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A Counselor’s Guide
to Occupational Information
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
July 1980
Bulletin 2042




A Counselor’s Guide
to Occupational Information
A Catalog of Federal Career Publications
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner
July 1980
Bulletin 2042







Preface

Up-to-date and accurate occupational in­
formation is essential in making wise career
decisions. Federal Government agencies
issue a wide variety of career guidance
publications, as well as related materials on
education, training, job search, career edu­
cation, and special programs for disadvan­
taged groups. The purpose of this publica­
tion is to inform interested parties about
these publications, and about Federal pro­
grams which gather, analyze, and dissemi­
nate occupational and career information,
in accordance with section 12 (a) of the
Career Education Incentive Act (Public
Law 95-207) of 1978.
This bulletin was prepared by Kathy Wil­
son, under the direction of Daniel E.
Hecker, in the Bureau’s Division of Occu­
pational Outlook. James V. Petrone as­
sisted in the research and compilation of
materials.
Material in this publication is in the public
domain and may be reproduced without
permission of the Federal Government.
Please credit the Bureau of Labor Statistics
and cite A Counselor’s Guide to Occupa­
tional Information, Bulletin 2042.




Ill




Contents

Introduction.............................

1

I. Occupational information...

2

Comprehensive information.................
Regional, State, and local information
Accounting..............................................
Agriculture ............................................
Arts and humanities .............................
Banking and finance.............................
Clerical occupations .............................
Communications....................................
Computers..............................................
Construction..........................................
Education and related occupations . ..
Environment, natural resources, and
related occupations ...........................
Federal employment .............................
General................................................
College graduates..............................
Agencies..............................................
Armed Forces....................................
Foreign languages ................................
Health.....................................................
General................................................
Occupations........................................
Law careers............................................
Law enforcement..................................
Liberal a r ts ............................................
Manufacturing ......................................
Marketing ..............................................
Recreation and sports...........................
Science and engineering.......................
Social work ............................................
Transportation......................................
Utilities...................................................
Working with older people .................

III. S p e c i a l g r o u p s in t h e la b o r f o r c e ............ 24
College graduates............................................................... 25
Ex-offenders .......................................................................25
Farm workers.....................................................................25
Handicapped workers....................................................... 26
Minorities.............................................................................27
Older workers.....................................................................28
Veterans.............................................................................. 28
W omen................................................................................ 28
Young workers...................................................................30

3
4
5
5
6

7
7
8
8
8

9

IV. A p p r e n t i c e s h i p , e d u c a t i o n , a n d
f i n a n c i a l a i d .......................................................... 32
Apprenticeship .................................................................. 33
Education............................................................................ 34
Financial a id ...................................................................... 35

9
10

10
11
11
12
12

13
13
13
15
15
16
16
17
17
17
19
19

20

20

II. Special categories of work .

VII. S t a t i s t i c s .................................................................... 4i
General................................................................................42
Education............................................................................42
Labor fo r c e ........................................................................ 42
W ages..................................................................................43

VIII. Bibliographies and publication lists . 4
4
Appendixes:
A. State employment security agencies......................... 46
B. State occupational information
coordinating committees..............................................48
C. Examples of State occupationalinformation........... 51
D. Federal agencies...........................................................58

22
22




..................................................................37

VI. C a r e e r e d u c a t i o n .................................................. 39

21

Overseas jobs ........................................
Part-time and temporary job s.............
Self-employment....................................
Summer jo b s ..........................................

V. J o b s e a r c h

23
23

V




Introduction

The first step for students exploring careers is to explore
themselves—to identify their talents, take stock of their strengths
and weaknesses, and think about career goals: Students also need
to become aware of the types of jobs that match their interests,
abilities, and aspirations. To help students explore their options
and make sound vocational and educational decisions, counselors
need occupational information. This should include materials on
employment trends for the Nation as a whole and detailed infor­
mation on occupations—the nature of the work; education, train­
ing, and experience needed for entry; aptitudes and personal
characteristics needed for success; job prospects; earnings; and
working conditions. Counselors also need information about edu­
cation and training programs, financial aid, and Government pro­
grams for special groups in the labor force.

tions. Rather, the current usefulness of each item was judged indi­
vidually. Some material issued in the early 1970’s, with job de­
scriptions and other information still considered accurate, was in­
cluded, but some material published during the mid-1970’s which
has become outdated was excluded.
Publications with no price indicated are available free of charge
from the issuing agency while the supply lasts. Priced publications
with a GPO Stock Number are available from the Superintendent
of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C. 20402. All Bureau of Labor Statistics publications also are
available from the Bureau’s regional offices. Make checks or
money orders payable to the Superintendent of Documents. (There
is a $1.00 minimum on mail orders. A 25 percent discount is al­
lowed for orders of 100 copies or more sent to one address.)

This publication describes occupational guidance and related ma­
terial available from Federal Government agencies. Through
legislative mandate, agencies collect, analyze, and publish infor­
mation on a variety of topics of interest to counselors, students,
parents, and others concerned with careers. As employers, most
agencies also develop information about the job opportunities they
offer.

Some publications listed are out of print and are so noted. They
may be available at Federal Depository Libraries. (Addresses of
Federal Depository Libraries are available from the Library of the
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402).
Many of the publications listed are available through the Education
Resources Information Center (ERIC) System. Many libraries
maintain collections of ERIC documents, and most publications in
the ERIC system may be purchased in paper copy and microfiche
from ERIC Document Reproduction Service, P.O. Box 190, Ar­
lington, Va. 22201. For more information, see Questions about
Education Theory, Curriculums, Career Information? Ask ERIC,
under Occupational Information— Comprehensive Information.

In addition, the Federal Government participates in several
Federal-State cooperative programs for developing and dis­
seminating occupational information. The Occupational Employ­
ment Statistics program produces State and area data on current
and projected occupational employment. (See Occupational Em­
ployment Statistics Handbook under Regional, State, and local in­
formation). Further information is available from State employ­
ment security agencies listed in appendix A. National and State
Occupational Information Coordinating Committees were man­
dated by the 1976 Education Act Amendments to establish a com­
munications network through which occupational and training in­
formation would be developed, tested, and shared across the coun­
try. Further information is available from State committees listed
in appendix B. As part of its mandate, the National Occupational
Information Coordinating Committee has compiled a listing of
examples of State-developed occupational information, including
computerized systems; videotape and microfiche tools; and printed
material on occupational characteristics, job search, and training
and occupational preparation. The listing appears in appendix C.

This Guide is divided into eight chapters. Chapter I covers occu­
pational information, including material that describes the nature
of work in occupations; the education, training, special skills, and
personal qualities usually needed to enter them; the job outlook;
opportunities for advancement; earnings; and so forth. Chapter II
discusses opportunities for self-employment, summer jobs, over­
seas jobs, and part-time and temporary jobs. Chapter III includes
materials covering special categories of workers, including college
graduates, minorities, veterans, young workers, and women.
Chapter IV includes general material on apprenticeship, education,
and financial aid for students. Chapter V covers materials on job
search—finding jobs, applying for them, taking tests, and inter­
viewing. Chapter VI includes materials on career education.
Chapter VII lists sources of statistics that can be useful for coun­
selors. Chapter VIII provides references to other bibliographies.

The listings include government career guidance material issued up
to the summer of 1979. No arbitrary age limit was set for publica­




1

Chapter I

Occupational Information




2

Comprehensive information
Regional, State, and local information
Accounting
Agriculture
Arts and humanities
Banking and finance
Clerical occupations
Communications
Computers
Construction
Education and related occupations
Environment, natural resources, and
related occupations
Federal employment
General
College graduates
Agencies
Armed Forces
Foreign languages
Health
General
Occupations
Law careers
Law enforcement
Liberal arts
Manufacturing
Marketing
Recreation and sports
Science and engineering
Social work
Transportation
Utilities
Working with older people

The Job Outlook in Brief, based on the
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1980-81
Edition, summarizes job prospects through
19901 for several hundred occupations.
Thomas Nardone, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Spring 1980, pp. 2-21. Reprint
available, $1.40.

Comprehensive information
Materials in this section are basic sources
of information covering a broad range of
occupations.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S.
Department of Labor conducts a continuing
program to gather and disseminate infor­
mation about occupations and employment
trends. The material described below con­
tains occupational outlook information
helpful to students, guidance counselors,
placement officials, and others interested in
job outlook.
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1980-81
Edition is an “ encyclopedia of careers”
covering several hundred occupations and
35 major industries. For each occupation
and industry discussed, information is in­
cluded on what the work is like, job pros­
pects to 1990, personal qualifications,
training and educational requirements,
working conditions, earnings, chances for
advancement, and where to find additional
information. Bulletin 2075,1980. 672 pp.
Paper cover, $8.00; cloth cover, $11. Pub­
lished biennially.
Reprints from the Occupational Outlook
Handbook, 1980-81 Edition, are leaflets
containing information on several related
occupations or about a major industry such
as nuclear energy. The reprints are espe­
cially useful to jobseekers who want to
know about a single field and to counselors
who must stretch the contents of one Occu­
pational Outlook Handbook among many
students. A listing of the occupations and
industries in each reprint is given in the
Handbook, and also may be obtained free
of charge from any BLS regional office.
Price per reprint, $1.25; price for a com­
plete set of 42 reprints comprising the en­
tire Handbook, $9.



Jobs for Which is a series of five leaflets,
based on the Occupational Outlook Hand­
book, 1980-81 Edition, that list jobs that
require specified levels of education. Titles
are: Jobs for Which. . .
. . . . You Can Qualify If You’re Not a
High School Graduate.
. . . . You can Qualify If You’re a High
School Graduate.
. . . . You Can Train Through Appren­
ticeship.
. . . . You Probably Will Need Some
College or Specialized Training.
. . . . You Probably Will Need A College
Education.
For each job listed, information is included
about the qualifications and training needed
and the employment outlook to 1990. 1979.
Looking Ahead to a Career, 1978-79
Edition is a filmstrip with cassette sound
track showing employment trends in occu­
pations and industries—which ones are
growing and which ones are declining.
Also discussed are the outlook for college
graduates, occupational “ c lu ste rs” ,
sources of job openings, and the way the
Bureau of Labor Statistics determines oc­
cupational outlook. Running time: 27 min­
utes. $12.50 per set.
Matching Personal and Job Characteris­
tics is a table listing 23 job characteris­
tics—for example, works with detail, out­
door work available, initiative required—
and showing which characteristics are as­
sociated with each of 281 occupations.
Kathy W ilson, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Fall 1978, pp. 2-13. Reprint
available, GPO Stock No. 029-00102274-3. $.90.
Your Career is a series of 11 leaflets on
careers:
Clerical Jobs and Your Career.
Ecology and Your Career.
English and Your Career.
Foreign Languages and Your Career.
Health Careers Without a College
Degree.
Liberal Arts and Your Career.
Math and Your Career.
Mechanics and Your Career.
Science and Your Career.
Social Science and Your Career.
The Outdoors and Your Career.
3

Each discusses the types of jobs that may
be available to persons with an interest or
proficiency in a particular academic subject
or field. 1980. Leaflets are also listed in the
following pages under subject headings.
Occupational Projections and Training
Data, Revised 1980 shows, for each of
several hundred white-collar, blue-collar,
and service jobs, employment in 1978,
projected employment requirements for
1990, average annual openings during
1978-90, and available statistics on the
number of people completing training in
each field. Also discusses long-term em­
ployment prospects for college graduates.
Bulletin 2058.
Occupational Outlook Quarterly is a
periodical to help young people, education
planners, and guidance counselors keep
abreast of current occupational and em­
ployment developments. The Quarterly,
written in nontechnical lanaguage, contains
articles on new occupations, training op­
portunities, salary trends, career counseling
programs, and the results of new occupa­
tional studies by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Yearly subscription is $6., single
copies $1.75 each. Individual articles are
listed in the following pages under subject
headings.
Exploring Careers is a career education
resource designed for middle school/junior
high school students. It promotes career
awareness through stories about people at
work, photographs, evaluative questions,
suggested activities, and career games. It
can be purchased as a single volume, as 15
separate booklets — one for each
chapter— or as a set of 15 booklets. Bulle­
tin 2001, 1979. 550 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-001-02224-7. $10.
Chapters of Exploring Careers, available
for $2 each, are:
Title
The World of Work and
You
GPO 029-001-02226-3
Industrial Production
Occupations
GPO 029-001-02227-1
Office Occupations
GPO 029-001-02228-0
Service Occupations
GPO 029-001-02229-8
Education Occupations
GPO 029-001-02230-1
Sales Occupations
GPO 029-001-02231-0

Bulletin No.
2001-1

2001-2
2001-3
2001-4
2001-5
2001-6

Construction Occupations
GPO 029-001-02232-8
Transportation
Occupations
GPO 029-001-02233-6
Scientific and Technical
Occupations
GPO 029-001-02234-4
Mechanics and Repairers
GPO 029-001-02235-2
Health Occupations
GPO 029-001-02236-1
Social Scientists
GPO 029-001-02237-1
Social Service Occupations
GPO 029-001-02238-7
Performing Arts, Design,
and Communications
Occupations
GPO 029-001-02239-5
Agriculture, Forestry, and
Fishery Occupations
GPO 029-001-02340-9

2001-7
2001-8

2001-9
2001-10
2001-11
2001-12
2001-13

2001-14

2001-15

The packaged set of all 15 chapters of
Exploring Careers is $12. GPO Stock No.
029-001-02225-5.
The Dictionary of Occupational Titles is a
comprehensive source of information on
job descriptions. The following entries in­
clude the Dictionary along with related
materials.
D ictionary of O ccupational T itles,
Fourth Edition is designed as a job place­
ment tool to facilitate matching job re­
quirements and worker skills. It includes
job descriptions and related information for
20,000 occupations, and groups occupa­
tions into a systematic classification based
on job tasks and requirements. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, U.S. Employment
Service. October 1977. 1,371 pp. GPO
Stock No. 029-013-00079-9. $12.
How to Use the Fourth Edition of the
Dictionary of Occupational Titles. U.S.
Department of Labor, U.S. Employment
Service. 14 pp.
A Well-Brewed D.O.T. describes im­
provements in the new fourth edition of the
Dictionary of Occupational Titles and the
9-digit occupational codes. Emanuel Wein­
stein, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Summer 1978, pp. 30-33.
The Right Words for 20,000 Jobs de­
scribes the new fourth edition of the Dic­
tionary of O ccupational T itles. Don
Barnes, Worklife, February 1978, pp.
9-13.



Conversion Table of Code and Title
Changes, Third to Fourth Edition, Dic­
tionary of Occupational Titles. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, U.S. Employment
Service, 1979. 389 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-013-00082-9. $7.50.

Commerce, Office of Federal Statistical
Policy and Standards. June 1978. 203 pp.
GPO Stock No. 003-005-00180-8. 6.50.

Guide for Occupational Exploration, A
Supplement to the Dictionary of Occu­
pational Titles, 4th Edition, groups the
thousands of occupations in the world of
work by interests and by abilities and traits
required for successful performance. Data
are classified into 12 interest areas, 66
work groups, and 348 subgroups. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, U.S. Employment
Service. May 1979. 715 pp. GPO Stock
No. 029-013-00080-2. $11.
Career Education: Selected U.S. Gov­
ernment Audiovisuals is a catalog of
career guidance audiovisual material de­
veloped by Federal agencies and available
for rent or purchase. Order forms included.
October 1977. 34 pp. For a copy or for in­
formation, write to National Audio Visual
Center, National Archives and Records
Services, General Services Administration,
Order Section DA, Washington, D.C.
20409, or call (301) 763-1896.
Dealing in Futures: Career Materials for
Students, Parents and Educators, A Bib­
liography Based on the Acquisitions of
the Educational Materials Center lists a
wide range of government and other publi­
cations. U.S. Department of Health, Edu­
cation, and Welfare, Office of Education,
Educational Materials Center. OE 77-001602, May 1977. 20 pp. GPO Stock No.
017- 080-01721-1. $1.
Questions About Education Theory,
Curriculums, Career Information? Ask
ERIC describes the Educational Resources
Information Center and how to obtain in­
formation from it. Neale Baxter, Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly, Spring 1977, pp.
18- 21.
Standard Occupational Classification
Manual, 1977 provides a coding system
for identifying and classifying occupations
and includes descriptions of job duties for
occupational groups. U.S. Department of
Commerce, Office of Federal Statistical
Policy and Standards. October 1977. 360
pp. GPO Stock No. 041-001-00153-1.
8.50.
Index, Standard Occupational Classifi­
cation Manual, 1977, a companion volume
to the entry above, provides an alphabetical
index and codes to occupations as listed in
the fourth edition of the Dictionary of Oc­
cupational Titles. U.S. Department of
4

Regional, State, and local
information

(Also see Introduction for a discussion
of information available from States.)
Guide to Local Occupational Informa­
tion 1976/Fifth Edition is a directory of
selected State Employment Service studies,
bulletins, brochures, and other releases
providing concise summaries of job duties,
employment prospects, training and experi­
ence requirements, training facilities, etc.,
in a particular area or State. Lists publica­
tions by job title, occupational group, and
State. U.S. Department of Labor, Em­
ployment and Training Administration,
1976. GPO Stock No. 029-000-00260-6.
$2.90.
Occupational Employment Statistics
Handbook describes the Federal-State pro­
gram to produce State and area data on
current and projected occupational em­
ployment. It describes the occupational
employment statistics survey; the indus­
try-occupation matrix; and the development
of national, State, and area projections.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. April 1979. 71 pp.
Employment Outlook for 1979 College
Graduates in New England describes job
prospects, by college major, based on in­
formation furnished by college directors of
placement. U.S. Department of Labor,
Bureau of Labor Statistics, New England
Regional Office, Boston, Massachusetts.
Regional Report 79-3, 1979. 22 pp. Pub­
lished annually.
Industry and Occupational Outlook for
the Southeast, 1974-85 presents data on
1974 employment, average annual openings
during 1974-85, and expected growth and

job prospects for several hundred occupa­
tions. U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau
of Labor Statistics, Southeastern Regional
Office, Atlanta, Georgia. Regional Report
41, January 1978. 41 pp.
Occupational Employment Projections to
1985, Federal Region 7—Iowa, Kansas,
Missouri, Nebraska presents data on 1974
employment, projected 1985 employment,
and average annual job openings during
1974-85 for several hundred occupations.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics, Mountain-Plains Regional
Office, Kansas City, Missouri. Regional
Report 20, 1977. 54 pp.

velopment. U.S. Department of Defense,
Defense Contract Audit Agency. 1977. 16
pp.
The Real Professionals describes the U.S.
Army Audit Agency, the work of its ac­
countants and auditors, entry requirements,
and opportunities for professional de­
velopment. U.S. Department of Defense,
U.S. Army Audit Agency. 1975. 8 pp.

Agriculture

(Also see Special groups in the labor
force—Farm workers)
A Career for You in Agricultural Statis­
tics describes the work of agricultural
statisticians in the Statistical Reporting
Service (SRS), entry requirements, promo­
tion opportunities, and application proce­
dures. Lists State offices of the SRS. U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Statistical Re­
porting Service Program Aid No. 1132,
February 1976. 6 pp.

Accountants, Auditors, IRS Agents, Op­
portunities in the Federal Government
describes the work in these occupations,
the location of jobs, entry requirements,
opportunities for professional development,
and application procedures. U.S. Office of
Personnel Management Announcement No.
425, revised May 1979. 8 pp.
An Accountant with SEC . . . A Sound
Investment in Your Future describes the
Securities and Exchange Commission, the
work of its accountants, entry require­
ments, and application procedures. Securi­
ties and Exchange Commission Pamphlet
1283 (2-75), 1975. 4 pp.
An Auditing Career describes the mission
of the Defense Contract Audit Agency, the
work of its auditors, entry requirements,
and opportunities for professional de­



An Engineering Career for You in the
Soil Conservation Service describes the
Service and the work of its engineers. U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Soil Conserva­
tion Service Miscellaneous Publication No.
715, May 1975. 12 pp.
Biological and Agricultural Technicians,
Federal Opportunities in the Washing­
ton-Metropolitan D.C. Area describes
nature of the work in 10 specializations of
research technician work—microbiology,
laboratory animals, biochemistry, insects,
plants, husbandry (animal science), soils,
fisheries, wildlife, and general—along with
entry requirements for grades GS-4 through
-9 and application procedures. U.S. Office
of Personnel Management, Washington
Area Office Announcement WA-8-07, re­
vised February 1979. 6 pp. Similar an­
nouncements are available for other areas.

Projections of Occupational Employment
in New England to 1985 presents data on
1974 employment and projected 1985 em­
ployment for several hundred occupations.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics, New England Regional
Office, Boston, Massachusetts. Regional
Report 78-4, 1978. 34 pp.

Accounting

work of graders, entry requirements, and
application procedures. U.S. Office of Per­
sonnel Management Announcement No.
Ch-5-08.

A Soil Science Career for You in the SCS
describes the work of soil scientists in the
Soil Conservation Service, opportunities
for professional development, and applica­
tion procedures. U.S. Department of Ag­
riculture, Soil Conservation Service Mis­
cellaneous Publication No. 716, revised
December 1975. 8 pp. GPO Stock No.
001-000-03496-1. $.35.
Agricultural Commodity Grader, Op­
portunities in the Federal Government
describes the work of graders—processed
fruit and vegetable (GS-5 and -7), fresh
fruit and vegetable (GS-5, -7 and -9),
poultry (GS-5 and -7), dairy (GS-5, -7 and
-9), and meat (GS-5, -7 and -9)—the loca­
tion of jobs, entry requirements, and appli­
cation procedures. U.S. Office of Person­
nel Management Announcement No. 453,
October 1979. 8 pp.
Agricultural Commodity Grader (Grain)
(Grades GS-5, -7, and -9) describes the
5

Careers in FmHA describes the Farmers
Home Administration, the work of its pro­
fessional employees, training provided,
entry requirements, and application proce­
dures. Lists addresses of FmHA offices.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Farmers
Home Administration. March 1977. 16 pp.
Careers in Soil Conservation Service de­
scribes the Service and the work of its
agronomists, biologists, economists, en­
gineers, foresters, geologists, and soil con­
servationists. U.S. Department of Agricul­
ture, Soil Conservation Service Miscel­
laneous Publication No. 717, December
1975. 12 pp. GPO Stock No. 001-00003497-9. $.60.
Careers in the Exciting Field of Interna­
tional Agriculture With the Foreign Ag­
ricultural Service describes the Service
and the work of its agricultural marketing
specialists, public administrators, and in­
ternational secretaries; opportunities for
professional development; entry require­
ments; and application procedures. U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Foreign Ag­
ricultural Service. May 1976. 12 pp.
Careers in the Food and Nutrition Serv­
ice describes jobs in the Food Stamp Pro­
gram, National School Lunch Program,
Food Donation Program, and the Special
Supplemental Food Program for Women,
Infants, and Children and tells how and
where to apply. U.S. Department of Ag­
riculture, Food and Nutrition Service Pro­
gram Aid No. 1036, 1975. 8 pp.

Farm Credit Administration Examina­
tion Announcement 435 describes the
farm credit system; the work of auditors,
credit examiners, and credit and operations
specialists; entry requirements; and appli­
cation procedures. Farm Credit Adminis­
tration. April 1978. 11 pp.
Food Inspector GS-5 discusses nature of
the work, location of jobs, entry require­
ments, and application procedures. U.S.
Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 451. February 1979. 4 pp.
Life Sciences, Opportunities in the Fed­
eral Government (GS-5 through GS-12)
describes the work in 25 professional posi­
tions including agricultural management,
agronomy, fishery biology, horticulture,
husbandry, and soil conservation. Includes
entry requirements and application proce­
dures. U.S. Office of Personnel Manage­
ment Announcement No. 421, revised Au­
gust 1978. 12 pp.
Occupations and Trends in the Dairy
Products Industry describes the dairy
products industry and, for 66 occupations
in the industry, discusses job duties; edu­
cation, training, and experience needed for
employment; desirable worker aptitudes
and interests; and working conditions. U.S.
Department of Labor, Manpower Adminis­
tration. 1970. 186 pp. (Out of print).

nouncement No. CH-1-15, revised June
1977.
Working with Animals provides an over­
view of jobs working with animals and de­
scribes the work of humane agents, animal
care attendants, conservation officers, vet­
erinary technicians, and zookeepers.
Charles F. Hermann III and Gary Hodge,
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Summer
1978, pp. 22-29.
Your Career as an Extension Agent de­
scribes the work of extension agents, op­
portunities for professional development,
entry requirements, and sources of more
information. U.S. Department of Agricul­
ture, Extension Service MP972, June 1973.
8 pp.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Sci­
ence and Education Administration has a
series of 8-page pamphlets describing em­
ployment opportunities in agricultural
research:
Animal Scientists in the Agricultural Re­
search Service. August 1970.
Chemists in Agricultural Research. Re­
vised October 1978.
Engineers in the Agricultural Research
Service. August 1970.
Entomologists in the Agricultural Re­
search Service. Revised May 1976.
Plant Scientists in Agricultural Re­
search. Revised August 1978.

Opportunities for Plant Quarantine
Inspectors/Plant Protection Inspectors
briefly describes the Animal and Plant
Health Inspection Service and the work of
its inspectors. U.S. Department of Ag­
riculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspec­
tion Service. April 1975. 4 pp.

Tobacco Grader describes nature of the
work, locations of positions, entry re­
quirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­



An Annotated Bibliography of Selected
Curriculum Materials in the Arts and
Humanities, while primarily focusing on
curriculum materials, also lists publica­
tions, films, and other materials describing
occupations in dance, music, theater and
entertainment, visual arts, the media,
writing, and the humanities. U.S. Depart­
ment of Health, Education, and Welfare,
Office of Education. 1975. 226 pp. A lim­
ited number of copies are available from
Education Research Centers, Inc., 44 Brat­
tle St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138. $10.
Architects, Landscape Architects de­
scribes nature of the work, entry require­
ments, and application procedures. U .S.Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 446. June 1979. 4 pp.
CETA Is Music to Their Ears describes
the CETA (Comprehensive Employment
and Training Act) Symphony in Alameda
County, California, formed to help un­
employed musicians qualify for profes­
sional symphonic positions. Mary Jane
Goodban, Worklife, June 1978, pp. 15-19.
Career Exploration Series has been pre­
pared by the U.S. Office of Education,
Bureau of Occupational and Adult Educa­
tion. The series, listed below, consists of
six student guidebooks and three books for
teachers and counselors.
Student Guidebooks. The following books
(each subtitled A Student Guidebook)
have been prepared for students interested
in career possibilities in the arts and
humanities. All include photographs and
sources of additional information. Some
have glossaries, names of related associa­
tions, charts, case studies, or lists of job
titles. Each is written to give a complete
and realistic picture of a career field and
how to get into it (for grades 7-12).

Opportunities Overseas, Agriculturalists
describes jobs with the Agency for Interna­
tional Development in the field of agricul­
ture. Includes information on entry re­
quirements and application procedures.
U.S. Department of State, Agency for In­
ternational Development. August 1977.
1 p.
Students— Start your Career In SCS
Before You Graduate describes the stu­
dent trainee program and the job duties of
scientists, engineers, and economists in the
Soil Conservation Service. U.S. Depart­
ment of Agriculture, Soil Conservation
Service Miscellaneous Publication No.
7 1 4 ,June 1976. 8 pp.

able from Education Research Centers,
Inc., 44 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass.
02138. $10.

