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U. S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ROYAL MEEKER, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES)
(WHOLE O f l l
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S / * * * ( NUMBER L \ J 1
IN D U ST R IA L

A C C ID E N T S

AND

H Y GIEN E

S E R IE S:

NO.

9

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS
AND COMPENSATION INSURANCE COST




OF THE

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION
OF IN D U ST R IA L A C C ID E N T
BOARDS AND COM MISSIONS

AUGUST, 1916

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1916




ADD ITIO N AL COPIES
OF THIS PUBLICATION MAT BE PROCURED FROM
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GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON, D. C.
AT

15 CENTS PER COPY

V

CONTENTS.

Pag#.
Report of the committee.............
7-16
Classification of industries....................................................................................... 17-71
Summary of divisions, schedules, and groups............................................17-21
Division A.—Agriculture....................................................................................21,22
21
Schedule 1. General farming....................................................................
Schedule 2. Dairy farming................. .....................................................
21
Schedule 3. Stock farming........................................................................
21
Schedule 4. Garden and truck farming...................................................
22
Schedule 5. Operating agricultural machinery (not by farmer)............
22
Division B.—Mining and quarrying................................................................22, 23
Schedule 1. Mining...... ...........................................................................
22
Schedule 2. Quarrying.............................................................................
23
Division C.—Manufacturing............................................................................. 23-48
Schedule 1. Stone products.....................................................................23,24
Schedule 2. Clay products......................................................................... 24,25
Schedule 3. Glass products......................................................................
25
Schedule 4. Ore reduction and smelting................................................
26
Schedule 5. Rolling mills and steelworks............................................... 26, 27
Schedule 6. Metal products....................................................................... 27-30
30-32
Schedule 7. Machinery and instruments..................................
Schedule 8. Vehicles................................................................................32,33
Schedule 9. Lumber and wood..................................................................33-36
Schedule 10. Leather— ........................................................................... 36, 37
Schedule 11. Rubber and composition goods......................................... 37, 38
Schedule 12. Chemicals and allied products.......................................... 38-41
Schedule 13. Paper and paper products..................................................41,42
Schedule 14. Printing and publishing.....................................................
42
Schedule 15. Textiles.................................................................................42-44
Schedule 16. Clothing and furnishings...................................................... 44,45
Schedule 17. Foods, beverages, and tobacco.......................................... 45-47
Schedule 18. Miscellaneous manufactured products (n. o. c .)...............47,48
Division D.—Construction..................................................................................48-57
Schedule 1. Wrecking and moving..........................................................
48
Schedule 2. Grading, excavating, and foundations.................................. 48-51
Schedule 3. Erecting................................................................................. 51-55
Schedule 4. Finishing, equipping, and installing.................................. 55-57
Division E.—Transportation and public utilities.......................................... 58-63
Schedule 1. Steam railroads.....................................................
58
Schedule 2. Electric railroads..................................................................
58
Schedule 3. Cartage and storage............................................................... 58-60
Schedule 4. Stockyards.............................................................................
60
Schedule 5. Transportation by water...................................................... 61, 62
Schedule 6. Public utilities (not transportation).................................... 62, 63
Division F.—Trade........................................................................................... 63-67
Schedule 1. Offices.................................................................................... 63,64
Schedule 2. Stores..................................................................................... 64, 65




4

C O N TE N TS.

Classification of industries—Concluded.
Division F.—Trade—Concluded.
Schedule 3. Yards.....................................................................................
Schedule 4. Salesmen and agents—outside.............................................
Division G.—S ervice.......................................................................................
Schedule 1. Domestic........................................................................ .......
Schedule 2. Personal.................................................................................
Schedule 3. Professional................ ..........................................................
Schedule 4. Municipal and public...........................................................
Classification of accident causes..............................................................................
General cause classification..............................................................................
I. Machinery...........................................................................................
A. Prime movers............................................................................
B. Power-transmission apparatus.................................................
C. Power-working machinery.......................................................
D. Hoisting apparatus and conveyors..........................................
E. Miscellaneous machinery........................................................
II. Boilers and steam-pressure apparatus...............................................
III. Vehicles..................................................................................................
A. Cars and engines—steam and electric railways....................
B. Mine and quarry cars...............................................................
C. Automobiles and other power vehicles...................................
D. Animal-drawn vehicles............................................................
E. Water transportation................................................................
F. All other vehicles.....................................................................
IV. Explosives, electricity, fires, and hot and corrosive substances.......
A. Explosive substances...............................................................
B. Electricity................................................................................
C. Conflagrations...........................................................................
D. Hot substances and flames.................... .................................
E. Corrosive substances.........................................................
V. Poisonous substances..........................................................................
VI. Falls of persons...................................................................................
A. From elevations........................................................................
B. Into excavations, pits, and shafts...........................................
C. On level....................................................................................
VII. Stepping on or striking against objects.............................................
A. Stepping on objects.................................................................
B . Striking against objects............................................................
V III. Falling objects....................................................................................
A. Collapse of.................................................................................
B. From elevations........................................................................
C. Into excavations.......................................................................
D. In mines and quarries.............................................................
E. Other falling objects.................................................................
IX . Objects being handled........................................................................
A. Heavy objects (loading, unloading, carrying, lifting, or piling)
B. Sharp objects............................................................................
C. Hand trucks, carts, and wheelbarrows...................................
X . Hand tools...........................................................................................
X I. Animals................................................................................................
A. Horses, mules, and oxen..........................................................
B. Other animals...........................................................................
X II. Miscellaneous causes...........................................................................




Page.
65,67
67
67-71
67-69
69.70
70.71
71
73-80
73-80
73-75
73
73
73
74
74.75
75
75.76
75.76
76
76
76
76
76
77
77
77
77
77
77
77
77, 78
77,78
78
78
78
78
78
78, 79
78
78
78
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
80

CO N TE N TS.

5
Page.

Classification of industrial accidents by location and nature of injury and ex­
tent of disability......................................................................................................81-84
I. Location of injury..........
81-83
A. Head....................
81
B. Face and neck.................................................................................
81
81,82
C. Trunk...................
D. Upper extremities...........................................................................
82
E. Lower extremities............................................................................ 82,83
83
II. Nature of injury............
III. Extent of disability......................................................................................
83
IV. Degree of partial disability..........................................................................
83
Multiple injuries................................................................................................
84
Appendix A.—Grouping of working machines used by New York State Indus­
trial Commission................................................................................................... 85-97
Stone, clay, and glass working machines........................................................
85
Metal-working machines..................................................................................... 85-88
Wood-working machines..................................................................................... 88-90
Leather-working machines—tanneries............................................................
90
Leather-working machines—leather products................................................ 90, 91
Paper-making machines.................................................................................... 91,92
Paper products and printing machines........................................................... 92-94
Textile and laundry machines...........................................................................94-96
Food products, laboratory, and tobacco machines......................................... 96, 97
Appendix B.—Resolutions in regard to accidents and workmen’s compensation
statistics adopted by the International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions at Chicago,January 12 and 13, 1915........................... 98-100
Appendix C.—Resolutions relating to accident and workmen’s compensation
statistics adopted by the Chicago conference of October 12 and 13, 1914___ 101,102
Appendix D.—Definitions and methods of tabulating the various kinds of in­
juries and of compensation payments in use by the Workmen’s Compensa­
tion Service Bureau................ ........................................................................ 103-108







BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
w hole no

.

201.

WASHINGTON.

august,

lo i e .

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND COMPENSATION
INSURANCE COST OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF
INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENT BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS.
Statistics are commonly thought to be dry as dust.

Newspapers

and others whose office it is to instruct and admonish the public
serve statistical information in homeopathic doses only. The bulky
and ill-arranged tomes issued by too many State and Federal
departments find their way only to the desk o f the technical expert
and the wastebasket o f the layman. Y e t statistics are simply a col­
lection o f facts, so selected and arranged as to bring out the bear­
ing o f experience upon a particular problem. A s experience is the
chief school of wisdom, so statistical analysis is an indispensable
aid in the study o f social problems. I f statistics have fallen into
disrepute, the fault lies with the incompetence o f statisticians, their
pedantry, their failure to understand the problems with which they
deal, and their lack of intelligible and interesting presentation.
No department o f statistical inquiry more closely touches the
public weal than the study o f personal injuries by accident. Sta­
tistics o f industrial accidents should serve for accident prevention,
for the due administration and intelligent revision o f workmen’s
compensation laws, and for the computation o f compensation insur­
ance rates. F or accident prevention it is needful to know how and
why accidents occur. F or the better administration o f workmen’s
compensation laws it is necessary to, have an accurate statistical
record o f the disposal o f compensation cases, not only the compara­
tively few cases which are form ally passed upon by the administra­
tive board, but the immensely larger number o f claims which are
settled between the parties with only a pro forma administrative
approval. F or the intelligent enactment and revision o f compensa­
tion legislation legislators must know the number and character o f
accidental injuries, the extent o f wage loss, and the cost in per cent
o f pay roll o f any proposed scale of benefits. Lastly, for the com­
putation o f insurance rates it is necessary to have not only the actual
pure premiums by industries, but a detailed analysis o f the accidents
which occasion the pure premiums.




7

8

BULLETIN OP THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

T o serve these ends, accident statistics must be analyzed by in­
dustry, by cause of accident, and by nature and location of injury
and extent o f disability, and must be so cross-analyzed as to show
the correlation of each o f these sets of facts with every other. Still
other analyses are necessary. I t is important to know the number,
ages, and relationships o f dependents in fatal cases, and the age
and wage groups o f the injured in all cases. In certain industries
an occupational analysis will be o f value. I t goes without saying
also that the pay-roll exposure should be obtained by indus­
tries, and that the wage loss and the amount of compensation and
o f medical aid should be shown by *industry, by cause of accident,
and by nature and location o f injury and extent o f disability. M any
other statistical studies will prove necessary for particular purposes.
Nevertheless, the classifications by industry, cause, and nature and
extent of injury are primary.

Faulty analysis in these respects will

vitiate the whole statistical output.
Vice versa, if these three
fundamental classifications are sound and adequate, everything else
can be added as opportunity and occasion arise.
The most cursory examination will show that the official indus­
trial accident statistics of the United States are lamentably weak
in just these vital particulars. No one State has yet published sta­
tistics that are at all adequate to its own needs, and no two States
have produced results that are in any way comparable. One State
department follows the census classification of industries, another
uses the schedules of the old liability manual, a third the literal
classifications of the compensation insurance manual. The classifi­
cation o f accident causes is sometimes so meager as to be o f little
value for prevention, sometimes so prolix and ill-digested as to
afford no comprehensive view. The classification of injuries ranges
from the simple division into fatal and nonfatal to an individual list
o f permanent disabilities— the mere raw material of statistics. W h ile
weightier matters have been thus neglected, much time and labor have
been expended upon such unprofitable subjects as race, conjugal con­
dition, day of the month, day o f the week, and hour of the day.
A fte r the approval o f the first report o f the Committee on Sta­
tistics and Compensation Insurance Cost by the association in its an­
nual meeting at Seattle, in 1915,1 there remained for the committee
the preparation of the final subdivisions o f classifications under each
o f the various industry groups, the preparation of classifications of
causes of accidents and o f nature o f injuries and the drafting of
uniform tables for the presentation o f accident and compensation
statistics. A ll o f these subjects, except the drafting o f uniform
1The first report of the committee was printed in full in the November, 1915, issue of
the Monthly Review of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

9

tables, have been taken up and are dealt with in the committee’s re­
port. D uring the year four meetings of the committee have been held
and besides this a very large amount of work has been done by mem­
bers of the committee individually.
In continuation of its work the committee met in New Y o rk City
February 3 and 4, 1916, in a joint session with representatives o f the
Casualty Actuarial and Statistical Society o f America and the W o r k ­
men’s Compensation Service Bureau.1 The meeting was given en­
tirely to the discussion o f the classification of causes o f accident. In
general, the classification included in the preliminary report of the
committee on classification o f causes, appointed in accordance with
the action of the joint conference held at Chicago, October 12 and
13, 1914, was taken as the basis of discussion and was accepted in
large part by the committee. This preliminary report was printed
in Bulletin 157 o f the United States Bureau o f Labor Statistics.2
A second meeting of the committee was held at Columbus, Ohio,
February 21 -2 2 , 1916. Four members o f the committee— Messrs.
Downey, Meeker, W atson, and Croxton— were present. Further con­
sideration was given to the classification of causes o f accidents, and
the classification of accidents by location and nature o f injury and
extent of disability was taken up.
A third meeting of the committee was held in New Y ork City
March 16, 1916, jointly with representatives of the Casualty A ctu ­
arial and Statistical Society and the W orkm en’s Compensation B u ­
reau.3 The meeting was devoted to the discussion of the classifica­
tion of industries and o f causes o f accidents.
The fourth and final meeting of the committee for the year was
held at Philadelphia March 31 and A p ril 1, 1916. Members of the
Committee present were Messrs. Downey, H atch, M agoun, W atson,
and Verrill, and, by invitation, F . S. Crum o f the Prudential Insur­
ance Co. Four long sessions were devoted to the discussion and
final revision o f the classification of causes o f accident and o f loca­
tion and nature o f injury and extent o f disability.
A t the Seattle meeting of the association your committee presented
a preliminary grouping of industries which was adopted by the asso1 Those present w ere: E. H. Downey, chairman, special deputy, Pennsylvania Insur­
ance Department; H. E. Ryan, associate actuary, New York Insurance Department;
L. W. Hatch, chief statistician, Industrial Commission of New Y ork; W. N. Magoun,
Massachusetts Insurance Department; C. H. Verrill, representing Commissioner Meeker,
U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; I. M. Rubinow, president Casualty Actuarial anfl
Statistical Society; C. E. Scattergood. Workmen’s Compensation Senvice Bureau; and
W. H. Burhop, chief statistician, Wisconsin Industrial Commission.
2 Pages 160 to 162.
8 Those present at this meeting w ere: Royal Meeker, U. S. Commissioner of Labor
Statistics; L. W. Hatch, chief statistician, Industrial Commission of New Y ork; C. H.
Verrill, U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; W. N. Magoun, general manager Pennsylvania
Compensation Rating and Inspection Bureau ; I. M. Rubinow, president Casualty Actuarial
and Statistical Society; and G. F. Michelbacher, statistician, Workmen’s Compensation

Bureau.




10

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

ciation. In the present report these groups o f industries have been
further subdivided into classifications corresponding as nearly as pos­
sible with the detailed classifications customarily used by compensa­
tion commissions and insurance companies in fixing premium rates.
There are also presented classifications o f causes of accidents and of
accidental injuries by nature and location of injury and extent o f
disability.
These classifications are not presented as in all respects perfect
or the embodiment o f all wisdom. They are necessarily the result
o f compromise. Y ou r committee had to consider, on the one hand,
the requirements o f scientific classification, and, on the other hand,
the limitations o f time and means at the disposal of administrative
boards. Due regard for these limitations enforced the omission of
much detail which may be within the reach o f some favored States,
and which is very desirable for certain purposes.
Nevertheless, your committee believe that these classifications will
serve the most important immediate needs of industrial accident sta­
tistics. They are the fruit of much thought and discussion by ex­
perienced statisticians. They embody the best that could be found
in the official classifications o f the United States and Europe. F u r­
ther improvement may well be left to further experience.
A ll of the classifications herewith recommended are designed to
admit of expansion or contraction, according to the varied needs and
facilities of different administrative boards. I f a particular board
is unable to undertake more, the industry groups will suffice for many
purposes and will facilitate comparisons with the accident statistics
of other States. In the same manner the classification o f accident
causes can at need be limited to the primary and secondary divisions
o f the standard classification. Per contra, i f time and means per­
mit, the items may be expanded to any desired extent, within the
general framework and without impairing the comparability of the
resultant tables. Every capable statistician will naturally under­
take such expansion as may be suitable to his own problems and the
facilities placed at his disposal. There are somewhat narrow limits
to the detail which can with advantage be shown in general tables,
but no classification can be too detailed or too specific for the needs
o f accident-prevention work in particular industries. I t should be
remembered, moreover, that the combination o f separate items in a
detailed code is always easy, whereas the opposite process is extremely
laborious and often impossible.
CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRIES.1
In all tabulations of industrial accident statistics the most im por­
tant factor is the classification of industries, as to this all other items




1 See p. 17 et seq.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

11

relate. F or example, the number of accidents o f a certain nature,
such as the loss of an arm, must be assigned to the industries in which
such accidents occur, and similarly the number o f accidents attribu­
table to a specific cause, such as the lack of a proper safeguard, must
be distributed by industries. U niform ity in the classification o f
industries is therefore of first importance and is absolutely essential
i f the data prepared by the various States are to be comparable.
The task undertaken by your committee was to prepare a logical
arrangement o f all the various industries o f the United States
according to the “ nature of the business.” The committee, after
very careful consideration, adopted a grouping of industries cov­
ering all o f the classifications used by insurance companies for
writing workmen’s compensation risks in this country.

In order that statistics pertaining to industrial accidents may be
comparable, it is obviously essential that they shall be on the same
basis. The accident data now being rapidly accumulated by indus­
trial accident boards and commissions are of great value. The light
which statistical data throw upon the subject of accident prevention
is of primary importance. Accident statistics are also of tremendous
importance in pointing out the relative hazard of industries, and as a
corollary thereof the rate of insurance which the respective lines of
industry should properly be called upon to pay.
A t the present time workmen’s compensation insurance rates are
provided by the insurance companies for some 1,500 different classifi­
cations. F or the various industrial accident boards and commissions
to keep and publish their accident data in the detail indicated by so
many classifications is well-nigh impossible, and would result in too
minute a refinement for practical purposes. I f , however, a logical
table o f industries can be prepared in such a manner that the 1,500
insurance classifications can be arranged under a reasonable number
o f headings, then the value of the industrial accident statistics will be
greatly enhanced and their usefulness extended. Industrial accident
board statistics and insurance statistics will “ dovetail,” and all doubt
as to just what is intended to be covered under a given designation
will be removed. T his is one of the chief objects which your com­
mittee has attempted to accomplish.

The classification groupings which the committee submit is drawn
up in accordance with the following arrangement:
Divisions.
Schedules.
Groups.
Classifications.
Divisions.— There are seven principal divisions or primary head­
ings corresponding to those adopted by the committee appointed by




12

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Commissioner Meeker at the Chicago Conference of October, 1914.1
These divisions a re :
(A )
(B )
(C )
(D )

Agriculture.
Mining and quarrying.
Manufacturing.
Construction.

(E ) Transportation and public utilities.
(F ) Trade.
(G ) Service.

Schedules.— The seven divisions are divided into 43 schedules cor­
responding to the secondary headings adopted by the committee
appointed by D r. Meeker. These secondary headings explain the
details into which the primary headings are separated. F or example,
the primary heading “ Manufacturing ” is divided into 18 schedules,
such as lumber and wood, leather, textiles, chemicals, paper, etc.
Groups.— The group headings, of which there are 272, are the
most important in the series and show a refinement of the secondary
headings. Each group heading is intended to be significant of the
industries covered under it, and it is the belief of the committee that
these tertiary or group headings will prove acceptable to the various
industrial accident boards and commissions for general use in tabu­
lating their accident data.
Classifications.— The final subdivision consists of the classifications
o f industries appearing in the manuals used by insurance companies
in connection with their writing of workmen’s compensation insur­
ance. These final subdivisions are o f special value to industrial
accident boards and commissions, serving as an index to show what
industries are intended to be covered by the respective groups.
CLASSIFICATION OF CAUSES.2
The whole purpose o f a classification o f accidents by causes is
accident prevention. The classification, therefore, should point to
the most immediate and tangible preventives. Doubtless every acci­
dent is, in fact, the outcome of a long train of events. I f only com­
plete information were available, it should be possible to trace any
accident to some remote initiating cause— ultimately to some failure
o f insight or foresight on the part o f some human agent, in many
cases. I f a tower falls, it is because the builder has miscalculated the
strength o f its materials in relation to the strains put upon them, or
the contractor has failed to carry out the specifications, or a workman
has slighted his task. So the death o f those who are buried in the
ruins might be attributed to the neglect o f the brickmaker, or to the
incompetence o f the supervising architect. B ut it is very seldom pos­
sible to ascertain the primary cause o f an accident in this sense. The
attempt, indeed, would generally prove o f doubtful utility. The im ­
mediate cause is a tangible fact, capable o f definite ascertainment.
T o go further is to venture into the speculative field of personal
1 See Bulletin 157 of U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, p. 153 et seq.




2 See p. 73 et seq.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE 01* STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

13

fault, where the bias o f witnesses and th # predilection of the statis­
tician will too often determine the result.
It is recommended, therefore, that accidents be uniform ly assigned
to the proximate or immediate cause. In the immense majority of
cases, the analysis will perforce stop at this point. The compara­
tively rare catastrophic accidents, however— such as train collisions
or coal-mine explosions— should be further analyzed with respect to
the antecedent circumstances which produce the catastrophe.
The committee adopted the following definition of proximate cause:
“ That the accident should be charged to that condition or circum­
stance the absence o f which would have prevented the accident; but
if there be more than one such condition or circumstance, then to the
one most easily prevented.”
The meaning of this rule may be made clear by illustration.

A

workman passing through an aisle stumbles upon a defective floor and
throws his hand into an open gear which mashes off two of his fingers.
Under the rule adopted this accident is to be charged to the gear and
not to stumbling. H ad the gear been properly covered the workman
m ight still have been injured by his fall, but the injury which did
occur— namely, the loss o f two fingers— would not have happened.
I t will be seen that the committee has grouped the causes of acci­
dents, as above defined, into 12 divisions, and that these again have
been subdivided into general classes. Machinery, for instance, is
divided into prime movers, power-transmission apparatus, power­
working machinery, hoisting and conveying apparatus, and miscel­
laneous machinery.

Vehicles are divided into cars and engines of

steam and electric railroads, mine and quarry cars, automobiles and
other power vehicles, animal-drawn vehicles, and vessels for water
transportation.
The committee was unable to prepare a proper classification o f
power-working machinery. The number o f machines is so great
and their relationships so intricate that much engineering study
would have to be given to the subject. The W orkm en’s Compensa­
tion Service Bureau, however, has prepared an elaborate list of
power-working machines, comprising all the principal classes of
machinery. M r. L . W . Hatch, of the Industrial Commission of
New Y ork , has made a grouping of these machines by industry, and
within each industry by operative hazard.1 I t is believed that any
industrial board can find in the bureau list above referred to all the
machines which it will have occasion to use for accident statistics,
and it is recommended that for the present M r. H atch ’s grouping
should be followed. I t is hoped that further experience will evolve
a grouping which can be officially adopted.
Under “ H oisting apparatus and conveyors” the committee have
recommended that elevator accidents should be analyzed in some
1 This grouping is printed as Appendix A to this report, p. 85 et seq.




14

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

detail because o f the large number and seriousness o f these acci­
dents. In mining States a similarly detailed analysis should be
made o f accidents on mine cages, skips, and buckets. In those States
where building construction is an important industry derrick acci­
dents should be similarly analyzed.
The committee have further recommended a detailed analysis o f
machine accidents by manner of occurrence and by part o f machine
on which the accident occurred. Such an analysis may not be prac­
ticable for publication in the general statistical tables, since it would
require a very large amount o f space to show the accidents upon
each listed machine by manner o f occurrence and part o f machine.
Nevertheless it should be practical to give this information in a
summary without reference to the individual machines, and the
statistical department should be able to obtain the information for
any specific machine or group of machines when required for special
studies.
The committee have given more attention to nonmachine acci­
dents than has been customary in most States and indeed in foreign
countries. Experience, both in the United States and abroad, has
shown that machinery of all descriptions— taking even the broad
definition here adopted— accounts for not more than one-fourth o f
industrial accidents, whether considered from the standpoint o f
mere numbers or from the standpoint of both number and severity.
Indeed, less than one-fourth of fatal injuries occur in connection with
power machinery. I t has been customary to give a somewhat de­
tailed analysis of machine accidents, and to lump all nonmachine
accidents under a few general headings. Y ou r committee believe,
however, that 75 per cent of the accidents should receive at least half
o f the time and thought of the statistical departments.
In the analysis of railroad equipment accidents, your committee
have followed the latest classification o f the Interstate Commerce
Commission, consolidating, however, to reduce the amount o f detail.
I t will be noted that under all vehicles objects falling from the
vehicle not in loading or unloading are charged to the vehicle itself.
Accidents in loading or unloading are charged to the handling o f
objects. This distinction appears to be logical. In the same way
falls of persons from the vehicle are considered vehicle accidents.
O f course a proper code system will enable any statistician who
desires so to do to throw these accidents into the groups o f falling
objects and falls of persons, respectively.
H and trucks are not treated as vehicles, but are included under
Division I X , 6 Objects being handled.” I t is o f course true that a
6
hand truck falls within the common definition o f vehicle. The com­
mittee believed, however, that hand trucking is not a part o f the




REPORT OF COMMITTEE 0 N STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

15

transportation industry, and that the hazards of hand trucking are
more analogous to the hazards o f handling objects than to those of
power vehicles.
The treatment o f water transportation equipment is very incom­
plete and unsatisfactory. I t is strongly recommended that in those
States where water transportation industry is important and is in­
cluded under workmen’s compensation, a more detailed analysis
should be worked out.
Accidents in the use of hand tools are analyzed by manner of oc­
currence. I t was not believed worth while to analyze these acci­
dents by the type o f tool which was being used.
The list o f accident causes herewith submitted will require expan­
sion in different States to provide for special industries. In logging
States, for example, more extended treatment should be given to
animal-drawn vehicles, to falling objects, and to hand tools. The
general classes here provided should be made more specific in order
to satisfy conditions peculiar to the logging industry.
Sim ilarly, wherever an administrative authority is carrying on a
safety campaign in the building industry, a special classification of
falls o f persons and of falling objects in building construction should
be introduced. Doubtless there are still other industries which will
require special treatment. I t is hoped that all these special classifica­
tions can be fitted into the general framework here provided.
CLASSIFICATION BY LOCATION AND NATURE OF INJURY AND
EXTENT OF DISABILITY.1
The committee has recommended four classifications of accidental
injuries as distinguished from the accidents themselves, namely, the
location of injury or part o f body injured, the nature o f injury, the
extent o f disability, and, as a subdivision of the last, the degree of
partial disability.
In assignment o f the location o f injury, the committee has fo l­
lowed the common anatomical divisions, beginning with the head and
ending with the feet. Special provision has been made for injuries
involving two or more parts. The amount o f detail given is not so
great as that called for by the specific indemnity schedules o f some
States, but it is believed sufficient for all ordinary statistical pur­
poses. A n y State which needs more detail can easily provide same.
I t is specially to be noted that accidents involving dismemberment or
permanent loss o f use of members should be listed in detail.
The nature o f injury classification is confined to the injuries sus­
tained at the time o f the accident, and is designated by popular
rather than technical medical terms. Special provision is recom­
mended for infections, so that the infection shall be correlated with
the nature o f injury and also with the extent of disability.




1 See p. 81 et seq.

16

B U L L E T IN

OF T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

W ith respect to extent of disability, injuries are divided into the
generally recognized classes of fatalities, permanent total disabilities,
permanent partial disabilities, temporary total disabilities, and tem­
porary partial disabilities. Permanent disabilities are further
divided into dismemberment and others. I t would probably be ad­
visable to extend this division with respect to permanent partial dis­
abilities so as to show some of the more common causes of permanent
partial disability other than dismemberment, e. g., ankylosis, short­
ening o f limb, and stiffness other than ankylosis.
The degree of partial disability need be shown only with respect
to permanent disabilities other than dismemberments. B y degree in
this connection is meant the degree o f impairment of the member
affected, and not the degree of disability of the injured workman.
A n y attempt to determine the degree o f disability of the workman
or his loss o f earning capacity will be more or less arbitrary. In
any given case the measure adopted by the statistician will probably
reflect the compensation law of the particular State as interpreted
by the administrative authorities thereof. The California schedule,
e. g., would show the degree of disability from the loss of an index
finger to a piano tuner. But statistics of degree of disability in this
sense would add nothing to our information. W ith regard to par­
tial impairment of members, however, it is highly important to know
the extent of impairment, and this is a matter which can be ascer­
tained with a fair degree o f accuracy.
A l l of which is very respectfully submitted.
E . H . D o w n e y , Chairman,
Special Deputy, Pennsylvania Insurance Department, Harrisburg, Pa,
R oyal M eeker,
Commissioner of Labor Statistics, Washington, D. C.
R obert K . O rr ,
Manager State Accident Fund, Lansing, Mich,
W . N. M agoun,
General Manager, Pennsylvania Compensation Rating and
Inspection Bureau, Philadelphia, Pa,
H . E. R ya n ,
Associate Actuary, State Insurance Department, Neto York City,




F loyd L ; D aggett ,
Chairman, Industrial Insurance Commission, Olympia, Wash,
F red C . C ro x t o n ,
Chief Statistician, Industrial Commission, Columbus, Ohio,
L . W . H atch,
Chief Statistician, Industrial Commission, Albany, K. Y,
E . E . W atso n ,
Actuary, Industrial Commission, Columbus, Ohio.

CLASSIFIC ATIO N OF INDUSTRIES,
Recommended by the Committee on Statistics and Compensation Insurance
Cost o f the International Association o f Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions.

The classification groups are drawn up in accordance with the
following arrangement:
Divisions.
Schedules.
Groups.
Classifications.

The

seven

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.

principal divisions or primary headings are—

Agriculture.
Mining and Quarrying.
Manufacturing.
Construction.
Transportation and Public Utilities.
Trade.
Service.

The list of divisions, schedules, and groups is as follows:
SUMMARY OF DIVISIONS, SCHEDULES, AND GROUPS.
DIVISION

A.— AGRICULTURE.

S chedule 1.— General farming.

Group 1. (Undivided.)
S chedule 2.— Dairy farming.

Group 5. ( Undivided.)
S chedule 3.—Stock farming.

Group 10. ( Undivided.)
S chedule 4.— Garden and truck

farming.
Group 15. (Undivided.)
S chedule 5.— Operating agricultural

machinery (not l>y farmer).
Group 20. Cotton ginning and pressing.
Group 21. Farm machines (not other­
wise classified).

DIVISION B.— MINING AND QUARRYING.

S chedule 1.—Mining.

Group 25.
Group 26.
Group 27.
Group 28.
Group 29.
Group 30.
Group 31.
Group 32.
Group 33.

Coal mines, anthracite. •
Coal mines, bituminous.
Precious-metal mines.
Iron mines.
Copper mines.
Other base-metal mines.
Mineral mines.
Oil and gas well operating.
Other mineral-well operat­
ing.
S chedule 2.— Quarrying.
Group 40. Building-stone quarries.
Group 41. Quarrying and stone crush­
ing.
Group 42. Cement rock.
Group 43. Sand and clay digging (no
blasting).

17
38043°— Bull. 201—16-----2




18

B U L L E T IN

OF T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

DIVISION C.— M ANUFACTURING.

S chedule 1.— Stone products.

Group 50. Stone crushing (no quarry­
ing).
Group 51. Stonecutting.
Group 52. Stone grinding.
Group 53. Carborundum.
Group 54. Cement and plaster (no
quarrying).
Group 55. Lime.
Group 56. Plaster and artificial-stone
products.
Group 57. Stone products (n. o. c.).
S chedule 2.— Clay products.

Group 70. Brick and tile ( including
underground mining).
Group 71. Brick and tile (no under­
ground mining).
Group 72. Potteries.

Group 114.
Group 115.
Group 116.
Group 117.
Group 118.
Group 119.
Group 120.
Group 121.
Group 122.
Group 123.
Group 124.
Group 125.
Group 126.
Group 127.
Group 128.
Group 129.
Group 130.

S chedule 7.—Machinery and instru­

ments.

S chedule 3.— Glass products.

Group 80. Glass, plate or sheet (no
quarrying or excavating).
Group81. Glass (not plate or sheet).
Group 82. Mirrors, signs, and orna­
mental glass.
Group 83. Optical goods.
S chedule 4.— Ore reduction and

smelting.
Group 90.
Group 91.
Group 92.
Group 93.

Ore reduction.
Gold and silver smelting.
Iron smelting.
Copper refining and smelt­
ing.
Group 94. Other metal smelting and
refining.
S chedule 5.—Rolling mills and steel­

works.
Group 100.
Group 101.
Group 102.
Group 103.

Steel making.
Rolling and tube mills.
Structural iron and steel.
Wire.

S chedule 6.—Metal products.

Group 110.
Group 111.
Group 112.
Group 113.

Foundries.
Lead.
Forging.
Architectural and
mental ironwork.




orna­

Safes.
Sheet-metal ware.
Sheet-metal work.
Stamping.
Hardware.
Eyelets, pins, etc.
Cutlery and hand tools. *
Small arms.
Stoves, heaters, etc.
Plumbing, gas, and electric
fixtures.
Wire products.
Beds and springs.
v
Copper and brass goods
(n. o. c.).
Jewelery, watches, etc.
Tlating and galvanizing.
Cutting and welding.
Metal goods ( n. o. c .).

Group 140.
Group 141.
Group 142.
Group 143.
Group 144.
Group 145.
Group 146.
Group 147.

Boilers and tanks.
Engines.
Agricultural machinery.
Textile machinery.
Machinery (n. o. c.).
Fine machines.
Machine shops (n. o. c.).
Electric apparatus and ap­
pliances.
Group 148. Instruments, professional
or scientific.
S chedule 8.— Vehicles.

Group 160.
Group 161.
Group 162.
Group 163.
Group 164.
Group 165.

Railroad cars.
Carriages and wagons.
Automobiles.
Motorcycles.
Bicycles.
Aeroplanes.

S chedule 9.—Lumber and wood.

Group 170.
Group 171.
Group 172.
Group 173.
Group 174.
Group 175.
Group 176.
Group 177.
Group 178.

Logging.
Sawmills.
Planing mills.
Cooperage.
Boxes.
Carpentry.
Turning.
Furniture.
Upholstering.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.
Group 179.
Group 180.
Group 181.
Group 182.
Group 183.
Group 184.
Group 185.

Rattan and willow ware.
Veneer goods.
Brooms and brushes.
Household utensils.
Musical instruments.
Canes, etc.
Wood preserving and fire­
proofing.

S chedule 10.—Leather.

Group 190.
Group 191.
Group 192.
Group 193.
Group 194.
Group 195.
Group 196.
Group 197.

Tanning and dressing.
Fur.
Embossing leather.
Shoe stock.
Boots and shoes.
Gloves.
Harness, bags, and belting.
Leather goods (n. o. c.).

S chedule 11.—Rubber and composi­

tion goods.
Group 210.
Group 211.
Group 212.
Group 213.
Group 214.
Group 215.
Group 216.
Group 217.
Group 218.
Group 219.
Group 220.

Gutta-percha.
Rubber reclaiming.
Rubber tires.
Soft-rubber goods.
Hard-rubber goods.
Celluloid.
Celluloid goods.
Insulation.
Bone and ivory.
Printer’s rollers.
Oilcloth and linoleum.

S chedule 12.— Chemicals and allied

products.
Group 230.
Group 231.
Group 232.
Group 233.
Group 234.
Group 235.
Group 236.
Group 237.
Group 238.
Group 239.
Group 240.
Group241.
Group242.
Group243.
Group 244.

Chemicals.
Baking powder and yeast.
Glue.
Ink, blacking, and polish.
Dyes, paints, and colors.
Drugs and medicines.
Pharmaceutical supplies.
Extracts.
Fertilizers.
Explosives.
Gases.
Fats' and oils (animal).
Oils (cottonseed).
Oils (vegetable), all other.
Petroleum and allied prod­
ucts.
Group 245. Coke and charcoal.
Group 246. Turpentine and rosin.




19

Group 247. Soap.
Group 248. Starch and glucose.
Group 249. Matches.
S chedule 13.—Paper and paper prod­

ucts.
Group 260.
Group 261.
Group 262.
Group 263.
Group 264.
Group 265.

Pulp mills.
Paper.
Stationery.
Boxes.
Fiber goods.
Paper products (n. o. c.}.

S chedule 14.—Printing and pub­

lishing.
Group270. (Undivided.)
S chedule 15.— Textiles.

Group 280.
Group 281.
Group 282.
Group 283.
Group 284.
Group 285.
Group 286.
Group 287.
Group 288.
Group 289.
Group 290.
Group 291.

Wool preparation.
Woolen goods.
Cotton goods.
Silk.
Linen.
Carpets and rugs.
Batting,
wadding,
shoddy.
Cordage.
Burlap and jute.
Knit goods.
Lace,
embroidery,
webbing.
Finishing textiles.

and

and

S chedule 16.— Clothing and

furnishings.
Group 300.
Group 301.
Group 302.
Group 303.
Group 304.
Group 305.

Clothing.
Shirts, collars, etc.
Furnishing goods.
Headwear.
Miscellaneous needlework.
Laundering, cleaning, and
dyeing.

S chedule 17.—Foods, beverages, and

tobacco.
Group 310. Flour and grist mill prod­
ucts.
Group 311. Baking.
Group 312. Coffee and spices.
Group 313. Beet-sugar refining.
Group 314. Sugar refining, cane.
Group 315. Confectionery.

20

B U L L E T IN

OF T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Group 316. Dairy products.
and
packing
Group 317. Slaughter
houses.
Group 318. Canning and preserving.
Group 319. Malting and brewing.
Group 320. Bottling, under pressure.
Group 321. Bottling, not under pres­
sure.
Group 322. Distilleries.
Group 323. Fermented liquors.
Group 324. Tobacco.
Group 325. Ice.
18.—Miscellaneous manu­
factured products (n .o . c.).

Schedule

Group 330. Lead pencils and crayons.
Group 331. Advertising and art novel­
ties.
Group 332. Photographic goods.
and
military
Group 333. Sporting
goods.
Group 334. Buffing wheels and steam
packing.
Group 335. Butchers’ and dairy sup­
plies.
Group 336. Soda-water apparatus.
Group 337. Artificial limbs.
Group 338. Painting (shop).
Group 339. Photography.
Group 340. Diamond cutting.
Group 341. Taxidermists.
DIVISION D.— CONSTRUCTION.

S chedule 1.— Wrecking and moving.

Group 350. Raising and wrecking.
Group 351. Blasting.
S chedule

2.— Grading, excavating,
and foundations.

Group 360. Surveying.
Group 361. Clearing and grading.
Group 362. Excavating and pile driv­
ing.
Group 363. Drilling.
Group 364. Tunnels and subways.
Group 365. Ditch digging, with pipe
laying.
Group 366. Canals.
Group 367. Masonry.
Group 370. Structural iron erecting.




S chedule 3.—Erecting.

Group 371. Metal construction (out­
side).
Group 372. Concrete construction.
Group 373. Signs, awnings, etc.
Group 374. Fence construction.
Group375. Carpentry (outside).
Group376. B u i l d i n g
construction
(n. o. c.).
Group 377. Painting, plastering, and
decorating (outside).
Group 378. Roofing.
Group 379. Dams, breakwaters, etc.
Group 380. Railroad construction (all
kinds).
Group 381. Boat and ship building
(w ood).
Group 382. Boat and ship building
(steel or iron).
Group 383. Yachts and rowboats.
Group 384. Boat and ship repairing
and rigging.
S chedule

4.—Finishing,
and installing.

equipping,

Group 390. Metal construction (within
buildings).
Group 391. Elevator erection (passen­
ger or freight).
Group 392. Metal appliances (instal­
ling within buildings).
Group 393. Millwrighting.
Group 394. Plumbing and heating.
Group 395. Electrical equipment.
Group 396. Marble, tile, and plaster
blocks
(within build­
ings).
Group 397. Carpentry work (within
buildings).
Group 398. Plastering, painting, and
decorating (within build­
ings).
Group399. Paving (outside).
DIVISION E.— TRANSPORTATION AN D
PUBLIC UTILITIES.

S chedule 1.— &team railroads.
Group 410. (Undivided.)
S chedule 2.—Electric railroads.
Group 420. Street railroads.
Group 421. Elevated railroads.

REPOET OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.

S chedule 3.— Cartage and storage.

DIVISION F.—TRADE.

Group 430. Drivers and stablemen.
Group 431. Chauffeurs.
Group 432. Express companies (opera­
tion).
Group 433. Storage and warehousing.
Group 434. Ice harvesting.
Group 435. Grain elevators.
Group 436. Refrigerator cars.
Group 437. Oil distributing.
Group 438. Garages.
Group 439. Gasoline supply stations.
Group 440. Riggers and safe movers.
Group 441. Horseshoeing.
S chedule 4.— Stockyards.

21

S chedule 1.— Offices.

Group450. (Undivided.)
Group 460.
Group 461.
Group 462.
Group 463.

Vessels.
Sailing vessels.
Fisheries.
Barges, lighters, and canal
boats.
Group 464. Stevedoring.
Group 465. Weighing and tallying.
Group 466. Marine wrecking.
S chedule 6.—Public utilities (not

transportation).

Group 476.
Group 477.
Group 478.
Group 479.

S chedule 2.—Stores.

Group 500. (Undivided.)
S chedule 3.— Yards.

Group 510. (Undivided.)
Schudule

4,— Salesmen

and agents

{outside).
Group 520. (Undivided.)
DIVISION G.—SERVICE.

S chedule 5.— Transportation by water.

Group 470.
Group 471.
Group 472.
Group 473.
Group 474.
Group 475.

Group 490. ( Undivided.)

Electric light and power.
Telegraph and telephone.
Natural gas.
Gas works.
Waterworks.
Steam heating or power
companies.
Garbage works and sewagedisposal plants.
Pneumatic-tube companies
(operation).
Irrigation works.
Crematories.

S chedule 1.—Domestic.

