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OCCUPATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT
STATISTICS,

1960-70
BULLETIN 1738
U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF LABOR
Bureau of
Labor Statistics

1972

Dayton & Montgomery Coi.

Public Library

AUG8 1 7
92







OCCUPATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT
STATISTICS,

1960-70
Bulletin 1738
U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF LABOR
J.D. Hodgson,
Secretary
Bureau of
Labor Statistics
Geoffrey H. Moore,
Qommissioner

1972

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D .C. 20402 - Price 50 cents




P re fa c e
This report brings together information on employment by occupation from many sources to
provide a handy reference volume to users of such data. It presents national occupational estimates
by industry for the 1960-70 period derived from a variety of sources, including surveys conducted
by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau of the Census, National Science Foundation, Office of
Education, Interstate Commerce Commission, Federal Communications Commission, and data
provided by many professional associations.
The most comprehensive source of data on occupational employment by industry is the 1960
census. Since more current statistics do not cover the occupational spectrum as comprehensively as
the census, a method was developed to derive 1970 estimates of employment by occupation for all
industries by using the 1960 census data and current data from other sources. This “occupationalindustry matrix system” is described in chapter 1 .
The 1970 estimates will be revised when a new matrix using data obtained from the 1970 Census
o f Population is prepared. These data will be available in late 1972 or early 1973. In addition, data
will be available in 1972 for many occupations not covered by the Census from the BLS new
Occupational Employment Statistics Survey Program, as described in chapter 2.
This bulletin was prepared by George T. Silvestri and Douglas F. Schmude in the Division of
Manpower and Occupational Outlook of the Office of Manpower Structure and Trends. Three
previous publications presented information on occupational employment statistics from 1947 to
1967. They are O c c u p a tio n a l E m p l o y m e n t S ta tis tic s , S o u rc e s a n d D a ta (BLS Report 305, 1966);
O c c u p a tio n a l E m p l o y m e n t S ta tis tic s , 1 9 6 0 -6 6 (BLS Bulletin 1579, 1968); and O c c u p a tio n a l
E m p l o y m e n t S ta tis tic s 1 9 6 0 - 6 7 (BLS Bulletin 1643, 1970).







Contents

Page

Chapter:
1.

Summary o f occupational changes between 1960 and 1970

2. Occupational estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics surveys ............................................................

5

3. Occupational estimates from other government agencies

..............................................................................

9

4. Occupational estimates from professional associations ...................................................................................

13

Tables:
1. Number o f employed persons, by occupation and industry, 16 years of age and over, 1960 and
1970 ................................................................................................................................................................
2.

Estimated employment in selected occupations in selected metal-working industries,
United States, October 1968 .....................................................................................................................

16

22

3. Estimated employment in selected occupations in the printing and publishing industry, United
States, March 1970 ......................................................................................................................................

23

4. Estimated distribution for selected occupations in the communications equipment industry, except
telephone and telegraph (SIC 3662), September 1967 and September 1968 and March 1970 .........

25

5. Employment o f engineers, by industry, January 1961-69 .................................................................................

26

6.

Employment o f scientists, by industry, January 1961-69 .................................................................................

27

7. Employment o f technicians, by industry, January 1961-69 ............................................................................

28

8.

Employment o f scientists, by occupation and industry, January1969 ............................................................

29

9. Employment of technicians, by occupation and industry, January1969 .......................................................

30

10. Employment o f scientific, professional, and technical personnel by State Governments, January
1964 and January 1967 ..................................................................................................................................

31

11 .

Employment o f engineers and scientists, by universities and colleges, January 1965 ..............................

32

12 .

Employment o f engineers and scientists, by universities and colleges, January 1967 ..............................




v

33

Contents--Continued
Page

...........................

34

14. Employment o f technicians, by universities and colleges, January 1965, January 1967, and January
1969 .................................................................................................................................................................

35

15. Employment o f engineers, scientists and technicians by independent nonprofit institutions,
January 1965, January 1967, and January 1970 .......................................................................................

35

16. Employment o f teachers and librarians in fall o f school year, 1959-60 through 1968-69 .......................

35

17. Employment in selected occupations, regulated interstate industries, 1960-69.........................................

37

18. Federal employment in selected white-collar occupations October 1964, October 1966, October 1967,
and October 1968 ............................................................................................................................................

38

19. Federal Government civilian employment o f blue-collar workers by job family and selected
occupational series, October 1960, October 1962, October 1966, and October 1968 .......................

42

20. Employment in selected post office occupations, October 1960-69 ............................................................

44

21. Occupational employment data available from professional associations, 1960-70 ...................................

44

13. Employment o f engineers and scientists, by universities and colleges, January 1969




vi

C h a p t e r 1. S u m m a r y of O c c u p a t i o n a l C h a n g e s
Between 1 9 60 and 1970
From 1960 to 1970, the number of white-collar
workers increased from about 29 million to 38
million. In comparison, all other workers—
blue
collar, service, and farmers and farmworkers—
increased at a much slower rate, from about 37
million to 41 million, and declined in relative terms
from about 56 percent to 52 percent of total em­
ployment.
The occupational patterns o f many industries have
been altered by a variety of factors. New products and
services have been created to meet new demands, and
occupations have changed in response to these demands.
New specialties have arisen in the scientific and engineer­
ing professions, especially in fields such as bionics,
cryogenics, microelectronics, and ultrasonics. New oc­
cupations were created such as lunar geologists, trajec­
tory analysts, cryogenic technicians, and environmental
scientists and technicians.
Technological changes also have had a profound
effect on occupations. For example, electronic data
processing has eliminated many routine clerical jobs in
addressing, billing, payroll, and inventory control, but
has created many new and higher grade jobs in program­
ming and computer equipment operation. Similarly,
many new skills are required for the operation and repair
of numerically controlled machine tools. By 1970, more
than 20,000 o f these were in use, mainly in the aircraft
and parts, motor vehicle, machinery, and fabricated
metal products industries. Other new technology in­
troduced during the 1960’s included metal cutting
machines which used electrical discharge, chemical,
ultrasonic, laser, and electron beam processes.

Professional, technical, and kindred occupations

Over 3.6 million more professional and technical
workers were employed in 1970 than in 1960, an
increase of nearly 50 percent. This percent was the
fastest rate o f growth of any broad occupational group,
and was more than twice as fast as the rate of growth in
total employment. Much of the growth for professional,
technical and kindred workers was centered in the
services industries and largely reflects the rapid expan­
sion in the medical and educational services industries.
The number of elementary, secondary, and college
teachers increased by nearly 700,000 in the 10-year
span, accounting for 20 percent o f the growth of all
professional and related workers. In addition, over
450,000 medical and other health workers were added
to the work force with professional nurses accounting
for over 40 percent of the increase.
Engineering employment approached 1.1 million by
1970, an increase of 33 percent during the 10-year
period. Durable goods manufacturing, by far the largest
employer of engineers, experienced over 40 percent of
this employment increase. The number of natural
scientists increased by 55 percent, as employment gains
were recorded in every major industry division. Mathe­
maticians experienced the sharpest employment increase
among the various scientific occupations; their numbers
more than doubled during the 10-year period. Growth in
computer technology and in research and development
activities spurred demand for these highly trained
workers.
Technicians (except medical and dental) employment
topped 1.0 million by 1970, growing 38 percent during
the 10-year period. About two-thirds of the increase was
in durable goods manufacturing and the service in­
dustries. Draftsmen remained the largest occupation
among the technician group, over 300,000 workers in
1970, up 76,000 from 1960. Electrical and electronic
technicians recorded the largest numerical and percent
gains during the 1960-70 period, increasing by nearly 75
percent or by 88,000 workers.

Occupational growth, 1960-70

Between 1960 and 1970 total employment increased
from 65.8 million to 78.6 million, or at a rate of nearly
20 percent. But, all occupations did not share equally in
this expansion. Changes in employment which occurred
during this period in the major occupational groups are
discussed below.




1

employer of clerical workers, increasing their numbers
by 463,000 up 33 percent in the past 10 years. Other
industry groups which had sizable increases in clerical
employment were durable goods manufacturing which
added 230,000 an increase of 19 percent, and construc­
tion, which added 106,000, an increase of 150 percent.
The employment of stenographers, typists, and secre­
taries rose by 1.1 million between I960 and 1970, an
increase of nearly 50 percent. More than 50 percent of
the rise was concentrated in the service industries.
Bank tellers and cashiers recorded the sharpest
employment growth rate among the clerical workers;
both categories increased by 77 percent over the 10-year
period. The expansion of banking services and the
development of banking outlets in the suburbs have
spurred the employment growth of bank tellers. Rising
incomes and the trend towards larger self-service stores
contributed to the employment of cashiers.

Managers, officials, and proprietors

The employment of managers, officials, and propri­
etors increased by 17 percent to 8.3 million during the
decade, growing somewhat more slowly than the 20-per­
cent increase in total employment. The service industries
recorded the largest numerical and percent gain for these
workers during the 1960-70 period, accounting for
one-third of the managerial increase. Wholesale and retail
trade accounted for nearly 25 percent of the increase for
this group during the same period and remained their
principal employer with 3.5 million in 1970. Employ­
ment gains for managers were recorded in all other major
industry divisions except agriculture, forestry and fish­
eries; and mining.
Salesworkers

In 1970, nearly 5.0 million salesworkers were em­
ployed in the national work force, an increase of 15
percent during the 1960-70 period. This rate of increase
was below that for total employment and represented
the lowest rate of growth for any white-collar group.
Trade accounted for over 70 percent of all the sales­
workers. The major part of these were in the retail
sector. The trade industries recorded a 430,000 increase
in sales employment during the 1960’s and accounted
for 68 percent of the increase for all salesworkers. The
finance, insurance, and real estate division accounted for
the next largest increase, 17 percent. Employment gains
for salesworkers were recorded in all major industry
divisions during the 1960-70 period.

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers

Craftsmen and kindred jobs increased by over 1.6
million in the 10-year period, up 19 percent over 1960.
The rate of growth for these workers kept pace with the
nearly 20-percent increase in total employment for the
whole work force. Durable goods widened its lead as the
largest employer of these skilled workers, adding over
330,000 a 15-percent increase. Durable goods employ­
ment increases were centered largely in production
occupations, such as machinist, or among the workers
required to maintain and service the increasingly com­
plex production machinery. Significant increases in
skilled workers also were experienced in the trc ie
industries. Requirements for motor vehicle mechanics
rose in new car dealerships and the number of skilled
installation, maintenance, and service workers grew
sharply in wholesale machinery and equipment dis­
tributors.
By the end of the decade, the employment of
construction craftsmen had increased by 213,000. This
amounted to an 8-percent increase, a rate of less than
half that recorded for all skilled workers during the same
period. The employment for carpenters, painters and
paperhangers, and plasterers decreased by 41,000, while
the number of electricians increased by 81,000; excavat­
ing machine operators by 65,000; plumbers and pipe­
fitters by 47,000; and structural metalworkers by

Clerical and kindred workers

Nearly 4.0 million clerical jobs were added during the
1960-70 period, representing the largest numerical ex­
pansion and the second highest rate of growth, 40
percent by a broad occupational group. With the
exception of agriculture, all major industry divisions
recorded gains in clerical employment. By far, the largest
and most rapid employment gains were in the service
industry division where clerical employment jumped by
over 1.4 million, increasing 80 percent over the 1960
level. The service industry division accounted for over 35
percent of the overall gain in clerical workers. By the
end of the decade, the wholesale and retail trade sectors
added over 800,000 new clerical workers while the
finance, insurance, and real estate sectors added nearly
600,000, an increase of about 45 percent for each
industry group. Government continued to be the leading




20, 000.
These diverse occupational trends for construction
craftsmen reflect the declining activity in homebuilding
caused by the collapse of the home mortgage market in

2

Bus, truck, and tractor drivers experienced a modest
overall gain of 85,000 or 5 percent during the 10-year
period, which was substantially lower than for the whole
work force. The transportation and public utility sector
continued as the largest employer of bus, truck, and
tractor drivers; such employment increased 11 percent
since 1960, as trucks continued to increase their role as
the Nation’s freight mover. Employment of deliverymen
and routemen increased at a rate of about 10 percent;
nearly all of the growth was centered in trade.
Nearly 90,000 mine operative jobs were lost during
the decade, down 31 percent, as the trend towards larger
more highly mechanized mining operations led to a
substantial reduction in the requirements for mine
workers, despite an increased demand for mining prod­
ucts.
Textile occupations experienced different occupa­
tional growth patterns. Sewers and stitcher employment
increased by 175,000, up 28 percent during the 1960-70
period. Apparel manufacturing accounted for nearly all
the increase. Rising per capita income, styling, the
changing age composition of the population, and the
expanded demand for military apparel all contributed to
a rise in demand for nearly all types of apparel.

1966 and the subsequent rise in interest rates. They also
reflect the new technology entering the industry because
of rising wage costs. Many building materials manu­
facturers are manufacturing more and more modular and
prefabricated products, which diminish the total onsite
construction time and reduce the demand for skilled
labor.
Skilled mechanics and repairmen had the largest and
sharpest gains in the craftsmen group; they recorded an
employment increase of 778,000 jobs, up nearly 40
percent during the decade. The increasing demand for
air-conditioning in residential and commercial installa­
tions triggered sharp gains in the number of airconditioning and heating repairmen. Employment in this
occupation skyrocketed to 118,000 in 1970, up nearly
90 percent from 1960; over half the 10-year increase was
in the construction industry.
The number of office machine mechanic jobs rose by
nearly 60 percent, up 29,000 in the 10-year period. Most
of the gain was experienced in the wholesale and retail
trade sector as the demand continued strong for business
machines, including electronic computers, typewriters,
computing machines, bookkeeping and accounting ma­
chines, and addressing, duplicating, and dictating ma­
chines. Airplane mechanics recorded above average
increases in employment in response to the growing
maintenance requirements of the Nation’s larger and
more complex commercial and general aviation aircraft
fleet.

Service workers

The number of service workers increased by 1.7
million, up 21 percent during the 1960-70 period, or
only slightly faster than the 20-percent increase in total
employment. However, if private household workers are
excluded, the remaining service worker employment
shows a much sharper increase of 35 percent during the
decade, a rate more than 13/ 4 times that of total
employment.
Service workers such as janitors, cleaners, and guards
are found in nearly every industry, yet, in 1970, 6 out of
7 service workers were in two major industry divisions—
trade and services (including private household). Be­
tween 1960 and 1970, nearly all growth in service
worker employment occurred either in the trade or
service industry divisions.
The number of hospital attendants nearly doubled
from 450,000 to 830,000, and practical nurses increased
by nearly 65 percent from 225,000 to 370,000. All of
this growth was the result of the rapid expansion in
medical and health services.
During the past decade, an additional 580,000 new
jobs opened in the food service occupational group.
Counter and fountain workers nearly doubled to
291,000 during the decade, and the number of

Operatives and kindred workers

Operatives and kindred workers were numerically the
largest of the broad occupational groups in 1970; they
numbered 13.9 million workers or over one-sixth of the
total work force. During the 1960-70 period, the
nuirfber of these semiskilled workers rose by nearly 2
million, an increase of 16 percent, a somewhat slower
rate than that for the work force as a whole.
Manufacturing continued as the principal employer of
operatives in 1970; over 8.5 million workers were
divided between durable and nondurable goods manu­
facturing. Between 1960 and 1970, the number of
operatives in manufacturing increased by more than 1.3
million workers, 67 percent of the total employment
growth experienced by this occupational group. Over
two-thirds of the 10-year increase of operatives in
manufacturing was in durable goods. Operatives in
nondurable goods manufacturing recorded a significant
gain of over 450,000 workers during the same 10-year
period.




3

Only government workers involved in activities unique
to government (e.g. judicial service) are classified in the
public administration industry.
In developing the occupational estimates for the
matrix, various sources of data other than the census
report were utilized when they were judged to be more
reliable, and many of these sources are specified in later
chapters of this bulletin. For example, most of the
occupational data collected from the survey of scientific
and technical personnel were inserted into the matrix.
As a general rule, occupational data collected directly
from employers are preferable, because jobs are created
by employers and, therefore, are best known to them.
Also, one assumption is that social pressures give an
upward bias to the job classifications reported by
individuals.
The concepts used to obtain counts of people in
various occupations often differ from those used in the
decennial census and Current Population Survey (CPS).
The census and CPS occupational estimates include
persons 16 years of age and older who are currently
employed within the boundaries of the United States
and who are not members of the Armed Forces.
Employed persons holding more than one job are
counted only once and are classified according to the job
at which they worked the greatest number of hours. The
adjustment of data obtained from BLS occupational
surveys for comparability with the matrix is explained in
chapter 2. Other organizations generally do not adhere
to the census criteria, because their purpose is to present
membership counts or counts of licensed persons in
particular occupations, whether or not they are cur­
rently employed. Therefore, it is necessary to adjust the
data obtained from these sources to exclude retired
persons, those working abroad, members of the Armed
Forces, and other groups not meeting census and CPS
criteria. For example, the data for physicians presented
in chapter 4 were adjusted to exclude members of the
Armed Forces and those practicing outside the United
States. In addition, those physicians who were teaching
full time and those who were doing research were
subtracted from the count of total physicians, because
they are included with teachers and scientists, respec­
tively, in the matrix.
The term occupation as used in this bulletin refers to
the job at which a person is working rather than the
specialty, craft, or discipline for which he considers
himself best trained. Thus, a person trained as a
sociologist, but reported to be working as a salesman is
classified in sales jobs rather than with professional
jobs.

waiters and waitresses increased by 231,000, up
nearly 30 percent.
Firemen and policemen were among the service
workers experiencing significant employment gains. Pop­
ulation growth, together with further urbanization, and
the growing public concern over crime were largely
responsible for increases in employment in these impor­
tant occupations.
Laborers (except farm and mine)

The employment of laborers remained nearly con­
stant over the past 10 years, increasing by less than 5
percent. Although the overall employment change for
laborers was minor, several important shifts did occur
within individual industries. In manufacturing, laborers
decreased by 148,000 down 13 percent from 1960, due
to increased mechanization of production and material
movement operations. However, these decreases were
offset by significant employment gains in construction,
trade, and government. Construction and trade in that
order remained the two largest employers of unskilled
laborers. Construction employed 22 percent of all
laborers in 1970 compared with 20 percent in 1960, and
trade employed 18 percent in 1970 compared with 16
percent in 1960.
Farmers and farmworkers

Employment of farmers and farmworkers between
1960 and 1970 dropped by over 2 million, or by 40
percent, as the long downward trend for this occupa­
tional group continued. Much of the decrease occurred
on the smaller marginal farms, which were unable to
keep pace with the new agricultural technology.
Notes on the industry-occupational
employment matrix

Table 1 presents the full occupational detail of the
1960 and 1970 industry-occupational employment mat­
rices at the broad industry level. The industry employ­
ment estimates presented in the table are based on the
total employment concept used in the decennial census
and Current Population Survey. They include private
wage and salary workers, self-employed persons, and
unpaid family workers. Federal, State, and local govern­
ment workers employed in activities having counterparts
in private industry are included in the private sector. For
example, Federal Government employees at naval ship­
yards are included in the matrix durable goods industry.




4

C h a p t e r 2. O c c u p a t i o n a l Estimates from the
B u r e a u of L a b o r Statistics Sur veys
The Occupational Employment
Statistics Program

portation equipment (SIC 37); and (6) instruments and
related products (SIC 38). The combined employment
of the separate industries in this important segment of
manufacturing constituted about 12 percent of total
nonfarm wage and salary employment in the United
States in 1968. Furthermore, of the 11.7 million
workers in the durable goods segment, more than 3 out
of 5 were in the metalworking industries. Employment
covered by the suivey was limited to private wage and
salary employees.
A single occupational questionnaire was designed for
use in all industries in the survey. Most of the 60
occupations and residual occupational categories sur­
veyed have high levels of skill requirements and are
common to all industries. Occupational definitions,
based chiefly on the Dictionary o f Occupational Titles
and definitions developed in the BLS occupational wage
survey program, accompanied each questionnaire. Some
definitions were tailored exclusively for this survey to
include learners, beginners, apprentices, trainees, handi­
capped, probationary, and part-time employees. The
questionnaire was pretested in selected establishments
for relevance to the industry, numerical importance of
the specific occupations, and meaningfulness of the
accompanying definitions.
Data for the metalworking survey were obtained
mostly by mail questionnaire. In selected establishments
which employ significantly large numbers of workers,
however, data weie obtained by personal visits of the
Bureau’s field staff. Employment in the reporting
establishments represented 43 percent of all employees
in the metalworking industries.
Table 2 gives the estimated employment and relative
sampling error of the occupations surveyed in each
major industry group as well as in total. The relative
error shows the amount (in percentage terms) of
deviation due to sampling variability between an esti­
mate and the figure that would have been obtained had
it been possible to take a complete census by using the
same schedules and procedures. It does not include the
effect of nonsampling errors, such as response error

A survey of employment of specific occupations in
the metalworking industries was conducted in 1968 as
an experiment to test the methods to be used in a
comprehensive survey program on employment by oc­
cupation. Previously, only employment of scientific and
technical personnel was surveyed by the BLS on a large
scale. The survey of metalworking was conducted as a
pilot survey for the Federal-State Cooperative Occupa­
tional Employment Statistics (OES) program. The pri­
mary purpose of the program is to provide more
accurate data at more frequent intervals for many
additional occupations than are currently available for
the purpose of assessing current and future manpower
requirements.
A survey of occupational employment in the printing
and publishing industry (SIC 27), as of March 1970, was
conducted also before the establishment of the OES
program. The results of that survey are presented in
table 3.
Design o f th e O ctober 19 6 8
m etalw orking survey

Six major industry groups were covered by the
survey: (1) Ordnance and accessories (defined in the
1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Gassification
(SIC) Manual prepared by the United States Office of
Management and Budget as SIC 19); (2) fabricated metal
products (SIC 34); (3) machinery (SIC 35); (4) electrical
machinery, equipment, and supplies (SIC 36);1 (5) trans1 Radio and television transm itting, signaling, and detection
equipm ent and apparatus industry (industry 3662) was surveyed
separately in Septem ber o f 1967 and 1968 and in March o f
1970. T he results o f th e 1967 survey appeared in th e June 1968
issue o f th e M o n th ly L a b o r R eview . T he results o f the 1968
survey have been adjusted to the O ctober 1968 em ploym ent
level and are being presented in table 2 as part o f the electrical
equipm ent industry. T he results o f th e 1970 survey appear in
table 4 together w ith the results o f the earlier surveys.




5

resulting from misunderstanding the instructions or
definitions; it does not include possible bias due to
nonresponse by some firms. Estimates o f fewer than
1.000 employees and those with a relative error o f
greater than 20 percent are not shown in table 2? The
Bureau will make available on request tabulations o f
occupational employment and relative sampling errors in
greater industry detail (3-digit SIC) than shown in the
table.

occupational employment. A major objective o f the
program is to obtain data for as many occupations as
possible by which to estimate current and future
manpower requirements for States and areas, as well as
for die United States as a whole. Another objective is to
provide data for studying the occupational composition
o f industries to determine: (a) how occupational com­
position differs within an industry by size o f plant,
process, and other factors; (b) the degree o f interplant
variability; and (c)h ow occupational composition
changes over time. Also, the program is intended to
provide data for computing job vacancy rates in the Job
Opportunities Labor Turnover Statistics (JOLTS) pro­
gram.
The OES survey program is designed to evolve into a
full-fledged Federal-State cooperative program.3 Manu­
facturing industries are to be surveyed in 1971 and
nonmanufacturing in 1972. This 2-year cycle will be
repeated in subsequent years so that occupational
employment changes over time can be analyzed. For
manufacturing, the national sample will provide occupa­
tional employment estimates for publication at the
3-digit SIC level. However, plans call for occupational
estimates to be developed at the 4-digit level for
analytical purposes and for establishing a data bank o f
occupational patterns for use by State manpower ana­
lysts to develop estimates for States and subdivisions of
States.
The surveys will be conducted by mail, using struc­
tured mail questionnaires; i.e., questionnaires with a list
o f the occupations on which reporting is desired.
However, they will be open ended to permit respondents
to identify separately important, as well as new and
emerging, occupations not identified in the document,
and to report employment in these occupations. These
then can be added to the questionnaires for each
industry in subsequent surveys.4 Questionnaires which

Design of the March 1970 printing
and publication survey
Fifteen separate printing and publishing industries
(SIC 27) were covered in this survey. At the time o f the
survey, the newspaper industry employed about a third
o f the 1.1 million workers in printing and publishing.
Commercial printing, except lithographic, was the next
largest industry segment, 210,000 workers, or about 20
percent o f the total. The average number o f employees
in all other printing industries was only 39,000. Survey
questionnaires were mailed to about 9 percent o f the
32.000 establishments employing four workers or more
throughout the SO States and the District o f Columbia.
The weighted employment accounted for by usable
responses was 62 percent o f all workers in printing and
publishing.
About 100 occupations were surveyed, and the
procedures used to develop the occupational question­
naire and occupational definitions were similar to those
used in the metalworking survey. (See p. S.) Reporting
was obtained on all full-time and part-time employees
who received pay for any part o f the payroll period that
included March 12, 1970. Excluded were persons on
leave without pay for the entire period, pensioners, and
members o f the Armed Forces who were carried on the
rolls but did not work during the period. Table 3 gives
the estimated employment and relative sampling error o f
the occupations surveyed.

3 As o f June 1971, 10 States were already in the program ,
and additional S tates were seeking to participate.

Future survey plans
Results from the metalworking and printing and
publishing surveys indicate that the OES program will
fulfill the need for more timely and reliable data on

* Estim ates o f fewer th an 1,000 em ployees shown in t h e 1
em ploym ent m atrix (table 1) probably have an even greater
degree o f unreliability th an estim ates o f com parable size based
on surveys. T hey are show n, however, to convey the general level
and position they hold in relation to one another.




6

4 T he nex t survey o f m etalw orking will use a questionnaire
w ith m ore th an tw ice as m any as th e 60 specific occupations and
residual occupational categories covered by th e 1968 survey.
This will help to reduce the size o f all residual occupational
categories, especially the category “ all other production m ainte­
nance, m aterial m ovem ent, an d pow erplant workers/* This
category, which was 33 percent o f all production and related
w orkers for all industries com bined, ranged from 25 percent in
nonelectrical m achinery (SIC 35) to 37 percent in transportation
equipm ent (SIC 37). In addition, the new questionnaire will be
im proved to m ake th e list o f occupations m ore representative o f
skill groups o th er th an ju st th e m ost highly skilled blue-collar
groups. This will be accom plished by adding about 20 new
semiskilled and unskilled blue-collar occupations.

subdivision o f industry detail. For instance, the private
payroll employment o f scientists, engineers, and tech­
nicians was tabulated for 89 industries in 1968 com­
pared with 55 :in 1961. This expansion and finer
classification has provided more detail on the structure
o f the occupation;d patterns in industry.
The universe in the 1969 survey covered about 34
million workers in 530,000 establishments from which a
sample o f 27,000 establishments was drawn. The results
o f the 1969 survey are the most reliable occupational
data available on scientific personnel in private industry.6
This annual collection o f data for scientists, en­
gineers, and technicians, was part o f a program to
provide occupational statistics on the Nation’s scientific
and technical manpower in private industry. However,
beginning in 1971, the collection o f occupational data
for scientists, engineers, and technicians in private
industry will be included in the Occupational Employ­
ment Statistics program o f the Bureau o f Labor Sta­
tistics.
Tables 5, 6, and 7 present occupational employment
statistics for engineers, scientists, and technicians by
Survey o f Scientific and
industry and year. Table 8 shows the employment o f
Technical Personnel
scientists in six occupations by industry for January
1969. The employment o f technicians in six occupations
In 1962, under the sponsorship o f the National
for January 1969 is presented by industry in table 9.
Science Foundation, the Bureau o f Labor Statistics
The estimates for scientists, engineers, and tech­
began to fund annually a series o f scientific manpower
nicians covered by this survey include only wage and
surveys which had been started in the mid-1950’s.
salary employees in most o f private industry. These data
Data collected from the pre-1961 surveys are not
were combined with estimates o f employees out o f the
comparable with those collected after 1960, because the
scope o f the survey in order to derive total employment
earlier surveys were based on a sample o f companies
in these occupations for inclusion in the occupational
rather than on a sample o f establishments.5 Before
matrix. Data obtained from the Bureau o f the Census are
1961, the employment o f an entire company was
used to estimate :he number o f self-employed in these
classified in the industry with which the company was
occupations. The Civil Service Commission provides
primarily associated. This led to an incorrect classifica­
estimates on the numbers employed in the Federal
tion o f employment by industry in companies that had
Government. (See: table 18.) Data obtained from the
plants which had activity in different industry. For
National Science Foundation are used to estimate the
further accuracy, the survey o f scientific and technical
employment o f scientists, engineers, and technicians in
personnel in industry has been refined to show a greater
educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.
(See tables 11-15.)
5
F or inform ation on th e pre-1961 surveys see Scientific and

ask the employer to provide his own list o f occupations
and the numbers employed in each (unstructured ques­
tionnaires) are being tested and may be used to some
extent in the future.
Standard lists o f occupations, one for manufacturing
industries and one or more for nonmanufacturing
industries, will be developed for inclusion on each survey
questionnaire. These standard lists will be supplemented
by other occupations which either employ sizable
numbers o f workers or require a substantial period o f
education and training. A significant proportion o f these
will be unique to particular industries, such as tanners in
the leather industry and leaf trimmers in the tobacco
industry. Each structured questionnaire will be accom­
panied by occupational definitions, which will be stand­
ardized as much as possible. However, some variation
from industry to industry in the wordings o f the
definitions for the same job will be necessary in order
for the surveyed establishment to respond accurately to
the questionnaires.

Technical Personnel in Industry, 1960 (1961); N ational Science
Foundation, Scientific and Technical Personnel in American
Industry, Report on a 1959 Survey (1962); Science and
Engineering in American Industry, Final Report on a 1953-54
Survey (O ctober 1956) and 1956 Survey (N ovem ber 1956).




‘ See Scientific and Technical Personnel In Industry, 1957
(BLS B ulletin 1674), W ashington, D.C. and Scientific and
Technical Personnel in Industry, 1961-66, (BLS Bulletin 1609),
W ashington, D.C.

7

for 1959 and 1962 ;7 however, these surveys are
not comparable in all their detail with the later
ones.

Survey of Scientific and Technical
Personnel in Government
Employment of scientific, professional, and technical
personnel by State Government in January 1964 and
1967 was obtained from sample surveys conducted by
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and is shown in
table 10. State data are for the 50 States and
exclude State educational institutions. Similar sur­
veys of State Government employment were made




’ E m p lo y m e n t o f S cientific and Technical Personnel in State
Governm ent Agencies, 1 9 6 2
o f S cientific and

(BLS Bulletin 1412). E m p lo y m e n t

Technical Personnel in State Governm ent

1961, NSF 61-17, National
Science Foundation. This survey was sponsored by the National
Science Foundation and conducted by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

Agencies, R e p o rt o f a 1 9 5 9 Survey,

8

C h a p t e r 3. O c c u p a t i o n a l Estimates From
O t h e r G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c ie s
in independent research and scientific nonprofit institu­
tions are foundations, science exhibitors, professional
and technical societies, academies of science, and inde­
pendent research institutes. The following are examples
of the five types of independent research and nonprofit
institutions: Ford Foundation, American Museum of
Natural History, American Chemical Society, National
Academy of Science and the Battelle Memorial Institute.
For the interested reader, the National Science
Foundation has available a recent publication with
further occupational characteristics of scientists and
engineers employed by nonprofit organizations.1

Many Government agencies, including the Na­
tional Science Foundation, the Office of Educa­
tion, the Interstate Commerce Commission, the
Federal Communications Commission, and the U.S. Civil
Service Commission collect occupational data in their
area of immediate interest. This chapter discusses these
sources of occupational information. In many instances
these data are published in greater detail than can be
used in the occupational matrix.

The National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation publishes informa­
tion on the employment of scientific and technical
personnel in universities and colleges and nonprofit
institutions. (See tables 11-15.) The Foundation re­
ported 350,000 full- and part-time engineers and sci­
entists at work in January 1970 in colleges and
universities. Of this total, 254,000 were employed
directly by colleges and universities, 84,000 were grad­
uate students receiving stipends for part-time work, and
nearly 12,000 were employed in university-administered
Federally Funded Research and Development Centers
(FFRDCs).
These centers emerged during World War II and have
continued as a means to meet the research and develop­
ment needs of particular Federal agencies. The U.S.
Department of Defense, the Atomic Energy Commis­
sion, and the National Aeronautics and Space Admin­
istration fund these centers. Universities, colleges, non­
profit institutions, and industrial firms administer them.
In 1970, 11,200 scientists and engineers were employed
by FFRDCs administered by universities and colleges;
5,900 by FFRDCs administered by nonprofit institu­
tions; and 5,500 by FFRDCs administered by industrial
firms.
In addition to colleges and universities, independent
research and scientific nonprofit institutions employed
nearly 24,000 scientists and engineers in 1970. Included




Office of Education
The Office of Education provides annual employment
estimates for elementary, secondary, and college
teachers. These estimates and their 10-year projections
are contained in the annual publication Projections o f
Educational Statistics . The teacher estimates for public
schools are provided by the State Department of
Education, and those for nonpublic schools are provided
individually.
The estimates for librarians include all full-time
librarians and a full-time equivalent estimate for those
working part time. Special and public librarians are
included in the estimates. Special librarians work in
libraries maintained by commercial and industrial firms;
public libraries included in table 16 are those confined
to cities that have populations of 35,000 or more.
However, the estimate for librarians used in the matrix
1Resources f o r Scientific A ctivities o f In d ep en d en t N o n ­

1970, National Science Foundation, Washing­
ton, D.C. Also see Scientific A ctivities o f N o n p ro fit In s titu ­
t io n s - 1 9 6 6 E xpenditures and January 1 9 6 7 M anpo w er (1969),
NSF 69-16, National Science Foundation and Scientific A c tiv i­

p ro fit Institutions,

ties o f N o n p ro fit In s t it u t io n - 1 9 6 4 E xpenditures and January
1 9 6 5 M anpo w er (1967), NSF 67-17, National Science Founda­
tion, Washington, D.C.

