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U. s . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W O M E N ' S BUREAtJ

SUPPLEMENT TO BULLETIN 16
CHANGES SINCE 1921 IN STATE LAWS AFFECTING WOMEN'S HOURS
AND WAGES

A great many changes in the legislation regulating hours and wages
have been made since the Women's Bureau Bulletin 16, State Laws
Affecting Working Women, was issued, and as a revised bulletin can
not be issued before next year this supplement has been prepared in
order to make available information pertaining to these laws as of
July 1, 1923.
The hour laws and night-work laws of Kansas, Minnesota, North
Dakota, and Wisconsin found in this supplement supersede those
found in Bulletin 16. The South Dakota hour law supplements the
o e in the bulletin. The laws in Chart VI for Kansas, Massachun
setts, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Washington should be substituted for the corresponding sections in Bulletin 16. That of Pennsylvania is supplementary to the material in the bulletin. The nightWork' laws of New Jersey, North Dakota, and Washington and the
south Dakota minimum wage law are new legislation, and therefore
do not appear in Bulletin 16. The minimum wage awards given for
Arizona, Arkansas, and California are substitutes for the same items
Bulletin 16. The remaining awards (Kansas, Massachusetts,
^orth Dakota, and Washington) are to be substituted for the entire
Action on awards in these States as found in Bulletin 16. The District
Columbia minimum wage law has been declared unconstitutional.
The chart and map showing mothers' pension laws should not be
J^d, as they are not up to date. No information concerning these
laws appears in this supplement, as the bureau has discontinued this
se

t of maps and charts.
maps found at the end of Bulletin 16 can not be used unless
y are changed to conform to this supplement.
69373°—-24




STATE LAWS_ AFFECTING

2

WORKING

WOMEN.

CHANGES IN STATE H O U R L A W S .
CHART I.—EIGHT-HOUR AND EIGHT-AND-A-HALF-HOUR LAWS FOR
WOMEN WORKERS.
EIGHT-HOUR
K a n s a s . ( B u i . 10, p . 10.)
W e e k l y limit
Overtime
Occupations or industries specified.
W e e k l y limit
Overtime
Occupations or industries specified.

LAWS.

S hours (basic), 6 d a y s (basic).
,
If t i m e and a half is p a i d for all hours over the basic d a v .
Telephone operators. (Industrial Welfare Commission Order N o . 9,1918.)
48 hours.
.
,
. ,
.
,
Public housekeeping o c c u p a t i o n ~ i . e., the work of waitresses in restaurants,
hotel dining rooms and boarding houses; all attendants employed at icecream parlors, soda fountains, light lunch stands, steam table or counter
work in cafeterias a n d delicatessens where freshly cooked foods are served,
a n d confectionery stores where lunches are served; the w o r k of chamberm a i d s in hotels, lodging and boarding houses and hospitals; the work of
janitrcsscs, of car cleaners, and of kitchen workers in hotels, restaurants,
a n d hospitals; elevator operators, cigar stand and cashier girls connected
w i t h such establishments. (Industrial Welfare Order N o . 15, 1922.)
EIGHT-AND-A-HALF-HOUR

LAWS.

North Dakota.
Weekly limit
Overtime

( B u i . 16, p . 16.)
48 hours, 6 days.
10 hours daily, 7 d a y s per week permitted in emergencies, provided permission is obtained from authorities enforcing hour l a w and weekly hour limit
is not exceeded. Emergency is defined as sickness of more than one female
employee, the protection of human life, banquets, conventions, celebrations, sessions of the State legislature, reporters in a n y of the district courts
of the State.
Occupations or indus- Manufacturing, mechanical, or mercantile establishment, laundry, hotel or
tries specified.
restaurant, or telephone or telegraph establishment or office, or any express or transportation c o m p a n y . Exceptions: Rural telephone exchanges
and in villages and towns of less than 500 population. (Session Laws of
North Dakota, 1919, ch. 170, p . 314. A m e n d e d 1923.)
CHART

II.—NINE-HOUR AND NINE-AND-A-HALF-HOUR LAWS FOR
WOMEN WORKERS.
NINE-HOUR

K a n s a s . ( B u i . 1C, p . IS.)
Weekly limit
Overtime
Occupations or industries specified.
Weekly limit
Overtime

. ,
Occupations or mdustries specified.

Weekly limit
Overtime
Occupations or industries specified.

LAWS.

