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Area Wage Survey
Indianapolis, Indiana, Metropolitan Area, October 1976
Bulletin 1900-58
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

s '?

HAMILTON

BOONE

HENDRICKS

-

9

HANCOCK

Go.

Indianapolis

r

|__

w
riSS*-

MARION

MORGAN




SHELBY
JOHNSON

Preface
This bulletin p r o v id e s r e s u l t s
o f an O c t o b e r
1976
s u r v e y o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s in the I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n dia na ,
S t a n d a rd M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a ( B o o n e , H a m i l t o n , H a n c o c k ,
H e n d r i c k s , J o h n s o n , M a r i o n , M o r g a n , and S h e lb y C o u n t i e s ) .
The
s u r v e y w a s m a d e as p a r t o f th e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s '
annual a r e a w a g e s u r v e y p r o g r a m , w h i c h is d e s i g n e d to y ie ld
data f o r in d iv id u a l m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s as w e l l as n a t io n a l and
r e g i o n a l e s t i m a t e s f o r a ll St a n d a rd M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a s
in th e U n it ed S t a t e s , e x c l u d i n g A l a s k a and H a w a ii.
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in th e a r e a w a g e s u r v e y p r o g r a m
is th e n e e d to d e s c r i b e th e l e v e l and m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s in a
v a r i e t y o f l a b o r m a r k e t s , t h r o u g h th e a n a l y s i s o f ( 1 ) t h e l e v e l
and d i s t r i b u t i o n o f w a g e s b y o c c u p a t i o n , and ( 2 ) th e m o v e m e n t
o f w a g e s b y o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e g o r y and s k i l l l e v e l .
The p r o g ra m
d e v e l o p s i n f o r m a t i o n that m a y b e u s e d f o r m a n y p u r p o s e s , i n ­
c lu d in g w a g e and s a l a r y a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , c o l l e c t i v e b a r g a i n i n g ,
and a s s i s t a n c e in d e t e r m i n i n g plant l o c a t i o n .
Survey resu lts also
a r e u s e d b y th e U.S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r to m a k e w a g e d e t e r ­
m i n a t i o n s u n d e r the S e r v i c e C o n t r a c t A c t o f 1965.
C u r r e n t l y , 84 a r e a s a r e i n c l u d e d in th e p r o g r a m .
(See
list o f a re a s on inside b a ck c o v e r .)
In e a c h a r e a , o c c u p a t i o n a l
e a r n i n g s data a r e c o l l e c t e d a n n u a lly .
In form a tion on e s t a b lis h ­
m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e b e n e f i t s is o b t a in e d e v e r y
t h ir d y e a r .




E a c h y e a r a f t e r a ll i n d iv id u a l a r e a w a g e s u r v e y s h a v e
b e e n c o m p l e t e d , tw o s u m m a r y b u l l e t i n s a r e i s s u e d .
The first
b r i n g s t o g e t h e r data f o r e a c h m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s u r v e y e d ; th e
s e c o n d p r e s e n t s n a t io n a l and r e g i o n a l e s t i m a t e s , p r o j e c t e d f r o m
in d iv id u a l m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a da ta.

T h e I n d ia n a p o lis s u r v e y w a s c o n d u c t e d b y th e B u r e a u ' s
r e g i o n a l o f f i c e in C h i c a g o , 111., u n d e r t h e g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f
L o is L. O r r , A ssista n t R egion a l C o m m is s io n e r fo r O perations.
T h e s u r v e y c o u l d not h a v e b e e n a c c o m p l i s h e d w ith o u t the c o o p ­
e r a t i o n o f th e m a n y f i r m s w h o s e w a g e and s a l a r y data p r o v i d e d
th e b a s i s f o r th e s t a t i s t i c a l i n f o r m a t i o n in t h is b u l l e t i n .
The
B u r e a u w i s h e s t o e x p r e s s s i n c e r e a p p r e c i a t i o n f o r th e c o o p e r a t i o n
receiv ed .

N o te :
A l s o a v a i l a b l e f o r th e I n d ia n a p o lis a r e a a r e l i s t i n g s o f
u nio n w a g e r a t e s f o r b u il d in g t r a d e s , p r i n t i n g t r a d e s , l o c a l - t r a n s i t
o p e r a t i n g e m p l o y e e s , l o c a l t r u c k d r i v e r s and h e l p e r s , and g r o c e r y
store em p loyees.
F r e e c o p i e s o f t h e s e a r e a v a i l a b l e f r o m the
B u r e a u 's r e g io n a l o f f i c e s . (See b a c k c o v e r f o r a d d r e s s e s .)

Area W age Survey:

Bulletin 1900-58

January 1977

Indianapolis, Indiana,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, W. J. Usery, Jr,, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

M etropolitan Area
October 1976

Contents

Page

Page

I n t r o d u c t i o n _________________________________________

2

T a b le s — Co n tin u e d
A.

T ab les:

A.

E arn ings:
A-l.
W eek ly earnings o f o f fic e
w o r k e r s ______________________________
A - I a . W eekly earnings o f o ffic e
w o r k e r s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ____
l
A -2.
W e e k l y e a r n in g s o f p r o f e s s i o n a l
and t e c h n i c a l w o r k e r s ______________
A -2 a . W eek ly earn ings of p r o fe s s io n a l
and t e c h n i c a l w o r k e r s — a r g e
l
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ______________________
A -3.
A v e r a g e w eek ly earn ings of o f f ic e ,
p r o f e s s i o n a l , and t e c h n i c a l
w o r k e r s , b y s e x ____________________
A - 3 a . A v e r a g e w eek ly earn ings of o f f ic e ,
p r o f e s s i o n a l , and t e c h n i c a l
w o r k e r s , b y s e x —l a r g e
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ______________________
A -4.
H ou rly earnings o f m ain ten ance,
t o o l r o o m , and p o w e r p l a n t
w o r k e r s ______________________________
A - 4 a . H ou rly earnings of m ain ten an ce,
t o o l r o o m , and p o w e r p la n t
w o r k e r s —l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ____
A -5.
H ou rly earn ings o f m a te ria l
m o v e m e n t and c u s t o d i a l
w o r k e r s ______________________________




3
5
7

8

9

10

11

E a r n i n g s — C o n tin u e d
A - 5 a . H ou rly earn ings o f m a t e r ia l
m o v e m e n t and c u s t o d i a l
w o r k e r s —l a r g e
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s _____________________ 1 5
A -6.
A v e r a g e h ou rly earn ings o f
m ain ten ance, to o l r o o m ,
pow erplant, m a te ria l
m o v e m e n t , and c u s t o d i a l
w o r k e r s , b y s e x ___________________ 1 6
A - 6 a. A v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f
m ain ten ance, to o l r o o m ,
pow erp lant, m a t e r ia l
m o v e m e n t , and c u s t o d i a l
w o r k e r s , b y s e x —l a r g e
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s _____________________ 1 7
A-l.
P e r c e n t i n c r e a s e s in a v e r a g e
h ourly earn ings fo r se le c t e d
o ccu p a tio n a l g r o u p s , adjusted
f o r e m p l o y m e n t s h i f t s ______________ j g

Appendix A.
A p p e n d ix B.

S c o p e and m e t h o d
o f s u r v e y _____ 1 9
O c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s _________ 22

12

1 3

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents,
O ffice,

Washington,

D. C.

Offices listed on back cover.

1

Superintendent of Documents.

2 0 40 2,

GPO

U .S .

Government Printing

Bookstores,

Price 75 cents.

or

BLS

Regional

Make checks payable to




Introduction
T h is a r e a i s 1 o f 84 in w h i c h the U.S.
D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s
c o n d u c t s s u r v e y s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s and r e ­
lated benefits.
In th is a r e a , data w e r e o b t a in e d b y
a co m b in a tio n of p e r s o n a l v isit, m a il q u e stio n n a ire ,
and telephon e in terview .
R epresen tative e sta b lis h ­
m e n t s w ith in s i x b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w e r e c o n ­
tacted:
M an ufactu ring; tran sportation , c o m m u n ic a ­
tio n ,
and o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ; w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ;
r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ;
a nd s e r v i c e s .
M a jo r industry groups ex clu d e d f r o m
t h e s e s t u d ie s a r e g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t i o n s and the
c o n s t r u c t i o n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s .
E sta b lish ­
m e n t s h av in g f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r of
w o r k e r s a r e om itted b e ca u s e of in su fficien t e m p lo y ­
m e n t in the o c c u p a t i o n s s tu die d .
Separate tabula­
t i o n s a r e p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h of the b r o a d i n d u s t r y

( c ) m a i n t e n a n c e , t o o l r o o m , and p o w e r p l a n t , and (d)
m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t and c u s t o d i a l .
In the 31 l a r g e s t
s u r v e y a r e a s , t a b le s A - l a t h r o u g h A - 6 a p r o v i d e
s i m i l a r data f o r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g 500 w o r k ­
ers or m ore.

division s

ap p end ix A .

w hich

m eet

p ub lication

T a b l e A - 7 p r o v i d e s p e r c e n t c h a n g e s in a v ­
e r a g e h ourly earn in gs of o ffic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s ,
e l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g
w o r k e r s , in d u s t r i a l
nurses,
s k illed m ain ten ance trad es w o r k e r s ,
and
u n s k i l l e d p la n t w o r k e r s .
W h e r e p o s s i b l e , data a r e
p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l i n d u s t r i e s , m a n u f a c t u r i n g , and
nonm an ufacturin g.
T h is ta b le p r o v i d e s a m e a s u r e of
w a g e t r e n d s a f t e r e l i m i n a t i o n o f c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e
e a r n i n g s c a u s e d b y e m p l o y m e n t s h if t s a m o n g e s t a b ­
lish m e n ts as w e ll as tu rn o v e r of esta b lish m e n ts in ­
c l u d e d in s u r v e y s a m p l e s .
F o r fu rth e r details, see

criteria.

A ppendixe s
A - s e r i e s tables
A p p e n d i x A d e s c r i b e s the m e t h o d s and c o n ­
c e p t s u s e d in the a r e a w a g e s u r v e y p r o g r a m and
p r o v i d e s i n f o r m a t i o n on the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .

T a b le s A - 1 through A - 6 provid e e stim a tes
o f s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y o r h o u r l y e a r n in g s f o r w o r k ­
e r s in o c c u p a t i o n s c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y of m a n u ­
f a c t u r i n g and n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g i n d u s t r i e s .
O ccupa­
t i o n s w e r e s e l e c t e d f r o m the f o l l o w i n g c a t e g o r i e s :
(a) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l , (b) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l ,

A p p e n d i x B p r o v i d e s jo b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d
b y B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s to c l a s s i f y w o r k e r s b y
occu pation.

E a r n i n g s data r e f l e c t w a g e s pa id in O c t o b e r 1976 w h e n a p p r o x i ­
m a t e l y 1 9 p e r c e n t o f the w o r k e r s in m a n u f a c t u r i n g w e r e w o r k i n g u n d e r
exp ired con tracts.

2

A. Earnings
Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Indianapolis, Ind., October 1976
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
O ccupation and in d u str y d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

80

weekly
(standard)

Mean

Median ^

Middle ranged

S
90

*

*

100

no

120

5

t

s

130

140

S
150

$
160

%

170

180

190

I

200

1

210

220

230

S

$

$
240

260

S
280

s

300

320
and

100

-

12
5
7
-

-

2
2
2

_

-

-

-

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

24 0

260

280

300

320

ove r

41

123
44
79

30 5
74
231
3
44

25 9
62
197
12
48

197
57
140
11
27

223
101
122
4
16

125
47
78
2
31

144
64
80
5
10

178
108
70
5
16

97
67
30
7
4

115
57
58
18
8

94
79
15
7
3

22 5
159
66
54
2

198
174
24
16
-

173
151
2?
20
-

105
80
25
13
“

21
21
-

-

_
-

4
2
2

32
18
14

17
3
14

10
3
7

16
5
11

n

2
2
-

17
11
6

12
11
1

23
21
2

35
18
17

7
7
*

56
14
42
3
6

37
11
26
1
8

50
14
36

21
8
13
2

27
7
20
2
2

19
12
7
3

61
40
21
17

54
47
7
3

76
57
19
18

6
6

14
14

“

4

38
16
22
1
6

25
11
14
2

42
12
30
1

71
45
26
*

39
31
8
*

37
24
13
5

44
39
5
3

93
71
22
2

73
72
1
“

64
56
8
*

53
42
11

26
23
3

40
26
14

29
26
3

54
37
17

12
12
-

1
1
-

_

-

9
9
9

-

.
-

2
2
2

_
-

-

”

-

-

42
42
42

-

3
3
3

4
3
1
1

29
23
6
2

35
26
9
8

52
25
27
27

28
27
1
1

17
13
4
4

30
20
10
2

19
19

23
7
16
16

-

-

*

1
1

1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

“

*

*

6
*

5
5

3
3

1
1

6
6

-

-

*

-

2
1
1
1

3
2
1
1

WORKERS

$
S E C R E T A R I E S ------------------------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ---------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------

2 ,816
1 ,393
1 , 423
178
252

3 9.5
40.0
3 9.0
40.0
39.5

197.50
223.00
17 2 . 5 0
235.50
162.00

184.00
225.50
160.00
244.00
15 4 . 0 0

$
$
150.00-242.00
175.00-269.50
143.00-193.00
211.50-267.00
140.00-184.00

-

16

179
32
147
1
23

-

i

5
5

-

2
2
-

13
5
8
1
1

38
4
34
3
12

49
19
30
4
8

72
8
64
5
13

73
5
68
17

143
49
94
26

85
18
67
29

55
25
30
6

123
25
98

65
22
43

82
47
35

45
22
23

42
35
7

6
2
4

6

l

30
2

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S A --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

202
111
91

39.5
40.0
39.5

236.00
248.00
221.00

226.00
271.50
205.00

182.50-293.50
190.00-298.00
182.50-250.00

-

-

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B --------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------- -----------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ---------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------

634
282
352
63
61

39.5
40.0
3 9.0
40.0
40.0

212.00
241.00
18 8 . 5 0
235.00
16 7 . 0 0

19 9 . 0 0
253.50
17 5 . 5 0
253.00
16 0 . 0 0

168.00-256.00
197.00-282.00
1 6 0 . 0 0 - 2 0 9 . OQ
180.00-287.00
150.00-182.00

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

149.50-255.50
188.50-274.50
140.00-195.00
140.00-156.50

_
-

-

-

4
2
2

-

“

-

58
22
36
9
58
17
41

93
22
71

123
21
102

49
27
22
3

91
33
58
4

87
32
55
10

35
16
19
1

26
12
14
“

27
13
14

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------

1 ,078
OOtt
470
106

39.5
4 0.0
3 9.0
39.5

204.00
231.00
16 9 . 5 0
15 4 . 0 0

200.00
239.50
15 2 . 5 0
150.00

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S D --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

896
392
504

3 9.0
40.0
38.5

170.50
19 0 . 5 0
155.00

160.00
19 2 . 5 0
150.00

142.50-198.00
159.50-222.50
138.00-165.50

-

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , G E N E R A L --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------

421
166
255
75

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0

15 5 . 5 0
14 2 . 5 0
16 3 . 5 0
215.50

14 1 . 5 0
1 39.00
14 5 . 0 0
246.50

133.00-163.50
126.50-154.00
134.00-174.00
195.00-246.50

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , S E N I O R ---------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------

470
242
22 8
83

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

192.50
204.50
179.50
216.50

19 0 . 0 0
205.50
16 8 . 0 0
210.00

156.50-220.60
176.50-228.50
146.00-210.00
180.50-233.50

T R A N S C R I B I N G - M A C H I N E t y p i s t s ------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

196
170

3 8.0
3 8.0

12 7 . 5 0
12 6 . 0 0

12 3 . 0 0
123.00

118.00-137.00
118.00-134.00

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S A ---------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -------------------------------------

44 8
199
249
38

3 9.0
40.0
38.5
39.5

143.50
151.00
13 8 . 0 0
165.50

13 5 . 5 0
1 39.50
132.00
148.00

125.00-156.50
133.00-162.50
121.00-148.00
135.00-193.50

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S 8 ---------------------------------------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------- -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------

728
150
57 8

38.5
39.5
3 8.0

117.50
120.50
116.50

11 2 . 5 0
1 17.00
11 0 . 0 0

104.00-121.00
115.00-117.00
102.50-121.00

-

68

FILE CLERKS, CLASS A
------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

91
67

38.5
3 8.0

13 6 . 0 0
13 5 . 5 0

123.00
12 2 . 5 0

108.00-145.00
111.00-137.00

-

3

*

F I L E C L E R K S , C L A S S B ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

22 8
193

3 9.0
3 9.0

118.00
11 6 . 5 0

114.00
114.00

104.00-124.00
104.00-124.00

-

See footn otes

$

$

and
under
90

ALL

'

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s rec e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e w ee k ly earn ings of ----S

i

*

52
22
30
6

-

2
2

12
5
7

36
9
27

-

2
2

1
1

34
25
9

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

13
1
12
*

9
3
6
*

22
8
14
2

46
13
33
2

39
23
16
"

39
2
37
6

36
17
19
2

-

“

1
1

11
7

38
38

73
69

37
29

21
21

10
1

1
1

1
1

-

9

40
3
37

88
32
56

58
29
29

4

22
9
13
1

41
26
15

*

108
63
45
13

12
4
8
1

6
4
2
2

13
9
4
1

12
4
8
1

23 3
24
209

236
90
146

88
6
82

42
17
25

16
7
9

-

-

14

8
8

20
16

14
10

6

4

“

21
17

*

4

20
20

67
46

60

37
36

21
11

3

14
14

-

-

9

19
4
15

-

-

-

-

68

-

-

at end o f t a b l e s .




-

3

60

3

3

4

33
15
18
11
"

”

11
5
6

*

*

-

120
104
16
*

8

4

4

-

-

-

-

7

8

4

4

“

2
2

2

3

-

-

2

-

*

2

1

_

4

2

2
2

1
1

1
1

*

*

“

3
3

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
I

3

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

*

*

*

-

-

-

-

”

*

16

3

11

*

-

-

*

~

-

-

*

1
1

*

_

-

-

-

T ab le A-1. W e e kly earnings of o ffic e w orkers in Indianapolis, Ind., O cto b e r 1 9 7 6 — C ontinu ed
W
eekly earnings 1
(standard)
Occupation and industry division

N ber Average
um
weekly
of
hours1
w
orkers
(standard)

N u mbe r of workers rec eiving straight-time weekly earnings of--S

$
80
M ^
ean

M
edian *

M
iddle range *

90

S

i

s

$

S

*

S

*

$

$

$

$

S
.
$
220
230

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

130

HO

150

160

1 70

180

190

200

210

220

230

1
1

8
8
5
4
-

100

no

120

HO

120

s

$

i

$

240

260

280

300

320

240

260

280

300

320

over

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

9
2
2

-

-

-

?
?

5
-

4
_
-

and
under

and

___9fl_ 1QQ
ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
^4.00-113.00
94.00-111.50

22
22

224
223

72
70

93
84

26
26

10
3

11
4

-

4
4

-

3
3

2
2

6
6

120. 00 1 0 4 . 0 0 - 1 5 3 . 5 0
112.50 1 0 2 . 5 0 - 1 4 8 . 0 0
135.50 1 1 0 . 0 0 - 2 0 0 . 5 0

9
9
-

28
28
7

52
49
4

30
30
7

17
11
6

29
22
5

12
7
-

17
16
1

4
2
2

4
4
4

3
3
1

5
3
3

15
12
12

-

126.50
126.50

112.00-153.00
103.50-140.00

_

25
23

19
13

34
33

21
14

18
15

7
3

12
5

4
2

2
-

3
2

5
4

3
3

_

-

16
16

139.50
141.00
139. 00

130.00
128.00
132.00

120.00-145.00
120.00-152.00
120.00-144.00

-

11
11

25
19
6

32
8
24

110
33
77

74
12
62

53
12
41

7
5
2

32
11
21

10
10

4
1
3

_
-

3
3
-

_
-

4
4
-

?

1
1

9
4
5

4 0. 0
40.0
40.0

151. 50
142.00
156.00

139.50
128.00
142.00

120.00-164.00
111.00-156.00
125.00-164.50

6
6

7
7

55
50
5

137
59
78

114
29
85

108
34
74

94
20
74

79
8
71

58
11
47

44
13
31

26
5
21

14
9
5

13
7
6

5
3
2

11
3
8

20
1
19

5
3
2

1 ,04 4

309
735
213

3 9. 0
40.0
39.0
3 9. 0

165. 50
181. 50
159. 00
153. 50

155.00
163. 50
152. 00
152.00

140.50-179.00
148.50-193.50
136.00-174.00
136.50-164.00

6
6
6

3
3
3

1
1
1

18
18
13

77
8
69
7

142
26
116
33

173
54
119
16

1 72
44
128
57

145
67
78
31

54
16
38
7

77
15
62
18

29
9
20
11

31
6
25
1

18
8
10
4

19
7
12
4

9
6
3
1

ACCOUNTING CLERKS, CLASS B --------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

i ,7 1 8
539
i .17 9
105
455

39.5
40.0
3 9. 0
A0.C
39.5

139. 50
142. 00
131.00
153.50
130.50

129.00
133.50
127.50
134.00
130.00

118.00-148.00
117.50-161.50
114.00-142.50
127.00-I51.no
110.00-146.00

3
3
3

55
5
50
31

221
58
163
4
73

2e3
109
174
4
51

319
69
250
32
59

221
53
168
21
86

205
51
154
13
63

165
53
112
7
42

69
30
39
4
17

40
24
16
1
4

61
50
11
11

23
12
11
8

5
2
3
_
3

10
4
t>
5
-

18
14
4
4

2
2

BILLING-MACHINE b i l l e r s --------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

123
95

4 0 . 0 233 .5 0 2 89 .0 0 1 4 5 . 0 0 - 2 8 9 . 0 0
4 0 . 0 2 54 .0 0 2 89 .00 2 2 7 . 5 0 - 2 8 9 . 0 0

_

_

-

-

-

1
-

13
-

_

-

26
13

_

*

6
6

1

-

-

-

-

8
8

-

-

PAYROLL CLERKS --------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----- ---------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

314
143
171
25

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0

170.50 160.00
180.50 175.00
161.50 152.50
2 37 .5 0 254. 00

137.50-187.00
153.50-201.50
136.50-173.50
180.50-293.00

-

-

3
3
-

4
4
-

31
9
22
“

49
7
42
-

29
15
14
~

39
11
28
-

36
26
10
-

22
10
12
5

30
14
16
5

9
8
1
-

19
19
-

4
4
-

9
8
1
1

6
2
4

4
2
2
2

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------PU3LIC UTILITIES ------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

754
177
577
175
66

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
39.5

174.50 156.50 1 3 9 . 5 0 - 2 0 5 . 0 0
183.00 169.00 1 4 7 . 5 0 - 2 2 3 . 5 0
172.00 151.00 1 3 6 . 0 0 - 1 9 9 . 0 0
2 32 .5 0 231 .5 0 1 9 7 . 5 0 - 2 8 9 . 0 0
140.00 135.00 1 2 2 . 0 0 - 1 5 9 . 0 0

-

31

96
10
86
1
17

130
24
106

77

47
30
17

26

18
1
17
12

37

10

4
4

52
in
42
42

21
15
6
6

5

70
19
51
13
5

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------------

740
249
491

3 9 . 5 139. 50 130.50
4 0 . 0 162. 50 153. 00
3 9 . 5 128. 00 122.00

119.00-152.00
138.00-187.00
114.00-138.00

80
43
37

68
35
33

23
7
16

15

5
5

7
7
-

2
2

3 9 . 5 186. 50 205 .5 0

136.50-218.50

2

1

PILE CLERKS, CLASS C --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

482
456

38.0 f o a . o o
3 8 . 0 107.00

MESSENGERS ----------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

242
202
54

39.0
3 9. 0
39.5

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

1B0
135

3 9 . 5 138.50
3 9 . 5 129.00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

384
113
271

3 9. 0
40.0
39.0

ORDER CLERKS ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

851
266
585

ACCOUNTING CLERKS, CLASS A --------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

t a b u l a t i n g -m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s C ---------------------------------------------------

50

135. 00
127. 50
150. 50

9 9. 5 0
98. 00

-

_

_

-

-

29
12

62
13
49
13

5

62
2
60

123
23
100

153
24
129

114

4

7

3

5

See footnotes at end of tables.




