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j£J'<s -ST
A r e a WAGE SURVEY
Boston, Massachusetts, Metropolitan Area
August 1975
Bulletin 1 8 5 0 - 5 8

DOCUMENT COLLECTION
F E B 1 d 1976
Dayton & Montgomery Co.
Public Library

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
_
Bureau of Labor Statistics



Ffe 2 ms




Preface
This bulletin provides results of an August 1975 survey of occupational earnings
and supplementary wage benefits in the Boston, M assachusetts, Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Area (Suffolk County, 16 communities in E ssex County, 34 in Middlesex County,
26 in Norfolk County, and 12 in Plymouth County). The survey was made as part of the
Bureau of Labor Statistics' annual area wage survey program.
The program is designed
to yield data for individual metropolitan areas, as well as national and regional estimates
for all Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the United States, excluding Alaska and
Hawaii.
A major consideration in the area wage survey program is the need to describe
the level and movement of wages in a variety of labor m arkets, through the analysis of
( 1) the level and distribution of wages by occupation, and (2 ) the movement of wages by
occupational category and skill level. The program develops information that may be used
for many purposes, including wage and salary administration, collective bargaining, and
assistance in determining plant location. Survey results also are used by the U.S. Depart­
ment of Labor to make wage determinations under the Service Contract Act of 1965.
Currently, 83 areas are included in the program. (See list of areas on inside
back cover.) In each area, occupational earnings data are collected annually. Information
on establishment practices and supplementary wage benefits is obtained every third year.
Each year after all individual area wage surveys have been completed, two sum­
mary bulletins are issued. The first brings together data for each metropolitan area sur­
veyed. The second summary bulletin presents national and regional estim ates, projected
from individual metropolitan area data.
The Boston survey was conducted by the Bureau's regional office in Boston, M a ss.,
under the general direction of Paul V . Mulkern, Associate A ssistant Regional Director for
Operations. The survey could not have been accomplished without the cooperation of the
many firm s whose wage and salary data provided the basis for the statistical information
in this bulletin. The Bureau wishes to express sincere appreciation for the cooperation
received.

Note:
Reports on occupational earnings and supplementary wage provisions in the Boston
area are available for the construction (September 1972); electrical appliance repair
(September 1972); machinery (February 1973); hotels and m otels (June 1973); auto dealer
repair shops (June 1973); banking (August 1973); department stores (September 1973); contract
cleaning services (July 1974); and laundry and dry cleaning (August 1975) industries. Also
available are listings of union wage rates for building trades, printing trades, local-transit
operating employees, local truckdrivers and helpers, and grocery store em ployees. Free
copies of these are available from the Bureau's regional offices. (See back cover for
addresses.)

AREA WAGE SURVEY

V

B ulletin 1 8 5 0 -5 8

reo u.s. D E P A R T M E N T

January 1976

OF LA BO R, John T . Dunlop, Secretary

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S , Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

Boston, Massachusetts, Metropolitan Area, August 1975
CONTENTS

pag

Introduction_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2

T a b le s :

A.

B.

Earnings;
A -l.
Weekly earnings of office workers_________________________________________________________________________________
A -l a . Weekly earnings of office workers—
large establishments ________________________________________________________________
A -2 .
Weekly earnings of professional and technical w o rk ers_________________ __________ _____________________________________
A - 2 a. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers—large establishments________________________
A -3 .
Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by s e x ______________________________________
A -3 a . Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technicalworkers, by sex—
large establishments______________
A - 4.
Hourly earnings of maintenance and powerplant workers _________________________________________________________________
A -4 a . Hourly earnings of maintenance and powerplant workers—
large establishments_______________________________________
A - 5.
Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement workers __________________________________________________________
A -5a . Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement workers—
large establishments__________________________________
A - 6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement workers, by s e x ________
A - 6a. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement workers,
by sex—
large establishments______________________________________________________ ________________________________________
A -7 .
Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected occupational groups, adjusted for employment shifts__
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
B -l.
Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and c le r k s _______________________________________________________
B -2 .
Late-shift pay provisions for full-tim e manufacturing plant w o rk ers___________________________________________________
B -3 .
Scheduled weekly hours and days of full-tim e manufacturing plant w orkers____________________________________________
B -4 .
Annual paid holidays for full-time workers _______________________________________________________________________________
B -4 a . Identification of major paid holidays for full-tim e w o rk ers______________________________________________________________
B -5 .
Paid vacation provisions for full-tim e w orkers___________________________________________________________________________
B - 6.
Health, insurance, and pension plans for full-tim e w orkers_____________________________________________________________

Appendix A.
Appendix B.




Scope and method of su rvey_________________________________________________________________________________________________
Occupational descriptions___________________________________________________________________________________________________

For sale by the Superintendent of Docume n t s , U.S. G o v e r n m e n t Printing Office, Washington, D . C . 20402, G P O Bookstores, or
BLS Regional Offices listed on b a c k cover.

Price $1. 50.

M a k e checks payable to Superintendent of D o cuments.

3
7
10
12
14
16
18
19
20
22
24
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
36
38
41

Introduction
T h is a rea is 1 o f 83 in w hich the U.S. D epartm ent o f L a b o r 's
B ureau of L a b o r S ta tistics con d u cts su rv ey s of occu p a tion a l earn in gs and
related ben efits on aui areaw ide b a s is . In th is a re a , data w e re obtained
by p erson a l v is its of B ureau fie ld e co n o m is ts to re p re se n ta tiv e e sta b ­
lishm ents within six b ro a d in d u stry d iv isio n s: M anufacturing; tr a n s p o r tation, com m u n ica tion , and oth er p u b lic u tilitie s; w h o le sa le tra d e ; re ta il
tra d e; finamce, in su ra n ce, and r e a l esta te; and s e r v ic e s . M a jo r industry
groups ex clu d ed fr o m th ese studies are govern m en t op era tion s and the
con stru ction and e x tra ctiv e in d u strie s . E stablish m en ts having fe w e r than
a p r e s c r ib e d n um ber o f w o r k e r s are om itted b e ca u se of in su fficien t
em ploym ent in the occu p a tion s studied. Separate tabulations are p ro v id e d
fo r each o f the b roa d indu stry d iv isio n s w hich m eet p u blication c r it e r ia .
A -s e r ie s ta b les
T a b les A - 1 through A -6 p rov id e estim a te s of stra ig h t-tim e
h ourly or w eek ly earn in gs fo r w o r k e r s in occu p a tion s com m on to a
v a riety of m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing in d u strie s. O ccupations
w ere s e le cte d fr o m the follow in g c a te g o r ie s : (a) O ffice c le r i c a l, (b) p r o ­
fe ssio n a l and te ch n ica l, (c ) m aintenance and pow erp lan t, and (d) cu sto d ia l
and m a te ria l m ov em en t. In the 31 la r g e s t su rv ey a r e a s , ta b le s A - l a
through A -6 a p rov id e s im ila r data fo r esta b lish m en ts em p loyin g 500
w o rk ers o r m o r e .
F ollow in g the o ccu p a tion a l wage ta b les is table A -7 which
p rov id es p e rce n t changes in average earn in gs of o ffic e c le r i c a l w o rk ­
e r s , e le c t r o n ic data p r o c e s s in g w o r k e r s , in d u stria l n u r s e s , sk illed




m aintenance w o r k e r s , and u n sk illed plant w o r k e r s . T h is m e a s u re of
wage trends elim in ates ch anges in a v era g e ea rn in g s ca u se d b y e m p lo y ­
ment shifts among esta b lish m en ts as w e ll as tu rn o v e r o f e sta b lish m en ts
in cluded in su rvey sa m p le s. W h ere p o s s ib le , data are p r e s e n te d fo r all
in d u strie s, m anufacturing, and n on m an u factu rin g. A ppendix A d is c u s s e s
this wage tren d m e a su re .
B -s e r ie s tables
The B -s e r ie s ta b le s p re se n t in fo rm a tio n on m in im u m entrance
sa la rie s fo r o ffic e w o r k e r s ; la t e -s h ift pay p r o v is io n s and p r a c t ic e s fo i
plaint w o rk e rs in m an u factu rin g; and data se p a ra te ly fo r plant and office
w o rk e rs on sch eduled w eek ly h ou rs and days of fi r s t -s h if t w o r k e r s ; paic
h olida ys; paid v a ca tio n s; and h ealth , in s u ra n ce , and p en sion plans,
Appendixes
T h is bulletin has tw o ap p en d ixes.
A ppendix A d e s c r ib e s the
m ethods and con cep ts u sed in the a re a w age su rv ey p r o g r a m . It p rov id es
in form ation on the scop e o f the a re a su rv e y and in fo rm a tio n on the a rea's
in d u stria l co m p o sitio n in m a n u factu rin g. It a ls o p r o v id e s in form atior
on la b or-m a n a g em en t a g reem en t c o v e r a g e .
A ppendix B p r o v id e s jo l
d e scrip tio n s used by B ureau fie ld e c o n o m is ts to c la s s ify w o r k e r s ir
occu pation s fo r w hich str a ig h t-tim e earn in gs in form a tion is p re se n te d

A. Earnings
Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Boston, Mass., August 1975
N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time w e e k l y earnings of—
Occupation a n d industry division

ALL

Number
of
workeis

s

%
weekly
hours 1
(standard)

90
Mean *

M edian*

.

Middle range*

Under
and
$
under
90
95

$
95

1

100

$

S

no

120

$
130

$
140

S

%

150

160

S

i

170

IRu

5
190

$
200

4
310

*
220

*

%

230

240

4

i

250

260

270
and

100.

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

2 VO

210

2^0

230

240

250

260

270 over

WORKERS

BILLERS,

MACHINE

(BILLING

$
$
124.00

BILLERS,

MACHINE

(BOOKKEEPING

37 •

97

37 . 0

142.00

21

13

128.00

128.00125.00-

130.50-176.00

127.50

115.00-

131.00

41

146.00-

84

oL A j j

36,5

9

158.50
157.50

198.50

4i

6
19
8

26

1

12

OPERATORS,

(,/Lt.Krvj y

13

8

OPERATORS,

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE

$

155.50

52
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE
CL A j j A

$

A vw U U N

11 f i v f

"

126^50

2,732
39 . 0

WnULUuALU

ju

K V 1ot b

1K A U L

**

"

3 .0
3,484

wholesale

trade

------------------

370
755

r
-

38.5
36.5

lOb.OO
SAT r a
n * n n 1 r n nn
f n 130.00-162.00
)
1' 8 00 1 A
1/ o " U
a
1 1 ->0
1 6 9 . 0 0 1 f 7 • '*n
137.00
137.00
141.50
118.00

131 00
130.00
133.00
140.00
115.00

■
*

364

38 . 0

135.50

135.00

130 loo
133.00

12610 0

116.50-150.00

151.00
116.50

1 1 1.00
1

10 1 . 0 0 - 1 2 1 . 0 0

6

523

1
1

37 0

r ILL y LL A b b D ••




42

16
1

101.00-122.00

115.50
111.00

t Tn

3
169

366
15
163

4^

284

324

26

19
58
24

72
75?

50
106

626

102
93

404

131
35

37.0
37 . 0

94

1
78

30*0

65

63

??

rt

29

59

34

31

93
61
69
49

^3

7

29

12

TO

61
82
78

18

23
23

*45
106

,?

33

^76
98

21

79

n

0^
1

10
3

1

1

6

1

1

e
~l

*

-A

—
6

1
1

11

J

1
12

**

140.50-179.50

145.00

67

0

f t - *

147.00
121.00

1-6

1

95

2 72
135

101.50-121.00

t4

2Q

0

7

A

3

1

_

''
I*

17

199
86
113
106

1

1

14

34
34

**7

1

116
65
4
17

7

70

95

1

“

30
16

^A

95

14
132

—J
146.50
150.00
144.00

07
£r
1?

1b J

113*U0
117.00
153.50

34^
1,285
499

32

100

136

110*00

116.00
163
553

7
_

28

364

306
A€J
41
61

1'6*00

223
L K V 1v L b

LLtKIxby

270

42

20

f r ILf y CL AS j‘ A

j

^ la
,r ^
-

12

18
261

5

125.00-150.00

TG*n

29

119
*

1— 0 *OU 1 j U ivIU
'
12?.00-149.00
/^
117.0015u.00
13?.50-148.50
103.001 3 0 . 0 0 47

61

buHl 1v tb
C L j

17

143
58
85
85

27

32
38
38

35
19
16
16

**

*7

22
22

17
17

32

-

1
1

-

-

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time w e e k l y earnings of—

Occupation a n d industry division

Number
of
workerc

&

Avcrn
weekly
(standard

$
90

Mean i

Median *

Middle ranged

TTnrl-i
and
$
und e r
90
95

t

$
95

100

_

$

i

$

I

4

%

4

4

4

S

150

160

170

_

-

-

-

_

130

no

140

140

150

160

170

180

19U

200

210,

220

230

240

3
3
_

6
5
1
-

-

1

R
1
7
3
1

9
5
4
_
_
-

3
3
•
.
-

_
.
-

-

-

-

13
13
_
-

.
-

2
2
-

_
.
-

-

-

-

_

180

190

200

210

_

i

$

*

130

120

-

1QQ

$

$
110

230

*

250

26J

270

-

220

-

and

250

260

270

ov e r

6
-

-

a
8
-

-

24.,

_

ALL W O R K E R S —
CONTINUED
642
3S9
2B3
99
55
74

38.0
38.5
38.0
37.5
36.5
38 . 0

$
$
157.50 155.00
157.00 160.00
158.50 153.00
137.00 132.50
150.50 152.00
160,00 150.50

$
$
139.50-177.50
140.00-181.50
13^.00-189.00
120.50-155.00
136.00-153.50
148.00-165.00

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S A --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------W H O L E S A L E T R A O E -----------------R E T A I L T R A O E ---------F I N A N C E ---------------S E R V I C E S ---------------

1.378
656
722
78
130
296
104

38.0
38.5
38.0
39 . 0
39 . 0
37 . 0
39 . 0

152.50
149.50
155.50
149.50
138.50
147.00
154.50

150.00
149.50
150.00
154.50
140.00
145.50
152.00

137.00-161.50
136.00-161.00
139.00-167.00
14n.00-155.00
120.00-151.00
135.00-157.00
14 a .5 0 - 1 6 7 . 0 0

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S b --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ---W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -----R E T A I L T R A D E ---------F I N A N C E ---------------S E R V I C E S ---------------

912
147
765
78
148
179
281
79

37.5
38.5
37.5
39.5
39.5
37.5
35.5
36.5

132.00
132.50
132.00
153.00
132.50
129.00
129.00
127.00

130.00
130.00
130.00
152.00
133.50
1 2 6 . CO
130.00
125.00

118.00-145.00
118.50-143.50
117.00-145.00
109.50-182.00
125.00-145.00
116.50-140.00
116.00-142.00
118.00-135.00

_
-

M E S S E N G E R S ------ -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------F I N A N C E ---------------S E R V I C E S ---------------

915
214
701
384
237

37.5
39 . 0
37.5
36.5
38.5

117.00
125.00
114.50
112.50
115.00'

113.00
124.00
110.50
110.00
110.50

104.00-126.00
109.50-137.00
101.00-122.00
104.00-119.00
100.00-125.00

14
14
4
6

S E C R E T A R I E S -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ---W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ----R E T A I L T R A D E --------F I N A N C E ---------------S E R V I C E S ---------------

10*768
4,135
6.633
468
797
382
3.397
1.589

38 . 0 1 7 7 . 0 0
39 . 0 1 8 1 . 5 0
37.5 174.50
38.5 209.00
38.0 175.00
37.5 164.00
36.5 169.00
39.0 178.50

173.50
178.00
171.00
206.00
168.00
161.00
165.00
177.00

154.00-196.00
160.00-197.00
150.00-194.00
186.50-222.00
150.00-191.00
139.50-184.00
147.00-188.00
159.50-197.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS A —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -----F I N A N C E ---------------S E R V I C E S ---------------

610
25 2
358
67
152
82

38.0
38.5
37.5
38.0
36.5
38.5

212.50
212.00
213.00
207.50
214.50
220.50

207.50
2 0 9 . CO
202.50
202.50
201.00
221.50

SECRETARIES. CLASS B —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G — ----

2.172
889
1,283
76
172
92
620
323

38.0
39.0
37.5

195.00
200.00
192.00

38.5
37.5
36 . 0
39 . 0

181.00
172.50
187.50
201.00

C L E R K S . P A Y R O L L -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U E A C T U R I N G ------R E T A I L t r a d e ---------F I N A N C E ---------------S E R V I C E S ---------------

W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -----R E T A I L T R A D E ---------F I N A N C E ---------------S E R V I C E S ---------------

S e e footnotes at en d of tables.




-

9
8
1
1
-

9
8
1
1
-

*

-

-

13
3
10
8
2
“

32
18
14
13
1
-

40
7
33
19
5
9

61
37
24
11
12
1

87
52
35
10
7
17

96
34
62
19
21
22

93
61
32
10
1
7

44
33
11
5
_
3

75
61
1«,
1
3
2

42
30
12
1
10

10
1
9
i

-

_
-

3
1
2
2

242
127
115
18
20
57
20

315
164
151
10
33
76
30

261
126
135
38
15
59
23

189
112
77
11
14
39
9

70
40
30
1
3
12
12

46
12
36
3
13
10

2

-

103
63
40
15
25
-

68
_
68
-

-

41
3
38
25
13
-

-

-

1
1
1
-

94
1
93
25
6
13
47
2

146
39
107
18
34
37
18

191
30
161
36
54
49
22

178
22
156
1
32
29
64
30

180
25
155
13
54
22
61
5

63
19
4A
5
19
19
1

20
9
11
2
7
2
-

5
5
2
2
1

11
_

6
_
6
6
.
-

13
-

-

2
2
2
-

38
38
14
14

106
13
93
45
45

214
43
171
129
35

212
42
170
98
59

146
47
99
58
32

71
23
48
9
21

50
11
39
17
20

41
18
23
lo
“

23
17
6
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

37

-

103
16
87
11
76
-

323
44
279
10
..45
182
42

734
219
515
94
40
290
91

9 1 9 12 3 9
293
436
621
803
4
45
114
35
46
396
464
1**5
175

1280
492
788
16
129
49
414
180

1482
651
831
42
103
39
418
229

13 2 6
577
751
78

-

1
1
1
-

50
30 9
238

998
455
54 3
33
55
22
2a5
148

627
21?
415
96
4 )
21
162
94

469
178
291
48
28
4
118
93

479
2C9
27(1
56
17
5
136
54

317
150
167
33
R
6
4P
72

121
36
85
2.)
2<*
3
26
13

149
74
75
14
17
2
31
11

64
42
22
7
6
3
1
5

<*a
46
52
14
17
1
15
5

186.00-241.00
175.00-245.00
186.00-239.00
170.00-246.00
187.00-225.00
192.50-236.00

_
“
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

37
31
6
2
1

44
19
25
15
6
1

47
15
32
12
11
-

43
i
42
23
13

ao
2r>
52
31
13

66
32
34
11
11
1

53
21
32
5
14
12

46
17
31
16
13

25
12
13
2

-

_
*

9

4^
33
16
5
.
4

54
14
<♦0
11
19
9

29
20
9
3
1
1

25
3
15
5

190.50
197.00
190.00

175.00-217.00
181.5U-219.00
170.00-219.00

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

13
13

11
11

106
39
67

52
10
42

94
22
72

114
30
84

216
65
151

314
123
191

329
176
153

218
102
llo

213
104
109

216
126
90

26
18

140.00-216.50
156.OC-137.00
170.00-204.50
181.00-223.50

-

-

-

-

13
3
20
6

5
9
51
7

21
12
34
17

19
13
87
32

11
5

-

41
6
20
-

4

-

5
6

8
PI
116

-

3
10
-

12
3
52
34

7
3
51
2b

44
2
42
16
14

31
7
24

172.50
172.00
1 8 7 . oO
200.00

134
39
95
24
6

“

37
12
25
-

-

1
1
1

11
11
_
-

2

-

-

2
_
_

_
-

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_
-

<+4

5
106
38

40

55

_

•
_
_

_
_
-

_

-

?

-

-

-

-

-

-

24
24
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

.
.

-

-

-

4

16
45

7
6

5
12
2

a

l
3
4

34
9

41
26
15
3
-

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
O c cupation an d industry division

Number
of
workere

N u m b e r of w srkers receiving straight-time w e e k l y earnings of—
4

weekly
hours1
(standard)

Mean *

Median ^

Middle range ^

90
Under
and
$
under
90
95

$
95

S

4
ioo

no

120

s
130

4

s
190

150

4

$
160

170

4
180

190

20ft

4

4
210

220

230

2A0

250

260

270
and

IQS.

no

120

130

1A0

150

160

170

IBS-

190

200

B10

?2Q

230

240

250

25
.
26
i
.
i
19

260

270 over

ALL W O R K E R S —
CONTINUED
SECRETARIES— CONTINUED
S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C ---------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U R L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------W H O L E S A L E T k A D E -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------F I N A N C E ----------------------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

3, 6 7 8
i , a &2
2,216
228
331
1JS
1,078
AAA

38.0
39. 0
37.S
38.0
38 . 0
37.5
36.5
39.0

$
$
$
$
178.00 175.00 156.50-19A.00
182. 0 0 1 6 2 . 5 0 1 6 c . 0 0 - 1 9 2 . 0 0
175. 5 0 1 7 2 . 5 0 1 5 3 . 5 0 - 1 9 6 . 5 0
211.50 206.00 205.50-222.00
175.00 165.50 15S.0u-190.00
1 6 7.50 1 5 5 . 0 0 1 3 6 . O u - 1 7 M . b O
167.50 165.00 1 A7.50-181.50
183.50 160.00 166.01-199.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S 0 ---------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------wholesale
t r a d e -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------F I N A N C E ----------------------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

A , 303
1, S 3 2
2,771
155
227
102
1,5A7
7A0

38.0
38.5
37.5
38.5
38.5
37 . 0
36 . 0
39.5

162.50
166.00
160.50
188.00
160.50
I m S. O O
1 5 8.00
161.00

161.50
169.00
159.50
166.00
165.00
1A5.00
15A.50
160.00

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , G E N E R A L ---------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------W H O L E S A L E t r a d e ------------------

800
2A2
558
96

38.5
39.5
37.5
38.5

15A.50
1 5 A . 50
lb4« 50
1A3.50

-

-

-

-

-

196.00-176.50
150.03-175.00
lAo.50-17o.00
1 7 9 . 5 0 - 1 8 7 . b0
138.00-170.50
1J O . 0 0 - 1 65.00
IAq .00-17A.5G
1A5.00-175.00

_
-

-

150.00
160.50
I A S . 00
1A2.00

136.00-163.00
1 A 3 . 0 '-16 1 . 5 0
130.00-176.00
130.00-150.50

10
10
-

7
1
6
5
1
-

52
6
A6
2
17
2A
3

196
39
157
12
17
121
7

302
88
219
26
19
192
27

976
186
290
2
80
16
196
96

975
162
313
8
60
23
179
93

9A5
187
258
9
19
10
156
69

598
352
2a 6
4
4e
12
9b
87

383
196
187
19
39
7
70
52

216
35
181
85
1M
5
m 2
31

128
38
90
31
5
-

15A
38
116
56
10

125
78
A7
7
_

-

16
16
16
-

10
44

37
13

2
20
18

21
21
12
9
-

83
15
68
3
65
-

260
38
222
8
23
158
33

A32
1A 1
291
A1
17
1A9
8A

569
200
369
6
13
233
112

632
197
935
2
29
18
265
121

696
281
365
8
33
10
195
119

773
38A
389
38
53
6
16A
128

372
101
271
7026
10
77
88

205
55
150
1A
12
1
78
AS

126
m 3
83

75
15
60
9
6
_

61
28
33
1
-

33
21
1?
2
_
_

-

1
1
1
-

A2
3

32
-

-

-

17
17
-

3A
1
33
13

88
28
60
-

91
11
80
27

199
39
110
29

8A
35
A9
13

155
117
38
1

3A
3A
5

*6
A6
1

21
21
4

16
10
6

-

-

12

23

16

15

10

2

7

2

-

29
1
28

115
98
67
19
39

109
22
82
78

193
50
93
2
76

113
25
88
5
22
51

9A
3
91

3
12

8A
27
57
15
A2

(
d

30
12
id
12

81

b

37
4
33
1>
23

----------------------------

87

37.5

1A8.50

1A7.C0

138.00-159.50

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , S E N I O R ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------F I N A N C E ----------------------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

806
199
607
3A
93
A 18

38.0
39.5
38 . 0
39.S
36.0
38.0

165.00
160.50
166.50
21A.50
166.00
1 6 A . 00

163.00
160.00
166.00
216.50
171.50
16A.50

lAfl.5 0 - 1 7 9 . 5 0
1A6.OC-170.00
1 A 9 . 5.1-165.00
183.50-250.50
1A1,50-192.50
150.00-185.00

S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------W H O L E S A L E t r a d e -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------f i n a n c e ---------------------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

8A0
179
661
A9
80
89
219
22A

38.0
39.5
38.0
A 0 .0
39.0
37.5
36 . 0
39.0

1A2.00
152.00
139.50
175.00
1AA. 5 U
1A2.50
1A2.50
125.00

1A0.00
1A9.00
137.50
179.50
1A0.00
131.50
1A1.50
117.00

126.00-155.00
135.00-16A.00
l 2 o .00-150.00
lA9.5C-206.50
1 3 n .00-156,50
123.00-156.00
135.00-150.00
105.00-1A2.00

SWITCHBOARD

OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

792

38.5

139.50

135.00

125.00-152.50

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------F I N A N C E -----------------------------

A57
166
80
6d
125

38.0
38.5
38 . 0
35.5
38 . 0

1A1.50
138.50
132.00
1 5 A.00
13A.00

135.00
135.00
1 2 8.00
15A.00
135.00

125.00-153.50
129.00-1A0.00
118.00-135.50
136.50-170.50
125.00-1AO.00

-

29A
69
225
173

37.5
38.5
37.0
36.5

1A5.50
1A5.00
1A6.00
138.00

1A5.00
1AA.S0
1A5.00
1A2.00

13a .00-158.00
I A o .0 0 - 1 5 1 . 0 0
123.00-160.00
123.00-153.50

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

15
15

12
8

SERVICES

T R A N S C R I B I N G — M A C H I N E OPt'RA TORS,
G E N E R A L ----------------------------- - — M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------




26
26
3

b

i
69
7

8
6
1
1
-

6
2
4
4
.
-

1A
2
12
1
n

-

-

-

10

J
1
2
1
1
.
-

4
l
3
J
-

3
2
1
1
-

9
9
.
-

-

*

-

11
-

1
1

10
_

11
_

•

10
_

7
7
.

_
_

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1A
_
1A
7
6
1

4
2
2
2
-

6
4
2
2
_

5
5
-

2
1
1
1
-

8
8
8
-

_
.
.

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
4
3
3
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
_
_
_
-

-

-

-

_
.
_
_
.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
7

10
10
3
7

10

-

8
8

5

76
A
72
12
10
12
38

98
25
73
5
30
23
15

157
26
131
1
27
13
60
30

162
35
127
15
19
8
65
25

78
30
A8
10
5
29
9

76
39
92
1
5
3
29
9

30
7
23
5
5
5
8

22
5
17
3
2
4
8

26
1
25
9
16
-

11
n
8
2
-

9
5
4
2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
2
8

5
5

1

-

72
1
71
2
69

2

22

115

12A

212

112

A2

89

39

5

15

_

1
1

2
2
-

1A
8
-

71
30
17
1
18

6A
1A
23
2
25

130
76
18
13
23

55
9
4

17
5
11

91
13
2
11
15

23
6
16

5
i

15
12
1
-

_

_

-

_

12

39
3
36
36

12
4
8
8

92
37
55
59

57
25
32
28

26

4

6

26

-

_

-

-

-

-

26
19

4

6

-

-

15

6

36

26

60
b'd

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

10

1

8

_

10

1
1
_

H
_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

.

-

_

O
-

-

.