9

test were classified as class II. From 1956 through 1964,
the test for a class I railroad was an annual operating
revenue of $3,000,000 or more.

includes all librarians performing work as librarians in a
primary job, whether they are employed full time or
part time.

Class I railroads

Federal Regulatory Agencies
Class I railroads accounted for about 90 percent of
the railroad transportation industry’s employment in
both 1968 and 1969. In 1969, 73 class I line haul
railroad companies operated 178,099 miles of road, and
27 class I switching and terminal companies operated
3,030 miles of track.
Class I railroads submit annual reports to the ICC,
which summarizes them in Statement No. A300, Wage
Statistics o f Gass I Railroads in the U nited S tates .
Before 1966, the employment data for class I railroads
were summarized in statement M300. These statements
show employment for 128 occupational categories, a
few of which consist of a mixture of occupations. Only a
selected number of occupational categories are shown in
this bulletin.

The Federal regulatory agencies such as Interstate
Commerce Commission (ICC) Federal Aviation Agency
(FAA); and Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
provide a rich source of annual occupational employ­
ment statistics for the regulated industries. Mandatory
reports from the companies in these sectors are filed
with the agencies.
Annual information on over 200 occupations and
occupational groups is on file with the regulatory
agencies. However, some of the broader occupational
classifications on file are not consistent with generally
accepted occupational classifications from the Bureau of
the Census (e.g., construction installation and repair
employees and business office and sales employees).
Nevertheless, the employment trends indicated in the
broad occupational categories provide helpful informa­
tion in discerning the change in the employment of
occupations within the broad categories. Selected oc­
cupational data from these reports are presented in
table 17.
The occupational estimates derived from the gov­
ernment regulatory agencies include many different
occupational concepts. For example, estimates from the
FAA are full-time equivalents, but those from the ICC
are an annual average based on the number of employees
on the payroll at midmonth for 12 months. To maintain
conceptual consistency with other data, these estimates
were adjusted to include only the primary jobs of all
full-time and part-time workers before they were in­
serted into the matrix. The regulated economic sectors
are described in the following sections.

Railw ay express agency

During the 3 years ending in 1969, the Railway
Express Agency has accounted for about 4 percent of
the employment in the railroad transportation industry.
Employment data for 28 occupational groups employed
by the Railway Express Agency are provided in the
annual issues of Transport Statistics in the United S ta tes ,
part 1, section F. Data covering the period before 1966
may be found in Transport Statistics in the U nited
S ta tes , part 3.
Pullman company

In 1968, the Pullman Company reported employment
of 2,945, or less than one-half of 1 percent of the
employment in the railroad industry. This was the last
year in which the Pullman Company reported data to
the ICC. Pullman service is now being provided by the
individual railroad companies. Occupational data for the
period of 1966 to 1968 may be found in the annual
issues of Transport Statistics in the U nited S tates , part 1,
section E. Data relating to the period before 1966
appear in part 2 of Transport Statistics in the United
S tates .

Railroads

The railroad industry is defined as including class I
and class II line haul railroads, class I and class II
switching and terminal companies, the Pullman Com­
pany, the Railway Express Agency, Inc., and electric
railways. Railroad companies are classified for statistical
purposes as class I or class II, depending on their average
operating revenues for a 3-year period. Since January 1,
1965, railroad companies that had average annual
operating revenues of $5,000,000 or more were clas­
sified as class I. Those railroads not meeting this revenue




Oil pipelines

Pipeline companies subject to the jurisdiction of the
ICC are those carriers engaged in the interstate

10

ment was below that reported a year earlier (26,131).
Since BLS’s initial annual study in 1947, employment,
exclusive of officials and managerial assistants, has
declined from 53,107 to 24,780, in the Western Union
Telegraph Co.
The six international telegraph carriers reported a
total employment of 5,522 in October 1969. The data
include carriers engaged in nonvocal international tele­
graph communications by radio or by ocean cable.
Although many of the occupational groups are in general
use by radio, telegraph, or ocean cable carriers, a few are
exclusive to one carrier group. For example, radio
operators were employed for only radio telegraph
carriers, and cable operators were employed only for
ocean cable carriers.
Approximately 2,300 employees working outside the
conterminous United States and the District o f Colum­
bia are excluded. These data included employment for
the whole industry.

transportation of oil or other commodities, except water
and gas. In 1969, 99 pipeline companies, two more than
in the previous year, which accounted for about 87
percent o f the industry employment filed reports con­
taining occupational data with ICC. These data appear in
Transport Statistics in the United States, part 6.
Scheduled airlines

Air Transport Facts and Figures, published annually
by the Air Transport Association o f America contains
occupational employment information on the airline
industry filed with the Civil Aeronautics Board. In 1969,
these data covered over 90 percent o f the airline
industry employment. The Federal Aviation Agency
annually publishes the FAA Statistical Handbook o f
Aviation , in which employment and other scheduled
airline information appears in great detail.
Telephones
Occupational employment information in the tele­
phone industry can be acquired from annual reports of
the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the
U.S. Independent Telephone Association. The U.S.
Department o f Labor publishes an annual wage survey in
the communication industry entitled Industry Wage
Survey: Communications. The data contained in the
wage survey bulletin are compiled from annual reports
filed with the FCC by Bell-System Telephone Carriers
having annual revenues that exceed $1 million. Before
1965, the annual revenue test was $250,000.
Annual occupational employment data for the inde­
pendent telephone segment o f the telephone industry is
available in the Independent Telephone Statistics pub­
lished by the U.S. Independent Telephone Association.
The combination o f the two reports covers all employ­
ment in the telephone industry, except for officials and
managerial assistants employed by the Bell-System.

U.S. Civil Service Commission
The Federal Government is by far the Nation’s largest
employer; it employs more than 3,000,000 white-collar
and over 800,000 blue-collar workers. The U.S. Civil
Service Commission (CSC) compiles these data2 in two
separate publications—
one includes white-collar and the
other blue-collar employment.
The CSC’s occupational classification system gen­
erally is not comparable with that of the Census because
o f the finer occupational detail and more functional
framework found in the CSC system. However, occupa­
tions in the CSC system are classifiable into the census
system for use in the matrix through the Census o f

Population Classified Index o f Occupations and Indus­
tries. In the industry-occupation matrix, the industry
concept of Federal Public Administration is used instead
o f the total Government concept. Therefore, many
employees who appear in CSC estimates of the Federal
Government work force are distributed to other indus­
tries. (See page 4.)
In the latest bulletin on white-collar workers, Occupa­
tions o f Federal White-Collar Workers published by the
CSC (O ctobet31, 1968), occupational data are pre­
sented for over 450 occupational series for each o f 23

Telegraph
Occupational employment data for the telegraph
industry are published annually in the BLS Industry
Wage Survey: Communications. The telegraph industry
data contained in this survey are compiled from annual
reports filed with the FCC by all companies in the
telegraph industry having annual revenues that exceed
$50,000. The latest data cover the 24,780 employees of
the Western Union Telegraph Co. in 1969. The employ­




2 Excluding the Central Intelligence Agency and the National
Security Agency.

11

The latest blue-collar publication, Occupations o f
Federal Blue-Collar Workers (October 31, 1968), con­

agencies (including one catchall category).3 Over 80
percent of all full-time white-collar personnel were
concentrated in six employer agencies—
Department o f
Defense; Post Office; Veterans Administration; Depart­
ment of Health, Education, and Welfare; Department of
Agriculture; and Department o f Treasury. The Depart­
ment of Defense was the largest employer, it had a total
o f 645,970 full-time white-collar personnel.
Table 18 shows white-collar occupational employ­
ment information for over 150 occupations containing
employment o f 1,000 persons or more at least once
during the periods ending October 31, 1964, Oc­
tober 31, 1966, October 31, 1967, and October 31,
1968. Employment in selected Post Office occupations
is presented in table 20.

tains data for nearly 1,500 separate occupations com­
bined into 36 specific job families and a “miscellaneous
occupations” job family.4 In 1968, job family size
ranged from 75,451 in mobile industrial equipment
operation and maintenance to four in plastic material
manufacturing. Many of the blue-collar occupations
which make up the Federal blue-collar work force are
shown in table 19. Blue-collar employment was reported
for 58 Federal agencies; however, about 90 percent o f all
full-time blue-collar employees were concentrated in four
agencies-the Department of Defense reported 472,653
(75.2 percent); the Post Office, 33,719 (5.4 percent);
the Veterans Administration, 33,834 (5.4 percent), and
General Services Administration, 19,062 (3.0 percent).

3
Earlier data are contained in similarly titled publications
dated Oct. 31, 1966; Oct. 31, 1961; Oct. 31, 1960; Oct. 31,
1959; Oct. 31, 1958; Feb. 28, 1957; and Aug. 31, 1954.
4
Earlier data are contained in similarly titled publications
Unpublished data are available for 1964 and 1962. Data for
dated Oct. 31, 1960; Oct. 31, 1958; and Feb. 28, 1957; unpub­
1951 and 1947 are in BLS Bulletin 1117, which was published in
lished data re available for 1961, 1962, and 1965.
cooperation with the U.S. Civil Service Commission.




12

C h a p t e r 4. O c c u p a t i o n a l Estimates
From P r o fe s s io n a l A s s o c i a t i o n s

1965-1967 and Health Resources Statistics. The esti­
mates for 1969 and 1970 are from the American
Optometry Association.

This chapter discusses occupational information from
professional associations and societies that maintain and
publish information annually or biennially on occupa­
tional employment from licensure statistics, from their
own membership records, and from other sources. The
data for the occupations shown in this chapter and
presented in table 21 were made consistent with the
employment concepts used in the occupational matrix.
(See the discussion o f this on page 4.)

Osteopaths
Employment estimates for osteopaths are available
from the American Osteopathic Association’s annual
report, A Statistical Study o f the Osteopathic Profes­
sion. These estimates exclude the retired and those for
whom status was not reported.

Dentists
Employment information for dentists is published by
the American Dental Association (ADA) in Distribution
o f Dentists in the U.S. by State Region, District, and
County. Before 1969, the report was published annually;
since then, it has become a biennial report. These
estimates include all practicing dentists whether or not
they are members o f ADA. Data on nonmembers are
collected through the State boards.

Pharmacists
Employment data before 1967 are from the NABP
Bulletin published by the National Association o f Boards
of Pharmacy. Since 1967, employment data for phar­
macists have been from Licensure Statistics and Census
o f Pharmacy published by the NABP. The data from
both sources represent a count o f registered pharmacists
in practice obtained from NABP census and licensing
data.

Nurses
Employment information concerning nurses may be
found in Facts About Nursing, an annual report pub­
lished by the American Nurses Association. Nursing
estimates were developed by the American Nurses
Association in cooperation with State boards o f nursing,
which used licensure records to collect data.

Physicians
About one-third o f the physicians in private practice
are general practitioners and two-thirds are specialists.
Included in the employment estimates for physicians are
specialists in all 33 fields recognized by the medical
profession. Among the largest specialties are internal
medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, psychi­
atry, pediatrics, radiology, anesthesiology, ophthal­
mology, and pathology. Since 1967, employment esti­
mates for physicians have been attained from Dis­
tribution o f Physicians, Hospital, and Hospital Beds in
the United States, Regional, State County, Metropolitan
Area. This annual survey was published by the Depart­
ment o f Survey Research, American Medical Associa­
tion. In order to conform to the civilian labor force
concept o f the Current Population Survey which is the
basis for the matrix system, the estimates exclude the

Optometrists
The American Optometry Association publishes re­
ports periodically that contain current manpower esti­
mates as well as future manpower needs. This informa­
tion is based on licensure and registration data from each
of the 50 States and the District o f Columbia. The
estimates for 1965 through 1970 include only those
optometrists who are actively practicing their profession.
The Public Health Service publishes statistics for this
category in the Health Manpower, United States




13

military, retired, and physicians who have temporary
foreign addresses.

these reports are published by the American Veterinary
Medicine Association (AVMA), and exclude the military
and those who are retired. Data for 1968 and 1969 are
estimates made by AVMA.

Podiatrists
The employment estimates for podiatrists were de­
veloped by the American Podiatry Association from
State licensing data. The revised 1965 edition of
Podiatry as a Career by Wilfred Belleau gives 1962
employment data. Numbers and the Podiatry Professions
by Lloyd E. Blauch, provides data for 1963 \ Journal o f
the American Podiatry Association, March 1965, “ 1964
Survey o f the Podiatry Profession: The Podiatrists: Dis­
tribution, Education Organizational Relationships,” by
Lloyd E. Blauch, gives 1964 data. Estimates for 1965
through 1970 were furnished by the American Podiatry
Association. In 1970, each State’s licensing board was
contacted for a list o f podiatrists. A survey then was
conducted by the Department o f Health, Education, and
Welfare from this list to determine how many were
practicing.

Architects
The 1968 and 1969 estimates are from the National
Council o f Architectural Registration, Washington, D.C.
Data for previous years are from the Architectural
Institute of America. Data include only single registrants
from their base state o f original licensing. Both sources
may include some retired registered architects.
Foresters
The employment data from foresters in 1961 are
from a survey o f alumni by colleges granting degrees in
forestry and a count o f the nondegree members of the
Society o f American Foresters. The data was published
in an article, “How Many Foresters” , by F. H. Eyre in
the Journal o f Forestry, 1962. The 1962 and 1966 data
are estimates made by the Society. They are based on
the 1961 figure and have been adjusted to include
entrants (degree recipients) and exclude retired person­
nel. The data for 1968 and 1969 are estimates by the
Bureau o f Labor Statistics.

Veterinarians

Dimensions o f Veterinary Medicine and the various
editions o f A VMA Directory , a biennial publication, give
employment data for licensed veterinarians. Both of




14




TABLES

15

Table 1. Number of employed persons by occupation and industry, 16 years of age older, 1960 and 1970
TOTAL
ALL
INDUSTRIES

OCCUPATION

CONSTRUCTION

TOTAL
MINING

AGRICULTURE
FORESTRY AND
FISHERIES TOTAL

DURABLE GOODS
MANUFACTURING

TOTAL
MANUFACTURING

60 EMP

PROFESSIONAL

TECHNICAL WKRS.

ENGINEERS.TECHNICAL
ENGINEERS.AERONAUTICAL
ENGINEERS.CHEMICAL
ENGINEERS.CIVIL
ENGINEERS.ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERS.INDUSTRIAL
ENGINEERS.MECHANICAL
ENGINEERS,METALLURG,ETC
ENGINEERS,MINING
ENGINEERS,SALES
OTHER ENGINEERS,TECHNICAL

70 EMP

60 EMP

70 EMP

60 EMP

70 EMP

60 EMP

70 EMP

60 EMP

60 EMP

70 EMP

65,778.0

INDUSTRY TOTAL

78,627.0

5,591.0

3,566.0

720.0

637.0

4,056.0

4,568.0

17,144.0

19,735.0

9,701.0

11,473.0

7,469.0

11,140.0

57.9

69.2

60.1

56.3

226.8

267.0

1,363.1

1,816.3

942.7

1,296.6

810.0

1,081.3

1.2

1.5

19.5

18.2

86.6

96.9

482.6

615.7

413.6

526.5

45.8
39.6
146.0
174.7
83.2
153.5
20.1
14.0

63.9
50.9
179.9
233.8
115.7
206.7
25.5
14.6

.0
.0
.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.2
1.1
.0
.0
. 1
.0
.0

.0
1.9
1.3
1.2
1.2
1.4
.3
10.7

.0
1.5
1.4
1.0
1.7
1.9
.6
8.5

.0
.3
76.1
2.5
.9
3.8
.0
.1

.0
.2
86.3
2.5
.7
3.6
.0
.1

40.1
32.5
13.3
113.1
67.7
117.3
17.7
1.5

50.2
41.2
15.9
142.0
89.1
154.1
20.8
2.0

40.1
8.5
9.7
109.9
57.1
103.5
16.9
.4

50.1
10.4
12.1
138.3
73.7
135.9
19.6
.7

68.6
121.6

.0
.5

.0
.2

50.1
83.0

1.0
.5

1.0

1.2

.

1 .7

2

7

.9
.6

70 EMP *

43. 8
56.6

32.0

43.9

35.7

39.0
46.7

35.7

NATURAL SCIENTISTS
CHEMISTS
AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS
BIOLOGICAL SCIENTISTS
GEOLOGISTS,GEOPHYSICISTS
MATHEMATICIANS
PHYSICISTS
OTHER NATURAL SCIENTISTS

235.6
91.0
30.0
29.5
18.0
20.7
24.0
22.4

364.8
118.3
39.2
49.9
25.4
48.6
35.9
47.5

10.1
.9
7.5
1.5
.0
.0
•0
.1

11.3
.2
8.4
2.5
.1
.1
.0
.1

12.3
1.3
.0
.0
10.7
.1
•2
.0

14.4
.9
.1
.0
12.8
.4
.1
.2

1.8
.5
.1
.1
.6
.3
.0
.1

2.4
.4
.1
.1
1.0
.5
.0
.3

106.5
63.5
5.1
7.6
1.6
9.5
11.1
8.1

142.2
80.9
3.9
9.0
1.3
23.5
12.5
11.1

38.4
16.1
.8
.3
.6
8.3
9.7
2.6

54.1
19.0
.5
.7
•8
20.1
9.7
3.2

TECHNICIANS,EXC MEDICAL,DENT
DRAFTSMEN
SURVEYORS
AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS
RADIO OPERATORS
ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC
OTHER ENG.AND PHY.SIC
TECHNICIANS.OTHER

730.9
233.0
44.0
12.0
17.0

1,011.7
309.5
51.2
20.0
22.3

6.0
.2
.4
.0
.0
.1

9.4
.2
.5
.0
.0

15.7
5.6
1.7

10.0
3.7
1.5
.0
.2

92.2
26.5
13.5
.0
.3

100.9
34.0
15.2
.0
.4

331.2
128.4
.7
.0
.6

434.9
150.2
1.9
.0
.8

260.8
117.3
.4
.0
.5

361.6
140.8
1.7
.0
.7

2 .9
4 6.5
2. 2

11.6
36.5

65.4
118 .8
17.6

102. 3
132. 5
47. 1

64.7
75.6
2 .7

MEDICAL,OTHER HEALTH WORKERS
DENTISTS
DIETITIANS,NUTRITIONISTS
NURSES,PROFESSIONAL
OPTOMETRISTS
OSTEOPATHS
PHARMACISTS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
PSYCHOLOGISTS
TECHNICIANS,MEDICAL,DENTAL
VETERINARIANS
OTHER MEDICAL,HEALTH WRKS
TEACHERS
TEACHERS,ELEMENTARY
TEACHERS,SECONDARY
TEACHERS,COLLEGE
TEACHERS,OTHER
SOCIAL SCIENTISTS
ECONOMISTS
STATISTICIANS ♦ ACTUARIES
OTHER SOCIAL SCIENTISTS
OTHER PROF. ♦ TECH. WORKERS
ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS
AIRPLANE PILOTS,NAVIGATORS
ARCHITECTS
WRKRS IN ARTS.ENTERTAINMNT
CLERGYMEN
DESIGNERS,EXC DESIGN DRAFT
EDITORS AND REPORTERS
LAWYERS AND JUDGES
LIBRARIANS
PERSONNEL AND LAB REL WRKS
PHOTOGRAPHERS
SOCIAL AND WELFARE WORKERS
PROF ♦ TECH WORKERS N.E.C.




1 1 7 .6

205.5

238. 0
69.3

264

.
139.

2

.

.0

.2
.5

.2
2.2

6. 8

.9
2. 1

6. 3

.9

1. 6

0

8
4 .4

1,321.4
86.7
27.1
495.6
17.0
13.1
113.8
220.9
17.0
140.8
18.6
170.8

1,776.4
96.7
30.0
688.7
17.5
13.5
128.8
266.0
33.2
263.0
24.0
215.0

15.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
14.7
.0

18.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
18.3
.0

.3
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
•0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0

.2
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
•0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0

1,945.1
977.9
602.7
206.2
158.3

3,072.0
1,260.0
1,015.0
552.0
245.0

.1
.0
.0
.0
.1

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.1
•0
.0
.0

45.7
17.1
22.8
5.8

63.2
25.0
29.2
9.0

.1
.1
.0
.0

.1
.1
.0
.0

2,380.3
429.3
28.5
30.0
470.0
200.0
66.0
100.0
225.0
80.0
100.0
51.0
105.0
495.5

3,770.7
491.0
57.0
33.0
750.0
208.0
93.0
112.0
286.9
125.0
160.0
65.0
170.0
1,219.8

25.4
1 .0
1.6
.1
4.5
.0
•6
.1
.1
.1
.1
.0
•0
17.3

28.5
.8
2.6
.1
4.1
.0
.8
.0
.1
.1
.1
.0
.0
19.9

3. 3

9 8.8
93.8
25.7

.1
.0
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0

.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
•0
.0
.0
.0

16.5
.0
.5
8.7
.1
.0
1.9
1.4
.4
3.5
.1
.1

12.9
.0
.7
6.3
.0
.0
2.7
1.1
.5
1.2
.2
.1

9.9
•0
.2
5.6
.1
.0
.1
.8
.3
2.8
.0
.0

6.5
.0
.4
4.1
.0
.0
.2
.7
.3
.7
.0
.0

.1
.0
.0
.0
.1

.5
.0
.0
.0
.5

.3
.0
.0
.0
.3

3.3
.0
.0
.0
3.3

3.8
.0
.0
.0
3.8

2.3
.0
.0
.0
2.3

2.6
•0
.0
.0
2.6

.3
.1
•2
.0

.4
.1
.2
.1

.5
.1
.4
.0

.5
.1
.4
.0

11.1
4.9
5.7
.5

13.1
5.9
6.5
.7

6.7
2.9
3.6
.2

8.1
3.6
4.3
.3

11.9
7.3
.4
.0
.0
.0
•1
.0
1.4
.0
•9
.1
.0
1.6

13.0
6.9
.7
.0
.0
.0
.2
.0
.9
.1
1.3
.1
.0
2.8

44.9
11.0
.4
1.4
.6
.0
3.7
.2
1.1
.1
1.1
.2
.0
25.3

65.9
10.7
.7
1.9
1.0
.0
5.1
.1
1.2
•0
1.9
.1
.0
43.0

411.9
112.1
2.6
1.0
44.1
.1
37.1
73.7
6.2
1.4
34.8
15.0
.3
83.4

593.7
106.4
4.8
1.4
58.7
.1
50.6
78.5
6.6
2.1
47.9
20.5
•3
215.8

210.9
69.3
1.9
.8
24.1
.0
23.0
4.0
3.7
.8
2?.l
4.1
.3
55.7

337.3
66.6
3.5
1.1
30.2
•0
31.7
4.6
4.0
1.4
31.2
5.1
.2
157.6

16

.2
.0

•0

Table 1. Number of employed persons by occupation and industry, 16 years of age and older, 1960 and 1970—Continued
TRANSPORTATION
COMMUNICATIONS
PUBLIC UTILITIES

WHOLESALE
AND
RETAIL TRADE

SERVICES

GOVERNMENT PUBLIC
ADMINISTRATION

O CCU PA TIO N

NONDURABLE GOODS
MANUFACTURING
60 EMP

70 EMP

60 EMP

70 EMP

60 EMP

70 EMP

60 EMP

60 EMP

70 EMP

60 EMP

70 EMP

IN D U S T R Y TO TAL

7,443.0

8,262.0

4,508.0

5,065.0

13,210.0

16,030.0

2,832.0

3,862.0

14,508.0

20,739.0

3,209.0

4,425.0

420.5

519.6

240.2

347.6

256.7

342.2

76.9

116.0

4,738.2

7,424.8

449.1

700.7

69.0

89.1

51.8

66.5

15.2

26.1

2.5

5.8

91.9

173.5

58.7

77.1

.0
24.0
3.6
3.2
10.5
13.9
•8
1.1
3.7
8.2

.1
30.8
3.8
3.7
15.4
18.2
1.2
1.2
4. 8
9.9

.4
.6
10.3
26.9
2.3
6.2
•4
.2
1. 3
3. 1

.8
.6
11.6
36.0
3.1
7.4
.6
.6
1.6
4.2

.0
.5
.9
1.1
.6
2.1
.1
.2
7.7
2. 0

.0
.7
1.4
1.3
1.9
3.0
.1
.7
12. 8
4.1

.0
.0
.7
.1
1.5
.1
.0
.1
.0
. 1

.0

1.7
3.3
21.6
19.2
6.2
15.0
1.2
.6
3. 2
19. 9

3.6
5.9
36.3
33.7
12.2
29.1
2.9
1.7
8.4
39. 6

3.5
.5
21.3
10.7
2.7
7.7
.4
.6
.0
11. 3

9.3
.7
24.6
17.3
3.4
7.2
.5
.8
. 0
13.4

N ATURAL S C IE N T I S T S
C H E M IS T S
A G R IC U L T U R A L S C IE N T I S T S
B IO L O G IC A L S C IE N T I S T S
G E O L O G IS T S .G E O P H Y S IC IS T S
M ATH EM ATICIAN S
P H Y S IC IS T S
OTHER NATURAL S C IE N T I S T S

68.2
47.5
4.3
7.2

88.0
61.8
3.4
8.3
.5
3.3
2.8
7.9

2.2
1.1
.3
.0
.5
.2
.0
.1

3.3
1.3
.2
.1
.6
1.0
.0
.2

2.4
1.4
.0
.1
.0
.8
.1
.1

9.6
5.0
.9
.4
.2
2.2
.2
.8

.1

.1

62.3
18.2
3.7
14.9
2.1
4.7
8.4
10.3

127.1
24.1
10.1
28.3
6.6
14.4
18.3
25.2

37.2
4.2
13.1
5.3
2.4
4.5
4.1
3.6

53.2
5.5
15.5
9.6
2.8
5.6
4.7
9.5

T E C H N IC IA N S .E X C K E O IC A L .O E N T
DRAFTSMEN
SURVEYORS
A IR T R A F F IC C O N TRO LLERS
R A D IO O PERATORS
E L E C T R IC A L AND E L E C T R O N IC
OTHER EN G .A NO P H Y . S I C
T E C H N IC IA N S ,O T H E R

70.4
11.1
.3
.0
.1
.7

73.4
9.4
.2
.0
.1

52.9
9.3
3.4
.0
7.6

75.0
11.3
3.7
.0
9.3

20.7
5.4
.3
.0
.2

34.4
5.4
.0
.0
• 1

1.9
.1
.5
.0
•1

1.7
.7

136.0
50.9
16.0
.0
.4

224.1
97.3
23.9
.0
.6

74.3
6.6
7.4
12.0
7.6

121.3
6.8
4.5
20.0
10.7

3.5

21.8
7.5
3.4

29.4
15.5
5 .8

17.0
4.3
7.5

. 5
. 5
. 3

10. 3
33. 1
25.2

22.7
28. 8
50 .7

12.5
17.5
10.7

21.3
41.7
16.3

M E O IC A L ,O T H E R H EA LTH WORKERS
D E N T IS T S
O IE T IT IA N S .N U T R IT IO N IS T S
N U R S E S ,P R O F E S S IO N A L
O P TO M E TR ISTS
O STEO PA TH S
P H A R M A CISTS
P H Y S IC IA N S AND SURGEONS
P S Y C H O L O G IS T S
T E C H N IC IA N S .M E O IC A L ,D E N T A L
V E T E R IN A R IA N S
OTHER M E O IC A L ,H E A L T H WRKS

6.6
•0
.2
3.2
.0
.0
1.7
.6
.1
.6
.1
.0

6.4
.0
.3
2.2
.0
.0
2.5
.4
.2
.5
.2
.1

1.4
.0
.1
.6
.0
•0
.0
.4
.0
.2
.0
.0

1.2
.0
.1
.5
.0
.0
.1
.3
.0
.1
.0
.0

111.3
.1
1.0
.9
3.2
.0
104.7

1,161.1
86.2
25.0
480.8
13.8
13.1
6.4
215.6
14.4
134.6
1.4
169.8

1,609.9
96.1
26.7
677.5
15.0
13.5
15.7
261.4
29.4
258.3
2.2
214.2

14.3

16.3

TE A C H ER S
T E A C H E R S .E L E M E N T A R Y
T E A C H E R S ,S E C O N D A R Y
T E A C H E R S ,C O L L E G E
T E A C H E R S .O T H E R

1 .0

.0
.0
.0
1.0

1.3
.0
.0
.0
1.3

1.6
.0
•0
.0
1.6

3,042.7
1,259.6
1*013.9
552.0
217.3

10.9
.6
.7
.0

.0

.7

1,922.7
977.3
602.0
206.2
137.2

9.7

13.2

S O C IA L S C IE N T I S T S
ECO N OM ISTS
S T A T I S T IC IA N S ♦ A C T U A R IE S
OTHER S O C IA L S C IE N T I S T S

4.4
2.0
2.0
.3

5.0
2.3
2.2
.5

201.0
42.8
.6
.2
20.0
.1
14.2
69.7
2.5
.6
11.7
10.8
.1
27.7

256.4
39.7
1.2
.3
28.4
.1
18.9
73.9
2.7
.7
16.7
15.5
.1
58.2

P R O F E S S IO N A L

T E C H N IC A L W KRS.

E N G IN E E R S .T E C H N IC A L
E N G IN E E R S . AERONAUT IC A L
E N G IN E E R S .C H E N IC A L
E N G I N E E R S .C I V I L
E N G IN E E R S .E L E C T R IC A L
E N G IN E E R S .IN D U S T R IA L
E N G IN E E R S .M E C H A N IC A L
E N G IN E E R S .N E T A L L U R G .E T C
E N G IN E E R S ,M IN IN G
E N G IN E E R S ,S A L E S
OTHER E N G IN E E R S ,T E C H N IC A L

OTHER P R O F . ♦ T E C H . WORKERS
ACCOUNTANTS AND A U D ITO R S
A IR P L A N E P IL O T S ,N A V IG A T O R S
A R C H IT E C T S
WRKRS IN A R T S .E N T E R T A IN M N T
CLERGYM EN
D E S IG N E R S ,E X C D E S IG N DRAFT
E D IT O R S ANO R EP O RTER S
LAW YERS ANO JU D G E S
L IB R A R IA N S
PER SO N NEL ANO LAB R E L WRKS
PH O TO GRAPH ER?
S O C IA L ANO WELFARE WORKERS
PROF ♦ T E C H WORKERS N . E . C .




1 .0

1.2
1.5
5.5

43.2
14. 9

38. 7
21.4

3. 6
6.5
4.6

FINANCE INSURANCE
AND REAL ESTATE

.7
.0
.0
.0
.0

70 EMP *

.0
1.3
.1
3.7
.3
.0

.2
0
.2

.