4

2

22

92

4
2

21
56
6

1

_

4
22

-

5

2

2

32
18
-

8
8
-

-

23
23
-

14
12
2

4

13

36
35
1

6
3
3

3

2

1

7

4

10
2

5
-

4
\ '
18

_

-

_
-

_
-

-

8

_
-

-

19
3
16

26
6
20

10
2
8

-

14
9
5
-

14
8
6

25
9
16
-

6
6
-

8

9
3
6
6

1

8
8
-

8

1

n
n

-

•

-

_

-

68
68

-

-

6
4
2
2

12
2
10
10

1
1

i
i

-

-

17
10

56

7

49
49

7

-

_

7
-

-

i

-

-

-

_

-

Table A-1a.

W eekly earnings of office w o rk e rs —large establishm ents in Indianapolis., In d ., O ctober 1976
W eek ly earnings
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of

1

Number of worke rs receiving straight -time weekly earnings of—
%

w eek ly
hours *
(standard

S
80

M ean

1

M edian

^

Middle ranged

S
90

l

$
100

no

$
120

$

5
130

180

$

$

s
150

160

170

$
180

S
190

S

$
200

210

$
220

*

i
230

280

$
260

%
280

s
300

and
under
90

320
and

100

120

130

J80

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

280

26Q

280

300

6
5
1
-

14
9
5
2

56
25
31
15

88
28
56
18

128
82
82
12

128
80
88
26

103
35
68
18

96
51
85
12

92
32
60
31

91
53
38
9

126
95
31
8

81
56
25

102
57
85
8

91
79
1?
3

205
183
62
2

178
163
15
-

160
186
18
-

85
80
5

n o

320 over

ALL WORKERS
$
213.50
231.50
182.00
167.00

$
210.00
237.00
172.00
166.00

$
$
168.50-258.00
193.50-278.00
189.50-212.50
142.00-185.50

40.0 268.50 283.50 229.00-303.00

SECRETARIES -----------------------MANUFACTURING------ -----------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

1.839
1,160
679
156

SECRETARIES. CLASS A ------------

89

SECRETARIES, CLASS 8 -----------MANUFACTURING---------- -------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------

409
233
176
53

80.0
80.0
39.5
80.0

SECRETARIES, CLASS c -----------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------

754
541
213

39.5 221.00 229.00 167.50-268.50
80.0 238.00 248.00 205.00-278.50
39.0 177.50 163.00 188.00-210.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 ------------

581
329
252

39.5 182.50 177.00 189.50-216.50
80.0 194.50 199.50 168.50-227.00
38.5 167.00 157.50 182.50-188.00

161
69
92
64

39.5
39.5
39.5
80.0

172.50
148.50
190.50
216.00

147.50
181.50
212.00
286.50

138.50-218.50
138.50-157.00
136.00-286.50
195.00-286.50

MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

312
206
106
58

80.0
80.0
39.5
80.0

196.00
206.50
175.00
195.50

202.00
207.50
180.00
205.00

159.00-221.50
178.50-229.00
188.50-205.50
180.50-210.00

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE TYPISTS -----------

63

TYPISTS, CLASS A ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------------------TYPISTS. CLASS B ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------------------s t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ----------------------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------------- ----------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------------------

PUBLIC UTILITIES

-------------------------------------

ste no g ra ph e rs , senior

-------------------------------------

39.5
40.0
39.0
39.0

231.50
258.00
202.00
225.50

231.00
263.50
194.50
241.00

190.00-278.00
219.50-288.50
170.00-228.50
1 70.00-259.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

6

1

7

2

5

2

7

8

18

23

7

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

19
2
17
8

20
5
15
5

27
9
18
3

28
7
17
1

25
10
19
-

28
16
12
1

21
8
13
2

21
7
18
2

16
12
8
2

51
31
20
16

53
87
6
2

69
57
12
11

18
18

1
-

7
1
6
3

6
6

-

3
1
2
1

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

27
5
22

63
28
35

81
18
23

33
16
17

27
19
8

19
5
18

28
12
12

87
39
8

32
25
7

36
28
12

84
39
5

93
71
22

107
98
9

72
72
-

56
56
-

-

-

8
2
2

-

-

58
22
32

53
13
80

62
20
82

47
18
33

80
23
17

82
19
23

37
30
7

84
80
4

26
23
3

-

-

-

27
13
18

.

-

6
5
1

-

-

9
7
2

20
12
8
3

26
18
8
8

28
19
9
6

9
4
5
1

6
4
2

4
8

2
2
-

-

-

-

6
3
3
3

4
3
1
1

8

-

3
1
2
-

7
3
8
-

15
4
11
2

28
11
13
2

30
23
7
-

13
2
11
6

17
13
8

27
11
16
11

17
13
4
2

33
28
9
8

86
23
23
23

-

-

29
12
17

-

1

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

39.0 132.50 127.00 114.00-185.00

-

1

7

13

11

13

3

10

i

i

-

i

i

236
133
103
30

39.5
80.0
39.5
80.0

126.50-162.50
127.00-162.50
125.00-160.00
135.50-216.CO

_
-

-

9
4
5
-

8
3
5
-

55
29
26
4

29
16
13
5

88
29
19
3

16
9
7
1

19
18
5
8

12
8

6

1

4
2
2

13
9
4
i

5
4
i
i

313
56
257

38.5 112.00 106.00 101.00-115.00
80.0 121.50 111.50 108.00-138.00
38.5 110.00 106.00 100.00-118.00

-

88
88

180
28
116

69
9
60

19
6

13
7

8
2

13

6

9
8
5

6

2
2
-

1
1
-

1
1
-

-

3

4

8

9

12

4

2

3

1

1

i

3
3

-

-

-

-

3
3

2
2

6
6

8
8
8

3
3
1

5
3
3

15
12
12

151.50
154.00
148.50
174.00

184.50
146.00
181.00
163.50

-

FILE CLERKS, CLASS A --------------

57

39.0 146.50 133.00 118.00-160.00

-

FILE CLERKS, CLASS B -------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

152
127

38.5 115.50 110.00 108.00-120.50
38.5 114.50 112.00 108.00-121.00

_
-

15
15

62
81

31
31

20
19

11
11

3
3

4
8

FILE CLERKS, CLASS C -------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------

192
185

38.5 113.50
38.0 113.00

92.00-115.00
92.00-118.00

22
22

76
75

39
37

18
18

7
7

5
3

5
3

-

-

8
4

MESSENGERS ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------

171
135
46

39.5 184.50 132.50 112.00-161.00
39.0 136.00 132.50 110.00-155.00
80.0 159.00 165.50 120.00-201.50

3
3

18
18
3

19
16
8

20
20
3

17
11
6

29
22
5

9
7

17
16
1

3
2
2

98.50
98.00

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e s .




21
21
*

5

2

6

80
26
18

29
26
3

_

58
37
17

10
10
-

1
1
-

.

_

-

*

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19
19
-

9
7
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1
1
1

1
1
-

3
2
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

'

-

9
2
2

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

38
38
38

27
27
-

7
7
-

18
18
-

1

-

-

6

6

1
1
-

3
3
-

3
3

-

_
-

_

i

2

2

3
1

-

2
-

1
1

8
8

.

8
8

-

6

_
-

-

_

1

3

-

-

-

_

_
-

Table A-1a.

W eekly earnings of o ffice w o rke rs —large establishm ents in Indianapolis, In d ., O cto b er 1 9 7 6 — Continued
S

Occupation and industry division

o
f
wres
okr

weekly

i
80

( t n a d Mean 1
sadr)

Median ^

Middle ranged

$
90

$

$
100

no

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
S
1 --- $
'I--- $
$
$
$
$
S
%
*
*
t
S
$
190
150 160
120
170
180 190 200 210 220 230 290 260 280 300 320
130

and
under

_

_

90

100

-

9
9

_

_

_

120

130

190

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

290

260

280

300

3
3

6
5

9
8

12
9

13
10

7
3

12
5

9
2

2
-

3
2

5
9

3
3

-

1
1

5
-

9
-

-

-

-

93

67

68

37

30

17

25

5

11

9

5

3

3

1

3

3

4

2

-

1
1
1

18
18
13

29
9
20
7

75
ci
52
33

79
90
39
12

58
12
96
13

68
23
95
IS

22
7

92
8
39
10

18
7
11
11

25
6
19
1

12
6
6
9

19
7
12
9

9
6
3
1

19
9
-

8
8
-

n
9
2
-

6
6
-

n
n
-

169
98
121
98

113
39
79
39

118
95
73
52

79
23
51
92

28
8
20
17

20

18
10
8
8

5

5
9

18
7
11
11

2
3
3

10
9
6
~

18
19
4
9

2
2
-

2
2
-

3
3
-

-

-

-

19

9
4

8
8

2
2

2
2

4
4

5
2

1
1

i
i

15
15

10
10
-

7
7
-

-

-

7
7
-

2

-

2

-

-

-

no

320 ove r

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS ------------n o n m a n u e a c t u r i n g ---------------

93
59

$
$
$
$
39.5 159.50 197.00 130.00-177.00
39.5 195.50 190.00 121.50-163.00

ORDER CLERKS -----------------------

399

90.0 139.00 128.50 119.00-151.00

6

7

ACCOUNTING CLERKS. CLASS A -------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------

529
192
337
137

39.5
90.0
39.5
39.0

190.50-192.00
195.00-230.00
136.50-180.50
130.50-169.00

6
6
6

3
3
3

ACCOUNTING CLERKS, CLASS B -------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------

877
317
560
350

39.5
90.0
39.5
39.5

119.00-197.50
115.00-159.00
112.00-199.50
108.50-150.00

3
3
3

19
19
18

150
56
99
67

107
91
66
39

PAYROLL CLERKS --------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

102
63

39.5 189.50 185.00 161.50-212.50
90.0 209.00 201.50 183.50-229.00

.
-

-

3
-

2
-

7
9

9
~

6
5

3
“

5
3

8
2

19
8

9
3

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTUHING -------- ------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------

961
153
30b
113
58

39.5
90.0
39.5
90.0
39.5

193.00-209.00
199.00-236.00
138.00-195.00
182.00-231.50
120.50-161.00

-

-

-

-

12

95
13
32
13

99
6
38
1
9

61
21
90
9
2

53
13
90
6
5

59
19
35
13
5

90
23
17
9
10

8
5
-

15
1
19
12
2

23

-

16
16

12

-

18
18
-

10
2
8
8
*

“

52
10
9?
9?
-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING ----------- — ----NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

381
161
220

39.5 198.50 139.50 120.00-168.50
90.0 171.00 163.50 139.50-196.00
39.0 132.00 130.50 112.00-195.00

-

2
2

33
33

58
17
91

91
11
30

59
19
95

39
15
29

31
19
12

23
7
16

15
2
13

26
25
1

18
18
-

12
12
-

9
4
-

6
3
3

5
5
-

172.50
199.00
160.00
150.50
135.00
191.00
131.50
133.00

173.00
187.50
166.00
203.50
190.50

160.00
169.00
155.50
199.00
129.00
131.00
128.00
132.00

161.00
170.00
156.50
209.00
132.00

-

-

See footnotes at end of tables.




6

-

15

3
15

9

19

5

9
9

5

-

-

*
-

-

-

T ab le A -2 .

W e e kly earnings of professional and technical w orkers in Indianapolis, In d ., O cto b er 1976
W eek ly earnings
(standard)

1
120

180

160

Number of workers receiving straight-time wee kly earning s of—
s
T
5
S
$
$
S
I
$
$
S
$
$
i
$
$
180 200 220 280 260 280 300 320 390 360 380 800 820 440 860 880 500

120

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

A verage
w eek ly
hours *
(standard'

180

160

ieo

200

220

280

260

280

300

320

380

360

380

800

820

880

460

880

500

over

$

i
no
M ean

^

M edian

^

Middle r n e^
ag

S

i

S

and
under

and

ALL WORKERS

ld7
92
95

$
$
$
$
39.5 362.50 350.00 319.50-392.00
90.0 385.50 379.50 326.00-992.50
39.5 390.00 339.00 307.00-365.no

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
2
3

20
5
15

22
9
13

37
17
20

28
9
15

16
5
11

25
13
12

1
1
-

13
7
6

7
7
-

3
3
-

6
6
~

8
8

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(BUSINESS), CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING ------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------

291
131
160

39.5 331.00 317.00 285.00-375.00
90.0 397.00 393.50 288.50-913.00
39.0 318.00 316.50 283.50-398.50

-

-

-

-

8
8

5
5
-

2
2

22
6
16

33
11
22

38
11
27

89
18
31

20
8
12

25
10
15

28
5
19

22
13
9

18
9
9

6
6
-

12
12
-

10
10
-

1
1
*

-

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(BUSINESS), CLASS C -------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

187
105

39.0 281.00 269.00 235.O0-323.no
38.5 258.00 297.00 231.00-283.00

-

-

-

-

8
7

3
3

35
33

18
18

16
15

15
11

13
9

12
6

9
3

10
-

8
-

8
-

-

-

•
-

*

-

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS)»
CLASS A --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

179
130

39.5 289.50 281.50 256.00-309.50
39.5 267.00 269.00 299.00-298.00

•-

-

-

-

8
8

11
11

18
13

26
25

29
27

80
33

21
15

8
1

8
1

6
-

3
-

5
-

2
-

1
-

-

-

-

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS).
CLASS B --------------------------NONMANUFACTURINO ---------------

178
138

39.0 230.00 223.50 201.50-253.50
38.5 222.50 212.00 195.00-250.00

-

-

“

13
12

27
25

88
38

18
15

35
26

23
15

8
6

8
1

2
*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS),
CLASS C --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

75
61

39.0 185.50 189.50 165.50-212.00
39.0 187.00 189.50 175.50-213.00

-

16
12

17
13

17
18

21
21

8
1

.

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS A ------m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

157
75
82

39.0 229.50 217.50 199.00-259.00
39.5 295.50 298.00 201.00-279.50
38.5 215.00 210.00 198.00-232.00

.
-

2
2

5
2
3

18
10
8

15
1
18

88
20
28

10
10

20
17
3

16
6
10

11
9
2

3
2
1

3
3
“

2
1
1

4
8
*

-

-

.
-

_
-

-

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

292
89
208

39.5 197.50 188.00 163.50-215.00
90.0 235.50 215.00 187.00-290.00
39.0 182.00 182.00 161.00-201.50

1
1

7

44
4
80

65
13
52

63
17
86

57
10
87

5
5
“

18
4
18

4
3
1

12
12
-

9
9

4
4

7

3
3
*

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_
-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C ------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------

1MO
113

39.0 160.00 150.00 139.00-177.00
39.0 153.50 150.00 138.00-173.50

2
2

86
35

36
33

39
39

4
4

2
*

3
“

5
*

2

•

1
*

-

.
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

DRAFTERS, CLASS A -------------*--MANUFACTURING ------------------

273
233

90.0 336.00 318.50 261.00-808.00
90.0 350.50 366.50 282.00-822.00

-

-

_
-

“

i
i

15
8

32
16

19
12

20
20

25
22

28
27

n
5

4
4

17
17

15
15

26
26

19
19

29
29

8
8

1
1

3
3

DRAFTERS, CLASS B ----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

206
161

90.0 228.00 211.50 188.50-289.50
90.0 229.50 210.00 185.00-253.00

-

-

-

11
11

57
50

58
30

13
12

29
23

18
10

6
3

2
2

11
11

9
9

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

d ra ft e rs , class

c ----------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

166
66

90.0 190.00 i89.00 155.00-222.5v
90.0 192.00 1Hi.00 155.00-235.50

-

11
-

35
28

21
5

36
17

1
1

83
2

15
13

-

1
1

2
2

1
1

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS ----------MANUFACTURING -------------------

167
130

90.0 266.00 239.00 226.00-306.50
90.0 261.50 226.50 226.00-318.00

-

_

_

3
3

5
8

6
6

33
12

38
31

-

_

-

78
65

_

-

11
8

_

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS, CLASS B-

106

-

-

-

-

-

6

65

-

5

6

21

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

REGISTERED INDUSTRIAL NURSES -----MANUFACTURING -------------------

96
90

-

-

2

2
2

6
6

13
13

21
20

6
6

10
7

8
8

18
18

9

1
1

_

_

.

_

_

o
o

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(BUSINESS), CLASS A --------------MANUFACTURING------------ -----NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

250.50 226.50 226.00-292.00

90.0 259.00 259.50 221.00-301.50
90.0 261.50 259.50 221.00-303.50

S ee f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b l e s .




7

-

.

.

9

*

.

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

-

_

Table A -2 a . W e e k ly earnings of professional and technical w o rk e rs —large establishm ents
in Ind ian ap o lis, Ind., O ctober 1976
W e e k ly e a r n in g s

*

N u m b e r

o f

w o r k e r s

r e c e iv in g

s tr a ig h t-tim e

w e e k ly

e a r n in g

S

o f ----

(s ta n d a r d )

$
um ber

S

5

%

$

$

$

S

S

$

%

$

3
>
s
t
$
f
S
i
%
£
320 340 360 380 400 420 440 460 480 500

ork ere

140

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

and

140

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

420

440

460

480

500

o v e r

*

*

“
*

3
•

14
5

18
9

30
17

16
9

9
5

9
8

1
1

7
7

7
7

3
3

6
6

8
8

no

w e e k ly
h ou rs1
(s ta n d a rd )

120

120

Occupation and industry division

M ean

^

M e d ia n

&

M id d le r a n g e d

300

and
u n d er

ALL WORKERS
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(BUSINESS), CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

131
BS

$
$
$
$
40.0 364.50 340.50 317.00-393.50
40.0 388.00 366.50 326.00-448.00

*

~

”

*

-

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(BUSINESS), CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

224
121
103

39.5 341.50 342.00 287.50-393.00
40.0 350.00 353.50 284.00-419.00
38.5 331.00 328.00 288.00-372.00

_

.
.

*

”

-

4
4

5
5
*

2
2
*
"

14
6
8

23
11
12

24
11
13

18
8
10

20
8
12

21
10
11

24
5
19

22
13
9

18
9
9

6
6
*

12
12
“

10
10

1
1
”

-

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(BUSINESS), CLASS C --------------

91

39.0 306.00 308.50 270.00-351.00

-

-

-

-

2

3

9

6

8

11

13

12

9

10

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS).
CLASS A --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

95
62

40.0 282.50 268.00 225.00-322.00
39.5 248.00 248.00 220.00-274.00

14
13

14
13

10
8

13
9

5
2

3
1

4
1

3
~

2
~

_

_

*

11
11

1

”

4
4

5

“

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS),
CLASS B --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

10B
71

39.0 239.00 242.00 207.50-264.00
38.5 229.00 226.50 202.00-251.00

22
17

12
11

26
17

15
7

7
5

8
1

.

_

_

_

_

-

9
7

_

-

7
6

2

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A ------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

112
53

-

1
1

3
3

15
10
5

12

11
6
5

4
4
-

3
3

1
I
“

4
4

-

8

15
12
3

2
2

12

33
11
22

8

b9

39.5 228.50 217.50 196.50-256.00
40.0 250.00 248.00 200.50-280.50
39.0 209.50 210.00 19h .00-224.50

-

-

*

-

”

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

146
66
80

39.5 206.50 185.50 166.00-243.50
40.0 246.00 247.50 188.00-297.00
39.0 174.50 175.00 156.50-188.50

-

7
7

20
4
16

33
10
23

30
10
20

13
2
11

5
5
*

7
4
3

3
3
*

12
12
-

9
9
-

4
4

3

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C -------

66

39.0 166# 50 155.00 136.00-183.50

2

20

18

9

4

2

3

5

2

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

8
6

5
5

10
10

25
22

25
25

n
5

4
4

17
17

15
15

26
26

19
19

29
29

8
8

1
1

3
3

-

*

6
6

9
6

5
4

17
17

12
8

6
3

2
2

11
11

9
9

-

_

«
.
*

_

-

_

*

_

-

-

1
1

8
8

65
65

“

5
4

6
6

33
12

31
31

-

-

-

-

*

*

*

-

-

-

6

65

-

5

6

21

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

21
20

6
6

6
3

8
8

18
18

9
9

i
i

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

209
198

40.0 365.00 377.00 301.00-424.00
40.0 369.00 388.50 301.50-430.00

DRAFTERS, CLASS B ----------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

77
66

40.0 270.00 260.50 236.00-322.50
40.0 273.00 260.50 241.50-328.00

_

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS ----------MANUFACTURING -------------------

149
127

40.0 268.00 269.50 226.00-306.50
40.0 261.50 226.50 226.00-319.50

-

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS, CLASS B-

103

REGISTERED INDUSTRIAL NURSES -----MANUFACTURING -------------------

88
82

o
o

DRAFTERS, CLASS A -----------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

*
-

-

248.50 226.00 226.00-292.00

-

'

-

-

-

40.0 262.00 254.50 222.00-305.00
40.0 264 .50 254.50 222.50-309.00

-

-

2

1
1

4
4

See footnotes at end of tables.