Weekly earnings
(standard)
Number

Occupation and industry division
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

1

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time w e e k l y earnings of-i
90

Mean 2

Median 2

M iddle range2

$

*

Under
and
$
und e r
90
95

95

*
100

$
no

$
120

s

i

130

140

$
150

$

S

S
160

170

180

s

S

S
190

200

210

*
22 0

240

i

4

$

*
230

250

260

27o
and

100

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

156
24
132

240
88
152

128
50
78
3
5
26
44

155
67
88
7
6
15

86
5
81
5
7
5
64

101
2
99
12
7
2
78

37
2
35
7

17
1
16
2

15

-

1

4

11

-

-

-

15
15

-

4
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
1
10

-

-

1
1

i
26

14

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

141
21
120
91
19

42
11
31
20
2

17
4
13
7

10

16

32

_

5

29

-

10
3

16
1

32

-

5

29

-

-

-

2*0

230

2 4 0 --g-Sfl.

260

270

ov e r

ALL W O RK ER S—
CO NTINUED
TYPISTS. CLASS A ----MA NU FA CT UR IN G --- N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG PUBLIC UT ILITIES
WH OLESALE TRADE •
FINANCE --------SE RVICES --------

1.372
349
1.023
57
75
475
413

38 . 0
38.5
37.5
38.5
37.5
36.5
39.0

$
$
140.50 136.50
137.50 136.00
141.50 136.50
181.50 175.50
153.50 131.50
124.00 123.00
154.50 155.00

$
$
123.00-157.00
126.00-1A5.00
12l.0C-162.50
169.00-202.50
125.00-170.50
113.00-135.00
136.00-170.50

TYPISTS. CLASS B ----MANU FA CT UR IN G ----N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG —
FINANCE --------SE RVICES --------

1.436
363
1.073
754
156

37.5
39.5
37 . 0
36.5
37.5

126.00
124.50
126.00
118.00
120.50

120.00
125.00
120.00
113.00
120.00

108.00-135.00
116.00-135.00
105.00-138.00
104.00-129.00
H O . 50-129.00

S e e footnotes at e n d of tables.




-

-

-

-

2
2

92
4
88

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

22
8
14
10

94
5
89
89

-

-

2
2

87
-

2
115
15

32
95
25

327
106
221
2
4
129
86

289
26
263
201
36

255
94
161
122
35

292
97
195
142
48

190
97
93
66
16

-

-

60

-

-

-

_

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of

Num ber of w orkers
*

Average
weekly

*
95

U nder
Median *

M '* "'

(standard]

Middle ranged

$
95

$

*
105

100

$
110

4
120

4
130

receivin g
4

140

stra ig h t-tim e w e e k ly earn in gs

4
150

4
160

■
i

4
170

18 j

$
190

S
20 0

of—
%

1
220

210

230

4

%
24 .1

28J

&
260

and
under
105

HO

120

130

140

150

160

79

93
2b
65

141

20
59
23
35

22
39
3

o
C
C

100

270
and

170

19u

2 1 1;

2U0

diO

220

d4Q

25,,

260

270

over

ALL WORKERS
CLERKS. ACCOUNTING. CLASS A
M A NU FA CT UR IN G -----------NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G --------RETAIL TRADE ----------FINANCE ----------------SERV IC ES ----------------

1,262
294
988
156

3 8 ,0
3 9 .0

$
18 2,50
17 7.00

3 8 .0
3 7 .5

18 4.00
14 7.00

240
66

3 6 .5
3 9 .5

14 8.00

$
16 8.50
1 6 6 . U0
19 8.50
143.00
147.50

1 8 0.50

1 7 7 . U0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS
M A N U FA CT UR IN G ---------NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G -----RETAIL TRADE --------FI NA NC E --------------SE RVICES --------------

1,39 0
307
1,08 3
446
248

142.50
14 5.50
14 1.50

13 5.00
14 0.00
134.00
1 1 7.50
12 1.00

3
3
3
3
3

7
8
7
6
7

.5
.0
.5
.5
.0

66

3 9 .5

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A
M A NU FA CT UR IN G ----NONMANUFACTURING —
FINANCE ----------

240
61
179

3 7 .5

CLERKS, FILE, CL AS S 8
NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G —
FI NA NC E ----------

271
230
185

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C
NONMANUFACTURING —
PU BL IC U T IL IT IE S
FINANCE ----------

366
320
52
188

CLERKS, ORDER —
M A NU FA CT UR IN G

120.50
125.00
13 6.50

$
1
1
1
1

5
=
5
2

?
4
1
3

.0
.5
.0
.5

0
0
0
0

$
- 2 0 3 . 0C
-1 9 7 .5 0
-2 0 3 .0 0
-1 6 1 .0 0

13 o .5 0 -1 6 3 .0 0
1 6 8 .5 0 -2 0 0 .5 0
1
1
1
1

1
2
1
0

6
5
8
6

.0
.0
.0
.5

0
0
0
0

-1
-1
-1
-1

6
6
6
3

3
1
9
2

.5
.0
.0
.0

0
0
0
0

1 1 4 .0 0 -1 3 6 .0 0
1 3 9.00 ' 1 2 8 .0 0 -1 4 9 .0 0

-

2
-

5
-

33
-

3

2

2
1

-

1
1

5
3

33
15
18

3
-

-

-

-

24
-

17
-

24
24
-

17
16

66
5
61
46
14

2
-

7
-

-

3

14

7
-

9
-

26
9

60
15
45

37
12

33
4

2
2

6
6

n
n

i
i

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

.

_

1

6

a

i

_

-

-

_

_

-

.

.

41

24

43

-

1

_

39

19

26
18

15
11

16
9

8
8

18
18

4

28
17
11
7

47
28
19

35
18
17

19

15

10
9

11
9

15
13

1
-

3
2
1

-

-

-

1

1
3

-

-

10

5

i

d
i

i
i
-

10

39
13
26
18

-

-

"

-

-

"

-

-

116
45
71
8
57

185
79

118
68

46
24

3t,
12

66
-

9
5
4
-

3
3
_

-

-

_
_

68
8

13
-

_

13
13

-

2
i
:
-

*20

49

7

CLERKS, PAYROLL ---M A NU FA CT UR IN G --NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G
RETAIL TRADE ,,-

270
128
142

38 .0
3 8 .5
3 6 .0

150.50
15 6.50

69

38 .0

14 7.50
15 4.00
14 5.00
14 0.50

K E Y P U N C H OP ERATORS, CLASS A
M A NU FA CT UR IN G -----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------RETAIL T R A D E --- -------F I NA NC E -----------------

616
373
443
62

3 8 .5
39 .0

15 2.00

231

K E Y P U N C H OPERATORS. CL AS S B
MA NU F A C T U R I N G -----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------PU BL IC U T IL IT IE S -----RE TA IL TRADE ----------FI NA NC E ----------- -----

459
64

ME SS E N G E R S ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG
F I NA NC E --------




-

-

-

36

17

1 3 0 .0 0 -1 6 5 .5 0
1 4 o .0 0 -1 7 3 .5 0
1 2 5 .0 0 -1 6 1 .0 0

1
-

1
-

4

7

1

1

i
3

2
5

18
7

32
4
28

1 2 0 .5 0 -1 5 7 .0 0

1

1

3

3

_

1
1
-

2
-

11
10

19
54
29

15 3.00
15 0.00
14 7.00

1
1
1
1

0
0
0
0

-

-

14 2.50

14 2.60

1 3 3 .0 0 -1 5 2 .0 0

-

-

-

2

1
13

22

13 3.50
14 6.50

13 0.00

1 1 8 .0 0 -1 4 5 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0 -1 5 6 .5 0

1
-

2
-

16
_

29

74

106

1
28
-

7
67
-

3
103
54
49

16
-

1

7

6

30

-

2

9

22

37

72
19

1 0 0 .0 0 -1 1 6 .0 0
9 9 .0 0 -1 1 6 .5 0

30
18

58
13
45
42

65
13
52
34

91

1 0 9 .0 0 -1 5 1 .0 0

30
-

1 1 8 .0 3 -1 4 0 .0 0
11 3 .0 0 -1 3 3 .0 0

3 8 .0

115.00

135
323
227

3 9 .0
3 7 .5

12 9.00
109.50
10 9.50

1 1 0.00
1 3 o.R O
1 0 7.00
10 7.00

2
-

17
3
14

2
-

12 6.00

458

3 7 .0

1

32

-

1 2 4.00

1 0 0 .0 0 -1 2 5 .0 0

_

17
17

9 7 .0 0 -1 1 2 .0 0

129.00

2
d

lo

1 1 2 .0 0 -1 5 3 .0 0
1 1 4 .0 0 -1 5 8 .0 0

12 4.00

4

20

13 3.00
13 0.00

3 7 .0

i*

_

34
34

13 5.00
137.50

170
181

-

2
6

3 8 .5
3 8 .5

1
-

-

47
47

153
121

1 1 6 .5 0 -1 4 2 .0 0
1 5 9 .0 0 -2 0 1 .5 0

i

1
4

49
49
-

12 7.50
19 3.00

_
-

20

20
20
-

131.50
179.50

2
1

4

57
45
-

1 4 s.5 0 -1 7 9 .5 0

40. C
3 7 .5

1

_
_

32
26
-

1 0 1 .0 0 -1 3 5 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 -1 3 7 .0 3

15 4.00
10 2.00

395
35

-

48
42
-

11 5.00
11 6.00

16 0.50
104.50

14 7.00

.
.

11
10

1 ?0.50
l2 l.0 0

38 .0
4 0 .0
3 7 .5

5

_

_

10
9

3 9 .0
3 7 .0

39 .0

_

_

38
16
4

3 8 .0
3 7 .5

3 7 .0

-

_

3
3
2

43

30

.0
.5
.0
.0

-

_

17
17
13

34
33
33

8
1
0
7

-

_
_

7
?

32
32

2
2
1

6
6
8
6

-

_

*
63
b

4
4
_

£

2

5
3

i n
34
77

1

1
5
-

2
2

5

_

3
1

6

30

1 0 5 . 0 0 - 1 3 6 . 5u
1 0 3 .0 0 -1 2 3 .0 0
1 0 1 .0 0 -1 2 0 .5 0

32
31

11 0.00

-1
-1
-1
-1

3

_

3

1
3
d

1

72
11
61

46
45
44

11 4.00
11 3.00

11 2.00

0
0
0
0

6

10

4
90

6

6 3
11
49

30
28

12 2.50
12 0.00

3 7 .0

.0
.0
.0
.0

35
9

30
4

43
5
38
4

16
-

90
19
21

12

3 7 .5
3 7 .5

0
2
9
o

67
37

20
4

273
17
2 nh
-

22

17
17

4
4
3
4

106
29
77

4h
4
40
_

118
17
101
lo
4

29

9
9

0
0
0
0

27
6

4h
15
P9
9
t
d

25
25

7

.0
.0
.0
.5

45
15

86
36
50
8
24
9

45

7

7
3
0
1

26
18

98
52
46
9

2o
16
4
4

7
7

15
15
16
15

90
32

53
88
£4

23
5
18

1 0 9 .0 0 -1 3 1 .5 0

3 7 .5

124
71
39

20

48

127.50
12 0.50

14 5.50
139.00

131
41

1

1 1 1 .0 0 -1 4 0 .0 0
1 1 6 .5 0 -1 5 0 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0 -1 3 /.0 0

162

192
68

-

4.00
6.00
1.00
8.00

12 8.00
130.00

-

229
39
190
105
82

12
12
12
11

3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

-

1
169
35
134
59
49
17

1

71
3
68

61
2
59
27
32

53
38

12
79
48

25
3

106
21

50
7

145
104
41
14

71

38

16

9

4fe

18
59
7

19

18
9

3
.

-

27

9
2
7

26

3
19
4

19

80

11
8
7

18

18
17

2

1

6o
i
25

21

32

50
9
41

35
23

31

9

12

i

1

i

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

4

_

i

74

i
.

22
3

3
2

•

1“
J

66
a

h
-

6
i

6

-

-

-

24
24
.

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workere

(standard

'lumber of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time w e ekly earnings of—
i

Average
weekly
Mean ^

Median ^

Middle ranged

%

95
U nder
and
$
under
95
lno

100

$

5

$

105

110

*

120

S

130

$

*

140

150

i

%

160

170

$

i>

180

1*0

200

$

210

$

$

220

230

24C

$

5

250

260

270
and

105

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

21o

220

230

240

ft*

260

270

over

78
4
74
11
63
-

213
24
189
45
142
2

360
130
230
40
169
21

469
179
290
32
224
34

564
242
322
43
231
46

732
348
384
47
246
79

942
541
401
38
216
117

787
443
344
44
14 1
88

586
33*
252
22
128
85

326
153
175
17
73
47

284
147
137
4
49
42

310
193
117
5
32
20

210
136
74
4
19
21

47
23
24
3
7
7

lu2
71
31
2
8
5

57
42
15
3
1
1

65
38
27
1
5
i

25
21

25
14
n
7

26
20
6
1

20
9
11
5

14
4
10
5
“
1
2

22
18
4
1

41
26
15
*12
“
~

ALL W O RK ER S—
CO NTINUED
SE CRETARIES -----------MANUFA CT UR IN G -----N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG —
RETAIL TRADE ----FINANCE ----------SERVICES ---------

6. 144
3,048
3.096
3bl
1, 7b4
616

SECRETARIES. CLASS A
MANU FA CT UR IN G -----N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG —
FINANCE -----------

265
104
161
95

$
179.50
186.00
173.00
163.00
163.50
183.50

$
176.00
182.00
171.00
16J.00
161.00
1 8 0 . uO

$
$
157.50-197.30
167.00-203.30
149.00-193.00
13-.0u-18i.00
1 4 2 . 5t,-181.00
166.00-199.00

38 . 0 2 2 1 . 0 0
39 . 0 2 4 2 . 5 0
37.5 207.50
37 . 0 2 0 3 . 0 0

218.50
246.50
199.30
196.30

193.00-250.00
224.50-264.50
184.00-225.00
184.50-216.00

38.5
39 . 0
37.5
37.5
37 . 0
40.0

SECRETARIES. CLASS B
MANU FA CT UR IN G -----N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG —
PUBLIC UTIL IT IE S •
RE TA IL TRADE ----FINANCE ----------SE RVICES ---------

1,118
590
528
46
86
273
98

38.5
39 . 0
38.0
39 . 0
37.5
37 . 0
40.0

203.50
207.00
199.50
250.00
171.50
192.50
208.50

205.00
209.50
199.50
234.50
170.00
193.50
209.00

183.50-221.50
189.00-221.00
17s.00-224.00
234.50-273.00
155.00-186.50
174.50-213.00
194.00-225.00

SECRETARIES. CLASS C
MA NU FA CT UR IN G — --N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S .
RETAIL TRADE ----FINANCE ----------SERVICES ---------

2.280
1,125
1.155
151
123
675
181

38.5 182.00
39. 0 1 8 8 . 5 0
38.0 175.50
38.5 214.00
37.5 155.50
37. 0 1 6 7 . 0 0
39.5 187.00

183.00
186.00
174.00
215.50
155.00
166.50
188.50

162.00-197.50
171.00-197.50
156.00-195.50
205.50-222.00
135.00-174.00
151.0'J- 1 8 1 . 0 0
174.00-203.00

SECRETARIES. CLASS D
MANUFA CT UR IN G -----N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG RETAIL TRADE ----FINANCE ----------SERVICES ----------

2.476
1.229
1.247
102
721
321

38.5
39.0
37.5
37. 0
37.0
40.0

162.00
169.00
155.50
148.00
144.50
171.50

165.00
169.50
155.00
145.00
145.00
174.00

145.03-176.00
156.00-176.50
135.00-174.50
l3o.00-165.00
129.50-158.50
159.50-184.00

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL
MA NU FA CT UR IN G -----N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG FINANCE -----------

476
202
274
64

39.0
39.5
38 . 0
37. 0

160.50
158.50
162.00
125.50

161.50
161.50
161.00
121.50

144.00-169.00
152.00-161.50
139.50-190.50
108.50-136.30

STENOGRAPHERS, SE NI OR •
MANUFA CT UR IN G ------

301
144

39. 5
40.0

158.00
157.50

155.00
152.00

410
163
247
34
74
76
b6

39 . 0
39.5
38.5
40.0
38.0
37.0
39.5

150.00
154.50
146.50
178.00
144.00
140.50
133.50

146.00
150.00
141.00
169.00
137.00
138.00
132.00

131.50-168.30
141.00-165.00
125.00-161.00
149.50-207.00
12ri. 5 0 - 1 6 5 . 0 0
126.00-154.50
117.00-144.00

1

8

-

-

i

1

8

-

-

-

-

i
-

1
-

8
-

_

_

«

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:

See footnotes at end of tables.




_

1
-

6

9

6
2

9
6

22
3
19
11

20
1
19
1J

33
b
28
20

21
2
19
11

25
11
14
11

lb
9
7
5

16
9
7

lbd
126
42
1
3
22
13

90
28
62
24
4
16
15

14
1
13
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

3
3

5
5

16
1
15

23
10
13

47
18
29

61
24
37

98
50
48

9b
46
52

146
62
04

129
73
56

-

-

-

-

3
-

5
-

6
9

3
10

9
19
1

12
22
3

13
30
5

15
29
b

5
H4
15

5
31
19

143
83
60
2
3
33
16

267
94
173
6
21
126
20

288
126
162
4
10
119
27

43b
30b
130
4
12
81
30

305
192
113
9
7
b9
30

127
35
92
30
3
31
21

97
38
59
29
“
5
21

105
38
67
54
“
5
7

81
78
3
1
1
1

b
b
i
i
4

59
b2
7
6
1

6
2
4
4
-

3
2
1
1
“
*

19
15
4
3

21
20
1
-

23
21
2
-

2
i
i
*

4
i
3
-

3
2
1

1
1

1
1
-

2

2
2

-

-

142.00-166.00
145.00-165.50

SW IT CH BO AR D OPER AT OR S ■
MANUFA CT UR IN G -----N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S ■
RETAIL TRADE ----FINANCE ----------SERVICES ----------

i
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
1
6

49
6
43

88
27
61

149
39

-

-

5
1
~

17
24
2

17
42
2

16
89
5

207
89
118
2
13
92
11

68
3
65
3
62
-

159
18
141
23
118
-

256
102
154
17
118
19

296
130
166
13
124
29

304
135
169
18
118
33

394
230
164
10
92
56

533
362
171
6
56
85

232
90
142
10
18
50

101
55
4b
i
5
40

50
43
7
1

31
9
22
14

33
11
22

59
24
35

58
29
29

17

16
10

6

14

43

17

6

6

6

4

16
16
2

43

9

150
117
33
2

18

9

11
1
10
10

1
*

3
“

4

54
27

61
32

49
22

70
33

30
19

8

2
“

-

7
“

4

6

-

-

2

4

-

2
1

-

“

43
4
39
10
9
20

44

69
26
43
1
13
19
10

75
35
40
15

9

9
5
4
2

7
4
3
3

?
2
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_

11
6

11
6

51
34
17
1
3
7
5

14
7
7
1

8

52
30
22
5

8
-

1
1
-

8
8
-

8

9
-

8

-

8

_
-

-

-

1

-

2
2
2

-

-

_
-

-

*

_
-

-

-

7
1

_
_
-

i
i
i
-

-

?

9

_
-

2
2
-

1
1
-

-

2

-

6 at $2 7 0 to $280; 1 at $280 to $290; 4 at $2 9 0 to $300; and l at $300 to $310.

1
9
35
17
11

7

no

3

5
4
-

-

-

5

i
i

1

20
1
19
3
16

6

10
1j
8

-

-

*

-

.

2

*

-

Weekly e amings 1
(stand ard)
Number

Occupation and industry division
work ere

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s rece ving straight-time w e e k l y earnings of---*

Avprago
weekly
hours1
[standard)

$
95

U
Median *

Middle ranged

nder

$
95

%

*

S
100

105

no

$

S
120

130

$
140

$

*
150

160

H
>
170

$

$
180

190

200

i
210

S
220

*
230

$
24q

105

no

120

130

140

150

16o

170

180

190

200

2

2

2

3

17

14

14

7

12

4

1

1

14
14

9
8

19
16

4
4

8

15

10
10
8

8
8

14

3

2

85

26
5

17
2
15
7

16
2
14
7

2
5

1
6

210

220

2

15

_

2

15

-

2

15

-

32

_

.

32

_

230

240

250

ALL W O R K E R S —
CONTINUED
OPEKATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

T R A N S C R 181NG-MACHINE OPERATORS,
G E N E R A L ---------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------F I N A N C E -----------------------------

3 8 .5

$
13 9.00

$
136.50

$

BO

1 2 5 . 0 0 - 1 5 7 . DO

1

87

37 .0
37 .0

13 4.50
134.00

138.00

1 1 9 .0 0 -1 5 0 .0 0

3

6

4

10

03

3

-

6

37 .0

131.50

137.50
1 3 4 . DU

1 1 6 .5 0 -1 5 1 .5 0

t>9

1 1 5 .0 0 -1 4 7 .0 0

3

-

6

4
4

10
6

1 2 0 . 0 0 —1 5 6 . 0 0

_
-

2

-

7

-

26
4

87
24

95
47

89
31

42
12

1 1 7 .0 0 -1 5 5 .0 0
1 6 9 .0 0 -2 0 2 .5 0
1 1 1 .0 0 -1 3 3 .5 0

-

2

7

22

63

48

58

-

-

7

21

61

37

30
3
14

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S A -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------F I N A N C E ----------------------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

513
183

38 .0
3 9 .5

13 8.50
13 7.50

13 4.00
1 3 4 . U0

330

3 7 .5

50
192

3 8 .5
3 6 .5

13 9.00
18 4.00

1 3 3 . DO
182.00

ti4

39 .0

12 3.50
14 9.00

120.50
1 5 0.00

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S B -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------ — —

611
158
4b3

3 7 .5
3 9 .5

1
1
1
1

12 1.50

Sec footnotes at end of tables.




312

37 .0
3 6 .5

2
2
2
1

7
4
8
6

.0
.5
.0
.5

0
0
0
0

12 0.00
123.50
109.50

$

1 2 4 .0 0 -1 5 8 .0 0

1 3 5 .0 0 -1 6 2 .0 0

-

-

-

1 0 f.0 0 -1 3 8 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0 -1 3 4 .0 0

12

1 0 5 .0 -1 4 1 .5 0

12

33
2
31

1 0 2 .0 0 -1 2 8 .0 0

12

31

-

260

270

and

100

SWITCH80AR0

$
250

and
u n der

-

-

-

-

-

2

11

43
15

72

62

1
71
69

11
51

99
53
46

46

40

112
38
74
39

75
26
49
35

13

56
29
7
3
19

21
5
3
13

55
15

18

8

15
4

40
27

10
4

11
5

10

16

10
3

16
1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

_

260

?7«

over

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of
workeis

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time w e e k l y earnings of—
i

Average
weekly

$

$

%

S

i

$

S

$

a

S

$

b

$

i

S

190

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

280

250

260

190

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

290

2 b':

P60

280 . 3,USL

6

23

10

-

-

-

-

-

6

23
4
12

10
7
2

92
7
35
20
4

59
23
36
29
7

69
28
91
30
9

80
32
98
21
13

78
86
32
15
12

52
10
82
18
17

52
38
19
11
2

10
5
5
1
3

80
19
21
6
3

29
11
18
10
2

106
55
51
1
8
27
15

121
23
98
19
20
59
5

92
90
52

30
6
29

91
8
33

19
7
7

12
4
8

2

3

-

-

18
26

6

1

-

n

b

6
2

21
3
18
11
_

11

39
19
20
18

80

71
28
87
33
8

84
29
56
83

4
3
3

3
2
2

-

1
1

-

1

9

1

9
7

18

81
8
37

120
Median*

(standard

Middle range*

Under
120

ALL

130

130

Occupation a n d industry division

S

%

30 0

320

380

360

32u

390

360

over

-

-

-

and
und e r

WORKERS
$
38.5 209.00
39.5 216.50
37.5 209.50
36.5 205.00
39 . 0 2 0 2 . 5 0

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------F I N A N C E ----------------------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------

552
219
333
169

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S t f --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -------------------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------------------------------F I N A N C E -----------------------------------------------------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------------------------------------

716
316
SOO
S3
93
209
136

38.0
39.0
37.5
38.5
38.5
36 . 0
39 . 0

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S C -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------ ----------------------------------

298

$
207.00
219.00
202.60
2 0 0 .0 0

$
$
19(1.00-227.00
199.50-230.50
188.50-229.50
18 A .o r -2 2 1.0 0

-

-

205.00

179.50-22**. 5o

-

-

9

176.50
179.50
175.50
165.50
179.50
179.50
172.50

175.00
175.00
175.00
169.00

-

2

33

82
15
67

183.00
165.00

160.00-190.50
1 6 a .0 0 - 1 9 1 . 5 0
157.50-190.00
160.00-182.00
1 5 a .0 0 - 1 9 o . 00
16<+.5i)-19J«u0
196.00-190.00

*

-

20
25
22

115
90
75
21
6
29
29

161.00
152.00
150.50
153.00

150.00
150.50
150.00
150.50

138.00-161.50
1 3 7 . 0 0 - 1 6 7.00
139.00-161.50
192,00-161.50

21
8
13
10

23

158

37.5
38.5
37 . 0
36.5

57
15
92
36

98
8
90
35

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S A ------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------- -------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------F I N A N C E -----------------------------

556
239
317
210

38 . 0
39 . 0
37,5
36.6

281.00
282.00
280.50
280.00

281.00
289.00
281.00
281.00

253.50-305.50
25^.50-305.30
253.50-305.00
258.00-302.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------F I N A N C E -----------------------------------------------------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------------------------------------

699
212
937
291
77

38.0
39.5
37.5
37 . 0
39 . 0

290-.50
259.00
239.00
220.00
278.00

238.00
251.50
230.00
221.00
291.00

210.00-268.50
232.50-271.50
202.50-252.00
197.50-29u.00
236.00-319.50

-

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
b u s i n e s s , c l a s s c ------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------------------------------------------

206
179
169

37.5
37 . 0
37 . 0

188.00
185.50
185.00

188.00
185.50
185.50

l73.or-198.00
l7o.00-198.00
170.00-197.00

_

.

-

“

“

“

COMPUTER SYSTEMS
BUSINESS, CLASS

ANALYSTS,
A -------------------------------------------

6 ia

manufacturing

-------------------------------------------------

as

77
221

1 8 0 .0 0

192
926
256

38 . 0
39. 5
37.5
37.C

351.50
353.50
361.00
326.00

393.00
355*00
335.00
323.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------------------------------------------

513
69
999
232

38 . 0
39.5
37.5
37.0

299.00
301.00
298.50
279.00

298.00
305.50
295.00
279.00

263.50-332.50
266.00-339.00
263.50-330.00
256.50-299.50

88
79
68

37.5
37.5
37 . 0

222.50
219.00
216.50

211.50
211.00
209.00

201.00-237.00
198.50-231.50
193.00-229.00

-

-

2

33

-

-

2

4
13
19

61
17
44
12
9
7
21

36
15
21
19

63
15
98
27

-

-

23
8

-

H

7

3
16
7

19
10
9
b

5
3
2
2

4
4
3

8
8

22
8
19
2

_

57
12
95
39
5

52
33
31

5
_

_

-

-

-

4

5

27

5
1

4
4

5
5

27
27

23
23
23

19
19
17

29
29
29

98
93
91

-

b

-

3

56
12
44
90
1

58
11
97
27

59

"

f

29
21
19

9
7
6

4

b

13

81
33

3
3

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S C ------------------------------------------nonmanufacturing

-----------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------




326.00-376.00
307.00-385.00
299.50-393.50
.

.

_

.

_
-

-

-

-

d

18
26
16

“

2

-

-

-

3

8

b

3

8
8

5

3

-

2
2

-

-

”

“

“

“

1

1
1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

51
18
37
28

96
81
55
38

119
59
60
50

75
25
50
32

85
26
19
17
1

71
83
28
17
10

50
19
31
4
18

4b
18
31
29

11
6
5
1
2

_

2
1

.

