______

*

Hours

4

Schools and academies:
Teachers..------------ --------------Office clerks_________ _____—
Arts and crafts employees
Truck drivers_____________
Other drivers----- ------------------Kitchen, dining room, and cafe­
teria employees.
Other employees-------------------Automobile driving schools:
Heavy motor vehicle instructor
Light motor vehicle instructor.
Other employees..........................
Aviation schools-------------------Other schools:
Instructors. ----- -----------------Other employees-------------------C. Social, fraternal, cultural, reli­
gious, sport, or similar organi­
zations—
Professional, industrial, business
agricultural, and trade or­
ganizations:
Office clerks
Truck drivers-----------------------Other drivers----- ------------------Arts and crafts employees-------Other employees-------------------Lodges, civic, charitable, cultural,
and similar associations:
Charitable institutions—
Charitable hospitals:
Registered female or male
nurses.
Office clerks
Practical female or male
nurses and ward attend­
ants.
Arts and crafts employees—
Skilled
Semiskilled.................. .
Drivers
X-ray and laboratory tech­
nicians or medical tech­
nologists.
Other employees
Other charitable institu­
tions.
V©

See footnotes at end of table.

ca



$1.20 an hour___
95 cents an hour.
$1.05 an hour_
_
$1.05 an hour___
85 cents an hour.
67 cents an hour.
75 cents an hour.
$1.25 an hour---$1.15 an hour_
_
60 cents an hour.
$1.25 an hour_
_
$1.25 an hour_
_
75 cents an hour.

$1.15 an hour_
_
$1.05 an hour___
85 cents an hour.
$1.00 an hour___
85 cents an hour.

$1.05 an hour*_
_
70 cents an hour*.
65 cents an hour*.

$1.00 an hour*_
_
70 cents an hour*.
80 cents an hour*.
85 cents an hour*.
60 cents an hour*.
35 cents an hour*.

VO
Cn

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

PUERTO RICO—Con.
Miscellanous Activities
Industry, No. 70, Oct.
29, 1964, as amended
Mar. 15,1965—Continued




Class of employees covered

Lodges, civic, cultural, and simi­
lar associations—
Office clerks
Truck drivers„
Other drivers____ _________
Arts and crafts employees
Dining room, kitchen, and
cafeteria employees.
Messengers and janitors
Other employees
Casinos, social clubs, and other
similar clubs:
Office clerks
Kitchen, dining room, and bar
employees; messengers and
janitors.
Other employees...... ................
Sororities and fraternities:
Office clerks
Kitchen, dining room, and bar
employees.
Other employees
Religious associations and insti­
tutions:
Lay employees—
Office clerks
Arts and crafts employees
Kitchen, dining room, and
cafeteria employees.
Messengers and janitors
Other employees
Labor unions, welfare funds, and
other similar associations:
Truck drivers
Other drivers
Messengers and janitors
Other employees
Athletic associations, ball clubs, or
other similar clubs:
Office clerks____________ _____
Other employees
Political parties and other similar
associations.
|

4

Minimum wage rates

85 cents an hour*.
$1.05 an hour*_
_
85 cents an hour*.
$1.15 an hour*_
_
63 cents an hour*.
65 cents an hour*.
80 cents an hour*.
$1.15 an hour___
65 cents an hour..
60 cents an hour..
$1.10 an hour___
63 cents an hour..
55 cents an hour..

80 cents an hour*.
$1.10 an hour*_
_
45 cents an hour*.
60 cents an hour*.
75 cents an hour*.
$1.05 an hour___
85 cents an hour.
70 cents an hour.
$1.00 an hour___
$1.25 an hour___
$1.15 an hour___
90 cents an hour.

Hours

*

Art galleries or establishments,
museums, libraries, botanical
gardens, zoological parks, and
similar establishments.
D. Paper, paper products, printing
and publishing for the local
trade—
Newspapers, periodicals, photo­
engraving, paper, and card­
board.
Wood, rag, bagasse, and other
fibers pulp.
Paper bags and paper boxes
Printing and lithography
Piling cards, indexes, decalcoinania transfers, posters, prod­
ucts made by the silk screen
process, alphabet letters and
folders, and paper for sanitary
use.
General classification
E. Plastic products for the local
trade—
Sprayers and vaporizers
Dinnerware
Phonograph records
Wall tile; flexible plastic films;
plastic footwear; general classi­
fication.
F. Credit unions and agricultural
credit institutions—
Agricultural credit institutions___
Credit unions_________________
See footnotes at end of table.

VO




$1.20 an hour.

$1.25 an hour*.
$1.15 an hour*.
$1.10 an hour..
$1,125 an hour.
$1.15 an hour..

80 cents an hour.
$1.15 an hour___
$1.10 an hour___
$1.00 an hour___
80 cents an hour.

$1.25 an hour.
$1.05 an hour.

O
CO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

RHODE ISLAND:
Wage fixed in law Sept. 3,
1962.1 Rates effective
Sept. 3, 1963.3
Ch. 135 (L. 1963), amend­
ing Title 28, Ch. 12,
Gen. Laws 1956. Pre­
viously amended by Ch.
105 (L. 1962) and Ch.
3957 (L. 1957).
(Supersedes rates effective
Sept. 3, 1962.)

Laundry and Drycleansing
Occupations. Rate ef­
fective Sept. 3, 1963.5
Administrative Regula­
tions.
(Supersedes rates effective
Sept. 3, 1962, which
superseded rates of Oct.
1, 1957, and partially
superseded Order No.
3-R, June 1, 1951.)




4

Class of employees covered

Any occupation, service, trade, business, indus­ All employees 2.
try, or branch or group of industries, or em­
ployment or class of employment. Exceptions:
Agriculture; domestic service in or about a Except employees in religious, chari­
private home; employees of the United States;
table, literary, educational, non­
educational, charitable, religious, or nonprofit
profit hospital organization or corpo­
organizations where the employer-employee
ration, or other nonprofit association
relationship does not, in fact, exist, or where
or corporation, where employer-em­
the services rendered are on a voluntary basis;
ployee relationship exists.
newsboys on home delivery, shoeshine boys in
shoeshine establishments, caddies on golf
courses, pinboys in bowling alleys, ushers in
theaters; traveling and outside salesmen; indi­
viduals in the employ of a son, daughter, or
spouse; employees under 21 years in the em­
ploy of a father or mother; resort establish­
ments between May 1 and October 1 which
regularly serve meals to the general public and
are open not more than 6 months a year; school
or college students employed on a part-time
basis (not over 22 hours a week) .5
Laundry occupations include any activity concerned with the washing, ironing, or processing
incidental thereto of any kind of fabric or
laundry wares; the collection, distribution, or
sale of laundry service; the producing or ren­
dering of such activity or service by the em­
ployer on his own behalf or for others, more
specifically, by hotels, overnight camps, clubs,
business establishments, factories, bakeries,
self-service laundries, automatic laundries, any
type of rental laundries, and other like estab­
lishments. Exception: Wards or charges of
charitable organizations.
Drycleansing occupations include any activity
concerned with the cleaning, refreshing, or
restoration of any fabric and/or of any article of
wearing apparel, including pressing or other
work incidental thereto or performed in con­
nection therewith; the collection, distribution,
or sale of drycleaning service; the producing or
rendering of such activity or service by the
employer upon his own behalf or for others,

All employees 2 except student parttime workers,

Minimum wage rates

$1.25 an hour.
$1 an hour.______ __________
Allowance for gratuities, under
specified conditions, as part
of the hourly wage rate may
not exceed 10 cents for taxicab
drivers; 40 cents for employ­
ees of restaurants, hotels, and
other industries.

$1.25 an hour.

Hours

Maximum for women
and minors, 9 a day,
48 a week.4
Do.4

Maximum for women
and minors, 9 a day, 48
a week.4

V

more specifically, by hotels, clubs, and like
business establishments, or by automatic
cleansers, self-service cleansers, or other types
of rental cleansers.
Laundry and Drycleansing
Industries, No. 3-R,
June 1, 1951 (applicable
to employees exempt
from wage fixed in law).
Restaurant, Hotel Restau­
rant, and Public House­
keeping Occupations.
Rates effective Sept. 3,
1963.6
Administrative Regula­
tions.
(Supersedes rates effective
Sept. 3, 1962, which
superseded rates of Oct.
1, 1957, and partially
superseded Order Nos.
5-R-2, Jan. 1, 1954, and
6, Sept. 15, 1947.)

Same as Laundry and Drycleansing Occupa­
tions under Administrative Regulations.

Restaurant and hotel restaurant occupations
include any activity connected with the prep­
aration or offering of food and/or beverage for
remuneration, for human consumption, either
on the employer’s premises or elsewhere, by
such services as catering, banquet, box lunch,
or curb service, whether such service is oper­
ated as the principal business of the employer
or as a unit of another business, to the public,
employees, members or guests of members,
or paying guests.
Public housekeeping occupations include all
employment connected directly or indirectly
with the offering or furnishing of rooms and/or
lodging for remuneration to the public, em­
ployees, members or guests of members,
paying guests, students, or others, whether
such service is operated as the principal busi­
ness of the employer or as a unit of another
business; including such occupations as cham­
bermaid, parlormaid, linenroom worker,
elevator operator, cashier, clerical worker
such as room and desk clerk, coatroom at­
tendant, matron, charwoman, telephone
operator, cleaner, janitor, bellboy, porter,
doorman, and all workers properly classified
in this occupation in any establishment fur­
nishing rooms and/or lodging for remunera­
tion. Exceptions: Employment on a farm;
domestic service in a private home, unless
operated as a roominghouse.
See footnotes at end of table.




Student6 part-time workers:
Experienced (240 hours in establishment).
Inexperienced (less than 240 hours
in establishment).
All employees2 except student part­
time workers.
For restaurant or hotel restaurant
employee when spread of hours
exceeds 10 (12 in resort hotels) in
any day, or there is more than one
interval off duty (two intervals in
resort hotels).
For public housekeeping employee
when spread of hours exceeds 10
(12 in seasonal resort hotels) in
any day, or there is more than one
interval off duty.

70 cents an hour__
65 cents an hour__
$1.25 an hour_____________
50 cents a day in addition to
hourly wage.

75 cents a day in addition to
hourly wage.
Allowance for gratuities, under
specified conditions, as part
of the hourly wage rate may
not exceed 40 cents.

22 hours or less a week.7
Do.7
Maximum for women and
minors, 9 a day, 48 a
week.4

100

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

RHODE ISLAND—Con.
Restaurant and Hotel
Restaurant Occupations,
No. 5-R-2, Jan. 1, 1954
(applicable to employees
exempt from wage fixed
in law).

Same as restaurant and hotel restaurant occu­
pations in Restaurant, Hotel Restaurant, and
Public Housekeeping Occupations under
Administrative Regulations.

Class of employees covered

Employees in resort restaurants:
Full-time—

Part-time—

Employees in resort hotels who re­
ceive full maintenance:
Student6 part-time workers:

Public Housekeeping
Occupations, No. 6,
Sept. 15, 1947 (applicable
to employees exempt
from wage fixed in law).




Same as public housekeeping occupations in
Restaurant, Hotel Restaurant, and Public
Housekeeping Occupations under Adminis­
trative Regulations.

Minimum wage rates

72 cents an hour (60 cents with
meals).
52 cents an hour (40 cents with
meals).
77 cents an hour (65 cents with
meals).
57 cents an hour (45 cents with
meals).

77 cents an hour (65 cents with
meals).
57 cents an hour (45 cents with
meals).

Do.

40 hours or more a week.
Less than 40 hours a week.

Student6 part-time workers:

4

22 hours or less a week.7

40 hours or more a week.
Less than 40 hours a week.

Service 8—

. _______

Over 45 hours a week.
24 hours or less a
week.
Do.
48 hours or less a week.
Do.