8

3

-

b

"
_

_
“

_

Table A -3 . Average w eekly earnings of office, professional, and technical w orkers, by sex
in Indianapolis, Ind., O ctober 1976
A v erag e
(m e a n 2 )
W e e k ly
e a r n in g s *
(sta n d a rd )

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - MEN
MESSENGERS ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------

i n

87

$
38.5 143.50
38.5 131.00

Sex,

occupation, and industry division

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED

167
137

40.5 198.00
40.5 193.00

ACCOUNTING CLERKS. CLASS A -MANUFACTURING ------------

88
54

40.0 206.00
40.0 220.00

ACCOUNTING CLERKS. CLASS B -NONMANUFACTURING ---------

125
116

40.0 156.50
40.5 157.00

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

TYPISTS. CLASS B -----------------MANUFACTURING ----------- — ----NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

727
150
577

FILE CLERKS, CLASS A -------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

90
66

FILE CLERKS, CLASS B -------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

225
190

FILE CLERKS, CLASS C -------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

ORDER CLERKS ----------------NONMANUFACTUHING ---------

481
455

MESSENGERS ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------

131
115
32

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS ------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

180
135

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

384
113
271

ORDER CLERKS ----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

684
236
448

ACCOUNTING CLERKS. CLASS A -------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

956
255
701
212

SECRETARIES -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

2,815
1,393
1,422
178
251

SECRETARIES. CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

202

SECRETARIES. CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING----------- ------ NONMANUFACTURING -------- ------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

634
282
352
63
61

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
40.0

212.00
241.00
188.50
235.00
167.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -----------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

1,077
608
469
105

39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5

204.00
231.00
169.50
154.50

SECRETARIES. CLASS 0 -----------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

896
392
504

39.0 170.50
40.0 190.50
38.5 155.00

ACCOUNTING CLERKS. CLASS B -------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

1,593
530
1,063
90
414

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -----------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------

416
166
250
70

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0

154.50
142.50
162.00
213.00

BILLING-MACHINE BILLERS ----------NONMANUFACTURING----------- ----

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ------------MANUFACTURING -----------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------

469
241
228
83

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

192.50
204.50
179.50
216.50

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE TYPISTS -----NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

196
170

38.0 127.50
38.0 126.00

TYPISTS, CLASS A -----------------MANUFACTURING -------- ------- -—
NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------

11 1

91

447
199
248
38

39.5
40.0
38.5
40.0
39.5

197.50
223.00
172.50
235.50
162.00

39.5 236.00
40.0 248.00
39.5 221.00

39.0
40.0
38.5
39.5

143.50
151.00
138.00
165.50

W e e k ly
h o u rs 1
[sta n d a rd )

W e e k ly
e a rn in g s 1
(sta n d a rd )

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN
4
>
38.5 117.50 COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
39.5 120.50
(BUSINESS), CLASS A ------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------------------------38.0 116.50
NONMANUFACTURING ---------- ----38.5 13b.00
38.0 135.50 COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(BUSINESS), CLASS B ------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------------------------■ 39.0 117.50
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------------39.0 116.50
38.0 108.00 COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(BUSINESS), CLASS C ------------------------------------------------38.0 107.00
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------------39.5 127.50
39.0 125.00 COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS),
CLASS A --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------40.0 144.00
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------------39.5 138.50
39.5 129.00 COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS),
CLASS B --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------39.0 139.50
40.0 141.00
39.0 139.00 COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS),
CLASS C --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------40.0 140.50
40.0 131.50 COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A ------MANUFACTURING -----------------40.0 145.00
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------------39.0 162.00
h O .O
173.00 COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B -----------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------------------------39.0 158.00
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------------39.0 153.00

N um ber
of

A v e ra g e
(m e a n 2 )
W e e k ly
h o u rs 1
[ s t a n d a rd )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s *
(sta n d a rd )

167
77
90

$
39.5 366.00
40.0 395.00
39.5 341.00

243
115
128

39.5 335.00
40.0 354.50
39.0 317.50

112
77

39.0 287.50
38.5 263.50

143
106

39.5 290.00
39.0 272.00

144
108

39.0 233.50
39.0 226.00

51

39.5 188.50

143
69
74

39.0 230.50
39.5 249.00
38.5 213.00

243
66
177

39.5 199.50
40.0 247.50
39.0 182.00

132.50 COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------------142.00
128.00
139.00 DRAFTERS, CLASS A -----------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------------------------129.50

104
93

39.0 161.00
39.0 155.00

272
233

“
♦0.0 336.00
40.0 350.50

89
61

40.0 212.50 DRAFTERS, CLASS B -----------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------40.0 234.50

206
161

40.0 228.00
40.0 229.50

PAYROLL CLERKS -------------------MANUFACTURING - --------- -----NONMANUFACTURING -------- -------

287
121
166

111
66

40.0 181.00
40.0 192.00

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

737
177
560
158

165
128

40.0 265.00
40.0 260.50

106

250.50

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

733
243
490

40.0 169.00 DRAFTERS, CLASS C ----------------MANUFACTURING -----------------40.0 182.00
39.5 159.50
ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS ----------MANUFACTURING -----------------39.5 173.00
40.0 183.00
39.5 170.00
ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS, CLASS B40.0 231.50
PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
39.5 140.00
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN
39.5 139.00
40.0 161.50 REGISTERED INDUSTRIAL NURSES --------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------------------------39.5 128.00

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e s .




A v e ra g e
(m e a n 2 )

9

66

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
39.5

95
89

o

W e e k ly
h e u rs 1
(sta n d a rd

Num b e r
o
f

o

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

40.0 258.00
40.0 260.50

Table A -3 a . A verage w e e k ly earnings of office, professional, and technical w orkers, by s e x large establishm ents in Indianapolis, Ind., O ctober 1976
Average
(mean2 )

Average
(mean2 )

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

Number
of

Weekly
h#urs 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - MEN

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours *
[standard)

Average
(mean2 )

Weekly
earnings *
(standard)

56
256

1/ ^

53

/ M . r- r■

$
112.00
121.50
38.5 110.00

56

160.j 0

Weekly
hours *
[standard)

Weekly
earnings *
(standard)

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN

OFFICE 0CCUP4TIONS WOMEN — CONTINUED

f .

&6

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

39.0 197.00

r
>

cn

1' 1*00

/j *J
j
L U n r U 1 C.^

3 1 3 1 C'^D

190

_
38.5 114.00

1,838

399.00

HP(ML T 3 1 -

39.5 347.50
359.50

85

L J 1 » JU
n L 1n 1 L

1 K MUL

182.00
167.00

Vr-r1

^

19 1
189

•

1 i J # uU

no

78
i

<♦0.0 268.50
(

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS

in 0
n
„

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS),

IQ • n
0

/

309.00
l.00

0. 0

14-..00

40.0 231.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS),
93
59

53
1 A*' 1 L j i

v L Mj j

L

*

753

.L j f

vL

j U

581

■r ^
.-

69

39.5 182.50
40.0 199.50
38. j 167.00

39.0 249.00
239.50

166.5u

221.00
40.0 238.00
178.00

168
K E 1 H 1l
.
.

j Q v‘ L 1
'

89

lr9 ' 0
"
39.5 195.50

|* M U C
T

"

1

"

0

254.00
m
J

•o

ACCOUN TI No Cut h K S ? CL A u o u
313

39.5 170.00
39.5 198.50
187.00
40.0 213.50

/A A
^ *I
J

l -n • 00
1 -» * n i
0

116
S3

139.50
191.00

A

A

._

*

r
.

•

_

60

270 00

213.50

36" "0
369.00
273.00

311
805
106
58

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0

19b.50
206.50
175.00
195.50

r\t. T r vj * u, I J U * L'*M 1 U • 3 ^
,
,

aO

1^3
1, L 1 A l t ,

1 Kfl UL

l.

133
102
30

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

Tr

I. v 11 v * C *' M 1 U1. 3 v
.

* , r r-«
-\

L^j — O
t
/A

151.50
159.00
148.50
179.00

40.0 267.SO
,0.0
ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS, CLASS H-

/ A A C
.
0 .0

. -30

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL

A

in n
J .0 13t.j 0
40.0 261.00
40.0 269.00

See footnotes at end of tables.




171.50
90.0 187.50
163.50
90.0
39.5 T?? . j Q
1 o

132.50

1n i j^K1 D 1 I U P ^ V 11A t | Tr i J 1 J
M l
1
’1 *
-

™M l U r n v 1U1m U
i
n

L

10

Table A -4 .

H ourly earnings of m a in ten a n c e , toolroom , and p o w e rp la n t w orkers in Indianapolis, In d ., O cto b er 1976
Hourly ea ■nings

Occupation and industry division

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of

4

*
$
l
$
$
T
“
5--$
S
S
$
$
$
1
5
$
$
i
$
5
*
4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.eo 5.00 5.20 5.40 5 .60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6 .40 6. 60 6.80 7. 00 7 .40 7.80 8.20 8.60 9 .00 9.40

“i“
o
workers

M ean

2

M e d ia n 2

M iddle range

2

S
and
4.00 under
4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5 .80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6 •60 6, d l 7,00 7, 40 7.80 8.20 8.60 9,00 9 .40 over
f

ALL WORKERS
m a i n t e n a n c e c a r p e n t e r s -----------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------

168
135

$
1.22
7.31

$
7.50
7.85

$
$
6.75- 7.85
6.9«- 7.85

m a i n t e n a n c e e l e c t r i c i a n s ---------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------

775
685
VO

7.40
7.47
6.84

7.53
8.02
7.31

6.57- 8.02
6.57- 8.06
6.45- 7.31

MAINTENANCE PAINTERS -------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------- -----------

103
VI

7.11
7.18

6.98
7.50

6.34- 7.77
6.50- 7.77

m a i n t e n a n c e m a c h i n i s t s -----------m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------

279
269

6.97
6.96

6.77
6.77

6.28- 7.48
6.28- 7.50

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS (MACHINERY) MANUFACTURING ------------------

998
987

7.18
7.18

7.53
7.53

6.13- 8.02
6.13- 8.02

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS
(MOTOR VEHICLES) ----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUEACTURING ------------------------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------------------

626
145
481
433

7.32
6.74
7.50
7.53

7.86
7.30
7.86
8.01

6.855.307.137.30-

MAINTENANCE PIPEFITTERS ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------- -- -----------

318
308

7.58
7.63

7.81
7.81

7.15- 7.85
7.15"- 7.85

MAINTENANCE SHEET-METAL WORKERS —
MANUFACTURING -------------------

103
103

7.73
7.73

7.81
7.81

7.54- 7.85
7.54- 7.85

MILLWRIGHTS -----------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

474
458

7.81
7.85

7.85
7.85

7.74- 8.49
7.81- 8.49

m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s h e l p e r s ----------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------------------------------

137
106

5.16
5.14

5.05
5.05

4.57- 6.08
4.57- 5.82

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS (TOOLROOM) MANUFACTURING ------------------

678
678

7.48
7.48

8.02
8.02

6.32- 8.14
6.32- 8.14

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS --------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

922
922

7.54
7.54

8. 14
8.14

6.29- 8.20
6.29- 8.20

STATIONARY ENGINEERS -------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

323
218

6.30
7.04

5.73
7.25

4.75- 7.85
5.66- 7.85

BOILER TENDERS --------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

122
122

5.37
5.37

4.91
4.91

4.25- 5.89
4.25- 5.89

* Workers were distributed as follows:

8.01
7.85
8.01
8.01

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

_

1
1

-

-

1
-

3
3

-

3
3

3
3

16
16

A
A

5
5

15
10
8
8

16

-

4
4
-

-

-

-

15
15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
1

1
1

A
4

5
5

1
-

11
4

■4
2

3
3

13
7

8
7

24
24

11
7

69
69

2
2

21
18
3

11
11

50
49
1

7
6
1

36
33
3

48
48
-

38
37
1

38
34
4

16
16
*

88
33
55

48
40
8

250
250
-

6
A

5
5

6
6

8
6

6
6

9
4

11
11

1
1

34
34

-

15
15

9
9

16
16

21
21

17
17

51
50

3
3

52
43

42
42

14
14

93
93

42
42

8
8

67
67

6
6

26
26

24
24

44
AA

100
100

336
330

2
2

14
11
3
3

2

15

33
5
28
15

32
13
19
5

38
10
28
17

350
44
306
297

12
12

8

-

10
4
6
6

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

33
33

-

18
18

-

8
8

-

-

97
97

-

_
-

36
36

21
21

A

24
16
8
8

-

16
16

-

4
4

_

_
-

-

-

_
-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

-

-

_

-

14
14

22
22

_

1

_

-

-

1
-

98
5

10
10

5
5

-

1

19
14

6

-

30
30

-

A
4

1
-

1
1

_

_

*26
17

-

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

4
4

_

-

-

12
12

6
-

2
1

15
15

42
5
37
37

1
1

1
-

13
13

21
18

20
20

25
25

44
44

124
124

-

1
1

A
A

2
2

2
2

6
6

25
25

55
55

_

3

13

-

-

26
26

-

-

-

18
18

189
189

17
A

-

15
15

-

-

-

7
7

19
19

20
20

_

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

10
10

38
38

3
3

6
6

13
13

3
3

7
7

2
2

60
60

47
47

6
6

6
6

24
24

40
40

138
138

-

1
1

11
11

-

14
11

_
2V
29

5
5

-

16
16

-

16
16

2
1

-

38
37

18
18

4
4

9
9

13
13

-

_

_

4
4

11

-

15
13

-

3
1

61
61
-

60
60
-

_

-

-

-

-

26
26

124
124

17
17

19
19

-

-

-

_
-

-

•

-

-

-

310
310

93
93

47
47

7
7

279
279

49
49

34
34

-

10
10

16
16

-

-

11
11

31
31

6
6

14
14

19
19

21
21

217
217

10
10

6

V
8

16
16

20
20

62
62

10
10

2
2

4
4

4
A

-

-

-

_

_

-

69
69

-

-

_

5

_

A
-

•

-

_

-

*

1
1

_

1 at $2.60 to $2.80; 1 at $3.20 to $3.40; 5 at $3.40 to $3.60; 13 at $3.60 to $3.80; and 6 at $3.80 to $4.

See footnotes at end of tables.




-

9
9

-

-

_
-

_
-

T ab le A -4 a . Hourly earnings of m aintenance, toolroom , and p o w e rp la n t w o rk e rs —large establishm ents
in Indianapolis, Ind., O ctober 1976




12

T ab le A -5 .

Hourly earnings of m aterial m ovem ent and custodial w o rkers in Indianapolis, Ind., O cto b er 1976
H
ourly ea ■nings 4

O ccupation and in du stry d ivision

of
w
orkers

M ean2

M edian 2

N u m b er of worke rs rece iving s t r a ig h t -t im e hourly earn ing s of-3
S
i
S
5
S
$
$
S
$
$
*
$
%
$
I
i
$
S
t
*
2 .0 0 2 .2 0 2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .80 3 .0 0 3 .20 3 .40 3 .60 3 .80 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 .60 4 .80 5.2 0 5.6 0 6 .0 0 6 .40 6.8 0 7.2 0 7.6 0 8.0 0

M iddle range 2

and
under

and

2 .2 0 2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0

3 .00 3 .2 0 3 .40 3 .60 3 .80 4 .00 4 .2 0 4 ,4 0 4 .6 0 4 .80 5 .20 5 .6 0 6.0 0 6.4 0 6 i80_ 7.20 7.6 0 8 .0 0

ove r

290 1321
232
3
58 1318
- 1272
58
46

46
46
46
“

ALL W
ORKERS
TRUCKDRIVERS ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------- ----------PUBLIC u t i l i t i e s ------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

3 ,1 1 3
490
2 ,6 2 3
1,3 27
368

$
6 .7 2
6 .2 8
6 .8 0
7.8 4
6 .1 3

$
7.3 0
7.03
7 .6 7
7 .8 6
6 .9 6

$
5 .6 4 5.315.907 .8 6 5.50-

$
7 .8 6
7 .3 0
7 .8 6
7 .8 6
7 .3 9

-

2
2
-

12
12
10

20
20
16

6
6
-

5
5
*

21
3
18
16

20
10
16
10

14
14
*

91
27
64
18

99
30
69

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT TRUCK ------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------- -— ------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

465
67
398
61

5 .4 8
4 .7 0
5 .6 2
5 .2 0

4 .7 0
4 .1 4
4 .7 0
2 .7 5

4.154.144 .1 5 2.75-

7 .6 7
5.6 1
7 .6 7
7 .8 5

-

2
2
-

12
12
10

20
20
16

6
6
-

3
3
-

2

-

2
“

6
6
-

25
5
20
“

TRUCKDRI VERS« M
EDIUM TRUCK----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

726
108
618
60

•4 4
6 .0 7
6.5 1
4 .9 6

6 .3 2
6.61
6 .3 2
4 .1 0

5.645 .0 0 6.323 .4 0 -

7 .8 6
7 .3 7
7 .8 8
7 .7 3

.
-

-

-

2
2
-

11
3
8
8

14

4

-

_
-

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY TRUCK
(TRAILER) -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTUKING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

1,431
111
1,320
902
231

7 .3 3
6 .1 8
7.4 3
7 .8 7
6 .7 3

7 .8 6
7 .0 3
7 .8 6
7 .8 6
6 .9 6

7 .0 0 5 .3 8 7 .0 0 7 .8 6 6 .5 2 -

7 .8 6
7 .3 7
7 .8 6
7 .8 6
7 .3 9

-

-

-

-

8

-

TRUCKDRIVERS. HEAVY TRUCK
( other than t r a i l e r ) --------------------nonmanufacturing :

428

6 .5 6

7.3 0

5 . 6 0 - 7.3 0

-

-

-

6

-

-

8
-

4

10
10

“

-

4
4
-

39
15
24

*

-

8

4

12
12
10

3

9

12
12
2

29
29
“

83
9
74
5

77
23
34
3
-

29
15
14
14

321
35
286
2
8

30?
18
284
32

71
33
38
4
28

242
38
204
96

84
28
56
*

10
10
-

25

75
6
69
*

3
3

4
4
*

2
2
-

15
15
-

4
i
3
*

-

25
*

*

167
“
167
25

*

13
13
9

*

2
2
*

8
3
5
5

52
17
35

8
8
*

68
13
55
*

252
252
-

14
14
*

6
6
*

42
42
*

218
218
18

*
*

2
2
*

*

“
*

-

22
6
16
-

16
2
14
14

65
20
45
6

18
18
18

35
35
1
28

226
28
198
96

89
31
58
58

861
3
858
855
3

46
46
46

2

2

-

-

-

182

-

-

156

75

*

8

75

'

f

SHIPPING clerks ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------- -----

171
138

5 .1 7
5 .2 8

5 .0 3
5 .6 3

3 . 9 9 - 6 .3 6
4 . 1 4 - 6 .4 6

“

*

-

clerks ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

367
167
190

4.43
4 .4 5
<♦•40
4 .5 0

3 .7 5 3 .8 0 3 .6 2 3 .5 0 -

5.33
5 .3 3
5 .3 6
4.95

-

1
1
1

-

4

-

4

88

4 .6 8
4 .8 0
4.58
4 .5 4

SHIPPING and r e c e i v i n g clerks --------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------nonmanufacturing -----------------------------

136
86
50

4.78
4 .6 9
4 .9 4

4 .7 0
4 .7 0
5 .2 5

4 . 4 0 - 4 .7 0
4 . 6 6 - 4 .7 0
4 . 2 5 - 5 .7 3

•
”

_

WAREHOUSEM
EN ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------

1,1 75
494
681
127

5 •b4

4 .7 7
4.29
7 .8 6
4.75

4.294.294.753 .7 0 -

7 .8 6
4 .7 0
7 .8 6
4 .7 5
5 .2 8
4 .0 0
6 .3 2
4.75

receiv ing

nonmanufacturing

ORDER FILLERS ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONM
ANUF ACTURING----------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------------SHIPPING packers ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------

1,7 49
421
1,3 28
425
1,9 06
1 , 5s 1
355

6 .4 9
4.54
4 .4 5
3 .8 4
4 #64
4 .5 1
4 .2 9
4 .5 1
3 .3 3

4 .0 5
3 .5 4
4.05
4 .3 0
3 .9 3
3 .9 8
3 .2 3

3 .5 7 3 .2 8 3 .8 5 3 .5 0 -

3 .8 6 4.75
3 . 9 1 - 4 . 9u
2 . « 5 - 3.71

_

-

8
8

5

1
1
1

4
4

15
2

15
15

9
9

10
10

10
10

3
3

7
7

8
1

11
10

25
25
10

10
2

61
40
21
6

18
14
4
•

24
9
15
6

26
16
10

25
12
13

27

20
s
15

9
9
-

3

8

41
27
14
14

1

*

*

1

8
7
1

66
66

-

1

16
3
13

18
5
13

i
i

68
18
50
4

255
221
34
9

7
2
5
*

153
96
57
57

11
10
1
1

83
38
45
-

3

1
1
1

-

-

6
6

~

2
2

1

*

-

-

-

16
16
16

5
5
5

38
26
12
5

-

-

-

-

52
20
32
23

166
136
30
19

-

13
13

4
4
4
16
13
3

22
22
13
81
39
42

88
24
64
37
155
52
103

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le s .




-

13

41

13
28

73
47
26

8
8

3

3
*

3

28
22
6
6

107
47
60
12

64
8
56
10

5
5

73
32
41

190
164
26

32
15
17
3

223
80
143
5
454
439
15

351
28
323
75
6b
3
63

46
6
40
24
32
27
5

72
11
61
35
42
39
3

4

23
8

78
-

78
78
199
199

45
44

1
36
12
24
10
117
117

d

33

14
19
2
2

19

33
3?

8
8

*

29
5
24
-

2
2
“

33
22
11
11

*
-

3

2
2
*

9
9

“

8

36
36
15

*

? 4

3
9
9
3

27
17
10

255
11
244

2

-

3
3

196
196

2
6
“
86
7
79
37
148
148

29
“
29
29
2
2

“

1
“

*
“

*
“

*
*

*
*

376
376
*

-

10
«
10
10

-

-

*
*

*

3
3

-

-

-

-

*

Hourly earnings of m a te ria l m ovem ent and custodial w o rkers in Indianapolis, Ind., O cto b er 1 9 7 6 — Continued
N u m b er of w o r k e r s rec e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e h ou rly ea rn in g s of—

Hourly

Occupation and industry division

3 ------- ~5------- 1 ------- 3 ------- 4
$
$
%
4
$
6
6
S
*
S
2 .0 0 2 .2 0 2 .90 2 .60 2 .8 0 3 .00 3 .2 0 3 .9 0 3 .6 0 3.8 0 9 .0 0 9 .2 0 9 .9 0 9 .60 9 .80
w
orkers

Mean2 M e d i a n 2

M
iddle range *

$
!
4
T
3 ----$
4
.20 5 .6 0 6 .00 6 .9 0 6 .8 0
.2 0 7 .60 8 .0 0

and
under

and

2 .2 0 2 .9 0 2 .60 2 .80 3.0 0 3 .20 3 .9 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0

o
o

T ab le A -5 .

9 .2 0 9 .9 0 9 .6 0 9 . 8Q 5 .2Q

.60 6 .0 0 6 *^0 6 .8 0 7.2 0

.60 8 .00

over

ALL W
ORKERS —
CONTINUED
MATERIAL HANDLING LABORERS --------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

2.9S?
1 ,2 9 5
1,7 07
851

$
5.35
5 .2 0
5 .9 7
7 .3 2

$
5 .2 0
5.95
5 .0 0
7 .8 6

$
3 .7 9 9 .1 5 3 .2 9 7.12-

$
7 .1 2
6.39
7 .8 6
7 .8 6

-

FORKLIFT OPERATORS ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------- -----NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

1,791
1,9 30
311
96

5 .6 0
5 .6 2
5 .9 7
9.87

6.25
6.95
5 .7 8
9 .8 0

9.579 .5 7 9.703 .5 0 -

6.6 1
6 .6 1
6 .3 2
6 .2 5

*

POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS (OTHER
THAN FORKLIFT) ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------

219
96

5 .5 1
5.85

5 .0 9
6 .0 3

9 .9 9 - 6.76
9 . 9 9 - 6 .9 6

GUAROS AND W
ATCHM
EN ----------------- ----------MANUFACTURING --------- ------------- ----------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

1,6 16
559
1,0 62
27

3 .5 9
5.25
2 .7 3
6 .0 8

2 .5 0
5 .3 9
2.33
6 .1 0

2 .3 3 3 .6 9 2 .3 0 5 .9 9 -

9.36
6.73
2.5 0
6 .5 8

*

GUARDS!
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------- -

957

JANITORS. PORTERS. AND CLEANERS ----MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

3,1 91
1 ,2 7 3
1 ,91 8
183
292

S ee footn otes at end of ta b le s.