Group 530. Care, custody, and mainte­
nance of buildings.
Group 531. Care of grounds.
Group 532. Hotels, restaurants, and
clubs.
,
S chedule 2.—Personal.

Group 540. Theaters.
Group 541. Amusements, indoor (other
than theaters).
Group 542. Amusements* outdoor.
Group 543. Individual service.
S chedule 3.—Professional.

Group 550.
Group 551.
Group 552.
Group 553.
Group 554.

Inspectors and appraisers.
Institutions.
Teachers and instructors.
Undertakers.
Motion pictures.

S chedule 4.—Municipal and public.

Group 560. (Undivided.)

DIVISION A.— AGRICULTURE.
SCHEDULE 1.— GENERAL FARMING.

Manual
number.

Group 1. (Undivided.)

Farm labor (no blasting)---------------------------------------

— 0006

SCHEDULE 2.— DAIR Y FARMING.
Group 5. (Undivided.)
SCHEDULE 3.— STOCK FARMING.
Group 10. (Undivided.)

Stock farm— operation_____________________________




0200

22

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

SCHEDULE 4.—GARDEN AND TRUCK FARMING.
Manual
Group 15. (Undivided.)
number.
Florists— cultivatingand gardening__________________________________ 0004
Hop picking—hand___________________________________________________ 0151
Hop picking—machinery_____________________________________________ 0150
Nurserymen_________________________________________________________ 0005
Trees—pruning, spraying, repairing, trimming, and fumigating:
In towns and cities______________________________________________ 0101
Outside towns and cities--------------------------------------------------------------0100
SCHEDULE 5.—OPERATING AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY (NOT BY FARMER).
Group 20. Cotton Ginning and Pressing.
Cotton compressing_________________________________________________ 0400
Cotton ginning and pressing (not compressing)______________________ 0401
Group 21. Farm Machines (not otherwise classified).
Farm machinery— erection, repair, and demonstration_______________ 0051
Hay baling_________________________________________________________ 0070
Threshing machines and corn shredders, ensilage cutters and harvest­
ing machines—operation— including drivers and drivers’ helpers,
also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers___________________________ 0050
The above classification applies to farm machinery operated under con­
tract. When machinery of this character is operated not under contract but
by an employer as an incident to the general operation of his own farm, the
rate applicable therefor is the rate for Farm Labor. (See page 21, group 1.)
DIVISION B.— MINING AND QUARRYING.
SCHEDULE 1.—MINING.
Group 26. Coal Mines—Anthracite.
Coal mining—surface (no shafts, tunnels, or d rifts)_______________ 1005
Coal mining—with drifts or slopes, tunnels, or galleries (n o sh a fts)- 1011
Coal mining—with shafts, tunnels, or galleries_______________________1010
Culm—slack or coal refuse— washing______________________________ 1004
Group 26. Coal Mines—Bituminous.
Coal mining—surface (no shafts, tunnels, or d rifts)_______________ 1005
Coal mining—with drifts or slopes, tunnels, or galleries (no shafts)_1003
Coal mining—with shafts, tunnels, or galleries______________________1001
Group 27. Precious-Metal Mines.
Gold mining----------------------------------1100
Gold mining by hydraulic process___________________________________ 1102
Silver mining----------------1101
Group 28. Iron Mines.
Iron mining—surface (no shafts, tunnels, or d rifts)________________ 1121
Iron mining—with shafts, tunnels, or drifts__________________________ 1120
Group 29. Copper Mines.
Copper mining--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1140
Group 30. Other Base-Metal Mines.
Carnotite (radium) mining__________________________________________1159
Lead and zinc mining—milling, prospecting, and shaft sinking, in­
cluding installation of machinery, and erection, construction, and
repair of premises and plant_______________________________________1154
Lead mining--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1153
Manganese mining___________________________________________________ 1155
Nickel mining_______________________________________________________ 1156
Ore mining (n. o. c.)—surface (no shafts, tunnels, or d rifts)________ 1150
Ore mining (n. o. c .)—with shafts, tunnels, ordrifts________________ 1151
Tungsten mining_______*
_____________________________________________ 1157
Vanadium mining___________________________________________________ 1158




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

23

Manual
Group 31. Mineral Mines.
number.
Clay or shale mining—surface (no shafts, tunnels, or d rifts)________ 1200
Clay or shale mining—with shafts, tunnels, or drifts________________ 1201
Feldspar mining_____________________________ - _____________________1202
Graphite mining____________________________________________________ 1203
Gypsum mining_____________________________________________________ 1204
Mica mining_________________________________________________________ 1205
Phosphate mining___________________________________________________ 1206
Rock-salt mining____________________________________________________ 1207
Silica mining_______________________________________________________ 1208
Sulphur mining (pyrites)____________________________________________ 1209
Talc mining_________________________________________________________ 1210
Group 32. Oil and Gas Well Operating.
Oil and gas well shooting—minimum premium, $25___________________1330
Oil producing—operation of oil leases—including putting the raw prod­
uct in vessels or pipe lines for transportation—excluding the drilling
o f new wells, cleaning out and drilling old wells deeper, erection
or dismantling of derricks (for which see page 49, group 363)______1321
Group 33. Other Mineral-Well Operating.
Salt mining (not rock salt)—pumping, includingdriving wells_______1301
SCHEDULE 2.—QUARRYING.
Group 40. Building-Stone Quarries.
Quarries—turning out exclusively dimension stone for monumental or
building purposes—with or without blasting________________________1603
Slate quarries—with or without blasting_____________________________ 1602
Group 41. Quarrying and Stone Crushing.
Quarries— including stone crushing—with or without blasting_______1620
Quarries (n. o. c .)—with or without blasting_________________________1622
State or municipal road or street making—including culverts not ex­
ceeding 10-foot span—quarrying__________________________________ 1621
Stone crushing—including quarrying—with or without blasting______1620
Group 42. Cement Rock.
Cement manufacturing—including quarrying—with or without blast­
in g -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1651
Cement quarries—with or without blasting___________________________ 1654
Group 43. Sand and Clay Digging (no blasting).
Clay digging (no canal, sewer, or cellar excavating or underground
mining)---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4001
Sand and gravel digging (no canal, sewer, or cellar excavating or
g rad in g)--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4000
DIVISION C.— MANUFACTURING.
SCHEDULE 1.—STONE PRODUCTS.
Group 50. Stone Crushing (no quarrying).
Stone crushing—no quarrying (not available for division of pay roll)., 1710
When quarrying and stone crushing are carried on at the same location,
classify as Stone crushing—including quarrying—with or without blasting.
(See group 41, above.)
Group 51. Stonecutting.
Grindstone manufacturing (no quarrying)____________________________ 1781
Hone and oilstone manufacturing------------------------------------------------------- 1783
Lithographic stone manufacturing (no quarrying)------------------------------- 1805
Mantle manufacturing—marble or slate (no quarrying)______________ 1800
Marble cutting and polishing (no quarrying)__________________________ 1801




24

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manual
Group 51. Stonecutting—Concluded.
number.
Millstone manufacturing (no quarrying)-------------------------------------------- 1782
Slate manufacturing (no quarrying) _________________________________ 1802
Stonecutting and polishing—yard work only_________________________ 1803
Stoneyards (no quarrying) including stone fitters sent out from yard
to fit cut stones on job (no setting o f stone)_______________________1804
Group 52. Stone Grinding.
Barytes manufacturing (no quarrying)________________
1740
1749
Black lead manufacturing_________________________
Emery or other abrasive wheel manufacturing_______________________1748
Emery works—crushing and grinding (no quarrying)_______________ 1741
Flint and spar grinding (no quarrying)_____________________________ 1742
Graphite manufacturing (not manufacturing artificial graphite)_____1750
Marl digging—including hauling, drying, and grinding________________ 1746
Silica grinding (no quarrying)________________________________________1743
Talc mills (no quarrying)____________________________________________ 1744
Group 53. Carborundum.
Carborundum or other abrasive material manufacturing (by electro­
chemical p rocess)__________________ _____________________________ 1880
Group 54. Cement and Plaster (no quarrying).
Cement manufacturing_______________________________________________ 1701
Mortar manufacturing________________________________.______________ 1702
Plaster mills______________________
1703
Group 55. Lime.
Lime burning—no crushing or quarrying (n. p. d .)__________________ 1641
Lime manufacturing— including quarrying, crushing, lime burning,
and all other operations incidental to the business_________________ 1640
Group 56. Plaster and Artificial-Stone Products.
Coffin and casket manufacturing andassembling—concrete____________ 4035
Concrete block manufacturing_______________________*
_______________ 4034
Plaster board and plaster block manufacturing (no quarrying and no
crushing or grinding)________
4036
Plaster or staff mixing—no crushing or grinding (n. p. d .)___________ 4037
Plaster statuary and ornaments manufacturing—from wooden molds_ 4038
Sewer pipe manufacturing—reinforced concrete— including all em­
ployees on ground engaged in manufacturing (no pipe laying)______ 4040
Group 57. Stone Products (n. o. c.).
Asbestos goods manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------ 1852
Emery cloth manufacturing__________________________________________ 1857
Isinglass manufacturing—mica---------------------------------------------------------- 1854
Mica preparing (no mining)__________________________________________ 1853
Sandpaper manufacturing (no paper making)________________________ 1856
Slate pencil manufacturing___________________________________________ 1850
SCHEDULE 2.—CLAY PRODUCTS.
Group 70. Brick and Tile (including underground mining).
Brick manufacturing—including construction and reconstruction of
sheds and kilns if done by assured’s employees_____________________4010
Earthenware manufacturing— tiling, gas retorts, sewer pipe, and
drain pipe---------------------4013
Fire-clay products manufacturing (n. o. c .)—no fire brick manufac­
turing-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4011
Potteries—tiling, gas retorts, sewer and drain pipes__________________ 4014
Terra cotta manufacturing________________
4015
Tile manufacturing—roof and drainage______________________________ 4012




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

25

Manual
Group 71. Brick and Tile (no underground mining).
number.
Brick manufacturing—including construction and reconstruction of
sheds and kilns if done by assured’s employees; also including clay
digging and quarrying------------------------------------------------------------------ 4029
Earthenware manufacturing—tiling, gas retorts, sewer pipe, and drain
p ip e--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4030
Fire-clay products manufacturing (n. o. c .)— no fire brick manufac­
turing____________________________________________________________ 4028
Potteries—tiling, gas retorts, sewer and drain pipes________________ 4031
Terra cotta manufacturing_________________________________________ 4032
Tile manufacturing—roof and drainage_____________________________ 4033
Group 72. Potteries.
China decorating—including firing (no manufacturing)_____________ 4050
China manufacturing_______________________________________________ 4051
Doll manufacturing—bisque or china________________________________ 4056
Earthenware manufacturing—household utensilsand art objects_____ 4052
Insulator manufacturing— porcelain and lavatips___________________ 4058
Pipe manufacturing (tobacco)— clay_________________________
4057
Porcelain ware manufacturing______________________________________ 4051
Potteries—flowerpots, art and household utensils only (no sewer or
drain pipe; no mining or excavating)_____________________________ 4053
Stone china manufacturing__________________________________________ 4052
Terra cotta manufacturing—art terra cotta for decorative purposes
(no mining or excavating)------------------------------------------------------------- 4054
This classification does not include the manufacture of terra cotta for
structural use, whether decorative or otherwise.
Tile manufacturing—for decorative purposes (no mining or exca­
vating) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4055
SCHEDULE 3.—GLASS PRODUCTS.
Group 80. Glass—Plate or Sheet (no quarrying or excavating).
Glass manufacturing—plate--------------------------------------------------------------- 4101
Glass manufacturing—sheet--------------------------------------------------------------- 4102
Goup 81. Glass (not plate or sheet).
Bottle manufacturing—no automatic blowing machines (n. p. d .)______ 4111
Bottle manufacturing (n. o. c .) ---------------------------------------------------------- 4114
Glass manufacturing_________________________________________________ 4110
Glass manufacturing— cut------------------------------------------------------------------ 4113
Incandescent lamp manufacturing___________________________________ 4112
Group 82. Mirrors, Signs, and Ornamental Glass.
Advertising sign manufacturing—glass_______________________________ 4132
Cathedral and art-glass window manufacturing—with or without glass
making------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 4133
Glass merchants—including operations of bending, grinding, beveling,
and silvering plate glass-----------------------------------------------------------------4130
Mirror manufacturing (no glass making)_____________________________ 4131
Stained glass manufacturing_________________________________________4133
Group 83. Optical Goods.
Eyeglass and spectacle manufacturing________________________________ 4152
Glass eye manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------- 4153
Lens manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4151
Optical goods manufacturing_________________________________________4150




26

B U L L E T IN OF T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

SCHEDULE 4.—ORE REDUCTION AND SMELTING.
Manual
Group 90. Ore Reduction.
number.
Ore crushing_________________________________________________________1450
Ores—concentration and amalgamation_______________________________ 1452
Quartz mills_____________________ i _________________________________ 1451
Group 91. Gold and Silver Smelting and Refining.
Assaying_____________________________________________________________ 1410
Gold refining (no ore reduction)_____________________________________ 1412
Gold smelting_______________________________________________________ 1400
Silver refining (no ore reduction)____________________________________ 1411
Silver smelting______________________________________________________ 1401
Group 92. Iron Smelting.
Blast furnaces—operation____________________________________________ 1421
Iron smelting_______________________________________________________ 1422
Slag excavation—including loading on cars—with or without blasting. 1420
Group 93. Copper Smelting and Refining.
Copper refining (no ore reduction)___________________________________ 1440
Copper smelting_____________________________________________________ 1441
Group 94. Other Metal Smelting and Refining.
Aluminum smelting__________________________________________________ 1434
Lead smelting________________________________________________________1430
Smelting, by electric process_______________
1439
Smelting (n. o. c .)__________________________________________________ 1438
Zinc smelting________________________________________________________1435
SCHEDULE 5.—ROLLING MILLS AND STEELWORKS.
Group 100. Steel Making.
Steelworks— crucible, casting ingots, and puddling or blooming mill
operations (n. p. d .)_____________________________________________ 3001
Steelworks—open hearth, bessemer and crucible, or open hearth and
bessemer, casting ingots, and puddling or blooming mill operations. 3000
Group 101. Rolling and Tube Mills.
Rolling mills— operated in connection with steelworks—rolling prod­
ucts of every description—including rod mill_______________________ 3011
Rolling mills—operated in connection with steelworks—rolling prod­
ucts of every description ( no rod mill) _____________________________ 3012
Rolling mills—rolling of bars only— no blast furnace, converter, or
casting of steel (n. p. d .)_______________
3015
Rolling mills—rolling of brass, copper, and other soft metals (no iron
or steel rolling work, no bar manufacturing, no blast furnace, con­
verter, or casting of steel)__________ ^_______________________ _____3014
Rolling mills—rolling of metal plates and sheets only, including dip­
ping for galvanizing purposes—no blast furnace, converter, or cast­
ing of steel (n. p. d .)_____________________________________________ 3013
Rolling mills—rolling of rods only—no blast furnace, converter, or
casting of steel (n. p. d .)__________________________________________3010
Tin and terneplate rolling from tin-plate bars, including dipping (no
tin-plate bar manufacturing, and no blast furnace, converter, or
casting of steel)___________________________________________________ 3016
Tin plate manufacturing. (Classify as Tin and terneplate rolling.)
Tin plate rolling and dipping. (Classify as Tin and terneplate rolling.)
Tube manufacturing—metal______________
3021
Wrought-iron pipe manufacturing__________________________________ 3020




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.
Group 102. Structural Iron and Steel.

27

Manual

number.

Iron and steel works— shop, fabricating, and assembling structural
iron and steel (no blast furnace, converter, or casting of steel, or
rolling m ill)_____________________________________________________ 3030
Group 103. Wire.

Cable manufacturing—w ire________________________________________ 3240
Wire drawing---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3241
SCHEDULE 6.— M ETAL PRODUCTS.
Group 110. Foundries.

Cast-iron pipe manufacturing______________________________________
Foundries—aluminum______________________________________________
Foundries— b e l l ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Foundries—brass___________________________________________________
Foundries—iro n __________________________:--------------------------------------Foundries— malleable ir o n __________________________________________
Foundries (n. o. c .) -------------------------------------------------------------------------Foundries—steel castings _________________________________________
Plumbers’ supplies manufacturing—enameled-iron ware manufactur­
ing_______________________________________________________________
Railroad permanent way materials manufacturing—frogs, switches,
and crossings_____________________________________________________
Sculptors—statuary and ornamental work in bronze, including mold­
ing and casting---------------------------------

3089
3087
3084
3085
3081
3086
3083
3082
3091
3088
3310

Group 111. Lead.

Babbitt-metal manufacturing_______________________________________
Lead works— sheet, pipe, shot (no smelting)_________________________
Patent-metal manufacturing—rolling of metal into thin sheets for
wrapping________________________________________________________
Shot w orks________________________________________________________
Steam packing manufacturing—metallic-------------------------------------------Tin-foil manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------Type foundry----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3335
3331
3333
3332
3339
3334
3336

Group 112. Forging.

Anchor manufacturing_______________________________________________ 3108
Blacksmithing—not shoeing (n. p. d .)------------------------------------------------- 3107
Chain manufacturing________________________________________________ 3103
Chain manufacturing—automatic process or hand forging (n. p. d .)_3109
Drop-forging works (not hardware; no steam forging)_______________ 3104
Forging works—handwork only—no machinery (n. p. d .)_____________ 3106
Forging works—steam _______________________________________________ 3100
Group 113. Architectural and Ornamental Ironwork.

Elevator manufacturing_____________________________________________ 3042
Escalator manufacturing. (Classify as Elevator manufacturing.)
Iron and steel works—shop—fabricating, assembling and manufactur­
ing railings, balconies, fire escapes, staircases, iron shutters, and
other ironwork (not structural iron or steel) and ornamental brass,
bronze, and iron work (no blast furnace, converter, or casting of
steel, or rolling m ill)--------------------------------------------------------------------- 3040




28

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manual
Group 113. Architectural and Ornamental Ironwork—Concluded.
number.
Iron and steel works— shop—manufacturing ornamental brass, bronze,
and iron work exclusively—no blast furnace, converter or casting of
steel or rolling mill (n. p. d .)___________
3041
Mail-chute manufacturing___________________________________________ 3044
Ornamental brass, bronze, and iron manufacturing. (Classify as Iron
and steel works—shop—manufacturing ornamental brass, bronze,
etc.)
Group 114. Safes.
Safe manufacturing and repairing—shop only—including all processes
to completion____________________________________________________ 3280
Group 115. Sheet-Metal Ware.
Aluminum ware manufacturing—from sheet aluminum (no rolling
mill or smelting operations)______________________________________
Can manufacturing______________________________________ ._________ _
Enamel and agate ware manufacturing---------------------------------------------Lamp and lantern manufacturing___________________________________
Mail box manufacturing (no stamping)---------------------------------------------Tin can manufacturing--------------------------Toy manufacturing—metal--------------------------------------------------------------Group 116. Sheet-Metal Work.
Advertising sign manufacturing—metal---------------------------------------------Building manufacturing—portable, metal—shopon ly _________________
Ceiling and wall covering manufacturing—metal____________________
Coffin and casket manufacturing and assembling—metal-------------------Coppersmithing—shop o n ly --------------------------------------------------------------Cornices and skylights— shop only___________________________________
Fireproof door and shutter manufacturing—wood covered with sheet
metal_____________________________________________________________
Fireproof equipment manufacturing—including herringbone and ex­
panded metal products, metal furniture filing equipment, and wood­
working___________________________________________________________
Furniture manufacturing—m etal___________________________________
Galvanized ironwork—shop__________________________________________
Sheet-metal work—shop on ly _________________
Tinsmith shop (n. o. c .)_____________________________________________
Ventilator manufacturing___________________________________________
Weather-strip manufacturing—metal________________________________
Wheelbarrow manufacturing—m etal________________________________

3227
3220
3224
3223
3226
3220
3221
3064
3079
3063
3074
3075
3072
3060

3076
3077
3066
3066
3065
3073
3078
3062

Group 117. Stamping.
Stamping—m etal____________________________________________________ 3210
Group 118. Hardware.
Agricultural tool manufacturing (hand)— shovels, spades, scoops,
pitchforks, rakes, hoes, and gardening tools_________________________ 3137
Badge manufacturing—metal (no stamping)__________________________ 3135
Bolt and nut manufacturing—excluding steel manufacturing—exclud­
ing rolling-mill operations__________________________________________ 3132
Button manufacturing ( n. o. c.) _______________________________________3131
Hardware manufacturing—automobile or carriage_____________________3153
Hardware manufacturing (n. o. c .)___________________________________ 3146




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

29

Manual
Group 118. Hardware—Concluded.
number.
Horseshoe manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------3147
Lock manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3144
Nail and spike manufacturing—excluding steel manufacturing—ex­
cluding rolling-mill operations---------------------------------------------------------3133
Pulley block manufacturing—metal_________________________________ 3142
Screw manufacturing_______________________________________________ 3145
Skate manufacturing_______________________________________________3149
Stencil manufacturing (no stamping)-------------------------------------------------3138
Tag, check, and label manufacturing—metal (no stamping)___________ 3140
Wire nail manufacturing_____________________________________________ 3152
Group 119. Eyelets, Pins, Etc.
Eyelet manufacturing------------------------------------- --------------------------------Pen manufacturing_________________________________________________
Pin manufacturing__________________________________________________
Tack manufacturing------------------------------- *---------------------------------------

3270
3273
3271
3274

Group 120. Cutlery and Hand Tools.
Ax manufacturing__________________________________________________ 3115
Cutlery manufacturing (n. o. c .) ----------------------------------------------------- 3122
Cutting die manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------- 3123
File manufacturing__________________________________________________ 3117
Logging tool manufacturing (n. o. c .)—hand__________________________ 3124
Needle manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------ 3119
Razor manufacturing—not safety------------------------------------------------------- 3121
Razor manufacturing— safety_*
----------------------------------------------------------3120
Saw manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3118
Tool manufacturing (n. o. c .)—not manufacturing machinery_________ 3116
Group 121. Small Arms.
Arms manufacturing—small arms (not charging shells)____________ 3200
Gun, rifle, and pistol manufacturing________________________________ 3200
Machine-gun* manufacturing (not heavy ordnance)---------------------------- 3201
Group 122. Stoves, Heaters, Etc.
Furnace manufacturing—house heaters----------------------------------------------- 3173
Oil stove manufacturing (no stamping)----------------------------------------------3171
Radiator manufacturing (n. o. c .) ----------------------------------------------------- 3174
Sheet-iron stove manufacturing (no stamping)_______________________3170
Stove manufacturing (not sheet iron )-------------------------------------------------3172
Group 123. Plumbing, Gas and Electric Fixtures.
Chandelier manufacturing____________________________________________3182
Gas and electric fixture manufacturing_______________________________3180
Lamp shade manufacturing (no stamping)------------------------------------------ 3186
Plumbers’ supplies manufacturing (n. o. c .) --------------------------------------- 3188
Group 124. Wire Products.
Screen manufacturing—metal (no wire drawing)----------------------------Umbrella frames and hardware manufacturing--------------------------------Wire cloth manufacturing (no wire drawing)---------------------------------Wire fence manufacturing (no wire drawing)---------------------------------Wire goods manufacturing (n. o. c .)— no wire drawing-----------------•_
_
Wire manufacturing—piano (no wire drawing)_____________________
Wire manufacturing—picture (no wire drawing)------------------------------




3250
3257
3255
3256
3257
3253
3254

30

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
Manual

Group 125. Beds and Springs.

number.

Bedstead manufacturing—m etal____________________________________
Bedsteads— metal— assembling of manufactured parts only (n. p. d .)Mattress manufacturing—wire______________________________________
Spring bed manufacturing_________________________________________
Spring manufacturing ( not railroad car springs) ____________________

3302
3304
3301
3300
3303

Group 126. Copper and Brass Goods (n. o. c.).

Brass goods manufacturing___________________________________________ 3311
Copper goods manufacturing__________________________________________3312
Group 127. Jewelry, Watches, Etc.

Clock manufacturing________________________________________________
Gold leaf manufacturing____________________________________________
Jewelry manufacturing______________________________________________
Precious stones—setting and making mountings therefor (n. p. d .)_____
Silverware manufacturing___________________________________________
Watchcase manufacturing___________________________________________
Watch manufacturing_______________________________________________

3382
3386
3383
3384
3381
3380
3385

Group 128. Plating and Galvanizing.

Detinning—separating tin from tin plate by electrolytic process, with
incidental foundry________________________________________________
Enameling—no metal working (n. p. d .)_____________________________
Galvanizing or tinning sheet metal—not manufacturing sheet metal or
metal goods (n. p. d .)-------------------------------------------------------------------Gilding and electroplating___________________________________________
Gold plating--------------------------------------- ^-------------------------------------------Japanning— no metal working (n. p. d .)_____________________________
Nickel plating and finishing (n. p. d .)_________
Silver plating_______________________________________________________

3374
3376
3373
3372
3372
3375
3372
3370

Group 129. Cutting and Welding.

Autogenous cutting and welding—oxyacetylene process. (Classify as
Oxyacetylene cutting and welding.)
Oxyacetylene cutting and welding (autogenous)— shopwork only, in­
cluding machining operations connected therewith, where apparatus
not approved by the Underwriters’ Laboratories or the Interstate
Commerce Commission is used_____________________________________ 3360
Oxyacetylene cutting and welding (autogenous)— shopwork only, in­
cluding machining operations connected therewith, where apparatus
approved by the Underwriters’ Laboratories or the Interstate Com­
merce' Commission is used exclusively_____________________________ 3361
Group 130. Metal Goods (n. o. c.).

Metal goods manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------

3400

SCHEDULE 7.— M ACHINERY AND INSTRUMENTS.
Group 140. Boilers and Tanks.

Boilermaking-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Gas holder manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------Tank building—metal—shop only------------------------------------------------------Water tower manufacturing— shop only____________________________
Group 141. Engines.

c.)

Engine manufacturing (n. o.
—with foundry_____________________
Engine manufacturing (n. o. c .)—without foundry__________________
Fire engine manufacturing__________________________________________
Gas or gasoline engine manufacturing—with foundry________________
Gas or gasoline engine manufacturing—without foundry_____________




3620
3622
3621
3623
3607
3608
3604
3605
3606

REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.

31

Manual
Group 141. Engines—Concluded.
number.
Locomotive w orks__________________________________________________ 3600
Pump manufacturing—metal—with foundry--------------------------------------- 3611
Pump manufacturing—metal—without foundry---------------------------------- 3612
Stationary engine manufacturing—with foundry------------------------------- 3609
Stationary engine manufacturing—without foundry---------------------------- 3610
Group 142. Agricultural Machinery.
Agricultural machinery manufacturing—thrashing or husking machine
manufacturing____________________________________________________ 3504
Agi \cultural machinery manufacturing—traction engine or power plow
manufacturing____________________________________________________ 3505
Cotton-gin machinery manufacturing________________________________ 3503
Lawn mower manufacturing________________________________________ 3502
Group 143. Textile Machinery.
Card clothing manufacturing________________________________________ 3510
Cop tube manufacturing______________________________________________ 3517
Loom harness and reed manufacturing________________________________ 3516
Loom manufacturing___________________________
3514
Shuttle manufacturing. (Classify as Cop tube manufacturing.)
Textile machinery manufacturing____________________________________ 3515
Croup 144. Machinery (n. o. c.).
Acetylene-gas machine manufacturing_______________________________ 3522
Arms manufacturing—heavy ordnance (not charging shells)_________ 3527
Boot and shoe machinery manufacturing (exclusively)______________ 3558
Confectioners’ machinery manufacturing_____________________________ 3559
Crane and derrick manufacturing___________________________________ 3528
Mining and milling machinery manufacturing_______________________ 3520
Printing and bookbinding machinery manufacturing_________________ 3548
Printing press manufacturing______________________________________ 3557
Road or street making machinery manufacturing___________________ 3521
Steam shovel, dredge, and ballast unloader manufacturing___________ 3526
Water wheel manufacturing;—metal___________ l_____________________ 3524
Windmill manufacturing—metal------------------------------------------------------- 3523
Group 145. Fine Machines.
Adding machine manufacturing_____________________________________ 3567
Automatic slot or vending machine manufacturing—including instal­
lation in place, repairs, and taking down__________________________ 3560
Carburetor manufacturing___________________________________________ 3581
Cash register manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------ 3569
Check protector manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------- 3573
Gas meter manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------- 3578
Mailing and addressing machine manufacturing---------------------------------3564
Numbering machine manufacturing-------------------------------------------------- 3568
Plumbers’ supplies manufacturing—valves and gauges______________ 3584
Scale manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------ 3582
Sewing machine manufacturing------------------------------------------------------- 3561
Speedometer and taximeter manufacturing, with or without odometer—
including installation-------------------------------------------------------------------- 3680
Sprinkler manufacturing—automatic------------------------------------------------- 3583
Steam and air-pressure gauge manufacturing________________________ 3571
Typewriter manufacturing_________________________________________ 3565
Vacuum cleaner manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------- 3563
Voting machine manufacturing_____________________________________ 3562
Water meter manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------- 3579




32

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manual
Group 146. Machine Shops (n. o. c.).
number.
Ball bearing manufacturing________________________________________ 3638
Cartridge manufacturing—for small arms— including insertion of per­
cussion caps— excluding the manufacturing of fulminate, loading,
charging, or handling of explosives________________________________ 3636
Gear grinding and manufacturing___________________________________ 3635
Machine shops—with foundry______________________________________ 3631
Machine shops—without foundry___________________________________ 3632
Projectile, shell, or case manufacturing (no loading or testing with
explosives)__________;_____________________________________________ 3633
Valve manufacturing________________________________________________ 3634
Washing machine and clothes wringer manufacturing, for household
use—metal_______________________________________________________ 3637
Group 147. Electric Apparatus and Appliances.,
Battery manufacturing—storage (manufactured from iron and nickel
p la te s)___________________________________________________________ 3641
Battery manufacturing— storage (manufactured from lead plates)_ 3640
_
Dry battery manufacturing__________________________________________ 3642
Electric apparatus manufacturing__________________________________ 3643
Ignition apparatus manufacturing for gasengines (n. p. d .)__________ 3644
Magneto manufacturing_____________________________________________ 3645
Group 148. Instruments, Professional or Scientific.
Instrument manufacturing—professionalor scientific________________ 3685
Musical instrument manufacturing—metal__________________________ 3686
Telegraph and telephone apparatus manufacturing_________________ 3681
Telescope manufacturing____________________________________________ 3684
Thermometer manufacturing_______________________________________ 3683
Thermostat manufacturing__________________________________________ 3680
SCHEDULE 8.—VEHICLES.
Group 160. Railroad Cars.
Car manufacturing—railroad— all kinds-------------------------------------------Car wheel manufacturing—cast iron or Steel (not pressed steel)______
Car wheel manufacturing—pressed-steel wheels______________________
Group 161. Carriages and Wagons.
Axle manufacturing—wood— _______________________________________
Baby carriage manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------Carriage and wagon manufacturing_________________________________
Carriage and wagon manufacturing—assembling o f manufactured
parts only (n. p. d .)--------------------------------------------------------------------Carriage dashes and top manufacturing—excluding the manufacture
of metal or wooden parts and leather enameling (n. p. d. in auto­
mobile m anufacturing)----------------------------------------------------------------For the manufacture of metal or wooden parts classify as Hardware manu­
facturing—automobile or carriage. (See page 28, group 118.)
Carriage manufacturing (not w agon)_______________________________
Wagon manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------Wheel manufacturing—w o o d ________________________________________
Group 162. Automobiles.
Autdmobile, carriage, and wagon body manufacturing—metal or wood
(n. p. d . ) -----------------------------------Automobile engine manufacturing___________________________________
Automobile frame manufacturing—not chassis manufacturing (n.
p. d .)--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




3881
3880
3882
3862
3865
3864
3866

3863

3867
3868
3863

3802
3805
3800

BEPOBT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.
Group 162. Automobiles— Concluded.

33

Manual

number.

Automobile lamp and lantern manufacturing (n. p. d .)_______________ 3801
Automobile manufacturing__________________________________________ 3808
This classification applies only to concerns turning out automobiles as
finished products, including the manufacture of such parts as they may them­
selves manufacture, with assembling and finishing of automobiles, and is not
applicable to concerns engaged in the manufacture of specific parts, such as
motors, bodies, castings, and the like.

Automobile manufacturing—assembling o f manufactured parts only
(n. p. d . ) ________________________________________________________ 3809
Automobile top manufacturing—excluding the manufacture o f metal
or wooden parts (n. p. d. in automobile manufacturing)____________ 3804
For the manufacture of metal or wooden parts of automobile or carriage
tops, classify as Hardware manufacturing— automobile or carriage. (See page
28, group 118.)

Automobile wind shield manufacturing______________________________ 3806
Cycle car manufacturing_____________________________________________ 3810
Radiator manufacturing (n. p. d .)__________________________________ 3807
Wheel manufacturing—metal________________________________________ 3803
Group 163. Motorcycles.

Motorcycle and motorcycle parts manufacturing—including the as­
sembling of motorcycles___________________________________________ 3850
Group 164. Bicycles.

Bicycle and bicycle parts manufacturing—including the assembling
of bicycles------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 3840
Group 165. Aeroplanes.

Aeroplane manufacturing—including overhauling and repair in shop
and outside—excluding operation and demonstration______________ 3830
SCHEDULE 9.— LUMBER AND WOOD.
Group 170. Logging.

Bark peeling------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 2701
Logging and lumbering—including transportation of logs to mill, but
excluding operation o f “ logging railroad ”— including drivers and
drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’helpers_____________ 2702
Group 171. Sawmills.

Bark m ills___________________________________________________________2716
Box shooks manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------- 2717
Excelsior manufacturing_____________________________________________ 2712
Kindling wood manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------ 2711
Lath manufacturing—wood----------------------------------------------------------------- 2713
Sawmills_____________________________________________________________ 2710
Shingle manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------------- 2715
Veneer manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2714
Group 172. Planing Mills.

Chair manufacturing— chair stock manufacturing (no assembling)____
Furniture manufacturing—furniture stock manufacturing (no assem­
bling) ___________________________________________________________
Picture-frame molding manufacturing----------------------------------------------Picture frames— including picture-frame moldingmanufacturing_____
Planing and molding mills----------------------------------------------------------------Sash, door, and blind manufacturing—including outside employees
soliciting and measuring--------------------------------------------------------------38043°—Bull. 201—16----- 3




2734
2735
2733
2732
2731
2730

34

BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manual
Group 173. Cooperage.
t
number.
Barrel manufacturing—assembling only (not making heads, hoops,
and staves)______________________________________________________ 2745
Barrel manufacturing—making heads, hoops, and staves, and assem­
bling _____________________________________________________________ 2742
Cooperage— assembling only (not making heads, hoops, and staves)___ 2745
Cooperage— making heads, hoops, and staves, and assembling_________ 2742
Cooperage stock manufacturing—heads, hoops, and staves_______ ____ 2741
Silo building—wood—shop only--------------------------------------------------------- 2750
Stave manufacturing________________________________________________ 2740
Tank building—wood—shop only------------------------------------------------------ 2751
Group 174. Boxes.
Box manufacturing—cig a r--------------------------------------------------------------- 2766
Box manufacturing—wood— assembling o n ly ________________________ 2767
Box manufacturing—wood—manufacturing shooks .and assembling___ 2760
Box manufacturing—wood (wire bound)—no box shooks manufactur­
ing (n. p. d .)--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2765
Packing case manufacturing—wood-------------------------------------------------- 2760
Trunk manufacturing—excluding metal frames and fittihgs__________ 2763
The manufacturiBg of metal frames and fittings should be classified and
rated as Metal goods manufacturing. (See page 30, group 130.)
Group 175. Carpentry.
Agricultural machinery manufacturing—woodworking_________
2825
Building manufacturing—portable, wood—shop only________ _________ 2814
Cabinet works—no power-driven woodworking machinery (n. p. d .)___2813
Cabinet works—with power-driven machinery_________________________ 2812
Carpentry—shop only----------------------------------------------------------------------- 2803
Coffin and casket manufacturing and assembling—wood______________ 2804
Hothouse manufacturing—shop only________________________________ 2805
Ladder manufacturing_____________________________________
2820
Mast and spar manufacturing—shop only____________________________ 2800
Parquet flooring manufacturing—shop only___________________________ 2810
Plumbers’ supplies manufacturing—tanks, seats, and cabinets—wood
2824
Pump manufacturing—wood________________________________________ 2807
Screen manufacturing—wood_______________________________________ 2821
Theatrical scenery manufacturing—excluding painting______________ 2823
Weather-strip manufacturing—w ood ________________________________ 2822
Wheelbarrow manufacturing—wood_________________________________ 2809
Windmill manufacturing—wood—shop only__________________________ 2808
Group 176. Turning.
Bobbin and spool manufacturing—wood_____________________________
Boot and shoe pattern manufacturing (n. p. d .)___________________
Cork cutting works_________________________________________________
Hat block manufacturing____________________________________________
Last manufacturing_________________________________________________
Last-block manufacturing___________________________________________
Pattern and model manufacturing—wood (n. p. d .)________________
Peg and skewer manufacturing—w o o d ______________________________
Pipe manufacturing (tobacco)—wood_______________________________
Pulley block manufacturing—wood__________________________________
Spool manufacturing—w o o d ________________________________________
Toy manufacturing—w ood __________________________________________
Wood heel manufacturing___________________________________________
Wood turning----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




2781
2792
2788
2782
2786
2780
2790
2789
2791
2783
2784
2785
2793
2786

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

35

Manual
Group 177. Furniture.
number.
Barbers’ supplies manufacturing—including furniture_______________ 2872
Bent wood manufacturing___________________________________________ 2879
Billiard table manufacturing—including setting up and taking down
at place of delivery__________.1___________________________________ 2870
Chair manufacturing—assembling of manufactured parts and finishing
only (n. p. d. when located on same or adjoining premises where
other ch^ir-manufacturing operations are carried o n )______________ 2885
Chair manufacturing—including assembling of manufactured parts
and finishing_____________________________________________________ 2880
Furniture manufacturing—assembling of manufactured parts and fin­
ishing only (n. p. d. when located on same or adjoining premises
where other furniture-manufacturing operations are carried o n )___ 2881
Furniture manufacturing—including assembling of manufactured
parts and finishing________________________________________________ 2883
Incubator manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------ 2886
Refrigerator manufacturing—shop on ly -------------------------------------------- 2871
School supplies manufacturing______________________________________ 2876
Showcase manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------ 2877
Group 178. Upholstering.
Chair manufacturing—upholstering-------------------------------------------------Coffin and casket manufacturing—upholstery work and manufacturing
burial garments---------------------------------------------------------------------------Furniture manufacturing—upholstering_____________________________
House furnishings (n. o. c.)—installation____________________________
Upholstering_______________________________________________________
Upholstering—away from shop_____________________________________

9524
9525
9523
9521
9522
9520

Group 179. Rattan and Willow Ware.
Basket manufacturing—willow ware------------------------------------------------- 2903
Rattan goods manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------- 2904
Willow ware manufacturing________________________________________ 2905
Group 180. Veneer Goods.
Barrel manufacturing—wood veneer (no veneer manufacturing)_____
Basket manufacturing—wood veneer (no veneer manufacturing)_____
Veneer package manufacturing (no barrel manufacturing; no veneer
m anufacturing)---------------------------------------------------------------------------Veneer seat manufacturing (no veneer manufacturing)______________
Group 181. Brooms and Brushes.
Broom manufacturing—assembling of manufactured parts only
(n. p. d .)________________________________________________________
Broom manufacturing—with sawmill or woodworking machinery____
Brush manufacturing—assembling only—excluding sawing, molding,
and turning of backs and handles (n. p. d. when located on same
or adjoining premises where other brush manufacturing operations
are carried o n )---------------------------Brush manufacturing—including assembling and sawing, molding, and
turning of backs and handles____________________________________
Brush manufacturing—sawing, molding, and turning of backs and
handles only—excluding assembling------------------------




2906
2907
2908
2909

2833
2830

2832
2831
2834

36

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manual
Group 182. Household Utensils.
number.
Ice-cream freezer manufacturing___________________________________ 2842
Picture frame manufacturing—no power machinery (n. p. d .)_______ 2850
Picture frame manufacturing (not operating molding mill or manufac­
turing m oldings)_________________________________________________ 2848
Shade roller manufacturing_________________________________________ 2851
Washboard manufacturing_______________________________
2846
Washing machine and clothes wringer manufacturing, for household
use (n. o. c .) _____________________________________________________ 2853
Window-curtain roller manufacturing_______________________________ 2847
Window shade manufacturing—making and mounting—assembling
only (not manufacturing cloth or roller)__________________________ 2852
Woodenware manufacturing (n. o. c .) ______________________________ 2841
Group 183. Musical Instruments.
Musical instrument manufacturing—wood___________________________ 2922
Organ building—cabinet or parlor-----------2921
Organ building—pipe— including setting up at the place of delivery_ 2920
_
Phonograph manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------- 2928
Piano action manufacturing_________________________________________ 2924
Piano and piano player manufacturing—assembling of manufactured
parts and finishing only (n. p. d .)------------------------------------------------- 2929
Pianoforte case manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------- 2925
Piano key manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------- 2926
Piano manufacturing-------------------2923
Piano player manufacturing_________________________________________ 2927
Group 184. Canes, Etc.
Cane manufacturing---------------------------2952
Crutch manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------- 2951
Golf club manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------ 2950
Umbrella handle manufacturing__________________________ ;__________ 2952
Group 185. Wood Preserving and Fireproofing.
Wood preserving and fireproofing___________________________________ 2960
SCHEDULE 10.—LEATHER.
Group 190. Tanning and Dressing.
Curriers------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 2624
Degreasing skins (n. p. d .)--------------------------------------------------------------- 2610
Leather dressing—gloves (n. p. d .)-------------------------------------------------- 2626
Leather dressing (n. o. c .) --------------------------------------------------------------- 2622
Leather manufacturing—patent or enamel__________ :_______________ 2620
Morocco dressing------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 2621
Tanning------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 2623
Group 191. Fur.
Fur manufacturing—preparing skins----------------------------------------------- 2600
Group 192. Embossing Leather.
Leather embossing (n. p. d .)------------------------------------------------------------ 2640
Group 193. Shoe Stock.
Counter, heel, and sole cutting______________________________________ 2650
Cut sole manufacturing_____________________________________________ 2650
Leather board manufacturing—from leather scraps__________________ 2653
Leather uppers (cutting o f ) —handwork only (n. p. d .)______________ 2652
Shoe findings manufacturing—tongues, linings, and facings (n. p. d.)_ 2654
Shoe stock manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------- 2651




REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.