Employees in resort hotels with res­
taurant:
Nonservice—

Service 8_________

Hours

35 cents an hour______

____

22 hours or less a week.7
Do.7

Retail Trade Occupations.
Rates effective Sept. 3,
1963.«
Administrative Regula­
tions.
(Supersedes rates effective
Sept. 3,1962, which
superseded rates effective
Oct. 1, 1957, and par­
tially superseded Order
No. 4-R-3, July 1, 1958.)

All employment in or for any industry or busi­
ness selling or offering for sale any type of
merchandise, wares, goods, articles, or com­
modities to the consumer; all work connected
with the soliciting of sales or opportunities for
sales and/or the distributing of such merchan­
dise, wares, goods, articles, or commodities
and the rendering of services incidental to the
sale, use, or upkeep of the same, whether per­
formed on the employer’s premises or else­
where. Exception: Home delivery of news­
papers.
Same as Retail Trade Occupations under
Administrative Regulations.

Retail Trade Occupations,
No. 4-R-3, July 1, 1958
(applicable to employees
exempt from wage fixed
in law).
See footnotes at end of table.

O




All employees 2 9 except student part­
time workers.

$1.25 an hour.

On 7th consecutive day.................. -­ ___ do..........................................If employee works a split shift, or $1 a day in addition to applica­
spread of hours exceeds 12, or both.
ble minimum wage.

Traveling and outside salesmen..
Student6 part-time workers: 11
18 years and over—................
Under 18 years....... -................

Maximum for women and
minors, 9 a day, 48 a
week.4
(10)

95 cents an hour...
95 cents an hour *2.
85 cents an hour ,2.

22 hours or less a week.43
Do.43

102

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

Any factory, workshop, mechanical or mercan­
tile establishment, laundry, hotel, restaurant,
or packinghouse.

SOUTH DAKOTA:
Wage fixed in law. Rates
effective July 1, 1964.
Code of 1939 with 1960
supplement, sec. 17. 0607,
as amended by H.B. 708
(L. 1964).
(Supersedes rates of July
1, 1945.3)




Class of employees covered

Females over 14 years of age:1
In cities with population of 2,500 or
over.

Minimum wage rates

$20 a week...... ....................

Elsewhere..... .............
Hourly rate............................

4

Weekly rate prorated______

i

Hours

Maximum for females,
10 a day, 54 a week, in
cities over 3,000 popu­
lation; elsewhere, 10 a
day.2
Maximum for females,
10 a day.2
Less than a week.

4

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Includes any place where washing, ironing,
cleaning, dyeing, pressing, or processing in­
cidental thereto of any kind of fabric is con­
ducted.

Women and minors:1 2
Experienced (500 hours in the in­
dustry)—
Zone 1 (Salt Lake, Weber, Utah,
and Davis Counties):

State, law or title of order,
and effective date
UTAH:
Laundry, Cleaning, Dye­
ing, and Pressing Indus­
tries, No. 5, Jan. 1, 1965.
(Supersedes Order No. 5,
Sept. 1,1960, which super­
seded Order No. 4, as last
amended July 1, 1959.)

Standard hours for women,
8 a day, 48 hours and 6
days a week; for minors,
8-44-6.
Do.

Zone 2 (cities, not in the abovenamed counties, with popula­
tion of 5,000 or more):
Until Jan 1, 1966

Do.
Do.

Zone 3 (all other incorporated and
unincorporated areas):
io cents an hour less than the
applicable minimum wage.
20 cents an hour less than the
applicable established rate for
experienced employee.
Hotels, boardinghouses, roominghouses, motels,
Public Housekeeping In­
apartment houses, buildings offering space for
dustry, No. 5, Jan. 1,
rent, resort hotels, hospitals, nursing homes,
1965.
and institutions. Includes linenroom girls,
(Supersedes Order No. 5,
Sept. 1, 1960, which super­ maids, cleaners, charwomen, elevator opera­
tors, and any other female or minor employee
seded Order No. 3, as last
connected with the establishment. Exceptions:
amended Aug. 1, 1959.)
Registered nurses, licensed practical nurses,
and resident managers.

Women and minors:14
Experienced (500 hours in the indus­
try)—
Zone 1 (Salt Lake, Weber, Utah,
and Davis Counties):




Do.

Do.
Do.

io cents an hour less than the
applicable minimum wage.
20 cents an hour less than the
applicable established rate
for experienced employee.
See footnotes at end o table.

Do.
Do.
Do.

Do.
Do.

Zone 2 (cities, not in the abovenamed counties, with popula­
tion of 5,000 or more):
Until Jan 1, 1966
— Zone 3 (all other incorporated and
unincorporated areas):

o
w

Hours

Minimum wage rates

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

104

ANALYSIS OP STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

UT AH—Continued
Restaurant Industry, No.
All food service establishments where refresh­
5, Jan 1, 1965.
ments or meals in solid or liquid form may be
(Supersedes Order No. 5,
obtained by the public generally or selected
Oct. 25,1962, which super­
portions of the public. Includes but is not
seded Order No. 2, as last
limited to cafes, restaurants, cafeterias, coffeeamended Oct. 1,1961.)
shops, soda fountains, snackbars, drive-ins,
food caterers, and all other persons or corpora­
tions supplying meals or refreshments.




Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Women and minors: 1
Experienced (500 hours in the in­
dustry)—
Zone 1 (Salt Lake, Weber, Utah,
and Davis Counties):
Until Jan. 1, 1966___ _________ $1 .10 an hour.
On and after Jan. 1, 1966........
Zone 2 (cities, not in the abovenamed counties, with popula­
tion of 5,000 or more):
Until Jan. 1, 1966
On and after Jan. 1, 1966
Zone 3 (all other incorporated and
unincorporated areas):
Until Jan. 1, 1966
On and after Jan. 1, 1966
Inexperienced

$1.15 an hour.

Hours

Standard hours for women,
8 a day, 48 hours and 6
days a week; for minors,
8-44-6.
Do.

Do.
Do.

95 cents an hour___ _________
$1.00 an hour
10 cents an hour less than the
applicable minimum wage.
Student worker s 20 cents an hour less than the
applicable established rate for
experienced employee.

4

$1.05 an hour.
$1.10 an hour.

Do.
Do.
Do.

*

-

779 502 — 65

Retail Trade Industry, No. Any business or occupation operated for the pur­
5, Jan. 1, 1965.
pose of selling, offering for sale, or distributing
(Supersedes Order No. 5,
goods, wares, and mechandise at retail, and
Sept. 1,1960, which super­
rendering services incidental to such opera­
seded Order No. 1, as last
tions.
amended July 1, 1959.)

Women and minors:1
Experienced (after 500 hours em­
ployment in the industry)—
Zone 1 (Salt Lake, Weber, Utah,
and Davis Counties):
Until Jan. 1, 1966____ ________

$1.10 an hour.

Standard hours for women,
8 a day, 48 hours and 6
days a week; for minors,

$1.15 an hour.

u.
Do.

$1.05 an hour.
$1.10 an hour.

Do.
Do.

95 cents an hour
$1.00 an hour
10 cents an hour less than the
applicable minimum wage.
Student worker 3 20 cents an hour less than the
applicable established rate for
experienced employee.

Do.
Do.
Do.

On and after Jan. 1, 1966
Zone 2 (cities, not in the abovenamed counties, with popula­
tion of 5,000 or more):
Until Jan. 1, 1966
On and after Jan. 1, 1966
Zone 3 (all other incorporated and
unincorporated areas):
Until Jan. 1, 1966
On and after Jan. 1, 1966
Inexperienced

00

See footnotes at end of table.

O
0\




Do.

106

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
VERMONT:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective Sept. 1,1959.
Act 303 (L. 1957), as
amended by Acts 32 and
109 (L. 1959).
(Supersedes rates effective
Sept. 1, 1957.)
Editor’s Note: H.B. 40
(L. 1965) increases the
minimum rate to $1.25
an hour effective Oct. 1,
1965.

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Any industry, trade, or business or branch
thereof or class of work therein of employers
of two or more employees. Exceptions: Agri­
culture; domestic service in or about a private
home; employees of the United States, the
State, or any political subdivision thereof;
employees of public-supported nonprofit
organizations except laundry employees,
nurses’ aides, or practical nurses; bona fide
executive, administrative, or professional em­
ployees; persons subject to the Federal Fair
Labor Standards Act; newsboys on home
delivery; taxicab drivers; outside salesmen;
students working any part or all of school year
or regular vacation period; switchboard oper­
ators employed in a public telephone exchange
servicing not more than 750 stations.

All employees 1

Hotel, Motel, Tourist
Place, and Restaurant
Industry, No. 2, Oct. 8,
1959.
(Order No. 2 of May 20,
1958, as amended by
Acts 32 and 109 (L.
1959).)
Editor’s Note: Order
revised. Nonservice rate
$1.25 an hour, effective
Dec. 3,1965.

Any establishment, including tourist place, inn,
cabin, and motel, which, as a whole or part
of its business activities, offers lodging accom­
modations for hire to the public or to members
or guests of its members, and services in con­
nection therewith; and any establishment
conducting any activity directly connected
with the preparation and serving of food to
the public, for pay, and where lodging is not
furnished for pay. Exception: Students (ex­
empt from the minimum wage law).

All employees:1
Nonservice 4
Apprentice or learner (not more
than 30 days).
Counter employees____________
Service4—
Resort hotels:5
Chambermaids___________
Other service employees
Other hotels, restaurants...............

Laundry and Drycleaning
Industry, No. 3, Oct. 8,
1959.
(Order No. 3 of July 23,
1958, as amended by
Acts 32 and 109 (L.
1959).)
Editor’s Note: Order
revised. Rate for ex­
perienced workers, $1.25
an hour; learners, $1.10
an hour, effective Dec.
13, 1965.

the collection, washing, or cleaning of garments, Experienced employees 1_______ ____ $1 an hour_____
household articles, etc. Exception: Students Learners 8 (3 months or 520 hours i i 85 cents an hour.
(exempt from the minimum wage law).
industry).




t

$1 an hour.

Ilours

Maximum for women
and minors, 9 a day, 50
a week.2

$1 an hour_____
75 cents an hour.
70 cents an hour.
75 cents an hour.........................
50 cents an hour
55 cents an hour
(Employer entitled to deduct
from minimum wage an allow­
ance for meals and lodging,
in amounts as specified.)
Do.2
Do.2

Retail, Wholesale, and
Service Establishments,
No. 4, Oct. 8, 1959.
(Order No. 4 of July 23,
1958, as amended by
Acts 32 and 109 (L.
1959).)
Editor's Note: Order
revised. Rate for all
employees, $1.25 an hour,
except $1.10 for learners,
effective Dec. 13,1965.

Any industry, trade, or business, or branch
thereof, or class of work therein in which the
worker is gainfully employed. Exception:
Students (exempt from the minimum wage
law.)

All employees, except handicapped
persons 1 and learners.
Learners 6 (3 months or 520 hours in
any branch of employment).

Summer Camp Industry,
No. 1, Jan. 25,1960.

Children’s camps, including the counseling
staff and the service staff, i.e., caretakers,
stable hands, kitchen and maintenance staff,
etc. Exceptions: Preseason training of counsel­
ing staff;9 students working during all or any
part of school year or reeular vacation periods.

All employees:
Service staff (resident and non­ $1 an hour.
resident).
Counseling staff 7 8—
Nonresident:
Experienced............................... $6 a day.
Apprentice II............................... $5 a day.
Apprentice I_______ ______
$4 a day.
First-year learner
All counselors................ ..............
Resident (with meals and lodg­
ing):
Experienced
Apprentice II
Apprentice I
First-year learner
All counselors
Camper-trainee (resident and non­ Reasonable compensation 12 _
resident).
(Minimum wage for service
staff members may be re­
duced by board, room, and
laundry allowance, in
amounts specified.)

