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Capital Stock Estimates for
Input-Output Industries:
Methods and Data
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1979
Bulletin 2034







Capital Stock Estimates for
Input-Output Industries:
Methods and Data
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner
September 1979
Bulletin 2034







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S u p t. o f D ocs, n o .: L 2.3:203^1 . C a p ita l- - U n ite d S t a t e s - - S t a t i s t i c a l m eth o d s.
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I. T itle .
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Preface

model. The number of industries was expanded to cov­
er the entire private economy in a 1971 study for the
Office of Emergency Preparedness, Executive Office
of the President (now Federal Preparedness Agency,
General Services Administration), and the detail in the
transportation sector was greatly expanded in a 1972
study for the Department of Transportation. Beginning
in 1973, the Office of Economic Growth of BLS as­
sumed responsibility for developing, maintaining, and
disseminating the capital stock data. To this end, a ma­
jor effort was devoted to developing a large-scale data
base to allow ease of access to the data both for inter­
nal BLS use and for users outside the Department of
Labor.
The data reflected in this report were recently up­
dated to 1974 by the Office of Economic Growth and
Jack Faucett Associates under the direction of Ken
Rogers. Significant revisions were made to the model,
and many of the data series were modified to reflect
newly available data. This study was prepared in the
Office of Economic Growth under the supervision of
Ronald E. Kutscher, Assistant Commissioner for Eco­
nomic Growth. It was designed and written by Ken
Rogers under the direct supervision of Charles T. Bow­
man. Joanne Hepburn compiled the complete invest­
ment series, developed the industry level deflator se­
ries, and provided assistance in making the calculations.
Betty Su developed the asset weight series, and Robert
Sylvester performed basic research on the structure of
the model and developed much of the mathematical
formulation. Joanne Brown provided statistical and re­
search assistance.
A special note of appreciation goes to Jack Faucett
and Ida Pepperman of Jack Faucett Associates for the
many valuable comments and assistance they provided.
Material in this publication is in the public domain
and may be reproduced without permission of the Fed­
eral Government. Please credit the Bureau of Labor
Statistics and cite Capital Stock Estimates for Input-Out­
put Industries: Methods and Data, Bulletin 2034.

Much of the empirical research undertaken in the
field of microeconomics is concerned with the study of
the production process. Many of these studies require
information on the major factors of production, most
notably the amount of capital and labor required to
produce a given level of output or the change in input
factors induced by a change in the demand for an in­
dustry’s product or service. The Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics (BLS) has developed several consistent annual
data series for input-output industries for use in the
study of labor demand and economic growth. (See Time
Series Data for Input-Output Industries, BLS Bulletin
2018.) This bulletin provides a thorough documentation
of the development of a capital stock series by indus­
try including a description of the mathematical model,
the sources and methodology used to develop the in­
put data, and the actual capital stock measures for 72
industries and three major sectors of the private
economy.
The initial impetus for developing the capital stock
series came in the mid-1960’s when the Interagency
Growth Project-a joint effort of the Council of Eco­
nomic Advisers, the Office of Management and Budg­
et, and the Departments of Labor and Commerce-was
organized to monitor economic growth and assess its
implications for the economy. Part of the research in
support of this project was the development of a com­
prehensive set of capital measures. Most of the work
of developing the capital stock model and data was per­
formed by Jack Faucett Associates on contract with
the Department of Labor. Beginning in 1967, the mod­
el was developed and capital stocks were estimated for
eight industries. Dr. Noel Roy was responsible for de­
veloping the theoretical model and writing the com­
puter program to derive the capital stock estimates.
These data were later used in a related 1970 study to
develop production and investment demand functions
for these eight industries. Two later contracts by Jack
Faucett Associates with other government agencies
greatly expanded the detail of the data and refined the




iii




Contents

Page
Chapters:
1.

5.

In tro d u c tio n ..........................................................................................................................................................
Choosing an estimation procedure...................................................................................................................
General requirements of the model...................................................................................................................
Relation to other s e r i e s ...................................................................................................................................
The investment se rie s.............................................................................................................................................
Criteria.................................................................................................................................................................
Data so u rc es.......................................................................................................................................................
Asset weights, service lives, and gross investment d e fla to rs...............................................................................
Asset weights ....................................................................................................................................................
Asset service l i v e s .............................................................................................................................................
Gross investment deflators................................................................................................................................
Time paths of discards and depreciation...............................................................................................................
Discard p attern ....................................................................................................................................................
Depreciation fu n c tio n .......................................................................................................................................
Capital stocks for major sectors..............................................................

1
1
4
4
6
6
7
14
14
14
15
18
18
20
25

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Simple discard function for five assets with service lives ranging from 5 to 25 y e a r s ....................................
Distribution of discards for an asset with a 10-year service l i f e ........................................................................
Alternative discard functions for five assets with service lives ranging from 5 to 25 years..............................
Efficiency of an asset with a 10-year service life under various depreciation assumptions..............................
Alternative discard and decay functions for five assets with service lives ranging from 5to 25 years . . . .
Comparison of BLS and BEA gross capital stock estimates, 1947-74 ...............................................................

18
19
20
22
24
32

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

Derivation of capital s t o c k ....................................................................................................................................
Capital stock and related time s e r i e s .....................................................................
Average service lives of equipment and structures...............................................................................................
Service life assumptions for transportation industries.........................................................................................
Transportation industry deflators by type and source.........................................................................................
Depreciation time paths based on alternative values of Beta for an asset with a 10-year service life .............
Impact on capital stock estimates of changes in the value of Beta......................................................................
Gross investment for major sectors: Historical d o lla r s .....................................................................................
Gross investment for major sectors: Constant dollars .....................................................................................
Gross capital stocks for major sectors: Historical d o llars..................................................................................
Gross capital stocks for major sectors: Constant d o lla r s ..................................................................................
Net capital stocks for major sectors: Historical d o llars.......................................................................................
Net capital stocks for major sectors: Constant d o lla r s .......................................................................................

2
3
16
16
17
23
24
26
27
28
29
30
31

2.

3.

4.

Charts:

Tables:




v

Contents— Continued
Page
Appendixes:
A.
Adjustments to investment data .........................................................................................................................
B.
Mathematical description of the m o d e l...............................................................................................................
C.
Tables of investment and capital stocks for input-output industries, 1947-74.................................................
D.
Data series and level of detail av a ila b le................................................................................................................
E.
Aggregation schem e................................................................................................................................................
Order f o r m .................................................................................................................................................................................




V
I

33
41
46
118
122
125

Chapter 1. Introduction

This bulletin presents estimates of the stocks of fixed
capital assets in the private sector of the economy for
the years 1947-74. For this study, fixed capital assets
include only structures (plant) and equipment available
for use by an industry in the direct production of or in
the support of the production of goods and services;
land is excluded.
This chapter discusses the basic concepts of the study
and provides an overview of the many conceptual and
practical problems involved in constructing a capital
stock series. Chapters 2 and 3 describe the data required
to develop the series, chapter 4 describes the mathe­
matical model and the underlying assumptions used to
estimate the stocks, and chapter 5 summarizes the steps
necessary in calculating the stock data and presents the
results for three major industrial sectors.
The capital stock is composed of many different as­
sets purchased at many different times. The composi­
tion of the capital stock changes through additions of
new plant and equipment (investment) and the sale or
scrapping (discarding) of assets which have reached the
end of their useful service life. Even assets that are os­
tensibly identical may age at different rates, and thus
may have different productive capabilities which must
be taken into account in the estimates.
There are two basic measures of capital stock com­
monly used, gross stock and net stock. Gross capital
stock is a measure of the capital on hand in any year
without reference to physical depreciation. This meas­
ure assumes that capital assets are equally productive
over their entire service life. The net stock measure is
the amount of capital on hand adjusted for physical de­
preciation. In this study, physical depreciation is de­
fined as the decline in the ability of capital to produce
at a given output level, i.e., the physical decay of the
asset or a decline in its productivity.

which will allow comparison with data from other firms.
The estimation techniques described in this bulletin have
been developed to permit comparative analysis. Ana­
lysts using the capital stock data should keep in mind,
however, that they are estimates based on a series of
assumed relationships; they are not based on actual data
collected through periodic surveys of business
establishments.
For this study, the estimates should meet several
criteria:
Consistency. The capital stock measures should be
consistent from industry to industry and from year
to year.
Measurability. The data should be expressed in a
common measure. A measure of value, adjusted for
price changes, provides a uniform basis for
aggregation.
Detail. The capital stock estimates should be in suf­
ficient detail to allow meaningful comparisons of dif­
ferent industry groups. In addition, the data should
account for the different types of capital employed
as well as the different ages of capital used in pro­
duction in a given year.
Choice of the estimation technique depends on the
availability of consistent input data for all industries de­
sired for a time span allowing estimation of the capital
stock from 1947 to the present. Two possible solutions
are: Use of book-value data from the Internal Revenue
Service (IRS) and other sources, and use of the perpet­
ual inventory process to accumulate investment flows
into capital stock values.
Book-value technique

The IRS series consists of data on the dollar value
of gross depreciable assets on hand for a sample of cor­
porations in specific industries. Adjustments would be
required to include the noncorporate portions of each
industry, and an estimate would be needed to break the
assets into the plant and equipment components.
Two major problems exist when using the book-val­
ue technique. First, these data would only yield gross
asset values, i.e., the value of assets assuming there is
no physical depreciation. For this study, physical de­
preciation, also called efficiency depreciation, is defined
as the change in productiveness of an asset over time.

Choosing an estimation procedure
Capital stock measures as outlined above generally
do not exist in sufficient detail or quantity to develop
a time series of annual measures either for specific in­
dustries or for an aggregate of all industries. Data of
this sort are probably maintained by many firms for
their own use, but the concepts are not rigorously de­
fined by accounting principles. A firm will maintain
data on productive capability in a manner most useful
for its own operations and not necessarily in a manner



1

Efficiency depreciation data are not available from the
IRS and would have to be estimated. Generally, ac­
counting depreciation figures are available, but these
data reflect tax code allowances and are intended to
measure depreciation due both to a decline in efficien­
cy and a decline in market value. Further, IRS depre­
ciation guidelines incorporate incentives for capital for­
mation and thus reflect considerations beyond the strict
economic valuation of assets. Second, book-value data
reflect a mixture of different vintages of capital, each
expressed in the prices of the year purchased. Devel­
opment of a constant-dollar price series would require
a knowledge of the age distribution of capital in each
year. With this knowledge, the proportion of book val­
ue purchased in each year could be weighted by the
appropriate price index for that year and summed to
yield a total book-value estimate expressed in constant
prices. However, no data are available on the age dis­
tribution of capital stock, and any imputations would
yield quite subjective results. Given the above prob­
lems, the use of book values alone would prove
unsatisfactory.

is no longer able to provide productive capital services.
(The numbers in parentheses reflect the depreciated
(net) value of capital stock.) The sum of capital by vin­
tage down each column yields the total capital stock
available for production in each year. Gross stock in
1955 and 1956 is 500 units of capital and net stock is
350 units of capital.
Three specific problems are associated with the per­
petual inventory technique. First, in developing capital
stocks using this method, it is assumed that no capital
goods were purchased prior to the first investment year
identified. In actuality, the capital stock calculated in
the early years of investment must be qualified since
there is a certain amount of capital available for pro­
duction which was purchased prior to the first year
identified. However, in subsequent years, the portion
of unidentified capital becomes smaller as these assets
depreciate and are discarded, and the capital stock data
more accurately reflect the investment identified. Thus,
investment series used must be of sufficient length to
insure that all unidentified assets purchased before the
earliest year of the stock series desired have been re­
tired. This may require using investment data which
are much less accurate than the data collected in more
comprehensive surveys in more recent years.
Second, once a capital asset is classified in a specific
industry, it remains there until it is retired even if the
firm which owns the asset has changed the goods and
services it produces sufficiently to be classified in an­
other industry. This may lead to inaccuracies in relat­
ing the capital stock to other time series for the indus­
try such as output and employment. This problem be­
comes less severe at higher levels of aggregation but
should be kept in mind by those who are using the de­
tailed industry data described as level 1 in table 2.
The final problem relates to the assumptions required
by the perpetual inventory technique. The above ex­
ample was overly simplified by using a 5-year life for
all capital assets. In fact, there is wide variation in the
service lives of capital assets, even among assets of the
same type. Little information is available, however, on
the actual service life of assets. Thus, a set of assump­
tions must be made to develop a model to account for

Perpetual inventory technique

A second method-the perpetual inventory techniquewould be to trace an industry’s investment in a specif­
ic capital asset by starting in its purchase year and est­
imating the yearly decline in the efficiency of the asset
until the time it is discarded (scrapped). For any given
year, the sum of the value of assets purchased in pre­
vious years would be calculated to derive the capital
stock for that year.
This technique can best be explained by an example.
Suppose that an industry purchases 100 units a year of
an asset which lasts 5 years. Suppose further that the
asset depreciates at a rate of 10 percent in the first year
and that depreciation increases by 5 percent in every
succeeding year until, at the end of 5 years, the asset
has no productive capacity. Table 1 shows the invest­
ment flows and resulting capital stock.
In table 1, the first investment year identified is 1951.
In the absence of depreciation, the value of the 1951vintage investment remains at 100 until 1956, when it

Table 1.

Derivation of capital stock
End-of-year value o f capital
Investment year
1951

1951
19 52
19 53
1954
1 9 55
1956

...........................................
...........................................
...........................................
...........................................
...........................................
...........................................

Capital stock:
G ro s s ...........................................
N et
...........................................




1952

1953

1954

1955

100

10 0 (9 0 )
100

10 0 (7 5 )
10 0 (9 0 )

1 0 0 (5 5 )
10 0 (7 5 )
10 0 (9 0 )
100

10 0 (3 0 )
1 0 0 (5 5 )
1 0 0 (7 5 )
10 0 (9 0 )
100

400
320

50 0
350

to o

100
100

200
190

300
265

2

1956

0
1 0 0 (3 0 )
1 0 0 (5 5 )
1 0 0 (7 5 )
10 0 (9 0 )
100
500
350

Table 2.

Capital stock and related time series

Level

Capital sto c k —
this study

1 .........................

T otal agriculture
32 nonm anufacturing industries
M anufacturing:
143 3-digit SIC industries
14 4-digit SIC industries.

BLS Input-O utput (I/O ) Sectors
7 agriculture industries
47 nonm anufacturing
industries
9 5 m anufacturing industries.

Time series available for 1947-74
in historical and constant
dollars (1972=100).

Time series available for 195 8-76.

Levels 2-5 below are defined based
on aggregations o f industries at
this level o f detail.

2 .........................

T otal agriculture
20 nonm anufacturing industries
52 m anufacturing industries.
Industries defined according to
BEA I/O definitions.

Related BLS and BEA data series

O u tp u t—
current dollars
O u tp u t—
constant dollars (1972 =
100)
Production or nonsupervisory
w orker jobs
N onproduction w orker jobs
Self-employed jobs
Production w orker hours
N onproduction w orker hours
Self-employed hours
Index o f labor productivity.
BLS I/O Industries
4 agriculture industries
20 nonmanufacturing
industries
52 manufacturing industries.

C om m ents
Capital stock may be developed for
m ost I/O sectors by aggregations
o f one or m ore capital stock
industries. However, lack o f
detail in the capital stock data
base requires:
1. aggregation of the 7 I/O
agriculture industries into
to tal agriculture,
2. aggregation of 25 I/O nonm anufacturing sectors in
various com binations to
form detail com parable
to detail available in the
capital stock data base,
and
3. aggregation of 10 I/O
m anufacturing sectors
to form comparable
industries.
D ata are com patible for all indus­
tries except agriculture where
the four BLS agriculture indus­
tries m ust be aggregated to form
the to ta l agriculture sector.

Industries defined according to
BEA I/O definitions. Aggre­
gated from tim e series above.
3 .........................

Total agriculture
9 nonm anufacturing industries
20 m anufacturing industries
(2-digit SIC definitions).

No com parable BLS or BEA tim e
series are currently available.

BLS industry data may be aggre­
gated for m ost of these indus­
tries.
Com parable data from o ther
sources may exist for this
comm only used aggregation
scheme.

4 ........................

T otal agriculture
7 nonm anufacturing industries
2 m anufacturing industries.

No com parable BLS or BEA tim e
series are currently available.

BLS industry data m ay be aggre­
gated for all o f these indus­
tries.
Com parable data from other
sources may exist for this
com m only used aggregation
scheme.

5 ........................

T otal agriculture
Total nonm anufacturing
Total m anufacturing.

BEA capital stocks
Total agriculture
Total nonm anufacturing
Total m anufacturing.
National Incom e investm ent
Producers’ durable equipm ent
Structures.

BEA data are not strictly com para­
ble due to differences in m ethod­
ology, assum ptions, desired end
use, and data gathering tech ­
niques.
BLS industries m ay be aggregated
to this level of detail to form
consistent values.

NOTE: “ N onm anufacturing industries” does not include agriculture.

book-value data available from IRS and Census sources
into constant-dollar gross and net capital stock.
The usefulness of this combined technique depends
upon the reliability of the book-value series and the va­
lidity of the calculated relationships. The IRS data are
not collected with a primary concern for year-to-year
comparability. However, an alternative source of bookvalue data, similar in concept but more comparable from
year to year, is available for manufacturing industries
from the Census of Manufactures and the Annual Sur­
vey of Manufactures. The great advantage of using the
combined technique is that it eliminates the problems

variation in the service lives and, once these service
lives are determined, the actual rate of physical
depreciation.
Combined technique

A third possible technique to develop the capital stock
estimates is to use a combination of the two previously
discussed methods. This would entail using the perpet­
ual inventory technique to develop relationships be­
tween the historical-dollar and constant-dollar capital
stock series and the gross and net stock series. These
relationships can then be used to convert observed gross



3

associated with reclassification of firms into other in­
dustries, since book-value data are purportedly an ac­
curate reflection of the actual capital assets on hand in
a given industry.
However, certain problems relating to the integrity
of the book-value data dampen somewhat the merits of
this approach. Specifically, the book-value data are only
available for a limited number of years and industries.
In addition, the series suffers from changes in the def­
inition of industries over time, requiring adjustment
techniques to create a continuous time series. Finally,
some of the year-to-year changes in the book-value data
cannot be accounted for. If one takes the change in
book value from year to year and subtracts this value
from total capital investment in that year, a measure of
the discards of worn-out assets should be arrived at.
However, in many cases this subtraction results in nega­
tive values, implying an increase of assets in the indus­
try other than through investment. To a limited extent,
the increase may be explained by transfers of establish­
ments into these industries. However, in other cases
there is no explanation for the negative values. Thus,
there may be some question concerning the reliability
of the book-value data.
Given the problems outlined, we conclude that fur­
ther research is required before an accurate capital stock
series can be developed based on the combined tech­
nique. In the interim, the perpetual inventory technique
is the best approach and is the one used in developing
the data presented in this study.
It should be noted that the capital stock series pre­
sented here does not take changes in technology ex­
plicitly into account. Rather, changes in the productive
capability of assets are reflected only to the extent they
are reflected in changes in the real costs of the assets.
Therefore, analysts using the data should consider ac­
counting for technological change in a manner which
is not related to any specific factor of production.

The first step involves identifying annual investments
to determine when an asset or group of assets enters
the stock of capital available for production. These data
should be in sufficient detail to develop separate capi­
tal stock series for structures and equipment, with each
series expressed in both historical-dollar costs and constant-dollar costs. Step 1 is discussed in the next chapter.
The second step is to determine when the assets leave
the capital stock. This requires identification of the serv­
ice lives of assets, ideally in sufficient detail to account
for variation in the specific types of assets purchased
by an industry as well as for variation in the actual
service lives of similar assets due to differences in qual­
ity, utilization rates, or simply chance. Step 2 is dis­
cussed in chapters 3 and 4.
The final step is to model the change, if any, in the
ability of the assets to produce capital services over
their useful service lives. For the purposes of this study,
we assume that the decline in efficiency occurs mostly
at the end of an asset’s service life when many of the
original parts begin to fail and there is less incentive to
maintain the asset at or near full efficiency. Step 3 is
discussed in chapter 4.

Relation to Other Series
The capital stock estimates developed in this study
are formally related in concept and definitions to oth­
er industry-specific time series developed by BLS. Oth­
er series currently available are employment, output,
and hours for the 149 private sector BLS industries in
the BLS input-output(I/0) model1 These time series
.
are developed using the Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion System (SIC) which allows meaningful compari­
sons of various industry data. The I/O industries are
defined based on groups of SIC industries. The capital
stock series also is based on SIC definitions and may
be used with the other series in studies of factor de­
mand, productivity, and output levels. In a few cases,
the level of detail in the capital stock data base does
not allow for comparison at the detailed industry lev­
el. In those instances, two or more I/O industries must
be aggregated to form an industry comparable to one
in the capital stock data base.
These data are also related to capital stock and in­
vestment data compiled by the Bureau of Economic
Analysis (BEA) of the Department of Commerce2. BEA
provides capital stock data for three major sectors-agriculture, nonmanufacturing excluding agriculture, and

General Requirements of the Model
The problems associated with the perpetual invento­
ry technique, while not minor, are outweighed by its
convenience and the wealth of information produced
when using this model, especially when calculating cap­
ital stock under varying assumptions concerning retire­
ment and depreciation patterns. The example previous­
ly given, while simplified, is an accurate depiction of
the basic model used in this study. There are three bas­
ic steps required to derive an industry’s capital stock
for any one year:
1. Develop an annual investment series.
2. Develop a discard pattern which determines
when assets are actually discarded from use.
3. Develop a depreciation function which relates
the original value of the asset to the value in sub­
sequent years as it declines in efficiency.



1Time Series Data for Input-Output Industries: Output, Price, and
Employment, Bulletin 2018 (Bureau o f Labor Statistics, 1979).
1Fixed Nonresidential Business and Residential Capital in the United
States, 1925-75, PB-253 (U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of
Economic Analysis, 1976).

4

manufacturing. These series are somewhat different in
concept from those developed here, although they are
estimated by a similar technique.
The investment series used in this study closely ap­
proximates the series used by BEA for manufacturing
industries but differs considerably for agriculture and
nonmanufacturing industries3 Thus, the capital stocks
.
presented in this report should not be considered as a
disaggregation of the capital stocks developed by BEA.

This report provides capital stocks at two levels of
detail-major sector totals and the input-output industry
detail. Data are maintained by BLS at three other lev­
els of detail; these are available upon request. Table 2
provides a summary of the capital stock data available
and comments on other comparable BLS and BEA data
series. Appendix C provides a complete list of all avail­
able industries in the BLS data base and describes the
time series calculated for each industry.

3The agriculture investment series in this study is slightly larger
than the BEA series due to the inclusion of agriculture services in
this sector. The investment series for nonmanufacturing excluding
agriculture differs from the BEA data due to the reallocation o f ag­
riculture services to the agriculture sector and to differences in the
methodology used to develop the investment series. The BEA study
uses the national income structure and equipment investment series
as the control for total investment. Nonmanufacturing investment is

simply the residual obtained by netting out agriculture and manufac­
turing investment from the total. The nonmanufacturing total devel­
oped in this study is the agregation o f investment for each o f the de­
tailed nonmanufacturing industries. The two nonmanufacturing series
differ for unexplained reasons. Since no known errors exist in the
detailed industry investment data for this study, no general revisions
were made to the data at this level o f detail to insure conformity
with the BEA total.




5

Chapter 2. The Investment
Series

A company consists of one or more establishments.
Industry classification by company is based on the pri­
mary product or service of the entire company. In the
event that the company produces a relatively narrow
line of products, the distinction between classification
systems is negligible, but if the company is composed
of many varying establishments, then there is a misallocation of investment expenditures to the company’s
classified industry, i.e., the investment is overstated in
the principal product industry and understated in those
industries in which the firm produces secondary
products.
For the purposes of this study, establishment-based
data are preferable since we are actually attempting to
define the productive ability of a particular industry,
and, as noted above, the establishment basis of classifi­
cation provides a more accurate allocation of invest­
ment expenditures to the actual industry purchasing the
capital. Establishment classification also facilitates use
of these data with other major data series, specifically
with input-output tables and with other related indus­
try-level time series data developed by BLS, all of which
are defined on an establishment basis.

The simple model described in chapter 1 outlined the
basic use of annual investment data in calculating cap­
ital stocks. This chapter presents the specific require­
ments for developing the investment data and discusses
the major sources of these data. Appendix A provides
a more detailed description of the adjustments required
for specific industries.

Criteria
The following criteria served as a guide in develop­
ing the investment data:
1. Investment should be classified into industries by
establishment.
2. Industry definitions should be consistent over the
length of the time series.
3. The investment time series should span a sufficient
number of years to allow valid estimation of capital
stocks beginning in 1947.
4. The investment series should:
a. Include the capital purchases of both corpor­
ate and noncorporate firms,
b. Include investmant by new firms even though
they may not have begun actual production of
goods or services,
c. Detail expenditures for plant and equipment
separately,
d. Exclude the cost of land.

Industry definitions

In developing the investment series, it is important
that the data be comparable over the entire series. Ma­
jor sources of data used for this study are based on the
SIC, which is revised periodically to account for
changes in the product structure of the economy. Gen­
erally, SIC’s are changed at 5-year intervals (the years
in which major censuses of business sectors are taken).
This poses a problem in developing a time series under
consistent industry classifications. To maintain consist­
ency, tabulations are required with which data from
one classification may be recast into another. SIC “con­
cordances” were developed to recast data classified un­
der the 1939, 1947, 1954, 1957, and 1967 SIC systems
into the 1972 SIC base used by this study.

Establishment vs. company classification

Investment data generally are classified into indus­
tries either on an establishment basis or on a company
basis. The choice of the classification system may sig­
nificantly affect the results, depending on the degree of
product diversification typical of companies in the
industry.
An establishment is defined as an economic unit, gen­
erally at a single location, where business is conducted
or where goods and services are produced. In those lo­
cations where several economic activities are per­
formed, each activity is treated as a separate establish­
ment if there is significant employment in each activi­
ty and if separate data are available for each establish­
ment. In the event these conditions are not met, all the
activities are classified according to the primary activ­
ity of the economic unit.



Length of investment series

The time period over which the investment time se­
ries is developed is related to both the beginning date
for the stocks estimates and the service lives of assets
purchased by the industry. The longer the service life,
the further back in time one must go to develop the
investment flows in order to insure that all or most of
6

the initial investment is discarded by the first year of
the stock series. In this study, equipment investment
data were developed for 1921 to 1974 and structures
data for 1890 to 1974. This provided a range of 26 and
57 years, respectively, over which the initial equipment
and structures were depreciated prior to 1947.

for the census years prior to 1949. The IRS provided
information on investment by manufacturing industries
prior to 1949 and by many of the nonmanufacturing in­
dustries for all years. Other sources included various
publications of government regulatory agencies, capi­
tal and investment surveys conducted by the Bureau of
Economic Analysis, and other studies pertaining to spe­
cific industry investment patterns.

Inclusions and exclusions

The investment series must include all domestic in­
vestment expenditures made by the private sector. This
should include expenditures by both corporate and non­
corporate businesses and by those business operations
which have invested in plant or equipment assets but
have not begun production in the investment year. Also,
due to the fundamental difference in the nature of plant
and equipment assets, a separate capital stock series
should be developed for each to capture the differences
in service life, depreciation patterns, and mix of these
types of assets in the production process over time.
In addition, those capital goods which were initially
purchased by the government and later sold to the pri­
vate sector should be included since, in certain indus­
tries these assets play a major role in the production
process. However, these data should be maintained sep­
arately in order to preserve the distinction between di­
rect purchases by the private sector and government
transfers.
Finally, although total capital expenditures by an es­
tablishment include purchases of depletable assets (land)
as well as depreciable assets (plant and equipment), for
most industries, only the factors of plant and equipment
enter directly into the production process. Therefore,
only these two were developed for this study.

Bureau of the Census

The largest single source of data for manufacturing
industries was the Bureau of the Census, specifically
the periodic Census of Manufactures and the related
Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM). The census
data were compiled for the years 1938, 1947, 1954, 1958,
1963, 1967, and 1972. Data for the intervening years,
beginning in 1949, were derived from the ASM, which
is a representative sample of establishments included in
the full census. These two series provided data in gen­
eral at the three- and four-digit SIC level of detail and
separated the investment into expenditures for plant and
equipment. Two problems prevented the use of these
data series directly. First, the industry definitions were
generally changed before each census and, second, the
level of detail available varied in some of the earlier
surveys, requiring the use of approximations to derive
the investment series. This second problem arose pri­
marily in the process required to convert the various
industry classifications to the common 1972 SIC used
in this study.
Most of the reclassifications of SIC codes occurred
at the four-digit level of detail where a complete four­
digit industry was usually reassigned to or combined
with another industry. For these reassignments, the pro­
cedure was simply to renumber old SIC codes to their
new codes, thus retabulating the old SIC data into the
new industries. In other cases, the reclassification was
less straightforward since only a portion of a four-digit
industry was moved to another code. For these indus­
tries, data in the census years were presented in both
the new classification and the old classification, detail­
ing the value added, annual shipments, and number of
workers employed by the industry in both classifica­
tions. From these data, ratios were developed based on
the value added in an industry as defined by the old
classification and the value added under the new defi­
nition. Using these ratios, the investment data were re­
tabulated into the SIC of the succeeding census. In some
cases, value added data were not available, and the val­
ue of shipments or number of employees was substi­
tuted. It was assumed that these adjustment ratios were
applicable to the SIC data in the intervening years, thus
allowing the data derived from the ASM to be adjust­
ed by the same ratio. These code-adjustment ratios op­
erated in a multiplicative manner. When data had to be
adjusted for two or more SIC revisions, the individual
ratios were multiplied together to derive the total ad-

Data Sources
The above criteria established a framework to select
sources of data used to develop the investment series.
Unfortunately, no single source could provide the re­
quired data for all industries for all years. Rather, there
were several sources representing a variety of concepts,
some of which were not compatible with the criteria
outlined above. In the absence of more consistent data,
these sources had to be used with appropriate adjust­
ments to meet the conceptual requirements of this study.
In general, the investment data developed for the more
recent years in the study were more reliable than the
data for earlier years. Fortunately, much of the early
data dropped out of the perpetual inventory calcula­
tions or neared zero in the years after 1947.
Two sources supplied most of the data used to de­
velop the investment time series: Various censuses and
surveys conducted by the Bureau of the Census, and
data from business income tax returns developed by the
Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The Census Bureau
sources provided annual observations for manufactur­
ing industries from 1949 to 1974 and benchmark points



7

justment ratio. For example, if an SIC code were re­
duced by 10 percent in one revision and 15 percent in
the next revision, the overall effect was to reduce the
SIC to 76.5 percent of its initial value (0.90 X 0.85).
Ideally, allocations should be made separately for
plant and equipment investment to capture differences
in the mix of investment expenditures in the reclassified
industries. In those cases where a complete four- or
five-digit SIC was reclassified, actual plant and equip­
ment expenditures were allocated to the appropriate
new SIC industry. In those cases where the adjustment
ratios were based on value added, the same ratio was
used to distribute both the plant and equipment expend­
itures. However, variations in the reporting detail of
the ASM in several years prevented use of these tech­
niques over the entire time period 1949-74. During the
period 1949-53, the ASM reported investment only at
the three-digit SIC level. Since most of the retabula­
tions required four-digit detail, the investment series for
these years was approximated by using the ratio of the
unrevised 1947 investment data to the revised 1947 data
as a constant distribution to be applied to the unrevised
ASM data.
For the years 1955-57, plant and equipment expend­
itures were not available separately at the four-digit
level. The total investment at the four-digit level was
instead retabulated. Annual proportions of plant and
equipment expenditures were derived for each threedigit SIC and applied to the four-digit industries mak­
ing up that three-digit industry. The investment series
was then retabulated based on the adjustment ratios cal­
culated for the census years.
The final adjustment to the census and ASM data
was to account for variations in the treatment of ex­
penditures by establishments not yet in operation. These

Internal Revenue Service

The major sources of investment data for manufac­
turing industries for the years 1930-46 and for nonman­
ufacturing industries for the years 1930-74 were two
publications of the Internal Revenue Service, Statistics
o f Income and Source Book o f Corporation Income Tax
Returns. These data are not developed specifically for
the purpose of economic measurement; rather, they are
a residual product of the enforcement of the tax law.
As such, they reflect accounting principles and con­
cepts and are the most incompatible of all the data
sources used in this study. However, they did provide
a reasonably consistent time series for a large number
of industries, especially in the early years 1930-46. In
addition, they were the only source of information for
many of the nonmanufacturing industries. As such, the
IRS-based investment expenditure series was used ex­
tensively throughout this study both as the actual in­
vestment data and as an index to move benchmark data
available only at infrequent intervals.
Capital expenditure data are not presented explicitly
in the IRS sources. Balance-sheet data are provided in­
stead, detailing the level of net depreciable assets and
depreciation. Total investment expenditures are imput­
ed as the sum of the change in end-of-year levels of net
depreciable assets for two successive years plus the de­
preciation charged during the year. For example, cap­
ital expenditures in 1971 would equal depreciable assets
at the end of 1971 less depreciable assets at the end of
1970-equivalent to gross new investment-plus depreci­
ation in 1971-equivalent to replacement investment.
Discussed below are several problems which had to
be dealt with in order to make the IRS data more com­
parable with data from other sources. A number of
these were complicated by the need for two consecu­
tiv e years o f com parable data to bridge a break or in­
compatibility in the series. While some of these prob­
lems were treated explicitly, others were not. Some
were overcome through the use of the IRS data as an
index only.

expenditures w ere included for all establishm ents b eg in ­

ning in 1958 but were not included prior to 1951. For
the years 1951-57, these expenditures were available
only at the two-digit SIC level. For these later years,
ratios were developed at the two-digit level based on
expenditures for all establishments and expenditures for
establishments in operation. These ratios were then used
to increase the expenditure level of each three-digit
component industry. For the years prior to 1951, the
census and ASM data were adjusted based on the av­
erage adjustment ratios of the 1951-57 investment se­
ries for each industry.
In certain industries throughout the time period, there
were gaps in the data where disclosure rules prevent­
ed reporting of the capital expenditures. Where these
gaps existed, the average of that industry’s share of a
two-digit industry for the years immediately preceding
and immediately following the missing year was calcu­
lated and assumed to apply to the missing year. This
share was then applied to the two-digit expenditure se­
ries to derive the estimated three-digit data.



Industry definitions. The IRS assigns a corporation to
one of 169 different industries based on the principal
product of the entire company. In those firms which
operate subsidiary facilities, the facilities are required
to file separate tax returns, and the data for each sub­
sidiary are classified according to the principal product
of the subsidiary. IRS definitions of industries have
changed twice over the 1930-74 period for which data
are available. The current industry definitions are based
on the 1974 Enterprise Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion (ESIC) developed by the Office of Management
and Budget. This classification system corresponds to
the SIC but is used to classify enterprises or companies
rather than establishments to an industry. The ESIC
8

contains several levels of detail corresponding to the
two-, three-, and four-digit SIC levels.
Prior to 1974, the IRS used its own industry classi­
fication, which also contained a hierarchical structure
of major industries, minor industries, and industry ac­
tivities which roughly corresponded to the detail of the
SIC. Calculations by IRS at the major industry (2-digit)
level indicate that no major breaks exist in the series
between the IRS-defined industries and the ESIC-defined industries. However, no analysis has been made
of the continuity of the series at the minor industry and
industry activity levels of detail. For this study, it was
assumed that there were no breaks in continuity at these
levels.
A major break in the IRS series occurred in 1938
due to a significant expansion of the amount of detail
reported in the industry balance sheets and the redefi­
nition of many industry activities. Several adjustments
to the 1930-37 data were required to make them con­
form with the later data.
Once the industry classifications were reconciled and
an investment series calculated for the entire 1930-74
time period, the IRS-defined series was related to SICdefined manufacturing industries in order to develop a
continuous manufacturing series prior to 1947. Unfor­
tunately, prior to the use of the ESIC, no strict con­
cordance existed between the IRS-defined industries
and SIC-defined industries. The only solution was to
allocate the IRS industry activities to an SIC on the
basis of similarity of name alone. This conversion proc­
ess is discussed in more detail later in this chapter.

Asset transfers and revaluations. Use of year-to-year
balance-sheet data created a second problem-the reval­
uation of assets which were sold or transferred from
one company to another. Book values of assets are main­
tained in a gross depreciable assets account, and depre­
ciation charged against an asset is maintained in an ac­
cumulated depreciation account. The two accounts are
equal only when an asset is fully depreciated. In those
cases where an asset is disposed of prior to the end of
its expected useful service life, either by premature
scrapping or sale to another firm, problems arise in
comparing the two accounts. For example, if an asset
is sold and the sales price does not equal the net book
value of the asset (gross book value less accumulated
depreciation), then the firm incurs either a capital gain
or a capital loss on the transaction. If we assume that
all sales of assets are to firms within the same industry
group, then the capital gains and losses pose a problem
in deriving the net investment portion of total capital
expenditures. For example, assume that a firm owns an
asset whose net book value is $100, which is sold to
another firm for $110, yielding a capital gain of $10.
The effect of this is to reduce the net depreciable as­
sets of the selling firm by $100 and increase the net de­
preciable assets of the buying firm by $110. However,
when the data are aggregated for the two firms into
the same industry group, the transaction yields an in­
crease of $10 in the net depreciable assets of the indus­
try when, in fact, no new capital capacity has been
added. Following the logic of the above example, we
had to revise the derived net investment to reduce the
expenditures by the amount of the net capital gain (to­
tal capital gains minus capital losses).
The above problem exists even if sales to firms in
other industry groups are allowed. However, this poses
an additional problem-determining what portion of
gains or losses is attributable to sales of assets to firms
within the industry group and the portion attributable
to sales outside the industry. S in ce no data exist on in­
terindustry sales, we made the simplifying assumption
that all sales are to firms within the same industry. The
balance-sheet data available in these sources identify
both the short- and long-term capital gains adjusted to
reflect losses of both depreciable and nondepreciable
assets. Only the capital gains on depreciable assets
should be eliminated and, for most industries, these gains
and losses are primarily derived from the sale or scrap­
ping of depreciable capital assets and land. However,
industries such as banking derive a large share of their
gains and losses from the sale of nondepreciable assets
such as corporate stock. For these industries, the deri­
ved investment series was used only as an index of
change, minimizing the effect of capital gains on the
actual level of capital expenditures. The land portion
of the total gains had to be eliminated when adjusting
the imputed investment. No data exist to determine the
share of total gains accounted for by land sales, and it

Changing product mix. One major problem encoun­
tered when developing the investment series from IRS
data was that which arose when a change in the mix
of products produced by firms composed of two or
more establishments was large enough to change the
principal product of the entire company. The capital
expenditures for the w h o le company were then allocat­
ed to the new industry. This created apparent changes
in the year-to-year levels of investment in an industry
which were greater than the actual changes. Recall that
the IRS investment series was derived from the change
in net depreciable assets in two successive years and
that company-based classification tends to overstate the
values in the primary product industry and understate
the values in the secondary product industries. Thus,
the first year in the calculation of gross investment will
be overstated in the old industry and understated in the
new industry, with the reverse pattern occurring in the
next year. This will create an understatement of the ac­
tual change in investment in the old industry and an
overstatement of the actual change in the new indus­
try. This problem was left unresolved and the user of
data developed from IRS sources should use the im­
puted investment data at fine levels of detail with some
caution.



9

was assumed that the ratio of capital gains on land to
other capital gains was the same as the ratio of land
assets to depreciable assets.

refining, depletion or investment data were developed
from other sources.
Land and intangible assets. Prior to 1938, land was in­
cluded with depreciable assets. Since it was not feasi­
ble to separate the land portion, it was assumed that
land was a constant portion of total assets based on the
distribution in 1938. In the cases where IRS data were
used as an index, the adjustment to exclude land was
ignored for all years except 1938 since the constant ad­
justment factor had no effect on the calculation of the
index. Data for 1938 had to be calculated both with
and without land values to calculate the 1938 and 1939
investment expenditures. Fortunately, 1938 data distin­
guished between land and depreciable assets, allowing
the presentation of the data in both forms.
A similar process was used to adjust the data between
1939 and 1953 for the inclusion of intangible assets such
as copyrights, patents, and goodwill. Intangibles were
also assumed to be a constant proportion of assets and
thus fell out of the series when used as an index for all
years except 1939 and 1953, when the data had to be
calculated both with and without intangibles in order
to maintain comparability.

Consolidated returns. Prior to 1933, assets of firms re­
porting on a consolidated or deconsolidated basis are
indistinguishable in the data. The problem of the prop­
er allocation of assets of multisector corporations be­
tween 1930 and 1933 was surmounted by assuming that
investment relationships in the years with no data break­
downs were similar to those in 1933 and 1934, when
breakdowns were available.
The first step in adjusting the data was to estimate
the consolidated firms’ share of total assets in 1930-32.
These proportions were available for 1933 and 1934 for
each major industry group and were assumed to apply
to assets in 1930-32 for corresponding industry groups
and component minor industries. These ratios were cal­
culated as the weighted average of the 1933 and 1934
ratios and were applied directly to the investment se­
ries calculated in 1930-32. Since a constant ratio was
used throughout the series, direct adjustment of the im­
puted investment yielded the same result as investment
imputed from adjusted asset data.
Once the overall values of the consolidated firms
were established for each industry, they had to be ad­
justed to allocate the expenditures to other industry
groups based on the consolidated/ deconsolidated data
available in the 1934 report. Ratios were calculated re­
lating the asset values of an industry reporting on a
consolidated basis to the asset values of the industry
reporting on the deconsolidated basis. These ratios were
then applied directly to the 1930-33 estimated or re­
ported investment data for the consolidated firms, thus
reallocating the expenditure data to the proper major
industry groups.
Due to the lack of detail, the adjustments to minor
industry groups were assumed to be proportional to the
adjustments for the corresponding major industries in
each year. The adjusted investment of consolidated
firms was added to deconsolidated investment in each
year to yield an adjusted total for each industry. A ratio
was calculated between the adjusted and unadjusted to­
tals which was used to scale the component minor in­
dustries in order to sum to the adjusted total.

Noncorporate investment share. An additional adjust­
ment was required to include the noncorporate share
of investment for each industry. This adjustment was
necessary only when the IRS data were used as the ex­
penditure series and not as an index of change. The ad­
justment was made based on the ratio of total depreci­
ation in an industry to depreciation charged by the cor­
porate portion of that industry. Annual depreciation
data were taken from unpublished tabulations by BEA
for the years 1946-74 and from the National Income
and Product Accounts for the years 1929-45. The cal­
culated ratio for 1929 was used for all years prior to
1929.
Conversion to SIC. To this point, the described calcu­
lations were used to develop a consistent series based
on IRS industry classifications. The manufacturing se­
ries then had to be converted to the common SIC base
used throughout the time series. In general, conversion
to the SIC was not required for nonmanufacturing in­
dustries since these industries are classified in broad
groups which are readily defined by aggregating groups
of IRS industries. In converting the manufacturing se­
ries, 1947 was chosen as the bridge year, since maxi­
mum detail was available both in the IRS and census
data. As previously noted, no cross-references of
IRS/census industries were available and the adjust­
ment was made solely on the similarity of industry titles.
With the exception of several textile industries, the
procedure followed was to take the four-digit SIC in­
vestment data and group them in an IRS minor (3-digit)

Depletion allowances. Depletion allowances included
with depreciation in the years 1930-54 tended to over­
state the investment expenditures in depreciable assets.
No detail was available to distinguish the depletion
charges, but, for a majority of industries, these charges
were insignificant. In addition, where the imputed in­
vestment series was used as an index, these charges
would be minimized since the benchmark of the index
would not include depletion. In those industries where
depletion was significant, such as mining or petroleum




10

industry according to IRS definitions of industrial ac­
tivities in the minor industry. The expenditure data were
then summed to derive a proxy minor industry total.
Each four-digit industry’s share of the total was then
calculated and used as a weight to allocate the actual
minor industry investment to the four-digit SIC codes.
For the cotton-, rayon-, and silk-textile industries, the
1947 Census and SIC did not make a sufficient distinc­
tion. Therefore, these industries were converted to the
1947 SIC using proportions derived from the 1939 cen­
sus and the 1939-47 ratios previously discussed.
The final step was to reclassify the IRS series (now
in 1947 SIC terms) into successive SIC codes until all
industries were classified in 1972 SIC terms. However,
this adjustment process yielded negative investment ex­
penditures in several years, notably in the 1930’s. While
negative investment could possibly occur due to major
asset devaluation or extensive shifts of firms to other
industries, the magnitude of negative expenditures ruled
out these explanations as plausible. True expenditures
were instead estimated for the negative years by com­
paring industry investment in the nearest 3 positive
years to the total expenditures in those years for all
manufacturing industries (as published by BEA) and as­
suming that an industry’s investment in the negative
year was the same proportion of total manufacturing
investment as it was during those 3 years.

servations available during this time period. Fortunate­
ly, these data tended to have a minimum impact on the
estimated stocks in the later years.
Chawner and Gort/Boddy series

The Chawner series on capital expenditures for man­
ufacturing industries consists of three articles published
in the Survey o f Current Business in 1941 and 19424 In
.
these, Chawner detailed the capital expenditures in plant
and equipment assets for total manufacturing for the
years 1915-40 and presented total capital expenditures
for 12 two-digit industries for the years 1919-40.
Estimates for total manufacturing were based on the
value of production reported in the census years from
1919 to 1939 for approximately 65 major groups of in­
dustrial machinery and equipment used for manufactur­
ing purposes. The data were supplemented from other
sources. The estimates were adjusted for gross exports,
changes in inventories, and transportation and trade
margins. The estimates for investment in structures were
based on reports of contract awards compiled by the
F.W. Dodge Corporation, adjusted to cover the entire
United States, and other miscellaneous sources.
Data for the 12 manufacturing industries were deri­
ved from gross changes in physical capacity multiplied
by appropriate indexes of construction costs, or on a
series based on annual expenditures for factory build­
ing, plus estimates of the annual production of indus­
trial machinery, allocated to the 12 industries using var­
ious sources of information. The data were then benchmarked to the 1939 census.
Another study of capital expenditures, by Michael
Gort and Raymond Boddy5 provided estimates for 16
,
of the 21 two-digit manufacturing industries for the
years 1921-63. These data were derived from IRS
sources and converted to the 1945 SIC for manufactur­
ing industries. Since these data were most compatible
with the IRS data of later years, the maximum detail
of the Gort/Boddy study was used as the basic data
source for this time period. The 16 Gort/Boddy series
were supplemented by 2 of the series from the Chawner
study. Investment in 2 of the remaining 3 industriesscientific instruments and miscellaneous manufacturingwas estimated based on the output of investment goods
primarily used by these industries. The scientific instru­
ments series was developed based on 2 other industriesmachinery except electrical, and electrical industriesmachinery. The miscellaneous manufacturing series was
assumed to be representative of all manufacturing proc­
esses, and the change in all 18 industries was used to

Plant vs. equipment. Once the previous adjustment was
made, the data could then be reconciled to the census
investment data and distributed between plant and
equipment. To make the reconciliation, it was assumed
that the ratio of total investment to an industry’s in­
vestment in IRS terms was the same as the correspond­
ing ratio in SIC terms, as expressed by the following
equation:
IR S (to ta l) =
S lC (to ta l)
IR S (in d u str y )
S lC (in d u stry )

In the above ratio, three of the four terms are known
and industry investment in SIC terms (SIC (industry))
can be calculated. These ratios were calculated for years
when the census data were available. Pre-1939 data
were calculated using the 1939 ratio. Data for the years
between censuses were calculated based on ratios which
were linearly interpolated between the census bench­
mark years. The census data include the distinction be­
tween plant and equipment which was used in calcu­
lating the ratios. The IRS-based series was also broken
into the component parts by the benchmarking proc­
ess. However, rather than use this process for the years
1930-38 when a great fluctuation in investment patterns
occurred due to depressed economic conditions, it was
assumed that the average ratio of plant to equipment
expenditures for the years 1947-66 would serve as a
proxy distribution. While this proxy is crude at best, it
was felt to be more reliable than the fragmentary ob­



4Lowell Chawner, “Capital Expenditures for Manufacturing Plant
and Equipment-1915 to 1940”, Mar. 1941, pp. 9-15; “Capital Expend­
itures in Selected Manufacturing Industries”, Dec. 1941, pp. 19-26;
“Capital Expenditures in Selected Manufacturing Industries - Part
II”, May 1941, pp. 14-23.
5M. Gort and R. Boddy, Capital Measures and Production Relations
(unpublished).
11

develop these data. The ordnance industry was assumed
to be unique; no other 2-digit industry or combination
provided reliable proxy estimates for this industry.
Therefore, a continuous value-added series was devel­
oped based on the firearm, ammunition, and explosives
industries available from the biennial Census of Manu­
factures of that time period and used as a proxy for this
series. Data for the missing years were derived by in­
terpolating the data of the successive pairs of preced­
ing and following years.

with IRS industry components. Ratios were calculated
from the WPB industry total to the sum of IRS com­
ponent industries in each WPB industry and were used
to scale the IRS components to sum to the WPB total.
The WPB data differentiated between plant and equip­
ment assets, and this ratio was used to break out the
IRS total investment into the plant and equipment parts
as the data were scaled.
BEA/SEC Survey

BEA and the Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC) conduct a quarterly survey of a sample of man­
ufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries6 The sur­
.
vey details capital expenditures for 28 manufacturing
industries and 14 nonmanufacturing industries. Compa­
nies (generally on a fully consolidated basis) rather than
establishments are classified to an industry based on the
SIC of the primary activity of the company; the com­
pany’s entire capital expenditures are included in the
specified industry. Thus, there is a significantly greater
chance for expenditures of one industry to be included
in another industry’s total. In addition, expenditures for
manufacturing industries with nonmanufacturing sub­
sidiaries are classified entirely by the manufacturing pri­
mary activity, yielding large distortions at the sector
level as well as the industry level. Comparisons by BEA
between the survey results and the Census of Manufac­
tures in 1963 revealed an overstatement of capital ex­
penditures as derived from the survey for total manu­
facturing of 46 percent.
Given the above discrepancies, the data derived from
this survey were generally found to be unacceptable
for developing the establishment-based investment se­
ries. However, these series were useful in developing
the capital expenditures series for certain industries
where little or no difference exists between classifica­
tions based on company data and those based on estab­
lishment data.

Wartime agencies, 1940-45

Annual investment statistics were collected and re­
corded for the period July 1940-June 1945 by the War
Production Board and the Civilian Production Admin­
istration (collectively referred to as the WPB). Capital
expenditures during this period required public authori­
zation under various regulations; the data produced in
the enforcement of these regulations are the most ac­
curate available from any source. These data were com­
piled in a unique industrial classification designed to
emphasize war product industries and are roughly at
the two-digit SIC level of detail. In order to take ad­
vantage of this series, equivalent IRS industries (ex­
pressed in SIC terms) were developed and scaled to
WPB totals. However, before the IRS data could be
adjusted, certain data gaps required estimation.
The WPB data for nonfederally financed investment
detail only expenditures of $25,000 or more. Total in­
vestment by all industries in assets costing less than
$25,000 is available and was assumed to be distributed
to each WPB industry in the same proportion as ex­
penditures for the larger capital goods. Expenditures
for capital which was privately owned but federally fi­
nanced are also available for each industry but only as
a total for the 5-year period. It was assumed that these
expenditures were distributed over the time period in
the same annual proportion as the privately financed
investment goods. The final adjustment was to scale the
annual investment to the manufacturing control total
published by BEA for each year. This scaling adjust­
ment also effectively estimated the missing investment
in the first half of 1940 and the last half of 1945.
The final step involved adjusting the IRS data to
conform with the adjusted WPB data. The WPB sta­
tistics defined ten industry groups, nine producers of
war materials and a residual group encompassing all
other manufacturing industries. None of the WPB in­
dustries were defined in terms of SIC or IRS industries.
Rather, IRS industries were assigned to a WPB indus­
try group on the basis of title alone. Sufficient data were
available at this point to split four of the WPB indus­
tries into an additional four industries by assuming that
the plant-to-equipment ratio of each component indus­
try was constant over the entire period and applying
this ratio to the annual data in the corresponding WPB
industry. Thus, 14 WPB industries were defined, each



BEA capital stock studies

BEA conducts periodic studies of capital stocks sim­
ilar to this study7 However, the BEA studies are di­
.
rected more towards deriving capital stocks expressed
in economic or market values for the major sectors of
the economy and for specific types of capital goods
across all industries. Therefore, their capital stock data
are not directly comparable to the data developed in
this study (see chapter 5). However, the investment se­
ries used by BEA does provide a useful control total
for the corresponding sector totals of this study.
The gross investment data used by BEA are derived
6 A discussion o f the B E A /S E C survey may be found in “N ew Es­
timates o f Fixed Business Capital in the United States, 1925-65”, Sur­
vey o f Current Business, Dec. 1966, pp. 34-40, and “Revised Estimates
o f New Plant and Equipment Expenditures in the United States, 194769: Part I”, Survey o f Current Business, Jan. 1970, pp. 25-37.
1 Fixed Capital, 1925-75.
12

from the National Income and Product Accounts which
in turn are derived from various surveys developed by
the Bureau of the Census. One slight modification is
made to the NIA investment data to adjust for the sale
of second-hand assets by businesses to foreigners. The
gross investment data are broken into agriculture and
manufacturing sectors using sector totals derived from
the Department of Agriculture and the Censuses and,
Annual Surveys of Manufactures, respectively. The re­
sidual amount is classified to the nonmanufacturing ex­
cluding agriculture sector. The BEA manufacturing se­
ries was used as a benchmark for the manufacturing se­
ries developed in this study for the years prior to 1947
and for 1948. The data for the years 1947 and 1949-74
are not benchmarked to the BEA series since census
control totals are available for these years.
Several definitional inconsistencies exist between the
BEA series and the census series. Notably, BEA totals
include purchases of government surplus assets, passen­
ger autos owned by households that are used for busi­
ness purposes, and the capitalized trade margins on pur­
chases of used equipment assets. Most purchases of gov­
ernment assets are included in a separate series in this
study. However, data on the other two adjustments
were not available at the SIC level of detail and any
scaling to the BEA total to account for these adjust­
ments would not have measurably improved the capi­
tal stock estimates. Thus the manufacturing data after
1946 were controlled to the available census totals.
For the period 1890-1920, the BEA structures invest­
ment total was used as the control for estimating indus­
try investment data. No industry detail was available
for this time period, either from IRS or the Chawner
series. In view of this, it was assumed that the capital
expenditures exhibited the same pattern as that exhib­
ited during the entire 1921-29 period.
These capital expenditures were estimated in a twostep process. First, total BEA plant expenditures were
allocated to two-digit industries based on the ratio of
total investment (1921-29) to component two-digit in­
vestment during the same period. Second, data were
allocated to the three-digit level by taking the compo­
nent three-digit industry’s share of the previously esti­
mated two-digit total. While this process forces the in­
vestment pattern of the 1920’s onto the previous 30
years, the impact of these expenditures was negligible
since most of these assets were fully depreciated by
1947.
Capital transactions matrices

BEA has developed a series of tables for 1963 and




13

1967 which detail the sales of various types of produc­
ers’ durable equipment (PDE) and structures to the in­
dustry using these capital assets8 These tables are bas­
.
ically a disaggregation of the gross private domestic in­
vestment (GPDI) column of final demand in the inputoutput tables developed for these years. Data are de­
veloped showing the flow of up to 506 different prod­
uct codes to the 76 private business sector industries
using these capital goods. The sales or use of the cap­
ital goods are developed from a variety of sources, some
of which depart from the ownership basis of capital ex­
penditures used in the various census sources. Other
departures from the census concept include rentals of
identifiable capital goods, inclusion of central adminis­
trative offices and auxiliary units, use of personal autos
for business purposes, and the purchases of equipment
rebuilt by the original manufacturer.
These tables were collapsed in this study to identify
22 types of equipment goods corresponding to the 22
types of PDE goods in the National Income Accounts
and 18 categories of structures corresponding to the 18
types of nonresidential structures defined in the BEA
I/O tables. These data were summed to derive total in­
vestment for each of the 76 industries and were con­
verted to a distribution for use in the asset-weight se­
ries described in chapter 3. The total investment series
was used as a benchmark for selected nonmanufactur­
ing industries where more reliable data were not avail­
able. The IRS-derived investment series was scaled to
the total investment series and broken into plant and
equipment components based on the distribution of these
assets in these two years.
A third capital flows table was prepared for 1958 by
BLS9 This table initially was developed using a meth­
.
odology different from that for BEA’s later tables. A
later revision by BLS attempted to conform to BEA
conventions but, due to the lack of sufficient detail in
the 1958 I/O table and other supporting data, the dis­
tribution of asset purchases in the revised 1958 table
yielded inconsistencies in many industries when com­
pared with the 1963 and 1967 tables. Therefore, only
the total investment data derived from the 1958 table
and the break between plant and equipment were used,
specifically as a third benchmark for adjusting IRS-der­
ived investment data.
8Interindustry Transactions in New Structures and Equipment, 1963
and 1967, BEA SUP-75-07 (U. S. Department o f Commerce, Bureau
o f Economic Analysis, 1975).
9 Capital Flow Matrix, 1958. Bulletin 1601 (Bureau o f Labor Statis­
tics, 1968.

Chapter 3. Asset Weights,
Service Lives, and Gross
Investment Deflators

bution of asset purchases for certain industries, espe­
cially between 1958 and 1963. Since the 1958 table was
based on less comprehensive data and different techni­
ques than the 1963 and 1967 tables, it was assumed that
the change in the distribution from 1958 to 1963 was
caused primarily by a change in estimating techniques
and not by a change in the actual distribution of pur­
chases. Therefore, the 1958 table was eliminated as an
indicator of asset distributions.
It was then assumed that the remaining asset distri­
butions were a reasonable representation of the distri­
bution of asset purchases for all years. While this as­
sumption is obviously weak, especially for years far
away from 1963 and 1967, it was made for the lack of
any more specific data for other years. The final distri­
bution of asset weights was assumed to be the weight­
ed average of the asset weights for each of the two
years for each I/O industry.
A further assumption was that component three- and
four-digit industries within each I/O industry also had
the same weight distribution. This industry-weight se­
ries was then used to develop the asset deflator series
and, in combination with the service life series, the two
replacement functions used in the calculation of the
gross and net stock series.

Asset Weights
Chapter 2 presented the general requirements for de­
veloping the investment data for structures and equip­
ment. These data represent a bundle of different types
of assets, each with its own attributes, including differ­
ences in expected service life. If a capital stock series
is estimated ignoring the differences in service lives of
actual assets purchased, then large distortions may be
introduced, particularly when interindustry compari­
sons are made, since the level of capital stock is direct­
ly related to the length of time assets are included in
the stock. An ideal approach is to develop investment
data for each type of capital good purchased by an in­
dustry, calculate a capital stock series for these goods,
and develop an aggregate measure from this detail.
However, very little information exists concerning the
detailed purchases of capital goods by type and devel­
oping a time series of sufficient length to use in the per­
petual inventory model would prove to be a burden­
some task.
Fortunately, information is available on the asset com­
position of the plant and equipment bundles for three
specific years: 1958, 1963, and 1967. These data are in
the form of the previously mentioned capital flows ta­
bles (transactions matrices) developed by BLS and
BE A 11 These tables detail the purchases or use of dif­
0
.
ferent types of equipment and plant assets for the 77
private sector industries defined in the BEA input-out­
put tables for those years. For this study, equipment
items were grouped into 22 broad categories consistent
with the producers’ durable equipment production se­
ries available in the National Income and Product Ac­
counts". The 18 categories into which structures were
divided provided more than sufficient detail for this
study and were left intact. Comparisons of the three
tables indicated fairly strong movements in the distri­

Asset Service Lives
The most useful source of service lives consistent
with the concepts required by this study is the BEA
capital stocks study1, which was based on IRS Bulle­
2
tin F 1 and data from the Agriculture Department on
3
the lives of farm assets. Bulletin F provided service
lives for a detailed list of equipment and structure types.
These lives were aggregated by BEA to 20 different
equipment categories and 11 structure categories by
weighting the specific IRS types by the value of ship­
ments of these goods and allocating the weighted life
to the BEA category. However, subsequent revisions
of the IRS depreciation guidelines and other evidence

10Capital Flow Matrix, 1958, and Interindustry Transactions, 1963 and
1967.
1 Data for the National Income and Product Accounts are present­
1
ed in various monthly issues o f the Survey o f Current Business. These
data are compiled periodically in a reference volume, the latest o f
which is The National Income and Product Accounts o f the United
States, 1929-74: Statistical Tables. Capital expenditures for equipment
may be found in tables 5.6 and 5.7.




12Fixed Capital, 1925-75.
1
3 Income Tax, Depreciation and Obsolescence, Estimated Useful Lives
and Depreciation Rates, IRS Bulletin F (Rev. January 1942).

14

which the data are shown. These figures are used as an
approximate measure of the replacement costs of capi­
tal. The third measure of stocks is expressed in constant
dollars - the value of assets is adjusted to remove the
effect of price changes relative to a given base year.
These data most accurately reflect the actual change in
the quantity or efficiency of capital over time. The cap­
ital stock and related time series presented in this bul­
letin are calculated in both historical dollars and con­
stant dollars with a 1972 base year.
Separate and unique price deflators to convert the
historical-dollar investment series into constant dollars
were developed for each industry. These deflators were
derived from price indexes for specific types of equip­
ment and structures obtained from the National Income
and Product Accounts1. The equipment deflators de­
5
tailed 22 specific types of equipment corresponding to
the 22 types of equipment assets in the asset bundle.
These data were available for the years 1929-74. Defla­
tor data for the time period 1921-28 were derived from
the BEA capital stocks study which detailed 20 types
of equipment assets. Where more detail existed in the
National Accounts series, it was assumed that the over­
all BEA deflator was applicable to the detailed parts.
The National Income and Product Accounts detailed
deflators for 12 specific types of structures for the years
1929-74. In order to develop the additional structures
detail required for this study, it was assumed that the
deflator for each of the four types of commercial build­
ings in this study corresponded to the overall commer­
cial deflator, and the four institutional and other struc­
tures categories corresponded to the National Accounts
institutional and other category. These data were sup­
plemented by deflator data from the BEA study to pro­
vide a continuous deflator series from 1890 to 1974.
Once the price indexes for asset types were devel­
oped, specific industry gross investment deflators were
obtained by weighting each asset price index by the
corresponding weight of that asset in the industry’s in­
vestment bundle. The sum of the weighted indexes
yielded a composite deflator which accurately reflect­
ed the mix of assets purchased by an industry.
The transportation industries were special cases since
neither their service lives nor their weights correspond­
ed to similar series for other industries. This required
development of a special deflator series for each trans­
portation industry. The structures deflators used were
various indexes from the National Accounts. The equip­
ment series was developed using weighted price index­
es from the National Accounts. Table 5 presents the
deflator series and weights used for each transportation
industry.

suggest that the Bulletin F lives were too long, espe­
cially for structures where the Bulletin F lives were
based only on new construction and did not include
shorter lived alterations and additions. In light of this,
BEA revised the service lives of its categories down­
ward to reflect the new guidelines. The final BEA lives
are:
Equipment: Bulletin F less 15 percent.
Structures: Manufacturing—
Bulletin F less 32
percent.
Nonmanufacturing—
Bulletin F less 21
percent.
Agriculture— years.
38
The final lives used in this study were based on the
BEA data with a few minor adjustments. These serv­
ice lives were used along with the asset weights to de­
velop the discard and decay functions described in the
following chapter. For a number of asset types, more
detail existed in the asset-weight series than in the serv­
ice life series. For those types of goods where no lives
were available, it was assumed that the life of the less
detailed BEA types applied to the more detailed na­
tional income types. For example, the equipment bun­
dle in this study includes three types of electrical equip­
ment. The assumed service lives of these three asset
types were the same as the one electrical machinery
category presented by BEA. A second adjustment was
made to the BEA lives of equipment and structures
purchased by transportation industries. These data were
based on a previous study by Jack Faucett Associates1
4
for the Department of Transportation and are detailed
separately below. Included in the transportation equip­
ment revision was a lowering of the BEA service life
for motor vehicles purchased by all industries. Table 3
details the general service lives assumed for this study.
Table 4 details the specific lives used for the transpor­
tation industries.

Gross Investment Deflators
Capital stock data may be developed using any of
three different methods of pricing. Stocks measured in
historical dollars represent the accumulated value of
capital assets based on their original acquisition costs.
These are the results of direct calculation of the stocks
using the historical-dollar investment series. Stocks
measured in current dollars reflect the value at which
assets were acquired over time converted to the cur­
rent year’s prices, i.e., the price level in the year for
1 Capital Stocks Measures for Transportation: A Study in Five Vol­
4
umes, Jack Faucett Associates for the U.S. Dept, o f Transportation
(December 1974).




1 National Income and Product Accounts, table 7.14.
5

15

Table 3.

Average service lives of equipment and structures
Life
(years)

Type of asset

Life
(years)

Type o f asset
Structures

Equipm ent
F u rn itu re ...............................................................................................
Fabricated metal products ............................................................
Engines and turbin es.....................................................................
Farm machinery except tractors....................................................
Construction machinery except tractors.....................................
Mining and oil field m achinery.......................................................
Metalworking m a c h in e ry .................................................................

O ffice, accounting, and computing machinery ......................
Service industry m a c h in e s ...............................................................
Com m unication e q u ip m e n t............................................................
Other electric equipm ent, no t elsewhere classified.................
Trucks, buses, and tr a ile r s ..............................................................
A u to s ......................................................................................................
Ships and b o a t s ..................................................................................
Railroad e q u ip m e n t...........................................................................
In s tru m e n ts ..........................................................................................
Other e q u ip m e n t................................................................................

Industrial b u ild in g s ...........................................................................
Office b u ild in g s ...................................................................................
W areho uses..........................................................................................

15
18
21
8
17
9
10
16
16
14
8
10
14
14
14
1 6.8

Stores and restaurants........................................................................
Religious buildings..............................................................................
Education b u ild in g s...........................................................................
Hospital b u ild in g s ..............................................................................

R ailro a d s...............................................................................................
Electric u t ilitie s ...................................................................................
Petroleum p ip e lin e s ...........................................................................
F a r m .......................................................................................................
Oil and gas wells ................................................................................
Oil and gas well e x p lo ra tio n ............................................................

29
2 22

27
36
36
36
36
48
48
48
31
27
(3 )
30
30
(3)
38
16
16
31

2 25
11
11

1Changed from BEA assumption of 9 years.
2 For equipm ent in transportation industries, see table 4.
3 See table 4.

Table 4.

Service life assumptions for transportation industries
Transportation mode

Service
life
(years)

Asset
weight
(percent)

Transportation mode

Domestic air:
Structures .....................................................
Equipm ent:
Flight equipm ent:
Turbo-fan .........................
Turbo-jetand turbo-prop:
4-engine ...............

Railroads:
58
Equipm ent:
Locomotives .................................
Work eq u ip m e n t...........................
Passenger c a rs .................................
Freight cars.....................................
Other e q u ip m e n t.........................
Commercial trucking:
Structures ..................................................
E q u ip m en t:
Trucks .............................................
Other e q u ip m e n t.........................

21.6
28.9
30.5
31.7
37 5
8.3

46
10.0
11.1

1 00
33 .3
2.0
10.6
52.6
1 0
.5

Piston ................................
W id e -b o d y .........................
Ground equipm ent ....................
International air:
S tru c tu re s .....................................................
Equipm ent:
Flight equipm ent:
Turbo-fan .........................
Turbo-jet and turbo-prop:
4-engine ...............
2-engine ...............
Piston .................................
W id e -b o d y .........................
Ground e q u ip m e n t......................

92
8

58
15

100
100

Local bus:
S tru c tu re s .....................................................
E q u ip m e n t..................................................

58
20

100
100

Equipm ent:
Trucks .............................................
Com m unication equipm ent . . .

100

1 5.0

75.7

14.0
11.5
10.0
17 .0
8.8

5.1
5.9
2.5
2.8
8 .0

25

100

15.0

75.7

14.0
11.5
10 .0
17.0
8.8

5.1
5.9
2.5
2.8
8 .0

Water:
30
32
40
45

S tru c tu re s .....................................................
E q u ip m e n t..................................................

15.9
80 .2
3.3
.6

E q u ip m e n t..................................................
5
25

58
26

100
100

30
8

100
100

Freight forwarders:

20.2
79 .8

Taxicabs:
S tru c tu re s .....................................................
E q u ip m e n t..................................................

1 No investment in structures.




25

Asset
weight
(percent)

100

Intercity bus:
S tru c tu re s ....................................................
E q u ip m e n t..................................................

Pipelines:
Structures:
Gathering lin e s ..............................
Main lin e s ........................................
Fuel ta n ks........................................

Service
life
(years)

16

(1)
3

(1)
100

Table 5.

Transportation industry deflators by type and source

Transportation mode

National accounts
price index1

Weight
(percent)

Railroads:
E quipm ent............
Commercial trucking:
S tru c tu re s ............
E q u ip m e n t..........

Domestic a ir :
Railroad equipm ent

100
100

Industrial
Trucks and buses
General industrial equipm ent

100
92
8

Intercity bus:
S tru c tu re s ............
E q u ip m e n t..........

Industrial
Trucks and buses

Industrial
Trucks and buses

E q u ip m e n t..........

International air;
S tru c tu re s .............
E q u ip m e n t..........

100
100

Local bus:
S tru c tu re s .............
E q u ip m e n t..........

National accounts
price in dex1

Transportation mode

100
100

Weight
(percent)

'
A ircraft
Trucks and buses
Furniture
Office equipm ent
Fabricated metal products

1 00
94
2.3
.5
.5
2.7

Commercial
A ircraft
Trucks and buses
Furniture
Office equipm ent
Fabricated metal products

100
94
2.3
.5
.5
2.7

Industrial
Ships and boats

100
100

Commercial
Trucks and buses
Furniture
Office equipm ent

100
6 6 .5
16 .75
16.75

(2)
Autom obiles

(2)
100

Water:
Pipelines:
S tru c tu re s ............
E q u ip m e n t..........

Pipelines
Engines and turbines
Electrical machinery
Tractors
Trucks and buses

S tru c tu re s ............
E q u ip m e n t..........

100
41
4 6 .2
6.4
6.4

Freight forwarders:
S tru c tu re s .............
E q u ip m e n t..........

Taxicabs:
S tru c tu re s .............
E q u ip m e n t..........
1 National income and product accounts: Structures, table 7.1 3;
equipm ent, table 7.14.




2 No investment in structures,

17

Chapter 4. Time Paths of
Discards and Depreciation

This chapter describes the model which incorporates
actual asset service lives and changes in the efficiency
of assets as they age to develop time paths of discards
and depreciation. Two basic relationships are coverd
here: The discard pattern of a group of assets over time,
and the depreciation function (which includes both the
discard pattern and changes in the productivity of a
group of capital assets over time). These relationships
correspond to the second and third steps in the estima­
tion process described in chapter 1.

Chart 1. Simple discard function for five assets
with service lives ranging from 5 to 25 years
Percent of assets available
for production

Discard Pattern
The second major step, once the annual investment
series was derived, was to determine the length of time
an asset is available for production once it is purchased.
The simple model illustrated in chapter 1 assumed that
the service lives of all assets were the same, that is,
there was no variation in the service lives due to qual­
ity differences, differences in types of assets, chance,
etc.
If we assume now that the asset bundle is composed
of several different asset types, each with variations in
their expected service lives, then there is a whole se­
ries of points over the entire life of the asset bundle at
which assets with progressively longer lives are
scrapped. These discard points may be expressed as a
function based on the percentage of the original invest­
ment bundle remaining n years after the original invest­
ment date. The value of this function will be 100 per­
cent up to the point where the shortest lived asset is
discarded. It will then decline to 100 less the percent
of the original investment composed of the shortest
lived asset. As time progresses, the discard function is
further reduced as more and more assets are discarded.
Chart 1 illustrates a simple discard function for an in­
dustry which buys five types of assets, each constitut­
ing 20 percent of total investment purchases. The short­
est lived asset is discarded after 5 years and the long­
est after 25 years; the rest of the assets reach the end
of their service lives at 5-year intervals between 5 and
25 years. The function shown assumes that there is no
difference in the service lives of a particular type of
asset.
A second cause for the variation in the pattern of
discards is variation within one specific asset type. For



example, two ostensibly identical machines may not
have the same actual service life due to differences in
usage, quality of components, maintenance and repair
patterns, or simply chance variation. Any service life
chosen for a particular type of asset is in reality an av­
erage-50 percent of the assets of that type will be dis­
carded sooner and 50 percent will be discarded later
than the average. Thus, there is a distribution of actual
discards centered on the mean service life. However,
very little data exist on the form of the distribution
around the mean service life. The only study available
was conducted by Winfrey1 during the 1930’s detailing
6
the actual service lives of a group of assets in use dur­
ing that time period. Winfrey’s S-3 distribution had a
bell-shaped appearance somewhat akin to the normal
1
6 R. Winfrey, Statistical Analysis o f Industrial Property Retirement,
Bulletin 125 (Iowa Engineering Experiment Station, 1935).
18

distribution. No rigorous tests were performed to de­
termine if this distribution was in fact a normal distri­
bution, but, based on this admittedly sparse evidence,
it is assumed that there exists a normal distribution about
the mean life of a particular type of asset. This assump­
tion is used mostly for convenience since tables of val­
ues for the normal distribution are readily available.
The assumption of a normal distribution says noth­
ing about the dispersion or standard deviation of the
distribution about the mean. For example, one could
assume a very narrow, almost spiked, distribution hav­
ing a small standard deviation. This would create a nar­
row boundary within which the assets would be dis­
carded. Conversely, one could assume a broad-based
distribution with a large standard deviation. This will
yield a discard range over a long time interval, possi­
bly too long for effective use with the perpetual inven­
tory process. Similar studies using the Winfrey distri­
bution1 assume that bounds exist on either side of the
7
mean which effectively establish a discard range with
endpoints at 45 and 155 percent of the mean life. For
this study, it is assumed that the bounds of the discard
range are 50 and 150 percent of the mean life. An ad­
ditional assumption is that the standard deviation of the
normal distribution is 25 percent of the mean life. Thus,
the discard range encompasses two standard deviations
of the normal or approximately 95 percent of the area
under the normal distribution1.
8
One problem arises when restricting the discard range
to two standard deviations about the mean. The nor­
mal distribution is a continuous function which extends
infinitely in both directions from the mean. As previ­
ously noted, two standard deviations account for ap­
proximately 95 percent of the area under the distribu­
tion. The remaining 5 percent falls outside the discard
range, with 2-1/2 percent of the distribution lying in
each of the tails. In addition, a portion of the left tail
falls outside the logical range of the actual distribution
of discards. That is, it implies that there is a small
amount of scrapping before the initial investment date.
This is illustrated by the area to the left of 0 in chart
2.
In order to restrict the discards to the actual desired
range (between 5 and 15 years in this illustration), the
normal distribution must be adjusted or truncated to
eliminate the area under the tails. This will involve ad­
justing the values of the normal upward in the allowed
range and eliminating values for time periods outside
the allowed range. The truncation process may be per­
formed in two ways. The first method is vertical trun­
cation, which cuts the function vertically at the two
endpoints of the discard interval. The area within the
allowed range is then adjusted upwards by the ratio of
the total area under the normal curve to the area un-

der the truncated distribution. In our example, this is
approximately equal to the ratio 100/95.
The second adjustment process is to truncate the nor­
mal horizontally by raising the X-axis to X’ and elimi­
nating all of the area under the normal that also falls
under X’. The values of the remaining distribution are
then adjusted upwards, as in the vertical technique, by
the ratio of the total area to the adjusted area. In this
case, the area eliminated from the normal distribution
is significantly greater than the area eliminated using
the vertical process, resulting in a correspondingly
larger adjustment factor. The major difference between
these two processes is the relative weight in the final
distributions. Vertical truncation tends to create a func­
tion weighted more towards the tails, whereas horizon­
tal truncation tends to create a function weighted more
towards the center of the distribution. For this study,
vertical truncation was used to maintain a flatter distri­
bution of discards throughout the entire discard range.
The above discussion detailed the variation in serv­
ice lives over the life of a single type of asset. This var­
iation about the mean service life is also evident in the
aggregate discard function (the function that describes
all assets in the investment bundle). That is illustrated
in chart 3 where the new discard function allowing for
variation in the actual service lives is plotted along with
the fixed-life discard function from chart 1.
As can be seen, there is a general smoothing of the
function away from the original stair-step. However,
the new discard function is still not continuous; it dis­
plays bumps and valleys corresponding to points in time
where the combination of discards of the specific asset
types is either above or below some average discard
rate. Also note that the discard interval for the entire
asset bundle has been lengthened from an initial range
of 5 to 25 years to a new range of 2-1/2 to 37-1/2 years

17Fixed Capital, 1925-75.
1 As derived from a table o f normal values.
8




19

of both writers and readers concerning what is being
measured.
An example may prove useful in illustrating many of
these different concepts. For consistency, we shall fol­
low much of the terminology and examples used by
Coen2 and Feldstein and Rothschild2. Suppose that we
0
1
own a single asset, a light bulb, from which we expect
to derive output (illumination) over a given time peri­
od, say, 1,000 hours, and that the cost of the bulb when
new was $1. After the first 100 hours of use, nine-tenths
of the expected useful service of the bulb remains. We
now raise the question of the amount of depreciation
during this time period. If we are interested in efficien­
cy depreciation, then we are not able to determine if
any decline of productivity has taken place from the
limited amount of data we have available. However,
we may assume that, if the bulb continues to burn as
brightly as when new, there has been no decline in out­
put and consequently no decline in efficiency. At the
same time, economic or market depreciation has oc­
curred, since after 100 hours of operation the bulb is
worth less to us than when new because the expected
service life has been reduced by one-tenth. Assuming
a discount rate of zero, the bulb is now worth only 90
cents, or, put another way, the bulb has been subject
to economic depreciation equal to 10 cents.
Now suppose that after 500 hours of operation the
bulb is still burning but not as brightly as when new.
There is an obvious decline in the output of the bulb,
i.e., a decline in the efficiency of the bulb in producing
a specified amount of light. At the same time, econom­
ic depreciation has occurred due to both a decrease in

Chart 3. Alternative discard functions for five
assets with service lives ranging from 5 to 25
years
Percent of assets
available for production

A ge of asset

corresponding to the distribution of discards around the
shortest and longest lived assets, respectively.

Depreciation Function
Concept of efficiency depreciation
1 The term ‘one-hoss shay’ is derived from a poem written by Oliver
9
Wendell Holmes entitled “The D eacon’s Masterpiece or, The Won­
derful ‘One-Hoss Shay’”. The portion concerning the shay’s depre­
ciation is reproduced here for the reader’s enjoyment.

