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THE BUDGET DOCUMENTS
Data and analyses relating to the budget for 1976 (and for the
3-month transition period, as applicable) are published in four
documents:
The Budget oj the United States Government, 1976 contains the
information that most users of the budget would normally need,
includings the Budget Message of the President. The Budget presents an
overview of the President's budget proposals which includes explanations of spending programs and estimated receipts. This document also
contains a description of the budget system and various summary
tables on the budget as a whole. (Price $3.45.)
The Budget of the United States Government, 1976—Appendix contains
detailed information on the various appropriations and funds which
comprise the budget.
The Appendix contains more detailed information than any of the
other budget documents. It includes for each agency: the proposed text
of appropriation language, budget schedules for each account, explanations of the work to be performed and the funds needed, proposed
general provisions applicable to the appropriations of entire agencies
or groups of agencies, and schedules of permanent positions. Supplemental proposals for the current year and new legislative proposals are
identified separately. Information is also provided on certain activities,
whose outlays are not part of the budget totals. (Price $19.20.)
Special Analyses, Budget oj the United States Government, 1976 contains 17 special analyses that are designed to highlight specified program areas or provide other significant presentations of Federal budget
data.
This document includes analytical information about: Government
finances and operations as a whole and how they affect the economy;
Government-wide program and financial information for Federal
education, manpower, health, income security, civil rights, and crime
reduction programs; trends and developments in the areas of Federal
aid to State and local governments, research and development, and
environmental protection. (Price $2.70.)
The United States Budget in Brief, 1976 provides a more concise,
less technical overview of the 1976 Budget than the above volumes.
Summary and historical tables on the Federal budget and debt are
also provided, together with graphic displays. (Price $1.15.)
GENERAL NOTES
1. All years referred to are fiscal years, unless otherwise
noted.
2. Detail in the tables, text, and charts of this volume may
not add to the totals because of rounding.




TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
1

PART 1. THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT
The budget and the economy
Budget trends and priorities
Energy
National security and foreign relations
Domestic assistance
Budget reform
Conclusion
PART 2. PERSPECTIVES ON THE BUDGET
Budget authority
Budget funds and the Federal debt
Reconciliation of actual and estimated relatively uncontrollable outlays—
Fiscal activities outside the Federal budget
PART 3. ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS A N D LONG RANGE BUDGET PROJECTIONS
Economic assumptions
Long range budget projections
PART 4. BUDGET RECEIPTS
Summary
Economic stimulus and energy tax proposals
Changes in budget receipts
Receipts by source
Analysis of 1974 receipts

5
8
10
12
14
18
19
21
22
24
29
32
39
40
42
53
54
55
58
59
61

PART 5. THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

63

New functional classification
Tax expenditures
National defense
International affairs
General science, space, and technology
Natural resources, environment, and energy
Agriculture
Commerce and transportation
Community and regional development
Education, manpower, and social services
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Law enforcement and justice
General government
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance
Interest

64
67
70
80
88
92
100
104
113
120
129
135
143
149
153
157
160

PART 6. THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

161

The budget process
Coverage of the budget totals
Budget authority and related transactions
Receipts




162
167
169
171

(Hi)

IV

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART 6. THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS-Continued
Page
Other transactions
173
Basis for budget
figures
174
PART 7. TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR
177
Table A. Budget summary
180
Table B. Budget receipts, outlays, and budget authority
181
Table C. Budget authority and outlays by agency..
182
Table D. Budget authority, and outlays therefrom, available through current action by
Congress
183
Table E. Budgetfinancingand outstanding debt
184
Table F. Budget receipts by source
185
Table G. Budget authority and outlays by function
187
Table H. Federal aid to Sstate and local governments
190

PART 8. THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

195

Legislative branch
The judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Military
Department of Defense—Civil
~
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Department of the Interior.
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Department of State
Department of Transportation
Department of the Treasury
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies
Allowances
Budget totals
PART 9. SUMMARY TABLES
Explanatory note relating to the summary tables
Table 1. Budget summary
Table 2. Budget receipts, outlays, and budget authority
Table 3. Budget authority and outlays by agency
Table 4. Budget authority available through current action by Congress
Table 5. Outlays from budget authority available through current action by Congress
Table 6. Relation of budget authority to outlays
Table 7. Obligations incurred, net
Table 8. Balances of budget authority
Table 9. Full-time permanent civilian employment in the executive branch
Table 10. Budgetfinancingand outstanding debt
Table 11. Budget receipts by source
Table 12. Offsetting receipts by type
Table 13. Budget authority and outlays by function and agency
Table 14. Controllability of budget outlays

197
201
204
207
211
221
227
233
237
247
252
261
263
266
270
276
280
281
283
286
287
290
316
316
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
328
329
330
331
332
335
338
354




TABLE OF CONTENTS

V

PART 9. SUMMARY TABLES—Continued
Page
Table 15. Legislative proposals for major new and expanded programs in the 1976 budget__ 356
Table 16. Budget receipts by source, 1966-76
358
Table 17. Budget outlays by function, 1966-76
360
Table 18. Federal transactions in the national income accounts, 1965-76
365
Table 19. Federalfinancesand the gross national product, 1954-76
366
Table 20. Budget receipts and outlays, 1789-1976
.
367
Index
369




PART I

THE BUDGET MESSAGE
OF THE
PRESIDENT




THE BUDGET DOLLAR
Fiscol Year 1976 Estimate
Other

Where it comes from.
individual
Income Taxes

Corporation
Income Taxes

Receipts

\

13/

From Employers

From
Employees




National
Direct

Defense

Benefit
Payments
to Individuals

G/ants
to.7States
d/Localities

Other Federal

For Individuals

Operations
Other

BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT
To the Congress of the United States:
The year 1976 will mark the bicentennial of this country. With this
budget we shall begin our third century as a Nation.
In our first two centuries we have developed from 13 struggling
colonies to a powerful leader among nations. Our population has
increased from three million to more than 213 million. From a simple
agricultural society we have grown into a complex industrialized one.
Our Government—and its budget—have grown with the Nation,
as the increasing complexity of modern society has placed greater
responsibilities upon it. Yet our society has remained free and democratic, true to the principles of our Founding Fathers.
As we approach our third century as a Nation, we face serious
economic difficulties of recession and inflation. I have a deep faith,
however, in the fundamental strength of our Nation, our people, our
economy, and our institutions of government. I am confident that we
can overcome today's challenges as we have overcome others in the
past—and go on to greater achievements.
M y budget recommendations are designed to meet longer-term national needs as well as immediate, short-run objectives. I t is vital
that they do so. Because of the size and momentum of the budget,
today's decisions will have far-reaching and long-lasting effects.
The recommendations set forth in this budget are an integral part
of the broader series of proposals outlined in my State of the Union
address. These proposals provide for:
—fiscal policy actions to increase purchasing power and stimulate
economic revival, including tax reductions and greatly increased
aid to the unemployed;
THE BUDGET AT A GLANCE
|In billioni of dollars)
Item

Receipts
OutUyi
Deficit ( - )




1974
actual

_____

_
_

_

1975
estimate

1976
Transition
estimate
quarter

264.9
268.4

278.8
313.4

297.5
349.4

84.4
94.3

-3.5

-34.7

-51.9

-9.8

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

—a major new energy program that will hold down energy use,
accelerate development of domestic energy resources, and promote
energy research and development;
—an increase in outlays for defense in order to maintain preparedness and preserve force levels in the face of rising costs;
—a one-year moratorium on new Federal spending programs other
than energy programs; and
—a temporary 5% ceiling on increases in pay for Federal employees,
and on those benefit payments to individuals that are tied to
changes in consumer prices.
These policies call for decisive action to restore economic growth
and energy self-reliance. My proposals include a one-time $16 billion
tax cut—$12 billion for individual taxpayers and $4 billion for businesses—to stimulate economic recovery.
Total Federal outlays are estimated to increase 11% between 1975
and 1976. It is essential that we keep a tight rein on spending, to
prevent it from rising still further and making tax reduction imprudent. I believe that tax relief, not more Government spending, is the
key to turning the economy around to renewed growth.
I regret that my budget and tax proposals will mean bigger deficits
temporarily, for I have always opposed deficits. We must recognize,
however, that if economic recovery does not begin soon, the Treasury
will lose anticipated receipts and incur even larger deficits in the future.
My energy program calls for an increased fee on imported oil, and an
excise tax on domestically produced petroleum and natural gas. The
proposals also call for decontrol of oil prices—coupled with a windfall
profits tax—and deregulation of prices on new natural gas. These
measures will discourage excessive energy use and reduce our dependence on imported oil. The $30 billion in receipts these measures will
produce will be refunded to the American people—refunded in a way
that helps correct the distortions in our tax system created by inflation.
Special provisions will ensure that low-income Americans and State
and local governments are compensated equitably. All of these compensatory measures will be in addition to the $16 billion in tax relief
I have proposed.
My budget recommendations provide for total outlays of $349.4
billion in 1976, an increase of $35.9 billion over 1975, and anticipate
receipts of $297.5 billion, an increase of $18.8 billion over 1975.
The Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974
provides for major reforms in the budget process. As part of these
reforms, it changes the fiscal year for the Federal budget from the
present July-through-June basis to an October-through-September
basis, beginning with the 1977 fiscal year. This requires that there be a
separate transition quarter, extending from July through September
of 1976, after fiscal year 1976 ends and before fiscal year 1977 begins.




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

5

Estimates for the transition quarter are included in this budget. In
general, they anticipate continuing the 1976 program levels unchanged
for the additional three months. Because outlays and receipts vary
seasonally—that is, they do not occur at uniform rates during the
year—the estimates for this quarter (and particularly the deficit) are
not representative of a full year's experience.

THE BUDGET AND THE ECONOMY
If the Congress acts decisively on the new policies I have announced
in my State of the Union address, and if we exercise reasonable patience
and restraint, we can go far toward solving the broad range of economic
problems our Nation now faces.
It must be clearly understood that these problems are serious and
that strong remedies are fully justified. The economy is now in a recession. Unemplovment is far too high and productivity has declined. At
the same time, inflation, a serious and growing problem for nearly
a decade, continues to distort our economy in major ways. Underlying
these problems is the fact that we are far from self-sufficient in energy
production, and even with the measures I have proposed, regaining
the capacity for self-sufficiency will take years to achieve. Imported
fuel supplies have been interrupted once and remain vulnerable, and
oil prices have been increased fourfold.
The increased unemployment and continued price increases from
which we now suffer are problems we share with much of the rest of the
world. The roots of these problems are complex. The steep rise in the
price of imported oil, for example, while directly increasing prices,
has also acted like a tax increase by reducing the real income of
American consumers and transferring that income to oil exporting
countries. Lower real incomes, combined with consumer resistance to
rising prices, has reduced the demand for goods in the American marketplace. Such factors, superimposed on the inevitable slowdown in
economic growth following the boom of 1972-73, underlie the recession
we are now in.
The weakening of consumer demand and investment, in turn, is
beginning to exert a dampening effect on price and wage increases.
Thus, inflationary pressures are already beginning to recede and are
likely to continue to do so. The one-time increase in fuel costs needed
to constrain excessive energy usage will not reverse this basic trend.
Aiding economic recovery.—In view of this situation, I have
proposed a $16 billion rebate of personal and corporation income taxes
that will help reduce unemployment without rekindling inflation. This
tax cut will contribute to deficits, adding $6 billion in 1975 and $10
billion in 1976.
Aside from the effects of the proposed tax reduction, the deficits
anticipated for 1975 and 1976 are in large part the result of those




6

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1 9 7 6

aspects of the budget and the tax system that respond automatically
to changes in the economy. When an economic slowdown occurs,
Federal tax collections slow down more than incomes and profits do,
and unemployment benefit payments rise sharply. These factors tend
to cushion the economic downturn and help sustain individual and
corporate incomes.
These stabilizing influences are substantial. If the economy were
to be as fully employed in 1976 as it was in 1974, we would have
$40 billion in additional tax receipts, assuming no change in tax rates.
Aid to the unemployed, including the special measures I proposed
and the Congress enacted last December, will be $12.7 billion larger
in 1976 than in 1974, providing income support for 14.7 million beneficiaries and their families. In 1975, receipts would be $30 billion higher
and aid to the unemployed is up $9 billion over 1974. These factors
alone more than account for the deficits expected in both 1975 and
1976.
THE BUDGET TOTALS
[In billions of dollars]
1974
actual

Description

1975
estimate

1976
Transition
estimate
quarter
estimate

Budget receipts

264.9

278.8

297.5

84.4

Budget outlays

268.4

313.4

349.4

94.3

Deficit ( - )

-3.5

-34.7

-51.9

-9.8

313.9

395.1

385.8

88.2

468.4
343.0

486.2
346.1

538.5
389.6

605.9
453.1

616.8
465.5

44.2
13.2
146.9
54.8

46.1
15.4
153.2
71.1

46.2
30.8
154.0
86.0

49.6
39.8
161.7
94.7

n.a
n.a
n.a
n.a

Budget authority
1973

actual
Outstanding debt, end of fiscal period:

Gross Federal debt
Debt held by the public
Outstanding Federal and federally assisted
credit, end of fiscal period:
Direct loans—on budget
Direct loans—off budget
Guaranteed and insured loans 1
Government-sponsored enterprise loans 2_
1
1

Exclude* loans held by Government accounts and special credit agencies.
See table E—10 in Special Analysis E. Federal Credit Programs, published in a separate rolume.

The Government must act decisively to help restore economic
health, and act compassionately to aid those most seriously affected
by unemployment. It does not make economic sense to insist on
cutting a dollar out of the budget for each dollar of tax receipts lost
just because of decreases in incomes and profits resulting from the
economic downturn. Nor does it make sense arbitrarily to offset each




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

dollar of increased aid to the unemployed by a reduction elsewhere
in the budget.
Last October, I proposed a National Employment Assistance Act,
which provided for liberalized unemployment benefits and coverage
and for more public employment. Congress has since enacted, and I
have signed into law, two employment assistance acts derived from my
proposals. One of these measures, the Emergency Jobs and Unemployment Assistance Act, provides unemployment benefits to workers not
covered by the regular unemployment insurance system and provides
increased job opportunities in the public sector. The other measure,
the Emergency Unemployment Compensation Act, extends the length
of time that workers covered by the regular unemployment insurance
system are eligible for benefits. My budget recommendations include
outlays of $17.5 billion in 1976 for income support for the unemployed,
both under these two acts and under the regular unemployment
compensation programs. Another $1.3 billion will be spent for increased
public sector jobs.
Budget reductions.—While recommending temporary measures to
help the economy and to provide greater assistance to the unemployed, I have sought, on an item-by-item basis, to eliminate nonessential spending and avoid commitment to excessive growth of
Federal spending in the long run. I am proposing no new spending
initiatives in this budget other than those for energy. I am also proposing that the allowable increase in Federal pay and in benefit payments
to individuals that currently are linked by law to increases in consumer
price levels be limited to 5% through June 30 of next year. To be
equitable, this ceiling should apply to all these programs. This limit
will save $6 billion in 1976 and permit us to concentrate maximum
resources on direct efforts to speed economic recovery, including tax
reduction.
In addition, I have previously asked the Congress to agree to a
series of measures that would reduce outlays. In some cases the
Congress has done so; in others it has overturned my proposals. Those
economy measures to which Congress has not objected are reflected in
my budget recommendations. These measures will provide $8 billion
in savings in 1976. Further program reductions recommended in this
budget will save another $3 billion. Unless the Congress concurs
with the proposals now before it, including those advanced in this
budget, outlays—and thus the deficit—will be about $17 billion
greater in 1976 than the figure estimated in this budget. It is therefore
essential that the tax cuts I am proposing be considered in conjunction
with these savings proposals.
My proposal to place a temporary limit on civil service and military
pay increases recognizes that the Federal Government must set an




8

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

example for the rest of the economy, and that Federal employees
generally enjoy considerably greater job security than the average
worker under current economic conditions. I believe that most Federal
employees will understand that some restraint on their pay increases
is appropriate now to help provide benefits and increased job opportunities for those who are unemployed.
I urge the Congress to accept this recommendation. I especially
urge the private sector—labor and management alike—to follow this
example and minimize price and wage increases.
I have proposed a similar temporary limit on the automatic increases
in benefit programs linked to changes in consumer prices. These programs include Social Security, Railroad Retirement, Federal employee
retirement and disability systems, military retired pay, Supplemental
Security Income, and the food stamp and child nutrition programs.
My proposal is made in the context of the very large increases that
have occurred in these programs in recent years—increases well in
excess of the rate of inflation. For example, between 1970 and 1975,
average payments per Social Security beneficiary have increased 22%
in constant prices—that is, after adjusting for the 38% rise in consumer prices. Both benefit increases and growth in the number of beneficiaries have contributed to an increase in outlays for these programs
from $39 billion in 1970 to an estimated $91 billion in 1975.
With thousands of workers being laid off while considerable inflationary momentum persists, I believe that modest restraint on Federal
pay raises and on the growth of Federal benefit programs is an equitable way to keep the budget from perpetuating inflation.
BUDGET TRENDS AND PRIORITIES
The Federal budget both reflects our national priorities and helps
to move the Nation toward their realization. Recent years have seen
a significant shift in the composition of the Federal budget. The proportion of the budget devoted to defense has declined substantially
since 1964, with a corresponding increase in the nondefense proportion of the budget. This shift has been particularly rapid since 1969,
due in part to the end of American combat involvement in Vietnam.
Defense outlays remained virtually level in current dollar terms
from 1969 to 1974, absorbing substantial cost increases—including the
pay raises necessary to establish equitable wage levels for our servicemen and women and to make possible the transition to an all-volunteer
armed force. Defense programs have undergone large reductions in
real terms—reductions of about 40% since 1969 in manpower and
materiel. In consequence, defense outlays have been a decreasing share
of our gross national product, falling from 8.9% in 1969 to 5.9% in
1976.
At the same time, Federal nondefense spending has increased substantially in both current and constant dollar terms, growing from




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT
Federal Outlays as a Percent of GNP
'jrW

30-

Total

30Payments to Individuals and Grants

Interest and
Other Nondefense

National Defense

1967

11.6% of the gross national product in 1969 to an estimated 16.0% in
this budget. In the process, the form that Federal spending takes has
shifted dramatically away from support for direct Federal operations
and toward direct benefits to individuals and grants to State and
local governments. About a third of the latter also help to finance
payments to individuals. Both legislated increases and built-in program
growth have contributed to the doubling of outlays for domestic
assistance in the past five years. The sharp drop in defense manpower
and procurement has helped make this possible without tax increases
or larger deficits.
It is no longer realistically possible to offset increasing costs of
defense programs by further reducing military programs and strength.
Therefore, this budget proposes an increase in defense outlays in
current dollars that will maintain defense preparedness and preserve
manpower levels in the face of rising costs. These proposals are the
minimum prudent levels of defense spending consistent with providing
armed forces which, in conjunction with those of our allies, will be
adequate to maintain the military balance. Keeping that balance is
essential to our national security and to the maintenance of peace.
In 1969, defense outlays were nearly one-fifth more than combined
outlays for aid to individuals under human resource programs and for




10

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

aid to State and local governments. Despite the increase in currentdollar defense outlays, this budget—only seven years later—proposes
spending twice as much money for aid to individuals and State and
local governments as for defense.
Outlays for assistance to individuals and to State and local governments will rise from $140 billion in 1974 to $173 billion in 1975,
and $190 billion in 1976. These increases include the costs of the
emergency unemployment assistance measures enacted last December, together with increased outlays under the regular unemployment insurance system. Outlays for other benefit programs, including
Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Medicare, and
Medicaid, will also increase substantially.
The budget carries forward a philosophy that stresses an appropriate separation of public and private sector responsibilities. Within
the sphere of public sector responsibilities, it calls for Federal emphasis on meeting national problems and encourages State and local
responsibility and initiative in meeting local and statewide needs.
Broader Federal aid to States and localities and a reduction in the
Federal restrictions imposed as requirements for this aid are key elements of this philosophy. In 1974, Federal aid supplied 2 1 % of total
State and local government receipts, more than twice the percentage
of two decades earlier. My budget recommends Federal grants-in-aid
of $56 billion in 1976.
ENERGY
The fourfold increase in oil prices dictated by oil-exporting countries
has been a major factor in the sharp inflationary surge of the past
year and a half. It endangers the health of world trade and is creating
significant financial and economic disruption throughout the world.
Among other things, the resulting high fertilizer prices are hampering
efforts to increase world agricultural production, thereby aggravating
the world food problem.
Fuel conservation.—I continue to believe that fuel conservation
and a reduction of world oil prices are in the long-term interest of both
consumer and producer countries. Accordingly, I have proposed a series
of stringent fuel conservation measures, including taxes on petroleum
and natural gas offset by income tax reductions, payments to lowincome individuals, and increased aid to State and local governments.
On balance, this program will preserve consumer and business purchasing power while strongly discouraging petroleum consumption.
Amendments to the Clean Air Act and other measures I have proposed
will contribute to substantial improvement in automobile gasoline




11

THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

mileage and allow greater use of domestic coal for electric power
generation, thus further reducing our need for imported oil.
At the same time, my Administration is pursuing diplomatic efforts
to alleviate financial and supply problems in the industrialized world.
Development of domestic energy sources.—Fuel conservation measures and stronger diplomatic efforts are only part of the
solution to the energy problem. Vigorous efforts to speed development
of our vast domestic energy resources—particularly oil, gas, coal, and
nuclear—are also essential. As part of these efforts, my Administration
has worked out a comprehensive plan for leasing the offshore oil and
gas resources of our Outer Continental Shelf. Studies are underway
to insure that development and production will be accomplished
safely and in an environmentally acceptable manner. We also seek
responsible use of our extensive Naval Petroleum Reserves in California and Alaska and are taking steps to increase our use of our
vast domestic coal reserves. These measures, including workable and
precise legislation regulating strip mining, seek a proper balance
between energy needs and environmental considerations. I will propose
Energy Research and Development Outlays
$ Billions

$ Billions

2.0-

-2.0
|

| Nude**, Breeder Reactor
1.66

Older Nuclear Power
Fossil Fuel and Other
1.5 —
1.22

.45

~~ 1.0

.82
.36

-.5

J974
Fiscal Years

580-000 O - 75 - 2




12

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

legislation to assist certain utilities facing serious financial difficulties
and to encourage utilities to use fuels other than oil and natural gas.
Increased domestic supplies, including establishment of a strategic
petroleum storage system, coupled with fuel conservation, will help
reduce our dependence upon petroleum imports and our vulnerability
to interruption of foreign supplies.
In addition, the Federal Government has further expanded its
research and development program to provide the new and improved
technologies necessary for increasing the use of our domestic energy
resources. Outlays for energy research and development will be $1.7
billion in 1976, an increase of 36% over 1975 and 102% over 1974.
My budget recommendations continue our vigorous nuclear research
and development program and further accelerate nonnuclear energy
research and development—particularly in coal and solar energy. To
provide a better organizational framework for this effort, last October
I signed into law an act creating the Energy Research and Development Administration, which brings together within a single agency the
Government's various research and development programs relating to
fossil fuels, nuclear energy, and other energy technologies such as
geothermal and solar. An independent Nuclear Regulatory Commission has also been established to improve the regulatory process
associated with nuclear plant licensing, safety, and nuclear materials
safeguards, and to separate this function from nuclear power development activities.
Agriculture.—Besides fuel costs, the cost of food has been the other
special problem in the inflationary surge of the past two years. A worldwide decline in agricultural production due in part to adverse weather
conditions has created shortages that have been critical in some areas
and have sent world food prices soaring.
In response to these shortages, we have stimulated U.S. production
by eliminating Government-imposed crop restrictions originally designed to prevent surpluses. Our increased production will help to
curb inflation and will aid in relieving severe food shortages abroad.
To the extent that we can produce beyond ou* domestic needs, we
will be able to increase our agricultural exports and share our increased supplies with hungry peoples overseas.
NATIONAL SECURITY AND FOREIGN RELATIONS
The ultimate goal of American foreign policy is to ensure the
freedom, security, and well-being of the United States as part of a
peaceful and prosperous international community. Our diplomacy,
backed by a strong national defense, strives to strengthen this international community through the peaceful resolution of international
disputes, through arms control, and by fostering cooperation and




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

13

mutual restraint. We seek a healthy world economy through expanded
trade, cooperative solutions to energy problems, and increased world
agricultural production to meet mankind's need for food. In today's
interdependent world, each of these objectives serves our own national
interest even as it helps others.
National security.—The Vladivostok understanding, which I
reached with General Secretary Brezhnev of the Soviet Union,
represents a major step on the long and arduous road to the control
and eventual reduction of nuclear arms. For the first time, we have
reached an understanding on specific and equal limitations on strategic
nuclear weapons. Once we have concluded an agreement based on
these understandings, we will be prepared to take the next step—
to seek further reductions, as we have already done in the case
of antiballistic missile launchers.
The progress we have already made along the road to eventual
strategic arms reductions has been possible only because we have
remained strong. If we are to make further progress, we must act to
preserve our strategic strength. My defense proposals provide for
necessary force improvements and for the development of strategic
alternatives necessary to maintain, within the limits of the Vladivostok
agreement, a credible strategic deterrent.
More attention must now be given to maintaining an adequate
balance in general purpose forces. In this area we share the burden of
defense with our allies. The United States has entered into negotiations between members of NATO and of the Warsaw Pact on mutual
and balanced force reductions. If those negotiations are successful,
some U.S. forces stationed in Europe could safely be withdrawn. For
the time being, however, the United States and its allies must maintain present manpower levels and continue to strengthen conventional
combat capabilities.
In an effort to increase efficiency and achieve greater combat oapability with existing manpower levels, the Army has undertaken to
provide 16 active combat divisions by June of 1976 with approximately
the same total number of Army personnel as was authorized for 13
divisions in June of 1974. This 16-division combat force will require additional equipment, which is provided for in my budget
recommendations.
Because the welfare and survival of the United States and its allies
depend upon the flow of ocean-going trade and supplies, strong naval
forces are required. In recent years, the number of Navy ships has
decreased, primarily as a result of the retirement of many aging ships
built during World War II. The savings from this action have been
used to strengthen the combat capabilities of the remaining force. This
budget provides for a vigorous program of new ship construction




14

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

and modernization necessary to maintain the naval balance in the
future.
Foreign relations.—In addition to maintaining a strong defense capability, the United States strives, through its diplomacy, to develop
and maintain peaceful relationships among nations. Foreign assistance
is both an expression of our humanitarian concern and a flexible
instrument of diplomacy. Our assistance in Indochina is making an
essential contribution to the security and reconstruction of the countries in that region. Additional military assistance is now necessary to
enable the South Vietnamese and Cambodian Governments to defend
themselves against increasing military pressure. Our assistance in the
Middle East is an integral part of our diplomatic effort to continue
progress toward a peaceful solution to the area's problems. An increasing portion of our economic aid program is devoted to helping
developing countries improve their agricultural productivity.
Higher oil prices, widespread food shortages, inflation, and spreading
recession have severely strained the fabric of international cooperation.
The United States has undertaken several major diplomatic initiatives
designed to help restore international economic stability. Our diplomatic efforts were instrumental in the establishment of the International Energy Agency and its program, which provides for emergency
oil sharing, conservation efforts, and development of alternative energy
sources. More recently, the United States proposed a $25 billion special
financing facility to assist industrialized countries in dealing with
balance of payments difficulties. This new facility will supplement
expanded operations of the International Monetary Fund. At the
World Food Conference, in Rome, the United States proposed a
number of measures to deal with the world food problem, including
Creation of an international system of grain reserves.
In addition, the Trade Act passed by the Congress last December
will make possible a strengthening of international trade relations by
enabling the United States to work with other nations toward reducing
tariff and nontariff barriers to trade and improving access to supplies.
The strengthening of international trade and financial cooperation
is essential if we and other nations are to cope successfully with
current economic stresses. It is a prerequisite for renewed economic
progress at home and abroad.
DOMESTIC ASSISTANCE
The enormous growth in recent decades of Federal programs for
assistance to individuals and families, and to State and local governments, has placed heavy demands on the budget. This growth expressed the desire of a compassionate society to provide well for its




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

15

retired workers, veterans, and less fortunate members without
sacrificing our proud and productive tradition of individual initiative
and self-reliance. I n the process, we have built a stronger partnership
among the various levels of government: Federal, State, and local.
AID TO INDIVIDUALS AND TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
[Dollar amounts in billions]

Item

Payments to individuals!
Grants-in-aid!
For payments to individuals
Other
Total
Memorandum:
All other outlays
1

1968

1970

1972

1974

1976

Percent
'"JgJ"*'
1976

$40
19
(6)
(13)

$51
24
(8)
(15)

$70
36
(15)
(21)

$94
46
(16)
(30)

$135
56
(18)
(37)

241
199
(201)
(198)

58

75

106

140

190

227

(121)

(122)

(126)

(128)

(159)

(32)

Excludes military retired pay and grants classified in the national defense function.

Human resources programs.—The rapid growth of human resources programs in recent years has brought about many improvements in the well-being of the American people. Benefits under Social
Security, Medicare, Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income, food
stamps and veterans programs have increased substantially. In just
seven years, cash benefits under social security programs will have risen
from $26 billion in 1969 to $70 billion in 1976. They now reach 28
million beneficiaries. By 1976, six social security benefit increases will
have occurred since 1969. Automatic cost-of-living adjustments to
benefits are now provided by law. Allowing for the temporary 5%
ceiling I have proposed on benefit increases between now and July
1976, the increases from 1970 through 1976 in the average recipient's
social security benefits, taken together, will total 77%. This far
exceeds the increases in the cost of living (51%) estimated for this
period.
The Supplemental Security Income program began operation a year
ago, replacing the various State public assistance programs for the
aged, the blind, and the disabled with a more uniform and equitable
national system. This broad reform has provided higher benefits for
these disadvantaged groups. In addition, Federal assumption of
responsibility for these programs has provided significant fiscal relief
to State and local governments. This budget provides for substantial
increases in administrative personnel necessary to improve services
to beneficiaries both of this program, and of social security.




16

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Outlays for the food stamp program have increased from $248
million in 1969 to an estimated $3.6 billion in 1976.1 have undertaken
reforms to simplify the administration of this program and reduce
costs, while providing for more equitable treatment of beneficiaries.
Outlays (or Aid to the Unemployed
$ Billions

S Billions

1976
Estimate

Over the years, the income security of our labor force has been
enhanced by liberalization of benefits and coverage under our unemployment insurance system, while increased employment opportunities
have been created in areas of high unemployment. Programs derived
from the special unemployment assistance measures I proposed last
October have been enacted into law as the Emergency Jobs and Unemployment Assistance Act and the Emergency Unemployment
Compensation Act. With these new acts, total unemployment assistance, including employment programs, will expand 207%, from $6.1
billion in 1974 to $18. 8 billion in 1976.
Our present welfare system is inefficient and inequitable. It is
wasteful not only of tax dollars but, more importantly, of human
potential. Left unchanged, over the long run the situation will almost
surely continue to deteriorate. I urge the Congress to work with my
Administration to develop reforms that make the system simple, fair,
and compassionate. This approach need not cost more, but rather
can use our welfare dollars more effectively.




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

17

America needs to improve the way it pays for medical care. We
should begin plans for a comprehensive national health insurance
system. However, in view of the economic developments and the
measures I have proposed to combat recession and inflation, I cannot
now propose costly new programs. Once our current economic probblems are behind us, the development of an adequate national medical
insurance system should have high national priority. I urge the Congress to work with my Administration in order to devise a system
that we will be able to afford.
The major existing Federal programs for financing medical care,
Medicare and Medicaid, are now 10 yeais old. Medicare outlays of
$15 billion in 1976 will help to meet the medical costs of an estimated 13.3 million aged and disabled Americans, 29% more people
than were aided in 1971. Medicaid outlays of $7.2 billion will help
to pay medical care for 26 million low-income Americans in 1976—
a 40% increase in beneficiaries since 1971. Federal health programs
also provide health care and insurance for Federal employees, veterans,
and other groups. In total, existing Federal health programs now pay
about 27% of the Nation's total health bill.
General Revenue Sharing.—General Revenue Sharing has become
an integral and important part of the Federal grants-in-aid system.
This program has been highly successful, providing fiscal assistance
that can be applied flexibly to meet the needs of States and localities
according to their priorities. It has distributed assistance more equitably than before, reaching many local governments that had not
received Federal aid in the past.
Current authority for general revenue sharing will expire at the
end of calendar year 1976. Because I believe in the soundness of this
program, I shall propose legislation extending general revenue sharing
through fiscal year 1982. Prompt action by the Congress on the
proposed extension will permit State and local governments to plan
their future budgets more effectively and avoid the waste and inefficiencies that prolonged budgetary uncertainties would create. In
addition, the energy tax equalization payments to State and local
governments will be distributed according to the formula used for
general revenue sharing.
Transportation.—My budget recommendations anticipate legislation that I shall propose to extend the Highway Trust Fund through
1980 for the Interstate Highway System only, and increase its funding.
My proposal will focus trust fund assistance on completion of key
segments of the Interstate Highway System needed to link the national
system together. They will also combine a number of narrow categorical grant programs to eliminate red tape and allow localities greater




18

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

Federal Grants to State and Local Governments

1966

?967

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

Fiicol Y«or*

flexibility in meeting their transportation problems. In 1978, States
will be permitted, under this proposal, to assume over $1 billion of
Federal motor fuel tax receipts for local needs.
In order to improve the safety and efficiency of the Nation's aviation system, and to increase its responsiveness to current needs, I
will propose legislation to restructure Federal airport and airway
development programs. My proposal will broaden the range of aviation
activities that may be financed from the Airport and Airway Trust
Fund, eliminate unnecessary Federal involvement in airport investment decisions, and allocate user fees more equitably among aviation
system users.
BUDGET REFORM
As demands on the budget have grown, the need for better congressional procedures for considering the budget has become increasingly clear. In the past the Congress has acted upon the budget in a
piecemeal fashion, with far too little attention to the total. The
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act, passed last
summer, mandates changes in the Federal budget and major reforms
in congressional procedures for dealing with it. Under the new proce-




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

19

dures, the Congress will have a larger and better-defined role in
developing sound budget and fiscal policies. Congressional organization and procedures will focus greater attention on the budget totals
early in the legislative process.
Major provisions of the act require greater attention to the futureyear costs of legislative proposals and ongoing programs, and establish
a budget committee in each Chamber and a Congressional Budget
Office to aid Congress in its consideration of budget recommendations.
The shift of the fiscal year to an October-to-September basis will give
the Congress more time to complete action on the budget before the
fiscal year begins.
The act also provides for a closer working relationship between
the Congress and the executive branch in controlling outlays. I look
forward to a new era of fruitful cooperation between the legislative
and executive branches on budgetary matters, a cooperation that
will enhance fiscal responsibility, make the budget a more useful
instrument of national policy, and promote a more careful allocation
of limited resources.
During the past six years, the budget has become increasingly
forward-looking, focusing attention on the future effects of budget
proposals. The new act builds upon this initiative with the requirement that the budget present more extensive five-year projections of
outlays and receipts. These projections indicate the large natural
increase in receipts resulting from rising incomes and profits as the
economy recovers. These increased receipts, coupled with prudent
fiscal restraint, will make it possible to avoid deficits that would be
inflationary when the economy returns to high employment.
The Government strongly affects the economy in many ways not
fully reflected in the budget. These influences include tax expenditures
such as those that encourage homeownership and business investment; and the operations of Federal or Government-sponsored enterprises, particularly in the credit field, that are excluded from the
budget. The new act recognizes the importance of these factors by
requiring that they be given greater consideration in connection
with the budget.
CONCLUSION
As we approach our national bicentennial, difficult challenges lie
before us. The recommendations in this budget address the Nation's
problems in a direct, constructive, and responsible fashion. They are
designed to move the Nation toward economic health and stability.
They meet human needs. They provide for the strong defense essential
to our national security and to our continuing efforts to maintain
world peace.




20

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Looking beyond the bicentennial, toward the year 2000, the practical limits to the growth of the Federal Government's role in our
society become increasingly clear. The tremendous growth of our
domestic assistance programs in recent years has, on the whole, been
commendable. Much of the burden of aiding the elderly and the needy
has been shifted from private individuals and institutions to society as
a whole, as the Federal Government's income transfer programs have
expanded their coverage.
These programs cannot, however, continue to expand at the rates
they have experienced over the past two decades. Spending by all
levels of government now makes up a third of our national output.
Were the growth of domestic assistance programs to continue for the
next two decades at the same rates as in the past 20 years, total
government spending would grow to more than half of our national
output. We cannot permit this to occur. Taxation of individuals and
businesses to pay for such expansion would simply become insupportably heavy. This is not a matter of conservative or liberal ideology.
It is hard fact, easily demonstrated by simple extrapolation. We must
begin to limit the rate of growth of our budgetary commitments in the
domestic assistance area to sustainable levels.
The growth of these domestic assistance programs has taken place
in a largely unplanned, piecemeal fashion. This has resulted in too
many overlapping programs, lack of coordination, and inequities.
Some of the less needy now receive a disproportionate share of Federal
benefits, while some who are more needy receive less. We must redouble the efforts of the past five years to rationalize and streamline
these programs. This means working toward a stable and integrated
system of programs that reflects the conscience of a compassionate
society but avoids a growing preponderance of the public sector
over the private. It also means decentralizing Government operations
and developing a closer partnership among the Federal Government,
State and local governments, and the individual private citizen.
The Congress will approach this budget in a new way, with new legislative machinery and procedures. I pledge to work in a spirit of
cooperation with the Congress to make this effort a success. The tasks
before us provide difficult tests: to meet immediate economic problems; to relate our limited Federal resources more clearly to current
national priorities; and to develop long-term strategies for meeting
Federal responsibilities as we begin our third century. I am confident
of success.
GERALD R. FORD.
FEBRUARY 3,




1975




PART 2

PERSPECTIVES
ON THE BUDGET

21

PERSPECTIVES ON THE BUDGET
This part of the budget discusses several subjects that relate to
budget totals and explains certain terms used in the budget message.
The first section explains budget authority and its relationship to
budget outlays. The second discusses budget funds and Federal debt
and how changes in Federal debt are related to budget fund surpluses
or deficits. This is followed by a section that reconciles the ostimates of
uncontrollable outlays for 1974 as originally published with the
figures that were actually realized. The final section, on fiscal activities
outside the Federal budget, examines the scope and nature of the
outlays of off-budget Federal agencies and privately owned Government-sponsored enterprises.
BUDGET AUTHORITY
The Congress must provide budget authority, generally in the form
of appropriations, before Federal agencies can incur obligations that
BUDGET AUTHORITY
[In billions of dollars]

Description

Available through current action by the Congress:
Enacted and pending
Proposed in this budget *
To be requested separately:
Under existing legislation
:
Upon enactment of proposed legislation
Allowances:
Civilian agencies2
Department of Defense—Military3

1974
actual

202.0

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

250.8
13.1

241.0

.2
—.5

.2
2.3

.8

8.3
1.4

Subtotal available through current action by the Congress.

202.0

264.3

253. 3

Available without current action by the Congress (permanent authorizations):
Trustfunds (existing law)
Interest on the public debt
Other
Deductions for offsetting receipts

107.5
29.3
13.4
—38.3

125.6
32.9
16.0
—43.7

130.3
36.0
15.6
—49.4

313.9

395.1

385.8

Total budget authority

1
Includes proposed increases of $1.8 billion in 1975 and $2.0 billion in 1976 that are offset in the
totals by interfund transactions.
2
Includes allowances for energy tax equalization payments, civilian agency pay raises, and contingencies.
3
Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense-

22




23

PERSPECTIVE'S

commit the Government to make expenditures or loans. For 1976,
a total of $385.8 billion of new budget authority is recommended.
The Congress will have to act on $253.3 billion of this total new
budget authority proposed for 1976 in order for it to become available.
The remaining $132.6 billion will be available under existing laws
without further action by the Congress. Such authority consists
mainly of the receipts of most trust fund programs, which are automatically appropriated by existing law, and interest on the public
debt, for which budget authority is automatically provided under a
permanent appropriation enacted in 1847.
Not all of the new budget authority provided for 1976 will be
obligated or spent in that year.
• Budget authority for most trust funds authorizes expenditure of
the funds7 receipts from special taxes and from Federal fund
payments to the trust funds, to be used as needed over a period
of years for benefit payments and other purposes specified by law.
• Budget authority for many construction and procurement programs covers the estimated full cost of projects at the time they
are started, although the outlays will occur over a number of
years as work on the projects progresses.
Relation of Budget Authority to Outlays —1976 Budget
Figures in brackets represent Federal funds only
$ Billions

New Authority
Recommended
for 1976
385.8

To be spent in 1976

237.8

Outlays
in 1976
349.4

[208.9]

[254.2]

[291

fcUnspent Authority
A
Enacted in
W
Prior Years
4
493.9
W

[327.5]

To be spent
in Future Years

354.3




[337.3]

[254.3]

NOTE: Tt.e diffeence beiw*** the total budget %Att«ftcl fexfetti fvwfc »fe<*m to hmtbm

Authority m
for Outlays in ^
Future Years
502.4

« M M » <* *»* &«*»* « * * *

24

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

• Budget authority for many insurance and direct or guaranteed
loan programs provides financing for a period of years, and may
include contingency amounts to be used only in the event of
defaults or other claims on the programs.
In keeping with the intent of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974,
the measure of budget authority for the subsidized housing programs
has been expanded in this budget. Budget authority for these programs
now reflects the maximum Federal payment permitted under new
authority to make contracts for very long periods, up to 40 years.
This change in treatment increases the unspent authority enacted in
previous years by $131 billion and is a further reason why some of
the budget authority provided for 1976 will not be spent until later
years.
As a result of these factors, a substantial amount of budget authority
carries over from one year to the next. Most of this is earmarked for
specific uses and is not available for new program proposals.
As shown in the preceding chart, $111.6 billion of outlays in 1976,
32% of the total, will be made under budget authority enacted in
previous years. Conversely, 38% of the new budget authority proposed
for 1976 will not result in outlays until future years.
BUDGET FUNDS AND THE FEDERAL DEBT
The budget is divided between two major groups of funds: Federal
funds and trust funds.
The Federal funds are derived mainly from taxes and borrowing.
Most of these funds are not restricted by law to any specific Government purpose. The trust funds, on the other hand, collect certain
taxes and other receipts for specified purposes, such as the payment
of social security and unemployment insurance benefits.
The budget combines the receipts and outlays of both Federal funds
and trust funds and deducts the various transactions that occur between them. Hence, the Federal budget is called the "unified budget."
The budget generally displays the net transactions of the Federal
Government with the public, except for the transactions of the offbudget Federal agencies. Thus, as is shown in the following table, the
unified budget surplus or deficit is the primary determinant of the
change in Federal debt held by the public.1 Since 1974, the deficit of
the off-budget Federal agencies has also become an important determinant of the change in Federal debt held by the public.
The deficit expected for 1976 and the other factors noted in the
preceding table will increase the Federal debt held by the public from
$389.6 billion at the end of 1975 to $453.1 billion at the end of 1976.
1

Federal debt held by the public includes debt held by the Federal Reserve System.




PERSPECTIVES

25

BUDGET FINANCING AND CHANGE IN DEBT OUTSTANDING
[In billions of dollars]1
Description

1974

1975

1976

Budget surplus or deficit ( - )

-3.5

-34.7

-51.9

Surplus or deficit ( - ) of off-budget Federal agencies

-2. 7

-13. 9

-10. 6

-6.1

-48.6

-62.5

2. 5

3.1

—.4

—.9
—*
.3
1.2

1.5
—.1
.6

—1.5
.2
.7

3.1

5.1

-1.0

—3.0

—43.5

—63.5

3.0

43.5

63.5

.7
14.9
-.9

.8
8.6
-.5

.7
3.4
-.2

14.8

8.8

3.9

17.8

52.3

67.4

Total surplus or deficit ( - )
Means of financing other than borrowing from the public:

Decrease or increase (—) in cash and monetary assets
Increase or decrease (—) in liabilities for:
Checks outstanding, etc
Deposit fund balances
Seigniorage on coins
Increment on gold
Total means of financing other than borrowing from the
public
Total requirements for borrowing from the public
Change in debt held by the public
Change in Federal agency investments in Federal debt:
Federal funds
Trust funds
Off-budget Federal agencies
Total change in Federal agency investments in Federal debt.
Change in gross Federal debt
•Less than $50 million.

As shown in the chart on the next page, the debt held by the public
has grown much more slowly than gross national product for most
years during the past two decades, although during 1975 and 1976
the debt held by the public is expected to grow faster.
Gross Federal debt is the sum of the debt held by the public and
the debt held by the Government itself, such as the investments in
Treasury debt by the social security trust funds. The Federal funds
deficit is the principal determinant of changes in gross Federal debt.
As of 1975, however, the off-budget agencies also have an important
effect.
Gross Federal debt is expected to rise from $538.5 billion on June 30,
1975, to $605.9 billion on June 30, 1976. As the lower section of the
preceding table indicates, $3.9 billion of this increase will be in debt
held by trust funds and other Federal agencies, reflecting mainly the
investment of trust fund surpluses in Treasury debt.




26

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Federal Debt as a Percent of G N P
Percent of GNP

Per«ntofGNP
Debt Held By:

70 ~
Gross Federal Debt

1

-70

I Government Accounts

P;:;:;-;:J Federal Reserve System

• H

Oilier

Federal Debt held
by the Public

-60

-50

-40

1955

1960

Fiscal Years

The gross Federal debt consists almost entirely of securities issued
by the Treasury Department. However, a few Government agencies
are authorized to issue their own debt instruments to the public or to
other Government agencies and funds. Such borrowing is part of the
gross Federal debt. At the end of 1974 the outstanding debt of such
agencies that was held by the public was $12.0 billion. This debt is
expected to fall by small amounts in 1975 and 1976 due to the operations of the recently established Federal Financing Bank, which
buys new issues of agency debt and finances its purchases through
Treasury borrowing. To prevent double-counting, these holdings are
not included in gross Federal debt. Consequently, the change in
agency debt is largely determined by the repayment of securities that
have matured.
Almost all Treasury debt issues are covered by a statutory debt
limit, but most borrowing by Federal agencies other than the Treasury
is excluded from this limit. The debt subject to statutory limit thus
includes not only most of the Federal debt held by the public but also
most of the Federal debt held internally by the Government itself.
The concept of Federal debt subject to statutory limit is roughly
consistent with the administrative budget concept that was used until




PERSPECTIVES

27

the 1969 budget. The administrative budget was similar in concept
to the Federal funds part of the unified budget. As a result, changes in
the Federal debt subject to limit are more closely related to the Federal
funds surplus or deficit than to the unified budget surplus or deficit.2
FEDERAL FUNDS FINANCING AND CHANGE IN DEBT SUBJECT TO LIMIT
fin billions of dollars]
Description

1974
actual

Federal funds surplus or deficit ( - )
Effect of outlays of off-budget Federal agencies on debt subject
to limit
Total, amount to be

financed

Means of financing other than borrowing:
Decrease or increase (—) in cash and monetary assets
Increase or decrease (—) in liabilities for:
Checks outstanding, etc
Deposit fund balances
Seigniorage on coins
Increment on gold
Total, means of financing other than borrowing
Decrease or increase (—) in Federal funds investments in Federal
debt
Increase or decrease (—) in Federal funds debt not subject to
limit
Total requirements for borrowing subject to debt limit
Change in debt subject to limit

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

-17.5

-43.0

-54.9

-1.2

-13.7

-10.4

—18.7

—56.8

—65.3

2. 5

3. 1

—.4

-1.8
.1
.3
1.2

1.3
—.1
.6

-1.9
.2
.7

2.3

4.9

—1.4

-.7

-.8

-.7

.2

-.2

-.2

—16. 9

—52. 8

—67. 6

16.9

52.8

67.6

The Federal funds deficit in 1976 is estimated to be $54.9 billion,
and the debt subject to limit is estimated to increase by $67.6 billion.
The preceding table shows that the major source of the difference
between these two figures is the effect of the outlays of off-budget
agencies.
A substantial part of the Federal funds deficit—and, therefore, a
substantial part of the growth in debt subject to limit—is associated
with transactions between Federal funds and trust funds. These transactions consist primarily of Federal funds payments to social insurance
trust funds (such as the Federal Government's contribution for
supplementary medical insurance and the Federal payment to finance
the unfunded liability of the civil service retirement fund) and interest
paid on Treasury debt held by trust funds.
2
Federal debt is discussed further in Special Analysis C, "Borrowing, Debt, and Investment," in
Special Analyses, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 1976.

580-000 O - 75 - 3




28

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

FEDERAL FUNDS RECEIPTS AND OUTLAYS
[In billions of dollars]

Description

Outlays (by agency):
Department of Defense military functions and military assistance l
Department of the Treasury:
Interest on the debt
Other
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Veterans Administration
Department of Agriculture
Department of Housing and Urban Development
All other agencies
Allowances2

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

79.0

85.0

92.6

29.3
6.8
30. 5
13.2
9.8
4.8
25.5

32.9
6.9
35.9
15.2
8.8
5.5
38.1
.7

36.0
7.7
37. 3
15.3
9.6
7.1
40.5
8.0

198.7
181.2

229.0
186.0

254.2
199.3

Deficit

17.5

43.0

54.9

Change in debt subject to limit

16.9

52.8

67.6

Total
Receipts

1
2

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for energy tax equalization payments, civilian agency pay raises, and contingencies.

From 1965 through 1974, there was a cumulative Federal funds
deficit of $172 billion, of which $85 billion was attributable to transactions with trust funds and the remaining $87 billion was attributable
to transactions with the public.3 As occurred in 1969, a significant
Federal funds deficit can exist when there are surpluses in the unified
budget and in the transactions of the Federal funds with the public.
The relevant figures for 1974 through 1976 are shown in the following
table:




PERSPECTIVEiS

29

BUDGET SURPLUS OR DEFICIT ( - ) BY FUND GROUP1
[In billions of dollars]

Description
Federal funds:
Transactions with the public
Transactions with trust funds
Total
Trust funds:
Transactions with the public
Transactions with Federal funds
Total
Budget total:
Federal funds
Trustfunds
Total

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

—2.8
—14.7

—23.7
—19.4

—33.3
—21.6

-17.5

-43.0

-54.9

—.7
14.7

—11.0
19.4

—18.5
21.6

14.0

8.3

3.1

-17.5
14.0

-43.0
8.3

-54.9
3.1

-3.5

-34.7

-51.9

1
For purpose of presentation in this table, payments from Federal funds to the general revenue sharing trust fund are treated as transactions with the public instead of transactions with a trust fund;
and the corresponding payments from the general revenue sharing trust fund to the public are accordingly omitted. This is because the general revenue sharing trust fund has no independent source of
funding but serves only as a channel through which Federal funds money is paid to the public.

RECONCILIATION OF ACTUAL AND ESTIMATED
RELATIVELY UNCONTROLLABLE OUTLAYS
This section of the budget explains the differences between actual
outlays for major relatively uncontrollable programs in 1974—the last
completed fiscal year—with the original budget estimates for that
year. The Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344)
requires that this information be included in each budget, beginning
with the one for 1978, at which time it must be provided for 1976. The
information is being added to the budget 2 years earlier to facilitate
the transition to the new congressional budget review process.
Outlays are considered to be relatively uncontrollable in any one
year when Government decisions in that year can neither increase nor
decrease them without changing existing substantive law. The amounts
estimated for relatively uncontrollable outlays, however, may not be
actually realized for a number of reasons. For example, legislation
may raise benefit rates, the number of beneficiaries under a program
may differ from the number estimated, and external conditions such
as the interest rates required to sell Federal debt may differ from what
was assumed.




30

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

T h e following table shows the differences between actual outlays for
major relatively uncontrollable programs in 1974 and the estimated
amounts shown in the 1974 budget, which was transmitted to the
Congress in J a n u a r y 1973. The list of such programs in this table is the
same as in table 14 (Controllability of Budget Outlays) in P a r t 9 of this
year's budget. T h e J a n u a r y 1973 estimate of uncontrollable outlays
did n o t include t h e outlay effect of legislation being proposed. This
standard practice is consistent with the definition of uncontrollable
outlays stated above. Where legislation was enacted t h a t significantly
affected relativeh T uncontrollable outlays in 1974, it is identified in
the discussion below. As the table shows, actual outlays for u n controllable programs, in total, were $2.1 billion higher t h a n originally
estimated. T h e discussion below explains the major differences listed
in the table.
RELATIVELY UNCONTROLLABLE OUTLAYS FOR 1974
[In billions of dollars]

Descriptions

January
1973
estimate 1

Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals:
Social security and railroad retirement
Federal employees' retirement and insurance
(Military retired pay)
(Other)
Unemployment assistance,.
Veterans' benefits: pensions, compensation, education, and
insurance
Medicare and medicaid
Housing payments
Public assistance and related programs

Actual

Chance,
actual less
estimate

56.6
9. 6
(4.7)
(4.9)
5.9

57.6
10.8
(5.1)
(5.7)
6.5

9.1
17.9
2.0
10.9

10.0
17.2
1.8
11.5

.9
—.7
—.2
.6

Subtotal, payments for individuals
Net: interest
General revenue sharing
Farm price supports (CCC)
Other open-ended programs and fixed costs

112.0
18.7
6.0
2.7
7.2

115.4
21.5
6.1
1.0
6.8

3.4
2.8
.1
-1.7
—.5

Total, open-ended programs and fixed costs
Outlays for prior-year contracts and obligations: 2
National defense
Civilian programs

146. 7

150. 8

4. I

21.6
24.1

20.9
22.9

-.7
—1.3

45. 7

43. 8

—2. 0

192.4

194. 5

2.1

Total, outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations__
Total, relatively uncontrollable outlays

3
3

1.0
1.2
(.4)
(.8)
.6

1
Based on the controllability classification used in the 1976 budget.
2
Excluding prior-year contracts and obligations for activities shown as "open-ended programs
and fixed costs."
3
Adjusted to make the functional classification consistent with that used in the 1976 budget.




PERSPECTIVE.S

31

Social security and railroad retirement outlays exceeded the original
estimate by $1.0 billion, with social security outlays up by $0.4 billion
and railroad retirement benefits up by $0.6 billion. The legislated 7%
benefit increase that became effective in March 1974 increased social
security outlays by almost $1.0 billion over the original estimate. This
increase was partly offset by an overestimate of the average level of
payments per beneficiary. The increase in railroad retirement benefits
was due almost entirely to legislation that extended temporary benefit
increases enacted in 1970, 1971, and 1972.
Outlays for Federal retirement and insurance programs were $1.2
billion higher than originally estimated. Much of this increase was
due to higher inflation, which produced larger and more frequent
cost-of-living increases than anticipated in the 1974 budget. Benefits
for these programs increase automatically whenever the consumer
price index goes up by 3 % over the base period and maintains that
level for 3 months. The consumer price index for 1974 was about
6%% higher than estimated. In addition, the number of retirees was
greater than originally estimated. Finally, unanticipated changes in
the financing arrangements for the Federal employees life insurance
program raised outlays by $150 million.
The $0.6 billion increase in unemployment assistance is explained
partly by an underestimate of unemployment. The benefit estimates
in the 1974 budget were based on a 1974 unemployment rate of 4.6%,
as compared to the actual rate of 5.0% for that year. In addition,
legislation extending unemployment benefits (Public Laws 93-53 and
93-156) added $0.3 billion to the original estimate.
The $0.9 billion increase in veterans benefits was due largely to
unanticipated increases in the veterans readjustment benefits program
stemming from the GI Bill amendments of 1972 (Public Law 92-540).
In addition, legislation increased outlays for pension and burial benefits by $0.1 billion (Public Laws 93-177 and 93-43).
Medicare outlays were $1.2 billion lower than originally estimated,
while medicaid outlays were $0.6 billion higher. The medicare shortfall resulted largely from an overestimate of hospital insurance benefits
for the disabled, who were first covered by medicare in 1974. This
new program was utilized considerably less than anticipated. The
original estimate of medicaid outlays assumed that States would respond to legislation enacted in 1972 that permitted them to reduce
expenditures below existing levels (Public Law 92-603). The $0.6
billion increase in medicaid outlays was due primarily to the States
not making these changes.
The $0.2 billion overestimate of housing payments resulted from a
shortfall in the estimated number of subsidized units under payment
at the end of the year. Fewer units were financed because of unanticipated delays in processing applications for multifamily housing due




32

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 76

to environmental and other reviews, and because of delays in implementing the new leased housing program.
Outlays for public assistance and related programs were $0.6 billion
higher than originally estimated, with virtually all the increase for food
stamp payments. This upward revision resulted in large part from the
Agriculture and Consumer Protection Act of 1973 (Public Law 93-86),
which mandated a 22% increase in the food stamp allotment and a
major expansion of the eligible population. Cash outlays for public
assistance, disabled coal miner benefits, and the supplemental security
income program were all within $0.1 billion of the original estimate.
The single largest revision in 1974 uncontrollable outlays was an
increase of $2.8 billion for net interest. The original estimate assumed
that the average rate on Treasury bills would remain at its December
1972 level of about 5%. Short-term rates increased sharply from this
level, however, and a year later the average rate on Treasury bills was
a full 3 percentage points higher. This sharp increase in interest rates
more than offset the effect of lower amounts of debt outstanding than
had originally been estimated.
The $1.7 billion lower payment for farm price supports resulted
from large increases in commodity prices due to a shortfall in world
agricultural output and the devaluation of the dollar. The higher
prices, especially for grain, reduced outlays for price support loans
(—$1.1 billion), commodity purchases (—$0.3 billion), and extension
of export credit (—$0.3 billion).
Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations were $2.0 billion
lower than originally estimated, with most of the overestimate in
civilian programs. The major overestimates were for the Environmental Protection Agency (—$0.8 billion) and the Department of
Agriculture (—$0.4 billion).
FISCAL ACTIVITIES OUTSIDE THE FEDERAL BUDGET
The budget does not include several fiscal activities of the Federal
Government that result in spending similar to budget outlays. Two
major exclusions—the off-budget activities of Federal agencies and the
activities of privately owned Government-sponsored enterprises4—are
discussed in some detail below.5
Outlays of off-budget Federal agencies and
Governmentsponsored enterprises.—Off-budget Federal agencies are federally
owned and controlled, but their transactions have been excluded from
the budget totals under provisions of law. Therefore, their fiscal
activities are not reflected in either budget outlays or the budget sur4
Detailed financial statements for these organizations are contained in "Annexed Budgets," Part
IV5 of the Appendix, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 1976.
The Exchange Stabilization Fund and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
(but not the Federal Reserve banks) are Federal entities. They are excluded from the budget and from
this discussion.




PERSPECTIVES

33

plus or deficit, and appropriations requests for their off-budget activities are not included in the totals of budget authority. The debt of
these agencies is part of the gross Federal debt but is not subject to the
statutory debt limit.
The first off-budget agency excluded from the unified budget was the
Export-Import Bank (excluded by statute as of Aug. 17, 1971),
although prior to the adoption of the unified budget for 1969 the
substantial trust fund activity of the Federal Government was not
included in the administrative budget. Since 1972, the Postal Service
fund, the Rural Telephone Bank, the lending activities that became
the Rural Electrification and Telephone revolving fund, and the
Housing for the Elderly or Handicapped fund were removed from the
budget; 6 and the Environmental Financing Authority fund,7 the
Federal Financing Bank, the United States Railway Association, and
the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation were established outside
the budget. Under recent law the Export-Import Bank will be returned
to the budget as of October 1, 1976. The budget totals still include
administrative expenses of the Rural Electrification Administration
lending programs and the United States Railway Association, and
they also include subsidies paid to the Postal Service and the
Environmental Financing Authority.
While the budget authority and outlays of off-budget activities are
excluded from the budget totals, not all of these activities are excluded
from Presidential and congressional review. For example, a limitation
on the program activity of the Export-Import Bank is established
annually by law. Furthermore, the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 calls for the newly created Committees
on the Budget of the House of Representatives and the Senate to study
on a continuing basis those provisions of law that exclude any outlays
of Federal agencies from the budget. From time to time these committees are to report to their respective Houses their recommendations
for terminating or modifying such provisions.
Government-sponsored enterprises were established and chartered
by the Federal Government to perform specialized functions that were
needed to achieve national objectives. The earlier enterprises were all
created with partial or full Government ownership and direct Government control, but, in time, they were converted to private ownership
and some new enterprises were established as privately owned institutions. The current rule governing the budget treatment of these
enterprises was established in 1967 in accordance with a recommendation by the President's Commission on Budget Concepts. The Commission, whose report led to the adoption of the unified budget,
8
The historical data for unified budget outlays include off-budget Federal agencies until their
removal from the budget and include Government-sponsored enterprises for periods when they had
any Government ownership.
7
The Environmental Financing Authority will go out of existence on June 30, 1975.




34

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

recommended that the budget exclude those Government-sponsored
enterprises t h a t are entirely privately owned.
The Federal Land Banks and Federal Home Loan Banks had
become fully privately owned by 1952 and therefore have always been
excluded from the unified budget. The Federal National Mortgage
Association, the Banks for Cooperatives, and the Federal Intermediate
Credit Banks became wholly privately owned by repaying their Federal equity capital during 1969 and were accordingly removed from
the budget. The Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation and the
Student Loan Marketing Association were subsequently established
with full private ownership.
COMPARISON OF OUTLAYS FOR THE UNIFIED BUDGET, OFF-BUDGET FEDERAL
AGENCIES, AND GOVERNMENT-SPONSORED ENTERPRISES
[In billions of dollars]
Outlays i
Unified

Fiscal year

Off-budget

Government-

1954
1955

70.9
68.5

-0.3
.2

1956
1957
1958
1959
1960

70.5
76.7
82.6
92.1
92.2

.4
.1
-.5
1.1

19611
1962
1963
1964
1965

97.8
106.8
111.3
118.6
118.4

-.3
1.1

1966
1967
1968
1969
1970_

134.7
158.3
178.8
184.5
196.6

1971
1972
1973
1974
1975 estimate
1976 estimate

211.4
231.9
246.5
268.4
313.4
349.4

_

.

.4

.5
1.8

1.2
1.9
-2.9

1.7
4.3
9.6
0.1
.6
2.7
13.9
10.6

*
4.1
10.8
14.6
14.5

7.2

*Less than $50 million.
1
To prevent double-counting, outlays of off-budget Federal agencies exclude loans to other offbudget Federal agencies and to other Federal agencies; and outlays of Government-sponsored
enterprises exclude loans to other Government-sponsored enterprises and loans to or from Federal
agencies.




PERSPECTIVEiS

35

Except for the Postal Service and the Pension Benefit Guaranty
Corporation, the excluded outlays of both the off-budget Federal
agencies and the Government-sponsored enterprises are for loan
programs. These programs are similar to the direct loan programs
in the unified budget. The outlays of most of these loan programs
reflect primarily, but not solely, the difference between new loans
disbursed and repayments of principal. For example, during 1974 new
loans disbursed by the excluded programs equaled $42.5 billion and
repayments were $23.4 billion. The outlays of the excluded loan programs were $16.4 billion. Like direct loans in the budget, the loans of
the excluded programs are designed to direct economic resources
toward particular uses. They also provide some stimulus to aggregate
economic activity, although this is offset to a degree in that their net
lending has to be financed largely by borrowing from the financial
markets just as does a deficit in the budget. The Governmentsponsored enterprises primarily support housing and also support
agriculture and higher education.
In the preceding table, the excluded outlays of the off-budget Federal
agencies and the privately owned Government-sponsored enterprises
are compared with the unified budget outlays. The outlays of offbudget agencies began at a negligible amount in 1972 but have grown
rapidly since then, in part because more off-budget agencies have been
created. The following table shows the extent to which the outlays in
1974-76 are due to one new off-budget agency, the Federal Financing
Bank (in billions of dollars) :
1974
Federal Financing Bank
Other off-budget Federal agencies
Total

1975

1976

0.1
2.6

10.6
3.4

5.8
4.9

2.7

13.9

10.6

As brought out in this table, the credit activities of the Federal
Financing Bank account for the greater part of the expansion in offbudget outlays in 1975-76 compared to 1974 and account completely
for the fluctuation in outlays during these years. The fluctuation is
almost all due to a much larger purchase of Government-guaranteed
loans in 1975 than in 1976. During 1975 and 1976 the outlays of the
other off-budget agencies also grow sizeably, especially for the Postal
Service, Export-Import Bank, and U.S. Railway Association. Altogether, the outlays of off-budget Federal agencies are expected to equal
4.4% of budget outlays in 1975 and 3.0% of budget outlays in 1976.
As shown in the table on page 25, the outlays of the off-budget Federal
agencies are added to the unified budget deficit to comprise the total
Government deficit that has to be financed by borrowing from the
public or by other means.




36

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

The outlays of the Government-sponsored enterprises have likewise
grown—from small amounts in the early 1960's to an average of $7.8
billion, or 3.4% of budget outlays, during 1970-74, when more
Government-sponsored enterprises were outside the budget. In 1975
and 1976 these enterprises are expected to spend $14.5 billion and
$7.2 billion, respectively, which are equal to 4.6% and 2.0% of budget
outlays.
In large part because the excluded outlays are primarily for credit
programs, they have certain characteristics that tend to differentiate
them from most budget outlays. This can be seen most clearly with
respect to the Government-sponsored enterprises, several of which
have operated outside the budget long enough for comparisons to be
made.
One distinguishing characteristic is that the excluded outlays are
more volatile than total budget outlays, although they are not more
volatile than some of the individual programs within the budget. As
the table shows, the outlays of the Government-sponsored enterprises
have fluctuated by large amounts on several occasions, particularly
since the mid-1960Js. The most important reason has been the cyclical
nature of mortgage lending and institutional deposit flows, which for
certain of the enterprises leads to large swings in lending, the repayment of past loans they have made, and the sale of assets. In some
years these factors have even produced large negative outlays for
the Federal Home Loan Banks. A large change in the outlays of
Government-sponsored enterprises is expected to occur in 1976, with
a total decrease of $7.3 billion from the year before. This will be due
primarily to a decline in the credit advanced by the Federal Home
Loan Banks to their member savings institutions and to a decrease in
the mortgage purchases by the Federal National Mortgage Association
and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation.
Another distinction is that the outlays of Government-sponsored
enterprises are less predictable than total outlays in the unified
budget, and for much the same reason that they are so volatile. In 4
of the 5 years from 1970 to 1974, the absolute difference between the
actual outlays and the original budget estimate of outlays was greater
for the Government-sponsored enterprises as a group than for the
entire unified budget—which is over 20 times larger. During this period
the absolute difference averaged $4.8 billion for these enterprises,
which is greater than the $3.0 billion average absolute difference for
the unified budget.
Other fiscal activities.—Several other fiscal activities not measured in the budget also have economic impacts. The tax structure
affects the economy not only by providing the Government with




PERSPECTIVES

37

receipts, which the budget does measure, but also by changing the
allocation of resources among private uses and the distribution of
income among persons. Some of these effects are discussed as "tax
expenditures" in Part 5 of the Budget, notably in the introduction,
and in Special Analysis F, "Tax Expenditures." 8
Credit guarantees are another significant fiscal activity not measured in the budget. They influence economic resources toward particular uses, especially toward housing, and provide some stimulus to
total spending in the economy. The outstanding guaranteed loans
held by the public are large and have grown substantially each year.
By the end of 1974 they were $153. 2 billion. They are expected to
grow $0.8 billion during 1975 and $7.7 billion during 1976, reaching
the sum of $161.7 billion by the end of 1976. The total impact of
guaranteed loans on the economy is uncertain, however, since some
portion of the private loans that were guaranteed might have been
made anyway.9
8
8

See Special Analyses, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 1976.
For further discussion see Special Analysis E, "Federal Credit Programs," in Special Analyses,
Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 1976.




PART 3

ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS AND
LONG RANGE BUDGET
PROJECTIONS




39

ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS AND LONG RANGE
BUDGET PROJECTIONS
This part of the budget discusses the long-range budget outlook
and the economic assumptions underlying that outlook. The first section presents economic assumptions for calendar years 1975 through
1980 and explains the nature of these assumptions. The second section
examines the budget outlook for the period 1976 through 1980,
presenting projections of outlays by function and agency and projections of receipts by major source. The outlay and receipts projections
are shown on both actual and full-employment bases.
ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS
There is a two-way relationship between the economy and the
budget. Economic conditions can strongly affect the budget, and the
budget, in turn, significantly influences economic conditions. Both
the tax structure and budget outlays can have a major effect on
national output, employment, and inflation.
At the same time, outlays for many Federal programs are directly
linked to developments in the economy, and this linkage has become
increasingly strong in recent years. For example, most retirement and
other social insurance benefit payments are now tied by law to cost-ofliving indices. Medicare and medicaid outlays are affected directly by
the price of medical services. Interest on the debt is linked to interest
rates and the size of the budget surplus or deficit, which in turn are
influenced by economic conditions. To the extent that outlays rise
automatically in response to inflation, of course, the budget is less
effective in counteracting inflationary pressures than it would be if
these linkages did not exist.
Another type of linkage to economic events is shown by outlays for
unemployment benefits, which rise and fall with the unemployment
rate. Also, budget receipts vary in accordance with individual and
corporate incomes, which respond to both real economic growth and
inflation. Thus, receipts and unemployment benefits serve as "automatic stabilizers" for the economy by both restraining inflation and
cushioning economic downturns.
The Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974
takes into account the interrelationships between the budget and the
economy. This act requires that the Congress set forth in a concurrent
resolution "the amount, if any, of the surplus or deficit in the budget
which is appropriate in light of economic conditions and all other
40




PROJECTIONS

41

relevant factors . . ." To assist the Congress in determining the
appropriate surplus or deficit, the act requires t h a t a "current services''
budget for the fiscal year ahead be submitted on or before November 10 of each year and t h a t it be accompanied b y the economic
assumptions on which its estimates are based. These assumptions are
not required to be included in this budget b u t are being presented
here in order to provide Congress and the public with information
t h a t m a y be helpful in understanding and assessing the budget
estimates and long-range projections.
T h e short-term economic assumptions presented in this section
have been developed in quite different ways from the longer run
assumptions:
• T h e assumptions for calendar years 1975 and 1976 are forecasts
of probable economic conditions during these years.
• The longer range assumptions for the period 1977 to 1980 are not
forecasts of probable economic conditions, b u t rather projections
consistent with moving gradually toward relatively stable prices
and maximum feasible employment.
ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS
[Calendar years; dollar amounts in billions]

Item

Gross national product:
Current dollars:
Amount
Percentchange
Constant (1958) dollars:
Amount
Percentchange
Incomes (current dollars):
Personal income
Wages and salaries
Corporate profits
Prices (percent change):
GNP deflator
Consumer Price I n d e x . . . .
Unemployment rates (percent) :
Total
Insured 1
Federal pay raise, October
(percent)
Interest rate, 91-day Treasury bills (percent) 2

Assumed for purposes of budget estimates

Actual
1973

Actual
1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

$1,295
11.8

$1,397
7.9

$1,498
7.2

$1,686
12.6

$1,896
12.4

$2,123
12.0

$2,353 $2,606
10.8
10.8

$839
5.9

$821
-2.2

$794
-3.3

$832
4.8

$879
5.6

$936
6.5

$997 $1,061
6.5
6.5

$1,232 $1,365 $1,536
$792
$884
$999
$115
$145
$163

$1,717
$1,117
$185

$1,900 $2,102
$1,236 $1,367
$208
$233

$1,055 $1,150
$692
$751
$123
$141

1979

1980

5.6
6.2

10.2
11.0

10.8
11.3

7.5
7.8

6.5
6.6

5.1
5.2

4.1
4.1

4.0
4.0

4.9
2.8

5.6
3.8

8.1
7.5

7.9
6.9

7.5
6.4

6.9
5.1

6.2
4.4

5.5
3.6

4.77

5.52

5.03

8.75

7.25

6.50

5.75

5.25

7.0

7.9

6.4

6.4

6.4

6.0

5.0

5,0

1
Insured unemployment as a percentage of covered employment; includes unemployed workers
receiving extended benefits.
2
Average rate on new issues within period; the rate shown for 1975 was the current market rate
at the time the estimates were made.




42

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

The table above shows assumptions for the major economic factors related to the budget: gross national product (in both current
and constant dollars), personal income, wages and salaries, corporate
profits, the GNP deflator, the Consumer Price Index, unemployment
rates, Federal employees' pay raises, and interest rates. For 1976,
the application of these economic assumptions to program estimates
has been modified by the proposed 5% ceiling on increases in Federal
employees' pay and in benefit payments to individuals. More detailed
assumptions on which estimates for particular programs are based can
be provided by the agencies responsible.

LONG RANGE BUDGET PROJECTIONS
The effects of current decisions extend beyond the budget year.
They establish program trends that help to shape the size and composition of budgets for years into the future. Just as the composition and
level of the 1976 budget have been largely determined by past decisions,
so, too, the decisions and proposals it embodies will strongly affect
subsequent budgets.
The budgets for the last 5 years have emphasized the longer range
implications of current decisions by presenting 5-year projections of
Federal outlays and receipts. In the 1973 budget, detailed 5-year
projections of the costs of legislative proposals for major new and
exx>anded programs were added. The last 2 budgets have also presented
detailed previews of the succeeding year's budget.
In accordance with the Congressional Budget and Impoundment
Control Act of 1974, this budget presents projections for each of the
years 1976 through 1980, and for the 3-month transition quarter
between fiscal years 1976 and 1977. The projections for 1976 and the
transition quarter are identical to the budget estimates for these
periods.
Nature of the projections.—The receipts projections presented
below are consistent with the foregoing economic assumptions, assuming continuation of current tax laws as modified by the proposals contained in this budget. The outlay and budget authority estimates
indicate the degree to which resources would be committed by the
continuation of existing and currently-proposed programs at the
program levels recommended for 1976. These projections are not
intended as forecasts of future receipts, outlays, or budget authority,
because no attempt is made to predict future decisions or their effects.
Nor are the projections intended as recommendations, since the continuation of Federal programs and taxes is a matter properly subject
to continuous review in light of changing conditions.




43

PROJECTIONS

In general, the outlay projections assume that program levels remain
constant except where there is an explicit budget recommendation to
increase or decrease program levels over time. One example is the
anticipated increase in energy research and development programs
between 1976 and 1977. Similarly, while defense manpower requirements are assumed to remain constant, other defense purchases
are assumed to rise by 4% a year in real terms. The projections allow
for changes in beneficiary populations of programs such as social
security. Allowances are also made for future cost-of-living adjustments to benefit levels, Federal pay raises, and other cost increases.
These allowances are consistent with the economic assumptions outlined above, and with the effect of the proposed temporary 5%
ceiling on automatic increases between 1975 and 1976.
The Fiscal Outlook to 1980
$8iiliom

500

100

1980

The fiscal outlook.—Under the assumptions used here, receipts
are projected to increase by an average of 13.1% a year between 1976
and 1980,1 rising from $298 billion to $502 billion. Over the same
period, outlays for current programs and those proposed in this budget
1
Throughout this section, computed annual rates of change take into account the fact that due
to the change in the fiscal year, 4)4 years will elapse between fiscal years 1976 and 1980.

580-000 O - 75 - 4




44

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

are projected to rise by an average of 7.6% a year, from $349 billion
to $477 billion. Thus, the projected receipts gradually overtake projected outlays, producing a potential surplus, or budget margin, in
1980.
THE FISCAL OUTLOOK. 1974-80
[In billions of dollars]
1974

1975

1976

Trans.
quarter

Outlays under current programs.__ 268.4 313.0 341.7
Outlays under proposed programs1.4
7.7
Total projected outlays...__

268.4 313.4 349.4

1977

1978

1979

1980

92.3 382.4 411.4 437.5 462.0
1.9
10.7 14.0 14.4 14.7
94.3 393.1 425.4 451.9 476.7

Receipts under current law
264.9 283.8 303.6
Effects of proposed tax changes..__
-5.0 -6.1

85.5 364.0 416.0
-1.1 - 1 . 5 - 1 0 . 2

465.5 517.1
-13.2-15.4

Total projected receipts..-.
Budget margin or deficit ( - )

84.4 362.5 405.8
-9.8-30.6-19.6

452.3 501.7
.4 25.0

764.9 278.8 297.5
-3.5-34.7-51.9

1
Includes general revenue sharing extension and energy initiatives shown in table 15 in part 9 of
this budget.

The projected 6 9 % growth in receipts between 1976 and 1980
reflects growth in tax bases, the proposed temporary tax reduction
in 1976, and an increase in the average effective tax rate on personal
income as inflation and rising real incomes move people into higher
tax brackets. This increase in effective tax rates, which is implicit in
a progressive income tax system, accounts for about $25 billion of
the total increase in individual income tax receipts between 1976
and 1980. Over the past two decades legislated tax cuts have offset
implicit increases of this nature. Without these reductions, total
Federal receipts would have risen to a much larger percentage of
gross national product than they now claim.
PROJECTED RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
(In billions of dollars]
Source

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions
Excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts
Total budget receipts




1976

Trans.
quarter

1977

1978

1979

1980

106.3
47.7
91.6
32.1
4.6
4.3
10.9

37.9
9.5
25.6
6.2
1.3
1.1
2.8

149.9 173.5 196.9
49.2 51.0 55.3
108.3 124.5 139.9
33.4 32.9 34.1
5.5
6.6
7.4
4.8
5.4
6.0
11.4 11.9 12.7

222.0
61.9
153.1
36.0
8.5
6.7
13.5

297.5

84.4 362.5 405.8 452.3

501.7

PROJECTIONS

45

On the other hand, a significant portion of total income taxes—
personal and corporation—will be replaced, under current proposals,
by energy taxes on petroleum and natural gas. Energy tax collections
will be somewhat greater than the proposed offsetting income tax
reductions in 1976, with the difference made up by outlays to compensate nontaxpayers, State and local governments, and Federal agencies
for increased energy costs. By 1980, however, total receipts will be
reduced by $15 billion as a result of these proposals. This occurs because the effect of income tax reductions will grow over time due to
growth in the tax base, while receipts from the proposed energy excises
and import fees will grow much more slowly, since they are based on
oil and natural gas consumption—which they are designed to discourage. Also, the proposed windfall profits tax will phase out over
time. This $15 billion net reduction in 1980 receipts serves to offset
much of the $25 billion implicit increase in income taxes, preventing
total receipts from rising significantly as a percentage of gross national
product between 1977 and 1980.
On the basis of the economic assumptions presented in the preceding section and tax law changes proposed in the budget, individual income taxes are projected to reach $222 billion by 1980,
an increase of $116 billion, or 109,% over 1976. More than a fifth of this
increase is due to the rise in the average tax rate on taxable personal
income. Over the same period corporation income taxes are projected
to increase by 30%, from $48 billion to $62 billion.
Increases in the taxable earnings base and rate under social security,
and increases in other social insurance taxes and contributions, will
occur under current law to finance benefit increases. These increases,
together with the growth in payrolls over the next 5 years, are projected to raise social insurance taxes and contributions from $92 billion
in 1976 to $153 billion in 1980, a 67% increase. Estate and gift taxes,
customs, excise taxes, and miscellaneous receipts are projected at
$65 billion in 1980, an increase of $13 billion from 1976.
Full-employment receipts is an analytical concept based on the
amount of income that would be generated if the economy were continually operating at full capacity (conventionally denned as a 4.0%
unemployment rate for the civilian labor force). Similarly, full-employment outlays include only that portion of the outlays for benefits under
the regular unemployment insurance program that would be paid if
the economy were continuously operating at full capacity. They thus
eliminate the fluctuations in actual outlays for these benefits due to
year-to-year changes in the unemployment rate. The differences between these adjusted receipts and outlay estimates are called fullemployment budget margins. Changes in these margins from one year
to the next provide a rough measure of the impact of discretionary
fiscal policy (i.e., excluding automatic stabilizers) on the economy.




46

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

FULL-EMPLOYMENT RECEIPTS AND OUTLAYS
{In billions of dollars]

1974

1975

282
267

323
306

budget
_^

15

Change from previous year._

16

Full-employment receipts
Full-employment outlays
Full-employment
margin

1976

quaVtw

1977

1978

1979

1980

352
340

98
92

413
384

450
418

491
446

534
473

17

12

6

29

33

45

61

2

—5

\8

4

12

16

Full-employment outlays are estimated at $340 billion in 1976,
rising to $473 billion in 1980. Full-employment receipts are projected to increase from $352 billion in 1976 to $534 billion in 1980.
The full-employment margin gradually increases from $12 billion in
1976 to $61 billion in 1980.
While the full employment concept is conventionally defined in
terms of a hypothetical 4.0% unemployment rate, any other rate
would serve essentially the same purpose, provided it remained fixed
from year to year. Were the rate to remain fixed at its fiscal year
1974 level of 5.0%, for example, the budget margin would decline
between 1975 and 1976 by an amount similar to the $5 billion decline
shown for a 4.0% unemployment rate.
Budget trends.—The outstanding feature of the changing composition of the Federal budget over the past two decades has been
the enormous growth of domestic assistance programs and the corresponding relative decline in spending for direct Federal operations.
Direct Federal operations involve Federal purchases of goods and
services for use in Government programs such as defense and space
exploration, compensation of Federal employees, and payment of
interest on the public debt. Domestic assistance programs, on the
other hand, entail the payment of benefits to retired, disabled, or
unemployed workers, or to low-income families and individuals; or
the granting of aid to State and local governments—the latter often
for the same ultimate purpose.
This shift in the composition of Federal outlays may be viewed in
many aspects, all facets of a single trend because of the overlap among




PROJECTIONS

47

categories: Growth in human resources programs, particularly in the
income security and health functions; growth in social insurance programs; growth in grants-in-aid to State and local governments and in
direct payments to individuals and families; growth in trust fund
outlays; and growth in relatively uncontrollable open-ended programs,
under which entitlement to Federal payments is specified in law for
certain classes of people and for State and local units of government.
Over the past 20 years each of these outlay aggregates has been
growing much more rapidly than national output, and more rapidly
than total Federal outlays. At the same time, the relative share of
defense and other direct Government operations has declined sharply.
BUDGET PRIORITIES
[Percent of outlays]
Descripti on

Domestic assistance
Payments for individuals:
Direct 1 Indirect (grants-in-aid)
All other grants-in-aid i
Direct Federal operations
National defense-.Net interest
Other
Total outlays
1

Esti mated

Actual
1956

1960

1964

1968

1972

22.3

29.4

30.6

32.5

45.7

(17.0)
(2.5)
(2.8)
77.7
(56.4)
(7.2)
(14.1)

1976

1980

54.4 52.7

(21.8) (22.1) (22.1) (30.2) (38.5)
(2.7) (3.0) (3.4) (6.3) (5.2)
(4.9) (5.5) (7.0) (9.2) (10.7)
70.5 69.4 67.5 54.4 45.6
(49.0) (44.5) (44.4) (33.4) (26.9)
(7.5) (6.9) (6.2) (6.7) (7.5)
(14.0) (18.0) (16.9) (14.3) (11.2)

(39.0)
(6.1)
(7.6)
47.3
(29.7)
(5.9)
(11.8)

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Excludes military retired pay and grants classified in the national defense function.

The composition of the 5-year projections of outlays and budget
authority is shown on pages 50-52 by major function and agency.
These projections show outlays for income security, health and defense increasing as percentages of total projected outlays between
1976 and 1980. Outlays for other functions, such as interest, decline in
relative terms. For many civilian functions and agencies, this relative
decline is due to the fact that allowances for contingencies and for
civilian agency pay and price increases are not distributed by function
or agency.
Excluding unemployment benefits, which are projected to decline
over the projection period due to decreasing unemployment rates,
outlays for income security and health programs are projected to rise
at an annual rate of 10.7% during the 1976-80 period. By 1980, these
two functions make up over 44% of total projected outlays. As recently
as 1968, they were less than a quarter of the budget total.




48

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

The strong growth trend of domestic assistance programs in recent
decades poses a long range budgetary problem of fundamental importance. Outlays for these programs have grown at a substantially
faster rate than potential national output. Thus, in the 8 years from
1968 to 1976, total Federal nondefense outlays will have risen from
11.6% of gross national product to 16.0%. Increases of this sort cannot
be sustained indefinitely, especially since State and local government
spending has also been rising more rapidly than national output. (This
is true of State and local government spending even when the substantial amount contributed by rapidly rising Federal grants-in-aid is
removed.)
Controllability
of outlays.—Most
Federal domestic assistance
programs—and some Federal programs for other purposes—create a
legal entitlement to benefits for all eligible recipients. Thus, in the
absence of statutory changes reducing eligibility or the rate of increase in benefits, controlling the growth of outlays for such programs
is virtually impossible. I n 1967, such "open-ended programs and fixed
costs" made up 35.9% of total outlays. B y 1976, however, they will
make up 59.2% of total outlays. As the table below indicates, this
percentage is projected to decline slightly to 57.7% by 1980.
CONTROLLABILITY OF BUDGET OUTLAYS
[In billions of dollars]
Category

Relatively uncontrollable under present law:
Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals:
Social security and railroad retirement
Medicare and medicaid
All other payments for individuals
Subtotal, payments for individuals
Net interest
General revenue sharing
Other open-ended programs and fixed costs.__

1976

76.6
24.1
64.3

21.4
6.4
15.4

165.1
26.1
6.3
9.2

43.2
8.6
1.7
2.7

Total, open-ended programs and fixed costs,
current law
206.8
Proposed open-ended programs and fixed costs *_ —7.5
Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations.
54.0]
Relatively controllable outlays
100.0J
Undistributed employer share, employee retirement
-3.9
Total budget outlays

Trans.
quarter

349.4

1977

1978

1979

1980

89.9
28.7
66.1

100.1
32.9
69.0

109.9
37.6
71.4

119.4
42.6
73.6

184.8 202.0 218.8
29.3 28.8 28.5
3.3
.1
11.2
11.2
11.4

235.5
27.9
11.6

56.2 228.6 242.1 258.8 275.0
—2.2 —6.0 —3.2 —4.0 —4.8
~A1 7 0 1 1 A
Ai o
17. ,
tnn n

-1.0

-4.1

-4.4

-4.7

-4.9

94.3 393.1 425.4 451.9

476.7

1
Includes general revenue sharing extension, less effects of proposed 5% ceiling on increases in
benefit payments to individuals between 1975 and 1976 and other proposed legislation.




PROJECTIONS

49

The tremendous momentum of Federal spending extends beyond
"open-ended programs and fixed costs." Each year a substantial
portion of outlays under many other programs is legally required as
payments come due under contracts or other obligations made in
earlier periods.
The problem of controlling outlays has been intensified in the past
by the separation, within the Congress, of jurisdiction over taxes,
program authorizations and appropriations. One consequence has
been that necessary fiscal policy adjustments have been increasingly
concentrated on a small and diminishing portion of total outlays—that
part which was most readily "controllable." New procedures being
established under the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974, however, may make it more feasible in the future to
adjust all parts of the budget.