1.2
.0

.1
.0
.0

.6

.9

.0

.0

.0
.0
.0
. 1
.6
. 3

1.4
.0
.1
.6

.1
.5
.0
.2

116.4
•1
1.6
.8
2.5
.0
109.2
.3
.1
1.6
.0
.2

.1
.0
.0

.0
.1
.0
.0

2.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0

5.2
.0
.0
.0
5.2

7.4
.0
.0
.0
7.4

.5

.7

.0

.0
.0
.5

.0
.0
.0

3.9
1.3
2.5
.1

4.2
1.5
2.6
•1

2.9
1.6
1.4
.0

4.0
2.1
1.8
.0

5.5
1.5
3.9
.1

8.0
2.6
5.4
.1

9.4
3.8
3.5
2.1

16.3
6.7
5.6
4.0

12. G
3.8
5.2
3.0

16.7
6.0
6.6
4.1

126.3
31.9
19.5
.2
7.3
.0
1.2
4.4
2.7
.3
7.3
1.1
.1
50.*

195.4
30.5
39.6
.3
10.8
.0
1.5
4.9
2.4
.4
10.2
1.5
.1
93.2

99.1
47.5
.4
.3
17.7
.0
5.8
1.8
1.6
.2
8.1
1.5
.1
14.0

144.3
48.6
1.0
.2
29.6
.0
8.6
2.6
1.9
.2
13.8
2.0
.0
35.7

64.4
36.2
.1
.4
.5
.0
.1
.6
8.4
.2
4.5
.3
.2
13.1

97.4
41.8
.1
.5
.8

1,354.7
124.4
1.2
25.4
389.8
199.7
16.9
15.9
167.7
76.1
15.0
29.8
43.0
249.8

2,231.1
182.6
3.0
26.9
636.9
207.7
25.3
21.1
221.3
119.7
30.3
36.3
66.9
653.1

241.7
58.0
2.3
1.2
5.4
.1
.5
3.4
35.8
1.7
28.1
3.2
61.3
40.7

401.4
62.7
4.4
1.7
8.2
.2
.7
3.9
42.7
2.1
47.0
4.1
102.4
121.3

.5

17

.0
.0

.0
.4
.0

1.2
.0

.2
.5
.0
.0
.0

.4

.0

.2
.8
9.8
.3
7.4
.3
.3
35.1

.5

.4
3.7
.0
.0

.8
2.4
2.0
1.6
2.3
.7

.5

.7
3.0
.0
.0
1.1
2.3
3.2
1.6
3.3
.5

14.8
.4

l.l

Table 1. Number of employed persons by occupation and industry, 16 years of age and older, 1960 and 1970-^Continued
O CC U P A TIO N

A G R IC U L T U R E
FO R E STR Y ANO
F I S H E R I E S TO TAL

TO TAL
A LL
IN D U S T R IE S

6 0 EMP

7 0 EMP

6 0 EMP

7 0 EMP

3 1.1

2 6 .9

6 7 .8

6 7 .3

4 7 3 .4

4 7 3 .5

1 ,0 6 7 .7

1 ,19 0 .3

5 5 5 .7

6 4 7 .2

4 0 .0
6 8 .0
3 4 .0
3 9 .0
1 6 7 .0
7 ,9 4 9 .0

•0
•0
1 .4
.0
.3
2 9 .4

.0
•0
1 .6
.0
•3
2 4 .6

.0
.2
.7
.0
1 .6
6 5 .2

•0
.2
.8
•0
2 .1
6 4 .1

•1
.1
1 .3
•0
1 .0
4 7 0 .9

.1
•1
1.5
•0
1.4
4 7 0 .4

•6
8 .9
1.1
•0
6 7 .3
9 8 9 .8

.7
10 .3
1.3
.0
9 2 .3
1 ,0 6 5 .8

•6
3 .3
•6
•0
4 5 .6
5 0 5 .6

•6
4 .0
.7
.0
6 5 .4
5 7 6 .4

9 ,7 6 2 .0

1 3 ,7 1 9 .0

3 3 .2

3 1.8

6 4 .1

7 0 .6

1 7 6 .2

2 2 6 .4

2 ,1 3 4 .4

2 ,5 3 5 .3

1 ,2 0 9 .4

1,4 3 9 .3

2 ,3 8 3 .0

3 ,5 0 4 .0

9 .1

8 .3

2 1.3

2 4 .2

5 1 .5

6 7 .2

5 3 8 .7

6 6 7 .4

3 1 8 .1

3 9 2 .5

3 7 9 .2

5 6 5 .0

.3

.2

1.1

2 .1

1 .7

2 .6

9 8 .3

1 3 8 .0

5 0 .9

7 6 .2

7 ,0 0 3 .8
3 8 2 .7
6 6 7 .3
12 7 .0
4 7 8 .8
2 0 9 .9
2 4 2 .7
3 2 9 .0
3 9 9 .2
4 .2 1 9 .6

9 ,6 4 6 .0
4 8 0 .0
8 6 0 .0
2 2 5 .0
8 4 7 .0
2 5 4 .0
3 0 0 .0
3 7 9 .0
4 2 0 .0
5 ,8 8 1 .0

2 3 .7
1.1
6 .2
•0
•4
.0
•0
•6
•1
13 .2

2 3 .3
1 .0
7 .7
•0
•1
.0
•0
.2
.1
14 .2

4 1 .7
3 .1
5 .0
•0
•1
.0
•0
.7
.7
3 2 .1

4 4 .3
3 .3
5 .2
.0
•1
.0
•0
.9
.7
3 4 .2

1 2 3 .0
2 1.3
2 7 .7
.0
.3
.0
.0
1.0
1 .6
7 1.1

1 5 8 .7
2 7 .9
3 5 .0
.0
.5
•0
.0
•8
1 .7
9 2 .8

1 ,4 9 7 .4
8 8 .9
9 7 .6
•0
10 .2
.0
.0
2 0 4 .6
2 6 .0
1 ,0 6 8 .1

1 ,7 3 0 .0
9 8 .0
10 2 .8
.0
12 .5
•0
.0
2 2 1 .3
2 6 .6
1,2 6 6 .8

8 4 0 .5
4 3 .9
4 2 .3
.0
3 .7
•0
.0
1 0 3 .5
13 .9
6 3 3 .1

9 7 0 .6
5 0 .2
4 3 .7
•0
4 .9
•0
•0
1 1 6 .4
14 .3
7 4 1.3

4 ,2 2 4 .0

4 ,8 5 4 .0

8 .3

9 .8

3 .0

3 .2

1 1 .9

14 .0

4 7 2 .0

5 13 .6

1 7 5 .5

19 9 .5

3 6 5 .0
1 9 5 .0
3 . 6 6 4 .0

4 0 5 .0
2 2 6 .0
4 .2 2 3 .0

.0
.0
8 .3

.0
.0
9 .8

.0
.1
2 .9

.0
. 1
3 .1

.0
.5
1 1.4

.0
.6
13 .3

.0
. 1
4 7 6 .9

.0
. 1
5 13 .5

.0
.0
17 5 .5

.0
.0
19 9 .4

2 8 .0

3 3 .1

1 7 3 .6

17 4 .1

2 ,110 .4

2 ,3 4 3 .1

3 ,2 7 9 .6

3 ,7 3 8 .2

2 ,1 9 3 .9

2 ,5 3 1.7

1 ,8 0 6 .4
6 5 7 .2
16 3 .0
4 5 .1
13 7 .5
18 5 .1
2 9 9 .2
4 7 .5
1 6 7 .4
4 6 .7
3 7 .6

1,9 5 0 .0
6 5 0 .0
1 7 5 .0
6 0 .0
1 9 0 .0
2 4 0 .0
2 7 0 .0
3 0 .0
2 2 5 .0
5 5 .0
5 5 .0

3 4 0 .5
7 8 .1
1 3 .9
•5
1 2 0 .4
12 .3
2 5 .9
•5
6 2 .6
1.0
2 5 .2

3 5 0 .5
7 2 .0
1 3 .1
2 .7
1 3 2 .8
1 3 .3
2 0 .7
.7
6 6 .0
1.4
2 7 .8

2 5 9 .4
6 2 .7
1 1 .9
.3
8 9 .1
9 .2
2 2 .3
.3
3 8 .1
•6
2 4 .9

12 5 .5

M A N A G E R S .O F F IC IA L S .P R O P R IE T O R S

T . 0 6 7 .0

8 ,2 8 9 .0

CO N D U C TO R S.R A ILR O A O
C REO ITM EN
O F F IC E R S . P IL O T S .E N G R S . S H IP
P O STM A STERS ANO A S S IS T A N T S
P U R C H A SIN G AGEN TS
M A N A G ER S,O F F I C E ,P R O P . N . E . C .

A 3 .3
3 0 .0
3 5 .0
3 9 .2
1 1 5 .0
6 .T B A . S

O F F IC E M ACHIN E OPERATO RS
OTHER C L E R IC A L WORKERS
A CCO U N TIN G C L E R K S
B O O K K E EP E R S,H A N D
RANK T E L L E R S
c a s h ie r s

N A IL C A R R IE R S
PO STA L C L E R K S
S H 1 P P IN G .R E C E IV I N G C L E R K S
TE LE PH O N E O PERATORS
C L E R IC A L WORKERS N . E . C .

S A L E S WORKERS
IN SU R A N C E AGEN TS
R EA L E S T A T E AGEN TS
OTHER S A L E S WORKERS N . E . C .

6 ,9 9 4 .0

1 0 ,1 5 8 .0

C O N ST R U C TIO N CRAFTSM EN
C A R P EN T ER S
N R1CK M A S0N S ANO T I L E S E T R S
C EM E N T ,C O N C R E T E F IN IS H E R S
E L E C T R IC IA N S
E X C A V A TN 6 .G R A 0 N G MACH OPER
P A IN T E R S ANO PA PERH AN GERS
PLASTERERS
PLUM BERS ANO P I P E F I T T E R S
ROO FERS ANO S L A T E R S
STR U C TU R A L METALWORKERS

2 .9 9 2 .0
6 3 2 .0
1 0 6 .0
4 6 .0
3 9 9 .0
2 4 9 .0
4 16 .0
9 0 .0
3 0 3 .0
9 0 .0
6 9 .0

2 ,7 6 5 .0
8 3 0 .0
2 0 0 .0
6 5 .0
4 4 0 .0
3 1 0 .0
3 9 0 .0
3 5 .0
3 5 0 .0
6 0 .0
8 5 .0

7 .9
4 .2
.3
•0
•2
2 .1
.9
•0
•2
•0
•0

7 .9
4 .1
.5
•0
.1
2 .3
.9
.0
.1
•0
•0

4 4 .0
3 .6
.7
•0
10 .9
2 5 .8
1.2
•0
1.8
•0
.2

4 3 .7
2 .7
.7
•0
10 .7
2 6 .9
.7
•0
1.8
•0
•2

CRA FTSM EN ANO FOREMEN

OURABLE GOODS
M ANUFACTURING

7 0 EMP

6 0 EMP

60 EMP

7 0 EMP •

6 0 EMP

7 0 EMP

ST E N O S . T V P IS T S •S E C R E T A R IE S

TO TA L
M ANUFACTURING

7 0 EMP

AO EMP

C L E R IC A L WORKERS

C O N ST R U C TIO N

TO TAL
M IN IN G

2 6 8 .8
5 9 .7
11.1
1.6
9 9 .0
9 ,4
18 .0
.4
4 1.3
•8
2 7 .4

FOREMEN N . E . C .

1,13 7 .0

1 ,4 8 8 .0

5 .6

7 .5

3 9 .6

4 5 .1

9 1 .2

7 11.8

8 8 6 .3

4 1 3 .9

5 2 5 .1

METALWKNG C R A F T S EX C MECH
M A C H IN IS T S ANO R E L A T E D OCC
• L K S M IT H S •FORGMN, HAMMERMEN
B O ILE R M A K ER S
H EA T T R E A T E R S .A N N E A L E R S
M IL LW R IG H T S
N O L 0 E R S .N E T A L .E X C CQREMKRS
PA TTERN M AKERS.M ETAL.W OO O
R O L L E R S ANO R O LL HANOS
S H E E T METAL WORKERS
TOOLM AKERS ANO 01E M A K E R S

1,0 9 0 .0
4 9 9 .3
3 3 .6
2 4 ,1
2 0 .4
6 9 .0
9 4 .2
4 0 .4
3 1 .9
13 6 .9
16 3 .0

1 ,2 1 5 .0
5 8 5 .0
2 6 .0
2 4 .0
2 2 .0
8 0 .0
5 6 .0
4 3 .0
3 0 .0
15 4 .0
19 5 .0

•5
•3
.2
•0
.0
•0
.0
.0
•0
.0
.0

.3
•2
.0
•0
•0
•0
.0
•0
•0
•0
.0

10 .1
3 .8
4 .6
.6
.0
•4
.0
•0
.0
•1
•2

8 .3
4 .1
2 .8
•5
•0
.4
.0
•0
•1
•1
•2

4 6 .4
2 .9
1.1
4 .0
.2
5 .1
.1
.1
.1
3 4 .8
.2

5 8 .6
3 .4
1.2
4 .7
.1
7 .3
•0
.0
•1
4 1.9
.1

9 3 9 .0
4 4 2 .9
17 .5
14 .1
1 9 .9
6 1 .6
5 4 .0
3 8 .0
3 1.2
8 1.4
1 7 6 .3

1 ,0 5 5 .3
5 3 1.8
1 4 .3
14 .0
2 1.5
6 9 .7
5 5 .9
3 9 .8
2 9 .7
8 7 .3
1 9 1 .4

8 7 4 .4
4 1 3 .4
1 6 .5
10 .8
1 9 .9
4 3 .1
5 3 .9
3 6 .7
3 1.2
7 7 .2
1 7 1.5

9 7 9 .5
4 9 5 .9
13 .4
1 1 .0
2 1.5
4 8 .2
5 5 .7
3 8 .1
2 9 .7
8 3 ,5
1 8 2 .4

P R IN T IN G TR A D ES CRAFTSM EN
C O M P O S IT O R S .T Y P E S E T T E R S
E L E C T R O T V P E R S ,S T E R E O T V P E R S
E N G R A V E R * EXC PHOTOENGRVER
P H 0 T 0 E N 6 R V R S .L IT H 0 6 R A P H E R S
P R E S S M E N .P L A T E P R IN T E R S

3 0 2 .0
1 8 2 .9
9 .0
10 .9
2 4 .2
7 9 .4

3 1 2 .0
1 7 5 .0
S .O
13 .0
3 4 .0
8 5 .0

•0
•0
.0
.0
.0
•0

.0
•0
•0
.0
.0
•0

•1
•1
.0
.0
.0
•0

.1
•1
•0
•0
.0
•0

.4
.1
.0
.1
•0
.1

•2
.1
•0
•1
.0
.1

2 8 4 .0
1 7 0 .3
8 .9
9 .5
2 3 .1
7 2 .3

2 8 8 .0
1 5 8 .5
4 .9
11.4
3 2 .6
8 0 .6

12 .9
5 .2
.1
3 .-9
1.6
2 .0

13 .9
5 .1
.1
4 .4
1.9
2 .4

TRANSPORT ANO PUB U T IL C R A FT
LIN EM EN ANO S E R V IC EM EN
LO CO M O TIVE E N G IN E E R S
LO CO M O TIVE FIR EM E N

3 7 3 .8
2 8 9 .7
4 6 .9
4 1.6

4 4 1 .1
3 8 0 .9
4 3 .0
1 7 .2

.1
•1
•0
.0

.1
.1
.0
.0

1 .4
.1
1.2
.1

1 .7
.1
1 .5
.1

7 .4
7 .3
.1
.0

1 1.0
10 .9
.1
•0

9 .4
6 .7
2 .5
•2

1 5 .2
1 1 .8
3 .2
.2

6 .5
6 .2
2 .1
•2

14 .0
1 1.1
2 .8
.2

M ECH AN ICS ANO R EPA IRM EN
A IR C 0 N 0 IT N 6 .H E A T N G .R E F R IG
A IR P L A N E MECH ANO jR E P A IR N N
MOTOR V E H IC L E M ECH AN ICS
O F F IC E M ACHIN E M ECH AN ICS
R A O IO ANO TV M ECH AN ICS
RR ANO C AR SHOP M ECH AN ICS
O THER M ECH AN ICS ANO R E P A IR

2 ,0 14 .0
6 2 .7
111.6
6 7 8 .9
9 1 .0
1 0 3 .3
3 9 .2
9 6 7 .3

2 ,7 9 2 .0
1 17 .5
1 4 0 .0
8 3 0 .0
8 0 .0
1 3 2 .0
3 £ .0
1 ,4 5 7 .5

1 1 .3
.0
•3
1 .2
.0
.1
•0
9 .1

14 .6
.1
.7
1 .2
.0
.1
•0
12 .5

3 0 .1
. 1
•1
1 .3
.0
•1
•1
2 6 .9

3 6 .7
.3
•1
1.4
.0
.2
•1
3 4 .6

8 3 .0
18 .4
.0
5 .6
•0
.7
.0
7 1.2

1 0 7 .2
3 8 .0
•0
6 .3
•0
•6
•0
6 2 .0

5 0 3 .3
8 .7
3 8 .9
4 4 .6
6 .3
6 .8
1.4
3 8 1 .2

6 5 6 .5
1 6 .4
3 8 .2
4 2 .4
9 .4
8 .8
1.9
5 3 9 .2

3 2 8 .4
5 .6
3 8 .6
3 6 .0
6 .0
6 .7
1 .3
2 2 5 .7

4 2 3 .8
11.2
3 7 .9
3 4 .1
9 .1
8 .8
1 .8
3 2 0 .9




18

Table 1. Number of employed persons by occupation and industry, 16 years of age and older, 1960 and 1970-^Continued
O CC U P A TIO N

NONDURABLE GOODS
M ANUFACTURING

TR A N SPO R TA TIO N
COM M UNICATIONS
P U B L IC U T I L I T I E S

WHOLESALE
ANO
R E T A IL TRAOE

7 0 EMP

6 0 EMP

7 0 EMP

60 EMP

7 0 EMP

5 1 1 .9

5 4 3 .2

3 7 5 .7

4 0 5 .6

3 ,2 3 2 .4

3 ,5 1 9 .0

5 7 6 .8

8 3 8 .1

9 3 3 .2

1,3 4 5 .7

3 0 9 .1

4 2 2 .9

C O N D U C TO R S,R A ILR O A D
CR E D ITM EN
O F F IC E R S , P IL O T S ,E N G R S , S H IP
PO STM A STERS ANO A S S IS T A N T S
P U R C H A SIN G AGENTS
M AN A G ER S,O FF IC E , P R O P . N . E . C .

.1
5 .5
•5
.0
2 1.7
4 8 4 .2

.1
6 .3
•5
.0
2 6 .9
5 0 9 .4

4 2 .2
•9
2 8 .5
.0
4 .3
2 9 9 .7

3 8 .9
1 .0
2 6 .6
•0
5 .3
3 3 3 .9

•0
2 9 .2
•4
•0
2 0 .2
3 ,1 8 2 .6

.0
3 8 .7
.4
.0
2 9 .4
3 ,4 5 0 .4

.1
7 .8
.0
.0
3 .1
5 6 5 .6

.1
12 .7
•0
•0
5 .1
8 2 0 .2

.0
2 .8
1 .2
•0
10 .5
9 18 .6

•0

.1
•0
•4
3 9 .2
6 .6
2 6 2 .7

*2
•0
.4
3 5 .0
10 .5
3 7 6 .8

9 2 5 .0

1,0 9 6 .0

1 ,0 9 4 .7

1 ,2 8 6 .1

1 ,8 6 4 .2

2 ,6 8 2 .9

1 ,2 8 5 .1

1,8 6 5 .6

1 ,7 3 8 .6

3 ,1 8 0 .3

1,3 7 1 .6

1 * 8 3 4 .1

2 2 0 .6

2 7 4 .9

1 2 9 .1

1 6 0 .5

2 6 9 .9

3 6 0 .2

3 6 9 .4

5 2 7 .9

7 2 5 .6

1* 3 0 3 .7

2 6 8 .6

3 8 4 .8

4 7 .5

6 1 .8

3 6 .7

4 8 .5

9 9 .8

1 4 2 .4

7 8 .3

1 2 8 .3

2 5 .1

5 2 .7

3 3 .8

5 0 .3

6 5 6 .9
4 5 .0
5 5 .3
.0
6 .5
•0
.0
10 1 .1
14 .1
4 3 5 .0

7 5 9 .3
4 7 .8
5 9 .1
•0
7 .6
.0
.0
1 0 5 .0
14 .3
5 2 5 .5

9 2 9 .0
4 6 .4
1 6 .2
•0
2 7 .6
•0
•0
10 .1
2 3 0 .2
5 9 8 .5

1 ,0 7 7 .1
5 2 .0
18 .8
.0
4 0 .3
.0
.0
1 2 .2
2 5 0 .6
7 0 3 .2

1,4 9 4 .4
10 2 .2
2 6 9 .7
.0
3 4 8 .7
.0
.0
9 6 .8
2 2 .3
6 5 4 .7

2 ,1 6 0 .4
1 2 9 .3
3 2 6 .1
.0
6 2 9 .6
•0
.0
12 5 .B
2 9 .9
9 3 9 .6

8 3 7 .4
4 1.8
13 7 .7
12 7 .0
3 0 .2
.0
.0
1 .2
1 3 .4
4 6 6 .2

2 9 6 .5

3 1 4 .1

3 9 .2

4 9 .6

3 ,0 1 3 .0

3 ,4 4 2 .7

O F F IC E M ACHINE OPERATO RS
OTHER C L E R IC A L WORKERS
A CCO U N TIN G C L E R K S
BOOKKE E P E R S , HAND
BANK T E L L E R S
C A S H IE R S
M AIL C A R R IE R S
PO STA L C L E R K S
S H IP P IN G ,R E C E IV I N G C L E R K S
TELEP H O N E O PERATORS
C L E R I C A L WORKERS N . E . C .
S A L E S WORKERS
IN SU R A N C E AGEN TS
R EA L E S T A T E A GENTS
OTHER S A L E S WORKERS N . E . C .

.0
.1
296.4

.0
.1
314. 1

.2
.0
39.1

.1
.0
49.5

.2
.5
3, 010.2

.2
.8
3,441.7

60 EMP

7 0 EMP • 6 0 EMP

6 0 EMP

S T E N O S ,T Y P IS T S ,S E C R E T A R IE S

7 0 EMP

GOVERNMENT P U B L IC
A D M IN IS T R A T IO N

S E R V IC E S

M A N A G E R S .O F F IC IA L S ,P R O P R IE T O R S

C L E R IC A L WORKERS

60 EMP

F IN A N C E IN SU R AN CE
ANO R EA L E S T A T E

7 0 EMP

5 .0
1.3
•0
2 0 .5
1,3 18 .9

1 ,2 0 9 .4
5 3 .6
18 7 .9
2 2 5 .0
5 3 .2
•0
•0
2 .0
17 .6
6 7 0 .0

9 8 7 .9
3 9 .2
1 0 5 .1
•0
5 4 .8
.0
•0
7 .5
4 9 .1
7 3 2 .1

1 ,8 2 3 .9
6 2 .1
1 7 6 .5
•0
1 0 0 .4
•0
.0
12 .4
7 6 .8
1 ,3 9 3 .8

1 * 0 6 9 .2
3 6 .8
.0
.0
6 .4
205*5
2 4 2 .7
2 .5
» 9 .7
5 6 3 .5

1 ,3 9 9 .1
5 2 .8
.0
.0
10 .4
2 5 4 .0
3 0 0 .0
3 .4
12 .0
7 6 6 .5

5 8 3 .9

6 8 9 .9

8 8 .9

12 6 .8

3 .7

4 .5

363.9
193. 3
24.2

403.9
223. 6
62. 3

.1
.2
88.2

.1
.4
126.2

.6
.3
2. 8

.6
.3
3.6

1 ,0 8 5 .9

1 ,2 0 6 .5

9 6 3 .7

1 ,0 8 0 .9

8 9 3 .3

1 ,1 9 8 .2

4 6 .9

6 6 .9

7 8 7 .8

1 ,1 5 1 .9

2 7 0 .4

8 1.0
1 5 .4
2 .0
.2
3 1.3
3 .1
3 .6
•2
2 4 .6
.4
.3

6 1 .7
12 .3
2 .0
1.1
3 3 .8
3 .9
2 .7
•3
2 4 .7
.6
•3

9 2 .1
1 3 .6
•6

8 6 .9
10 .5
.7
.5
3 7 .2
9 .8
7 .1
.0
2 0 .0
.1

7 4 .0
2 8 .3
6 .0
.9
10 .0
3 .3
1 0 .9
•1
12 .1
2 .2
.2

1 6 .0
5 .5
.2
.0
1.2
.4
7 .5
•5
.7
•0
.0

2 1.0
7 .2
42
•0
1.5
.6
9 .8
.9
.7
•0
•0

10 7 .4
2 8 .7
1 .6
•i
2 0 .2
1.7
4 4 ,5
1.2
9 .0
.3
•2

1 5 0 .2
4 1.7
2 .6
.4
3 1 .1
3 .4
5 3 .7
2 .8
13 .4
.7
.2

6 9 .1
13 .6

l.i

6 8 .6
2 7 .5
4 .8
.2
8 .6
2 .7
11.8
.1
1 1.3
1.5
.2

2 9 7 .9

3 6 1.2

1 2 2 .3

1 4 1 .3

9 8 .7

1 5 6 .3

4 .0

6 .7

3 7 .0

METALWKNG C R A F T S EX C MECH
M A C H IN IS T S ANO R E L A T E D OCC
8 L K S M 1T H S ,FORGMN,HAMMERMEN
B O ILERM A K ER S
HEAT T R E A T E R S ,A N N E A L E R S
M IL LW R IG H TS
H O L D E R S ,M E T A L ,E X C COREMKRS
PA TTERN M A KERS,M ETA L,W OO D
R O L L E R S ANO R O LL HANDS
S H EE T METAL WORKERS
TOOLM AKERS ANO O IEM A KERS

6 4 .7
2 9 .5

4 4 .3
3 0 .6
2 .8
3 .6
.0
.5
.1
.1
.0
5 .8
•8

3 7 .2
2 5 .1
1 .9
2 .7
.0
.7
.1
.0
• .0
6 .2
.6

7*9
•5
•4
.2
•0
.7
•0
.2
.2
5 .0
.7

7 .6
•8
•3
•2
.0
.7
•0
.3
•2
4 .8
.4

•2

3 .3
.0
18 .5
.1
1.3
•0
4 .1
6 .8

7 5 .7
3 5 .8
.8
3 .0
•0
2 1.5
.2
1.7
•0
3 .8
9 .0

.0
•0
.0
•0
.1
.0

.2
.0
•0
.0
•0
.0
.0
.0
•0
.1
.0

1 6 .4
3 .1
6 .4
1.2
.0
•4
.0
•8
.0
2 .9
1.5

P R IN T IN G TRA OES CRAFTSM EN
C O M P O S IT O R S ,T Y P E S E T T E R S
E L E C T R O T V P E R S ,S T E R E O T Y P E R S
EN G R A VERS EXC PHOTOENGRVER
PH O TO EN G RVRS ,L ITH Q G R A P H ER S
P R E S S M E N ,P L A T E P R IN T E R S

2 7 1 .1
16 5 .1
8 .7
5 .5
2 1.5
7 0 .3

2 7 4 .1
15 3 .4
4 .8
7 .0
3 0 .6
7 8 .2

1.1
.7
.1
•1
•1
•1

.9
.7
.0
.1
.1
•1

3 .5
2 .5
•0
•6

4 .5
3 .4
.0
.7
.1

2 .4
2 .0
•0
.0
.1
.3

3 .0
2 .5
.0
.0
.1
.4

TRANSPORT ANO PUB U T IL C RA FT
LIN EM EN ANO SE R V IC E M E N
LO CO M O TIVE E N G IN E E R S
LOCO M OTIVE F IR E M E N

.9
.5
.4
•0

1.2
.7
.5
.0

3 5 1.6
2 6 8 .0
4 2 .5
4 1.2

4 0 7 .0
3 5 2 .3
3 7 .9
1 6 .8

•4
•4
•0
.0

.4
•4
•0
•0

•0
•0

.0

.1
.1
.0

•0

•6
•0

.0

*0

M ECH AN ICS ANO R EPA IRM EN
A IR CO N DI T N G ,H E A T N G ,R E F R IG
A IR P L A N E MECH ANO REPAtRM N
MOTOR V E H IC L E M ECH AN ICS
O F F IC E M ACHINE M ECH AN ICS
R A D IO ANO TV M ECH AN ICS
RR ANO CAR SHOP M ECH AN ICS
OTHER M ECH AN ICS ANO R E P A IR

1 7 4 .9

2 3 2 .7

2 4 9 .9

3 16 .6

5 3 4 .4

7 5 0 .9

1 6 .2

2 6 .1
.6
•0
.4
.4
.0
.0
2 4 .8

4 6 5 .9
1 5 .1
1.8
2 3 4 .4
9 .8
5 1 .2
•1

CRAFTSM EN AND FOREMEN
C O N ST R U C TIO N CRAFTSM EN
C A R P EN T ER S
BRICKM A SON S AND T I L E SE T R S
C EM EN T ,C O N C R ET E F IN IS H E R S
E L E C T R IC IA N S
EXCA VA TN G ,G RA D N G MACH OPER
P A IN T E R S ANO PA PERH AN GERS
PLASTERERS
PLUM BERS ANO P I P E F I T T E R S
ROO FERS ANO S L A T E R S
STR U C TU R A L METALWORKERS
FOREMEN N . E . C .




1.0

3.1

.3
8 .6
.3
.1
•1

155.5

•i
3 8 .2
7 .8
9 .4

•0

2 1.1
.1
1.2

•i
•2

.3

.0

•0
•0
•0

2.7

16.0

8 .3
.3
.1
.1

3 7 .7
5 6 .6
.3
3 .6
3 7 .5

5 7 .7
7 2 .7
.2
4 .2
3 2 .7

1.7
3 19 .6
3 3 .9
3 2 .0
•0

3 .0
4 0 5 .6
5 5 .0
3 8 .7
•0

.0
.2
.3
•0
.0

218.3

107.3

146. 3

138.5

216.4

14.7

5.3
•4

1.3

19

32.0

.2

3 7 1.6

.1
2 1.8
7 .0
1 5 .6
.2
8 .9
.4
•5

8 0 .8
1 3 .4
1 .3
•6
2 6 .6
1 0 .5
16 .0
.5
10 .6
•6
.5

7 8 .0

2 7 .0

4 1 .2

2 0 .6
5 .7
5 .1
1.6
.0
.9
.0
1.6
.0
4 .6
1 .0

2 3 .2
1 1 .0
•4
.3
•2
•3
.0
1.3
•0
8 .5
1 .2

2 6 .7
14 .0
.4
.3
.3
.2
.0
1 .2
•0
9 .0
1 .3

6 .2
4 .6
•0
.2
•3
1.0

9 .6
7 .0
.0
.2
•5
1.9

4 .4
2 .1
•0
.4
.5
1.3

5 .7
2 .7
.0
•5
.7
1 .7

.6

1 .7
1 .7
•0
.0

2 .9
2 .6
.2
•0

3 .9
3 .6
.3
•0

158.0

1.0

7 0 1.9

1 1 9 .8

3 .8
2 7 8 .6
1 4 .4
6 7 .4
.1
3 17 . 1

3 1.2
1 5 .0
.5
8 .8
.1
6 0 .4

20.5

2.9

1 8 1.5
7 .0
3 6 .4
2 1 .0
*6
11.7
.2
10 4 .6

Table 1. Number of employed persons by occupation and industry, 16 years of age and older, 1960 and 1970—Continued
TOTAL
ALL
INDUSTRIES

OCCUPATION

60
OTHER CRAFTSMEN
BAKERS
CABINETMAKERS
CRANE,DERRICK,HOIST MEN
GLAZIERS
JEWELERS AND WATCHMAKERS
LOOM FIXERS
OPTICIANS*LENS GRINDERS
INSPECTORS*LOG AND LUMBER
INSPECTORS*OTHER
UPHOLSTERERS
CR AF T S M E N N.E.C.

EMP

AGRICULTURE
FORESTRY AND
FISH ER IE S TOTAL

70

EMP

60

EMP

70

CONSTRUCTION

TOTAL
MINING

EMP

60

EMP

TOTAL
MANUFACTURING
70

EMP

60

EMP

70

EMP

60

EMP

70

DURABLE GOODS
MANUFACTURING
EMP

•

60

EMP

70

EMP

1,085.2
102.5
66.0
124.0
15.8
37.0
25.0
20.4
19.5
95.5
59.0
520.5

1,144.9
101.0
70.0
145.0
21.0
35.0
24.0
23.0
20.0
95.0
63.0
547.9

2.6
.0
.0
.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
.6
.0
1.6

2.7
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.8
.0
1.4

48.4
.0
.0
6.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.6
.0
39.6

38.5
.0
.0
6.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
•0
1.9
.0
29.9

73.7
.2
6.3
16.8
5.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
13.1
.4
31.7

90.3
,1
7.0
24.1
8.2
.0
.0
.0
.1
16.6
,4
33.8

491.9
69.7
36.3
84.6
3.4
10.1
25.0
9.2
16.8
12.7
27.8
196.4

486.5
61.2
36.8
92.4
3.9
9.1
23.9
8.7
16.4
11.1
26.7
196.2

296.5
•2
35.5
78.4
3.2
10.1
.1
9.1
15.9
10.6
26.4
106.8

306.6
.2
36.0
85.7
3.7
9.1
.2
8.7
15.3
9.3
25.2
113.1

11,950.0

13,909.0

103.7

101.6

342.7

258.0

320.5

408.3

7,368.2

8,674.0

3,717.2

4,569.9

2,367.0
1,769.2
597.8

2,510.0
1,855.0
655.0

65.4
62.7
2.7

64.5
62.3
2.2

32.9
32.5
.4

30.3
29.8

145.6
143.2
2.4

154.2
151.4
2.7

485.6
300.7
184.9

449.0
273.2
175.8

169.2
157.7
11.5

159.9
146.3
13.6

TRANSP AND PUB UTIL OPERATVS
B R AK EM EN AND SW IT C H M E N RR
POWER STATION OPERATORS
SAILORS AND DECKHANDS

156.4
103.2
20.9
32.3

142.0
88.0
23.0
31.0

.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0

.6
.2
.1
.3

.5
.2
.1
.3

2.3
.0
.4
1.9

2.9
.0
.5
2.4

10.4
5*1
4.5
.8

11.6
5.3
5.5
.9

6.8
4.7
1.7
.4

7.4
4.9
2.0
.5

SE MI S K I L L E D ME TA L W O R K I N G OCC
FURNACEMN,SMELTRMN*POURERS
HEATERS,METAL
WELOERS AND FLAME-CUTTERS
ASSEMBLERS,MTLWRK,CLASS A
ASSEMBLERS,MTLWRK,CLASS B
INSPECTORS,MTLWRK,CLASS B
MACHINE TOOL OP ER,CLASS B
ELECTROPLATERS
ELECTROPLATERS HELPER

1,452.8
52.1
6.9
355.0
101.1
467.9
179.0
258.9
11.7
20.2

1,892.0
60.0
8.0
535.0
136.0
580.0
221.0
310.0
17.0
25.0

.4
.0
.0
.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.7
.0
.0
.7
•0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

7.7
.2
.0
7.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

11.2
.4
.0
10.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
•0

31.2
.0
.0
31.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

52.0
.0
.0
52.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

1,352.6
51.7
6.8
255.2
101.1
467.9
179.0
258.9
11.7
20.2

1,735.5
59.5
8.0
379.1
136.0
580.0
221.0
310.0
17.0
25.0

1,336.3
51.6
6.8
239.1
101.1
467.9
179.0
258.9
11.7
20.2

1,712.8
59.3
7.9
356.6
136.0
580.0
221.0
310.0
17.0
25.0

780.0
44.0
50.0
61.0
625.0

957.5
47.5
50.0
60.0
800.0

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0
•0

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

779.5
44.0
50.0
60.5
625.0

956.8
47.5
49.8
59.4
800.0

29.0
.0
.1
.5
28.4

40.5
.0
.1
.5
39.9

7,193.8

8,407.5

37.9

36.4

301.5

216.0

141.5

199.2

4,740.2

5,521.0

2,176.0

2,649.3

19.6
380.0
5.1
392.1
189.9
281.0
5,926.1

25.0
430.0
5.0
360.0
190.0
195.0
7,202.5

.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.0
37.7

•0
.0
•0
•0
.0
•0
36.4

.0
.0
3.1
.0
.1
281.0
17.2

.0
.0
2.7
.0
.1
195.0
18.1

11.4
.3
1.2
.1
.0
.0
128.5

14.7
.3
1.5
.0
.0
.0
182.7

6.6
2.1
.7
3.3
1.1
.0
4,726.5

8.4
1.9
.7
2.1
1.0
.0
5,507.0

4.2
1.4
.4
.2
•3
.0
2,169.4

5.6
1.5
.5
.1
.2
.0
2,641.5

8,023.0

9,712.0

12.9

11.9

8.7

7.5

20.2

18.8

327.0

283.5

173.9

155.6

1,973.0

1,558.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

•0

765.0
148.0
330.0
287.0

968.0
180.0
373.0
415.0

2.2
.0
2.1
.0

1.5
.1
1.5
.0

4.2
.0
4.0
.1

3.3
.0
3.1
.1

7.4
.2
6.7
.5

5.6
.1
5.3
.2

116.6
2.6
110.2
3.9

98.1
2.5
92.2
3.4

76.5
2.0
72.0
2.6

66.2
2.0
62.0
2.2

FOOD SERVICE WORKERS
BARTENDERS
COOKS,EXC PRIV HOUSEHOLDS
COUNTER AND FOUNTAIN WKRS
WAITERS ANO WAITRESSES

1,653.0
163.7
530.0
150.4
808.9

2,231.0
160.0
740.0
291.0
1,040.0

3.4
.0
3.3
.0
.2

2.5
.0
2.4
.0
•1

.7
.0
.6
.0
.0

.8
.0
.7
.0
.0

1.7
.0
1.1
•3
.4

1.9
.0
1.0
.4
.4

19.6
.1
7.1
6.5
5.9

21.3
.0
6.9
8.6
5.7

7.9
•0
2.5
3.5
1.9

9.5
.0
2.7
4.9
1.9

OTHER SERVICE WORKERS
AIRLINE STEWARDS,STWRDSSES
A T T E N D A N T S , H O S P , O T H E R INST
CH ARWOMEN ANO CLEANERS
JANITORS AND SEXTONS
NURSES,PRACTICAL
SERVICE WORKERS, N.E.C.