The previous discussion of the discard function as­
sumed that assets are fully productive throughout their
useful service lives, at which point they simply fall
apart. This form of depreciation is commonly referred
to as ‘one-hoss shay’ depreciation1. However, assets (es­
9
pecially equipment) do deteriorate over time and re­
quire more resources— labor, materials, maintenance
and repair, etc.— in order to maintain the same output of
the assets as when new. This concept is commonly called
depreciation but is in many cases confused with eco­
nomic or accounting forms of depreciation. For the
purposes of this study, it was desirable to develop a
measure of capital which accurately reflected the de­
cline in the ability of capital to produce goods and serv­
ices; i.e., depreciation defined as the decline in the po­
tential productivity or efficiency of capital. Other mod­
els of depreciation such as tax depreciation or change
in market value are not directly applicable to this study
but are useful for other purposes such as rate-of-return
studies or investment demand analyses. Unfortunately,
much of the literature in this area uses many of these
terms interchangeably, with much confusion on the part



“First a shiver, and then a thrill,
Then something decidedly like a spill,—
And the parson was sitting upon a rock,
At half past nine by the m eet’n-house clock,—
Just the hour o f the Earthquake shock!
What do you think the parson found,
When he got up and stared around?
The poor old chaise in a heap or mound,
As if it had been to the mill and ground!
You see, o f course, if you’re not a dunce,
How it went to pieces all at once,—
All at once, and nothing first,—
Just as bubbles do when they burst.
End o f the wonderful one-hoss shay.
Logic is logic. That’s all I say.”
“ Robert M. Coen, “Investment Behavior, the Measurement o f D e­
preciation and Tax Policy”, American Economic Review, Mar. 1975,
pp. 59-74.
21M. Feldstein and M. Rothschild, “Towards an Economic Theory
o f Replacement Investment”, Econometrica, May 1974, pp. 393-425.
20

the remaining potential output of the bulb (500 hours)
and a decrease in the efficiency of the bulb in provid­
ing the output. Thus, economic depreciation is a func­
tion not only of the remaining life (output) of the bulb
but also of the efficiency with which that output may
be produced. In this example, the market value of the
bulb would be less than 50 cents, reflecting the loss in
expected output (50 cents) and the loss in productivity.
Feldstein and Rothschild attempt to clarify much of
the confusion regarding these concepts by expanding
the number of factors affecting depreciation (defined in
the broadest sense). Their concept of depreciation is
akin to the economic depreciation concept discussed
above where depreciation is the fall in the price of an
asset as it ages. Depreciation is based on the rate of de­
terioration of the asset as it ages and the rate of tech­
nological obsolescence (the decrease in real resource
cost per unit of output through the use of newer vin­
tages of the asset). Deterioration is defined as the in­
crease in the cost of resources required to produce a
unit of output and can be broken into two componentsoutput decay and input decay. Output decay is the de­
cline in the output of the asset as it ages. In the above
example, the decline in illumination after 500 hours of
use can be characterized as output decay. That is, the
asset is no longer able to produce at the same level as
when new. Input decay is defined as the increase in
materials, labor, maintenance and repair, etc., required
to maintain the same level of output. For example, if
more energy were required to produce the same amount
of light after 500 hours than when new, then input de­
cay has occurred since it now requires more resources
to make the asset produce the same amount of output.
In practice, the distinction between the two forms of
decay is not clear and in the subsequent discussion we
will simply refer to decay as the combined effect of in­
put and output decay on the productivity of the asset.
In developing the capital stock series for productiv­
ity studies, we are interested in the potential produc­
tivity or efficiency of a group of capital assets in pro­
ducing a given output. These stocks are affected by
both forms of deterioration, and the efficiency measure
we develop should provide an index of how produc­
tive the capital is in one time period compared to an­
other. Our measure (expressed in dollars) is simply the
amount of original capital goods available for produc­
tion in subsequent time periods. Throughout the re­
mainder of this study, we shall refer to the decline in
productivity as efficiency depreciation or decay.
In order to develop capital stock measures reflecting
efficiency depreciation (net stocks) which will mesh
with the previously discussed discard function in the
model, it is desirable to develop a function that maps
both the decay and discards of an investment bundle
over time. This function will be called the decay func­
tion and is simply a series of proportions indicating what
part of an investment bundle is available for production



N years after the purchase year. As with the discard func­
tion, the decay function is used in the perpetual inven­
tory process to cumulate capital of different vintages
into a capital stock estimate for a single year.
One might note that the decay function develops es­
timates for both efficiency decay and discards of wornout assets. Returning briefly to the concept of discards,
the distribution of actual discards around the mean life
effectively breaks the total investment value (normal­
ized to 1) into many small service intervals, each hav­
ing a service life which may differ from the mean life.
The discard function assumes that over the service in­
terval the efficiency of the capital good does not di­
minish. The decay function carries the discard function
one step further by assuming that within each interval
the efficiency of the capital asset declines according to
a yet-to-be-defined formula. The total decay function
for a particular asset class (plant or equipment) is de­
veloped based on an aggregation of individual decay
functions for each service interval into a decay func­
tion for each asset type. This function is in turn weight­
ed by the asset weight and combined with other weight­
ed asset decay functions to derive the total decay func­
tion for the investment bundle purchased by the
industry.
Form of depreciation

To this point the actual form of depreciation has not
been mentioned, and it is this form over which much
of the controversy concerning development of a capi­
tal stock series has arisen. There is no general consen­
sus as to what time path efficiency depreciation follows,
but it can generally be characterized by one of two
classes. The first class comprises accelerated forms of
depreciation where most of the efficiency decline oc­
curs early in the service life of the asset. These forms
— geometric decay, declining balance, sum-of-the-years
digits, etc.— are closely related to tax depreciation guide­
lines and accounting principles. The second class of de­
preciation functions assumes that most of the depreci­
ation occurs in the later years of service rather than in
the early years.
In developing the depreciation formula for this study,
it was desired to derive a formula which encompassed
many of the above forms as special cases so that by
varying certain parameters, the form of the deprecia­
tion could be varied. This function follows the formula:
A ~a
A -B a

where
A is the service life of the asset,
a is the actual age of the asset, and
B is a curvature parameter describing the form of
depreciation.
The calculated value of the above function yields the
21

The problem now arises as to what value should be
chosen for Beta to reflect the efficiency decay. Unfor­
tunately, there is very little empirical evidence to sug­
gest a precise value. Much of the justification for use
of accelerated forms is based on several studies which
detail the resale of used assets in various types of wellestablished secondary markets2. These studies found for
2
the most part that the value of assets did decline in an
accelerated pattern, with most of the decline occurring
in the early years of service. However, they failed to
distinguish between efficiency depreciation and changes
in the economic value of the assets. Returning to the
above discussion of the light bulb, we saw that the ex­
pected value of the bulb in the absence of a discount
rate was proportional to the number of years in serv­
ice or the straight-line rate. Thus, if we look at eco­
nomic depreciation, the maximum value of Beta is zero.
However, if there is a discount rate and the future cap­
ital services are discounted to the present year, we find
that the present value of future capital services in the
early years is greater than in the later years and that
the capital services decline at a geometric rate since the
discount factor is operating exponentially (geometrical­
ly) on the future capital services. Thus, empirical evi­
dence tends to support the theory that economic value
does decline at an accelerated rate.
However, there is no justification for extending this
evidence to assume that efficiency also declines at an
accelerated rate. On the contrary, both technological
and economic arguments tend to support the theory
that efficiency decay occurs more in the later years than
in the early years. If one observes capital assets in use,
it appears that the efficiency is relatively high during
the early years of use and that only after some time
does the asset begin to deteriorate. For example, the
efficiency of an automobile to produce transportation
services is uniformly high during the early years of its
life2. After a time, some of the original equipment on
3
the auto begins to fail. In the absence of maintenance
and repair expenditures, the efficiency of the auto has
declined. As the auto ages, more and more parts of the
auto wear out and the repair expenditures rise accord­
ingly. At some point, the expenditures for repairs are
at such a level that many are foregone and the efficien­
cy of the auto declines until the point where the auto

value of assets available for production a years after
the purchase date of the asset expressed as a proportion
of the initial investment amount. Subtracting this value
from 1 will yield the proportion of accumulated depre­
ciation a years after the purchase date.
This function is referred to as the Beta-decay func­
tion and it incorporates many of the above-mentioned
concepts in a form consistent with the discard function.
The upper limit of Beta(B) is 1. This corresponds to
the ‘one-hoss shay’ form of depreciation where an as­
set is fully productive until it reaches the end of its
service life, at which point it falls apart. As the value
of B approaches zero, depreciation occurs but at an in­
creasing rate over time, corresponding to the second
general class of depreciation forms described above. If
B is zero, the function reduces to
A ~a
A

which corresponds to the fomula for straight-time depreci­
ation where the physical decay of the asset occurs in even
increments over the life of the asset. Finally, if B is nega­
tive, depreciation occurs most rapidly in the early years of
service corresponding to the accelerated forms of the
first class. Several possible values of B and their corre­
sponding depreciation time paths are presented in table 6
and are illustrated in chart 4.

Chart 4. Efficiency of an asset with a 10-year
service life under various depreciation
assumptions
Efficien cy of
productive assets
Percent




Index of maintenance
and repair

22A second major justification is based on the work o f Dale Jorgen­
son in which he develops an explanation o f accelerated forms based
on renewal theory. This particular concept and the resulting argu­
ments against its use are beyond the scope o f this publication. For
an excellent discussion o f many o f these concepts, see Michael F.
Mohr, Issues in the Theory and Measurement o f Capital Inputs in Pro­
duction (unpublished).
23 Some persons would suggest that the efficiency o f the car or any
other asset is not 100 percent initially but rather that it increases to
100 percent only after some break-in period in which all o f the ini­
tial defects are adjusted. While it is certainly a valid point, it poses
a problem in developing a uniform pattern o f depreciation o f all as­
sets and will be ignored in this study.

A ge of asset

22

Table 6.

Depreciation time paths based on alternative values of Beta for an asset with a 10-year service life
Age

Percent o f initial efficiency (lena of year)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

.........................................................................
.........................................................................
.........................................................................
.......................................................................................

........................................................................
.........................................................................
.........................................................................
.........................................................................
.........................................................................

B=.75

98 .9
97 .5
9 5 .8
93.7
9 0 .9
86 .9
8 1 .0
7 1 .4
52.5
0.

97.2
94.1
90.3
85.7
8 0 .0
72.5
63.1
50.0
30.7
0.

o
n
m

B=.9

B=-1

B =-2

B=.9

B=.75

90.
80.
70.
60.
50.
40.
30.
20.
10.
0.

81.8
6 6 .6
53.8
42 .8
3 3 .3
2 5 .0
17.6
11.1
5.2
0.

75.0
57.1
43.7
3 3 .3
25 .0
18.1
12.5
7.6
3.5
0.

1.1
1.4
1.7
2.1
2.8
4 .0
5.9
9.6
18.9
52.5

2.8
2.8
3.8
4.6
5.7
7.5
9.4
13.1
19.3
30.7

B=0
10.
10.
10.
10 .
10.
10.
10 .
10.
10.
10.

B=-1

B =-2

18.2
15.3
12.8
11.0
9.5
8.3
7.4
6.5
5.9
5.2

25.0
17.9
13.4
10.4
8.3
6.9
5.6
4.9
4.1
3.5

Two studies2 add evidence to suggest that firms at­
4
tempt to maintain the efficiency of capital until such
time as changes in demand, technological obsolescence,
or efficiency decay warrant the decision to scrap the
asset. At that point, the asset is allowed to depreciate
over the remaining service life with little effort to off­
set the decline in efficiency. These studies are incon­
sistent with the accelerated form of depreciation where
efficiency declines rapidly in early years of service and
more slowly in later years.
Given the above discussion, it seems appropriate to
accept the second form of depreciation as the most ap­
plicable for this study and restrict the possible values
of Beta to greater than zero and less than one. It was
assumed that the efficiency of a structure (especially a
building) declines very slowly over most of its service
life until a point is reached where the cost of major re­
pairs to the structure exceeds the increased capital serv­
ices derived from the repairs, at which point the struc­
ture is allowed to depreciate rapidly until it is useless
for production purposes. The Beta value for equipment
was chosen assuming that the decline in efficiency oc­
curred over a larger portion of the service life and with
less severity than the structures depreciation. Given
these assumptions, the final Beta values chosen were
0.9 for structures and 0.75 for equipment.
To illustrate the effects of changes in the value of
Beta on a capital stock series, various values of Beta
were used to calculate a test series of capital stock es­
timates. The service lives and weights used in this test
correspond to the sample values used throughout this
chapter. The capital expenditure series used was invest­
ment in equipment assets by all manufacturing indus­
tries for the years 1921-74. Table 7 presents the results
of the calculations for seven different values of Beta
for the years 1947 and 1974 and the trend rate of growth
of the capital stock series during this time period.
Changes in the values of Beta produce significant
changes in the magnitude of the capital stocks. How­
ever, there is a remarkable similarity in the rate of

is sold or scrapped.
For this study, maintenance and repair expenditures
are defined to be those expenditures of a normal and
minor nature required to keep the asset running or
usable. It does not include major expenditures which
tend not only to increase the efficiency of the asset but
also to extend the service life of the asset. This concept
is consistent with accepted accounting and tax princi­
ples under which minor repairs are considered current
expenses of the firm while major repairs are generally
considered capital expenditures. The example of the au­
tomobile above may be explained using the Beta-decay
formula developed above. Returning to chart 4, we can
see that the depreciation time path may also be thought
of as an index of maintenance and repair expenditures
by subtracting the efficiency value of the asset in a
given year from the value at 100-percent efficiency.
This value can be read from the illustration by using
the right-hand maintenance and repair axis. At any lev­
el along this axis, the value represents the relative
amount of repair expenditures required to maintain the
asset at full productivity. Thus, the efficiency of the as­
set becomes a function in part of the level of past and
present maintenance and repair expenditures. In gener­
al, the higher the level of expenditures, the smaller the
decline in productivity.
A firm will engage in maintenance and repair activ­
ity only if the cost of doing so is less than or equal to
the present value of the additional capital services made
possible by the repairs. In the early years of service, it
pays the firm to keep the asset at or near full efficien­
cy since the cost of doing so is relatively small and
there is a relatively large number of productive years
remaining. As the asset ages, both the amount of future
capital services and the efficiency of the asset decline.
Thus, the payoff to maintain the asset at full efficiency
falls and there is less incentive to perform these serv­
ices. In addition, with the increase in maintenance and
repair expenditures required to maintain the older asset
comes a corresponding increase in the amount of time
the asset is out of service for repairs. Thus, the amount
of time available for production is smaller, which is re­
flected in the efficiency with which the asset produces
a given output.



Percent annua! depreciation

24 T. Barna, “On Measuring Capital” in The Theory o f Capital, F.A.
Lutz and D.C. Hague, eds. (London, Macmillan and Co., 1961); G.C.
Bittros, “A Statistical Theory o f Expenditures in Capital Maintenance
and Repair”, Journal o f Political Economy, Oct. 1976, pp. 917-36.

23

Table 7.
Impact on capital stock estimates of changes in the
value of Beta1
Beta
coefficient

Capital stock
(millions of dollars)
1947

1 . 0 .........................................................
. 9 ..........................................................
. 7 5 .......................................................
.5 .......................................................
. 2 5 .......................................................
. 1 ..........................................................
0 ............................................................

$ 2 0 2 ,9 8 9
1 8 0 ,5 6 4
1 6 4 ,6 0 4
1 4 8 ,1 1 2
1 3 6 ,9 1 5
1 3 1,58 9
1 2 8 ,4 4 6

G rowth
rate2

Percent of assets
available for production

1974

$ 2 0 ,8 0 4
18 ,600
17 ,103
15 ,592
14,577
14 ,0 9 6
1 3 ,813

Chart 5. Alternative discard and decay functions
for five assets with service lives ranging from
5 to 25 years

7.9
7.8
7.7
7.6
7.6
7.5
7.5

'in v e s tm e n t data used in calculations are total manufacturing
equipm ent purchases, 19 21-7 4. The asset bundle is assumed to be
composed o f assets with service lives of 5, 10, 15, 2 0 , and 25 years,
each constituting 20 percent of total investment.
1Based on least squares m ethod.

growth of the series over this time interval.
Thus, at least in the aggregate, the choice of Beta,
while producing a pronounced impact on the level of
capital stock, has little effect on the long-run trend. At
finer levels of detail where greater year-to-year fluctu­
ations exist in the annual investment patterns, there may
be a more pronounced effect on the growth of the cap­
ital stock.
Once the form of depreciation is chosen, a decay
function may be calculated for the investment bundle
relating the efficiency of the entire investment bundle
n years after purchase to the efficiency of the bundle
in the purchase year. This function reflects not only
changes in efficiency but also the different types of as­
sets in the investment bundle and the discard distribu­
tions around the mean service lives of the assets. Two




A ge of investment bundle

functions using the two assumed values of Beta are
shown in chart 5 superimposed on the two previously
illustrated discard functions.

24

Chapter 5. Capital Stocks for
Major Sectors

over their service life. Net stocks are calculated in the
same manner as gross stocks with the exception that
the assets lose efficiency during the course of their serv­
ice to the industry. This loss of efficiency is assumed
to occur over the entire lifetime of the assets and at an
increasing rate. Thus, the major portion of depreciation
occurs towards the end of the service life. In addition,
it is assumed that structures depreciate more slowly
than equipment.

Three major data series are developed in this study,
as outlined in the preceding chapters: Gross investment,
gross capital stocks, and net capital stocks. The gross
investment data are the basic time series used in the
perpetual inventory model to develop the two capital
stocks series. The three data series are presented below,
along with a description of the requirements and as­
sumptions used to develop the data.
Gross investment

For each industry, gross investment data have been
developed which meet the following criteria:
1. Data are provided separately for structures and
equipment.
2. Equipment data span the years 1921-74.
3. Structures data span the years 1890-1974.
4. All investment time series are consistent in defi­
nition both between industries and for all years.
5. Data are expressed in both historical-dollar costs
and constant-dollar costs.
6. The constant-dollar data reflect both the varia­
tion in the types of assets purchased from indus­
try to industry and the variation in the price changes
of different types of capital assets.

Capital stocks by major sector

Tables 8 through 13 detail the level of gross invest­
ment and gross and net capital stocks for the three ma­
jor industrial sectors of the economy and the total pri­
vate sector. The data are divided into nonresidential
structures and producers’ durable equipment and are
expressed in both historical and constant dollars. Sim­
ilar data are presented in appendix C for 72 input-out­
put industries.
Comparison With BEA capital stocks

The discussion in chapter 2 indicated that many of
the assumptions and data underlying the BEA capital
stock study differed from those in this study and yield­
ed different capital stock estimates. Chart 6 compares
the level of constant-dollar gross capital stocks from
the two studies for the years 1947-74. The measures are
similar, especially if the trends are compared, but the
actual levels differ, primarily in the structures series.
The BEA structures series is generally higher than the
BLS series until the early 1960’s, when the BLS series
becomes the higher of the two. The BEA equipment
series is consistently higher than the BLS series for all
years. As noted in chapter 2, the data presented in this
study should not be construed as a disaggregation of
the BEA data. Aside from the differences in the gross
stock series, the net stock series is different because
BEA assumes a much faster depreciation rate. This re­
sults in a BEA net stock series which is significantly
lower than the data presented in this study.

Gross capital stocks

Gross stocks as described in chapter 4 are the cumu­
lation of all past investments adjusted for the discard
of worn-out assets. Discards are calculated based on an
assumed service life for a bundle of investment goods
and a distribution of actual discards around this mean
life. Assets are assumed to be fully productive up to
the time they are discarded. At that point, the produc­
tivity of the asset falls to zero and the asset is no long­
er counted as part of the gross stock.
Net capital stocks

Net capital stocks are the cumulation of all past in­
vestments adjusted for the discard of worn-out assets
and the loss of efficiency (depreciation) of the assets




25

Table 8.

Gross investment for major sectors: Historical dollars

(M illions o f dollars)
Producers' durable equipm ent
Year

Nonresidential structures
Agri­
culture

M anu­
facturing

N onm anu­
facturing

Agri­
culture

Total
1947 ..................................................
1948 ..................................................
1949 ..................................................

Manu­
facturing

Nonm anu­
facturing

$ 1 2 ,9 6 0
15 ,868
14 ,419

$ 4 ,1 9 5
4 ,5 0 8
3,6 6 6

$ 6 ,7 9 6
8 ,6 3 0
7 ,7 0 0

$1 ,9 6 8
2 ,7 29
3 ,0 52

$8 ,5 9 7
10,121
9 ,7 3 0

$ 2 ,427
2 ,2 4 3
1,728

$5 ,3 7 6
7 ,0 53
7 ,2 22

$ 7 93
825
780

Total

1 9 50
1951
1952
1953
1954

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

15 ,273
17 ,945
16 ,875
17 .845
18,348

3 ,8 4 3
5 ,2 82
5,3 17
5,5 15
5 ,7 35

8 ,3 3 8
9 ,5 4 3
8 ,8 2 2
9 ,2 4 7
9,951

3,091
3,1 1 9
2 ,7 3 6
3 ,0 8 2
2,661

10 ,5 5 0
12 ,465
12 ,625
1 3 ,8 0 9
1 4 ,3 0 0

1,575
2 ,6 93
2 ,6 9 2
2 ,6 05
2 ,4 82

8 ,1 9 0
8 ,9 3 3
9 ,0 2 2
1 0 ,3 84
11 ,047

784
838
90 9
819
77 0

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

2 0 ,8 1 3
23 ,8 8 8
2 7 ,3 7 8
2 3 ,1 0 0
2 5 ,3 7 2

5,781
7 ,8 52
8 ,3 27
6 ,2 9 4
6 ,2 79

12 ,266
13,611
16,441
13 ,6 6 2
15 ,9 4 4

2 ,7 6 5
2 ,4 2 4
2,6 0 9
3 ,1 4 3
3 ,1 4 8

16 ,242
18 ,278
1 9 ,623
18,091
18 ,649

2 ,6 3 2
3,651
3,9 0 7
3 ,2 18
2,491

12,871
13 ,798
14 ,915
1 4 ,102
15 ,1 5 4

738
828
799
77 0
1,003

19 60
1961
1962
1963
19 64

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

26,881
26 ,833
2 9 ,772
3 0 ,9 2 6
36 ,858

7 ,2 3 2
6 ,9 8 6
7 ,6 68
8 ,3 7 4
9 ,9 6 4

16 ,9 8 2
16 ,8 7 9
19 ,256
18 ,7 3 5
2 3 ,1 5 2

2 ,6 67
2 ,9 6 8
2,8 47
3 ,8 1 6
3,741

1 9 ,6 6 0
2 0 ,0 3 3
2 1 ,3 3 4
2 1 ,5 2 3
2 4 ,0 3 8

2 ,8 5 0
2 ,8 0 0
2 ,8 0 8
3 ,0 5 2
3,3 87

15 ,9 1 8
16 ,317
17 ,5 1 5
17 ,4 6 5
1 9 ,6 4 3

891
915
1 ,0 10
1 ,0 06
1 ,0 0 6

19 65
1966
1967
1968
1969

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

4 1 ,9 8 2
4 9 ,4 5 3
4 9 ,9 2 6
5 6 ,533
6 1 ,6 4 3

1 2 ,375
1 4 ,9 1 0
15 ,689
15,231
1 6 ,3 8 0

2 5 ,3 3 0
2 9 ,6 9 3
2 9 ,1 6 6
3 6 ,1 8 2
3 9 ,9 3 0

4,2 7 7
4 ,8 49
5 ,0 7 0
5 ,1 19
5 ,3 32

2 8 ,0 7 4
3 1 ,2 9 5
3 1 ,2 8 0
3 3 ,4 7 8
3 7 ,7 6 7

4 ,4 6 3
5 ,4 05
5,841
5,407
5,9 52

2 2 ,5 4 6
2 4 ,7 2 5
2 4 ,0 5 0
2 6 ,6 8 8
30,431

1 ,0 64
1 ,1 64
1,389
1 ,3 82
1,383

1970
1971
1972
1973
19 74

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

59 ,6 3 3
61,301
69,961
8 4 ,697
9 5 ,9 6 7

16,271
15,477
18,706
20,957
27 ,3 3 7

3 7 ,4 5 2
4 0 ,3 4 8
4 4 ,8 5 3
5 5 ,4 5 0
58 ,8 6 7

5 ,9 09
5 ,4 74
6,401
8 ,2 8 9
9 ,7 6 2

39,971
4 1 ,5 1 2
4 5 ,0 6 4
5 4 ,1 6 4
57 ,7 6 9

5,8 19
5,3 86
5 ,3 1 4
5,9 99
8 ,2 12

32,491
3 4 ,4 5 7
38 ,2 3 3
4 5 ,9 2 4
4 6 ,7 4 8

1 ,6 6 0
1,6 68
1,5 16
2 ,2 4 0
2,8 08




26

Table 9.

Gross investment for major sectors: Constant dollars

(M illions of dollars)
Nonresidential structures

Producers' durable equipm ent
Year
Total
1947 ..................................................
1948 ..................................................
1949 ..................................................

M anu­
facturing

Non manu­
facturing

Agri­
culture

Total

M anu­
facturing

Nonm anu­
facturing

Agri­
culture

$26,621
30,011
26 ,1 6 7

$ 9 ,4 8 4
9 ,4 7 9
7 ,3 58

$ 1 2 ,8 6 6
1 5 ,1 9 0
1 3 ,166

$ 4 ,269
5,341
5,641

$ 1 9 ,5 1 4
2 0 ,7 1 0
20 ,1 3 7

$ 5 ,3 9 4
4 ,4 8 6
3 ,5 55

$ 1 2 ,3 4 8
14 ,573
1 4 ,982

$ 1 ,7 7 0
1,6 5 0
1,598

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

2 6 ,9 2 3
2 9 ,1 7 0
2 7 ,0 6 6
2 8 ,1 7 6
2 8 ,0 7 4

7,4 87
9 ,2 5 3
9,151
9 ,3 1 9
9 ,4 7 6

13 ,866
14 ,665
13 ,479
13 ,876
14 ,366

5,569
5,251
4 ,4 3 4
4 ,9 7 9
4,231

2 1 ,6 6 5
22,811
22,531
2 4 ,2 4 8
2 5 ,6 1 3

3,281
4 ,9 8 6
4 ,8 08
4,651
4 ,5 1 5

16 ,7 5 0
1 6 ,283
1 6 ,099
18 ,139
19,687

1,633
1,540
1,623
1,457
1,4 10

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

3 1 ,2 0 3
3 3 ,1 8 0
3 6 ,2 0 8
29 ,9 5 7
3 2 ,2 9 0

9 ,3 0 6
11,529
1 1 ,5 4 0
8 ,5 6 8
8 ,3 8 7

17 ,5 1 4
18 ,032
20 ,9 2 5
1 7 ,0 1 0
19 ,636

4 ,3 8 2
3 ,6 18
3,7 43
4 ,3 77
4 ,2 66

2 8 ,6 9 9
2 9 ,6 5 4
3 0 ,4 1 5
2 8 ,6 1 3
29,371

4 ,7 8 5
6 ,0 8 4
6 ,2 0 2
5,276
4 ,1 5 0

2 2 ,5 7 6
22,191
2 2 ,9 3 7
2 2 ,0 7 4
2 3 ,5 6 2

1,337
1,378
1,2 74
1,262
1,658

1 9 60
1961
1962
1963
19 64

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

3 3 ,8 3 4
3 3 ,7 2 8
3 7 ,3 2 3
3 8 ,6 9 2
4 5 ,7 5 8

9 ,4 5 8
9 ,1 0 9
9,9 67
10 ,7 8 2
1 2 ,7 0 0

2 0 ,8 0 4
2 0 ,6 8 7
2 3 ,6 1 9
2 2 ,9 4 6
2 8 ,2 4 8

3 ,5 7 0
3,931
3 ,7 3 6
4 ,9 6 2
4 ,8 0 9

3 1 ,0 7 0
3 1 ,9 8 0
3 3 ,8 7 9
3 3 ,8 5 4
3 7 ,2 7 8

4 ,7 5 0
4 ,6 6 7
4 ,6 0 4
4 ,9 2 2
5,3 76

24 ,8 3 9
2 5 ,7 9 2
2 7 ,6 1 6
2 7 ,3 0 8
3 0 ,3 0 9

1,4 80
1,5 20
1,659
1,623
1,592

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

5 1 ,8 3 4
6 0 ,0 3 3
59 ,0 5 9
6 4 ,5 1 4
68,151

15,581
18 ,324
1 8 ,622
1 7 ,414
18 ,1 4 2

3 0 ,8 4 5
35,721
3 4 ,3 3 5
4 1 ,1 2 6
4 4 ,0 0 3

5,407
5,986
6,101
5,9 73
6 ,0 0 5

4 2 ,4 2 2
45,331
4 3 ,4 6 8
4 4 ,4 2 9
4 6 ,6 1 8

6 ,8 6 6
7 ,9 5 4
8 ,2 78
7,307
7,4 05

3 3 ,9 1 4
3 5 ,6 5 6
3 3 ,2 2 5
3 5 ,2 5 3
3 7 ,4 9 4

1,642
1,719
1,965
1,8 68
1,718

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

63,601
6 2 ,7 5 4
69,961
8 3 ,0 7 8
8 6 ,7 3 3

17 ,265
15,767
18 ,706
2 0 ,4 5 4
24 ,2 9 7

3 9 ,9 3 3
4 1 ,1 1 3
4 4 ,8 5 3
5 4 ,5 1 3
53 ,9 5 3

6 ,4 0 2
5,873
6,401
8,111
8,481

4 5 ,3 7 3
4 3 ,8 6 3
4 5 ,0 6 4
5 0 ,2 3 7
4 4 ,8 1 3

6 ,6 1 3
5,6 69
5,314
5 ,5 55
6 ,4 16

36,871
3 6 ,4 3 0
3 8 ,2 3 3
42,601
3 6 ,2 0 7

1,889
1,763
1,516
2 ,0 8 0
2,1 89




27

Table 10.

Gross stocks for major sectors: Historical dollars

(M illions of dollars)
Producers' durable equipm ent
Year
Total

Manu­
facturing

N onm anu­
facturing

1947 ..................................................
1948 ..................................................
1949 ..................................................

$ 7 3,96 5
86 ,0 0 2
9 6 ,4 7 3

$20,351
2 4 ,0 3 2
26 ,8 5 2

$ 4 4 ,0 5 2
5 0 ,248
5 5 ,4 2 0

1 9 50
1951
1952
1953
19 54

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

107,619
121,149
133,127
14 5,37 6
15 7,29 5

2 9 ,8 1 3
3 4 ,1 4 9
3 8 ,4 1 9
4 2 ,7 4 8
4 7 ,1 3 9

19 55
1956
1957
1958
1959

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

17 0,77 4
18 6,39 8
20 4,62 8
2 1 7,73 2
23 2,28 2

1960
1961
1962
1963
1964

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1 9 70
1971
19 72
1973
1974

Nonresidential structures
Agri­
culture

Agri­
culture

T ota I

Manu­
facturing

N onm anu­
facturing

$9,561
1 1,721
14 ,2 0 0

$ 9 0,49 3
9 8 ,4 8 2
1 0 6 ,0 0 5

$19,991
2 1 ,6 3 8
2 2 ,7 5 3

$ 6 4 ,8 0 4
70,451
76,211

$5 ,697
6 ,3 9 2
7 ,0 4 0

6 1 ,0 9 7
67 ,787
7 3 ,4 4 8
79 ,1 1 5
8 5 ,013

16 ,708
19 ,213
2 1 ,2 5 9
2 3 ,5 1 2
2 5 ,1 4 2

1 1 4,27 4
12 4,39 2
1 3 4,60 5
14 5,937
1 5 7,70 2

2 3 ,7 0 2
2 5 ,7 5 9
2 7 ,8 1 0
2 9 ,7 7 3
3 1 ,6 1 7

8 2 ,8 8 2
9 0 ,2 4 2
9 7 ,6 3 3
1 0 6,32 2
11 5,61 3

7,6 89
8 ,3 9 0
9,161
9,841
10,471

51,401
5 7 ,5 4 7
6 3 ,9 6 3
6 8 ,1 2 0
71 ,996

9 2 ,7 3 2
10 1,28 7
11 2,18 6
11 9,82 6
12 9,28 2

2 6 ,6 4 0
2 7 ,5 6 3
2 8 ,4 7 8
2 9 ,7 8 4
3 1 ,0 0 3

17 1,35 4
186,986
2 0 3,91 5
2 1 9 ,2 6 8
2 3 5 ,1 3 0

3 3 ,6 1 5
3 6 ,6 3 9
3 9 ,9 3 2
4 2 ,5 5 2
4 4 ,4 6 2

12 6,66 9
1 3 8 ,5 9 0
15 1,56 6
16 3,66 7
1 7 6 ,7 5 4

11 ,069
1 1 ,757
12 ,416
13 ,047
13 ,9 1 3

247,421
26 1,45 5
2 7 7,23 2
29 2,87 8
3 1 3 ,1 6 4

7 6 ,513
80,431
84,651
89,191
9 4 ,9 4 6

1 3 9 ,2 3 0
14 8,41 9
1 5 9,22 3
16 8,68 7
1 8 1,75 4

31 ,6 7 7
3 2 ,6 0 4
33 ,3 5 7
3 4 ,9 9 9
3 6 ,4 6 3

2 5 1 ,9 3 4
269,021
2 8 7 ,2 9 8
305,621
3 2 6 ,2 8 4

4 6 ,7 3 7
4 8 ,9 5 9
5 1 ,1 8 0
5 3 ,6 2 6
5 6 ,3 8 4

19 0,52 7
2 0 4 ,6 0 9
2 1 9 ,7 8 6
2 3 4 ,7 8 4
2 5 1 ,8 1 0

1 4 ,6 7 0
1 5 ,452
1 6 ,3 3 2
1 7 ,2 1 0
18 ,089

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

3 3 7,24 7
3 6 7,49 9
39 6,90 3
4 3 1 ,5 1 3
469,721

1 0 2,75 0
11 2,75 2
1 2 3,21 2
1 3 2,88 4
1 4 3,36 3

19 6,15 6
2 1 4 ,0 7 6
2 3 0 ,5 7 8
2 5 3 ,1 3 2
2 7 8 ,3 8 4

3 8 ,3 3 9
4 0 ,6 6 9
4 3 ,1 1 2
4 5 ,4 9 6
4 7 ,9 7 3

350,771
3 7 8 ,2 2 5
4 0 5 ,3 8 0
4 3 4 ,4 2 3
467,421

60,181
6 4 ,8 6 8
6 9 ,9 3 0
74 ,4 8 5
7 9 ,5 0 4

2 7 1 ,5 6 2
293,291
3 1 4 ,1 2 7
3 3 7 ,3 6 9
3 6 4 ,1 0 9

19 ,0 2 7
2 0 ,0 6 4
2 1 ,3 2 2
2 2 ,5 6 8
23 ,807

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

5 0 4,24 5
5 3 8,53 3
5 7 9,33 9
6 3 2,49 8
6 9 4 ,2 3 5

1 5 3 ,3 6 5
16 2,15 9
17 3,73 6
1 8 7,08 8
2 0 6 ,2 9 2

2 9 9,99 8
3 2 3 ,1 9 7
3 4 9 ,4 0 2
3 8 4 ,5 0 2
4 2 1 ,0 4 5

50,881
53 ,1 7 6
5 6 ,2 0 0
6 0 ,9 0 7
66 ,897

50 2,26 2
5 3 8 ,2 5 3
5 7 7 ,3 8 2
6 2 5 ,1 7 8
6 7 6 ,1 2 6

8 4 ,2 9 2
8 8 ,5 3 3
9 2 ,5 7 7
9 7 ,1 7 9
1 0 3 ,8 6 3

3 9 2 ,6 5 4
4 2 2 ,8 9 9
4 5 6 ,6 4 5
4 9 7 ,7 9 3
5 3 9 ,4 5 8

2 5 ,3 1 5
2 6 ,8 2 0
2 8 ,1 5 9
30 ,2 0 6
3 2 ,8 0 3




28

Table 11.

Gross stocks for major sectors: Constant dollars

(M illions of dollars)
Nonresidential structures

Producers' durable equipm ent
Year
Total
1947 ..................................................
1948 ..................................................
1949 ..................................................

Manu­
facturing

$ 1 9 5 ,0 1 7
2 1 3 ,7 5 6
2 2 8 ,5 2 9

$ 5 4 ,6 4 2
61,541
66,291

Non manu­
facturing

Agri­
culture

Agri­
culture

Total

Manu­
facturing

$ 1 1 5 ,4 2 0
1 2 3 ,5 6 0
1 2 9,57 2

$ 2 4 ,9 5 3
2 8 ,6 5 4
3 2 ,6 6 5

$ 3 7 4 ,3 4 7
3 8 3 ,9 3 6
3 9 2 ,7 9 3

$ 7 9 ,2 7 6
8 0 ,7 9 7
8 1 ,3 6 8

$269,461
2 7 6 ,8 0 4
2 8 4,40 6

$ 2 5 ,6 1 0
2 6 ,3 3 4
2 7 ,018

Nonm anu­
facturing

1 9 50
1951
1952
1953
1954

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

2 4 3 ,8 7 5
2 6 1 ,0 8 0
27 5,41 7
289,741
3 0 2 ,7 0 5

7 1 ,1 0 2
77,551
83,691
8 9 ,7 2 2
9 5 ,6 0 5

1 3 6,16 8
143,351
148,931
154,321
1 5 9 ,6 0 0

3 6 ,6 0 4
4 0 ,1 7 7
4 2 ,7 9 4
4 5 ,6 9 8
4 7 ,5 0 0

4 0 3 ,0 2 7
4 1 4 ,2 7 8
4 2 5 ,1 2 4
4 3 7 ,5 6 9
4 5 1 ,2 9 3

8 1 ,6 5 4
8 3 ,6 4 0
8 5 ,4 5 2
8 7 ,1 3 2
8 8 ,7 0 7

293,621
3 0 2 ,2 3 2
3 1 0 ,5 1 2
3 2 0 ,6 7 4
3 3 2 ,2 4 8

27,751
2 8 ,4 0 5
2 9 ,1 5 8
2 9 ,7 6 2
3 0 ,3 3 7

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

3 1 7 ,5 3 8
3 3 3 ,1 2 8
3 5 0 ,6 6 8
3 6 0 ,9 8 5
3 7 2 ,7 3 2

10 1,00 3
1 0 8,30 4
115,281
1 1 8,93 4
121,991

1 6 7,47 5
17 5,32 7
18 5,58 6
1 9 1,46 6
19 9,55 5

4 9 ,0 5 9
4 9 ,4 9 6
4 9 ,7 9 9
5 0 ,5 8 4
5 1 ,1 8 6

46 8,03 1
4 8 5 ,6 6 7
5 0 4 ,0 6 3
5 2 0 ,6 9 4
5 3 8 ,1 2 4

9 0 ,5 8 2
9 3 ,7 9 4
9 7 ,1 8 4
9 9 ,7 2 2
101,211

3 4 6 ,5 8 9
3 6 0 ,4 3 2
3 7 4 ,9 3 9
388,521
4 0 3 ,5 3 6

3 0 ,8 5 8
3 1 ,4 4 0
3 1 ,9 4 0
3 2 ,4 4 9
3 3 ,377

19 60
1961
1962
1963
19 64

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

3 8 5,01 2
3 9 6 ,0 0 8
4 0 9 ,3 0 2
4 2 2 ,6 3 8
4 4 1 ,7 7 7

12 5,63 9
1 2 8,41 8
1 3 1,52 4
1 3 4 ,9 4 4
13 9,83 8

2 0 8 ,3 0 4
2 1 6 ,2 8 4
2 2 6 ,4 4 6
2 3 5 ,1 5 8
2 4 8 ,4 3 3

5 1 ,0 6 8
5 1 ,3 0 5
51,331
5 2 ,5 3 4
5 3 ,506

5 5 7 ,2 7 3
5 7 7 ,3 3 4
5 9 9 ,2 7 9
6 2 1 ,1 3 0
6 4 6 ,2 9 4

1 0 3,35 3
10 5,44 8
1 0 7,51 2
1 0 9 ,9 1 2
1 1 2,77 5

4 1 9 ,7 7 0
4 3 6 ,8 9 9
455,781
4 7 4 ,2 4 8
4 9 5 ,5 7 6

3 4 ,1 5 0
34 ,9 8 7
3 5 ,9 8 5
3 6 ,9 6 9
3 7 ,9 4 2

19 65
1966
1967
1968
1969

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

4 6 5 ,7 3 9
49 6,72 1
52 5,52 7
5 5 8 ,4 8 3
5 9 3 ,6 2 8

14 7,22 7
157,041
166,881
17 5,25 2
1 8 4 ,1 0 0

2 6 3 ,5 3 6
2 8 2 ,7 4 4
2 9 9 ,7 1 3
3 2 2 ,5 0 5
3 4 7 ,0 6 6

5 4 ,9 7 5
5 6 ,9 3 4
5 8 ,9 3 2
6 0 ,7 2 6
6 2 ,4 6 0

6 7 6 ,4 3 0
7 0 9 ,2 4 2
7 3 9 ,9 2 3
7 7 1 ,2 6 5
8 0 4 ,4 5 5

11 7,10 8
1 2 2,48 7
1 2 8,13 3
1 3 2,73 7
1 3 7 ,3 4 8

5 2 0 ,3 3 6
5 4 6 ,6 3 9
5 7 0 ,2 9 0
5 9 5 ,7 3 7
6 2 3 ,1 7 5

3 8 ,9 8 4
4 0 ,1 1 5
4 1 ,4 9 9
4 2 ,7 9 0
43,931

19 70
1971
1972
1973
1974

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

6 2 2 ,5 7 9
6 4 8 ,7 7 6
6 8 0 ,0 3 9
7 2 2 ,0 8 2
7 6 5,21 6

19 1,80 7
1 9 7 ,7 0 0
2 0 6,19 9
2 1 6 ,0 8 6
2 2 9 ,3 9 6

3 6 6 ,2 9 8
3 8 5 ,2 6 6
4 0 6 ,3 2 9
435,231
4 6 1 ,5 4 9

6 4 ,4 7 3
6 5 ,8 0 9
6 7 ,5 1 0
7 0 ,7 6 4
74 ,2 6 9

8 3 6 ,0 2 6
8 6 5 ,6 6 6
8 9 6 ,0 4 2
9 3 1 ,0 8 8
9 6 0 ,1 7 3

14 1,05 8
1 4 3,68 8
1 4 5,80 5
1 4 7 ,9 9 6
15 0,88 7

6 4 9 ,7 2 8
6 7 5 ,5 6 3
7 0 2 ,9 0 9
7 3 4 ,3 0 4
758,951

4 5 ,2 3 9
4 6 ,4 1 3
4 7 ,3 2 7
4 8 ,7 8 7
5 0 ,3 3 4




29

Table 12.

Net stocks for major sectors: Historical dollars

(M illions of dollars)
Producers' durable equipm ent
Year

Nonresidential structures
Agri­
culture

Agri­
culture

Total

Manu­
facturing

Non manu­
facturing

$ 3 4,91 7
4 0 ,6 3 2
4 5 ,1 0 3

$ 7 ,6 3 4
9 ,7 0 6
12,017

$ 7 5,80 7
8 3 ,4 4 2
9 0 ,5 9 9

$ 1 5 ,1 8 6
1 6 ,7 8 3
1 7,8 49

$ 5 5 ,7 7 3
6 1 ,1 2 5
6 6 ,5 7 8

$ 4 ,8 4 6
5 ,5 33
6,171

25,161
2 8 ,8 9 9
32 ,4 4 9
3 5 ,9 5 9
3 9 ,4 3 9

49,861
5 5 ,3 9 2
5 9 ,687
6 3 ,8 9 7
6 8 ,2 9 6

14 ,249
1 6 ,354
1 7 ,8 8 0
19 ,537
2 0 ,5 4 5

9 8 ,4 9 5
1 0 8,22 2
1 1 8 ,0 1 0
1 2 8,87 9
1 4 0,12 6

1 8 ,7 5 0
2 0 ,7 6 0
2 2 ,7 5 0
2 4 ,6 3 0
2 6 ,3 6 5

7 2 ,9 3 2
7 9 ,9 5 8
8 6 ,9 9 6
9 5 ,3 1 7
1 0 4 ,2 1 2

6,811
7 ,5 0 3
8 ,2 6 3
8,931
9 ,5 4 8

13 8,64 6
151,087
16 5,99 5
17 5,51 4
186,231

4 2 ,6 9 9
4 7 ,7 5 2
52 ,9 4 7
5 5 ,7 4 6
5 8 ,1 8 9

7 4 ,4 8 9
8 1 ,4 6 6
9 0 ,6 9 7
9 6 ,4 8 3
1 0 3 ,8 9 4

2 1 ,4 5 8
2 1 ,8 6 8
2 2 ,3 5 0
2 3 ,2 8 4
2 4 ,1 4 7

1 5 3,19 6
1 6 8,16 5
18 4,31 4
1 9 8 ,7 4 2
2 1 3 ,5 2 4

2 8 ,2 2 5
3 1 ,0 7 5
3 4 ,1 3 9
3 6 ,4 6 0
3 8 ,0 0 0

1 1 4 ,8 4 0
12 6,28 7
1 3 8 ,7 3 2
1 5 0 ,2 3 0
16 2,63 2

10,131
1 0 ,8 0 2
1 1 ,4 4 2
12,051
1 2 ,8 9 0

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

19 7,26 4
206,981
2 1 8,36 6
2 2 9,58 5
2 4 5 ,4 4 2

6 1 ,2 3 6
6 3 ,6 7 2
6 6 ,4 5 0
6 9 ,6 0 4
74 ,0 2 7

1 1 1,56 5
11 8,28 7
126,531
1 3 3,34 5
14 3,70 7

2 4 ,4 6 2
25,021
2 5 ,3 8 4
2 6 ,6 3 6
2 7 ,7 0 7

2 2 9,08 7
2 4 4 ,7 6 0
2 6 1 ,4 3 9
2 7 7 ,9 7 6
2 9 6 ,6 6 4

3 9 ,8 4 2
4 1 ,5 6 8
4 3 ,2 2 9
4 5 ,0 5 6
47,131

1 7 5 ,6 3 0
1 8 8,83 3
2 0 3,01 7
2 1 6 ,9 0 5
2 3 2 ,7 0 4

1 3 ,6 1 4
1 4 ,3 5 8
15,191
1 6 ,0 1 4
1 6 ,8 2 8

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

2 6 5 ,0 1 4
29 0,52 5
3 1 4 ,7 4 2
3 4 3 ,6 8 4
3 7 5 ,5 1 8

8 0 ,5 2 8
89,191
9 8 ,1 9 7
10 6,26 8
11 4,98 5

155,271
1 7 0 ,1 5 0
183,301
2 0 2 ,2 1 5
2 2 3,33 7

2 9 ,2 1 4
3 1 ,1 8 4
3 3 ,2 4 3
3 5 ,2 0 0
3 7 ,1 9 5

3 1 8 ,9 8 3
3 4 4 ,0 7 3
3 6 8 ,6 6 0
3 9 4 ,9 3 4
4 2 4 ,9 6 3

5 0 ,1 8 4
5 4 ,0 6 6
58 ,2 5 8
61,881
6 5 ,9 1 3

2 5 1 ,1 0 8
2 7 1 ,3 6 7
2 9 0 ,6 0 4
312,121
3 3 7 ,0 0 2

1 7 ,6 9 0
18,638
19 ,797
2 0 ,9 3 2
2 2 ,0 4 8

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

4 0 2 ,8 0 5
4 2 9 ,1 3 7
4 6 1 ,2 9 0
5 0 4 ,9 9 4
5 5 6 ,3 2 8

1 2 3,02 5
1 2 9 ,6 6 8
1 3 8 ,9 2 4
149,721
16 6,11 7

240,211
2 5 8,18 6
278,651
3 0 7 ,4 6 4
3 3 7 ,1 0 4

3 9 ,5 6 8
4 1 ,2 8 3
4 3 ,7 1 4
4 7 ,8 0 9
5 3 ,1 0 6

4 5 6 ,6 2 7
4 8 9 ,2 4 0
5 2 4 ,7 9 8
568,821
6 1 5 ,7 5 9

69 ,6 6 7
7 2 ,8 4 3
7 5 ,8 0 8
7 9 ,3 2 2
8 4 ,9 0 7

3 6 3 ,5 3 9
391,621
4 2 3 ,0 3 6
4 6 1 ,6 6 9
5 0 0 ,6 1 0

2 3 ,4 1 9
2 4 ,7 7 5
2 5 ,9 5 3
2 7 ,8 2 8
30,241

Total

Manu­
facturing

Nonm anu­
facturing

19 47 ..................................................
1948 ..................................................
1949 ..................................................

$5 9,38 2
70 ,587
79 ,8 0 9

$ 1 6 ,8 2 9
2 0 ,2 4 9
2 2 ,6 8 9

1 9 50
1951
1952
1953
1954

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

8 9 ,2 7 2
10 0,64 6
11 0,01 6
11 9,39 3
1 2 8,28 0

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

1 9 60
1961
1962
1963
19 64




30

Table 13.

Net stocks for major sectors: Constant dollars

(M illions of dollars)
Producers' durable equipm ent
Year

N onm anu­
facturing

Agri­
culture

Agri­
culture

Total

Manu­
facturing

$ 8 8 ,3 0 5
9 5 ,7 2 6
100,761

$ 1 9 ,4 6 6
23 ,0 1 7
2 6 ,7 2 9

$ 3 0 1 ,3 1 6
3 1 0 ,4 0 5
3 1 8 ,8 0 4

$56,701
5 8 ,3 1 8
5 9 ,009

$ 2 2 4 ,2 9 6
2 3 0 ,9 4 8
2 3 7,87 5

$ 2 0 ,2 1 7
2 1 ,138
2 1 ,919

Total
1947 ..................................................
1948 ..................................................
1949 ..................................................

Nonresidential structures

M anu­
facturing

Nonm anu­
facturing

$1 51,691
1 6 9 ,0 3 6
18 1,76 7

$ 4 3 ,9 1 9
50,291
54 ,2 7 6

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

19 4,38 2
2 0 8 ,1 3 6
2 1 8 ,4 7 2
2 2 8 ,6 3 0
2 3 7 ,4 3 0

58 ,1 1 9
6 3 ,4 0 9
6 8 ,2 1 3
7 2 ,7 9 3
77 ,1 3 4

1 0 6 ,0 9 0
111,691
1 1 5 ,5 0 0
11 9,14 4
1 2 2,75 6

30,1 72
3 3 ,0 3 4
34,7 58
3 6 ,6 9 2
3 7 ,5 3 9

32 8,63 1
339,511
3 5 0 ,0 1 6
3 6 2 ,1 5 3
3 7 5 ,5 7 5

5 9 ,4 4 0
6 1 ,5 9 8
6 3 ,5 8 5
6 5 ,4 2 3
67,131

2 4 6 ,4 4 0
2 5 4 ,4 1 2
262,081
2 7 1,68 2
2 8 2,72 9

2 2 ,7 4 9
23,501
24 ,3 4 9
25 ,047
2 5 ,7 1 3

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

2 4 8,19 8
2 5 9 ,8 0 8
2 7 3 ,3 7 6
2 7 9,57 3
2 8 7,07 5

8 0 ,9 0 9
8 6 ,5 0 9
9 1 ,6 6 9
9 3 ,3 8 9
9 4 ,5 1 0

12 9,01 7
13 5,24 7
1 4 3,84 4
1 4 7 ,9 1 4
15 4,02 8

38,271
3 8 ,0 5 0
3 7 ,8 6 2
3 8 ,2 6 9
3 8 ,5 3 6

392,001
4 0 9 ,2 9 7
4 2 7 ,2 5 0
4 4 3 ,2 7 6
4 5 9 ,9 1 5

6 9 ,1 1 5
72 ,3 9 7
7 5 ,7 7 9
78,201
7 9 ,4 5 8

2 9 6 ,5 6 5
3 0 9 ,9 1 3
3 2 3 ,9 1 0
3 3 6 ,9 3 6
3 5 1 ,3 3 3

26,321
2 6 ,9 8 5
2 7 ,5 6 0
2 8 ,137
2 9 ,123

1 9 60
1961
1962
1963
1964

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

2 9 4 ,9 7 5
301,581
3 1 0 ,6 3 8
3 1 9 ,9 0 4
3 3 5 ,1 1 9

9 6 ,2 9 7
9 7 ,3 4 2
9 8 ,9 1 3
10 1,00 9
10 4,77 0

1 6 0 ,5 8 4
1 6 6,22 6
1 7 4 ,0 1 0
18 0,27 7
1 9 1,04 2

3 8 ,0 9 3
3 8 ,0 1 2
3 7 ,7 1 4
3 8 ,6 1 6
3 9 ,3 0 6

4 7 8 ,0 7 2
4 9 6 ,9 1 2
5 1 7 ,3 7 3
5 3 7 ,4 7 5
5 6 0,62 0-

8 1 ,2 6 8
8 2 ,9 3 6
84,471
8 6 ,2 4 5
88,381

3 6 6 ,8 6 2
3 8 3,16 8
4 0 1 ,0 8 4
4 1 8 ,4 3 5
4 3 8 ,4 9 9

2 9 ,9 4 0
30 ,8 0 7
31 ,8 1 7
3 2 ,7 9 4
3 3 ,7 3 8

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

3 5 5 ,1 5 4
3 8 1 ,9 5 9
4 0 6 ,0 6 9
4 3 3 ,7 8 3
4 6 2 ,9 3 8

11 1,15 8
11 9,99 7
1 2 8,77 5
1 3 5,95 2
14 3,44 6

2 0 3 ,4 5 2
2 1 9 ,6 6 8
2 3 3 ,2 2 6
25 2,23 3
272,471

4 0 ,5 4 2
4 2 ,2 9 3
4 4 ,067
4 5 ,5 9 7
4 7 ,0 2 0

5 8 8 ,4 6 6
6 1 8 ,7 1 7
6 4 6 ,5 5 7
6 7 4 ,7 8 3
7 0 4 ,6 0 2

9 1 ,8 9 9
9 6 ,3 7 7
1 0 1 ,0 3 2
104,561
1 0 8,03 7

4 6 1 ,8 3 8
4 8 6,55 7
5 0 8 ,4 5 5
5 3 1 ,9 8 3
5 5 7,32 7

34 ,727
3 5 ,7 8 2
37 ,0 6 8
38 ,238
39 ,237

1 9 70
1971
1972
1973
1974

..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................
..................................................

4 8 5 ,0 5 0
5 0 3,82 7
5 2 7 ,2 3 2
5 6 0 ,9 6 6
5 9 5 ,2 7 4

1 4 9,58 8
1 5 3,73 6
16 0,32 9
1 6 8 ,0 9 2
17 9,06 9

2 8 6 ,7 8 0
300,451
3 1 5 ,9 2 8
3 3 8 ,9 9 9
3 5 9 ,2 3 4

48,681
4 9 ,639
5 0 ,9 7 3
5 3 ,8 7 4
5 6 ,9 7 0

7 3 2 ,5 4 8
7 5 8 ,3 4 5
7 8 4,69 9
8 1 5 ,5 6 3
8 4 0 ,3 0 7

1 1 0 ,5 6 4
1 1 2 ,0 0 0
11 2,94 7
1 1 4,00 9
1 1 5,81 2

5 8 1 ,6 0 2
6 0 4 ,9 7 4
6 2 9 ,6 7 2
6 5 8 ,2 3 2
679,861

4 0 ,3 8 0
4 1 ,3 6 9
4 2 ,0 8 0
4 3 ,3 2 0
4 4 ,6 3 3




31

Chart 6. Comparison of BLS and BEA gross capital stock estimates, 1947-74

B illio n s of 1972 dollars




32

Appendix A. Adjustments to
Investment Data

mining were combined as one industry and stone and
clay mining was combined with chemical and fertilizer
mineral mining. IRS data were not published for these
industries in 1962, creating the gap for 1962 and 1963.
Fortunately, data for 1963 were available from the Cen­
sus of Mineral Industries for that year and 1962 was
estimated as the midpoint between the 1961 values (ad­
justed to census definitions) and the 1963 values. For
the years 1935-42, only one aggregate mining sector
was reported in the IRS reports. These aggregate data
were distributed to component industries based on the
distribution of investment in the 1939 census. For the
years prior to 1935, no investment series was available.
Instead, a proxy series was developed based on the an­
nual production of mining equipment. This series was
converted to an index (1935=100) and used to distrib­
ute the 1935 investment value to earlier years. One fi­
nal adjustment was required to the stone and clay min­
ing industry (I/O sector 9) and the chemical and ferti­
lizer mineral mining industry (I/O sector 10). IRS clas­
sified production of certain mineral products in sector
10 and census classified production of these products
in sector 9. No investment detail was available to make
the proper adjustment for specific minerals so it was
assumed that investment for each of the mineral cate­
gories was related to total investment in a sector in the
same ratio as production of the specific mineral to to­
tal production in the sector. Ratios were developed for
1967-73 based on statistics available from the Minerals
Yearbook which related the production of the misclassified minerals in sector 10 to total production in sec­
tor 10. Total investment in this industry was reduced
by this ratio, and a corresponding amount was added
to the investment in sector 9. These continuous IRS se­
ries were then adjusted to exclude depletion allowances
and expanded to include the noncorporate sector.
With the exception of the petroleum and natural gas
industry, the IRS data were then benchmarked to in­
vestment controls from the Census of Mineral Indus­
tries for the years 1939, 1954, 1958, 1963, 1967, and
1972. Data for the intervening years were estimated
based on linear interpolations of the benchmark ratios
in the census years and applied to the IRS data in the
intercensal years. Data prior to 1939 were scaled by
the 1939 ratio and data after 1972 were scaled by the
1972 ratio.

This appendix contains a more thorough description
of the derivation of selected investment series, particu­
larly in the nonmanufacturing sector. It also describes
the procedure used to develop the Type B asset data.
Agriculture

Capital expenditures of farms are available from the
BEA capital stock study. These data are supplied to
BEA directly by the Department of Agriculture but
they do not include investment by forestry, fishery, and
agricultural services, which should be included in the
total for the agriculture sector. These three industries
are implicitly classified in the nonmanufacturing sector
by BEA. These series are not developed separately in
this study due to (l) the lack of available data and(2)
the ease with which firms within these industries can
move to other industries within the sector. They are
instead estimated in the aggregate and combined with
the BEA agriculture data to yield a total agriculture
sector.
To account for the lack of these industries in the
BEA capital expenditures, adjustment factors were de­
veloped from IRS data with which to scale the BEA
expenditure series upward. Separate industry invest­
ment series for these industries are only available from
the IRS data for the years 1964-72. The investment se­
ries derived for this time period were adjusted to in­
clude the noncorporate sector using the ratio of cor­
porate to noncorporate business receipts. Annual ratios
were then developed based on the sum of investment
in the three missing industries to total agriculture in­
vestment excluding these industries. These ratios were
used to directly adjust the BEA data in each year of
the time period. For the years before 1964 and after
1972, average ratios were developed and assumed to
apply for each year: 1.05 for years before 1964 and
1.0588 for years after 1972.
Mining

Investment for the six mining industries was derived
generally from the IRS data which were benchmarked
to census data. Expenditure data could be derived for
all six industries only for the years 1967-73. With the
exception of 1962 and 1963, investment data for four
mining industries were available for the years 1943-66.
During this period, iron ore and nonferrous metal ore



33

BEA Plant and Equipment Survey. The data were quite
consistent with the BEA data through 1963. However,
the IRS data for the period 1964-73 did not agree with
either the BEA series or the capital expenditure series
in the 1967 and 1972 Census of Construction Industries.
Accordingly, the IRS-based series for this period was
benchmarked to the 1967 and 1972 census estimates,
with years between 1964 and 1972 based on interpola­
tions of the 1963, 1967, and 1972 benchmark points.
Data for 1973 were based on the 1972 ratio. IRS data
were not available for 1974; capital expenditures were
estimated by applying the 1973-74 growth rate of “com­
mercial and other” plant and equipment expenditures
from the Plant and Equipment Survey to the 1973 IRSbased data. The adjustment factors between census and
IRS were 0.6984 for 1967 and 0.7155 for 1972.
The investment series was allocated between struc­
tures and equipment based on unpublished Plant and
Equipment Survey proportions for years prior to 1967
and the 1972 census proportions for 1967 and beyond.

Data for 1974 were not available from IRS at the
time of this study. Expenditures for this year were es­
timated based on the growth rate between 1973 and
1974 of investments in mining exploration and mining
machinery which are available in the NIPA investment
series. These growth rates were then applied to the 1973
plant and equipment expenditure data to estimate the
1974 data.
The derived expenditures define the actual outlays
for physical structures and equipment. National income
accounting conventions also include the cost of miner­
al exploration and development exclusive of land ac­
quisition or mineral rights acquisition costs in the total
structures investment for these industries. These data
are available in the NIPA accounts but only as a total
for all mineral industries exclusive of the oil and gas
well drilling industry. However, these data are availa­
ble for each industry in the census years and were used
as a distribution to allocate the NIPA control values to
the component mineral industries.
Gross investment data for the oil and gas well indus­
try were initially developed using the procedure out­
lined above. However, the IRS series was found to fluc­
tuate greatly, probably because the series is based on a
company classification system. Since companies in this
highly integrated industry may vary their primary ac­
tivity from year to year, in one year emphasizing ex­
traction and in another refining, and since the IRS clas­
sification is based on the primary activity in a given
year, the level of depreciable assets of the industry fluc­
tuates as firms change activities. In order to smooth
these fluctuations, the IRS capital expenditures were
adjusted to include the capital expenditures charged to
the current accounts of these firms. These data are avail­
able for the oil and gas well drilling industry from BEA
and caused a significant smoothing in the IRS based
series.
The revised IRS expenditure series was then benchmarked to the census totals and interpolated for inter­
vening years. The benchmark process also broke the
total investment figure into the plant and equipment
parts. The final adjustment was to increase the struc­
tures component to include the NIPA oil and gas well
drilling exploration series.

Transportation

Railroads. The primary data source was the Interstate
Commerce Commission (ICC), specifically Transport
Statistics in the United States and Statistics o f Railways
in the United States. Reliable data were available for
total investment in road and equipment of Class I and
Class II railroads from 1914 to the present. A coverage
adjustment, based on the ratio of investment in railroad
property of Class I and Class II railroads to property
investment of all railroads was applied to derive the fi­
nal total investment series. This coverage adjustment
was always less than 5 percent. This series was broken
into plant and equipment shares according to the rela­
tive shares of annual expenditures for additions and bet­
terments to road and equipment property made by Class
I railroads. For the vears prior to 1914, the investment
compiled by Ulmer1 was used.
The substantial amount of leasing of freight cars to
railroads by private car lines and major corporations
constitutes investment in railroad equipment and, con­
sequently, was included with the railroad transporta­
tion mode. Data on the number of freight cars pur­
chased by nonrailroad companies by type - hopper, tank
car and other - were obtained from the American Rail­
way Car Institute. Price information by type of car was
taken from Transport Statistics. It was assumed that the
price paid by the private car owners for each type of
freight car was the same as that paid by the railroads.
In addition to freight cars, there was some leasing of
passenger cars. In general, the methodolgy for deriv­
ing this investment was the same as that for freight cars:

Construction

Investment expenditures by the construction indus­
try were developed primarily from IRS data. For the
years prior to 1958, the data were taken from the Gort/
Boddy study. Data for 1958 and beyond were devel­
oped for each IRS construction industry separately and
then aggregated. Data for the entire series were then
adjusted for the effect of capital gains and expanded to
include the noncorporate sector. Expenditure data pri­
or to 1959 were benchmarked to the investment value
contained in the 1958 BLS capital flows matrix and the
1963 BEA capital flows matrix and compared to the



Melville J. Ulmer, Capital in Transportation, Communica
tion, and Public Utilities (Princeton University Press, National
Bureau o f Economic Research, 1960).

34

The number of Pullman cars shipped was obtained from
the American Railway Car Institute and the price
weights from Transport Statistics. Due to data limita­
tions, it was possible to include only the equipment por­
tion of leased property.

derive ratios of investment in structures and other equip­
ment to investment in revenue equipment to be used
when ICC data were not available. The revenue equip­
ment estimates were derived by multiplying the num­
ber of new units purchased by the average cost per bus.
The cost per bus and the structures and other equip­
ment relationships were derived as follows. The ICC
data provided price estimates back to 1942. These were
used directly for the years 1961-74. Between 1946 and
1961, they were used in terms of a 3-year moving av­
erage which was designed to take out some seemingly
random fluctuations. To extend the series prior to 1946,
a cost per bus for 1930 was estimated based on infor­
mation given in Bus Transportation. When the 1947 bus
price was extended to 1930 based only on the change
in the price index, the estimate exceeded that given in
Bus Transportation. A residual change factor was then
estimated and applied to become cumulatively effective
in a linear function. These two adjustment factors were
then applied to the 1947 estimate and the cost per bus
was extended back to 1924.
Using data for the years 1947-49 and 1951-54, ratios
of investment in structures and other equipment invest­
ment to buses were developed and used to obtain the
investment in these categories based on the previously
calculated investment in buses. Finally, all these previ­
ously described data were used in the following man­
ner to obtain the series on gross investment.
For the periods 1943-45 and 1961-74, ICC data were
used without adjustment. For the periods 1940-42 and
1946-60, investment in buses was based on the series on
prices per bus and the number of buses estimated as to­
tal domestic factory sales of motor coaches(all buses
except school bus chassis) less the number purchased
by transit companies (data obtained from the American
Transit Association). Other investments were from ICC.
For the period 1924-39, bus purchases were estimated
based on the production of intercity and special motor
buses and the series on price per bus. The other invest­
ments were derived based on the ratios of these invest­
ments to bus investment.

Commercial or for-hire trucking. This sector includes
all for-hire trucking operations, both ICC-regulated and
nonregulated common and contract carriers, both local
and intercity. Commercial warehousing operations are
also included in this industry. The investment series was
developed primarily from IRS balance-sheet and in­
come reports for the trucking and warehousing indus­
try. The IRS data were adjusted to include the noncor­
porate portion of this industry by using the ratio of
Gross Product Originating to corporate segments of
this industry. The investment series was broken into
structures and equipment using relative proportions of
annual gross investment derived from the ICC invest­
ment data of Class I motor carriers of general freight
which detail investment by the two components.
The IRS data were available for the years 1932-73.
For the years prior to 1932, the series was estimated
based on the NIPA investment series on trucks. Capi­
tal expenditures in 1974 were estimated based on the
change from 1973 in structures and equipment invest­
ment by the Class I general freight carriers.
Intercity bus. This industry includes the activities of
ICC regulated intercity carriers, nonregulated intercity
carriers, and intercity charter and sightseeing compa­
nies. The most reliable and detailed data available are
those presented by the ICC in Transport Statistics and
Statistics o f Class I Motor Carriers. These data include
a direct record of investment in buses and balance sheet
and income statement data sufficient to estimate invest­
ment in structures and other equipment. The two basic
limitations of these data are that they present only par­
tial coverage of the industry and they are not available
prior to 1940. The first limitation is mitigated by the
prevalent practice of smaller companies in the industry
of purchasing buses from the larger companies and also
of using the terminal facilities of these companies. The
larger companies are ICC-regulated and their data are
reflected in the sources. The lack of data prior to 1940
was overcome by estimating these data based on rela­
tionships from less reliable data, as explained below.
The only other relevant data available were the pro­
duction and factory sales of buses by bus type. These
two series are: 1) Automobile Manufacturers Associa­
tion (AMA) data on domestic factory sales of buses by
bus type (intercity, local, special, and school bus chas­
sis), 1940-41 and 1946-60; 2) Bus Transportation data on
production by bus type (intercity, local, special, and
school bus), 1924-56.
The basic methodology was to take the ICC data for
those years where it was believed to be reliable and



Oil pipelines. The most reliable investment series avail­
able was the capital and exploration expenditures series
for pipelines in the United States published by the Chase
Manhattan Bank in Capital Investments o f the World
Petroleum Industry. All pipeline companies, as well as
pipeline divisions of the major petroleum companies,
report directly to the bank’s Research Department.
Since there is no distinction between structures and
equipment in this series, a separation was made based
on the distribution reported to the ICC by the inter­
state carriers for the period 1955-62. For the years pri­
or to 1955 and after 1962, a constant proportion of
structures to equipment was utilized.
Unfortunately, the Chase Manhattan series does not
exist prior to 1951. From 1951 back to the early 1900’s,
35

it was necessary to rely on the pipeline construction
series published in the Construction Review, which is
based on ICC data with coverage adjustment for intra­
state carriers.
During World War II, the government constructed
six oil-carrying pipelines which were later sold as sur­
plus. The two largest lines-the ‘Big Inch’ and the ‘Lit­
tle Inch’-however, were sold for the transportation of
natural gas. This left only about $9.1 million at original
cost which was sold to the private sector for the pur­
pose of oil transmission. This total is reflected in the
investment series.

ived from the PDE series for ships and boats. These
data include private sector purchases of government
surplus vessels and exports of used vessels in the year
that the transaction was made. The PDE series includes
both self-propelled and other craft (barges). An adjust­
ment was made to the series to exclude fishing vessels
and business vessels used for entertainment purposes.
These vessels were assumed to represent a constant per­
centage of PCE for pleasure boats, estimated from un­
published data.
The investment in structures and equipment other
than revenue equipment was estimated based on their
relationship to revenue equipment. More specifically,
constant percentages were applied to the investment in
revenue equipment to derive investment in other types
of assets. These percentages were derived from infor­
mation reported by several major corporations engaged
in water transportation and checked for consistency
against book value of assets reported to the Maritime
Administration. Fortunately, the investment in other
types of equipment is extremely small for this industry.

Domestic and international air transportation. The in­
vestment series for equipment includes both flight equip­
ment, derived from BEA’s producers’ durable equip­
ment (PDE) series, and ground equipment, estimated
from balance sheet data in the Handbook o f Airline Sta­
tistics of the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB). Investment
in structures was also estimated from CAB data.
For flight equipment, the PDE series for aircraft,
which contains both the purchase of government sur­
plus aircraft by the private sector (positive), and the
exports of used aircraft (negative), in addition to the
sales of new aircraft, was used with an adjustment to
exclude business aircraft. Sales of business aircraft were
derived by subtracting the BEA total of PCE aircraft
from the estimate of total general aviation sales of air­
craft. Total general aviation sales of aircraft were esti­
mated from the value of shipments data, exports and
imports of general aviation aircraft. An additional ad­
justment to the total flight equipment investment series
was made to remove the general aviation share of ex­
ports of used aircraft (actually to ‘add’ the general avi­
ation share since the used exports were subtracted from
the new aircraft series in order to set the total PDE
series).
The final flight equipment series was allocated to the
domestic and international sectors according to the rel­
ative shares of CAB domestic and international air car­
riers. Gross investment in flight equipment could then
be derived from balance sheet data, but this alternative
series was abandoned in favor of the PDE series since
the CAB does not include leased aircraft. The domestic/international split from the CAB series was utilized
to break down the PDE series.
Combined annual gross investment in ground equip­
ment and structures was calculated from the CAB bal­
ance sheet. The series was broken down between the
two categories according to a constant factor based on
unpublished CAB data. The ground equipment invest­
ment estimates for domestic and international carriers
were added to the respective flight equipment series to
derive the total equipment series.

Local bus transportation. The local bus industry, as de­
fined in this study, consists of the bus operations of all
local transit and sightseeing and charter companies, both
privately and publicly owned. Separate investment es­
timates were developed for buses, other equipment, and
structures. Because of the nature of the data sources,
data development was done in two steps. For the pe­
riod 1940-74, the basic data came from the American
Transit Association (ATA) and the ICC. For the peri­
od 1910-40, the estimates were closely tied to those of
Ulmer.
The ICC data from Transport Statistics of the United
States and Statistics o f Class I Motor Carriers provided
estimates of investments only for regulated (interstate)
local carriers. They did, however, provide estimates in
useful detail-the number and cost of buses and dollar
investment in structures and other equipment. The data
were used to develop: (1) A series on the cost of a lo­
cal bus, and (2) estimated ratios of investment in struc­
tures and other equipment to investment in buses. For
the cost series, the ICC average prices were used. To
obtain the investment ratios, selected years were taken
and averaged.
Two sets of data were also available from the ATA.
One was a series on total new buses purchased by all
transit companies. This covered all years 1940-74. For
the years 1941-49, ATA conducted a more thorough
survey of the transit industry which provided historical-dollar estimates of bus investments.
All these series were used to develop the investment
data in the following manner:
For the period 1954-74, the ATA buses were multi­
plied by the ICC estimated cost per bus to obtain bus
investments. Other investments were then found using
the ratios of other equipment and structures to the bus

Water transportation. Investment in revenue equipment
for both domestic and overseas transportation was der­



36

investments. For the period 1941-49, the AT A dollar
bus estimates were accepted and the other investments
estimated as a fixed proportion to the bus investments.
From 1910-40, the gross investment series was derived
from the data presented by Ulmer. An adjustment was
made to this series to include public investment which
represented about 14 percent of private investment. The
distribution of total gross investment to the three com­
ponents, ie., revenue equipment, other equipment, and
structures, was assumed to be the same as that found
in the later period-1940-74. Prior to 1910, there was
relatively no investment in this transportation mode.
Taxicabs. Since little data are available on purchases
of new taxis, it was necessary to estimate this series by
an indirect method. In general, the only reliable data
are on the total number of units in use, and this infor­
mation was used to derive the number of new units. It
was assumed that the average taxicab has a 3-year life,
and, therefore, that one-third of the total number in use
is replaced each year. The number of new units was
then multiplied by the average price to derive the final
investment series.
The total number of taxis in use was estimated by
applying the ratio of all taxis to those in fleet service
to the number of fleet taxis as reported in Motor Vehi­
cle Facts and Figures of the Motor Vehicle Manufac­
turers Association. The average ratio was based on data
from a study by the International Taxicab Association
entitled An Analysis of Taxicab Operating Characteris­
tics, August 1975. This study estimated the total num­
ber of taxis in use in 1973; the ratio of this estimate to
the number of taxis in fleets was used to derive the en­
tire series. The average price of a taxi in 1970 was es­
timated from a survey of major taxicab owners and a
paper by the Urban Institute, The Nation ’ Expenditures
s
on Urban Travel, Working Paper 450-5, February 1970.
The price for all other years was estimated by the
change in the consumer price index for automobiles.
Transportation services. The total investment series was
developed from IRS data for the period beginning with
1947 and adjusted to cover the noncorporate sector us­
ing capital consumption allowance weights from the
BEA Gross Product Originating data. It was not pos­
sible to derive consistent IRS data for the pre-1947 pe­
riod. Therefore, the average expenditures of the trans­
portation sector were used as an interpolating series,
multiplied by a constant factor based on the 1947-63
average ratio of transportation services expenditures to
transportation excluding transportation services. The
resulting estimates were allocated between structures
and equipment using the Life of Depreciable Assets
Survey proportions.
An independent estimate was made for 1971 since the
calculated IRS estimate yielded a totally unreasonable
number. For 1974, investment was estimated from the



1973-74 percent change in total transportation invest­
ment, excluding transportation services.
Communications, except radio and TV

Capital expenditures for the telephone and telegraph
industry were developed from statistics compiled by
the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). For
the period 1958-74, these data were developed from the
FCC report, Statistics o f Communications Common Car­
riers, which provided separate statistics on the capital
expenditures of the telephone and telegraph industries.
Data prior to 1951 were taken from the telephone in­
vestment series developed by Ulmer, which was based
on AT&T balance-sheet data, and the FCC telegraph
investment series. Data for 1951-57 were developed us­
ing Ulmer’s methods and sources, with the telegraph
supplement from the FCC.
The investment series was benchmarked to the in­
vestment totals in the 1958, 1963, and 1967 capital trans­
actions matrices. Data for 1964-74 were adjusted by
trending the adjustment factors of the benchmark years
and scaling the FCC data accordingly. The adjustment
factors were 0.9521, 0.9461, and 1.003 for 1958, 1963,
and 1967, respectively. The total investment series was
broken into plant and equipment components by taking
the structures series for telephone and telegraph con­
struction as reported in the Construction Review and de­
riving the equipment series as a residual.
Radio and TV

Annual total investment expenditures for the broad­
casting industry were based on IRS data compiled in
the early years by Gort and Boddy and derived for
later years directly from the IRS Source Book. The data
were adjusted to exclude the effects of capital gains and
allocated between structures and equipment by a con­
stant proportion derived from the Life of Depreciable
Assets Survey. Data for 1974 were estimated based on
the 1973-74 growth rate in the production of radio and
TV braodcast equipment as reported in the Annual Sur­
vey of Manufactures.
Electric and gas utilities and water and sanitary
services

Data for these industries were developed from the
Plant and Equipment Expenditure Survey for the years
1947-74 and from the Ulmer study for years prior to
1947. The BEA data identify capital expenditures for
electric utilities and for an aggregation of gas utilities
with water and sanitary services. This latter series was
divided into its component parts by developing annual
proportions of these two industries from the IRS Sta­
tistics of Income and applying them to the expenditure
levels in this series.
The structures portion of the electric utility and gas
utility series were developed from annual construction
data from Construction Statistics 1915-64 (a supplement
37

responding benchmark ratios for these years were low­
er: 1.61, 1.25, and 0.8135, respectively. Note that the
index was benchmarked twice for 1958, once for the
post-1957 index and once for the pre-1958 index, in or­
der to maintain continuity in the two indexes.
An important part of retail trade, the investment ex­
penditures for gasoline service stations built by major
petroleum companies but leased to individual operators,
was not included in the census retail trade statistics and
had to be estimated from other sources. A capital ex­
penditure series on marketing by the petroleum indus­
try was obtained from the Chase Manhattan Bank pub­
lication, Capital Investments of the World Petroleum In­
dustry. From this total marketing figure, investment ex­
penditures by independent service station operators
were subtracted to obtain the investment series for gas­
oline stations owned by the petroleum companies. This
figure was then added to the previously calculated cen­
sus-based investment series to derive the final total in­
vestment series. This series was then broken into plant
and equipment components based on proportions of
these assets in the four census years.

to the Construction Review) and the January issues of
the Construction Review for 1965-74. Structures for wa­
ter and sanitary services were estimated based on a con­
stant proportion for this industry derived from the Life
of Depreciable Assets Survey. Capital expenditures for
equipment were then calculated as the difference be­
tween total investment and structures investment.
Wholesale trade

The investment series for wholesale trade was initial­
ly developed from IRS data and benchmarked to data
from the Retail and Wholesale Trade censuses. Data
prior to 1947 were developed from the Gort/Boddy
study. Beginning in 1947, data were developed from
the IRS Source Book to form a continuous investment
series through 1973. Capital expenditures for merchant
wholesalers were available in 1958 and 1972 from the
Census of Business and in 1967 and 1972 from the 1972
Census of Wholesale Trade. These capital expenditures
were inflated to cover capital expenditures of all whole­
sale trade establishments. Plant investment was adjust­
ed by the ratio of inventories of all wholesale trade es­
tablishments to the inventories of merchant wholesalers
and equipment investment was adjusted using the pro­
portion of payrolls of all wholesale trade establishments
to the payrolls of only merchant wholesalers.
The IRS investment series was then benchmarked to
the four census estimates by interpolating the bench­
mark ratios for the intercensal years and applying the
ratios to each IRS observation. IRS data for 1973 were
adjusted based on the 1972 ratio. Data for 1974 were
estimated based on the growth rate in retail trade in­
vestment as described below.