50

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
[In billions of dollars]
Description

1976

Trans.
quarter

1977

1978

1979

1980

118.5
8.9
4.7
11.9
2.0
14.1
5.4
13.7
35.3
174.9
15.5
3.2
3.6

129.5
8.9
4.5
7.5
1.8
14.5
5.1
13.7
41.5
188.7
15.1
3.3
3.7

140.0
8.5
4.2
6.9
1.9
14.6
5.3
13.7
47.2
202.5
14.8
3.4
4.1

149.4
8.1
3. 7
6.7
1.9
14.8
5.3
13.8
52.5
215.0
14.5
3.4
4.3

7.3
7.4
38.5
38.5
13.8
16.9
-19.3 -20.1

7.6
38.7
20.1
-20.9

7.7
38.6
23.2
-21.6

Budget authority:

National defense
107.7
International affairs
12.6
General science, space, and technology. _ _
4.7
Natural resources, environment, and energy
12.2
Agriculture
4.3
Commerce and transportation
6.6
Community and regional development
5.2
Education, manpower, and social services.
13.7
Health
31.0
Income security
135.3
Veterans benefits and services
16.2
Law enforcement and justice
3.2
General government
3.3
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal
assistance
7.3
Interest
34.4
Allowances
8.3
Undistributed offsetting receipts
-20.2
Total budget authority

385.8

Outlays:
National defense
94.0
International affairs
6.3
General science, space, and technology. _ _
4.6
Natural resources, environment, and energy
10.0
Agriculture
1.8
Commerce and transportation
13.7
Community and regional development
5.9
Education, manpower, and social services.
14.6
Health
28.0
Income security
118.7
Veterans benefits and services
15.6
Law enforcement and justice
3.3
General government
3.2
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal
assistance
7.2
Interest
34.4
Allowances
8.0
Undistributed offsetting receipts
-20.2
Total outlays




349.4

25.2
1.3
1.2
2.2
.3
1.9
.5
4.8
7.7
27.6
3.9
.8
.8
2.0
9.3
1.9
-3.4
88.2

452.1

480.7

512.7

541.4

25.8
1.6
1.2
3.1
.4
3.5
1.6
3.0
7.2
31.2
3.9
.9
.8

105.5
8.2
4.7
.11.9
1.9
14.7
6.5
14.0
32.0
132.2
15.4
3.4
3.6

120.4
7.3
4.6
12.5
1.9
14.8
6.6
13.8
35.6
144.4
15.0
3.3
3.5

131.5
6.8
4.2
11.5
2.2
14.9
5.5
13.7
39.8
155.6
14.6
3.4
3.8

141.4
6.6
3.8
9.5
2.2
15.0
5.3
13. 6
44.3
166.3
14.3
3.4
4.1

2.0
9.3
2.1
-3.4

7.3
38.5
12.6
-19.3

7.6
38.5
15.7
-20.1

7.6
38.7
18.9
-20.9

7.7
38.6
22.0
-21.6

94.3

393.1

425.4

451.9

476.7

51

PROJECTIONS

BUDGET AUTHORITY BY AGENCY
[In billions of dollars]
Department or other unit

1976

Trans,
quarter

1977

1978

1979

1980

Budget authority:

Legislative and judicial branches
1.2
Executive Office of the President
.1
Funds appropriated to the President
13.8
Agriculture:
Food stamps and other nutrition programs
5.0
Other agriculture
6.8
Commerce
1.8
Defense—Military:
Military retired pay
_.._
6.9
Defense less retired pay
96.1
Pay and price increases
Defense-Civil
2.0
Health, Education, and Welfare:
Social security
69.1
Medicare
18.6
Other Health, Education, and Welfare..
32.6
Housing and Urban Development
30.3
Interior
2.5
Justice
2.1
Labor:
Unemployment trust fund
9.8
OtherLabor
1.6
State
1.0
Transportation
4.4
Treasury:
Interest on the public debt
36.0
General revenue sharing
6.4
Other Treasury
1.2
Civil Service Commission
12.3
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
3.5
Veterans Administration
16.1
Other agencies
16.5
Allowances:
Energy tax equalization payments
7.0
Other pay, price, and contingencies
1.3
Undistributed offsetting receipts
-20.2
Total budget authority

.3
*
1.6

1.4
.1
7.4

1.5
.1
7.0

1.7
.1
6.6

1.8
.1
6.0

1.5
.9
.4

6.0
4.3
1.9

6.3
4.3
1.9

6.6
4.6
1.9

6.8
4.7
2.1

1.9
22.1
.6

7.9
97.4
8.3
2.2

8.9
100.8
15.1
2.2

10.0
103.7
21.7
2.1

11.0
106.1
27.9
2.0

18.2
4.6
9.7
.3
.8
.5

79.8
21.6
34.1
53.5
2.3
2.1

88.9
26.9
35.3
53.3
2.4
2.2

98.3
31.4
36.8
53.2
2.4
2.2

108.0
35.2
38.4
53.2
2.4
2.3

2.9
.8
.4
1.0

10.5
3.5
1.1
9.9

12.8
3.7
1.2
10.1

14.7
3.8
1.3
10.3

15.0
3.9
1.4
10.5

9.7
1.7
.3
1.6

40.1
6.5
1.4
13.5

40.1
6.6
1.4
15.0

40.3
6.8
1.6
16.7

40.2
6.9
1.7
18.4

1.0
3.9
2.9

3.6
15.5
21.7

3.4
15.1
17.3

3.0
14.8
16.9

2.5
14.5
16.9

1.8
7.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
.1
6.8
9.9
13.1
16.2
- 3 . 4 - 1 9 . 3 -20.1 - 2 0 . 9 - 2 1 . 6

385.8

88.2

291.8
122.3
-28.3

62.3
29.9
-4.0

385.8

88.2

452.1

480.7

512.7

541.4

338.6 351.3 368.3
142.9 161.3 179.1
-29.4 -32.0 -34.7

384.4
194.8
-37.9

MEMORANDUM

Federal funds
Trustfunds
Interfund transactions
Total




452.1

480.7

512.7

541.4

52

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
BUDGET OUTLAYS BY AGENCY
[In billions of dollars]
Department or other unit

1976

Trans,
quarter

1977

1978

1979

1980

Outlays:

Legislative and judicial branches
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture:
Food stamps and other nutrition programs
.
Other agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military :
Military retired pay
Defense less retired pay
Pay and price increases
Defense-Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare:
Social security
Medicare
Other Health, Education, and Welfare..
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor:
Unemployment trust fund
OtherLabor
State
Transportation
Treasury:
Interest on the public debt
General revenue sharing
Other Treasury
Civil Service Commission
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Other agencies
Allowances :
Energy tax equalization payments
Other pay, price, and contingencies
Undistributed off setting receipts
Total outlays

1.2
.1
6.6

.3
*
1.5

1.4
.1
6.9

1.5
.1
5.7

1.5
.1
5.1

1.7
.1
4.7

5.4
4.3
1.8

1.5
1.1
.5

5.9
4.4
2.0

6.3
4.7
1.9

6.6
5.0
1.9

6.8
5.1
2.1

6.9
83.8

1.9
23.2

2.0

.6

7.9
88.1
5.7
2.2

8.9
95.8
12.1
2.2

10.0
99.3
18.6
2.2

11.0
101.9
25.0
2.0

70.1
15.0
33.3
7.1
2.5
2.2

19.6
4.0
7.9
1.9
.8
.6

82.5
17.9
34.8
7.8
2.3
2.3

92.2
20.6
36.0
8.6
2.2
2.2

101.5
23.5
37.3
8.9
2.1
2.2

110.4
26.7
38.7
9.9
2.2
2.3

15.9
6.7
1.0
10.0

3.4
1.0
.4
2.6

16.6
3.8
1.0
11.0

16.1
3.7
1.2
11.4

14.5
3.8
1.2
11.8

12.9
3.9
1.4
12.1

36.0
6.3
1.2
8.1

9.7
1.7
.3
2.1

40.1
6.5
1.4
8.8

40.1
6.8
1.3
10.1

40.3
6.8
1.5
11.4

40.2
6.9
].7
12.7

3.5
15.6
15.1

.9
3.9
4.1

3.6
15.4
19.3

3.4
14.9
19.8

3.1
14.6
19.1

2.7
14.3
17.0

1.8
7.0
.4
5.6
-3.4 -19.3

7.0
8.7
-20.1

7.0
11.9
-20.9

7.0
15.0
-21.6

425.4

451.9

476.7

281.7 302.9
140.8 154.5
-29.4 -31.9

320.0
166.6
-34.7

336.0
178.6
-37.9

451.9

476.7

7.0
1.0
-20.2
349.4

94.3

254.2
123.4
-28.3

65.4
32.9
-4.0

349.4

94.3

393.1

MEMORANDUM
Federalfunds
Trust fund*
Interfund transactions
Total




393.1

425.4




PART 4

BUDGET RECEIPTS
53

54

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET RECEIPTS
This section of the budget describes the major sources of budget
receipts and discusses legislative proposals affecting them. In addition,
an analysis is provided of the difference between receipts for 1974,
the last completed fiscal year, and the original budget estimates of
receipts for that year. The detail of budget receipts by source is shown
in table 11 in Part 9, and the economic assumptions underlying these
estimates are presented in Part 3.
SUMMARY
Total budget receipts in 1976 are estimated at $297.5 billion, an
increase of $18.8 billion from the $278.8 billion estimated for 1975.
The estimates of budget receipts for these years reflect proposed
legislation to:
• Temporarily reduce individual and corporation income taxes to
provide economic stimulus.
• Increase energy taxes through an excise tax and import fee on oil,
an excise tax on natural gas, and an increase in business taxes
through a windfall profits tax on domestic crude oil. The windfall
profits tax collections will result primarily from decontrol of
crude oil prices.
• Return to the economy all of the increased energy taxes, primarily through permanent individual and corporation income tax
reductions.
Composition of budget receipts.—The Federal tax system relies
predominately on income and payroll taxes. In 1976:
• Income taxes paid by individuals and corporations are estimated
at $106.3 billion and $47.7 billion, respectively. Combined receipts from these sources will account for 52% of total budget
receipts.
• Social insurance taxes and contributions—composed largely of
payroll taxes levied on wages and salaries and paid equally by
employers and employees—will produce an estimated $91.6 billion, 31% of the total.
• Excise taxes imposed on selected commodities, services, and
activities are expected to provide $32.1 billion, 11% of total
budget receipts.
• Other taxes and miscellaneous receipts will amount to an estimated $19.8 billion, 7% of the total.
Full-employment receipts.—While actual receipts are affected by
the state of the economy, full-employment receipts are based on
estimates of personal and corporate income that would be generated
if the economy were continually operating at full employment (con-




BUDGET RECEIPTS

55

BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
[In billions of dollars]
Source

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust funds)
Excise taxes 1
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts !
Total budget receipts
1

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

J19.0
38.6
76.8
16.8
5.0
3.3
5.4

117.7
38.5
86.2
19.9
4.8
3.9
7.7

106.3
47.7
91.6
32.1
4.6
4.3
10.9

264.9

278.8

297.5

Includes both Federal fund and trust fund receipts.

ventionally defined as unemployment equal to 4% of the civilian
labor force). Full-employment receipts that would be produced by
existing and proposed tax laws were $282 billion in 1974 and are
estimated to be $323 billion in 1975 and $352 billion in 1976.
ECONOMIC STIMULUS AND ENERGY TAX PROPOSALS
On January 13, 1975, the President announced programs to stimulate the economy and to reduce energy consumption. The tax
stimulus will take the form of a temporary $16.3 billion income tax cut,
with three-quarters of the cut going to individual taxpayers and onequarter going to businesses. The new energy program will permanently
increase the cost of oil and natural gas, but will offset the increases in
energy tax receipts by reductions in individual and corporation income
taxes and by increases in Federal spending. The increase in oil and
natural gas prices relative to other prices is designed to reduce imports by inducing consumers and businesses to shift to other sources
of energy and to use less energy in total. The proposals as they relate
to taxes are discussed below.
Economic stimulus.—The income tax reductions to stimulate the
economy will reduce receipts by $6.1 billion in 1975 and $10.2 billion
in 1976. Individual income tax rebates—which are three-quarters of
this $16.3 billion total—will reduce receipts by $4.9 billion in 1975
and $7.3 billion in 1976. These rebates will be in two installments—
one beginning in M%y 1975 and the other in September 1975—and
will be equal to 12% of calendar year 1974 tax liabilities up to a
maximum of $1,000. The payment in 1975 is less than in 1976 because it will not be administratively possible to compute and process
the rebate for all taxpayers by the end of June 1975.
Business taxes will be reduced by raising the investment tax credit
for qualifying investment that is put in service in calendar year 1975 or




56

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

ordered in calendar year 1975 and put in service in calendar year 1976.
The maximum credit will be increased from 4% to 12% for utilities
and from 7% to 12% for other business. The amount of investment
credit that utilities can use to offset their tax liability will be increased
temporarily from a maximum of 50% of their tax liability in excess of
$25,000 to 75%. The 75% limit will be phased back to the 50% limit
that applies to other businesses by 1980. Also, the credit will be extended an additional 2 years for facilities fired by fuels other than oil or
natural gas which provide power for generating electricity. These
proposals will reduce receipts by $1.2 billion in 1975 and $2.9 billion in
1976.
Increased energy taxes.—The higher energy taxes fall into three major
categories. First, the President has issued a proclamation increasing
import fees on petroleum products by $1 per barrel on February 1,
1975, $2 per barrel on March 1, 1975, and, in the absence of legislation
on his energy proposals, by $3 per barrel on April 1, 1975. The estimates presented in the budget assume that the tax proposals will be
enacted by April 1 and that the increase in import fees to $3 per
barrel will not become effective.
Second, a $2 per barrel excise tax on domestic crude oil, and an
excise tax on natural gas that is equivalent on a Btu basis to that on
crude oil are proposed. The estimates in this budget assume that
these taxes take effect on April 1, 1975, increasing receipts by $3.7
billion in 1975 and $19.0 billion in 1976. About 55% of the combined
$22.7 billion increase in receipts is due to taxes on oil and about 45%
to taxes on natural gas.
Third, a windfall profits tax is proposed, retroactive to January 1,
1975, in the form of a graduated tax on the sale of domestic crude
oil at prices higher than the nontaxable level, called the adjusted
base price. The adjusted base price—which will initially be set at
$4.95 per barrel on the average—escalates monthly so that the windfall tax phases out over a number of years. This tax will not affect
1975 receipts because collections will not begin until July 1975 but will
increase 1976 receipts by $16.3 billion.
Energy tax offsets.—Increased energy tax receipts will be fully offset,
partially through reductions in individual and corporation income
taxes, and partially through increased Federal spending directed
toward those individuals and those sectors of the economy affected
by increased energy costs but not compensated by income tax
reductions.
Individual income taxes will be reduced by three changes. First,
the minimum standard deduction will be increased from the present
$1,300 for individuals and families to $2,000 for individuals and $2,600
for families. It is estimated that this change will decrease the number




BUDGET

57

RECEIPTS

of individuals or families subject to the income tax by over 5 million,
and will reduce 1975 receipts by $0.6 billion and 1976 receipts by $8.1
billion. Second, reductions in the rate structure—concentrated in the
lower income brackets—will decrease 1975 receipts by $0.8 billion
and 1976 receipts by $16.3 billion. The effect of these two tax changes
on the tax liability for a family of four is illustrated in the table below.
CHANGE IN TAX LIABILITY FOR A FAMILY OF FOUR
Adjusted gross income

Present
taxi

$5,600

$185

$7,000

402

$10,000
$12,500

867
1,261

$15,000

1,699

$20,000

2,660

$30,000

4,988

$40,000

7,958

New tax

Tax
saving

0 $185

$110
58
1
91
6
1,478
2,450
4,837
7.828

22
9
39
4
30
0
21
2
20
1
11
5
10
3

Percent
saving

100.0

72.6
40.3
23.8
13.0
79
.
30
.
16
.

1
Calculated assuming minimum standard deduction or itemized deductions equal t o 17% of
i n c o m e , whichever is greater.

Each of these two changes in individual income taxes will be retroactive to January 1, 1975. Withholding schedules will be adjusted
beginning June 1, 1975, in such a way that the full year's reduction in
tax liability is offset by reducing withheld taxes in the remaining 7
months of the calendar year. Then in January 1976 withholding rates
will be adjusted again so that the effect of the tax reduction is distributed over 12 months.
Finally, an income tax credit of 15% of expenditures on energysaving home improvements such as storm windows and insulation,
limited to $150 over 3 years, is proposed. This credit would reduce
1976 receipts by $0.5 billion.
Corporation income taxes will be reduced by lowering the maximum
rate from 48% to 42% retroactive to January 1, 1975. This will reduce
receipts by $1.8 billion in 1975 and by $6.6 billion in 1976.
The following table shows the effect of the tax proposals on receipts
by half years.
In addition to offsets through the tax system, $7 billion of offsets
are included in the budget as outlays to compensate nontaxpayers,
State and local governments, and Federal agencies for higher energy
costs. The payments to non-taxpayers—estimated at $2 billion—will
take the form of an $80 payment for each non-taxpaying adult. It is
estimated that 21 million individuals will be eligible for this payment.
In addition, individuals and families receiving benefits of less than $80
per adult from the income tax reductions will receive a portion of the
$80 per adult payment.




58

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 76
EFFECT OF THE PRESIDENT'S TAX PROPOSALS ON BUDGET RECEIPTS
BY HALF YEARS
[Dollars in billions]
Fiscal
year 1975
JanuaryJune
1975

Economic stimulus tax proposals:
Temporary increase in investment tax credit
Individual income tax rebate of 12% of calendar year 1974
liability

Fiscal year 1976
JulyDecember
1975

JanuaryJune
1976

—1.2

—1.2

-4.9

-7.3

—6.1

—8.5

—1.7

1.3
1.3
1.7

1.8
3.2
4.2
11.0

2.0
3.6
4.2
5.3

4.3

20.2

15.1

Energy tax offsets:
Individual income tax reductions:
Increase in minimum standard deduction
Changes in rate structure

—0.6
—0.8

—6.6
—9.6

—1.5
—6.7

Residential energy conservation credit
Corporation income tax rate reduction

—1.8

—1.8

—0.5
—4.8

Subtotal—Energy tax offsets

-3.2

-18.0

-13.5

Total tax changes

-5.0

-6.3

-0.1

Subtotal—Economic stimulus
Energy taxes:
Increase in import fe^s on crude oil and petroleum products.
Excise tax on oil
Excise tax on natural gas
Windfall profits tax
Subtotal—Energy taxes

—1.7

CHANGES IN BUDGET RECEIPTS
Budget receipts are estimated to rise by $13.8 billion in 1975 and
$18.8 billion in 1976. The year-to-year changes can be divided between
those due to growth in the tax base and those due to revisions in the
tax structure. Under tax laws in effect on January 1, 1973, receipts
would have risen by $14.9 billion in 1975 (from $264.6 billion to
$279.5 billion) and by $17.5 billion in 1976 (from $279.5 billion to
$297.0 billion). Thus, enacted and proposed tax law changes, which
are shown in the accompanying table, reduce the growth in receipts
by $1.0 billion in 1975 and increase the growth in receipts by $1.2
billion in 1976.




BUDGET RECEIPTS

59

CHANGES IN BUDGET RECEIPTS
[In billions of dollars]
1974
actual
Receipts under tax rates and structure in effect on Jan. 1,1973
Enacted legislative changes:

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

264.6

279.5

297.0

+0.4

+4.8
+0.1

—0.1

—0.3

+5.6
+1.6
+0.2
—0.5

-0.3

-0.3

283. 8

303. 6

+4. 3

+19.0
+16.3

—0.6
—0.8
—].8

—8.1
—16.3
—0.5
—6.6

Subtotal, energy related
Economic stimulus tax proposals:
Temporary investment tax credit of 12%:
Individual
Corporation
Individual income tax rebate of 12% on calendar year 1974
liability

+1.1

+3.8

-0.2
—1.0

-0.6
—2.3

-4.9

-7.3

Subtotal, economic stimulus
Other:
Write-off of silver certificates
Other

—6.1

—10.2

Social security taxable earnings base increases:
$10,800 to $13,200 effective Jan. 1, 1974
$13,200 to $14,100 effective Jan. 1,1975
$14,100 to $15,300 effective Jan. 1, 1976
Reductions in telephone excise tax
Liberalized deductions for individual contributions to pension
plans
Total receipts under existing legislation

264.9

Changes due to tax proposals:

Energy-related tax proposals:
Excise tax and import fee on oil and excise tax on natural gas _
Windfall profits tax
Individual income tax reductions:
Increase in minimum standard deduction
Changes in rate structure
Residential energy conservation creditCoiporation income tax rate reduction

Total receipts from existing and proposed legislation

+0.2
+0.1
264.9

278. 8

297.5

RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
Individual income taxes.—Individual income tax receipts are
estimated at $117.7 billion in 1975 and $106.3 billion in 1976. The
proposed tax law changes outlined in the previous section reduce
receipts from this source by $6.5 billion in 1975 and $32.8 billion in
1976. In the absence of these tax law changes, individual income
taxes would increase by $14.9 billion in 1976 rather than decline by
$11.4 billion as is projected here.

580-000 O - 75 - 5




60

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Corporation income taxes.—Corporation income tax receipts are
estimated at $38.5 billion in 1975 and $47.7 billion in 1976. Proposed
tax law changes reduce these receipts by $2.8 billion in 1975 and
increase them by $7.4 billion in 1976. In the absence of these tax law
changes, taxes on profits would increase by $2.7 billion in 1975 and
would decrease by $1.0 billion in 1976. This 1975 increase—exclusive
of tax law changes—is due in large part to a sharp increase in inventory
profits in calendar year 1974 caused by high rates of inflation. Corporate profits including inventory profits increased by about $18
billion in calendar year 1974 and are expected to decline by $26 billion
in calendar year 1975.
Social insurance taxes and contributions.—Receipts from this
source are expected to total $91.6 billion in 1976, up by $5.3 billion
from 1975. Included in the total are social security and other payroll
taxes, unemployment insurance taxes and deposits, Federal employee
retirement contributions, and premium payments for supplementary
medical insurance. These receipt figures reflect:
• An anticipated increase in the dollar amount of payrolls covered
by social security and by other retirement insurance programs
due to expansion of employment and a rise in wage rates.
• A statutory increase in the taxable earnings base under social
security from $13,200 to $14,100 effective January 1, 1975, and
an anticipated increase from $14,100 to $15,300 effective January 1, 1976, due to the operation of the automatic adjustment
mechanism. The base increase in January 1976 will be determined
by the increase in the average taxable wage from the first quarter
of calendar year 1974 to the first quarter of calendar year 1975.
Excise taxes.—Excise taxes are levied on a variety of products,
services, and activities. Receipts from these taxes in 1976 are; estimated
at $32.1 billion, which is $12.2 billion more than in 1975. The proposed legislation for energy taxes increases these receipts by $3.0
billion in 1975 and $15.2 billion in 1976, thus producing the sharp
increase in excise tax receipts in 1976. Excise tax receipts in both 1975
and 1976 also reflect the continued phasing out of the telephone
excise tax. This tax rate was reduced from 8% to 7% on January 1,
1975, and will be reduced to 6% on January 1, 1976.
Other receipts.—Estate and gift taxes, customs, and miscellaneous
receipts are estimated to total $19.8 billion in 1976, an increase of $3.4
billion from 1975. These figures reflect the imposition of increased
fees on oil imports, which increases miscellaneous receipts by $1.3
billion in 1975 and $3.8 billion in 1976.
In addition to these budget receipts, the Government receives
significant proprietary income from the public. This is derived from
various market-oriented activities—such as rents, royalties, and the
sale of Government products and property—that are excluded from




61

BUDGET RECEIPTS

Bucket Receipts: 1966-1976
$ Billions

$ Billions

350

350

-300

300Total
250 —

-250

200-

-200

-150

-100

-50

1966

1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 (972 1973 1974 1975

Fiscal Years

1976

Estimate

budget receipts and instead are treated as offsets to related budget
authority and outlays. The detail of proprietary receipts from the
public is shown in table 12 in Part 9.
ANALYSIS OF 1974 RECEIPTS
This section explains the differences between actual receipts by
major source for the last completed fiscal year and the original budget
estimates for that year. The Congressional Budget Act of 1974 requires
that this information be included in each budget beginning with the
one for 1978, at which time it must be provided for 1976. The information is being added to the budget 2 years earlier to facilitate the
transition to the new congressional budget review process.
The table below makes this comparison for 1974. As shown in the
table, receipts were about $9 billion higher than originally estimated,
with the bulk of the increase due to higher-than-anticipated individual income taxes.
Individual income taxes in 1974 were $7.4 billion higher than originally estimated, largely because personal income was $37 billion higher
in calendar year 1973 than anticipated. The higher personal income
resulted entirely from higher inflation than originally estimated. In
addition, failure to enact legislation proposed in the 1974 budget to
provide an income tax credit for nonpublic elementary and secondary




62

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
COMPARISON OF 1974 BUDGET RECEIPTS
[In billions of dollars]
January
1973
estimate

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions
Excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs
Miscellaneous receipts
Total

Actual

Change,
actual
less
estimate

111.6
37.0
78.2
16.8
5.0
3.3
4.1

119.0
38.6
76.8
16.8
5.0
3.3
5.4

7.4
1.6
—1.4
*
*
*
1.2

256.0

264.9

9.0

*Less than $50 million.

education and to liberalize deductions for individual pension plans
increased individual income taxes by $0.6 billion from the initial
estimate. Finally, reapportionment of withheld taxes between individual income taxes and employment taxes increased individual income taxes by $0.5 billion and reduced employment taxes by an equal
amount.
The $1.6 billion increase in corporation income taxes was due to
higher profits in calendar year 1973 than expected, offset in part by
lower than expected effective tax rates.
Social insurance taxes and contributions were $1.4 billion lower than
estimated in the 1974 budget despite higher wages and salaries than
anticipated. Part of this downward revision was due to an overestimate of the percentage of wages and salaries covered by social security,
and part was due to an overestimate of the percentage of covered
wages and salaries below the maximum level subject to tax. The
major data source for the percentage? assumed in the 1974 Budget was
the Social Security Bulletin-Annual Statistical Supplement, 1971.
These data were revised significantly in the 1972 Supplement published a year later. Also, receipts from this source were revised downward by $0.5 billion because of the reapportionment of withheld
taxes mentioned above. Finally, failure of the Congress to increase
railroad retirement taxes as proposed in the 1974 Budget reduced
social insurance taxes and contributions by $0.6 billion.
Miscellaneous receipts were $1.2 billion higher than first estimated
largely due to an increase in deposits of earnings by the Federal Reserve System, which appear in the unified budget as miscellaneous
receipts. This increase resulted from both higher interest rates and
larger amounts of debt held by the Federal Reserve System than
assumed in the 1974 Budget.
Excise taxes, estate and gift taxes, and customs duties were all
within $50 million of the original estimate.




PART 5

THE FEDERAL
PROGRAM BY FUNCTION




63

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
NEW FUNCTIONAL CLASSIFICATION
This section discusses budget outlays in terms of the major functions or purposes being served. The use of a functional budget classification started with the 1948 budget. The purpose is to compare budget outlays for each major purpose regardless of which agency is carrying out the activity and without double counting.
Part 6 of the budget discusses the criteria for the functional classification in greater detail. While the use of functional classifications
extends back nearly three decades, it has been necessary to revise the
classifications somewhat from time to time to reflect better the composition of current budgets. The 1976 budget contains the results of
the first major revision of the functional classification in 14 years. The
historical data used in this document have been revised to reflect the
new functional classifications, so outlays in earlier years are comparable to those for the 3 years (and transition quarter) covered by this
budget. The following functions are used in this budget:
National defense.—This function is essentially the same as the
previous national defense function except for the transfer of nuclear,
physical and life sciences research to "general science", and civilian
nuclear energy development and production activities to "energy".
International affairs.—This function is virtually unchanged from
the previous one except for shortening the title.
General science, space, and technology is a new function. It includes
most of the previous "space research and technology" function,
nuclear, physical and life sciences research, and the activities of the
National Science Foundation.
Natural resources, environment, and energy is similar to the previous
natural resources and environment function, but with the addition of
civilian applications of nuclear energy. It also no longer includes the
offsetting receipts from rents and royalties on the Outer Continental
Shelf.
Agriculture no longer includes funds for rural development, rural
housing, or the Section 32 commodity distribution programs.
64




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

65

Commerce and transportation is similar to the previous function but
includes support of the commercial housing market and includes
aeronautical technology outlays by NASA.
Community and regional development includes rural as well as urban
development spending and disaster relief. Housing is no longer included
in this function; commercial housing activities have been transferred
to the commerce and transportation function, and spending on lowincome housing is included in income security.
Education, manpower, and social services is similar to the previous
education and manpower function except for the transfer of general
science to the general science, space, and technology function, and the
addition of social services (previously included in income security).
The health function is essentially the same as the previous health
function except for inclusion of meat and poultry inspection (from
agriculture) and some safety activities previously included under
manpower.
The income security function now includes low-income housing
programs and the Section 32 commodity distribution programs but
no longer includes social services spending.
The veterans benefits and services function is unchanged.
enforcement and justice is a new function: it incorporates two
subfunctions from last year's general government function: judicial
functions and law enforcement and justice.
The general government function lost two subfunctions to law enforcement and justice, and also lost the "national capital region"
subfunction, which was distributed among general purpose fiscal
assistance, community development, and transportation.
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance includes not
only general revenue sharing but also other forms of general purpose
fiscal assistance to States and localities such as shared revenues and
the Federal payment to the District of Columbia.
The interest function is essentially unchanged from last year.
Undistributed of setting receipts includes not only undistributed
intragovernmental receipts (that is, employer share of employee retirement and interest received by trust funds) but also rents and
royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf.




66

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

In addition to the above changes in the major functions, there have
been many changes in the subfunctions. Table 17 shows comparable
historical data for 1966 through 1976 on the new basis. 1
CHANGING BUDGET PRIORITIES

The table below highlights the changes in the totals for each function as a percent of total budget outlays at 5-year intervals over a 35year period.
PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
Function

National defense___.

1941

1951

44.3 75.3 47.8

International affairs....
1.1
General science, space, and technology
_
.1
Natural resources, environment,
and energy
._
6.4
Agriculture
2.5
Commerce and transportation
4.7
Community and regional development
1.1
Education, manpower, and social
services
12.5
Health
.4
Income security
13.7
Veterans benefits and services
4.1
Law enforcement and justice
.7
General government
2.2
Revenue sharing and general purposefiscalassistance
.1
Interest....
8.1
Allowances
_
Undistributed offsetting receipts... - 1 . 9
Totaloutlays

1946

1956

1961

1966

1971

41.5 36.3

1976
est.

56.4

47.6

3.5

8.2

3.4

3.3

3.4

1.5

1.8

26.9

.1

.2

.2

1.1

5.0

2.0

1.3

.9
1.1
.1

3.1
-.7
4.8

1.5
4.9
2.8

2.2
2.7
5.3

2.3
1.8
6.7

2.1
2.0
4.9

2.9
.5
3.9

.4

.6

.3

.5

1.1

1.9

1.7

.2
.4
4.7
4.5
.3
1.6

.5
.7
10.2
12.1
.5
2.3

.8
.5
14.0
7.1
.4
.7

1.1
.9
21.9
5.8
.4
1.1

3.0
2.0
21.5
4.4
.4
1.1

4.3
7.0
26.2
4.6
.6
1.0

4.2
8.0
34.0
4.5
.9
.9

*
.1
.1
8.5
12.2
8.9
_
_
-1.5 -2.6 -2.1

.2
8.3

.2
8.4

.2
9.3

-2.5

-2.7

-4.0

2.1
9.9
2.3
-5.8

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

• Less than 0.05%.

The table reflects the impact of world conditions on the Federal
budget through changes in the magnitude of spending on national
defense and international affairs. Since the National Government has
sole responsibility in this area, Federal spending is equal to total
Government spending. In contrast, State and local government spending is dominant in many areas such as education and law enforcement.
The most significant trend during the past two decades is the decline
1
Data on outlays by subf unction for the years 1962 to 1965, and by major function for 1940
through 1965. are available upon request from the Office of Management and Budget, Washington,
D.C. 20503.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

67

in the proportion of Federal outlays for national defense and international affairs and the rise in domestic civil spending—especially for
income security and health.
The table below provides some further perspective on this swing
away from national defense and toward domestic civil programs, and
also provides some perspective on Federal spending in relation to the
total economy.
BUDGET OUTLAYS BY MAJOR CATEGORY AS A PERCENT OF GROSS NATIONAL
PRODUCT
1941

National defense
Human resources i
Net interest 2 ..
All o t h e r . . . .
Total....

1946 1951 1956 1961

1966 1971

5.5 20.6 7.0 9.7 9.2 7.7 7.6
3.8 2.7 3.4 3.9 5.7 5.8 8.8
9 2.0 1.5 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.5
2.2 2.1 2.7 2.4 3.0 3.9 3.0

1976
c.t.

5.9
11.1
1.6
3.3

12.5 27.4 14.7 17.2 19.3 18.7 20.9 21.9

1
Composed of the education, manpower, and social services; income security; health; and veterans benefits and services functions.
3
Composed of the interest function net of interest received by trust funds.

National defense spending has dropped as a percent of gross national product (GNP), but spending on domestic civil programs—
especially human resources programs—has risen at an even faster
rate, so budget outlays are a somewhat larger proportion of our
GNP than they were a decade or two ago.
TAX EXPENDITURES
While budget outlays are the most obvious method by which the
Federal Government allocates resources, other fiscal activities of the
Government also have large effects on resource allocation. Tax expenditures are a major example of such activity. In recognition of
this, the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 requires that the budget
"shall set forth the levels of tax expenditures. . . ." In response to this
requirement, a detailed discussion of tax expenditures is presented in
Special Analysis F in the Special Analyses volume of the Budget. In
addition, tax expenditures are briefly explained here, and are discussed
where they are ^2 major importance in the functional sections that
follow.
The act defines tax expenditures as those revenue losses attributable
to provisions of the Federal income tax laws which allow a special
exclusion, exemption, or deduction from income or which provide a
special credit, a preferential rate of tax, or a deferral of tax liability.
Tax expenditures are instruments of public policy and, to varying




68

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

degrees, can be viewed as alternatives to other types of fiscal activity
such as credit programs or direct outlays. Most tax expenditures
either encourage certain economic activities or reduce the taxes of
persons considered to be in adverse circumstances or who have
suffered serious economic reverses. Among the economic activities
encouraged are private investment, spending by State and local
governments, and support of charities. Among the persons whose
tax burdens are lightened are the aged, those with large medical
expenses, and recipients of government assistance and social insurance
payments.
Given the definition of tax expenditures as exceptions to the "normal
structure" of the individual and corporation income taxes, a number
of conceptual issues arise. First, most features of the tax law can
fairly clearly be classified as either tax expenditures or part of the
normal structure. Nonetheless, as in most classifications, the borderline is necessarily somewhat arbitrary. For example, since income
includes capital gains, a tax expenditure might be considered to result
from the fact that capital gains completely escape income taxation if
they remain unrealized at the time of their beneficiary's death.
However, in the budget this feature of the tax law is regarded as
part of that concession to administrative practicality which taxes
capital gains as they are realized, rather than as they accrue. Hence,
it is not counted as a tax expenditure.
Second, the normal structure of the income tax, like tax expenditures, is a subject for value judgments. It is decided through the legislative process and many of its features have changed over time. During
the last decade, legislation has altered overall rates, the degree of
progressivity, the size of personal exemptions, and the difference
between tax rates for married persons and those for single individuals.
Such changes in the normal structure are to some extent possible
substitutes for some tax expenditures. For example, an increase in the
minimum standard deduction—which is not counted as a tax expenditure—might serve much the same purposes as are now served by the
exclusion from income of transfer payments such as social security
benefits and unemployment compensation—which are counted as tax
expenditures.
Third, because tax expenditures are measured as departures from the
normal structure of the income tax, changes in the normal structure
affect the magnitude of tax expenditures. For instance, if tax rates
were generally lowered, the size of tax expenditures would generally
decline. Conversely, if changes in tax expenditures substantially
altered the size or distribution of the tax burden, changes in the normal
structure might be expected to accompany them. Actual rates
of taxation are the result of both the normal structure and tax
expenditures.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

69

A set of cautions also arises from essentially technical problems
in estimating the size of tax expenditures. First, estimates of the
revenue losses associated with particular tax provisions sometimes
involve substantial uncertainty.
Second, the revenue loss associated with a combination of tax
expenditures is not, in general, equal to the sum of each tax expenditure
estimated separately. The overall loss may be greater if, for instance,
the elimination of multiple exclusions pushes taxpayers into higher
tax brackets. It may also be smaller if, for instance, elimination of
multiple deductions causes taxpayers to switch from itemizing deductions to using the standard deduction. Thus, tax expenditures should
not be simply added together. In a few cases, totals which take account
of interactions have been computed and are presented in the functional
sections that follow.
Thirds tax expenditure estimates do not always indicate the increase
in receipts that would appear in the first year if a tax expenditure
were eliminated. The estimates assume that transitional effects resulting from changes in tax laws have disappeared, whereas actual changes
of law would sometimes produce long-lasting transitional effects.
Most tax expenditures are classified into the same functional categories as are spending programs. Those of major importance are discussed in the functional sections. However, some of the largest tax
expenditures are classified into three functions for which there are no
comparable outlays: "business investment", "personal investment",
and "other tax expenditures."
"Business investment" tax expenditures support business investment. The tax credit for investment in business equipment is the largest item in this category. Primarily as a result of the President's
economic proposals, the loss of receipts due to this credit is expected
to grow from $4% billion in 1974 to nearly twice that figure in 1976.
"Personal investment" tax expenditures aid investment by individuals. The taxation of capital gains at rates lower than those which
apply to ordinary income is estimated to reduce tax receipts from
individuals by $4.2 billion. The deductibility of mortgage interest and
of property taxes on owner-occupied homes encourage investment in
home ownership with 1976 tax expenditures estimated at $6.5 billion
and $5.3 billion, respectively. The exclusion of interest on life insurance savings provides a $1.8 billion dollar tax expenditure that
fosters investment through life insurance.
The deductibility of charitable contributions and the deductibility
of interest on consumer credit are the largest among "other tax
expenditures." They are estimated to reduce 1976 receipts by $5.1
billion and $3.5 billion, respectively.




70

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

NATIONAL DEFENSE
Program Highlights
• Continue negotiations to limit strategic arms and to
achieve mutual and balanced force reductions in Central
Europe for the NATO and Warsaw Pact nations.
• Increase outlays to maintain defense preparedness and
preserve personnel levels in the face of rising costs.
• Continue strategic force modernization to insure a
credible strategic deterrent.
• Strengthen the general purpose forces with little or no
increase in present manpower ceilings by adding to
combat manpower and reducing headquarters and
general support.

Peace and international stability are major United States objectives.
National security programs contribute to these goals by helping to
maintain the worldwide military equilibrium that is essential to peace.
This equilibrium requires a balance in strategic forces between the
United States and the Soviet Union, a balance in conventional forces
in Central Europe between the NATO and Warsaw Pact nations and a
balance in naval strength between the United States and the Soviet
Union. A presence in Northeast Asia will also be required, as will an
ability to provide weapons and munitions rapidly to allies and friends.
Total outlays for national defense will increase from $85.3 billion in
1975 to $94.0 billion in 1976 to maintain defense preparedness and
preserve personnel levels in the face of rising costs.
To achieve and maintain a military balance, United States forces
must be strengthened. Improved strategic nuclear forces and the
development of possible strategic systems for future deployment are
planned in order to maintain clear strategic deterrents against the
spectrum of potential threats. The fighting power of the general
purpose forces will also be strengthened, but with little or no increase
in present personnel ceilings. This will be accomplished by shifting
personnel from support activities to combat functions and by modernizing weapon systems and equipment. The major change planned
is an increase in the number of active Army divisions from 13 in June
1974 to 16 by September 1976. The reserve and guard forces, which
augment the active forces, will receive better training, improved
equipment and an increased share of combat responsibilities. The
tactical air forces will be modernized by the replacement of older aircraft with newer and more capable aircraft. A vigorous shipbuilding
program is planned to improve and expand the fleet.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

71

NATIONAL DEFENSE
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

Department of Defense—Military
Military personnel
Retired military personnel
Operation and maintenance
Procurement
Research development, test and evaluation
Military construction
Family housing
Revolving and management funds and other
Allowances for:
Civilian and military pay raises:
Existing legislation
Proposed legislation
Other legislation
Subtotal, military K
Military assistance 2
Subtotal, military and military assistance
Atomic energy defense activities
Defense-related activities
Deductions for offsetting receipts 2
Total

Outlays
1974
actual

1976
1975
estimate estimate

23,728
5,128
22,478
15,241
8,582
1,407
884
177

25,036
6,281
25,669
14,785
8, 650
1,457
1,090
10

Recommended
budget
authority
for 19761

24,999
6,884
28,246
16,600
9, 610
1,703
1,260
—836

25,078
6,885
29,182
24,720
10,179
2,887
1,222
223

3,002
-1,808
141

3,079
-1,847
142

77,625
819

82,978
1,822

89,800
3,000

101,749
4,591

78,444
1,486
-1,349
-13

84,800
1,598
-1,115
-7

92,800
1,763
-533
-3

106,340
1,896
-532
-3

78,569

85,276

94,027

107,700

1
2

Compares with budget authority of $89,293 million in 1974 and $91,314 million in 1975.
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been deducted by subfunction above; 1974 $4,719 million;
1975 $5,481 million; 1976 $6,093 million.

Department of Defense. Outlays for Department of Defense
military functions and military assistance will increase $8 billion
in 1976. This increase is necessary to cover pay and price increases and
to maintain defense preparedness.
Under existing law, civilian and military pay raises and military
retirement annuity increases would amount to $3.0 billion in 1976.
Legislation is proposed to limit these increases to 5% through June 30
of next year. This policy will save $1.8 billion in defense outlays in
1976. This proposal recognizes that Federal employees enjoy greater
job security than the average worker under current economic conditions and that increases in recent years in retirement annuities have
been well in excess of the rate of inflation.




72

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Defense1 Outlays
SBilliom

100

m4 - W

'66

%? m

*§»

10

*tl

*Tt

"»

*?4 1$

To aid in planning national security needs, military forces are
grouped, regardless of service, according to the major missions to
be accomplished. The following table summarizes the defense program
on the basis of these major missions in terms of total obligational
authority (TOA). Total obligational authority includes budget authority enacted each year by the Congress, plus the authority granted in
earlier years that is transferred to subsequent years.
Strategic forces.—The primary objective of the strategic forces is
deterrence. In order to constitute credible deterrents across the
spectrum of potential threats, these forces must be:
• able to absorb a first strike and respond with devastating effectiveness against any aggressor;
• prepared to execute a range of appropriate attacks, including
attacks limited in terms of targets and numbers of weapons;
• perceived as equal in overall capability to the forces of any
opponent or combination of opponents so that no one could hope
to use a nuclear threat to gain diplomatic or military advantage
over the United States and its allies; and




THE FEDEiRAL, PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

73

SUMMARY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BUDGET PROGRAM *
[In billions of dollars]
Total obligational authority
Major military programs

Actual
1968

Strategic forces__
General purpose forces
Intelligence and communications
.
Airlift and sealift
_
Guard and Reserve
_
Research and development2
Central supply and maintenance
Training, medical, and other general personnel activities...
Administration and associated activities
Support of other nations *
_

7.2
30.5
5.5
1. 7
2.2
4.3
8.4

Total obligational authority
Prior year funds and other financial adjustments
Total budget authority
1
9

Estimate
1974

1975

1976

6.8

7.4

7.7

27.5

28.2

35.9

5.9

8.5

6.4
.9
4.8
7.7
9.0

7.3
1.6
5.6
9.4
9.9

12.2
1.2
2.4

18.2

20.0

21.7

1.8
4.3

2.1
2.5

2.4
3.3

75.6
.8

85.0
3.9

89.0
1.8

104.7
1.6

76.4

88.9

90.8

106.3

.8

4.3
6.9

Includes military assistance program and foreign military sales programs.
Excludes R. & D. in other program areas on systems approved for production.

• equivalent to the forces and programs of any other nations in
payload, accuracy and reliability.
The Vladivostok negotiations with the Soviet Union are a significant
achievement. For the first time in our negotiations with the Soviet
Union we have reached an understanding on specific and equal limitations on the total number of strategic delivery vehicles and missiles
with multiple independently targetable warheads (MIRVs). By establishing overall quantitative limits, a substantial expansion of
strategic forces can be avoided. Within the limits of the agreement,
the United States will continue to deploy an effective combination of
strategic bombers, land-based missiles and submarine-launched
missiles, and will develop options for the deployment of improved
systems in the future. The 1976 strategic program, including systems
funded in the research and development program, will permit us to:
• continue engineering development of the B-l strategic bomber
and begin full scale production in 1977 if performance goals in
relation to costs are achieved;
• proceed with the Trident submarine system to be deployed in
1979 and design a lower cost alternative to the Trident;




74

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

• develop options for future deployment of improved intercontinental ballistic missiles that could be launched from fixed
silos or mobile launchers;
• continue development of ballistic missile warhead accuracy
improvements and long range cruise missiles;
• maintain technology for ballistic missile defense systems and
improve the capability for surveillance and early warning of
nuclear attack;
• improve the command, control and communications of the
strategic forces.
General purpose forces.—Most land, air and naval forces are designed
to perform the general purpose mission of deterring or repelling attacks
not deterred by the threat of strategic nuclear retaliation. These
threats range from isolated incidents to major assaults by a combination of opponents.
Between 1968 and 1975, the general purpose forces were sharply
reduced following the United States disengagement from the conflict
in Vietnam. As shown in the summary of active military personnel
and forces, military personnel was reduced by 1.4 million, from 3.5
million in 1968 to 2.1 million in 1975. This is the lowest level since
before the Korean war and 556,000 less than in 1964 prior to the
Vietnam conflict. The number of active divisions, tactical air wings
and warships has also been reduced below pre-Vietnam war levels.
The United States has initiated negotiations between the NATO
Alliance and the Warsaw Pact on mutual and balanced force reductions. If these negotiations are successful, some U.S. forces stationed
in Europe could be withdrawn. For the time being, however, the
United States and its allies must maintain present manpower levels
and strengthen conventional combat capabilities. This will be accomplished by shifting manpower from support activities to combat
functions, and by modernizing weapon systems and equipment. Increased standardization of weapons will also be emphasized.
With little or no increase in present manpower ceilings, combat
capabilities will be strengthened by an increase in the number of active
combat elements and an offsetting reduction of headquarters and
general support activities. More extensive use of reserve combat
components will further augment the active forces. This will result in
greater combat power in the early days of a conflict. The major change
planned is an increase in the number of active Army divisions from 13
in June 1974, to 16 by September 1976.
Production of modern equipment for the land forces will increase in
1976 with emphasis on tanks and antitank weapons. Other procurement priorities include armed helicopters, armored personnel carriers,




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION.

75

and air defense weapons. These production increases are necessary,
in part, to replace equipment and weapons that were delivered to
Middle East nations to rebuild their forces following the Yom Kippur
War; in particular the supply of tanks, armored personnel carriers, selfpropelled artillery and antitank weapons. At the same time, the
Middle East War demonstrated that previously planned inventory
levels were too low to sustain United States forces in a conflict that
might be fought in the European area. Therefore, production rates
will be increased in 1976 to replace the equipment, munitions and
spare parts shipped to the Middle East and to build up to the new
inventory objectives.
The retirement of many aging ships built during World War II,
together with the rapid growth in the Soviet Navy, requires that the
United States maintain a vigorous program of new ship construction
and modernization for the naval forces. Procurement of 10 guided
missile frigates will help maintain an appropriate naval balance. The
ship construction program for 1976 also includes two more nuclear
attack submarines, a DLGN class nuclear-powered guided missile
cruiser and two patrol hydrofoil missile ships. A number of destroyer
tenders, tankers, and ocean tugs will also be acquired to provide for
the adequate maintenance and supply of the fleet.
The tactical air forces support the land and naval forces by protecting
them from air attack, providing close air support and preventing
enemy resupply and reinforcement. Maintaining the superiority of the
tactical air forces is essential to offset the numerical advantages that
the Warsaw Pact nations have in land forces and ship-to-ship cruise
missies.
Continued procurement of aircraft is planned in 1976 to replace
older systems. Additional production of Air Force F-15 fighters is
planned to maintain air superiority. Development of the F-16 air
combat fighter will continue. Full scale production of the new A-10
is proposed for close air support of ground forces. Carrier-based
F-14s equipped with the Phoenix missile, A-7 and A-6 attack aircraft, EA-6B electronic warfare aircraft and E-2C early warning and
surveillance aircraft will be purchased to strengthen Navy and
Marine Corps air capabilities. Purchase of S-3A and P-3C aircraft
is planned for antisubmarine search and destroy missions. Increased
purchases of air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles are also proposed
for all tactical air forces.
Increased use of flight simulators for air crew training continues as
a high priority. These simulators duplicate the actual flight environment and train pilots in bombing, air combat maneuvering, and
emergencies without using aviation fuels or risking men and aircraft.

580-000 O - 75 - 6




76

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Airlift and sealift forces.—The transfer of a large amount of supplies
on short notice during the October 1973 Middle East War demonstrated the effectiveness of airlift for strategic purposes. Recent improvements in midair refueling have increased the load that can be
airlifted over great distances without landing. Several efforts initiated
in 1974 to improve the strategic airlift capability will be pursued in
1976.
Guard and Reserve,—The National Guard and Reserves are the
initial and primary sources of manpower to augment the active forces
during an emergency. Army Guard and Reserve units designated to
augment the active divisions will be maintained in the Selected
Reserve at a high level of readiness and will train with the active units
to which they are affiliated. Air Force Guard and Reserve units will
participate for the first time in the strategic mission of refueling.
Tankers are transferred from the active forces to the Air Guard and
Reserve.
Guard and Reserve recruiting is more successful than anticipated
and a large number of individuals with prior service have joined the
Selected Reserve. Howevei, an intensified recruiting campaign may
be needed to offset the significant number of reservists expected to
leave the service during 1975 and 1976 as the last of the draft inspired
enlistees are discharged.
Research and development.—An increase in total obligational authority is necessary to continue the research and development programs
that keep U.S. forces modern and maintain technological superiority.
In addition to the strategic development programs discussed earlier,
major increases are planned for tactical programs. These include development of an advanced air combat fighter for the Navy and Air
Force. This system should be available for procurement in 1978 as a
low cost fighter to complement the highly sophisticated F-14 and F-15
aircraft now being deployed by the Navy and Air Force. Work will
continue on the development of a new battle tank, armored infantry
combat vehicle and attack helicopter system to overcome the Warsaw
Pact advantage in armored strength. Naval development programs
will emphasize antisubmarine warfare and fleet air defense systems.
The Air Force will increase efforts to improve its capability to penetrate and suppress enemy air defenses, and to attack enemy ground
forces beyond the reach of friendly ground forces.
There will also be increased emphasis on exploratory research and
technology to identify new concepts and to maintain technological
superiority.
Training, medical, and other general personnel support activities.—The
Nation has achieved an all-volunteer force by paying fair wages and




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION'

77

competing effectively in the marketplace for manpower. If current
enlistment and reenlistment trends continue, authorized personnel
levels will be met in 1975 and 1976.
The third quadrennial review of military compensation, which
started early in January 1975 is designed to assure that all aspects of
military compensation meet defense needs. Every segment of military
compensation will be examined to ensure that equitable wages are
paid and nonessential costs are eliminated. Legislation embodied in the
Defense Officer Personnel Management Act and related proposals is
needed to better align the military work force with job requirements in
terms of length of service and rank. Legislation is again proposed to
restructure the military retired pay system gradually and to permit
equitable separation of excess military personnel.
Annuities for retired military personnel and their survivors will require $6.9 billion in 1976. Slightly more than half of the $0.6 billion
increase over 1975 levels results from an increase of 57,000 in the number of retired personnel. Cost of living adjustments, raises in active
duty basic pay and changes in the grade distribution of eligible
personnel account for the balance of the increase.
The budget this year does not propose funding or legislation to recompute military retired pay. Current economic conditions make it
necessary to restrain the growth of Federal expenditures. The present
military retirement system, with its provisions for consumer price
index adjustments, already has the effect of recomputing retired
military pay. Further recomputation would not be appropriate at
this time.
The current wage board pay law requires the use of wage rate data
outside of the local area involved. Legislation will be proposed to
repeal this feature, in order that the process for determining Federal
wage rates is more consistent with the long standing principle that
such rates will be comparable with area prevailing rates.
Approximately 10 million people are eligible to receive benefits from
the military health care system. The cost of providing health care
services through the civilian health and medical program of the
uniformed services and through the Army, Navy, and Air Force
medical systems for those beneficiaries will exceed $3.5 billion. Included in this funding is the cost of the new Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, which will in the future graduate
physicians trained to meet military medical needs.
Administration and associated activities.—More effective use of naval
petroleum reserves is planned to reduce U.S. dependence on imports
of petroleum products and help preclude political and economic disruption of supplies. Legislation is requested to increase production




78

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 at Elk Hills, Calif. Proceeds
from the sale of this oil will be used to finance further exploration of
reserves in Alaska, and the initial costs of establishing a national
strategic petroleum reserve. This strategic reserve will provide up
to 1.0 billion barrels of petroleum or petroleum products for domestic
and industrial use, and 0.3 billion barrels for military use in time of
national emergency or serious disruption of supplies.
Support of other nations.—This program includes military assistance
for the armed forces of South Vietnam and other nations. For 1976,
$1.3 billion in total obligational authority is recommended for military
assistance to South Vietnam. Beginning with the transition quarter
(July 1,1976), military assistance for South Vietnam will be authorized
under the Foreign Assistance Act, which is discussed in the section on
international affairs.
Military assistance.—The military assistance and credit sales programs provide the support necessary to strengthen the efforts of other
countries to provide for their own defense. These programs are discussed in the section on international affairs.

Atomic energy defense activities.—The research and development and underground testing of nuclear weapons will increase in 1976
primarily to complete the detailed design and testing of specific
weapons already approved for development prior to the effective date
of the Threshold Test Ban Treaty. Spending on production of plutonium and tritium related to future nuclear weapons production will
rise due to increased labor and fuel costs. Funds for the development of
improved nuclear propulsion plants for naval ships will increase
primarily because of requirements for the Trident submarines.
Defense related activities.—The Selective Service System will
begin major program adjustments in 1976. Local board operations will be phased down while a new standby system is tested. An
annual registration system will be evaluated. Alternate induction
procedures will be developed for possible use in a major contingency.
Classification activity will be deferred until such time as induction
authority may be requested by the President. Funding is included for
the reconciliation service program for returned Vietnam-era draft
resisters and deserters.
Receipts from the sale of excess strategic stockpile commodities are
estimated at $1,180 million in 1975, of which $150 million requires
enactment of new disposal authority. Stockpile receipts in 1976




THE FEDEiRAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

79

should decline to $620 million, reflecting lower demand and the exhaustion of existing disposal authority for certain key commodities.
Of the $620 million 1976 receipts estimate, $488 million is dependent
on enactment of new stockpile disposal legislation by the Congress.
SUMMARY OF ACTIVE MILITARY PERSONNEL AND FORCES
Actual
Description

Military personnel (in thousands):
End strength:
Army.
_
Navy..__
_
Marine Corps
Air Force
._

June 30.
1968

1,570
75
6
37
0
95
0

Estimated

June 30.
1974

73
8
56
4
19
8
63
4

June 30.
1975

June 30.
1976

75
8
56
3
16
9
62
1

75
8
59
2
16
9
50
9

2.129

2.100

Total, Department of Defense.__
Average strength:
Army..
Navy
Marine Corps.
_
Air Force
_

3.547
1.487
73
5
28
9
89
9

77
8
54
5
11
9
63
7

79
7
56
4
13
9
61
3

74
8
51
3
16
9
67
0

Total, Department of Defense.._
Strategic forces:
Intercontinental ballistic missiles:
Minuteman
_
Titan II
Polaris-Poseidon missiles
Strategic bombers

3,437

2.206

2,149

2,118

1.000
5
4
66
5
68
4

1,000
5
4
66
5
50
0

1,000
5
4
66
5
48
9

1,000
5
4
66
5
47
9

1
9
4

1
3
3

1
4
3

1
6
3

2
5
1
5
3

22
1
4
3

22
!
4
3

2
2
1
3
3

2
3
3
3
37
8
17
5

1
4
6
1
17
8
6
5

1
5
6
4
19
8
6
4

1
3
6
8
15
8
6
3

0
3
2
10
3

4
1
3
3
7

4
1
3
40

4
1
3
4
3

2.161

General purpose forces:

Land forces:
Army divisions
Marine divisions
Tactical air forces:
Air Force wings
Navy attack wings.
Marine Corps wings
Naval forces:

Attack and antisubmarine carriers...
Nuclear attack submarines
Other warships
Amphibious assault ships
Airlift and sealift forces:

C-5A airlift squadrons._
Other strategic airlift squadrons
Troopships, cargo ships, and tankers.




80

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

Program Highlights
• Continue strategic arms limitation negotiations within
the context of the recent agreement at Vladivostok.
• Seek lasting peace in the Middle East and Indochina.
• Participate in a proposed $25 billion special financing
facility for industrialized countries with balance-of-payments difficulties due to high oil prices.
• Conduct international negotiations to reduce trade
barriers.
• Focus economic assistance on world food problems.

In today's interdependent world this Nation's domestic well-being
requires a purposeful and responsible involvement in the search for
world peace and international economic progress. Outlays for international affairs are estimated to be $6.3 billion in 1976.
The search for peace is being conducted through arms control
negotiations, diplomacy in the Middle East, and continued efforts
toward a solution to the problems of Indochina. Foreign assistance
programs are an indispensable complement to American diplomacy
and serve as a flexible means for meeting security, humanitarian, and
development needs in a world still plagued by hostilities, unrest, and
economic dislocations.
The United States is taking steps to strengthen a world economy
shaken by increases in oil and food prices. These steps constitute a
framework for international economic cooperation and progress.
To assure an adequate energy supply, this Nation joined 15 other
industrialized countries last November to form the international energy program which provides for emergency energy sharing, conservation, and development of alternative energy sources. To assure
that industrialized countries will be able to finance balance-of-payments deficits resulting from high oil prices and associated financial
distortions, the United States has proposed a special $25 billion
facility to help finance these deficits when other sources of credit are
insufficient. This facility will supplement expanded operations of the
International Monetary Fund. Authorizing legislation will be proposed
when negotiations are completed. To assure continued trade expansion,
the United States, under the authority of the Trade Act of 1974, will
participate in multilateral negotiations for reduction of trade barriers.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION.

81

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
[In millions of dollars]

Outlays

Program or agency

1974

1975

1976

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1976 »

Foreign economic and financial assistance:

(Military assistance)2
Security supporting assistance
Middle East special requirements fund
Indochina postwar reconstruction.._
Multilateral development assistance
Bilateral development assistance
_
Foodfor Peace
Migration and refugee assistance
International narcotics control
President's foreign assistance contingency fund.
Special financing facility (proposed legislation) _
Peace Corps
Other (including offsetting receipts)

246
615
848
639
43
5
25

(2,101)
319
12
508
876
1,058
1,165
66
27
14

81
-50

83
-68

2,834

4,060

5,468

11, 793

584
22

647
38

742
41

738
38

606

686

784

776

215
51
54

241
50
59

268
66
78

274
66
89

320

__

(1,312)
382

350

412

429

-167

-243

-370

-370

3,593

4,853

6,294

12,627

(1,228)

(1,609)

(1,757)

(2,913)

_

Subtotal, foreign economic andfinancialassistance.

(2,800)
398
12
762
990
1,133
1,070
10
38
20
1,000
83
-49

(2,460)
580
25
952
759
1,023
1,336
10
42
30
7,000
81
-46

Conduct of foreign affairs:

Department of State
Other.

_

._
_.

Subtotal, conduct of foreign affairs....
Foreign information and exchange activities:

United States Information Agency
Board for International Broadcasting
Department of State and other
Subtotal, foreign
activities....

information
_.__

Deductions for offsetting receipts.
Total, international affairs
Memorandum:
Export-Import Bank 3____
1
2

and exchange

_

Compares with budget authority of $5.3 billion for 1974 and $4.9 billion for 1975.
Excludes trust funds. Net of offsetting receipts. Outlays and budget authority for military assistance are classified in the national defense function; they are not included in the. totals shown for
international affairs. In 1974 outlays for South Vietnam were included in separate Defense Department accounts.
'Under Public Law 92-126, the receipts and disbursements of the Export-Import Bank have
not been included in the budget totals since August 17, 1971; they will be included beginning October 1, 1976, pursuant to Public Law 93-646, approved January 4, 1975. The Bank's outlays and
budget authority for periods prior to August 17, 1971, are shown in historical table 17 in subfunction 151 "Foreign Economic and Financial Assistance."




82

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

The United States is also supporting several initiatives growing out
of the World Food Conference including: greater quantities of food aid
to needy countries, additional assistance to improve food production
in the poorer countries, and creation of an international system of
grain reserves.

Foreign economic and financial assistance.—This subfunction
includes foreign aid, the special financing facility, and the Peace
Corps. The United States provides aid to foreign countries to enhance
self-defense capabilities, to support political stability, to promote
economic development, and to provide humanitarian relief. The table
on page 83 identifies the programs that constitute foreign aid.
Military assistance.—Military assistance includes grants and credit
sales of equipment, training, and other services to support the defense
efforts of friendly countries and is administered by the Department of
Defense. It is classified in the national defense function along with trust
fund outlays which facilitate cash sales of defense articles and services
that are not considered foreign aid.
In addition to $790 million in budget authority for military assistance grants in 1976, an appropriation of $250 million is requested for
1976 to reimburse the military departments for stocks delivered to
Cambodia in 1974 pursuant to the emergency drawdown provision of
the Foreign Assistance Act.
South Vietnam's defense efforts depend upon continued U.S. military
assistance. Because the $700 million appropriated in 1975 for this
purpose will not meet South Vietnam's critical needs, a supplemental
appropriation of $300 million is being proposed. Military assistance to
South Vietnam is included in a separate account under Defense
Department appropriations. Moreover, the amounts of assistance to
Cambodia authorized by the Foreign Assistance Act of 1974 are inadequate for that country's minimum needs. Legislation to remove
restrictions on this authorization and a budget amendment requesting
an additional $222 million for Cambodia are being proposed.
To highlight the continuing importance of training for foreign
military personnel, foreign military training assistance for 1976 is
provided in a separate account from the grant materiel program.
Outlays for all military assistance (excluding trust fund outlays of
$0.2 billion) are estimated at $2.8 billion in 1976.
Economic assistance.—Economic assistance includes funds for:
security supporting assistance for the Middle East, Indochina postwar
reconstruction, development aid for poorer countries, food aid, refugee
assistance, and international narcotics control programs.




THE

FEDEiRAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

83

FOREIGN AID
[In millions of dollars]
Budget authority
Assistance programs

Military assistance: 1
Grant military assistance.__.
Foreign military training2
Military assistance. South Vietnam.
Foreign military credit sales
Emergency security assistance for
Israel
Offsetting receipts, and other....
Total, military assistance
Economic assistance:
Security supporting assistance....
Middle East special requirements
fund
_
Indochina postwar reconstruction.
Multilateral development assistance
International financial institutions
International organizations
Bilateral development assistance...
Agency for International Development
Overseas Private
Investment
Corporation.. _
Inter-American Foundation._
Proprietary receipts from the
public...
Food for Peace
Migration and refugee assistance...
International narcotics control
Total, economic assistance....
President's foreign assistance contingency fund.. _
_
Total, Foreign Aid
1
2
3

1974
actual

Outlays

1975
1976
estimate estimate

695

897

(3)
325

1,000
405

790
30
1,293
560

2,200
-109

-147

3.111

2,155

1974
actual

1975
1976
estimate estimate

460

709

(3)
406

515
400

917
17
975
500

-213

640
-195

700
-223

659
-268

2,460

1,312

2.101

2,800

118

386

580

382

319

398

499

25
617

25
952

246

12
508

12
762

(2,383)

(1,195)

(759)

(615)

(876)

(990)

2,237
146

1,006
190

546
214

446
168

704
171

818
173

(669)

(785)

(936)

(780)

(782)

(839)

820

961

1.023

_
-63

54
5
5
6
4
2
4,434

1.035

1,129

—21
6

25

863

14
9

—6
10

-122

-354

-63

-122

-354

78
7
3
4
4
2

1,336
1
0
4
2

69
3
4
3
5

1.165
6
6
2
7

1.070
1
0
3
8

3,917

4.373

2.715

3,909

4,060

15

5

30

25

14

20

7,560

6,077

6,864

4,052

6,024

6,880

Excludes trust funds to facilitate cash sales. Net of offsetting receipts.
Included in grant military assistance in years prior to 1976.
From 1967 to 1974 military assistance to South Vietnam was included in several military department accounts.




84

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Security supporting assistance is required to maintain progress
toward a negotiated settlement in the Middle East. Economic support
and assistance for reconstruction and development are provided to
Israel, Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. The Middle East special requirements
fund provides a measure of flexibility to meet unforeseen contingencies. Outlays in 1976 for these programs are estimated at $410 million.
Indochina postwar reconstruction assistance to South Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos is required to maintain economic stability, to provide
for reconstruction and development, and to finance refugee relief.
Other nations are joining the United States in this effort. Outlays will
be $762 million in 1976.
Multilateral development assistance in the form of contributions to
international development banks and international organizations continues as a major facet of foreign aid. Outlays are estimated to be $990
million in 1976.
The international development banks include: the World Bank
Group and the Inter-American, Asian, and African Development
Banks. During the past few years programs of these institutions have
continued to expand while the United States has reduced its proportion
of total contributions. These institutions now obtain most of their
private capital financing abroad, most recently from the oil-exporting
countries which have provided large sums for relending to developing
countries. Outlays of $818 million for 1976 will meet U.S. commitments to international development banks. In addition, after consultation with the Congress, negotiations will proceed on the fourth
replenishment of the Inter-American Development Bank and a 1976
appropriation may be sought later for this replenishment.
Voluntary contributions of $173 million in outlays are proposed for
international organizations. The largest of these are the United
Nations Development Program, which furnishes developing countries
with technical and investment survey assistance, and the United
Nations Relief and Works Agency, which aids Palestinian refugees.
Bilateral development assistance, administered principally by the
Agency for International Development (AID), is responding to the
need for increasing food production in the poorer countries. Grants
and long-term loans at low-interest rates are provided for agricultural
development, improved agricultural practices, and research into new
and improved crops. Budget authority for food and nutrition will
increase from $282 million in 1974 to $629 million in 1976. The remaining development programs concentrate on low-income groups in the
poorest countries, particularly in improving health, family planning,




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION-

85

and education. Total outlays for AID development programs for 1976
are estimated at $1,129 million.
The Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) offers political risk insurance to U.S. firms investing in developing countries and
also provides guaranties for loans made to firms in those countries.
OPIC is now working with a group of private insurance companies
to form a joint underwriting association for political risk insurance.
OPIC is currently operating on a self-sustaining basis and requires no
budget authority in 1976.
The Inter-American Foundation supports experimental development activities in Latin America undertaken primarily by private
nonprofit organizations. Outlays are estimated at $10 million for 1976.
Food aid grants and concessional loans under the food for peace
program (Public Law 480) serve a number of foreign policy objectives,
including the alleviation of hunger and malnutrition. These programs
will remain critical for developing nations until their longer term efforts to increase production achieve desired results.
Migration and refugee assistance consists of contributions to American voluntary agencies, the United Nations, and the Intergovernmental Committee on European Migration.
International narcotics control assistance of $38 million to foreign
governments and international organizations aids in eliminating the
illicit cultivation, production, and trafficking of dangerous drugs in
order to curtail their entry into the United States.
The President's foreign assistance contingency fund.—This fund permits the United States to respond to unforeseen requirements, primary
humanitarian emergencies. Budget authority of $30 million is requested for 1976.
Special financing facility.—In response to high oil prices and resulting international financial distortions, the United States has proposed
the establishment of a $25 billion international lending facility. This
facility will make loans to supplement other sources of credit available
to industrialized countries with major balance-of-payments difficulties. The United States is prepared to lend up to $7.0 billion to the
facility. Outlays are estimated at $1.0 billion in 1976.
Peace Corps.—In 1976, approximately 6,000 Peace Corps volunteers
will assist 68 host countries in their effort to solve development and
human problems. During 1976, Peace Corps efforts will concentrate
on agriculture, health and nutrition, education, and conservation.




86

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Efforts will be made in 1976 to increase the level of host country
contributions for financing Peace Corps programs.
Conduct of foreign affairs.—Increased assessments by international organizations and rising overseas operating costs account for
most of the additional outlays for the Department of State in 1976.
Outlays are estimated to be $784 in 1976.

Foreign information and exchange activities.—Increases for the
United States Information Agency include funds for new facilities for
the Voice of America in the Far East. Increased grants by the Board
for International Broadcasting to Radio Free Europe and Radio
Liberty are required for higher wages and prices abroad, special retirement costs, and improvements of transmitting facilities. State
Department education and cultural exchange programs will be increased to broaden American individual and institutional contacts
with foreign societies. A special appropriation of $15 million in United
States owned Japanese currency is requested to fulfill a 1962 cultural
agreement with Japan and will reciprocate for similar grants made in
1973 to American universities by Japan. Total outlays for foreign
information and exchange activities are estimated at $412 million in
1976.
Export-Import Bank.—The Export-Import Bank provides loans,
guaranties, and insurance to facilitate exports. The Bank's receipts
and disbursements have been excluded by statute from the budget
totals since August 17, 1971, but will again be included beginning
October 1, 1976.
Tax expenditures.—The international affairs function contains a
number of tax expenditures that serve to promote international trade
and investment. The largest, estimated at $1.3 billion for 1976,
is the deferral of tax on profits of domestic international sales corporations (DISCs). For an explanation of tax expenditure, see pages 67 to
69 above, or Special Analysis F in the Special Analyses volume of the
Budget.
Credit programs.—The international affairs loan and loan guarantee programs that appear in the table below have been discussed
above except for special State Department loans. Most of these
loans were made in 1949-53 for the construction of the United Nations headquarters and in 1963-64 for United Nations peacekeeping
operations.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

87

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
CREDIT PROGRAMS
[In millions of dollars]
1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

Foreign military credit sales and other:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loan, outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loan outstanding, end of year

430
-172
1,469
298

507
-178
1,798
500

896
-221
2,472
700

639
—84
10,977
346

765
—160
11,582
426

784
—208
12,159
519

7
1
18
172

4
22
185

16
1
36
212

578
-288
3,438

931
-93
4,276

863
-85
5,055

International development assistance: 1

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayment
Direct loan outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loan outstanding, end of year
Overseas Private Investment Corporation:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loan, outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loan outstanding, end of year
Food for Peace:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loan, outstanding, end of year
Special Financing Facility:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan outstanding, end of year
Department of State:
Direct loan repayments
Direct loan outstanding, end of year. _
Export-Import Bank:

Direct loan disbursements.._
Direct loan repayments
Direct loan, outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year
i Excludes the Overseas Private Investment Corporation.




1,000
1,000
—6
68

—6
62

—6
56

2,538
-1,214
7.911
3,443

3,032
-1,359
9,584
4,222

3,342
-1.541
11,385
5,062

88

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE AND TECHNOLOGY
Program
Highlights
• Build-up in development and production of the space
shuttle designed to reduce the cost of future operations
in space.
• Continue development of new scientific spacecraft to
explore the sun, the planets, and the universe.
• Continue research, development, and experimentation
in the application of space technology for surveying
natural resources and improving weather forecasting.
• Increase support for basic science.

Outlays for Federal programs in the general science, space and technology function are estimated at $4.2 billion in 1975 and $4.6 billion
in 1976, an increase of $398 million.
GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE AND TECHNOLOGY
[In millions of dollars]

Outlays

Program or agency

1974
actual

Space research and technology:
Manned space
flight
Space science, applications, and technology
Supporting space activities

1,473
1,168
322

1

1,782
1,119
324

2,905

3,183

3,225

649
393

720
414

757
438

178
—3
-

1,705
1,127
351

647
369

Earth Sciences:
Geological Survey
Deductions for offsetting receipts

1,538
1,040
327

2,963

Subtotal
General science and basic research:
National Science Foundation
Energy Research and Development Administration

Total

1975
1976
estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority1
for 1976

238
—3

266
—3

268
—3

4,154

4,183

4,581

4,686

Compares with budget authority of $3,874 million in 1974 and $4,299 million in 1975.




89

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Outlays (or General Science and Space
$ Billion,

$ Billions

-0

8-

1966

1967

Fiscal Y eore

1968

1969

1970

1971

1978

1973

1974

1975

1976

Estimate

Space research and technology.—The 1976 budget requests
additional funds for NASA's program, which includes manned space
flight, space science, and the application of space technology.1 Outlays
for space in 1976 of $3.2 billion are $278 million greater than the $2.9
billion planned for in 1975. This increase provides for the orderly
build up in the development and production of prototype space shuttles designed to provide for more economical manned access to space
in the 1980's and beyond.
Manned space flight.—In July 1975, the United States and the
U.S.S.R. will conduct a rendezvous and docking mission, climaxing
the Nation's near-term manned space flight effort. Manned space
flight activities, beyond this mission, will be concentrated on development of the space shuttle. Today, the United States relies on expendable rockets to launch spacecraft that orbit the Earth and travel to the
planets. The space shuttle will reduce the cost of operations in Earth
orbit in the 1980's and beyond because it will be reusable and can re1
Aeronautical research undertaken by NASA is classified under the commerce and transportation
function, and discussed in that section of Part V.




90

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

cover satellites for repair and reuse. In the development of shuttle payloads the United States will continue to work closely with European
countries, who are providing a space laboratory to be flown with the
space shuttle.
Space science, applications and technology.—The 1976 budget provides funds for continuing a number of projects concerned with the
exploration of the solar system using unmanned spacecraft. Recently,
the first spacecraft to travel to Jupiter, Pioneer 10 and 11, transmitted
scientific measurements and photographed the planet. Preparations
continue on the unmanned Viking spacecraft to be launched in the
late summer of 1975 and to begin the search for life on Mars in July
1976. Work on spacecraft that will explore the atmosphere of Venus
in 1978 is going forward. Two larger spacecraft are also being developed
to explore Jupiter and Saturn further by about 1979. In addition to
these planetary missions, development will continue in 1976 on high
energy and ultraviolet astronomy observatories that will orbit the
Earth to study the composition of the galaxy and distant parts of
the universe.
In the applications program, funds are provided for a third Earth
resources technology satellite (LANDSAT) to continue experiments
on the utility of information .gathered from space for agricultural,
geological, and other applications. Development is proceeding on a
new generation of satellites to provide major improvements in weather
forecasting, the first of which will be launched in 1977. Work is continuing on a spacecraft to be launched in 1977 to locate and map
potential geothermal sources of energy. A satellite to moniter the
Earth's pollution, Nimbus-G, is being prepared for a 1978 launch. A
satellite is also being developed to be orbited in 1978 to monitor
ocean conditions and thereby provide improvements in weather
prediction.
Research will continue to develop technology to support future
space science and applications missions. Work on improved materials,
structures, propulsion, electric power sources, communications, and
data processing techniques will continue in 1976.
General science.—The 1976 budget provides funds to assure
balanced Federal support of research, particularly in basic science,
across all scientific disciplines.
National Science Foundation,—The National Science Foundation
will increase its outlays by 11% from $649 million in 1975 to $720
million in 1976.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

91

Obligations for fundamental research will increase by 11%, $39
million above the 1975 level of $341. A significant portion of this
increase will be used to add to the scientific knowledge needed for the
solution of long-term national problems in such areas as energy and
the environment. National research programs and centers will receive
a $36 million increase to a total of $173 million for 1976, including funds
for two ski-equipped replacement aircraft to support the U.S. Antarctic research effort. These programs and centers include a wide range
of activities primarily in research related to the physical environment
of the Earth, such as the: Deep sea drilling project, the International
Decade of Ocean Exploration, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. They also include support for the major radio and
optical astronomy centers of the Nation.
The role of the Foundation in energy research will change with
the transfer of solar and geothermal research to the Energy Research
and Development Administration. The Foundation will continue to
support basic and exploratory research related to the long-term
development of the Nation's energy resources.
Energy Research and Development Administration.—Funds for high
energy physics research will increase to improve utilization of the
large accelerator facilities which investigate the basic nature of matter.
Other physical research funding will increase to provide a foundation
of technology in support of energy research and development. Efforts
on advanced technology for nuclear power systems to be used in space
will continue.
Earth sciences.—Geological Survey.—The programs of the Geological Survey include topographic surveys and mapping, geological
and mineral resources surveys and mapping, water resources investigations, and the supervision of leasing of Federally owned natural
resources. A discussion of leasing activity of the Geological Survey
is found in the natural resources, environment and energy function.
Outlays for the Survey will be $266 million in 1976, an increase of $28
million over the 1975 level. The increases are primarily to support
Outer Continental Shelf and onshore energy and mineral leasing
programs.

580-000 O - 75 - 7




92

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT, AND ENERGY

Program Highlights
• Pursue plans for leasing in all promising oil areas of the
Outer Continental Shelf by 1978, with decisions to hold
lease sales contingent upon meeting environmental
requirements.
• Establish a strategic petroleum storage program to
reduce America's vulnerability to disruptions in foreign oil supplies.
• Provide increased funds for energy conservation in
commercial enterprises, transportation, industry, and
residences.
• Advance the consolidation and coordination of Federal energy research and development programs
through the new Energy Research and Development
Administration.
• Provide increased funds to continue expansion of energy
research and development programs.
• Regulate the use of nuclear materials and power reactors
through the new independent Nuclear Regulatory
Commission.
• Provide for $5 billion in obligations for the construction
of waste water treatment plants in 1976, an increase of
24% over 1975.
• Implement a permit program to regulate discharges of
pollutants into waterways and continue delegation of
program responsibility to States.
• Accumulate by the end of 1976 an inventory of 2 billion
board feet of timber prepared for sale as a stockpile
against future increased demand.
• Provide $300 million for the acquisition and development
of park and recreation land by State and Federal agencies.
• Expend $15.1 million for protection of endangered species.
• Develop a comprehensive resource assessment and multiyear plan for the Forest Service.
• Spend over $3 billion for water resources and power
projects.

Natural resources, environment, and energy programs encourage
the management of the Nation's resources of air, water, timber,
energy, minerals, fish, wildlife, and recreation lands in a manner that




THE FEDEiRAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

93

NATURAL RESOURCES. ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY
[In millions of dollars]

Outlays

Program or agency

1974
actual

1975
1976
estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority1
for 1976

Energy:

General operating programs
Regulation
Research and development

—223
90
739

498
164
1.577

548
178
1,764

606

1.454

2,240

2,491

1,553
479

Subtotal, energy

152
171
1,131

2,300
614

2,300
674

Pollution control and abatement:

Sewage plant construction grants
Other
Subtotal, pollution control and abatement

2

(4,000)
631

2,032

2,914

2,974

631

Water resources and power
Conservation and land management:

2,540

3,301

3,282

7,638

Forest Service
Bureau of Land Management
Agriculture conservation programs
Other, including offsetting receipts

719
140
247
—348

904
216
476
—324

763
230
302
—356

633
243
256
—347

757

1,272

939

785

248
414

256
544

292
564

330
527

662
498
—705

800
546
—875

856
607
—869

857
694
—869

6,390

9,412

10,028

12,226

Subtotal, land management
Recreational resources:

Purchase of new recreation areas
Operation, of recreational resources
Subtotal, recreational resources.
Other natural resources
Deduction for offsetting receipts
Total

_.._

_.

1
3

Compares with budget authority of $10,650 million in 1974 and $11,464 million in 1975.
Contract authority of $4,000 million for 1976 was made available in 1975, as provided by law;
therefore, no new budget authority is requested.

balances development and environmental needs and which provides
for the conservation of resources. Pollution abatement and control
programs are also included in this function. Outlays for these programs
are estimated to be $10.0 billion in 1976.
Energy.—Federal energy programs are divided into three broad
categories: General operating programs, regulatory programs, and
research and development programs. Outlays for energy programs are
estimated to total over $2.2 billion in 1976.
In addition to Federal energy programs, the President's energy
policy includes a comprehensive petroleum, natural gas, and windfall




94

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

profits tax proposal to reduce the consumption of these products and
to reduce dependence on uncertain foreign energy supplies. This tax is
proposed to be offset by reductions in income taxes, and allowances
for payments to low-income individuals, increased aid to State and
local governments, and various Federal agencies. Most of this offset
can occur through the income tax system, but for those instances
where it can not, the budget includes an allowance for energy tax
equalization payments.
Included in general operating programs are the analysis and development of energy policy; the management and leasing of federally
owned oil, natural gas, and coal resources; and uranium enrichment.
These activities are administered by the Federal Energy Administration, the Department of the Interior, and the Energy Research and
Development Administration. The generation and marketing of
hydroelectric power is included under "Water resources and power."
Negative outlays in 1974 result primarily from offsetting revenues for
sales of uranium enrichment services. Outlays for operating programs
will total $498 million in 1976.
In order to increase domestic energy production over the next 10
years, a program to prepare for leasing oil and gas lands in all new
areas on the Outer Continental Shelf is being pursued, and a tentative
schedule of sales has been drawn up. A decision to lease any area will
be made only after the completion of environmental studies and
impact statements and a determination that unacceptable adverse
environmental impacts will not occur. Proceeds from this leasing
are counted as undistributed offsetting receipts, and the estimates
for them appear at the end of the budget.
Uranium enrichment operations, which primarily provide fuel for
civilian nuclear powerplants, must increase significantly in order to
meet future demands. The previously authorized expansion of the three
existing enrichment plants of the Energy Research and Development
Administration (ERDA) will continue. Legislation will be proposed to
enable ERDA to institute commercial pricing for uranium enrichment
services. Outlays for uranium enrichment activities will be $738
million in 1976.
Some provisions of the tax structure—known as tax expenditures—
also encourage the development and exploitation of energy and mineral
resources. The two such provisions with the largest impact are the
treatment of exploration and development costs (mostly for oil and
gas) as current expenses rather than as capital investments, which is
estimated to reduce receipts by $1.4 billion in 1976; and the excess of
percentage depletion over actual cost depletion (up to 50% of net
income), a provision that applies to over a hundred minerals and
energy sources and is estimated under current law to reduce 1976




THE FEDEiRAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

95

receipts by $3.1 billion. A series of interactions resulting from the
President's energy and economic stimulus proposals will reduce this
latter tax expenditure significantly. The President's proposals also
include a tax expenditure of $0.5 billion in 1976 to encourage improvements in the insulation of homes and a special extension of the investment tax credit for coal and nuclear powered electric generating plants.
For an explanation of tax expenditures, see pages 67 to 69 above, or
Special Analysis F, Tax Expenditures, in the Special Analyses volume
of the Budget.
Federal energy regulation affects the development and sale of
petroleum, natural gas, and electric power and the use of nuclear
materials, reactors, and other facilities. These regulatory programs are
administered by the Federal Power Commission, the Federal Energy
Administration, and the newly created Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Outlays for energy regulation in 1976 will total $164 million.
The President's energy recommendations propose the decontrol of
crude petroleum prices and the deregulation of interstate price of
new natural gas in 1975. These recommendations are intended to
encourage conservation of these resources and stimulate general
energy resource production.
The expanded Federal program of energy research and development
reflects the Administration's commitment to develop new and improved technologies that will provide the United States with the
capability to expand use of its domestic energy resources in an economic and environmentally acceptable manner. The major elements of
the program cover nuclear energy (both fission and fusion), fossil
energy, solar and geothermal energy, conservation through increased
efficiency, and environmental controls. The program will be carried out
largely by the newly created Energy Research and Development Administration, which was formed to bring together activities previously
scattered among several agencies.
Outlays for energy research and development programs in this subfunction will increase from $1,131 million in 1975 to $1,577 million in
1976. This 39% increase is distributed among all major program areas
and reflects further growth in programs that increased by nearly 53%
from 1974 to 1975. The nonnuclear portion of the Federal energy
research and development effort will reach 40% of the recommended
budget authority in 1976.
Major areas of increase in nonnuclear energy research and development include solar energy development, which will more than double
in 1976, and the coal program, which will rise by over 50%. In the
nuclear energy programs, major increases are provided for the liquid
metal fast breeder reactor and the nuclear fusion programs. Energy
research and development outlays in other subfunctions total $84




96

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

million in 1974, $91 million in 1975, and $86 million in 1976. For further
details of the energy research and development program, including
activities not in this subfunction, see Special Analysis P, " Research
and Development" in the Special Analyses volume of the budget.

Pollution control and abatement.—In 1976, continued emphasis
will be placed on encouraging State and local governments to assume
an increasing share of the responsibility for pollution control and
abatement. Areas best handled by these levels af government include
enforcing standards for air and water pollution, ensuring the proper use
of pesticides, and adopting environmentally sound techniques in solid
waste management.
Federal outlays for pollution control and abatement programs in
1976 will increase by $60 million to $3.0 billion. Approximately $2.3
billion of these outlays will be for grants for construction of waste
treatment plants. Funds allotted to the States for waste treatment
facilities under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act amendments
of 1972 will be $4 billion in 1976, bringing to $13 billion the total allotted thus far under the act. Priorities will be established to ensure that
appropriated funds are used for those projects that are most effective
in abating water pollution.
Outlays (or Environment and Natural Resources

$966

1967




196*

1969

tm

fffl

{fit

ffft W$$

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

97

Budget authority of $32 million is provided in 1976 for the Safe
Drinking Water Act, an increase of $25 million over 1975.
Water resources and power.—Budget outlays for water resources
and power programs in 1976 will decrease by about $19 million from
1975, to $3,282 million, because increased power receipts will offset
increased program expenditures.
Water development.—The 1976 budget provides $2,753 million in
outlays for the water resource development programs of the Corps of
Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Soil Conservation
Service, compared with $2,598 million in 1975. Emphasis has been
placed on projects for hydroelectric power, municipal and industrial
water supply, and urban flood control. Water development programs
also help control erosion, improve navigation, and provide irrigation
and water-related recreation opportunities. Priority is given to maintaining schedules for projects nearing completion and avoiding costly
construction delays. For this reason, the budget does not include any
new construction starts. However, funds are provided for planning 25
projects whose construction can begin when the funding required for
projects already underway starts to decline. The President has assigned
the Water Resources Council responsibility for conducting the 1-year
study of major water resources policies mandated by the Water
Resources Development Act of 1974.
Power programs.—New legislation places the Bonneville Power Administration, a federally owned and operated electric transmission
system in the Pacific Northwest, on a self-financing, rather than subsidized basis starting in 1975. Revenues from the sale of power will be
the chief means used to construct, operate, and maintain the system,
with supplementary borrowings to be available at market rates from
the Treasury when needed. The 1976 budget reflects this change from
appropriations to a self-financing operation.
Outlays for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) will be $731
million in 1976. This figure is net of sales of power and other revenues.
Gross outlays will rise from $2,111 million in 1975 to $2,495 million
in 1976, while capital expenditures for the TVA power program will
increase from $978 million to $982 million. The TVA will make a study
of future power demands as a basis for deciding how much additional
borrowing authority to request.