See footnotes at end of table.

107



$1 an hour.................................

Do.9

85 cents an hour_____ ______
(Deductions may be made for
furnished meals, in amount
specified.)

Do.2

Actual time worked.

(10)
(10)
Over 6-day week.
(10)

108

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
WASHINGTON:
Wage fixed in law June 30,
1961. Rate effective Jan.
1,1962.3
Ch. 18 (L. 1961).
(Amends Ch. 294 (L. 1959)
and supplements wage
order provisions estab­
lished under 1913 Mini­
mum Wage Law.)




Occupation or industry covered

Any occupation, service, trade, business, indus­
try, or branch or group of industries or employ­
ment or class of employment. Exceptions:
Farm employment (as defined); employment
in packing, packaging, grading, storing, or
delivery to storage or market or to a carrier
for transportation to market, of agricultural
or horticultural products; domestic service in
a private home; executive, administrative, or
professional personnel; outside salesmen; em­
ployees of the United States Govermnent;
newspaper vendors or carriers; employees of
a carrier subject to regulation by Part I of the
Interstate Commerce Act; employment in
forest protection and fire prevention activi­
ties; employees engaged in the activities of an
educational, charitable, religious, or nonprofit
organization where employer-employee rela­
tionship does not, in fact, exist and services
rendered are gratuitous; any individual em­
ployed (1) by the State, any county, city,
town, municipal or quasi-municipal corpora­
tion, political subdivision, or any instrumen­
tality thereof; (2) by any charitable institution
charged with child care responsibilities en­
gaged primarily in the development of char­
acter or citizenship, promoting health or
physical fitness, providing or sponsoring rec*
reational opportunities or facilities for young
people or members of the Armed Forces; (3) in
performing services in a hospital licensed pur­
suant to Ch. 70.41 RCW or Ch. 71.12 RCW
or in a nursing home licensed pursuant to Ch.
18.12 RCW; any individual whose duties re­
quire that he reside or sleep at the place of
employment or who otherwise spends a sub­
stantial portion of his time subject to call, and
not engaged in the performance of active
duties; students enrolled in and employed
by an institution of higher education; minors
under 18.

4

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Hours

Includes all work involving duties primarily Women and minors:
relating to guidance, instruction, supervision,
Nonresident employeecounselor III (at least 3 seasons
and care of campers in organized camps,
of employment).
whether such work involves direct charge of,
Counselor II (at least 1 season of
or responsibility for, such activities, or merely
assistance to persons in charge (exclusive of
employment).
Counselor I (new employee)----preseason training courses), including but not
Resident employee—
limited to head counselors; assistant head
Counselor III (at least 3 seasons
counselors; specialist counselors or instructors
of employment).
(swimming, arts, crafts, etc.); group or divi­
Counselor II (at least 1 season of
sion leaders; camp mothers; teachers; super­
employment).
vising, general, senior, bunk, assistant, and
Counselor I (new employee)..........
junior counselors; cocounselors; counselor
aides; and kitchen helpers working no more
than 27 hours in a given workweek. Excep­
tions: Kitchen helpers working in excess of
27 hours a week and camp cooks (covered by
Public Housekeeping Order No. 9-62); women
and minors 16 years and over who are regular
or associate members of the organized group
conducting the camp and who serve as volun­
teer members of the counselor staff; resident
campers under 16 years engaged in an intrain­
ing program which requires no more than 24
on-duty hours weekly, under specified condi­
tions.
Organized camp defined as a resident group
camp established and maintained for recrea­
tional, educational, vacation, or religious
purposes for use by organized groups, wherein
these activities are conducted on a closely
supervised basis and wherein day-to-day
living facilities, including food and lodging, are
provided either free of charge or by payment
of fee.

Food Processing Industry,
No. 5-62, Mar. 1,1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 51,
Mar. 12,1951, as amend­
ed by Ch. 18 (L. 1961),
Jan. 1,1962. Order No.
51 superseded Order
No. 38, July 3, 1942.)

109

Counselor Staff Occupa­
tions in Organized Sea­
sonal Recreational
Camps, No. 11-63, Oct.
14,1963.
(Supersedes Counselors
and Leaders Occupations
in Organized Seasonal
Recreational Camps,
No. 54, June 12,1954,
as amended for women
by Ch. 18 (L. 1961),
Jan. 1, 1962.)

Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of processing by canning,
freezing, cooking, or otherwise of food for hu­
man or other consumption, including the
processing of fruit, vegetables, fish, shellfish,
or any other products for the purpose of pre­
serving them for food purposes.

Women and minors

$1.25 an hour.

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable
Packing Industry, No.
6-62, Mar. 1,1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 52,
as amended by Ch. 18
(L. 1961), Jan. 1, 1962.
Order No. 52 of Apr. 16,
1951, superseded Order
No. 39, Sept. 7, 1942.)

Any industry, business, establishment, person,
firm, association, or corporation engaged in
handling, packing, packaging, grading, stor­
ing, or delivering to storage or to market or to
a carrier for transportation to market, any
agricultural or horticultural commodity in its
raw or natural state as an incident to the prep­
aration of such fruits and vegetables for mar­
ket. Exception: Minors engaged in agricul­
ture (as defined by statute).

Women and minors

$1.25 an hour.

See footnotes at end of table.




$31.20 a week..

6-day week.4

$22.20 a week..

Do.4

$16.20 a week..

Do.4

$25.00 a week..

Do.4

$16.00 a week..

Do.4

$10.00 a week..

Do.4

Order specifies that the
hours of employment of
women and minors in
this industry shall be
subject to any applicable
statutes of the State and
United States.3
Do.3

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Any industry, business, or establishment offer­
ing board or lodging in addition to medical,
surgical, nursing, convalescent, or child care
services; including, but not limited to, hos­
pitals, sanitariums, nursing homes, rest homes,
child care nurseries and institutions, homes for
the aged, and similar institutions. Exception:
Such operations performed in an industry
covered by another wage order.

Women and minors: *
Until July 1,1963___ ____ ________
July 1,1963
Minor learners (first 480 hours in
industry), by permit.

Laundry, Drycleaning,
and Dye works Indus­
try, No. 3-62, Mar. 1,
1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 48,
June 5,1950, as amended
by Ch. 18 (L. 1961), Jan.
1, 1962. Order No. 48
superseded Order No. 25,
Dec. 14, 1921.)

Includes, but is not confined to: (l) the marking,
sorting, washing, cleaning, collecting, iron­
ing, assembling, packaging, pressing, re­
ceiving, shipping, or renovating in any capac­
ity directly concerned with sale or distribution
at retail or wholesale of any laundry or dry­
cleaning service; (2) the work performed by
clerical workers and telephone operators (not
employed directly by a telephone company)
in connection with the production and furnish­
ing of these services; (3) the production of
laundry, drycleaning, or dyeing services by
any establishment, which services may be
incidental to its principal business; (4) the
cleaning, pressing, finishing, refreshing, dye­
ing, or processing of any article of wearing
apparel, including hats, household furnishings,
rugs, textiles, fur, leather (including shoes), or
any fabrics whatsoever, when such activity is
not performed in the original process of manu­
facture. Exception: Such operations per­
formed in an industry covered by another
wage order.

Women and minors 8__________

Manufacturing Industry
and General Working
Conditions, No. 2-62,
Mar. 1, 1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 50,
July 17,1950, as amended
by Ch. 18 (L. 1961), Jan.
1,1962. Order No. 50
superseded Order No. 40,
Sept. 7, 1942.)

Any industry, business, or establishment operated for the purpose of preparing, producing,
making, altering, repairing, finishing, proc­
essing, inspecting, handling, assembling,
wrapping, bottling, or packaging goods, arti­
cles, or commodities, in whole or in part. Ex­
ception: Such activities covered by Food
Processing Order or by another wage order.

Women and minors 8.............................

WASHINGTON—Con.
Health Care Industry, No.
10-62, July 1, 1962.
(Partially supersedes Pub­
lic Housekeeping Indus­
try Order No. 46, Jan.
23,1950, as amended by
Ch.l8 (L. 1961), Jan. 1,
1962.)




Minimum wage rates

Hours

6 days in a calendar week.
Maximum for females,
8 a day.8

Do.3

4

Maximum for females, 8
a day.8

Mercantile Industry,
Wholesale and Retail,
No. 1-62, Mar. 1,1962.
(Supersedes Order No. 44,
June 6, 1949, as amended
by Ch. 18 (L. 1961), Jan.
1, 1962. Order No. 44
superseded Order No. 41,
Sept. 7,1942.)

Any industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of purchasing, selling, or
distributing goods or commodities at whole­
sale or retail; or of renting goods or commodi­
ties. Exception: Such operations performed in
an industry covered by another wage order.

Women and minors fi $1.25 an hour.
Minor learners (first 480 hours in
industry), by permit.

$1 an hour—

Officeworkers, No. 13-63,
Oct. 14,1963.
(Supersedes Officeworkers
Order No. 43, Apr. 1,
1949, as amended for
women by Ch. 18 (L.
1961), Jan. 1,1962.)
(Previously amended by
Ch. 294 (L. 1959), June
11,1959. Order No. 43
of Apr. 1, 1949, super­
seded Order No. 37, Jan.
1,1942.)

Includes but is not limited to accountants, accounting clerks, appraisers, board markers,
bookkeepers, canvassers, cashiers, checkroom
attendants, checkers, circulation clerks, claims
adjusters, clerks, collectors, compilers, comput­
ers, demonstrators, instructors, interviewers,
investigative shoppers, librarians and their as­
sistants, messengers, office machine operators,
PBX and office telephone operators, physi­
cians’ and dentists’ assistants, secretaries, so­
cial workers, statisticians, stenographers, tele­
phone solicitors, tellers, ticket agents, tracers,
typists, and other related or similar occupa­
tions. Exceptions: Office and similar occupa­
tions performed in an industry, business, or
establishment specifically covered by another
wage order; employees of an interstate com­
mon carrier subject to Federal regulations.

Women and minors 5.

$1.25 an hour.

8 a day, 6 days a week.

Personal Service Industry,
No. 4-62, Mar. 1, 1962.
(Supersedes Beauty Cul­
ture Industry, Order No.
47, Feb. 13, 1950, as
amended by Ch. 18 (L.
1961), Jan. 1,1962.)
(Order No. 47 superseded
Order No. 35-A, Dec. 1,
1940.)

Any industry, business, or establishment operated for the purpose of rendering, directly or
indirectly, any service, operation, or process
used or useful in the care, cleansing, or beauti­
fication of the body, skin, nails, or hair, or in
the enhancement of personal appearance or
health; or in selling, or demonstrating or ap­
plying beauty preparations, cosmetics, or
supplies, either to the demonstrator or other
persons; instructing students in any of the
foregoing occupations; and all services or oper­
ations incidental to such occupations, includ­
ing the services of instructors in beauty schools.
Includes but is not limited to beauty salons,
barbershops, bath and massage parlors, physi­
cal conditioning and weight control salons,
charm schools, and mortuaries.

Women and minors !_

$1.25 an hour.

Order specifies that the
hours of women in this
industry shall be sub­
ject to any applicable
statutes of the State.3

See footnotes at end of table




112

ANALYSIS OP STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
State, law or title of order,
and effective date
WASHINGTON—Con.
Public Housekeeping In­
dustry, No. 9-62, Mar. 6,
1962.
(Partially supersedes Or­
der No. 46, Jan. 23,1950,
as amended by Ch. 18
(L. 1961), Jan. 1, 1962.)
(Order No. 46 superseded
Order Nos. 23 (Public
Housekeeping) and 36
(Apartment Houses),
Oct. 4,1921, and Dec. 7,
1937, respectively.)
Telephone and Telegraph
Industry, No. 12-63, Oct.
14, 1963.
(Supersedes Telephone and
Telegraph Industry
Order No. 53, May 1,
1951, as amended for wom­
en by Ch. 18 (L. 1961),
Jan. 1, 1962.)
(Previously amended by
Ch. 294 (L. 1959), June
11, 1959. Order No. 53
superseded Order No. 27,
Dec. 14, 1921.)