_

_

-

-

*

*

_

19
1
18
16

65
9
56
82

90
6
88
62

82
9
73
55

4

3

3
2

1
1

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

21
10
11
4

15
11
4

3
2
1

3
1
2

-

-

*

”

-

-

*

“

“

8rt
18
78
52

lib

39
76
58

99
87
52
88

*221
81
180
81

76

65
10
55
20

58
12
82
5

83

66
31

1
1
1

2

2
1

2
1
1

1

_

P

2
-

1

3 l7 .0 f> -J 8 2 .0 0

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------F I N A N C E --- -------------------------

FINANCE

280

5

5
5
5

9

19
8

17
2

-

2
2

8

a

3

8

15
15

16
17

20
17
13

10
9
9

9
9
8

8

7
4

3
3

7

l

1
P

-

P4
5
5
5

-

lu

-

69
d4
JD

22

i

_

3

80

_
-

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time w e e k l y earnings of—
Number

$

i

Average

workers

weekly
hours1
(standard)

Median 2

Middle ranged

Under
$

120

120
and
under

130

130

Occupation and industry division

$

$

140

140

$

$

150

160

i

$

170

180

*

$

190

200

210

3
>
220

S

%

$

23o

240

*
250

i

26o

$

s

*
280

30(1

320

4
340

360
and

150

160

17(3

180

200

210

220

-

20
12
8
8

28
11
17
17

89
51
38
38

53
25
28

66
23
43

107
80
27
2
19

125
40
85

l?flL

240

250

260

280

300

320

3-*o

360

over

88
47
41
40

97
29
68
68

127
70
57
56

85
39
46
46

251
109
142
141

99
69
30
29

105
47
58
32

si
29
24
7

21
10
11
2

15
15
15

127
25
102

162
123
39

104
17
87
2
85

39
14
25
10
13

57
49
8

44

6

68
17
51
34
17

34
5
29

-

2 lit

ALL W O R K E R S - CONTINUED

, c l a s s a ---------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

1.092
531
561
505

39.5
40.0
39 . 5
39.5

262.00
261.00
263.00
257.50

$
259.50
259.50
258.00
253.50

$
$
234.00-284.00
233.00-288.00
237.00-279.a0
2 3 4 . 0 0 - 2 7 2 . oO

D R A F T E R S . C L A S S B ---------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

1.102
474
628
49
546

39.0
40.0
38.5
39 . 0
38.5

222.00
219.50
224.00
275.00
223.00

224.00
224.00
225.00
282.00
222.00

200.00-243.00
200.00-231.00
199.50-247.00
251.00-294.00
1 9 9 . 5 0 - 2 4 J.00

D R A F T E R S , C L A S S C ---------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------ ----N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

547
239
308
244

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5

174.50
169.50
178.00
167.50

170.00
1 6 2.00
173.00
1 7 0.00

150.00-189.50
147.01-188.50
152.50-194.00
150.00-185.00

------------------------

76

39.5

134.50

134.00

120.50-145.00

E L E C T R O N I C S T E C H N I C I A N S -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

2.133
1.439
694
183

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

233.00
215.50
269.00
237.50

227.50
210.00
277.00
238.00

200.00-271.50
1 9 3 . 0 0 - 2 3 9 . 5C
243.00-310.50
214.50-269.00

12
12

E L E C T R O N I C S T E C H N I C I A N S , C L A S S AM A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------------

984
534
450
132

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

262.00
247.50
279.50
247.00

260.50
244.00
303.50
241.50

23(i , 5 o - 3 0 0 . 50
226.00-275.00
244.00-310.53
226.50-276.00

E L E C T R O N I C S T E C H N I C I A N S . C L A S S BM A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------- -----

894
668
226

40.0
40.0
40.0

217.50
205.00
253.50

210.00
206.00
267.00

194.00-236.00
192.50-217.00
243.00-277.00

_

E L E C T R O N I C S T E C H N I C I A N S , C L A S S CH A N U F A C T U R I N G --- --------------------

173
161

40.0
40.0

161.00
160.00

164.00
164.00

14(1.00-174.00
14(1.00-171.00

N U R S E S . I N D U S T R I A L ( R E G I S T E R E D ) --M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

174
112
62

39.0
39 . 5
38.0

216.50
216.50
217.00

214.00
213.00
223.00

200.00-232.00
200.00-232.00
195.00-237.00

$
drafters

DRAFTERS-TRACERS

S e e footnotes at e n d of tables.




-

-

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

10

4

20
7
13

16
11
5

74
27
47

-

-

-

-

-

6
-

6
6

-

-

-

4
-

10

22
12
10

-

-

4
-

-

6

6

-

12

4

46

28

41

26
6
20
20

54
42
12
12

61
25
36
36

57
29
28
28

78
30
48
47

77
23
54
53

28
16
12
11

20
15
5

-

48
27
21
20

-

31

15

18

9

2

60
54

16
14
2
2

82
67
15

171
148
23
11
28
16
12

9
-

9

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

6

2

3

-

-

-

4
4

2
2

3
68
61

80
6

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

14

26
8
18

211
193
18
6

198
171
27
15

162
145
17
18

157
116
41
33

122
90
32
19

84
49
35
10

226
99
127
24

205
120
85
21

248

1

248
9

1
1

66
46
20
11

77

101
69
32

96
74
22
13

47
27
20
5

123
91
32
17

145
114
31
21

248

1

-

.

“

-

-

9

43
31
12
3
159
153
6

122
120
2

76
72

24
11
9

33
19
14

100
5
95

10

3
3

7
6

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

5
3
2

31
20
11

31
27
4

7

126
117
11

41
41

7
6

8
a

3
3
28
23
5

30
24
6

66

11
8

29

-

24o

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

1
1

-

-

60

-

-

-

_

6

-

5

-

12
12

_

46
■♦0

10
10

41
41

1

6

7

6

-

-

18
u

1

5
2

2

-

1
5

4

7

-

“

23
9

-

_
-

40

6

-

-

-

“

4

-

-

1

37

-

-

-

_

-

102

-

-

-

_

4

84

12
12
-

_

-

-

40
-

1
92
81
11
2

4

-

-

-

86

-

-

49
42
7

23
16
7

32
19
13

3
2
1 .

-

10

-

-

-

“

-

-

_

.

_

_

-

-

-

54

1

-

*

in Boston, Mass., August 1975
Weekly earnings
(standard)

Occupation a n d industry division

ALL

Number
of
workers

1

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time w e e k l y earning

i

Average
weekly
Mean

(standard

*

Median

*

Middle ranged

!

140
Under
and
S
under
140
is_a.

*

*
150

160

170

*180 *190

200

210

220

*

$

%

*

s

$

230

240

230

of—

*

$
260

270

*
280

300

$
320 * 340

s

$
360

380
and

160

170.

180

19Q___200

210

220

230

260

_2&0

_2 6 0

-ttSL

280

320

360

360

25
19
13

300

24
19

10

380

over

u/OflKERS
$

354

$_ _

$

221.00

3C*"
337

$

..0(1.30
40.0

^31*00

198

38.0
39 . 0

180.00
182.00

179.00

67

^7
-'r

1 Ofl
51

51

65

16o.00- - 1 9 6 . b a

n

38
13
11

?4
18

4
3

2

12

26
69
111

36.5

172.30

155.50-166.50

153.00

173^00

38.0

16

161.00-167.50

*13

18
30

52

147
3 7 10

152.30

?7
24

162.00-167.50

34
25

23
19

21

13

^7

Vft
o

3
11

12

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
351

24

298.00
1j 6

0-7 . ^
J
J

* ^ #00
7
c.08*

6

276.00-321.00

0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
20P.50-257.00

38.0
285

37.5 224.00
37. u

223.00
1.00

37*0

N O N M A i U F A C T U R I M G ------------------M

|0"*"L
185.00

5

200.00-261.50

5

-

-

3
11

5

27
29

^4
29
2fl

12
32
29

29

T3
36
33

^6
17

56
40
Ju

31

21

29

5

6

l_
r

20

16

16

25
19

27

18

13

7

6

17

*

11

11

17
16
3

1

3

1

4^

41

2

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*

1G0
COMPUTER SYSTEMS
uU j 1
j j 9 vLM j

COMPUTER SYSTEMS

ANALYSTS.
M

185.00

474
159
315
c 18
.

23

3
3

^ 351.50
354.00

25

6

J2 J

5^!!* 2*.1
• j»0

311.50

3 1 4 . U0

276*00

6Q.Q

1^7

272.50

36

1

263.50284.50262.50250.50-

332.50
363.00
330.00
299.50

8

7^

JO
r8

lb
“
18

JO
24

19

60

43

10
50
20

i

7

47
20

18

1

1

ANALYSTS.
3

77

217.50 211.00
3 7 . t t-16.50 ^ 0 9 . 0 0
rr.
19 n

*
**
t

60

*
3 3 G .0 0
Jc . 1 . 0

ANALYSTS*
403
50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS

3

24

l7f>. 0 0 - 1 9 7 . 0 0

W o r k e r s w e r e at $ 130 to $ 140.
W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:
W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:

See footnotes at e n d of tables.




194.00-232.50

^ 273.00
40.0
39.0 274.00

r^y r r~n
-

39

^ G 4 50

8

3
266.00265.00-

-.«/ d
298.50
306.00

3
*

1-3

5
*

}}

1A

tj
J

}
5

1

1

r*7
2

9

10 at $ 1 1 0 to $120; 11 at $ 1 2 0 to $130; an d 20 at $ 130 to $ 140.
40 at $ 3 80 to $ 400; 17 at $ 400 to $ 420; 43 at $ 420 to $ 440; 9 at $ 4 4 0 to $ 460; 13 at $ 460 to $ 480; 3 at $ 4 8 0 to $ 500; a n d 1 at $ 500 to $ 520.

70
67

53

29

%

32

in Boston, Mass., August 1975— Continued
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of
workers

Occupation a n d industry division

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time w e e k l y earnings of-*

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

140

Mean ^

Median £

Middle ranged

S

%
150

160

170

180

190

200

210

22 0

230

t
>
240

%
25o

*

%
26o

270

28o

300

*

S
320

340

$
36o

Under
,
i
and
140

36o

and

under
150

160

170

180

190

200

1A
12
2

210

220

32

27
20

230

2AQ

250

260

270

260

30 0

58

117
111

15

26
14
12

35

6
y

32
3

20
17

40
17
23

_

_

-

34
5
29

-

-

-

-

51

320

340

360

380

over

ALL W O R K E R S —
CONTINUED
$
D R A F T E R S . C L A S S B ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------

434

3 9 .5

30V
125

4 0 .0
3 8 .5

D R A F T E R S , C L A S S C ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------

21s
160
65

32

A
-

8
7

3

4
3

13
13

A

1

1

1

-

19
9

22
22

16
1A

13
13

23
22

2A

-

2

-

1

37
37

58
56
2
2

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2

2 0 0 .0 0 -2 6 0 .0 0
1 9 3 .5 0 -2 3 9 .5 0

465
364

A O .O
A O .O
A 0.G

2 4 2 .5 0
2 7 6 .5 0

A O .O

b-

512
361

ELECTRONICS

CLASS

c-

----

(REGISTERED)
----------------

W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:

See footnotes at end of tables.




8
6
0
7

.0
.0
.0
.0

0
0
0
0

2 4 9 .5 0

2
1
7
6

6
3
7
1

.0
.0
.0
.0

0
0
0
0

2 5 6 .5 C -2 8 A .S o
2 3 5 . 5 0 - 2 8 1 . oO

*10
_

6
6

-

-

1A
1A
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

2 2 7 .0 0 -2 7 6 .5 0
2 2 6 .0 0 -2 5 8 .5 0
2 5 7 . 0 0 - 3 0 3 . SO

2 6 7 .0 0

2 A 3 .5 0 -2 8 A .5 o

-

A O .O
A O .O

2 2 2 .0 0
2 0 3 .5 0

2 1 0 .0 0
2 0 2 .0 0

1 9 5 .5 0 -2 5 1 .5 0

_

1 9 1 .0 0 -2 1 3 .0 0

-

85

A O .O

1 7 1 .5 0

1 7 1 .0 0

1 6 0 . 0 0 - 1 7 6 . SO

1A3
82

3 9 .0
A O .O
3 8 .0

2 1 6 .5 0

2 1 5 .0 0
2 1 3 .0 0
2 2 2 .5 0

2 0 0 . 0 0 - 2 3 1 . SO
2 0 0 .5 0 -2 2 3 .3 0
1 9 5 .0 0 -2 3 7 .5 0

61

7

25
33

6

2 1 6 .5 0
2 1 7 .0 0

3

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

121
46

35
-

1
-

75
21

35
9

1
1

n
_

16
15

6
A

10
9

1A
8

1

1

2

1

6

6A

10A

131
129

93
87
6

98

94
81

lo l
9 r>

SI
33

79
29

13
8

11
11

16
9

50
12

22
29
12

65
59

64
58

80
74

32
27

30
23

30
20

67
46

35
-

1
-

10

21

35

9

l
1

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

23

62
2
2

-

101
3
3

2
2

6

90
8
8

5
A

32

2A

31

1

1

22
2

6

6

6

5

7

1

2

6

6

6

5

7

10

21

62

26
2A

25
18

16

47
4

20
1

54

11

16
3

22

21
8

3

10

13

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

3
3

9
9

17
15

A3
A2

8A
82

90
89

60

4

-

-

-

5
A
1

18
16
2

_

2 A A .0 0
2 A 1 .S 0
2 8 1 .0 0
2 7 4 . SO

101
75

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ' ------------------------

A 0 .0

25
7

10

A 0 .0
A 0 .0
AO .O

2
1
7
5

A

ou *
1 5 6 .5 0 -2 2 6 .3 0
1 5 6 .5 0 -2 0 0 .0 0
1 6 6 .0 0 -2 5 0 .5 0

CLASS

#

12

1 8 3 .0 0
1 7 9 .0 0
2 5 0 .5 0

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS,
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

INDUSTRIAL

12

2 1 4 .0 0 -2 5 1 .0 0

u •u «

$

1 8 9 .5 0
1 8 1 .5 0
2 1 3 .0 0

A-

NONMANUFACTURING

2 lA .0 0 -2 5 2 .0 0
2 1 5 .0 0 -2 5 3 .0 0

3 9 .5
AO . 0
3 9 .0

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS, CLASS
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------------

NURSES,

$

2 3 1 .0 0
2 3 1 .0 0
2 2 5 . SC

1 ,1 3 8
863
255
106

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------S E R V I C E S ----------------

TECHNICIANS,

$

2 3 1 .0 0
2 3 2 .0 0
2 2 8 .5 0

10

22

29

7

8

3

2

1
-

6

3
1
2

6

17

-

2

10

17
12

30
2A

A

7

5

6

1

3 at $ 1 0 0 to $110; 6 at $ 1 1 0 to $120; a n d 1 at $ 1 2 0 to $130.

1
5

16
6

3

3

2
10

-

3
1

_

4
.

-

-

Average

Average
( me an *)

Sex. occupation, and industry division

of
woikers

OFFICE

Averaje

( mean*)

Number

(m ean ')
Number

Number
Weekly
hours *
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN

of
woiken

Weekly
houn 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED

of

Weekly
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED

19'
r

1L L i L L ~

jj

O ”
73

194.00
loj % j G

-

39

0

}

SECRETARIES— CONTINUED

m

*2 1 5 1 . 0 0
3t>« _ 1 4 4 . 0 0
/

sx, x N -rrn

.r
~

191

40.0

138
415
262

1K A L C " ~
/.

061
466
595

119.50
38.5 126.50
37 . 0 1 1 7 . 0 0
36. i 1 1 6 . 0 0

151.50

T
38 ■ .
”
38.0 1A6 '"f
39.0 1 4 1 . 5 0

84

OFFICE

BILLERS.

OCCUPATIONS

MACHINE

09
338
271

- WOMEN

tt1
BILLERS.

55
73

(BILLING.

MACHINE

38 . 5

124.00
" C T r Ur, u i U* L h

(BOOKKEEPING

1UH

j

, CL A j o

148.50
B O O K K E E P I N G - M A C H I N E O P E P A T U k S.
CLASS A

84

119
97

9 .i a /«T r r ■
C ■

37 . 5

#
; 2 ; *22
126.5v

W t T R XL-

1 I\

3.395
«54
2,541
361
736
717
358

f
t

„

147
762

196.50

1 77

,,

2.357
1.656
585
235
324
397
315

78
130
295
11)4

38 0
38.5

|

r XL L y

vL

”J J




W

39'
61
331
210

37.5
z i *

2

z t i ' i

38.5
36. 5
36.0
30 . 0

141.50

..

-r

W O O'
j
• 2^
149. 5 0
138.50
1 4 7.00
1 5 4.50

^ r r , -v .. Tr r
-- r
i
-

a

x

38.0

7 ’

9

1 in. on
3 7 .0

158.00
161.00

^* ^ 7

8b

154.00
154.50
153.50
143.50
130.00
1 4 H . 00

1 up

165.00
1 6 J . SO

3 9 .5

1
a
P

0

__

_

*’

1 7 7.50
182.00

1

!

or
38.0

41

38.0
30^
3.367
1,569

,2-.* ~L

ir "99

129. 0 0

38.0 113. 0 0
3 1.0 1 . t . -.0

TRADE

~

’1 ,
1

1 528

13^ 00
1 3 2 . 5u
132.00
1 5 3.00

36

10.750

131.00
13j._.0

■I’
' '®

175.00
*

1 0 5 . SO

118.00

133.00
38 0 1 3 0 . 0C
37.5
37 . 0 1 2 2 . 0 0
39 . 0

228

*2
a ->

136.00

WHOLESALE
L L L r. j
f\

38 *C
39.0
39.0
37.0
31.0

1 36

38 . 0

3,664
1,459

.r „

31^
^76

166.00

195.00

1 1 5.50

"79

38.0

39 . 0

or
ir. *2j!
3 .>

10 7 .50

30 r 1'' 6 ^ ’
36 . 5 1 5 5 . 5 0
1 5 8 . 0C
37* 5
36.5 150.50
30.0 lC-0 . ->0

fj

^80

37*5

37.5

172.50
37!5

1,375
654

155.00

37.5
37 . 0

^

37.0

2^*2

^83
76

37 5 1 1 6 . 0 0
3 7 . u 113.50
37. 5 1 1 6.50

38.0

82

llr zo
1 1 1.50

70 1
163
539
54
343

159.00

Wf IULC. J ALC.

3 7 .0
3 7 .t
.

6lU
2s2
356
67

323

406
56

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

$
LLt-KMj |

285

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

39.0

142.00
152.00
139.50
40 • 0 1 7 5 . 0 0
144.50
37.5 142.50
36.0 142.50
125.00
39.5

1 6 4.00
169.00
178.j 0
n tTA i L

HO

1 H AU L
7

'3

214.50
166.00
164.00

in Boston, Mass., August 1975— Continued
Average
(m ean2 )

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED
SWITCHBOARD

Number
of

Weakly
hours 1
[standard)

792

139.50
137.00
141.50
138.50
132.00

166
ao
62
jtKVIwLj
294
225

JU • 0 2 ^ -'•00
1 2*22
37 . 5
38.5
37.0

38.0
38. 5
37.5

AND TECHNICAL
MEN— CONTI N U E D

TECHNICIANS— CONTINUED

36.5

ELECTRONICS

TECHNICIANS,

CLASS

B-

864

40.0

218

$
218.50
206.00
254.50

40. 0

161 *"0
160.00

38.(1

172. 0 0

P ROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

129
105
96
SYSTEMS

37.5
37.0
37 . 0

189.00
187.00
185.50

170. 0 0
51

AN4LYSTS,

512

38.5

118.00
120.50

354.00

124.50

1,056
754
1Sj

Weakly
earnings 1
(standard)

PROGRAMMERS,

I 2 3 !50
155.00

37.5

. j

Weekly
standard)

38.5 242.50
39.5 257.00
37.5 235.50

3

4.0 0

COMPUTER

1*4 1 9

3 7 .5

334

140.50
137.50
141.50

36* ^
39.0

286.00
280.00
. . . 0. 0 0

490

145.50
145.00
146.00
138.00

398
r i ---------

Number
of

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,

38 . 0

52
75

CLASS

Sex, occupation, and industry division

ELECTRONICS

$

245
163

COMPUTER
1 * 340
349

TYPISTS?

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

PROFESSIONAL
OCCUPATIONS -

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
ul/ j 1 I' L j i v L n j vj M
Jd
"

38 . 5
38.0

OPERATORS,

Weekly
hours 1
standard)

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— C O NTINUED

-

OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

Average
(m ean*)

(mT,™*')
Number
of
workexs

Sex, occupation, and industry division

332

37.5

37.0

n _
/

353.50

370
COMPUTES

157.00
''TC 0(
285.00

PSOGRAPMESS*
38.0

234.00

222*-2

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND TECHNICAL
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN

-b;*??

*00

32b

^ 1 7*^U

997

■
’rt" ^2
469
487
196
291

* 1
“

_
_

38.5 211.50
39.5 218.00
37.5 207.50

i 6.
COMPUTER

SYSTEMS

ANALYSTS,

,.39.00

^

94
82

227.00

j
-

FINANCE

37.0

r^

222* 2'
310•50

9

COMPUTE^
527
159

SYSTEMS

ANALYSTS*
285.00

39 ^ 5

59

T*
nn

104

36*0
39.5

211
177!50
Oc.

171.00

^77

I 1 1/ ,
1J • 00
COMPUTER
40.0

171.00
1 ,<*04
657
ICC

55
149*50
152.00

ELECTRONICS

TECHNICIANS,

CLASS

233.50
216.50

SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
vL m j j C — 1

37.0
265.00
38.0 2 1 0 . 5 0

40.0

214.00

A38.0
'00

2 4 8 ^0

NOTE:
E a r n i n g s data in table A - 3 relate only to w o r k e r s w h o s e sex identification w a s provided b y the establishment.
all w o r k e r s in an occupation. (See appendix A for publication criteria.)
S e e footnotes at e n d of tables.




216.50
216.50
217.00

E a rnings data in tables A - 1 a n d A-2, on the other hand, relate to

large establishments in Boston, Mass., August 1975
A venge
(m ean2 )

A venge
(m ean2 )

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

O FFICE O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN
$

158
.r ^ „ f k. r
-

r
-

30*'” 2 0 3 . 0 0
36.0 157.50
38.0

^92
198
107

n

37.0
37 . 0

119.50
130.00
112.50
119.00

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of

Weekly
hours 1

|
standard)

OCCUPATIONS

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED
, rtnrniTAf,f.

Kt 1 A I L

^ a

A56

38. 0

392
35
168
180

1K f U L — —
t

Sex, occupation, and industry division

37^5
37.5
37. 0
38.0

1n7

An

Weekly

909

— —1 ™ " 1 " “ 1"
“
1

39.0

296
39

b t K V 1 vt j

,^ „

76
55

J i.u

199.00
139.00
r
-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

3 7 #0

- WOMEN

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE
179.00
175.50

1.086
030
197

^y,
295

38* 0
37.5
37.0

3.091
3.095

39 ^ 0
37.5

1.7 6 9
616

37 . 0
90.0

163.50
183.50

?2*£

39.5

125.00
139.j 0

161
95

1 9 1 Iso

428
239

69
138.00
Ja.0

3 f«- 192.50
>

r - r - - r *n T r

-

n

38 C
39 . 0 2 9 2 . 5 0
37.5 207.50

, ilr
.
39 . 0

r U u L 1 v U 1 1L I 1 1 t o

138.00
182.00

***■” ” *

127.00
129.50
128.00
116.j O

2 0 3 50
207.00

528
38.0
inn
1

37. 0

128.00
130.00
127.50
120.00

'< 9
■4
‘
210

37 5
37 . 0
37 . 0

123.00
120.00
llt...>0

392

38 . 0
37.5
39.0
37 . 0

120.00
120.50
162.50
109.50

"a 7
186
193
111




38 . 0
38.5
37.5
37.5

199.50
155.00
1 9 A . 00
139.00

1.122
1.159

62
230

39 . 0
37.0

151.50
192.50

technical

123
675
181

39 . 0

188.50
175.50
219.00
37.5 155.50
37.0
39. j 1 8 7 . 0 0

39 * 0

210.00
222.00
202.00
✓ r» -r.a--^ r.e
N -r - r - -

ri .
+

162.00
169.00

^

280

38..0
37.5
38i0

1 a o nS
1/ y ’El!

721

469

-/. „
s-

22*2
37.0

301

180.00
189.50
177.50
177.50
173.50
155.50
153.00
153.50

1 7 1 •-'0
1 1

267
64

813

and

E-0 • -’
0
1Q^

132.50
139.00

256
129
132
85
nlirn.TA^r

38.0

professional

98

139.00

OPERATORS,

186.00
173.00

197.00
195.00
173.j 0

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

-

133.50
196.50
131.50
179.50
129.00
129.00
11 n *"n

Number
of
workers

(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED

218
OFFICE

A venge
(m ean 2 )

Number

160.00
290.50
39.5 301.00
37 .'j 2 7 9 . 5 0

I t . j . jiO

_

158.00
/ 0 0 157.50
COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
38.0

290.00
260.00
226.50
222.00

large establishments in Boston, Mass., August 1975— Continued
Average
(m ean2 )

Average
(m ean2 )

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

PROFESSIONAL
OCCUPATIONS -

Number
of
workers

ACTURl N G

SYSTEMS

--------------- -------------------------

9ll

$
J7 r" 1 4 8 . 0 0
37.0 1 8 6 . 5 0
37.9 1 8 5 . 0 0

ANALYSTS,

_
_ r.

JUG
239
lt>->
COMPUTER

SYSTEMS

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

^

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

PROFESSIONAL a n d TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

a /

COMPUTER

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

AND TECHNICAL
MEN— C O N T I N U E D

COMPUTE P PROGRAMMERS,
n o n m anuf

Weekly
hours 1
standard)

Number
of

37^5
37.0

rr.--r

^

. r-r- „

196

1,118

^

1 '
100
.

40.0 * 9 2 . 5 0
162.00
80.0
80.0
40.0

61

( eOU»

229.00
217.00
270.00
257.00

75
38.0
37.5

308.50
303.00

583
355
188

39. 5
80.0
39.0

273.00
273.00
278.00

395
ce5
llu

39 «
'"o
80.0 233.50
39.0 2 8 u . 5 0

U 1 L 't

80.0

’70*^0
267.00

ELECTRONICS

T E C H NICIANS» CLASS

8-

501
360

80.0
80.0

v L A -o u

COMPUTER

ELECTRONICS

TECHNICIANS.

C-

81
76

80.0
40.0

4
*

57

^

170.j 0

PROGRAMMERS,

38.0

COMPUTER

SYSTEMS

*-08.00
rsn

an

216*00
37.1) 2 1 7 . 0 0

ANALYSTS*
386.00
388.50
3 7 • 0 310 . - 0
j

223.00
208.00
172.00
171.00

CLASS

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

PROGRAMMERS.

COMPUTER SYSTEMS

ANALYSTS*
286.00
262.50

NURSES.

See footnotes at end of tables.




v l L n h 1UK j t

250.00
-.0

ANALYSTS,
^87
280
121

Weakly
hours 1
(standard)

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C HNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

COMPUTER

_

of
workers

Average
(m ean2 )

Earnings data in table A - 3 a relate only to w o r k e r s w h o s e sex
identification w a s provided b y the establishment.
Earnings data in
tables A - l a and A - 2 a , on the other hand, relate to all w o r k e r s in an
occupation.
(See appendix A for publication criteria.)