Conservation and land management.—The public lands are
administered both to develop and conserve natural resources, to
provide recreation opportunities, and to manage and protect wildlife
habitat, environmental quality, watersheds, and areas of scenic




98

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

beauty. Outlays for conservation and land management programs
will total $939 million in 1976, a decrease of $333 million from 1975.
The decrease results largely from the planned termination of the
agricultural conservation program, and Forest Service outlay reductions discussed below.
The Forest Service will offer 10.8 billion board feet (BBF) of timber
for sale during 1976 and develop an inventory of 2 BBF, prepared
for future sale as a reserve against expected increases in demand.
Funds are proposed to assure that appropriate consideration is given
to uses other than timber sales in the overall timber management
program. The Forest Service's 1976 outlays of $763 million would be
about the same level as 1975, excluding the effects of outlays for
fighting forest fires, which are not funded in advance, and the one-time
1975 purchase of the Klamath Indian Forest lands.
A budget authority increase of $30 million for the Forest Service
also provides for increased management of recreation, wildlife, soil
and water, and grazing resources in national forests. Over 500,000
acres will be reforested, and other improvement practices will be
applied to an additional 450,000 acres.
In 1975 and 1976, the Forest Service will be heavily involved in
carrying out the new Forest and Range Renewal Resources Planning Act. As required by the act, an assessment of supply, demand,
and production opportunities for renewable resources and multiyear
plans for all Forest Service programs will be prepared by December 31,
1975.
Treating income from certain timber operations as capital gains
rather than as ordinary income creates an estimated tax expenditure
of about $0.2 billion in 1976.
Outlays for conservation and land management by the Bureau oj
Land Management (BLM) will increase by $14 million to $230 million.
This increase will support an expanding energy and minerals program.
For example, a total of $63 million—$29 million above the 1975 level
will be expended by the BLM to ensure that accelerated oil and gas
leasing will be conducted in an environmentally acceptable manner.
Further, legislation will be proposed to establish national policies
governing the management and use of the public domain lands under
the principles of multiple use and sustained yield. Other proposed
legislation will require more competitive mineral leasing and sales
and will strengthen control over mineral development so as to improve
environmental safeguards.
Recreational resources.—Recreation programs include grants to
State and local governments for acquiring and developing park and
recreation areas and wildlife refuges, as well as Federal purchase,
development, and operation of natural areas and nationally significant




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

99

historic sites. Outlays for these programs will increase from $800
million in 1975 to $856 million in 1976.
The Land and Water Conservation Fund, which provides for grants to
State and local governments for the acquisition and development of
recreation land, will be fully funded in 1976 with $300 million in new
appropriations. Grants from this fund to State and local governments
will total $176 million, and will help to assure that recreation program
decisions are made by levels of government closer and more responsive
to the people using these recreation areas. Each dollar granted by the
Federal Government must be matched by one dollar of State or
local funds. Federal agencies will receive $118 million from the fund.
Outlays for the National Park Service and for the Fish and Wildlife
Service will increase from $538 million in 1975 to $559 million in 1976,
an increase of $21 million. The Fish and Wildlife Service is emphasizing
the environmental effects of resource development in order to enhance
the Nation's ability to protect fish and wildlife. Over $15 million will be
spent to protect endangered species, and $23 million will be spent to
provide improved sport fishing. The $359 million expected to be spent
by the National Park Service will enable it to host 227 million visitors
to national parks and historic sites in 1976, including those sites
designated for the American Revolution Bicentennial.
Other natural resources.—Outlays for other natural resources
programs will increase from $546 million in 1975 to $607 million in
1976. The bulk of this increase will go to programs of the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Its increases provide for
improved weather services through continued development of a new
generation of weather satellites, extension of VHF-FM weather radio
broadcast service throughout the country, and establishment of a
program to automate weather service field operations. In the marine
area, activities will be expanded to meet the requirements of the
Endangered Species Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act.




100

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

AGRICULTURE
Program Highlights
• Continue efforts to give the agricultural sector of the
economy a greater market orientation.
• Remove supports for 1975 soybean crop and several other
minor crops.
• Start the annual Economic Survey of Agriculture in 1976.
• Continue monitoring exports of grain.
• Pay farmers $592 million in disaster relief.
AGRICULTURE
[In millions of dollars]

Outlays

Program or agency

1974
actual

1975
1976
estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1976

Farm income stabilization:

Price support and related programs
(Proposed legislation)

_ _ _.

Long-term land retirement programs
National Wool Act
SugarAct
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
Agricultural Credit Insurance Fund
Other
Subtotal, farm income stabilization
Agricultural research and services:
Research programs
Extension programs
__
Consumer protection, marketing, and regulatory
programs
_
Economic intelligence
Other
Offsetting receipts
Subtotal, agricultural research and services
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total agriculture
1

1,004

943

_

671

2,939

—128

47
8
83
—2
94
225

44
16
86
33
-403
169

42
23
9
17
96
152

42
24
0
12
169
155

1,458

887

881

3,342

296
193

334
211

367
220

366
224

216
71
48
—50

255
83
51
—44

250
92
54
—46

243
92
55
—46

775
—3

889
—3

938
—3

934
—3

2,230

1,773

1,816

* 4,273

Compares with budget authority of $4,546 million for 1974 and $5,873 million for 1975.




101

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
Outlays for Agriculture
$ Billions

Agriculture programs provide income protection for farmers, new
technology, economic information, regulatory services for the agribusiness sector of the economy, inspection services, and education
for consumers.
Farm income stabilization.—1974 was a year of disappointment
in agriculture. Because of poor weather the grain harvest failed by a
wide margin to match expectations. The resulting shortages caused
major economic problems for livestock producers, reduced supply
levels for foreign customers, and resulted in substantial increases
in food prices, to U.S. consumers. Because of continued high market
prices outlays for price supports in 1976 (estimates include proposed
legislation permitting reimbursement to Commodity Credit Corporation for commodities donated for child food assistance) are expected
to be $543 million, the lowest since 1951.
Lower crop production, a decline in cattle prices, and record high
prices for fertilizer, seed, and fuel, brought net farm income down 17%
in 1974 to $27 billion from the record $32.5 billion of 1973. However,
this is more than double the income level of 10 years ago.
The objective of Federal agricultural policy is to encourage farmers
to respond more freely to the forces of the marketplace. This should




102

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

increase production, and reduce the Federal role in buying, storing,
and selling agricultural commodities. Consumers will benefit from this
policy because increased production will lead to lower prices, and
farmers will benefit from the higher income that will result from
increased output.
To increase farm output the Administration has, where legally
possible, removed Federal restrictions on planted acreage. I n addition,
high priority has been given to the needs of farmers for energy and
fertilizer. The Administration has proposed legislation to reduce
Federal controls over the production of peanuts, rice, and extra-long
staple cotton. The Sugar Act has expired and the administrative
machinery used to enforce the act has been dismantled. This will
result in a saving to the taxpayer of nearly $90 million.
Reflecting reduced dependence of agriculture on Federal price and
income supports, the costs of these supports are expected to decline
further in 1976.
Despite the reduced volume of foreign sales, the dollar value of U.S.
agricultural exports in 1975 is expected to be about the same as the
record $21 billion of a year earlier. The contribution of agriculture to
the U.S. trade balance is expected to be $10 to $11 billion.
COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION OUTLAYS
[In millions of dollars]
Program or agency

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

Agriculture:

Price support operations:
Direct commodity payments
Disaster payments
Commodity loans
Commodity purchases
Other price support operation
Receipts and adjustments

1,959
1,164
332
1,369
—3.820

Subtotal

_.

International affairs and finance:
Food for Peace:
Gross outlays.___
Receipts and reimbursements
Subtotal
Total CCC outlays




-

2
254
1,294
500
756
—2, 135

1,004
102

Subtotal price support operations
Other activities

4
592
940
628
914
—2,135
943
2

671
22

1,106

945

693

963
—324

1,425
—260

1,319
—249

639
1,745

1,165
2,110

1.070
1,762

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

103

Poor weather during the growing season in much of the corn belt
and Great Plains resulted in large claims for payments under the
disaster protection provisions of the Agriculture and Consumer Protection Act of 1973. Outlays to satisfy those claims are expected to
reach $592 million in 1975. Legislation for an expansion of all-peril crop
insurance will be sent to Congress this year. This proposal, which will
substitute for the existing program, will put disaster protection on a
sound financial basis and move most of the cost from the taxpayer to
the primary beneficiaries of the program.
Agricultural
research and services.—Federally
financed
agricultural research develops new technology for improving productivity
in the agribusiness sector of the economy. Funds are being redirected to
those projects t h a t hold the greatest promise for increasing the production of grain, meat animals, and vegetable protein. Other areas of
high research priority include pesticides, energy use, and environmental protection. The agricultural research and development budget
is being increased by $33 million because of the high priority accorded
increasing agricultural production. This sum includes additional
support for the State land grant colleges and universities—major
components of the Nation's agricultural research effort.
I n 1976, the Department of Agriculture is beginning an annual
Economic Survey of Agriculture to obtain additional data needed for
development of improved commodity forecasts, income projections,
and environmental impact analyses.
CREDIT PROGRAMS-AGRICULTURE
[In millions of dollars]
Program or agency
Farm income stabilization:
Commodity Credit Corporation:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loan, outstanding, end of year
Agricultural and emergency credit programs:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loan, outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year

1974
actual

F975
estimate

1976
estimate

1,550
-2,563
1,708

1,415
-1,523
1,600

1,769
-1,836
1,533

1,268
-1,308
1,018
3,006

1,255
-1,742
532
4,636

1,134
-1,173
493
4,224

Federal tax expenditures arise from two provisions of the income tax
law that farmers, including corporations, can use the definition of
certain capital outlays as current expenses, and capital gains treatment of certain types of farm income. Reductions in farmers' taxes
attributable to these provisions will total an estimated $1.0 billion in
1976. For an explanation of tax expenditures, see pages 67 to 69 above,
or Special Analysis F in the Special Analysis volume of the Budget.




104

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION
Program Highlights
• Establish predictable funding for public transit under
the $11.8 billion, 6-year National Mass Transportation
Assistance Act of 1974.
• Propose regulatory reform legislation for railroads,
trucks, and air transportation.
• Propose legislation restructuring highway programs to
focus Federal effort on interstate highways and to provide
greater discretion to State and local governments for
other highways.
• Transfer operational control of bankrupt rail freight
network in Northeast United States to Consolidated
Rail Corporation.
• Propose legislation for revised airport development
formula grants and revision of aviation user fees.
• Propose legislation to extend Amtrak program, but with
Federal spending ceilings as incentives for controlling
costs and promoting efficiency.
• Continue Federal support for $23 billion in mortgage
loans to finance over 700,000 housing units in order to
alleviate short-term credit problems.

Programs for commerce and transportation include aids to business,
support of the several modes of transportation, mortgage and home
loan programs, the subsidy to the Postal Service, and related regulatory activities. Outlays for commerce and transportation programs
are estimated to be $13.7 billion in 1976.
Ground transportation.—Total
tion will be $6.9 billion in 1976.

outlays for ground transporta-

Highways.—Federal Highway Administration outlays will be $5.0
billion in 1976. Obligations will total $5.4 billion, including $3.0
billion for Interstate highways—a $500 million increase over the 1975
program—and $300 million for highway safety improvements. The
Administration will propose major highway legislation which will
provide increased long-term highway funding through 1980. The highway trust fund will be extended and its resources concentrated on the
interstate highway system. Special emphasis will be placed on completion of key interconnecting segments of the interstate system. The




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

105

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1976 l

Outlays
1974
actual

Ground transportation:

Highway improvement and construction
Traffic and highway safety
Mass transit
Railroads
Regulation

4,574
157
590
223
38

4,652
166
986
529
47

4,967
162
],257
494
50

289
130
100
608
50

Subtotal, ground transportation

5,583

6,380

6,931

1,176

Airways and airports
Air carrier subsidies
Aeronautical research and technology

1,870
73
292

2,092
67
304

2,288
66
316

2,285
61
314

Subtotal, air transportation

2,236

2,464

2,670

2,660

851
507

955
556

1,022
685

1,076
573

Subtotal, water transportation
Other transportation

1,357
57

1,511
79

1,707
82

1,650
82

Subtotal, transportation

9,233

10,434

11,390

5,568

Air transportation:

Water transportation:

CoastGuard
Shipping

Mortgage credit and thrift insurance:

Department of Housing and Urban Developmentmortgage insurance and related programs
Department of Agriculture-rural housing programs
Other
Subtotal, mortgage credit and thrift insurance
Paymenttothe Postal Service
Other advancement and regulation of commerce:
International trade and travel promotion
Technology utilization
Economic and demographic statistics..
Small business assistance
Proposed legislation
Other
Subtotal, other advancement and regulation of
commerce
Deductions for offsetting receipts.
Total
1

829
1,002
1,083
1,296 — 1,190
169
-606
-845 -1,033

808
124
-2,000

1,519
1,698

-1,033
1,831

219
1,490

-1,068
1,490

39
136
59
288

38
141
78
201

33
147
88
189

192

257

33
145
84
251
—35
263

714
—64

715
—149

741
—116

730
—116

13,100

11,796

13,723

6,602

273

Compares with budget authority of $23,545 million in 1974 and $28,944 million in 1975.




106

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

flexibility of State governments in the use of other highway funds will
be increased. In 1978, States will be permitted to take over some of the
Federal motor fuel tax, which will provide them over $1 billion in
additional revenues. The legislation will also propose measures to
reduce authorizations for highway spending to a level consistent with
other national priorities.
A related tax expenditure estimated at $0.8 billion in 1976, permits
the deductibility of State and local gasoline taxes. For an explanation
of tax expenditures, see pages 67 to 69 above or Special Analysis F
in the Special Analyses volume of the Budget.
In 1976, Federal highway safety efforts will continue to strive to
reduce the highway accident rate. The 55-mile-an-hour speed limit
and past safety efforts have contributed to a major decline in highway fatalities.
Mass transit.—The $11.8 billion National Mass Transportation
Assistance Act of 1974 provides almost $4.0 billion over the next
6 years for formula grants. State and local governments may divide
these grants as they see fit between capital and operating subsidies for
transit. In addition, the act provides $7.8 billion through 1980 for
previously existing Federal transit programs. Federal obligations in
1976 for mass transit will exceed $2.0 billion—$500 million in formula
grants, $1.1 billion in discretionary capital grants, about $200 million
transferred to transit by States from Federal highway authorizations,
and about $100 million for construction of the Washington, D.C. transit system. This is more than a 60% increase over 1974. To assure the
equitable and efficient use of the discretionary grant funds, applicants
will be asked to emphasize a careful evaluation of alternatives and theucosts in planning major projects. The Administration will consider
multiyear commitments for major projects, with funds provided at the
level required by the most cost-effective alternative. Service will
begin on the first section of the Washington, D.C. area rapid transit
system in calendar year 1975.
Railroads.—The Administration continues to support efforts to
improve the productivity and financial viability of the Nation's rail
freight system. Energy and environmental concerns underscore the
need to utilize better the inherent efficiency of railroads. A critical link
in achieving this goal is the Federal program to restructure seven bankrupt railroads in the Northeast United States. A key milestone will be
reached during 1976 when ConRail (Consolidated Rail Corporation),
a new private corporation, begins operation of the restructured system. In addition, the Administration will support measures aimed at
providing financial assistance to railroads for upgrading both rolling
stock and fixed installations.




107

THE FEDERAL. PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Federal outlays for Amtrak, which operates the Nation's intercity
rail passenger service, will rise to $360 million in 1976, an increase of $59
million. Amtrak's rising operating deficit, which will approximate $300
million in 1975, is more than 100% greater than was forecast a year
earlier. The Administration will propose legislation to extend Amtrak
Outlays (or Transportation
SBillions

SBillior*

12-

-it

-JO

1966

fttff

Fiscal Y c a «

1968

1969

m$

mi

m$

i

E*timat«

funding beyond 1976 and to provide assured amounts for fixed
capital improvements and to offset deficits. These funds, while adequate to continue and improve existing service, are intended to be a
maximum Federal commitment within which Amtrak must operate.
Legislation will be proposed to remove regulatory and managerial
restrictions on Amtrak. This will provide its management with the
flexibility to control costs and stay within the ceiling set by the Federal
commitment.
To reduce unnecessary costs and inefficiencies generated by regulated ground transportation, the Administration will propose legislation to reform railroad and truck regulation. The proposal will increase
rate and service flexibility and will permit greater energy conservation.
In addition to this legislation, the Administration and the independent
' regulatory agencies will be examining other legislative and administrative measures to improve transportation regulation and thereby facilitate more economical and efficient service than is presently possible.
580-000 O - 75 - 8




108

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Air transportation.—The
Administration will propose major
legislation on aviation development and revenues. The proposal will
provide for continued long-term Federal development of the airway
system, a substantial restructuring of the airport grant program to
increase local flexibility and project eligibility while eliminating unnecessary Federal involvement, and a restructuring of user fees to
reflect more equitably the burden that users place on the Federal aviation system. The proposal will authorize funds for new facilities, additional automation, and other improvements that will lead to a safer and
more efficient airway system. Adjustments in user fees will include
proposed charges for general aviation use of airport traffic control
services while reducing air carrier taxes. Capital costs of Federal airport
and airway programs will continue to be financed by trust funds, while
user-funding of maintenance costs of the Federal traffic control and
navigation system will be initiated. In addition, as part of the Administration's program to eliminate regulations that cause inefficiency and
higher travel prices for consumers, legislation will be proposed to reform price regulation of air passenger carriers.
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration will spend
$316 million in 1976 on its broad program of research and technology to
support civilian and military aeronautical objectives. Among major
aims of the program are reducing aircraft noise and exhaust pollution,
improving fuel consumption, and improving aircraft performance,
reliability, and safety.
Water transportation.—Federal
maritime program expenditures
will reach $678 million in 1976, up from $549 million in 1975. These
funds aid the U.S. ship construction and operating industries. Emphasis will be placed on improving productivity by the construction of
ships in series and by the development of technology to reduce construction costs. Operating subsidies will provide for the continued
growth of U.S.-flag participation in our foreign trade.
Outlays for the Coast Guard will total $1,022 million. Its priorities
will include improving long-range navigation facilities on the west and
gulf coasts and upgrading its vessels and aircraft. Legislation will be
submitted to eliminate obsolete functions.
The Deepwater Ports Act of 1974 will permit the development of
offshore ports for the unloading of petroleum from supertankers.

Mortgage credit and thrift insurance.—A smoothly functioning mortgage market is a prerequisite to the production of housing
in sufficient quantities to meet the Nation's needs. This can be best
fostered through sound fiscal and monetary policies and the maintenance of an efficient and flexible financial system.




THE FEDEfRAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

109

Several Federal or federally sponsored agencies help to increase the
supply of funds available for housing. The Federal Home Loan Bank
System (FHLBS) maintains public confidence in savings and loan
associations, the principal source of funds for home financing, by
insuring savings deposited with these institutions, by regulating them,
and by providing loans to expand their mortgage lending or to meet
unexpected withdrawals. In addition, the Federal National Mortgage
Association (FNMA) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC) augment the sources of funds available for housing by
purchasing mortgages from originating lenders with funds raised in
the securities markets. The Government National Mortgage Association
(GNMA) achieves a similar result through its guarantee program for
mortgage-backed securities.
Most of the Federal Government's support for housing does not
appear in the budget outlay totals. For example, government-sponsored enterprises, such as FNMA and the Federal Home Loan Banks,
are excluded from the budget because they are privately owned. These
enterprises increased mortgage credit by over $12 billion in 1974—
over one-fourth of the total increase. Federal loan guarantees support
housing, but do not appear as budget outlays unless defaults occur.
Tax expenditures are an important form of Federal support. The provisions of the tax code that permit home owners to deduct interest on
home mortgages and local real estate taxes are estimated to cost the
Treasury $6.5 billion and $5.3 billion, respectively, in 1976. The
Federal Government also aids financial institutions through a tax
expenditure, estimated at $1.0 billion in 1976, that permits them larger
tax-free reserves for bad debts than actual default experience would
justify.
Besides their regular activities in support of the market, these
agencies have helped to alleviate housing credit problems of a temporary nature. During calendar 1974, the FHLBS advanced $3
billion to savings and loan associations at subsidized interest rates to
support additional mortgage loans covering 100,000 units of housing.
The FHLMC made commitments to purchase $3 billion in mortgages,
which will finance the purchase of approximately 100,000 homes at
below-market interest rates. GNMA is aiding the purchase of 500,000
housing units by making commitments to buy mortgages carrying
below-market interest rates which later will be resold at a discount
to yield prevailing market returns. FHA-VA insured mortgages will
cover approximately 333,000 of these units. The remaining 167,000
units will carry conventional (not federally insured) mortgages, as
authorized by the Emergency Home Purchase Assistance Act. Total
purchases of nearly $16 billion have been authorized under the
GNMA program, including $6 billion under the Emergency Act.




110

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

The 1976 budget assumes that as conditions in the mortgage market
return to normal, there will no longer be a need for these temporary
programs.
A succession of short-run measures designed to combat temporarydislocations in financial markets cannot assure the availability of
adequate housing credit in the future. A basic reform of the financial
system is essential if the Nation's housing objectives are to be met. To
this end, the Administration has urged passage of the Financial Institutions Act, which would enable savings and loan associations to
compete more effectively for funds and would encourage additional
investment in residential mortgages through a tax credit on mortgage
investment income. This new tax expenditure is intended to replace
the tax expenditure for excess bad debt reserves.
The Federal Housing Administration will continue to provide
mortgage insurance during 1976 for those families which are able to
fulfill the obligations accompanying a mortgage loan, but which are not
adequately served by the private mortgage market. Heavy default
rates experienced under some mortgage insurance programs—particularly those aimed at older, declining areas—will result in net outlays of about $792 million in 1975 and $730 million in 1976. Private
lenders will have an opportunity to participate in a new coinsurance
program under which default risks will be shared.
The budget provides for several major changes in direction and
intent of rural housing programs. As a result of ongoing analyses of
rural housing needs, rural housing assistance is being redirected to
provide more assistance to lower income families through low-interest
rehabilitation loans. In addition, almost one-half of the rural home
ownership assistance funds will be used to aid the purchase of existing
housing units, rather than new construction with its higher costs. An
experimental program of loan guarantees will be undertaken to test
the effectiveness of attracting private capital into the rural housing
market. Direct Federal mortgages will also be available through the
Farmers Home Administration. A total of $2.1 billion in direct and
guaranteed loans will aid in the construction, acquisition, and improvement of 107,000 rural housing units in 1976.
Payment to the Postal Service.—The Postal Reorganization Act
of 1970 established the U.S. Postal Service as an independent agency
and removed it from the Federal budget except for the Federal subsidy
payment. This payment covers liabilities of the former Post Office Department, public service costs, and reductions in revenues associated
with carrying certain classes of mail at free and reduced rates. In 1976,
the continued use of full, rather than subsidized, rates for third class




THE FEDERAL. PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

111

mail will hold the subsidy down to $1,490 million. The recommended
subsidy level also does not include the $92 million that would be
required to extend the time granted certain other mailers to mail at
reduced rates while they adjust to full cost postage rates. The recommended subsidy, as it stands, provides for an adequate period for
adjustment to full cost rates, and follows a schedule for the transition
that was established by the 1970 act.

Other advancement

and regulation of commerce.—The

major initiative in business remains in the private sector, and the
primary effects of Federal actions on private business are through
fiscal and monetary policy, credit programs, tax policy, and regulation.
However, in some specific areas, Federal agencies do provide important
direct services to the private sector. Outlays for other advancement
and regulation of commerce are expected to total $741 million in 1976.
Because of the serious problems facing many small businesses in the
current economic situation, the Small Business Administration (SBA)
will give top priority to assisting established small businesses that are
in temporary economic difficulty. Assistance will be provided primarily
through guarantees of loans, direct loans, and information services.
The budget anticipates requesting $200 million for new direct loans
for small businesses in temporary difficulty, an increase of $60
million over 1975. The $200 million will be requested upon enactment
of a legislative change that will permit SBA to charge interest rates
that cover the full cost of the loan program. This change will permit
SBA to make long-term loans, at reasonable interest rates, without
a direct taxpayer subsidy to the firms.
The Department of Commerce and SBA will continue their programs to increase the successful participation of minorities in private
business. Increased assistance funds will be provided by SBA to stimulate equity financing for minority-owned businesses. SBA will focus
on improving the successful "graduation" of minority firms from its
program to assist them in obtaining Federal supply contracts. The
Office of Minority Business Enterprise expects to assist over 27,000
minority-owned firms in 1976.
A tax expenditure, estimated at $3.6 billion in 1976, stems from a
rate of tax on the first $25,000 of corporate profits that is less than
half the rate that applies to corporate profits in general. Although
this provision aids all businesses, it is primarily an aid to small businesses, in whose earnings the first $25,000 of profits bulk relatively
large. In addition, several of the largest tax expenditures, such as
the reduced rate of taxation of capital gains and the investment
credit, serve as incentives to business and individual investment.
While similar to advancement of commerce programs, they are classi-




112

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

fied under "business investment'' and "personal investment" functions
in Special Analysis F, "Tax Expenditures", and hence are not discussed here.
Outlays for trade promotion will total $21 million in 1976. Trade
promotion programs are being redirected in 1976 toward aiding
new exporters. Services to experienced exporters will continue to be
provided, b u t only on a full-cost reimbursement basis.
The Administration will again ask Congress to enact a comprehensive reform of the U.S. patent laws. Outlays for the Patent Office will
increase by $7 million in 1976, largely in order to reduce the time
required to review requests for patents.
Outlays for statistical programs in the Department of Commerce
will rise to $84 million in 1976. Particular attention will be given to
improving national income estimates and measures of the use of
potentially scarce natural resources.
I n 1976 the Administration plans a complete review of regulatory
policy. This review will be conducted to identify those Government
regulations that add needlessly to costs and exert upward pressures
on prices. Regulation of trading in commodity futures will be improved
under the new Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
MAJOR CREDIT PROGRAMS-COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION
[In millions of dollars]
Program

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

Department of Housing and Urban Development—mortgage
insurance:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments l
Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year

361
34
1,686
85,312

35
4
47
1,984
83,565

380
67
2,296
83,312

2,245
1,104
1, 785
5, 791

2,719
4,033
41
7
8,745

2,385
2,600
26
5
10,413

1,666

3,154

4,735

292
166
1,531
4,012

34
5
28
6
1,618
4,741

40
0
111
1,745
5,781

Department of Agriculture—rural housing:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments l
Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year
Maritime Programs:
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year
Small Business Administration:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments l Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year
1

Includes sales of loans.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

113

COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Program Highlights
• Carry out new legislation authorizing a community
development bloc grant program that will commit over $2.5
billion in 1976 to support of local community development
activities.
• Continue emphasizing rural community development
programs.
• Continue expanded Indian assistance programs under the
recently enacted Indian Financing Act.
• Carry out new legislation authorizing Indian tribes to
administer Federal programs that directly serve them.
• Support improved and expanded programs to assist
communities with persistent unemployment or lowincome.
• Finance disaster relief programs under new comprehensive disaster legislation.
• Increase the number of areas in which federally subsidized
flood insurance is available from 5,000 to 16,000 by the
end of 1976.
The community and regional development function primarily
covers physical planning and development activities supported by the
Federal Government. This support is provided by numerous agencies,
although four cabinet departments—Agriculture, Commerce, Housing
and Urban Development, and Interior—account for 80% of the
outlays under this function. The Federal Government's impact on
community and regional development, however, is not limited to the
programs included in this function. Many grant-in-aid programs help
promote the social and economic development of the Nation's States
and localities. In addition, direct Federal activities, such as defense
contracting and public works, can significantly affect the development
of individual communities and regions.
In 1976, community and regional development will be furthered
through major new programs authorized by the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, by recent amendments to the
Public Works and Economic Development Act of 1965, by the Disaster Kelief Act of 1974, and by the Indian Financing Act of 1974.
Outlays for community and regional development will total §5.9
billion in 1976.




114

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

Outlays
1974
actual

1975
1976
estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority1
for 1976

Community development:

Department of Agriculture: Water and sewer grants
Department of Housing and Urban Development:
Community development grants
Categorical programs replaced by bloc grants
Planning and research
Departmental management and other
District of Columbia
ACTION
Community Services Administration
Other
Subtotal, community development
Area and regional development:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Indian programs
Appalachian programs
Subtotal, area and regional development
Disaster relief and insurance:

Funds appropriated to the President for disaster relief_
Department of Housing and Urban Development—flood
insurance and other
Small Business Administration disaster loans
Proposed legislation
Subtotal, disaster relief and insurance
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total
1

34

50

66

150

1,874
160
72
153
86
660
6

225
1,883
166
118
206
99
498
35

1,300
1,722
121
117
248
105
376
13

2,550
3
57
118
249
102
363
14

3,045

3,280

4,068

3,606

281
270
286
291

53
316
431
340

247
294
500
340

200
356
387
320

1,129

1.142

1,382

1.264

250

275

250

150

48
466

20
197

128
55
68

75
100

501

325

764

492

-27

-27

-31

-31

4,910

4,887

5,920

5,164

Compares with budget authority of $3,969 million in 1974 and $5,075 million in 1975.

Community development.—The aim of community development
programs is to facilitate local development in accordance with locally
determined objectives by supplementing State and local government
resources. Outlays for community development will be $4.1 billion in
1976.
The community development grant program, which has replaced seven
categorical grant and loan programs (such as urban renewal and model
cities), will begin its first full year of operation in 1976. Localities in




115

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Outlays for Community and Regional Development
If

S Billion,

•8

{/tftftfff IWitf <HKl ftfeil$f<lf?C£

4-

1966

J967

1966

t969

wm nm

Estimate

both urban and rural areas are eligible to receive grants in support of
locally designed community development activities. The funds are
allocated by a formula based on objective measures of need. Localities
may use them to support any of a wide range of community development activities—including most activities eligible for assistance under
the antecedent programs—with only a minimum of review by HUD.
The program will emphasize general-purpose units of government (as
opposed to special districts) so that federally supported projects may
be linked more effectively to local activities. To insure a smooth transition to bloc grant funding, localities that participated in categorical
grant and loan programs will be eligible to receive bloc grants in
excess of their formula share for a limited period under a "holdharmless" provision.
New commitments under the bloc grant program will total $2,550
million in 1976, an increase of $55 million over the 1975 level. Outlays
reflect the rate at which recipients carry out assisted projects, and
are expected to total $1.3 billion in 1976.
HUD will continue to provide planning and management assistance
under the comprehensive planning program. Grant commitments
totaling $50 million in both 1975 and 1976 will enable State and local




116

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

governments to strengthen their decisionmaking and managerial
capabilities. Outlays are estimated to be $60 million in 1976.
HUD's research and technology program supports studies of community development problems and opportunities. The 1976 research
program will continue analysis of methods to achieve neighborhood
preservation, development of improved management tools for local
government use, and other studies designed to help local governments
achieve locally determined goals. Outlays for these and other projects
will total $61 million in 1976.
Outlays of $247 million will provide loans to the District of Columbia
for capital projects previously authorized. Now that home rule is in
effect, new projects will be financed through municipal bonds rather
than loans from the Federal Treasury.
ACTION'S domestic volunteer programs include Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA), University Year for ACTION (UYA), Older
Americans Volunteer programs, the SCORE/ACE program for retired
and active businessmen-volunteers, and a broad range of special volunteer programs. In 1976, there will be approximately 20,000 full-time
and 200,000 part-time volunteers participating in ACTION programs.
ACTION projects will continue to emphasize local design and operation, and will allow community-based volunteers to work on diverse
human and social problems. ACTION will try to increase the number
of volunteers participating in community activities and will give
special priority to encouraging older citizens to volunteer. Where
possible, local financial support will be sought. Federal outlays will
total $105 million.
The new National Fire Prevention and Control Administration
supplements and supports the fire prevention and control activities of
State and local governments, which have the primary responsibility
in this area. Outlays for Fire Administration programs, which are
focused on training, education, research, development, and data
collection, will be $9 million in 1976, a 70% increase above 1975.
The recently enacted Head Start, Economic Opportunity and Community Partnership Act of 1974 established the Community Services
Administration (CSA) to succeed the Office of Economic Opportunity
as of January 4, 1975. CSA will administer the legal services program
until the new Legal Services Corporation is fully operating, as well as
the community action and community economic development programs. However, the act authorized the submission of a reorganization
plan, currently under development, which would transfer CSA to
the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and the community economic development program to the Department of
Commerce.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

117

Area and regional development.—The principal Federal sources
of area and regional development assistance are the Farmers Home
Administration, the Economic Development Administration, the
Regional Action Planning Commissions, the Bureau of Indian Affairs,
and Appalachian programs. Outlays for area and regional development
will be $1.4 billion in 1976.
Farmers Home Administration.—The Rural Development Act of
1972 is in its second year of operation. Programs authorized by this
act provide loans for business and industrial development, as well
as loans and grants for water, sewer, and other community facilities.
In 1976, new grant and loan commitments will exceed $1 billion
and outlays are estimated at $151 million. Funds will be allocated
among the States on the basis of rural population and income.
Rural electric and telephone loans, which by law are excluded from
the budget, will total $2.4 billion in 1976.
Department of Commerce.—The Economic Development Administration and the Regional Action Planning Commissions provide assistance to economically depressed areas and assist States and communities in meeting regional economic adjustment problems. The act that
provides authority for these programs was amended in 1974 to permit
use of an expanded range of aids. These programs are designed to
maximize State and community involvement in the economic recovery
and adjustment process. Outlays for these programs will total $294
million in 1976.
Indian programs.—The major objectives of Federal Indian policy
are to strengthen Indian autonomy, to preserve community rights and
relationships, and to increase self-determination for Indian communities. Toward these ends, the Indian Financing Act, enacted in 1974,
provides for business development assistance, direct Federal loans,
guaranteed loans, and interest subsidies to Indians. The Indian SelfDetermination and Education Assistance Act will further these objectives by enabling Indian communities to administer Federal programs
serving them, pursuant to contracts with the Bureau of Indian Affairs
(BIA). Funds are set aside within the 1976 BIA budget to pay the
overhead costs for tribes electing to take over the operation of these
programs. Outlays for Indian programs in this subfunction will be
$500 million in 1976, an increase of $69 million over 1975.
In 1976, Appalachian regional development programs will continue
to undergo changes designed to provide greater flexibility in meeting
the diverse problems of Appalachia. Fiscal resources will be concen-




118

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

trated on the overall economic development objectives of the region.
A new system of allocations for nonhighway programs will allow the
Appalachian States themselves to choose activities that best meet
the changing needs of the region. The highway program will continue
to emphasize construction that contributes to overall economic development within the region. Outlays for Appalachian development
will total $340 million in 1976.
Disaster relief and insurance.—Although private insurance and
affected State and local governments are primarily responsible for
financing recovery from natural disasters, Federal aid is available
to supplement these resources when they are insufficient. The
Disaster Relief Act of 1974 broadened the relief that the Federal
Government may provide to include grants to persons unable to
meet serious needs arising from disasters, and bloc grants for
restoration of public facilities. Outlays depend upon the incidence
and severity of uninsured losses from natural disasters occurring
during the year, and are estimated to be $250 million in 1976. The
$150 million of additional budget authority proposed for 1976 is
sufficient to meet disaster requirements in an average year.
The national flood insurance program is designed to reduce the
impact of floods on life and property. Under the program, flood
insurance on structures in participating localities is provided at rates
that are subsidized by the Federal Government, thus protecting
against losses far more effectively than disaster assistance. At the
same time, the program discourages unwise development in floodprone areas by requiring communities to adopt flood protection
controls in order to qualify their citizens for the insurance premium
subsidy. Most of the $128 million in outlays under the program will
result from this subsidy.




T H E FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

119

MAJOR CREDIT PROGRAMS-COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
{In millions of dollars]

Major c,.d it p , . g r . r o

J™

J^^

J ^

Community development:

Urban renewal:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year
New communities fund:
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year

843
926
90
3,839

900
850
140
3,707

600
550
190
3,054

252

282

370

383
256
380
962

629
745
264
1,607

734
716
282
2,236

32
18
476
52

43
22
497
52

36
23
510
52

2
1
29

23
1
50
43

38
5
83
78

201
133
1,340
7

212
150
1,402
7

183
164
1,421
6

Area and regional development:

Rural development:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year
Economic development:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year
Indian Financing Act:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year
Disaster relief and insurance:
Disaster loans:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year




_

120

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

EDUCATION, MANPOWER, AND SOCIAL SERVICES
Education, manpower, and social services programs are designed to
help individuals participate as fully as possible in the Nation's social
and economic opportunities. Outlays for these programs totaled $11.6
billion in 1974, and are expected to increase to $14.7 billion in 1975,
and $14.6 billion in 1976.

Program Highlights
• Consolidate certain categorical educational programs
and continue to provide advanced funding for most elementary and secondary education programs.
• Provide special aid to school districts facing problems of
desegregation.
• Propose legislation to restructure vocational education
support and to give State agencies more flexibility.
• Improve access to postsecondary education by funding
basic educational opportunity grants of up to $1,400 for
all eligible students.
• Fund about 636,000 training and employment opportunities under the Comprehensive Employment and Training
Act in 1976.
• Provide $2 billion for temporary public service employment during 1975 and 1976.
• Find 140,000 unsubsidized jobs for welfare recipients
through the work incentive program.
• Implement new pension reform act and improve enforcement of minimum wage and related laws.
• Propose legislation to raise the State share of financing
social services consistent with general realignment of
Federal-State cost sharing.
• Propose legislation to encourage coordination of human
service delivery programs at the State and local level.

EDUCATION

The primary responsibility for public education rests with State and
local governments. Federal assistance is focused on equalizing educational opportunity for disadvantaged students and improving the
programs of local and State educational agencies to provide better
educational services. Outlays for education programs are estimated to
be $7.3 billion in 1975 and $7.4 billion in 1976.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

121

EDUCATION. MANPOWER AND SOCIAL SERVICES
[In millions of dollars]
^
~

Recommended
budget
1975
1976
authority
estimate estimate for 1976 l
Outlays

1974
actual

Education:
Elementary, secondary and vocational education:
Aid to education agencies
Child and human development
Proposed legislation (impact aid and vocational
education modification)
Subtotal, elementary, secondary and vocational
education
Higher education:

3,350
421

3,767
449

3,996
481

4,197
483

—255

—396

3,771

4.216

4,222

4. 284

1,238
111

1,971

2.209

133

116

2, 245
116

1.349

2,104

2.325

2.361

869

937

11
828

20
729

869

937

839

749

5,989

7,257

7,386

7,394

350

650

1,517
340
448
605

2,861

2,755

2,461

316
532
59

315
521

330
511

Subtotal, manpower training
Other manpower services

2,910
219

4,118
278

4,241
301

3,302
305

Subtotal, manpower
Social services:
Grants to States for social services
Proposed legislation
Rehabilitation services..
Administrative expenses and other
Proposed legislation (allied services)

3,129

4.397

4,542

3,607

1,472
724
300

1,972
-10
785
359

2,064
-478
806
343
5

2,067
-478
789
332
20

2,496
-13

3,106
-45

2,740
-45

2,730
-45

11,600

14,714

14,623

13,686

Student aid and institutional support
Special institutions
Subtotal, higher education
Research and general education aids:

Proposed legislation (library services)
Other
Subtotal research and general education aids
Subtotal, education
Manpower:
Manpower training:

Temporary employment assistance
Manpower program activities
Work incentive program
Federal-State employment service and other
Emergency employment assistance

Subtotal, social services
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Totals1

_

Compares with budget authority of $13,222 million in 1974 and $14,577 million in 1975.




122

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Outlays for Education
SBillions

M ...'.....

*- Efcmentary, Secondary, and
v --r • ;'" Vocational Education '
-

Elementary, secondary and vocational education.—Elementary and secondary education programs include aid to State and local
educational agencies through formula grants and discretionary
project grants. The bulk of Federal aid provides both special compensatory assistance to disadvantaged students and assistance to develop
better programs for students with special needs and handicaps.
Aid to education agencies.—The Education Amendments of 1974
provide for several areas of reform requested by the Administration.
Among the more significant changes are:
• Revision of the formula for allocation of funds for education of
disadvantaged children to reflect more accurately the distribution of disadvantaged children within the population;
• Establishment of two new consolidated grant programs for
educational support and innovation, and libraries and instructional resources to provide more authority for State and local
agencies to plan programs tailored to local needs.
Special Federal aid will be continued to help overcome special
problems in those school districts in the process of desegregation.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

123

Child development.—Federal funds support research, demonstration,
and service programs aiding the development of preschool children
including innovations in the area of child abuse prevention. In 1976,
the Head Start preschool program for disadvantaged will serve 379,000
children, 10% of whom are handicapped. Emphasis will be placed
upon inclusion of the more severely handicapped, and a wider use of
demonstration program results.
Proposed legislation.—The 1976 budget includes proposed legislation
which would consolidate vocational education support to provide
greater flexibility for decisions by State agencies, shift Federal support
toward innovation and development, and increase the non-Federal
share of program costs.
In addition, the Administration is proposing, in 1976, legislation
to reform the impact aid program. As presently designed, the aid provided under this program is not based upon the actual fiscal impact
of the presence of Federal operations. The proposed changes would
limit Federal payments to those school districts in which impact aid
would provide more than 5% of the operating budget. These changes
are estimated to save approximately $270 million in 1976.
Higher education.—The budget emphasizes increased access to
postsecondary education by concentrating resources on direct financial
aid to students on the basis of need. In addition, assistance is provided
to institutions with special needs and special programs.
Student aid.—The 1976 budget requests $1,050 million in budget
authority to fund basic educational opportunity grants for an estimated 1.3 million undergraduate students in the 1976-77 school year.
The statutory maximum grant award is $1,400.
In addition, $250 million of budget authority for work-study funds
will help 520,000 students meet educational expenses through parttime work. Under the national direct student loan program, repayments of existing loans will make $164 million in new loans available
to some 328,000 students. The guaranteed student loan program will
insure an estimated $1,650 million in loans for 1.1 million students.
Outlays to support improvement of developing institutions, including
predominantly black colleges, will continue to rise in 1976.
Special institutions.—Federal support for Howard University and
Gallaudet College will be continued in 1976.
Provisions of the Federal income tax law benefit higher education.
These tax provisions, or tax expenditures, include: Exclusion of
scholarships and fellowships from taxable income, parental personal
exemptions for students aged 19 and over, and the deducibility of
580-000 O - 75 - 5




124

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

contributions to educational institutions. For 1976, it is estimated that
these provisions will reduce receipts by $0.2 billion, $0.7 billion, and
$0.6 billion, respectively. For an explanation of tax expenditures, see
pages 67 to 69 above or Special Analysis F in the Special Analyses
volume of the Budget.
Research and general education aids.—These programs include
educational research and development, cultural activities, special
projects which focus on national education problems and library
services. Transfer of the Educational development account to elementary, secondary and vocational education results in an apparent
decrease in outlays.
Proposed legislation,—The budget reflects funds for proposed legislation to support development and demonstration of new methods of
delivering public library services.
Other educational activities.—Outlays for the National Institute of
Education in 1976 of $84.4 million will support research efforts in the
areas of basic skills, education and work, and equal educational
opportunity. A program of special projects focusing on national
education problems will be supported with $39 million in budget
authority in 1976. The Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary
Education with $17.5 million in 1976 budget authority will stress
bridging the gap between education and work. In 1976, the National
Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities will spend an estimated
$183 million in support of cultural activities. It is estimated that of
this total, $40 million will be directed to the support of Bicentennialrelated activities. Some $108 million will support activities of the
Smithsonian Institution, $12 million of which will be devoted to the
Smithsonian Bicentennial program.
MANPOWER

The Federal Government finances State and local programs that
help individuals obtain jobs via training and employment services
or through the provision of temporary public jobs. It also sets and
enforces minimum wage and other standards regulating employment
and labor-management relations practices. Outlays for Federal
manpower programs are estimated at $4.5 billion in 1976, an increase
of 3.3% or $146 million over 1975.
Manpower training.—Federal money is provided to States and
localities for programs to train the unemployed and the disadvantaged,
to help jobseekers find work, and to provide temporary jobs that furnish useful public services. The total amount spent on these programs




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

125

Outlays (or Manpower and Social Services

Manpower Training and Other Manpower

mi

mm tm

tm

mi

tm

m$ ms

in 1976 is expected to be $4.2 billion, $123 million more than in
1975.
Temporary employment assistance.—In response to the President's
request, the Congress, in December 1974, authorized a temporary
unemployment assistance and public employment program to help
unemployed workers. One part of this program—special unemployment benefit payments—provides aid to all eligible workers who have
lost jobs and cannot find new ones. It is discussed in the income
security function. The second part, temporary employment assistance, will enable States and localities to create temporary jobs for
unemployed workers, primarily those who have been out of a job for a
long time or have used up their unemployment compensation. States
and localities are encouraged to develop special projects outside their
regular work programs in order to employ as many unemployed
workers as fast as possible. The program provides jobs similar to those
financed under regular manpower programs, but has special provisions
to accelerate hiring in areas of high unemployment. It is estimated
that $350 million will be spent on such jobs in 1975 and $650 million
in 1976. Continuation of this program in its present form after
December 31, 1975, depends upon an analysis of its success.




126

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Manpower program activities.—The Comprehensive Employment
and Training Act (CETA) enters its second full year of operation in
1976. In 1975, States and localities are receiving authority to use some
$2.3 billion to finance locally conceived plans to train or employ people
in ways that best fit the needs of the local employment situation.
Portions of this amount together with funds made available late in
1974 have provided $1 billion on an accelerated schedule to provide
170,000 transitional public service jobs for the unemployed. The
States and localities are filling these jobs as rapidly as possible given
their local needs and given the goal that the jobs should ultimately
channel workers into regular employment. A substantial amount
of the 1975 funding will remain available in 1976 to finance similar
jobs in that year. In addition, as States and localities organize to
carry out their new responsibilities under CETA, significant amounts
of 1975 authority will remain available in 1976 for skill training,
remedial education, on-the-job training, job development, job
matching, vocational counseling, and related supporting services.
These carryovers, plus 1976 budget authority equal to that provided
in 1975, will support over 636,000 man-years of training and employment in 1976.
About $370 million of the total outlays expected in 1976 will be for
special national manpower programs. These include programs for migrant workers, Indians, and the Job Corps, as well as research and
evaluation projects.
Work incentive program (WIN).—Help in obtaining jobs is provided
those receiving aid to families with dependent children. Every recipient able to work must register for work or training. Under recently
proposed regulations, registrants will be referred to suitable job
openings listed with the employment service. Counseling helps the
welfare recipient discover effective methods of getting jobs, and testing
helps determine the individual's job capability. Where necessary, work
experience or on-the-job training is provided. Those lacking essential job skills can receive classroom instruction. Public employment can be financed if other services are insufficient. Child care and
other supportive services are furnished as needed to enable welfare
recipients to seek or accept jobs. In 1974, jobs were found by 177,000
WIN program participants and 115,000 of these persons stayed in
jobs for at least 90 days. The goal for 1976 is to place 140,000 people
in jobs lasting 90 days or more. Outlays for the WIN program are
expected to total $315 million in 1976, about the same as estimated
for 1975.
Federal-State employment service.—The Federal Government pays
100% of the cost of the State offices providing job matching services to




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

127

workers and employers. Employment Service (ES) employees also
provide a readily available resource for expediting the processing of
unemployment insurance claims when unemployment rates rise. In
1974, the ES placed people in 3.4 million jobs and in 1976 expects to
do the same. Outlays for the service in 1976 are estimated at $521
million, $11 million less than in 1975.
Emergency employment assistance.—This emergency program was
enacted in 1971. Authorization for appropriations for this program
expired June 30, 1973.
Other manpower services.—The Federal Government establishes
and enforces basic standards governing the relationship between
employee and employer, such as minimum wages, overtime payments,
equal pay for equal work, and welfare and pension plan practices.
The Federal Government also sets ground rules for fair practices in
labor-management relations and gathers and disseminates employment, unemployment, and price statistics. The Employee Retirement
Income Security Act, which became law in September 1974, placed
new requirements on employers with respect to any pension plans
they establish for their workers. While not requiring the establishment
of such plans, the law establishes minimum employee participation
requirements, new employee-benefit vesting and plan-funding standards, and more rigorous rules for the management of plan assets
and the conduct of plan managers. Individual plan beneficiaries are
afforded new information rights and legal remedies, and qualifying
plans are required to send full periodic reports on the plans' status
to the Secretary of Labor. The Employee Retirement Income Security
Act also created a new Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation to
insure employees against the loss of basic retirement benefits if their
plans terminate. By law, the Corporation's effect on the U.S. Treasury
is not included in the budget totals.
Outlays for these other manpower services are estimated at $301
million in 1976, $23 million more than in 1975.
SOCIAL SERVICES

Social services.—Grants to States jor social services provides assistance to States and localities via several programs for an array of social
services and specialized services to the poor and other special target
groups. These services are designed to promote greater independence
for individuals in these groups. This program is primarily administered
by State and local governments, which determine within Federal
regulations the kinds and levels of services to be delivered. These
services may encompass such activities as counseling, family planning,
child care, and homemaker services.




128

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Under recently enacted legislation States will have clear Federal
guidelines and a stronger obligation to plan and account for their
social service programs. In order to bring the Federal share of financing
social services more into line with the Federal/State shares for medical
services, legislation will be proposed to increase the State share of
financial responsibility from 25% to 35% in 1976 and to 50% in 1977.
Under this plan, Federal grants to States for social services and related
activities will decline by approximately $400 million in 1976 to a
level of $1.6 billion. Should the States assume the increased share of
the costs, the overall level of available service would remain the same.
Rehabilitation services, with outlays of $806 million, incorporate
both vocational rehabilitation and services for the developmentally
disabled (individuals such as the severely mentally retarded, epileptics,
or those suffering from cerebral palsy). Under the Rehabilitation
Act of 1973, the vocational rehabilitation program will increasingly
focus on the severely handicapped. Approximately 1.7 million persons
will receive vocational rehabilitation services in 1976. Beyond the
regular program for funding vocational rehabilitation services,
additional resources for these services are available under the Federal
supplemental security income program and the old age, survivors, and
disability insurance programs. Together, these programs will provide
an added $132 million for 1975 and $158 million in 1976.
Services for the aging and other special groups will receive continued
Federal support in 1976, with outlays estimated at $279 million. This
includes funds for programs which apply innovative approaches and
necessary services to deal with the special needs of Indians and other
Native Americans. Outlays for special programs for the aging will
provide more than 200,000 meals daily and other services which will
assist those older persons capable of self-care to secure and maintain
independence in a home environment. The aging program places emphasis on assisting State and local area agencies to develop coordinated
service systems that can effectively bring together available Federal,
State, local, and private resources.
Juvenile delinquency prevention programs, which were included in
this section in prior years, are now included in the General Government function. Primary responsibility for this activity was transferred
to the Department of Justice with enactment of the Juvenile Justice
and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974. However, funds will still be
provided under this function for continued demonstration of coordinated services for runaway youths.
Legislation will be proposed to authorize a program to encourage
coordination of human service delivery programs at the State and
local level.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

129

HEALTH
Program Highlights
• Increase medicare and medicaid expenditures from $17
billion in 1974 to over $22 billion in 1976, expanding
coverage from 43 million to 45 million aged, disabled, and
low-income Americans.
• Increase support of health research from $1. 6 billion
in 1974 to $1. 8 billion in 1976.
• Provide $155 million for innovations in health professions
training.
• Increase funds for consumer safety and disease prevention activities from $750 million in 1974 to $920 million
in 1976.

Outlays for Federal health programs are estimated at over $28
billion in 1976, an increase of almost $1.6 billion or 6% over 1975. The
1976 budget for health programs is based on a policy of providing
access to basic health services through financial assistance to individuals under the medicare and medicaid programs rather than continuing to increase funding for inequitable project grants to selected
communities and groups under narrow categorical program authorities.
The budget also provides funding to improve the quality of health
care and health care delivery through research, training, planning,
and regulatory activities.
Health care services.—The largest Federal effort in the health
sector is the financing and provision of health care services.
Financing medical services.—Medicare outlays of $15 billion in
1976 will help meet the medical costs of an estimated 13.3 million aged
and disabled Americans, 29% more people than were aided in 1971.
Medicare legislation is proposed to provide financial incentives against
overutilization, to improve protection against catastrophic health
care expenses, to allow future adjustments in the supplementary medical insurance premiums, and to prevent payments for excessive
hospital costs. Administrative actions will be taken to limit reimbursement for medically necessary services to reasonable costs.
Medicaid outlays of over $7 billion will help to pay for medical care
for almost 26 million low-income Americans. This represents a 40%
increase in beneficiaries and a 113% increase in funding since 1971.
The medicaid program will emphasize early and periodic screening of
children in 1976 in order to assure that all eligible children receive




130

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
HEALTH
IIn millions of dollars]

Program or agency

Health care services:
Financing medical services:
Medicare
Proposed legislation
Medicaid
Proposed legislation
Other
Providing medical services
Proposed legislation

Outlays
1974
actual

1975
1976
estimate estimate

11,348

financing

Subtotal, health care services
Health research and education:
Health research
Health education and training
Subtotal, health research and education
Prevention and control of health problems:
Preventing and controlling diseases
Consumer safety.

14,158 16,369
- 2 5 5 -1,379
5,818 6,788
7,766
-199 -610
962 1,386 1,419
374
468
459
48

Recommended
budget
authority
for 19761

18,553
20
7,766
-610
1,319
444
48

18,502

22,346

24,072

27,540

1,650
684

1,894
786

1,864
620

1,829
558

2,334

2,680

2,484

2,387

375
375

470
438

459
461

439
450

Subtotal, prevention and control of health problems.
Health planning and construction:
Health planning
Health construction

750

908

920

889

145
349

202
388

246
366

110
135

Subtotal, health planning and construction
Deductions for offsetting receipts. _

494
-6

590
-39

612
-39

245
-39

22,074

26,486

28,050

31,022

Total

1
Compares with budget authority for 1974 and 1975 as follows: 1974. $26,365 million: 1975.
$28,448 million.

necessary care, particularly immunizations and other vital preventive
services. The management of medicaid will be improved through
expanded eligibility screening and more effective program review.
Legislation is proposed to provide greater sharing of medicaid program costs by the 13 highest income States. This change will mean
that proportionately more Federal assistance will go to lower income
States. Legislation is also being proposed to eliminate Federal matching
for routine dental services for adults and to provide medicaid reimbursement for care received in neighborhood health clinics.
Federal tax laws currently exclude from taxable income employer
contributions to health insurance premiums for the employee. They




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

131

Health Outlays

also permit itemized deductions for certain health care and health
insurance premium costs. In 1976, the revenue loss from these tax
expenditures is estimated at $3.7 billion for employer contributions,
and $2.6 billion for itemized medical deductions. For an explanation
of tax expenditures, see pages 67 to 69 above or Special Analysis F in
the Special Analyses volume of the Budget.
Providing medical services.—In addition to financing medical services,
the Federal Government provides some medical care directly.
An estimated $437 million will be spent in 1976 on the provision of
medical services to Alaska Natives, merchant seamen, and American
Indians who live on or near reservations. Of this amount, $322 million
in outlays will be requested for the care of approximately 500,000
eligible American Indians and Alaska Natives. Annual Federal expenditures of over $640 per Indian or over $2,500 for a family of four
compare to estimated per capita national expenditures of about $600
in 1976 for the U.S. civilian population. Funding for Indian health
services has increased 125% in 6 years, from $143 million in 1971 to
$322 million in 1976.
Legislation is being proposed to transfer Saint Elizabeths Hospital
from the Federal Government to the District of Columbia. Under the




132

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

legislation, the Federal Government will continue to subsidize the
operating costs of the hospital and to reimburse the District for the
treatment of Federal beneficiaries. Approximately 87% of the inpatient population of the hospital are District residents and virtually
all of its outpatient activity is devoted to District residents. Funds
will be requested for renovation and construction at Saint Elizabeths
as soon as the transfer takes place and the District has developed a
facilities plan. In addition, legislation will be developed to transfer to
local community use one or two PHS hospitals in 1976. Necessary
medical care for eligible merchant seamen and other beneficiaries will
be financed through other means.
Efforts to improve the ways in which health services are made
available will be continued in 1976. Federal policy on providing for the
direct delivery of health care through project grants will emphasize
cost-sharing by States, local governments, and other grantees.
Support will continue to be provided for the demonstration of health
maintenance organizations. These organizations provide health care on
a prepaid basis and stress preventive services. The National Health
Service Corps program will continue to place physicians and other
health professionals in areas of the country with critical shortages of
health manpower.
The national effort against drug abuse—including Federal, State,
local and private efforts—has resulted in the development of treatment
capacity for all heroin addicts seeking treatment. Treatment of heroin
addiction will continue to be a national priority in 1976 and other drug
abuse prevention efforts will also be continued. As required by law,
the Special Action Office for Drug Abuse Prevention will terminate in
June 1975. A separate agency for drug abuse prevention in the Executive Office of the President is no longer necessary since the major
policy and coordination issues in drug abuse prevention have been
resolved. In 1976, funding will continue for a wide range of alcoholism
prevention projects designed to demonstrate more effective delivery
of medical, social, and education services.
Federal support for existing Community Mental Health Centers
(CMHCs) will continue through the 8-year demonstration cycle.
Subsidies to CMHCs have demonstrated the viability of communitybased mental health services. Therefore, no new demonstration awards
will be made in 1976. Mental health and social services provided in
CMHCs are included among services already available on a more
equitable basis through the medicaid and social services programs for
which the Federal Government will spend $8.7 billion in 1976. In
addition, State and local governments will spend an estimated $7.7
billion in 1976 for these programs.
In 1976, $50 million is being requested for the Professional Standards Review Organizations (PSRO) program, which aims at improving




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

133

the quality and appropriateness of medical care through the establishment of a nationwide system of these physician-sponsored organizations. About half of the 203 proposed PSRO areas throughout the
country will be covered by the end of 1976.

Health research and education.—Programs for health research
and education include support for biomedical, behavioral, and health
services research, as well as training and education of health care
personnel.
Health research.—Outlays for NIH biomedical research will be
nearly $1.7 billion in 1976—an increase of 15% since 1974. This
funding level will maintain efforts in all significant research areas.
Major emphasis will continue to be placed on cancer research, where
outlays of $582 million are estimated for 1976.
Health education and training.—In 1976, total HEW outlays for
training health professionals are estimated at $620 million. Measures
undertaken since 1969 have assured major increases in the number of
graduates of U.S. health professions schools. From 1965 to 1974,
medical school enrollments and the number of graduates each grew
by 56%. Medical school enrollments have grown from 32,428 to 50,477
and the annual number of graduates has increased from 7,409 to
11,580.
As in other fields of higher education, Federal assistance in 1976
will emphasize aid to students rather than to institutions. Unnecessary
Federal institutional subsidies will be gradually phased out. Since
students in the health professions can anticipate high earnings, they
can be expected to finance a greater share of their own educational
costs. Federally guaranteed private loans are available, and recently
increased ceilings on such loans will heighten their usefulness to students in the health professions. Proposed legislation will reflect this
appropriate Federal role in the support of health professions training.
An expanded National Health Service Corps program of scholarships in return for service will both assist students financially and
help meet Federal needs for health professionals. A total of 1,100
new postdoctoral fellowships for research training will be awarded
in 1976 based upon merit as determined through national competition. No new predoctoral research training awards are proposed.

Prevention and control of health problems.—Programs will be
expanded to prevent and control health problems in the areas of
consumer safety, communicable disease control, and occupational
safety and health. Outlays for these programs are expected to reach
$920 million in 1976.




134

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Outlays of $461 million are being requested for consumer safety.
Priority will continue to be placed on the development of standards to
assure the safety and efficacy of drugs, medical devices, vaccines, biological and other consumer products, as well as on the inspection of
food and drug manufacturing firms, and blood banks. The Department
of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service will
help to assure the wholesomeness of meat and poultry in interstate and
foreign commerce.
Outlays of $459 million are proposed for disease prevention and
control activities. Efforts will focus on the control of communicable
diseases and the improvement of interstate clinical laboratories.
A total of $228 million will be spent for Federal occupational safety
and health programs in 1976. The Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare will continue to provide research in support of the efforts
of the Departments of Labor and the Interior to safeguard workers
through the establishment and enforcement of health and safety
standards in the workplace.

Health planning and construction.—Programs for health planning and construction include support for State and sub-State planning
bodies, health statistical activities, and construction of medical and
research facilities.
Health planning.—Estimated outlays of $246 million in 1976 will
assist health planning and related activities, including support to
States and localities in establishing new consolidated planning agencies
to replace and improve the present health planning entities. Continued development of the cooperative health statistics system will
promote improved health planning at all levels of government.
Health facilities construction.—A revised construction assistance
activity will focus Federal support on the modernization of existing
facilities and the construction of outpatient facilities. Construction
funds for cancer research facilities will be used primarily for alteration
and renovation of existing research space in 1976.
Special Analysis K, "Federal Health Programs/' discusses all
Federal activities related to health including those outside this
function such as programs for military personnel and veterans. See
the Special Analyses volume of the budget.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

135

INCOME SECURITY

Program Highlights
• Raise average individual social security benefits from
$185 a month in 1974 to $235 a month in 1976.
• Increase total social security cash outlays from $54.9
billion in 1974 to $70.1 billion in 1976, amounting to 20%
of the Federal budget.
• Expand the supplemental security income program from
3.6 million recipients in 1974 to more than 5 million
recipients in 1976.
• Increase average monthly food stamp coupon benefits
per person from $17 in 1974 to more than $22 in 1976.
• Expand grants to States for the Aid to Families with
Dependent Children program from $4.4 billion in 1974,
to $4.7 billion in 1976.
• Increase unemployment program outlays from $6.1 billion
in 1974 to $18.2 billion in 1976.
• Request $26 billion in budget authority to cover subsidy
payments for 400,000 housing units.

The Federal income security programs mitigate the loss of family
income when the wage earner is no longer in the work force because of
unemployment, retirement, disability, or death. These programs
also provide assistance to families when they are in financial need.
More than 79% of the income security programs are funded out of
trust funds and are paid without personal tests of need. Additionally,
Federal revenues foregone {tax expenditures) constitute an important
income supplement. For an explanation of tax expenditures, see
pages 67 to 69 above, or Special Analysis F in the Special Analyses
volume of the Budget.
This budget provides more than $17 billion in unemployment
compensation, under both regular unemployment insurance laws and
the temporary legislation enacted at the close of the 93d Congress.
The size of Federal income security programs is significant. Retirement system contributions make up 24% of all Federal receipts.
Retirement system outlays make up 23% of all Federal outlays in
1976. Moreover, most of the payments are automatically increased as
the cost-of-living rises. These automatic adjustments account for onethird of the total increase of $12 billion between 1975 and 1976.




136

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
INCOME SECURITY
[In millions of dollars]

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1976 *

54,935

63,591

73,307

69,077

-60

-648
—2,546

26
91

2.675

3,024

3,383
—116

3.232

1.000

964

2

5

996
—23
3

1.000
—23
3

58.613

67,526

74,356

73.406

5.645

7,125

8,646
—773

12.212
—110

_

Outlays

General retirement and disability:

Old-age, survivors, and disability insurance:
Present programs
Proposed legislation:
Benefit reforms
Cost of living modification
Railroad retirement:
Present programs
Proposed legislation: Cost of living modification
Special benefits for disabled coal miners:
Present programs
Proposed legislation: Cost of living modification
Other
Subtotal, general retirement and disability
Federal employee retirement and disability:

Present programs
Proposed legislation: Cost of living modification
Subtotal, Federal employees retirement and disability
Unemployment insurance
Public assistance and other income supplements:

Supplemental security income:
Present programs
Proposed legislation: Cost of living modification
Grants to States for maintenance payments:
Present programs
Proposed legislation: Management reforms
Housing assistance
Food stamps:
Present programs
Proposed legislation: Cost of living modification
Child nutrition and other food and nutrition programs:
Present programs
Proposed legislation:
Benefit reforms
Cost of living modification
Other....
:
Subtotal, public assistance and other income
supplements
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total
1

5,645

7,125

7,873

12,102

6,065

14.697

18,162

7.834

2,257

4.713

5,543
—85

5,539
—85

5,423
1.819

4,851
—118
2.153

5,166
—499
2.646

5,166
— 499
26.664

2,84^

3,672

3,860
—217

3.447
—217

1.588

1.935

1.796

1.841

176

182

-12
—64
233

21
—64
217

14,108
-*

17,388
-34

18,368
-34

42,031
-34

84,431 106,702 118,724

135,339

Compares with budget authority for 1974 and 1975. as follows: 1974, $95,249 million; 1975.
$156,126 million.
* Less than $500 thousand.




137

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

The Administration is proposing major legislation affecting all income security programs tied to increases in the Consumer Price Index
(CPI). Until July 1, 1976, all CPI adjusted benefit increases will be
limited to no more than 5%. The following programs will be affected
by this modification: The old age, survivors, and disability insurance
programs, the railroad retirement system, the Federal employees retirement and disability system, special benefits for disabled coal
miners, the supplemental security income program, and the food
stamp and child nutrition programs. Other civilian and military Federal
employee pay and benefit programs, carried in other functional categories, would also be affected by this proposal.
Income Security Outlays

1966 1967
Fi«alYe

1968

1969

*910

1973

W4

W5

I9?6

Eifimat.

Income tuppfeawoH weh a

General retirement and disability.—The social security cash
benefit programs are the world's largest system of retirement, survivors, and disability insurance. In 1976, a total of 15.4 million retired
workers will receive an average of $211 per month. The total number of beneficiaries, including dependents and survivors, is expected
to be 32.2 million. Outlays for social security benefits in 1976 will increase by $6.6 billion, of which the 5% cost-of-living increase will
account for $3.5 billion. Additional increases due to the rising proportion of elderly in the population and the steady rise in average
wages, will account for $3.1 billion more.




138

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

The social security payroll tax rate will remain the same in 1976, but
under an automatic adjustment mechanism, the amount of an employee's earnings subject to the payroll tax rose from $13,200 to
$14,100, effective January 1, 1975.
The Administration will continue to seek legislation to eliminate
permanent reduction to a beneficiary's regular monthly check as a
result of a claim for retroactive entitlement. The Administration will
also seek legislation to convert the monthly retirement test on income
earned after retirement to an annual test. Other legislative proposals
will be introduced to improve and simplify the administration of the
program. The recommendations of the Social Security Advisory Council for improvements of the system are expected to be reported early
this year, and will be considered by the Administration in developing
its legislative program.
A separate contributory retirement system provides benefits for
retired or disabled railroad workers. Outlays under the railroad retirement program are estimated at $3.3 billion in 1976, an increase of
$0.2 billion over 1975. These outlays include the effects of recently
enacted legislation.
Several provisions of the Federal personal income tax are designed
to benefit the aged. The major benefits result from the extra exemptions available to persons 65 or over, from the exclusion of all social
security and railroad retirement benefits from tax liability (not just
the portion representing a return of the taxpayer's original contribution), and to a much lesser degree, the retirement income credit. The
combined loss of tax receipts from the retired and elderly due to these
three provisions is estimated to be $5.1 billion in 1976.
Other provisions are directed to the future security of aged persons
by encouraging private provision for retirement years. The major
impacts result from the exclusion of employer contributions to and
earnings of qualified pension funds from current taxation. After allowing for deferred taxes collected from present retirees, the net loss in
receipts from this tax expenditure is estimated to be $5.7 billion in
1976. The Pension Reform Act of 1974 expanded the similar tax provisions for noncovered or self-employed persons, and will result in an
estimated tax expenditure of $0.7 billion in 1976.
Disabled persons receiving particular types of income are assisted
by the exemption of disability insurance benefits under social security,
the exclusion of workmen's compensation benefits from taxation, and
provisions excluding certain types of payments such as sick pay and
private disability insurance benefits. These exclusions are estimated
to reduce receipts in 1976 by $0.3 billion, $0.6 billion, and $0.3 billion
respectively.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Federal employee retirement

139

and disability.—A separate

retirement system provides benefits for 1.4 million retired and disabled
Federal civilian employees. Outlays for civil service retirees and their
survivors have increased from $1.8 billion in 1969 to $5.7 billion in
1974, and are projected to reach $8.0 billion by 1976 and $12.5 billion
by 1980. These cost increases are due primarily to the large growth in
retirement rolls, rising average salaries on which annuities are based,
and cost-of-living adjustments which overcompensate by providing
for permanent annuity increases in excess of changes in the Consumer
Price Index. A comprehensive evaluation of the current financing
mechanisms and methods used under the Civil Service Retirement Act
will be undertaken including normal cost, employer and employee contributions and provisions for the cost-of-living increases. Civil service
retirement is now recognized as one of the most liberal public or private
systems in the country. No further liberalizations will be considered at
least until policy recommendations are received following a study of
total compensation comparability with the private work force.
Unemployment
insurance.—Counter-cyclical
unemployment
benefit programs will play a larger role in mitigating the effects of a
downturn in the economy in 1975 and 1976. Approximately 14.2 million
workers will receive unemployment compensation in 1975 and 14.4
million in 1976. A new program to mitigate the effects of unemployment, based on an Administration proposal, was enacted in December
1974. This program has two components: Unemployment compensation, and the temporary employment assistance program, which
is discussed in the Education, Manpower, and Social Services function. Under temporary legislation workers covered by State unemployment insurance laws can receive up to 13 weeks of additional
benefits. When added to the existing regular program of 26 weeks and
the State extended program of 13 weeks, up to a full year of benefits
can be provided. Workers can receive up to 26 weeks of benefits if
they are not covered under State law. These temporary provisions
provide replacement income for longer periods during the current increase in the unemployment rate with its resulting increase in the
length of job search. Based on experience with this temporary legislation, the need for changes to the basic unemployment insurance law
will be evaluated.
Significant tax benefits are provided to unemployed persons by the
exclusion from taxation of unemployment insurance benefits. This tax
expenditure is estimated to reach $3.8 billion in 1976.

Public assistance and other income supplements.—In January 1974, the federally aided State assistance programs for the aged,

530-000 O - 75 - 10




140

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

blind, and disabled were replaced by the supplemental security income
program. The conversion of over 3 million cases from State and local
governments was completed on schedule, and during the first full year
of operation, over 1 million additional persons, many of whom could
not qualify for assistance under the former programs under State and
local administration, were enrolled. The Federal share of assistance
payments to the aged, blind and disabled has increased from $2 billion
in calendar year 1973 to $4 billion in calendar year 1974. The Federal
share for fiscal year 1975 and 1976 is estimated to be $4.3 billion and
$5.0 billion respectively. The outlay totals also include spending for administrative costs and supporting services. This budget provides the
necessary additional manpower to ensure that these very large additions to the Federal workload can be absorbed and the public served as
rapidly and efficiently as possible. Legislation was enacted in 1974 to
provide automatic benefit increases in line with those provided in social
security cash benefit programs. All aspects of this new program will
be monitored closely, and recommendations for legislation will be
made where needed to simplify Federal administration and improve
services for all beneficiaries.
Grants to States jor maintenance payments provide the Federal share
of welfare benefits in the aid to families with dependent children
(AFDC) program. The AFDC quality control program's most recent
results indicate that 9.3% of cases are ineligible, 20.6% are receiving
overpayments, and 8.0% are receiving underpayments. The Department of Health, Education, and Welfare is working with the States to
reduce these errors, and the consequent costs associated with them.
The AFDC caseload and the average benefit payment are expected to
increase moderately in 1975 and 1976. The Administration is proposing
legislative and administrative reforms in 1975 to simplify and improve
management. Included are the making of more frequent redeterminations of eligibility and simplifying of the AFDC matching rate formula.
Housing assistance.—Total housing payments for the subsidized
housing programs are expected to reach $2.6 billion in 1976, an increase of $478 million over 1975. During 1975 and 1976 HUD will
provide additional housing assistance primarily under the new lower
income housing assistance program (sec. 8) authorized by the Housing
and Community Development Act of 1974. This program, a modified
version of the public housing leasing program, provides greater opportunities for lower income families to select housing in accordance with
their needs while increasing the management and maintenance responsibilities of private landlords. HUD will continue to provide a
limited amount of housing assistance under the conventional public
housing program, as required by the 1974 act. Projects will also be




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

141

approved under the rent supplement and rental housing assistance
programs where bona fide commitments cannot be met under the
lower income housing assistance program.
In 1975, HUD is authorized to approve subsidy contracts for 400,000
housing units. Because the section 8 program will not be available for
the full year, however, it is estimated that not more than 200,000
units will actually be processed. Commitments for all programs in
1975 will involve Federal obligations of $23.5 billion.
In 1976, HUD proposes to approve 400,000 units under the Section
8 program. Budget authority of $26.1 billion is estimated for this
purpose. This amount may vary depending on the amount of unused
authority carried over from 1975. Total lifetime cost per unit is
estimated at $77,000.
In addition to direct unit subsidies, the experimental program of
direct cash assistance will continue during 1976.
This budget provides for the initiation of a major step to improve
the operation of public housing projects. Operating subsidies will be
budgeted at $450 million in 1975 and $525 million in 1976. This increase
will allow HUD to implement a performance funding system for
allocating operating subsidies and to continue other efforts to achieve
more effective management of public housing. These improvements
together with increased cooperation from States and localities are
expected to curb the growth of operating subsidies in future years.
Additional assistance for existing public housing projects will be provided under the modernization program to permit capital improvements of $215 million in 1976.
The food stamp and child nutrition programs provide additional
benefits in the form of cash and food to insure the needy the opporunity for an adequate diet. In recent years, inequities, inefficiencies,
and soaring costs have made legislative reforms in these programs a
necessity. The Administration is proposing reforms for family feeding
assistance focused on more equitable treatment of recipients, strengthened audit and management controls, and a more comprehensive and
balanced program for needy children.
Federal outlays for food stamps will rise from $248 million in 1969
to $3.6 billion in 1976, reflecting increased participation and higher
benefit levels due to semiannual adjustments in the "economy food
plan". At the same time, the efficiency of the program's administration
will be upgraded by a strengthened quality control program.
The Administration is proposing legislation to substitute a comprehensive block grant program for the existing child nutrition programs in order to eliminate the fragmented, overlapping, and administratively complex provisions of the Child Nutrition and School
Lunch Acts. This proposal will provide nutrition subsidies only




142

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

to needy children. Under this proposal school nutrition program
outlays will increase from $1.0 billion in 1969 to $1.6 billion in 1976.
An average of 8.5 million needy children will participate in the
child nutrition programs daily in 1976 through schools and other
facilities.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

143

VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES
Program Highlights
• Support improvements in VA medical care, including
$261 million for structural improvements of VA hospitals
and clinics.
• Provide 22.7% GI Bill increase for 2.5 million trainees in
1975.
• Increase VA pension benefits 12%, effective January 1,
1975.
• Continue activation of new VA medical facilities including
3 new VA hospitals and 10 outpatient clinics.
• Provide for over one million new job and training opportunities for Vietnam veterans through the President's
veterans program.

This budget recognizes the Nation's continuing obligation to provide
help to returning veterans seeking a productive place in the civilian
economy. It provides liberalized readjustment benefits on a broad
front—education, training, housing, and jobs. The budget also provides
increased assistance to VA pension beneficiaries in recognition of the
rising cost of living. Spending for benefits and services to veterans and
their families is proposed to rise from $15.5 billion in 1975 to $15.6
billion in 1976. In addition, tax expenditures flowing from the tax
exempt status of compensation and pension payments, and readjustment benefits amounted to $0.6 billion and $0.2 billion respectively in
1976. For an explanation of tax expenditures, see pages 67 to 69 above,
or Special Analysis F in the Special Analyses volume of the Budget.
Income security for veterans.—Several programs help to maintain family income when veterans are disabled, aged, or deceased.
Total outlays for these programs will be $7.7 billion in 1976.
Service-connected compensation.—The Veterans Administration pays
compensation to those veterans who, as a result of military service,
have a disability that impairs their earning ability. The amount paid
varies with the degree of earnings impairment. For the severely
disabled, compensation is supplemented by a dependent's allowance
and special statutory awards for certain disabilities. Survivors of
veterans who have died from service-connected injuries also receive
compensation. Compensation payments are estimated to be $4.6
billion in 1976.




144

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays
Program or agency

Income security for veterans:
Compensation and pensions:
Service-connected compensation. _
Non-service-connected pensions
Other veterans benefits and services
Insurance programs:
National service life insurance trust fund
U.S. Government life insurance trust fund
NSLI and USGLI receipts
All other insurance programs

•
1974
actual

1975
1976
estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority1
for 1976

3,985
2,530
119

4,627
2,661
155

4,596
2,729
163

4,618
2,719
163

623
78
-478
—67

683
77
-471
—61

694
78
-493
—60

874
38
-493
7

6,789

7,671

7,707

7,925

3,249

4,203
-161

4,200
-600

4,214
-600

Subtotal, education, training, and rehabilitation._
Veterans housing:
Loan guaranty revolving fund
Direct loan revolving fund
_
_
_
Other (HUD Participation sales trust fund)
_

3,249

4,042

3,600

3,614

65
—99
20

—192
—83
-8

6
—100
-10

3

Subtotal, veterans housing..
Hospital and medical care for veterans:
Medical care and hospital services.
Proposed legislation
Construction of hospital and extended care facilities...
Medical administration, research and other

-15

-283

-104

3

2,789

3,318
-61
137
159

3,668
-122
184
177

3.668
-122
404
176

3,553

3,906

4,125

_...

Subtotal, income security for veterans
Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation:
Readjustment benefits and other
Proposed legislation

Subtotal, hospital and medical care for veterans. _
Other veterans benefits and services:
VA administrative expenses and other
Non-VA veterans support programs
Proposed cemetery legislation.
Subtotal, other veterans benefits and services
Deductions for offsetting receipts.
Total

_
104
113
3,006
329
29

455
29

454
26
5

465
26
5

359
—2

484
—2

485
—2

496
—2

13,386

15,466

15,592

16,163

» Compares with budget authority of $13,964 million in 1974 and $15,986 million in 1975.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

145

Outlays for Veterans Benefits and Services

1966
1967
Fbco!Y«or»

1968

Non-service-connected pensions.—Disabled and aged veterans whose
income falls below minimal levels are eligible for pensions, provided
they have served in wartime. The families of deceased wartime veterans also qualify for pensions if they are in financial need. In recently
enacted legislation, basic benefits were raised 12%, assisting 2.3 million VA pension beneficiaries in 1975. With this enactment, outlays
for pensions will rise from $2.5 billion in 1974 to $2.7 billion in 1975.
Cemetery and burial benefits.—The budget provides for $143 million
in burial assistance payments to an estimated 338 thousand families of
deceased veterans in 1976.
Lvfe insurance.—Insurance programs for veterans and their survivors provide $34.9 billion of coverage for 5 million families. In addition, the Veterans Administration supervises the Servicemen's group
life insurance program for active duty military personnel, providing
$63.6 billion of coverage for 3.2 million families.

Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation.—The educational benefits of the "GI Bill" are varied. They range from college
courses to vocational and on-the-job training; all are designed to pre-




146

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

pare recipients for productive civilian careers. The Vietnam Veterans
Readjustment Act of 1974 extends the scope and amount of education
benefits. Monthly payments are increased by 22.7%, some entitlements are extended for an additional 9 months, work-study opportunities are expanded and up to $600 per academic year can be provided
in direct VA educational loans.
Most of the 2.5 million current beneficiaries are Vietnam-era veterans, although servicemen on active duty, and widows and children of
veterans who have died or been totally disabled in military service are
also eligible. Service-disabled veterans with significant disabilities
have a choice between regular GI bill benefits or vocational education.
Legislation to rescind the 2 year extension of eligibility is being
resubmitted effective March 1. This action will reduce 1976 outlays
by $600 million.
Outlays per veteran trainee are projected to rise from $1,490 in 1975
to $1,564 in 1976. Between 1969 and 1976, outlays for VA educational
benefits will have risen from $0.7 billion to $3.6 billion. The number of
returning veterans who will have received training under the Vietnamera GI Bill will reach 6.5 million by the end of 1976.
Veterans housing.—In 1976, the VA will help some 366,000 veterans to become homeowners by guaranteeing $9.1 billion worth of
mortgage loans. Efforts to help veterans secure mortgage loans from
private lenders have greatly reduced the need for direct Government
loans. In addition, recently enacted housing amendments increase the
loan amounts for all programs, including the mobile home loan
program.
Hospital and medical care for veterans.—The Veterans Administration operates a nationwide civilian medical care system, which
includes 171 hospitals, 209 outpatient clinics, and 84 nursing homes.
Outlays for medical programs will reach $3,906 million in 1976, a $353
million increase over 1975.
Medical care and hospital services.—Medical care is available to all
veterans with service-connected disabilities. To the extent that available facilities and staff are not fully utilized by these veterans, care is
also provided for other veterans unable to pay the cost of care.
Many patients receiving treatment in VA facilities for nonservice connected ailments have private health insurance coverage which prohibits reimbursement for care in Federal facilities. Legislation is being
proposed to require reimbursement to the VA medical system in such
cases.
A 1975 quality survey report of VA hospitals identified specific
actions needed to bring the quality of care up to VA's high standards




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

147

CREDIT PROGRAMS-VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES
[In millions of dollars)
Program

1974

Housing:
Direct housing loans:
Direct loan disbursements
_
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Housing loan guaranty and other:
Guaranteed loan disbursements
Guaranteed loan repayments
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of year

__

1975

1976

322
375
1,769

367
711
1,426

385
524
1,287

7,888
2,161
52,895

8,877
4,697
57,074

9,484
4,929
61,629

80
80

72
_
152

184
102
1,172

165
100
1,238

Education:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of year
Other veterans benefits and services:
Insurance policy loans:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of year

__

147
105
1,090

throughout the system. The survey report proposed an immediate
start on these improvements in the 1975 and 1976 budgets. This budget
fully meets that objective. It further relies upon authority conferred
by the Health Care Expansion Act of 1973 to strengthen outpatient
ambulatory care, and nursing home care. Emphasis will be placed on
arrangements, such as medical care in the home, which will permit
earlier discharge of patients and convalescence in a more familiar
environment. The Health Care Expansion Act also extends care to
some dependents and survivors of veterans who previously have had
no Government-sponsored health care.
In 1976, over 1.1 million veterans will be treated in VA hospitals
with another 27 thousand treated in other hospitals at VA expense. In
addition, an estimated 14.7 million outpatient visits will be funded—
1.1 million more than in 1975. Quality and efficiency of services will
continue to advance in 1975 and 1976, including:
• the opening of 32 mental hygiene clinics;
• the addition of 63 specialized medical services, such as intensive
care units; and
• the strengthening of regional management to provide faster responses to problems at individual hospitals.
Construction of hospital and extended care facilities.—Budget authority of $404 million, an increase of $101 million over 1975, will finance




148

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
MEDICAL CARE FOR VETERANS
Program indicator

Number receiving hospital care (thousands)__
Staff patient ratio for VA hospitals...
Average length of stay (days)
_
Number receiving extended care (thousands)
Outpatient visits (millions)
_
_

1974
actual

_

1,072
1.57
39.8
69
12

1975
estimate

1,115
1.59
38.0
77
14

1976
estimate

1,166
1.67
37.0
81
15

already approved construction projects and initiate new ones. Design
or construction will progress on 6 replacement hospitals. Funds in the
amount of $261 million are requested for modernization, air-conditioning, and correction of safety hazards in existing facilities, including
projects recommended by the quality survey report.

Other veterans benefits and services.—In 1974, the President's
veterans program placed 609,000 veterans in jobs, a 45% increase
over the number placed in 1971. Unemployment among Vietnam-era
veterans has been kept below the rate for nonveterans in 1974. Both
Government agencies and private industry—through Jobs for Veterans
and the National Alliance of Businessmen—will continue in 1975 to
open new job opportunities to veterans. In 1975, the goal is to place
over a million veterans in jobs or training programs.
Under the National Cemeteries Act of 1973, VA operates a national
cemetery system. Legislation and financing are proposed that will
provide a 50% Federal grant-in-aid to States desiring to establish
their own veterans cemeteries.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

149

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND JUSTICE
Program Highlights
• Intensify enforcement activities directed against major
drug traffickers and white collar and organized crime.
• Expand antitrust activities of the Department of Justice
in order to reduce artificial inflationary pressures on
costs and prices.
• Develop recommendations, under the auspices of a new
Cabinet-level committee, to deal with the problem of
illegal aliens.
• Increase Immigration and Naturalization Service outlays
by $34 million to cope with the increasing number of
illegal aliens.
• Provide legal aid to indigent defendants through the
newly created Legal Services Corporation.
• Continue to develop a balanced correctional system by
building new community and institutional facilities and
by emphasizing vocational rehabilitation programs.
• Promote more effective State and local criminal justice
systems through the Law Enforcement Assistance
Adminis tr a tion.

State and local governments have the primary responsibility for law
enforcement and justice. Federal programs include enforcement of
Federal laws and financial support for law enforcement activities of
State and local governments. Outlays for these purposes will be $3.3
billion in 1976. Special Analysis N, "Federal Programs for the Reduction of Crime," in the Special Analyses volume of the Budget
discusses all Federal activities related to the reduction of crime.
Federal law enforcement and prosecution.—Outlays for Federal
law enforcement and prosecution, which are primarily responsibilities
of the Justice and Treasury Departments, will rise from $1,582
million in 1975 to $1,726 million in 1976.
During the past year, the consolidation of Federal drug enforcement activities under the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has
continued. The DEA coordinates Federal activities, provides technical
expertise and training to support State and local police, and assists
foreign governments in controlling the illegal production and smuggling of dangerous drugs. In 1976, a new intelligence center in El Paso,
Texas, will be opened to support the narcotics intelligence effort.
This center will coordinate the collection, analysis, and dissemination




150

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
LAW ENFORCEMENT AND JUSTICE
(In millions of dollars]

Outlays

Program or agency

1974
actual

Federal law enforcement and prosecution:
Drug Enforcement Administration
Federal Bureau of Investigation
_
Immigration and Naturalization Service
Secret Service
_
Customs Service
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
Justice Department legal activities
Other

_.

Subtotal, Federal law enforcement and prosecution.
Federal judicial activities
__..
Federal correctional and rehabilitative activities
Law enforcement assistance:
Law Enforcement Assistance Administration
Legal Services Corporation
Subtotal, law enforcement assistance
Deductions for offsetting receipts
_
Total
1

_

1975
1976
estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority1
for 1976

98
381
149
68
225
79
183
91

136
435
175
85
305
96
219
131

153
459
209
97
314
102
239
153

151
466
210
98
305
101
245
148

1,274
221
202

1,582
323
219

1,726
350
258

1,725
354
254

770

862
47

887
72

770
72

770
—5

909
—6

959
—4

841
—4

2,462

3,026

3,288

3,169

Compares with budget authority of $2,615 million in 1974 and $3,074 million in 1975.

of narcotics trafficking information. Outlays for the DEA will reach
$153 million in 1976, an increase of $17 million over 1975.
Outlays for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) will increase
by $24 million to $459 million. In 1976, the FBI will give highest
priority to white collar and organized crime.
The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) will have outlays
of $209 million in 1976. This increase of $34 million will improve the
detection, apprehension, and expulsion of illegal aliens. During 1976, the
INS will begin to issue a new, counterfeitproof alien documentation
card which will prevent illegal entry into the U.S. by the use of forged
documents. There will be an increased effort to understand better the
illegal alien problem and to develop more effective approaches for
dealing with it.
Law enforcement activities in the Treasury Department will also
increase in 1976. Secret Service outlays will increase from $85 million
in 1975 to $97 million in 1976 to provide for expanded protection of
Presidential candidates and of foreign missions in Washington, D.C.




151

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) will continue
to improve its programs to enforce Federal firearms and explosive
laws. The Customs Service will continue to improve its system for
processing imports.
Outlays (or Law Enforcement and Justice
SBilliom

SBilliom

-33

-3.0

Federal Enforcement and Prosecution

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

197!

1972

1973

1974

197$

1976

Fi«al Year.

