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U  a.oli '.50oo-i+^  Area Wage Survey  Chattanooga, TennesseeGeorgia, Metropolitan Area September 1980  U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 3000-44   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Sequatchie Hamilton  Marion  l*4yyy/ Chattanooqa |_____  \  Tennessee  Catoosa  SOUTHWEST MISSOURI SVA7H  Walker  DNlVaesiTY LIBRARY  U.S. DWOefTOWY OOFY  DEC 2  a 1980  Preface  This bulletin provides results of a September 1980 survey of occupational earnings in the Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. The survey was made as part of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ annual area wage survey program. It was conducted by the Bureau’s regional office in Atlanta, Georgia, under the general direction of Jerry G. Adams, Assistant Regional Commissioner for Operations. The survey could not have been accomplished without the cooperation of the many firms whose wage and salary data provided the basis for the statistical information in this bulletin. The Bureau wishes to express sincere appreciation for the cooperation received. Unless specifically identified as copyright, material in this publication is in the public domain and may, with appropriate credit, be reproduced without permission. Note: Also available for the Chattanooga area are listings of union wage rates for building trades, printing trades, local-transit operating employees, local truckdrivers and helpers, and grocery store employees. Free copies of these are available from the Bureau’s regional offices. (See back cover for addresses.)   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Area Wage Survey  Chattanooga, TennesseeGeorgia, Metropolitan Area September 1980  U S. Department of Labor Ray Marshall, Secretary  Contents  Page  Page  Bureau of Labor Statistics Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner Introduction  December 1980 Bulletin 3000-44  For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C, 20402, GPO Bookstores, or BLS Regional Offices listed on back cover. Price $1.75. Make checks payable to Superintendent of Documents, G.P.O.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Tables—-Continued  Tables: Earnings, all establishments: A- 1. Weekly earnings of office workers............................... A- 2. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers........................................... A- 3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex ......................................................................... A- 4. Hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant workers......................................... A- 5. Hourly earnings of material movement and custodial workers................................................... A- 6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, powerplant, material movement, and custodial workers, by sex................................ A- 7. Indexes of earnings and percent increases for selected occupational groups............................  A- 8. A- 9.  3 5  A-10.  g  A-11.  7 8  9 9  Average pay relationships within establishments for office clerical occupations Average pay relationships within establishments for professional and technical occupations . Average pay relationships within establishments for maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant occupations Average pay relationships within establishments for material movement and custodial occupations  Appendixes: A. Scope and method of survey B. Occupational descriptions  . . . . 10  Introduction  This area is 1 of 71 in which the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings and related benefits. (See list of areas on inside back cover.) In each area, earnings data for selected occupations (A-series tables) are collected annually. Information on establishment practices and supplementary wage benefits (B-series tables) is obtained every third year. This report has no B-series tables. Each year after all individual area wage surveys have been completed, two summary bulletins are issued. The first brings together data for each metropoli­ tan area surveyed; the second presents national and regional estimates, projected from individual metropolitan area data, for all Standard Metropoli­ tan Statistical Areas in the United States, excluding Alaska and Hawaii. A major consideration in the area wage survey program is the need to describe the level and movement of wages in a variety of labor markets, through the analysis of (1) the level and distribution of wages by occupation, and (2) the movement of wages by occupational category and skill level. The program develops information that may be used for many purposes, including wage and salary administration, collective bargaining, and assistance in determining plant location. Survey results also are used by the U.S. Depart­ ment of Labor to make wage determinations under the Service Contract Act of 1965. A-series tables Tables A-l through A-6 provide estimates of straight-time weekly or hourly earnings for workers in occupations common to a variety of manufacturing and   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  nonmanufacturing industries. The occupations are defined in appendix B. For the 31 largest survey areas, tables A-12 through A-17 provide similar data for establishments employing 500 workers or more. Table A-7 provides indexes and percent changes in average hourly earnings for office clerical workers, electronic data processing workers, industrial nurses, skilled maintenance trades workers, and unskilled plant workers. Where possible, data are presented for all industries and for manufacturing and nonmanufacturing separately. Data are not presented for skilled maintenance workers in nonmanufacturing because the number of workers employed in this occupational group in nonmanufacturing is too small to warrant separate presentation. This table provides a measure of wage trends after elimination of changes in average earnings caused by employment shifts among establish­ ments as well as turnover of establishments included in survey samples. For further details, see appendix A. Tables A-8 through A-11 provide measures of average pay relationships within establishments. These measures may differ considerably from the pay relationships of overall area averages published in tables A-l through A-6. See appendix A for details. Appendixes Appendix A describes the methods and concepts used in the area wage survey program and provides information on the scope of the survey. Appendix B provides job descriptions used by Bureau field representatives to classify workers by occupation.  Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980  Occupation and industry division  Secretaries.......................................... Manufacturing............................... Nonmanufacturing........................  Number of workers  416 256 160  Average weekly hours1 (stand­ ard)  39.0 39.5 38.0  Weekly earnings (in dollars)1  Mean2  224.50 230.50 214.50  Median2  215.00 221.00 210.50  Middle range2  192.00- 247.50 194.00- 249.50 180.00- 241.50  Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of 110 and under 120  120 130  _ -  150  140  130  150  140  160  2  1  9  2  1  9  Secretaries, class A......................  41  39.0  236.00  236.00  224.00- 247.50  Secretaries, class B...................... Manufacturing............................... Nonmanufacturing.......................  89 63 26  39.0 40.0 37.5  246.00 250.00 235.50  224.50 224.50 230.00  205.00- 276.00 204.50- 292.50 205.50- 263.00  _  _  -  Secretaries, class C...................... Manufacturing..............................  78 60  39.0 39.0  243.50 255.00  233.00 248.50  208.00- 271.00 208.00- 277.50  Secretaries, class D...................... Manufacturing..............................  131 72  38.5 40.0  210.00 209.00  207.00 209.00  Secretaries, class E...................... Manufacturing.............................. Nonmanufacturing.......................  73 40 33  39.5 39.5 39.5  196.50 199.50 193.00  Stenographers................................... Manufacturing..............................  99 34  38.0 39.5  Stenographers, senior.................. Manufacturing..............................  77 30  Transcribing-machine typists...........  170 8 5 3  180  20 5 15  190  180 190  29 19 10  210  200  29 20 9  210  200  39 22 17  220  220  52 41 11  230  230  28 14 14  240  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  44 32 12  27 11 16  57 36 21  21 12 9  17 13 4  5 3 2  11 10 1  9  1  1  380 and over  6 6  3 3  8 4 4  -  -  -  -  -  5 5  1 1  -  -  1  1  -  4  12  -  5  _ -  _ -  2  4 4  18 14 4  3 1 2  12 11 1  5 2 3  10 6 4  4 1 3  6 3 3  _ -  7 7  -  8 6 2  -  -  -  3 2 1  _ -  1  1  -  -  -  3 1  5 3  15 13  7 4  4 1  4 4  10 10  11 10  4 4  4 3  2 2  1 1  2 2  2 2  1  1  2  -  -  12 2  23 18  11 9  11 3  17 13  10 4  6 4  6 3  22 12  3 1  2 2  _ -  1 1  _ -  _ -  3  _ -  5  6 5 1  7 3 4  3 1 2  10 6 4  13 9 4  2 1 1  4 1 3  10 7 3  5 2 3  6 5 1  2  5  2  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  4 -  20 10  14 1  7 1  6 2  8 1  7 2  5 4  2 1  3 3  4 2  5 1  6 4  1 1  3 1  4 "  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  4 -  19 9  14 1  7 1  5 2  5 1  3  5 4  1 -  3 3  2 2  1 1  6 4  1 1  1 1  _  -  _ -  1  1  13  3  5  1  2  3  -  1  -  4  4  2  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  16  9  7  21  4  11  3  14  3  4  -  1  3  -  -  -  -  -  1  -  -  -  5  8  1  2  2  5  2  4  -  1  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  16  9  2  13  3  9  1  9  1  -  -  -  3  -  -  -  -  -  1  -  61 61  37 37  33 23  10 6  6 5  9 9  _ -  1 1  _ -  _ -  2 1  _ "  _ -  _ -  _ -  _  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  10 10  6 6  21 11  5 1  1 1  5 5  -  _  _ -  _ -  2 1  _ -  _ -  _ "  _  _ -  _  _ -  _  _ -  115.00- 146.00 115.00- 137.50  16 16  7 7  8 8  2 2  3 2  3 2  _ -  _ -  1  _ -  1 1  _ -  _  _ -  _ -  1  1  1  -  1 1  _  -  _ -  _ -  158.00  143.50- 182.50  -  1  -  11  2  -  4  2  -  2  1  1  1  -  -  1  -  -  -  -  -  172.50 181.00 157.50  170.00 177.00 161.00  149.50- 191.50 158.00- 209.50 126.00- 170.00  -  16 1 15  8 5 3  9 9  17 10 7  28 22 6  6 4 2  6 1 5  2 2 -  16 13 3  4 3 1  1 1  3 3  -  -  -  -  1 1 "  -  -  “  10 7 3  -  -  40.0 40.0  192.00 212.50  197.00 210.50  156.00- 212.50 180.00- 230.50  _ -  _ -  10  15  5  17 12  2 2  9 4  3 3  40 8  3 3  4 4  2 2  4 4  _ -  _ -  2 2  _ "  _  -  _ -  _  -  40.0 40.0  189.00 208.50  190.50 210.50  156.00- 212.50 178.00- 229.00  _ -  10  15  5 -  _ -  7 2  1 1  40 8  3 3  4 4  2 2  _ -  2 2  _ -  _  -  2 2  _  -  17 12  -  -  -  2  -  -  _ -  1  _ -  _ -  _ -  176.50- 237.50 178.00- 231.50  _ -  _  -  194.00 194.00 194.50  172.50- 221.00 183.50- 225.50 161.00- 220.00  _ -  _ -  218.50 227.00  198.00 223.00  171.00- 247.50 169.00- 259.00  _ -  38.0 39.5  203.50 229.00  182.00 226.00  169.00- 226.00 169.00- 273.50  _ -  40  38.0  169.50  152.50  132.50- 206.00  Typists.................................................  98  38.5  164.50  154.00  138.50- 190.00  Typists, class A...............................  30  38.5  177.50  176.00  150.50- 198.50  -  Typists, class B............................. .  68  38.5  159.00  150.00  130.50- 175.00  1  File clerks............................................ Nonmanufacturing.......................  186 170  37.5 37.5  137.50 135.50  132.00 129.00  125.50- 146.00 125.50- 140.00  27 27  File clerks, class C........................ Nonmanufacturing.......................  50 35  39.5 39.5  148.00 145.00  148.00 140.00  138.00- 151.50 129.00- 149.00  Messengers....................................... Nonmanufacturing.......................  44 40  38.0 38.0  145.00 136.50  125.00 124.50  Switchboard operators.....................  26  38.5  171.00  Switchboard operatorreceptionists................................... Manufacturing.............................. Nonmanufacturing.......................  127 82 45  39.5 39.5 40.0  Order clerks....................................... Manufacturing..............................  116 44  Order clerks, class B..................... Manufacturing..............................  108 36   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  170  5  -  See footnotes at end of tables.  160  _ -  1 2  -  2  _ -  _ -  -  -  Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980 —Continued Weekly earnings (in dollars)1  Average Occupation and industry division  Accounting clerks...... Manufacturing...... Nonmanufacturing  Number of workers  hours1 (stand­ ard)  Mean2  Median2  Middle range2  479 256 223  39.5 39.5 39.5  191.00 211.50 167.50  180.00 193.00 156.00  155.00- 221.00 175.00- 240.00 136.00- 192.00  Accounting clerks, class A Manufacturing.................. Nonmanufacturing...........  172  122 50  39.0 39.5 39.0  227.50 235.50 207.50  226.50 240.00 207.00  190.00- 253.50 191.00- 253.50 174.00- 228.00  Accounting clerks, class B Manufacturing.................. Nonmanufacturing...........  307 134 173  39.5 40.0 39.5  170.50 189.50 155.50  170.00 178.50 150.00  Payroll clerks............. Manufacturing...... Nonmanufacturing  104 38  39.5 39.5 39.5  210.00 221.50 190.50  Key entry operators.... Manufacturing....... Nonmanufacturing  416 142 274  39.0 40.0 39.0  Key entry operators, class A. Nonmanufacturing...............  93 70  Key entry operators, class B. Manufacturing...................... Nonmanufacturing...............  323 119 204  66  Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of — 110 and under 120  120  130  140  150  160  170  180  190  200  210  220  230  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  130  140  150  160  170  180  190  200  210  220  230  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  2  37  31  2  37  31  _ -  _  1  "  1  145.50- 188.00 171.50- 202.50 134.00- 172.00  2  37  30  2  37  30  200.00 220.00 187.50  185.00- 222.00 200.00- 229.00 181.00- 205.50  _ -  _ -  174.00 196.00 162.50  164.00 180.00 154.00  146.50- 195.00 161.00- 220.50 140.00- 181.50  2  19  38.5 38.5  186.50 184.50  180.00 180.50  169.00- 202.50 168.00- 200.00  _ -  39.5 40.0 39.0  170.50 196.50 155.50  160.00 179.00 148.00  140.50- 189.50 161.00- 221.00 140.00- 164.00  \ _  35 15 20  30 8 22  36 19 17  68 49 19  34 20 14  38 24 14  27 10 17  19 9 10  29 21 8  16 12 4  48 45 3  8 5 3  6 5 1  3 3  1 1  2 2  -  -  -  10 6 4  5 4 1  9 6 3  10 5 5  3 2 1  19 13 6  11 6 5  12 6 6  11 4 7  12 8 4  44 42 2  8 5 3  5 4 1  1 1 -  1 1  1 1  -  -  25 9 16  25 4 21  27 13 14  58 44 14  31 18 13  19 11 8  16 4 12  7 3 4  18 17 1  4 4  _ _ -  1 1  2 2  .  -  -  _ -  1 1  -  4 3 1  1 1  9 3 6  4 3 1  16 6 10  8 1 7  22 15 7  6 3 3  20 19 1  2 2  7 7  1 1  2 1 1  _ -  _ -  5 5  6 6  -  -  _ -  _ -  -  _ -  -  -  -  -  _  _  1 1  _  -  -  -  -  2 2  -  -  "  78 8 70  33 9 24  65 33 32  40 19 21  25 14 11  23 5 18  31 7 24  25 10 15  10 5 5  11 10 1  9 9  .  -  -  2  19  33 1 32  _ -  3 3  _  3 3  18 14  14 11  13 8  15 13  13 10  4 3  7 4  3 1  .  -  2  19  -  19  30 1 29  78 8 70  30 9 21  47 29 18  26 16 10  12 9 3  8 3 5  18 4 14  21 9 12  3 2 1  8 8  9 9  -  -  2  .  See footnotes at end of tables.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  380 and over  4  -  -  -  -  _ -  -  -  5 5  6 6  -  -  _ -  9 8 1  _ -  9 8 1 .  -  _ -  _ -  2 2  1 1  1 1  -  -  -  1 1  -  -  Table A-2. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers in Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980  Occupation and industry division  Number of workers  Average weekly hours1 (stand­ ard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)1  Mean2  Median2  Middle range2  Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings (in dollars) of 120 and under 140  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  540  540 and over  Computer systems analysts (business)........................................ Manufacturing...............................  90 35  38.5 40.0  436.50 415.00  448.50 433.00  392.50- 482.00 342.00- 465.50  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  -  4 3  1 1  1 1  7 7  5 1  6 2  7 -  9 4  12 5  12 6  13 3  8  -  Computer systems analysts (business), class A....................  26  38.5  487.50  481.00  451.00- 522.50  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  1  2  5  4  4  5  *4  Computer systems analysts (business), class B.................... Manufacturing...............................  