INDUSTRIAL

(REGISTERED)

---

140

39.0
80.0
38.0

217.00
216.50
217.00

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time h o urly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

Occupation a n d industry division

of
workers

$
3. 8 0

i
$
4 • 00 4 . 2 0

*
4.40

S
S
S
4 . 6 0 4 .80 5 . 0 0

*
5.20

$
5. 4 0

$
5. 6 0

s
5.80

$

s

$

6 .2 0

$
6.40

%

6 .0 0

6.60

6 .8 0

*
7. 0 0

*
7. 2 3

*
7.40

$
7.60

4.00

4.20

4. 4 0

4.60

4.80

5 .00 5 . 2 0

5.40

5. 6 o

5. 8 0

6.00

6 .2 0

6.40

6 »6Q

6.80

7.00

7n!iL 7.4 0

7. 6 0

7«B9_ over

5
5

1
1

80
75

18
15

28
16

27
23

27
27

16
6

17
16

37
35

5
5

28

-

-

-

29
24

8

28

8

_
-

4
4
2

3
3
“

19
19
13

14
3
11
7

7
5

109
85
24
5

20
14
6
-

31

-

35
19
16
-

23
-

33
8
25
-

22
8
14
“

14
13
1
1

8
8
4

-

12
12
-

_
-

17
17
-

39
35
4
4

42
36

-

17
16
1
1

5

no
98
12
12

78
71
7
6

49
41
8
5

243
202
41
9

51
24
27
8

56
16
40
6

_
-

_
-

3
3
-

9
4
5

21
19
2

23
5
18

25
22
3

9
1

-

1
1

19
19

-

8
8

6

25
7
18

•

-

13

i

-

13

i

*
3.60

Number
Mean 2

M edian2

M iddle'range 2

Under

$
7.80

and

3. 6 0
3.80
ALL W O R KERS
B.OILER T E N 0 E R S -------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

326
284

$
5.16
5.18

$
5.16
5.16

$
4.354.35-

$
5.7(i
5.7r

C A R P E N T E R S . M A I N T E N A N C E -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

384
191
193
61

5.85
5.73
5.98
6. 7 1

5.42
5.36
5.78
6.73

5.33- 6.16
5.33- 6.16
5.04- 6.17
4.67- 8.63

•
-

E L E C T R I C I A N S , M A I N T E N A N C E ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------

1,0 9 1
799
292
60

6.09
5.97
6.42
5.68

5.87
5. 8 1
6.39
5.65

5#485.375.94S.22-

6.74
6.53
6.8?
6.00

.
-

E N G I N E E R S , S T A T I O N A R Y ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

232
157
75

6.30
6.49
5.92

6.14
6.37
6.00

5.525.525.64-

7.23
7.32
6.3s

---------

*

-

-

-

-

*

_
-

2

6

8

-

-

-

*

-

2

4
i

-

30
3
*27
27

1

3b
lb
20
-

36
34
2
”

_
-

28
21
7
-

1
1

24
24
-

7
6
1

32
32
-

2
2

_

-

-

P

-

-

-

-

“

“

*

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

16
16

a
8

“

*

16
lb
*

4
4
-

3
3
”

134
66

9
8

68

2

68
36
32
2

1
*

3
2
1

8
5
3

12
8
4

2

1

2

8

6

-

1

-

66

50
16

4

255

4.26

4.13

3.83- 4.6?

17

46

43

31

35

12

21

25

1

7

-------------------

74

4.42

3.90

3.78- 5.3°

**11

8

23

3

-

3

2

-

*

7

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

164
164

5.38
5.38

5.36
5.36

5.03- 5.79
5,03- 5.79

12
12

_

-

13
13

3
3

21
21

50
50

3
3

25
25

4
4

23
23

9
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

M A C H I N I S T S , M A I N T E N A N C E -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

804
787

5.81
5.80

5.69
5.69

5.375.37-

6.16
6.16

46
46

7
4

44
44

79
76

89
89

260
258

29
29

13
13

28

38

1

28

36

61
61

1
*

37
37

7
“

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
( M A I N T E N A N C E ) -------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

771
137
634

6.53
5.86
6.68

6.78
5.85
6.78

5.935.456.10-

7.2?
5.93
7.36

15
15
-

42
22
20

18
4
14

83
54
29

77
11
66
62

17
17

6
6

Ill
Ill
31

55

-

85
8
77

62
8
54

24
24
24

32

30

----------------------

152

5.92

6.78

4.87-

6.78

*

-

1

1

4

17

M E C H A N I C S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

2,357
1 , 941
416
62
178

5.68
5.64
5.86
5.16
5.80

5. 8 1
5. 8 1
6.26
4.75
5.25

5.035.035.194.635.19-

6.49
6.43
6.77
5.83
6.33

133
121
12

132
128
4
-

88
75
13

361
355

2

11

-

129
51
78
“
39

55

10

129
114
15
10
1

116
113

-

232
152
80
80

M I L L W R I G H T S -----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------- -----------

171
165

5.48
5.49

5.33
5.33

4.985.07-

6.01
6. 0 1

-

-

4
3

2
1

1

-

54
54

19

“

20
20

-

-

6
2

-

19

P A I N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

212

5.37
5.37
5.39

4.82-

6.4]

6

4

5 .0 9 -

5 .6 o

-

1

94
118

5.54
5.5 1
5.57

5
1

1

6

1

32
30

25
23

6

1

4

4

11

8

8

2

1

2

3
3

3
3

6.66

15
12
3

6
5

4.53-

12
12

P I P E F I T T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

384
369

5.80
5.78

5.51
5. 5 1

5.335.33-

6.29
6.27

-

-

-

-

29
29

-

21
20

87
83

24
24

1
1

80
80

7
7

11

-

32
32

SHEET-METAL

102
79

5.84
5.85

5.8 1
5.81

5.37- 5.94
5.37- 6.02

-

-

-

-

-

2
1

5
4

3
3

16
18

4
4

5.665.66-

-

-

-

-

"

“

*

16
16

16
16

16o
160

1
1
47

“

"

29
28
123
123

11
t
o

•

16
1
83
83

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES
NONMANUFACTURING

RETAIL

TRADE

nonmanufacturing

-----------------

WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —
m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------

T O O L A N D D I E M A K E R S ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

786
786

*
W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:
**
W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:
*** W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:
S e e footnotes at e n d of tables.




6 .0 8

6.08

5.97
5.97

6 . 2s]
6.2S

-

1
1

-

-

-

“

-

-

40
40

-

24
24

12
12

-

4
3
1

14

9

5

14

-

-

*

24

12

“

-

13

28
28
-

23
21
2

149
132
17

-

54
54
-

-

“

151
105
46
36
1

-

_

“
-

5

*

47
37
10
-

82
81
1

6

28

-

9
9

12

14

9

28

“

9

6
5

6 at $8 to $8.20; 2 at $8.40 to $8.60; 6 at $8.60 to $8.80; 11 at $9 to $9.20; 1 at $9.40 to $9.60; a n d
1 at $2.60 to $2.80; 2 at $2.80 to $3; 5 at $3 to $3.20; 2 at $3.20 to $3.40; and 1 at $3.40 to $3.60
55 at $7.80 to $8; 16 at $8 to $8.20; 1 at $8.20 to $8.40; and 1 at $8.60 to $8.80.

80

3

3

259
178
81
6

42
40
2
-

8

20

-

1

-

-

1

1

-

27
27

11

15
2
13

7
7

13
13

11
10

_

27
27

2

_

2

6

-

2

65
6b

1 at $9.80 to $10.

4
4

9
9

8
8

-

48
7
”

35
73
35 ***73
73
35
*

“

136
100
36

9

176
176

3

52
52

a
8

”

-

3
3
-

*

3

-

-

-

-

-

~

6

2

-

4
2

2

2

-

-

7
7

-

48
46

4
-

1
1
23
23

-

-

2
2

6

39
39

2
-

2

20
20

1
1
4
4

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
%

*

4.8o

5 .0 0

S
5 .20

S
5. 40

I
5.6o

*
5.80

*
$
%
$
%
6 . 0 0 6 .20 b H0 6. b*> 6 • bo

5 .2 0

5 .40 5. 6Q

5.80

6.00

6 . 2 0 6 t4'} b 60

17
16

4
2

5
5

-

.

5

93
85
8

8
6
2

15
8
7

17
8
9

14
8
6

8
b

13
12
1

4

5

-

2

s
-

25
22
3

104
98
6

61
60
1

22
17
5

187
178
9

30
8
22

bo
lo
4U

60
50
10

6
-

3
3
-

9
4
5

5
4

4
4

18
5
13

22
19
3

3
1
2

21
3
18

3
2
1

7

-

.

12

<
b
3.8 0
workers

Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range 2

$
4.20

$
$
4 • 40 4 . 6 0

8.00

Occupation a n d industry division

s
4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

O
O

Hourly earnings3

1
1

-

12
9

7
4

24
20

27
27

6
6

1
1

1
1

13
3
10

7
5
2

29
19
10

6
6
-

3
2
1

18
17
1

%
7.0 0

*
7

40

7.60

*
1—
7.80 8 . 0 0

7 60

7.80

8.00 over

S
F
20

7

i

Under
and
3.8 0

ALL

7 • on

7.2;; 7 40

WORKERS

B O I L E R T E N D E R S -------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

110
92

$
5.13
5.09

$■
5.16
5.16

$
$
4 . 8 5 - 5. 4 3
4 . 9 2 - 5.37

-

C A R P E N T E R S . M A I N T E N A N C E -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

2b9
171
98

5.93
5.66
6. 4 1

5.36
5.36
5.96

5 . 3 3 - 6. 1 6
5 . 3 3 - 5. 8 3
5 . 0 4 - 8.00

.

-

4

-

-

-

E L E C T R I C I A N S . M A I N T E N A N C E ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

738
S91
147

6.10
6.04
6.35

5.83
5.81
6.26

5 . 5 0 - 6.56
5 . 4 2 - 6.53
6.15- 6 . 8 2

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

E N G I N E E R S , S T A T I O N A R Y ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

117
66
51

6.09
6.15
6.02

5.98
5.98
6.26

5 . 6 9 - 6. 5 8
5 . 6 3 - 6. 7 3
5.69- 6.35

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

H E L P E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E T R A D E S --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

178
135

4.32
4.26

4.22
4.22

3.90- 4.62 * * 2 9
3.98- 4.6?
21

37
20

17
16

27
27

9
9

18
16

25
25

1
1

3

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM ~
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

141
141

5.5*
5.54

5.36
5.36

5.275.27-

5.98
5.98

-

-

_

*

-

1
1

-

-

-

13
13

3
3

10
10

50
50

3
3

25
25

4
4

23
23

9
9

M A C H I N I S T S , M A I N T E N A N C E -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

608
S97

5.79
5.79

5.69
5.6S

5 . 4 0 - 5.7 8
5 . 4 0 - 5.7 8

-

-

-

_

18
18

7
7

7
4

36
36

79
76

54
54

260
258

9
9

13
13

28
28

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
( M A I N T E N A N C E ) --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------ ------ — --P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------

241
83
158
131

6.61
5.92
6.97
7.16

6.29
5.85
6.71
7.3 8

5 . 9 3 - 7. 3 8
5.80- 5.93
6 . 2 9 - 7.8()
6 . 7 1 - 7.8l

1

3
3
-

14
11
3
2

9
4

63
54
9
8

15

17

5
3

M E C H A N I C S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

1.224
1,034
190
67

5.80
5. 7 0
6.36
6.30

5.85
5.81
6.32
6.32

5.255.106.266.32-

6. 3 3
5. 8 7
6. 8 ?
6. 3 3

4

-

11
10
1
*

323
322
1
*

M I L L W R I G H T S -----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

96
90

5.34
5.36

5.33
5.33

5 . 1 7 - 5. 3 3
5 . 2 1 - 5. 3 3

-

-

-

-

-

P A I N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---- *-----------------*
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G — -----------------

171
94
77

5.76
5. 5 1
6.07

5. 6 0
5.37
6.35

5 . 0 9 - 6.4l
5 . 0 9 - 5.60
5.09- 6 . 8 1

1
-

-

1

P I P E F I T T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

317
308

5.99
5.99

5.81
5.81

5.36- 6.58
5 . 3 6 - 6. 6 6

-

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

102
79

5.84
5.85

5. 8 1
5.81

5 . 3 7 - 5.94
5 . 3 7 - 6. 0 2

T O O L A N D D I E M A K E R S -------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

442
442

6.32
6.32

6. 1 0
6.10

5 . 9 7 - 6. 4 7
5 . 9 7 - 6.47

*
**

W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:
W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:




-

2
2

4

-

-

-

”

*

_

_
-

3
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

3
3

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

103
101
2
2

47
45
2
“

97
95
2
“

52
42
10
10

1
1

6
2

20
20

54
54

4
3

2
1

9
6
3

3
1
2

6

32
30
2

15
12
3

6
5
1

25
23
2

3

-

_

8
8

_

-

21
20

85
83

24
24

2
1

5
4

3
3

18
18

-

.

5
5

16
16

73
67
6
-

55
54
1
1

24
24

-

-

-

5
1
4

4
1
3

_

.

-

17
17
-

-

1

8
6
2
-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

“

*

*

.

-

.

.

-

-

-

6

.

-

15
11

17
-

5 103
2
27
3 ' 78
1
39

20
20

4

b

5
2

1

9
5
4

37
37

60
37
3
3

_

4
-

-

4

1

16
16
-

2d
26
2

5
5
-

b
b

37
37

32
4
29
24

1

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

*30
3
27

1

1
1
-

1

1

_

31
31

_

_

-

-

12

170
114
56

12
8

3

-

31
.
_

-

23
21
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

37

8

37
37

8
8

_

b
.

1
1

6
b

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

3

-

55
48
7
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
_

2
-

1

3
2

7

2

1

•
.

.

7
7

1
1

1
1

3

3
3
“

11
2
9

9
2
7

1
1

72
72

7
7

11
b

11
10

4
4

16
1

29
28

11
6

1
1

2
2

_

17
17

23
23

76
76

129
129

23
23

65
65

*

90
54
36

-

-

-

7
-

13
-

-

7

13

-

6
6
-

_

27
27

-

48
48

-

-

-

-

9
9

-

1
1

-

-

-

4
4

8
8

2
2

11
11

39
39

20
20

4
4

-

6 at $ 8 to $ 8.20; 2 at $ 8.40 to $ 8.60; 6 at $ 8.60 to $ 8.80; 11 at $ 9 to $ 9.20; 1 at $ 9.40 to $ 9.60; 1 at $ 9.80 to $ 10; a n d 3 at $ 10 to $ 10.20.
1 at $ 2.60 to $ 2.80; 2 at $ 2.80 to $ 3; 2 at $ 3.20 to $ 3.40; 7 at $ 3.40 to $ 3.60; and 17 at $ 3.60 to $ 3.80.

1

2
2

1
1

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time h o u r l y earnings of—
$

2*60

2 .8 0

S
3.00

s
3.20

$
3.4 0

I
3. 6 0

$
3. 8 0

0
0

2.40

2 ,6 0

2.60

3.00

? » £ P 3. 4 0

3,60

3. 8 0

4.00

602

2260

17 8 7

575

216

61

272
74

53

602

2260

17 8 7

575

2.20
Median2

Middle range 2

$
4.20

s —
$
4.60 4.80

$
5.00

4 t 8Q

5.00

5,2\) 5 t 4 0

98
68
30

$
4.90

99
38
61
1
15
45

75
59
16

51
16
35

12

30

35

■—
5
t
5.40 5.60

19

16

S
5.2 0

~S---- -5 —
"i—
f*
6.00 6.40 6.80 7 . 2

0

1

Mean 2

Under
and
$
under
2 .2 0

0

Occupation and industry division

i
2.40

rv

Hourly earnings

Number
of
Workers

4 . 4 9 -4.60

6.00

$.40

20

5 .6 9

22
20

6.80

7.20

7 .6 0

-

-

-

ALL W O R K E R S
$

$

$

2»5o

2.25-

3

3*77

^*7

2.25-

$

2.75

CO.7.080

JI.K V X
guards

6.658

mL

! U0

OJ

:

:

3

3.QC
JANITORS.

PORTERS.

nilULuJHLL

A N D C L E A N E R S ---

1K M U C

7.869
1.738
6.131

2.75

2.65-

3.58

114

504

567 2776

2.94

2^65

2^65-

2^ 9 n

114

504

"*00

3*7a

^1

800

f * i?
t

1*692
75

i^

i • *^

✓ n/

IK A U L

UKUtK r ILLtKj

1.397

TRADt

^ " or
• <-3

/ -7T

897

^ ®^

]r
." p

487

541
53

2604
P?

< *52
*
5*7r
5.07- 5^96
J*UU
J »C f
.

u
19
19

2

49
-r
»-

r1
IT

120
02
-.

92
73

302
153
149
7t?
57

209

1 ?n

25
12




8

47

82

19
49

17

/„

.3

2

100

.

11

57

ITT
1 lo

30
27

0

19

15

9

16
14

213

30

39

138
41
96

207

30

39
2

144
63

34

fZ
27

20

141

37

23

]S

6

44

24

185
109
76
35
41

24
24

445
57
388

66
66

328

n_
a
l-i

37

/ n»

100

33

106

33

32
2'

''Hn
19^

1
1

c
l
.

100
100

37

43

* 78

3

1

13
3

0
00
13
75
56

14

24

314
159
155

12

|03
163

1

106

11

6/
3*^8
4.20

"

T9
3 *!l2
3 1 fJ

1

5

5*i~'
< fA {
J .]

/ iy
7*f7
7*y o

616

6.* 7^

T* 70
^*gr-

2 *c |
'-*6£>

( *95

146
*76
69

4.75-

15

3

25

''*77
4^65

5.49

4*0'"
^*07
4.60- 5.56

1

£

*

0

8

25
1
24

14

20
.

0

16
12

1

14
8
8

'

-Z

0

1

1
8

,

0

1

3
3

12

15

0

48

20
20

1

1

18
4.05-

32
16
15

6.38

oo
/ */ c

j^
*

*4
3

38

1

3.68

in
-*•10

44
31
->r

4.00

225

100
51
99

fr

11'
20
94
77

26
5

. * i?

1H A U L

259
169
90

57

98

265
180
85

8

603

W H U L L j ALL

528

1-5

3 2y
' %')
3 . 2 4 - 5^ 2 1

13C
143

33
109
21
88

39

271

9

43
q

'"*9C
5.86

35

22

.
1
26

3 30
3.60-

11

e.60

44

ff

sT a o

14

16

73

_

, *__
/ QC
7" g7

*

.

2]75

17

47

52
21

1

12
587
203
384
31
45
24
284

555 2748

2.65-

NETAIL

48

3.15

3 # ,I

994

3

m

^33
313

nu 1A 1w

34

3

4.<_6
watchmen

1 ° 15
1005

106

24

52
95

34
2^

90

13
10

8

12
12

2

85
t2

rr
55

-r
Tt

A

2

'

rr
7o
4U

Hourly earnings

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
%

Occupation and industry division

of
workers

Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range 2

*
2.20 2.40
Under
,
5
and
2.20 under
2.4o

2 .6 0

5
2.60

$
2.80

$
3.00

*
3. 2 0

1 ----- I
S
3 40 3 . 6 0 3 . 8 0

S
4.00

S
4 .20

T
T
"I---- "5---- 5
1 ---- t
T
S
"5---- 1 ---4 . 4 0 4 .60 4 .80 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 . 4 0 5 . 6 o 6. 0 0 6 . 4 0 6. 8 0 7.20

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3 60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4 .40

4.60

4.80

5 .0?

5.20

5,40

5.60

6.00

46

3

13

79
35
44

167
30
137

47
45
2

120

-

2
4

87
57
30
9
14
3

331
31
300
115
113
4

141
65
76
16
59

318
206
112
20
66
25

334
131
203
42
114
47

59
52
7
7
.

“

105
12
93
25
30
23

39
31
8

30
12

92
70
22
2
15
1

23
22
1
*

20
14
6
“

11
9
2
*

10
4
6
3

23
5
18
5

7
7
2

18
6
12
9

11
7
4
2

1

1
1
-

•

.

26
13
13
12

20
14
6
“

14
14
-

43
41
2
1

44
6
38
13

28
27
1
-

20
8
12
3

211
22
189
11)
4

33
2
31
24
-

3
3

26

4
4

30

6.40 6.80

7.20

7.60

4 74 2 2 0 7
8
150
4 6 6 20 5 7
- 1491
137
521
329
45

230
70
160
6
150
4

72

7C
70

ALL W O R K E R S —
CONTINUED
$

$

$

T R U C K D R I V E R S ----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U P I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------w h o l e s a l e t r a d e -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

4.924
1,0 0 1
3,923
1,733
1,420
636

6.10
5.56
6.23
6.78
5.96
5.71

6.65
5.55
6. 9 0
7.08
6.53
6.53

5 . 3 2 - 7.08
4 .93- 6.23
5 . 4 0 - 7.08
6 . 9 0 - 7. 0 8
5 . 1 1 - 7.08
4 . 5 3 - 6. 6 ?

T R U C K D R I V E R S . L I G H T (UNDER
1 - 1 / ? T O N S ) -------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ------------------

442
145
297
233

4.68
5.64
4.21
4.33

4.11
5.03
3.13
3. 0 0

3.003.853.003.00-

7.08
7.4o
5. 1 6
7.08

T R U C K D R I V E R S . M E D I U M ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
A N D I N C L U D I N G 4 T O N S ) ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------- —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

1,292
526
766
363
70

5.72
5.71
5.72
5.65
5.13

5.77
5.77
5.88
5.88
5. 3 0

5.115.135.115.114.56-

6.86
6.9)
6.53
6.53
5.6fi

T R U C K D R I V E R S . H E A V Y (OVER 4 TONS,
T R A I L E R T Y PE) -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U P I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ------------------

1,6 0 1
220
1,381
578
670

6.70
5. 4 8
6.90
7. 0 6
6.86

7. 0 8
5.55
7. 0 8
7.08
7.03

6 . 6 5 - 7.08
5 . 4 3 - 5.58
7 . 0 8 - 7.0?
7 . 0 8 - 7.08
7 . 0 8 - 7.19

-

T R U C K D R I V E R S , H E A V Y (OVER 4 TONS,
O T H E R T H A N T R A I L E R T Y P E ) --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ------------------

619
88
531
346
154

6. 1 0
5.04
6.28
6.79
5.23

6. 9 0
5.35
6.90
6.9o
5.4fl

5.404.285.456.904.25-

6.90
5.37
6.9a
7.08
5.7?

_

_

-

-

T R U C K E R S , P O W E R ( F O R K L I F T ) ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

1,492
902
590
135
176

5. 1 0
4.41
6.15
5. 0 1
5.65

4.85
4.27
6.5 o
4.85
5.83

4.023.805.783.805.78-

6.07
4. 9 3
7.08
6.11
5.91

W A R E H O U S E M E N ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE ■
R E T A I L T R A D E ----

1.786
222
1,564
96
1,306
149

4.58
4.35
4. 6 1
5.29
4.62
4. 1 1

4.55
4.36
4.59
5.5 0
4.90
3.9q

3.593.883.504.593.503.40-

5.2n
4. 7 ?
5.20
5.51
5.2o
4,7o

See footnotes at e n d of tables.




$

-

“

-

-

-

46

13
8
5

105

3

13

22
12

46
“

5

89
“

2

12

34
34
22

_

34
34

34
34
34

13
8
5
"

93
93
84

"

1
1
“

7

3

12

“

12
12
*

-

7
-

3
2

12
12
*

_

_

-

12
-

105

-

*
_

_

-

*

5
-

-

5

-

-

12
12

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

50
49
1

-

-

-

87

58

84
18
66

-

-

-

-

66
2

52
6

50
16

-

-

52
-

5

14
13
1

-

5

48
4

-

58

87

84
3

-

-

-

-

52

-

-

73
3
70

*

b
-

5

-

*

*

“

1
98
23
75
11
46
15

5
5

-

6

“

~

“*

24

“

“

6
6

2
2

_

24

-

36
22
14
2
12

24

*

Ill
108
3

163
155

-

3

4
4

96
6
90

100
11
89

65
13
52

75
38
37

-

-

-

-

68
22

84
5

41
11

23
10

“

1

102
79
23
3

220
111
109
78
24

40
39
1

50
20
30
8
12

13
13

8

47
42
5

3
1

30

137
127
10

25

*

5

“

30

*

1
1

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

77
63
14
9
5

78

2
2

6

48
34
14
10

2
1
1

1
-

1
1
-

100
84
16
6
10
134
24
110
15
85
9

-

6
2
2
-

41
31
10
-

5
5

-

100
5
95
5
88

2

75

70
5
5
-

259
39
220
9
205
5

-

1L5
11
104
6
96
2

.
.

-

-

1

_

-

25

72
28
44
40
3

208
196
12
12

-

.

126
•
126
126

.

327
150
177
4

-

-

72
72

126
8
118

995

4
.

4
-

4

156

_

11

995
564
431

317

-

*

63

6

7

-

.

•

•

78

6
6

7
-

66

63
27
24

-

-

317
299
18

24
10
14

218
98
120

32

156
6
150

272

.

•
_
-

14

120

83
32
51
30
21

29

55

5

-

•

.

-

_

-

29
27

55
4
24
27

5
5

94
3
91

155
11
144

-

-

-

2

-

6

-

.

26
26

272
•

.
-

-

-

-

94

155

6
6
6

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

Occupation a n d industry division

Number
of
workers

Median2

Middle range 2

$
5 • 00

$
5.20

$
5.40

*
5.6o

6.00

$
6.20

s
6*40

5.QQ

5 ,20 5 . 4 0

5.60

5.8a.. 6 . 0 0 -6.20

6.40

6 . 6 0 over

6
2.80

S
3.00

$ 3.20

$
3.40

S
3.60

$
3.80

$
4.00

$
4. 2 0

$
4.40

and
$
under
[2.40
2.60 2,80

3.00

3.20

3,«B

3.60

3.80 4 . 0 0

4.20

4.4 0

4.60

2
2

19
7
12

35
15
20

52
28
24

50
15
35

326
272
54

116
69
47

65
24
41

115
57
58

69
60
9

46
30
16

51
35
16

-

3

19

18

32

34

45

39

12

8

lb

3

1

3

9

260

30

9

43

35

14

$

25

82
10
72
3
1

2.40
Mean 2

$
5.8o

*
4.80

$
2.60

%

$
4.60

%

6 .6 0

ALL WORKERS

G U A R D S A N D W A T C H M E N ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------— -----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------FINANCE

-----------------------------

1.621
647
974

$
3.62
4.22
3.22

$
3.94
3.94
2.70

$
2.703.942.40-

$
4.25
120
4.52
4.00 *120

268

4.22

4.13

3.76-

4.55

490

4.30

3.94

3.94- 4.61

“

262
3
259

204
3
201

*

GUARDS*
manufacturing
watchmen

-----------------------

*

3

30

35

”

81
16
65
2
2

296
147
149
1
~

31
31
3

6
“
6
1

8
2
6
6
*

63
22
41
41

2
2

20
20

*

2

“

20

*

71
71
-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

*

*

"

-

*

“

9

9

14
14
13
1

-

”

18
9
9

12

35
35
16
19

-

“

:
157

3.98

4.02

3.47- 4.33

14

25

J A N I T O R S . P O R T E R S . A N D C L E A N E R S --M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------F I N A N C E -----------------------------

3.230
1.250
1.980
281
236

3.58
4.00
3.31
3.61
3.71

3.49
3.79
2.90
3.33
3. 8 1

2.653.502.652.803.49-

4.07
4.08
3.94
3.73
4.00

11
11
10
*

129
129
14

792
4
788
35
5

234
10
224
27
14

186
116
70
23
14

193
128
65
36
14

173
80
93
44
40

372
311
61
26
30

195
133
62
4
57

236
164
6
49

71
36
35
2
7

L A B O R E R S . M A T E R I A L H A N D L I N G --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------- ----R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

1.423
1.060
363
331

4.01
3.89
4.37
4.25

3.98
3.98
5.15
4.35

3.60“
3.763.042.90-

4. 3 l
4.28
5.43
5.29

20
20
20

37
29
8
8

106
62
44
43

14
2
12
12

16
7
9
9

85
68
17
17

61
48
13
13

109
101
8
8

427
421
6
6

43
37
6
6

243
219
24
24

18
17
1
-

31
30
1
1

5
3
2
1

69
6
63
63

30
30
27

39
39
37

26
26
2

44
10
34
34

-

O R D E R F I L L E R S --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------ ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

484
158
326

4.87
4.40
5.10

5.38
4.31
5.85

3.95- 5.85
3.84- 5.03
4.20- 5.86

2
-

-

8
4
4

20
10
10

16
9
7

23
12
11

26
13
13

11
7
4

32
29
3

3
3
“

23
23
-

23
8
15

29
5
24

193
193

_
-

1

34
24
10

10
10

-

a
l
7

1

c

22
22

P A C K E R S . S H I P P I N G ---------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

306
257

3.92
4.07

4.17
4.23

3.42- 4.4o
3.54- 4.43

5

13

16
9

_

10

24
24

72
72

33
27

21
20

11
11

7
7

4
3

1
1

2
2

1
1

-

-

5

12
11

-

6

40
35

8

-

26
23

“

R E C E I V I N G C L E R K S ----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

238
102
136
133

4.57
4.36
4.73
4.74

4.60
4.34
5.15
5.15

3.98- 5.15
3.98- 4.88
4.00- 5.82
4.00- 5.82

5

3
3
-

6

4
4
-

11

31
19
12
12

15
3
12
10

19
13
6
5

14
10
4
4

9
6
3
3

30
24
6
6

31
3
28
28

“

10
7
3
3

*

40
40
40

1
1
1

-

1
5
5

4
3
1
1

-

-

*
“

*

S H I P P I N G C L E R K S ------ -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

128
86

4.23
4.24

4.18
4.13

3.82- 4.78
3.98- 4.52

5
-

2
“

3
2

7
6

27
26

6
6

16
16

8
8

8
4

6
6

-

2
i

16
7

5
*

3

“

“

”

S H I P P I N G A N D R E C E I V I N G C L E R K S -----M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------- -----------

1 93
no

5.05
4.58

4.88
4.68

4.58- 5.87
4.46- 4.88

_

.