Arts and humanities
A Preliminary Exploration of Occupa­
tions in the Arts and Humanities dis­
cusses clustering of arts and humanities oc­
cupations, career ladder and lattice pos­
sibilities, the methods used to project job
opportunities, and the competencies and
skills required for these occupations. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Office of Education. 1975. 192
pp. A limited number of copies are avail­
6

Exploring Careers in the Humanities.
1976. 175 pp. GPO Stock No. 017—
080-01649-4. $2.45.
Exploring Dance Careers. 1976. 28 pp.
GPO Stock No. 017-080-01638-9.
$.75.
Exploring Music Careers. 1976. 67 pp.
GPO Stock No. 017-080-01639-7.
$1.30.
Exploring Theater and Media Careers.
1976. 138 pp. GPO Stock No. 017 —
080-01640-1. $2.15.

Exploring Visual Arts and Crafts
Careers. 1976. 162 pp. GPO Stock
No. 017-080-01641-9. $2.35.

nities. Board of Governors of the Federal
Reserve System. 20 pp.
Financial Analyst: A Sound Investment
in Your Future with the SEC describes
the Securities and Exchange Commission,
the work of its financial analysts, entry
qualifications, advancement opportunities,
and application procedures. Securities and
Exchange Commission Pamphlet 1047
(2-75), 1975. 6 pp.

Exploring Writing Careers. 1976. 74
pp. GPO Stock No. 0 1 7 - 0 8 0 01642-7. $1.40.
The following books for educators have
been prepared in conjunction with the
Guidebook series but may be used inde­
pendently.
Career Guidance in the Arts and
Humanities: Activities, Information
and Resources for Grades 7 -1 2 .
1976. 188 pp. GPO Stock No. 017080-01644-3. $2.60.
E xplorin g Arts and H um anities
Careers in the Community: A Pro­
gram Planning Guide. 1976. 64 pp.
GPO Stock No. 017-080-01648-6.
$1.25.
391 Ways to Explore Arts and Hu­
manities Careers: Classroom Ac­
tivities in Dance, Music, Theater
and Media, Visual Arts and Crafts,
Writing, and Humanities. 1976. 168
pp. GPO Stock No. 0 1 7 - 0 8 0 01643-5. $2.40.
Graphic Designers, Illustrators, Photog­
raphers describes nature of the work, entry
requirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 448. January 1979. 4 pp.
Smithsonian Opportunities for Research
and Study in History, Art, Science de­
scribes the Smithsonian Institution’s aca­
demic programs, its major research ac­
tivities, and the research interests of the in­
dividual members of its professional staff.
Comments on programs for visiting scho­
lars, scientists, and students, and provides
general information about stipends and
grants for study, application procedures for
academic appointments, and deadlines for
applications. Smithsonian Institution, Of­
fice of Academic Studies. 1977. 152 pp.

Banking and finance
A Career in Bank Supervision describes
the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation,
the work of its bank examiners, entry qual­
ifications, opportunities for professional
development, and application procedures.
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. 8
pp.

I Got a Job as a Savings and Loan
Examiner At the Federal Home Loan
Bank Board describes the Loan Board, the
work of its savings and loan examiners,
entry qualifications, opportunities for pro­
fessional development, and application
procedures. Federal Home Loan Bank
Board. 12 pp.

A Sound Investment in Your Future as a
Securities Compliance Examiner with the
SEC describes the Securities and Exchange
Commission, the work of its examiners,
entry qualifications, advancement opportu­
nities, and application procedures. Securi­
ties and Exchange Commission Pamphlet
1433 (2-7), 1977. 6 pp.
Accountants, Auditors, IRS Agents, Op­
portunities in the Federal Government
describes the work in these occupations,
the locations of jobs, entry requirements,
opportunities for professional development,
and application procedures. U.S. Office of
Personnel Management Announcement No.
425, revised May 1979. 8 pp.

Clerical occupations
A Day in the Worklife of Manuel Santalla, Secretary describes a man’s experi­
ences working in a traditionally female job.
Carol Morgan, Worklife, February 1978,
pp. 21 -23.
Clerical Jobs and Your Career, one of a
series of 11 leaflets, describes the wide va­
riety of clerical jobs available. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics. 1978. 4 pp.

“ Soothing the Savage Breast,’’ Music
Therapy as a Career describes the field of
music therapy and the education needed to
enter, and lists colleges and universities
offering programs. G. Ricardo Campbell,
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Summer
1975, pp. 23-24.

Comptroller of the Currency describes
the functions of the Office of the Comp­
troller, the work of its national bank
examiners, entry requirements, and appli­
cation procedures. U.S. Department of the
Treasury, Office of the Comptroller of the
Currency. 32 pp.
Farm Credit Administration Examina­
tion Announcement 435 describes the
farm credit system; the work of auditors,
credit examiners, and credit and operations
specialists; entry requirements; and appli­
cation procedures.

Clerical Opportunities, Social Security
Administration describes the agency, the
types and locations of clerical jobs avail­
able, entry requirements, and application
procedures. U.S. Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare, Social Security
Administration. HEW publication No.
(SSA) 76-10133, April 1976. 14 pp.

The Art Guardians describes the work of
museum curators and conservators (restor­
ers), entry requirements, job opportunities
and earnings. G. Ricardo Campbell, Occu­
pational Outlook Quarterly, Fall 1971,
pp. 2-8.

Federal Reserve Notes, Career Opportu­
nities at the Board of Governors of the
Federal Reserve System describes the
mission of the Board; its employment op­
portunities in economics, finance, law, and
data processing; and advancement opportu­




7

Stenographers and Typists, Opportuni­
ties in the Federal Government describes
entry qualifications for grades G S -2
through GS-5 and application procedures
for jobs in the Washington, D.C., area.

130 pp. GPO Stock No. 0 2 9 - 0 1 3 00067-5. $1.40.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement W A -7-06, revised December
1977. 6 pp. Similar announcements are
available for other areas.

Opportunities in Data Processing For
Positions As Peripheral Equipment
Operators Grades G S -2 through 4,
Computer Systems Operators Grades
G S -4 through 7, Com puter Aides
Grades GS-2 through 4 and Computer
Technicians Grades GS-4 through 7 de­
scribes nature of the work, entry require­
ments, and application procedures for the
Washington, D.C., area. U.S. Office of
Personnel Management Announcement No.
W A -5-06, revised October 1977. 8 pp.
Similar announcements are available for
other areas.

The Latest Word About Shorthand Re­
porting discusses the work of shorthand
reporters, entry requirements, job pros­
pects, and earnings and lists schools ap­
proved by the National Shorthand Reporters
Association. Alex Kacen, Occupational
O utlook Q u a rte rly , Summ er 1976,
pp. 8-9.

Computers
Computer Specialist, Opportunities in
the Federal Government GS-7 through
GS-12 describes the kinds of problems
computer specialists work on; the job duties
of computer programmers, computer sys­
tems analysts, computer equipment anal­
ysts, and computer specialists; entry re­
quirements; and application procedures.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 420, January 1979. 6 pp.

Communications
Careers in Communications Media is a
guide for instructors organizing courses for
career exploration in the communications
field. It describes various occupations in
the field and offers a step-by-step approach
to developing a career education program.
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Office of Education, Bureau of
Occupational and Adult Education. 1975.
288 pp. GPO Stock No. 0 1 7 - 0 8 0 01496-3. $5.60.
Careers: International Communication
Agency describes the agency (formerly the
United States Information Agency) and its
career opportunities. International Com­
munication Agency. 10 pp.
Journalism: The Whole Story describes
the work of journalists, entry requirements,
pay, hours, and working conditions and
lists sources of more information. Christine
Egan, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Winter 1976, pp. 2-8.
Women On The Job: Careers in Broad­
casting describes jobs in radio and televi­
sion and the education needed to enter
them. Lists colleges offering programs in
broadcasting administration. U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Women’s Bureau. 1979. 26
pp.



Social Security Careers: Computer Pro­
grammers describes job opportunities,
training provided, and promotion opportu­
nities. U.S. Department of Health, Educa­
tion, and Welfare, Social Security Admin­
istration. DHEW Publication No. (SSA)
75-10121, October 1974. 4 pp.

Computers and Careers: A Suggested
Curriculum for Grades 9-12 is designed
to help teachers and others introduce all
students to what computers can do, to pro­
vide certain students with a problem­
solving tool, or to prepare other students
for entry into the job market. Contains 14
instructional units which cover topics such
as advanced COBOL programming, begin­
ning keypunch, and data entry. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Office of Education, Bureau of
Occupational and Adult Education. 1973.
Available from ERIC.
Elements of Computer Careers provides Construction
students with an awareness of jobs in the
computer field and discusses educational Construction Industry Series is a set of
requirements, salary levels, and opportuni­ student manuals and instructor’s guides de­
ties for advancement. This textbook for signed for a course for high school stu­
familiarizing students with computers can dents. It was prepared by the U.S. Depart­
be used in a classroom with no computer ment of Health, Education, and Welfare,
hardware, with a remote terminal, or with a Office of Education. The following manu­
computer installation. U.S. Department of al and guide are designed for the occupa­
Health, Education, and Welfare, National tional exploration level. (A series of six
manuals and six guides designed for the oc­
Institute of Education. 1977. 344 pp.
cupational preparation level also is avail­
Occupations in Electronic Computing able.)
Systems discusses how computers are used
and describes job duties, education, train­ Careers in Construction—Instructor’s
ing, and experience required for employ­ Guide contains suggested activities to be
ment, and desirable worker aptitudes, used in exploring career opportunities in
interests, and temperaments for 29 com­ the construction field. Reprinted 1976. 60
puter-related occupations. U.S. Department pp. GPO Stock No. 017-080-01414-9.
of Labor, Manpower Administration. 1972. $4.15.
8

Careers in Construction—Student Man­
ual contains general information about na­
ture of the work, training requirements,
opportunities for advancement, and job
outlook for occupations in seven major oc­
cupational groups. 1975. 104 pp. GPO
Stock No. 017-080-01415-7. $1.35.

Professional Careers for Librarians, Op­
portunities in the Federal Government
describes locations of positions, entry re­
quirements for GS-7 through GS-12, and
application procedures. U.S. Office of Per­
sonnel Management Announcement No.
422, July 1978. 4 pp.
Professional Careers in Education GS-5,
7, 9, Opportunities in the Federal Gov­
ernment discusses nature of the work and
location of jobs for both teaching and non­
teaching positions, entry requirements, and
application procedures. U.S. Office of Per­
sonnel Management Announcement No.
DM -5-01, January 1978. 8 pp.

Education and related
occupations
Librarians in Veterans Administration
Hospitals describes the work of librarians
in VA hospitals, locations of jobs, entry
requirements, and application procedures.
Veterans Administration. VA Pamphlet
10-61, November 1973. 8 pp.

Teacher and School Administrator Sup­
ply and Demand is a report based on two
surveys: The Survey of Recent College
Graduates conducted in spring 1976 of
1974-75 graduates and the Local Educa­
tion Agency Survey of Teacher and Ad­
ministrator Shortages conducted in fall
1977. It discusses current supply and de­
mand, areas of surplus and shortage, em­
ploym ent status of newly q ualified
teachers, and the outlook for teacher supply
and demand to the mid-1980’s. U.S. De­
partment of Health, Education, and Wel­
fare, National Center for Education Statis­
tics. 1979. 70 pp.

Librarians Serving Older People de­
scribes the work in this field, training
needed for entry, employment outlook, and
sources of additional information. U.S.
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor
Statistics. 1979. 25 pp. Based on research
originally presented in an article with the
same title in fhe Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Spring 1978, pp. 48-52.
Library Manpower: A Study of Demand
and Supply discusses current employment
and the demographic, educational, and
earnings characteristics of librarians. Iden­
tifies and analyzes factors which influence
employment needs and projects the demand
for and supply of library personnel through
1985. U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau
of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1852, 1975. 94
pp. GPO Stock No. 0 29-001-01367.
$1.75.
Occupations in Library Science furnishes
occupational descriptions and worker trait
requirements for 25 occupations, and de­
scribes education, training, and experience
needed for employment. Overview provides
general information about librarians and li­
braries. U.S. Department of Labor, Man­
power Administration. 1973. 73 pp. (Out
of print.)



Career Outlines: National Park Service
describes nature of the work, location of
jobs, entry requirements, and salaries for
park rangers, technicians, and other posi­
tions. U.S. Department of the Interior, Na­
tional Park Service. 1978. 21 pp.
Career Opportunities describes the Bu­
reau of Reclamation and the work of its
professional, technical, administrative, and
craft employees. U.S. Department of the
Interior, Bureau of Reclamation. 1977.
12 pp.
Career Opportunities in the Environ­
mental Protection Agency describes the
agency, the types and locations of jobs
available, and application procedures. U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency. 17 pp.
Career Profiles in Forestry, Conserva­
tion, Ecology, Environmental Manage­
ment describes the types of jobs available
in these four areas within the Federal Gov­
ernment and with other employers. Also
lists other sources of information. U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
FS308, 1977. 14 pp. GPO Stock No.
001-001-00423-5. $.90.
Challenge in Wood Research describes
the wood research program of the Forest
Service, the work of its technologists, en­
gineers, chemists, physicists, mathemati­
cians, pathologists, and entomologists; and
entry requirements and application proce­
dures. U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Forest Service Miscellaneous Publication
No. 1054, 1967. 14 pp.
Ecology and Your Career, one of a series
of 11 leaflets, discusses the types of jobs
available to persons interested in protecting
the environment. U.S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. 1978.
4 pp.

Environment, natural
resources, and related
occupations
A Job with the Forest Service: A Guide
to Nonprofessional Employment de­
scribes, through a series of questions and
answers, the Forest Service and the work of
its technicians, aides, clerks, skilled work­
ers, and laborers. Lists schools with fores­
try technician programs. U.S. Department
of Agriculture, Forest Service Miscellane­
ous Publication No. 843, August 1975. 18
pp. GPO Stock No. 001-000-03429-4.
$.35.
9

Engineering Careers in the Bureau of
Reclamation describes the Bureau and the
work of its engineers in planning and de­
sign, construction, research, operation and
maintenance, and foreign activities. U.S.
Department of the Interior, Bureau of Rec­
lamation. 1976. 25 pp.
Employment Opportunities, U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service describes the Service;
the work of its fishery and wildlife biol­
ogists, ecologists, refuge managers, and
special agents; and entry requirements,
summer employment positions, and bene­
fits. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish
and Wildlife Service. 1977. GPO Stock
No. 024-010-00437-1. $1.00.

Exploring Careers in the Natural Re­
sources: A Student Resource Guide for
the Middle School. Section A is designed
to help students develop knowledge of their
personal strengths and weaknesses and un­
derstand the relationship of those charac­
teristics to educational and vocational
choices. Section B contains information on
duties, characteristics of the job, employ­
ment prospects, and advancement opportu­
nities for natural resources occupations, in­
cluding those in air pollution control,
fisheries, forestry, land use planning, min­
erals and mineral fuels, and wildlife and
rangeland management. U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office
of Education, Bureau of Occupational and
Adult Education. 1973. 90 pp. Available
from ERIC.
Forest Service Guide: Professional Op­
portunities in Natural Resource Man­
agement, Planning and Research de­
scribes the Forest Service; career opportu­
nities in forestry, engineering, geology,
hydrology, landscape architecture, range
conservation, research, soil science, and
wildlife management; entry requirements;
and application procedures. U.S. Depart­
ment of Agriculture, Forest Service Mis­
cellaneous Publication 1282, November
1974. 20 pp.
Natural Resources and Career Aware­
ness, A Teacher’s Guide for Grades K -6
provides an outline of topics and learning
activities in the field of natural resources
for teachers and offers information regard­
ing careers in this field. U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office
of Education, Bureau of Occupational and
Adult Education. 1973. 195 pp. GPO Stock
No. 017-080-01256-1. $1.50.
Opportunity in Resource Management
describes the Bureau of Land Management
and the work of its employees in forest,
range, minerals, and watershed manage­
ment; fire protection; recreation; wildlife
biology; ecology; land classification; land
law examining; resource economics; en­
gineering; data processing; and administra­
tion. Describes entry requirements and ap­
plication procedures. U.S. Department of
the Interior, Bureau of Land Management.
1976. 40 pp.
Surface Mining Reclamation Specialist
GS-5/13, Opportunities in the Federal
Government describes the work of these
specialists, the location of jobs, entry re­
quirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 434, August 1978. 1978.
4 pp.



Working for the Bureau of Outdoor Rec­
reation describes the Bureau’s activities in
recreational planning, land and water con­
servation, recreation resource studies, and
environmental protection. Also discusses
career opportunities and entry requirements
for outdoor recreation planners. U.S. De­
partment of the Interior, Bureau of Outdoor
Recreation. 1977. 10 pp. GPO Stock No.
024-016-00062-5. $.35.
Working Toward a Better Environment:
Career Choices describes employment op­
portunities in the environmental field. Lists
postsecondary schools and colleges offering
environmental programs. Federal Govern­
ment agencies involved in environmental
management, and sources of environmental
career information. U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency. Revised 1977. 15 pp.
GPO Stock No. 055-000-00158-8. $.35.
Material in this publication is also available
in an article with the same title in the Oc­
cupational Outlook Q uarterly, Spring
1974, pp. 18-24.
Working with Animals provides an over­
view of jobs working with animals and de­
scribes the work of humane agents, animal
care attendants, conservation officers, vet­
erinary technicians, and zookeepers.
Charles F. Hermann III and Gary Hodge,
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Summer
1978, pp. 22-29.

April-June 1979 listing are included in this
publication under appropriate subject
headings. Current listings are available
from Federal Job Information Centers (see
below).
Directory of Federal Job Information
Centers lists addresses and telephone num­
bers of Centers in all the States and in the
District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto
Rico. U.S. Office of Personnel Manage­
ment BRE-9, September 1979. 8 pp.
Directory of Federal Personnel Offices,
Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management
EWA-305. January 1979.
Federal Employment Outlook is a sum­
mary of career fields and locales for which
opportunities are most favorable for wellqualified applicants or for which chances
for appointment are extremely limited
U.S. Office of Personnel Management BRE
74, September-November 1979. Revised
periodically.
Pace Your Way to a Government Job de­
scribes the Professional and Administrative
Career Examination (PACE), which college
graduates and people with qualifying ex­
perience must pass to be considered for
entry-level positions in about 120 techni­
cal, professional, and administrative occu­
pations. Christine Egan, Occupational
O utlook Q u a rterly, W inter 1977,
pp. 10-15.
Some General Information About Fed­
eral Jobs, First See US describes how jobs
are filled, chances for employment, veter­
ans preference, qualifications needed, and
how to apply. U.S. Office of Personnel
Management BRE-67, April 1979. 8 pp.

Federal employment

Standard Form 171 provides a step-bystep guide to preparing the Personal Qual­
ifications Statement which summarizes an
individual’s experience and skills, educa­
tion, training, awards, and outside ac­
tivities. It is used by most Federal agencies
in selecting job applicants for positions.
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Winter
1977, pp. 16-23.

General
Current Federal Exam ination An­
nouncements is a periodic listing of Fed­
eral job announcements which are issued on
a nationwide basis. These announcements
describe, for each occupation, the nature of
the work, pay grades, entry requirements,
and application procedures. U.S. Office of
Personnel Management AN 2279. Revised
quarterly. Individual announcements in the
10

Summer Jobs: Opportunities in the Fed­
eral Government contains information on
summer employment for clerical jobs in
grades GS-1 through GS-4 and for spe­
cialized positions in grades G S-5 and
above requiring a bachelor’s degree or
equivalent experience. Provides informa­
tion on trades and labor jobs and special
summer employment programs. Lists Of­
fice of Personnel Management area offices

and agency addresses. U.S. Office of Per­
sonnel Management Announcement No.
414, April 1979. 28 pp. Revised annually.
The Federal Career Service . . . At Your
Service presents a general picture of the
Federal personnel system and how it works.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management
OPA-2 1977. 24 pp. GPO Stock No. 006000-00974-3. $.70.
U.S. Government Manual 1979/80 con­
tains information about the legislative,
judicial, and executive branches of Gov­
ernment, including Cabinet-level depart­
ments and independent agencies. It de­
scribes the work and administrative struc­
ture of each organization and lists the
names and addresses of major officials.
Most entries include a source of informa­
tion about employment with the agency and
a list of agency publications. General
Services Administration. 914 pp. 1979.
GPO Stock No. 022-003-00982-5. $7.50.
Working for the USA describes how Fed­
eral Government jobs are filled, hiring
qualifications, pay and benefits, training
and advancement, and how to apply. U.S.
Office of Personnel Management BRE 37,
April 1979. 32 pp.
Working for US tells how to find out
about Federal Government jobs, how jobs
are filled, entry requirements, and pay and
benefits. Neale Baxter, Occupational Out­
look Quarterly, Winter 1977, pp. 2-9. Re­
print available, GPO Stock No. 006-00001040-70. $.70.

College graduates
Beyond the BA: Your Graduate Degree
and the Federal Job Market provides
general information about Federal Govern­
ment jobs for graduate degree holders. For
26 occupational categories, gives applica­
tion procedures, examples of qualifying
graduate degrees, and employment oppor­
tunities. U.S. Office of Personnel Man­
agement BRE 65, June 1978. 8 pp.
Federal Career Directory 1976-1977: A
Guide for College Students provides in­
formation about Federal careers and the
agencies that employ college graduates for
these positions. Part 1 describes nature of
the work, qualifications required, and
career possibilities in more than 100 occu­
pations. Part 2 describes the work of Fed­
eral agencies and their career opportunities
for college graduates. Part 3 lists major
fields of study in college and the jobs for
which people with these backgrounds can
qualify. U.S. Office of Personnel Manage­



ment, March 1976. GPO Stock No. 006000-00900-0. $3.45.
Guide to Federal Career Literature 1978
describes pamphlets and brochures used in
recruiting college graduates for entry-level
positions by Federal agencies. U.S. Office
of Personnel Management BRE-24. 1978,
17 pp. GPO Stock No. 006-000-01037-7.
$ 1. 10.
The College Student’s Guide to Federal
Jobs provides information on entry re­
quirements and entry level grades and
employing agencies for over 150 occupa­
tions. Mary Ellen Ayres, Occupational
Outlook Q uarterly, Winter 1977, pp.
24-59.
Trends in Federal Hiring is a newsletter
for college and university placement direc­
tors that provides current information about
entry-level staffing needs by college major,
occupation, and agency. U.S. Office of
Personnel Management.

Agencies
The following publications, issued by Fed­
eral agencies, describe career opportunities
in a number of occupations in the Federal
service. Publications covering only one oc­
cupation, or agencies whose work is cov­
ered under another heading, are classified
under the appropriate occupational heading.
A Career in Labor Management Rela­
tions as a Field Examiner describes the
work of field examiners, entry require­
ments, opportunities for career develop­
ment, and salaries. National Labor Rela­
tions Board. 1976. 20 pp.
Career Gateways describes the Commerce
Department, the types of jobs available,
and their locations. U.S. Department of
Commerce, Office of Personnel. 1976. 14
pp.
Career Opportunities describes the Com­
modity Futures Trading Commission; its
career opportunities for attorneys, account­
ants, economists, statisticians, and sec­
retaries; entry requirements; opportunities
for advancement; and application proce­
dures. Commodity Futures Trading Com­
mission. 12 pp. 1979.
Career Paths in the Department of Labor
describes the department and provides job
briefs for 52 occupations in the.department,
covering the work, entry qualifications, lo­
cation of jobs, and the level of competition
for jobs. U.S. Department of Labor, Office
of the Assistant Secretary for Administra­
tion and Management. 1978. 27 pp.
11

Careers, United States Army Corps of
Engineers describes the mission of the
Corps, the work of its civilian employees in
a wide range of fields, and the location of
jobs. Department of Defense, U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers. 36 pp.
Careers with Eximbank for Accountants,
Economists, Engineers, Financial Anal­
ysts, and Lawyers describes the bank and
the work of its employees. Export-Import
Bank of the United States. 1978. 6 pp.
Careers with the Employment Standards
Administration describes the work in three
major job categories— Wage and Hour
Compliance Specialist, Workers’ Compen­
sation Examiner, and Equal Opportunity
Specialist. U.S. Department of Labor, Em­
ployment Standards Administration. April
1978. 2 pp.
Careers with HUD describes the mission
of the Department of Housing and Urban
Development and its employment opportu­
nities in a wide range of fields. U.S. De­
partment of Housing and Urban Develop­
ment. 6 pp. 1975.
Central Intelligence Agency describes the
agency, the work of its employees, entry
requirements, opportunities for professional
development, and application procedures.
Central Intelligence Agency. January 1976.
8 pp.
Do It in 3 describes the General Services
Administration, job assignments and aca­
demic background desired for 23 occupa­
tions, and the 3-year professional develop­
ment program. General Services Adminis­
tration. 1974. 20 pp.
Employment Opportunities: Federal
Mediator Positions describes the Federal
Mediation and Conciliation Service, the
work of Federal mediators, entry require­
ments, and application procedures. Federal
Mediation and Conciliation Service. 8 pp.
Let Us Fit Into Your Future describes the
Internal Revenue Service and the duties of
its employees. Describes job duties, educa­
tional qualifications, opportunities for
professional development, and promotion
opportunities in eight occupational cat­
egories in accounting, law, and investiga­
tion. U.S. Department of the Treasury,
Internal Revenue Service Publication 818,
revised January 1977. 15 pp.
Opportunities for College Graduates de­
scribes jobs in the Government Printing
Office in accounting, data processing, li­
brary science, printing management, and

general administration. U.S. Government
Printing Office, 1973. 6 pp.
Professional Careers with Census de­
scribes the Bureau and the work of its em­
ployees in demography, economics, re­
search and development, data collection
and processing, data systems and opera­
tion, and administration. Discusses profes­
sional development and application proce­
dures. U.S. Department of Commerce,
Bureau of the Census. 1975. 28 pp.
Smithsonian Opportunities for Research
and Study in History, Art, Science de­
scribes the Smithsonian Institution’s aca­
demic program s, its m ajor research
activities, and the research interests of the
individual members of its professional
staff. Comments on programs for visiting
scholars, scientists, and students, and pro­
vides general information about stipends
and grants for study, application procedures
for academic appointments, and deadlines
for applications. Smithsonian Institution,
Office of Academic Studies. 1977. 152 pp.
The Federal Communications Commis­
sion and You describes the FCC, its career
opportunities, and pay and benefits. Fed­
eral Communications Commission. 6 pp.
Vista: A Louder Voice for the Nation’s
Poor describes Vista programs and the
work of Vista volunteers. Provides infor­
mation about eligibility, training, assign­
ments, and application procedures. Vista/
Peace Corps Action Pamphlet 4300 6.
January 1978. 20 pp.
Work With GAO for More Effective
Government describes the mission of the
General Accounting Office; opportunities
for majors in accounting, business, eco­
nomics, engineering, law, mathematics,
and public administration; and training and
career development. U.S. General Ac­
counting Office, 1973. 26 pp.
You and ACDA describes the U.S. Arms
Control and Disarmament Agency, its hir­
ing policies, opportunities for career de­
velopment, and pay and benefits. U.S.
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
Publication 70, August 1973. 28 pp.

pects of military careers. Publications are
available from local recruiting offices or by
writing to the following addresses: U.S.
Army Recruiting Command, Fort Sheridan,
111. 60037; Navy Recruiting Command
(Code 40), 4015 Wilson Blvd., Arlington,
Va. 22203; USAF Recruiting Service, Di­
rectorate of Recruiting Operations, Ran­
dolph Air Force Base, Tex. 78148; Head­
quarters, U.S. Marine Corps, Washington,
D.C. 20380; Commandant, (G-PMR), U.S.
Coast Guard, Washington, D.C. 20590.
Selected publications are listed below:
Air Force—A Great Way of Life is a
counselor’s reference book which describes
programs for enlisted personnel and offi­
cers.
The Officer in the United States Air
Force describes opportunities in a number
of career areas. 1977. 53 pp.
Army Occupational Handbook was pre­
pared for students, guidance counselors,
and Army recruiters. For each enlisted oc­
cupational specialty, it describes job duties,
desirable aptitudes and interests, training
provided, and related civilian occupations.
1976. 96 pp.
Help Yourself, A Guide to Enlisted
Careers in the Coast Guard describes de­
sirable aptitudes and interests, training pro­
vided, and related civilian occupations for
Coast Guard jobs. 1977. 22 pp.
O pportunities After College. Coast
Guard describes the job duties of Coast
Guard officers, pay and benefits, and the
officer candidate school. 1977. 14 pp.
Academic Appointm ent Guide is a
desk-top calendar which describes Marine
Corps programs.
Navy Career Guide 1980-81 acquaints
young people and guidance counselors with
opportunities in the Navy. For each enlisted
occupation, it describes job duties, desira­
ble aptitudes and interests, working envi­
ronment, and related civilian occupations.
109 pp.