61 27  38.0 40.0  421.50 399.00  431.50 430.00  379.50- 471.50 342.00- 458.00  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  3 3  1 1  1 1  6 6  5 1  5 1  6  7 2  7 5  8 4  9 3  3  -  Computer programmers (business).. Manufacturing.............................. Nonmanufacturing.......................  104 41 63  38.5 40.0 37.5  308.50 292.00 319.00  308.50 285.50 321.00  269.00- 343.50 253.00- 328.00 279.00- 355.50  _ -  -  -  -  2 1 1  5 5  19 8 11  11 5 6  11 3 8  17 7 10  13 4 9  8 1 7  3 1 2  1 1  4 1 3  -  -  -  “  -  -  10 5 5  Computer programmers (business), class A.................... Nonmanufacturing.......................  37 30  37.5 37.5  344.00 347.50  355.00 355.50  323.00- 374.00 325.00- 377.00  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 1  3 3  5 2  -  6 4  8 8  7 6  2 2  1 1  4 3  -  -  -  "  -  Computer programmers (business), class B....................  36  39.0  310.00  318.50  296.00- 336.00  -  -  -  ~  -  2  4  2  2  9  10  5  1  1  -  -  -  "  ■  “  _  Computer programmers (business), class C....................  31  38.0  264.50  268.50  250.00- 278.50  -  -  -  -  2  3  5  14  4  2  1  -  -  -  -  ~  -  -  -  -  Computer operators.......................... Manufacturing.............................. Nonmanufacturing.......................  174 65 109  39.0 40.0 38.5  221.00 247.50 205.00  206.50 216.50 201.50  183.00- 236.50 201.50- 272.00 179.50- 225.50  5 5  6 2 4  26 5 21  30 8 22  36 18 18  30 7 23  8 5 3  15 5 10  3 3  _ -  _ -  _ -  2 2  3 3  1 1  2 2  1 1  -  6 3 3  -  -  -  -  -  _ -  _ -  _ -  Computer operators, class A.......  40  39.0  281.50  242.50  225.00- 309.50  -  -  -  -  8  10  5  4  -  4  -  -  -  2  3  1  2  1  -  -  -  Computer operators, class B....... Manufacturing.............................. Nonmanufacturing.......................  77 38 39  39.0 40.0 38.5  214.50 223.00 205.50  201.50 215.00 190.00  188.50- 237.00 201.50- 240.50 179.50- 224.50  _ -  1 1  12 1 11  16 5 11  21 17 4  10 5 5  3 2 1  11 5 6  3 . 3  _ “  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ ~  _ -  -  _ “  Computer operators, class C....... Nonmanufacturing.......................  57 47  38.5 38.0  187.50 191.00  183.00 185.00  167.00- 207.00 169.50- 217.00  5 5  5 3  14 10  14 11  7 6  10 10  _ -  _ -  _ -  2 2  “  -  “  -  -  _ ~  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  Drafters............................................... Manufacturing..............................  194 167  39.5 39.5  256.50 257.00  255.00 255.00  224.50- 297.00 224.50- 299.50  1  2  -  -  23 20  2 2  19 18  28 28  24 20  22 19  28 19  25 23  9 8  7 6  1 1  1 1  2 2  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  Drafters, class B............................ Manufacturing..............................  47 44  39.5 39.5  279.00 279.50  263.50 263.50  255.00- 280.50 255.00- 279.50  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  1 -  _ -  14 14  20 19  2 2  4 4  -  3 2  _ -  1 1  2 2  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  Drafters, class C............................ Manufacturing..............................  75 70  39.5 39.5  213.00 216.50  208.00 224.50  193.00- 232.50 201.50- 232.50  _ -  2  16 13  2 2  18 18  28 28  6 6  _ -  2 2  1 1  _ -  _ "  _  _ -  _  -  -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ -  Electronics technicians.....................  61  40.0  340.50  390.50  293.00- 423.50  -  -  2  1  3  3  2  4  12  1  -  -  -  15  -  18  -  -  -  -  -  Electronics technicians, class B ...  30  40.0  367.00  423.50  293.00- 423.50  18  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _ -  307.50 294.50 271.00- 346.50 40.0 27 Registered industrial nurses............ 308.50 294.50 270.50- 348.50 40.0 26 Manufacturing.............................. * Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $540.00 to $580.00; and 2 at $580.00 to $620.00. See footnotes at end of tables.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  4  6  1  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 1  2 2  3 3  3 3  6 5  2 2  2 2  2 2  2 2  2 2  2 2  5  -  -  4 2  -  _ -  Table A-3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex, in Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980  Sex,3 occupation, and industry division  Number of workers  Weekly hours’ (stand­ ard)  Weekly earnings (in dollars)1  Office occupations women  Sex,3 occupation, and industry division  412 256 156  39.0 39.5 38.0  224.50 230.50 214.00  41  39.0  236.00  89 63  39.0 40.0  246.00 250.00  72  39.0 39.0  40.0  243.50 255.00  209.00  73 40 33  39.5  196.50  39.5  193.00  97 34  38.0 39.5  219.00 227.00  77 30  38.0 39.5  203.50 229.00  40  38.0  169.50  30  38.5  177.50  Typists, class B........................................................  68  38.5  159.00  File clerks..................................................................... Nonmanufacturing..................................................  179 167  37.5 37.5  137.00 135.50  45 34  39.5 39.5  148.00 145.50  32  37.5  148.00  25  38.5  170.50  65 35 30  38.5 40.0 37.5  313.00 299.50 329.00  28  39.5  312.50  95 33 62  38.5 40.0 37.5  229.50 271.00 207.50  Computer operators, class B.................................  38  38.5  216.50  Computer operators, class C.................................  33 27  38.0 37.5  201.00 204.50  173 153  39.5 39.5  260.00 262.50  46 43  39.5 39.5  279.50 280.00  Drafters, class C...................................................... Manufacturing.........................................................  71 66  39.5 39.5  215.50 219.50  174.50 196.00 163.00  Electronics technicians...............................................  56  40.0  334.00  26  40.0  358.50  38.5  186.50  Professional and technical occupations - women  39.5 40 0 39.0  171.00 196 50 155.50  39 33  37.5 37.0  301.00 310.50  79 32 47  39.5 39.5 39.0  211.00 223.50 202.00  39  39.5  212.00  27 26  40.0 40.0  307.50 308.50  127 82 45  39.5 39.5 40.0  172.50 181.00 157.50  101 34  40.0 39.5  189.50 202.50  Manufacturing..........................................................  93 26  40.0 40.0  186.00 194.00  Accounting clerks.........................................................  449  39.5  187.00  Nonmanufacturing...................................................  210  39.5  164.50  Manufacturing.......................................................... Nonmanufacturing...................................................  157 110 47  39.0 39.5 39.0  221.50 230.00 202.00  Accounting clerks, class B...................................... Manufacturing.......................................................... Nonmanufacturing...................................................  292 129 163  39.5 40.0 39.5  168.50 187.50 154.00  Manufacturing.......................................................... Nonmanufacturing...................................................  98 60 38  39.5 39.5 39.5  206.50 216.50 190.50  Key entry operators...................................................... Manufacturing.......................................................... Nonmanufacturing...................................................  412 142 270  39.0 40.0 39.0  93 70 319 119 200  Key entry operators, class B...... ...........................  Sex,3 occupation, and industry division  Computer programmers  in  Computer programmers (business)..........................  Professional and technical occupations - men Computer systems analysts  Computer systems analysts (business), class B...............................................  See footnotes at end of tables.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Weekly earnings (in dollars)'  Weekly earnings (in dollars)'  Order clerks...................................................................  6  Number of workers  Weekly hours' (stand­ ard)  Weekly hours' (stand­ ard)  98  Switchboard operators................................................  Number of workers  Switchboard operator-  78 60  Stenographers..............................................................  Average (mean2)  Average (mean2)  Average (mean2)  70 30  38.5 40.0  443.00 423.50  45  38.5  428.00  Manufacturing.........................................................  Table A-4. Hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant workers in Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980 Hourly earnings (in dollars)4 Occupation and industry division  Maintenance electricians.................. Manufacturing..............................  Number of workers  Mean*  Median*  Middle range*  360 359  8.27 8.27  7.97 7.97  7.24- 9.76 7.24- 9.76  141 141  8.45 8.45  8.97 8.97  7.51- 8.97 7.51- 8.97  Maintenance mechanics (machinery).................................... Manufacturing..............................  852 836  8.21 8.23  7.97 8.00  7.27- 9.76 7.27- 9.76  Maintenance mechanics (motor vehicles)............................. Manufacturing..............................  123 100  7.94 7.54  7.97 7.78  Tool and die makers......................... Manufacturing..............................  51 51  7.90 7.90  Stationary engineers......................... Manufacturing..............................  36 36  8.36 8.36  Maintenance machinists................... Manufacturing..............................  4.60 Under and 4.60 under 4.80  4.80  5.00  5.20  5.40  5.60  5.80  6.00  6.20  6.40  6.60  6.80  7.20  7.60  8.00  8.40  8.80  9.20  9.60  10.00  10.40  5.00  5.20  5.40  5.60  5.80  6.00  6.20  6.40  6.60  6.80  7.20  7.60  8.00  8.40  8.80  9.20  9.60  10.00  10.40  10.80  2 2  5 5  7 7  4 3  1 1  27 27  39 39  41 41  63 63  -  -  3 3  3 3  1 1  6 6  9 9  9 9  13 13  5 5  6 6  _  12 12  _  -  6 6  16 16  19 19  14 14  89 73  192 192  4 4  2 2  5 5  2 2  6 6  8 8  10 10  -  -  -  3 3  -  -  -  9 9  _  _  _  .  -  -  _ -  .  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  "  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  6.88- 8.06 6.79- 8.06  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  7.66 7.66  7.61- 8.51 7.61- 8.51  _  _  _  _  _  .  .  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  8.16 8.16  7.13- 9.76 7.13- 9.76  _  _  _  _  .  -  -  -  -  3 3  -  5 5  Boiler tenders.................................... 54 5.26 5.09 3.75- 6.96 Manufacturing.............................. 54 5.26 5.09 3.75- 6.96 * Workers were distributed as follows: 16 under $4.00; and 8 at $4.00 to $4.20. See footnotes at end of tables.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of  * 24 24  -  -  -  -  -  7  -  -  -  6 6  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  19 19  32 32  -  24 24  -  83 83  -  69 69  -  76 76  95 95  9 9  4 4  21 21  41 32  9 9  25 25  -  6 6  _  _  10.80 and over  -  32 32  -  -  11 11  -  12 12  -  94 94  -  132 132  92 92  -  -  -  8 4  4  -  2 2  6  -  -  7 7  7 7  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 1  -  -  17 17  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  Table A-5. Hourly earnings of material movement and custodial workers In Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980 Hourly earnings (in dollars)* Occupation and industry division  Number of workers  Mean2  Median2  Middle range2  Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of — 3.00 and under 3.20  3.20  3.40  3.60  4.00  4.40  4.80  5.20  5.60  6.00  6.40  6.80  7.20  7.60  8.00  8.40  8.80  9.20  9.60  10.00  10.40  10.80  11.20  3.40  3.60  4.00  4.40  4.80  5.20  5.60  6.00  6.40  6.80  7.20  7.60  8.00  8.40  8.80  9.20  9.60  10.00  10.40  10.80  11.20  11.60  -  -  -  -  “  “  -  ~  -  8  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ■  7  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  3 3  -  -  4 4  -  -  -  -  -  4 4  -  -  ”  ~  ”  4 4  "  “  ~  “  “  1 1 ~ -------- 1 -------- 1 -------- --------- --------- ---------  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  45 45  2 ■  -  8  -  -  2  -  -  -  -  -  -  18 18  168 168  -  1 1  12  -  6 6  ■  80 1 79  10 9  6 6  “  2 2  7 7  -  -  4  5  3  3  1  -  -  17 3  20 8  6 5  180 12  119 39  3  1  -  4 1  -  -  12  -  7  -  2  -  -  25  24  28  53  21  6  11  4  -  10  39  -  121  4  -  -  -  59 59  8 8  62 62  -  Truckdrivers, light truck................  62  4.41  3.25  3.25- 4.53  3  35  -  -  2  7  -  1  -  -  Truckdrivers, medium truck.......... Manufacturing.............................. Nonmanufacturing.......................  264 92 172  5.66 5.44 5.78  5.70 5.06- 6.40 5.27 4.86- 5.70 6.10 5.06- 6.40  _  _  -  _ "  11  -  3 2 1  29 18 11  52 16 36  27 27  30 10 20  Truckdrivers, tractor-trailer........... Manufacturing............................... Nonmanufacturing.......................  222 92 130  6.79 5.48 7.72  6.00 5.44- 6.68 5.21 5.10- 5.44 6.10 6.01-11.50  -  “  "  "  -  1 1  45 45  6 6  “  ~  34 32 2  Shippers.............................................. Manufacturing...............................  35 33  5.58 5.60  5.58 5.58  5.02- 6.30 4.99- 6.66  -  -  _  "  “  8 8  2 1  Receivers............................................  48  4.65  4.34  3.98- 5.19  -  -  -  13  15  4  5.88- 6.10 5.89- 8.10  11  _  12  18  -  -  -  -  21 16  -  -  -  -  -  -  5  -  20  15  4.10- 5.17  -  -  3 2  5 5  5.17  -  -  5  83 23 60  4.60  -  -  5  2  107 4 103  209  -  "  2  36 16 20  Shipping packers................................  -  -  -  62 59 3  4.19- 5.16  -  ■  74 14 60  98 62 36  5.06  -  -  27 3 24  41 23 18  4.85  37  1 -  1  5 4 1  177  ~  -  -  11  Order fillers.........................................  ~  -  -  11  “  5.15- 8.98  -  4  -  _  35  5.60  -  -  9  35  3  6.65  -  -  ■  3  31  -  -  1  5.08- 6.40 5.10- 6.66 5.06- 6.40  5.85 6.41  -  -  17 16 1  5.90 5.44 6.05  467 129  -  16 16  5  6.10 5.95 6.20  Warehousemen.................................. Manufacturing............................... Nonmanufacturing: Public utilities............................  37  4 4  5  14  580 232 348  5.90 6.13  “  -  14  Truckdrivers....................................... Manufacturing.............................. Nonmanufacturing.......................  11  ~  12  1  Material handling laborers................ Manufacturing..............................  624 459  5.67 5.89  5.35 6.36  4.18- 7.40 4.18- 7.40  4 -  _ -  -  30 16  140 120  24 16  92 40  74 14  -  Forklift operators............................... Manufacturing...............................  554 481  5.79 5.99  6.05 6.13  4.85- 6.66 5.12- 6.66  _  _  -  _ -  24 4  25 18  55 21  109 98  11 11  25 25  107 107  128 128  Power-truck operators (other than forklift).........................  189  4.79  4.50 4.50- 5.05  ”  -  ■  “  8  132  11  23  '  *  15  386 142 244  4.10 5.60 3.23  3.10 3.10- 4.93 6.32 4.20- 6.38 3.10 3.10- 3.10  220 7 213  6  4 4  37 31 6  13 12 1  10 5 5  8 8  47 47  15 15  1 1  -  -  -  5 5  -  6  11 7 4  5  Manufacturing............................... Nonmanufacturing.......................  306 77 229  3.80 5.47 3.24  3.10 5.19 3.10  3.10- 4.15 4.16- 6.59 3.10- 3.10  205 7 198  6 6  4 4  11 7 4  19 13 6  5  Manufacturing............................... Nonmanufacturing.......................  5  13 12 1  10 5 5  8 8  -  15 15  1 1  -  -  ”  5 5  -  778 278  4.21 5.71  3.37 6.09  3.10- 5.24 4.25- 6.97  320  70 10  59 17  45 26  46 18  24 16  14 5  9 7  24 18  67 63  4 4  69 69  25 25  Janitors, porters, and cleaners.......  -  5  See footnotes at end of tables.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  8  -  “  -  -  37  *  -  Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, powerplant, material movement, and custodial workers, by sex, in Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980  Sex,3 occupation, and industry division  Number of workers  Average (mean4) hourly earnings (in dollars)4  Sex,3 occupation, and industry division  Maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant occupations - men  Truckdrivers, light truck.................  62  Maintenance electricians.... .............................. Manufacturing............................. ..................  360 359  8.27 8.27  Maintenance machinists..................................... Manufacturing..... ..........................................  141 141  8.45 8.45  Truckdrivers, tractor-trailer................................  Maintenance mechanics (machinery)........................ ............................. Manufacturing................................................  852 836  8.21 8.23  Maintenance mechanics (motor vehicles).............................................. Manufacturing................................................  