15
14

20
20

32
30

24
21

4
4

_

6
2

4
4

72
2

-

-

-

.

"

*

*

T R U C K D R I V E R S ----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

1.147
532
615
240

6.04
6.01
6.07
6.21

6.65
5.58
<>•65
6.65

5.435.375.435.73-

6.89
6. 9 1
6.86
6.65

-

-

33
17
16
3

31
13
18
4

60
43
17
“

168
134
34
13

46
3
43
29

53
17
36
16

6
6
-

11
10
1

-

-

17
11
6
4

T R U C K D R I V E R S . L I G H T (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 T O N S ) --------------------------

137

5.94

7.40

4.51-

7.40

-

“

-

70

T R U C K D R I V E R S . M E D I U M ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
A N D I N C L U D I N G A TONS) ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

518
299

6.11
6.06

6.86
6.86

5.265.43-

6.9l
6.86

6
6

1
1

-

323
173

*
3

-

5

12

5
5

-

2
-

6
i

2
1

4
2

7
6

1
-

1
1

5
5

1
1

1
-

•

7
-

1
-

1
-

-

1
“

1
-

2
1
1
-

19
7
12
-

11
9
2
-

34
27

7

-

5
5
5

1

60
12
48
10

-

“

5

-

-

1

“

8

3

7

18

5

9

9

1

1

-

-

7

1
1

-

2
1

9
6

8

23
2

29
23

8
1

20
12

19
13

9
7

30
23

-

5
5

12

*
-

-

-

7

-

6

5
5

*

*
W o r k e r s w e r e as follows: $ 2.20 to $ 2.40.
** W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 122 at $ 6.60 to $ 6.80; 384 at $ 6.80 to $ 7; 70 at $ 7.20 to $ 7.40; and 6 at $ 7.40 to $ 7.60.




7

23
23

*

*
-

“

**582
228
354
155
*

Hourly earnings3

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

J
Occupation a n d industry division
Middle range 2

$

I

i

2.4o

2 .6 0

2.80

3.00 3.20

Under
S
a" d
under

2

2.60

$

s

$

3.40

3.60 3.80 4.00 4.2o 4.40 4.60 4.80

s

$

$

$

$

$

I

§

i

i

5.00 5.20 5.40

s

$

5.60 5.80

$

6 .0 0

6.20 6.40

I

S
6 .6 0

......................................................................................... ....................................... and
2.80

3.00

3.20

3.4Q

3.60

3.80

4.QQ

4^2Q, 4 . 4 p

4,60

4.80 5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.2 0 6 . 4 0

6 . 6 0 over

137

3

27

10

-

141

1
1

6
6

-

-

-

-

ALL W O R K E R S —
CONTINUED

TR UC KDRIVERS - CONT IN UE D
T R U C K D R I V E R S , HE A V Y (OVER A TONS.
T R A I L E R T Y P E ) -----------------------TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY
OTHER THAN TRAILER

4 TONS,
T Y P E > ---------

$

$

5.87

326

5.55- 6.65

$

4

2

2

50

19

20

6

18
1«

65
65
-

2
1
1
-

16
2
14
14

29
1
26
28

97
5
92
92

41
20
21
21

3

29

27

A

2

3
2

29
2

27
27

4
-

2

(O V E R

112

5.56

5.37

5.37-

TRU C K E R S , P O WER (FORKLIFT)
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------

468
309
179
176

5.0 1
4.64
5.63
5.65

5.01
4.39
5.83
5.83

W A R E H O U S E M E N -------MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING
RETAIL TRADE —

362
173
169

4.56
4.33
4.78
4.23

4.56
4.32
5.03
3. 9 0

3.85- 5.17
3.86- 4.82
3.70- 5.66
3.40- 5.66

2

4.28- 5.83
4.26- 5.03
5 . 7 8 - 5. 9 l
5 . 7 8 - 5.9i

»

S e e footnotes at end-of tables.




101

5.94

5

4

5
5

4

3
-

3
3

6
3
3
2

6
-

6
6

-

4

15
12
3
3

143
139
4
4

16
6
10
10

-

-

-

24
20
4
3

-

-

24
6
18
18

16
11
5
5

16
13
3
3

39
35
4
2

34
13
21
5

20
19
1
1

12
5
7

2
1
1
-

3
2
1
1

10
10

10
6
4
4

31
23
8
7

-

-

-

54
39
15
5

7

-

-

3

2

12

3

2

12
-




Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant,
custodial, and material movement workers, by sex.
in Boston, Mass., August 1975
Number

Number

of

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

workers

maintenance

and

hourly
earnings3

workers

- MEN
$

-^/
t

284

TRADE

384
191
193
61

5.73
5.98
6.71

^ *784
292

5.98
6.42

w a t c h m e n

»'MMUI

----------------------

STATIONARY

232
187

-----------------

6.30
b*

:

JANITORS,

:
£.86
PORTERS,

AND

cleaners

W ■l(JLL.wAL.C

TOULKOOM

156

—

3.23
f *R3
/ r\c.

Ir A l C 1 ~
\ J. ,
1

/ /o
•
OPERATORS,

---

3.8_>

6*072
1*608

d

7 " iS

MACHINE-TOOL

3,436

5.39
j.3 J

2,644
1,495

P

728
M E C H A N I C S , A l /TOMOTIVE
( M A I N T E N A N C E ) --------------------------

771
137

t * rn
^11

6.53
5.86
6.94

3^0
1» 9 3 4

5 68
5.65

165

f "a o
5.

2

5.92

937
H c 1A 1 L „ 1K A U t
f.

—~

561

•e
r-

/ oy

r r
- -y

_

94
118

/A

5.57

_

WORKERS,

■^*60

'**1^
,* ^
L

406
67
152

SHEET-METAL

$

J XC
m

g u a r d s

M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

ENGINEERS.

Average
(m ea n 2 )
hourly
earnings3

5.16

j.CO

RETAIL

of

C U S T O D I A L AND M A T E R I A L MOVE M E N T
OCCUP A T I O N S - MEN

powerplant

OCCUPATIONS

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

MAINTENANCE

—

102
79

4*88

5.84
5.85

CLCRKj

^ ^
387

-»m
cor
_______ !

; • ;f
?




Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant,
custodial, and material movement workers, by sex,
in Boston, Mass,, August 1975— Continued
Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

Number
of
•workers

Average
( me an ^ )
hourly
earnings3

C U S T O D I A L AND M A I E R I A L MOVE M E N T
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

TRUCKDRIVERS,

MEDIUM

6.10
5.56
6.23
6.78
5.96

440
143
297
233

LIGHT

wholesale

RETAIL

trade

T n m u r -r ic -

4.68
5.66
4.21
4.33

13 b

1*

<1-1/2

TO

— — — — — —
—
- - - - - — -------

TRADE

(OVER

<
♦

4.63
36

C U S T O D I A L AND MATER I A L M O V E M E N T
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN
766
363
70

5.72
5.65
5.13

6.70

578

HEAVY

ir
t\

$
5.12
4.42
6.15
5.01
5.65

5.29

155
151
JANITORS.

TRUCKDRIVERS.

A verage
(m ean 2 )
hourly
earnings3

on

(UNDER

1.601
220

N O N M A N U F A C T U k ING

Number
of
workers

C U S T O D I A L AND M A T E R I A L MOVEM E N T
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
A , 922
999
3.923
1,733
1.420
636

TRUCKDRIVERS,

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

PORTERS,

AND C L E A N E R S

-------

2.38

1.766

2.86
2.80

1,446
6*90
7.06
6.86

3.36

TONS,
619
68
531
154

r nv oL n o y

o n A r . 1 Ivu

5.04
6.28
6.79
5.23

S e e footnotes at end of tables.

E a r n i n g s data in table A - 6 relate only to w o r k e r s w h o s e s e x
identification w a s p r o v i d e d b y the establishment.
E a r n i n g s data in
tables A -4 a n d A -5, on the other hand, relate to all w o r k e r s in an
occupation.
(See a p p e n d i x A for publication criteria.)

59

Table A-6a. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material
movement workers, by sex—large establishments in Boston. Mass., August 1975
Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

Number
of
workers

A verage
(m ean2 )
hourly
earnings3

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

Number
of
woikers

A verage
(m ean 2 )
hourly
earnings3

M A I N T E N A N C E AND PO WE R P L A N T
O C C U P A T I O N S - M E N — C O NT IN UE D

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

Number
of
woikers

A verage
(m ea n 2 )
hourly
earnings3

CUSTODIAL AND M A TERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

$
WORKERS.

MAINTENANCE

—

CUSTODIAL

AND

MATERIAL

102
79

5.84
5.85

437
437

SHEET-METAL
5.09

6.33
6.33

,,
MANUFACTURING

MOVEMENT

------------------------

530

5.13

6.02

fc J

240
MANUFACTURING
117

177

MACHINE-TOOL

OPERATORS*

TQu Lk OOM

—

133

------------------------

1 ''60
* ’6 2 4

6.09
6.15
6.02
4.32

5.56

3 63
4.22

TRUCKDRIVERS*

g u a r d s

518

6.11
6.06

T R U C K D R I V E R S . H E A V Y (OVER 4 TONS.
T R A I L E R T Y P E ) ------------------------

:

326

6.07

479

WATCHMEN!

5.80 JANITORS.

241
83

7.16

1.217
1.027

158

4.40
_»• 67

S H I P P I N G -----------------------

196

4.22
4.30 J A N I TORS.

<+ T O N S *

4.01
3.86
4.37
4.25

------------------------

(OVEk

3.83
2.76

1.226
863
363
331

HEAVY

3.76

6.6 1
5.92

131

2.368

144
581

549

5.80
5.70

PORTERS.

AND CLEANERS

---

4 60

automotive

_ _
_

,, .

T

C* 30 U K U t K r ILLt-Kb
MANUFACTURING

,k/
l.

5.34
PACKERS.
94
77

5.76
5. 5 1
6.07
MANUFACTURING

306

6.02
6.02

------------------------

236
100
136

CUSTODIAL

4.57
4.36
4.73

S e e footnotes at end of tables.




(UNDtR

T R U C K D RIVERS. M E D I U M (1-1/2 TO
A N D I N C L U D I N G 4 T O N S ) -------------

TRUCKDRIVERS*

MECHANICS,

LIGHT

c**//

E a r n i n g s data in table A - 6 a relate only to w o r k e r s w h o s e sex
identification w a s p r ovided b y the establishment.
E a r n i n g s data in
tables A - 4 a and A - 5 a , o n the other hand, relate to all w o r K e r s in
an occupation. (See appendix A for publication criteria.)

AND

MATERIAL

PORTERS.

MOVEMENT

AND C L E A N E R S

---

631
92

3.04




Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected
occupational groups, adjusted for em ploym ent shifts.
in Boston, Mass., for selected periods
A u g u s t 1972
to
A u g u s t 1973

A u g u st 1973
to
A u g u s t 1974

A u g u s t 1974
to
A u g u st 1975

A ll in d u s t r ie s :
O f f ic e c l e r i c a l (m en and w o m e n )--------------------------------E le c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w o m e n ) ______
I n d u s tr ia l n u r s e s (m en and w o m e n ) .. ---------------------S k ille d m a in te n a n ce tr a d e s (m en )-------------------------------_
—
U n s k ille d p lan t w o r k e r s (m e n )—

5.5
*
6.2
6.6
6.1

7.6
6.5
7.5
8.5
9.1

8.1
6.3
9.2
7.9
8.2

M a n u fa ctu rin g :
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m en and w o m e n )_____________________
E le c t r o n i c d ata p r o c e s s i n g (m en and w o m e n ) --------I n d u s tr ia l n u r s e s (m en and w o m e n )— ------------------S k ille d m a in te n a n ce tr a d e s (m e n ).----- -------- -------------U n s k ille d p lan t w o r k e r s (m e n )------------ ----------------------

5 .9
*
6 .8
6 .4
6 .3

7.2
7.4
8.1
8.1
9.1

7.7
7.7
9 .9
7.6
8.4

N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g :
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m en and w o m e n )_____________________
E le c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w o m e n ) ______
I n d u s tr ia l n u r s e s (m en and w o m e n )---------------------------S k ille d m a in te n a n c e t r a d e s (m en )-------------------------------U n s k ille d p lan t w o r k e r s (m en )
------------ —

5 .2
*
5.1
**
5 .4

7.8
6.1
6.4
**

8.3
5.5
7.8
**
8.2

In d u s try and o c c u p a tio n a l
grou p

*
**

9.1

D ata not a v a ila b le .
D ata d o not m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .

N O T E : The p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e s p r e s e n t e d in t h is t a b le a r e b a s e d on c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e
h o u r ly e a r n in g s fo r e s t a b lis h m e n t s r e p o r t in g th e t r e n d j o b s in b o th th e c u r r e n t and p r e v io u s
y e a r (m a tc h e d e s t a b lis h m e n t s ).
T h e y a r e not a ffe c t e d b y c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e e a r n in g s
r e s u ltin g f r o m e m p lo y m e n t s h ifts a m on g e s t a b lis h m e n t s o r t u r n o v e r o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts
in c lu d e d in s u rv e y s a m p l e s .
T h e p e r c e n t in c r e a s e s , h o w e v e r , a r e s t ill a ffe c t e d b y f a c t o r s
o th e r than w a g e in c r e a s e s .
H ir i n g s , la y o f f s , and t u r n o v e r m a y a ffe c t an e s ta b lis h m e n t
a v e r a g e f o r an o c c u p a tio n w hen w o r k e r s a re p a id u n d e r p la n s p r o v id in g a r a n g e o f w a g e r a te s
f o r in d iv id u a l j o b s . In p e r io d s o f i n c r e a s e d h ir i n g , f o r e x a m p le , n ew e m p lo y e e s e n te r at the
b o tto m o f th e r a n g e , d e p r e s s in g the a v e r a g e w ith ou t a ch a n g e in w a g e r a t e s .
T h e s e wage tr e n d s a r e not lin k e d to the w age in d e x e s p r e v io u s ly p u b lis h e d f o r th is
a r e a b e c a u s e the w a ge in d e x e s m e a s u r e d ch a n g e s in a r e a a v e r a g e s , w h e r e a s th e s e w age
tre n d s m e a s u r e ch a n g e s in m a tc h e d e s t a b lis h m e n t a v e r a g e s .
O th e r c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f th e s e
w age tr e n d s w h ich d i f f e r f r o m the d is c o n tin u e d in d e x e s in clu d e (1) e a r n in g s d a ta o f o f f i c e
c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and in d u s tr ia l n u r s e s a r e c o n v e r t e d to an h o u r ly b a s i s , (2) tre n d e s t im a t e s
a r e p r o v id e d fo r n o n m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , w h e re p o s s i b l e , and (3) tr e n d e s tim a te s
a r e p r o v id e d fo r e l e c t r o n i c d ata p r o c e s s i n g j o b s .
F o r a m o r e d e t a ile d d e s c r i p t i o n o f th e m e th o d u s e d t o c o m p u te th e s e w a g e t r e n d s , s e e
"I m p r o v in g A r e a W a g e S u r v e y I n d e x e s ," M on th ly L a b o r R e v i e w , J a n u a ry 1973, p p . 5 2 -5 7 .

B. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
Other inexperienced clerical w o r k e r s

Inexperienced typists

M i n i m u m w e e k l y straight-time s a lary4

establishments

establishments

a

$100.,00
$105.,00
$110.,00
$115.,00
$120.,00
$125.,00
$130.,00
$135,,00
$140.,00
$145.,00
$150.,00
$155,,00
$160,,00
$165..00

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNOER
UNDER
UNDER
UNOER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 8 0 . 0 0 ------------$ 8 2 . 5 0 ------------$ 8 5 . 0 0 ------------$ 8 7 . 5 0 ------------$ 9 0 . 0 0 ------------$ 9 2 . 5 0 ------------$ 9 5 . 0 0 ------------$ 9 7 . 5 0 ------------$ 1 0 0 . 0 0 -----------

UNDER $105.00
UNDER $110.00
UNDER $115.00
UNDER $120.00
UNDER $125.00
UNDER $130.00
UNDER $135.00
UNDER $140.0u
UNOER $145.00
UNDER $150.00
UNDER $155.00
UNDER $160.00
UNDER $165.00
O V E R ----------

ESTABLISHMENTS H A VING NO SPECIFIED
M I N I M U M --------------------------------ESTABLISHMENTS WHICH DID NOT EMPLOY
W O R K E R S IN T H I S C A T E G O R Y ------------

See footnotes at end of tables.




All
sched­
ules

40

---All--sched­
ules

40

37 */a

Nonmanufacturing

36 V4

35

B a s e d on s tandard w e e k l y ho urs 6 of—
All
sched­
ules

40

37 V 2

All
s c he d ules

40

37 V 2

36 %

35

80

XXX

243

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

323

so

XXX

XXX

243

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

132

A0

29

92

32

21

14

14

178

57

36

15

121

47

26

15

17

2
2
3
3
—
5
3
b
6

_
-

2
1
1
—
1
1
2
-

3

-

2
2
1
1
1

1

3

-

—
2
1
5
-

1
1
1
1

2
1
2
1
—
4
i
4
-

1
—
2
1
5
1

-

19
8
9
3
7
4
3
1
2
2

3
3
1
2
5

6
2
b

6
i

3

2
1
-

-

-

-

-

3
2
3
1
1
1
-

5
-

1
1
2
2

6
2
2
2
1
-

-

specified

M I N I M U M -------------------------------$77.50
$80.00
$82.50
$85.00
$87.50
$90.00
$92.50
$95.00
$97.50

All
industries

B a s e d on standard w e e k l y hours 6 of--

323

studied

having

All
i n dustries

Manufacturing

Nonmanufacturing

Manufacturing

2
2
4
3

_

_

-

-

1

1
_

•

7
3
8
7

2
_
-

2
-

1

1

27
11
17
9
11
6
3
2
2
5
1

8
3
8
6
4
2
-

3
2
6
3
4
2
1

1
-

3
1

-

3
1

_

.

1
1

-

-

58

133

6

i
-

3

3
6
6
16
4
15
5

2

2
1
2
2

5
1
-

3
2
3
1
“
1
-

32
13
13
17
11
7
4
4

-

-

3

-

5
1
2
2
1

1
2
J
1
1
“
”

14
5
8
6
4
3

3

4
6
14
3

13
3

2
5
2
6

-

2
6
6
4
i
i

3

3

2

“

4
3
1
1
3
1

18
8
10
11
7
4
3
2

1
2
1

2
1
2
1

3

1
-

-

3

-

1
2
2

3
2
3
4
-

-

-

”

-

“

“

1
1

12

XXX

46

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

76

19

xxx

XXX

57

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

28

XXX

105

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

69

4

xxx

xxx

65

xxx

xxx

xxx

xxx

-

1
1

“

-

-




2^ l^ tu il2 £im e^ nanu factuH ng^ )l^ it^ w ork££s^= ^ C H 3^ £erc^ nt^
All w o r k e r s 7

W o r k e r s o n late shifts

Item
S e c o n d shift

PERCENT
In

e s t a b l i s h m e n t s

with

OF

UNIFORM
UNIFORM

PAY

S e c o n d shift

83.0

80.1

12.9

5.0

2.1
80.9
28.7
46.8
5.4

1.6
78.5
29.8
42.8
5.8

.6
12.3
4.0
7.4
1.0

.1
4.9
2.2
2.1
.6

15.2
9.9

20.0
11.6

14.6
10.0

20.3
11.6

T h i r d shift

WORKERS

late

shift

p r o v i s i o n s

------

W I T H N O P A Y D I F F E R E N T I A L F O R L A T E S H I F T W O R K ------W I T H P A Y D I F F E R E N T I A L F O R L A T E S H I F T W O R K ----------U N I F O R M C E N T S - P E P - H O U R D I F F E R E N T I A L ----------------U N I F O R M P E R C E N T A G E D I F F E R E N T I A L ---------------------O T H E R D I F F E R E N T I A L ----------------------------------------AVERAGE

T h i r d shift

DIFFERENTIAL

C E N T S - P E R - H O U R D I F F E R E N T I A L ------------------P E R C E N T A G E D I F F E R E N T I A L ------------------------P E R C E N T O F W O R K E R S BY T Y P t A N D
AMOUNT OF PAY D I F F E R E N T I A L

UNIFORM CENTS-PER-HOUR!
5 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------6 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------7 A N D U N O E P 8 C E N T S ----------------------------------10 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------11 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------12 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------1 3 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------1 4 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------1 5 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------1 6 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------1 7 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------1 8 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------19 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------2 0 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------2 5 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------2 7 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------3 0 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------4 0 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------5 0 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------UNIFORM PERCENTAGE!
5 P E R C E N T ------------------------------------------------7 A N D U N D E R 8 P E R C E N T -------------------------------10 P E R C E N T -----------------------------------------------1 2 A N D U N D E R 1 3 P E R C E N T ----------------------------1 4 P E R C E N T -----------------------------------------------1 5 P E R C E N T -----------------------------------------------2 0 P E R C E N T -----------------------------------------------OTHER

DIFFERENTIAL

-------------------------------------------

1.2
1.0
7.5
1.0
2.2
2.0
3.7
2.0
-

1.1
-

.8
2.5
.9
-

1.7
1.2
-

3.1
5.7
33.2
1.8

-

1.2
4.2
1.6

.1
.4
•
•

1.5
.2
(8)

-

1.5
6.0
1.0
1.1
.6
3.6
2.0
.9
.8
1.4
2.2
1.7

-

1.4
1.6

5.0
21.1
2.7
.7
11.7
1.6

5.4

5.8

-

.1
.3
-

.2
.2
-

.1
.2

.1

-

-

.1
.5
.1
.2

.1
.4
.2
-

-

.2
.2
-

.2
.1
.1

.2
1.4
5.1
.2
-

•

.1
.4

.2
1.1
.2
•
.4
.1

1.0

.6

Office w o r k e r s

Plant w o r k e r s
It e m

All
industries

Nonmanu­
Manur
factoring facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

All
industrie

M a n u ­ Nonmanufacturing factoring

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

P E R C E N T OF W O R K E R S BY S C H E D U L E D
W EEKLY HOURS AND o a y s *
ALL FULL-TIMfc
15
20
?5
28
3?

32
35

35
36

36
36
36
37
37
38

38
38
38
38
40
4?
44
45

46
46
48

--------------

100

H O U R S - 5 O A Y S -------------------------H O U R S - 5 O A Y S -------------------------H O U R S - 5 O A Y S -------------------------H O U R S - 5 O A Y S -------------------------H O U R S ----------------------------------4 D A Y S ---------------------------------5 1/2 D A Y S ----------------------------1/2 H O U R S - 5 D A Y S --------------------H O U R S ----------------------------------4 D A Y S ---------------------------------5 D A Y S ---------------------------------5 O A Y S ---------------------------------1/2 H O U R S - 5 JAYS --------------------H O U R S ----------------------------------4 O A Y S ---------------------------------4 1/2 D A Y S ----------------------------1/4 H O U R S - 5 D A Y S --------------------V 3 H O U R S - 5 D A Y S --------------------3 / 4 H O U R S - 5 O A Y S --------------------H O U R S - 5 D A Y S -------------------------1/2 H O U R S - 5 O A Y S --------------------H O U R S ----------------------------------4 D a y s ---------------------------------5 O A Y S ---------------------------------1/4 H O U R S - 5 O A Y S --------------------1/2 H O U R S - 5 D A Y S --------------------2 / 3 H O U R S - 5 D A Y S --------------------3/4 H O U R S - 5 D A Y S --------------------H O U R S ----------------------------------5 D A Y S ---------------------------------5 1/2 D A Y S ----------------------------1/2 H O U R S - 5 D A Y S --------------------H O U R S ----------------------------------5 1/2 D A Y S ----------------------------H O U R S ----------------------------------5 d a y s ---------------------------------5 1/2 D A Y S ----------------------------H O U R S - 6 D A Y S -------------------------1/2 H O U R S - 5 1/2 D A Y S --------------H O U R S - 6 O A Y S --------------------------

WORKERS

(9)
<9>
1
(9)
1
(9)
1
(9)
5
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
(9)
2
2
1
79
79
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
3
2
1
(9)
(9)
1

100

_
3
3
2
2
2
88
88
(9)
(9)
5
5
-

100
(9)
1
2
(9)
1
(9)
1
(9)
6
4
2
1
2
2
4
(9)

-

3
?
71
71
(9)
1
1
1
1
1
(9)
1

39.9

38.9

100
97
97
3
3
-

loo

100

100
2
4
2
8
5
2
3
3
2
1
5
61
61
2
5
5

3
2
2
8
6
2
2
3
4
8
8
6
2
60
60
1
-

-

2
2
2
2
2
2
89
89
2
2
1
-

-

6

40.1

39.7

38.4

38.7

100

1
15
1
14
(9)
2
2
9
3
(9)
27
6
(9)
6
(9)
(9)
5
32
32
(9)
(9)
(9)
-

13
13
1
(9)
18
?
2
-

“

38.8

100
-

-

37.8

100
-

100

62
62
(9)
.

1
16
1
15
(9)
2
2
12
4
31
8
1
7
(9)
(9)
5
20
20
(9)
(9)
-

2
2
48
50
50
-

-

“
-

37.4

38.7

100

100

100

_

-

-

-

-

—
2
21
2
19
4
4
21
8
32
11

100

10
10
2
-

13
13
2
-

26
3
3
10
48
48
1
1
”

30
9
9
1
16
20
20
“
“
“

38.6

37.7

“
9

11
1
(9)
(9)
-

*
“

*
1
15
*
15
*
*
(9)
“
“
16
4
4
“
*
13
51
51
*
*
*
*
*

“
*

AVtRAOE SCHEDULED
WEEKLY HOURS
ALL

WEEKLY

*

The

S ee

WORK

S C H E D U L E S -------------

le a s t

com m on

fo o tn o te s

at

sch e d u le s

end o f ta b le s .




are

39.4

not p r e se n te d .