Finance and insurance

Gross investment data for this industry were based
on the IRS Source Book and benchmarked to the 1958,
1963, and 1967 capital transactions matrices. The IRS
data were expanded to include the noncorporate sector
and to exclude the effects of capital gains. The 1974
expenditure figure was based on the growth rate of fi­
nance and insurance expenditures in the Plant and
Equipment Survey and applied to the 1973 IRS figure.
The adjustment figures to convert the IRS data were
0.5823 in 1958, 0.8900 in 1963, and 0.9187 in 1967. Plant
and equipment were separated based on the plant and
equipment proportions in the capital transactions
matrices.

Retail trade

Investment in retail trade was estimated based on the
Gort/Boddy study through 1946 and from an index from
the Construction Review for 1947-74.The index was cal­
culated based on the construction of stores, mercantile
buildings, and garages for 1958-74 and on the construc­
tion of office and other commercial buildings for 194757. The Construction Review index was then benchmarked on census values in 1958, 1963, 1967, and 1972;
the intervening years were interpolated between the
census benchmark points. The benchmark ratio for 1972
was used for 1973 and 1974. The adjustment ratios were
2.5636 in 1958, 2.7237 in 1963, 2.4522 in 1967, and 1.8165
in 1972. Census data prior to 1958 were not available
and the capital expenditures series from the BEA Plant
and Equipment Survey series was used as a substitute
for 1954 and 1948. The BEA series and the census val­
ues were quite similar in 1958; the census total invest­
ment figure was $2,647 billion and the BEA figure was
$2,748 billion, and it was assumed that this close rela­
tionship held in the previous two benchmark years. The
Construction Review index was higher since a substitute
series was used in 1948, 1954, and 1958. Thus, the cor­



Real estate

Total investment in the real estate industry is deri­
ved from IRS data and the Construction Review. Invest­
ment in this industry is defined as the purchase of build­
ings and equipment for use by the real estate industry
and commercial buildings and related equipment which
are rented or resold to other businesses. It does not in­
clude the purchase of buildings used for residential pur­
poses such as apartments or nonhousekeeping units such
as dormitories.
For the period 1946-73, initial estimates of real estate
investment were developed using IRS data. Two ad­
justments were required to: (1) eliminate the residential
portion and (2) include the noncorporate sector. The
residential investment was eliminated in a two-step pro­
cedure. First, the IRS data were used to develop an
estimate of total investment (including residential) by
the real estate industry. Second, an estimate of the to­
tal corporate share of residential investment was devel­
oped, assuming that one-half of total investment in mul­
38

tifamily dwellings and nonhousekeeping units was pur­
chased by corporations. It was then assumed that only
a fixed proportion of the corporate residential invest­
ment was made by firms in the real estate industry. This
proportion was derived from the Life of Depreciable
Assets Survey, resulting in an allocation of 76.8 percent
of corporate residential investment to the real estate in­
dustry. This latter figure was subsequently subtracted
from the IRS total real estate investment to derive the
real estate investment in nonresidential buildings and
equipment.
The investment series was then expanded to include
the noncorporate sector based on the ratio of noncor­
porate depreciation to corporate depreciation. The re­
sulting investment time series proved to be quite errat­
ic for several years. Therefore, it was smoothed over
the entire period using the series “nonresidential build­
ings: commercial, miscellaneous, and all other private”
from the Construction Review.
Investment prior to 1946 was developed based on the
average ratio of the commercial buildings series from
the Construction Review to the investment series deri­
ved above for the years 1946-63. This ratio was applied
to the pre-1946 commercial buildings series to derive
the real estate portion.
Investment in 1974 was derived based on the 197374 growth rate of the commercial buildings series. The
1973 investment figure was then moved by this growth
rate to derive the 1974 investment figure. The resulting
total investment series was then allocated between struc­
tures and equipment based on the proportions from the
Life of Depreciable Assets Survey.

Gross investment series for these sectors were based
on IRS data adjusted to exclude capital gains and to
include the noncorporate portion of the industry. The
1974 expenditure data were calculated based on the
growth rate of commercial and other construction found
in the Plant and Equipment Expenditures Survey. The
investment series was then broken down into compo­
nent parts based on the Life of Depreciable Assets Sur­
vey proportions.
Auto repair

Gross investment for this sector was based on IRS
data adjusted to exclude capital gains and to include
the noncorporate portion of the industry. The 1974 ex­
penditure data were calculated based on the growth
rate of commercial and other construction found in the
Plant and Equipment Expenditures Survey. The invest­
ment series was then broken down into component parts
based on the Life of Depreciable Assets Survey
Proportions.
Amusements

Gross investment for this sector was based on IRS
data adjusted to exclude capital gains and to include
the noncorporate portion of the industry. The 1974 ex­
penditure data were calculated based on the growth
rate of commercial and other construction found in the
Plant and Equipment Expenditures Survey. The invest­
ment series was then broken down into component parts
based on the Life of Depreciable Assets Survey
Proportions.
Medical and educational services and nonprofit
organizations

Hotels and personal and miscellaneous repair
services

The investment series for medical and educational
services and nonprofit organizations was based on ag­
gregated data from the Construction Review on religious,
hospital and institutional, and educational construction.
This series was benchmarked to the capital transactions
matrix for 1958, 1963, and 1967. The adjustment ratios
were 1.5787 in 1958, 1.8961 in 1963, and 2.0586 in 1967.
Plant and equipment expenditures were broken out
based on proportions of these assets in the capital trans­
actions matrices.

The gross investment series for each component of
this sector was developed from IRS sources and ad­
justed to exclude capital gains and to include the non­
corporate sector. The IRS-based investment series for
hotels and lodging places was found to be inconsistent
with the construction of nonresidential housekeeping
units found in the Construction Review for individual
years. Therefore, it was adjusted by redistributing the
IRS data for the entire period by using the Construc­
tion Review series for nonresidential housekeeping as an
index. The adjusted series was then added to the IRS
series for personal and miscellaneous repair services to
form the final total investment series. The estimate for
1974 was based on the growth rate of nonresidential
housekeeping units between 1973 and 1974.
The structures series for hotels and lodging places
was obtained from the Construction Review series and
the personal and miscellaneous services structures were
calculated based on the proportion available from the
Life of Depreciable Assets Survey. The equipment se­
ries was then calculated as the difference between to­
tal and structures investment.



Business services

Purchases of government-owned assets

The concept of investment discussed to this point has
been developed assuming that all investment was made
directly by private businesses purchasing capital goods
directly from other private businesses. However, in
some cases, firms may purchase or lease capital goods
which were purchased initially by the Federal Govern­
ment. These goods are used in the production of goods
and services and, therefore, should be included as part
of the stock of capital assets. However, they do not ap­
pear in the capital stock estimates derived from private
investment flows.
39

The great majority of government investments oc­
curred during World War II and the period immedi­
ately thereafter. Many of these assets were used from
the time of their purchase by private firms which con­
tracted to produce goods and services for the govern­
ment. Following the war, these assets were generally
either sold to the private sector, placed in the national
industrial reserve, scrapped, or retained by the govern­
ment for continued use by firms producing goods and
services for the government.
It is only those capital goods which remained in pro­
duction which are of interest to this study. Of the two
types of capital goods remaining in use, only those as­
sets which were sold are identified in the capital stock
data. The stock of capital assets owned by the govern­
ment but used by private firms is not identified, primar­
ily due to the lack of available data concerning the
amount of investment and the industry using the assets.
However, it is assumed that elimination of these invest­
ments from the capital stock estimates will have little
impact on the relationship between capital stock and
other industry data such as output and employment
which, in most cases, will contain information on pro­
duction activity which uses government-owned facili­
ties. This is justified on the grounds that the negotiated
price of the output of firms using government facilities
will be less than the market price if the firm were the
owner of the capital goods. Thus, the relationship be­
tween output and capital stock will be somewhat ten­
uous, which may yield distorted results when compar­
ing the capital inputs to output measures.
As noted above, government purchases of capital as­
sets were concentrated during the period 1940-46. Of
the nearly $14.3 billion invested during this period, $5.7
billion were sold over a number of years at a total sales
price of $2.1 billion. Government investments follow­
ing World War II which were later sold were gener­
ally concentrated in the aircraft and missile industries.
Data on the cost of these assets and the industries pur­
chasing them were not available and, consequently, are
not included in the data. In any event, it is believed
that ignoring these assets will have a minimum impact
on the magnitude of the estimated stocks.
Questions arise concerning the time at which assets
become part of the private sector capital stock and their
value. One argument is that assets ahould only be in­
cluded at the time of their transfer and should be val­
ued at their sales price. The second argument is that




assets should be transferred at the time of their pur­
chase and at their original acquisition cost. The latter
argument is the one adopted by this study, for two rea­
sons. First, the cost of assets at the time of their trans­
fer may not accurately reflect the actual productive­
ness of the assets. Second, in many cases, the compa­
nies purchasing the surplus assets were the operators
prior to the sale date, and thus the assets were part of
the capital stock of these companies. This requires iden­
tifying government purchases of capital assets during
the wartime years and the industries which later pur­
chased these assets.
In general, assets transferred fell into one of two
classes: Joint transfer of plant and equipment facilities,
and equipment items sold separately. Data pertaining
to the transfer of joint plant and equipment facilities
were available from several Federal agencies. In many
cases, the data identified the purchasing industry, the
original cost and purchase year, and the value of the
plant and equipment components. These expenditures
were allocated to the purchasing industry directly.
However, in other cases, only the total value of the as­
sets was identified. This required the elimination of any
land value and separation of the data into plant and
equipment components. This was accomplished based
on the ratio of total investment to investment net of
land values for this time period and the ratio of the
plant component to total investment.
Sales of equipment items alone were much more dif­
ficult to identify since only a total value was available.
Thus, investment had to be allocated to the proper pur­
chasing industry and to the proper purchase year. These
allocations were based on the pattern of total capital
expenditures over the 6-year period 1940-45 and on the
industries purchasing metalworking machinery and gen­
eral industrial machinery identified in the 1958 capital
flow matrix.
Once the investment series was developed, capital
stock estimates were derived using procedures identi­
cal to those used to prepare the private sector capital
stock estimates. The resulting estimates are not present­
ed in this bulletin but are available from BLS upon re­
quest. For more information concerning the develop­
ment of the investment data, see Development o f Capi­
tal Stock Series by Industry Sector (1973) prepared by
Jack Faucett Associates for the President’s Office of
Emergency Preparedness (now Federal Preparedness
Agency, General Services Administration).

40

Appendix B. Mathematical
Description of the Model

hold the value of A constant and evaluate the replacement
function for various values of B. One possible form of the
replacement function is given by

The perpetual inventory technique discussed in chapters
1 and 4 is a process used to cumulate annual capital
expenditures into a measure of the stock of capital assets.
This capital stock is then adjusted for the discards of
worn-out assets and the depreciation or decline in effi­
ciency of the capital stock to produce goods and services.
For any one year, the capital stock is equal to the capital
stock in the previous year plus the current year’s invest­
ment less the discards and depreciation of currently held
assets. This value may be expressed by
(1)
where

. .
^

= the value of capital stocks in years t
and t— respectively,
1,
It = investment in year t,
Dt = discards in year t (discards will be used
to refer to both discards and deprecia­
tion).

The value of discards in year t is equal to the sum of
investment in each previous time period times its relative
efficiency in producing goods and services in year t.
t-1

^ ^ Iv R fv
v=l

where Iv is investment of vintage v and R is a replacement
function denoting the portion of investment of
vintage v remaining t~v years after purchase.
The term I in (2) is the annual capital expenditure time
series described in chapter 2 and appendix A. The term R is
somewhat more complicated, and much of the remaining
discussion in this appendix is devoted to describing the
derivation of the replacement function R.
Specifically, it is desired to develop a function which
relates the efficiency of an asset when new to its efficiency
in subsequent time periods. Two basic restrictions are
placed on this function:

0<=a<A
a>=A

tion of service life has elapsed. The absolute differences in
the values of R(a) at any given age are due only to
differences in the service lives.
The concept of variable lives is related to the concept of
investment in this study where investment is composed of a
bundle of different types of capital goods
N
(4)

Assets are fully productive when new;
Depreciation or the change in efficiency of an asset over
time is a continuous function which declines to zero at
the end of an asset’s service life.

.t = E ' k ,
k=l

where 1^ t is investment in good type k in year t.
Each of the N types of capital goods is a homogeneous
group of capital assets in which the actual service life of
each asset is a random variable reflecting quality differ­
ences, maintenance schedules, etc. For each type of capital
good there exists some mean service life A around which is

The replacement function R may be evaluated at any
asset age, say a. This function, R(a), may be expressed in
terms of two parameters, the service life of an asset (A) and
a curvature or depreciation parameter (B). Initially, we will



A~a
A-Ba
0

where both a and A denote end of year time periods. This
function is a form of a rectangular hyperbola which
provides a generalized model incorporating several types of
depreciation as specific cases.
The value of B is restricted only to values less than or
equal to 1. Values greater than 1 yield results outside the
bounds established by the restrictions on R(a). For values
of B greater than zero, the function R(a) tends to approach
zero at an increasing rate. For values less than zero, R(a)
approaches zero at a decreasing rate. Several possible values
of B are illustrated in chapter 4, chart 4.
The choice of B, while arbitrary, does allow flexibility in
the specification of depreciation forms, which increases the
flexibility of the model. A discussion of the alternate forms
of B and the values chosen for this study may be found in
chapter 4.
Consider now the replacement function R(a), which
holds B constant and allows A to vary. Chart B-l illustrates
a series of replacement functions differing only in the
length of the service life. Each function displays the same
rate of decay since B is fixed and decays in the same
proportion of initial productivity after some given propor­

Kt = Kt_ , + I t - D t

(2)

R(a)=

41

where X is a standard normal variable. The adjusted normal
distribution then becomes

Chart B-1. Decay functions accounting for
variation in actual service lives

1

Efficien cy

e—
(A-A)2/ 2c;2

y/2ito

P(A) =

(7)

r b /o

f

J-8/o

X2

-7 = * ~

e -(A -A ) 2 I2 ° 2
o

r 8,° e - X ? d x
2/2
J - 6 lo

Calculation of the normal truncated horizontally is more
complex computationally. If the X-axis is shifted up to
intersect the distribution at the cut-off points, the values of
the probability distribution will measure the probability
density of the truncated distribution plus a constant equal
to the vertical distance between the original X-axis and the
shifted axis. Calculation of the distribution between the
cut-off points requires elimination of this constant factor
measured by the ordinate of the distribution at the cut-off
points and adjusting the remaining area under the curve by
the area eliminated from consideration. This involves
determining the ordinates of the normal distribution at the
cut-off points and calculating the area of the distribution
below the ordinates. The ordinates at A— and A+5 may be
6
calculated by:

a distribution of the actual service lives of the assets in the
group. In order to determine the actual capital available for
production, the actual service lives and relative frequency
of assets with these service lives must be determined.
Following the discussion in chapter 4, it is assumed that
this distribution may be accurately depicted by the
standard normal distribution:
(5)

P(A)=

— jk =r-

e-(A -A )2/2 o 2

(8) 0= . - L - e-(A+5-A)2/2g2 = — !— e —
(l/2)(5/ff)2
\/27r a

This is a continuous function in which, for any value of
A, there exists a non-zero density and, for the neighbor­
hood around A, a non-zero probability. One property of
the normal distribution is related to the infinite nature of
the distribution. Without adjustment, the distribution
would yield cases where assets were discarded prior to their
purchase or assets with unrealistically long service lives. In
order to eliminate these extremes, some adjustment is
warranted to restrict the values of the actual service lives to
a reasonable range around A. This adjustment requires
truncation of the normal at some point before and after A,
say by a value of 5. As illustrated in chapter 4, chart 2, this
procedure may take two forms, truncation of the tails of
the distribution vertically at the points A— and A+5 or
6
raising the X-axis horizontally to intercept the normal at
the cut-off points.
Either technique requires adjustment of the remaining
standard normal values between the cut-off points by an
amount 100/E where E is the percent of the distribution
remaining within the truncated curve. For vertical trunca­
tion, the value of E is simply the area under the normal
curve between the cutoff points.




y /lir a

The total area remaining in the adjusted distribution is
equal to the area within the cut-off points as calculated in
(6) less the area of the rectangle bounded by the cut-off
points, the original X-axis and the shifted X-axis. This is
determined by multiplying the value of the ordinate
determined in (8) (the height of the rectangle) by the
length between the cut-off points, 2 5 (the length of the
rectangle). The adjusted probability distribution then be­
comes
i __ _ -(A —
A)2/ 2< ^ ____ L
( 9 ) P(A)=

\/27r o
.5 l o
- '—ft/a y/Tn

- ( l / 2)( 5/cr)2

\J l7 a
r
25

— )(6 /a )2
(l/2

\f2/n o

Note that the numerator in (9) is the area of the normal
distribution adjusted for the constant 0 derived in equation
(8). The results of the above calculations, regardless of the
truncation form used, allow calculation of the probability
of service life A occurring given the average age of a group
of similar capital goods, the cut-off points of a distribution
around the average age, and the standard deviation of the
distribution. The latter two variables are assumed to be 50

42

where b is the end point of the interval,
c is the beginning of the interval,
n is the number of pairs of equal width segments,
and
2n is the total number of segments.

and 25 percent, respectively, of the mean life in this study.
Once the frequency of a true service life A is known, the
decay function for that particular service life may be
calculated using some fixed value of B. A similar process is
followed for all other possible values of A, and all the decay
curves are aggregated to derive a replacement function for
that type of good. This may be thought of as summing the
curves vertically in chart B-l to yield the aggregate
replacement function. This function may be expressed
mathematically as

Substitution of
A+5 for b
A~5 for c
25 for b~c
yields
A+5

s~ A+5

(10) R (a| A,5,

o,

B) = /
A-5

( 1 1 ')

D(a| A, B)P(A | A, C, 5) dA
T

l

+y ^ 4 r (^_§+(3i_2) 5

A specific example may prove useful in clarifying many of
the concepts discussed here. For the purposes of this
example, we will make the following assumptions:
Average service life = 10 years.
Assets distributed normally about the mean service life.
Standard deviation of the distribution = 2.5 years.
Distribution truncated vertically at 5 and 15 years.
Depreciation occurs according to (3).
Value of the decay parameter (B) = .75.
From these assumptions, we know that actual discards
will occur over a range of 5 to 15 years. This example
assumes vertical truncation. However, the process is identi­
cal using the horizontal truncation method. The distinction
between the two methods lies in how the values derived
from the normal distribution are adjusted.
Calculation of the replacement function may be broken
into two distinct steps: Derivation of the frequency
distribution of discards, and weighting of depreciation
functions by their corresponding discard frequencies to
yield the replacement function values. The first step in the
calculation of the discard frequencies is to divide the
discard interval into an even number of equal-width
segments. For this example, we will choose 10 segments,
which yields a segment width exactly equal to 1 year. This
interval width was chosen in this example largely for
convenience; in general, the segment widths are not integer
values. The second step requires calculating the various
ages, A, which compose the boundaries between the
segments determined above. These ages correspond to each
of the columns shown in table B-1.
The next step is to calculate the probability or fre­
quency of occurrence for each of the 11 asset service lives
determined. Given our assumptions concerning the distribu-

2f(c + 2 it £ )

i=l

+^ 4 f ( c + ( 3 i - 2 ) t i )
i=l

Chart B-2. Calculation of integral using
Simpson’s approximation




2 r ( a - 5 + 2i 5
_
n

n

n—
1

c

R(A-S) + R(A+5)

3i

1

c
f(x)dx = b— f(c) + f(b)
6n

+£

R <a > -

L

This function, unfortunately, is not continuous and may
not be integrated to determine the values of R for each age.
An alternative to integration is to use an approximation
technique to estimate the area under the curve. One such
method is Simpson’s approximation. This technique re­
quires dividing the area under the curve to be integrated
into an even number of equal width segments. The area
under the first two segments is estimated by fitting a
parabola between the bounds of the first two segments
(P1,P2,P3) in chart B-2. The areas in successive pairs of
segments are estimated in a similar manner. This procedure
may be conveniently expressed for a general integral by:

00

/

b

43

Table B-1.

Derivation of the frequency distribution of discards for an asset with a 10-year service life
Segment boundary fo r asset service lives (years)
7

5
Frequency of service
l i f e ...................................
W eight fo r Simpson's
a p p r o x im a tio n ............
Weighted fre q u e n c y ..........
Actual fre q u e n c y ...............

6

.0 2 2 6 2

.04 6 4 8

1
.0 2 2 6 2
.0 0 7 5 4

4
.1 8 5 9 2
.06 197

8

9

.0 8 1 3 7

.1 2 1 3 9

.15431

.1 6 7 1 7

.15431

.1 2 9 3 9

.0 8 1 3 7

.0 4 6 4 8

.0 2 2 6 2

2
.1 6 2 7 4
.0 5 4 2 5

4
.4 8 5 5 6
.1 6 1 8 5

2
.3 0 8 6 2
.1 0 2 8 7

4
.6 6 8 6 8
.2 2 2 8 9

2
.3 0 8 6 2
.1 0 2 8 7

4
.4 8 5 5 6
.1 6 1 8 5

2
.1 6 2 7 4
.0 5 4 2 5

4
.1 8 5 9 2
.06 197

1
.0 2 2 6 2
.0 0 7 5 4

P(A)=

e (A -10)2/i2.5
2.5

^

e ~ x 2 /

2 dx

J -2
Recall that the denominator in (7') is equal to the total
area under the normal curve less the area under the normal
curve and outside the cut-off points defined by our
truncation assumption. Rather than perform these calcula­
tions, this value may be derived from a table of standard
normal values. This is found to be 0.9546. The numerator
in (7') is the ordinate of the distribution for each of the 11
lives calculated previously. These values may be derived
from a table of standard normal ordinates. In many cases,
this latter table is developed for the standardized normal
distribution with mean 0 and standard deviation of 1. For
distributions with a standard deviation other than 1, the
ordinates determined from the table must be divided by the
standard deviation of the distribution actually used. These
resulting calculations are shown in line 1 of table B-1. The
next step requires weighting each of the ordinate values by
the appropriate weight required to perform Simpson’s
approximation. These are derived fro m (ll')an d are shown
in line 2 along with the weighted frequency values in line 3
of table B-1. The final calculation is to multiply each of the
weighted frequency values by the ratio:
Length of the discard interval
3[Number of segments]

12

13

14

15

( 12)

In this example, this ratio is (15—
5)/3(l0), yielding 1/3.
Multiplying each of the weighted frequencies by 1/3 yields
the actual frequencies for each of the 11 service lives as
shown in line 4.
We may now proceed to determine the depreciation
pattern for the group of assets. Recall that while the mean
service life is 10 years, the actual service lives of assets in
the bundle range between 5 and 15 years. For each of these
service lives, there exists a depreciation function which
describes the change in the relative efficiency of assets with
that service life to produce goods and services. The
efficiency of these assets is determined according to (3).
These calculations are performed for each of the 11 service



11

lives and are presented in the corresponding columns of
table B-2. The values shown measure the efficiency of the
assets at the end of a time period relative to the efficiency
of the assets when new. For example, assets with a 5-year
service life are slightly more than 94 percent as efficient
after 1 year of service as when new. By the end of the fifth
year of service, the relative efficiency has fallen to zero.
The relative efficiency of the entire group of assets may
now be determined. ’ This is derived by weighting the
efficiency of each of the 11 segments (or ages) in a given
year by the actual frequency or proportion of assets with
that service life in the total asset bundle (line 4, table B-1).
These weighted efficiency values are summed across all
segments to yield the relative efficiency of the entire
bundle of assets. For example, according to the calcula­
tions, this bundle of assets is 97 percent as efficient after 1
year of service as when new.
The result of these calculations has been to develop a
replacement function for a homogeneous group of capital
goods. “Homogeneous” in this example refers to capital
goods characterized by a mean service life of 10 years with
a dispersion of actual service lives about the mean life equal
to 2.5 years and the range of actual service lives restricted
to between 5 and 15 years. A replacement function
describing an investment bundle composed of a group of N
different types of capital goods may now be developed
using the above technique. It is assumed that each of the
types of capital goods is a homogeneous group. The
replacement function for the entire investment bundle is
derived by weighting each of the N replacement functions
by the respective proportion of total investment composed
of the Nth type good.

tion about the mean life, the probability of each asset life,
A, occurring may be derived using (7), which is reproduced
below with the actual values of a , 8 , and A.

(7')

10

k=l
where I^/Iy is determined from the relative shares of each
capital good to total investment in 1963 and 1967.
(13)

lk _

rT

Ik, 1963 + l k , 1967
1963 + l T , 1967

lT,

The replacement function may then be used with (2) to
determine the discards and depreciation of assets of vintage
v in time t. These data are then subtracted from investment
in time t and added to the previous year’s capital stock to
determine the stock in year t.

44

Table B-2.
Change in the efficiency of assets with varying service lives and the total replacement function for a bundle of assets with a
10-year service life
Age of
asset
(years)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1 0
11
1 2
1 3
1 4
1 5

..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................

Decay of assets w ith service lives (years) of —
5

6

7

8

9

10

.94 12
.8571
.72 73
.5 0 0 0
0

.95 42
.88 89
.80 00
.66 67
.44 44
0

.9 6 0 0
.9091
.8421
.7 5 0 0
.61 54
.40 00
0

.9 6 5 5
.9 2 3 0
.86 95
.8 0 0 0
.70 5 8
.5 7 1 4
.3636
0

.96 96
.93 3 3
.88 8 8
.83 3 3
.7 6 1 9
.6 6 6 6
.53 3 3
.33 33
0

.97 29
.9411
.9 0 3 2
.8571
.80 00
.72 72
.63 1 5
.5 0 0 0
.30 7 6
0

.97 56
.94 73
.91 4 2
.87 50
.82 75
.76 9 2
.69 56
.6 0 0 0
.47 05
.25 87
0

12

13

14

15

.97 77
.95 23
.9 2 3 0
.8 8 8 8
.84 84
.80 00
.74 07
.66 66
.57 1 4
.4 4 4 4
.26 66
0

.97 95
.95 65
.93 02
.9 0 0 0
.86 48
.82 35
.7741
.71 42
.6 4 0 0
.5 4 5 4
.4 2 1 0
.2 5 0 0
0

.9811
.96 00
.9361
.90 90
.8 7 8 0
.8421
.80 00
.7 5 0 0
.6896
.61 53
.52 17
.40 00
.23 52
0

.98 24
.96 29
.9411
.91 66
.88 88
.8571
.82 05
.77 77
.7 2 7 2
.66 66
.5 9 2 5
.5 0 0 0
.38 0 9
.22 22
0

.971 1
.93 64
.8941
.82 90
.76 23
.65 68
.54 36
.40 65
.29 23
.17 12
.10 28
.04 22
.0 1 7 5
.00 16
0

numbered segment boundaries and 2 for odd num­
bered segment boundaries.
e. Calculate a decay function for each of the 2n+l
service lives using a fixed value of B and create a
matrix containing 2n+l columns and k rows where k
corresponds to A+5 years.
f. Multiply each of the columns of the matrix deter­
mined in (e) by the corresponding weights deter­
mined in (d). Sum each row of the matrix and
multiply each element of the resulting vector by the
value 25/6n. This yields the replacement function for
1 type of capital good.

SUMMARY OF REQUIRED STEPS: The following steps
are a summary of the discussion in this appendix.
1. Create adjusted normal distribution:
a. Set cut-off points around A.
b. Select values for the standard deviation (a).
c. Determine truncation type.
d. Calculate adjusted normal distribution.
2. For each asset type in the investment bundle,
a. Determine the range of discard years around the
mean service life (A— A+5).
5,
b. Divide the interval 25 into 2n equal width segments.
c. Determine the service life at each of the 2n+l
segment boundaries and calculate the frequency of
this service life from the adjusted distribution.
d. Weight the ordinate of the distribution for each life
determined in (c) above. The weights are 4 for even




11

Replacem ent
function

3. For each replacement function calculated in (2) above,
a. Multiply the function by the proportion of invest­
ment composed of that type of good.
b. Sum the weighted replacement functions to derive
the aggregate industry replacement function.

45

Appendix C. Tables of investment and capital stocks for
input-output industries, 1947-74
Sectors 1 - 4. Agriculture: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Gross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year

r
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 3 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

Equ i p m e n t

$2,762
5,5 5 5
3,8 3 3

S tr u c tu re s

$1,958
2,729
3,052

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

3
3
3
3
3

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 5 _____
1 5 5 7 _____
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

3,504
3,253
3,409
3 , 9 14
4 , 152

2,765
2,424
2,609
3 , 143
3,148

I 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1962. .. .
1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

3
3
3
4
4

,5
,8
,8
,3
,7

5
8
5
2
4

9
4
8
3
3

1 9 6 5 ....
1966 . . . .
1 9 6 7 _____
1 6 6 3 _____
1 9 6 9 _____

5
6
6
6
6

,3
,0
,4
,5
,7

4
1
6
0
1

2
4
0
2
6

$793
825
780

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

,8
,9
,6
,9
,4

3
3
2
3
2

T o ta l

I

$9,561
11,721
14,200

$ 15,258
1 8 , 114
21,240

S tr u c tu r e s

$5,697
6,392
7,040

$12,431
15,239
18,188

I
|
I
|

$7,634
9,706
12,017

21,060
23,857
26,143
2 3,468
30,093

I
I
|
|
|

14,249
16,354
17,880
19,537
2 0,545

69
57
16
47
13

3
3
3
3
3

1
2
3
5
7

9
0
3
6
5

I
|
I
I
|

2
2
2
2
2

1,458
1,868
2,350
3,284
4,147

1
1
1
1
1

14,670
15,452
16,332
17,210
18,039

3
3
4
4
4

8,0
9,3
0,5
2,6
4,5

77
79
75
50
35

I
I
I
I
|

2
2
2
2
2

4
5
5
6
7

13,6
14,3
15,1
16,0
16,8

7
4
2
8
7

4
4
5
5
5

6
9
3
6
9

9
8
0
1
£

0
2
4
3
4

4
2
1
2
3

|
I
|
I
|

2
3
3
3
3

9,214
1 , 1S 4
3,243
5,200
7,195

17,690
18,638
19,797
20,932
22,048

5,315
6,820
8 , 159
0,206
2,833

6
6
6
7
S

2,5
6,0
9,5
5,6
3,3

3
5
6
3
4

8
8
8
8
7

I
I
I
I
|

3
4
4
4
5

9,568
1,283
3,714
7,309
3,106

2
2
2
2
3

9
0
2
5
1

7
3
1
3
4

16,708
19,213
21,259
23,512
2 5 , 142

7,68
8,39
9,16
9,84
10/47

738
828
799
770
1,003

5
3
4
4
4

7
9
0
2
4

,7
,3
,8
,8
,9

2
9
3
1

10
0
4
2
7

2
2
2
2
3

6
7
8
9
1

,6
,5
,4
,7
,0

4
6
7
8
0

1
1
1
1
1

391
9 15
1 , 0 10
1,006
1, 0 C6

4
4
4
5
5

6
8
9
2
4

,3
,0
,6
,2
,5

47
56
89
09
52

3
3
3
3
3

1
2
3
4
6

,6
,6
,3
,9
,4

77
04
57
99
63

4
4
5
5
5

7,570
7,143
7 , 9 18
10,530
12,571

24,3
27,6
30,4
33,3
35,6

1
1
1
1
1

5
6
6
6
7

7
0
4
3
1

,367
,733
,435
,064
,781

3
4
4
4
4

8,339
0,669
3,112
5,496
7,973

19,02
20,06
21,32
22,56
23,80

5
5
5
6
6

0
3
6
0
6

2
2
2
3
3

,2
,8
,0
,1
,3

7
4
7
1
3

7 84
8 38
909
8 19
770

Equ i p m a n t

2,667
2,968
2.847
3 , 8 16
3,741

76
58
46
02
32

,091
,119
,756
,082
,66 1

T c ta l

7
9
0
9
2

5,909
5,474
6,40 1
8,289
9,762-,

_______

,0
,1
,3
,3
,3

6
6
8
8
8

4
4
9
2
3

1,660
1,668
1,516
2,2 4C
2,808

76,1
79,9
84,3
91,1
99,7

96
96
59
13
01

,8
,1
,2
,9
,3

0
3
8
4
3

8
7
0
0
9

1
6
0
7
7

_________

1
1
2
3
3

,0
,7
,4
,0
,9

9
0
1
1
1

,5
,6
,7
,3
,0

,
,
,
,
,

8
7
9
3
3

Equi pment

,4
,0
,3
,6
,7

62
21
84
36
07

S tr u c tu r e s

$4,845
5,533
6,171
6,311
7,503
8,263
8 ,9 3 1
9,545
0
0
1
2
2

3
4
5
7
0

,131
,802
,442
,051
,890

,
,
,
,
,

4
7
9
3
2

14
53
91
14
28

1
7
5
2
4

9
5
3
3
1

Sectors 1 - 4. Agriculture: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s tock s

Net

s to c k

Year
1
|

T o ta l

r
Equi pment

________________ | _
1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$6,043
6,991
7,240

I
|
|

$4,269
5,34 1
5,641

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

7
6
6
6
5

,2
,7
,0
,4
,6

0 3
92
53
37
41

|
!
|
|
|
j

5
5
4
4
4

,569
,251
,434
,979
,231

1,633
1,540
1,623
1,457
1,410

6
6
7
7
7

56
83
53
60
57

|
|
I
|
|

3
4
4
4
4

6
0
2
5
7

,6
,1
,7
,6
,5

04
77
94
98
00

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
--------_____
_____
_____

5
4
5
5
5

,719
,996
,018
,640
,9 2 4

|
I
I
1
|

4
3
3
4
4

,3
,6
,7
,3
,2

82
18
43
77
66

1,337
1,373
1,274
1,262
1,658

79,918
80,937
81,739
83,033
54,563

|
|
|
|
|

4
4
4
5
5

9
9
9
0
1

,0
,4
,7
,5
,1

59
96
99
84
86

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

5
5
5
6
6

,051
,452
,395
,585
,4 0 1

!
I
|
I
|

3
3
3
4
4

,5
,9
,7
,9
,8

70
31
36
62
09

1,480
1,520
1,659
1,623
1,592

85,2
86,2
87,3
89,5
91,4

9
2
7
3
5

|
|
|
|
|

5
5
5
5
5

1
1
1
2
3

,0
,3
,3
,5
,5

68
05
31
34
06

1965
1966
1957
1968
1969

7
7
8
7
7

,0
,7
,0
,8
,7

0
6
6
1
3

j
I
|
|
|
j

5
5
6
5
6

,4
,9
,1
,9
,0

0
8
0
7
0

1,642
1,719
1, 9 6 5
1,868
1 , 7 18

93,960
97,050
100,431
103,516
106,392

|
|
I
I
I

5
5
5
6
6

4
6
8
0
2

,9
,9
,9
,7
,4

7
3
3
2
6

5
4
2
6
0

8,291
7,637
7,918
10,191
10,670

|
|
I
|
|

6,402
5,873
6,40 1
8,111
8,481

1
1
1
1
1

|
|
|
I

6
6
6
7
7

4
5
7
0
4

,4
,8
,5
,7
,2

73
09
10
64
69

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____
_______________

5
0
6
4
2

__________ L .




7
6
1
3
5

I

_______ _____________ _______ ________ | _ ___________________
I
I
$1,770
$50,563
I
$24,953
1,650
54,988
|
28,654
|
1,595
59,654
|
32,665

1,389
1,763
1,515
2,080
2 , 189

4
8
1
5
7

,3
,5
,9
,4
,8

1
9
1
0
4

09,712
12,222
14,837
19,551
24,603

__________ L

|
|
|

S tr u c tu r e s

2
2
2
2
3

7,751
8,405
9 , 158
9,762
0,337

I
|
|

3
3
3
3
3

0,85
1,44
1,9 4
2,44
3,37

I
|
I

3
3
3
3
3

4
4
5
6
7

,1
,9
,9
,9
,9

5
8
3
6
4

|
|
I
I

3
4
4
4
4

8
0
1
2
3

I
I
|

4
4
4
4
5

5
6
7
8
0

*

$19,466
23,017
26,729

S tr u c tu r e s

$20,317
21,138
21,919

5
5
5
6
6

2
6
9
1
3

,9
,5
,1
,7
,2

2
3
0
4
5

2
5
8
0
3

3
3
3
3
3

0 , 172
3,034
4,758
5,692
7,539

2
2
2
2
2

2
3
4
5
5

8
0
0
9
7

6
6
6
6
6

4
5
5
5
7

,5
,0
,4
,4
,6

92
36
23
06
59

3
3
3
3
3

3,271
3,050
7,862
8,269
8,536

2
2
2
2
2

6,321
6,955
7,560
8,137
9 , 123

0
7
5
9
2

6
6
6
7
7

8
8
9
1
3

,0
,8
,5
,4
,0

34
19
32
11
45

3 S , 093
38,012
37,714
33,616
39,306

2
3
3
3
3

9
0
1
?
3

,9
,8
,8
,7
,7

4
0
1
9
3

0
7
7
4
8

,9
,1
,4
,7
,9

34
15
99
90
31

7
7
8
8
8

5
8
1
3
6

,2
,0
,1
,8
,2

7
7
3
3
5

0
6
6
6
7

4
4
4
4
4

0
2
4
5
7

4
9
6
9
2

2
3
7
7
0

3
3
3
3
3

4
5
7
8
9

,7
,7
,0
,2
,2

2
8
6
3
3

7
2
8
8
7

,2
,4
,3
,7
,3

3
1
2
8
3

85,0 6
91,00
93,05
97,19
101,60

2
9
3
4
3

4
4
5
5
5

S ,68
9,63
0,97
3,87
6,97

1
9
3
4
0

4
4
4
4
4

0
1
2
3
4

,3
,3
,0
,3
,6

8
6
8
2
3

0
9
0
0
3

9
3
7
7
4

____________________

46

Equ i p m e n t

$39,784
4 4 , 156
48,649

$25,610
25,334
27,018

T o ta l

,5
,2
,0
,5
,0

,7
,5
,3
,0
,7

4
0
4
4
1

9
1
9
7
3

Sector 5. Iron and ferroalloy ores mining: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—

—

*--------------------------r
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

—

i
1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 ....
1 9 4 9 ....
1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 4 _____
1 9 5 5 ....
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1953 . . . .
19 5 9 . . . .
19 6 0 .
1 9 6 1
1 9 6 2
1 9 6 3
1 9 6 4

.. .
....
....
....
. -------- |

i
I
i
I
i
I
I
i
I
i
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
i
|

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

S tr u c tu re s

Equ

T o ta l

ipment

I
|
I

T o ta l

I
I
I
I
I
j

63
8 1
8 4
87
113

123
164
196

518
529
546
584
655

I
I
I
|
|

155
145
142
149
169

363
384
404
435
436

572
647
730
825
950

742
824
907
996
1,133

I
I
|
|
|

190
202
207
207
226

552
622
700
739
906

,076
,15 1
,225
,513
,774

1,284
1,360
1,445
1,918
2,343

|
I
I
i
|
j

259
269
29 1
487
664

1, 0 2 5
1,090
1 , 154
1,430
1,679

2
2
2
2
2

|
|
I
I
|

683
775
753
6 98
68

1,754
1 , 906
1, 952
1, 9 82
2,073

$108
144
172

$66
73
77

$4 1
70
95

$90
125
153

42

11
24
10
11
34

30
42
33
37
65

207
266
303
34 5
437

82
99
103
108
136

125
167
199
236
30 1

187
245
230
320
4 09

18 1
176
177
139
214

370
392
4 15
449
503

12 1
26
33
56
9 1

51
2
9
21
36

69
23
23
34
54

551
569
592
6 38
7 17

110
107
111
1 15
168

39
31
26
2 1
4 1

70
75
84
96
126

812
9 C3
995
1,092
1,239

S tr u c tu r e s

$40
69
94

$23
29
25

44
49
100

E qu ip m e nt

I
|
|
|

$49
55
59

$5
12
10

240
255
264
266
288

L

1 9 6 5 ....
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 _____
1968. . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

S tr u c tu r e s

$29
42
36

I
I
I
I
i
i
I
I
i
I
I
|

_______________

Equ i p m a n t

T o ta l

1S 6
1 15
127
519
482

56
36
48
225
213

129
78
78
293
268

1,402
1,452
1,592
2,081
2,530

325
340
366
568
756

1
1
1
1
1

162
321
1 14
75
189

63
142
33
15
62

98
173
75
62
126

3 : 656
7 . =37
3 , . C6
3,031
3 , 153

793
90'9 13
89 1
904

1,863
2 ,0 -0
2 , " 73
2,140
2,248

,4
,6
,7
,6
,7

3
8
0
8
5

7
1
6
1
4

1

l 62
296

_____________________ ________________ l____

Sector 5. Iron and ferroalloy ores mining: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

I
|

I
E quipm ent

S tr u c tu re s

1 9 4 7 _____
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

$62
83
7 1

I
|
I

$ 11
24
19

$5 1
58
51

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1954 . . . .

83
1 18
76
84
173

|
I
|
|
|

20
40
17
18
54

1955. . . .
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 9 _____

205
42
49
83
135

|
|
|
|
|

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
19 6 3 . . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

166
164
17 1
182
252

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

. .. .
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1972. .. .
19 7 3 . . . .
1974. .. .

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$301
365
416

I
|
i

63
77
59
66
119

480
577
634
700
856

|
I
|
I
|

202
223
222
223
26 1

79
3
12
27
45

125
38
37
56
89

1,043
1,068
1,098
1,161
1,274

|
|
|
|
|

325
3 12
307
3 15
340

|
I
I
|
|

49
39
33
27
52

116
125
138
155
199

1,415
1,550
1,690
1,838
2,055

I
I
|
|
i

365
377
38 1
377
399

270
160
169
655
570

I
|
|
|
|

70
45
58
258
237

199
115
1 11
396
333

2
2
2
3
3

,2
,4
,5
,1
,6

8
1
3
4
7

8
0
8
9
1

|
I
|
|

439
453
479
705
909

179
335
1 14
73
154

I
|
I
I
|

67
146
38
15
55

112
188
75
58
98

3
4
4
4
4

,7
,0
,1
,1
,1

9
7
2
1
7

7
2
0
6
5

_____________ I____ ________________




$193
200
200

i

|
|
I
I

942
1,050
1, 0 4 8
1,015
1,010

i
I

S tr u c tu r e s

$108
165
216

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$245
307
358

$ 140
146
147

$104
160
2 10

277
353
4 1 1
476
594

421
5 18
574
638
789

149
172
172
172
209

27 1
346
402
465
580

7 18
755
79 1
846
934

97 1
985
1,005
1,057
1,153

269
250
238
240
259

70 1
735
766
8 16
893

1,049
1 , 172
1,308
1,460
1,656

1,285
1,403
1,535
1,671
1,874

278
287
288
283
303

1,006
1,12 1
1,247
1,337
1,570

1,849
1 , 957
2,059
2,443
2,76 1

2
2
2
2
3

,0
,1
,2
,8
,3

9
9
9
8
7

34 1
352
373
594
786

1,749
1,840
1, 9 24
2,28 9
2,585

2,855
3,022
3,072
3,100
3 , 165

3
3
3
3
3

,4
,6
,6
,6
,6

54
82
73
08
10

7 98
883
850
782
746

2
2
2
2
2

__________________

47

T o ta l

0
2
8
4
1

,6
,7
,8
,8
,8

5
9
2
2
6

6
8
3
5
3

Sector 6. Nonferrous metal ores mining: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—

—
—
Gross
Year

G ross

i r.vestm ent

scou!

—
5

Hat

s to c k s

|
T o ta l

I

E quipm ent

T o ta l

S tr u c tu re s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

$87
152
177

$ 159
166
160

1937. . . .
1 9 3 8 _____
1 9 3 9 _____

$56
93
51

!
I
1

$ IS
35
13

$39
57
37

$239
353
395

$ 1 96
2 15
2 10

$93
159
185

$236
303
337

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1954. .
.

68
90
59
99
117

|
1
I
1
I

20
29
17
3
33

57
65
51
55
S3

553
512
560
588
682

2 12
218
216
200
213

230
295
353
587
569

383
550
595
518
6 10

160
165
16 1
152
155

222
285
533
376
555

1955
1956
1957
1956
1959

. . . .
_____
_____
_____
_____

105
93
156
1 S1
299

I
|
I
I
I

25
1
55
55
80

79
51
1 10
135
168

763
78 1
9 12
1,069
1,295

216
195
217
250
300

556
586
695
323
995

688
705
S35
988
1,208

157
136
16 1
135
255

531
567
673
302
963

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1962. .. .
19 6 3 . . . .
1 9 6 3 _____

254
202
178
159
230

|
I
|
I
I

93
75
66
55
10 1

160
126
111
99
128

1,527
1,707
1,863
1 , 993
2 , 196

373
529
576
510
588

1,155
1,273
1 , 3S7
1,583
1,607

1,531
1,596
1,732
1,837
2,009

3 15
365
50 1
520
580

1,115
1,232
1,331
1,516
1,529

--------. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
_____

278
206
258
970
230

|
I
I
|
|

130
8 3
109
259
8 1

157
122
138
220
153

2,5 5 0
2,602
2,796
3,202
3,358

690
737
800
996
1,015

1,759
1,865
1 , 996
2,206
2,352

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,3
,5
,8
,9

1
5
0
7
9

9
5
3
5
0

56 1
587
63 1
SC 9
809

1,657
1,758
1,872
2,065
2 , 180

19 7 0 . . . .
1 9 7 1 _____
1972. .. .
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 9 _____

355
298
368
600
616

|
I

163
1 16
162
31 1
263

195
18 1
205
288
357

3
3
5
5
5

1,111

2
2
2
3
3

3
3
3
5
5

,2
,3
,6
,0
,5

2
8
0
3
7

5
5
5
9
0

1955
1966
1967
1968
1969

I
j

,633
,839
,106
,595
,082

1, 155
1,238
1,563
1,635

,5
,6
,8
,1
,5

21
85
68
3 1
58

2
2
2
2
3

886
908
968
1, 167
1,309

,3
,5
,6
,8
,1

3
7
3
7
6

8
7
6
2
1

________________

________________ 1
____

Sector 6. Nonferrous metal ores mining: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—

—
G ross

invastm e i t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year
T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

I ------------------------------------S tr u c tu r e s
—

1 9 5 7 _____
1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 ....

$121
185
10 1

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
19 5 2 . . . .
1 9 5 3 ....
19 5 5 . . . .

135
159
120
85
205

36
39
28
5
5 1

93
120
9 1
80
152

1,063
1, 165
1,228
1,257
1,503

500
588
566
521
521

1 5 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
19 5 8 . . . .
1959. .. .

182
70
255
279
379

38
1
59
57
100

153
68
175
22 1
278

1,527
1,550
1,720
1, 9 5 7
2,279

508
359
370
382
552

1,118
1 , 180
1,350
1,565
1,837

1, 352
1,367
1,559
1,777
2 , 105

2S 1
239
259
28 0
355

1,071
1,127
1,290
1,597
1,760

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1962. . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
1S6 5 . . . .

382
305
26 6
229
330

116
95
83
6o
127

266
209
182
160
203

2 , 6 18
2,881
3 , 106
3,293
3,577

521
582
633
669
76 1

2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
3
3

2
5
3
5
8

525
580
520
55 1
6 13

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,1
,3
,5
,6

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 ....
1968. . . .
1969. .. .

390
283
325
580
273

162
102
129
282
89

227
181
196
293
135

3 , 9 13
5 , 130
5,376
5,855
5:032

883
936
1,005
1,217
1,228

3,029
3 , 195
3,37 1
3,656
3,803

3,557
3,723
3 , 9 17
5,355
5,566

7 12
739
786
978
967

2
2
3
3
3

,855
, 98 3
,131
,376
,599

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1973.. . .
1 9 7 5 ....

395
3 11
368
57 1
510

173
119
162
303
239

22 1
192
205
267
27 1

5; : c s
5, hi 9
5 , 7 15
6 , 127
6,558

1 , 3 0
1,351
1,505
1,601
1,721

3
5
5
5
5

5
5
5
5
5

1,033
1,037
1,076
1,258
1,352

3
3
3
5
5

,6
,7
,8
,0
,2

_______________




$35
69
25

$87
115
76

$815
953
986

$522
55 1
515

____________ ________________

48

$293
50 1
57 1
56 3
677
762
836
98 1

,0
,2
,5
,6
,8

96
99
73
25
16

, 9 92
, ' 7
,309
,525
,737

$650
775
817
893
995
1,055
1, 08 1
1,227

,5
,6
,3
,0
,2

,6
,8
,9
,3
,5

3
7
7
2
6

8
0
6
1
8

6
7
9
6
1

$386
503
376

$265
37 1
550

362
35 1
329
285
289

53 1
652
725
796
938

0
9
5
8
5

5
7
9
6
3

7
5
2
5
5

3
0
2
8
9

Sector 7. Coal mining: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Gross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
—
I

1 9 9 7 _____
1 9 9 8 _____
1 9 9 9 _____

I

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu re s

I960. . . .
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 --------1 9 6 3 _____
1969. .. .
1965. .. .
1 9 6 6 ....
1967 . . . .
1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 _____

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$79
10 1
96

$837
1, 186
1,286

$737
937
992

$ 1 50
299
293

$726
1,006
1,086

$536
768
809

$140
238
28 1

397
171
171
56
1 14

282
1 19
1 19
69
7 1

1 19
5 1
51
3 1
42

1 , 6 17
1 , 7 18
1 , 8 15
1,831
1,853

1,211
1,263
1,311
1,298
1,230

905
959
503
532
572

1,398
1,972
1,536
1 , 5 13
1,997

1,005
1,032
1,099
999
995

392
44 0
437
5 14
551

66
121
270
202
256

37
69
163
111
155

28
51
106
90
100

1,812
1,305
1,931
1, 9 7 3
2,077

1,213
1,158
1 , ISO
1,139
1,19 1

598
697
750
838
936

1,922
1,397
1,521
1,580
1,702

897
776
800
775
305

574
620
720
804
897

197
29 1
299
2 17
637

123
19 1
177
160
932

73
99
7 1
56
159

2
2
2
2
3

1,11
1,18
1,29
1,30
1,68

1,007
1,103
1,17 1
1,229
1,379

1,779
1, 997
2,080
2 , 176
2,639

8 12
896
968
1,020
1,389

1
1
1
1

256
963
333
25 9
330

179
330
229
16 1
209

76
132
103
97
125

3,215
3,5 6 6
3,773
3,891
9,062

1,770
1, 995
2,103
2,139
2,191

1,995
1,570
1,670
1,757
1,870

2
3
3
3
3

,7
,0
,2
,2
,3

8
8
3
8
8

1,935
1 , 6 19
1,679
1,659
1,669

1,354
1, 467
1,553
1,626
1,724

775
967
983
770
90 1

299
229
299
390
9 1 1

9
5
5
6
7

2
3
3
3
9

2 , 150
2,353
2,583
2,902
3,288

9
9
5
5
6

,2
,6
,0
,8
,7

2
9
3
8

2
2
2
3
3

1,933
2,179
2,335
2,653
3,048

1
I

;

I
j

1

1

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1972. .. .
1 9 7 3 _____
1979. .. .

S tr u c tu r e s

$152
293
1 12

1
1 9 5 5 _____
19 5 6 . . . .
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 _____
1 9 5 9 _____

Equ i p m e n t

$272
350
159

j
1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 _____
1953. .. .
1 9 5 9 _____

T o ta l

1,070
692
728
1,111
1,313

,1
,2
,9
,5
,0

,9
,9
,9
,7
,8

26
89
15
27
63

9
3
2
8
2

9
3
7
2
5

,7
,0
,3
,8
,5

9
0
3
2
9

93
79
93
80
37

9
6
3
5
9

19
5
9
3
5

i

,2
,9
,6
,1
,7

2
9
6
4
3

5
6
3
9
6

_________

96 1
,051
,111
,155
,295

Sector 7. Coal mining: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

t
Gross investment
L
j
|
|
Equipment i Structures 1 Total
Total

Year
1947 ....
1948....
1949. .. .
1950....
1951....
1952. . . .
1953 __
1954 __
1955....
1956 ... .
1957 ... .
1958__
1959 __
1960 ... .
1961....
1962. ...
1963 ... .
1964 ... .
1965....
1966....
1967 ... .
1968 ....
1969 __
1970 ....
197!....
1972 __
1973....
1974 ... .

i
I
I
!
!
I
1
1
!
I
I
I
i
I
!
j
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
i
i
i
I
i

$475
$64 I
6
559
753 I
238
328 I
I
573
810 |
219
312 I
216
306 I
13
1
168 I
122
198 j
1
62
14 I
1
17
0
193 I
237
406 I
17
5
3C I
2
214
377 l
17
6
288 I
258
^2 1 I
237
352 1
21
4
3C 1
2
634
874 |
232
343 i
41
9
61 I
2
276
426 I
139
319 |
230
385 I
837
1,17 1 I
983
720 I
433
728 I
746
1,065 i
789
1,109 I
1
_________




I
|

$17 1
194
9
0
237
9
3
89
54
7
6
52
£5
18
6
145
162
10
2
162
114
58
239
115
192
150
19
2
155
333
237
244
31
8
319

I
I
|
I
I
|
i
|
1
|
|
|
I
I
|
I
I
|
|
|
i
I
I
L_________

Gross stacks
l_
I
I Equipment I Structures

I $2,773 !
j 3,335 I
| 3,446 |
j
| 4,022 I
4,092 I
I 4,154 1
I 4,070 I
I 4,003 i
3,330 |
! 3,706 I
] 3,772 1
I 3,724 I
I 3,761 |
j
j
| 3,737 I
I 3,836 |
I 4,008 I
i 4,113 I
I 4,810 |
! 4,983 i
I 5,416 |
I 5,648 |
| 5,757 |
I 5,909 |
I 6,817 |
7,244 I
| 7,645 I
8,358 |
9,C j
98 |

$2,327
2,704 I
2,734 |
3,082 I
3,069 I
3,05 1
2,922 I
2,763 |
2,573 I
2,373 I
2,280 I
2,097 I
1,931 I
1,346 |
1,842
1,860 |
1,888 |
2,358 |
2,43 1
2,689 |
2,792 t
2,796 I
2,821 |
3,426 |
3,652
3,84 9
4,288 I
4,760 I
_L

49

$446
63 1
71
2
939
1,023
1,103
1, 148
1,214
1,257
1,333
1,491
1,627
1,730
1,891
2,043
2,148
2,225
2,451
2,55 1
2,726
2,856
2,96 1
3,038
3,39 1
3,592
3,796
4,06 9
4,338

Net

stocks

T

To ta l
$ 2 , ISO

2,699
2,77 1
3,320
3,339
3, 373
3,238
3,122
2,911
2,779 I
2,872
2,88 1
2,992
3,093
3,25 I

3,903
3,508

9,179
9,299
9,666 I
9,823
9,898
9,9 1
5
5,796
6,087
6,9 1
2
7,059
7,7 1
2

Structures

Equ i p m e n t

$399
583
662

$1,781
2,115
2,109
2,932
2,336
2,328
2, 152
1, 579
1,725
1,523
1,963
1, 393
1,310

SSS

968
1,095
1, 086
1,193
1,186
1,256
1,909
1,537
1,631

1,261
1,329
1,391
1,435
1/895

!
I
|
I
!

1,781
1, 922
2,011
2,072
2,28 1

1 , 938
2,152
2,202
2,146
2,111

I
I
I
|

2,360
2 , 5 13
2,620
2,70 1
2,804

2,666
2,834
2,983
3,382
3,802

I
|
i
I
I
I

3,079
3,253
3,428
3,67 1
3 , 9 10

Sector 8. Crude petroleum and natural gas: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Nat

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1948. .. .
1 9 4 9 _____

$324
516
473

$1,251
1 , 8 14
1,751

Equ i p m e n t

$13,211
14,261
15,247

$4,382
4,534
4,637

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$8,829
9,727
10,609

$10,924
11,927
12,840

$3,308
3,425
3,482

16,593
1 3, 177
20,102
22,026
24,140

4
5
5
5
5

,8
,0
,3
,4
,6

5
6
4
7
3

0
7
7

1
1
1
1
1

1
3
4
6
8

,7
,1
,7
,5
,5

33
16
62
48
03

14,099
15,585
17,399
19,195
21,158

3
3
4
4
4

,
,
,
,
,

6
8
0
1
2

5
1
6
6
9

8
8
3
3
3

83 1
787
8 14
687
769

2
2
2
2
2

,6
,8
,7
,5
,7

68
05
88
15
04

2
2
3
3
3

6,741
9,400
2,020
4,177
6,529

6
6
6
6
7

,0
,3
,6
,8
,0

1
3
7
5
9

3
7
1
7
9

2
2
2
2
2

0
3
5
7
9

,7
,0
,3
,3
,4

2
6
4
2
2

2
2
2
3
3

6
8
8
2
10

787
362
697
536
875

127
388
7 54
779
992

1,518
1,777
2,046
2 , 198
2,38 1

2
2
2
2
2

,551
,5 9 5
,6 8 4
,4 0 3
,7 0 8

3
4
4
4
4

8
0
2
4
5

48
71
87
65
75

7
7
7
7
7

,3
,6
,6
,6
,8

29
0 1
76
10
07

3
3
3
3
3

2,451
2,811
2,736
2,916
3,062

47,314
48,985
50.791

8
8
8
8

,0
,2
,4
,7

3
9
2
5

2,831
2,663
3 , 187
3,43 1
5,419

5
5
5
5
6

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

2,
2,
2,
2,
2/

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
-----------------

3
3
3
3
3

,5
,5
,6
,2
,4

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

------------------------_____
_____

3
3
3
2
3

,339
,453
,332
,990
,534

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

3
3
3
3
4

,382
,738
,595
,98 0
,581

930
976
858
1,053
1 , 5 18

,54 1
,356
, 0 9S
,307
,803

709
692
910
875
1,383

3
3
4
4
6

$926
1,297
1,277

T o ta l

608
6 10
707
580
6 10

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

S tr u c tu re s

00
93
03
03
74

,6
,7
,6
,0
,8

,
,
,
,
,

5
0
1
3
9

3
5
4
3
1

69
91
27
56
39

4
4
5
5
5

,6
,8
,1
,2
,4

2
8
4
5

1,319
3,170
5,011
6,455
8,068

33,8
35,5
37,0
37,9
39,2

54
45
06
18
72

5
5
5
5
5

,5
,7
,7
,6
,7

5
5
5
3
8

3
4
4
'‘
4

9
0
1
3
4

,2
,6
,3
,0
,2

7
8
6
6
5

6
7
5
3
8

4
4
4
4
4

0
1
2
3
5

,2
,5
,4
,5
,1

6
0
0
6
9

3
6
9
3
0

5
6
6
6
7

,9
,2
,3
,6
,3

9,498
9,436
9,57 1
9,640
10,174

3
5
7
4
2

,5
,9
,3
,1
,1

9,532

5Ha 1
. 6

53.791
4
5
6
7
0

9
1

4
4
4
4
5

5
5
6
7
0

,0
,6
,5
,6
,7

8
1
7
9
3

5
9
6
4
7

4
4
4
4
5

5
5
6
7
0

,6
,8
,6
,5
,9

4
0
3
8
6

2
8
2
2
0

7
7
7
7
7

7
7
5
3

7
3
8
0
9

3
5
8
0
2

S tr u c tu r e s

$7,616
8,5 0 1
9,357
10,441
11,766
13,336
15,027
16,864
18,94
21,10
23,17
24,90
26,72

3
3
9
4
8

8
3
7
1
6

2
2
3
3
3

8,2
9,7
1,2
2,2
3,4

9
9
4
8
3

6
2
9
6
6

81
10
11
09
45

3
3
3
3
3

4
5
6
6
7

,
,
,
,
,

2
2
0
9
8

8
9
9
5
4

2
5
3
4
5

,235
,088
, 135
,116
,579

3
3
3
4
4

8
8
9
0
3

,
,
,
,
,

4
7
4
4
3

0
2
9
6
8

6
0
6
5
1

________________

Sector 8. Crude petroleum and natural gas: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G"oss

—
in vastm e i t

G ross

s to c k s

Met

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1948. . . .
1949 . . . .

Equ i p m a n t

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$38
760
39 ,6 2 2
40 3 9 8

$12 ,577
12 4 0 8
12
122

$2
3
3

6 14
443
332

$700
1,032
899

$1
2
2

913
4 11
432

_____
_____
_____
. . . .
_____

4
4
4
4
4

030
027
539
547
973

1,116
1,015
1, 157
937
950

2
3
3
3
4

9 14
0 12
382
609
022

4 1
43
45
47
49

867
3 10
240
156
5 10

12
11
i i
11
11

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 ....
1957 . . . .
19 5 8 . . . .
1959. . . .

5
5
5
4
4

71 1
3 96
182
70 1

91/5

1,279
1,107
1,031
896
987

4
4
4
3
3

432
289
100
805
965

52
55
53
60
62

626
446
056
172
506

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1962. . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

4

4
4
5

782
029
889
443
257

996
1,091
882
740
1,097

3
3
4
3
4

785
938
006
703
160

64
66
68
70
72

600
841
8 17
193
202

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 5 ....
1 9 6 7 _____
1 5 6 3 _____
1969. .. .

4
5
4
4
5

837
16 7
735
982
422

1, 157
1, 196
1,023
1,219
1,683

3
3
3
3
3

680
970
712
763
739

73
75
76
77
78

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1972. . . .
1973. . . .
1974. . . .

3
3
4
3
5

963
60 1
098
977
058

756
709
910
855
1,236

3
2
3
3
3

206
891
187
122
822

77
77
76
75
76

1950
1951
1952
1953
19 5 4

D

_




_____

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$26
27
28

182
214
276

048
854
790
50S
272

29
31
33
35
38

8 19
455
449
648
238

34
35
37
39
4 1

184
565
451
340
657

8
8
8
8
8

627
450
439
239
094

25
27
29
3 1
33

556
1 15
0 12
100
562

11
n
11
11
11

4 10
422
44 1
295
251

4 1 216
44
024
4 6 6 15
48 8 7 7
51 2 5 5

44
47
49
5 1
53

697
376
777
6 15
603

8
8
8
8
8

3 11
366
40 1
249
188

36
39
4 1
43
45

386
009
376
365
4 15

11
11
11
10
10

209
249
068
739
767

53
55
57
59
6 1

390
591
748
454
435

55
57
58
59
60

294
088
576
448
964

8
8
7
7
7

129
162
984
673
736

47
48
50
5 1
53

165
925
591
774
227

605
144
055
023
26 1

10
11
10
11
11

862
0 10
997
198
878

62
64
65
65
66

742
134
058
825
383

6 1
62
63
64
64

88 1
956
437
024
922

7
8
8
8
3

870
050
06 1
276
949

54
54
55
55
55

0 1 1
906
375
748
972

835
006
500
767
025

11
11
11
11
11

642
357
258
030
248

66
65
65
64
64

243
649
242
687
776

64
63
62
6 1
6 1

231
096
399
535
732

8
8
8
7
8

666
325
173
949
098

55
54
54
53
53

565
77 1
226
586
634

50

_____

$31
32
32

204
055
780

$9
18 1
9 0 12
8 ,710

$22
23
24

023
043
069

sector 9. Stone and clay mining and quarrying: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equi pmant

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

945
30
40

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$30
19
27

$14
10
12
14
20
21
21
29

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

283
332
383
431
504

$36
45
56

$ 174
187
208

$14 1
145
155

$32
41
53

2 12
243
274
30 1
346

$213
229
254

30
46
48
46
65

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

70
89
109
129
153

233
279
326
368
435

167
194
22 1
243
283

66
85
105
124
152

530
6 15
727
3 17
903

340
389
456
50 1
543

190
226
27 1
3 16
360

537
57 1
6 10
652
742

387
431
475
520
574

$176
183
197

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

45
67
70
68
95

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

--------_____
_____
--------_____

126
12 1
153
137
140

86
82
105
89
92

39
33
47
47
47

607
703
829
934
1,039

4 11
470
549
609
667

196
233
279
325
372

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 --------1 9 6 4 _____

83
145
157
168
230

52
97
108
1 18
169

30
47
48
49
60

1,082
1,179
1,281
1,386
1,545

680
732
786
843
943

40 1
447
494
542
60 1

925
1,003
1, 085
1,172
1,316

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

203
337
219
17 1
330

145
266
172
127
246

57
70
46
43
83

1,672
1, 9 2 9
2,065
2,150
2,387

1,015
1,204
1,296
1,341
1,499

657
725
768
808
883

1,427
1,667
1,778
1,830
2,030

802
979
1,052
1,071
1,199

378
573
359
691
516

236
446
254
567
423

91
126
104
123
92

2,6
3,1
3,3
3,8
4,2

1,688
2,024
2 , 153
2,580
2,850

2
2
2
3
3

1,353
1,651
1,735
2,118
2,3 3 1

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1972 . . . .
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

6
1
4
8
3

2
9
4
6
7

1
1
1
1

974
,094
,191
,306
,387

,2
,6
,8
,3
,6

6
7
4
3

3
1
3
0
13

_______ _________

625
688
725
759
85 1
909
1, 0 20
1,107
1,211
1,282

Sector 9. Stone and clay mining and quarrying: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—

r
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
j

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

I
|
|

$100
60
78

$68
39
53

$31
20
25

$634
649
679

$513
51 1
519

$121
138
159

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

i
I
I
!
|

87
1 17
119
1 15
159

57
80
31
77
106

29
37
38
37
53

7 14
779
844
902
1,005

529
560
59 1
6 16
669

185
218
252
286
336

1S 5 5
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

I
|
I
I
|

208
184
220
197
199

137
120
145
119
120

7 1
63
75
77
78

1, 156
1,282
1,443
1,577
1,708

753
820
909
969
1, 026

403
462
534
607
681

I 96 0
1961
1962
1 96 3
1964

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

j
I
I
I
|

1 18
204
219
232
3 12

67
126
14 C
153
216

50
78
79
79
95

1,752
1,874
2,00 1
2,131
2,333

1,023
1,071
1, 1 2 2
1 , 177
1,288

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

I
|
I
I
|

272
436
275
207
380

184
332
209
148
276

88
104
65
58
103

2,4 9 1
2.811
2 ,9 o3
54
3 , 3 06

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

I
I
I
I
|

4 12
592
359
667
448

308
458
254
553
375

104
133
104
114
72

3
4
4
4
4

T o ta l




,5
,0
,1
,6
,9

Equi pmant

$502
509
534

$397
337
391

$105
121
142

51

168
20 1
234
267
3 16

982
1,097
1,241
1, 355
1,463

600
656
73 1
774
8 10

382
440
509
58 1
652

728
803
878
953
1, 0 4 4

1,481
1,579
1,684
1,796
1,983

785
8 13
848
890
993

695
765
836
905
989

1,128
1,226
1,285
1,337
1, .3 1

2 , 125
2,424
2,551
2,598
2,804

1,060
1,270
1,348
1,354
1,479

1
1
1
1
1

,0
,1
,2
,2
,3

6
5
0
4
2

2
2
2
2
3

_____________________ _____________________ ________________

397
424
452
474
523

1,363
1,584
1,682
1,71/
1,874

78
14
96
67
02

1
1
1
1
1

3
3
3
3
4

1 , 6 18
1,890
1 , 938
2,270
2,404

1
1
1
1
1

,4
,5
,5
,6
,7

05
13
87
69
04

,0
,3
,4
,8
,0

5
6
6
3
1

3
8
0
4
6

,525
,646
,736
,833
,885

565
626
686
74 1
839

S tr u c tu r e s

,0
,4
,5
,9
,1

2
0
2
3
0

4
3
5
9
8

______

5
4
3
3
5

Sector 10. Chemical and fertilizer mineral mining: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—
Gross

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

Equ i p m e n t

$18
14
17

$9

6
9

1
0

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

19
26
26
28
36

21

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

43
37
48
41
'42

30
25
35
33
30

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

31
55
62
70
103

18
34
36
37
59

105

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 _____
1969. .. .

14
14
15

$8
7
7

8
11
11
1
2
14

1
2
11
1
2
7
11
1
2
20

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m a n t

$73
82
94

$54
56
1

$18
25
32

$60

6

107
127
146
167
196

67
77
85
95

39
50
60
72

91
109
127
146
172

110

86

S tr u c tu r e s

$43
45
49

79

$17
23
30

53

68

37
48
58
69
83

61
68
76
89

110

133
150
177
1

20
220

97
108
119
126
137

204228
262
237
311

124
147
166
180

25
32
43

375
414
458
507
586

226
246
265
283
319

148
168
192
224
266

321
353
389
431
503

179
192
205
2 17
249

142
160
184
214
254

47
79
62
36
32

664
845
958
978
989

35 1
454
506
492
473

313
391
45 1
486
516

575
749
851
856
852

276
375
4 19
394
363

298
374
43 1
462
488

80
89

143
51
45

230
253
297
327
357

57
130
80
14

210

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

S tr u c tu r e s

51
43
26
63
42

1,085
1, 176
1,219
1,551

520
572
592
865
946

564
604
626
685
722

398
435
444
7 10
778

533
568
586
640
671

1
2

132
133
93
390
181

66

326
138

1,668

93 1
1,003
1,030
1,350
1,450

94
104
115

121
131

Sector 10. Chemical and fertilizer mineral mining: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

stocks

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$40
28
34

Equ i p m e n t

$22
13
19

20

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

37
46
45
48
62

25
25
26
36

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

72
58
70
58
60

50
39
51
46
4 1

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

45
79
90

24
46
48
49
77

102
146

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

147
282
187

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

145
138
93
375
154

66
54

74
165
98
16
14

86
92
66
317
121

S tr u c tu re s

$18
14
15
17

20
20
21
26

22
18
19

1
2

18

20
33
4 1
52

68

73
117

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$2 18

$ 159
160
166

232
250

|

$175
186

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu r e s

I
I
|

$124

126

$5 1
63
75

247
272
299
338

|
|
|
I
|

130
138
146
153
170

90
108
126
145
168

202
220

122

172
182
192
1

20
220

99
1 17
135
154
178

45 0
486
535
57 1
608

251
272
303
329
349

198
2 14
232
24 1
253

387
420
464
493
522

|
I
I
I
|

199
216
244
264
277

187
203

627
679
738
804
9 11

351
370
38 9
406
446

276
308
348
393
465

532
574
623
681
780

I
|
|
|
|

270
282
294
3C4
341

26 1
291
329
376
439

481
605
662
637
608

535
650
735
780
15

878
1,109
1,233
1,241
U 2 2 7

|
I
|
|
I

372
492
541
505
462

907
926
976

1,3
1,3
1,3
1,6
1,7

I
|
I
I
|

489
5 14
508
750
789

17
55
97
17
24

49
40
58
46
26
58
33

1,518
1,599
1,624
1, 922
1,991

649
69 1
697
945
991

8
868
1,000

0
5
6
4
0

0
8
3
8
2

________________ I____

________________




$59
7 1
84

T o ta l

27 1
300
327
356
398

1,0
1,2
1,3
1,4
1,4

88

S tr u c tu r e s

52

220

229
244

506

616
696
736
765
811
843
854
897
912

Sectors 11 and 12. New and repair construction: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$445
460
368

$396
409
327

$48
50
40

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

500
609
585
400
600

445
542
521
356
534

54
66
63
43
65

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

907
921
1,235
1,058
1,385

808
820
1, 100
983
1,246

98
100
134
74
138

4,917
5,528
6,411
7,081
8,0 4 5

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1,263
1,276
1,626
1,701
1,708

1,161
1, 126
1,430
1,496
1,502

101
149
195
204
205

8,854
9,628
10,689
11,745
12,717

7,680
8,313
9 , 187
10,046
10,820

1
1
1
1
1

,173
,314
,502
,699
,896

7,3
7,9
8,7
9,5
10,3

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 _____

1,783
1,764
1 , 6 13
1,861
1,972

1,586
1,410
1,318
1,522
1 , 6 15

196
353
294
338
356

13,672
i 4 ,322
1 5 , :3 3
15,920
16,726

11,587
12,092
i 2,421
12,873
13,332

2
2
2
3
3

,0
,4
, '
,0
,3

11,052
11,681
12,084
12,669
13,300

9,0
9,3
9,4
9,7
10,0

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

1,846
2 , 5 18
2,945
2 , 6 10
2,689

1,513
2,066
2,419
2 , 144
2,209

332
45 1
525
465
479

17,326
18,530
20,110
21,322
22,582

1
1
1
1
1

3,715
4 , 155
4,667
5,117
5,579

1
1
1
1
1

10,202
10,866
11,839
12,481
13,131

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

________

$1,718
2,076
2,343
2
3
3
3
4

,7
,2
,6
,9
,2

4
3
8
0
7

$1,483
1,796
2,028

0
6
0

2
2
3
3
3
4
4
5
6
6

1
8

,3
,8
,2
,3
,7

$235
280
3 15

7
3
1
5
4

$1,430
1,766
1,992

363
422
479
515
573

,253
,772
,528
,131
,966

3
4
5
6
7

7
1
0
8
0

S tr u c tu r e s

2,328
2,736
3,076
3 , 187
3,460

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,3
,6
,7
,9

04
54
39
15
32

4
4
5
5
6

02
13
97
54
87

3
3
4
4
5

,3
,8
,4
,9
,6

8
0
6
5
6

4
5
5
8
3

6 17
708
832
896
1,023

2
0
5
7
2

6,21
6,65
7,31
7,95
8,50

5
6
9
5
7

1,113
1,251
1,433
1,623
1,813

9
3
3
4
6

1,993
2,328
2,60 1
2,915
3,244

664
756
883
949
1,079

,611
,375
,443
,204
,002

85
50
17
46
93

__________

,0
,5
,2
,8
,6

$ 1,229
1,522
1,715

9
7
2
9
1

3,749
4,830
6,289
7,352
8,432

5
5
8
5
5

$200
243
276
323
382
437
47 1
528

3
3
4
4
5

,5
,9
,4
,8
,3

4
6
5
7
0

6
3
0
1
0

Sectors 11 and 12. New and repair construction: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu re s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$4,084
4,571
4,875

$4,986
5,542
5,895

1 9 4 7 _____
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

$981
922
705

$876
825
626

$ 104
97
78

1950 . . . .
1951 . . . .
1 9 5 2 ....
1953. . ..
1 9 5 4 _____

949
1,052
977
669
988

837
951
867
593
870

112
120
1 10
75
1 18

1955. . . .
1956 . . . .
1 9 5 7 _____
1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 ---------

1,475
1,377
1,751
1,452
1,870

1,295
1,209
1,539
1,332
1,646

179
167
212
119
224

9,250
9,942
10,958
11,633
12,699

7,70
8,26
9,09
9,68
10,56

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

1,638
1 , 7 11
2,179
2,268
2,250

1,522
1,466
1,864
1, 9 4 5
1,931

166
245
314
322
319

13,552
14,381
15,610
16,840
17,955

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 6 5 ....
1966 . . . .
1967 . . . .
1968 . . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

2
2
2
2
2

,3
,2
,0
,2
,2

15
68
18
29
57

2 , 0 18
1,754
1,607
1,778
1,817

297
514
4 11
451
440

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,5
,9
,5
,3

0
8
4
3
4

1,630
2 , 1 13
2,419
2,098
1,971

376
476
525
435
373

7
9
5
3
4

$902
97 1
1,020

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$3,969
4,507
4,805

S tr u c tu r e s

$733
799
847

$3,236
3,708
3,958

927
,015
,092
,135
,219

0
7
5
6
5

4
4
5
5
5

,382
,84 1
, 162
, 141
,346

1
1
1
1

1,547
1,680
1,860
1,946
2 , 137

7,295
7,876
3,790
9,355
10,288

5
6
7
7
8

,9
,3
,1
,5
,3

1,365
1,498
1,676
1,761
1,951

1,280
1,896
2,842
3,780
4,605

2
2
2
3
3

,2
,4
,7
,0
,3

7
8
6
6
5

10,966
11,585
12,585
13,575
14,450

8,883
9,292
10,014
10,718
11,312

2
2
2
2
3

,0
,2
,5
,8
,1

8
9
7
5
3

2
2
1
7
8

19,041
19,993
20,612
21,357
22,037

15,422
15,889
1 6 , 126
16,448
1 6 , 7 16

3
4
4
4
5

,6
,1
,4
,9
,3

18
04
86
09
20

1
1
1
1
1

11,908
1 2 , 156
12,183
12,317
12,429

3
3
4
4
5

,3
,8
,2
,6
,0

9
6
3
3
2

5
7
2
4
1

2
2
2
2
2

16,714
17,124
17,794
18,125
18,321

5
6
6
7
7

,6
,1
,6
,0
,3

6
1
0
0
3

17,650
18,407
19,494
20,141
20,576

1
1
1
1
1

5
5
6
6
6

,3
,7
,2
,5
,8

3
5
0
6
5

9
3
9
7
7

6
7
7
7
8

2
3
4
5
5

,5
,2
,7
,9
,4

,3
,2
,4
,1
,6

0
0
7
6
0

3
3
0
3
6

5
6
6
6
7

2
0
5
7
0

2
8
1
1
1

________




S tr u c tu r e s

53

,4
,0
,5
,6
,0

0
0
0
5
0

0
8
4
2
0
3
1
7
6
1

5
5
6
6
6

1,102
1,192
1,27 1
1,315
1,400

1
4
8
0
0

7
3
6
5
9

,3
,8
,2
,2
,5

1
5
5
7
6

5,303
6,023
6,415
6,951
7,450

3
7
1
9
3

0
8
4
4
7

2,310
2,653
3,285
3,573
3,719

Sector 13. Ordnance and accessories: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

i

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1949. . . .

$7
6
5

$5
4
3

$1
1
2

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

7
20
4
18
63

4
12
2
13
50

2
7
1
5
13

I
|

1955. .. .
1 9 5 6 --------1 9 5 7 --------1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

60
53
55
75
7 1

4 1
35
35
46
47

18
18
19
29
24

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1963. .. .
1 9 6 4 _____

69
74
90
89
1 17

46
49
59
62
75

22
24
30
26
42

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

98
174
200
213
181

75
133
137
144
129

23
4 1
63
69
51

I
i
I

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

128
13 1
129
157
17 1

94
96
90
108
119

33
34
38
48
51

|
|
|
|
I
I

Equi pment

$460
450
434

$705
696
681

!