Armed Forces

The Navy Officer describes officer com­
missioning programs, training provided,
and opportunities for advancement. June
1979. 44 pp.

The Armed Forces publish a great deal of
material describing special enlistment pro­
grams, officer training, opportunities for
women, reserve programs, and other as­

Military-Civilian Occupational Source
Book gives titles and descriptions of mili­
tary jobs and indicates equivalent civilian
jobs. Civilian job titles are based on the




Dictionary of Occupational Titles and the
U.S. Office of Education Career Clustering
System; military titles are based on the en­
listed classification (job/rating) systems of
the five military services. It emphasizes the
commonality between military and civilian
occupations to stimulate qualified young
men and women to investigate the military
services as a source of immediate employ­
ment and of basic and advanced technical
training which they can use in their military
or civilian careers. An introductory section
discusses enlistment, training, pay, promo­
tion, and advanced educational programs.
Department of Defense, U.S. Military En­
listment Processing Center, Fort Sheridan,
111. 60037. Second E dition, January
1978-DOD 1304. 12Y. 293 pp.

12

Foreign languages
Earning a Living with Foreign Lan­
guages discusses the work of foreign lan­
guage teachers, translators, and interpret­
ers. Occupational Outlook Q uarterly,
Winter 1975, pp. 34-35. Reprinted by
permission from the “ Career Corner’’ sec­
tion of Interaction, Volume 3, Number 6,
March 1975.
Foreign Languages and Careers describes
the wide range of jobs in which knowledge
of a foreign language is a highly desirable
supplement to technical, business, or pro­
fessional talents. Lucille J. Honing and
Richard I. Brod. Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Winter 1974, pp. 26-36. Ex­
cerpted by permission from the Modern
Language Journal, April 1974.
Foreign Languages and Your Career,
one of a series of 1 1 leaflets, discusses
careers in which knowledge of a foreign
language is essential or helpful. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics. 1978. 4 pp.

selors, and art and music therapists in the
mental health field and gives information
on entry requirements and earnings. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, National Institute of Mental
Health. DHEW Publication No. (ADM)
75-250, 1975. 19 pp. GPO Stock No.
017-024-00463-4. $1.

Health

(Also see Working with older people.)
General
A Sourcebook for the Health Information
Program helps counselors advise prospec­
tive health professional students, with spe­
cial emphasis-on students from minority
groups. Includes descriptions of about 200
occupations and specializations, covering
nature of the work, educational require­
ments, personal qualities desirable for the
field, working conditions, licensing re­
quirements, and salary ranges. Appendix A
lists organizations for additional informa­
tion; appendix B gives sources of informa­
tion on minority groups. U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, Health
Resources Administration. September
1976. 279 pp. (Out of print.)
Career Opportunities at the National In­
stitutes of Health describes the types of
jobs available for people with training in
medicine, the life sciences, and liberal arts,
and discusses Civil Service benefits. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, National Institutes of Health.
DHEW Publication No. (NIH) 77-16,
1977. 15 pp.
Career Opportunities for: Chemists, En­
gineers, Industrial Hygienists, Medical
Officers, Pharmacologists and Health
Statisticans describes the National Institute
for Occupational Safety and Health, the
work of its employees, and entry require­
ments. U.S. Department of Health, Educa­
tion, and Welfare, Center for Disease Con­
trol, National Institute for Occupational
Safety and Health. 10 pp.
Careers in Mental Health describes the
work of psychiatrists, psychologists, social
workers, psychiatric nurses and aides, rec­
reation therapists, rehabilitation coun­



Have You Considered A Health Career?
in a comic book format, describes the work
in a number of health careers and the edu­
cation needed to enter them. It also in­
cludes career profiles of distinguished
practitioners and researchers. U.S. De­
partment of Health, Education, and Wel­
fare, Health Resources Administration.
DHEW Publication No. (HRA) 77-622,
January 1977. 26 pp.
Health Careers Guidebook, Fourth Edi­
tion discusses nature of the work; desirable
personality traits; and the education, train­
ing, and licensing requirements for a wide
range of health-related occupations. Also
covers career planning, financial aid, and
sources of further information. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Employment and
Training Administration; and U.S. Depart­
ment of Health, Education, and Welfare,
Health Resources Administration. 1979.
221 pp. GPO Stock No. 029-00000343-2. $5.25.
Health Careers Without a College De­
gree, one of a series of 11 leaflets, de­
scribes nature of the work, training re­
quirements, licensing, and earnings for
medical technicians and assistants and
nurses. U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau
of Labor Statistics. 1978. 4 pp.
Job Descriptions and Organizational
Analysis for H ospitals and Related
Health Services discusses the functions
performed in hospitals and, for several
hundred occupations, describes job duties;
education, training, and experience re­
quired; desirable worker traits; and the re­
lationship to other occupations. Also lists
related professional associations or organi­
zations. U.S. Department of Labor, Man­
power Administration. Revised 1971, re­
printed 1978. 732 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-014-00020-5. $10.25.
The Emergency Department Team:
Working Together to Save Lives de­
scribes the work of physicians, nurses,
technicians, registration clerks, and others
providing emergency services, and the
entry requirements and promotion opportu­
nities in these jobs. Lists sources of addi­
tional information. Larry Drake, Occupa­

13

tional Outlook Quarterly, Winter 1978, pp.
16-25.
The Nursing Home Industry describes
employment in the industry in 1973 and
projects requirements by occupation to
1980 and 1985. AOA Occasional Papers in
Gerontology No. 2. Manpower Needs in
the Field of Aging. U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, Adminis­
tration on Aging, National Clearinghouse
on Aging. DHEW Publication No. (OHD)
76-20082, 1975. 16 pp.
200 Ways to Put Your Talent to Work in
the Health Field is a pamphlet describing
health careers and listing sources of more
information. Its preparation was funded in
part by the U.S. Department of Health.
Education, and Welfare. Single copies are
available free from the National Health
Council, Box 40, Radio City Station, New
York, N.Y. 10019. (Please enclose 25
cents for handling.) Bulk quantities are
available at 6 cents each. (Please also en­
close 25 cents for handling each order.)
Send check/purchase order to National
Health Council, 1740 Broadway, New
York, N.Y. 10019.

Occupations
Audiologists and Speech Pathologists in
Veterans Administration Hospitals and
Clinics describes the work, entry require­
ments, and application procedures. Veter­
ans Administration. VA Pamphlet IB10-9, revised January 1976. 3 pp.
A Day in the Worklife of Diane Deakyne,
Dentist describes her work and job oppor­
tunities in dentistry, particularly for
women. Carol Morgan, Worklife, July
1978, pp. 30-32.
Choosing To Serve . . . A Career as a
Dental Hygienist describes nature of the
work and entry requirements and lists
sources of more information. U.S. De­
partment of Health, Education, and Wel­
fare, Public Health Service, Health Re­
sources Administration. 1977. 8 pp. GPO
Stock No. 017-021-00028-1. $.70.
Dental Assisting: A Career on the Move
describes nature of the work, location of
jobs, education programs, certification of
graduates, and earnings. U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, Public
Health Service, Health Resources Admin­
istration. Pamphlet DHEW Publication No.
(HRA) 78-40. 7 pp.
Dental Auxiliary Careers in Veterans
Administration Hospitals and Clinics de­

scribes the work of dental hygienists, lab­
oratory technicians, and assistants in the
VA; entry requirements; work locations;
and application procedures. VA Pamphlet
IB 10-5, May 1974. 4 pp.
Opportunities for Dentists in the Veter­
ans Administration describes the work of
dentists in the VA, educational opportuni­
ties available, entry requirements, and ap­
plication procedures. VA Pamphlet IB
10-8, February 1976. 12 pp.
Dietitian, Opportunities in the Federal
Government GS-5/12 describes the work
of dietitians, dietetic assistants, and public
health nutritionists, as well as entry re­
quirements and application procedures.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 450, February 1979. 6 pp.
An Invitation to Involvement: Engineer­
ing Career Opportunities in the U.S.
Public Health Service describes the mis­
sion of the Service, the job duties of its en­
gineers, entry requirements, and applica­
tion procedures. U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, Public
Health Service. 1979. 36 pp. GPO Stock
No. 017-041-00114-9. $.65.
Exploring Careers in Health Services
Administration describes nature of the
work, personal qualities needed for suc­
cess, and various ways to enter the field.
Lists colleges and universities with pro­
grams in health administration and sources
of career information. U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, Health
Resources Administration. DHEW Publi­
cation No. (HRA) 78-90, 1978. 20 pp.
GPO Stock No. 017-022-00641 -3. $ 1.20.
Homemaker—Home Health Aide Serv­
ices. Part I describes the scope of services
provided by aides and the characteristics of
the agencies that provide them. Part II
gives a profile of homemaker-home health
aides, including the personal qualities usu­
ally sought by employers, discusses histori­
cal and current employment, and provides
projections of requirements, job openings,
and supply through 1990. AOA Occasional
Papers in Gerontology No. 2. Human Re­
sources Issues in the Field of Aging. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Administration on Aging, Na­
tional Clearinghouse on Aging. DHEW
Publication No. (OHD) 77-20086, 1977. 32
pp.
Industrial Hygienists, Opportunities in
the Federal Government GS-5/12 de­
scribes nature of the work, entry require­
ments, and application procedures. U.S.



Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 230, June 1979. 4 pp.
Wanted! Industrial Hygienists describes
the work of hygienists, entry requirements,
earnings, and the current shortage of people
with graduate degrees in the field. Jerry
Stilkind, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Spring 1979, pp. 20-25. Reprinted in up­
dated form from Job Safety and Health,
March 1977.
Career Opportunities as a Medical Rec­
ord Librarian GS-5 thru GS-12 describes
the work, eqtry requirements, and applica­
tion procedures. U.S. Office of Personnel
Management Announcement No. 331,
September 1977. 4 pp.
Careers in Medical Technology, Posi­
tions in Clinical and Health Research
Grades GS-5 through GS-12 describes
nature of the work, entry requirements, and
application procedures for the Washington
D.C., area. U.S. Office of Personnel Man­
agement Announcement No. WA-8-15, re­
vised May 1976. 6 pp. Similar announce­
ments are available for other areas.
Medical Technical Assistant, Opportuni­
ties in the Federal Government describes
nature of the work, training provided, entry
requirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. LK-7-01, March 1977. 4
pp.
Careers in Medical Technology and Re­
lated Biological Sciences in Veterans
Administration Health Care Facilities de­
scribes nature of the work, training pro­
vided, entry requirements, and application
procedures. Veterans Administration. VA
Pamphlet IB 10-13, September 1977. 24
pp.
A Day in the Worklife of Richard Elliott,
Registered Nurse describes the experience
of a police officer who became a nurse.
Carol Morgan, Worklife, March 1977, pp.
29-31.
Nurse Anesthetists in Veterans Admin­
istration Hospitals describes the work,
entry requirements, and application proce­
dures. Veterans Administration. VA Pam­
phlet IB 10-12, August 1976. 4 pp.
Nurse Careers in the Veterans Adminis­
tration describes the duties of nurses in the
VA, educational opportunities, entry re­
quirements, application procedures, and lo­
cations of jobs. Veterans Administration.
VA Pamphlet IB 10-11, May 1977. 24 pp.
14

Nurse-Midwives: Breathing New Life
into Maternity Care discusses nature of
the work, training needed, and State laws
concerning the practice of nurse-midwifery.
Christine Egan, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Spring 1977, pp. 8-11.
Nurses, Opportunities in the Federal
Government describes the work of nurses
in the major employing agencies, entry
requirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 419, revised November
1976. 12 pp.
Practical Nurses in the VA describes em­
ployment opportunities in the VA, entry
requirements, and application procedures.
Veterans Administration. VA Pamphlet
10-52, May 1977. 12 pp.
Careers: Occupational Safety and Health
describes job duties, education require­
ments, and places of work (government and
nongovernment)' for occupational health
nurses, occupational safety and health
technicians, occupational physicians, in­
dustrial hygienists, and safety profession­
als. U.S. Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare, Public Health Service, Na­
tional Institute for Occupational Safety and
Health, Division of Training and Man­
power D evelopm ent. 4 pp. (Foldout
poster/brochure.)
A Day in the Worklife of Nancy Adams
OSHA Inspector describes her job duties,
advancement opportunities, and the grow­
ing number of jobs in her field. Worklife,
January 1979, pp. 29-13.
Orthotist, Prosthetist, Restoration Tech­
nician, Opportunities in the Federal
Government describes nature of the work,
entry requirements, and application proce­
dures. U.S. Office of Personnel Manage­
ment Announcement No. 452, March 1979.
6 pp.
Pharmacists in the Veterans Adminis­
tration describes the work of VA pharma­
cists, postgraduate training programs, entry
requirements, application procedures, and
locations of jobs. Veterans Administration.
VA Pamphlet 10-62, August 1977. 4 pp.
Pharmacists, Opportunities in the Fed­
eral Government GS-9/11 describes nature
of the work, entry requirements, and appli­
cation procedures. U.S. Office of Person­
nel Management Announcement WA-8-09,
January 1978. 4 pp.
Opportunities for Physicians in Veterans
Administration Health Care Facilities de­

scribes the medical and research programs
of the VA, educational opportunities, entry
requirements, and application procedures.
Veterans Administration. VA Pamphlet IB
10-15, January 1978. 10 pp.
Physician’s Assistants, Opportunities in
the Federal Government GS-7/12 de­
scribes nature of the work, locations of
jobs, entry requirements, and application
procedures. U.S. Office of Personnel Man­
agement Announcement No. 428, De­
cember 1977. 4 pp.
Clinical Psychologist, Federal Prison
System, Opportunities in the Federal
Government GS-11/12 describes the
work, locations of jobs, entry require­
ments, and application procedures. U.S.
Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 437, April 1978. 2 pp.
Professional Opportunities in the Veter­
ans Administration for Psychologists
(Clinical or Counseling) and for Psychol­
ogy Technicians, Psychology Aids, and
Graduate Student Trainees describes the
VA’s Department of Medicine and Surgery
and the Department of Veterans Benefits,
the work of VA psychologists and support
personnel, entry requirements, application
procedures, and job locations. Veterans
Adm inistration. VA Pamphlet 05-44,
March 1977. 4 pp.

cal, and recreational therapists; application
procedures; and job locations. Veterans
Administration. VA pamphlet IB-10-7,
August 1975. 16 pp.
Therapists, Opportunities in the Federal
Government describes entry requirements
and application procedures for physical,
occupational, corrective, educational, and
manual arts therapists. U.S. Office of Per­
sonnel Management Announcement No.
441, March 1979. 8 pp.
Careers for Veterinarians describes the
work of veterinarians in the Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service, entry re­
quirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal
and Plant Health Inspection Service. 1976.
12 pp.
Veterinary Medical Officer, Opportuni­
ties in the Federal Government GS-9/15
describes the nature of the work in Federal
agencies, entry requirements, and applica­
tion procedures. U.S. Office of Personnel
Management Announcement No. WA-9-07,
September 1977. 4 pp.
Careers for Voluntary Service Officers
describes the work of coordinating the vol­
unteer program in Veterans Administration
hospitals and application procedures. Vet­
erans Administration. VA Pamphlet IB
10-14, April 1977. 4 pp.

Psychologist, Opportunities in the Fed­
eral Government describes the work of
psychologists in the Veterans Administra­
tion, entry requirements, and application
procedures. U.S. Office of Personnel Man­
agement Announcement No. 444, October
1978. 4 pp.

In Public Practice: Lawyers in the Fed­
eral Government describes jobs in the
field of law, entry requirements, applica­
tion procedures, and opportunities for
summer jobs. Lists Federal agencies which
employ attorneys. U.S. Office of Personnel
Management BRE-66, 1976. 20 pp. GPO
Stock No. 006-000-00954-9. $.45.
Information for Applicants for Attorney
Positions discusses the role of attorneys in
the work of the Federal Communications
Commission, entry qualifications, and ap­
plication procedures. Federal Communica­
tions Commission. 5 pp.
Legal and Quasi-Legal Positions in the
Veterans Administration describes the
VA and the work of its lawyers and claims
examiners, entry requirements, promotion
opportunities, and application procedures.
Veterans Administration. VA Pamphlet
05-51, November 1975. 16 pp.
Legal Assistant: New Career in the
Making discusses the work of paraprofessional legal assistants, qualifications and
training, the job outlook, and earnings, and
lists legal assistant training programs avail­
able. Alex Kacen, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Fall 1975, pp. 8-11.
Today’s Lawyer for the SEC describes the
Securities and Exchange Commission, the
work of its lawyers, entry requirements,
and application procedures. Securities and
Exchange Commission Pamphlet 924
(9-74), 1974. 6 pp.

Program Representative: Non-Technical
describes the work of program representa­
tives in the venereal disease control pro­
gram of the Center for Disease Control,
entry requirements, and application proce­
dures. U.S. Department of Health, Educa­
tion, and Welfare, Center for Disease Con­
trol. October 1977. 4 pp.
“ Soothing the Savage Breast,’’ Music
Therapy as a Career describes the field of
music therapy and the education needed to
enter, and lists colleges and universities
offering programs. G. Ricardo Campbell,
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Summer
1975, pp. 23-24.
Rehabilitation Therapist in the Veterans
Administration describes the VA’s Re­
habilitation Medicine Service; the work of
and entry requirements for corrective, edu­
cational, manual arts, occupational, physi­



Law careers
Careers for Attorneys in Consumer Pro­
tection and Anti-Trust Law describes the
Federal Trade Commission, the work of its
attorneys, and its hiring procedures. Fed­
eral Trade Commission. 1978. 20 pp.
Career Opportunities for Attorneys with
the Civil Aeronautics Board describes the
Board and the work of its attorneys. Civil
Aeronautics Board. 1975. 10 pp.
15

Law enforcement
A Career As A Correctional Officer—An
Opportunity For A Challenge describes
the work of Federal corrections officers,
the location of jobs, entry requirements,
and application procedures. U.S. Office of
Personnel Management Announcement No.
431, January 1979. 8 pp.

ATF Inspectors describes the work of in­
spectors and the training they receive, entry
requirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Department of the Treasury, Bureau
of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. 1977. 4
pp.
Border Patrol Agent, Customs Patrol
Officer, Opportunities in the Federal
Government GS-5 describes the work of
agents and officers and the training they re­
ceive, the location of positions, entry re­
quirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. DS-8-01, February 21,
1978. 6 pp.
Careers in Criminal Justice lists occu­
pations in law enforcement, courts, and
corrections, and explains how to obtain ad­
ditional information on these careers. Dis­
cusses affirmative action programs and in­
novations in the criminal justice system.
U.S. Department of Justice, Law Enforce­
ment Assistance Administration. 13 pp.
Careers in Law Enforcement: An Anno­
tated Bibliography lists publications pro­
viding information about law enforcement
careers. U.S. Department of Justice, Law
Enforcement Assistance Administration.
1977. 20 pp.
Careers in Law Enforcement: State and
Local Government describes entry re­
quirements, job duties, and promotion
opportunities in police work. U.S. Depart­
ment of Justice, Law Enforcement Assist­
ance Administration. 1977. 8 pp.
Careers in Law Enforcement: The Fed­
eral Government describes the functions
of 12 Federal agencies involved in law en­
forcement and provides sources of em­
ployment information. U.S. Department of
Justice, Law Enforcement Assistance Ad­
ministration. 1977. 12 pp.

new employees receive, and salary and
benefits. U.S. Department of Justice, Fed­
eral Bureau of Investigation. 10 pp.
How to Become a Fingerprint Examiner
with the FBI describes entry requirements,
advancement opportunities, and earnings.
U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau
of Investigation, 1978. 4 pp.
Law Enforcement and Related Jobs with
Federal Agencies describes job duties,
entry requirements, and application proce­
dures for jobs such as narcotics agents,
postal inspectors, and immigration inspec­
tors. U.S. Office of Personnel Management
Announcement No. BRE 38, 1977. 24 pp.
Polygraph Examiners: The Truth Will
Out describes the work of polygraph
examiners administering “ lie detector”
tests, personal qualities needed for success
in this field, training and licensing re­
quirements, and beginning salaries. Lists
schools approved by the American Poly­
graph Association. Alex Kacen, Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly, Fall 1978, pp.
-18-20.

Putting a Bachelor of Arts Degree to
Work describes jobs available to liberal
arts graduates in business and government.
Gloria Stevenson, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Winter 1971. pp. 3-10.
What Good is a Degree in English? This
article indicates that the study of English
can be a valuable preparation for students
planning careers in medicine, law, and
business. It is based on information ob­
tained in a survey of medical schools, law
schools, and large industrial organizations.
Lin wood Orange, Occupational Outook
Quarterly, Spring 1974, pp. 9-17.

The Gatekeepers describes the work of
customs, immigration, and quarantine in­
spectors; entry requirements; and earnings.
Joyce Kling. Occupational Outlook Quar­
terly, Fall 1971, pp. 16-23.
United States Secret Service Uniformed
Division discusses duties of officers, entry
requirements and the training they receive,
salary, and benefits. U.S. Department of
the Treasury, United States Secret Service.
5 pp.

Manufacturing
Exploring Manufacturing Occupations.
The following two publications prepared by
the U.S. Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare, Office of Education, help
secondary school students explore careers
in manufacturing occupations. A variety of
course designs and development techniques
allows the teacher and students jointly to
design an individualized course of instruc­
tion. Descriptions of manufacturing indus­
tries form the basis for exploration ac­
tivities.

Exceptional Careers describes jobs in the
U.S. Customs Service for inspectors,
pilots, patrol officers, and others. U.S. De­
partment of the Treasury Customs Service.
July 1979.




Liberal Arts and Your Career, one of a
series of 11 leaflets, discusses the types of
jobs available to liberal arts graduates.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. 1978. 4 pp.

Special Agent describes duties of special
agents, entry requirements, the training
they receive, and pay and benefits. U.S.
Department of the Treasury, United States
Secret Service. 5 pp.

Deputy U.S. Marshall, Opportunities in
the Federal Government describes the
work of marshalls and the training they re­
ceive, the location of positions, entry re­
quirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. WA-7-09, April 1977. 8
pp.

FBI Career Opportunities describes the
job of FBI agent as well as other positions
in the Bureau, entry requirements, training

English and Your Career, one of a series
of 11 leaflets, discusses the types of jobs
available to persons with an interest or
proficiency in English. U.S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. 1978. 4
pp.

Student’s Manual discusses the manufac­
turing process and, for 21 industries, de­
scribes the types of goods produced, typical
jobs, and working conditions, and dis­
cusses the future of the industry. 1976. 104

Liberal arts
16

pp. GPO Stock No. 017-080-01657-5.
$1.75.
Instructor’s Guide provides information
on manufacturing processes and their de­
velopment and suggests several pos­
sibilities for curriculums for studying man­
ufacturing occupations. 1976. 158 pp. GPO
Stock No. 017-080-01658-3. $2.30.
Occupational Preparation-Inspection and
Quality Control. The following publica­
tions form a direct followup to the preced­
ing two listings.
Student’s Manual contains a general over­
view of the quality control and inspection
field, as well as occupational preparation
materials. 1976. 130 pp. GPO Stock No.
017-080-01655-9. $2.
Instructor’s Guide provides curriculum
development guidelines as well as a variety
of instructional resources on the quality
control and inspection field. 1976. 127 pp.
GPO Stock No. 017-080-01656-7. $2.

Occupational and Adult Eduction. 1975.
332 pp. GPO Stock No. 017-08001494-7. $4.65.
Career Exploration in the Fashion In­
dustry: A Suggested Program Guide in­
troduces the field and presents suggestions
for a career exploration program. Five sec­
tions, or resource modules, cover an over­
view of the industry, fashion merchandis­
ing, apparel design and production, textile
design and production, and drycleaning and
laundering. Contains a profile of occupa­
tions in each part of the industry, including
places of employment and job respon­
sibilities. U.S. Department of Health, Edu­
cation, and Welfare, Office of Education,
Bureau of Occupational and Adult Educa­
tion. 1973. Available from ERIC.
The Retail Trade: Selected Department
Store Occupations describes job duties,
education, experience, and training re­
quirements, and aptitudes, interests, and
temperaments needed for 45 department
store occupations. U.S. Department of
Labor, Manpower Administration. 1972.
103 pp. (Out of print.)

ing and playing seasons, working condi­
tions, earnings, and the kinds of jobs in the
sport players have after their playing days
end. Harold Blitz, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Summer 1973, pp. 2-16.
Career Exploration in Hospitality and
Recreation contains five units, each with a
teacher’s guide and student materials. Be­
ginning units focus on the development of
career decisionmaking skills in the context
of hospitality and recreation occupations.
Later units provide information on jobs in
the field. U.S. Department of Health, Edu­
cation and Welfare, Office of Education,
Bureau of Occupational and Adult Educa­
tion, 1976. 219 pp. Available from ERIC.
Recreation Workers Who Organize Ac­
tivities For Older People describes nature
of the work, entry requirements, and em­
ployment outlook. U.S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1979. 25
pp. Based on research originally presented
in Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Fall
1976. pp. 49-53.
Tour Escorting—Glamour or Hard Work
describes the work of escorts, personal
qualities needed for success, income, and
the chances of finding a job. Charlotte
Richmond, Occupational Outlook Quar­
terly, Fall 1971, pp. 9-15.