Occupation or industry covered

Any industry, business, or establishment operated for public housekeeping, including
restaurants, lunch counters, cafeterias; cater­
ing, banquet, or box lunch service; curb
service; boardinghouses; all other establish­
ments where food in either solid or liquid form
is prepared for and served to the public to be
consumed on the premises; hotels and motels;
apartment houses; roominghouses; camps;
clubs (public and private); building or house­
cleaning or maintenance services. Excep­
tion: Such operations performed in an indus­
try covered by another wage order.
Includes any business or establishment operated
primarily for the purpose of transmitting mes­
sages for the public by telephone or tele­
graph for hire. Exception: Telephone and
telegraph employment performed in an indus­
try specifically covered by another order.

Class of employees covered

Minimum wage rates

Women and minors 3___ _____ _
_
Minor learners (first 480 hours in industry), by permit.

Women and minors5_______

$1 an hour — ___
__
(If meals are furnished, 40 cents
per meal may be deducted
from the wages paid.)
(A definite employer-employee
agreement must be made if
lodging rooms are furnished
by employer as part of the
minimum wage. Maximum
amounts specified in the
order.)

Hours

Maximum for females, 8
a day.3

6 days a week for women; 8
a day, 6 days a week for
minors. Order specifies
that the hours of employ­
ment of women and mi­
nors shall be subject to
any applicable statutes
of the State.3

Theatrical Amusement and
Recreation Industry, No.
7-62, and General Amuse­
ment and Recreation In­
dustry, No. 8-62, Mar. 6,
1962.
(Supersede Orders Nos. 45
and 45-A, Nov. 28, 1949,
as amended by Ch. 18 (L.
1961), Jan. 1, 1962.)

Amusement and recreation orders include any
industry, business, or establishment operated
for the purpose of furnishing entertainment
or recreation to the public. Theatrical Amuse­
ment and Recreation Industry includes both
moving picture and legitimate theaters and
food and drink dispensaries operated in con­
nection therewith, but excluding other seg­
ments of the Amusement and Recreation In­
dustry.
General Amusement and Recreation Industry
includes, but is not limited to, dancehalls, the­
aters, bowling alleys, billiard parlors, skating
rinks, riding academies, shooting galleries,
racetracks, amusement parks, athletic fields,
public swimming pools, private and public
gymnasiums, golf courses, tennis courts, carni­
vals, wired-music studios, fairs, expositions,
rodeos, circuses, and concessions in any and all
amusement establishments, but excluding the
Theatrical Amusement and Recreation Indus­
try. Exception: Such operations performed in
an industry covered by another wage order.
See footnotes at end of table.

113



Women and minors 5_______ _____ $1,25 an hour.

Minor learners (first 480 hours in industry), by permit.

$1 an hour,

The wage orders for both
branches of this industry
specify that the hours of
employment of women
and minors shall be sub­
ject to any applicable
statutes of the State.3
Do. 3

114

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

“Agriculture” means the same as “farm prem­
ises,” as defined in Workmen’s Compensation
Act.

Minimum wage rates

Adult women and minors 16 and over:

State, law or title of order,
and effective date

Hours

WISCONSIN:
Minimum Wage Regula­
tions for Adult Women
and Minors, Wisconsin
Administrative Code
Sections Ind 72 and 73.
Agriculture, Ind 72.04.
Rates effective Sept. 1,
1964.2
(Supersedes rates of June
1, 1960, which superseded
rates of May 1,1956.)

Minors under 16:

Actual time worked.
(Allowance may be made for
furnished board and lodging
in amounts specified.)
$45 a week (with board, $29.25;
with board and lodging,
$21.25).

Actual time worked.
(See above for allowance.)
$20.25; with board and
lodging, $13.50).

Any Occupation, Trade,
or Industry, Ind 72.02.
Rates effective Sept. 1,
1964.2
(Supersedes rates of June
1,1960, which superseded
rates of May 1, 1956.)

Any occupation, trade, or industry. Exceptions:
Domestic service and agriculture.

45 or more a week.

Adult women and minors 16 and over
(including homeworkers):
In cities with population of 1,000 or
more.3

45 or more a week.

In general: maximum for
women, 9 a day, 50 a
week; for minors, 8 a
day, 48 a week.4

Minors under 16:
In cities with population of 1,000 or
more.3
(Allowance may be made for
furnished board and lodging
in amounts specified in order.)

Canning or First Process­
ing Fresh Fruits and
Vegetables, Ind 73.06.
Rates effective Sept. 1,
1964.2
(Supersedes rates of June 1,
1960, which superseded
rates of June 1,1956.)




Canning or first processing fresh fruits and
vegetables. Exception: Factories engaged in
dehydrating fruits and vegetables which are
covered by general factory regulations.

k

Overtime: Women 18 and over, and
boys 6 and girls 16 to 18 years.

Same as rates for “Any Occupation, Trade, or Industry.”
\X times employee’s regular
A
rate.

«
Over 9 a day, 54 a week.

4

Domestic Service in Pri­
vate Homes, Ind 72.03.
Rates effective Sept. 1.
1964.2
(Supersedes rates of June 1,
1960, which superseded
rates of May 1, 1956.)

Domestic service in private homes. Exception:
Casual employment in or around a home in
work usual to the home of the employer and
not in connection with or a part of the busi­
ness, trade,. or profession of the employer,
such as caring for children, mowing lawns,
raking leaves, shoveling snow, etc. “Casual
employment” defined as employment for a
period of not more than 15 hours a week for
one employer.

Operators in Telephone
Operators in telephone exchanges. Exception:
Exchanges, Ind 72.05.
Exchanges in a private residence operated by
Rates effective Sept. 1,
members of the household.10
1964.2
(Supersedes rates of June 1,
1960, which superseded
rates of June 1, 1956.)
See footnotes at end of table.

115



Adult women and minors 16 and over:
Hourly basis Same as rates for “Any Occu­
pation, Trade, or Industry.”
Weekly basis—
In cities with population of 1,000 $49.50 a week (with board,
$32.75; with board and
or more.
lodging, $24.00).
Elsewhere in the State $45.00 a week (with board,
$29.25; with board and
lodging, $21.25).
Minors under 16:
Hourly basis. _
Same as rates for “Any Occu­
pation, Trade, or Industry.”
Weekly basis—
In cities with’population of 1,000 $38.25 a week (with board,
or more.3
$23.00; with board and
lodging, $15.50).
Elsewhere in State.
$33.75 a week (with board,
$20.25; with board and
lodging, $13.50).
Adult women and minors.

Same as rates for “Any Occupa­
tion, Trade, or Industry.”

Less than 45 a week.*
45 or more a week.
Do.

Less than 45 a week. *
45 or more a week.
Do.

(8)

09

116

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM WAGE COVERAGE AND RATES—Continued
Occupation or industry covered

WYOMING:
Wage fixed in law. Rate
effective May 22, 1965.
Stat. 1957, sec. 27-208, as
amended by Ch. 97 (L.
1965).
(Supersedes rate effective
May 20, 1955.)




Ik

Minimum wage rates

Class of employees covered

Any occupation, service, trade, business, in­
dustry, or branch or group of industries or
employment or class of employment. Excep­
tions: Agriculture; domestic service in or about
a private home; any person employed in a bona
fide executive, administrative, or professional
capacity; by the U.S., or by the State or any
political subdivision; in activities of an educa­
tional, charitable, religious, or nonprofit orga­
nization where no employer-employee relation­
ship exists, or where services are voluntary;
minors under 18 years; part-time and piece
workers; outside salesmen solely on commis­
sion basis; any person who drives an ambu­
lance or other vehicle as necessity requires but
who is on call at any time.

State, law or title of order,
and effective date

All employees (except minors under
18, see Exceptions).

Hours

and over, 8 a day, 48
a week.i

ft

r

FOOTNOTES
ALASKA
1 The 1955 law repealed sections 43-2-31 to 43-2-37 (Alaska Compiled Laws Annotated, 1949). The repealed law, enacted in 1939, set a statutory minimum rate applicable to all
female employees.
2 1962 enactment requires wages at a rate not less than 50 cents greater than the “prevailing Federal Minimum Wage Law” (that is, the applicable rate under the Federal Fair Labor
Standards Act, as amended May 5,1961); under applicable regulations of the Commissioner, handicapped workers, learners, and apprentices may be employed at wages lower than the
minimum.
3 Agriculture defined to include farming in all its branches, and, among other things, the cultivation and tillage of the soil; dairying; the production, cultivation, growing, and har­
vesting of any agricultural or horticultural commodities; the raising of livestock, bees, furbearing animals, or poultry; and any practices (including forestry or lumbering operations)
performed by a farmer, or on a farm, including preparation for market and delivery to storage, market, or carrier for transportation to market.
4 For a period of not more than 14 workweeks in calendar year during the mining season (as defined), overtime provision inapplicable to employees engaged in small mining operations
where not more than 12 are employed, provided hours worked are not in excess of 12 a day, 56 a week.

ARIZONA
1 Handicapped worker whose earning capacity is impaired may be paid less than the scheduled minimum, by special license from the Industrial Commission.
2 The basic weekly minimum need not be paid from June 1 through Aug. 31 by establishments in the counties of Cochise, Gila, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, Pima, Pinal, Santa
Cruz, and Yuma; and from Dec. 16 through Mar. 15, by establishments in Apache, Coconino, Mohave, Navajo, and Yavapai counties.
3 Maximum hours for women and minors, 8 a day, 48 a week.
4 Number not to exceed 10 percent of women and minors employed in establishment, except that 1 learner is permitted if less than 4 women and minors employed.
4 Number with less than 1 year of experience in retail trade may not exceed 33 percent of the number of women employed in an establishment, except that 1 learner or apprentice
permitted if less than 3 women employed. Rule not applicable during the month of December or for 2 weeks immediately preceding Easter.

ARKANSAS
1 The attorney general of Arkansas, in an opinion dated Apr. 17,1947, held that the 1943 amendment to the State’s wage-hour law made the $1.25 and $1 minimum wage rates appli­
cable to a day of 8 hours.
2 Women may be employed on 7 days a week if and when an industry engaged in handling perishable products would suffer an irreparable injury or if the Labor Commissioner
determines that exigency requires such overtime, by permit for 90 days at any one time.

CALIFORNIA

117

1 Handicapped worker whose earning capacity is impaired may be paid less than the minimum, by permit from the Industrial Welfare Commission granted upon joint application
of employer and employee.
2 If total weekly hours do not exceed 30, and daily hours do not exceed 6, employee may be employed 7 days a week.
3 The number of minors (or the number of learners) employed at $1.05 an hour may not exceed 10 percent of the persons regularly employed in an establishment, except that em­
ployers of less than 10 persons may employ 1 minor and 1 learner at the lesser rate. The provision for minors applies to all orders, except the number may not exceed 20 percent of the
persons regularly employed and employers of less than 10 persons may employ 2 minors at the lesser rate in Industries Handling Products After Harvest and Industries Preparing Agri­
cultural Products for Market, on the Farm Orders. The provision for learners is applicable only to following orders: Industries Handling Products After Harvest; Industries Preparing
Agricultural Products for Market, on the Farm; Laundry, Linen Supply, Drycleaning, and Dyeing; Manufacturing; Mercantile; and Professional, Technical, Clerical, Mechanical, and
Similar Occupations.