123 100  7.94 7.54  Tool and die makers........................................... Manufacturing................................................ .  51  7.90  Stationary engineers........................................... . Manufacturing.................................................  36 36  8.36 8.36  54 54  5.26 5.26  Material movement and custodial occupations - men Truckdrivers...... .................................................... Manufacturing................................................. Nonmanufacturing........................................  572 232 340  6.08 5.95 6.16  Average (mean4) hourly earnings (in dollars)4  Number of workers  Sex,3 occupation, and industry division  4.41  368  256 92 164  5.59 5.44 5.68  222 130  6.79 5.48 7.72  26 26  5.90 5.90  27  4.62  438 127  5.87 6.38  Shippers............................... Manufacturing........................... Receivers......................................  Guards, class B....................... Manufacturing..................................... Nonmanufacturing.......................................  Manufacturing.............................. Warehousemen.................................. Manufacturing...................... Order fillers........................  67  Shipping packers........................ Manufacturing........ ...............  51 39  4.46  Material handling laborers................... Manufacturing.........................  602 437  5.71 5.96  Forklift operators.......................... Manufacturing...........................  530 457  5.80 6.01  Power-truck operators (other than forklift).................  189  4.79  Average (mean3) hourly earnings (in dollars)4  231  4.10 5.56 3.24  293 76 217  3.81 5.43 3.25  517 211 306  4.50 6.04 3.44  Manufacturing..................................  Truckdrivers, medium truck....................... Manufacturing......................... Nonmanufacturing...........................  Boiler tenders....................................................... Manufacturing.................................................  Number of workers  Material movement and custodial occupations - women  158  Janitors, porters, and cleaners........................... Manufacturing.............................................  258 67  See footnotes at end of tables.  3.62 4.66  Table A-7. Indexes of earnings and percent increases for selected occupational groups, Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., selected periods All industries Period5  Indexes (September 1977 = 100): September 1979..................................... September 1980.................................... Percent increases: September 1972 to September 1973.. September 1973 to September 1974.. September 1974 to September 1975.. September 1975 to September 1976.. September 1976 to September 1977.. September 1977 to September 1978.. September 1978 to September 1979.. September 1979 to September 1980..  Manufacturing  Office clerical  Electronic data processing  114.8 125.4  117.6 129.0  C) «  117.4 128.7  119.1 129.5  0  (*)  w  (*)  6.2 9.3 7.5 6.3 6.9 6.5 7.8 9.2  (6)  5.6 9.5  6.3 8.3  (6)  5.8 8.9  8.1  (6)  9.1 8.6 6.7 10.0 9.6  6.8 10.3 7.7 10.8 8.3 9.1 9.2 8.7  9.5 7.3 6.8 7.4 10.7 6.2 9.7  Industrial nurses  0 (6) 7.4 9.4  Skilled mainte­ nance  Unskilled plant  See footnotes at end of tables.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  9  Office clerical  C) 7.4 8.6 7.5  C) C)  Electronic data processing  Nonmanufacturing Skilled mainte­ nance  Unskilled plant  Office clerical  C) C)  117.3 128.6  117.2 127.6  114.2 c)  C) C)  C) (*)  (')  C) (*> C) (1 C)  5.6 9.5  6.5 9.7 7.3 5.4 5.5 5.9 7.8 (a)  (*)  (*)  (')  6.5 8.9 7.2  C) C) C) C) (')  5.2 15.3 3.9  C) 7.2 9.4  7.1 9.2 8.7 10.5 9.3 7.8 8.7 8.9  (*)  (*)  6.3 8.4 8.1 9.1 8.6 6.7 9.9 9.6  C) C)  Industrial nurses  C) C) (')  Electronic data processing  C) (*) C)  Industrial nurses  (*)  Unskilled plant  (')  C) C) (*) (’)  f)  Table A-8. Average pay relationships within establishments tor office clerical occupations, Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980 Office clerical occupation being compared  Stenog­ raphers  Occupation which equals 100 Class A  Class B  Class C  Class D  Senior  Class E  Tran­ scrib­ ing ma­ chine typists  100 Secretaries, class A................ 116 Secretaries, class B................ 100 114 108 Secretaries, class C................ 100 117 125 131 Secretaries, class D................ 100 110 121 122 134 Secretaries, class E................ 100 (8) 125 Stenographers, senior............ 100 C) C) C) (8) (8) 100 (6) (8) 164 Transcribing-machine typists <8) (8) (8) (6) 125 (8) Typists, class A ...................... C) C) (8) (6) (8) 127 Typists, class B....................... C) C) C) (8) (8) (8) 133 148 169 File clerks, class C.................. C) (8) (8) 137 147 188 C) Messengers............................. f) (8) (6) 89 93 130 158 145 Switchboard operators ....... Switchboard operator97 97 102 116 114 130 145 receptionists......................... (8) (8) (#) 93 112 125 Order clerks, class B.............. C) 79 90 96 105 105 119 125 Accounting clerks, class A..... (8) 112 93 111 126 128 131 Accounting clerks, class B.... . (8) 85 110 98 110 119 131 Payroll clerks........................... (8) (8) 108 132 114 130 Key entry operators, class A.. (8) 105 115 125 135 122 151 153 Key entry operators, class B.. NOTE: This matrix table shows the average (mean) relationship of earnings within establishments between any two occupations compared. Earnings for an occupation in the column heading are expressed as a percent of the earnings for an occupation in the table stub at the point where the data lines for the two intersect. For example, a value of 122 indicates that earnings for the occupation directly above in the heading are 22 percent greater than earnings for the occupation directly to  File clerks  Typists Class B  Class A  Class C  Switch­ Switch­ board Messen­ board operator gers operators -recep­ tionists  Order clerks  Accounting clerks  Class B  Class A  Key jntry operaators  Payroll clerks  Class A  Class B  Class B  100 100  0  c) o c)  <•>  no  100 95  o  100 76  100  100 <*) 81 81 88 110 100 89 (6) (8) (a) o o 100 103 88 87 72 74 (8) (8) 121 104 102 101 90 90 87 90 106 97 88 89 73 74 (8) (8) 116 101 (6) 84 (8) (*) o o 129 105 111 120 98 103 o 0 the left in the stub. Similarly, a value of 85 indicates earnings for the occupation  100 100 90 100 104 90 100 121 121 104 in the heading are 15 percent below  earnings for the occupation in the stub. See appendix A for method of computation. See footnotes at end of tables.  Table A-9. Average pay relationships within establishments for professional and technical occupations, Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980 Professional and technical occupation being compared  Occupation which equals 100  Computer systems analysts (business) Class A  Computer systems analysts (business), class A............... Computer systems analysts (business), class B............... Computer programmers (business), class A............... Computer programmers (business), class B............... Computer programmers (business), class C............... Computer operators, class A Computer operators, class B Computer operators, class C.. Drafters, class B...................... Drafters, class C...................... Electronics technicians, class B................................... Registered industrial nurses...  Class B  Class A  Class B  Class C  Class A  Class B  Class C  Class B  Class C  Class B  100 117  100  149  o  100  158  137  116  100  (6) 186 228 273 148 (*)  153 169 196 242 (8) o  138 154 181 191 (6) o  119 130 146 171 105 130  100 109 128 148 c) <•>  100 121 140 103 c)  100 118 84 92  100 83 0  100 124  100  (<*) 162  (6) 142  (8) c)  (8) 109  c) o  o 103  77 88  <•) c)  « 99  o o  See footnotes at end of tables.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Electronics technicians  Draf ers  Computer operators  Computer programmers (business)  10  100 111  Registered in­ dustrial nurses  Table A-10. Average pay relationships within establishments for maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant occupations, Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980 Maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant occupation being compared Mechanics  Occupation which equals 100 Electricians  Machinists  Maintenance electricians........................................................................................... Maintenance machinists............................................................................................ Maintenance mechanics (machinery).............................................................................................................. Maintenance mechanics (motor vehicles)................................................................................. Tool and die makers................................................................ Stationary engineers................................................................................................... Boiler tenders.............................................................................................................. See table A-8 for description of these pay relationships and appendix A for method of See footnotes at end of tables.  100 100  100  102  101  100  102 0 c) o  100 97 o o  102 98 c) 110 computation.  Tool and die makers  Motor vehicles  Machinery  100 (•) 0 o  Stationary engineers  100 o o  Boiler tenders  100 c)  100  Table A-11. Average pay relationships within establishments for material movement and custodial occupations, Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., September 1980 Material movement and custodial occupation being compared Truckdrivers  Occupation which equals 100 Light truck  Medium truck  Truckdrivers, light truck........................................................ 100 Truckdrivers. medium truck.................................................. o Truckdrivers, tractor-trailer................................................... c) Shippers................................................................................. c) Receivers......................................................................... c) Warehousemen................................................................... 89 Order fillers............................................................................ o Shipping packers.................................................................... 0 Material handling laborers.................................................... o Forklift operators.................................................................... 0 Power-truck operators (other than forklift)............................................................. o Guards, class B..................................................................... <*) Janitors, porters, and cleaners............................................................................... 113 See table A-8 for description of these pay relationships and appendix A for See footnotes at end of tables.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Tractortrailer  Shippers  Receivers  Warehouse­ men  Order fillers  Shipping pack­ ers  Material han­ dling laborers  100 98 (6)  100 93  100  Forklift operators  Power-truck operators (other than forklift)  Guards Class B  Janitors, por­ ters, and cleaners  100  o  100  125  o o c) (*)  n o  <*) <•> 108 102 106 115  (*> 116 109  n  <•>  126 143 method of computation.  100 102  o «  100 107 99  100  o  104  o o  100 102  <■>  108  100 103 100 103  o c)  112  111  (•)  0  o  (8)  c) c)  90 107  96 103  100 107  100  110  108  129  105  108  107  108  110  111  o  «  11  100  Footnotes  1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours. 2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all workers and dividing by the number of workers. The median designates position—half of the workers receive the same or more and half receive the same or less than the rate shown. The middle range is defined by two rates of pay; one-fourth of the workers earn the same or less than the lower of these rates and one-fourth earn the same or more than the higher rate. 3 Earnings data relate only to workers whose sex identification was provided by the establishment. 4 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. 5 Estimates for periods ending prior to 1976 relate to men only for skilled maintenance and unskilled plant workers. All other estimates relate to men and women.  6 Data do not meet publication criteria or data not available.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  12  Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey  In each of the 71 areas1 currently surveyed, the Bureau obtains wages and related benefits data from representative establishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Government operations and the construction and extractive industries are excluded. Establishments having fewer than a prescribed number of workers are also excluded because of insufficient employment in the occupations studied. Appendix table 1 shows the number of establishments and workers estimated to be within the scope of this survey, as well as the number actually studied. Bureau field representatives obtain data by personal visits at 3-year intervals. In each of the two intervening years, information on employment and occupational earnings only is collected by a combination of personal visit, mail questionnaire, and telephone interview from establishments participating in the previous survey. A sample of the establishments in the scope of the survey is selected for study prior to each personal visit survey. This sample, minus establishments which go out of business or are no longer within the industrial scope of the survey, is retained for the following two annual surveys. In most cases, establishments new to the area are not considered in the scope of the survey until the selection of a sample for a personal visit survey. The sampling procedures involve detailed stratification of all establishments within the scope of an individual area survey by industry and number of employees. From this stratified universe a probability sample is selected, with each establishment having a predetermined chance of selection. To obtain optimum accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large than small establishments is selected. When data are combined, each establishment is weighted according to its probability of selection so that unbiased estimates are generated. For example, if one out of four establishments is selected, it is given a weight of 4 to represent itself plus three others. An alternate of the same original probability is chosen in the same industry-size classification if data are not available from the original sample member. If no suitable substitute is available, additional weight is assigned to a sample member that is similar to the missing unit.  movement and custodial. Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation in duties within the same job. Occupations selected for study are listed and described in appendix B. Unless otherwise indicated, the earnings data following the job titles are for all industries combined. Earnings data for some of the occupations listed and described, or for some industry divisions within the scope of the survey, are not presented in the Aseries tables because either (1) data were insufficient to provide meaningful statistical results, or (2) there is possibility of disclosure of individual establishment data. Separate men’s and women’s earnings data are not presented when the number of workers not identified by sex is 20 percent or more of the men or women identified in an occupation. Earnings data not shown separately for industry divisions are included in data for all industries combined. Likewise, for occupations with more than one level, data are included in the overall classification when a subclassification is not shown or information to subclassify is not available. Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for full-time workers, i.e., those hired to work a regular weekly schedule. Earnings data exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-of-living allowances and incentive bonuses are included. Weekly hours for office clerical and professional and technical occupations refer to the standard workweek (rounded to the nearest half hour) for which employees receive regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates). Average weekly earnings for these occupations are rounded to the nearest half dollar. Vertical lines within the distribution of workers on some A-tables indicate a change in the size of the class intervals. These surveys measure the level of occupational earnings in an area at a particular time. Changes in an occupational average over time reflect, in addition to earnings changes, factors such as changes in proportions of workers employed by high- or lowwage firms, or high-wage workers advancing to better jobs and being replaced by new workers at lower rates. Such shifts in employment could decrease an occupational average even though most establishments in an area increase wages during the year. Changes in earnings of occupational groups, shown in table A-7, are better indicators of wage trends than are earnings changes for individual jobs within the groups. Average earnings reflect composite, areawide estimates. Industries and establish­ ments differ in pay level and job staffing, and thus contribute differently to the estimates  Occupations and earnings  Occupations selected for study are common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries, and are of the following types: (1) Office clerical; (2) professional and technical; (3) maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant; and (4) material   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1  for each job. Pay averages may fail to reflect accurately the wage differential among jobs in individual establishments. . Average pay levels for men and women in selected occupations should not be assumed to reflect differences in pay of the sexes within individual establishments. Factors which may contribute to differences include progression within established rate ranges (only the rates paid incumbents are collected) and performance of specific duties within the general survey job descriptions. Job descriptions used to classify employees in these surveys usually are more generalized than those used in individual establish­ ments and allow for minor differences among establishments in specific duties performed. Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actually surveyed. Because occupational structures among establishments differ, estimates of occupational employment obtained from the sample of establishments studied serve only to indicate the relative importance of the jobs studied. These differences in occupational structure do not affect materially the accuracy of the earnings data.  Industrial nurses Registered industrial nurses Skilled maintenance Carpenters Electricians Painters Machinists  Mechanics (machinery) Mechanics (motor vehicle) Pipefitters Tool and die makers Unskilled plant  Janitors, porters, and cleaners  Material handling laborers  Percent changes for individual areas in the program are computed as follows:  Wage trends for selected occupational groups  Indexes in table A-7 measure wages at a given time, expressed as a percent of wages during the base period. Subtracting 100 from the index yields the percent change in wages from the base period to the date of the index. The percent increases in table A-7 relate to wage changes between the indicated dates. Annual rates of increase, where shown, reflect the amount of increase for 12 months when the time span between surveys was other than 12 months. These computations are based on the assumption that wages increased at a constant rate between surveys. The indexes and percent increases are based on changes in average hourly earnings of men and women in establishments reporting the trend jobs in both the current and previous year (matched establishments). The data are adjusted to remove the effects on average earnings of employment shifts among establishments and turnover of establish­ ments included in survey samples. The percent increases, however, are still affected by factors other than wage increases. Hirings, layoffs, and turnover may affect an establishment average for an occupation when workers are paid under plans providing a range of wage rates for individual jobs. In periods of increased hiring, for example, new employees may enter at the bottom of the range, depressing the average without a change in wage rates. Occupations used to compute wage trends are: Office clerical Secretaries Stenographers, senior Stenographers, general Typists, classes A and B File clerks, classes A, B, and C Messengers  Switchboard operators Order clerks, classes A and B Accounting clerks, classes A and B Payroll clerks Key entry operators, classes A and B  1. Average earnings are computed for each occupation for the 2 years being compared. The averages are derived from earnings in those establishments which are in the survey both years; it is assumed that employment remains unchanged. 2. Each occupation is assigned a weight based on its proportionate employment in the occupational group. 3. These weights are used to compute group averages. Each occupation’s average earnings (computed in step 1) are multiplied by its weight. The products are totaled to obtain a group average. 4. The ratio of group averages for 2 consecutive years is computed by dividing the average for the current year by the average for the earlier year. The result— expressed as a percent—less 100 is the percent change. The index is computed by adding 100 to the most recent percent increase, multiplying the total by the previous year’s index number, and dividing the product by 100 to obtain the current index value. For a more detailed description of the method used to compute these wage trends, see ‘Improving Area Wage Survey Indexes,’ Monthly Labor Review, January 1973, pp. 52­ 57. Average pay relationships within establishments  Tables A-8 through A-11 present occupational pay relatives derived from compari­ sons of job averages within individual establishments. The method of computation is as follows:  Electronic data processing Computer systems analysts, classes A, B, and C   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Computer programmers, classes A, B, and C Computer operators, classes A, B, C  1. A pay relative for any two occupations is computed for each establishment in which they are found by dividing the average earnings for one occupation by the average for the other and multiplying by 100 (e.g., $5 divided by $4 = 1.25 times 100 = 125).  2. Each pay relative is weighted by the number of workers in the two occupations compared and by the weight assigned to the establishment to represent establish­ ments not included in the survey sample.  addition, the mix of establishments used in the comparisons may differ between the two methods. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions  Tabulations on selected establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions (B-series tables) are not presented in this bulletin. Information for these tabulations is collected at 3-year intervals. These tabulations on minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced office workers; shift differentials; scheduled weekly hours and days; paid holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans are presented (in the B-series tables) in previous bulletins for this area. 1 Includes 70 areas surveyed under the Bureau’s regular program plus Poughkeepsie-KingstonNewburgh, N.Y., which is surveyed under contract. In addition, the Bureau conducts more limited area studies in approximately 100 areas at the request of the Employment Standards Administra­ tion of the U.S. Department of Labor.  3. The weighted pay relatives for all establishments reporting the two occupations are summed and divided by the total of the weights to produce the average pay relatives shown in the tables. Occupational pay relationships measured in this manner yield considerably different results than those produced by using overall survey averages, such as those shown in tables A-l through A-6. The former measure the average pay relationships found within establishments; the latter measure the relationships among job averages in an area. In  Appendix table 1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied In Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga.,1 September 1980 Minimum employment in establish­ ments in scope of study  Industry division2  All divisions.. Manufacturing........................................... Nonmanufacturing.............................. ..... Transportation, communication, and other public utilities’......................... Wholesale trade8................................. Retail trade-........................................... Finance, insurance, and real estate* Services61.............................................. —  .  —  '-----------  7  ----- —  “~  Number of establishments  Within scope of study3  Within scope of study4  Studied  Studied  Number  Percent  -  294  109  68,964  100  44,727  50 "  171 123  56 53  44,062 24,902  64 36  26,628 18,099  50 50 50 50 50  13 23 49 12 26  gw. i.wm Mi  10 4,796 7 4,524 5 2,656 4 616 16 8,153 12 5,039 8 5,787 8 5,399 14 3,510 5 2,521 4 Includes all workers in all establishments with total employment (within the area) at or above the minimum limitation. s Abbreviated to public utilities in the A-series tables. Taxicabs and services incidental to water transportation are excluded. Chattanooga’s electric utilities and local-transit are municipally operated, and are excluded by definition from the scope of the study. * Separate data for this division are not presented in the A-series tables, but the division is represented in the ‘all industries’ and ‘nonmanufacturing' estimates. 7 Hotels and motels; laundries and other personal services; business services; automobile repair, rental, and parking; motion pictures; nonprofit membership organizations (excluding religious and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectur­ al services.  UUUgVl II M UU^II  February 1974, consists of Hamilton, Marion, and Sequatchie Counties, Tenn.; and Catoosa, Dade, and Walker Counties, Ga. The ‘workers within scope of study’ estimates provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey. Estimates are not intended, however, for comparison with other statistical series to measure employment trends or levels since (1) planning of wage surveys requires establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) small establishments are excluded from the scope of the survey. 2 The 1972 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual was used to classify establishments by industry division. All government operations are excluded from the scope of the survey. 3 Includes all establishments with total employment at or above the minimum limitation. All outlets (within the area) of nonmanufacturing companies are considered as one establishment when located within the same industry division.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Workers in establishments  15  Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions  The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to assist its field representatives in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This permits grouping occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau’s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’s field representatives are instructed to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; and part-time, temporary, and probationary workers. Handicapped workers whose earnings are reduced because of their handicap are also excluded. Learners, beginners, and trainees, unless specifically included in the job descriptions, are excluded.  d.  Assistant-type positions which entail more difficult or more responsible technical, administrative, or supervisory duties which are not typical of secretarial work, e.g., Administrative Assistant, or Executive Assistant:  e.  Positions which do not fit any of the situations listed in the sections below titled ‘Level of Supervisor,’ e.g., secretary to the president of a company that employs, in all, over 5,000 persons;  f.  Trainees.  Classification by Level. Secretary jobs which meet the required characteristics are  Office  matched at one of five levels according to (a) the the level of the secretary’s supervisor within the company’s organizational structure and, (b) the level of the secretary’s  SECRETARY  Assigned as a personal secretary, normally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly responsive relationship to the day-to-day activities of the supervisor. Works fairly independently receiving a minimum of detailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied clerical and secretarial duties requiring a knowledge of office routine and an understanding of the organization, programs, and procedures related to the work of the supervisor. Exclusions. Not all positions that are titled ‘secretary’ possess the above characteristics. Examples of positions which are excluded from the definition are as follows: a.  Positions which do not meet the ‘personal’ secretary concept described above;  b.  Stenographers not fully trained in secretarial-type duties;  c.  Stenographers serving as office assistants to a group of professional, technical, or managerial persons;   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  responsibility. The tabulation following the explanations of these two factors indicates the level of the secretary for each combination of the factors. Level ofSecretary's Supervisor (LS) LS-1  a. b.  Secretary to the supervisor or head of a small organizational unit (e.g., fewer than about 25 or 30 persons); or Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional employee, administrative officer or assistant, skilled technician or expert. (NOTE: Many companies assign stenographers, rather than secretaries as described above, to this level of supervisory or nonsupervisory worker.)  LS-2 a-  b.  Level ofSecretary's Responsibility (LR) Secretary to an executive or managerial person whose responsibility is not equivalent to one of the specific level situations in the definition for LS-3, but whose organizational unit normally numbers at least several dozen employees and is usually divided into organizational segments which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In some companies, this level includes a wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; or Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc., (or other equivalent level of official) that employs, in all, fewer than 5,000 persons.  This factor evaluates the nature of the work relationship between the secretary and the supervisor, and the extent to which the secretary is expected to exercise initiative and judgment. Secretaries should be matched at LR-1 or LR-2 described below according to their level of responsibility. LR-1 Performs varied secretarial duties including or comparable to most of the following:  LS-3 a. b. c.  d. e.  a. b.  Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that employs, in all, fewer than 100 persons; or Secretary to a corporate officer (other than chairman of the board or president) of a company that employs, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 persons; or Secretary to the head (immediately below the officer level) over either a major corporatewide functional activity (e.g., marketing, research, oper­ ations, industrial relations, etc.) or a major geographic or organizational segment (e.g., a regional headquarters; a major division) of a company that employs, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000 employees; or Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc., (or other equivalent level of official) that employs, in all, over 5,000 persons; or Secretary to the head of a large and important organizational segment (e.g., a middle management supervisor of an organizational segment often involving as many as several hundred persons) of a company that employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.  c. d. e. LR-2  Performs duties described under LR-1 and, in addition performs tasks requiring greater judgment, initiative, and knowledge of office functions including or compara­ ble to most of the following: a. b.  LS-4 a. b. c.  c.  Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that employs, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 persons; or Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the board or president) of a company that employs, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000 persons; or Secretary to the head, immediately below the corporate officer level, of a major segment or subsidiary of a company that employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.  d. e.  Screens telephone and personal callers, determining which can be handled by the supervisor’s subordinates or other offices. Answers requests which require a detailed knowledge of office procedures or collection of information from files or other offices. May sign routine correspondence in own or supervisor’s name. Compiles or assists in compiling periodic reports on the basis of general instructions. Schedules tentative appointments without prior clearance. Assembles necessary background material for scheduled meetings. Makes arrange­ ments for meetings and conferences. Explains supervisor’s requirements to other employees in supervisor’s unit. (Also types, takes dictation, and files.)  The following tabulation shows the level of the secretary for each LS and LR combination:  NOTE: The term ‘corporate officer’ used in the above LS definition refers to those officials who have a significant corporatewide policymaking role with regard to major company activities. The title ‘vice president,’ though normally indicative of this role, does not in all cases identify such positions. Vice presidents whose primary responsibili­ ty is to act personally on individual cases or transactions (e.g., approve or deny individual loan or credit actions; administer individual trust accounts; directly supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be ‘corporate officers’ for purposes of applying the definition.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Answers telephones, greets personal callers, and opens incoming mail. Answers telephone requests which have standard answers. May reply to requests by sending a form letter. Reviews correspondence, memoranda, and reports prepared by others for the supervisor’s signature to ensure procedural and typographical accura­ cy. Maintains supervisor’s calendar and makes appointments as instructed. Types, takes and transcribes dictation, and files.  LS-1. LS-2. LS-3. LS-4.  1  LR-1 Class E Class D Class C Class B  LR-2 Class D Class C Class B Class A  STENOGRAPHER  FILE CLERK  Primary duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to transcribe the dictation. May also type from written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool. May occasionally transcribe from voice recordings (if primary duty is transcribing from recordings, see Transcribing-Machine Typist).  Files, classifies, and retrieves material in an established filing system. May perform clerical and manual tasks required to maintain files. Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.  NOTE: This job is distinguished from that of a secretary in that a secretary normally works in a confidential relationship with only one manager or executive and performs more responsible and discretionary tasks as described in the secretary job definition.  Class A. Classifies and indexes file material such as correspondence, reports, technical documents, etc., in an established filing system containing a number of varied subject matter files. May also file this material. May keep records of various types in conjunction with the files. May lead a small group of lower level file clerks.  Stenographer, Senior. Dictation involves a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc., OR Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and responsibility than stenographer, general, as evidenced by the following: Work requires a high degree of stenographic speed and accuracy; a thorough working knowledge of general business and office procedures and of the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures, files, workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in performing stenographic duties and responsible clerical tasks such as maintaining follow-up files; assembling material for reports, memoranda, and letters; composing simple letters from general instructions; reading and routing incoming mail; and answering routine questions, etc.  Class B. Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple (subject matter) headings or partly classified material by finer subheadings. Prepares simple related index and cross-reference aids. As requested, locates clearly identified material in files and forwards material. May perform related clerical tasks required to maintain and service files.  Stenographer, General. Dictation involves a normal routine vocabulary. May maintain files, keep simple records, or perform other relatively routine clerical tasks.  Performs various routine duties such as running errands, operating minor office machines such as sealers or mailers, opening and distributing mail, and other minor clerical work. Exclude positions that require operation of a motor vehicle as a significant duty.  TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE TYPIST  Primary duty is to type copy of voice recorded dictation which does not involve varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as that used in legal briefs or reports on scientific research. May also type from written copy. May maintain files, keep simple records, or perform other relatively routine clerical tasks. (See Stenographer definition for workers involved with shorthand dictation.) TYPIST  Uses a typewriter to make copies of various materials or to make out bills after calculations have been made by another person. May include typing of stencils, mats, or similar materials for use in duplicating processes. May do clerical work involving little special training, such as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and distributing incoming mail.  Class C. Performs routine filing of material that has already been classified or which is easily classified in a simple serial classification system (e.g., alphabetical, chronological, or numerical). As requested, locates readily available material in files and forwards material; and may fill out withdrawal charge. May perform simple clerical and manual tasks required to maintain and service files. MESSENGER  SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR  Operates a telephone switchboard or console used with a private branch exchange (PBX) system to relay incoming, outgoing, and intrasystem calls. May provide information to callers, record and transmit messages, keep record of calls placed and toll charges. Besides operating a telephone switchboard or console, may also type or perform routine clerical work (typing or routine clerical work may occupy the major portion of the worker’s time, and is usually performed while at the switchboard or console). Chief or lead operators in establishments employing more than one operator are excluded. For an operator who also acts as a receptionist, see Switchboard Operator-Receptionist. SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST  Class A. Performs one or more of the following: Typing material in final form when it involves combining material from several sources; or responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication, punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language material; or planning layout and typing of complicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing. May type routine form letters, varying details to suit circumstances.  At a single-position telephone switchboard or console, acts both as an operator—see Switchboard Operator—and as a receptionist. Receptionist’s work involves such duties as greeting visitors; determining nature of visitor’s business and providing appropriate information; referring visitor to appropriate person in the organization or contacting that person by telephone and arranging an appointment; keeping a log of visitors.  Class B. Performs one or more of the following: Copy typing from rough or clear drafts; or routine typing of forms, insurance policies, etc.; or setting up simple standard tabulations; or copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.  Receives written or verbal customers’ purchase orders for material or merchandise from customers or salespeople. Work typically involves some combination of the following duties: Quoting prices; determining availability of ordered items and   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ORDER CLERK  suggesting substitutes when necessary; advising expected delivery date and method of delivery; recording order and customer information on order sheets; checking order sheets for accuracy and adequacy of information recorded; ascertaining credit rating of customer; furnishing customer with acknowledgement of receipt of order; following up to see that order is delivered by the specified date or to let customer know of a delay in delivery; maintaining order file; checking shipping invoice against original order. Exclude workers paid on a commission basis or whose duties include any of the following: Receiving orders for services rather than for material or merchandise; providing customers with consultative advice using knowledge gained from engineering or extensive technical training; emphasizing selling skills; handling material or merchan­ dise as an integral part of the job. Positions are classified into levels according to the following definitions: Class A. Handles orders that involve making judgments such as choosing which specific product or material from the establishment’s product lines will satisfy the customer’s needs, or determining the price to be quoted when pricing involves more than merely referring to a price list or making some simple mathematical calculations. Class B. Handles orders involving items which have readily identified uses and applications. May refer to a catalog, manufacturer’s manual, or similar document to insure that proper item is supplied or to verify price of ordered item. ACCOUNTING CLERK  Performs one or more accounting clerical tasks such as posting to registers and ledgers; reconciling bank accounts; verifying the internal consistency, completeness, and mathematical accuracy of accounting documents; assigning prescribed accounting distribution codes; examining and verifying for clerical accuracy various types of reports, lists, calculations, posting, etc.; or preparing simple or assisting in preparing more complicated journal vouchers. May work in either a manual or automated accounting system. The work requires a knowledge of clerical methods and office practices and procedures which relates to the clerical processing and recording of transactions and accounting information. With experience, the worker typically becomes familiar with the bookkeeping and accounting terms and procedures used in the assigned work, but is not required to have a knowledge of the formal principles of bookkeeping and accounting. Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions: Class A. Under general supervision, performs accounting clerical operations which require the application of experience and judgment, for example, clerically processing complicated or nonrepetitive accounting transactions, selecting among a substantial variety of prescribed accounting codes and classifications, or tracing transactions through previous accounting actions to determine source of discrepancies. May be assisted by one or more class B accounting clerks. Class B. Under close supervision, following detailed instructions and standardized procedures, performs one or more routine accounting clerical operations, such as posting to ledgers, cards, or worksheets where identification of items and locations of postings are clearly indicated; checking accuracy and completeness of standardized and repetitive records or accounting documents; and coding documents using a few prescribed accounting codes.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR  Operates a bookkeeping machine (with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions. Class A. Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic bookkeeping principles, and familiarity with the structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records by hand. Class B. Keeps a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records usually requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll, customers’ accounts (not including a simple type of billing described under machine biller), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or assist in preparation of trial balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department. MACHINE BILLER  Prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or electromatic typewriter. May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work incidental to billing operations. For wage study purposes, machine billers are classified by type of machine, as follows: Billing-machine biller. Uses a special billing machine (combination typing and adding machine) to prepare bills and invoices from customers’ purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping memoranda, etc. Usually involves application of predeter­ mined discounts and shipping charges and entry of necessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing machine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine. The operation usually involves a large number of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine. Bookkeeping-machine biller. Uses a bookkeeping machine (with or without a type­ writer keyboard) to prepare customers’ bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simultaneous entry of figures on customers’ ledger record. The machine automatically accumulates figures on a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of sales and credit slips. PAYROLL CLERK  Performs the clerical tasks necessary to process payrolls and to maintain payroll records. Work involves most of the following-. Processing workers’ time or production records; adjusting workers’ records for changes in wage rates, supplementary benefits, or tax deductions; editing payroll listings against source records; tracing and correcting errors in listings; and assisting in preparation of periodic summary payroll reports. In a nonautomated payroll system, computes wages. Work may require a practical knowl­ edge of governmental regulations, company payroll policy, or the computer system for processing payrolls. KEY ENTRY OPERATOR  Operates keyboard-controlled data entry device such as keypunch machine or keyoperated magnetic tape or disk encoder to transcribe data into a form suitable for  computer processing. Work requires skill in operating an alphanumeric keyboard and an understanding of transcribing procedures and relevant data entry equipment. Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions: Class A. Work requires the application of experience and judgment in selecting procedures to be followed and in searching for, interpreting, selecting, or coding items to be entered from a variety of source documents. On occasion may also perform routine work as described for class B. NOTE: Excluded are operators above class A using the key entry controls to access, read, and evaluate the substance of specific records to take substantive actions, or to make entries requiring a similar level of knowledge. Class B. Work is routine and repetitive. Under close supervision or following specific procedures or detailed instructions, works from various standardized source documents which have been coded and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be entered. Refers to supervisor problems arising from erroneous items, codes, or missing information.  