3,632.0
12.9
450.0
200.0
625.0
225.0
2,119.1

4,955.0
35.0
830.0
272.0
828.0
370.0
2,620.0

7.2
.0
3.8
.2
.8
.1
2.3

7.9
.0
4.4
.1
.5
.0
2.9

3.7
.0
.0
.3
2.2
.0
1.2

3.5
.0
.0
.4
1.9
.1
1.2

11.0
.0
.0
2.6
4.5
.0
4.0

11.3
.0
.0
2.8
4.6
.0
3.8

190.8
.0
.5
26.1
91.7
.7
71.7

164.1
.0
.9
22.8
77.2
.6
62.6

3,553.0

3,724.0

140.0

156.1

.0

.0

716.6

815.0

1,131.8

983.9

732.6

633.3

5,176.0

3,126.0

5,176.0

3,126.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

•0

.0

.0

OPERATIVES
DRIVERS AND DELIVERYMEN
DRIVERS,BUS,TRUCK,TRACTOR
DELIVERYMEN AND ROUTMEN

SEMISKILLED TEXTILE OCCUP
KNITTERS,LOOPERS,TOPPERS
SPINNERS,TEXTILE
WEAVERS,TEXTILE
SEWERS AND STITCHERS,MFG
OTHER

OPERATIVES

N.E.C.

ASBESTOS,INSULATION WRKS
ATTEND,AUTO SERVICE,PARKNG
BLASTERS AND POWDERMEN
LAUNDRY,DRY CLEANING OPER
MEAT CUTTERS,EXC MEATPCKNG
MINE OPERATVS,LABORERS,NEC
OPERATIVES N.E.C.

SERVICE

WORKERS

PRIVATE

HOUSEHOLD

WORKERS

PROTECTIVE SERVICE WORKERS
FIREMEN
GUARDS,WATCHMEN,OOORKEEPRS
POLICE,OTH LAW ENFORCE OFF

LABORERS,EXCEPT

FARMERS

AND

FARM

FARM

ANO

MINE

WORKERS




20

89.4 .
.0
.3
11.5
46.8
.5
30.3

79.9
.0
.7
11.4
39.4
.4
28.0

Table 1. Number of employed persons by occupation and industry, 16 years of age and older, 1960 and 1970—Continued
OCCUPATION

NONDURABLE GOODS
MANUFACTURING
60

EMP

70

EMP

WHOLESALE
ANO
RETA IL TRADE

TRANSPORTATION
COMMUNICATIONS
PUBLIC UTILITIES
60

EMP

70

EMP

60

EMP

70

FINANCE INSURANCE
AND REAL ESTATE
EMP

60

EMP

70

EMP

GOVERNMENT PUBLIC
ADMINISTRATION

SERVICES

•

60

EMP

70

EMP

60

EMP

70

EMP

195.A
69.5
.8
6.1
.2
.0
24.8
.0
.9
2.0
1.3
89.7

180.0
61.0
.9
6.8
•2
.0
23.8
.0
1.1
1.7
1.5
83.1

102.4
.2
•4
7.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
46.5
.9
46.7

90.9
•2
.3
8.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
37.5
.7
43.6

179.9
23.7
16.8
6.1
6.6
17.0
.0
9.3
1.9
6.7
9.3
82.5

204.5
27.0
18.0
9.2
8.2
17.4
.0
10.6
2.3
7.2
11.5
93.0

8.2
.1
.1
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
.0
4.8

9.6
.0
.1
.2
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.5
.0
5.8

154.2
8.2
5.3
.7
.5
9.8
•0
1.8
.2
10.3
19.9
97.5

189.9
12.1
6.8
1.5
•6
8.4
.1
3.4
•8
16.4
22.8
117.0

23.9
.3
.8
1.9
.1
.1
.0
.1
.1
.0
.7
19.9

31.8
.4
1.0
2.3
.1
.0
.0
.2
.0
•0
.9
27.0

3,650.9

4,104.0

1,187.7

1,271.1

1,692.7

2,026.9

11.4

17.0

811.6

1,007.2

111.5

145.0

316.4
143.0
173.4

289.1
126.9
162.2

839.1
700.4
138.7

919.7
778.9
140.8

613.7
418.8
194.9

658.1
404.4
253.7

2.6
1.7
.9

3.4
2.0
1.4

145.8
76.8
69.0

184.1
111.2
72.9

36.4
32.5
4.0

46.7
41.9
4.8

TRANSP ANO PUB UTIL OPERATVS
B R A K E M E N AN D S W I T C H M E N RR
POWER STATION OPERATORS
SAILORS ANO DECKHANDS

3.6
.4
2.8
.4

4.2
.4
3.5
•4

140.5
97.3
15.2
27.9

124.2
82.0
15.9
26.3

1.0
.3
.1
.6

.8
.3
.0
.5

.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0

.4
.0
.2
.2

.9
.0
•6
.2

1.3
.2
.3
.7

1.0
.2
.5
•3

SEMISKILLED METALWORKING OCC
FURNACEMN,SMELTRMNtPOURERS
HEATERS,METAL
WELOERS AND FLAME-CUTTERS
ASSEMBLERS,MTLWRK,CLASS A
ASSEMBLERS,MTLWRK,CLASS B
INSPECTORS,MTLWRK,CLASS B
MACHINE TOOL OPER,CLASS B
ELECTROPLATERS
ELECTROPLATERS HELPER

16.3
.1
.0
16.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

22.7
.2
.0
22.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
•0
•0

15.0
•1
.0
14.9
.0
.0
.0
•0
.0
.0

18.0
.1
.0
18.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

15.7
.0
.0
15.6
.0
.0
•0
.0
.0
.0

24.5
.0
•0
24.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0
•0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

26.4
.0
.0
26.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
•0
.0

44.8
.1
.0
44.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

3.9
.0
.0
3.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

5.2
•0
.0
5.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

750.5
44.0
49.9
60.0
596.6

916.2
47*5
49.7
58.9
760.1

.0
.0
.0
•0
.0

.1
.0
.1
.0
.0

.3
.0
.0
.3
.0

.4
.0
.0
.4
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0

.2
•0
.0
•2
.0

.2
.0
.0
•2
.0

.0
•0
.0
.0
.0

.0
.0
•0
.0
.0

2,564.2

2,871.7

193.1

209.1

1,062.0

1,343.1

8.8

13.5

638.9

777.2

69.9

92.0

2.4
.6
.2
3.1
•8
•0
2,557.1

2.8
.5
.2
2.0
•8
.0
2,865.5

.3
1.8
•0
.1
2.9
.0
188.0

.4
1.7
.0
.1
2.3
.0
204.6

1.0
350.9
.0
1.5
181.9
.0
526.8

1.2
393.1
.0
1.5
180.6
.0
766.6

.0
1.4
.0
.1
.0
.0
7.3

.0
1.7
.0
.1
.G
.C
11.8

.2
22.3
.0
385.0
3.1
.0
228.2

.2
29.0
.0
354.5
5.2
.0
388.4

.2
1.1
.0
2.0
.7
.0
65.9

•2
2.2
.0
1.8
•8
.0
87.1

153.1

127.9

147.0

148.6

1,701.2

2,143.3

206.8

215.0

5,019.6

6,105.1

579.7

778.3

.0

•0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

1,973.0

1,558.0

.0

.0

PROTECTIVE SERVICE WORKERS
FIREMEN
GUAROS,WATCHMEN,OOORKEEPRS
POLICE,OTH LAW ENFORCE OFF

40.1
.6
38.2
1.3

31.8
.5
30.2
1.2

33.0
.4
26.0
6.6

26.0
.4
19.7
6.0

17.0
.1
15.5
1.4

17.9
.0
15.9
1.9

19.4
.0
18.3
1.0

22.4
.0
21.0
1.4

76.3
1.2
61.8
13.3

120.7
1.8
98.2
20.7

489.0
143.5
85.4
260.1

672.5
175.2
116.2
381.1

FOOD SERVICE WORKERS
BARTENDERS
C O O K S, EX C PR1V H O US EH OL DS
COUNTER ANO FOUNTAIN WKRS
WAITERS AND WAITRESSES

11.6
.1
4.6
3.0
4.0

11.8
.0
4.3
3.7
3.8

18.7
.3
10.0
1.0
7.4

15.7
.1
8.3
1.3
5.9

1,201.6
141.7
306.0
88.5
665.4

1,559.3
139.1
417.5
164.8
837.9

4.2
.0
1.4
1.2
1.7

5.0
.0
1.5
1.7
1.6

393.3
21.7
194.2
51.7
125.7

612.2
20.7
293.3
112.5
185.7

9.8
.0
6.3
1.2
2.2

12.4
•0
8.3
1.6
2.4

101.3
.0
.2
14.7
45.0
.2
41.3

84.2
.0
.2
11.4
37.9
•2
34.6

95.3
12.9
.0
6.8
23.9
.1
51.6

106.9
35.0
•0
6.7
21.6
.1
43.5

482.6
.0
.2
23.7
47.3
.1
411.3

566.2
.0
.2
34.3
52.1
•1
479.4

183.3
.0
.0
26.5
74.6
.2
82.0

187.6
.0
.0
27.1
76.7
•2
83.7

2,577.1
.0
443.0
106.3
338.2
221.9
1,467.7

3,814.2
.0
817.4
169.2
551.6
366.3
1,909.6

81.0
.0
2.5
7.4
41.7
1.9
27.4

93.4
.0
7.1
8.5
41.7
2.8
33.3

399.2

350.6

459.8

475.5

556.5

674.7

44.1

53.6

390.3

397.3

114.0

167.9

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

OTHER CRAFTSMEN
BAKERS
CABINETMAKERS
CRANE,DERRICK,HOIST MEN
GLAZIERS
JEWELERS AND WATCHMAKERS
LOOM FIXERS
OPTICIANS,LENS GRINDERS
INSPECTORS,LOG ANO LUMBER
INSPECTORS,OTHER
UPHOLSTERERS
CRAF TS ME N N.E.C.

OPERATIVES
DRIVERS ANO DELIVERYMEN
DRIVERS,BUS,TRUCK,TRACTOR
DELIVERYMEN ANO ROUTMEN

SEMISKILLED TEXTILE OCCUP
KNITTERS,LOOPERS,TOPPERS
SPINNERS,TEXTILE
WEAVERStTEXTILE
SEWERS ANO STITCHERS,MFG
OTHER

OPERATIVES

N.E.C.

ASBESTOS,INSULATION WRKS
ATTEND,AUTO SERVICE,PARKNG
BLASTERS ANO POWDERMEN
LAUNDRY,DRY CLEANING OPER
M E A T c u t t e r s ,e x c m e a t p c k n g
MINE OPERATVS,LABORERS,NEC
OPERATIVES N.E.C.

SERVICE

WORKERS

PRIVATE

HOUSEHOLD

WORKERS

OTHER SERVICE WORKERS
AIRLINE STEWARDS,STWROSSES
A T T E N D A N T S , H O S P , O T H E R INST
CHARWOMEN AND CLEANERS
JANITORS ANO SEXTONS
NURSES,PRACTICAL
SERVICE WORKERS, N.E.C.

LA60RERS,EXCEPT

FARMERS

ANO

FARM

FARM

ANO

MINE

WORKERS




21

Table 2. Estimated employment in selected occupations in selected metal-working industries,
United States, October 1968
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l M a c h in er y , e x ­
E le c t r ic al
O rd nance and
T r a n s p o r ta tio n
P r o fe s s io n s il in c e p t e le c t r i c a l
product ts
a c c e s s o r ie s
equipm ei at
eq u ip m en t
strum eni ts
(SIC 35)
(SIC 34 )
(SIC 36
(SIC 37)
(SIC 19)
(SIC 38
R e la ­ E s t im a t e d R e la ­ E s tim a te d R e la ­ E s tim a te d R e la ­ E s tim a te d R e la ­ E s tim a te d R e la ­ E s tim a te d R e la ­
t iv e
t iv e
tiv e
e m p lo y ­
e m p lo y ­
tiv e
e m p lo y ­
tiv e
e m p lo y ­
e m p lo y ­ tiv e
e m p lo y ­
tiv e
m en t
error
error
m en t
error
error
error
error
m en t
m en t
m en t
m en t
error

T o ta l, a ll
in d u s tr ie s
O ccu p ation

A ll e m p lo y e e s
T o ta l p r o d u c tio n , m a in te n a n c e
w o r k e r s ________-___________
A s s e m b le r s -— ----------------C la s s A -------------- ---------C la s s B
—
C la s s C -----------------------B la c k s m it h s —— -----------—
—
C a r p e n te r s - — ..................... —
C orem akers
___
B e n c h - f lo o r ..- .....................
M a c h in e -------------- — — -C r a n e m e n -------------- ----------D ie s e t t e r s — —
D ie 8 i n k e r s __
E le c t r ic ia n s . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . .
F i l e r s , g r in d e r s ,
p o lis h e r s — —
— ........
F la m e c u t te r s —
-----F o r e m e n , non w ork in g ____
F o r g in g and str a ig h te n in g
r o ll o p e r a to r s . . . . — — —
H a m m e r s m it h s ...— . . ___ —
H e a t e r s , m e t a l ------— ------H ea t t r e a t e r s --------------------I n s p e c to r s -—-----------— -----C la s s A ____
___
C la s s B
C la s s C
■
In str u m e n t m a k e r s -------- -L ayou t m e n , m a ch in e
sh o p r-------------------------------M a c h in e -to o l o p e r a to r s — .
C la s s A
C la s s B ------------------------C la s s C ________________
M a c h in is ts — ------- -----—
—
M e c h a n ic s - ........*-----------. . . .
A u to m o b ile -.....................
G en eral
In str u m e n t r e p a ir m e n «.
M a in te n a n c e
A ll o th e r m e c h a n ic s ----M illw r ig h ts
..........................
M o ld e r s ------. . . . . .
H and, m e t a l ___ —
...
M a c h in e , m e t a l -------- —
P a in t e r s , m a in te n a n c e — *
.
P a tte r n m a k e r s
......
P la t e r s
P lu m b e r s and p ip e fit te r s -P o u r e r s , m eta l
Setup m e n , m a ch in e
to o l
--- ------S h e e t -m e ta l w o r k e r s ______
S ta tio n a r y e n g in e e r s ------. . .
T o o l and d ie m a k e r s ___ . . . .
W e ld er s
C la s s A
C la s s B ________________
S e r v ic e w o r k e r s
P la n t c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s —
E x p e d ito r s —__________ __ —
P r o d u c tio n c le r k ,
c o o r d in a to r
A ll o th e r p la n t c l e r k s ____
O ffic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s . . . . . . . .
B ook k eep ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C o n so le o p e r a to r s ( c o m ­
p u te r o p e r a t o r s ) . . . . . . . —
S e c r e t a r ie s
S te n o g r a p h e r s — ------ ------—
A ll o th e r o f fic e c le r k s ----A d m in is t r a tiv e , te c h n ic a l —
T o o l p r o g r a m e r s ---------------

E s tim a te d
e m p lo y ­
m en t
8 ,2 5 6 . 3

-

336. 1

-

1 ,4 1 3 . 9

-

1 ,9 1 8 . 1

-

2 , 0 0 2 .8

-

2 , 123. 3

-

46 2 . 3

-

5 ,5 9 7 . 1
1, 311. 7
307. 0
431. 7
573. 0
2. 1
16. 7
5. 7
3. 1
2 .6
22. 3
16. 9
1. 8
44. 0

(*)
2
3
4
3
17
15
9
11
14
4
7
18
3

1 9 3 .5
46. 7
(1 )
2
( )
(*)
< )
3
( )
( )
(*)
( )
()
(3 )
(3 )
1. 9

1
9
.
„
_
.
.
_
.
_
_
.
.
3

1, 1 1 0 .2
144. 3
35. 5
40. 5
68. 3
(?)
(!)
(!)
(2 )
(2 )
8. 2
10. 1
(3 )
7 .2

1
8
8
11
11
.
.
_
_

1
4
5
6
10
.
9
12
15
_
7
18
.
5

1 ,2 9 6 . 0
5 1 9 .7
87. 0
1 6 5 .6
26 7 . 1
<3 )
1. 7
(3 )
(3 )
(3 )
(2 )
2. 8
(2 )
8. 5

1
3
7
5
4
..
9

271. 8
9 1 .4
2 1 .4
(')
37. 1

4
13
16

_
_
_
10
.
4

1 ,4 4 7 . 5
303. 8
7 9. 3
9 6 .4
128. 1
(3 )
6. 1
(3 )
(3 )
(3 )
5. 3
1. 5
(3 )
1 5 .4

1
3
3
5
2
.
11

6
11
.
5

1 ,2 7 8 . 1
20 5 . 8
72. 5
78. 0
55. 3
(3 )
2. 7
2 .9
2. 0
(3 )
6 .6
2. 0
(3 )
9 .6

_
_
4
3
.
2

(?)
( )
( )
(3 )
(?)
<3 )
(*)
(3 )
1. 4

1. 5
(?)
(2 )

19
_
_

3 7 .2
5 .6
42. 7

7
15
3

27. 3
3. 8
52. 3

7
7
2

9. 5
(3 )
41. 5

15
_
2

18. 5
2 .6
67. 8

10
7
2

5. 5
(3 )
8. 7

.
_
.
.
6
13
15
.
.

1. 8
8. 7
(3 )
3 .6
3 4 .9
1 1 .2
9. 3
1 4 .4
(3 )

19
13
.
8
5
9
9
b
_

(3 )
2. 1
(2 )
7. 1
50. 7
1 9 .9
15. 8
15. 0
(2 )

.
16
.
9
3
3
4
6
.

(3 )
(2 )
(2 )
1 .6
85. 8
18. 8
24. 2
42. 8
(2 )

_
_
_
15
‘4
6
5
5

(3 )
4. 8
1. 3
5. 8
83. 3
22. 0
1 7 .2
44. 1
(3 )

.
4
8
2
1
6
8
1
_

.
9
17
18

6. 3
129. 0
3 6 .4
30. 3
62. 3
2 1 .9
26. 2
1. 3
4. 5
(3 )
1 5 .7
4. 0
5 .4

6 .6
26 2 . 1
1 1 7 .8
P6. 0
58. 3
9 1 .4
2 4. 5
(2 )
6 .6
(2 )
11. 0
3 .6
5. 4
( !)
(2 )
(2 )
2. 7
1 0 .9
2 .9
2. 6
1. 8

6
4
5
6
7
11
5
_
11
.
5
14
8
.

10
6
9
8
8
6
6
.
15
10
12
8
8
_
_

.
10
8
16
7
9

1. 6
70. 5
22. 3
2 1 .6
2 6 .6
20. 4
2 9. 7
(3 >
4 .7
5. 1
14. 8
4 .6
3. 5
(2 )
(2 )
(2 )
1 .4
(3 )
7. 7
3 .2
(2 >

8
_
12
6
.

2 .9
142. 2
4 4. 3
4 7 .4
50. 5
3 5 .2
38. 7
4. 2
6 .9
1 .7
1 5 .2
1 0 .7
1 1 .8
1 .7
1. 3
(3 )
3 .9
2 .2
4. 5
9 .4
(3 )

9
3
6
7
2
7
3
1
8
9
3
7
4
15
18
_
7
12
3
5
_

(3 )
25. 7
9 .4
8 .2
8. 1
6. 3
7. 0
(3 )
1. 5
1. 7
2. 8
(3 )
!!!
3
(3
(3 )
< )
3
(3 )
1. 2

99. 5
12. 5
225. 0

4
7
2

4. 2
18. 5
4. 1
18. 9
2 9 0 .6
8 1 .4
80. 7
128. 5
6. 3

17
7
12
4
2
3
4
2
17

17. 9
648. 9
2 3 4 .6
198. 0
216. 3
178. 8
1 3 2 .8
8. 2
2 5 .4
11. 7
62. 3
25. 2
28. 1
17. 0
7. 6
9 .4
1 1 .6
16. 5
45. 3
1 8 .9
4. 5

5
2
3
3
4
6
2
7
6
7
4
5
3
12
12
18
4
7
6
3
11

(3 )
1 9 .4
4. 4
4. 5
(2 )
3 .6
6 .7

57. 8
91. 3
7. 1
144. 0
237. 3
117. 5
119. 8
1 4 0 .9
2 2 9 .4
4 6 .4

3
5
4
4
2
3
3
2
2
4

58. 1
124. 9
788. 0
6 7 .8
1 7 .2
127. 5
53. 5
52 2 . 0
1 , 5 0 0 .9
5. 5

( !)
( !)
V

(M
1 7 .5
4 .6
5. 0
(2 )
(3 )

6
_
_
.
9
6
20
11
_
.
9
13
9
15
8
7
_
14
11
10
_
_
_

.
.
.
.
6
.

(!)
( )
(2 )
2. 5
(2 )
28. 5
2. 0
<2 )

2 .2
(?)
(?)
(2 )
1 .9
1 .2
(3 )
6. 5
1 1 .5
2. 2

18
.
.
12
_
20
5
18
8

1 2 .7
36. 4
(3 )
34. 0
75. 8
3 5 .7
40. 1
1 9 .4
3 0 .6
5. 3

9
9
_
8
6
5
8
5
3
6

14. 0
20. 0
1. 2
6 0 .4
67. 5
40. 1
2 7 .4
31. 3
5 2 .6
10. 2

7
8
9
9
3
5
5
4
3
4

8. 0
10. 9
1. 8
1 9 .2
16. 1
7. 1
9. 0
32. 8
5 9 .5
1 2 .0

12
10
9
5
7
13
9
4
7
5

1 8 .2
19. 3
2 .4
23. 7
73. 0
3 1 .8
4 1 .2
44. 3
60. 3
1 4 .4

2
6
2
2
1
4
2
5
4
12

2 .7

11

(!)
(3 )
4. 3
3. 0
1 .6
1 .4
6 .6
14. 8
2. 3

_
10
10
12
15
3

4
3
1
2

2 .2
7. 1
3 4 .4
1. 5

13
11
16
3

8 .0
17. 3
1 0 3 .6
17. 3

5
6
3
3

1 5 .7
26. 8
209. 3
2 2 .2

7
4
2
4

1 3 .7
3 3 .8
1 9 7 .6
1 2 .4

6
10
3
4

U. 3
3 1 .6
187. 0
9 .6

14
5
3
3

4 .2
8. 3
56. 1
4 .8

8
10
7
6

4
4
2
1
1
6

1. 1
5 .2
2 .6
24. 0
9 0. 0
(3 )

10
19
15

2 .2
1 5 .7
6. 8
6 1 .6
150. 1
(3 )

10
5
7
4
4

5. 0
32. 8
1 4 .2
135. 1
346. 7
2. 3

10
3
3
2
2
9

4. 0
35. 8
1 3 .0
1 3 2 .4
4 1 6 .9
(3 )

6
4
4
3
3

3 .8
26. 5
1 3 .9
1 3 3 .2
384. 2

8
17
3
1
3
6

1. 1
1 1 .5
3. 0
3 5 .7
113. 0
(3 )

8
10
11
9
5
-

(2 )
(3 )
2 .8
<2 )
(?)
(3 )
(3 )
(?)
(3 )
(?)
(3 )
1. 2
(3 )

8
13
_
.
13
_
.
.

_

.

5
-

-

D e ta il m a y n o t add t o to t a ls due to ro u n d in g .

SO UR CE: U . S. D e p a r tm en t o f L a b o r, B u re a u o f L ab or S t a t is t ic s




10
12

11
16
18
9
9
7
7
11
18
.
10
12
8
.
_
_
12
.
9
9
„

1 Stan d ard e r r o r o f l e a s than 0 . 5.
2 R e la tiv e s ta n d a r d e r r o r g r e a te r than 20 p e r c e n t.
3 L e s s than 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s .
NO TE :

(!)
(2 )
(!)
(3 )
1 8 .4
4 .9
9 .2
4. 3
(2 )

9

22

-

1

.

1

_
_
12

n

(3 )

5

Table 3. Estimated employment in selected occupations in the printing and publishing industry,
United States, March 1970
(In thousands)
O cc u p a tio n

P ercen t
o f to ta l

1 .1 1 2 .3

1 0 0 .0

0

7 4 .2
1 1 1 .5
6 .2
10. 8
<*)
1 .1
4 .7
(2)
V)
1 .3
5. 8
3. 0
/2\

6 .7
1 0 .0
.6
1 .0
.1
.4
*

2
2
7
6
%
5
6
-

. 1
.5
.3

5
5
9

A ll e m p l o y e e s ------------------- ------------------ ---------------- M a n a g e r s and o f f ic ia ls --------- ------------ ---------------------— —
P r o f e s s io n a l and t e c h n ic a l w o r k e r s -----------—..... —...........
A c c o u n ta n ts and a u d ito r s —— —
--------------------------C o m m e r c ia l a r t i s t s ------------------ — — — ------------ -------C o m m e r c ia l d e s i g n e r s -------—
E n g i n e e r s ----- —
------- ----------—----------- ---------- - - — —
------- --------------------------------------------E s t im a t o r s
M a th e m a tic a l s c i e n t i s t s ----------------- ------------—----- ------N a tu r a l s c i e n t i s t s ------------ ----------—------------------- ------- —
P e r s o n n e l and la b o r r e la tio n s s p e c i a l i s t s -----------——
P h o to g r a p h e r s ------- -----■
...... — —
P u r c h a s in g a g e n ts
■■
■............ —— -------- .-------------------S o c ia l s c i e n t i s t s ------- -------------------- ----------------- ----------S y s t e m s a n a ly s ts , e le c t r o n ic data p r o c e s s in g — — W r it e r s , e d it o r s , and r e p o r t e r s --------- ■ - ...—
T e c h n ic ia n s — — — — — — —
——
— —
.
C om p u ter p r o g r a m e r s ....... --■ —
— ......... ................... ........
D r a f t s m e n -----------------------------------------------------—
E l e c t r i c a l and e le c t r o n ic t e c h n ic ia n s - --------—
A ll o th e r t e c h n ic ia n s -------------- — ---------------- — ----A ll o th e r p r o f e s s io n a l w o r k e r s ......... ..........—-------— >
—
S a le s w o r k e r s --------------------------- -------------- — —------ ------- —
C le r ic a l w o r k e r s ------- ------ -------- --------------- —-------------------A c c o u n tin g c le r k s ■ ■■ — -----------------------------------------— ■■
B o o k k e e p e r s ---------------------------------------------------- ---------C a s h ie r s ---------- ——.................... ...... ...... ................—
—... .
C la s s if ie d - a d c le r k s , n e w s p a p e r -------------------- — C o r r e s p o n d e n c e c l e r k s ----------------------------------------------C u sto m e r s e r v i c e r e p r e s e n t a t iv e s ......■■
■—----- -----------I n v o ic e - c o n tr o l c le r k s —
O ffic e m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------B illin g -a n d b o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s -------D ig ita l c o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s ------------------ --------------—
K eypunch o p e r a to r s ■■■ . -------- - ■ -------------- --------■■
A ll o th e r o f fic e m a c h in e o p e r a to r s —■
— '■
P a y r o ll c le r k s —— —— — — -------------------------------------P e r s o n n e l c l e r k s ------------------ —
— —
-------------------P r o c u r e m e n t c le r k s
— -------------- —— —— --------------—
T e le p h o n e a d -ta k e r —
—— ----------------------- —
T e le p h o n e o p e r a to r s
- ----- ------- — — -------— ----S e c r e t a r ie s , s te n o g r a p h e r s , t y p i s t s -----------------------S e c r e t a r ie s
-------- ■ ---------------------------— —— —
—
S te n o g r a p h e r s — -------------------------—-----------T y p is t s — — ----------—
—
A ll o th e r c le r i c a l w o r k e r s
................ ................
P r o d u c tio n , m a in te n a n c e , m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t, and
p o w er p la n t w o r k e r s ------------------ —----------- --------------------A p p r e n tic e s — ----------------— --------------------— --------------A p p r en tic e b o o k b in d e r s — ------------------- —-------— —
A p p r en tic e c o m p o s it o r s and t y p e s e t t e r s ---- —
A p p r en tic e e l e c t r o t y p e r s --------- — — — - ............
A p p r en tic e e tc h e r s and e n g r a v e r s , e x c e p t
p h o to e n g r a v e r s —— —
------..................... ■ ■■■ ■
■ ■■ ■ .
A p p r en tic e lith o g r a p h ic p r e p a r a tio n w o r k e r s ----A p p r en tic e p h o to e n g r a v e r s —
— ------- -------- ---A p p r en tic e p r e s s m e n - ................. —— ................. ........
A p p r en tic e s te r e o t y p e r s —
--------■■- .....—
■■
...—
A p p r e n tic e , a ll o th e r p r in tin g t r a d e s -----------------A p p r e n tic e , a ll o th e r -..... —
-------- -------------------------—
C o m p o sin g r o o m o c c u p a tio n s — — -■■ -■ ■ —
■
—
.
C o p y c u t t e r s -----—— -------------— — -------- ------------ ----Hand c o m p o s it o r s — — -----------I m p o s e r s and m a k eu p m en —
— - - - ----------L in e c a s tin g m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ■ .... .
i..-— —
L in e c a s tin g m a c h in e k e y b o a r d o p e r a to r s — —
L in e c a s tin g m a c h in e t e n d e r s ---- —
----------—
-------L u d lo w -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s .................................... —
—— ——
M arkup m e n ----------------------------- ----------- - —■
M o n o ty p e -c a s tin g m a ch in e o p e r a to r s ........................
M o n o ty p e -k e y b o a r d o p e r a to r s ■ ■ ■
■
■ ....................... . ....
P a s te u p m en — ---------------------------- -------- —
——
P h o to le tte r in g m a ch in e o p e r a to r s — — ——-----—
P h o t o t y p e s e t t in g .m a c h in e k e y b o a r d o p e r a to r s —
P h o to ty p e s e tt in g -m a c h in e m o n it o r s ---------------------P h o to ty p e s e t t e r ope r a to r s ■—■ ........ —■■■
■ ■■
■------------P r o o f r e a d e r , c o m p o sin g r o o m s —— -------------- - ■■■
■■
S t r ik e - o n m a c h in e o p e r a to r s
-----—— —
L ith o g r a p h ic -p h o to m e c h a n ic a l p r e p a r a tio n
o c c u p a tio n s — —... ---------------------- ----------- -— , — -— —
A r t is t s —
— ------- ------------------ ----------C a m e r a m e n ------- ------------ ----- — ..... ...........—— .......
D e v e lo p e r s — --------------------—
....... —— — ——
P la te m a k e r s — — -------------------------------- ----------—----S tr ip p e r s — — — ' — ...........— ........— ........................
■

\

)

~ x

(p e r c e n t)

1 .0
65. 1
' 6 .6
2. 1
( 2)
(2)
s3 .2
3 .9
6 2 .4
1 9 9 .7
1 1 .7
1 6 .2
1 .9
5 .7
3 .2
6 .6
3 .7
16. 2
4. 8
1. 8
5 .7
3 .9
3 .6
1. 1
1. 3
7 .6
5 .7
4 7 .6
2 0 .9 .
4. 3
2 2 .4
67. 7

5 7 .6
3 .0
.2
.8
-

1
NA
12
6
-

( 2)
3 .7
1. 1
1 1 .6
(2)
4. 1
(2)
1 3 9 .2
1 .2
2 4 .5
1 5 .6
3 1 .6
8 .9
3. 1
2 .6
5 .2
1 .0
1 .0
1 3 .9
1 .3
6. 0
1 .5
(')
1 6 .5
3 .0

_
.3
.l
1 .0
.4
_
1 2 .5
.1
2 .2
1 .4
2. 8
.8
.3
.2
.5
. l
.l
1 .2
,1
.5
. 1
1 .5
.3

_
8
9
6
9
_
NA
10
5
5
4
6
8
11
5
9
16
8
14
10
13
3
18

33. 8
3. 1
10. 0
1 .6
7 .9
1 1 .2

23

5.’ 9
.6
.2
.3
.4
5 .6
1 8 .0
1. 1
1 .5
.2
.5
.3
.6
.3
1 .5
.4
.2
.5
.4
.3
.1
.1
.7
.5
4 .3
1 .9
.4
2 .0
6. 1

641. 1
3 3 .4
2 .5
8 .5
( 2)

S e e fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




R e la tiv e

E s tim a te d
e m p lo y m e n t

10
2
7
11
.
8
11
3
2
4
4
8
7
8
6
8
5
6
9
7
10
5
5
11
6
4
3
4
7
5
4

3 .0
.3
.9
.1
.7
1 .0

NA
9
7
12
7
6

Table 3. Estimated employment in selected occupations in the printing and publishing industry,
United States, March 1970—Continued
^Ij^thousandsj^
O ccu p a tio n

E s tim a te d
e m p lo y m e n t

641. 1
2 2 .4
2. 1

R e la tiv e
error
(p e r c e n t)

P ercen t
o f to ta l

5 7 .6
2 .0
.2
.9
.8
1 0 .6

P r o d u c tio n , m a in te n a n c e , m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t, and
p o w er p la n t w o r k e r s — C o n tin u e d ------------ ---- ----------------- -----O th er p la te m a k in g o c c u p a t io n s -------- -----—-----------------------E le c tr o ty p e r s --------------------------- ----------- ------------------------E t c h e r s and e n g r a v e r s , e x c e p t p h o to e n g r a v e r s -------P h o t o e n g r a v e r s ---------------- — ",
.....— . . — ------ ------ —
.
S t e r e o t y p e r s ----------— --------------------- ----- ------------------------P r e s s r o o m o c c u p a t i o n s ------- ---------------------- -- -— -------F le x o g r a p h ic p r e s s m e n ------- ---------- ----------------- -----------G ra v u re p r e s s m e n , r o to g r a v u r e and s h e e t fed — ----L e tte r p r e s s m e n , s h e e t fe d and r o ll fed —— ---- — —
—
L e t t e r s e t p r e s s m e n ------- — — —-------- ------------ --------------O ff s e t l it h o g r a p h ic - p r e s s m e n , s h e e t fed and r o ll
f e d --------------------- -------------- ------— ---------------------------------- S t e e l d ie p r e s s m e n ------------------ ------------------ -------.------- —
P r e s 8 a s s is t a n t s and f e e d e r s -------------------------------- -----S c r e e n p r o c e s s o c c u p a t i o n s --------- ------- ------ --------------------S c r e e n c u t t e r s ------------------ i
—
—
----------------S c r e e n m a k e r s , p h o to g r a p h ic p r o c e s s ------------------------S c r e e n p r i n t e r s ------------------- --------------------------—— -------B in d in g, m a ilin g , and sh ip p in g o c c u p a tio n s — -----------B in d e r y m a ch in e se tu p m e n ---------------------------------------B in d e r y w ork e r s ----------------- —
------—-------- --------------------B ook bind e r s -------- ----------- - — ------- —---- ------------------------D e l iv e r y m e n -------------------------------------------------------M a ile r s — —-------—
------- —----------------------------------------R ou te m en , n e w s p a p e r s ------------ ------------- ---------------------Shipping and r e c e iv in g c l e r k s -----------—— ---------- ------—
T r u c k d r i v e r s -.-------—------- -------- ---------------------------------—
C o n str u c tio n , m a in te n a n c e , r e p a ir , and p o w er p la n t
o c c u p a t i o n s ...... ................................ ......... .....— — .------ ----------C a r p e n te r s — — ---- ----------------— ----------------- ------------------E l e c t r i c i a n s ----------------------------------------- ------------------------M a c h in is ts
------—
—----- — ----- ------------------------------ ——
M e c h a n ic s , a u t o m o t i v e ------- ---------- — ------ ----------- -------M e c h a n ic s , g e n e r a l ------- — ---------- ---------- .— ----------- ■
—
M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e ---------------------------------------- -----M e ch a n ic s and r e p a ir m e n , a ll o t h e r -------------------------P lu m b e r s and p i p e f i t t e r s --------------------------------------------S ta tio n a r y e n g i n e e r s ------------ ------- ----------- ----- — ----------A ll o th e r p r o d u c tio n , m a in te n a n c e , m a te r ia l m o v e ­
m en t, and p o w er p la n t o c c u p a t io n s ------------------ —-----------F o r e m e n , n o n w o r k in g ------------- — ——
—
.......... ...... ..........
A ll o th e r s k ille d c r a ft s m e n and k in d red w o r k e r s -----A ll o th e r o p e r a tiv e s and s e m i s k il le d w o r k e r s — ■ —
—
A ll o th e r l a b o r e r s and u n s k ille d w o r k e r s ----------------S e r v ic e w o r k e r s ..
--------------------------------------------------G u ard s, w a tc h m e n , d o o r k e e p e r s —
------- — < ---------——
J a n ito r s , p o r t e r s , and c le a n e r s — — — ------- ------- ------- ----A ll o th e r s e r v i c e w o r k e r s — — ------— --------- ------— ------—

(')

9 .7
8 .4
1 1 7 .5
(*)
2. 2
43. 2
5 .9
38. 0
(*)
24. 6
3. 1
iZ\
(!)
0

1
NA
10
6
6
NA
15
4
11

-

.2
3 .9
.5
3 .4
2 .2
.3

4
.