118

CALIFORNIA—Continued
4 Orders include a step-up pay provision. Rates effective Aug. 30,1963, were $1.25 for women and minors, $1.00 for learners and/or minors under 18 years, and $1.25 a day additional
for split shift.
6 Women employed in administrative, executive, or professional capacities (as defined) are exempt from all provisions of wage orders except those relating to working conditions and
one under the Motion Picture Industry Order that women required to work at night who are not dismissed in time to return home by public transportation must be provided trans­
portation by the employer.
6 Hours may not exceed 72 in any 7 consecutive days, after which the employer may not employ the worker for 24-hour period.
7 Hours may not exceed 16 in any 1 day, including meal periods, from time employee is required to report until dismissed.
6 If personal wardrobe or property of extras is damaged through the nature of the work, extras must be compensated therefor.
® For regular employees in banks, receiving not less than $300 a month, the emergency requirement for overtime (that is, an unpredictable or unavoidable occurrence at unscheduled
intervals requiring immediate action) is waived, provided nonemergency overtime is limited to 2 hours a day, not less than 1H times the employee’s regular rate is paid for such time,
weekly hours do not exceed 48, and such nonemergency overtime is on a voluntary basis.
10 Hours provisions inapplicable to women 18 years and over employed as resident housemothers with direct responsibility for children under 18 receiving 24-hour care, or as resident
managers of homes for the aged having less than 8 beds. Such women are permitted to work 54 hours, 6 days a week, at regular rate of pay, and, in case of emergency, over 54 hours,
6 days, at 1H times employee’s regular rate.

COLORADO
1 Handicapped worker whose earning capacity is impaired may be paid less than minimum hourly rate, provided a special license has been issued.
2 Zone A includes the cities of Denver, Pueblo, and Colorado Springs and a radius of 6 miles beyond the corporate limits thereof. Zone B includes cities outside of Zone A with a
population of 5,000 or more and, from June 1 to Oct. 1, Estes Park and Grand Lake. Zone C includes remainder of State and, from Oct. 1 to June 1, Estes Park and Grand Lake. In
Beauty Service Occupations Order, Zone B combines Zones B and C.
8 The number of junior operators paid less than the established rate for senior operators may not exceed 20 percent of the total number of operators. In shops employing less than 5
operators, 1 junior operator may be employed at the “junior” rate.
4 In emergencies, women permitted to work over 8 hours a day, as provided by Women’s Eight Hour Law; overtime rate must be paid and employer must first obtain relaxation permit
from Industrial Commission. Relaxation permit not required for hospitals, sanitariums, and convalescent homes under Public Housekeeping Order.
6 Number of employees receiving lower rate may not exceed 20 percent of the total number of employees in any establishment at any one time. If fewer than 5 persons are employed,
1 inexperienced person may be employed at lower rate.

CONNECTICUT
1 Under regulations, Labor Commissioner may provide for modifications of the minimum fair wage for (1) learners and apprentices; (2) persons under 18 years; (3) special cases or classes
of cases where appropriate, to prevent curtailment of employment opportunities.
2 Hours law establishes a maximum of 8- to 48-hour week for females and minors employed in mercantile establishments; 9- to 48-hour week, in manufacturing and mechanical (includ­
ing laundry and cleaning and dyeing) establishments, public restaurants, cafes, dining rooms, barbershops, hairdressing or manicuring establishments, or photograph galleries, with
permissible variations. Hotels are exempt from coverage of statute.
8 Handicapped worker whose earning capacity is impaired may be employed at less than the minimum fair wage, by special license issued by the Labor Commissioner for a specified
period of time.
4 “Clerk” means any person who performs the work of an appointment clerk, desk clerk, telephone operator, bookkeeper, stenographer, typist, or other clerical work. “Minor” means
any person under 18 years of age.




4

9

6 “Operator” means any person holding a license issued by the State of Connecticut for registered hairdresser and cosmetician or assistant hairdresser and cosmetician.
0 Learner and apprentice rate permitted after written approval has been received from Labor Commissioner. Number of learners may not exceed 10 percent of the total number of
employees.
7 Overtime rate inapplicable to adult males engaged in production work (as defined) in laundry occupation that is not ordinarily performed by women and minors under 18 years.
Adult males so employed must be paid not less than the minimum fair wage for hours in excess of 44 a week.
8 Number of beginners over 18 years of age may not exceed 5 percent of the number of persons regularly employed in the establishment.
9 (a) If employee receives a commission or bonus as part of his earnings, overtime may be figured at $1 an hour in addition to and exclusive of all other earnings, or at V/^ times the
regular hourly rate which when computed will include commission in addition to the established hourly or weekly wage or any combination thereof, (b) Order expressly exempts from
overtime provision: executive, administrative, and professional employees; outside salesmen and automobile service mechanics, under specified conditions.
10 (a) If employee is engaged partly in restaurant occupation and partly in an occupation covered by Mercantile Order, the provisions of Mercantile Order shall apply to entire work
period, except that when time spent in each occupation is segregated and separately recorded, allowance for gratuities as part of the minimum fair wage may be applied to hours worked
in restaurant service category, (b) If employee is engaged partly in an occupation under the Restaurant Order and partly in an occupation covered by another wage order other than
M ercantile, the higher provision of each order shall apply to entire work period, except that when time spent in each occupation is definitely segregated and recorded, provisions of appli
cable wage order shall apply.
11 In the case of a salaried employee whose salary is in excess of the required minimum, the excess over the minimum may not be applied to cover overtime in excess of the usual and
regular workweek; instead employee should receive an additional $1.50 for each hour worked over usual and regular workweek.
12 “Service” means any employee who serves food and/or beverage solely to patrons seated at tables or booths and performs duties incidental to such service, and who customarily
receives gratuities. A person shall not be considered as customarily receiving gratuities unless a minimum of $10 a week in gratuities is received by full-time employees, of $2 a day by
part-time employees, as evidenced by a signed statement of employee and by records maintained by employer. “Nonservice” means employee other than service, including but not limited
to counter girls, counter waitresses, counter men, counter waiters, and those serving food or beverage to patrons at tables or booths and who do not customarily receive gratuities (as
defined).
18 Gratuities may be recognized as constituting part of minimum fair wage when: (a) employee is in employment in which gratuities customarily and usually constitute and are
recognized as part of remuneration for hiring purposes; (b) amount received in gratuities claimed as credit for part of minimum fair wage is recorded on a weekly basis as a separate item;
(c) employer obtains a weekly statement from employee that amount claimed as gratuities has been received; and (d) gratuities in excess of 40 cents an hour (45 cents an hour, May 1, 1964)
need not be reported or recorded.

DELAWARE
Hour law establishes a maximum of 10 hours a day, 55 hours a week, and 6 days a week for females employed in any mercantile, mechanical, or manufacturing establishment;
laundry; baking or printing establishment; telephone and telegraph office or exchange; restaurant, hotel, place of amusement, dressmaking establishment, or office, except canning,
preserving or preparation of perishable fruits and vegetables.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

119

1 Rate of pay for a woman whose earning capacity is impaired shall be fixed by the Minimum Wage and Industrial Safety Board and stated in special license issued to such person
by the board.
2 Hour law establishes 8 hours a day, 48 hours a week, as the maximum women 18 years of age or over may be employed in manufacturing, mechanical, or mercantile establishments,
laundries, hotels, restaurants, telegraph or telephone establishments or offices, and express or transportation companies.
8 Order repealed all parts of Public Housekeeping Occupation Order that prescribed minimum wage rates for the building service occupation.
4 The student certificate expires after 9 months, after which the part-time hourly wage must be paid.
0 Order repealed all parts of Building Service Occupation Order that prescribed minimum wage rates for building service occupations in retail trade. Section 1(a) of Building Service
Occupation Order amended to delete the word “stores” from definition.




120

HAWAII
1 The act authorizes the Director of Labor and Industrial Relations to make regulations providing for payment of a lower hourly rate to learners, apprentices, part-time employees
who are full-time students, and handicapped workers.
2 Agricultural employers and employers engaged primarily in first processing of, or in canning or packing, seasonal fresh fruits and who are not engaged in agriculture have special
exemptions for overtime work up to 48 hours in 20 weeks, under specified conditions.
3 Act 19, effective July 1,1962, provides that if the minimum wage paid an employee covered by the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act for any workweek is less than the minimum
wage prescribed by the Hawaii Wage and Hour Law, the higher minimum shall apply to such employees for such workweek; and if the maximum workweek for employees under the
Federal Fair Labor Standards Act for purposes of overtime compensation is higher than the workweek for such purposes under the Hawaii law, then the maximum hour provision of the
Hawaii law shall apply to such employees for such workweek.

IDAHO
1 Handicapped worker whose earning capacity is impaired, apprentice, and learner may be employed at less than minimum wage, by special license from Commissioner of Labor.
2 Statute provides that females may not be employed over 8 hours a day or 48 hours a week without payment of \l times the rate for hours worked in excess of 8 a day or 48 a week.
A
3 As determined by Employment Security Agency.

KENTUCKY
1 Authorization of Commissioner of Industrial Relations required for hiring of learners at a rate lower than the legal minimum wage; number of learners may not exceed one-third of
the total number of regular full-time employees. Under All Industries and Occupations Order, period may not exceed 540 hours; Laundry and Drycleaning Order, 250 hours; Hotel
and Restaurant Order, 90 days.
2 Handicapped employees whose earning capacity is impaired may be paid less than the minimum wage, by special license from Commissioner.
3 Zone 1 includes cities of 20,000 or more population and contiguous territory within 5 miles thereof; Zone 2, cities having between 4,000 and 20,000 population and contiguous territory
within 2 miles thereof; Zone 3, rest of State. Under All Industries and Occupations and Hotel and Restaurants Orders, in overlapping of one or more zones, wages prescribed by highest
zone shall apply.
4 Maximum hours for women and girls in nearly all industries and occupations, 10 a day, 60 a week.

MAINE
1 Commissioner of Labor and Industry may issue certificate authorizing employment at a wage less than the minimum to (1) handicapped workers for a period not to exceed 1 year;
and (2) a learner or an employee under an approved apprentice training program for a fixed period of time stated in certificate.
2 Hours law establishes a maximum 9- to 50-hour workweek for females employed as production workers in workshops, factories, manufacturing or mechanical establishments; a maxi­
mum 9- to 54-hour workweek for females employed as nonproduction workers in such establishments, and for females employed in mercantile establishments, beauty parlors, hotels,
commercial places of amusement, restaurants, dairies, bakeries, laundries, drycleaning establishments, telegraph offices, telephone exchanges with more than 750 stations, express or
transportation companies, nursing homes, and retail establishments where frozen dairy products are manufactured with specified exceptions.

MARYLAND
1 Hours law establishes a maximum 10 hours a day and 60 hours a week for females 18 years and over employed in any manufacturing, mechanical, mercantile, printing, bakery, or
laundry establishment, except canning, preserving, or preparing for canning or preserving perishable fruits and vegetables. By interpretation, female officeworkers employed in enu­
merated establishments are exempt from the maximum hours provisions.