Professional and Technical COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST, BUSINESS  Analyzes business problems to formulate procedures for solving them by use of electronic data processing equipment. Develops a complete description of all specifica­ tions needed to enable programmers to prepare required digital computer programs. Work involves most of the following-. Analyzes subject-matter operations to be automated and identifies conditions and criteria required to achieve satisfactory results; specifies number and types of records, files, and documents to be used; outlines actions to be performed by personnel and computers in sufficient detail for presentation to management and for programming (typically this involves preparation of work and data flow charts); coordinates the development of test problems and participates in trial runs of new and revised systems; and recommends equipment changes to obtain more effective overall operations. (NOTE: Workers performing both systems analysis and programming should be classified as systems analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.) Does not include employees primarily responsible for the management or supervision of other electronic data processing employees, or systems analysts primarily concerned with scientific or engineering problems. For wage study purposes, systems analysts are classified as follows: Class A. Works independently or under only general direction on complex problems involving all phases of systems analysis. Problems are complex because of diverse sources of input data and multiple-use requirements of output data. (For example, develops an integrated production scheduling, inventory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis record in which every item of each type is automatically processed through the full system of records and appropriate follow-up actions are initiated by the computer.) Confers with persons concerned to determine the data processing problems and advises subject-matter personnel on the implications of new or revised systems of data processing operations. Makes recommendations, if needed, for approval of major systems installations or changes and for obtaining equipment.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  May provide functional direction to lower level systems analysts who are assigned to assist. Class B. Works independently or under only general direction on problems that are relatively uncomplicated to analyze, plan, program, and operate. Problems are of limited complexity because sources of input data are homogeneous and the output data are closely related. (For example, develops systems for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank, maintaining accounts receivable in a retail establishment, or maintaining inventory accounts in a manufacturing or wholesale establishment.) Confers with persons concerned to determine the data processing problems and advises subjectmatter personnel on the implications of the data processing systems to be applied. OR Works on a segment of a complex data processing scheme or system, as described for class A. Works independently on routine assignments and receives instruction and guidance on complex assignments. Work is reviewed for accuracy of judgment, compliance with instructions, and to insure proper alignment with the overall system. Class C. Works under immediate supervision, carrying out analyses as assigned, usually of a single activity. Assignments are designed to develop and expand practical experience in the application of procedures and skills required for systems analysis work. For example, may assist a higher level systems analyst by preparing the detailed specifications required by programmers from information developed by the higher level analyst. COMPUTER PROGRAMMER, BUSINESS  Converts statements of business problems, typically prepared by a systems analyst, into a sequence of detailed instructions which are required to solve the problems by automatic data processing equipment. Working from charts or diagrams, the program­ mer develops the precise instructions which, when entered into the computer system in coded language, cause the manipulation of data to achieve desired results. Work involves most of the following-. Applies knowledge of computer capabilities, mathemat­ ics, logic employed by computers, and particular subject matter involved to analyze charts and diagrams of the problem to be programmed; develops sequence of program steps; writes detailed flow charts to show order in which data will be processed; converts these charts to coded instructions for machine to follow; tests and corrects programs; prepares instructions for operating personnel during production run; analyzes, reviews, and alters programs to increase operating efficiency or adapt to new requirements; maintains records of program development and revisions. (NOTE: Workers performing both systems analysis and programming should be classified as systems analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.) Does not include employees primarily responsible for the management or supervision of other electronic data processing employees, or programmers primarily concerned with scientific and/or engineering problems. For wage study purposes, programmers are classified as follows: Class A. Works independently or under only general direction on complex problems which require competence in all phases of programming concepts and practices. Working from diagrams and charts which identify the nature of desired results, major processing steps to be accomplished, and the relationships between various steps of the problem solving routine; plans the full range of programming actions needed to efficiently utilize the computer system in achieving desired end products.  At this level, programming is difficult because computer equipment must be organized to produce several interrelated but diverse products from numerous and diverse data elements. A wide variety and extensive number of internal processing actions must occur. This requires such actions as development of common operations which can be reused, establishment of linkage points between operations, adjustments to data when program requirements exceed computer storage capacity, and substantial manipulation and resequencing of data elements to form a highly integrated program. May provide functional direction to lower level programmers who are assigned to assist. Class B. Works independently or under only general direction on relatively simple programs, or on simple segments of complex programs. Programs (or segments) usually process information to produce data in two or three varied sequences or formats. Reports and listings are produced by refining, adapting, arraying, or making minor additions to or deletions from input data which are readily available. While numerous records may be processed, the data have been refined in prior actions so that the accuracy and sequencing of data can be tested by using a few routine checks. Typically, the program deals with routine recordkeeping operations. OR Works on complex programs (as described for class A) under close direction of a higher level programmer or supervisor. May assist higher level programmer by independently performing less difficult tasks assigned, and performing more difficult tasks under fairly close direction. May guide or instruct lower level programmers. Class C. Makes practical applications of programming practices and concepts usually learned in formal training courses. Assignments are designed to develop competence in the application of standard procedures to routine problems. Receives close supervision on new aspects of assignments; and work is reviewed to verify its accuracy and conformance with required procedures. COMPUTER OPERATOR  In accordance with operating instructions, monitors and operates the control console of a digital computer to process data. Executes runs by either serial processing (processes one program at a time) or multiprocessing (processes two or more programs simultaneously). The following duties characterize the work of a computer operator: • • • • • • •  Studies operating instructions to determine equipment setup needed. Loads equipment with required items(tapes, cards, disks, paper, etc.). Switches necessary auxiliary equipment intosystem. Starts and operates computer. Responds to operating and computer output instructions. Reviews error messages and makes corrections during operation or refers problems. Maintains operating record.  May test-run new or modified programs. May assist in modifying systems or programs. The scope of this definition includes trainees working to become fully qualified computer operators, fully qualified computer operators, and lead operators providing technical assistance to lower level operators. It excludes workers who monitor and operate remote terminals.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Class A. In addition to work assignments described for a class B operator (see below) the work of a class A operator involves at least one of the following: * * • •  Deviates from standard procedures to avoid the loss of information or to conserve computer time even though the procedures applied materially alter the computer unit’s production plans. Tests new programs, applications, and procedures. Advises programmers and subject-matter experts on setup techniques. Assists in (1) maintaining, modifying, and developing operating systems or programs; (2) developing operating instructions and techniques to cover problem situations; and/or (3) switching to emergency backup procedures (such assistance requires a working knowledge of program language, computer features, and software systems).  An operator at this level typically guides lower level operators. Class B. In addition to established production runs, work assignments include runs involving new programs, applications, and procedures (i.e., situations which require the operator to adapt to a variety of problems). At this level, the operator has the training and experience to work fairly independently in carrying out most assignments. Assignments may require the operator to select from a variety of standard setup and operating procedures. In responding to computer output instructions or error condi­ tions, applies standard operating or corrective procedures, but may deviate from standard procedures when standard procedures fail if deviation does not materially alter the computer unit’s production plans. Refers the problem or aborts the program when procedures applied do not provide a solution. May guide lower level operators. Class C. Work assignments are limited to established production runs (i.e., programs which present few operating problems). Assignments may consist primarily of on-thejob training (sometimes augmented by classroom instruction). When learning to run programs, the supervisor or a higher level operator provides detailed written or oral guidance to the operator before and during the run. After the operator has gained experience with a program, however, the operator works fairly independently in applying standard operating or corrective procedures in responding to computer output instructions or error conditions, but refers problems to a higher level operator or the supervisor when standard procedures fail. PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT OPERATOR  Operates peripheral equipment which directly supports digital computer operations. Such equipment is uniquely and specifically designed for computer applications, but need not be physically or electronically connected to a computer. Printers, plotters, card read/punches, tape readers, tape units or drives, disk units or drives, and data display units are examples of such equipment. The following duties characterize the work of a peripheral equipment operator: * •  Loading printers and plotters with correct paper; adjusting controls for forms, thickness, tension, printing density, and location; and unloading hard copy. Labelling tape reels, disks, or card decks.  • • • •  Checking labels and mounting and dismounting designated tape reels or disks on specified units or drives. Setting controls which regulate operation of the equipment. Observing panel lights for warnings and error indications and taking appropriate action. Examining tapes, cards, or other material for creases, tears, or other defects which could cause processing problems.  This classification excludes workers (1) who monitor and operate a control console (see computer operator) or a remote terminal, or (2) whose duties are limited to operating decollaters, bursters, separators, or similar equipment. COMPUTER DATA LIBRARIAN  Maintains library of media (tapes, disks, cards, cassettes) used for automatic data processing applications. The following or similar duties characterize the work of a computer data librarian: Classifying, cataloging, and storing media in accordance with a standardized system; upon proper requests, releasing media for processing; maintaining records of releases and returns; inspecting returned media for damage or excessive wear to determine whether or not they need replacing. May perform minor repairs to damaged tapes. DRAFTER  Class A. Plans the graphic presentation of complex items having distinctive design features that differ significantly from established drafting precedents. Works in close support with the design originator, and may recommend minor design changes. Analyzes the effect of each change on the details of form, function, and positional relationships of components and parts. Works with a minimum of supervisory assistance. Completed work is reviewed by design originator for consistency with prior engineering determinations. May either prepare drawings or direct their preparation by lower level drafters.  assignments. Instructions are less complete when assignments recur. Work may be spotchecked during progress. DRAFTER-TRACER  Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing cloth or paper over drawings and tracing with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracing limited to plans primarily consisting of straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation.) AND/OR Prepares simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized items. Work is closely supervised during progress. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN  Works on various types of electronic equipment and related devices by performing one or a combination of the following: Installing, maintaining, repairing, overhauling, troubleshooting, modifying, constructing, and testing. Work requires practical applica­ tion of technical knowledge of electronics principles, ability to determine malfunctions, and skill to put equipment in required operating condition. The equipment—consisting of either many different kinds of circuits or multiple repetition of the same kind of circuit—includes, but is not limited to, the following: (a) Electronic transmitting and receiving equipment (e.g., radar, radio, television, tele­ phone, sonar, navigational aids), (b) digital and analog computers, and (c) industrial and medical measuring and controlling equipment. This classification excludes repairers of such standard electronic equipment as common office machines and household radio and television sets; production assemb­ lers and testers; workers whose primary duty is servicing electronic test instruments; technicians who have administrative or supervisory responsibility; and drafters, designers, and professional engineers. Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions:  Class B. Performs nonroutine and complex drafting assignments that require the application of most of the standardized drawing techniques regularly used. Duties typically involve such work as: Prepares working drawings of subassemblies with irregular shapes, multiple functions, and precise positional relationships between components; prepares architectural drawings for construction of a building including detail drawings of foundations, wall sections, floor plans, and roof. Uses accepted formulas and manuals in making necessary computations to determine quantities of materials to be used, load capacities, strengths, stresses, etc. Receives initial instruc­ tions, requirements, and advice from supervisor. Completed work is checked for technical adequacy.  Class A. Applies advanced technical knowledge to solve unusually complex problems (i.e., those that typically cannot be solved solely by reference to manufacturers’ manuals or similar documents) in working on electronic equipment. Examples of such problems include location and density of circuitry, electromagnetic radiation, isolating malfunctions, and frequent engineering changes. Work involves: A detailed understan­ ding of the interrelationships of circuits; exercising independent judgment in perfor­ ming such tasks as making circuit analyses, calculating wave forms, tracing relation­ ships in signal flow; and regularly using complex test instruments (e.g., dual trace oscilloscopes, Q-meters, deviation meters, pulse generators). Work may be reviewed by supervisor (frequently an engineer or designer) for general compliance with accepted practices. May provide technical guidance to lower level technicians.  