49J hours.
2£ hours of overtime weekly is allowed if time and a half is paid and if daily
hours are not exceeded.
Laundry occupation—i. e., laundries, d y e i n g , d r y cleaning and pressing
establishments. (Industrial Welfare Order N o . 12, 1922.)
49 £ hours, 6 days.
4£ hours of overtime weekly is allowed i n cases of emergency. T i m e and
one-half m u s t b e paid for such overtime. H o w e v e r , canneries, creameries,
condensaries, a n d poultry houses are allowed this overtime without penalty for 6 weeks during the peak season or for t w o periods not t o exceed 3
weeks each, a n d poultry dressing and packing businesses are allowed to
w o r k 11 hours per day and 58 hours per week for 4 of these 6 weeks and 11
hours per day and 60 hours per week for the remaining 2 weeks: Providedf.
One of these latter weeks falls between N o v e m b e r 1 and Thanksgiving and
the other between Thanksgiving and Christmas.
.Manufacturing occupation—I. e., all processes in the production of coramoditics. Exceptions: Millinery workrooms, dressmaking establishments, hems t i t c h i n g - a n d button shops, and alteration, drapery and upholstery
departments of a mercantile establishment m a y obtain permission from
the Court of Industrial Relations t o operate under the mercantile order.
(Industrial Welfare Order N o . 13,1922.)
54 hours,*G days.
10-hour working d a y allowed once a week, provided m a x i m u m weekly hours
d o n o t exceed 54.
Mercantile establishments; includes all establishments operated for the purpose of trade in the purchase or sale of any goods or merchandise, and
includes the sales force, the wrapping employees, the auditing and checking
force, the shippers in the mail-order department, the receiving, marking
and stock room employees, sheet music saleswomen and demonstrators,
and all employees in such establishments in any w a y directly connected
w i t h the sale, purchase and disposition of goods, wares and merchandise.
(Industrial Welfare Order N o . 14,1922.)




STATE LAWS_ AFFECTING WORKING WOMEN.

3

Wisconsin. (Bui. 16, p. 24.)
Weekly limit
50 hours.
Overtime
10 hours daily may be worked during emergency periods, provided such
S e r i o d s do not exceed 4 weeks in any one year and the weekly hours worked
o not exceed 55.
Occupations or indus- Place of employment—i. e., manufacturing, mechanical or mercantile estabtries specified.
lishment, laundry, restaurant, confectionery store, or telegraph or telephone
office or exchange, or any express or transportation establishment. (Wisconsin Statutes, 1921, Vol. I, ch. 83, sees. 172S-1 to 1728-4, pp. 1365-1366, and
Session Laws of Wisconsin, 1923, ch. 185.)
NINE-AND-A-HALF-HOUR

LAWS.

Minnesota. (Bui. 16, pp. 19, 23, 26.)
Weekly limit
54 hours.
Overtime
.
Occupations or indus- Any business or service whatever. Exceptions: Domestics in the home; pertries specified.
sons engaged in the care of the sick or injured; cases of emergency in which
the safety, health, morals or welfare of the public may otherwise be affected;
night employees whose total hours at their place of employment do not
exceed 12 and who have the opportunity for at least 4 hours' sleep; telephone operators in municipalities of less than 1,500 inhabitants. (Session
Laws of Minnesota, 1923, ch. 422, p . 626.)

CHART III,—TEN-HOUR LAWS FOR WOMEN WORKERS.
South Dakota.
Weekly limit

(Bui. 16, p. 24.)
;..
54 hours.

1 2 k o u r s daily may be worked on the 5 days preceding Christmas.
rwi r t u ??
occupations or indus- Any employer, or other person having control of any woman. Exceptions:
tries specified.
Farm laborers, domestic servants, telegraph and telephone operators, persons engaged in the care of livestock; cities having a population of 3,000 or
less. (Session Laws of South Dakota, 1923, ch. 308, p. 328.)
Wisconsin. (Bui. 16, p. 24.)
Weekly limit
55 hours.
overtime
12 hours daily, 66 hours weekly may be worked on not more than 10 days
during the season.
0(V))
occupations or indus- Pea canning factories. (Industrial Commission Order Regulating Pea Canines specified.
ning Factories, 1923.)

o^1^;;::
°Stp°e£ifi£d

in<^US"

H o t e 1 ®-

(Session Laws of Wisconsin, 1923, ch. 117.)