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MASSACHUSETTS

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779 502 — 05

1 Handicapped worker whose earning capacity is impaired may be paid less than the minimum wage, by special license from the Labor Commissioner; also applicable to learners, ap­
prentices, and employees certified by the State Rehabilitation Commission as handicapped persons under wage fixed in law.
2 Existing wage minimums established by wage order were automatically raised (with exceptions) to 75 cents an hour by Ch. 762 (L. 1955) and Ch. 185 (L. 1956), efiective Apr. 1 1956'
to 80 cents an hour by Ch. 740 (L. 1956), effective Jan. 4, 1957; to 90 cents an hour by Ch. 616 (L. 1958), except to $1 an hour for manufacturing by Ch. 620 (L. 1958), effective Jan. 1 1959to $1 an hour by Ch. 551 (L. 1959), effective Dec. 2, 1959; to $1.15 an hour by Ch. 134 (L. 1962), effective May 24, 1962; and to $1.25 an hour by Ch. 586 (L. 1963), effective Sept! 6, 1963!
Ch. 586 (L. 1963) raised service rates to 80 cents an hour effective July 31, 1963, and to 85 cents an hour effective Sept. 4,1964.
* Hours law establishes a maximum 9- to 48-hour workweek for women and minors employed in any factory or workshop; manufacturing, mechanical, or mercantile establishmenthospital (other than professional personnel); beauty culture, weight-reducing, or other similar establishment; telegraph office; telephone exchange (including switchboard operator in
a private exchange); express or transportation company; private club; office; lettershop; financial institution; laundry; hotel; manicuring or hairdressing establishment; motion picture
theater or other place of amusement; or garage; or as elevator operators; with specified exceptions and permissible variations.
4 Homeworkers must be paid at the established minimum rates or the equivalent in piece rates. Employer is liable for expenses incurred in connection with employment, and under
the Clerical, Technical, and Similar Occupations Order, employer must pay an additional 5 cents an hour where heat, light, power, machinery, and equipment are furnished by the
homeworker. Under Food Processing and Clerical Orders, special permit must be obtained by employer before such work may be distributed.
* The M™™™ Wage Commission may grant a special license permitting payment of less than the established minimum to any school, college, university, or summer camp in the
case of students enrolled and employed therein in these occupations. Also, under the Clerical Order, it may grant a similar license to any school, college, university, hospital, labora­
tory, or other training establishment in the case of each person, including learners, apprentices, or student technicians, whose employment for wages is part of an organized training pro­
gram, at such wages and for such period of time as shall be fixed by the Commission and stated in the license.
5 For any person, including a learner or apprentice, whose employment in the occupation is part of a cooperative educational program, Commission may grant a special cooperative
educational license authorizing a subminimum rate fixed by the Commission and applicable to the period stated in tho license.
’ The 1,040 hours shall not include the time spent or required in a school.

MICHIGAN
1 Hours law establishes an average 9 hours a day (10 maximum) and 54 hours a week for females employed in any factory; mill; warehouse; workshop; quarry; clothing, dressmaking
or millinery establishment; or any place where the manufacture of any goods is carried on; or where any goods are prepared for manufacturing; or in any laundry, store, shop, or any other
mercantile establishment; or in any office, restaurant, theater, concert hall, music hall, hotel, or hospital; or in the operation of an elevator; or on stroet or electric railways
2 Act provides that any increases or decreases in the minimum hourly rate, established in the act after 1967, shall reflect corresponding increases or decreases in the cost of living.

MINNESOTA
1 Hours law sets maximum of 54 a week for females 16 years and over employed in public housekeeping, manufacturing, mechanical, mercantile, or laundry occupations, and as tele­
phone operators in towns with population of 1,600 or more, with specified exceptions. In cases of emergency, or when the Industrial Commission grants special exemptions, longer hours
may be permitted. The law sets a maximum of 8 hours a day, 48 a week, for employed minors under 16 years of age in all occupations.
2
woman or m^nor earner, apprentice, or handicapped person may not be employed at less than the minimum exeept pursuant to M.S. 1957, sec. 177.121.
2 “Service employees” are defined as (I) those whose primary duty is the serving of food and/or beverage to patrons and (2) bellhops, both of whom customarily receive gratuities
equal to or greater than 10 cents an hour directly from patrons they serve. Employees whose primary duties are the preparation or cooking of food or beverage, washing dishes, or main­
taining or cleaning premises are not included under service employee.




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NEVADA
1 Handicapped or incapable workers must be paid the minimum wage rate, the same as other workers. (Op. Atty. Gen., Apr. 11, 1957)
2 Hours law provides that in event of illness of employer or other employees, or a temporary unforeseen increase of business, under specified conditions, regularly employed females
may be permitted to work up to 12 hours a day, up to 56 hours in any week of 7 days, provided VA times employee’s regular rate is paid for each hour over 8 a day and 48 a weok.

NEW HAMPSHIRE
1 Kate effective Jan. 1,1964, was $1.15 an hour.
2 Hours law for women and minors sets a maximum of 10 a day, 48 a week, for manual or mechanical work in any manufacturing establishment; of 10H a day, 54 a week, for such
work in other employment. It expressly exempts hotel and cabin labor, including dining and restaurant service operated therewith and incidental thereto, and boardinghouse labor.
2 Notice must be filed with Labor Commissioner within 5 days after date of employment.
4 Number of apprentices in any establishment at any time limited to one; apprentices must be registered with the Board of Registration of Hairdressers and the Minimum Wage
Board.
4 Number of learners and apprentices may not exceed 10 percent of the number of women and minors in any one establishment, except that each establishment is allowed one learner.
« Labor Commissioner is authorized to make regulations as to wages and hours with reference to the service of students employed while attending school who receive meals and/or
room in lieu of pay.
J Number of learners may not exceed 10 percent of the number of women and minors employed in any estabhshment, except that each establishment is permitted one learner. Learn­
ing period for part-time workers may be computed on a cumulative basis until after 1,040 hours, or 1 year of part-time employment. Order provides that no part-time employee, able
and willing to work, shall be employed less than 4 hours in any 1 day.

NEW JERSEY
1 Handicapped worker whose earning capacity has been impaired may be paid less than minimum, by special license from Commissioner of Labor and Industry.
2 Hours law applicable to females 18 years of age and over sets a maximum of 10 a day, 54 a week, in manufacturing or mercantile establishments, bakeries, laundries, or restaurants,
with specified exceptions and permissible variations.
2 Orders for Restaurant Occupations and for Laundry and Cleaning and Dyeing Occupations declared to be invalid to the extent of their application to hotel restaurants and hotel
laundries, even though hotel restaurants cater to persons who are not guests and hotel laundries handle articles not belonging to the hotel. (Hotel Suburban System v. Holderman, 42 N. J.
Super. 84, 125 A. (2d) 908). (Decision rendered prior to Laundry and Cleaning and Dyeing Occupations Order of Dec. 2, 1962.)
4 Overtime rates became effective for hours over 48 a week beginning Jan. 1, 1957; over 45 beginning July 1, 1957; and over 40 beginning Jan. 1, 1958.
6 Overtime rates became effective for hours over 48 a week beginning Feb. 19, 1956; over 44 beginning May 20,1956; over 40 beginning Aug. 18, 1956.

NEW MEXICO
1 Section of definition of “service employees” which includes drugstore employees held invalid. (.Burch v. h'oy (1957), 62 N.M. 219, 308 P. (2d) 199) “All employees of drugstores . ..
are to be paid a minimum wage of 75 cents an hour.” (Op. Atty. Gen., Apr. 16, 1957) (Minimum wage of 75 cents an hour increased to 80 cents by Ch. 227 (L. 1963); to 90 cents by Ch.
121 (L. 1965).)
2 Hours law sets a maximum of 8 a day, 48 a week, for females employed in any industrial or mercantile establishment; hotel; restaurant, cafe, or eating house; laundry; office as stenog­
rapher, clerk, bookkeeper, or in any other clerical position; place of amusement; telephone or telegraph office; other public utility; with specified exceptions and permissible variations.
2 The term “3 months” means calendar months, irrespective of number of days actually worked. After such period worker becomes eligible for minimum wages. (Op. Atty. Gen.,
July 11,1956) Pieceworkers may be paid on a quantity basis and are exempt from the 75-cent-an-hour minimum. (Op. Atty. Gen., Oct. 8, 1958) (Minimum increased to 80 cents by
Ch. 227 (L. 1963).)




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NEW YORK
1 Minimum wage rates must be paid, or such other wage as determined in accordance with provisions of the article, including allowances for gratuities and, when furnished, for meals
lodging, apparel, and other such items, services, and facilities.
2 Hours law establishes a maximum 8- to 48-hour week for females 16 years and over employed in factories, mercantile establishments, beauty parlors, hotels, or restaurants, with
permissible variations. Exempt from coverage of hour law provisions are females employed in resort or seasonal hotels or restaurants and beauty parlors in towns of less than 15 000
population, as specified.
1
2 Statute applies to nonprofitmaking institutions (as defined), except under option available to nonprofitmaking institutions.
4 Statute provides that (1) exceptions from coverage shall be as defined by regulations of the Commissioner; and (2) exclusion from the term “employee” of those to whom Fair Labor
Standards Act applies shall not apply to the statutory minimum wage established by statute.
* Handicapped worker whose earning capacity has been impaired may be paid not less than 75 percent of the applicable minimum wage after allowances, by special certificate
obtained upon application signed by employer and employee, filed with the Commissioner.
* Employees in this industry who work for the same employer at an occupation governed by another New York State minimum wage order for 1 hour or more on any day, or for
6 hours or more in any week, shall be paid for all hours of working time at the rate for such other industry or this industry, whichever is higher.
7 Employees exempt from coverage of the Minimum Wage Act, Ch. 019 (L. 1960), are exempt from coverage of all minimum wage orders. In addition, each order specifically exempts
establishments operated by any corporation, unincorporated association, community chest, fund, or foundation organized exclusively for religious, charitable, or educational purposes, no
part of the net earnings of which inures to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual.
3 Minimum weekly wage shall not apply and not less than the applicable minimum hourly rate shall be paid for each hour of working timo: in case of voluntary absence (as defined);
in any week there is a total stoppage of the whole plant In excess of 6 hours in a day because of a legal holiday, riot, general breakdown, or act of God; to new employees, under specified
conditions; and under Cleaning and Dyeing Order only, to minors whose hours are limited by law to fewer than 30 a week (in no event shall such minors’ earnings for working 24 or more
hours a week be less than the minimum amount that may be earned at the part-time rate for working time of less than 24 hours a week).
8 The part-time hourly rate shall not apply to a full-time employee who works less than the full-time hours in a week as a result of voluntary absence.
“An employee who works 32 hours on 4 days in any week and reports for work by request or permission of employer on 5th day shall be paid the minimum weekly rate. This provi­
sion is not applicable, and full-time hourly rate must be paid: to new employees hired after beginning of week; to employees voluntarily absent during the period; to employee students
between 14 and 18 years of age who are required to attend a full-time school during the period; and in any week there is a total stoppage of the whole plant in excess of 6 hours a day due to
holiday, riot, breakdown, or act of God.
“ In no event sha11 tlle earnings for a workweek of more than 32 hours be less than the total that may be earned at the part-time rate for 32 hours in any such week.
32 The wages of an employee who works at diversified employment shall be subject to no allowance for gratuities for that day, provided he works for 2 hours or more as a nonservice
employee. Wages of service employee in resort hotel who works 2 hours or more as a chambermaid on any day are subject to allowance for chambermaid for that day.
13 A residential employee shall not be permitted to work or required to be available for work during his normal sleeping hours solely because he is required to be on call during such
hours or at any time when he is free to leave the place of employment.
34 In no event shall the earnings for total hours worked in excess of 30 in any week be less than the total that may be earned at the part-time rate for 30 hours in any such week.
33 Restaurant Industry Order No. 5-d of Apr. 1, 1962, set hourly rate of $1.10 until Nov. 3,1962; $1.15 between Nov. 3, 1962, and Sept. 3, 1963; $1.25 on and after Sept. 3, 1963.
311 In case of voluntary absence, the minimum hourly rate shall be paid for each hour of working time.

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NORTH CAROLINA
1 Handicapped workers, learners, and apprentices may be employed at a wage lower than the minimum, under regulations of the Commissioner of Labor.
2 Law (Ch. 1123 (L. 1963)) provides that a husband, wife, son, daughter, or parent of an employer shall not be enumerated in the number of persons for the purpose of determining
certain establishments excluded from coverage of the law.
3 Hours law sets a mayimnm 9- to 48-hour week for females employed in establishments with 9 or more persons, with exceptions; 10- to 55-hour week for females employed as clerks,
salespersons, or waitresses in retail or wholesale establishments or other businesses and public eating places with 3 but less than 9 persons; and 11- to 55-hour week for females employed
in the following establishments with less than 9 persons: laundries, drycleaning establishments, pressing clubs, workshops, factories, manufacturing establishments, or mills.