3*7

Manual
Group 194. Boots and Shoes.

number.

Boot and shoe manufacturing______________________________________ 2660
Slipper manufacturing______________________________________________ 2661
Group 195. Gloves.

Glove manufacturing—leather______________________________________ 2670
Group 196. Harness, Bags, and Belting.

Bag manufacturing—leather_______________________________________ 2683
Harness and saddle manufacturing_________________________________ 2681
Leather belting manufacturing_____________________________________ 2686
Group 197. Leather Goods (n. o. c.).

Baseball manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------- 2690
Leather wearing apparel and novelties manufacturing (n. o. c .) ____ 2688
Pocketbook manufacturing (n. p. d .)______________________________ 2687
SCHEDULE 11.— RUBBER AND COMPOSITION GOODS.
Group 210. Gutta-percha.

Gutta-percha manufacturing________________________________________

4425

Group 211. Rubber Reclaiming.

Rubber reclaiming---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4400
Rubber reclaiming—not using benzine, naphtha, or gasoline (n. p. d.)_ 4401
Group 212. Rubber Tires.

Rubber tire manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------- 4420
Group 213. Soft-Rubber Goods.

Rubber
Rubber
Rubber
Rubber
Rubber
Rubber
Rubber

belting manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------ 4413
boot and shoe manufacturing-------------------------------------------------- 4417
cement manufacturing______________________________________ 4411
garment manufacturing—including rubber mill______________ 4409
garment manufacturing—no rubber mill______________________4416
goods manufacturing (n. o. c .) -------------------------------------------------4410
stamp and pad manufacturing-------------------------------------------------4418

Group 214. Hard-Rubber Goods.

Fountain pen manufacturing________________________________________ 4432
Phonograph record manufacturing__________________________________ 4431
Vulcanized rubber manufacturing (n. p. d .)-------------------------------------- 4430
Group 215. Celluloid.

Celluloid manufacturing (pyroxylin plastics)------------------------------------ 4440
Disculoid manufacturing. (Classify as Celluloid manufacturing.)
Fiberloid manufacturing. (Classify as Celluloid manufacturing.)
Pyroxylin plastic manufacturing. (Classify as Celluloid manufac­
turing.)
Group 216. Celluloid Goods.

Advertising sign manufacturing—celluloid----------------------------------------Button manufacturing—celluloid----------------------------------------------------Celluloid goods manufacturing—from celluloid and from composition
in the manufacture of which celluloid has been used (no celluloid
m anufacturing)__________________________________________________
Leather (imitation) manufacturing—using pyroxylin or pyroxylin
composition______________________________________________________
Tortoise-shell goods manufacturing—manufactured from real and imi­
tation tortoise shell-----------------------------------------------------------------------




4454
4453

4452
4456
4451

38

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manual
Group 217. Insulation.
number.
Cables— insulation (no wire drawing)__ ____________________________ 4470
Circular loom manufacturing—flexible piping for electric wires______ 4472
Piping manufacturing—flexible (not metal) for interior work in
buildings to carry electric wires_________________________________ 4471
Wire insulation (no wire drawing)-------------------------------------------------- 4470
Group 218. Bone and Ivory.
Bone and ivory turning_____________________________________________
Button manufacturing—pearl and shell_____________________________
Button manufacturing—vegetable ivory_____________________________
Horn goods manufacturing (not containing pyroxylin)_______________
Lime manufacturing from oyster shells_____________________________

4481
4480
4482
4485
4483

Group 219. Printers' Rollers.
Printers’ rollers manufacturing_____________________________________ 4460
Group 220. Oilcloth and Linoleum.
Leather (imitation) manufacturing (not using pyroxylin or pyroxylin
com position)_____________________________________________________ 4492
Linoleum and cork carpet manufacturing____________________________ 4491
Oilcloth manufacturing—all kinds__________________________________ 4490
SCHEDULE 12.—CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.
Group 230. Chemicals.
Acetic acid manufacturing__________________________________________ 4536
Acid manufacturing (n. o. c .) ________________________________________4510
Alcohol manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------- 4535
Ammonia manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------ 4521
Analytical chemists—including shopwork and work performed away
from shop--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4511
Arsenic manufacturing______________________________________________ 4532
Bleaching powder manufacturing___________________________________ 4527
Borax manufacturing_______________________________________________ 4529
Camphor manufacturing_____________________________________________ 4530
Carbide of calcium manufacturing___________________________________ 4533
Chemical manufacturing (n. o. c .)___________________________________ 4524
Creosote manufacturing_____________________________________________ 4528
Disinfectant manufacturing (n. o. c .) _______________________________ 4523
Picric acid manufacturing____________________________________________ 4514
Salt manufacturing (not mining or sinking w ells)___________________ 4534
Saltpeter manufacturing_____________________________________________ 4525
Sulphur refining---------------------------------------------------------------------------------4512
Tartaric acid manufacturing_________________________________________ 4522
Vitriol manufacturing______________________________________________* 4513
Wood preservative manufacturing (n. o. c.) __________________________ 4526
Group 231. Baking Powder and Yeast.
Baking powder manufacturing (no can manufacturing)______________ 4500
Soda bicarbonate manufacturing____________________________________ 4502
Yeast manufacturing (no can manufacturing)______________________ 4501
Group 232. Glue.
Capsule manufacturing—gelatine____________________________________ 4657
Gelatine manufacturing_____________________________________________ 4654
Glue manufacturing_________________________________________________ 4653




REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.

39

Manual
Group 232. Glue—Concluded.
number.
Isinglass manufacturing—fish glue__________________________________ 4652
Mucilage manufacturing_____________________________________________ 4651
Paste manufacturing________________________________________________ 4655
Sealing wax manufacturing__________________________________________ 4656
Size manufacturing_________________________________________________ 4650
Group 233. Ink, Blacking, and Polish.
Metal polish manufacturing (no can manufacturing)________________
Shoe and harness blacking manufacturing (no can manufacturing)_
_
Stove polish manufacturing________________________________________
Writing ink manufacturing_________________________________________

4591
4590
4592
4594

Group 234. Dyes, Paints, and Colors.
Aniline and alizarin manufacturing_________________________________
Color manufacturing—d r y _________________________________________
Ink manufacturing—printing_______________________________________
Lampblack manufacturing___________________________________________
Lead manufacturing—red---------------------------------------------------------------Lead manufacturing—white_________________________________________
Paint manufacturing (no lead manufacturing)_______________________
Putty manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------------Varnish manufacturing_____________________________________________
Whiting manufacturing_____________________________________________
Zinc oxide manufacturing___________________________________________

4558
4554
4557
4552
4550
4551
4558
4559
4561
4560
4562

Group 235. Drugs and Medicines.
Drug manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------Patent medicine manufacturing____________________________________
Pharmaceutists_____________________________________________________
Serum (hog) manufacturing—not operating packing houses (n. p. d.)_

4601
4605
4607
4609

Group 236. Pharmaceutical Supplies.
Absorbent cotton manufacturing------------------------------------------------------- 4690
Dental material manufacturing (n. o. c .) ____________________________ 4692
Pharmaceutical and surgical goods manufacturing (n. o. c .) _________ 4693
Group 237. Extracts.
Essential oils manufacturing—including distillation________________
Extract manufacturing—dyewood----------------------------------------------------Extract manufacturing—tanning----------------------------------------------------Flavoring extract manufacturing----------------------------------------------------Medicine extract manufacturing------------------------------------------------------Perfumery and flavoring essence manufacturing____________________

4620
4624
4625
4621
4622
4623

Group 238. Fertilizers.
Fertilizer manufacturing (not phosphate companies)------------------------- 4580
Phosphate works (no mining)---------------------------------------------------------- 4581
Group 239. Explosives.
Cartridge manufacturing—charging and loading— all operations in­
volving the handling of explosives, including the manufacture of
fulminate_________________________________________________________
Fireworks manufacturing (no exhibition w ork )--------------------------------Fuse manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------------Powder manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------Projectile, shell or case—charging and loading----------------------------------




4766
4761
4760
4770
4765

40

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manual
Group 240. Gases.
number.
Acetylene-gas tank charging stations— operation____________________ 4636
Carbonic acid gas manufacturing__________________________________ 4633
Oxygen and hydrogen manufacturing—electrolytic process___________ 4634
Oxygen and hydrogen manufacturing—liquid-air process____________ 4635
Group 241. Fats and Oils (animal).
Butterine manufacturing________________________________________ ,— 4717
Candle manufacturing_______________________________________________ 4710
Cod-liver oil manufacturing________________________________________ 4660
Glycerine manufacturing____________________________________________ 4711
Grease manufacturing______________________________________________ 4712
Lard refining_________________________________________________________4716
Oil manufacturing—fish (n. o. c .) __________________________________ 4662
Oil manufacturing—lard____________________________________________ 4661
Oil manufacturing—tallow__________________________________________ 4663
Oleomargarine manufacturing________________________________________4718
Tallow chandlers____________________________________________________ 4715
Wool extract manufacturing (lanolin)______________________________ 4664
Group 242. Oils (cottonseed).
Cottonseed oil manufacturing—with or without refining—minimum
premium per mill, $25_____________________________________________ 4670
Cottonseed oil refining—no manufacturing or expressingof oil________ 4671
Oil cake manufacturing_____________________________________________ 4672
Group 243. Oils (vegetable), All Other.
Castor oil manufacturing____________________ _____________________ 4681
Oil manufacturing—linseed. (Classify as Oil manufacturing—vege­
table, n. o. c.)
Oil manufacturing—vegetable (n. o. c . ) -------------------------------------------- 4683
Group 244. Petroleum and Allied Products.
Asphalt works—shop and yard only_________________________________
Axle grease manufacturing__________________________________________
Gasoline manufacturing—from casing-head gas____________________
Oil refining—petroleum_____________________________________________
Tar manufacturing—coal tar—manufacturing and refining coal tar
and its by-products, including saturating of paper and felt with tar
(no fat or paper making; no coke-oven operations)________________
Wax manufacturing (not sealing w a x )______________________________

4745
4742
4743
4740

4741
4744

Group 245. Coke and Charcoal.
Carbon manufacturing (not electro-chemicalprocess)__________________ 1465
Charcoal manufacturing______________________________________________ 1481
Coal billet and briquette manufacturing______________________________ 1463
Coke burning________________________________________________________3480
Graphite and pure carbon manufacturing—artificial__________________ 1462
Group 246. Turpentine and Rosin.
Turpentine and rosin manufacturing—excluding pulling and cuttingstumps ___________________________________________________________ 0301
Turpentine and- rosin manufacturing— including pulling and cutting
stumps ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------0302
Group 247. Soap.
Soap manufacturing (n. p. d .)______________________________________ 4720
Soap powder manufacturing________________________________________ 4721




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

41

Manual
Group 248. Starch and Glucose.
number.
Dextrin manufacturing—dry process_______________________________ 4704
Dextrin manufacturing—wet process_______________________________ 4701
Glucose manufacturing—dry process_______________________________ 4705
Glucose manufacturing—wet process_______________________________ 4702
Starch manufacturing—dry process_________________________________ 4706
Starch manufacturing—wet process_________________________________ 4703
Group 249. Matches.
Match manufacturing—excluding lumbering operations______________ 4730
SCHEDULE 13.—PAPER AND PAPER PRODUCTS.
Group 260. Pulp Mills.
Pulp manufacturing—ground wood (no saw or barking m ills)_______ 4206
Pulp manufacturing—saw and barking mills_________________________4211
Pulp manufacturing—soda (no saw or barking m ills)______________ 4203
Pulp manufacturing—sulphite (no saw or barking m ills)____________ 4205
Group 261. Paper.
Bristol board manufacturing_______________________________________ 4233
Cardboard manufacturing (no pulp m ill)____________________________ 4233
Cigarette paper manufacturing. (Classify as Paper manufacturing.)
Ledger paper manufacturing. (Classify as Writing paper manufac­
turing. )
Paper board manufacturing (no pulp m ill)__________________________ 4233
Paper manufacturing (no pulp manufacturing; no saw or barking
m ills)____________________________________________________________ 4234
Writing paper manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------ 4232
Group 262. Stationery.
Envelope manufacturing___________________________________________ 4252
Paper coating and finishing (n. p. d .)_______________________________ 4250
Stationery manufacturing (n. p. d. in plants manufacturing paper of
any kind)------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4251
Group 263. Boxes.
Box manufacturing—folding paper boxes (no paper or paper board
manufacturing)___________________________________________________ 4241
Box manufacturing—solid paper boxes (no paper or paper board
m anufacturing)__________________________________________________ 4240
Jewelry box and tray manufacturing (no stamping)-------------------------- 4242
Group 264. Fiber Goods.
Fiber goods manufacturing (no fiber pulp making)---------------------------- 4263
Fiber pulp manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------- 4267
Papier-mfiche goods manufacturing (no paper or pulp making; no
car wheels)---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4266
Group 265. Paper Products (n. o. c.).
Bag manufacturing—paper only (no paper manufacturing)--------------- 4273
Building paper or building felt manufacturing (no paper or felt
manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4283
Carbon paper manufacturing (no paper manufacturing)-------------------- 4275
Cork paper manufacturing (no paper manufacturing)----------------------- 4277
Corrugated paper manufacturing (no paper manufacturing)--------------- 4284
Dress pattern manufacturing—paper only—including designers, drafts­
men, cutters, and all clerical force (no paper manufacturing)---------- 4282
This classification shall not include publication of magazines, for which
classify as Publishing. (See page 42, group 270.)




42

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manual
Group 265. Paper Products (n. o. c.)—Concluded.
number.
Fly paper manufacturing— no paper manufacturing (n. p. d .)________ 4278
Music rolls manufacturing—perforated paper (no paper manufac­
turing)___________________________________________________________ 4280
Oiled, paraffined, or waxed paper manufacturing (no paper manufac­
turing)___________________________________________________________ 4276
Paper goods manufacturing (n. o. c .)—no paper manufacturing______ 4279
Roofing paper or roofing felt manufacturing_________________________ 4285
Tag, check, and label manufacturing (not m etal)_____________________ 4286
SCHEDULE 14.—PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Group 270. (Undivided.)
Bookbinding________________________________________________________
Electrotyping (n. p. d .)_____________________________________________
Engraving (n. o. c.) (n. p. d .)_ ________________________________ I _
Linotype and hand composition (n.p. d .)____________________________
Lithographing (n. p. d .)____________________________________________
Loose-leaf ledger and notebook manufacturing—including all opera­
tions (n. p. d .)___________________________________________________
Newspaper publishing—------------------------------------------------------------------

4307
4350
4352
4308
4302
4309
4304

Artists, designers, proof readers, editors, reporters, advertising and cir­
culation solicitors should be classified as Clerical office employees. (See page
63, group 490.)
Photo-engraving (n. p. d .)___________________________________________ 4351
Playing cards manufacturing (no paper or cardboard manufacturing) _ 4306
Printing____________________________________________________________ 4300
Artists, designers, proof readers, editors, reporters, advertising and cir­
culation solicitors should be classified as Clerical office employees. (See page
63, group 490.)
Publishing (not Newspaper publishing)_____________________________ 4305
Artists, designers, proof readers, editors, reporters, advertising and cir­
culation solicitors should be classified as Clerical office employees. (See page
63, group 490.)
Wall paper manufacturing—designing, printing, and finishing (no
paper manufacturing)-------------------------------------------------------------------- 4301
SCHEDULE 15.—TEXTILES.
Group 280.
Wool
Wool
Wool
Wool

Wool Preparation.
combing______________________________________________________
pulling_______________________________________________________
scouring (n. p. d .)----------------------------------------------------------------separating—chemical separation of woolfrom cotton___________

2260
2264
2263
2269

Group 281. Woolen Goods.
Bunting manufacturing_____________________________________________
Felting manufacturing______________________________________________
Haircloth manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------Hatters’ fur manufacturing (n. p. d .)_______________________________
Horse blanket manufacturing_______________________________________
Upholstery fabric manufacturing_____________
Wool spinning and weaving—excludingshoddymanufacturing________

2283
2288
2284
2280
2287
2281
2286




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

43

Manual
number.
Awning and tent fabric manufacturing—shop only (no manufactur­
ing of wooden pegs or iron fram es)_______________________________ 2246
Canvas belting manufacturing______________________________________ 2245
Canvas manufacturing. (Classify as Duck cloth manufacturing.)
Carding and fulling mills (n. p. d .)________________________________ 2221
Cotton spinning and weaving________________________________________ 2222
Duck cloth manufacturing___________________________________________ 2240
Hose manufacturing—cotton or linen_____________________________
2242
Shade cloth manufacturing__________________________________________ 2241
Thread manufacturing—cotton or linen_____________________________ 2224
Yarn manufacturing (n. p. d .)_____________________________________ 2220

Group 282. Cotton Goods.

Group 283. Silk.

Plush and velvet goods manufacturing______________________________
Ribbon manufacturing______________________________________________
Silk manufacturing_________________________________________________
Silk thread manufacturing__________________________________________

2300
2301
2303
2302

Group 284. Linen.

Linen cloth manufacturing_________________________________________

2326

Group 285. Carpets and Rugs.

Carpet manufacturing_______________________________________________ 2400
Rug manufacturing—cotton, woolen, or silk_________________________ 2401
Group 286. Batting, Wadding, and Shoddy.

Cotton batting manufacturing—from cotton waste and new rags
(n. p. d .)__________________________________________________________2213
Cotton batting manufacturing—from cull cotton and new rags (n.
p. d .)______________________________________________________________ 2212
Cotton batting manufacturing—from cull cotton only (n. p. d .)---------- 2211
Shoddy manufacturing— cotton_ ____________________________________2214
_
Shoddy manufacturing—wool_________________________________________2215
Wadding and waste manufacturing (n. p. d .)_________________________ 2210
Group 287. Cordage.

Cord and binder twine manufacturing—not cordage_________________ 2342
Cordage manufacturing_____________________________________________ 2340
Rope manufacturing________________________________________________ 2341
Group 288. Burlap and Jute.

Burlap and sack manufacturing—weaving___________________________
Flax spinning and weaving--------------------------------------------------------------Hemp spinning and weaving. (Classify as Jute and hemp spinning
and weaving.)
Jute and hemp spinning and weaving----------------------------------------------Rug and matting manufacturing—fiber_____________________________

2345
2320

2348
2346

Group 289. Knit Goods.

Hosiery manufacturing—silk_______________________________________
Hosiery manufacturing (n, o. c .) ___________________________________
Hosiery manufacturing—from cop yarn (n. p. d .)----------------------------Knitting mills______________________________________________________
Knitting mills—from cop yarn—no yarn manufacturing (n. p. d .)------




2364
2360
2361
2363
2362

44

BULLETIN OP THE BUREAU OP LABOR STATISTICS.

Group 290. Lace, Embroidery, and Webbing.

number1

Badge manufacturing—cloth_________________________________ :______
Embroidery manufacturing__________________________________________
Fringe and braid manufacturing____________________________________
Incandescent gas mantle manufacturing_____________________________
Lace manufacturing________________________________________
Net manufacturing (not wire; no cordage or twine making)__________
Shoe string manufacturing__________________________________________
Typewriter ribbon manufacturing___________________________________
Upholstery trimming manufacturing_________________________________
Webbing manufacturing—elastic or nonelastic_______________________
Wicking manufacturing_____________________________________________

2389
2388
2387
2390
2386
2384
2385
2383
2382
2380
2381

Group 291. Finishing Textiles.
Bleacheries____________
2414
Cloth printing. (Classify as Textiles—dyeing, finishing, etc.)
Cloth sponging (n. p. d .)_____________________________________________ 2415
Finishing of textiles— new goods (n. p. d .)___________________________ 2413
Mercerizing cotton goods_____________________________________________ 2412
Textiles—dyeing, finishing, and printing new goods (not dyeing and
cleaning)__________________________________________________________ 2413
Waterproofing cloth—not rubber_________
2411
Waterproofing cloth—rubber__________________________________________ 2410
Yarn finishing—including dyeing—no manufacturing o f yarn (n. p. d .) - 2416
SCHEDULE 16.—CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS.
Group 300. Clothing.
Cloak manufacturing________________________________________________
Clothing manufacturing_____________________________________________
Dressmaking-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Fur-goods manufacturing ( not preparing skins) ______________________

2501
2501
2503
2502

Group 301. Shirts, Collars, Etc.
Collar and cuff manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------- 2520
Shirt manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2521
Group 302. Furnishing Goods.
Corset manufacturing_______________________________________________ 2554
Furnishing goods manufacturing—wearing apparel ( n. o. c.) ( n. p. d.) _ 2553
Glove and mitten manufacturing—cloth—sewed______________________ 2561
This classification is available only in case no manual classification or
classifications specifically describe the risk, or if more than one classification,
and pay-roll division in accordance with the rules in respect thereto is not
possible.
Glove and mitten manufacturing—silk, woolen, or thread (k n it)______
Handkerchief manufacturing—no weaving__________________________
Necktie manufacturing______________________________________________
Suspender manufacturing___________________________________________
Suspender manufacturing—no buckle, webbing, or leather parts manu­
facturing (n. p. d .)----------------------------------------------------------------------Umbrella manufacturing (not manufacturing frames and handles)_
_
The manufacturing of umbrella handles should be classified and rated as Cane
manufacturing. (See page 36, group 184.) The manufacturing of umbrella
frames and hardware should be classified and rated as Wire goods manufac­
turing (n. o. c.)—no wire drawing. (See page 29, group 124.)




2552
2555
2551
2556
2550
2560

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

45

Manual
Group 303. Headwear.
number.
Bonnet frame manufacturing (no wire manufacturing)_____________ 2533
Cap and hat manufacturing—cloth__________________________________ 2535
Feather and flower manufacturing—artificial________________________ 2534
Hair goods manufacturing___________________________________________ 2536
Hat manufacturing—not straw or cloth_____________________________ 2530
Hat manufacturing—straw__________________________________________ 2531
Millinery manufacturing____________________________________________ 2532
Group 304. Miscellaneous Needlework.
Awning and tent manufacturing—shop only_________________________
Bag manufacturing—burlap, sacking—sewing only__________________
Feather pillow manufacturing______________________________________
Mattress manufacturing (no spring or wirework or excelsior manu­
facturing)________________________________________________________
Quilt manufacturing________________________________________________
Sail making________________________________________________________
Group 305. Laundering, Cleaning, and Dyeing.
Carpet cleaning and beating_________________________________________
Cleaning and dyeing________________________________________________
Laundries (n. o. c .) _________________________________________________
Laundries (no machinery) doing handwork exclusively (n. p. d .)_____
Laundries—wet wash (no flat-work ironing or operating power-iron­
ing machine)__________________________________

2574
2575
2572
2570
2571
2573
9640
2583
2581
2582
2580

Wet wash laundries operating flat-work ironers or other power-ironing
machines should be classified as Laundries (n. o. e.).
Towel and toilet supply companies— including (if no laundry opera­
tions are conducted) all employees except clerical office employees,
drivers and drivers’ helpers,chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers______ 2584
SCHEDULE 17.—FOODS, BEVERAGES, AND TOBACCO.
Group 310. Flour and Grist Mill Products.
Breakfast food manufacturing—prepared foods— excluding oatmeal
and corn milling___________________________________________________ 2016
Cattle and stock food manufacturing-------------------------------------------------- 2009
Corn m ills___________________________________________________________2010
Flour mills___________________________________________________________2011
Grist mills___________________________________________________________2012
Hominy m ills_______________________________________________________ 2013
Millers (n. o. c .) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 2034
Poultry food manufacturing__________________________________________2015
Rice milling--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2017
Group 311. Baking.
Bakeries____________________________________________________________ 2000
Cracker manufacturing_____________________________________________ 2001
Macaroni manufacturing____________________________________________ 2002
Group 312. Coffee and Spices.
Bean sorting and handling__________________________________________ 2054
Coffee cleaning, roasting, and grinding---------------------------------------------- 2050
Mustard mills______________________________________________________ 2051
Nuts—handling, cleaning, andshelling (n. p. d .)--------------------------------- 2052
Spice m ills,------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2053




46

BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

Manual
Group 313. Beet-Sugar Refining.
number.
Beet-sugar manufacturing_____,_____________________________________ 2030
Group 314. Sugar Refining—Cane.
Molasses and sirup manufacturing (no glucose)_____________________ 2020
Sugar refining (not beet-sugar manufacturing)_____________________ 2021
Group 315. Confectionery.
Chewing gum manufacturing_______________________________________
Chocolate manufacturing____________________________________________
Cocoa manufacturing________________________________________________
Coconut shredding and drying ( n. p. d.) _____________________________
Confectionery manufacturing_______________________________________
Ice cream manufacturing___________________________________________
Licorice manufacturing_____________________________________________

2042
2042
2042
2043
2041
2040
2044

Group 316. Dairy Products.
Butter manufacturing_______________________________________________
Cheese manufacturing_______________________________________________
Condensed milk manufacturing (no can manufacturing)_____________
Creameries and dairies (not farm ing)_______________________________
Milk products manufacturing (n. o. c .)— no can manufacturing_______

2067
2061
2062
2063
2065

Group 317. Slaughter and Packing Houses.
Packing houses— all operations incidental to packing houses except
lard refining, butterine manufacturing, fertilizer manufacturing, soap
manufacturing, and slaughtering including handling of live stock_ 2090
_
Packing houses— curing hams, bacon, and meat products, including
packing in jars or cans—no handling of live stock, no slaughtering,
no handling of carcasses, and no other operations incidental to pack­
ing-house operations (n. p. d .)____________________________________ 2093
Sausage-case manufacturing (n. p. d .)_______________________________ 2091
Sausage manufacturing______________________________________________ 2092
Serum (hog) manufacturing—including packing-house operations____ 2083
Slaughtering, including handling of live stock________________________ 2081
Group 318. Canning and Preserving.
Canneries (n. o. c .)—no can manufacturing___________________________ 2111
Compressed food manufacturing—tablet form only (n. p. d .)_________ 2104
Fish curing and packing—no vessel hazard or ice harvesting—no can
manufacturing (n. p. d .)____________________________________________ 2101
Fruit evaporating—excluding box manufacturing______________________2102
Fruit packing (no canning, no evaporating or preserving—excluding
box manufacturing)___ t
___________________________________________2105
Fruit preserving (not canneries). (Classify as Jams, jellies, and pre­
serves—preparing.)
Jams, jellies, and preserves—preparing (not canneries)_______________ 2112
Oystermen—sorting, shucking, washing, packing—shore and dock work
only (n. p. d. in canneries)__________________________________________2114
Pickle manufacturing________________________________________________ 2110
Group 319. Malting and Brewing.
Breweries—with or without bottling—excluding drivers and drivers’
helpers, chauffeurs, and chauffeurs’ helpers_________________________2121
Malt houses—excluding drivers and drivers’ helpers, chauffeurs and
chauffeurs’ helpers____________________________________________
2125




REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AN D IN SU RA N CE COST.

47

Manual
Group 320. Bottling—Under Pressure.
number.
Bottling______________________________________________________________ 2161
Mineral water manufacturing—artificial______________________________ 2160
Group 321. Bottling—Not Under Pressure.
Bottling (n. p. d .)----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2165
Mineral or spring water bottling—natural_____________________________ 2166
Group 322. Distilleries.
D istillin g____________________________________________________________2130
Group 323. Fermented Liquors.
Cider manufacturing_________________________________________________ 2141
Vinegar manufacturing_______________________________________________ 2140
Wine manufacturing_________________________________________________ 2142
Group 324. Tobacco.
Cigar or cigarette manufacturing—hand made(n. p. d .)_______________ 2171
Cigar or cigarette manufacturing—machinemade______________________2170
Tobacco manufacturing (n. o. c .) ____________________________________ 2173
Tobacco manufacturing—snuff_______________________________________ 2175
Tobacco rehandling and warehousing________________________________ 2174
Group 325. Ice.
Ice manufacturing— excluding" drivers and drivers’ helpers, chauffeurs,
and chauffeurs’ helpers____________________________________________ 2150
SCHEDULE 18.—MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS (N. O. C.).
Group 330. Lead Pencils and Crayons.
Crayon manufacturing______________________________________________ 2941
Lead pencil manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------2940
Croup 331. Advertising and Art Novelties.
Advertising novelties manufacturing (not exclusively wood, metal, or
cellu loid )________________________________________________________ 4050
This classification is applicable to concerns engaged exclusively in the manu­
facture of a miscellaneous line of advertising novelties.
Art novelties (n. o .c.)—finishing and assembling only— no stamping
(n. p. d .)------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4951
Group 332. Photographic Goods.
Photographic sensitive films and dry plates—manufacturing and de­
velopment of negatives only_____________________________________ 4921
Photographic supplies manufacturing__________________ _
____________ 4923
Group 333. Sporting and Military Goods.
Fishing rod manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------Fishing tackle manufacturing (n. o. c .) _____________________________
Military or fraternal orders equipment and regalia manufacturing
(n. o. c .)—no stamping___________________________________________
Sporting goods manufacturing (n. o. c .)_____________________________
Whip manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------------

4901
4900
4904
4902
4903

Group 334. Buffing Wheels and Steam Packing.
Buffing wheel manufacturing—cloth or leather only_________________ 4980
Steam packing manufacturing (not m etal)__________________________ 4982
Group 335. Butchers* and Dairy Supplies.
Butchers’ supplies manufacturing___________________________________ 4910
Creamery and dairy supplies manufacturing_________________________ 4911




48

B U L L E T IN

OF

THE

BUBEAU

OF

LABOR

S T A T IS T IC S .

Group 336. Soda-Water Apparatus.

Manual
Dumber.

Soda-water fountain and apparatus manufacturing_________________ 4940
Group 337. Artificial Limbs.

Artificial limb manufacturing______________________________________

4970

Group 338. Painting (shop).

Painting—automobile and carriage bodies only (n. p. d .)___________
Painting (n. p. d. in manufacturing plants)__________________________
Sign painting_______________________________________________________
Theatrical scenery painting (no woodworking)______________________

9505
9501
9500
9506

Group 339. Photography.

Film exchanges—with or without projecting room, not located at
motion-picture studios______________________________________
4362
Motion pictures—development of negatives, printing positives, and all
subsequent operations except the marketing of the product through
film exchanges at locations other than the studios_________________ 4360
Photograph studios (not producing motion pictures)_________________ 4361
Group 340. Diamond Cutting.

Diamond cutting and polishing (n. p. d .)____________________________ 4930
Group 341. Taxidermists.

Taxiderm ists_______________________________________________________ 9600
DIVISION D.— CONSTRUCTION.
SCHEDULE 1.— W RECKING AN D MOVING.
Group 350. Raising and Wrecking.

Building moving—including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauf­
feurs and chauffeurs’ helpers_____________________________________
Building raising— shoring buildings, removing walls and foundations,
columns and piers, and rebuilding same___________________________
Salvage operations—all operations in damaged buildings or elsewhere
incidental to the sorting, removing, storing, reconditioning, and dis­
tributing o f merchandise from buildings previously damaged by fire
(no wrecking, shoring, or other structural operations)_____________
Salvage operations— in buildings damaged by fire— all operations inci­
dental to wrecking, shoring, or other structural work in buildings
previously damaged by fire, including the handling of machinery____
Wrecking (not marine; no blasting)________________________________

5703
5702

5705

5704
5701

Group 351. Blasting.

Blasting—including the whole remuneration of all employees engaged
in the storage, handling, or use o f explosives; loading, capping, con­
necting, and firing; with an additional minimum premium of $25_ 6280
_
State or municipal road or street making—including culverts not
exceeding 10-foot span—blasting---------------------------------------------------- 6280
SCHEDULE 2.— GRADING, EXCAVATIN G , AN D FOUNDATIONS.
Group 360. Surveying.

Surveying and inspecting engineer work, including sharpening of
stakes and other shopwork incident to surveying and inspection of
construction operations— no actual construction operations of any
description and no supervising or superintending of construction op­
erations (n. p. d .)------------------------------------------------------------------------ 6030




BEPOBT OF C O M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AN D IN SU RA N CE COST.

49

Manual
Group 361. Clearing and Grading.

‘

number.

Clearing land, removing stumps, and grading for agricultural purposes
exclusively—including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauf­
feurs and chauffeurs’ helpers_____________________________________
Grading land (no canal or cellar excavation; excluding railroad con­
struction and road or street making; no quarrying or blasting)— in­
cluding drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’
helpers___________________________________________________________
Landscape gardening (no blasting)— including drivers and drivers’
helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers___________________
State or municipal road or street making—including culverts not ex­
ceeding 10-foot span— all operations except quarrying and blasting_

6040

6041
6046
6042

The classification above includes the setting up and taking down of road­
making equipment and appliances at the place of work, and the operation
of road-making machinery or vehicles, with or without horses or other draft
animals, also the operation of trucks, traction engines, and steam rollers or
other vehicles in connection with the work of transporting material, merchan­
dise, and equipment to and from the place of work. The wages of all
drivers and helpers, chauffeurs and their helpers, and others engaged in
connection therewith to be included in the pay roll and subjected to the rates.
If teams are hired by contract, including drivers, then 50 per cent of the
contract price of the team shall be accepted in lieu of drivers’ wages, and If
automobile trucks are hired by contract, including chauffeurs, then 25 per cent
of the contract price of the automobile trucks shall be accepted in lieu of
chauffeurs’ wages.
Group 362. Excavating and Pile Driving.

Cellar excavation (no caisson or subaqueous work and no blasting) —
maximum depth of excavation 12 feet (n. p. d .)------- ---------------------Cellar excavation (no caisson or subaqueous w ork)—including dig­
ging holes and filling them with concrete for foundations for build­
ings_______________________________________________________________
Ditch digging (no sewer or canal building or excavation for water or
gas mains and no blasting)_______________________________________
Dredging, etc.— drilling and blasting-------------------------------------------------Dredging—excavation by means of suction dredges only—including
loading and unloading_____________________________________________
Dredging-—by floating dredges— all operations except rock drilling and
blasting__________________________________________________________
Excavation—bridge foundations, retaining walls, and bases of dams
(no caisson work or cellar excavation and no blasting)____________
Pile driving—building foundations only______________________________
Sewage disposal plants— construction—for private houses, institutions,
or hotels, and not connected with public sewers (no blasting)______

6227

6220
6225
6231
6224
6223
6221
6222
6226

Group 363. Drilling.

Artesian well drilling----------------------------------------------------------------------Diamond drilling___________________________________________________
Drilling work (not diamond drilling)—prospecting for ore (no shaft
sinking; no blasting)______________________________________________
Oil producing—drilling new wells, cleaning out and drilling old wells
deeper, erecting or dismantling derricks---------------------------------------

6201
6200
6203
6202

Group 364. Tunnels and Subways.

Caisson work—bridges and other subaqueous work— including all em­
ployees working under air pressure and all others engaged in or
upon the caissons or the apparatus connected therewith------------------ 6250
38043°—Bull. 201—16----- 4




50

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Group 364. Tunnels and Subways— Concluded.

Manual
number.

Caisson work—building foundations— including all employees working
under air pressure and all others engaged in or upon the caissons
or the apparatus connected therewith____________________________
Shaft sinking______________________________________________________
Subway construction—for passenger and freight traffic—tunneling
only----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Subway construction—for passenger and freight traffic—open cut or
cut and cover (no tunneling)____________________________________
Tunneling—including all work to completion_________________________

6253
6252
6254
6255
6251

Group 365. Ditch Digging with Pipe Laying.

Cesspool digging—including incidental concrete lining (no blasting)_
Conduits for electric wires—construction work (no blasting)________
Gas works—laying of mains and connections (no tunneling or blast­
ing) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Oil pipe_____________________________________________________________
Pneumatic tubes— installation, including construction, care and main­
tenance of conduits and manholes (no blasting)___________________
Refrigerating companies—excavation and laying and repair of pipe
lines (no blasting)_______________________________________________
Sewer building—maximum depth of excavation 7 feet at any point
(n. p. d.) (masonry work in connection with sewers should be classi­
fied as sewer building)____________________________________________

6304
6325
6324
6326
6331
6322

6302

This classification not available to any sewer contract, the maximum depth
of which exceeds 7 feet at any point.

Sewer building—no limit of depth (masonry work in connection with
sewers should be classifiedas sewer building)______________________ 6300
Sewer contracts involving sections less than 7 feet in depth and sections
more than 7 feet in depth should be submitted to the home office for classifica­
tion.

Steam heating—laying of mains and surface or house connections (no
tunneling or blasting)____________________________________________ 6320
Waterworks—laying of mains and surface or house connections (no
tunneling or blasting)------------------------------------------------------------------ 6321
Group 366. Canals.

Canal construction—excluding barge canal construction—all opera­
tions in connection therewith, except railroad operations, bridge
building, caisson work, and wrecking____________________________ 6361
The above excepted classifications to take full manual rates. For contracts
involving the performance of dredging work only, no rock work, no blasting,
and no other operations of any nature whatsoever, classify as Dredging— by
floating dredges. (See page 49, group 362.)
Group 367. Masonry.

Blast furnaces—erection, repair, and relining________________________ 5002
Bridge building—masonry other than concrete (no blasting)_________ 5021
Chimney construction— stone, brick, or concrete (not structural iron
or steel)------------------------5000
Gas benches and retorts, installation of (n. p. d .)—including drivers
and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers______ 5026
Marble and stone setting—away from shop (no blasting)____________ 5024
Marble and stone work—decoration in place only____________________ 5320
Masonry—building chimneys only (no structural iron or steel and no
blasting)--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5000




51

REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AN D IN SU RA N CE COST.

Group 367. Masonry— Concluded.

Manual
number.

Masonry (n. o. c .)— no blasting_____________________________________

5022

Masonry work in connection with sewers should be classified as Sewer build­
ing (see page 50, group 365), and not Masonry (n. o. c.).

Mausoleums and monuments in cemeteries— erection only-----------------Sewage disposal plants—public— construction (no sewer construction
or blasting)______________________________________________________
Silo erection—brick, hollow tile, concrete blocks, and concrete stavesSmokestacks and chimneys—lining__________________________________
Statuary in connection with mausoleums, monuments, or mortuary
work—erection only_______________________________________________
Tunnel lining—masonry or concrete (for previously driven tunnels
otherwise completed by other contractors)-------------------------------------

5321
5020
5025
5001
5322
5023

This classification not available if lining is done by contractors construct­
ing tunnel.
SCHEDULE 3.— ERECTING.
Group 370. Structural-Iron Erecting.

*

Bridge building—metal (no blasting)_______________________________
Gas holders—metal—erection_______________________________________
Iron and steel lock gates—construction and installation_____________
Ironwork—elevated railroads—erecting steel and iron frame work
(no bridge building)_____________________________________________
Ironwork—erecting steel and iron frame structures (no bridge build­
ing)—including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and
chauffeurs’ helpers__________________________ !____________________
Ironwork—placing iron and steel store fronts as alterations of existing
buildings—including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs
and chauffeurs’ helpers____________________________________________
Merry-go-rounds, swings, and other similar movable amusement de­
vices—erecting, repairing, dismantling, and removing_____________
Painting—steel structures and bridges______________________________
Silo erection—m etal-------------------Smokestacks and chimneys— metal— erection (no blasting)___________
Tanks (n. o. c .)—metal—erection (no blasting)_____________________
Vaults—fire and burglar proof—construction and installation________
Vaults—prison vaults and cells—erection____________________________
Waterworks—erecting standpipes and water towers (no blasting)_____

5067
5047
5061
5046

5040

5045
5066
5041
5063
5042
5048
5065
5060
5043

Group 371. Metal Construction (outside).

Corrugated-iron buildings—erecting or covering buildings already con­
structed (no structural-steel w ork )________________________________
Electric cutting and welding—including shop________________________
Fireproof shutters— erection and repair________________
Ironwork—erecting and repairing balconies, fire escapes, railings,
staircases, coal chutes, fireproof shutters (outside of buildings) —
including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauf­
feurs’ helpers-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lightning rods— erection____________________________________________
Oxyacetylene cutting and welding (autogenous)—away from shop___
Windmills—erection _____________________________________




5086
5083
5082

5081
5080
5084
5085

52*

B U L L E T IN OF T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

Group 372. Concrete Construction.

Manual

number.