™ Z L A W S PROVIDING FOR A DAY OF REST, ONE SHORTER
WORKDAY, TIME FOR MEALS, AND REST PERIODS FOR WOMEN

C R

Kansas. (Bui. 16, p. 29.)
^ l 0 / j e s t or 1 shorter Employment for women and minors shall be limited to 6 days in a week, with
Tim?£? a y - ,
1 day of rest in every 7 days.
n
i m e r o r meals
The meal relief shall be not less than 45 minutes (females). Exceptions: The
Court of Industrial Relations may grant a shorter lunch period in any
particular industry after investigation, or where the industry operates
ftocr
• ,
on an 8-hour basis the lunch period shall not bo less than 30 minutes.
ejsl Penods
Not more than 5 hours shall be worked in any one period without relief for
R a t i o n s or indus- M^uf^urin^cKiupation—i. e., all processes in the production of commodim e s specified.
ties. Exceptions: Millinery workrooms, dressmaking establishments, hemstitching and button shops, and alteration, drapery and # upholstery
departments of a mercantile establishment may obtain permission from the
Court of Industrial Relations to operate under the mercantile order. (Industrial Welfare Order No. 13,1922.)
011 shortcr
vm?tJ
No woman or minor shall be employed
more than 6 days during each
Ti
week*
Re?te^Seals
Relief for meals, 1 hour (Woman or minor).
,
^
,
A
1 P^nods
No woman or minor shall be employed for more than 5 hours without relief
° S a , t i o n 5 o r frdusg e s specified.

Davof™*+
„ t
wnrtru o r 1 s o r t e r
u a yTime fnr ^ ,
Bs b£iSeals
et
i^nods

MercaStUe establishments: Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of trade in the purchase or sale of any goods or merchandise, and
includes the sales force, the wrapping employees, the auditing and checking
force, the shippers in the mail-order department, the receiving, marking
and stock-room emplovees, sheet music saleswomen and demonstrators,
and all employees in such establishments in any way directly connected
with the sale, purchase and disposition of goods, wares, and merchandise.
(Industrial Welfare Order No. 14, 1922.)
.
^- , „ j
,
No woman or minor shall be permitted to work without 1 M day of rest m
eveiy 7 days. Exceptions: Women working part of each day whose total
weekly hours do not exceed 35.
.
'
.
.
Relief for meals shall not be less than one-half hour (woman or minor).
No woman or minor shall be permitted to work for more than 5 hours without
If work is done in two shifts, 4 hours rest must be allowed between shifts.
If work is done in three shifts, 3 hours rest must be allowed between the
second and third shifts.




4

STATE LAWS_ AFFECTING

Occupations or Industries specified

WORKING

WOMEN.

Public housekeeping occupation—1. e., the work of waitresses in restaurants,
hotel dining rooms and boardmg houses; all attendants employed at ice
cream parlors, soda fountains, light lunch stands, steam table or counter
work in cafeterias and delicatessens where freshly cooked foods are served,
and confectionery stores where lunches are served: the work of chambermaids in hotels, lodging and boarding houses, ana hospitals; the work of
janitresses, of car cleaners, and of kitchen workers in notels.. restaurants
and hospitals; elevator operators, cigar stand and cashier girls connected
with such establishments. (Industrial Welfare Order No. 15, 1922.)