Marketing
Cafeteria and Retail Management Ca­ Recreation and sports
reers in Veterans Administration Hospi­
tal Canteens describes the work of canteen Athletic Trainers describes job duties,
officers, entry requirements, professional educational background needed, job op­
development, and application procedures. portunities, and income. Ocania Chalk,
Veterans Administration. VA Pamphlet Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Spring
10-81, April 1973. 12 pp.
1974, pp. 28-31.
Career Exploration in Marketing and Professional Golfers: At the Club and on
Distribution is a complete course outline the Tour describes the work of pros, the
and curriculum about career opportunities skills they need, earnings, and job pros­
in marketing and distribution. The course pects. Charles A. Byrne, III, Occupational
materials are divided in two parts: (1) a Outlook Q uarterly, Spring 1979, pp.
general discussion of career decisionmak­ 10-13.
ing skills, and (2) an explanation of mar­
keting and distribution principles, occupa­ The Drive to Win, Careers in Profes­
tions in the field, and skills necessary for sional Sports describes, for baseball, foot­
those considering such occupations. U.S. ball, basketball, and ice hockey, how
Department of Health, Education, and people make their way to professional
Welfare, Office of Education, Bureau of teams and the competition they face, train­



17

Science and engineering

(Also see Agriculture; Environment,
natural resources, and related occupa­
tions; and Health.)
A Soil Science Career for You in the SCS
describes the work of soil scientists in the
Soil Conservation Service, opportunities
for professional development, and applica­
tion procedures. U.S. Department of Ag­
riculture, Soil Conservation Service Mis­
cellaneous Publication No. 716, revised
December 1975. 8 pp. -GPO Stock No.
001-000-03496-1. $.35.

An Engineering Career for You in the
Soil Conservation Service describes the
Service and the work of its engineers, U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Soil Conserva­
tion Service Miscellaneous Publication No.
715, May 1975. 12 pp.

Chemist, A Career with FDA describes
nature of the work in the Food and Drug
Administration, opportunities for profes­
sional development, entry requirements,
location of jobs, and application proce­
dures. U.S. Department of Health, Educa­
tion, and Welfare, Food and Drug Admin­
istration. HEW Publication No. (FDA)
77-1023, 1977. 5 pp.

An Invitation to Involvement: Engineer­
ing Career Opportunities in the U.S.
Public Health Service describes the mis­
sion of the Service, the job duties of its en­ Consumer Safety Officer, A Career with
gineers, entry requirements, and applica­ FDA describes nature of the work in the
tion procedures. U.S. Department of Food and Drug Adminsitration, opportuni­
Health, Education, and Welfare, Public ties for professional development, entry re­
Health Service. 1979. 36 pp. GPO Stock quirements, location of jobs, and applica­
No. 017-041-00114-9. $.65.
tion procedures. U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, Food and
Aerospace Bibliography (Sixth Edition) Drug Administration. HEW Publication
lists books, periodicals, and other educa­ No. (FDA) 77-1022, 1977. 5 pp.
tional materials related to space flight,
space science, and career opportunities in Engineering, Physical and Mathematical
the space program, coded by reading level. Sciences and Related Professions, Op­
National Aeronautics and Space Adminis­ portunities in the Federal Government
tration. January 1972. 116 pp. GPO Stock describes entry requirements for grades
No. 033-000-00460-5. $1.40.
GS-5 through GS-15 and application pro­
cedures. It also contains a section on jobs
Careers for Engineers, Mathematicians, with the National Aeronautics and Space
Computer Scientists at the National Se­ Administration. U.S. Office of Personnel
curity Agency discusses the mission of the Management Announcement No. 424,
agency, the work of its employees, oppor­ January 1979. 13 pp.
tunities for professional development, and
pay and benefits. 17 pp. National Security Engineering Careers in the Bureau of
Agency.
Reclamation describes the Bureau and the
work of its engineers in planning and de­
Careers: Electric/Telephone Engineering sign, construction, research, operation and
describes the Rural Electrification Admin­ maintenance, and foreign activities. U.S.
istration and the work of its engineers, op­ Department of the Interior, Bureau of Rec­
portunities for professional development lamation. 1976. 25 pp.
and travel, and application procedures.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rural Engineers and Scientists, Civilian Career
Electrification Administration. April 1977. Opportunities with Navy describes the
16 pp.
work of the Navy’s civilian engineers and
physical scientists and the location of jobs.
Careers in Aerospace is a series of 3-page Department of the Navy, Navy Civilian
pamphlets describing nature of the work Personnel Command. 16 pp.
and entry requirements for aerospace en­
gineer, aerospace engineering technician, Federal Forecast for Engineers is a
astronomer, geologist, meteorologist, and nationwide compendium of Federal Gov­
test and research engineer. National Aero­ ernment employment prospects for profes­
nautics and Space Administration. 1979.
sional engineers by engineering specialty,
Federal agency, and geographic area. U.S.
Careers in the Aerospace Industry is a Office of Personnel Management BRE-69.
general introduction to jobs in the industry. 12 pp.
Federal Aviation Administration. 1975. 4
pp. Reprinted by permission of Aerospace.
Life Sciences, Opportunities in the Fed­
eral Government (GS-5 through GS-12)
Careers in Aerospace and Related Fields: describes the work in 25 professional posi­
A Listing of Information Sources lists tions including agricultural management,
more than 150 occupational and educational agronomy, fishery biology, horticulture,
publications on aerospace and aviation, en­ husbandry, and soil conservation, and entry
gineering, industry, sciences, government, requirements and application procedures.
and business, and provides sources of fur­ U.S. Office of Personnel Management An­
ther information. National Aeronautics and nouncement No. 421, revised August 1978.
Space Administration. 1976. 4 pp.
12 pp.



18

Marine Career Series: Marine Related
Occupations, A Primer for High School
Students describes scientific, engineering,
technician, and management jobs related to
oceans and other waterways, boating,
fishing, and shipping. Lists sources of ad­
ditional information. U.S. Department of
Commerce, National Oceanographic and
Atmospheric Administration, Office of Sea
Grant. January 1977. 17 pp. Single copies
available free from Marine Advisory Serv­
ice, Publications Unit, University of Rhode
Island, Narragansett, R.I. 02822.
Math and Your Career, one of a series of
11 leaflets, discusses the types of jobs in
which skills in mathematics are valuable.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. 1978. 4 pp.
Microbiologist, A Career with FDA de­
scribes nature of the work in the Food and
Drug Administration, opportunities for
professional development, entry require­
ment, location of jobs, and application pro­
cedures. U.S. Department of Health, Edu­
cation, and Welfare, Food and Drug Ad­
ministration. 1977. 5 pp.
NOAA Careers and Challenges describes
work in various technical occupations with
the National Oceanographic and Atmos­
pheric Administration and provides infor­
mation on application procedures. U.S.
D epartm ent of C om m erce, N ational
Oceanographic and Atmospheric Adminis­
tration. Revised December 1978. 25 pp.
Opportunities with FCC describes the
Federal Communications Commission, the
work of its electronics engineers, and ap­
plication procedures. Federal Communica­
tions Commission. 5 pp.
Professional Energy Careers briefly de­
scribes 20 occupations related to energy,
including nature of the work, education re­
quirements for entry, and sources of more
information. U.S. Department of Energy.
1979. 45 pp.
Road to Your Success, Opportunities for
Young Engineers in the Federal Highway
Administration provides information for
engineering students interested in careers in
highway and highway-bridge engineering.
U.S. Department of Transportation, Fed­
eral Highway Administration. GPO Stock
No. 050-001-00092. $1.20.
Science and Your Career, one of a series
of 11 .leaflets, discusses the types of jobs in
which a knowledge of science is required.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. 1978. 4 pp.

Airport Careers. GA-300-124.
Aircraft Manufacturing Occupations.
GA-300-125.
Airline Careers. GA-300-126.
Flight Attendants. GA-300-127.
Government Careers. GA-300-128.
Agricultural Aviation. GA-300-129.

Shaping Ships: Naval Architects de­
scribes the nature of their work and the
education needed to enter the field. Philip
King, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Summer 1979, pp. 9.
The Compieat Electronic Engineer de­
scribes the mission of the Naval Electronic
Systems Command and the work of its en­
gineers. Department of the Navy, Naval
Electronic Systems Command. 34 pp.
Your Future in Aerospace Engineering
and Management describes the Naval Air
Systems Command, the work of its en­
gineers and scientists, and opportunities for
professional development. Department of
the Navy, Naval Air Systems Command.
24 pp.

Careers for Economists and Transporta­
tion Industry Analysts: Civil Aeronautics
Board describes the Board, the work of its
economists and analysts, entry require­
ments, and hiring and application proce­
dures. Civil Aeronautics Board. 1972. 10
pp.

Transportation
A Civilian Career in the Coast Guard de­
scribes the mission of the Coast Guard and
its job opportunities in accounting, data
processing, and management. U.S. De­
partment of Transportation, U.S. Coast
Guard. 1973. 5 pp.
Career Opportunities describes career
fields within the Interstate Commerce
Commission—attorney, accountant, trans­
portation analyst, economist, statistician,
secretary, and typist. Interstate Commerce
Commission. 16 pp.

Social work
Social Worker, Opportunities in the
Federal Government discusses nature of
the work and location of positions, entry
requirements for grades G S -9 through
GS-12, and application procedures. U.S.
Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement No. 426, May 1979. 4 pp.
Social Workers Who Help Older People
describes nature of the work, entry re­
quirements, employment outlook, and
earnings in the field. U.S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. 1979. 27
pp. Based on research originally presented
in Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Fall
1976, pp. 45-49.
The Social Worker in the VA describes
the Social Work Service of the Veterans
Administration, the job duties, opportuni­
ties for professional development, entry re­
quirements, application procedures, and lo­
cation of jobs. Veterans Administration.
VA Pamphlet IB 10-10, June 1976. 11 pp.



Exploring Careers in Transportation: A
Guide for Teachers discusses four occu­
pational clusters: (1) land transportation,
(2) water transportation, (3) air and space
transportation, and (4) conveyance trans­
portation. U.S. Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare, Office of Educa­
tion, Bureau of Occupational and Adult
Education. 253 pp. Available from ERIC.
Air Traffic Controllers: Opportunities in
the Federal Government describes the
work of controllers and the training they
receive, application procedures, and entry
requirements (including sample questions
of the type used on the written test required
of applicants). U.S. Office of Personnel
Management Announcement No. 418, May
1975. 8 pp.
Aviation Careers Series consists of eight
free pamphlets which provide information
on nature of the work, working conditions,
advancement opportunities, and entry re­
quirements for occupations in eight areas of
aviation. U.S. Department of Transporta­
tion, Federal Aviation Administration.
1976.
Career Pilots and Flight Engineers.
GA-300-122.
Aviation Maintenance. GA-300-123.
19

List of FAA Aviation Education Mate­
rials contains materials on airplanes, air­
ports, and air traffic control for elementary
and secondary school students. Also lists
publications describing aviation careers.
U.S. Department of Transportation, Fed­
eral Aviation Administration. 1978. 6 pp.
Information Concerning Employment
and Training Opportunities in the U.S.
Merchant Marine discusses earnings on
U.S. merchant vessels and documents re­
quired for employment and lists training in­
stitutions and sources of information. U.S.
Department of Commerce, Maritime Ad­
ministration. 1976. 9 pp.
Career Opportunities in the Trucking
Industry describes the job duties; educa­
tion, training, and experience usually re­
quired for employment; and worker traits
needed for 18 trucking occupations. Has
glossary of trucking jargon and bibliog­
raphy. U.S. Department of Labor, Em­
ployment and Training Administration.
1978. 80 pp. GPO Stock No. 029-000-

00306 - 8 . $ 2 . 50 .

Railroad Safety Inspector G S-9, 11, and
12, Nationwide Opportunities in the Fed­
eral Government describes the work of in­
spectors in five specializations: Signals and
train controls; track; motive power and
equipment; hazardous materials; and op­
erating practices. Also gives entry require­
ments and application procedures. U.S.
Office of Personnel Management An­
nouncement PH -6-02, March 1976. 4 pp.
Road to Your Success, Opportunities for
Young Engineers in the Federal Highway
Administration provides information for
engineering students interested in careers in
highway and highway-bridge engineering.
U.S. Department of Transportation, Fed­
eral Highway Administration. 1975. 28 pp.
GPO Stock No. 050-001-00092. $1.20.

Women in Non-traditional Aviation and
Space Careers: An Overview describes
the accomplishments of women in aero­
space careers. U.S. Department of Trans­
portation, Federal Aviation Administration.
G A -3 0 0 -140. March 1979. 8 pp. GPO
Stock No. 050-007-00473-7. $1.00.

Nursing Home Administrators Who Care
for Older People. 1979. 21 pp. Also see
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Fall
1976, pp. 34-37.
Occupational Therapists Who Help
Older People. 1979. 17 pp. Also see Oc­
cupational Outlook Quarterly, Winter,
1976, pp. 13-17.
Physical Therapists Who Help Older
People. 1979. 21 pp. Also see Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly, Winter 1976, pp.
1 3 - 17.

Working with older people

Utilities
Career Opportunities in the Electric
Power and Gas Utilities Industries pre­
sents overviews of the two industries and
describes nature of the work, education,
training, experience, and worker traits
needed for entry for 61 occupations. Also
contains a glossary and a list of publica­
tions about the industries. U.S. Department
of Labor, Employment and Training Ad­
ministration. 1978. 136 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-000-00341-6. $3.25.

Working with Older People is a 27-page
pamphlet which provides brief descriptions,
including educational requirements, of nine
occupations in the field of aging. It also
lists sources of more information and State
agencies on aging. Nine other pamphlets
(see below) each devoted to a single occu­
pation, provide more detail on nature of the
work, entry requirements, employment
outlook, and earnings. Each is based on re­
search which was originally presented in
the Occuptational Outlook Quarterly. They
were prepared by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics for the Administration on Aging
of the Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare. They are available from the
Bureau of Labor Statistics and from State
agencies on aging.

Career Opportunities in the Telephone Architects Who Design Buildings for
and Telegraph Industries describes or­ Older People. 1979. 21 pp. Also see Oc­
ganization of the industries, hiring policies, cupational Outlook Quarterly, Spring
hours of work, pay, and promotion oppor­ 1978, pp. 44-47.
tunities. Discusses education, training, and
experience needed for employment in 24 Librarians Who Serve Older People.
occupations. Has a short bibliography and a 1979. 25 pp. Also see Occupational Out­
glossary of telephone industry terminology. look Quarterly, Spring 1978. pp. 48-52.
U.S. Department of Labor, Employment
and Training Administration. 1977. 68 pp. Nurses Who Work With Older People.
GPO Stock No. 0 2 9 -0 0 0 - 0 0 2 9 4 -1 . 1979. 28 pp. Also see Occupational Out­
$2.30.
look Quarterly, Summer 1979, pp. 18-23.




20

Pyschologists Who Work With Older
People. 1979. 21 pp. Also see Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly, Spring 1978, pp.
1 4 - 17.
Recreation Workers Who Organize Ac­
tivities for Older People. 1979. 25 pp
Also see Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Fall 1976, pp. 49-53.
Social Workers Who Help Older People.
1979. 27 pp. Also see Occupational Out­
look Quarterly, Fall 1976, pp. 45-49.
Working with Older People. The entire
issue of the Occupational Outlook Quar­
terly, Fall 1976, is devoted to working with
the elderly. It contains an overview of the
field, as well as articles on individual oc­
cupations listed above.
Nutritionists Who Work With Older
People discusses nature of the work, entry
requirements, earnings, and sources of
more information. Jon Q. Sargent, Occu­
pational Outlook Quarterly, Spring 1979,
pp. 14-17.
Tomorrow’s Jobs Are Coming of Age de­
scribes jobs providing services to the eld­
erly. Anne B. Cadman and Gloria Steven­
son, Worklife, March 1977, p. 8-13.

Chapter II

Special categories of work




21

Overseas jobs
Part-time and temporary jobs
Self-employment
Summer jobs

Department of State, Board of Examiners
for the Foreign Service. Issued annually.
Foreign Service of the United States of
America Affirmative Action Program for
Junior Foreign Service Reserve Officer
Candidates describes job opportunities in
the Foreign Service, eligibility, and appli­
cation procedures. U.S. Department of
State, Board of Examiners for the Foreign
Service. February 1979. 7 pp.

Overseas jobs
A m erican S tu dents and T eachers
Abroad, Sources of Information about
Overseas Study, Teaching, Work, and
Travel. Revised Edition. U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office
of Education, Bureau of Postsecondary
Education. DHEW Publication No. (OE)
77-19003, reprinted April 1977. 66 pp.
GPO Stock No. 017-080-01377-1. $.90.
Careers in the Exciting Field of Interna­
tional Agriculture with the Foreign Ag­
ricultural Service describes the Service
and the work of its agricultural marketing
specialists, public administrators, and in­
ternational secretaries; discusses opportu­
nities for professional development, entry
requirements, and application procedures.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign
Agricultural Service. 1976. 12 pp.
Employment Fact Sheet describes the
mission of the Agency for International
Development, entry requirements, and ap­
plication procedures. U.S. Department of
State, Agency for International Develop­
ment. June 1978. 8 pp.
Employment With the International Or­
ganizations is a fact sheet describing em­
ployment opportunities in international or­
ganizations, such as the United Nations,
the World Bank, and the Organization of
American States, and the skills and educa­
tional background needed. U.S. Depart­
ment of State. October 1977. 9 pp.
Examination for Foreign Service Officer
Careers discusses career development and
promotion opportunities, entry require­
ments, and application procedures and pro­
vides a list of examination locations. Also
discusses the written examination, includ­
ing sample test questions, and other tech­
niques used to evaluate candidates. U.S.



Foreign Service of the United States
Mid-Level Hiring of Women and Minor­
ity Group Members describes job oppor­
tunities, eligibility, and application proce­
dures. U.S. Department of State, Office of
Recruitment, Examination, and Employ­
ment. April 1979. 7 pp.
Federal Jobs Overseas lists agencies
employing overseas personnel, the kinds of
positions they may be recruiting for and
addresses for employment inquiries, along
with general information on entry require­
ments and tours of duty. U.S. Office of
Personnel Management BRE-18, April
1979. 14 pp.

tions needed by volunteers, and the training
they receive. G. Ricardo Campbell, Occu­
pational Outlook Quarterly, Winter 1975,
pp. 2-9.
Peace Corps: The Toughest Job You’ll
Ever Love describes Peace Corps programs
and the work of Peace Corps volunteers.
ACTION/Peace Corps. 12 pp.
Work Abroad describes the kind of work
and the earnings and working conditions
people can expect, and lists publications
and organizations which can provide infor­
mation or assistance in locating a job.
Marjorie Adoff Cohen and Margaret E.
Sherman, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Winter 1978, pp. 26-31. This article is
based on material in the Whole World
Handbook: A Student Guide to Work,
Study, and Travel Abroad. 1978-79 Edi­
tion, published by the Council on Interna­
tional Educational Exchange and the
Frommen/Pasmantier Publishing Corpora­
tion.

Opportunities Overseas, Agriculturalists
describes jobs with the Agency for Interna­
tional Development in the field of agricul­
ture, the entry requirements, and applica­
tion procedures. U.S. Department of State,
Agency for International Development.
August 1977. 1 p.
Opportunities Overseas, International
Development Intern Program describes a
two-year career program leading to posi­
tions of increasing responsibility in profes­
sional and managerial jobs in the Agency
for International Development, the entry
requirements, the training provided, and
application procedures. U.S. Department of
State, Agency for International Develop­
ment. January 1979. 2 pp.
Opportunities Overseas, Secretaries—
Africa/Middle East Asia/Latin-America
describes opportunities with the Agency for
International Development, entry require­
ments, orientation and training provided,
and application procedures. U.S. Depart­
ment of State, Agency for International
Development. August 1978. 1 pp.
Peace Corps, An Action Program de­
scribes the work of Peace Corps volunteers,
the kinds of skills needed, and countries
where they are needed. ACTION/Peace
Corps. Action Pamphlet 4200.12, 1977. 20
pp.
Peace Corps: An Ideal Endures describes
the work of the Peace Corps, the qualifica­
22

Part-time and temporary
jobs
Hopping in Hamburger Heaven describes
part-time employment opportunities for
high school and college students in fastfood resturants. John Franklin, Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly, Spring 1975, pp.
19-21.
Should You Be a Notary Public? de­
scribes job duties, entry qualifications, and
earnings in this part-time occupation. Oc­
cupational Outlook Q uarterly, Spring
1974, pp. 25-27.
Back to Work—as “ Temporaries” de­
scribes job opportunities as temporary
workers. Roberta Wyper, Worklife, April
1977, pp. 24-26.
Is Temporary Work for You? describes
how temporary help contractors operate.

the kinds of jobs they offer, and the people
who are attracted to temporary work. Shir­
ley Rudney, Occupational Outlook Quar­
terly, Winter 1978, pp. 12-14.

Like? describes the typical workday of a
self-employed retailer, the advantages and
disadvantages of being your own boss,
likely earnings, personal traits needed for
success, and the need for capital to get
started. Gloria Stevenson, Occupational
Outlook Q uarterly, Spring 1973, pp.
20-30.

Working for Yourself . . . What’s It




Summer Jobs: Opportunities in the Fed­
eral Government contains information on
summer employment for clerical jobs in
grades GS-1 through GS-4 and for spe­
cialized positions in grades G S-5 and
above requiring a bachelor’s degree or
equivalent experience. Provides informa­
tion on trades and labor jobs and special
summer employment programs. Lists Of­
fice of Personnel Management area offices
and agency addresses. U.S. Office of Per­
sonnel Management Announcement No.
414, April 1979. 28 pp. Revised annually.
Summer Jobs for Students provides
suggestions on where to find a summer job,
writing a resume, and interviewing. Donald
Dillon, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Winter 1972, pp. 16-19.

Self-employment
Checklist for Going Into Business pro­
vides tips on assessing your ability to start
a business and how to get started. U.S.
Small Business Administration Small Mar­
keters Aid 71, 1978. 12 pp. It is reprinted
in the Winter 1979 issue of Occupational
Outlook Quarterly. The SBA also publishes
a number of other free pamphlets which
provide assistance in detailed aspects of
operating a business.

Personnel Management BRE-47, 1977. 5
pp.

Summer jobs
A Unique Opportunity: The Federal
Summer Intern Program describes the
program established to involve talented
student leaders in operations of the Federal
Government. Indicates selection procedures
and salaries for students who intend to re­
turn to school in the fall. U.S. Office of

23

Thoughts Turn To Summer Jobs de­
scribes the programs under the Comprehen­
sive Employment and Training Act (CETA)
to provide part-time jobs for 9 weeks for 1
million disadvantaged youth. Michael J.
Walker, Worklife, April 1978, pp. 27-31.
Tips on How to Find A Summer Job has
some suggestions on how to improve your
chances of finding a summer job. Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly, Winter 1978, pp.
32-33.

Chapter III

Special groups in the labor force ™Z S u,e
J n , a8
™




Farm workers
Handicapped workers
Minorities
Older workers
Veterans
Women
Young workers

24

Occupational Outlook for College Grad­
uates, 1980-81 Edition describes the out­
look for college graduates in general and
contains information on more than 100 oc­
cupations for which a college degree is re­
quired or useful. U.S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin
2076.
Payoffs and Payments: The Economics of
a College Education discusses the compli­
cated process of determining the monetary
returns to a college degree. Neale Baxter,
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Summer
1977. pp. 28-23.

College graduates

(Also see Federal employment-College
graduates.)
1976 Survey of 1974-75 College Grad­
uates presents data on bachelor’s and mas­
ter’s degree recipients, covering topics
such as unemployment, underemployment,
sex and racial differences in employment
status, and teacher supply and demand.
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, National Center for Education
Statistics. NCES 78-123, 1978. 19 pp.

Higher Education and Good Jobs dis­
cusses the results of a survey of persons
who entered college in 1961. The questions
dealt with what benefits are derived from
college education and what college grad­
uates seek from their work. Lewis C. Sol­
mon, Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Fall
1977, pp. 34-39. Reprinted from National
Review, October 15, 1976.



Twists on the Way to Going Straight
presents case studies which offer clues to
what prime sponsors can expect in assisting
ex-offenders under CETA. Gloria Steven­
son, Worklife, May 1978, pp. 28-31.
Toppling Job Barriers for Offenders de­
scribes the employment problems of offen­
ders and ways to help them. Ian McNett,
Worklife, May 1978, pp. 24-27.

The Jam At the Bottom of the Funnel:
The Outlook for College Graduates dis­
cusses the supply-demand situation for
college graduates during the early and
mid-1970s and what it is likely to be
through 1985. Daniel E. Hecker, Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly, Spring 1978, pp.
36-39.
The Job Outlook for College Graduates
Through 1990 offers an analysis of current
supply-demand trends and an indication of
what will happen if those trends continue.
Janet L. Norwood, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Winter 1979, pp. 2-7.

College Education on the Job: The
Graduate’s Viewpoint presents findings of
a national study of college graduates (who
entered college in 1961 and had been
working full time for up to 10 years) to de­
termine the utilization and value of higher
education in employment. Focuses on utili­
zation of knowledge obtained in under­
graduate study, and includes graduates’
views on the ways in which their college
education contributed to their long-run de­
velopment. Ann Stouffer Bisconti and
Lewis C. Solmon, U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, National
Institute of Education. 1977. 53 pp.
College Graduates—Their Work Experi­
ences Following Commencement dis­
cusses a survey of 1972 college
graduates—the kinds of jobs they found,
their job search methods, and those who
were unemployed. Anne M. Young, Occu­
pational Outlook Quarterly, Summer 1975,
pp. 35-36.

program does, how it works, and how
others may become involved. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Women’s Bureau.
Leaflet 57, 1977.

Farm workers
Farm Workers and the Fair Labor
Standards Act contains general informa­
tion on provisions of the act regarding
wages, age limits for minors, recordkeep­
ing by employers, enforcement, and who is
covered by the act. U.S. Department of
Labor, Employment Standards Administra­
tion. WH Publication 1161, revised 1975. 4
pp.

Ex-offenders
Employment Needs of Women Offenders:
A Program Design has three parts. The
first is a report, “ Focus on the Employment
Needs of Women Offenders.” The second
discusses how an organization can carry out
a program for women offenders. The final
section contains samples of relevant mate­
rials and a resource directory. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Women’s Bureau. Pam­
phlet 13, 1977. 63 pp.
Women Offenders: Must We Bar Them
From Employment? describes a program
for women offenders initiated in 1975 by
the Women’s Bureau. It explains what the
25

Guide to Farm Jobs, Eastern Seaboard
States provides a map of crop areas and in­
dicates the seasonal work periods for each
crop and the U.S. Employment Service of­
fices to contact for more information. U.S.
Department of Labor, Employment and
Training Administration. October 1978.
Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker Pro­
gram, U.S. Department of Labor High­
lights, one of a series of fact sheets, de­
scribes how the program works, who are
served, how to apply, and where to get
more information. U.S. Department of
Labor, Employment and Training Admin­
istration. Consumer Information Leaflet
No. USDL— 10 (E T A -6), November
1978. 1 p. A compilation of all 22 fact
sheets is titled Employment and Training
Highlights.

Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker Pro­
grams presents charts and statistical data,
including income and life expectancy of
migrant farmworkers. Briefly describes
programs aimed at improving living condi­
tions for these workers through on-the-job
and classroom training and services such as
health and medical care. U.S. Department
of Labor, Employment and Training Ad­
ministration. 1978. 36 pp.

Committee on Employment of the Handi­
capped and the National Association for
Retarded Citizens. 1978. 35 pp.
Affirmative Action for Disabled Peo­
ple—A Pocket Guide is a explanation of
sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation
Act of 1973 and the Vietnam Era Veteran’s
Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974. Tells
who is a veteran, what employers have to
do for veterans, how and where to look for
a job, and how to file a complaint. The
President’s Committee on Employment of
the Handicapped. 1974. 11 pp.
Disabled Veterans on the Job Front de­
scribes the Disabled Veterans Outreach
Program to locate and help find jobs for
unemployed disabled veterans. Michael J.
Walker, Worklife, November 1978, pp.
28-31.

Handicapped workers
A Bright Future, Your Guide To Work is
a booklet for people who have had mental
or emotional illnesses. It covers how to as­
sess your abilities, where you can turn for
help, how to look for a job, what you
should do in a job interview, and what to
do once on the job. Also lists State sources
of assistance. The Mental Health Associa­
tion and The President’s Committee on
Employment of the Handicapped. 1977. 29
pp.
A Handbook on the Legal Rights of
Handicapped People is a summary of Fed­
eral, District of Columbia, Maryland, and
Virginia laws designed to aid handicapped
citizens. Intended to serve as a model for
the development of similar regional hand­
books around the country. The President’s
Committee on Employment of the Handi­
capped. 1977. 103 pp. GPO Stock No.
040-000-00355-0. $1.80.
Able-Disabled Battling Against Barriers
describes the “ Able-Disabled Advocacy’’
model program in San Diego, offering
work experience, counseling, and place­
ment services to the disabled. Shirley Boes
Neill, Worklife, October 1978, pp. 8-11.
About Jobs and M entally Retarded
People covers evaluation of the skills of
mentally retarded people, ways they can
prepare for work, vocational rehabilitation,
job hunting, and potential employers. Lists
State sources of assistance. The President’s



Guide to Job Placement of Mentally Re­
stored People presents the facts about
mentally restored workers for those helping
them find jobs and for prospective employ­
ers. The President’s Committee on Em­
ployment of the Handicapped. 1974. 47 pp.
Guide to Job Placement of Mentally Re­
tarded Workers presents facts about men­
tally retarded workers for those helping
them find jobs and for prospective employ­
ers. The President’s Committee on Em­
ployment of the Handicapped in coopera­
tion with The National Association for Re­
tarded Citizens and the U.S. Employment
Service of the U.S. Department of Labor.
20 pp.
High Marks for the “ Hardest to Em­
ploy” describes the CETA-funded onthe-job training program for retarded per­
sons of the National Association for Re­
tarded Citizens. Neal Barnett, Worklife,
October 1978, pp. 16-19.
How DOL Helps Handicapped Workers
describes a number of programs of the U.S.
Department of Labor. Emily Wadlow,
Worklife, May 1977, pp. 7-12.
How to Get a Job provides guidance to
mentally retarded jobseekers on assessing
their skills, finding sources of assistance in
finding a job, applying for a job, and deal­
ing with supervisors. It also contains a list
of 100 jobs in which retarded individuals
may function well. The President’s Com­
mittee on Employment of the Handicapped.
1977. 29 pp. A 13-page Teachers Manual
also is available.
Interviewing Guides for Specific Disabil­
ities were developed for the U.S. Employ­
26

ment Service to acquaint the counselor or
interviewer with the nature of the disability
and to assist in understanding the medical
terminology associated with it. They are
useful in helping to determine an appli­
cant’s employment capabilities. Guides in­
clude:
Alcoholism. 1969. 9 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-000-00353-0. $1.
Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Dis­
eases. 1979. 18 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-000-00355-6. $1.
Cerebral Palsy. 1978. 23 pp. GPO
Stock No. 029-000-00301-7. $1.
Epilepsy. Reprinted 1976. 8 pp.
Hearing Impairments. Reprinted 1975.
17 pp. GPO Stock No. 0 2 9 -0 0 0 00248-7. $.90.
Legal Blindness and Blindness. Re­
printed 1976. 17 pp.
Mentally Restored. Reprinted 1977. 16
pp.
Mental Retardation. 1976. 8 pp.
Orthopedic Disabilities. 1979. 17 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-000-00353-0.
$

1.

Respiratory Impairments. 1977. 22 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-000-00289-4. $1.
Visual Impairments. 1978. 14 pp. GPO
Stock No. 029-000-00332-7. $.90.

Pocket Guide to Federal Help for the
Disabled Person describes the principal
government services for which handicapped
people may be eligible, including those re­
lated to education and employment. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Office of Information and Re­
sources for the Handicapped. July 1979.
24 pp. GPO Stock No. 017-000-00216-3.
$ 1.

Preparing for Work is a checklist to as­
sess the readiness of mentally retarded
people for work. It can be used by teachers,
counselors, work-study specialists, families
of mentally retarded people, and mentally
retarded people themselves. The Presi­
dent’s Committee on Employment of the
Handicapped, 1978. 17 pp.
Program for the Handicapped, U.S. De­
partment of Labor Highlights, one of a
series of fact sheets, describes how the
program works, who are served, how to
apply, and where to get more information.
C onsum er In form ation L eaflet No.
U.S. Department of Labor, Employment
and Training .Administration. Consumer
Information Leaflet No. USDL-7 (ETA-3),
May 1978. 1 p. A compilation of all 22 fact

sheets is titled Employment and Training
Highlights.
TAPS Would Sound the End of Epilepsy
Bias describes the Training and Placement
Services Project (TAPS) of the Epilepsy
Foundation of America to place people with
epilepsy in jobs and dispel employer preju­
dice against them. Janet K. Asher, Worklife, October 1978, pp. 12-14.
The Blind on the Go and at Work de­
scribes how blind people use their senses of
taste, smell, and hearing in various em­
ployment situations. U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, Rehabili­
tation Services Administration. DHEW
Publication No. (SRS) 73-25501, 1973.
14 pp.

Minorities
Counseling Black Teenage Girls explores
some of the reasons why black teenage girls
have higher unemployment rates than any
other group in the labor force and describes
steps school counselors may take to im­
prove the situation. Gloria Stevenson, Oc­
cupational Outlook Quarterly, Summer
1975, pp. 2-13.
Counseling the American Indian exam­
ines the relationships between counseling
and the Indian heritage and describes some
special programs designed to aid Indians.
Mary Ellen Ayres, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Spring 1977, pp. 22-29.
Counseling Hispanic Americans describes
the Hispanic community and programs to
help Hispanic Americans obtain education
and jobs. Mary Ellen Ayres, Occupational
Outlook Quarterly, Summer 1979, pp.

and community action, ethnic service, civil
rights, human resources, educational, busi­
ness, and media organizations that may be
helpful to those involved in equal employ­
ment or civil rights work. U.S. Department
of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and
Training. 1979. 300 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-000-00357-2. $4.50.
Career Education and Minorities. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, 1977. 94 pp. GPO Stock No.
017-080-01733-4. $2.75.
Discover the World of Work, a 36volume set written in both English and
Spanish, is designed to introduce basic
career education to Spanish-speaking mi­
grant students, grades K-6. The material
covers 12 careers: Fruit grower, cattle
rancher, auto mechanic, telephone oper­
ator, appliance repairer, shipping and re­
ceiving clerk, butcher, bank teller, sales
clerk, beautician, school nurse, and police
officer. Each career is presented at three
levels: Level A for the nonreading student
who will work with a teacher, parent, or
both; Level B for the student of limited
reading ability; and Level C for the student
who can read in either language but who
may require reinforcement in the other lan­
guage. U.S. Department of Health, Educa­
tion, and Welfare. 1976. (Out of print.)
Indian Program, U.S. Department nf
Labor Highlights, one of a series of fact
sheets, describes how the program works,
who are served, how to apply, and where to
get more information. U.S. Department of
Labor, Employment and Training Admin­
istration. Consumer Information Leaflet
No. USDL-13 (ETA-9), November 1978.
1 p. A compilation of all 22 fact sheets is
titled Employment and Training High­
lights.
Minority Women, Professional Work de­
scribes the Minority Women’s Employment
Program (MWEP), designed to place un­
derutilized college-educated minority
women in managerial, professional, and
technical jobs for which they qualify.
Robert Glover, Alexis Herman, and Allan
King. 5 pp. U.S. Department of Labor,
Women’s Bureau. Reproduced from Man­
power, July 1975. Available from U.S.
Department of Labor, Women’s Bureau.

2- 8 .

Directory for Reaching Minority and
Women’s Groups contains names, ad­
dresses, and telephone numbers of ap­
proximately 5,000 government agencies



Minority Women Workers: A Statistical
Overview presents statistics on minority
women workers, covering topics such as
labor force participation, unemployment
rates, women heads of families, education,
27

employment status of high school dropouts,
and earnings. U.S. Department of Labor,
Women’s Bureau. Revised 1977. 14 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-016-00050-0. $1.
Native American Career Education: A
Curriculum Guide, intended for teachers,
counselors, and others involved in the Na­
tive American Career Education program.
The guide serves as a resource for junior
high schools, covering topics such as career
education as a discipline in American edu­
cation, traditional Indian teaching methods,
and implementation of strategies discussed.
Each of 12 units available separately. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Office of Education. 1977. 113
pp.
Selected List of Postsecondary Education
Opportunities for Minorities and Women
lists sources of information on educational
opportunities and financial aid. Programs
and financial aid not limited to women and
minorities also are listed. U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office
of Education, Bureau of Higher and Con­
tinuing Education, 1979. 100 pp. GPO
Stock No. 017-080-02040-8. $3.75.
Women and Minorities in Science and
Engineering uses statistical data to illumi­
nate the role of women and minorities in
science and engineering. National Science
Foundation. NSF 77-304, 1977. 24 pp.
GPO Stock No. 038-000-00307-1. $.75.
Workers of Spanish Origin: A Chartbook includes information on Hispanic
labor force participation, employment and
unemployment, work experience, earnings,
and poverty. Many charts show charac­
teristics by age, sex, family status, and
years of school completed. U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Bulletin 1970. 1978. 75 pp. GPO Stock
No. 029-001-02134-8. $2.40. Spanish
edition, Bulletin 1971. GPO Stock No.
029-001-02135-6. $2.40.
You Can Help Them is a guide for teach­
ers, guidance counselors, social service
workers, and others describing the Job
Corps and what it can do for disadvantaged
young men and women. U.S. Department
of Labor, Job Corps. 1971. 10 pp.
Youth Build A Future in the Barrio de­
scribes San Antonio’s Youth Community
Conservation and Improvement Project to
train M exican-American youth in the
building trades. Marina Pisano, Worklife,
October 1978, pp. 9-13.

November 1978. 2 pp. A compilation of all
22 fact sheets is titled Employment and
Training Highlights.

Older workers

Veterans

Employment Services for Older Work­
ers, U.S. Department of Labor High­
lights, one of a series of fact sheets, de­
scribes the services, who are served, how
to apply, and where to get more informa­
tion. U.S. Department of Labor, Employ­
ment and Training Administration. Con­
sumer Information Leaflet No. USDL-50
(ETA-18), November 1978. 2 pp. A com­
pilation of all 22 fact sheets is titled Em­
ployment and Training Highlights.

Affirmative Action to Employ Disabled
Veterans and Veterans of the Vietnam
Era: A Pocket Guide is an explanation of
section 402 of the Vietnam Era Veterans
Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974. It
tells who is a veteran, what employers have
to do for veterans, how and where to look
for jobs, and how to file a complaint. The
President’s Committee on Employment of
the Handicapped. 20 pp.

Mature Women Workers: A Profile is a
statistical profile of women workers 45
years of age and older. Includes tables on
employment and unemployment, education,
occupational distribution, income, and liv­
ing arrangements. U.S. Department of
Labor, Women’s Bureau. 1976. 12 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-016-00040-2. $.35.
Memo to M ature Job seek ers suggests

techniques for assembling records, check­
ing job sources, following up on leads, and
making the most of interviews. U.S. De­
partm ent of Labor, Employment and
Training Administration. 1978. 2 pp.
Older Workers “ SEE” a Better Envi­
ronment describes the Senior Environ­
mental Employment (SEE) program, which
employs older workers in pollution control
projects. Karen Morehouse, Worklife, July
1978, pp. 26-29.
Programs for Older Workers, U.S. De­
partment of Labor Highlights, one of a
series of fact sheets, describes how the
programs work, who are served, how to
apply, and where to get more information.
U.S. Department of Labor, Employment
and Training Administration. Consumer
Info rm atio n L eaflet No. U S D L -1 2
(ETA-8), November 1978. 1 p. A compi­
lation of all 22 fact sheets is titled Em­
ployment and Training Highlights.



D-Day for Veterans’ Jobs describes a
government-funded effort to provide work
for unemployed veterans. Robert R.
Nathan, Worklife, July 1977, pp. 2-7.
Disabled Veterans on the Job Front de­
scribes the Disabled Veterans Outreach
Program to locate and help find jobs for
unemployed disabled veterans. Michael J.
Walker, Worklife, November 1978, pp.
28-31.
Federal Benefits for Veterans and
Dependents describes the full range of
benefits and services, including those for
education, training, and job placement.
Veterans Administration. IS — Fact Sheet,
1
January 1979. GPO Stock No. 051-00000128-1. $1.50.

Women
1975 Handbook on Women Workers is a
3-part handbook of facts about the status of
women in the work force. Part I deals with
women’s economic status—their participa­
tion in the work force, occupations, earn­
ings, and education and training. Part II
centers on Federal and State laws governing
women’s employment and their civil and
political status. Part III describes State,
national, and international efforts to ad­
vance the status of women. U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Women’s Bureau. Bulletin
297, 1975. 435 pp. GPO Stock No. 029016-00037-2. $4.70.
A Woman’s Guide to Apprenticeship de­
s c r ib e s th e a p p r e n t ic e s h ip system and how
to become an apprentice. It discusses the
status of women as skilled craft workers
and the barriers to women in appren­
ticeship. U.S. Department of Labor,
Women’s Bureau. 1978. 24 pp.

Q&A With the Chairman of the (HIRE)
Board discusses the Help through Industry
Retraining and Employment (HIRE) pro­
gram to help unemployed Vietnam-era and
disabled veterans. Worklife, January 1978,
pp 19-21.

A Working Woman’s Guide to Her Job
Rights discusses the rights of working
women, including equal pay, maternity
leave, overtime pay, minimum wages,
child care, unemployment insurance, social
security, pensions, and unions. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Women’s Bureau.
1978. 32 pp. GPO Stock No. 029-01600056-9. $1.60.

Veterans’ Employment Programs, U.S.
Department of Labor Highlights, one of a
series of fact sheets, describes how the
programs work, who are served, how to
apply, and where to get more information.
U.S. Department of Labor, Employment
and Training Administration. Consumer
Information Leaflet No. USDL-9 (ETA-5),

Career Options for Black Women de­
velops recommendations for policies and
programs to aid black women in improving
their career options. Discusses employment
outlook for selected occupations through
the m id-1980’s. U .S. D epartm ent of
Health, Education, and Welfare, National
Institute of Education. 1976. 372 pp.

28

Counseling Black Teenage Girls explores
some of the reasons why black teenage girls
have higher unemployment rates than any
other group in the labor force and describes
steps school counselors may take to im­
prove the situation. Gloria Stevenson, Oc­
cupational Outlook Quarterly, Summer
1975, pp. 2-13.
Employment in Perspective: Working
Women is a quarterly report which presents
highlights of current data on women in the
labor force. Most recent issue is the 1979
summary. U.S. Department of Labor,
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Report 587,
1980. 3 pp.
Employment Needs of Women Offenders:
A Program Design has three parts. The
first is a report of the Women’s Bureau
program “ Focus on Employment Needs of
Women Offenders.” The second discusses
how an organization can carry out a pro­
gram for women offenders. The final sec­
tion contains samples of relevant materials
and a resource directory. U.S. Department
of Labor, Women’s Bureau Pamphlet 13,
1977. 63 pp.
Far From the Surrey with the Fringe on
Top describes the entry of Oklahoma
women into jobs traditionally reserved for
men, with the help of CETA. Doris Wedge,
Worklife, January 1979, pp. 2-7.
From Homemaking to Moneymaking of­
fers advice for homemakers entering the
labor force on assessing one’s skills,
choosing a career, writing a resume, look­
ing for a job, and interviewing for a posi­
tion. Gail M. Martin, Occupational Out­
look Quarterly, Winter 1978, pp. 2-10.
Minority Women, Professional Work de­
scribes the Minority Women’s Employment
Program (MWEP), designed to place un­
derutilized college-educated minority
women in managerial, professional, and
technical jobs for which they qualify.
Robert Glover, Alexis Herman, and Allan
King. 5 pp. Reproduced from Manpower,
July 1975. *Available from U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Women’s Bureau.
Mature Women Workers: A Profile is a
statistical profile of women workers 45
years of age and older. Includes tables on
employment and unemployment, education,
occupational distribution, income, and liv­
ing arrangements. U.S. Department of
Labor, Women’s Bureau. 1976. 12 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-016-00040-2. $.35.
Minority Women Workers: A Statistical
Overview presents statistics on minority



women workers, covering topics such as
labor force participation, unemployment
rates, women heads of families, education,
employment status of high school dropouts,
and earnings. U.S. Department of Labor,
Women’s Bureau. Revised 1977. 14 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-016-00050-0. $1.
Nontraditional Vocational Educational
Programs for Women, Final Report dis­
cusses ways to increase occupational op­
portunities for women in vocational areas
that have been traditionally limited to
males. Presents data and conclusions based
on samples of current and former students,
and the parents of student respondents.
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Office of Education. 1977. 297
pp.
Places for Displaced Homemakers de­
scribes pilot programs to assist homemak­
ers to prepare for and find jobs. Eric
Raimy, Worklife, July 1977, pp. 28-32.
Publications of the Women’s Bureau is a
bibliography of Women’s Bureau publica­
tions, including information on how to
order. Department of Labor, Women’s
Bureau. May 1978. 4 pp.
Selected List of Postsecondary Education
Opportunities for Minorities and Women
lists sources of information on educational
opportunities and financial aid. Programs
and financial aid not limited to women and
minorities are also listed. U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office
of Education, Bureau of Higher and Con­
tinuing Education, 1979. 100 pp. GPO
Stock No. 017-080-02040-8. $3.75.
Stamped with Approval by the Women’s
Bureau describes three training programs
specifically set up for women, which the
Labor Department’s Women’s Bureau has
chosen to serve as models. Judy Harkison,
Worklife, January 1978, pp. 26-32.
State Labor Laws in Transition: From
Protection to Equal Status for Women
summarizes laws of special interest to
women and highlights trends of the past
dozen years. Covers such topics as min­
imum wage laws, protective laws, and fair
employment practices. U.S. Department of
Labor, Women’s Bureau. 1976, 20 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-016-00049-5. $1.30.
The Earnings Gap Between Women and
Men describes earnings differences be­
tween men and women and discusses some
reasons for the gap, such as differences in
occupational status, educational attainment,
work experience, and overtime work. U.S.
29

Department of Labor, Women’s Bureau.
Revised October 1976. 12 pp. GPO Stock
No. 029-016-00046-1. $.35.
The Labor Force Patterns of Divorced
and Separated Women compares the labor
force characteristics of divorced and sepa­
rated women with those of married women.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. Special Labor Force Re­
port 198, 1977. 6 pp.
The Women’s Bureau: 55 Years of Par­
ticipating With Women is a pamphlet de­
scribing the Women’s Bureau and its goals.
U.S. Department of Labor, W omen’s
Bureau. 1975. 1 p.
Trends in Women’s Employment and
Training in Selected Professions discusses
women’s share of employment since 1965
in professional occupations such as law,
pharmacy, medicine, veterinary medicine,
architecture, dentistry, engineering, and
optometry. U,S. Department of Labor,
Women’s Bureau. February 1976. 4 pp.
Where to Find BLS Statistics on Women
summarizes the types of statistics on
women available from the Bureau of Labor
Statistics and indicates publications in
which they appear. Also describes unpub­
lished data available. U.S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Report
530, 1978. 9 pp.
Women and Minorities in Science and
Engineering is an analytical report using
statistical data to illuminate the role of
women and minorities in science and en­
gineering. National Science Foundation.
NSF 77-403. 1977. 24 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-016-00307-1. $.75.
Women and Work, published monthly,
contains short articles on reports, statistics,
new laws and government decisions, and
other items relating to women in the labor
force. U.S. Department of Labor, Office of
Information, Publications and Reports.
Women and Work describes the increasing
attachment of women to the labor force, but
their continued segregation into tradi­
tionally female jobs. It is based on the re­
sults of a longitudinal survey of young
women. Marc Weinstein, Occupational
Outlook Quarterly, Summer 1979, pp.
24-26.
Women and Work reviews what has been
learned about women and work, mainly, but
not exclusively, from research and de­
velopment projects sponsored by the Em­

ployment and Training Administration, and
explores some directions that future policy
on women might follow. U.S. Department
of Labor, Employment and Training Ad­
ministration. R&D Monograph 46. 1977
Reprint. 71 pp. GPO Stock No. 029-00000285-1. $2.20.
Women at Work: A Counselor’s Sourcebook complements current literature on the
vocational counseling of women. Provides
counselors with information regarding: (1)
Career opportunities for women in fields
traditionally dominated by men, (2) legal
rights of women in the world of work, (3)
counseling strategies and techniques, and
(4) current social science research on
working women. U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, National
Institute of Education. February 1975. 377
pp.
Women at Work: Things Are Looking Up
provides information for girls and women
on career planning. It discusses new career
opportunities opening up for women, laws
affecting women, and barriers to employ­
ment. Lists reference materials. U.S. De­
partment of Health, Education, and Wel­
fare, National Institute of Education.
DHEW Publication No. NIE-C-74-0100.
1977. 64 pp.

Women in Traditionally Male Jobs: The
Experience of Ten Public Utility Com­
panies examines the experiences of com­
panies sponsoring programs to move
women into traditionally male jobs. It in­
cludes information obtained from the
women as well as from their peers, subor­
dinates, and supervisors and from other
managers concerned with the equal oppor­
tunity program. U.S. Department of Labor,
Employment and Training Administration.
R&D Monograph 65, 1978. 136 pp. GPO
Stock No. 029-000-00351-3. $3.25.
Women Offenders: Must We Bar Them
From Employment? describes a special
program for women offenders, initiated in
1975 by the Women’s Bureau. It explains
what the program does, how it works, and
how others may become involved. U.S.
Department of Labor, Women's Bureau
Leaflet 57. 1977.
Working Mothers and Their Children is
a statistical profile, including information
on marital status of mother and age of chil­
dren, minority mothers, trends in labor
force participation, age, work experience,
unemployment, occupational distribution,
and child care arrangements. U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Women’s Bureau. 1977. 11
pp. GPO Stock No. 029-016-00051-8. $1.

Women in Management, Selected Recent
References is an annotated bibliography
primarily of books and articles published
from 1975 to 1977. Sections include de­
velopment, training, and recruitment;
women in business; women on boards of
directors; and women in education. U.S.
Department of Labor Library. February
1978. 29 pp. GPO Stock No. 029-00000317-3. $1.40.
Women in Non-traditional Aviation and
Space Careers: An Overview describes
the accomplishments of women in aero­
space careers. U.S. Department of Trans­
portation, Federal Aviation Administration.
GA-300-140. March 1979. 8 pp. GPO
Stock No. 050-007-00473-7. $1.
Women in Nontraditional Employment
lists publications, slides, and films about
women in nontraditional jobs. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Women’s Bureau.
February f978. 7 pp.
Women in the Labor Force: Some New
Data Series describes historical trends in
women’s labor force status, their occupa­
tions, unemployment rates, earnings, and
related series. U.S. Department of Labor,
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Report 575.
1979. 9 pp.



Polhemus and Gregory J. Mounts, Occu­
pational Outlook Quarterly, Fall 1978, pp.
14-17.
Catalogue of Federal Youth Programs
describes 161 programs sponsored by the
Federal Government for the benefit of
young people. For each program, discusses
the objectives, type of assistance provided,
standards for eligibility, application proce­
dures, and sources of more information.
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Administration for Children,
Youth, and Families. 252 pp. GPO Stock
No. 017-091-00216-9. $2.25.
Comprehensive Employment and Train­
ing Programs, U.S. Department of Labor
Highlights, one of a series of fact sheets,
describes how the programs work, who are
served, how to apply, and where to get in­
formation. U.S. Department of Labor, Em­
ployment and Training Administration.
C onsum er In fo rm atio n L eaflet No.
USDL-19 (ETA-15), November 1978. 1 p.
A compilation of all 22 fact sheets is titled
Employment and Training Highlights.
Employment and Training Programs for
Youth, U.S. Department of Labor High­
lights, one of a series of fact sheets, de­
scribes how the programs work, who are
served, how to apply, and where to get
more information. U.S. Department of
Labor, Employment and Training Admin­
istration. Consumer Information Leaflet
No. USDL-16 (ETA-12), November 1978.
2 pp. A compilation of all 22 fact sheets is
titled Employment and Training High­
lights.
Help Wanted: Jobs for Unwanted Youth
describes the problems faced by unskilled,
inexperienced young people and what the
Government is doing to help them. J. T.
Hashian, Worklife, November 1978, pp.
10- 12.

A Message To Young Workers about the
Fair Labor Standards Act, as Amended
in 1974 describes standards affecting work­
ers under age 18 concerning types of work
and hours permitted under the Act. U.S.
Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Di­
vision WH Publication 1236, revised 1976.

Job Corps, U.S. Department of Labor
Highlights, one of a series of fact sheets,
describes how the Job Corps program
works, who are served, how to apply, and
where to get more information. U.S. De­
partm ent of Labor, Employment and
Training Administration. Consumer Infor­
mation Leaflet No. USDL-6 (ETA-2), June
1978. 1 p. A compilation of all 22 fact
sheets is titled Employment and Training
Highlights.

A Renewed Deal for Youth Employment
describes a Federal program of jobs, train­
ing, and counseling for youths 16-24, set
up by the Youth Employment and Demon­
stration Projects Act of 1977. Craig

Meeting the Mandate to Employ Youth
describes four programs under the Youth
Employment and Demonstration Projects
Act. Ruth S. Blau and Deborah A. Holmes,
Worklife, January 1978, pp. 2-7.

Young workers

30

Putting America’s Future to Work de­
scribes a number of Federal youth employ­
ment and training programs. U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Office of Youth Programs.
1979. 21 pp.
The Young Workers and the Law; A
Guide for 14-18 Year Olds is for young
people who are employed or seeking em­
ployment. It discusses the steps in obtain­
ing employment and explains young peo­
ple’s rights and responsibilities as beginning
employees. Provides information on social
security requirements, work permits, taxes,
insurance, working hours, hazardous occu­
pations, cooperative education, and work
study programs. U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of
Education. 1977. 46 pp.
The Job Corps—Cornerstone of Youth
Employment and Training Efforts de­




scribes the services provided to corpsmembers and improvements in the Job
Corps since its inception. U.S. Department
of Labor, Employment and Training Ad­
ministration, Office of Youth Programs.
1978. 8 pp.