36.5

38.5

Plant w o r k e r s
Item

PERCENT
ALL

FULL-TIME

OF

All
industries

N U M B E R OF

FOR WORKERS
PROVIDING

Public
utilities

Office w o r k e r s

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

Manu­ Nonmanu­
All
industries facturing facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

F i n ance

Services

WORKERS

W O R K E R S --------------

IN E S T A B L I S H M E N T S N O T P R O V I D I N G
P A I D H O L I D A Y S -------------------------IN E S T A B L I S H M E N T S P R O V I D I N G
P A I D H O L I D A Y S -------------------------AVERAGE

Nonmanu­
Manu­
facturing facturing

100

100

100

100

loo

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

7

-

13

1

-

16

27

(9)

-

(9)

1

-

2

-

(9)

99

100

98

100

99

10 . 3

10.1

9.5

11.2

10.1

-

2

1
(9)

-

(9)
5
3
(9)
2
(9)
13
8
30
“
25
(9)
10
(9)
2
1

93

100

87

99

100

84

73

99

100

99

9.8

10.2

9.4

10.2

10.1

8.9

9.0

10.5

10.3

10.6

-

6
2

1
-

-

-

-

PAID HOLIDAYS

IN E S T A B L I S H M E N T S
H O L I D A Y S --------------------

P E R C E N T OF W O R K E R S BY N U M B E R
O F P A I D H O L I D A Y S P R O V I D E D 10
1
2
3
5
6
7

H O L I D A Y ---------------------------------H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------P L U S 1 O R M O R E H A L F D A Y S ---------8 H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------P L U S 1 OR M O R E H A L F D A Y S ---------9 H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------P L U S I O R M O R E HALF' D A Y S ---------10 H O L I D A Y S -------------------------------P L U S 1 O R M O R E H A L F D A Y S ---------11 H O L I D A Y S -------------------------------P L U S 1 O R M O R E H A L F D A Y S ---------12 H O L I D A Y S -------------------------------P L U S 1 H A L F D A Y ---------------------13 H O L I D A Y S -------------------------------P L U S 1 H A L F D A Y ---------------------14 H O L I D A Y S -------------------------------15 H O L I D A Y S -------------------------------PERCENT OF WORK E R S
PAID HOLIDAY TIME

2
(9)
1
1
3
1
4
1
12
6
38
6
13
3
3
1
(9)
“
1
(9)

-

2
4
i
9
13
36
9
16
4
2
2
(9)
1
1

3
(9)
1
1
4
1
3
(9)
14
1
40
3
10
1
3
(9)
1

_
1
10
71
4
14
-

2
“
4
7
18
2
26
5
25
5
(9)
7

3
2
3
(9)
16
(9)
40
3
8
1
-

5
11
3
2
11
1
24
3
10
1
-

"

*
(9)
(9)
1
1
(9)
2
1
7
5
28
5
34
2
11
1
2
(9)
(9)

1
2
(9)
4
IS
35
9

23
6
2
3
(9)
1

(9)
(9)
1
1
(9)
2
1
8
2
26
3
38
1
14
1
3
(9)
*
(9)

“
5
“
1
4
62
4
24
*

5
22
3
32
5
18
4
8
-

~

100
100
100
98
93
93
71
69
36
36
14
9
2
2

(9)
13
3
60
(9)
17
2

5
“
“

2

99
99
99
94
93
93
89
89
28
28
24
24
-

(9)
11
5
30
1
34
7
*8
3
-

“

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
87
85
24
24
7
5

99
99
95
92
90
90

BY T O T A L
P R O V I D E D 11

1 D A Y O R M O R E ----------------------------3 D A Y S O R M O R E ---------------------------7 D A Y S O R M O R E ---------------------------8 D A Y S O R M O R E ---------------------------8 1 / 2 D A Y S O R M O R E ---------------------9 D A Y S O R M O R E --------- -----------------9 1 / 2 D A Y S O R M O R E ---------------------10 D A Y S O R M O R E ------ -------------------10 1 / 2 D A Y S O R M O R E --------------------11 D A Y S O R M O R E --- ---------------------11 1 / 2 D A Y S O R M O R E — ------------------12 D A Y S O R M O R E -------------------------12 1 / 2 D A Y S OR M O R E --------------------13 D A Y S O R M O R E -------------------------1 4 D A Y S O R M O R E --------------------------




93
91
90
87
83
82
70

67
26
22
7

6
2
1
1

100
100
100
98
94
93
84
78
36
28
10
7
4
2
2

87
83
81
77
73
73
58
58
17
17
5
4
1
1
1

99
99
99
98
98
98
89
89
18
18
14
14
-

100
98
98
95
88
88
69
67
41
41
12
12
7
7
7

84
78
76
73
68
68
52
52
12
12
1
-

73
72
67
56
52
51
40
39
15
11
1
1
-

99
99
99
98
96
95
88
84
55
52
17
15
4
2
(9)

100
100
100
99
96
96
92
80

42
36
11
6
3
1
1

99
99
99
98
95
95
87
85
60
59
19
18
4
3
(9)

2

98
98
97
97
86
82
51
51
17
17
3
“

.

77

69
39
39
14
13
3
3

Office w o r k e r s

Plant w o r k e r s
I t e m 10

All
industries

NonmanuManufacturing facturing

Wholesale
Public
utilities
trade

Retail
trade

Services

ManuNonmanuAll
industries facturing facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

100

100

100

100

100

99
18
97
16
75
99
18
99
99
86
84

100
1
75
17
45
100
100
100
83
85
4
100
24
11
11
95

98

100
“
86
6
85
100
47
100
100
97
99
100
39
10
5
98

99
2

Services

Per c e n t of w o r k e r s
100

Martin Luther King's B i r t h d a y ------------Washington's B i r t h d a y ______________________

L a b o r D a y _________________________________

C h r i s t m a s E v e ______________________________
C h r i s t m a s D a y ____________________________ _
C h r i s t m a s — N e w Ye ar's holiday period 12--Extra d a y during C h r i s t m a s w e e k --------3 extra da y s during C h r i s t m a s w e e k _______
N e w Year's E v e ___________________________ Floating holiday, 1 d a y 1 ___________________ -

See footnotes at end of tables.




90
2
72
11
45
90
2
89
89
64
63
4
91
27
13
14
93
1
6
(9 )
4
5
16
4
9
2

100
98
1
76
16
47
100
2
97
97
57
59
8
99
46
24
27
100
1
11
6
10
26
8
5
1

100
83
3
68
6
44
82
2
82
82
70
68
(9)
83
10
3
3
86
1
1
(9)
1
1
7
1
13
2

100
99
12
97
22
66
99
11
99
99
78
81
-

99
16
2
99
“

2
13
13

100
98
9
70
15
36
98
(9 )
98
98
81
77
2
100
22
10
6
100
7
2
7
1
15
2
13

100

100

78
62
1
42
76

71
57
2
31
72
1
70
72
51
46

-

76.
76
71
69
-

-

78
5
1
3
84

72
12
6
1
72

_
"

-

1
2
(’)
18

1
3
10

100
99
2
77
12
68
99
20
99
95
79
86
1
99
37
11
13
98
(9 )
3
2
2
23

100

100

99
1
63
23
64
100
1
99
84
49
74
4
99
58
17
30
100
(9)

99
2
82
7
70
99
27
99
99
90
91
(9)
99
29
8
6
97
(9 )

2
7
51

2

-

2

13

14

8
8

-

99
8
2
99
“
"

73
3
31
97
(9 )
98
97
95
88
~
97
9
7
8
97

-

-

2

11

18

59
97
5
96
99
65
70
99
30
7
8
95

10
10
28
10

Plant w o r k e r s
Item

PERCENT

OF

ALL F U L L - T I M E

All
industries

Manu­
Nonmanu­
facturing facturing

Public
utilities

Office w o r k e r s

Wholesale
trade

--------------

loo

100

3

1

88
9
1

100
84
15
2

97
9?
5

99
9u
i
*

6 M O N T H S OF S E R V I C E S
U N D E R 1 W E E K -----------------------1 W E E K -------------------------------O V E R I A N O U N D E R 2 W E t K S ------2 W E E K S -----------------------------3 W E E K S ------------------------------

12
30
1
b
*

21
33
1
1
"

5
27
1
8
-

1
32
3
44

1 Y E A R OF S E R V I C E S
U N D E R 1 W E E K -----------------------1 W E E K -------------------------------O V E R 1 A M D U N D E R 2 w E t K S ------2 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 2 A N D U N D E R 3 W E E K S ------3 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 3 a n d U N D E R A W E t K S -------

i
48
i
46
(9)
2
”

1
52
3
41
3

(0)
45
51
(9)
1
*

17
60
3
-

36
64
-

16
2
75
3
2

38
4
59
6
3
“

5

(9)
89
1
1
-

i
95
3
-

21
79
-

2
3
83
8
3

2
(9)
90
2
3

i
9s

OF

PAID

Services

All
Manu­ Nonmanu­
industries facturing facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

WORKERS

WORKERS

IN E S T A R L I S H M E N T S N O T P R O V I D I N G
P A I D V A C A T I O N S ------------------------IN E S T A R L I S H M E N T S P R O V I O I N u
P A I D V A C A T I O N S -----------------------L E N G T H - O F - T I M E P A Y M E N T ------------P E R C E N T A G E p a y m e n t -----------------O T H E R P A Y M E N T ------------------------AMOUNT

Retail
trade

VACATION

2

-

10';

100

100

J00
95
5
-

39
1
2
“

100

100

5

3

(9)

95
95
-

97
77
19
"

99
99
(9)
*

9
28
1
“

(9)
13
3
*

b
56
7
14
1

51
44
-

(9)
61
31
1
3
-

6
90
(9)
4
(9)

14
<9>
75
3
5
-

3

_

1
-

1

5

_
_

_

-

1

69
3
7
(9)

9]

87
3
6
(9)

97
_

95

1
-

_

99
(9)

86
2
12

-

95
-

72
13
13
1

91
7
2
*

92
1
1
“

7
(9)
82
3
5
-

(9)
(9)
64
3
13

87
7
6

92
1
1

7
(9)
82
3
5

(9)
62

10o

100

100

100

loo

loo

100

(9)

99

1

1

99
99
-

99
99
-

loo
100

loo
loo
-

100
100
_

99
99
-

-

loo

-

-

-

-

-

6
49
b
19
2

3
33
1
45
-

5
54
1
5
-

8
60

12
53
6
26
3

2
36
18
1
-

(9)

A F I E k !1
4

2 YE A R S OF S E R V I C E S
1 W E E K ----------------------— -------O V E R 1 A N D U N D E R 2 W E E K S ------2 W E E K S ------------------------------O V E R 2 A N D U N D E R 3 W E E K S ------3 W E E K S ' -----------------------------O V E R 3 A N D U N D E R A W E E K S ------3 Y E A R S OE S E R V I C E S
1 W E F K -------------------------------O V E R 1 A N D U N D E R 2 W E t K S ------2 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 2 A N O U N D E R 3 W t E K S ------3 W E E K S --- --------fc----------------O V E R 3 A N D U N D E R 4 W E E K S ------4 YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 W E E K -------------------------------O V E R 1 A N D U N D E R 2 W E t K S ------? R E E K S ------ '
-----------------------O V E R 2 A N D U N D E R 3 W E E K S ------3 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 3 A N D U N D E R 4 W E E K S -------




100

2
2
67
b

3

1
2
65
5
5

1
3
81
9
7

3

2
(9)
89
2

i
95
-

3

3

-

19)

1

1
7<

9
i
-

_

O
89
(9)

3
-

(9)

_

C
s
(9)
9?,

3
3
_

1
93
3
3

(9)

( V)

13
(9)

2
-

_

_

-

_

-

10

22
_

7
-

2
-

68
1
-

78
.
_

93
.

93
_

-

-

6
.
79
2
12
1

-

-

(9)
_

1

_

80
3
16
(9)

97
.

95
2
4

99
(9)
I

72
2
26

95
2
4

99
(9)
1

71
2
27

1

_

(9)
60
3
17
(9)

97

_

1

09
h

4

5
-

1

_

(9)
71
13
14
1

(9)
71
13
14
1

Office w o r k e r s

Plant w o r k e r s
Item

AMOUNT OF P A I D
CONTINUED

vacation

All
industries

after

Nonmanu­
Manu­
facturing facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

60
A
36
-

•
36
6A
*

7
7
86
*

56
13
30
1
"
*

3
95
1
“

22
57
?
19
"

2
A7
50
*

*

13
12
63
i
ii
”

3

22
57
2
19
*

2
•
A6
•
52

8
- ‘
A3
A8
-

2
1A

Public
utilities

14 -

5 Y E A R S OF S t R V I C E S
O V E R I A N D U N D E R 2 W E E K S ------2 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 2 A N D U N D E R 3 W E E K S ------3 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 3 A N D U N D E R A W E E K S ------A W E E K S ------------------------------

(9)
60
8
30
(9)

61
15
2A
*

(9)
59
2
36
(9)

6A
35
<91

•
6A
2
3A
*

A8
1
A5
”

(9)
82
A
10

10 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E S
2 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 2 A N D U N D E R 3 W E E K S ------3 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 3 A N D U N D E R A W E E K S ------A W E E K S -----------------------------5 W E E K S ------------------------------

7
(9)
75
2
1A
(9)

3
85
3
10
(9)

12
1
66
1
17
*

1
97
(9)

13
6A
' 7
17
*

8
58
28

12 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E :
2 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 2 A N D U N D E R 3 W E E K S ------3 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 3 A N D U N D E R A W E E K S ------A W E E K S -----------------------------5 w e e k s ------------------------------

6
(9)
73
3
15
(9)

(9)
82
6
11
(9)

12
1
65
1
18
*

1
97
(9)

15 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E S
2 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 2 A N D U N D E R 3 W E E K S ------3 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 3 A N D U N D E R A W E E K S ------A W E E K S -----------------------------5 W E E K S -----------------------------6 W E E K S ------------------------------

6
(9)
A5
2
A5
(9)
(9)

(9)
55
5
39
(9)

10
(9)
37
A9
*9)

56
A3
-

20 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E S
2 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 2 A N D U N D E R 3 W E E K S ------3 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 3 A N D U N D E R A W E E K S ------A W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R A A N D U N D E R 5 W E E K S ------5 W E E K S -----------------------------6 W E E K S ------------------------------

6
(91
18
66
1
7
(9)

21
72
1
5
(9)

10
(9)
17
61
8
"

3
69

25 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E S
2 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 2 A N D U N D E R 3 W E E K S ------3 W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R 3 A N D U N D E R A W E E K S ------A W E E K S -----------------------------O V E R A A N D U N D E R 5 W E E K S -----5 W E E K S ---------------- -------6 W E E K S -------------------------

6
(9)
17
A1
2
30
2

19
A6
A
29
2

10
(9)
15
36

3
6




Manu­ Nonmanu­
All
industries facturing facturing

T

-

-

31
3

73
17

8
57
29

5
A8
•
A7

8
21
66

*

27
-

13
62
7
19
“

5
32
A6
16
*

1A
70
“
3
*

61
13
26
-

“
28
3
6A
»
2
“

A
1
79
2
13
(9)

A
85
(9)
lo
(9)

A
2
77
3
13

28
3
62
2
2
“

A
1
76
6
13
(9)

1
79
7
13
(9)

4
2
7A
6
1A
~

28
2
52
15
(9)

2
1
AA
7
A6
(9)
<9>

(9)
AA
7
A9
(9)

3
2
AA
6
AS
(9)

28
2
2A
A3
(9)
*

2
1
13
<9>
79
2
A
<9>

(9)
13
-

3
2
12
(9)
77
2
3
~

2
5
77

28
2
20
A5

2
1
9
(9)
56
A
26

(91
12
57
3
27

3
2
8
(9)
56

2
5

25

7A

1

1

1

10

“

5
29
AA-

8

8
1A
A1

-

21

31

2

82

(9)

•
29
6
65
(9)
(9)

57

38
8
5A
(9)
(91

A1
1

9A
3
“
2
57
A0

8A
-

'
m

88
5
7
*

*
86
7
7
*

A9
12
39
-

*

15
“

8

A
*

12
10

8
“
20
*
51

2
8
6A

66

26

8
22

21

-

12
10
A0
1
36
(9)
"
12
10
29
1
AS

2
8
86

-

u
ii

*
9
87
A
-

8
20
63
9

A
“

13
12
53

2

18
1

56
•
3

Plant w o r k e r s
Item

AU
industries

A MOUNT OF PAID
Continued

VACATION

30 Y E A R S O F

ManuNonmanufacturing facturing

Office w o r k e r s

Public W h o l e s a l e
utilities
trade

Retail
trade

Services

ManuNonmanuAH
industries facturing facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

F i nance

Services

A F T E R 14 -

SERVICEi
(9)
12

OVER

3 AND UNDER A WEEKS

-------

■

-

_
J!EE!55
S

6 WEE

MAXIMUM

*

"

JO

(9)

IT

-

-

8

”
“
4

52

8

51

6A

63
21

21

26
“

5

20

8

A

8

51

59

62

21

26
“

12
10
18
1
53

30
*

(9)

*
17

19

__

Pft

15

3

29

1A

20

9

12

62
1
32

8
8

tr"
Wtti'O

2

20

5

AVAILABLE:

3 W E E K S -------------------------------

3

5

27
6

*
*

VACATION

8
8
(9)

—*

2

2

See footnotes at end of tables.




12
10
18
1
53

2

t A

31

2
(9)

1

“

Office w o r k e r s

Plant w o r k e r s
Item

A ll

industries

PE R C E NT

OF

Manu­
Nonmanu­
facturing facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

All
Manu­ Nonmanu­
industries facturing facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

W OR KE RS
100

100

loo

100

loo

100

100

100

100

100

ion

lo o

loo

100

100

B E L O W 15---------------------------------------------------------------

97

100

95

10o

loo

97

81

99

100

99

100

100

loo

100

99

L I F E I N S U R A N C E --------------------------------------------------------N O N C O N T R I B U T O R Y P L A N S --------------------------------

90
68

97
75

85
62

100
93

81
69

89
55

76
51

96
77

98

96
76

100

87
60

85
50

100

84

ALL

F U L L -T IM E

IN E S T A B L IS H M E N T S
L E A S T ONE O F THE
SHOWN

W O R K ER S

A C C I D E N T A L D E A T H AND
DISMEMBERMEN T INSURANCE

AT

90

92

4<*

------------------------------

78

87

76

73
56

89

79

76

6b

51

81

51

61
39

64

63

65
96

69

84

65
91

82

68

70
52

86

59

99

47

AND A C C I D E N T I N S U R A N C E
L E A V E OR B O T H 1 6 --------------------------------

87

98

77

95

71

81

52

93

97

91

99

91

85

91

93

63
96

7b
61

52
39

30
29

99
36

61
38

99
31

52
38

73

44

6?

29

26
16

98
28

62
33

36
28

44

97

96

98

76

98

52

16

78

83

7o

89

76

53

86

59

5

3

23

6

PLANS

S I C K N E S S AND A C C I D E N T
I N S U R A N C E --------------------------------------------------------------N O N C O N T R I B U T O R Y P L A N S --------------------------S IC K LEAVE
( F U L L P A Y AND NO
W AITING P E R IO D )
---------------------------------------------S I C K L E A V E ( P A R T I A L P A Y UR
WAITING
LO N G -T E R M

8n

--------------------------------

N O N C ONTR IB UTOR Y
SICKNESS
OR S I C K

------------------------------

PRO VID IN G
BENEFITS

PERIOD)

-------------------------------------------

6

71

7

9

3

1

17

“

6

3

7

32
19

15

16
16

33
26

7
7

22
10

40
26

91
2s

9J

19

99

64

27

18
18

28

11

13

19

37

16

99

99
93

100
96

96
90

98
22

99
38

99
35

99

99

98

93

100
96

96

64

90

22

100
38

35

100
96

96
90

93
22

100
38

99
35

DISABILITY

I N S U R A N C E -------------------------------------------------------------------N O N C O N T R I B U T O R Y P L A N S --------------------------------

23>

IS

H O S P I T A L I Z A T I O N I N S U R A N C E ------- -------------------N O N C O N T R I a U T O R Y P L A N S --------------------------------

95

57

100
69

91
51

100
97

60

92
35

77
95

99
99

S U R G I C A L I N S U R A N C E ---------------------------------------------N O N C O N T R I b U T O R Y P L A N S --------------------------------

95
57

100
69

91
51

100
97

96
60

92
35

77
95

99
99

ME DIC A L INS UR ANC E
N O N CONTRIB UTORY

99
57

100
69

89
51

100
97

96

88
35

77
95

99

99

99

60

99

64

43

92

98
61

87

10(!
97

89

91

99

99

59

32

65
35

99

96

97

6p

4^

100
96

96
38

98
22

100
38

98
39

3

16

9

22
19

1H
6

39
32

21
12

1
1

13
2

12
“

87
70

91

b?

85
73

88
81

72
57

89
68

99
83

60
93

------------------------------------------------P L A N S --------------------------------

M AJ OR M E D I C A L I N S U R A N C E
N 0N C0N TRI6U T0RY PLANS

---------------------------------------------------------------

53

D E N T A L I N S U R A N C E ---------------------------------------------------N O N C O N T P I B U T O R Y P L A N S --------------------------------

13
11

4

12

37
35

33

11

30

4

R E T I R E M E N T P E N S I O N ---------------------------------------------N O N C O N T R I B U T O R Y P L A N S --------------------------------

80
68

89
75

72
62

91
87

82
75

71
58

See footnotes at end of tables.




19

19

51
99

69

99

Footnotes
A ll of these standard footnotes may not apply to this bulletin.

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which em ployees receive their regular straight-tim e salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime
at regular a n d /o r prem ium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all workers and dividing by the number of w orkers. The median
designates position— half of the employees surveyed receive m ore and half receive le s s than the rate shown. The middle range is defined
by two rates of pay; a fourth of the workers earn less than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn m ore than the higher rate.
3
Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
4 These sa la ries relate to form ally established minimum starting (hiring) regular straight-tim e salaries that are paid for standard
workweeks.
5 Excludes w orkers in subclerical jobs such as m essenger.
6 Data are presented for all standard workweeks combined, and for the m ost common standard workweeks reported.
7 Includes all plant workers in establishments currently operating late sh ifts, and establishments whose form al provisions cover late
sh ifts, even though the establishm ents were not currently operating late shifts.
8 L e ss than 0.05 percent.
9 L e ss than 0.5 percent.
10 For purposes of this study, pay for a Sunday in Decem ber, negotiated in the automobile industry, is not treated as a paid holiday.
1 A ll combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for exam ple, the proportion of workers receiving
1
a total of 9 days includes those with 9 full days and no half days, 8 full days and 2 half days, 7 full days and 4 half days, and so on.
Proportions then were cumulated.
12 A C hristm as—New Year holiday period is an unbroken series of holidays which includes C hristm as Eve, Christmas Day, New Y e a r 's
Eve, and New Y e a r 's Day.
Such a holiday period is common in the automobile, aerospace, and farm implement industries.
13 "F lo a tin g " holidays vary from year to year according to em ployer or employee choice.
14 Includes payments other than "length of t i m e ," such as percentage of annual earnings or fla t-su m payments, converted to an
equivalent tim e b a sis; for exam ple, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 w eek's pay. Periods of service are chosen arbitrarily
and do not n ecessa rily reflect individual provisions for progression; for exam ple, changes in proportions at 10 years include changes between
5 and 10 y e a r s. E stim ates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 w eeks' pay after 10 years includes those eligible for
at least 3 w eeks' pay after fewer years of service.
15 E stim ates listed after type of benefit are for all plans for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the em ployer. "Noncontributory
p lan s" include only those financed entirely by the em ployer.
Excluded are legally required plans, such as workm en's compensation, social
security, and railroad retirem ent.
18 Unduplicated total of workers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below. Sick leave plans are
lim ited to those which definitely establish at least the minimum number of days' pay that each employee can expect. Informal sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.




Appendix A
A r e a w a g e and related benefits data are obtained b y p e rsonal visits of B u r e a u field represent­
atives at 3 - y e a r intervals.1 In e a c h of the intervening years, information on e m p l o y m e n t and
occupational earnings is collected b y a c ombination of personal visit, m a i l questionnaire, and tele­
phone interview f r o m establishments participating in the previous survey.
In e a c h of the 8 3 2 areas currently surveyed, data are obtained f r o m representative e s t a b - .
lishments within six b r o a d industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation, c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and other
public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, a n d real estate; and services. M a j o r
industry g r oups excluded f r o m these studies are g o v e r n m e n t operations a n d the construction and
extractive industries. Establi s h m e n t s having f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r of w o r k e r s are omitted
bec a u s e of insufficient e m p l o y m e n t in the occupations studied.
Separate tabulations are provided for
ea c h of the b r o a d industry divisions w h i c h m e e t publication criteria.
T h e s e surveys are c o nducted on a s a m p l e basis.
T h e s a m p l i n g p r o c e d u r e s involve detailed
stratification of all establishments within the scope of an individual a r e a s u r v e y b y industry and n u m b e r
of e m ployees. F r o m this stratified universe a probability s a m p l e is selected, with e a c h establishment
having a p r e d e t e r m i n e d c h a n c e of selection. T o obtain o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m cost, a greater
proportion of large than s m all establishments is selected. W h e n data are co m b i n e d , e a c h establishment
is weighted according to its probability of selection, so that unbiased estimates are generated.
For
e x ample, if one out of four establishments is selected, it is given a weight of four to represent itself
plus three others. A n alternate of the s a m e original probability is c h o s e n in the s a m e industry-size
classification if data are not available for the original s a m p l e m e m b e r .
If n o suitable substitute is
available, additional weight is assigned to a s a m p l e m e m b e r that is similar to the m i s s i n g unit.
Occupations and Earn i n g s
Occupations selected for study are c o m m o n to a variety of manufa c t u r i n g a n d n o n m a n u facturing
industries, and are of the following types:
(1) Office clerical; (2) professional a n d technical; (3)
main t e n a n c e and powerplant; and (4) custodial and material m o v e m e n t . Occupational classification is
b a s e d on a u n i f o r m set of job descriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the s a m e job. Occupations selected for study are listed and described in appendix B.
Unless otherwise indicated, the earnings data following the job titles are for all industries c o mbined.
Earnings data for s o m e of the occupations listed and described, or for s o m e industry divisions within
occupations, are not pres e n t e d in the A - series tables, b e c a u s e either (1) e m p l o y m e n t in the occupation
is too small to provide e n o u g h data to m e r i t presentation, or (2) there is possibility of disclosure of
individual establishment data. Separate m e n ' s a n d w o m e n ' s earnings data are not p r esented wher. the
n u m b e r of w o r k e r s not identified b y sex is 20 percent or m o r e of the m e n or w o m e n identified in an
occupation.
E a r n i n g s data not s h o w n separately for industry divisions are included in all industries
c o m b i n e d data, w h e r e shown.
Likewise, data are included in the overall classification w h e n a s u b ­
classification of electronics technicians, secretaries, or truckdrivers is not s h o w n or information to
subclassify is not available.
Occupational e m p l o y m e n t a n d earnings data are s h o w n for full-time w o r k e r s , i.e., those hired
to w o r k a regular w e e k l y schedule. E a r n i n g s data exclude p r e m i u m p a y for o v e r t i m e a n d for w o r k on
week e n d s , holidays, a n d late shifts. N onproduction b o n u s e s are excluded, but cost-of-living allowances
ahd incentive b o n u s e s are included. W e e k l y h o u r s for office clerical a n d professional and technical
occupations refer to the standard w o r k w e e k (rounded to the nearest half hour) for w h i c h e m p l o y e e s
receive regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of p a y for ov e r t i m e at regular a n d / o r p r e m i u m rates).
A v e r a g e w e e k l y earnings for these occupations are r o u n d e d to the nearest half dollar.
T h e s e surveys m e a s u r e the level of occupational earnings in an a r e a at a particular time.
C o m p a r i s o n s of individual occupational a v e r a g e s over t i m e m a y not reflect expected w a g e changes.
T h e averages for individual jobs are affected b y ch a n g e s in w a g e s and e m p l o y m e n t patterns.
For
e x ample, proportions of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y high- or l o w - w a g e fir m s m a y change, or h i g h - w a g e
1 Personal visits were on a 2-y ea r c y c le before July 1972.
Included in die 83 areas are 13 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract.
These areas are Akron, Ohio; Austin, T e x .; Binghamton,
N. Y . —P a .; Birmingham, A la .; Fort Lauderdale—H ollywood and West Palm Beach—Boca Raton, F l a .; Lexington—Fayette, Ky. ; Melbourne—T itu sv ille C ocoa , F la.; Norfolk—Virginia Beach—Portsmouth and Newport News—Hampton, V a. —N .C .; Poughkeepsie—Kingston—Newburgh, N .Y .; Raleigh—
Duiham, N .C .; Syracuse, N .Y .; Utica—R om e, N .Y .; and Westchester County, N .Y .
In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies
in approximately 70 areas at die request o f the Employment Standards Administration of the U. S. Department of Labor.




w o r k e r s m a y a d vance to better jobs and be replaced b y n e w w o r k e r s at l o w e r rates.
S u c h shifts in
e m p l o y m e n t could d e c r e a s e a n occupational a v e r a g e e v e n though m o s t establishments in an are a
increase w a g e s during the year.
T r e n d s in earnings of occupational groups, s h o w n in table A - 7,
are better indicators of w a g e trends than individual jobs within the groups.
A v e r a g e earnings reflect composite, a r e a w i d e estimates. Industries and establishments differ
in p a y level a n d job staffing, a n d thus contribute differently to the estimates for e a c h job.
Pay
a v erages m a y fail to reflect accurately the w a g e differential a m o n g jobs in individual establishments.
A v e r a g e p a y levels for m e n and w o m e n in selected occupations should not be a s s u m e d to
reflect differences in pay of the sexes within individual establishments. F a c t o r s w h i c h m a y contribute
to differences include progression within established rate ranges, since only the rates paid i n c u m b e n t s
are collected, and p e r f o r m a n c e of specific duties within the general s u r v e y job descriptions.
Job
descriptions us e d to classify e m p l o y e e s in these su r v e y s usually are m o r e generalized than those u s e d
in individual establishments and allow for m i n o r differences a m o n g establishments in specific
duties performed.
Occupational e m p l o y m e n t estimates represent the total in all establishments within the scope
of the study and not the n u m b e r actually surveyed. B e c a u s e occupational structures a m o n g establish­
m e n t s differ, estimates of occupational e m p l o y m e n t obtained f r o m the s a m p l e of establishments studied
serve only to indicate the relative i m p o r t a n c e of the jobs studied. T h e s e differences in occupational
structure do not affect materially the a c c u r a c y of the earnings data.
W a g e trends for selected occupational g r oups
T h e percents of change in table A - 7 relate to w a g e c h a n g e s b e t w e e n the indicated dates.
A n n u a l rates of increase, w h e r e shown, reflect the a m o u n t of increase for 12 m o n t h s w h e n the t i m e
span b e t w een'surveys w a s other them 12 m o n t h s . A n n u a l rates are b a s e d on the a s s u m p t i o n that w a g e s
incre a s e d at a constant rate b e t w e e n surveys.
Occupations use d to c o m p u t e w a g e trends are:
Office clerical ( m e n and w o m e n ) :
B o o k k e e p i n g - m a c h i n e operators,
class B
Clerks, accounting, classes A and B
Clerks, file, classes A, B, and C
Clerks, order
Clerks, payroll
K eyp u n ch o p e r a to r s ,

c la s s e s

A

and B

Messengers
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Tabulating-machine operators,
class B
Typists, classes A and B
Electronic data processing
( m e n and w o m e n ) :
C o m p u t e r operators, classes A, B, and
C o m p u t e r p r o g r a m m e r s , classes A, B,
and C

Electronic data proce s s i n g ( m e n
a n d w o m e n ) — C o ntinued
C o m p u t e r s y s t e m s analysts, classes A,
B, a n d C
Industrial n u r s e s ( m e n a n d w o m e n ) :
N u r s e s , industrial (registered)
Skilled m a i n t e n a n c e ( m e n ) :
Carpenters
Electricians
M a chinists
Mechanics
M e c h a n i c s (automotive)
Painters
Pipefitters
T o o l an d die m a k e r s
Unskilled plant ( m e n ) :
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
L a b o r e r s , mate r i a l handling

P e r c e n t changes for individual areas in the p r o g r a m are c o m p u t e d as follows:
1. E a c h occupation is assigned a weight b a s e d on its proportionate e m p l o y m e n t in the selected
g r o u p of occupations in the base year.
2. T h e s e weights are u s e d to c o m p u t e g r o u p averages.
E a c h occupation's av e r a g e ( m e a n )
earnings is multiplied b y its weight. T h e products are totaled to obtain a gro u p average.
3. T h e ratio of g r o u p averages for 2 consecutive y e a r s is c o m p u t e d b y dividing the av e r a g e
for the current ye a r b y the average for the earlier year. T h e results— e x p r e s s e d as a percent— less 100
is the percent change.