Concrete erection—unit system— construction o f concrete columns,
beams, roofs, walls, and floors in sections including subsequent
erection and placing o f same_____________________________________ 5200
Concrete mixers (mechanical)—operation (n. p. d .)_________________ 5205
Concrete work—bridge building—including those engaged in making,
setting up, and taking down frames, scaffolds, false work, and con­
crete-distributing apparatus (no blasting)_________________________ 5203
Concrete work—buildings (not grain elevators)— concrete construc­
tion, without reinforcement, either monolithic in form or by means
of blocks, in which floors, beams, and horizontal bearing surface are
not of reinforced or self-bearing concrete— including those engaged
in making, setting up, and taking down frames, scaffolds, false
work, and concrete-distributing apparatus (no blasting)_________ 5208
Concrete work—buildings (not grain elevators)—reinforced concrete
construction, with selfrbearing floors or other horizontal surfaces
or parts, constructed by means of reinforced concrete— including
those engaged in making, setting up, and taking down frames, scaf­
folds, false work, and concrete-distributing apparatus (no blasting). 5204
Concrete work— dams—including those engaged in making, setting
up, and taking down frames, scaffolds, false work, and concretedistributing apparatus (no blasting)______________________________ 5207
Concrete work—foundations for buildings—including those engaged
in making, setting up, and taking down frames, scaffolds, false
work, and concrete-distributing apparatus—excluding all work in
tunnels, subways, or caissons for which use proper classifications
and rates________________________________________________________ 5209
Concrete work—grain elevators— including those engaged in making,
setting up, and taking down frames, scaffolds, false work, and con­
crete-distributing apparatus_________________________________ _____ 5206
Concrete work—piers or abutments for bridges (not concrete bridges),
retaining walls, water conduits (no tunneling), and other structures
(no buildings, bridges, or dams)—including those engaged in mak­
ing, setting up, and taking down frames, scaffolds, false work, and
concrete-distributing apparatus—excluding all work in tunnels, sub­
ways, or caissons, for which use proper classifications and rates_ 5210
_
Fireproof construction—by means of wire lathing and concreting—ex­
cluding roofs, floors, and horizontal surfaces.v___________________ 5212
Fireproof construction—reinforced or suspended concrete floors______ 5201
Silo erection— concrete______________________________________________ 5202
Group 373. Signs, Awnings, Etc.

Advertising signs—erection and repair only—excluding sign painting
on buildings______________________________________________________
Advertising signs—maintenance andoperation_______________________
Awning and tent erection____________________________________________
Bill posting (no erection or repair o f signs)_________________________
Decorating, interior and exterior—hanging flags and bunting for con­
ventions and celebrations__________________________________________
Sign painting or lettering on buildings or structures________________

9540
9542
9543
9545
9544
9541

Group 374. Fence Construction.

Fence construction—wood, stone, metal,or concrete___________________




6400

REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.

53

Manual
Group 375. Carpentry (outside).

number.

Bridge building—wood (no blasting)________________________________ 5407
Buildings (portable)—erection of sectionalbuildings------------------------- 5405
Carpentry (n. o. c .) _________________________________________________ 5401
Carpentry work in connection with wooden bridges should be classified as
Bridge building— wood.

Hothouses—erection________________________________________________ 5402
Scaffolds— installation, operation, and removal_______________________ 5406
This classification is available only to concerns engaged in installing and
leasing scaffolds to contractors. Includes the operation and removal of same
when work has been completed.

Silo erection—wood_________________________________________________ 5400
Tank erection—wood________________________________________________ 5404
Group 376. Building Construction (n. o. c.).

Additions to, alteration, and repair of assured’s existing buildings or
plants (not maintenance of equipment covered as manufacturing
operation)—excluding the erection or demolition of structural steel
or any fabricated iron or steel product or structure or the construc­
tion of sewers, tunnels, shafts, or subways_________________________ 5602
This classification is not available to contractors.

Architects—supervising____________________________________________ _
Contractors—building private residences, flats, or apartments, with or
without stores, one-story stores and stores with offices above, private
stables and private garages, exclusively, and buildings not mercan­
tile or factory, all not exceeding three stories and basement in
height, including jobbing work connected therewith (no blasting) —
excluding the erection of churches, theaters, railroad stations,
roundhouses, courthouses, city halls, and capitol buildings_________
Masonry or concrete work______________________________________
Carpentry work, including interior trim and cabinetwork________
Cellar excavating_______________________________________________

5603

5640
5642
5643
5644

Any other operations incident to the construction of the class of buildings
described under the foregoing classification, such as structural-iron work,
painting, plumbing, roofing, and plastering, should take the regular manual
rate for such operations.

Contractors—general—where all work is subcontracted, or where
contractor performs work involving more than one manual classi­
fication :
For watchmen, timekeepers, and cleaners only__________________ 5604
For officers, superintendents, and other employees supervising the
entire work__________________________________________________ 5606
For superintendents only_______________________________________ 5605
Superintendents only can not be insured except at the highest rated
manual classification for any direct work involved.

Jobbing work—on buildings, other than private residences—excluding
iron and steel erection and the demolition of buildings (n. p. d .)_ 5601
Owners engaged in construction work or for whom construction work
is being done. (Classify as Contractors—general.)
Group 377. Painting, Plastering, and Decorating (outside).

Cleaning and renovating outside surfaces of buildings_______________ 5469
Glaziers—away from shop_________________________________________ 5462




54

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
Manual

Group 377. Painting, Plastering, and Decorating (outside)— Concluded.

number.

Painting and decorating—away from shop (not interior w ork)—ex­
cluding painting steel structures and bridges_______________________
Plastering on outside of buildings (n. o. c.). (Classify as Stucco
work on outside of buildings.)
Staff work—erecting buildings or structures_________________________
Stuccowork on outside of buildings---------------------------------------------------Tuck pointing (n. p. d.)„-----------------------------------------------------------------Waterproofing—cellars and foundations_____________________________
Waterproofing—in or on structures by means of felt, paper, burlap,
or pitch—no roofing and no subaqueous work (n. p. d .)____________

5461

5471
5472
5470
5467
5466

Group 378. Roofing.

Cornices and skylights— erection and repair_________________________
Galvanized-iron and sheet-iron work— erection and repair (no tank
erection) ________________________________________________________
Roofing (n. o. c .) ___________________________________________________
Roofing—slate ---------------------Tinsmithing— away from shop______________________________________

5540
5541
5545
5546
5543

Group 379. Dams, Breakwaters, Etc.

Cribwork____________________________________________________________ 6006
Dam construction—excluding construction o f concrete dams (no
blasting) _________________________________________________________ 6002
Dry docks— construction (no blasting)______________________________ 6008
Jetty and breakwater—construction (no blasting)___________________ 6005
Marine railway— construction______________________________________ 6004
Pile driving— including timber wharf building_______________________ 6003
Waterworks—construction of pumping stations, dams, and reservoirs_6010
Group 380. Railroad Construction (all kinds).

Railroad construction— electric— rail joint welding in street by mol­
ten metal or electricity------------------------------------------------------------------ 6100
Railroad construction— electric, horse, or cable (not including thirdrail systems)—laying or relaying of rails exclusively—including
drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ help­
ers (n. p. d .)---------------------------------------------------------------------------------6104
Railroad construction—electric, horse, or cable, with or without in­
stallation of electric equipment or pole lines connected therewith—
including incidental culverts not more than 10-foot span; urban or
Interurban lines (no blasting, tunneling, or bridge building)—in­
cluding drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauf­
feurs’ helpers______________________________________________________ 6105
Railroad construction—steam (no blasting, tunneling, or bridge
building)—including incidental culverts not more than 10-foot
span and steam-shovel work— including drivers and drivers’ help­
ers, also chauffeurs andchauffeurs’helpers_________________________ 6102
Railroad construction—steam (no blasting, tunneling, or bridge build­
ing)— including incidental culverts not more than 10-foot span (no
steam-shovel w ork)— including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also
chauffeurs andchauffeurs’ helpers (n. p. d .)_______________________6103
Railroad signals—erection or installation (not including operation
o f railroad)_______________________________________________________ 6101




Re p o r t

of c o m m it t e e o k s t a t is t ic s a n d in s u r a n c e c o s t .

55

Manual

Group 381. Boat and Ship Building (wood).
number.
Boat building— constructing canal boats, scows, and barges ( n. p. d .) _ 6803
Boat building (n. o. c .)—where staging or scaffolding is used— includ­
ing shop and yard work____________________________________________ 6801
Dry docks (floating)—construction__________________________________ 6802
Ship and boat building. (Classify as Boat building.)
Group 382. Boat and Ship Building (steel or iron).
Boat building (n. o. c .)—where staging or scaffolding is used—includ­
ing shop and yard work__________________________________________ 6840
Ship and boat building. (Classify as Boat building.)
Group 383. Yachts and Rowboats.
Boat building—constructing or repairing motor boats—wood or
metal—not exceeding 75 feet over all— including shop and yard
work (n. p. d .)___________________________________________________
Boat building—constructing or repairing small yachts, sailboats,
or rowboats—wood or metal—not exceeding 150 feet over all—in­
cluding shop and yard work (n. p. d .)_____________________________
Boat building—constructing or repairing small yachts, sailboats, or
rowboats—wood or metal—not exceeding 40 feet over all—includ­
ing shop and yard work (n. p. d .)-----------------------------------------------Canoe building-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Group 384. Boat and Ship Repairing and Rigging.
Dry docks—operating docks and repairing of vessels only, including
shipwright work (no construction of docks)______________________
Marine railway—handling boats, displacement over 80 tons___________
Marine railway—handling boats, displacement 80 tons or less (n.p.d.)_
Rigging—ship or boat (n. p .d .)------------------------------------------------------Shipwright work—repairing vessels or the machinery therein, includ­
ing work in dry docks------------------------------------------------------------------Shipwright work—repairing vessels or the machinery therein while
afloat (no operations of dry dock or on dry dock )_________________
Shipwright work—shop employees-----------------------------------------------------

6823

6820

6821
6822

6860
6862
6863
6864
6866
6861
6865

SCHEDULE 4.—FINISHING, EQUIPPING, AND INSTALLING.
Group 390. Metal Construction (within buildings).
Appliances (n. o. c .)— installing and erecting copper and other sheet
metal wholly inside buildings not in course of construction. (Clas­
sify as Coppersmithing—installing and erecting.)
Coppersmithing— away from shop------------------------------------------------------- 5111
Coppersmithing—installing and erecting appliances, copper and other
sheet metals—wholly inside buildings not in course of construction_5105
Door, window frame, or sash—erection and repair—metal or metal
covered_____________________________________________________________5103
Ironwork—ornamental— erection within buildings_________________
5100
Locksmithing—repairing, fitting, and installing locks in completed
buildings (including shop)--------------------------------------------------------------- 5113
Metal ceilings and wall coverings—installation------------------------------------ 5101
Ornamental brass, bronze, and ironwork within buildings—erection___5100
Safety treads—installation------------------------------5109
Tank building—metal—erection within buildings exclusively__________ 5112




56

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Manual
Group 390. Metal Construction (within buildings)—Concluded.
number.
Theater stage rigging—setting up ornamental, architectural, and
theater ironwork and all mechanical effects over stages of theaters,
including hanging of signs, setting stairways, iron beams, and lintels,
all included in the operations of stage rigging_____________________ 5108
Window frames—metal— installation-------------------------------------------------5104
Wire work— interior erection only—excluding ornamental brass, bronze,
or iron work_______________________________________
5110
Group 391. Elevator Erection (passenger or freight).
Elevator erection____________________________________________________ 5160
Elevators—repairs only______________________________________________ 5161
Hod hoists—installation, operation, and removal of hod elevators and
construction hoists_________________________________________________ 5163
Group 392. Metal Appliances (installing within buildings).
Carrier systems— installation and repair— inside of mercantile build­
ings only—gravity, pneumatic, or power____________________________ 5143
Installation of freight-carrier systems to be classified with Millwright work.
(See group 393, below.)
Gravity chutes—erection-------------------------------------------------------------------- 5145
Mail chutes— installation-------------------------------------------------------------------- 5142
Office furniture and fixtures—metal— erection_________________________ 5140
Window-opening devices—installation________________________________ 5141
Group 393. Millwrighting.
Acetylene-gas machines—installation------------------------------------------------Automatic stokers—installation-------------------------------------------------------Bakers’ ovens—portable— installation or removal____________________
Boilers (steam)—installation and repair, including construction of
necessary concrete or masonry foundations—including drivers and
drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers___________
Brewery vats—metal and wood—installation________________________
Conveyors and hoisting apparatus—coal, ash, and ore— erection out­
side of buildings---------------------------------------------------------------------------Conveyors—coal and ash—installation inside of buildings (in connec­
tion with power and manufacturing plants)_______________________
Cranes and derricks— installation----------------------------------------------------Engines—installation—including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also
chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers------------------------------------------------Galvanized iron tanks (complete)—installation of, for irrigation or
for agricultural purposes—with earth or masonry foundations (no
tank building). (Classify as Boilers (steam)— installation.)
Leather belting—installation and repair____________________________
Mailing and addressing machines—installation_____________________
Millwright work—erection and repair of machinery— including driv­
ers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers_
_

3722
3734
3721

3726
3728
3701
3720
3700
3727

3732
3736
3724

Employees of assured engaged in millwright work on premises of the as­
sured must be included in the governing classification.
Pumps—installation _______________________________________________ 3729
Refrigerating machinery— installation_______________________________ 3723
Group 394. Plumbing and Heating.
Automatic sprinkler—installation____________________________________ 5188
Furnaces (heaters or stoves)— installation-------------------5181




REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.

57

Manual
Group 394. Plumbing and Heating—Concluded.
number.
Gas, steam, and hot water apparatus fitting—including installation
of ventilating plants— shop and outside____________________________ 5182
Plumbing—including house connections—including shop pay roll, if
any__________ ^____________________________________________________ 5183
Soap dispensers— installation and inspection__________________________5180
Steam pipes or boilers—applying cork, asbestos, and other nonconduct­
ing materials to same------------------------------------------------------------------- 5184
Thermostats— installation____________________________________________5186
Vacuum-cleaning systems—installation_______________________________ 5185
Group 395. Electrical Equipment.
Electrical equipment— installation and repairs within buildings and
on buildings incidental to such inside work, including the making
of service connections for such work—excluding the installation of
equipment in power plants__________________________________________5190
Group 396. Marble, Tile, and Plaster Blocks (within buildings).
Fireproofing—tile construction and repair___________________________
Floor surfacing by machines operated by electricity_________________
Mantle setting and repairing (n. p. d .)______________________________
Marble and stone setting— inside construction only__________________
Mosaic work________________________________________________________
Plaster block partitions (not fireproof tile )__________________________
Soda-water fountains—installation and repair_______________________
Tile installation_______________________________________ :_____________
Group 397. Carpentry Work (within buildings).
Carpentry—installation of interior trim, such as builders’ finish and
cabinetwork---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ladders—installation-----------Lathing____________________________________________________________
Parquet-floor laying-------------------------------------------------------------------------Refrigerators— erection, installation, and repair_____________________
Showcases—erection and installation------------------------------------------------Stair building (wooden)— erection (n. p. d .)________________________
Wall board—installation (no plaster board).
(Classify as Car­
pentry— installation of interior trim.)
Waether-strips— installation------------------------------------------------------------Window screens—installation_______________________________________
Group 398. Plastering, Painting, and Decorating (within buildings).
Painting and decorating—away from shop____________________________
Paper hanging--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Plaster board— erection away from shop____________________________
Plastering (n. o. c .) ------------------------------------------------------------------------Sign painting or lettering-----------------------------------------------------------------Group 399. Paving (outside).
Asphalt laying—street or sidewalk—including shop and yard________
Concrete work—floors or pavement of artificial stone or concrete, not
reinforced or self-bearing__________________________________________
Light prisms— installation and repair_______________________________
Paving (n. o. c .)—including yards---------------------------------------------------Sidewalk ca lk in g __________________________________________________




5343
5346
5340
5341
5345
5347
5342
5344

5437
5432
5443
5436
5440
5435
5431

5434
5442
5490
5491
5481
5480
5483
5503
5502
5501
5500
5504

58

B U L L E T IN

OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

DIVISION E.— TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES.
SCHEDULE 1.—STEAM RAILROADS.
Manual
Group 410. (Undivided.)
number.
Logging railroad—operation— including maintenance and extension of
existing lines______________________________________
7100
Railroad hazard— in connection with manufacturers’ and contractors’
r is k s ______________________________________________________________ 7102
Railroad operation: Steam railroads—including ordinary maintenance
and repair of roadbed—
Shop employees__________________________________________________ 7103
All other employees__________________________ l_________________ 7101
SCHEDULE 2.—ELECTRIC RAILROADS.
Group 420. Street Railroads.
Railroad operation:
*
Street railroads—cable— including ordinary maintenance and re­
pair of roadbed—
Shop employees______________________________________________ 7124
All other employees_________________________________________7121
Street railroads—electric—all systems, not interurban—including
ordinary maintenance and repair of roadbed—
Shop employees______________________________________________ 7126
All other employees__________________________________________7122
Street railroads—electric—interurban— including ordinary mainte­
nance and repair of roadbed—
Shop employees______________________________________________ 7123
All other employees_________________________________________7120
Group 421. Elevated Railroads.
Railroad operation: Elevated railroads— including ordinary mainte­
nance and repair of roadbed—
Shop employees----------------------------------------------------------------------------7141
All other employees______________________________________________ 7140
SCHEDULE 3.—CARTAGE AND STORAGE.
Group 430. Drivers and Stablemen.
Breweries— drivers and drivers’ helpers______________________________ 7215
Cab companies (horse)— including all except clerical office employees. 7202
Coal merchants—receiving or shipping by water or by land and water,
including stevedoring operations when performed by the assured
by means of power machinery—drivers and drivers’ helpers________ 7212
Coal merchants—receiving or shipping by land, but not by water,
where power machinery is used either for loading or unloading or
spotting cars—drivers and drivers’ helpers_________________________ 7213
Coal merchants—receiving or shipping by land or water, where no
power machinery is used for loading or unloading or spotting cars— >
,
drivers and drivers’ helpers------------------------------------------------------------ 7214
Drivers and drivers’ helpers________________________________________ 7205
The rate for this classification is not applicable to those classifications
which specifically provide for inclusion of pay roll of drivers and drivers’
helpers at the rate for such classifications.
Horse shows—in halls, theaters, or auditoriums, exclusively—stable­
men ______________________________________________________________ 7200
Ice manufacturing—drivers and drivers’ helpers_____________ _______7216




KEPORT OF C O M M IT TE E 'O N STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.
Group 430. Drivers and Stablemen— Concluded.

59

Manual
number.

Livery and boarding stables— including drivers and drivers’ helpers
(not sales stables)________________________________________________ 7201
Malt houses—drivers and drivers’ helpers___________________________ 7217
Omnibus companies (horse)—including all except clerical office em­
ployees ___________________________________________________________ 7204
Riding academies, clubs, and schools—porters, waiters, grooms, stable­
men, and all other employees engaged in the care, custody, and
maintenance of stables and animals—excluding extraordinary addi­
tions, alterations, or repairs)_____________________________________ 7207
Stablemen (not livery, boarding, or sales stables)__________________ 7200
Truckmen— general trucking (n. o. c .)— including all such employees
as drivers, drivers’ helpers, chauffeurs, chauffeurs’ helpers, stable­
men, blacksmiths, repairmen, and riggers—excluding only clerical
office employees and storage warehouse employees, who must take
the proper manual rates applicable therefor_______________________ 7208
This classification shall not be available for truckmen engaged exclusively

in any of the operations where the classification specifically includes the pay
roll of drivers and drivers’ helpers, such as the handling of boilers, building
materials, coal, garbage, refuse and ashes, ice, junk and scrap iron, machinery,
railway iron, safe moving, structural iron and steel.

Truckmen—drivers, helpers, and stablemen only— excluding black­
smiths, repairmen, rigging and the trucking of boilers, building ma­
terial, coal, garbage, refuse and ashes, ice, junk and scrap iron,
machinery, railway iron, safe moving, structural iron and steel
(n. p. d .)________________________________________________________ 7211
Group 431. Chauffeurs.

Automobile livery, garages, and taxicab stations—chauffeurs_________ 7382
Breweries—chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers_______________________ 7388
Chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers—commercial------------------------------- 7380
This rate is not applicable to those classifications which specifically provide
for inclusion of pay roll of chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers at the rate for
such classifications.

Coal merchants—receiving or shipping by water or by land and
water, including stevedoring operations when performed by the as­
sured by means of power machinery—chauffeurs and chauffeurs’
h elp ers_______________________________________
Coal merchants—receiving or shipping by land but not by water where
power machinery is used either for loading or unloading or spotting
cars—chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers__________________________
Coal merchants—receiving or shipping by land or water where no
power machinery is used for loading or unloading or spotting cars—
chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers_______________________________
Ice manufacturing—chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers______________
Malt houses—chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers____________________

7385

7386

7387
7389
7390

Group 432. Express Companies (operation).

Express companies—urban or suburban (including the hazard of rail­
road transportation)— including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also
chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers_______________________________ 7361
Forwarding agents—packing, handling, and shipping merchandise on
docks, railroad platforms—no stevedore work (n. p. d .)----------------- 7360
Freight handlers (n. o. c .)—not loading or unloading vessels; not rail­
road employees. (Classify as Forwarding agents.)




60

B U L L E T IN

OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
Manual

Group 433. Storage and Warehousing.

number.

Cold storage warehouses— operation________________________________
Storage—baled cotton (no compressing or ginning)---------------------------Storage—fu rn itu re ------1____________________________________________
Storage— general merchandise (n. o. c .) _____________________________
Warehouse—private—mercantile— used exclusively for storing surplus
stock of assured— in buildings which are entirely separated from
the store or other sales place_____________________________________
For compensation coverage charge the rates applicable to the risk with
which the warehouse is connected.
Warehousing—general merchandise (n. o. c .)________________________

8291
8290
8293
8292

8294

8292

Group 434. Ice Harvesting.

Ice harvesting and storing only— including drivers and drivers’
helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers___________________ 9630
Group 435. Grain Elevators.

Grain elevators—floating—operation only____________________________ 8300
Grain elevators—line or terminal— operation.-._______________________ 8301
Group 436. Refrigerator Cars.

%

Refrigerator cars—loading and unloading and caring for freight in
cars during transit----------------------------------------------------------------------- 7340
Group 437. Oil Distributing.

Oil distributing—excluding gasoline supply stations_________________ 8350

m

Group 438. Garages.

Automobile livery, garages, and taxicab stations—employees of garage,
excluding chauffeurs and clerical office employees_________________ 8380
Automobile dealers with or without garage and auto garages________ 8380
Entire remuneration of all employees, not excepting clerical (including execu­
tive officers whose duties expose them to any operative hazard of the business)
must be included without division. The actual remuneration of such executive
officers and salesmen must be included in the pay roll, but not in excess of $1,500
per annum per officer or salesman.

Rubber-tire dealers—sale, repair, and vulcanizing, including adjust­
ment of tire to vehicles away from premises of assured____________ 8382
Group 439. Gasoline Supply Stations.

Gasoline and oil supply stations— operation (for supplying automo­
biles and motor boats)—minimum premium per location $25_______ 8390
Group 440. Riggers and Safe Movers.

Bells (tow er)—installation__________________________________________ 9532
Rigging (not ship or boat)—including drivers and drivers’ helpers,
also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’helpers_____________________________ 9530
Safe moving—including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs
and chauffeurs’ helpers___________________________________________ 9531
Group 441. Horseshoeing.

#Blacksmithing—shoeing_____________________________________________ 9590
SCHEDULE 4.— STOCKY ARDS.
Group 450. (Undivided.)

Cattle dealers—not operating stockyards—not live-stock shipping
(n. p. d .)-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Live-stock commission merchants and salesmen (not cattle dealers) —
including work in stockyards but not operation of stockyards (no
loading and unloading o f cattle)__________________________________
Live-stock shipping (n. p. d .)________________ :_______________________
Sales stables— including exhibition and delivery of horses___________
Stockyards without railroad entry—with or without slaughtering____




8282

8284
8281
8280
8285

REPORT OF C O M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.

61

SCHEDULE
TRANSPORTATION BY WATER.
Manual
Group 460. Vessels.
number.
Ferries_____________________________________________________________ 7006
Great Lakes steamers_______________________________________________ 7000
Great Lakes tugboats________________________________________________ 7001
Inland lake vessels—excluding vessels on the Great Lakes__________ 7007
Ocean and coastwise steamers______________________________________ 7004
Ocean and coastwise tugboats_______________________________________ 7005
River and sound steamers__________________________________________ 7003
River and sound tugboats____________________________________________ 7008
Supply boats— supplying water or gasoline for shipping______________ 7002
Group 461. Sailing Vessels.
Great Lakes sailing vessels__________________________________________ 7041
Ocean and coastwise sailing vessels_________________________________ 7042
Group 462. Fisheries.
Fisheries—river only— including work on floats and on shore— includ­
ing, if any, curing and packing fish and repairing nets and boats_ 7071
_
Fishing vessels—motor boats and tugs only—engaged in net fishing
and lobster hauling_______________________________________________ 7068
Fishing vessels—motor boats and tugs only (not seagoing)—engaged
in net fishing and lobster hauling__________________________________ 7067
Fishing vessels (n. o. c .) ___________________________________________ 7072
Fishing vessels—pound fishing only—including work on shore of pack­
ing, curing, and shipping fish, and repairing nets and boats________ 7066
Oystermen—planting and harvesting, and operation of boats— includ­
ing entire remuneration o f allemployees____________________________ 7073
Group 463. Barges, Lighters, and Canal Boats.
%
Barges and lighters (n. o. c .)—operation_____________________________ 7060
Barges and lighters— ocean going—operation__________________r____ 7061
Boat livery— limited to boats under 15 tons, including laying up of
boats and putting in commission, used for fishing and pleasure
purposes__________________________________________________________ 7063
Vessels of 15 tons and over should be written at regular rates for steamers
and sailing vessels.
Canal boats and scows—operation___________________________________ 7065
Yachts—private— either sail or power----------------------------------------------- 7059
Group 464. Stevedoring.
Steamship agencies—wharf employees, including stevedores and freight
handlers__________________________________________________________ 7302
Stevedoring—handling coal exclusively--------------------------------------------- 7306
Stevedoring—handling coal, grain, salt, and other merchandise from
lighters to steamships by means of mechanical conveyors only
(n. p. d .)--------------------------7303
Stevedoring—handling fruit, not general freight (n. p. d .)__________ 7305
Stevedoring—handling general freights—seagoing and lake vessels____ 7300
Stevedoring—handling ore exclusively_______________________________ 7307
Stevedoring—river and sound steamers----------------7304
Group 465. Weighing and Tallying.
Steamship agencies—wharf employees (clerks and tallymen only when
stevedoring work is done by assured)-------------------------------------------- 8703
Steamship agencies—wharf employees (clerks and tallymen only when
stevedoring work is let out by contract)------- —------------------------------ 8704




62

B U L L E T IN

OF TH E BUBEAU OF LABOB STATISTICS,

Group 465. Weighing and Tallying— Concluded.

number.

Stevedoring—tallymen and checking clerks engaged in connection with
stevedoring w ork _________________________________________________ 8703
Weighers and samplers o f merchandise on vessels and docks and at
railroad stations and warehouses— including mending and repacking
of damaged containers, if any (no operation of warehouses; no
stevedoring)______________________________________________________ 8705
Weighers on docks—when no stevedoring is done by assured_________ 8702
Group 466. Marine Wrecking.

Wrecking—marine— includingsalvage operations (no blasting)_______ 6890
SCHEDULE 6.—PUBLIC UTILITIES (NOT TRANSPORTATION).
Group 470. Electric Light and Power.

Cable (electric)—placing of same in conduits or subways____________
Conduits—placing electric cable or wire therein (no conduit con­
struction)________________________________________________________
Electric apparatus—erection and repair work only, including the
making of service connections and the installation of equipment in
power plants— excluding erection of poles and stringing of wires_
_
Electric light and power line construction work—excluding transmis­
sion lines not intended for local distribution (n. p. d .)____________
Electric light and power line construction work—exclusively on trans­
mission lines not intended for local distribution__________________
Electric light and power companies— operation, maintenance, exten­
sion of lines, and making of service connections__________________
Electric light and power companies—operation, maintenance, and ex­
tension of transmission lines not intended for local distribution_____

7536
7536

7535
7534
7530
7531
7532

Tbe"*two preceding classifications require that all pay roll, including that
expended for line construction, shall be subiect to the rate of the classifi­
cation unless the assured maintains an entirely separate department for
installing electrical equipment which is operated by a separate set of employ­
ees, who are at no time engaged in connection with the operation of the
power plant in any capacity. In such cases the pay roll of such employees
shall be separately stated at the manual rates for the kind of installation
work performed.
Under no circumstances shall this rule be interpreted to mean that the
pay roll of the linemen may take any rate other than the operative rate
of the plant.
If manufacturing or mercantile plants, insured at the manufacturing or
mercantile rates applicable thereto, are engaged in the generating of elec­
tricity and supplying the same, or any part thereof, to other plants or build­
ings, the manufacturing or mercantile rate applicable to the plant or location
covered shall be applied to all pay roll in that plant, including the pay roll
engaged in the generation and distribution of the electric current, and, in
addition thereto, there shall be charged as an extra rate upon that portion
ot the pay roll actually engaged in the generation and distribution of the
electric current, including the maintenance of the equipment, a rate equal to
50 per cent of the rates for the two preceding classifications. This rule shall
not apply to public-service or public-utilities plants, nor to any plant having
for its sole or principal purpose the generation and distribution of electric
current.
Group 471. Telegraph and Telephone.

Fire alarm systems—municipal construction_________________________ 7602
Telegraph and telephone companies—operation, maintenance, exten­
sion of lines, and making of service connections___________________ 7600
Telegraph and telephone construction________________________________ 7601




REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE OK STATISTICS AND IK SU R A K C E COST.

Group 472. Natural Gas.
Natural gas production.
group 473, below.)

( Classify as Gas works—operation.

63

Manual
number.
See

Group 473. Gas Works.
Gas works— including operation of gas house, maintenance of existing
works and mains, making of house connections and installation, in­
spection, and repair of equipment on consumers’ premises_________
Group 474. Waterworks.
Waterworks—operations only (no construction w ork )_______________
Group 475. Steam Heating or Power Companies.
Steam heating or power companies (not electric)— operation of plant
only (no construction w ork )_____________________________________
Group 476. Garbage Works and Sewage-Disposal Plants.
Garbage works—reduction or incineration of garbage or offal________
Municipal sewage-disposal plants—operation (construction work to
be covered separately at manual rates)___________________________
Sewage-disposal plants— care and maintenance— excluding construc­
tion work_________________________________________________________
Group 477. Pneumatic-Tube Companies (operation).
Pneumatic-tube companies—operation_______________________________
Group 478. Irrigation Works.
Irrigation works—operation and maintenance, including ordinary ex­
tension of laterals________________________________________________
Group 479. Crematories.
Crematories—operation_____________________________________________

7500
7520

7570
7590
7581
7580
7620

0250
9650

DIVISION F.— TRADE.
SCHEDULE 1.—OFFICES.
Group 490. (Undivided.)
Asylums— clerical office employees___________________________________ 8810
Auditors, accountants, and systematizers—clerical office employees,
traveling auditors, accountants, and office systematizers___________ 8803
Automobile livery garages and taxicab stations— clerical office em­
ployees ____________________________________________________________8810
Clerical office employees______________________________________________ 8810
Colleges and schools—clerical office employees________________________ 8810
Draftsmen (engaged exclusively in that profession)—office duty only
8811
Horse shows— in halls, theaters, or auditoriums exclusively— clerical
office employees___________________________________________________'8810
Hospitals—clerical office employees__________________________________ 8810
Mailing and addressing companies__________________________________ 8800
Municipal, township, county, or State employees— clerical office em­
ployees ___________________________________________________________ 8802
Office buildings— clerical office employees___________________________ 8810
Public libraries—librarian, assistant librarian, and clerical office em­
ployees_____________________________________________________________8810
Public museums of art or natural history—curator, assistant curator,
and clerical office employees________________________________________8810
Public picture galleries— curator, assistant curator, and clerical office
employees__________________________________________________________8810
Railroad operation—elevated railroads—clerical officeemployees___ __8810
'Riding academies— clubs and schools—clerical officeemployees___ - ____ 8810
Steam railroads— clerical office employees____________________________ 8810




64

BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOB STATISTICS.

Group 490. (Undivided)— Concluded.

Manual
number.

Street railroads— cable— clerical office employees____________________ 8810
Street railroads—electric, all systems not interurban—clerical office
employees_____________________ ,__________________________________ 8810
Street railroads—electric, interurban— clerical office employees______ 8810
Telegraph and telephone companies— office and exchange employees
only------------------------------------------------------8901
Y. M. G. A. and Y. W. C. A. institutions— clerical office employees_____8810
SCHEDULE 2.— STORES.
Group 500. (Undivided.)

Agricultural-implement stores________________________________________8104
Automobile salesrooms (no garage or repair shop; no movement of
cars except by hand)— entire compensation of salesmen and clerical
force to be included_______________________________
8109
Butchers—meat or provision stores (no manufacturing, slaughtering,
or rendering; not Packing house products—distributing stations)_ 8003
_
Carriage depositories and salesrooms_________________________________ 8108
Cigar stores—retail-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8020
Clothing stores—retail (no manufacturing)__________________________ 8008
If any manufacturing of clothing is conducted on the premises, it should be
separately classified and rated at the manual rate for such work.

Clothing stores—wholesale (no manufacturing)_____________ ________ 8009
Department stores__________________________________________________ 8000
This classification shall apply to risks in which the following conditions
obtain :
1. The mercantile pay roll is at least $25,000 per annum.
2. The store occupies at least two (2) floors, exclusive of basement.
3. The floor area occupied, exclusive of basement, is at least 30,000
square feet.
4. Not less than four of the following classes of merchandise are sold :
Dry goods.
Musical instruments.
Clothing.
Groceries.
Furnishings.
Kitchen utensils.
Furniture.
Hardware.
Department stores where the preceding conditions do not obtain, classify
as Store risks— retail, exclusively (n. o. c.). (See page 65.)

Dry-goods stores— no manufacturing.________________________________ 8007
This classification shall apply to risks in which the following conditions
obtain:
1. The mercantile pay roll is at least $25,000 per annum.
2. The store occupies at least two (2) floors, exclusive of basement.
3. The floor area occupied, exclusive of basement, is at least 30,000
square feet.
Dry-goods stores where the conditions outlined above do not obtain,
classify as Store risks— retail, exclusively (n. o. c.). (See page 65.)

Five and ten cent stores, or stores advertising merchandise at a maxi­
mum or minimum price___________________________________________ 8050
Florists—including service away from store (not cultivating and
gardening)_______________________________________________________ 8001
Furniture dealers—store only________________________________________8015
Gas, steam, and hot-water apparatus supplies dealers (no manufactur­
ing)—shop on ly ------------------------------------------------------------------------------8112
This classification is not applicable to concerns engaged in the manufac­
of gas, steam, or hot-water apparatus.

ture




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.
Group 500. (Undivided)—Concluded.

65

Manual

number.

Hardware stores_____________________________________________________ 8010
Hide and leather dealers— goat and sheep skins_____________________ 8100
Hide and leather dealers (n. o. c .) ____________________________ ______ 8105
Iron merchants (not junk or scrap-iron or hardware dealers)________ 8106
Jewelry stores—wholesale or retail__________________________________ 8013
Machinery dealers— store only_______________________________________ 8107
Market men—including meat and provision stores (no manufacturing,
slaughtering, or rendering; not Packing house products— distrib­
uting stations)___________________________________________________ 8003
Milk dealers— store or depot only____________________________________ 8005
Packing-house products—distributing stations (n. p. d. when located on
or adjoining premises where packing-house operations are carried
o n )_______________________________________________________________ 8021
Plumbers’ supplies dealers (no manufacturing)— shop only (n. p. d.)_ 8111
Poultry dealers—wholesale and retail—with or without killing of
poultry__________ 1----------------------------------------------------------------------- 8004
Produce and commission merchants—with cold-storage facilities (not
operating refrigerating machinery) _________________________________ 8019
Seed merchants— including the operation of seed-sorting machinery_ 8102
_
Ship-chandler stores (no manufacturing)-------------------------------------------- 8101
Store risks—retail exclusively (n. o. c .) -------------------------------------------- 8017
Store risks—wholesale and retail (n. o. c .) -----------------------------------------8018
Store risks— wholesale (n. o. c .) ____________________________________ 8016
Tailor stores—retail (no manufacturing)------------------------------------------ 8008
If any manufacturing of clothing (except cutting) is conducted on the
premises it should be separately classified.

Wine and spirit merchants (no bar on premises)—liquor sold in pack­
ages on ly _________________________________________________________ 8012
Wine and spirit merchants—retail---------------------------------------------------- 8002
Wine and spirit merchants— wholesale______________________
8011
Wool merchants— including warehouse_______________________________ 8103
SCHEDULE 3.— YARDS.
Group 510. (Undivided.)

Bottle dealers—secondhand__________________________________________8212
Building-material dealers—yard work only—no secondhand materials
or lumber yard___________________________________________________ 8205
Building-material dealers—yard work only— secondhand materials—
including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauf­
feurs’ helpers------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8204
Charcoal dealers (no furnaces)---------------------------------------------------------- 8214
Coal merchants— receiving or shipping by water or by land and water,
including stevedoring operations when performed by the assured by
means of power machinery------------------------------------------------------------ 8220
Coal merchants—receiving or shipping by land but not by water where
power machinery is used for loading or unloading or spotting cars_ 8221
Coal merchants— receiving or shipping by land or water where no
power machinery is used for loading or unloading or spotting cars_ 8222
Cotton and woolen clippings dealers— new goods only, including baling
(not rag and paper stock dealers)-------------------- ----------------------------- 8211
Flour dealers (no m illing)---------------------------------------------------------------8217
38043°—Bull. 201—16-----5




66

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Goup 510. (Undivided)— Continued.

Manual
number.

Fuel and material dealers—when the risk involves handling of and
dealing in any combination of the following products, but no others,
v iz :
Coal.
If the handling of coal involves stevedoring operations performed by the
assured by means of power machinery or the use of power machinery, either
for loading or unloading or spotting cars, these classifications are not avail­
able, and the risk should be classified as Coal merchants.

Ice.
Kindling or fire wood___________________________________________ 8224
Including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’
helpers.

Fuel and material dealers—when the risk involves handling of and
dealing in any combination of the following products, and any
others, v iz :
Coal.
If the handling of coal involves stevedoring operations performed by the
assured by means of power machinery or the use of power machinery, either
for loading or unloading or spotting cars, these classifications are not avail­
able, and the risk should be classified as Coal merchants.

Kindling or fire wood.
Lumber.
Building materials.
Hay, grain, and feed--------------------------------------------------------------- 8225
Including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’
helpers.

Fuel and material dealers— when the risk involves the handling of and
dealing in any combination of the following products, but no others,
v iz :
Building materials.
Lumber.
Hay, grain, and feed.
Agricultural implements.
Grain elevator.
Seed______________________________________ _____________________ 8226
Including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers.
E x c e p tio n .— When the combination consists of agricultural-implement dealers
and seed merchants only, classify as Agricultural-implement stores. (See page
64, group 500.)

Hay, straw, and feed dealers________________________________________8215
Ice dealers—including the taking of ice from storage— excluding
harvesting and storing—including drivers and drivers’ helpers,
also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers___________________________ 8203
Junk dealers—shop and outside (no wrecking of buildings; no blast­
ing)—including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and
chauffeurs’ helpers________________________________________________ 8260
Junk dealers—shop and yard only (no blasting)—including drivers
and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers_____ 8261
Lumber and fuel yards and building-material dealers, etc. "(Classify
as Fuel and material dealers.)
Lumber yards— commercial yards only (no mill hazard)____________ 8207
Lumber yards—not commercial yards—to take highest rate for any
mill connected therewith.




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.
Group 510. (Undivided)— Concluded.

67

Manual
number.

Packing and unpacking furniture and other household utensils_____8213
Paper and paper-stock dealers. (Classify as Paper-stock and rag
dealers.)
Paper-stock dealers— handling new paper waste or new cloth clipping
(no handling of junk, old rags, or old paper)___________________ 8208
Paper-stock and rag dealers_______________________________________ 8200
Produce dealers— buying, packing, or otherwise preparing general
produce for shipment and transportation, using stores or buildings
temporarily, but operating no warehouses, no railway operation,
and not operating refrigerator cars or caring for freight in transit- 8209
Rubber-stock dealers—receiving, handling, baling, and shipping old
rubber stock (n. p. d .)-------------------------------------------------------------------- 8210
Sawdust dealers. (Classify as Hay, straw, and feed dealers. See
page 66.)
Scrap-iron and junk dealers—shop and outside (no wrecking of build­
ings; no blasting)—including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also
chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers------------------------------------------------- 8260
Scrap-iron and junk dealers— shop and yard only (no blasting)—in­
cluding drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and chauffeurs’
helpers__________________________________________________________ 8261
Wood yards—handling wood exclusively—commercial yards only (no
mill hazard) _____________________________________________________ 8206
SCHEDULE 4.— SALESMEN AND AGENTS (OUTSIDE).
Group 520. (Undivided.)

Auctioneers—to cover wherever goods are auctioned (not live-stock
sales stables)____________________________________________________
Automatic slot or vending machines—operation_____________________
News agents_______________________________________________________
Photography— outside work (not producing motion pictures)-------------Piano tuning— away from shop_____________________________________
Real estate agencies—employees engaged outside of office, including
collectors (no construction w ork )-------------------------------------------------Salesmen (outside), collectors, and messengers---------------------------------

8090
8743
8745
8746
8744
8741
8742

This classification does not include as salesmen, collectors, or messengers
any employees who, as a part of their duty, deliver the goods or merchandise
handled, treated, or sold.
If employees who deliver goods use automobiles or motorcycles for solicita­
tion, collection, and delivery, they shall be classified as chauffeurs. If such
employees use teams they shall be classified as drivers. If such employees use
bicycles (not motorcycles), public means of transportation, or walk, they
shall be rated at the governing classification of the risk in which their employ­
ment occurs.
D IV IS IO N G.— S E R V IC E .
SCHEDULE 1.— DOMESTIC.
Group 530. Care, Custody, and Maintenance of Buildings.