5
NA

_

1 7 3 .0
8 .9
7 3 .0
10. 6
14. 5
25. 0
1 4 .5
1 5 .0
1 1 .2

1 5 .6
.8
6 .6
1 .0
1 .3
2. 3
1 .3
1 .3
1 .0

I
NA
5
3
7
6
4
7
5
6

13. 5
(2)
1 .9
5 .0

1 .2
.2
.4

NA
4
4

_

_

(2)
2 .6
( 2)
( )
(2)

.2

5

1 0 5 .7
1 4 .5
10. 9
2 9 .4
50. 9
23. 3
1. 8
1 7 .5
4. 0

9 .5
1 .3
1 .0
2 .6
4 .6
2. 1
.2
1 .5
.4

0

_

_

NA
3
11
8
5
3
7
3
10

1 E s tim a te d e m p lo y m e n t w ith r e la t iv e sta n d a r d e r r o r g r e a te r than 20 p e r c e n t. D o e s n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n s ta n d a r d s .
2 L e s s than 1, 000 e m p lo y e e s .
3 A p o s t - s u r v e y a n a ly s is in d ic a te d r e p o r tin g e r r o r s w e r e m a d e in th is o c c u p a tio n , th e m a g n itu d e o f w h ich h a s not y e t b e e n
a s c e r t a in e d . T h u s, th e e s tim a t e m a y be o f lim it e d r e lia b ility .
N A s N ot a v a ila b le .

T h e r e la t iv e e r r o r w a s co m p u te d fo r a ll s p e c if ic o c c u p a tio n s but n o t fo r a ll o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p in g s.

NO TE : D e ta il m a y not add to t o ta ls due to ro unding.

SO URCE:

U. S . D e p a r tm en t o f L a b o r, B u re a u o f L ab or S t a tis tic s




24

Table 4. Estimated distribution for selected occupations in the communications equipment industry,
except telephone and telegraph (S IC 3662). Septem ber 1967, Septem ber 1968, and March 1970
[In t h o u s a n d s )

---------------- lw r ---------------S e l e c t e d oc c up a tio n

employm ent

---------------- r m ---------------- ......... ........"i 4f'5 --------------employm ent
employm ent

1970 p e r c e n t
di s tr i b u t io n

T o ta l e m p lo y m e n t —---------------— ----- —--------- -----------------

385. 3

390.6

352. 5

100. 00

A d m in is tr a tiv e , m a n a g e r ia l, p r o f e s s io n a l, s a le s , and
t e c h n ic a l p e r s o n n e l —— —
—— — -------------- ------- — --------- ------

1 72 . 7

172.2

159. 3

45 . 19

C le r ic a l w o r k e r s -----------------------------— ------------------------------------A c c o u n tin g c le r k s —.................................. —........-■
.... ......
E x p e d ite r s —
— —
——— .....
O ffic e m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ----------------— —
C o n so le o p e r a to r s — — ------- -------------------— ----------------K eyp unch o p e r a t o r s -------------------------- ------ ------— — ------T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s , A. B . C . --------------------O th er o f fic e - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ------------- -----P a y r o ll or tim e k e e p in g c l e r k s ------------------ ------------ — ------S e c r e t a r i e s ...... ................ - ■ - .................. . .............*..... — ------- ------ Shipping o r r e c e iv in g c le r k s — — — ------------------ ------------S te n o g r a p h e r s —--------- -------- ------------------ — — ----T y p i s t s ---------------- ------------- — ................ ..........—
----- -------------------S tock c le r k s — -----—------------ ------ ------------•—
-- --O th er -------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------

63.4
3.5
5.5
5.3
1.2
2. 1
.6
1.4
1.0
12.3
1.7
3.4
5.3
2.9
22.5

64. 0
3.4
5.7
5.2
1. 1
2.0
.7
1.5
1. 1
12. 5
1.9
3. 1
5.5
3.5
22. 1

57.4
3. 2
6. 0
5. 0
1. 1
1.7
.4
1. 8
.8
11.2
1. 6
2.9
4. 2
3. 1
19.5

16.28
.90
1.70
1. 41
. 31
.48
. 11
.48
. 22
3. 17
.45
. 82
1. 19
. 87
5.55

S k ille d tr a d e s and o th e r -------- ------ — ............ .............- — ■
—....—
A s s e m b l e r s .....................-...... — — ...... — ---------------, --------------—
C oil w i n d e r s -------------------------- — ......................
— , — ------ E le c t r ic ia n s ------—------— > — ------------------------- ------ —-----------—
F i le r s , g r in d e r s , and p o l i s h e r s ------— -------- ----------—------F o r e m e n (n onw orking) — ------------- --------------------——
------------I n s p e c to r s —........- ..............-------- -----— .................— ■> .....——
■—
M achin e t o o l o p e r a to r s ----------- ------------ ------- -------M a c h in is t s --------------------------- ---- ,— — — ------------- --------' ------M e ch a n ic s and r e p a ir m e n — — - ------------ ------------------------M i l l w r i g h t s -----... — .................................. — ------— —-------- ------P a in t e r s , m a in t e n a n c e --------------------------- -------- ----------------P a in t e r s , p r o d u c t io n ------------ -------——....—
P l a t e r s ------------------------------------- . . . . . . ------------ —-------------------P l a t e r s , h e l p e r s ------———-------------—
--------------- ----------------P lu m b e r s and p ip e fit te r s ---- -------- — ....... ................—
P o w e r t r u c k e r s -----------— — — — ■
■
---- ----------------------P u n c h -p r e s s o p e r a t o r s --------------------------— -- ---------- ---------Setup m en , m a ch in e t o o l -------- —...... ........... ........ ..— ... — -------S h e e t -m e ta l m e c h a n ic s — ---------------------------- — ---------------S ta tio n a r y e n g in e e r s —-------------------------— -------- — ------- — —
T e s t e r s ..............................
.......—- -------- ----------------------------- T o o lm a k e r s and d ie m a k e r s ■ —
■
■
—— — — — —
—
T rue kd r iv e r s — — - —
......... .........— —
—
........
W e ld e r s , h a n d --------------------- ----------- — ------------- ----W e ld e r s , m a ch in e ------- --------- -----■ ----—
W i r e m e n .......................................... ................................ .............. — ...... .
O th er s k ille d tr a d e s and o th e r m a n u a l o c c u p a tio n s —

143.4
47.5
2. 1
.9
.9
5.6
11.2
6.7
4. 1
2.4
.3
.4
.9
.8
.3
.4
.3
1.0
.5
1 .7
.1
9.2
2.2
.7
. 8
.3
9.1
32.9

148. 1
52.3
2.0
1.1
1. 1
5.7
12. 1
7. 1
4 .4
2.7
.2
.4
1. 1
.9
.2
.4
.4
1.2
.5
2.0
.2
8.7
2. 0
.7
.7
.4
1 1 .5
27.9

129.7
43.7
1,7
1.2
.9
4.7
9. 8
7.5
4. 3
2. 8
.3
.3
1.0
.7
.2
.4
.4
.9
.5
2.2
.2
7.3
1. 8
.6
.8
.3
10. 8
24. 3

36.79
12. 39
.48
. 34
. 25
1. 33
2.78
2. 12
1 .2 1
.79
. 08
. 08
. 28
. 19
. 05
. 11
. 11
. 25
. 14
. 62
. 05
2. 07
. 51
. 17
. 22
.08
3. 06
6. 89

7. 1

6.4

6.2

1. 75

S e r v ic e w o r k e r s --------- —
NOTE:

— ■ -------— ------ — ■
—
—

--------------

B e c a u s e of rounding, s u m s of i ndi vi dua l i t e m s m a y not eq ual t o ta l s .

SOURCE:

U. S. D e p a r t m e n t of La b o r, B u re a u of La bo r S t a t i s t i c s .




25

Table 5, Employment of engineers, by industry, January 1961-69
sic
code

In d u str y
A ll i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------------------------------—

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

640. 1

6 6 9 .7

7 1 1 .6

7 2 6 .4

7 4 9 .2

7 7 6 .2

8 2 4 .0

8 4 7 .7

8 4 9 .0

0 7 -0 9

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , and f is h e r ie s 1 —■ ■■ ... -...
■

-

-

1 0 -1 4

M in ing —-——— — — — ---------------------— --------------—

(2)

(2)

1 5 -1 7

C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c tio n — —
-------- - -— - — ------—
------- --

3 6 .2

3 7 .5

38. 8

38. 8

4 2 .0

4 6 .7

4 3 .3

48. 0

46. 8

M a n u factu rin g
............ — ...................................—
O rd n an ce and a c c e s s o r i e s ——- —— -----------------F o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts —-----------— - — —------T e x t ile m il l p r o d u c ts and a p p a r e l -------- -----------P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s ------■
--------------------------C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p r o d u c t s ----------------------- P e t r o le u m r e fin in g and r e la t e d i n d u s t r i e s ------R u bber and m is c e lla n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c ts —
S to n e, c la y , and g l a s s p r o d u c ts -----------— — —
P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s t r ie s --------- -------- --------------F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c ts — ------- ----------------- ----M a c h in er y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ------------------ —-----E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m en t, and
s u p p lie s ......... ......—- ...................— — ------------------- —
T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t3 ----------- ------ ------- -—
P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n t if ic , and c o n tr o llin g — - —
in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g r a p h ic and o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s and c lo c k s --------— ............... ............
------------------------------- -— -— -------------O th e r 4

4 5 0 .2
3 6 .2
5 .8
2 .6
9 .0
3 2 .2
9 .4
5 .3
7 .6
2 0 .5
2 3 .9
6 2 .3

472. 3
41. 1
5. 8
2. 7
9 .5
3 3 .2
9 .5
5. 1
7 .9
21. 1
2 3 .9
65. 3

5 0 3 .3
4 6 .2
5 .8
2 .9
9 .5
3 4 .6
9 .6
5 .6
8 .0
2 0 .3
2 4 .7
6 9 .6

5 0 4 .4
4 7 .4
4 .4
3. 8
9 .3
3 9 .4
9. 8
6. 0
7. 8
1 8 .6
24. 8
7 2 .7

5 1 9 .9
5 0 .7
4 .8
3 .4
9 .6
3 8 .6
10. 1
7 .2
8 .4
2 0 .0
2 6 .2
7 3 .5

5 3 6 .2
5 1 .5
4 .9
3 .7
9 .7
40. 6
9 .9
7. 8
8 .9
2 0 .5
2 7 .9
75. 1

5 7 7 .5
5 1 .9
5 .2
3 .7
9 .4
4 2 .5
1 0 .7
9 .7
9 .6
2 1 .4
2 9 .2
8 1 .5

5 8 5 .7
5 3 .7
5 .2
3 .9
9 .6
4 2 .9
10. 6
9. 0
9 .6
2 1 .4
2 9 .2
8 3 .5

5 8 6 .5
5 4 .2
7 .4
3 .7
9 .2
4 4 .2
8. 8
10. 3
9 .7
2 1 .6
2 8 .7
81. 1

1 1 7 .7
8 5 .9

1 2 2 .7
9 0 .5

1 3 3 .9
9 7 .3

1 2 9 .6
9 6 .7

1 3 2 .1
1 0 0 .6

1 3 5 .5
1 0 3 .6

1 4 2 .0
1 1 9 .5

145. 0
121. 0

1 4 6 .7
1 2 3 .7

2 4 .3
6 .1

2 5 .9
6 .4

26. 8
6 .7

26. 7
6. 5

2 7 .9
6 .7

2 9 .6
7 .0

3 2 .4
7 .8

33. 0
8. 1

3 0 .0
7 .2

T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n s , and u t il it i e s ——

4 3 .2

4 4 .7

4 4 .8

4 6 .6

50. 8

5 1 .6

5 3 .2

5 5 .4

53. 1

R a ilr o a d t r a n sp o r ta tio n ------------------- —— ------- —
O th er t r a n sp o r ta tio n s e r v i c e s —
------- — ----------- —
C o m m u n ica tio n —— — ------- — ----------— ------- ------E l e c t r i c , g a s , and s a n ita r y s e r v i c e s ——
---------

8. 8

1 2 .5
2 1 .9

12. 8
2 3. 2

1 2 .9
2 3 .6

1 3 .7
24. 1

4. 1
4 .3
16. 8
2 5 .5

4. 1
4 .3
17. 1
26. 1

4 .2
5 .1
1 7 .9
2 5 .9

4. 3
4. 8
1 8 .8
2 7 .5

3 .3
4. 1
1 8 .7
2 7 .0

1 5 .0

1 6 .7

1 8 .2

23. 1

2 1 .6

23. 0

2 4 .8

2 5 .6

20. 8

2 .5

3. 1

3. 1

5 .0

4 .0

4 .2

4.4

4 .9

7 5 .7

78. 9

8 5 .5

9 0 .5

9 3 .7

9 7 .3

1 0 3 .4

2 8 .8

3 0 .0
_
4 8 .9

3 5 .7
_
49. 8

36. 1

3 9 .4

54. 0

19
20
2 2 ,2 3
26
28
29
30
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

40
4 1 -4 7
48
49
5 0 -5 9

W h o le sa le and r e ta il tr a d e ---------- --------------------- -—

6 0 -6 7

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ---------— — —
H o te l, p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , r e p a ir , a m u s e m e n t r e c r e a t io n , and l e g a l 5 — .............. ■ ........ —

7 0 -7 9
81
807
891

E n g in e e r in g and a r c h it e c tu r a l s e r v i c e s — --------

8 .8
-

4 6 .9

8 .7
-

-

-

1 7 .0

17. 0

8 .3
-

-

3 6 .5
_

-

1 7 .2

3 5 .2
_

5 8 .5

_

-

-

-

1 7 .3

_

6 1 .2

1 7 .3

_

6 4 .0

17. 3

1 8 .7

4 .7

109. 1

1 1 8 .3

41. 1

4 9 .0

68. 0

69. 3

_

1 E s t im a t e s fo r e n g in e e r s in t h is in d u s tr y g ro u p a r e in c lu d e d in the to ta l o n ly , s in c e th e y h a v e a v e r a g e d fe w e r than 1 ,0 0 0 o v e r the y e a r s .
2 No e s t i m a t e s fo r e n g in e e r s in m in in g a r e sh o w n fo r 1961 and 1962 b e c a u s e th e d ata a r e not c o m p a r a b le w ith la te r y e a r s .
3 Due to a ch a n g e in e s tim a t in g p r o c e d u r e and the a llo c a t io n o f c o n s o lid a te d r e p o r ts in th e m o to r v e h ic le in d u stry , the 1967, 1968, and 1969
d ata a r e n ot c o m p a r a b le w ith 1966 and e a r li e r y e a r s .
T h is a d ju stm e n t a ls o a f fe c t s to a l e s s e r d e g r e e o r d n a n c e and in d u s t r ie s in the e le c t r i c a l
m a c h in e r y g rou p .
4 In clu d ed a r e : T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu r e s (SIC 21); lu m b e r and w ood p r o d u c ts (SIC 24); fu r n itu r e and fix t u r e s (SIC 25); p r in tin g and p u b lish in g
(SIC 27); le a t h e r and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts (SIC 31); and m is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu r in g (SIC 39).
3 V ir tu a lly a l l th e e m p lo y m e n t i s c o n ta in e d in c o m m e r c ia l la b o r a to r ie s , r e s e a r c h and o th e r b u s in e s s s e r v i c e s (SIC 7 3 9 ).
NO TE:

B e c a u s e of rounding, s u m s o f ind ividu al i t e m s m a y not eq ual t o ta l s .

SO UR CE: D ata c o v e r p a y r o ll e m p lo y m e n t in p r iv a te in d u s tr y and a r e draw n fr o m th e annu al s u r v e y s c o n d u cted by th e U . S. D e p a r tm en t o f
L a b o r, B u re a u o f L ab or S t a t is t ic s w ith th e su p p o r t o f th e N a tio n a l S c ie n c e F o u n d a tio n .
( F o r fu r th e r d e t a ils s e e B L S B u lle tin 16 0 9 , S c ie n tific and
T e c h n ic a l P e r s o n n e l in In d u str y 1961 >66 and B L S B u lle tin 16 7 4 , S c ie n tific and T e c h n ic a l P e r s o n n e l in In d u stry , 1 9 6 7 . ) S c ie n tific and t e c h n ic a l
P e r s o n n e l in g o v e r n m e n ts , c o ll e g e s , and u n i v e r s i t ie s , and n o n p ro fit in s titu tio n s w e r e e x c lu d e d b e c a u s e th e y a r e c o v e r e d in s e p a r a te s u r v e y s .




26

Table 6. Employment of scientists by industry, January 1961-69
u n tnousa nas i
SIC
cod e

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1 4 6 .9

In d u stry

154. 3

158. 8

16 4 . 6

1 6 8 .6

1 7 8 .4

1 8 9 .1

2 0 0 .5

2 1 3 .5

1 1 .6

1 2 .0

1 4 .4

1 4 .7

1 4 .7

-

-

-

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , and f is h e r ie s 2 ------------------

0 7 -0 9
1 0 -1 4

M in ing -------- --------------------------- - —------ ---------------- ------

( 3)

(3)

1 0 .5

10. 1

15 -1 7

C o n tra ct c o n s tr u c tio n 2 -------- ------- -----■ ----------------—

-

-

-

-

-

M a n u factu rin g .............. ...---------------------- . O rd n an ce and a c c e s s o r i e s
........ . — ....... - —
F ood and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------T e x t ile m il l p r o d u c ts and a p p a r e l ------- — —— ~
P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s ----------------------- --------C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p r o d u c t s -----------——---- ---P e t r o le u m r e fin in g and r e la t e d in d u s t r ie s — —
R u bber and m is c e lla n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c ts —
S ton e, c la y , and g l a s s p r o d u c ts --------- ------------P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s t r ie s .......... — --------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c ts -------------------------— M a c h in er y , e x c e p t e le c t r i c a l ------- —--- -------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m en t and
s u p p l i e s ------------------------------------ —
----------T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t4 —— ----------------- — —
P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n t if ic , and c o n tr o llin g
in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g r a p h ic and o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s and c l o c k s ------- -------— ------------..
O th er 5 -----------------------------------------------------------------

1 1 5 .2
4 .5
7 .2
1 .2
3 .6
4 7 .2
4 .9
1 .9
2 .1
9 .9
2 .2
4 .9

120. 1
6. 1
6 .7
1. 3
3 .9
4 9 .9
4 .9
2 .0
2. 1
1 0 .5
2. 1
5 .2

1 2 2 .4
6 .7
7 .1
1 .3
3 .9
5 0 .4
5 .0
2 .1
2 .1
9 .5
2 .3
5 .8

125. 9
7. 2
7. 6
1 .2
4. 0
5 1 .5
5. 1
2. 0
2. 1
9 .5
2 .6
7. 1

1 2 3 .5
7 :8
7 :2
2 .3
3 .9
5 3 .4
4 .0
3 .0
1 .5
7 .3
2 .6
6 .5

1 2 9 .7
8 .4
6 .9
2 .5
4. 1
57. 1
4 .0
3 .2
1 .7
7 .2
2 .3
6 .5

135. 8
9 .0
7 ,4
1 .8
4 .5
5 6 .9
4 .0
2 .7
2 .4
7 .8
2 .6
7 .1

1 4 4 .6
9 .7
8 .4
1 .9
4 .0
60. 0
4. 1
2 .8
2 .4
8. 1
2 .7
8. 3

1 4 9 .2
8 .8
7 .3
2 .1
5 .5
59*3
3 .9
4 .1
2 .4
1 0 .5
2 .5
8 .7

9 .2
9 .5

9 .5
8 .9

1 0 .4
8 .7

9 .7
9. 1

8 .2
8 .7

9 .0
8 .9

1 0 .5
1 1 .3

1 1 .2
1 2 .6

1 3 .9
1 2 .2

4 .4
1 .7

4 .6
1. 6

4 .7
1 .7

4. 7
1 .9

5 .4
1 .7

6. 0
1 .9

5 .7
2 .0

6 .5
1 .9

5 .8
2 .3

T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and u t i l i t i e s ------T r a n s p o r ta tio n and r e la te d s e r v i c e s 2 — ----------—---------------------C o m m u n ica tio n 2 ...... ...... ..............- ■
E l e c t r i c , g a s , and s a n ita r y s e r v i c e s ——------—

1 .6

1. 6

1 .7

1 .9
-

.
1 .0

-

1 .8
-

2 .0

-

2 .0
-

1. 8

4 0 -4 7
48
49

-

-

3 .3
1 .6
1 .3

5 0 -5 9

W h o le sa le and r e ta il t r a d e -------------------------------------

2 .7

6 0 -6 7

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ------------- -------

7 0 -7 9 ,
81
807
891

S e r v ic e s ...... ................ ............................ ------------------ -------H o te l, p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , r e p a ir , a m u s e m en t r e c r e a t io n , and l e g a l f ------------------------M e d ic a l and d e n ta l la b o r a to r ie s -------- —-----------E n g in e e r in g and a r c h it e c tu r a l s e r v i c e s —— —
—

19
20
2 2 ,2 3
26
28
29
30
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

-

-

-

1. 0

1. 1

1 .2

1 .2

1 .2

1 .2

1 .2

3. 1

3 .5

4. 3

7 .9

8 .6

1 0 .1

10. 0

8 .4

2 .1

2. 1

2 .1

2. 3

4 .4

4. 8

4 .8

4 .9

5 .1

1 3 .2

15. 3

1 7 .2

1 9 .0

1 8 .6

2 0 .5

2 1 .2

2 2 .9

3 1 .3

1 0 .3
1 .0
1 .9

1 2 .4
1. 1
1. 8

13. 8
1 .1
2 .3

1 4 .7
1 .2
3. 1

15. 1
1 .3
2 ,2

1 6 .2
1 .4
2 .9

1 6 .6
1 .6
3 .0

1 7 .6
1 .6
6 .1

2 4 .5
1. 8
5 .0

-

1 S c ie n t is t s in c lu d e c h e m is t s , p h y s i c is t s , m e t a llu r g is t s , g e o lo g is t s and g e o p h y s ic is t s , o th e r p h y s ic a l s c ie n t is t s , a g r ic u lt u r a l s c ie n t is t s , b io lo g i­
c a l s c ie n t is t s , m e d ic a l s c ie n t is t s , o th e r lif e s c ie n t is t s and m a th e m a tic ia n s .
2 E s t im a t e s for s c ie n t is t s in th is in d u s tr y g ro u p a r e in c lu d e d in the to ta l o n ly , s in c e th e y h a v e a v e r a g e d fe w e r than 1 ,0 0 0 o v e r the y e a r s .
3 N o e s t im a t e s fo r s c ie n t is t s in m in in g a r e show n fo r 1961 and 1962 b e c a u s e the data a r e not c o m p a r a b le w ith l a t e r y e a r s .
4 D ue to a ch an ge in e s tim a t in g p r o c e d u r e and the a llo c a tio n o f c o n s o lid a te d r e p o r ts in th e m o to r v e h ic le in d u s tr y , th e 1967, 1968, and 1969
data a r e not c o m p a r a b le w ith 1966 and e a r li e r y e a r s .
T h is a d ju stm e n t a ls o a f fe c t s to a l e s s e r d e g r e e o r d n a n c e and in d u s t r ie s in th e e le c t r i c a l
m a c h in e r y grou p .
5 In clu d ed ar e : T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu r e s (SIC 21); lu m b er and w ood p r o d u c ts (SIC 24); fu r n itu r e and fix t u r e s (SIC 25); p r in tin g and p u b lish in g
(SIC 27); le a t h e r and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts (SIC 3 1); and m is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu r in g (SIC 39).
6 V ir tu a lly a l l th e e m p lo y m e n t is c o n ta in e d in c o m m e r c ia l la b o r a to r ie s , r e s e a r c h and o th e r b u s in e s s s e r v i c e s (SIC 7 3 9 ).
NO TE:

B e c a u s e of rounding, s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u a l t o ta ls .

SO UR CE: D ata c o v e r p a y r o ll e m p lo y m e n t in p r iv a te in d u s tr y and a r e draw n fr o m th e a nnu al s u r v e y s c o n d u c te d by th e U .S . D e p a r tm e n t o f
L a b o r, B u re a u o f L ab or S t a t is t ic s w ith th e su p p o r t o f the N a tio n a l S c ie n c e F o u n d a tio n .
(F o r fu r th e r d e t a ils s e e B L S B u lle tin 1 6 09, S c ie n tific and
T e c h n ic a l P e r s o n n e l in In d u str y 1 9 6 1 -6 6 and B L S B u lle tin 1674, S c ie n tific and T e c h n ic a l P e r s o n n e l in In d u str y , 1 9 6 7 ).
S c ie n tific and t e c h n ic a l
p e r s o n n e l in g o v e r n m e n ts , c o lle g e s
and u n i v e r s i t ie s , and n o n p ro fit in s titu tio n s w e r e e x c lu d e d b e c a u s e th e y a r e c o v e r e d in s e p a r a te s u r v e y s .




27

Table 7. Employment of technicians1 by industry, January 1961-69
—

STC

1961

In d u str y

cod e

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------- -—------------

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

570. 0 2

58 9 . 5

6 1 9 .0

6 3 6 .5

6 4 6 .5

6 7 3 .2

7 3 4 .7

7 4 5 .5

7 7 2 .5

0 7 -0 9

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , and f is h e r ie s 3 — .......

10 -1 4

M in in g -------- ------- —------ — -------------------------- ----------—

(4)

(4)

1 0 .4

1 2 .3

10. 3

1 5 -1 7

C on tract c o n s tr u c tio n — --------- — — -------------------- —

2 6 .0

2 6 .2

27. 8

23. 8

2 5 .4

3 0 .2

2 5 .7

3 6 .7

3 1 .5

M an u factu rin g - —.
.
— -------------------O rd n an ce and a c c e s s o r i e s — ---- ------- ---------------F o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ---- — ------————
——
T e x t ile m il l p r o d u c ts and a p p a r e l ------------ — ----P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c ts ■■
■■
—......... ...... ...... — -------C h e m ic a l and a llie d p r o d u c ts ----------------—---------P e t r o le u m r e fin in g and r e la t e d i n d u s t r i e s ------R ubber and m is c e lla n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c ts —
S ton e, c la y , and g l a s s p r o d u c ts - - - — -------- -P r im a r y m e t a l in d u s t r ie s ----------------—-----— —
F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c ts — ------------------------—
M a c h in er y , e x c e p t e le c t r i c a l —— — —— — —
—
—
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m en t, and
s u p p l i e s -------------------— — —........ ■■• — —— ——
■
T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t5 ---- — ------------- ---------P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n t if i c , and c o n tr o llin g — —
in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h s and o p tic a l good s;
---- — — — — — —
w a tc h e s and c lo c k s —
O th er m a n u fa ctu r in g in d u s t r ie s 6— — -------—-----

3 2 9 .6
1 6 .9
3 .2
2 .6
5 .7
3 5 .6
5 .4
5 .1
5 .1
1 6 .0
2 3 .3
5 3 .8

3 5 5 .9
1 8 .2
3. 9
2. 8
6 .2
3 5 .5
5 .8
5. 1
5 .4
18. 1
25. 8
5 7 .9

3 6 5 .3
1 9 .3
4 .0
2 .8
6 .3
3 6 .8
4 .7
4 .9
5 .7
1 6 .5
2 5 .3
6 1 .7

370. 0
1 9 .2
4 .7
2 .7
6. 3
38. 0
4 .6
4 .7
5. 8
1 7 .3
2 5 .9
64. 9

3 6 9 .4
1 9 .4
4. 1
2 .2
6 .0
3 6 .7
5 .7
5 .0
5 .6
1 7 .4
2 4 .7
6 5 .5

3 8 0 .4
1 9 .3
4. 2
2. 6
6. 0
38. 3
5. 8
4. 9
5 .6
1 7 .6
2 4 .7
6 7 .4

416. 0
2 0 .9
5. 1
2 .4
8. 1
4 0 .8
6 .2
5 .5
7 .4
1 8 .2
2 5 .8
77. 8

410. 9
1 9 .9
4 .5
3 .2
6. 8
41. 1
5 .9
5 .4
6 .0
1 8 .5
2 5 .9
7 5 .4

4 2 1 .9
20. 1
5 .9
2 .9
6. 8
4 5 .4
6 .9
5 .9
7 .0
1 9 .7
2 5 .4
7 6 .3

8 4 .1
4 7 .8

9 2 .6
5 1 .2

9 3 .8
5 5 .4

93. 8
5 6 .0

9 6 .8
5 5 .2

1 0 0 .9
56. 8

1 0 4 .4
6 4 .4

109. 5
61. 2

1 0 6 .4
6 1 .8

1 8 .5
6 .5

20. 0
6 .9 .