Estab l i s h m e n t practices a n d s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e provisions
T h e B - s e r i e s tables provide information on establishment practices a n d s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e
provisions for full-time plant and office w o r k e r s .
’
’Plant w o r k e r s " include w o r k i n g f o r e m e n and all
n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s (including l e a d m e n and trainees) e n g a g e d in nonoffice functions.
Cafeteria
w o r k e r s and r o u t e m e n are excluded f r o m manufacturing, but included in n o n m anufacturing industries.
"Office w o r k e r s " include w o r k i n g
supervisors and nonsupe r v i s o r y w o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g clerical or
related functions.
Administrative, executive, professional, and part-time e m p l o y e e s are excluded.
P a r t - t i m e e m p l o y e e s are those hired to w o r k a schedule calling regularly for f e w e r w e e k l y h o urs than
the establishment's schedule for full-time e m p l o y e e s in the s a m e general type of wor k .
The
determination is b a s e d on the e m p l o y e r ' s distinction b e t w e e n the t w o groups w h i c h m a y take into
account not only differences in w o r k schedules but differences in pay and benefits.
M i n i m u m entrance salaries for office w o r k e r s relate only to the establishments visited. (See
table B-l.) B e c a u s e of the o p t i m u m samp l i n g techniques used and the probability that large
establishments are m o r e likely than s m all establishments to have f o r m a l entrance rate's above the
subclerical level, the table is m o r e representative of policies in m e d i u m and large establishments.
Shift differential data are limited to full-time plant w o r k e r s in m anufacturing industries. (See
table B-2.) This information is p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s of (1) establishment policy 3 for total plant w o r k e r
e m p l o y m e n t , a n d (2) effective practice for w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d on the specified shift at the t i m e of the
survey. In establishments having varied differentials, the a m o u n t applying to a majority is used.
In
establishments having s o m e late-shift h o urs paid at n o r m a l rates, a differential is r e c o r d e d only if it
applies to a majority of the shift hours. A s e cond (evening) shift ends w o r k at or n e a r midnight. A
third (night) shift starts w o r k at or n e a r midnight.
T h e s c heduled w e e k l y h o u r s and days of a majority of the first-shift w o r k e r s in an establish­
m e n t are tabulated as applying to all full-time plant or office w o r k e r s of that establishment.
(See
table B-3.) Sched u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s and days are those w h i c h a majority of full-time e m p l o y e e s are
expected to w o r k for straight-time or o v e r t i m e rates.
Pa i d holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans are treated statistically
as applying to all full-time plant or office w o r k e r s if a majority of such w o r k e r s are eligible or m a y
eventually qualify for the practices listed. (See tables B - 4 through B-6.) S u m s of individual items in
tables B - 2 th r o u g h B - 5 m a y not equal totals b e cause of rounding..

T h e s u m m a r y of vacation plans is a statistical m e a s u r e of vacation provisions rather than a
m e a s u r e of the proportion of full-time w o r k e r s actually receiving specific benefits. (See table B-5.)
Provisions apply to all plant or office w o r k e r s in an establishment regardless of length of service.
P a y m e n t s on other than a t i m e basis are converted to a ti m e period; for e x ample, 2 percent of
annual earnings are c onsidered equivalent to 1 w e e k ' s pay. Only basic plans are included. Estimates
exclude vacation bonuses, vacation-savings plans, and "extended" or "sabbatical" benefits b e y o n d basic
plans.
S u c h provisions are typical in the steel, a l u m i n u m , and can industries.
Health, insurance, a n d pension plans for w h i c h the e m p l o y e r pays at least a part of the cost
include those (1) underwritten b y a c o m m e r c i a l insurance c o m p a n y or nonprofit organization, (2)
provided through a union fund, or (3) paid directly b y the e m p l o y e r out of current operating funds or
f r o m a fund set aside for this purpose.
(See table B-6.)
A n establishment is considered to have
such a plan if the majority of e m p l o y e e s are c o v e r e d ev e n though less than a majority participate
u n der the plan b e c a u s e e m p l o y e e s are required to contribute t o w a r d the cost.
E x c l u d e d are
legally required plans, such as w o r k m e n ' s c o m p ensation, social security, and railroad retirement.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of insurance under w h i c h p r e d e t e r m i n e d
c a s h p a y m e n t s are m a d e directly to the insured during t e m p o r a r y illness or accident disability.
Information is presented for all such plans to w h i c h the e m p l o y e r contributes.
H o w e v e r , in N e w
Y o r k and N e w Jersey, w h i c h ha v e enacted t e m p o r a r y disability insurance laws requiring e m p l o y e r
contributions,4 plans are included only if the e m p l o y e r (1) contributes m o r e than is legally required,
or (2) provides the e m p l o y e e with benefits w h i c h e x c e e d the r e q u i r e m e n t s of the law. Tabulations of
paid sick leave plans are limited to f o r m a l p l a n s 5 w h i c h provide full pay or a proportion of the
w o r k e r ' s p a y during a b s ence f r o m w o r k b e c a u s e of illness. Separate tabulations are presented
according to (1) plans w h i c h provide full p a y and n o waiting period, and (2) plans w h i c h provide either
partial pay or a waiting period.
In addition to the presentation of proportions of w o r k e r s provided
sickness and accident insurance or paid sick leave, an unduplicated total is s h o w n of w o r k e r s w h o
receive either or both types of benefits.
L o n g t;erm disability insurance plans provide p a y m e n t s to totally disabled e m p l o y e e s upon the
expiration of their paid sick leave a n d/or sickness and accident insurance, or after a p r e d e t e r m i n e d
period of disability (typically 6 months).
P a y m e n t s are m a d e until the end of the disability, a
m a x i m u m age, or eligibility for retirement benefits.
Full or partial p a y m e n t s are almost always
r e d u c e d by social security, w o r k m e n ' s c o m p e nsation, and private pensions benefits payable to the
disabled empl o y e e .

Da t a on paid holidays are limited to holidays* granted annually on a f o r m a l basis, w h i c h (1)
are provided for in written f o r m , or (2) are established by custom.
(See table B-4.) Holidays
ordinarily granted are included eve n t h o u g h they m a y fall on a n o n w o r k d a y and the w o r k e r is not
granted another day off.
T h e first part of the paid holidays«table presents the n u m b e r of who l e and
half holidays actually granted. T h e s e c o n d part c o m b i n e s tohole and half holidays to s h o w total holiday
t i m e . Tab l e B - 4 a reports the incidence of the m o s t c o m m o n paid holidays.

M a j o r m e d i c a l insurance plans protect e m p l o y e e s f r o m sickness and injury expe n s e s b e y o n d
the c o v e r a g e of basic hospitalization, medical, a n d surgical plans. Typical features of m a j o r me dical
plans are (1) a "deductible" (e.g., $ 5 0 ) paid b y the insured before benefits begin; (2) a coinsurance
feature requiring the insured to p a y a portion (e.g., 20 percent) of certain expenses; and (3) stated
dollar m a x i m u m benefits (e.g., $ 10,000 a year).
M e d i c a l insurance provides c o mplete or partial
p a y m e n t of doctors' fees. Dental insurance usually co v e r s fillings, extractions, and X-rays. E x cluded
are plans w h i c h c o ver only oral s u rgery or accident d a m a g e .
R e t i r e m e n t pension plans provide
p a y m e n t s for the r e m a i n d e r of the w o r k e r ' s life.

3 An establishment-was considered as having a p olicy if it met either o f the following conditions: (1) Operated late .Iiifts at the tim e o f the
survey, or (2 ) had form al provisions covering late shifts. A n establishment was considered as having formal provisions if it (1 ) had operated late
shifts during the 12 months before the survey, or (2). had provisions in written form to operate late shifts.

4 The temporary disability laws in C alifornia and Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.
* A n establishment is considered as having a formal plan if it established at least the minim um number o f days sick leave available to each
em ployee.
Such a plan need not be written; but informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, are excluded.




Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied in Boston, Mass.,1 August 1975
N u m b e r of establishments

W o r k e r s in establishments

employment
Industry division

m e n t s in scope
of study

Within scope of study
Within scope
of s t u d y 5

Studied

Studied

Total4

Full-time
plant w o r k e r s

Full-time
office w o r k e r s

Number

Percent

496,334

100

243,373

106,904

272,896

112,263
131,110

29,374
77,530

100,410
172,486

Total4

ALL E S T A B L I S H M E N T S
A l L D I V I S I O N S -------------------------------------

_

1,664

323

100

459
1,205

79
244

193,273
30 3*0 6 1

39
61

100
50
100
50
50

71
311
192
241
390

27
48
44
43
82

44,668
31,568
89,349
64,930
72,546

9
6
18
13
15

22,678
15,927
64,905
71 , 3 2 6
26,274

9,022
6,907
9,641
40,503
11.457

38,333
7,673
55,040
40,698
30,542

A L L D I V I S I O N S -------------------------------------

-

161

107

270,419

100

129,994

61,792

232,251

M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------TRANSPORTATION, C O M M U N ICATION, AND
O T H E R P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 5 ------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE
----------------------------------RETAIL TRADE
--------------------------------------F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , A N D R E A L E S T A T E 6 --------S E R V I C E S 8 ---------------------------------------------

500

70
91

36
71

115,177
15 5 , 2 4 2

43
57

61,969
68,025

18,273
43,519

90,778
141,473

500
500
500

10
1
41
23
16

10
1
26
19
15

34,605
1 , 678
60,765
39,487
18,707

13
1
22
15
7

17,299
512
44,467

6,667
298
6,986
25,867
34 701

34,605
1,678
50,798
36,785
17,607

M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------T R A N S P O R T A T I O N , C O M M U N I C A T I O N , AND
O T H F R P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 5 ------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE
— --------------------------------RETAIL TRADE
--------------------------------------F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , A N D R E A L E S T A T E 6 --------S E R V I C E S • --------------------------------------------LARGE

ESTABLISHMENTS

.

soo
500

-

5,747

1 T h e B o s t o n Standard Metropolitan Statistical A r e a , as defined b y the Office of M a n a g e m e n t and B u dget through F e b r u a r y 1974, consists of Suffolk County, 16 c o m m u n i t i e s in E s s e x County, 34
in M i d d l e s e x County, 26 in Norfolk County, and 12 in P l y m o u t h County.
T h e " w o r k e r s within s c ope of study" estimates s h o w n in this table provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and
composition of the labor force included in the survey.
E s t i m a t e s are not intended, h o w e v e r , for c o m p a r i s o n with other e m p l o y m e n t indexes to m e a s u r e e m p l o y m e n t trends or levels since (1) planning
of w a g e surveys requires establishment data c o m p i l e d considerably in a d v a n c e of the payroll period studied, a n d (2) small establishments are excluded f r o m the scope of the survey.
2 T h e 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification M a n u a l w a s u s e d to classify establishments b y industry division.
3 Includes all establishments with total e m p l o y m e n t at or above the m i n i m u m limitation.
All outlets (within the area) of c o m p a n i e s in industries su c h as trade, finance, auto repair service, and
motion picture theaters are considered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes executive, professional, part-time, a n d other w o r k e r s excluded f r o m the separate plant a n d office categories.
5 A b b r e viated to "public utilities" in the A - and B - series tables.
Tax i c a b s and services incidental to w a t e r transportation w e r e excluded.
Boston's transit s y s t e m is municipally o p erated and
is excluded b y definition f r o m the scope of the survey.
6 A b b r e viated to "finance" in the A - and B - s e r i e s tables.
7 E s t i m a t e relates to real estate establishments only. W o r k e r s f r o m the entire industry division are represented in the A - s e r i e s tables, but f r o m the real estate portion only in "all industry"
estimates in the B - series tables.
8 Hotels and motels; laundries and other p e rsonal services; business services; automobile repair, rental, and parking; m o t i o n pictures; nonprofit m e m b e r s h i p organizations (excluding religious
and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectural services.
L a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t agreement coverage

Industrial composition in m a n u f acturing
O v e r one-third of all w o r k e r s within scope of the s u r v e y in the B o s t o n a rea w e r e
e m p l o y e d in m a n u f acturing firms.
T h e following presents the m a j o r industry groups and
specific industries as a percent of all manufacturing:
Industry g r o u p
Electrical e q uipment and
supplies_______________________ 25
Instruments and related
products _____ ______________ . 14
.
M a c h i n e r y , except electrical .. 14
.
F o o d and kindred p r o d u c t s ___
7
Fabricated m e t a l p r o d u c t s ___ .
. 6
Printing and publishing_________
6
Transportation e q u i p m e n t ___ _
6

Specific industries
C o m m u n i c a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ___. ii
..
Office and c o m p u t i n g
m a c h i n e s ____________________ . . . 6
P hotographic e qui p m e n t
a n d s u p p l i e s ________ _____ . . 6
.
Electronic c o m p o n e n t s and
a c c e s s o r i e s _________________ . . 5
.

This information is b a s e d o n estimates of total e m p l o y m e n t derived f r o m universe
materials c o m p i l e d before actual survey.
Proportions in various industry divisions m a y
differ f r o m proportions b a s e d o n the results of the s u r v e y as s h o w n in the appendix table.




T h e following tabulation s h o w s the percent of full-time plant and office w o r k e r s
e m p l o y e d in establishments in w h i c h a union contract or contracts c o v e r e d a majority of
the w o r k e r s in the respective categories, Boston, M a s s . , A u g u s t 1975:
Plant w o r k e r s
All industries__________________
Manufacturing______________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g __________
Public utilities__________
Whol e s a l e t r a d e ________
Retail trade------------F i n a n c e __________________
S e r v i c e s _________________

Office w o r k e r s

50
52
47
91
48
36

10
8
11
76
8
8

40

*

A n establishment is considered to h a v e a contract covering all plant or office
w o r k e r s if a majority of such w o r k e r s are c o v e r e d b y a l a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t a g r e e m e n t .
Therefore, all other plant or office w o r k e r s are e m p l o y e d in establishments that either do
not have l a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t contracts in effect, or h a v e contracts that apply to f e w e r than half
of their plant or office w o r k e r s .
E s t i m a t e s a r e not necessarily representative of the extent
to w h ich all w o r k e r s in the area m a y be c o v e r e d b y the provisions of l a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t
agr e e m e n t s , b e c a u s e small establishments are excluded and the industrial scope of the
survey is limited.
* L e s s than 0.5 percent.

Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions
T h e p r i m a r y purpose of preparing job descriptions for the B u reau's w a g e surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations w o r k e r s w h o are e m p l o y e d under a variety of payroll titles and different w o r k a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m establishment to establishment and
f r o m a r e a to area.
This p e rmits the grouping of occupational w a g e rates representing c o m p a r a b l e job content.
B e c a u s e of this e m p h a s i s on
interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the B u r e a u ' s job descriptions m a y differ significantly f r o m those in use in
individual establishments or those p r e p a r e d for other purposes.
In applying these job descriptions, the B u r e a u ' s field e c o n o m i s t s are instructed
to exclude w o r k i n g supervisors; apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-time, t e m p o r a r y , and probationary w o rkers.

OFFICE
BILLER, M A C H I N E

CLERKS,

P r e p a r e s statements, bills, and invoices on a m a c h i n e other than an ordinary or electromatic
typewriter. M a y also k e e p re c o r d s as to billings or shipping charges or p e r f o r m other clerical w o r k
incidental to billing operations. F o r w a g e study purposes, billers, mach i n e , are classified b y type of
m a c h i n e , as follows:

P e r f o r m s one or m o r e accounting clerical tasks su c h as posting to registers and ledgers;
reconciling b a n k accounts; verifying the internal consistency, c ompleteness, and m a t h e m a t i c a l ac curacy
of accounting do c u m e n t s ; assigning p r escribed accounting distribution codes; e x amining and verifying
for clerical a c c u r a c y various types of reports, lists, calculations, posting, etc.; or preparing simple or
assisting in preparing m o r e c o m p l icated journal vouchers. M a y w o r k in either a m a n u a l or autom a t e d
accounting system.

Biller, m a c h i n e (billing machine).
U s e s a special billing m a c h i n e (combination typing and
adding m a c h i n e ) to p r e p a r e bills a n d invoices f r o m custom e r s ' pur c h a s e orders, internally p r e p a r e d
orders, shipping m e m o r a n d u m s , etc.
Usually involves application of p r e d e t e r m i n e d discounts and
shipping c h a r g e s and entry of n e c e s s a r y extensions, w h i c h m a y or m a y not be c o m p u t e d on the billing
m a c h i n e , and totals w h i c h are automatically a c c u m u l a t e d by ma chine. T h e operation usually involves a
large n u m b e r of c a r b o n copies of the bill being p r e p a r e d and is often done on a fanfold m a chine.
Biller, m a c h i n e (bookkeeping m a c h i n e ) . U s e s a bookkeeping m a c h i n e (with or without a
typewriter k e y b o a r d ) to p r e p a r e c u s t o m e r s ' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation.
Generally involves the simultaneous entry of figures on c u stomers' ledger record.
The machine
automatically a c c u m u l a t e s figures on a n u m b e r of vertical c o l u m n s and c o m p u t e s and usually prints
automatically the debit or credit balances. D o e s not involve a k n o w l e d g e of bookkeeping. W o r k s f r o m
u n i f o r m a n d standard types of sales and credit slips.

ACCOUNTING

T h e w o r k requires a k n o w l e d g e of clerical m e t h o d s and office practices and p r ocedures whi c h
relates to the clerical processing and recording of transactions and accounting information.
Wi t h
experience, the w o r k e r typically b e c o m e s familiar with the bookkeeping and accounting t e r m s and
p r o c e d u r e s us e d in the assigned w o r k , but is not required to ha v e a k n o w l e d g e of the f o rmal principles
of bookkeeping and accounting.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A. U n d e r general supervision, p e r f o r m s accounting clerical operations w h i c h require
the application of experience and j u dgment, for e x a m p l e , clerically processing complicated or
nonrepetitive accounting transactions, selecting a m o n g a substantial variety of prescribed accounting
cod e s and classifications, or tracing transactions though previous accounting actions to determine
source of discrepancies. M a y be assisted b y one or m o r e class B accounting clerks.

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

O p e r a t e s a b o o k k e e p i n g m a c h i n e (with or without a typewriter keyboard) to k e e p a r e cord of
business transactions.
C l ass A . K e e p s a set of records requiring a knowl e d g e of and experience in basic bookkeeping
principles, and familiarity with the structure of the particular accounting s y s t e m used.
Determines
p r o p e r r e cords and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each pha s e of the work. M a y
p r e p a r e consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records by hand.

G l a s s B . K e e p s a r e c o r d of one or m o r e phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little k n o w l e d g e of basic bookkeeping. P h a s e s or sections include accounts payable, payroll,
c u s t o m e r s * accounts (not including a s i mple type of billing described under biller, machine), cost
distribution, e x p e n s e distribution, inventory control, etc. M a y check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and pr e p a r e control sheets for the accounting department.

Class B . U n d e r close supervision, following detailed instructions and standardized procedures,
p e r f o r m s one or m o r e routine accounting clerical operations, such as posting to ledgers, cards, or
w o r k s h e e t s w h e r e identification of items and locations of postings are clearly indicated; checking
a c c u r a c y and c o m p l e t e n e s s of standardized and repetitive records or accounting documents; and coding
d o c u m e n t s using a f e w prescr i b e d accounting codes.
CLERK,

FILE

Files, classifies, and retrieves material in an established filing system.
M a y perform
clerical and m a n u a l tasks required to maintain files. Positions are classified into levels on the basis
of the following definitions.
Class A . Classifies and indexes file material such as c o r r espondence, reports, technical
d o c u m e n t s , etc., in an established filing s y s t e m containing a n u m b e r of varied subject matt e r files.
M a y also file this material.
M a y k e e p records of various types in conjunction with the files.
May
lead a small g r o u p of low e r level file clerks.

R e v i s e d occupational descriptions for switchboard operator; switchboard operator-receptionist; mach i n e - t o o l operator, toolroom; and tool and die m a k e r are being introduced
this year.
T h e y are the result of the B u reau's policy of periodically reviewing area w a g e s u r v e y occupational descriptions in o r d e r to take into account technological developments
and to clarify descriptions so that they are m o r e readily understood an d uniformly interpreted.
E v e n though the revised descriptions reflect basically the s a m e occupations as previously
defined, s o m e reporting c h a n g e s m a y occur b e cause of the revisions.
The new




single level description for switchboard operator is not the equivalent of the two levels previously defined.

S E C R E T A R Y — Continued
Class B . Sorts, codes, a n d files unclassified material b y simple (subject matter) headings
or partly classified material b y finer subheadings. P r e p a r e s simple related index a n d c ross-reference
aids. A s requested, locates clearly identified material in files a n d f o r w a r d s material. M a y p e r f o r m
related clerical tasks required to maintain and service files.
C l ass C . P e r f o r m s routine filing of material that has already b e e n classified or w h i c h is
easily classified in a s i mple serial classification s y s t e m (e.g., alphabetical, chronological, or
numerical). A s requested, locates readily available material in files and f o r w a r d s material; and m a y
fill out withdr a w a l charge. M a y p e r f o r m simple clerical and m a n u a l tasks required to maintain and
service files.
CLERK,

ORDER

R e c e i v e s c u s t o m e r s * orders for m a terial or m e r c h a n d i s e b y mail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the following: Quoting prices to cus t o m e r s ; m a k i n g out an order
sheet listing the items to m a k e up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on ord e r sheet;
and distributing ord e r sheets to respective d e p a r t m e n t s to be filled. M a y che c k with credit de p a r t m e n t
to d e termine credit rating of c u s t o m e r , a c k n o w l e d g e receipt of orders f r o m c u s t o m e r s , follow up
orders to see that they ha v e b e e n filled, k e e p file of orders received, and che c k shipping invoices
with original orders.
CLERK,

PAYROLL

C o m p u t e s w a g e s of c o m p a n y e m p l o y e e s and enters the n e c e s s a r y data on the payroll sheets.
Duties involve: Calculating w o r k e r s ' earnings b a s e d on ti m e or production records; and posting
calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such as w o r k e r ' s n a m e , w b r k i n g days, time,
rate, deductions for insurance, and total w a g e s due. M a y m a k e out p a y c h e c k s a n d assist p a y m a s t e r
in m a k i n g up and distributing p a y envelopes.
M a y use a calculating m a chine.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Ope r a t e s a k e y p u n c h m a c h i n e to re c o r d or verify alphabetic a n d / o r n u m e r i c data on tabulating
cards or on tape.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A . W o r k requires the application of experience and j u d g m e n t in selecting p r ocedures
to be followed and in searching for, interpreting, selecting, or coding i t ems to be k e y p u n c h e d f r o m a
variety of source docume n t s . O n occasion m a y also p e r f o r m s o m e routine k e y p u n c h wor k . M a y train
inexperienced k e y p u n c h operators.
ClassB.
W o r k is routine and repetitive.
U n d e r close supervision or following specific
proced u r e s or instructions, w o r k s f r o m various standardized source d o c u m e n t s w h i c h hav e b e e n coded,
and follows specified p r o c e d u r e s w h i c h have be e n prescr i b e d in detail and require little or n o selecting,
coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. Refers to supervisor p r o b l e m s arising f r o m erron e o u s
items or codes or mi s s i n g information.
MESSENGER

Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled " s ecretary" p o s s e s s the above characteristics.
positions w h i c h are excluded f r o m the definition are as follows:

Examples

a.