Apartment hotel and hotel apartments— including laundry----------------Apartment houses---------------------------------------------------------------------------Asylums— all employees except clerical and professional____________
Buildings—office or mercantile—contractors for janitor work, in­
cluding cleaning and caretaking, also the operation of elevators,
heating, lighting, and power apparatus on the premises (n. p. d .)—
This classification does not apply to contractors whose sole or principal
business is window cleaning.




9005
9004
9040

9001

68

B U L L E T IN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

Group 530. Care, Custody, and Maintenance of Buildings— Continued.

Manual

number.

Buildings—private residences or private estates— contractors for
janitor work, including cleaning and caretaking, care of lawns, side­
walks, and furnaces and all other work incidental to the care, cus­
tody, and maintenance of the property— excluding extraordinary
additions, alterations, or repairs__________________________________ 9002
This classification does not apply to the owner or tenant hiring labor direct.

Churches— all employees engaged in care, custody, and maintenance
of premises, including elevator attendants—excluding extraordinary
additions, alterations, or repairs_________________________________ 9104
Colleges and schools—all employees except clerical, professors, and
teachers_______________ : ----------------------------------------------------------------9101
Dance halls— including dance floors, galleries, and instruction rooms—
all employees engaged in care, custody, and maintenance of prem­
ises, including elevator attendants—excluding extraordinary addi­
tions, alterations, or repairs______________________________________ 9103
Dog shows. (Classify as Horse shows.)
Dwellings—of every description, when occupied by three or more fami­
lies, and buildings occupied partly for residence purposes by one or
# more families and partly for store, office, or mercantile purposes— all
employees engaged in care, custody, and maintenance of premises,
including elevator attendants—excluding extraordinary additions,
alterations, or repairs-------------------------------------------------------------------- 9003
Exhibitions (n. o. c .)—employees engaged in care, custody, and main­
tenance of premises, including elevator attendants—excluding ex­
traordinary additions, alterations, or repairs_______________________9102
Halls (n. o. c .)— all employees engaged in care, custody, and mainte­
nance of premises, including elevator attendants—excluding extraor­
dinary additions, alterations, or repairs:
When alcoholic liquors are served on the premises______________ 9110
When no alcoholic liquors are served on the premises___________ 9103
Horse shows— in halls, theaters, or auditoriums exclusively—all em­
ployees engaged in care, custody, and maintenance of premises, in­
cluding elevator attendants—excluding extraordinary additions, al­
terations, or repairs-----------------------------------------------------------------------9102
Hospitals— all employees except clerical and professional____________ 9040
Mercantile or manufacturing premises variously occupied by persons
other than the owner (n. o. c .)—owner’s risk only—including ele­
vator attendants and all other employees engaged in care, custody,
and maintenance of premises—excluding extraordinary additions,
alterations, or repairs--------------------------------------------- :______________ 9006
Office buildings—including elevator attendants and all other em­
ployees engaged in care, custody, and maintenance of premises—ex­
cluding extraordinary additions, alterations, or repairs__________ 9007
Parks or buildings (n. o. c .)—used for exhibition, convention, or
show purposes—owner’s risk only—all employees engaged in care,
custody, and maintenance of premises, including elevator attend­
ants—excluding extraordinary additions, alterations, or repairs___ 9102
Public libraries—all employees engaged in care, custody, and main­
tenance of premises, including elevator attendants—excluding extra­
ordinary additions, alterations, or repairs_________________________ 9104




REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE OK STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.

Group 530. Care, Custody, and Maintenance of Buildings— Concluded.

69

Manual
number.

Public museums of art or natural history—all employees engaged in
care, custody, and maintenance of premises, including elevator at­
tendants—excluding extraordinary additions, alterations, or repairs- 9104
Public picture galleries— all employees engaged in care, custody, and
maintenance of premises, including elevator attendants—excluding
extraordinary additions, alterations, or repairs------------------------------- 9104
Sanatoriums. (Classify as Hospitals.)
Schools. (Classify as Colleges and Schools. See page 68, group 530.)
Tenements_________________________________________________________ 9008
Vacuum cleaning—by means of portable air suction cleaning ma­
chines— including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs and
chauffeur’s helpers-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9010
Window cleaning____________________________________________________ 9170
Group 531. Care of Grounds.

Cemetery companies— all employees except clerical office (no blasting)- 9220
Private estates— all employees---------------------------------------------------------- 9221
Group 532. Hotels, Restaurants, and Clubs.

Athletic clubs______________________________________________________
Baths (n. o. c .) ____________________________________________________
Catering—including services away from store________________________
Clubhouses (not athletic, country, or yacht clu b)____________________
Commissary— cooks, waiters, and other employees engaged in furnish­
ing board for employees in connection with manufacturing, lumber­
ing, or contracting risks (not exposed to mechanical hazard of such
r is k )_____________________________________________________________
Country clubs (not available to parks or other grounds where ad­
mission is charged) _______________________________________________
Hotels—excluding laundry__________________________________________

9065
9064
9069
9072

9078
9066
9050

Hotels which operate in connection therewith cottages, gymnasiums, or
grounds for recreation or sports shall be classified as Country clubs.

Lunch rooms_______________________________________________________
Lunch wagons_______________________________________________
Restaurants_________________________________________________________
Yacht clubs________________________________________________________
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. institutions— all employees except cleri­
cal, teachers, and preachers______________________________________

9070
9077
9071
9067
9062

SCHEDULE 2.—PERSONAL.
Group 540. Theaters.

Motion-picture theaters—rate to apply to all employees of the
theater_______________________________
9152
Theater companies—rate applicable to players or entertainers only—
for operas, dramas, and comedies__________________________________ 9153
Theater companies— rate applicable to players or entertainers only—
for vaudeville, burlesque, farce, and continuous performance, includ­
ing incidental moving pictures_____________________________________ 9151
P rem iu m com p u ta tion "basis.— The actual remuneration of players or enter­
tainers of the two classifications preceding must be used unless the amount
exceeds $100 per week, in which event that sum shall be used as representing
the actual weekly remuneration of each player or entertainer provided that,
subject to the above limitation, the pay-roll basis for vaudeville, burlesque,
farce, and continuous-performance players shall be the amounts paid by the
theaters for each act.




70

BULLETIN OP THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

Group 540. Theaters— Concluded.

Manual
number.

Theater employees— including managers (not stage managers), boxoffice employees, ushers, and others not employed upon the stage,
but excluding care, custody, and maintenance of premises--------------- 9154
Theater employees— with stage duties or engaged in care, custody, or
maintenance of premises—excluding extraordinary additions, alter­
ations, or repairs_________________________________________________ 9150
Group 541. Amusements— Indoor (other than Theaters).

Billiard and bowling halls:
When alcoholic drinks are served on the premises______________
When no alcoholic drinks are served on the premises_____________
Billiard halls (no bowling alleys) :
When alcoholic drinks are served on the premises______________
When no alcoholic drinks are served on the premises_____________
Bowling halls:
When alcoholic drinks are served on the premises_______________
When no alcoholic drinks are served on the premises_____________
Dance halls— including dance floors, galleries, and instruction rooms—
instructors, musicians, and attendants____________________________
Shooting galleries (not rifle ranges)________________________________
Skating rinks—ice or roller-------------------------------------------------------------

9085
9084
9087
9086
9083
9082
9080
9088
9081

Group 542. Amusements— Outdoor.

Amusement parks. (Classify as Exhibitions.)
Baseball clubs and parks— all employees engaged in care, maintenance,
and operation of grounds and care of teams, including ticket sellers
and collectors, trainers, managers (not playing managers), bat boys,
and special officers_______________________________________________________ 9182
B a seb all clu bs and parks— all players on sa la ry list o f assured, w hether
regu la rly p la yed or not, in clu d in g u m pires___________ -________________ 9181
B ath hou ses and ba th in g p a villion s— b ea ch ______________________________ 9183
E x h ib ition s (n. o. c . ) — em ployees engaged in care, operation , and
m aintenance o f m erry-go-roun ds, sw ings, roller coasters, and oth er
am usem ent d evices— in clu d in g a ll em ployees con nected w ith such
am usem ent devices, in clu d in g ticket sellers and tick et co lle cto rs _____ 9180
Group 543. Individual Service.

B a rb e r sh op s------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9580
H aird re ssin g ( f o r w o m e n )------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9583
M a n ic u r in g _________________________________________________________________ 9584
SCHEDULE 3.—PROFESSIONAL.
Group 550. Inspectors and Appraisers.

A p p ra isin g o f buildin gs, th eir contents, and m a ch in ery___________________ 8721
A u d itors, a ccou ntants, and system atizers— fa c to r y cost s y stem a tiz ers. 8722
B o ile r in sp ectin g___________________________________________________________ 8731
B o ile r sca lin g __________ T___________________________________________________ 8782
E leva tor in sp ectin g____________________________________________________.____ 8730
In sp ection o f m ercantile, m an u factu rin g, and m arine risk s f o r in su r­
ance and v a lu a tion p u rposes____________________________________________ 8720
In sp ectors— gra in and fr u it at ra ilro a d or steam ship term in als.
(C la ss ify as W eig h ers an d sam plers o f m erchan dise. See pa ge 62,
grou p 465.)




EEPOET OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSUEANCE COST.

71

Manual
Group 551. Institutions.

number.

A sylu m s— p rofession a l em p loyees_________________________________________
C hurches— re ctors and assistants— orga n ist and m em bers o f ch o ir____
D entists— in clu d in g em p loyees____________________________________________
H osp ita ls— p rofession a l em ployees________________________________________
H osp ita ls— v eterin a ry ____________________________________________________

8830
8840
8832
8830
8831

Group 552. Teachers and Instructors.

C olleges and s ch o o ls :
A g ricu ltu ra l— p rofessors and tea ch ers----------------------------------------------D om estic science— p rofessors and tea ch ers__________________________
M anual train in g— p rofessors and tea ch ers__________________________
M ilita ry — p rofessors and tea ch ers___________________________________
N ot oth erw ise classified— professors and tea ch ers___________________
V eterin a ry— p rofessors and tea ch ers------ _-----------------------------------------Y. M. C. A. and Y . W . C. A. in stitu tions— teach ers and preach ers—

8860
8861
8862
8863
8865
8864
8866

Group 553. Undertakers.

U n d e r t a k e r s _______________________________________________________________

9620

Group 554. Motion Pictures.

M otion pictu res— p rod u ction o f, in stu dios and outside, in clu d in g all
operation s up to th e developm ent o f n ega tives_________________________9610
P rem iu m com p u ta tion b a sis .— The actual remuneration of players or enter­
tainers must be used unless the amount exceeds $100 per week, in which event
that sum shall be used as representing the actual weekly remuneration of each
player or entertainer.

SCHEDULE 4.— M UNICIPAL AND PUBLIC.
Group 560. (Undivided.)

Detective agencies. (Classify as Policemen.)
Firemen—minimum premium $10 per man per annum______________ 7701
Fire patrol and salvage corps (not salvageoperations)_______________ 7700
Fumigation of buildings______________________________________________ 9210
Garbage collecting—refuse and ashes (excluding garbage reduction
or fertilizer plants)— including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also
chauffeurs and chauffeurs’ helpers_________________________________9403
Lam plighting______________________________________________________ 9405
Municipal, township, county, or State employees—employees, not
laborers, workmen, or mechanics, not engaged in manual labor and
not engaged in clerical office duties (n. o. c .) _____________________ 9410
This classification includes employees engaged in laboratory work, inspectors
of the board of health, electrical inspector, building inspectors, and similar
occupations.

Policemen—minimum premium $10 per man perannum_____________
Scavengers—including drivers and drivers’ helpers, also chauffeurs
and chauffeurs’ helpers____________________________________________
Sewer cleaning_____________________________________________________
Snow and ice removal (no blasting)________________________________
Street cleaning_____________________________________________________




7720
9403
9407
9400
9402




CLASSIFIC ATIO N OF AC C ID E N T C A U SE S .1
G E N E R A L C A U S E C L A S S IF IC A T IO N .
I. M achinery.
II. Boilers and steam -pressure apparatus.
I I I . Vehicles.
IV . Explosives, electricity , fires, and hot and corrosive substances.
V. Poisonous substances.
V I. Falls o f persons.
V II.
Stepping on or strik in g against objects.
V III. F a llin g objects.
IX . Objects bein g handled.
X . H and tools.
X I. Anim als.
X II.
M iscellaneous causes.
L M ACHINERY.
A.

Prime Movers.

1. Steam engines.
2. Gas or gasoline engines.
ote — Include all internal
3. Electric motors and dynamos.
4. Compressed-air motors.
5. Water motors.
6. Other prime movers.

N

B.

combustion engines.

Power-Transmission Apparatus.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

C.

.

Shafts.
Shaft collars and couplings.
Set screws, ke^s, and bolts.
Belts and pulleys.
Chains and sprockets.
Ropes, cables, and drums.
Cogs, cams, gears, and friction wheels.
ote —Accidents upon gears, belts, pulleys, etc., which are an integral
part of individual working machines should be charged to the specific
machine.

N

.

Power-Working Machinery.
N ote.—The committee

believes that power-working machines should be
classified by industry, and that within each industry group the princi­
pal types of working machines should be grouped by operative hazard.
The committee is unable to undertake such a classification at present
because of the lack of time in which to make the special study essen­
tial to such a technical classification.
Pending the development of such a classification the committee calls
attention to the list of working machines prepared by the Workmen’s
Compensation Service Bureau. This list is exhaustive, and the com­
mittee believes that each industrial accident board or commission can
select therefrom such working machines as may be of importance.2

1 For explanation of classification of causes, see page 12 et seq.
2 An example of a tentative classification of working machines, by industry, is that
used by the New York Industrial Commission, printed as Appendix A.




73

74

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

D. Hoisting Apparatus and Conveyors.

1. Elevators (not construction elevators).
(а) Cable, breaking.
(б) Cable, unwinding.
( c j Cable, caught by.
(d) Counterweight, struck by.
(e) Machinery, breaking.
( / ) Machinery, caught in.
(g ) Car, caught between floor and.
(h) Car, caught between shaft side and.
(i) Car, caught between gate and.
O') Car, struck by, in pit.
( k ) Car, struck by, on top of.
(Z) Car, struck by, elsewhere.
(m ) Fall of person into shaft, from floor.
(n) Fall of person into shaft, from car.
(o) Objects falling down shaft, from floor.
(p ) Objects falling down shaft, from car.
( q ) Gates, n. o. c.
t
(r ) All other.
2. Cranes—traveling.
(a) Car, striking person.
(&) Cable, catching person.
(c) Load, swinging.
(d) Load, lowering.
(e) Load falling, broken cable.
( / ) Load falling, broken machinery.
(g) Load falling, hitch slipping.
(h) Objects falling from bucket or clam.
(i) Falls from crane or crane track (not in erecting or rigging).
( / ) All other.
3. Derricks.
4. Construction hoists and elevators (not derricks).
5. Escalators.
6. Mine cages, skips, buckets, and self-acting inclined planes.
7. Blocks and tackles, windlasses, capstans, and winches, n. o. c.
8. Hay forks, derricks, and stackers.
9. Conveyors.
ote Accidents due to mine cages, etc., should be analyzed in the same
way as accidents due to elevators, and derrick accidents in the same
way as crane accidents.

N

E.

.—

Miscellaneous Machinery.

1. Pumps.
2. Fans and blowers.
3. All other.
The committee recommends that machine accidents should be further classified
by manner of occurrence and part o f machine, as follow s:
(a)

Manner o f occurrence, machine accidents.
( l ) Adjusting machine, tool, or work.
(2) Starting, stopping, or operating machines.
(3) Cleaning or oiling machine.




BEPOBT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSUBANCE COST.

75

(4) Repairing machine.
(5) Breaking of machine or tool.
4' T6) Flying objects.
(7) All other.
(b) Part of machine on which accident occurred.
(1) Point of operation.
ote —Point of operation means that part o f machine at
which work is actually inserted and maintained during any proc­
ess of forming, cutting, shaping, or other operation.
(2) Belts.
ote — Charge to belt, gear, set screw, key, or bolt of working
machine only accidents on the drive belts, gears, set screws, etc.,
which are an integral part of that specific machine.
(3) Cranks or eccentrics.
(4) Flywheels.
(5) Gears.
(6) Set screws, keys, and bolts.
(7) Counterweights.
eneral ote — The classification o f part o f machine and manner o f occur­
rence applies as well to prime movers and hoisting or conveying machinery as
to working machines.

N

N

G

N

.

.

.

II.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

BOILERS AN D STEAM-PRESSURE APPAR ATU S.

Steam boilers, explosions of.
Steam boilers, all other causes.
Steam pipes, explosions of.
Steam pipes, all other causes.
Steam and hot water gauges, explosions of.
Steam and hot water gauges, all other causes.
Other steam-pressure apparatus, explosions of.
Other steam-pressure apparatus, all other causes.
III.

A.

VEHICLES.

Cars and Engines— Steam and Electric Railways.

1. Train wrecks.
(a) Collisions.
(b) Derailments.
2. Falls from or in.
(а) In getting on or off, In motion.
(б ) In getting on or off, at rest.
(c) While riding on, due to sudden start or stop.
( d) While riding on, due to slipping or loss of balance,
(e) While riding on, contact with overhead structure.
( / ) While riding on, contact with side structure.
(g) Falls, n. o. c.
3. Struck by or caught between.
(a) While coupling or uncoupling.
(b) While switching.
(c) While repairing cars or engines.
(d ) While repairing track.
( e ) While crossing track.
( / ) While standing or walking on track.




76

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

A . Cars and Engines— Steam and Electric Railways— Concluded,

4.

Other causes.
(a) Setting or releasing hand brakes.
(Exclude falls due to.)
(&) Objects falling from (not in loading or unloading).
(c) Objects shifting on load.
(d) All other.

B. Mine and Quarry Car*.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

Collisions.
Derailments.
Falls from, due to sudden start or stop.
Falls from riding on tail chain.
Riding on, contact with roof.
Riding on, contact with rib or side structure.
Struck by or caught between, while braking or spragging.
Struck by or caught between, while repairing track.
Struck by or caught between, while standing or walking on track.
Coal or rock falling from (not in loading or unloading).
All other.

C. Automobiles and other power vehicles.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Collisions with
Collisions with
Collisions with
Overturning.
Cranking.
Falls from.
Struck by.
Objects falling

cars or engines.
other vehicles.
stationary objects.

from (not in loading or unloading),

9. O b jects sh iftin g on load.

10.

All other.

D. Animal-drawn vehicles.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Collisions with cars or engines.
Collisions with other vehicles.
Collisions with stationary objects.
Overturning.
Whiffletrees.
Falls from.
Struck by.
O bj«2 falling from (not in loading or unloading).
ts
Objects shifting on load.
All other.
ote —All vehicle accidents due
runaways should
animals (X I-A -2 ).

N

.

E. Water transportation.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Collisions with vessels.
Collisions with other objects.
Capsizing.
Hawsers and other ropes.
All other.

F. All other vehicle*.




to

be

charged

to

REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.
IV.

77

EXPLOSIVES, ELECTRICITY, FIRES, AND HOT AND CORROSIVE SUBSTANCES.

A. Explosive substances.

1. Explosives, manufacturing and storing.
2. Explosives, transportation and handling.
3. Explosives, blasting.
(a) Premature or delayed shot.
(b) Misfires.
(c) Windy shot.
(d) Tamping.
(e) All other.
4. Dust.
5. Gas.
6. Gasoline and other petroleum products.
7. All other.
B. Electricity.
C. Conflagrations.
D. Hot Substances and Flames.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Hot water.
Asphalt, pitch, and tar.
Other hot liquids.
Molten metal, explosions of.
Molten metal or slag, all other.
Oxyacetylene or electric cutting and welding;
Flames.
All other hot objects.

E. Corrosive Substances.
V.

POISONOUS SUBSTANCES.

N ote.—In case of occupational disease or industrial poisoning it is desirable
to subdivide specifically so as to show each occupational disease or poisoning.
In the present state of knowledge in regard to the subject it is not possible
to prepare a satisfactory code.3 It must be built up as various occupational
diseases and poisonings are reported and experience is accumulated. For this
purpose it is especially desirable that detailed information should be published
rather than general groups which will conceal the exact name of the disease
or poison. The correlation of this information with industry and occupation
is also exceedingly important.
V I.
A.

FALLS OF PERSONS.

From Elevations.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Benches, boxes, chairs, and tables.
Boats, bridges, dams, docks, or gangways.
Buildings in construction or demolition.
Cranes, derricks, and hoists in erecting and rigging.
Floors, temporary.
Ladders.
Machines and boilers.
Piles.

1A tentative code for occupational diseases which has been prepared by the Work­
men’s Compensation Service Bureau, 18 Park Row, New York City, will be found to be
helpful.




78

B U L L E T IN

OF TH E BUBEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

A. From Elevations— Concluded.

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

Poles and trees.
Roofs.
Runways, balconies, and p la tform s.
Scaffolds or staging.
Stairs.
Tramways and trestles.
Windows or wall openings.
All other.

B. Into Excavations, Pits, and Shafts.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Bins and vats.
Floor openings (not eleva tor s h a ft s ),
Manholes.
Mine shafts.
Excavations, n. o. c.

C. On Level.

1. Slipping.
2. Stumbling.
3. All other.
VII.

STEPPING ON OR STRIKING AGAINST OBJECTS.

A. Stepping on Objects.

1. Nails.
2. All other sharp objects.
B. Striking Against Objects.

1. Nails.
2. Splinters or sharp p ro je ctio n s fro m walls o r stru ctures.
3. All other objects.
V III.

FALLING OBJECTS.

A . Collapse of.

1. Buildings and walls.
2. Piles (stored or piled-up materials).
3. Scaffolds or staging.
B. From Elevations.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Buildings.
Chutes, conveyors, or slides.
Machines and workbenches.
Piles.
Racks and shelves.
Runways, balconies, and platforms.
Scaffolds and staging.
Temporary floors or through floor openings (not elevator shafts),
Tramways and trestles.
Other elevations.

C. Into Excavations.

1.
2.
3.
4.

Into ditches or trenches.
Into other excavations.
Cave-ins of ditches.
Cave-ins of tunnels.
5. Cave-ins of other excavations.




REPORT OF COMMITTEE OK STATISTICS AKD IKSURAKCE COST.

79

D. In Mines and Quarries.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Falls
Falls
Falls
Falls
Falls
Falls
Falls

of coal, rock, or ore at working face.
of roof.
from pillars, walls, or slopes.
from chutes or pockets (underground),
from surface into shaft.
from or in bins.
or rolls from or on dumps.

E. Other Falling Objects.

1. Poles.
2. Trees and limbs.
3. Objects tipping over (except vehicles).
IX .

OBJECTS BEING HANDLED.

A . Heavy Objects (loading, unloading, carrying, lifting, rolling, or piling).

1. Objects dropped.
2. Objects falling from load or pile (while loading, unloading, or piling).
ote —1 refers to an object which is dropped while being handled;
2 to an object which falls after it has been placed upon the load or pile.
3. Caught or squeezed between object handled and other object.
4. Strain in lifting.
ote — Include only strains, hernias, etc., caused
excessive weight
of object handled.

N

.

N

.

by

B. Sharp Objects.

1.
2.
3.
4.

Glass.
Sheet metal.
Objects with protruding nails.
All other sharp objects (not tools),

C. Hand Trucks, Carts, and Wheelbarrows.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Collisions with persons.
Collisions with objects.
Overturning.
Objects falling from (not in loading or unloading truck, cart, etc.),
All other.
X.

1.
2.
3.
4.

HAND TOOLS.

G la n cin g o r slipp in g o f tool in use.
B rea k in g o r com in g apa rt o f tool.
F ly in g nails, chips, o r p a rticles set in m otion b y tool,
A ll other.
X I.

A.

Horses, Mules, and Oxen.

1. K ick s.
2. R u naw ays.
ote — U n der ru n a w a ys in clu d e
3. A ll oth er causes.

N

B.

AN IM ALS.

.

Other Animals.




all veh icle

a ccid en ts due

to ru naw ays.

80

B U L L E T IN

OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
XII.

MISCELLANEOUS CAUSES.

1. Flying particles (n. o. c.).
N ote.— Chips, dust, sparks, and other particles set in motion by working
machines or tools are to be charged to the specific machine or tool.
The above number relates only to nonassigned flying particles.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Doors, windows, and gates, exclusive of elevators.
Asphyxiation.
Drowning.
Heat prostration and sunstroke.
Cold, including frostbites.
Lightning.
Intentional violence of coemployee.
Intentional violence, all other.
All other.




CLASSIFIC ATIO N OF IN D U S T R IA L A C C ID E N T S B Y LO C A­
TION A N D N A T U R E OF IN JU R Y A N D E X T E N T OF D IS­
A B IL IT Y .1
The committee recommends that accidental injuries be classified by—
I. Location of injury (or part of body affected).
II. Nature of injury (meaning thereby the character of the injury sustained
at the time o f the accident).
III. Extent of disability.
IV. Degree of partial disability.
I.

LOCATION OF IN JU R Y.

A . Head.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
B.

Face and Neck.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
C.

Brain.
Eye.
Both eyes.
Internal ear.
Both internal ears.
External ear.
Skull.
Scalp.
Head (n. o. c.).
Forehead.
Eyelids.
Nose.
Cheek.
Upper jaw.
Lower jaw.
Teeth.
Tongue.
Lips and chin.
Face (n. o. c.).
Neck.

Trunk.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

Spinal cord.
Vertebrae.
Back (external).
Sternum.
Ribs.
Thorax (generally) external.
Thoracic organs, internal.
Abdomen, external.
Abdominal viscera.
Groin.
Sacrum or coccyx.
Pelvis (n. o. c.).

1 For explanation of classification by location and nature of injury and extent of dis­
ability, see page 15.

38043°—Bull. 201—16----- 6




81

82

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOB STATISTICS,

C. Trunk— Concluded.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

Anus, rectum, or perineum.
External generative organs.
Hernia, umbilical.
Hernia, inguinal.
Hernia, other.

D. Upper Extremities.

1. Scapula.
2. Clavicle.
3. Shoulder joint.
ote —
number only for dislocations o f shoulder or fractures
of head of humerus.
4. Humerus.
5. Upper arm.
6. Elbow.
7. Radius.
8. Ulna.
9. Radius and ulna.
10. Forearm.
11. Wrist.
12. Arm, general.
13. Both arms or one arm and one hand.
14. Arm and leg.
15. Hand, general.
16. Both hands.
17. Hand and foot.
18. Palm.
19. Back of hand.
20. One metacarpal.
21. Two or more metacarpals.
22. Thumb, one phalange.
23. Thumb, more than one phalange.
24. Index tinge , one phalange.
25. Index finger, more than one phalange.
26. Middle finger, one phalange.
27. Middle finger, more than one phalange.
28. Ring finger, one phalange.
29. Ring finger, more than one phalange.
30. Little finger, one phalange.
31. Little finger, more than one phalange.
32. Thumb and one finger.
33. Thumb and two or more fingers.
34. Two fingers.
35. Three fingers.
36. Four fingers.

N

E.

. Use this

Lower Extremities.

1. Hip joint.
ote —Use this number only for dislocations o f hip or fractures o f
head of femur.
2. Femur.
3. Upper leg.
4. Patella.
5. Knee, other than patella.

N

.




REPORT OF COMMITTEE O STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.
FT

83

E. Lower Extremities— Concluded.

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.

Tibia.
Fibula.
Tibia and fibula.
Lower leg.
Both legs or one leg and one foot.
Ankle.
Metatarsals.
Foot.
Both feet.
Great toe, one phalange.
Great toe, more than one phalange.
Lesser toe, one phalange.
Lesser toe, more than one phalange.
Great toe and lesser toe or toes.
20. Two or more lesser toes,,
II.

NATURE OF IN JU R Y.

1. Bruises, contusions, and abrasions.
2. Burns and scalds.
3. Concussions.
4. Cuts, punctures, and lacerations.
5. Dislocations.
6. Fractures.
7. Sprains and strains.
8. All other.
ote —In case of infection, nature of injury should be correlated with the
infection. This is especially important in cases of bruises, contusions, and
abrasions, burns and scalds, and cuts and lacerations.

N

.

III.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Fatal.
Permanent
Permanent
Permanent
Permanent

EXTENT OF D ISABILITY.

total disability— dismemberment.
total disability—other.
partial disability—dismemberment.
partial disability—other.

6. T em p ora ry tota l disa b ility.

7. Temporary partial disability.
IV.

N

.—

DEGREE OF PARTIAL DISABILITY.

ote This classification should be used only for permanent injuries not dis­
memberments, and for temporary partial disabilities. It relates only to the
degree of impairment of the specific organs or members affected.
1. 10 per cent and under.
2. 11 to 20 per cent.
3. 21 to 30 per cent.
4. 31 to 40 per cent.
5. 41 to 50 per cent.
6. 51 to 60 per cent.
7. 61 to 70 per cent.
8. 71 to 80 per cent.
9. 81 to 90 per cent.
10. 91 to 100 per cent.




84

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,
MULTIPLE INJURIES.

In case of an injury involving more than one part or one classification o f
nature of injury, as specified above, as a rule the injury should be placed
in that classification which indicates the most serious disability. I f one
or more dismemberments are involved, each should be separately listed. If
the injury is a temporary injury only, it may be charged to the general
part of the bod y; but if it is a permanent injury, the above rule should be
strictly followed.




A P P E N D IX A .
G R O U P IN G O F W O R K IN G M A C H IN E S U S E D B Y N E W Y O R K S T A T E
I N D U S T R I A L C O M M IS S IO N .

30-99

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS WORKING MACHINES.

030 Brick-making machinery (not elsewhere classified).
031
Dry pans and crushers (grinding brick).
032
Molding machines.
033
Pug mill (grinding and tempering clay).
040 Cement making machinery (n. e. c.).
041
Bag-filling machines.
050 Glassmaking machinery (n. e. c.).
051
Polishing wheels.
052
Surface grinding machines.
060 Pottery-making machinery (n. e. c.).
070 Stone cutting, rubbing, and polishing machinery (n. e. c.).
071
Gang saws.
072
Planers.
075
Stone crushers.
Rock crushers.

100
101
102
104
105

107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
114a
114b
115
116
117
118
119
120

100-219 METAL-WORKING MACHINES.
Abrasive wheels (belts).
Bursting of wheel.
Contact with wheel.
Flying objects (except bursting), including particles of wheels and
material.
Other (n. e. c.).
Bending and straightening machines.
a. Revolving rolls.
b. Screw or clamp.
Bolt and nut machines.
Cutting.
Nut tapping.
Threading.
Boring machines or mills.
Horizontal (tool moves).
Vertical (work moves).
Broaching machines.
Cleaning mills—tumblers or rumblers.
Drills (drill presses).
Radial.
Upright or gooseneck.
Forging machines.
Forging hammer.
Bradley hammer.
Helve and strop.
Bulldozers.
Eye and wrapper machines.
Upsetting machines.
Bolt machines.
Swaging machines.




86

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

G ear-cuttin g m achines.
G ear cutters.
G ear shapers.
Hammers.
126
B oa rd drop.
C ylin der.
127
Steam .
128
A ir.
129
E lectric.
130
S cra p b reaker.
131
Spring.
132
Indefinite.
Lathes.
133
B in d in g and co il w in d in g lathes.
134
E n gin e lathe.
P recision .
135
Speed lathe.
T u rre t lathe.
136
H orizon ta l.
137
V ertica l.
138
W h eel lathe.
139
U nclassified.
140 M illin g m achines.
140a
H orizon ta l.
V ertical.
140b
D ie sinkers.
140c
P rofilers.
M old in g m achines.
145
C ore and m olding.
146
J arrin g.
147
Sand m ixers and shakers.
148
T am ping.
Pipe m achines (in clu d in g h a n d ).
150
Cutting.
151
T h readin g.
153 Planers.
H orizon ta l (w o r k m o v e s ).
Open side.
R o ta ry .
155 Polishers and buffers.
P ortable pow er tools.
E lectric.
160
D rills.
H am m ers.
161
Chipping.
162
R iveters.
Pn eum atic.
165
D rills.
H am m ers o r guns.
166
Chipping.
167
R iveters.
168
Sand ram m er.
123
124




EEPOET OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST,
Presses.
A rb or.
C ylin der.
H y d ra u lic.
Pneum atic.
172
D ro p presses (in clu d in g d rop ham m ers fo r lig h t w o r k ) .
173
F o rg in g (ben d in g or form in g w o rk b y p ow er p r e s s ).
F lan gin g.
174
Punch.
175
Stam ping.
176
T rim m ing.
177
B ottle-ca p p in g m achines.
178
P resses (sheet-m etal w o r k ).
179
P resses (m etal and cellu loid b u tto n s ).
179a
Presses (n. e. c . ) .
R iveters.
180
H yd ra u lic.
181
P n eum atic (to o l m o v e s ).
182
P o w e r (press t y p e ).
185 R o llin g mills.
186
R o llin g m achines.
Saws.
188
Jig.
189
Band.
190
C ircu la r.
C ircu la r (stereoty p e tr im m e r).
191
H ack.
192
Indefinite.
Screw m achines.
193
A u to.
194
H an d.
Shapers.
195
H orizon ta l.
S ta tion ary head.
T ra v elin g head.
196
V ertica l.
Shears and punches.
197
Punches.
198
R o ta ry shears.
199
Shears, indefinite.
200
S littin g shears (p o w e r driven and han d d r iv e n ),
201
S p acin g punches.
202
P u n ch and eyelettin g m achines.
203 Slotters.
W e ld in g and heat cu ttin g m achines.
E le ctric a rc.
205
Carbon.
206
M etallic.
207
E le ctric spot o r riveter.
Gas.
Oxyacetylene.
208
Oxy hydrogen.
209
170
171




87

88
211
212
213
214
215

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,
W ire -w o rk in g m achines.
C overin g m achines.
D ra w in g m achines (in clu d es tu b e-d ra w in g m a ch in e s).
R o llin g m achines.
S tra n d in g m achines.
Crim ping.
220-329

WOOD W O RK IN G MACHINES.

220

B en din g m achines.
B orin g m achines (h orizon ta l and v ertica l spin dles).
221a B orin g tools (p ow er).
C ork -cu ttin g m achines, b lock cutters, cork slicers, etc.
Lathes.
223
A u tom a tic and w o o d cop y in g lathes.
224
A u to w ood form in g.
B a ck kn ife.
225
H an d -tu rn in g w ood kn ife.
226
227
R o d and dow el.
229
Indefinite.

221

222

230
231
232
233
234

236
237
238
239
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
253
254
255
256
257

M ortisin g and ten on in g m achines.
M ortisin g m achines.
Chain m ortisers.
Chisel m ortisers.
P ock et and b orin g m achines.
T en on cu tters.
A u to b lin d slat.
T en on m achine.
Planers, join ters, and edgers.
S u rfa ce planers.
D ia g on a l planer.
P a n el-raisin g m achine.
S u rfa cer.
T im b er sizer.
E d g ers and join ters.
B u zz planer.
E dger.
G lu e jo in te r.
H an d s u rfa ce r o r jo in te r.
Join ter.
P on y planer.
P lan er, n ot specified.
Presses.
C lam pin g m achine.
B o x nailer.
B o x -b o a rd squeezer.
D o o r and b lin d cla m p (h a n d ).
Sanding m achines.
B elt (in clu d in g fe llo e and p a n e l).
D isk.
S pindle o r post.
S u rfa ce o r drum (p o w e r f e e d ; hand f e e d ) .
U nclassified (w h e e l).




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST,

260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280

285

2818
287
288
289
290
295
299
300
301
302
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
317
318

Saws.
C ircu la r.
B uzz.
C h am fering.
C ircu la r saw .
C ircu la r rip.
C rosscu t.
Cut-off.
D ado.
G a in in g m achine.
G ang circu la r.
G ang rip.
G roovin g.
Job.
L a th ( b o lt e r ).
P low .
Sash cu t-off.
S e lf-feed rip.
Slitting.
Sw ing.
T able.

Trim.
U n iversal bench.
In defin ite (p la ce w ith 2 6 2 ).
Band.
Band.
B a n d m ill.
B a n d resaw .
B a n d and rip.
L u m ber saw .
L u m ber ca rria ge.
In definite (p la ce w ith 2 8 5 ).
S cro ll o r jig .
Indefinite.
Shapers.
F rie zin g (in clu d es fra is in g m ach in es on u m brella h a n d le s ).
M old in g m ach in e (h a n d f e e d ) .
Shaper.
H olders.
A u to-b lin d sla t plan er.

Box-board matcher.

D o o r sticker.
F lo o rin g .
G roovin g.
M atcher.
M old in g m ach in e (n . e. c , ) .

Molding sticker.
Sash sticker.
Sticker.
S u rfa ce plan er and m a tch er com bination.
Special head cutters.
C ore-b ox m achine.
V a rie ty or u niversal w o od w ork er (v a rie ty m o ld e r ).




89

90

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
V en eerin g m achines.

320

321
322 *
323
325

326

Veneer cutter.
Veneer machine.
Veneer press.

Brush and broom m akin g m achines.
W ood -b ox m achines.

Corner-lock machine.
Dovetailer.

327
328
329

W ood h ogs or w ood grinders.
W ood trim m ers or m iter cutters.
W o o d w o rk in g m achines (in d efin ite).

330
331
332
333
334
335
336
336a
337
338
339
340
341

Buffing drums.
D ry-m illin g drums.
D yein g drums.
Stuffing drums.
T a n n in g drums.
F u r-dressing m achines.
F u r-com b in g m achines.
F u r-p u llin g m achines.
F lesh in g m achines.
G rain ing rolls, etc.
Jacks— fe ltin g , glassing, peb b lin g, rollin g , ston ing.
H air w a sh in g, dryin g , and b a lin g m achines.
Paddle vats (b a itin g , p ick lin g , ta n n in g ).
Presses.

330-351

342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351

LE A TH ER-W O RK IN G MACHINES— TAN NERIES.

Hydraulic.
Power tan.
W et m achines.
Settin g-up (or s e ttin g -ou t) m achines.
Shaving m achines.
S p littin g and sk iv in g m achines.
U n hairin g m achines.
W h ite n in g m achines.
W a ter extractors, cen trifu ga l.
Trimmers.
352-394

LEA TH ER-W O RK IN G MACHINES— LEA TH ER PRODUCTS*

352

C em enting machines.
Channelers.

353
354

Channelers.
Channel turners.
C u tting m achines.

355
356

357

358

Die cutter.
Rotary cutter.
Drag knife.
Sole-rounding machine.
Drop knife (direct cut).
Heel breaster.
Stripping machine.
Cutting machines (n. e. c.)*

359
359a
360 Edge folders.




REPORT OF COMMITTEE OK STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST,
361
362

E y elettin g and h ook -settin g and p u n ch in g m achines.
Heelers.

Automatic.
Rapid.
L asting m achines.
363
364

Bed.
McKay.
Puller over.
Lcvclers.

366
367
368
369
370
372

Direct pressure.
Embossing machine.
Heel compressers.
Levelers.
Molding machine.
Sole-stamping machine.
Rolling pressure.
Levelers.
N ail (loose) or w ire-fa sten in g machines*

374
375
376
377
378

Heel slugger.
Nailer.
Sole fastener.
Welt tacker.
Riveters.
R o llin g and c u ttin g m achines.

380
381
382

Skiving machines.
Smoothing machines.
Splitting machines.
Sew ing m achines.

384
385
386
387
389
390
392
393
394

Sole.
Fair stitcher.
Inseamer.
McKay.
Sole stitcher.
Upper.
Light-stitching machine.
Buttonhole machine.
E m bossing machines.
Buffing and scou rin g m achines.
Other.
395-429

395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407

PAPER-M AK IN G MACHINES.

Barkers (k n ife , dru m ).
Beaters (r a g w a sh ers).
Chippers.
Grinders.
Paper cutters and slitters.
Paper m achines (b y parts th e re o f).

Head box.
Apron.
Wire.
Suction roll.
Couch rolls.
Dryers.
Calenders.
Doctors.




91

92
410
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
425
426
427

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOB STATISTICS,
R olls and w inders.
Screens.
C en trifugaL
F la t.
K n o tte r (in clu d in g du stin g m achine fo r r a g s ) ,
R evolv in g.
Riffler.
Shaker.
W a sh ers o r thickeners.
Splitters.
W e t machines.
F ib e r-cu ttin g machines.
430-539

430

PAPER PRODUCTS AND PRIN TIN G MACHINES.

A u tom atic feeders.
A u tom atic m achines.
431
A u to m a tic square b o x m achines.
432
B a lin g m achines.
433
E gg-case filler m achines.
434
E gg-tra y filler m achines.
435
S. & S. b o x m achines.
436
S. & S. sten cil m achines.
B ending m achines (rota ry rolls fo r ben d in g plate fo r cylin d er press [see
1 0 5 ]).
Com posing m achines.
441
M onotype.
442
M on otype caster.
443
L in otype.
C overing m achines (a w ide class o f m achines used to cover board w ith
pap er).
445
Case-m aking m achine.
446
Casing-in m achine.
447
C o lla rin g m achine.
448
C overin g m achine.
449
L a b elin g (co v e rin g ) m achine.
450
L a cin g m achine.
451
L in er (P e r r y ) necker or cylin der m achine.
452
P a p er-b ox m ach in e (bon b on c u p s ).
452a
F in ishers.
453
T op p er m achine.
454
T u rn -in m achine.
455
W ra p p in g m achine.
C utting m achines and saws (paper)#
Shears.
460
C utter.
461
Chopper.
462
Shears.
463
P a rin g m achine.
464
T rim m in g m achine.
D ie.
467
C orn er cutter.
468
T h um b-h olin g (in d e x in g ) m achine.
469
R ou n d corner.