The Justice Department conducts most Federal litigation in both
civil and criminal matters. Outlays for the legal divisions of the
Justice Department will increase 9% in 1976 to $239 million. Staff in
the U.S. Attorneys' field offices will expand in order to handle additional
caseload and to deal with increasingly complex cases. The Antitrust
Division will expand its enforcement activities to promote competition and reduce artificial inflationary pressures on costs and prices.
Civil rights are another principal Federal enforcement responsibility. The constitutional guarantees of equality are enforced through
civil rights programs by the Department of Justice and other Federal
agencies. See Special Analysis M, "Federal civil rights activities/'
for a more detailed discussion of Federal civil rights activities.
Federal judicial activities.—By law, the President's budget contains estimates for the Judiciary as they are submitted by that branch.




152

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

The Federal Judiciary proposes to spend $341 million in 1976 for the
Supreme Court, the appellate and district courts, and the other
activities of the Judicial branch in this subfunction.

Federal correctional and rehabilitative activities.—Community and institutional treatment programs will continue to expand.
Seven additional community treatment centers and two new correctional institutions will be opened in 1976. Programs to divert accused
defendants from prosecution to community programs supervised by
the probation offices of the U.S. courts will be initiated in selected
districts in cooperation with the U.S. Attorneys. Outlays for correctional and rehabilitative activities will total $258 million.
Law enforcement assistance.—The Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA) is the principal Federal agency for
providing law enforcement assistance to State and local governments.
Total LEAA outlays for 1976 are estimated at $887 million. In 1976,
$485 million will be distributed as bloc grants in support of State and
local law enforcement activities. Other Federal agencies, such as the
FBI, ATF, and Bureau of Prisons, will continue to provide technical
assistance to State and local governments upon request. The new
Legal Services Corporation will provide funds for assistance for
indigent defendants who are unable to pay for the cost of legal services. Its outlays are estimated to be $72 million in 1976.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

153

GENERAL GOVERNMENT
Program Highlights
• Strengthen voluntary compliance with revenue laws by
increasing both audits and taxpayer assistance.
• Expand Internal Revenue Service certification of employee pension plans and the examination of related tax
returns.
• Develop recommendations for determining appropriate levels of total compensation for Federal employees
on the basis of comparability with the private work
force.
• Improve operation of the recently created Federal buildings fund to achieve better utilization of property.
• Begin an automated system for ordering commercial
supplies to reduce Federal staffing and achieve greater
economies in volume purchasing.
• Begin celebration of the Nation's Bicentennial.
General government programs encompass many fundamental
Federal activities including the Legislative branch, collection of
revenues, and Government-wide operations affecting supplies, personnel, and property. Outlays for general government programs will
increase by $.5 billion in 1976 to a total of $3.2 billion.
Legislative functions.—By law, the President's budget contains
estimates for the Legislative branch as they are submitted by that
branch. The Legislative branch proposes to spend $741 million in 1976
for the Congress, the General Accounting Office, and other legislative
functions.
Executive direction and management.—Expenditures for the
White House, the Executive Office of the President, and related
activities will decrease from $117 million in 1974 to $71 million in
1976. The 1974 staffing for these activities will be cut a third by
June 30, 1976. These reductions reflect a greatly reduced and less
cumbersome mechanism for stabilizing prices as well as a smaller
White House Office. These estimates also provide for an official
residence for the Vice President and additional management resources
for developing Federal procurement policy and carrying out the
Trade Act of 1974. An additional $35 million of outlays is provided
in 1976 for public financing of Presidential nominating conventions
and primary elections.




156

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

years in an exhibit called "The World of Franklin and Jefferson"
which opens a year of European touring in calendar 1975 and returns
to American audiences in 1976. In 1976, the National Park Service will
complete major construction and development activities in 21 park
sites of Revolutionary significance, and interpret them for the large
number of visitors expected. The Nation's armed forces, which celebrate
their own bicentennials in 1975, will provide traveling exhibit vans as
a centerpiece for bicentennial activities at the grass-roots level in
small communities. In the Nation's Capital, the National Archives
and Records Service will continue to make records of the Revolutionary period more accessible to scholars. The Smithsonian Institution
will tell the story of the people of America in the largest single exhibit
it has ever undertaken, "A Nation of Nations." It will also recreate
the spirit of the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial in its remodeled Arts
and Industries Building, and it will open the new National Air and
Space Museum on July 4, 1976. The Smithsonian Institution, the
National Park Service, and other Federal agencies and private
organizations will jointly sponsor a special edition of the annual
Festival of American Folklife on the Mall in Washington, D.C.
Performing elements of the Festival, including many foreign troupes,
will tour the Nation throughout the summer.
Territories.—Outlays for territories will be $122 million in 1976, an
increase of $25 million over the 1975 level. Programs for the Trust
Territory of the Pacific Islands provide for rapid development of
transportation, communications, and other facilities as agreed recently in the negotiations on the political future of the Islands. To
carry out these agreements, new legislation and $16.5 million in
supplemental appropriations are proposed. The 1976 budget also
includes payment of World War II claims, rehabilitation of Enewetak
Atoll, and an ex gratia payment to former residents of Bikini Atoll.
Assistance to State and local governments under the Intergovernmental Personnel Act will remain at $15 million for 1976 while the CSC
completes an evaluation of this program.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

157

REVENUE SHARING AND GENERAL PURPOSE FISCAL
ASSISTANCE
Program Highlights
• Renew general revenue sharing through 1982.
• Continue the development of cooperative mechanisms
between the Department of the Treasury and other
Federal and State agencies to enforce general revenue
sharing regulations.
• Help States and localities adjust to higher energy costs
by payments distributed through the revenue sharing
formula.
• Increase the District of Columbia's Federal payment to
$254 million in 1976.
• Return certain Federal Government receipts as shared
revenues to State, local, and territorial governments.
REVENUE SHARING AND GENERAL PURPOSE FISCAL ASSISTANCE
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

General revenue sharing2
Other general purpose fiscal assistance:

Agriculture Department: Forest Service
Department of Defense Civil—Corps of Engineers
Interior Department:
Federal tax collections paid to Virgin Islands
Payments from Federal land management activitiesOther
Treasury Department:
Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands collections of duties,
taxes and fees
Excise tax collections in Puerto Rico
District of Columbia:
Federal payment
Other transactions
_
_._
_
Total

Outlays
1974
actual

1975
1976
estimate estimate
6,304

Recommended
budget
authority l
for 1976

6,106

6,176

6,357

115
3

121
4

119
3

119
4

17
106
7

18
161
7

18
196
7

20
196
7

103
101

220
116

225
118

225
118

187

230
-19

254
6

254
6

6,746

7,033

7,249

7,305

* Compares with budget authority of $6,719 in 1974 and $7,062 in 1975.
D o e s n o t include energy tax equalization p a y m e n t s of $500 million in 1975 and $2 billion in 1976

2




158

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

General revenue sharing.—General revenue sharing is the cornerstone of a major reform of the fiscal relationships between the Federal
Government and State and local governments. Outlays in 1976 will
be $6.3 billion, with one-third going to State governments and twothirds to local governments. Over the 5-year authorized life of the
current program, $30.2 billion of Federal funds will have been distributed. These payments are made subject to minimal restrictions
and controls, thus allowing decentralized decisionmaking and narrowing the gap between people and the governmental authorities dealing
with their problems. The principal requirements of the program address such concerns as assuring nondiscrimination and public participation in spending decisions. By permitting State and local
governments greater latitude in setting priorities—without undue
Federal interference—general revenue sharing is helping to restore a
balanced Federal system while increasing government accountability.
The Office of Revenue Sharing supplements its own efforts to assure
compliance with program requirements by relying extensively on
other i ederal and State agencies. Under a recent agreement, the Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission and the Office of Revenue
Sharing will cooperatively assure employment nondiscrimination in
those instances where resolution cannot be achieved by negotiation. In
addition, agreements have been negotiated with 30 States whereby
these States assume the responsibility for auditing the use of revenuesharing funds by their local jurisdictions. Under these agreements, the
Office of Revenue Sharing follows up on audits that reveal any form of
noncompliance.
Through January 6, 1975, $17.3 billion has been distributed. These
funds have enabled State and local governments to provide needed
services, to reduce debt burdens, and in many cases to reduce taxes.
The Administration will recommend that the general revenue sharing
program, which terminates December 31, 1976, be extended through
1982. The proposed legislation will continue the authorization and
appropriation of specific annual amounts, increasing by $150 million
annually to $7.2 billion for 1982. The renewal legislation will continue
the program in essentially its present form. Greater public participation will be encouraged and reporting requirements simplified. A
constraint on the distribution formula will be eased to allow increased
entitlements for some jurisdictions.
Energy tax equalization payments.—The increased cost of petroleum products resulting from the President's energy recommendations will substantially increase costs for State and local governments,
both directly for energy purchases and indirectly in the increased costs
of other purchases. Equalization payments will be distributed to State




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

159

and local governments to compensate for these increased costs,
beginning in the last quarter of 1975. This will increase outlays
distributed using the revenue sharing formula by $500 million in
1975 and $2 billion in 1976. Estimates for these payments are included
as part of the budget "allowances."
Federal payment to the District of Columbia.—The District of
Columbia's operating budget is financed by local taxes and by an
annual Federal payment to compensate for burdens placed on the
District as the Nation's capital. A Federal payment of $254 million is
requested for 1976, as authorized by the District of Columbia SelfGovernment and Governmental Reorganization Act.
Other general purpose fiscal assistance.—The Federal Government returns all or part of certain taxes and other charges to specific
jurisdictions. These payments are known as shared revenues.
The Department of Agriculture pays 25% of most national forest
receipts to States to pay for roads and schools in counties in which the
receipts are generated. These payments will total over $118 million in
1976. Another $1 million will be paid to several States under other
statutory requirements.
The Department of the Interior returns to States and counties part
of its receipts for activities such as timber sales, mineral leasing, and
grazing on Federal lands. These shared revenues are expected to total
$196 million in 1976.
The Department of the Interior returns most Federal revenues
collected on Virgin Islands products transported to the United States
to the Virgin Islands for general purpose governmental use. Similarly,
the Department of the Treasury collects and returns to Puerto Rico
and the Virgin Islands duties and other taxes collected by the U.S.
Customs Service. The Internal Revenue Service collects and returns
to Puerto Rico Federal excise taxes on articles produced there and
either transported to the mainland or consumed on the island.
Two major tax expenditures also provide general purpose fiscal
assistance to States and localities. The exclusion from income of
interest on State and local debt instruments allows these governments
to borrow at relatively low interest rates. The revenue thus foregone by
the Federal Treasury is estimated to be $4.8 billion in 1976. The
deductibility of State and local taxes allows individuals to offset their
State and local tax liabilities through reduced Federal taxes; the
aggregate reduction is estimated to be $10.0 billion in 1976. The deductibility of only some State and local government taxes is included
as a tax expenditure in this function. For further information see
Special Analysis F, "Tax Expenditures/' in the Special Analyses
volume of the Budget.




160

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

INTEREST
Budget outlays for the interest function will rise by $3.3 billion in
1975, and by another $3.1 billion in 1976 reaching $34.4 billion. These
increases result from the financing of budget deficits in each of these
years.
INTEREST i
[In millions of dollars}

Outlays
1974
actual

Interest on the public debt 2
Other interest..

1975
1976
estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
(or 1976

Total

29,319
-1.247

32,900
-1,569

36,000
-1,581

36,000
-1,581

28,072

_..

31,331

34,419

34,419

1
Excludes interest on debt issued by various agencies, which is included in the outlays of the
function served. For this function budget authority equals outlays.
2
Includes interest paid on the public debt held by Government investment accounts.

A substantial amount of the outlays in the interest function is paid
to trust funds on Government securities held by them. These payments, amounting to $8.3 billion in 1976, are deducted from both
outlays and budget authority in arriving at budget totals, since they
are intragovernmental transactions. Therefore, as shown in the table
below, net interest outlays are projected to be $26.1 billion in 1976.
(In millions of dollars]
1974

Outlays for the Interest function
Interest received by trust funds
Net interest outlays
Deduct: Deposit of earnings by Federal Reserve System 1
Net impact2
1
3

1975

1976

28,072
-6,583

31,331
-7,769

34,419
-8,305

21,489
4,845

23,563
5,700

26,114
6,100

16,644

17,863

20,014

Shown as budget receipts.
Net amount or interest to be paid from receipts or other means of financing.

In addition, $6.1 billion of the interest paid on securities held by
the Federal Reserve banks will be returned to the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts. Hence, the net impact on the 1976 budget of interest
paid will be $20.0 billion.







PART 6

THE BUDGET SYSTEM
AND CONCEPTS

161

THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS
The budget system of the U.S. Government is based upon a structure for financial administration that has as objectives the efficient
management of programs in relation to the requirements of the Nation,
and effective financial control.
This year the budget process begins to undergo a major change due
to the recent enactment of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344). The act establishes
new congressional budget procedures and a new fiscal year time-frame
(October 1 through September 30) effective with fiscal year 1977.
There will be a 3-month transition period between fiscal year 1976,
which ends June 30,1976, andfiscalyear 1977, which begins October 1,
1976.
THE BUDGET PROCESS
The budget process has four identifiable phases: (1) executive
formulation and transmittal; (2) congressional authorization and
appropriation; (3) budget execution and control; and (4) review and
audit. Each of these phases interrelates and overlaps with the others.
Executive formulation and transmittal.—The budget sets forth
the President's financial plan of operation and thus indicates national
budget priorities for the coming year. The President's transmittal of
his budget proposals to the Congress early in each calendar year
climaxes many months of planning and analysis throughout the executive branch. Formulation of the 1976 budget began in the spring of
1974, although tentative goals were set earlier—when the 1975 budget
was transmitted to the Congress in February of 1974.
During the period when a budget is being formulated in the executive branch, there is a continuous exchange of information, proposals,
evaluations, and policy determinations among the President, the Office
of Management and Budget (OMB), and the various Government
agencies.
In the spring, agency programs are evaluated, policy issues are
identified, and budgetary projections are made, giving attention both
to important modifications and innovations in programs and to alternative long-range program plans. Preliminary plans are then presented
to the President for his consideration. At about the same time, the
President receives projections of estimated receipts, prepared by the
Treasury Department, and projections of the economic outlook,
162




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

163

prepared jointly by the Council of Economic Advisers, the Office of
Management and Budget, and the Treasury Department.
Following a review of both sets of projections, the President establishes general budget and fiscal policy guidelines for the fiscal year
that will begin about 12 months later. (Because of the change in the
fiscal year time-frame, these guidelines, beginning with the 1977
budget, will be established about 15 months prior to the beginning of
the fiscal year.) Tentative policy determinations and planning ceilings
are then given to the agencies as guidelines for the preparation of
their budgets.
Agency budget requests are reviewed in detail by the Office of
Management and Budget throughout the fall and earty winter and
are presented, along with OMB recommendations, to the President for
decision. Overall fiscal policy issues—relating to total budget receipts
and outlays—are again examined. The actual budget data trom the
most recently completed fiscal year provide an essential reference base
in this review and decision process. Thus, the budget process involves
the consideration simultaneously of the resource needs of individual
program and the total outlays and leceipts that are appropriate in
relation to the outlook for the national economy. The budget reflects
the results of both of these considerations.
The Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act has little
effect on the executive budget formulation process. The act does,
however, affect the content of the budget that is formulated. The
budget for 1976 contains the following new information which the
act requires be included this year:
• Estimates of tax expenditures for the budget year;
• Detailed five-year projections of estimated outlays, budget
authority, and receipts;
• Information with respect to estimates for the next succeeding
fiscal year for any program for which advance appropriations
have been authorized; and
• Estimates for the 3-month transition period beginning July 1,
1976, and ending September 30, 1976, in addition to the complete fiscal year 1976 estimates.
Comparisons of actual uncontrollable outlays and total receipts for
the last completed fiscal year with the amounts initially estimated
and explanations of any differences are also shown in this year's
budget, although the act does not require that they be included for
another two years.
Congressional authorization
and
appropriation.—Congressional review begins when the President transmits his budget to the
Congress. The Congress can change programs, eliminate them, or add




164

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

programs not requested by the President. It can increase or decrease
the amounts recommended by the President to finance existing and
proposed new programs. It may also act upon legislation determining
taxes and other means of raising revenues.
The Congress does not normally vote on outlays directly, but rather
upon budget authority. The Congress first enacts legislation that
authorizes an agency to carry out a particular program and, in some
cases, sets a limit on the amount that subsequently can be considered
for appropriation for the program. Many programs are authorized for
a specified number of years, or even indefinitely; other programs, such
as nuclear energy, space exploration, defense procurement, foreign
affairs, and some construction programs, require annual authorizing
legislation. Authorizing legislation for a new program or activity that
is to continue for more than 1 fiscal year is submitted for at least the
first 2 fiscal years of the program.
The granting of budget authority is usually a separate, subsequent
action. In most cases, budget authority becomes available each year
only as voted by the Congress. However, in some cases, the Congress
has voted permanent budget authority, under which funds become
available annually without further congressional action. Most trust
fund appropriations are permanent, as is the appropriation to pay
interest on the public debt.
Congressional consideration of requests for appropriations and for
changes in revenue laws has traditionally followed an established
pattern. They are considered first in the House of Representatives.
The Ways and Means Committee reviews proposed revenue measures;
the Appropriations Committee, through its subcommittees, studies
the proposals for appropriations and examines in detail each agency's
performance. Each committee then recommends the action to be
taken by the House of Representatives.
As parts of the budget are approved by the House, the appropriation
and tax bills are forwarded to the Senate, where a similar process is
followed. In case of disagreement between the two Houses of Congress,
a conference committee (consisting of Members of both bodies) meets
to resolve the issues. The report of the conference committee is returned to both Houses for approval, and the measures are then transmitted to the President in the form of an enrolled bill, for his approval
or veto. When action on appropriations is not completed by the beginning of the fiscal year, the Congress may enact a "continuing resolution" to provide authority for the affected agencies to continue operations until their regular appropriations are enacted.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

165

When it goes into full effect, the new Congressional Budget Act
will change the congressional budget process in several significant
ways:
• It establishes a new legislative agency, the Congressional Budget
Office, to serve both Houses, and a Committee on the Budget in
each House, all with substantial responsibilities.
• It requires that a "current services budget"—one that projects
estimated budget authority and outlays for the fiscal year ahead
based on current program levels—be submitted to the Congress
by November 10 of each year.
• It establishes several additional budgetary controls, including:
—by April 1, submission to the Senate and House Budget Committees of budget estimates by each committee of the Congress
and a fiscal policy report by the Congressional Budget Office;
—by May 15, adoption by the Congress of a concurrent budget
resolution containing Government-wide budget targets for the
Congress; and, by September 15, a second concurrent resolution
containing budget ceilings for congressional budget action;
—by September 25, completion by the Congress of action on any
required reconciliation bill or resolution implementing the second
concurrent resolution.
Under this schedule the Congress will complete action on the budget
before the new fiscal year begins on October 1.
The budget targets and ceilings adopted by the Congress will be
classified by major function. The functional classification, which is
explained below, arrays budgetary data according to the major
purposes served, rather than on an agency basis. Appropriations will
continue to be made, however, on the basis of agency accounts.
Budget execution and control.—Once approved, the budget
becomes the financial basis for the operations of each agency during the
fiscal year.
Under the law, most budget authority and other budgetary
resources are made available to the executive branch through an
apportionment system. Under authority delegated by the President,
the Director of the Office of Management and Budget apportions
(distributes) appropriations and other budgetary resources to each
agency by time periods (usually quarterly) or by activities. Obligations
may not be incurred in excess of the amount apportioned.
The objective of the apportionment system is to assure the effective
and orderly use of available authority and to reduce the need for




166

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 76

requesting additional or supplemental authority. It is, of course,
necessary to insure flexibility if circumstances change.
Changes in laws or other factors may indicate the need for more
authority, and supplemental requests may have to be transmitted to
the Congress. On the other hand, reserves may be established under
the Antideficiency Act (31 U.S.C. 665) to provide for contingencies or
to effect savings made possible by or through changes in requirements
or greater efficiency of operations. Amounts may also be withheld for
policy or other reasons, pursuant to the Congressional Budget and
Impoundment Control Act.
Whenever it is determined that all or part of any budget authority
provided by the Congress will not be required to carry out the full
objectives or scope of such programs (e.g., reserves for savings), or
that such budget authority should be rescinded for fiscal policy or
other reasons, a special message is transmitted by the President to the
Congress requesting a rescission of the budget authority. If both the
House and Senate do not pass a rescission bill within 45 days of
continuous session, the budget authority proposed for rescission is
made available for obligation.
Whenever the President proposes to defer (i.e., temporarily withhold), all or part of any budget authority provided by the Congress
he transmits a special deferral message to the Congress. Either House
may pass a resolution disapproving this deferral of budget authority,
thus requiring that the funds be made available for obligation. When
no congressional action is taken, deferrals may remain in effect until
the end of the fiscal year.
Review and audit.—This is the final step in the budget process.
The individual agencies are responsible for assuring—through their
own review and control systems—that the obligations they incur and
the resulting outlays are in accordance with the provisions of the authorizing and appropriating legislation, as well as other laws and regulations relating to the obligation and expenditure of funds. The
Office of Management and Budget reviews program and financial
reports and keeps abreast of agency programs in attainment of program objectives.
In addition, the Comptroller General, as agent of the Congress,
regularly audits, examines, and evaluates Government programs.
His findings and recommendations for corrective action are made to
the Congress, to the Office of Management and Budget, and to the
agencies concerned. The Comptroller General also monitors the executive branch's reporting of special messages on proposed rescissions
and deferrals. He reports any items not reported by the executive




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

167

branch, reports any differences that he may have with the classification (as rescission or deferral) of special messages submitted by the
President, and is permitted to bring civil actions to obtain compliance
should the President fail to make budget authority available in accordance with the Impoundment Control Act.

COVERAGE OF THE BUDGET TOTALS
Agencies and programs.—The budget totals cover agencies and
programs (including Government corporations) administered by the
Federal Government, no matter how funded, except for the following:
Exchange stabilization fund,
Rural electrification and telephone revolving funds,
Rural Telephone Bank,
Environmental Financing Authority,1
Export-Import Bank of the United States,2
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System,
Housing for the elderly or handicapped fund (after August 31,
1974),
Pension Benefit Guarantee Corporation (established in 1975),
Postal Service fund,
United States Railway Association,
Federal Financing Bank.
In addition to these exceptions, the totals exclude privately owned,
Government-sponsored enteiprises, such as the Federal land banks
and Federal home loan banks. Information on the excluded Government agencies and on the Government-sponsored agencies is presented
in the form of "annexed budgets" in Part IV of the Budget Appendix.
Functional classification.—The functional classification arrays
budgetary data according to the major purpose served by the unit
being classified (usually, a budget account). Once the Congressional
Budget Act is in full effect, the Congress will pass resolutions establishing budget targets and ceilings in terms of functional categories.
The following criteria are used in establishing and in assigning
activities to functional categories:
• A function must have a common end or ultimate purpose addressed to an important national need. (The emphasis is on what
the Federal Government seeks to accomplish rather than the
means of accomplishment, what is purchased, or the clientele
or geographic area served.)
• A function must be of continuing national importance and be
significant in size, i.e., normally account for at least 2% of total
budget outlays over a number of years.
1
2

The authorization for the Environmental Financing Authority expires on June 30, 1975.
Beginning Oct. 1, 1976, the Export-Import Bank will be included in the budget totals.




168

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 76

• The basic unit of classification generally is the appropriation
or fund account. Any split of an account into two or more subfunctions requires a compelling reason, and must involve relatively
large amounts for each subfunction.
• Each unit is classified into the single best or predominant purpose
served. Thus, a unit is assigned to one (and only one) function.
• Activities and programs are normally classified by common purpose (or function) regardless of which agencies conduct the activities.
The 1976 Budget incorporates the first major revision of the functional classification in 14 years. The revision was adopted to make the
functional classification more appropriate for the composition of
budget outlays as they now occur.3
Types of funds.—Agency activities are financed through Federal
funds and through trust funds, both of which are included in the
budget.
Federal funds are of four types. The general fund is credited with
receipts not earmarked by law for a specific purpose, and is charged
with payments from such revenues and from general borrowing. Special
funds contain Federal receipts earmarked for specific purposes, other
than for carrying out a cycle of operations. Public enterprise (revolving)
funds finance a cycle of business-type operations in which outlays
generate receipts, primarily from the public. Intragovernmental
revolving and management funds facilitate financing operations within
and between Government agencies.
Trust funds are established to account for receipt and expenditure of
moneys by the Government for use in carrying out specific purposes
and programs in accordance with the terms of a trust agreement or
statute. These moneys are not available for the general purposes of the
Government. Within the category of trust funds there is a special
subcategory of trust revolving funds which carry on a cycle of businesstype operations.
Current expense and capital outlay.—The budget includes
spending for both current operating expenses and capital outlays such
as the purchase of lands, structures, and equipment. It also includes
capital outlays in the form of lending and the purchase of investments.
However, it excludes from obligations and outlays the acquisition of
Federal securities issued by the Government itself (either by the
Treasury Department or other Federal agencies).
3

A further discussion of this subject is found in Part 5 of this volume.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

169

BUDGET AUTHORITY AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS
Budget authority.—Government agencies are permitted to enter
into obligations, requiring either immediate or future payment of
money, only when they have been granted authority to do so by law.
The amounts thus authorized by the Congress are called budget
authority.
Budget authority permits obligations to be incurred, and for most
accounts the amount of the authority is related to the obligations expected to be incurred during the year. In some cases—especially construction (other than water resources projects), research, and procurement—budget authority is requested and granted to finance the full
cost of each project at the time it is started, regardless of when obligations are expected to be incurred and the expected time of completion.
Budget authority usually takes the form of appropriations, which
permit obligations to be incurred and payments to be made. Some
budget authority is in the form of contract authority, which permits
obligations in advance of appropriations but requires a subsequent
appropriation or receipts to "liquidate" (pay) these obligations. There
is also authority to spend debt receipts (i.e., borrowing authority)) such
budget authority permits the use of borrowed money to incur obligations and make payments. Where such authority pertains to the use of
Treasury borrowing, it is authority to spend public debt receipts.
Authority for a Government agency to borrow directly from the public
or from a Government-administered fund available for investment is
authority to spend agency debt receipts.
Starting in January 1976, it will not be in order for either House of
the Congress to consider any bill that provides new borrowing or
contract authority, with certain exceptions, unless that bill also provides that such new spending authority will be effective only to the
extent provided in appropriations acts.
Most appropriations for current operations are made available for
obligation only within the year (1-year appropriations). Some are for
a specified longer period (multiple-year appropriations). Others, including most of those for construction, some for research, and nearly
all trust fund appropriations, are made available for obligation until
the objectives have been attained (no-year appropriations).
When budget authority is made available by the Congress for a
specific period of time, any part that is not used for obligations during
that period lapses and cannot be used later. However, reappropriations—congressional actions to continue availability of unused balances
that have lapsed—aie counted as budget authority in the year of the
congressional action.




170

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

A rescission is a congressional action that cancels budget authority
previously granted that is still unused and available for obligation.
Such rescissions are offset against new budget authority in arriving
at the total of budget authority for each year. A deferral is an executive
branch action or inaction—including the establishment of reserves
under the Antideficiency Act—that effectively delays the obligation
or expenditure of budget authority.
Most authority to obligate funds is granted year by year (current
authority). Under certain laws, some budget authority in Federal
funds and most budget authority in the trust funds become available
from time to time without further action by the Congress (permanent
authority).
The amount of budget authority is usually stated specifically in the
legislation that makes it available (definite authority). In a few cases
the amount is left indefinite to be determined by subsequent circumstances (indefinite authority). Examples of the latter type are the appropriation for interest on the public debt, and the trust fund appropriation equal to receipts under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act
(social security).
While budget authority is normally granted with the intention that
spending of a similar amount will occur, certain insurance or other
programs are provided with standby budget authority that may never
be used fully but is available if certain contingencies should arise.
Obligations incurred.—Following the enactment of budget
authority, obligations are incurred by Government agencies. Such
obligations include the currently accruing liabilities for salaries and
wages, certain contractual services, and interest; entering into contracts for the purchase of supplies and equipment, construction, and
land; entering into contracts to make loans; and other contractual
arrangements requiring the payment of money.
Outlays.—Obligations generally are liquidated by the issuance of
checks or the disbursement of cash; such payments are called outlays.
In lieu of issuing checks, obligations may also be liquidated (and
outlays occur) by the maturing of interest coupons in the case of some
bonds, or by the issuance of bonds or notes (or increases in the redemption value of bonds outstanding).
Outlays during any fiscal year may be payments of obligations
incurred in prior years or in the same year. Such outlays, therefore,
flow in part from unexpended balances of prior year budget authority
and in part from budget authority provided for the year in which the
money is spent.4
*This process is depicted on a chart "Relation of Budget Authority to Outlays—1976 Budget"
i Part 2 of this volume.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCGEPTS

171

Balances of authority.—Not all budget authority enacted for a
fiscal year is obligated and paid out in the same year. In the case of
salaries and wages, 1 to 3 weeks elapse between the time of obligation
and the time of payment. In the case of major procurement and construction, up to several years may elapse. Amounts that have been
obligated, and the balances of budget authority to cover such obligations, are carried forward until the obligations are subsequently paid.
Such amounts are known as obligated balances.
In addition, in multiple-year or no-year accounts, amounts that are
still available for obligation may be carried forward. These are
unobligated balances. Therefore, a change in the amount of budget
authority for a given year does not necessarily result in a similar
change either in the obligations incurred or the budget outlays in that
same year. A change in budget authority in any one year may have an
effect on obligations for 2 or more years, and may affect budget outlays
for an even longer period. In the case of standby budget authority,
obligations and outlays may never materialize.
Allocations between agencies.—In some cases, one or more
agencies may share in the administration of a program for which appropriations are made to another agency or to the President. This is
made possible, in the accounts, by the establishment of allocations
from the "parent" account (the account to which the appropriation
was made). Such allocations permit the other agencies to incur
obligations that are included with the parent account in the Budget
(without separate identification) and in the Budget Appendix (where
the total obligations of each participating agency are identified
separately).
RECEIPTS
In general.—Receipts represent collections during the year, and
are classified into two types:
• Budget receipts, which are compared with total outlays in calculating the budget surplus or deficit.
• Offsetting receipts, which are deducted from spending in calculating total outlays. Corresponding offsets are made in arriving at
total budget authority and net obligations incurred.
Budget receipts.—The fundamental characteristic of budget
receipts is that they are collections from the public that result from
the exercise of the Government's sovereign or governmental powers.
These consist primarily of tax revenues, but also include receipts from
court fines, regulatory requirements for certain licenses, war reparations (in applicable years), and the like. Gifts and contributions
(as distinguished from payments for services or cost-sharing deposits by
State and local governments) are also counted as budget receipts.
580-000 O - 75 - 12




172

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Offsetting
receipts.—Offsetting
receipts occur in
four
circumstances:
Revolving funds.—For three types of funds—public enterprise, intragovernmental, and trust revolving—outlays are regularly stated net
of receipts collected by the fund.
Reimbursements and refunds.—When authorized by law, some incidental sums received are treated as reimbursements to appropriations;
these are netted in determining outlays from such appropriations. The
collection of refunds, representing a return of previous erroneous
outlays, is also usually offset against outlays of the amount involved.
Proprietary receipts from the public.—Receipts that arise out of the
businesslike and market-oriented activities of the Government (e.g.,
loan repayments, interest, sale of property and products, charges for
nonregulatory services, rents and loyalties, etc.) are deposited in the
general fund, special funds, or trust funds. Such collections are not
counted as budget receipts, and with one exception, are offset against
total budget authority and outlays for each agency and for each
function.5
Intragovernmental transactions.—Any payment from a federally
owned or administered account to another Federal account is treated
as an offset to budget outlays rather than as a receipt. As previously
described, many such transactions occur in the case of payments to
revolving funds or as reimbursements to appropriations. All such
transactions not falling into either of these categories are classified as
intragovernmental transactions. Intragoverrmental transactions may be
either intrabudgetary (in cases where the payment and receipt both
occur within the budgetary universe) or result from receipts from offbudget Federal agencies in those cases where the payment comes from a
Federal agency whose funds are excluded from the budget totals.
Normally intragovernmental transactions are deducted from both
the outlays and the budget authority for the agency receiving the
payment.6
Intrabudgetary transactions are further subdivided into three
groups: (1) interfund transactions, where the payment is from one
fund group (either Federal funds or trust funds) and the receipt is
5
Receipts from rents and royalties from the Outer Continental Shelf lands are deducted from total
budget authority and outlays for the Government as a whole rather than any single agency or function.
0
In two situations intragovernmental transactions are not deducted from the figures of any agency
or function, but appear as special deduct lines in computing total budget authority and outlays for
the Government as a whole. One of these consists of the agencies' payments (incl uding payments by
off-budget agencies) as employers into trust funds for retirement of employees. The other is the payment of interest to trust (nonrevolving) funds.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

173

by the other fund group; (2) Federal intrajund transactions, in those
cases where the payment and receipt both occur within the Federal
fund group; and (3) trust intrajund transactions, in those cases where
the payment and receipt both occur within the trust fund group.
OTHER TRANSACTIONS
Borrowing and repayments.—Borrowing and debt repayment are
not treated as receipts or outlays, since if they were the budget could
be balanced simply by borrowing. This applies both to borrowing in
the form of public debt securities and to specialized forms of borrowing—such as agency securities, military family housing mortgages,
and certificates representing participation in a pool of loans.
Exercise of the monetary power.—Seigniorage is the profit from
coining money; it is the difference between the value of coins as money
and their cost, including the cost of manufacturing. Seigniorage on
coins arises from the exercise of the Government's monetary powers
and differs from receipts coming from the public, since there is no
corresponding payment on the part of another party. Therefore,
seigniorage is excluded from receipts and treated as a means of financing a budget deficit, or as a supplementary amount to be applied (to
reduce debt or to increase the cash in Treasury) in the years of a
budget surplus. The increment (profit) resulting from the revaluation
of gold as a monetary asset is treated like seigniorage, but the profit
from sale of gold as a commodity is treated as a proprietary receipt.
Liabilities in deposit fund accounts.—Accounts outside the
budget, known as deposit funds, are established to record certain
amounts held in suspense temporarily, or held by the Government
as agent for others (e.g., savings accounts for military personnel,
State and local income taxes withheld from Federal employees'
salaries, and payroll deductions for the purchase of savings bonds by
civilian employees of the Government). Such transactions affect
Treasury's cash balances even though they are not a part of the budget.
Exchange of cash.—The Government's deposits with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) are considered similar to cash assets.
Therefore, the movement of money between the IMF and the Treasury
Department is not in itself considered a receipt or an outlay, borrowing or lending.
Obligations to international lending organizations.—Debt

instruments issued (in lieu of checks) in payment of subscriptions to
international lending organizations are not considered borrowings or




174

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

outlays, but remain a part of the obligated balances until they are
cashed—at which time they become outlays. These differ only in
form, and not in substance, from ordinary balances for unpaid
obligations.
BASIS FOR BUDGET FIGURES
In general.—Receipts and repayments reflect collections. Outlays
are stated in terms of checks issued, including cash paid in lieu of
checks. The accrual basis is generally used for interest on the public
debt. In the case of bonds and notes where interest expense of the
Government is reflected in periodic changes in redemption value, the
interest expenditure is counted when the redemption value changes.
Data for 1974.—The 1974 column of this budget generally presents
the actual transactions and balances for that year, as recorded in
agency accounts and as summarized in the central financial reports
prepared by the Treasury Department.
Data for 1975.—The amounts for 1975 include budget authority
actually made available by the Congress, and estimates of the budget
outcome for the year as a whole, taking account of action up to the
time the budget schedules were prepared. The Congress has, by now
(February 1975), completed action on all regular appropriations for
1975, except Foreign Assistance, for which a continuing appropriation
has been provided. However, some proposed rescissions are now
pending before the Congress, and additional supplemental appropriations will be required in certain cases. Part III of the Budget Appendix
includes supplemental now requested. These supplemental represent
the amounts required for various pay raises including those of October
1974 and the additional amounts requested to meet previously unforeseen program costs.
Where the word "enacted" is used with reference to 1975, as in
tables 4 and 5, the amount represents budget authority already voted
by the Congress. In the case of indefinite appropriations, the enacted
sums include the amounts likely to be required. Actions "pending"
before the Congress include unenacted appropriations and proposed rescissions, whether included in regular or supplemental appropriation bills or rescission messages. Where the word "estimate" is
used, the amounts include needed supplemental as well as enacted
budget authority. Certain standard footnotes are used in Part 8 of
the Budget (and are explained at the end of that table) to distinguish
the status of these additional items for 1975.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

175

Data for 1976.—This budget is complete as to the estimates for
1976. Part I of the Budget Appendix generally includes the proposed
appropriation language for the various items identified in the budget.
However, in some instances, estimates are included in the budget
tables without appropriation language for 1975 and 1976 supplementals. For these, proposed legislation may be required and/or the
estimated amounts will be requested later when the requirements are
known. In certain tables of the budget these items for later transmitt al and the related outlays are separately identified. Estimates of
the total requirements for 1976 include both the amounts formally
proposed and the amounts planned for later transmittal.
Data for the transition period, July 1, 1976, through September 30, 1976.—Part I of the Budget Appendix contains appropriation requests in the form of appropriation language for the 3-month
period. However, time did not permit the inclusion of these amounts
in the Appendix schedules. Aggregated amounts for budget authority,
outlays, and receipts for this transition period are shown in Part 7
of the Budget.
Allowances.—Lump-sum allowances are included in the tables to
cover possible additional supplemental proposals that may be required
for 1975 and 1976. The allowance for energy tax equalization payments provides for payment to low-income individuals, Federal
agencies, and State and local governments to reimburse them for the
increased cost of energy due to the proposed energy taxes. The allowance for contingencies anticipates the need for supplemental appropriations to meet requirements not now foreseen for existing programs or
resulting from the enactment of legislation not specifically provided
for in the budgets of the agencies concerned. The contingency allowance also covers possible uncontrollable outlay changes. The allowance
for civilian agency pay raises includes an estimate of the additional
amounts that will be required for pay raises anticipated in October
1975 for employees of civilian Government agencies. A separate
allowance for pay raises is shown for the military and civilian employees of the Department of Defense and is included in its figures.
These increases could not be reflected in the various program appropriation requests since the applicable detailed amounts have not
yet been determined.




PART 7

TRANSITION TO THE NEW
FISCAL YEAR




177

TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR
The Congressional Budget Act of 1974, enacted last summer,
requires a change in the beginning and ending dates for the fiscal
year used in the budget. Since 1843, the fiscal year has begun on
July 1 of one calendar year and ended on June 30 of the following
year. The 1976 budget is on this basis. Beginning with the 1977
budget, however, the fiscal year will run from October 1 of one calendar
year through September 30 of the following year. This change is
being made to allow Congress additional time to review the President's
budget, which will continue to be submitted near the beginning of
each session of the Congress, and to carry out new procedures called
for under the act (see part 6 for a discussion of these procedures).
In order to facilitate the conversion to the new fiscal year, the act
provides for a 3-month transition period, or quarter, between fiscal
years 1976 and 1977. In accordance with the act, this quarter will be a
separate accounting period belonging to neither year. The tables in this
section present summaiies of estimates for this peiiod. To the extent
that appropriations will be required during the period, appropriation
language is included by account in the Budget Appendix. However,
transition quarter estimates are not carried in the detailed budget
schedules because time did not permit development of necessary
budget schedules.
The act requires that the President prepare and submit to the
Congress "proposed legislation he considers appropriate with respect
to changes in law necessary to provide authorizations of appropriations" for the transition quarter. This includes:
• Legislation authorizing additional appropriations and other
budget authority for that period;
• Legislation extending the availability of 1976 appropriations that
would normally lapse on June 30, 1976, through the transition
quarter; and
• Legislation making other miscellaneous changes when necessary
and appropriate.
Legislation will be submitted to the Congress to authorize appropriations on a Government-wide basis of "such sums as may be necessary" to cover the transition quarter. It is intended that this
authorization will cover all programs funded through the normal
appropriation process, though there may be some exceptions. Authorizations for programs funded outside the appropriation process will be
requested through special legislative proposals in a form consistent
with the intent of the act.
178




TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR

179

Legislation enacted in Public Law 93-554 extends the availability of
appropriations until September 30 for fiscal year 1976 and for each
subsequent year. This will permit obligation of 1976 funds in the
transition quarter; it will not permit obligation in 1976 of budget
authority provided for the transition quarter.
The shift to a new fiscal year will also require changes in reporting
schedules, schedules for allocating grant funds among States, and other
administrative standards keyed to the fiscal year. Legislation to make
these changes will be submitted early in the 94th Congress.
Total budget authority requested for the transition period is $88.2
billion, with outlays projected at $94.3 billion. Receipts are projected
to be $84.4 billion, with a resulting deficit of $9.8 billion. Care
should be taken in using these aggregates and the detail provided in
this section, since estimates for one quarter may not be characteristic
of a full year's experience, and therefore cannot easily be compared to
the estimates for a full fiscal year.
Corporate tax payments, for example, are relatively low in the JulySeptember quarter. Individual income tax receipts, on the other hand,
are relatively high.
Program levels may also not be comparable with annual levels. As a
rule, recommendations for the transition quarter extend the recommended 1976 program level without change or make allowance for
normal built-in growth in open-ended programs, such as social security. However, growing or declining programs may have significant
shifts in budget authority or outlays representing quirks of funding that have no programmatic impact. Programs of short duration
could cause similar statistical aberrations. Also of significance are
seasonal factors resulting from the nature of the programs themselves.
For example, Commodity Credit Corporation outlays are high in the
July-September quarter because farm price support loans are made
at that time; repayments, which offset outlays, occur in larger amounts
in other quarters.
All the tables in this section, with the exception of table H, present
information normally presented for the past, current, and budget years
in the Summary Tables section (Part 9) of the Budget. Table H,
"Federal Aid to State and Local Governments," is presented in response to the Congressional Budget Act requirement that State and
local governments be assisted in understanding • the impact of the
Federal budget on their budgets. This table is similar to Table 0-8
of Special Analysis O of the Special Analyses volume.
Information on the transition quarter is shown this year in a
number of standard budget tables. The long-range projections in
Part 3 include estimates for this quarter and Table 15 in Part 9
includes estimates for major new and expanded programs.




180

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

The following tables appear in this section :
A—Budget summary.
B—Budget receipts, outlays, and budget authority.
C—Budget authority and outlays by agency.
D—Budget authority, and outlays therefrom, available through
current action by Congress.
E—Budget financing and outstanding debt.
F—Budget receipts by source.
G—Budget authority and outlays by function.
H—Federal aid to State and local governments.
Table A. BUDGET SUMMARY For July 1-September 30, 1976.
(in millions of dollars)
Description

Estimate

Budget authority (largely appropriations):

Available through current action by Congress:
Proposed in this budget
Available without current action by Congress
Deductions for offsetting receipts 1

51,120
45, 958
—8,878

Total budget authority

88,200

Receipts and outlays:
Receipts:
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

57,059
31,363
—4,011

Total budget receipts
Outlays:
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions
Total budget outlays

84,411
65,373
32,898
—4,011
94,261

Surplus or deficit (—):
Federal funds
Trust funds

-8,314
-1,535

Total budget

-9,850

Outstanding debt, end of period:

Gross Federal debt
Held by:
Government agencies
The public
1

These consist of intragovernmental transactions and proprietary receipts from the public.




616,773
151,318
465,455

TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR

181

Table B. BUDGET RECEIPTS, OUTLAYS, AND BUDGET AUTHORITY
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (in millions of dollars)
Description

Estimate

Receipts by source:
Individual income taxes.
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions:
Employment taxes and contributions
Unemployment insurance
Contributions for other insurance and retirement
Excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts

37,900
9,500
21,548
2,823
1,242
6,164
1,300
1,100
2,833

Total receipts

84,411

Outlays by function:
National defense *
International affairs
General science, space, and technology
Natural resources, environment, and energy
Agriculture
Commerce and transportation
Community and regional development
Education, manpower, and social services
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Law enforcement and justice
General government
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance
Interest
Allowances2
_
_
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee retirement
_
Interest received by trust funds
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf

25,753
1,590
1,233
3,148
445
3,535
1,558
3,021
7,183
31,170
3,906
932
830
1,952
9,307
2,100
—974
—679
—1,750

Total outlays

_

Budget surplus or deficit ( - )

__

Budget authority by function:
National.defense 1
International affairs
General science, space, and technology
Natural resources, environment, and energy
Agriculture.
_
Commerce and transportation
Community and regional development
Education, manpower, and social services
Healths
Income security
__
_
_
Veterans benefits and services
_
Law enforcement and justice..
General government
_
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance
Interest
Allowances2
_
_
Undistributed offsetting receipts. _.
Total budget authority
1

94,261

_

-9,850
___
__
_
_

_

_
_
--.----

25,245
1,297
1,239
2,189
299
1,947
498
4,821
7,738
27,602
3,942
809
834
1,957
9,307
1.880
-3,403
88,200

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
2
Includes allowances for energy tax equalization payments, civilian agency pay raises, and (for
outlays) contingencies.




182

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

Table C. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY AGENCY
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (in millions of dollars)
Estimate

Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
_
Agriculture
_
Commerce
Defense-Military i
Defense—Civil.
Health, Education, and Welfare_.__
Housing and Urban Development..
Interior..
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies
Allowances 2
.
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee retirement
Interest received by trust funds
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf
Total budget authority and outlays

Budget
authority

_
_

Outlays

205
84
16
1,553
2,392
422
23,986
584
32,529
341
807
541
3,754
420
995
11,675
1,207
172
—106
958
3,936
3,253
1,880

226
90
17
1,481
2,649
451
25,035
619
31,543
1,905
826
644
4,405
371
2,642
11,654
1,138
968
—128
906
3,896
4,226
2,100

—974
—679
— 1,750

—974
—679
— 1,750

88,200

94,261

51,120
45,958

36,416
15,551
23,112
28,059

—4, 619
—4,259

—4,619
—4,259

88,200

94,261

MEMORANDUM

Portion available through current action by Congress 3
Portion available without current action by Congress
Outlays from obligated balances
Outlays from unobligated balances
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total budget authority and outlays
1
2

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for energy tax equalization payments, civilian agency pay raises, and (for
outlays) contingencies.
8
Budget authority excludes appropriations to liquidate contract authorizations. Outlays from
such appropriations are included as outlays from balances below.




TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR

183

Table D. BUDGET AUTHORITY, AND OUTLAYS THEREFROM, AVAILABLE
THROUGH CURRENT ACTION BY CONGRESS
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (in millions of dollars)
Estimate *

Department or other unit

Legislative branch
___
The Judiciary
_
_
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
_
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military 2
_
Defense—Civil
,
_
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
_Labor
_
_
State
Transportation
_
Treasury
_
_
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration.
Other independent agencies
Allowances 3_

Budget
authority

Outlay*

208
83
16

1,276
2,375

169
82
15
470

2,259

361

173

24,126

15,655

601

_
_

Total budget authority, and outlays therefrom, available through current action by Congress

7,294

165
851
542
881
404

_

268

8,018

56
591
274
732
336
842
406
440
129
79
330

1,009

626

1,207

172
84
959

3,828
1,449
1,880

2,636
1.105
1,875

51,120

36,416

MEMORANDUM
Appropriations to liquidate contract authority:
Funds appropriated to the President
Commerce
Interior
Transportation
Environmental Protection Agency
Total appropriations, and outlays from appropriations, to liquidate
contract authority

25

71
40

71
19

1,611

1.530

15

15

1,761

1,635

* Less than $500 thousand.
Includes the effect on the transition quarter of later transmittal items proposed in 1976.
Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for energy tax equalization payments and civilian agency pay raises.

1
2
3




184

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
Table E. BUDGET FINANCING AND OUTSTANDING DEBT
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (in millions of dollars)
Description

BUDGET FINANCING
Budget surplus or deficit ( - )
Surplus or deficit (—) of off-budget Federal agencies
Total surplus or deficit ( - )
Means of financing other than borrowing from the public:
Seigniorage on coins
All other
Total means of financing other than borrowing from the public
Total requirements for borrowing from the public
Change in debt held by the public

Estimate

-9,850
—2, 727
-12,577
175
175
—12,402
12,402

OUTSTANDING DEBT, END OF PERIOD
Gross Federal debt:
Debt issued by Treasury
Debt issued by other agencies
Total gross Federal debt
Held by:
Government agencies..
The public

605,494
11,279
616,773
151,318
465,455

DEBT SUBJECT TO STATUTORY LIMITATION, END OF PERIOD
Debt issued by Treasury
Treasury debt not subject to limitation
Agency debt subject to limitation
Notes not part of Federal debt but included in debt limit 1
Total, debt subject to statutory limitation2
1

605,494
—610
1,592
845
607,321

Non-interest-bearing notes issued to the International Monetary Fund plus District of Columbia
Stadium bonds. See Special Analysis C for further explanation.
2
The statutory debt limit is permanently established at $400 billion. By Act of June 30, 1974
(Public Law 93-325). the statutory debt limit was temporarily increased to $495 billion through
Mar. 31, 1975. Legislation is needed to change the limitation.




TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR

185

Table F. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE

For July 1-September 30, 1976 (in millions of dollars)
Description

Estimate

Individual income taxes:

Withheld
Other
Proposed legislation
Gross individual income taxes
Refunds

38,100
5,800
—5,100
38,800
-900

Net individual income taxes

37,900

Corporation income taxes___
Proposed legislation
Refunds

__

Net corporation income taxes

9,380
1,100
-980
9,500

Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust funds):

Employment taxes and contributions:
Old-age and survivors insurance
Disability insurance
Hospital insurance
Railroad retirement
Total employment taxes and contributions

15,781
2,073
3,236
458
21,548

Unemployment insurance:
State taxes deposited in Treasury 1
Federal unemployment tax receipts 1
Railroad unemployment tax receipts l

2,432
361
30

Total unemployment insurance

2,823

Contributions for other insurance and retirement:
Supplementary medical insurance
Proposed legislation
Federal employees' retirement—employee contributions
Other retirement contributions 2
Total contributions for other insurance and retirement
Total social insurance taxes and contributions

489
22
718
14
1» 242
25,614

Excise taxes:

Federal funds:
Alcohol taxes
Tobacco taxes
Manufacturers' excise taxes
Miscellaneous excise taxes
Proposed legislation
Undistributed Federal tax deposits and unapplied collections
Total Federal fund excise taxes
Trust funds:
Highway.....
Airport and airway
Proposed legislation

1,278
538
30
572
1,800
4,218
1,676
266
4

Total trust fund excise taxes

1.946

Total excise taxes

6,164

See footnotes at end of table.




186

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
Table F. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Description

Estimate

Estate and gift taxes

1,300

Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts:3
Deposit of earnings, Federal Reserve System
Other miscellaneous receipts

1,100

Total miscellaneous receipts
Total budget receipts..

1,600
1,233
2,833
84,411

MEMORANDUM
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

57,059
31,363
—4,011

1
Deposits by States are State payroll taxes that cover the benefit part of the program. Federal
unemployment tax receipts cover administrative costs at both the Federal and State level. Railroad
unemployment tax receipts cover both the benefits and administrative costs of the program for the
railroads.
2
Represents employer and employee contributions to the civil service retirement and disability
fund for covered employees of Government-sponsored, privately owned enterprises and the District
of 3Columbia municipal government.
Includes both Federal and trust funds. Trust fund amounts in miscellaneous receipts are $7
million.




TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR

187

Table G. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (in millions of dollars)
Estimate

Function

Budget
authority

050 NATIONAL DEFENSE:
051 Department of Defense—Military:
Military personnel
Retired military personnel
Operation and maintenance
Procurement
Research and development
Military construction and other 1
Allowances 2_
Deductions for offsetting receipts

6,453
1,775
7,581
4,578
2,683

41
8
57
7

63
0
-142

23,986

24,800

83
7
57
4

60
0
55
1

-161

_

__

250 GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY:
251 General science and basic researchJ
252 Earth sciences *
253 Manned space
flight
254 Space science, applications, and technology
255 Supporting space activities *
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total general science, space, and technology

-1

25,245

150 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS:
151 Foreign economic and financial assistance l.
152 Conduct of foreign affairs 1
153 Foreign information and exchange activities *
Deductions for offsetting receipts

-161

-1

_

Total international affairs

6,453
1,789
8,051
4,736
2,250
1,060

-142

Subtotal, Department of Defense—Military.
052 Military assistance 1
_'
053 Atomic energy defense activities
054 Defense-related activities _
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total national defense

Outlays

25,753

905
370
108
—85

1,234
324
117
—85

1,297

1,590

297
67
465
315
95
—1

340
70
462
281
81
—1

1,239

1,233

788
555
219
151
672
173
—369

948
592
228
944
647
159
—369

2,189

3,148

63
237
—1

209
237
—1

299

445

300 NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT, AND ENERGY:
301 Water resources and power l
302 Conservation and land management l
303 Recreational resources *
304 Pollution control and abatement
305 Energy 1
__.
306 Other natural resources 1
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total natural resources, environment, and energy
350 AGRICULTURE:
351 Farm income stabilization
352 Agricultural research and services *
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total agriculture
See footnotes at end of table.

580-000 O - 75 - 13




188

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
Table G. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (in millions of dollars) -Continued
Estimate

Function

Budget
authority
400 COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION:
401 Mortgage credit and thrift insurance 1
402 Payment to the Postal Service
403 Other advancement and regulation of commerce
404 Ground transportation l
405 Air transportation *___
406 Water transportation *
407 Other transportation
Deductions for offsetting receipts

177
393
150
235
621
380
21
—29

_

_

_

500 EDUCATION, MANPOWER, AND SOCIAL SERVICES:
501 Elementary, secondary, and vocational education
502 Higher education i
503 Research and general education aids 1
504 Manpower training *
505 Other manpower services
506 Social services
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total education, manpower, and social services




_

_

_

-

20,705
2,063
3,435
4,967
—*

27,602

700 VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES:
701 Income security for veterans 1
_____
702 Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation
703 Hospital and medical care for veterans
704 Veterans housing
705 Other veterans benefits and services *
Deductions for offsetting receipts

7,183

18,809
1,589
2,859
4,346
—*

Total income security.

6,288
582
245
69
—1

7,738

600 INCOME SECURITY:
601 General retirement and disability insurance 1
602 Federal employee retirement and disability 1
603 Unemployment insurance *_
._._
604 Public assistance and other income supplements
Deductions for offsetting receipts. _

3,021

6,903
583
216
38
—1

_
_

Total health

See footnotes at end of table.

600
425
225
897
75
803
—3

4,821

550 HEALTH:
551 Healthcare services 1
_
552 Health research and education
553 Prevention and control of health problems
554 Health planning and construction l
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total veterans benefits and services

1,558

2,574
186
316
823
76
849
—3

450 COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT:
451 Community development
452 Area and regional development 1
453 Disaster relief and insurance
Deductions for offsetting receipts

1,131
373
72
—18

498

._

3,535

200
260
56
—18

__

16
393
177
1,823
692
441
21
—29

1,947

l

Total commerce and transportation

Total community and regional development

Outlays

31,170

1,995
831
995
-121
—*

1,947
767
1,040
38
115
—*

3,942

3,906

TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR

189

Table G. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Estimate

Function

Budget
authority

750 LAW ENFORCEMENT AND JUSTICE:
751 Federal law enforcement and prosecution l
752 Federal judicial activities
753 Federal correctional and rehabilitative activities
754 Law enforcement assistance
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total law enforcement and justice.

809

850

REVENUE SHARING AND GENERAL
ASSISTANCE:
851 General revenue sharing l

PURPOSE

Other general purpose fiscal assistance
Total revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance

900 INTEREST:
901 Interest on the public debt
902 Other interest *
Total interest
_

_

Allowances for:
Energy tax equalization payments
Civilian agency pay raises
Contingencies
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee retirement
Interest received by trust funds
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf
Total budget authority and outlays

Federal funds.
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

.

834

830

1,664

1,656
296

1,957

1,952

9,700
-393
9.307

9,700
-393
9,307
1,750
150
200

—974
— 679
- 1 , 750

—974
—679
-1,750

88,200

_

187
33
453
57
27
120
—46

1, 750
130

Total general government

932

172
32
455
79
26
116
—46

_

494
92
80
267
—1

293

_

451
85
61
213
—1

800 GENERAL GOVERNMENT:
801 Legislative functions
_
802 Executive direction and management
l
803 Central fiscal operations
804 General property and records management 1
805 Central personnel management l
806 Other general government l
__
Deductions for offsetting receipts
_

852

Outlays

94,261

62,324
29,888
—4,011

65,373
32,898
—4,011

FISCAL

*Less than $500 thousand.
1
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
2
Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises and other legislation for Department
of Defense.
Note.— In many cases offsetting receipts are distributed at the subfunctional level. In those cases
where such distributions would be inappropriate, the offsetting receipts are deducted at the major
functional level in a separate line entry entitled "Deductions for offsetting receipts."




190

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
Table H. FEDERAL AID TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS»
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (outlays in millions of dollars)
Functional Estimate
code

Agency and program

National defense:

Department of Defense—Military:
Civil defense shelters and financial assistance
Construction of Army National Guard centers

051
051
. __

Total, national defense

8
10
18

International affairs:

East-West Cultural and Technical Interchange center

153

Total, international affairs

-_.

Natural resources, environment, and energy:
Department of Agriculture:
Watershed planning and flood prevention
Resource conservation and development
Forest service
Department of Commerce: NOAA
Department of the Interior:
Bureau of Land Management (shared revenue)
Bureau of Reclamation
Office of Water Research and Technology
Land and water conservation fund
Fish and Wildlife Service
National Park Service
Bureau of Mines
Energy Research and Development Agency
Environmental Protection Agency
Tennessee Valley Authority (shared revenue)

301
302
302
306
302
301
301
303
303
303
306
305
304
301

Agriculture:
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
Cooperative State Research Service
Extension Service
Total, Agriculture

--

150
6
2
40
21
4
*
2
767
14

. --

Total, natural resources, environment, and energy

24
3
8
5

1,045

352
352
352

9
26
46

_._

81

401
401
403

1
*
*

407
406
405

*
1
100

404
404
404
404
404
404
404

10
1,215
13
22
18
276
40

---

h697

Commerce and transportation:

Department of Agriculture:
Rural housing for domestic farm labor
Mutual and self-help housing
Department of Commerce: M inority business development
Department of Transportation:
Grants-in-aid for natural gas pipeline safety
State boating safety assistance
Grant-in-aid for airports
Federal Highway Administration:
Highway beautification
Highway trust fund
.._._
Other..
........
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
Federal Railroad Administration
_
Urban Mass Transportation Administration
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
Total, commerce and transportation
See footnotes at end of table.




TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR

191

Table H. FEDERAL AID TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS l
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (outlays in millions of dollars)—Continued
Agency and program

Community and regional development:
Funds appropriated to the President:
Appalachian Development
Disaster Relief
Department of Agriculture:
Rural water and waste disposal grants
Rural development grants
Department of Commerce:
Economic Development Administration
Regional Action Planning Commissions
Department of Housing and Urban Development:
Community development bloc grants
Comprehensive planning grants
Model cities...
Urban renewal
Other
Department of the Interior:
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning Commission for Alaska
Community Services Administration
Total, community and regional development
Education, manpower, and social services:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare:
Elementary and secondary education
School assistance in federally affected areas
Emergency school aid
Education for the handicapped
Occupational, vocational, and adult education
Higher education
Library resources
Educational development
Innovative and experimental programs
Assistant Secretary for Education
Work incentives
Social services
Assistant Secretary for Human Development
Allied Services
Department of Interior:
Indian education programs
Department of Labor:
Comprehensive manpower assistance
Grants for employment services
Unemployment trust fund (manpower training)
Corporation for Public Broadcasting
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities
Total, education, manpower, and social services
See footnotes at end of table.




Functional Estimate
code

452
453

95
38

451
452

16
2

452
452

54
11

451
451
451
451
451

600
12
20
281
37

452
452
451

1
*
94

...

1,262

501
501
501
501
501
502
503
503
503
_ 502
504
506
501
506

218
29
15
7
92
7
19
9
5
1
75
560
322
10

501

7

504
504
504
503
503

593
18
105
18
11

...

2,121

192

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Table H. FEDERAL AID TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS 1
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (outlays in millions of dollars)—Continued
Functional Estimate
code

Agency and program

Health:

Department of Health, Education, and Welfare:
Health Services Administration
_
Center for Disease Control
__
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration
Health Resources Administration
Medicaid
_
Department of the Interior:
Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration
Department of Labor:
Occupational Safety and Health Administration _

_

551
553
551
552
551
553

*

553

Total, Health..

122
27
102
45
1.825

12

—

2,133

Income security:

Department of Agriculture:
Agricultural Marketing Service (commodity distribution)
Food stamps
—
Child nutrition programs
Food donations
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare: Public assistance
Department of Housing and Urban Development (housing payments)
Department of Labor (unemployment insurance)

Veterans benefits and services:
Veterans Administration:
Aid to State homes..
.
Grants for construction of State nursing homes
Administrative expenses
Health manpower
._.
Grants for State cemeteries
Total, veterans benefits and services
Law enforcement and justice:
Department of Justice: Law enforcement assistance
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Legal Services Corporation

2
1,011
473
1
1,180
455
144

---

Total, income security

604
604
604
-- 604
604
604
603

3,267

703
703
703
703
705
._.

6
1
*
8
1
17

-

Total, law enforcement and justice

754
751
754

195
1
24

---

220

General government:

Department of the Interior:
Administration of territories
Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands
.
Civil Service Commission (intergovernmental personnel assistance)
Total, general government
See footnotes at end of table.




806
806
806

4
18
3

---

24

TRANSITION TO THE NEW FISCAL YEAR

193

Table H. FEDERAL AID TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS 1
For July 1-September 30, 1976 (outlays in millions of dollars)—Continued
Agency and program

Functional
code

Estimate

Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance:

General revenue sharing
_
_
Federa 1 payment to the District of Columbia (shared revenue)
Forest Service (shared revenue)_
_
__
Department of the Interior: Internal revenue collections for the Virgin Islands
(shared revenue)
_
Department of the Treasury: Shared revenue for Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands
Federal Power Commission (shared revenue)
_
._

851
852
852

1,655
64
129

852
852
852

83
*

Total, revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance

___

1,947

Allowance for energy tax equalization payments

___

500

Total, grants and shared revenues

___

14,336

'"Less than $500 thousand.
Grants-in-aid unless otherwise specified.

1




PART 8

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM
BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT




195

EXPLANATORY NOTE
This tabulation contains information on budget authority
(BA) and outlays (O) for each appropriation and fund account. The budget authority in this tabulation takes account
of certain transfers between appropriations. All budget authority items are current and definite appropriations except
where otherwise indicated.
Functional code numbers are shown for each account as
a cross reference to table 13 (pp. 338-353), where the figures
are summarized by functional classification. Types of funds
in the budget and the deduct entries at the end of each
chapter of this tabulation are explained in Part 6 (pp. 168-173).
Congressional action in the appropriation process occasionally takes the form of a limitation on the use of a trust
fund or other fund, or of an appropriation to liquidate contract
authority. Amounts for such items, which do not affect budget
authority, are included here in parentheses and identified in
the stub column, but are not included in the totals.
196




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

197

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
SENATE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

801

Senate

97,558
93,066

"106,531
v
106,531

111,557
°111,557

5,026
5,026

162,511
158,093

173,647
«173,647

201,586
*201,586

27,939
27,939

BA
0

36,315
37,178

*45,137
7
45,137

53,015
'-53,015

7,878
7,878

B
A

2,000

4,0001

6,500

2,459

6,100

1,767

BA
0

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

House of Representatives

801

JOINT ITEMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Joint Items

801

OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

801

0
Trust

308

4,333

0

-1

1

Funds

Contributions and donations

801

-1

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

B
A

1,312

1,396

1,588

164

0

1,290

1,442

1,590

148

75
72

140
142

150
150

10
8

B
A

4,645

4,428
C
255

4,218

-1,617

BA
0

115
4,959

1,127
10,477

4,433

-6,044

3,087

1,534

2,562

1,070

Salaries

801

Contingent expenses

801

BA
0

Capitol buildings

801

Reappropriation
Extension of the Capitol

801

0

Capitol grounds

801

B
A

1,361

B
A
0
0

1,166

1,176
<127
250
1,492

3

42

Additional parking facilities for
congressional employees
801

BA
0

153
41

801

B
A

7,059

6,621]
C
397

7,094

22

0

5,670

8,411

7,242

-1,169

Reappropriation
Acquisition of property as an
addition to the Capitol grounds

-44

44

-42

801

Senate office buildings

See footnotes at end of table.




1

198

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Construction of an extension to the
New Senate Office Building
801
Extension of additional Senate Office
Building site:
801
Reappropriation

BA
0

20,900
560

BA
0

174

Acquisition of property as a site for
parking facilities for the United
States Senate
801

BA
0

Plans for garage and related
facilities for the United States
801

0

Senate garage

801

BA

House office buildings

801

BA

11
0
9,252

BA
0

100
8,550

0
BA

19
0
5,222

(145)
226
5,443
^3,100
6
145

BA
0

62
4,913

6,002

0

Reappropriation
Acquisition of property, construction,
and equipment, additional House
Office Building
801
Liquidation of contract authority....
Capitol Power Plant

801

Reappropriation

213

10
0

16,322
3,115
14
7
M.000
3,862
'700
49

J03}
11
2
8,672
C
544
"71
10
10,690

-16,322
24,468

27,583

]
^300

-174
-1,000
-4,262
-49

17
2

7

18
2
9,815

7
518

9^849

-841

9,063

(-145)
-226
35
7

368

Expansion of facilities, Capitol Power
Plant
801

0

25

60

8,870
^300
41
0

Modifications and enlargement,
Capitol Power Plant
801

0

257

2,181

12,691

10,510

John W. McCormack Residential Page
School
801

0

Alterations and improvements,
buildings and grounds, to provide
facilities for the physically
handicapped
801

BA
0

2,700
1800

2,700
1800

Structural and mechanical care,
Library buildings and grounds.801
Reappropriation

BA

1,631

1,631
c
110

2,396

65
5

BA
0

Library of Congress, James Madison
Memorial Building
801

0

150
1,790
18,417

2,208
12,500

1,951
18,500

-257
6,000

BA
0

52,311
48,138

53,192
66,739

40,238
98,350

-12,954
31,611

Total Federal funds Architect of
the Capitol.
See footnotes at end of table.




31
4

2 ..
.

199

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
BOTANIC GARDEN
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

801

BA

885

0

Salaries and expenses

858

1,209

191

1,214

156

48,460
r
201
"1,483
49,981
5,839

58,675

8,531

56,897
6,958

6,916
95
1

6,300
13,3451
"422
13,983
10,581
C
15
"234
12,174
1,458
1,504
229
235
11,417

6,827
17,810

57
2
4,043

17,398
11,387

3,415
557

11,118
1,695
1,695
251
251
15,941

-1,056
237
191
22
16
4,469

13,017

1,697

9171
^ 101J
1,058

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Copyright Office:
expenses

503

Salaries

and
403

Congressional Research
Salaries and expenses

Service:
801

Distribution of catalog
Salaries and expenses

cards:
503

Books for the general collections.503
Books for the law library

503

Books for the blind and physically
handicapped: Salaries and
expenses.
503

BA

42,532

0

Salaries and expenses

B
A

41,331
5,433

0
BA

5,376
11,391

0
BA

11,038
11,161

0
BA
0
BA
0

10,224
1,195
1,278
208
181
9,895

B
A

CM

"51
11,320

0
0

8,915
4

Collection and distribution of library
materials (special foreign currency
program)
503

BA
0

2,267
2,406

Indexing and microfilming the
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic
Church records in Alaska
503

0

Furniture and furnishings

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

2,868
657
32
18
143
151

3,319
860
34
44

BA
0

4
15

4
20

Organizing and microfilming the
papers of the Presidents-. Salaries
and expenses
503

503

Revision of Annotated Constitution:
Salaries and expenses
503
Revision of Hinds' and Cannon's
Precedents: Salaries and expenses
503
Oliver Wendell Holmes devise fund
(special fund): Permanent
503
See footnotes at end of table.




2,014
1,568

2,014 ..
.
2,014

446
-1

1

4,930
7,272
34
34

1,611
6,412
-10
-18

1
8
3
20

1

200

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

35

182

36

-146

B
A
0

87,129
81,629

99,314
98,190

119,698
116,579

20,384
18,389

B
A
0

4,199
4,490

4,096
4,539

4,041
4,484

-55
-55

801

R
A
0

64,000
64,069

80,000
80,385

108,500
107,800

28,500
27,415

Office of Superintendent of
Documents: Salaries and expenses

B
A

36,871

36,976

86

806

0
R
A
0

37,946

36,0001
D
890J
37,823

Consolidated working fund

503

Total Federal funds Library of
Congress.
Trust

Funds

Gift and trust fund accounts,
non-revolving: Permanent
503
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Printing and binding

Acquisition of site and general plans
and designs of buildings
806

4,600

37,976

153

15,500
15,500

...

15,500
15,500

806

R
A
0

Government Printing Office revolving
fund
806

B
A
0
B
A
0

7 400
-6,396

12 000

408

-8,007

-12,000
-8,415

112,871
95,619

129,190
118,916

160,976
153,269

31.786
34,353

B
A

109.395

139,540

14,351

0

106,920

121,3761
D
3,813J
124,441

142,640

18,199

Environmental impact

300
300

-300
-300

....
....

Intragovernmental funds:

Total Federal funds Government
Printing Office.
GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

801

COST-ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

801

B
A
0

1.500
1,342

1.628
1,642

1,650
1,615

22
-27

B
A
0

5,818
4,782

6,285
7,341

6,919
7,038

-303

R
A
0

8,673

'2,000
4,903
'1,900

B
A
0

5,818
13,455

8,285
14,144

UNITED STATES TAX COURT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Construction

Total Federal funds
States Tax Court.
See footnotes at end of table.




752
752

United

...

1
'100J
6,919
7,138

634
-2,000
-6,703
-1,366
-7,006

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

201

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

LEGISLATIVE B R A N C H — C o n t i n u e d
UNITED STATES TAX COURT—Continued
Trust

Funds

Tax Court judges survivors
fund: Permanent, indefinite

annuity
602

BA
0

88
20

4

668,293
636,606

747,172
754,778

842,888
893,063

95,716
138,285

-539

-525

-525

-4

-4

-3

1

BA1
0 J

-7,406

-7,510

-7,760

-250

BA1

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
803

84
20

BA
0

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

73
24

-5,361

-5,241

-5,284

-43

BA 1

0I
902

BA1

0I
Proprietary
public

receipts from the
500
800

0I

902

BA1

-1

0 I
Total Federal funds

BA

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

654,982

733,892

829,316

95,424

0

623,295

741,498

879,491

137,993

4,272
4,513

4,180
4,560

4,129
4,504

-51
-56

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
503

BA1
0 J
BA

T850

1,782

1,761

-21

2,091

2,162

2,136

-26

-50

-40

-40

BA

803

-2,368

656,782

735,634

831,037

95,403

0

Interfund transactions

-2,398

0

Total trust funds

-2,422

625,336

743,620

881,587

137,967

BA1

30

o!
Total Legislative Branch

THE JUDICIARY
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries

752

BA

4,154

4,4501

5,118

513

4,053

155J
4,625

5,071

446

BA
0

515
318

565
506

706
632

141
126

BA

605

642

712

70

0

362

629

677

48

161

19

2

2

0
Printing and binding Supreme Court
reports
752
Miscellaneous expenses

752

Automobile for the Chief Justice.752

BA

0

15

17

19

Books for the Supreme Court

BA

63

63

63

0

65

63

63

See footnotes at end of table.




752

16

202

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

THE JUDICIARY—Continued
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Care of the building and grounds
752
Reappropriation
Total Federal funds Supreme
Court of the United States.

1,429

75
979

946
r
58
372
1,544

1,578

34

6,921
5,792

7,268
7,384

8,047
8,040

779
656

7821
D
21J
797

853

50

850

53

2,4791
D
81J
2,549

2,587

27

2,586

37

2,429

35

2,426

49

28,750

700

8A

1,493

BA
0
BA
0

53

COURT OF CUSTOMS AND PATENT APPEALS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

752

B

677
706

CUSTOMS COURT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

2,424
2,349

B
A

2,194

0

752

B
A

0

Salaries and expenses

2,204

2,3411
D
53J
2,377

27,9751

COURT OF CLAIMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

752

COURTS OF APPEALS, DISTRICT COURTS, AND
OTHER JUDICIAL SERVICES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

752

B
A

27,300

0
B
A

27,030

28,018

28,729

711

Salaries of supporting personnel..752

90,000

119,221

12,869

87,810

101,8221
D
4,530J
106,211

119,125

12,914

17,875

15,7001

16,551

725

Salaries of judges

Representation by court-appointed
counsel and operation of defender
organizations
752

0
B
A
0

16,384

19,995

16,293

-3,702

752

BA
0

18,500
17,308

18,500
18,438

18,000
18,024

-500
-414

Travel and miscellaneous expenses
752

BA
0

12,909
12,659

15,100
14,770

19,804
19,141

4,704
4,371

Administrative Office of the United
States Courts
752

BA

4,678

8.697

2,936

0

4,711

5,5301
"2311
5,702

8,579

2,877

B
A

7,837

8,7641

10,297

1,325

0

7,435

8,891

10,230

1,339

Fees of jurors

Salaries and expenses of United
States magistrates
752
See footnotes at end of table.




203

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

THE JUDICIARY—Continued
COURTS OF APPEALS. DISTRICT COURTS. AND
OTHER JUDICIAL SERVICES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

351
353

98

-351
-255

BA
0

2.675
2 318

4,650
4 307

1,975
1989

Space and facilities, The Judiciary
752

BA
0

66.100
66,083

69,500
69,499

3,400
3,416

Salaries and expenses of referees
(special fund)
752

BA

19.851

20,5501

22,365

1,277

0

19,457

20,859

22,252

1,393

0

-50

35

Commission on Revision of the
Federal Court Appellate System of
the United States
752

BA
0

Expenses, United States court
facilities-. Furniture and
furnishings
752

155

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

752

-35

General and special funds:

'3,000
'2,750

Bicentennial expenses, The Judiciary
752
Total Federal funds Courts of
Appeals, District Courts, and
other Judicial Services.

BA
0

BA
0

1,816

32,060
27,354

10,548

8,104

2,338

2,073

320,835
319,027

2,4001

198.950
192,899

3,000
2,750

8,274

5,936

2,444
2,338

10,548
8,274

8,104
5,936

BA
0
288.775
291,673

FEDERAL JUDICIAL CENTER
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

752

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Total Federal funds
Judicial Center.

752
Federal

0
BA
0

47
2,073
1,863

...

COMMISSION ON BANKRUPTCY LAWS OF THE
UNITED STATES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses (special fund)
752

0

109

JUDICIARY TRUST FUNDS
Trust

Funds

fund:
602

BA
0

1,948
1,040

2.064
1,160

2,141
1,245

77
85

Operation of the Public Defender
Service for the District of Columbia:
Permanent
751

BA
0

1,922
2,066

1,824
1,768

2,161
2,154

337
386

BA
0

3,870
3,106

3,888
2,928

4.302
3,399

414
471

Judicial survivors'
Permanent

annuity

Total trust funds
Trust Funds.
See footnotes at end of table.

580-000 O - 75 - 14




Judiciary

204

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

THE JUDICIARY-Continued
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

213,239
205,922

304,244
307,118

345,299
341,203

BAl

-1,910

-86

-86

-9

-9

-9

BA
0

211,320
204,003

304,149
307,023

345,204
341,108

41,055
34,085

BA
0

3,870
3,106

3,888
2,928

4,302
3,399

414
471

-1,922

-1,824

-2,161

-33?

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
750

0f

902

BAl

41,055
34,085

0 I
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
751

BAl

oI

Total trust funds

BA
0

1,948
1,184

2,064
1,104

2,141
1,238

77
134

Total The Judiciary

BA
0

213,268
205,187

306,213
308,127

347,345
342,346

41,132
34,219

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Compensation of the President

802

BA

0

250
250

250
250

250
250

11,260
10,384

16,367
16,367

16,946
16,946

579
579

THE WHITE HOUSE OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

BA

0
SPECIAL PROJECTS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

802

BA
0

414
646

BA

1,433

1,695
<24

1,826

82

0

Special projects

1,788

1,722

1,750

28

315
300

104
100

-211
-200

...

EXECUTIVE RESIDENCE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

802

OFFICIAL RESIDENCE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

See footnotes at end of table.




802

BA ...
0 ...

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

205

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT—Continued
SPECIAL ASSISTANCE TO THE PRESIDENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

B
A
0

692
609

910
965

990
990

80
25

802

B
A
0

1,414
1,331

1,600
1,571

1,617
1,601

17
30

802

0
B
A
0

1,414
1,425

1,600
1,571

1,617
1,601

17
30

B
A
0

2,466
2,603

2,500
2,500

2,750
2,750

250
250

0
B
A
0

2,466
2,358

2,500
2,500

2,750
2,750

250
250

802

B
A
0

1,376
1,480

1,600
1,575

*1,657
1,622

57
47

802

B
A
0

1,100

1,250
1,278

1,320
1,320

70
42

Special assistance to the President

802
COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Total Council
Advisers.

of

Economic

94

COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND
OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Council on Environmental Quality
and Office of Environmental
Quality
.
802

A

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

802

Total Council on Environmental
Quality and Office of
Environmental Quality.

-245

....

COUNCIL ON INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC
POLICY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

DOMESTIC COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

957

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

0

47

NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses




BA

2,802

2,900

3,000

100

0
See footnotes at end of table.

802

2,532

2,913

3,002

89

206

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT—Continued
OFFICF OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGE1r
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

802

Office of the Federal Procurement
Policy: Salaries and expenses ..802

BA

19.400

21.0001

24,150

2,650

0

Salaries and expenses

18,350

21,898

24,150

2,252

660
399

940
940

280
541

BA .
0 ...

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Total Office of
and Budget.

802

Management

0

-79

80

19,400
18,271

22,160
22,377

25,090
25,090

2.930
2,713

f

1.519
1,360

1.850
1,830

2,000
1,960

150
130

0

108
1.519
1,468

1,850
1,830

2,000
1,960

150
130

2.126
2,385

8,450
8,634

8.962
8,812

512
178

i"8bo

-4,240
-21,304

BA
0

-80

OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE
FOR TRADE NEGOTIATIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

802

Total Office of the Special
Representative for Trade
Negotiations.

BA
0

OFFICE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

BA
0

802

SPECIAL ACTION OFFICE FOR DRUG ABUSE
PREVENTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

553

BA
0

25,000
9,670

4,240
23,104

Special fund for drug abuse

553

BA
0

26,000
11,794

8.760 .
22,353

6,780

-8.760
-15,573

BA
0

51,000
21,464

13.000
45,457

8,580

-13,000
-36,877

1,000
935

*1,60Q
1,561

600
626

75.896
108,674

68.112
76,334

-7,784
-32,340

Total Special Action Office for
Drug Abuse Prevention.

....

COUNCIL ON WAGE AND PRICE STABILITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
Total Executive Office of the
President.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA ..
0 ....

BA
0

97,252
66,064

207

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
APPALACHIAN REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Appalachian regional development
programs
452
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA
BA
0

Public enterprise funds:
Appalachian housing fund

452

Total Appalachian
Regional
Development Programs.

113,500

133,500

"133,500

185,000
(155,000)
288,888

-40,000
185,000
(160,000)
336,000

185,000
(160,000)
336,000

40,000

BA
0

1,500
564

2,000

2,000

...

BA
0

300,000
289,452

278,500
338,000

318,500
338,000

...

BA
0

432,600
250,085

200,000
275,000

150,000
250,000

BA
0

74,395
72,317

3,847

40,000

DISASTER RELIEF
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Disaster relief

..453

-50,000
-25,000

ECONOMIC STABILIZATION ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

..802

-3,847

UNANTICIPATED NEEDS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Unanticipated needs

500
475

802

BA
0

Emergency fund for the President
802

BA
0

435

25

BA
0

1,000
435

500
500

500
525

1,000

Total Unanticipated Needs

1,000
1,000

-25
1,000
1,000

500
500

16,200
16,200

16,200
16,200

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Expenses, Defense Production Act
054

BA
0

Public enterprise funds:
Revolving fund, Defense Production
Act:
054
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.

BA
0

-155,890

..

BA
0

-155,890

..

Total Expansion
Production.
See footnotes at end of table.




of

Defense

A

-85,091

-85,091

85,091
16,200
16,200

101,291
16,200

208

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
EXPENSES OF MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Expenses of management
improvement

H
A
0

350
15

760

R
A
R
A

445,000
250 000

822,000
75 000

0

802

459,963

709,315

25

-735

FOREIGN ASSISTANCE
International Security Assistance
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military assistance
052
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority

*780,0001

-107,000

052

R
A
0

Foreign military credit sales

052

Security supporting assistance

151

B
A
0
B
A
0
R
A
0
R
A

(250 000)
208,068

*30,000
17 000

Foreign military training

(250 000)
917,383

30,000
17 000

150 000

Emergency security
Israel

assistance for
052

Emergency military
Cambodia

assistance for
052

325,000
406,008

405,000
400,000

"560,000
500,000

155,000
100,000

117,500
381,862

385,500
319,033

"580,400
397,891

194,900
78,858

2,200,000
640 278

700 000

659 000

-41,000

20,811

0

4 435

0

-89,927

-76,207

-55,396

0

Military credit sales to Israel .. . 052

7,731,380
(3,167,364)
2,675,051

6.700,000
(3,892,021)
3,613,164

6,800,000
(4,669,298)
4,869,298

100,000
(777,277)
1,256,134

B
A
0

3,487,500
1,802,619

1,687,500
2,052,141

1,960,400
2,435,878

272,900
383,737

Public enterprise funds:

Liquidation of foreign military sales
fund
052
Trust

Funds

Advances, foreign military sales:
052
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
052
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
052
Total trust funds
Total International
Assistance.
See footnotes at end of table.




Security

B
A

B1
A
0 \
B
A
0

-109,095

-147,251

-212,987

-65,736

3,378,405
1,693,524

1,540,249
1,904,890

1,747,413
2,222,891

207,164
318,001

B
A
0

7,731,380
2,675,051

6,700,000
3,613,164

6,800,000
4,869,298

100,000
1,256,134

B1
A
0
R
A
0

-3,167,364

-3,892,021

-4,669,298

-777,277

4,564,016
-492,313

2,807,979
-278,857

2,130,702
200,000

-677,277
478,857

B
A
0

7,942,421
1,201,211

4,348,228
1,626,033

3,878,115
2,422,891

-470,113
796,858

1

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

209

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
FOREIGN ASSISTANCE—Continued

Indochina postwar reconstruction assistance
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Indochina postwar
assistance

reconstruction
151

6A
0

499,000
246,316

617,000
508,267

"952,000
762,387

335,000
254,120

BA

2,237,013

990,6351
J
\ 5,000 J
703,500
•a.ooo
189,700
171,041
1,195,335
875,541

545,635

-460,000

816,9001
'1,000/
"213,500
172,540
759,135
990,440

113,400

International Development Assistance
MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

International

financial

institutions
151

0
International
programs

organizations

and
151

BA
0
BA
0

Total Federal funds,
Multilateral Assistance.

446,312
145,500
168,357
2,382,513
614,669

23,800
1,499
-436,200
114,899

BILATERAL ASSISTANCE

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Functional development assistance BA
program
151
0
Payment to Foreign Service
retirement and disability fund .152

574,881
161,503

844,000
"-480
696,179
"-480

B
A

"1,006,700

163,180

960,250

264,551

16,080
"16,080
16,080

American
abroad

schools

and

hospitals
151

Other assistance programs

151

BA
0
BA
0

19,000
22,039
221,581
328,432

"16,080
19,000
20,037
92,451
313,284

"10,000
16,009

-9,000
-4,028
-92,451
-166,318

13,791
9,033

-5,934
10,000

-19,725
967

971,051
1,067,924

1,032,780
1,143,371

61,729
75,447

Public enterprise funds:

Development loans—revolving fund
151

351,608

Development loan fund (liquidation
account)
151

-3,240

Housing guaranty fund

151

Overseas Private
Corporation

151

0

151

0

BA

Investment

The Inter-American Foundation

6,283

Intragovernmental funds:

Advance acquisition of
property—revolving fund

151

0
-1,315

Office of the Inspector General of
Foreign Assistance
151
Consolidated working fund




-6

151

Total Federal funds, Bilateral
Assistance.
See footnotes at end of table.

507
25,000
-20,600

BA
0

63
840,462
845,274

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

210

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
FOREIGN ASSISTANCE—Continued
International Development Assistance—Con.
BILATERAL ASSISTANCE—Continued
Trust Funds

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150

902

6,000
6,000

6,000
6,000

3,222,975
1,459,943

2,166,386
1,943,465

1,791,915
2,133,811

-374,471
190,346

BA1

-25,909

-70,773

-207,072

-136,299

BA1

-32,086

-45,093

-140,573

-95,480

3,164,980
1,401,948

2,050,520
1,827,599

1,444,270
1,786,166

-606,250
-41,433

BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)..

4.893
2r959

BA
0

151

BA
0

BA
0

Technical assistance: Permanent

4,893
2,959

6,000
6,000

6,000
6,000

-4,893

-6,000

-6,000

0 f

o\
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
151

BA1
0 J

Total trust funds

0

Total International Development
Assistance.

BA
0

3,164,980
1,400,014

2,050,520
1,827,599

1,444,270
1,786,166

-606,250
-41,433

BA
0

15,000
25,224

5,000
14,329

"30,000
20,341

25,000
6,012

25,000
12,300

*25,000
11,854

-446

-1,934

.

Contingencies
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

President's foreign
contingency fund
Middle East
fund

assistance
151

special

requirements
151

BA
0

Total Contingencies
Total Federal
Assistance.

funds

Total trust funds
Assistance.

BA

n

Foreign
Foreign

15,000
25,224

30,( m
26,6^9

55,000
32,195

25,000
5,566

BA
0

7,057,385
3,367,012

4,237,769
4,267,385

4,198,683
4,803,639

-39,086
536,254

BA
0

4,564,016
-494,247

2,807,979
-278,857

2,130,702
200,000

-677,277
478,857

7,000,000
•'1,000,000

7,000,000
1,000,000

SPECIAL FINANCING FACILITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Special financing facility

151

y

BA
0

PUBLIC WORKS ACCELERATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Public works acceleration
See footnotes at end of table.




452

640

640

THE FEDERAL P R O G R A M BY A G E N C Y A N D A C C O U N T

211

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
SUMMARY
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

8,032,820
3,990,516

4,894,795
5,149,249

12,245,015
6,970,136

7,350,220
1,820,887

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
052
150

BA 1
0J
BA1

-109,095

-147,251

-212,987

-65,736

-25,909

-70,773

-207,072

-136,299

BA1

-32,086

-45,093

-140,573

-95,480

BA
0

7,865,730
3,823,426

4,631,678
4,886,132

11,684,383
6,409,504

7,052,705
1,523,372

BA
0

7,736,273
2,678,010

6,706,000
3,619,164

6,806,000
4,875,298

100,000
1,256,134

BA1 -3,167,364
0J
BA1
-4,893

-3,892,021

-4,669,298

-777,277

-6,000

-6,000

2,807,979
-278,857
7,439,657
4,607,275

2,130,702
200,000
13,815,085
6,609,504

-677,277
478,857
6,375,428
2,002,229

18,693

1,421

18,333
22,621

1,389
1,580

164j
20,673
7,8441
D
266J
7,947

22,239
8,303

1,566
193

4M23
45,56*

49,617
48,710

902

0I

0 }
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
052
151

0I
Total trust funds
Total Funds Appropriated to the
President.