M a s s a c h u s e t t s . (Bill. 16, p. 31.)
. ,A
^ ^
,
^
Day of rest or 1 shorter Employee may not be reqmred to work on Sunday unless such employee is
workday.
allowed during the next 6 days 24 consecutive hours without labor.
Time for meals.
Bestperiods
. ,
. ,
,,
,
..
Occupations or indus- Commercial occupation, any industrial process, tho work of transportation or
tries specified.
communication. Exceptions: Manufacture or distribution of gas, electricity,
milk or water; hotels, restaurants, drug stores, livery stables, or garages;
the transportation, sale, or delivery of food; janitors, watchmen; employees
whose duties include no work on Sunday other than (1) setting sponges m
bakeries, (2) caring for live animals, (3) maintaining fires, (4) caring for
machinery, (5) employees engaged in the preparation, printing, publication,
sale or delivery of newspapers, (6) farm or personal service, (7) any labor
called for by an emergency that could not reasonably have been anticipated;
request of employee. (General Laws of Massachusetts, 1921, Vol. II. ch. 149,
sees. 47, 49, and 50, pp. 1562-1563.)
M i n n e s o t a . (Bui. 16, p. 32.)
Day or rest or 1 shorter workday.
Time for meals
At least 60 minutes shall be allowed for meals. Exceptions; The Industrial
Commission may issue permits allowing a shorter tune.
Rest periods
Occupations or indus- Any business or service whatever. Exceptions: Domestics in the home; pertries specified.
sons engaged in the care of the sick or injured; cases of emergency in whiqh
the safety, health, morals or welfare of the public may otherwise be affected;
night employees whose total hours at their place of employment do not
exceed 12 and who have the opportunity for at least 4 hours sleep; telephone
operators in municipalities ofless than 1,500 inhabitants. (Session Laws of
Minnesota, 1923, chap. 422, p . 626.)
North. D a k o t a . (Bui. 16, p. 35.)
Day of rest or one
snorter workday.
Time for meals
30 minutes shall be allowed for meals if they are furnished on the premises;
60 minutes for lunch if employees must leave premises (females).
Rest periods.,
No woman shall be employed for more than 4 hours of continuous labor without a rest period.
Occupations or indus- Public housekeeping occupation—i. e., the work of waitresses in restaurants,
tries specified.
hotel dining rooms, boarding houses, and all attendants employed at ice
cream and light lunch stands and steam tables or counter work in cafeterias
and delicatessens where freshly cooked foods are served and the work or
chambermaids in hotels and lodging houses and boarding houses and hospitals and the work of janitresses and car cleaners and of kitchen workers m
hotels and restaurants and hospitals and elevator operators. (Minimum
Wage Department Order No. 1,1922.)
Day of rest or 1 shorter
workday.
Time for meals
A 30-minute period for the noon meal shall be the minimum allowed (females).
Rest periods., ..
No woman shall be employed for more than 5£ hours of continuous labor
without a rest period.
Occupations or indus- Manufacturing occupations—i. e., all processes in the production of comtries specified.
modities. Includes the work performed in dressmaking shops and wholesale millinery houses, in the workrooms of retail millinery shops, and in the
drapery ana furniture covering workshops, the garment alteration, art,
needlework, fur garment making and millinery workrooms in mercantile
stores, and the candy making departments o f retail candy stores and oi
restaurants, and in bakery and biscuit manufacturing establishments,
in candy manufacturing and in book binding and job press feeding establishments. (Minimum Wage Department Order No. 2,1922.)
Day of rest or 1 shorter
workday.
Time for meals
A 30-mmute period for the noon meal shall be the minimum allowed (females).
Rest periods
No woman shall be employed for more than 5 hours of continuous labor without a rest period.
Occupations or indus- Laundry occupation—i. e., all the processes connected with the receiving,
tries specified.
marking, washing, cleaning, ironing, and distribution of washable or cleanable materials. The work performed in laundry departments in hotels,
hospitals and factories. (Minimum Wage Department Order No. 4, 1922.)
Day of rest or 1 shorter
workday.
Time for meals
Adequate time and provision at seasonable hours must be given to the employees for meals (females).
Rest periods...
Occupations or indus- Telephone establishments. (Minimum Wage Department Order No. 5*

tries specified.



73 S T A T E L A W S _ A F F E C T I N G

WORKING

WOMEN.

Pennsylvania. (Bui. 16, p. 37.)
Day of rest or 1 shorter Women employees may be granted 1 whole day of rest or 2 half days in each
workday.
calendar week.
Time for meals.
..
Rest periods
Occupations or indus- Short term summer hotels. (Rulings of the Industrial Hoard Pertaining to
tries specified.
Women in Industry, Rule W - l , 1916, pp. 6-6.)
Day of rest or 1 shorter
workday.

Time for meals..
Rest periods
Occupations or industries specified.

Women employees may be granted 1 day of rest per week by any one of the
following methods:
(1) 1 complete day.
(2) 24 hours consecutive rest beginning at any hour of the day.
(3) Sunday off 1 week, a week day off the next day.
(4) Alternate Sundays o 2 with 1 half week day. Equals two full days
per fortnight.
(5) 2 half holidays or at least 5 hours each.
Hotels and institutions employing not more than 10 women; single departments, employing not more than 10 women, of hotels and institutions.
(Rulings of tho Industrial Board Pertaining to Women in Industry, Rule
W - l , 1916, pp. 5-6.)