Class C. Prepares detail drawings of single units or parts for engineering, construction, manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types of drawings prepared include isometric projections (depicting three dimensions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning of components and convey needed information. Consolidates details from a number of sources and adjusts or transposes scale as required. Suggested methods of approach, applicable precedents, and advice on source materials are given with initial  Class B. Applies comprehensive technical knowledge to solve complex problems (i.e., those that typically can be solved solely by properly interpreting manufacturers’ manuals or similar documents) in working on electronic equipment. Work involves: A familiarity with the interrelationships of circuits; and judgment in determining work sequence and in selecting tools and testing instruments, usually less complex than those used by the class A technician.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher level technician, and work is reviewed for specific compliance with accepted practices and work assignments. May provide technical guidance to lower level technicians.  equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working standard computations relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of electrician’s handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In general, the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.  Class C. Applies working technical knowledge to perform simple or routine tasks in working on electronic equipment, following detailed instructions which cover virtually all procedures. Work typically involves such tasks as: Assisting higher level technicians by performing such activities as replacing components, wiring circuits, and taking test readings; repairing simple electronic equipment; and using tools and common test instruments (e.g., multimeters, audio signal generators, tube testers, oscilloscopes). Is not required to be familiar with the interrelationships of circuits. This knowledge, however, may be acquired through assignments designed to increase competence (including classroom training) so that worker can advance to higher level technician. Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher level technician. Work is typically spot-checked, but is given detailed review when new or advanced assignments are involved.  Paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an establishment. Work involves the following: Knowledge of surface peculiarities and types of paint required for different applications; preparing surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler in nail holes and interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush. May mix colors, oils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency. In general, the work of the maintenance painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.  REGISTERED INDUSTRIAL NURSE  MAINTENANCE MACHINIST  A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general medical direction to ill or injured employees or other persons who become ill or suffer an accident on the premises of a factory or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of thefollowing-. Giving first aid to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of employees’ injuries; keeping records of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or other purposes; assisting in physical examinations and health evaluations of applicants and employees; and planning and carrying out programs involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment, or other activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety of all personnel. Nursing supervisors or head nurses in establishments employing more than one nurse are excluded.  Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Interpreting written instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist’s handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds, and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties of the common metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and equipment required for this work; and fitting and assembling parts into mechanical equipment. In general, the machinist’s work normally requires a rounded training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.  Maintenance, Toolroom, and Powerplant MAINTENANCE CARPENTER  Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim made of wood in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenter’s handtools, portable power tools, and standard measuring instruments; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work; and selecting materials necessary for the work. In general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIAN  Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the installation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, control­ lers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems, or other transmission   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  MAINTENANCE PAINTER  MAINTENANCE MECHANIC (MACHINERY)  Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a machine shop or sending the machine to a machine shop for major repairs; preparing written specifications for major repairs or for the production of parts ordered from machine shops; reassembling machines; and making all necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the work of a machinery maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprentice­ ship or equivalent training and experience. Excluded from this classification are workers whose primary duties involve setting up or adjusting machines. MAINTENANCE MECHANIC (MOTOR VEHICLE)  Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Examining automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling equipment and performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches, gauges, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or  fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassembling and installing the various assemblies in the vehicle and making necessary adjustments; and aligning wheels, adjusting brakes and lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the motor vehicle maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. This classification does not include mechanics who repair customers’ vehicles in automobile repair shops. MAINTENANCE PIPEFITTER  Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves most of the following-. Laying out work and measuring to locate position of pipe from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe­ cutting machines; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven machines; assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard tests to determine whether finished pipes meet specifications. In general, the work of the maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. Workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating systems are excluded. MAINTENANCE SHEET-METAL WORKER  Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-metal equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans, shelves, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an establishment. Work involves most of the following-. Planning and laying out all types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints, models, or other specifications; setting up and operating all available types of sheetmetal working machines; using a variety of handtools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assembling; and installing sheet-metal articles as required. In general, the work of the maintenance sheet-metal worker requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. MILLWRIGHT  Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dismantles and installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout are required. Work involves most of the following- Planning and laying out work; interpreting blueprints or other specifica­ tions; using a variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations relating to stresses, strength of materials, and centers of gravity; aligning and balancing equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment, and parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order power transmission equipment such as drives and speed reducers. In general, the millwright’s work normally requires a rounded training and experience in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  MAINTENANCE TRADES HELPER  Assists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades, by performing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a worker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning working area, machine, and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding materials or tools; and performing other unskilled tasks as directd by journeyman. The kind of work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade: In some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding materials and tools, and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to perform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are also performed by workers on a full-time basis. MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR (TOOLROOM)  Specializes in operating one or more than one type of machine tool (e.g., jig borer, grinding machine, engine lathe, milling machine) to machine metal for use in making or maintaining jigs, fixtures, cutting tools, gauges, or metal dies or molds used in shaping or forming metal or nonmetallic material (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work typically involves: Planning and performing difficult machining operations which require complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; setting up machine tool or tools (e.g., install cutting tools and adjust guides, stops, working tables, and other controls to handle the size of stock to be machined; determine proper feeds, speeds, tooling, and operation sequence or select those prescribed in drawings, blueprints, or layouts); using a variety of precision measuring instruments; making necessary adjustments during machining operation to achieve requisite dimensions to very close tolerances. May be required to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils, to recognize when tools need dressing, and to dress tools. In general, the work of a machine-tool operator (toolroom) at the skill level called for in this classification requires extensive knowledge of machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through considerable on-thejob training and experience. For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not include machinetool operators (toolroom) employed in tool and die jobbing shops. TOOL AND DIE MAKER  Constructs and repairs jigs, fixtures, cutting tools, gauges, or metal dies or molds used in shaping or forming metal or nonmetallic material (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work typically involves: Planning and laying out work according to models, blueprints, drawings, or other written or oral specifications; understanding the working properties of common metals and alloys; selecting appropriate materials, tools, and processes required to complete tasks; making necessary shop computations; setting up and operating various machine tools and related equipment; using various tool and die maker’s handtools and precision measuring instruments; working to very close tolerances; heat-treating metal parts and finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities; fitting and assembling parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances. In general, the tool and die maker’s work requires rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not include tool and die makers who (1) are employed in tool and die jobbing shops or (2) produce forging dies (die sinkers).  STATIONARY ENGINEER  Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrigeration, or air conditioning. Work involves- Opera­ ting and maintaining equipment such as steam engines, air compressors, generators motors, turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and boiler-fed water pumps; making equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May also supervise these operations. Head or chiefengineers in establishments employing more than one engineer are excluded. BOILER TENDER  Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which employed with heat power, or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; and checks water and safety valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom equipment. &  Material Movement and Custodial TRUCKDRIVER  Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport materials, merchandise, equipment, or workers between various types of establishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail establishments and customers’ houses or places of business. May also load or unload truck with or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep truck in good working order. Salesroute and over-the-road drivers are excluded. For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by type and rated capacity of truck, as follows: Truckdriver, light truck (straight truck, under 1 1/2 tons, usually 4 wheels) Truckdriver, medium truck (straight truck, 1 1/2 to 4 tons inclusive, usually 6 wheels) Truckdriver, heavy truck (straight truck, over 4 tons, usually 10 wheels) Truckdriver, tractor-trailer SHIPPER AND RECEIVER  Performs clerical and physical tasks in connection with shipping goods of the establishment in which employed and receiving incoming shipments. In performing day-to-day, routine tasks, follows established guidelines. In handling unusual nonrou­ tine problems, receives specific guidance from supervisor or other officials. May direct orbeingre'ceived16 aCtlVltl6S of other wooers engaged in handling goods to be shipped xclnrTZ ‘S are responsible for most of the following: Verifying that orders are accurately filled by comparing items and quantities of goods gathered for shipment gainst documents; insuring that shipments are properly packaged, identified with record8 'nfor™at'on’ and loaded lnto transporting vehicles; preparing and keeping records of goods shipped, e.g., manifests, bills of lading. B   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Receivers typically are responsible for most of the following: Verifying the correct­ ness of incoming shipments by comparing items and quantities unloaded against bills of lading, invoices, manifests, storage receipts, or other records; checking for damaged goods; insuring that goods are appropriately identified for routing to departments within the establishment; preparing and keeping records of goods received. For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows: Shipper Receiver Shipper and receiver WAREHOUSEMAN  As directed performs a variety of warehousing duties which require an understanding of the establishment's storage plan. Work involves most of the following-. Verifying materials (or merchandise) against receiving documents, noting and reporting discrep­ ancies and obvious damages; routing materials to prescribed storage locations; storing stacking, or palletizing materials in accordance with prescribed storage methods’ rearranging and taking inventory of stored materials; examining stored materials and reporting deterioration and damage; removing material from storage and preparing it for shipment. May operate hand or power trucks in performing warehousing duties. xclude workers whose primary duties involve shipping and receiving work (see Shipper and Receiver and Shipping Packer), order filling (see Order Filler) or operating power trucks (see Power-Truck Operator). ORDER FILLER  Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips, customers’ orders, or other instructions May, in addition to filling orders and indicating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requisition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other related duties. SHIPPING PACKER  Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being dependent upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the type of container employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the placing of items in shipping containers and may involve one or more of the following-. Knowledge of various items of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size of container; inserting enclosures in container- using excelsior or other material to prevent breakage or damage; closing and sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying data on container. Packers who also make wooden boxes or crates are excluded. MATERIAL HANDLING LABORER  A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store, or other establish­ ment whose duties involve one or more of the following: Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or from freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving, or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage location; and transporting materials or merchandise by handtruck, car, or wheelbarrow Longshore workers, who load and unload ships, are excluded.  