3

13

3

13
-

182
9
178
-

137
9
128
“

127
96
61
“

101
33
68
*

101
63
38
-

125
112.
li
*

16
16
*

199
50
99
*

163
197
16
-

90
16
29
“

195
79
71
39

169
91
128
5

53
92
11
9

59
18
91
39

309
289
20
-

299
299
-

299
52
297
297

50
50
50

962
962
962

-

-

-

9
9

11
5
6
6

73
59
19
19

90
35
5
5

38
- 38

19
12
7
7

80
76
9
9

152
138
19
4

185
133
52
3

76
96
30
21

37
35

113
68
95
-

78
9
69
9

583
583
-

208
159
59
18

9
9
-

*

37
28
9
3

.
-

-

9
”

9

9
“

15
-

59
30

12
12

4

”

9
*

i

*

9

20
20

90
19

31
15

1
-

-

-

39
10
29
”

78
65
13
“

35
18
17

26
7
19

58
18
90
*

65
98
17
*

12
6
6
“

22
11

35
16
19

29
20
9
9

20
16
9
9

_

_

_

-

10

29
29
-

219
210
4

-

99
35
9
-

-

-

11

31

16

21

20

-

-

16
9
7
5

67
17
50
96
9

70
59

89
73
16
8
-

300
289

•
-

-

5 .5 9

6 .3 7

9 .3 6 - 6.73

*

3 .7 4

3 .9 1

5

9 .7 1
3 .0 9
9 .6 8
3 .1 9

9.95
2.85
9 .7 0
2.82

2.653 .9 8 2 .3 1 3 .6 5 2 .50-

66?
662

9.95
6.23
3 .5 0
5 .0 3
3 .5 0

5
5

165
165
“
*

999
5
989

259

93

51

268
19

10
9
6
"
*
200

35
165
3
39

25
25

53
46
7
*

*

93

193
29
119
19
28

262
72
190
1

23

10

197
92
105
10

16

1

328
99
279
7
18

19

3

89

201

10

189

79
27

12

11

7

i

18

37

6

159
101
53
9
13

92
80

169
193

12

21
11

5
7

9

11

2

2
2

11

8
3

11

2

9
210
86
62
29
15
9

16
16
.
16
19

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

3
3

-

-

Table A -5 a . Hourly earnings of m a te ria l m ovem ent and custodial w o rk e rs —large establishm ents
in Indianapolis, In d ., O ctober 1976
Hourly earnings 4

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

M ean 2

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
$
$
$
7
7
7
7
*
S
t
7
S
I
*
i
s ---------- $
s
5 ---------- S
S
$
2.30 2.A0 2.60 2.80 3.00 3 .20 3.A0 3 .60 3.80 A.00 A.20 A.A0 A .60 A .80 5 .00 5 • A0 5.80 6.20 6.60 7.00 7 .A0 7.80 8.20

M e d ian 2

and
under

M iddle range 2

2.A0 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20

9

.A0 3.60 3 .80 A.00 A.20 A.A0 A . 60 A ±8fl_ 5 .00 5 .40 5 .80 6.20 6.60 7.00 7.A0

_ L * ti£ L

8.20

8»60

ALL W0RKE3S
TRUCKDRIVERS ---------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

655
162
A93
197

$
7.16
b •64
7.3A
7.17

$
7 . A8
7.18
7.67
6.96

$
6.965.896.966.96-

$
7.73
7.37
7.86
7.39

2
2
-

2
2
-

A
A

TRUCKDRIVERS. MEDIUM TRUCK ------

87

6.83

7.37

6.61- 7.37

-

-

TRUCKDRIVERS. HEAVY TRUCK
(TRAILER) ----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

279
233

7.39
7.A6

7.39
7.39

6.96- 7.88
6.96- 7.88

-

SHIPPING CLERKS -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

109
10 A

5.72
5.71

6.23
6.23

A.59- 6.52
A.58- 6.52

-

RECEIVING CLERKS -----------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------

171
98
73
72

A.86
5.03
A.61
A.6A

A.75
A.95
A.50
A.50

A.PAA.293.603.60-

WAREHOUSEMEN --------------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------- -------- —

A50
7A

A.5A
A.65

A.29
A. 15

ORDER FILLERS ------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

A86
162
32A
305

A.A8
A.2A
A.60
A.57

SHIPPING P A C K E R S ------------- -----MANUFACTURING ------------------

972
757

MATERIAL HANDLING LABORERS -------MANUFACTURING -----------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------

1.765

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
6
1
1

15
13
2

15
1A
1
-

7
7
-

-

-

6
2
A
A

18
5
13
12

126
27
99
96

101
63
38
38

185
25
160
18

156
156
28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

13

A

2

1

-

6

A2

1A

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

8
-

“

-

1
1

97
96

50
38

28
3

95
95

-

-

_
-

1
1

10
10

4
4

7
7

8
8

3
3

1
1

-

6
4

1A
13

3A
32

13
13

8
8

-

-

-

.
-

1
1
1

6
6
6

6
2
A
A

8
2
6

8
8
-

1A
11
3
3

15
7
8
8

10
2
8
8

17
12
5
5

80
17
3
3

n
5
6

9
9
-

5
5
-

-

6

15
9
6
6

-

-

20
9
11
11

-

6
6

3
3

8
5

1A
4

22
4

223
9

2

32

2

1

39
1

-

-

57
1

-

5
3

6
6

15
15

A0
20
20
20

32
16
16
16

26
20
6
b

12
8
A
2

5
5
5

A6
3
A3
A3

30
6
2A
2A

A5
10
35
35

10
10
10

10
6
6

23
2
21
4

27
23
4
4

18
18
-

1
1
-

56
7
A9
A9

102
-

27
-

21
-

A3
28

86
80

32A
321

4
i

21
21

38
35

A6
A6

54
5A

3
3

2
2

2
2

1A3
1A3

166
166

128
126

81
81

68
68

38
38

12
12

6
6

A3
37
6

15
15

22
1
21

102
A7

8
8

39
25
1A

6
4

180
180
-

-

*

6
-

1A
-

5

A
A

5

3
“

35
31

17
1A

2

36
3A

7A
7A

-

A

6A
62

7

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

“

-

*

1
1

15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

7

-

*

8
1

15
10

17
A

23
13

26
7

58
18

65
A8

7
1

22
11

8
5

-

1

10

13

3

18

37

1

11

68

A0

11

A2

11
3
2

A2
27
11

200
189
11

112
101
11
5
3

A6
3A
12
5
7

35
1A
21
11
9

8
1
7
5
2

6
6
-

3
3
-

2
-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

_

-

1
1
1

-

A
A
3

1
1
1

A.29- A.73
3.29- 6.7A

-

_

-

-

-

-

16
16

-

A.23
3.80
A.30
A.25

3.263.093.263.26-

5.A9
5.A9
5.28
5.65

“

4
4
4

13
13
13

61
2A
37
37

A.28
A.63

3.93
3.93

3*66- 4.67
3.93- A.90

*

i
-

3A
-

1,071

5 .A 1
o.06
A.96

6.17
6.23
4 •45

3.3A- 6.86
6.P8- 6.AS
2.92- 7.12

1
1

n

958
886

6.13
6.22

6.61
6.6 1

5.6A- 6.61
5.67- 6 •b 1

-

POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS (OTHER
THAN FORKLIFT) ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

153
66

6.02
6.25

6.23
6.2A

5.04- 6.76
5.96- 6.59

-

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

1,095
A2A

A.00
5.80

3.60
6.5A

2.99- 5.75
A.65- 6.73

352

GUARCS!
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

398

5.90

6.66

5.11- 6.73

JANITORS, PORTERS, AN!) C L E A N E R S -----MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------------------------RETAIL TRAOE ---------------------------------------

1.2A5
772
A73
120
1b4

A.57
5.17
3.60
*♦•66
3.56

A.05
5.28
3.15
A.69
3.10

3.653.982.803.7A2.80-

o p e r a t o r s ---------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

forklift

69a

5.A3
5.60
5.25
5.25

6.25
6.29
A . 17
A.96
A.02

-

*

5
1
4

n

-

1A 1
-

36
2
3A

-

-

C

1A

-

86
5
81
3
35

63
5
58
1
20

4

A0
2
15

-

-

-

6A
1
17

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e s .




2

15

-

7

-

55

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

.

-

-

-

27
27
27

_
-

-

.
-

16
16

2
2

3

3

“

-

33 A
33A
-

66
66
-

297
297

-

1A2
1A2

-

163
15A

500
500

22

-

-

*

4

-

-

3
3

12
12

19
19

17
17

59
17

i
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A6
31

26
16

37
28

29
29

187
187

15
15

*

5

27

13

28

29

187

15

-

3A
1
33
29
A

55
A1
1A
1A

19
16
3

33
33

265
263
2

73
62
11

IA
-

_
-

1A
1A

-

4

b

2

-

3

-

-

2

-

11

-

_

•
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, powerplant, material movement,
and custodial workers, by sex, in Indianapolis, Ind., October 1976
Sex,

3

occupation, and industry division

Number Average
(mean2 )
o
f
ory
wres hul
okr
erig
anns

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

m a i n t e n a n c e , t o o l r o o m , and
POWERPLANT OCCUPATIONS - MEN

$

6.84

r L 1 M X ^i 1U L
l —
'M

445
67
378
51

m

726
108
618
60

.L1rsr~

TRUCKDRIVERS. HEAVY TRUCK
1,428
111
1,317
899
231
6.74
, U1 nL K

I i ■A l K A i LL K /
l1

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

Number Average
(mean2)
o
f
ory
w res hul
okr
erig4
anns

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

TRUCKDRIVERS— CONTINUED

10 3
T
.

Number Average
(
mean2)
o
f
ory
w res hul
okr
erig4
anns

428

NONMANUFACTURING:
75

FORKLIFT OPERATORS ---------------MANUFACTURING -----------------$
5.42
n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------4.70
5.55
5.20 POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS (OTHER
THAN FORKLIFT) ------------------6.44
MANUFACTURING -----------------6.07
6.51 GUARDS AND WATCHMEN --------------4.96
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------7.33
RETAIL TRADE ----------------6.18
7.43 GUARDS:
7.87
m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------6.73
JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS --MANUFACTURING -----------------6.56
NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------7.86
RETAIL TRADE -----------------

1,716
1,412
304
95

$
5.61
5.64
5.50
4.88

219
96

5.51
5.85

1,418
538
880
27
52

3.65
5.24
2.68
6.08
4.05

441

5.59

2,459
1,053
1,406
142
222

3.87
4.80
3.18
4.86
3.32

673
432

3.62
3.63

979
722

3.86
4.13

7.63
^r „
- .

143
110

,Ariunr

nt 1 AIL
nAiNItNAfivL

1 H A UtJ

1 K A UL

319
148
171
69

r "

HLLr j
L''
c* 1 /
*1

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS

675
675

7.48
1,036
356
680
126

, rn^
,
M L I AIL

1K A U L

1,076
180
896
276
J
ill r r i P U r A^rvLi'
l

3,089
489
2,600
1,307
368

™

6.72
6.28
6.80
7.84
6.13

2,471
1,147
1,324
841
272

See footnotes at end of tables.




927
829
98

16

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
4. 79
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN
4.90
4.69
4.80 ORDER FILLERS ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------4.79
4.69 SHIPPING PACKERS -----------------MANUFACTURING -----------------5.82
4.52 MATERIAL HANDLING LABORERS:
6.50
MANUFACTURING -----------------4.54
GUARDS AND WATCHMEN --------------4.97
NONMANUFACTURING --------------4.15
5.13 JANITORS, PORTERS, ANO CLEANERS MANUFACTURING -----------------5.10
NONMANUFACTURING --------------4.74
PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------4.84
RETAIL TRADE ----------------3.92
5.70
5.23
6.11
7.32
3.47

98

rvj
00

f.r
-T-

(TOOLROOM) -

135
86

5.32
5.51

198
182

3.17
2.95

732
220
512
41
70

3.28
4.28
2.84
4.04
2.75




Table A-6a. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom,
powerplant, material movement, and custodial workers, by sexlarge establishments in Indianapolis, Ind., October 1976
Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

A vera ge
( ean 2 )
m
hourly
earnings4

Sex,

occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

A verage
(m e a n 2 )
hourly
earnings4

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

MAINTENANCE, t o o l r o o m , a n d
POWERPLANT OCCUPATIONS - MEN

RECEIVING CLERKS ------------------MANUFACTURING ------------ -----n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

145
83
62
61

$
5.02
5.21
4.76
4.60

WAREHOUSEMEN ----------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

311
238
73

m

204
194

7.23 ORDER FILLERS ---------------------7.24
MANUFACTURING -------------------

289
102

5.13
4.52

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS (MACHINERY) •
MANUFACTURING ------------------

730
724

7.48 SHIPPING PACKERS -----------------7.48
MANUFACTURING -------------------

398
398

5.16
5.16

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS
(MOTOR VEHICLES) ----------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------

282
88
194
172

7.45
7.44
7.45
7.48

MATERIAL HANDLING LABORERS -------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

1,356
668
b88
482
206

6.00
6.06
5.95
7.10
3.26

MAINTENANCE PIPEFITTERS ---------MANUFACTURING ------------------

318
308

7.58 FORKLIFT OPERATORS ---------------7.63
MANUFACTURING -------------------

943
872

6.15
6.25

MAINTENANCE SHEET-METAL WORKERS —
MANUFACTURING ------------------

103
103

153
66

6.02
6.25

MILLWRIGHTS ----------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

467
461

925
408

4.13
5.81

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS (TOOLROOM)
MANUFACTURING------------ ------

606
606

7.73 POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS (OTHER
7.73
THAN FORKLIFT) -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------7.85
7.89 GUARDS AND WATCHMEN --------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING:
7.70
RETAIL TRADE ----------------7.70

52

4.05

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS -------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

791
791

7.76
7.76

GUARDSt
MANUFACTURING -------------------

382

5.91

STATIONARY ENGINEERS ------------MANUFACTURING------- -----------

202
196

BOILER TENDERS -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

55
55

7.16 JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS 7.21
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------6.36
6.38
RETAIL TRADE -----------------

918
573
345
79
125

4.80
5.44
3.73
4.96
3.70

631
161
470
197

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN
7.17
6.65 ORDER FILLERS ---------------------7.35
7.17 SHIPPING PACKERS -------------- ----

197

3.53

574

3.66

6.83 GUARDS AND WATCHMEN --------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

170
154

3.30
3.05

7.39 JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS —
MANUFACTURING ------------------7.46
NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------5.88

327
199
128
41

3.95
4.39
3.27
4.04

MAINTENANCE CARPENTERS ----------MANUFACTURING ------------------

139
121

$
7.32
7.35

MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIANS --------MANUFACTURING ------------------

692
620

7.53
7.56

MAINTENANCE PAINTERS -------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

103
91

7.11
7.18

MAINTENANCE MACHINISTS ----------MANUFACTURING ---------------- -

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN
TRUCKORIVERS ---------------------MANUFACTURING --------------- —
n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------TRUCKORIVERS, MEDIUM TRUCK

87

TRUCKDRIVERS. HEAVY TRUCK
(TRAILER) --------- -----NONMANUFACTURING --------

276
230

SHIPPING CLERKS ------------

91

See

fo o tn o te s

at

en d o f t a b l e s .

17

4.66
4.66
.67

Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected
occupational groups, adjusted for employment shifts,
in Indianapolis, Ind., for selected periods
Industry and occupational group
(men and wo m e n combined)

October 1972
to
October 1973

October 1973
to
October 1974

October 1974
to
October 1975

October 197 5
to
October 197 6

All industries;
Office clerical._____
_________
- __ _ _
Electronic data processing _ _
______ ___ _
Industrial nurses____ _ ______ _ ___ _ _ _ _
Skilled maintenance trades ** . ........ .....
Unskilled plant workers * * _________ __________

6.3
*
7.9
7.3
6.4

8.6
7.6
10.4
9.5
10.4

8.4
7.6
9.2
8.7
9.6

6.4
5.6
5.2
8.0
8.2

Manufacturing:
Office clerical.
_ __ _ _
_ _ _ __ _
_
Electronic data processing_____ _____ _
___
_
_
Industrial nurses______________ _ ------ _ —
Skilled maintenance trades * * __ ___ __
Unskilled plant workers ** ____________ _

6.8
❖
8.0
7.2
7.1

8.9
6.7
10.6
9.6
10.4

8.5
9.4
9.2
9.1
10.1

6.4
4.3
5.4
7.6
8.0

Nonmanufacturing:
Office clerical___ _ _ _ __
_ _ _
_
_
Electronic data processing__ _ ______ _ _ _
Industrial nurses _____ __ _
_
_ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _
Skilled maintenance trades * * _____ _ _ ______
_
Unskilled plant workers * * ___ ________ _
__

6.1
*
***
***
5.0

8.4
8.4
***
***
10.4

8.4
6.5
***
***
9.0

6.5
6.4
***
8.3

*
Data not available.
**
Percent increases for periods ending prior to 1976 relate to m e n only.
*** Data do not meet publication criteria.

Footnotes
1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond
to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all workers and dividing by the number of workers. The median designates position— half of the employees surveyed receive more
and half receive less than the rate shown. The middle range is defined by 2 rates of pay; a fourth of the workers earn less than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn more than the higher rate.
1 Warnings data relate only to workers whose sex identification was provided by the establishment.
1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.




18

Appendix A
Area wage and related benefits data are obtained by personal visits
of Bureau field representatives at 3-year intervals. 1 In each of the inter­
vening years, information on employment and occupational earnings is col­
lected by a combination of personal visit, mail questionnaire, and telephone
interview from establishments participating in the previous survey.
In each of the 84 2 areas currently surveyed, data are obtained from
representative establishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufac­
turing; transportation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale
trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major
industry groups excluded from these studies are government operations and
the construction and extractive industries. Establishments having fewer than
a prescribed number of workers are omitted because of insufficient employ­
ment in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are provided for each
of the broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.
These surveys are conducted on a sample basis. The sampling
procedures involve detailed stratification of all establishments within the
scope of an individual area survey by industry and number of employees.
From this stratified universe a probability sample is selected, with each
establishment having a predetermined chance of selection. To obtain optimum
accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large than small estab­
lishments is selected. When data are combined, each establishment is
weighted according to its probability of selection, so that unbiased estimates
are generated. For example, if one out of four establishments is selected,
it is given a weight of four to represent itself plus three others. An alternate
of the same original probability is chosen in the same industry-size classi­
fication if data are not available from the original sample member. If no
suitable substitute is available, additional weight is assigned to a sample
member that is similar to the missing unit.
Occupations and earnings
Occupations selected for study are common to a variety of manufac­
turing and nonmanufacturing industries, and are of the following types:
(1) Office clerical; (2) professional and technical; (3) maintenance, toolroom,
and powerplant; and (4) material movement and custodial. Occupational
classification is based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to take
account of interestablishment variation in duties within the same job. Occu­
pations selected for study are listed and described in appendix B. Unless
otherwise indicated, the earnings data following the job titles are for all
industries combined. Earnings data for some of the occupations listed and
1 Personal visits were on a 2-year cycle before July 1972.
^ Included in the 84 areas are 14 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract. These areas are
Akron, Ohio; Austin, T ex.; Binghamton, N .Y . — a.; Birmingham, A la .; Fort Lauderdale—
P
Hollywood and West
Palm Beach—
Boca Raton, Fla.; Lexington—
Fayette, K y .; Melbourne—
Titusville—
Cocoa, Fla.; Norfolk—
Virginia
Beach—
Portsmouth and Newport News—
Hampton, Va. — C. ; Poughkeepsie—
N.
Kingston—
Newburgh, N.Y. ; Raleigh—
Durham, N .C .; Stamford, Conn.; Syracuse, N .Y .; Utica—
Rome, N .Y. ; and Westchester County, N .Y .
In
addition, the Bureau conducts more limited area studies in approximately 100 areas at the request of the
Employment Standards Administration of the U. S. Department of Labor.




19

described, or for seme industry divisions within the scope of the survey, are
not presented in t'-'e A-series tables, because either (1) employment in the
occupation is too small to provide enough data to merit presentation, or
(2) there is possibility of disclosure of individual establishment data. Sepa­
rate men's and women's earnings data are not presented when the number of
workers not identified by sex is 20 percent or more of the men or women
identified in an occupation. Earnings data not shown separately for industry
divisions are included in data for all industries combined. Likewise,
data are included in the overall classification when a subclassification of
electronics technicians, secretaries, or truckdrivers is not shown or infor­
mation to subclassify is not available.
Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for full-time
workers, i.e ., those hired to work a regular weekly schedule. Earnings data
exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-of-living allowances
and incentive bonuses are included. Weekly hours for office clerical and
professional and technical occupations refer to the standard workweek
(rounded to the nearest half hour) for which employees receive regular
straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or
premium rates). Average weekly earnings for these occupations are rounded
to the nearest half dollar.
These surveys measure the level of occupational earnings in an area
at a particular time. Comparisons of individual occupational averages over
time may not reflect expected wage changes. The averages for individual jobs
are affected by changes in wages and employment patterns. For example,
proportions of workers employed by high- or low-wage firms may change, or
high-wage workers may advance to better jobs and be replaced by new
workers at lower rates. Such shifts in employment could decrease an occu­
pational average even though most establishments in an area increase wages
during the year. Changes in earnings of occupational groups, shown in table
A -7 , are better indicators of wage trends than are earnings changes for
individual jobs within the groups.
Average earnings reflect composite, areawide estimates. Industries
and establishments differ in pay level and job staffing, and thus contribute
differently to the estimates for each job. Pay averages may fail to reflect
accurately the wage differential among jobs in individual establishments.
Average pay levels for men and women in selected occupations should
not be assumed to reflect differences in pay of the sexes within individual
establishments. Factors which may contribute to differences include pro­
gression within established rate ranges (only the rates paid incumbents are
collected) and performance of specific duties within the general survey job
descriptions. Job descriptions used to classify employees in these surveys
usually are more generalized than those used in individual establishments
and allow for minor differences among establishments in specific duties
performed.

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the t o t a l in a l l e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t s w it h in th e s c o p e o f the stu dy and n o t the n u m b e r a c t u a l l y s u r v e y e d .
B eca u se occu pational stru ctu res am ong establish m en ts d iffe r, estim ates of
o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b t a i n e d f r o m the s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s tu d ie d
s e r v e o n l y to i n d i c a t e th e r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e o f the j o b s s tu d ie d .
These
d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e do not a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y the a c c u r a c y o f
th e e a r n i n g s data.

W a ge t r e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s

T h e p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e s p r e s e n t e d in ta b le A - 7 a r e b a s e d o n c h a n g e s
in a v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s r e p o r t i n g the t r e n d j o b s in b o th
the c u r r e n t and p r e v i o u s y e a r ( m a t c h e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ) .
T h e data a r e
a d j u s t e d to r e m o v e the e f f e c t s on a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f e m p l o y m e n t s h ift s
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and t u r n o v e r o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i n c l u d e d in s u r v e y
sa m p les.
The p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e s , h o w e v e r, are s till affected by fa c to r s
o t h e r than w a g e i n c r e a s e s .
H i r i n g s , l a y o f f s , and t u r n o v e r m a y a f f e c t an
e s t a b l i s h m e n t a v e r a g e f o r an o c c u p a t i o n w hen w o r k e r s a r e p a id u n d e r pla n s
p rovid in g a range o f w age ra tes f o r individual jo b s .
In p e r i o d s o f i n c r e a s e d
h i r i n g , f o r e x a m p l e , n e w e m p l o y e e s e n t e r at the b o t t o m o f the r a n g e ,
d e p r e s s i n g the a v e r a g e w ith o u t a c h a n g e in w a g e r a t e s .