Where to Find BLS Data on Children
and Youth describes Special Labor Force
Reports, Monthly Labor Review articles,
new releases, and other materials from the
Bureau of Labor Statistics containing in­
formation on youth 16 to 24 years old and
children under 18 in families. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics. 1979. 13 pp.

Training Opportunities in the Job Corps,
A Directory of Job Corps Centers and
Courses provides information on the loca­
tion, capacity, and type of courses provided
and the name of the organization operating
the center. U.S. Department of Labor, Em­
ployment and Training Administration, Re­
vised 1978. 24 pp.

CCC: An Army of Young Men in the
Woods describes the Young Adult Conser­
vation Corps. Gordon Berg, Worklife,
January 1978, pp. 8-11.

“ We Need a Rite of Passage Between
School and Work” examines the difficul­
ties young people face in finding their place
in the world of work and discusses efforts
to surmount these problems. Richard F.
Schubert, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Summer 1975. pp. 30-34.

You Can Help Them is a guide for
teachers, guidance counselors, social serv­
ice workers, and others describing the Job
Corps and what it can do for disadvantaged
young men and women. U.S. Department
of Labor, Job Corps. 1971. 10 pp.

31

Chapter IV

Apprenticeship, education,
and financial aid




32

Apprenticeship
Education
Financial aid

Department of Labor, Employment and
Training Administration. Consumer Infor­
mation Leaflet No. USDL-15 (ETA-11),
November 1978. 1 p. A compilation of all
22 fact sheets is titled Employment and
Training Highlights.
College Credits: Trend in Apprenticeship
describes programs which combine appren­
ticeship and associate degree programs.
William L. Abbott, Worklife, September
1977, pp. 27-30.

Apprenticeship
General
A Woman’s Guide to Apprenticeship de­
scribes the apprenticeship system and how
to become an apprentice, as well as the
status of women as skilled craft workers
and the barriers to women in appren­
ticeship. U. S. Department of Labor,
Women’s Bureau. 1978. 24 pp.
Apprenticeship discusses the Federal role
in apprenticeship and lists Employment and
Training Administration regional offices
and apprenticeship information centers.
U.S. Department of Labor, Employment
and Training Administration. 1975. 4 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-000-00231-2. $.35.
Apprenticeship Now describes what ap­
prenticeships are, how to qualify for them,
and where to go for more information.
Christine Egan, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Summer 1978, pp. 2-19.
A pprenticeship: Past and Present is
primarily a history of apprenticeship, but
also discusses current programs and new
directions in apprenticeship. U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Employment and Training
Administration. 1977. 28 pp.
Apprenticeship Training, Sure Way to a
Skilled Craft describes how apprenticeship
programs work, entry qualifications, and
earnings, and lists some of the occupations
with apprenticeship training. U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Manpower Administration.
1974. 8 pp. GPO Stock No. 029-00600007-5. $.35. In Spanish: GPO Stock No.
029-006-00008-3. $.35.
A pprenticeship, U.S. D epartm ent of
Labor Highlights, one of a series of fact
sheets, describes how apprenticeship pro­
grams work, who are served, how to apply,
and where to get more information. U.S.



New Directions for Apprenticeship Policy
describes how the Department of Labor is
extending apprenticeship programs into
previously untried areas. James P. Mitch­
ell, Worklife, January 1977, pp. 2-6.
Recruits March Toward Apprenticeship
describes a program of the Bureau of Ap­
prenticeship and Training for accredited
apprenticeship in the Armed Forces, which
can provide a stepping stone to civilian
jobs. Ted Shields, Worklife, October 1978,
pp. 3-7.
The “ M a rsh a ll P lan to M eet New
Needs” describes the U.S. Department of
Labor’s efforts to expand and improve the
apprenticeship system. Ben Burdetsky,
Worklife, August 1977, pp. 18-24.

Occupations
Automobile Mechanic Apprenticeship
Program describes the training received by
apprentices, certification of mechanics, and
application procedures. Shirley Rudney,
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Summer
1978, pp. 20-21.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards is a series of free pamphlets
listing the apprenticeship standards for spe­
cific trades. Each pamphlet describes a
trade’s apprenticeship system, entry qual­
ifications, previous work experience rec­
ommended, and relevant Federal regula­
tions, and provides a sample apprenticeship
agreement. U.S. Department of Labor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. In­
dividual titles are listed below:
National Apprenticeship Standards for
Auto Body Repairer and Auto Painter.
1978.
National Apprenticeship Standards for
Automotive Machinist. 1973.
National Apprenticeship Standards for
Autom otive Service C ouncils. 1977.
(Automobile mechanic, automobile body
repairer, and automobile painter.)
33

National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Associated Retail Bakers
of America. 1975.
National Apprenticeship Standards for
Cement Masonry, Asphalt, and Com­
position Trade. Revised 1976.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Dental Technicians. Re­
vised 1975.
National Apprenticeship and Training.
Standards for Drafters. Revised 1977.
National Pattern Standards of Appren­
ticeship and Training for Electricians.
Revised 1978.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Emergency Medical Tech­
nicians. 1978.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Fire-Medics. 1978.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for the Fire Fighter. 1975.
National Apprenticeship and Training
S ta n d a rd s for G laz ie rs and G lassworkers. Revised 1976.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for the Graphic Arts Interna­
tional U nion. 1975. (Lithographers,
photoengravers, gravure workers, book­
binders, and finishers.)
National Apprenticeship and Training
S tandards for the IUE (International
Union of Electrical, Radio and Machine
Workers.) Revised 1976. (Covers a wide
range of occupations.)
National Apprenticeship Standards for
the Lathing Industry. Revised 1976.
(Lathers.)
National Apprenticeship Standards for
the National Machine Tool Builder’s As­
sociation. Revised 1977. (Covers a wide
range of occupations.)
National Apprenticeship Standards for
Operating Engineers. 1978.
National Apprenticeship Standards for
Ophthalm ic Finisher-Dispenser. 1973
edition.
National Apprenticeship and Training

graduates. Section II presents a listing, by
State and city, of hospitals with training
programs. U.S. Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare, Health Resources
Administration, Bureau of Health Man­
power. DHEW Publication No. (HRA)
77-84. December 1977. 362 pp. GPO
Stock No. 017-022-00585-9. $5.75.

Standards for Optical Technician. (Con­
tact lens technician.) 1974.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Painting and Decorating
and Dry wall Finishing. 1974 edition.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for the Photographic Equip­
ment Repair Industry. (Photographic
equipment repair technician, movie equip­
ment repair technician, and still-camera re­
pair technician.) 1974.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Plastering. 1976.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Orthotic and Prosthetic
Technicians. Revised 1976.
National Apprenticeship Standards for
the Retail Meatcutting Industry. Revised
1976.
National Apprenticeship Standards for
Roofers, Damp and Waterproof Work­
ers. Revised 1976.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for the Sheet Metal Industry.
Revised 1977.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Sign, Display, and Allied
Workers Industry. Revised 1976.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Plumbing and Steam­
fitting-Pipefitting. Revised 1977.
National Apprenticeship Standards for
Heavy Duty Truck Mechanic, Truck
Body and T ra iler M ech anic, and
Trucker Painter. 1978.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Truck Mechanics. 1977.
National Apprenticeship and Training
Standards for Vending Machine Me­
chanics. 1978.
National Apprenticeship Standards for
the UAW (United Automobile, Aerospace,
and Agricultural Implement Workers of
America). Revised 1977. (Covers a wide
range of occupations.)
The Saucerer’s Apprentice describes an
apprenticeship program for cooks. Shirley
Rudney, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Fall 1977, pp. 32-33.



Education
A Timetable for College Bound Youth is
designed to help high school students on
the road to college keep track of what they
should do and when they should do it. Oc­
cupational Outlook Quarterly, Fall 1978,
p. 32.
Allied Health Education Programs in
Junior and Senior Colleges, Guidance
Edition is a directory of allied health and
public health education programs, as of
October 1975. It lists programs in 28 occu­
pational categories, including administra­
tion, biomedical engineering, clinical lab­
oratory services (medical technology),
dental services, and dietetic and nutrition
services. For each group, lists institutions
providing training, school program title and
occupational title, award conferred, length
of program, total enrollment, prerequisite
courses, entrance requirements, financial
aid, and tuition. Also lists professional or­
ganizations and State Health Careers Coun­
cils. U.S. Department of Health, Educa­
tion, and Welfare, Health Resources Ad­
ministration, Bureau of Health Manpower
DHEW Publication No. (HRA) 78-30.
1978. 609 pp. (Out of print.) A Health
Planners edition with greater emphasis on
data on enrollment, graduates, and number
of programs also is published.
Health Occupations Training Programs
Administered by Hospitals, April 15,
1976 is a d irec to ry of h o sp italadministered allied health and nursing pro­
grams. It is a companion to Allied Health
Education Programs in Junior and Senior
Colleges. Section I contains an alphabetical
listing of occupational training categories,
including administration, biomedical en­
gineering, clinical laboratory services,
dental services, and dietetic and nutrition
services. For each, indicates length of the
program, year program began, educational
entrance requirements, and num ber,of
34

Directory of Academic Programs in Oc­
cupational Safety and Health lists and de­
scribes programs in occupational safety and
health/industrial hygiene, occupational
safety, industrial hygiene, occupational
health nursing, and occupational medicine.
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, National Institute for Occupa­
tional Safety and Health. DHEW (NIOSH)
Publication No. 79-126. January 1979. 116
pp.
Directory of Aviation Majors and Curriculums Offered by Colleges and Uni­
versities lists institutions offering 2-year,
baccalaureate, and higher degree programs
in flight attendant and customer service oc­
cupations, aviation administration, aviation
technology, aeronautical and astronautical
(aerospace) engineering, flight technology
(pilot training), and air traffic control. U.S.
Department of Transportation, Federal
Aviation Administration. 1977. 66 pp.
Education Directory, Colleges and Uni­
versities 1978-79 lists institutions that
offer at least a 2-year program of collegelevel studies. For each institution it pre­
sents information on address, enrollment,
tuition and fees, type of program, accredi­
tation, and names and titles of principal of­
f i c e r s . U.S. D e p a r t m e n t of H e a lt h , E d u c a ­
tion, and Welfare, National Center for Edu­
cation Statistics. 1978. 558 pp. GPO Stock
No. 017-080-02011-4. $6.25. Published
annually.
Directory of Postsecondary Schools with
Occupational Programs 1978 is a listing
of noncollegiate public and private schools
by State (and indexed by program) which
can be used to identify schools offering
training for particular occupations. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, National Center for Education
Statistics. 1978. 376 pp. GPO Stock No.
017-080-01992-2. $5.25. Published bien­
nially since 1970.
Programs and Schools, a Supplement to
the Directory of Postsecondary Schools
With Occupational Programs 1978 lists
names and addresses of noncollegiate
schools by vocational program. U.S. De­
partment of Health, Education, and Wel­
fare, National Center for Education Statis­

tics. 1978. 330 pp. GPO Stock No. 017080-02026-2. $7.
Directory of Training and Education Re­
sources in Occupational Safety and
Health is a guide to academic programs,
short courses and workshops, audiovisuals,
publications, and other resources for fields
including: Health and hygiene, medicine
and disease, health nursing, psychology,
radiological health and protection* toxi­
cology and chemistry, noise and audiology,
environmental measurement and control,
human engineering, safety engineering, ac­
cident prevention, fire safety, and danger­
ous materials. U.S. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, National Institute
for Occupational Safety and Health, Divi­
sion of Training and Manpower Develop­
ment. February 1975. 381 pp.
Directory of Transportation Education
lists postsecondary institutions that offer
degree programs in transportation and re­
lated areas, and regularly scheduled semi­
nars, workshops, or institutes. U.S. De­
partment of Transportation, Office of the
Secretary. September 1976. 204 pp. GPO
Stock No. 050-000-00121-1. $2.80.
Get Credit for What You Know describes
ways of getting a high school diploma
equivalency certificate and college credit
through examinations which evaluate
learning no matter how it has been acquired.
U.S. Department of Labor, Women’s
Bureau. Leaflet 56 (revised), January 1974.
8 pp. GPO Stock No. 029-000-00201-1.
$.70.
How to Select a Private Vocational
School describes how private vocational
schools operate and offers 10 suggestions
on what to look for in a school. Griff D.
Pitts, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Summer 1976, pp. 23-25.
Look Out for Yourself! Helpful Hints for
Selecting a School or College. U.S. De­
partment of Health, Education, and Wel­
fare, Office of Education. 16 pp. Available
free from Office of Assistant Secretary for
Education (Policy Communication), Room
309G, 100 Independence Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20202.
Medical School: Start Planning Now pro­
vides advice to high school students and
college freshmen on steps which may in­
crease their chances of acceptance in medi­
cal school. Occupational Outlook Quar­
terly, Winter 1976, pp. 11-12.
National Solar Energy Education Direc­
tory describes solar courses, programs, and



curricula offered by all postsecondary in­
stitutions. ‘ U .S. Department of Energy.
1979. 279 pp. GPO Stock No. 061-00000210-3. $4.75.
The Ten O’clock Scholar, Alternative
Ways to Earn College Credit describes
four ways to earn college credit: Corre­
spondence instruction and independent
study; off-campus programs; noncollegiate
instruction received through businesses,
labor unions, government agencies, and
other organizations; and on the basis of ex­
perience and knowledge, regardless of how
that knowledge was attained. Christine
Egan, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Fall 1977, pp. 2-13.

More detail on the results has been pub­
lished in Occupational Training in Se­
lected Metalworking Industries, 1974.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1976. 1977. GPO
Stock No. 029-001-02127-5. $2.20.
Which Job Training Will You Choose?
provides some tips on how to evaluate cor­
respondence, technical, and trade schools.
Federal Trade Commision. Buyer’s Guide
No. 14. 5 pp.

The Uncertain Road to Law School Ad­
mittance. An adviser to pre-law students
offers some useful tips for persons deter­
mined to enter law school. Bernard J.
Lammers, Occupational Outlook Quar­
terly, Fall 1975, pp. 4-7.
Tips on Home Study Schools tells how to
choose a correspondence school.Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly, Summer 1976,
pp. 26-27. Reprinted from a copyrighted
pamphlet of the same title by permission of
the Council of Better Business Bureaus,
1150 17th Street N.W., Washington, D.C.
20036.
University Curricula in the Marine Sci­
ences and Related Fields, Academic
Years 1979-80, 1980-81 describes, by in­
stitution, degree programs and facilities
and lists courses and faculty members.
U.S. Department of Commerce, National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
Office of Sea Grant. 1979. 285 pp.
Where School and Industry Meet de­
scribes programs in which college students
alternate between classroom and work that
contributes to what the students learn at
school. Mary Ellen Ayres, Occupational
Outlook Quarterly, Fall 1978, pp. 21-23.
The Student in the Workplace describes
the experience of two college students
working for the Federal Government
through a co-op program. Gail M. Martin,
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Fall
1978, pp. 24-25.
Occupational Training in Industry de­
scribes the results of a survey of selected
metalworking industries which investigated
the extent to which employers provided
structured training to workers in 14 manual
occupations and the reasons why training
was provided. James Neary, Occupational
Outlook Q uarterly, Fall 1977, p. 29.
35

Financial aid
Catalogue of Federal Education Assist­
ance Programs 1978 is composed of brief
descriptions of, and extensive indexes to,
Federal programs which provide educa­
tional benefits to the public. For each pro­
gram, describes the assistance provided,
the purpose for which it is available, who
can apply for it, and where to apply. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Office of Education. 1978. 756
pp. GPO Stock No. 017-080-01865-9.
$6.25.
Counselors Handbook: Federal Student
Financial Aid tells counselors how to help
students fill out applications for aid. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Office of Education, Bureau of
Student Financial Aid. 1979. GPO Stock
No. 017-080-02023-8. $2.
It’s a Two Way Street, The National
Health Service Corps Scholarship Pro­
gram for Students of Medicine, Os­
teopathy, and Dentistry describes the pro­
gram of financial support to eligible stu­
dents who commit themselves to serve
people who live in medically underserved
areas in inner cities and small towns, on
Indian reservations, and in prisons. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Health Resources Administration,

Bureau of Health Manpower. DHEW Pub­
lication No. (HRA 78-42), 1978. 8 pp.
Nursing Student Loan Program is a 2page fact sheet describing the program.
Available from U.S. Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare, Health Resources
Administration, Bureau of Health Man­
power, Student and Institutional Assistance
Branch.




Selected List of Postsecondary Education
Opportunities for Minorities and Women
lists sources of information on educational
opportunities and financial aid. Programs
and financial aid not limited to women or
minorities also are listed. U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office
of Education, Bureau of Higher and Con­
tinuing Education. 1979. 100 pp. GPO
Stock No. 017-080-02040-8. $3.75.

36

Student Consumer’s Guide, Six Federal
Financial Aid Programs, 1980-81 de­
scribes the basic educational opportunity
grant, the supplemental educational oppor­
tunity grant, college work-study, the na­
tional direct student loan, the guaranteed
student loan, and the health education as­
sistance loan programs. U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office
of Education. 1979. 16 pp.

Chapter V

Job search




37

Beginner’s Guide to Work describes, for
new workers, what employers are likely to
expect of them—being at work on time,
following instructions, and taking respon­
sibility for the work they do. It also dis­
cusses what employees can expect of em­
ployers—explaining what their job duties
are, paying salaries, and providing a safe
working environment. Gloria Stevenson,
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Winter
1974, pp. 12-16.
Business Interview: Frequent Questions,
Acceptable Answers discusses the 10
questions most frequently asked during the
author’s interviews with 40 corporations.
David P. Boyd, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Fall 1977, pp. 26-28.
Campaigning for Jobs in the College
Labor Market discusses directories useful
in identifying employers and the services
available from placements offices. It also
provides advice on job interviews. John L.
Fulmer, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Fall 1977, pp. 16-18.
Computerized Placement Systems, U.S.
Department of Labor Highlights, one of a
series of fact sheets, describes how the
systems work, who are served, how to
apply, and where to get more information.
U.S. Department of Labor, Employment
and Training Administration. Consumer
In fo rm atio n L eaflet No. U S D L -4 7
(ETA-21), February 1978. 2 pp. A com­
pilation of all 22 fact sheets is titled Em­
ployment and Training Highlights.
Doing Your Best on Aptitude Tests pro­
vides hints for taking aptitude tests and a
short sample test. U.S. Department of
Labor, Manpower Administration. 1976.
14 pp. GPO Stock No. 029-000-00005-1.
$

1.

From Homemaking to Moneymaking of­
fers advice for homemakers entering the
labor force on assessing one’s skills,
choosing a career, writing a resume, look­
ing for a job, and interviewing for a posi­
tion. Gail M. Martin, Occupational Out­
look Quarterly, Winter 1978, pp. 2-10.
Getting Chosen: The Job Interview and
Before tells how to prepare for an interview
and how to act during the interview, in­
cluding how to handle difficult questions,
and suggests questions you can ask. It also
lists 50 questions asked by employers dur­
ing interviews with college seniors and 14
negative factors listed by employers which
most often lead to rejection. Gail M. Mar­
tin, Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Spring 1979, pp. 2-9.
Help Wanted—A Job Hunter’s Guide
provides step-by-step instructions on look­
ing for a job, including information on re­
sume writing, interviewing, and overcom­
ing special problems such as a criminal
record or a history of drug abuse. It also
list sources of information in New York
City. U.S. Department of Health, Educa­
tion, and Welfare, National Institute on
Drug Abuse. 1975. 68 pp. GPO Stock No.
014-010-00022-3. $1.10.
How to Get a Job provides guidance to
mentally retarded jobseekers on assessing
their skills, finding sources of assistance in
finding a job, applying for a job, and deal­
ing with supervisors. It also contains a list
of 100 jobs in which retarded individuals
may function well. The President’s Com­
mittee on Employment of the Handicapped,
1977. 29 pp. A 13-page Teacher’s Manual
also is available.
Job Bank in the Secondary School de­
scribes the computerized Job Bank avail­
able to the Sheboygan Public Schools in
cooperation with the Sheboygan Career
Education Project. Terry Seifert, Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly, Summer 1976,
pp. 28-29.

Employment Service/Job Service U.S.
Department of Labor Highlights, one of a
series of fact sheets, describes how the
programs work, who are served, how to
apply, and where to get more information.
U.S. Department of Labor, Employment
and Training Administration. Consumer
Info rm atio n L eaflet No. U S D L -11
(ETA-7), June 1978. 2 pp. A compilation
of all 22 fact sheets is titled Employment
and Training Highlights.

Job Flow: How to Learn if There’s a Job
in Dallas When You’re Jobless in Des
Moines describes the monthly Job Bank
Report on frequently listed openings issued
by the Employment and Training Adminis­
tration of the U.S. Department of Labor.
Neale Baxter, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Summer 1976, pp. 2-7.

Filling in the Blanks provides some tips to
young jobseekers on how to fill out em­
ployment applications. John E. Keefe, Oc­
cupational Outlook Quarterly, Winter
1971, pp. 27-30.

Job Search: There’s a Method in the
Madness discusses the results of a survey
of people who sought jobs in 1972. It cov­
ers job search methods and their effective­
ness by age, race, and sex of jobseekers




38

and type of jobs sought. Christine Egan,
Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Winter
1976, pp. 18-19.
Job Service Centers Give Free Assistance
to Job Seekers describes the services pro­
vided. Occupational Outlook Quarterly,
Winter 1978, p. 11.
Memo to Mature Jobseekers suggests
techniques for assembling records, checkjob services, following up on leads, and
making the most of interviews. U.S. De­
partm ent of Labor, Employment and
Training Administration. 1978. 2 pp.
Merchandising Your Job Talents offers
suggestions on appraising your qualifica­
tions and career goals, preparing a resume,
finding sources of job information, taking
tests, and preparing for an interview. U.S.
Department of Labor, Employment and
Training Administration. 1978, 24 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-000-00304-1. $1.20.
Occupations in Demand At Job Service
Offices is a monthly publication in a news­
paper format. It lists occupations for which
large numbers of job openings were re­
ported in public employment service com­
puterized job banks. It identifies, by job
title, openings available nationwide, pay
ranges, and geographic areas with rela­
tively large concentrations of job openings.
Available free from the U.S. Employment
Service, Attn: TET, Employment and
Training Administration, U.S. Department
of Labor, Washington, D.C. 20213.
The Employment Service describes the
mission of the U.S. Employment Service
and the services it provides. Copies of this
12-page pamphlet may be obtained from
State Employment Service offices or from
the U.S. Department of Labor, Employ­
ment and Training Administration, Wash­
ington, D.C. 20213.
The Free Employment Service for Col­
lege Students describes the services pro­
vided by college placement offices. Marc
Weinstein, Occupational Outlook Quar­
terly, Summer 1979, pp. 10-13.
Words from the Workplace is a glossary
of idioms commonly used in the world of
work. It is designed for newcomers to the
labor force. Occupational Outlook Quar­
terly, Winter 1974, pp. 17-20.
Writing Resumes and Cover Letters pro­
vides advice on preparing these documents.
Christine Egan, Occupational Outlool
Quarterly, Fall 1977, pp. 20-24.

Chapter VI

Career education




39

The summer 1977 edition of the Occupa­
tional Outlook Quarterly contains five arti­
cles on career education:

Career Education and M in orities.
Roberta H. Jackson. 1977. 94 pp. GPO
Stock No. 017-080-01733-4. $2.75.

Why Johnny and Joann Can’t Work, by
Kenneth J. Hoyt. In this article, the author.
Director of the U.S. Office of Career Edu­
cation, answers questions about the career
education movement and discusses criti­
cism leveled against it.

Career Education and the Business- Teachers and Career Education. Kenneth
Labor-Industry Community. Kenneth Hoyt. 1976. 35 pp. GPO Stock No. 017Hoyt. 1976. 22 pp. GPO Stock No. 017— 080-01618-4. $.20.
080-01613-3. $.45.

Can Career Education Get Off the
Ground? by Sidney C. High, Jr., lists six
goals of career education and cites evidence
that these goals are being met.
A Checklist on Career Education and
Comprehensive Placement in the Senior
High School, by Alex Kacen, provides a
checklist for counselors to use in evaluating
how comprehensive their placement serv­
ices are.
Community Resources for Career Edu­
cation, by Kenneth B. Hoyt, describes or­
ganizations such as Junior Achievement,
the Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts, and a
number of large corporations that can help
young people understand the relationship
between education and work. The article is
based on a booklet of the same title (see
below, Monographs on Career Educa­
tion).
Government Resources for Career Edu­
cation describes government programs that
offer aid to school career education pro­
grams, ranging from publications to de­
velopmental grants.
Monographs on Career Education, pub­
lished by the U.S. Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare, Office of Educa­
tion, present a wide variety of views about
career education. Some titles are:
Application of the Concept of Career
Education to Higher Education: An
Idealistic Model. Kenneth B. Hoyt. 1976.
17 pp. GPO Stock No. 017-080-01617-6.
$.45.

Career Education and the Meanings of
Work. Donald E. Super. 1976. 47 pp.
GPO Stock No. 017-080-01554-4. $.75.
Career Education and Vocational Edu­
cation: Similarities and Contrasts. Rupert
M. Evans. 1975. 19 pp. GPO Stock No.
017-080-01742-2. $1.10.

The National Institute of Education in the
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare publishes research studies in the
field of education, including some which
can be of use to counselors. A complete list
of publications is available from the Na­
tional Institute of Education, Washington,
D.C., 20208. Some titles are:

Career Education for Special Popula­
tions. Kenneth Hoyt. 1976. 21 pp. GPO
Stock No. 017-080-01612-5. $.45.

Directions in Career Education: Ques­
tions People Ask About Education and
Work is a summary of the findings of
Career Education: What Proof Do We about 90 of the Institute's research projects
Have That It Works? Lois-ellin Datta and funded since 1972. Chapters include: Who
others. 1977. 64 pp. GPO Stock No. 017— is Career Education For? What Should
Schools Teach About the World of Work?
080-01785-7. $2.10.
What Do We As Educators Need to Know
Community Resources for Career Edu­ About the World of Work? Nancy Bridgecation. Kenneth Hoyt. 1976. 30 pp. GPO ford, Marilyn Clark, and Larry McClure.
Stock No. 017-080-01615-0. $.55.
November 1977. 288 pp.
K-12 Classroom Teachers and Career
Education: The Beautiful People. Ken­
neth B. Hoyt. 1976. 62 pp. GPO Stock No.
017-080-01537-4. $.90.

Education and Job Satisfaction: A Ques­
tionable Pay Off examines the relationship
between education and job satisfaction and
attempts to explain the relationship in
Liberal Arts and Career Education: A socio-psychological terms. The report con­
Look at the Past and the Future. Paul A. cludes with a series of recommendations for
Olson. 1976. 24 pp. GPO Stock No. 017— research and for policy changes on the part
of employers and educators. NIE Papers on
080-01744-0. $1.30.
Education and Work: No. 5. Robert P.
Primer for Career Education. Kenneth B. Quinn and Martha S. Baldi de ManHoyt. 1977. 39 pp. GPO Stock No. 017— dilovitch, March 1977. 69 pp.
080-01610-9. $1.50.
Issues of Sex Bias and Sex Fairness in
Refining the Career Education Concept. Career Interest Measurement is a collec­
Kenneth Hoyt. 1976. 47 pp. GPO Stock tion of papers addressing the problem of
No. 017-080-01610-9. $.75.
sex stereotyping of occupations, particu­
larly with reference to the use of interest
Refining the Career Education Concept.
inventories in career guidance. Esther E.
Part II. Kenneth Hoyt. 1977. 32 pp. GPO
Diamond, editor. Spring 1975. 219 pp.
Stock No. 017-080-01739-3. $1.50.