BA
0
BA
0

4,564,016
-494,247
12,429,746
3,329,179

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Departmental Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Office of the Secretary

352

BA

15,276

Audit and Investigation

352

0
BA

14,368
20,019

16,7891
^483/
16,944
20,4071
D

An\

G

Office of the General Counsel

352

0
BA

19,146
7,238

0

7,296

8,138

191

3,075

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

352

0

Consolidated working fund

352

0

Total Federal funds
Departmental Administration.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

2
42,533
43,887

3J94
3,146

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

212

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
SCIENCE AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Agricultural Research Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

352

226,130
15,000

15,680

2,000
202,242

201,369
15,000
n,732
"5,349
2,000
225,368

Reappropriation
Scientific activities overseas (special
foreign currency program)
352

247,273

21,905

5,000
7,784

5,000
8,700

10,000
8,840

5.000
140

318

54

BA
0

210,126
210,344

230,450
234,122

BA
0

606
521

600
585

BA
BA

188,126
15,000

BA
0

Agricultural Research Service
Permanent

BA
0

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund,
Research Center

Agricultural
352

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Research Service.
Trust

-54
251,130
256,113

20,680
21,991

Funds

Miscellaneous contributed
Permanent, indefinite

funds:
352

600
585 ..
.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service:
(Agricultural research and
services)
352

BA

121,351

214,6151
D

146,794

-70,919

3,098J

0
(Prevention and control of health
problems)
553

122,661

153,108

154,299

1,191

B
A

185.902

195,6511

210,371

9,012

0

Animal quarantine station (special
fund): Permanent, indefinite....352
Total Federal funds Animal and
Plant Health Inspection
Service.
Trust

191,067

200,057

209,200

9,143

BA
0
BA .
.
0
BA
0

307,253
313,728

419,072
353,165

357,165
363,499

-61,907
10,334

100
50

327
471

227
421

307,253
313,728

419,172
353,215

357,492
363,970

-61.680
10,755

BA
0

1.869
1,916

2,034
2,034

2,039
2,039

5
5

B
A

90,105

12,691

85,374

101,7241
"fill
OIJ
99,259

114,476

0

Total, Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service.

109,930

10,671

5
5

5

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
352
Cooperative State Research Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Cooperative State Research Service
352
Trust

Miscellaneous
Permanent

Funds

contributed

See footnotes at end of table.




funds:
352

B
A
0

5 ..
.

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

213

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
SCIENCE AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS-Con.
Extension Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

204,073
352

212,1571

223,768

11,445

193,436

Extension Service

211,096

220,165

9,069

223,768
220,165

11,445
8,779

5,439

523

5,487

534

BA
0

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
352
Total Federal funds Extension
Service.

-97

0
BA
0

BA

4,506

0

290 .

204,073
193,339

4,485

212,323
211,386

-290

National Agricultural Library
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Agricultural Library

352

0

4,7931
123J
4,953

42

75 .,

-75

Total Federal funds National
Library facilities
352
Agricultural Library.

BA
0

4,506
4,527

4,916
5,028

5,439
5,487

523
459

Total Federal funds Science
and Education Programs.

BA
0

816,063
807,312

968,646
903,010

952,305
955,665

-16,341
52,655

Total trust funds Science and
Education Programs.

BA
0

2,475
2,437

2,639
2,624

2,644
2,629

5
5

BA

24,279

26,2181

30,629

3,559

0

23,786

26,961

29,361

2,400

BA
0

7
14

18
18

18
18

BA

18,425

0

18,451

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
Statistical Reporting Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Statistical Reporting Service

Trust

Miscellaneous
Permanent

352

Funds

contributed

funds:
352

Economic Research Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Economic Research Service

352

21,6491
D
745J
22,330

25,492

3,098

25,556

3,226

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

151

0

164

...

BA
0

18,425
18,615

22,394
22,330

25,492
25,556

3,098
3,226

funds:
352

BA
0

498
225

523
523

498
498

-25
-25

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Economics.

BA
0

42,704
42,401

49,464
49,291

56,121
54,917

6,657
5,626

Total trust funds Agricultural
Economics.

BA
0

505
239

541
541

516
516

-25
-25

Total Federal funds Economic
Research Service.
Trust

Funds

Miscellaneous contributed
Permanent, indefinite

See footnotes at end of table.




THE BUDGET F0R

214

FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
MARKETING SERVICES
Commodity Exchange Authority
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Commodity Exchange Authority

352

BA

0

3,459

6,6111

-6,766

2,919

»155}
6,596

-6,596

Packers and Stockyards Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Packers and Stockyards
Administration

BA

4,323

4,7451
D
154J

5,047

148

0

3,986

4,759

4,907

148

BA

2,229

2,3441

2,493

65
66

352

Farmer Cooperative Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Farmer Cooperative Service

352

0

D

84J

1,993

2,419

2,485

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

16
49
10,011
8,898
16
49

50
70
14,093
13,774
50
70

50
48
7,540
7,392
50
48

BA
BA

27,986
3,117

29,2421
2,117f
D

33,8051
2J17J

4,086

0

Trust

27,807

36,422

3,398

Funds

Miscellaneous contributed funds:
Permanent
352
Total Federal funds Marketing
Services.
Total trust funds Marketing
Services.

-22
-6,553
-6,382
-22

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
Foreign Agricultural Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Foreign Agricultural Service
Permanent, indefinite

352

Salaries and expenses (special
foreign currency program)
352
Total Federal funds Foreign
Agricultural Service.

0
BA
0

350

477j
33,024

500

500

31,103
28,157

31,836
33,524

35,922
36,922

4~086
3,398

553,638
638,951

778,473
1,165,184

1,336,017
1,069,681

557,544
-95,503

Foreign Assistance Programs and Special
Export Programs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Expenses, Public Law 480, foreign
assistance programs, Agriculture
1D i
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

215

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS—Continued
Foreign Assistance Programs and Special
Export Programs—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

0

-85,313

-386,711

266,336

653,047

Total Federal funds Foreign
Assistance Programs and
Special Export Programs.

B
A
0

553,638
553,638

778,473
778,473

1,336,017
1,336,017

557,544
557,544

Total Federal funds
International Programs.

B
A
0

584,741
581,795

810,309
811,997

1,371,939
1,372,939

561,630
560,942

166,651

157,3651

152,053

-9,478

148,803

-9,178
-85,700
-76,145
-33,750

Increase (-) or decrease in amount
owed by general fund to
Commodity Credit Corporation..351

AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION AND
CONSERVATION
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

351

Sugar Act program

B
A

351

BA
0

program
302

BA

Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

Agricultural

conservation

Water Bank Act program

302

BA
0

Cropland adjustment program

351

BA
0

Conservation reserve program

351

Emergency

conservation

Dairy and beekeeper
payment program

0

measures
302

BA
0

indemnity
351

BA
0

Cropland conversion program

351

Forestry incentives
Indefinite

160,000
(15,000)
1,551
10,000
975
50,301
47,143
-18
10,000
18,195
3,913
95

4,166J
157,981
85,700
85,600
33,750
(285,500)
239,125
-11,213
2,200
43,801
43,801
32
10,000
12,000
1,850
2,720
107

9,455

(33,750)
40,195
2,043
42.000
42,000

-251,750)
-198,930
11,213
-157
-1,801
-1,801
-32

10,000
15,000
3,350
3,350
107

3,000
1.500
630

207,403
260,953

-118,016
-282,613

302

programs:

0

150,622
88,500
82,744
15,000

D

BA

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

302

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Stabilization and
Conservation Service.
See footnotes at end of table.




0
BA
0

212
500,452
305,432

325,419
543,566

216

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
CORPORATIONS
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administrative
expenses

and

operating
351

BA
0
0

11,994
11,456
-13,533

12,000
12,000
20,514

12,000
12,000
4,730

-15,784

BA
0

11,994
-2,077

12,000
32,514

12,000
16,730

-15,784

BA
0

3,301,940
1,004,067

4,069,412
943,214

Public enterprise funds:

Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
fund
351
Total Federal funds Federal
Crop Insurance Corporation.
Commodity Credit Corporation
SUPPORT AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Price support and related programs:
Reimbursement for net realized
losses
..351
Limitation on administrative
expenses.

(39,900)

(38,000)

58,803
7,735

64,418
15,637

2,939,054
670,5141
M28,288J
(39,400)

-1,130,358
-400,988
(1,400)

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Wool Act (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
351

8A
0

23,999
23,172

-40,419
7,535

-1,000

23,000

Intragovernmental funds:

(Game bird protection)

351

0

7

4

(Conservation loans)

302

0

25,000

-24,000

research)
352

0

-8

for
351

0

54,790

(Purchase of dairy products, section
709)
351

0

14,312

Increase or decrease (-) in amount
owed to the Corporation by Public
Law 480 general fund for foreign
assistance programs
351

0

85,313

386,711

-266,336

-653,047

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

58,803
187,149
3,360,743
1,191,216
3,372,737
1,189,139

64,418
388,282
4,133,830
1,331,496
4,145,830
1,364,010

23,999
-244,164
2,963,053
298,062
2,975,053
314,792

-40,419
-632,446
-1,170,777
-1,033,434
-1,170,777
-1,049,218

BA

1,987

1,308

318

0

1,905

1,284

149

(Domestic

consumption

(Purchase of
donations)

commodities

Total Federal funds, Special
Activities.
Total Federal funds Commodity
Credit Corporation.
Total Federal funds
Corporations.

-4

-9,930

9,930

RURAL DEVELOPMENT
Rural Development Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Rural Development Service

See footnotes at end of table.




452

9551
1,135

217

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
RURAL DEVELOPMENT-Continued
Rural Electrification Administration
Federal

Funds

General and special funds:

452
452

0
BA

594
17,489

Total Federal funds Rural
Electrification Administration.

BA
0

16,794
17,489
17,388

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA

30,000
33,990
10,000
164
7,500
3,302
4,000
2,718
120,742

Loans
Salaries and expenses

19,0461
D
639J
20,664
19,685
20,664

20,198

513

20,036
20,198
20,036

-628
513
-628

30,000
50,459
10,000
6,000
5,000
5,205
5,000
6,680
127,9021
D
4,123J
132,384

150,000
66,000
10,000
10,000

120,000
15,541

Farmers Home Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Rural water and waste disposal
grants
451
Rural development grants
452
Rural housing for domestic farm
labor
401
Mutual and self-help housing

401

Salaries and expenses

452

117,246

720
142,850

4,000
-5,000
1,074
-5,000
-5,960
10,825

142,850

10,466

6,279

Public enterprise funds:

Self-help housing land development
fund
401
Rural housing insurance fund:
Indefinite
401
Permanent, indefinite
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.
Agricultural credit insurance fund:
Indefinite
351
Rural development insurance fund:
Indefinite
452
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.
Economic opportunity loan fund ...452
Total Federal funds Farmers
Home Administration.
Trust Funds
State rural rehabilitation funds
Total Federal funds
Development.
Total trust
funds
Development.
See footnotes at end of table.




452
Rural
Rural

0

-54

763

200

-563

BA

89.170

124,592

122,000

-2,392

BA
BA
0
BA
0
BA

863
1,485,721
1,290,034
74,554
93,572

1,416

1,616

BA
0

-1,203,000
485,262
-403,110
17,446

162,000
169,214
95,500
25,2141

1,365,000
-316,048
498,610
-27,103

0
BA
0

391,670
148,647
-4,815
2,214,220
1,684,804

34,871
-103,500
-3,300
845,612
-1,511,419

75,000
-1,800
620,894
556,749

178,500
1,500
-224,718
2,068,168

0
BA
0
0

11
8
2,233,696
1,704,097
11
8

866,287
-1,489,620

642,400
578,069

-223,887
2,067,689

218

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS
So/7 Conservation Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Conservation operations

302

BA

and

167,309

O
River basin surveys
investigations

B
A

200,375

2,368

165,135

192,1161
»5,891}
201,357

200,004

-1,353

12,341

14,1221

14,798

267
-246

301
O

Watershed planning

301

11,960

15,155

14,909

B
A

10,095

10,7601
/>339J
11,603

11,236
12,273

670

136,576

12,049

137,918

-16,216

20,575

379

O
prevention
301

Great plains conservation

program
302

8,255

BA

157,847

O

Watershed and flood
operations

131,576

122,6431
D
1,884J
154,134

18,253

20,0001

B
A

137

0
Resource conservation
development

16,432

19,400

19,700

300

BA

and

17,204

19,8681
°452j
25,435

25,012

4,692

302

25,722

287

BA
O

383,049
352,104

388,680
427,084

408,572
410,526

19,892
-16,558

BA
O

601
903

553
781

553
581

-200

BA
O

171
258

247
330

247
336

Total, Miscellaneous
contributed funds.

BA
O

772
1,161

800
1,111

800
917

Total trust funds Soil
Conservation Service.

BA
O

772
1,161

800
1,111

800
917

-194

Total Federal funds
Environmental Programs.

BA
O

383,049
352,104

388,680
427,084

408,572
410,526

19,892
-16,558

Total trust funds Environmental
Programs.

BA
O

772
1,161

800
1,111

800
917

-194

352

B
A

37,064

42,275

1,520

Payments to States and possessions
352

BA
0

0
Total Federal funds Soil
Conservation Service.
Trust

18,746

Funds

Miscellaneous contributed funds-.
(Water resources and power):
Permanent, indefinite
301
(Conservation and land
management): Permanent,
indefinite
302

6

-194

CONSUMER PR06RAMS
Agricultural Marketing Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

33,318

Marketing services

See footnotes at end of table.




39,5261
°1,229|
40,542

1,600

1,600

-1,600

1,539

1,600

-1,600

42,062

1,520

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

219

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
CONSUMER PROGRAMS-Continued
Agricultural Marketing Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Funds for strengthening markets,
income, and supply (section 32)
(special fund): Permanent
604
Permanent, indefinite

'-248,761

8A

-178,403

BA
0

706,450
786,846

288,414
492,021

Perishable Agricultural Commodities
Act fund (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
352

BA
0

1,538
1,271

1,640
1,624

358,772
295,910
'-248,761
1,640
1,641

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Marketing Service.

BA
0

746,652
822,974

332,409
535,787

153,926
90,852

-178,483

BA
0

40,427
41,706
-1,668

42,097
42,447

1,670

0

46,477
46,517
1,128

BA
0

46,477
47,645

40,427
40,038

42,097
42,447

2,409

BA

648,083

653,029
4
24,623

739,305

-1,383,578

BA

199,631

705,926

0

751,326

1,298,297
^24,623

'-739,305
737,111
'-737,111
1,476,000

-1,322,920

Trust

-444,872
17
-444,935

Funds

Agricultural Marketing Service
funds: Permanent, indefinite

trust
352

Milk market orders assessment fund
351
Total trust funds Agricultural
Marketing Service.

741
1,668
1,670

Food and nutrition Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Child nutrition programs

604

Appropriation, Permanent

Grants for child food assistance..604
Appropriation, Permanent
Special milk program

BA
0

'-1,476,000
'9,186
'1,673,280
'1,649,100

BA
BA
0

604

97,123
50,236

120,000
120,000

Food donations program

604

Food stamp program

604 BA

2,995,367

3,984,704

0

2,844,815

'-164
3,672,385

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

3,940,204
3,646,377
4,686,856
4,469,351
46,477
47,645

5,488,118
5,115,305
5,820,527
5,651,092
40,427
40,038

Total Federal funds Food and
Nutrition Service.
Total Federal funds Consumer
Programs.
Total trust funds
Programs.
See footnotes at end of table.

580-000 O - 75 - 15




Consumer

BA
0

1,682,466

1,649,100
-120,000

18,097
5,839
5,839
3,446,905
'-217,300
3,860,000
'-217,300
4,917,910
5,315,736
5.071,836
5,406,588
42,097
42,447

-101,903
5,839
5,839
-754,935

-29,685
-570,208
200,431
-748,691
-244,504
1.670
2,409

220

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
FOREST PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT
Forest Sen/ice
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Forest protection and utilization...302

8A

469,132
440,866

Construction and land acquisition
302

BA

Youth Conservation Corps

302

BA

Forest roads and trails

302

BA

Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA

27,093

401,238
'84,000
'10,599
428,188
'84,000
30,908

447,730

-48,107

455,329

-56,859

14,475

-16,862

DAOQ

0

0

0
Acquisition of lands for national
forests, special acts (special
fund)
302

BA
0

Acquisition of lands to complete
land exchanges (special fund).302

BA
0

Acquisition
Indians

Klamath
302

BA
0

49,092
10,240

23,917
10,400

-25,175
8

5,269

11,139
-3,714
°3,714
-61,611
140,000
(124,578)
139,817
161
140

10,400

-739
-78,389

(108,225
103,228
161
161

(-16,353)
-36,589

140,000
140,000
(97,700)
110,570
94
26

BA
0

improvements
302

33,825
10,000

35
53

2
1
-4
-23
-49,000
-49,000

700
700
1,013

39
76
49,000
49,000
700
700
1,344

984
3,278
2,380
40

1,355
1,260
1,760
303

1,356
3,674
3,400

1
2,414
1,640
-303

BA
0

70,945
66,990

77,318
74,646

81,275
79,468

3,957
4,822

(Other general purpose fiscal
assistance): Permanent,
indefinite
852

BA
0

114,638
114,638

120,518
120,518

118,898
118,898

-1,620
-1,620

Total, Forest Service permanent
appropriations (special
funds).

BA
0

185,583
181,628

197,836
195,164

200,173
198,366

2,337
3,202

-428
-2,239
976,948
773,621

-607
3,298
866,306
963,425

-350
500
678,707
797,060

257
-2,798
-187,599
-166,365

of

lands,

Cooperative range
(special fund)
Assistance to
planting

States

for

tree
302

BA

Construction and operation of
recreation facilities: Indefinite .302

BA
0

Other general funds
302
Forest Service permanent
appropriations (special funds):
(Conservation and land
management): Permanent,
indefinite
302

0

0

5
5

700
700
1,359

4

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

302

Consolidated working fund
Total Federal
Service.
See footnotes at end of table.




funds

302
Forest

0
0
BA
0

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

221

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
FOREST PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT
—Continued
Forest Service—Continued
Trust Funds
Cooperative work: Permanent, indefinite
302

BA
0

66,617

59,573

68,600
61,310

72,900
84,557

4,300
23,247

866,306
963,425

678,707
797,060

-166,365

Total Federal funds Forest
Protection and Management.

BA

976,948

0

773,621

Total trust funds Forest
Protection and Management.

BA
0

66,617
59,573

68,600

61,310

72,900
84,557

4,300
23,247

BA
0

13,649,790
10,278,037

14,301,984

12,421,493

-1,880,491

9,283,193

10,207,611

924,418

-194,817

-206,057

-211,259

-5,202

0 I

-307,431

-310,670

-343,101

-32,431

BA l
0 I
B/
0
BAl

-2,918

-2,913

-3,139

-226

-21

-21

-134

-64

-64

-248

-226

-226

BA
0

13,144,221

13,782,033
8,763,242

11,863,683

BA
0

116,862
111,285
-66,617

113,057
105,694
-68,600

119,007
131,114
-72,900

5,950
25,420
-4,300

-50,244

-44,457

-46,107

-1,650

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300
302
350
450
600
902
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
302

BA
0 1
BAl

0I
BAl
0I

BAl

0 I
B
A

Total trust funds

9,772,468

9,649,801

-1,918,350
886,559

0I
BAl

352

-21

-187,599

1 ..
.
-5,576

Total Department of Agriculture

BA

0

-7,363

12,107

19,470

13,144,222

13,782,033

11,863,683

-1,918,350

9,766,892

8,755,879

9,661,908

906,029

11.1801
^275/
11,805

12,504

1,049

12,242

437

1,900

1,000

-900

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
403

BA

8,589

0
Special foreign currency program.403

8,336

BA

2,940

0
See footnotes at end of table.




839

222

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Participation in
expositions

States
403

United

BA
0

150
9,327

-5,000
2,177

403

BA
0

2,700
2,370

530
681

366

Miscellaneous Federal funds

5,530
-1,496
-366

Intragovemmental funds:

Working capital fund

403

0

200

..

Consolidated working fund

403

0

139

...

Total Federal funds
Administration.

General

BA
0

14,379
21,211

6,455
16,248

13,034
13,923

6,579
-2,325

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
403

BA
0

412
456

503
460

500
503

-3
43

BA

41,117

47,6041

54,863

5,966

0

40,306

»1,260J
48,490

BA

19,100

0

18,282

Consolidated working fund: Indefinite
403

BA
0

265
-2,895

Total Federal funds Social and
Economic Statistics
Administration.

BA
0

60,482
55,693

B
A

21

BA
0

3,576
3,775

4,890
4,400

Total Federal funds Business
Economics and Statistics.

BA
0

60.482
55,693

71,772
73,813

83,056
80,276

11,284
6,463

Total trust funds Business
Economics and Statistics.

BA
0

3,597
3,775

4,890
4,400

4,481
3,500

-409
-900

Trust

Funds

BUSINESS ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Social and Economic Statistics
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

Periodic censuses and programs..403

Trust

53,203

4,713

22,2501
"625}
25,323

*28,193

5,318

27,073

1,750

71,772
73,813

83,056
80,276

11,284
6,463

....

Funds

Special studies, services, and projects:
Indefinite
403
Permanent, indefinite

...

]
4,481]
3,500

-409

-900

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE
Economic Development Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

assistance
452

BA
0

220.500
236,633

244,950
273,868

290.000
256,609

45,050
-17,259

Administration of economic
development assistance programs
452

BA
0

20,007
20,221

22,900
22,824

24,271
23,785

1,371
961

Economic development
programs

See footnotes at end of table.




223

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1974
actual

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE-Con.
Economic Development Administration—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Job opportunities program

504

125,0001
M 25,000 J
31,375

BA
0

93,6251

'-31,375

M3.625J
-20,809

Public enterprise funds:

revolving
452

0

-21,027

-21,868

working fund,
grant administration
452

0

-70

70

BA
0

240,507
235,757

267,850
274,894

BA

41,987

0

Economic
fund

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

development

1,059

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated
integrated
fund

-70
314,271

46,421

259,585

-15,309

38,4971
°20J

42,081

3,564

40,326

41,125

41,374

249

23,349
17,646
282,494
276,083
23,349
17,646

20,562
20,870
306,367
316,019
20,562
20,870

26,436
19,505
356,352
300,959
26,436
19,505

5,874
-1,365
49,985
-15,060
5,874
-1,365

BA

53,547

-4,350

51,032

57,603
"1,180
"1,137
58,411
"649

55,570

0

Total Federal funds Economic
Development Administration.

55,3091
"27J

-3,724

BA
0

4,514

Regional Action Planning Commissions
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Regional development programs...452

Trust

Funds

Regional action planning commissions:
Permanent, indefinite
452
Total Federal funds Economic
Development Assistance.
Total trust funds Economic
Development Assistance.

PROMOTION OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
Domestic and International Business
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operations and administration

403

Financial and technical assistance
403

-12,000
2,887

6,717

12,000
3,830

7,650
106

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

403

Total Federal funds Domestic
and International Business
Administration.
Trust




23

..

BA
0

53,547
55,569

47,920
61,947

55,570
62,053

BA
0

3,115
2,740

4,354
4,500

4,349
4,500

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
403
See footnotes at end of table.

0

-5
....

224

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
PROMOTION OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
—Continued
Minority Business Enterprise
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Minority business development

403

B
A
0

35,650
46,637

52.000
62,064

0
B
A
0

35,650
46,637

52.000
62,154

52,615
50,061

B
A

11,253

11,1671

52,615
50,061

615
-12,003

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

403

Total Federal funds Minority
Business Enterprise.

90 .

-90
615
-12,093

United States Travel Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

403

11,587

343

"J
10,243

11,200

957

11,253
10,906

11.244
10,243

11,587
11,200

343
957

100,450
113,112

111,164
134,344

119,772
123,314

8.608
-11,030

3.115
2,740

4,354
4,500

4,349
4,500

-5

B
A

370,440

441,640
r
837
°7,662

"499,392

48,968

0

Salaries and expenses

394,987

424,980

464,627

39,647

BA

12,000

18,038

3,019

Dill

0

10,900

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

403

Total Federal funds United
States Travel Service.
Total Federal funds Promotion
of Industry and Commerce.
Total trust funds Promotion of
Industry and Commerce.

0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

6

...

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
national Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operations, research, and facilities
306

Coastal zone management

302

0
Promote and develop fishery
products and research pertaining
to American fisheries (special
fund): Permanent, indefinite ....403

547

12,0001
'3,000
D
19
19,080
'1,000

15,5331
'1.500J

-3,047

BA
0

7,288
6,627

7,750
7,794

7,428
7,278

-322
-516

-2,764
325
-332
101
145
-1,164

-1,150

-1,980

-830

BA
0
BA
0

Public enterprise funds:

Fisheries loan fund

403

Offshore shrimp fisheries fund

403

Fishermen's guaranty fund

403

Federal ship financing fund, fishing
vessels
403
See footnotes at end of table.




600
61
61
-114

-600
61
61
-104

10

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

225

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY—Continued
Hational Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration— Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Revolving fund

306

Consolidated working fund

306

Total Federal funds National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration.
Trust

0
0
BA
0

312
3,218
390,154
401,576

BA
0

5,554
4,954

-2,994 ..
.
473,254
449,257

524,919
486,915

2,994
51,665
37,658

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
306

6,458
4,400

6,850
4,400 ..
.

32
9

national Fire Prevention and Control
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operations, research,
administration

and
451

6,000
5,325

BA
0

10,500
9,000

4,500
3,675

75,566]
<20
°2,OO3J
76,560

84,792

7,203

83,339

6,779

59,644
"1,000
r
332
°1,360
63,583
"500
1,790

*61,727

-609

2,585

795

64,126
64,083

64,312
62,131

186
-1,952

Patent and Trademark Office
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

BA

71,982
72,972

Science and Technical Research
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Scientific and technical research and
services
403

BA

63,947

62,725
Intragovernmental funds:

403

BA
0

Consolidated working fund-. Indefinite
403

BA
0

Total Federal funds Science
and Technical Research.

BA
0

1,335
-2,351
38
-596
65,320
59,778

BA

3
1

BA
BA

7,512
7,268
527,456
534,326
13.097
12,222

61,6311
"500J

Working capital fund

Trust

Funds

Information products and
Indefinite
Permanent, indefinite
Total Federal funds
and Technology.

services:
403

Science

Total trust funds Science and
Technology.
See footnotes at end of table.




-1,952

0
BA
0
BA
0

1,997
9,203
9,203
620,969
595,225
15,661
13,603

11,200
11,200
684,523
641,385
18,050
15,600

1,997
63,554
46,160
2,389
1,997

226

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
OCEAN SHIPPING
Maritime Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Ship construction

406

Operating-differential subsidies: 406
Contract authority, Permanent,
indefinite.
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
0

B
A

275,000
200,257
226,589

275,000
256,000
237,500

245,000
315,000
262,916

-30,000
59,000
25,416

(242,800
243,170
25,900
23,989
40,333
"166

*(315,936)
315,936
*12,232
24,300
M5.155

(73,136)
72,766
-13,668
311
3,927

Research and development

406

0
BA
0

Operations and training

406

B
A

(244,515)
257,919
19,000
24,365
36,826

0

34,987

39,909

43,550

3,641

0
0
0

-14,338
-50
-387

-13,844
-311
-432

-20,214
-499

-6,370
31
1
-67

Total Federal funds Maritime
Administration.

0
BA
0

6
9
557,415
502,822

-16
579,628
548,465

89
565,303
678,162

15
0
-14,325
129,697

Trust Funds
Special studies, services and projects:
Permanent, indefinite
406

BA
0

BA
0

15
15
557,415
502,822
15
15

56
56
579,628
548,465
56
56

36
36
565,303
678,162
36
36

-20
-20
-14,325
129,697
-20
-20

BA
0

1,542,676
1,503,247

1,696,355
1,684,114

1,822,040
1,838,019

125,685
153,905

-2

-1

-I

-2,179

-2,275

-2,275

-38,100

-34,644
_1

-34,229

Public enterprise funds:

Federal ship financing fund

406

Vessel operations revolving fund..406
War risk insurance revolving fund
406
Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund
406

Total Federal
Shipping.
Total trust
Shipping.

funds
funds

Ocean
Ocean

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Intrafund transactions
803

BA
0

BA1

0I
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300
400

BA1
0 \
BA1

0I
450
902
Total Federal funds
See footnotes at end of table.




BA1.

0t
BA1

-1,426

-1,656

1,500,969
1,461,540

1,657,772
1,645,531

0}
BA
0

-139
-2,639
1,782,757
1,798,736

415
-132
-983
124,985
153,205

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

227

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public

306

403

43,585
36,854

46,026
43,889

53,852
43,644

7,826
-245

BA1

-5,555

-6,458

-6,850

-392

-14,204

-18,447

-20,030

-1,583

0 j

BA1

0 I
406
452

BA1
0 |
BA1

-15

-56

-882

-986

-36
-1,346

20
-360

0 \
BA

Total trust funds

Interfund transactions

452

22,929

20,079

25,590

5,511

0
BA1

16,198
-22,466

17,942
-19,576

15,382
-25,090

-2,560
-5,514

1,501,432
1,455,272

1,658,275
1,643,897

1,783,257
1,789,028

124,982
145,131

8,264,400

179,422

8,268,6411
"359J
5,784,900

49,000
-63,080

5,800,000
1,828,300

-37,000
66,000

1,816,7541
"246J
7,400,600

78,000

0I
Total Department of Commerce

BA
0

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY
MILITARY PERSONNEL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military personnel, Army

Military personnel, Air Force

Reserve personnel, Army

051

BA

5,586,100

0
BA

5,483,292
1,664,334
1,580,621

BA

7,479,100
7,365,584

7,780,2631
"28,265
*276,450J
8,192,094
"27,906
5,679,8101
*168,170J
5,837,000
1,695,4561
"6,140
'60,704]
1,733,106
"5,894
7,229,5311
4
11,6691
*258,756j
7,493,564
"11,436
493,8001

-99,356

7,340,7671
"233J
464,600

-164,000

Reserve personnel, Marine Corps..051
See footnotes at end of table.




475,500
433,296

467,000
'-3,700

453,0001
'-800J

-11,100

BA

220,600

-22,273

215,153

211,9001
'-6,000
*7,373J
226,000
'-5,200

191,000

0

051

BA
0

Reserve personnel, Navy

051

7,720,115

0

Military personnel, Marine Corps..051

7,736,000

0

051

BA
0

Military personnel, Navy

051

194,0001
'-800J

-27,600

66,800
66,000

72,700
71,000

BA
0

61,400
57,913

M.500J

-24,700

5,900
5,000

228

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
MILITARY PERSONNEL—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Reserve personnel, Air Force

051

BA
0

133.847
118,571

147,865
135,400

160,700
152,600

12,835
17,200

National Guard personnel, Army ...051

B
A

625,500

660,800]

697,300

31,300

0

579,140

*9>00j
656,000
'-3,700

692,0001

38,900

BA

185,083

213,200

8,460

0

174,504

National Guard personnel, Air Force
051

204,527]
'-2,000
£
2,213j
199,000
'-1,800

'-800J

212,0001
'-2001

14,600

funds

Military

25,077,700
24,999,000

94,508
-37,000

6,040,6001
'235,300/
6,046,000
'235,000

6,885,200

609,300

6,883,7001

603,000

6,587,934

6.240.332]
C
177,498
"98,041

7,352.000

836.129

0
B
A

6,290,454

6,507,000

(42,214)
7,073,000

(42,214)
566,000

6,594,096

7,123,675
c
100,800
"61,000

0

Total Federal
Personnel.

5,960,497

7,028,000

442,263

444,284
c
11.300
"3.900
454,000

BA
0

24,167.464
23,728,189

BA

5,150,700

0

5,127,554

B
A

24.983,192
25,036,000

RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Retired pay, Defense

051

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation and maintenance, Army
051
Liquidation of contract authority....
Operation and Maintenance, Navy
051
Liquidation of contract authority....
Operation and maintenance, Marine
Corps
051

BA

0
maintenance,

Force

Air

391,064

(67,000)
551,000

2,348.659]
c
5,092
"45,796
2,273,000

2,569.800

170,253

2,514,000

241,000

274,800]
c
4,089
"5,319
285,000

332,300

48.092

326,000

41,000

BA

1.559,544

1,541,718

See footnotes at end of table.




264.067

245,521

47,816

(67,000)
7,742,000

7,191,000

B
A

507,300

36,000

6,570,909

0

Operation and maintenance, Army
Reserve
051

(54,000)
946,000

636,670

Liquidation of contract authority....
Operation and maintenance, Defense
agencies
051

(54,000)
7,974,000

490,000

7.192.4301
65,400
"61,800

051

1,034,525

7,956,300

6.900.840

0

and

B
A

0

Operation

8,320,000

229

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Operation and maintenance, Navy
Reserve..
051

Operation and maintenance, Marine
Corps Reserve
051

Operation and maintenance, Air
Force Reserve
051

Operation and maintenance, Army
National Guard
051

Operation and maintenance, Air
National Guard
051

National Board for the Promotion of
Rifle Practice, Army
051
Naval petroleum reserve

051

B
A

198,050

244,100
'1,900

308,600

62,412

0
B
A

151,219

238,000

289,000

51,000

12,100

372

12,378

11,7001
C

A

0
B
A

239,100

0
B
A

545,980

0
B
A

552,925

0
B
A
0
B
A

8,169

230,238

503,287

534,955

12,000

1,000

290,7801
c
3,600
"3,600
287,000

343,800

45,820

339,000

52,000

588,1001
'9,446 •
D
\ 0,282
601,000

678,200

70,372

673,000

72,000

654,000
c
8,200
"6,900
659,000

723,500

54,400

718,000

59,000

233

50

11,000

169

1781I

134

"5
220
69,400
J
17,500
50 000

0

230
117,700
M l 7,700
99,0001

10
-86,900
-42,700

•'12,200

Claims, Defense
Contingencies Defense

051
..051

Court of Military Appeals, Defense

051
Miscellaneous expired accounts. ..051
Total Federal funds Operation
and Maintenance.

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
0
B
A
0

52,100
48,822

54,600

66,000

71,600
71,000

17,000
5,000

5,000

2,500
5,714

5,000
3,670

2,500
-2,044

1,065
1,066

1,134
1,100

69
34

23.955,360
22,478,082

26,242,287
25,669,200

29,181,867
28,245,500

2,939,580
2,576,300

154,400
104,646

225,460
90,000

"362,300
232,000

136,840
142,000

598,700
840,899

390,600
537,000

"460,800
421,000

70,200
-116,000

295,400
270,476

339,800
420,000

"989,300
609,000

649,500
189,000

934,300
944,313

692,749
673,000

751,400
882,000

58,651
209,000

497,190
398,153

643,200
391,000

1,002,800
605,000

359,600
214,000

191
914
703
201

PROCUREMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Aircraft procurement, Army

..051

Missile procurement, Army

051

Procurement of weapons and tracked
combat vehicles Army
051
Procurement of ammunition, Army

051
Other procurement, Army
See footnotes at end of table.




.051

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

230

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
PROCUREMENT—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Aircraft procurement, Navy
Weapons procurement, Navy

051
..051

Shipbuilding and conversion, Navy
Other procurement, Navy

051
051

Procurement, Marine Corps

051

Aircraft procurement, Air Force- ..051
Missile procurement, Air Force... ..051
Other procurement, Air Force

...051

Procurement, Defense agencies. ...051
Inventory replenishment, Defense .051
Procurement of aircraft and missiles,
Navy
051
Procurement of equipment
missiles, Army

and

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
0

2,817,700
207,449

2.775.400
1,440,000

"3,077,000
2,106,000

301,600
666,000

800.700
122,269

725.300
532,000

"1,224,200
801,000

498,900
269,000

3,492,900
2,104,419

3.059.000
2,358,000

"5,446,000
2,631,000

2,387,000
273,000

1,305,000
1,398,774

1.555.900
1,504,000

1,981,900
1,507,000

426,000
3,000

207,732
128,156

204.600
162,000

"285,800
202,000

81,200
40,000

2,828,100
2,077,558

2.851.800
2,390,000

"4,575,500
2,671,000

1,723.700
281,000

1,404,700
1,537,068

1.533.700
1,488,000

"1,791,400
1,580,000

257,700
92,000

1,625,100
1,751,877

1,633.400
1,424,000

2,342,800
1,778,000

709,400
354,000

66,000
64,112

98,416
81,000

128.300
94,000

29,884
13,000

'300,000
'90,000

300,000
90,000

3,065,548

1,235,000

461,000

-774,000

225,528

60,000

-70,000

-130,000

B
A
0

17,027,922
15,241,245

16,729,325
14,785,000

24,719,500
16,600,000

7,990,175
1,815,000

B
A

1.938.846

1,716,030]
c
6,090
"19,296
1,877,000

"2,181,700

440,284

2,035,000

158,000

3,006,914]
"17,000
2,899,000

"3,467,700

443,786

3,249,000

350,000

3,274,360]
c
3,300

"3,903,200

612,347

3,740,000
"597,800
560,000

397,000
107,143
53,000

0

..051

Total Federal funds
Procurement.
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND
EVALUATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research, development, test, and
evaluation Army
051

0
Research, development, test, and
evaluation, Navy
051
Research, development, test, and
evaluation, Air Force
051

Research, development, test, and
evaluation, Defense agencies. .051
See footnotes at end of table.




2,189,724

B
A

2.681,273

0
B
A

3,069.893

BA
0

3,239,566
461,661
504,029

2,623,433

"13,193
3,343,000
490.657
507,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

231

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND
EVALUATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Director of test
Defense

and evaluation,
051

8A
0

Total Federal funds Research,
Development, Test, and
Evaluation.

8A
0

24,600
25,534
8,176,273
8,582,286

25,000
24,000
8,571,840
8,650,000

"28,500
26,000
10,178,900
9,610,000

3,500
2,000
1,607,060
960,000

578,120
631,497
609,292
398,732
247,277
266,015

656,825
490,000
606,376
537,000
456,439
282,000
31,260
18,000
59,000
38,000
35,500
21,000
43,700
40,000
22,135
20,000
16,000
11,000
1,927,235
1,457,000

"957,900
595,000
"854,000
561,000
"703,600
353,000
"141,500
32,000
"62,700
51,000
"63,000
31,000
"50,300
42,000
"36,400
23,000
"18,000
15,000
2,887,400
1,703,000

301,075
105,000
247,624
24,000
247,161
71,000
110,240
14,000
3,700
13,000
27,500
10,000
6,600
2,000
14,265
3,000
2,000
4,000
960,165
246,000

1,142,360
c
8,642
"1,552]
1,077,300

"1,221,620

69,066

1,258,400

181,100

MILITARY CONSTRUCTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military construction, Army

051

BA
0

Military construction, Navy

051

BA
0

Military construction, Air Force

051

BA
0

Military construction,
agencies

051

BA
0

Military construction, Army National
Guard
051

BA
0

Military construction,
Guard

Air National
051

BA
0

Military construction, Army Reserve
051

BA
0

Military construction, Naval Reserve
051

BA
0

Military construction,
Reserve

Defense

Air

Force
051

BA
0

Total Federal funds
Construction.

Military

BA
0

13,390
35,200
34,554
20,000
13,862
40,700
27,311
22,900
15,014
10,000
6,165
1,563,489
1,406,540

051

BA

1,091,978

FAMILY HOUSING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Family housing, Defense

878,914
Public enterprise funds:

Homeowners assistance fund,
Defense
051
Authority to spend agency debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.

BA
BA
0

7,000

5,000
3.000
12,700
1,160,554
1,090,000

1,221,620
1,260,000

-11,100
61,066
170,000

63,400
64,000

66,000
66,000

2,600
2,000

Family

BA
0

5,408
1,098,978
884,322

Operation and maintenance, Defense
Civil Preparedness Agency
051

BA
0

59,994
56,892

Total Federal
Housing.

funds

-8,000

i~6dd

CIVIL DEFENSE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

See footnotes at end of table.




232

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
CIVIL DEFENSE—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Research, shelter survey and
marking, Defense Civil
Preparedness Agency
051
Total Federal
Defense.

funds

Civil

BA
0

22.000
18,442

18.600
26,000

22.000
22,000

3.400
-4.000

BA
0

81.994
75,334

82.000
90,000

88.000
88,000

6.000
-2,000

BA
0

2.600
3.895

1.945
3,000

"2.668
4,800

723
1,800

1.000.000
515,000

"1,293.000
975,000

293.000
460,000

SPECIAL FOREIGN CURRENCY PROGRAM
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Special foreign currency program.051

MILITARY ASSISTANCE. SOUTH VIETNAMESE
FORCES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military Assistance,
Vietnamese Forces

South
052

BA
0

NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Naval Petroleum Reserve

051

J

BA
0

239,700
'148,400

239.700
148,400

-254

-1,040

REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Defense production guarantees ....051
Laundry service, Naval Academy ..051
Naval working fund

051

Intragovernmental funds:

Army stock fund

051

Navy stock fund

051

Marine Corps stock fund

051

Air Force stock fund

051

Defense stock fund

051

Army industrial fund

051

Navy industrial fund

051

Marine Corps industrial fund

051

Air Force industrial fund

051

Defense industrial fund

051

Army management fund

051

Navy management fund

051

See footnotes at end of table.




0
0
0
BA ..
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

786

-980
2
- 2 3 458

35 021

30,903

8,200

-31,299

18,200

6,948

8,400

66,139

-128,200
76.200
290,000
-4,261
-102,654
-690
21,717
5,118
863
-10,000 ..

81,993
-26,829
145,186
532
5,381
-10,747
8,572
12,954

- 3 5 021
94.000
-96,800
42,000
-75,200
8.700
-11,500
82.100
-49,700
250.000
-182,800
-3,292
-36,117
155
-36,551
-47
6

94,000
-105,000
42,000
-93,400
8,700
-19,900
82.100
78,500
173.800
-472,800
969
66,537
845
-58,268
-5,165
-857
10,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

233

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS-Con.

Federal

Funds—Continued

Intragovernmental funds:—Continued
Air Force management fund
051

2,772

1,000

500

-500

268,069

76,200
143,500

476,800
-491,600

400,600
-635,100

-\ ,847,000
'3,079,000
M.808,000
/
3,002,000

1,232,000

BA
0

Total Federal funds Revolving
and Management Funds.

'142,100
•'141,000

142,100
141,000

BA
0

1,374,100
1,335,000

1,374,100
1,335,000

0
BA
0

ALLOWANCES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Civilian and military pay raises ...051

Other Total Federal funds Allowances.
legislation
051

J

BA
BA
0
0

1,194,000

TRUST FUNDS

7,003
6,797

6,745
6,910

6,745
6,655

-255

0

-17,679

28,490

-1,555

-30,045

BA
0

7,003
-10,882

6,745
35,400

6,745
5,100

-30,300

BA

81,224,780
77,795,516

87,050,478

103,626,455

16,575,977

83,719,700

91,361,100

7,641,400

BA1
0 J

-152,638

-255,800

-584,900

-329,100

BA
0

81,072,142
77,642,878

86,794,678
83,463,900

103,041,555
90,776,200

16,246,877
7,312,300

BA
0

7,003
-10,882

6,745
35,400

6,745
5,100

-30,300

-6,552

-6,300

-6,300

81,072,593
77,625,444

86,795,123
83,493,000

103,042,000
90,775,000

16,246,877
7,282,000

5,617
5,500

5,359
-1,850

Miscellaneous trust funds-. Permanent,
indefinite
051

BA
0

Miscellaneous (trust revolving funds)
051
Total trust funds

SUMMARY

Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
..051
public...
Total Federal funds...
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

..051

Interfund transactions.

BA)

0I
BA
0

Total Department of
Defense—Military.

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL
CEMETERIAL EXPENSES, ARMY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

See footnotes at end of table.




705

BA
0

5,725
11,104

258
7,350

234

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued
CORPS OF ENGINEERS-CIVIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General investigations

301

BA
0

56,142
62,029

65,284
68,000

62,200
64,000

-3,084
-4,000

Construction, general

301

BA
0

873,589
986,571

965,178
1,047,904

1,101,203
1,109,144

136,025
61,240

Operation and maintenance, general
301

BA

426,625

446,577
C
8,524
D
4,425

547,700

88,123

0

451,629

465,000

560,000

95,000

Flood control
emergencies

301

BA
0

107,000
9,436

40,400
40,000

15,000
30,000

-25,400
-10,000

301

BA

35,084

38,800]

42,700

2,600

and

coastal

General expenses

0

0

34,256

*113j
40,000

42,600

2,600

Flood control, Mississippi River and
tributaries
301

BA
0

264,600
123,659

145,051
234,000

170,497
180,000

25,446
-54,000

Special recreation use fees (special
fund): Indefinite
301
Permanent appropriations (special
funds):
(Water resources and power):
Permanent, indefinite
301

BA
0

700
412

700
750

1,900
1,800

1,200
1,050

BA
0

2,713
725

725
2,713

800
725

75
-1,988

(Other general purpose fiscal
assistance): Permanent,
indefinite
852

BA
0

3,717
3,046

3,100
3,717

3,700
3,100

600
-617

Total, Permanent appropriations
(special funds).

BA
0

6,430
3,771

3,825
6,430

4,500
3;825

675
-2,605

0

-666

4,529

1,131

-3,398

0

24

Intragovernmental funds:

Revolving fund, Corps
Engineers—Civil

of

Consolidated working fund
Trust

301
301

-262

262 ..
..

Funds

22,000
22,000 ..
.

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300

BA
0

21,485
19,058

22,000
22,000

BA
0

Corps of Engineers—Civil, trust funds:
Permanent
301

1,770,170
1,671,121

1,720,115
1,906,875

1,945,700
1,992,500

225,585
85,625

BA
0

-13,308

-9,966

-11,406

-1,440

301

See footnotes at end of table.




-9

-9

-9

902
Total Federal funds

BA
0
BA
0

-738

-900

-1,085

-185

BA
0

1,756,115
1,657,066

1,709,240
1,896,000

1,933,200
1,980,000

223,960
84,000

235

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1974
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued
CORPS OF ENGINEERS—CIVIL—Continued
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
BA
0
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
BAl
public
301
0 j
Total trust funds

0

Total Corps of Engineers—Civil

BA
0

21,485
19,058

22,000
22,000

22,000
22,000

-21,485

-22,000

-22,000

1,756,115
1,654,639

1,709,240
1,896,000

1,933,200
1,980,000

223,960
84,000

-2,427

RYUKYU ISLANDS, ARMY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

806

0

-84

110

72

-38

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800

0

-84

110

72

-38

BAl

-381

-439

-410

29

BA
0

-381
-465

-439
-329

-410
-338

29
-9

13,842

14,505
<651

15,665

274

13,726

15,389

15,670

21
8

Administration

Total Ryukyu Islands, Army

0I

SOLDIERS' AND AIRMEN'S HOME
Trust

Funds

Operation and maintenance

705

B
A

Capital outlay

705

BA
0

Permanent,
705

BA
0

Payment of
indefinite

claims-.

1,821
5
5

-1,821
5 .
.
5 .
.

-15

Soldiers' and Airmen's Home revolving
fund (trust revolving fund)
705
Summary
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

456
530

14,298
14,241

15,396
17,215

15,670
15,675

-146

-150

-150

BA
0

14,152
14,095

15,246
17,065

15,520
15,525

274
-1,540

BA

60,000

60,174

-3,467

0

58,638

60,5051
"3.136 J
63,641

60,174

-3,467

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
705
Total Soldiers' and Airmen's
Home.

BAl
0 J_

274
-1,540

THE PANAMA CANAL
CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

See footnotes at end of table.

580-000 O - 75 - 16




806

T H E B U D G E T FOR

236

FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued
THE PANAMA CANAL—Continued
CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT—Continued

Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Capital outlay

3,500

5,790

3,000

3,661

6,857

5,030

-1,827

63,500
62,299

69,431
70,498

63,174
65,204

-6,257
-5,294

-14
(21,266)

30,000
2,000
(23,837)1
D
(2,445)j

(24,371)

-30,000
-2,000
(-1,911)

BA

63,500

99,431

63,174

-36,257

0

Canal

BA

0
Total Federal funds,
Zone Government.

806

62,285

72,498

65,204

-7,294

-23,625

-22,562

-25,570

-3,008

BA
0

-2,790

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY

Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Corporation: Panama Canal Company
fund:
406
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.
Limitation on general and
administrative expenses.
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
806

BA
0

BA1

0I
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800

BA1
0 J

-36,222

-41,757

-34,992

6,765

902

BA1
0 |

-69

-74

-81

-7

BA

3,584

35,038

2,531

-32,507

0

2,369

Total The Panama Canal

8,105

4,561

-3,544

MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Wildlife conservation, etc., military
reservations: Permanent, indefinite
303

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
301
Total Miscellaneous Accounts....
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
806

660
595

765
905

855
855

90
-50

BA
0

660
595

765
905

855
855

90
-50

-660

-765

-855

-90

-65

140

BA

1,840,055

1,820,569

2,015,346

194,777

0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

1,745,021

1,987,738

2,064,131

76,393

-23,625

-22,562

-25,570

-3,008

BA1
0 J
0

BA1

0I
See footnotes at end of table.




-140

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

237

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300

-13,968

-10,731

-12,261

BA1

-9

-9

-9

-36,603

-42,196

-35,402

6,794

-807

-974

-1,166

-192

1,765,043
1,670,009

1,744,097
1,911,266

1,940,938
1,989,723

196,841
78,457

BA
0

35,783
33,299

37,396
39,215

37,670
37,675

274
-1,540

BA1
0 J

-21,485

-22,000

-22,000

BA1

-146

-150

-150

BA
0

14,152
11,668

15,246
17,065

15,520
15,525

274
-1,540

BA
0

301

BA1
0 J

-1,530

1,779,195
1,681,677

1,759,343
1,928,331

1,956,458
2,005,248

197,115
76,917

0 \
800

BA1

0 \
902
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
301
705

BA1
0 |
BA
0

0 \
Total trust funds
Total Department
Defense-Civil.

of

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

553

BA

166,963

196,3561
<;4,541J

203,460

2,563

0

165,077

195,600

214,741

19,141

0

-203
200,897
195,600

203,460
214,741

2^563
19,141

*696,536

-160,111

Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for certification and
other services
553
Total Federal funds Food and
Drug Administration.
Trust

BA
0

166,963
164,874

Funds

Unconditional gift fund

553

0

7

HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Health services

See footnotes at end of table.




551

BA

922,790

0
Buildings and facilities

551

680,431

BA
0

9,500
4,219

849,7661
"20,877
M3.996J
843,929
"10,877

734,1191
"10,000j

-110,687

238

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

551

Emergency health

054

250,549
216,056
6,008
5,445

BA
0

310,999

17,896

321,752

29,013

-27,175

BA
0

Indian health

25,380

52,555

283,6481
C
9,455J
292,739
808

Public enterprise funds:

Health maintenance organization
loan and loan guarantee fund.551

0

Total Federal funds Health
Services Administration.

BA
0

1,188,847
906,151

1,149,750
1,121,178

1,007,535
1,091,251

-142,215
-29,927

BA
0

139,643
133,515

139,738
138,903

133,311
149,801

-6,427
10,898

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

506,277
397,422
20,607
25,641
526,884
423,063
286,334
269,311
43,949
43,096
153,541
149,182

546,605
522,405
22,000
34,781
568,605
557,186
286,363
306,205
42,375
48,261
144,648
172,747

"583,000
550,350
22,000
31,451
605,000
581,801
"292,794
293,000
"43,536
40,010
"148.409
147,236

36,395
27,945
-3,330
36,395
24,615
6,431
-13,205
1,161
-8,251
3,761
-25,511

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

121,291
118,107
111,044
104,815
168,328
161,037
125,259
117,834

111,915
128,614
105,477
110,638
156,576
176,000
117,963
134,732

41,166
37,110
28,365
27,894

37,621
41,250
28,027
31,287

"114,955
121,230
"108,711
110,902
"161,630
178,233
"106,062
116,374
"16,190
9,394
"39,201
39,228
"31,113
30,552

3,040
-7,384
3,234
264
5,054
2,233
-11,901
-18,358
16,190
9,394
1,580
-2,022
3,086
-735

CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Preventive health services

553

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Cancer Institute:
(Health research and education)
552
(Health planning
construction)

and
554

Total, National Cancer Institute.
National Heart and Lung Institute
552
National Institute of Dental Research
552
National Institute of Arthritis,
Metabolism and Digestive
Diseases
552
National Institute of Neurological
Diseases and Stroke
552
National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases
552
National Institute of General Medical
Sciences
552
National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development
552
National Institute on Aging

552

National Eye Institute

552

National Institute of Environmental
Health Sciences
552
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

239

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

552

BA

128,057

0

Research resources

85,850
4,544
4,080

86,9401
'-6,305J
105,122
4,524
5,138

"81,058

423

103,039
4,540
4,546

-2,083
16
-592

28,815
27,000
3,000
10,360
19,986

750
2,052
2,468

19,940

2,262

John E. Fog arty International Center
for Advanced Study in the Health
Sciences
552

BA
0

National Library of Medicine

552

BA
0

Buildings and facilities: Indefinite
552

BA
0

Office of the Director

BA

26,293
26,138
8,000
2,212
12,852

0

13,407

28,065
27,000
3,000
8,308
17,1921
«326J
17,678

General research support grants..552

0

National Institutes of
Management fund

Health
552

0

18,257
-6,277

-2,000

Grants management fund

554

0

Service and supply fund

552

BA
0

Total Federal funds National
Institutes of Health.

BA
0

552

Intragovernmental funds:

6,862
69
751
1,785,976
1,602,729

2,000

-53
1,733,312
1,868,113

90
1,805,000
1,832,935

143
71,688
-35,178

372,877
-2,326
427,890
199,916
265,410
104,671
103,877

"371,629

1,078

396,543
"177,452
220,791
"104,546
100,527

-31,347
-22,464
-44,619
-125
-3,350

15,542
653,627
733,403

-5,714
-21,511
-85,030
-47,700

ALCOHOL, DRUG ABUSE, AND MENTAL HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Alcohol, drug abuse, and mental
health:
(Health care services)
551

BA

420,223

0
(Health research and education)
552

BA
0

(Prevention and control of health
problems)
553

BA
0

(Health planning
construction)

554

BA
0

Total, Alcohol, drug abuse, and
mental health.

BA
0

257,620
257,678
231,262
100,710
87,081
14,250
15,248
792,861
591,211

BA
BA

40,875

0

40,388

Saint Elizabeths Hospital
Current, indefinite

and

551

Payment to Saint Elizabeths Hospital
551
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

F

21,256
675,138
818,433
'1341
45,240
G
2,326
47,554
'134

I

(
4,906

-42,782

"48,064
'48,064

48,064
48,064

THE BUDGET F 0 R

240

FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
ALCOHOL, DRUG ABUSE, AND MENTAL HEALTH

ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Operation of commissary, Lexington
Clinical Research Center
551

0

4

0

-28

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund, Lexington
Clinical Research Center
551
Total Federal funds Alcohol,
Drug Abuse, and Mental
Health Administration.

-66

-21

45

BA
0

833,736
631,575

722,838
866,055

701,691
786,352

-21,147
-79,703

BA

681,904

"421,891

-15,164

0
BA

521,709
434,193

437,8321
'-777J
567,441
-271,8321

445,497
"189,596

-121,944
394,928

0

407,303

HEALTH RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Health resources:
(Health research and education)
552
(Health

planning

and

construction)

554

Total, Health resources

'66,500/

BA
0

1,116,097
929,012

488,874
'23,500
231,723
1,079,815

468,9171
'43,000}
611,487
957,414

-457
379,764
-122,401

10,000
16,113
2,284
2,284
1,716
1,716
625,487
977,527

10,000
7,936
16
16
-16
-16
389,764
-114,465

Public enterprise funds:

Medical facilities guarantee and loan
fund
554
Health education loans
552

BA
0
BA
0
Nurse training fund
552 BA
0
Total Federal funds Health
BA
Resources Administration.
0

.
26,088
4,000
802
-447
1,120,097
955,455

8,177
2,268
2,268
1,732
1,732
235,723
1,091,992

OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR
HEALTH
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Assistant Secretary for Health

554

Retirement pay and medical benefits
for commissioned officers:
Indefinite
551
Scientific activities overseas (special
foreign currency program)
552

BA

12,945

23,288

-7,704

12,302
34,251
31,633

30,2151
G
777J
12,849
39,200
34,013

0
BA
0

36,812
45,013
42,321

23,963
5,813
8,308

BA
0

1,912
11,499

10,266

12,583

2,317

Intragovernmental funds:

Service and supply fund
See footnotes at end of table.




551 BA
0

44
-84

-245

-119

126

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

241

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR
HEALTH-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:—Continued

Consolidated working funds

552

Total Federal funds Office of
Assistant Secretary for
Health.
Trust

0

-1,097

BA
0

49,152
54,253

....
70,192
56,883

68,301
91,597

-1,891
34,714

BA
0

1,448
1,156

1,463
1,664

1,527
1,556

64
-108

BA

2,045,168

2,219,819

*130,500

120,899

1,666,900
40,000

1,890,552
42,0001
G

2,210,218
2,193,395
42,055

302,843
21

Funds

Public Health Service
Permanent, indefinite

trust

funds:
554

EDUCATION DIVISION
Office of Education
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Elementary and secondary education

501
Appropriation, Permanent

BA

0
Indian education

501

BA

34J

School assistance
affected areas

in

federally
501

BA

593,416

38,805
656,016

558,527

0

630,508
75,000
206,955
147,109

15,694

501

BA
0

258,193
204,575

Education for the handicapped ....501
Permanent

BA
BA
0

147,079

Occupational, vocational, and adult
education
501
Permanent

BA

588,549

BA
0

569,638

BA

1,860,497

BA
BA
0

2,700
43,000
1,176,308

BA

163,124

Emergency school aid

Higher education

502

Permanent
Reappropriation..

122,744

7,161

125,000
641,964
7,161
630,955
2,072,971
"67,400
2,700

149,896

Library resources

503

Educational development
Innovative and
programs

experimental

See footnotes at end of table.




503

503

BA
0
BA
0

1,763,000
"47,000
118,041]
"15,000
F
-2,791J
169,489

177,510
246,112

-32
160,000

39,000
"56,000
"210,000
213,990'
"157,500
101,700
122,277
"75,0001
100,000]
138,000
M5.712
"523,006
74,661
386,456
"259,939
2,005,541

2,030,000
"20,400
10,000
"20,000

195
-390,016
-259,018
26,700
-84,678
27,891
13,000
-5,746
15,440
-137,530

240,400
-100,250

114,5001
"10,500/

-44,489

43,046
38,993
5,829

32
-116,954
38,993
5,829

242

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
EDUCATION DIVISION—Continued
Office of Education—Continued
Federal
Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

BA
0

1,000
1,908

1,000
3,676

B
A

87,523

0

77,057

502

BA

88,668

Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent.

BA
0

20,000 .
83,823

Educational activities overseas
(special foreign currency program)
503
Salaries and expenses-. Indefinite.503

2,000
1,776

1,000
-1,900

114,4001
<;2,345J
112,000

112,525

-4,220

105,309

-6,691

115,000
'82,600

201,787

4,187

129,357
'46,464

155,787'
'36,136

16,102

2,948

2,701

2,192

-509

1,340
12,081

1,500
11,268

1,500
9,605

-1,663

Public enterprise funds:

Student loan insurance fund

Higher education facilities loan and BA
insurance fund
502
BA
Permanent, indefinite
BA
0
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
503
Total Federal funds Office of
Education.

0

-348

BA
0

6,127,876
4,884,915

6,381,938
5,965,029

5,963,390
6,043,445

-418,548
78,416

Trust Funds
Special statistical compilations and BA
surveys: Permanent, indefinite 503 0

1
9

20
39

21
26

1
-13

70,0001
<-357J
82,200

"80,000

9,643

84,363

2,163

11,500
9,919
2,3071
6
56J
2,129
13,863
12,048
13.863
12,048

17,500
11,500
25,334

6,000
1,581
22,971

17,144
42,834
28,644
42,834
28,644

15,015
28,971
16,596
28,971
16,596

6,086,224
6,156,452
21
26

-379,934
97,175
1
-13

National Institute of Education
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Institute of Education

503 BA
0

75,700
96,635

Office of the Assistant Secretary for
Education
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses:
(Higher education)

502 BA
0
(Research and general education BA
aids)
503
0
Total, Salaries and expenses
BA
0
Total Federal funds Office of BA
the Assistant Secretary for 0
Education.
Total Federal funds Education BA
Division.
0
Total trust funds Education
Division.

See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

10,000
1,846
1,488
11,846
1,488
11,846
1,488
6,215,422
4,983,038
19

6,466,158
6,059,277
20
39

243

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING | in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, i&ND WELFARE—Continued
SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Public assistance:
(Social services)
(Health care services)

506
551

(Public assistance and other
income supplements).... ....604
(Social services)

(Health care services)

(Public assistance and
income supplements)

..506

....551

other

604

Total, Public assistance..

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

1 446 452
1,472,201

1 491 899
1,463,622

*2 066 698
2,063,613

574 799
599,991

5,016,075
5,818,391

6,293,932
6,115,557

7,766,000
7,766,000

1,472,068
1,650,443

5,200,252
5,423,354

4,313,000
4,302,073

5,166,387
5,166,387

853,387
864,314

B
A
B
A
0
0

'508,378
'-10,000
'508,378
'-10,000

B
A
B
A
0
0
B
A
B
A
0
0

'672,443
'-199,000
'672,443
•'-199,000
'548,927
M l 8,000
'548,927
'-118,000

-976,378
'-478,000
1
1

-976,378

'-478,000.

-1,083,443
'-610,000
-1,083,443
'-610,000
-929,927

M99.000
-929,927
'-499,000

B
A
0
B
A
0

11,662,779
12,713,946

13,501,579
13,284,000

13,412,085
13,409,000

-89,494
125,000

340,443
339,862

210,000
316,000

330,000
315,000

120,000
-1,000

72,775

6,953

Work incentives

504

Salaries and expenses

506

B
A

71,241
62,737

72,077

5,150

Assistance to refugees in the United
.604
States

0
B
A
0

63,8191
6
2,003J
66,927

129,000
107,770

87,000
86,000

40,300
54,000

-46,700
32,000

0
B
A
0

12,203,463
13,225,364

13,864,401
13,752,927

13,855,160
13,850,077

-9,241
97,150

B
A

2,616,393

2,846,000

2,527,706

2,847,567

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

506

Total Federal funds Social and
Rehabilitation Service.

1,049

SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payments to social security trust
and other funds:
(Health care services)
551

See footnotes at end of table.




3,609,3831
'-110,000 J
3,609,3831
'-110,000/

653,383
651,816

244

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Payments to social security trust
and other funds-.—Continued
(General retirement and
8A
disability insurance)
601

493,788
493,788

to social
and other

BA
0

3,110,181
3,021,494

Special benefits for disabled coal
miners
601

B
A

1,013,925

Total, Payments
security trust
funds.

499,323
'20,242
499,323
'20,242

565,872

46,307

565,872

46,307

3,365,565
3,367,132

4,065,255
4,065,255

699,690
698,123

999,778

19,038

876,0891
'80,844

'-23,000
G

1,000,055

807
888,896
'74,844

security

income

BA

2,211,636

4,774,000
'83,102

2,256,654

Supplemental
program

4,629,521
'83,102

604

989,7781
'6,000
'-23,000

9,038

5,538,523

596,421

'-85,000
5,542,688

745,065

'-85,000
Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund

601

0

-933

Total Federal funds Social
Security Administration.

BA
0

6,335,742
6,277,270

Trust Funds
Federal old-age and survivors insurance
trust fund: Permanent, indefinite .601
Limitation on salaries and expenses..

BA
0

50,935,184
49,483,237
(1,887,898)

Limitation on construction
Limitation on salaries and expenses..

9.180,407
9,043,495

10,495,556
10,495,721

1,315,149
1,452,226

61,820,364
58,324,712
64,832,418
56,565,979
(2,004,729)1 (2,373,132)
D
(42,590)J
(6,300)
(8,232)
(78,668) .

3,495,652
8,266,439
(325,813)
(-1,932)
(-78,668)

Federal disability insurance trust fund:
Permanent, indefinite
601

BA
0

6,768,122
6,384,075

7,768,642
7,984,971

8,251,014
9,469,829

482,372
1,484,858

Federal hospital insurance trust fund:
Permanent, indefinite
551

BA
0

11,609,785
8,064,753

12,473,072
10,187,600

13,583,401
11,709,613

1,110,329
1,522,013

Federal supplementary medical
insurance trust fund: Permanent,
indefinite
551
Social Security Trust Funds:
(Health care services): Indefinite
551

BA
0

3,809,254
3,282,799

4,294,735
3,970,606

4,970,032
4,659,698

675,297
689,092

BA
0

'9,000
'-255,000

'20,000
'-1,379,000

11,000
-1,124,000

(General retirement and
disability insurance):
Indefinite
601

BA
0

'-60,000

'117,000
'-3,194,000

117,000
-3,134,000

BA
0

9.0G0
-315,000

137,000
-4,573,000

128,000
-4,258,000

82,870,161
78,394,156

88,761,811
86,098,558

5,891,650
7,704,402

Total, Social
Funds.

Security

Trust

Total trust funds Social
Security Administration.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

73,122,345
67,214,864

245

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
SPECIAL INSTITUTIONS
Federal Funds
Generaj and special funds:

House for the
501

BA
0

1,818
1,818

1,967
1,967

2,408
2,408

441
441

National Technical Institute for the
Deaf
502

BA
0
BA

6,487
12,168

9,819
11,731

9,836
9,500

17
-2,231

15,012

22,435

-13,159

0

19,286

27,5421
4
8,052
38,040
"286

22,387

-15,939

B
A

62,146

84,158

2,458

0

79,228

79,650
"2,050
81,080'
"2,050

84,066

936

BA
0

85,463
112,500

129,080
135,154

118,837

118,361

-10,243
-16,793

and
501

BA
0

423,485
420,949

477,522
449,148

482,678
481,289

5,156
32,141

506

BA

1,037,810

*1,046,915

23,672

American
Blind

Printing

Gallaudet College

502

Howard University

Total Federal
Institutions.

502

funds

Special

ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Human development:
(Elementary, secondary,
(El
vocational education)
(Social services)

0
Total, Human development

BA
0

Research and training activities
overseas (special foreign curency
program)
506

0

958,445

1,038,9431
"-15,700]
1,074,496
"-8,578

1,079,4011
"-7,122]

6,361

1,500,765
1,515,066

1,529,593
1,553,568

2,777

3,000

3,000

BA
0

1,461,295
1,382,171

1,500,765
1,518,066

1,529,593
1,556,568

28,828
38,502

B
A

18,888

22,2071

25,147

2,285

0

Total Federal funds Assistant
Secretary for Human
Development.

1,461,295
1,379,394

13,754

23,413

25,756

2,343

1,488

23

28,828
38,502
.

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Office for Civil Rights

751

Office of Consumer Affairs

506

BA

1,222
1,048

General Departmental management:
(Community development)
451
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

30,900
4,449

1,4151
c
50J
1,513

26,451

1,579

66
-2M51

THE BUDGET FOR

246

FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT—Continued
Federal

Funds—Continued

General and special funds:—Continued

General Departmental management:
—Continued.
(Public assistance and other
supplements)
604

Allied services

506

88,831

0
Total, General Departmental
management.
Policy research
604

BA

68,372

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

119,731
72,821

103,532]
A
Zn
<-2,464J
96,259
*83
106,083
122,793

'20,000

93,035

-13,048

111,9741
Hj
93,035
111,978
29,260
12,142
'20,000
'5,000

15,636
-13,048
-10,815
29,260
12,142

-500
654

-7,100
1,938

5,000

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund
506
Consolidated working fund, Office of
the Secretary
506
Total Federal funds
Departmental Management.

0
0

-2,347
-2,742

6,600
-1,284

BA
0

139,841
82,534

150,410
153,035

168,930
156,609

18,520
3,574

BA
0

31,725,640
30,511,429

35,543,671
36,000,678

36,799,085
37,477,992

1,255,414
1,477,314

SUMMARY
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
902

BA1

-21,113

-21,500

-21,500

0I
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
550
600

BA1
0J

-4,197

-36,226

-36,107

119

BA1
0 \

-5,891

-38,791

-38,816

-25

-34,000

-34,000

BA1
0 \

800

BA1

-880

-972

-916

56

0I
902

BA1

-3,464

-2,700

-2,793

-93

0 \
BA
0

31,690,095
30,475,884

35,409,482
35,866,489

36,664,953
37,343,860

1,255,471
1,477,371

BA
0

Total Federal funds

73,123,812
67,216,027

82,871,644
78,395,859

88,763,359
86,100,140

5,891,715
7,704,281

BA1

-930,912

-980,000

-1,045,000

-65,000

BA1
0 \
BA1
0J

-3,675

-2,160

-6,000

-3,840

Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
601
902
Proprietary receipts from the
public
503
See footnotes at end of table.




0I

-19

-20

-21

-1

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

247

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Trust funds:—Continued

551 BA1

0I

-47

50

50
-67

554

BA1

-1,019

-1,208

-1,275

601

BA1

-61

-61

-61

72,188,079
66,280,294

81,888,145
77,412,360

87,710,952
85,047,733

5,822,807
7,635,373

551

-2,527,706

-2,847,567

-3,499,383

-651,816

601

-493,788

-499,323

-515,317

-15,994

100,856,680
93,734,684

113,950,737
109,931,959

120,361,205
118,376,893

6,410,468
8,444,934

0I

Total trust funds

0I

BA
0

Interfund transactions

Total Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare.

BA
0

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
HOUSING PRODUCTION AND MORTGAGE
CREDIT: FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION
AND GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Annual contributions
housing:
Contract authority
Permanent

for assisted
604
BA
BA
BA

Salaries and expenses, housing
production and mortgage credit
programs
604

5,600,000
369,130

B
A

5,246

604

"26,063,0001
34,000

-18,762,014

14,100

427

5,246

44UJ
13,673

14,100

427

-375

-1,077

-1,053

24

13,2331
DAAdX

0

Public enterprise funds:

Nonprofit sponsor assistance

44,520,070
338,944

0

Low-rent public housing—loans and
other expenses
604

o

12169

College housing—loans and other
expenses
502
Appropriation, Permanent,
indefinite.
Contract authority

B
A
B
A
BA
BA .

12,946

15,089

14,098

404

405

402

668,326

0
Housing for the elderly or
handicapped fund
401
Federal Housing Administration fund:
401
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.
Limitation on administrative
expenses.
Limitation on nonadministrative
expenses.
See footnotes at end of table.




-36,028

-669,320 .
-47,000

0

-13,537

-1,784

BA
0

817,403
862,767
(15,445)

875,000
792,000
(13,803)1
D

800,000
730,000
(16,145)

-75.000
-62,000
(1,915)

(176,796)

(190,500)1
D
(5,465)

(193,962)

(-2,003)

-60,000

-13,000
1,784

(427)J

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

248

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
HOUSING PRODUCTION AND MORTGAGE
CREDIT: FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION
AND GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:—Continued

Special assistance functions fund
401
Appropriation, Permanent,
indefinite.
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.
Management and liquidating
functions fund
401
Limitation on administrative
expenses, Government National
Mortgage Association.

-3,000,740

B
A

4,967

5,434

4,745

B
A

3,577

3,533

3,482

BA
0
0

41,772

3,000,000
260,933

385,183

124,250

-66,241

-46,649

-28,977

17,672

(920)

(1.159)1

(1,360

(168)

Guarantees of mortgage-backed
securities
401
Participation sales fund:
(Mortgage credit and thrift
insurance)
401

-7,895

-8,170

-9,536

-1,366

11,918

5,226

5,917

691

(Other advancement and
regulation of commerce)....403

-2,514

-1,273

-1,783

-510

(Community development)

451

0

363

2,140

1,920

-220

(Higher education)

502

0

1,026

1,917

4,921

3,004

(Health research and education)
552

0

-66

96

56

-40

(Veterans housing)

-2,043

704

0

19,674

-8,456

-10,499

Total, Participation sales fund..

0

30,401

-350

532

882

Total Federal funds Housing
Production and Mortgage
Credit: Federal Housing
Administration and
Government National
Mortgage Association.

BA
0

6,813,673
828,279

48,102,828
961,576

26,933,827
1,030,249

-21,169,001
68,673

0

(1,944,195)
1,788,326

HOUSING MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Housing payments
604
Liquidation of contract authority....
Payments for operation of low
income housing projects:
604
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

(2,300,000)
2,130,000

0

Counseling services
See footnotes at end of table.




housing
604
506

BA

24.521

0

Salaries and expenses,
management programs

24,521

23,4001
°697f
24,097

0

1,519

388

(-55,000)
268,000

"525,000
(525,000)
210,000

BA

(2,245,000)
2,398,000

525,000
(525,000)
210,000

28,400

4,303

28,400

4,303
-388

249

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
HOUSING MANAGEMENT—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

-1,213

-1,000

-1,000

-11,131

-14,000

-3,000
2,092

11,000
3,056

BA
0

-4,902

-4,100

964
230,920

235,020

BA
0

-3,482
24,521
1,793,638

-48,701
24,097
2,086,684

556,456
2,863,320

48,701
532,359
776,636

75,000
101,302
33,363

50,000
2,125,000
(2,125,000)
225,000
100,000
110,000
39,0001
D
1,219J
40,219
123,375
280,000

Community disposal operations fund
451
Rental housing assistance fund...604

0

Revolving fund
programs)
Appropriation,
indefinite.

BA

(liquidating
451
Permanent,

Intragovernmental funds:

Disaster assistance fund

453

Total Federal funds Housing
Management.

COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Community development grants ...451
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA
0

Comprehensive planning grants...451

BA
0

Salaries and expenses, community
planning and development
programs
451

BA

Model cities programs

451

BA
0

Open space land programs

451

BA
0

Community development training and
urban fellowship programs
451

33,363
150,000
468,475
25,000
79,928

6G\00b
42,640

375,000
(375,000)
1,075,000
-100,000
-50,000
2,421
2,421
-123,375
-50,000

42,640
23G\000

75,000
3,279

-75,000
-3,279

35,000

-35,000

140,000

-140,000

2,935

facilities
451

0

Grants for basic water and sewer
facilities
451

0

Grants for neighborhood

50,0001
2,500,000 f
(2,500,000)
1,300,000

40,465
136,055

URBAN RENEWAL FUND

Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Urban renewal fund-capital grants:
451
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....
Liquidation of contract authority....
Urban renewal fund-loans
planning advances

and
451

Total Federal funds,
Renewal Fund.

Urban

197,000
(197,000) .
.
(201,665)
1,200,000
1,200,000
50,000
50,000

-197,000
(4,665)

0
0

600,000
(600,000)
1,210,588
-84,567

BA
0

600,000
1,126,021

197,000
1,250,000

-197,000
1,250,000

4,845

88,000

6,714

BA
B
A

i

Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Rehabilitation loan fund
See footnotes at end of table.




451

-81,286

250

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
—Continued
URBAN RENEWAL FUND-Continued

Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:—Continued

Public facility loans
Appropriation, Permanent,
indefinite.

451

Total Federal funds Community
Planning and Development.

B
A
B
A
0
B
A
0

1,908

2,360

1

992

998

J

-3,358

18,284

15,000

886,263
2,011,673

2,638,952
2,261,498

2,592,640
2,889,354

-46,312
627,856

0

686

2,500

3,000

500

0
0

-3,704

700

-1,163

-1,863

-3,018

3,200

1,837

-1,363

-4,269

-6,000

-7,000

-1,000

20,000
250,000

50,000

75,0001

25,000

-15,000

NEW COMMUNITIES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

New community assistance grants
451
Public enterprise funds:

New communities fund

451

Total Federal funds New
Communities Administration.
FEDERAL INSURANCE ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

National insurance development fund
403
National flood insurance fund
453
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.
Total Federal funds Federal
Insurance Administration.

BA
BA
0
BA
0

51,463

68,330

128,000

59,670

270,000
47,194

50,000
62,330

75,000
121,000

25,000
58,670

2,726

2,701

OFFICE OF INTERSTATE LAND SALES
REGISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Interstate land sales (special fund)
403
Permanent, indefinite

BA
BA
0

688
1,460

925
2,391

900
3,626

1,235

BA
0
BA

65,000
58,382

57,000
61,000
7,210

-8,000
5,000
890

BA
0

65,000
58,382

65,000
56,000
6,1301
D
190J
6,320
71,320
62,320

7,210
64,210
68,210

890
-7,110
5,890

POLICY DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research and technology

451

Salaries and expenses, policy
development and research
451
Total Federal funds Policy
Development and Research.
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

251

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
FAIR HOUSING AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

88
4

11,5431
D
344J
11,887

12,735

5,905

358

5,905
3,765

358
217

3,765
7,245

27
1
43
2

6,708
11,650

5,4131
°134J
5,547
3,4251
D
123j
3,548
6,6261
D
196J
6,822
18,9281

7,245
22,745

43
2
3,490

11,650
19,143

19,255
28,5631

22,745
28,795

3,490
-439

19,143
99
7
-98

29,234
1,000
1,326

28,795
1,269

-439
29
6
-1,326

-719
-1,844
17
6
46,915
45,400

1500
78
362
64,406
68,672

68,455
69,824

-1,500
22
-362
4,049
1,152

8,116,837
4,792,785

50,964,415
5,520,558

30,306,949
7,060,155

-20,657,466
1,539,597

BA1
0 J

-6,966

-3,797

-5,197

-1,400

BA1

-2

BA

9,777

0

9,777

General departmental management
451

BA

6,161

0
Salaries and expenses, Office of
General Counsel
451

BA

6,161
3,253

Salaries and expenses, Office of
Inspector General
451

BA

Administration

services
451

BA

Regional management and services
451

BA

Urban transportation

404

0

Low income-housing
programs

demonstration
451

0

Fair housing and equal opportunity
751

12,735

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

0

0
and staff

0

0

3,253
6,708

Intragovernmental funds:

Administrative operations fund

451

0

Working capital fund

451

0

Consolidated working fund

451

0

Total Federal funds
Departmental Management.
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
450
902

-2

10
0

-2

0I
Total Department of Housing
and Urban Development.
See footnotes at end of table.

580-000 O - 75 - 17




BA
0

8,109,869
4,785,817

50,960,616

30,301,750

-20,658,866

5,516,759

7,054,956

1,538,197

252

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
LAND AND WATER RESOURCES
Bureau of Land management
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Management of lands and resources
302

302

116,721

0

Construction and maintenance

BA

105,825

6,800

0

Public lands development roads and
trails:
302
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

6,111

153,356]
MD 9,950 i
2,440
150,947
'19,450
6,725
8,165

186,989

11,243

176,6531
'500}
9,061
8,935

6,756
2,336
770
-5,109

-4,891
10,000
(4,070)
4,070
38.200
26,639
4,187
4,278
242
210

(4,683)
4,683
38,200
31,436
5,450
5,200
300
260

1,785
1,378

2,002
2,002

2,002
2,002

106,562
106,384

161,048
161,048

195,508
195,508

34,460
34,460

108,347
107,762
284,582
246,003

163,050
163,050
393,259
376,809

197,510
197,510
437,510
425,177

34,460
34,460
44,251
48,368

632
496

650
647

650
640

-7

BA
0

16,850
17,401

19,427
19,200
13,825
14,500
1,654
1,300
27,650
13,800
600
1,100

20,485
22,432
15,515
14,855
1,525
995
19,670
25,120
1,000
1,000

1,058
3,232
1,690
355
-129
-305
-7,980
11,320
400
-100

BA
BA

20,000
(4,000)

0

Oregon and California grant lands
BA
(special fund): Indefinite
302 0
Range improvements (special fund):
BA
Indefinite
302 0
Recreation development and
BA
operation of recreation facilities
0
(special fund): Indefinite
302
Permanent appropriations (special
funds):
(Conservation and land
BA
management): Permanent,
0
indefinite
302
(Other general purpose fiscal
BA
assistance): Permanent,
0
indefinite
852
Total, Permanent appropriations BA
(special funds).
0
Total Federal funds Bureau of BA
Land Management.
0
Trust Funds
Bureau of Land Management trust BA
funds-. Permanent, indefinite
302 0

3,176

29,307
20,058
3,242
2,925
165
146

(613)
613
4,797
1,263
922
58
50

Bureau of Reclamation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General investigations

301

Loan program

301

Recreational and fish and wildlife
facilities, Upper Colorado River
storage project
303
Colorado River Basin Salinity control
projects
301
Emergency fund (special fund) 301

BA

18,422

0

12,458

BA
0

600
1,546

BA
0
BA

600

0
See footnotes at end of table.




616

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

253

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
LAND AND WATER RESOURCES—Continued
Bureau of Reclamation—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

rehabilitation
301

BA
0

Operation and maintenance (special
fund)
301

8A

194,197
233,046
89,000

0

86,342

expenses
301

BA

18,320

0
Other miscellaneous appropriations
(special funds): Permanent
852
Permanent, indefinite

BA

18,403
600

Construction and
(special fund)

General administrative
(special fund)

244,123
260,031
97,000
4
9,821
93,300
^9,821
20,3001
"620J
20,767
600

298,681
289,961
131,810

54,558
29,930
24,989

127,060

23,939

21,420

500

21,373
600]

606
-300

BA
0

2,123

2,700

2,400

2,771

3,290

3,000'

-290

BA
BA

13,500
4,000
(52,500)
62,209
24,426
13,862
-731

23,000
12,500
(32,800)
49,875
22,967
24,118
-187

29,2401
J
(17,440)
46,145
38,635
38,630

-6,260

Public enterprise funds:

Colorado River Basin project
301
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

0
Upper Colorado River storage project
301

BA
0

Continuing fund for emergency
expenses, Fort Peck project
301

0

(-15,360)
-3,730
15,668
14,512
187

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

301

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Reclamation.
Trust

0

-171

604

-604

BA
0

382,638
447,752

496,787
511,519

580,981
590,571

84,194
79,052

BA
0

2,162
2,056

8,274
6,000

11,385
11,500

3,111
5,500

17,396
26,610

19,792
23,492

*18,327
19,070

-1,465
-4,422

Funds

Reclamation trust funds: Permanent
301

Office of Water Research and Technology
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

301

BA
0

306

0

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

156

85 ..

Trust

BA
0

19,792
23,577

BA

-39
(59)
-172

-85

_7

0

Total Federal funds Office of
Water Research and
Technology.

17,396
26,766

18,327
19,070

-1,465
-4,507

Funds

Cooperation with foreign agencies:
Permanent
301
Liquidation of contract authority

7

(7)
10 ..

(-7)
-10

Total Federal funds Land and
Water Resources.

BA
0

684,616
720,521

909,838
911,905

1,036,818
1,034,818

126,980
122,913

Total trust funds Land and
Water Resources.

BA
0

2,755
2,380

8,917
6,657

12,035
12,140

3,118
5,483

See footnotes at end of table.




254

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
FISH AND WILDLIFE AND PARKS
Bureau of Outdoor Recreation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

303

BA

4,696

5,2101
D

5,645

265

0

Salaries and expenses

5,365
300,000

5,563
300,000

198

BA

4,385
76,195

BA
0

30,000
248,488

30,000
256,000

30,000
292,000

36,000

0

97
110,891
252,970

335,380
261,365

335,645
297,563

265
36,198

112,433

8,635

107,143
6,727
9,390

6,797
-7,320
-2,085
-1,000

Land and water conservation
(special fund): Indefinite
303
Contract authority, Permanent

170J

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

303

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Outdoor Recreation.

BA
0

United States Fish and Wildlife Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

303

BA

86,972

Construction and anadromous fish
303

BA
0

Migratory bird conservation account
(special fund): Indefinite
303
Permanent, indefinite

BA

83,307
8,127
9,026
3,500

101,126
C
452
D
2,220
100,346
14,047
11,475
1,000

BA
0

10,220
12,544

12,000
17,632

12,000
14,000

BA
0
BA
0

65,344
51,185
4,038
4,034

75,059
63,677
4,100
4,100

76,315
67,400
4,200
4,200

BA
0

69,382
55,219

79,159
67,777

80,515
71,600

0
BA
0

23
3
178.201
160,329

10
0
210,004
197,330

100
211,675
202,233

1,671
4,903

BA
0

1,578
1,595

1,663
1,700

2,063
1,800

400
100

BA

193,443

209,325
C
5,478
D
5,335J
212,120

240,121

19,983

229,594

17,474

Resource management

Miscellaneous appropriations
(special funds):
(Recreational resources):
Permanent, indefinite
303
(Other general purpose fiscal
assistance): Permanent,
indefinite
852
Total, Miscellaneous
appropriations (special
funds).

-3,632
1,256
3,723
100
100
1,356
3,823

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

303

Total Federal funds United
States Fish and Wildlife
Service.
Trust

Contributed funds:
indefinite

Funds

Permanent,
303

National Park Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation
system

of

the

national

park
303

170,890
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

255

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
FISH AND WILDLIFE AND PARKS—Continued
national Park Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Planning and construction

303

Road construction:
303
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
0
BA
BA
0

Preservation of historic

22,800
54,080

-35,312
-11,271
-94,539

(35,000)
16,172
15,842

58,112
65,351
-10,461
105,000
(26,026)
26,026
24,3751

(38,820)
38,820
24,516

(12,794)
12,794
40

20,012
39,778
195,000

properties
303

BA

Planning, development, and
operation of recreation facilities:
Indefinite
303

BA
0

9,193
27,300
10,458

15,044
11,900
18,728

16,921
18,000
13,500

1,877
6,100
-5,228

John F. Kennedy
Performing Arts

BA

2,400

2,4201

2,575

7
5

0

2,131
281
250

2,432
290
290

2,517
300
300

8
5
10
10

162 ..
.
454,278
249,034

411,955
339,991

308,312
355,732

-103,643
15,741

3,000
3,000
957,339
798,686
4,663
4,700

3,000
3,000 .
.
-101,707
855,632
56,842
855,528
400
5,063
100
4,800

249,3001
c
2061
D
4,640
238,029

268,259

14,113

265,778

27,749

254,146
238,029

268,259
265,778

14,113
27,749

0

Center for the
303

Miscellaneous permanent
appropriations (special
Permanent, indefinite

funds):
303

BA
0

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

303

Total Federal funds National
Park Service.
Trust

0
BA
0

Funds

funds:
303

BA
0

Total Federal funds Fish and
Wildlife and Parks.

BA
0

Total trust funds Fish
Wildlife and Parks.

and

BA
0

2,751
1,448
743,370
662,333
4,329
3,043

Surveys, investigations and research
252

BA

172,324

0
Payment from proceeds, sale of
water, Mineral Leasing Act of
1930: Permanent, indefinite 301

BA

177,639
1

National Park
Permanent

Service

trust

ENERGY AND MINERALS
Geological Survey
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

252

Total Federal funds Geological
Survey.
See footnotes at end of table.