Day of rest or 1 shorter Women employees shall be given 1 complete day off in each calendar week,
workday.
or 24 hours of consccutivo rest beginning at any hour of the day.
Time for meals
Rest periods
Occupations or indus- Hotels employing more than 10 women. (Rulings of the Industrial Board
tries specified.
Pertaining to Women in Industry, Rule W - l , 1916, pp. 5-6.)
Day of rest or 1 shorter Women may be employed 7 days per week provided their daily hours do not
workday.
exceed 7.
Tune for meals.... . . .
Rest periods
Occupations or indus- Short term hotels operating approximately 4 months in the year. (Ibid.,
tries specified.
Rule W-3,1917, p. 6.)
Washington. (Bui. 16, p. 37.)
,
„
..
Day of rest or 1 shorter No female shall be employed more than 6 days in any 1 week. Exceptions:
workday.
Emergencies, when women may be employed 10 days before a day or rest
is # v e n them, provided they receive at least 4 days' rest in any 2&day
Time for meals.
period.
Rest periods.
. . ' " " No female shall be employed more than 5 hours without a rest penod of at
least one-half hour.
Occupations or indus- Public housekeeping industry—i. e., linen room girls, chambermaids, cl^ners,
tries specified.
kitchen girls, dishwashers, pantry girls, pantry servers, waitresses, counter
girls, bus girls, elevator operators, jamtresses, laundry workers (except
when a commercial laundry is operated). and any other pupation which
would properly be classified under public housekeeping. The establishments shall include hotels, rooming houses, boarding houses, restaurants,
cafds, cafeterias, lunch rooms, tea rooms, a p a r t m e n t J p ^ s , h ( ^ i ^ s (not
nurses), philanthropic institutions, and any other w h i c h ^ f / J ^ ^ P ^
classified under this industry. (Industrial Welfare Committee Order No.
23, 1921.)
*
Day of rest or 1 shorter Minimum wage is set for a 6-day week (females),
workday.
A line for meals
. , ,
R e s t p e r i o d s . N o female shall be employed on a shift of more than 6 hours without a rest
Occupations 0 r indus- i i u n d ^ f d r y ^ S n g or d y e ^ r k s o^pation, trade or industry. (Intries specified.
dustnai Welfare Committee Order No. 25, 1921.)
f Day

of rest or 1 shorter
.workday.
J ^ f o r meals
tnes specified.

D a Jofrest or 1 shorter
^workday
^e^or^is

tries specified.

Minimum wage is set for a 6-day week (females),
Not less than 1 hour shall be allowed for a luncheon period (females).
Telephone or telegraph lines or any o t ^ r pubUcomipation.
Occupations regulated by orders, numbered 23, 25,28 and 29. (Industrial
Welfare Committee Order No. 27, 1921.)
Minimum wage is set for a 6-day week (females),
N o t less t h a n

!

h o u r shaii b e

allowed for a noonday luncheon (females).

M ^ n t i l e establishment. (Industrial Welfare Committee Order No. 28,

1921.)

D
wo?kdly °r 1 Sh0rter Nofemale shaU ** employed for more tMn 6 dayS in any °ne WeCk*
Jfane for meals...
periods
Occupations or* Y n d ^ M W a c t u r i n g occupations, trades and industries. (Industrial Welfare Come s specified.
mittee Order No. 29, 1922.)




STATE LAWS AFFECTING WORKING WOMEN",
CHART

VII.—NIGHT WORK LAWS FOR WOMEN WORKERS.

K a n s a s . ( B u i . 16, p. 38.)
Prohibition of night
work.
Limitation of
night
Occupations or industries specified.
1

12 p . m . to 6 a. m .
•
P u b l i c housekeeping o c c u p a t i o n ^ i . c . , the w o r k of waitresses in restaurants,
hotel dining rooms and boarding houses; all attendants employed at ice
cream parlors, soda fountains, Ught lunch stands, steam table or counter
w o r k i n cafeterias and delicatessens where freshly c o o k e d foods are served,
and confectionery stores where luncheons are served; t h e work of chambermaids i n hotels,lodging and boarding houses, a n d hospitals; the work of

N e w Jersey.
Prohibition of night 10 p . m . t o 6 a. m .
work.
Limitation of night
work.
Occupations or indus- A n y manufactory, mercantile establishment, a n y bakery, laundry or restautries specified.
rant. Exceptions; Canneries engaged in packing a perishable product, such
^
—
„„
as fruits or vegetables. (Session Laws of N e w Jersey, 1923, c h . 144, p p .
312-313.)
North Dakota.
Prohibition of night 1 a. m . t o 5 a . m .
work.
Limitation of night
work.
Occupations or indus- Public housekeeping occupation—i. e., the work of waitresses in restaurants,
tries specified.
hotel dining rooms, boarding houses, and all attendants employed at ice
cream and light lunch stands and steam table or counter work in cafeterias
a n d delicatessens where freshly cooked foods are served and the work of
chambermaids i n hotels and lodging houses and boarding houses and hospitals and work of janitresses and car cleaners and of kitchen workers m
hotels and restaurants and hospitals. ( M i n i m u m W a g e Department
Order N o . 1,1922.)
Prohibition of night
work.
Limitation of night
work.
Occupations or industried specified.
Prohibition of night
work.
Limitation of night
work.
Occupations or industries specified.