NORTH DAKOTA
1 Only women are covered by wage order for specified occupations or industries. According to Order No. 6, “Minors in All Occupations,” Aug. 15, 1939, minors up to 18 years of age
of either sex are entitled to the wage of an experienced adult worker and to an apprentice wage, if not experienced.
2 Hours law establishes a maximum of %X a day, 48 a week, 6 days a week, with permissible variations, for females employed in manufacturing, mechanical, or mercantile establishment;
A
hotel or restaurant; telephone or telegraph establishment or office; express or transportation company. Statute is not applicable to females employed in municipalities of less than 500
population, rural telephone exchanges, and small telephone and telegraph offices where Commissioner, after hearing, determines that work is too light to justify application of the act.
3 Number of employees paid less than the rates for experienced workers may not exceed 25 percent of the employees in an establishment.
4 Order provides that “all existing State wage and hour laws applying to women workers shall apply to all manufacturing industries and establishments/-’ (See footnote 2.)
® Upon application to the Commissioner, any woman physically defective by age or otherwise may secure a permit allowing her to work under conditions and for wages not specified
in order.
« Employer shall so arrange consecutive hours of continuous employment that part-time employee may have fair opportunity to secure other employment to enable her to earn a full
week’s wage.
.
7 Order provides that in exchanges of less than 250 main stations (not covered by hours law) arrangement of operators’ schedules and maximum number of hours a day and days a month
shall be arrived at by mutual agreement between employer and employee, such agreement to be made known to the Department of Agriculture and Labor, and, when no agreement, the
matter shall be referred for adjustment to the Department.

OHIO
1 Women and minors engaged at combined laundry and drycleaning occupations as part of one job shall be paid for all hours worked at the minimum fair rate for the cleaning and
dyeing trade.
.
2 Hours law establishes a maximum 8- to 48-hour week for females employed in any mercantile establishment, office, or laundry and drycleaning establishment, with specified
exceptions and permissible variations.
3 In no event shall earnings for total hours worked in excess of 30 in any week be less than the total that may be earned at part-time rates for 30 hours in any week.
4 Part-time rates shall not apply to: (a) full-time employees who voluntarily absent themselves for any period during the week; (b) high school students enrolled in the part-time
cooperative school-work program conducted by the Ohio Department of Education, for a period not exceeding 1 school year.




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OREGON
1 Permit required to hire a learner at a rate less than the minimum established.
2 Restrictions on types of employment for minors are specified in the order.
3 Women or minor employees who feel they are being required to work overtime too frequently, or unnecessarily, or for excessive number of hours shall have the right to appeal to the
Wage and Hour Commission.
4 No employer shall employ a minor under 18 years of age in excess of 10 hours a day, except as approved by the Commissioner of Labor.
8 Order as amended includes a step-up pay provision only for women and minors in hospitals and nursing homes.
• Hours regulations not applicable in the event of a disaster within the community.
7 Every woman and minor shall have 1 day’s rest in 7; unless a different arrangement is made by employer, Sunday shall be considered the established day of rest. Office Order pro­
vides that employee desiring a greater number of consecutive days off may work not to exceed 10 days without a day off, by employer-employee agreement.
8 At least 24 consecutive hours’ free time or time off each week must be allowed; in lieu of the 24 consecutive hours, the camp may allow 48 consecutive hours each 2-week period.
9 No minor under 16 years of age shall be assigned duties prior to 6 a.m. or after 10 p.m., nor more than 8 hours a day.
10 Counselor defined as a person whose duties primarily relate to guidance, instruction, supervision, or care of campers: (a) special activities counselor has health, safety, and sanitation
responsibilities, such as waterfront, horseback riding, dining room, etc.; (b) senior counselor has had at the beginning of the camping season at least three seasons’ employment on a counselor
staff; (c) junior counselor has had at least one but less than three seasons' employment; (d) first-year trainee counselor has never before been employed a full season in any counselor staff
occupation.
11 Every volunteer or counselor shall be allowed time off or free time amounting to at least 2 hours between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. each day.
12 Wages are in addition to board and lodging.
13 In case a telegraph office or telephone exchange does not demand the uninterrupted attention of the operator, the manager, upon application to the Wage and Hour Commission, may
obtain a special license for the employment of operators under different conditions as to hours and wages than those specified in order, provided such conditions are satisfactory to employee
and are approved by the Commission.
14 Day of rest provision is not applicable to employee who works 6 hours or less a day.

PENNSYLVANIA
1 Handicapped worker whose earning capacity has been impaired may be paid less than the applicable minimum rate, by license from the Department of Labor and Industry,
granted to employer after joint application of employer and employee.
2 Hour law establishes a maximum 10- to 48-hour week for females employed in any establishment; a maximum 8- to 44-hour week for minors under 18 years.
3 Number employed at applicable learner rate limited to no more than 1 employee to 4 experienced workers employed in the establishment; any employer shall be entitled to 2 employ­
ees at learner rate. Employees subject to student and learner provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act meet requirements of this regulation. Longer than 200 hours’ learning period
permitted, by permit from Department of Labor and Industry.
4 Number employed at applicable learner rate limited to no more than 1 employee to 2 other persons employed in establishment.
8 Only male minors 18 years of age and over may be legally employed in excess of 48 hours a week or for 7 days a week.
8 Department of Labor and Industry may grant resort hotels, operating less than 100 days a year between May 26 and September 30, a variation in the number of learners.
7 Employers in restaurant occupations in mercantile establishments are subject to minimum wage regulations applicable to restaurant occupations.
8 Metropolitan Philadelphia and Pittsburgh means (a) all cities, boroughs, and townships any part of which are within a radius of 21 air miles of City Hall, Philadelphia, and (b) all
of Allegheny County.

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PUERTO RICO
I Secretary of Labor may issue a special permit to apprentice or handicapped worker permitting employment at a minimum rate not less than 50 percent of the fixed minimum.
a No maximum hours established, but law requires double the regular rate to be paid for hours over 8 a day, 48 a week, and hours worked on holidays or on day of rest, with specified
exceptions and variations.
• The provisions contained in the orders “in force on the date this act is approved, other than those relative to minimum wage, shall subsist with full force and effect even if the Board
shall subsequently, by decree or order to that effect, change the minimum wage rates.”
4 Includes carpenter and painter helper, hand bottle washer, rum filled-bottle cleaner, grounds keeper, hand loader and trucker, stacker, watchman, janitor, gateman, and messenger.
8 “Any work or service necessary or related to the activities mentioned” includes the work of transporting materials used by the farmer in his farm and the transportation of coffee to
the market when such transportation is not done by an independent contractor; any repair, conservation, or maintenance work done by a coffee farmer on his own account in buildings,
fixed structures, equipment, machinery, or real or personal property used only for agricultural purposes and in relation to coffee production.
• Zone I includes farms in the municipalities of Aguadilla, Cidra, Corozal, Lajas, Las Piedras, Mayaguez, Morovis, Naranjito, San German, Toa Alta, the wards (barrios) to the south
of Road No. 2, or to the west of Road No. 167, within the municipal jurisdiction of Bayamon, and any other municipality of the mountainous region of Puerto Rico, or of the west coast;
Zone II, farms in all other areas.
7 Zone I includes an area which, with the city of San Juan as a center, describes a semicircle with the following boundaries: on the east, along the road by the sea leading to Loiza
Alden up to Loiza River; by Road No. 1 going to Caguas up to La Muda; and by Road No. 2 from San Juan to Bayamon, up to the town of Bayamon itself, including the Catano Zone;
Zone II includes the remainder of Puerto Rico.
8 Whenever the laborer works on a piecework basis, he shall be entitled to receive the highest minimum wage.
• Zone I includes establishments located in the urban zone of the capital and on the margins of Road No. 187 from Santurce to Boca de Cangrejos, including the International Airport,
those in the urban zone of Bayamon and on the margin of Road No. 2 from San Juan to Bayamon; Zone II, those in the urban zone of Aguadilla, Arecibo, Caguas, Guayama, Humacao,
Mayaguez, and Ponce, and those on the margins of Road No. 1 from Rio Piedras to Caguas; Zone III, those in the remainder of Puerto Rico.
10 When an establishment engaged in wholesale and retail trade employs more than 2 employees part of the time, or 1 or more employees full time in wholesale activities, said employees
shall be covered by the order applicable to those activities. In case of a mixed establishment which in addition to engaging in retail trade engages in any activity other than wholesaling,
it shall be understood that the worker or employee is covered by the order applicable to the enterprise or activity he cares for exclusively or chiefly or to which he devotes more than
half of his working time.
II Zone I includes establishments located in the urban zone of the capital and Bayamon and on the margins of Road No. 2 from San Juan to Bayamon and Road No. 187 from Santurce
to Boca de Cangrejos, including the International Airport; Zone II, the urban zone of Aguadilla, Arecibo, Caguas, Guayama, Humacao, Mayaguez, and Ponce, and those on the margins
of Road No. 1 from Rio Piedras to Caguas; Zone III, the remainder of Puerto Rico.
12 In addition to the basic daily wages, the order provides that for every 10 cents of increase (or part thereof) in the price of the hundredweight of sugar (duty-paid basis, delivered)
over a basic price of $5.50, wages will increase by
cents a day.
18 First-class theaters include theaters and motion picture theaters charging 75 cents or more for admission to adults in night shows at least 3 days a week and including drive-in
theaters; second-class theaters include those charging 40 to 74 cents; and third-class theaters include the rest of the theaters and motion picture theaters not comprised in the other two
classes.
14 Zone I comprises the routes in the metropolitan area served or to be served in the future by the Metropolitan Bus Authority of Puerto Rico. Zone II comprises all other routes in
Puerto Rico.
18 Zone I includes the establishments located in the urban zone of the capital and on the margins of Road No. 1 from Rio Piedras to the urban zone of Caguas, Road No. 2 from San
Juan to the urban zone of Bayamon, Road No. 3 from Rio Piedras to the urban zone of Carolina, Roads No. 20 and 23 from Rio Piedras to the urban zone of Guaynabo, Road No. 833 to
Guaynabo (known as Camino Alejandrino), Road No. 187 from Santurce to Boca de Cangrejos, including Roads No. 26 and 187 from Isla Verde to the 65th Infantry Avenue, Road No.
850 from Rio Piedras to the urban zone of Trujillo Alto, Road No. 24 from San Juan to the urban zone of Catano, Road No. 167 from Bayamon to Catano, as well as those establishments
located in the housing developments adjacent to these roads; Zone II includes the establishments located in the remainder of Puerto Rico.




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M Zone I includes the establishments located along the north coastal zone, from the territorial jurisdiction of the municipality of Vega Baja to the territorial jurisdiction of Fajardo;
Zone II includes the establishments located in the remainder of Puerto Rico.