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

472
473
474
476
477
478
479
480
481
484
485

Punching machines.
Drilling.
Perforating.
Punching.
Rotary cutter and creaser.
Greaser.
Paper slitter.
Rotary card slitter.
Rotary board cutter.
Scorers (single).
Scorers (double).
Indefinite (paper cutters, n. e. c.),

Saws.
Circular.

Cutting m achines (m e ta l). (In clu d ed in Nos. 190-192.)
Saw s.
C ircu lar.
L in otype.
S a w in g m achine.
Shears.
R u le-cu tter shear (m e t a l). (In clu d e d in N os. 197 -2 0 1 .)
D om ing and em bossing m achines.
490
C orru ga tin g m achine.
491
D om in g m achine.
492
D om in g m achine (E . R . & T . W . S h e rid a n ).
E n din g m achines.
495
E n din g m achine.
496
E n din g m ach in e (g lu e r ).
F old in g machines.
497
P a p er b ox.
498
Other.
498a
P oin t.
498b
B o o k and job .
500

G athering m achines.

501

Leaders.
D ry.
W et.

502
503
504
505
506
507
508

Presses.
B liss press.
B u n d lin g press.
C om pressing press.
M old in g press.
Sm ashing press.
Stam pin g press.
P u n ch press.

510
511
512
513
514

P rin tin g presses.
C ylin der.
P laten.
W eb.
Em bossing.
K in d o f p rin tin g press n ot stated.




ti3

94
515

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

521
522

R o u tin g and rou g h in g m achines.
Sew ing m achines.
B astin g.
Sew ing.
Stabbing.
T h read.
(W ir e stitch in g u nder sta yin g m a ch in e.)
S h aving m achines.
M etal.
W ax.

524
525

Spiral tube m achines.
S p ira l tube m achine.
T u b e cu ttin g m achine.

527
528
529
530
531
532
533

S ta yin g m achines.
G um m er.
G um stayer.
Setting-up m achine.
S taplin g m achine.
S ta yin g m achine.
W ir e stitcher.
E n velope m achine.

534
535
536
539

Trim m ing and b evelin g m achines.
B evelin g.
Trim m ing.
G lu eing m achine.
B ook b in din g m ach in ery (n. e. c.).

516
517
518
519

540-669 * TE X TIL E AND LAU ND RY MACHINES.

540
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552

Carding m achines.
B ailer.
Cards, rev olv in g flat cards.
Com ber.
D ra w in g fr a m e s ; ra ilw a y heads.
F in e speeders.
G arnett m achine.
G illin g m a c h in e ; porcupine.
R ib b on lap m achine.
R o v in g fr a m e ; in term ediate sp eed ers; in term ediate fly fra m e.
S liver la p m achine.
Slubber.
Spindle d ra w in g fram es.
Settin g m achine.

555
556
557
558
559
560
561

Cloth cu ttin g and stam ping m achines.
D ie cutters.
E le ctric cutters.
In k in g stam pers.
P ress cu tters— colla r trim m ers.
R ib cutters.
B and k n ife cu tter.
B u tton, eyelettin g.




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST,

562
563
564
565
566
567
569
570
571
572
573
574
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591

F in ish in g and la u n derin g m achines.
Calenders.
C olla r tippers.
C olla r shapers and m olders.
D am peners.
D y e kettles.
L orim er dy e kettle.
K la u d er W eld on dy e kettle,
F old in g m achines.
H y d ro ex tra ctors.
Iron ers.
B ody.
Bosom .
C olla r and cu ff.
N eck band.
M angles (w a te r and s ta r c h ),
M easuring m achines.
N apping m achines.
B rushes.
Gigs.
N ap raisers.
N appers.
S h earing m achines.
Presses (bosom , cuff, c lo th in g ).
P rin tin g m achines.
Singing m achines (o il or g a s ).
Starchers.
T en terin g fram es.
W a sh in g and soapin g m achines.
Squeezers.
O verh aulin g m achines.
F in ish in g m achines, kn it goods.

595 K n ittin g m achines.
595a
K n ittin g fr a m e s ; cy lin d e r s ; tables.
695b
R ib k n ittin g fr a m e s ; flat rib kn ittin g fra m es.
597
598
599
600
601
602
603
604
610
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618

Opening m achines.
A u tom atic h opper feed in g m achine.
B a le breaker.
C one duster.
C raton opener.
E xh a u st com pou nd opener.
Opener.
W a ste opener.
W o o l breaker.
P ic k in g m achines.
B rea k er p ick er o r lapper.
B u rr p ic k e r ; cylin d er b u rr picker.
D uster or w illow .
H ard-w aste m achine.
In term edia te picker.
L a p m a ch in e ; scutcher, finishing p ick er or lapper,
M ixin g picker.
P ick er.
Shredder.




95

96

620
621
622
623
624
625
626
627
628
630
631
632
634
635
636

640
641
642

BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOB STATISTICS.
Sew ing m achines.
B u tton h olin g m achines.
B u tton -sew in g m achines.
C over seam ers.
C ylin d rica l-sew in g m achines.
E m broid ery-sew in g m achines.
L oop er-sew in g m achines.
P la itin g-sew in g m achines.
P orta b le sew in g m achines.
S ew in g m ach in e (n . e. c .) .
Spin n in g m achines.
B anders.
D oublers.
D r e s s e r s ; w a r p e r s ; w a rp in g m achines.
M u le s ; ja ck s.
S pinn ing fr a m e s ; w a rp spinning fr a m e s ; fillin g spin nin g f r a m e s ; rin gfra m e spinner.
T w isters.
W a sh in g and d ry in g m achines (n ew s to ck ).
W ash er.
A pron .
D u ck.
F ork .
D ryer.
W e a v in g m achines.

645

Beamers.

646
647
648
649
650

K n otters.
L oom s.
Slashers.
W e ft loom s.
W ettin g-u p m ach in es.

655
656
657
658
659

W in d in g m achines.
C op w in ders.
B eelers.
Spoolers.
Y a rn reelers.
C loth w in ders.

660
661
662
663
664

H at-m a k in g m ach in ery.
B lo ck in g m ach in es (la th e s ).
R o u n d in g and cu ttin g m achines.
W ire -se w in g m achines.
P o u n cin g m achines.
H y d ra u lic presses.

666
667

R ope-m ak in g m ach in ery.
F o rm in g m achine.
M attress-filling m achines.
670-739

670
671
672
674

FOOD PRODUCTS, LABORATORY, AND TOBACCO MACHINES.

Apple corers.
A pple peelers.
Apple slicers.
B lanchers (ca n n eries).




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.

97

675 B len din g m achines.
676 Bottle w a sh in g, fillin g, and ca pp in g (o r co rk in g ) m achines.
676a E xplosion or brea k in g o f bottles w hen in or b e in g rem oved from w ashin g,
fillin g, pasteurizing, crow n in g machines.
677 B read-proofing machines.
679 Cherry pitters.
680 Cleaners.
681 C on fection ery and sugar refin in g m achines.
682
Presses.

687
688
689
690
691
692
693
695
696
697
698
699
700
701
702
703
704
705
706
707
708
709
711
713
714
715
716
717
718
720
721
730
731
732
739

Rolls (for forming candy).
Bagging and packing m achines (bag r o lle r s ).
Other.
Corncutters.
Corn buskers.
Corn m ixers.
Corn silkers.
D ough brakes.
D ou gh -dep ositin g m achines.
D ough dividers.
Dough m ixers.
Dough molders.
D ough rou n d in g and b a llin g m achines.
D ough m achines (indefinite, and n. e. c .),
E gg beaters.
F illin g and ca pp in g m achines (ca n n eries).
Graders (ca n n eries).
I c in g and m arshm allow m ixers.
H acaron i presses.
Choppers and slicers fo r meat, bread, etc.
H ills and grin ders (flour, drug, paint, e tc .).
Ice cru sh in g m achines.
Ovens.
Coffee roasters.
P ick in g tables (ca n n eries).
P ie-cru st rollers.
Pie m achines.
Pie markers.
Pie rim mers.
Sausage casers.
T ob a cco-w ork in g m achines.
V iners (ca n n eries).
W ashers (ca n n eries).
W a sh in g m achines (excep t b o ttle s ).
Indefinite.

38043°—Bull. 201—16----- 7




A P P E N D IX B,
RESOLUTIONS IN REGARD TO ACCIDENT AND W ORKM EN’S COM­
PENSATION STATISTICS ADOPTED BY THE INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENT BOARDS AND COM­
MISSIONS AT CHICAGO, JA N U ARY 12 AND 13, 1915.
In order that all the definitions and classifications approved and recom­
mended by the association either as a result of the work of the Committee on
Statistics and Compensation Insurance Cost or directly may be brought together
and presented in one place, it has seemed desirable to review briefly the action
of the association which immediately preceded the appointment of this com­
mittee, and to include as a part of this report the resolutions dealing with
this subject which were adopted at the special meeting of the association held
in Chicago January 12 and 13, 1915.
A special meeting of the National Association of Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions for the purpose of taking steps toward working out a plan
for uniform statistics of industrial accidents which could be recommended to
all the States and would thus make comparison of the experience of the
various States possible was held at Chicago January 12 and 13, 1915.
The first action of the meeting was the adoption of the definition o f a tabulatable accident practically uniform 1 with that which had been formulated
at the joint conference on standardization of accident reports and tabulations
held at Chicago October 12 and 13, 1914. This definition is as follows:
“ A ll accidents cau sin g death, perm anent disa b ility, or loss o f tim e other than
the balance o f the day, turn, or sh ift on w h ich the a ccid ent occu rred shall be
classified as tabulatable accidents, and a report o f a ll such accidents to some
State or n ation a l a u th ority shall be requ ired.”

A standard report blank for the first report of accident was then agreed
upon. This form is the same in all respects as that also agreed upon at the
Chicago conference above referred to, having been adapted with a few changes
from the earlier form recommended by a committee of the American Association
for Labor Legislation. The standard report blank as finally adopted is as
follow s:
1 The definition finally adopted differed from the earlier one only in the substitution of
the word “ tabulatable ” for “ reportable.”
The resolutions adopted at the Chicago
conference are given in full in Appendix C (p. 101).

98




REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS AND INSURANCE COST.
S tandard B l a n k

for

99

A ccident R eports .

FIRST REPORT OF ACCIDENT TO EMPLOYEE.

[To be filled out and sent in within 7 days of the accident.]

a. Employer’s name .........................................................................................
b. Office address: Street and No.......................; City or village.................
1.
c. Business (goods produced, work done, or kind of trade or transportaEm pi oyer,
tion).................... ......................................................................................
place, d. Location of plant or place of work where accident occurred, if not at
and
office address: Street and No.......................; City or village.................
time. e. Date on which accident occurred............................................................
f. Hour of d a y ......... ; g. Hour injured person began work that d a y ..........
a.
b.
e.
f.
g.

Name............................................. ; Address.....................................
S e x ......... ; c. A g e ----- ; d. Single, married, widowed, or divorced
Number of children under......... years......................................................
Speak English?....... ..................... ; If not, what language?.....................
2.
Occupation when injured.................... ; In what department or branch
Injured
of w ork ?........................... ; Was this regular occupation?..................
person.
If not, state regular occupation............................................................
h. Length of experience both here and elsewhere in occupation followed
when injured...........................................................................................
i. Piece or time worker?___ ; j. Wages, or average earnings, per d a y ___
k. Working hours per d a y ___ ; 1. Working days per w eek ..........................
a. Name of machine, tool, or appliance in connection with which accident
occurred................... ; By what kind of power d riven ?.....................
Hand feed or mechanical fe e d ? .................; Part on which accident
3.
occurred...................................................................................................
Cause, b. Describe in full how accident happened.................................................

a. State exactly part of person injured and nature of injury
4.
Nature b. Did injury cause loss of any member or part of a member? If so, de­
scribe exactly..........................................................................................
and
extent c. Attending physician or hospital where sent: Name and address.............
of
injury. d. Has injured person returned to w ork?........................... ; If so, give date
and hour............................................................................................
Date of report




; Made out by

100

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

The time for submitting the first report of accident was provided for in the
following resolution:
“ Unless the State law otherw ise provides, n otices o f accidents term in a tin g
fa ta lly w ith in 7 days o f the a ccid ent occurrence shall be given w ith in 24 hours
a fte r death; all reportable accidents shall be reported on standard accid en t
blanks, in fu ll, w ith in 7 days o f the occurrence o f the accid ent.”

With these few fundamentals agreed upon, a further resolution was adopted
providing—
“ th at the chairm an appoint a perm anent com m ittee to w h ich can be referred the
item or item s th a t can n ot be disposed o f b y the con feren ce at th is tim e.”

The duties of this committee were outlined in the following resolution:
That it is the sense o f this m eeting th at the com m ittee on statistics and com ­
pensation insurance cost prepare as exp editiou sly as possible the fo llo w in g
reports:
(1) U niform tables fo r the establishm ent o f com pensation costs.
(2 ) U niform classification o f industries.
(3 ) U niform classification o f causes o f in ju ries.
(4) U niform classification o f nature o f in ju ries.
That the com m ittee is directed w ith ou t fu rth er a u th ority to send a cop y o f this
report to each m em ber o f this organ ization, and make final report at the regu la r
m eetin g in September, 1915.

This committee was later named by the chairman as follow s:
E. H. Downey, chairman, chief statistician, Wisconsin Industrial Commission,
Madison, Wis.
Royal Meeker, Commissioner of Labor Statistics, Washington, D. C.
Robert K. Orr, manager State Accident Fund, Lansing, Mich.
W. N. Magoun, chief, Workmen’s Compensation Bureau, Massachusetts Insur­
ance Department, 508 Pemberton Building, Boston, Mass.
H. E. Ryan, associate actuary, New York Insurance Department, 165 Broadway,
New* York City.
Floyd L. Daggett, chairman, Industrial Insurance Commission, Olympia, Wash.
Fred C. Croxton, chief statistician, Industrial Commission, Columbus, Ohio.
Two additions to the committee were subsequently made:
Leonard W. Hatch, chief statistician, Industrial Commission, Albany, N. Y.
E. E. Watson, actuary, Industrial Commission, Columbus, Ohio.




A P P E N D IX C,
RESOLUTIONS RELATING TO ACCIDENT AND W ORKMEN’S COM­
PENSATION STATISTICS ADOPTED BY THE CHICAGO CONFER­
ENCE OF OCTOBER 12 AND 13, 1914.
A full account of the conferences held upon the initiative of the United States
Bureau of Labor Statistics, for the purpose of standardizing accident and work­
men’s compensation reports and statistics prior to the Chicago meeting of the
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Jan­
uary 12 and 13, 1915, was given in Bulletin 157 of the United States Bureau of
Labor Statistics and need not be repeated here. The resolutions of the Chicago
conference of October 12 and 13, 1914,1 reviewed and revised the work of all the
earlier conferences, and it will, therefore, be useful to reprint them here. They
are as follow s:
1. Definition of reportable accident.— (a) All accidents causing death, per­
manent disability, or loss of time other than the balance of the day, turn, or
shift on which the accident occurred shall be classified as reportable accidents,
and a report of all such accidents to some State or national authority shall be
required, (b) Where a compensation act provides for any expense on account
of medical attendance or hospital treatment, thus necessarily involving a report
of such cases, even though resulting in no loss of time or in a loss less than that
specified above, such minor accidents should be classified separately in all tabu­
lations and compiled reports, (c) The employer shall be required to enter upon
his record all reportable accidents as above defined, and also all accidents
causing a loss of time less than that above specified or requiring any medical
attention.
2. Classification of accidents according to their consequences.— (a) Accidents
should be classified according to their consequences, as resulting in death, total
permanent disability, partial permanent disability, and temporary disability.
1 The minutes of the meeting give the following list of the persons present:
R ep res en ta tiv es o f official bodies handling a ccident s ta tis tic s . — Commissioner Meeker,
C. H. Verrill, United States Bureau of Labor Statistics ; A. H. Fay, H. M. Wilson, F. II.
Willcox, J. M. Sampson, United States Bureau of Mines ; J. B. Vaughn, P. J. Angsten,
Robert Eadie, W. V. Conley, Thomas A. Murphy, Industrial Board of Illinois ; Edwin
Mulready, Commissioner of Labor, Massachusetts ; Richard L. Drake, Michigan Industrial
Accident Board ; Fred C. Croxton, Industrial Commission of Ohio ; A. R. Houck, Lew R
Palmer, Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry ; E. H. Downey, W. H. Burhop,
Wisconsin Industrial Commission.
M em b ers o f N ational Council o f S a f e t y C o m m ittee on Standard F o r m s . — C. L. Close,
United States Steel Corporation; James B. Douglas, United Gas Improvement C o.;
Frederick L. Hoffman, Prudential Insurance C o.; W. B. Spaulding, St. Louis & San
Francisco Railroad Co.
R ep res en ta tiv e o f co m m itte e on standard sch ed u les, A m erica n A s so c ia tio n f o r L a bor
L e g isla tio n . — Dr. John B. Andrews.
R ep res en ta tiv es o f W o rk m e n ’ s C om p en sa tion S erv ice B u rea u , insu ra n ce com pa n ies, and
em p lo yer s. — Albert W. Whitney, C. E. Scattergood, C. M. Hanson, Workmen’s Compensa­

tion Service Bureau. New York City ; E. G. Trimble, Employers’ Indemnity Corporation.
Kansas City, M o.; Louis I. Dublin, Metropolitan Life Insurance C o.; Dudley R. Kennedy.
Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co., Youngstown, Ohio ; George T. Fonda, Bethlehem Steel C o.;
R. C. Richards, Chicago & North Western Railway C o.; Dr. D. Z. Dunott, Western
Maryland Railway Co.




101

102

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

(b) Accidents resulting in temporary disability should be classified according to
length of temporary disability so as to show the number terminating in the 2d
and 3d days, number terminating in the 4th to 7th days, inclusive, number ter­
minating in the 2d week, in the 3d week, in the 4th week, in the 5th to 13th
weeks, inclusive, in the 14th week and later.
3. Time of reporting accidents.— (a) In the case o f accidents terminating
fatally within 7 days of the accident occurrence, notice shall be given within 24
hours of death. All reportable accidents shall be reported, upon standard acci­
dent blanks, in full, within 7 days of the occurrence o f the accident, (b) A
committee shall be appointed to formulate a resolution covering the subject of
the final report.
4. Accident report forms.— [The form of report adopted to be recommended for
first reports of accidents does not differ from that adopted by the International
Association at its Chicago meeting of January 12 and 13, 1915, except in ques­
tion 2-e, which in the earlier form called for the number o f children under 38
years. The later form is given in full on page 99.]
5. Average number of men.— (a) The basis used for the average number of
men should be the actual number of man-hours for the yea r; that is, the total
working time for all employees of the establishment or the department for the
year reduced to the number of hours required for one man to do the same work.
This should be taken from exact records if such records are in existence,
(b) I f this exact information is not available in this form in the records, then
an approximation should be computed by taking the number of men at work
(or enrolled) on a certain day of each month in the year, and the average of
these numbers multiplied by the number of hours worked by the establishment
for the year would be the number o f man-hours measuring the exposure to
risk for the year.
6. Computation of rate of accidents.—Accident rates should be expressed in
terms of number of accidents per 1,000 full-time workers; that is, workers
employed 300 days of 10 hours each.1
7. Classification of causes of accidents.—The chair shall appoint a committee
on the classification of causes of accidents, the committee to meet not later
than early in December and to submit its report to a later meeting of the
conference.
8. Classification of nature and extent of injury.—The chair shall appoint a
committee on the classification of the nature and extent of injury, the committee
to meet not later than early in December and to submit its report to a later
meeting of the conference.
1 This is in accordance with the practice of Germany, Austria, and a number of other
European countries, and also in accordance with the recommendations of a joint committee
of the permanent international committee on social insurance and the International Insti­
tute of Statistics. This method was used in Germany as early as 1897. See Germany:
Antliche Nachrichten des Reichsversicherungsamts 1899. Beiheft. I. Teil, Unfallstatistik
fiir das Jahr 1897. Berlin, 1899, pp. 5 ff. See also Bulletin de l’ lnstitut International
de Statistique, Vol. XV, pp. 54, 55. London, 1906; Ibid, Vol. XVIII, Part II, p. 461, et
seq. Paris, 1909.




A P P E N D IX D.
DEFINITIONS AND METHODS OF TABULATING THE VARIOUS
KINDS OF INJURIES AND OF COMPENSATION PAYM ENTS IN
USE BY THE W ORKMEN’S COMPENSATION SERVICE BUREAU.
[From Circulars 2603 and 2840 of the Workmen’s Compensation Service Bureau.]

One of the most important purposes of the plan for securing and compiling
workmen’s compensation statistics is to determine the duration and the kind
of benefits awarded under various acts for different kinds of disabilities
resulting from injuries1 broadly classified as follow s:
1. Temporary total.
2. Temporary partial.
3. Permanent total.
4. Permanent partial— dismemberment.
5. Permanent partial—loss o f use.
6. Permanent partial— exclusive of 4 and 5.
7. Disfigurement.
As an illustration of our meaning in the foregoing paragraph, let us take
a dismemberment case in Massachusetts. In this State such a case may be
compensated by three different kinds of payments—a benefit for the period of
temporary total disability, another for the period of partial disability, the third
being for the specific period allowed for the loss of member. Here we are
confronted with a problem. The limiting conditions of the punch card do not
permit the punching of more than one kind of payment on one card. Unless
means were adopted to identify each one of the payments with the class of
injury which gave rise to the different disabilities, the bureau when tabulating
the experience would have no way of knowing whether the duration o f and
the payment for, say, temporary total disability was in connection with a dis­
memberment injury or one in the temporary total class.2
Therefore, to enable the bureau to allocate the payments to proper classes of
injuries, a column has been provided on the punch card entitled “ Kind of
injury.” In this column will be punched the injury in accordance with the
definitions for * Kinds of injuries.” In the column headed “ Kind of compensa­
“
tion ” will be punched the symbol for the particular kind of payment made,
in accordance with the definitions for “ Kinds of copmensation benefit pay­
ments.”
The designation of payment, of course, will always correspond with the kind
of disabilities compensated.
In “ Duration of injury ” field will be punched the number of weeks during
which the particular kind of benefit was paid, with waiting period added in
case of temporary total payments. Thus it will be seen that the duration is
associated with the kind of payment and not with the kind of injury.
The following illustrations show how the information will appear on punch
cards.
1 An injury involving amputation produces total disability for a time which may or
may not be followed by partial disability; a laceration of the hand may totally disable at
first and then partially.
2 It is true that the various payments in dismemberment cases can be allocated to this
class of injuries by means of the nature of injury field [of the punch card], but this is
the only instance where this field can be utilized for such purposes.




103

104

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

(1) An injury in any State resulting, for example, in temporary total disability
of 10 weeks’ duration followed by temporary partial disability of 5 weeks’
duration.
Percent
impair­
ment.

Dura­
tion,
weeks.

Kind of injury.

Temporary to­
tal.
(1)
29 Temporary to­
tal.
0)

1st card.......... ..................
2d card____ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Compensation paid.
Counter.
Kind of payment. Amount.
$56

1

10

10 Temporary to­
tal.
(11)
5 Temporary par-

0

13 (12)

(8) Dismemberment case in Massachusetts receiving three kinds of benefits.
Per cent
impair­
ment.

Duration,
weeks.

Kind of injury.

1st card...........................

Dismemberment
(4)

2d c a r d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dismemberment
(4)
40 Dismemberment

3d c a r d .. . . . . . . ................

Compensation paid.
Counter.
Kind of payment. Amount.

20 Temporary to­
tal.
(11)
50 Dismemberment
(14)
380 Permanent par­
tial.
(16)

(4)

$180

1

500

0

1,140

0

The attached tabulation of losses in 10,515 hypothetical cases gives at a
glance the results that can be attained by the methods described above.
TABULATION OF LOSSES IN 10,515 HYPOTHETICAL NONFATAL CASES, ALLOCATING
KINDS OF BENEFITS PAID TO CLASS OF INJURY PRODUCING THE DISABILITY SO
COMPENSATED.

Sym­
bol.

(11) Temporary total.
(12) Temporary partial.
Total
number
of cases. Number Dura­ Amount.
Dura­ Amount.
tion.
of cases.
cases. tion.

Kind of injury.

( 1) Temporary total...................
( 2) Temporary partial_______ _

<)
5
(7)

Permanent total...................
Dismemberment...................
Loss of use......................... .
Permanent partial................
Disfigurement.......................

10,000
50
10
200
200
50
5

10,000
100
100
50
5

1,000
1,000
1,000
50

10,515

(3)
(4)

10,255

53,050

(13) Permanent total.
Sym­
bol.

(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)

Kind of injury.

Temporary total.......
Temporary partial__
Permanent total.......
Dismemberment......
Loss of use................
Permanent partial_
_
Disfigurement...........




50,000 $300,000

10

4,000 $40,000

4,000

40,000

1,000
500

$2,500
1,000

10,000
10,000
10,000
500

40
40
30

1,200
1,200
900

3’ 600
1,800

330,500

260

4,800

12,500

(14) Dismemberment.

Num­ Dura­
Num­
ber of tion. Amount. ber pf
cases.
cases.

10

10Q
50

Amount.

150

11,000

$110,000

150

11,000

110,000

(15) Loss of use.

cases.

Vmount.

150 11,000

$110,000

150 11,000

110,000

REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE ON STATISTICS AND IN SU RA N CE COST.

105

TABULATION OF LOSSES IN 10,515 HYPOTHETICAL NONFATAL CASES, ALLO­
CATING KINDS OF BENEFITS PAID TO CLASS OF INJURY PRODUCING THE
USABILITY SO COMPENSATED--Concluded.
(16) Permanent partial.
Sym­
bol.

(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)

Kind of injury.

Number
of cases.

Duration.

30
30
20

6,000
6,000
8,000

Temporary total......................
Temporary partial...................
Permanent total.....................
Dismemberment.....................
Loss of use ................... .........
Permanent partial.................
Disfigurement.........................

80
DISTINCTION BETW EEN

“ KIND

(17) Disfigurement.
i

Amount.

$24,000
24,000
32,000

20,000 |

OF INJURY ”

Number Duration. Amount.
of cases.

90,000

$5,000

10

500

5

250

2,500

750

7,500

15

AND “ KIND OF P A Y M E N T ."

The purpose of the “ Kind of injury ” column is to classify all accidents in
accordance with their gravity. The nature of an injury may be complex from
the very beginning, or may change from time to time. Nevertheless, each acci­
dent must be placed in a definite group according to the most predominant
feature.
The purpose of the “ Kind of payment ” column is to analyze payments made.
Many injuries call for more than one kind of payment, as for instance, dis­
memberment may call for temporary total disability payments, then for spe­
cific dismemberment payments, and for additional payments for either tempo­
rary or permanent partial disability.
Some difficulty is created by the use of similar terms in both columns. This
is inevitable, but is easily overcome if the distinction between an injury and the
resulting disability is carefully kept in mind.
Detailed instructions as to grouping of injuries and classification of pay­
ments are given in the following rules.
DISTRIBUTION OF INJURIES INTO GROUPS ACCORDING TO GRAVITY.
(In connection with “ Kind of injury

1—

T emporary

”

column.)

total .

To this group shall be assigned every injury which totally disables the
injured person from performing any work at any gainful occupation without
involving amputation or a permanent loss of any function, but from which
injury the recovery is so complete in time that the workman is able to re­
sume work in the same or other occupation and earn the same wages which
he earned at the time of accident.
To this group shall also be assigned every injury where the resulting tem­
porary total disability, as defined above, is followed by a period of temporary
partial disability described in the paragraph immediately following.1
2—

T emporary

partial .

To this group shall be assigned every injury which does not involve
amputation nor result in the permanent loss of any function, which does not
disable the injured person from work in the same or other gainful employ­
ment, but which, for a time, merely impairs his earning power.
The decreased earnings may be due to inability to work full time, or to
turn out as much product (if working piecework), or to inability to do heavy
work and accepting lighter work at lesser wage.
1 Temporary partial disability is very infrequently the immediate result of injuries; it
is usually preceded by a period of temporary total disability. It is evident that an injury
resulting in both total and partial disabilities must be designated either one or the other.
Injuries first resulting in temporary total disability will, throughout, carry the designa­
tion “ Temporary total.” The fact that it was followed by temporary partial disability
will be brought out by means of “ Kind of compensation ” column where the duration of
and the payment for such disability will be indicated by the symbol for temporary partial
payment. “ 12.”




106

B U L L E T IN

8— P ermanent

OF T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

totae.

To this group shall be assigned every injury resulting in loss of both eyes,
total loss of eyesight or mental faculties, paralysis, or any other condition
permanently incapacitating the workman from performing any work at any
gainful occupation.
Certain injuries are conclusively presumed to constitute permanent total
disabilities. In other cases the awards by industrial boards and courts
will indicate whether the injury was adjudged permanent total. In other
words, the act itself or the interpretation of the act by industrial boards
should govern in this matter.
4—

D ismemberment .

To this group shall be assigned every injury involving the loss of member
or members or parts of members by traumatic or surgical amputation, includ­
ing enucleation of eye.
Multiple amputations in combinations which render the injured person
permanently totally disabled, or which the law conclusively presumes to
constitute permanent total disability, shall not be considered Dismemberment
so far as this classification is concerned, but shall be assigned to Permanent
total group.
5— Loss OF USE.
To this group shall be assigned every injury which results in total loss
of use of that which can be dismembered, including loss of sight in one eye
and total loss of hearing in one or both ears.
Loss of use of more than one member in such combinations as to render
the injured person permanently totally disabled, or which by law is con­
clusively presumed to constitute permanent total disability, shall not be
considered Loss of use, but shall be assigned to Permanent total group.
6— P ermanent partial . (Other than dismemberment and loss of use.)
To this group shall be assigned every injury which results in partial loss
of any function of the body, as of any member, or in permanent physical
impairment, such as permanent stiff neck, chronic traumatic neurosis or
neurasthenia, weakening of mental faculties, general debility on account of
internal injuries, etc.
Examples of partial loss of function of members :
(1) Ankylosis of elbow joint (often result of compound comminuted frac­
tures and sometimes due to improper treatment of simple fractures and
dislocations) which, though preventing supination, pronation, or other mo­
tions, is not the same as loss of use of arm, there being some important
functions that can still be performed with the arm itself and the hand;
(2) ankylosis of wrist jo in t; (3) contracted palm from infection or other
cause, where fingers are not involved; (4) severance of muscles and liga­
ments and the consequent loss of certain motions; (5) ankylosis of ankle
and knee joints; (6) considerable shortening of leg, say f of an inch or
more, as a consequence of fractures; (7) partial loss of eyesight in one or
both eyes; (8) impairment of hearing in one or both ears.
7—

D isfigurement .

To this group shall be assigned every injury which results in facial dis­
figurement, even though accompanied by temporary total or partial disa­
bility. Facial disfigurements concurrent with dismemberment or loss of use
are excluded from the group and shall be assigned to Dismemberment or
Loss of use group, as the case may be.
N ote.—An injury involving both amputation and loss of use may be assigned
either to Dismemberment or Loss of use group, the choice to be governed by
the predominating feature of the injury. Thus, an injury resulting in amputa­
tion of a finger and the loss of use of a leg should be placed in the Loss of use
group.
To R ecapitulate .
Injuries producing temporary total disability, as defined in paragraph 1, and
nothing else, or temporary total disability followed by temporary partial disa­
bility, and nothing else, shall be classified as temporary total.
Injuries producing temporary partial disability only, as defined in paragraph
2, shall be classified as temporary partial.
Injuries resulting in permanent total disability, as defined in paragraph 3,
shall be classified as permanent total.




REPORT OF CO M M ITTEE OK STATISTICS AKD IN SU RA N CE COST.

107

Injuries involving amputation of members, exclusive of combinations render­
ing injured person totally disabted, shall be classified as dismemberments.
Injuries resulting in complete loss of use of members, exclusive of combina­
tions which render the injured person permanently totally disabled, shall be
classified as loss of use.
Injuries resulting in partial loss o f use of members, etc., as defined in para­
graph 6, shall be classified as permanent partial.
Injuries resulting in facial disfigurement, and nothing else except temporary
total or partial disability, shall be classified as disfigurements.
CODE FOR KINDS OF COMPENSATION BENEFIT PAYM ENTS.
(In connection with “ Kind of payment ” column.)

D efinitions .
Symbol.

11— T emporary total benefit shall mean the payment which is made for the
time the injured party is rendered temporarily totally disabled, irrespec­
tive of whether such disability is in connection with temporary total,
dismemberment, or any other class of injury.
Temporary total benefits are p aid:
1st. In all States for an injury which, for a temporary time after the
expiration of the specified waiting period, totally incapacitates the injured
from all work;
2d. In Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and a number of other States in
cases of amputation and other permanent partial injuries for the period
during which the injured is totally incapacitated.
12— T emporary partial benefit shall mean the payment made for temporary
impairment of earning power, irrespective of whether the partial dis­
ability so compensated results from an injury classified as Temporary
total, Dismemberment, or any other class.
In other words, temporary partial benefit is awarded for the time the
injured workman is working at reduced wages. This means that such
compensation is usually applied in cases where the injured returns to
work before he has fully recovered from the injury or become fully
rehabilitated, and, therefore, unable to earn as much as he did before
the accident.
Temporary partial payments may begin immediately after the termina­
tion of waiting period or after a period of temporary total disability.
13— P ermanent total benefits shall mean payments made in the case of in­
juries conclusively presumed by law or judicially determined by courts
and industrial accident boards to constitute permanent total disability.
In some instances it is often impossible to predetermine whether the
injury will result in temporary total or permanent total disability. If
as a matter of policy or because the physician holds out hopes for com­
plete or partial recovery the case is for the time being designated as
temporary total, it may be treated as such until the expiration of the
maximum period. Upon completion of last payment, change the desig­
nation of entire payment from temporary total to permanent total. It
will be admitted that failure to recover in 400 or 500 weeks makes the
likelihood of ultimate recovery rather nil, and for this reason the dis­
ability may from' the statistical point of view be safely considered as
permanent total.
14— D ismemberment benefits shall mean only that portion of payments made
in the case of loss of members which is based upon the specific or fixed
number of weeks allowed in the act.
In States providing specific indemnity in lieu of all other, the entire
benefit shall be designated “ Dismemberment.”
In States providing other benefits in addition to specific, only the
specific benefit shall be considered a dismemberment payment. No part
of the benefit shall be designated dismemberment in States where dis­
memberments are compensated on basis of time lost from work and im­
pairment of wage-earning power.




108

BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOB STATISTICS.

15------ Loss

of use .— Since loss of use is compensated in all States on the same
basis as dismemberment v f illows that the remarks under “ Dismember­
ment ” apply equally well to “ Loss of use ” payments. The specific
benefits paid in cases of total or partial loss of use of that which can be
dismembered shall be designated as “ Loss of use ” payments.

16—

P ermanent

partial benefits

shall mean only those payments which are

made for permanent impairment of earning power and nothing else.
The term permanent partial shall not be used to designate a payment for
dismemberment in States providing for such injury, compensation based
on a fixed number of weeks in lieu of all other compensation; nor
should it be used for this purpose in Illinois and States having similar
laws where compensation for permanent partial injuries is based on
temporary total disability in addition to the specific indemnity.
The term permanent partial, as applied to payments, should not be con­
founded with a similar term used in our classification of injuries and in
all compensation acts to designate such injuries as amputation of finger,
hand, leg, etc., or loss of use of such members. The confusion, if any,
arises from the failure to differentiate between “ Permanent injury ” and
“ Permanent disability.” A laborer does not necessarily become perma­
nently partially disabled because of the loss of his little finger. In a
short time he can wield his pick and shovel as well as ever. In Mas­
sachusetts and Rhode Island a case like this would be compensated on
basis of time lost from work (temporary total payment) in addition to
the fixed (specific dismemberment) sum allowed for loss of finger. It
is to be noted that the ter?n permanent partial is not used at all in this
case so far as it concerns the kind of payment. Should, however, the
loss of finger, upon his return to work, prevent the workman from fol­
lowing his usual occupation, and force him to do work at a lower wage,
he would, in above States, be entitled to further compensation for the
T
impairment of his earning power (50 per cent or some other per cent of
th difference between his former wage and the wage he is now earning).
If the impairment is only temporary, the payment should be desig­
nated “ Temporary partial ” ; but if the impairment is lasting, or at
least continues for the maximum period fixed by law, then the payment
is to be designated permanent partial.
17— D isfigurement benefits .—Payments shall be considered as such only when
the award by the industrial board specifically states that they were
made under the disfigurement section of the act. In California and
one or two other States, such compensation is only paid for facial dis­
figurement. It is only in Illinois that disfigurements to hand (includ­
ing amputation of fingers, with or without involvement of metacarpal
bones) may be compensated under the disfigurement section. If the
files indicate that the loss of fingers or a similar injury was compensated
under this section, then the payments must be shown as disfigurement
and not dismemberment.
18— A ll other compensation paym ents .—This classification was inserted in
the code to provide for amendments to laws establishing forms of com­
pensation other than those enumerated in the code. Its use will readily
suggest itself when the proper occasion arises.
19— L iability claim payments shall mean amounts paid to an injured employee
who has either elected not to come under the workmen’s compensation
act, or who is otherwise excluded from compensation benefits under the
act and recovers damage under common law.
N ote.—The entire amount of the benefit paid in the State of California for
permanent disability in all cases of injuries classed as Dismemberment, Loss of
Use, or Permanent Partial, shall be designated as Permanent Partial Payments
(symbol 16).




IN D E X O F C L A SSIF IC A TIO N O F IN D U STR IE S.

Absorbent cotton manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------Accountants— clerical office employees------------------------------------------------------Accountants— professional service------------------------------------------------------------Acetic acid manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------------Acetylenfe-gas machine manufacturing____________________________________
Acetylene-gas machines— installation-------------------------------------------------------Acetylene-gas tank charging stations— operation--------------------------------------Acid manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Adding machine manufacturing___________________________________________
Addressing and mailing companies— clerical office employees---------------------Addressing and mailing machine manufacturing--------------------------------------Addressing and mailing machines— installation-----------------------------------------Advertising and art novelties manufacturing_____________________________
Advertising sign manufacturing— celluloid------------------------------------------------Advertising sign manufacturing— glass-----------------------------------------------------Advertising sign manufacturing— metal----------------------------------------------------Advertising signs— erection, repair, maintenance, and operation---------------Advertising solicitors--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Aerated water manufacturing (see Mineral water manufacturing)______
Aeroplane manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------------Agate and enamel ware manufacturing (see Enamel and agate ware manu­
facturing)—
Agents and salesmen--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Agricultural implement dealers----------------------------------------------------------------Agricultural implement stores----------------------- , -----------------------------------------Agricultural machinery manufacturing___________________________________
Agricultural machinery manufacturing— woodworking-----------------------------Agricultural machinery— operation (Division A, Schedule 5 ) ______________
Agricultural schools— professors and teachers-----------------------------------------Agricultural tool manufacturing_________________________________________
Agriculture (Division A ) -------------------------------------------------------------------------Air-pressure gauge manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------Alcohol manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------------------Aluminum foundries---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Aluminum smelting---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Aluminum ware manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------Ammonia manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------Amusement devices— care, operation, and maintenance____________________
Amusement devices— erection, etc-------------------------------------------------------------Amusement parks (see Exhibitions— personal service)-------------------------------Amusements, indoor— personal service------------------------------------------------------Amusements, outdoor— personal service----------------------------------------------------Analytical chemists---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Anchor manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------------------Aniline and alizarin manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------Apartment hotel, hotel apartments, and apartment houses— care, custody,
and maintenance-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Appraisers and inspectors------------------------------------------------------------------------Architects— supervising----------------------------------------------------------------------------Architectural and ornamental ironwork manufacturing___________________
Arms manufacturing— heavy ordnance____________________________________
Arms manufacturing— small______________________________________________
Arsenic manufacturing___________________________________________________
Artesian-well drilling-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Art-glass window manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------Artificial feather and flower manufacturing (see Feather and flower manu­
facturing)—
Artificial limb manufacturing_____________________________________________
A rtis ts __________________________________________________________________
Art novelties manufacturing______________________________________________
Art objects manufacturing_______________________________________________
Asbestos goods manufacturing____________________________________________
Asphalt laying------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Asphalt works____________________________________________________________
Assaying_________________________________________________________________
Asylums— clerical office employees________________________________________
Asylums— not clerical and professional employees_________________________
Asylums— professional employees________________________________________
Athletic clubs— domestic service_________________________________________
Auctioneers________________________________________________________ 1J1J1
Auditors, accountants, and systematizers— clerical office employees______
Auditors, accountants, and systematizers— professional service_________ I I




Page.
39
63
70
38
31
56
40
38
31
63
31
56
47
37
25
28
52
42
47
33

Group.
236
490
550
230
144
393
240
230
145
490
145
393
331
216
82
116
373
270
320
165

28
67
66
64
31
34
22
71
28
21
31
38
27
26
28
38
70
51
70
70
70
38
27
39

145
230
110
94
115
230
542
370
542
541
542
230
112
234

67
70
53
27
31
29
38
49
25

530
550
376
113
144
121
230
363
82

45
48
42
47
25
24
57
40
26
63
67
71
69
67
63
70

303
337
270
331
72
57
399
244
91
490
530
551
532
520
490
550

109

115
520
510
500
142
175
552
118

110

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,
Group.
438
162
338
500
373
282
304
120
244
161

Page.
60
33
48
64
52
43
45
29
40
32

Automobile dealers----------------------------Automobile manufacturing----------------Automobile painting--------------------------Automobile salesrooms-----------------------Awning and tent erection--------- :---------Awning and tent fabric manufacturing.
Awning and tent manufacturing--------Ax manufacturing____________________
Axle grease manufacturing----------------Axle manufacturing__________________
B.