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

T o ta l

I

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

$630
603
57 1

$245
246
247

$396
37 1
341

S tr u c tu r e s

$234
232
230

I
|

665
658
633
620
651

415
40 1
375
358
377

249
256
257
262
27 4

540
521
486
465
490

312
289
257
237
254

228
231
228
228
235

I
I
I
|
I

678
698
7 19
758
792

387
390
393
405
4 17

29 1
308
326
353
374

511
526
54 1
577
607

264
268
272
287
303

247
257
269
289
303

821
854
903
952
1,030

429
443
468
497
54 1

392
4 11
435
454
488

633
663
708
751
820

3 18
336
363
393
435

314
327
344
357
385

1 , 088
1,222
1,379
1,547
1,678

586
689
795
906
999

50 1
532
583
640
678

867
987
1,127
1,274
1,38 1

474
568
662
756
829

393
4 18
465
518
551

697
7 16
740
772
808

1
1
1
1
1

86 1
887
900
926
958

566
581
600
628
659

I
|

I

1,053
1,104
1,14 1
1 , 188
1,238

1,751
1,821
1,881
1,961
2,047

,427
,468
,50 1
,555
, 6 17

Sector 13. Ordnance and accessories: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
I
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
l
T o ta l

I
j

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu r e s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

|
|
|

$13
10
8

|
|
1

$10
7
5

$3
3
3

1950
1951
1952
1953
19 5 4

_____
----------------_____
_____

I
|
I
I
|

13
31
6
28
93

|
1
1
|
|

7
18
4
19
70

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

I
|
|
|
|

90
73
72
10 1
94

|
|
|
|
|

I960
1961
1962
1963
196 4

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

|
I
|
I
|

90
97
117
114
155

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

--------_____
_____
_____
_____

I
|
|
|
|

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

I
I
|
I
|

T o ta l

$1

I

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu r e s

|

$1,629
1,560
1,484

I
|
|
j

E qu ip m e nt

$869
809
742

$760
751
742

S tr u c tu r e s

1
1

820
795
758

I
I
|

$1,015
989
950

5
12
2
9
23

1
1
1
1
1

7 15
686
627
586
609

|
I
|
I
|

905
864
805
757
759

8 10
82 1
822
829
849

1,408
1,348
1,263
1,201
1,206

|
|
|
I
|

673
6 16
544
490
491

734
732
7 19
7 10
7 14

59
44
43
54
56

31
28
29
46
38

1
1
1
1
1

627
625
620
640
651

|
I
|
|
|

749
723
695
677
66 1

877
90 1
924
962
990

1,207
1,193
1,177
1,191
1,197

I
I
|
I
|

483
463
444
438
437

724
730
733
752
759

|
|
|
|
|

54
58
70
74
91

35
38
47
40
63

1 655
1 664
1 695
1 726
1 800

|
|
|
I
|

643
632
637
652
690

1,011
1,032
1,058
1, 074
1,109

1,1
1,2
1,2
1,2
1,3

8
8
9
7
4

|
|
I
|
|

438
444
465
492
537

760
764
773
774
797

127
219
249
253
203

I
|
|
|
|

91
158
158
159
140

35
60
90
93
63

1
1

2
2
2

847
986
153
32 1
434

|
|
|
|
|

734
847
962
1,078
1,17 1

1
1
1
1
1

1,372
1,498
1,649
1,798
1,890

I
|
|
I
|

580
688
792
890
962

791
810
857
908
927

137
133
128
152
149

|
|
|
|
|

99
97
90
107
109

37
35
38
44
40

2
2
2
2

475
505
523

|
|
|

555

|

2

577

|

1,2
1,2
1,2
1,3
1,3

1,255
1,245
1,238
1,236
1,231

1
1
1
1
1

|
|
|
I
|

986
1,000
1,001
1 , 0 13
1,022

___________ I_____




54

19
60
85
18
46

$805
806
807

T o ta l

,1
,1
,1
,2
,2

1
3
9
4
6

3
8
0
3
3

,9
,9
,9
,9
,9

9
0
3
6
3

08
15
12
27
37

921
9 14
9 11
914
9 14

Sector 14. Food and kindred products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
I
|

T o ta l

I
I

iquipm ent

S tr u c tu r e s

I
I

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

r
|

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

r
|

$ 4,224
4,948
5,511

|
I
|

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

I
1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$1,043
966
825

|
|
|
j

$693
584
521

1950
1951
1952
1955
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

731
782
605
649
815

|
I
|
I
|

489
510
424
450
576

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

823
910
966
938
1,018

|
|
|
I
|

608
666
693
685
728

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1,012
1,010
1,217
1,210
1,361

|
I
|
I
|

746
76 1
859
884
986

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

--------_____
_____
_____
_____

1
1
1
1
1

,4
,6
,6
,6
,8

17
10
55
61
39

|
|
I
|
|

1,039
1,204
1,209
1,194
1,281

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

2
2
2
2
3

,0
,1
,3
,4
,0

6
4
5
1
0

I
I
I
|
|

1,422
1,561
1,746
1,787
2,1 8 8

2
8
5
2
7

$349
38 1
303

|
|

$5,353
6,124
6,749

24 1
27 1
18 1
199
239

|

$2,762
3,075
3,304

|
|
|
|
|

3
4
4
4
5

,8
,1
,4
,7
,0

0
8
5
2
8

6
0
0
0
7

|
I
|
|

3
3
3
3
4

,4
,6
,7
,8
,0

I
|

215
243
272
303
289

9,585
10,141
10,732
11,327
11,930

|
|
|
|
|

5
5
6
6
7

,4
,8
,2
,6
,0

5
6
7
5
6

8
3
4
7
0

I
|
|
|

4
4
4
4
4

, 127
,277
,457
,670
,870

|
i
|
|

265
248
358
326
375

12,500
13,035
13,741
14,404
15,181

|
|
|
j
|

7,4
7,8
8 ,2
8 ,6
9,1

5
2
6
8
8

2
7
3
9
4

|
j
I
|

5
5
5
5
5

,0
,2
,4
,7
,9

|
I
|

378
406
445
466
558

15,98
16,93
17,90
18,84
19,92

0
7
7
7
8

|
I
|
|
|

1
1
1
1

9,700
0,354
0,986
1,575
2,222

|
|
|
I
|

6
6
6
7
7

,2
,5
,9
,2
,7

I
|
|
|
|

639
586
609
625
8 18

2
2
2
2
2

0
0
6
4
8

|
|
|
|
|

12,977
13,833
14,833
15,831
1 7, 184

|
I
|

I

|

_______ I__

1
2
3
5
7

,1
,4
,9
,4
,3

7
3
9
7
9

$2,590
3,049
3,444

3
4
8
7
2

|
|
|

7,2
7,8
8,1
8,5
9,0

I
I
j

9
9
4
0
9

_______ L_

6
5
4
5
0

6
4
8
7
4

5
6
6
6
7

,9
,4
,6
,9
,3

5
1
7
4
4

$2,115
2,548
2,90 1

$2,108
2,400
2,609

4
9
3
0
3

|
|
|
|
|

3
3
3
3
4

,200
,493
,669
,840
,110

2
2
3
3
3

,7
,9
,0
,0
,2

7,724
8,166
8,6 3 4
9,094
9,550

|
|
|
I
|

4
4
4
5
5

,
,
,
,
,

3
0
8
0
7

3
3
3
3
3

,341
,475
,635
,823
,992

48
08
78
14
97

9,963
10,337
10,880
11,379
11,991

|
|
|
|
|

5,830
6,087
6,410
6,729
7 , 120

4
4
4
4
4

,1
,2
,4
,6
,8

7
8
2
7
0

9
3
0
2
6

12,619
13,399
14,177
14,912
15,774

I
|
|
|
|

7,5
8,0
8,5
9,0
9,5

3
0
6
7
5

5
5
5
5
6

,086
,319
,581
,855
,208

8 ,213
8,657
9,112
9,572
10,214

16,801
17,852
19,044
20,221
21,9 19

|
I
i
|
|

0,169
0,861
1,685
2,489
3,632

6
6
7
7
8

,632
, 990
,359
,732
,287

1
1
1
1
1

3
6
9
2
5

8
9
9
7
5

3
8
9
5
6

5
2
0
9
3

3
4
7
5
7

3
5
4
9
3

2
9
0
0
1

Sector 14. Food and kindred products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

T o ta l

I

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

---------------------------- !
E qu ip m e nt

I

S tr u c tu r e s

$2,220
1,908
1,598

I
I
I

I
I

T o ta l

I
I

$17,928
19,132
20,003

$775
763
632
503
503
323
356
434

I
1
I
1

2
2
2
2
2

|

39 1
406
432
496
482

I
I
1

2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
3
3

,3
,6
,9
,2
,6

2
4
5
9
4

3
4
5
3
5

Equ i p m e n t

0,645
|
1 ,2 1 3 1
1,394
|
1,592
|
1,985
|
|
j
I
I
|

---------------------------$1,444
|
1,145
966
j

$6,759
7,515
8,0 9 5

S tr u c tu r e s

E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

12,047
12,166
1 2 , 08S
12,029
12,039

15,755
16,155
16,168
16,215
16,483

|
I
I
I
|

6
7
7
7
7

,9
,2
,3
,4
,7

36
51
6 2
72
23

I
I
I
|

8
8
8
8
8

,
,
,
,
,

8
9
8
7
7

1
0
0
4
6

9
3
5
2
0

10,324
10,672
10,982
1 1,250
11,537

1
1
1
1
1

1,999
1,971
1, 972
2,043
2,107

1
1
1
1
1

6
6
7
7
7

,713
,939
,156
,393
,634

|
|
I
I
|

7
8
8
8
8

,9
,2
,3
,5
,6

7
0
9
3
9

i
|
I
I
I

8
8
8
8
8

,7
,7
,7
,8
,9

3
3
6
5
3

7
4
1
6
8

1
1
1
1
1

7,819
7,956
8 , 36S
8,713
9,220

|
I
|
|
|

8,838
8,9 6 2
9 , 189
9,414
9,734

8,5
9,0
9,3
9,5
9,9

9
4
0
6
4

8
7
6
2
6

.
.
.

889
851
695
737
9 14

.
.
.
.
.

1,341
1,358
1,369
1,410
1,441

|
|
|
I
|

949
952
937
9 14
958

1960 . .
1961..
1962. .
1963 . .
1964. .

1
1
1
1
1

,412
,390
,688
,645
,828

I
|
I
I
I

969
976
1,101
1,119
1,232

|
1
I
I

442
4 14
586
526
596

I
I
I
I
I

2
2
2
2
2

3
4
4
5
5

,9
,1
,6
,1
,7

4
8
3
2
1

0
0
7
3
7

|
|
|
|
|

11,801
12,032
12,349
12,646
13,027

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2

1965.
1966 .
1967 .
1968 .
1969 .

1,880
2,0 6 5
2,059
1,988
2,106

|
I
I
|
I

1,2
1,4
1,4
1,3
1,4

98
68
23
57
08

|
|
|
I
|

58 1
596
636
630
697

I
I
|
I

2
2
2
2
2

6
7
7
8
9

,3
,1
,9
,5
,3

4
3
0
8
6

2
4
5
6
5

I
I
|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

3,450
4,026
4,541
4,976
5,445

1
1
1
1
1

2,891
3,108
3,363
3,610
3,920

19,753
20,445
21,098
21,643
22,267

I
I
I
I
|

2
2
2
2
2

|
|
I
I
I

1,5
1,5
1,7
1,7
1,9

1
9
4
5
3

I
I
1
I

727
6 17
609
579
639

I
I
I
|
I

3
3
3
3
3

0
1
2
2
3

,2
,0
,0
,8
,9

5
7
0
7
3

3
8
9
2
4

I
|
I
|
|

15,999
16,606
17,338
18,041
18,893

1
1
1
1
1

4
4
4
4
5

2
2
2
2
2

I
|
I
|
|

1955.
1956 .
1957 .
1958.
1959.

.
.
.
.
.

1970 . .
1971..
1972 . .
1973. .
1974. .

,2
,2
,3
,3
,5

40
11
55
31
76




3
3
6
2
6

I
I

$8,144
8,503
8 ,7 3 1

1
I
|

|
I
|
I
1

I
I
I
|

|
I

S tr u c tu r e s

$13,455
14,536
15,269

,392
,354
,018
,093
,349

.
.

$5,311
6,027
6,537

I
I

$11,169
11,616
11,907

1
1
1
1
1

1950 .
1951.
1952.
1953.
1954.

s to c k s

1

I
I
I
I
|

I
I
I
1
I

r~

1947 . .
1948. .
1949. .

Net

s to c k s

|

,1
,1
,3
,4
,6

3
4
3
7
9

9
8
8
6
0

,253
,471
,671
,830
,041

2
3
4
5
5

,9
,6
,3
,0
,8

8
1
5
0
5

2
9
2
8
7

________________ [ _

55

6
4
4
6
6

I
|

8,980
8,994
9, 179
9,299
9,485

10,103
10,620
11,066
11,417
11,787

I
|
|
|

9,650
9,825
10,032
10,226
10,479

1
1
1
1
1

I
I
I
I

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
3
3
4

,228
,708
,300
,852
,542

I

____________L

0,754
0,911
1,051
1,156
1,315

Sector 15. Tobacco manufactures: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

I

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

1
|

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$36
24
23

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$23
16
15

|

$13
8
7

$ 1 10
132
151

|
|
|

$63
77
90

$46
54
60

$95
1 15
133

$55
68
80

$40
47
53

166
18 1
200
226
250

|
|
|
I
|

99
108
121
140
159

67
73
79
86
90

146
158
174
196
215

87
93
103
1 19
135

59
65
70
76
80

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

18
18
23
30
29

11
11
16
22
23

i
j
|
I
|

7
7
7
8
5

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

28
47
43
49
54

22
30
36
31
38

|
I
I
I

6
16
6
17
15

272
313
348
389
433

I
|
I
|
|

177
202
232
256
286

95
110
1 16
132
146

232
267
296
330
366

148
169
193
2 12
236

84
98
103
1 18
130

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

48
50
50
54
59

32
39

|

4 1
42
48

I
|
|

15
10
8
12
11

469
506
542
580
621

|
|
i
|
|

308
336
364
391
423

160
170
177
188
198

395
423
450
479
5 10

252
273
294
314
339

143
150
155
164
17 1

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

60
59
53
5 1
6 1

47
46
42
41
46

I
|

12
12
11
9
15

66 1
699
729
754
787

|
I
|
|
|

452
479
500
518
538

209
2 19
228
236
248

540
566
585
599
620

36 1
380
392
402
414

179
186
192
196
206

44
45
80
114
122

|
|
|
I

12
49
53
66
63

812
874
97 1
1,113
1,258

I
I
|
i
|

554
570
6 18
697
783

257
304
353
4 16
475

635
686
773
905
1,038

423
43 1
472
546
625

2 12
254
300
359
413

_____
_____
_____
. . . .
_____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1973. . . .
1 9 7 4 _____

56
95
134
181
186

j

Sector 15. Tobacco manufactures: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
-------------------------------r
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

|
I
|

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
---------

!
I
|
j
|

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

I960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

E qu ip m e nt

|

S tr u c tu r e s

E qu ip m e nt

I
|

$ 166
178
190

j

459
48 1
5 10
550
585

258
270
291
321
351

|
I
I
|

200
2 10
2 18
228
233

j
|
I
|

10
27
10
28
24

6 15
672
7 14
764
8 17

375
408
445
470
502

|
I
I
I
|

240
263
269
294
314

I
|
|

25
17
14
20
17

858
897
933
973
1,016

522
548
574
599
630

6 1
58
50
48
52

|
|
|
|

19
18
16
12
18

1,056
1,091
1,115
1,130
1,154

657
679
693
702
7 14

47
46
80
111
108

|
|
|
|

14
52
53
62
49

1 , 165
1 , 2 10
1,288
1,402
1,500

7 19
720
753
8 15
873

|
|
|

$29
16
15

37
34
4 1
54
50

23
20
29
40
40

I
I
I
|
|

14
14
12
14
9

|
|
|
I
|

47
76
62
73
77

37
48
52
44
33

|
|
I
I
|

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

|
|
|
|
|

69
70
70
76
81

43
52
55
56
63

|

_____
--------_____
_____
_____

I
|
|
|
|

80
76
67
6 1
7 1

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 ....

|
|
|
|
j

6 1
98
134
173
158

$86
54
48

____________ 1
__




$354
396
434

S tr u c tu r e s

I
I

$ 187
2 17
243

$57
37
33

_________ I_
_

T o ta l

[
I

|
|

E qu ip m e nt

|
|
j

$ 159
186
208

385
40 1
422
454
480

|
j
I
I
|

219
226
240
264
286

50 1
548
578
6 17
658

|
I
|
|
|

302
327
354
370
393

|
I
I
|
|

405
423
443
462
487

|

|

688
7 16
742
772
804

I
I
I
|

399
4 12
422
428
439

|
|
|
|

834
857
869
872
884

|
|
|
|
|

507
522
529
531
535

446
490
534
587
626

I
|
|
j

884
919
987
1,092
1,180

I
|
|
|
I

533
529
558
6 16
669

|
|
|

|
|
|

$292
332
365

I

335
348
358
373
385

|

____________ L_

56

I

T o ta l

I

I
|
|

I
|

|
|
|
|
|

S tr u c tu r e s

$133
145
156
166
175
18 1
190
194
198
220
224
246
264

|
|
|

282
292
298
309
317

|
|
|

327
335
340
341
348

|
I

350
389
429
476
510

Sector 16. Fabric,yarn, and thread mills: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

$547
844
1,038

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 ---------

$243
400
272

$166
315
211

$76
85
60

$1,101
1,452
1,677

1 9 5 0 --------1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 --------1 9 5 4 _____

246
295
221
169
144

192
222
166
128
113

54
72
54
40
30

1,877
2,125
2,300
2,423
2,517

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 5 5 --------1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 --------1 9 5 9 ---------

174
208
183
127
183

141
169
15 1
107
154

33
38
31
20
28

2
2
2
2
3

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1963. .. .
1 9 6 4 ---------

220
204
263
27 1
35 1

184
163
2 12
224
275

36
40
50
47
76

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

422
606
510
407
458

331
452
398
320
356

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

438
466
569
628
682

347
372
455
496
530

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$553
608
638

$832
1 , 186
1,405

$468
760
942

$363
425
463

4
9
7
5
3

663
706
733
747
753

1,594
1,826
1,976
2,066
2 , 122

1,099
1,280
1,396
1,467
1,512

495
545
579
599
609

1,875
2 , 0 10
2,117
2,170
2,257

763
780
792
795
807

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,3
,3
,3
,4

0
0
6
6
0

1
4
0
1

1,577
1,658
1 , 7 10
1,705
1,737

623
642
654
655
664

3 , 188
3,28 1
3,4 1 7
3,546
3,741

2
2
2
2
2

,3
,4
,5
,6
,7

60
26
24
19
51

828
855
892
927
989

2
2
2
2
2

,4
,5
,5
,6
,8

6
0
9
8
4

6
5
5
4
7

1,787
1,807
1,869
1,936
2,048

679
697
725
748
798

91
153
1 12
86
10 1

3
4
4
4
5

,9
,4
,7
,9
,2

9
2
5
7
4

2
3
3
3
3

,9
,2
,4
,6
,7

2
1
5
0
9

90
93
1 14
131
152

5
5
6
6
7

,4
,7
,1
,5
,0

89
63
38
67
41

,639
,791
, 9 10
,965
,065

5
3
0
0
0

,2
,4
,5
,6
,7

1
1
6
7
6

0

1
1
1
1
1

3,976
4 , 184
4,473
4,802
5 , 157

,0
,2
,2
,3
,4

6
0
9
6
4

6
4
8
5
5

3
3
3
3
4

,0
,4
,7
,9
,2

75
80
8 1
70
02

2
2
2
2
3

1
1
1
1
1

8
8
1
5
4

,5
,5
,6
,7
,8

1
7
6
6
8

2
9
4
4
3

4
4
4
5
5

,4
,6
,9
,2
,6

0
2
3
8
6

3 , 180
3,348
3,587
3,853
4,134

5
4
3
4
9

,2
,4
,7
,8
,0

14
96
19
58
27

86 1
983
1,061
1,112
1,175
1
1
1
1
1

,225
,276
,346
,431
,534

________ __________

Sector 16. Fabric, yarn, and thread mills: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year

~ r
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$597
902
595

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$426
732
470

$170
170
125

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1953. . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

530
56 1
4 17
3 15
265

4 17
427
319
242
209

112
133
97
72
56

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

307
342
282
193
27 1

247
278
233
159
223

59
64
49
33
47

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
19 6 3 . . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

322
297
378
383
487

262
230
294
306
366

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 _____
1968. .. .
1 9 6 9 _____

576
809
646
494
527

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

477
478
569
604
576

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____




T o ta l

I

$3,924
4,608
4,994

|
|
|

5
5
5
6
6

,
,
,
,
,

3
6
9
0
1

2
8
0
3
0

E q u i p men- f c

$1,655
2,319
2,726

S tr u c tu r e s

$2,268
2,288
2,267

2
5
9
3
7

|
|
|
I
|

3
3
3
3
4

,0
,4
,7
,8
,0

6,221
6,365
6,436
6,403
6,431

|
|
|
|
|

4
4
4
4
4

, 166
,343
,453
,467
,519

2,054
2,0 2 2
1, 982
1,936
1,911

60
67
83
76
120

6
6
6
6
6

,4
,4
,5
,5
,6

5
7
1
5
1

|
|
|
|
|

4
4
4
4
4

,5
,5
,6
,6
,6

435
580
486
377
400

140
228
159
1 16
127

6
7
7
7
7

,8 8 1
,295
,545
,650
,797

|
|
|
|
|

373
380
455
482
457

103
98
1 14
122
1 19

7
8
8
8
8

,9
,0
,2
,5
,7

|
|
|
|
|

8
8
4
7
9

0
2
5
1
4

8
9
1
4
7

83
48
03
76
07

3
3
0
5
9

9
6
5
6
9

Equ i p m e n t

$2,738
3,459
3,864

S tr u c tu r e s

$1,371
2,027
2,406

$1,366
1,432
1,457

,1
,5
,7
,8
,8

9
5
5
3
5

8
3
3
7
9

2,7 2 1
3,032
3,218
3 , 3 10
3,350

1,476
1,521
1,534
1,527
1,509

|
I

4
4
4
4
4

,9
,9
,9
,8
,7

07
72
57
33
71

3,408
3,476
3,476
3,381
3,331

1,498
1,495
1,481
1,452
1,440

1,905
1,911
1,938
1,962
2,032

|
|
|
|
|

4
4
4
4
4

,7
,6
,6
,6
,7

4
7
8
8
9

4
7
2
7
4

3
3
3
3
3

,3
,2
,2
,2
,2

0
2
1
0
5

3
9
2
2
3

1,440
1,447
1,470
1,484
1,541

4,757
4,994
5 , 139
5 , 182
5,262

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,3
,4
,4
,5

2
0
0
6
3

3
0
6
7
5

|
|
|
|

4
5
5
5
5

,9
,4
,6
,8
,9

9
2
9
0
6

1
3
1
8
1

3
3
3
3
4

,3
,6
,8
,9
,0

76
49
31
08
12

1 , 6 14
1,773
1,860
1,900
1, 9 4 9

5
5
5
5
6

2
2
2
2
2

,5
,6
,6
,7
,7

7
0
5
0
4

6
8
3
2
5

|
|
|
|

6
6
6
6
6

,0
,1
,3
,5
,7

62
60
43
48
11

4
4
4
4
4

,0 9 1
, 173
,3 2 6
,4 9 6
,627

1,971
1,986
2 , 0 16
2,052
2,084

,332
,421
,598
, 8 12
,002

,2
,2
,2
,1
,0

|

T o ta l

4
4
4
4
4

80
75
02
12
58

2
2
2
2
2

I
|

|
I
|
|

I

____________L

57

__________

Sector 17. Miscellaneous textile goods and floor coverings: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k ;

Year
Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

I

S tr u c tu r e s

E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

S tr u c tu re s

$102
143
167

$73
82
8 6

125
135
14 1
145
150

290
330
357
383
406

197
226
246
268
284

93
103
1 10
1 15
121

352
374
402
423
443

163
165
174
180
188

430
446
473
490
507

295
308
327
338
349

134
137
145
15 1
158

460
484
502
517
550

195
205
2 11
2 18
232

520
543
556
569
608

356
37 1
380
388
416

164
172
176
18 1
192

588
638
68 1
759
858

250
269
295
330
390

656
7 18
779
884
1,033

449
495
534
608
701

206
222
244
275
331

429
453
488
527
599

1 , 156
1,230
1,328
1,462
1,643

791
846
913
1,014
1, 129

365
384
414
448
514

$37
6 1
40

$25
48
31

$ 11
13
8

$235
285
314

1950 . . . .
1951 . . . .
1952. . . .
1953. . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

49
53
42
43
40

38
38
30
34
30

11
15
11
9
9

352
394
425
456
484

226
259
283
31 1
334

1955 . . . .
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

44
37
50
42
45

26
30
37
32
34

17
7
12
10
11

515
540
576
603
631

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1962. . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 ---------

43
55
48
49
76

32
4 1
38
38
59

10
13
9
10
17

656
690
7 13
736
783

1 9 6 5 ....
1966 . . . .
1967. . . .
1968 . . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

86
103
104
149
197

65
80
74
1 11
132

20
23
29
38
65

838
907
977
1,089
1/249

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1972. . . .
1973. . ..
1 9 7 4 _____

175
130
158
200
252

131
100
1 16
153
173

43
29
41
46
78

|
I
I
I

S tr u c tu r e s

$176
226
253

$109
1 17
120

$125
168
194

1947 . . . .
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

|

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

957
1,023
1,105
1,223
1,359

1,386
1,476
1,593
1,750
1,958

__________

__________

I

I

Sector 17. Miscellaneous textile goods and floor coverings: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
Gross

investm e

G ross

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equi pment

Net

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 ....
1 9 4 9 ....

$90
140
88

$65
1 13
7 1

$25
26
17

$856
949
99 1

$398
493
544

$457
456
446

9 5 0 _____
9 5 1 ....
952. . . .
9 5 3 ....
9 5 4 ....

106
102
79
80
73

82
75
58
6 3
55

23
27
20
16
17

1,050
1,106
1 , 139
1,173
1,20 1

606
660
697
738
770

444
446
442
435
430

80 1
857
889
920
942

506
554
582
6 13
633

294
303
307
307
308

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1 9 5 7 ....
1 9 5 8 ....
1 9 5 9 ....

78
6 1
77
64
6 7

46
49
57
47
49

32
11
19
17
18

1
1
1
1
1

,235
,251
,283
,300
,318

793
8 16
846
864
879

442
434
436
436
438

968
973
992
994
997

642
650
663
662
661

326
323
328
332
336

442
450
452
456
47 1

992
1,002
998
993
1,023

652
654
648
640
659

340
348
350
352

38 1
400
427
462
525

1
1
1
1
1

$597
695
739

$ 3 12
403
450

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 ....

63
80
68
69
106

45
58
53
53
79

17
21
15
16
?6

1
1
1
1
1

,329
,352
,358
,361
,397

886
902
906
904
925

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 ....
19 6 8 . . . .
1 9 6 9 ....

1 18
13/
133
182
229

86
103
91
130
148

32
34
42
52
81

1
1
1
1
1

,442
,504
,561
,667
,822

950
989
1,015
1,082
1, 168

492
514
545
585
653

1 , 066
1, 127
1, 183
1,289
1,439

684
726
756
826
913

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
19 7 2 . . . .
1 9 7 3 ....
1974 . . . .

191
134
158
192
210

14 1
102
1 16
149
148

49
31
41
42
61

1,938
1, 9 99
2,084
2,204
2,341

1,249
1,292
1,351
1,443
1,534

689
706
733
760
806

1,548
1,597
1,667
1,768
1,881

992
1,029
1, 078
1/157
1,230




|

58

$285
29 1
289

364

556
* >68
589
650

Sector 18. Apparel: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

1 9 4 7 _____
1948. .. .
1 9 4 9 _____

$ 156
166
147

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

103
98
90
96

93
84
79
72
76

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

116
122
137
1 12
125

89
95
117
86
96

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

126
123
14 1
159
168

96
99
110
125
123

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

229
337
27 1
335
42 1

179
227
204
239
296

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

390
514
675
578
517

292
398
530
437
382

$120
143
128

111

I
'

S tr u c tu re s

|
|
|

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$35
23
19

$669
8 13
936

$ 4 13
542
656

$256
270
280

$546
683
796

$355
477
580

$190
205
2 16

17
18
18
17
19

1, 022
1,099
1,166
1,221
1,275

734
80 1
859
905
948

288
297
307
315
326

867
925
970
1,002
1,033

642
690
726
748
769

224
234
244
253
263

26
27
20
25
29

1,342
1,411
1,491
1,542
1,602

999
1,049
1,116
1,149
1, 187

343
362
374
392
414

1,079
1,126
1, 184
1 , 2 12
1,249

798
828
875
887
905

280
298
309
325
344

|

30
24
31
34
45

1,6
1,7
1,7
1,8
1,9

5
0
6
3
0

8
5
4
4
3

1
1
1
1
1

,220
,250
,284
,327
,363

437
455
479
506
544

1
1
1
1
1

83
10
50
05
66

920
933
954
987
1,016

363
376
396
4 17
449

|
|
|
|
|

50
1 10
67
95
124

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,2
,4
,6
,9

3
7
4
7
8

8
5
4
4
9

1,452
1,587
1,697
1,842
2,042

586
688
746
832
946

1,586
1,809
1,961
2,170
2,456

1,100
1,229
1,330
1,462
1,645

485
580
630
707
811

|
|
|
|
|

97
115
145
141
135

3
3
4
4
5

,2
,6
,2
,6
,0

6
6
2
7
4

9
8
3
1
8

2
2
2
3
3

2
3
3
3
4

1 , 8 13
2,077
2,459
2,728
2,924

887
979
1,098
1,212
1,316

I

I
|

I
I

________________L_

,2
,5
,9
,2
,5

3
3
5
7
3

7
3
5
7
4

__________

1,032
1, 135
1,267
1,394
1,514

,2
,3
,3
,4
,4

,70 1
,0 5 7
,558
,940
,241

__________

Sector 18. Apparel: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
G ross

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Equ i p m e n t

$236
259
228

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

s to c k s

Equi pment

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

$709
7 17
7 19

$1,025
1,026
1,020

$1,527
1,742
1,910

$817
1, 024
1,191

,505
,591
,661
,708
,748

1,011
1,002
992
982
977

1, 999
2,048
2,078
2,083
2,089

1,281
1,331
1,363
1,371
1,376

7
7
7
7
7

1
6
7
2
0

1,796
1,833
1,887
1,894
1,906

985
993
989
997
1,013

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,1
,1
,1
,1

1
3
6
5
6

8
8
5
6
1

1
1
1
1
1

,391
,399
,426
,407
,396

727
739
739
749
765

4 1
49
73
12
60

1,909
1,906
1 , 908
1,923
1 , 928

1,032
1,042
1,064
1, 089
1,13 1

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,1
,1
,2
,2

6
5
6
0
4

1
1
5
0
8

1,378
1,360
1,356
1,370
1,381

783
790
809
830
867

77
162
95
129
155

3 , 178
3,438
3,597
3,823
4,130

1,999
2 , 126
2,220
2,348
2,532

1, 179
1,311
1,377
1,474
1,598

2
2
2
2
3

,3
,6
,7
,9
,2

6
3
8
9
8

9
0
3
8
6

1,460
1,596
1,692
1 , 8 18
1, 9 9 2

1
1
1
1

1 11

4
4
5
5
5

2
2
3
3
3

1,675
1,763
1,873
1,968
2,036

3
3
4
4
4

,5
,8
,2
,5
,7

0
1
6
7
5

4
8
4
4
0

2
2
2
2
3

1,360
1,437
1,535
1 , 6 16
1,671

$79
47
39

$975
1,197
1,386

$2,001
2,223
2,406

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$ 3 15
306
267

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 _____
1953. . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

197
166
156
142
150

16 1
132
123
111
1 16

36
34
32
3 1
34

2
2
2
2
2

,5
,5
,6
,6
,7

1
9
5
9
2

7
4
4
1
5

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 5 5 ....
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

18 1
177
187
156
173

133
132
156
1 14
124

47
44
31
4 1
48

2
2
2
2
2

,7
,8
,8
,8
,9

8
2
7
9
2

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

172
165
191
2 13
225

122
125
139
158
153

50
40
51
54
7 1

2
2
2
3
3

,9
,9
,9
,0
,0

1 9 6 5 ....
1 9 6 6 _____
1967 . . . .
1968. . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

298
439
336
40 1
481

22 1
277
240
272
325

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

422
528
675
559
444

3 11
406
530
428
338




Net

s to c k s

122
145
130
105

,3
,7
,2
,5
,8

7
3
2
9
4

9
2
6
8
5

59

,7
,9
,3
,6
,8

0
6
5
3
0

3
8
3
0
8

,1
,3
,7
,9
,0

4
8
2
5
7

3
1
9
7
9

18
17
15
11
12

908
,033
,091
,179
,293

Sector 19. Miscellaneous fabricated textile products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
------------------------------Gross

i nvestm e n t

G ross

r

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
I
I

T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu re s

T p ta l

i
|

i
|

E qu ip m e nt

I
i
I
|

$69
80
87

155
170
180
19 1
209

|
|
|
|
|

95
106
1 14
12 1
130

$ 18
21
14

I
1
I

$ 11
14
9

$6
7
4

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

15
20
16
16
25

j
|
I
|
|

11
14
12
12
14

3
5
3
4
10

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 _____
1 9 5 9 _____

20
21
19
24
25

|
|
|
|
|

15
16
16
15
15

4
4
3
8
9

222
235
247
262
278

|
|
|
|
|

139
149
159
167
174

1 9 6 0 --------1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 --------1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

24
21
25
34
33

|
I
|
|
|

14
16
16
24
20

10
5
8
9
12

292
302
315
335
354

I
|
|
I
|

180
186
192
205
214

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

50
48
57
67
85

I
I
|
I
I

40
33
40
50
65

9
14
16
17
19

389
422
463
514
581

I
|
|
|
|

24 1
262
289
325
376

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

108
104
91
105

I
|
I
|

111

I

86
85
70
76
96

22
19
21
29
14

670
755
824
905
990

I
|
|
|
I

446
5 15
567
623
6 98

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

$116
133
143

________________ I_____

S tr u c tu r e s

r
|

T o ta l

E quipm ent

|

S tr u c tu r e s

$46
52
56

|
|

$99
1 14
122

$58
67
72

|
I
|

$4 1
46
49

59
64
66
69
79

|
|
|
|

131
143
15 1
158
173

79
87
93
98
104

I
I
I
|

52
56
57
60
68

82
86
88
95
103

|
|
|
|
|

183
193
200
2 12
223

112
119
126
13 1
136

|
j
|
|
|

7 1
73
74
80
87

112
115
122
130
140

|
|
|
|
|

233
239
248
265
280

139
142
146
157
164

|
j
|
|
|

94
96
10 1
107
116

|
|

I
|

148
160
173
188
205

|
|

3 12
340
376
42 1
482

189
208
232
264
310

|
|
I
|
|

122
132
144
156
17 1

|
|
|
|

224
239
256
28 1
292

|
|
|
|

563
637
694
76 1
830

375
436
478
523
584

I
I
1
|

188
20 1
216
238
245

I
|

|
I
|

|
|
|

|
|
|
|
|
I

________________ l____ ________________ I___

________L

Sector 19. Miscellaneous fabricated textile products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

i n vestm ent

G ross

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

|

E qu ip m e nt

1

S tr u c tu r e s

E qu ip m e nt

|

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

|

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu r e s

|
|
j

$193
2 14
223

|

$ 178
188
195

$307
333
343

I

435
455
467
477
50 1

|
|
I
I
|

235
249
258
264
273

|
I
I
|
|

199
206
209
2 12
227

353
367
373
377
395

I
I
I
I
|

187
197
202
205
21 1

165
170
170
17 1
184

|
I
I
I
|

5 14
526
532
545
558

|
|
I
j
I

283
29 1
297
30 1
304

I
|
|

231
234
235
243
254

402
408
408
415
422

I
|
j
|
|

2 17
22 1
225
225
225

185
186
183
189
197

16
8
13
15
20

I
I
|
I
|

569
572
580
598
614

|
I
|
|
|

303
304
305
3 15
318

|
I
|
|

265
268
275
283
296

428
427
43 1
446
460

I
|
|
|
|

222
221
22 1
230
233

205
205
210
216
227

14
2 1
23
23
24

1
|
|
|

650
682
723
772
837

|
I
I
|
|

346
365
391
426
476

|
I
|
I
|

303
3 16
331
345
36 1

493
522
560
605
665

|
I
I
|
|

26 1
279
304
337
382

232
243
255
268
282

25
20
21
26

I
I
I
|

11

I

921
995
1,051
1,115
1,173

I
|
|
|
|

544
607
652
699
755

|
|
|
|
I

377
387
399
4 15
417

742
806
851
902
944

I
I
I
I
|

445
50 1
536
573
6 16

296
304
314
328
328

I
1
|

$25
29
18

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

29
34
27
27
42

I
|
|
|
|

22
24
21
20
23

|
1
I
|

18

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

32
32
28
35
36

I
1
|
I
|

24
24
23
21
21

|
I
j
I
I

7
7
4
13
15

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

35
30
35
47
46

I
|
I
|
|

19

I

21
22
32
26

I
I
|
|

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

65
62
72
8 1
97

|
|
|
1
|

50
4 1
49
57
72

I
I
|
|

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

117
107
91
10 1
96

|
|
I
|
|

9 1
87
70
74
85

|
|
|
|




|

$371
403
4 18

$39
42
28

____________1 _
_

T o ta l

I
I
|
j

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

I
|

1

$14
13
9

|
I

7
10
6
7

|
|
I
|

___________ I___ ____________ L_

60

____________ l___

$ 1 57
174
179

$150
159
163

Sector 20. Lumber and wood products excluding containers: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
G ross
Year

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

----------------------------j

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

|

r

r
T o ta l

1947. . . .
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$235
248
188

I

E qu ip m e nt

I

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

I
I
I

$ 155
174
133

I
|
|

$79
74
55

$1,144
1,343
1,481

|
|
|

I

S tr u c tu r e s

$679
722
744

,1
,5
,8
,3
,0

9
0
9
1
1

4
6
1
1
3

|
I

0
1
7
4
0

4
5
5
6
7

,834
,2 3 1
,745
,271
, 1S5

19 6 0 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1962 . . . .
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

328
248
312
393
363

I
|
I
I
I

24 1
178
231
264
27 1

|
|

87
69
80
128
92

3
3
3
4
4

,5
,6
,8
,0
,2

13
38
15
61
65

|
I
I
I

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,3
,4
,5
,6

4
2
3
6
9

5
0
4
9
9

1 9 6 5 _____
1966 . . . .
1 9 6 7 _____
1968. .. .
1 9 6 9 _____

479
476
425
481
587

|

373
330
337
397
47 1

4
4
5
5
5

,
,
,
,
,

5
8
1
3
7

7
7
0
8
6

5
2
8
9
4

I

I
I
I
|

105
96
88
S3
116

2
3
3
3
3

,9
,1
,3
,5
,8

2
4
1
3
1

2
2
0
0
5

|
|
|

1,652
1,729
1,797
1,858
1 , 949

110
143
190
17 1
280

6
6
7
7
8

,0
,5
,1
,7
,7

7
5
5
7
9

5
1
0
1
2

I
I

4
4
4
5
6

,0
,4
,8
,3
,1

4
0
5
3
2

3
7
0
8
0

|
|
|
|
|

2
2
2
2
2

|
|

3
3
3
4
5

6
0
7
9
0

1,565
1,728
1,830
1, 949
2,096

I
I

|
I
I
I
I

,6
,9
,0
,2
,6

|
|
|
|
|

|

,384
,439
,482
,518
,583

3
3
4
4
4

38
60
91
82
97

|
__________ !___

1
1
1
1
1

I
I
|
I

,5
,7
,8
,0
,2

I
I

I

2
3
7
1
3

2
2
2
3
3

I
I
I
I

5
2
4
5
6

6
3
5
5
0

92
86
53
95
9 1

425
575
668
725
1,034

7
6
9
7
1

,8
,9
,0
,2
,4

|
I
|
I
|

1

,2
,4
,5
,7
,0

2
2
3
3
3

224
221
169
192
228

|

2
2
2
2
3

,268
,318
,380
,491
,565

|
I
I
I
I

536
7 18
858
897
1,315

I
|
I
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

3 17
308
223
288
319

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
19 7 2 . . . .
1973. .. .
1 9 7 4 _____

,0
,1
,1
,2
,3

|
|
I
|

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

|

1
1
1
1
1

4
1
3
1
8

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

|
|
|

I

|
|
|
I

|

1,785
1,816
1,891
1,989
2,085

0
9
8
3
9

891
1,054
1,166
1,263
1,391

|
|
|

792
854
882
952
1,017

,1
,2
,3
,5
,6

I
|
I
I
|

i
I
I
|

i
|
|
I
|

2
2
2
2
2

1,672
1,884
2,011
2,132
2,301

|

1,311
1,437
1,500
1,578
1,681

973
1,032
1,060
1,132
1,201

68
82
46
55
70

|

574
630
650
680
725

|
I
|
I
|

I
I
I
I

|
|
I

I
I
I
|
|

,367
,561
,663
,758
,897

172
183
137
130
169

I
I

793
931
1,013
1,078
1,172

1
1
1
1
1

I
I
I
I
|

,0
,1
,2
,4
,6

31
43
99
33
7 1

S tr u c tu r e s

$458
505
532

780
830
845
868
909

24 1
265
183
185
24 0

j

I
I
|

I
|
|

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1952. .. .
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

|

E qu ip m e nt

$859
1,057
1,189

$464
620
736

|

T o ta l

[

$40 1
552
656

|

|
|

|
I

|
__________ L_____________I__

76
16
66
61
17

1,639
1,724
1,854
1,960
2,17 1

Sector 20. Lumber and wood products excluding containers: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
r
T o ta l

|

e qu ip m e nt

|

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

3
2
8
5
4

|
|
|
|
|

1,814
2,028
2,135
2,212
2,337

1
1
1
1
1

1
0
3
5
9

2
6
7
6
8

I
|
I
I
|

2
2
2
2
2

,5
,6
,6
,7
,8

2
6
9
3
0

1,885
1,943
1, 945
2,0 2 1
2,094

,0
,0
,1
,3
,4

3
4
3
2
5

5
5
3
7
5

I
|
I
|
|

2
2
2
2
3

,8
,8
,8
,9
,0

7
4
8
5

5
5
6
6
6

,7
,9
,0
,2
,4

1
4
8
4
8

8
6
1
3
8

|
|
|
I
|

6
6
7
7
8

,6
,9
,2
,6
,2

25
01
79
40
42

I
I
|
|
I

I
|

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

487
479
323
327
420

|
|
|
|
|

345
326
240
229
292

|
|
|
|

14 1
152
82
97
128

4
5
5
5
5

,754
,021
,125
,222
,403

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,3
,5
,6
,8

9
5
2
6
5

4
8
5
4
0

2
2
2
2
2

,6
,6
,5
,5
,5

5
6
9
5
5

9
2
9
7
2

3
3
3
3
4

,5
,8
,9
,9
,1

6
2
0
8
4

1 9 5 5 ....
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 _____
1 9 5 9 _____

541
479
326
424
460

|
|
I
|
|

373
335
24 1
267
308

|
I
|
|

167
143
85
157
15 1

5
5
5
6
6

,6
,9
,9
,1
,3

9
1
8
4
3

4
7
2
3
4

3
3
3
3
3

,1
,2
,3
,4
,6

0
9
9
9
3

1
9
1
8
4

2
2
2
2
2

,5
,6
,5
,6
,7

93
17
91
44
00

4
4
4
4
4

,4
,6
,6
,7
,8

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

467
353
440
555
497

|
I
|
|
|

32 1
23S
308
347
351

|

145
1 15
132
207
145

6
6
6
6
7

,5
,5
,7
,9
,1

2
8
2
6
3

3
6
2
0
1

3
3
3
3
4

,765
,795
,875
,978
,071

2,757
2,791
2,847
2,982
3,060

5
5
5
5
5

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

64 1
6 17
535
575
673

|
|
|
I
|

479
475
411
462
529

|
I
|
|
|

162
14 1
124
1 12
143

7
7
7
8
8

,4
,7
,8
,1
,4

3
1
9
1
2

7
1
8
6
4

4
4
4
4
5

,2
,4
,6
,7
,0

3 , 156
3,232
3,291
3,338
3,412

|
I
|
|
I

457
587
668
704
907

|
I
|

125
150
190
159
2 19

8,631
8,979
9,4 3 2
9,8 7 5
10,566

5
5
5
6
6

, 166
,439
,783
, 154
, 7 19

3
3
3
3
3

583
738
858
863
1,126

6
3
4
2
4

5
9
8
0
7

$2,768
3,097
3,283

I

I

________________ ___

_______________ ________________ ____ ________________ l _




,4
,5
,6
,7
,8

61

S tr u c tu r e s

$1,071
1,373
1,563

$36 1
369
27 1

80
79
06
78
12

$2,724
2 , 7 15
2,67 1

Equ i p m e n t

I
|
|

|
I
|

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

$1,281
1,592
1,806

T o ta l

$537
518
383

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

$4,006
4,307
4,478

S tr u c tu r e s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 ....
1 9 4 9 _____

|
|

$175
148
112

T o ta l

7
3
1
4
4

$1,697
1,724
1 , 7 19
,749
,794
,773
,773
,807

3
8
4
2
18

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,1
,2
,3
,4

6
9
4
7
3

3,2
3,3
3,4
3,6
3,8

07
85
89
37
4 1

2
2
2
2
2

,5
,5
,5
,6
,6

11
6 1
9 1
06
47

3
4
4
4
5

5
9
9
1
2

2
2
2
2
2

,6
,7
,7
,8
,9

6
0
8
2
2

,9
,1
,4
,8
,3

9
5
6
6
0

1
7
9
5
6

6
6
3
4
2

Sector 21. Wooden containers: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

Equi pment

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i pine n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$13
60
2 1

$9
51
17

$4
9
3

$60
1 19
138

$39
89
105

$21
30
33

$54
1 12
129

$35
84
99

$ 18
27
29

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

33
67
8
11
10

25
55
6
9
7

7
12
2
2
3

170
235
24 1
250
257

130
184
188
196
200

39
51
52
54
56

157
219
220
223
224

121
172
172
174
174

36
47
47
49
50

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

10
13
5
7
5

8
10
4
4
4

2
2
1
2
1

264
273
273
273
27 1

206
2 13
213
211
209

57
59
60
6 1
62

225
227
219
212
203

173
174
167
159
150

51
52
52
53
52

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

8
7
8
9
7

4
4
5
5
5

3
3
3
3
1

269
265
259
252
242

204
197
189
179
168

65
67
70
73
73

195
185
176
168
157

140
129
119
109
99

54
56
57
58
58

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

13
21
10
11
12

8
16
7
6
8

4
5
3
4
4

236
237
228
220
215

159
157
146
136
128

76
80
81
84
86

153
158
154
151
150

93
96
91
87
85

59
6 1
62
64
65

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

11
8
10
11
12

7
6
8
6
9

3
2
2
4
2

210
203
200
200
20 1

122
1 16
1 13
111
114

87
87
87
88
87

149
146
146
147
149

84
82
83
83
87

65
63
63
63
62

__________

________

Sector 21. Wooden containers: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 --------1 9 4 9 _____

$33
139
46

$23
121
39

$9
18
6

$192
327
369

$117
236
273

$75
91
95

$165
298
334

$103
220
252

$6 1
77
81

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

--------_____
_____
--------_____

70
129
14
21
18

55
107
11
17
12

15
22
3
4
5

434
558
567
582
591

325
430
437
450
456

108
128
130
132
135

393
509
506
508
504

299
395
392
393
387

94
113
113
1 14
1 16

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

18
21
8
10
8

15
17
6
6
6

3
4
1
3
1

600
6 10
604
598
586

464
472
466
457
446

136
138
138
140
140

499
493
47 1
450
424

382
376
356
334
311

1 16
117
115
115
113

0 _____
1 _____
2 _____
3 _____
4 _____

12
11
12
13
10

6
5
6
7
7

6
5
5
5
2

574
556
536
512
481

430
409
385
358
328

144
147
150
153
153

400
374
348
323
296

285
257
231
206
181

1 15
1 16
1 17
1 17
1 14

196
196
196
196
196

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
---------

17
28
13
14
14

11
21
8
7
9

6
7
5
6
5

456
44 1
412
385
363

300
281
252
224
20 1

155
159
160
16 1
16 1

279
274
258
245
235

163
158
142
129
121

1 15
116
115
1 15
113

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

12
8
10
10
10

8
6
8
6
7

4
2
2
3
2

342
320
305
294
285

181
164
152
144
140

160
156
152
150
145

226
214
208
202
197

1 14
107
105
102
101

11 1
106
103
100
95




62

Sector 22. Household furniture: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------- r

---------------------------------------------------------------- f
Gross
Year

----------------------------

!

T o ta l

I

1947 . . . .
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____
1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1952. .. .
1 9 5 3 --------1 9 5 4 _____

22
23
22
2 1
23

14
12
14
12
14

25
48
27
30
29

18
22
16
17
20

I
I
|
|

28
27
30
4 1
43

17
13
21
21
25

59
7 1
64
63
67

39
49
40
32
48

98
78
125
132
143

52
45
77
97
10 0

I

|
44 |
70
I
44
|

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

$16
10
9

|
I
|
|

36
35
37
34
38

$35
18
16

. . . .
_____
_____
_____
---------

47
50

|
I

|

45
4 1
51
63
69

_____
_____
_____
. . . .
_____

98
121
104
95
1 16

I
|
I
|
I
I

1 9 7 0 --------1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 ....
1973. .. .
1 9 7 4 _____

151
124
203
229
244

|
|
I
|
|

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

I
I

T o ta l

Net

s to c k s

r
S tr u c tu r e s

E qu ip m e nt

|
I
I

$52
29
25

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

G ross

i nvestm e n t

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

I
$ 1 18
134
146

$99
107
1 14

291
319
347
372
400

165
183
200
215
231

125
135
147
157
168

433
492
524
558
593

248
288
306
325
342

184
204
2 18
233
250

621
643
673
7 13
757

355
366
378
400
422

265
276
294
313
335

|
I
j

828
92 1
996
1,061
1, 144

458
506
545
583
623

370
4 15
451
478
521

I
I
|
I

1
1
1
1
1

693
740
834
932
1,039

567
605
675
764
855

$ 2 18
241
26 1

|

|
1
|
j
I

|
I
I

|
|
|
I
I
I

I

I

,260
,346
,510
,696
,895

________ 1
__

I
I

T o ta l

s to c k s

E qu ip m e nt

$ 187
207
223

|
|
|

$ 104
117
127

249
272
296
3 15
337

|
|
|
I
|

142
156
169
180
191

I
I
I

363
415
438
463
488

I
I
I
I

203
237
248
26 1
271

I

|
I
|

507
519
540
57 1
606

I
|
I
|

669
752
8 17
869
938

|
|
I
I
|
|

|

I
I
I

I
I

S tr u c tu r e s

_______ I__________ I______________________

1,0
1,1
1,2
1,4
1,5

3
0
5
2
9

|
|
I
I
I
|

$82
90
96
107
1 15
126
135
145

|
I
|
|

159
177
189
202
2 17

278
282
289
306
324

I
I
I
|

228
236
250
265
282

|
|
|
|
|
j

356
400
433
465
497

I
|
|
I
|

3 13
352
383
403
440

|
I
|
|
1

559
597
680
765
858

|
|
I
I
|

9
9
4
0
5

I

I
I
I

479
5 11
574
654
737

_______ 1
__

Sector 22. Household furniture: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
I
T o ta l

I
|
E qu ip m e nt
_______________
1

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$122
61
52

|
I
|
I

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1953. . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

74
63
65
59
66

|
I
|
|
|

75
110
65
70
74

$86
40
34

1
I

S tr u c tu r e s

1
|
I
|
1

45

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$36
20
18

$695
736
767

I
|
|

$332
362
385

819
858
896
926
960

|
|
I
|
|

418
446
469
488
507

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

$363
373
38 1

S tr u c tu r e s

|
I
I

$285
309
325

400
4 12
426
438
453

667
695
722
742
766

|
I
I
j
I

350
368
383
393
404

3 17
327
339
349
36 1

797
86 1
877
896
9 16

|
I
|
I
|

4 15
456
460
464
465

38 1
405
4 17
43 1
450

|

29
22
25
22
25

I
|
|
|
|
|

42
72
39
42
40

|
|
|

33
37
26
28
33

1,002
1,078
1,108
1,142
1,176

|
I
|
I
|

527
576
59 1
607
6 18

475
50 1
517
534
557

1

—
:q u i p m e n t

$568
602
624

9 1
40
37
40

I
|

I
I

$283
293
299

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

66
58
75
90
96

|
|
I
|
|
|

38
36
40
55
56

|
I
|
I
|

28
22
35
35
40

1
1
1
1
1

,199
,210
,234
,270
,311

|
j
|
|
j

623
623
624
637
650

575
586
609
632
660

925
924
939
967
1,000

I
|
|
|
i

462
455
45 1
462
475

463
469
487
504
525

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

135
162
135
116
135

|
|
|
|
|

75
89
77
73
74

|
|
|
|

60
72
58
43
60

1
1
1
1
1

,389
,492
,569
,625
,700

|
I
|
|
|

682
727
760
788
8 18

706
765
808
837
882

1
1
1
1
1

,072
,168
,235
,281
,343

I
|
|
|
I

506
551
582
607
632

566
6 17
653
674
7 1 1

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

164
128
203
218
205

|
|
1
|
|

104
79
125
128
126

|
I
I
|

59
48
77
90
78

1,802
1,866
2,003
2,153
2,286

|
|
|
|
|

877
910
989
1,068
1, 144

924
955
1 , 0 14
1, 084
1, 142

1,432
1,48 0
1,600
1,730
1,842

|
|
|
I
|

686
7 12
782
85 1
9 15

745
767
8 17
879
927

|

______ L




________________ 1
___

________________ _____________________ ________________ I____

63

Sector 23. Other furniture and fixtures: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—

—
—
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
E quipm ent

T o ta l

I
|

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

|

E quipm ent

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 3 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$18
23
13

$10
15
9

|
I

$7
7
4

$130
15 1
16 1

|
I
|

$63
78
86

$6 6
72
75

$ 120
139
146

$59
71
76

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

15
15
14
20
20

9
10
s
11
12

I
|
I
I
|

5
5
5
8
7

174
186
196
2 10
224

I
|
I
|
|

93
10 1
106
113
120

80
84
89
97
103

155
163
169
179
189

81
86
88
92
96

73
76
80
87
92

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

26
33
43
31
27

17
18
26
19
17

|
|
|

9
15
17
12
10

243
270
306
329
347

|
I
|
|
|

132
144
164
176
185

111
125
14 1
152
162

205
227
258
275
288

106
1 16
132
140
146

99
111
126
135
14 1

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

3 1
33
4 1
42
34

19
19
18
24
23

|
I
I
|

11
13
22
17
10

367
388
4 16
443
46 1

|
|
|
|
|

195
204
2 11
222
232

172
184
205
220
229

302
317
339
36 1
373

153
158
162
172
179

149
158
176
188
193

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

45
54
86
76
67

28
36
44
43
42

I
I
|
I
|

17
18
4 1
32
24

490
528
596
653
699

I
I
|
I
|

246
268
297
325
35 1

244
260
298
327
348

397
428
488
538
575

191
2 10
236
26 1

282

205
2 17
252
276
293

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

7 1
65
104
1 15
108

55
41
65
64
75

I
I
|
i

16
23
38
5 1
32

749
790
868
956
1,033

|
|
|
|
|

389
412
457
499
55 1

359
378
4 1 1
456
48 1

6 14
645
7 12
787
851

3 14
331
369
404
448

300
314
342
383
403

|

$6 1
67
69

________________ _____________________

_____________________ l___

Sector 23. Other furniture and fixtures: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

-------------------------------------------------- r
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 ....

E quipm ent

$39
47
25

$22
32
17

I

S tr u c tu r e s

I
j

T o ta l

$360
40 1
420

11
9
10
15
13

442
459
471
49 1
508

15
24
27
19
16

535
568
6 13
640
658

I

19
22
36
28
16

680
70 1
733
763
779

29
26
23
34
33

18
17
13
19
19

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

43
5 1
62
45
39

27
26
35
25

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

. . . .
_____
_____
_____
_____

44
47
59
59
46

25
24
23
31
29

I

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

62
7 1
111
93
77

35
44
52
49
46

|
|
|
I
|

30

809
849
928
989
1,031

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

76
66
104
1 10
93

58
42
65
63
68

I

18
24
38
47
25

1
1
1
1
1

22

|

|
|
|
|

|
|

26
27
59

44

,0
,1
,1
,2
,2

72
01
64
32
80

S tr u c tu r e s

$156
185
199

|

|
|
|
|
|
|
I
|

468
487
538
573
593

47 1
488
526
560
598

|

366
384
415
438
448

341
36 1
389
4 15
438

|

275
296
320
337
350

3 14
3 17
3 18
325
330

|

228
234
241
253
263

259
27 1
292
302
307

|
|
I
|
|
I
|

$204
2 15
220

2 13
224
230
238
245

|
|
|
|

________ __________ I
_




s to c k s

I

I
T o ta l

E quipm ent

I

S tr u c tu r e s

r

I

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

Net

r
Equi pm e nt

|
|
|

$16
14
8

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

I
|

I
|

s to c k s

600
6 12
638
67 1
682

$142
168
176

|
|
|

$ 180
190
193

383
39 1
395
407
4 17

183
187
186
188
191

|
|

200
204
209
2 18
226

436
462
498
515
524

20 1
209
225
229
230

|
|

536
550
574
598
607

233
233
233
240
245

|
|
|
|
|

63 1
664
735
786
8 19

255
275
302
325
343

848
866
9 18
974
1,010

372
382
4 15
442
473

|
|
|
|

i

|

|
|
|

|
|
|

|
|
|
I

_____________________ L

64

$323
358
370

I

|

|
|
|
|
I
|

|

|
|
|

|
I

|
|

|
j
|
|

235
253
273
285
293
303
3 16
341
357
362
375
388
433
46 1
475
476
483
503
531
536

Sector 24. Paper and allied products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k

Year
I
I

T o ta l

:qu ip m e nt

I
|

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 ....
1 9 4 9 _____

$357
301
269

|
I
|

$254
240
2 16

|
|
|

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

267
341
323
368
437

|
|
|
I
|

209
269
265
299
334

|
|
|
|
|

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

473
688
771
500
522

|
I
|
I
|

38 1
543
609
396
424

I 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
19 6 3 . . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

533
556
578
568
742

I
I
|
|
I

438
46 1
488
475
629

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
---------

1,008
1,173
1,337
985
1,128

|
|
|
|
|

850
980
1,102
799
937

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
19 7 3 . . . .
1 9 7 4 _____

1,157
1,004
1,130
1,303
1,867

I
|
|
I
|

988
859
970
1,145
1,616

S tr u c tu r e s

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

$103
60
52

T o ta l

Equ i p m a n t

$1,326
1,586
1 , 8 15

S tr u c tu r e s

$808
1, 023
1,214

$517
563
60 1

T o ta l

I
I

$1,099
1,350
1,563

I
|
|

$692
898
1,075

$407
45 1
488

1,767
2,037
2,279
2,553
2,884

|
|
I
|
|

1,238
1,453
1,654
1,878
2 , 124

529
583
624
675
759

644
700
744
798
886

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

57
7 1
58
69
103

2
2
2
2
3

,0
,3
,6
,9
,3

4
4
2
4
2

2
1
1
2
8

1,398
1,641
1,877
2,144
2,442

I
|

9 1
145
162
104
97

3
4
5
5
5

,7
,3
,0
,4
,8

4
6
6
7
9

3
5
1
4
4

2
3
3
4
4

,7
,2
,8
,1
,4

8
7
2
4
7

0
2
0
2
8

963
1,093
1,241
1,331
1 , 4 15

3
3
4
4
4

,2
,7
,3
,6
,9

3
7
8
9
9

3
9
5
3
8

I
|
I
I
|

2
2
3
3
3

,4
,8
,2
,5
,7

0
2
9
2
5

|
I
|
|

95
94
89
93
1 12

6
6
7
7
8

,307
,721
,134
, 5 12
,037

4
5
5
5
6

,8
,1
,4
,7
,2

0
4
8
8
0

9
3
0
0
8

1
1
1
1
1

97
78
54
32
29

5
5
5
6
6

,2
,5
,8
,0
,4

8
7
5
9
8

8
5
5
9
9

|
|
|
I
|

3
4
4
4
4

,9
,2
,4
,6
,9

80
03
29
16
34

1
1
1
1
1

i
I
|
|

157
193
234
185
190

8,800
9,70 1
10,736
11,391
12,159

6,8
7,5
8,3
8,8
9,4

3
5
8
7
7

1
7
0
2
6

1, 968
2 , 143
2,3 5 6
2,519
2,683

7
7
8
9
9

,1
,8
,7
,2
,8

1
7
5
5
5

5
3
9
4
7

I
|
|
|
|

5
6
6
7
7

,4
,0
,7
,1
,6

4
6
6
3
0

1,667
1 , 8 13
1,996
2 , 124
2,252

168
145
159
157
250

12,926
13,508
1 4, 184
15,000
16,347

10,451
10,853
11,344
11,967
13,110

|
I
|
|
I

|

|
|
I
I
|
___ l___

10,104
10,574
11,129
11,831
12,975

________

2
2
3
3
3

,4
,5
,6
,7
,8

,8
,9
,0
,1
,3

2
3
5
6
7

2
3
4
9
2

2
4
1
0
5

830
954
1,093
1,172
1,242

7
0
3
0
5

8,098
8,427
8,836
9,384
10,363

2
2
2
2
2

,308
,371
,426
,482
,554

,3
,4
,5
,5
,7

5
2
0
8
4

3
6
8
3
7

Sector 24. Paper and allied products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
I
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
1
T o ta l

1947 . . . .
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

I

1 ----------------------------1
-------$834
|
643
|
567
1
1

19 6 5 . . . .
1966 . . . .
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 _____
1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1973. .. .
1 9 7 4 _____

$604
522
46 1

$229
120
106

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$4,241
4,725
5,135

$2,299
2,735
3,110

6
0
4
2
8

|
|
|
|
|

3,452
3,854
4,244
4,677
5 , 153

2
2
2
2
2

,
,
,
,
,

2
2
2
2
3

,4
,6
,8
,9
,0

427
489
48 1
533
585

1 19
132
104
122
187

I
I

801
1,077
1,127
729
744

|
|
|
I
|

635
835
870
558
581

165
24 1
257
170
162

8 ,109
8 ,979
9,881
10,361
10,829

|
I
|
|
|

5
6
7
7
7

158
157
147
150
179

11,269
11,704
12,125
12,483
13,025

I
|
I
|
i

8,142
8,477
8,809
9,076
9,498

24 1
284
335
251
238

13,868
14,853
15,960
16,536
17,192

I
|
|
|
|

191
153
159
145
196

1
1
1
1
1

I
|
I
I
|
I

,5
,9
,4
,9
,4

2
9
1
0
9

$1,941
1, 9 90
2,025

E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

$3,334
3,803
4 , 186

$1,914
2,331
2,674

3
5
0
4
5

4
4
5
5
6

,5
,9
,2
,6
,1

3
4
9
9
9

4
2
6
8
3

2
3
3
3
4

,9
,3
,6
,9
,3

7
1
2
7
4

0
3
8
4
8

44
20
14
23
27

6
7
8
8
8

,6
,4
,1
,4
,7

8
2
7
8
7

7
5
6
7
9

4
5
5
6
6

,
,
,
,
,

4
1
7
8
9

4
0
4
8
2

3 , 126
3,2 2 6
3,315
3,407
3,527

9,038
9,293
9,539
9,729
10,112

6
6
6
6
7

,4
,6
,8
,9
,2

10,161
10,925
11,763
1 2 , 157
12,648

3
3
4
4
4

,7
,9
,1
,3
,5

0
2
9
7
4

7
8
7
9
3

10,802
1 1,636
12,588
13,002
13,494

7,807
8 ,459
9, 185
9,464
9,841

13,124
13,388
13,724
14, 180
14,904

4
4
4
4
4

,6
,7
,7
,8
,9

5
2
9
4
3

6
5
3
1
2

1
1
1
1
1

,6
,3
,0
,4
,8

6
5
6
3
0

5
8
6
7
1

0
1
1
2
3

7
3
7
2
4

7
3
8
0
2

I
I

S tr u c tu r e s

|
|
|

$1,419
1,472
1,511

|
|
I

1,564
1,629
1,667
1, 723
1,844

I
I
|
|

1,942
2,115
2,30 1
2,398
2,486

I
I
I
|

2
2
2
2
2

,5
,6
,7
,7
,8

6
4
0
6
5

5
2
4
5
1

2
3
3
3
3

,9
,1
,4
,5
,6

9
7
0
3
5

5
6
3
7
3

3
3
3
3
3

,7
,7
,7
,7
,7

1
3
5
5
9

6
4
3
3
9

I

I

750
781
806
784
1,007

i
|
|
|

591
623
659
633
828

I
i
I
I
I

1
1
1
1
1

I
i
I
I
I

1,104
1,240
1,344
929
1,053

I
I
1
I

5
5
6
6
7

S tr u c tu r e s

|
I
|

1
|
|
|
I
|

I
1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 ....
1963. .. .
1 9 6 4 _____

S tr u c tu r e s

546
621
586
656
773

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1953. .. .
1 9 5 4 _____
1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 ....
1957 . . . .
1 9 5 8 ....
1 9 5 9 _____

E quipm ent

1
1
1
1
1

,346
,525
,679
,180
,291
,2
,0
,1
,2
,6

5
2
3
5
0

4
9
0
8
2

I
I
|
I
i




1,062
876
970
1,112
1,406

7
8
8
9
9

,7
,1
,5
,0
,8

81
14
18
21
37

65

3,916
4,078
4,311
4,638
5,273

1
1
1
1
1

0
0
0
0
1

72
51
35
63
60

,200
,344
,557
,884
,473

|

|
|
|
|
|
|
I

Sector 25. Paperboard containers and boxes: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu re s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$71
72
64

$45
48
44

$25
23
20

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

49
84
48
67
34

36
56
39
50
59

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

9 1
124
1 17
136
1 16

64
9 1
86
84
79

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

109
1 13
16 1
14 1
161

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

I

$26 1
327
385

$ 14 1
186
227

12
28
8
17
24

427
504
544
603
676

260
311
346
390
442

27
32
30
52
37

756
866
968
1, 087
1, 184

497
578
653
723
785

|
|

84
80
116
115
123

25
33
44
26
37

1,270
1,357
1,487
1,592
1,712

849
906
995
1,078
1,165

S tr u c tu r e s

|
|

133
188
172
185
208

46
6 1
66
57
72

1,845
2,044
2,226
2,406
2 , 6 19

1
1
1
1
1

56
99
20
50
98

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

227
180
206
228
342

174
142
167
184
264

52
38
38
43
77

2
2
2
3
3

1,908
1,979
2,071
2,173
2,350

|
|
|
|
|

________

,7
,8
,9
,1
,3

7
7
9
2
6

3
3
3
6
7

|

________ ________________ L _

$99
119
135

376
446
477
525
587

232
277
304
340
382

144
168
173
185
205

654
750
834
934
1,009

427
495
556
6 10
655

227
254
278
324
353

1,071
1, 133
1,238
1,316
1,409

701
738
808
87 1
938

370
394
429
445
470

588
644
705
756
820

|
|

,2
,3
,5
,6
,7

$124
167
204

420
450
49 1
514
547

|
|

$223
286
340

258
288
315
364
398

|

179
249
238
242
280

S tr u c tu r e s

167
192
198
2 12
234

|
|
|

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

Equi pment

$119
140
158

|
|

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

T o ta l

1,513
1,682
1,832
1,979
2 , 155

1
1
1
1
1

,0
,1
,2
,3
,4

09
3 1
30
36
58

504
551
602
643
697

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1

,540
,582
,643
, 7 15
,860

730
747
762
782
833

865
894
92 1
953
1,017

,2
,3
,4
,4
,6

7
2
0
9
9

0
9
6
7
3

Sector 25. Paperboard containers and boxes: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

s to c k s

Year
1
I

T o ta l

1
I

—
E quipm ent

_______________ 1
________________ 1
_____________________
I
1 9 4 7 _____
$173
|
$ 1 16
1 9 4 8 _____
159
I
112
139
|
97
1 9 4 9 _____

S tr u c tu r e s

r

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu r e s

$56
46
4 1

$859
992
1,106

T o ta l

____________________I_____________________
I
$425
I
$433
I
525
|
467
|
611
i
495

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
---------

105
16 1
91
124
154

I
I
|
|
1

79
109
75
94
109

26
51
15
30
44

1,186
1,320
1,383
1,476
1,595

|
|
|
|
|

677
772
832
907
995

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

164
203
18 1
211
178

I
I
|
|
|

1 14
149
133
126
117

49
54
47
85
6 1

1,721
1,882
2,017
2,178
2,301

|
I
|
|
|

1,084
1,203
1,303
1,390
1,464

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

162
168
235
200
224

|
I
I
I
|

119
1 13
162
157
164

42
54
73
42
59

2
2
2
2
2

,
,
,
,
,

1
0
8
2
3

|
|
|
I
|

1,534
1,591
1,689
1,774
1,860

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
-------------------------

246
331
304
295
324

|
I
|
|
|

175
241
209
217
233

70
90
94
77
90

3
3
3
3
3

,0
,2
,4
,6
,8

47
71
61
35
31

|
|
|
I
|

1,950
2,100
2,213
2,328
2,454

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

247
185
206
219
287

|
|
|
|
I

187
145
167
179
226

60
40
38
40
60

3
3
4
4
4

,9
,9
,0
,1
,2

4
8
4
1
3

|
|
|
|
I

2
2
2
2
2




I
I

Net

4
5
6
7
9

0
0
5
7
0

5
9
8
3
9

,5
,5
,6
,6
,7

3
5
0
5
5

0
7
3
6
0

I
|
I
I
|

s to c k s

__________________ ____________________________________________________________
r
Equ i p m e n t

$702
828
932

I
I
|

$365
458
534

S tr u c tu r e s

$336
369
397

509
547
550
568
600

1
1
1
1

998
,116
,159
,230
,326

I
|
|
|
|

637
679
7 14
787
836

1
1
1
1
1

,4
,5
,6
,7
,8

5
9
3
9
5

I
I
|
|
|

900
995
1,069
1, 128
1, 173

525
563
593
660
702

|

867
909
969
997
1,042

1,938
1,999
2,119
2,197
2,293

|
|
I
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

,2
,2
,3
,3
,4

13
42
13
73
36

724
756
806
823
856

|
I
|
|
|

1,097
1,17 1
1,248
1,307
1,377

2
2
2
2
3

,
,
,
,
,

4
5
7
8
0

0
9
4
8
4

3
3
7
4
2

I
I
|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

,5
,6
,7
,8
,9

04
32
23
17
20

899
960
1,023
1,067
1, 122

|
|
I
I

1,414
1,431
1,444
1,457
1,488

3
3
3
3
3

,
,
,
,
,

1
1
1
1
2

1
2
3
6
4

6
0
7
2
7

|
|
|
|
I

1,971
1,974
1,994
2,021
2,089

I
|
|

I
|

2
5
6
8
7

588
669
7 1 1
767
833

409
447
448
463
492

1, 144
1, 146
1 , 143
1,14 1
1, 157

___________

66

Sector 26. Printing and publishing: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

|

S tr u c tu r e s

h
I
I
|

$1,174
1,238
1,270

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

I
1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$279
279
264

$148
182
197

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

274
347
337
248
326

195
167
129
156
179

79
179
208
9 1
147

3
3
3
3
3

,2
,5
,7
,8
,9

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

369
498
415
423
388

198
229
254
278
27 1

170
269
160
145
116

4
4
4
5
5

,
,
,
,
,

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

458
476
535
570
6 19

302
298
321
353
344

155
178
214
217
275

5
5
6
6
6

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

857
935
963
89 1
1,043

4 17
537
578
569
627

991
1,035
1,047
1, 084

636
673
80 1
843
874

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

1,141

$130
97
66

$2,905
3,036
3,1 5 6

I
|
|

$1,730
1,797
1,886

91
01
01
12
97

|
|
|
|
|

1,976
2,040
2,068
2 , 121
2,194

2
5
8
0
2

2
6
1
7
8

0
5
8
4
7

|
I
|
|
|

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,3
,5
,6
,7

80
89
14
55
83

,5
,8
,1
,5
,9

6
5
9
5
6

4
2
1
6
1

|
I
|
I
|

2
3
3
3
3

,9
,0
,2
,4
,5

34
75
32
13
77

440
397
384
321
415

7,597
8,299
9,019
9,654
10,428

|
|
|
|
|

3
4
4
4
5

,809
,154
,534
,897
,309

|

3,787
4 , 144
4,484
4,757
5,118

354
36 1
246
241
267

1
1
1
1
1

I
I
I
|
I

5
6
6
7
7

,
,
,
,
,

I
|
|
|

5
5
5
6
6

1,132
1,857
2,568
3,287
4,033

7
1
6
2
8

18
49
89
49
18

$2,234
2,369
2,485

$1,317
1,391
1,478

$916
977
1,006

|

1,315
1,460
1,633
1,690
1,803

2,6
2,7
2,9
3,0
3,2

0
9
7
5
0

8
8
2
0
0

1,559
1,606
1,611
1,637
1,681

1
1
1
1
1

|
I
|
|

1,940
2,176
2,304
2,418
2,504

3,3
3,6
3,9
4,1
4,2

8
8
0
1
7

4
9
0
2
7

1,737
1 , 8 17
1,915
2,032
2,135

1,646
1,872
1, 984
2,079
2,142

2
2
2
3
3

4
4
5
5
5

03
35
13
12
44

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,3
,5
,6
,7

6
7
0
5
9

2
7
6
9
3

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,3
,5
,6
,8

6,199
6,8 1 1
7,426
7,944
8,586

2
3
3
3
4

,9
,2
,6
,9
,2

9
9
2
3
7

0
6
8
3
6

3
3
3
4
4

,208
,514
,798
,011
,309

9, 143
9 , 7 11
10,255
10,798
11,358

4
4
5
5
6

,6
,9
,3
,8
,2

0
4
9
4
9

5
7
0
4
6

4
4
4
4
5

,5
,7
,8
,9
,0

|
|

|
|
|

|

,6
,7
,9
,1
,3

,4
,7
,8
,0
,2

2
7
5
4
8

1
0
7
3
1

9
6
9
3
4

3
7
8
7
5

,5
,7
,0
,3
,6

,049
,192
,361
, 4 12
,518

4
5
0
5
5

3
6
6
5
6

0
7
6
2
1

7
4
5
4
1

___________L

Sector 26. Printing and publishing: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

----------------------------------r
G ross
Year
T o ta l

$627
572
532

1 9 4 7 _____
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

547
625
597
433
566

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

635
796
17
630
565

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 --------1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

667
694
772
808
877

6

I
|
|

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
I

|
|
|
|
|
I
I
I
|

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

E qu ip m e nt

$337
378
395

S tr u c tu r e s

$290
193
137

382
293
226
269
299
324
346
362
392
37 1

310
449
255
237
193

408
398
422
458
44 1

4
4
4
4
4

,4
,6
,8
,8
,9

7
5
3
7
6

4
4
4
5
5

,9
,9
,9
,0
,0

3
5
8
3
5

0
6
5
4
3

5
5
5
5
5

,1 2 2
,420
,528
,6 2 4
,681

|

5
5
5
5
5

,1
,1
,2
,2
,3

0
4
0
9
7

4
2
3
9
9

5
5
6
6
6

,8
,9
,1
,4
,7

0
7
8
0
1

7
0
9
8
3

8
3
0
3
8

|
|
I
|
|

5
5
6
6
6

,5
,8
,2
,5
,8

5
7
1
2
7

1
1
3
1
3

7,2
7,7
8,1
8 ,3
8,7

5
0
0
9
5

6
1
7
2
4

|
|
I
I
|

2
3
7
6
0

|
|
|
I
|

7
7
7
8
8

,1
,5
,9
,3
,7

99
24
48
71
23

8 ,9
9,1
9,2
9,2
9,2

9
9
5
8
8

3
8
8
5
7

|
|

1
1
1
1
1

0,911
1,113
1,393
1,708
2,092

1
1
1
1
1

2
3
4
4
5

,8
,5
,3
,9
,6

0
7
2
1
2

1
1
1
1
1

6
6
7
7
8

,1
,7
,2
,6
,0

9
2
0
5
1

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

1,080
1,068
1,047
1,042
976

|
I
|
I
|

676
687
80 1
818
767

403
38 1
246
223
209

52
76
13
58
35

|
I

|
I
|

|
|
I

|

67

7
4
5
5
6

T o ta l

Equi pment

$6,904
6,995
7,049

|

7
7
7
7
7

,1
,2
,3
,3
,4

1
6
7
2
0

8
3
8
5
2

I
I
I
|
|

7
7
7
8
8

,5
,8
,9
,0
,1

4
4
5
7
3

4
1
5
9
5

|
|
|

$3,646
3,7 0 0
3,77 1

$3,257
3,2 9 5
3,277

3
3
3
3
3

|
|
I
|

3,56 1
3,560
3,572
3 , 6 12
3,632

3
4
4
4
4

,9
,2
,3
,4
,5

82
81
83
66
02

I
|

3
3
3
3
4

,6
,7
,8
,9
,0

90
37
08
15
03

4
4
4
5
5

,6
,7
,9
,0
,3

00
30
10
82
34

5
7
8
7
8

|
|
|
|
|

4
4
4
5
5

,
,
,
,
,

1
4
8
0
3

7
9
0
8
7

7
0
8
0
9

5
6
6
6
7

, 8 17
,196
,529
,737
, 0 19

12,811
13,181
13,499
13,777
13,956

|
I
|
|
I
I

5
5
6
6
6

,6
,8
,2
,5
,8

3
8
2
5
0

7
4
3
3
4

7
7
7
7
7

, 173
,2 9 6
,275
,224
,151

8,290
8,4 6 8
8 ,7 1 8
8,9 9 8
9,338

I
|

|
1
1
1
1

9,99
0,68
1,33
1,81
2,39

|

|
|
I
|

,828
,792
,6 8 6
,621
,580

S tr u c tu r e s

|
|
|
I

|
|
|

|
|

s to c k s

r~

|

259
296
350
350
436

654
697

$ 4,482
4,508
4,4 7 8

58
35
54
19
14

,0
,3
,5
,6
,7

677
584
549
434
519

$4,946
4,957
5,005

|
I
I
|
|
|

,0
,0
,9
,9
,9

0
0
0
0
0

528
672

I

|
|
|
j
|
|

S tr u c tu r e s

5
5
4
4
4

1
1
1
1
1

|
I
I
|
|




$9,428
9,465
9,484
,535
,680
,807
,776
,881

05
56
38
89
17

688

Equi pment

9
9
9
9
9

1
1
1
1
1

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

T o ta l

164
332
37 1
163
267

1 9 6 5 --------1966 . . . .
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 _____