E l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g
( m e n and w o m e n ) :

S k ille d m a i n t e n a n c e (m e n
and w o m e n ) :

Com puter system s
analy sts, c la s s e s
A , B , and C
Com puter p r o g ra m m e rs ,
c l a s s e s A , B , and C
Com puter op erators,
c l a s s e s A , B , and C

C arpen ters
E lectricia n s
Pain ters
M achinists
M e ch a n ics (m ach inery)
M e c h a n ic s (m o to r veh icle)
P ip efitter s
T o o l and die m a k e r s

I n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s ( m e n and
wom en):
R e g is t e r e d in du strial
nurses

U n s k i l l e d plant ( m e n and
w o m e n ):
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and
clean ers
M a t e r i a l h an dlin g l a b o r e r s

P e r c e n t c h a n g e s f o r i n d i v i d u a l a r e a s in the p r o g r a m
as f o l l o w s :

are com puted

O c c u p a t i o n s u s e d to c o m p u t e w a g e t r e n d s a r e :

O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ( m e n and
wom en):

O f f i c e c l e r i c a l (m e n and
w o m e n )---- C o n tin u e d

S ecreta ries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
T y p i s t s , c l a s s e s A and B
File c le r k s , c l a s s e s A ,
B , and C
Me s s e n g e r s
Sw itchboard o p e r a t o r s
O rder clerk s

A ccou ntin g c le r k s ,
c l a s s e s A and B
B ook k eeping-m ach in e
op erators, class B
P a y roll clerk s
Keypunch o p e r a to r s ,
c l a s s e s A and B
T a b u la tin g-m a ch in e
op e ra to rs, cla ss B

E a c h o c c u p a t i o n i s a s s i g n e d a w e ig h t b a s e d on it s p r o ­
p o r t i o n a t e e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p in the
base yea r.

2.
T h e p e r c e n t c h a n g e s r e l a t e to w a g e c h a n g e s b e t w e e n the in d i c a t e d
dates.
W hen the t i m e span b e t w e e n s u r v e y s i s o t h e r than 12 m o n t h s , annual
r a t e s a r e sh o w n .
(It i s a s s u m e d that w a g e s i n c r e a s e at a c o n s t a n t ra te
betw een su rv e y s.)

1.

T h e s e w e i g h t s a r e u s e d to c o m p u t e g r o u p a v e r a g e s .
E ach o c c u p a t io n 's a v e ra g e (m ean) ea rn in gs is m u ltiplied
b y i t s w e ig h t .
T h e p r o d u c t s a r e t o t a l e d t o o b ta in a
group avera ge.

3.

T h e r a t i o o f g r o u p a v e r a g e s f o r 2 c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s is
c o m p u t e d b y d i v id in g the a v e r a g e f o r the c u r r e n t y e a r
b y the a v e r a g e f o r th e e a r l i e r y e a r .
The result—
e x p r e s s e d a s a p e r c e n t — l e s s 100 i s the p e r c e n t c h a n g e .

F o r a m o r e d e t a i l e d d e s c r i p t i o n o f the m e t h o d u s e d to c o m p u t e t h e s e
w a g e t r e n d s , s e e " I m p r o v i n g A r e a W a g e S u r v e y I n d e x e s , " M o n th ly L a b o r
R e v i e w , J a n u a r y 1973, pp . 5 2 - 5 7 .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s




T a b u l a t i o n s on s e l e c t e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y
w a g e p r o v i s i o n s ( B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d in t h is b u ll e t in .
In for­
m a t i o n f o r t h e s e t a b u l a t i o n s i s c o l l e c t e d at 3 - y e a r i n t e r v a l s . 1 T h e s e t a b u ­
l a t i o n s on m i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r i n e x p e r i e n c e d o f f i c e w o r k e r s ; shift
d i f f e r e n t i a l s ; s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s and d a y s ; p a id h o l i d a y s ; paid v a c a t i o n s ;
and h e a lth , i n s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n p la n s a r e p r e s e n t e d (in the B - s e r i e s t a b l e s )
in p r e v i o u s b u l l e t i n s f o r t h is a r e a .
1 Personal visits were on a 2-year cycle before July 1972.

Appendix table 1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied
in Indianapolis, Ind., October 1976
Industry division 2

M i n imum
employment
in establishments in scope
of study

Workers in establishments

Number of establishments

Within scope of study 4
Within scope
of study 3

Studied

Studied
Number

Percent

ALL ESTABLISHMENTS
ALL DIVISIONS -----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------- ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------------TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, and
OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES5 -----------------------------------wholesale trade 6 ---------------------------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------------------------------FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE 6 ------------SERVICES6 7-----------------------------------------------------------------

950

215

232 ,2 2 5

100

1 3 8 , 42S

50
-

295
655

81
134

112.559
119,66 6

48
52

77, 137
61, 2 88

50
50
50
50
50

21
24
42

116
113

22
25

2 4 ,2 22
15,283
4 4 ,0 77
23, 6 94
12.390

1
0

221

5

17, 352
4 ,7 1 6
22, 1 44
13,150
3 .92 6

-

79
126

7
19

1
0

LARGE ESTABLISHMENTS
ALL DIVISIONS -----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------------------TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, AN
D
OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES5 -----------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE” ---------------------------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------------------------------FINANCE, INSURANCE, ANO REAL ESTATE' ------------SERVICES6 7-----------------------------------------------------------------

79

63

124,831

100

112,740

500
-

A0
39

32
31

73, 0 99
51, 7 32

59
41

67, 4 24
45, 3 16

500
500
500
500
500

2
2
1
8
1

7

14,800
1,129
24, 340
10.936
527

12
1
19
9

14,800
1,129
17,924
10,936
527

-

7

2
13

8
1

1

1 The Indianapolis Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the Office of Management and Budget through February 1974, consists of Boone, Hamilton,
Hancock, Hendricks, Johnson, Marion, Morgan, and Shelby Counties. The "workers within scope of study" estimates shown in this table provide a reasonably accurate
description of the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey. Estimates are not intended, however, for comparison with other employment indexes
to measure employment trends or levels since (1) planning of wage surveys requires establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied,
and (2) small establishments are excluded from the scope of the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification M anual was used in classifying establishments by industry division.
3 Includes all establishments with total employment at or above the m i nimum limitation. All outlets (within the area) of companies in industries such as trade,
finance, auto repair service, and motion picture theaters are considered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes all workers in all establishments with total employment (within the area) at or above the m i n i m u m limitation.
1 Abbreviated to "public utilities" in the A-series tables. Taxicabs and services incidental to water transportation are excluded. Indianapolis' gas utilities and
5
local transit system are municipally operated and are excluded by definition from the scope of the survey.
6 This division i represented in estimates for "all industries" and "nonmanufacturing" in the A-series tables. Separate presentation of data i not made for one
s
s
or more of the following reasons: (1) Employment i too small to provide enough data to merit separate study, (2)
s
the sample was
not designedinitially to permit
separate presentation, (3) response was insufficient or inadequate to permit separate presentation, and (4) there i possibility of disclosure of individual establishment data.
s
7 Hotels and motels; laundries and other personal services; business services; automobile repair, rental, and
parking; motion
pictures; nonprofit membership
organizations (excluding religious and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectural services.




21

Appendix B.

Occupational Descriptions

T h e p r i m a r y p u r p o s e o f p r e p a r i n g j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s f o r the B u r e a u ' s w a g e s u r v e y s i s to a s s i s t
it s f i e l d s t a f f in c l a s s i f y i n g in to a p p r o p r i a t e o c c u p a t i o n s w o r k e r s w ho a r e e m p l o y e d u n d e r a v a r i e t y o f
p a y r o l l t i t l e s and d i f f e r e n t w o r k a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m e s t a b l i s h m e n t to e s t a b l i s h m e n t and f r o m a r e a to
area.
T h i s p e r m i t s the g r o u p in g o f o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e r a t e s r e p r e s e n t i n g c o m p a r a b l e j o b co n t e n t .
B e c a u s e o f th is e m p h a s i s on i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t and i n t e r a r e a c o m p a r a b i l i t y o f o c c u p a t i o n a l c o n t e n t , the
B u r e a u ' s j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s m a y d i f f e r s i g n i f i c a n t l y f r o m t h o s e in u s e in i n d iv id u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o r t h o s e
p r e p a r e d fo r other p u r p o s e s .
In a p p ly in g t h e s e j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s , the B u r e a u ' s f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s a r e
i n s t r u c t e d to e x c l u d e w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s ; a p p r e n t i c e s ; l e a r n e r s ; b e g i n n e r s ; t r a i n e e s ; -and h a n d i c a p p e d ,
p a r t - t i m e , t e m p o r a r y , and p r o b a t i o n a r y w o r k e r s .

OFFICE
SECRETARY

S E C R E T A R Y— C o n tin u e d

A s s i g n e d a s p e r s o n a l s e c r e t a r y , n o r m a l l y to o n e in d i v i d u a l .
M ain ­
ta in s a c l o s e and h ig h ly r e s p o n s i v e r e l a t i o n s h i p to the d a y - t o - d a y w o r k o f the
su p ervisor.
W o r k s f a i r l y in d e p e n d e n t l y r e c e i v i n g a m i n i m u m o f d e t a i l e d
s u p e r v i s i o n and g u i d a n c e .
P e r f o r m s v a r i e d c l e r i c a l and s e c r e t a r i a l d u t i e s ,
u s u a l l y in c l u d i n g m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g :

M a y a l s o p e r f o r m o t h e r c l e r i c a l and s e c r e t a r i a l t a s k s o f c o m p a r a b l e
n a t u r e and d i f f i c u l t y .
T h e w o r k t y p i c a l l y r e q u i r e s k n o w l e d g e o f o f f i c e r o u tin e
and u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f the o r g a n i z a t i o n , p r o g r a m s , and p r o c e d u r e s r e l a t e d to
th e w o r k o f th e s u p e r v i s o r .
E xclu sion s

a. R e c e i v e s t e l e p h o n e c a l l s , p e r s o n a l c a l l e r s , and i n c o m i n g m a i l ,
a n s w e r s r o u t in e i n q u i r i e s , and r o u t e s t e c h n i c a l i n q u i r i e s to the p r o p e r
persons;
b.

E sta b lish es,

c.
in stru cted ;
d.

m ain tain s,

and r e v i s e s the s u p e r v i s o r ' s f i l e s ;

M a in ta in s the s u p e r v i s o r ' s
R elays m e s s a g e s

from

Not a l l p o s i t i o n s that a r e t i t l e d " s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s the a b o v e c h a r ­
a cteristics.
E x a m p l e s o f p o s i t i o n s w h i c h a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m th e d e f i n i t i o n a r e
as fo llo w s :

a. P o s i t i o n s
d s ri
c a l e n d a r and m a k e s a p p o i n t m e n te s cas b e d a b o v e ;
b.

s u p e r v i s o r to s u b o r d i n a t e s ;

e . R e v i e w s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , m e m o r a n d u m s , and r e p o r t s p r e p a r e d b y
o t h e r s f o r the s u p e r v i s o r ' s s ig n a t u r e to a s s u r e p r o c e d u r a l and t y p o g r a p h i c
accuracy;
f.

P erform s




sional,

w hich

do

n ot

meet

the

"p erson a l"

secretary concept

S t e n o g r a p h e r s n ot f u l l y t r a i n e d in s e c r e t a r i a l - t y p e d u t ie s ;

c . S ten og rap h ers se rv in g as o ffic e
techn ical, or m a n a ge ria l p e r so n s ;

a s s i s t a n t s to a g r o u p o f p r o f e s ­

d. S e c r e t a r y p o s i t i o n s in w h i c h th e d u t ie s a r e e i t h e r s u b s t a n t i a l l y
m o r e r o u t in e o r s u b s t a n t i a l l y m o r e c o m p l e x and r e s p o n s i b l e than t h o s e c h a r ­
a c t e r i z e d in the d e f i n i t i o n ;

s t e n o g r a p h i c and ty p in g w o r k .

B e g in n i n g with c a l e n d a r y e a r 1976 s u r v e y s , the B u r e a u h as g r o u p e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d ie d in it s
a r e a w a g e s u r v e y s in to j o b f a m i l i e s in o r d e r to p r e s e n t i n f o r m a t i o n on r e l a t e d o c c u p a t i o n s in s e q u e n c e .
J o b f a m i l i e s h ave n ot b e e n t i t l e d , h o w e v e r , s i n c e d o in g so m i g h t h av e a d d e d e x t r a n e o u s e l e m e n t s to the
jo b m atching p r o c e s s .
T h e B u r e a u has a l s o r e v i s e d s e v e r a l o c c u p a t i o n a l t i t l e s .
w o r d o r d e r and a r e m o r e d e s c r i p t i v e o f the s u r v e y j o b s .

22

T h e t i t l e s m o r e n e a r l y r e f l e c t u su a l

S E C R E T A R Y — Continued

S E C R E T A R Y — Co ntinue d

E x c l u s i o n s ----C o n tin u e d

C lass C

e.
A s s i s t a n t - t y p e p o s i t i o n s w h ich i n v o l v e m o r e d i f f i c u l t o r m o r e
1. S e c r e t a r y to an e x e c u t i v e o r m a n a g e r i a l p e r s o n w h o s e r e s p o n ­
r e s p o n sib le te ch n ica l, a dm inistrative, s u p e r v is o r y , o r sp e cia liz e d c l e r i c a l
s i b i l i t y is not e q u iv a le n t to one o f the s p e c i f i c l e v e l s itu a tio n s in the d e f in it io n
d u tie s w h i c h a r e not t y p i c a l o f s e c r e t a r i a l w o r k .
f o r c l a s s B , but w h o s e o r g a n i z a t i o n a l unit n o r m a l l y n u m b e r s at l e a s t s e v e r a l
d o z e n e m p l o y e e s and is u s u a l l y d i v i d e d in to o r g a n i z a t i o n a l s e g m e n t s w h i c h a r e
o f t e n , in tu r n , f u r t h e r s u b d iv id e d .
In s o m e c o m p a n i e s , th is l e v e l i n c l u d e s a
N O T E : T h e t e r m " c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r , " u s e d in the l e v e l d e f i n i t i o n s
w id e ra n g e o f o r g a n i z a t i o n a l e c h e l o n s : in o t h e r s , o n ly o n e o r tw o ; cm
f o l l o w i n g , r e f e r s to t h o s e o f f i c i a l s w ho have a s i g n i f i c a n t c o r p o r a t e w i d e
p o l i c y m a k i n g r o l e with r e g a r d to m a j o r c o m p a n y a c t i v i t i e s .
T h e title " v i c e
2 . S e c r e t a r y to the h e ad o f an i n d iv id u a l pla n t, f a c t o r y , e t c . ( o r
p r e s i d e n t , " th ou gh n o r m a l l y i n d i c a t i v e o f th is r o l e , d o e s not in a ll c a s e s
o t h e r e q u iv a le n t l e v e l o f o f f i c i a l ) that e m p l o y s , in a ll, f e w e r than 5, 000
id e n t i fy s uch p o s i t i o n s .
V i c e p r e s i d e n t s w h o s e p r i m a r y r e s p o n s i b i l i t y i s to
persons.
a ct p e r s o n a l l y on in d i v i d u a l c a s e s o r t r a n s a c t i o n s ( e . g . , a p p r o v e o r d e n y
in d iv id u a l loan o r c r e d i t a c t i o n s ; a d m i n i s t e r in d iv id u a l t r u s t a c c o u n t s ; d i r e c t l y
C la ss D
s u p e r v i s e a c l e r i c a l s ta ff) a r e not c o n s i d e r e d to be " c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r s " f o r
1. S e c r e t a r y to the s u p e r v i s o r o r hea d o f a s m a l l o r g a n i z a t i o n a l unit
p u r p o s e s o f a p p ly in g the f o l l o w i n g l e v e l d e f i n i t i o n s .
( e . g . , f e w e r than about 25 o r 30 p e r s o n s ) ; o r
C lass A
1. S e c r e t a r y to the c h a i r m a n o f the b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t o f a c o m p a n y
that e m p l o y s , in a ll, o v e r 100 but f e w e r than 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; o r

2. S e c r e t a r y to a n o n s u p e r v i s o r y s t a f f s p e c i a l i s t , p r o f e s s i o n a l
e m p lo y e e , a d m in istra tiv e o f f i c e r , o r assistan t, skilled techn ician, o r exp ert.
(N O TE :
M any c o m p a n i e s a s s i g n s t e n o g r a p h e r s , r a t h e r than s e c r e t a r i e s as
d e s c r i b e d a b o v e , to th is l e v e l o f s u p e r v i s o r y o r n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r . )
STENOGRAPHER

2. S e c r e t a r y to a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r ( o t h e r than the c h a i r m a n o f the
b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t ) o f a c o m p a n y that e m p l o y s , in a ll, o v e r 5, 000 but f e w e r
than 2 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r
3. S e c r e t a r y to the h e ad , i m m e d i a t e l y b e l o w the c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r
l e v e l , o f a m a j o r s e g m e n t o r s u b s i d i a r y o f a c o m p a n y that e m p l o y s , in a ll,
ov e r 2 5 ,00 0 p e r s o n s .

C lass B

P r i m a r y duty i s to ta ke d i c t a t i o n u s in g s h o r t h a n d , and to t r a n s c r i b e
th e d i c t a t i o n .
M a y a l s o ty p e f r o m w r i t t e n c o p y .
May operate fro m a sten o­
graphic pool.
M a y o c c a s i o n a l l y t r a n s c r i b e f r o m v o i c e r e c o r d i n g s ( if p r i m a r y
du ty i s t r a n s c r i b i n g f r o m r e c o r d i n g s , s e e T r a n s c r i b i n g - M a c h i n e T y p i s t ) .
NOTE:
T h i s j o b is d i s t i n g u i s h e d f r o m that o f a s e c r e t a r y in that a
s e c r e t a r y n o r m a l l y w o r k s in a c o n f i d e n t i a l r e l a t i o n s h i p with o n ly o n e m a n a g e r
o r e x e c u t i v e and p e r f o r m s m o r e
r e s p o n s i b l e and d i s c r e t i o n a r y t a s k s as
d e s c r i b e d in the s e c r e t a r y j o b d e f i n i t i o n .

1. S e c r e t a r y to the c h a i r m a n o f the b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t o f a c o m p a n y
that e m p l o y s , in a ll, f e w e r than 100 p e r s o n s ; o r
2. S e c r e t a r y to a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r ( o t h e r than the c h a i r m a n o f the
b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t ) o f a c o m p a n y that e m p l o y s , in a ll, o v e r 100 but f e w e r
than 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r
3. S e c r e t a r y to the h e ad , i m m e d i a t e l y b e l o w the o f f i c e r l e v e l , o v e r
e i t h e r a m a j o r c o r p o r a t i o n w i d e f u n c t io n a l a c t i v i t y ( e . g . , m a r k e t i n g , r e s e a r c h ,
o p e r a t i o n s , i n d u s t r i a l r e l a t i o n s , e t c . ) cm a m a j o r g e o g r a p h i c o r o r g a n i z a t i o n a l
s e g m e n t ( e . g . , a r e g i o n a l h e a d q u a r t e r s ; a m a j o r d i v i s i o n ) o f a c o m p a n y that
e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 but f e w e r than 2 5 , 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s ; o r
4 . S e c r e t a r y to the h ead o f an in d iv id u a l plant, f a c t o r y , e t c . ( o r
o t h e r e q u iv a le n t l e v e l o f o f f i c i a l ) that e m p l o y s , in a ll, o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r
5. S e c r e t a r y to the head o f a l a r g e and i m p o r t a n t o r g a n i z a t i o n a l
s e g m e n t ( e . g . : a m i d d l e m a n a g e m e n t s u p e r v i s o r o f an o r g a n i z a t i o n a l s e g m e n t
o fte n i n v o l v i n g as m a n y as s e v e r a l h u n d re d p e r s o n s ) o r a c o m p a n y that
e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 25, 000 p e r s o n s .




Stenographer, General

keep

D ic t a t io n i n v o l v e s a n o r m a l r o u t in e v o c a b u l a r y .
M a y m a in ta in f i l e s ,
s i m p l e r e c o r d s , o r p e r f o r m o t h e r r e l a t i v e l y r o u tin e c l e r i c a l t a s k s .
S ten og rap h er, Senior

D ic t a t io n i n v o l v e s a v a r i e d t e c h n i c a l o r s p e c i a l i z e d v o c a b u l a r y s uch
as in l e g a l b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s on s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h .
M a y a l s o set up and
m a in t a in f i l e s , k e e p r e c o r d s , e t c .
OR
P e r f o r m s s t e n o g r a p h i c d u t ie s r e q u i r i n g s i g n i f i c a n t l y g r e a t e r i n d e ­
p e n d e n c e and r e s p o n s i b i l i t y than s t e n o g r a p h e r , g e n e r a l , a s e v i d e n c e d b y the
follow ing :
W o r k r e q u i r e s a high d e g r e e o f s t e n o g r a p h i c s p e e d and a c c u r a c y ;
a t h o r o u g h w o r k i n g k n o w l e d g e o f g e n e r a l b u s i n e s s and o f f i c e p r o c e d u r e ; and
o f the s p e c i f i c b u s i n e s s o p e r a t i o n s , o r g a n i z a t i o n , p o l i c i e s , p r o c e d u r e s , f i l e s ,
w ork flow , etc.
U s e s th is k n o w l e d g e in p e r f o r m i n g s t e n o g r a p h i c d u t ie s and
r e s p o n s i b l e c l e r i c a l t a s k s s uch as m a in t a in in g f o l l o w u p f i l e s ; a s s e m b l i n g
m a t e r i a l f o r r e p o r t s , m e m o r a n d u m s , and l e t t e r s ; c o m p o s i n g s i m p l e l e t t e r s
f r o m g e n e r a l i n s t r u c t i o n s ; r e a d in g and r o u tin g i n c o m i n g m a i l ; and a n s w e r i n g
r o u tin e q u e s t i o n s , e t c .

T R A N SC R IB IN G -M A C H IN E TYPIST

SW ITCHBOARD O PER ATO R

P r i m a r y duty is to t r a n s c r i b e d ic ta ti o n in v o lv in g a n o r m a l rou tin e
voca b u la ry from transc rib in g -m a ch in e r e c o r d s .
M a y a l s o ty pe f r o m w r it t e n
c o p y and do s i m p l e c l e r i c a l w o r k .
W o r k e r s t r a n s c r i b i n g d ic t a t i o n in v o lv in g
a v a r i e d t e c h n i c a l o r s p e c i a l i z e d v o c a b u l a r y such as le g a l b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s
on s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h a r e not in c l u d e d .
A w o r k e r who ta k e s d i c t a t i o n in
s h o rt h a n d o r b y S te n o type o r s i m i l a r m a c h i n e is c l a s s i f i e d as a s t e n o g r a p h e r .

O p e r a t e s a t e l e p h o n e s w i t c h b o a r d o r c o n s o l e u se d with a p r i v a t e
b r a n c h e x c h a n g e ( P B X ) s y s t e m to r e l a y i n c o m i n g , o u t g o in g , and i n t r a s y s t e m
ca lls.
M a y p r o v i d e i n f o r m a t i o n to c a l l e r s , r e c o r d and t r a n s m i t m e s s a g e s ,
k e e p r e c o r d o f c a l l s p l a c e d and t o l l c h a r g e s .
B e s id e s op e ratin g a telephon e
s w i t c h b o a r d o r c o n s o l e , m a y a l s o ty pe o r p e r f o r m r o u tin e c l e r i c a l w o r k
(typ in g o r r o u tin e c l e r i c a l w o r k m a y o c c u p y the m a j o r p o r t i o n o f the w o r k e r ' s
t i m e , and i s u s u a l l y p e r f o r m e d w h i le at the s w i t c h b o a r d o r c o n s o l e ) .
C hief
o r le a d o p e r a t o r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g m o r e than o n e o p e r a t o r a r e
exclu ded .
F o r an o p e r a t o r w h o a l s o a c t s as a r e c e p t i o n i s t , s e e S w it c h b o a r d
Ope rat o r - R e c e p t i o n i s t .