Washington.
Prohibition of night
work.
l i m i t a t i o n of night
work.
Occupations or industries specified.

11 p . m . t o 7 a. m .

Elevator operators.

( M i n i m u m Wage Department Order N o . 1,1922.)

After9p.m.

Mercantile establishment—i. e., the w o r k of those e m p l o y e d in establishments
operated for the purpose of trade i n the purchase or sale of a n y goods or
merchandise, and includes the sales force, t h e wrapping force, the auditing
or checking force, the shippers i n the mail order department, the receiving,
marking a n d stock r o o m employees, and sheet music saleswomen and
demonstrators and cigar stand girls. ( M i n i m u m W a g e Department Order
N o . 3, 1922.)
After 12 midnight,

Elevator operators




(Industrial Welfare Committee Order N o . 23,1921.)

STATE LAWS_ AFFECTING

7

WORKING

WOMEN.

CHANGES IN STATE MINIMUM WAGE LEGISLATION AND
AWARDS.
C A T IX.—MINIMUM WAGE LEGISLATION IN THE UNITED STATES.
HK
South D a k o t a .
Body empowered t o
administer law.
Method of selecting occupation or industry
to be considered b y
this body.
Method of arriving at
wage awards.
Means provided for securing enforcement of
award.
Principles b y wliich
amount of award is
determined.
Occupations or industries covered b y law.
Classes of employees
covered b y law.

Exceptions..^

Industrial commissioner

Minimum wage fixed b y law.
Refusal to comply with law a misdemeanor.
wages and costs.

Employee may recover back

Amount equals a living wage.
A n y factory, workshop, mechanical or mercantile establishment, laundry,
hotel, restaurant, or packing house.
" 1 *
itau
A n y woman or girl over the age of 14.
Apprentices. Industrial commissioner must be notified of each apprentice
and must give permission for their employment. (Session Laws of South
Dakota 11923, ch. 309, p.. 329.)

AWARDS.
Bate of award.
Arizona.
1923...

Arkansas.

Bee. l , 1922..

California.
April 8,1923..

Classes of employees.

Amount of wage.

A n y store, office, shop, restaurant,
dining room, hotel, rooming house,
laundry, manufacturing establishments.

Females..

$16 per week.

Mercantile establishments
Smith and Little R o c k .

Females:
Experienced
Inexperienced

$11 per week.
$10 per week.

Occupations or industries.

at

Fort

Mercantile industry

May 9,1923..

Fish canning industry...

Way 8,1923..

Manufacturing industry.

Inexperienced

Kansas.

19,1922.,

Experienced women
or minors.
Inexperienced:
Women
Minors
Women or minors:
Experienced
Inexperienced
Women or minors:
Experienced

Laundry occupation—i. e., laundries,
dyeing, d r y cleaning and pressing
establishments.
Manufacturing occupation—i. e., all
processes in the ^production of commodities, including work performed
in florists' shops, and candy-making
departments of confectionery stores
ana bakeries; millinery workrooms,
dressmaking establishments, hemstitching and button shops, alteration, drapery and upholstery departments, unless as a part of a mercantile establishment they are granted
permission b y Industrial Court t o
operate under mercantile order.
Mercantile occupation—i. e., sales
force, wrapping employees, auditing
and checking, force, shippers in the
mail-order department, receiving,
marking and stock room employees,
sheet music saleswomen and demonstrators and all employees i n such
establishments directly connected
with the sale, purchase and disposition of goods, wares and merchandise.




Women or minors:
Experienced
Inexperienced
Women or minors:
Experienced
Inexperienced:
in general
Garment
workers and
millinery
workrooms
and d r e s s -

$16 p e r w e e k ;
$69.33J per month.
$12 per week.
$10 per week.
$0.33 J per hour.
$0.28 per hour.
$16 p e r w e e k ;
$69.33$ per month.
$9 per week.
$11 per week.
$7.50 per week.
$11 per week.
$7.50 per week.
$6.50 per week.

making

establishments.
Experienced:
Woman or minor.; $10.50 per week.
Inexperienced:
$7.50 per week.
Adult woman
Minors
; $6 per week.