,2
,2
,2
,0
,2

Net

s to c k s

r-

3,289
3,47 1
3,691
3,704
3,8 2 1

Sector 27. Chemicals and allied products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Not

s to c k s

s to c k s

r
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$538
365
389

1947 . . . .
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$357
269
290

$181
96
99

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$ 1,992
2,336
2,700

|
|
|

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

$708
80 1
896

$1,284
1,535
1,803

$1,815
2,119
2,435

$66 1
745
832

$1,154
1,373
1,603

979
,124
,316
,484
,647

2
3
3
4
4

,7
,2
,8
,4
,9

28
47
83
94
69

1,825
2,211
2,670
3,130
3,462

1
1
1
1

97
17
72
20
20

1,791
1,954
2,1 2 7
2,299
2 , 4 18

5
5
6
6
7

,3
,7
,3
,8
,0

0
5
4
0
5

4
5
0
3
7

3
3
4
4
4

,6
,9
,4
,7
,9

77
91
31
55
25

1,626
1,764
1,908
2,047
2 , 131

6
0
3
7
9

2,5
2,7
2,8
3,0
3,2

7,472
7 , 9 98
8,356
8,300
9,431

5
5
5
6
6

,2
,6
,9
,2
,7

43
49
41
49
30

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,3
,4
,5
,7

29
49
15
51
00

4
6
7
4
4

7,438
8,274
9 , 126
9,799
10,395

2
3
3
3
4

,9
,2
,4
,7
,0

0
0
6
8
6

6
1
0
4
8

7
0
7
8
0

1
1
1
1
1

4
4
4
4
4

,2
,4
,5
,6
,9

5
2
1
7
8

7
5
9
3
1

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

380
621
759
760
650

294
472
563
587
482

85
149
196
173
168

3
3
4
5
5

,0
,6
,3
,0
,6

4
3
4
5
3

9
2
6
0
2

|
|
I
|
|

2,0
2,5
3,0
3,5
3,9

6
0
2
6
8

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
. . . .
--------_____

538
682
846
76 1
587

389
5 12
666
58 1
457

149
169
180
180
129

6
6
7
8
8

,0
,6
,3
,0
,4

8
7
9
2
3

8
2
9
0
9

|
|
|
|
|

4
4
5
5
6

,2
,7
,2
,7
,0

1 9 6 0 --------1 9 6 1 --------1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

780
927
797
9 18
1, 140

632
751
670
7 15
9 18

148
176
127
202
222

9,025
9,726
10,263
10,887
11,698

I
|
I
I
|

6
7
7
7
8

,4
,0
,4
,8
,4

1 9 6 5 ....
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 --------1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 _____

1
1
1
1
1

,462
,725
,753
,691
,625

1,176
1,342
1,398
1,261
1,227

285
382
354
429
398

12,795
14,117
15,430
16,644
17,757

I
|
I
|
|

1
1
1
1

9,330
0,303
1,301
2,131
2,897

3,464
3,813
4 , 129
4,513
4,859

1
1
1
1
1

0
1
2
3
4

,3
,4
,5
,5
,4

4
7
8
8
6

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

1,712
1,572
1,453
1,776
2,900

1,400
1,273
1,220
1,475
2,438

312
299
233
30 1
462

18,917
19,896
20,711
21,800
23,9 62

|
|
|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

3
4
5
6
7

5
5
5
5
6

1
1
1
1
1

5
6
6
7
9

,3
,0
,6
,4
,2

7
9
2
2
9

. . . .
_____
_____
_____
_____

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

9
8
9
5
4

9
8
6
8
0

,805
,551
,206
,076
,866

1
1
1
1

,1
,3
,5
,7
,0

55
17
27
09
07

1
4
0
2
9

2
5
4
3
6

_

1,1
1,6
2,1
2,7
4,3

1
6
0
5
0

9
5
8
5
9

903
,036
, 2 13
,364
,506

Sector 27. Chemicals and allied products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

Equi pment

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

$1,161
7 19
759

$759
528
557

$402
191
202

Equ i p m e n t

$5,640
6,289
6,966

$3,328
3,80 1
4,292

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

733
1,062
1,288
1,254
1,070

555
786
938
946
764

178
276
349
308
305

7,602
8,5 4 8
9,700
10,792
11,671

4
5
6
7
7

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

878
1,003
1,173
1,059
809

607
721
887
764
594

270
282
286
295
215

12,325
13,068
13,941
14,658
15,076

8,0
8,5
9,1
9,6
9,8

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1,046
1,256
1,066
1,231
1,514

800
963
858
905
1,16 1

246
293
208
326
352

15,683
16,446
16,968
17,604
18,473

1
1
1
1
1

1965
1966
1967
1968
19 6 9

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1,910
2,199
2,164
2,030
1,871

1,470
1,637
1,664
1,450
1,379

439
562
499
580
49 1

19,690
21,150
22,531
23,737
24,746

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

_______

1,860
1,627
1,453
1,711
2,519




1,506
1,312
1,220
1,432
2 , 157

_________

s to c k s

-------------------------------- r

354
314
233
279
36 1

,7
,4
,2
,0
,6

6
5
7
7
7

5
3
3
7
3

8 1
7 2
91
48
93

S tr u c tu r e s

$2,311
2,488
2,674
2
3
3
3
3

,8
,0
,4
,7
,9

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

$5,046
5,587
6 , 140

36
95
26
15
98

6,6
7,4
8,4
9,3
9,9

3
2
0
0
6

$2,946
3,338
3,734

6
8
5
1
4

4,243
4,496
4,750
5,009
5 , 183

1
1
1
1
1

0,301
0,827
1,206
1,589
2,189

5
5
5
6
6

81
19
62
15
84

3,060
4,062
5,061
5,817
6,477

6,6
7,0
7,4
7,9
8 ,2

3
8
6
1
6

1
1
1
1
1

0
7
9
9
8

|
j

$2,099
2,249
2,405

0
7
6
1
4

2
2
0
6
9

j

,
,
,
,
,

8
9
3
0
6

5
7
5
6
9

8,0 0 3
8,367
8,591
8 ,832
9,303
1
1
1
1
1

,1
,6
,3
,0
,4

6
6
7
7
7

0,387
0,889
1,513
1,971
2,129

5,356
6,609
7,777
8,761
9,535

S tr u c tu r e s

4
4
5
6
6

12,482
13,000
13,283
13,692
14,347

,3
,6
,7
,0
,2

1

0
0
1
2
2

6
9
4
7
7

,053
,936
,809
,430
,942

2
2
3
3
3

,
,
,
,
,

i
|
I
|
|

3
3
4
4
4

,7
,8
,0
,2
,3

0 1
92
78
64
60

|
|

4
4
4
4
5

,4
,6
,6
,8
,0

7
3
9
6
4

8
3
2
0
3

5
5
5
6
6

,3
,6
,9
,3
,5

0
7
6
3
9

2
3
7
0
3

6
6
6
6
6

,7
,7
,7
,7
,8

0
7
4
6
5

7
3
9
3
3

j
j

j

|
|
|

5
7
0
2
5

3
5
4
8
1

3
5
4
4
4

I
2
2
2
2
2

5
6
6
7
8

,7
,3
,8
,5
,9

06
92
60
39
76

17,239
17,778
18,193
18,785
20,065

8
8
8
8
8

,4
,6
,6
,7
,9

67
14
67
53
11

2
2
2
2
2

0,249
0,676
0,876
1,284
2,446

13,541
13,902
14,127
14,520
15,592

|
I
|
|
|

____________ L

68

sector 28. Plastics and synthetic materials: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Equi pment

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k :

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$532
588
655

$375
417
467

$156
171
187

222
252
290
324
356

723
847
978
1,109
1,255

517
6 15
7 10
812
930

205
232
267
297
325

1, 172
1,368
1,607
1,790
1, 900

404
460
528
583
6 11

1,358
1,577
1,848
2,045
2,135

990
1, 159
1,368
1,518
1,590

367
4 17
479
526
545

0
3
0
0
7

2
2
2
2
3

,0
,2
,4
,7
,0

7
8
9
3
0

6
3
2
0
7

674
760
807
860
959

2
2
2
2
3

,3
,5
,7
,9
,3

2
6
6
9
0

5
4
2
0
0

1,726
1,890
2,052
2,240
2,464

598
674
7 10
750
836

43
25
18
04
27

3
4
4
4
5

,4
,0
,5
,8
,3

7
3
0
8
3

6
0
6
4
1

1,067
1,195
1,311
1 , 4 19
1,496

3
4
4
5
5

,8
,4
,9
,2
,7

0
0
0
9
0

5
6
8
4
8

2
3
3
4
4

,8
,3
,7
,0
,4

7
6
6
6
2

4
4
6
3
0

930
1,042
1,141
1,230
1,287

7,335
7,883
8,364
8,960
9,978

5
6
6
7
7

,74 1
,200
,604
,100
,9 4 1

1,594
1,682
1,760
1,860
2,037

6
6
6
7
8

,0
,5
,8
,3
,1

97
18
64
16
8 1

4
5
5
5
6

,7
,0
,3
,7
,4

3
8
7
5
6

3
7
9
4
7

1,364
1,430
1,485
1,561
1 , 7 14

$423
475
538

$ 166
183
20 1

824
966
1,118
1,272
1,444

60 1
7 14
827
948
1,088

1,577
1,829
2,135
2,374
2,511

65
89
52
57
105

2
3
3
3
3

,7
,0
,3
,5
,9

5
4
0
9
6

1 14
135
125
1 18
88

4
5
5
6
6

,5
,2
,8
,3
,8

111
104
94
119
198

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

§139
76
90

$95
59
70

$43
17
19

$589
658
739

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 4 ---------

95
155
166
173
194

73
124
127
138
160

21
30
39
35
33

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
. . . .
. . . .
_____

158
28 1
342
279
183

108
224
27 1
222
153

49
57
70
57
30

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

. . . .
_____
_____
_____
_____

292
353
326
369
465

226
264
274
311
360

1 9 6 5 ....
1966 . . . .
1 9 6 7 _____
1968. . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

676
795
7 18
627
678

562
659
593
508
590

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 _____
1972. . . .
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 ---------

681
740
694
830
1,277

570
636
600
7 1 1
1,078

Net

s to c k s

Sector 28. Plastics and synthetic materials: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$323
162
189

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$227
127
148

$95
34
40

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$1,753
1,891
2,0 5 1
2
2
2
2
3

,2
,4
,7
,9
,2

$1,216
1,322
1,446

1
2
5
6
2

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$537
568
604

$1,061
1,137
1,228

$492
516
546

646
699
765
823
879

1,890
2,085
2,287
2,484
2,702

1,310
1,461
1,606
1,757
1, 932

579
624
680
727
770

194
282
30 1
308
34 1

149
225
230
246
281

44
56
70
62
60

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

270
440
505
406
263

180
344
393
3 12
212

89
95
111
93
50

3,426
3,779
4 , 185
4,48 1

4,622

2
2
3
3
3

,462
,726
,029
,240
,3 4 0

963
1,052
1,156
1,241
1,282

2,836
3 , 128
3,469
3,695
3,763

1,995
2,212
2,465
2,624
2,670

84 1
9 16
1,004
1,071
1,093

1960
196 1
1962
19 6 3
1964

--------_____
--------_____
_____

415
505
455
508
64 1

305
357
370
4 15
474

109
148
85
92
166

4
5
5
5
6

03
60
54
85
36

3
3
3
4
4

,5
,7
,9
,2
,5

2
4
6
2
2

1
1
1
1
1

,380
,515
,585
,661
,808

3
4
4
4
5

,9
,2
,4
,7
,0

7
5
6
2
8

0
3
8
0
8

2
2
3
3
3

,7
,9
,1
,3
,5

9
6
3
3
7

8
6
3
2
6

1,172
1,286
1,334
1,388
1,511

5
5
6
6
7

,0
,7
,2
,5
,0

74
10
23
89
12

1, 963
2,138
2,287
2 , 4 18
2,495

5
6
6
7
7

,7
,4
,9
,3
,7

0
1
7
5
3

2
9
5
6
3

4
4
5
5
5

,0
,6
,0
,3
,6

60
27
6 1
39
67

1,642
1,792
1,914
2 , 0 17
2,065

2
2
2
2
2

8,048
8,36 1
8,575
8,866
9 , 4 18

5
6
6
6
7

,9
,1
,3
,6
,1

21
94
84
39
14

2 , 126
2 , 167
2,190
2,2 2 6
2,303

1 9 6 5 _____
1966 . . . .
1 9 6 7 _____
1968. .. .
1 9 6 9 _____

906
1,033
900
751
772

729
834
723
591
663

176
199
176
160
109

7,037
7,849
8,5 1 1
9,007
9,507

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

739
765
694
80 1
1,093

6 12
656
600
690
938

126
109
94
1 10
155

1,564
1,753
1 , 939
2,1332,352

$1,553
1,654
1,774

1 9 5 0 --------1 9 5 1 --------1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 4 ---------

,9
,2
,5
,8
,3

1
5
0
5
3

S tr u c tu r e s

9,953
10,404
10,762
11,203
11,911

_____
_____
--------_____
_____




7,36
7,74
8,05
8,42
9,02

2
4
8
4
8

8
8
3
9
9

_______ _________

69

,5
,6
,7
,7
,8

8
5
0
7
8

5
6
8
4
1

_______

Sector 29. Drugs, cleaning and toilet preparations: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

$ 140
98
100

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

------------------------------------ 1
E qu ip m e nt
I

$73
54
56

I
I
I

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$548
638
730

$66
44
44

Net

s to c k s

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

$251
294
337

$296
344
393

s to c k s

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$263
303
342

$496
576
655

$233
273
313

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1 18
218
150
135
105

76
13 1
98
81
70

|
I
|
I
I

4 1
86
5 1
54
35

837
1, 042
1,176
1,293
1,375

460
580
665
729
779

376
46 1
511
563
596

747
935
1,048
1,14 1
1,196

399
506
575
621
651

348
429
473
519
544

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
. . . .
_____
_____

95
137
157
155
164

66
93
106
99
95

|
I
I
|

28
43
50
56
69

1,444
1,549
1,669
1,782
1,897

821
886
958
1,018
1, 068

622
663
7 11
764
829

1,236
1,312
1,401
1,482
1,565

673
717
768
807
837

563
595
632
674
727

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
-----------------

167
173
178
202
191

94
105
120
123
124

1
I
I
|

72
67
58
78
66

2
2
2
2
2

,009
, 120
,231
,360
,47 1

1,111
1, 160
1,219
1,276
1,329

898
960
1,012
1,084
1, 142

1
1
1
1
1

,644
,723
,802
,898
,978

861
893
935
977
1,016

1 9 6 5 ....
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 _____

243
270
351
363
429

142
172
207
212
239

|

10 1
97
143
15 1
189

2
2
3
3
3

,6
,8
,0
,3
,6

8
6
8
8
8

1,395
1,487
1 , 6 11
1,736
1,885

1,233
1,318
1,447
1,582
1,752

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,2
,4
,6
,9

0
4
6
9
7

3
9
8
2
2

1,069
1, 148
1,258
1,368
1,499

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

560
5 17
482
486
630

332
320
339
316
394

I
I
|
I

227
196
143
170
235

4,083
4,479
4,832
5 , 182
5,665

2 , 125
2,348
2,585
2,794
3,073

1, 958
2,130
2,247
2,388
2,5 9 1

3
3
4
4
4

,3
,7
,0
,2
,7

73
16
09
91
00

1 , 7 16
1,911
2,113
2,280
2,511

1,656
1,804
1,896
2,0 1 1
2 , 188

I

2
0
5
1
3

782
830
866
92 1
96 1
,0
,1
,2
,3
,4

3
0
0
2
7

4
0
9
3
3

Sector 29. Drugs, cleaning and toilet preparations: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1
|

Equi p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

________________ 1
-------1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$ 3 10
20 1
202

|
|
|
j

$ 163
1 12
1 12

$ 147
88
90

$1,586
1,762
1,935

$775
869
959

$8 11
892
975

$1,406
1,553
1,694

$677
751
8 18

$729
802
875

1,856
2 , 166
2,334
2,463
2,527

9 13
1,083
1 , 182
1,239
1,267

942
1,082
1,152
1,224
1,260

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

233
390
26 1
234
179

|
|
I
|
|

147
229
169
136
116

85
160
92
97
63

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,4
,7
,8
,9

3
8
0
8
9

4
5
0
1
9

1,081
1,279
1,411
1,503
1,566

1
1
1
1
1

,0
,2
,2
,3
,4

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

158
2 11
227
227
242

|
I
I
|
|

107
139
147
136
127

5 1
72
80
9 1
1 14

3
3
3
3
3

,0
,2
,3
,4
,6

86
17
52
77
05

1 , 6 12
1,681
1,749
1,796
1,823

1
1
1
1
1

,474
,535
,603
,681
,782

2
2
2
2
2

,5
,6
,7
,7
,8

60
35
16
87
64

1,277
1,312
1,347
1,364
1,367

1
1
1
1
1

,282
,323
,368
,422
,497

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

245
249
251
285
263

|
|
I
I
|

123
137
156
158
157

121
111
95
127
105

3,726
3,840
3,949
4,082
4 , 185

1
1
1
1
1

1,886
1, 979
2,053
2 , 155
2,233

2
3
3
3
3

,9
,0
,0
,1
,2

3
0
7
6
2

6
5
0
2
7

1,362
1,367
1,389
1,411
1,430

1
1
1
1
1

,5
,6
,6
,7
,7

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

333
353
446
445
500

I
|
I
|
|

177
2 10
243
24 1
266

155
143
202
204
233

4
4
4
5
5

,3
,5
,7
,0
,3

5
2
9
5
6

0
9
5
5
5

1,994
2,067
2,17 1
2,272
2,399

2
2
2
2
2

,3
,4
,6
,7
,9

5
6
2
8
6

6
2
3
2
6

3
3
3
3
4

,357
,502
,733
,956
,226

1,469
1,538
1,640
1,735
1,852

1,888
1,963
2,093
2,221
2,374

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

6 12
534
482
468
536

|
|
|
|
|

354
327
339
310
352

258
206
143
157
184

5
6
6
6
6

,7
,1
,3
,6
,9

8
1
8
4
5

2
5
9
2
3

2
2
2
3
3

3
3
3
3
3

,1
,3
,3
,4
,5

6
1
9
8
9

9
6
6
5
7

4
4
5
5
5

,5
,8
,0
,2
,5

2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2

_______________ ________________ I____




70

,839
,861
,895
,926
,952

,6
,7
,9
,1
,3

13
98
93
56
55

5
0
8
7
3

3
5
9
8
2

9
7
9
8
2

8
9
6
3
5

,051
,215
,382
,509
,666

,5
,6
,7
,7
,8

7
3
8
5
9

3
7
0
1
7

47
64
13
74
58

_

Sector 30. Paints and allied products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

I

S tr u c tu r e s

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

T o ta l

Equi pment

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

$53
80
9 1

$49
73
83

$96
145
164

$49
74
84

$47
70
79

11
10

194
228
247
270
290

102
122
133
144
155

91
105
1 14
125
135

179
209
224
24 1
256

92
109
117
124
13 1

86
99
107
117
124

|
|
I
I
|

6
9
9
15
7

307
332
353
379
393

166
182
195
206
2 14

140
149
158
173
179

267
284
299
318
325

138
149
158
164
167

128
135
14 1
154
157

I
i
I
I
I
|
|
|
I
|

7
6
9
12
11

409
424
440
462
434

223
232
240
252
264

186
191
199
2 10
2 19

333
34 1
349
365
38 1

172
178
182
19 1
20 1

160
162
166
174
179

27
23
27
18
23

527
569
6 16
660
704

283
304
328
357
383

244
264
288
302
321

4 18
453
494
531
567

217
237
258
284
307

200
216
236
246
260

I
|
|
j
I
|

30
20
26
2 1
40

791
829
887
933
1 , 025

445
469
506
539
598

345
360
380
394
427

646
675
72 1
757
836

365
383
4 13
438
488

281
291
308
3 18
347

1 9 4 7 ....
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 ---------

$38
52
23

$20
27
12

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 ....
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 ---------

20
36
22
26
24

12
21
12
14
14

_____
. . . .
_____
. . . .
_____

21
30
28
34
22

15
20
19
18
15

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

25
26
28
37
37

18
19
19
24
25

1 9 6 5 ....
1966 . . . .
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 ....
1 9 6 9 _____

60
60
66
64
65

33
36
39
45
42

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ....
1973.. . .
1 9 7 4 _____

109
62
82
73
120

79
4 1
55
51
79

$102
153
175

8
14
9

l
|
I
I
|
|

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

$17
24
10

I
|
|

___ |___

_________

________________

Sector 30. Paints and allied products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
Gross

i nvestm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

I
|

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu re s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1949. .. .

$86
108
48

I
I
|
I

$47
60
26

$39
48
21

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
19 5 3 . . . .
1954. . . .

41
65
39
45
42

I
I
I
I
|
j

24
38
22
25
24

17
27
16
20
18

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
. . . .
_____

36
47
42
51
33

|
I
I
|
|

25
3 1
27
25
2 1

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

36
37
40
52
51

|
|
|
|
I
j

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

83
79
85
77
75
1 18
64
82
70
10 1

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 ... .
1 9 7 3 _____
1974 . . . .

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$286
39 1
435

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$ 138
196
219

$148
195
215

472
532
565
603
636

240
275
293
3 12
328

231
257
272
29 1
307

428
479
50 1
527
548

214
243
253
263
27 1

213
236
248
264
276

11
15
14
25
12

66 1
695
722
755
769

344
364
378
389
392

317
33 1
343
366
376

560
580
594
6 14
6 14

278
289
296
298
294

28 1
290
298
3 16
319

25
26
25
32
33

11
10
14
20
18

783
795
808
829
848

398
402
404
4 10
416

385
393
403
4 18
431

6 15
6 15
6 17
630
64 0

294
293
291
295
300

321
322
325
334
339

I
|
|
|
|

42
45
46
52
47

4 1
34
38
25
28

897
940
988
1, 027
1,063

430
447
465
489
507

466
492
522
537
555

682
7 19
760
792
82 1

314
332
350
374
391

367
386
4 10
4 18
429

|
|
I
|
|

84
42
55
50
69

34
21
26
20
3 1

1, 140
1, 163
1,203
1,229
1,284

563
578
605
627
667

577
585
597
60 1
6 16

891
905
935
951
995

445
456
479
494
527

445
448
456
456
468

________________ 1
_____




$262
362
399

$126
180
199

_____________________

71

$136
18 1
200

Sector 31. Petroleum refining: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

|
E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

I

S tr u c tu re s

$4,001
4,427
4 , 7 19

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$3,092
3,481
3,733

$2,735
3,038
3,248

$1,266
1,388
1,471

Equ i p m e n t

$1,061
1,152
1,201

S tr u c tu r e s

$2,031
2,3 2 9
2,532

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$348
552
427

$58
160
127

!
|

$289
391
299

1 9 5 0 _____
1951. .. .
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

273
355
464
677
704

103
159
235
243
247

I
I
I
|

169
195
228
433
457

4
5
5
5
6

,8
,0
,3
,8
,3

4
4
4
5
8

7
7
8
5
4

1,521
1 , 6 18
1,784
1 , 952
2,118

3
3
3
3
4

,3
,4
,5
,9
,2

2
2
6
0
6

6
9
3
3
5

3
3
4
4
5

,821
,983
,247
, 7 14
, 198

1
1
1
1
1

18
84
20
57
89

2
2
2
3
3

,602
,698
,826
, 157
,508

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1958. .. .
1 9 5 9 ---------

603
708
900
688
433

176
176
278
159
148

I
I
I
I
|

427
532
621
529
285

6
7
8
8
8

,8
,3
,0
,5
,7

0
2
2
0
2

5
3
6
9
8

2
2
2
2
2

,
,
,
,
,

2
2
4
5
5

0
8
5
0
2

5
5
7
1
3

4
5
5
6
6

,5
,0
,5
,0
,2

9
3
6
0
0

9
8
8
7
5

5
6
6
7
7

,5
,0
,6
,0
,2

6
3
7
8
2

1,741
1,786
1 , 926
1,935
1,928

3
4
4
5
5

,826
,243
,744
, 145
,295

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
. . . .
_____

485
495
480
414
413

130
127
182
130
146

|
I
I
|

355
368
298
284
267

8,991
9,257
9,500
9,668
9,828

2
2
2
2
2

,
,
,
,
,

5
5
5
5
4

1
0
3
1
9

8
2
5
0
6

6
6
6
7
7

,473
,754
,965
, 158
,331

7
7
7
7
7

,4
,5
,7
,8
,8

05
85
37
11
74

1
1
1
1
1

97
59
74
33
08

5
5
5
5
6

,
,
,
,
,

5
7
8
9
0

0
2
6
7
6

7
5
3
7
5

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 --------1968. .. .
1 9 6 9 _____

604
669
1,000
1,065
1,072

180
254
439
644
522

I
I
I
|

424
4 15
560
42 1
549

10,172
10,573
11,296
12,073
12,844

2
2
2
3
3

,5
,6
,8
,3
,6

1
0
7
4
9

4
2
3
7
6

7,
7,
8 ,
8 ,
9,

8,116
8 , 4 11
9,020
9,674
10,307

1,816
1,898
2 , 163
2,626
2,957

6
6
6
7
7

,3
,5
,8
,0
,3

0
1
5
4
5

0
2
7
7
0

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1,218
1,305
1, 155
1,107
1,846

547
553
529
637
1,047

|
|
|
|

670
75 1
625
470
798

1
1
1
1
1

4
4
4
5
6

,0
,4
,7
,2
,0

7
4
9
3
8

0
6
3
8
1

11,0
1 1,8
12,4
13,0
14,2

3
3
3
4
5

7,758
8,230
8,557
8,7 1 3
9 , 183

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

3
4
5
6
7

,7
,7
,5
,2
,6

48
20
20
46
79

>

1
1
1
1

658
970
422
725
147

9,677
0,274
0,727
1,008
1,598

5
6
8
1
4

7
0
0
1
3

9
4
2
4
4

,2
,2
,4
,5
,6

,8
,8
,8
,8
,8

,3
,6
,9
,3
,0

0
3
2
0
6

0
4
4
0
1

_______________________

_____________________

Sector 31. Petroleum refining: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$764
1,096
851

$121
3 14
24 0

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1954. . . .

544
627
793
1,166
1,223

19 1
265
385
392
392

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

1
1
1
1

,047
,135
,358
,077
665

270
248
37 1
209
189

756
775
7 19
623
606

165
16 1
230
164
182

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

877
920
1,312
1,310
1,267

225
310
523
740
580

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1,345
1,355
1, 155
1,060
1,559

582
564
529
624
935




!
I

|
|

S tr u c tu r e s

$643
782
6 10

T o ta l

Equi pment

$14,607
15,154
15,436

|
|

S tr u c tu r e s

$11,256
11,595
11,764

352
362
407
774
830

1
1
1
1
1

,391
,408
,574
,101
,674

3
3
4
4
4

,7
,8
,0
,1
,3

14
10
09
99
77

|
|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

1,676
1,598
1,565
1, 9 0 2
2,297

777
886
986
867
475

17,062
17,526
18,204
18,594
18,566

4
4
4
4
4

,4
,4
,5
,4
,3

1
2
3
7
7

9
4
7
2
3

|
|
|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

2,643
3,101
3,667
4,122
4,193

|

591
6 14
488
458
423

18,626
18,705
18,729
18,661
18,583

4
4
4
3
3

,2
,0
,0
,8
,7

3
9
1
7
5

8
3
6
4
4

|

14,388
14,611
14,713
14,787
14,829

|
|
|
|

652
6 10
789
569
686

18,783
19,032
19,678
20,321
20,919

3,68
3,70
3,94
4,40
4,70

3
2
0
2
8

|
|
|
|

15,100
15,330
15,737
15,918
16,210

762
791
625
436
623

2
2
2
2
2

5
5
5
5
6

4
3
9
6
5

|
|
|
|
|

16,569
16,942
1 7, 129
17,107
17,253

j
j

I
|
|
j
|
|

|
|
|
I
I
___ l _

5
5
5
6
6

$3,351
3,558
3,672

1
|

1
2
2
3
3

,5
,2
,7
,0
,8

9
6
1
5
5

3
6
9
4
8

,0
,3
,5
,9
,6

2
2
8
4
0

|
|

_____________ L

72

T o ta l

I
I
I
I
1
1

$10,696
1 1, 184
11,404

$2,779
2,905
2,937

S tr u c tu r e s

$7,917
8 ,278
8,467

1,301
1,272
1,402
1,898
2,441

2
2
3
3
3

,9
,9
,0
,1
,3

02
29
65
98
20

8,398
8 ,3 4 3
8,336
8,700
9 , 120

12,797
13,232
13,882
14,240
14,178

3
3
3
3
3

,3
,2
,3
,2
,1

11
7 1
48
55
4 1

9,486
9,96 1
10,534
10,984
11,037

14,207
14,252
14,240
14,131
14,007

3
2
2
2
2

,0
,8
,8
,6
,5

0
6
0
7
8

3
5
2
9
2

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

,2
,3
,4
,4
,4

03
86
38
52
25

j
I
i

14,154
14,340
14,910
15,461
15,949

2
2
2
3
3

,5
,5
,8
,3
,6

3
8
4
2
3

5
0
3
3
5

11
11
12
12
12

,6
,7
,0
,1
,3

19
59
66
38
13

I
I
I
I

1
1
1
1
1

3
4
4
4
5

,943
,220
,447
,7 5 1
,344

I

I
I
I

I

1
1
1
1
1

Equ i p m e n t

6,491
7,016
7,308
7,475
8,107

_________

12,548
12,795
12,860
12,723
12,762

Sector 32. Rubber and miscellaneous plastic products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
G ross

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu r e s

s to c k ;

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

Net

s to c k s

S tr u c tu r e s

$ 6 18
7 16
788

$431
5 10
563

$186
206
224

$533
623
684

$381
45 1
495

$152
171
189

893
,026
,175
,322
,468

652
763
882
1,003
1, 129

241
262
293
319
338

776
892
1,021
1, 145
1,263

57 1
668
767
867
968

204
224
253
277
295

33
33
4 1
33
43

1,616
1,801
1,981
2 , 129
2,305

1,249
1,406
1,549
1,668
1,806

367
395
432
46 1
499

1,381
1,531
1,674
1,781
1,913

1,060
1, 186
1,295
1,378
1,477

320
345
379
403
436

248
237
300
286
324

50
54
49
53
70

2
2
3
3
3

,5
,7
,0
,2
,5

4
6
4
9
9

1,999
2 , 174
2,402
2,608
2,842

544
594
638
686
75 1

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,2
,5
,7
,9

1,632
1,767
1,953
2,116
2,304

475
517
553
592
647

j
I
i
I
I

428
494
547
592
699

84
92
131
188
159

4
4
5
5
6

,
,
,
,
,

00
69
19
59
65

3
3
3
4
5

,17 1
,555
,982
,444
,001

829
9 14
1,036
1,215
1,363

3
3
4
4
5

,299
,704
, 183
,743
,357

|
I
I
|
|

656
579
816
1,028
1, 124

7,019
7,577
8,382
9,454
10,675

5
5
6
7
8

,5
,9
,5
,3
,2

1,515
1,662
1,834
2,079
2,397

5,90
6,34
7,02
7,95
9,00

1947 . . . .
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

$144
112
87

I
|
|

$100
88
64

$44
24
23

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
1952. . . .
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 4 ---------

120
149
168
168
170

I
I
I
I
I

99
123
132
137
145

21
25
36
30
24

1
1
1
1

1955. . . .
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 ---------

176
2 17
218
192
226

|
|
I
I
|

143
184
176
158
183

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1962. . . .
1963.. . .
1 9 6 4 _____

298
292
349
340
394

|
I
i
I
I

1965. . . .
1966 . . . .
1 9 6 7 ....
1968. . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

513
587
678
780
858

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1972. . . .
1 9 7 3 ... .
1 9 7 4 _____

8 19
740
1,003
1,289
1,461

163
160
186
26 1
336

0
4
0
6
3

4
8
1
4
3

0
1
4
7
7

3
4
7
4
8

0
8
0
0
5

8
4
7
8
1

2
2
3
3
4

7 14
787
897
1,061
1,193

4
4
5
6
6

6
7
3
0
7

,585
, 9 17
,286
,681
,164
,579
,892
,417
, 122
,886

1,327
1,455
1,606
1,827
2 , 120

________________ I____

Sector 32. Rubber and miscellaneous plastic products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
r
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$36 1
258
192

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$263
209
144

$97
48
47

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$ 1,857
2,061
2 , 199

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

$1,189
1,365
1,478

$668
695
721
744
770
8 12
846
868

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,1
,3
,5
,7

Equi pment

$1,539
1,725
1,838

S tr u c tu r e s

|
|
|

$1,030
1,190
1,278

$508
535
560

07
93
94
81
5 3

|
|
I
I
i

1,425
1,585
1,746
1,900
2,052

582
607
648
680
700
736
767
808
837
88 1

1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

255
280
308
304
303

211
233
244
250
259

43
47
64
54
44

2
2
2
3
3

,3
,6
,8
,1
,3

99
21
67
03
31

1,655
1,851
2,054
2,257
2,462

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

302
338
321
28 1
326

242
283
254
226
255

59
55
66
54
71

3
3
4
4
4

,5
,7
,0
,1
,3

4
9
0
7
6

9
3
8
0
2

2
2
3
3
3

,6
,8
,0
,1
,2

4
5
2
4
8

2
1
0
8
8

907
94 1
987
1,022
1, 073

2
3
3
3
3

,9
,0
,2
,3
,4

1
8
3
2
5

0
9
6
8
2

I
|
j
|
|

2
2
2
2
2

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

4 18
407
475
463
532

335
316
394
377
420

83
90
80
86
111

4
4
5
5
5

,6
,8
,1
,4
,7

3
7
6
2
5

0
0
3
9
0

3
3
3
4
4

,4
,6
,8
,0
,3

9
6
9
9
2

2
2
4
4
4

1
1
1
1
1

,137
,208
,269
,335
,426

3
3
4
4
4

,6
,8
,0
,2
,5

5
2
5
6
2

3
8
9
4
5

|
I
|
|
|

2 , 7 17
2,832
3 , 0 13
3 , 165
3,350

936
996
1,046
1,098
1,175

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

--------_____
_____
_____
_____

672
746
836
935
973

542
6 10
65 1
68 1
777

129
135
184
254
196

6
6
7
7
8

,1
,7
,2
,9
,6

9
0
9
6
6

7
6
2
6
7

4
5
5
5
6

,6
,0
,4
,9
,4

6
5
8
3
6

3
9
6
2
5

1,534
1,646
1,806
2,034
2,202

4
5
5
6
7

,9
,3
,8
,4
,0

1
5
7
6
7

2
6
3
8
8

|
|
|
I
|

3,645
3,994
4,369
4,757
5,222

1,267
1,362
1,503
1 , 7 10
1,856

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

876
754
1,003
1,240
1,258

690
585
816
998
995

185
169
186
242
262

9,260
9 , 7 16
10,406
11,316
12,221

6
7
7
8
9

,9
,2
,7
,4
,1

01
2 1
58
63
46

2
2
2
2
3

7
7
8
9
9

,5
,9
,4
,2
,9

6
0
6
3
7

5
4
5
0
4

|
I
|
I
|

5
5
6
6
7

1,987
2,098
2,223
2,399
2,592

_______ _________




73

,
,
,
,
,

3
4
6
8
0

5
9
4
5
7

8
5
7
2
5

_________

I

,1
,3
,4
,4
,5

,5
,8
,2
,8
,3

7
2
2
9
7

7
0
4
3
8

3
2
7
1
0

8
6
1
0
1

Sector 33. Leather tanning: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross
Year

i nvestm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

_____________________________________ L
T o ta l

|

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu r e s

j

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$11
18
12

|
I
|

$7
11
7

$3
6
4

$55
7 1
80

$30
4 1
47

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

8
8
5
8
8

I
I
|
I
I

6
6
3
5
5

2
2
1
2
2

86
9 1
93
98
102

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

7
7
7
8
8

i
|
|
I
I
I

5
5
6
6
6

2

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

7
5
8
7
8

j
I
j
|
I

5
4
6
6
7

1
1
1

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

12
18
17
17
15

|
I
|
|
|

10
12
12
12
11

2
5
5
5
3

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

13
18
17
13
14

I
|
|
|
|

11
14
13
10
10

2
3
4
3
3

S tr u c tu r e s

1
1
2
2
1
1

__________ 1 __
_

I

i
I

!
I
I

|
I

I
I
I

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$24
30
33

$44
59
68

52
56
59
62
66

33
34
34
35
36

73
77
77
81
84

45
49
49
52
53

27
28
28
28
30

106
109
1 12
1 16
1 19

68
70
73
76
79

37
38
38
39
40

35
87
89
9 1
93

55
55
57
58
60

30
31
31
32
33

12 1
12 1
123
123
125

80
80
8 1
82
83

4 1
40
4 1
4 1
4 1

93
9 1
92
91
92

59
58
59
59
60

33
32
32
32
32

130
14 1
151
16 1
168

87
94
100
106
1 12

42
46
5 1
54
56

97
107
1 17
126
132

64
7 1
77
83
88

32
35
39
42
43

174
185
194
199
205

1 17
126
133
136
140

57
59
6 1
62
64

137
146
153
157
160

_____________ L

$26
36
4 1

92
100
106
108
110

$ 18
23
26

44
45
47
48
49

___ _____________

Sector 33. Leather tanning: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
---------------------------- r

—
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
E quipm ent

T o ta l

i
1

S tr u c tu r e s

1
$8
13
8

r
|
|
j

|
|
I
|
I

«
3
1
3

8
7

I
|

8
9

I

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 --------1 9 4 9 ....

$26
39
24

$ 18

16

I
!

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

17
14
8
13
13

13
10
6
10
9

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

12
10
11
12
11

8

I

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

. . . .
_____
_____
--------_____

9
7
11
9
11

7
6
8
3
9

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

. . . .
_____
_____
_____
_____

16
24
22
21
17

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

14
19
17
13
12




r
1

T o ta l

I

E quipm ent

S tr u c tu r e s

i

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$ 188
218
234

|
|
j

$90
1 12
125

$97
105

j

|

$ 14 1
17 1
186

$74
96
106

$66
75

109

j
I
j
1

242
248
247
250
254

I
|
|
I
|

134
140
142
147
150

108
107
104
103
103

|
|
j
I
|

193
196
192
194
195

113
1 17
1 16
1 18
1 18

79
78
76
76
76

3
2
2
3
3

I
1
1
1
I

255
254
253
253
252

I
|
|
I
|

152
153
153
154
154

102
10 1
99
99
98

194
19 1
188
186
183

1 17
115
113
112
110

76
75
74
74
73

I

2
i

I
j

I
I
I

2
1

1
|

2

I

249
242
238
233
229

|
I
I
|
|

15 1
147
144
140
137

97
95
94
92
91

178
17 1
167
162
158

106
10 1
98
95
93

72
70
68
66
65

13
16
14
14
13

|
|
|
I
|

2
7
7
6
4

I
I
I
I
I

229
238
245
252
255

|
|
|
I
|

138
142
146
149
15 1

91
95
99
103
103

160
170
178
186
189

96
102
106
111
1 14

64
68
72
74
74

11
15
13
10
9

I
I
I
1

2
4
4
3

I
I
I
I
I

255
26 1
264
264
263

|
I
|
I
I

153
158
162
163
163

102
102
102
10 1
99

190
195
198
197
194

1 16
121
125
124
123

73
73
73
72
70

26

_____________________ 1
____

2
__________ L _______________I____

74

_____________________

I
I

|
|
I

I
|
|
|

|

j

l

79

Sector 34. Footwear and other leather products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
—
T o ta l

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

Equ i p m e n t

$ 111
117
122

$ 182
192
199

S tr u c tu r e s

$70
74
77

$138
146
152

$96
100
103

264
270
274
28 1
292

160
166
170
176
183

104
104
104
105
108

206
209
2 11
2 16
223

128
131
133
136
141

77
78
78
79
81

6
7
6
5
5

310
329
34 1
35 1
363

199
2 13
223
231
24 1

m
115
1 17
1 19
121

240
256
265
272
280

155
167
174
179
186

84
88
9 1
92
94

23
21
2 1
23
22

5
9
7
5
8

376
389
40 1
4 11
423

252
26 1
269
277
283

123
128
132
134
139

290
300
309
3 16
325

194
200
205
211
216

95
100
103
104
108

36
45
46
63
50

27
30
3 1
42
34

8
14
15
20
16

439
464
490
53 1
560

295
310
324
349
366

143
154
165
181
194

338
359
38 1
419
443

226
238
249
272
285

1 12
121
131
147
158

51
54
59
69
63

35
4 1
43
47
4 1

15
12
15
21
22

588
6 19
654
697
734

383
405
428
454
473

205
213
225
242
260

466
49 1
5 19
556
586

298
316
335
356
370

167
174
184
199
215

$22
21
20

$17
14
13

----------------_____
. . . .
_____

19
17
15
19
22

15
12
11
14
16

4
4
4
4
6

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1958. .. .
1 9 5 9 _____

32
32
26
24
27

25
24
20
18
21

1 9 6 0 --------1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 --------1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

29
30
29
29
30

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
. . . .
. . . .
_____

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

$234
246
256

$5
7
6

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 ....
1 9 4 9 _____
1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

_________ __________

Sector 34. Footwear and other leather products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

—

-------------- r
Gross

i nvestm e n t

G ross

i

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 --------1 9 4 9 _____

$50
44
40

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
. . . .

37
30
27
33
38

1955. .. .
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 _____
1 9 5 9 _____

53
50
33
35
38

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
---------

40
44
40
39
42

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1967 . . . .
1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 ---------

47
59
58
76
58

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

55
56
59
66
53

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

i
I

|
|
|

|
|
|
|
|
|
I
|
I
|
I

E qu ip m e nt

$38
29
26

I

35
38
37
48
38

I
|
|




|

41
37
28
26
29

|
|
I
|
|
|

S tr u c tu r e s

I

I
|

|

r

|
|

29
22
20
24
27

32
29
29
30
28

|
|

i
I

37
42
43
45
36

|
I
|
|
I
I

|
I
I
I

|

|

|
|
I
|

|
|
I

_______ I_

$ n
19
13
8
7
7
8
11

|
i
I

|
I

|

i

11
12
9
9
s

i

8
14

I
I

11
9
13

|

12
20
21
27
20
17
13
15
20
17

I
I

I
I

I
I
I

|
|

|
I
|
|

T o ta l

Net

s to c k s

E qu ip m e nt

I
|

S tr u c tu r e s

|

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$812
8 19
823

$392
402
408

I
|

$419
4 17
4 14

$60 1
606
606

$308
314
316

$293
292
289

822
814
802
795
792

416
4 17
415
4 15
4 18

|
|
I
|

406
397
387
379
374

603
59 1
577
567
562

321
3 17
311
308
307

282
273
265
258
254

803
8 1 1
805
797
79 1

434
445
446
445
447

369
365
358
351
344

573
579
573
564
558

321
329
328
324
323

25 1
250
245
240
235

787
785
778
77 1
767

449
448
445
444
441

337
336
333
327
326

554
554
550
546
545

324
323
321
320
319

230
23 1
229
225
226

769
783
798
831
847

445
453
460
479
487

|

324
330
338
352
359

550
567
583
6 17
632

324
333
340
359
366

226
234
243
258
266

859
873
889
9 12
922

495
508
521
536
54 1

|
|
|

363
364
367
375
381

644
656
670
691
698

372
383
394
406
408

27 1
272
276
284
290

|
|
|
|
|
|
|

|

|

__________ L_

75

________ __________ ___________

Sector 35. Glass and glass products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu re s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

Net

s to c k s

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

$137
150
155

376
435
465
507
560

212
252
276
304
340

164
183
188
202
219

287
34 1
385
4 10
438

632
785
934
984
1,046

385
488
596
623
663

246
297
338
360
383

857
929
1,004
1,060
1,144

47 1
513
534
557
591

1, 123
1,211
1,281
1,332
1,421

7 12
764
8 19
854
917

410
446
46 1
477
503

1,874
2 , 146
2,320
2,453
2,663

1,244
1,445
1,573
1,671
1,818

629
700
747
782
845

1,529
1,770
1,909
2,005
2 , 176

1
1
1
1

2
3
3
3
3

1 , 978
2,091
2,255
2,495
2,746

907
974
1,019
1,105
1,166

2
2
2
2
3

1,596
1,678
1 , 8 10
2 , 0 16
2,228

450
515
552
60 1
664

253
298
328
362
405

196
216
223
239
258

33
58
48
30
31

746
9 11
1,076
1,144
1,227

458
570
691
733
789

90
97
104
90
122

37
46
26
28
39

1,3
1,4
1,5
1,6
1,7

28
42
38
18
36

188
327
235
200
283

143
249
181
156
211

44
78
53
43
72

303
269
307
431
425

231
192
249
332
349

72
77
58
99
75

$283
324
34 1

$166
180
186

$73
55
32

$39
37
22

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
1952 . . . .
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

52
77
50
64
77

38
53
39
44
54

13
24
11
19
23

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1 9 5 7 _____
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

99
183
184
89
106

66
125
136
59
74

1960
1961
1962
1963
1964

--------_____
_____
--------_____

127
143
131
1 18
162

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

--------. . . .
_____
_____
_____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

$146
174
185

$176
207
222

$343
387
409

$33
17
10

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

s to c k s

,885
,066
,275
,60 1
, 9 13

,3
,4
,6
,9
,1

5
9
5
3
9

7
4
9
8
8

533
596
633
658
710

995
,173
,276
,346
,465

76 1
815
848
921
969

Sector 35. Glass and glass products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

Equi pment

$172
12 1
68

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$98
86
48

$73
34
20

$1,135
1,218
1,246

79
98
70
79
95

28
44
19
35
41

S tr u c tu r e s

$522
586
6 11

$ 6 13
63 1
634

1,312
1 , 4 12
1,455
1,520
1,606

666
738
779
827
888

T o ta l

E quipm ent

$897
970
988

$ 4 18
476
492

646
673
675
693
7 17

1,041
1, 128
1, 157
1,209
1,279

537
599
629
665
7 15

1
1
1
1
1

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

107
143
90
115
137

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

17 1
289
273
133
156

m
192
197
84
103

59
96
76
49
52

1,723
1, 955
2,170
2,242
2,333

963
1,117
1,273
1,314
1,371

759
837
896
927
962

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

183
208
183
166
224

121
13 1
139
120
16 1

61
77
43
45
62

2
2
2
2
2

,446
,578
,678
,754
,881

1,441
1 , 5 15
1,591
1,641
1,727

1,005
1,063
1, 087
1,112
1,153

1 , 967
2,065
2,130
2,17 1
2,263

1,1
1,1
1,2
1,2
1,3

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

251
426
294
238
325

184
3 11
218
180
235

67
1 14
75
58
90

3
3
3
3
3

,0
,3
,5
,6
,8

1,829
2,052
2,177
2,257
2,3 8 6

1, 199
1,291
1,343
1,377
1,442

2
2
2
2
3

1
1
1
1
1

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

328
277
307
4 14
366

246
196
249
322
307

81
81
58
92
59

2
2
2
2
3

1
1
1
1
1

3 , 170
3,257
3,364
3,570
3 , 7 16

2
4
2
3
2

8
3
0
5
8

4 , 0 17
4 , 146
4,296
4,546
4,740

20
96
18
08
76

,4
,5
,5
,6
,6

97
49
77
38
63

,3
,6
,7
,8
,0

7
5
9
7
2

7
8
7
1
4

777
916
1,054
1,072
1,105

76

S tr u c tu r e s

|
|

|
|
I

|
i
|

$478
494
495
504
529
528
543
563
602
676
729
754
782

49
97
48
73
35

|
I
|
|

8 17
867
882
897
928

,414
,613
,712
,766
,868

|
|
|
I
|

963
1,044
1, 084
1,105
1 , 156

1,973
2,022
2,116
2,276
2,412

|
j
|
I

1 , 196
1,235
1,248
1,293
1,304

_______ ____________

J ____________




,5
,5
,7
,9
,0

,379
,592
,783
,826
,887

1

L.

Sector 36. Stone and clay products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

1947 . . . .
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

T o ta l

Net

s to c k s

S tr u c tu r e s

$197
179
153

$303
249
210

$105
70
56

$1,144
1,364
1,544

$593
754
889

1,743
2,026
2,2 5 7
2,470
2,6 9 7

1,041
1,249
1,424
1,575
1,730

70 1
777
833
894
966

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$ 5 18
667
784

$457
5 13
554

1,509
1,757
1 , 947
2,114
2 ,2 9 1

9 12
1,090
1,229
1,341
1,454

596
6 67
7 17
772
83/

$975
1, 180
1,338

$551
6 10
655

58
87
68
73
84

T o ta l

s to c k '

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
19 5 3 . . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

23 1
320
275
266
291

173
233
207
193
206

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

506
699
644
406
452

36 1
463
432
293
330

145
236
211
1 13
122

3 , 128
3,741
4,289
4,587
4,919

2
2
2
2
3

,029
,419
,768
,966
, 188

1
1
1
1
1

,099
,322
,521
,621
,731

2
3
3
3
4

,6
,2
,7
,9
,1

7
2
0
1
5

0
3
0
4
5

1,709
2,049
2,340
2,47 1
2,6 2 1

96 1
1,174
1,359
1,443
1,533

I960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1962. . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 ---------

42 1
4 17
426
496
473

305
325
320
366
383

115
92
106
130
90

5
5
5
5
6

,203
,46 1
,704
,991
,232

3
3
3
3
4

,3
,5
,7
,8
,0

7
5
0
7
4

1,833
1,911
2,002
2,116
2 , 188

4
4
4
4
4

,3
,4
,6
,8
,9

3
9
3
3
8

9
5
9
2
4

2,724
2,827
2,905
3 , 0 12
3 , 122

1 , 6 14
1 668
1,733
1,820
1,862

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

595
623
600
549
637

456
49 1
457
432
506

139
131
143
1 16
131

6
6
7
7
7

,5
,9
,2
,5
,8

6
2
0
0
9

4
4
4
4
5

,2
,5
,7
,8
,0

68
15
14
74
93

2
2
2
2
2

08
17
36
25
26

5
5
5
5
6

,243
,511
,738
,894
, 120

3
3
3
3
3

,2
,4
,6
,7
,8

9
8
3
3
9

3
6
0
5
9

1,949
2,0 2 5
2,107
2 , 159
2,220

49 1
536
724
798
938

137
132
165
163
220

8,1 0 9
8 , 4 16
8,922
9,480
10,215

5
5
5
6
6

,2
,4
,8
,3
,8

8
9
8
2
9

2,829
2,922
3,042
3 , 155
3,319

6
6
6
7
8

,3
,5
,9
,4
,0

4
4
4
4
5

,0
,1
,5
,9
,4

3
9
3
2
3

3
7
4
6
8

2
2
2
2
2

. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . .
---------

. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
_____

1 9 7 0 ....
1 9 7 1 ....
1972. . . .
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

629
669
890
96 1
1,159

7
3
5
0
1

0
0
2
5
4

0
4
0
4
6

,3
,4
,5
,6
,7

1
3
5
1
5

7
3
0
6
4

1

,
,
,
,
,

2
3
4
4
6

8
3
1
8
1

3
5
6
9
6

Sector 36. Stone and clay products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____
1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 --------1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 ....

$682
512
421
46 1
570
478
458
497

Equ i p m e n t

$448
372
307

S tr u c tu re s

$233
140
114

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$3,599
3,999
4,306

339
408
357
327
344

121
16 1
121
13 1
153

4
5
5
5
6

,6
,0
,4
,7
,0

6,6
7,5
8,2
8,5
8 ,8

$1,582
1,897
2 , 145
2
5
1
3
4

S tr u c tu r e s

$2,017
2 , 102
2 , 16 1

$1,574
1,654
1,707

0
3
8
3
4

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,3
,3
,4
,5

2
3
9
7
7

7
3
9
4
1

3,828
4,196
4,447
4,653
4,877

2
2
2
2
2

5
0
0
2
9

2
9
2
7
1

3
4
4
5
5

,873
,394
,807
,004
,2 2 0

2
3
3
3
3

,7
,1
,3
,5
,6

7
1
9
2
7

8
5
4
3
0

5
6
6
6
7

,427
, 189
,770
,971
,202

3,164
3,605
3,930
4,029
4 , 143

2
2
2
2
3

,2
,5
,8
,9
,0

6
8
4
4
5

3
3
0
2
9

3
3
4
4
4

,8
,8
,0
,1
,2

05
99
11
58
34

7
7
7
7
7

,3
,4
,5
,7
,8

5
6
5
2
2

2
0
6
3
2

4
4
4
4
4

,
,
,
,
,

1
2
2
3
3

9
4
6
2
9

2
3
6
8
5

3
3
3
3
3

,1
,2
,2
,3
,4

6
1
9
9
2

0
7
0
4
6

7
9
2
9
7

8
8
8
8
8

,
,
,
,
,

6
0
6
2
3

5
2
7
5
8

4
4
4
4
4

,5
,7
,7
,8
,9

4
0
9
3
2

0
6
8
2
3

3
3
3
3
3

,5
,5
,6
,6
,7

24
95
69
93
14

8 ,688
8,731
8,965
9,227
9,543

4
5
5
5
5

,9
,0
,2
,5
,8

6
1
4
2
3

3
9
5
0
0

3
3
3
3
3

,7
,7
,7
,7
,7

24
11
19
07
13

582
690
60 1
40 1
4 40

263
393
335
185
203

196
196
196
196
196

0
1
2
3
4

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

594
580
595
685
634

402
427
42 1
475
491

192
153
173
2 10
142

9 , 179
9,421
9,642
9 , 9 19
10,116

5
5
5
5
5

,3
,5
,6
,7
,8

7
2
3
6
8

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

79 1
800
745
654
724

577
607
544
496
562

214
193
20 1
157
162

10,449
10,775
11,033
11,184
11,388

6
6
6
6
6

,0
,2
,4
,4
,6

69
76
10
85
13

4
4
4
4
4

,3
,4
,6
,6
,7

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

522
547
724
783
830

156
139
165
151
172

1
1
1
1
1

6
6
7
7
7

,6
,7
,0
,3
,6

8
7
2
2
6

4
4
4
4
5

,837
,875
,9 3 1
,966
,013




$1,345
1,632
1,839

,4
,7
,0
,2
,4

846
1, 0 8 3
936
586
644

,5
,6
,9
,2
,6

$2,919
3,2 8 6
3,546

S tr u c tu r e s

2
2
3
3
3

--------_____
_____
_____
_____

1
1
1
2
2

Equ i p m e n t

48
87
18
07
15

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

679
686
890
934
1,003

T o ta l

26
49
55
88
75

3
1
0
1
1

8
3
3
2
1

9
8
3
9
4

0
3
4
5
6

,0
,3
,5
,6
,8

61
32
26
68
07

_______ _________

77

1,766
1,864
1,920
1, 985
2,070

Sector 37. Primary iron and steel manufacturing: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—
G ross

--------------------------- 1
T o ta l
|

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu re s

$238
272
17 1

E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

$6,501
6,902
7,028

«

s to c k s

$2,546
2,867
3,020

I
I

S tr u c tu r e s

I
I
I

$3,955
4,034
4,007

1947 . . . .
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

$581
805
528

I
|
I

$343
532
357

1950 . . . .
1951 . . . .
1 9 5 2 ....
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 4 _____

535
1,218
1,385
1,101
813

|
I
I
I
I

370
765
934
7 14
548

164
452
450
386
264

7 , 164
7,988
8,986
9,7 0 6
10,143

3
3
4
5
5

,1
,7
,5
,0
,4

9
7
2
6
3

4
0
3
1
6

I
I
I
|
I

3
4
4
4
4

,9
,2
,4
,6
,7

7
1
6
4
0

19 5 5 . . . .
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

770
1,325
1,744
1,125
828

j
I
|
|
I

532
900
1,111
698
573

237
425
633
426
254

1
1
1
1
1

5
6
7
7
8

,7
,5
,4
,9
,3

9
2
4
4
0

6
1
7
6
0

I
I
I
I
j

4
4
5
5
5

,7
,9
,4
,6
,7

4
7
2
7
6

1,380
998
9 18
1,137
1,587

|
I
I
|
|

957
700
702
820
1,223

422
298
2 15
3 17
364

15,037
15,603
16,055
16,686
17,724

9,008
9,422
9,796
10,239
11,034

1 9 6 5 ....
1966 . . . .
1967 . . . .
1968. . . .
1 9 6 9 ---------

1,764
2,111
2 ,344
2,328
2,0 7 2

|
|
|
|
j

1,337
1,653
1,854
1,851
1,602

426
457
490
477
470

18,888
20,350
22,000
23,591
24,883

1 1,889
13,007
14,280
15,508
16,447

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

1,900
1,549
1,417
1,649
2,5 1 1

|
I
j
i
|

1,500
1 , 2 18
1 , 157
1,364
2,077

399
330
259
284
434

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1

$4,235
4,681
4,851

6
8
5
5
2

I 9 6 0 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

T o ta l

0
8
3
4
7

0,5
1,4
2,8
3,6
4,0

5
6
7
7
9

,9
,6
,1
,8
,2

4
9
7
2
6

I

3
9
3
2
3

62
43
41
16
92

s to c k s

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

$2,496
2,590
2,585

$ 1,739
2,090
2,265

I
I
I
j

I
I
I

I
I
I
I
|

2
3
3
4
4

,4
,0
,7
,2
,5

54
38
79
82
99

2
2
3
3
3

,576
,859
,142
,363
,465

8,4 2 4
9,319
10,598
11,214
11,493

|
|
I
|
I

4
5
6
6
6

,879
,502
,300
,641
, 8 16

3
3
4
4
4

,5
,8
,2
,5
,6

1
1
1
1
1

85
44
77
85
97

|
|
|
I
|

7
7
7
7
8

,3
,5
,7
,9
,5

5
9
1
0
2

4
5
5
5
5

,949
,094
, 155
,314
,514

6
7
7
8
8

|*
|

31
97
21
4 5
6 4

6,028
6 , 180
6,259
6,447
6,689

I

7,250
7,732
8,116
8,666
9,884

Net
I
I

15,033
16,265
17,672
19,001
20,0 09

I
I
|
I
|

1
1
1
1

9,264
0,220
1,330
2,387
3,144

5
6
6
6
6

,7
,0
,3
,6
,8

2
2
2
2
2

|
|
|
I
|

13,749
14,019
1 4 , 180
14,497
15,472

7
7
7
7
7

,031
,115
,113
, 125
,2 7 3

,
,
,
,
,

9
3
7
0
4

5
5
6
7
8

99
42
19
8 2
3 5

8 , 7 12
8,911
9,025
9,150
9,408

I
I
j

,0
,8
,9
,6
,0

2
2
2
3
4

0
1
1
1
2

,2
,6
,8
,2
,0

,7
,1
,2
,6
,7

8
3
9
2
4

0
4
4
2
6

3
4
2
7
8

45
16
98
73
77

6
4
4
1
6

9
4
2
3
5

_________ L

____________ L

Sector 37. Primary iron and steel manufacturing: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
1

r
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

Year
T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu re s

1947 . . . .
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$ 1,345
1,701
1,093

$ 8 17
1, 157
743

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1, 08 3
2,204
2,444
1,922
1,410

740
1,367
1,639
1,232
928

343
837
804
690
48 1

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 _____
1 9 5 9 _____

1,304
2,051
2,569
1,656
1,199

872
1,343
1,565
957
775

43 1
708
1,004
699
424

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

1,964
1,418
1,277
1,576
2 , 146

1,260
921
924
1,064
1,568

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

2
2
2
2
2

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

_______

,348
, 7 13
,897
,772
,367

2,051
1,591
1 , 4 17
1,588
2,177




$528
544
350

To ta l

E qu ip m e nt

$25,424
25,476
24,942

$7,660
8 ,129
8 ,208

24,423
25,055
25,963
26,387
26,341

8 , 3 10
9,068
10,128
10,806
11,206

2
2
2
2
2

6
6
8
8
8

,231
,905
,130
,470
,374

704
496
353
511
578

2
2
2
2
3

9
9
9
9
0

,
,
,
,
,

1,692
2,0 4 1
2,207
2 , 128
1,780

656
672
690
644
587

31,1
32,4
33,8
35,2
36,1

1,596
1,243
1 , 157
1,325
1,838

454
348
259
263
339

3
3
3
3
3

6
6
6
6
7

|

|
|
|

Net

S tr u c tu r e s

$17,763
17,347
16,733

$ 15,925
16,233
15,963

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$5,055
5,642
5,827

$10,870
10,591
10,136

15,723
16,644
17,826
18,497
18,666

11,571
12,417
13,487
13,940
14,191

14,660
14,487
14,642
14,529
14, 183

18,739
19,564
20,892
2 1,275
21,177

1
1
1
1

9,322
0,054
0,962
1,206
1,216

9 , 4 17
9,510
9,929
10,069
9,96 1

14,890
15,198
15,448
15,771
16,525

14, 162
13,981
13,703
13,627
13,660

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
2

10,158
1 0, 169
10,055
10,116
10,254

43
35
90
05
04

17,331
18,421
19,6^4
20,705
21,407

13,811
14,014
14,266
14,499
14,697

23,474
24,667
26,004
2 7 , 172
27,887

12,996
13,948
15,029
15,992
16,567

7
7
6
0
8

21,901

14,775
14,753
14,640
14,519
14,460

2
2
2
2
2

16,924
16,891
16,740
16,722
1 7 , 180

6
2
8
4
5

2
2
2
2

78

2
2
2
2

,
,
,
,

018
028
184
824

|
|

1
1
1
1
1

T o ta l

s to c k s

6,112
5,987
5,835
5,581
5,135

052
180
152
399
185

,6
,7
,6
,7
,2

"

s to c k s

1
1
1
1
2

8
8
7
7
7

,8
,8
,7
,9
,6

19
76
60
16
11

,239
,084
,711
,464
,758

6
6
7
8
9

,0
,8
,9
,6
,0

,6
,7
,7
,7
,3

2
6
7
6
3

6
7
8
5
2

9
9
9
9
9

60
06
05
99
56

|

|
|
|
|

,6
,7
,8
,8
,6

10,4
10,7
10,9
11,1
11,3

9
7
4
3
3

6
7
8
1
3

77
18
74
79
19

11,315
11,192
10,970
10,741
10,578

Sector 38. Primary nonferrous metals manufacturing: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------G ross

-■
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

stock*

—
—
S tr u c tu re s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

r
I

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

—
1947 . . . .
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____
1
1
1
1

9
9
9
9

5
5
5
5

0
1
2
3

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

1 9 5 4 _____
1955 . . . .
19 5 6
.
1957
19 5 8
1 9 5 9 --------196 0
196 1
19 6 2
196 3
1 9 6 4 _____
196 5
1 96 6
1967
1968
196911..

1972
1974. . 1.

$9 1
159
117

$37
51
37

$696
896
1,037

$400
551
659

136
265
418
334
221

10 1
182
24 1
2 16
164

34
82
177
1 18
57

1,158
1,406
1,805
2,115
2,307

749
918
1,143
1,339
1,478

264
42 1
538
452
291

192
3 13
423
285
216

71
107
159
166
75

2
2
3
3
4

,536
,914
,4 5 0
,842
,064

1,639
1,914
2,296
2,527
2,680

I
|
|
I
|

266
263
28 1
349
366

204
197
220
27 1
292

6 1
66
60
77
74

4
4
4
4
5

,2
,4
,5
,8
,0

48
16
86
08
28

2
2
3
3
3

,809
,920
,039
,193
,3 5 1

|
I

555
740
897
863
825

436
582
672
65 1
653

1 19
157
225
21 1
172

5
5
6
7
7

,4
,9
,6
,3
,9

1
7
7
1
0

3
4
4
4
5

,636
,051
,5 4 1
,996
,439

696
550
63 1
600
993

217
160
166
155
342

5
6
6
6
7

,9
,2
,5
,9
,6

9 13
7 11
798
756
1,336

9
5
1
6
6

8,567
9,007
9,513
9,958
10,961

11
22
98
29
36

$ 6 12
798
92 1

$350
491
584

$26 1
306
336

1,021
1,245
1 , 6 13
1,886
2,034

658
807
1,008
1,174
1,279

363
437
6 05
7 11
755

896
999
1,153
1,314
1,383

2
2
3
3
3

,2
,5
,0
,3
,4

1,403
1 6
1,972
2 , 149
2,2 4 1

811
902
1, 043
1, 188
1,239

1,438
1,496
1,547
1 , 6 14
1,677

3
3
3
3
4

,581
,663
,745
,878
, 0 13

2
2
2
2
2

7
2
5
6
3

1,274
1,311
1,339
1,382
1,419

1,782
1,923
2 , 130
2,319
2,467

4
4
5
5
6

,3
,7
,4
,9
,4

2
9
0
5
5

0
4
6
9
0

2,823
3 , 184
3,619
4 , 0 14
4,392

1,497
1,610
1,786
1 , 944
2,057

2,656
2,784
2 , 9 15
3,028
3,325

7
7
7
8
8

,0
,3
,7
,0
,8

0
2
1
2
8

4
6
0
2
5

4
5
5
5
6

2
2
2
2
2

$296
344
377

$ 128
2 11
154

I
|

408
487
66 1
775
829

I
I
|

I
|
j
I

|
I
|
I

_L

14
39
16
37
80

7 5/

,3
,3
,4
,4
,5

,7
,0
,3
,5
,1

0
5
0
9
9

9
2
1
5
5

3
4
5
0
3

,2
,3
,3
,4
,7

1
0
9
7
3

0
2
5
1
1

1

Sector 38. Primary nonferrous metals manufacturing: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars )
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$305
456
323

$223
354
248

$8 1
102
75

$2,176
2,594
2,874

$1,080
1,411
1,632

$1,095
1, 182
1,242

T o ta l

Equi pment

$1,875
2,256
2,490

S tr u c tu r e s

$934
1,237
1,422

$940
1,018
1,067

1,555
1,802
2,132
2,393
2,535

1,110
1,234
1,517
1,692
1,754

1950
1951
1952
19 5 3
1954

_____
_____
_____
. . . .
_____

278
485
746
58 9
382

207
332
431
378
278

7 1
153
315
2 11
103

3,104
3,535
4,220
4,738
5,036

1,806
2,099
2,484
2,806
3 , 0 16

1,297
1,435
1,735
1,931
2,019

2
3
3
4
4

,6
,0
,6
,0
,2

6
3
5
8
8

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

451
647
856
664
4 17

321
467
603
39 1
292

129
179
253
272
125

5
5
6
7
7

,3
,9
,6
,1
,3

8
1
3
4
9

6
5
6
7
3

3,255
3,625
4,114
4,376
4,521

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,2
,5
,7
,8

3 1
90
22
7 1
7 1

4
4
5
5
6

,5
,9
,5
,9
,0

42
70
82
72
90

2
2
3
3
3

,7
,9
,4
,5
,6

03
99
11
86
42

1,839
1,970
2,17 1
2,386
2,448

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

37 1
369
388
477
492

268
259
289
352
374

102
110
99
124
1 18

7
7
7
8
8

,5
,7
,8
,0
,2

7
2
6
7
7

0
3
9
7
3

4
4
4
4
5

,
,
,
,
,

6
7
7
9
0

2
0
8
0
2

5
0
2
4
5

2
3
3
3
3

,9
,0
,0
,1
,2

4
2
8
7
4

6
6
6
6
6

,138
,161
, 183
,273
,359

3
3
3
3
3

,6
,6
,6
,6
,7

55
42
41
88
43

2
2
2
2
2

,4
,5
,5
,5
,6

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

735
950
1,117
1,034
938

552
7 19
800
749
725

182
231
317
285
212

8,683
9,284
10,030
10,672
11,200

5
5
6
6
7

,3
,7
,2
,6
,0

0
2
1
3
1

1
4
1
3
9

3
3
3
4
4

,382
,560
, 8 18
,039
,1 8 1

3,964
4,340
4,783
5 , 158
5,494

2
2
3
3
3

,707
,840
,054
,2 3 0
,325

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

980
730
798
727
1,155

733
56 1
63 1
583
887

246
169
166
143
268

1
1
1
1
1

7
7
7
8
8

,40 1
,600
,857
,056
,547

4
4
4
4
4

,3
,4
,5
,5
,7

5,821
5,957
6 , 147
6,270
6,676

3
3
3
3
3

,4
,4
,5
,5
,6

_______




1
2
2
2
3

,7
,0
,3
,6
,2

53
38
73
19
75

_______

79

4
3
7
2
7

51
38
15
63
28

_________

6
6
0
5
9

6,67 1
7,181
7,837
8 ,388
8,820
9,2
9,4
9,6
9,7
10,3

7
4
7
9
3

1
8
1
8
0

8
1
4
8

5
9
2
2
5

2
9
1
4
15

0
0
3
8
3

Sector 39. Metal containers: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
G ross

E quipm ent

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

I

S tr u c tu re s

E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

Net

s to c k s
1
j

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equi p ne nt

S tr u c tu r e s

-------------------------------------p $122
145
170

$74
94
115

84
92
93
99
104

204
238
259
283
326

142
167
186
205
243

111
1 15
123
140
151

365
399
433
472
506

275
305
33 1
353
377

90
94
102
119
129

162
168
178
184
191

552
575
608
646
687

412
430
455
488
525

140
144
152
157
162

I
I
I
I
|

198
2 16
228
247
270

732
798
864
947
1,040

565
6 16
673
740
8 14

167
18 1
191
207
226

1, 136
1,211
1,288
1,366
1,490

896
970
1,042

I
I

287
292
30 1
307
320

239
24 1
246
248
257

$25
31
34

$19
25
27

|
I
|

$5
6
6

$164
187
2 13

1950 . . . .
1951 . . . .
1 9 5 2 ....
19 5 3 . . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

44
44
32
37
57

33
32
28
28
48

|

I
|

1 1
11
4
9
8

249
285
310
338
386

165
193
216
238
28 1

1 9 5 5 ....
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

55
52
54
6 1
58

|
I
|
I

10
7
11
20
13

431
472
5 14
563
607

3 19
356
39 1
422
456

|

44
43
40
44

I 9 6 0 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

74
52
66
73
80

59
44
54
64
70

|

|

14
8
12
9
9

665
700
747
798
853

502
532
569
6 13
66 1

_____
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
_____

87
111
1 14
134
149

76
9 1
100
1 12
123

|
I
|
I
|

10
19
14
22
26

9 11
99 1
1,071
1,169
1,278

7 12
775
843
922
1,008

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1973. . . .
1 9 7 4 _____

156
140
147
153
204

135
13 1
133
143
186

I
I
I
|

20
9
13
10
18

1,391
1,486
1,584
1,686
1,835

1,104
1,194
1,283
1,379
1,515

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

I

|

I
I
I
|

I
I

________________ _____________________

_____________________ I___

$48
51
54

$70
73
76

I
I
I
I
|

$94
114
136

1947 . . . .
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

1,118
1,232

62
7 1
72
78
83

L.

Sector 39. Metal containers: Constant dollars

Gross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year

s to c k s

I
T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equi p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

1 9 4 7 _____
19 4 8 . . . .
1949.. . .

$64
73
76

$53
6 1
62

$ 11
12
13

$591
633
678

|
|
|

$28 1
325
372

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1953. . . .
19 5 4 . . . .

94
84
6 0
6 7
103

7 1
62
52
51
88

22
21
7
15
15

742
797
827
863
935

|
|
|
|
|

429
476
5 14
549
620

313
320
312
313
314

569
6 19
644
674
738

358
400
430
456
518

210
219
213
217
220

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1957 . . . .
1 9 5 8 ______
1959. . . .

95
8 1
8 1
9 1
85

77
69
63
57
62

18
12
17
33
22

996
1,042
1,087
1,139
1,184

|
|
|
|
|

678
727
767
800
836

317
315
319
339
348

79 1
827
860
899
930

565
600
627
644
664

226
226
232
255
266

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

105
7 3
92
99
107

8 1
59
71
84
93

24
14
20
14
14

1
1
1
1
1

,2
,2
,3
,3
,4

47
74
16
62
11

|
|
|
|
|

887
9 12
946
987
1,032

360
362
370
374
378

977
988
1,015
1,045
1,081

697
706
723
750
783

279
282
29 1
295
298

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 ....
1967 . . . .
1968. . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

113
142
140
159
169

98
113
1 19
129
137

15
29
21
30
32

1
1
1
1
1

,462
,539
,610
,697
,793

|
|
|
|
|

1,079
1, 136
1,195
1,262
1,335

383
403
414
435
458

1,120
1, 185
1,245
1,321
1,405

8 18
865
915
974
1,038

302
320
329
347
366

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1972. . . .
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

166
143
147
148
179

143
133
133
139
165

23
9
13
9
14

1,883
1,949
2,017
2,085
2,180

|
|
|
|
|

1,411
1,477
1,541
1,609
1,702

472
472
475
475
478

1
1
1
1
1

1,105
1,159
1,211
1,263
1,337

376
37 1
370
365
364

_____________________




________________ I____

80

$310
307
305

_____________________

$418
462
507

,481
,531
,58 1
,629
,702

$215
260
306

$202
20 1
20 1

Sector 40. Heating and plumbing apparatus, fabricated metal products: Historical dollars

G ross

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$112

1947
1948
1949

$67
41
46

______________
62
______________
69
______________

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

21
22

$220

$194
229
269

$414
465
523

$44

stocks

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

T o ta l

Met

s to c k s

20

1 9 5 0 _____
1951
1952
1953
1954

84
107
______________
1 14
______________
144
______________
136
------------------------

51
62
78
94
87

32
44
36
50
48

595
690
790
9 18
1,035

315
370
440
523
598

1955
1 9 5 6 --------1 9 5 7 _____
1958
1959

164
-----------------------198
170
162
-----------------------154
------------------------

110
112
102

94

70

676
767
858
935

105

57
59
48

1, 179
1,352
1,496
1,628
1,747

1,012

502
585
637
692
734

99
87

4 1
38
46
45
51

1,847
1,927
2,024
2,118
2,226

1,076
1 , 123
1,179
1,234
1,298

77 1
804
844
883
928

1,5
1,6
1,6
1,7
1,7

142
153
193

7 1
7 1
104
87
108

2,3
2,5
2,7
2,9
3,1

1
1
1
1

87
87
16
163
152

3
3
3
4
4

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1962
1963
1964

140
125
149
-----------------------152
-----------------------173
------------------------

1965
1 9 6 6 --------1 9 6 7 --------1968
1969

214
-----------------------225
297
288
______________
306
------------------------

1 9 7 0 --------1 9 7 1 --------1972
1973
1974

102
107
122
200
198
226

314
299
370
-----------------------542
______________
486
______________

211
253
379
333

1

6
1
2
2
3

8
4
7
3
2

,3
,4
,5
,6

1,94
2,06
2,21
2,48
2,70

448
526
573
620
655

875
898
931
963
1,006

1,906

842
889
967
1,026

1 , 156
1,206
1,284
1,405
1,512

992
,055
, 150
,226
,322

2,0 1 8
2,195
2,355
2,525

1,063
, 128
1,227
1,329
1,422

1
1
1
1
1

,395
,465
,562
,704
,832

2,6
2,8
3,0
3,4
3,7

1,537
1,630
1,757
1
2,188

6
2
4
6
6

682
705
734
76 1
792

58
03
65
24
98

1
1
1
1

75
58
76
97
10

1,8

,341
,528
,777
, 190
,539

1

237
275
304
346
386

579
654
725
781
835

1,028
, 180
1,299
1,402
1,490

88

211

276
323
383
455
516

514
599
687
80 1
903

280
319
349
394
437

$180
195

$169
1
237

$350
396
449

235
253

S tr u c tu r e s

9
3
4
0
0

1

3
7
1
7
1

2,00

1,102

Sector 40. Heating and plumbing apparatus, fabricated metal products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

—
G ross

Year

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

___________________________________________________________
T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$251
128
139

$ 15 1
87
93

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 --------1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

167
189
194
245
229

99
107
130
156
14 1

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

277
303
243
234
219

148
157
152
137
139

128
146
9 1
97
79

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

196
173
206
208
234

126
10
130
136
153

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

285
290
37 1
343
349

175
185
224
225
16

335
306
370
523
420

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

_______




$99
4 1
46

68
81

s to c k s

Net

__________________________
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$1,252
1,339
1,436

S tr u c tu r e s

$475
545
621

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$777
793
14

$1,000
1,080
1,168

|
|
|

$407
470
536

$593
609
63 1

605
677
765
873
958

674
73 1
770
833
894

8

1,56 1
1,708
1,856
2,0 5 1
2,225

703
792
90 1
1,031
1,140

858
915
955
, 020
1, 084

1,279
1,408
1,535
1,706
1,853

|
|
|
|
|

2,441
2,679
2,852
3,011
3 , 149

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,2
,3
,4
,5

4
4
7
9
8

0
5
9
6
8

|
|
|
|
j

1, 044
1,13 1
1,205
1,257
1,302

995
1,113
1,174
1,239
1,285

69
63
75
72
1

3
3
3
3
3

,255
,3 3 0
,428
,519
,628

1,691
1,724
1,768
1,809
1,860

1,563
1,605
1,659
1,709
1,768

2
2
2
2
2

,6
,6
,7
,7
,8

4
7
2
7
4

6
4
6
4
0

|
|
j
|
|

1,327
1,329
1,345
1,36 1
1,391

1,319
1,345
1,38 1
1 , 4 12
1,449

2

104
146
18
133

3
3
4
4
4

,7
,9
,1
,3
,5

79
27
50
37
23

1,925
1, 995
2,098
2,198
2,284

1,853
1,932
2,0 5 1
2,139
2,239

2
3
3
3
3

,9 5 1
,059
,242
,390
,535

|
|
|
|
I

1» 4 3 8
1,492
1,582
1,669
1,741

1
1
1
1
1

236
214
253
37 1
300

99
92
16
151
1 19

4
4
5
5
5

,6
,8
,0
,3
,5

8
1
0
3
4

2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
4
4

,6
,7
,8
,1
,3

|
I
I
|
|

1,829
1,890
1, 984
2,1 9 1
2 , 3 17

1,828
1,853
1,898
1, 976
2,018

1

64
89

88

8
110
1
1

8
7
1
0
8

81

,252
,366
,470
,554
,633

,386
,462
,575
,80 1
,951

1

, 189
,312
,38 1
,457
,515

,3
,3
,4
,5
,5

02
54
26
29
96

_________

58
43
83
67
36

,512
,567
,660
,721
,793

Sector 41. Screw machine products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

s to c k s

N et

s to c k s

Year

r
T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

|
I
$67
60
50

11 1
115
120

$497
569
627

$27

76
85
82

$94
82
70

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

35
30
38
31

21
19

$323
376
418

$174
192
208

$429
492
541

$282
328
362

$146
163
178

485
560
630
7 17
798

240
266
300
327
344

628
7 15
803
900
978

419
482
538
10
673

208
233
265
290
304

|
|
I

884
1,004
1,140
, 186
1,253

382
424
459
493
520

1,079
18
1,361
1 , 4 12
1,473

740
841
954
976
1,017

338
377
407
435
456

544
56 1
587
15
672

1,516
1,521
1,561
1,608
1,743

1,043
1,038
1,061
, 088
1, 177

473
482
499
5 19
565

733
783
821
850
924

1,907
2,064
2 , 177
2,252
2,477

1
1
1
1
1

968
995

2
2
2
2
3

1,787
1,824
1,939
, 122
2,359

|
I

I

98

20

725
827
931
1,045
1,143

148
192
203
1 17
134

106
145
164
78
104

4 1
46
38
38
30

1
1
1
1
1

_____
_____
_____
_____
---------

123
91
132
145
239

11
0
11 1

94
69

21

1,888

30
33
62

1,960
2,039
2,205

|
I
|
|
I

1
1
1
1
1

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

275
275
239
208
364

207
217
192
170
278

2
2
2
2
3

,4
,5
,7
,8
,1

0
8
3
4
0

0
9
5
3
0

|
|
I
I
|

1,667
1,805
1,913
1,993
2 , 176

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

252
207
292
394
513

195
166
249
325
388

3
3
3
3
4

,2
,3
,4
,7
,1

3
2
9
5
2

8
5
0
1
4

|
|
|
|
I

2
2
2
2
2

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

--------_____
_____
_____
---------

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

102

133
119

68
57
47
38
85
56
41
42

68

124

66
29
99
80
73

1,849

28

177

,2
,4
,5
,6
,7

|

|
|
I

|
|

1

,305
,326
,373
,423
,533

,2
,3
,4
,6
,9

70
30
68
78
46

1,2

6

1,021
1,073
1, 178

,579
,630
,759
,981
, 3 11

6

1

61 6

,290
,408
,495
,554
, 7 16

655
682
698
760
791
806
820
859
952

2

Sector 41. Screw machine products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
Gross

i n v e s t m e rfc

G ross

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

Net

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

1 9 4 7 _____
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 ....