TYPIST
U s e s a t y p e w r i t e r to m a k e c o p i e s o f v a r i o u s m a t e r i a l s o r to m a k e
out b i l l s a f t e r c a l c u l a t i o n s have b e e n m a d e by a n o t h e r p e r s o n .
M a y i n c lu d e
ty pin g o f s t e n c i l s , m a t s , o r s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s f o r u se in d u p lic a t in g p r o ­
cesses.
M a y do c l e r i c a l w o r k i n v o l v i n g lit tle s p e c i a l t r a i n in g ,
s u ch as
k e e p in g s i m p l e r e c o r d s , f ilin g r e c o r d s and r e p o r t s , o r s o r t i n g and d i s t r i b u t i n g
in com in g m ail.
C lass A.
P e r f o r m s one o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g : T y p in g m a t e r i a l
in fin a l f o r m w hen it i n v o l v e s c o m b i n i n g m a t e r i a l f r o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s ; o r
r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r c o r r e c t s p e l l i n g , s y l l a b i c a t i o n , pu n c tu a tio n , e t c . , o f t e c h ­
n i c a l o r u nusual w o r d s o r f o r e i g n la n g u a ge m a t e r i a l ; o r pla n nin g la yo u t and
ty pin g o f c o m p l i c a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l t a b l e s to m a in t a in u n i f o r m i t y and b a la n c e in
s p a c i n g . May type ro u tin e f o r m l e t t e r s , v a r y i n g d e t a i l s to suit c i r c u m s t a n c e s .
C la ss
rou gh o r c l e a r
o r settin g up
a l r e a d y set up

B.
P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g : C o p y typin g f r o m
d r a f t s ; o r r o u tin e ty pin g o f f o r m s , i n s u r a n c e p o l i c i e s , e t c . ;
s i m p l e s ta n d a r d t a b u l a t i o n s ; o r c o p y i n g m o r e c o m p l e x t a b l e s
and s p a c e d p r o p e r l y .

FILE C LE R K
F i l e s , c l a s s i f i e s , and r e t r i e v e s m a t e r i a l in an e s t a b l i s h e d f ilin g
system .
M a y p e r f o r m c l e r i c a l and m a n u a l t a s k s r e q u i r e d to m a in t a in f i l e s .
P o s i t i o n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d in to l e v e l s on the b a s i s o f the f o l l o w i n g d e f i n i t i o n s .
C l a s s A . C l a s s i f i e s and i n d e x e s f i l e m a t e r i a l s uch as c o r r e s p o n d ­
e n c e , r e p o r t s , t e c h n i c a l d o c u m e n t s , e t c . , in an e s t a b l i s h e d f ilin g s y s t e m
c o n t a in in g a n u m b e r o f v a r i e d s u b j e c t m a t t e r f i l e s .
May a l s o file th is
m aterial.
M a y k e e p r e c o r d s o f v a r i o u s t y p e s in c o n j u n c t i o n with the f i l e s .
M a y le a d a s m a l l g r o u p o f l o w e r l e v e l f i l e c l e r k s .
C l a s s B.
S o r t s , c o d e s , and f i l e s u n c l a s s i f i e d m a t e r i a l by s i m p l e
( s u b j e c t matter"5~headings o r p a r t l y c l a s s i f i e d m a t e r i a l b y f i n e r s u b h e a d in g s .
P r e p a r e s s i m p l e r e l a t e d in d e x and c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e a id s .
A s requested,
l o c a t e s c l e a r l y id e n t i f i e d m a t e r i a l in f i l e s and f o r w a r d s m a t e r i a l .
May
p erform
r e l a t e d c l e r i c a l t a s k s r e q u i r e d t o m a in t a in and s e r v i c e f i l e s .
C l a s s C.
P e r f o r m s ro u tin e f ilin g o f m a t e r i a l that has a l r e a d y b e e n
c l a s s i f i e d o r w h ich is e a s i l y c l a s s i f i e d in a s i m p l e s e r i a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n
system
(e .g ., alph abetical, c h r o n o lo g ic a l, o r n u m e rica l).
As requested,
l o c a t e s r e a d i l y a v a i l a b l e m a t e r i a l in f i l e s and f o r w a r d s m a t e r i a l ; and m a y
f i l l out w i t h d r a w a l c h a r g e .
M a y p e r f o r m s i m p l e c l e r i c a l and m a n u a l ta s k s
r e q u i r e d to m a in t a in and s e r v i c e f i l e s .
MESSENGER
P e r f o r m s v a r i o u s ro u tin e d u t ie s s u ch as ru nnin g e r r a n d s , o p e r a t i n g
m i n o r o f f i c e m a c h i n e s such as s e a l e r s o r m a i l e r s , o p e n in g and d i s t r i b u t i n g
m a i l , and o t h e r m i n o r c l e r i c a l w o r k . E x c l u d e p o s i t i o n s that r e q u i r e o p e r a t i o n
o f a m o t o r v e h i c l e a s a s i g n i f i c a n t duty.




SW ITCH BO ARD O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
At a
an o p e r a t o r —
w ork in volves
b u s i n e s s and
priate p e r so n
a r r a n g i n g an

s i n g l e - p o s i t i o n t e l e p h o n e s w i t c h b o a r d o r c o n s o l e , a c t s both as
s e e S w i t c h b o a r d O p e r a t o r — and a s a r e c e p t i o n i s t . R e c e p t i o n i s t ' s
s uch d u tie s as g r e e t i n g v i s i t o r s ; d e t e r m i n i n g n a tu r e o f v i s i t o r ' s
p r o v i d i n g a p p r o p r i a t e i n f o r m a t i o n ; r e f e r r i n g v i s i t o r to a p p r o ­
in the o r g a n i z a t i o n o r c o n t a c t i n g that p e r s o n by te l e p h o n e and
a p p o in t m e n t ; k e e p i n g a lo g o f v i s i t o r s .

O R D E R CLER-K
R e c e i v e s c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s f o r m a t e r i a l o r m e r c h a n d i s e by m a i l ,
phone, o r p e r so n a lly .
D u tie s i n v o l v e a ny c o m b i n a t i o n o f the f o l l o w i n g :
Q u o t in g p r i c e s to c u s t o m e r s ; m a k in g out an o r d e r s h e e t lis t i n g the i t e m s to
m a k e up the o r d e r ; c h e c k i n g p r i c e s and q u a n tit ie s o f i t e m s on o r d e r s h e e t ;
and d i s t r i b u t i n g o r d e r s h e e t s to r e s p e c t i v e d e p a r t m e n t s to be f i l l e d .
May
c h e c k with c r e d i t d e p a r t m e n t to d e t e r m i n e c r e d i t ra tin g o f c u s t o m e r , a c k n o w l ­
e d g e r e c e i p t o f o r d e r s f r o m c u s t o m e r s , f o l l o w up o r d e r s to s e e that th ey
have b e e n f i l l e d , k e e p file o f o r d e r s r e c e i v e d , and c h e c k sh ip p in g i n v o i c e s
with o r i g i n a l o r d e r s .
ACCOUNTING C LE R K
P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e a c c o u n t i n g c l e r i c a l t a s k s s u c h as p o s t in g to
r e g i s t e r s and l e d g e r s ; r e c o n c i l i n g bank a c c o u n t s ; v e r i f y i n g the in tern aJ c o n ­
s i s t e n c y , c o m p l e t e n e s s , and m a t h e m a t i c a l a c c u r a c y o f a c c o u n t i n g d o c u m e n t s ;
a s s i g n i n g p r e s c r i b e d a c c o u n t i n g d i s t r i b u t i o n c o d e s ; e x a m i n i n g and v e r i f y i n g
f o r c l e r i c a l a c c u r a c y v a r i o u s t y p e s o f r e p o r t s , l i s t s , c a l c u l a t i o n s , p o s t in g ,
e tc .; o r p r e p a rin g sim p le o r a s s i s t in g in 'p r e p a r in g m o r e c o m p lic a t e d jo u rn a l
vouchers.
M a y w o r k in e i t h e r a m a n u a l o r a u t o m a t e d a c c o u n t in g s y s t e m .
T h e w o r k r e q u i r e s a k n o w l e d g e o f c l e r i c a l m e t h o d s and o f f i c e p r a c ­
t i c e s and p r o c e d u r e s w h i c h r e l a t e s to the c l e r i c a l p r o c e s s i n g and r e c o r d i n g
o f t r a n s a c t i o n s and a c c o u n t i n g i n f o r m a t i o n .
With e x p e r i e n c e , the w o r k e r
t y p i c a l l y b e c o m e s f a m i l i a r with the b o o k k e e p i n g and a c c o u n t i n g t e r m s and
p r o c e d u r e s u s e d in the a s s i g n e d w o r k , but i s not r e q u i r e d to have a k n o w le d g e
o f the f o r m a l p r i n c i p l e s o f b o o k k e e p i n g and a c c o u n t i n g .
P ositions
d efin ition s.

are

classified

in to

levels

on

the

b a s i s o f the f o l l o w i n g

C la ss A .
U n der g e n e r a l s u p e r v i s i o n , p e r f o r m s a c c o u n t in g c l e r i c a l
o p e r a t i o n s w h i c h r e q u i r e the a p p l i c a t i o n o f e x p e r i e n c e and ju d g m e n t , f o r
e x a m p le , c l e r i c a l l y p r o c e s s in g c o m p lic a t e d or n on rep etitive accounting t r a n s ­
a c t i o n s , s e l e c t i n g a m o n g a s u b s t a n t ia l v a r i e t y o f p r e s c r i b e d a c c o u n t in g c o d e s
and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s , o r t r a c i n g t r a n s a c t i o n s
th rou gh p r e v i o u s a c c o u n t in g
a c t i o n s to d e t e r m i n e s o u r c e o f d i s c r e p a n c i e s .
M a y be a s s i s t e d by o n e o r
m o r e c l a s s B a c c o u n t in g c l e r k s .

A C C O U N T I N G C L E R K ---- Continued

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR

C la ss B .
Un der c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n , f o l l o w i n g d e t a i l e d i n s t r u c t i o n s
and s t a n d a r d i z e d p r o c e d u r e s , p e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e r o u tin e a c c o u n t i n g c l e r ­
i c a l o p e r a t i o n s , s u c h a s p o s t i n g to l e d g e r s , c a r d s , o r w o r k s h e e t s w h e r e
i d e n t i f i c a t i o n o f i t e m s and l o c a t i o n s o f p o s t i n g s a r e c l e a r l y i n d i c a t e d ; c h e c k i n g
a c c u r a c y and c o m p l e t e n e s s o f s t a n d a r d i z e d and r e p e t i t i v e r e c o r d s o r
a c c o u n t i n g d o c u m e n t s ; and c o d i n g
d ocu m en ts u sing a few p r e s c r i b e d
accou nting c o d e s .

O p e r a t e s a k e y p u n c h m a c h i n e to r e c o r d o r v e r i f y a lp h a b e tic
n u m e r i c data o n t a b u la tin g c a r d s o r on ta p e .

BO O K K EEPIN G -M ACH IN E O P E R A T O R
O p e r a t e s a b o o k k e e p i n g m a c h i n e (with o r w it h ou t a t y p e w r i t e r k e y ­
b o a r d ) to k e e p a r e c o r d o f b u s i n e s s t r a n s a c t i o n s .
C l a s s A . K e e p s a s e t o f r e c o r d s r e q u i r i n g a k n o w l e d g e o f and
e x p e r i e n c e in b a s i c b o o k k e e p i n g p r i n c i p l e s , and f a m i l i a r i t y w ith the s t r u c t u r e
o f the p a r t i c u l a r a c c o u n t i n g s y s t e m u s e d .
D e t e r m i n e s p r o p e r r e c o r d s and
d i s t r i b u t i o n o f d e b i t and c r e d i t i t e m s to be u s e d in e a c h p h a s e o f the w o r k .
M a y p r e p a r e c o n s o l i d a t e d r e p o r t s , b a l a n c e s h e e t s , and o t h e r r e c o r d s b y han d.
C la s s B . K eep s a r e c o r d of one o r m o r e phases o r se ctio n s o f a
s e t o f r e c o r d s u s u a l l y r e q u i r i n g li t tle k n o w l e d g e o f b a s i c b o o k k e e p i n g . P h a s e s
o r s e c t i o n s in c l u d e a c c o u n t s p a y a b l e , p a y r o l l , c u s t o m e r s ' a c c o u n t s (not
i n c lu d in g a s i m p l e ty p e o f b i l l i n g d e s c r i b e d u n d e r m a c h i n e b i l l e r ) , c o s t d i s ­
tribu tion , ex p en se d istribu tion , in v en tory c o n tr o l, etc.
May c h e c k o r a s s i s t
in p r e p a r a t i o n o f t r i a l b a l a n c e s and p r e p a r e c o n t r o l s h e e t s f o r the a c c o u n t i n g
departm ent.
M ACH INE B IL L E R
P r e p a r e s s t a t e m e n t s , b i l l s , and i n v o i c e s o n a m a c h i n e o t h e r than an
ord inary o r e le ctro m a tic typew riter.
M a y a l s o k e e p r e c o r d s a s to b i l l i n g s
o r s h ip p in g c h a r g e s o r p e r f o r m o t h e r c l e r i c a l w o r k i n c i d e n t a l to b i l l i n g
operations.
F o r w a g e stu dy p u r p o s e s , m a c h i n e b i l l e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d b y type
o f m a c h i n e , as f o l l o w s :
B illin g-m a ch in e b ille r .
U ses a s p e cia l billin g m ach in e (com b in a tion
t y p in g and a dd in g m a c h i n e ) to p r e p a r e b i l l s and i n v o i c e s f r o m c u s t o m e r s '
p u r c h a s e o r d e r s , i n t e r n a l l y p r e p a r e d o r d e r s , sh ip p in g m e m o r a n d u m s , e t c .
U s u a lly i n v o l v e s a p p l i c a t i o n o f p r e d e t e r m i n e d d i s c o u n t s and s h ip p in g c h a r g e s
and e n t r y o f n e c e s s a r y e x t e n s i o n s , w h i c h m a y o r m a y not b e c o m p u t e d on
the b i l l i n g m a c h i n e ,
and t o t a ls w h i c h a r e a u t o m a t i c a l l y a c c u m u l a t e d by
m ach in e.
The o p er a tion usually in volves a la rg e n um ber o f ca r b o n c o p ie s
o f the b i l l b e i n g p r e p a r e d and i s o fte n d o n e o n a f a n f o ld m a c h i n e .
B ook k eepin g-m a ch in e b ille r .
U s e s a b o o k k e e p i n g m a c h i n e (with o r
w it h ou t a t y p e w r i t e r k e y b o a r d ) to p r e p a r e c u s t o m e r s ' b i l l s as p a r t o f the
accounts r e c e iv a b le operation.
G e n e r a l l y i n v o l v e s th e s im u l t a n e o u s e n t r y o f
f i g u r e s on c u s t o m e r s ' l e d g e r r e c o r d . T h e m a c h i n e a u t o m a t i c a l l y a c c u m u l a t e s
f i g u r e s on a n u m b e r o f v e r t i c a l c o l u m n s and c o m p u t e s and u s u a l l y p r i n t s a u t o ­
m a t i c a l l y the d e b i t o r c r e d i t b a l a n c e s .
D o e s not in v o lv e a know led ge o f b o o k ­
keepin g.
W o r k s f r o m u n i f o r m and s ta n d a rd t y p e s o f s a l e s and c r e d i t s l i p s .
PA Y R O LL CLERK
C o m p u t e s w a g e s o f c o m p a n y e m p l o y e e s and e n t e r s the n e c e s s a r y
da ta on the p a y r o l l s h e e t s .
D u tie s i n v o l v e :
Calcu latin g w o r k e r s ' earn ings
b a s e d on t i m e o r p r o d u c t i o n r e c o r d s ; and p o s t i n g c a l c u l a t e d data on p a y r o l l
s h e e t , s h o w in g i n f o r m a t i o n s u c h as w o r k e r ' s n a m e , w o r k i n g d a y s , t i m e , r a t e ,
d e d u c t i o n s f o r i n s u r a n c e , and t o t a l w a g e s d u e .
M a y m a k e out p a y c h e c k s and
a s s i s t p a y m a s t e r in m a k in g up and d i s t r i b u t i n g p a y e n v e l o p e s .
May use a
calcu latin g m a ch in e.




P osition s
d e fin ition s.

are

cla ssified

in to

levels

on

the

an d /or

b a s i s o f the f o l l o w i n g

C lass A .
W o r k r e q u i r e s the a p p l i c a t i o n o f e x p e r i e n c e and ju d g m e n t
in s e l e c t i n g p r o c e d u r e s to be f o l l o w e d and in s e a r c h i n g f o r , i n t e r p r e t i n g ,
s e l e c t i n g , o r c o d i n g i t e m s to be k e y p u n c h e d f r o m a v a r i e t y o f s o u r c e d o c u ­
m ents.
On o c c a s i o n m a y a l s o p e r f o r m s o m e r o u tin e k e y p u n ch w o r k .
M ay
train in e x p e r ie n c e d keypunch o p e r a t o r s .
C lass B.
W o r k i s r o u tin e and r e p e t i t i v e .
Under c l o s e s u p e r v is io n
o r fo llo w in g s p e c if ic p r o c e d u r e s o r in st r u c tio n s , w o r k s f r o m v a rio u s stan­
d a r d i z e d s o u r c e d o c u m e n t s w h i c h have b e e n c o d e d , and f o l l o w s s p e c i f i e d
p r o c e d u r e s w h i c h h av e b e e n p r e s c r i b e d in d e t a i l and r e q u i r e li t tle o r no
s e l e c t i n g , c o d i n g , o r i n t e r p r e t i n g o f data to be r e c o r d e d . R e f e r s to s u p e r v i s o r
p r o b le m s arisin g fr o m e rro n e o u s item s or co d e s o r m issin g in form ation .

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R

O p e r a t e s o n e o r a v a r i e t y o f m a c h i n e s s u ch as the t a b u l a t o r , c a l c u ­
la to r , c o lla t o r , in t e r p r e t e r , s o r t e r , r e p ro d u cin g punch, e tc .
Excluded fro m
t h is d e f i n i t i o n a r e w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s .
A ls o exclu ded are o p e r a to r s of
e l e c t r o n i c d i g i t a l c o m p u t e r s , e v e n th ou gh th e y m a y a l s o o p e r a t e e l e c t r i c
a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e e q u ip m e n t .
P osition s
definitions.

are

cla ssified

in to

levels

on

the

b a s i s o f the f o l l o w i n g

C lass A .
P e r f o r m s c o m p l e t e r e p o r t i n g and ta b u la tin g a s s i g n m e n t s
in clud ing d e v isin g d ifficu lt c o n t r o l panel w irin g under ge n e ra l su p e rv isio n .
A s s i g n m e n t s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e a v a r i e t y o f lo n g and c o m p l e x r e p o r t s w h ich
o f t e n a r e i r r e g u l a r o r n o n r e c u r r i n g , r e q u i r i n g s o m e pla nnin g o f the n ature
and s e q u e n c i n g o f o p e r a t i o n s , and the u s e o f a v a r i e t y o f m a c h i n e s .
Is
t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e d in t r a i n i n g n e w o p e r a t o r s in m a c h i n e o p e r a t i o n s o r t r a i n in g
l o w e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r s in w i r i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s and in the o p e r a t i n g s e q u e n c e s
o f lo n g and c o m p l e x r e p o r t s .
D o e s n o t in c lu d e p o s i t i o n s in w h i c h w ir in g
r e s p o n s i b i l i t y is l i m i t e d to s e l e c t i o n and i n s e r t i o n o f p r e w i r e d b o a r d s .
C lass B .
P e r f o r m s w o r k a c c o r d i n g to e s t a b l i s h e d p r o c e d u r e s and
under s p e cific in stru ction s.
A s s i g n m e n t s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e c o m p l e t e but r o u ­
tine and r e c u r r i n g r e p o r t s o r p a r t s o f l a r g e r and m o r e c o m p l e x r e p o r t s .
O p e r a t e s m o r e d i f f i c u l t ta b u la tin g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e s s u c h as
th e t a b u l a t o r and c a l c u l a t o r , in a d d it io n to the s i m p l e r m a c h i n e s u s e d b y
cla ss C op erators.
M a y b e r e q u i r e d to do s o m e w i r i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s .
C lass C .
U n de r s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s , o p e r a t e s s i m p l e ta b u la tin g
o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e s s u c h as th e s o r t e r , i n t e r p r e t e r , r e p r o d u c i n g
punch, c o l l a t o r , e tc.
A s s i g n m e n t s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e p o r t i o n s o f a w o r k unit,
fo r e x a m p le , individual sortin g o r colla tin g runs, o r rep etitive o p e r a tio n s .
May p e r fo r m
s i m p l e w i r i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s , and d o s o m e f i l i n g w o r k .

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS

C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T , BU SINESS— C o n tin u e d

A n a l y z e s b u s i n e s s p r o b l e m s to f o r m u l a t e p r o c e d u r e s f o r s o lv in g
th e m by u s e o f e l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g e q u ip m e n t .
D evelops a co m p le te
d e s c r i p t i o n o f a l l s p e c i f i c a t i o n s n e e d e d to e n a b le p r o g r a m m e r s to p r e p a r e
r e q u ire d d igital c o m p u te r p r o g r a m s .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g :
A n a l y z e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r o p e r a t i o n s to be a u t o m a t e d and i d e n t i f i e s c o n d i t i o n s
and c r i t e r i a r e q u i r e d to a c h i e v e s a t i s f a c t o r y r e s u l t s ; s p e c i f i e s n u m b e r and
t y p e s o f r e c o r d s , f i l e s , and d o c u m e n t s to be u s e d ; o u t lin e s a c t i o n s to be
p e r f o r m e d by p e r s o n n e l and c o m p u t e r s in s u f f i c i e n t d e t a i l f o r p r e s e n t a t i o n
to m a n a g e m e n t and f o r p r o g r a m m i n g ( t y p i c a l l y t h is i n v o l v e s p r e p a r a t i o n o f
w o r k and data f l o w c h a r t s ) ; c o o r d i n a t e s the d e v e l o p m e n t o f t e s t p r o b l e m s and
p a r t i c i p a t e s in t r i a l ru ns o f n e w and r e v i s e d s y s t e m s ; and r e c o m m e n d s e q u i p ­
m e n t c h a n g e s to o b ta in m o r e e f f e c t i v e o v e r a l l o p e r a t i o n s .
(N O TE :
W orkers
p e r f o r m i n g both s y s t e m s a n a l y s i s and p r o g r a m m i n g s ho u ld be c l a s s i f i e d as
s y s t e m s a n a ly s t s if th is i s the s k i l l u s e d to d e t e r m i n e t h e i r pa y.)