Baby Boom Equals Career Bust. Charles
Guy Moore. 1977. 18 pp. GPO Stock No.
017-080-01758-0. $1.10.

Relationships Between Career Education
and Vocational Education. Kenneth Hoyt.
1976. 39 pp. GPO Stock No. 017-08001614-1. $1.75.

Career Education and Human Services.
Joann Chenault. 1976. 23 pp. GPO Stock
No. 017-080-01741-5. $1.30.

Review of Career Education Evaluation
Studies. Thomas Enderlien. 1977. 31 pp.
GPO Stock No. 017-080-01686-9. $1.40.




School Counselors and Career Education.
Kenneth Hoyt. 1976 27 pp. GPO Stock No.
017-080-01528-5. $.55.

40

The External Degree as a Credential:
Graduates’ Experiences in Employment
and Further Study, the third and final re­
port on independent, off-campus study as a
primary mode of instruction, examines the
value of degrees gained by this form of
study. Carol P. Sosdian and Laure M.
Sharp. April 1978. 124 pp.

Chapter VII

Statistics




General
Education
Labor force
Wages

41

tries. Contains 174 tables which generally
begin with the earliest year for which data
are available and run through calendar year
1977. BLS Bulletin 2000. 1979. 618 pp.
GPO Stock No. 029-001-02194-1. $9.50.
Published annually.
How Accurate Are BLS Manpower Pro­
jections? This article discusses the need for
occupational projections and evaluates past
projections. Occupational Outlook Quar­
terly, Fall 1975, pp. 32-34.

General
1979 U.S. Industrial Outlook, with pro­
jections to 1983. for 2t)0 industries, pro­
vides discussions and statistics on current
and projected developments in various in­
dustries and occupations, which can be
useful in assessing future job opportunities.
The 1979 edition is the 20th in an annual
series. U.S. Department of Commerce, In­
dustry and Trade Administration. January
1979. 547 pp. GPO Stock No. 003-00800180-7. $6.75.
BLS Handbook of Methods describes, for
each major program of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, its history and purpose and
where the basic data come from, and de­
fines terms and concepts used. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics. Bulletin 1910, 1976, 283 pp. GPO
Stock No. 029-001-01936-0. $4.75.

How to Get Inform ation From the
Bureau of Labor Statistics describes what
information BLS produces and the news
releases, periodicals, bulletins, and reports
through which it is disseminated. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics. 1980. 5 pp.
Occupational Supply: Concepts and
Sources of Data for Manpower Analysis
discusses the uses of supply information,
conceptual problems in estimating supply,
and the availability of data for supply
analyses. U.S. Department of Labor,
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1816,
1974. 70 pp. (Out of print.)

The Condition of Education, 1979 Edi­
tion. Part One is a statistical report de­
scribing conditions in education as well as
those in the larger society that affect edu­
cation. Topics includes public opinion
about schools and education, enrollments,
elementary and high school teachers, fac­
ulty in higher education, financial re­
sources, and educational attainment of the
labor force. Part Two describes the 1979
programs and the plans for 1980 of the Na­
tional Center for Education Statistics. U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, National Center for Education
Statistics. 1979. Part One, 284 pp.; Part
Two 18 pp. GPO Stock No. 017-08002008-4. $7 per set.

Projections of the Population of the
United States: 1977 to 2050 presents pro­
jections by age, race, and sex and for the
components of population change (births,
deaths, and migration). U.S. Department of
Commerce, Bureau of the Census Series
P-25, No. 704, July 1977. 87 pp. GPO
Stock No. 003-001-90897-2. $1.95.

Directory of Federal Statistics for Local
Areas: A Guide to Sources, 1976 provides
table-by-table descriptions of statistical re­
ports on a wide range of subjects, including
education, employment, and income for
areas smaller than States. Covers reports is­
sued prior to January 1, 1977. U.S. De­
partment of Commerce, Bureau of the Cen­
sus. 1978. 359 pp. GPO Stock No. 003024-01553-6. $5.50.

Labor force

Employment and Training Report of the
President, 1979 discusses labor force
problems and public policies to deal with
them. A statistical appendix presents data
on the labor force. U.S. Department of Education
Labor, Employment and Training Admin­
istration. 398 pp. GPO Stock NO. 029- Digest of Education Statistics, 1979 cov­
ering all levels of education, contains data
000-00359-9. $7. Published annually.
on enrollments, teachers, graduates, fi­
Handbook of Labor Statistics 1978 is a nances, and libraries. U.S. Department of
compilation of the major statistical series Health, Education, and Welfare, National
produced by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Center for Education Statistics. NCES 79It also includes related series from other 401, 1979. 216 pp. GPO Stock No. 017governmental agencies and foreign coun­ 080-02031-9. Published annually. $5.50.



Projections of Education Statistics to
1986-87 provides historical trends and
projections of enrollments, graduates, in­
structional staff, and expenditures at all
levels of education. U.S. Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare, National
Center for Education Statistics. NCES 78403, 1978. 171 pp. GPO Stock No. 017080-01918-3. $3.75.

42

Employment and Earnings provides de­
tailed data on the labor force, employment,
and unemployment; employment status of
Vietnam-era veterans; employment, hours,
earnings, and labor turnover in nonfarm
business establishments; output per hour,
hourly compensation, and unit labor costs;
insured unemployment, nationally and by
State and area; charts; and technical notes
on concepts and methods. U.S. Department
of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Monthly. Annual subscription, $22, $27.50
foreign; single copy, $2.75.
Employment Projections for the 1980’s
consists of reprints of four articles from the
Monthly Labor Review plus additional ta­
bles: (1) “ Labor Force Projections to 1990:

Three Possible Paths,” (2) “ The U.S.
Economy to 1990: Two Projections for
Growth;” (3) “ Industry Output and Em­
ployment: BLS Projections to 1990,” (4)
“ Changing Patterns of Demand; BLS Pro­
jections to 1990.” U.S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin
2030, June 1979. 106 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-001-02312-0. $4.
Labor Force Studies. This article de­
scribes Bureau of Labor Statistics surveys
and reports on current employment and un­
employment and earnings. Occupational
Outlook Q uarterly, Spring 1979, pp.
26-27.
Questions and Answers on Popular
Labor Force Topics discusses some of the
more frequently raised questions on the
concepts and measurement of employment
and unemployment. Includes a short bib­
liography. U.S. Department of Labor,
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Report 522,
1978. 30 pp.
Special Labor Force Reports. These re­
ports on the labor force, reprinted from the
Monthly Labor Review, are based, for the
most part, on supplemental questions asked
in the monthly Current Population Survey.
Some titles follow:
Work Experience of the Population in
1977 shows the number of individuals who
worked during the year and the number un­
employed, by age, sex, race, and marital
status. U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau
of Labor Statistics. Special Labor Force
Report 224, 1979. 35 pp.

Employment and Unemployment During
1978: An Analysis is a year end report on
the civilian labor force by age, sex, race,
and major occupational and industry group.
Also includes persons outside the labor
force by reason and sex. Tables and charts
includes 1976-77 annual averages and sea­
sonally adjusted quarterly averages. U.S.
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Special Labor Force Report 212,
1979. 58 pp.
Students, Graduates, and Dropouts in
the Labor Market, October 1978 exam­
ines the labor force status of 1978 students,
graduates, and dropouts. Presents data by
sex, race, marital status, educational at­
tainment, major occupation, industry, and
duration of unemployment. U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Special Labor Force Report 223, 1979.
The Labor Force in 1990 discusses the
Bureau of Labor Statistics’ low, inter­
mediate, and high projections, with data by
sex and age group. Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Spring 1979, pp. 18-19.
U.S. Workers and Their Jobs: The
Changing Picture is a chartbook with brief
accompanying text which illustrates pat­
terns of change in the American labor
force, including employment, the level of
education, and earnings. U.S. Department
of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bul­
letin 1919, 1976. 36 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-001-01917-3. $.60.




Industry Wage Surveys. A broad range of
industries are surveyed to provide data by
occupation on hourly earnings or weekly
salaries, and on nonwage practices and
benefits. Results published first, as avail­
able, in individual reports for areas by re­
gional offices; summary results for all areas
appear in issues of the Monthly Labor Re­
view and as separate summary tabulations;
final results appear in a single bulletin.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
National Survey of Professional, Admin­
istrative, Technical, and Clerical Pay,
March 1979, the 20th in an annual series,
provides nationwide salary averages and
distributions for 89 work level categories
covering 21 occupations including account­
ants, attorneys, buyers, chemists, drafters,
engineers, engineering technicians, person­
nel management workers, and clerical
workers. U.S. Department of Labor,
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 2045,
October 1979. 71 pp. GPO Stock No.
029-001-02403-7. $3.25.
Occupational Earnings and Wage Trends
in Metropolitan Areas, 1978. Tabulations
of average straight-tim e earnings for
selected groups of occupations studied in
six broad industry divisions (manufactur­
ing, public utilities, wholesale trade, retail
trade, finance, and services). U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Occupational Earnings: Sources of In­
formation lists government and non­
government sources. Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Fall 1975, pp. 35-36. Informa­
tion in this article was taken from Occupa­
tional Supply: Concepts and Sources of
Data for Manpower Analysis. Bureau of
Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1816.

Educational Attainment of Workers—
Some Trends from 1973 to 1978 presents
findings based on surveys of the educa­
tional attainment of workers 16 years old
and over. Data presented by sex, age, race,
employment status, occupation, and indus­
try. U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. Special Labor Force Re­
port 225, 1979. 27 pp.
Multiple Jobholders in May 1978 presents
findings from the latest survey of persons
wbo hold more than one job. Data pre­
sented by industry, occupation, and class of
worker. Includes some comparative data by
sex and race from May 1962 to May 1977.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. Special Labor Force Re­
port 221, 1979. 18 pp.

professional and technical, maintenance
and powerplant, and custodial and material
movement occupations in each of about 75
metropolitan areas. U.S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Wages
Area Wage Surveys present straight-time
earnings and distributions of earnings for
approximately 60 selected office clerical,

43

Union Wages and Benefits. Results of
periodic surveys of wage rates, hours of
work, and selected benefits in effect on the
first workday in July for specified crafts or
jobs, as provided in labor-management
agreements. Preliminary listings for indi­
vidual areas issued as available by regional
offices; final results for all areas later
summarized in a single bulletin. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics.

Chapter VIII

Bibliographies and publications lists




44

BLS Publications, 1972-77 provides nu­
merical listings and a subject index of bul­
letins and reports issued by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics from 1972 through 1977.
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1990, 1978. GPO
Stock No. 029-001-02204-0. $1.80.
Index to Publications of the Employment
and Training Administration includes
publications, reports, and articles issued
between January 1973 and December 1977.
Chapters and major subdivisions of the
Employment and Training Report of the
President and all articles in Worklife are
indexed separately. U.S. Department of
Labor, Employment and Training Admin­
istration. 1978. 23 pp.
Publications and Papers lists and briefly
describes current reports published by the
National Institute of Education. U.S. De­
partment of Health, Education, and Wel­
fare, National Institute of Education. May
1979. 34 pp.

tion. U.S. Department of Health, Educa­
tion, and Welfare, Office of Education.
1977. 37 pp. GPO Stock No. 017-08001786-5. $1.60.
The 1979 Publications Catalogue of the
U.S. Department of Health, Education,
and W elfare, Cumulative: January
1978-December 1978 lists publications by
agency, author, and subject. U.S. Depart­
ment of Health, Education, and Welfare.
1979. 520 pp. GPO Stock No. 017-00000214-7. $9.
Publications of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics June-December 1978, the latest
in a semiannual series, provides a listing,
with selected annotations, of all bulletins,
reports, press releases, reprints, periodi­
cals, special articles from periodicals, and
summaries issued by the Bureau from June
through December 1978 by the Washing­
ton, D.C. and regional offices. U.S. De­
partment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics. 1979.

Publications of the U.S. Office of Educa­ Publications of the Women’s Bureau,
tion is an annotated listing of publications U.S. Department of Labor, W omen’s
on a wide range of topics related to educa­ Bureau. Leaflet 10, 1979. 6 pp.




45

Research and Development Projects,
1978 Edition, the eighth annual edition,
summarizes the projects funded by the Of­
fice of Research and Development of the
Employment and Training Administration,
U.S. Department of Labor. It includes all
projects active on September 30, 1978, and
all those completed between July 1, 1975,
and September 30, 1978. It covers research
and experimental, developmental, demon­
stration, and pilot projects to improve tech­
niques and demonstrate the effectiveness of
specialized methods in meeting employ­
ment and training problems. U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor, Employment and Training
Administration. 1978. 296 pp.
The U.S. Government Printing Office
periodically issues bibliographies on vari­
ous subjects. Titles of those of particular
interest to counselors include: Employ­
ment and Occupations, Educational
Statistics, Financial Aid for Students,
Handicapped, Minorities, and Occupa­
tional Outlook Handbook. They are avail­
able free from the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Of­
fice, Washington, D.C. 20402.

Appendix A.
State Employment
Security Agencies
State employment security agencies de­
velop occupational projections and related
employment statistics in cooperation with
the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S.
Department of Labor. The following list gives
the addresses of employment security agency
research directors.
Alabama
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Department of Industrial Relations,
Industrial Relations Bldg.,
619 Monroe St.,
Montgomery, Ala. 36130.
Alaska
Chief, Research and Analysis,
Employment Security Division,
Department of Labor,
P.O. Box 3-7000,
Juneau, Alaska 99802.
Arizona
Chief, Labor Market Information, Research
and Analysis,
Deparment of Economic Security,
P.O. Box 6123,
Phoenix, Ariz. 85005.
Arkansas
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Employment Security Division,
P.O. Box 2981,
Little Rock, Ark. 72203.
California
Chief, Employment Data and Research
Division,
Employment Development Department,
P.O. Box 1679,
Sacramento, Calif. 95808.
Colorado
Chief, Research and Analysis,
Division of Employment,
Department of Labor and Employment,
1210 Sherman St.,
Denver, Colo. 80203.
Connecticut
Director, Research and Information,
Connecticut Employment Security
Division,
200 Folly Brook Blvd.,
Wethersfield, Conn. 06109.




Delaware
Chief, Office of Research, Planning, and
Evaluation,
Department of Labor,
Bldg. D,
Chapman Rd.,
Route 273,
Newark, Del. 19713.
District of Columbia
Chief, Branch of Labor Market Information
and Analysis,
D.C. Department of Labor,
605 G St. NW., Room 1000,
Washington, D C. 20001.
Florida
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Division of Employment Security,
Florida Department of Commerce,
Caldwell Bldg.,
Tallahassee, Fla. 32304.

Kansas
Chief, Research and Analysis,
Department of Human Resources,
401 Topeka Avenue,
Topeka, Kans. 66603.
Kentucky
Chief, Research and Special Projects,
Department of Human Resources,
275 E. Main St.,
Frankfort, Ky. 40601.
Louisiana
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Department of Employment Security,
P.O. Box 44094,
Baton Rouge, La. 70804.
Maine
Director, Manpower Research Division,
Employment Security Commission,
20 Union St.,
Augusta, Maine 04330.

Georgia
Director, Information Systems,
Employment Security Agency,
Department of Labor,
254 Washington St. SW.,
Atlanta, Ga. 30334.

Maryland
Director, Research and Analysis,
Department of Human Resources,
1100 North Eutaw St.,
Baltimore, Md. 21201.

Hawaii
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Department of Labor and
Industrial Relations,
P.O. Box 3680,
Honolulu, Hawaii 96811.

Massachusetts
Director, Information and Research,
Division of Employment Security,
Hurley Bldg.,
Government Center,
Boston, Mass. 02114.

Idaho
Chief, Research and Analysis,
Department of Employment,
P.O. Box 35,
Boise, Idaho 83707.

Michigan
Director, Research and Statistics Division,
Employment Security Commission,
Department of Labor Bldg.,
7310 Woodward Ave.,
Detroit, Mich. 48202.

Illinois
Manager, Research and Analysis Division,
Bureau of Employment Security,
Department of Labor,
910 South Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, 1 1 60605.
1.
Indiana
Chief of Research,
Employment Security Division,
10 North Senate Ave.,
Indianapolis, Ind. 46204.
Iowa
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Department of Job Services,
1000 East Grand Ave.,
Des Moines, Iowa 50319.

46

Minnesota
Acting Director,
Research and Statistics Services,
Department of Economic Security,
390 North Robert St.,
St. Paul, Minn. 55101.
Mississippi
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Employment Security Commission,
P.O. Box 1699,
Jackson, Miss. 39205.
Missouri
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Division of Employment Security,
Department of Labor and Industrial
Relations,
P.O. Box 59,
Jefferson City, Mo. 65101.

Ohio
Director, Division of Research and
Statistics,
Bureau of Employment Services,
145 South Front St.,
Columbus, Ohio 43216.

Nebraska
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Division of Employment,
Department of Labor,
P.O. Box 94600,
Lincoln, Nebr. 68509.

Tennessee
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Department of Employment Security,
Cordell Hull Bldg.,
Room 519,
Nashville, Tenn. 37219.

Oklahoma
Chief, Research and Planning Division,
Employment Security Commission,
310 Will Rogers Memorial Office Bldg.,
Oklahoma City, Okla. 73105.

Texas
Chief, Economic Research and Analysis,
Employment Commission,
TEC Bldg.,
15th and Congress Ave.,
Austin, Tex. 78778.

Nevada
Chief, Employment Security Research,
Employment Security Department,
500 East Third St.,
Carson City, Nev. 89713.

Oregon
Assistant Administrator, Research and
Statistics, Employment Division,
875 Union St. NE.,
Salem, Oreg. 97311.

New Hampshire
Director, Economic Analysis and Reports,
Department of Employment Security,
32 South Main St.,
Concord, N.H. 03301.

Pennsylvania
Director, Research and Statistics,
Bureau of Employment Security,
Department of Labor and Industry,
7th and Forster Sts.,
Harrisburg, Pa. 17121.

Vermont
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Department of Employment Security
P.O. Box 488,
Montpelier, Vt. 05602.

Puerto Rico
Chief of Research and Statistics,
Bureau of Employment Security,
427 Barbosa Ave.,
Hato Rey, P.R. 00917.

Virginia
Commissioner,
Virginia Employment Commission,
P.O. Box 1358,
Richmond, Va. 23211.

Rhode Island
Supervisors, Employment Security
Research,
Department of Employment Security,
24 Mason St.,
Providence, R.I. 02903.

Washington
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Employment Security Department,
1007 So. Washington St.,
Olympia, Wash. 98501.

Montana
Chief, Reports and Analysis,
Employment Security Division,
P.O. Box 1728,
Helena, Mont. 59601.

New Jersey
Director, Division of Planning and
Research,
Department of Labor and Industry,
P.O. Box 2765,
Trenton, N.J. 08625.
New Mexico
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Employment Security Commission,
P.O. Box 1928,
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 87103.
New York
Director, Division of Research and
Statistics,
Department of Labor,
State Campus,
Bldg. 12,
Albany, N.Y. 12240.

South Carolina
Director, Manpower Research and
Analysis,
Employment Security Commission,
P.O. Box 995,
Columbia, S.C. 29202.

North Carolina
Director, Bureau of Employment Security
Research,
Employment Security Commission,
P.O. Box 25903.
Raleigh, N.C. 27611.

South Dakota
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Employment Security Department,
607 North Fourth St.,
Box 730,
Aberdeen, S. Dak. 57401.

North Dakota
Chief, Research and Statistics,
Employment Security Bureau,
P.O. Box 1537,
Bismarck, N. Dak. 58501.




47

Utah
Director, Research and Analysis,
Department of Employment Security,
P.O. Box 11249,
Salt Lake City, Utah 84147.

West Virginia
Chief, Labor and Economic Research,
Department of Employment Security,
112 California Ave.,
Charleston, W. Va. 25305.
Wisconsin
Director, Research and Statistics,
Department of Industry, Labor and Human
Relations,
P.O. Box 7944,
Madison, Wis. 53701.
Wyoming
Chief, Research and Analysis,
Employment Security Commission,
P.O. Box 2760,
Casper, Wyo. 82601.

Appendix B.
State Occupational
Inform ation Coordinating
Committees
National and State Occupational Informa­
tion Coordinating Committees (SOICC’s)
were mandated by the 1976 Education Act
Amendments to establish a communications
network through which occupational and
training information would be developed,
tested, and shared across the country. The
mission of SOICC’s is to oversee the or­
ganization of occupational information into
a comprehensive occupational information
system and to encourage the use of the
system by counselors, education and train­
ing planners, job placement specialists, and
individuals seeking career information.
Addresses of these State committees are
listed below.
Alabama
Director,
Alabama Occupational Information
Coordinatings Committee,
State Department of Education,
First Southern Towers, Suite 402,
100 Commerce St.
Montgomery, Ala. 36104.
Alaska
Director,
Alaska Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Pouch F-State Office Building,
Juneau, Alaska 99811.
American Samoa
State Director for Vocational Education
Government of American Samoa,
Pago Pago, American Samoa 96799.
Arizona
Director,
Arizona State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
1535 West Jefferson, Room 345,
Phoenix, Ariz. 85007.
Arkansas
Director,
Arkansas State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Post Office Box 5162,
Little Rock, Ark. 72205.
California
Director,
California Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
535 East Main Street,
Ventura, Calif. 93009.




Colorado
Director;
Colorado Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
770 Grant, Room 222,
Denver, Colo. 80203.
Connecticut
Director,
Connecticut State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Hartranft Hall,
55 Elizabeth Street,
Hartford, Conn. 06053.
Delaware
Director,
State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee of Delaware,
820 North French Street,
Wilmington, Del. 19801.
District of Columbia
Director,
District of Columbia Occupational
Information Coordinating Committee,
500 C Street N.W., Suite 621,
Washington, D.C. 20001.
Florida
Director,
Florida Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
325 John Knox Road, Suite L-500,
Tallahassee, Fla. 32303.
Georgia
Director,
State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
151 E l l i s S tr e e t N . E . , S u it e 5 0 4 ,

Atlanta, Ga. 30303.
Guam
Director,
Guam Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Post Office Box 2817,
Agana, Guam 96910.
Hawaii
Director,
Hawaii State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
1164 Bishop Street, Suite 502,
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813.
Idaho
Director,
State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Len B. Jordan Building,
650 W. State Street,
Boise, Idaho 83720.

48

Illinois
Director,
Illinois Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
623 E. Adams Street,
Post Office Box 1587,
Springfield, 1 1 62705.
1.
Indiana
SOICC Contact,
Indiana Office of Manpower Development,
State Board of Vocational and Technical
Education,
17 W. Market Street,
401 Illinois Building,
Indianapolis, Ind. 46204.
Iowa
Director,
Iowa State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
523 East 12th Street,
Des Moines, Iowa 50319.
Kansas
Director,
Kansas Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
634 S. Harrison, Suite C,
Topeka, Kans. 66603.
Kentucky
Director,
Kentucky Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
103 Bridge Street,
Frankfort, Ky. 40601.
Louisiana
Director,
Louisiana State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
P.O. Box 44094,
Baton Rouge, La. 70804.
Maine
Director,
State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
State House Station 71,
Augusta, Maine 04330.
Maryland
Director,
Maryland Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Department of Human Resources,
1100 N. Eutaw St.,
Baltimore, Md. 21201.

Massachusetts
Director,
Massachusetts Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Park Square Building, Suite 341,
31 St. James Ave,,
Boston, Mass. 02116.
Michigan
Director,
Michigan Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
309 N. Washington,
P.O. Box 30015,
Lansing, Mich. 48909.
Minnesota
Director,
Department of Economic Security,
690 American Center Building,
150 East Kellogg Boulevard,
St. Paul, Minn. 55101.
Mississippi
Director,
Vocational Technical Education,
Post Office Box 771,
Jackson, Miss. 39205.
Missouri
Director,
Missouri Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
8300 East High Street,
Jefferson City, Mo. 65101.
Montana
Director,
Montana State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Post Office Box 1728,
Helena, Mont. 59601.
Nebraska
Director,
State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
W. 300 Nebraska Hall,
University of Nebraska,
Lincoln, Nebr. 68588.
Nevada
Director,
State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Capitol Complex,
505 East King Street,
Kinkead Building, Room 603,
Carson City, Nev. 89710.




New Hampshire
Director,
Department of Employment Security,
32 South Main Street,
Concord, N.H. 03301.
New Jersey
Director,
New Jersey Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Division of Planning and Research,
Post Office Box 2765,
Trenton, N.J. 08625.
New Mexico
Director,
New Mexico State Occupational
Information Coordinating Committee,
Executive Plaza,
4219 Montgomery Blvd., N.E.,
Albuquerque, N.M. 87125.
New York
Director,
State Department of Labor,
Labor Department Building 12,
State Campus,
Albany, N.Y. 12240.
North Carolina
Director,
North Carolina Department of
Administration,
112 W. Lane St.,
Raleigh, N.C. 2761 1.
North Dakota
Director,
State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
1424 W. Century Avenue,
Post Office Box 1537,
Bismarck, N. Dak. 58501.
Northern Mariana Islands
Director,
Northern Mariana Islands Occupational
Information Coordinating Committee,
Post Office Box 149,
Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands 96950.
Ohio
Director,
State Department Building,
S-65 South Front Street, Room 904,
Columbus, Ohio 43215.

49

Oklahoma
Director,
State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
School of Occupational and Adult
Education,
Oklahoma State University,
1515 West 6th Street,
Stillwater, Okla. 74074.
Oregon
Director,
Oregon Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
875 Union Street N.E.,
Salem, Oreg. 97311.
Pennsylvania
Director,
Pennsylvania Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Labor and Industry Building,
7th and Forster Streets, Room 1008,
Harrisburg, Pa. 17121.
Puerto Rico
Director,
Puerto Rico Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
414 Barbosa Avenue,
Hato Rey, P R. 00917.
Rhode Island
Director,
Rhode Island Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
22 Hayes Street, Room 315,
Providence, R.I. 02908.
South Carolina
Director,
State Occupational
Information Coordinating Committee,
1550 Gadsden Street,
Columbia, S.C. 29202.
South Dakota
Director,
South Dakota Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
108 East Missouri,
Pierre, S. Dak. 57501.
Tennessee
Director,
Tennessee Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
512 Cordell Hull Building,
Nashville, Tenn. 37219.

Texas
Director,
State Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Texas Employment Commission Building,
15th and Congress,
Austin, Tex. 78778.
Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands
Occupational Information Coordinating
Committee,
Office of Planning and Statistics,
Saipan, Mariana Island 96950.
Utah
Director,
Occupational Information Coordinating
Committee,
State Board of Education,
250 E. 5th St., South
Salt Lake City, Utah 84111.
Vermont
Director,
Vermont Occupational Information,
Coordinating Committee,
Post Office Box 488,
Montpelier, Vt. 05602.