$234
188
153

$174
144
12

$59
43
40

$1,500
1,647
1, 758

$877
997
1, 085

$623
649
673

$1,245
1,374
1,462

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
19 5 2 . . . .
1953. . . .
1954 . . . .

232
217
2 17
239

73
55
67
55
37

1,945
2,115
2,279
2,460
2,605

1,216
1,348
1,461
1,603
1,728

8 17

729
767

210

159
162
149
183
173

856
877

1,623
1,761
1,891
2,033
2,138

1,0
1,1
1,2
1,3
1,4

30
33
15
23
12

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1957. . . .
19 5 8 . . . .
1 9 5 9 ....

256
297
296
17 3
193

220
235
11 1

181

2
3
3
3
3

,7
,0
,2
,2
,3

8
0
0
8
7

7
3
9
5
1

1,852
2,007
2,169
2,199
2,252

935
995
1 , 039
1,085
1,119

2,278
2,450
11
2,637
2,675

1
1
1
1
1

00
19
42
33
47

778
83 1

142

75
77
1
62
50

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
19 6 2 . . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 ....

173
128
183
1
329

126
92
133
147
230

47
35
49
54
98

3
3
3
3
3

,4
,4
,4
,5
,7

2
3
7
2
0

8
0
5
8
0

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,2
,2
,2
,3

7
6
7
9
8

9
2
6
4
7

1, 149
1 , 167
1,199
1,234
1,312

2
2
2
2
2

,6
,6
,6
,6
,7

8
4
4
6
9

4
0
4
0
9

1,738
1,689
1,675
1,671
1,747

945
95 1
96 9
989
1,052

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 ....
1968. . . .
1969. . . .

366
353
296
243
4 16

262
268
229
192
309

104
84
67
5 1
107

3
4
4
4
4

,900
,079
,195
,252
,4 7 6

2
2
2
2
2

,5
,6
,6
,7
,8

0
2
9
3
7

5
3
7
0
7

1,395
1,455
1,497
1,521
1,598

2
3
3
3
3

,9
,1
,2
,2
,4

7 0
20
08
38
37

2,021

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 ....

269
1
292
38 0
44 1

205
167
249
316
343

64
43
42
63
97

4
4
4
4
5

,5
,5
,6
,8
,0

2
2
2
3
3

, 9 16
,916
,996
, 142
,314

1,631
1,639
1,644
1,667
1,722

3
3
3
3
3

,4
,4
,5
,6
,8

8
6
2
6
6

20

21




1

6

_________

47
55
4 1
10
36

_________ _________

82

2,6

2
4
3
5
1

$753
856
923

,5
,6
,7
,7
,7

1,851
1, 9 5 7

2,045
2 , 183
2,213

2,202
2,272
2,404
2,557

$492
5 17
539
592
675
7 10
725

868
904
927

1,118
1,162
1 , 187
1,193
1,254
1,269
1,261
,
1

1

1,261
1,303

Sector 42. Other fabricated metal products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

I

E qu ip m e nt

|

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

$102
55
76

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 --------1 9 4 9 _____

Net

s to c k s

r~

~ i

I
|
I

$73
36
51

|
I

$28
18
25

$431
478
545

S tr u c tu r e s

I
|

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$376
415
473

|
|
|

$238
262
300

$ 137
152
173

225
259
290
35 1
392

554
653
747
881
1,021

|
|
|
I
|

354
422
487
563
666

200
23 1
259
317
355

$158
174
196

$273
303
348
411
490
567
657
776

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

102
124
122
167
178

i
|
I
I
|

70
87
88
104
134

I
|
|
|

31
36
33
63
44

637
749
857
1,009
1,168

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
----------------_____

170
198
178
136
153

|
|
I
|
I

124
138
137
103
113

|
|
I

46
59
4 1
32
39

1,316
1,488
1,637
1,741
1,856

88 1
997
1,108
1, 182
1,261

435
49 1
529
558
594

1,147
1,294
1,414
1,485
1,566

|
I
I
I
|

754
850
939
987
1,040

393
444
475
497
526

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

165
158
20 1
227
258

I
|
I
|
I

121
119
14 1
169
198

I
|
|
|
|

44
38
59
57
59

1,978
2,087
2,232
2,395
2,58 1

1,343
1 , 4 17
1,507
1 , 6 18
1,751

635
669
724
776
830

1,651
1,721
1,826
1,949
2,094

I
I
|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

,093
,138
,199
,280
,383

557
582
627
668
7 10

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

290
346
384
348
409

I
I
|
I
I

224
257
286
265
309

|
I
I

66
88
98
83
100

2,7
3,0
3,3
3,5
3,8

2
0
6
8
2

1, 902
2,079
2,277
2,446
2,651

889
970
1,059
1, 132
1,220

2
2
2
2
3

,2
,4
,7
,9
,1

6
7
1
1
5

2
5
6
0
4

I
I
I
I
|

1,504
1,651
1,818
1, 954
2 , 126

757
824
898
955
1,027

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1972. .. .
1973. . . .
1 9 7 4 _____

363
357
420
526
637

|
|
|
I
I

270
267
326
4 17
464

I
I
I
i

92
89
93
108
172

4
4
4
4
5

,109
,3 3 1
,606
,978
,450

2,810
2,957
3 , 157
3,439
3,7 6 0

1
1
1
1
1

3
3
3
4
4

,3
,5
,7
,0
,4

39
05
22
31
34

I
I
1
|
|
1

2,2
2,3
2,5
2,7
3,0

1,089
1, 146
1,204
1,274
1,406

9
5
3
7
7

,2
,3
,4
,5
,6

9
7
4
3
8

9
3
9
8
9

________________ I___

4
5
1
5
2

9
9
8
6
8

Sector 42. Other fabricated metal products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$247
119
163

E quipm ent

I

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

r
|

Equ i p m e n t

$184
83
1 12

I
|

$62
36
51

$1,319
1,410
1,542

|
|
|

1,717
1,910
2,084
2,331
2,588

|
(
|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

S tr u c tu r e s

$735
80 1
893

$584
608
649

, 0 14
, 150
,277
,421
,609

703
759
807
910
979

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$634
682
755

$487
509
545

1,448
1,609
1,749
1,959
2,175

854
965
1,063
1,179
1,336

594
644
685
780
838

$1,122
1,19 1
1,300

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

208
229
2 17
295
3 11

143
162
157
182
231

I
|
|
|

65
67
59
113
80

1955
1956
1957
1953
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

290
305
257
197
220

206
206
193
144
155

I
I
I
|
|

83
98
64
53
65

2
3
3
3
3

,8
,0
,2
,3
,4

1
4
2
3
6

4
8
8
9
5

|
|
|
|
|

1,764
1,912
2,040
2,112
2 , 187

1,050
1,136
1 , 187
1,227
1,278

2
2
2
2
2

,3
,5
,6
,7
,8

5
4
7
3
0

8
6
6
4
4

1,459
1,573
1,664
1,698
1,733

899
973
1,011
1, 036
1,071

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

233
222
28 1
313
348

159
157
183
2 19
254

|
|
|
|

73
64
97
93
94

3
3
3
4
4

,5
,7
,8
,0
,2

9
0
5
3
3

4
1
7
2
2

|
I
|
|
|

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
3
3
3

,8
,9
,0
,1
,2

77
28
28
5 1
99

1,765
1,786
1,825
1,894
1,990

1,112
1, 142
1,203
1,256
1,309

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

385
444
480
4 13
465

283
313
340
30 1
340

|

102
130
139
1 12
125

4
4
5
5
5

,4
,7
,0
,2
,5

5
3
2
4
0

7
0
8
7
8

|
|
|
|
|

2,77 1
2,939
3 , 126
3,265
3,434

1,686
1,790
1,901
1, 932
2,074

3,475
3,699
3,948
4 , 120
4,333

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,2
,4
,5
,6

08
48
08
21
65

1,367
1,450
1,540
1,599
1,668

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

390
364
420
510
550

285
270
326
409
415

|
|
|
|

105
94
93
100
134

5
5
6
6
6

,6
,8
,0
,2
,5

8
2
1
8
8

4
5
5
5
8

|
|
|
|
|

3
3
3
3
4

2
2
2
2
2

4
4
4
4
5

2
2
2
3
3

,7
,8
,9
,0
,2

4
0
1
9
7

1,7
1,7
1,7
1,8
1,8




I
|

83

,2
,3
,3
,4
,6

,5
,6
,7
,9
,1

58
17
94
96
23

4
2
6
8
9

2
8
7
3
8

,336
,383
,462
,535
,608

,
,
,
,
,

1
2
3
3

142
97
47
02
89

,4
,5
,6
,9
,1

6
5
8
0
4

0
1
8
4
7

6
5
3
5
2

14
46
75
09
74

Sector 43. Engines and turbines: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

N et

s to c k s

s to c k s

------------------------------------ !
E quipm ent

T o ta l

|

S tr u c tu r e s

I
I

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

E qu ip m e nt

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

------------------------------------ r _
1 9 9 7 _____
1998 . . . .
1 9 9 9 _____

$39
20
21

$22
19
15

I
|
I

$ 17
5
5

$180
197
2 16

I
|
|
|

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 9 _____

16
39
93
50
92

13
25
28
32
30

|
I
|
I
|

2
8
15
17
11

229
259
298
392
378

I
|
I
|
|

131
159
179
206
231

97
105
1 19
136
196

205
231
269
302
331

1 19
139
159
177
196

90
97
110
125
139

1 9 5 5 ....
1956 . . . .
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 _____
1 9 5 9 ---------

38
95
82
69
53

30
37
6 1
50
38

|

8
7
21
18
19

909
995
518
577
617

|
I
|
I
|

255
289
337
377
909

153
16 1
18 1
199
212

359
382
995
992
521

219
238
283
3 16
339

139
199
16 1
176
186

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 ... .
1 9 6 9 _____

9 1
50
96
55
6 1

28
38
38
96
51

|
I
I

693
676
70 1
739
769

|
|
I
I
|

9 19
992
962
9S8
5 18

229
239
239
295
251

539
559
567
587
6 11

390
359
366
389
905

199
200
20 1
203
205

569
6 19
708
82 1
969

266
287
33 1
386
412

660
729
893
996
1,197

999
99 1
57 1
673
803

2 15
232
27 1
322
393

960
998
536
598
673

1,319
1,933
1,593
1,757
2,020

I
I
I

1

12
11
7
8
9

1 9 6 5 ....
1966 . . . .
1967 . . . .
1968 . . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

89
106
169
203
206

7 1
8 1
117
193
175

I
1
|
j
|

17
25
97
60
3 1

830
907
1,039
1,208
1,377

I
|
I
|
|

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 9 _____

229
188
186
299
358

174
193
19 1
228
273

|
I

59
95
99
70
89

1,565
1,709
1,896
2,091
2,389

$99
107
120

|
|
|
I
|
1

I
I

1
1
1
1
1

$85
90
95

$ 168
182
197

$86
96
107

$8 1
85
89

,109
,210
,310
,992
,715

927
1,013
1,091
1,299
1,992

386
9 19
95 1
508
577

___

Sector 43. Engines and turbines: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year
T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

1
|

S tr u c tu re s

s to c k s

I
T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

To ta l

:q u i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

________________
1 9 9 7 _____
1 99S . . . .
1999. .. .

$92
93
99

$59
32
32

I
I

$37
11
11

$989
525
562

$290
267
299

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1953. . . .
1959 . . . .

32
62
75
86
72

26
96
98
55
51

|
|
|
I
I

5
15
26
30
21

586
638
702
779
830

3 15
359
393
937
979

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1 9 5 8 _____
1 9 5 9 ... .

63
67
1 18
100
76

99
59
85
69
52

|
|
|
|
|

19
12
33
30
29

875
92 1
1,017
1,091
1,138

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 ....
19 6 3 . . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

58
68
6 1
/ 3
79

37
50
99
59
65

|
|
I
I
|
j

21
18
1 1

1, 169
1,195
1,219
1,291
1 , 2 7 1*

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 _____
1968. . . .
1969. .. .

1 16
136
205
299
231

88
99
137
162
192

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 9 ....

293
192
186
289
3 10

182
199
19 1
229
299

|
|
I
|

27
37
67
8 1
39

1,3
1,9
1,5
1,7
1,9

3
1
6
9
1

|
|
|
|

6 1
97
99
65
65

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,2
,3
,5
,7

|
|
|

$ 2 16
238
253

$232
238
295

27 1
289
308
337
355

517
557
608
666
708

I
|
|
|
|
I

27 1
30 1
330
369
39 1

296
256
277
302
316

367
377
908
936
957

737
767
895
899
926

|
|
|
|
|

9 19
939
992
526
539

323
328
352
373
387

689
706
7 19
739
762

975
989
995
502
509

93 1
999
995
955
970

|
|
I
I
|

535
59 1
595
557
573

396
902
900
398
397

807
860
950
1 , 069
1,206

527
555
6 12
680
706

|
|
|
|

1,533

|

6 11
658
79 1
896
977

907
927
976
538
556

1
1
1
1
1

9
5
2
5
2

$998
977
509

507
593
608
655
68 1

87
08
18
25
98

_____________________ I____




13
19

$299
258
267

752
789
81 1
857
903

1,687
1,783
1,866
2,096
2,237

|
|
|
|
|

,339
,929
,507
,668
,899

_____________________

84

1
1
1
1

,019
,085
,218
,389

________________ I____

1
1
1
1
1

,091
,162
,229
,363
,513

596
620
692
683
723

Sector 44. Farm machinery and equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k ;

Year

$46
51
27

$77
69
38

1947 . . . .
1948. . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

To ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$31
18
10

Equi pment

$120
168
193

$226
292
326

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$106
123
132

$207
269
298

$109
155
176

S tr u c tu r e s

$97
1 14
12 1

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ... .
1 9 5 2 ... .
1953.. . .
1 9 5 4 _____

32
42
5 1
60
51

24
29
35
44
40

8
12
15
15
1 1

354
391
437
489
531

215
240
27 1
309
342

139
150
165
179
189

320
349
386
429
460

193
2 12
236
266
290

127
137
150
162
170

1955. . . .
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 ---------

5 1
48
46
56
46

42
38
36
41
36

9
9
9
14
10

57 1
606
638
677
705

375
402
426
452
47 1

196
204
2 12
225
234

490
513
532
558
57 1

314
332
346
362
37 1

175
180
185
195
200

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

57
47
44
66
84

45
35
34
48
59

11
11
10
17
25

741
763
778
8 13
864

497
510
518
538
566

243
253
260
275
297

593
602
605
629
670

387
390
391
404
428

206
2 11
214
224
242

1 9 6 5 ....
1966 . . . .
1967 . . . .
1968 . . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

88
110
130
123
105

70
70
94
94
86

17
39
35
29
19

916
988
1,077
1,159
1,220

604
641
700
757
806

311
346
377
40 1
4 14

7 12
775
855
925
974

461
493
547
598
640

25 1
28 1
307
326
334

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1972 . . . .
19 7 3 . . . .
1 9 7 4 _____

10 1
102
164
139
241

75
78
123
99
159

26
23
41
40
81

1,2
1,3
1,4
1,5
1,7

842
879
960
1,014
1, 126

433
448
48 1
5 12
583

1,016
1,055
1,153
1,221
1,387

667
695
765
806
905

348
359
388
414
482

75
28
41
26
10

Sector 44. Farm machinery and equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 --------1 9 4 9 _____

E qu ip m e nt

$179
150
77

$ 109
112
57

I
I

47

T o ta l

I
I
J

$69
37
20

51
6 1
74
67

1
j
j
j

16
23
27
27
19

879
940
1,012
1,094
1, 156

68
55
50
55
48

|
|
I
|
|

16
15
14
24
16

I
|
I

Equi pment

$624
762
828

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

64
75
89
102
87

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

84
7 1
64
79
65

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

77
64
59
89
1 15

58
45
43
6 1
75

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

114
143
16 1
145
1 18

105
94

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

108
104
164
134
207

78
79
123
97
143

|
|
I

$296
402
452

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$328
360
375

$553
684
738

$265
365
407

$288
3 18
330

492
534
584
643
69 1

387
405
428
450
465

775
8 19
872
934
975

435
464
499
542
574

339
354
373
391
40 1

1,213
1,252
1,282
1,324
1,347

737
766
788
8 11
823

476
486
494
5 13
524

1,010
1,027
1, 0 34
1,051
1,051

603
6 16
620
625
621

407
4 11
414
426
429

18
18
16
28
40

1,378
1,388
1,388
1,413
1,460

84 1
840
832
837
853

536
548
556
576
606

1 , 058
1,049
1,033
1 , 045
1, 082

624
6 12
596
597
6 12

434
437
437
448
470

27
58
50
40
23

86
85
111




S tr u c tu re s

1,502
1,572
1,658
1,727
1,767

880
903
952
996
1,030

622
668
705
730
737

1
1
1
1
1

,116
,179
,258
,319
,351

638
663
7 13
757
789

478
515
544
562
562

29
25
4 1
37
63

1,796
1 , 8 19
1, 902
1,952
2,073

1,047
1,065
1 , 126
1,16 1
1,241

748
754
775
790
83 1

1
1
1
1
1

,371
,384
,456
,494
,602

803
816
87 1
897
968

567
568
584
596
634

_______ _________

85

_________

Sector 45. Construction machinery and equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—

—
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

T o ta l

$44
45
32

$6 1
60
42

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

S tr u c tu r e s

$16
15
10

E qu ip m e nt

$27 1
325
36 1

$167
207
233

I
I

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$104
1 18
128

$242
292
322

$143
181
203

135
152
169
186
20 1

|
|

$98
111
119

348
420
472
538
585

223
280
316
368
402

124
140
155
169
182

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
----------------_____
_____

39
88
70
88
72

31
70
51
70
55

7
18
18
17
16

393
474
535
6 13
673

258
321
365
426
4 7 1

1955
1956
1957
1953
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

62
8 1
106
7 1
83

52
66
76
52
68

9
14
30
19
14

72 1
786
874
923
98 1

5 10
562
621
653
697

I
I
|

2 10
223
252
270
283

6 19
667
758
769
807

430
469
5 14
532
562

188
198
223
237
245

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 ---------

89
63
74
75
106

7 1
44
54
60
76

18
19
19
14
30

1, 0 4 2
1,072
1,108
1,142
1,202

742
755
776
798
832

I
I
I
|

299
3 16
332
343
370

849
859
877
893
936

591
590
597
607
630

257
268
279
285
306

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 _____
1968. .. .
1 9 6 9 _____

14 1
17 1
228
194
211

1 11
121
174
144
158

30
50
53
49
53

1,294
1,411
1,581
1 , 7 14
1,862

898
970
1,093
1, 183
1,285

685
749
862
942
1,030

326
365
407
443
482

56
56
42
68
191

2 , 0 15
2 , 156
2,309
2,520
3,020

1,389
1,483
1,603
1,756
2,076

1
1
1
1
1

524
564
590
640
812

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

219
212
228
29 1
585

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

163
155
185
222
394

_________

I
I
I

|

395
44 1
488
53 1
577

|
I
|
|
|
|
|

__________ L_

1,01
1,11
1,26
1,38
1,51

2
4
9
5
3

625
673
706
763
943

1,644
1,760
1,885
2,065
2,530

,1
,1
,2
,4
,7

19
95
95
25
18

Sector 45. Construction machinery and equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G '■oss

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1948. . . .
1949. . . .

$139
128
8 6

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

76
156
1 19
150
121

60
122
87
1 19
9 1

15
33
32
3 1
29

1
1
1
1

1955
1956
1957
19 5 8
1959

102
119
152
10 1
114

84
96
104
70
90

17
23
47
30
24

Equi pment

1,510
1,590
1,698
1,750
1,809

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

$102
98
65

$36
29
20

$760
870
938

$ 4 18
50 1
550

996
,132
,228
,352
,443

594
699
766
862
926

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

$34 1
369
388

s to c k s

Equi pment

$667
768
822

$352
430
470

$314
338
352

40 1
432
462
490
516

864
98 1
1 , 056
1,155
1,219

503
595
646
724
769

360
386
409
430
449

979
1,040
1,105
1,13 1
1, 171

531
550
593
6 18
637

1,25
1,30
1,38
1,40
1,43

8
8
6
5
2

80 1
842
885
888
907

456
466
500
516
525

6 1
50
48
43
78

923
900
887
880
889

537
550
56 1
563
588

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

121
87
100
100
142

91
56
69
76
95

29
31
3-1
23
47

1,868
1,886
1,910
1,927
1,930

1
1
1
1
1

8
3
5
9
8

660
683
704
7 17
752

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 ....

183
220
279
228
240

137
146
202
162
173

45
74
76
66
66

2
2
2
2
2

,068
, 188
,364
,486
, 6 17

1,284
1,345
1,461
1,536
1,621

784
843
902
949
996

1,550
1,657
1,820
1,928
2,044

940
997
1,110
1, 180
1,258

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1974. . . .

234
216
228
282
505

169
156
185
2 18
355

64
59
42
63
149

2
2
2
3
3

,739
,841
,952
,112
,491

1,701
1,766
1,859
1,982
2,239

1,038
1,074
1,092
1 , 130
1,252

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1




S tr u c tu r e s

86

,2
,2
,2
,2
,2

0
0
0
0
2

,4
,4
,4
,4
,4

, 150
,231
,320
,455
,8 0 7

,329
,383
,460
,565
,801

610
659
709
748
786
820
848
859
889
1,005

Sector 46. Materials handling equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

i nvestm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1

E qu ip m e nt

1

$54
76
9 1

I
I
I

$22
29
34

I

8
19
19
18
9

103
132
158
186
204

I
I
|
|
I

38
49
56
66
75

11
13
15
13
17

1
I
I
I
I

5
8
17
5
4

216
234
261
274
290

|
I
I
|
|

82
92
104
1 12
124

18
11
14
14
17

I
i
1
I
|

5
5
5
5
10

306
315
326
335
352

|
|
I
I
I

137
14 1
148
153
16 1

25
28
34
28
31

|
I
I
I
I

10
19
18
17
18

377
411
449
480
513

|
I
|
|
I

176
193
2 16
232
251

32
30
37
49
76

I
I

19
14
18
19
34

547
573
605
650
733

|
I
I
|
I

269
285
305
336
393

$8
8
5

I
I

14
31
28
31
21

|
1
I
I
I

5
12
9
12

I
I
I
I

11

1955 . . . .
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

16
22
33
18
22

|
|
|
|
|

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1962. . . .
1963. . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

23
17
19
19
28

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
_____

36
47
53
46
50

|
|
|
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
|

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

. .. .
_____
_____
_____
_____

52
45
55
69
110

|
I
I
|
I

$25
24
16

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1953. . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

E qu ip m e nt

$ 17
15
10

i
I
|

1 9 4 7 _____
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

I
I

I
I

I
I

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$30
44
54

I
|

$31
47
57

$49
70
84

$ 19
26
29

I
|

64
83
10 1
119
128

94
122
145
170
185

33
43
48
57
64

133
14 1
157
16 1
165

194
207
23 1
239
249

69
77
86
92
102

124
130
144
146
147

I
I
|
|

169
173
178
182
19 1

260
263
267
27 1
282

11 1
1 13
1 16
1 19
125

148
150
15 1
15 1
157

|
I
I
|

200
2 17
233
247
262

300
328
36 1
384
4 10

138
152
172
186
200

162
17 6
188
198
209

278
287
300
313
340

436
453
477
5 14
590

215
226
241
267
319

221
227
236
246
270

I
I

|

I

________I____

_
________I_ _______ I
_

T o ta l

____

6 1
79
96
113
120

Sector 46. Materials handling equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$54
46
32

Equ i p m e n t

$16
15
10

S tr u c tu r e s

$38
3 1
22

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$147
189
217

S tr u c tu r e s

$52
64
71

$94
124
145

T o ta l

$129
170
195

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$43
55
6 1

$86
115
134

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

--------_____
_____
_____
. . . .

26
54
47
5 1
34

9
19
13
18
17

16
35
33
32
16

239
289
33 1
376
402

78
94
103
117
128

16 1
195
227
258
274

2 14
260
297
336
357

65
79
86
97
106

148
180
210
239
251

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

26
31
46
25
28

16
17
19
16
21

10
13
27
8
6

420
442
478
492
509

137
147
159
167
179

282
294
319
325
330

368
384
4 13
420
428

1 12
120
128
133
142

256
264
285
286
286

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

30
22
25
25
38

22
13
17
17
21

8
8
8
8
16

527
535
546
555
575

19 1
193
198
202
209

336
342
347
352
365

437
437
438
438
450

151
150
152
153
158

286
286
286
285
291

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

47
6 1
66
55
57

31
33
39
32
34

16
28
26
23
23

603
643
687
7 18
751

226
243
266
282
299

377
400
420
436
451

469
50 1
536
559
581

172
187
209
221
235

297
313
327
337
346

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

56
46
55
67
97

33
31
37
49
70

22
15
18
18
26

780
796
8 19
850
909

315
327
343
369
415

464
469
476
481
494

600
607
621
645
697

247
254
266
288
330

353
352
354
356
366




_________

87

_________

Sector 47. Metalworking machinery and equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

----------------------------i
T o ta l

I

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

I

$46 1
498
534

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

T o ta l

$380
409
436

$188
200
211

|
I
|

$273
298
322

573
667
793
924
1,054

1
|
|
|
|

352
4 14
492
577
668

4 1
49
49
24
19

1,163
1,315
1,463
1,537
1,593

I
I
|
I
I

745
847
950
1,006
1,048

422
467
5 12
53 1
545

1
1
1
1

83
74
88
1 10
137

29
2 1
34
26
38

1,669
1,724
1,801
1,888
2 ,008

|
i
I
I
I

1,099
1,138
1, 188
1,254
1,343

I
I
I
I
|

179
252
250
224
221

45
87
69
63
67

2,171
2,440
2,682
2,8 8 5
3,080

|
|
I
|
I

1,467
1,657
1,839
1, 988
2 , 127

|
I
I
|
I

179
14 1
174
206
321

53
34
44
50
90

3
3
3
5
3

|
i
|
I
I

2
2
2
2
2

$16
15
15

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$57
49
48

|
I
I

$40
33
33

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
1952. .. .
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

53
110
143
15 1
151

|
I
I
I
|

40
73
9 1
10 1
107

12
37
52
50
43

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1957 . . . .
1 9 5 8 _____
19 5 9 . . . .

138
174
177
106
90

I
I
I
|
I

97
124
128
82
7 1

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1962. .. .
1963. . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

113
96
122
137
176

|
I
I
I
I

1965. . . .
1 9 6 6 _____
1967 . . . .
1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 _____

225
339
320
287
288

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1972. .. .
1973. .. .
1 9 7 4 _____

232
176
219
257
4 11

,212
,281
,386
,524
,809

Equ i p m e n t

$225
244
26 1

S tr u c tu r e s

$154
164
174

284
333
407
483
562

18 1
213
259
302
338

999
,129
,258
,309
,340

628
7 17
806
844
866

371
4 12
451
465
473

569
585
6 13
633
665

1,387
1 , 4 12
1,458
1,512
1,599

897
9 13
938
980
1, 044

490
499
520
532
555

703
783
843
896
953

1,729
1, 9 6 5
2,172
2,339
2,498

1 , 144
1,310
1,468
1,592
1,707

584
654
704
746
79 1

2
2
2
2
3

1,772
1,794
1,843
1,917
2,099

820
828
846
868
928

220
253
30 1
346
386

,218
,265
,341
,444
,657

1
1
1
1

994
,015
,045
,079
,151

466
55 1
666
785
90 1

,5
,6
,6
,7
,0

9
2
8
8
2

2
2
9
5
7

_____________________

________________ I____

Sector 47 Metalworking machinery and equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G"oss
Year

T o ta l

1947 . .
1948 . .
1949. .

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu re s

$ 14 1
107
105

$ 104
76
73

1 10
204
258
269
268

84
135
165
180
188

.
.
.
.

235
27 1
26 1
155
129

.
.
.
.

160
133
172
186
237

97
1 16
143
17 6

.
.
.
.
.

297
4 36
397
340
326

227
307
298
255
242

69
128
98
85
83

1970 . .
1971..
1972. .
1973. .
1974. .

247
179
219
247
354

186
143
174
200
284

60
35
44
46
70

1950 .
1951.
19 5 2 .
1953.
1954.
1955.
1956 .
1957 .
19 5 8 .
1959.
196 0 .
1961.
1962.
1963.
1964.
1965.
1966 .
1967.
1968.
1969.

.
.
.
.
.

.

.

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

—




$36
31
3 1

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

1
1 S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$1,513
1,577
1,636

I
|
|

$750
803
849

$762
774
786

$1,209
1,254
1,293

$6 1 1
646
676

$598
6 07
6 17

26
69
92
83
79

1,697
1,849
2,050
2,257
2,457

|
|
|
|
|

903
1,005
1,133
1,269
1,409

793
843
9 17
987
1,047

1,332
1,461
1,639
1,820
1,994

7 11
794
902
1,019
1, 140

62 1
667
736
800
853

16 1
188
183
1 16
97

74
82
77
39
31

2
2
2
3
3

,619
,810
,985
,0 5 1
,087

|
|
|
|
|

1 , 5 16
1,645
1,763
1,811
1,837

1,102
1,164
1,221
1,239
1,250

2,1
2,2
2,4
2,4
2,4

2
9
3
6
6

7
0
6
8
7

1,227
1,336
1,434
1,459
1,459

90 0
954
1,001
1,009
1,008

111

48
35
55
43
6 1

3
3
3
3
3

,1
,1
,2
,3
,4

9
0
4
5
8

|
|
t
|
|

1,873
1,892
1, 924
1, 977
2,056

1
1
1
1
1

,2
,2
,3
,3
,3

76
88
20
37
72

2
2
2
2
2

,4
,4
,5
,5
,6

91
8 1
03
32
06

1,468
1,458
1,460
1,484
1,535

1 023
1,023

3,593
3,886
4,130
4,307
4,461

|
|
|
|
|

2
2
2
2
2

, 179
,372
,549
,673
,779

1
1
1
1
1

,4
,5
,5
,6
,6

14
13
80
33
82

2
2
3
3
3

,7 3 1
,988
,1 9 7
,341
,464

1,632
1,802
1 , 957
2,06 1
2,149

1,099
1,186
1,240
1,279
1,315

4
4
4
4
4

|
I
|
|
|

2
2
2
2
3

,8 2 1
, 8 17
,84 1
,889
, 0 19

1
1
1
1
1

,7
,7
,7
,7
,7

07
05
10
15
42

3
3
3
3
3

,502
,466
,467
,491
, 6 16

2,175
2,155
2 , 163
2,193
2,302

1 . 326

,5
,5
,5
,6
,7

4
8
4
1
2

29
22
51
04
61

_______ L___________________

88

,

1,042
1,048
1,070

1,311
1,303
1,297
1,313

Sector 48. Special industry machinery and equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
Gross

G ross

i nvestm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1947 . . . .
1948. . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

I

E qu ip m e nt

---------------------------- 1
--------$62
I
39
I
33
I

S tr u c tu re s

I
I

E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

I
I

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

I
i

E quipm ent

S tr u c tu r e s

$39
27
23

$22
12
10

$ 199
235
265

$113
138
159

I
|

$86
96
105

$183
216
242

I
I
|

$109
126
195

I

$79
89
97

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
1952 . . . .
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 9 _____

93
63
59
58
98

I
I
I
|
I

32
39
39
39
35

11
23
19
18
12

305
369
9 19
966
507

189
226
257
292
322

I
I
i
|

1 15
138
156
179
185

277
330
372
915
446

I
|
I
I
|

170
202
227
255
277

|
I
I
I
|

106
128
19 5
160
169

1 9 5 5 ....
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 ---------

56
81
78
55
56

|
I
I
I
I

9 1
70
51
39
9 1

15
1 1
26
15
15

559
626
693
735
776

355
9 17
959
986
513

I
|
I
|

198
209
239
298
262

983
593
597
623
648

302
359
385
902
9 17

I
I
I
I
I

181
188
2 1 1
22 1
23 1

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
19 6 2 . . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 9 _____

67
7 1
73
72
99

I
I
I
I
I
I

I
I
|
I
|
j

99
99
56
59
68

18
21
17
18
31

825
879
923
967
1,039

596
575
608
637
676

I
|
I
|

279
298
3 19
330
358

681
7 19
797
775
827

I
I
j
1
I

937
955
977
995
529

|
I
I
|
I

293
258
269
279
302

1965 . . . .
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 ....
1968. . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

119
156
180
193
131

I
I
1
I
I

87
107
1 16
103
99

32
98
63
39
32

1,119
1,237
1,376
1,976
1,560

732
805
886
951
1,009

I
I
I
|

387
93 1
990
525
55 1

897
999
1,122
1,203
1,268

|
i
I
I
|

572
636
706
760
807

I
I
I
I

325
36 3
4 15
993
96 1

1
1
1
1
1

157
125
160
203
269

|
I
I
I
I

1 18
96
1 17
198
193

39
28
93
55
7 1

1,667
1,739
1,892
1 , 985
2 , 189

1
1
1
1
1

|
|
I
I
I

583
609
639
689
799

1
1
1
1
1

I
I
I
I
I
1

9 7 0 ....
9 7 1 ....
9 7 2 ....
9 7 5 ....
9 7 9 _____

,0
,1
,2
,3
,9

8
3
0
0
3

3
9
3
0
9

,3
,9
,9
,6
,7

5
0
8
0
7

5
5
6
5
8

____________ L_

868
905
958
1,039
1,159

987
500
527
565
6 18

I
I
I
1

________________ L _

Sector 48. Special industry machinery and equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
------------------------------- r
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 9 7 _____
1 9 9 8 _____
1 9 9 9 _____

1
|

I
E qu ip m e nt

$ 198
85
71

|
|
I

$98
6 1
50
69
72
60
69
6 1

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

$99
23
20

:quipm ent

1
1

$551
626
688

I
|
|

$286
393
388

I
|

$269
283
299

23
93
39
32
2 1

766
870
95 1
1,037
1,102

|
|
|
|
|

997
5 12
562
620
666

I
|
|
|

3 18
358
33 9
9 17
935

26
19
9 1
29
25

1,175
1,279
1,361
1,909
1,455

I
|
|
|
|

7 17
80 1
850
878
902

|
j
|
|
j

953
973
5 10
531
552

30
35
28
29
99

1,508
1,561
1,609
1,698
1,720

|
|
|
|
|

930
953
973
996
1,027

|
|
I
|

577
607
630
652
693

1950
1951
1952
1953
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

87
115
95
102
83

|
|
|
I
|
|

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

95
123
119
79
81

|
|
|
I
I

68
109
72
55
56

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1962. . . .
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

94
100
10 1
99
136

|
|
|
I
|
1

69
65
72
70
87

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

158
202
227
17 1
149

I
|
|
|
|

109
130
137
1 17
109

98
7 1
90
53
90

1,809
1,938
2,088
2,180
2,245

I
|
|
|
|

1,076
1,199
1,216
1,267
1,308

|
|
I
|
|

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1979

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

167
128
160
196
228

I
I
I
j
|

122
97
1 17
195
172

99
30
93
5 1
55

2
2
2
2
2

|
|
I
I
|

1,362
1,389
1,939
1,506
1,603

I
I
|




S tr u c tu r e s

,3
,3
,9
,5
,6

2
6
3
3
6

7
6
5
6
6

|

r
1

E quipm ent

$999
562
6 19

|
|

|
I

$260
3 11
398

679
769
839
902
996

I
|

397
950
987
530
56 1

I

|
|

I
|
I

S tr u c tu r e s

$233
25 1
266
282
3 19
397
37 1
335

|
|
|
|

1
1
1
1

997
,073
,139
,155
,173

599
66 1
69 1
698
703

|
I
|
|

902
9 12
993
957
969

I
I
I
|

1,200
1,227
1,251
1,270
1,323

7 13
720
73 1
738
76 0

|
I
I
|

986
507
519
53 1
562

732
793
872
9 12
937

|
|
I
|
|

1,395
1,507
1,691
1 , 7 15
1,762

965
977
1,000
1,030
1,062

|
|
I
|
I

1,825
1,899
1,893
1,973
2,080

__________ L

89

T o ta l

803
865
932
977
1,011

I
|
|

591
69 1
708
737
751

1
1
1
1
1

I
I
|
|

769
77 1
785
805
830

,056
,073
,107
,167
,250

|

Sector 49. General industrial machinery and equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$45
34
33

$65
54
53

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Net

s to c k s

$20
20
19

$225
274
321

$135
166
195

s to c k s

$121
148
174

123
152
186
212
227

48
90
109
101
90

35
58
7 1
70
7 1

13
31
37
30
19

364
447
548
640
7 18

226
280
346
409
470

137
167
202
231
248

1955. .. .
1 9 5 6 _____
1957. . . .
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

90
13 1
134
1 15
110

70
93
87
75
83

19
37
46
40
27

795
909
1,024
1,118
1,202

528
608
678
733
791

266
30 1
346
384
4 10

697
794
889
960
1,021

454
519
573
6 11
651

242
274
316
349
370

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1963. . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

123
98
121
125
148

91
75
87
98
1 16

31
22
34
26
31

1
1
1
1
1

94
56
37
16
13

854
895
944
999
1,068

440
460
492
516
544

1,088
1 , 124
1,179
1,232
1,303

694
7 16
747
784
835

393
407
432
448
468

1 9 6 5 ... .
1966 . . . .
1 9 6 7 _____
1968. .. .
1 9 6 9 _____

201
272
292
253
265

157
196
20 1
189
207

44
75
90
64
58

1,757
1 , 967
2,191
2,372
2,559

1, 172
1,311
1,450
1,573
1,709

585
656
740
798
849

1,42
1,60
1,80
1,94
2,09

2
5
0
8
9

923
1,044
1 , 165
1,266
1,379

499
560
634
681
720

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1973. .. .
1 9 7 4 _____

243
246
233
32 1
449

180
187
185
249
326

62
58
47
72
122

2
2
3
3
3

1 , 8 14
1,919
2 , 0 14
2 , 166
2,387

903
952
988
1 , 047
1,156

, 2 19
,331
, 4 19
,586
,869

1,457
1,533
1,598
1 , 7 19
1,907

761
797
820
866
96 1

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

,2
,3
,4
,5
,6

,7
,8
,0
,2
,5

18
7 1
03
14
43

323
399
49 1
57 1
636

$78
96
113

200
247
305
358
408

$199
245
287

$89
108
125

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

2
2
2
2
2

1

Sector 49. General industrial machinery and equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
Gross

1

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
19 4 8 . . . .
1 9 4 9 ....

$142
109
105

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu re s

$98
63
65

T o ta l

$44
40
40

Equ i p m e n t

$62 1
7 15
804

$302
336
369

488
576
678
775
865

389
440
500
547
574

9 1
157
183
169
147

64
99
1 17
1 15
112

27
58
66
54
34

878
1,016
1 , 178
1,322
1,440

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1957. . . .
19 5 8 . . . .
1959. . . .

145
193
192
166
153

110
13 1
1 18
100
107

35
6 1
74
65
45

1,551
1,706
1,856
1, 9 7 3
2,072

948
1,048
1,13 1
1,190
1,250

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1963. . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

168
133
16 5
166
194

115
95
109
123
144

52
37
56
42
50

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,2
,3
,4
,5

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

9 6 5 _____
9 6 6 ....
9 6 7 ....
9 6 8 ....
9 6 9 _____

259
344
36 3
299
298

192
233
234
212
225

67
111

2
2
3
3
3

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ... .
1973. . . .
1974. . . .

259
25 1
233
311
390

188
189
185
244
294

3
3
3
4
4




128
86
72
7 1
6 1
47
66
96

S tr u c tu r e s

$319
379
434

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1952. . . .
1553. . . .
19 5 4 . . . .

_______________

s to c k s

\

78
42
30
11
14

602
657
724
783
822

,311
,345
,385
,433
,496

867
897
944
978
1,018

,675
, 9 14
,166
,349
,524

1,601
1,742
1,880
1,992
2,113

1,074
1,172
1,286
1,356
1,411

,6
,7
,8
,0
,2

2
2
2
2
2

1,462
1,501
1,523
1,562
1,628

5
6
5
0
3

4
7
4
8
3

,1
,2
,3
,4
,6

9
6
3
4
0

1
6
0
6
4

_____________________

90

|

T o ta l

|
|

|
|

|
|
|

$280
333
380

756
878
1,021
1,144
1,237

423
497
584
663
734

332
38 1
437
480
503

1,322
1,448
1,565
1,648
1 , 7 10

796
873
930
963
997

525
574
634
684
7 13
747
765
300
8 19
845

|

1,77
1,80
1,85
1,90
1,97

9
6
9
7
7

1,031
1,041
1,059
1, 087
1, 132

|
|
|
j

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,3
,5
,6
,8

0
1
3
8
1

7
6
5
1
7

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
3
3
3

,9
,9
,0
,1
,3

05
74
16
28
09

|
|
|

j
__________L

S tr u c tu r e s

$530
6 16
695

|
|

|

Equi pment

$250
282
314

,221
,347
,469
,563
,663

886
963
1,065
1,118
1, 154

1 , 7 18
1,767
1,804
1,894
2,025

1, 187
1,207
1 , 2 12
1,234
1,283

/

Sector 50. Machine shop products: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ”
G ross
in v e s tm e n t

-

1

G ross

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

-------------------------------------1
E qu ip m e nt
I

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

I
I

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

E qu ip m e nt

I
I
I
I
|
I
|
I

$3
4
3

06 0
69
77

|
I
|

$39
45
50

$20
24
26

$53
6 1
68

$35
40
44

$ 18
21
24

4
7
7
6
1 1

86
105
127
146
182

|
I
I
I
|

56
68
84
97
123

30
36
43
48
59

76
93
1 13
130
163

49
60
7 3
85
108

27
33
39
44
54

31
42
44
54
4 1

I
I
I
I

10
16
18
38
25

221
276
336
424
485

I
I
I
I
|

152
19 1
232
283
319

69
85
103
14 1
165

198
249
303
384
437

134
170
207
252
282

64
78
95
132
155

38
40
42
50
64

I
I

20
2 1
22
20
17

537
592
648
7 10
781

I
I
|
|
I

352
386
421
463
517

185
205
227
247
263

480
523
568
6 16
67 1

307
332
357
389
43 1

172
19 1
210
226
239

857
977
1,135
1,263
1,377

|
|
|
|
|

57 1
632
754
858
949

285
344
380
404
427

73 1
833
972
1, 078
1,169

473
52 1
628
7 16
790

257
3 11
343
36 1
3/8

1,461
1,546
1,658
1,835
2,034

|
|
I
|
I

447
465
492
526
578

1,228
1,287
1,372
1,521
1,689

837
885
95 1
1,073
1,198

391
40 1
42 1
447
491

1947 . . . .
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

$ 13
11
9

$9
6
6

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
1952 . . . .
1953. . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

11
20
24
2 1
39

7
13
16
15
27

1955. . . .
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 ---------

42
58
63
92
66

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
19 6 2 . . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

58
62
64
7 1
82

I

1 9 6 5 ....
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 ....
19 6 8 . . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

89
135
177
150
139

66
75
139
124
114

|
I
|
I

23
60
38
25
25

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
19 7 2 . . . .
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

1 13
1 18
150
2 18
246

91
97
119
180
189

I
I
I
I
I

21
20
30
37
56

I
1
i

1,014
1,081
1 , 166
1,308
1,456

_____________________

________________ I-------

Sector 50. Machine shop products: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

I

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

I
|

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

I
—
1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$33
24
20

$25
16
13

$7
7
7

$ 180
200
216

|
|
|

$ 108
123
134

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

23
39
44
39
70

15
26
3 1
28
49

8
12
12
11
20

235
269
308
34 1
404

I
|
j
|
|

146
169
197
22 1
265

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

73
92
95
140
99

53
65
65
77
57

19
26
29
63
42

469
552
637
766
853

|
I
|
|
|

1960
196 1
1962
19 6 3
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

84
90
92
100
111

51
54
56
66
83

33
36
36
33
27

923
997
1,071
1,150
1,237

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

120
18 1
220
175
158

85
93
166
14 1
127

35
88
54
34
31

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

120
120
150
210
2 12

95
98
119
175
168

24
21
30
35
44




$7 1
77
82

$ 156
174
186

|
I
j

$96
108
1 16

$59
65
70

89
99
1 10
120
138

20 1
231
264
292
349

|
|
|
|
|

125
145
168
187
227

76
86
96
104
12 1

313
37 1
429
496
543

156
180
208
270
310

406
481
556
673
746

I
I
I
|
|

268
320
369
427
464

138
16 1
187
245
282

I
|
|
I
|

582
622
662
7 10
772

34 1
375
409
439
464

80 1
858
9 13
972
1,038

I
|
I
I
|

49 1
5 18
544
578
625

309
339
369
394
4 13

1,331
1,481
1,667
1,803
1,918

I
I
I
|
|

834
900
1,035
1,14 1
1,229

496
58 1
632
662
689

1,109
1,236
1,396
1,505
1,591

|
I
I
|
|

670
720
837
925
994

438
5 16
558
579
596

1,989
2,056
2,147
2,293
2,456

|
|
|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

708
724
748
775
810

1,633
1,669
1,730
1,846
1,957

|
I
I
|
|

1 , 027
1,058
1,107
1,207
1,294

606
6 11
623
639
662

________________I____

91

,281
,331
,398
,517
,625

Sector 51. Office and computing machines: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

$38
32
30

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 --------1 9 4 9 _____

$26
24
22

$11
8
7

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$83
104
124

$ 154
182
207

$70
77
82

$131
156
178

$73
93
109

$57
63
68

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
----------------_____

22
40
36
46
41

17
18
25
34
52

4
22
11
12
9

223
257
286
323
353

138
152
17 1
198
221

85
105
1 14
125
131

190
219
242
273
297

119
128
142
164
182

71
90
99
109
1 15

1955
1956
1957
1953
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

46
90
16 1
85
65

36
53
79
55
51

9
36
82
29
14

386
46 1
606
674
721

247
287
352
392
426

139
173
254
28 1
294

323
392
529
537
620

202
237
296
328
352

121
155
233
258
268

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

90
1 10
107
120
1 10

66
85
9 1
98
90

23
25
16
22
20

790
876
956
1,044
1,117

474
537
602
67 1
726

3 16
339
353
373
391

675
745
807
877
931

389
440
492
546
588

286
305
3 15
330
342

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
. . . .
----------------_____

169
199
193
198
342

14 1
149
149
162
268

27
50
44
36
74

1,245
1,399
1,542
1,685
1, 966

829
936
1,038
1,148
1,359

416
463
504
536
607

1,038
1, 168
1,235
1,398
1,645

676
765
848
936
1,121

362
403
437
46 1
523

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

356
310
287
282
378

268
232
2 16
229
314

88
77
71
52
63

2,254
2,486
2,686
2,870
3 , 137

1,563
1,723
1,858
1,997
2,208

69 1
763
827
873
928

1,893
2,030
2,230
2,360
2,569

1,295
1,420
1,516
1,611
1,777

598
660
714
748
791
______________________

Sector 51. Office and computing machines: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G"oss

investm e i t

G ross

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 ....
1 9 4 9 ....

$68
54
50

$43
38
34

$25
16
15

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1 9 5 3 ....
19 5 4 . . . .

35
66
54
69
60

25
25
34
46
44

9
41
20
22
15

505
555
59 1
638
673

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1 9 5 7 ....
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 ....

65
127
224
1 14
84

48
66
94
6 6
59

17
60
130
48
24

1
1
1
1
1

9 6 0 _____
9 6 1 ....
9 6 2 _____
9 6 3 ....
9 6 4 . ___

1 16
140
132
149
137

77
98
106
114
105

1
1
1
1
1

9 6 5 _____
9 6 6 ....
9 6 7 _____
9 6 8 _____
9 6 9 _____

205
243
228
225
377

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 ....
1974 . . . .

380
3 16
287
276
347




s to c k s

$410
450
486

Net

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$152
184
213

$258
266
272

$328
364
395

232
249
274
307
335

273
305
3 17
330
338

408
450
478
516
543

198
207
223
249
269

2 10
242
254
267
274

7 1 1
809
1,003
1, 035
1,136

364
409
48 1
523
557

347
399
522
562
579

574
664
848
9 17
952

292
330
394
427
450

28 1
333
453
490
502

39
41
26
35
32

1
1
1
1
1

7
8
6
7
0

606
673
742
815
874

6 10
645
664
691
715

1 , 0 15
1,097
1, 165
1,243
1,303

486
540
595
654
6 98

528
557
569
589
605

163
169
165
176
285

42
73
62
48
91

1,736
1,916
2,076
2,228
2,525

986
1,101
1,208
1,322
1,537

749
8 14
867
906
987

1,426
1,579
1,707
1,823
2,081

795
893
979
1, 0 6 8
1,257

630
685
728
755
824

279
235
216
227
297

100
8 1
7 1
49
50

2
3
3
3
3

1,740
1,889
2 , 0 10
2,13 1
2,310

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1

,2
,3
,4
,5
,5

,8
,0
,2
,3
,5

1
1
0
0
9

16
34
12
66
77

_______ _________

92

1,076
1, 145
1,201
1,234
1,266

,3
,4
,6
,7
,8

27
93
17
13
64

$ 132
16 1
185

,4
,5
,6
,6
,8

2
3
2
9
3

7
9
0
9
3

_________

$ 195
210

899
953
996
1,013
1,031

Sector 52. Service industry machines: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Net

s to c k s

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

100
1 18
128
143
16 6

437
485
"516
« 25
537

26 1
292
308
3 11
3 16

175
193
208
213
22 1

1 9 5 9 --------196 0
1 9 ft 1
196?
1 <3ft 5

266
275
290
304
317

553
573
589
604
6 18

321
335
34 1
347
352

232
237
248
257
265

1 9 6 4 ---------

.
.

497
550
6 10
669
731

339
380
427
486
525

657
742
838
943
1,030

375
424
478
53 1
586

282
3 18
359
4 11
443

1 9 6 9 _____
197 0

800
900
1,042
1 , 180
1,346

581
624
663
721
775

1, 139
1,264
1,425
1,595
1 , 786

647
7 36
86 5
986
1,131

$78
1 10
130

$78
96
107

20
28
27
36
51

12
21
13
18
26

264
308
342
389
458

147
173
196
227
272

116
135
146
162
186

4 1
47
35
25
28

12
22
19
10
13

502
560
60 1
623
648

305
343
368
381
395

196
216
233
241
252

31
42
35
36
37

16
11
18
15
16

676
708
736
762
786

410
433
446
458
469

80
127
142
154
140

1954! ! . .
1 9 5 5 --------1 9 5f t
1957
19S8

$ 156
207
237

47
53
53
52
53

IQS?
1g m

55
82
91
9 1
95

25
45
51
63
44

836
930
1, 038
1, 155
1,256

62
50
47
66
63

1,381
1,524
1,706
1,901
2 , 121

104
137
181
180
210

167
187
229
246
274

1 97 1
1972
. . .
1975..
1 9 7 4 _____

S tr u c tu r e s

131
153
170
196
235

$16
20
12

53
69
54
35
41

19 5 0
195 1

Equi pment

$63
8 1
9 1

$30
35
22

32
49
40
55
78

1 9 4 9 _____

T o ta l

stocks

$69
100
1 17

$47
56
34

1947 . . . .
1948

1 9f t 5
1 9ftft
1967
1968

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

$132
182
208
232
27 1
299
340
402

492
527
559
609
655
______________________

Sector 52. Service industry machines: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$103
112
68

Equ i p m e n t

$67
7 1
42

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$36
41
25

$474
569
621

$ 188
252
289

$285
3 16
332

$376
469
5 16

666
735
783
853
959

3 19
359
394
440
509

346
375
388
4 12
450

554
6 14
652
7 1 1
805

279
31 1
335
37 1
429

275
303
3 16
339
376

$ 162
224
255

$214
245
26 1

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

6 1
86
67
92
131

37
48
43
58
83

24
38
23
33
47

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

86
104
77
50
58

64
67
47
33
37

22
37
29
17
2 1

1,018
1,093
1,140
1 , 157
1, 180

555
602
628
637
647

462
49 1
5 1 1
520
532

851
9 12
94 1
94 1
944

464
499
5 11
506
50 1

386
4 12
430
434
443

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

66
7 1
73
7 1
7 1

39
53
44
46
46

26
18
29
25
25

1
1
1
1
1

,207
,234
,259
,278
,295

655
673
678
68 1
682

551
560
581
597
6 13

953
963
973
979
985

496
5C3
499
496
493

456
460
474
483
49 1

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

107
165
180
189
160

68
99
107
103
105

38
66
73
85
55

1
1
1
1
1

,345
,452
,571
,697
,792

704
754
812
864
9 18

641
697
759
832
874

1,024
1,119
1,228
1,341
1,422

511
560
6 15
665
7 15

512
559
6 12
676
707

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

181
191
229
238
241

109
138
18 1
176
191

7 1
52
47
6 1
49

1,905
2,027
2 , 183
2,346
2,507

975
1,060
1, 187
1,307
1,439

930
966
996
1,038
1,067

1,520
1,624
1,760
1,898
2,033

766
844
960
1,066
1 , 180

753
780
799
832
852




93

_________

Sector 53. Electric transmission equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
Gross

Gross

investm ent

Net

stocks

stocks

Year
To ta l

Equipm ent

!“
I S tru c tu re s

Equipm ent

T o tal

I
I

6 1
108
1 15
125
124

42
67
72
86
88

I
I
I
I
I

18
4 1
42
38
36

621
708
80 1
902
999

1955. . . .
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

1 16
138
163
1 13
12 1

62
108
105
78
83

I

53
29
57
34
37

1, 085
1,19 1
1,319
1,394
1,473

I 9 6 0 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
19 6 2 . . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

140
147
136
123
137

94
97
102
95
105

45
50
34
28
31

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 6 5 ....
1 9 6 6 ....
1967 . . . .
1968 . . . .
1 9 6 9 ---------

195
267
355
332
347

153
19 1
231
205
242

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
19 7 2 . . . .
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

3 11
258
252
320
403

231
200
194
24 1
289

$80
85
60

1 9 5 0 ....
1 9 5 1 ....
1952 . . . .
1953. . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

I
I
I
I
i
I

I
1
I

I
|
|
|
|
I

I
Equipm ent

T o ta l

S tru c tu re s

$360
423
459

$267
28 1
287

$207
259
293

$475
540
580

$22
25
17

$58
59
42

1947 . . . .
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

I
I

$ 181
196
203

293
322
352
379
403

494
575
659
749
834

284
334
386
448
507

210
24 1
273
30 1
326

641
728
809
860
9 11

444
462
509
534
562

906
996
1,105
1,160
1,216

537
609
672
704
734

368
386
433
456
482

1,287
1,358
1,413
1,450
1,496

77 1
806
84 1
865
895

5 15
55 1
57 1
584
600

968
1,022
1,076
1,118
1,165

598
640
666
685
709

42
76
123
126
105

1,998
2 , 189
2,462
2,708
2,964

1,254
1,377
1,536
1,664
1,826

743
811
926
1, 043
1/138

1,59
1,75
2,00
2,21
2,43

79
58
58
79
113

3
3
3
3
3

1,973
2,083
2,181
2 , 3 19
2,4 9 6

1
1
1
1
1

2 , 6 13
2,722
2 , 8 15
2,964
3 , 183

7
3
7
7
4

$ 178
226
256

I
I

S tru c tu re s

328
386
448
522
596

,567
,662
,742
,804
,875

,1
,3
,4
,6
,9

I

8
4
5
5
8

,2
,2
,2
,3
,4

0
5
9
5
5

5
0
4
6
1

4
9
5
9
9

969
1, 077
1,219
1,329
1,470

625
682
785
889
969

1,591
1,672
1>7 38
1,841
1,983

1,021
1,050
1,076
1,122
1,200

__________

Sector 53. Electric transmission equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
1
Gross

r-

investm e

Gross

Year
T o tal

Equi pment

S tru c tu re s

T o ta l

stocks

Equ i p m e n t

Net

S tru c tu re s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 ....
1 9 4 9 ....

$163
163
1 12

$114
111
76

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
19 5 3 . . . .
19 5 4 . . . .

1 12
182
189
203
200

74
106
1 13
134
135

37
76
76
68
65

1,723
1,827
1,937
2,057
2,1 7 1

666
752
842
949
1,052

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 ....

190
197
228
159
16 7

93
148
136
102
105

96
49
9 1
57
62

2
2
2
2
2

,27 1
,375
,507
,567
,631

1,108
1 , 2 13
1,301
1,349
1,393

1, 163
1,162
1,205
1,217
1,238

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
19 6 2 . . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
19 6 4 . . . .

194
204
183
164
181

117
121
127
1 19
130

76
83
55
44
50

2
2
2
2
2

,7
,8
,8
,9
,9

1,442
1,488
1,532
1,561
1,596

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 / . . . .
1968 . . . .
1969. .. .

25 1
342
443
402
397

186
230
269
230
266

64
1 12
174
171
131

3,092
3,300
3,606
3,867
4 , 120

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 ....

334
265
252
3 10
354

243
204
194
236
265

90
61
58
73
89

4
4
4
4
4




$48
5 1
35

|

_________ _________ 1

$1,570
1,654
1,688

1
0
7
1
7

$46 1
553
6 11

$1,108
1,100
1,077
,056
,075
,094
,108
,119

T o ta l

1

stocks

Equ i p m e n t

$1,090
1,179
1,215
1,24 9
1,35 1
1,455
1,568
1,673

$389
475
523

S tru c tu re s

$70 1
703
691

94

1,762
1,854
1,971
2 , 0 13
2,057

905
986
1,048
1,069
1,087

857

1,275
1,321
1,342
1,355
1,374

2
2
2
2
2

, 123
,193
,237
,258
,291

1,111
1,134
1,158
1,170
1,191

1,011
1 , n 59

1
1
1
1
1

, 4 10
,493
,638
,781
,883

2
2
2
3
3

,3
,5
,8
,0
,3

9
7
5
8
0

1
6
5
5
2

1,264
1,377
1,525
1,629
1,762

2
2
2
2
2

,305
,4 1 6
,5 0 6
,645
, 8 18

683
7 15
748
775
800

1,682
1,807
1,967
2,086
2,237

8
9
5
7
1

566
635
706
793
873

1, 943
1, 972
1,996
2,032
2,0 8 1

3
3
3
3
3

,4
,5
,5
,6
,7

4
0
4
3
5

4
7
7
4
4

1,865
1,921
1,959
2,030
2,122

,362
,444
, 5 10
, 6 13
,737

868
9??
943
970

1,078
1,087
1, 100
1,126
1,330
1,456
1,539
1 , 578
1 T 586
1f 588
1 , 6 A5
1,632

Sector 54. Household appliances: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—

Gross

in v e s t m e n t

—

—

Net s t o c k s

Gross stocks

Year
1
I

Total

Equipment

I Structures

Total

Structures

Equ ip m ent

Total

I
I

Equipment

1947 ... .
1948 ... .
1 9 4 9 ____

$75
70
55

1
|
I

$51
44
35

I
|
|

$24
25
19

$27 1
332
378

$ 133
173
204

$ 137
158
174

$22 3
282
324

I
I
|

$ 1 17
155
182

1950 ... .
195 1 ____
1 9 5 2 ---1953. .. .
1954 ____

56
80
54
86
97

35
97
38
59
66

424
494
537
6 10
69 1

235
276
303
359
4 14

139
2 17
228
250
277

365
428
46 1
523
593

I
|
I
|
|

208
242
266
306
351

77
99
75
44
56

|
|
|
I
|
I
|
I
I
I
I

20
32
15
26
31

1955. .. .
1956 ____
1957 ... .
1958 ____
1959 ____

|
|
|
I
|
1
|
|
I
I
I

20
30
23
7
16

750
827
878
896
922

456
508
540
554
568

293
3 19
338
342
354

639
703
739
740
750

|
|
|
|
|

382
422
44 1
442
444

1960 ____
1961....
1962. .. .
1963 ... .
1 9 6 4 ----

60
46
49
72
78

47
40
40
57
59

I
|
|
I

12
6
8
14
19

950
958
966
994
1 , 025

586
593
596
6 13
630

363
365
370
380
395

76 1
754
749
765
785

|
I
I
I
|

450
446
44 1
452
464

1965. .. .
1966. .. .
1 967 ____
1968. .. .
1 969. .. .

121
1 12
126
125
152

|
I
|
I
I
1
I
I
I
|
|

10 1
84
90
95
122

I
|
|
I
|

20
28
36
30
29

1,096
1,157
1,230
1,301
1,396

686
724
767
815
889

4 10
433
463
486
507

847
898
960
1,018
1,100

I
I
|
|
I

5 17
552
591
633
700

|
j
|
I

52
31
34
43
61

1,503
1,569
1,655
1,765
1,900

952
997
1,060
1 , 140
1,227

55 1
572
595
625
673

1,190
1,238
1,305
1,395
1,508

I
|
I
I
|
I

754
788
838
903
974

1970. .. .
1971....
1972. .. .
1973 ____
1974 ____

57
68
51
36
39

166 |
128 I
152 I
180 I
210 I
____________ I
___

113
97
1 18
137
148

_

I
| Structures
$ 106
127
142

I
|

157
185
195
2 16
241

l
|
I
j
|
I
I
|

256
280
297
297
305

I
|

3 10
308
307
3 12
320
330
346
369
335
399

I
1
|
|
I
I
I
|
|
___| _

436
450
467
49 1
533

Sector 54. Household appliances: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

Gross

Year
Total

investment

Equipment

1947 ____
1 9 4 8 ____
1 9 4 9 ____

$ 15 1
131
103

$98
81
62

1950 ____
195 1 ____
1 9 5 2 ____
1 9 5 3 ---1 9 5 4 ____

102
133
86
137
154

59
73
59
89
98

1 9 5 5 ____
1956 ____
1957 ____
1 9 5 8 ____
1 9 5 9 ____

121
143
103
58
76

83
92
65
46
49

1960 ____
196 1 ____
1 9 6 2 ____
1963 ____
1 9 6 4 ____

80
59
64
94
102

58
49
50
71
72

1 9 6 5 ____
1966 ____
1967 ____
1 9 6 8 ____
1969 ____

152
14 1
154
146
170

121
100
103
105
133

1970 ____
197 1____
1 9 7 2 ____
1973 ____
1 9 7 4 ____

178
131
152
174
184

1 18
98
1 18
134
136




Gross stocks

I
I Structures

I
|
1
I
|
I
|
|
I
I
|
|
|
|
|
I
|
|
I
I
|
|
|
|
|

Total

Equ i p m ent

$52
50
40

$806
904
975

42
60
27
47
56

1, 044
1,144
1,195
1,293
1,404

456
517
56 1
632
706

37
50
37
12
26

1,477
1,568
1,6 16
1,6 17
1,631

21
10
13
23
30

1,645
1,632
1,6 19
1,633
1,652

31
41
51
40
36

1,720
1,776
1,844
1,903
1,984

59
32
34
39
48

2,07 1
2,108
2, 163
2,236
2,314

$288
357
408

Net
Structures
$517
547
566

Total

stocks

Equi p m ent

Structures

$246
3 12
357

$368
400
42 1

587
627
634
66 1
697

840
930
967
1,050
1, 145

395
444
473
527
586

444
485
494
522
559

76 1
82 1
849
855
860

7 15
747
766
76 1
77 1

1,201
1,275
1,304
1,284
1,278

623
666
677
665
653

577
609
626
6 18
625

868
86 1
850
856
860

776
77 1
769
777
792

1,272
1,242
1,215
1,2 17
1,227

646
627
609
6 11
6 15

625
6 14
605
606
6 12

913
944
979
1,016
1,081

807
83 1
865
886
903

1,287
1,334
1,392
1,439
1,507

668
700
734
770
831

6 18
633
657
669
675

1 , 130
1 , 158
1,204
1,265
1,325

95

$6 15
7 12
778

940
949
958
970
989

1,579
1,599
1,637
1,693
1,753

874
894
931
98 1
1 , 027

704
704
706
7 12
726

_________

Sector 55. Electric wiring and lighting equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

Gross

Year

i
I

Total
1 9 4 7 ____
1948....
1 9 4 9 ____

Gross stocks

investment

Equipment

i
I Structures

r
I

$38
34
29

|
|
|

$27
24
21

|
|
I

$10
9
8

|
I
I

1950 ____
1951....
1 9 5 2 ____
1953. .. .
1 9 5 4 ____

37
47
39
53
36

|
I
|
|
|

29
30
25
36
29

|
|
|
|

8
16
13
16
7

1955. .. .
1956 ... .
1957 ____
1 9 5 8 ____
1 9 5 9 ____

53
50
55
43
48

|
I
|
|
|

36
40
39
33
37

|
I
|
|
|

16
io
15
9

1960 ____
196 1 ____
1 9 6 2 ____
1963 ....
1 9 6 4 ____

54
51
57
63
74

|
|
|
I
I

41
39
45
47
56

111

i
I
I
|
|

1 9 6 5 ____
1966 ... .
1 967 ____
1968 ... .
1 969. .. .

120
13 1
135
14 1

1 970. .. .
197 1 ____
1 9 7 2 ____
1 9 7 3 ____
1 9 7 4 ____

Total

Equipment
$86
108
126

I
I
I
|
|

240 I
281 I
3 14 j
360 I
389 |

152
180
202
235
26 0

11

|
|
I
i
i

434
475
519
550
584

|
|
|
|
|

291
324
356
380
406

|
|
|
|

13
12
11
15
17

I
I
I
|

623
656
693
733
782

I
|
I
i
|

79
92
97
103
1 12

132 |
126 |
162 |
207 |
252 I
_ |
_ ___

|
I
|

|
I
|
|
|

32
27
34
31
29

|

866
956
1,056
1,156
1,261

97
94
122
151
187

I
I
|

34
31
40
56
65

I
|
|
1

1,354
1,439
1,557
1,718
1,920

|
|
j

$157
185
209

1
I

Net

1
1 Structures

Total

stocks

Equipment

I Structures

$7 1
77
82

$ 126
154
175

$75
96
1 12

I
I
|

$51
57
62

87
10 1
111
124
128

204
242
270
3 11
333

136
160
177
205
224

j
|
I
|

68
81
92
105
109

I
|

142
150
163
170
178

37 1
404
440
460
484

248
274
297
3 12
328

I
|
|
I
|

123
130
142
148
155

433
457
485
511
545

|
|
I
i
|

189
199
208
22 1
237

5 11
534
559
588
626

347
362
380
399
424

i
|
|
|
|

164
172
178
189
20 1

|
I
|
|
|

600
665
733
805
884

|
|
|

266
29 1
323
35 1
37 6

699
778
864
95 1
1, 040

472
529
589
652
720

|
|
j
I
|

227
248
275
299
3 19

|
|
|
|
|

947
1,005
1,089
1,199
1,343

|
|
I
|

406
433
468
5 18
576

1,116
1,18 1
1,278
1,415
1,591

I
|
I
|
|
|
I
|

77 1
815
883
976
1,100

|
|
I

344
365
394
439
49 1

Sector 55- Electric wiring and lighting equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

Gross
Total
1947 .
1948.
1949.
1950 .
1951 .
1952.
1953.
1954.
1955.
1956 .
1957 .
1953.
1959.
1960 .
196 1.
1962.
1963.
1964.
1965 .
1966 .
1967.
1968.
1969 .
1970 .
197 1.
1972.
1973.
1974.

I
I
I
1

1
1
1

1
|
1

1
i
1

1

1
1

1

1
1
1

1
1
1

investment

Equipment

$85 I
71 I
59 |
1
73 I
83 I
68 |
92 I
62 I

$6 1
52
43
56
52
44
63
49

Gross

I Structures
I
|
|
1

$23
18
16
16
50
24
29
12

90
77
80
62
68

|
|
I
I
|

59
59
55
46
50

I
|
j
|
1
I
I
I
I
I

76
72
78
87
10 1

I
I
I
I
|

54
52
60
62
73

|
I
I
|

21
20
18
25
28

151
156
166
16 1
160

I
|
|
|
|

102
115
1 17
1 18
124

I
|
|
|

48
40
49
42
36

143
129
162
199
218

I
|
I
I
|

104
96
122
147
167




I
I
|

stocks

Equipment
I
I
|
1
1
1
1

1
1
1

Net

| Structures

Total

stocks

Equipment

I Structures

$500
548
586

I
I
|

$221
265
30 0

|
I
|

$ 278
233
285

I
I
|

$372
421
458

$ 188
230
262

$ 184
191
195

637
699
745
815
853

I
I
|
I
I

349
394
430
483
522

I
I
|
I
I

287
304
3 15
331
331

I
|
|
|
|

506
563
603
664
692

305
342
369
4 11
437

200
220
234
252
254

j
|
|
|

349
354
368
373
381

|
|
|
|

745
782
820
835
854

470
500
523
533
544

274
28 1
296
302
310

|

394
405
4 15
432
452

j
|
|
|

878
895
9 15
942
980

557
564
577
590
6 12

321
330
338
351
367

30
17
24
15
18

1
1
1
1
1
|

9 17
966
1,017
1,047
1,080

|
|
I
j
I

568
6 11
648
673
698

1
1

1,118
1,149
1,182
1,221
1,271

|
|
I
I
|

724
744
767
789
818

1,368
1,467
1,574
1,674
1,772

|
|
|
|
|

874
940
1,007
1,073
1,144

|
|
|
|

493
526
567
60 1
627

I
|
|
|
|

1,066
1,154
1,249
1,336
1,419

662
722
783
843
906

404
431
466
493
512

1,851
1,914
2,008
2 , 136
2,279

I
I
I
|
I

1,194
1,234
1,300
1,338
1,495

I
|
I
|
|

657
679
707
747
784

|
|
|
|

1,480
1,524
1,596
1,701
1,819

945
974
1,026
1,099
1, 187

534
549
570
602
631

39
33
40
52
51

1

1
1
1
1

1
1
|

1
1
1

96

|

Sector 56. Radio, TV, and communication equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

Gross

Net

Gross stocks

investment;

stocks

Y ear
I
|

Tot a l

Structures

Equipment

Total

Equipment

T
I Structures

Total
$30 1
347
39 1

$ 174
20 1
228

I
|

$ 127
145
162

2 15
24 1
275
3 15
333

439
507
590
698
739

264
306
356
426
450

|
|
I
|

175
200
233
272
288

I
|
|
|

359
4 16
497
57 1
620

800
908
1 , 068
1,178
1,278

487
54 1
623
663
720

|
|
I
I
|

3 12
366
444
5 14
557

|
I
|
I
|

670
74 1
800
859
906

1,389
1,499
1,6 16
1,754
1,870

789
835
902
99 1
1,071

I
|
|

960
1,090
1,208
1,321
1,446

2,06 1
2 , 364
2,676
2 , 973
3,3 C 6

1,220
1,407
1,618
1,819
2,045

|
|
I
|
|

1,564
1,636
1,7 19
1,8 16
1,913

3,559
3,3 0 3
4,024
4,313
4,625

$373
423
473

$207
239
27 1

I
I

$ 165
184
20 1

18
31
39
45
23

529
605
698
819
874

313
363
423
503
54 0

I
I
|
|
|

72
93
127
90
112

31
62
86
79
53

950
1,075
1,254
1,386
1,509

59 1
659
757
8 14
889

|
|
I
|
|

129
1 14
139
169
168

55
76
63
64
52

1,646
1,784
1 , 930
2,100
2,250

976
1,042
1,129
1,240
1,344

... .
... .
... .
... .
____

304
427
450
450
504

|
|
|
|
|

243
290
325
329
369

60
136
125
120
134

2,477
2,820
3,179
3,529
3,926

1,516
1,729
1,970
2,208
2,479

1970 ... .
1971....
1972. .. .
1973 ... .
1974. .. .

445
457
457
549
597

I
I
I
|
I

3 17
373
360
437
48 1

128
83
97
112
115

4,253
4,576
4 , 884
5,263
5,669

2,6 8 8
2,940
3 , 164
3,447
3 , 755

1 9 4 7 ____
1 9 4 3 ____
1 9 4 9 ____

$84
64
64

I
|
|

$57
41
42

1950 ____
1951 ... .
1 9 5 2 ____
1953. .. .
1954 ____

71
93
112
142
79

i
I
I
I
|

52
62
72
96
55

1 9 5 5 ____
1956 ____
1957 ____
1 9 5 8 ____
1 9 5 9 ____

103
155
213
170
166

I
|
|
|
|

1960 ____
1961....
1962 . .. .
1 9 6 3 ____
1 9 6 4 ____

184
190
203
234
220

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

$26
23
22

I
I Structures

Equipment

|

600
664
7 14
763
798

|
I
j
|

840
956
1,058
1,154
1,260

|
i

2,202
I
2 , 396
|
2,557
|
2 , 774
3,014
I
________________ I
—

1,357
1,406
1,466
1,538
1,611

Sector 56. Radio, TV, and communication equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

Gross

Year
Total

--------------------------------- r
Gross stocks

investment

1
Equipment 1 Structures
________________ 1

Total

Equ ip m ent

Structures

I
I

Net
Total

I

stocks

Equipment

r
| Structures

1947 ____
1 9 4 8 ____
1949. .. .

$ 155
1 13
1 12

$97
67
66

I
|
|

$58
46
46

$1,0 5 7
1, 126
1,193

$4 17
464
509

$6 3 9
66 1
684

I
|
|

$80 3
866
925

|
|
|

$ 343
382
4 17

I
I
|

1950 ... .
1 9 5 1 ____
1 9 5 2 ____
1953. .. .
1954. .. .

1 19
146
172
2 16
119

80
88
102
136
76

|
I
|
|

38
57
69
80
43

1,266
1,363
1,484
1,645
1,706

566
630
704
308
848

699
733
779
837
857

|
|
|
|
|

988
1,073
1,180
1,326
1,368

|
I
I
I
|

464
5 15
575
664
686

I
I
I
|

523
553
605
662
68 1

1 9 5 5 ____
1956 ____
1957 ____
1958 ____
1 9 5 9 ____

156
22 1
292
239
22 1

100
1 18
155
109
134

I
i
|
|

55
103
137
130
87

1,798
1,951
2, 170
2,3 3 2
2,47 1

908
980
1, 084
1,136
1,209

890
97 1
1,086
1,195
1,261

|
|
I
j

1,442
1,576
1,774
1,910
2,022

|
|
|
|
|

729
783
869
902
954

j
|
|

7 13
792
904
1,008
1,068

1960 ____
1961....
1 9 6 2 ____
1 963 ____
1964. .. .

244
262
270
305
282

152
135
166
20 1
200

I
I
|
|

91
126
104
104
82

2,627
2,796
2,969
3,169
3,34 1

1,294
1,357
1,445
1,562
1,671

1,332
1,439
1,523
1,607
1,669

I
|
|
j
|

2,1 5 0
2,288
2,426
2,591
2,724

I
|
|
|
|

1,019
1,061
1,128
1,223
1,310

|
|
I
|

1,130
1,226
1,298
1,367
1,4 13

1 9 6 5 ____
1 966 ____
1967 ... .
1 9 6 8 ____
1 9 6 9 ____

383
542
546
529
563

290
342
369
365
397

|
|
I
I
|

92
200
176
163
166

3,605
4,0 2 2
4,4 3 5
4,823
5,237

1,864
2,1 0 2
2,362
2,6 10
2,8 8 3

1,741
1,919
2,073
2,213
2,354

|
I
|
|
|

2,947
3 , 318
3,677
4,001
4,3 4 0

|
|
|
|
|

1,480
1,692
1,919
2,129
2,3 5 4

I
|
|
|

1,467
1,625
1,757
1,871
1,985

1 970 ____
197 1 ____
1 9 7 2 ____
1 9 7 3 ____
1 9 7 4 ____

480
465
457
536
540

334
377
360
432
450

|
|
|
I
|

145
87
97
103
90

5,555
5,84 1
6, 102
6,4 19
6,7 17

3,081
3,310
3,505
3,7 5 3
3,9 9 9

2 , 473
2,531
2,597
2,665
2 , 718

|
|
I
|

4,572
4,7 6 6
4,929
5,148
5,346

I
I
|
|
I

2,497
2 , 664
2 , 794
2,976
3,1 5 5

I

2 , 075
2,102
2,1 3 5
2,17 1
2 ,19 1




97

__________ L

$460
483
507

Sector 57. Electronic components and accessories: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—

G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
—
Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu re s

Equ i p m e n t

To ta 1

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

$63
66
70

$50
54
58

$77
82
87

$66
70
74

172
187
206
231
277

95
103
1 14
129
16 1

77
83
92
102
116

137
150
167
190
233

76
82
91
104
134

6 1
67
75
85
98

17
31
29
20
31

326
395
457
522
628

195
235
27 1
318
394

13 1
160
186
204
233

278
344
400
457
554

165
202
233
275
344

113
14 1
166
182
210

1 15
1 12
1 19
129
147

36
42
36
46
65

768
909
1,049
1,209
1,401

500
600
707
822
95 1

268
308
342
386
449

682
808
930
1,067
1,232

440
529
620
717
825

242
279
309
349
407

264
395
374
330
404

196
304
274
248
322

67
90
99
8 1
81

1,64
2,00
2,34
2,63
2,98

1
7
6
5
9

1,126
1,405
1,648
1,857
2 , 134

514
602
698
777
855

1,441
1,770
2,065
2,302
2,598

1
1
1
1

974
,222
,429
,596
,825

466
548
636
705
772

359
338
344
629
786

289
246
287
508
629

70
9 1
57
121
156

3
3
3
4
5

0
8
0
1
3

2,368
2,550
2,760
3 , 176
3,6 9 8

921
1,008
1, 059
1,175
1,324

2
3
3
3
4

2
2
2
2
3

,0
,1
,2
,6
,0

1947 . . . .
1948. . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

$19
15
15

$ 12
8
9

$7
6
6

$ 143
152
162

1950 . . . .
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

16
21
26
32
54

11
13
15
20
38

5
8
10
12
16

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1958. . . .
1 9 5 9 ---------

57
78
7 1
75
1 17

40
47
42
55
85

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

151
154
155
176
212

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

,2
,5
,8
,3
,0

9
5
2
5
2

_______

$ 1 13
12 1
129

S tr u c tu r e s

,8
,0
,2
,6
,2

3
2
1
6
4

2
7
0
0
2

0
2
7
2
7

5
6
2
2
2

826
900
938
1,037
1, 169

__________ __________

Sector 57. Electronic components and accessories: Constant dollars

G"oss

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 ....