2 0 .6
7 .5

1 8 .7
7 .9

1 9 .3
5 .8

2 0 .2
6 .2

2 2 .5
6 .2

22. 8
4 .6

23. 3
8. 1

40
4 1 -4 7
48
49

T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and u t il it i e s -----R a ilro a d t r a n s p o r t a t io n ------------------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n s e r v i c e s —- — ------ — — — ---------C o m m u n ica tio n --------------------------- — ------- -----------E le c t r i c , g a s , and s a n ita r y s e r v i c e s — ---------

5 2 .3
6 .2

54. 3
6 .0

5 5 .6
6 .0

5 7 .9
6 .5

2 9 .8
1 6 .3

3 0 .4
1 7 .9

3 0 .7
1 8 .9

31. 3
20. 1

5 6 .9
4 .5
2. 1
3 0 .6
1 9 .6

5 8 .4
4 .7
2. 1
31. 7
19. 8

6 2 .4
4 .0
2 .7
3 4 .5
2 1 .2

6 4 .4
7. 6
2 .9
33. 6
20. 3

70. 1
4. 3
3 .7
3 8 .6
2 3 .5

5 0 -5 9

W h o le sa le and r e ta il tra d e —--------------------- — -------

2 2 .9

2 1 .6

2 3 .3

2 5. 8

2 9 .4

3 1 .2

38. 0

3 2 .0

3 9 .7

6 0 -6 7

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e -------- ------- —

4 .3

4 .4

4 .6

4 .6

5 .2

5. 8

7 .2

5 .9

6. 3

7 0 -7 9
81
807
891

S e r v ic e s — — — ------------------------ --------- —...- -------—
H o te l, p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , r e p a ir , a m u s e ---- — — — —
m en t, r e c r e a t io n , and le g a l
M e d ic a l and d e n ta l l a b o r a to r ie s — — — —
—
E n g in e e r in g and a r c h it e c tu r a l s e r v i c e s ------------

19
20
2 2 ,2 3
26
28
29
30
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

— <
•

1962

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 0 .4

10. 3

10. 1

-

-

-

-

-

1 3 .7

1 0 6 .6

113. 8

1 2 9 .2

142. 5

149. 1

1 5 6 .2

1 7 2 .5

1 8 4 .4

1 8 8 .5

3 7 .0
1 3 .5
56. 1

36. 0
15. 6
6 2 .2

3 9 .8
1 6 .2
7 3 .2

4 0 .2
1 8 .7
8 3 .6

3 9 .6
1 8 .6
9 0 .9

3 9 .9
1 8 .5
97. 8

4 8 .5
2 0 .7
1 0 3 .3

46. 2
2 1 .4
116. 8

51. 1
2 2 .5
1 1 4 .9

1 T e c h n ic ia n s in c lu d e d r a fts m e n , s u r v e y o r s , e le c t r i c a l and e le c t r o n ic t e c h n ic ia n s , o th e r e n g in e e r in g and p h y s ic a l s c ie n c e te c h n ic ia n s , lif e s c ie n c e
te c h n ic ia n s and a ll o th e r t e c h n ic ia n s .
2 T h e 1961 te c h n ic ia n to ta l in c lu d e s the a d d itio n o f 1 5 ,0 0 0 s u r v e y o r s , m a d e to in s u r e c o m p a r a b ility o f the tim e s e r i e s on an o c c u p a tio n a l l e v e l ,
but it h a s not b e e n p o s s ib le to a llo c a t e t h is input on an in d u s tr y l e v e l .
3 E s t im a t e s fo r t e c h n ic ia n s in t h is in d u s tr y g roup a r e in c lu d e d in the t o ta l o n ly , s in c e th e y h a v e a v e r a g e d l e s s than 1 ,0 0 0 o v e r the y e a r s .
4 N o e s t im a t e s fo r te c h n ic ia n s in m in in g a r e show n fo r 1961 and 1962 b e c a u s e th e data a r e not c o m p a r a b le w ith la te r y e a r s .
5 D ue to a ch a n g e in e s tim a t in g p r o c e d u r e and the a llo c a t io n o f c o n s o lid a te d r e p o r ts in th e m o to r v e h ic le in d u str y , the 1967, 1 9 6 8 and 1969
data a r e not c o m p a ra b le w ith 1966 and e a r li e r y e a r s .
T h is a d ju stm e n t a ls o a f fe c t s to a l e s s e r d e g r e e o r d n a n c e and in d u s t r ie s in the e le c t r i c a l
m a c h in e r y group.
6 In clu d ed ar e : T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu r e s (SIC 21); lu m b e r and w ood p r o d u c ts (SIC 24); fu r n itu r e and fix t u r e s (SIC 25); p r in tin g and p u b lish in g
(SIC 27); le a t h e r and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts (SIC 31); and m is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu r in g (SIC 3 9 ).
7 V i r tu a ll y a l l the e m p l o y m e n t i s co nt ai ne d in c o m m e r c i a l l a b o r a t o r i e s , r e s e a r c h , and ot he r b u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s , SIC 73 9.
NO TE:

D e ta il m a y not add to to ta l b e c a u s e o f rounding o r in c lu s io n in to ta l o f ite m s n ot show n s e p a r a te ly .

SO URCE: D ata c o v e r p a y r o ll e m p lo y m e n t in p r iv a te in d u s tr y and a r e d ra w n f r o m the annu al s u r v e y s c o n d u cted by the U .S . D e p a r tm e n t o f
L ab or, B u re a u o f L ab or S t a t is t ic s w ith th e su p p o r t o f th e N a tio n a l S c ie n c e F o u n d a tio n .
( F o r fu r th e r d e t a ils s e e B L S B u lle tin 1 6 09, S c ie n tific and
T e c h n ic a l P e r s o n n e l in In d u str y 1 9 6 1 -6 6 and B L S B u lle tin 1 6 7 4 , S c ie n tific and T e c h n ic a l P e r s o n n e l in In d u stry , 1 9 6 7 .) S c ie n tific and t e c h n ic a l
p e r s o n n e l in g o v e r n m e n ts , c o ll e g e s and u n i v e r s i t ie s , and n o n p ro fit in s titu tio n s w e r e e x c lu d e d b e c a u s e th e y a r e c o v e r e d in s e p a r a te s u r v e y s .




28

T a b le 8. Em ploym ent of scien tists by occupation and industry, January 1 9 6 9
(In thousands)
SIC
code

Total
physical
and life
s c ie n tists

Industry

A ll in d u stries _____

150.9

__. . . .

213. 5

07-09

A griculture, fo restry , and fis h e r ie s . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.6

10-14

M in in g -------------------------- ----------------------------------

14. 7

15-17
19
20
2 2 ,2 3
26
28
29
30
32
33
34
35
36

______ ____

Total

Contract construction _____ ___________________
M anufacturing_____ _________ . . . ______ _____ ___
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ________________ _
Food and kindred p rod u cts_______________. . .
T extile m ill products and a p p a r e l_____ ____
Paper and a llied products _ __________ . . . . .
_
C hem icals and a llied products . . . __________
P etroleu m refining and related
in d u str ie s _________________________ ____ . . .
Rubber and m isce lla n eo u s p la stics
p rod u cts_ . . . . . . . . . . . . ____ . . . . . . . _______ . . . . . .
_
Stone, cla y , and g la ss products __________ _
Prim ary m eta l in d u stries ____ _____________
Fabricated m eta l p rod ucts_ ___________ ___
_
M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l___ __________
E le ctric a l m ach in ery, equipment and
Transportation eq u pim en t2 _______________
P r o fessio n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
instrum ents; photographic and optical
goods; w atches and clock s ____. . . . . . . . . . . .
Other 3 ---------------------------------------------------------

37
38

.9
149. 2
8 .8
7. 3
2. 1
5 .5
59. 3

P h y sica l s c ie n tists
C hem ists
90. 5

G
P h y sic ists geoeologists .All other
p h y sicists
2 0 .6

15.9

Life
s c ie n tists

Mathem a­
ticia n s

2 3 .9

2 3 .6

39. 0
(*)
.4

(*)

(M

(M

(M

(l )

.6

14. 3

.9

.2

12. 8

.4

(l)

.4

.1

(*)

.3

(')

(l )

111.2
4. 7
4 .6
1 .9
4. 1
45. 7

76. 6
1. 5
4. 3
1.8
3. 3
4 1 .6

13. 3
2. 5
( |)
(M
.i
2 .2

1. 1
.2
(M
(l )
.1
.2

2 0 .2
.5
.3
.1
.6
1.7

16.8
.2
2. 3
(*>
1 .0
11.9

.3

(l )

(*)

.2

(l )
.2
(;>
<)

.9
.3
6 .9
.8
1.9

!!!
(>
()
(l )
.2

.3
.2
.5
.4
3 .6

.5
21. 2
3 .9
.4
.2
.4
1.7

3 .9

3 .7

3. 3

.1

4 .0
2 .4
10. 5
2. 5
8. 7

3 .7
2 .2
10.0
2. 1
4 .9

2 .7
1 .4
2 .9
1. 0
2 .0

.!
.3
.2
.3
1. 0

13.9
12.2

9 .4
7. 7

2 .8
3. 1

3 .4
2 .0

(l)

3 .2
2. 5

.3
.1

4 .2
4 .4

5. 8
2. 3

4. 7
1.8

3 .2
1.7

1. 1

n
(*)

.4
.1

.5
.3

.6
.2

.2

.4

(J)
( >
n
(l)

1. 7
1. 0
.4
.3

3. 0

.4

(*)

(1)

.1

T ransportation, com m unications, and
40-47
48
49

Transportation and related s e r v ic e s _____ _
______
Communication ____________ ____
E le c tr ic , g a s, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ____ _

3. 3
1.6
.4
1. 3

1 .4
.6

.6
.2

( l )

(l)

50-59

W holesale and re ta il tr a d e _____________ ___. . . . .

8 .4

4. 0

.8

.4
.1
(*)

.4
.3
(')

.3

.1

.1

.5

<;>
(*)

.2

1. 1

3. 3

50-67

Finance, insurance and re a l e s t a t e _________. . .

5. 1

(*)

(M

(M

(M

0)

.4

4. 7

31. 3

19.6

9. 3

6 .7

1 .2

2 .4

4. 5

7. 2

7 0 -7 9 ,
81
807
891

S e rv ices . . . . ___________ ________ _____________ . . .
H otel, p erson al, b u sin e ss, r e p a ir 4
am usem ent, recreation and le g a l ________
M edical and dental lab oratories . . . ___ ____ _
Engineering and architectu ral

24. 5
1.8

16. 3
.2

8. 5
.2

5. 5
(*)

.6

1. 7

(*)

(*)

2. 7
1 .6

5. 5
(*)

5 .0

3, 1

.6

1 .2

.6

.7

.2

1. 7

1 Few er than 50.
2 Due to a change in estim ating procedure and the allocation of consolidated rep orts in the m otor veh icle industry, the 1969 data are not com parable with 1966 and e a r lie r y e a r s. T his adjustm ent a ls o a ffe c ts to a le s s e r d egree certa in other in d u stries, n am ely ordnance and in d u stries in the
e le c tr ic a l m achinery group.
3 Included are: Tobacco m an ufactures (SIC 21); lum ber and wood products (SIC 24); furniture and fix tu res (SIC 25); printing and publishing
(SIC 27); leather and leather products (SIC 31); and m isce lla n eo u s m anufacturing (SIC 39).
4 V irtually a ll the em ploym ent is contained in co m m erica l lab orato ries, re sea r ch and other b u sin e ss s e r v ic e s , (SIC 739).
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual ite m s m ay not equal to ta ls.
SOURCE: Data cover p ayroll em ploym ent in private industry and a re drawn from the annual surveys conducted by the U .S . Departm ent of Labor,
S t a t is t ic s w ith th e su p p ort of the N a tio n a l S cience Foundation. S cientific and tech n ical person nel in governm en ts, c o lle g e s and u n iv e r s itie s , and non­
profit institutions w ere excluded b ecau se they are covered in separate su rv ey s.




29

T ab le 9. Employment of technicians, by occupation and industry, January 1969
^h»J^ou«and8
SIC
code

Industry

Total

D raftsm en

S urveyors

E le ctric a l
and
electro n ic

----- OBTer----engineering
and p hysical
scien ce

Life
scien ce

A ll other
tech n ician s
87. 0

A ll in d u stries ..... ..................................... .......

772. 5

275. 5

27. 1

177. 9

174. 7

30. 3

0 7 .0 9

A griculture, fo r e s tr y , and f i s h e r i e s ___ ______

.8

(*)

(l )

(l )

(M

.6

.2

10-14

M in in g........ ........ ..............................................................

13. 7

3. 7

1.4

1. 5

4. 2

.2

2 .7

15-17
19
20
2 2 ,2 3
26
28
29
30
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

Contract construction ________________________

31. 5

1 7.8

3. 2

6 .4

1 .4

(l )

2 .7

M anufacturing_______ _____________ ___________
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ..................................
Food and kindred p rod u cts..................................
T extile m ill and apparel p r o d u c ts____ _____
Paper and a llied products _______ __________
C hem icals and a llied products _____ -______
P etroleum and refining and related
Industrie s ________________ ____
Rubber and m isce lla n eo u s p la stics
products . . . ___________________ _ _________
Stone, cla y , and g la s s products ____ _______
Prim ary m eta l in d u stries ----------------------Fabricated m eta l p rod u cts____ _____________
M achinery, except e le c t r i c a l___ ___ . . . . . . . . .
E le ctric a l m ach in ery, equipment and
SUPplie 8 n— -nTri,--1T
-,rr-n .,...,n ..„r...rr.-,-.T ran s port at ion equ ip m en t2 _______ _____ ___
P ro fessio n a l, scie n tific and controlling
instrum ents; photographic and optical
goods; w atches and c l o c k s _______________
Other m anufacturing in d u stries 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

421. 9
20. 1
5 .9
2 .9
6 .8
4 5 .4

140.8
4. 3
.8
.3
1.4
4 .4

1 .4
(!)
( )
(*)
.1
(M

9 7 .7
9 .0
.4
.2
.8
. 1-7

129. 5
5 .8
1.7
1. 0
3. 3
2 6 .6

6. 3
(*)
.9
(M
.1
4. 2

46. 2
1. 0
2. 1
1.4
1. 1
8. 5

6 .9

.8

i

.3

4 .6

(l )

1. 1

5 ,9
7. 0
19.7
2 5 .4
76. 3

1. 5
2 .6
5. 5
17.4
38. 7

(*)
.i
.2
.2
.1

.

.2
.7
1 .7
1 .4
14.8

3 .0
2. 3
9. 1
4 .8
15.4

<*)
.1
.1
(*)
.2

1.2
1. 2
3. 1
1 .6
7. 1

106.4
6 1 .8

30. 1
2 2 .2

.4
.1

49. 1
9. 3

19.8
2 5 .0

.1
.1

6 .9
5. 1

23. 3
8. 1

6 .6
4. 2

(*)
.1

7. 1
1 .0

5 .4
1 .7

.5
(>)

3 .7
1. 1

40-4 7
48
49

T ransportation, com m unication and
u tilitie s
.
................... ..
Transportation and related s e r v ic e s ______
Communication . . . ___________________ ,_____
E le c tr ic , g a s, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ______

70. 1
8. 0
3 8 .6
23. 5

10. 1
2. 2
1 .3
6 .6

2 .9
1. 1
.2
1 .6

3 2 .6
1 .9
2 3 .6
7. 1

17.6
1 .2
11.2
5. 2

.1
(*)
(*)
.1

6 .8
1 .6
2. 3
2 .9
11. 7

50-59

W holesale and re ta il trade

______. . . _________

39.7

5 .5

(*)

17.7

3 .0

1.8

60-67

Finance, in su ran ce, and re a l esta te . . . . . . _ . . .
_

6. 3

.7

(M

.1

.4

.2

4 .9

188. 5

9 6 .9

1 8 .2

2 1 .9

18.6

21. 1

11. 8

70-79
81
807
891

S erv ices _____ _____________ _______________ __
H otel, p erson al, b u sin e ss, rep air,
am usem ent recrea tio n , and le g a l4 ______
M edical and dental lab oratories ___________
Engineering and arch itectu ral s e r v ic e s ____

51. 1
2 2 .5
114, 9

16.7
(*)
80. 2

.2
o
18. 0

1 4 .8
O
7 /1

.5
2 0 .5
. 1

5. 1
2. 0
4. 7

1 3 .8
(l)
4 .8

1 F ew er than 50.
2 Due to a change in estim ating procedure and the allocation of consolidated rep o rts in the m otor v eh icle industry, the 1967 and 1969 data are
not com parable with e a r lie r y e a r s. T h is adjustm ent a ls o a ffects to a le s s e r d egree certain other in d u stries, nam ely, ordnance and in d u stries in the
e le c tr ic a l m achinery group. H ow ever, the im pact of th is adjustm ent is la rg ely re str ic te d to 2 occupations, en gin eers and engineering and p hysical
scie n c e tech n ician s.
3 Included are: Tobacco m anufactures (SIC 21); lum ber and wood products (SIC 24); furniture and fix tu res (SIC 25); p r in tin g and p u b lish in g
(SIC 27); le a t h e r and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts (SIC 31); and m isce lla n eo u s m anufacturing (SIC 39).
4 V irtually a ll the em ploym ent is contained in co m m er cia l la b o ra to ries, re sea r ch and other b u sin ess s e r v ic e s (SIC 739).
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual ite m s m ay not equal to ta ls.
SOURCE: Data cover payroll em ploym ent in private industry and a re drawn from the annual su rv ey s conducted by the U .S . Department of Labor,
Bureau of Labor S ta tistics with the support of the National S cience Foundation. S cien tific and tech n cia l person nel in governm ent, c o lle g e s , and u n iv ers it ie s , and nonprofit in stitu tion s w ere excluded b ecau se they a re covered in sep arate su rv ey s.




30




Table 10. Employment of scientific, professional, and
technical personnel by State governments,
January 1964 and January 1967
{In thousands)
1964

Occupation

1967

A ll occupations1 -----

1 5 6 .8

200. 5

E ngineers ---------------------C ivil en gin eers2 --------*
Sanitary en gin eers
Other e n g in e e r s ---------

34. 5
3 1 .0
1. 2
2. 3

34. 2
3 0 .6
1 .3
2 .3

16. 7
1 .4
1 .0
.1
3. 3
2 .0
2 .9
.3
1. 6
.7
.2
.5
2 .0
.1
.4

2 0 .6
1 .7
1. 1
.4
4 .6
2 .4
3 .3
.3
1 .6
.9
.3
1 .0
2 .3
.2
.5

C h e m is ts ------ ------------------------G eologists and geop h ysicists Other p h ysical s c ie n tists
A gricultural s c ie n tists --------—
B iom edical s c i e n t i s t s -----------Other life s c i e n t i s t s -------------------M athem aticians — —
----- —
----------- —
S t a t is t ic ia n s ----------- ------------- —
—
E conom ists ---- — ---—
S ocio lo g ists and an thropologists —
Other s o c ia l sc ie n tists --------------C lin ical p sych ologists —
S ocial p s y c h o lo g is ts ---- —
Other p sych ologists ------S ocial w ork ers5 ------------------ -

9. 2

4 2 .8

S elected health p r o fe ssio n s4 ----------------Public health o fficers (M. D .) ---------—
P sy ch ia tr ists (M. D. ) ---------------- --------A ll other p hysician s (M. D. and D. O. )
D entists (D. D. S. or D. D. M .)------------P r o fessio n a l n urses (R. N .) --------------V eterinarians (D. V. M .) -------------------S a n ita r ia n s--------------------------------------—

3 6 .2
.8
3. 8
4 .4
1 .0
21. 6
1. 1
3 .4

4 1 .0
1 .0
4. 1
4 .9
1 .2
2 5 .3
1 .0
3. 5

T echnicians ------------------------------- D raftsm en —---------------------------Su rveyo r s 5
--------- -------------- -----Engineering technicians -------P h y sica l scie n c e technicians A gricultural te c h n ic ia n s -------B iological technicians ---------M edical and dental technicians
Other tech n ician s4 ----------*------

60. 2
7 .9
1 2 .0
3 0 .5
1 .5
2 .0
1 .8
3. 7
.8

6 1 .9
7. 1
7 .8
33* 1
2 .5
2. 1
1 .8
4 .5
3.1

1 The 1964 and 1967 totals are not com parable. See footnote 3.
2 Includes e le c tr ic a l, m ech an ical, and traffic en gin eers.
5
Data for 1967 are not com parable with 1964 becau se o f a change in d ef­
in itional requ irem en ts. The 1967 data include holders of b a ch elo r's d eg rees and
above, w hile the 1964 data include only holders of m a ster's d eg re es and above.
4 The relevant occupations do not include p hysician s and d en tists dealing
with p atients.
5 Data for 1964 w ere overstated to the extent that chainm en and rodmen
w ere included.
4 Computer p rogram ers included for the fir st tim e in 1967.
NOTE: B ecau se of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.
SOURCE: 1964 data, Employment of S cie n tific, P r o fessio n a l, and T echnical
P erso n n el in State Governments January 1^64, Bulletin 1 5 ^ (1967).
1967 data.
Bureau of Labor S ta tistic s, unpublished sam ple survey p relim in ary data.

31

T a b le 11. Employment of engineers and scientists by universities and colleges, January 1 9 6 5
P art tim e2

F u ll tim e
Total

Teaching

Other3

Total

Teaching

Other4

T o t a l-------------------- --------------------- ------

159. 6

98. 2

61. 2

102. 1

60. 1

4 2 .0

A ero n a u tica l----------- -----------------------------C hem ical — *-----------------------------------------C ivil --------------------------------------------*--------E le c tr ic a l---------------------------------------------------------------------------M e ch a n ica l---------- —
I n d u str ia l---------------------------------- ------ ---Other engineers ----------------------------------

2 2 .9
1. 1
1 .6
2 .8
6. 7
4. 7
1. 0
4 .9

13. 2
.6
1 .0
2. 2
3. 2
2 .9
.8
2. 6

9. 7
.6
.6
.6
3 .5
1. 8
.3
2 .3

1 4 .5
.9
1. 6
2 .0
3. 7
2 .4
.6
3 .3

7. 1
.4
.7
.9
1 .5
.4
1. 2

7 .4
.6
1. 0
1 .0
1. 6
.9
.1
2. 1

P h y sica l sc ie n tists —
-------------------- ----------Chem i s ts ------------— -— —
-—
------ ------ Earth s c ie n t is t s ---- ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---P h y sic ists -----*
M a th em atician s------ -----------------------------Other p hysical s c ie n tis ts ---------—------- -—

38. 7
11.0
3. 7
10 .4
11.9
1.8

26. 6
7. 3
2. 7
6 .0
10.0
.7

12. 1
3. 7
1 .0
4 .4
1 .9
1. 1

2 9 .4
9 .9
2. 8
8. 1
7. 7
1 .0

18. 2
5 .8
1 .6
4. 1
6. 4
.3

11. 2
4. 2
1. 1
4. 0
1. 3
.7

Life s c ie n t is t s -------------------------------------------A gricultural — ------ ----- ------------------------B io logical — ----------- ----------------------------M e d ica l-------------------------------------------------

6 3 .4
13.4
2 1 .0
2 9 .0

29. 3
2 .9
12. 7
1 3 .7

34. 1
10. 5
8 .3
15. 3

3 8 .0
5 .0
1 2 .4
20. 6

20. 2
1 .0
6. 7
1 2 .5

17. 8
4 .0
5. 7
8. 1

z:i

P sy ch o lo g ists --------------------------------------------

7. 1

5. 7

1. 3

5 .7

3. 7

2. 1

S ocial s c ie n tists ------ —
----- -------- ---------------E co n o m ists-------------------------------------------S o cio lo g ists ----------------------------------------P o litic a l s c ie n t is t s -------------------------------Other s o c ia l sc ie n tists ---------—
-------------

26. 6
6 .4
4 .9
4 .9
10 .4

2 2 .9
5. 1
4. 3
4 .5
9 .0

3. 6
1. 3
.5
.4
1 .4

14. 3
3. 7
3 .0
2. 3
5 .3

10. 8
2. 6
2. 2
1 .9
4. 2

3 .4
1. 1
.8
.4

Other s c ie n tists , not s p e c if ie d ------ • ----------

.9

.5

.4

.2

.1

.1

1. 1

1 Includes em ploym ent in F ed erally funded re sea r ch and developm ent c e n te r s ad m in istered by u n iv ersities and c o lle g e s . T h ese cen ters a c­
counted for alm ost 5 p ercen t of em ploym ent and w ere alm ost ex c lu siv ely involved in r e sea r ch and developm ent.
2 Graduate students w ere sligh tly m ore than 50 p ercen t of a ll part-tim e em p loyees and w ere concentrated in the p hysical sc ie n c e s occupations.
Other part-tim e em p loyees w ere concentrated in the life sc ie n c e s occupations.
3 Includes ad m in istrative and other functions. Over 70 p ercent w ere involved with re sea r ch and developm ent functions.
L ess than 20 p ercen t
w ere em ployed in the F e d e ra lly funded research and developm ent cen ter s.
4 Includes ad m in istrative and other functions. A lm ost a ll w e*e em ployed by the u n iv ersities and c d lle g e s, and over 85 p ercen t w ere involved
with re sea r ch and developm ent functions.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.
SOURCE: S cientific A ctiv ities at U n iv ersities and C o lle g es, 1964 NSF 68-22, May 1968, N ational S cien ce Foundation, and unpublished data at
the National Science Foundation.




32

T ab le 12. Em ploym ent of engineers and scientists by universities and colleges, January 1 9 6 7 1
(In thousands)
P art tim e2

F u ll tim e
F ield of em ploym ent
Other3

Total

107. 7

77. 2

118. 5

67. 3

5 1 .4

25. 8
1. 3
1. 6
3 .3
7. 6
5. 2
.8
5 .9

1 3 .4
.6
.9
2 .3
3 .3
2. 7
.6
2 .9

1 2 .4
.7
.7
1 .0
4. 2
2. 5
.2
3 .0

17. 0
1. 0
1.7
2 .4
4 .5
2 .5
.7
4. 2

7 .5
.3
.7
1 .0
2 .2
1 .3
.5
1. 5

9 .6
.8
1 .0
1 .4
2 .3
1. 1
.3
2 .7

P h y sica l s c ie n t is t s --------------------------‘
----- -—
C h e m is t s ----- — ----------- •
----------------— —
—
Earth s c ie n t is t s ------ ----------------------------P h y sic ists -------------------------------------------M athem aticians ---------------------------------Other p hysical s c ie n t is t s -----------------------

47. 1
12.9
4 .6
12. 3
15.3
1 .9

30. 8
8. 2
3. 1
6 .4
1 2 .3
.8

16. 3
4 .7
1. 6
5 .9
2 .9
1. 2

34. 5
1 1 .5
3. 7
8. 5
9 .7
1. 1

20. 8
6 .5
1 .9
4. 1
7 .9
.4

13. 7
5. 0
1 .8
4. 5
1. 8
.7

Life s c ie n t is t s ----------- —
------------------------- ---A gricultural -------------------------- ------------ —
B io lo g ic a l---------- *------ --------------------------M e d ica l-------------------------------------------------

70. 1
15.3
23 .9
3 0 .9

30. 2
3 .0
14. 3
1 2 .8

40. 1
1 2.3
9 .6
18. 1

4 1 .5
5 .4
15. 2
2 0 .9

21. 2
.9
8 .0
12. 3

20.
4.
7.
8.

Total

Teaching

A ll occupations ------ —
----- ---- — ---- ----

184. 7

Engineers — — -------------------- --------------------—
A eronautical -------------- ------------------------- *
C h e m ica l---------*------ —
----------- ---------------C iv il-----------------------------------------------------E le ctric a l — ----------- — —
—
— ----------- ---------M e ch a n ica l--------------------------- '---------—
---I n d u s tr ia l---------------------------------------------Other engineers — ---------------------------------

P sy ch o lo g ists --------------------------------------------

8. 6

6 .6

2 .0

6. 8

Social s c ie n tists 9 -------------------------------------E conom ists — ---------------- — ----- — --------S ociologists --------—
------------------------------P o litic a l sc ie n tists —
----------------------—
----O th er----------- -----------------------*-----------------

32. 3
7 .9
5 .9
5 .9
1 2 .6

2 6 .4
5 .9
4 .9
5. 2
1 0 .4

5 .9
2 .0
1 .0
.7
2. 2

1 7 .9
4. 8
3. 3
2 .9
6 .9

Other s c ie n tis ts , not s p e c if ie d ----- — ---------

.8

.3

.5

.8

Teaching

4 .4

Other4

3
6
2
6

2 .4

1
1
6
3
1

4 .8
1. 6
.8
.6
1. 8

.3

.6

13.
3.
2.
2.
5.

1 Includes em ploym ent in F ed erally funded re sea r ch and developm ent centers ad m in istered by u n iv ersities and c o lle g e s .
2 P art-tim e em ploym ent was n early 40 p ercen t of total em ploym ent; graduate students em ployed as s c ie n tists and en gin eers w ere over 60
p ercen t of the part-tim e em ploym ent and w ere concentrated in the p h y sica l sc ie n c e s and m athem atics group. Other part-tim e em ployees w ere
concentrated in the life sc ie n c e s occupations.
* Includes ad m in istrative and other functions. Over 70 p ercen t w ere involved with re sea r ch and developm ent functions.
L ess than 15 percent
w ere employed in the F ed erally funded r e sea r ch and developm ent cen ter s.
4
Includes ad m in istrative and other functions. A lm ost a ll w ere em ployed by the u n iv ersities and c o lle g e s , and 90 p ercent w ere involved
resea rch and developm ent.
9 The so c ia l sc ie n c e definition was expanded in 1967 to include re sea r ch in education.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals.
SOURCE: Based on unpublished survey data at the National S cience Foundation.




33

with

T ab le 13. Em ploym ent of engineers and scientists by universities and colleges January 1 9 6 9 1
^L ^housands^
F u ll tim e

Part tim e2

Field of em ploym ent
Total

Teaching

Other3

Total

Teaching

Other4

A ll occupations — — ---------------— — —

21 5 .2

140. 3

7 4 .9

1 3 5 .2

8 1 .0

54. 2

E n g in eer s____________ — ____ —
______-— ___
A eronautical — ---------—
---------------- ---------C hem ical — — -— —
— — — — —— — — — —
—
—
C i v i l -----------------------------------------------------E le c tr ic a l--------— — -— — --------— ---------M e ch a n ica l--------------------------------------------Other e n g in e e r s -------------------------------------

2 6 .5
1 .4
1 .8
3 .4
7 .8
5 .5
6 .6

1 5 .9
.8
1. 1
2 .7
4. 1
3. 3
3 .9

10. 5
.6
.7
.7
3 .7
2. 2
2. 6

1 7 .9
1 .0
2 .0
2. 7
4. 7
3 .0
4 .4

8 .9
.4
.9
1 .4
2 .5
1 .7
1 .9

9 .0
.6
1 .0
1 .4
2. 2
1 .3
2. 5

P h y sica l s c ie n t is t s ---- -— — ----- ------ ---- ----—
C hem ists ----- .----------------------- ------ ---------Earth s c ie n tists ---------*------------------- ----Phy s ic is ts ---- —
----- -------------- — ----- -— ---—
M athem aticians — ----------— -— -------------Other p h ysical s c ie n tists —
------ ---------------

53. 8
14.0
5 .0
13.1
19 .5
2 .2

3 9 .5
10 .0
3 .9
8. 1
16 .5
.1

14. 2
4 .0
1 .1
5 .0
3 .0
1. 2

40. 3
1 2 .9
4. 1
9. 5
1 2 .2
1 .7

25. 2
7. 8
2. 3
4. 7
9 .8
.5

15. 1
5. 1
1 .8
4 .8
2 .3
1. 1

Life s c ie n t is t s ------------------------- -------------- -—
A g r ic u ltu r a l------------ ---------— —
---------—
B io lo g ic a l------------- —
----- —
----------------M edical —------------------------------------------------

7 9 .6
1 4 .0
2 6 .0
3 9 .6

3 8 .0
3 .0
1 7 .9
17. 1

41. 6
1 1 .0
8 .0
2 2 .5

43. 7
5 .9
1 4 .9
2 3 .0

2 3 .9
1. 3
8 .8
1 3 .9

19.9
4. 6
6. 1
9 .1

----- ------- --------------P s y c h o lo g i s t s ------------- —

11 .7

9 .6

2. 2

8 .9

6 .0

2 .9

S o cia l s c ie n tists 9 ---------------------------------------E conom ists — — — ----------— — ----------- —
—
Soc iologi s ts —— ----------— — — — --------—
— —
P o litic a l s c ie n t is t s ------------- ----- ----- —
----H istorians —
--------------------------------------- -—
Other s o c ia l s c ie n tists ----- ---------- ----------

43. 7
8. i
7 .4
6 .8
12.6
8. 2

37. 3
7. 2
6 .6
6. 3
12. 1
5. 2

6 .4
1. 5
.9
.5
.5
3 .0

2 4 .4

17. 1
3 .5
3 .4
2 .7
4 .4
3 .0

7 .3
1. 7
1. 1
.8
.7
2 .9

5. 2

4. 6
3 .5
5. 2
5 .9

1 Includes em ploym ent in F e d e ra lly funded r e sea r ch and developm ent cen ters ad m in istered by u n iv ersities and c o lle g e s.
1
P art-tim e em ploym ent was n early 40 p ercen t of total em ploym ent. Graduate students em ployed as sc ie n tists and en gin eers w ere 63 percent
of the part-tim e em ploym ent and w ere concentrated in the p h ysical and life scie n c e groups excepting the m ed ical s e r ie s .
3 Includes ad m in istrative and other functions.
67 p ercen t w ere involved with re sea r ch and developm ent functions. L ess than 15 p ercent
w ere em ployed in the F ed erally funded re sea r ch and developm ent cen ter s.
4 Includes ad m in istrative and other functions.
A lm ost a ll w ere em ployed by u n iv ersities and co lleg es and 85 p ercen t of the part-tim e
em ploym ent w ere involved with r e sea r ch and developm ent.
* The so c ia l scie n c e definition was expanded in 1967 to include re sea r ch in education.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding* sum s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.
SOURCE: R esources for S cientific A ctiv ities at U n iv ersities and C o lleg es. 1969, NSF 70-16, N ational S cien ce Foundation, W ashington, D. C.




34

T a b le 14. Em ploym ent of technicians, by universities and co lleges,1 January 1 965, January 1 9 6 7 ,
and January 1 9 6 9
(In thousands)
Total
F ield of em ploym ent13
2
1965

1967

1969

1965

R esea rch and
developm ent
1967

1969

1965

Other
a ctiv ities
1967

1969

T o t a l------------------------------------------------------

47. 0

57. 5

5 7 .6

36. 2

4 4 .8

4 2 .4

10. 8

1 2 .7

15. 2

Engineering and p hysical sc ie n c e ------------------Life scie n c e ---------------------------------------------------Social s c i e n c e ------------------ -— —
------------ -----------

17 .4
28. 3
1. 3

2 3 .9
32. 2
1 .4

2 0 .8
34. 0
2 .8

1 4 ,9
20. 2
1. 1

19. 8
2 3 .9
1. 1

16. 3
24. 1
2 .0

2. 2
8 .4
.2

3 .9
8 .5
.3

4 .5
9 .8
.8

1
Includes em ploym ent in F ed erally funded resea rch and developm ent centers managed ex c lu siv ely or p rim a rily by u n iv ersities and college^ .
T hese centers had about 20 p ercen t of em ploym ent in 1965 and 15 percent in 1967 and 1969. T echnician em ploym ent at th ese cen ters w ere alm ost
ex clu siv ely engaged in re sea r ch and developm ent.
* The s m a ll category of other tech n ician s, com posed of th ose in in terd iscip lin a ry p u rsu its, w ere distributed proportionately by weight to the
other three field s of em ploym ent for 1965, 1967 and 1969.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals.
SOURCE: 1965 data, S cientific A ctiv ities at U n iv ersities and C o lle g es, 1964, NSF 68-22, May 1968, National Science Foundation, 1967. 1967
data unpublished at the N ational S cien ce Foundation. 1969 data, R esources for S cientific A ctiv ities at U n iv ersities and C o lle g es, 1969, National
S cience Foundation, NSF 70-16 Washington, D. C.
'' '




Table 15. Em ploym ent of engineers, scientists, and
technicians by independent nonprofit institutions,
January 1965, January 1967, and January 1970
J|InJ^hov^and^

Em ploym ent1
Field of em ploym ent
1965*

1967

1970

Total — ---------------------------------------------------

2 1 .3

25. 6

3 23. 7

E n g in e e r s_______________-____________ —
______
----- -— ----- ------ P h y sica l sc ie n tists — ------------ —
M a th em a tic ia n s----------------------------------------------Life s c ie n t is t s ---- -------------------------------------------P sy ch o lo g ists ---------------------—------ ----- —
---------S ocial s c ie n tis ts 4------------------------------ ------ ------

4. 3
3 .5
2 .4
7. 6
1. 3
2. 2

5. 5
4. 1
2. 5
8 .5
1 .9
3. 1

5 .2
3. 7
1. 5
8 .0
1 .4
3 .9

Total technicians ----- ------------------------------

19. 7

21. 2

25. 4

Engineering and p hysical scie n c e ------------------L ife scie n c e ------------------ —
--------—
------ ------------S ocial s c i e n c e ---- -— ------ ------------- -------------- —

2. 7
15. 7
1. 3

3 .4
1 6 .3
1.5

3. 8
2 0 .4
1. 2

1 Em ployment includes full-and part-tim e w o rk ers. Includes independent
r e sea r ch in stitu tes. F ed erally funded re sea r ch and developm ent centers adm ini­
stered by nonprofit in stitu tion s, foundations, p ro fessio n a l and tech n ical s o c ie tie s ,
acad em ies of sc ie n c e , scie n c e exhibitors and other nonprofit organ ization s. In
elud es voluntary nonprofit h osp itals and health ag en cies excep t State and lo ca l
h osp itals and educational in stitu tion s.
2 1965 data for engineers and p hysical sc ie n tists have been adjusted to
elim in ate double counting sin ce som e hospitals in 1965 w ere counted as resea r ch
in stitu tes.
3 In 1970, over 90 p ercen t (21,600) of the sc ie n tists and en gin eers w ere
engaged in r e sea r ch and developm ent. A lso in 1970 F ed era lly funded resea rch
and developm ent cen ters accounted for 25 p ercen t of the s c ie n tist and engineer
em ploym ent.
* Includes econom ic type re sea r ch supporting the m ilita ry .
NOTE: B ecau se of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.
SOURCE: S cientific A ctivities of Independent Nonprofit Institu tion s, 1970,
NSF 71-19; N ational S cience Foundation, W ashington, D. C.