Virginia
Director,
Vocational and Adult Education,
Department of Education,
Post Office Box 60,
Richmond, Va. 23216.
Virgin Islands
Director,
Virgin Islands Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Department of Education,
Charlotte Amalie,
St. Thomas, Virgin Islands 00801.
Washington
Director,
Commission for Vocational Education,
Building 17, Airdustrial Park,
Mail Stop LS-10,
Olympia, Wash. 98504.
West Virginia
Director,
West Virginia State Occupational
Information Coordinating Committee,
Capitol Complex,
Building #6, Room B-221,
Charleston, W. Va. 25305.

50

Wisconsin
Director,
Wisconsin Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
Educational Sciences Building, Room 952,
1025 W. Johnson,
Madison, Wis. 53706.
Wyoming
Director,
Wyoming Occupational Information
Coordinating Committee,
1520 East 5th Street,
Cheyenne, Wyo. 82002.

Appendix C.
Examples of State
Occupational Information
Table C -l. Computer-based systems for delivery of occupational information
State

Title of project

Source/Contact

Abstract/Description

California

Eureka, Sigi, CIVIS,
GIS, Discover, et al.

Commercial systems

Occupational guidance and decisionmaking information-is provided
by these systems although little local information is included. Most
provide job descriptions, worker traits, hiring specifications, na­
tional outlook, and training requirements. Further, some systems in­
clude data on students. All are interactive.

New Jersey

Computer-assi sted
Career Information
System (CACIS)

Asbury Park Computer
Center

The primary objectives of CACIS are to generate student interest in
career planning and to improve the realism of student career deci­
sions. The substance of the CACIS model is the interactive process
between the counselor and the student. Services of CACIS include:
• Development of student data bank
• Development of student profiles for occupational information and
counseling
• Educational information
• Job placement
• Development of assessment instruments
• Follow-up of graduate students and dropouts
• Longitudinal studies in career areas
• Development of localized resource data banks, which include
people in the community willing to assist the school, companies,
and agencies; and resources in the school such as films, books,
periodicals, etc.

North
Carolina

CIS

State Occupational
Information Coor­
dinating Committee

When completed, CIS will be a computerized delivery system using
the Standard Occupational Classification.

Table C-2. Noncomputerized guidance and occupational information tools
State

Title of project

Source/Contact

Abstract/Description

California

Microfiche OIDS

State employment se­
curity agency

The microfiche presents 114 worker trait groups; extensive informa­
tion on job characteristics and training facilities; lists of potential
employers; and job-search tips.

Michigan

MOIS-Microfiche

Michigan Occupa­
tional Information
System (MOIS)

Information on microfiche is the same as that on an MOIS
computer-based system.

Oregon

Search; CISNeedlesort

Texas

OIDS-Microfiche

State employment se­
curity agency

The Texas system is an adaptation of the California system.

Various

VIEW

Vocational education
and local education
agencies

VIEW is composed of aperture and camera cards that provide four
pages of information on a specific occupation. Each view script cov­
ers job description, preparation and training needed, job prospects,
wages, working conditions, and related jobs. VIEW is a commercial
package and, except for a few items, data are standard copy; wage
and outlook data are local. Also, the package includes an appren­
ticeship deck for the same States.




Decks with information comparable to that available in the CIS
package comprise the needlesort system. Access to occupational
characteristics and requirements is by needle through punched cards,
using a Quest Questionnaire.

51

Table C -3. Publications and printed materials containing occupational characteristics

State

Title of project

Source/Contact

Abstract/Description

Arizona

Occupational Guides

Labor Market Infor­
mation, Research and
Analysis, Bureau of
Employment and
Training, Department
of Economic Security

A series of 65 loose-leaf occupational fact sheets. Each sheet in­
cludes job description, training and other qualifications, wages,
lines of advancement, where employed, and employment outlook
into the 1980’s.

Counselor’s Newslet­
ter

Labor Market Infor­
mation, Research and
Analysis, Bureau of
Employment and
Training, Department
of Economic Security

A monthly newsletter sent to vocational counselors to keep them
informed on labor market and job search information programs, and
publications of the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Office of
Education.

Careers Today,
MiniGuides

State employment se­
curity agency

These publications describe job characteristics, job-search tips, re­
lated jobs, and jobs in industry, wages, outlook, qualifications, and
training.

Career Education
Matrix

Career Education Proj­
ects, Arizona Depart­
ment of Education

The matrix is a “ road map’’ for career education in Arizona which
has received international recognition. The matrix illustrates how
career education provides for program articulation at four grade
levels: Primary, intermediate, junior high, and high school.

Career Education:
Project Profiles

Career Education Proj­
ects, Arizona Depart­
ment of Education

Project profiles describe various exemplary projects being conducted
throughout Arizona.

Career Guides for
Entry Occupations

Occupational Field
Center of State em­
ployment security
agency

Training, areas of work, national job outlook, promotion or ad­
vancement potential, and related jobs are discussed.

Occupational Guides

State employment se­
curity agency

Guides address job duties, employment outlook, working condi­
tions, pay and hours, entrance requirements, training, promotions,
and how to find the job, and direct the reader to additional sources
of information.

Florida

Broward County
Employers’ Training
Needs Assessment

Dr. Mantha Mehallis,
Project Director, Bro­
ward Community
College

Employers’ (industrial, nonindustrial, and government) training
needs assessment with 1-, 2-, and 5-year projections. Personal inter­
views with employers used to determine training needs and which
educational agencies could best fulfill the needs, and to inform
employers of results in order to begin planning for the needed pro­
grams. Also analyzes employee qualities, recruitment, incentives,
employment and training of the handicapped, and affirmative action.

Hawaii

A Guide to Occupa­
tions in Hawaii

State Director for Vo­
cational Education,
University of Hawaii

An 8-volume set of loose-leaf binders, each covering an occupa­
tional family with supporting search advice.

Idaho

Occupational Guide
Series

State employment se­
curity agency

Three booklets provide helpful data on specific occupations. Local
data are obtained by a questionnaire administered to employers.

Arizona

Calif mia




52

Table C-3. Publications and printed materials containing occupational characteristics—continued

State

Title of project

Source/Contact

Abstract/Description

Iowa

Career Guides

State employment se­
curity agency

These booklets, designed to provide guidance to those entering the
job market, are based on qualifications required to enter a specific
occupational field, except for a special volume on licensed occupa­
tions in Iowa. Each booklet contains information about the require­
ments, working conditions, and employment outlook for every oc­
cupation within its covers. Guides have been published for the fol­
lowing areas:
Building Trade Careers
Clerical Careers (recently revised)
Food Services Careers
Health Careers (recently revised)
Licensed Occupations in Iowa (revision soon to be released)

Careers

State employment se­
curity agency

These booklets contain short statements on the characteristics of a
job cluster, e.g., clerical jobs.

Kansas

Kansas Job Guides

State employment se­
curity agency

A series of 1-page statements covering job duties, working condi­
tions, wages, hours, employee benefits, entry requirements, method
of entry, training needs, and job outlook. The series comprises two
bound volumes. Volume I is about jobs needing a high school edu­
cation or less, and Volume II is about jobs requiring post-high
school education or training.

Maine

Careers in the Maine
Woods

State employment se­
curity agency

For careers in the Maine woods, discusses job duties, work envi­
ronment, physical and educational requirements, and advancement.
Includes a glossary of logging terms, a map of job site concentra­
tions, and an industry organization chart.

Occupational Monog­
raphs

State employment se­
curity agency

Four-page pamphlets that describe selected occupations. Information
covers job duties, work environment, physical requirements, earn­
ings, hours of work, future demand, advancement potential, com­
mon attitudes, interests and temperaments, education requirements,
other requirements, location of jobs, institutions that provide train­
ing, and related occupations.

Massachuetts

Manpower Data Pack­
age for Planning Em­
ployment and Training
Programs Based Upon
the 1976 Survey of In­
come and Education

Research and Program
Development, De­
partment of Manpower
Development

Detailed information on the demographic, labor force, and earnings
characteristics of Massachusetts residents from the 1976 Survey of
Income and Education. Data are available for all persons, youth, and
for persons in poverty in the State of Massachusetts.

Michigan

MOISCRIPTS

MOIS

These 14-page documents provide substantial information on
selected occupations including a job description and discussions of
working conditions, worker requirements, earnings and advance­
ment, employment outlook, educational requirements, review ques­
tions, and additional sources of information.

Missouri

Occupational Profiles

Division of Employ­
ment Security

Profiles provide the following information related to individual oc­
cupations: Job description, working conditions, pay and hours, per­
sonal characteristics, entrance and training, advancement, benefits,
disadvantages, licenses and unions, employment outlook, and
sources of additional data.

Nevada

Occupational Guides

Employment Security
Division

Information on specific occupations includes the job and job duties,
employment outlook, pay and hours, working conditions, promo­
tion, entrance requirements, how to train, finding the job, additional
information, and acknowledgements.




53

Table C-3. Publications and printed materials containing occupational characteristics—continued

State

Title of project

Source/Contact

Abstract/Description

New Jersey

Handbook of Occupa­
tions and Projections
for Employment
(HOPE)

Department of Labor
and Industry

The objective of this project was to establish a labor market analysis
curriculum that would integrate, better than prior publications, the
realities of the world of work with the world of education. This
publication presents brief descriptions of job duties, industry set­
tings, wages, and employment prospects in occupations. Work ex­
perience necessary, suitable interests and abilities, and educational,
licensing, or certification requirements are listed.

New York

Job Profiles

Division of Employ­
ment

Profiles of applicant and job-order characteristics for selected occu­
pations are prepared for the various labor market areas. Information
in each profile includes job description, vocational preparation re­
quired, job requirements, job characteristics, common applicant
characteristics, number of openings filled, number of openings cur­
rently on file, and a comparison of the characteristics of jobseekers
referred and jobseekers placed.

Oregon

Miniguides

State employment se­
curity agency

Brochures include, for an occupation, a job description, worker
traits and specifications, pay, hours of work, industrial attachment,
related jobs, and how and where to train.

Pennsylvania

Job Opportunity Guide)

State employment se­
curity agency

Small brochures cover the job description, place of work, skills
needed, pay, hours, training requirements, and related jobs.

PENNSCRIPTS

State Department of
Vocational Education

These occupational descriptions on microfiche include such infor­
mation as working conditions, worker requirements, earnings po­
tential, employment outlook, educational requirements, review
questions, and additional sources of information.

South
Carolina

Entry Occupations in
South Carolina

Employment Security
Commission

This publication is a guide to jobs at the entry level and to services
available to jobseekers who are entry workers or who need training
or other services to help them become employable. The occupations
included generally are suitable for applicants with a high school
education or less. Some information is provided on the nature of the
jobs, the requirements, working conditions, employment pros­
pects,and entry wage rates.

South
Carolina

Wage Rates and
Fringe Benefits

Employment Security
Commission

This report contains entry wage rate data for job openings received
from manufacturing and nonmanufacturing firms in the Charleston,
Columbia, Florence, and Greenville Job Bank areas. Fringe benefits
are listed as either frequently observed or infrequently observed.
Wage rates and fringe benefits are representative only of occupa­
tions coded to nine digits of the DOT that are listed with the Em­
ployment Service.

Wisconsin

Information Packets

Occupational Analysis
Field Center, State
employment security
agency

These bound books are industry based and contain descriptions of
processes, career opportunities, earnings, benefits, working condi­
tions, training, and entry. Also contain a 1-page summary of each
job in the subject industry.




54

Table C -4. Job-search materials and tools

State

Title of project

Source/Contact

Abstract/Description

Arizona

Job Openings— Who,
What, Where, When

State employment se­
curity agency (SESA)

Describes labor availability for frequently listed occupations in
Arizona and provides a table for wage conversion. Standard Indus­
trial Classification codes, and a directory of Employment Service
offices.

Connecticut

Looking for a Parttime Job, Jobs for
Middle-aged Job
Seekers

SESA

Contains short descriptions of kinds of jobs most readily available to
middle-aged and part-time employees.

Delaware

How to Get and Hold
the Right Job

SESA

Discusses decisionmaking and self-assessment and prepares the
reader to develop a personal work history and profile, take a job
interview, and write a resume.

District of
Columbia

Job Bank Analysis

SESA

Published monthly, this analysis provides occupational characteris­
tics (salary, education, and experience requirements) and the geo­
graphic location of the jobs processed through the Washington
Metropolitan Area Job Bank. Data are compiled from the daily job
orders received during the calendar month. Jobs are evaluated in
terms of number and location of orders, number and location of
openings, employers’ educational requirements, salary offered, and
employers’ experience requirements.

Hawaii

Summer jobs in
Hawaii

SESA

Lists potential summer jobs by group. Includes information on gov­
ernment programs for youth, college student programs, summer fun
programs, and job searching in Hawaii.

New York

Hiring specifications

SESA

Contains data on wages, education and experience required, the
workweek, and the industry. Based on job openings received and
processed by the Employment Service in the City of New York.

South Carolina

Firms that Employ
Workers in Selected
Occupations

SESA

A computer printout which lists, by occupation, employers who
currently employ individuals in the occupations.




55

Table C -5. Inform ation related to occupational training and preparation

State

Title of project

Source/Contact

Abstract/Description

Arizona

Comprehensive Man­
power Delivery Sys­
tem Outline

Office of Economic
Planning and De­
velopment

A catalog of the full range of manpower agencies and programs in
Arizona. Each entry gives information on the geographic area
served; the program’s target groups; training activities and services
available; most recent funding levels, and.the agency’s planning
cycle.

Connecticut

Vocational Career
Guide

State Department of
Education

A comprehensive inventory of vocational career education in Con­
necticut, to assist students and guidance counselors in learning about
the schools and programs in Connecticut that provide formal educa­
tion for careers below the baccalaureate level, including public and
private schools, colleges, and universities.

Health Careers in
Connecticut

Connecticut Institute
for Health Manpower
Resources, Inc.

Lists training opportunities available in high schools, 2- and 4-year
public and private colleges, vocational technical schools, health care
facilities, State agencies, and universities, Part I lists the names and
addresses of all Connecticut institutions that offer health education
or training programs, including programs operated by each school
agency and health care facility. Part II lists all health occupations
for which educational opportunities exist within the State. Part III is
a chart that shows the location of employment opportunities for
selected occupations in health care and related facilities in Connec­
ticut. Part IV gives general descriptions of the listed occupations
and professions.

Hawaii

Directory of Educa­
tional Requirements
for Selected Occupa­
tions

State employment se­
curity agency

Lists occupations in which, based on the 1970 Census, 100 or more
persons are employed. Data are available on educational require­
ments, institutions of higher education, and agencies offering free
employment services.

Iowa

Opportunities in Iowa
Area Schools

Department of Public
Instruction

An initial source of information on Iowa’s area schools. It is in­
tended to provide, in a single publication, an explanation of the
Statewide system of area schools.

Louisiana

Louisiana’s Occupa­
tional Education Pro­
gram

State Department of
Education

Presents general descriptions of various course offerings in
vocational-technical schools. A course outline is provided and the
schools that offer the course are listed.

Nevada

Labor Unions, Com­
mittees and Licensing
Agencies

Employment Security
Department

This publication: (1) lists the local unions for individuals with trade
skills; (2) serves as a directory of joint apprenticeship committees
and approved on-the-job training programs; and (3) provides a com­
prehensive listing of Nevada’s occupational licensing agencies.

Occupational Training
Directory

Manpower Information
and Research Section

Occupational training information is listed alphabetically, by subject
and by the name of the organization. Data include background in­
formation on the school or training agency, general requirements for
admission, course offerings, fees, and how to apply. Also provided
is information regarding training courses for veterans.

An Inventory of
Health Professions
Education Programs

State Department of
Higher Education

Provides information on postsecondary education for health profes­
sions (including mental health professions) offered in New Jersey
colleges, hospitals, and vocational schools.

Institutional Charac­
teristics of New Jersey
Licensed Colleges and
Universities

State Department of
Higher Education

Contains selected institutional characteristics and a complete listing
of all degree or certificate programs approved by the New Jersey
Board of Higher Education.

New Jersey




56

Table C-5. Information related to occupational training and preparation— continued

State

Title of Project

Source/Contact

Abstract/Description

North
Carolina

Educational Guide

North Carolina Com­
munity Colleges and
Technical Institutes

The guide provides:
• General information regarding admission policies, guidance and
counseling services, tuition and fees, financial aid, student ac­
tivities, and job placement
• Brief explanation of the types of educational programs available
with a listing of courses and curricula offered
• Curriculum offerings in each institution
• Descriptions of the curricula offered and a listing of the institu­
tions that offer them
• Descriptions of the continuing education programs offered in the
State.

North
Dakota

Directory of Post­
secondary
Vocational-Technical
Education

A compliation of the postsecondary vocational-technical education
programs offered in the State of North Dakota by both public and
private vocational schools. The Directory is divided into three major
categories:
• Contents By Cluster— An alphabetical listing of occupational pro­
grams offered and schools that offer specific training in each occu­
pation.
• Contents By School — An alphabetical listing of the public and pri­
vate vocational-technical schools. Listed under each school are the
programs offered.
•Program Descriptions — A detailed outline of training programs.
Information on each program includes: program title, name and ad­
dress of school, contact person, nature of work, starting dates and
length of programs, helpful high school courses, job opportunities,
admission requirements, expenses, and scholarship information.

Vermont

Adult and Continuing
Education Study Guide




Vermont Advisory
Council for Vocational
Technical Education

A survey was conducted of schools, businesses, government agen­
cies, and nonprofit institutions to gather data on training made avail­
able to employees or the general public. Extensive information is
provided on each organization that responded.

57

Appendix D. Federal
Agencies
The following addresses are for agency
headquarters offices. Most agencies also
have regional offices, which may be able to
provide copies of publications. Publications
of the Office of Personnel Management
may be obtained from Federal Job Infor­
mation Centers. Addresses are listed in the
white pages of telephone directories under
United States Government. Addresses of
Bureau of Labor Statistics regional offices
are listed on the inside back cover of this
publication.
ACTION/Peace Corps
806 Connecticut Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20525
ACTION/Vista
806 Connecticut Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20525
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Fourteenth St. and Independence Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20250

Soil Conservation Service
Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250
Statistical Reporting Service
(Write to Economics, Statistics,
and Cooperatives Service)
U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament
Agency
Department of State Building
Washington, D.C. 20451
Central Intelligence Agency
Washington, D.C. 20505
Civil Aeronautics Board
1825 Connecticut Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20428
U.S. Department of Commerce
Fourteenth St. Between Constitution Ave.
and E St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20230

Naval Electronic Systems Command
(Code 903)
Department of the Navy
Washington, D.C. 20360
Navy Civilian Personnel Command
Recruitment Programs Branch
801 North Randolph St.
Arlington, Va. 22203
U.S. Department of Energy
Washington, D.C. 20585
Environmental Protection Agency
401 M St. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20460
Export-Import Bank of the United States
811 Vermont Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20571
Farm Credit Administration
490 L’Enfant Plaza East S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20578

Bureau of the Census
Department of Commerce
Washington, D.C. 20233

Federal Communications Commission
1919 M St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20554

Agricultural Extension Service
Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250

Industry and Trade Administration
Department of Commerce
Washington, D.C. 20230

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
550 Seventeenth St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20429

Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service
Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250

Maritime Administration
Department of Commerce
Washington, D.C. 20230

Federal Home Loan Bank Board
1700 G St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20552

Economics, Statistics, and Coopera­
tives Service
Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250

National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration
Department of Commerce
6010 Executive Blvd
Rockville, Md. 20852

Federal Maritime Commission
1100 L St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20573

Farmers Home Administration
Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250
Forest Service
Department of Agriculture
P.O. Box 2417
Washington, D.C. 20013
Food and Nutrition Service
Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250
Foreign Agricultural Service
Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250
Rural Electrification Administration
Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250
Science and Education Administration
Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250



Commodity Futures Trading Commis­
sion
2033 K St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20581
Department of Defense
The Pentagon
Washington, D.C. 20301
U.S. Army Audit Agency
Washington, D.C. 20310
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Washington, D.C. 20314
Defense Contract Audit Agency
Cameron Station
Alexandria, Va. 22314
Naval Air Systems Command
(AIR-90A3)
Department of the Navy
Washington, D.C. 20361

58

Federal Mediation and Conciliation
Service
2100 K St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20427
Federal Reserve System
Twentieth St. and
Constitution Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20551
Federal Trade Commission
Pennsylvania Ave. at Sixth St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20580
General Services Administration
Eighteenth and F Sts. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20405
U.S. Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare
200 Independence Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20201

National Clearinghouse on Aging
Administration on Aging
330 Independence Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20201

Health Resources Administration
Center Bldg.
3700 East-West Highway
Hyattsville, Md. 20782

Administration for Children, Youth,
and Families
400 Sixth St. SW
Washington, D.C. 20013

Bureau of Health Manpower
Health Resources Administration
Center Bldg.
3700 East-West Highway
Hyattsville, Md. 20782

National Institute of Education
Brown Bldg.
Nineteenth and M Sts. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20208
Office of Education
400 Maryland Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20202
Bureau of Higher and Continuing
Education
Office of Education
400 Maryland Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20202
Bureau of Occupational and Adult
Education
Office of Education
400 Maryland Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20202
Bureau of Postsecondary Education
(name changed to Bureau of Higher and
Continuing Education)
National Center for Education Statis­
tics
Office of Education
400 Maryland Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20202
Public Health Service
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, Md. 20857
Center for Disease Control
1600 Clifton Rd. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30333
National Institute for Occupational
Safety and Health
Center for Disease Control
1600 Clifton Rd. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30333
Division of Training and Manpower
Development
National Institute for Occupational
Safety and Health
Robert A. Taft Laboratories
4676 Columbia Parkway
Cincinnati, Ohio 45226
Food and Drug Administration
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, Md. 20857



Student and Institutional Assistance
Branch
Bureau of Health Manpower
Health Resources Administration
Center Bldg.
3700 East-West Highway
Hyattsville, Md. 20782
National Institutes of Health
9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Md. 20014

Bureau of Reclamation
U.S. Department of the Interior
Washington, D.C. 20240
Geological Survey
National Center
12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
Reston, Va. 22092
Heritage Conservation and Recreation
Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Washington, D.C. 20243
National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Washington, D.C. 20240
United States Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Washington, D.C. 20240

International,Communication Agency
1750 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.
National Institute of Mental Health
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Washington, D.C. 20547
Administration
Interstate Commerce Commission
5600 Fishers Lane
Twelfth St. and Constitution Ave. N.W.
Rockville, Md. 20857
Washington, D.C. 20423
National Institute on Drug Abuse
U.S. Department of Justice
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health
Washington, D.C. 20530
Administration
5600 Fishers Lane
Federal Bureau of Investigation
Rockville, Md. 20857
Ninth St. and Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20535
Rehabilitation Services Administration
330 C St. S.W.
Law Enforcement Assistance
Washington, D C. 20207
Administration
633 Indiana Ave. N.W.
Social Security Administration
Washington, D.C. 20531
6401 Security Blvd.
Baltimore, Md. 21235

U.S. Department of Labor
Department of Housing and Urban De­ 200 Constitution Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210
velopment
451 Seventh St. S.W.
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training
Washington, D.C. 20410
601 D St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20213
U.S. Department of the Interior
C St. Between 18th and 19th Sts. N.W.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20240
441 G St. N.W.
Bureau of Land Management
U.S. Department of the Interior
Washington, D.C. 20240
Bureau of Mines
U.S. Department of the Interior
2401 E St., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20241
Bureau of Outdoor Recreation
(write to Heritage Conservation and
Recreation Service)

59

Washington, D.C. 20212
Employment Standards Administra­
tion
U.S. Department of Labor
Washington, D.C. 20210
Wage and Hour Division
Employment Standards Administration
Washington, D.C. 20210
Employment and Training Adminis­
tration
601 D St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20213

Securities and Exchange Commission
Job Corps
Employment and Training Administra­ 500 North Capitol St.
Washington, D.C. 20549
tion
Washington, D.C. 20213
Small Business Administration
1441 L St. N.W.
Office of Youth Programs
Employment and Training Administra­ Washington, D.C. 20416
tion
Smithsonian Institution
Washington, D.C. 20213
1000 Jefferson Drive S.W.
United States Employment Service
Washington, D.C. 20560
Employment and Training Administra­
U.S. Department of State
tion
2201 C St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20213
Washington, D.C. 20520
Manpower Administration
U .S. Department of State Board of
(Name changed to Employment and
Examiners for the Foreign Service
Training Administration)
Office of Recruitment, Examination and
Women’s Bureau
Employment
Department of Labor
P.O. Box 9317
Washington, D.C. 20210
Rosslyn Station, Arlington, Va. 22209
National Aeronautics and Space Admin­
istration
400 Maryland Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20546
National Labor Relations Board
1717 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20570
National Security Agency
Ft. George G. Meade, Md. 20755
National Science Foundation
1800 G St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20550
U.S. Office of Personnel Management
1900 E St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20415
The President’s Committee on Employ­
ment of the Handicapped
1111 Twentieth St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210




Agency for International Development
U.S. Department of State
320 Twenty-first St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20523
U.S. Department of Transportaton
400 Seventh St. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20590
U.S. Coast Guard
Department of Transportation
400 Seventh St. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20590
Federal Aviation Administration
Department of Transportation
800 Independence Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20591
Federal Highway Administration
Department of Transportation
400 Seventh St. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20590

60

U.S. Department of the Treasury
Fifteenth St. and Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20220
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Fire
arms
Department of the Treasury
1200 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20226
Internal Revenue Service
Department of the Treasury
1111 Constitution Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20224
Office of the Comptroller
of the Currency
Department of the Treasury
Washington, D.C. 20219
U.S. Customs Service
Department of the Treasury
1301 Constitution Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20229
U.S. Secret Service
Department of the Treasury
1800 G St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20223
Veterans Administration
810 Vermont Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20420




OLD FAITHFUL
... one of the most widely used
resources in the field of vocational
guidance. A new edition is
published every 2 years. The
Handbook is an “encyclopedia of
careers” covering several hundred
occupations and many major
industries. The reader will find
information on:

Occupational
Outlook
Handbook
1974-75 Edition

•
•
•
•

What the work is like
Job prospects
Personal qualifications
Education and training
requirements
• Earnings
• Related occupations
• Where to find additional
information.

$8.00 for the paper bound single
volume. $9.00 for the packaged se
of 42 reprints.

Occupational
Outlook
Handbook



VND SOMETHING NEW
A new career guidance publication
for junior high/middle school
students.

Exploring
Careers

Promotes career awareness through
occupational narratives,
photographs, evaluative questions,
activities, and career games.
Organized into career clusters.

U S, Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1979
Bulletin 2001

$10.00 for the 575-page single
volume. $2.00 each for the 15
separate chapters. $12.00 for the
packaged set of 15 chapters.
For ordering information, contact the
BLS Regional Office nearest you.
(See inside back cover)

Exploring
Careers



* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1980 0

32H-895




Bureau of Labor Statistics
Regional Offices

1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617) 223-6761

Region II

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: (212) 944-3121

Region III

3535 Market Street
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154




Region IV

Regions VII and VIII

Region V

Region I

Regions IX and X

1371 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30367
Phone: (404) 881-4418

9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: (312) 353-1880

Region VI

Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214) 767-6971

911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: (816) 374-2481

450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415) 556-4678


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102