STATU

8

LAWS

AFFECTING

WORKING

WOMEN.

AWARDS—Continued.
Date of award.

Occupations or industries.

Kansas—Contd.
July 19,1922.-.. Telephone operators..

Massachusetts.
Jan. 1,1919...

Wholesale millinery

Sept. 1,1919...

Canning and preserving.

Jan. 1,1920..

Candy making

Feb. 1,1920..

Men's clothing and raincoats;

Mar. 1,1920..

Corset factories

July 1,1920.,

Knit goods..

Feb. 1,1921.

Office'and building cleaners.

May 15, 1922...

Paper b o x occupation

May 15,1922...

Women's clothing occupation.

June 1, 1922....

Junel, 1922..

June 6 , 1 9 2 2 . .

Men's furnishings factories.

Muslin underwear, etc., occupation..

Retail stores.

July 1,1922..

Laundries

Mar. 1, 1923..

Brush industry.,


See note page 10.


Amount of wage.

Classes of employees.

Women or minors in
cities or communities of less than 1,000
population:
Experienced.. . . .
Inexperienced
In cities or communities of 1,000 and less
than 5,000 population:
Experienced
Inexperienced
In cities or communities of 5,000 and less
than 20,000 population:
Experienced
Inexperienced
In cities of 20,000 or
more population:
Experienced
Inexperienced

$7 per week.
$6 per week.

$7.50 per week.
$6 per week.

$8 per week.
$6 per week.

Experienced females
over 18 years of age.
Inexperienced females
Experienced females
18 years of age and
over.
Inexperienced females
Females:
Experienced...,.
Inexperienced
Experienced females
18 years of age and
over.
Inexperienced females.
Experienced females..
Inexperienced females
17 years of age and
over.
Females:
Experienced..
Inexperienced.
Females.
Experienced females.
Inexperienced females
18 years of age and
over.
Under 18 years...
Experienced employees.
Inexperienced employees 18 years of age
and over.
Under 18 years...
Experienced employInexperienced employees 16 years o f age
and over.
Under 16 years of
age
Experienced employees.
Inexperienced employees 16 years o f age
and over.
Under 16 years....
Experienced employees.
Inexperienced employ. ees under 18 years of
All others
Employees:
Experienced...
InexperiencedFemales:
Experienced...
Inexperienced..

$9 per week.
$7 per week.
$11 per week.
$6 per week.
$11 per week.
$8.50 per week.
$12.50 per week.
$8 per week.
$15 per week.
$7 per week.
$13 per week.
$10 per week.

$13.75 per week.
$S.50 per week.
$15.40 per week.
$0.57 per hour.
$13.50 per week.
$10 per week.
$8.50 per week.
$14 per week.
$11 per week$9 per week.
$13.75 per week.
$9 per week.

$8 per week.
$13.75 per week.
$3 per week.
$7.50 per week$14.50 per week.
$10 per week.
$12 per week.
$13.50 per week.
$11 per week.
$13.92 per week.
$9.60 per week.

STATU

LAWS

AFFECTING

WORKING

9

WOMEN.

AWARDS—Continued.
Date of award
North D a k o t a .
April 4, 1922.

April 4,1922...

Occupations or industries.

Classes of employees.

Public housekeeping—i. e., waitresses
in restaurants, hotel dining rooms,
boarding houses, attendants employed at ice cream and light lunch
stands and steam table or counter
work in cafeterias and delicatessens
where freshly cooked foods are
served and work of chambermaids in
hotels and lodging houses and boarding houses and hospitals, and the
work of janitresses and car cleaners
and of kitchen workers in hotels
and restaurants and hospitals and
elevator operators.
Waitress or counter girl.