0
BA
0

724
172,325
178,363

256

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
ENERGY AND MINERALS—Continued
Mining Enforcement and Safety
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

553

BA

58,713

67,9131

79,500

10,687

58,804

Salaries and expenses

73,879

79,402

5,523

68,813
73,879

79,500
79,402

10,687
5,523

"900J

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

553

Total Federal funds Mining
Enforcement and Safety
Administration.
Trust

Contributed funds:
indefinite

173
BA
0

58,713
58,977

Funds

554

BA .
0 ...

305

BA

Permanent,

139
139 ....

-139
-139

Bureau of Mines
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Mines and minerals:
(Energy)

8,900

0
(Other natural resources)

306

12,192

BA

72,789

51,9001
^OOJ
20,637
81.0631
D
644J
79,334

50,150

-1.950

46,848

26,211

93,237

11,530

0

Miscellaneous appropriations

306

70,520

91,489

12,155

BA
0

Total, Mines and minerals

81,689
82,712

133,807
99,971

143.387
138,337

9,580
38,366

87

200

200

47,500
-1,616

47,500
-86

47,500
487

0

Public enterprise funds:

Helium fund:
306
Contract authority, Permanent

BA
0

573

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

306

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Mines.
Trust

-300

150

150

BA
0

129,189
80,883

181,307
100,235

190.887
139,174

9,580
38,939

BA
0

446
423

485
497

485
485

-12

0

...

Funds

Contributed funds: Permanent

306

Alaska Power Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General investigations

301

BA
0

513
458

540
584

660
713

120
129

Operation and maintenance....

301

BA
0

756
591

760
759

840
842

80
83

Total Federal funds Alaska
Power Administration.

BA
0

1,269
1,049

1,300
1,343

1,500
1,555

200
212

See footnotes at end of table.




257

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
ENERGY AND MINERALS—Continued
Bonneville Power Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Construction

301

BA
0

97,487
97,065

66,679
40,711

Operation and maintenance

301

BA
0

35,127

11,243

-11,243

34,565

11,869

-11,869

BA
0

2,616

Continuing fund (special
Permanent, indefinite

fund):
301

Public enterprise funds:

Bonneville Power Administration fund

2,616

BA

Total Federal funds Bonneville
Power Administration.

-500

. ^ ^

135^230

1

1,250,000

BA
0
BA
0

500
94,078

301
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.

-66,679
-40,711

]

-3^330 ___-68 L 300

-1,344,078

-33,970

M22JJ00 7 Z Z Z Z ~~YA22M

134,246

18,750

BA
0

20,113

6,727

-6,727

18,552

9,839

-9,839

301

BA
0

900
758

946
946

1,024
1,024

78
78

fund):
301

BA
0

24
24

BA
0

924
782

946
946

1,024
1,024

78
78

BA
0
BA
0
B
A
0

465
828
5,287
3,543

620
850
5,795
5,954
70
70

700
700
6,136
6,136

80
-150
341
182
-70
-70

Total Federal funds
Southwestern Power
Administration.

BA
0

5,752
4,371

6,485
6,874

6,836
6,836

351
-38

Total Federal funds Energy and
Minerals.

BA
0

503,402
458,671

1,934,997
440,056

548,006
425,469

-1,386,991
-14,587

Total trust funds Energy and
Minerals.

BA
0

20,559
18,975

7,351
10,475

485
485

-6,866
-9,990

Trust

Funds

Bonneville Power Administration trust
fund: Permanent, indefinite
301

-68,300

-87,050

Southeastern Power Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation and maintenance....
Continuing fund (special
Permanent, indefinite
Total Federal funds
Southeastern Power
Administration.

Southwestern Power Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Construction

301

Operation and maintenance

301

Continuing fund
Permanent




(special

fund):
301

258

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
INDIAN AFFAIRS
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation of Indian programs:
(Conservation and land
management)
302

B
A

26,607

0

25,809

(Elementary, secondary, and
vocational education)
501
Liquidation of contract
authority.
Total, Operation
programs.

of

Construction

Indian
452

Road construction:
452
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

191,586

0

(Area and regional development)
452

186,384

BA

196,285

0
BA
0
BA
0

(793) ,
189,193
414,478
401,386
54,607
48,917

30,651

-1,001

30,2521
'200J
266,105

-2,214

236,293
'1,200
221,695]
"4,800

262,8851
'300J
230,170

25,692

236,876
485,632
507,035
61,804
66,262

227,360
526,926
520,997
61,400
72,000

-9,516
41,294
13,962
-404
5,738

1

38,620

3,675

-100,000

(43,000)
55,604

25,000
7R nnn
73,UOU
(59,500
64,000

(66,705)
68,001

(7,205)
4,001

12,010
11,700
70,000
2,280
72,285
84,290
83,985

12,666
12,800
70,0001
2,200}
72,200
84,866
85,000

656
1,100
-80

BA
0

11,611
11,167
70,000
295
70,295
81,906
81,462

452

BA
0

900
-159

Indian loan guaranty and insurance
fund
452

BA
0

Liquidation of Hoonah
Project revolving fund

0

3

38,000
20,000
20,000
2,600
13

12,000
30,000
20,000
6,190
13

0
BA
0

-4,375
701,891
582,838

789,726
743,895

705,192
782,201

-84,534
38,306

BA

2,984

3,000

3,000

-19,400

BA
BA
0

29,102
134,981
137,793

19,500
119,100
158,000

31,200
88,000
155,479

-2,521

BA
BA
0

Miscellaneous appropriations-.
(Area and regional development):
Permanent, indefinite
452
(Other general government) ...806
Permanent, indefinite
Total, Miscellaneous
appropriations.

BA
0
BA
BA
0

150,000

25,958
4
5,000
D
694
27,866
'4,800
222,161
'1,500

-85
576
1,015

Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for loans

Housing
452

-26,000
10,000
3,590

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

452

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Indian Affairs.
Trust

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds:
(Area and regional development)
452
Current, indefinite
Permanent, indefinite
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

259

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
INDIAN AFFAIRS—Continued
Bureau of Indian Affairs—Continued
Trust Funds—Continued
Miscellaneous trust funds:—Con.
R
A
(Other general government)Permanent
806
R
A
Permanent indefinite
Total, Miscellaneous
funds.

0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

trust

Total trust funds Bureau of
Indian Affairs.
Total Federal
Affairs.

funds

Indian

Total trust funds Indian Affairs.

70,000
1,137
125,863

..

238,204
263,656

141,600
158,000

122,200
155,479

-19,400
-2,521

238,204
263,656

141,600
158,000

122,200
155,479

-19,400
-2,521

701,891
582,838

789,726
743,895

705,192
782,201

-84,534
38,306

238,204
263,656

141,600
158,000

122,200
155,479

-19,400
-2,521

-2,424

TERRITORIAL AFFAIRS
Office of Territorial Affairs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

B
A
0
B
A

806

Trust territory of the Pacific Islands

14,500
19,970

14,450
20,500

15,000
18,076

59,386

0

Administration of territories

63,842

61,700
"16,500
65,300
"5,250

81,000
"5,770
77,000
"16,270

1,400
5,000

10,000
10,000

8,600
5,000

625
625

600
600

-25
-25

806

550
8,570
22,720

R
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

17,479
17,329

18,500
17,579

19,500
18,500

1,000

B
A
0

91,785
101,775

113,175
114,254

131,870
140,446

18,695
26,192

Office of the Solicitor, salaries and
expenses
306

BA

8,375

12,014

932

7,950

11,059

12,016

957

Office of the Secretary, salaries and
expenses
306

BA

17,183

19,4541
^SJ

21,343

1,504

0

17,682

19,652

21,163

1,511

Departmental operations

306

BA

6,620

10,5781
"180J

14,278

3,520

0

5,599

10,965

13,435

2,470

Salaries and expenses (special
foreign currency program)
306

BA
0

670
617

192
400

1,714
1,400

1,522
1,000

Micronesian claims fund, Trust
Territory of the Pacific lslands.806
Office of the Comptroller for Guam
(special fund): Permanent
806
Internal revenue collections for the
Virgin Islands (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
852
Total Federal funds Office of
Territorial Affairs.

38
420
596

921

SECRETARIAL OFFICES
Office of the Solicitor and Office of tits
Secretary
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

0

See footnotes at end of table.




10,7551
°327J

260

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1974
actual

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
SECRETARIAL OFFICES-Continued
Office of the Solicitor and Office of the
Secretary— Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Mined area protection
Litter prevention and
Permanent, indefinite

302

Intragovernmental funds:

...306

Consolidated working fund, Office of
the Secretary
306
Total Federal funds Office of
the Solicitor and Office of
the Secretary.
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
301

'20,000
'12,000
25 .
25

17,000
10,000

0
0

26
37
-2,777 .
.
-1,097

BA
0

32,874
28,011

44,896
44,801

69,374
60,039

24,478
15,238

2,757,938
2,554,149

4,749,971
3,053,597

3,346,892
3,298,501

-1,403,079
244,904

BA1

0 I
Proprietary
public

"3,000
'2,000
25
25

BA
0

cleanup:
304

Working capital fund

BA
0
BA
0

receipts from the
250

BA1

-700

700 ..
.

30
15

450
500
800
806
92
0

BA]

-493,762

-655,991

-643,086

12,905

BA1

-308,493

-176,571

-184,711

-8,140

BA1

-12,142

-12,545

-13,201

-656

BA1

-67

-68

-68

-274

-280

-280

-2,000

-2,000

-3,496

-2,987

-2,982

1,939.677
1,735,888

3,899,514
2,203,140

2,500,564
2,452,173

-1,398,950
249,033

BA
0

301

-15

BA
0

300

-57

265,847
288,054

162,531
179,832
-15,001

139,783
172,904

-22,748
-6,928
3,616

0J

0 I

0 I
BA1

0 I
BA1..

0 I
BA1

o|
Total Federal funds..
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the

public

301
302

BA1

0I

BA1
0I
3 3 BA1
0
0J

See footnotes at end of table.




-22,295
-632
-986

-650
-1,763

-11,385
-650
-2,063

-300

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

261

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
306

BA1

0I
452

BA1

0 I
554
806
Total trust funds....

BA1..
0 I
BA1
0

-446

-485

-485

-95,576

-91,808

-107,808

-16,000
139

-139
-1,136
17,392
50,513

BA
0

Interfund transactions

452
806

Total Department of the Interior

144,776
166,983

52,685
69,986

BA
0
BA
0

-53,700

-37,600

BA
0

1,960,691

3,914,599

2,517,956

-1,396,643

1,779,109

2,235,526

2,502,686

267,160

21,8501
D
529J
21,786

20,953

-1,426

20,696

-1,090

22,379
21,786

20,953
20,696

-1,426

59,000
'246
°1,743
58,653
'240

60,633

-356

16,762
'77
D
536
16,665
'73

18,812

1,437

18,4721

1,738

126,600
'886
°3,672
125,780
'853

144,947

13,789

141,6491
'33 J

15,049

14,200
12,800

16,480
15,650

2,280
2,850

-35,293
-19,473
37,600

-70,062

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

BA

17,308

16,728
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

751

0

591
17,308

B
A

53,298
50,901

BA

14,790

0

General

BA
0

0

Total Federal funds
Administration.

13,651

17,319

-1,090

LEGAL ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses, General Legal
Activities
751

Salaries and expenses,
Division

Antitrust
751

S.
751

Fees and expenses of witnesses..751
See footnotes at end of table.




B
A

107,994

0

Salaries and expenses, U.
Attorneys and Marshals..

103,615

BA
0

13,100
11,071

59,4581

571

'4}

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

262

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE—Continued
LEGAL ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Total Federal
Activities.

funds

Legal

BA

3,517

0

Salaries and expenses, Community
Relations Service
751

3,794

3,7501
°97J
3,737

3,947

100

3,925

188

BA
0

192,699
183,032

227,569
218,801

244,819
239,197

17,250
20,396

BA

395,438

427,800
"3,570
D
12,876j
431,352
"3,203

465,767

21,521

458,9911
"367f

24,803

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

..751

380,580

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

751

BA

155,161

174,5501

209,744

29,724

0

Salaries and expenses

148,847

174726

208,787

34,061

B
A

144,020

186,410

18,627

0
B
A
0
B
A
0

138,486

163,7501
D
4,O33J
164,751

185,205

20,454

14,800
42,054

25,940
28,887

35,760
42,539

9,820
13,652

21,500
22,771

26,200
25,715

31,875
29,800

5,675
4,085

(1,804)

(1,906)

FEDERAL PRISON SYSTEM
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses, Bureau of
Prisons
753
Buildings and facilities

753

Support of United States prisoners

753
Intragovernmental funds:

Federal Prison Industries, Inc.:
Federal Prison industries fund.753
Limitation on administrative

0

-1195
(1,312)

flvnancac
cXpcllSco.

(4,197)

Limitation on vocational expenses
Total Federal funds
Prison System.
Trust




BA
0

prisons
753

0

180,320
202,116

Funds

Commissary funds, Federal
(trust revolving fund)
See footnotes at end of table.

Federal

-285

(5,051)

(5,120)

219,923
219,353

254,045
257,544

(102)
(69)

34,122
38,191

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

263

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE—Continued
LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

BA

112,499

769,784

887,6471
M00J

25,119

132,6001
D
3,123J
136,438

770,428

BA

880,0001
M,479f
°581J
866,207
M.079

870,526

0

754

150,785

15,062

152,895

16,457

2,115,897
2,225,724

9,935
157,937
2,095

-106,318

DRU6 ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATEi
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

751

0

97,635

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
750
902

2,105,962
2,067,787

1,923,951
1,799,957

BA}

-2,933

-6,395

-4,300

BA1

-214

-200

-200

1,920,804
1,796,810

2,099,367
2,061,192

2,111,397
2,221,224

12,030
160,032

2,099,367
2,061,192

2,111,397
2,221,224

12,030
160,032

66,438
70,674
2,394,400
2,684,000

-571
3,849

0 \
BA
0

Total Federal funds

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

Total Department of Justice

BA
0

-285
1,920,804
1,796,525

.

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
MANPOWER ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Program administration

504

BA

71,721

0

63,206

Comprehensive manpower assistance
504

BA
0

2,265,584
1,453,589

Community service employment for
older Americans
504

BA
0

10,000

Temporary

BA

67,009
66,825
2,394,400
2,784,500

employment

assistance
504

0
Emergency

employment

assistance
504

Federal unemployment benefits and
allowances
603
See footnotes at end of table.




0

604,978

BA
0

365,000
361,905

10,000
875,0001
4
125,0001
300,000
^50,000
59,157
2,365,000
2,165,000

-100,500
-10,000
-1,000,000

575,0001
^75,000}

300,000
-59,157

410,000
610,000

-1,955,000
-1,555,000

264

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—Continued
MANPOWER ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Grants to States for unemployment
BA
insurance and employment
0
services
504
Advances to the unemployment trust
fund and other funds
603

8A

504

74,000
74,000

9,600
9,600
-5,750,000

750,0001
5,000,000J
500,000
'1,400,000

597,2311
"3,400,000J

4

0
Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund

64,400
64,400

64,400
60,011

0

-8,524

2,097,231

-2,168

Total Federal funds Manpower
Administration.

BA
0

2,776,705
2,532,997

11,640,809
7,399,882

2,944,838
8,085,905

-8,695,971
686,023

Trust Funds
Unemployment trust fund:
(Manpower training): Permanent,
indefinite
504

BA
0

436,283
390,147

436,179
467,379

437,242
447,042

1,063
-20,337

BA

7,103,073

0

5,758,419

7,866,521
< 1,400,000
11,132,621
'1,400,000

8,022,6891
M ,300,000 f
14,152,9581
'1,300,000/

Total, Unemployment trust fund

BA
0

7,539,356
6,148,566

9,702,700
13,000,000

9,759,931
15,900,000

57,231
2,900,000

Total trust funds Manpower
Administration.

BA
0

7,539,356
6,148,566

9,702,700
13,000,000

9,759,931
15,900,000

57,231
2,900,000

LABOR-MANAGEMENT SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
505

BA

24,350

42,000

4,943

0

23,550

35,8951
D
1,162J
35,450

41,160

5,710

75,2301
"886)
76,116

79,715

3,599

(Unemployment insurance):
Permanent, indefinite
603

EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
505 BA

57,241

56,168
2,920,337

0
Special benefits

602

Total Federal funds
Employment Standards
Administration.
Trust Funds
Special workers' compensation
expenses: Permanent
601
See footnotes at end of table.




55,519

79,715

3,599

BA
0

138,450
106,523

165,000
165,000

201,000
201,000

36,000
36,000

BA
0

195,691
162,042

241,116
241,116

280,715
280,715

39,599
39,599

BA
0

3,670
2,516

5,184
7,256

2,751
2,601

-2,433
-4,655

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

265

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—Continued
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

553

BA

70,105

102,0061
"321J

116,025

13,698

69,313

Salaries and expenses

101,915

115,825

13,910

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

48,635

53,1721
"1,496 J

61,683

7,015

47,839

53,966

59,710

5,744

BA
0

510
48,635
48,349

54,668
53,966

61,683
59,710

7,015
5,744

BA
0

292
333

BA

24,240

29,3751

31,127

0

505

BA
0

Salaries and expenses

24,856

29,645
200
230

30,397
200

9
5

-100

-195

31,327

30,492

938
522

-8,629,778
751,508

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

505

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
Trust Funds
Special statistical work: Permanent..505

163

-163

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

505

Special foreign currency program.505

BA

0

59

15
9

98
3
72
5
-5
3

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

505

0

-3,248

Consolidated working fund

505

0

-259

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
600

24,240
21,408

30,389
29,970

3,139,726
2,857,659

12,106,366

7,862,299

3,476,588
8,613,807

BA1
0 J

-631

-603

-603

BA1

-337

-250

-250

-3

-2

-2

-76

-70

-70

BA

3,138,679

12,105.441

0

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

BA
0

Total Federal funds
Departmental Management.

2,856,612

7,861,374

0I
603

BA1

0I
902
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA1
0\

See footnotes at end of table.




BA

7,543,318

9,707,884

0

6,151,415

13,007,419

3,475,663
8,612,882
9,762,682
15,902,601

-8,629,778
751,508
54,798
2,895,182

266

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS 1LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued

Trust funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting recei ptS:
Proprietary receipts from the
505
public
... .
601
603
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

BAl

01
BAl

603

-1,000

BAl..

0f

7,542.897
6,150,994

-1,000

9.706.884
13,006,419

9.761.682
15,901,601

1,946

BAl..

0

I

BA{

o I
BA

Total Department of Labor.

-129

o}
BA
0

601

-292

0

54.798
2,895,182
-1,946

-41,477

1,900,000

1,897,231

-2,769

10.640.099
8,966,129

19.910,379
18,965,847

11.340.114
22,617,252

-8.570,265
3,651,405

349,6501

"4131200

56,814

"6,685
352,000
1,350
1,210
22,9141
"81J
24,270
4,870
9,399

406,000
"1,750
1,675
"29.840
42,404
"9.785
8,575

54,000
400
465
6.845
18,134
4,915
-824

2.100
2,000
20.535
M4.180
20.900
25,8351
"1,42OJ

"2,100
2,100
"6,3551
23.400J
29,755

DEPARTMENT OF STATE
ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

152

BA

325,280
328,848

Representation allowances

1.200
1,194

152

Acquisition, operation, and
maintenance of buildings abroad
152

BA

22.358

0

22,587

Acquisition, operation, and
maintenance of buildings abroad
(special foreign currency program)
152

BA
0

5,462
5,766

Emergencies in the diplomatic and
consular service
152

BA
0

2.100
1,934

Payment to Foreign Service
retirement and disability fund .152
Appropriation, Permanent,
indefinite.

BA

20.535

BA
0

16.400
36,935

BA
0

29
-255
-1,988
393.364
395,021

100
2,500
2,500

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

152

Consolidated working fund

152

Total Federal funds
Administration of Foreign
Affairs.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

291
414.956
416,425

-291
486,430
490,509

71.474
74,084

267

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE—Continued1
ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS-Con.
Trust Funds
Foreign Service retirement and
BA
disability fund: Permanent, indefinite
602
0

39,358

4

79,5721
17,500J
54,456

86,293
68,7781
'-5.180J

-10,779
9,142

152

BA
0

521
680

1,030
840

1,030
840

Foreign

BA
0

75,655
40,038

98,102
55,296

87,323
64,438

-10,779
9,142

BA
0

201,200
210,619

203,903
204,070

"245,707
245,118

41,804
41,048

5,658
'17,342
*28,837
5,658
'17,342
B
28,837

"29,400

-22,437

29,400

-22,437

6,6001
108
6,440

"8,696

1,988

8,233

1,793

6,400]
'1,000
6,486
'290

"5,840

-1,560

Miscellaneous appropriations:
Permanent, indefinite
Total trust funds
Administration of
Affairs.

75,134

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND
CONFERENCES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Contributions to international
organizations
152
Contributions for international
peacekeeping activities
152

BA

0

Missions to international
organizations

BA

5,997

152
0

6,450

BA

6,200

0

5,631

International trade negotiations ...152

BA
0

1,744
592

1.900
1,614

"2,596
2,308

696
694

Total Federal funds
International Organizations
and Conferences.

BA
0

215,141
223,292

271,748
270,737

292,239
292,061

20,491
21,324

BA
0

118
106

50
50

50
50

B
A

4,595

4,701
C
152

"5,322

International conferences
contingencies

and
152

Trust Funds
Gifts and bequests, National
Commission on Educational,
Scientific, and Cultural Cooperation:
Permanent, indefinite
152
INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
International Boundary and Water
Commission, United States and
Mexico:
Salaries and expenses
301

6,2921
'710J

226

370

0
301

Chamizal settlement

301

See footnotes at end of table.

530-000 O - 75 - 18




4,458

5,060

5,320

260

B
A
0

Construction

3,800
7,754

6,231
14,705

"8,365
16,215

2,134
1,510

0

1

268

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1974
actual

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE—Continued
INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

American sections,
commissions

international
301

BA
0

International fisheries commissions
306

BA

1,003

1,350

"1,576

197

923

1,352

1,555

203

4,0301
"30!
4,060

"4,730

670

3,575

0

3,692

4,730

670

BA
0

12,973
16,828

16,622
25,177

19,993
27,820

3,371
2,643

Mutual educational and cultural
exchange activities
153

BA

50,587

54,000
M,000

"65,000

11,620

0

46,830

51,354

58,500

7,146

International educational exchange
activities (special foreign currency
program)
153

0

3

5

10

5

Center for Cultural and Technical
Interchange Between East and
West
153

BA
0

6,925
7,165

7,400
7,400

"9,000
9,000

1,600
1,600

Preservation of ancient Nubian
monuments (special foreign
currency program)
153

0

25

25

United States-Japan Friendship
Activities (foreign currency
program): Indefinite
153

BA
0

Educational exchange fund,
payments by Finland, World War I
debt: Permanent, indefinite
153

BA
0

353
252

352
375

352
375

Total Federal funds Educational
Exchange.

BA
0

57,865
54,250

61,132
59,159

89,352
77,910

28,220
18,751

funds:
153

BA
0

115
245

135
165

135
151

-14

Migration and refugee assistance
151

BA

19,779

"10,100

-14,393

0

13,968

24,4701
"23}
31,477

10,000

-21,477

Assistance to refugees from the
Soviet Union
151

BA
0

36,500
29,020

10,000
34,307

International narcotics control

151

BA
0

42,500
5,162

42,500
26,800

Center,
152

BA
0

2,200
2,200

Total Federal funds
International Commissions.
EDUCATIONAL EXCHANGE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Trust Funds
Educational exchange trust
Permanent, indefinite

..

"15,000
10 000

15,000
10 000
.

OTHER
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payment to International
Washington, D.C
See footnotes at end of table.




-10,000
-34,307
"42,500
37,800

11,000

269

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE—Continued
OTHER-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

International Center, Washington,
D.C. (special fund)
152
Permanent indefinite

BA

2,200

1

1,896

1.896J
3,010

2,089

...

8A
0

921

Payment to the Republic of Panama:
Permanent
152

BA
0

2,328
2,328

2,328
2,328

2,328
2,328

Total Federal funds Other

BA
0

105,507
52,678

79,321
95,833

56,824
53,138

-22,497
-42,695

BA
0

784,850
742,069

843,779
867,331

944,838
941,438

101,059
74,107

BAl

-2,719

-519

-519

-4,855

-4,885

-6,790

-76

-58

-58

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
152

0 I
Proprietary
public

receipts from the
150
300

BAl
0 I
BAl

-1,905

oI
400

BAl

-1,429

-1,400

-1,400

902

oI

-1,107

-1,118

-1,109

BA
0

774,664
731,883

835,799
859,351

934,962
931,562

99,163
72,211

BA
0

75,888
40,389

98,287
55,511

87,508
64,639

-10,779
9,128

BAl

-103

-50

-50

BAl

-10

-10

-10

75,775
40,276

98,227
55,451

87,448
64,579

Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
602
Proprietary
public

BAl

0 I

receipts from the
153

Total trust funds

01
0I
BA
0

Interfund transactions

152

BAl

of

Total Department of State

BA
0

9

-10,779
9,128

-36,935

-43,335

-45,835

-2,500

813,504
735,224

890,691
871,467

976,575
950,306

85,884
78,839

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

See footnotes at end of table.




407

BA
BA

34,952
176

0

Salaries and expenses
Current indefinite

26,249

29,9151

A

34,415|

3,835

...
^ 6 5 J '"'
37,924

35,000

-2,924

270

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

35,000
35,500
1,800
1,800
250
300

1,580

-300
-5,790

-1,100

-800
5,790

61,303
49,249

65,158
69,034

71,465
71,500

6,307
2,466

BA

584,278

617,965
"37,000

"723,7201

51,135

BA

4,885

712,8311
"2.400J

39,810

25,000
25,941
1,175
835

33,420
35,500
1,158
1,500

55

200

1,318
-5,149

BA
0

Transportation planning, research,
and development
407
Grants in aid for natural gas
pipeline safety
407

BA
0
BA
0

Transportation research activities
overseas (special foreign currency
program)
407

BA
0

642
300
250
100

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

407

0

Consolidated working fund,
transportation systems center..407

0

Total Federal funds Office of
the Secretary.
COAST GUARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

406

Current, indefinite

"2,012
\ 2,992
640,821
"34,600
E

574,385
and
406

BA

75,500

108,376
"-10,000
c
402

"165,310

66,314

131,486

Acquisition, construction,
improvements

117,621
"-10,000

125,109

17,488

6,562
6,590
95,850
"9,605
95,850
"9,605
27,985

"6,600
5,665
115,650

38
-925
10,195

115,650

10,195

"31,350

2,438

Alteration of bridges

406

BA
0

4,000
14,908

Retired pay

406

BA

86,750

0

86,397

BA
BA

26,770
382

Reserve training
Current, indefinite

406

D

53

0

State boating safety assistance ...406
See footnotes at end of table.




26,889

28,912

31,350

2,438

BA

14,000

16,887
"-2,500
D
59

"20,652

6,127

16,473

Research, development, test, and
evaluation
406

17,938
"-2,500

18,874

3,436

3,500
3,936

5,790
5,790

6,000
6,000

210
210

BA
0

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

271

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
COAST GUARD—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

fund):
406

BA
0

2,358
3,383

5,000
4,000

5,000
4,000

406

Pollution fund (special
Permanent, indefinite

BA
O

1,743

-400

2,000
1,900

Intragovernmental funds:

Coast Guard supply fund

-9,080

5,920

-2,000

-7,920

406
Coast

BA
0

802,423
850,520

937,825
954,747

1,076,282
1,021,779

138,457
67,032

fund:
406

BA
0

11
31

30
30

30
30

0
Coast Total yard fund funds
Guard Federal
Guard.
Trust

2,000
2,300

Funds

Coast Guard general
Permanent indefinite

gift
..

-36

155

-1

-156

BA
0

11
-5

30
185

30
29

-156

405

BA

1,280,957

1.375,500

1,545,000
M33.928

-308,778

Appropriation, Current, indefinite...

BA

11,000
1,534,0001
-433,928

-289,928

Miscellaneous trust revolving funds .406
Total trust funds Coast Guard...

O

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operations

0
Facilities, engineering
development

BA

and

1,290,781

D
44,350
1,390,000
J

0
B
A

11,500
6,014

11,821
12,500

13,000
13,000

1,179
500

14,742

15,440

17,700

1,390

0

14,207

15,960

17,200

1,240

BA
0

3.000
1,662

5,500
7,569

12,100
4,000

6,600
-3,569

Civil supersonic aircraft development
termination
405

0

18,733

19,000

7,643

-11,357

Safety regulation

O
0

1,974

3,291

490

-2,801

273

222

375

15

42

27

1,321,199

1,453,481

1.153,872

-299,609

1,334,021

1,448,557

1,142,447

-306,110

405

Operation and maintenance, National
capital airports
405
Construction,
airports

national

capital
..405

United States International
Aeronautical Exposition

405

-222

405

Public enterprise funds:

Aviation war risk insurance revolving
fund
405
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated
integrated
program

working fund,
grant administration
405

Total Federal funds Federal
Aviation Administration.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

272

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Trust Funds
Grants-in-aid for airports (Airport and
airway trust fund):
405
Contract authority
BA
Liquidation of contract authority
0

(200,000)
242,999

(280,000)
290,000

"350,000
(370,000)
360,000

350,000
(90,000)
70,000

Facilities and equipment (Airport and
airway trust fund)
405

BA
0

250,000
207,203

227,278
270,000

"250,000
261,650

22,722
-8,350

Research, engineering and development
(Airport and airway trust fund)....405

BA

62,095

80,400

21,750

0
BA
0

68,146

73,000

8,300

2,765

1,025

BA
0

312,095
521,113

285,928
625,725

FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
404 BA
0

5,600
13,191

Operations (Airport and airway trust
fund)
405
Total trust funds Federal
Aviation Administration.

Motor carrier safety

404

Highway beautification

404

BA

Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

57,9001
D
750J
64,700

'431,128
1141
J
431,128J

431,128
430,217

1,111,528
1,125,892

825,600
500,167

2,490

-2,490

5,9151
"172J
6,087

BA

BA

0

6,779
6,779

692

965

1,031

-109,968

1,020

692

(30,000)
24,062

110,000
(25,000)
48,849

(44,200)
45,231

(19,200)
-3,618

(2,000)
2,326

(4,500)
4,600

(5,746)
3,300

(1,246)
-1,300

BA
0

5,000
5,382

13,510
13,000

9,900
11,200

-3,610
-1,800

Territorial highways:
404
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA

11,060

Rail crossings-demonstration projects
404
Railroad-highway crossings
demonstration projects

0
Highway-related safety grants
404
Liquidation of contract authority....
Darien Gap Highway

151

404

(4,000)
4,000

-509

BA
0

9,800
484

965
2,600

2,835
4,900

1,870
2,300

BA

2,000

467

800

Rural highway public transportation
demonstration program
404
National scenic and recreational
highway:
404
Contract authority
Permanent
..404

BA
0

52




BA
BA

j

-333J
510

M67
2,895

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.

-2,009

(2,500)
3,702

0

Alaska Highway

iibo}

10,009
(4,000)
4,509

600

2571
'-166J

-252

7,105
2,400

4,210
1,800

-10,000

20,000
10,000
4,825
2,500

8,000
3,800

3,175
1,300

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

273

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Off-systems roads (Liquidation of
contract authorization):
404
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

Access highways to public recreation
areas on lakes (Liquidation of
contract authorization):
404
Permanent

BA

Miscellaneous accounts
404
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

200,000

Total Federal funds Federal
Highway Administration.
Trust

BA
0

56
(11,000)
20,502
54,536
69,701

(20,720)
21,820
358,957
107,398

Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

BA
BA
0

11,245,683
100,000
(4,315,900)
4,464,462

Right-of-way revolving fund (trust
revolving fund)
404
Liquidation of contract authority
0
Parkway

23,002

(trust
404

BA
0

Trust fund share of other highway
programs
404
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

BA

15,700

BA
BA

35,000 .

0
Highway safety research and
development
404
Highway related safety grants:
404
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

(5,000)
22,100

BA
0
BA
BA

152,500

"-3,250,000
6,357,500
3,475,000
(4,685,840) (4,737,000
4,817,000
4,516,000
(20,000)
25,937
1,544
2,500
8,685
y
-667
25,000
(7,500)
11,520
'-333
8,685
1,800

54,190

Rail crossings demonstration projects
404

BA
0

Other Federal Highway Administration
trust funds: Permanent
151
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

BA
BA
0

Total trust funds Federal
Highway Administration.




BA
0

(20,000)
41,000
2,500
3,000
14,178

(11,992)
16,200
'-334
9,135
9,135
1

34,491

0

See footnotes at end of table.

6,771
44,117
88,472

(-20,720)
-15,049
-314,840
-18,926

Funds

Federal-aid highways (trust fund): 404
Contract authority

Baltimore-Washington
fund)

-200,000
(10,000)

25,000

BA

0

(10,000)
'-25,000

2,811
1,921
(4,548)
6,062
11,455,305
4,515,626

38,000
(7,292)
20,436
6,625,738
4,577,860

(3,100)
3,100
M.150
1,000
45,100
41,100
300,063
4,931,201

-6,285,000
(51,160)
301,000

15,063
956
500
-18,840

(4,492)
4,679
450
7,335
-34,491
(3,100)
3,100
4,150
1,000
7,100
(-7,292)
20,664
-6,325,675
353,341

274

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

State and community highway
safety.
404
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....
Total Federal funds National
Highway Traffic Safety
Administration.
Trust

36,340

42,7641

42,636

-517

38,649

43,400

47,180

3,780

BA
BA

3,300

0

404

B
A
0

Traffic and highway safety

(30,000)
29,076

2,250
(10,860)
10,000

BA
0

39,640
67,725

45,403
53,400

42,636
50,180

BA

39,432

28,110

30,464

BA
BA

259,200

0
0
BA
0

(70,000)
89,449
7
298,632
89,456

BA

2,900

-2,250
(2,000)
3,000

(-8,860)
-7,000
-2,767
-3,220

Funds

Trust fund share of highway safety
programs
404
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority
Gifts and donations
Total trust funds
Highway Traffic
Administration.

404
National
Safety

195,750
(85,140)
112,270
1 ..
.
224,130
112,271

56,500
(74,000
112,120
86,964
112,120

-137,166

(-11,140)
-150
-1
-137,166
-151

FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Office of the administrator

404

Railroad safety

404

0

2,896

BA

9,075

0

6,843

BA

24,350

0

Railroad research and development
404

38,269

Grant-in-aid for railroad safety

404

BA
0

1,500

Rail service assistance

404

BA

39,800

0

22,518

BA

140,000

0

128,600

Grants to National Railroad
Passenger Corporation
404

Emergency rail facilities restoration
404
See footnotes at end of table.




23,904

3,6671
D
115J
3,615
9,814
'1,900
D
280
10,094
'600

6,700

2,918

6,400
"16,275

2,785
4,281

14,8751
'1.300J
66,550

19,000

52,600

9,991

"3,000
965
45,000

2,035
-535
-65,200

15,0001
25,000j
"460,000

-97,482

360,000

59,325

48,250
MOO
43,309
MOO
965
1,500
10,2001
*100,000]
62,482
*75,000

200,2751
B
77,9OOJ
222,7751
*77,900J
3,533

B

5,481

181,825

-3,533

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

275

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION—Con
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

BA
0
BA
0

-1,070
217,625
221,960

Urban mass transportation fund..404

B
A

39,771

Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

Alaska Railroad revolving fund

404

Total Federal funds Federal
Railroad Administration.

6,031
2,905
458,697
503,013

4,764
597,525
480,904

-6,031
1,859
138,828
-22,109

83,100

-8,800,000

URBAN MASS TRANSPORTATION
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

3,055,517
(380,000)
418,954

49,340
"206
8,750,454
(400,000)1
^(150,000)/
650,0001
^150,0001

-83,1001
(890,300)

(340,300)

1,075,000

275,000

-1,000

1,000

SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT
CORPORATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Saint Lawrence Seaway Development
Corporation fund
406
Limitation on administrative
expenses.
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

(846)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400

BA1
0 J

902

BA1

(943)

5,592,014
3,009,371

12,119,521
3,934,149

2,985,897
3,929,282

-24,158

-62,763

-61,908

(57)

-9,133,624
-4,867
855

-104

-311

-311

12,056,447
3,871,075

2,923,678
3,867,063

-9,132,769
-4,012

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
151
902
Total trust funds




(886)

5,567,752
2,985,109
12,066,043
5,126,190

7,135,826
5,316,041

1,498,585
6,169,242

-5,637,241
853,201

BA1
0 J

-6,987

-45,262

-45,100

BA1

-93

7,090,564
5,270,779
19,147,011
9,141,854

1,453,485
6,124,142
4,377,163
9,991,205

0 I

See footnotes at end of table.

-2,000

BA
0

Total Federal funds

Total Department
Transportation.

-2,759

0I
BA
0

of

12,058,963
5,119,110

BA
0

17,626,715
8,104,219

162

-5.637,079
853,363
-14,769,848
849,351

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

276

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Office of Revenue Sharing

19,571

17,355

851

BA
0

Salaries and expenses, Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center....751

BA

2,250

0

2,098

25,645
<186
"386
26,032

3,0401
^751
3,123

28,050

1,833

28,990

2,958

2,704
2,500

BA

0

Salaries and expenses, Office of the
Secretary
803

2,704
2,500

3,210

95

3,210

87

14,300
20,685

-4,615
12,835

Construction, Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center....751

BA
0

Expenses for economic stabilization
(liquidating functions)
802

BA
0

2,000
2,000

Presidential election campaign fund:
Permanent, indefinite
802

BA
0

50,000
26,000

45,000
35,000

-5,000
9,000

Miscellaneous permanent
appropriations (special
Permanent, indefinite

BA
0

21
23

23
20

16
20

-7

0

1

1

1

Liquidation of Reconstruction
Finance Corporation
803

0

-511

-460

-438

Liquidation of Home Owners' Loan
Corporation
803

0

1

1

funds):
803

479

18,915
7,850

-2,000
-2,000

Public enterprise funds:

Liquidation of Federal
Mortgage Corporation

Farm
803

22

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

803

Total Federal funds Office of
the Secretary.
Trust

Pershing Hall
Permanent

0

-268

-44

-24

20

BA
0

21,842
19,177

100,270
64,523

93,280
89,945

-6,990
25,422

6,303

Funds

memorial

fund:
705

BA
0

BUREAU OF GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL
OPERATIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

803

BA

95,104

112,6481

120,141

0

88,678

112)692

122,425

Subsidy payment to environmental
financing authority
304
Permanent, indefinite

BA

1,188

Salaries and expenses

Claims, judgments, and relief acts
806
Permanent, indefinite

See footnotes at end of table.




75

BA
0

9,733
1

J

75

BA

79,520

BA
0

18,797
110,899

51,473
'98,527
22,100
65,774
'98,527

-75

-75
1
'153,500
23,000
23,0001
'153,500

4,400

12,199

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

277

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
BUREAU OF GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL
OPERATIONS-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Interest on uninvested
Permanent, indefinite

7,153
6,091
800
413

funds:
902

8A
0

Payment of Government losses in
shipment: Indefinite
803

BA
0

Eisenhower College grants

502

BA
0

803

0

10

403

BA
0

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Government Financial
Operations.

BA
0

1,000
2,459 ..
.
203,562
208,550

BA
0

24
24

BA

80,614

0

78,822

751

BA

241,334

0
Miscellaneous permanent accounts
(special funds): Permanent,
indefinite
852

BA
0

Total Federal funds Customs
Service.

Public enterprise funds:

Check forgery insurance fund

7,824
7,824
600
600
9,000
9,000
15

7,933
7,933
700
700
1,000
1,000
16

109
109
100
100
-8,000
-8,000
1

303,437
294,507

306,274
308,574

2,837
14,067

Intragovernmental funds:

Fishermen's protective fund

Trust

Funds

Bureau of Government Financial
Operations trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
806

24
24

24
24 ..
.

BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND
FIREARMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

92,0001
D
2,448J
95,654

101,339

6,891

101,615

5,961

304,920

15,443

224,792
116,578
102,569

281,8001
D
7,677J
305,486
220,000
220,000

314,230
225,000
225,000

8,744
5,000
5,000

BA
0

357,912
327,361

509,477
525,486

529,920
539,230

20,443
13,744

BA
0

2,611
2,803

2,500
2,500

3,000
3,000

500
500

53

16

CUSTOMS SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Trust

Funds

Refunds, transfers and expenses,
unclaimed, abandoned and seized
goods: Permanent, indefinite
803
BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Air-conditioning of the Bureau of
Engraving and Printing buildings
803
See footnotes at end of table.




0

-16

278

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Bureau of Engraving and Printing
fund
803

0

1,466

2,958

-1,377

-4,335

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Engraving and Printing.

0

1,519

2,974

-1,377

-4,351

25,290

41,441

6,792

39,800
40.600
6,940
3,200
3,200
85.241
49,940

6,340
40,600
6,140
825
289
48,217
12,769

BUREAU OF THE MINT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

803

BA

20,510

32,0001
(
2,336 [
"313
33,460

Construction of mint facilities

803

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

53
1,411
1,672
26,701
22,235

800
2,375
2,911
37,024
37,171

803

BA

81,009

89,117]
'7,000

98,550]

1,393

Appropriation, Current, indefinite...

BA

161
"1,040
94,272
'5,652

94,2901
'1.348J

-4,286

45.260

3,061

44,4591

1,921

Coinage profit fund (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
803
Total Federal funds Bureau of
the Mint.

BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administering the public debt

0

75,909

BA
BA

36,562

0

35,815

BA
BA

606,570

0

585,976

BA

666,092

0

651,888

Refunding internal revenue
collections, interest: Permanent,
indefinite
902

BA
0

Internal revenue collections for
Puerto Rico (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
852

BA
0

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Accounts, collection
service

Compliance

See footnotes at end of table.




803

and taxpayer
803

803

220,243
220,243

40,4701
'229
"1,500
42,327
'220
703,3701
'1,937
"20,293
730,043
'1,859
780.760
'4.483
"18,252
806,230
'4,304
239,400
239,400

111,387
101,484

116,000
116,000

118.000
118,000

772,881

47,281

759,2011
'78f
837,637

27,377

822,9101
'179J
390.000
390,000

12,555

34,142

150,600
150,600
2,000
2,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

279

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Federal tax lien
Indefinite

revolving

Total Federal funds
Revenue Service.

fund:
803

R
A
0
B
A
0

1,640,854
1,595,415

B
A

69,792

0
B
A
0
B
A
0

0

9

500 .
-141 .

-500

141
2,163,778
2,134,836

236,584
194,594

95,250

12,370

66,836

79,3001
D
3,580J
82,800

94,550

11,750

1,812
1,204

1,700
2,000

2,600
2,550

900
550

71,604
68,040

84,580
84,800

97,850
97,100

13,270
12,300

-4,475

6,102

2,647

-3,455

B
A
0

29,318,933
29,318,933

32,900,000
32,900,000

36,000,000
36,000,000

3,100,000
3,100,000

B
A
0

6,054,780
6,054,780

6,204,780
6,204,780

6,354,780
6,354,780

150,000
150,000

B
A
0

6,054,780
6,105,921

6,204,780
6,176,000

6,354,780
6,301,000

150,000
125,000

B
A
0

Internal

37,857,972
37,770,741

42,258,367
42,250,061

45,831,012
45,770,281

3,572,645
3,520,220

BAl

-248

-275

-300

-25

BAl
0 J|

-1,097,941

-1,232,987

-1,207,768

25,219

BAl

-50,000

-50,000

-50,000

-155,489

-333,210

-436,150

1,927,194
1,940,242

SECRET SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

Contribution for annuity
Permanent, indefinite
Total Federal
Service.

benefits:
751

funds

Secret

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE
CURRENCY
Trust

Funds

Assessment funds (trust revolving fund)
403
INTEREST ON THE PUBLIC DEBT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Interest on the public
Permanent, indefinite

debt:
901

GENERAL REVENUE SHARING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payments to State and local
government fiscal assistance trust
fund: Permanent
851
Trust

Funds

State and local government fiscal
assistance trust fund: Permanent

851
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
803

0 1
v
J
902

w

Receipts from off-budget
Federal agencies
151

902
See footnotes at end of table.




.

0I
BAl
0 1

-102,940

280

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
the
Proprietary receipts from the
050
public

10
5
400
800
902
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Interfund transactions

803
851

Total Department
Treasury.

of the

i
i^
i
i

BA
0
BA
0
B
A
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

-12,701

-7,242

-2,540

4,702

-136,274

-166,828

-155,797

11,031

-18

-19

1

-69,031

-444,162

-99,757

344,405

-153,374

-175,519

-161,573

13,946

36,182,914
36,095,683

39,848,126
39,839,820

43,717,108
43,656,377

3,868,982
3,816,557

6,057,419
6,104,277
-152,431

6,207,311
6,184,633
-155,000

6,357,811
6,306,678
-155,000

150,500
122,045

-6,054,780

-6,204,780

-6,354,780

-150,000

36,033,122
35,992,749

39,695,657
39,664,673

43,565,139
43,453,275

3,869,482
3,788,602

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION'
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses:
(Atomic energy defense
activities)
and

(Energy)..

basic
251
..305

Total, Operating expenses
Special foreign currency program.305
Plant and capital equipment:
(Atomic energy defense
activities)
(General science
research)
See footnotes at end of table.




and

1,329,213

0
BA

1,291,288
308,276

0
BA

291,664
175,899

1,490,4061
"2,841 J
1,297,787
361,5621
"568J
322,784
919,774

200,075

(General science
research)

BA

"2,272
769,713

BA
0
BA
0

1,813,388
1,783,027

2,777,423
2,390,284

BA
0
BA
0

256,823
194,646
64,868
76,920

274,186
300,006
44,094
70,624

053

053
basic
251

*1,627,106

133,859

1,460,961
M01,670

163,174
39,540

358,957
*1,375,2111
'-86,0001

36,173
367,165

1,253,9761
-/-86f000J
3,317,987
2,987,894
6,650
5,600
268,415
302,237
36,683
54,789

398,263
540,564
597,610
6,650
5,600
-5,771
2,231
-7,411
-15,835

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

281

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION'-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Plant and capital equipment:
—Continued.
(Energy)
Total, Plant
equipment.

and

capital

Total Federal funds Energy
Research and Development
Administration.
Trust

BA
0

340,225
253,923

483,432
329,314

589,619
464,848

106,187
135,534

BA
0

661,916
525,489

801,712
699,944

894,717
821,874

93,005
121,930

BA
0

2,475,304
2,308,516

3,579,135
3,090,228

4,219,354
3,815,368

640,219
725,140

BA
0

7,950
7,980

13,550
13,589

10,550
10,550

-3,000
-3,039

BA
0

305

2,475,304
2,308,516

3,579,135
3,090,228

4,219,354
3,815,368

640,219
725,140

Funds

Advances for cooperative
Permanent, indefinite

work:
305

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300

BA1

-210

0F
BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
305

2,475,094
2,308,306

3,579,135
3,090,228

4,219,354
3,815,368

640,219
725,140

BA
0

Total Federal funds

7,950
7,980

13,550
13,589

10,550
10,550

-3,000
-3,039

-7,950

-13,550

-10,550

3,00C

BA1

0I
30

-39

Total trust funds

0

Total Energy Research and
Development Administration.

BA

2,475,094

3,579,135

4,219,354

640,219

0

2,308,336

3,090,267

3,815,368

725,101

39 .

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Agency and regional management
304

BA

Energy research and development
305

BA
0

Research and development

304

BA
0

Abatement and control

304

Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

55,694

6,593

57,150

63,000

5,850

112,000
113,000

-22,000
81,000

159,427
116,496

170,157
161,000

*163,400
167,000

-6,757
6,000

BA

256,015

275,888
02,450
£
150

*339,700

-88,788

BA
BA

100,000

0




65,700

134,000
32,000

48,153

See footnotes at end of table.

57,907]
D
U84

(4,000)
193,371

150,000
(26,000)
276,500

(65,000)
352,000

(39,000)
75,500

THE BUDGET F 0 R

282

FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Enforcement

304

Buildings and facilities

304

BA

45,812

0

38,200

BA

1,400

0
Construction grants:
304
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

0

51,7431
"1,0861
*14
50,050

*53,900

1,057

54,000

3,950

2,100

700

300

1,500

1,200

5,333,770
(600,000)

3,399,800
(1,400,000)

(500,000)

1,553,421

2,300,000

2,300,000

2,000
3,110

3,600

6,000
4,000

6,000
400

-3,399,800
(-900,000)

Scientific activities overseas (Special
foreign currency program)
304

BA
0

Operations, research, and facilities
304

0

77,237

56,000

25,000

-31,000

0

187

60

50

-10

Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for certification and
other services
304
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

304

Trust Funds
Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
304
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
304

188

304

439

135

BA
0

5,952,718
2,030,363

4,245,795
2,936,964

742,800
3,079,989

-3,502,995
143,025

BA
0

-5
2

36

24

-12

BA
0

5,952,718
2,030,363

4,245,795
2,936,964

742,800
3,079,989

-3,502,995
143,025

-273

-264

-274

-10

BA

5,952,445

4,245,531

742,526

-3,503,005

0

Total Federal funds
Environmental Protection
Agency.

0

2,030,090

2,936,700

3,079,715

143,015

-5
2

36

24

-12

BA1
0 J

BA
0
BA1
0 J

5

Total trust funds

0

7

36

24

-12

Total Environmental Protection

BA

5,952,445

4,245,531

742,526

-3,503,005

0

2,030,097

2,936,736

3,079,739

143,003

Agency.
See footnotes at end of table.




283

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
REAL PROPERTY ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Real property miscellaneous
accounts:
(General property and records
management)
804

BA
0

Disposal of surplus real and related
personal property, operating
expenses
804

8A

Expenses, disposal of surplus real
and related personal property
(special fund): Permanent,
indefinite
804

8A
0

653,421
816,238

19,430 ..
.
7,2001

6,340

-19,430
-816

797
481

7,156
1,500
1100

6,340
1,500
1100

-816

-114,4301

0

-97 937

-11,507

intragovernmental funds:

Federal buildings fund

804

0

804

0
0

12 086
3,032

0

-1,368

1,780

14
7

-1,606

BA
0

654,218
830,469

8,656
-56,964

7,840
-90,323

-816
-33,359

BA

101,950

165,5001

166,912

84
3

0

104,945

158,660

160,073

1,413

BA
0

30,248
219
101,950
135,412

-7,021
-256
166,078
151,383

-30,000
-95
166,912
129,978

-22,979
11
6
834
-21,405

National Archives and Records
Service, operating expenses 804

BA

41,175

50,5001

62,971

11,571

0
Records declassification

804

BA
0

Records

BA
0

38,948
1,085
1,104
42,260
40,052

48,322
1,305
1,305
52,705
49,627

60,608
1,372
1,372
64,343
61,980

12,286
67
67
11,638
12,353

0

-679

-598

-364

234

Buildings management fund
Construction
buildings

services,

public
804

Consolidated working
property activities

fund,

Total Federal funds
Property Activities.

real
804
Real

PERSONAL PROPERTY ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Federal Supply
expenses

Service, operating
804

Intragovernmental funds:

General supply fund

804

0

Working capital fund

804

0

Total Federal funds Personal
Property Activities.
RECORDS ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Total Federal
Activities.

funds

Trust

Funds

National archives trust fund (revolving)
804
See footnotes at end of table.

n 580-000 O - 75 - 19




284

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Continued
RECORDS ACTIVITIES—Continued
Trust Funds—Continued
National archives gift fund
804
Total trust
Activities.

funds

Records

BA
0

128
301

500
889

115
125

-385
-764

BA
0

128
-378

500
291

115
-239

-385
-530

BA

7.100

7.320

200

0

6,606

7.0001
°120J
7,414

7,326

-88

AUTOMATED DATA AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS
ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Automated Data and
Telecommunications Service,
operating expenses
804
Intragovernmental funds:

0

3,025

-405

-400

5

0
BA
0

4,960

-8,000

-6,000

2,000

7.100
14,591

7.120
-991

7.320
926

200
1,917

BA
0

31.200
33,009

3,502

873

-2,629

(General property and records
management)
804

BA
0

7.000
7,000

620

2,327

1,707

Total, Property Management
and Disposal Service,
Operating expenses (special
fund).

BA
0

38.200
40,009

4,122

3,200

-922

0

-20,136

-2,060

-1,100

960

0

-881

287

BA
0

38.200
18,992

2,349

2,100

-249

Office of Preparedness, salaries and
expenses
054

BA
0

5.096
4,327

7.650
7,294

16.843
16,611

9.193
9,317

Defense mobilization
Federal agencies

of
054

BA
0

3.260
4,100

1.500
2,618

-1,500
-2,618

054

0

15

-15

Federal telecommunications fund.804
Automatic data processing fund ..804
Total Federal funds Automated
Data and
Telecommunications
Activities.
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL
ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Property Management and Disposal
Service, Operating expenses
(special fund):
(Defense-related activities) 054

Strategic and critical materials....054
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund,
Emergency health activities

-287

054

Total Federal funds Property
Management and Disposal
activities.
PREPAREDNESS ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

functions

State and local preparedness
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

285

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Continued
PREPAREDNESS ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Defense Production Act,
guarantee activities

-29

loan
054

0

William Langer Jewel bearing plant
revolving fund
054

0

Total Federal funds
Preparedness Activities.

8A
0

8,356
8,398

Office of Administrator, salaries and
expenses
804

BA
0

2,950
2,724

Administrative and staff support
services, salaries and expenses
804

8A

Consumer information center

403

BA
0

Indian trust accounting

806

BA

and agency
804

BA
0

Federal management policy, salaries
and expenses
804

BA

Allowances and office
former Presidents

BA

60

0

64

-27

-27

-165

-175

-10

9,150
9,735

16,843
16,409

7,693
6,674

51,776

-122
3,628

51,384
1,056
970
2,660

4,201
60
39
111

2,660
12,747
12,204
1,880

111
1,912
1,786
132

1,880
328
'39
328
'39

132
207

GENERAL ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

0

665
725
2,290
2,364

General management
operations

0
staff

for
802

Expenses, presidential transition..802

BA
0

Refunds under Renegotiation Act .902

0

10

Reconstruction Finance Corporation
liquidation fund
804

0

-59

Virgin Islands Corporation liquidation
fund
804

0

122
47,9781
D
170J
47,183
996
931
2,5231
6
'26J
2,549
10,835
10,418
1,7301
G
18J
1,748
160
160

-100
-100

100
100

Public enterprise funds:

-900

12
-3

207

3
-10

-9
-7

-867

119

-986

Intragovemmental funds:

Administrative operations fund
Total Federal
activities.

funds

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
054
Proprietary
public

receipts from the
054

See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

1,141
5,965
6,069

1,449
64,536
63,683

70,486
68,591

-1,449
5,950
4,908

BA
0

858,049
1,053,983

308,245
218,822

333,744
189,661

25,499
-29,161

-6,332

-40,000

-1,276,797

-1,140,000

804

General

BA]
0j
BA]
0

40,000
-620,000

520,000

286

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease ( - )

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued

Federal funds:—Continued

800

BA1

0f

-47,000

-45,000

-471,388
-275,454

-918,755
-1,008,178

-331,256
-475,339

587,499
532,839

128

500
291

115

-378

-239

-385
-530

-471,260
-275,832

-918,255
-1,007,887

-331,141
-475,578

587,114
532,309

-45,600

2,00C

J

902

BA1
0 1
u

-708

J

Total Federal funds

BA

0
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

B
A
0
B
A
0

Total General Services
Administration.

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research and development:
(Manned space flight)

..253

(Space science, applications,
and technology)
254
(Supporting space activities) .255
(Air transportation)
Total, Research
development.

405
and

Construction of facilities:
(Manned space flight)

253

(Space science, applications,
and technolgoy)
254
(Supporting space activities) .255
(Air transportation)

405

Total, Construction of facilities
Research and program
management:
(Manned space flight)

..253

(Space science, applications,
and technology)
254
(Supporting space activities).255

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0




1,110,300
1,167,700

"1,414,600
1,328,100

304,300
160,400

767,900
901,867

793,115
762,300

"838,430
837,700

45,315
75,400

251,600
252,992

253,500
248,900

"250,000
272,400

-3,500
23,500

143,000
147,151

166,400
164,000

"175,350
175,700

8,950
11,700

2,194,000
2,421,552

2,323,315
2,342,900

2,678,380
2,613,900

355,065
271,000

56,300
25,241

77,185
52,000

"47,220
57,600

-29,965
5,600

3,010
12,154

19,430
6,800

"2,490
11,700

-16,940
4,900

39,380
28,934

36,295
33,000

"30,275
32,400

-6,020
-600

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

2,410
8,798

9,745
8,200

"4,635
6,400

-5,110
-1,800

101,100
75,127

142,655
100,000

84,620
108,100

-58,035
8,100

B
A

321,124

"319,700

1,400

0
B
A

310,4001
D
7,900J
317,920

319,700

1,780

249,723

"277,900

6,225

254,088

264,5001
D
7,175J
271,385

277,900

6,515

40,767

41,7001

"44,200

1,400

41,195

42,760

44,200

1,440

0
B
A
0

See footnotes at end of table.

1,031,500
1,119,542

328,345

°i1,1 UUJ
iflfli

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

287

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Research and program
management:—Continued
(Air transportation)

405

BA

132.986

128,6001

"134,200

1,800

0

135,909

°3,800J
132,235

134,200

1,965

Total, Research and program
management.

BA
0

744,600
759,537

765,175
764,300

776,000
776,000

10,825
11,700

Total Federal funds National
Aeronautics and Space
Administration.

BA
0

3,039,700
3,256,216

3,231,145
3,207,200

3,539,000
3,498,000

307,855
290,800

BA
0

2,537
1,445

1,550
3,900

525
2,900

-1,025
-1,000

BA
0

3,039,700
3,256,216

3,231,145
3,207,200

3,539,000
3,498,000

307,855
290,800

BA1
0 J

-2,803

-2,335

-2,360

-25

BA1

-15

-15

-15

BA

3,036,882

3,228,795

3,536,625

307,830

0

3,253,398

3,204,850

3,495,625

290,775

2,537
1,445

1,550
3,900

525
2,900

-1,025
-1,000

-525

1,025

Trust

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds.- Permanent,
indefinite
255
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
250
902

0I
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
255

BA1
0 J

Total trust funds

0

Total National Aeronautics and
Space Administration.

BA
0

-2,537

-1,550

-1,092

2,350

2,375

25

3,036,882
3252,306

3,228,795
3,207,200

3,536,625
3,498,000

307,830
290,800

4,617,506
4,595,1541
'649 J
2,718,766

13,663
-31,386

2,705,4461
'23.751J
163,428
162,700

68,591

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Compensation and pensions:
(Veterans service-connected
compensation)
701

0

(Other veterans income security
programs)
701
See footnotes at end of table.




BA

2,572,085

0

(Veterans non-service-connected
pension)
701

4,051,000
3,984,575

2,529,910

BA

BA
0

120,715
118,734

4,599,9431
'3,900J
4,623,944
'3,245
2,528,6581
^142,500/
2,541,851
'118,755
154,399
155,205

47,608

9,029
7,495

288

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease ( - )

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Compensation and pensions:—Con.
Total, Compensation and
pensions
701

B
A

6,743,800
6,633,219

Readjustment benefits

702

BA

3,353.000
3,248,899

Veterans insurance and indemnities
701

BA
0

Medicalcare

BA

703

0

3,468
2,859,076

2,789,001

Medical and prosthetic research ..703

BA

76,142

0
Medical administration and
miscellaneous operating expenses
703

BA

77,696
33.950

General operating expenses

705

BA

Construction of hospital
domiciliary facilities

and
703

Construction, major projects

703

0

29,847
349,809

0

336,976
34,927

BA

68,343

0

41,170
Construction, minor projects

703

BA

42,218
27,621

Grants for construction
extended care facilities

of State
703

Grants to the Republic
Philippines

of the
703

Grants for construction and
operation of State cemeteries ..705
Assistance for health
training institutions

manpower
703

Payment of participation
insufficiencies
See footnotes at end of table.




sales
704

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA

3,653
2,000
1,999

25,0
21
6

7,283,0001
'146.400J
7,321,000
'122,000
3,407,400
'638.038
'-161,000
3,487,400
'638,038
'-161,000
8,750
9,238
3,187,644
'36,239
'-61,000
'28,000
D
72,637
3,282,894
'35,579
'-61,000
89,0001
D
2,377J
91,168

7,499,700

70,300

7,463,3001
'24,400/

44,700

4,145,375

-339,063

'-600,000
4,130,3751

-434,063

'-600.000J
6,600
6,661
3,667,8661

-2,150
-2,577
282,346

'-122,000 J
3,667,206
'660
'-122,000

288,393

95,000

3,623

95,000

37,5081
D
170J

"38,528

3,832
850

37,785
420,5001
D
12,028]
446,750
15,891

38,528
452,957

743
20,429

450,957
4,615

4,207
-11,276

223,9251
'27.202J
62,845

297,464

46,337

87,8571
'13.829J
106,426

38,841

73,3591
'4.340J
10,000
5,500
2,100
2,100
'5,000
'5,000
30,000
35,400

19,737

43,7961
'7,706 [

mi]
57,962
9,700
5,200
2,050
2,050

10,000
22,600

54,532

300
300
50
50
5,000
5,000
20,000
12,800

289

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Loan guaranty revolving fund

704

Direct loan revolving fund

704

0

Canteen service revolving fund ....705

0

Rental, maintenance, and repair of
quarters
705

4,139

1,828

3,148

1,320

64,602
-99,388
-3,441

-192,000
-83,000
-1,654

6,000

-100,000
-1,500

198,000
-17,000
154

5,150

BA
0

-164

3,188

3,352

2
-31,748

-6
-32,984

2
-33,297

8
-313

69,100

-11,200

69,436

-8,455

0

Service-disabled veterans insurance
fund
701
Soldiers' and sailors' civil relief...701

0

Veterans reopened insurance fund
701

0

Education loan fund

BA
0

80,300
77,891

BA
0

37

97
47

-97
-44

-2,623

2,624

-2,624

10,576
-7,585

10,000
5,826

8,000

-2,000
-5,826

Vocational
fund

702

rehabilitation

Servicemen's group
fund

revolving
702

life insurance
701

Intragovernmental funds:

Supply fund:
Contract authority,
indefinite.

705
Permanent,

Consolidated working fund

705

BA
0
0

-134

BA
0

13,568,314

15.564,687

15,715,264

150,577

13,153,340

15,192,980

15,330,919

137,939

General post fund, National Homes:
Permanent, indefinite
705

BA
0

3,854
3,611

3,950
4,050

4,100
4,550

150
500

National service life insurance fund:
Permanent
701

BA
0

808,432

831,581

873,660

622,883

683,285

694,450

42,079
11,165

United States Government
insurance fund: Permanent

BA
0

38,444
77,727

38,160
77,327

38,260
77,638

311

-41,090

-40,128

-36,427

3,701

BA
0

850,730
663,131

873,691
724,534

916,020

42,329

740,211

15,677

BA
0

13,568,314

15,564,687

15,715,264

150,577

13,153,340

15,192,980

15,330,919

137,939

-2,051

-1,746

-1,746

-30

-30

-30

13,566,233

15,562,911

15,713.488

150,577

13,151,259

15,191,204

15,329,143

137,939

Total Federal funds Veterans
Administration.
Trust

Funds

life
701

Veterans special life insurance fund
701
Total trust funds
Administration.

Veterans

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
700
902
Total Federal funds




BA1

0I
BA1

o\
BA
0

100

THE

290

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
701
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

701

850,730
663,131

873,691
724,534

916,020
740,211

42,329
15,677

BA1
0 J

-475,337

-468,643

-490,905

-22,262

BA
0
BA1

375,393
187,794
-2,183

405,048
255,891
-2,058

425,115
249,306
-2,037

20,067
-6,585
21

13,939,443
13,336,870

15,965,901
15,445,037

16,136,566
15,576,412

170,665
131,375

"80,801

-2,117

82,999
101,574
105,231

233
1,574
6,428

0I
Total Veterans Administration....

BA
0

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES
ACTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses, international
programs (Peace Corps)
151

BA

76,963

451

0
BA
0

80,735
91,658
85,838

Miscellaneous trust funds-. Permanent,
indefinite
151

BA
0

Operating expenses,
programs

domestic

82,2311
/
WJ
82,766
100,000
98,803

Trust Funds

273
369

272
272

280
296

8
24

Summary
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150
902

BA1
0J
BA1

168,621
166,573

182,918
181,569

182,375
188,230

-45

-46

-46

-1

-1

-1

168,575
166,527

182,871
181,522

182,328
188,183

-543
6,661

0 I
Total Federal funds

BA
0

-543
6,661

Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
151
Total trust funds
Total Action
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0
BA1
0 J
BA
0
BA
0

273
369

272
272

280
296

8
24

-149

-149

-157

-8

124
220
168,699
166,747

123
123
182,994
181,645

123
139
182,451
188,322

16
-543
6,677

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

291

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
ADMINISTRATIVE CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED
STATES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

B
A
0

600
507

750
779

751

0
B
A
0

21
600
528

BA

790
780

40
1

750
798

790
780

-19
40
-18

130

130

140

10

63

106

145

39

4,100

4,5121

5,012

233

4,151

<267J
4,690

4,900

210

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund..

Total Administrative Conference
of the United States.

19

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON FEDERAL PAY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

805

0
AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

705

BA

0
Trust

Contributions:

Funds

Permanent,

indefinite
705

BA
0

83
19

21
53

51
53

30

BA
0

4,100
4,151

4,779
4,690

5,012
4,900

233
210

-3

-3

-3

BA

4,097

4,776

5,009

233

0

4,148

4,687

4,897

210

BA

83

21

51

30

0

19

53

53

4,180
4,167

4,797
4,740

5,060
4,950

263
210

BA

8,065

"10,690

1,280

0

8,894

9,2501
D
160J
9,155

10,300

1,145

65,640
65,639

15,840
15f759

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
700
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Total American Battle
Monuments Commission.

BA1
0

BA
0

ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Arms control
activities

and

disarmament
152

BOARD FOR INTERNATIONAL BROADCAST ING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Grants and expenses
See footnotes at end of table.




..

153

BA
0

49,625
50,674

49,800
49,880

292

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
CABINET COMMITTEE ON OPPORTUNITIES F R
O
SPANISH-SPEAKING PEOPLE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

506

B
A
0

1,000
1,044

B
A

15,607

500

-500
-559

559

CIVIL AERONAUTICS BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

405

17,1501

19,400

1,785

DAfLZl
*»D3J

0
405

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

15,297

18,051

19,400

1,349

B
A
0

73.265
73,362

67,728
66,781

60,695
66,232

-7,033
-549

B
A
0

Payments to air carriers

88,872
88,659

85,343
84,832

80,095
85,632

-5,248

-133

-139

-146

-7
3

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400

BA1

902

BA1

0 I
w

800

J

-13

-10

-7

B
A
0

88,726
88,513

85,194
84,683

79,942
85,479

-5,252

BA

71,839

96,000

3,100

0

73,347

90,0001
'150
D
2,750
92,560
'150

96,000

3,290

Government payment for annuitants,
employees health benefits
551

BA
0

163,114
163,114

264,817
251,540

338,650
338,650

73,833
87,110

Payment to civil service retirement
and disability fund
805
Permanent, indefinite

BA

881,981

1,280,9701

645,347

BA
BA
0

1,502,331
2,384,312

955,863
'363,100
2,124,862
3,080,7251
'363,100

2,808,202]
4,089,172

645,347

B
A

777

01
Total Civil Aeronautics Board....

796

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Federal Labor Relations
Salaries and expenses

805

Council:
805

0
Intergovernmental
assistance

806

BA
0

805

0

personnel

1,109

102

718

1,021

1,109

88

10,000
14,239

15,000
14,400

15,000
15,000

600

278

1,096

1,091

-5

Intragovernmental funds:

Revolving fund
See footnotes at end of table.




293

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION—Continued
Trust

Funds

Civil service retirement and disability
fund
602
Permanent, indefinite

M10.108]

BA

776,024

BA

8,955,256

10,680,510
^363,100

11,929,742]

0

5,668,972

7,204,558

8,741,8281
•'-767,800J

Employees health benefits fund (trust
revolving fund)
551

0

-62,121

-38,111

Employees life insurance fund (trust
revolving fund)
602

0

-155,528

-277,796

Retired employees health benefits fund
(trust revolving fund)
551

0

5,271

10,747

2,630,042
2,636,008

3,817,549

4,539,931

3,804,592

4,541,022

-727

-605

-605

-3

-3

-3

BA
0

2,629,312
2,635,278

3,816,941

4,539,323

3,803,984

4,540,414

722,382
736,430

BA
0

8,955,256
5,456,594

11,043,610

11,819,634

776,024

6,899,398

7,617,322

717,924

-15,279

-22,242

-6,765

15,477

8,939,977
5,441,315
-2,384,236

11,021,368
6,877,156
-3,443,825

11,812,869
7,610,557
-4,089,172

791,501
733,401
-645,347

BA
0

9,185,053
5,692,357

11,394,484
7,237,315

12,263,020
8,061,799

868.536
824,484

BA

153

171

200

24

0

145

180

190

10

7,843

843

7,737

584

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800
902

BAl
0 J
BA
0

Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
602

BAl

-5,998
-360,552
9,844

769,470
32,113
-82,756
-903

722,382
736,430

0 \
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

805

Total Civil Service Commission..

BA
0
BAl

0I

COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

451

COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

BA

5,896

,8501
6,850
*150J

0
See footnotes at end of table.




6,056

7,153

THE

294

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974

1975

1976

Increase or

actual

estimated

estimated

decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE OF PRODUCTS

AND SERVICES OF THE BLIND AND OTHER
SEVERELY HANDICAPPED
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

505 BA
0

240
190

252
249

256
266

4
17

COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

BA

11,193

11,193

0

10,934

10,934

COMMUNITY SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Community services program:
(Community development)

(Manpower training)

358,609

308,2001
•112,600)

363,000

-57,800

659,907

394,100
"104,400

368,0001
*8,200J

-122,300

0

secondary,and

vocational education)

BA

0
(Elementary,

451

20,982

5,000

-5,000

501
504

Total, Community services
program.
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

-76

:;;: ^ ;;;::;:;;;;;;;;;:

902
Total Community
Administration.

Services

358,609
680,813

420,800
503,500

363,000
376,200

-57,800
-127,300

BA
0

358,609
680,813

420,800
503,500

363,000
376,200

-57,800
-127,300

358,271
680,475

420,800
503,500

363,000
376,200

-57,800
-127,300

BA

34,684

35,745

36,595

850

0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
450

BA
0

18,710

42,730

36,575

-6,155

BA
0

34,684
18,710

35,745
42,730

36,595
36,575

850
-6,155

35,745
42,730

36,595
36,575

850
-6,155

BA1
0 J

-93

BA1
0 \

-245

BA
0

CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

553

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
550
Total Consumer Product Safety
Commission.
See footnotes at end of table.




BAl
0 J
BA
0

-2
34,682
18,708

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

295

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC BROADCASTING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

BA
0

47,750
47,750

62,000
62,000

"70,000
70,000

8,000
8,000

BA

191,533

24,088

191,533

226,800
'8,800
226,800

259,688

0

259,688

24,088

BA
0

226,184
151,961

152,600
205,416

248,153
247,355

95,553
41,939

BA
0

832
832

832
832

BA
0

750
750

40,000
40,000

832
832
40,000
40,000

B
A
0

419,299
345,076

429,032
481,848

548,673
547,875

119,641
66,027

BA1
0 J

-7,944

-10,426

-12,286

-1,860

BA1

-5,000

-65,000

-40,000

25,000

B
A
0

406,355
332,132

353,606
406,422

496,387
495,589

142,781
89,167

0

-4,868

-5,792

-6,241

-449

B
A

44,140

8,348

42,103

53,5971
°1,485J
52,880i
"800J

63,430

0

Payment to the Corporation for
Public Broadcasting
503

60,260

6,580

BA
0

44,140
42,103

55,082
53,680

63,430
60,260

8,348
6,580

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Federal payment
Columbia

to

District

of
852

Loans to District of Columbia for
capital outlay
451
Advances to stadium sinking fund,
armory board:
451
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.
Repayable advances to the District
of Columbia general fund:
Permanent, indefinite
852
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
450

852
Total District of Columbia

0I

EMERGENCY LOAN GUARANTEE BOARD
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Emergency loan guarantee fund...403
EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




751

THE

296

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
COMMISSION—Continued
Summary—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
750
Total Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission.

BA1
0 J

-5

-5

-5

44,135
42,098

55,077
53,675

63,425
60,255

8,348
6,580

0

-91

-176

-69

107

0

-91

-176

-69

107

BA
0

FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund
expenses

for administrative
351

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
350
Total Farm Credit
Administration.

BA1
0 J

-2

BA
0

-2
-93

-176

-69

107

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Federal Communications
Commission.

40,155

46,900

49,820

2,920

38,145

49,300

49,924

624

BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA

0

40,155
38,145

46,900
49,300

49,820
49,924

2,920
624

-22

-50,017

-18,017

32,000

BA1
0 J
BA
0

40,133
38,123

-3,117
-717

31,803
31,907

34,920
32,624

-223,733

-529,591

-698,721

-169,130

*2,000

1,500

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
Trust

Funds

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
fund (trust revolving fund)
401

0

FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses.....

802

BA
'500

0
See footnotes at end of table.




*470

1,8801
^30J

1,440

297

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
FEDERAL ENERGY ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

305

73,477

112,4351
'75.000J

45.400

80,881

6,500

141,117
'58.000
B
8,500

2,707

2,847

2,787

-60

4,670

2.000.000
-9,684

-2,000.000
-139

-4.000.000
9,545

0

-377,075

-299,164

-320,964

-21,800

BA ..
0

-369,698

2.000.000
-306,001

-2,000,000
-318,316

-4,000,000
-12,315

7,915

487

7,927

567

487
567

BA

124,835
"15,000
c
10
°2 f 190

32,884

120,236
B

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Interest adjustment payments

401

Public enterprise funds:

Federal Home Loan Bank Board
revolving fund:
401
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Current, indefinite.
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance
Corporation fund
401
Total Federal Home Loan Bank
Board.
FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
406

BA
0

BA

6.385

0

6,488

7.3001
D
128J
7,360

BA
0

6.385
6,488

7.428
7,360

7,915
7,927

-13

-21

-21

BA
0

6.372
6,475

7,407
7,339

7,894
7,906

487
567

BA

11.895

18,250

2.305

0

11,783

15,5211
D
424J
15,750

17,100

1,350

BA
0

11.895
11,783

15,945
15,750

18,250
17,100

2,305
1,350

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total Federal
Commission.

Maritime

BA1

0 I

FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION
SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

505

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)...
See footnotes at end of table.




298

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION
SERVICE-Continued
Summary—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
500
public
Total Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service.

BAl

0 }

-1

BA
0

11,894
11,782

15,945
15,750

18,250
17,100

2,305
1,350

BA
0

60
39

60
58

60
60

2

BA

28,500

32,100

35,910

2,813

0

26,588

"980
36,737

35,684

-1,053

BA
0

80
81

80
80

80
80

BA
0

28,580
26,669

33,177
36,817

35,990
35,764

-13

-14

-14

BA
0

28,567
26,656

33,163
36,803

35,976
35,750

2,813
-1,053

BA

32,334

37,8981

45,649

6,651

0

32,359

41,131

45,500

4,369

BA
0

32,334
32,359
-20

38,998
41,131
-20

45,649
45,500
-20

6.651
4,369

32,314
32,339

38,978
41,111

45,629
45,480

6.651
4,369

FEDERAL METAL AND NONMETALLIC MINE
SAFETY BOARD OF REVIEW
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

553

FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

305

Payments to States under Federal
Power Act (special
Permanent, indefinite

fund):
852

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300
Total Federal
Commission.

Power

BAl

2,813
-1,053

o \

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Federal Trade Commission

See footnotes at end of table.




BAl
0
L
BA
0

aiooj

299

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Total Foreign Claims Settlement
Commission.

1,441

869

1,252

130

0

4,761

24J
1,122
1,093

4,000

2,907

BA
0

947
5,630

1,264
2,215

1,441
5,252

177
3,037

BA
0

10,000
10,000

10,000
10,000

BA
0

362
80

362
80

10,000
10,000

10,000
10,000

BA
0

Payment of Vietnam prisoner of war
claims
152

1,2401

BA
0

152

947

0

Salaries and expenses

362
80

362
80

-10,000

-10,000

362
80

362
80

BA

D

177

HISTORICAL AND MEMORIAL COMMISSIONS
Harry S Truman Scholarship Foundation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payment to the Harry S Truman
memorial scholarship trust fund
502
Trust

Funds

Harry S Truman memorial scholarship
trust fund: Permanent
502
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
..502

Interfund transactions..

BA1

0 \
BA
0

Total Harry S Truman
Scholarship Foundation.
American Revolution Bicentennial
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Commemorative activities
fund): Permanent
Trust

806
(special
806
806

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800
Total Federal funds

580-000 O - 75 - 20




314

19,705
6,622

9,686
23,582

10,000
10,400

-13,182

5,286
3,768

5,500
8,000

11,900
11,000

6,400
3,000

Funds

Gifts and donations

See footnotes at end of table.

B
A
0
B
A
0

0

1

....

B
A
0

24,991
10,390

15,186
31,582

21,900
21,400

6,714
-10,182

BA1

-5,286

-5,500

-11,900

-6,40C

19,705
5,104

9,686
26,082

10,000
9,500

-16,582

0I
B
A
0

314

300

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
HISTORICAL AND MEMORIAL COMMISSIONS
—Continued
American Revolution Bicentennial
Administration—Continued
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Total American Revolution
Bicentennial Administration.

0
BA
0

314
-16,582

19,705
5,105

9,686
26,082

10,000
9,500

11

23

24

806

60

14

-14

806

68

1

-1

0

71

37

0

68
139

BA
0

Other Historical and Memorial Agencies
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial
Commission
806
Miscellaneous appropriations
Trust

0

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

Total Other Historical
Memorial Agencies.

and

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Interfund transactions

24

-13

38

24

-1
-14

24,991
10,461

15,186
31,619

31,900
31,424

16,714
-195

BA1
0 J_

-5,286

-5,500

-11,900

-6,400

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

19,705
5,175

9,686
26,119

20,000
19,524

10,314
-6,595

362
80

362
79

-10,000

-10,000

0

BA .
0
502

69

BA1.
0

Total Historical and Memorial
Commissions.

1

i.

BA
0

19,705
5,244

9,686
26,120

10,362
9,604

676
-16,516

BA
0

1,164
1,161

1,324
1,324

1,420
1,420

96
96

INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses




..752

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

3Q1

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental
Relations
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

806

BA

1,106

1,1621

1,223

39

D22\

0

1,009

1,317

1,223

-94

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Contributions:

806

0

64

-132

143

275

BA
0

2
20

20
34

25
25
_

5
-9

BA

1,106

1,184

1,223

0

Trust

1,073

1,185

1,366

Funds

Permanent,

indefinite
806

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA

2

20

25

5

20

34

25

-9

BA
0

1,108
1,093

1,204
1,219

1,248
1,391

44
172

BA

1,492

1,7401
D

"1,852

105

0
Total Advisory Commission on
Intergovernmental Relations.

39

181

Appalachian Regional Commission
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

452

7J

0

1,670

1,546

1,852

0

-191

706

BA
0

2,670
2,441

3,150
3,150

"3,334
3,334

306

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Trust

452

-706

Funds

Miscellaneous trust fund
Permanent, indefinite

accounts:
452

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

184
184

BA

Deductions for offsetting receipts.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
452
Total trust funds

1,747

1,852

1,479

2,252

1,852

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

1,492

0

2,670
2,441

3,150
3,150

3,334
3,334

184
184

-1,542

-92

BA1
0 J

-1,215

-1,450

105

-400

Interfund transactions

BA
452

1,455

1,700

1,792

92

0

1,226

1,700

1,792

92

BA1

-1,455

-1,700

-1,792

-92

0 I
Total Appalachian
Commission.
See footnotes at end of table.




Regional

BA
0

1,492
1,250

1,747
2,252

1,852
1,852

105
-400

302

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES-Continued
INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES-Continued
Delaware River Basin Commission
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

69
69
242
220
311
289

78
78
238
209
316
287

79
79
215
215
294
294

34
34

52
52

52
52

7
1
6
9
10
5
10
2
21
2
19
8

7
8
78
10
5
10
5
228
228

7
9
7
9
10
5
10
5
29
2
29
2

1
1

BA

33,713
131,181
170,453

31.700
^17,145
50,879
181,600

-27,165

BA
0

35,850
^679
90,360
184,900

BA
0

168,058
173,517

130,416
188,904

103,374
185,393

-27,042
-3,511

BA
0

2,672
2,461

3,170
3,184

3,359
3,359

189
175

BA
0

-1,215

-1,450

-1,542

-92

BA
0

1,457
1,246
-1,455

1,720
1,734
-1,700

1,817
1,817
-1,792

97
83
-92

168,060
173,308

130,436
188,938

103,399
185,418

Salaries and expenses

301

BA
0

Contribution

301

BA
0

Basin

BA
0

Total Delaware
Commission.

River

1
1
-23
6
-22
7

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Contribution

304

BA
0

Susquehanna River Basin Commission
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

301

BA
0

Contribution

301

BA
0

Total Susquehanna River Basin
Commission.

BA
0

1
1

Washington Metropolitan Area Transit
Authority
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Federal contribution

404

Permanent
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
452
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions
Total Intergovernmental
Agencies.
See footnotes at end of table.




452

BA
0
BA
0

-3,300

-27,037
-3,520

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

303

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

152

BA

7,400

8,900

9,700

800

0

7,079

8,864

9,630

766

49,970

4,900

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

404

Total Interstate
Commission.

Commerce

43,1701
'500 i
D
1,400

38,097

47,160
49,7871
^250 _ _ _ < 2 5 0 J

2,627

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400

40,655

0
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA

40,655
38,097

45,070
47,410

49,970
50,037

4,900
2,627

-367

-322

-322

40,288
37,730

44,748
47,088

49,648
49,715

4^900
2,627

'71,500
'47,200

'71,500
'71,500

24,300

BA1
0 J
BA
0

LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payment to the
Corporation

Legal

Services
754

BA
0

MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

302

BA

412

750

1,000

250

0

134

735

1,000

265

NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

BA

1,540

1,777

1,895

118

0
Trust

451

1,486

1,842

1,895

53

Funds

Advances from District of Columbia .451
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

26

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Total National Capital Planning
Commission.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA

1,540

1,777

1,895

118

0

1,486

1,842

1,895

53

U77
1,842

U95
1,895

U8
53

0
BA
0

26
U40
1,512

304

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND
INFORMATION SCIENCE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

503

B
A
0

Trust

Contributions:

405
461

409
405

502
472

9
3
67

409
405

502
472

9
3
67

-1
405
460

409
405

502
472

93
67

282
327

2
3

Funds

Permanent,

indefinite
503

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

B
A

B
A
BA

1 .
.

0
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
503

405
41
6

BA

1

BA1
0 J

Total trust funds

0

Total National Commission on
Libraries and Information
Science.

BA
0

-1

NATIONAL COUNCIL ON INDIAN OPPORTUNITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

..452

Salaries and expenses

BA
0

-23

NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

401

0

Credit union share insurance fund
401

0

-13,512

-59
-8,880

-675
-14,949

-616
-6,069

0

-12,614

-8,939

-15,624

-6,685

118,494

159,2001

175,000

15,517

168,028

28,619

Operating fund

Total National Credit
Administration.

Union

NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE
HUMANITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

503

B
A

£OdJ

0

83,390

503

0

-60

Permanent,
503

BA
0

12,999
12,999

139,409

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Trust

Gifts and donations:
indefinite
See footnotes at end of table.




91 .
.

-91

Funds

16.753
16,753

15,000
15,000

-1,753
-1,753

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

3Q5

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE
HUMANITIES—Continued
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
902
Total Federal funds

BA1
0 J
BA

118,494
83,330

159,483
139,500

175,000
168,028

15,517
28,528

-5
175,000

15,517

139,500

168,028

28,528

BA

12,999

16,753

15,000

-1,753

12,999

16,753

15,000

-1,753

BA
0

131,488
96,324

176,236
156,253

190,000
183,028

13,764
26,775

BA

56,016

60,980)

68,499

5,830

0

55,312

63,565

69,753

6,188

BA
0

56,016
55,312

62,669
63,565

68,499
69,753

5,830
6,188

-239

-150

-162

-12

BA
0

55,777
55,073

62,519
63,415

68,337
69,591

5J18
6,176

BA

2,930

3,1861

3,105

-131

0

2,835

3,230

3,095

-135

BA
0

2,930
2,835

3,236
3,230

3,105
3,095

-131
-135

-6

-18

-18

BA

2,924

3,218

3,087

Hi31

0

Total National Foundation on
the Arts and the Humanities.

159,483

83,325

0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

118,489

0

2,829

3,212

3,077

-135

751,400
714,700

39,830
73,300

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses: Indefinite.505

ne

*1,673J
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total National Labor Relations
Board.

BA1
0 J

NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

505

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total National Mediation Board

BA1
0 J

»5o|

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
See footnotes at end of table.




251

BA
0

566,484
645,042

711,570
641,400

T H E BU

306

DGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Scientific activities (special foreign
currency program)
251

BA
0

3,000
5,265

4,850
7,000

4,000
5,000

-850
-2,000

-3,178

-1,100

-700

400

BA
0

428
-171

2,355
2,000

1,355
1,000

-1,000
-1,000

BA
0

569,484
647,129

716,420
647,300

755,400
719,000

38,980
71,700

BA1
0 J

-326

-295

-295

BA1

-5

-5

-5

BA
0

569,153
646,798

716,120
647,000

755,100
718,700

38,980
71,700

BA
0

428
-171

2,355
2,000

1,355
1,000

-1,000
-1,000

BA
0

569,581
646,627

718.475
649,000

756,455
719,700

37,980
70,700

9,4501
»190|
9,940

10,175

535

10,000

60

9,640
9,940

10,175
10,000

535
60

9,640
9,940

10,175
10,000

535
60

89,2251

219,935

72,770

196,9721
'1,000)

58,865

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Trust

.....251

0

Funds

Donations: Permanent, indefinite

251

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
250
902

0I
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Total National
Foundation.

Science

NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

BA

8,251

0
Trust

407

8,183

0

-11

Funds

Donations

407

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

Total National Transportation
Safety Board.

8.251
8,183
-11

BA
0

8,251
8,172

BA

82,167

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

305

0
See footnotes at end of table.




79,827

'56,400
D
1,540J
83,707
'55,400

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

307

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW
COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

B
A
0

4,687
4,596

5,512
5,500

5,675
5,675

163
175

451

B
A
0

500
556

824
845

1,256
1.145

432
300

Payment to the Postal Service fund
402

BA
0

1,698,000
1,698,000

1,830,656
1,830,656

1,489,685
1,489,685

-340,971
-340,971

Retirement
601

BA
0

22,478
22,478

3,516
3,516

250,000
250,000

246,484
246,484

Regional rail transportation
protective account
604

BA
0

55,100
55,100

55,100
55,100

3,232,100

399,333
240,862

Salaries and expenses

553

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT
CORPORATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

POSTAL SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payments to
Trust Fund

Railroad

Trust

Funds

Railroad retirement account:
Permanent indefinite

601

BA
0

2,606,953
2,675,228

2,832,767
3,024,056
'2,200

3,383,118]
M16.000J

Limitation on salaries and expenses..
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

(2,200)
'(2,200)

(-2,200)
(-2,200)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
603

3,516
3,516

305,100
305,100

301,584
301,584

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

22,478
22,478
2.606,953
2,675,228

2,832,767
3,026,256

3,232,100
3,267,118

399,333
240,862

2,939

5,000

6,000

1,000

BA
0
BAl

2,604,825
2,673,100
-22,478

2,837,767
3,031,256
-3,516

3,238,100
3,273,118
-250,000

400,333
241,862
-246,484

BA
0

2,604,825
2,673,100

2,837,767
3,031,256

3,293,200
3,328,218

455,433
296,962

BAl

-5,067

0 I
902

BAl

o

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions
Total Railroad
Board.
See footnotes at end of table.