35

Ta b le 16. Em ploym ent of teachers and librarians, in fall of school year, 1959-60 th ro u g h 1968-69
^Lt^thousanda^

Occupation

1959-60

1960-61

1961-62

1962-63

1963-64

1964-65

1965-66

1966-67

1967-68

1968-69

E lem en tary and seco n d a ry 1 —
------ —------------- — —
—
E lem en tary school t e a c h e r s ------------------ — —
—
Public — ..... - ......... —------------------------------- -----Nonpublic - — ------------- ------------- - —...--------Secondary sch ool t e a c h e r s ---- P u b l i c -------------------------- ----------- ------------- ---N o n p u b lic---------- -----------------------------------------

1,531
952
832
120
580
524
56

1,600
991
858
133
609
550
59

1, 668
1, 015
869
146
653
592
61

1,727
1,036
886
150
690
621
69

1, 806
1, 062
908
154
743
669
47

1,882
1,096
940
156
786
708
78

1, 951
1, 123
965
158
828
746
82

2, 028
1. 159
1,006
153
869
783
86

2, 095
1, 193
1, 040
153
902
815
87

2, 185
1,234
1 .0 7 9
155
951
864
87

C ollege instructional staff 2 ----- ------ -- - - — — — —
Instructors or above — —
— ——— ------ -------------—
Full tim e ----- ------ —
--------- —- —---------------—
—
Part tim e - ---------------- ---- ---------------------------Junior instructional s ta ff2 — — ----------------—

282
243
162
81
39

294
253
169
84
42

311
265
177
88
46

334
285
190
95
49

356
303
202
101
53

387
329
220
109
58

427
363
243
120
64

449
382
255
127
67

478
406
271
135
72

505
426
331
95
79

Librarians 3
------------—------------------------— —
---Public elem en tary and secondary — — ----------Nonpublic elem en tary and se c o n d a r y -------- -— —
C ollege and u n iv ersity ------------------------------—
Public l i b r a r y ---- ----- ------- -----------------------------Special lib rary -------------------- —----- ---- --------------

62
20
3
9
20
10

63
20
3
10
20
10

66
22
4
10
20
10

69
23
4
11
20
10

73
25
4
12
21
12

77
27
5
12
21
12

81
28
5
14
22
13

83
29
5
14
22
15

87
31
6
15
22
15

90
32
6
16
22
16

1 The estim a tes of elem en tary and secondary sch ool teach ers are from the U. S. O ffice of Education. The estim a tes of nonpublic c la ssr o o m
teach ers and in stru ction al staff during 1960-61 through 1965-66 w ere rev ised in 1968-69 on the b a sis of the 1965 O ffice of Education Survey.
2 Data are for the 50 States and the D istric t of Columbia. Data cover only faculty for resid en t in stru ction in d eg re e-cre d it c o u r se s.
Data
for 1960-61, 1962-63, and 1964-65 are interpolated. Data for 1965-66, 1966-67, 1967-68 are es tim a te s . Data for 1968-69 are p relim in ary data
from the U .S . O ffice of Education. The 1968-69 junior in stru ction al staff figu res are projected.
3 BLS estim a tes for y ea r s ending 1966-67, through 1968-69. (Includes fu ll-tim e equivalants of p art-tim e p rofession al lib r a r ia n s .)
SOURCE: Data for elem en tary and secondary sch ool teach ers are from P rojection s of Educational S ta tistics to 1977-78, 1968 edition, U .S .
Departm ent of Health, Education, and W elfare, O ffice of Education, publication ta. O k - 10030-6& t a b l e d , bata for college in stru ction al staff are
from P rojection s of Educational S ta tistics to 1977-78, ib id ., table 28. Data for librarian s are from D igest of Educational S ta tistics, 1965 and 1966
edition, publication Nfos. O E -10024-65 table 1^8, and 1966 edition, publication No. 10029-66, table 138.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not eq u al.totals.




36

Tab l.e 17. E m p lo y m e n t in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s , re g u la te d in te rs ta te in d u s trie s , 1 9 6 0 - 6 9
^In^hou^ands^
O c c u p a tio n 1

1961

I960

1962
70 0 . 1
37. 0
6. 3
3. 5
9. 0
2. 4
6. 3

1964

1963
680.
37.
6.
3.
8.
2.
6.

0
1
0
5
6
3
1

1965

665. 0
3 7 .4
6. 0
3 .4
8. 3
2. 1
6. 0

640. 0
38. 0
6. 1
3 .4
8. 0
2. 0
5. 7

1966
630.
38.
6.
3.
7.
1.
5.

1968

1967
9
7
1
4
9
9
5

610.
38.
6.
3.
7.
1.
5.

2
0
0
3
6
8
2

59 0 .
38.
5.
3.
7.
1.
5.

1969

5
0
8
3
2
6
0

578.
38.
5.
3.
7.
1.
4.

3
0
8
4
0
5
8

C la s s I r a ilr o a d s ( li n e - h a u l) 2---------------------- -------C o n d u c to r s, r a i l r o a d ---- -------- --------------- ----O ffic e -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------S e c r e t a r ie s ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------- S te n o g r a p h e r s and t y p is ts
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s -------- ------- — _ -----------C a r p e n t e r s ----------------------------------------------------------L in e m e n and s e r v ic e m e n (telep h o n e and
te le g r a p h )
--------------- ----------------------------B la c k s m it h s , fo r g e m e n , and h a m m e r m e n ------B o ile r m a k e r s _
--------------------------------------------S ta tio n a r y e n g in e e r s ___________________________
------------- — ----------- L o m o tiv e e n g in e e r s —
L o m o tiv e f ir e m e n _ _____ ___________________
D r iv e r s and d e l i v e r y m e n -----------------------------------

78 0 .
39.
7.
3.
10.
2.
7.

5
0
0
8
4
8
1

71 7 . 5
36. 9
6 .6
3. 6
9. 5
2. 5
6. 5

2.
2.
2.
1.
36.
38.
5.

5
0
3
0
2
8
9

2.
1.
2.
.
34.
36.
5.

4
7
1
9
1
6
7

2. 3
1. 8
2. 0
.9
34. 2
36. 5
5. 8

2. 3
1. 8
2. 0
.8
3 3 .9
35. 9
5. 8

2.
1.
1.
.
34.
30.
5.

3
8
9
8
3
0
8

2. 2
1. 8
1. 8
.7
35. 1
21. 8
5 .9

2. 2
1. 7
1. 8
. 7
36. 2
1 9 .6
5 .9

2. 1
1. 5
1. 7
.6
35. 3
1 9 .2
5. 7

2. 1
1. 5
1 .6
.6
3 5 .4
18. 0
5. 4

2. 1
1. 4
1. 6
.6
35. 7
1 7 .4
5. 3

R a ilw a y E x p r e s s A g e n c y , Inc. 2 __________________
D r iv e r s and d e liv e r y m e n — -------------- ----------T r a in m e s s e n g e r s ___ __ ____ __ — ____ ___
W a r e h o u se and p la tfo r m l a b o r e r s ---------------------

30.
9.
1.
5.

8
0
5
5

30.
9.
1.
5.

4
2
3
3

30. 4
9 .4
1. 2
5 .2

3 0 .4
9 .6
1. 1
5. 3

3 1 .4
10. 0
1. 1
5 .7

32. 1
1 0 .4
.9
5 .9

30. 9
10. 3
.7
5. 3

29.
10.
.
5.

24.
8.
.
4.

8
7
1
0

20. 3
7. 5
(3 )
2 .9

6. 7
.6
2. 6

6 .4
.6
2. 5

5. 9
.6
2. 2

5. 5
.5
2. 2

5. 3
.5
2. 1

4. 9
.5
2. 0

4. 2
.4
1. 7

2. 9
.3
1. 2

(4 )
_

2
2
8
4
7
1

15. 9
2. 1
2. 7
1 .4
.8
1. 1

16. 0
2. 0
2. 7
1 .4
.8
1. 1

1 5 .7
2. 0
2. 5
1. 5
.8
1. 0

The P u llm a n C o m p a n y 2--------------- __
C on d u ctors ---------------------------------- -------------------P o r ter s
____
__________________ ____________

7. 3
.7
2 .9

O il p ip e lin e s 2 _____________________________________
S tation e n g in e e r s and p u m p e r s -------------------------___
G a g e r - d e liv e r y m e n and o il r e c e i v e r s >
P ip e lin e r e p a ir m e n ____________ ____
_______
O ther m e c h a n ic s - — -------------------- ------------- L a b o r e r s -------------------------------------------------------------

21. 3
3. 3
3. 6
2. 3
.8
1. 1

20.
3.
3.
2.
.
1.

S ch ed u led a ir lin e s 5 ------------------------------------------------A ir lin e p ilo ts and c o p ilo ts — ___________________
A ir lin e s t e w a r d e s s e s and p u r s e r s ------ ----O ther flig h t p e r s o n n e l ___________________________
C o m m u n ica tio n s p e r s o n n e l ____________________
M e ch a n ic s and m a in te n a n c e p e r s o n n e l ----------—
A ir c r a ft and tr a f f ic s e r v i c e p e r s o n n e l _ -----O ffice e m p lo y e e s ____________ _________________
O ther e m p lo y e e s __ -------------------------------- —

166. 1
13. 5
10. 6
3. 8
4. 2
34. 2
43. 3
3 5 .4
21. 1

169. 9
13. 9
11. 9
4. 2
3 .7
34. 1
44. 6
3 6 .6
20. 9

172.
13.
12.
4.
3.
34.
46.
37.
20.

T elep h on e in d u s t r y 6 ------------------------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l and s e m ip r o fe s s io n a l
p e r s o n n e l _________________________________ __
B u s in e s s o ffic e and s a le s e m p lo y e e s _________
C le r ic a l e m p l o y e e s --------------------------------------------T elep h on e o p e r a t o r s ____________________________
F o r e m e n , tele p h o n e c r a ft s m e n _ ______________
C e n tr a l o ffic e c r a ft s m e n ----------------------------------In s ta lla tio n and e x c h a n g e r e p a ir c r a f t s m e n ---L in e , c a b le , and con d u it c r a f t s m e n ____________
B u ild in g , s u p p lie s , and m o to r v e h ic le
e m p lo y e e s _________________________________ ____
L a b o r e r s ------ --------- ------------------------- —
O ther e m p lo y e e s --------------------------- ----------------

694. 9

672. 5

66 9 . 6

50.
49.
144.
216.
26.
58.
71.
43.

52.
51.
142.
196.
25.
59.
7 2.
38.

0
6
6
8
5
1
0
8

5 3 .4
5 2. 0
142. 9
188. 5
2 5 .9
62. 0
73. 2
38. 1

28. 8
.5
1. 7

27. 9
.5
1. 5

T e le g r a p h in d u s tr y ----------------------- ------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l and s e m ip r o fe s s io n a l
p e r s o n n e l --------------------------------------------------------O ffice s u p e r in te n d e n t ___________________________
S a le s e m p lo y e e s _ __ „
___ ______ _____ _
C le r ic a l e m p l o y e e s _____________________________
T e le g r a p h o p e r a to r s ____ ____________________
T elep h on e o p e r a t o r s ------ ----------------- —
C o n str u c tio n , in s ta lla t io n , and r e p a ir
e m p lo y e e s — -------- ------------ ------ — -------B u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s ____________________
M e ssen g ers _
_ --------- ----------------------------

37. 6
1 .4
3. 1
.6
8. 7
8. 7
1. 9
6. 6
.9
5 .9

1
2
3
4
5
6

5
8
9
3
0
0
2
0

2
5
1
8
7
2

17.
2.
2.
1.
.
1.

178.
14.
13.
4.
3.
34.
49.
37.
22.

9
3
1
0
7
5
1
9
4

191. 8
15. 1
14. 5
4 .4
3. 2
39. 4
5 1 .9
40. 3
23. 0

20 5 .
16.
17.
4.
3.
40.
56.
42.
24.

9
3
1
8
2
7
3
9
7

24 4 . 0
21. 0
20. 9
6. 8
3. 2
45. 3
6 6 .6
51. 0
29. 2

276. 0
23. 4
25. 1
7. 5
3. 3
50. 0
74. 9
59. 3
3 2 .4

300. 0
24. 6
30. 0
8. 0
3 .4
52. 0
83. 0
63. 2
3 6 .4

311. 9
26. 3
33. 6
8 .4
3. 3
5 2 .9
86. 5
63. 7
37. 3

678. 7

6 9 9 .9

71 7 . 9

767. 0

77 7 . 3

809. 6

8 7 7 .4

60.
51.
142.
189.
26.
63.
75.
37.

9
4
5
2
1
1
1
0

64. 0
52. 7
147. 9
193. 1
27. 2
6 5 .9
77. 7
38. 3

67. 5
54. 3
152. 2
199. 1
28. 9
69. 0
7 9 .6
39. 2

7 2 .4
58. 8
161. 9
21 2 . 2
31. 4
75. 3
85. 1
4 1 .6

74. 5
5 9 .4
164. 1
21 2 . 8
32. 1
78. 0
86. 8
41. 2

77.
63.
171.
21 6 .
34.
8 2.
91.
43.

7
4
0
5
4
8
3
2

84. 5
68. 9
1 8 5 .4
23 2 . 2
3 8 .4
8 9 .9
99. 9
46. 7

2 7 .2
.5
1 .4

26. 0
.4
2. 4

2 5 .4
.4
2. 3

24. 9
.4
2. 7

25. 2
.4
2 .7

25. 1
.5
2. 8

25. 5
.4
3. 2

26. 8
.4
4. 1

36. 5

34. 9

32. 8

3 1 .6

30. 9

3 1 .9

31. 4

31. 6

30. 3

1. 4
3. 0
.6
8. 5
8. 0
1. 8

1. 4
2 .9
.6
8. 1
7 .4
1 .6

1. 2
2. 8
.5
7 .7
7. 0
1. 5

1. 2
2 .6
.5
7. 3
6. 3
1. 3

1 .4
2. 6
.5
7. 2
6. 1
1. 3

1.
2.
.
7.
6.
1.

1.
2.
.
7.
6.
1.

7
5
5
5
0
5

1. 8
2 .4
.6
7. 7
6. 2
1. 4

2.
2.
.
7.
6.
1.

6. 9
.9
5 .6

1 .1
.8
5. 1

6. 5
.7
5. 0

6. 9
.6
4. 5

6. 9
.6
4. 3

7 .4
.6
4. 1

7. 2
.6
3 .9

7. 1
.6
3. 7

6. 9
.5
3. 1

1 9 .2
2. 8
3. 2
2. 0
.7
1. 2
8
8
2
2
4
9
7
0
7

16. 9
2. 3
2 .9
1. 5
.7
1. 1

16.
2.
2.
1.
.
1.

7
5
5
5
2
5

G roup to ta ls in c lu d e d ata not show n s e p a r a te ly .
A v e r a g e n u m b er o f e m p lo y e e s fo r the y e a r b a s e d on the n u m b er o f e m p lo y e e s on p a y r o ll at m id -m o n th fo r 12 m o n th s.
L e s s than 100.
The P u llm a n C om pany w a s d is s o lv e d in 1969. P u llm a n s e r v i c e is now b ein g p r o v id e d b y the in d iv id u a l r a ilr o a d s .
F u ll- t im e e q u iv a le n ts .
A d ju sted to in c lu d e p a r t -t im e w o r k e r s and e x c lu d e o f f ic ia ls and m a n a g e r ia l a s s is t a n t s w ith in d ep en d en t tele p h o n e c o m p a n ie s .

SOURCE:

S ee te x t p. 10




-

18.
2.
3.
1.
.
1.

3
0
4
1
7
1

1
5
9
7
7
1

5
0
5
0

37

0
3
6
5
0
5

T a b le 18. F ederal e m p lo y m e n t in selected w h ite -c o lla r occupations, O c to b e r 1 9 6 4 ,
O c to b e r 1 966 , O c to b e r 1 9 6 7 , and O c to b e r 1 9 6 8
(In thousands)
S e r ie s
cod e

S e r ie s

1964

1966

1967

1 , 0 9 7 .4

T o ta l s e le c t e d w h it e - c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s P r o f e s s i o n a l o c c u p a t i o n s --------------- —-----------— --------- — — - —
----------- — __ —
---------------- ---------- __
_
____
_
______ _ _ _ _ _
-------------------------------------------------------------

1, 2 0 4 .6

220. 7

2 2 6 .4

7.
3.
1.
2.

8.
4.
1.
2.

6
6
8
1

.

1968

1 ,W 1 .7

1 ,2 7 6 .2

236. 9

241. 2

1
1
9
1

8. 6
4. 5
1 .9
2. 2

8.
4.
2.
2.

8
3
0
4

0110
0180
0185

S o c ia l s c ie n c e
E c o n o m ic s _
P s y c h o lo g y
S o c ia l w o r k

0401
0457
0460
0470
0475

B io lo g y and a g r ic u ltu r e — ------—
------------- _ -----G e n e r a l b io lo g ic a l s c i e n c e ___-____________________
____ _ ----- ---—— _ _
S o il c o n s e r v a tio n _
F o r e s tr y
----- -----------— --------- — _ _ ----- _ S o il s c ie n c e ______________ ____________________ ____
A g r ic u ltu r a l m a n a g e m e n t _ _______ ___ ___ _ _ _

16. 3
1. 0
4. 8
6 .0
1. 9
2. 6

1 5 .4
1. 2
4. 8
6. 1
1 .9
3. 2

1 8 .4
2 .4
4. 8
6. 1
1 .9
3. 2

18. 4
2. 5
4. 8
5 .9
1. 8
3. 3

0510
0512

A cco u n tin g ____________________________________________
A cco u n tin g -------- -------- — — ---------- _ -----I n ter n a l r e v en u e a g e n t ____________________ _________

31. 0
18. 3
12. 8

32. 3
19. 0
13. 2

33. 8
19. 8
14. 0

33. 4
20. 2
13. 2

0602
0610
0630
0644
0660
0680

M e d ic a l _
.___________________ ________ _____ _____
M e d ic a l o f fic e r _
_ __
_________ _____ _____
N u r s e ------- ----------- — — ------- ------ ___ ----------D ie titia n -------- _ _
------ — — — -------- _ __
M e d ic a l te c h n o lo g is t _________ ___
_
_____
P h a r m a c is t ------------- _ __ _
_ __ ----- -------D en ta l o f fic e r -----------------------------------------------------------

38. 7
11. 7
2 2 .6
1. 2
1. 1
.9
1. 3

37. 6
9 .7
23. 0
1. 1
1. 4
1. 1
1. 2

3 7 .9
10. 1
22. 7
1. 1
1. 6
1. 2
1. 3

37. 0
9 .9
22. 1
1. 0
1. 6
1. 2
1. 3

0701

V e te r in a r y s c ie n c e _ -------------

_

2. 3

2. 3

2 .4

2. 4

0801
0808
0810
0811
0812
0813
0819
0820
0830
0840
0850
0855
0861
0870
0871
0893
0896

E n g in e e r in g
__ __ ____ __ ______ -__ ___ . . . .
G e n e r a l — -------- --------------- —,----- ------A r c h ite c tu r e ____ _______
_____ __ _ _
..
C i v i l 1 .....................................................................................
C o n str u c tio n ___ ______ _
S tr u c tu r a l _ __ ______________ __ ____ _____ __
__ _____ __ ________
H y d r a u lic ___ ____
S a n i t a r y __________________ -______________________ ___
H ig h w a y --------------------- _ — — __
M e c h a n i c a l _____._______________ ________________ __
. — _
__
N u c le a r ________________ _—
E le c t r ic a l
___________ __
_ __ ______ __
E le c tr o n ic - ______
___ _____ — ____ ____
A e r o s p a c e __________________________________________
------ _— — _
__ __
M a r in e _ _ ------ -------N a v a l a r c h it e c t u r e ------ _ — ------- __ -----------C h e m ic a l __________ _______________ ___________ ___ _
I n d u s t r ia l ------------------------------------------------------------------

7 9 .4
10. 4
1. 4
8. 5
3. 5
1. 3
2. 2
1. 0
1 .9
8. 4
.9
4. 4
13. 2
8. 2
.9
1. 1
1. 3
2. 0

79. 0
1 1 .6
1. 4
17. 6
_
_
_
1. 0
_
8. 8
1. 0
4 .4
1 3 .9
8. 9
1. 0
1. 0
1. 3
2. 1

78. 3
12. 4
1. 5
17. 6
_
_
_
1. 3
_
9 .7
1. 1
4. 4
15. 0
9 .4
1. 0
1. 2
1. 5
2. 2

79. 9
13. 1
1. 5
1 7 .6

0905

A tto r n e y --------

9. 1

9. 1

9 .4

10. 0

1224

P a te n t e x a m in in g __

1. 1

1. 1

1. 1

1301
1310
1320
1340
1350
1370

____ ____ ___ ____ ______ _ P h y s ic a l s c ie n c e
G e n e r a l p h y s ic a l s c ie n c e — ____
_
_ ____
P h y s ic s
-------- _ _______________ „__ __
_____
C h e m is tr y ___________ __________________ ____________
M e te o r o lo g y _ — -------------------------- -------- -------G eo lo g y
__ _
------------------------ ------ ----- __
C a r t o g r a p h y -------------------------------------------------------------

26.
6.
5.
7.
2.
2.
2.

0
5
0
7
2
0
7

1515
1520
1529

----------------------M a th e m a tic s
_ --------------- — —
O p e ra tio n r e s e a r c h -------- ----- - — __ ------ _ M a th e m a tic s
_____
------M a th e m a tic a l s t a t i s t i c s ____________________________

4.
.
3.
.

1710

E d cu a tio n and v o c a tio n a l tr a in in g ------------ ------- —

------------—

__ _ -_ ___________

-------------------

------------

------------

__ ---------_

Adm in i s tr a tiv e - te c h n ic ia n (gen e r al)
o c c u p a t io n s ------- ------- __ ------- _ —

—

-----

27.
6.
5.
8.
2.
1.
2.

_

_
_
1- 3
_
9. 5
1. 3
4 .6
15. 7
9. 5
1. 0
1. 2
1. 4
2. 2

1. 2

0
2
5
1
3
9
9

2 7 .6
6. 3
5. 8
8. 3
2 .4
1. 9
3. 0

28.
6.
6.
8.
2.
1.
3.

4
5
2
5
4
8
1

1
6
1
4

5. 0
.9
3 .6
.5

5. 8
1. 1
4. 1
.6

6.
1.
4.
.

5
5
3
7

14. 0

14. 7

13. 4

15. 3

29 2 . 0

323. 2

34 7 . 8

3 5 9 .9

0018
0018
0080

S a fe ty m a n a g e m e n t ________ _ ------------------ ------ --S e c u r it y a d m in is tr a tio n -----------------------------------------------

1. 4
2. 1

1. 6
2. 3

1. 8
2. 6

1. 7
2. 7

0132

I n te llig e n c e

2. 8

3. 0

3. 2

3. 3

0188

R e c r e a tio n

1. 8

2. 0

2. 2

2. 3

_ ------------- - -----------------

- ----- _

— ___ ___ _

— --------------------------------- — ----

—

—

See footnotes at end of table.




38

T ab le 18. Federal em ploym ent in selected w hite-collar occupations, O c to b e r 1964,
O ctober 1966, O c to b e r 1967, and O ctob er 1 9 6 8 —Continued
(in th ou san d s)
S e r ie s
_______ code

1903
1936
1940
1942
1948
1950
2001
2010

2030
2050
2090

1966

1967

1968

10. 4

12. 8

13. 7

13. 9

2. 1
1. 6

2. 0
1. 8

2. 2
2. 0

2. 3
2. 0

Supply --------------------------------------------------------------------------G e n e r a l s u p p ly --------------------------------------------------------In v en to ry m a n a g e m e n t ------------------------------------------D is tr ib u tio n f a c i l it ie s and s to r a g e m a n a g e m e n t—
Supply id e n tific a tio n s y s t e m s --------------------------------P u b lic a tio n s su p p ly 5 ----------------------------------------------

1901

1964

Q u a lity c o n tr o l and i n s p e c t i o n s ----------------------------------G e n e r a l c o m m o d ity q u a lity c o n tr o l and
in s p e c tio n -----------------------------------------------------------Q u a lity c o n tr o l and in s p e c tio n m a n a g e m e n t -------E le c tr o n ic eq u ip m en t q u a lity c o n tr o l and
i n s p e c t i o n -------------------------------------------------------------M e c h a n ic a l eq u ip m en t q u a lity c o n tr o l and
i n s p e c t i o n -------------------------------- ----------------------------A ir c r a f t q u a lity c o n tr o l and i n s p e c t i o n ----------------A m m u n itio n q u a lity c o n tr o l and in s p e c t i o n ----------M is s i le q u a lity c o n tr o l and in s p e c t i o n ------------------

S e r ie s

G e n e r a l t r a n sp o r ta tio n -----------------------------------------T r a ffic m a n a g e m e n t ----------------------------------------------F r e ig h t r a t e ------------------------------------------------------------T r a v e l ------------ ---------------------------------------------------------

2101

2130
2131
2132
2181

A d m in is t r a tiv e -t e c h n ic ia n (G o v ern m en t)
o c c u p a t io n s -----------------------------------------------------------0007

C o r r e c tio n a l o f fic e r ----------------------------------------------------

0105

S o c ia l in s u r a n c e a d m in is t r a t io n ---------------------------------

0526
0560
0592

A c c o u n tin g -------------------------------------------------------------------T a x t e c h n ic ia n --------------------------------------------------------B u d get a d m in is t r a t io n --------------------------------------------T ax a c c o u n tin g -------------------------------------------------------

0685

P u b lic h e a lth p r o g r a m s p e c ia l is t

0962
0963
0993
0996

C la im s e x a m in in g --------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t r e p r e s e n t a t iv e ---------------------------------------L e g a l in s tr u m e n ts e x a m i n i n g -------------------------------S o c ia l s e c u r it y c la im s -----------------------------------------V e te r a n s c l a i m s -------------------------------------------------------

1169

In ter n a l re v en u e o f f i c e r s ---------------------------------------------

1811
1813
1816
1854
1863
1890
1896

I n v e s t i g a t i o n ----------------------------------------------------------------C r im in a l in v e s t ig a tio n --------------------------------------------W age and hour l a w -------------------------------------------------Im m ig r a tio n i n s p e c t i o n -----------------------------------------A lc o h o l, to b a c c o ta x in s p e c t io n -----------------------------F ood in s p e c t io n -------------------------------------------------------C u sto m s i n s p e c t i o n ------------------------------------------------I m m ig r a tio n p a tr o l in s p e c t io n --------------------------------

------------------------------

2. 4

3. 0

3. 1

3. 1

1.
1.
.
1.

5
0
8
1

2. 4
1. 6
1. 0
.9

2.
1.
1.
.

7
7
2
8

2.
1.
1.
.

31. 3
11. 8
13. 0
1. 2
3 .9
1. 4

31. 2
10. 2
14. *4
1. 1
4. 0
1. 5

30.
9.
14.
1.
4.
1.

8
4
5
1
2
6

29. 8
10. 3
14. 3
1. 1
4. 0
-

8.
1.
1.
2.
1.
1.

8.
1.
1.
2.
1.
1.

6
8
3
7

2
8
7
2
5
0

8 .8
1. 9
1. 8
2. 2
1. 7
1. 1

88. 0

93. 6

98. 5

2 .9

2. 8

2. 7

2. 7

9 .9

10. 7

0
8
5
3
4
0

9. 5
15.
2.
6.
6.

4
8
2
4

1. 6
10.
1.
2.
5.
1.

2
2
2
1
8

6. 4
22.
11.
1.
1.
1.
3.
2.
1.

4
3
2
2
1
7
7
3

9. 7
17.
3.
6.
7.

1
0
4
7

1 .9
11.
1.
2.
6.
2.

8
3
1
2
2

6. 2
24.
12.
1.
1.
1.
4.
2.
1.

3
3
2
2
1
4
8
3

18.
3.
6.
8.

1
0
8
3

2. 4
12.
1.
2.
7.
2.

8
3
2
1
2

9.
2.
1.
2.
1.
1.

2
0
8
3
8
3

102. 3

18.
2.
7.
8.

5
7
2
6

2. 5
13.
1.
2.
7.
2.

4
4
2
6
2

6. 4

6. 0

25. 2
12. 6
1. 2
1. 2
1. 2
4 .9
2. 8
1. 3

25. 8
1 2 .8
1. 2
1. 2
1. 1
5. 3
2. 9
1. 3

1980

A g r ic u ltu r a l c o m m o d ity g r a d in g ---------------------------------

2 .9

3. 0

2. 9

2. 8

2152

A ir t r a f f ic c o n t r o l --------------------------------------------------------

17. 6

16. 9

18. 0

1 9 .9

A i d - a s s i s t a n t o c c u p a tio n s -------------------------------------

42. 2

44. 7

45. 7

47. 9

39. 9
36. 0

42. 1
37. 4

42. 7
38. 1

44. 7
36. 8

0699

M e d ic a l s u p p o r t -----------------------------------------------------------N u rsin g a s s is t a n t --------------------------------------------------P h y s ic a l- m e d ic a l r e h a b ilita tio n th e ra p y
a s s is t a n t -------------------------------------------------------------D e n ta l a s s i s t a n t ------------------------------------------------------M e d ic a l a i d --------------------------------------------------------------

1. 0
1. 3
1. 6

1. 1
1. 8
1. 9

1. 1
2. 0
1. 5

1. 1
1. 9
1. 6

1411

L ib r a r y t e c h n i c i a n -------------------------------------------------------

2. 3

2. 6

3. 0

3. 3

C le r ic a l ( s p e c ia liz e d ) o c c u p a t io n s -------------------------

93. 7

108. 2

114. 9

118. 0

P e r so n n e l c le r ic a l
--------------------------------------------------P e r s o n n e l c le r i c a l and a s s i s t a n c e -----------------------M ilita r y p e r s o n n e l c le r i c a l and t e c h n ic ia n —
---------

13. 5
7. 5
6. 0

15. 6
7. 8
7. 7

18. 0
9. 0
9. 0

19. 5
9. 5
9 .9

0621
0636
0681

0203
0204

See footnotes at end of table.




39

T ab le 18. Federal em ploym ent in selected w h ite-co llar occupations, O ctob er 1964,
O ctob er 1966, O ctob er 1967, and O ctober 1 9 6 8 —Continued
(In th o u sa n d s)
S e r ie s
cod e

S e r ie s

1964

1966

1967

1968

0201
0212
0221
0235

P erson n el — —
- — - — —
P e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t — --------- — —
P e r s o n n e l s ta ffin g ------ - - —
— — _
_
___
P o s itio n c la s s i f i c a t i o n -------- -- .
E m p lo y e e d e v e lo p m e n t

1 5 .0
8. 0
2 .9
2 .4
1 .6

16.
8.
3.
2.
1.

2
8
3
3
7

1 7 .0
9. 2
3 .5
2. 4
1 .8

17. 2
9. 1
3. 7
2 .5
1 .9

0330
0331
0332
0334
0335
0340
0341
0342
0343
0344
0345
0362
0392
0393

C o m p u ter and m a n a g e m e n t s e r v i c e s ------------ -------------D ig ita l c o m p u te r s y s t e m s a d m in is tr a tio n _ -----------D ig ita l c o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r 2 - — ------------D ig ita l c o m p u te r s y s t e m s o p e r a t i o n -----------—---- ——
C o m p u ter s p e c i a l i s t 3 ------- ----------- — —
C o m p u ter a id and te c h n ic ia n ------- -----__----------- ---------P ro g ra m m anagem ent —
_ - — - A d m in is tr a tiv e o f fic e r O ffic e s e r v i c e s and m a n a g e m e n t and s u p e r v is io n __
M a n a g em en t a n a ly s is ----- —
- —
----M a n a g em en t t e c h n ic ia n - - --P r o g r a m a n a l y s i s --------- —-— —------- -------------------------E l e c t r i c a c c o u n tin g m a c h in e p r o j e c t p l a n n i n g ---- —
G e n e r a l c o m m u n i c a t i o n ------------- ------ -------------- — -----C o m m u n ica tio n s p e c ia l is t
— - -—

44. 2
1. 1
5. 4
3 .7
3 .4
.
2 .6
9 .5
2 .0
8. 3
3 .5
.
1. 5
2 .0
1. 1

5 3 .9
1. 2
5 .5
12. 1
.9
2. 8
9 .4
2. 0
8. 5
3 .9
2 .5
.9
2 .5
1 .6

6 3 .4
1. 2
6. 6
1 4 .8
2. 1
3 .0
9 .6
2. 3
8 .8
4. 1
5 .0
.7
3. 2
1 .9

7 0 .6
1. 3
7 .5
16. 9
3. 1
3. 2
9. 5
2 .5
9 .2
4. 2
6 .4
.6
3 .8
2. 4

0403
0404
0458

A g r ic u lt u r a l su p p o r t — __ — —
M ic r o b io lo g y __ —
_
- — ___
B i o lo g ic a l te c h n ic ia n - - —
S o il c o n s e r v a tio n te c h n ic ia n ------------------- ----------------

6.
1.
2.
2.