Experienced...
Inexperienced.,
Chambermaid and kitchen h e l p . . . Experienced...
InexperiencedManufacturing occupation—i. e., all
processes in the production of commodities. W o r k performed in dressmaking shops and wholesale millinery houses, in the work rooms of
retail millinery shops, and in the
drapery and furniture covering
workshops, the garment alteration,
art, needlework, fur garment making and millinery workrooms in
merchantile stores, and the candy
making departments of retail candy
stores ana of restaurants, and in
bakery and biscuit manufacturing
establishments, in candy manufacturing and in b o o k binding and j o b
press feeding establishments.
Women:
Biscuit and candy making
Experienced...
Inexperienced..
B o o k binding and j o b pressfeeding. Women:
Experienced...
Inexperienced..
All other manufacturing.,

April 4,1922.... Mercantile occupation—i. e., establishments operated for the purpose of
trade i n the purchase or sale of any
goods or merchandise, and includes
the sales force, the wrapping force,
the auditing or checking force, the
shippers i n the mail order department, the receiving, marking and
stockroom employees, and sheet
music saleswomen ana demonstrators and cigar stand girls.
APril4,1922....
Laundry occupation—i. e., a place
where clothes are washed or cleaned
b y a n y process, b y a n y person, firm,
institution, corporation or association ana laundry w o r k shall i n clude all the processes connected
with the receiving, marking, washing, cleaning, ironing and distribution -of washable or cleanable m a terials. T h e work performed in
laundry departments in hotels,
hospitals and factories.




Women:
Experienced...
Inexperienced-

Women:
Experienced.,
Inexperienced.,

Women:
Experienced.,

Inexperienced..

Amount of wage.

$14.90 per
$11,90 per
$14.20 per
$11.20 per

week.
week.
week.
week.

$14 per week.
$60.67 per month.
$9 per week.
$39 per month.
$14 per week.
$60.67 per month.
$9 per week.
$39 per month.
$14 per week.
T o oe determined
by
conferences
between
the
board and the
e m p l o y e r and
e m p l o y e e concerned.
$14.50 per week.
$62.83 per month.
$9.60 per week.
$41.60 per month.

$14 per week, or
13.50 per week if
laundry
privileges are allowed.
$60.67 per month.
$11 per week.
$47.67 per month.

STATE

1 0

LAWS

AFFECTING

WORKING

WOMEN.

AWARDS—Continued.
Date of award.

Occupations or industries.

North
DakotaContinued.
April 4,1922..,. Telephone occupation..

Classes of employees.

AVomen in towns of
1,800 and over p o p u lation:
Experienced
Inexperienced

A m o u n t of wage.

SI4 per week.
$60.67 per month.
$10 per week.
$43.43 per month.

I n towns of under 1,800
population:
Experienced.
. . . $12 per week.
$52 per month.
$9 per week.
Inexperienced
$39 per month.
South Dakota.
July 1, 1923..

Washington.
Oct. 4,1921.

Dec. 14,1921.
Dec. 14,1921..

Dec. 31,1921.

A n y factory, workshop, mechanical
or mercantile establishment, laundry, hotel, restaurant, or packing
bouse.

Females, experienced.. $12 per week.

Public housekeeping—i. e., linen-room
girls, chambermaids, cleaners, kitchen girls, dishwashers, pantry girls,
pantry servers, waitresses, counter
girls, DUS girls, elevator operators,
janitresses, laundry workers (except where a commercial laundry is
operated). T h e establishment shall
include hotels, rooming houses,
boarding houses, restaurants, caf6s,
cafeterias, lunch rooms, tea rooms,
apartment houses, hospitals (not
nurses), philanthropic institutions.
Laundry, dry-cleaning or d y e works
occupation, trade or industry.
Telephone or telegraph lines or in any
puDlic occupation other than public
housekeeping, laundry, dry-cleaning
and d y e works, mercantile ana
manufacturing.
Mercantile establishment...

Females over 18 years
of age.

Jan. 22,1922.

Manufacturing occupations, trades and
industries.

Jan. 22, 1922.

Mercantile, manufacturing, printing,
laundering, or d y e works establishments, sign painting, machine or
repair shops, or parcel d d i v e r y service, or a n y other industry other
than public housekeeping; occupation of stenographer, bookkeeper,
typist, billing clerk, filing clerk,
cashier, checker, invoicer, c o m p tometer operator, or a n y clerical
office work, including assistants and
helpers in doctors' and dentists'
offices.

Minors.

Females over 18 years
of age.
Females over 18 years
of age.

Females over 18 years
of age.
Women:
Experienced
Inexperienced—
Minors

$14.50 per week.
$2.50 per d a y .
$0.35 per hour.
$12 per week.

$13.20 per week.
$13.20 per week.

$13.20 per week.
$13.20 per week.
$9 per week.
$9.C

NOTE.—Since this supplement went t o press there has gone into effect i n Massachusetts a wage award,
effective January 2, 1924, in the druggists' preparations, etc., occupation, establishing a wage of 313.-AJ
per week for experienced females 18 years of age and over and $9.60 per week for inexperienced females.

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V


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102