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$40
29
29

$25
16
16

$15
12
13

$454
465
476

$ 189
197
205

$265
267
27 1

$344
352
359

$ 152
156
160

$ 192
195
199

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
.. . .

30
37
43
54
88

19
21
24
32
59

10
15
19
22
29

486
503
525
556
621

214
225
237
257
302

27 1
277
287
299
3 19

366
379
398
426
488

166
173
182
198
240

200
206
216
228
247

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

92
1 18
102
104
163

6 1
66
56
72
110

31
52
46
32
52

689
783
859
938
1,074

349
399
439
494
587

340
383
4 19
443
486

552
64 1
7 11
781
906

283
330
365
4 13
497

268
310
346
367
408

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

206
214
210
239
290

145
143
151
164
186

60
70
59
75
103

1,252
1,436
1 , 6 14
1,819
2,071

7 13
836
964
1, 102
1,260

538
600
650
7 17
8 11

9 6 5 _____
9 6 6 ....
9 6 7 _____
9 6 8 _____
9 6 9 _____

349
504
465
392
456

245
37 1
323
281
354

104
133
142
1 10
102

2
2
3
3
3

,3
,8
,2
,5
,9

7
3
4
7
5

8
4
4
2
4

1,472
1,804
2,08 1
2,309
2,600

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 . ___

387
348
344
6 10
694

307
251
287
498
572

79
96
57
1 12
122

4
4
4
5
5

,2
,5
,7
,2
,7

56
06
36
15
58

2,833
2,998
3 , 184
3,565
4,00 1

1
1
1
1
1




98

1,0
1,2
1,3
1,5
1,7

70
35
90
67
86

6 12
720
830
946
1,077

457
515
560
621
708

906
1,030
1 , 162
1,262
1,354

2
2
2
3
3

,0
,4
,8
,0
,3

53
63
16
80
91

1,258
1,553
1,786
1,963
2,197

795
909
1,030
1,117
1, 193

1
1
1
1
1

3
3
3
4
4

,6
,7
,9
,3
,7

13
75
15
00
45

2
2
2
2
3

1,245
1,311
1,335
1,413
1,497

,422
,507
,551
,650
,757

,3
,4
,5
,8
,2

6
6
7
8
4

7
4
9
7
8

Sector 58. Miscellaneous electrical machinery: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$27
32
35

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 ---------

$23
29
19

$ 16
22
15

$7
6
4

$88
1 14
130

$53
74
87

$35
40
42

$75
100
114

$47
67
78

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 ---------

17
39
4 1
39
35

13
23
25
23
28

3
16
16
15
7

144
180
2 17
25 1
28 1

99
120
142
163
187

45
59
74
88
93

126
158
192
222
246

88
106
125
142
16 1

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
--------_____
--------_____

33
43
26
22
24

28
35
21
17
19

5
8
4
5
5

308
345
362
375
389

2 10
240
254
263
273

97
104
107
111
1 15

268
298
308
313
319

179
203
212
214
218

88
94
96
99
10 1

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 --------1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

29
33
39
37
42

24
23
31
29
33

5
9
8
8
9

406
425
448
469
492

286
297
314
326
342

120
128
134
142
150

329
340
356
369
386

224
229
24 1
248
260

104
1 10
1 15
12 1
126

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1967 . . . .
1968. .. .
1 9 6 9 _____

55
64
104
1 10
96

39
52
72
82
72

15
11
32
27
23

526
569
649
735
804

362
395
445
505
554

164
173
204
229
250

414
450
524
602
662

276
305
352
407
45 0

137
144
172
194
21 1

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

1 10
95
93
173
257

87
7 1
73
133
204

22
24
20
39
53

887
953
1,015
1 , 156
1,377

6 17
662
709
8 14
987

270
290
306
342
390

506
543
579
672
83 1

227
244
257
289
333

__________ _______

734
788
836
96 1
1, 164

_______ __________

37
52
66
80
85

Sector 58. Miscellaneous electrical machinery: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
r
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Net
s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

E quipm ent

I
I

S tr u c tu r e s

I
|

T o ta l

I
|

:qi/i pm ent

S tr u c tu r e s

To ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

I
1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$48
56
36

$33
43
27

I
I

$15
12
8

I
I

$245
293
319

|
|
|

$ 1 19
159
183

$126
133
136

$196
242
265

$104
142
162

$92
99
103

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

31
67
68
64
56

24
37
40
37
43

I
I
|
|
|

6
29
28
26
12

I
|
|
|
I

341
3 98
456
509
552

|
|
|
|
|

203
236
270
30 1
337

138
162
185
207
2 15

283
335
387
432
467

177
205
233
256
284

105
130
153
175
182

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

52
63
35
30
33

42
49
28
22
25

I
|
I
|

9
13
7
8
8

I
|
|
I
I

589
636
652
663
674

I
|
|
|
|

369
407
421
428
435

219
228
231
235
239

4 95
531
537
537
537

308
337
34 1
338
336

186
194
195
198
200

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

39
45
52
50
56

30
30
39
36
41

9
15
'2
14
14

I

I
I
I
I

|
j
|

689
707
729
747
769

|
|
|
|
|

444
451
465
472
484

244
256
264
275
285

54 1
549
562
572
587

337
336
344
347
355

203
2 12
2 18
225
231

I
|
I
|

806
849
940
1,030
1,098

|
|
|
|
|

50 1
532
582
640
684

304
317
358
389
413

6 16
653
738
820
879

370
398
446
502
542

246
254
29 1
3 17
336

1
1
1
1
1

|
|
|
|
|

944
985
1,020
1 , 125
1,285

594
623
650
732
865

350
362
369
392
420

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

72
so
129
130
109

49
63
83
92
79

|
I
|
I
|

23
17
46
37
29

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

118
97
93
168
227

92
72
73
131
185

I
I
|
I
|

25
25
20
37
41

_____________________ 1
___




|
I

,1
,2
,2
,3
,5

73
27
75
96
74

741
777
813
906
1,052

_______ L______________ 1____

99

432
449
46 1
489
521

Sector 59. Motor vehicles: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

—
G ross

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

S tr u c tu re s

664
776
902
94 1
1 , 0 18

1,283
1,456
1,538
1,588
1,628

3
4
5
5
5

,833
,639
,057
,111
, 163

2
3
3
3
3

,7
,3
,7
,7
,7

2
6
1
3
6

7
9
9
7
7

1, 106
1,269
1,338
1,373
1,396

1,705
1,783
1,891
2,005
2,160

5
5
5
5
6

,2
,3
,4
,6
,0

79
20
10
26
56

3
3
3
3
4

,8
,8
,8
,9
,2

2
0
1
4
4

5
9
4
2
5

1,454
1,510
1,596
1,684
1,811

,095
,604
,901
, 167
,557

2
2
2
3
3

,4
,7
,9
,0
,2

6
7
7
8
8

,7
,4
,8
,1
,6

9
2
1
0
0

4
5
5
5
5

,7
,1
,3
,5
,8

0
3
5
4
5

0
8
6
2
2

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,2
,4
,5
,7

8
9
5
6
5

9
1
3
7
6

7,870
8,043
9,493
10,628
12,211

3
3
3
3
4

,440
,558
,68 1
,899
, 150

6,087
6 , 186
7,567
8,605
10,060

2
2
3
3
3

,8
,9
,0
,2
,4

6
4
2
0
0

9
5
5
1
8

7
7
3
1
4

3
3
4
4
4

,2
,9
,3
,4
,6

0
2
6
9
3

4
0
4
2
5

1
8
8
0
3

3
2
9
8
5

4
4
4
5
5

,8
,8
,9
,2
,5

0
9
9
0
7

8
9
7
3
5

332
26 1
227
184
264

8,564
9,3 0 8
9,8 0 4
10,222
10,842

6
6
6
7
7

195
162
172
272
310

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
3
3
4

,3
,7
,0
,4
,0

4
0
4
2
2

1 9 5 5 ....
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1958. .. .
1 9 5 9 _____

57 1
1,008
655
322
349

457
8 16
555
255
292

1 14
19 1
100
67
56

4
5
5
6
6

,4
,3
,9
,0
,2

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

444
396
470
6 14
846

349
300
343
480
669

95
96
127
133
176

6
6
6
7
7

,5
,6
,8
,2
,7

1,169
1,101
87 1
8 17
1,046

837
840
643
632
781
732
620
1,921
1,625
2,087

927
783
2,094
1,898
2,398

1,319
1,519
1,684
1,968
2,423

8
7
0
8
6

52
133
149
63
10 1

1,310
1,601
3,174
4,527
6,362

S tr u c tu r e s

1 , 984
2,295
2,586
2,910
3,44 1

$1,451
1 , 7 14
1 , 8 14

8 13
928
1,059
1,104
1, 187

207
28 1
262
397
585

Equ i p m e n t

$588
624
632

1,535
1,776
1 , 989
2,325
2,835

259
4 14
4 11
46 1
687

s to c k s

$862
1,090
1,181

9
5
9
9
3

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 4 _____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

T o ta l

_______

$728
766
778

$1,732
2,014
2 , 143

$280
335
18 1

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

S tr u c tu r e s

$1,003
1,247
1,364

$75
56
29

$204
278
151

1 9 4 7 ....
1 9 4 8 ....
1 9 4 9 _____

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

Net

s to c k s

__________

6
0
0
5
8

8
3
2
5
4

1

0
9
0
9
9

8,957
9,131
10,592
11,806
13,468

__________

Sector 59. Motor vehicles: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year
T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1949. . . .

$621
680
357

$454
568
297

$166
111
59

$ 5 , 151
5,646
5 , 8 19

1 9 5 0 _____
1951 . . . .
1952. . . .
1953. . . .
1954 . . . .

499
722
703
764
1,113

390
476
437
650
929

109
246
265
113
184

6,135
6,664
7 , 154
7,679
8,526

3
3
4
4
5

,442
, 8 10
,118
, 6 13
,358

2,692
2,853
3,035
3,066
3 , 168

4
5
5
6
6

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 _____
1959. . . .

921
1,468
908
446
474

713
1, 150
750
335
379

207
318
158
110
94

1
1
1
1

9 , 157
0,315
0,898
0,996
1,091

5
6
7
7
7

,8
,7
,2
,3
,4

6
8
8
5
2

2
3
6
0
6

3
3
3
3
3

,2
,5
,6
,6
,6

94
32
11
45
64

7,46
8,49
8,92
8,85
8,7 6

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

600
540
642
823
1,116

158
160
208
215
279

1
1
1
1
1

1,269
1,339
1,462
1,726
2,255

7
7
7
7
7

,5
,5
,4
,6
,9

2
0
9
2
5

2
8
9
6
5

3
3
3
4
4

,7
,8
,9
,0
,2

47
31
62
99
99

1
1
1
1
1

9 6 5 _____
9 6 6 ....
9 6 7 _____
9 6 8 _____
9 6 9 _____

1,544
1,396
1,069
960
1, 185

1,033
1,012
748
7 10
858

510
383
320
249
326

13,190
13,963
14,392
14,692
15,190

8,4 6 3
8,939
9 , 138
9,285
9,558

4
5
5
5
5

,7
,0
,2
,4
,6

2
2
5
0
3

7
3
3
7
2

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

992
7 98
2,094
1,846
2,123

770
627
1,921
1,593
1,88 1

221
170
172
252
242

15
15
16
17
19

9 , 7 18
9 , 7 11
10,982
11,917
13,135

5
5
5
5
6

,7
,8
,8
,9
,0

4
0
5
7
8

7
3
3
6
4

1 1,865
11,824
13,066
14,019
15,212




44 1
380
434
607
837

,4
,5
,8
,8
,2

6
1
3
9
1

$2,483
2,952
3 , 151

5
4
6
4
9

$2,668
2,693
2,668

$4,105
4,566
4,687
,9
,3
,7
,1
,9

3
7
7
9
4

s to c k s

$2,088
2,523
2,668

$2,016
2,043
2 , 0 18

2
7
1
8
5

2
3
3
3
4

,8
,1
,3
,7
,4

8
7
8
8
3

9
1
5
6
6

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,2
,3
,4
,5

43
05
85
12
08

4
9
7
0
5

4
5
6
5
5

,8
,6
,0
,9
,8

3
4
0
1
3

6
3
7
5
4

2
2
2
2
2

,6
,8
,9
,9
,9

27
55
20
34
31

8,7 6 8
8,6 7 8
8,666
8,821
9,255

5
5
5
5
5

,7
,6
,5
,5
,8

8
3
2
7
5

0
5
4
6
0

2,987
3,042
3 , 142
3,244
3,405

0
0
1
1
1

6
6
6
6
7

,3
,7
,8
,9
,1

11
37
81
71
93

,102
,779
,103
,296
,690

7,306
7,260
8,50 1
9,378
10,510

__________

100

S tr u c tu r e s

3
4
4
4
4

,7
,0
,2
,3
,4

9
4
2
2
9

1
2
2
4
7

4
4
4
4
4

,
,
,
,
,

5
6
6
4
0

8
3
4
0
2

5
5
5
6
7

Sector 60. Aircraft and parts: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$887
889
890
890
,012
, 184
,306
,390

$416
427
437

$470
462
452
446
485
528
575
6 19

$1,030
1,055
1,076

$567
576
581

$462
479
495

17
92
14 1
89
56

1,096
1,236
1,427
1,569
1,675

587
638
692
749
802

508
597
735
820
872

125
20 1
222
129
128

78
146
174
77
73

1,828
2,121
2,459
2,602
2,735

882
1,036
1,206
1,280
1,349

945
1, 0 85
1,252
1,321
1,385

1,520
1,789
2,0 9 7
2,2 0 6
2,30 1

689
832
989
1,046
1,096

831
957
1,108
1,160
1,204

179
227
292
295
264

124
150
189
192
205

54
77
102
102
59

2
2
3
3
3

,8
,9
,1
,3
,5

4
8
9
8
4

0
6
0
7
5

1
1
1
1
1

1,4
1,4
1,5
1,6
1 ,7

2
2
2
2
2

,3
,4
,6
,7
,8

64
65
21
69
75

1
1
1
1
1

5
3
2
5
4

1,228
1,272
1,339
1,403
1,421

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1967. .. .
1968. .. .
1 9 6 9 ---------

312
685
799
625
668

206
415
547
464
479

105
270
252
16 1
188

3
4
4
5
5

,7
,3
,9
,4
,9

4
0
7
5
6

2
5
3
6
9

1, 9 46
2,26 1
2,70 1
3,051
3,406

1,79
2,04
2,27
2,40
2,56

6
4
1
4
2

3
3
4
4
4

,0
,5
,1
,5
,9

2
2
2
3
5

0
6
9
4
9

1,537
1,820
2,223
2,523
2,821

1,482
1,705
1,906
2,010
2,137

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 ---------

4 13
237
199
284
320

293
197
163
217
257

120
39
35
66
63

6
6
6
6
6

,2
,2
,2
,2
,3

1
6
5
9
5

3
2
0
7
3

3
3
3
3
3

2
2
2
2
2

9
2
7
9
4

5
5
4
4
4

,
,
,
,
,

0
4
3
8
5

4
8
3
4
5

2
2
2
2
2

2,192
2 , 163
2 , 126
2,118
2 , 103

1 9 4 7 ....
1948. .. .
1 9 4 9 _____

$34
49
50

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1952. . . .
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____

53
177
231
186
152

36
84
89
96
95

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

203
348
396
207
20 1

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

$11
20
20

$22
29
30

, 4 10
,492
,607
,718
,834

,5
,6
,6
,6
,6

63
10
03
28
68

,6
,6
,6
,6
,6

29
94
82
69
10

4
5
4
6
8

1
1
1
1

1
0
9
8
8

,1
,1
,2
,3
,4

,9
,8
,8
,7
,7

3
9
8
6
5

444
526
655
731
77 1

11
85
06
65
51

Sector 60. Aircraft and parts: Constant dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

n
|

$3,123
3,149
3,163

I
I
I
|
|

$1,398
1,400
1,391

E qu ip m e nt

$72
95
96

$47
56
56

$24
39
40

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

100
307
395
3 14
25 1

64
136
142
154
149

35
17 1
252
160
102

3
3
3
3
3

,1
,3
,6
,8
,9

71
77
63
61
90

|
I
|
|
j

1,379
1,432
1,483
1,540
1,586

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

332
52 1
569
296
287

190
277
293
169
166

142
243
276
126
121

4
4
4
5
5

,1
,5
,9
,1
,2

9
7
9
2
5

0
0
0
9
2

|
|
I
I
j

1,668
1,831
2,005
2,051
2,091

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1962. .. .
19 6 3 . . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

248
3 16
406
403
347

156
188
238
237
253

91
128
167
165
93

5
5
5
5
6

,3
,4
,6
,8
,0

26
61
76
78
13

I
|
|
|
|

2,119
2 , 175
2,277
2,374
2,482

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

414
890
991
739
760

252
494
636
521
527

162
396
355
217
232

6,207
6,867
7,616
8,101
8,591

|
I
|
I
|

2,586
2,930
3,410
3,769
4 , 123

442
24 1
199
275
283

305
199
163
213
233

136
4 1
35
6 1
49

8
8
8
8
8

|
|
|
|
|

4,242
4,24 1
4 , 182
4,149
4,1 1 2

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____




,7
,6
,5
,4
,3

4
7
4
5
4

5
8
3
6
9

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

1

S tr u c tu r e s

b

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

I

|

|

I

|
|
|

I
|

|

__________ _______ L_________ L

10 1

$1,724
1,748
1,772

$2,669
2,635
2,594

$1,148
1,110
1,066

1,791
1,945
2,179
2,321
2,403

2
2
2
3
3

,5
,7
,9
,0
,1

5
0
4
9
7

0
8
7
7
7

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
3
3

,5
,7
,9
,0
,1

2
3
8
7
6

2
9
5
7
0

3
3
4
4
4

,3
,6
,0
,1
,1

3
6
3
2
9

2
7
9
4
2

1,2
1,3
1,5
1,5
1,6

3
3
3
3
3

,2
,2
,3
,5
,5

0
8
9
0
3

7
6
8
3
0

4
4
4
4
4

,2
,2
,4
,5
,6

0
8
3
7
5

9
5
9
9
3

1
1
1
1
1

3,6
3,9
4,2
4,3
4,4

2
3
0
3
6

0
7
6
1
7

4
5
6
6
6

,7
,3
,0
,4
,8

8
7
5
5
5

3
9
5
5
2

4
4
4
4
4

0
3
6
0
3

2
7
1
6
6

6,
6,
6,
6,
6,

,5
,4
,3
,3
,2

904
732
499
324
145

,025
,053
,085
,125
,158

$1,520
1,524
1,527
I
|
I
|

1,5
1,6
1,8
1,9
2,0

24
54
62
72
19

30
86
53
89
18

I
I

2
2
2
2
2

,1
,2
,4
,5
,5

0
8
8
3
7

,632
,672
,756
,832
,918

I
I
I
|

2
2
2
2
2

,5
,6
,6
,7
,7

76
12
83
47
34

1,996
2,310
2,752
3,0 6 0
3,354

I
I
|
|
|

2
3
3
3
3

,7
,0
,3
,3
,4

8
6
0
9
9

3
3
3
3
3

,4
,3
,1
,1
,0

04
28
98
02
17

I

_______ __________L

3,
3,
3,
3,
3,

1
0
5
4
3

6
8
3
5
7

500
404
300
22 1
128

Sector 61. Other transportation equipment: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
I

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

E quipm ent

r

I

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

I

1 9 9 7 _____
1 9 9 8 _____
1 9 9 9 _____
1950
1951
1952
1953
1959

$26
92
25

$95
69
36

$896
926
927

$19
22
11

$37 1
397
403

19
30
38
3 1
37

18
22
22
17

920
930
950
96 1
97 1

902
9 12
927
939
444

56
89
100
8 1
79

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

39
96
53
95
90

16
93
97
35
39

98 1
1,022
1, 073
1,109
1,128

959
969
990
50 1
508

30
28
21
26
35

1,151
1,168
1,178
1,199
1,292

515
521
525
537
561
598
669
720
77 1
848

31
99
6 1

59
59

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 _____
1959. .. .

1 1

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1969

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

73
68
60
72
95

92
90
39
96
60

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1 17
158
152
158
228

73
107
87
88
116

93
51
65
69
111

1,307
1,912
1,510
1,613
1,783

27 1
237
366
3 13
903

159
123
2 11
180
256

116
113
155
132
197

1,995
2,169
2,968
2,709
3,036

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 9 _____

1
1
1
1

_____________________

962
,092
,206
,337
,539

$525
529
523

$692
7 15
708

$300
318
317

$392
396
390

517
5 18
522
527
527

6 99
697
7 11
7 16
721

310
3 12
321
321
326

389
385
389
395
395

527
552
583
602
620

728
766
8 15
899
869

332
395
369
375
380

395
921
950
968
989

635
697
652
662
681

883
897
900
916
952

387
391
393
903
929

996
505
506
5 12
527

708
792
790
892
935

1,008
1,109

959
525
570
680

599
578
621
667
759

1,033
1 , 126
1,261
1,372
1,997

1,627
1,778
2,053
2,269
2,556

782
897
995
1,105
1,283

895
931
1,057
1,158
1,273

I
I

|
|
|

|

|
|
i
|
|
|

|

I

|

I
I
|

I

1,191

6 12

1,280
1,939

________________________ L _

Sector 61. Other transportation equipment: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
I

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

|

$3
3
2

0 06
00 1
938

|
|
|

$903
939
937

Equi pm ent

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

_______________ I________________
1 9 9 7 _____
1 9 9 8 ....
1 9 4 9 _____

|
|
|

$95
125
69

$53
8 1
97

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
--------_____
_____

I
I
|
|
|

58
83
100
89
88

39
99
6 1
99
56

23
33
39
39
32

2
2
2
2
2

86 1
807
769
7 17
662

|
|
|
|
|

920
916
920
908
900

1 990
1 89 1
1 899
1 808
1 762

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

|
I
I
|
|

89
139
193
1 16
107

59
63
69
57
5 1

30
7 1
79
58
56

2
2
2
2
2

605
592
588
558
522

|
|
i
i
|

890
88 1
876
859
837

I960
1961
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

|
|
|
I
|
j

103
97
82
100
129

52
50
98
58
73

50
97
39
9 1
55

2
2
2
2
2

989
993
392
362
364

|
|
|
I
|

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

--------_____
_____
_____
_____

|
|
|
|
|

156
202
193
193
269

89
127
10 1
98
126

66
75
91
99
138

2
2
2
2
2

396
978
55 1
627
774

1970
1971
1972
1973
1979

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

|
I
I
I
i

295
295
366
30. 0
398

162
125
21 1
17 7.
232

132
119
155
122
115

2
3
3
3
3

950
075
319
993
712

_______________ 1
____ ___________ _____________________




$9 1
93
22

$2
2
2

103
062
000

$2
2
2

20 1
188
1 19

$ 7 17
738
722

$1,983
1,950
1,397

2 037
1 980
1 990
1 889
1 839

690
672
669
693
628

1,396
1,307
1,276
1,296
1 , 2 10

1 7 15
1 7 11
1 7 11
1 698
1 685

1 79 1
1 790
1 80 1
1 786
1 765

6 17
6 10
6 10
600
586

1, 179
1, 180
1,190
1, 185
1, 179

816
796
777
770
781

1
1
1
1
1

667
697
6 15
592
583

1
1
1
1
1

792
7 16
677
658
670

575
563
551
551
567

1 , 167
1 , 153
1, 126
1,107
1,102

|
|
|
|
|

810
879
929
967
1,038

1
1
1
1
1

586
598
627
659
736

1
1
1
1
2

709
795
870
999
086

600
669
712
750
8 13

1,109
1, 125
1, 158
1,193
1,273

|
I
|
I
|

1
1
1
1
1

1 807
1 866
1 960
2 022
2 077

2
2
2
2
2

255
369
599
755
953

909
962
1,096
1,190
1,333

, 193
,209
,358
,970
,635

________I____ ________________ _________

102

1
1
1
1
1

,3
,9
,5
,5
,6

4
0
0
6
1

6
6
2
5
9

Sector 62. Professional and scientific instruments: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year

r~

~ i
T o ta l

I

E qu ip m e nt

I

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

$32
36
29

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

|
I
|

$23
24
20

|

$8
11
9

$110
145
173

$87
1 10
129

$22
34
44

Equ i p m e n t

$105
137
162

|

S tr u c tu r e s

$80
10 1
116

$25
36
45

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

43
59
49
53
50

|
|
|
I
|

29
35
34
31
33

I
|
I
|

13
23
15
22
16

213
269
315
363
406

156
188
2 18
244
271

57
so
96
1 18
135

197
247
286
326
360

139
167
191
2 10
230

58
80
95
115
130

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

--------_____
_____
_____
_____

64
87
88
69
89

|
|
I
|
|

36
49
52
46
67

|
j
|
I
|

27
37
36
22
21

46 1
538
6 14
669
74 1

299
338
378
411
462

162
199
235
25S
279

407
473
537
580
639

250
282
314
337
379

156
190
223
242
260

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

10 1
122
119
98
99

I
I
|
|
|

72
69
77
67
67

I
|
|
|
|

29
52
42
3 1
32

824
925
1,021
1,092
1, 162

5 15
564
6 18
659
697

308
360
402
433
464

707
792
87 1
924
974

422
460
503
531
557

284
332
368
392
4 16

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

--------_____
_____
_____
_____

116
134
144
152
170

I
|
|
|
|

77
84
96
96
110

I
I
I
I

38
49
48
56
60

1,2
1,3
1,4
1,5
1,6

742
79 1
849
903
967

50 1
548
594
647
703

1,036
1,111
1,192
1,277
1,374

590
626
67 1
7 12
764

445
484
521
564
609

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

183
183
209
259
293

|
I
|
i
|

123
127
139
173
211

60
55
69
85
82

1,80 1
1,926
2,073
2,264
2,484

759
808
87 1
949
1,022

1,479
1,577
1,694
1,855
2,042

|
|
I
|

4
4
4
5
7

4
0
3
0
0

1,041
1,117
1,201
1,315
1,462

824
885
952
1,048
1, 175

654
692
742
807
866

________________ l___

Sector 62. Professional and scientific instruments: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

I

S tr u c tu re s

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$66
7 1
56

$48
47
37

|
|

$ 18
23
19

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

80
100
8 1
88
8 1

52
57
53
49
51

|
|
|
I

27
43
27
39
29

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

--------_____
_____
_____
_____

105
130
125
96
122

55
69
63
60
86

|
I
|

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1963. .. .
1 9 6 4 _____

138
174
166
133
134

89
86
96
82
83

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

154
172
18 1
184
194

94
100
1 12
108
119

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

196
187
209
249
256

127
128
139
169
191

T o ta l




Equ i p m e n t

$248
3 17
37 1

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

I
I

S tr u c tu re s

$193
237
270

$55
80
100

$24 1
304
349

$175
214
241

I
i

$66
89
108

447
542
6 17
694
762

317
368
4 13
450
487

129
174
203
244
274

4 15
498
557
620
67 1

280
320
354
380
404

|
|
I
|
|

135
177
203
239
266

50
6 1
57
36
36

851
962
1,065
1,136
1,229

525
574
6 19
652
709

325
388
446
483
520

743
836
9 19
969
1,041

430
466
498
519
562

I
I
|

312
369
420
450
479

|
I
|
|
|

48
87
69
5 1
50

1,334
1,470
1,595
1,682
1,766

765
8 15
87 1
909
945

568
655
724
773
82 1

1,124
1,238
1,338
1,401
1,459

605
642
685
7 11
734

|

59
72
69
76
74

1,865
1,979
2,096
2,212
2,333

988
1,034
1,088
1, 134
1, 190

877
945
1,008
1,077
1,143

1,532
1 , 6 19
1,709
1,797
1,889

765
799
842
877
920

69
58
69
79
64

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1

1,202
1,248
1,304
1,367
1,413

1, 978
2,0 5 1
2,139
2,26 1
2,383

|

I
|

|
I

,
,
,
,
,

4
5
6
8
9

5
5
7
3
9

3
8
9
6
3

,250
,309
,375
,468
,579

1
1
1
1

958
,013
,064
,142
,236

|
I

|

I
|
|
I
|

____________ L_

103

5 18
595
652
690
725
767
820
867
920
969
1,009
1, 037
1, 075
1,119
1,146

Sector 63. Photographic and optical goods: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$30
4 1
33

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$20
29
24

$9
11
9

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

T o ta l

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$116
140
157

$186
220
245

$72
83
92

$126
154
176

$198
237
268

Net

s to c k s

$69
80
88

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

27
31
34
44
50

21
21
21
31
36

5
10
12
12
14

292
319
346
382
422

194
211
227
25 1
277

97
107
119
13 1
145

262
28 1
300
328
359

169
180
189
206
226

92
100
110
121
133

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

50
60
62
56
57

36
4 1
43
38
40

14
18
19
18
16

461
509
556
596
635

302
331
360
383
406

159
177
195
2 12
228

390
428
465
495
522

245
268
290
305
32 1

144
160
175
189
20 1

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

70
67
73
94
62

46
44
53
73
54

24
23
20
21
7

684
728
775
842
873

433
456
485
532
559

251
272
290
309
3 14

560
593
630
685
705

340
356
379
420
440

220
237
250
264
264

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
. . . .
. . . .
_____
_____

1 17
174
249
246
2 19

87
1 10
151
151
160

30
64
98
94
58

341
40 1
495
585
638

777
904
1, 100
1,287
1,440

490
562
670
774
881

287
342
430
513
559

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

. . . .
_____
_____
_____
_____

253
211
233
317
440

15 1
131
187
226
309

102
79
46
90
130

1,619
1,748
1,889
2,104
2,430

972
1,037
1,149
1,292
1,508

__________

1
1
1
1

6 16
696
815
93 1
1, 055

958
,098
,310
,517
,694

1
1
1
1
1

1,902
2,063
2,240
2,494
2,864

,167
,255
,394
,566
, 8 14

734
807
845
928
1,049

__________

647
711
739
8 11
922

------------------------r

Sector 63. Photographic and optical goods: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
Gross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year

s to c k s

1
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
19 4 8 . . . .
1949. . . .

$65
8 3
65

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1 9 5 3 ....
1954 . . . .

51
55
58
74
86

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1 9 5 7 ....
1 9 5 8 ....
1 9 5 9 ....

86
94
9 1
85
83

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 ....

Equi pment

$43
60
47

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$21
23
18

$589
667
726

|
|
|

39
37
35
5 1
59

11
18
22
22
26

768
8 11
853
906
968

|
|
j
|
|

58
6 1
59
54
54

27
32
31
31
28

1
1
1
1
1

,026
,088
,144
,191
/233

10 1
98
104
130
82

60
58
69
93
67

41
39
34
36
15

1
1
1
1
1

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 ....
1968 . . . .
1 9 6 9 ....

153
226
314
300
250

106
132
174
172
175

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 / 1 . . . .
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 ....

274
217
233
306
384

157
132
187
222
281

_______




$328
384
425

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$260
283
30 1

$548
6 13
655

$299
344
373

$248
268
282

455
48 1
50 1
533
568

312
330
351
373
399

679
703
725
759
802

390
400
406
424
448

289
302
318
334
354

|
|
|
I
|

600
63 1
659
678
694

425
456
485
513
539

84 1
885
922
951
974

468
489
506
514
522

372
396
4 16
436
452

,289
,337
,386
,457
/479

|
|
|
|
|

7 12
726
747
791
807

576
6 10
638
666
672

1,012
1,044
1, 0 7 9
1, 137
1, 146

533
540
557
598
611

479
503
52 1
539
535

46
94
140
128
74

1,569
1,731
1,979
2,210
2,388

|
|
|
|
|

86 1
942
1,063
1,181
1,301

707
789
9 16
1,029
1 , 086

1,223
1,370
1,601
1,810
1, 9 6 2

66 1
736
850
956
1,061

1 16
84
46
84
102

2
2
2
3
3

|
I
|
|
|

1,400
1,472
1,594
1,744
1,947

1, 185
1,249
1,275
1,337
1 , 4 16

2
2
2
2
2

1,140
1,189
1,285
1,407
1,579

,5
,7
,8
,0
,3

86
22
69
81
63

I

104

,1
,2
,3
,5
,7

30
3 2
42
15
55

__________

56 1
6 34
75 1
854
90 1
989
1, 0 4 3
1,057
1/108
1, 176

Sector 64. Miscellaneous manufacturing: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

$86
98
108

$229
263
287

$146
169
184

$83
94
103

232
251
27 1
30 1
333

122
140
156
170
187

319
348
374
408
447

203
215
227
250
275

1 15
132
146
158
172

36 1
394
420
464
505

212
247
270
302
328

489
546
583
645
699

294
319
336
37 1
403

195
227
247
274
295

892
951
1,031
1,113
1,201

542
581
628
682
741

349
370
402
431
459

743
788
853
919
990

432
462
500
545
594

31 1
326
352
374
396

1,293
1,402
1,524
1,656
1,797

804
869
937
1 , 0 15
1,103

489
532
587
640
694

647
700
754
818

888

418
454
500
545
589

1,92
2,06
2,31
2,58
2,86

1,181
1,268
1,434
1,608
1,792

743
794
879
976
1,076

948
.015
.16 1
,310
,468

629
670
745
831
9 19

$62
42
33

$41
29
23

$20
13
10

1950 .
1951 .
1952.
1953.
1954.

44
42
42
53
60

29
23
26
38
42

14
18
16
14
17

354
392
427
472
520

1955.
1956 .
1957.
1958.
1959.

65
82
65
93
88

39
47
40
6 1
60

26
35
24
32
27

573
64 1
690
766
833

1960 .
1961 .
1962.
1963.
1964.

82
85
109
1 14
122

59
63
74
83
90

22
22
34
30
31

1965.
1966 .
1967.
1968.
1969.

130
149
165
180
191

97
10 1
106
120
131

33
47
59
59
59

1970 .
1 9 7 1.
1972.
1973.
1974.

182
198
317
34 1
362

126
139
223
234
251

56
59
94
107
111

$157
185
206

$244
284
314

1947.
1948.
1949.

S tr u c tu r e s

Equi pment

To ta l

Net

s to c k s

4
2
4
4
9

1
1
1
1
1

,0
,1
,2
,3
,4

6
5
5
6
7

5
4
4
3
8

1,577

1,686

1
1
1
1

1,906
2,142
2,388

Sector 64. Miscellaneous manufacturing: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$140
89
68

Equi pment

$95
64
47

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

$44
25
21

$654
737
797

$391
450
491

$262
286
306

$608
677
720

$359
407
434

S tr u c tu r e s

$248
269
286

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

87
76
73
91
10 1

57
4 1
45
65
70

29
34
28
25
31

875
938
994
1,064
1,139

540
570
599
644
689

335
368
395
4 19
449

779
821
855
902
956

468
480
493
521
55 1

311
340
362
380
404

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1 10
128
95
136
126

63
68
56
83
8 1

47
59
38
52
44

1,219
1,313
1,370
1,465
1,545

724
760
782
827
865

495
552
588
638
680

1 , 0 14
1,086
1, 120
1,192
1,249

57 1
593
600
632
657

443
493
520
560
591

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

1 14
1 19
15 1
156
164

77
82
95
107
114

37
37
56
49
49

1
1
1
1
1

,609
,671
,76 1
,852
,948

895
925
965
1,014
1,069

7 13
745
795
838
879

1
1
1
1
1

0
2
3
5
2

676
6 98
731
774
822

6 13
633
67 1
70 1
729

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

172
194
209
2 17
219

121
123
124
136
144

50
7 1
84
80
74

2
2
2
2
2

,048
, 168
,300
,436
,570

1,128
1, 189
1,249
1,319
1,396

920
979
1,050
1,116
1, 174

1,631
1,729
1,837
1 , 946
2,052

875
927
976
1,034
1,096

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

196
203
317
329
31 1

132
140
223
229
224

64
62
94
99
87

2
2
3
3
3

,677
,7 8 6
,003
,225
,423

1,457
1,523
1,668
1 , 8 15
1,952

1.219
1,262
1,334
1,410
1,471

2
2
2
2
2

1,14 1
1 , 189
1,315
1,440
1,553

________________ _____________________




|

_____________________i

105

,2
,3
,4
,4
,5

9
3
0
7
5

, 129
,206
,390
,5 7 8
,739

|

________________ _____________________

756
802
860
9 12
956
987
1,016
1,075
1 , 137
1 , 185

Sector 65. Transportation: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—

Gross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1947 . . . .
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____
1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

Equi pment

2
3
3
3
2

,6
,3
,2
,1
,5

3
1
1
1
6

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$32,048
34,363
36,381

$16,453
15,324
19,947

$13,099
14,767
1 6, 160

S tr u c tu r e s

$13,829
14,192
14,506

2,030
2,635
2,477
2,377
1,926

8
7
5
0
9

607
631
737
732
643

3
4
4
4
4

8
0
2
5
6

,2
,6
,9
,0
,5

1
6
4
7
8

5
0
6
0
7

2
2
2
2
2

7
2
9
2
7

16,908
17,398
17,986
18,557
19,029

3
3
3
3
3

2
4
6
8
9

,1
,3
,2
,0
,1

98
26
63
03
19

17,300
19,022
20,457
21,715
22,440

1
1
1
1
1

,2
,5
,6
,2
,1

9
3
3
8
7

5
5
2
0
7

28,879
30,671
33,212
34,490
37,034

19,415
19,864
20,420
20,789
21,142

4
4
4
4
4

0
2
4
6
8

,4
,2
,8
,0
,4

10
23
84
69
91

2
2
2
2
3

3
4
7
7
0

,4
,8
,0
,9
,1

0
9
7
7
7

16,980
17,343
17,816
18,102
18,373

174
297
842
869
280

3
4
4
4
4

9,493
1,283
3,498
5 , 17 1
8,102

2
2
2
2
2

1,680
2,014
2,343
2,697
3 , 177

5
5
5
5
5

0
2
4
5
8

,9
,5
,4
,7
,4

6
0
3
8
8

0
7
5
8
4

3
3
3
3
3

2
3
5
6
3

,
,
,
,
,

126
419
095
172
466

18,833
19,087
19,339
19,615
20,018

75,450
80,546
8 5,398
91,735
97,255

5
5
6
6
7

1,887
6,428
0,693
6,226
1,009

2
2
2
2
2

3
4
4
5
6

,5
,1
,7
,5
,2

6
6
7
7
8

1
6
0
5
0

,9
,2
,3
,8
,3

23
61
10
03
79

4
4
4
5
5

1
5
8
3
7

,5
,4
,9
,7
,6

97
58
96
64
82

2
2
2
2
2

0
0
1
2
2

,3
,8
,3
,0
,6

2
0
1
3
9

02
06
08
16
25

75,391
78,755
80,497
37,296
93,715

2
2
2
2
3

6
7
3
9
1

,983
,760
, 191
,526
,541

84,448
87,438
88,397
95,311
102,432

6
6
6
6
7

1
3
3
9
4

,0
,3
,9
,6
,8

93
86
96
55
42

2
2
2
2
2

3
4
4
5
7

,3
,0
,4
,6
,5

55
51
01
56
89

2,3 3 6
3,452
4,394
3,026
4,354

2
2
3
2
3

,268
, 8 12
,635
,444
,776

567
640
758
582
577

4
5
5
5
5

8
0
3
5
8

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

4
3
4
3
5

,5
,7
,2
,8
,3

29
36
40
12
02

3
3
3
3
4

,7
,1
,6
,1
,5

5
5
5
9
4

5
7
5
4
8

774
579
584
6 18
753

6
6
6
6
7

1,
3,
5,
7,
1,

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

6
7
7
8
3

,2
,3
,2
,8
,1

1
0
1
6
9

9
6
6
6
7

5
6
6
7
7

,5
,4
,3
,7
,1

5
5
2
4
3

0
7
3
6
4

669
848
893
1,119
1,063

7,948
7 , 150
5 , 4 10
11,612
12,198

6
6
4
9
9

,8
,0
,6
,9
,7

72
23
16
02
94

1,076
1, 126
793
1,710
2,403

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 ---------

$26,928
28,959
30,666

1
1
1
1
1

,375
,515
,688
,822
,256

1
3
4
6
7

,3
,2
,9
,5
,5

0
6
5
1
5

$15,594
16,038
16,434

Equ i p m e n t

$494
560
520

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 ....
1 9 5 9 _____

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

$2,348
2,364
2,195

$2,842
2,924
2 , 7 15

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

S tr u c tu r e s

6
1
0
0
4

3
7
5
9
6

3
7
6
6
1

4,897
5,303
5,805
6,292
6,678

5
3
3
9
6

_________________________

Sector 65. Transportation: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

T

I

Gross

i n vestm ent

Gross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
----------------------------r
T o ta l
I

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$6,031
5,742
5 , 1S6

—
Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

1

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

1

$97,017
99,56 1
101,341

$38,877
4 1 ,332

|

I
I
1

$4,956
4 , 6 13
4 , 150

$1,124
1 , 128
1, 036

$1 1 8 , 0 5 6
121,431
124,026

I
I
|
|
|

3,623
4,546
4 , 120
3,870
3,046

1, 186
1 , 142
1,283
1,228
1, 0 8 3

126,010
128,744
131,077
132,981
133,785

5
5
6
6
6

7,279
9,693
1 , 6 16
3,214
3,901

6
6
6
6
6

8
9
9
9
9

,7
,0
,4
,7
,8

31
45
60
67
83

I
I
i
I
j

1
1
1
1
1

$50,429
53,381
55,689

$67,627
68,050
68,337

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

4,
5,
5,
5,
4,

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
--------_____
_____
_____

4
5
6
4
5

,4
,0
,0
,0
,6

1
3
6
2
5

6
6
6
7
6

I
|
|
I
|

3,470
4,040
4,955
3 , 187
4 , 8 10

946
996
1,110
83 9
846

134,751
1 3 6 , 191
138,508
138,652
1 4 0 3 1 1

6
6
6
6
7

4
6
8
9
1

,9
,4
,7
,1
,1

3
2
3
8
8

0
7
2
2
4

6
6
6
6
6

9
9
9
9
9

,821
,763
,775
,470
,126

I
I
I
I
I

107
108
110
109
110

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
---------

5
4
5
4
6

,9
,8
,4
,8
,8

2
6
2
6
2

4
3
0
4
4

|
I
I
I
|
!

4
4
4
4
5

,807
,029
,591
,000
,730

1,116
834
829
864
1,094

142
142
143
144
146

7
7
7
7
7

5
4
5
6
9

,1
,2
,8
,7
,2

3
3
2
3
8

6
4
0
6
5

6
6
6
6
6

9,008
8 , “ / 1
8,094
7,619
7,345

I
I
I
i
I

1955
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

7,887
9,165
8,886
10,516
9,411

I
|
I
|
|

6,931
7,980
7,681
9,063
8,105

955
1 , 185
1,205
1,453
1,305

149,776
154,010
157,796
163,032
167,006

82,874
8 7,353
91,333
96,647
100,813

6
6
6
6
6

6
6
6
6
6

01
57
07
85
93

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

8,626
7,335
5,410
11,256
10,580

|
|
I
I
|

7,402
6 , 146
4 , 6 16
9,66 1
8,693

1,223
1, 189
793
1,594
1,886

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

6
6
6
6
6

5,899
5,549
4,791
4,823
5 , 133

809
683
404
098
129




'45
,816
,914
,356
,630

70,044
71,605
71,010
76,019
80,064

04,144
06,055
06,218
11,195
14,930

106

,9
,6
,4
,3
,1

02
04
06
07
07

9
9
8
4
1

$ 5 8 , 140
58,228
58,188

0
4
5
8
9

4
4
4
4
4

4
6
7
8
9

,3
,3
,8
,9
,2

26
34
22
72
08

5
5
5
5
5

8
8
8
8
8

,2
,2
,3
,3
,2

63
60
63
76
10

,664
,405
,066
,575
,635

4
5
5
5
5

9
0
2
2
4

,
,
,
,
,

8
4
2
5
5

7
1
7
9
9

5
5
5
5
5

7
7
7
6
6

,
,
,
,
,

7
6
3
1
7

1
1
1
1
1

11,836
1 1 , S51
12,303
12,060
13,640

5
5
5
5
5

5
5
7
7
9

,8
,4
,5
,8
,8

51
55
18
63
15

5
5
5
5
5

5,
5,
4,
4,
3,

985
395
785
196
825

I
1
I
I
1

1
1
1
1
1

16
19
22
27
30

,116
,689
,790
,325
,515

6
6
7
7
7

2
6
0
4
8

,8
,6
,0
,6
,0

11
83
71
52
42

5
5
5
5
5

3
3
2
2
2

,
,
,
,
,

3
0
7
6
4

I
I
I
I
I

1
1
1
1
1

3
3
3
3
3

,681
,304
,756
,863
,982

8
8
8
8
8

0
1
0
4
7

,4
,4
,6
,6
,3

9
3
0
2
6

5
5
5
5
5

2
1
1
1
1

, 1S8
,866
,149
,236
,615

2
3
1
5
8

,5
,5
,1
,3
,4

43,152

S tr u c tu r e s

7
8
7
7
3

3
7
7
7
7

8
5
3
8
2

0
0
1
7
7

7
4
8
5
5

5
5
8
2
3

Sector 66. Communications except broadcasting: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—

G ross

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$1,085
1,335
994

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$574
621
460

$510
7 13
533

$6,110
7 , 189
7,511

Net

s to c k s

$1,841
2,335
2,659

S tr u c tu r e s

$4,269
4,854
5,25 1

24
11
95
82
09

4,820
5 , 144
5,549
5,996
6,482

7,896
8,800
9,708
10,455
11,254

11,424
12,799
14,720
16 , 1 6 4
17,582

4
4
5
6
7

,307
,789
, 8 18
,537
, 188

7,116
8,0 0 9
8,9 0 2
9,626
10,394

9,9 7 3
11,145
12,601
13,947
15,395

1
1
1
1
1

93
27
76
54
15

19,335
21,043
22,993
24,911
27,075

8,044
8,974
10,143
11,162
12,259

11,291
12,059
12,850
13,749
14,815

0
8
6
6
5

17,094
18,991
20,952
23,346
25,962

17,316
13,756
20,213
21,719
23,703

29,595
32,415
35,272
38,566
42,493

13,588
15,093
16,637
18,585
20,703

16,007
17,321
18,634
19,981
21,790

5
6
0
6
7

2
3
3
4
4

2
2
3
5
3

4
5
5
6
7

25,428
26,530
29,877
3 3 , 183
37,062

2
2
2
3
3

440
487
570
6 15
655

8,441
9,1 4 9
10,266
11,260
12,244

2
3
3
4
4

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1,556
2,054
2,660
2,258
2,305

750
937
1,591
1,353
1,353

835
1,066
1,068
904
951

13,341
14,368
16,938
18,553
20,173

5
6
7
8
8

,4
,0
,2
,0
,9

I 9 6 0 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1963 . . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

2
2
3
3
3

,7
,7
,1
,2
,6

1,633
1,801
2 , 153
2,136
2,350

1,088
980
996
1, 123
1,314

2 2 , 167
24,174
26,478
28,801
31,410

1 9 6 5 ....
1 9 6 6 ....
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 _____
1 9 6 9 _____

4
4
4
5
6

, 189
,671
,903
,556
,429

2
3
3
3
4

,7 2 7
,06 1
,269
,851
,225

1,461
1,609
1,638
1,704
2,203

3
3
4
4
4

4
7
1
5
9

,4
,7
,1
,0
,6

1
4
6
6
6

8,027
8,706
9,556
10,528
11,798

5
5
6
6
7

,0
,7
,2
,5
,5

2
3
3
3
4

5
6
6
7
8

5
2
9
7
5

,6
,1
,2
,0
,8

7
5
5
4
0

5
5
6
6
7

,893
,263
,964
,502
,991

,968
,005
, 3C2
,967
,279

$3,597
4 , 162
4,540

,4
,7
,2
,6
,0

372
510
851
7 18
721

8
0
3
0
8

$ 1,499
1,965
2,249
2
2
3
3
4

8 13
998
1,422
1,334
1,377

5
0
5
6
1

$5,097
6 , 127
6,789

S tr u c tu r e s

7,245
7,855
8,844
9,679
10,492

.. .
_____
_____
_____
_____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

48
86
01
58
53

1950
1951
1952
1953
1959

22
82
50
65
65

s to c k s

4
6
2
9
1

5
7
9
7
8

9,246
2,995
7,094
1 ,268
6,135

,5
,8
,3
,7
,2

2,1
3,0
3,8
4,8
6,0

6,428
9,160
2 , 155
5,778
9,672

7
3
9
6
3

,7
,3
,4
,1
,6

51
73
89
75
86

4
6
9
2
6

,322
,843
,612
,991
,624

Sector 66. Communications except broadcasting: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Nat

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1
|

$1,986
2,442
1,791

I
I
j

1,456
1,633
2,262
2,180
2,237

i
I
|
I
I

523
687
1, 180
1,032
1,030

932
946
1,082
1, 1 4 7
1,206

2
2
2
2
2

1
2
3
4
6

,1
,0
,4
,7
,0

7
0
2
2
0

8
2
9
7
9

.
.
.
.

2
3
3
3
3

,5
,1
,9
,3
,3

1
8
3
2
7

4
4
7
7
2

I
|
|
I
I

1,073
1,382
2 , 138
1,797
1,799

1,440
1,801
1,798
1,530
1,572

2
2
3
3
3

7
9
2
4
6

,4
,5
,2
,3
,4

8
3
6
3
0

1960 . .
1961..
1962..
1963..
1964. .

3
3
4
4
5

,9
,9
,5
,6
,2

1
5
2
5
0

8
3
4
9
6

I
I
I
|
I

2 , 163
2,405
2,894
2,859
3 , 129

1,755
1,548
1,630
1,799
2,076

3
4
4
4
5

8
1
4
7
1

1965..
1966 . .
1967..
1968..
1969..

5
6
6
6
7

,8
,4
,5
,9
,7

9
1
0
9
1

2
6
6
8
3

1
|
I
!
I

3,626
4,049
4 , 186
4 , 7 14
4 , 9 13

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,3
,3
,2
,7

65
66
20
84
99

5
5
6
6
7

4
9
3
7
2

9,112
9,245
9,556
10,110
10,662

i
|
I
I
I

5
6
6
6
7

3
3
3
3
3

,3
,2
,3
,6
,4

9
3
0
9
5

1947 . .
1948. .
19 4 9 . .
1950
1951
1952
1553
1954

. .
..
..
..
..

1555.
1956 .
1957 .
1958.
1959.

1
1
1
1
1

9
9
9
9
9

7
7
7
7
7

0
1
2
3
4

.

..
..
..
..
..
-

Equ i p m e n t

$824
895
66 1

,7
,0
,2
,4
,2

15
06
53
13
08

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

$1,162
1,547
1, 129

$17,779
19,493
20,515

6
8
2
7
4

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

$ 14,285
15,389
16,053

$14,711
16,322
17,240

9
3
2
0
3

16,499
16,938
17,496
18,106
18,765

17,789
18,476
19,736
20,830
21,901

3
4
4
5
5

8
8
1
7
5

14,010
14,408
14,935
15,522
16* 166

0
4
8
7
6

7,829
8,642
10,137
11,226
12,264

19,651
20,892
22,131
23,110
2 4 , 142

2
2
2
2
3

,1
,0
,6
,4
,3

7
5
2
8
0

7
9
5
9
8

6 , 135
6,782
8,116
9 , 0 17
9,832

17,041
18,276
19,508
20,472
21,475

,9
,5
,5
,5
,0

76
21
43
73
02

13,611
15,130
17,042
13,793
20,668

2
2
2
2
3

5
6
7
8
0

,3
,3
,5
,7
,3

65
91
00
79
34

33,5
35,7
33,2
40,8
43,6

6
2
9
0
6

8
7
4
5
4

10,912
12,110
13,648
14,981
16,409

2
2
2
2
2

2,655
3,617
4,645
5,824
7,255

,
,
,
,
,

5
4
3
0
6

2
2
2
3
3

3
3
3
3
3

2
3
5
7
9

,0
,9
,6
,3
,5

73
05
76
38
85

4
5
5
5
6

96
16
65
32
07

18,
20,
21,
24,
26,

149
111
991
169
292

2
3
3
3
3

8
0
2
5
5

4
4
4
5
5

2
4
7
0
3

,
,
,
,
,

4
0
8
9
0

66,954
7 1,864
76,695
81,672
86,784

3,947
1,587
4 , 148
6,529
9,358

3
4
4
4
4

8,007
0,277
2,546
5 , 143
7,425

9
2
4
9
8

2
6
8
9
6

78,973
84,937
90,895
97,059
103,403

$3,493
4,103
4,462
4
5
5
6
7

,6
,0
,9
,6
,2

7
6
3
2
4

2,878
5,341
7,761
0,521
3,281

36,6
40,0
43,4
46,6
50,4

________ L .




S tr u c tu r e s

2
3
1
6
0

9
1
4
5
0

3
9
4
3
0

4
6
0
4
2

3
5
7
9
1

6
0
4
7
1

,9
,6
,0
,7
,8

__________________

107

$2,739
3,311
3,624

2
3
3
3
3

,7
,0
,3
,3
,7

7
6
0
0
3

$11,971
13,011
13,616

,8
,5
,0
,5
,5

4
0
7
6
1

7
4
4
2
5

Sector 67. Radio and TV broadcasting: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$27
35
24

$20
26
17

$ 168
222
256

31
52
1
53
79

17
30
0
30
45

13
21
0
22
33

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

86
85
1 18
8 1
87

49
49
60
46
50

36
35
57
34
36

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 --------( 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

147
51
89
214
175

85
29
51
123
10 1

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 _____
1968. .. .
1 9 6 9 _____

26 1
242
398
254
266

_____
_____
_____
. .. .
_____

165
294
398
460
542

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$48
62
42

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 _____
1 9 5 4 _____
1955
1956
1957
19 5 3
1959

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

S tr u c tu r e s

$99
128
145

$69
94
1 10

277
320
3 10
350
4 13

155
178
170
189
22 1

122
14 1
140
160
19 1

480
542
635
6 90
751

254
283
321
345
372

225
258
313
345
379

6 1
21
37
90
73

8 7 1
894
95 1
1,128
1,260

433
437
459
548
609

h

151
140
230
147
154

109
10 1
167
106
111

1,472
1,661
2,003
2,193
2,40 1

7 15
805
933
1,075
1,171

95
170
230
266
313

69
123
167
193
228

2,4
2,7
3,0
3,3
3,7

1
1
1
1
1

T o ta l

__________

97
11
14
59
67

,201
,297
,438
,596
,783

E qu ip m e nt

S tr u c tu r e s

$81
108
123

I
|
|

$6 1
85
10 1

24 1
278
26 1
294
350

129
147
132
146
17 1

I
I
I
|
|

1 12
131
128
143
17 S

4 11
468
557
607
660

199
224
259
278
299

770
779
82 1
934
1,102

351
343
353
430
480

756
855
1,019
1 , 122
1,230

1,300
1,472
1,794
1,961
2,128

575
654
8 17
887
953

1
1
1
1
1

2,1
2,3
2,6
2,9
3,2

38
456
49 1
579
650

,295
,414
,576
,763
,984

$ 143
194
224

I

8
4
0
0
7

0
8
3
4
2

1
1
1
1

948
,006
,109
,234
,393

212
244
298
329
36 1

|
I
|
|
I
I
|

4 18
435
468
553
621

|
I
i
|

724
8 18
977
1,074
1, 174

|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

,232
,341
,493
,669
,878

Sector 67. Radio and TV broadcasting: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$82
10 1
68

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

51
79
1
82
124

24
4 1
0
43
64

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

137
127
17 1
1 16
124

70
68
80
6 1
66

67
59
90
55
58

1960
1961
1962
1963
1964

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

212
73
128
305
247

111
38
68
164
134

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

364
331
524
319
316

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

186
310
398
442
477

T o ta l

27
38
0
38
60




$39
51
35

S tr u c tu re s

$43
49
32

Equ i p m e n t

$421
504
553

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

$191
229
249

$230
275
303

$352
429
471

I
I
i

$153
187
203

$199
242
268

258
282
264
287
327

325
358
352
333
436

494
543
509
554
639

|
1
I
|
j

207
225
199
2 15
248

287
318
3 10
339
390

865
952
1 , 080
1 , 152
1,234

369
406
452
478
5 11

495
545
627
673
723

733
815
939
1,006
1/078

I
I
|
|
|

285
313
36 1
383
408

448
497
578
622
670

100
34
59
141
113

1,403
1,432
1,510
1,759
1,941

589
592
6 19
735
813

8 14
840
890
1,023
1, 127

1
1
1
1
1

4
4
3
4
8

|
|
|
|
I

474
46 1
472
574
638

759
783
831
960
1,060

200
185
292
178
178

163
146
231
140
137

2
2
2
3
3

,2
,4
,9
,1
,3

3
8
3
6
9

951
1,068
1,290
1,395
1,496

1,282
1,419
1,642
1,773
1,901

1,973
2,207
2,625
2,824
3,005

I
j
|
i
I

764
866
1,069
1, 145
1,209

1,209
1,341
1,556
1,678
1,796

107
179
230
260
300

78
130
167
18 1
177

3
3
3
4
4

,4
,6
,9
,2
,5

87
87
55
41
39

1
1
1
1
1

1, 970
2,089
2,245
2,413
2,576

3
3
3
3
3

|
I
|
I
|
I

1, 185
1,219
1,287
1,370
1,482

1,852
1,959
2 , 100
2 ,252
2,397

584
640
6 17
67 1
764

4
8
2
9
8

108

,5
,5
,7
,8
,9

1
9
0
2
6

7
7
9
7
3

,2
,2
,3
,5
,6

,0
,1
,3
,6
,8

3
4
0
3
9

3
7
8
2
8

8
8
7
3
0

Sector 68. Public utilities: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross

To ta l

.

194a
1 9 4 9 _____

$359
986
1,106

$1,181
1,554
1,995

$15,369
17,402
19,974

19

o

3,991

1,107
1,192
1,425
1,621
1,447

2 , 143
2,368
2,3 1 5
2,7 2 9
2,543

2
2
2
3
3

2
5
8
2
5

4
4
5
5
5

,0 2 1
,521
,671
,529
, 142

1,408
1,597
2,221
2,058
1,813

2,6
2,9
3,4
3,4
3,3

12
23
49
70
28

5,243
5,006
4^901
4,967
5,479

2,002
1,868
1,836
1,829
2,057

3
3
3
3
3

,2
,1
,0
,1
,4

40
37
64
37
21

6,127
7,431
8,752
10,201
11,611

2,0 8 1
2,57 1
3,207
3,451
4,673

4
4
5
6
6

,0
,8
,5
,7
,9

4
5
4
4
3

13,141
15,301
17,001
18,701
20,551

5,363
7 , 152
7,489
8,073
8,975

3
3
3
4

19 S 1
195?
19 5 4
1955
1956
1957
195a

... .
. . .

1 9 5 9 '...
1 96 n
196 1
196 ?
196 ^
1 9 6 4 _____
196 5
196 6
1967
19 6 a
1 9 6 9 --------197
197
197
197

$1,541
2,541
3,102

n
1
?
5

1 9 7 4 _____

,2
,5
,7
,3

5
6
4
5

1
1
1
1

5
9
4
9
7

7,777
8,148
9,51 1
10,627
11,575

Net

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu re s

Equi pment

T o ta l

1947

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

s to c k :

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$2,235
3,018
3,9 0 0

S tr u c tu r e s

$10,460
1 1 >638
13,243

$3,017
3,815
4,727

$12,352
13,587
15,247

$12,695
14,656
17,143

78
78
38
78
01

5,639
6,637
7,863
9,266
10,449

17,039
19,040
20,975
23,312
2 5,452

19,735
22,584
25,544
29,021
32,025

3
4
4
5
5

9 , 176
2,850
7,561
2,015
5,975

11,523
12,690
14,371
15,774
16,821

2
3
3
3
3

7,
0,
3,
6,
9,

653
160
190
241
154

3
3
4
4
5

4
8
2
6
0

2
0
9
7
0

9,620
10,477
11,851
12,947
13,699

25
27
30
33
36

5
6
6
7
7

9
3
7
0
4

17,960
18,88 1
19,692
20,415
21,281

4
4
4
5
5

1
4
7
0
3

,983
,715
,379
,116
, 133

5
5
5
6
6

3,730
6,934
9,923
2,862
6 , 199

14,554
15,190
15,712
16,149
16,744

5
4
4
4
4

78,850
84,492
91,362
99,597
1 0 9 , 159

2
2
2
2
3

2
3
5
7
0

,0
,3
,0
,0
,2

88
05
93
76
43

5
6
6
7
7

6
1
6
2
8

,7
,1
,2
,5
,9

70,063
75,111
81,347
8 8,873
97,624

17,296
18,283
19,849
2 1,590
24,471

5
5
6
6
7

1 2 0 , 164
133,222
147,828
163,920
181,578

3
3
4
5
5

4
9
5
1
8

,0
,6
,4
,7
,8

69
42
81
85
16

,6
,6
,8
,5
,9

,9
,5
,0
,5
,4

44
96
71
31
14

61
86
68
21
15

86,095
93,579
102,346
1 12, 134
122,762

107
119
132
147
162

,
,
,
,
,

9
2
5
6
1

,6
,5
,7
,1
,8

4
4
6
2
8

6
5
4
5
6

2
5
4
8
3

4
5
6
7
8

27
32
38
43
49

,7
,6
>
,9
,8

14,981
16,929
18,811
21,095
23,179

53
54
32
26
45

1

,911
,962
>084
,466
,354

,321
>/63
,718
>6 / 9
>4 8 1

9 , 176
1,744
4,210
6,713
9,455
2,767
>828
1,497
7,282
3 , 153

d

79,750
86,592
94,660
103,691
1 13,508

________________

_______________

Sector 68. Public utilities: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

Equi pment

$3,830
5,453
6,456

$689
1,796
1,982

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

$3,141
3,657
4,473

$60,595
63,750
67,863

Equ i p m e n t

$7,297
8,605
10,090

S tr u c tu r e s

$53,297
55,145
57,773

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

6
6
6
7
6

,4
,3
,6
,3
,7

3
4
4
5
4

2
8
7
0
2

1 , 939
1,871
2,237
2,467
2,160

4
4
4
4
4

,4
,4
,4
,8
,5

93
76
10
82
82

71,922
75,873
80,095
84,971
89,152

1 9 5 5 _____
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1 9 5 8 _____
1 9 5 9 _____

6
6
7
7
6

,6
,7
,8
,5
,8

29
04
03
6 1
36

2,086
2 , 129
2,745
2,480
2,148

4
4
5
5
4

,5 4 3
,5 7 4
,057
,081
,687

93,097
94,561
10 ; , 7 6 2
106 , 173
109,737

19,575
20,847
22,56?
23,833
24,630

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

6
6
6
6
7

,8
,7
,7
,8
,4

7
7
2
3
4

2
2
2
2
2

4
4
4
4
4

,512
,520
,480
,580
,908

113,25
116,61
119,90
123,27
127,21

7
8
4
4
4

2
2
2
2
2

5
6
6
7
8

,5
,1
,7
,3
,1

1
9
9
4
1

87,741
90,424
93,110
95,930
99,102

1965
1966
1967
1968
19 6 9

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

8 , 188
9,720
11,018
12,465
13,534

2,553
3,109
3,742
3,878
5 , 135

5,634
6 , 6 11
7,276
8,587
8,398

131,361
138,000
145,389
1 5 4 , 175
163,964

2
3
3
3
3

8
0
1
3
7

,8
,0
,9
,8
,0

47
93
37
91
78

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

14,465
15,784
17,001
17,773
17,239

5,687
7,26 1
7,489
7,915
8 , 189

8,7
8,5
9,5
9,8
9,0

174,598
186,425
199,282
212,654
2 2 5 , 160

4
4
5
5
6

0
6
1
7
2

,788
,028
,413
,091
,858

$48,894
51,952
55,960

73,521
76,114
79,200
82.335
8 5 , 10 7

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

T o ta l

7
1
5
8
2

,3
,2
,2
,2
,5

64
51
45
58
33

__________




7
2
1
5
5

8
3
1
8
0

1
1
1
1
1

1,534
2,917
4,666
6 , 6 18
8,192

6
6
6
6
7

6
4
4
4
2

0
2
5
8
0

,3
,9
,4
,3
,9

8
5
2
5
6

7
5
9
2
0

5
6
6
7
7

9,883
3,647
7 , 6 18
2 , 163
5,945

Equi pment

$5,297
6,587
8,034

5
5
5
5
6

0
3
5
8
0

,4
,0
,4
,3
,9

8
1
6
8
9

79,460
82,904
87,317
91,365
94,594

15,886
16,712
18,015
18,917
19,383

6
6
6
7
7

3
6
9
2
5

,5
,1
,3
,4
,2

74
91
02
48
11

97,794
100,821
103,733
106,684
110,158

19,983
20,412
20,773
21,096
21,653

,013
,907
,452
,283
,886

1
1
1
1
1

14,282
19,831
26,543
34,527
43,370

2
2
2
2
2

2
3
4
6
9

1
1
1
1
1

,809
,396
,869
,562
,301

152,868
163,345
174,608
1 8 6 , 149
196,595

3
3
4
4
5

2,773
7,464
2 , 120
6,888
1,557

3
0
7
5
2

, 187
,240
,881
,590
,474

__________

109

$43,597
45,364
47,926

9,395
10,631
1 2, 152
13,781
14,949

103
107
113
120
126
3
4
4
5
6

S tr u c tu r e s

77,8
80,4
82,9
85,5
88,5

0
0
6
8
0

7
6
6
2
6

6
9
0
8
5

92,095
96,590
101,661
107,936
1 13,896
1
1
1
1
1

20,094
25,881
32,488
39,261
45,038

Sector 69. Wholesale and retail trade: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

Net

s to c k s

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
194?...
1 9 4 9 _____

Equ i p m a n t

S tr u c tu re s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

S tr u c tu r e s

$2,644
3,659
4,424

$10,588
13,120
14,969

$7,645
9,147
10,213

$2,943
3,972
4,755

$8,976
11,384
13,019

$6,332
7,725
8 ,595

1,826
1,887
1,315
1,746
2 , 190

,821
, 9 I7
,031
,693
,379

$756
1,066
822
994
1,029
7 15
946
1 , 188

17,29
19,65
20,97
22,78
25,11

7
0
8
9
9

11,589
12,956
13,616
14,529
15,721

5,708
6,693
7,362
8,260
9,398

15,030
16,985
17,890
19,327
21,339

1
1
1
1

2
2
9
8
7

'.7 ,5 2 8
19,324
20,663
21,672
22,848

10,994
12,687
14,195
15,616
1 7, 159

2
2
3
3
3

,454
,633
, 120
,123
,351

13,957
15,489
16,511
17,148
17,895

10,497
12,143
13,609
14,974
16,456

18,736
20,307
2 2 , 130
23,814
25,852

36
38
41
44
47

,6
,7
,6
,1
,4

49
91
60
60
32

18,684
19,332
20,467
21,383
22,733

17,965
19,459
21,193
22,776
24,698

5
5
6
6
7

2,016
7,561
1,475
7,912
4,593

24,891
27,627
29,097
32,190
35,330

2
2
3
3
3

37
39
41
45
49

4 2 , 152
4 5 , 188
49,015
53,490
58,056

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

2
2
2
2
3

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
--------_____
--------_____

4,5 8 0
4,7 5 6
4 , 168
3 , 8 12
4 , 180

2 , 930
3,006
2,6 C1
2,331
2,574

1,649
1,749
1,566
1,480
1,605

2
3
3
3
4

8
2
4
7
0

,5
,0
,8
,2
,0

2
1
5
8
0

4
4
5
5
5

14
18
75
23
93

2,77 1
2,780
3,385
3,270
3,786

1,642
1,637
1,889
1,752
2,106

4
4
4
5
5

2
5
8
1
5

,8
,4
,7
,6
,2

22
58
56
41
97

2
2
2
2
2

4
5
6
7
9

,
,
,
,
,

6
6
7
7
8

0
6
1
8
5

,
,
,
,
,

2
2
0
0
7

3
0
7
7
8

3
3
3
4
4

1
5
7
0
4

,9
,0
,0
,6
,5

12
48
23
86
01

2
3
3
3
4

8
1
3
7
1

,4
,3
,9
,5
,2

11
71
84
21
77

91,503
97,463
1 0 5 , 143
114,439
123,798

4
4
5
5
6

7
9
3
7
2

,0
,7
,3
,8
,2

95
54
11
06
42

4
4
5
5
6

4
7
1
6
1

,4
,7
,8
,6
,5

0
0
3
3
5

,4
,4
,2
,0
,8

Equ i p m e n t

$1,393
1,956
1,511

$2,150
3,023
2,334

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 ....
1S 6 3 . . . .
1 9 6 4 _____

To ts 1

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

7,326
8,465
7,064
9 , 8 19
10,376

4,696
5,4 2 8
4,367
6 , 189
6,516

2,629
3 , C 36
2,696
3,629
3,859

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

8,763
9,274
11,295
13,236
13,637

5
5
7
8
3

3,246
3,432
4,270
4,969
5 , 120

,5
,8
,0
,2
,5

16
41
24
66
16

3
4
0
2
7

086
150
626
827
445

7
9
2
3
6

4
7
0
2
4

79,30
84,20
90,78
98,92
107,06

7
5
0
0
6

9,67
0,66
0,92
1,49
2,40

5,3
6,3
6,9
7,8
8,9

3
6
7
6
2

, 154
,017
,764
,430
,009

__________

5
1
6
3
3

7
9
2
1
7

7 , 124
9,934
2,376
5,722
9,263

Sector 69. Wholesale and retail trade: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year
T o ta l

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 ....
1 9 4 9 ....

i
|

$3,998
5,198
3,985

|
j
|

$2,318
3,06 1
2,293

Equi pment

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

Equ i p n e n t

$ 1,680
2 , 136
1,691

$28,455
32,219
34,814

$16,495
18,373
19,532

1 9 5 0 _____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1953. . ..
19 5 4 . . . .

4
4
3
4
5

,8
,4
,0
,0
,0

0
9
3
7
9

9
9
4
3
6

j
I
|
j
j

2,750
2,621
1,770
2,402
2,932

2,058
1,878
1,263
1,671
2,164

38,265
41,306
42,660
44,766
47,656

2
2
2
2
2

1
2
2
3
4

,1
,6
,9
,6
,6

8
1
7
8
8

1 9 5 5 _____
19 5 6 . . . .
1957 . . . .
19 5 8 . . . .
1959.. . .

6
6
5
5
5

,
,
,
,
,

8
5
5
1
6

8
8
7
7
5

9
4
8
4
5

|
|
|
|
j
j

3
3
3
2
3

2
2
2
2
2

5
1
8
4
4

5
5
5
6
6

2
6
9
2
5

9
3
5
3
9

2
2
2
2
3

6
8
9
9
0

,5
,1
,1
,7
,5

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 ....

5
5
7
6
7

,9
,9
,0
,6
,7

5
7
9
9
9

2
1
9
6
2

|
|
|
j
I
j

3,2 3 7
3,255
3,997
3,870
4,459

2 , 7 14
2 , 7 15
3 , 102
2,826
3,332

6
7
7
7
8

8,730
1,868
5,936
9,464
4,035

3
3
3
3
3

1
2
3
4
6

,4
,2
,4
,5
,0

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 ....
1967 . . . .
1968. . . .
1 9 6 9 ....

9,602
10,833
8,856
11,818
11,859

j
I
|
j
|

5
6
5
6
7

,5
,3
,0
,9
,0

4,051
4,49 1
3,824
4,911
4,776

90,40
97,97
103,47
111,80
119,97

2
2
5
4
4

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 ....
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 ....

9,477
9,499
11,295
12 > / 6 6
11,721

|
j
|
j
|

5
5
7
8
7

,788
,882
,024
,160
,721

3
3
4
4
4

1
1
1
1
1

25,504
30,751
37,463
45,298
51,743

_______ _______ L_




,933
,702
,100
,759
,011

5
4
3
0
8

1
1
1
7
3

,9
,8
,4
,4
,6

5
8
7
1
4

,689
,6 1 6
,2 7 0
,605
,000

,
,
,
,
,

1
3
5
2
4

9
7
3
6
1

5
4
4
2
8

S tr u c tu r e s

$11,960
13,845
15,282

s to c k s

T o ta l

Equi pment

$23,422
27,029
29,327

$13,168
14,918
15,813

S tr u c tu r e s

$10,254
12,111
13,513

17,079
18,692
19,686
2 1,083
22,968

3
3
3
3
3

2,296
4,740
5,497
7,145
9,711

1
1
1
1
1

7
7
7
3
8

,0
,9
,7
,0
,7

60
42
22
37
55

2
2
3
3
3

5
8
0
2
4

9
0
3
6
4

4
4
5
5
5

3
7
0
3
5

,
,
,
,
,

9
8
7
0
6

9
9
0
0
5

8
9
6
4
2

2
2
2
2
2

0
1
2
2
3

,442
,827
,536
,813
,226

2
2
2
3
3

3,5
6,0
8,1
0,1
2,4

6
0
8
0
6

4
4
8
9
7

3
3
4
4
4

7,265
9,663
2,447
4,954
7,967

5
6
6
6
7

8
1
4
7
2

,4
,1
,7
,9
,2

4
0
9
9
2

1
4
3
4
2

2
2
2
2
2

3
4
5
6
7

,725
,113
,158
,010
,407

3
3
3
4
4

4,715
6,990
9,635
1,983
4,814

3
4
4
4
5

8,706
2,117
4 , 140
7,916
1,686

5
5
5
6
6

1
5
9
3
8

5
5
5
6
6

3
5
8
2
5

71,5
74,7
78,6
82,7
86,2

,9
,9
,8
,5
,5

26
75
61
71
42

__________

110

,6
,2
,4
,5
,8

,6
,8
,3
,8
,2

3
3
1
2
6

9
5
3
8
8

24
00
14
19
60

15,272
16,840
17,783
19,126
20,951
5
7
7
9
2

6
2
0
0
5

6
5
4
7
7

7 8 , 152
85,126
89,857
97,315
104,451

2
3
3
3
4

9
2
4
7
0

,8
,8
,3
,5
,6

18
68
94
85
51

4
5
5
5
6

8
2
5
9
3

,3
,2
,4
,7
,8

34
58
72
30
00

78
76
01
26
00

1 0 8 , 8 17
112,860
1 18,353
124,956
130,156

4
4
4
4
5

2
3
5
8
0

,0
,3
,4
,3
,6

89
34
41
95
33

6
6
7
7
7

6
9
2
6
9

,7
,5
,9
,5
,5

2
2
1
6
2

8
5
2
0
3

Sector 70- Finance and insurance: Historical dollars
( Mi l l i ons of dol l ar s)
—
G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Net

s to c k s

----------------------------[—
T o ta l

|

s to c k s

I
T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m a n t

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

----------------------------h
$130
190
182

1997 . .
1946 . .
1999. .

I
i
|

$9
13
13

$1,758
1,870
1, 972

,2
,9
,7
,2
,3

91
09
59
79
69

|
I
|
I
|

150
196
155
175
165

2
2
2
3
3

'-,36 0
9-367
3,
5 , 9c9
6,893

290
26 0
278
307
919

9
9
5
5
6

,119
.696
,099
, b / 7
,929

3
9
9
5
6

,8
,3
,7
,9
,2

3
3
8
2
7

1
0
0
9
4

|
I
|
I
|
j

183
203
218
291
398

3,697
9 , 127
9,562
5 , 132
5,926

778
873
939
1,095
1,867

7,715
8,787
10,059
11,687
19,782

587
866
1,279
1,889
3 , 195

7,127
7,921
8,730
9,797
1 1,587

7,123
8,1 6 9
9,900
10,963
13,953

|
|
|
I
|

507
772
1, 157
1,720
2,997

6,61
7,39
8,2 9
9,29
11,01

881
878
1,360
1,117
2,709

1,005
823
1,052
863
2,091

16,538
18,083
20,297
22,013
26,936

9,0 2 0
9 , 8 16
6,099
6,97 1
9,372

1
1
1
1
1

15,598
16,879
18,815
20,195
24,258

|
|
I
I
|

3
9
5
5
7

1
1
1
1
1

2 , 186
2,326
3,738
9,157
9,283

1,690
1,798
2,8 9 1
3,215
3 , 3 12

2
3
3
9
5

2
3
3
9
9

|
I
|
I
|

29
18
31
93
13

187
238
9 19
575
178

2
2
3
3
3

1955.
1956 .
1957 .
1958 .
1959.

.
.
.
.
.

570
609
559
756
967

|
|
I
I
|

90
92
39
50
135

529
56 1
519
705
831

1960 . .
1961..
1962. .
1963..
1969. .

973
1,181
1,382
1,790
3,219

I
1
I
|
I

199
307
992
699
1,396

1965.
1966 .
1967 .
1968 .
19 6 9 .