601
Retirement

0I

308

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES-Continued
RENEGOTIATION BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

BA

4,805

0

Salaries and expenses

4,709

054

5,1631
D
147J
5,142

5,445

135

5,347

205

47,187

2,754

48,746

3,635

2,754
3,635

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

BA

36,202

0

34,537

43,0771
a356J
45,111

BA
0

36,202
34,537

44,433
45,111

47,187
48,746

-21

-26

-26

BA
0

36,181
34,516

44,407
45,085

47,161
48,720

2,754
3,635

BA
0

54,247
59,525

45,000
47,000

47,887
47,800

2,887
800

BA
BA

54,247
59,525

45,000
47,000

47,887
47,800

2,887
800

-22

-10

10

BA
0

54,225
59,503

44,990
46,990

47,877
47,790

2,887
800

403

BA
0

26,500
25,900

29,000
28,000

2,500
2,100

sales
403

BA

23,000
21,909
720

Business loan and investment fund
403

BA
0

225,253
263,540

307,500
171,300

150,000
217,165
'-35,000

-157,500
10,865

Disaster loan fund

BA

Salaries and expenses

403

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the

public

400

Total Securities and Exchange
Commission.

BAl

0

L

SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

054

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050
Total Selective Service System...

BAl

0I

SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Payment of participation
insufficiencies
Public enterprise funds:

Permanent, indefinite

See footnotes at end of table.




453

BA
0

90,000
1,602
465,618

110
196,977

10,058
"100,000
168
54,800

-74,177

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

309

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:—Continued

Lease and surety bond guarantees
revolving fund
403

0

Lease bond
fund

2,091

guarantees

revolving
403

0

-1,970

-2,225

-255

Surety bond guarantees
fund

revolving
403

8A
0

20,000
5,965

10,000
8,275

-10,000
2,310

444,110
398,172

289,168
339,015

-154,942
-59,157

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
902

250,575
753,158

BA
0

-9

BA
0

-2 ..
.

BA
0

250,564
753,147

444,110
398,172

289,168
339,015

-154,942
-59,157

BA

58,668

79,408

8,702

0

55,363

79,278

14,468

Museum programs and related
research (special foreign currency
program)
503

BA
0

4,500
2,950

67,789]
4
390
q,09i
D
1,436
64,420
^390
2,000
3,000

2,000
4,000

1,000

Science information exchange

BA

1,695

1,875

70

0
BA
0
BA
0

1,691
3,790
872
1,070
1,324

1,7551
"50
1,796
9,420
5,452
1,490
4,200

1,875
9,550
5,893
1,467
4,309

79
130
441
-23
109

(7,000)
21,000
82
2
1

(3,000)
4,595

6,6231
^90
C
136
"166
7,053'
^90

7,598

583

7,564

421

Total Small Business
Administration.
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

503

503

Construction and improvements,
National Zoological Park
503
Restoration and renovation of
buildings
503
Construction
503
Liquidation of contract authority....

The John F. Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts
303

0

(17,000)
15,195
1
8
1

Salaries and expenses,
Gallery of Art

BA

6,237

0

5,973

0
Miscellaneous appropriations

See footnotes at end of table.




503

National
503

o

(-4,000)
-16,405
-82
-21

310

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Salaries and expenses, Wood row
Wilson International Center for
Scholars
503
Trust

BA
0

800
842

954
958

975
975

21
17

BA
0

45
57

45
50

50
50

5

BA
0

76,760
84,230
-22

93,390
108,462
-14

102,873
108,489
-14

9,483
27

BA
0

76,738
84,208

93,376
108,448

102,859
108,475

9,483
27

BA
0

45
57
76,783
84,265

45
50
93,421
108,498

50
50
102,909
108,525

5

Funds

Smithsonian Institution
Permanent

trust

funds:
252

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Total Smithsonian Institution

BA]
0 J

BA
0

9,488
27

SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES CONTROL BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

0

11 ..
.

0

2
0

BA
0

63
1
66
9

63
9
70
1

78
0
78
0

1
5
-2

BA
0

50
5
50
5

57
3
57
3

78
0
78
0

11
7
11
7

BA
0

63
1
66
9

63
9
70
1

78
0
78
0

1
5
-2

BA

550

537

708

171

0

550

537

708

171

TEMPORARY STUDY COMMISSIONS
Aviation Advisory Commission
Trust

Funds

Salaries and expenses (Airport and
airway trust fund)
405
Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning
Commission for Alaska
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Trust

Cooperative funds:
indefinite

Funds

Permanent,

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)




452

452

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

3 \ \

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
TEMPORARY STUDY COMMISSIONS—Con.
Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning
Commission for Alaska—Continued
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
452
Total Joint Federal-State Land
Use Planning Commission
for Alaska.

BA1
0 J
BA
0

-550

-537

-708

-171

613
696

693
710

708
708

15
-2

Other Temporary Study Commissions
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Commission on American
Shipbuilding: Salaries and
expenses
406

BA
0

205 ..
.
26
2

Commission on Executive,
Legislative, and Judicial Salaries:
Salaries and expenses
805

0

10 ..
..

Commission on Government
Procurement: Salaries and
expenses...
804

0

76 ..
.

Commission on
Beautification:
expenses

Highway
Salaries and
404

0

19
7

Commission on Population Growth
and the American Future: Salaries
and expenses
806

0

3
4

2

2

Commission on Railroad Retirement:
Salaries and expenses
601

0

2

7

_7

Commission on the Organization of
the Government for the Conduct
of Foreign Policy: Salaries and
expenses
152

BA
0

1,050
679

1,594
1,823

15
6

-1,594
-1,658

Commission on the Organization of
the Government of the District of
Columbia.- Salaries and expenses
806

0

Commission on the Review of the
National Policy toward Gambling:
Salaries and expenses
751

BA
0

250
196

1,000
951

750
775

-250
-176

Defense Manpower Commission.Salaries and expenses
054
Reappropriation

BA

400

800

1,300

15
4

2
8
332
36

355 .
.
1,052
332
513

1,260
400
450

208
68
-63

National Commission for the Review
of Federal and State Laws
Relating to Wiretapping and
Electronic Surveillance: Salaries
and expenses
751




BA
0
BA
0

20 ..
..

-20

75 ..
..

-75

11 ..
.

312

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
TEMPORARY STUDY COMMISSIONS—Con.
Other Temporary Study Commissions—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

42

National Commission on Consumer
Finance-. Salaries and expenses
403

0

National Commission on Electronic
Fund Transfers: Salaries and
expenses
403

BA
0

National Commission on Fire
Prevention and Control: Salaries
and expenses
451

0

National Commission on Materials
Policy: Salaries and Expenses..403

0

National Commission on Productivity-.
Salaries and expenses
403

BA
0

National Commission on Supplies
and Shortages: Salaries and
expenses
403

BA
0

National Commission on the
Financing of Postsecondary
Education: Salaries and expenses
502

0

National Commission on Water
Quality: Salaries and expenses
304

BA

10,000

0

1,243

National Study Commission
Records and Documents
Federal Officials

BA
0

-50

0

National Commission on Marihuana
and Drug Abuse: Salaries and
expenses
552

50

on
of
804

500
450
44

50

-500
-400

31

-31

120

-120

112
244
882
1,764

2,000
2,096
287
200

821

2,500
2,400
87

500
304
-287
-113

225

-225

4,8001
2,000J
9,067

-6,800

4

'200
'200

4,4601
^2,000 J
'350
'350

-2,607
150
150

National Tourism Resources Review
Commission: Salaries and
expenses
403

0

64

6

-6

National Water Commission: Salaries
and expenses
301

0

104

35

-35

Public Land Law Review
Commission: Salaries and
expenses
302

0

Total Other Temporary Study
Commissions.

BA
O

Total Federal funds Temporary
Study Commissions.

BA
0

Total trust funds Temporary
Study Commissions.

0

See footnotes at end of table.




1 .
.
13,119
5,916
13,732
6,612
20 .
.

13,868
16,923
14,561
17,633

5,300
11,997
6,008
12,705

-8,568
-4,926
-8,553
-4,928

313

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

45,676

77,400

87,800

5,010,400

0

401,137

800,000

"5,000,000
731,000

-69,000

B
A
0

45,676
401,137

77,400
800,000

5,087,800
731,000

5,010,400
-69,000

-32

-25

-24

B
A
0

45,644
401,105

77,375
799,975

5,087,776
730,976

5,010,401
-68,999

UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
BA
Salaries and expenses
153
Sli
d

203,957

218,462]
H65
"3,663
219,466

"246,984

24,694

Payment to Tennessee Valley
Authority fund
301
Authority to spend agency debt
receipts.
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts.Proprietary receipts from the
public
300
Total Tennessee Valley Authority

B
A
BA ...

BA1

J

0 I

244,554

25,088

Salaries and expenses (special
foreign currency program)
153

BA
0

6,000
7,982

8,377
8,760

"10,708
10,001

2,331
1,241

Special international exhibitions... 153

B
A

10,793

6,7701
C
1

"6,187

-655

0

0

200,140

5,040

10,904

8,693

-2,211

Special international exhibitions
(special foreign currency program)

BA
0

78
95

158

28

-130

Acquisition and construction of radio
facilities
153

BA
0

1,000
1,545

4,400
1,361

"10,135
4,939

5,735
3,578

Trust Funds
United States Information Agency trust
funds: Permanent, indefinite
153

BA
0

86
94

86
116

86
86

-30

BA
0

221,828
214,802

241,909
240,649

274,014
268,215

32,105
27,566

-412

-391

-391

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
.
..
.150

902
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above).
See footnotes at end of table.




BA1

0 f

-43

-43

-43

BA
0

221,373
214,347

241,475
240,215

273,580
267,781

32,105
27,566

BA
0

86
94

86
116

86
86

-0
3

BA1
0

...

314

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES-Continued
UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY-Con.
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
BA1
Proprietary receipts from the
public
153
0 )

-66

-66

-66

Total trust funds

BA
0

20
28

20
50

20
20

-30

Total United States Information
Agency.

BA
0

221,393
214,375

241,495
240,265

273,600
267,801

32,105
27,536

7,0001
45.000J
21,694
M.000

10,000

-2,000

11,8001

-12,894

9,670
9,670

-105
-1,543

UNITED STATES RAILWAY ASSOCIATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administrative expenses

404

B
A

18,000

0

1,200

301

BA
0

7,417
7,207

9,775
11,213

301

0

-61

62

BA
0

3.063
2,705

3,480
3,958

2,904
3,812

-576
-146

BA
0

7,417
7,146

9,775
11,275

9,670
9,670

-105
-1,605

BA
0

3,063
2,705

3,480
3,958

2,904
3,812

-576
-146

-905

-1,198

-1,086

2,158
1,800

2,282
2,760

1,818
2,726

-2,158

-2,282

-1,818

BA
0

7,417
6,788

9,775
11,753

9,670
10,578

-105
-1,175

BA
0

7,592,815
8,266,199

11,649.914
10,117,073

13,519,566
10,943,500

1,869,652
826,427

-22

-10

-10

WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Water resources planning
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Trust

-62

Funds

River Basin Commissions: Permanent,
indefinite
301
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
301
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

BA1
0 J
BA
0

301

BA)

112
-464
-34

464

0I
Total Water Resources Council..

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050
See footnotes at end of table.




BA1
0 J

315

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1976
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Federal funds:—Continued

150
250

BAl

-457

-437

-437

-326

-295

-295

0 I
BAl

..

0 I
300
350

BAl
0 \

-45

BAl

-39

-38

1

-2

0 J

400
450

BAl

oI
BAl
0 1
J

-563

-50,524

-18,531

31,993

-8,037

-10,426

-12,286

-1,860

-203

-215

500

BAl

-290

550

of
BAl
of

-2

700
750
800
852

~3

-3

-5

-5

-5

BAl

-6,013

-6,105

-12,505

-6,400

BAl

-5,000

-65,000

-40,000

25,000

of
BAl

of
0J

of

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
600

902
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150

301
452

BAl

-317

-62

-59

7,571,733
8,245,117

11,516,805
9,983,964

13,435,182
10,859,116

1,918,377
875,152

BA
0

Total Federal funds




-3

BAl

BA
0

902

580-000 O - 75 - 21

-12

11,582,409
7,927,276

13,903,096
9,422,987

15,075,889
10,210,163

1,172,793
787,176

-20,346

-22,242

-6,765

15,477

0f

BAl

0J
w
)

2,939

5,000

6,000

-215

-215

-223

BAl

-905

-1,198

-1,086

BAl
0 f

-1,765

-1,987

-2,250

BAl

0f
BAl

0J
w

3

1,000

-8

J

0J

112
-263

316

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Trust funds:—Continued

503
Total trust funds..
Interfund transactions.

..301
452
502
601
805

Total Other
Agencies.

Independent

BA1
0

-1

BA
0
BA]

11,562,116
7,906,983
-2,158

13,882,454
9,402,345
-2,282

15,071,565
10,205,839
-1,818

1,189,111
803,494
464

-1,455

-1,700

-1,792

-92

A
U1

BA
A
UJ
0 RA
BA
A
U1

BA
0
BA
0

-10,000

-10,000

-22,478

-3,516

-250,000

-246,484

-2,384,236

-3,443,825

-4,089,172

-645,347

16,723,522
13,741,773

21,947,936
15,934,986

24,153,965
16,712,173

2,206,029
777,187

500,000
500,000

7,000,000
7,000,000

6,500,000
6,500,000

ALLOWANCES
Allowances for:

Energy tax equalization payments

BA
0

Civilian agency pay raises

BA

1,000,0001
'-425,000/
960,000\
'-410,000/

0
Contingencies

Total Allowances

575,000
550,000

BA
0

250,000
200,000

750,000
500,000

500,000
300,000

BA
0

750,000
700,000

8,325,000
8,050,000

7,575,000
7,350,000

310,912,466
240,014,291

305,588,534
267,976,214

-5,323,932
27,961,923

BUDGET TOTALS
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
(As shown in detail above):
Intrafund transactions

BA
0

232,654,733
210,327,712

BA]
0

-1,152,493

-1,318,373

-1,256,186

62,187

Receipts from off-budget
Federal agencies.

BA1

-205,489

-383,210

-486,150

-102,940

Proprietary receipts from the
public.

BA1 -3,529,639
0I

-4,307,474

-4,019,256

288,217

See footnotes at end of table.




0I

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

3\J

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1975
estimated

1976
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

BUDGET TOTALS—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued

(Undistributed by agency and
function)-.
Rents and royalties on the BA1 -6,748,394
Outer Continental Shelf
0J
lands
953
Total deductions
BA1 -11,636,015

-5,000,000

-8,000,000

-3,000,000

-11,009,057

-13,761,592

-2,752,535

BA 221,018,718
0
198,691,697

299,903,409
229,005,234

291,826,942
254,214,622

-8,076,467
25,209,388

BA 119,523,724
0
96,381,713

127,893,162
117,155,482

129,644,532
130,780,547

1,751,370
13,625,065

BA1 -952,097

-999,452

-1,051,815

-52,363

BA1 -3,954,182
0 J

-4,707,997

-5,524,693

-816,696

BA1 -642,031
0 J
BA1 -5,548,310

-1,110,145

-778,765

331,380

-6,817,594

-7,355,273

-537,679

BA 113,975,414
0
90,833,403

121,075,568
110,337,888

122,289,259
123,425,274

1,213,691
13,087,386

BA1 -2,677,433
0J
BA1 -6,583,227
0 J
BA1 -11,872,457

-2,959,960

-3,109,289

-149,329

-7,768,517

-8,304,867

-536,350

-15,168,848

-16,853,795

-1,684,947

-25,897,325

-28,267,951

-2,370,626

395,081,652
313,445,797

385,848,250
349,371,945

-9,233,402
35,926,148

0}
Federal fund totals
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
(As shown in detail above)-.
Intrafund transactions

0I
Proprietary receipts from the
public.
(Undistributed by agency and
function):
Receipts from off-budget
Federal agencies:
Employer share, employee
retirement
951
Total deductions

0I
Trust fund totals
Interfund transactions (-).Employer share, employee
retirement
951
Interest received by trust funds
952
Applied by agency above

0I
Total interfund transactions

BA) -21,133,117

0 J
Budget totalsA




BA 313,861,015
0
268,391,983

318

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
actual

1976
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

BUDGET TOTALS—Continued
ABudget totals are distributed as follows:
1975
BA

1976
Outlays

BA

Outlays

Federal funds:
Enacted and recommended herein

299,162,969

232,106,980

290,526,999

256,369,174

750,000

700,000

9,699,100

9,385,000

17,145

3,553,523

Allowances
Transmittal:
A

( ) Supplemental existing legislation

9,036,517

5,452,206

(*) Supplemental proposed legislation

221,737

188,237

H Wage-board pay raises

460,585

434,530

28,381

770,947

752,141

42,061

(*) Military pay raises

798,039

759,488

39,328

(*) Transfer for pay raises (-)

-26,404

D

( ) Civilian pay raises

c

( ) Transfer for pay raises

26,404

C) Proposed 1975 amendment

20,777

17,899

170,227

145,927

33,500

0 Existing legislation
(J) Proposed legislation
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total Federal funds

2.878
228,350

228,100

-479,333

-543,117

5,166,940

-1,705,731

-11,009,057

-11,009,057

-13,761,592

-13,761,592

299,903,409

229,005,234

291,826,942

254,214,622

126,102,323

116,066,746

131,136,512

134,511,696

1,780,600

1,402,200

1,300,000

1,300,000

651

640

11

1,255

1,229

26

Trust funds:
Enacted and recommended herein
Transmittal:
(A) Supplemental existing legislation
W Wage-board pay raises
D

( ) Civilian pay raises
J

( ) Proposed legislation

8,333

-315,333

-2,791,980

-5,031,186

-6,817,594

-6,817,594

-7,355,273

-7,355,273

121,075,568

110,337,888

122,289,259

123,425,274

Interfund transactions (-)

-25,897,325

-25,897,325

-28,267,951

-28,267,951

Budget totals

395,081,652

313,445,797

385,848,250

349,371,945

Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total trust funds

1

Supplemental now requested under existing legislation.

* Supplemental now requested. Additional authorizing legislation required.
'Supplemental now requested, wage-board pay raises.
"Supplemental now requested, civilian pay raises.
^Supplemental now requested, military pay raises.
'Proposed transfer to other accounts for pay raises (-).
''Proposed transfer from other accounts for pay raises.
"Amendment to 1974 budget now proposed.
'Proposed for later transmittal under existing legislation.
-'Proposed for later transmittal under proposed legislation.
"Additional authorizing legislation required.
'This agency, established by P i . 93-438, assumed on January 19, 1975, the energy research and development activities previously performed by
the Atomic Energy Commission and several other agencies.
"Excludes $3,305 thousand requested to cover increased pay costs.
"Excludes $3,172 thousand for requested pay supplemental.
"Excludes $132 thousand for requested 1975 pay supplemental.
''Excludes $4,195 thousand requested to cover increased pay costs and $105 thousand in enacted 1975 appropriations.
"Excludes $4,027 thousand for requested pay supplemental and $105 thousand.
"Excludes $168 thousand for requested 1975 pay supplemental.
s

Excludes $138 thousand to cover increased pay costs and $7 thousand in enacted 1975 appropriations.

r

Excludes $133 thousand for requested pay supplemental and $7 thousand.

t-

Excludes $6 thousand for requested 1975 pay supplemental.







PART 9

SUMMARY TABLES

319

EXPLANATORY NOTE RELATING TO THE
SUMMARY TABLES
Types of tables.—This part of the budget consists of tables
as follows:
• Tables 1 through 10 are short summary tables of the
budget, often only one page each.
• Tables 11 through 13 provide greater detail in support
of data in the first three tables.
• Table 15 presents 5-year projections of the estimated
costs of proposed legislation pursuant to section 221 (a)
of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970.
• Table 14 and tables 16 through 20 are historical in
nature, giving data, for earlier years, comparable to
that data in the preceding tables, and also giving information on the national income accounts and the
gross national product over a longer period.
Concepts followed.—The concepts used in the current and
historical tables are discussed in Part 6 of this volume.
Other sources of data.—The Special Analyses volume, part
1, presents a series of data covering Government finances
and operations as a whole. These include, for example:
• Special Analysis A—which compares budget totals with
the Federal sector of the national income accounts.
• Special Analysis B—which provides a breakdown of
selected data between Federal funds and trust funds.
• Special Analysis C—which gives the detail of the
agency debt and the holdings of U.S. securities which
are summarized here in table 10.
• Special Analysis D—which focuses on the distinction
between outlays that are of an investment or "capital"
nature and outlays for operating or "current" purposes.
• Special Analysis H—which presents information on
civilian employment in the executive branch.

320




321

SUMMARY TABLED
Table 1. BUDGET SUMMARY (in millions of dollars)
Description

1974
actual

1975
estimate

201,994
150,185
-38,317

250,762
13,533
174,511
-43,724

253,297
181,936
-49,385

313,861

395,082

385,848

181,219
104,846
-21,133

185,966
118,681
-25,897

199,278
126,510
-28,268

264,932

278,750

297,520

198,692
90,833
-21,133

229,005
110,338
-25,897

254,215
123,425
-28,268

268,392

313,446

349,372

-17,473
14,013

-43,039
8,343

-54,937
3,085

-3,460

-34,696

-51,852

468,426

486,247

538,541

605,925

125,381
343,045

140,194
346,053

148,988
389,553

152,872
453,053

75,182
267,863

80,649
265,404

44,203
13,198
146,935
54,801

46,132
15,353
153,182
71,060

46,227
30,827
154,008
85,998

49,599
39,750
161,704
94,694

Budget authority (largely appropriations):
Available through current action by Congress:
Enacted and pending
Proposed in this budget
Available without current action by Congress
Deductions for offsetting receipts *
Total budget authority
Receipts and outlays:
Receipts:
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions
Total budget receipts
Outlays:
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions
Total budget outlays
Surplus or deficit (—):
Federal funds
Trust funds
Total budget

1976
estimate

1973
actual

Outstanding debt, end of year:
Gross Federal debt
Held by:
Government agencies
The public
Federal Reserve System
Others
MEMORANDUM

Outstanding loans, end of year:
Direct loans—on-budget accounts
Direct loans—off-budget accounts
Guaranteed and insured loans 2
Government-sponsored agencies loans 3
1
2
3

These consist of intragovernmental transactions and proprietary receipts from the public.
Excludes loans held by Government accounts and sponsored credit agencies.
Excludes Federal Reserve banks.




322

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Table 2. BUDGET RECEIPTS, OUTLAYS, AND BUDGET AUTHORITY
(in millions of dollars)
Description

1974
actual

1975

1976

Receipts by source:

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions:
Employment taxes and contributions
Unemployment insurance
Contributions for other insurance and retirement
Excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts

118,952
38,620

117,700
38,500

106,300
47,700

65,892
6,837
4,051
16,844
5,035
3,334
5,369

74,688
7,154
4,383
19,947
4,800
3,910
7,668

79,555
7,392
4,603
32,145
4,600
4,300
10,925

264,932

278,750

297,520

78,569
3,593
4,154
6,390
2,230
13,100
4,910
11,600
22,074
84,431
13,386
2,462
3,327
6,746
28,072

85,276
4,853
4,183
9,412
1,773
11,796
4,887
14,714
26,486
106,702
15,466
3,026
2,646
7,033
31,331

700

94,027
6,294
4,581
10,028
1,816
13,723
5,920
14,623
28,050
118,724
15,592
3,288
3,180
7,249
34,419
8,050

-3,319
-6,583
-6,748

-4,070
-7,769
-5,000

-3,888
-8,305
-8,000

Total outlays

268,392

313,446

349,372

Budget surplus or deficit (—)

-3,460

-34,696

-51,852

89,293
5,292
3,874
10,650

91,314
4,871
4,299

107,700
12,627
4,686
12,226

4,546
23,545

5,873
28,944

4,273

3,969
13,222
26,365
95,249
13,964
2,615
3,137
6,719
28,073

5,075
14,577

5,164

Total receipts
Outlays by function:

National defense 1
International affairs
General science, space, and technology
Natural resources, environment, and energy
Agriculture
Commerce and transportation
Community and regional development
Education, manpower, and social services
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Law enforcement and justice
General government
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance
Interest
Allowances 2
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee retirement
Interest received by trust funds
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf lands

Budget authority by function:

National defense J_ *
International affairs
General science, space, and technology
Natural resources, environment, and energy
Agriculture
Commerce and transportation
Community and regional development
Education, manpower, and social services
Health
.
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Law enforcement and justice
General government
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance. __
Interest
Allowances2
Undistributed offsetting receipts
Total budget authority
1
2

11,464

6,602

-16,651

-16,839

13,686
31,022
135,339
16,163
3,169
3,335
7,305
34,419
8,325
-20,193

313,861

395,082

385,848

28,448
156,126
15,986
3,074

2,725
7,062
31,331

750

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for energy tax equalization payments, civilian agency pay raises, and
contingencies.




323

SUMMARY TABLES
Table 3. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY AGENCY
(in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Off. of the President.
Funds approp. to the President.
Agriculture
Commerce____
Defense—Military i
Defense-Civil
Health, Education, & Welfare..
Housing & Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Energy Research & Development Admin.2
Environmental Protect. Agency
General Services Admin
Nat'l Aero. & Space Admin. _ _ _
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies. _ _.
Allowances3
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee
retirement
Interest received by trust
funds
Rents and royalties on the
Outer Continental Shelf
lands
Total budget authority
and outlays

Budget authority
1974

657
213
97
12,430
13,144
1,501
81,073
1,779
100,857
8,110
1,961
1,921
10,640
814
17,627
36,033
2,475
5,952
-471
3,037
13,939
16, 724

1975

736
306
76
7,440
13,782
1,658
86,795
1,759
113,951
50,961
3,915
2,099
19,910
891
19,147
39,696
3,579
4,246
-918
3,229
15,966
21,948
750

Outlays
1976

831
347
68
13,815
11,864
1,783
103,042
1,956
120,361
30,302
2,518
2,111
11,340
977
4,377
43,565
4,219
743
-331
3,537
16,137
24,154
8,325

1974

625
205
66
3,329
9,767
1,455
77,625
1,682
93, 735
4, 786
1,779
1,797
8,966
735
8,104
35,993

1975

744
308
109

4,607
8,756
1,644
83,493
1,928
109,932
5,517
2,236
2,061
18,966

1976

882
342
76

6,610
9,662
1,789
90,775
2,005
118,377
7,055
2,503
2,221
22,617

871

950

9,142
39,665

9,991
43,453

2,308
3,090
2,937
2,030
- 2 7 6 -1,008
3,207
3,252
13,337
15,445
13, 742
15,935

700

3,815
3,080
-476
3,498
15,576
16,712
8,050

-3,319

-4,070

-3,888

-3,319

-4,070

-3,888

-6,583

-7,769

-8,305

-6,583

-7,769

-8,305

-6,748

-5,000

-8,000

-6,748

-5,000

-8,000

313,861

395,082

385,848

268,392

313,446

349,372

117,832

140,560

159,546

76,484
60,820

91,128
68,548

106,076
77,253

51,573

56,933

55,882

-24,085

-29,709

-31,841

-14,232

-14,015

-17,544

268,392

313,446

349,372

MEMORANDUM
Portion available through current action by Congress 4 . .
201,994 264,295 253,297
Portion available without current action by Congress.__
150,185 174,511
181,936
Outlays from obligated balances.
Outlays from unobligated balances
Deductions
for
offsetting
receipts:
Intragovernmental
transactions
-24,085 -29,709 -31,841
Proprietary receipts from the
public
-14,232 -14,015 -17,544
Total budget authority
and outlays
1
2

313,861

395,082

385,848

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
This agency, established by Public Law 93-438, assumed on Jan. 19, 1975, the energy research
and development activities previously performed by the Atomic Energy Commission and several
other agencies.
3
Include allowances for energy tax equalization payments, civilian agency pay raises, and
contingencies.
4
Budget authority excludes appropriations to liquidate contract authorizations. Outlays from
such appropriations are included as outlays from balances below.




324

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Table 4. BUDGET AUTHORITY AVAILABLE THROUGH CURRENT ACTION
BY CONGRESS (in millions of dollars)
1975 estimate
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Off. of the President.
Funds approp. to the President.
Agriculture
Commerce
:
Defense—Military *
Defense—Civil
Health, Education, & Welfare.
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury Department
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental
Protection
Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies. _.
Allowances2
Total budget authority
available through current action by Congress

1974
actual

Enacted
and
pending

Proposed
changes

1976 estimate
Total

RecomPromended
posed
herein changes

Total

668
213
97
7,848
10,461
1,309
81,225
1,847
31,694

732
298
75
4,679
12,687
1,554
85,229
1,813
33,678

15
6
1
31
163
-103
1,818
18
1,863

6,925
2,485
1,924
3,140
766
17,551
2,007

46,740
4,112
2,073
6,977
781
12,298
2,323

4
89
33
6,530
57
280
171

46,745
4,201
2,106

2,475

3,573

6

3,579

4,305

-86 4,219

5,953

4,091

5

4,096

743

743

857

305

2

307

332

3,040
13,558
5,951

3,211
14,805
8,727

20
749
1,024
750

3,231
15,555
9,751
750

3,539
16,424
10,344

201,994

250,762

13,533

155
113
245

160
410
243

160
410
243

410
142
316
163

410
142
316
163

2,544
135
5,046

4,622
122
5,541

4,622
122
5,691

5,270

5,270

128
6,172

128
6,172

604
17

1,426
7

1,426
7

565
3

565
3

12,682

13,169

13,169

747
304
76
4,710
12,850

1,451
87,047
1,831
35,541

13,506
838
12,577
2,494

843
342
68
5,060
11,341
1,552

101,830
2,026
35,397

3
7,000
-260

843
345
68
12,060
11,081
1,552

1,796 103,626
2,026
-847 34,550

29,467
29,467
2,950
26 2,975
2,116
2,116
3,477 1,300 4,777
917
917
4,148-3,278
870
2,508
154
2,661

*

332

- _
_ 3,539
-717 15,707
154 10,497
8,325 8,325

264,295 239,727 13,570 253,297

MEMORANDUM
Appropriations to liquidate contract authority:

Legislative branch
Funds approp. to the President.
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Transportation
Environmental
Protection
Agency
_
Other independent agencies.-.
Total appropriations to
liquidate
contract
authority

8,859

12,532

150

150

*Less than $500 thousand.
1
Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
2
Includes allowances for energy tax equalization payments, civilian agency pay raises, and
contingencies.




SUMMARY TABLES!

325

Table 5. OUTLAYS FROM BUDGET AUTHORITY AVAILABLE THROUGH
CURRENT ACTION BY CONGRESS (in millions of dollars)
1975 estimate
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Off. of the President,
Funds approp. to the President.
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military *
Defense—Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor.
State
Transportation
Treasury Department
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental
Protection
Agency
General Services Administration.
National Aeronautics and
Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies. __
Allowances2

1974
actual

Enacted
Proand
posed
pending changes

1976 estimate
Total

RecomPromended
posed
herein changes

Total

526
190
44
1,770
5,740
610
56,817
1,161
21,318

628
280
63
1,785
6,801
760
60,568
1,144
23,448

14
6
1
17
159
18
1,744
18
2,063

642
286
63
1,802
6,961
778
62,312
1,161
25,511

751
320
64
2,277
7,409
771
68,032
1,439
26,220

163
1,509
1,088
1,509
620
2,228
1,768

415
1,840
1,202
5,016
657
2,444
2,091

4
73
34
1,455
55
263
168

419
1,914
1,236
6,470
712
2,707
2,259

455
2,103
1,331
2,816
794
2,878
2,228

861

1,516

6

1,522

1,874

1,874

264

353

5

358

406

406

633

282

2

284

298

2,044
12,240
4,730

2,128
13,443
5,352

19
907
616
700

2,147
14,349
5,968
700

2,446
14,874
6,117

Total outlays from
budget authority available through current
action by Congress
117,832 132,214

8,347

3
1,000
9
3,381
472
16

431
154

751
323
64
3,277
7,418
771
71,414
1,439
26,691
455
2,119
1,331
2,816
794
3,309
2,382

*

298

5
174
8,000

2,446
14,879
6,290
8,000

140,560 145,902 13,644

159,546

MEMORANDUM
From appropriations to liquidate contract authority:
Legislative branch
Funds approp. to the President.
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Transportation
Environmental
Protection
Agency
Other independent agencies
Total outlays from appropriations to liquidate contract authority

155
97
244

*
160
360
243

*
160
360
243

2,544
93
4,764

2,722
97
5,163

139
17

776
7

8,053

9,528

150

410
)27
316
163

2,722
97
5,313

2,770
85
5,972

2,770
85
5,972

776
7

150

410
127
316
163

565
3

565
3

9,678

10,411

10,411

* Less than $500 thousand.
Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for energy tax equalization payments, civilian agency pay raises, and
contingencies.
1
2




326

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
Table 6. RELATION OF BUDGET AUTHORITY TO OUTLAYS
(in millions of dollars)
Description

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

Budget authority available through current action by Congress:

Enacted or recommended herein:
Appropriations i
Authority to spend debt receipts
Contract authority
.
Reappropriations and reauthorizations
Proposed changes:
Appropriations 12
Contract authority
Total budget authority available through current action
by Congress (table 4)

174,466
250
27,233
46

188,761
3,195
58,802
4

210,647
3,000
26,080

13,533

16,845
—3,275

201,994

264,295

253,297

138,623
2,716
8,846

155,920
3,914
14,676

170,203
801
10,932

-24,085
-14,232

-29,709
-14,015

-31,841
-17,544

313,861

395,082

385,848

Budget authority available without current action by Congress
(permanent authorizations):

Appropriations*
Authority to spend debt receipts
Contract authority
Deductions for offsetting receipts (table 12):

Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total budget authority for the year (table 3)
Unobligated balances and adjustments:

Unobligated balances:
Brought forward at start of year (table 8)
Written off (rescinded, lapsed, etc.) 3 *
Carried forward at end of year (table 8 ) . . . . . .
Application of new authority to prior obligations:
Budget authority of year, obligated previously
Budget authority of subsequent year, obligated currently.
Obligations incurred, net (table 7)
Obligated balances:
Brought forward at start of year, funded (table 8)
Adjustments in expired accounts 3
Deficiency appropriations
Carried forward at end of year (table 8 ) .

Outlays (table3)
See footnotes at end of table.




206,877
234,279
258,128
-9,574
- 1 0 , 721
-27,458
-234,279 -258,128 -221,424
—2,625
3,359

—3,359
3,729

—3,729
4,022

277,619

360,881

395,387

181,797
—2,623
11
-188,412

188,412
—261
44
-235,630

235,630
—248
-281,397

268,392

313,446

349,372

iSUMMARY TABLED

327

Table 6. RELATION OF BUDGET AUTHORITY TO OUTLAYS
(in millions of dollars)—Continued
Description

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

MEMORANDUM
Federal funds included above:
Budget authority available through current action by
Congress
Budget authority 5
Obligations incurred 5
Outlays s
1

Excludes appropriations to liquidate contract authority:

189,986
221,019
205,365
198,692

253,310
291,827
296,684
254,215

1975
1976
estimate
estimate
For later transmittal
150
All other
12,031
16,433
18,040
2
Includes proposed changes of $1,781 million in 1975 and $1,258 million in 1976 to be offset by
interfund transactions.
3
Includes writeoff of balances of the Housing for the elderly or the handicapped fund resulting
from removal from the budget totals.
4
Includes redemption of agency debt and capital transfers to the general fund.
5
Amounts are net of intragovernmental transactions and proprietary receipts from the public.




1974
actual

262,032
299,903
270,589
229,005

328

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

Table 7. OBLIGATIONS INCURRED, NET (in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President:
International security assistance
International development assistance
Other
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military i
Defense-Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Civil Service Commission
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Federal Home Loan Bank Board
Postal Service
Railroad Retirement Board
Other independent agencies
Undistributed offsetting receipts
Allowances*

1974

1975

1976

770
305
76

873
347
68

3,430
1,467
1,157
9,038
1,536
79,348
1,956
96,564
4,070
1,886
1,867
8,934
727
9,120
36,005
2,618
3,185
-319
3,074
13,665
5,991
—320
-344
1,698
2,695
4,319
-16,651

3,446
2,585
731
9,025
1,692
91,430
1,811
111,833
33,634
2,449
2,179
19,565
890
10,056
39,720
3,901
5,008
-1,054
3,576
15,570
7,667
1,283
-302
1,831
3,070
4,220
-16,839
750

3,458
1,367
8,503
9,470
1,767
101,118
2,079
118,669
30,935
2,626
2,133
21,677
980
11,266
43,573
4,219
5,965
-401
3,629
15,857
8,558
—657
-302
1,490
3,341
4,648
-20,193
8,325

277,619

Total

624
206
72

360,881

395,387

205,365
93,387
-21,133

270,589
116,189
-25,897

296,684
126,971
-28,268

277,619

360,881

395,387

MEMORANDUM
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions
Total
1
2

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for energy tax equalization payments, civilian agency pay raises, and
contingencies.




329

SUMMARY TABIiES
Table 8. BALANCES OF BUDGET AUTHORITY (in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Obligated
Legislative branch
The judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the
President:
International security assistance
International development
assistance
Other
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military 1
Defense—Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental
Protection
Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration
Veterans Administration
Civil Service Commission
Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation
Federal Home Loan Bank
Board
Postal Service
Railroad Retirement Board
Other independent agencies
Allowances 2

Total.

End 1974

Start 1974

Unobli- Obligated
gated

194
9

End 1975

Unobli- Obligated
gated

211
9

Unobli- Obligated
ated

170
10

Unobligated

111
11

15

2

7,599

96
19

End 1976

1,318 9,814 5,557 11,619 6,371 12,636 6,717

4,524 8,872 4,512 10,645
80 1,871
244
1,442
5,196 3,206 4,472 7,086
358 1,782
321
1,679
26,941 12,689 28,608 15,122
398
220
811
537

5,072 10,085 4,410 10,162
251 7,551
1,448
241
4,732 11,698 4,539 13,970
287 1,807
304
1,830
36,574 10,221 46,929 11,282
167
694
768
45

16,764 46,576 19,117 51,802 21,008 54,240 21,300 56,218
85,222
1,176
1,150
1,730
126
9,959
1,871
1,143

32,449 84,508 36,791 112,628
1,016 1,284
981 1,498
104 1,217
155 1,334
11,576 1,628 13,224 2,219
114
178
127
109
5,984 10,967 14,410 11,882
91 1,938
74 1,883
501

1,452

358

4,355 5,467 5,510 8,134
424

380

523
9,378
30,882
325 8,318

1,091
1,429
1,682

-27
1,940
209
3,178

7,854
9,498
4,411
4,652

382

13

2,263

45,092 36,508 18,777
2,236 1,621 1,845
74 1,245
53
13,568 1,279 3,231
179
157
175
23,227 13,157 16,246
65 2,058
57
36

36 2,667

7,582 7,341 10,466 2,119
336

132

410

125

138 1,417
918
46
485 1,286
1,769 9,592 1,894 9,878 2,175 10,053
2,410 37,791 2,906 41,495
34,076
2,042 7,355 2,084 8,011
229
* 8,638
10,478
20 8,781
8,196
284 4,045
271 4,093
232 4,326
3,215 3,412 2,764 2,943 2,563 7,266
325
50

181,797 206,877 188,412 234,279 235,630 258,128 281,397 221,424

MEMORANDUM
Federal funds _
Trust funds...

TotaL

159,371 96,587 163,435 103,476 204,80; 122,71 247,023 90,752
22,426 110,289 24,97! 130,80: 30,828 135,416 34,374 130,672
181,797 206,87: 188,412 234,279 235,630 258,128 281,39] 221,424

* Less than $500 thousand.
1
Includes balances of allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
2
Includes balances of allowances for civilian agency pay raises, and contingencies.




330

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Table 9. FULL-TIME PERMANENT CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT IN THE
EXECUTIVE BRANCH
As of June 30
Agency

Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—military functions
Defense-civil functions
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior2
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
.
......
Energy Research and Development Administra2
tion
.__
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. _
Veterans Administration
Other:
Agency for International Development
Civil Service Commission
Federal Energy Administration2
Nuclear Regulatory Commission2
Panama Canal
Selective Service System
Small Business Administration
Tennessee Valley Authority
United States Information Agency
Miscellaneous

1974
actual

l

1975 estimate
In 1975
budget

1976

Cun

79,621
28,549
973,778
29,072
126,692
15,021
56,558
48,188
12,788
22,644
69,524
104,391

80,200
29,100
995,900
29,100
126,200
14,200
56,100
51,000
13,000
23,400
71,300
111,400

80,200
28,700
960,800
29,300
127,300
15,200
57,900
49,900
13,600
23,200
69,900
109,000

81,100
28,600
953,300
28,800
128,300
15,200
58,800
50,800
13,700
23,300
72,000
112,500

6,736
9,144
36,733
24,854
174,515

6,900
9,200
38,000
24,600
181,800

7,400
9,200
36,400
24,300
186,200

7,600
9,300
36,700
24,300
195,700

8,961
6,190
2,002
1,538
13,841
2,333
3,957
14,001
8,829
35,844

9,500
6,300
3,300
1,900
14,100
2,200
4,300
14,400
9, 100
36,600

8,700
6,400
3,100
2,100
13,800
2,200
4,200
14, 100
9,000
38,600

8,500
6,700
1,700
2,300
13,800
1,700
4,200
15, 100
9,000
39,600

Subtotal
Contingencies3

1,916,304 1,963,100 1,930,700 1,942,600
5,000
5,000

Subtotal
Postal Service

1,916,304 1,968,100 1,930,700 1,947,600
563,475
534,700
556,800
541,200

Total

2,479,779 2,502,800 2,487,500

2,488,800

1
Excludes developmental positions under the worker-trainee opportunity program and certain
disadvantaged youth programs.
2
Adjusted for comparability purposes to reflect the change from the Atomic Energy Commission
to the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, both of which were activated Jan. 19, 1975. Positions were transferred from the Atomic Energy
Commission and the Department of the Interior to staff these new agencies.
3
Subject to later distribution.




SUMMARY TABLE©

331

Table 10. BUDGET FINANCING AND OUTSTANDING DEBT
(in millions of dollars)
BUDGET FINANCING
1974
actual

1975
estimate

Budget surplus or deficit ( - )
Surplus or deficit ( - ) of off-budget Federal agencies

-3,460
-2,675

-34,696
-13,931

-51,852
-10,642

Total surplus or deficit ( - )
Financing needs or sources other than borrowing from the
public:
Decrease or increase (—) in cash and monetary assets
Increase or decrease (—) in liabilities for:
Checks outstanding, etc.1
Deposit fund balances
Seigniorage on coins
___
Increment on gold

-6,135

-48,627

-62,494

2,519

3,147

—367

-913
-19
321
1,219

1,500
-133
613

-1,500
189
672

3,127

5,127

-1,006

—3,009

—43,500

—63,500

3,009

43,500

63,500

Total, financing needs or sources other than borrowing
from the public
Total requirements for borrowing from the public
Change in debt held by the public
Nonbank investors
Commercial banks
Federal Reserve System

1976
estimate

3,191
—5,650
5,467

OUTSTANDING DEBT, END OF YEAR
1973
actual

Gross Federal debt:
Debt issued by Treasury
Debt issued by other agencies
Total gross Federal debt
Held by:
Government agencies
The public
Federal Reserve System
Others

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

457,317 474,235 527,030
11,109 12,012 11,511

594,600
11,325

468,426 486,247 538,541

605,925

125,381 140,194 148,988 152,872
343,045 346,053 389,553 453,053
75,182 80,649
267,863 265,404

DEBT SUBJECT TO STATUTORY LIMITATION, END OF YEAR
Debt issued by Treasury
457,317 474,235 527,030 594,600
Treasury debt not subject to limitation
—620
—617
—610
—610
Agency debt subject to limitation
1,547
1,543
1,588
1,592
Notes not part of Federal debt but included in debt limit 2_ _
845
845
845
845
Total debt subject to statutory limitation3
1

459,089 476,006 528,853 596,427

Includes military payment certificates, accrued interest (less unamortized discount) on Treasury
debt, and as offset certain collections in transit.
2
Non-interest-bearing notes issued to the International Monetary Fund plus District of Columbia
stadium bonds. See Special Analysis C for further explanation.
3 The statutory debt limit is permanently established at $400 billion. By Act of June 30, 1974 (Public
Law 93-325), the statutory debt limit was temporarily increased to $495 billion through Mar. 31,
1975. Legislation is needed to change the limitation.




332

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
Table 11. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE (in millions of dollars)
1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

112.092
30.812

122.900
28,500
-1,600
149,800
-27,200
-4,900

139.400
29.600
-28,100
140,900
-29,900
-4,700

118,952

117,700

106,300

41,744
-3,125

45,460
-2,800
-4,160

44,000
7.400
-3,700

38,620

38,500

47,700

47,778
6,147
10,556
1,411

54,779
7,196
11.167
1.546

58,276
7,662
11,975
1,642

65,892

74,688

79.555

5,264
1,454
118

5,560
1,476
118

5.840
1,434
118

6,837

7.154

7,392

1,704

1.868

2.302
45

2.468
47

1.913
64
2,576
50

4.051

4.383

4,603

76,780

86,225

91,550

3,883
1.263
24
170
19
-110

3.886
1.277
23
190
17
-112

3,966
1,307
21
197
16
-114

5.248

5.281

5,393

Individual income taxes:

Withheld
Other
_.__
Proposed legislation
Gross individual income taxes _
Refunds
Proposed legislation

142,904
-23.952

Net individual income taxes.
Corporation income taxes.

Proposed legislation. _
Refunds
Net corporation income taxes _
Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust funds):

Employment taxes and contributions:
Old-age and survivors insurance
Disability insurance
Hospital insurance
Railroad retirement
Total employment taxes and contributions_.
Unemployment insurance:
State taxes deposited in Treasury 1
Federal unemployment tax receipts l
Railroad unemployment tax receipt *
Total unemployment insurance.
Contributions for other insurance and retirement:
Supplementary medical insurance
_ _ __ _ __
Proposed legislation
Federal employees' retirement—employee contributions
Other retirement contributions 2_ _
Total contributions for other insurance and retirement. __
Total social insurance taxes and contributions _.
Excise taxes:
Federal funds:
Alcohol taxes:
Distilled spirits
Beer _
Rectification tax
___
__
____
Wines . .
...
Special taxes in connection with liquor occupations
Refunds
Total alcohol taxes




..

_

.._

SUMMARY TABLE®

333

Table 11. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

Excise taxes—Continued

Federal funds—Continued
Tobacco taxes:
Cigarettes
Cigars
Cigarette papers and tubes
Other
Refunds

_

_

2.383
5
2
1
1
-2

_

_

Total tobacco taxes
Manufacturers' excise taxes:
Casoline
Firearms, shells, and cartridges.
Fishing rods, creels, etc___
Pistols and revolvers
Other
Proposed legislation
Refunds

_-.
_

2,303

2,260

—8

104

Miscellaneous excise taxes:
General and toll telephone and teletype serviceWagering taxes, including occupational taxes
Sugar tax
Coin-operated gaming devices
Interest equalization tax
,.
Tax on foundations
Foreign insurance policies
Other
Refunds
__

1,893
7
10
2
7
6
3
7
0
1
7

2
9
5
4
1
9
1
1
1
00
-9
3,105

2,109
7
15
2
8
1
8
2
20

2
9
5
5
2
1
1
2
3
15,200
-9
15,311

1,989
7
15
2
9
9
0
2
3

-20

-23

13,168

25,166

3,821
52
5
70
6
40
0
20
0
18
4
13
0
-145

3,861
50
6
74
9
45
2
20
1
10
6
18
0
-146

6,260

5,839

5.972

652

767

43
67

Total highway trust fund

16
4

4,010
64
1
85
9
35
9
25
2
10
3
14
1
-123

Trust funds:
Highway:
Gasoline
Trucks, buses, and trailers
Tires, innertubes, and tread rubber.
Diesel fuel used on highways
Use-tax on certain vehicles
Truck parts and accessories
Lubricating oils
Refunds

2,225

9,743

Total Federal fund excise taxes

-18

2,333

-200

Undistributed Federal tax deposits and unapplied collections

-19

2,157

Total miscellaneous excise taxes




2.210
5
1
1
1
-3

30
48
18
9
6

_

Total manufacturers' excise taxes

Airport and airway:
Transportation of persons
Proposed legislation
Waybill tax
Tax on fuels
Proposed legislation
International departure tax
Proposed legislation
See footnotes at end of table.

2.253
5
1
1
1
-3

2,435

__

45
55

60
_.-

51
-

815
—102
48
54
—4
52
35

__
_

_

334

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

Table 11. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
1974
actual

Excise taxes—Continued
Trust funds—Continued
Airport and airway—Continued
Aircraft registration fees
Tires and innertubes
Proposed legislation: Departure fees
Refunds

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

21
1

23
1

—2

—2

22
1
88
—2

840

940

1,007

_

Total airport and airway trust fund
Total trust fund excise taxes

7,100

32,145

4,800

4,600

3,334

3,910

4,300

127
4,845

231
5,700

243
6,100

50
31
51
30
21
*

Customs duties

19,947

5,035

Estate and gift taxes

6,979

16,844

Total excise taxes

6,779

52
30
54
1,380
27
61
*

53
32
54
3,847
32
170
*

183

1,605

4,188

75

79

3

Miscellaneous receipts:
Miscellaneous taxes
Deposit of earnings, Federal Reserve System
Fees for permits and regulatory and judicial services:
Immigration, passport, and consular fees
Patent and copyright fees
Registration and filing fees
Import fees on crude oil and petroleum products
Miscellaneous fees for permits, licenses, etc
Miscellaneous fees for regulatory and judicial services
Fees for legal and judicial services
Total fees for permits and regulatory and judicial services
Fines, penalties, and forfeitures

_

__

Proposed legislation

84
228

Total fines, penalties, and forfeitures
War reparations and recoveries under military occupation..
Gifts and contributions
Undistributed collections
Total miscellaneous receipts
Total budget receipts

75

79

312

57
24
58
5,369

57
29
—33
7,668

57
26
10,925

264,932

278,750

297,520

181,219
104,846
-21,133

185,966
118,681
-25,897

199,278
126,510
-28,268

MEMORANDUM

Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

•Less than $500 thousand.
1
Deposits by States are State payroll taxes that cover the benefit part of the program. Federal
unemployment tax receipts cover administrative costs at both the Federal and State level. Railroad unemployment tax receipts cover both the benefits and administrative costs of the program
for2 the railroads.
Represents employer and employee contributions to the civil service retirement and disability
fund for covered employees of Government-sponsored, privately owned enterprises and the District of Columbia municipal government.
3
Includes both Federal and trust funds. Trust fund amounts in miscellaneous receipts are: 1974,
$36 million; 1975, $40 million; 1976, $37 million.
Note.—Estimates for 1975 and 1976 include effects of proposed legislation.




.SUMMARY TABLES

335

Table 12. OFFSETTING RECEIPTS BY TYPE (in millions of dollars)
Type

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

INTRAGOVERNMENTAL TRANSACTIONS
Intrabudgetary transactions:
Federal intrafund transactions:

Interest on Government capital in enterprises
Other

1,119
33

1,254
64

1,229
27

1,152

1,318

1,256

936
16

980
19

1,045
7

952

999

1,052

2,105

2,318

2,308

2,421
2,029
—9
303
261
451
2

3,487
2,329
1,900
307
244
471
_
3

4,135
2,914
1,897
268
295
537
250
2

6,055
156

6,205
67

6,355
45

11,669

15,013

16,699

152
51

155
1

155

203

156

155

11,872

15,169

16,854

1, 756

1,864

1,946

911
10

1,082
14

1,149
15

2,677

2,960

3,109

6,583

7,769

8,305

9,261

10,728

11,414

Total interf und transactions

21,133

25,897

28,268

Total intrabudgetary transactions

23,238

28,215

30,576

Total Federal intrafunds
Trust intrafund transactions:

1

Railroad retirement/social security
Other
Total trust intrafunds
Total intrafund transactions
Inter fund transactions:
Distributed by agency and function:
Federal fund payments to trust funds:
Contributions to insurance programs:
Supplementary retirement contributions
Supplementary medical insurance
Unemployment insurance
Old-age and survivors insurance
Military service credits, various programs
Hospital insurance
Railroad dual benefits
Other
Miscellaneous:
State and local government fiscal assistance
Other
Subtotal
Trust fund payments to Federal funds:
Charges for services to trust funds
Repayment of loans on advances to trust funds
Subtotal..
Total interfunds distributed by agency and
function
Undistributed by agency and function:
Employer share, employee retirement:
Civil service retirement and disability insurance _ _
Old-age, survivors, disability, and hospital insurance (contribution as employer) 2
Other Federal employees retirement
Total employer share, employee retirement
Interest received by trust funds
Total interfunds undistributed by agency and
function

See footnotes at end of table.




336

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

Table 12. OFFSETTING RECEIPTS BY TYPE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Type

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

INTRAGOVERNMENTAL TRANSACTIONS—Con.
Receipts from off-budget Federal agencies:
Distributed by agency and function:
Interest on loans to Government-owned enterprises
Dividends and other earnings

155
50

333
50

436
50

Total distributed by agency and function

205

383

486

642

1,110

779

848

1,493

1,265

24,085

29,709

31,841

187
57

216
72

313
68

244

288

381

6

5

5

2
67
23

2
54
39

3
55
24

92

95

81

Royalties*

292

332

339

Sale of products:
Sale of timber and other natural land products 3
Sale of power and other utilities _ . .
Sale of other products
Recovery of mint manufacturing expense

649
356
29
27

832
227
45
36

1, 241
238
56
43

1,061

1,140

1,578

475
350

469
519

491
462

826

988

953

33

52

62

3,167

3,892

4,669

1,277

620

67
2

1,140
365
54
7

4,547

5,511

5,418

Undistributed by agency and function:
Employer share, employee retirement
Total receipts from off-budget Federal agencies
Total intragovernmental transactions
PROPRIETARY RECEIPTS FROM THE PUBLIC
Distributed by agency and function:
Interest:
Interest on foreign loans and deferred foreign collections.
Other interest (domestic) 3
Total interest
Dividends and other earnings
Rents:
Rent and bonuses from land leases for resource exploration and extraction
Rent of land and other real property 3
Rent of equipment and other personal property
Total rents

Total sale of products
Fees and other charges for services and special benefits:
Veterans life insurance
Other 3
Total fees and other charges
Sale of Government property:
Sale of land and other real property 3
Sale of equipment and other personal property:
Military assistance program sales (trust fund)
Sale from the stockpile of strategic and critical materials
Profit on the sale of gold
Other
Sale of scrap and salvage material 3
Total sale of property
See footnotes at end of table.




65
1

SUMMARY TABLED

337

Table 12. OFFSETTING RECEIPTS BY TYPE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Type

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

PROPRIETARY RECEIPTS FROM THE PUBLIC—
Continued
Distributed by agency and function—Continued
Realization upon loans and investments:
Foreign military credit sales
Dollar repayments of loans, Agency for International
Development
Repayment of advances to District of Columbia general
fund
Dollar conversion of foreign currency
Repayment of loans to United Kingdom
Other 3

24
5
49
69
77

65
40
70
168

207
40
38
7)
118

Total realization upon loans and investments

22
9

51
1

67
2

8
6

18
6

13
6

39

-22

7,484

9,015

9,544

6,340
408

4,500
500

7,200
800

6,748

5,000

8,000

14,232

14,015

17,544

38,317

43,724

49,385

Recoveries and refunds

s

Deposits in clearing accounts
Total proprietary receipts from the public distributed
by function and agency
Undistributed by agency and function:
Rents and royalties on Outer Continental Shelf Lands:
Rents and bonuses
Royalties
Total proprietary receipts from the public undistributed by function and agency
Total proprietary receipts from the public
Total offsetting receipts

4

68

97
71

152

i

* Less than $500 thousand.
1
Interchange receipts between the social security and railroad retirement funds place the social
security funds in the same position they would have been in if there were no separate railroad retirement system. Interchange receipts between Federal retirement funds occur when an employee
transfers from coverage by one system to coverage by another system.
2
Includes provision for covered Federal civilian employees and military personnel.
3
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
4
Consists of:
1974
1975 1976
Federal funds
10,278 9,307 12,019
Trust funds
___
-_-.
3,954 4,708
5,525




338

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1976

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

050

OUTLAYS

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

1974
actual

24,167
5,151
23,955
17,028

24,983
6,276
26,242
16,729

25,078
6,885
29,182
24,720

23,728 25,036
5,128 6,281
22,478 25,669
15,241 14,785

8,176
1,563
1,191

8,572
1,927
1.327

10,179
2,887
2,036

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

NATIONAL DEFENSE

051

Department of Defense—
Military:
Military personnel.
Retired military personnel
Operation and maintenance
Procurement
Research, development, test, and
evaluation
.
Military construction
Other i
Allowances for:
Civilian and military pay
raises.
Other legislation

Deductions for offsetting receipts _

052 Military assistance:
Funds appropriated to
President J
Other l

-159

Atomic energy defense activities :
Energy Research and Development Administration

9,610
1,703
1,015
1,194
141

-159

-262

-591

85,795 101,749

77,625

82,978

89,800

1,307
515

2,025
975

-262

-591

the

Total 052.

8,650
1,457
1,362

1,232
142
81,073

Total 051

8,582
1,407
1,221

24,999
6,884
28,246
16,600

7,825

3,963
1,000

3,298
1,293

819

7,825

4,963

4,591

819

1,586

1,767

1,896

1,822 3,000

053

054 Defense-related activities:
Funds appropriated to the
President.
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
_
General Services Administration.
Other independent agencies:
Renegotiation Board
__
Selective Service System., i
Other temporary study commissions
Total 054
Deductions for offsetting receipts...
Total national defense
See footnotes at end of table.




-85

16

6
- 1 , 244 - 1 , 171

-603

5
45

5
48

1

1,486 1,598

1

5
54

-1,178 - 1 , 2 0 4
-13

89,293

-156

1
6

5
1
-1,263 -1,169
5
60

1,763

5
47

1

-604
5
48
1

- 5 3 2 -1,349

-1,115

-533

-3

-13

-7

-3

91,314 107,700

78,569

85,276

94,027

-7

.SUMMARY TABLES

339

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued

Function and department or other unit

BUDGET AUTHORITY
1974
1975
1976
actual
estiestimate
mate

OUTLAYS
1975
1976
estiestimate
mate

1974
actual

150 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
151 Foreign economic and financial assistance:
Funds appropriated to the
President 1
Department of Agriculture
Department of State
Department of Transportation L
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies:
ACTION i

152 Conduct of foreign affairs:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of State!
Other independent agencies:
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
Foreign Claims Settlement
Commission
International Trade Commission
Other temporary study commissions

3,183
778
77
6
-50

10,363
1,336
53
10
-50

77

83

81

81

83

83

4,537

Total 151

3,854
554
99
3
-50

4,078

11,793

2,834

4,060

5,468

576

16
646

16
738

584

16
647

16
742

8

9

11

9

9

10

2

5

7

9

10

1

2

*

1

1

1

2,111
2,781
639
1,165
48
93
4 — 1 2
-50
-50

6

7

9

1

2

594

684

776

606

686

784

58

61

89

54

59

78

50

50

66

51

50

66

222

242

274

215

241

268

329

353

429

320

350

412

Deductions for offsetting receipts...

-167

-243

-370

-167

-243

-370

Total international affairs

5,292

4,871

12,627

3,593

4,853

6,294

Total 152
153 Foreign information and exchange activities:
Department of State 1___
Other independent agencies:
Board for International Broadcasting.
...
United States Information
Agency i
Total 153__

See footnotes at end of table.

580-000 O - 75 - 22




.._

10

4,310
1,070
48
7
-50

340

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

250

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

OUTLAYS
1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE,
AND TECHNOLOGY

251

General science and basic
research:
Energy Research and Development AdministrationOther independent agencies: National Science Foundation L - _

252 Earth sciences:
Department of the Interior
Other
independent
agencies:
Smithsonian Institution (trust
fund)
_
_
_Total 252

-

406

438

369

393

414

570

719

757

647

649

720

943

Total 251

373

1,125

1,195

1,016

1,043

1,134

172

254

268

178

238

266

18
7

28
3

26
6

*

*

*

*

*

*

172

254

268

1,409

1,506

1,782

1.473

1,538

1,705

Space science, applications,
and technology:
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration

1,021

1,084

1,119

1,168

1,040

1,127

255 Supporting space activities:
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration i
._

332

333

324

322

327

351

Deductions for offsetting receipts..

—3

—3

—3

—3

—3

—3

Total general science, space,
and technology

3,874

4,299

4,686

4,154

4,183

4,581

181
1,766
231
9

151
1,717
1,766
13

163
1,942
419
15

153
1,666
300
13

253 Manned space flight:
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration
254

300

NATURAL
RESOURCES,
ENVIRONMENT,
AND
ENERGY

301 Water resources and power:
Department of Agriculture 1
Department of Defense-Civil K
Department of the Interior L . . .
Department of State
Other independent agencies:
Delaware River Basin Commission
Susquehanna
River
Basin
Commission
Other temporary study commissions
See footnotes at end of table.




12
8
,903
33
8
2
1

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

16
6
1,989
32
6
2
3

SUMMARY TABLES

341

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

1974

1975
mate

OUTLAYS

1976
mate

1974

1975
mate

1976
mate

300 NATURAL
RESOURCES,
ENVIRONMENT, AND
ENERGY—Continued
301 Water resources and power:—
Continued
Tennessee Valley Authority. __
Water Resources Council1
Total 301
302 Conservation and land management:
Department of Agriculture J
Department of Commerce
Department of the Interior l
Other independent agencies:
Marine Mammal Commission.
Other temporary study commissions
._ ______
Total 302
303 Recreational resources:
Department of Defense—Civil __
Department of the Interior l
Other independent agencies:
Smithsonian Institution
Total 303.
304 Pollution control and abatement:
Department of the Interior
Department of the Treasury
Environmental Protection Agency i
Other independent agencies:
Interstate Commission on the
Potomac River Basin
Other temporary study commissions
Total 304
305 Energy:
Department of the Interior
Energy Research and Development Administration *
Environmental Protection Agency
Other independent agencies:
Federal Energy Administration
Federal Power Commission...
See footnotes at end of table.




46
7

11
10

5,088
10

401
7

800
12

731
11

2,242

3,734

7,638

2,540

3,301

3,282

953
12
205

706
15
267

473
18
293

591
1
165

1,001
20
250

649
17
111

*

1

1

*

1

1

*
1,170

989

785

757

1,272

939

1
743

1
958

1
856

1
662

1
799

1
855

*

*

857

662

800

*

744

959

*
1

*
*

*

5,953

4,112

631

*
10

*

856

*
*

*

2,030
*

2,905
*

2,967
*

1

7 _

9

6

5,964

4,119

631

2,032

2,914

2,974

9

52

50

12

21

47

516

1,405
134

1,885
112

454

1,099
32

1,638
113

73
28

142
33

187
36

33
27

127
37

208
36

342

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY

Function and department or other unit

300

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

OUTLAYS
1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

NATURAL
RESOURCES,
ENVIRONMENT,
AND
ENERGY—Continued

305 Energy—Continued
Other independent agencies—
Continued
Nuclear Regulatory Commission

82

147

220

80

139

198

_

709

1,914

2,491

606

1,454

2,240

306 Other natural resources:
Department of Commerce i
Department of the Interior *____
Department of State

370
153
4

450
171
4

499
190
5

398
97
4

420
122
4

462
140
5

527

626

694

498

546

607

Deductions for offsetting receipts...

-705

-875

-869

-705

-875

-869

Total natural resources, environment, and energy

10,650

11,464

12,226

6,390

9,412

10,028

3,753

4,924

3,342

1,458

887

881

—*

—*

—*

3,753

4,924

3,342

1,458

887

881

Agricultural research and
services:
Department of Agriculture!____

796

952

934

775

889

938

Deductions for offsetting receipts.-

—3

—3

—3

—3

—3

—3

4,546

5,873

4,273

2,230

1,773

1,816

Total 305

Total 306

350

AGRICULTURE

351 Farm income stabilization:
Department of Agriculture 1____
Other independent agencies:
Farm Credit Administration..Total 351
352

Total agriculture
400

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION

401

Mortgage credit and thrift
insurance:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Other independent agencies:
Federal Deposit
Insurance
Corporation (trust fund) ___
Federal Home Loan Bank

Board
See footnotes at end of table.




1,587

136

124

1,296

-1,190

169

826

3,884

808

829

1,002

1,083

-224

-530

-699

-370

-306

-318

2,000

-2,000

SUMMARY TABLES

343

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
1

BUDGET AUTHORITY

1975

1974

OUTLAYS

1976

mate

Function and department or other unit

mate

1974

1975

1976

mate

mate

400 COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION—Continued
401 Mortgage credit and thrift
insurance—Continued
Other independent agencies—
Continued
National Credit Union Administration
Total 401
402 Payment to the Postal Service:
Other independent agencies:
Postal Service _
403 Other advancement and regulation of commerce:
Legislative branch
Department of Commerce x
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Department of the Treasury l
General Services Administration.
Other independent agencies:
Commodity Futures Trading
Commission
Emergency Loan Guarantee
Board
Federal Communications Commission
Federal Trade Commission
Securities and Exchange Commission
Small Business Administration.
Other temporary study commissions
Total 403
404 Ground transportation:
Department of Transportation l .
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Other independent agencies:
Washington Metropolitan Area
Transit Authority _ _ _ _
Interstate Commerce Commission
Other temporary study commissions
United States Railway Association _ _
_____
Total 404
See footnotes at end of table.




-9

-16

1,519 -1,033

219

-13
2,413

6,020 •-1,068

1,698

1,831

1,490

1,698

1,831

1,490

5
321

6
339

7
373

5
325

6
372

368

1
1
1

1

4

1

1

-5
-2
1

-5
6
1

7
-5

3
1
11

11

-5

-6

-6

40

47

50

38

49

50

32

39

46

32

41

46

36
249

44
354

47
189

35
288

45
201

49
216

1

3

2

2

3

3

687

835

730

714

715

741

15,151

16,461

1,016

5,372

6,121

6,686

1

1

1

165

127

100

170

185

182

41

45

50

38

47

50

*

*

18

12

10

1

26

13

15,375

16,645

1,176

5,583

6,380

6,931

344

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

OUTLAYS

1975

1976

mate

mate

1,633

1,739

2,265

1,855

2,074

2,268

278

309

314

292

304

316

89

85

80

89

85

86

1974
actual

1974
actual

1975

1976

mate

mate

400 COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION—Con tinueo
405 Air transportation:
Department of Transportation J _
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration
Other independent agencies:
Civil Aeronautics Board
Aviation Advisory Commission
(trust fund)
__
Total 405—
406 Water transportation:
Department of Commerce 1
Department of Defense—Civil _
Department of Transportation l _
Other independent agencies:
Federal Maritime CommissionOther temporary study commissions.
_
Total 406
407 Other transportation:
Department of Transportation..
Other independent agencies:
National Transportation Safety
Board 1
Total 407

*
2,001

2,133

2,660

2,236

2,464

2,670

557

565

503
__*

1,076

548
2
953

678

802

580
30
938

1,021

6

7

8

7

8

*

848
6
*

*

1,366

1,555

1,650

1,357

1,511

1,707

61

65

71

49

69

72

8

10

10

8

10

10

70

75

82

57

79

82

Deductions for offsetting receipts..

-64

-149

-116

-64

-149

-116

Total commerce and transportation
_

23,545

28,944

6,602

13,100

11,796

13,723

34

50
5

66
9

4

26

450 COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
451 Community development:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare
Department of Housing and Urban
Development
Other independent agencies:
ACTIpN
.
Commission of Fine Arts
Community Services Administration
District of Columbia
National Capital Planning Commission x
See footnotes at end of table.




30

30
6

150
11

31
998

2,775

2,729

2,106

2,392

3,260

92
*

100
*

102
*

86
*

99
*

105
*

359
227

421
153

363
249

660
153

498
206

376
248

2

SUMMARY TABLES

345

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

450

1974
actual

1975
estimate

OUTLAYS

1976
estimate

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT—Continued

451

Community development—
Continued
Other independent agencies—
Continued
Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation
Other temporary study commissions
Total 451

452 Area and regional development:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Agriculture l
Department of Commerce 1
Department of the Interior 1
Other independent agencies:
Appalachian Regional Commission
National Council on Indian Opportunity
Joint Federal-State Land Use
Planning Commission for
Alaska 1
Total 452

1

1

1

1
#

1

2

1
*

2

2

1,739

3,488

3,606

3,045

3,280

4,068

30
0
52
4
22
8
46
2

28
7
25
1
36
0
41
7

38
1
20
0
36
5
37
8

29
8
21
8
20
7
26
8

39
3
5
3
36
1
41
3

39
3
27
4
24
9
50
0

*

*

*
1

1

1,382

10
5

20
5

25
7

20
5

5
0

7
5

4
8

2
0

18
2

2

9
0

10
0

46
6

17
9

13
2

74
0

30
4

35
2

74
6

42
9

51
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts.. -

-27

-27

-31

-27

-11

-31

Total community and regional
development

3,969

5,075

5,164

4,910

4,887

5,920

See footnotes at end of table.




433

20
0

270

1,264

1
1,142

Total 453

1,274

1
1,129

453 Disaster relief and insurance:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Housing and Urban
Development
Other independent agencies:
Small Business Administration.

1,553

1

346

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY

Function and department or other unit

500

1974
actual

1975
estimate

OUTLAYS

1976
estimate

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

EDUCATION, MANPOWER,
AND SOCIAL SERVICES

501

Elementary, secondary, and
vocational education:
Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Other
independent
agencies:
Community Services Administration
Total 501

502 Higher education:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies:
Harry S Truman Scholarship
Foundation 1
Other temporary study commissions
Total 502
Research and general education aids:
Legislative branch i
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare i . . _ .
Other independent agencies:
Corporation for Public Broadcasting
National Commission on Libraries and Information Science 1
National Foundation on the
Arts and the Humanities K.
Smithsonian Institution

4,105
196

4,269
226

4,054
230

3,561
189

3,974
237

21

3,994
227

5

4,301

4,495

4,284

3,771

4,216

4,222

2,113

2,483

2,345

1,383

2,140

2,379

13

-654
9

-35

-45
9

-55
1

14
1

*

*
1

*

2,126

1,839

2,361

1,349

2,104

2,325

72

81

97

67

80

94

507

321

289

573

530

382

48

62

70

48

62

70

*

*

1

*

*

*

131
77

176
93

190
103

96
84

156
108

183
108

835

734

749

869

937

839

340
2,848

210
3,962

330
2,972

340
2,570

316
3,802

315
3,926

4,118

4,241

503

Total 503
504 Manpower training:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of Labor i
Other
independent
agencies:
Community Services Administration
Total 504
See footnotes at end of table.




—*
3,188

4,172

3,302

2,910

SUMMARY TABLES

347

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

500

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

OUTLAYS
1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

EDUCATION, MANPOWER,
AND SOCIAL SERVICES
—Continued

505 Other manpower services:
Department of Labor *
Other independent agencies:
Committee for Purchase of
Products and Services of the
Blind and other Severely
Handicapped
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
National
Labor
Relations
Board
National Mediation Board__._

154

*

198

*

215

*

149

*

196

*

211

*

506 Social services:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.....
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
Other independent agencies: Cabinet Committee on Opportunities
for
Spanish-Speaking
People

16

18

12

16

17

56
3

63
3

68
3

55
3

64
3

70
3

226

Total 505

12

280

305

219

278

301

2,493

3,105

2,740

2

*

1

1

2,557

1

3,101

2,730

1

2,558

3,101

2,730

2,496

3,106

2,740

Deductions for offsetting receipts. _

-13

-45

-45

-13

-45

-45

Total education, manpower,
and social services

13,222

14,577

13,686

11,600

14,714

14,623

22,202

25,150

27,202

18,396

22,122

23,729

163

265

339

106

224

342

22,365

25,415

27,540

18,502

22,346

24,072

2,711

2,352

2,386

2,334

2,680

2,484

_*

*

*

2,681

2,484

Total 506

550

HEALTH

551 Health care services:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare i
Other independent agencies: Civil
Service Commission!

Total 551
552

Health research and education:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
Other independent agencies: Other
temporary study commissions.

Total 552 . -

._

See footnotes at end of table.




...

*
2,711

2,352

2,386

2,334

348

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

1974
actual

1975
estimate

OUTLAYS

1976
estimate

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

550 HEALTH—Continued
553 Prevention and control of
health problems:
Executive Office of the President,
Department of Agriculture
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare i
Department of the Interior
Department of Labor
Other independent agencies:
Consumer Product Safety Commission
Federal Metal and Nonmetallic
Mine Safety Board of Review
Occupational Safety and Health
Review Commission

51
186

13
201

210

21
191

45
200

9
209

407
59
70

445
69
102

441
80
116

385
59
69

438
74
102

465
79
116

35

36

37

19

43

37

*

*

*

*

*

*

5

6

6

5

6

6

812

872

890

750

908

920

554 Health planning and construction:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare i

482

-152

245

494

590

612

Deductions for offsetting receipts..

-6

-39

-39

-6

-39

-39

26,365

28,448

31,022

22,074

26,486

28,050

57,786
4

66,091
3

70,171
3

55,935
2

64,495
5

71,087
3

2,607

2,833

3,232

2,675

3,026

3,267

*

*

58,613

67,526

74,356

Total 553

Totalhealth
600 INCOME SECURITY
601 General retirement and disability insurance:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare *
Department of Labor!___
Other independent agencies:
Railroad Retirement Board!__
Other temporary study commissions
Total 601
602 Federal employee retirement
and disability:
Legislative branch (trust fund)..
The judiciary (trust fund)
Department of Labor
Department of State (trust fund)
Other independent agencies: Civil
Service Commission (trust
fund)
Total 602
See footnotes at end of table.




60,397

68,927

*

73,406

*
2
138
75

2
165
97

*
2
201
86

*
1
107
39

*
1
165
54

*
1
201
64

8,940

11,021

11,813

5,498

6,905

7,607

9,155

11,286

12,102

5,645

7,125

7,873

SUMMARY TABLES

349

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
|974

1O7A

mate

600

1O7C

OUTLAYS
1976
1975

mate

1974

mate

mate

INCOME SECURITY—Con.

603

Unemployment insurance:

Department of Labor *
Other independent agencies: Railroad Retirement Board (trust
fund)
Total 603
604 Public assistance and other
income supplements:
Department of Agriculture
_
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
_
Other independent agencies:
Railroad Retirement Board. __
Total 604
Deductions for offsetting receipts __
Total income security

7,427

15,481

7,834

6,070

14,697

18,162

-5

-5
7,422

15,481

7,834

6,065

14,697

18,162

4,647

5,777

5,028

4,433

5,60?

5,313

7,630

9,794

10,284

7,856

9,628

10,303

5,999

44,897

26,664

1,819

2,153

2,646
55

55
18,275

_*
95,249

42,031

14,108

17,388

18,368

-34

_*

-34

-34

156,126 135,339

84,431

106,702

118,724

60,467

-34

700 VETERANS BENEFITS AND
SERVICES
701 Income security for veterans:
Veterans Administration l

7,113

7,837

7,925

6,789

7,671

7,707

702 Veterans education, training,
and rehabilitation:
Veterans Administration

3,353

3,965

3,614

3,249

4,042

3,600

703 Hospital and medical care for
veterans:
Veterans Administration

3,107

3,717

4,125

3,006

3,553

3,906

704 Veterans housing:
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Veterans Administration

2

3

20
-35

-8

4

-275

-10
-94

4

2

3

-15

-283

-104

20

16

21

25

24

21

*
364

*
446

*
470

*
329

*
455

*
459

4

5

5

4

5

5

388

467

496

359

484

485

Total 704
705 Other veterans benefits and
services:
Department of Defense—Civil J__
Department of the Treasury
(trust fund)
Veterans Administration *
Other independent agencies:
American Battle Monuments
Commission 1
Total 705

See footnotes at end of table.




350

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

OUTLAYS

1974

1975
mate

1976
mate

1974

1975
mate

1976
mate

Deductions for offsetting receipts..

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

Total veterans benefits and
services.....

13,964

15,986

16,163

13,386

15,466

15,592

*

_*

_*

700 VETERANS BENEFITS AND
SERVICES—Continued

750 LAW ENFORCEMENT AND
JUSTICE
751 Federal law enforcement and
prosecution:
The judiciary (trust fund)
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Department of Justice
Department of the Treasury....
Other independent agencies:
Administrative Conference of
the United States
Commission on Civil Rights.__
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Subversive Activities Control
Board
Other temporary study commissions
Total 751
752 Federal judicial activities:
Legislative branch
The judiciary
Other independent
agencies:
Indian Claims Commission
Total 752

19

23

25

14

2
3

2
6

10
873
396

12
1,010
491

13
1,092
522

10
827
374

1
2
96
8
47
9

1
3
1,081
57
3

6

7

8

1
6

1
7

1
8

44

55

63

42

5
4

6
0

1

1

1

*
1

1

1

*

1

1,349

1,599

1,725

1,274

1,582

1,726

6
213

8
304

7
345

13
206

14
307

7
341

1

1

1

1

1

1

220

314

354

221

323

350

180

220

254

202

219

258

871

876

770

770

862

887

72

72

47

72

81
7

98
4

81
4

70
7

99
0

99
5

Deductions for offsetting receipts..

-5

-6

-4

-5

-6

-4

Total law enforcement and
justice

2,615

3,074

3,169

2,462

3,026

3,288

753 Federal correctional and rehabilitative activities:
Department of Justice!
754 Law enforcement assistance:
Department of Justice
Other independent agencies:
Legal Services Corporation
Total 754

See footnotes at end of table.




•SUMMARY TABLES*

351

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued

Function and department or other unit

BUDGET AUTHORITY
1974
1975
1976
actual
estiestimate
mate

1974
actual

OUTLAYS
1975
1976
estiestimate
mate

800 GENERAL GOVERNMENT
801 Legislative functions:
Legislative branch i_
802 Executive direction and management:
Executive Office of the President.
Funds appropriated to the President...
Department of the Treasury....
General Services Administration.
Other independent agencies:
Federal Election Commission..
Total 802

803 Central fiscal operations:
Legislative branch
Department of Commerce
Department of the Treasury 1 ...
Total 803

804 General property and records
management:
General Services Administration1.
Other independent agences: Other
temporary study commissions.
Total 804
805 Central personnel management:
Other independent agencies:
Advisory Committee on Federal Pay
Civil Service Commission i . . . .
Other temporary study commissions
Total 805
806 Other general government:
Legislative branch
Department of Defense-CiviL..
Department of the Interior 1 ....
Department of the Treasury i . . .
General Services Administration.
Other independent agencies:
Civil Service Commission
American Revolution Bicentennial Administration L . . .
Other historical and memorial
agencies1
See footnotes at end of table.

580-000 O - 75 - 23




538

604

682

521

618

741

46

63

68

45

63

68

76

1
52
*

1
45

73

5
28

1
35
*

*

2

*

*

*

*

1

2

122

116

116

117

97

106

—1
—*
1,383

—1
—*
1,694

—1
—*
1,836

—1
*—
1,329

—1
—*
1,711

—1
—*
1,770

1,382

1,693

1,836

1,329

1,710

1,770

816

296

313

1,030

204

169

*

*

*

*

*

816

296

313

1,030

204

170

*
73

*
94

95

*
98

*

*
97

*
74
*

73

94

97

74

95

98

49
40
145
98
2

49
47
165
172
3

52
38
183
177
3

32
39
209
111
2

39
48
167
164
3

45
40
192
177
3

10

15

15

14

14

15

25

15

22

10

32

21

*

*

*

352

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

1975

OUTLAYS

1976

mate
800

1975

1974

mate

1976
estimate

1975

estimate

GENERAL GOVERNMENT—
Continued

806 Other general government—
Continued
Other independent agencies—
Continued
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations* _ _ _
Other temporary study commissions

1

1

1

1

1

*

*

370

467

490

419

468

494

Deductions for offsetting receipts—

-164

-546

-199

-164

-546

-199

Total general governments.

3,137

2,725

3,335

3,327

2,646

3,180

6,055

6,205

6,357

6,106

6,176

115
4
131
228

121
3
187
336

119
4
222
343

115
3
131
204

11
2
4
16
8
36
3

19
1
3
21
2
33
4

187
*

211
*

260
*

187
*

21
1
*

20
6
*

664

857

948

640

857

96
4

6,719

7,062

7,305

6,746

7,033

7,249

29,319

32,900

36,000

29,319

32,900

36,000

—*
—*

—*
—*

—*
—*

—*
—*

_*

_*
_*

-32
—*
—1
—1

-45
—*
—2
—1

-141
—*
—3
—1

-28

-26

-*

-*

Total 806

850 REVENUE SHARING AND
GENERAL PURPOSE
FISCAL ASSISTANCE
851 General revenue sharing:
Department of the Treasury 1 ...
852 Other general purpose fiscal
assistance:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Defense—Civil _ _
Department of the Interior
Department of the Treasury.___
Other independent agencies:
District of Columbia
Federal Power Commission
Total 852
Total revenue sharing and
general purpose fiscal assistance

6,304

900 INTEREST
901 Interest on the public debt:
Department of the Treasury.___
902

Other interest:

Legislative branch
The judiciary
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Civil _ _
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare *
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
See footnotes at end of table.




-32
—*
—1
—1

-45
_*
-2
-1

-141
_*
-3
-1

-30

-28

-26

-30

-*

-*

-*

353

SUMMARY TABLE.9
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollar*,)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

1975
estimate

OUTLAYS

1976
estimate

1974
actual

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

INTEREST—Continued

902

Other interest—Continued

Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Department of State
Department of Transportation x_
Department of the Treasury
General Services Administration _
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies:
ACTION
Civil Aeronautics Board
Civil Service Commission
Community Services Administration
National Foundation on the
Arts and the Humanities. _.
National Science Foundation. _
Railroad Retirement Board
(trust fund)
Small Business Administration.
United States Information Agency
Total 902

-3
_*
_*
-1
__*
-1,179
-1

_*
_*
__*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*

Allowances for:
Energy tax equalization payments.
Civilian agency pay raises
Contingencies
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee retirement:
Interfund transactions
-2,677
Receipts from off-budget Federal
agencies
-642
Interest received by trust funds
-6,583
Rents and royalties on the Outer
-6,748
Continental Shelf
Total budget authority
outlays

_*

_*

_*
_*

_*
_

5
6
3
_*
_*
_*
6
-1,245 -1, 5 9 -1,581 -1,247 -1, 5 9 -1,581
6
3
_*

28,073

Total interest.

-3
-3
—3
-3
-3
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
i
-1
-1
-1
—i
-1
_*
_*
_ * -1,494
_
_*
_
_*
-1,408
-1,494 -1,408 -1,180
-1
*
*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_*
_
_*
_*
_*
_
_*
_*
_
_*
_*
_*
_
_*
_
_*
_*
•X-

900

1974
actual

5

6

3
31, 3 1 34,419

3
31, 3 1

34,419

500
"200

28,072

7,000
550
500

250

7,000
575
750

-2,960

-3,109

-2,677

-2,960

-3,109

-1,110
-7,769

-779
-8,305

-642
-6,583

-1,110
-7,769

-779
-8,305

-5,000

-8,000

-6,748

-5,000

-8,000

313,861 395,082 385,848 268,392 313,446

349,372

221,019 299,903 291,827 198,692 229,005
113,975 121,076 122,289 90,833 110,338
-21,133 -25,897 -28,268 -21,133 -25,897

254,215
123,425
-28,268

500

and

MEMORANDUM

Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

*Less than $500,000.
1
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
Note.— In many cases offsetting receipts are distributed at the subfunctional level. In those cases
where such distributions would be inappropriate, the offsetting receipts are deducted at the major
functional level in a separate line entry entitled "Deductions for offsetting receipts."




CO

T*tble 14. CONTROLLABILITY OF BUDGET OUTLAYS (dollar* in billions)
Estimate

Actual
1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

Relatively uncontrollable under present law:

Open-ended programs andfixedcosts:
Payments for individuals:
Social security and railroad retirement
Federal employees'retirement and insurance
(Military retired pay)..
(Other)
Unemployment assistance
Veterans' benefits: Pensions, compensation, education, and
insurance
Medicare and Medicaid
Housing payments
Public assistance and related programs

2
22.5
3.8
(1.8)
(2.0)
2.8

24.8
4.3
(2.1)
(2.2)
2.9

28.3
4.8
(2.4)
(2.4)
2.9

31.3
5.6
(2.8)
(2.7)
3.7

37.2
6.6
(3.4)
(3.2)
6.6

41.6
7.7
(3.9)
(3.8)
7.5

50.7
9.0
(4.4)
(4.6)
5.7

57.6
10.8
(5.1)
(5.7)
6.5

66.6
13.5
(6.3)
(7.2)
15.2

76.6
15.7
(6.9)
(8.8)
18.6

5.0
4.6
3
2.8

4.9
7.2
.3
3.4

5.7
8.9
.4
3.9

6.6
9.9
.5
4.7

7.6
11.2
.7
7.4

8.3
13.4
1.1
8.9

9.3
14.1
1.6
9.1

10.0
17.2
1.8
11.5

11.9
20.9
2.1
14.2

11.9
24.1
2.6
15.6

41.8
10.3

47.6
11.1

54.9
12.7

62.2
14.4

77.3
14.8

88.4
15.5

1.7
3.0
56.8

3.2
3.0
64.8

4.1
2.8
74.5

3.8
3.8
84.2

2.8
5.2
100.1

4.0
6.4
114.3

99.6
17.4
6.6
3.6
6.3
133.4

115.4
21.5
6.1
1.0
6.8
150.8

144.4 165.1
23.6 26.1
6.2
6.3
.9
.7
7.9
8.6
183.0 206.8

21.2
15.8

24.6
17.8

25.0
16.9

24.5
17.0

21.6
18.6

19.9
19.4

18.3
21.3

20.9
22.9

22.3
26.8

23.5
30.5

Total, outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations...