RHODE ISLAND
1 Standards relating to minimum wages, maximum hours, overtime compensation, and other working conditions in effect under any other law which are more favorable to employees
than those applicable under this statute shall continue in full force and effect.
2 Handicapped worker whose earning capacity is impaired and learner and apprentice (for 90 days of employment) may be employed at wages lower than the minimum wage, by
special license issued under regulations of the Department of Labor. Provisions for handicapped worker are applicable to administrative regulations for Laundry and Drycleansing; Retail
Trade; and Restaurant, Hotel Restaurant, and Public Housekeeping.
3 Ch. 105 (L. 1962) established minimum wage rates of $1.15 and 90 cents an hour between Sept. 3,1962, and Sept. 3,1963; $1.25 and $1.00 an hour thereafter.
4 Hours law establishes a 9- to 48-hour workweek for women and minors 16 to 18 years employed in any factory, manufacturing, mechanical, business, or mercantile establishment,
if 5-day week, 9H hours a day permitted. (By permit from the local school department, minors 14 to 16 years of age may work up to 8- to 40-hour week; employment prohibited
during hours school is in session.)
• Regulations included a step-up pay provision. Between Sept. 3, 1962, and Sept. 3,1963, the minimum rate was $1.15 an hour.
• Student is one who is registered for full-time attendance at a recognized institution of learning.
7 Any week in which student works longer than specified part-time hours, hours worked must be paid for at $1.25 an hour.
8 Service occupations include only bellboys, page boys, and porters who regularly receive gratuities.
• Minimum wage may not be reduced due to summer or seasonal schedule of hours; wages of regular employees, whether full- or part-time, may not be reduced for week in which
holiday occurs because of time lost on holiday.
10 At least 24 consecutive hours of rest in each period of 7 consecutive days should be scheduled by every employer for all employees in retail trade occupations.
71 Number of part-time students employed at 85-cent hourly rate shall not exceed 15 percent of the total number of employees in an establishment.
12 Retail establishments covered by the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act may not pay part-time student workers less than $1.25 an hour unless they hold a Federal certificate.
13 During school vacation periods and 2 calendar weeks preceding Easter and Christmas, weekly maximum may not exceed 36 hours.

SOUTH DAKOTA
1 Apprentices, learners, and mentally or physically deficient persons are exempt from statutory minimum wage rate where the Industrial Commissioner issues permits for their
employment fixing their wage or compensation.
2 Hours law establishes a maximum 10- to 54-liour week for females, except for 5 days prior to Christmas when they may be employed for not more than 12 hours a day. Provision
not applicable to farm laborers, domestic servants, telephone and telegraph operators, or persons engaged in the care of livestock. Cities with a population of 3,000 or less exempt from
54-hour limitation.
3 The provisions of the 1943 Act enacted for a 2-year period were made permanent in 1945.

UTAH

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7 Commission may permit handicapped employee to be employed at a special minimum wage.
2 Minors between 16 and 18 years may be employed as markers, shakers, folders, and general clerks for receiving, recording, dispatching, and handling of business traffic in the laun­
dry, cleaning, dyeing, and pressing industry.
3 Student worker defined as a student receiving instruction in an accredited school, college, or university and employed on a part-time basis or during summer vacations.
4 Order prohibits the employment of girls under 18 in hotels, and as messengers in the distribution or delivery of goods or messages.




128

VERMONT
1 Statute authorizes the Commissioner to appoint a wage board with authority to: (a) recommend a suitable scale of rates for learners, apprentices, and handicapped persons; (b) rec­
ommend and determine the amount of deductions for board, lodging, apparel, or other items or services supplied by employer or such other conditions or circumstances as may be usual
in a particular employer-employee relationship, including gratuities.
2 Hours law establishes a 9- to 50-hour workweek for women and minors (16 to 18 years) employed in any mine, quarry, manufacturing or mechanical establishment, with specified
exceptions and permissible variations.
2 Handicapped person may be paid at a reduced rate upon application to the Commissioner of Industrial Relations for a work permit.
4 Service employees include bellboys, porters, doormen, room service waiters, caddy masters, waiters, waitresses, and bartender waiters in hotels and chambermaids in resort hotels;
waiters, waitresses, and bartender waiters in restaurants; and carhops in drive-in restaurants. Counter waiters and waitresses are not included in service employees. Nonservice em­
ployees, in either hotels or restaurants, are those not listed under service employees, including bartenders who do not wait on tables and chambermaids in other than resort hotels.
4 Resort hotel defined as any hotel that offers complete lodging and dining services to the public, not more than 10 months of the year, and further provides, or has immediate access
to, recreational facilities, but in any specific case classification may be determined by the Commissioner of Industrial Relations.
® Total number of learners may not exceed 10 percent of regular employees, except employer with at least one experienced employee may employ one learner.
7 (a) Counseling staff includes experienced counselor who, at the beginning of camping season, has had at least three seasons’ employment in a counselor staff occupation; apprentice
II, no more than two seasons’ previous employment; apprentice I, one season’s previous employment; first-year learner (excluding camper-trainee), no previous employment in a coun­
selor staff position; and camper-trainee, under 17 years, who assists in the guidance and/or instruction of other campers and receives supervision and training from a counselor and/or
camp supervisor, (b) No more than 20 percent of the counseling staff may be paid at the first-year learner rate, and no more than 70 percent may be paid at the first-year and apprentice
rates together. At least one counselor shall be paid at the experienced rate.
8 The minimum wage may be reduced by the value of any supervised educational experience recognized for credit for any college or university, or by any educational experience which
is regularly supervised by a qualified counseling instructor.
* Preseason training courses for counseling staff members are exempt from provisions, except that service and maintenance work in any substantial amount shall be paid for at the
minimum wage of $1 an hour.
10 A resident employee is entitled to 24 hours off duty per week, 12 hours of which should be consecutive.
11 If a counselor works more than a 6-day week, he or she should be given additional compensation prorated on the established scale, except that the first and last weeks of the camp
season a longer week without such additional compensation may be permitted.
12 Camper-trainee shall receive a reasonable compensation in accord with the value of the service rendered and the value of instruction received, by a reduction of tuition, in addition
to maintenance, as agreed between the camper-trainee and the camp director.

WASHINGTON
1 Under special certificate, issued by and pursuant to regulations of Director, handicapped persons, learners, apprentices, and messengers (employed primarily in delivering letters
and messages) may be employed at wages lower than the minimum wage for a specified period of time.
2 Hours law establishes a maximum 8-hour day for females employed in any mechanical or mercantile establishment, laundry, hotel, or restaurant and provides that the hours of work
may be so arranged as to permit the employment of females at any time so that they shall not be employed more than 8 hours during the 24. Statute exempts from coverage harvesting,
packing, curing, canning, or drying perishable fruits or vegetables and canning fish or shellfish.
3 Minimum wage rate of $1.15 an hour was in effect from June 30,1961, until Jan. 1,1962.
4 Minimum wage rates established by wage order are based on a 6-day week. Order provides that unless the equivalent in time off duty has been received, a premium of 25 percent
of the employee’s applicable rate for each week of employment must be paid to resident counselors at termination of employment. Premium payment for 1 week is the equivalent
to 24 hours off duty, 12 hours of which must be in sequence.
s Wage provisions do not apply to apprentices registered under program approved by State Apprenticeship Council, or to learners or to handicapped workers, by special certificate.




4

r

*v

WISCONSIN
1 Where payment of wages is made on other than time rate basis, actual wage shall not be less than provided in order, except piece rates on a particular kind of work are deemed
adequate if they yield 5 cents an hour more than the prescribed minimum to 65 percent of the women and minors.
2 Regulations include a step-up pay provision. Hourly rates effective Nov. 1, 1963, were 15 cents an hour less for women and minors 16 and over; 10 cents an hour less for minors
under 16.
8 Includes communities and isolated establishments which are within the commercial and industrial areas of such cities, although outside their territorial limits.
* Hours law establishes a maximum of 9 a day, 50 a week, for daywork and 8 a day, 48 a week, for nightwork for females 18 and over employed in any manufacturing, mechanical, or
mercantile establishment, beauty parlor, restaurant, laundry, confectionery store, telegraph or telephone office or exchange, or express or transportation establishment, with specified
exceptions. In emergency or peak period for 4 calendar weeks in year, maximum hours may be exceeded, provided V-A times the employee’s regular rate is paid for such overtime and
Commission is notified. Note.—Industrial Commission is empowered to change hours specified in statute by orders regulating hours of work.
6 During the canning season, maximum hours for women and minors over 16 years are 9 a day, 54 a week, except on 12 emergency days in the season of actual canning of a product,
when women and minors 16 to 18 years may be employed 11 hours a day, 60 hours a week. In addition, hour limitations may be waived for boys 16 and 17 years in 10 weeks during the
canning season under conditions specified in the order. Before and after the canning season, maximum hours are 9 and 50 for women 18 years and over; 8 and 48 for boys and girls 17
years of age; 8 and 40 for boys and girls 16 years of age, except that during school vacations they may work 48 hours a week.
• Overtime rate need not be paid to a boy 16 or 17 years of age under specified conditions, provided his rate of pay is at least equal to the lowest hourly rate paid to male employees
and in no case less than $1.15 an hour ($1 between Nov. 1, 1963, and Sept. 1,1964).
i Regulations specify that employees not living in the home who are required to be on duty more than 45 hours must be paid, as a minimum, for 45 hours a week.
8 Minimum wage regulations specify the following pay hours for telephone operators: (a) for 16-hour period between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m., 12 hours’ pay where there are 1 to 199 telephones,
and 16 hours’ pay where there are 200 telephones or more; for 8-hour period between 10 p.m. of one day and 6 a.m. of next day, 3 hours’ pay where there are 1 to 199 telephones, 4 hours’
pay for 200 to 399 telephones, 6 hours’ pay for 400 to 599 telephones, and 8 hours’ pay for 600 telephones or over.
# Maximum hours of work for women operators 18 years of age or over (Ind 74.22, effective June 1, 1956): 9 a day, 50 a week, for exchanges with 1,500 telephones or more; 10 a day,
50 a week, when 600 but less than 1,500 telephones; 10 a day, 54 a week, when 200 but less than 600 telephones; and 10 a day, 60 a week, when less than 200 telephones. In exchanges
having 1,500 telephones and over, if any part of a woman’s work is done before 6 a.m. or after 6:30 p.m. on more than 1 day a week, hours are limited to 8 and 48 during that week.
In exchanges located in a private residence and operated primarily by members of the household, the payment of a wage for the operation of the switchboard of $1.40 a month ($1.25
between Nov. 1,1963, and Sept. 1,1964) per telephone will be regarded as compliance with the minimum wage law, but, if outside help is employed, such help must be paid the minimum
wage rates.

WYOMING
i Hours law establishes a maximum of 8- to 48-hour workweek for females 16 years of age and over employed in manufacturing, mechanical, or mercantile establishments, laundries,
hotels, public lodginghouses, apartment houses, places of amusement, or restaurants. Statute permits overtime for females 18 years and over, provided time and one-half is paid for hours
over 8 a day in a 12-hour period.

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SELECTED WOMEN'S BUREAU PUBLICATIONS
Series of Bulletins on Minimum Wage

61. The Development of Minimum-Wage Laws in the United States,
1912 to 1927. 1928.
167. State Minimum-Wage Laws and Orders: An Analysis. 1939.
Supplements: 1939, 1940, 1941.
191. State Minimum-Wage Laws and Orders: 1942. An Analysis.
1942.
227. State Minimum-Wage Laws and Orders, July 1, 1942-July 1,
1950. Revised Supp. to Bull. 191. 1950. Supplements to
January 1, 1953.
247. State Minimum-Wage Laws and Orders, July 1, 1942-March 1,
1953. 1953. Supplements to August 16, 1956.
267. State Minimum-Wage Laws and Orders, July 1, 1942-July 1,
1958.
Part I—Historical Development and Statutory Provisions,
1958.
Part II—Analysis of Rates and Coverage. 1958. Supple­
ments to January 1, 1962; completely revised January 1,
1963.
Other Bulletins That Include Minimum Wage

16.
40.
63.
98.
137.

State Laws Affecting Working Women. 1921.
State Laws Affecting Working Women. 1924.
State Laws Affecting Working Women. 1927.
Labor Laws for Women in the States and Territories. 1932.
Summary of State Hour Laws for Women and Minimum-Wage
Rates. 1936.
144. State Labor Laws for Women. 1937.

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U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE >1961


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102