for assistance when deemed necessary and time allows), to keep situation under surveillance, or to report situation so that it can be handled by appropriate authority. Duties require specialized training in methods and techniques of protecting security areas. Commonly, the guard is required to demonstrate continuing physical fitness and proficiency with firearms or other special weapons.  POWER-TRUCK OPERATOR  Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered truck or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment. For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of powertruck, as follows:  Class B. Carries out instructions primarily oriented toward insuring that emergencies and security violations are readily discovered and reported to appropriate authority. Intervenes directly only in situations which require minimal action to safeguard property or persons. Duties require minimal training. Commonly, the guard is not required to demonstrate physical fitness. May be armed, but generally is not required to demonstrate proficiency in the use of firearms or special weapons.  Forklift operator Power-truck operator (other than forklift) GUARD  Protects property from theft or damage, or persons from hazards or interference. Duties involve serving at a fixed post, making rounds on foot or by motor vehicle, or escorting persons or property. May be deputized to make arrests. May also help visitors and customers by answering questions and giving directions. Guards employed by establishments which provide protective services on a contract basis are included in this occupation. For wage study purposes, guards are classified as follows:  JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER  Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following-. Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor maintenance services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers who specialize in window washing are excluded.  Class A. Enforces regulations designed to prevent breaches of security. Exercises judgment and uses discretion in dealing with emergencies and security violations encountered. Determines whether first response should be to intervene directly (asking   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  26  Service Contract Act Surveys The following areas are surveyed per­ iodically for use in administering the Service Contract Act of 1965. Survey results are published in releases which are available, at no cost, while supplies last from any of the BLS regional offices shown on the back cover. Alaska (statewide) Albany, Ga. Albuquerque, N. Mex. Alexandria-Leesville, La. Alpena-Standish-Tawas City, Mich. Ann Arbor, Mich. Asheville, N.C. Atlantic City, N.J. Augusta, Ga.-S.C. Austin, Tex. Bakersfield, Calif. Baton Rouge, La. Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange and Lake Charles, Tex.-La. Biloxi-Gulfport and PascagoulaMoss Point, Miss. Binghamton, N.Y. Birmingham, Ala. Bremerton-Shelton, Wash. Brunswick, Ga. Cedar Rapids, Iowa Champaign-Urbana-Rantoul, 111. Charleston-North CharlestonWalterboro, S.C. Cheyenne, Wyo. Clarksville-Hopkins ville, Tenn. -Ky.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Colorado Springs, Colo. Columbia-Sumter, S.C. Columbus, Ga.-Ala. Columbus, Miss. Connecticut (statewide) Dothan, Ala. Duluth-Superior, Minn.-Wis. El Paso-Alamogordo-Las Cruces, Tex.-N. Mex. Eugene-Springfield-Medford, Oreg. Fayetteville, N.C. Fort Smith, Ark.-Okla. Fort Wayne, Ind. Frederick-HagerstownChambersburg, Md.-Pa. Gadsden and Anniston, Ala. Goldsboro, N.C. Guam, Territory of Knoxville, Tenn. La Crosse-Sparta, Wis. Laredo, Tex. Lexington-Fayette, Ky. Lima, Ohio Little Rock-North Little Rock, Ark. Logansport-Peru, Ind. Lower Eastern Shore, Md.-Va.-Del. Macon, Ga. Madison, Wis. Maine (statewide) Mansfield, Ohio McAllen-Pharr-Edinburg and Brownsville-Harlingen- San Benito, Tex. Meridian, Miss.  Middlesex, Monmouth, and Ocean Counties, N.J. Mobile-Pensacola-Panama City, Ala.Fla. Montana (statewide) Montgomery, Ala. Nashville-Davidson, Tenn. New Bern-Jacksonville, N.C. New Hampshire (statewide) North Dakota (statewide) Northern New York Northwest Texas Orlando, Fla. Oxnard-Simi Valley-Ventura, Calif. Peoria, 111. Pine Bluff, Ark. Pueblo, Colo. Puerto Rico Raleigh-Durham, N.C. Reno, Nev. Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif. Salina, Kans. Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-Lompoc, Calif. Savannah, Ga. Selma, Ala. Sherman-Denison, Tex. Shreveport, La. South Dakota (statewide) Southeastern Massachusetts Southern Idaho Southwest Virginia Spokane, Wash.  Springfield, 111. Stockton, Calif. Tacoma, Wash. Topeka, Kans. Tucson-Douglas, Ariz. Tulsa, Okla. Upper Peninsula, Mich. Vallejo-Fairfield-Napa, Calif. Vermont (statewide) Virgin Islands of the U.S. Waco and Killeen-Temple, Tex. Waterloo-Cedar Falls, Iowa West Virginia (statewide) Western and Northern Massachusetts Wichita Falls-Lawton-Altus, Tex.Okla. Y akima-Richland-KennewickPendleton, Wash.-Oreg. ALSO A VAILABLE— An annual report on salaries for ac­ countants, auditors, chief accountants, attorneys, job analysts, directors of per­ sonnel, buyers, chemists, engineers, en­ gineering technicians, drafters, and cler­ ical employees is available. Order as BLS Bulletin 2045, National Survey of Professional, Administrative, Technical and Clerical Pay, March 1979, $3.00 a copy, from any of the BLS regional sales offices shown on the back cover, or from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.  Area Wage Surveys A list of the latest bulletins available is presented below. Bulletins may be purchased from any of the BLS regional offices shown on the back cover, or from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402. Make checks payable to Superin­ tendent of Documents. A directory of occupational wage surveys, covering the years 1970 through 1977, is available on request.  Area Akron, Ohio, Dec. 1978 ........................................................... Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N.Y., Sept. 1979............................ Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Calif., Oct. 1979............ Atlanta, Ga., May 1980 ........................................................... Baltimore, Md., Aug. 1980 ....................................................... Billings, Mont., July 1980'......................................................... Birmingham, Ala., Mar. 1978 ................................................... Boston, Mass., Aug. 1980 ......................................................... Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 1979 ........................................................... Canton, Ohio, May 1978 ........................................................... Chattanooga, Tenn.—Ga., Sept. 1980...................................... Chicago, 111., May 1980'............................................................. Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1980 .................................. Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1979....................................................... Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1979 ....................................................... Corpus Christi, Tex., July 1980................................................. Dallas—Fort Worth, Tex., Dec. 1979........................................ Davenport—Rock Island—Moline, Iowa—111., Feb. 1980' ... Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1979 ........................................................... Daytona Beach, Fla., Aug. 19801 ............................................. Denver—Boulder, Colo., Dec. 1979 .......................................... Detroit, Mich., Mar. 1980 ......................................................... Fresno, Calif., June 1980' ......................................................... Gainesville, Fla., Sept. 1979....................................................... Gary—Hammond—East Chicago, Ind., Oct. 1979'................ Green Bay, Wis., July 1980 ....................................................... Greensboro—Winston-Salem—High Point, N.C., Aug. 1979 Greenville—Spartanburg, S.C., June 1980 .............................. Hartford, Conn., Mar. 1980'..................................................... Houston, Tex., Apr. 1980'.......................................................... Huntsville, Ala., Feb. 1980'....................................................... Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1979..................................................... Jackson, Miss., Jan. 1980 ......................................................... Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 1979' ................................................... Kansas City, Mo.—Kans., Sept. 1980........................................ Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., Oct. 1979 .......................... Louisville, Ky.—Ind., Nov. 1979 ..............................................   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Bulletin number and price* 2025-63 2050-46 2050-48 3000-21 3000-38 3000-31 2025-15 3000-40 2050-65 2025-22 3000-44 3000-26 3000-32 2050-47 2050-61 3000-28 2050-67 3000- 5 2050-64 3000-33 2050-72 3000- 7 3000-30 2050-45 2050-60 3000-22 2050-49 3000-16 3000-19 3000-18 3000-14 2050-54 3000- 2 2050-69 3000-42 2050-59 2050-66  $1.00 $1.50 $1.50 $2.25 $2.25 $2.00 $0.80 $2.25 $2.25 $0.70 $1.75 $3.25 $2.25 $1.75 $2.25 $1.75 $2.25 $2.25 $2.00 $1.75 $2.25 $2.25 $2.00 $1.50 $2.25 $1.75 $1.50 $1.75 $2.25 $3.25 $2.25 $2.25 $1.75 $2.25 $2.25 $2.25 $2.00  Area  Bulletin number and price*  Memphis, Tenn.—Ark.—Miss., Nov. 1979'........................................................... 2050-56 Miami, Fla., Oct. 1979 ............................................................................................. 2050-55 Milwaukee, Wis., Apr. 1980 ................................................................................... 3000-10 Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.—Wis., Jan. 1980 ................................................. 3000- 1 Nassau—Suffolk, N.Y., June 1980........................................................................ 3000-29 Newark, N.J., Jan. 1980'......................................................................................... 3000- 8 New Orleans, La., Oct. 1979 ..................................................................................... 2050-53 New York, N.Y.—N.J., May 1980 ........................................................................... 3000-24 Norfolk—Virginia Beach—Portsmouth, Va.—N.C., May 1980........................... 3000-20 Norfolk—Virginia Beach—Portsmouth and Newport News— Hampton, Va.—N.C., May 1978 ...................................................................... 2025-21 Northeast Pennsylvania, Aug. 1980 ...................................................................... 3000-37 Oklahoma City, Okla., Aug. 1980'........................................................................ 3000-41 Omaha, Nebr.—Iowa, Oct. 1979 .......................................................................... 2050-51 Paterson—Clifton—Passaic, N.J., June 1980'.................................................... 3000-34 Philadelphia, Pa.—N.J., Nov. 1979'................................................... .............. 2050-57 Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 1980 ...................................................................... ............... 3000- 3 Portland, Maine, Dec. 1979 .................................................................................... 2050-63 Portland, Oreg.—Wash., May 1979 ...................................................................... 2050-27 Poughkeepsie, N.Y., June 1980'............................................................................ 3000-35 Poughkeepsie—Kingston—Newburgh, N.Y.,June 1980'................................... 3000-39 Providence—Warwick—Pawtucket, R.I.—Mass., June 1980 ............................ 3000-27 Richmond, Va., June 980'..................................................................................... 3000-23 St. Louis, Mo.—111., Mar. 1980............................................................................. 3000-12 Sacramento, Calif., Dec. 1979............................................................................... 2050-71 Saginaw, Mich., Nov. 1979'................................................................................... 2050-52 Salt Lake City—Ogden, Utah, Nov. 1979 ........................................................... 2050-62 San Antonio, Tex., May 1980'............................................................................... 3000-17 San Diego, Calif., Nov. 1979 ................................................................................. 2050-70 San Francisco—Oakland, Calif., Mar.1980 ........................................................ 3000- 9 San Jose, Calif., Mar. 1980 ................................................................................... 3000- 6 Seattle—Everett, Wash., Dec. 1979'..................................................................... 2050-68 South Bend, Ind., Aug. 1980 ................................................................................. 3000-36 Toledo, Ohio—Mich., May 1980 ........................................................................ 3000-13 Trenton, N.J., Sept. 1980 ....................................................................................... 3000-43 Utica—Rome, N.Y., July 1978 ............................................................................ 2025-34 Washington, D.C.—Md.—Va., Mar. 1980 ........................................................ 3000- 4 Wichita, Kans., Apr. 1980' .................................................................................. 3000-15 Worcester, Mass., Apr. 1980' .............................................................................. 3000-25 York, Pa., Feb. 1980 .............................................................................................. 3000-11 Prices are determined by the Government Printing Office and are subject to change. Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.  $2.25 $2.25 $2-25 $2.25 $2.00 $3.25 $2.25 $2.25 $1.75 $0.80 $1.75 $2.25 $1.50 $2.25 $3.00 $2.25 $1.75 $1.75 $2.00 $2.00 $2.00 $2.25 $2.25 $1.75 $1.75 $2.00 $2.00 $2.00 $2.25 $2.00 $2.25 $1-75 $1 -75 $1.75 $1.00 $2.25 $2.25 $2.00 $1.75  Postage and Fees Paid U.S. Department of Labor  U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Washington, D.C. 20212  Third Class Mail Official Business Penalty for private use, $300  Lab-441  Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional Offices Region I  Region II  Region III  Region IV  1603 JFK Federal Building Government Center Boston, Mass. 02203 Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)  Suite 3400 1515 Broadway New York, N Y 10036 Phone: 944-3121 (Area Code 212) New Jersey New York Puerto Rico Virgin Islands  3535 Market Street, P.O. Box 13309 Philadelphia, Pa. 19101 Phone: 596-1154 (Area Code 215)  Suite 540 1371 Peachtree St., N.E Atlanta, Ga. 30367 Phone 881-4418 (Area Code 404)  Delaware District of Columbia Maryland Pennsylvania Virginia West Virginia  Alabama Florida Georgia Kentucky Mississippi North Carolina South Carolina Tennessee  Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont  Region V  Region VI  Regions VII and VIII  Regions IX and X  9th Floor, 230 S. 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