37.0

42.3

41.9

41.5

40.2

39.2

39.6

43.8

49.1

54.0

Total, relatively uncontrollable outlays

93.7

107.2

116.4

125.7

140.4

153.5

173.0

194.5

B
g

3
Subtotal, payments for individuals
Net interest
General revenue sharing
Farm price supports (CCC)
Other open-ended programs andfixedcosts
Total, open-ended programs andfixedcosts
Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations: l
National defense..._
Civilian programs




__
_

232.1 260.7

Relatively controllable outlays:
National defense
Civilian programs
Total, relatively controllable outlays
Undistributed employer share, employee retirement
Total budget outlays

46.1
20.1
_

52.7
20.8

52.6
17.6

51.8
21.5

51.8
21.9

53.5
27.7

52.6
23.8

53.0
24.2

56.9
28.5

63.4
29.1

66.2
-1.7

73.5
-1.8

70.1
-2.0

73.3
-2.4

73.7
-2.6

81.1
-2.8

76.4
-2.9

77.2
-3.3

85.4
-4.1

92.5
-3.9

158.3

178.8

184.5

196.6

211.4

231.9

246.5

268.4

313.4 349.4

MEMORANDUM
Percent of total outlays:
Relatively uncontrollable under present law:
Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals
Other

26.4%
9.4

26.6%
9.6

29.8%
10.6

31.7%
11.2

36.6%
10.8

38.1%
11.1

40.4%
13.7

43.0%
13.2

46.1% 47.3%
12.3 11.9

Total open-ended programs and fixed costs
Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations

35.9
23.4

36.3
23.7

40.4
22.7

42.9
21.1

47.4
19.0

49.3
16.9

54.1
16.1

56.2
16.3

58.4
15.8

59.2
15.5

Total relatively uncontrollable outlays
Relatively controllable outlays
Undistributed employer share, employee retirement

59.2
41.8
-1.1

59.9
41.1
-1.0

63.1
38.0
-1.1

64.0
37.3
-1.2

66.4
34.8
-1.2

66.2
35.0
-1.2

70.2
31.0
-1.2

72.5
28.8
-1.2

74.2
27.2
-1.3

74.7
26.5
-1.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Total budget outlays
1

Excluding prior year contracts and obligations for activities shown as "open-ended programs and fixed costs."




CO
C

00

s

td

3

Table

15. LEGISLATIVE

PROPOSALS

FOR MAJOR NEW AND EXPANDED PROGRAMS
PROJECTION OF COSTS * (in millions of dollars)

1976

1975

Trans,
quarter

1976

BUDGET

Explanation

1978

1977

THE

3

Estimates

Department or agency

IN

1979

0
-362

-723

0
—723

1980

GO

I

Funds appropriated to the
President:

Special financing facility
Defense:
Naval petroleum reserve.
Offsetting receipts

7,000
1,000

BA
0
18
12




750

0

122
69

53
10

312
297

2,182
1,956
-656
-656

2,182 Increase production from Elk Hills, Calif., to finance further
2,156
exploration, development, and production of naval
—656
petroleum reserves and to establish a National Strategic
—656
Petroleum Reserve, subject to the control of the President.

20
20

20 Encourage States to develop and implement a program for
20
regulating surface mining.

BA
0
BA
0

-112
-112

-469
-469

-110
-110

-597
-597

1,714
1,314
-714
-714

BA
0

3
2

*
20
12

5
5

20
20

20
20

Interior:

Mined area protection

0
250

0

Provide loans to industralized countries with oil-related and
other balance-of-payment difficulties.

CO

Federal Energy Administration:

9
2
0
0

55
50
20
15

15
10
5
5

55
50
20
15

31
40
20
15

0
13
20
20

0
0
15
20

Provide grants to States to winterize dwellings of low-income
persons, particularly the elderly.
Provide grants to States to develop and implement programs
that expedite the siting and construction of energy
facilities.

Energy tax equalization BA
payments 2
0

500
500

7,000
7,000

1,750
1,750

7,000
7,000

7,000
7,000

7,000
7,000

7,000
7,000

Provide payments to offset increased energy costs for those
individuals and sectors of the economy that cannot be
compensated by tax reductions.

Relatively small and un- BA
forseen items
0

150
150

200
150

60
50

250
200

300
250

350
300

400
350

Low-income residential BA
winterization
0
Energy facility siting
BA
0
Allowances:

relative priorities of these and other Government programs, in the light of economic and other circumstances then prevailing. Thus, the estimates do not represent a commitment as to amounts to be included in future budgets.
2
Includes payments to low-income nontaxpayers and State and local governments and allowances for the increased cost of Federal operations resulting from the
higher cost of energy. For 1976, these allowances will be $2.0 billion, $2.0 billion, and $3.0 billion respectively. The distribution in later years has not yet been determined.




00

00

Table 16. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE, 1966-1976 (in millions of dollars)
Actual

Estimate

1966

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes

1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

55,446
30,073

61,526
33,971

68,726
28,665

87,249
36,678

90,412
32,829

86,230
26,785

94,737
26,166

103,246
36,153

118,952
38,620

117,700
38,500

1976

106,300
47,700

§

o
Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust funds):
Employment taxes and contributions:
Old-age and survivors insurance
Disability insurance
Hospital insurance
Railroad retirement
Total employment taxes and contributions
Unemployment insurance

17,556
1,530
893
683

22,197
2,204
2,645
776

22,265
2,651
3,493
814

25,484
3,469
4,398
885

29,396
4,063
4,755
919

31,354
4,490
4,874
980

35,132
4,775
5,205
1,008

40,703
5,381
7,603
1,198

47,778
6,147
10,556
1,411

54,779
7,196
11,167
1,546

58,276
7,662
11,975
1,642

20,662

27,823

29,224

34,236

39,133

41,699

46,120

54,876

65,892

74,688

79,555

3,777

3,659

3,346

3,328

3,464

3,674

4,357

6,051

6,837

7,154

^
G
Q
9

7,392
CD

Contributions for other insurance and retirement:
Supplementary medical insurance
Employees'retirement—employee contributions
Other retirement contributions

05
1,111
18

647
1,201
19

698
1,334
20

903
1,426
24

936
1,735
29

1,253
1,916
37

1,340
2,058
39

1,427
2,146
41

1,704
2,302
45

1,868
2,468
47

1,977
2,576
50

Total contributions for other insurance and retirement

1,129

1,867

2,052

2,353

2,701

3,205

3,437

3,614

4,051

4,383

4,603

Total social insurance taxes and contributions,.,-

25,567

33,349

34,622

39,918

48,578

53,914

86,225

91,550




45,298

64,542

76,780

Excise taxes:
Federal funds:
Alcohol
Tobacco.
_
Other 1
"_"_
Total Federal excise taxes
Trust funds:
Highway. _
Airport and airway
Total trust excise taxes
Total excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts:
Deposit of earnings by Federal Reserve System
Other miscellaneous receipts2
Total miscellaneous receipts
Total budget receipts

3,720
2,066
3,358

3,980
2,077
3,221

4,198
2,121
3,390

4,482
2,136
3,649

4,610
2,093
3,609

4,696
2,205
2,297

5,004
2,205
2,522

5,040
2,274
2,522

5,248
2,435
2,060

5,281
2,303
5,584

5,393
2,260
17,513

9,145

9,278

9,700

10,585

10,352

10,510

9,506

9,836

9,743

13,168

25,166

3,917

4,441

4,379

4,637

5,354

5,542
563

5,322
649

5,665
758

6,260
840

5,839
940

5,972
1,007

3,917

4,441

4,379

4,637

5,354

6,104

5,971

6,424

7,100

6,779 ~6/979

13,062

13,719

14,079

15,222

15,705

16,614

15,477

16,250

16,844

19,947

32,145

3,066 ~V978
1,767
1,901

3,051
2,038

3,491
2,319

3,644 ~ 1 u 3 5
2,430
2,591

5,436
3,287

4,917
3,188

5,035
3,334

4,800
3,910

4,600
4,300

1,713
162

1,805
303

2,091
400

2,662
247

3,266
158

3,533
325

3,252
381

3,495
426

4,845
524

5,700
1,968

6,100
4,825

1,875

2,108

2,491

2,908

3,424

3,858

3,633

3,921

5,369

7,668

10,925

130,856 149,552 153,671 187,784 193,743 188,392 208,649 232,225 264^932 278,750 297^520

MEMORANDUM

Federalfunds
Trustfunds
Interfund transactions

101,427 111,835 114,726 143,321 143,158 133,785 148,846 161,357 181,219 185,966 199,278
32,997 42,935 44,716 52,009 59,362 66,193 72,959 92,193 104,846 118,681 126,510
-3,568 -5,218 -5,771 -7,547 - 8 , 778 - H , 5 8 6 -13,156 -21,325 -21,133 -25,897 -28,268

1 Includes proposed excise tax on domestic crude oil and natural gas of $3,000 million in 1975 and $15,200 million in 1976.
2
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds. Includes import fees on crude oil and petroleum products of $1,380 million in 1975 and $3,847 million in 1976.




CO

Or
CD

00

Table 17. BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1966-1976

( in millions of dollars)

Actual
Funct ion

Subtotal, Department of Defense-Military.
052 Military assistance
053 Atomic energy defense activities
054 Defense-related activities
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total national defense

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

17,956
1,830
19,000
19,012
7,160
2,636
-138

19,859
2,095
20,578
23,283
7,747
3,975
-164

21,374
2,444
22,227
23,988
7,457
525
-143

23,031
2,849
21,609
21,584
7,166
1,059
-148

22,633
3.386
20,941
18,858
7,303
1,552
-126

23,036
3,885
21,675
17,131
7,881
1,655
-113

23,246
4,390
21,069
15,654
8,157
895
-113

23,728
5,128
22,478
15,241
8,582
2,627
-159

25,036
6,281
25,669
14,785
8,650
2,819
-262

24,999
6,884
28,246
16,600
9,610
4,053
-591

54,178
1,003
1,466
-792

67,457
858
1,277
-491

77,373
654
1,336
51
-4

77,872
789
1,389
162
-5

77,150
731
1,415
-8
-3

74,546
999
1,385
-120
-3

75,151
806
1,373
29
-2

73,297
531
1.409
-162
-4

77,625
819
1,486
-1,349
-13

82,978
1,822
1,598
-1,115
-7

89,800
3,000
1,763
-533
-3

1976

55,856

69,101

79,409

80,207

79,284

76,807

77,356

75,072

78,569

85,276

4,498
368
245
-416

4,249
353
253
-243

3,389
370
237
-211

3,154
398
235
-223

2,718
405
241
-271

3,274
451
274
-277

2,820
475
295
-634

2,834
606
320
-167

4,060
686
350
-243

5,468
784
412
-370

4,554

4,695

4,612

3,784

3,564

3,093

3,723

2,956

3,593

4,853

6,294

858
74
4,210
1,213

897
80
3,649
1,236

930
88
3,096
1,110

938
92
2,781
913

947
103
2,209
984

1,009
114
1,885
933

978
127
1,740
1,118

961
138
1,537
1,230

1,016
178
1,473
1,168

_._
1,043
238
1,538
1,040

, ,_.
1,134
266
,705
1,127

i-g
M
«
w
§

m

O

94,027

4,104
354
228
-131

150 International affairs:
151 Foreign economic and financial assistance
152 Conduct of foreign affairs
153 Foreign information and exchange activities...
Deductions for offsetting receipts

>

Total international affairs




1967

15,162
1,591
14,710
14,339
6,259
2,279
-160

050 National defense:
051 Department of Defense—Military:
Military personnel
Retired military personnel
Operation and maintenance..
Procurement
Research and development
Military construction and other i
Deductions for offsetting receipts

250 General science, space and technology:
251 General science and basic research
252 Earth sciences...
__
253 Manned space
flight
254 Space science, applications, and technology

Estimate

1966

.

255 Supporting space activities

41
5
-2

388
2

37
8
-4

370
-3

35
5
-2

338

304

-2

-1

322
_3

327
-3

31
5
-3

6,790

Deductions for offsetting receipts

45
3
-1

6,311

5,610

5,108

4,611

4,294

4,299

4,169

4,154

4,183

4,581

2,493
71
3
566
1,114
666
435
-544

2,540
757
662
2,032
606
498
-705

3,301
1,272
800
2,914
1,454
546
-875

3,282
939
856
2,974
2,240
607
-869

Total general science, space, and technology
300 Natural resources, environment, and energy:
301 Water resources and power
_
302 Conservation and land management
303 Recreational resources
304 Pollution control and abatement
305 Energy
306 Other natural resources
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total natural resources, environment, and energy,

1,706
640
245
158
468
246
-390

1,778
71
0
280
190
530
280
-379

1,802
694
333
249
677
286
-417

1,728
572
380
303
638
281
-400

1,674
723
372
384
593
332
-467

2,053

-475

2,315
788
521
763
647
447
-463

3,074

3,379

3,624

3,503

3,611

4,449

5,019

5,461

6,390

9,412

10,028

350 Agriculture:
351 Farm income stabilization
352 Agricultural research and services
Deductions for offsetting receipts

2,004
446
-8

2,515

4,032
514

5,304
520
-46

4,589

3,651

69
3
-2

4,553
728
-2

4,099
758
-3

1,458

59
7
-5

75
7
-3

887
889
_3

881
938
-3

2,441

2,982

4,541

5,779

5,164

4,288

5,279

4,855

2,230

1,773

1,816

2,016
888

1,750
1,141

1,510

-251
2,183

477

474

4,075

4,140
1,046

4,678
1,422

74
7
6
-42

5,180
1,824
1,053

-42 -1,192
1,772
1,567
488
552
5,353
5,640
1,925
2,177
1,111
1,239
36
5
6
-43
-101

1,519 -1,033
1,698
1,831

30
9

-624
920
247
4,443
1,220
874
21
-36

14
0

35
4

2,807
1,080
457
4,378
1,088
856
13
-41

9,205

10,637

7,065

9,090

Total agriculture
400 Commerce and transportation:
401 Mortgage credit and thrift insurance
402 Payment to the Postal Service
403 Other advancement and regulation of commerce. _
404 Ground transportation
405 Air transportation
406 Water transportation
407 Other transportation
Deductions for offs etting receipts
Total commerce and transportation
1

46
7
-8

85
6
46
7
72
0
41
4
37
8

So

>

w

94
6
71
1
-44
8,956

93
1
26
-40

37
-103
10,397

10,601

9,938

74
1

75
1

5,583
2,236
1,357

6,380
2,464
1,511

57
-64

-149

219
1,490
71
4
6,931
2,670
1,707
82
-116

13,100

11,796

E

13,723

7
9

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay ri ses for Department of Defense.




00

CO

to
Table 17. BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1966-1976 (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Actual

Estimate

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

724
764
220
-169

1,039
733
69
-191

1,335
955
114
-215

1,631
1,052
33
-184

2,328
1,106
249
-188

2,613
1,245
341
-189

3,110
1,404
388
-203

3,088
1,378
1,571
-169

3,045
1,129

3,280
1,142

4,068
1,382

764
-27

492
-27

501
-31

Total community and regional development

1,540

1,651

2,189

2,531

3,495

4,010

4,699

5,869

4,910

4,887

5,920

500 Education, manpower, and social services:
501 Elementary, secondary, and vocational education.
502 Higher education
503 Research and general education aids
504 Manpower training
505 Other manpower services
506 Social services
Deductions for offsetting receipts

1,887
705
148
992
101
267
-7

2,639
1,160
265
1,239
107
623
-10

2,815
1,393
329
1,590
112
778
-14

2,728
1,232
330
1,560
122
908
-10

3,107
1,385
521
1,602
135
1,148
-10

3,544
1,433
520
1,952
157
1,449
-10

3,962
1,447
524
2,894
184
2,694
-11

3,745
1,532
668
3,283
202
2,455
-10

3,771
1,349
869
2,910
219
2,496
-13

4,216
2,104
937
4,118
278
3,106
-45

4,222
2,325
839
4,241
301
2,740
-45

4,093

6,023

7,004

6,871

7,888

9,045

11,696

11,874

11,600

14,714

14,623

1,153
948
275
v 262
—1

4,909
1,229
313
311
—2

7,593
1,405
318
393
—2

9,537
1,459
348
415
—2

10,648
1,577
362
469
—6

12,107
1,687
459
465
—2

14,538
1,?52
541
443
—3

15,476
2,272
638
449
—3

18,502
2,334
750
494
—6

22,346
2,681
908
590
—39

24,072
2,484
920
612

2,638

6,759

9,708

11,758

13,051

14,716

17,471

18,832

22,074

26,486

28,050

21,435
1,726

22,773
2,076

24,552
2,660

28,288
1,732

31,303
2,688

37,485
3,191

41,956
3,789

51,684
4,500

58,613
5,645

67,526
7,125

74,356
7,873

450 Community and regional development:
451 Community development
452 Area and regional development
453 Disaster relief and insurance
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total education, manpower, and social services
550 Health:
551 Health care services
552 Health research and education
553 Prevention and control of health problems
554 Health planning and construction
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total health
600 Income security:
601 General retirement and disability insurance
602 Federal employee retirement and disability




—39

H
w
d

CD

a

i
CO

603 Unemployment insurance
604 Public assistance and other income supplements..
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total income security
700 Veterans benefits and services:
701 Income security for veterans
702 Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation..
703 Hospital and medical care for veterans
704 Veterans housing
705 Other veterans benefits and services
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total veterans benefits and services
750 Law enforcement and justice:
751 Federal law enforcement and prosecution
752 Federal judicial activities
753 Federal correctional and rehabilitative activities..
754 Law enforcement assistance
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total law enforcement and justice
800 General government:
801 Legislative functions
802 Executive direction and management
803 Central fiscal operations
804 Central property and records management
805 Central personnel management
806 Other general government
. „
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total general government




2,338
3,400
-5

2,507
3,465
-1

2,412
4,059
-2

2,583
4,679
-1

3,364
5,712
-2

6,169
8,580
-2

7,076
11,081
-2

5,356
11,419
-2

6,065
14,108
—*

14,697
17,388
-34

18,162
18,368
-34

28,895

30,821

33,680

37,281

43,066

55,423

63,911

72,958

84,431

106,702

118,724

4,184
54
1,318
169
198
—2

4,704
305
1,391
304
197
—2

4,506
478
1,469
210
220
—2

5,036
701
1,564
102
239
—2

5,552
1,015
1,800
54
263
—2

5,966
1,659
2,036
-179
296
—2

6,344
1,960
2,425
-317
320
—2

6,533
2,801
2,711
-381
350
—2

6,789
3,249
3,006
-15
359
—2

7,671
4,042
3,553
-283
484
—2

7,707
3,600
3,906
-104
485
—2

5,921

6,899

6,882

7,640

8,683

9,776

10,730

12,013

13,386

15,466

15,592

418
84
60
1
—9

456
92
64
6
—7

481
100
69
8
—8

549
116
71
29
—3

667
139
88
65
—6

815
152
104
233
—6

958
186
128
380
—2

1,152
204
158
624
—7

1,274
221
202
770
—5

1,582
323
219
909
—6

1,726
350
258
959
—4

554

610

650

761

952

1,299

1,650

2,131

2,462

208
17
672
583
25
40
-118

218
19
728
655
19
163
-233

237
21
762
586
37
201
-159

254
25
808
587
38
88
-151

303
30
934
616
44
152
-145

342
38
1,013
637
51
218
-141

404
59
1,183
719
58
189
-146

438
72
1,209
910
67
221
-235

521
117
1,329
1,030
74
419
-164

618
97
1,710
204
95
468
-546

741
106
1,770
170
98
494
-199

1,426

1,569

1,684

1,649

1,934

2,159

2,466

2,682

3,327

2,646

3,180

3,026

3,288

I
5
f

CO

Table 17. BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1966-1976 (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Actual
1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

Estimate
1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

CO

1976

850 Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance:
851 General revenue sharing
852 Other general purpose fiscal assistance

242

288

311

365

451

488

531

6,636
586

6,106
640

6,176
857

6,304
946

Total revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal
assistance

242

288

311

365

451

488

531

7,222

6,746

7,033

7,249

W

12,014
-728

13,391
-858

14,573
-822

16,588
-796

19,304
-992

20,959
-1,350

21,849 24,167
-1,267 - 1 , 3 5 5

29,319
-1,247

32,900
-1,569

36,000
-1,581

W
d
g

11,286

12,533

13,751

15,793

18,312

19,609

28,072

31,331

34,419

500

7,000
550
500

900 Interest:
901 Interest on the public debt
902 Other interest
Total interest

20,582

22,813

Allowances for:
Energy tax equalization payments
Civilian agency pay raises
Contingencies
__

. , ,

_

__

. . .

, . ,

,

Total allowances
950 Undistributed offsetting receipts:
951 Employer share, employee retirement
952 Interest received by trust funds
953 Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental
Shelf

200
,
700

8,050

-1,447
-1,917

-1,661
-2,275

-1,825
-2,674

-2,018
-3,099

-2,444
-3,936

-2,611
-4,765

-2,768
-5,089

-2,927
-5,436

-3,319
-6,583

-4,070
-7,769

-3,888
-8,305

-248

-637

-961

-428

-187

-1,051

-279

-3,956

-6,748

-5,000

-8,000

Total undistributed offsetting receipts

-3,613

-4,573

-5,460

-5,545

-6,567

-8,427

Total outlays

134,652 158,254 178,833 184,548 196,588 211,425 231,876 246,526 268,392 313,446 349,372

-8,137-12,318-16,651-16,839-20,193

MEMORANDUM
Federal funds
Trustfunds
Interfund transactions




106,512 126,779 143,105 148,811 156,301 163,651 177,959 186,403 198,692 229,005 254,215
31,708 36,693 41,499 43,284 49,065 59,361 67,073 81,447 90,833 110,338 123,425
- 3 , 5 6 8 -5,218 -5,771 - 7 , 5 4 7 —8,778 —11,586 —13.156 —21,325 —21,133 —25,897 —28,268

o
£
M
>

Table 18. FEDERAL TRANSACTIONS IN THE NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS, 1965-1976 (in billions of dollars)

Description

1965'

1966

1967

1968

Actual
1969
1970

Estimate
1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

RECEIPTS, NATIONAL INCOME BASIS
Personal taxes and nontaxes
Corporate profits tax accruals
Indirect business tax and nontax accruals
Contributions for social insurance

51.3
27.7
16.9
24.6

57.6
31.0
15.7
28.5

64.5
31.2
15.8
35.7

71.4
33.7
17.1
38.3

90.0
37.4
18.6
44.4

93.6
33.3
19.2
49.1

87.5
32.2
20.1
52.6

100.7
34.1
20.0
58.5

106.8
41.2
20.7
71.7

123.1
45.6
21.6
83.3

122.1
41.0
33.1
91.4

111.1
39.9
54.7
99.4

Total receipts, national income basis...

120.5

132.8

147.2

160.6

190.4

195.2

192.5

213.2

240.4

273.6

287.6

305.1

EXPENDITURES, NATIONAL INCOME
BASIS
Purchases of goods and services
Defense
Nondefense
Transfer payments
Domestic ("to persons")
Foreign
Grants-in-aid to State and local governments.
Net interest paid
Subsidies less current surplus of Government
enterprises
Wage accruals less disbursements

64.4
(48.9)
(15.5)
30.5
(28.3)
(2.2)
10.9
8.5

71.7
(54.4)
(17.3)
34.2
(31.8)
(2.3)
12.7
9.0

85.3
(67.7)
(17.6)
39.4
(37.2)
(2.2)
14.8
9.9

94.9
(75.9)
(18.9)
44.8
(42.7)
(2.1)
17.8
10.9

99.4
(78.0)
(21.4)
50.7
(48.5)
(2.2)
19.2
12.3

98.0
(77.0)
(21.0)
56.8
(54.8)
(2.0)
22.6
14.0

95.8
(73.1)
(22.7)
69.7
(67.4)
(2.3)
26.8
14.3

103.2
(73.6)
(29.5)
78.6
(75.7)
(2.8)
32.6
13.4

105.3
(74.2)
(31.0)
89.4
(86.7)
(2.7)
40.2
14.5

4.1

4.5

5.1

4.1

4.1

4.7
—.1

5.7
.1

5.3

6.7
—.5

4.7
.2

3.7
.4

4.1

Total expenditures, national income
basis

118.5

131.9

154.5

172.5

185.7

195.9

212.4

232.9

255.4

278.3

323.7

361.0

Excess of receipts ( + ) or expenditures (—),
national income basis

+2.0

+.9

-7.3

-11.9

+4.7

-.7

-19.8

-19.7

-15.0

-4.7

-36.1

-55.9




110.3
(75.4)
(34.9)
104.2
(101.3)
(2.9)
41.5
17.4

121.1 136.1
(80.3) (90.9)
(40.8) (45.2)
131.7 147.0
(128.2) (143.0)
(3.5)
(4.0)
47.0
50.8
19.8
23.0

g
g
>
£4
g
5

CO

01

Table 19. FEDERAL FINANCES AND THE GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT, 1954-1976 (dollar amounts in billions)
Federal debt, end of year
Fiscal year

1954.
1955_
1956.
1957.
1958.
1959.
I960.
1961..
1962..
1963.
1964..
1965.
1966.
1967_
1968.
1969.
1970.
1971.
1972.
1973.
1974.
1975 estimate.
1976estimate_




Gross
national
product

Budget receipts
Amount

Percent
of GNP

Budget outlays
Amount

Percent
of GNP

Total
Amount

Held by the public

Percent
of GNP

Amount

Percent
of GNP

362.1
378.6

69.7
65.5

19.3
17.3

70.9
68.5

19.6
18.1

270.8
274.4

74.8
72.5

224.5
226.6

62.0
59.9

409.4
431.3
440.3
469.1
495.2

74.5
80.0
79.6
79.2
92.5

18.2
18.5
18.1
16.9
18.7

70.5
76.7
82.6
92.1
92.2

17.2
17.8
18.8
19.6
18.6

272.8
272.4
279.7
287.8
290.9

222.2
219.4
226.4
235.0
237.2

54.3
50.9
51.4
50.1
47.9

506.5
542.1
573.4
612.2
654.2

94.4
99.7
106.6
112.7
116.8

18.6
18.4
18.6
18.4
17.9

97.8
106.8
111.3
118.6
118.4

19.3
19.7
19.4
19.4
18.1

292.9
303.3
310.8
316.8
323.2

66.6
63.1
63.5
61.3
58.7
57.8
55.9
54.2
51.7
49.4

238.6
248.4
254.5
257.6
261.6

47.1
45.8
44.4
42.1
40.0

721.2
769.8
826.0
898.3
954.6

130.9
149.6
153.7
187.8
193.7

18.1
19.4
18.6
20.9
20.3

134.7
158.3
178.8
184.5
196.6

18.7
20.6
21.6
20.5
20.6

329.5
341.3
369.8
367.1
382.6

45.7
44.3
44.8
40.9
40.1

264.7
267.5
290.6
279.5
284.9

36.7
34.8
35.2
31.1
29.8

,012.1
,101.6
,224.1
,348.9

188.4
208.6
232.2
264.9

18.6
18.9
19.0
19.6

211.4
231.9
246.5
268.4

20.9
21.0
20.1
19.9

409.5
437.3
468.4
486.2

40.5
39.7
38.3
36.0

304.3
323.8
343.0
346.1

30.1
29.4
28.0
25.7

,434.0
,596.0

278.8
297.5

19.4
18.6

313.4
349.4

21.9
21.9

538.5
605.9

37.6
38.0

389.6
453.1

27.2
28.4

©

Q

O

CD

367

SUMMARY TABLES
Table 20. B U D G E T R E C E I P T S A N D O U T L A Y S , 1789-1976
(in millions of dollars)
Fiscal year

Receipts

1789-1849
1850-1900

Outlays

Surplus
or
deficit ( - )

+70 1938
-991 1939

1,160
14,462

1,090
15,453

1901
1902
1903
1904
1905

588
562
562
541
544

525
485
517
584
567

+63
+77
+45
-43
-23

1906
1907
1908
1909
1910

595
666
602
604
676

570
579
659
694
694

+25
+87
-57
-89
-18

702

691

+ 1 1 1950

1912...

693

690

1913
1914
1915

714
725
683

715
726
746

1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

761
1,101
3,645
5,130
6,649

1921

5,571

5,062

1922

4,026

3,289

1923
1924
1925

3,853
3,871
3,641

3,140
2,908
2,924

1926

3,795

2,930

1927

4,013

2,857

1928
1929
1930

3,900
3,862
4,058

2,961
3,127
3,320

1931

3,116

3,577

- 4 6 2 1970

1932 _
1933
1934
1935

1,924
1,997
3,015
3,706

4,659
4,598
6,645
6,497

3,997
4,956

8,422
7,733

-2,735
-2,602 1971
-3,630 1972
-2,791 1973
1974
- 4 , 4 2 5 1975 est
- 2 , 7 7 7 1976 est

1911

.

_

1936
1937

Outlays

Surplus
or
deficit ( - )

6,765
8,841
9,456

-1,177
-3,862
-3,095

13,634
35,114
78,533
91,280
92,690

-5,013
-20,764
-54,884
-47,004
-47,474

1940

6,361

1941
1942

8,621
14,350

1943
1944

23,649
44,276

1945

45,216

1946

39,327

1947
1948

38,394
41,774

1949

39,437
39,485

+3

- * 1951
- * 1952
- 6 3 1953

1954
+ 4 8 1955

713
1,954
-853
12,677 -9,032 1956
18,493 -13,363 1957
6,358
+291 1958

1959

_

Receipts

5,588
4,979

Fiscal year

+509 196O.__-

+736

+713 1961
+963 1962
+717 1963
1964
+865 1965
+1,155
+939 1966
+734 1967
+738 1968

1969

55,183 -15,856
34,532 +3,862
29,773 +12,001
+603
38,834
42,597 -3,112
+6,100
-1,517
-6,533
-1,170
-3,041

69,574
69,719
65,469

45,546
67,721
76,107
70,890
68,509

74,547
79,990
79,636
79,249
92,492

70,460 +4,087
76,741 +3,249
82,575 - 2 , 9 3 9
92,104 -12,855
+269
92,223

94,389

97,795

51,646
66,204

99,676 106,813

106,560 111,311
112,662 118,584
116,833 118,430

-3,406
-7,137
-4,751
-5,922
-1,596

130,856 134,652 -3,796
149,552 158,254 -8,702
153,671 178,833 -25,161
187,784 184,548 +3,236
193,743 196,588 -2,845
188,392 211,425
231,876
246,526
268,392
313,446
349,372

208,649
232,225
_ __ 264,932
278,750
297,520

-23,033
-23,227
-14,301
-3,460
-34,696
-51,852

*Less than $500 thousand.
Notes.— Certain interfund transactions are excluded from receipts and outlays starting in 1932.
For years prior to 1932 the amounts of such transactions are not significant.
Refunds of receipts are excluded from receipts and outlays starting in 1913; comparable data are
not available for prior years.
Data for 1789-1939 are for the administrative budget; 1940-1976 are for the unified budget.




INDEX
ACTION, 116,290
Administrative Conference of the United States,
291
Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, 202
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental
Relations, 301
Aeronautical Exposition, United States International, 271
Aeronautical technology, 65, 286
Aeronautics Board, Civil, 292
Aeronautics and Space Administration, National, 65, 108, 286-287
Aeronautics and Space Council, National, 205
African Development Bank, 84
Aged:
Assistance, 128, 139-140,244
Housing, 247
Insurance, 244
Agency for International Development, see
Foreign assistance
Aging, National Institute on, 238
Agricultural commodities, price support, 100,
103,216
Agricultural credit, 100, 103
Agricultural economics, 213
Agricultural Library, National, 213
Agricultural Marketing Service, 218-219
Agricultural Research Center, 212
Agricultural Research Service, 212
Agricultural Service, Foreign, 214
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service, 215
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance
Act (Public Law 83-480) programs, 214
Agriculture:
Food costs, 12
Function, 64
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 100
Program analysis, 100-103
Research and services, 100, 102-103
Agriculture, Department of, 28, 113, 211-221
Aid, foreign, see Foreign assistance
Air carriers, payments to, 105, 108
Air Forces, tactical, 75, 79
Air pollution control, 96
Air transportation, 105,108
Aircraft, supersonic development termination,

271
Airlift, forces, 73, 76, 79
Airmen's Home, U.S. Soldiers' and, 235
Airports and airways trust fund, 18, 105, 108,
272
Airports, National Capital, 271
Alaska, claims, native, 131




Alaska, Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning
Commission for, 310-311
Alaska Power Administration, 256
Alaska Railroad, 275
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, 239-240
Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Bureau of,
150-151,277
Alcoholism, 132
Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National
Institute of, 238
Allied services, 246
Allocations between agencies, explanation, 171
All-volunteer armed forces, 8
American Battle Monuments Commission, 291
American Future, Commission on Population
Growth and the, 311
American Printing House for the Blind, 245
American Revolution Bicentennial Administration, 99, 154-156, 299-300
American Shipbuilding, Commission on, 311
Amtrak program, 104, 107
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service,
134,212
Animal Quarantine Station, 212
Antarctic research, 91
Antitrust enforcement activities, 151
Appalachian Regional Commission, 301
Appalachian regional development programs,
114,117-118,207
Appeals, Military Court of, 229
Appeals courts, 202-203
Appellate Court System of the United States,
Commission on Revision of the Federal, 203
Apportionment system, 165
Appropriations, 22-23, 169
Appropriations, authorization of transition,
178-179
Architect of the Capitol, 197
Archives and Records Service, National,
155,283-284
Area and regional development, 117
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 291
Army:
Cemeterial expenses, 233
Civil functions, 233-237
Corps of Engineers, 234-235
Art, National Gallery of, 309
Arthritis, Metabolism, and Digestive Diseases,
National Institute of, 238
Arts, Commission of Fine, 293
Arts, John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing, 255, 309
Arts and the Humanities, National Foundation
on the, 124, 304-305
Asian Development Bank, 84
Assessment, Office of Technology, 197
369

370

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

Atmospheric Administration, National Oceanic
and, 224-225
Atomic energy defense activities, 71, 78, 280
Atomic energy power, civilian, 64
Automatic data processing activities, General
Services Administration, 284
Aviation Administration, Federal, 271-272
Aviation Advisory Commission, 310
Aviation safety, 18,271
Aviation user fees, 104

B
Balance of payments, 80, 85
Balances, budget authority, explanation, 171
Balances, budget authority, summary, table,
329

Baltimore-Washington Parkway, 273
Banks:
For cooperatives, 34
Federalfinancing,33
Federal home loan, 34, 109-110, 167
Federal intermediate credit, 34
Federal land, 34, 167
Federal reserve, 160
Bankruptcy Laws of the United States, Commission on, 203
Basis for budget figures, 174-175
Beautification, 311
Beautification, Commission on Highway, 311
Bicentennial Administration, American Revolution, 3, 20,124, 299-300
Bilateral assistance, 209-210
Bilateral development assistance, 81, 83-85
Biomedical research, 133
Blind, aid to, 140
Blind, American Printing House for the, 245
Blind and Other Severely Handicapped, Committee for the Purchase of Products and
Services of the, 294
Bonneville Power Administration, 97, 257
Borrowing and debt repayments, definition, 173
Botanic Garden, United States, 199
Bridges, alteration of, 270
Broadcasting, Board for International, 82
Broadcasting, Corporation for Public, 295
Budget:
Allowances, 175
By agency, for each account and functional
code, 197-318
Ceilings, 165, 167

Congressional authorization and appropriation, 163-165
Congressional process, 165
Content, 163
Control, 165
Controllability, 354
Coverage, 167-168
Current services, 41, 165
Data for 1974-76, 174-175

Data for transition period, 175
Deficit, 4
Discussion, 32-37
Execution and control, 165-166
Executive formulation and transmittal,
162-163




1976

Budget—Continued
Federal funds, totals, table, 1974-76, 29
Financing, 331
Financing and outstanding debt, transition
table, 184
Fiscal year, new, 4
Functional classification:
Discussion, 64-67
New, 64-67
Revision, 64-67
Historical data, 1966-76
Legislative proposals for major new and
expanded programs, 1975-80, 356-357
Message of the President, 3-20
Outlays, limit on increases, 7-8
Outlays, totals, table, 1974-76, 3, 6
Outlook, long-range, 42-52
Priorities, changing, 66
Priorities, table, 1956-80, 47
Procedures, new congressional, 162
Process, discussion, 162-167
Projections, 19
Receipts, discussion, 54
Receipts, totals, table, 1974-76, 3, 6
Receipts and outlays, table, 1789-1976, 367
Receipts by source, transition table, 185-186
Recommendations, 3-4
Reductions, 7-8
Reform, 1&-19
Review and audit, 166-167
Summary, 1974-76, 321
Summary, table, 321
Summary, transition table, 180
Surplus or deficit by fund group, totals,
table, 1974-76, 29

System and concepts, explanation of, 161-175
Targets, 165, 167
Terms, explanation of, 167-173
Total outlays, 4
Totals, table, 1974-76, 6
Transition quarter, 4-5
Trends, discussion, 46-48
Trends and priorities, 8-10
Trust funds, totals, table, 1974-76, 29
Budget, Office of Management and, 162-163,
206

Budget in 1976, 175
Budget authority:
Available through current action by Congress,
table, 22, 324
Available without current action by Congress,
table, 22
Balances, by agency, summary, table, 329
Balances, explanation, 171
By agency, totals, table, 1976-80, 51
By agency, transition table, 182
By function, totals, table, 1976-80, 50
By function, transition table, 181, 187-189
By function and agency, summary, table,
338-353
Construction and procurement programs, 23
Defense, national, table, 1976, 71
Direct loans, 24
Discussion, 22-24
Explanation, 169-171
Granting of, 164

INDEX
Budget authority—Continued
Guaranteed loan program, 24
Outlays therefrom, available through current
action by Congress, transition table, 183
Relation to outlays, chart, 23
Relation to outlays, summary, table, 326-327
Revenue sharing, 17
Summary:
By agency, table, 1974-76, 323
By function, table, 1974-76, 322
Table, 22, 321
Total, table, 1974-76, 321
Total, table, 1974-76, 6, 22
Totals, transition table, 181
Transition, 179
Trust funds, 23
Budget and the economy, discussion, 5-8
Budget concepts, President's Commission on,
33-34
Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974,
Congressional, 162-163
Budget outlays, see Outlays
Budget reform, 4, 18-19
Budget review, Congressional, 178
Buildings, construction of, see Construction
Buildings Service, Public, 154-155, 283
Business, advancement of, 97-99
Business Administration, Domestic and International, 223

Cabinet Committee on Opportunities for
Spanish-Speaking People, 292
Cambodia, assistance to, 14
Cambodia, emergency military assistance for,
82
Canal Zone Government, 235-236
Cancer Institute, National, 238
Cancer research, 134
Capitol, Architect of the, 197
Cash assistance, 141
Cemeterial expenses, Army, 233
Censuses, periodic, 222
Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange
between East and West, 268
Center for Disease Control, 238
Chamizal settlement, 267
Child Health and Human Development,
National Institute of, 238
Children:
Dependent, aid to families, 126, 140
Development, 121, 123
Cities, Model, 249
Civil Aeronautics Board, 292
Civil Rights:
Education, 245
Enforcement activities, 151
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 295-296
Housing, 251
Civil Rights, Commission on, 293
Civil Rights, Office for, 245
Civil Service Commission, 155, 292-293
Civil Service retirement and disability fund,
136, 139
Claims:
Defense, Department of, 229




371

Claims—Continued
Indian, 300
Prisoners of war, 299
Vietnam, 299
Claims, Court of, 202
Claims Commission, Indian, 300
Claims Settlement Commission, Foreign, 299
Clean Air Act, amendments, 10-11
Coal miners, disabled, 32, 244
Coast Guard, 105, 108, 270-271
Coastal zone management, 224
College housing, 247
Combat forces, 13
Commerce, Department of, 111-113, 117, 221227
Commerce, promotion of, 223-224
Commerce Commission, Interstate, 303
Commerce and transportation: Function, 65
Outlays and recommeuded budget authority,
by program or agency, 105
Program analysis, 104-112
Commercial housing market, 65
Commissions and committees, see under more
specific titles
Committees on the Budget, Senate and House
of Representatives, 33
Commodity Credit Corporation, 103, 215-216
Commodity Credit Corporation outlays, 103,
179
Commodity distribution program, 64
Commodity Exchange Authority, 214
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, 294
Communications Commission, Federal, 296
Community development:
Grant program, 113-116
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 114
Planning and management, 115-116, 249-250
Program analysis, 113-119
Urban and rural areas, 113-116
Community Mental Health Centers, 132
Community and regional development, function, 65
Community Relations Service, 262
Community Services Administration (CSA),
116,294
Comprehensive Employment and Training Act,
120, 126
Comptroller of the Currency, Office of the, 279
Conciliation Service, Federal Mediation and,
297-298
Congress, Library of, 198-200
Congress of the United States, 197
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, 67, 165, 167,
178, 179
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974,4,18, 33,40-41,49,162-163
Congressional Budget Office, 19, 165
Conservation:
Fish and wildlife, 236
Fuel, 10-11
Soil, 218
Conservation Corps, Youth, 220
Conservation and land management, 93, 97-98

372

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Consolidated Rail Corporation, 104, 106
Construction grants, hospitals and health
facilities, 134, 288
Construction programs:
Defense—Military, 231
General Services Administration, 154-155
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 286
Veterans Administration, 144, 147-148, 288
Consumer Affairs, Office of, 245
Consumer Finance, National Commission
on, 312
Consumer health and safety, 133-134
Consumer Information Center, 285
Consumer Price Index, 41, 137-139
Consumer price levels, 7
Consumer Product Safety Commission, 294
Consumer protection, 218-219
Contingencies, 166
Contract authority, 169
Cooperative State Research Service, 212
Corporations, Government-owned, see under
particular name
Corps of Engineers—Civil, 97, 234-235
Correctional and rehabilitation activities, 152
Cost-Accounting Standards Board, 200
Council of Economic Advisers, 205
Council on Environmental Quality, 205
Council on International Economic Policy, 205
Courts, see under particular kind
Credit Administration, Farm, 296
Credit guarantees, 37
Credit programs, Federal:
Agriculture, by program or agency, 103
Commerce and transportation, 112
Community and regional development, 119
International affairs, 86-87
Veterans, 147
Credit Union Administration, National, 304
Crime prevention, 149
Corp Insurance Corporation, Federal, 216
Cultural Cooperation, National Commission on,
267
Cultural exchange activities, 86, 124, 268
Current budget authority, definition, 170
Current expense and capital outlay, explanation,
168
Customs Court, 202
Customs duties, 44, 45, 55, 60, 62
Customs and Patent Appeals, Court of, 202
Customs Service, U.S., 150-151, 159, 277

D
Darien Gap Highway, 272
Deaf, National Technical Institute for the, 245
Debt, public, see Public debt
Deep sea drilling project, 91
Deepwater Ports Act of 1974, 108
Defense, Department of—Civil, 233-237
Defense, Department of—Military, 71-79.
227-233
Construction, 71, 231
Operation and maintenance, 71, 228-229
Outlays and budget authority for, 71




FISCAL

YEAR

1976

Defense, Department of Military—Continued
Pay increases, 71
Procurement, 71, 229-230
Program analysis, 70-79
Receipts and outlays, Federal funds, 28
Research and development, 76, 230-231
Revolving and management funds, 71, 232—
233
Summary, obligational authority, table, 73
Support activities, 78
Defense, national:
Function, 64
Outlays, table, 71
Outlays and recommended budget authority
for, by program or agency, 71
Program analysis, 70-79
Defense Civil Preparedness Agency, 231-232
Defense Manpower Commission, 311
Defense Officer Personnel Management Act, 77
Defense outlays, 4, 8
Defense preparedness, 4, 70
Defense production, expansion of, 207
Defense programs, 8-9
Defense spending, 67
Deferral, definition, 170
Deficit, budget, 4
Deficit or surplus, budget, table, 1789-1976, 367
Deficit or surplus, table, 6, 25, 171
Definite budget authority, definition, 170
Definition of terms, 167-173
Delaware River Basin Commission, 302
Dental Research, National Institute of, 238
Development, rural, 64
Development, urban, 65
Development assistance, economic, 222-223
Development assistance, international, 209-210
Development loans, international, 209
Development Service, Rural, 216-217
Direct loans, 6, 112, 119
Disability fund, Civil Service, 136, 139
Disability insurance, Federal, 136, 139, 244
Disabled, aid to, 140
Disadvantaged benefits, 15
Disarmament, see Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
Disaster relief, 65, 100, 113, 118, 207
Discrimination, see Civil Rights
Disease Control, Center for, 238
Diseases, prevention and control, 133-134
District of Columbia, 295
District of Columbia, Commission on the Organization of the Government of the, 311
District of Columbia, Federal payment to, 65,
157,159
District of Columbia, loans to, 116
District of Columbia, rapid transit, 106-107
District of Columbia Self-Government and
Government Reorganization Act, 159
District Courts, 202-203
Domestic assistance, discussion, 14-18
Domestic assistance outlays, 9
Domestic civil spending, 67
Domestic Council, 205
Domestic and International Business Administration, 223

373

INDEX
Drug Abuse, Mental Health, and Alcohol
Administration, 239-240
Drug Abuse, National Commission on Marihuana and, 312
Drug Abuse Prevention, Special Action Office
for, 132,206
Drug addiction, 132
Drug Enforcement Administration, 263

Earth Resources Technology Satellite, 90
Economic Advisers, Council of, 205
Economic assistance, foreign, see Foreign
assistance,
Economic assumptions, discussion, 40-42
Economic assumptions, table, 1973—80, 41
Economic Development Administration, 117,
222-223
Economic development assistance, 222-223
Economic growth, 4
Economic Opportunity, Office of, 116
Economic Policy, Council on International, 205
Economic projections, 41
Economic recovery, 3-4
Economic Research Service, Agriculture Department, 213
Economic stabilization activities, 207
Economic Statistics Administration, Social and,
222
Economic stimulus, discussion, 55-56
Economic Survey of Agriculture, 100, 102
Education:
Aid to school districts, 122-123
Black institutions, 123
Child development, 121, 123
Civil rights, 245
Disadvantage^ 122-123
Elementary and secondary, 120-123, 241
Federally impacted areas, 121-123
Grants to States, 120-123
Handicapped, 122-123, 241
Health manpower, 133
Higher, 120, 123-124, 133,241
Indians, 24
International exchange activities, 86, 268
Occupational, 241
Postsecondary, 120, 124
Research, 121-124
State and local government spending, 66
Student aid, 121, 123, 133,242
Veterans, 143-146
Vocational and adult, 121-123, 241
Education, manpower, and social services:
Function, 65
Outlays and recommended budget authority
by program or agency, 121
Program analysis, 120-128
Education, National Commission on the
Financing of Postsecondary, 312
Education, National Institute of, 124, 242
Education, Office of, 241-242
Education, Office of the Assistant Secretary for.
242
Educational Cooperation, National Commission on, 267




Eisenhower College grants, 277
Elderly, see Aged
Election Commission, Federal, 296
Election Fund Transfers, National Commission
on, 312
Electronic Surveillance, National Commission
for the Review of Federal and State Laws
Relating to Wiretapping and, 311
Emergency credit programs, 103
Emergency employment assistance, 121, 127,
263
Emergency energy sharing, 80
Emergency funds, Presidential, 207
Emergency Jobs and Unemployment Assistance
Act, 7
Emergency Loan Guarantee Board, 295
Emergency military assistance for Cambodia,
208
Emergency preparedness, see Defense Civil
Preparedness Agency
Emergency rail facilities restoration, 274
Emergency school assistance, 241
Emergency security assistance for Israel, 208
Emergency unemployment assistance, 10
Emergency Unemployment Compensation Act,
Employee Retirement Income Security Act,

127, 154

Employees, Federal, see Federal employees
Employment, Federal civilian, summary by
agency, table, 330
Employment, full, 45-46. 54-55
Employment assistance, temporary, 125, 263
Employment Assistance Act, National, 7
Employment Opportunity Commission, Equal
158, 295-296
Employment services, Federal-State, 121,

126-127

Employment Standards Administration, 264
Endangered Species Act, 99
Energy:
Conservation, 92
Discussion, 10-12
Domestic resource development, 4
Domestic resources, 11-12, 95
Fossil, 95
Geothermal and solar, 12, 95
Nuclear, 12, 95
Research and development, 4, 43, 92-93,
95-96, 281
Regulation, 95
Energy Administration, Federal, 94-95, 297
Energy and minerals, 98, 255-256
Energy programs, 4, 64, 93-96, 280-281
Energy Research and Development Administration, 12, 88, 91, 92, 94, 280-281
Energy self-reliance, 4
Energy tax equalization payments, 158-159
Energy tax offsets, 56-57
Energy tax proposals, discussion, 55-56
Energy taxes, 54, 56
Engineers, Corps of, see Corps of Engineers
Engraving and Printing, Bureau of, 277-278
Environmental Financing Authority, 33, 167
Environmental Health Science, National
Institute of, 238
Environmental protection, 92

374

T H E BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

Environmental Protection Agency, 281-282
Environmental Quality, Office of and Council
on, 205
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission,
295-296
Erosion control, 97
Estate and gift taxes, 44, 45, 55
Exchange of cash, 173
Exchange Commission, Securities and, 308
Exchange stabilization fund, 167
Excise tax, 44, 45, 54, 55, 60, 62
Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries,
Commission on, 311
Executive Office of the President, 153, 204-206
Executive Residence, 153, 204
Expenditures:
National income accounts, table, 1965-76,
365
Tax, 67-69, 86, 94-95, 98, 103, 106, 111-112,
159
Export-Import Bank, 33, 81, 86-87, 167
Export programs, Agriculture Department,
214-215
Export promotion program, 86
Extension Service, Agriculture Department, 213
Eye Institute, National, 238

Facilities, construction of, see Construction
Fair housing, 251
Family housing, Defense Department, 231
Farm Credit Administration, 103, 296
Farm Mortgage Corporation, Federal, 276
Farmer Cooperative Service, 214
Farmers Home Administration, 110, 117, 217
Farms:
Income stabilization, 100-103
Loans, 103
Federal Aid to State and local governments,
transition table, 190-193
Federal Aviation Administration, 271-272
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 150, 262
Federal Communications Commission, 296
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, 100, 216
Federal debt, 6, 24-29, 33, 321, 331, 366
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 296
Federal Election Commission, 296
Federal employees:
Life insurance program, 30, 31
Pay increase, 41
Pay increase ceiling, 4, 7-8
Retirement and disability fund, 136, 139
Retirement program, 30, 31
Federal Energy Administration, 94-95, 297
Federal Farm Mortgage Corporation, 276
Federal finances and gross national product
table, 1954-76, 366
Federal Financing Bank, 33, 167
Federal funds, explanation, 24, 168
Federal Highway Administration, 104-106,
272-273
Federal Home Loan Bank Board, 297
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, 34,
109
Federal Housing Administration, 110, 247-248
Federal Insurance Administration, 250




1976

Federal intrafund transactions, definition, 173
Federal Judicial Center, 203
Federal Labor Relations Council, 292
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, 276
Federal Maritime Commission, 297
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service,
297-298
Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety
Board of Review, 298
Federal National Mortgage Association, 34, 109
Federal Pay, Advisory Commission on, 291
Federal payments to individuals and aid to
State and local governments, 9-10,14-15
Federal Power Commission, 95, 298
Federal Prison System, 262
Federal procurement policy, 153
Federal Procurement Policy, Office of, 206
Federal program, analysis by function, 63-160
Federal program by agency and account, 197—
318
Federal Railroad Administration, 274-275
Federal Reserve System, 167
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, 297
Federal spending, 7, 49, 66
Federal spending, moratorium on new, 4
Federal Supply Service, 283
Federal Trade Commission, 298
Fertilizer prices, 10
Financial institutions, international, 83
Financial Operations, Bureau of Government,
276
Financing, means of, 331
Financing facility, special, 81, 85, 210
Fine Arts, Commission of, 293
Fire Prevention and Control, National
Commission on, 312
Firearms, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and, 277
Fiscal outlook:
Discussion, 43-46
Table, 1974-80, 44
Fiscal policy, discussion, 3-5
Fiscal year, new, 162
Fiscal year, new, transition, 4, 178-179
Fish and Wildlife Service, 99, 254
Fisheries, International commissions, 268
Five year projections, Federal outlays and
receipts, 42-43
Flood control, 97
Flood Disaster Protection Act, 118
Flood insurance, 118, 250
Food assistance, 141 -142
Food costs, increase in, 12
Food and Drug Administration, 237
Food and Nutrition Service, 219
Food for Peace, 81, 83, 85, 87, 103
Food shortages, 14
Food stamp program, 15, 32, 136, 141-142, 219
Food stamps outlays, 8, 16
Forces, combat and support, 70
Foreign affairs, conduct and administration of,
86, 266-267
Foreign agricultural assistance, 214-215
Foreign Agricultural Service, 214
Foreign assistance, 14, 78, 81, 208-209
Foreign Claims Settlement Commission, 299

375

INDEX
Foreign information and exchange activities,
81,86
Foreign military sales, 83
Foreign Policy, Commission on the organization of the Government for the Conduct of,
311
Foreign policy, discussion, 12-14
Forest and Range Renewal Resources Planning
Act, 98
Forest Service, 92-93, 98, 220-221
Forests, protection and management, 220-221
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission, 300
Fuel conservation, 10-11
Full employment, 45746, 54-55
Functional classification, 64-67, 167
Funds, types of, explanation, 168
Funds appropriated to the President, 207-211

Gallaudet College, 123, 245
Gambling, Commission on the Review of the
National Policy Toward, 311
General Accounting Office, 153, 200
General fund, explanation, 168
General government:
Function, 65
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by function or agency, 154
Program analysis, 153-156
General purposes forces, defense, 73, 74-75, 79
General Revenue Sharing, 17, 158-159, 279
General science, 64, 90-91, 280
General science, space, and technology:
Function, 64, 65
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program, 88
Program analysis, 88-91
General Services Administration, 154-155,
283-286

Geological Survey, 88, 91, 255
Government National Mortgage Association,
109,247-248
Government Printing Office, 200
Government Procurement, Commission on, 311
Government spending, 66
Government-sponsored agency loans, 6
Government-sponsored enterprises, 32-36, 167
Grain exports, 100
Grants, see under particular purpose
Grazing fees, 159
Gross national product:
Federal debt as a percent of, 25-26, 366
Federal finances and, table, 1954-76, 366
Increase, 41
Ground transportation, 104-107
Guaranteed and insured loans, 6
H
Handicapped:
Assistance, 128
Education of, 122-123,241
Housing for, 247




Handicapped, Committee for the Purchase of
Products and Services of the Blind and Other
Severely, 294
Harry S Truman Scholarship Foundation, 299
Head Start, 116, 123
Health:
Domestic civil spending, 67
Education and training, 133
Facilities, see Hospital and health facilities
Function, 65
Indians, 131,238
Insurance, 244
Manpower, 133
Mental, 132
Merchant seamen, 131
Mining and minerals industries, 244
Occupational, 133
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 130
Program analysis, 129-134
Services and planning, 134
Health, Education, and Welfare, Department
of, 28, 237-247
Health, National Institutes of, 238-239
Health, Office of the Assistant Secretary for,
240-241

Health care services, 129-133, 243
Health Administration, Occupational Safety
and, 265
Health Care Expansion Act, 147
Health Resources Administration, 240
Health Safety Review Commission, Occupational, 307
Health Sciences, John E. Fogarty International
Center for Advanced Study in the, 239
Health Services Administration, 237-238
Heart and Lung Institute, National, 238
Higher education, 123-124, 133, 241
Highway Administration, Federal, 272-273
Highway Beautification, Commission on, 311
Highway Traffic Safety Administration, National, 274
Highways:
Baltimore-Washington Parkway, 273
Darien Gap, 272
Interstate, 104-106
Safety, 104-106, 274
Scenic and recreational, 272
Historical commissions, 299-300
Historical data, 1966-76, 66
Home Loan Bank Board, Federal, 297
Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Federal, 109
Home Owners' Loan Corporation, liquidation
of, 276
Hospital insurance, Federal, 244
Hospitals and health facilities:
Construction, 134, 144, 147-148
Mental health centers, 132
Veterans, 144, 146-148, 288
House of Representatives, 197
Housing:
Assistance, 140-141,249
College, 247
Commercial market, 65
Counseling services, 248
Disaster assistance, 249

376

T H E BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

Housing—Continued
Elderly, 247
Equal opportunity in, 251
Handicapped, 247
Low income, 65, 141
Management programs, 248-249
Mortgage market, 110
Payments, 30, 31-32
Production and mortage credit, 247-248
Public, low-rent, 140-141,247
Rural, 110
Subsidized program, 24, 140-141
Veterans, 144, 146-147
Housing Administration, Federal, 247-248
Housing for the Elderly or Handicapped Fund,
33,167
Housing and Urban Development, Department
of, 28, 113,247-251
Howard University, 123, 245
Human development, 245
Human resources programs, 9-10, 15-17, 67
Human service delivery programs, 120, 128
Humanitarian assistance, 82
Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts
and the, 124, 304-305

I
Immigration and Naturalization Service, 150,
262
Income security:
Domestic civil spending, 67
Function, 65
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 136
Program analysis, 135-142
Income tax, 44, 45, 54, 55
Indefinite budget authority, definition, 170
Indian Affairs, Bureau of, 117, 258-259
Indian Claims Commission, 300
Indian Financing Act of 1974, 117
Indian Opportunity, National Council on, 304
Indian programs, 113-114, 117
Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, 117
Indians:
Claims, 131
Education and welfare, 131, 241
Health services and facilities, 131, 238
Klamath, forest lands, 98
Programs, 128
Individuals, aid to, 9-10, 14-15
Indochina, assistance to, 14
Indochina postwar reconstruction assistance, 81,
82-84, 209
Industry and commerce, promotion of, 223-224
Inflation, 3
Information Agency, United States, 81, 86, 313—
314
Information Science, National Commission on
Libraries and, 304
Insurance:
Disability, Federal, 136, 139, 244
Flood, 250
Health, 244
Hospital and medical, 244




1976

Insurance—Continued
Life, 144-145
Mortgage, 109
Old-age and survivors, Federal, 136, 244
Social, 44, 45
Unemployment, 136, 139
Veterans, 144-145. 288-289
Insurance Administration, Federal, 250
Insurance Corporation, Federal Deposit, 296
Intelligence and communications, 73
Inter-American Development Bank, 84
Inter-American Foundation, 83, 85, 209
Interest:
Function, 65
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 160
Public debt, 160,279
Interfund transactions, definition, 172-173
Intergovernmental agencies, 301-302
Intergovernmental Relations, Advisory Commission on, 301
Intergovernmental revolving funds, explanation, 168
Interior, Department of the, 94, 113, 252-261
Internal Revenue Service, 154, 159, 278-279
International Aeronautical Exposition, United
States, 271
International affairs:
Federal spending, 67
Function, 64
International affairs and finance:
Outlays and recommended budget authority
by function or agency, 81
Program analysis, 80-87
International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico, 267
International Broadcasting, Board for, 72, 86,
291
International Business Administration, Domestic and, 223
International Center, Washington, D.C., 269
International commissions, 267-268
International cooperation, 80
International Decade of Ocean Exploration, 91
International Development, Agency for, 84-85
International development assistance, 81-85,
209-210
International Economic Policy, Council on, 205
International educational exchange activities,
86, 268
International Energy Agency, 14
International energy program, 80
International financial institutions, 83, 209
International fisheries commissions, 268
International lending organizations, obligations
to, 173-174
International Monetary Fund, 80, 173
International narcotics control, 81, 83, 85
International organizations and conferences, 83,
267
International organizations and programs, 84,
209
International peacekeeping activities, 267
International programs, agricultural, 214-215
International security assistance, 208
International security supporting assistance, 81,
83-84

377

INDEX
International trade, 80
International Trade Commission, 303
International trade negotiations, 267
Interstate Commerce Commission, 303
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin, 302
Interstate Highway System, 17
Interstate Land Sales Registration, Office of, 250
Intrabudgetary transactions, definition, 172
Intragovernmental transactions, definition, 172
Israel, emergency security assistance for, 83-84
Israel, military credit sales, 83-84, 208

J
Jobs for Veterans, 148
John E. Fogarty International Center for
Advanced Studies in the Health Sciences, 239
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing
Arts, 255,309
Judicial Center, Federal, 203
Judicial Salaries, Commission on Executive,
Legislative, and, 311
Judiciary, The, 201-204
Justice, Department of, 128, 149-152, 261-263
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Act of 1974,128

Labor, Department of, 263-266
Labor-Management Services Administration,
264
Labor Relations Board, National, 305
Labor Relations Council, Federal, 292
Labor Statistics, Bureau of, 265
Land:
Retirement programs, long-term, 100
Sales, interstate, 250
Land forces, defense, 74-75, 79
Land Law Review Commission, Public, 312
Land Management, Bureau of, 93, 98, 252
Land management, public 97-98
Land Use Planning Commission for Alaska,
Joint Federal-State, 310-311
Land and water conservation fund, 99
Law enforcement:
Activities, 150
Assistance, State and local governments, 149,
150, 152
State and local government spending, 66
Law Enforcement Assistance Administration,
150, 152, 263
Law enforcement and justice:
Function, 65
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 150
Program analysis, 149-152
Law Enforcement Training Center, Federal, 276
Legal activities, Justice Department, 261-262
Legal Services Corporation, 116, 150, 152, 303
Legislation, proposed transition, 178
Legislative, and Judicial Salaries, Commission
on Executive, 311
Legislative branch, 197-201
Legislative proposals for major new and expanded programs, 1975-80, 356-357




Lexington Clinical Research Center, 240
Liabilities in deposit fund accounts, 173
Libraries and Information Science, National
Commission on, 304
Libraries and library services, 124
Library, National Agricultural, 213
Library of Congress, 198-200
Library of Medicine, National, 239
Library resources, 241
Life insurance, see Insurance
Loan Bank Board, Federal Home, 297
Loan Guarantee Board, Emergency, 295
Loan guarantees, Veterans Administration, 143
144,146-147,289
Loans, see particular kind
Long-range assumptions, 41
Long-range budget outlook, 42-52
Long-range budget projections, discussion, 42
Low-rent public housing, 247

M
Mammal Commission, Marine, 303
Management and Budget, Office of, 162-163,
206
Management improvement, Federal Government, 208
Manned space flight, 8&-90. 286
Manpower, program analysis, 124-127
Manpower Administration, 263-264
Manpower development and training, 120, 121,
124-127
Manpower programs:
Analysis, 120-128
Outlays and recommended budget authority
by program or agency, 121
Marihuana and Drug Abuse, National Commission on, 312
Marine Mammal Commission, 303
Marine Mammal Protection Act, 99
Maritime Administration, 226
Maritime Commission, Federal, 297
Marketing services, agricultural, 214, 218-219
Mass transit, 105-106
Materials Policy, National Commission on, 312
Means of financing budget, 331
Meat inspection, 65
Mediation Board, National, 305
Mediation and Conciliation Service, Federal,
297-298
Medicaid, 10, 15, 17, 30, 31, 129-131
Medical care, veterans, 144, 146-148, 288
Medical insurance, Federal, 244
Medical research, Veterans Administration, 288
Medical Sciences, National Institute of General, 238
Medicare, 10, 15, 17, 30, 31, 129-131
Medicine, National Library of, 239
Memorial commissions, 299-300
Mental Health Administration, Alcohol, Drug
Abuse and, 239-240
Mental health centers, 132
Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Board of
Review, Federal, 298
Mexico, International Boundary and Water
Commission, United States, and, 267
Middle-East, assistance to, 14

378

T H E BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

Middle-East special requirements fund, 81,
83-84,210
Migrant and refugee assistance, 81, 83, 85, 268
Military Appeals, Court of, 229
Military assistance, 14, 71, 81, 82-83, 208
Military assistance program, 78
Military construction, see Construction, Defense—Military
Military personnel:
Active forces, 79
Pay increases, 71
Retired forces, 228
Summary, table, 79
Training, 76-77
Military programs, 9
Military readiness, 70
Military strength, 70
Milk program, special, 219
Mine Safety Board of Review, Federal Metal
and Nonmetallic, 298
Mineral leasing programs, 91, 159
Mineral resources:
Program, 98
Research, 98
Miners, disabled, benefits for, 136
Mines, Bureau of, 256
Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration, 256
Mining health and safety, 244
Minority Business Enterprise, Office of, 111112,224
Mint, Bureau of the, 278
Missiles, 73-74
Model Cities programs, 249
Monetary power, exercise of the, 173
Mortgage Association, Government National,
109, 247-248
Mortgage credit and thrift insurance, 108—111
Mortgage insurance, 109
Mortgage market, 110
Multilateral assistance, 209
Multilateral development assistance, 81, 83-84
Multilateral trade negotiations, 80
Mutual and balanced force reductions in
Europe with the Warsaw Pact countries, 70

N
National advisory commissions, see under more
specific titles
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 65, 108, 286-287
National Aeronautics and Space Council, 205
National Agricultural Library, 213
National Air and Space Museum, 156
National Alliance for Businessmen, 148
National Archives and Records Service, 156,
283-284
National Board for Promotion of Rifle Practice,
229
National Capital airports, 271
National Capital Planning Commission, 303
National Capital Region, 65
National Cemetery System, 148
National Center for Atmospheric Research, 91




1976

National commissions, committees and councils, see under more specific titles
National Credit Union Administration, 304
National defense, Federal spending, 67
National Fire Prevention and Control Administration, 116, 225
National Forest Service, 159
National Foundation of the Arts and the
Humanities, 124, 304-305
National Gallery of Art, 309
National Guard, 76
National Health Service Corps, 132-133
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 274
National income accounts, transactions in,
table, 1965-76, 365
National Institute of Education, 124, 242
National Institutes of Health, 238-239
See also under particular name
National Labor Relations Board, 305
National Library of Medicine, 239
National Mass Transportation and Assistance
Act of 1974, 104, 106
National Mediation Board, 305
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 99, 224-225
National Park Service, 99, 156, 254-255
National Railroad Passenger Corporation
(AMTRAK), 274
National Science Foundation, 64, 88, 90-91,
305-306
National security, discussion, 12-14
National Security Council, 205
National Service Life Insurance, 144, 289
National Technical Institute for the Deaf, 245
National Transportation Safety Board, 306
National Water Commission, 312
National Wool Act, 100
Native American program, 128
NATO, 13, 70
Natural gas, taxes on, 4
Natural resources, environment, and energy:
Function, 64
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 93
Program analysis, 92-99
Naval force?, 13-14, 75,79
Naval Petroleum Reserve, 11, 77-78, 229, 232
Naval strength, 70
Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National
Institute of, 238
New Communities Administration, 250
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO),
13,70
Nuclear arms control, 13
Nuclear energy, 12
Nuclear energy development and production, 64
Nuclear and physical life sciences research, 64
Nuclear powerplants, 94
Nuclear reactors, 95
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 12,92,95, 306
Nuclear weapons, 13, 78
Nutrition, 136, 141-142
Nutrition Service, Food and, 219

379

INDEX

Obligations, explanation, 169
Obligations incurred, by agency, summary,
table, 328
Obligations incurred, explanation, 170
Occupational education, 241
Occupational health and safety, 133
Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 265
Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, 307
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
National, 224-225
Off-budget agencies, 32-36
Offsetting receipts, by type, 335-337
Offsetting receipts, definition, 171 -173
Oil, decontrol of prices, 4
Oil, dependence on imported, 4
Oil, increased fee on imported, 4
Oil, tariff on, 54
Oil and gas leasing, 98
Oil and gas leasing, Outer Continental Shelf, 94
Oil prices, 14

Oil prices, decontrol of, 54
Oil prices, increase, 10, 80
Old-age and survivors insurance, Federal, 136,
244
Older Americans volunteer program, 116
Open-end programs and fixed costs, 48-49
Organization of the Government for the Conduct of Foreign Policy, Commission on the,
311
Organization of the Government of the District
of Columbia, Commission on the, 311
Outdoor Recreation, Bureau of, 254
Outer Continental Shelf, 11, 64, 65, 91, 92, 94
Outlays:
1941-76, 66, 67
1974 actual, 71

1975 estimate, 71
1976 estimate, 71
Aeronautical technology, 65
Agriculture, by program or agency, 100
As a percent of gross national product, table,
1954-76, 366
By agency, for each account and functional
code, 197-318

By agency, totals, table 1976-80, 52
By agency, transition table, 182
By function, totals, table, 1966-76, 360-364
By function, totals, table, 1976-80, 50
By function, transition table, 181, 187-189
By function and agency, 338-353
Commerce and transportation, 104
Commodity Credit Corporation, 103, 179
Community and regional development, 113114

Conservation and land management, 97-98
Control, 19
Controllability, discussion, 48-49
Controllability, table, 1967-76, 354-355
Controllability, table, 1976-80, 48
Defense, 8
Defense, national, table, 71
Defense programs, 4




Outlays—Continued
Discussion, 64-67
Domestic assistance, 9
Education, manpower, and social services,
121

Education programs, 120-121
Energy programs, 93-96
Energy research and development, 12
Explanation, 170-171
Federal employees life insurance program,
30,31
Federal employees retirement programs, 30,31
Federal funds, table, 1974-76, 28
Fiscal outlook, table, 1974-80, 44
Five year projections, 42-43
Food stamps, 8, 16
From budget authority available through
current action by Congress, table, 325
Full-employment, 45—46
Full-employment, table, 1974-80, 46
General Government, by program or agency,
154

General revenue sharing, 157
General science, space and technology, 88
Health, by program or agency, 129-130
Housing payments, 30, 31-32
Income security, by program or agency, 136
Increases, 4, 8, 10
Individuals, aid to, 10
Interest, 160
International affairs, 67
International affairs and finance, by program
or agency, 80
Law enforcement and justice, 149-150
Medicaid, 10, 30, 31
Medicare, 10, 30, 31
National defense, 67
Natural resources, environment and energy,
by program or agency, 93
Natural resources programs, 99
Net interest, 32
Off-budget agencies and Government-sponsored enterprises, 32-36
Off-budget agencies and Government-sponsponsored enterprises, table, 1954-76, 34
Percentage distribution, table, 1941-76, 66
Price support loans, 32
Public assistance, 30, 32
Railroad retirement, 8, 30, 31
Reduction of, 7
Relation to budget authority, chart, 23
Relation to budget authority, summary,
table, 326-327
Retired pay, military, 8
Retirement, Federal employees, 8
Social security, 8, 10, 30, 31
Space, 89
State and local governments, 10
Summary:
By agency, table, 323
By function, table, 322
By function, table, 1941-76, 66
Table, 321
Supplemental security income, 8, 10
Table, 1974-76, 3
Tennessee Valley Authority, 97
Total, 4

380

T H E BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

Outlays—Continued
Total, by major category as a percent of gross
national product (GNP), 67
Total, table, uncontrollable, 1974, 30
Total projected, 44
Totals, by function, table, 1941-76, 66
Totals, table, 1789-1976, 367
Totals, table, 1941-76, 67
Totals, table, 1974-76, 6
Transition, 179
Uncontrollable, 29-32
Uncontrollable, table, 1967-76, 354-355
Under current programs, 44
Under proposed programs, 44
Unemployment assistance, 30, 31
Unemployment insurance, 10
Unified budget, table, 1954-76, 34
Veterans benefits, 30, 31
Veterans benefits and services, by program or
agency, 144
Overseas Private Investment Corporation, 83^
84, 86, 209
P
Packers and stockyards, 214
Panama, Republic of, payment to, 269
Panama Canal, 235-236
Panama Canal Company, 236
Park Service, National, 99, 156, 254-255
Participation sales authorizations, Government
National Mortgage Association, 248
Patent Appeals and Customs, Court of, 202
Patent and Trademark, Office, 112, 225
Pay, Advisory Committee on Federal, 291
Peace Corps, 81, 85-86, 290
Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation, 307
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, 33, 35,
127, 167
Pensions, veterans, 143-145, 287-288
Permanent budget authority, definition, 170
Personal property activities, General Services
Administration, 283
Personnel, full time permanent, summary,
table, 330
Pesticides control, 96
Petroleum, taxes on, 4
Philippines, Veterans Administration grants,
288
Planetary exploration, 90
Planning Commission, National Capital, 303
Plant Health Inspection Service, Animal and,
212
Policy development and research, 250
Pollution:
Abatement and control, 92-93, 96, 281
Water, 92-93, 96
Population growth, 3
Population Growth and the American Future,
Commission on, 311
Postal Service, 35, 104, 110-111, 307
Postal Service fund, 33, 167
Potomac River Basin, Interstate Commission
on the, 302
Poultry inspection, 65
Power Commission, Federal, 298
Power development, 97




1976

Power projects, 92
Preparedness, Office of, 284-285
President, The:
Budget message of, 3-20
Compensation, 204
Emergency fund, 207
Funds appropriated to, 207-211
Special assistance, 205
Special projects, 204
Unanticipated personnel needs, 207
President, Executive Office of the, 153, 204-206
Presidential candidates, protection of, 150
President's foreign assistance contingency fund,
81,83.85,210
President's veterans program, 148
Price Stability, Council on Wage and, 206
Price support programs, 100, 103, 216
Printing and Engraving, Bureau of, 277-278
Prison System, Federal, 262
Prisons, Bureau of, 262
Procurement, Commission on Government, 311
Procurement, defense, 229-230
Procurement Policy, Office of Federal, 206
Product Safety Commission, Consumer, 294
Productivity, National Commission on, 312
Professional Standards Review Organizations
(PSRO's), 132-133
Property:
Management and disposal, 154-155, 284
Personal, 283
Real, 283
Proprietary receipts from the public, definition,
172
Prosthetic research, Veterans Administration,
288
Public assistance, 30, 32, 136, 139-142
Public assistance, grants to States, 243
Public buildings, see Buildings, grounds, and
sites
Public Buildings Service, 283
Public debt:
As a percent of gross national product,
1954-76, table, 366
Increase in, 25
Interest, 160
Interest on, 23, 279
Limit, table, 1974-76, 27
Outstanding, 321,331
Outstanding, table, 1974-76, 25
Outstanding, totals, table, 1974-76, 6
Public Debt, Bureau of the, 278
Public enterprise revolving funds, explanation, 168
Public Health Service, 241
Public housing, low-rent, 247
Public housing leasing program, 140
Public Land Law Review Commission, 312
Public Law 83-480, see Agricultural Trade
Development and Assistance Act
Public works, acceleration, 210
Puerto Rico, 157, 159
R
Radio Free Europe, 86
Radio Liberty, 86
Rail crossings, 272

INDEX
Rail freight system, 106
Rail service assistance, 274
Railroad Administration, Federal, 274-275
Railroad Passenger Corporation, National,
(AMTRAK), 274
Railroad research, 274
Railroad retirement, 136
Railroad Retirement, Commission on, 311
Railroad Retirement Board, 307
Railroad retirement outlays, 8, 30-31
Railroad safety, 274
Railroad and truck regulation, 104-105, 107
Railroads, 105-107
Railway Association, United States, 33,167,314
Readjustment benefits, veterans, 30-31, 288
Real property activities, General Services
Administration, 283
Receipts:
Analysis, 61-62
Authority to spend debt, 169
Budget, 171-173
By source, discussion, 59-61
By source, projected, table, 1976-80, 44
By source, summary, table, 322-334
By source, table, 1966-76, 358-359
By source, transition table, 181, 185-186
Changes in, table, 1974-76,59
Discussion, 171-173
Federal funds, table, 1974-76, 28
Five year projections, 42-43
Fiscal outlook, table 1974-80, 44
Full-employment, 45-46, 54-55
Full-employment, table, 1974-80,46
Increase, 4, 19, 54
Intergovernmental, 65
National income accounts, table, 1965-76,
365
Offsetting, by type, summary, table, 335-337
Offsetting, definition, 171-173
Offsetting, discussion, 64
Offsetting, undistributed, 65
President's tax proposals, effect of, 58
Projections, discussion, 44
Relation to gross national product, table,
1954-76,366
Summary, 54-55
Summary, by source, table, 322
Summary, by source, table, 1974-76, 55
Summary, table, 321
Summary, totals, transition table, 185-186
Table, 1974-76,3
Total, 4,54
Total projected, 44
Totals, table, 1974-76,6,55
Totals, table, 1789-76,367
Transition, 179
Recession, 3
Reclamation, Bureau of, 97,252-253
Reconstruction Finance Corporation, liquidation fund, 276, 285
Records activities, 154-155,283-284
Records and Documents of Federal Officials,
National Commission on, 312
Recreation, Bureau of Outdoor, 254
Recreational resources, 93,98-99
Refugees, assistance to, 243,268




381

Regional Action Planning Commissions, 117,
223
Regional development, 117
Regional management, environmental protection, 281
Regulatory policy, review of, 112
Rehabilitation:
Services, 128
Vocational, 144-146
Reimbursements and refunds, definition, 172
Renegotiation Board, 308
Rent supplement, 141
Rental housing assistance programs, 141
Rescission, definition, 170
Research:
Agricultural, 102, 212
Biomedical, 133
Economic, Agriculture Department, 213
Educational, 121-124
Housing and community development, 116
Housing and Urban Development, Department of, 250
Medical and prosthetic, Veterans Administration, 288
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 286-287
National Science Foundation, 88, 90-91
Railroad, 274
Space, 88
Water resources, 253
Research and development:
Defense-Military, 76, 230-231
Energy, 4, 43, 95-96, 281
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 286
Reserve forces, 76
Reserve personnel, see Military personnel
Resource development, domestic energy, 4
Resources Council, Water, 314
Resources and technology, space, 64
Retired pay, Defense, Department of, 71
Retired pay, military, outlays, 8
Retirement, Federal employees outlays, 8
Retirement fund, Civil Service, 136
Revenue sharing, general, 17, 279
Revenue Sharing, Office of, 158-159, 276
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal
assistance:
Function, 65
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 157
Program analysis, 157-159
Revolution Bicentennial Administration, American, 299-300
Revolving funds, definition, 172
River basin commissions, 314
Roosevelt, Franklin Delano, Memorial Commission, 300
Rural development, 64
Rural Development Service, 216-217
Rural electric and telephone loans, 117
Rural Electrification Administration, 33, 217
Rural electrification and telephone revolving
fund, 33, 167
Rural housing, 64, 110
Rural Telephone Bank, 33, 167
Ryukyu Islands, Army, 235

382

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Safe Drinking Water Act, 97
Safety:
Aviation, 18,271
Boating, 270
Highway and motor carrier, 272
Manpower, 65
Mining and minerals industries, 244
Occupational, 133
Safety Administration, Mining Enforcement
and, 256
Safety Board, National Transportation, 306
Safety Board of Review, Federal Metal and
Nonmetallic Mine, 298
Safety Commission, Consumer Product, 294
Safety and Health Administration, Occupational, 265
Safety Review Commission, Occupational
Health, 307
Saint Elizabeths Hospital, 131-132, 239
Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation, 275
Salaries, Commission on Executive, Legislative,
and Judicial, 311
Scholarship Foundation, Harry S Truman, 299
School assistance in federally affected areas, 241
School lunch program, 141-142
Science, general, 64, 90-91
Science, National Commission on Libraries and
Information, 304
Science education, 212
Science Foundation, National, 64, 88, 90-91,

305-306
Science and technical research, 225
Scientific Cooperation, National Commission
on, 267
SCORE/ACE, 116
Sealift, forces, 73, 76, 79
Secret Service, U.S., 150,279
Securities and Exchange Commission, 308
Security assistance, international, 208
Security Council, National, 205
Security income, supplemental, 15
Security income outlays, supplemental, 8, 10
Security income program, supplemental, 32, 128
Security supporting assistance, international,
81,83-84,208
Seigniorage, 173
Selective Service System, 78, 308
Senate. U S . , 197
Servicemen's Group Life Insurance Fund, 289
Sewage treatment facilities, 93, 96
Sewer grants, water and, 114
Shipbuilding, Commission on American, 311
Shipping, ocean, 226
Ships, construction, 13-14, 108
Small Business Administration,
111-112,
308-309
Smithsonian Institution, 124, 156, 309-310
Social and Economic Statistics Administration, 222
Social insurance, 44-45, 54-55
Social and Rehabilitation Service, 243
Social security, 15, 60, 62, 137-138
Social Security Administration, 243-244
Social security outlays, 8, 10, 30-31
Social services, 65




FISCAL

YEAR

1976

Social services, analysis, 120-128
Social services program analysis, 127-128
Soil Conservation Service, 97, 218
Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, U.S., 235
South Vietnam, assistance to, 14, 78
South Vietnam, military assistance, 83-54, 232
Southeastern Power Administration, 257
Southwestern Power Administration, 257
Space Administration, National Aeronautics
and, 65
Space exploration, 90
Space programs, 286-287
Space research and technology, outlays and
recommended budget authority, by program,
88-90
Space resources and technology, 64
Space science, applications and technology, 88,
90
Space shuttle, 89-90
Space technology, 286
Spanish-Speaking People, Cabinet Committee
on Opportunities for, 292
Special Action Office for Drug Abuse Prevention, 132,206
Special financing facility, 210
Special funds, explanation, 168
Special Representative for Trade Negotiations,

206
State, Department of, 81, 86-87, 266-269
State and local assistance, 15
State and local governments, aid to, 9-10,14-15
State and local governments, Federal aid to,
transition table, 190-193
State and local governments spending, 66
States:
Boating safety assistance, 270
Employment service, 126-127
Federal grants-in-aid, 17
Highway safety programs, 272, 274
Law enforcement assistance, 149, 152
Nursing homes, veterans, 147
Pollution control programs, 92-93, 96
Public assistance grants, 136, 140, 243
Revenue sharing and general purpose assistance, 157-159
Social services, grants to, 127-128
Statistical activities:
Agriculture, Department of, 213
Commerce, Department of, 112, 222
Labor, Department of, 265
Statistical Reporting Service, 213
Statistics, Bureau of Labor, 265
Statistics Administration, Social and Eco
nomic, 222
Stockyards, 214
Strategic arms limitation with the Soviet Union,
70,80
Strategic forces, 79
Strategic forces, defense, 72-74
Strategic nuclear systems, 70
Strategic petroleum storage program, 92
Strategic stockpile commodities, 78-79
Strategic systems, 70
Student aid, 121, 123,133
Student loan insurance fund, 242
Student Loan Marketing Association, 34
Submarines, 76

383

INDEX
Subversive Activities Control Board, 310
Sugar Act program, 100, 102
Summary tables, explanation of, 320
Supersonic aircraft development termination,

271

Supplemental authority, 166
Supplemental security income, 15, 140
Supplemental security income outlays, 8, 10
Supplemental security income program, 32, 128,
140, 244
Supplies and Shortages, National Commission
on, 312
Supply Service, Federal, 283
Supreme Court of the United States, 152, 201—
202
Surplus or deficit, 6, 25, 171
Surplus or deficit, table, 1789-1976, 367
Susquehanna River Basin Commission, 302

Transit Authority, Washington Metropolitan
Area, 302
Transition, fiscal year, 162
Transition, new fiscal year, discussion, 178-179
Transportation:
Air, 105, 108
Ground, 104-107
Urban, 251
Water, 105, 108
Transportation, Department of, 269-275
Transportation and commerce, function, 65
Transportation Safety Board, National, 306
Travel Service, United States, 224
Treasurer, Office of the, 276
Treasury, Department of the, 28, 149-150,

276-280
Trust funds, explanation, 24, 168
Trust intrafund transactions, definition, 173

U
Tax administration, see Internal Revenue
Tax Court, United States, 200-201
Tax expenditures, 36-37, 67-69, 86, 94-95, 98,
103, 106, 111-112, 159
Tax liability, changes in, 57
Tax rebate, 5
Tax reductions, 3, 56-57, 94
Taxes:
Estate and gift. 44-45, 55, 60, 62
Excise, 44-45, 54-55, 60, 62
Homeownership and business investment, 19
Income, 44-45, 54-55, 59-62
Insurance, social, 44-45, 55
Payroll, 54
Petroleum and natural gas, 4, 10, 93-94
Social security, 44-45, 60, 62
Technology Assessment, Office of, 197
Telecommunications Policy, Office of, 206
Telecommunications service, General Services
Administration, 284
Tennessee Valley Authority, 97, 313
Territorial affairs, 154, 156
Territorial Affairs, Office of, 259
Threshold Test Ban Treaty, 78
Timber sales, 159
Timber stockpile, 92
Tobacco and Firearms, Bureau of Alcohol, 277
Tourism Resources Review Commission, National, 312
Trade, foreign, promotion of, 80
Trade Act of 1974, 14,80, 153
Trade barriers, 80
Trade Commission, Federal, 298
Trade Commission, International, 303
Trade negotiations, international, 267
Trade Negotiations, Special Representative
for, 206
Trade promotion, 112
Trade relations, 14
Traffic safety, 274
Training:
Health manpower, 133
Manpower development, 121, 124-127
Military personnel, 76-77
On-the-job, 126
Veterans, 144-146




Unemployed, aid to, 3, 5-6
Unemployment assistance, 16, 30-31
Unemployment insurance, 136, 139
Unemployment insurance outlays, 10
Unemployment rates, 41
Unified budget, 24, 27, 33
Uniformed Services University of the Health
Sciences, 77
United Nations, 85-86
United Nations Development Program, 84
United Nations Relief and Works Agency, 84
United States Government Life Insurance, 144,
289
United States Information Agency, 81, 86,
313-314
United States International Aeronautical Exposition, 271
United States Railway Association, 33, 167, 314
United States Tax Court, 200-201
United States Travel Service, 224
University Year for ACTION (UYA), 116
Uranium enrichment operations, 94
Urban development, 65
Urban Development, Department of Housing
and, 113,247-251
Urban Mass Transportation Administration,
275
Urban renewal, 249-250
Urban transportation, 251
Veterans:
Cemetery and burial benefits, 145
Compensation and pensions, 144-145, 287—
288
Disability, non-service-connected, 144-145
Disability, service-connected, 143-145
Education and training, 143-146
Employment, 148
Hospitals and domiciliary facilities, 144, 146-

148, 288
Housing, 144, 146-147
Insurance, 144-145, 288, 289
Loans, 143-144, 146-147, 289
Medical care, 144, 146-148,288

384

THE

BUDGET

FOR

FISCAL YEAR

Water ports, deep, 108
Water Quality, National Commission on, 312
Water Research and Technology, Office of, 253
Water resources:
Development, 97
Programs, 97
Water Resources Council, 97, 314
Water resources projects, 92, 97
Water and sewer grants, 114
Water transportation, 105, 108
Weapons, nuclear, 13
Weapons, strategic, development of, 74
Weather programs, 90, 99
Welfare, 16
White House Office, 153, 204
Wildlife conservation, 236
Wildlife habitat, protection of, 97
Wildlife Service, Fish, and, 99, 254
Windfall profits tax, 4, 54, 93-94
Wiretapping and Electronic Surveillance, National Commission for the Review of Federal
and State Laws Relating to, 311
Woodrow Wilson International Center for
Scholars, 310
Work incentives, 121, 126,243
World Bank Group, 84
World Food Conference, 14, 82
World food problems, 80

Veterans—Continued
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 144
Pensions, non-service-connected, 144-145
Program analysis, 143-148
Readjustment benefits, 30-31, 288
State nursing homes, 147
Unemployment, 148
Vocational rehabilitation, 144-146
Veterans Administration, 28, 287-290
Veterans benefits and services, function, 65
Veterans programs, 15
Vice President, The, 153
Vice President, The, residence of, 204
Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974,

146
Virgin Islands, 157, 159
Virgin Islands Corporation, liquidation, 285
Vladivostok agreement, 13, 73
Vocational education, 121-123, 241
Vocational rehabilitation, 128, 144-146
Voice of America, 86
Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA), 116

W
Wage and Price Stability, Council on, 206
Warsaw Pact, 13,70
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, 302
Waste treatment and disposal, 92, 96
Water Commission, National, 312




1976

Youth Conservation Corps, domestic resource
development, 220

O


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