C la ss C .
W o r k s u n d e r i m m e d i a t e s u p e r v i s i o n , c a r r y i n g out a n a l y ­
s e s as a s sig n e d , u su ally o f a single activity .
A s s i g n m e n t s a r e d e s i g n e d to
d e v e l o p and e x p a n d p r a c t i c a l e x p e r i e n c e in the a p p l i c a t i o n o f p r o c e d u r e s and
skills req u ired fo r sy ste m s analysis w ork .
F o r e x a m p le , m a y a s sist a higher
l e v e l s y s t e m s a n a ly s t b y p r e p a r i n g the d e t a i l e d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s r e q u i r e d b y
p r o g r a m m e r s f r o m i n f o r m a t i o n d e v e l o p e d b y the h i g h e r l e v e l a n a ly s t .
C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M M E R , BUSINESS
C o n v e rts statem ents o f b u sin ess p r o b le m s , ty p ica lly p rep a red by a
s y s t e m s a n a l y s t , in to a s e q u e n c e o f d e t a i l e d i n s t r u c t i o n s w h i c h a r e r e q u i r e d
to s o l v e the p r o b l e m s b y a u t o m a t i c data p r o c e s s i n g e q u ip m e n t .
W orking f r o m
c h a r t s o r d i a g r a m s , the p r o g r a m m e r d e v e l o p s the p r e c i s e i n s t r u c t i o n s w h i c h ,
w h e n e n t e r e d in to the c o m p u t e r s y s t e m in c o d e d la n g u a g e , c a u s e the m a n i p u ­
la ti o n o f data to a c h i e v e d e s i r e d r e s u l t s .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g :
A p p l i e s k n o w l e d g e o f c o m p u t e r c a p a b i l i t i e s , m a t h e m a t i c s , l o g i c e m p l o y e d by
c o m p u t e r s , and p a r t i c u l a r s u b j e c t m a t t e r i n v o l v e d to a n a ly z e c h a r t s and
d i a g r a m s o f the p r o b l e m to be p r o g r a m m e d ; d e v e l o p s s e q u e n c e o f p r o g r a m
s t e p s ; w r i t e s d e t a i l e d f l o w c h a r t s to s h o w o r d e r in w h i c h data w i l l be
p r o c e s s e d ; c o n v e r t s t h e s e c h a r t s to c o d e d i n s t r u c t i o n s f o r m a c h i n e to f o l l o w ;
t e s t s and c o r r e c t s p r o g r a m s ; p r e p a r e s i n s t r u c t i o n s f o r o p e r a t i n g p e r s o n n e l
d u r i n g p r o d u c t i o n ru n; a n a l y z e s , r e v i e w s , and a l t e r s p r o g r a m s to i n c r e a s e
o p e r a t i n g e f f i c i e n c y o r adapt t o n e w r e q u i r e m e n t s ; m a i n t a i n s r e c o r d s o f
p r o g r a m d e v e l o p m e n t and r e v i s i o n s .
(N O TE:
W o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g both
s y s t e m s a n a l y s i s and p r o g r a m m i n g s h o u ld b e c l a s s i f i e d as s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s
if th is is the s k i l l u s e d to d e t e r m i n e t h e i r pay.)

D o e s not in c lu d e e m p l o y e e s p r i m a r i l y r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the m a n a g e ­
m e n t o r s u p e r v i s i o n o f o t h e r e l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g e m p l o y e e s , o r s y s ­
t e m s a n a l y s t s p r i m a r i l y c o n c e r n e d with s c i e n t i f i c o r e n g i n e e r i n g p r o b l e m s .
F o r w a g e stu dy p u r p o s e s , s y s t e m s a n a ly s t s a r e c l a s s i f i e d as f o l l o w s :
C la ss A .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n on
c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s i n v o l v i n g a ll p h a s e s o f s y s t e m a n a l y s i s .
P r o b le m s are
c o m p l e x b e c a u s e o f d i v e r s e s o u r c e s o f inpu t data and m u l t i p l e - u s e r e q u i r e ­
m e n t s o f output da ta.
( F o r e x a m p l e , d e v e l o p s an i n t e g r a t e d p r o d u c t i o n s c h e d ­
u lin g , i n v e n t o r y c o n t r o l , c o s t a n a l y s i s , and s a l e s a n a l y s i s r e c o r d in w h ich
e v e r y i t e m o f e a c h ty p e i s a u t o m a t i c a l l y p r o c e s s e d t h r o u g h the f u l l s y s t e m
o f r e c o r d s and a p p r o p r i a t e f o l l o w u p a c t i o n s a r e in itia t e d by the c o m p u t e r . )
C o n f e r s with p e r s o n s c o n c e r n e d to d e t e r m i n e the data p r o c e s s i n g p r o b l e m s
and a d v i s e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l on the i m p l i c a t i o n s o f n e w o r r e v i s e d
s y s t e m s o f data p r o c e s s i n g o p e r a t i o n s .
M akes r e co m m e n d a tio n s , if n eeded,
f o r a p p r o v a l o f m a j o r s y s t e m s i n s t a l l a t i o n s o r c h a n g e s and f o r o b ta in in g
e q u ip m e n t .

D o e s n o t i n c l u d e e m p l o y e e s p r i m a r i l y r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the m a n a g e ­
m e n t o r s u p e r v i s i o n o f o t h e r e l e c t r o n i c da t a p r o c e s s i n g e m p l o y e e s , o r p r o ­
g r a m m e r s p r i m a r i l y c o n c e r n e d w ith s c i e n t i f i c a n d / o r e n g i n e e r i n g p r o b l e m s .
For

May p r o v id e fun ction al
who a r e a s s i g n e d to a s s i s t .

direction

to

low er

level sy ste m s

stu dy p u r p o s e s ,

program m ers

a r e c l a s s i f i e d as f o l l o w s :

C l a s s A . W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t l y o r u n d e r o n l y g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n on
c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s w h i c h r e q u i r e c o m p e t e n c e in a l l p h a s e s o f p r o g r a m m i n g
c o n c e p t s and p r a c t i c e s .
W o r k i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s and c h a r t s w h ich i d e n t i fy
th e n a t u r e o f d e s i r e d r e s u l t s , m a j o r p r o c e s s i n g s t e p s to b e a c c o m p l i s h e d ,
and the r e l a t i o n s h i p s b e t w e e n v a r i o u s s t e p s o f th e p r o b l e m s o lv in g r o u t in e ;
p la n s the f u l l r a n g e o f p r o g r a m m i n g a c t i o n s n e e d e d to e f f i c i e n t l y u t i l i z e the
c o m p u t e r s y s t e m in a c h i e v i n g d e s i r e d end p r o d u c t s .

C l a s s B.
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n l y g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n on
p r o b l e m s that a r e r e l a t i v e l y u n c o m p l i c a t e d to a n a l y z e , p la n , p r o g r a m , and
operate.
P r o b l e m s a r e o f l i m i t e d c o m p l e x i t y b e c a u s e s o u r c e s o f input data
a r e h o m o g e n e o u s and the output data a r e c l o s e l y r e l a t e d .
(F o r exam ple,
d e v e l o p s s y s t e m s f o r m a in t a in in g d e p o s i t o r a c c o u n t s in a b a n k , m a in t a in in g
a c c o u n t s r e c e i v a b l e in a r e t a i l e s t a b l i s h m e n t , o r m a in t a in in g i n v e n t o r y
a c c o u n t s in a m a n u f a c t u r i n g o r w h o l e s a l e e s t a b l i s h m e n t . )
C o n f e r s with p e r ­
s o n s c o n c e r n e d to d e t e r m i n e the data p r o c e s s i n g p r o b l e m s and a d v i s e s
s u b j e c t - m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l on the i m p l i c a t i o n s o f the data p r o c e s s i n g s y s t e m s
to be a p p lie d .

A t t h is l e v e l , p r o g r a m m i n g i s d i f f i c u l t b e c a u s e c o m p u t e r e q u ip m e n t
m u s t be o r g a n i z e d to p r o d u c e s e v e r a l i n t e r r e l a t e d but d i v e r s e p r o d u c t s f r o m
n u m e r o u s and d i v e r s e data e l e m e n t s .
A w id e v a r i e t y and e x t e n s i v e n u m b e r
o f internal p r o c e s s in g a ctions m u st o c c u r .
T h i s r e q u i r e s s uch a c t i o n s as
d e v e l o p m e n t o f c o m m o n o p e r a t i o n s w h i c h c a n be r e u s e d , e s t a b l i s h m e n t o f
lin k a g e p o in ts b e t w e e n o p e r a t i o n s , a d j u s t m e n t s to da ta w h e n p r o g r a m r e q u i r e ­
m e n t s e x c e e d c o m p u t e r s t o r a g e c a p a c i t y , and s u b s t a n t ia l m a n ip u la t io n and
r e s e q u e n c i n g o f data e l e m e n t s to f o r m a h ig h ly i n t e g r a t e d p r o g r a m .

OR
W o r k s on a s e g m e n t o f a c o m p l e x data p r o c e s s i n g s c h e m e o r s y s t e m ,
as d e s c r i b e d f o r c l a s s A .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t l y on r o u tin e a s s i g n m e n t s and
r e c e i v e s i n s t r u c t i o n and g u id a n c e on c o m p l e x a s s i g n m e n t s .
W ork is r ev iew ed
f o r a c c u r a c y o f ju d g m e n t , c o m p l i a n c e with i n s t r u c t i o n s , and to i n s u r e p r o p e r
a lig n m e n t with the o v e r a l l s y s t e m .




wage

a n a ly s t s

M a y p r o v i d e f u n c t i o n a l d i r e c t i o n to l o w e r l e v e l p r o g r a m m e r s w ho a r e
a s s i g n e d to a s s i s t .

26

COMPUTER PROGRAMMER,

B U S I N E S S — Co ntinue d

C O M P U TER OPERATOR-

C lass B .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n on
r e la t iv e ly sim p le p r o g r a m s , o r on s im p le s e g m e n ts o f c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .
P r o g r a m s ( o r s e g m e n t s ) u s u a l l y p r o c e s s i n f o r m a t i o n t o p r o d u c e data in tw o
or three v a ried sequen ces or fo rm a ts.
R e p o r t s and l i s t i n g s a r e p r o d u c e d b y
r e f i n i n g , a d a p tin g, a r r a y i n g , o r m a k i n g m i n o r a d d it io n s to o r d e l e t i o n s f r o m
input data w h i c h a r e r e a d i l y a v a i l a b l e .
W h ile n u m e r o u s r e c o r d s m a y be
p r o c e s s e d , the da ta h ave b e e n r e f i n e d in p r i o r a c t i o n s s o that the a c c u r a c y
and s e q u e n c i n g o f da ta c a n b e t e s t e d b y u s in g a f e w r o u t in e c h e c k s . T y p i c a l l y ,
the p r o g r a m d e a l s w ith r o u tin e r e c o r d k e e p i n g o p e r a t i o n s .
OR
W o r k s on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s (as d e s c r i b e d f o r c l a s s A) u n d e r c l o s e
d ir e c tio n o f a higher le v e l p r o g r a m m e r or s u p e r v is o r .
M a y a s s i s t h ig h e r
l e v e l p r o g r a m m e r b y in d e p e n d e n t l y p e r f o r m i n g l e s s d i f f i c u l t t a s k s a s s i g n e d ,
and p e r f o r m i n g m o r e d i f f i c u l t t a s k s u n d e r f a i r l y c l o s e d i r e c t i o n .
M a y gu ide o r i n s t r u c t l o w e r l e v e l p r o g r a m m e r s .
C la ss C .
M akes p r a c tic a l applications o f p r o g ra m m in g p r a c tic e s
and c o n c e p t s u s u a l l y l e a r n e d in f o r m a l t r a i n in g c o u r s e s .
A ssign m en ts are
d e s i g n e d to d e v e l o p c o m p e t e n c e in the a p p l i c a t i o n o f s t a n d a r d p r o c e d u r e s to
ro u tin e p r o b l e m s . R e c e i v e s c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n o n n e w a s p e c t s o f a s s i g n m e n t s ;
and w o r k i s r e v i e w e d to v e r i f y it s a c c u r a c y and c o n f o r m a n c e w ith r e q u i r e d
procedures.

COMPUTER OPERATOR
M o n i t o r s and o p e r a t e s the c o n t r o l c o n s o l e o f a d ig i t a l c o m p u t e r to
p r o c e s s data a c c o r d i n g to o p e r a t i n g i n s t r u c t i o n s , u s u a l l y p r e p a r e d b y a p r o ­
gram m er.
W o r k i n c l u d e s m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g : Stud ie s i n s t r u c t i o n s to
d e t e r m i n e e q u ip m e n t s e tu p and o p e r a t i o n s ; lo a d s e q u ip m e n t with r e q u i r e d
i t e m s (tape r e e l s , c a r d s , e t c . ) ; s w i t c h e s n e c e s s a r y a u x i l i a r y e q u i p m e n t in to
c i r c u i t , and s t a r t s and o p e r a t e s c o m p u t e r ; m a k e s a d j u s t m e n t s to c o m p u t e r to
c o r r e c t o p e r a t i n g p r o b l e m s and m e e t s p e c i a l c o n d i t i o n s ; r e v i e w s e r r o r s m a d e
d u r in g o p e r a t i o n and d e t e r m i n e s c a u s e o r r e f e r s p r o b l e m to s u p e r v i s o r o r
p r o g r a m m e r ; and m a i n t a i n s o p e r a t i n g r e c o r d s .
M a y t e s t and a s s i s t in
correctin g program .
For

wage

stu dy

purposes,

com puter

operators

are

cla ssified

as

follow s:
C lass A.
O p e r a t e s in d e p e n d e n t ly , o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n ,
a c o m p u t e r ru n n in g p r o g r a m s with m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s :
N e w p r o g r a m s a r e f r e q u e n t l y t e s t e d and i n t r o d u c e d ; s c h e d u l i n g r e q u i r e m e n t s
a r e o f c r i t i c a l i m p o r t a n c e to m i n i m i z e d o w n t i m e ; the p r o g r a m s a r e o f
c o m p l e x d e s i g n s o that i d e n t i f i c a t i o n o f e r r o r s o u r c e o f te n r e q u i r e s a w o r k i n g
k n o w l e d g e o f the t o t a l p r o g r a m , and a lt e r n a t e p r o g r a m s m a y not be a v a i l a b l e .
M a y g iv e d i r e c t i o n and g u id a n c e to l o w e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r s .
C l a s s B.
O p e r a t e s in d e p e n d e n t l y , o r u n d e r o n l y g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n ,
a c o m p u t e r ru nn in g p r o g r a m s with m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s :
M o s t o f the p r o g r a m s a r e e s t a b l i s h e d p r o d u c t i o n r u n s , t y p i c a l l y run o n a
r e g u l a r l y r e c u r r i n g b a s i s ; t h e r e i s li t tle o r n o t e s t i n g o f n e w p r o g r a m s
r e q u i r e d ; a l t e r n a t e p r o g r a m s a r e p r o v i d e d in c a s e o r i g i n a l p r o g r a m n e e d s




ontinued

m a j o r c h a n g e o r c a n n o t b e c o r r e c t e d w ith in a r e a s o n a b l y s h o r t t i m e .
In
c o m m o n e r r o r s i t u a t i o n s , d i a g n o s e s c a u s e and t a k e s c o r r e c t i v e a c t i o n .
T h is
u s u a l l y i n v o l v e s a p p ly in g p r e v i o u s l y p r o g r a m m e d c o r r e c t i v e s t e p s , o r u sin g
standard c o r r e c t i o n te ch n iq u e s.
OR
O p e r a t e s u n d e r d i r e c t s u p e r v i s i o n a c o m p u t e r ru nnin g p r o g r a m s o r
s e g m e n t s o f p r o g r a m s with the c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s d e s c r i b e d f o r c l a s s A .
M ay
a s s i s t a h i g h e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r b y i n d e p e n d e n t ly p e r f o r m i n g l e s s d i f f i c u l t t a s k s
a s s i g n e d , and p e r f o r m i n g d i f f i c u l t t a s k s f o l l o w i n g d e t a i l e d i n s t r u c t i o n s and
w ith f r e q u e n t r e v i e w o f o p e r a t i o n s p e r f o r m e d .

expected
a b i l i t y to
receiv ed
operator

C la ss C .
W o r k s on r o u t in e p r o g r a m s u n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n .
Is
to d e v e l o p w o r k i n g k n o w l e d g e o f the c o m p u t e r e q u ip m e n t u s e d and
d e t e c t p r o b l e m s i n v o l v e d in ru nnin g ro u tin e p r o g r a m s .
U s u a l l y has
s o m e f o r m a l t r a i n i n g in c o m p u t e r o p e r a t i o n . M a y a s s i s t h i g h e r l e v e l
on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .

DRAFTER
C lass A .
P la n s the g r a p h i c p r e s e n t a t i o n o f c o m p l e x i t e m s h avin g
d i s t i n c t i v e d e s i g n f e a t u r e s that d i f f e r s i g n i f i c a n t l y f r o m e s t a b l i s h e d d r a f t i n g
preceden ts.
W o r k s in c l o s e s u p p o r t w ith the d e s i g n o r i g i n a t o r , and m a y
r e c o m m e n d m in o r design ch a n g es.
A n a l y z e s the e f f e c t o f e a c h c h a n g e on the
d e t a i l s o f f o r m , f u n c t i o n , and p o s i t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s o f c o m p o n e n t s and p a r t s .
W o r k s w ith a m i n i m u m o f s u p e r v i s o r y a s s i s t a n c e .
C o m p l e t e d w o r k is
r e v i e w e d b y d e s i g n o r i g i n a t o r f o r c o n s i s t e n c y with p r i o r e n g i n e e r i n g d e t e r ­
m inations.
M a y e i t h e r p r e p a r e d r a w i n g s o r d i r e c t t h e i r p r e p a r a t i o n by l o w e r
level drafters.

C la ss B .
P e r f o r m s n o n r o u t i n e and c o m p l e x d r a f t i n g a s s i g n m e n t s
th at r e q u i r e the a p p l i c a t i o n o f m o s t o f the s t a n d a r d i z e d d r a w in g t e c h n i q u e s
re g u la rly used.
D u t ie s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e s u ch w o r k a s :
P r e p a r e s w orking
d r a w i n g s o f s u b a s s e m b l i e s with i r r e g u l a r s h a p e s , m u l t i p l e f u n c t i o n s , and
p r e c is e p osition a l rela tion sh ip s betw een com p on en ts; p r e p a r e s a rch ite ctu r a l
d r a w i n g s f o r c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a b u il d in g in c lu d in g d e t a i l d r a w i n g s o f f o u n ­
d a t i o n s , w a l l s e c t i o n s , f l o o r p l a n s , and r o o f .
U s e s a c c e p t e d f o r m u l a s and
m a n u a l s in m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y c o m p u t a t i o n s to d e t e r m i n e q u a n tit ie s o f
m a t e r i a l s to be u s e d , lo a d c a p a c i t i e s , s t r e n g t h s , s t r e s s e s , e t c .
R eceiv es
i n i t i a l i n s t r u c t i o n s , r e q u i r e m e n t s , and a d v i c e f r o m s u p e r v i s o r .
C om pleted
w ork is ch ecked fo r te c h n ica l adequacy.

C lass C .
P r e p a r e s d e t a i l d r a w i n g s o f s in g le unit s o r p a r t s f o r
en gineering, con stru ctio n , m anufacturing, o r rep air p u rp oses.
Types of
d r a w i n g s p r e p a r e d in c l u d e i s o m e t r i c p r o j e c t i o n s ( d e p i c t i n g t h r e e d i m e n s i o n s
in a c c u r a t e s c a l e ) and s e c t i o n a l v i e w s to c l a r i f y p o s i t i o n i n g o f c o m p o n e n t s
and c o n v e y n e e d e d i n f o r m a t i o n .
C on solida tes details fro m a num ber o f
s o u r c e s and a d j u s t s o r t r a n s p o s e s s c a l e as r e q u i r e d .
Suggested m e th o d s of
a p p r o a c h , a p p l i c a b l e p r e c e d e n t s , and a d v i c e on s o u r c e m a t e r i a l s a r e g ive n
w ith i n i t i a l a s s i g n m e n t s .
I n s t r u c t i o n s a r e l e s s c o m p l e t e w hen a s s i g n m e n t s
recur.
W o r k m a y be s p o t - c h e c k e d d u r in g p r o g r e s s .

D R A F T E R -T R A C E R

E L E C T R O N IC S T E C H N IC IA N — C ontinued

Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing
cloth or paper over drawings and tracing with pen or pencil. (Does not
include tracing limited to plans primarily consisting of straight lines and a
large scale not requiring close delineation.)

Work may be reviewed by supervisor (frequently an engineer or
designer) for general compliance with accepted practices. May provide
technical guidance to lower level technicians.

AND/OR
Prepares simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized items.
Work is closely supervised during progress.
ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN
Works on various types of electronic equipment and related devices
by performing one or a combination of the following: Installing, maintaining,
repairing, overhauling, troubleshooting, modifying, constructing, and testing.
Work requires practical application of technical knowledge of electronics
principles, ability to determine malfunctions, and skill to put equipment in
required operating condition.
The equipment--- consisting of either many different kinds of circuits
or multiple repetition of the same kind of circuit— includes, but is not limited
to, the following: (a) Electronic transmitting and receiving equipment (e.g.,
radar, radio, television, telephone, sonar, navigational aids), (b) digital and
analog computers, and (c) industrial and medical measuring and controlling
equipment.
This classification excludes repairers of such standard electronic
equipment as common office machines and household radio and television
sets; production assemblers and testers; workers whose primary duty is
servicing electronic test instruments; technicians who have administrative
or supervisory responsibility; and drafters, designers, and professional
engineers.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following
definitions.
Class A. Applies advanced technical knowledge to solve unusually
complex problems (i.e., those that typically cannot be solved solely by refer­
ence to manufacturers' manuals or similar documents) in working on elec­
tronic equipment. Examples of such problems include location and density of
circuitry, electromagnetic radiation, isolating malfunctions, and frequent
engineering changes. Work involves: A detailed understanding of the inter­
relationships of circuits; exercising independent judgment in performing such
tasks as making circuit analyses, calculating wave forms, tracing relation­
ships in signal flow; and regularly using complex test instruments (e.g., dual
trace oscilloscopes, Q-meters, deviation meters, pulse generators).

Class B. Applies comprehensive technical knowledge to solve com­
plex problems (i.e., those that typically can be solved solely by properly
interpreting manufacturers' manuals or similar documents) in working on
electronic equipment. Work involves: A familiarity with the interrelation­
ships of circuits; and judgment in determining work sequence and in selecting
tools and testing instruments, usually less complex than those used by the
class A technician.
Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher
level technician, and work is reviewed for specific compliance with accepted
practices and work assignments. May provide technical guidance to lower
level technicians.
Class C. Applies working technical knowledge to perform simple or
routine tasks in working on electronic equipment, following detailed instruc­
tions which cover virtually all procedures. Work typically involves such
tasks as: Assisting higher level technicians by performing such activities as
replacing components, wiring circuits, and taking test readings; repairing
simple electronic equipment; and using tools and common test instruments
(e.g., multimeters, audio signal generators, tube testers, oscilloscopes).
Is not required to be familiar with the interrelationships of circuits. This
knowledge, however, may be acquired through assignments designed to
increase competence (including classroom training) so that worker can
advance to higher level technician.
Receives technical guidance, as required, f r o m supervisor o r higher
level technician. Work is typically spot checked, but is given detailed review
when new or advanced assignments are involved.
REGISTERED INDUSTRIAL NURSE
A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general medical
direction to ill or injured employees or other persons who become- ill or
suffer an accident on the premises of a factory or other establishment.
Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid to the ill or
injured; attending to subsequent dressing of employees' injuries; keeping
records of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or
other purposes; assisting in physical examinations and health evaluations of
applicants and employees; and planning and carrying out programs involving
health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment, or
other activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety of all personnel.
Nursing supervisors or head nurses in establishments employing more than
one nurse are excluded.