3
2
2
9

8 .7
1. 4
4 .4
2 .9

9 .0
1 .4
4 .7
3 .0

8. 9
1 .5
4 .6
2 .9

0501
0525
0570

A c c o u n tin g , fin a n ce su p p o r t
—
—_
G e n e r a l a c c o u n tin g , c le r i c a l , and a d m in is tr a tio n
A c c o u n tin g te c h n ic ia n —
— F in a n c ia l in s titu tio n e x a m i n e r ------___------- — ------- -----

2 6 .8
11. 1
1 3 .0
2 .7

26. 1
1 0 .6
12. 6
3. 0

26. 8
10. 8
1 2 .9
3. 2

2 7 .6
10. 9
13. 3
3 .5

0645
0647

M e d ic a l
__
___—. . . . . . . .
—
M e d ic a l t e c h n i c i a n _______ — ------------------ -----------------R a d io lo g y te c h n ic ia n - -

4. 1
2 .6
1 .5

4. 6
2 .9
1 .6

4. 7
3. 0
1. 7

4. 5
2 .9
1. 7

0802
0809
0817
0818
0856
0895

E n g in e e r in g su p p o rt ------- --.
E n g in e e r in g te c h n ic ia n __ ____ __ ________________ ___
C o n str u c tio n in s p e c t io n _
—
—
S u r v e y in g t e c h n i c i a n __ _____ ___________________ ____
E n g in e e r in g d r a ftin g
E le c tr o n ic t e c h n i c i a n _____— --------------------------- ------—
In d u s tr ia l e n g in e e r in g t e c h n i c i a n _____ __ ______ ____

49. 9
2 1 .8
2 .8
4 .6
3. 9
1 6 .8
-

5 4 .8
25. 3
3. 0
4. 2
3 .9
18. 3
. 1

60. 5
2 7. 3
3 .0
3. 9
4 .0
2 0. 3
1 .9

6 2 .0
2 8 .0
2. 9
3. 3
3 .7
21. 8
2 .4

1 3 .4
2. 4
2 .5
1 .7
1 .7
1 .5
1 .9
1. 7

1 4 .7
2 .6
2 .9
2. 1
1. 8
1 .7
1 .9
1. 8

15. 9
2 .8
3. 2
2. 3
1 .9
1 .8
2 .0
1. 9

16. 1
2 .9
3. 3
2. 3
1 .9
1. 8
1 .9
1. 9

3 6 .0
1 .9
1 5 .0
1. 3
3 .8
6. 5
2. 2
2. 8
2 .6

3 9 .6
2 .5
1 7 .0
1. 2
4 .6
6. 3
2 .4
2 .9
2 .8

4 2 .0
2 .8
1 8 .0
1. 2
5. 2
6 .6
2 .6
2 .9
2 .6

44. 1
3. 4
18. 5
1. 2
5. 1
7. 8
2 .5
2. 9
2 .6

8 .0
2 .9
2 .6
2 .5

9 .2
3 .4
2 .4
3. 4

9 .6
3 .6
2 .5
3 .4

9 .4
3 .6
2 .5
3. 3

1020
1060
1081
1082
1083
1085
1087

I l l u s t r a t i n g -----— -------- ------------- ------------- — ------- -----P h o to g r a p h y
~
P u b lic in fo r m a tio n
___
—
—
—
W ritin g and e d itin g ______ ___ — --------------------------------T e c h n ic a l w r itin g and e d itin g - E d it o r ia l a s s is t a n c e .

.

.

.

.

.

1101
1102
1104
1150
1152
1165
1170
1171

B u s in e s s and i n d u s t r y ------------ --------------------------- ------- ----G e n e r a l b u s in e s s and in d u stry
C o n tr a c t and p r o c u r e m e n t ---------------------------------------P r o p e r ty d is p o s a l ----------------— --------------------------------I n d u s tr ia l s p e c ia l is t — __ ____ ______________________
P r o d u c tio n c o n tr o l
L o a n s p e c ia l is t . _
. .
_
R e a l t y -------------------------------------------------------------------------A p p r a is in g and a s s e s s i n g

1311
1341
1371

P h y s ic a l s c ie n c e su p p o r t _ _
P h y s ic a l s c ie n c e te c h n ic ia n
M e te o r o lo g ic a l t e c h n ic ia n C a r to g r a p h ic t e c h n i c i a n ___

—

---- --— —
—— .
__
_____

1410

L ib r a r ia n . . . --------------------------------- — ------------. . . .. .. ---------—

3 .4

3 .5

3 .5

3 .6

1530

S t a t i s t i c i a n ----------------------------------------------------------------------

2. 3

2. 3

2. 3

2. 2

1640
1670

E q u ip m en t and c o n s tr u c tio n
C o n str u c tio n and m a in te n a n c e
E q u ip m e n t s p e c ia l is t -

1 3 .7
2 .6
11. 1

15. 3
2 .7
1 2 .7

1 6 .4
2 .6
1 3 .8

1 6 .9
2. 9
14. 1

1712

In s tr u c tio n

6 .6

8 .4

9 .3

9 .4

1810
1825

I n v e s tig a tio n G e n e r a l in v e s t ig a tio n A v ia tio n s a fe t y o f fic e r —

4. 4
2 .8
1 .6

4 .4
2 .9
1 .6

4 .5
2 .9
1 .6

4 .4
2 .7
1 .7

_

—
-.
--------------------------------_

_
—
—

__

—

See footnotes at end of table.




40

T a b le 18. F ederal em ploym ent in sele c te d w h ite -c o lla r occupations, O c to b e r 1 9 6 4 ,
O c to b e r 1 966 , O c to b e r 1 9 6 7 and O c to b e r 1 9 6 8 —Continued
(In th o u sa n d s)
S e r ie s
cod e

1964

S e r ie s

1966

1967

1968
1. 8

0309

C o r r e s p o n d e n c e c le r k ----------------------------------------

1 .7

1 .9

1 .9

0520
0540
0544
0545
0590

A c c o u n tin g c l e r i c a l ------------------------------------------------------A c c o u n ts m a in te n a n c e c le r i c a l -----------------------------V o u ch er e x a m i n i n g -------------------------------------------------P a y r o l l ---------------------------------------------------------------------M ilita r y p a y ------------------------------------------------------------T im e and l e a v e --------------------------------------------------------

27. 1
1 1 .6
5 .4
4 .4
3 .6
2. 1

2 8. 1
11. 6
5. 5
4. 5
4. 5
1 .9

29. 3
1 1 .8
5. 8
4 .6
5. 1
2. 0

29.
12.
5.
4.
5.
2.

0998

C la im s c l e r i c a l --------------------------------------------------------

2 .9

9. 2

10. 7

10. 9

1531

S t a tis tic a l a s s i s t a n t -------------------------------------------------

7 .0

6. 8

6. 8

4 1 .5

46. 7

2005
2020
2040
2091
2134

Sup ply c le r i c a l ------------------------------------------------------------Sup ply c le r i c a l and t e c h n ic ia n 4 -----------------------------P u r c h a s in g --------------------------------------------------------------S up ply c le r i c a l and a s s i s t a n c e 5 -----------------------------S a le s s to r e c l e r i c a l ------------------------------------------------S h ip m en t c l e r i c a l ----------------------------------------------------

-

8 .2
29. 0
2. 5
1 .9

-

8.
32.
2.
2.

4 8 .2

6. 0

9. 1
33. 6
3. 0
2 .5

50. 0
34. 6
9 .2
3. 0
3. 1

-

6
7
8
6

8
0
9
6
2
0

C le r ic a l (g e n e r a l) o c c u p a t i o n s -------------------------------

243. 9

27 6 . 4

278. 6

260. 5

0302
0304
0305
0312
0316
0318
0322
0350
0356
0357
0359
0382
0385

O ffic e o c c u p a t i o n s -------------------------------------------------------M e s s e n g e r ---------------------------------------------------------------I n fo rm a tio n r e c e p t i o n i s t ----------------------------------------M a il and f i l e ------------------------------------------------------------C le r k -s te n o g r a p h e r and r e p o r t e r -------------------------C le r k -d ic ta tin g m a ch in e t r a n s c r i b i n g -------------------S e c r e t a r y -----------------------------------------------------------------C l e r k - t y p i s t ------------------------------------------------------------O ff ic e - m a c h in e o p e r a t i n g ---------------------------------------C ard punch o p e r a t i o n ---------------------------------------------C o d i n g ---------------------------------------------------------------------E l e c t r ic a cco u n tin g m a ch in e o p e r a t i o n ----------------T e le p h o n e o p e r a t i n g ----------------------------------------------T e l e t y p i s t -----------------------------------------------------------------

24 0 . 6
1 .7
.8
24. 0
5 1 .9
6. 5
5 4 .9
7 0 .6
1 .5
12. 3
1 .5
5. 8
6. 8
2. 3

273. 6
1 .9
1 .2
2 6 .7
53. 3
6. 7
57. 1
94. 0
1. 7
16. 1
1 .7
4 .4
6. 7
2. 1

2 7 5 .7
2. 0
1 .2
27. 6
5 1 .8
6. 7
5 9 .5
9 3 .4
1 .7
17. 1
2. 0
3. 8
6. 6
2 .2

257. 7
1 .8

0530

C a sh p r o c e s s in g -------------------------------------------------------

3. 3

2. 8

2. 8

2. 8

O ther o c c u p a t io n s -------------------------- --------------------------

116. 9

132. 1

1 3 9 .4

1 4 6 .4

P r o t e c t i v e ---------------------------------------------------------------------F ir e p r o te c tio n and p r e v e n t i o n ---- —---- ----------------P o l i c e -------------------------------------------------------- _____------G uard -----------------------------------------------------------------------

26. 8
1 1 .4
2. 3
13. 1

27. 9
11. 8
2. 6
1 3 .4

28. 8
12. 3
2 .7
13. 8

2 9 .4
12. 6
2 .9
13. 9

9 0 .2

104. 2

110. 6

117. 0

0081
0083
0085
0301
1
2
3
4
lic a t io n
5

G en er a l c le r i c a l and a d m in is t r a t i v e ----------------------

1

.

1

26. 4
47. 9
6. 4
6 1 .0
8 1 .5
1 .7
16. 2
2. 1
3. 3
6. 2
2. 1

C o v e r a g e o f 0810 expanded to in c lu d e s e r i e s 0811, 0812, 0 8 1 3 , and 0820, w h ich w e r e d isco n tin u e d in 1966.
Inclu ded in 0334 c o m p u te r s p e c ia l is t a fte r 1964.
In clu d es d ig ita l c o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r a fte r 1964.
E ffe c tiv e June 1968, the su p p ly c le r i c a l and te c h n ic ia n s e r i e s w as added w h ile the su p p ly c le r i c a l and a s s is t a n c e and p u b ­
su p p ly w e r e d isco n tin u e d .
A fter 1967 in c lu d e d in su p p ly c le r i c a l and te c h n ic ia n s e r i e s .

SOURCE: 1968, O cc u p a tio n s o f F e d e r a l W h ite -C o lla r W o r k e r s, O cto b e r 31, 1968, P a m p h le t SM 5 6 -0 8 ; 1967, O cc u p a tio n s o f
F e d e r a l W h ite -C o lla r W o r k e r s, O c to b e r 31, 1967, P a m p h le t SM 5 6 -7 ; 1966 O cc u p a tio n s o f F e d e r a l W h ite -C o lla r W o r k e r s, O c t­
o b e r 31. 1966. P a m p h le t blS 5 6 -6 . U. S. C iv il S e r v ic e C o m m is s io n , W ash in g to n D. C. ; 19^4, u n p u b lish ed data a t the U .S . C iv il
S e r v ic e C o m m is s io n .




41

T ab le 19. Federal governm ent civilian em ploym ent of blue-collar w orkers by job fam ily
and selected occupational series, O cto b er 196 0 , 1962, 1966, and 1 9 6 8
^IrMthousandsj^
Code

I9 6 0

Job f a m ilie s and s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s
A ll jo b f a m i l i e s -------------------------------------------------W ire c o m m u n ic a tio n eq u ip m en t in s ta lla t io n and
m a in t e n a n c e --------------------------------------------------------------E le c tr o n ic eq u ip m en t in s ta lla t io n and
m a in t e n a n c e --------------------------------------------------------------Q uartz c r y s t a l w o r k --------------------------------------------------E le c t r ic a l in s ta lla t io n and m a in t e n a n c e -------------------E l e c t r i c a l in s ta llin g and r e p a ir --------------------------A ir c r a f t s y s t e m s e l e c t r i c a l ---------------------------------E le c tr o n ic eq u ip m en t o p e r a tio n ---------------------------------F a b r ic and le a th e r w o rk -------------------------------------------U p h o ls t e r i n g ----------------------------------------------------------S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a tin g -----------------------------------G la s s w o r k -----------------------------------------------------------------In str u m e n t m a in te n a n c e -------------------------------------------M a c h in e -to o l w o rk ---------------------------------------------------M o d elm a k in g , m e ta l -------------------------------------------M a ch in in g g e n e r a l ------------------------------------------------T o o l, d ie , g a g e m a k in g ----------------------------------------M anual l a b o r ---------------------------------------------------------------L a b o rin g ---------------------------------------------------------------H o u s e k e e p in g --------------------- -----------------------------------G rounds m a in te n a n c e -------------------------------------------C u sto d ia l w o r k in g ---------------------------------------------------

2500
2600
2700
2800
2805
2892
2900
3100
3106
3111
3200
3300
3400
3403
3414
3416
3500
3502
3503
3504
3565
3566
3600
3602
3603
3605
3607
3700
3702
3703
3704
3711
3752
3800
3804
3806
3807
3808
3853
3900

M a so n ry , p la s te r in g and r o o f i n g ------------------------------C em en t f in i s h in g ----------------------------------------------------M a s o n r y -----------------------------------------------------------------P l a s t e r i n g --------------------------------------------------------------M eta l p r o c e s s in g -------------------------------------------------------F la m e cu ttin g -------------------------------------------------------W elding —---------------------------------------------------------------B la c k s m ith in g ------‘ -------------------------------------------------E le c tr o p la tin g ---------------------------------------------------------A ir c r a f t w e ld in g -----------------------------------------------------C opper s m ith in g ------------------------------------------------------S h e e t -m e ta l w o r k in g ------------------------------ ■
---------------S t r u c tu r a l-ir o n w o r k in g ----------------------------------------B o i le r m a k i n g ---------------------------------------------------------A ir c r a f t s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k in g ------------------------------M otion p ic tu r e , r a d io , T. V. and sound e q u ip m en t
w o r k in g --------------------------------------------------------------------O p tic a l w o r k ----------------------------------------------------------------P a in tin g and p a p e r - h a n g in g ------------------------------------- —
P ip e fittin g -------------------------------------------------------------------P la s t i c w o r k ----------------------------------------------------------------P r in tin g and r e p r o d u c tio n ------------------------------------------R u bber w o r k ----------------------------------------------------------------W o o d w o rk --------------------------------------------------------------------C a b in e tm a k in g -------------------------------------------------------C a r p e n tr y , m a r i n e ------------------------------------------------C a r p e n t r y ---------------------------------------------------------------W o o d w o rk in g ----------------------------------------------------------G e n e r a l m a in te n a n c e and o p e r a t io n s ------------------------G e n e r a l e q u ip m en t and m a in te n a n c e -----------------------A g r ic u ltu r e f o r e s t r y and k in d red -----------------------------F ix e d in d u s tr ia l eq u ip m en t m a in t e n a n c e -----------------R e fr ig e r a tio n and a ir c o n d itio n in g e q u ip m en t
r e p a ir in g ----------------- ------------------------------------------H eating e q u ip m en t r e p a i r i n g -------------------------------M il l w r ig h t --------------------------------------------------------------F ix e d in d u s tr ia l eq u ip m en t o p e r a tio n ----------------------B o ile r and s te a m p la n t o p e r a tin g ----------------------S tea m p la n t o p e r a t i n g -------------------------------------------G e n e r a l u t il it i e s o p e r a tin g -----------------------------------P o w e r p la n t o p e r a tio n s ----------------------------------------S e w a g e d is p o s a l p la n t o p e r a tin g --------------------------W ater tr e a tm e n t p la n t o p e r a tin g --------------------------F u e l d is tr ib u tio n s y s t e m s o p e r a t i n g -------------------P a r t s and eq u ip m en t s te a m c le a n e r o p e r a tin g ----

4000
4100
4200
4300
4400
4500
4600
4605
4606
4607
4652
4700
4800
5000
5300
5306
5309
5315
5400
5402
5405
5406
5407
5408
5409
5413
5417
5423
5436
5438

L ock and dam o p e r a tin g ---- ------------------------------------E le v a to r o p e r a tin g -------------------------------------------------See footnotes at end of table.




42

1962

1966

1968

612. 2

623. 6

629. 3

628. 2

3. 2

3. 0

3. 0

2. 8

24. 3
. 1
32. 3
20. 3
4. 1
. 2
6. 3
. 6
1. 9
. 1
6. 2
31. 9
1. 2
16. 8
2. 2
66. 9
63. 2 2
. 5
1. 9
2. 4
. 6
.8
. 3
. 2
15. 3
. 6
9. 2
. 6
1. 0
. 5
23. 22
. 6
7. 5
. 6
2. 2
7. 2

26. 3
. 1
33. 3
20. 1
4. 3
. 1
6. 0
. 5
2. 0
. 2
7. 2
31. 6
1. 1
16. 0
1. 8
64. 4
42. 1
5. 6
. 9
1. 2
12. 0
2. 6
. 4
.8
. 3
. 3
16. 2
. 6
9. 6
. 5
. 9
. 6
24. 1
. 6
7. 4
. 6
2. 6
7. 2

26. 8
. 1
31. 0
17. 8
5. 0
. 1
6. 5
. 5
3. 0
. 1
7. 8
26. 6
1. 0
14. 0
1. 5
69. 8
43. 1
7. 1
1. 4
. 7
14. 4
2. 4
. 4
. 8
. 4
. 2
13. 5
. 2
7. 7
.4
1. 1
. 7
22. 9
. 2
6. 4
.4
1. 6
9. 0

28. 0
. 1
31. 8
17. 3
4. 4
. 2
5. 4
. 5
2. 1
. 1
7. 8
2 5 .9
1. 0
32. 0
1. 4
65. 2
38. 1
7. 0
1. 5
1. 2
1 3 .9
2. 5
.4
.8
. 3
. 3
14. 4
. 3
8. 9
.4
1. 0
.8
24. 4
. 2
6. 6
. 7
2. 6
8. 5

. 6
. 4
1 3 .9
17. 7
. 4
14. 93
.8
21. 9
. 5
1. 7
10. 6
1. 2
12. 5
2. 1
. 8*
16. 2

1.
.
13.
18.
.
14.
.
23.
2.
1.
10.
1.
15.
2.
4.
16.

2
1
9
4
4
9
9
1
1
3
5
2
5
6
1
8

.
.
11.
15.
.
15.
.
21.
1.
.
9.
1.
17.
2.
3.
18.

9
2
3
8
6
6
7
2
7
9
7
0
6
7
6
1

.
.
12.
17.
.
14.
.
20.
1.
1.
8.
1.
17.
3.
2.
19.

4.
1.
2.
37.
8.
3.
1.
4.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
2.
3.

4.
2.
2.
35.
8.
3.
1.
3.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
2.
3.

6
2
1
6
1
5
4
7
0
2
1
8
3
4
0

4.
2.
2.
32.
7.
3.
1.
3.
1.
1.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.

9
2
1
6
2
2
4
6
0
2
0
1
4
2
8

5. 1
2. 2
2. 1
31. 3
6. 6
3. 0
1. 3
3. 5
.8
1. 2
1. 0
1 .9
1. 5
2. 2
1. 6

3
8
1
3
9
5
8
3
0
6
5
0
4
5
3

9
2
6
5
6
9
6
0
9
0
6
1
7
0
7
5

T a b le 19. F e d e ra l g o v e rn m e n t c iv ilia n e m p lo y m e n t o f b lu e -c o lla r w o r k e rs by jo b fa m ily
and s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l s e rie s , O c to b e r 1 9 6 0 ,1 9 6 2 , 1 9 6 6 , and 1 9 6 8 —C o n tin u e d
(in thousand si
Code

I9 6 0

Job f a m i li e s and s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s

5600

C u rr e n c y , s e c u r it y , c o in and m e d a l m a n u fa ctu rin g ----

5700
5710
5712
5716
5722
5756
5800
5803
5807
5823
5900
5906
5924
5921
5926
5923
5909
6000

M o b ile in d u s tr ia l eq u ip m en t o p e r a tin g ------------------------C rane o p e r a tin g --------------------------------------------------------E l e c t r ic b r id g e c r a n e o p e r a tin g -----------------------------E n g in e e r e q u ip m en t o p e r a tin g ----------------------------------R ig g in g -----------------------------------------------------------------------T r a c to r t r a ile r o p e r a tin g -----------------------------------------M o b ile in d u s tr ia l eq u ip m en t m a in te n a n c e --------------------E n g in e e r eq u ip m en t r e p a i r -------------------------------------C om bat v e h ic le r e p a i r ---------------------------------------------A u to m o tiv e eq u ip m en t r e p a ir -----------------------------------M a r in e o p e r a t i o n -----------------------------------------------------------D eck h a n d - s e a m a n ---------------------------------------------------R e v e tw o r k in g -------------------------------------------------------------P ilo t --------------------------------------------------------------------------W iper o i l e r ----------------------------------------------------------------D red g in g eq u ip m en t o p e r a tin g ----------------------------------R a ilr o a d o p e r a t i o n --------------------------------------------------------C o n d u c to r -------------------------------------------------------------------L o c o m o tiv e e n g in e e r --------------------------------------------------

_5
48.
2.
.
2.
5.
3.
24.
4.
1.
9.
9.
1.
.
.
.
.
.
1.
.
.

3
3
7
0
0
4
2
2
3
2
3
2
6
3
8
1
2
4
2
4

1962

1966

1968

2. 1

2. 3

2. 1

47. 4
2. 1
. 7
2. 9
4. 7
3. 2
24. 1
4. 1
1. 4
9 .8
12. 2
1. 5
. 7
. 3
. 3
. 1
. 2
1. 1
. 3
. 3

47. 6
1. 9
. 6
2. 9
3 .9
3. 2
26. 5
3 .9
1. 9
10. 0
14. 7
1. 6
. 6
. 3
. 3
. 2
. 2
1. 1
. 3
. 4

50. 7
2. 0
. 6
2. 8
4. 7
3. 6
24. 8
4. 0
1. 6
10. 5
12. 9
1. 5
. 3
. 3
.. 3
. 2
. 2
1. 2
*3
. 4

1

6100

R a ilro a d m a in te n a n c e ------------------------------------------------------

. 9

1. 1

. 9

. 8

6200

M arine m a in t e n a n c e -------------------------------------------------------M a rin e eq u ip m en t r e p a ir i n g ------------------------------------Ship f it t i n g ------------------------------------------------------------------

14. 3
5. 2
6. 0

13. 0
5. 2
5. 8

10. 1
4. 3
4. 0

11. 7
5. 2
4. 5

6500

16. 5

A m m u n itio n s and e x p l o s i v e s ------------------------------------------

9. 3

10. 3

15. 4

6600

A r m a m e n t w o r k --------------------------------------------------------------

5. 2

5. 4

5. 2

5. 2

6700

M an u fa ctu re and r e p a ir sh o p o p e r a tio n ------------------------

7 . 86

3. 1

2. 8

2. 5

6900
6954
6955
6965

W a r e h o u sin g --------------------------------------------------------------------S e r v ic e s ta tio n o p e r a tin g -----------------------------------------S e r v ic e s ta tio n a t t e n d i n g -----------------------------------------M a te r ia ls and e q u ip m en t in s p e c t in g -------------------------

50. 8

7000

P a c k in g and p r o c e s s i n g --------------------------------------------------

10. 3

7300

L aundry and d ry c le a n in g -----------------------------------------------

9 .8

7400
7402
7404
7407
7408

F ood p r e p a r a tio n and s e r v i n g ---------------------------------------B a k in g -----------------------------------------------------------------------C o o k in g ----------------------------------------------------------------------M e a tc u ttin g ----------------------------------------------------------------F ood s e r v i c e w o r k in g ------------------------------------------------

7500

M e d ic a l s e r v i c e s ------------------------------------------------------------

1. 2

1. 4

1. 5

1. 4

7600

M e rc h a n d isin g and p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s --------------------------

2. 8

4. 5

5. 7

6. 7

7700
7800
8200
8300
8400
8500
8600
8700

A n im a l c a r e t a k in g ----------------------------------------------------------F a r m in g --------------------------------------------------------------------------F lu id s y s t e m s -----------------------------------------------------------------I n s tr u m e n t a tio n -------------------------------------------------------------R e c la m a tio n w o r k -----------------------------------------------------------A ir c r a f t p r o p e lle r o v e r h a u l------------------------------------------A ir c r a f t en g in e o v e r h a u l-----------------------------------------------M a n u fa ctu re, r e p a ir and in d u s tr ia l su p p o rt, s u p e r ­
v is o r y —
A ir c r a f t o v e r h a u l-----------------------------------------------------------F ilm p r o c e s s i n g --------------------------------------------------------------

1. 1
. 5
_7

8800
9000

M is c e lla n e o u s o c c u p a tio n s 1 0------------------------------------------ 1
0
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

-

2. 4

27.
.
7.
1.
16.

.
.
1.
10.

9
7
8
6
0

3
1
0
5

_8
22. 29
1. 2

3
3
8
0

51. 4
. 4
1. 0
1 .9

9. 9

10. 2

10. 6

9. 7

9. 7

51.
.
.
2.

27.
.
7.
2.
16.

6
4
9
3

5
7
0
2
1

1. 0
-

3. 5
. 6
. 1
.9
10. 2
. 6

52.
.
.
2.

31.
.
7.
2.
19.

4
7
2
9
1

1. 2
-

4.
.
.
.
8.

8. 6
33.
.
8.
3.
19.

3
8
2
3
4

1. 1
-

6
5
8
9
7

4.
.
.
.
9.

9
3
9
7
1

19. 0

. 7
20. 1

.6
19. 4
. 1

. 7

2. 6

. 9

1 I 9 6 0 data in t h is gro u p in c lu d e s c u s to d ia l w o rk in g and j a n it o r ia l and p a r t o f h o u se k e e p in g .
2 I 9 6 0 data in c lu d e p a r t of c u r r e n c y , s e c u r ity , c o in and m e d a l m a n u fa ctu rin g .
3 I n c lu d e s p a r t o f c u r r e n c y , s e c u r it y , c o in and m ed a l m a n u fa ctu r in g .
4 P a r t o f I 9 6 0 data i s in c lu d e d in m a n u a l la b o r . Data a f te r I9 6 0 in c lu d e s fa r m in g .
5 In clu d ed in m e ta lw o r k , p r in tin g and r e p r o d u c tio n , and m is c e lla n e o u s o c c u p a tio n s .
6 I 9 6 0 data in c lu d e s m a n u fa c tu r e , r e p a ir and in d u s tr ia l su p p o r t s u p e r v is in g .
7 1 9 6 0 d a ta in c lu d e d in a ir c r a f t o v e r h a u l.
8 I 9 6 0 data in c lu d e d in m a n u fa ctu r e and r e p a ir shop o p e r a tio n .
9 I 9 6 0 data in c lu d e s flu id s y s t e m s .
10
M is c e lla n e o u s o c c u p a tio n s in c lu d e th o s e in s e r i e s 49 0 0 , p la s tic m a te r ia l m a n u fa ctu rin g ; 5 2 00, m is c e lla n e o u s o c c u p a tio n s;
and 5500 q u a r r y w o rk .
N O TE: Job f a m i li e s in c lu d e data n o t show n s e p a r a te ly .
SO URCE:




U. S. C iv il S e r v ic e C o m m is s io n .

43

T able 20. Em ploym ent In selected post office occupations, O ctober 1 9 6 0 -6 9
(In th o u sa n d s)
I9 6 0

1961

1962

1963

1964

A ll o c c u p a tio n s 1 ------------------

56 8

5 80

5 85

590

593

610

692

705

714

728

P o s t m a s t e r s 2 ---------------------------------S u p e r v i s o r s ------- — ■--- --------------------P o s t a l c l e r k s ---------------------- -----------M ail c a r r i e r s 3 -------------------------------S p e c ia l d e liv e r y c a r r i e r s --------------M ail h a n d l e r s ----------------------------------

35
30
234
190
5
29

35
31
239
195
4
30

35
31
239
198
4
31

34
32
239
200
4
31

34
32
240
202
4
32

33
32
25 0
207
4
32

33
33
300
225
5
44

32
34
304
230
5
44

32
36
304
233
6
46

31
38
310
237
6
47

O ccu p ation

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1 In c lu d e s data not show n s e p a r a te ly .
2 D o e s not in c lu d e a s s is t a n t p o s t m a s t e r s .
3 In c lu d e s p a r t -t im e c a r r i e r s on a f u ll- t im e e q u iv a le n t b a s is .
SOURCE: P o s t O ffic e D e p a r tm en t, B u rea u of F in a n c e and A d m in istr a tio n , P a id E m p lo y e e s R e p o r t, fo r m 1988. 1
3
2

T ab le 21. O ccupational em ploym ent data available from professional associations, 1 9 6 0 -7 0
(In th o u sa n d s)
O ccu p a tio n

I960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

H ea lth p r o f e s s i o n s : 1
D e n t i s t s ---------------------------------------------N u r s e s , p r o f e s s i o n a l ----------------------O p t o m e t r i s t s ------------------------------------O s t e o p a t h s ----------------------------------------P h a r m a c i s t s --------------------------------------P h y s ic ia n s ---------------------------------------P o d i a t r i s t s ---------------------------------------V e t e r i n a r i a n s ------------------------------------

87
504
(2)
12
117
224
( 2)
20

88

0
( 2)

12
117
231

89
55 0

,(*)

89

0
(2)

0
(2)

311
117
239
8
21

11
117
248
8
(2)

(2)
18

27
20

( 2)

90
5 82
( 2)
11
118
255
8
21

91
(2)
17
11
118
265
8
(2)

91
621
17
12
121
272
8
23

30
( 2)

32
(2)

32
23

92
640
17
12
122
278
8
23

93
659
17
13
122
280
8
24

93
680
18
13
124
287
8
24

95
700
18
13
(2)
(2)
8
25

33
25

34
25

34
25

O th er p r o f e s s io n s :
A r c h ite c t s , r e g i s t e r e d --------------------F o r e s t e r s ------------------------------------------

26
( 2)

0

<)
*
(2)

1 F o r a d e ta ile d and c o m p r e h e n s iv e p r e s e n ta tio n o f e m p lo y m e n t and o th e r c h a r a c t e r is t ic s o f h e a lth p r o f e s s io n s and o c c u p a tio n s ,
R e s o u r c e s S t a t is t ic s , 1 9 6 9 , 1969, U. S. D e p a r tm en t of H ea lth , E d u ca tio n , and W e lfa r e , P u b lic H ea lth S e r v ic e .
2 No e s t im a t e s m a d e.
3 A p p r o x im a te ly 2, 200 o s te o p a th s in C a lifo r n ia w e r e a w a rd ed the m e d ic a l d o c to r d e g r e e in 1962.




44

s e e H ea lth

☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING O FFIC E : 1972 O - 484-793 (127)

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Improving Productivity: Labor and Manage­
ment Approaches (BLS Bulletin 1715, 45 cents)
Describes formal efforts by labor and manage­
ment to improve productivity concentrating on
plant-level practices that are within the control
of management and unions.
MAIL ORDER FORM To: Superintendent o f Docum ents, Governm ent Printing Office, W ashington, D .C . 20402
E nclosed find $ _________ ( c h e c k , m o n e y o r d e r , o r S u p t . o f D o c u m e n t s c o u p o n s ) . P lease sen d m e
_____ co p ies o f The Meaning and Measurements of Productivity (BLS B u lletin 1 7 1 4 , 3 0 c en ts)
-------- co p ies o f Productivity and the Economy (BLS B u lletin 1 7 1 0 , 5 0 cen ts)
_____ co p ies o f Improving Productivity: Labor and Management Approaches (B L S B u lletin 1 7 1 5 , 4 5 c en ts)

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R E G IO N A L

S T A T IS T IC S

O F F IC E S

Region I
1603 J F K Federal Building
Governm ent Center
Boston, Mass. 0 2 2 0 3
Phone: 2 2 3 -6 7 6 2 (Area Code 6 1 7 )

Region V
8 th Floor, 3 0 0 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 6 0 6 0 6
Phone: 3 5 3 -1 8 8 0 (Area Code 3 1 2 )

Region II
15 15 Broadway
New Y o rk , N .Y . 10 036
Phone: 9 7 1 -5 4 0 5 (Area Code 2 1 2 )

Region V I
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Dallas, Tex. 7 5 2 0 2
Phone: 7 4 9 -3 5 1 6 (Area Code 21 4)

Region IN
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Philadelphia, Pa. 19 107
Phone: 5 9 7 -7 7 9 6 (Area Code 2 1 5 )

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Federal O ffice Building
911 W alnut St., 10th Floor
Kansas C ity, Mo. 6 4 1 0 6
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 8 1 6 )

Region IV
Suite 5 4 0
1371 Peachtree St. NE
A tlanta, Ga. 3 0 3 0 9
Phone: 5 2 6 -5 4 1 8 (Area Code 4 0 4 )

Region IX and X
4 5 0 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36 0 1 7
San Francisco, Calif. 9 4 1 0 2
Phone: 5 5 6 -4 6 7 8 (Area Code 4 1 5 )




Regions V II and V I I I w ill be serviced by Kansas C ity.
Regions IX and X w ill be serviced by San Francisco.

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l

T H IR D C LA S S

MaTl

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LAB - 446


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