1,887
1,702
2,913
1,981
9,796

I
|
|
|
|
I

3
9
6
7
7

|
I
I
i
|

7
5
0
3
6

$167
156
197

2
2
2
3
3

|
|
|
i
I

7
2
3
7
9

I
|
|

,517
,699
,099
,553
,662

212
257
996
6 19
192

,8
,1
,6
,3
,5

$1,9 25
2,027
2,120

2
2
3
3
3

.
.
.
.
.

1970 . .
1971..
1972 . .
1973. .
1979. .

$2,199
2,279
2,388

209
205
219
239
223

1950 .
1951 .
1952.
1953.
1959.

.
.
.
.
.

$236
220
207

$2,386
2,995
2,595

$120
176
168

9
3
9
5
2

,7
,8
,2
,7
,8

2
9
5
8
8

6
9
8
7
5

,813
,302
,162
,697
, 195

11,126
12,889
15,923
19,269
22,576

2,517
3,267
9,297
5,091
7,069

18,687
20,917
23,233
26,382
29,619

7
0
5
1
7

,2
,2
,6
,9
,2

17
55
21
85
79

,6
,2
,2
,8
,9

3
9
5
8
8

6
8
2
9
9

,0
,2
,5
,0
,1

9
5
9
9
9

0
8
9
8
8

5
7
3
3
1

1,911
2,625
3,563
9,305
6,268

17,818
19,963
2 2 , 185
25,212
28,312

9,398
10,791
13,935
16,272
18,961

_________ L

_________ L_

Sector 70. Finance and insurance: Constant dollars
( Mi l l i ons of 1 972 dol l ars)
G ross
Year

I
I
!
1 9 9 7 ....
1 9 9 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

I
T o ta l

I
|
j
j

E quipm ent

I
j

$28 1
372
365

$19
19

|
|

16
33
23
39
55
16

19 50. . . .
1 9 5 1 _____
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 4 _____

|
|
|
|
!
j

921
958
77 1
1,071
39 1

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

|
|
|
|
|

998
973
865
1,206
1,518

I960
1961
1962
1963
1969

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

|
|
j
|
|

1 ,999
1,789
2,027
2,97 1
9,926

212
335
985
705
1,971

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

I
|
|
|
|
j

2
2
2
2
5

,5
,1
,9
,3
,9

1970
1971
1972
1973
1979

_____
_____
_____
--------_____

I
|
|
I
|

9
9
6
7
6

, 163
,233
,6 3 0
,116
,663

7
6
5
1

15
7
0
3
7




99
98
93
56
149

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

1

$267
353
396

I
I
!

I
|
I
|

337
939
731
1,016
329

I
I
j
1

|
I
|
|

998
929
82 1
1,150
1,369

1
I
I
1

Equi pment

$10,793
10,762
10,721
1
1
1
1
1

0
0
1
1
1

,7
,7
,1
,8
,7

$93 1
399
362

36
86
96
00
19

S tr u c tu r e s
—
$8,117
8,111
8 ,095

|
I
|
I
|

295
231
232
299
229

339
397
357
38 1
998

12,299
12,893
13,237
19,072
15,170

11,959
12,996
12,929
13,691
19,671

9,975
10,597
11,013
11,823
12,997

I
|
I
|
|

295
26 1
27 1
29 1
903

15,571
16,637
17,803
19,202
21,800

14,049
15,933
17,051
19,099
23,055

|
I
I
|
|

573
857
1,276
1,890
3,229

13,975
19,575
15,775
17,209
19,826

2
2
2
2
2

9
9
3
6
3

2
2
2
3
3

5
6
8
0
9

,026
,581
,829
,325
,755

|
|
|
i
I

3
9
5
6
8

3
0
7
6
6

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
3
3
6

29,865
31,992
39,122
36,850
3 9 , 189

3
9
9
5
5

7,790
0,621
5,729
1,070
5,669

I
I
I
|
|

9,955
11,287
13,856
16,597
19,008

2
2
3
3
3

7,789
9,339
1,868
9,972
6,661

966
959
1,967
1,185
2,829

j
|
I
|
|

1,599
1,218
1,992
1,168
2,588

I
1
I
i
I

27,913
29,169
31,665
33,998
38,291

9,9
5,2
6,6
7,5
10,0

2
2
3
9
9

|
|
|
|
|
|

1,921
1,895
2,891
2,980
2,588

I
I
I

9
9
5
5
6

11,836
13,552
16,526
19,779
22,800

1 ,702
5,095
0,699
6,625
1,990

$299
273
25 1

Equi pment

8 ,363
8,916
8,781
9,995
9,3 8 0

I
|

2
8
8
6
5

$8,917
8 ,3 8 5
8,346

r
|
|
|

0,389
0,951
0,812
1,952
1,395

16,297
17,611
19,229
21,287
25,307

9
3
3
3
7

|

1
1
1
1
1

I
1
I

,2
,3
,7
,1
,0

$10,361
10,368
10,359

T o ta l

352
335
339
398
323

1,286
1,998
1,592
1,766
2,959

|

S tr u c tu r e s

675
979
1,920
2,089
3,507

111

0
7
0
7
6

9
5
2
2
7

3
3
5
5
8

,0
,8
,0
,9
,2

0
8
6
2
2

,9
,6
,7
,3
,5

8
5
2
8
5

_________

8,117
8 ,135
8 ,599
9,196
9 , 150

1
1
1
1

9,7 2 9
0,286
0,792
1,531
2,593

,092
,931
,097
,938
,199

Sector 71. Real estate and rentals: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

T o ta l

i

1947 . . . .
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

1/752
1,275
1,904
884
1,190

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 ....
1962. . . .
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 _____

1/709
1,889
1,903
1,577
608

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

3,020
3,649
2,935
1,876
2,178

$17
46
203

$44
6 1
267

1
|
1
I
I
|

40 9
439
240
4 16
1,681

1 9 5 5 _____
1956. .. .
1 9 5 7 _____
1953 . . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

S tr u c tu re s

E quipm ent

I
I
I

$62
108
47 1

1950 . . . .
1951 . . . .
1 9 5 2 _____
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 4 _____

G ross

i nvestm ent

Gross

176
189
103
179
725

995
724
1,081
499
708

647
647
670
58 1
3S9

$5,765
5,650
5,893

232
249
136
236
955

756
550
822
384
481

E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

Met

s to c k s

$932
899
1,024

I

S tr u c tu r e s

i

$4,833
4,751
4,869
,9
,0
,9
,0
,8

9,293
10,276
1 1,876
12,441
13,291

2
3
3
4
4

6
7
8
8
8

1,061
1,241
1,237
995
208

14,623
16,084
17,509
18,552
18,582

4,8
5,2
5,6
5,8
5,8

5
5
2
5
4

2,942
2,618
2,096
1,239
1,805

2
2
2
2
2

0
3
6
7
8

,9
,9
,2
,4
,8

87
87
42
15
32

5
6
6
6
6

75
15
24
03
02

3,536
4,637
3,193
5,970
3 , 120

3
3
4
4
5

2
7
1
7
1

,2
,2
,1
,3
,5

57
62
61
88
81

6 , 173
6,670
7,503
7,889
9,097

,068
,2 6 7
,2 5 6
, 4 10
,820

,647
,093
,802
,059
,391

4
3
9
5
3

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

$704
669
793

$4,570
4,432
4,654

S tr u c tu r e s

$3,866
3,762
3,86 1

884
932
986
1,061
1,674

3
3
3
4
4

,921
,994
,953
,009
,785

7,890
8,813
10,334
10,789
11,510

2
2
3
3
3

,2
,6
,2
,4
,6

9
7
9
3
3

5
6
7
7
7

,598
, 138
,036
,3 5 1
,878

1
1
1
1
1

3
4
4
4
4

,9
,1
,4
,5
,3

40
9 1
17
13
94

8,760
9,823
10,882
11,700
11,732

3
2
9
5
4

14,500
16,937
18,844
19,886
21,486

4
4
4
5
6

,646
, 132
,074
,382
,899

542
1 , 058
1,391
958
1,791

|

4
5
4
5
5

77
1,050
838
636
372

1
|
I
j
i

1 , 124
1,236
1,258
1,350
1,985

6
6
6
6
7

s to c k s

4
0
8
9
5

,8
,9
,9
,0
,4

06
77
39
7 1
59

2
4
8
8
1

I

. . ..
_____
. . . .
_____
_____

4
5
4
6
4

1970 . . . .
197 1 . . . .
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 ....
1 9 7 4 _____

,0
,6
,5
,9
,9

7
9
8
2
1

|
I
I
|
|
|

|
I
1
I
I
|
I
I
I
I
l

9
6
5
9
2

,4
,0
,3
,4
,2

2
8
8
3
7

1
1
1
1

9,77 1
0,826
1,880
2,698
2,735

2
4
5
6
6

,700
,014
,300
,213
,127

15,512
17,971
19,917
21,012
22,680

18,43
21,35
23,53
24,63
26,03

4
9
9
9
6

3
4
4
4
4

,9
,4
,6
,7
,5

2
3
3
3
4

2
3
3
4
4

8
7
4
4
4

4
5
5
6
7

,522
,0 1 1
, 8 11
, 143
,284

6
0
3
9
2

,0
,5
,6
,4
,4

8
9
5
9
8

4
2
8
9
4

9
4
7
3
7

,3
,2
,9
,9
,8

2
1
4
5
8

4
2
4
3
9

2 4,
2 9,
32,
37,
40,

805
205
133
811
600

__________ __________

Sector 71. Real estate and rentals: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—

—
G ross

i nvestm e vt

G ross

Year
T o ta l

E quipm ent

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

s to c k s

E qu ip m e nt

Net

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

$124
______________
189
______________
833

$27
68
295

$97
120
537

1 9 5 0 _____
1951
1952
1953
1954

728
______________
698
______________1
37
______________
649
______________
2,643

248
245
132
233
9 10

480
453
239
415
1,733

2
2
2
2
2

2
2
1
1
2

,9
,5
,8
,4
,9

58
72
56
09
57

2
2
2
2
2

,068
, 126
,072
,118
,844

20,889
20,446
19,783
19,291
20,113

1955
1 9 5 6 _____
1 9 5 7 _____
1958
1959

______________
2,756
1,850
2,657
______________
1,259
______________
1 , 7 19

953
651
946
448
562

1,803
1,199
1,710
810
1, 157

2
2
2
2
2

4
5
6
7
7

.6
,3
,9
,1
,7

20
74
37
00
16

3
4
4
5
5

,6
,0
,8
,0
,4

16
82
38
85
23

2
2
2
2
2

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1962
1963
1964

2,502
2,802
______________
2,796
______________
2,268
______________
790

753
753
784
678
463

1,748
2,048
2,011
1,590
327

2
3
3
3
3

9
0
2
3
2

,0
,7
,3
,3
,8

9
2
1
4
7

0
5
4
5
9

5
6
6
6
6

,9
,3
,7
,9
,9

1
4
3
6
2

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

______________
4,582
5,03 1
3,897
2,364
2,633

90
1 , 187
948
700
399

4,492
3,844
2,948
1,663
2,234

3
3
4
4
4

6
9
2
3
5

,1
,9
,5
,6
,0

9
4
6
6
4

1
6
5
0
9

4,576
5,955
______________
4,585
______________
6,499
______________
4,029

562
1,063
1,391
940
1,596

4 , 0 14
4,891
3,193
5,559
2,432

4
5
5
6
6

8
3
6
2
4

,4
,2
,6
,0
,9

19
15
76
57
70

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1972
1973
1974

_______




s to c k s

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

I
—

1 9 4 7 _____
1948
1949

_____
_____
_____
_____

------------------------------------------------------- ---------------

1

$24,444
23,558
23,310

_______

$2,058
1,918
2 , 0 12

$22,386
21,639
21,298

$18,714
17,849
17,637

$1,479
1,354
1,467

$17,235
16,494
1 6, 170

1,531
1,591
1,534
1,580
2,299

15,791
15,388
14,777
14,352
15,256

19,278
20,074
21,665
21,827
22,426

3
3
4
4
4

16,2
16,6
17,5
17,5
18,0

2 3 , 177
24,383
25,579
26,382
25,956

23,7
25,3
26,9
2 7,9
27,5

76
89
67
99
46

4,739
5,000
5,238
5,327
5 , 169

19,037
20,389
21,729
22,672
22,376

6,463
7,056
7,370
7,406
7 , 126

2
3
3
3
3

9
2
5
6
7

,7
,8
,1
,2
,9

2
8
9
5
2

30,892
34,699
37,359
38,438
39,900

4 , 6 18
5,161
5,442
5,466
5 , 193

2
2
3
3
3

7,0
7,4
8,1
8,4
9,3

4
4
4
5
5

1
5
8
3
5

,4
,7
,5
,6
,6

03
94
14
18
08

4
4
5
5
5

5
5
6
6
7

3 8 , 175
42,512
4 5 , 132
50,098
51,903

3
2
4
3
3

15
21
6 1
38
6 1

1,0u4
1,'-52
2,099
2,015
2,292

8
9
5
4
2

__________

112

1
1
1
1
1

|

7
6
6
5
7

3
8
1
6
9

,3
,9
,3
,9
,5

,2
,0
,3
,5
,2

2
7
1
3
5

7
1
5
5
3

3
9
2
2
5

0
5
2
5
8

,0
,4
,1
,2
,4

3
4
0
2
1

6
0
8
9
7

,094
,502
,219
,4 5 7
,334

6
9
1
3
4

,2
,5
,9
,0
,7

41
34
57
98
09

7
3
1
2
0

4
8
7
2
7

Sector 72. Hotels and repair places except auto repair: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
—
Year

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Gross

Net

s to c k s

!
T o ta l

I

E quipm ent

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

I
I
I

$7,612
8 ,1 8 2
8,588

I
|
|

----------------------------!—

$5,799
6,077
6,304

$1,813
2,105
2,284

182
257
94
199
138

423
408
478
675
407

8,940
9,3 2 4
9,577
10,095
10,256

I
I
I
I
j

2
2
2
2
2

669
775
667
8 13
962

10,906
11,891
12,713
13,659
14,804

I
I
I
I
J

2,526
2,919
3,260
3,583
3,957

8,380
8 ,972
9,453
10,076
10,846

1
1
1
1

6
9
3
4
6

6
6
7
7
7

2
3
0
1
7

,5
,8
,1
,6
,8

7
3
4
5
8

9
9
9
7
6

|
|
I
I
|

1,916

I

1,849
1,817
1,719

I
I
|

5
5
6
6
6

9,093
0,059
0,853
1,757
2,838

|
j
|
|
I
j

1,868
2,254
2,578
2,868
3,187

|
I
I
I

7,2
7,8
8,2
8,8
9,6

I
1
|
1
I

,4
,7
,8
,3
,4

2
1
8
4
6

1
1
1
1
1

52
95
32
56
54

I
I
I
I
I
|

382
6 19
564
542
59 1

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 ....
1 9 6 4 ---------

1,579
1,973
1,965
2,311
2,440

I
I
I
|
i
I

535
684
556
727
737

1,043
1,288
1,408
1,583
1,702

15,964
17,494
18,981
20,772
22,656

|
|
|
|
|

4
4
4
5
5

,2
,7
,9
,3
,7

6
0
7
7
4

8
4
6
5
5

11,695
12,789
14,004
15,396
16,911

13,911
15,339
16,715
18,398
20,171

|
I
I
I
j
|

3
3
3
4
4

,418
,7 6 1
,933
,240
,523

1 9 6 5 ....
1 9 6 6 ....
1967 . . . .
19 6 8 . . . .
1 9 6 9 _____

2
2
2
2
2

,2
,5
,0
,4
,3

6
0
3
5
0

0
0
7
8
0

|
I
i
i
|

579
808
578
9 14
692

1,680
1,691
1,458
1,543
1,607

2
2
2
2
3

4
6
7
9
1

,3
,2
,6
,4
,0

3
2
3
4
5

2
5
5
0
8

|
I
I
|
|

5
6
6
6
7

,9
,3
,4
,8
,0

2
0
3
7
6

5
9
9
7
2

18,407
19,916
21,195
22,562
23,995

2
2
2
2
2

1
3
4
6
7

,7
,4
,7
,4
,8

8
4
9
1
4

I
|
|
|
I

4
4
4
5
5

, 6 16
,915
,9 5 1
,299
,394

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
3
3
2

,2
,4
,0
,1
,2

4
3
5
9
7

0
6
2
4
7

I
|
I

654
779
791
6 13
437

1,585
1,656
2,260
2,580
1,839

3
3
3
3
4

2
4
6
8
0

,5
,2
,5
,9
,4

8
8
6
6
1

7
3
6
4
6

|
I
|

7
7
7
7
7

,1
,3
,5
,5
,3

7
9
8
8
7

9
1
9
2
7

2
2
2
3
3

2
3
3
3
3

9
0
2
5
6

,221
,741
,339
,040
,289

I
I
I
I
|

5
5
5
5
5

,4
,5
,6
,6
,3

9 7 0 ....
9 7 1 ....
9 7 2 ....
9 7 3 ... .
9 7 4 ---------

1

|
I
______ I
_

i
|
I

5
6
8
1
3

,4
,8
,9
,3
,0

08
92
77
81
39

$4,807
5,059
5,262

I

19 5 5 . . . .
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1958 . . . .
1 9 5 9 _____

,0
,3
,2
,3
,5

S tr u c tu r e s

$1,521
1,782
1,907

7
7
7
8
8

8
0
6
4
8

I

I
|
|
j

$6,3 28
6,8 4 2
7,169

$293
385
27 1

,3
,4
,4
,4
,3

E qu ip m e nt

T o ta l

I
I
|
I
|
I

606
666
573
875
546

1950 . . . .
1951 . . . .
1952. . . .
1953.. . .
1 9 5 4 _____

$424
4 15
37 1

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

I
I
I

$723
80 1
643

1947 . . . .
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 _____

s to c k s

1

2
9
5
1
6

________ ______ L

2
6
9
3
7

7
6
6
0
8

|

I
I

I
|

|

,5
,7
,0
,5
,7

1
4
3
2
4

2
3
9
9
7

24
05
7 5
89
51

10,492
11 ,578
12,781
14, 15
15,648

1

17,111
18,579
19,807
21,112
22,470
2
2
2
2
3

3
5
7
9
0

,7
,1
,1
,4
,9

9
7
4
0
1

4
4
2
9
0

Sector 72. Hotels and repair places except auto repair: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

To ta 1

Equi pment

S tr u c tu r e s

_____________________
1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$1,430
1,424
1,17 1

$487
59 1
406

$942
832
765

$31,503
31,740
31,725

$3,799
4,151
4,326

$27,703
27,588
27,399

$24,970
2 5 , 180
25,105

$3,078
3,391
3,4 8 6

$21,852
21,789
21,619

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1, 145
1,095
970
1,464
924

268
350
125
27 1
182

876
745
845
1,193
74 1

3
3
3
3
3

1,664
1,514
1,186
1,302
0,850

4
4
4
4
3

,3
,4
,2
,0
,8

4
1
0
9
7

9
7
9
9
3

2
2
2
2
2

7
7
6
7
6

,315
,097
,977
,203
,976

2
2
2
2
2

4
4
4
4
4

,9
,7
,3
,4
,0

6
4
7
9
9

6
5
6
9
5

3
3
3
2
2

,404
,369
,081
,934
,703

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1,708
2,036
1,728
1,971
2,2 8 1

509
759
672
645
696

1,199
1,277
1,055
1,326
1,585

3
3
3
3
3

1,1
1,8
2,2
2,8
3,8

3
4
4
4
5

,9
,3
,6
,8
,2

69
25
13
89
30

2
2
2
2
2

7
7
7
7
8

,2
,5
,6
,9
,6

0
1
0
7
0

7
6
6
3
4

2
2
2
2
2

4
5
5
6
7

,5
,2
,7
,4
,4

0
5
2
3
6

2
9
2
9
6

2
3
3
3
4

,8
,1
,4
,7
,0

1
9
9
6
6

9
8
4
0
4

2
2
2
2
2

1,682
2,060
2,227
2,678
3,401

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____

2
2
2
3
3

628
804
659
863
869

1,724
2,136
2 , 3 12
2,553
2,693

34,834
36,514
3 8 , 158
40,224
42,425

5,50 1
5,929
6 , 176
6,585
6,965

2
3
3
3
3

9
0
1
3
5

,3
,5
,9
,6
,4

82
85
81
39
60

2
3
3
3
3

8
0
1
3
6

,5
,2
,8
,9
,1

51
06
67
57
74

4
4
4
5
5

,2
,6
,7
,1
,4

7 1
19
80
12
17

2
2
2
2
3

4
5
7
8
0

,2
,5
,0
,8
,7

7
3
8
4
5

19 6 5
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

3,27
3,45
2,73
3,11
2,74

6
0
7
2
2

687
948
668
1,024
753

2,589
2,502
2,068
2,088
1,989

4
4
4
4
5

4
6
7
9
0

,3
,4
,8
,5
,9

38
31
17
79
66

7 , 135
7,548
7,661
8,103
8 ,243

37,202
38,882
4 0 , 155
41,476
42,723

3
4
4
4
4

8
0
1
3
4

,0
,1
,5
,2
,5

8
6
0
0
0

5,510
5,841
5,858
6,206
6,249

3
3
3
3
3

2
4
5
6
8

,5
,3
,6
,9
,2

78
24
47
99
57

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 _____
1 9 7 2 --------1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

2,48
2,53
3,05
2,99
1,83

8
2
2
5
1

1,801
1,745
2,260
2,391
1,437

5
5
5
5
5

2
3
4
6
6

,0
,2
,9
,5
,9

90
48
18
24
59

8
8
8
8
7

4
4
4
4
4

4
4
4
4
4

5,532
6,586
8 , 140
9,615
9,911

6
6
6
6
5

3
4
4
4
4

9
0
1
3
4

,
,
,
,
,

3
4
7
2
0

,3
,9
,9
,4
,5

52
40
7 1
17
63




686
787
79 1
603
393

76
42
20
62
34

113

,2
,3
,4
,3
,9

8
9
7
4
8

3
1
6
8
9

3
4
6
8
8

,8
,8
,4
,1
,9

0
5
4
7
6

6
7
1
6
9

8
5
6
5
6

,2
,2
,2
,0
,7

0
4
6
9
0

2
0
6
2
9

,5
,3
,2
,5
,3

3
3
8
5
2

61
76
94
65
91

9
6
6
4
7

0
6
4
2
2

Sector 73. Business services, research and development: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
G ross
Year

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
. . . .
_____
_____
_____

1 9 6 0 _____
1 9 6 1 _____
1 9 6 2 ....
1 9 6 3 _____
1 9 6 4 _____
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
_____
. . . .
_____
_____

1 9 7 0 _____
1 9 7 1 ....
1 9 7 2 _____
1 9 7 3 _____
1 9 7 4 _____

i
I
I

T o ta l

I
I
I
I

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
|

$290
363
287

G ross

S tr u c tu re s

$22
27
21

T o ta l

s to c k 3

Equ i p m e n t

$1,309
1,589
1,790

$ 1,225
1,479
1,660

I
|

Net

S tr u c tu r e s

I

T o ta l

I
1

$1,037
1,312
1,496

$962
1,211
1,375

$75
10 1
120

I
I

$84
1 10
130

j
|

s to c k s

1,726
2,128
2 , 2 11
2,360
2,461

1,583
1,947
2,013
2,139
2,217

143
180
197
22 1
243

I
I
I

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

368
562
280
378
362

342
522
260
35 1
336

25
39
19
26
25

2,054
2,514
2,677
;• , 9 1 0
3 . C9 1

1,900
2,322
2,467
2,676
2 ,834

!

154
191
209
234
257

565
6 15
1,053
8 17
8 19

525
572
979
759
76 1

39
42
73
57
57

3
3
4
5
5

,4
,7
,5
,0
,5

3
9
6
6
6

6
3
0
9
6

3
3
4
4
5

41
58
53
07
49

|
|
I
|
|

2 94
335
406
46 1
5 16

I
I
I
I

2
3
3
4
4

,7
,0
,7
,1
,5

3
3
4
8
9

6
3
4
4
2

2
2
3
3
4

,4
,7
,3
,7
,0

55
13
55
41
96

280
319
389
443
496

6
7
7
8
9

,2
,0
,9
,9
,2

2
5
5
1
1

3
5
6
0
7

5,6
6,3
7,2
8,0
8 ,3

4
8
0
5
0

0
9
0
6
3

|
I
|
|
I

583
665
755
854
913

I
I
1
1
I

5
5
6
7
7

,1
,8
,5
,3
,4

3
1
3
0
1

2
0
4
1
4

4
5
5
6
6

,5
,1
,8
,4
,5

7
6
0
7
3

56 1
64 1
728
824
879

96
93
13
39
34

9,543
10,888
12,341
15,190
17,817

|

1, 052
1,205
1,372
1,649
1,916

,881
,032
,331
,546
,599

18,815
18,879
19,999
22,883
25,596

I
I
I
I

I
I
I
I
I

Equ i p m e n t

$313
39 1
309

I

in v e s tm e n t

994
1,195
1,317
1,441
868

924
1,110
1,224
1,339
306

69
84
92
10 1
6 1

2
2
2
3
3

,016
,204
,403
,988
,835

1,874
2,048
2,233
3,707
3,564

14 1
155
169
280
270

10,5
12,0
13,7
16,8
19,7

2,178
1,298
2 , 6 15
4,786
4,931

2,024
1,206
2,431
4,450
4,585

153
91
183
335
345

2
2
2
2
2

_

0
1
2
5
8

_______

,1
,4
,1
,6
,0

|
|
|

|

|
|
|
I
I

2
2
2
2
3

I
I
j

,066
, 153
,332
,662
,002

1
I
I

0
9
5
7
4

8,6 1 3
9,906
11,294
1 4, 153
16,684

7,599
8,744
9,97 1
12,560
14,832

1,01
1,16
1,32
1,59
1,85

17,353
16,956
17,689
20,369
22,959

15,36 1
14,837
15,452
17,815
20,080

1,992
2,069
2,236
2,553
2,8 7 8

_______

4
2
2
3
2

Sector 73. Business services, research and development: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
—

“ 1
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Nat

s to c k s

Year

r
T o ta l

$518
6 10
470

1 9 4 7 _____
1948 . . . .
1 9 4 9 --------195
195
195
195
195

Equ i p m e n t

0 --------1 _____
2 _____
3 _____
4 _____

$469
556
426
499
707
342
469
435

551
779
376
5 15
48 1

S tr u c tu re s

$49
54
43

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

$2,729
3,091
3,322

S tr u c tu r e s

$2,37 1
2,685
2,880

$357
405
441

T o ta l

E qu ip m e nt

$ 2 , 108
2,476
2 , 6 97

$1,801
2,122
2,310

I

S tr u c tu r e s

|

$307
353
387

j

3
4
4
4
4

,6
,2
,3
,6
,7

50
17
63
11
74

3
3
3
3
4

,1
,6
,7
,9
,1

6
6
8
9
2

4
7
8
8
5

485
549
574
6 12
649

2
3
3
3
3

,9
,4
,5
,6
,7

8
8
2
6
3

9
1
3
4
2

2
2
3
3
3

,5
,9
,0
,1
,1

5
8
0
1
4

9
9
7
2
4

5
5
6
6
7

52
7 1
34
46
46

,1
,4
,2
,7
,2

5
9
9
9
9

4
4
5
5
6

,4
,7
,4
,8
,2

4
2
1
3
4

7
4
8
8
5

7 10
770
877
96 1
1,045

4
4
5
5
5

,0
,3
,0
,5
,9

4
2
7
2
2

1
3
7
0
9

3
3
4
4
4

,3
,6
,2
,6
,9

9
1
6
3
5

4
8
8
0
8

6,8
7,5
8 ,4
9,3
9,5

2
8
2
2
4

0
2
5
6
9

1, 149
1,279
1,420
1,573
1,659

6,49
7,23
8,04
8,90
9,02

6
4
0
7
1

5
6
6
7
7

,4
,0
,7
,4
,4

2
3
0
2
5

3
6
5
4
7

|
I

1,0
1,1
1,3
1,4
1,5

I
|

646
705
809
890
97 1

1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

752
752
1,243
964
958

682
682
1, 127
870
864

70
69
116
93
94

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964

--------_____
_____
_____
_____

1, 156
1,390
1,535
1,676
1,006

1, 0 4 2
1,250
1,383
1,513
909

114
139
151
163
97

7,970
8,86 1
9,845
10,900
11,209

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 ....
1 9 6 9 _____

2
2
2
4
4

35
23
10
87
18

2 , 1 18
2,293
2,470
4,008
3,783

217
229
240
37 9
334

12,77
14,45
16,25
19,64
22,67

5
9
2
0
5

10,908
12,373
13,937
16,957
19,669

1,867
2,086
2,315
2,683
3,005

10,402
11,871
13,414
16,511
19,150

8 ,6 3 8
9,895
11,218
13,958
16,286

|
|
|
I
|

1,764
1,975
2 , 196
2,553
2,864

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

2,268
1,307
2 , 6 15
4,735
4,579

2,093
1,211
2,431
4,424
4,309

174
96
183
31 1
270

2
2
2
2
3

0
8
9
5
4

2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3

19,720
19,134
19,663
22,090
24,137

16,708
16,054
16,430
18,579
20,392

|
|

3
3
3
3
3

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

,3
,5
,7
,3
,1

_________ _________




3
3
4
7
0

,
,
,
,
,

7
7
8
8
3

6
5
7
4
3

3
5
5
9
0

430
492
516
552
587

|

114

0
0
1
4
6

,5
,5
,4
,1
,3

9
0
5
2
6

3
7
8
8
3

,1
,2
,4
,7
,9

67
51
20
17
7 1

|

|

j

,0
,0
,2
,5
,7

7
9
3
8
6

2
8
5
3
4

12
80
33
11
45

Sector 75. Auto repair and services: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)
Gross
i
|

T o ta l

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

1
T o ta l

S tr u c tu re s

E quipm ent

$95
9 1
82

$1,668
1,660
1,634

$33
32
29

$129
124
112

I
I
I

1950 .
1951.
19 5 2 .
1953 .
1954.

194
239
203
279
2 16

I
|
j
I
|
I

143
176
150
206
159

50
62
52
72
56

1955.
1956 .
1957 .
1958.
1959.

378
574
536
47 1
674

I
|
|
I
I
I

279
424
396
348
493

19 6 0 .
196 1.
1962 .
1963.
1964.

669
4 17
889
378
1,705

I
|
|
I
|

1965.
1966 .
1967 .
1968.
1969.

1,001
1,297
581
1,707
2,1 0 2

|
I
I
|
|

1970.
1 9 7 1.
197? .
19 7 3 .
1974.

1 , C84
2,194
1,965
2,580
2,658

I
|
j
I
|
I
I

19 4 7 .
1948 .
1949.

Net

s to c k s

1
|
1
|
|
j

S tr u c tu r e s

Equ i p m e n t

$327
355
380

$1,341
1,304
1,253

s to c k s

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

__ ____

$995
948
89 1

$290
3 16
38

898
94 1
962
1 ,0 44
1, 0 77

380
434
477
540
586

$ 1,285
1,264
1,229
1,2
1,3
1,4
1,5
1,6

S tr u c tu r e s

78
76
40
85
64

6

1,68
1,77
1,83
1,97
2,06

4
7
5
6
3

|
|
|
|
|

1
1
1
1
1

,258
,294
,306
,381
, 4 19

426
483
529
595
644

98
149
139
122
175

2
2
3
3
3

,3
,7
,1
,4
,9

6
0
7
6
6

I
|
|
|
|

1,58 1
1,884
2 , 150
2,356
2,70 1

735
876
1,006
1,119
1,285

1,900
2,318
2,680
2,955
3,412

1,225
1,507
1,741
1,907
2,202

674
8 11
938
1,048
1,209

494
308
657
279
1,261

174
108
23 1
98
443

4
4
5
5
6

,475
,690
,345
, 4o4
,855

|
|
|
|
|

3
3
3
3
4

,0
,1
,5
,5
,5

2
4
7
9
6

6
3
7
9
8

1,449
1,547
1,767
1,855
2,287

3
3
4
4
5

2,4
2,5
2,8
2,8
3,7

62
02
62
08
16

1,369
1,462
1/6 /7
1,757
2 , 182

740
959
429
1,262
1,555

260
337
15 1
444
546

7,526
8,470
8,6 7 9
9,587
11,638

|
I
|
|
j

4
5
5
6
7

,9
,6
,6
,5
,6

8
0
7
5
7

9
7
7
3
0

2
2
3
3
3

,5
,8
,0
,4
,9

3
6
0
3
6

6
2
2
4
8

6,479
7,318
7,392
8,546
10,016

4
4
4
5
6

,0
,5
,5
,2
,2

5
8
2
6
1

6
0
7
2
4

2
2
2
3
3

,4
,7
,8
,2
,8

2
3
6
8
0

2
8
5
3
1

282
570
511
67 1
690

12,199
13,792
15,096
16,962
18,843

|
I
|
|
j
1

4
4
5
5
6

,2
,7
,2
,9
,6

37
94
90
46
19

10,378
11,797
12,907
14,548
16, 165

6,3
7,2
7,8
8,8
9,8

2
1
4
6
4

7
1
9
4
1

4
4
5
5
6

,0
,5
,0
,6
,3

5
8
5
3
2

1
5
7
4
4

1
1
1
1

80 1
,623
,453
,908
,967

1
6
5
7
8

7,96 1
8,998
9,805
11,016
12,223

,8
,9
,5
,5
,8

3
6
4
6
9

2
4
0
6
9

Sector 75. Auto repair and services: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

—
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

Year

1
T o ta l

Equi pment

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

!

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

1
1947 . .
1948 . .
1949..

$170
150
129

$73
63
59

$4,730
4,549
4/347

|
I
|

4,290
4.282
4,218

|
|
I

4,'.C2

1950 .
1951 .
1952.
1953.
1954.

.
.
.
.
.

323
36 1
290
4 16
312

219
248
198
289
2 10

104
1 13
91
127
102

4 , : 07

1955.
1956 .
1957 .
1958 .
1959.

.
.
.
.
.

557
744
676
604
86 1

379
498
455
405
574

177
246
220
198
287

19 60. .
1961..
1962..
1963. .
1964. .

852
530
1,138
48 1
2,167

565
35 1
760
324
1,470

287
179
377
157
697

1965.
1966.
196/.
1968 .
196 9 .

.
.
.
.
.

1,267
1 , 6 18
708
2,000
2,363

869
1,122
495
1,402
1,687

1970 . .
1971..
1972. .
1973 . .
1974. .

1,154
2,226
1,965
2,534
2,360

834
1,625
1,453
1,910
1,82 1




|
___ | _

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

------------------------ r

$243
2 14
188

________________

s to c k s

r

$3,344
3,116
2,874

$1,386
1,433
1,473

|
|
j

$2,356
2,146
1, 933

1,556
1,645

1,-00

3, 184
3,213
3,190
3,312
3,341

|
|
|
|
|

1,834
1,784
1,707
1,743
1 , 7 12

$1,217
1,252
1,280

1
;

2
2
2
2
2

,7
,6
,5
,4
,4

3
3
0
9
2

4,576
5,040
5,431
5,743
6,306

|
|
|
I
|

2
2
3
3
3

,5
,8
,0
,1
,4

52
06
15
69
88

2
2
2
2
2

,0
,2
,4
,5
,8

2
3
1
7
1

3
4
5
3
8

3,619
4,078
4,451
4,736
5,260

|
|
I
I
|

1,856
2,114
2 , 3 15
2,4 5 1
2,738

1,763
1, 9 6 4
2,136
2,285
2,521

6
7
7
7
9

48
48
29
22
71

|
|
|
I
|

3
3
4
4
5

,7
,8
,3
,2
,3

8
5
0
8
9

7
5
6
9
0

3
3
3
3
4

,0
,1
,5
,6
,2

6
9
2
3
8

0
3
3
2
1

5
5
6
6
8

45
74
87
05
91

|
|
|
I
|

2
2
3
3
4

,9
,9
,3
,3
,3

8
9
8
0
4

8
3
3
1
8

2
2
3
3
3

,7
,8
,2
,3
,9

5
8
0
0
4

398
496
213
598
676

10,498
11,655
11,886
13,379
15,175

|
I
|
|
|

5,867
6,578
6,646
7,591
8,7 6 1

4
5
5
5
6

,6
,0
,2
,7
,4

30
76
40
88
14

1
1
1
1

9,025
0,069
0,148
1,465
3,055

|
|
|
|
|

4
5
5
6
7

,7
,3
,2
,0
,0

4
5
8
6
5

4
3
4
9
4

4
4
4
5
6

,2
,7
,8
,3
,0

8 1
15
6 3
95
0 1

320
60 1
5 11
624
538

15,680
1 7 , 168
18,324
19,997
21,435

|
|
I
|
I

3,996
9,933
10,629
11,730
12,682

6,684
7,235
7,695
8,267
8,752

1
1
1
1
1

3
4
5
7
8

|

,8
,0
,8
,9
,6

4
6
7
2
7

$3,574
3,399
3,214

1,711
1,809

4

____________________ ______________ L _ __________________

115

,7
,8
,5
,6
,2

,339
,639
,599
,052
,239

I
|

|
|
I
|

______________ L _

7,091
7,867
8,398
9,314
10,056

1
1
1
1
1

,3
,4
,4
,5
,6

50
28
82
69
29

6
1
3
4
3

6,247
6,772
7,20 1
7,738
8 , 182

Sector 76. Amusements: Historical dollars
(Millions of dollars)

Gross

Year

I
|

To ta l
1 9 4 7 ____
1 9 4 8 ____
194 9 ____

investment

Equipment

$420 |
403 |
30 1 |

$2 09
20 1
150

Gross

1
| Structures

To t a l

|
j
|
I

$210
20 1
150

$1,893
2,211
2,429

I

stocks

Equ i p m e n t

Net stocks
Structures

I

To t a l

Equi p m e n t

Structures

$1,032
1,169
1,256

$860
1,042
1, 172

I
I

$1,563
1,872
2,074

$821
952
1,028

$ 74 2
920
1,045

I
I
I
I

2,319
2, 35 1
2, 4 1 0
2, 4 2 7
2,548

1, 123
1,108
1,102
1,072
1,090

1,196
1,243
1,307
1,355
1,458

2,798
3, 29 7
3, 6 8 5
4,105
4,693

1,168
1,370
1,514
1,672
1,912

1,629
1,926
2,17 1
2,432
2, 7 80

1950 ---1 9 5 1 ____
1 9 5 2 ____
1 9 5 3 ____
1 9 5 4 ____

352
148
185
154
266

I
|
I
|
|

175
73
92
77
133

|
|
|
|

176
74
92
76
132

2, 69 7
2,76 1
2, 8 5 5
2, 9 0 9
3,06 1

1,370
1,381
1,407
1,408
1,453

1,327
1,379
1,448
1,501
1,608

1 9 5 5 ____
1956 ____
1957 ____
1 9 5 8 ---1 9 5 9 ____

4C1
657
553
590
767

|
|
I
|
|

200
328
276
295
383

I
|
|
|
|

200
328
276
294
383

3, 33 5
3, 8 5 3
4, 2 5 9
4,699
5,3 16

1,552
1,768
1 , 924
2, 09 6
2, 356

1,783
2,085
2,335
2,602
2,959

I
I

I960 ____
196 1 ____
1 9 6 d ____
1963 ____
196“ ____
+

867
765
935
934
1,033

|
|
I
|
|

433
382
467
467
5 16

|
|
|
|

433
382
467
466
516

6, 0 3 2
6, 6 4 4
7,4 18
8,173
9,0 17

2, 6 6 5
2, 92 0
3, 2 5 2
3, 57 0
3,920

3 ,3 67
3, 7 2 3
4, 166
4 ,6 07
5 ,0 97

I
I
I
I
I

5,368
5, 9 2 0
6, 6 1 8
7, 2 8 7
8,023

2, 190
2,398
2, 67 1
2,9 19
3, 139

3, 1 77
3,521
3, 947
4,368
4,834

1965 ____
1966 ____
1967 ____
1968 ____
196 9 ____

1,116
1,286
9 11
1,133
1/701

|

|
|
|
|

552
636
450
560
842

I
|
|
|

563
649
460
572
858

9,9 16
10,957
1 1,593
12,420
13, 784

4,284
4, 7 0 4
4, 911
5,198
5,738

5,632
6,253
6,682
7,222
8,046

I
I
I
I

8,809
9 ,7 28
10 ,235
10,931
12,161

3, 4 6 5
3, 79 6
3, 9 0 9
4, 10 6
4,558

5,343
5,932
6,326
6,825
7, 6 03

1970 ____
197 1 ____
1 9 7 2 ____
1 9 7 3 ____
1 9 7 4 ____

2, 0 6 8
947
1,632
2,318
2,388

|
|
|
|
|

1,023
468
807
1,147
1,182

1,044
478
824
1,170
1,205

15,483
16,028
17,225
19,076
20,963

6, 4 2 0
6, 5 3 8
6, 9 5 7
7, 691
8,433

9, 0 5 2
9, 48 9
10,267
11,385
12,530

I
I
I
I

13 ,716
14,100
15,136
16, 81 4
18, 50 3

5, 158
5, 166
5, 4 9 0
6, 122
6, 7 4 7

8,557
8,934
9, 6 4 5
10,691
1 1,756

|
i
|
|

__________ L—

_______

I

__________

Sector 76. Amusements: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

T o ta l

$5,335
5,775
6,039

I
I
|

Equ i p m e n t

$797
702
522

--------_____
_____
--------_____

I
I
|
I
|

$349
320
236

$448
381
286

633
238
290
242
422

1 9 4 7 _____
1948. .. .
1 9 4 9 _____
1950
195 1
1952
1953
1954

I

i
|

|
|
|
|
I

268
103
130
110
184

364
134
159
132
238

6
6
6
6
6

0
8
1
3
9

|
|
|
|
|

2
2
2
2
2

,6
,5
,5
,5
,5

6,892
7,550
8,007
8,521
9,292

|
I
|
|
|

2
2
2
3
3

,4
,4
,4
,4
,5

2
0
4
1
4

$2,305
2,453
2,523
3
3
6
0
0

,58 1
,796
,922
,071
,332

4
4
5
5
5

,3
,7
,0
,4
,9

1
5
8
4
6

0
4
4
9
0

5
6
6
7
7

11
63
16
27
86

1,868
2,078
2,204
2,352
2,606

3,742
4 , 184
4,512
4,874
5,380

6,5
7,0
7,7
8 ,3
9,0

6
8
3
6
6

6
8
3
3
0

8,886
9 , 6 19
10,558
11,446
12,422

2,907
3 , 130
3,440
3,721
4,026

5
6
7
7
8

9,807
0,645
1,182
1,838
2,798

13,452
14,628
15,223
16,009
17,351

4
4
4
5
5

,3
,7
,8
,0
,4

3
0
4
8
3

9,109
9,907
10,398
11,000
11,897

13,877
14,276
14,986
15,964
16,766

18,924
1 9 , 157
20,003
21,394
22,513

6
5
6
6
7

,021
,939
, 167
,682
,108

12,903
13,217
13,835
14,712
15,404

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

1,240
1,093
1,321
1,303
1,425

|
I
|
|
I

530
469
577
575
629

7 10
623
744
727
795

1
1
1
1
1

0,222
1,008
2,021
3,005
4,094

I
I
|
I
[

3
3
4
4
5

,6
,9
,2
,6
,0

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

_____
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
_____

1
1
1
1
1

18
04
67
95
91

|
|
|
|
|

673
767
530
639
929

844
937
636
756
1,061

1
1
1
1
1

5,252
6,567
7,312
8,252
9,754

|
|
I
I
|

5
5
6
6
6

,444
,921
,130
,414
,955

1970
197 1
1972
1973
1974

. . . .
_____
_____
_____
_____

2,270
983
1,632
2,221
2,005

I
|
I
I
|

1,087
477
807
1,121
1,070

1, 1 8 2
506
824
1,100
935

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
2
4
5

|
I
|
|
|
1

7,622
7,645
7,967
3,575
9,104

116

$2,511
2,795
2,980
3
3
3
3
3

1960
196 1
1962
1963
1964




$1,757
1,909
1,975
2,069
1,989
1,926
1,832
1,806

370
550
437
47 1
6 16

_____ l

$4,268
4,704
4,956

S tr u c tu r e s

5,311
5,260
5,250
5 , 182
5,286

276
426
343
366
472

0
2
4
9
1

Equ i p m e n t

,785
,822
,88 1
,911
,045

|
I
|
I
|

0
2
5
3
7

T o ta l

3
3
3
3
4

647
977
78 1
837
1,089

,5
,9
,9
,5
,8

$3,029
3,321
3,515

4
5
0
2
3

1955. .. .
1956. .. .
1957 . . . .
1 9 5 8 _____
1 9 5 9 _____

,5
,7
,1
,3
,9

S tr u c tu r e s

5
2
8
4
3

5
0
7
2
3

1
1
1
1

______

,6
,2
,7
,2
,9

4
2
2
0
5

,2
,2
,3
,3
,4

4
7
2
4
7

2
1
4
9
9

,979
,489
, 1 18
,725
,3 9 5

77. Medical and educational services, nonprofit organizations: Historical dollars

>r

(Millions of dollars)
G ross

in v e s tm e n t

G ross

s to c k s

Net

s to c k s

Year
I
I

T o ta l

1
Equ i p m e n t

1947 . .
1948 . .
1949. .

$63 1
996
1/313

|
I
|

$205
324
427

1950 . .
1951..
1952. .
1953 . .
1954 . .

1,654
1,921
1,807
1,919
2/304

|
I
I
j
j

558
625
588
625
750

1955.
1956 .
1957 .
1958.
1959.

.
.
.
.
.

2
2
3
3
3

,491
,577
,029
,324
,441

|
1
|
|
|

. .
..
..
..
..

3
4
4
5
5

,7
,2
,9
,1
,7

5
7
4
8
2

6,279
6,801
7,338
7,739
8,618

S tr u c tu r e s

1950
1961
1962
1963
1964

1965.
1966 .
1967 .
1968.
19 69.

.
.
.
.
.

1970 . .
1971..
19 72. .
1973 . .
1974..

8,9
9,5
10,2
9,3
9,8

9
6
7
3
7

04
12
61
88
39

T o ta l

Equ i p m e n t

S tr u c tu r e s

I

T o ta l

Equi pment

$6,124
6,751
7,587

I
I
I

$6,513
7,310
8 ,4 1 3

I
I
|

$997
1,205
1,512

$5,516
6,104
6,901

S tr u c tu r e s

$425
67 1
835

$7,450
8,283
9,431

,1
,2
,2
,2
,5

15
95
13
93
53

1
1
1
1
1

0
2
4
6
8

,921
,674
,303
,025
,104

2
2
3
3
4

,2
,7
,2
,7
,3

7
8
6
6
6

2
9
5
5
7

8,648
9,884
1t ,038
12,260
13,737

I
I
I

9,838
11,500
13,009
14,584
16,490

|
|
|
|
|

1,917
2,389
2,792
3,195
3,6 7 7

7 , 920
9,111
10,217
11,339
12,812

8 11
839
936
1, 0 8 3
1,121

1,679
1,737
2,042
2,240
2 , 3 19

2
2
2
2
3

0,331
2,594
5,252
8 , 145
1,094

4
5
6
7
7

,9
,6
,3
,0
,8

98
13
23
76
10

15,333
16,981
18,928
21,069
23,283

j
I
I
j

13,519
20,567
22,993
25,651
28,347

|
|
I
I
|

4
4
5
5
6

14,353
15,942
17,326
19,898
22,039

I
|
|
|
I

1,2
1,3
1,6
1,6
2,0

36
90
20
74
16

2,558
2,876
3,353
3,463
3,755

3
3
4
4
5

4
7
2
6
1

1
4
8
2
7

,3
,6
,6
,7
,3

2
8
6
1
0

0
4
8
8
0

|
I
|
j
|

6,913
7,604
8,450
9,270
10,345

24
27
30
33
36

,4
,0
,2
,4
,9

0
8
1
4
5

I
I
|
I
|

2,339
2,4 4 6
3,073
3,241
3 , 6 10

3,939
4,354
4,264
4,497
5,007

56
62
69
75
82

2
7
3
9
6

,2
,6
,3
,3
,0

7
3
8
6
1

2
2
3
0
9

|
|
|
|
|

1 1,645
12,939
14,736
16,550
18,563

4
4
4
5
5

0
4
8
2
7

,6
,6
,6
,8
,4

26
92
46
09
56

|
|
|
|
|
I

3
3
4
4
4

5
5
5
5
5

82,741
89,327
97,395
104,300
110,867

|
|
|
|
|

2
2
2
2
2

6
6
7
7
8

2
7
2
8
3

,2
,3
,8
,0
,2

4
4
4
8
5

,7
,9
,2
,1
,1

29
34
98
42
22

1
1
1
1
1

_

, 174
,527
,962
,745
, 7 16

,3
,9
,2
,6
,5

3
7
6
4
8

$1,326
1,531
1,844

3
9
5
4
2

8,60 1
9,486
10,538
1 1,578
12,890

j
I

3
3
3
4
4

42,497
46,712
50,831
5 5 , 178
60,029

I
|
I
I
I

5
5
6
6
7

’
2
5
3
3

90,333
9 S , « . SC
10 6 , 7 o 3
114,634
122,249

31
92
26
65
92

14,452
16,042
18,174
20,377
22,339

,949
,755
,006
,556
86 9

2
2
3
3
3

65.040
70, '96
76,177
81,730
87,240

I
I
I
I
I

5
7
0
2
5

,
,
,
,
,

2
8
5
9
0

9
5
5
0
0

3
3
5
3
8

5
8
1
5
8

,7
,4
,7
,0
,6

0
2
4
6
7

, 166
,625
,17 1
,752
,307

,
,
,
,
,

5
4
5
2
6

0
3
5
1
0

1
4
0
2
3

7
0
7
8
4

0
3
4
8
8

J____________ L

Sector 77. Medical and educational services, nonprofit organizations: Constant dollars
(Millions of 1972 dollars)

—

—

G ross

G ross

in v e s tm e n t

Nat

s to c k s

r
Equ i p m e n t

To ta l

S tr u c tu re s

T o ta l

I
I

$31,562
32,815
34/680

I
|
|

1 9 4 7 _____
1 9 4 8 _____
1 9 4 9 _____

$1,291
1,855
2,476

$342
509
658

$949
1,345
1 , 8 17

1950. .. .
1951 . . . .
1952. .. .
1953 . . . .
1 9 5 4 _____

3 , 137
3,251
2,990
3 , 169
3,856

8 14
874
814
868
1,011

2,323
2,376
2 , 175
2,30 1
2,844

3
3
4
4
4

7
9
2
4
7

,2
,8
,1
,6
,7

0
2
6
4
5

2
5
4
4
9

4
3
4
4
5

,131
,947
,454
,977
,165

1,095
1,061
1, 197
1,305
1,331

3
2
3
3
3

,036
,385
,257
,672
,833

5
5
5
6
6

1
4
7
1
5

,0
,1
,6
,5
,5

84
43
22
37
51

|
I
I

1960 . . . .
1 9 6 1 ....
1 9 6 2 _____
1 9 6 3 --------1 9 6 4 _____

5
6
7
7
8

,7
,4
,3
,5
,2

1,452
1,628
1,890
1 , 942
2,317

4
4
5
5
5

,249
,777
,506
,586
,942

70,0
75,0
81,0
87,0
93,7

1
9
7
9
6

|
I
j

I
Equi pment

$2,833
3,059
3,444

I
|
|
I
I

1 9 5 5 _____
1956 . . . .
1957 . . . .
1 9 5 8 ....
1 9 5 9 _____

0
0
9
2
5

2
5
6
8
9

3
0
0
6
8

1 9 6 5 _____
1 9 6 6 _____
1 9 6 7 _____
1 9 6 8 ....
1 9 6 9 _____

8,765
9,211
9,466
9,624
10,070

2
2
3
3
3

,6
,7
,4
,5
,8

8
7
2
3
6

5
0
6
3
5

6
6
6
6
6

,079
,441
,040
,085
,2 0 5

100,856
108,297
115,892
123,533
131,494

1970 . . . .
1 9 7 1 ....
1972. .. .
1973. .. .
1 9 7 4 _____

9,7
9,8
10,2
9,4
8,2

3
4
4
4
3

,8
,0
,2
,0
,7

7
2
9
8
9

2
0
8
5
2

5
5
5
5
4

,8
,8
,9
,3
,4

138
146
154
160
165

59
57
61
15
48




3
3
6
2
5

6
6
2
9
5

,994
,418
,046
,600
,733

|
|

|
|

|
|
I
I
|
I

|
I
|
I
_______L

s to c k s

4
4
5
5
6

,0
,6
,1
,8
,5

0
2
9
0
2

$23,729
29,756
31,236

Equ i p m e n t

T o ta l

S tr u c tu r e s

$27,236
28,361
30,086
2
4
6
9
1

,4
,8
,9
,1
,9

3
5
4
4
5

9
5
8
8
2

|
I
|
I
1

3
3
4
4
5

,2
,8
,2
,7
,3

4 0
19
99
86
60

2
3
3
3
3

9
1
2
4
6

,1
,0
,6
,3
,5

98
36
48
61
92

795
178
910
036
304

4
4
5
5
5

4
7
0
4
7

,9
,6
,7
,3
,9

4
4
6
1
6

0
6
6
7
0

I
I
I
I

5
6
6
7
8

,9
,4
,9
,5
,1

4
3
8
6
0

3
4
4
4
4

8
1
3
6
9

,9
,2
,7
,7
,8

90
13
85
49
51

8,7 0 1
9,398
10,282
11,135
12,279

5
5
6
6
7

3,346
7,345
2,046
6,800
1,882

13,690
15,068
16,972
18,828
20,833

77,071
82,590
87,676
92,773
97,953

3
5
6
8
1

,2
,1
,9
,8
,2

7,288
7,965
8 , 7 12
9,500
10,246

4
4
4
5
5

3
6
8
2
5

,
,
,
,
,

11,043
11,945
13,039
14,116
15,497

5
6
6
7
7

8
3
3
2
8

,9
,1
,0
,9
,2

0
5
0
0
0

62,047
66,743
72,329
77,936
84,161

17, 174
18,857
21,110
23,378
25,857

83,632
89,440
94,781
100,155
105,636

90,761
97,659
104,648
111,602
118,786

2
3
3
3
3

110
115
121
125
129

1
1
1
1
1

08
50
86
99
89

7
4
3
8
7

,785
,868
,060
,600
,244

2
3
3
4
4

5
1
8
3
7

,4
,8
,4
,9
,9

1
9
9
6
7

9
2
3
0
8

|
|

|
j
I
|
|
|

|
I
|
|
|
I
|
I

________________ 1

117

$ 2 5 , 180
26,059
27,388

3
3
3
3
4

3
3
3
3
4

,2
,5
,9
,9
,4

$2,056
2,302
2,698

01
98
70
43
56

0
7
4
0
3

8
0
2
4
6

I
|
|

S tr u c tu r e s

2
2
2
2
2

2
4
6
7
8

,6
,3
,1
,5
,3

9
2
1
8
9

43
86
77
15
31

102,775
107,506
112,316
116,445
119,647

Appendix D. Data Series and
Level of Detail Available

Data Series

Investment net of discards

Investment net of discards is gross investment minus
gross discards. It represents that portion of gross investment
not used to replace assets which are discarded.

The following data series are available from the capital
stock data base. Each series is available separately for plant
and equipment both in historical dollars and constant
dollars. Unless otherwise noted, these data are available
annually for the period 1947—
74.

Service lives

The service lives series represents the assumed useful
productive life of the plant and equipment assets making up
the gross investment bundle. This series is currently
assumed to be constant and corresponds in number and
position to the asset-weight series described below.

Gross investment

Gross investment is the total annual expenditure by an
industry for depreciable fixed capital goods valued at
original cost. Data are available for plant assets from 1890
to 1974 and for equipment assets from 1921 to 1974.

Asset weights

This series represents the constant distribution of the
different plant and equipment types making up the gross
investment bundle. Each value is the portion of gross
investment used to purchase a particular type of plant or
equipment item.

Replacement investment

This series represents discards of worn-out assets and loss
of efficiency of the capital stock for each year.
Net investment

Investment deflators

Net investment is the difference between gross invest­
ment and replacement investment. It represents the net
addition or decline in the net stocks from the previous year.

This series is used to convert the historical-dollar gross
investment series to constant (1972=100) dollars.
Replacement functions

Gross stocks

Two replacement functions—
discard and decay—
are
available which relate the portion of investment remaining
in production N years after its original purchase date. The
discard function relates to the portion of assets not
discarded and the decay function relates to the portion of
assets not discarded or decayed (not depreciated).

Gross stocks represent capital assets on hand adjusted
for discards of worn-out assets.
Net stocks

Net stocks represent the value of capital assets adjusted
both for discards of worn-out assets and loss of efficiency
in production.

Level of Detail
Vintage distributions

Most of the above data series are available for the four
levels of detail given below as well as for each of the level 2
(I/O) industries presented in appendix C.

The vintage distributions relate the value of gross or net
stocks for a given year to the purchase date of the assets
making up the total stock value. Each value in this series
represents the percent of the total stock value which was
purchased in that year. Eight vintage distributions are
available, four each for gross and net stocks for the years
1974, 1969, 1964, and 1959.

Level
1
3
4
5

Gross discards

Gross discards represent the value of stocks which are
discarded because they have reached the end of their useful
service lives.




Content
3- and 4-digit SIC and nonmanufacturing
sectors
2-digit SIC
1-digit sectors
sector totals

Industries at levels 1,3, and 4 are numbered according to
SIC conventions. Where exceptions to the SIC code exist,

118

an X is inserted in the industry number to denote the
exception. For example, 44X1 denotes an industry which is
in SIC 44 but is composed of several three-digit industries
in SIC 44.
Eighty data series are available for each industry at level
1. At all other levels, 64 series are available.

209

Meat products
Dairy products
Preserved fruits and vegetables
Grain mill products
Bakery products
Sugar and confectionery products
Fats and oils
Beverages
Alcoholic beverages
(includes 2082-5)
Miscellaneous foods and kindred products

211
212
213
214

Cigarettes
Cigars
Chewing and smoking tobacco
Tobacco stemming and redrying

221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229

Weaving mills, cotton
Weaving mills, synthetic
Weaving and finishing mills, wool
Narrow fabric mills
Knitting mills
Textile finishing, except wool
Floor covering mills
Yarn and thread mills
Miscellaneous textile goods

231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239

Men’s and boys’ suits and coats
Men’s and boys’ furnishings
Women’s and misses’ outerwear
Women’s and children’s undergarments
Hats, caps, and millinery
Children’s outerwear
Fur goods
Miscellaneous apparel and accessories
Miscellaneous fabricated textile products

241
242
243
244
2448
245
2451
2452
249

Logging camps and logging contractors
Sawmills and planing mills
Millwork, plywood, and structural members
Wood containers
Wood pallets and skids
Wood buildings and mobile homes
Mobile homes
Prefabricated wood buildings
Miscellaneous wood products

251
252

Household furniture
Office furniture




Public building and related furniture
Partitions and fixtures
Miscellaneous furniture and fixtures
Pulp mills
Paper mills, except building paper
Paperboard mills
Miscellaneous converted paper products
Paperboard containers and boxes
Building paper and board mills

271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279

Level 1—manufacturing industries

201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
208X

253
254
259
261
262
263
264
265
266

Newspapers
Periodicals
Books
Miscellaneous publishing
Commercial printing
Manifold business forms
Greeting card publishing
Blankbooks and bookbinding
Printing trade services

281
Industrial inorganic chemicals
281X Aluminum oxide (SIC 28195)
282
2821
2822
283
284
2844
285
286
287
289

Drugs
Soap, cleaners, and toilet goods
Toilet preparations
Paints and allied products
Industrial organic chemicals
Agricultural chemicals
Miscellaneous chemical products

291
295
299

Petroleum refining
Paving and roofing materials
Miscellaneous petroleum and coal products

301
302
303
304
306
307

Tires and inner tubes
Rubber and plastics footwear
Reclaimed rubber
Rubber and plastics hose and belting
Fabricated rubber products, nec
Miscellaneous plastics products

311
313
314
315
316
317
319

Leather tanning and finishing
Boot and shoe cut stock and findings
Footwear, except rubber
Leather gloves and mittens
Luggage
Handbags and personal leather goods
Leather goods, nec

321
322
3221

119

Plastics materials and synthetics
Plastics materials and resins
Synthetic rubber

Flat glass
Glass and glassware, pressed or blown
Glass containers

323
324
325
326
327
328
329
331
332
333
3331
3333
3334
334
335
336
3361
3362
339

Products of purchased glass
Cement, hydraulic
Structural clay products
Pottery and related products
Concrete, gypsum, and plaster products
Cut stone and stone products
Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral products
Blast furnace and basic steel products
Iron and steel foundries
Primary nonferrous metals
Primary copper
Primary zinc
Primary aluminum
Secondary nonferrous metals
Nonferrous rolling and drawing
Nonferrous foundries
Aluminum foundries
Brass, bronze, and copper foundries
Miscellaneous primary metal products

341
342
343
344
345
346
3462
3463
347
348
348X

Metal cans and shipping containers
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware
Plumbing and heating, except electric
Fabricated structural metal products
Screw machine products, bolts, etc.
Metal forgings and stampings
Iron and steel forgings
Nonferrous forgings
Metal services, nec
Ordnance and accessories, nec
Small arms and ammunition
(includes 3482-3)
Miscellaneous fabricated metal products

349

363
364
365
3651
366
3661
367
369
3694
371
37IX
372
372X
3721
373
3731
374
375
376
3761
379
3795
381
382
3825
383
383X
384
385
386
387

Engines and turbines
Farm and garden machinery
Farm machinery and equipment
Construction and related machinery
Construction machinery
(includes 3531-3)
3534 Elevators and moving stairways
(includes 3534-7)
354
Metalworking machinery
355
Special industry machinery
356
General industrial machinery
356X Pumps and air compressors
(includes 3561 and 3563)
3562 Ball and roller bearings
357
Office and computing machines
357X Computing, calculating, and accounting machines
(includes 3573-4)
358
Refrigeration and service machinery
3585 Refrigeration and heating equipment
359
Miscellaneous machinery, except electrical

Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware
Musical instruments
Toys and sporting goods
Pens, pencils, office and art supplies
Costume jewelry and notions
Miscellaneous manufactures
Dressed and dyed furs

Level 1—nonmanufacturing industries

0X10
1X10
1X20
1X30
10X1

120

Agriculture
Coalmining
Stone and clay mining and quarrying
New and repair construction
Iron and ferroalloy ores mining

10X2
13X1
1470
4X10
4X20

Electric distributing equipment
Electric industrial apparatus




Engineering and scientific instruments
Measuring and controlling devices
Instruments to measure electricity
Optical instruments and lenses
Sighting and fire control equipment
(includes 38322-38323)
Medical instruments and supplies
Ophthalmic goods
Photographic equipment and supplies
Watches, clocks, and watchcases

391
393
394
395
396
399
399X

351
352
3523
353
3531

361
362

Household appliances
Electric lighting and wiring equipment
Radio and TV receiving equipment
Radio and TV receiving sets
Communication equipment
Telephone and telegraph apparatus
Electronic components and accessories
Miscellaneous electrical equipment and supplies
Engine electrical equipment
Motor vehicles and equipment
Trucks, buses, and truck trailers
(includes 3713 and 3715)
Aircraft and parts
Aircraft engines, spare propulsion units, and parts
(includes 3724 and 3764)
Aircraft
Ship and boat building and repairing
Ship building and repairing
Railroad equipment
Motorcycles, bicycles, and parts
Guided missiles, space vehicles, parts
Guided missiles and space vehicles
Miscellaneous transportation equipment
Tanks and tank components

Nonferrous metal ores mining
Crude petroleum and natural gas
Chemical and fertilizer minerals
Railroads
Commercial trucking

4X30 Transportation services
41X1 Local bus transportation
4121 Taxicabs
4130 Intercity highway transportation
44X1 Water transportation
45X1 Domestic air transportation
45X2 International air transportation
4610 Pipelines, except natural gas
48X1 Communications except broadcasting
48X2 Radio and TV broadcasting
49X1
49X2
49X3
5X10
5X20
6X10
6X20
7X10
7X20
7500

Level 3—nonmanufacturing industries

X I00
X200
X300
X400
X510
X520
X600
X710
X720

Water utilities
Gas utilities
Electric utilities
Retail trade
Wholesale trade

Level 4 —manufacturing industries

Level 4 —nonmanufacturing industries

X I00
X200
X300
X400
X500

Level 5

TMAN Total manufacturing
NMAN Total nonmanufacturing excluding agriculture
TAGR Total agriculture

Level 3—manufacturing industries

Food and kindred products
Tobacco manufactures
Textile mill products
Apparel and other textile products
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Paper and allied products
Printing and publishing
Chemicals and allied products
Petroleum and coal products

30
31
32
33
34

Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products
Leather and leather products
Stone, clay, and glass products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products

35
36
37
38
39

Machinery, except electrical
Electric and electronic equipment
Transportation equipment
Instruments and related products
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries




Agriculture
Mining
New and repair construction
Transportation
Communications and public utilities

X600 Wholesale and retail trade
X700 Finance, insurance, real estate, and services

8X10 Health, education, and social services;
nonprofit organizations
X I00 Business services; research and development

25
26
27
28
29

Public utilities
Wholesale and retail trade
Finance, insurance, and real estate
Services

X010 Durable goods manufacturing
X020 Nondurable goods manufacturing

Finance and insurance
Real estate and rentals
Hotels and repair places except auto repair
Amusements
Auto repair, services, and garages

20
21
22
23
24

Agriculture
Mining
New and repair construction
Transportation
Communications

Data Requests
The capital stock data described in this bulletin are
maintained and disbursed by the BLS Office of Economic
Growth. The data are stored on a direct access device
utilizing the TOTAL Data Base Management System which
is integrated into a comprehensive set of computer pro­
grams to calculate the stocks and perform updating and
extraction activities on the data base. Data requests may be
made directly to the Office of Economic Growth using the
request form provided at the end of this bulletin or by
telephone (202-523-9036). Each request is treated individ­
ually and a specific job is run to extract only the data series
required. Data are available in a printed form, on computer
tape, or on punched cards. In addition, the data may be
provided as a straight listing of each data series or in a
tabular form which displays related series in a more
readable manner. Examples of the various standard output
forms may be obtained from the Office of Economic
Growth.

121

Appendix E.
Scheme

Aggregation

This appendix presents the aggregation scheme used to
construct three aggregate industry levels of detail in the
capital stock data base. It illustrates the allocation of the
most detailed industry to the higher level aggregations in
which the industry is included. Input-output industries
enclosed in parentheses denote those cases where the level 1
industry is subtracted from the input-output industry when
computing the aggregate. For example, SIC 281X is added
to I/O sector 38 and is subtracted from I/O sector 27 to




which the remaining portion of SIC 281 is allocated.
Level 5 industries are not shown in this appendix but are
derived by aggregating level 4 industries. Total manufactur­
ing (TMAN) is derived from the two level 4 manufacturing
industries (X010 and X020). Total nonmanufacturing
excluding agriculture (NMAN) is an aggregation of the six
nonagricultural industries (X200-X700) in this sector. Total
agriculture (TAGR) is developed from the one agriculture
industry available at all other levels of detail.

122

Table E-1. Aggregation scheme
Aggregations

Aggregations
Level 1 (basic industry)

Level 1 (basic industry)
Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Level 2

2 0 1 ...................................
202 ........................................
203 ........................................
204 ........................................
205 ........................................
206 ........................................
207 ........................................
208 ........................................
208 X ......................................
209 ........................................

14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
—
14

20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
—
20

2 1 1 ........................................
2 1 2 ........................................
2 1 3 ........................................
2 1 4 ........................................

15
15
15
15

21
21
21
21

2 2 1 ........................................
222 ........................................
223 ........................................
224 ........................................
225 ........................................
226 ........................................
227 ........................................
228 ........................................
229 ........................................

16
16
16
16
18
16
17
16
17

22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22

2 3 1 ............., ........................
232 ........................................
233 ........................................
234 ........................................
235 ........................................
236 ........................................
237 ........................................
238 ........................................
239 ........................................

18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
19

23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23

2 4 1 ........................................
242 ........................................
243 ........................................
244 ........................................
2448 ......................................

20
20
20
21
20
(21)
—
61
20
20

24
24
24
24
—
—
24
—
—
24

245 ........................................
2451 .....................................
2452 ......................................
249 ........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................

22

25

25
25
25
25

2 6 1 ........................................
262 ........................................
263 ........................................
264 ........................................
265 ........................................
266 ........................................

24
24
24
24
25
24

26
26
26
26
26
26

2 7 1 ........................................
272 ........................................
273 ........................................
274 ........................................
27 5 ........................................
276 ........................................
277 ........................................
278 ........................................
279 ........................................

26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26

27
27
27
27
27
27
27
27
27

X 020
X 020
X020
X 020
X020
X 020
X 020
X020
X020

2 8 1 ........................................
281 X ...................................

27
38
(27)
28

28
—
—
28

X020
—
—
X 020

282 ........................................




30
30
30
30
30
30

X 010
X 010
X 010
X 010
X 010
X 010

33
34
34
34
34
34
34

31
31
31
31
31
31
31

X 020
X 020
X 020
X020
X020
X 020
X 020

35
35
—
35
36
36
36
36
36
36

32
32
—
32
32
32
32
32
32
32

X 010
X010
—
X 010
X 010
X010
X010
X 010
X 010
X010

37
37
38
—
—
—
38
38
38
—
—
37

33
33
33
—
—
—
33
33
33
—
—
33

X010
X010
X010
—
—
—
X 010
X 010
X010
—
—
X 010

39
42
40
40
41
41
37
(41)
38
(41)
42
42
—
42

34
34
34
34
34
34
—
—
—
34
34
—
34

X 010
X010
X 010
X010
X010
X 010
—
—
—
X 010
X 010
—
X010

3 5 1 ........................................
3 5 2 ........................................
3 5 2 3 ......................................
3 5 3 ........................................
3531 ......................................
3 5 3 4 ......................................
35 4 ........................................
35 5 ........................................
35 6 ........................................

X 020
X020
X 020
X020
X 020
X020

32
32
32
32
32
32

347 ........................................
3 4 8 ........................................
3 4 8 X ......................................
349 ........................................

X 010
X010
X 010
X010

252
253
25 4
259

X 020
X 020
X 020

3 4 1 ........................................
3 4 2 ........................................
3 4 3 ........................................
3 4 4 ........................................
34 5 ........................................
346 ........................................
3 4 6 2 ......................................

X010

23
23
23
23

251

29
29
29

3 3 1 ........................................
3 3 2 ........................................
33 3 ........................................
3331 ......................................
3 3 33 .....................................
3 3 3 4 .....................................
33 4 ........................................
3 3 5 ........................................
33 6 ........................................
3361 ......................................
3362 ......................................
33 9 ........................................

X010
X 010
X010
X 010
—
—
X010
—
—
X 010

31
31
31

3 2 1 ........................................
3 2 2 ........................................
3221 ......................................
32 3 ........................................
32 4 ........................................
3 2 5 ........................................
32 6 ........................................
327 ........................................
3 2 8 ........................................
3 2 9 ........................................

X020
X020
X020
X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020

X 020
X 020
—
X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020

3 1 1 ........................................
3 1 3 ........................................
3 1 4 ........................................
3 1 5 ........................................
3 1 6 ........................................
3 1 7 ........................................
3 1 9 ........................................

X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020
X020
X 020
X 020
X020
X 020

28
28
—
28
28
28
28

3 0 1 ........................................
3 0 2 ........................................
30 3 ........................................
304 ........................................
306 ........................................
307 ........................................

X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020

29
29
—
30
27
27
27

2 9 1 ........................................
295 ........................................
299 ........................................

X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020
X 020
X020
—
X 020

Level 4

2 8 22 ......................................
283 ........................................
284 ........................................
2 8 44 .....................................
285 ........................................
286 ........................................
287 ........................................
289 ........................................

M anufacturing:

Level 3

43
44
—
45
46
47
48
49

35
35
—
35
—
—
35
35
35

X 010
X 010
—
X 010
—
—
X 010
X010
X 010

3463 .....................................

123

Table E-1. Aggregation scheme— Continued
Aggregations

Aggregations

Level 1 (basic industry)

Level 1 (basic industry)
Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

356 X ......................................
3 5 6 2 .....................................

_

_

—

—

35 7 ........................................
357 X .....................................
358 ........................................
3 5 8 5 ......................................
359 ........................................

51
—
52
—
50

35
—
35

3 6 1 ........................................
362 ........................................
3 6 3 ........................................
3 6 4 ........................................
3 6 5 ........................................
366 ........................................
3651 .....................................
3661 .....................................
3 6 9 4 .....................................
367 ........................................
369 ........................................

53
53
54
55
56
56
—
—
—
57
58

36
36
36
36
36
36
—
—
—
36
36

X010
X010
X 010
X 010
X010
X 010
—

3 7 1 ........................................
371 X .....................................
37 2 ........................................
3 7 2 X .....................................
3721 .....................................
373 ........................................
3731 .....................................
37 4 ........................................
3 7 5 ........................................
376 ........................................
3761 ......................................

59
—
60
—
—
61
—
61
61
60
13
(60)
61
13
(61)

37
—
37
—
—
37
—
37
37
37
—
37
—
38
38
—
—
38

3 8 1 ........................................
38 2 ........................................
38 25 .....................................
383 ........................................
3 8 3 X .....................................
384
38 5
386
387

........................................
........................................
........................................
........................................




—

39
39
39
39
39
39
—

X010
X010
X 010
X010
X010
X 010
—

1
5
6
7
8
9

X 100
X 200
X 200
X 200
X 200
X 20 0

X 100
X200
X 200
X200
X 200
X 200

10
11
65
65
65

X 200
X 300
X 400
X400
X400

X200
X300
X400
X400
X400

4 1 2 1 ......................................
4 1 3 0 ......................................
41 X 1 .....................................
4 4 X 1 .....................................
4 5 X 1 .....................................

65
65
65
65
65

X 400
X 400
X 400
X400
X 400

X400
X400
X400
X400
X 400

4 5 X 2 ......................................
4 6 1 0 .....................................
4 8 X 1 .....................................
4 8 X 2 .....................................
4 9 X 1 .....................................

65
65
66
67
68

X 400
X 400
X51 0
X51 0
X 520

X400
X400
X 500
X 500
X500

4 9 X 2 .....................................
4 9 X 3 ......................................
5 X 1 0 .....................................
5 X 2 0 .....................................
6 X 1 0 ......................................

68
68
69
69
70

X 520
X520
X600
X 600
X71 0

X500
X500
X 600
X600
X 700

6 X 2 0 .....................................
7 X 1 0 .....................................
X 1 0 0 .....................................
7 X 2 0 .....................................
8 X 1 0 .....................................
7 5 0 0 .....................................

71
72
73
76
77
75

X71 0
X720
X 720
X720
X 720
X 720

X700
X700
X700
X700
X700
X700

-

-

Nonmanufacturing:

—

—
X 010
X 010

—

64
64
64
64
64
64
18
(64)

3 9 1 ........................................
39 3 ........................................
39 4 ........................................
39 5 ........................................
396 ........................................
39 9 ........................................
3 9 9 X ......................................

X 010
—
X 010
—
X 010

—

38
38
38
38

Level 4

1470 ......................................
1 X 3 0 .....................................
4 X 1 0 .....................................
4 X 2 0 .....................................
4 X 3 0 .....................................

X 010
X 010
—
—
X010

379 ........................................
3 7 9 5 ......................................

35
—

_
—

Level 3

0 X 1 0 ...................................
1 0 X 1 .....................................
1 0 X 2 .....................................
1 X 1 0 .....................................
1 3 X 1 .....................................
1 X 2 0 .....................................

X010
—
X010
—
X 010
—
X 010
X010
X010
—
—
X010
—
-

62
62
53
(62)
63
13
(63)
62
63
63
62

Level 2

—

X010
X010
X 010
X 010

124

Order Form

Persons wishing to receive additional capital stock data for industries other than those presented in this bulletin or on com­
puter tape or cards should return this order to:
Office of Economic Growth
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212
Telephone: 202-523-9036

Capital Stocks Data Request
Name:__________________________________________________________________ Telephone:
Organization:______________________________________________________________________
Address:__________________________________________________________________________

Type of organization (check one): Government_ Educational_ Private Business__ Other (specify)
_
_

Data desired:
Structures_______ Equipment_______ T otal________
Historical dollars________ Constant dollars________
Years: Begin_______ E nd________
Level of detail (See appendix D. Request may be at more than one level.):
1_
_ 2_
_ 3 __ 4 __ 5___
Industries: Specify the actual industries required, a range of industries, or ‘ALL’ if all industries are desired. Use the
industry codes from appendix D to identify each industry. If more than one level is requested, also indicate the
detail level for each industry.
Time series: See appendix D for the available series.
Output medium:
P rintout_____ Cards_____ Computer tap e_____
Tape requirements (check one):
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125

☆ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1979 O —

231-412/152

Characteristics of
Major Collective
Bargaining
Agreements,
July 1,1976
For the labor relations practitioner and student—
A handy statistical reference on 1570 of the largest col­
lective bargaining agreements in the United States.
More than 80 tables dealing with agreement
characteristics:
• Union security, management rights, and related
provisions
• Wages and wage-related clauses
• Hours, overtime, and premium pay
• Paid and unpaid leave
• Seniority and seniority-related provisions
• Job security arrangements
• Dispute settlement procedures
All data are derived from a broad review of agreements
currently on file with the Bureau of Labor Statistics
covering at least 1,000 workers and in effect on July 1,
1976, or later.
Bulletin 2013 reports the results of negotiations
involving some of the largest companies and unions in
the United States.

Fill out and mail this coupon to
BLS Regional Office nearest you or
Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, D.C. 20402.
Make checks payable to
Superintendent of Documents.



Please send_________copies of Characteristics of Major Collective Bargaining
Agreements, July 1, 1976, Bulletin 2013 No.029-001-22086-7, price $2.75.
□ Remittance is enclosed

□ Charge to GPO deposit account no.________

N a m e ____________________________________________
Address _______________________________________ _________________
City, State, and Zip Code __________________________ __________________

Bureau of Labor Statistics
Regional Offices

Region I

1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston. Mass 02203
Phone: (617) 223-6761

Region IV

1371 Peachtree Street. NE
Atlanta. Ga 30309
Phone: (404) 881-4418
Region V

Region II

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York. N Y 10036
Phone: (212) 944-3121
Region III

3535 Market Street
PO Box 13309
Philadelphia. Pa 19101
Phone (215) 596-1154




9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S Dearborn Street
Chicago. Ill 60604
Phone:(312)353-1880

Regions VII and VIII*

911 Walnut Street
Kansas City. Mo 64106
Phone: (816) 374-2481
Regions IX and X**

450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif 94102
Phone: (415) 556-4678

Region VI

Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas. T0x 75202
Phone: (214) 767-6971

* Regions VII and VIII are serviced
by K an sas City
“ Regions IX and X are serviced
by San Francisco


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102