MAINTENANCE, TOOLROOM, AND POWERPLANT
MAINTENANCE CARPENTER

MAINTENANCE CARPENTER----Continued

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain
in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters,
benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim made of wood
in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Planning and
laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal instructions;

using a variety of carpenter's handtools, portable power tools, and standard
measuring instruments; making standard shop computations relating to dimen­
sions of v/ork; and selecting materials necessary for the work. In general,
the work of the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and experi­
ence usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.




28

M A IN T E N A N C E E L E C T R IC IA N

M A I N T E N A N C E M E C H A N IC (M o to r v e h ic le )

Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the instal­
lation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generation, distribution,
or utilization of electric energy in an establishment. Work involves most
of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of electrical equip­
ment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, controllers, circuit
breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems, or other transmission
equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or other specifi­
cations; locating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equip­
ment; working standard computations relating to load requirements of wiring
or electrical equipment; and using a variety of electrician's handtools and
measuring and testing instruments. In general, the work of the maintenance
electrician requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an estab­
lishment. Work involves most of the following: Examining automotive equip­
ment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling equipment and performing
repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches, gauges, drills,
or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts; replacing broken
or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassembling and
installing the various assemblies in the vehicle and making necessary adjust­
ments; and aligning wheels, adjusting brakes and lights, or tightening body
bolts. In general, the work of the motor vehicle maintenance mechanic
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

MAINTENANCE PAINTER

MAINTENANCE PIPEFITTER

Paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an estab­
lishment. Work involves the following: Knowledge of surface peculiarities
and types of paint required for different applications; preparing surface for
painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler in nail holes and
interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush. May mix colors,
oils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper color or
consistency. In general, the work of the maintenance painter requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.
MAINTENANCE MACHINIST
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of
metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work
involves most of the following: Interpreting written instructions and speci­
fications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist's
handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating
standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making
standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds,
and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties of the common
metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and equipment required for this
work; and fitting and assembling parts into mechanical equipment. In general,
the machinist's work normally requires a rounded training in machine-shop
practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC (Machinery)
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment.
Work involves most of the following; Examining machines and mechanical
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling
machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of handtools in
scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items
obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a
machine shop or sending the machine to a machine shop for major repairs;
preparing written specifications for major repairs or for the production of
parts ordered from machine shops; reassembling machines; and making all
necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the work of a machinery
maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experi­
ence. Excluded from this classification are workers whose primary duties
involve setting up or adjusting machines.




This classification does not include mechanics who repair customers'
vehicles in automobile repair shops.

29

Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Laying
out work and measuring to locate position of pipe from drawings or other
written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct lengths with
chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machines; threading
pipe with stocks - and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven
machines; assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers;
making standard shop computations relating to pressures, flow, and size of
pipe required; and making standard tests to determine whether finished pipes
meet specifications. In general, the work of the maintenance pipefitter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. Workers primarily
engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating systems
are excluded.
MAINTENANCE SHEET-METAL WORKER
Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-metal
equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans, shelves,
lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying out all types of
sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints, models, or other specifi­
cations; setting up and operating all available types of sheet-metal working
machines; using a variety of handtools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping,
fitting, and assembling; and installing sheet-metal articles as required. In
general, the work of the maintenance sheet-metal worker requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dismantles and
installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout are
required. Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying out
work; interpreting ulueprints or other specifications; using a variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations relating to stresses,
strength of materials, and centers of gravity; aligning and balancing equip­
ment; selecting standard tools, equipment, and parts to be used; and installing
and maintaining in good order power transmission equipment such as drives
and speed reducers. In general, the millwright's work normally requires a
rounded training and experience in the trade acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

M A IN T E N A N C E T R A D E S H E L P E R

T O O L A N D D IE M A K E R

Assists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades, b
yperforming specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a
worker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning working area, machine,
and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding materials or tools; and per­
forming other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind of work
the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade: In some
trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding materials and
tools, and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to perform
specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are also performed
by workers on a full-time basis.

Constructs and repairs jigs, fixtures, cutting tools, gauges, or metal
dies or molds used in shaping or forming metal or nonmetallic material (e.g.,
plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work typically involves: Planning and laying
out work according to models, blueprints, drawings, or other written or oral
specifications; understanding the working properties of common metals and
alloys; selecting appropriate materials, tools, and processes required to
complete tasks; making necessary shop computations; setting up and operating
various machine tools and related equipment; usihg various tool and die
maker's handtools and precision measuring instruments; working to very
close tolerances; heat-treating metal parts and finished tools and dies to
achieve required qualities; fitting and assembling parts to prescribed toler­
ances and allowances. In general, the tool and die maker's work requires
rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired
through formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR (Toolroom)
Specializes in operating one or more than one type of machine tool
(e.g., jig borer, grinding machine, engine lathe, milling machine) to machine
metal for us^ in making or maintaining jigs, fixtures, cutting tools, gauges,
or metal dies or molds used in shaping or forming metal or nonmetalli'c
material (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work typically involves:
Planning and performing difficult machining operations which require com­
plicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; setting up machine tool or
tools (e.g., install cutting tools and adjust guides, stops, working tables,
and other controls to handle the size of stock to be machined; determine
proper feeds, speeds, tooling, and operation sequence or select those pre­
scribed in drawings, blueprints, or layouts); using a variety of precision
measuring instruments; making necessary adjustments during machining
operation to achieve requisite dimensions to very close tolerances. M a y be
required to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils, to
recognize when tools need dressing, and to dress tools. In general, the work
of a machine-tool operator (toolroom) at the skill level called for in this
classification requires extensive knowledge of machine-shop and toolroom
practice usually acquired through considerable on-the-job training and
experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not
include machine-tool operators (toolroom) employed in tool and die jobbing
shops.

For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not
include tool and die makers who (1) are employed in tool and die jobbing
shops or (2) produce forging dies (die sinkers).
STATIONARY ENGINEER
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of
stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the
establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrigeration, or airconditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment such as
steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors, turbines, ventilating
and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and boiler-fed water pumps;
making equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation of machinery,
temperature, and fuel consumption. May also supervise these operations.
Head or chief engineers in establishments employing more than one engineer
are excluded.
BOILER TENDER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which
employed with heat, power, or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; and checks water and
safety valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom equipment.

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
TRUCKDRIVER--- Continued

TRUCKDRIVER
Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport mate­
rials, merchandise, equipment, or workers between various types of estab­
lishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses, whole­
sale and retail establishments, or between r e t a i l establishments and
customers' houses or places of business. May also load or unload truck with
or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep truck in good
wo r k i n g order. Sales-route and over-the-road drivers are excluded.
For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and
type of equipment, as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on the basis
of trailer capacity.)




30

Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,

light truck (under 1V tons)
2
medium truck (1 V to and including 4 tons)
2
heavy truck (trailer) (over 4 tons)
heavy truck (other than trailer) (over 4 tons)

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is responsible
for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials. Shipping work
involves: A knowledge of shipping procedures, practices, routes, available
means of transportation, and rates; and preparing records of the goods

S H IP P IN G A N D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K — C ontinued

S H IP P IN G P A C K E R — C ontinued

shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges, and
keeping a file of shipping records. May direct or assist in preparing the
merchandise for shipment. Receiving work involves: Verifying or directing
others in verifying the correctness of shipments against bills of lading,
invoices, or other records; checking for shortages and rejecting damaged
goods; routing merchandise or materials to proper departments; and main­
taining necessary records and files.

shipping containers and may involve one or more of the following: Knowledge
of various items of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate
type and size of container; inserting enclosures in container; using excelsior
or other material to prevent breakage or damage; closing and sealing con­
tainer; and applying labels or entering identifying data on container. Packers
who also make wooden boxes or crates are excluded.
MATERIAL HANDLING LABORER

For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store, or
other establishment whose duties involve one or more of the following:
Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or from freight
cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving, or placing
materials or merchandise in proper storage location; and transporting
materials or merchandise by handtruck, car, or wheelbarrow.
Longshore
workers, who load and unload ships, are excluded.

Shipping clerk
Receiving clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
WAREHOUSEMAN
As directed, performs a variety of warehousing duties which require
an understanding of the establishment's storage plan. Work involves most
of the following: Verifying materials (or merchandise) against receiving
documents, noting and reporting discrepancies and obvious damages; routing
materials to prescribed storage locations; storing, stacking, or palletizing
materials in accordance with prescribed storage methods; rearranging and
t a k i n g inventory of stored materials; examining stored materials and
reporting deterioration and damage; removing material from storage and
preparing it for shipment. May operate hand or power trucks in performing
warehousing duties.
Exclude workers whose primary duties involve shipping and receiv­
ing work (see Shipping and Receiving Clerk and Shipping Packer), order filling
(see Order Filler), or operating power trucks (see Power-Truck Operator).
ORDER FILLER

POWER-TRUCK OPERATOR
Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered truck
or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse,
manufacturing plant, or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of powertruck, as follows:
Forklift operator
Power-truck operator (other than forklift)
GUARD AND WATCHMAN
Guard. Performs routine police duties, either at fixed post or on
tour, maintaining order, using arms or force where necessary. Includes
guards who are stationed at gate and check on identity of employees and
o t h e r p e r s o n s e n t e r in g .

Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips, customers'
orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to filling orders and indi­
cating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requisition
additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other
related duties.
SHIPPING PACKER
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them
in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being dependent
upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the type of container
employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the placing of items in




31

Watchman. Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting
property against fire, theft, and illegal entry.
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and
washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial
or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following:
Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips, trash,
and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing metal
fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor maintenance services;
and cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers who specialize
in window washing are excluded.

Available On Request
The following areas are surveyed periodically for use in administering the Service Contr;
available at no cost from any of the BLS regional offices shown on the back cover.

Act of 1965.

Survey results are published in releases which, while supplies last, are or will be

Alaska
Albany, Ga.
Albuquerque, N. Mex.
Alexandria, La.
Alpena, Standish, and Tawas City, Mich.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Asheville, N.C.
Atlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.— S.C.
Bakersfield, Calif.
Baton Rouge, La.
Battle Creek, Mich.
Beaumont— Port Arthur— Orange, Tex.
Biloxi— Gulfport and Pascagoula, Miss.
Boise City, Idaho
Bremerton, Wash.
Bridgeport, Norwalk, and Stamford, Conn.
Brunswick, Ga.
Burlington, Vt.-N.Y.

Logansport— Peru, Ind.
Lorain— Elyria, Ohio
Lower Eastern Shore, Md.— Va.— Del.
Lynchburg, Va.
Macon, Ga.
Madison, Wis.
Mansfield, Ohio
Marquette, Escanaba, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.
McAllen— Pharr—Edinburg and Brownsville—
Harlingen— San Benito, Tex.
Medford— Klamath Falls-Grants Pass, Oreg.
Meridian, Miss.
Middlesex, Monmouth, and Ocean Cos., N.J.
Mobile and Pensacola, Ala.— Fla.
Montgomery, Ala.
Nashville— Davidson, Tenn.
N e w Bern— Jacksonville, N.C.
N e w London— Norwich, Conn.— R.I.
North Dakota, State of

Cape Cod,

O rlan d o,

Mass.

Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Champaign— Urbana— Rantoul, 1 1
1.
Charleston, S.C.
Charlotte— Gastonia, N.C.
Cheyenne, Wyo.
Clarksville— Hopkinsville, Tenn.-Ky.
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ga.—Ala.
Columbus, Miss.
Crane, Ind.
Decatur, 1 1
1.
Des Moines, Iowa
Dothan, Ala.
Duluth— Superior, Minn.— Wis.
El Paso, Tex., and Alamogordo— Las Cruces, N. Mex.
Eugene— Springfield, Oreg.
Fayetteville, N.C.
Fitchburg— Leominster, Mass.
Fort Smith, Ark.— Okla.
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Frederick—Hager stown , Md.—Chambersburg , Pa.—
Martinsburg, W. Va.
Gadsden and Anniston, Ala.
Goldsboro, N.C.
Grand Island— Hastings, Nebr.
Great Falls, Mont.
Guam, Territory of
Harrisburg— Lebanon, Pa.
Huntington—Ashland, W. Va.—Ky.—Ohio
Knoxville, Tenn.
La Crosse, Wis.
Laredo, Tex.
Las Vegas, Nev.
Lawton, Okla.
Lima, Ohio
Little Rock— North Little Rock, Ark.

Fla.

Oxnard— Simi Valley— Ventura, Calif.
Panama City, Fla.
Parkersburg— Marietta, W. Va.— Ohio
Peoria, 1 1
1.
Phoenix, Ariz.
Pine Bluff, Ark.
Pocatello—Idaho Falls, Idaho
Portsmouth, N.H.— Maine— Mass.
Pueblo, Colo.
Puerto Rico
Reno, Nev.
Richland—Kennewick— Walla Walla—
Pendleton, Wash.— Oreg.
River side— San Bernardino— Ontario, Calif.
Salina, Kans.
Salinas— Seaside— Monte rey, Calif.
Sandusky, Ohio
Santa Barbara— Santa Maria— Lompoc, Calif.
Savannah, Ga.
Selma, Ala.
Sherman— Denison, Tex.
Shreveport, La.
Sioux Falls, S. Dak.
Spokane, Wash.
Springfield, 1 1
1.
Springfield— Chicopee— Holyoke, Mass.— Conn.
Stockton, Calif.
Tacoma, Wash.
Tampa— St. Petersburg, Fla.
Topeka, Kans.
Tucson, Ariz.
Tulsa, Okla.
Vallejo—Fairfield— Napa, Calif.
Waco and Killeen— Temple, Tex.
Waterloo—Cedar Falls, Iowa
West Texas Plains
Wilmington, De 1 — N.J. Md.
.
—

An annual report on salaries for accountants, auditors, chief accountants, attorneys, job analysts, directors of personnel, buyers, chemists, engineers, engineering technicians, drafters, and
clerical employees is available. Order as B L S Bulletin 1891, National Survey of Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical Pay, March 1975. $1.30 a copy, from any of the BLS regional sales
offices shown on the back cover, or from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.




Area Wage Surveys
A list of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A directory of area wage studies including more limited studies conducted at the request of the
Employment Standards Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins may be purchased from any of the BLS regional offices shown
on the back cover or from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402
Bulletin number
and price*

Area
Akron, Ohio, Dec. 1975______________________________________
Albany-Schenectady—
Troy, N.Y., Sept. 1975 1
__________________
Anaheim—
Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Calif., Oct. 19751
_________
Atlanta, Ga., May
1976______________________________
Austin, Tex., Dec.
19751 _____________________________
Baltimore, Md., Aug. 1976___________________________________
Billings, Mont., July 1976____________________________________
Binghamton, N.Yr-Pa., July 1976*____________________________
Birmingham, Ala., Mar. 19761
_______________________________
Boston, Mass., Aug. 1976____________________________________
Buffalo, N.Y., Oct.
19751_____________________________
Canton, Ohio, May
1976______________________________
Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., Sept. 1976__________________________
Chicago, 111., May 1976______________________________________
Cincinnati, Ohio— y.—
K Ind., Mar. 1976_________________________
Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1975__________________________________
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 19751 _________________________________
Corpus Christi, Tex., July 1976______________________________
Dallas-Fort Worth, Tex., Oct. 19751 _________________________
Davenport-Rock Island—
Moline, Iowa-Ill., Feb. 1976__________
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1975______________________________________
Daytona Beach, Fla., Aug. 1976______________________________
Denver—
Boulder, Colo., Dec. 1975____________________________
Detroit, Mich., Mar. 19761
___________________________________
Fort Lauderdale—
Hollywood and West Palm Beach^Boca Raton, Fla., Apr. 1976________________________________
Fresno, Calif., June 1976____________________________________
Gainesville, Fla., Sept. 1976_________________________________
Green Bay, Wis., July 1976__________________________________
Greensboro-Winston-Salem—
High Point,N.C., Aug. 1976_______
Greenville—
Spartanburg, S.C., June 1976 1____________________
Hartford, Conn., Mar. 1976__________________________________
Houston, Tex., Apr. 1976____________________________________
Huntsville, Ala., Feb. 1976 __________________________________
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1976_________________________________
Jackson, Miss., Feb. 1976____________________________________
Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 1975_________________________________
Kansas City, Mor-Kans., Sept. 1975__________________________
Lexington—
Fayette, Ky., Nov. 19751__________________________
Los Angeles—
Long Beach, Calif.,'Oct. 1975 1_________________
Louisville, Ky.—
Ind., Nov. 1975______________________________
Melbourne—
Titusville—
Cocoa, Fla., Aug. 1975__ ______________
Memphis, Tenn.—
Ark.—
Miss., Nov. 1975_______________________

1850-80,
1850-63,
1850-75,
1900-30,
1850-83,
1900-52,
1900-39,
1900-49,
1900-11,
1900-53,
1850-69,
1900-28,
1900-57,
1900-32,
1900-7,
1850-64,
1850-78,
1900-41,
1850-59,
1900-25,
1850-73,
1900-45,
1850-82,
1900-15,

45 cents
$1.20
85 cents
85 cents
75 cents
85 cents
55 cents
85 cents
95 cents
85 cents
95 cents
55 cents
55 cents
$1.05
75 cents
$1.30
95 cents
55 cents
$1.50
55 cents
45 cents
45 cents
75 cents
$1.25

1900-20,
1900-29,
1900-54,
1900-37,
1900-47,
1900-36,
1900- 14,
1900-26,
1900- 17,
1900-58,
1900-8,
1850-81,
1850-55,
1850-84,
1850-86,
1850-79,
1850-54,
1850-85,

55 cents
55 cents
45 cents
55 cents
65 cents
85 cents
55 cents
85 cents
55 cents
75 cents
55 cents
45 cents
80 cents
75 cents
$1.15
45 cents
65 cents
45 cents

* Prices are determined by the Government Printing Office and are subject to change.
* Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




Area
M iam i, F la ., O ct. 1975____________________________________________
M ilw aukee, W is., A p r. 1976______________________________________
M inneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn.— is., Jan. 1976____________________
W
N assau-Suffolk, N .Y ., June 1976_________________________________
Newark, N .J., Jan. 1976______________________________________ _____
New O rlean s, L a., Jan. 1976_____________________________________
New Y ork, N . Y N . J ., May 1976__________________________________
N orfolk— irg in ia Beach— ortsm ou th , Va.— .C ., M ay 19761____
V
P
N
N orfolk— irg in ia Beach—
V
Portsm ou th and N ew port News—
Hampton, Va.— .C ., May 19761 _____ ___________________________
N
N ortheast Pennsylvania, Aug. 1976_______________________________
Oklahom a City, O kla., Aug. 1976 __________________-_____________
Omaha, N e b r I o w a , O ct. 1975____________________________________
P a terson -C lifton — a s s a ic , N .J., June 1976______________________
P
Philadelphia, Pa,— .J ., Nov. 1975_______________________________
N
Pittsburgh, P a ., Jan. 19761 ______________________________________
P ortland, M aine, Nov. 1975___________________________________ ___
P ortland, O reg,— ash., M ay 1976_______________________________
W
P oughkeepsie, N .Y ., June 1976___________________________________
Poughkeepsie—
Kingston—
Newburgh, N .Y ., June 1976_____________
P rov id en ce— arw ick—
W
Pawtucket, R .I ^ M a s s ., June 1976________
Raleigh—
Durham, N .C ., F eb . 1976_______________________________
R ichm ond, V a., June 1976_________________________ _____ ________
St. L ou is, Mo.—
111., M ar. 19761 __________________________________
Sacram ento, C a lif., D e c. 1975____________________________________
Saginaw, M ich ., Nov. 1975________________________________________
Salt Lake City—
Ogden, Utah, Nov. 19751_________________________
San Antonio, T ex ., May 1976_____________________________________
San D iego, C a lif., Nov. 1975______________________________________
San F r a n cis co —
Oakland, C a lif., M ar. 1976______________________
San J o s e , C a lif., M ar. 1976_______________________________________
Seattle— verett, W ash., Jan. 1976_______________________________
E
South Bend, Ind., M ar. 1976______________________________________
Stam ford, Conn., May 1 976 1______________________________________
S yracu se, N .Y ., July 1976________________________________________
T oled o, O h io-M ich ., May 1976____________________________________
Trenton, N .J., Sept. 1976_________________________________________
U tic a— om e, N .Y ., July 197 5 1____________________________________
R
W ashington, D.C.—Md.— a ., M ar. 1976___________________________
V
W estch ester County, N .Y ., May 1976____________________________
W ichita, K ans., A pr. 1976__________________________ ______________
W o rc e s te r, M a ss., A p r. 1976____________________________________
Y ork , P a ., F eb . 1976______________________________________________

Bulletin number
and price*
1850-76,
1900-22,
1900-3,
1900-35,
1900-10,
1900-2,
1900-48,
1900-27,

95 cents
85 cents
95 cents
85 cents
85 cents
75 cents
$1.05
85 cents

1900-33,
1900-43,
1900-42,
1850-56,
1900-38,
1850-65,
1900-1,
1850-72,
1900-51,
1900-50,
1900-55,
1900-31,
1900-18,
1900-34,
1900-19,
1850-87,
1850-71,
1850-74,
1900-23,
1850-77,
1900-9,
1900-13,
1900-6,
1900-5,
1900-40,
1900-44,
1900-24,
1900-56,
1850-48,
1900-12,
1900-46,
1900-21,
1900-16,
1900-4,

85 cents
65 cents
55 cents
$ 1 .10
55 cents
85 cents
$ 1 .1 5
45 cents
75 cents
45 cents
55 cents
75 cents
55 cents
65 cents
$ 1 .25
45 cents
35 cents
75 cents
65 cents
45 cents
95 cents
75 cents
65 cents
55 cents
85 cents
55 cents
55 cents
55 cents
80 cents
85 cents
55 cents
55 cents
55 cents
55 cents

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212

Postage and Fees Paid
U.S. Department of Labor
Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300

Lab-441

Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional Offices
Region I
Region III
Region II
Region IV
3535 Market Street,
1603 JFK Federal Building
Suite 3400
Suite 540
Government Center
P.O. Box 13309
1515 Broadway
1371 Peachtree St., N.E.
Boston, Mass. 02203
New York, N.Y. 10036
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Phone: 596-1154 (Area Code 215)
Phone: 662-5406 (Area Code 212)
Phone: 881-4418 (Area Code 404)
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Delaware
District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia

Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee

Region V
.Region VI
Regions VII and y 1 1
1
Regions IX and X
9th Floor, 230 S. Dearborn St.
Second Floor
Federal Office Building
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Chicago, III. 60604
555 Griffin Square Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
Illinois
IX
X
Indiana
VII
VIII
Arkansas
Alaska
Michigan
Arizona
Iowa
Colorado
Louisiana
California
Idaho
Minnesota
Kansas
Montana
New Mexico
Oregon
Missouri
North Dakota
Hawaii
Ohio
Oklahoma
Washington
Nevada
Nebraska
South Dakota
Wisconsin
Texas
Utah
Wyoming





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102