Babbitt metal manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------Baby carriage manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------Bacon, hams, and meat products— curing--------------------------------------------------Badge manufacturing— cloth---------------------------------------------------------------------Badge manufacturing— metal------------------- : ----------------------------------------------Bag manufacturing— burlap, sacking-------------------------------------------------------Bag manufacturing— leather---------------------------------------------------------------------Bag manufacturing— paper_____________________________________1_________
Bakeries--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Bakers’ ovens (portable)— installation or removal------------------------------------Baking powder manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------Balconies, metal— erection and repair (see Ironwork— erecting and repair­
ing, etc.)-------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------Balcony manufacturing— iron and steel_________________________________
Ballast unloader manufacturing_________________________________________
Ball bearing manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------------Barber shops— personal service___________________________________________
Barbers’ supplies manufacturing_________________________________________
Barge construction-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Barges, lighters, and canal boats— operation-------------------------------------------Bark m ills_______________________________________________________________
Bark peeling______________________________________________________________
Barrel manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Barrel manufacturing— wood veneer-------------------------------------------------------Barytes manufacturing___________________________________________________
Baseball clubs and parks--------------------------------------------------------------------------Baseball manufacturing__________________________________________________
Base metal mining------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Basket manufacturing— willow ware_____________________________________
Basket manufacturing— wood veneer-------------------------------------------------------Bathhouses and bathing pavilions— personal service----------------------------------Baths— domestic service_________________________________________________
Battery manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------------------Batting, wadding, and shoddy manufacturing____________________________
Bean sorting and handling_______________________________________________
Bed spring manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------------Bedstead manufacturing and assembling----------------------------------------------------Beet sugar refining______________________________________________________
Bell foundries------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Bells (tow er)— installation-----------------------------------------------------------------------Belting— leather— installation and repair------------------------------------------------Belting manufacturing— canvas___________________________________________
Belting manufacturing— leather----------------------------------------------------------------Belting manufacturing— rubber___________________________________________
Bent wood manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------------Beverages, foods, tobacco (Division C, Schedule 1 7 )_______________________
Bicycle manufacturing____________________________________________________
Billiard halls— personal service___________________________________________
Billiard table manufacturing______________________________________________
Bill posting-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Binder twine manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------Blacking manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------------Black lead manufacturing_______________________________________________
Blacksmithing— not shoeing______________________________________________
Blacksmithing— shoeing----------------------------------------------------------------------------Blast furnaces— erection, etc---------------------------------------------------------------------Blast furnaces— operation________________________________________________
B la stin g_________________________________________________________________
Bleacheries_______________________________________________________________
Bleaching powder manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------Blind manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Boat -and ship building— steel or iron----------------------------------------------------Boat and ship building— wood___________________________________________
Boat livery_______________________________________________________________
Bobbin and spool manufacturing__________________________________________
Boiler inspecting and scaling---------------------------------------------------------------------Boilermaking________________________________________________________ ____
Boilers or steam pipes— applying asbestos, etc___________________________
Boilers— steam— installation and repair_____________ ____________________
Bolt and nut manufacturing_____________________________________________
Bone and ivory turning_________________________________________________
Bonnet frame manufacturing_____________________________________________
Bookbinding______________________________________________________________
Bookbinding machinery manufacturing___________________________________
Boot and shoe machinery manufacturing________________________________




27
32
46
44
28
45
37
41
45
56
38

111
161
317
290
118
304
196
265
311
393
231

51
27
31
32
70
35
55
61
33
33
34
35
24
70
37
22
35
35
70
69
32
43
45
30
30
46
27
60
56
43
37
37
35
45
33
70
35
52
43
39
24
27
68
50
26
48
44
38
33
55
55
61
34
70
30
57
56
28
38
45
42
31
31

371
113
144
146
543
177
381
463
171
170
173
180
52
542
197
30
179
180
542
532
147
286
312
125
125
313
110
440
393
282
196
213
177

-

164
541
177
373
287
233
52
112
441
367
92
351
291
230
172
382
381
463
176
550
140
394
393
118
218
303
270
144
144

Ill

INDEX OF CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRIES.

Boot and shoe manufacturing-------------------------------------------Boot and shoe manufacturing— rubber___________________
Boot and shoe pattern manufacturing-------------------------------Borax manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Bottle dealers-------------------------------------------------------------------Bottle manufacturing____________________________________
Bottling— not under pressure_____________________________
Bottling— under pressure________________________________
Bowling halls— personal service___________________________
Box manufacturing— paper-----------------------------------------------Box manufacturing— wood________________________________
Box shooks manufacturing_______________________________
Braid manufacturing (see Fringe and braid manufacturing)
Brass foundries----------------------------------------------------------------Brass goods manufacturing_______________________________
Brass work— erection-------------------------------------------------------Brass work manufacturing-----------------------------------------------Breakfast food manufacturing-------------------------------------------Breakwater construction--------------------------------------------------Breweries— chauffeurs_____________________________________
Breweries— drivers and drivers’ helpers----------------------------Brewery vats— installation-----------------------------------------------Brewing and m alting-------------------------------------------------------Brick manufacturing— no underground mining____________
Brick manufacturing— underground mining_______________
Bridge building— concrete------------------------------------------------Bridge building— masonry (except concrete)______________
Bridge building— m etal___________________________________
Bridge building— wood____________________________________
Bridge foundations— excavation----------------------------------------Bristol board manufacturing_____________________________
Bronze work— erection-----------------------------------------------------Bronze work manufacturing______________________________
Broom manufacturing_____________________________________
Brush manufacturing_____________________________________
Buffing wheel manufacturing______________________________
Building construction_____________________________________
Building manufacturing— portable— metal________________
Building manufacturing— portable— wood------------------------Building material dealers--------------------------------------------------Building moving, raising, and wrecking------------------------Building paper or building felt manufacturing_____________
Buildings— cleaning outside surfaces---------------------------------Buildings— concrete---------------------------------------------------------Buildings— domestic service----------------------------------------------Buildings— portable— erection_____________________________
Bunting manufacturing___________________________________
Burial garment manufacturing-----------------------------------------Burlap and sack manufacturing__________________________
Butchers_________________________________________________
Butchers’ supplies manufacturing_________________________
Butterine manufacturing--------------------------------------------------Butter manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------Button manufacturing— celluloid_________________________
Button manufacturing— n. o. c----------------------------------------Button manufacturing— pearl, shell, and vegetable ivory_

47
40
46
37
28
38

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
..
_

.
-

-

Group.
194
213
176
230
510
81
321
320
541
263
174
171
290
110
126
390
113
310
379
431
430
393
318
71
70
372
367
370
375
362
261
390
113
181
181
334
376
116
175
519
350
265
377
372
530
375
281
178
288
500
335
241
316
216
118
218

34
34
27
38
62
49
38
55
61
50
40
46
36
28
46
55
43
45
38
38
40
40
41
24
31
41
31
43

175
175
103
217
470
364
230
381
463
366
241
315
184
115
318
383
282
303
‘>32
230
240
245
265
53
145
261
143
282

Page.
37
37
34
38
65
25
47
47
70
41
34
33
44
27
30
55
27
45
54
59
58
56
46
25
24
52
50
51
53
49
41
55
27
35
35
47
53
28
34
65
48
41
53
52
67
53
42
35
43

C.
Cabinets, tanks, and seats— manufacturing (plumbers’ supplies)
Cabinet works____________________________________ ______________
Cable manufacturing— wire______________________________________
Cables— insula tion_______________________________________________
Cables— placing in conduits---------------------------------------------------------Caisson w o rk ___________________________________________________
Camphor manufacturing________________________________________
Canal boat construction________________________________________
Canal boats— operation----------------------------------------------------------------Canal construction______________________________________________
Candle manufacturing___________________________________________
Candy manufacturing (see Confectionery manufacturing)________
Cane manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------Can manufacturing______________________________________________
Canning and preserving_________________________________________
Canoe building_________________________________________________
Canvas manufacturing___________________________________________
Cap and hat manufacturing____________________________________
Capsule manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------Carbide of calcium manufacturing_____________________________
Carbonic acid gas manufacturing________________________________
Carbon manufacturing__________________________________________
Carbon paper manufacturing_____________________________________
Carborundum manufacturing____________________________________
Carburetor manufacturing_______________________________________
Cardboard manufacturing_______________________ _______________
Card clothing manufacturing____________________________________
Carding and fulling mills______________________________________




-

112

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Care, custody, and maintenance of buildings----------------------------------------------Car manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Carnotite mining---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Carpentry— outside-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Carpentry— shop only------------------------------------------------------------------------------Carpentry— within buildings----------------------------------------------------------------------Carpet cleaning and beating--------------------------------------------------------------------Carpet manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------------Carriage body manufacturing------------- '-----------------------------------------------------Carriage depositories and salesrooms------------------------------------------------------Carriage m anufacturing__________________________________________________
Carrier system s__________________________________________________________
Cartage and storage (Division E, Schedule 3 ) ----------------------------------------Cartridge manufacturing— charging and loading----------------------------------------Cartridge manufacturing— for small arms-------------------------------------------------Car wheel manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------------Case manufacturing— charging and loading----------------------------------------------L
Case manufacturing— no loading, etc--------------------------------------------------------Cash register manufacturing______________________________________________
Castings— steel— foundries_______________________________________________
Castor oil manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------------Catering__________________________________________________________________
Cathedral and art-glass window manufacturing-----------------------------------------Cattle dealers--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ceiling and wall covering manufacturing— metal------------------------------------Ceilings and wall coverings— installation--------------------------------------------------Cellar excavation-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Cellar excavation— contractors------------------------------------------------------------------Celluloid goods manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------Celluloid m anufacturing__________________________________________________
Cement manufacturing— including quarrying-------------------------------------------Cement manufacturing— no quarrying------------------------------------------------------Cement manufacturing— ru b b e r -------------- ,-----------------------------------------------Cement qu arryin g_______________________________________________________
Cemetery companies— care of grounds----------------------------------------------------Cesspool d ig g in g -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Chain m anufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------------Chair manufacturing— including assembling of parts____________________
Chair manufacturing— no assembling---------------------------------------------------------Chair manufacturing— upholstering______________________________________
Chandelier manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------------Chandlers, tallow _______________________________________________________
Charcoal dealers--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Charcoal manufacturing__________________________________________________
Chauffeurs_______________________________________________________________
Check manufacturing— metal (see Tag, check, and label manufacturing—m etal)---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Check manufacturing— not metal (see Tag, check, and label manufactur­
ing— not m etal)------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Check protector manufacturing___________________________________________
Cheese manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------------Chemicals and allied products (Division C, Schedule 1 2 )_______________
Chewing gum manufacturing_____________________________________________
Chimneys— construction__________________________________________________
Chimneys— erection-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------China manufacturing and decorating------------------------------------------------------Chocolate m anufacturing_________________________________________________
Churches— care, custody, and maintenance______________________________
Churches— professional s erv ice----------------------------------------------------------------Cider m anufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Cigar box manufacturing________________________________________________
Cigarette paper manufacturing____________________________________________
Cigar or cigarette manufacturing_______________________________________
Cigar stores _____________________________________________________________
Circulation solicitors— newspaper________________________________________
Clay d ig gin g--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Clay or shale mining-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Clay products manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 2 ) ____________________
Cleaning and dyeing______________________________________________________
Cleaning and renovating outside surfaces of buildings_____________________
Clearing and grading_____________________________________________________
Clerical office employees__________________________________________________
Cloak manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Clock manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Clothes wringer and washing machine manufacturing— metal____________
Clothes wringer and washing machine manufacturing— n. o. c___________
Clothing and furnishings manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 1 6 )_______
Clothing stores___________________________________________________________
Cloth printing and sponging______________________________________________
Clubhouses— domestic service_____________________________________________
Coal billet and briquette manufacturing___________________________________
Coal chutes— erection and repair (see Ironwork— erection and repair)____
Coal dealers---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Coal merchants— chauffeurs__________________________________________ ____
Coal merchants— drivers and drivers’ helpers_____________________________
Coal merchants— yards___________________________________________________
Coal mining— anthracite_________________________________________________




Page.
67
32
22
53
34
57
45
43
32
64
32
56
58
39
32
32
39
32
31
27
40
69
25
60
28
55
49
53
38
37
23
24
37
23
69
50
27
35

Group.
530
160
30
375
175
397
305
285
162
500
161
392

35
29
40
65
40
59

239
146
160
239
146
145
110
243
532
82
450
116
390
362
376
216
215
42
54
213
42
531
365
112
177
172
178
123
241
510
245
431

29

118

42
31
46
38
46
50
51
25
46
68 •
71
47
34
41
47
64
42
23
23
24
45
53
49
63
44
30
32
36
44
64
44
69
40
51
66
59
58
65
22

265
145
316
315
367
370
72
315
530
551
323
174
261
324
500
270
43
31
305
377
361
490
300
127
146
182
500
291
532
245
371
510
431
430
510
25

113

INDEX OF CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRIES.

Coal mining— bituminous-----------------------------------------------------Coal tar manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------Cocoa manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------Coconut shredding and drying-----------------------------------------------Cod-liver oil manufacturing---------------------------------------------------Coffee cleaning, roasting, and grinding----------------------------------Coffin and casket manufacturing— concrete---------------------------Coffin and casket manufacturing— metal------------------------------Coffin and casket manufacturing— upholstery work---------------Coffin and casket manufacturing— wood--------------------------------Coke burning------------------------------------------------------------------------Cold storage warehouses— operation-------------------------------------Collar and cuff manufacturing----------------------------------------------Collectors and messengers----------------------------------------------- Colleges and schools— clerical office employees----------------------Colleges and schools— not clerical, professors and teachers—
Colleges and schools— teachers and instructors----------------------Color manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------Commissary— cooks, waiters, etc-------------------------------------------Commission merchants and salesmen— live stock------------------Composition goods manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 11)-.
Compressed food manufacturing--------------------------------------------Concrete block manufacturing----------------------------------------------Concrete construction------------------------------------------------------------Concrete mixers— operation-------------------------------------------------Concrete work— paving----------------------------------------------------------Condensed milk manufacturing----------------------------------------------Conduits for electric wires— construction----------------------------Conduits— no construction-----------------------------------------------------Confectioners’ machinery manufacturing------------------------------Confectionery manufacturing------------------------------------------------Construction (Division D )----------------------------------------------------Contractors— building private residences, etc-----------------------Contractors— gen eral-----------------------------------------------------------Conveyors and hoisting apparatus— erection and installation
Cooperage-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Copper goods manufacturing-----------------------------------------------Copper mining----------------------------------------------------------------------Copper smelting and refining------------------------------------------------Coppersmithing— away from s h o p ----------------------------------------Coppersmithing— shop only---------------------------------------------------Cop tube manufacturing------------------------------------------------------Cordage manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------Cork carpet manufacturing---------------------------------------------------Cork cutting works--------------------------------------------------------------Cork paper manufacturing----------------------------------------------------Cornices and skylights— erection and repair-----------------------Cornices and skylights— shop only---------------------------------------Corn mills----------------------------------------------------------------------------Corn shredders— operation---------------------------------------------------Corrugated iron buildings— erection--------------------------------------Corrugated paper manufacturing-----------------------------------------Corset manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------Cotton and woolen clippings dealers-------------------------------------Cotton batting manufacturing---------------------------------------------Cotton compressing, ginning, and pressing---------------------------Cotton-gin machinery manufacturing------------------------------------Cotton goods manufacturing------------------------------------------------Cotton goods— mercerizing--------------------------------------------------Cotton manufacturing— absorbent----------------------------------------Cottonseed oil manufacturing and refining----------------------------Cotton spinning and weaving---------------------------------------------Counter, heel, and sole cutting---------------------------------------------Country clubs— domestic service------------------------------------------Cracker manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Crane and derrick manufacturing----------------------------------------Cranes and derricks— installation---------------------------------------Crayon manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------Creameries and dairies— not farming-----------------------------------Creamery and dairy supplies manufacturing--------------------------Crematories— operation------------------------------------- -----------------Creosote manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Cribwork— construction-------------------------------------------------------Crossing manufacturing— railroad----------------------------------------Crutch manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------Culm washing---------------------------------------------------------------------Curator— picture galleries, museums, etc-----------------------------Curriers____________________________________________________
Curtain roller manufacturing-----------------------------------------------Cut glass manufacturing____________________________________
Cutlery manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------Cut sole manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Cutting and welding— electric----------------------------------------------Cutting and welding— oxyacetylene— away from shop_______
Cutting and welding— oxyacetylene— shop only_____________
Cutting die manufacturing_________________________________
Cycle car manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------

38043°—Bull. 201—16----- 8




_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

Page.
22
40
46
46
40
45
24
28
35
34
40
60
44
67
63
68
71
39
69
60
37
46
24
52
52
57
46
50
62
31
46
48
53
53
56
34
30
26
55
28
31
43
38
34
41
54
28
45
22
51
41
44
65
43
22
31
43
44
39
40
43
36
69
46
31
56
47
46
47
r3
38
54
27
36
22
63
36
36
25
29
51
51
30
29
33

Group.
26
244
815
815
241
312
56
116
178
175
245
433
301
520
490
530
552
234
532
450
318
56
372
372
399
316
365
470
144
315
376
376
393
173
126
29
93
390
116
143
287
220
176
265
378
116
310
21
371
265
302
510
286
20
142
282
291
236
242
282
193
532
311
144
393
330
316
335
479
230
379
110
184
25
490
190
182
81
120
193
371
371
129
120
162

114

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

D.
Dairies and creameries— not farming---------------------------Dairy and creamery supplies manufacturing________ _
Dairy farming-------------------------------------------------------------Dairy products manufacturing-------------------- ----------------Dam construction— not concrete dams------------------------Dams— concrete________________________________________
Dams— excavation-------------------------------------------------------Dams, reservoirs, and pumping stations— construction..
Dance halls— care, custody, and maintenance-------------Dance halls— instructors, musicians, and attendants..
Decorating and painting— interior work----------------------Decorating and painting— not interior w ork ----------------Decorating— interior and exterior---------------------------------Degreasing skins----------------------------------------------------------Dental material manufacturing-----------------------------------Dentists— professional service (including employees)..
Department stores_____________________________________
Derrick and crane manufacturing--------------------------------Derricks and cranes— installation_____________________
Designers--------------------------------------------------------------------Detective agencies------------------------------------------------------Detinning_____________________________________________
Dextrin manufacturing-----------------------------------------------Diamond cutting and polishing-----------------------------------Diamond drilling---------------------------------------------------------Die manufacturing, cutting-----------------------------------------Disculoid manufacturing----------------------------------------------Disinfectant manufacturing___________________________
Distilling______________________________________________
Ditch d ig g in g -------------------------------------------------------------Ditch digging with pipe laying-----------------------------------Dog shows— domestic service__________________________
Doll manufacturing----------------------------------------------------Domestic science— professors and teachers___________
Domestic service (Division G, Schedule 1 )-------------------Door manufacturing— firep roof-----------------------------------Door manufacturing— wood------------------------------------------Doors— erection and repair------------------------------------------Draftsmen--------------------------------------------------------------------Drain pipe manufacturing— no underground mining---Drain pipe manufacturing— underground mining______
Dredge manufacturing--------------------------------------------------Dredging— floating dredges-----------------------------------------Dredging— suction dredges------------------------------------------Dressmaking___________________________________________
Dress pattern manufacturing----------------------------------------D rilling_______________________________________________
Drivers and stablemen-----------------------------------------------Drug manufacturing----------------------------------------------------Dry battery manufacturing----------------------------------------Dry docks— construction---------------------------------------------Dry docks (floating)— construction-----------------------------Dry docks— operation--------------------------------------------------Dry goods stores---------------------------------------------------------Duck cloth manufacturing-------------------------------------------Dwellings (a ll)— care, custody, and maintenance_____
Dyeing and cleaning (see Cleaning and dyeing)________
Dyeing of textiles (see Textiles— dyeing, finishing, etc.)
Dye, paint, and color manufacturing---------------------------

Page.
46
48
21
46
54
52
49
54
68
70
57
54
52
36
39
71
- 64
_ 31
- 56
42
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

30
41
48
49
29
37
- 38
._ 47
- 49
- 50
68
- 25
71
- 67
28
33
55
63
25
24
- 31
49
49
44
41
49
58
39
32
- 54
55
- 55
64
43
68
45
44
-

Group.
316
335
5
316
379
372
. 362
379
530
541
398
377
373
190
236
551
500
144
393
270
560
128
248
340
363
120
215
230
322
362
365
530
72
552
116
172
390
490
71
70
144
362
362
300
265
363
430
235
147
379
381
384
500
282
530
305
291
234

E.

Earthenware manufacturing— household utensils_______
Earthenware manufacturing— no underground mining..
Earthenware manufacturing— underground mining_____
E ditors------------------------------------------------------------------------Electric apparatus— erection and repair— public utilities.
Electric apparatus manufacturing____________________
Electric cutting and welding----------------------------------------Electric equipment— installation and repair____________
Electric fixture manufacturing-------------------------------------Electric light and power companies— operation-------------Electric light and power line construction--------------------Electric railroad construction----------------------------------. . .
Electric railroads— clerical office employees____________
Electric railroads— operation (Division E, Schedule 2) _
Electroplating-------------------------------------------------------------Electrotyping--------------------------------------------------------------Elevated railroads— operation--------------------------------------Elevated railroads— clerical office employees----------------Elevated railroads— ironwork erecting_________________
Elevator attendants----------------------------------------------------Elevator erection and repair______________________ ___
Elevator inspecting____________________________________
Elevator manufacturing_______________________________
Embossing leather--------------------------------------------------------




25
25
24
42
62
32
51
57
29
62
62
54
64
58

._
._

58
63
51
68
56
70
27
36

72
71
70
270
470
147
371
395
123
470
470
380
490
128
270
421
490
370
530
391
550
113
192

115

INDEX OF CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRIES.
Embroidery manufacturing____________________
Emery cloth manufacturing----------------------------Emery or other abrasive wheel manufacturing.
Emery w orks__________________________________
Enamel and agate ware manufacturing-------------Enameled ironware manufacturing------------------Enameling--------------------------------------------------------Engine manufacturing-------------------------------------Engine manufacturing— automobile------------------Engines— installation---------------------------------------Engraving_____________________________________
Ensilage cutters— operation----------------------------Envelope manufacturing_______________________
Erecting (Division D, Schedule 3 ) ------------- -----Escalator manufacturing----------------------------------Essential oils manufacturing---------------------------Estates, private— care of grounds------------------Excavating and pile driving----------------------------Excelsior manufacturing______________________
Exhibitions— care, custody, and maintenance..
Exhibitions— personal service--------------------------Explosive manufacturing---------------------------------Express companies— operation--------------------------Extract manufacturing-----------------------------------Eyeglass and spectacle manufacturing-------------Eyelet manufacturing---------------------------------------Eye manufacturing— glass---------------------------------

Page.
44
24
24
24
28
27
30
30
32
56
42
22
41
51
27
39
69
49
33
68
70
39
59
39
25
29
25

Group.
290
57
52
52
115
110
128
141
162
393
270
21
262
113
237
531
362
171
530
542
239
432
237
83
119
83

F.
Factory cost systematizer (see Auditors, accountants, etc.)---------Farming— dairy-------------------------------------------------------------------------Farming— garden and truck-------------------------------------------------------Farming— general----------------------------------------------------------------------Farming— stock-------------------------------------------------------------------------Farm labor--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Farm machinery-----------------------------------------------------------------------Fats and oils— animal---------------------------------------------------------------Feather and flower manufacturing--------------------------------------------Feather pillow manufacturing---------------------------------------------------Feldspar mining------------------------------------------------------------------------Felting manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------Fence construction— wood, stone, metal, or concrete-------------------Fence manufacturing— w ire------------------------------------------------------Ferries________________________________________________________
Fertilizer manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------Fiber goods manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Fiberloid manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------File manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------Filing equipment manufacturing-----------------------------------------------Film exchanges-------------------------------------------------------------------------Film manufacturing— photographic-------------------------------------------Fire alarm systems— construction---------------------------------------------Fire clay products manufacturing— no underground mining____
Fire clay products manufacturing— underground mining----------Fire engine manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Fire escape manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Fire escapes— erection and repair (see Ironwork— erecting, etc.)
Firemen_______________________________________________________
Fire patrol and salvage corps----------------------------------------------------Fireproof construction--------------------------------------------------------------Fireproof door and shutter manufacturing_____________________
Fireproof equipment manufacturing------------------------------------------Fireproofing— tile construction and repair---------------------------------Fireproof shutters— erection and repair------------------------------------Fireworks manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------Fish curing and packing-----------------------------------------------------------Fisheries-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Fishing tackle and rod manufacturing--------------------------------------Fishing vessels-------------------------------------------------------------------------Five and ten cent stores-------------------------------------------------------------Flavoring extract manufacturing---------------------------------------------Flax spinning and weaving-------------------------------------------------------Flint and spar grinding-------------------------------------------------------------Floor surfacing-------------------------------------------------------------------------Florists— cultivating and gardening_____________________________
Florists— not cultivating and gardening________________________
Flour dealers— ------------------------------------------------------------------------Flour mills--------!-----------------------------------------------------------------------Flower and feather manufacturing_____________________________
Flowerpot manufacturing______________________________________
Fly paper manufacturing_____________________ l ________________
Food manufacturing— tablet form______________________________
Foods, beverages, and fobacco (Division C, Schedule 1 7)_______
Forging-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Forwarding agents-------------------------------------------------------------------Foundations (Division D, Schedule 2 ) ___- ______________________




70
21
22
21
21
21
22
40
45
45
23
42
52
29
61
39
41
37
29
28
48
47
62
25
24
30
27
51
71
71
52
28
28
57
51
39
46
61
47
61
64
39
43
24
57
22
64
65
46
45
25
42
46
45
27
59
48

550
5
15
1
10
1
21
241
303
304
31
281
374
124
460
238
264
215
120
116
339
332
471
71
70
141
113
371
560
560
372
116
116
396
371
239
318
462
333
462
500
237
288
52
396
15
500
510
310
303
72
265
318
112

432

116

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Foundations for buildings— concrete construction______
Foundries_____________________________________________
Fountain pen manufacturing-------------------------------------Fraternal orders equipment and regalia manufacturing.
Freight handlers--------------------------------------------------------Fringe and braid manufacturing--------------------------------Frog manufacturing— railroad-----------------------------------Fruit evaporating, packing, and preserving----------------Fuel and material dealers------------------------------------------Fumigation of buildings----------------------------------------------Fur goods manufacturing------------------------------------------Fur manufacturing----------------------------------------------------Furnace manufacturing----------------------------------------------Furnaces— installation-----------------------------------------------Furnishing goods manufacturing--------------------------------Furniture dealers------------------------------------------------------Furniture manufacturing— assembling of parts_______
Furniture manufacturing— metal--------------------------------Furniture manufacturing— no assembling--------------------Furniture manufacturing— upholstering----------------------Furniture— packing and unpacking-----------------------------Fuse manufacturing----------------------------------------------------

Page.
52
27
37
47
59
44
27
46
66

71
44
36
29
56
44
64
35
28
33
35
67
39

Group.
372
110

214
333
432
290
110

33 8
510
560
300
191
122

394
302
500
177
116
172
178
510
239

G.

Galvanized iron and sheet iron work— erection and repair_______________
54
Galvanized ironwork manufacturing______________________________________ 28
Galvanizing or tinning sheet m etal------------------------------------------------------------ 30
Garages and taxicab stations— chauffeurs--------------------------------------------------- 59
Garages and taxicab stations— clerical office employees___________________ 63
Garages and taxicab stations— not clerical office employees_______________
60
Garbage collecting-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 71
Garbage works and sewage disposal plants— operation, etc_______________
63
Garden and truck farming------------------------------------------------------------------------ 21
Gardening tool manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------- 28
Garment manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------37
Gas and electric fixtures manufacturing______________________________ __ 29
Gas benches and retorts— installation_____________________________________ 50
Gas engine ignition apparatus manufacturing (see Ignition apparatus
manufacturing for gas engines)------------------------------------------------------------ 32
Gases— manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------------40
Gas holder manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------ 30
Gas holders— erection--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 51
Gas machine manufacturing (see Acetylene-gas machine manufacturing)___ 31
Gas machines— installation (see Acetylene-gas machines— installation)____ 56
Gas mantle manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------- 44
Gas meter manufacturing________________________________________________
31
Gasoline and oil supply stations— operation---------------------------------------------- 60
Gasoline m anufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 40
Gas or gasoline engine manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------- 30
Gas production— n a tu r a l-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 63
Gas retort manufacturing— no underground mining______________________
25
Gas retort manufacturing— underground mining_________________________
24
Gas, steam, and hot water apparatus supplies dealers_____________________ 64
Gas well operating----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 23
Gas works— laying of mains, etc________________________________________
50
Gas works— operation, maintenance, etc___________________________________ 63
Gauge and valve manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------31
Gear grinding and manufacturing_______________________________________
32
Gelatine manufacturing__________________________________________________
38
Gilding and electroplating------------------------------------------------------------------------ 30
Ginning, cotton ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22
Glass eye manufacturing_________________________________________________
25
Glass manufacturing— not plate or sheet_______________________________
25
Glass manufacturing— ornam ental_______________________________________
25
Glass manufacturing— plate or sheet-------------------------------------------------------- 25
Glass merchants_________________________________________________________
25
Glass products manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 3 ) ____________________ 25
Glaziers----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------53
Glove and mitten manufacturing— cloth__________________________________
44
Glove manufacturing— leather____________________________________________ 37
Gloves— leather dressing--------------------------------------------------------------------------36
Glucose manufacturing___ ________________________________________________
41
Glue manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 38
Glycerine manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------40
Gold leaf manufacturing_________________________________________________
30
Gold m in in g --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22
Gold p la tin g --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 30
Gold smelting and refining------------------------------------------------------------------------26
Golf club manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 36
Grading and clearing------------------------------.-------------------------------------------------- 49
Grain and fruit inspector------------------------ ‘________________________________
70
Grain elevators— dealers--------------------------------------------------------------------------66
Grain elevators— concrete construction____________________________________ 52
Grain elevators— o p era tion ______________________________________________ 60
Graphite and pure carbon manufacturing— artificial_______________________
40
Graphite manufacturing— not artificial____________________________________ 24




378
116
128
431
490
438
560
476
15
118
213
123
367
147
240
140
370
144
393
290
145
439
244
141
472
71
70
500
32
365
473
145
146
232
128
20

83
81
82
80
82
377
302
195
190
248
232
241
127
27
128
91
184
361
550
510
372
435
245
52

117

INDEX OF CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRIES,
Page.
23
23
56
40
24
23
45
65
59
29
37
23

Graphite mining------------------Gravel d ig g in g ------------------Gravity chutes— erection___
Grease manufacturing______
Grinding— stone____________
Grindstone manufacturing
Grist m ills_________________
Grocers_____________________
Groom s____________________
Gun m anufacturing________
Gutta-percha manufacturing
Gypsum m ining-------------------

Group.
31
43
392
241
52
51
310
500
430
121
210
31

H.

Haircloth manufacturing_________________________
Hair dressing--------------------------------------- ---------------Hair goods manufacturing_______________________
Halls— care, custody, and maintenance___________
Hams, bacon, and meat products— curing_______
Handkerchief manufacturing ___________________
Hand tool manufacturing-------------------------------------Hardware manufacturing________________________
Hardware stores_________________________________
Harness and saddle manufacturing______________
Harness blacking manufacturing_________________
Harvesting machines— operation_________________
Hat block manufacturing-------------------------------------Hat manufacturing_______________________________
Hatters’ fur manufacturing______________________
Hay b a lin g --------------------------------------------------------Hay, grain, and feed dealers------------------------------Hay. straw, and feed dealers-____________________
Headware manufacturing________________________
Heater manufacturing___________________________
Heating and plumbing----------------------------------------Heating or power companies, steam— operation__
Heating, steam— laying of mains_________________
Heel and sole cutting____________________________
Hemp spinning and weaving--------------------------------Hide and leather dealers________________________
Hod hoists— installation, etc--------------------------------Hoe m anufacturing_____________________________
Hoisting apparatus and conveyors— erection, etc.
Hominy m ills------------------------------------------------------Hone and oilstone manufacturing_________________
Hop picking--------------------------------------------------------Horn goods manufacturing_____________________
Horse blanket manufacturing------------------------------Horseshoeing------------------------------------------------------Horseshoe manufacturing _______________________
Horse shows— care, custody, and maintenance____
Horse shows— clerical office employees____________
Horse shows— stablemen_________________________
Hose manufacturing— cotton or linen____________
Hosiery manufacturing___________________________
Hospitals— clerical office employees______________
Hospitals— not clerical office employees_________
Hospitals— professional employees________________
Hotels— domestic service_________________________
Hothouse manufacturing_________________________
Hothouses— erection_____________________________
House furnishings— installation__________________
Household utensils manufacturing— earthenwareHousehold utensils manufacturing— wood________
Household utensils— packing and unpacking_____
Husking machine manufacturing_________________
Hydrogen and oxygen manufacturing___________

42
70
45
68
46
45
29
28
65
37
39
22
34
45
42
22
66
66
45
29
56
63
50
36
43
65
56
28
56
45
23
22
38
42
60
29
68
63
58
43
43
63
68
71
69
34
53
35
25
36
67
31
40

281
543
303
530
317
302
120
118
500
196
233
21
176
303
281
21
510
510
303
122
394
475
365
193
288
500
391
118
393
310
51
15
218
281
441
118
530
490
430
282
289
490
530
551
532
175
375
178
72
182
510
142
240

36
46
66
66
60
47
59
58
32
44
25
35
39
39
70
56

182
315
510
510
434
325
431
430
147
290
81
177
234
233
550

I.
Ice cream freezer manufacturing__________________
Ice cream manufacturing_________________________
Ice dealers— not harvesting and storing___________
Ice dealers (see Fuel and material dealers)________
Ice harvesting and storing_____________________ __
_
Ice manufacturing_________________________________
Ice manufacturing— chauffeurs__________________ _
Ice manufacturing— drivers and drivers’ helpers___
Ignition apparatus manufacturing for gas engines.
Incandescent gas mantle manufacturing___________
Incandescent lamp manufacturing_________________
Incubator manufacturing__________________________
Ink manufacturing— printing_____________________
Ink manufacturing— w riting_____________________
Inspectors and appraisers__________________________
Installing (Division D, Schedule 4 ) _______________




118

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Institutions— professional employees____________________
Instrument manufacturing— musical— metal____________
Instrument manufacturing— musical— w ood ____________
Instrument manufacturing— professional or scientific__
Insulation______________________________________________
Insulator manufacturing— porcelain and lava tips_____
Iron and steel works— ornamental______________________
Iron and steel works— structural_______________________
Iron foundries__________________________________________
Iron— malleable (see Foundries— malleable iro n )_,_____
Iron merchants________________________________________
Iron mining____________________________________________
Iron smelting___________________________________________
Ironwork— erection and repair— outside____________ Ironwork— erection— inside_____________________________
Ironwork manufacturing— architectural and ornamental
Ironwork manufacturing— galvanized___________________
Ironwork— structural iron erecting______________ ______
Irrigation works— operation and maintenance__________
Isinglass manufacturing— fish glue_____________________
Isinglass manufacturing— mica_________________________
Ivory turning___________________________________________

._
._

Page.
71
32
36
32
38
25
27
27
27
27
65

._

26
51

.
._

. . . 27
.- 28
._ 51
63

Group.
551
148
183
148
217
72
113
102
110
110
500
28
92
371
390
113
116
370
478
232
57
218

J.
Jams, jellies, and preserves— preparing.
Japanning_____________________________
Jetty and breakwater construction____
Jewelry box and tray manufacturing_
_
Jewelry manufacturing_______________
Jewelry stores------------------------------------Jobbing work— building construction_
_
Junk dealers__________________________
Jute and hemp spinning and weaving—

.
._

46
30
54
41
30
65
53
66
43

318
128
379
263
127
500
376
510
288

66
33
43
43

510
171
289
289

K.
__

Kindling or firewood dealers— .
Kindling wood manufacturing.
Knit goods manufacturing------Knitting mills--------------------------

—
-

L.
Label manufacturing— metal (see Tag, check, and label manufacturing—
m eta l)--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Label manufacturing— not metal (see Tag, check, and label manufactur­
ing— not m etal)-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lace manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ladder manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ladders— installation--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lamp and lantern manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------Lamp and lantern manufacturing— automobile___________________________
Lampblack manufacturing------------------------------------------------a.______________
Lamplighting----------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lamp shade manufacturing_______________________________________________
Landscape gardening--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lanolin manufacturing-------------------------------- -------------------------------------------Lard refining--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Last and last-block manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------Lathing-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lath manufacturing______________________________________________________
Laundries-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lava tips manufacturing_________________________________________________
Lawn mower manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------Lead manufacturing— black---------------------------------------------------------------------Lead manufacturing— white— re d ________________________________________
Lead mining----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lead pencil manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------------Lead products manufacturing_____________________________________________
Lead sm elting------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Leather (Division C, Schedule 1 0 )_______________________________________
Leather board manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------Leather dealers----------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------Leather dressing---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Leather embossing-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Leather goods manufacturing— n. o. c_____________________________________
Leather manufacturing (imitation)— n6t using pyroxylin, etc___________
Leather manufacturing (imitation)— using pyroxylin, etc_________________
Leather manufacturing— patent or enamel______________________________
Leather uppers— cutting ,--------------------------------------------------------------------------Ledger m anufacturing___________________________________________________
Lens manufacturing ____________________________________________________
Libraries, public— care, custody, and maintenance____:_____________________
Libraries, public— librarian, etc___________________________________________




29

118

42
44
34
57
28
33
39
72
29
49
40
40
34
57
33
45
25
31
24
39

265
290
175
397
115
162
234
560
123
361
241
241
176
397
171
305
72
142
52
234
30
330

22

47
27
26
36
36
65
36
36
37
38
37
36
36
42
25
68

63

111

94

193
500
190
192
197

220

216
190
193
270
83
530
490

INDEX OF CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRIES.

119
Page.

Licorice manufacturing ---------------------------------------------------Lighters, barges, and canal boats— operation------------------Lightning rods— erection---------------------------------------------------Light prisms— installation and repair--------------------------------Limb m anufacturing_____________________________________
Lime burning--------------------------------------------------------------------Lime manufacturing—from oyster shells-------------------------Lime manufacturing— including quarrying, etc----------------Linen cloth m anufacturing----------------------------------------------Linoleum and cork carpet manufacturing-------------------------Linotype and hand, composition__________________________
Linseed oil manufacturing.:---------------------------------------------Liquor manufacturing— fermented _______________________
_
Lithographic stone manufacturing________________ <______
Lithographing________________________________________ ___.
Livery and boarding stables— drivers and drivers’ helpers--.
Live stock— shipping— commission merchants and salesmen.
Lock gates— construction and installation______________ _
Lock manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------Locksmithing--------------------------------------------------------------------Locomotive works :_______________________________________
Logging and lumbering------------------------------------------------------Logging railroads— opera tion ____________________________
Logging tool manufacturing----------------------------------------------Loom, loom harness, and reed manufacturing____________
Loom manufacturing— circular____________________________
Loose leaf ledger and notebook manufacturing____________
Lumber and wood (Division C, Schedule 9 ) _______________
Lumber dealers __________________________________________
l.umbering-------------------------------------------------------------------------Lumber yards--------------------------------------------------------------------Lunch rooms— domestic service----------------------------------------Lunch wagons— domestic service— ------------------------------------

46
61
51
57
48
24
38
24
43
38
42
40
47
23
42
59
60
51
29
55
31
33
58
29
31
38
42
33
66
33
66
69
69

Group.
315
463
371
399
337
55
218
55
284
220
270
243
323
51
270
430
450
370
118
390
141
170
410
120
143
217
270
510
170
510
532
532

M.

Macaroni manufacturing------------------------------ -----------------------------------Machine gun manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------Machinery and instrument manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 7)_
Machinery dealers________________________________________________
Machine s h o p s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Magneto manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------Mail bag or pouch manufacturing (see Bag manufacturing— leather)
Mail box manufacturing____________________________________________
Mail chute manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------Mail chutes— installation_________________________________________
Mailing and addressing companies— clerical office employees________
Mailing and addressing machines— installation-------------------------------Mailing and addressing machine manufacturing___________________
Malleable iron foundries___________________________________________
Malt houses— chauffeurs-----------------------------------------------------------------Malt houses— drivers and drivers’ helpers--------------------------------------Malting and brewing-----------------------------------------------------------------------Manganese mining--------------------------------------------------------------------------Manicuring — ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mantle manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------Mantle setting and repairing---------------------------------------------------------Manual training— professors and teachers________________________
Manufactured products— miscellaneous (Division C, Schedule 18)___
Manufacturing (Division C>------------------------------------------------------------Marble and stone setting— away from shop________________________
Marble and stone setting— inside construction only_______________
Marble cutting and polishing-------------------------------------------------------Marine railway— construction_____________________________________
Marine railway— handling boats----------------------------------------------------Marine w reck in g__________________________________________________
Marketmen------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Marl digging---------------------------------------------------------------------------------M asonry----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mast and spar manufacturing______________________________________
Match manufacturing_____________________________________________
Matting and rug manufacturing___________________________________
Mattress manufacturing— not wire or excelsior_____________________
Mattress manufacturing— w i r e ____________________________________
Mausoleums and monuments— erection_____________________________
Meat products, hams, and bacons— curing________________________
Medicine extract manufacturing_____:______________________________
Medicine m anufacturing___________________________________________
Mercerizing cotton goods__________________________________________
Merry-go-rounds— care, operation, and maintenance________________
Merry-go-rounds— erection, etc_____________________________________
Messengers and collectors_______________________________ _________
Metal appliances— installing within buildings_____________________
Metal construction— outside_______________________________________
Metal construction— within buildings______________________________
Metal goods manufacturing__________*____________________ ......._
_




45
29
30
65
32
32
37
28
28
56
63
56
31
27
59
59
46
22
71
23
57
71
47
23
50
57
23
54
55
62
65
24
50
34
41
43
45
30
51
46
39
39
44
70
51
67
56
51
55
30

311
121
500
146
147
196
115
113
392
490
393
145
110
431
430
319
30
543
51
396
552
367
396
51
379
384
466
500
52
367
175
249
288
304
125
367
317
237
235
291
542
370
520
392
371
390
130

120

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Metal polish manufacturing_____________________________________
Metal products manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 6 )---------------Mica mining--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mica preparing _________________________________________________
Military or fraternal orders equipment and regalia manufacturing.
Military schools— professors and teachers-------------------------------------Milk d e a le rs____________________________________________________
Milk products manufacturing____________________________________
Millers___________________________________________________________
Millinery manufacturing_________________________________________
Milling machinery manufacturing,-----------------------------------------------Millstone manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------Millwright work__________________________________________________
Mineral mines------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mineral or spring water bottling— natural________________________
Mineral water manufacturing— artificial_________________________
Mineral wells— gas or oil— operation--------------------------------------------Mineral wells— salt— operation----------------------------------------------------Mining— all kinds (Division B, Schedule 1 )_______________________
Mining and milling machinery manufacturing___________________
Mirror manufacturing___________________________________________
Mitten and glove manufacturing---------------------------------------------------Model and pattern manufacturing------------------------------------------------Molasses and sirup manufacturing_______________________________
Monuments and mausoleums— erection___________________________
Morocco dressing------------------------------------------------------------------------Mortar manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------Mosaic w ork ____________________________________________________
Motion pictures— developing of negatives, etc____________________
Motion pictures— production____________________________________
Motion picture theaters— personal service_________________________
Motor boats— construction or repair_____________________________
Motorcycle manufacturing_______________________________________
Moving, raising and wrecking buildings__________________________
Mucilage manufacturing_________________________________________
Museums, public— care, custody, and maintenance________________
Museums, public— curator, etc___________________________________
Musical instrument manufacturing— metal_______________________
Musical instrument manufacturing— w ood _______________________
Music rolls manufacturing_______________________________________
Mustard mills___________________________________________________

Page.
39
27
23
24
47
71
65
46
45
45
31
24
56
23
47
47
23
23
22
31
25
44
34
46
51
36
24
57
48
71
69
55
33
48
39
69
63
32
36
42
46

Group.
233
“ 31
57
333
552
500
316
310
303
144
51
393
31
321
320
32
33
144
82
302
176
314
367
190
54
396
339
554
540
383
163
350
232
530
490
148
183
265
312

N.

29
63
45
29
45
47
44
67
42
22
30
42
31
22
28
45

Nail and spike manufacturing________
Natural gas production----------------------Necktie manufacturing_______________
Needle manufacturing________________
Needlework manufacturing____________
Negatives, photographic— developing
Net manufacturing____________________
News agents__________________________
Newspaper publishing________________
Nickel m ining________________________
Nickel plating__________________;_______
Notebook manufacturing______________
Numbering machine manufacturing___
Nurserymen---------------------------------------Nut and bolt manufacturing__________
Nuts— handling, cleaning, and shelling.

118
472
302
120
304
332
290
520
270
30
J28
270
145
15
118
312

68
63
63
56
40
38
60
42
40
40
40
50
49
23
40
39
23
29
60
40
59
25
22

530
490
490
392
242
220
437
265
241
242
243
365
363
32
244
237
51
122
439
241
430
83
30

O.
Office buildings— care, custody, and maintenanceOffice buildings— clerical office employees-------------Office employees— clerical____________ ____________
Office furniture and fixtures— erection___________
Oil cake manufacturing__________________________
Oilcloth manufacturing__________________________
Oil distributing__________________________________
Oiled, parafined, or waxed paper manufacturing.
Oil manufacturing— animal (fish, lard, tallow )__
Oil manufacturing— cottonseed__________________
Oil manufacturing— vegetable___________________
Oil pipe laying---------------------------------------------------Oil producing— drilling new wells, etc____________
Oil producing— not drilling new wells, etc_______
Oil refining--------------------------------------------------------Oils manufacturing— essential___________________
Oilstone manufacturing__________________________
Oil stove manufacturing_________________________
Oil supply stations---------------------------------------------Oleomargarine manufacturing____________________
Omnibus companies______________________________
Optical goods manufacturing____________________
Ore mining______________________________________




.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

121

IN D EX OF CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRIES.
Page.
26
36
56
53
51
30
40
61
46

Group.
90
183
393
376
371
129
240
462
318

67
34
65
_ 46
57
54
48
51
- 39
_ 41
41
_ 57
41
67
_ 41
_ 68
_ 34
_ 57
42
39
39
_ 27
34
41
57
34
47
24
29
37
39
40
39
39
36
37
23
39
42
47
48
48
67
36
67
29
— 46
38
— 33
36
69

510
174
500
317
398
377
338
370
234

Ore reduction_______________________________________________
Organ building--------------------------------------------------------------------Ovens, bakers’— portable— installation---------------------------------Owners of buildings— engaged in construction work, etc--------Oxyacetylene cutting and welding— away from shop-------------Oxyacetylene cutting and welding— shopwork only----------i -----Oxygen and hydrogen manufacturing----------------------------------Oystermen— planting and harvesting and operation of boats.
Oystermen— shore and dock work only----------------------------------

P.

racking and unpacking furniture and other household utensils----Packing case manufacturing______________________________________
Packing-house products----------------------------------------------------------------Packing houses_______________ ,___________________________________
Painting and decorating— interior work----------------------------------------Painting and decorating— not interior work______________________
Painting— shop___________________________________________________
Painting— steel structures and bridges____________________________
Paint manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------Paper and paper products manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 13)
Paper coating and finishing______________________________________
Paper hanging------------------------------------------------------------------------------Paper manufacturing_____________________________________________
Paper stock dealers______________________________________________
Papier-mach£ goods manufacturing----------------------------------------------Parks or buildings— care, custody, and maintenance---------------------Parquet flooring manufacturing___________________________________
Parquet floor laying______________________________________________
Paraffined, oiled, or waxed paper manufacturing--------------------------Paste manufacturing_____________________________ _______________
Patent medicine manufacturing___________________________________
Patent metal manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Pattern and model manufacturing— wood_________________________
Pattern manufacturing, dress— paper_____________________________
Paving------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Peg and skewer manufacturing____________________________________
Pencil (lead) and crayon manufacturing________________________
Pencil manufacturing— slate______________________________________
Pen manufacturing______________________________________________
Pen manufacturing— fountain_____________________________________
Perfumery manufacturing________________________________________
Petroleum and allied products manufacturing____________________
Pharmaceutical and surgical goods manufacturing----------------------Pharmaceutists___________________________________________________
Phonograph manufacturing_______________________________________
Phonograph record manufacturing_______________________________
Phosphate mining------------------------------------------------------------------------Phosphate works— no mining_____________________________________
Photo-engraving__________________________________________________
Photographic goods and supplies manufacturing__________________
Photograph studios_______________________________________________
Photography_____________________________________________________
Photography— outside— not producing motion pictures____________
Piano and piano player manufacturing___________________________
Piano tuning_____________________________________________________
Piano wire manufacturing________ _______________________________
Pickle manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------Picric acid manufacturing_______________________________________
Picture frame and picture-frame molding manufacturing__________
Picture frame manufacturing— not including moldings__________
Picture galleries, public— care, custody, and maintenance________
Picture galleries, public— curator, etc____________________________
Picture wire manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------Piers or abutments for bridges— concrete_________________________
Pile driving— building foundations only__________________________
Pile driving— dams, breakwaters, etc_____________________________
Pillow manufacturing___________________________________________
Pin manufacturing_______________________________________________
Pipe laying-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Pipe manufacturing— cast iron__________________________________
Pipe manufacturing— drain— no underground mining_____________
Pipe manufacturing— drain— underground mining________________
Pipe manufacturing— lead________________________________________
Pipe manufacturing (sewer)— concrete__________________________
Pipe manufacturing (tobacco)— clay_____________________________
Pipe manufacturing (tobacco)— wood____________________________
Pipe manufacturing— wrought iron_______________________________
Pipe organ building---------------------------------------------------------------------Piping manufacturing___________________________________________
Pistol manufacturing____________________________________________
Pitchfork manufacturing_________________________________________
Planing and molding mills________________________________________
Plaster and artificial stone products manufacturing______________
Plaster block partitions— erection________________________________
Plaster board and plaster block manufacturing__________________
Plaster board— erection________________________________ _____ . . . .




_
_

__
„
—
__
__
__
__
__
—
„
—
__
__
__
—
__
__
__
__
__
—
—

29
52
49
54
45
29
50
27
25
24
27
24
25
34
26
36
38
29
28
33
24
57
24
57

262
398
261
510
264
530
175
397
265
232
235
111
176
265
399
176
330
57
119
214
237
244
236
235
183
214
31
238
270
332
339
339
520
183
520
124
318
23C
172
182
530
490
124
372
362
379
304
119
365
A 10

71
70
111
56
72
176
101
183
217
321
118
172
56
396
. 56
398

122

BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOB STATISTICS.
Page.
57
54
24
25
30
42
31
65
29
56
43
63
50
37
71
39
25
25
28
34
53
25
25
24
65
45
39
22
30
46
39
38
31
42
44
31
65
67
70
39
32
42
71
58
62
42
29
34
41
41
54
31
34
56
39
37

Plastering— n. o. c---------------------------------------------------------------------Plastering— on outside of buildings (see Stuccowork, etc.)_____
Plaster m ills____________________________________________________
Plate glass manufacturing______________________________________
Plating and galvanizing_________________________________________
Playing cards manufacturing------------------------------------------------------Plow manufacturing____________________________________________
Plumbers’ supplies dealers______________________________________
Plumbers’ supplies manufacturing— n. o. c______________________
Plumbing and heating__________________________________________
Plush and velvet goods manufacturing_________________________
Pneumatic tube companies— operation__________________________
Pneumatic tubes— installation___________________________________
Pocketbook manufacturing__________________________________ :___
Policemen_______________________________________________________
Polish manufacturing____________________________________________
Porcelain tips manufacturing____________________________________
Porcelain ware manufacturing___________________________________
Portable building manufacturing— metal________________________
Portable building manufacturing— wood________________________
Portable buildings— erection (see Buildings (portable)— erection)
Pottery manufacturing— household utensils, etc__________________
Pottery manufacturing— no underground mining________________
Pottery manufacturing— underground m ining-----------------------------Poultry dealers_________________________________________________
Poultry food manufacturing_____________________________________
Powder manufacturing__________________________________________
Precious metal mining___________________________________________
Precious stones— setting, etc____________________________________
Preserving and canning_________________________________________
Printers ink manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Printers’ roller manufacturing___________________________________
Printing and bookbinding machinery manufacturing_____________
Printing and publishing_________________________________________
Printing— cloth--------------------------------------------------------------------------Printing press manufacturing____________________________________
Produce and commission merchants_____________________________
Produce dealers_________________________________________________
Professional service (Division G, Schedule 3 )-----------------------------Projectile, shell, or case manufacturing— charging and loading___
Projectile, shell, or case manufacturing— no loading, etc________
Proof readers------------------------------------------------------------------------------Public service------------------------------------------------------------------------------Public utilities (Division E ) -------------------------------------------------------Public utilities— not transportation (Division E, Schedule 6 ) ____
Publishing----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Pulley block manufacturing— metal____________________________ _
Pulley block manufacturing— w ood ______________________________
Pulp manufacturing_____________________________________________
Pulp manufacturing— fiber----------------------------------------------------------Pumping stations, dams, and reservoirs— construction___________
Pump manufacturing— metal____________________________________
Pump manufacturing— wood_____________________________________
Pumps— installation-------------------------------------------------------------------Putty manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------Pyroxylin plastic manufacturing________________________________

Group.
398
377
54
80
128
270
142
500
123
394
283
477
365
197
560
233
72
72
116
175
375
72
71
70
500
310
239
27
127
318
234
219
144
270
291
144
500
510
239
146
270
560
270
118
176
260
264
379
141
175
393
234
215

Q.

Quarrying (Division A, Schedule 2)
Quartz mills---------------------------------Quilt manufacturing----------------------

23
26
45

"90
304

R.

Radiator manufacturing— automobile_____________________________
Radiator manufacturing— n. o. c--------------------------------------------------Radium m ining___________________________________________________
Rag dealers-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Railing manufacturing______________ _____________________________
Railings— erection and repair (see Ironwork— erection and repair)
Railroad car manufacturing______________________________________
Railroad construction____________________________________________
Railroad permanent way materials manufacturing_______________
Railroads— clerical office employees_______________________________
Railroads— electric— operation (Division E, Schedule 2 ) ___________
Railroads— elevated— operation___________________________________
Railroad signals----------------------------------------------------------------------------Railroads— logging— operation____________________________________
Railroads— steam— operation_________________________ ____________
Raising, wrecking, and moving buildings--------------------------------------Rake m anufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------Rattan goods manufacturing--------------------------------------------------- ;___
Razor manufacturing ___________________________________________
Real estate agencies----------------------------------------------------------------------Red lead manufacturing__________________________________________
Reduction— o r e ___________________________________________________
Refining and smelting (Division C, Schedule 4 ) ____________________




_
_

33
29
22
67
27
_ 51
32
_ 54
27
— 63
58
58
54
_ 58
-

48
28
35
29
67
39

-

26

162
122
30
510
113
371
160
380
110
490
421
380
410
410
350
118
179
120
520
234
90

123

IN D EX OF CLASSIFICATION OF IN D U STRIES.

Refrigerating companies----------------------------------------------------------------------------Refrigerating machinery— installation-------------------------------------------------------Refrigerator cars— loading, unloading, etc_______________________________
Refrigerator m anufacturing_____________________________________________
Refrigerators— erection, etc_______________________________________________
Reporters_________________________________________________ _______________
Reservoirs, dams, and pumping stations— construction____________________
Restaurants— domestic s e rv ice ___________________________________________
Retaining walls— excavation______________________________________________
Ribbon manufacturing____________________________________________________
Rice m illin g _____________________________________________________________
Riding academies, clubs, and schools— clerical office employees_____________
Riding academies, clubs, and schools— porters, waiters, grooms, stable­
men, etc________________________________________________________________
Rifle manufacturing______________________________________________________
Rigging— not ship or boat________________________________________________
Rigging— ship or boat____________________________________________________
Road or street making— blasting__________________________________________
Road or street making machinery manufacturing________________________
Road or street making— no quarrying or blasting________________________
Road or street making— quarrying________________________________________
Rock salt mining________________________________________________________
Roller coasters— care, operation, and maintenance________________________
Roller manufacturing— printers’__________________________________________
Rolling m ills _____________________________________________________________
Roofing___________________________________________________________________
Roofing paper or roofing felt manufacturing_____________________________
Rope manufacturing______________________________________________________
Rope manufacturing— wire (see Cable manufacturing— w ire)____________
Rosin and turpentine manufacturing______________________________________
Rowboats and yachts— construction or repair_____________________________
Rubber and composition goods manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 11)___
Rubber reclaim ing_______________________________________________________
Rubber stamp and pad manufacturing____________________________________
Rubber stock dealers_____________________________________________________
Rubber tire dealers______________________________________________________
Rubber tire manufacturing_______________________________________________
Rug and matting manufacturing— fiber___________________________________
Rug manufacturing— cotton, woolen or silk______________________________
S.
Sack manufacturing____________________________________________
Saddle and harness manufacturing_____________________________
Safe manufacturing and repairing_____________________________
Safe moving------------------------------------------------------ ----------------------Safety razor manufacturing____________________________________
Safety treads— installation_____________________________________
Sailboats— construction or repair______________________________
Sailing v e sse ls________________________________________________
Sail making____________________________________________________
Salesmen and agents___________________________________________
Sales stables___________________________________________________
Salt manufacturing____________________________________________
Salt m ining------------------------------------------------------------------------------Saltpeter manufacturing________________________________________
Salvage corps and fire patrol_________________________________
Salvage op eration s____________________________________________
Samplers and weighers of merchandise_________________________
Sanatoriums— domestic serv ice________________________________
Sand and gravel digging_______________________________________
Sandpaper m anufacturing_____________________________________
Sash, door, and blind manufacturing____________________________
Sashes— erection and repair____________________________________
Sausage and sausage case manufacturing_______________________
Sawdust dealers _________________________________ _____________
Saw manufacturing____________________________________________
Sawmills_______________________________________________________
Scaffolds— installation, etc_____________________________________
Scale manufacturing____________________________________________
Scavengers _____________________________________________________
Schools and colleges— clerical office employees__________________
Schools and colleges— not clerical, professors, teachers________
Schools and colleges— teachers and instructors_______ _________
School supplies manufacturing________________________________
Scientific instrument manufacturing____________________________
Scoop manufacturing___________________________________________
Scows— construction____________________________________________
Scows— operation________ _____________________________________
Screen manufacturing— metal___________________________________
Screen manufacturing— w ood ___________________________________
Screens, window— installation__________________________________
Screw m anufacturing__________________________________________
Sculptors— statuary and ornamental work in bronze____________
Sealing wax manufacturing____________________________________
Seats, tanks, and cabinets— manufacturing (plumbers’ supplies)
Seed dealers_____________________ _______________ ______________




Page.
50
56
60
35
57
42
54
69
49
43
46
63

Group.
365
393
436
177
397
270
379
532
362
238
310
490

59
29
60
55
48
31
49
23
23
70
38
26
54
42
43
27*
40
55
37
37
37
67
60
37
43
43

430
121
440
384
351
144
361
41
31
542
219
101
378
265
287
103
246
383

43
37
28
60
29
55
55
61
45
67
60
38
23
38
71
48
62
69
23
24
33
55
46
67
29
33
53
31
71
63
68
71
35
32
28
55
61
29
34
57
29
27
39
34
66

288
196
114
440
120
390
383
461
304
520
450
230
33
230
560
350
465
530
43
57
172
390
317
510
120
171
375
145
560
490
530
552
177
148
118
381
463
124
175
397
118
110
232
175
510

211

213
510
438
212
288
285

124

B U L L E T IN

OF T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Seed m erchants__________________________________________________
Serum (hog) manufacturing— including packing house operations
Serum (hog) manufacturing— not operating packing houses_____
Service— domestic (Division G, Schedule 1 )----------------------------------Service— personal (Division G, Schedule 2 ) -----------------------------------Service— municipal and public (Division G, Schedule 4 ) ---------------Service— professional (Division G, Schedule 3 ) -----------------------------Sewage disposal plants— care and maintenance----------------------------Sewage disposal plants— private--------------------------------------------------Sewage disposal plants— public___________________________________
Sewer buildin g----------------------------------------------------------------------------Sewer cleaning------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sewer pipe manufacturing— no underground mining---------------------Sewer pipe manufacturing— reinforced concrete----------------------------Sewer pipe manufacturing— underground mining_________________
Sewing machine manufacturing___________________________________
Shade cloth manufacturing______________________________________
Shade m anufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------Shade roller manufacturing______________________________________
Shaft sinking--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Shale m ining_____________________________________________________
Sheet-iron work— erection and repair____________________________
Sheet-metal ware manufacturing_________________________________
Sheet-metal work manufacturing_________________________________
Shell manufacturing— charging and loading_______________________
Shell manufacturing— no loading, etc_____________________________
Shingle m anufacturing___________________________________________
Ship and boat building— steel or iron (see Boat building)________
Ship and boat building— wood (see Boat building)_______________
Ship-chandler stores______________________________________________
Shipwright w o r k ________________________________________________
Shirt m anufacturing_____________________________________________
Shoddy m anufacturing___________________________________________
Shoe blacking manufacturing_____________________________________
Shoe findings manufacturing______________________________________
Shoe machinery manufacturing____________________________________
Shoe manufacturing— le a th e r ____________________________________
Shoe manufacturing— ru bber_____________________________________
Shoe pattern manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------Shoe stock manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------Shoe string manufacturing_________________________ ______________
Shooting galleries— personal service______________________________
Shot m anufacturing_____________________________________________
Shovel manufacturing ___________________________________________
Showcase m anufacturing________________________________________
Showcases— erection, etc____________ ______________________________
Shutter manufacturing— fireproof________________________________
Shutter manufacturing— i r o n ____________________________________
Shutters— fireproof— erection and repair_________________________
Shuttle manufacturing (see Cop tube manufacturing)_____________
Sidewalk calking--------------------------------------------------------------------------Signals— railroad— erection or installation_______________________
Sign manufacturing— celluloid------------------------------------------------------Sign manufacturing— glass-----------------------------------------------------------Sign manufacturing— m e ta l______________________________________
Sign painting or lettering— within buildings---------------------------------Sign painting or lettering— on buildings or structures-------------------Sign painting— s h o p _____________________________________*_______
Signs— erection, repair, maintenance, and operation_______________
Silica grin d in g___________________________________________________
Silica m in in g ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Silk and silk thread manufacturing----------------------------------------------SilO building— w o o d --------------------------------------------------------------------Silo erection— concrete------------------------------------------------------------------Silo erection— m asonry----------------------------------------------------------------Silo erection— m e ta l_____________________________________________
Silo erection— w o o d ______________________________________________
Silver m in in g------------------------------------------------------------------------------Silver p la tin g ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Silver smelting and refining---------------------------------------------------------Silverware m anufacturing_______________________________________
Sirup and molasses manufacturing-----------------------------------------------Size m anufacturing______________________________________________
Skate manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------Skating rinks— personal service----------------------------------------------------Skewer and peg manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------Skins— degreasing-------------------------------------------------------------------------Skins— preparing------------------------------------- ------------------------------------Skylight and cornice manufacturing________________________ :-----Skylights and cornices— erection and repair-------------------------------Slack or coal refuse— washing____________________________________
Slag excavation ------------------------------------------------------------ --------------Slate manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------Slate pencil manufacturing_______________________________________
Slate quarries--------------------------------------------------------------- --------------Slate roofing------------------------------------------------------------------ -------------Slaughtering--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Slipper m anufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------




Page.
65
46
39
67
_ 69
_ 71
70
63
- 49
51
_ 50
71
_ 25
24
24
_ 31
43
36
_ 36
50
23
_ 54
28
28
39
32
33
55
_ 55
65
_ 55
44
43
_ 39
36
31
37
_ 37
34
36
44
70
27
28
_ 35
57
28
27
51
_ 31
57
54
37
25
28
57
52
- 48
52
24
- 23
43
_ 34
52
_ 51
51
53
22
_ 30
26
30
- 46
_ 39
29
_ 70
34
36
30
_ 28
54
22
26
24
24
23
_ 54
46
- 37

_

Group.
500
317
235

476
362
367
365
560
71
56
70
145
282
182
182
364
31
378
115
116
239
146
171
382
381
500
384
301
286
233
193
144
194
213
176
193
290
541
111
118
177
397
116
113
371
143
399
380
216
82
116
398
373
338
373
52
31
283
173
372
367
370
375
27
128
91
127
314
232
118
541
176
190
191
116
378
25
92
51
57
40
378
317
194

125

INDEX OF CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRIES.
Slot machine manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------Slot machines— operation________________________________________________
Smelting (Division C, Schedule 4 ) ------------------------------------------------------------Smokestacks and chimneys— erection--------------------------------------- :---------------Smokestacks and chimneys— lining-----------------------------------------------------------Snow and ice removal-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Snuff m anufacturing_____________________________________________________
Soap and soap powder manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------Soap dispensers— in stallation _______________________;____________________
Soda bicarbonate manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------Soda-water fountain and apparatus manufacturing________________________
Soda-water fountains— installation and repair-------------------------------------------Sole cutting---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Spade manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Spar and mast manufacturing____________________________________________
Spar grinding--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Spectacle manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------Speedometer manufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------------------Spice m ills-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Spike and nail manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------Sponging, cloth----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Spool manufacturing______________________________________________________
Sporting and military goods manufacturing----------------------------------- ________
Spring bed manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------------Spring manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sprinkler— automatic— installation-----------------------------------------------------------Sprinkler manufacturing— automatic---------------------------------------------------------Stablemen and drivers------------------------------------------------------------------------------Staff mixing______________________________________________________________
Staff work— erecting buildings____________________________________________
Stage rigging— setting up, etc------------------------------------------------------------------Stained glass manufacturing______________________________________________
Stair building— wooden----------------------------------------------------------------------------Staircase manufacturing— iron and steel--------------------------------------------------Staircases— metal— erection and repair (see Ironwork—-erecting, etc.)____
Stamp and pad manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------Stamping________________________________________________________________
Standpipes and water towers— erection------------ :----------------------------------------Starch manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------------Stationary engine manufacturing________________________________________
Stationery manufacturing________________________________________________
Statuary manufacturing— bronze_________________________________________
Statuary manufacturing— plaster________________________________________
Statuary— masonry-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Stave manufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Steam and air-pressure gauge manufacturing-------------------------------------------Steamers_________________________________________________________________
Steam heating— laying of mains, etc------------------------------------------------------Steam heating or power companies— operation____________________________
Steam packing manufacturing— metallic_________________________________
Steam packing manufacturing— not metal------------------------------------------------Steam pipes or boilers— applying asbestos, etc____________________________
Steam railroads— clerical office employees------------------------------------------------Steam railroads— construction-----------------------------------------------------------------Steam railroads— operation_______________________________________________
Steamship agencies— clerks, etc------------------------------------------------------------------Steamship agencies— stevedores, etc------------------------- --------------------------------Steam shovel manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------Steel castings— foundries________________________________________________
Steel making--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Steel— structural— fabricating and assembling____________________________
Steelwork— ornamental----------------------------------------------------------------------------Stencil manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------------Stevedoring— freight handlers-------------------------------------------------------------------Stevedoring— tallymen and checking clerks______________________________
Stock and cattle food manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------Stock farming____________________________________________________________
Stockyards -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Stokers— installation_____________________________________________________
Stone and marble setting— away from shop_______________________________
Stone and marble setting— inside construction only______________________
Stone china manufacturing_______________________________________________
Stone crushing— including quarrying_____________________________________
Stone crushing— no quarrying------------------------------------------------------------------Stonecutting_____________________________________________________________
Stone grinding------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Stone products manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 1 )___________________
Stone quarries— building_________________________________________________
Stoneyards_______________________________________________________________
Storage and warehousing________________________________________________
Storage battery manufacturing____________________________________________
Store risks_______________________________________________________________
Stores____________________________________________________________________
Stove manufacturing________________________________________________ I __I
Stove polish manufacturing_________________________________________ __
Straw hat manufacturing (see Hat manufacturing— straw )____________
Straw, hay, and feed dealers_____________________________________________
Street cleaning________________________________ ___________________“ “
~
Street or road making— blasting______________ _______________ I I I I I I




Page.
31
67
26
Si
51
71
47
40
57
38
48
57
36
28
34
24
25
31
45
29
44
34
47
30
30
56
31
58
24
54
56
25
57
27
51
37
28
51
41
31
41
27
24
51
34
31
61
50
63
27
47
57
63
54
58
61
61
31
27
26
27
27
29
61
62
45
21
60
56
50
57
25
23
23
23
24
23
23
24
60
32
65
64
29
39
45
66
71
48

Group.
145
520
370
367
560
324
247
394
231
330
396
193
118
175
52
83
145
312
118
291
176
333
125
125
394
145
430
56
377
390
82
397
113
371
213
117
370
248
141
262
110
56
367
173
145
460
365
475
111
334
394
490
380
410
465
464
144
110
100
102
113
118
464
465
310
10
450
393
367
396
72
41
50
51
52
"40
51
433
147
500
500
122
233
303
510
560
351

126

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

Street or road making machinery manufacturing--------Street or road making— no quarrying or blasting--------Street or road making— quarrying--------------------------------Street railroads— operation------------------------------------------Structural iron— erection ------------------------------------------Structural iron and steel— fabricating and assembling.
Stuccowork_ :_________________________________________
_
Studios— photograph__________________________________
Subway construction__________________________________
Sugar refining— beet___________________________________
Sugar refining— ca n e---------------------------------------------------Sulphur mining________________________________________
Sulphur refining_______________________________________
Superintendents— building construction-----------------------Supply b oats__________________________________________
Surgical goods manufacturing-------------------------------------Surveying--------------------------------------------------------------------Suspender manufacturing---------------------------------------------Swings— care, operation, and maintenance--------------------Swings— erection, etc__________________________________
Switch manufacturing— railroad_______________________

T.

Tack manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------------Tag, check, and label manufacturing— metal----------------------------------Tag, check, and label manufacturing— not metal-----------------------------Tailor stores_______________________________________________________
Talc m ills _________________________________________________________
Talc m in in g _______________________________________________________
Tallow chandlers----------------------------------------------------------------------------Tallying and weighing--------------------------------------------------------------------Tank building— metal ____________________________________________
Tank building— metal— erection within buildings----------------------------Tank building— w o o d ______________ :_______________________________
Tank erection (n. o. c.)— metal____________________________________
Tank erection— wood _____________________________________________
Tanks, galvanized iron— installation_______________________________
Tanks, seats, and cabinets— manufacturing (plumbers’ supplies)__
Tanning and dressing_____________________________________________
Tar m anufacturing________________________________________________
Tartaric acid manufacturing_______________________________________
Taxicab stations— chauffeurs--------------------------------------------------- -------Taxicab stations— drivers and drivers’ helpers----------------------------------Taxicab stations— garages__________________________________________
Taxidermists_______________________________________________________
Taximeter manufacturing___________________________________________
Teachers and instructors---------------------------------------------------------------Telegraph and telephone apparatus manufacturing________________
Telegraph and telephone companies— office and exchange employees.
Telegraph and telephone companies— operation, etc-------------------------Telegraph and telephone— construction--------------------------------------------Telescope m anufacturing__________________________________________
Tenements— domestic service --------------------------------------------------------Tent and awning erection---------------------------------------------------------------Tent and awning fabric manufacturing----------------------------------------Tent and awning manufacturing_______________________ __________
Terneplate r o llin g _________________________________________________
Terra cotta manufacturing—decorating purposes---------------------------Terra cotta manufacturing— no underground mining______________
Terra cotta manufacturing— underground mining__________________
Textile machinery m anufacturing__________________________________
Textiles (Division C, Schedule 1 5 )-------------------------------------------------Textiles— dyeing and finishing_____________________________________
Theaters— personal service_________________________________________
Theater stage rigging— setting up, etc--------------------------------------------Theatrical scenery manufacturing__________________________________
Theatrical scenery painting-----------------------------------------------------------Thermometer manufacturing _____________________________________
Thermostat m anufacturing-----------------------------------------------------------Thermostats— installation---------------------------------------------------------------Thrashing machine manufacturing__________________________________
Thrashing machines— operation____________________________________
Thread manufacturing— cotton or linen__________________________
Thread manufacturing— s i l k ______________________________________
Tile in stallation___________________________________________________
Tile manufacturing— decorative purposes----------------------------------------Tile manufacturing— no underground mining--------------------------------Tile manufacturing— underground mining--------------------------------------Tiling manufacturing— no underground mining-----------------------------Tiling manufacturing— underground mining---- ------------------------------Timekeepers— building construction----------------------------------- -------------Tin can manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------Tin-foil manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------Tinning or galvanizing sheet metal-----------------------------------------------Tinplate manufacturing------------------------------------------------------------------Tinsmithing-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Tinsmith s h o p ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Tire manufacturing ______________________________________________




Page.
31
49
23
58
51
27
54
48
50
46
46
23
39
53
61
39
48
44
70
51
27
29
29
42
65
24
23
40
61
30
55
34
51
53
56
34
36
40
38
59
63
60
48
31
71
32
64
62
62
32
69
52
43
45
26
25
25
24
31
42
44
69
56
34
48
32
32
57
31
22
43
43
57
25
25
24
25
24
53
28
27
30
26
54
28
37

Group.
144
361
41
420
370
102
377
339
364
313
314
31
230
376
460
236
360
302
542
370
110
119
118
265
500
52
31
241
465
140
390
173
370
375
393
175
190
244
230
431
490
438
341
145
552
148
490
471
471
148
530
373
282
304
101
72
71
70
143
291
540
390
175
338
148
148
394
142
21
282
283
396
72
71
70
71
70
376
115
111
128
301
378
116
212

127

INDEX OF CLASSIFICATION OF INDUSTRIES,

Tobacco------------------ -----------------------------------------------------------------Tool manufacturing— agricultural____________________________
Tool manufacturing— hand __________________________________
Tool manufacturing— lo g g in g -------------------------------------------------Tortoise-shell goods manufacturing-----------------------------------------Towel and toilet supply com panies.,--------------------------------------Toy manufacturing— metal ----------------------------------------------------Toy manufacturing— wood-------------------------------------------------------Traction engine manufacturing-----------------------------------------------Trade (Division F ) ___________________________________________
Transportation and public utilities (Division E )---------------------Transportation by water (Division E, Schedule 5 ) -------------------Traveling bag manufacturing (see Bag manufacturing— leather)
Trees— pruning, spraying, etc--------------------------------------------------Truck farming------------------------------------------------------------------------Truckmen--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Trunk m anufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------Tube m anufacturing--------------------------------------------------------------Tuck pointing _______________________________________________
Tugboats---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Tungsten m in in g --------------------------------------------------------------------Tunneling--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Tunnel lining — ---------------------------------------------------------------------Turning_______________________________________________________
Turpentine and rosin manufacturing----------------------------------------Twine and cord manufacturing-----------------------------------------------Type fo u n d ry -------------------------------------------------------------------------Typesetting— linotype and by hand----------------------------------------Typewriter m anufacturing------------------------------------------------------Typewriter ribbon manufacturing--------------------------------------------

Page.
47
28
29
29
37
45
28
34
31
63
58
61
37
22
22
59
34
26
54
61
22
50
51
35
40
43
27
42
32
44

Group.
324
118
120
120
216
305
115
176
142

196
15
15
430
174
101
377
460
30
364
367
176
246
287
111
270
145
290

U.
Umbrella frames and hardware manufacturingUmbrella handle manufacturing--------------------------Umbrella manufacturing— not frames and handles.
Undertakers---------------------------------------------------------Upholstering-------------------------------------------------------Upholstery fabric manufacturing_________________
Upholstery trimming manufacturing_____________

29
36
44
71
35
42
44

124
184
302
553
178
281
290

31
69
57
31
32
22
39
56
51
32
43
31
67
35
33
57
28
61
71
71
47
38
31
37

145
530
394
145
146
30
234
393
370
283
145
520
180
171
394
116
460
551
552
323
230
345
214

43
32
32
57
28
55
42
49
60
36
32
36
43
30
53
31
54
44

286
162
161
397
116
390
270
362
433
182
146
182
286
127
376
145
377
291

V.
Vacuum cleaner manufacturing-------------------------------Vacuum cleaning— domestic service--------------------------Vacuum cleaning systems— installation_____________
Valve and gauge manufacturing (plumbers’ supplies)
Valve manufacturing-----------------------------------------------Vanadium mining----------------------------------------------------Varnish manufacturing-------------------------------------------Vats, brewery— installation________________________
Vaults---------------------------------------------------------------------Vehicle manufacturing (Division C, Schedule 8 )____
Velvet and plush goods manufacturing______________
Vending machine manufacturing-----------------------------Vending machines— operation---------------------------------Veneer goods manufacturing------------------------------------Veneer manufacturing--------------------------------------------Ventilating plants— installation-----------------------------Ventilator manufacturing___________________________
Vessels------------------------------------------------- -------------------Veterinary hospitals— professional employees----------Veterinary schools— professors and teachers________
Vinegar manufacturing-------------------------------------------Vitriol manufacturing----------------------------------------------Voting machine manufacturing______________________
Vulcanized rubber manufacturing___________________
W.

Wadding and waste manufacturing_______________________________________
Wagon body manufacturing_______________________________________________
Wagon manufacturing-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Wall board— installation_________________________________________________
Wall covering manufacturing_____________________________________________
Wall covering, metal— installation________________________________________
Wall paper manufacturing_______________________________________________
Walls, retaining— excavation______________________________________________
Warehousing and storage________________________________________________
Washboard manufacturing_______________________________________________
Washing machine and clothes wringer manufacturing— metal_____________
Washing machine and clothes wringer manufacturing (n. o. c .) ___________
Waste manufacturing_____________________________________________________
Watch and watchcase manufacturing_____________________________________
Watchmen— building construction________________________________________
Water meter manufacturing_______________________________________________
Waterproofing_______________________________________________________
Waterproofing cloth_____________________________________ ” 11




128

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Water tower manufacturing--------------------------------------Water towers— erection--------------------------------------------Water transportation (Division E, Schedule 5 ) ------Water-wheel manufacturing--------------------------------------Waterworks— construction---------------------------------------Waterworks— erection of standpipes, etc--------------------Waterworks— laying o f mains, etc---------------------------Waterworks— operations on ly------------------------------------Waxed, oiled, or paraffined paper manufacturing------Wax manufacturing— not sealing wax-----------------------Wax manufacturing— sealing------------------------------------Wearing apparel manufacturing^-leather----------------Wearing apparel— n. o. c------------------------------------------Weather-strip manufacturing— metal-----------------------Weather-strip manufacturing— wood-------------------------Weather-strips— installation-------------------------------------Webbing manufacturing--------------------------------------------Weighers and samplers of merchandise----------------------Weighing and tallying----------------------------------------------Welding and cutting— electric-----------------------------------Welding and cutting— oxyacetylene— away from shop.
Welding and cutting— oxyacetylene— shop only--------Wheelbarrow manufacturing— metal-------------------------Wheelbarrow manufacturing— wood-------------------------Wheel manufacturing— autom obile--------------------------Wheel manufacturing— car---------------------------------------Wheel manufacturing— wood-------------------------------------Whip manufacturing------------------------------------------------White lead manufacturing---------------------------------------Whiting manufacturing--------------------------------------------Wicking manufacturing--------------------------------------------Willow ware manufacturing-------------------------------------Windmill manufacturing— metal-----------------------------Windmill manufacturing— wood--------------------------------Windmills— erection-------------------------------------------------Window cleaning------------------------------------------------------"Window-curtain roller manufacturing-----------------------Window frames— erection and repair-------------------------Window frames— installation------------------------------------Window manufacturing— cathedral and art glass-----Window opening devices— installation---------------------Window screens— installation---------------------------------Window shade manufacturing---------------------------------Wind shield manufacturing-------------------------------------Wine manufacturing-----------------------------------------------"Wine and spirit merchants---------------------------------------Wire cloth manufacturing----------------------------------------Wire insulation------------------------------------------ v
------------Wire manufacturing------------------------------------------------Wire nail manufacturing-----------------------------------------Wire products manufacturing----------------------------------Wire, wire drawing, and wire cable manufacturing_
Wirework— erection------------------------------------------------Wooden ware manufacturing------------------------------------Wood heel manufacturing----------------------------------------Wood preservative manufacturing---------------------------Wood preserving and fireproofing----------------------------Wood turning----------------------------------------------------------Wood y a rd s ------------------------------------------------------------Woolen goods manufacturing------------------------------------Wool extract manufacturing (lanolin)---------------------Wool merchants------------------------------------------------------Wool preparation----------------------------------------------------Wool spinning and weaving--------------------------------------Wrecking— m arine--------------------------------------------------Wrecking, raising, and moving buildings---------------- Writing ink manufacturing--------------------------------------Writing paper manufacturing----------------------------------

Page.
30
51
61
31
54
51
50
63
42
40
39
37
44
28
34
57
44
62
61
51
51
30
28
34
33
32
32
47
39
39
44
35
31
34
51
69
36
55
56
25
56
57
36
33
47
65
29
38
29
29
29
27
56
36
34
38
36
34
67
42
40
65
42
42
62
48
39
41

Group.
140
370
144
379
370
365
474
265
244
232
197
302
116
175
397
290
465
465
371
371
129
116
175
162
160
161
333
234
234
290
179
144
175
371
530
182
390
390
82
392
397
182
162
323
500
124
217
124
118
124
103
390
182
176
230
185
176
510
281
241
500
280
281
466
350
233
261

Y.

Yacht clubs— domestic service--------------------------------------------------------Yachts and rowboats— construction or repair_____________________
Yachts, private— operation------------------------------------------------------------Yards--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Yarn finishing— no manufacturing-------------------------------------------------Yarn manufacturing----------------------------------------------------------------------Yeast manufacturing---------------------------------------------------------------------Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A.— clerical office employees_____________
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. institutions— teachers and preachersY. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A.— not clerical, teachers, and preachers

69
55
61
65
44
43
38
64
71
69

532
383
463
510
291
282
231
490
552
532

22
39
26

30
234
94

Z.

Zinc mining--------------------Zinc oxide manufacturing.
Zinc smelting-------------------




O


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102