Positions w h i c h do not m e e t the " personal" secretary concept described above;

b.

of

Stenographers not fully trained in secretarial type duties;

c. Stenographers
m a n a g e r i a l persons;

serving

as

office

assistants

to

a

g r o u p of professional,

d. Secretary positions in w h i c h the duties are either substantially m o r e
stantially m o r e c o m p l e x and responsible than those characterized in the definition;
e. Assistant type positions w h i c h involve m o r e difficult or m o r e
administrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical duties w h i c h are not
work.

technical,

or

routine or s u b ­

responsible technical,
typical of secretarial

N O T E : T h e t e r m "corporate officer," u s e d in the level definitions following, refers to those
officials w h o have a significant c o r p o rate-wide p o l i c y m a k i n g role with r e g a r d to m a j o r c o m p a n y
activities.
The title "vice president," though n o r m a l l y indicative of this role, do^s not in all cases
identify such positions. Vice presidents w h o s e p r i m a r y responsibility is to act personally on individual
cases or transactions (e.g., approve or d e n y individual loan or credit actions; administer individual
trust accounts; directly supervise a clerical staff) are not co n s i d e r e d to b e "corporate officers" for
p u r p o s e s of applying the following level definitions.
Class A
1. Secretary to the c h a i r m a n of the b o a r d or president of a c o m p a n y that e m p l o y s ,
over 100 but fewer than 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; or

in all,

2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the c h a i r m a n of the b o a r d or president) of a
c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 5,000 but f e w e r than 25, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
3. Secretary to the head, i m m e d i a t e l y b e l o w the corporate officer level, of a m a j o r
or subsidiary of a c o m p a n y that emp l o y s , in all, ove r 2 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s .

segment

Class B
1. Secretary to the c h a i r m a n of the b o a r d or president of a c o m p a n y that e m p l o y s ,
f e w e r than 100 p e r s o n s ; or *
1

in all,

2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the c h a i r m a n of the b o a r d or president) of a
c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 100 but f e w e r than 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; or
3. Secretary to the head, i m m e d i a t e l y b e l o w the officer level, ov e r either a m a j o r c o r p o r a t e ­
w i d e functional activity (e.g., marketing, research, operations, industrial relations, etc.) or a m a j o r
geographic or organizational s e g m e n t (e.g., a regional headquarters; a m a j o r division) of a c o m p a n y
that emp l o y s , in all, over 5,000 but f e wer than 2 5 , 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s ; or

P e r f o r m s various routine duties such as running errands, operating m i n o r office m a c h i n e s
such as sealers or mailers, opening and distributing mail, and other m i n o r clerical work. Exclude
positions that require operation of a m o t o r vehicle as a significant duty.

4. Secretary to the h e a d of an individual plant,
official) that employs, in all, over 5,000 p e r s o n s ; or

SECRETARY

5. Secretary to the he a d of a large a n d i m portant organizational s e g m e n t (e.g., a m i d d l e
m a n a g e m e n t supervisor of an organizational s e g m e n t often involying as m a n y as several h u n d r e d
persons) or a c o m p a n y that e m ploys, in all, o v e r 2 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s .

A s s i g n e d as personal secretary, n o r m a l l y to one individual.
Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the day-to-day w o r k of the supervisor.
W o r k s fairly independently
receiving a m i n i m u m of detailed supervision and guidance. P e r f o r m s varied clerical and secretarial
duties, usually including m o s t of the following:
a. Rece i v e s telephone calls, personal callers, and i n c o m i n g mail, a n s w e r s routine inquires,
and routes technical inquiries to the p r o p e r persons;
b.

Establishes,

c.

Maintains the supervisor's calendar and m a k e s

maintains,

a n d revises the

d.

Relays m e s s a g e s f r o m supervisor to subordinates;

Performs

appointments as instructed;

stenographic and typing w o rk.

M a y also p e r f o r m other clerical and secretarial tasks of c o m p a r a b l e nature and difficulty.
T h e w o r k typically requires k n o w l e d g e of office routine and understanding of the organization, p r o g r a m s ,
and proce d u r e s related to the w o r k of the supervisor.




etc. (or other equivalent

level of

Class C
1. Secretary to an executive or m a n a g e r i a l p e r s o n w h o s e responsibility is not equivalent to
one of the specific level situations in the definition for class B, but w h o s e organizational unit
n o r m a l l y n u m b e r s at least several d o zen e m p l o y e e s and is usually divided into organizational s e g m e n t s
w h i c h are often, in turn, further subdivided. In s o m e c o m p a n i e s , this level includes a w i d e range of
organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; ojr

supervisor's files;

e. R e v i e w s c o r r espondence, m e m o r a n d u m s , and reports p r e p a r e d by others for the s u p e r ­
visor's signature to assure proced u r a l and typographic accuracy;
f.

factory,

2. Secretary to the h e a d of an individual plant,
official) that employs, in all, few e r than 5,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .

factory,

etc. (or other equivalent level of

Class D
1. Secretary to the
about 25 or 30 persons); ojc

supervisor

or

head

of a s m a l l

organizational

unit

(e.g., f e w e r

than

2. Secretary to a n o n s u pervisory staff specialist, professional e m p l o y e e , administrative
officer, or assistant, skilled technician or expert.
(NOTE:
M a n y c o m p a n i e s assign stenographers,
rather than secretaries as described above, to this level of s u p e r visory or n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o rker.)

STENOGRAPHER

T A B U L A T I N G - M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R (Electric Accounting M a c h i n e Operator)

P r i m a r y duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to transcribe the dictation. M a y also
type f r o m written copy.
M a y operate f r o m a stenographic pool.
M a y occasionally transcribe f r o m
voice recordings (if p r i m a r y duty is transcribing f r o m recordings, see T r a n scribing-Machine
Operator, General).

Ope r a t e s one or a variety of m a c h i n e s su c h as the tabulator, calculator, collator, interpreter,
sorter, reproducing punch, etc. E x c l u d e d f r o m this definition are w o r k i n g supervisors. Also excluded
are operators of electronic digital c o m p u t e r s , ev e n though they m a y also operate E A M equipment.

N O T E : This job is distinguished f r o m that of a secretary in that a secretary n o r m a l l y w o r k s
in a confidential relationship with only one m a n a g e r or executive and p e r f o r m s m o r e responsible and
discretionary tasks as desc r i b e d in the secretary job definition.

Class A. P e r f o r m s c o m p l e t e reporting a n d tabulating a s s i g n m e n t s including devising difficult
control panel wiring u n d e r general supervision.
A s s i g n m e n t s typically involve a variety of long and
c o m p l e x reports w h i c h often are irregular or nonrecurring, requiring s o m e planning of the nature and
sequencing of operations, and the use of a variety of m a c h i n e s . Is typically involved in training n e w
operators in m a c h i n e operations or training l o w e r level operators in wiring f r o m d i a g r a m s and in
the operating seque n c e s of long and c o m p l e x reports.
D o e s not include positions in w h i c h wiring
responsibility is limited to selection and insertion of p r e w i r e d boards.

Stenographer, G e n e r a l
t
Dictation involves a n o r m a l routine vocabulary.
or' p e r f o r m other relatively routine clerical tasks.

M a y maintain

files, k e e p simple records,

Stenographer, Senior
Dictation involves a varied technical ,or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or
reports on scientific research. M a y also set up and maintain files, k e e p records, etc.
OR
P e r f o r m s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence a n d responsibility
than stenographer, general, as evide n c e d b y the following: W o r k requires a high degr e e of stenographic
s p e e d a n d accuracy; a t h o r o u g h w o r k i n g k n o w l e d g e of general business and office procedure; a n d of
the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures, files, workflow, etc. U s e s this
k n o w l e d g e in p e r f o r m i n g stenographic duties a n d responsible clerical tasks such as m aintaining followup
files; a s s e m b l i n g m a terial for reports, m e m o r a n d u m s , and letters; c o m p o s i n g simple letters f r o m
g eneral instructions; reading a n d routing i n c o m i n g mail; and answe r i n g routine questions, etc.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
O p e r a t e s a telephone swi t c h b o a r d or console us e d with a private b r a n c h e x c h a n g e ( P B X )
s y s t e m to relay incom i n g , outgoing, and i n t r a -system calls.
M a y provide information to callers,
r e c o r d arid t r ansmit m e s s a g e s , k e e p r e c o r d of calls placed and toll charges.
B e s i d e s operating a
telephone swi t c h b o a r d or console, m a y also type or p e r f o r m routine clerical w o r k (typing or routine
clerical w o r k m a y o c c u p y the m a j o r portion of the wor k e r ' s time, and is usually p e r f o r m e d while at
the swi t c h b o a r d or console).
Chief or lead operators in establishments e m p l o y i n g m o r e than one
operator are excluded. F o r an operator w h o also acts as a receptionist, see Swi t c h b o a r d Opera t o r Receptionist.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
At a single-position telephone s witchboard or console, acts both as an operator— see Swit c h ­
b o a r d O p e r a t o r —— a n d as a receptionist. Receptionist's w o r k involves such duties as greeting visitors;
d e termining nature of visitor's b u siness a n d providing appropriate information; referring visitor to
appropriate p e r s o n in the organization, or contacting that p e r s o n by telephone and arranging an
appointment; keeping a log of visitors.

Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.

Class B . P e r f o r m s w o r k according to established p r o c e d u r e s and u n d e r specific instructions.
A s s i g n m e n t s typically involve com p l e t e but routine and recurring reports or parts of larger and m o r e
c o m p l e x reports.
O p erates m o r e difficult tabulating or electrical accounting m a c h i n e s such as the
tabulator and calculator, in addition to the s i mpler m a c h i n e s u s e d b y class C operators.
M a y be
required to do s o m e wiring f r o m d i a g r a m s .
M a y train n e w e m p l o y e e s in basic m a c h i n e operations.
Class C . U n d e r specific instructions, operates simple tabulating or electrical accounting
m a c h i n e s such as the sorter, interpreter, reproducing punch, collator, etc.
A s s i g n m e n t s typically
involve portions of a w o r k unit, for e x a m p l e , individual sorting or collating runs, or repetitive
operations.
M a y p e r f o r m simp l e wiring f r o m d i a g r a m s , and do s o m e filing work.
TRANSCRIBING:-MACHINE OPERATOR,

GENERAL

P r i m a r y duty is to transcribe dictation involving a n o r m a l routine vocabulary f r o m trans c r i bing-machine records.
M a y also type f r o m written co p y and do simple clerical work. W o r k e r s
transcribing dictation involving a varied technical or specialized v o cabulary such as legal briefs or
reports on scientific r e s e a r c h are not included.
A w o r k e r w h o takes dictation in shorthand or by
Stenotype or similar m a c h i n e is classified as a stenographer.
TYPIST
U s e s a typewriter to m a k e copies of various materials or to m a k e out bills after calculations
hav e b e e n m a d e b y another person.
M a y include typing of stencils, mat s , or similar materials for
use in duplicating processes. M a y do clerical w o r k involving little special training, such as keeping
simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting a n d distributing i n c o m i n g mail.
Class A . P e r f o r m s one or m o r e of the following: T y p i n g material in fined f o r m w h e n it
involves c o m b i n i n g material f r o m several sources; or responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication,
punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual w o r d s or foreign language material; or pl«mning layout and
typing of com p l i c a t e d statistical tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing. M a y type routine
f o r m letters, varying details to suit c ircumstances.

Cla s s B . P e r f o r m s one or m o r e of the following: C o p y typing f r o m rough or clear drafts;
or routine typing of f o r m s , insurance policies, etc; or setting up simple standard tabulations; or
copying m o r e c o m p l e x tables already set up and s p a c e d properly.

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COMPUTER OPERATOR

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R — Continued

M o n i t o r s a n d operates the control console of a digital c o m p u t e r to pr o c e s s data cccording to
operating instructions, usually p r e p a r e d b y a p r o g r a m m e r .
W o r k includes m o s t of the following:
Studies instructions to d e t e r m i n e e q u i p m e n t setup and operations; loads e q u i p m e n t Atfith required
i te m s (tape reels, cards, etc.); switches n e c e s s a r y auxiliary e q u i p m e n t into circuit, a n d starts and
operates c o m p u t e r ; m a k e s adjustments to c o m p u t e r to correct operating p r o b l e m s and m e e t special
conditions; reviews e r r o r s m a d e
during operation and de t e r m i n e s cause or refers p r o b l e m to
supervisor or p r o g r a m m e r ; a n d maintains operating records.
M a y test a n d assist in correcting
program.

Cla s s B . O p erates independently, or u n d e r only general direction, a c o m p u t e r running
p r o g r a m s with m o s t of the following characteristics: M o s t of the p r o g r a m s are established production
runs, typically run on a regularly recurring basis; there is little or n o testing of n e w p r o g r a m s
required; alternate p r o g r a m s are p r ovided in case original p r o g r a m n e e d s m a j o r change or cannot be
corrected within a reasonably time. In c o m m o n e r r o r situations, diagnoses cause and takes corrective
action. This usually involves applying previously p r o g r a m m e d corrective steps, or using standard
correction techniques.
OR

For wage

study p u rposes,

c o m p u t e r operators are classified as follows:

C l a s s A . O p e r a t e s independently, or under only general direction, a c o m p u t e r running
p r o g r a m s with m o s t of the following characteristics:
N e w p r o g r a m s are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling r e q u i r e m e n t s are of critical i m p o r t a n c e to m i n i m i z e d o w n t i m e ; the p r o g r a m s
are of c o m p l e x design so that identification of err o r source often requires a w o r k i n g k n o w l e d g e of the
total p r o g r a m , a n d alternate p r o g r a m s m a y not be available.
M a y give direction a n d guidance to
l o w e r level operators.




O p e r a t e s u n d e r direct supervision a c o m p u t e r running p r o g r a m s or s e g m e n t s of p r o g r a m s
with the characteristics described for class A. M a y assist a higher level operator b y independently
p e r f o r m i n g less difficult tasks assigned, a n d p e r f o r m i n g difficult tasks following detailed instructions
and with frequent review of operations p e r f o r m e d .
C l ass C . W o r k s on routine p r o g r a m s u n der close supervision. Is e xpected to develop w o r king
k n o w l e d g e of the c o m p u t e r e q u i p m e n t u s e d a n d ability to detect p r o b l e m s involved in running routine
p r o g r a m s . Usually has received s o m e f o r m a l training in c o m p u t e r operation. M a y assist higher level
operator on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .

C o n v e r t s statements of business p r o b l e m s , typically p r e p a r e d b y a s y s t e m s analyst, into a
sequence of detailed instructions w h i c h are required to solve the p r o b l e m s b y automatic data processing
equipment. W o r k i n g f r o m charts or d i a g r a m s , the p r o g r a m m e r develops the precise instructions which,
w h e n entered into the c o m p u t e r s y s t e m in c o d e d language, c a use the manipulation of data to achieve
desired results.
W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Applies k n o w l e d g e of c o m p u t e r capabilities,
m a t h e m a t i c s , logic e m p l o y e d b y c o m p u t e r s , and particular subject m a t t e r involved to analyze charts
and d i a g r a m s of the p r o b l e m to be p r o g r a m m e d ; develops sequ e n c e of p r o g r a m steps; writes detailed
flow charts to s h o w o r d e r in w h i c h data will be processed; converts these charts to c o d e d instructions
for m a c h i n e to follow; tests a n d corrects p r o g r a m s ; p r e p a r e s instructions for operating personnel
during production run; analyzes, reviews, and alters p r o g r a m s to increase operating efficiency or
adapt to n e w requirements; maintains re c o r d s of p r o g r a m de v e l o p m e n t a n d revisions. ( N O T E : W o r k e r s
pe r f o r m i n g both s y s t e m s analysis and p r o g r a m m i n g should be classified as s y s t e m s analysts if this is
the skill u s e d to d e t e r m i n e their pay.)
D o e s not include e m p l o y e e s primarily responsible for the m a n a g e m e n t or supervision of other
electronic data p rocessing e m p l o y e e s , or p r o g r a m m e r s p r imarily c o n c e r n e d with scientific and/ o r
engineering p r o b l e m s .
F o r w a g e study purposes,

programmers

are classified as follows:

Class A . W o r k s independently or und e r only general direction on c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s w h i c h
require c o m p e t e n c e in all p h a s e s of p r o g r a m m i n g concepts and practices.
Working f r o m diagrams
and charts w h i c h identify the nature of desired results, m a j o r processing steps to be accomplished,
and the relationships b e t w e e n various steps of the p r o b l e m solving routine; plans the full range
of p r o g r a m m i n g actions n e e d e d to efficiently utilize the c o m p u t e r s y s t e m in achieving desired
end products.
At this level, p r o g r a m m i n g is difficult b e c a u s e c o m p u t e r e q u i p m e n t m u s t be organized to
p r oduce several interrelated but diverse products f r o m n u m e r o u s a n d diverse data elements. A wi d e
variety and extensive n u m b e r of internal processing actions m u s t occur. Th i s requires such actions as
d e v e l opment of c o m m o n operations w h i c h can be reused, establishment of linkage points b e t w e e n
operations, adjustments to data w h e n p r o g r a m r e q u i r e m e n t s e x c e e d c o m p u t e r storage capacity, and
substantial manipulation and resequencing of data e l e m e n t s to f o r m a highly integrated p r o g r a m .
May

provide

functional

direction to l o w e r level p r o g r a m m e r s

w h o are

systems

analysts are classified as follows:

Class A . W o r k s independently or u n d e r only general direction on c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s involving
all p h a s e s of s y s t e m analysis.
P r o b l e m s are c o m p l e x b e c a u s e of diverse so u r c e s of input data and
multiple-use r equirements of output data. (F o r e x a m p l e , develops an integrated production scheduling,
inventory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis r e c o r d in w h i c h eve r y i t e m of e a c h type is
automatically p r o c e s s e d through the full s y s t e m of re c o r d s and appropriate followup actions are initiated
b y the computer.)
Confers with persons c o n c e r n e d to d e t e r m i n e the data pr o c e s s i n g p r o b l e m s and
advises subject-matter personnel on the implications of n e w or revised s y s t e m s of data processing
operations. M a k e s r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s , if needed, for approval of m a j o r s y s t e m s installations or ch a n g e s
and for obtaining equipment.
M a y provide functional direction to l o w e r level s y s t e m s analysts w h o are assigned to assist.
Class_B. W o r k s independently or u n d e r only general direction on p r o b l e m s that are relatively
u ncomplicated to analyze, plan, p r o g r a m , a n d operate. P r o b l e m s are of limited comple x i t y b e c a u s e
s o urces of input data are h o m o g e n e o u s and the output data are closely related. (F o r e x a m p l e , develops
s y s t e m s for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank, maintaining accounts receivable in a retail
establishment, or maintaining inventory accounts in a m a n u f a c t u r i n g or w h olesale establishment.)
Co n f e r s with p e rsons c o n c e r n e d to d e t e r m i n e the data proce s s i n g p r o b l e m s a n d advises subjectm a t t e r personnel on the implications of the data proce s s i n g s y s t e m s to be applied.
OR
W o r k s o n a s e g m e n t of a c o m p l e x data proces s i n g s c h e m e or s y s t e m , as d e scribed for class A.
W o r k s independently on routine a s s i g n m e n t s and receives instruction and guidance on c o m p l e x
assignments. W o r k is revi e w e d for a c c u r a c y of judg m e n t , c o m p l i a n c e with instructions, a n d to insure
p r o p e r alignment with the overall system.
Class_C.
W o r k s u n d e r i m m e d i a t e supervision, carrying out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. A s s i g n m e n t s are designed to develop and e x p a n d practical e x perience in the
application of proced u r e s and skills required for s y s t e m s analysis w o r k . F o r e x a m p l e , m a y assist a
higher level s y s t e m s analyst b y preparing the detailed specifications required b y p r o g r a m m e r s f r o m
information developed b y the higher level analyst.

assigned to assist.

C l ass B . W o r k s independently or u n d e r only general direction on relatively simple p r o g r a m s ,
or on simple s e g m e n t s of c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s . P r o g r a m s (or s e g m e n t s ) usually pr o c e s s information to
p r oduce data in t w o or three varied seque n c e s or formats.
Reports and listings are p r o d u c e d b y
refining, adapting, arraying, or m a k i n g m i n o r additions to or deletions f r o m input data w h i c h are
readily available.
Whi l e n u m e r o u s records m a y be processed, the data have b e e n refined in prior
actions so that the a c c u r a c y a n d sequencing of data can be tested b y using a few routine checks.
Typically, the p r o g r a m deals with routine r e c o rd-keeping type operations.
OR
W o r k s on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s (as described for class A) und e r close direction of a higher
level p r o g r a m m e r or supervisor.
M a y assist higher level p r o g r a m m e r b y independently p e r f o r m i n g
less difficult tasks assigned, a n d p e r f o r m i n g m o r e
difficult tasks und e r fairly close direction.
M a y guide or instruct l o w e r level p r o g r a m m e r s .
Class C . M a k e s practical applications of p r o g r a m m i n g practices and concepts usually learned
in f o rmal training courses.
A s s i g n m e n t s are designed to develop c o m p e t e n c e in the application of
standard p r o c e d u r e s to routine p r o b l e m s . R e c e i v e s close supervision on n e w aspects of assignments;
and w o r k is r e v i e w e d to verify its a c c u r a c y a n d c o n f o r m a n c e with required procedures.
C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S ANALYS T , BUSINESS
A n alyzes business p r o b l e m s to formulate p r o c e d u r e s for solving t h e m b y use of electronic
data processing equipment;
Dev e l o p s a c o m p l e t e description of all specifications n e e d e d to enable
p r o g r a m m e r s to p r e p a r e required digital c o m p u t e r p r o g r a m s .
W o r k involves m o s t of the following:
Analyzes subject-matter operations to be a u t o m a t e d and identifies conditions and criteria required to
achieve satisfactory results; specifies n u m b e r and types of records, files, and d o c u m e n t s to be used;
outlines actions to b e p e r f o r m e d b y pers o n n e l a n d c o m p u t e r s in sufficient detail for presentation to
m a n a g e m e n t a n d for p r o g r a m m i n g (typically this involves preparation of w o r k and data flow charts);
coordinates the de v e l o p m e n t of test p r o b l e m s and participates in trial runs of n e w a n d revised systems;
and r e c p m m e n d s e q u i p m e n t c h a n g e s to obtain m o r e effective overall operations.
(NOTE:
Workers
per f o r m i n g both s y s t e m s analysis and p r o g r a m m i n g should be classified as s y s t e m s analysts if this is
the skill u s e d to d e t e r m i n e their pay.)
D o e s not include e m p l o y e e s pr imarily responsible for the m a n a g e m e n t or supervision of other
electronic data processing e m p l o y e e s , or s y s t e m s analysts primarily c o n c e r n e d with scientific or
engineering p r o b l e m s .




F o r w a g e study purposes,

DRAFTER
Class A. Plans the graphic presentation of c o m p l e x i t ems having distinctive design features
that differ significantly f r o m established drafting precedents. W o r k s in close support with the design
originator, and m a y r e c o m m e n d m i n o r design changes.
A n a l y z e s the effect of e a c h c h a n g e on the
details of form, function, and positional relationships of c o m p o n e n t s a n d parts.
W o r k s with a
m i n i m u m of supervisory assistance. C o m p l e t e d w o r k is r e v i e w e d b y design originator for consistency
with prior engineering determinations. M a y either p r e p a r e d r awings, or direct their preparation by
l o w e r level drafters.
Class B . P e r f o r m s nonroutine and c o m p l e x drafting a s s i g n m e n t s that require the application
of m o s t of the standardized drawing techniques regularly used. Duties typically involve s u c h w o r k as:
P r e p a r e s w o rking d r a w i n g s of su b a s s e m b l i e s \yith irregular shapes, multiple functions, and precise
positional relationships b e t w e e n c o m p o n e n t s ; p r e p a r e s architectural d r a w i n g s for construction of a
building including detail d r awings of foundations, wall sections, floor plans, a n d roof. U s e s accepted
f o r m u l a s and m a n u a l s in m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y c o m p u t a t i o n s to d e t e r m i n e quantities of materials to be
used, load capacities, strengths, stresses, etc.
R e c e i v e s initial instructions, re q u i r e m e n t s , a n d
advice f r o m supervisor.
C o m p l e t e d w o r k is c h e c k e d for technical adequacy.
Class C . P r e p a r e s detail d r a w i n g s of single units or parts for engineering, construction,
manufacturing, or repair purposes.
T y p e s of d r a w i n g s p r e p a r e d include i s ometric projections
(depicting three d i m e n s i o n s in accurate scale) a n d sectional v i e w s to clarify positioning of c o m p o n e n t s
and c o n v e y n e e d e d information.
Consolidates details f r o m a n u m b e r of s o urces and adjusts or
transp o s e s scale as required.
Suggested m e t h o d s of a pproach, applicable precedents, a n d advice on
s o u r c e materials are given with initial a s signments. Instructions are less c o m p l e t e w h e n a s s i g n m e n t s
recur.
W o r k m a y be spot-checked during progress.
DRAFTER-TRACER
Copies plans and draw i n g s p r e p a r e d b y others b y placing tracing cloth or p a p e r o v e r d r a w i n g s
and tracing with pen or pencil.
(Does not include tracing limited to plans prima r i l y consisting of
straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
AND/OR
P r e p a r e s simple or repetitive d r a w i n g s of easily visualized items.
during progress.

W o r k is closely s upervised

W o r k s on
c o m b in a t i o n o f th e
c o n s t r u c t i n g , and
p r in c ip le s , a b ility

v a r i o u s t y p e s o f e l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t a n d r e l a t e d d e v i c e s b y p e r f o r m i n g o n e o r a
fo llo w in g : I n s t a llin g , m a in ta in in g , r e p a ir in g , o v e r h a u lin g , t r o u b le s h o o t in g , m o d ify in g ,
te s tin g .
W o r k r e q u i r e s p r a c t i c a l a p p lic a t io n o f t e c h n ic a l k n o w le d g e o f e l e c t r o n i c s
t o d e t e r m i n e m a l f u n c t i o n s , a n d s k i l l t o p u t e q u ip m e n t in r e q u i r e d o p e r a t i n g c o n d i t i o n .

C l a s s B . A p p l i e s c o m p r e h e n s i v e t e c h n i c a l k n o w l e d g e t o s o l v e C o m p le x p r o b l e m s ( i . e . , t h o s e
th a t . t y p ic a l ly ca n b e
s o lv e d s o le ly
by p r o p e r ly
i n t e r p r e t i n g m a n u f a c t u r e r s ' m a n u a ls o r s i m i l a r
d o c u m e n t s ) in w o r k i n g o n e l e c t r o n i c e q u i p m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s :
A f a m i l i a r i t y w it h th e i n t e r r e l a t i o n ­
s h i p s o f c i r c u i t s ; a n d j u d g m e n t in d e t e r m i n i n g w o r k s e q u e n c e a n d in s e l e c t i n g t o o l s - a n d t e s t i n g
i n s t r u m e n t s , u s u a l l y l e s s c o m p l e x th a n t h o s e u s e d b y t h e c l a s s A t e c h n i c i a n .

T h e e q u ip m e n t— c o n s i s t i n g o f e it h e r m a n y d iffe r e n t k in d s o f c i r c u i t s o r m u lt i p l e r e p e t it io n o f
t h e s a m e k in d o f c i r c u i t — i n c l u d e s , b u t i s n o t l i m i t e d t o , t h e f o l l o w i n g :
(a ) E l e c t r o n i c t r a n s m i t t i n g
an d r e c e i v i n g e q u ip m e n t ( e . g . , r a d a r ,
r a d io , t e le v is io n , t e le p h o n e ,
s o n a r , n a v i g a t i o n a l a i d s ) , (b )
d i g i t a l a n d a n a lo g c o m p u t e r s , a n d ( c ) i n d u s t r i a l an d m e d i c a l m e a s u r i n g and c o n t r o l l i n g e q u i p m e n t .

R e c e iv e s t e c h n ic a l g u id a n c e , as r e q u ir e d , fr o m
s u p e r v i s o r o r h i g h e r l e v e l t e c h n ic i a n - , an d
w o r k i s r e v i e w e d f o r s p e c i f i c c o m p l i a n c e w it h a c c e p t e d p r a c t i c e s a n d w o r k a s s i g n m e n t s .
M a y p r o v id e
t e c h n ic a l g u id a n c e t o lo w e r l e v e l t e c h n ic ia n s .

T h i s c l a s s i f i c a t i o n e x c l u d e s r e p a i r e r s o f s u c h s t a n d a r d e l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t a s c o m m o n o f f i c e
m a c h in e s and h o u s e h o ld r a d io an d t e le v is io n s e t s ; p r o d u c tio n a s s e m b l e r s and t e s t e r s ; w o r k e r s w h o s e
p r im a r y
d u ty is
s e r v ic in g
e le c tr o n ic
te s t
in s tr u m e n ts ; te c h n ic ia n s w h o h a v e
a d m in is t r a t iv e o r
s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s ib ilit y ; and d r a ft e r s , d e s ig n e r s , and p r o fe s s io n a l e n g in e e r s .

G l a s s C . A p p l i e s w o r k i n g t e c h n i c a l k n o w l e d g e t o p e r f o r m s i m p l e o r r o u t in e t a s k s in w o r k i n g
on e l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t, f o ll o w in g d e t a ile d i n s t r u c t io n s w h ic h c o v e r v i r t u a lly a ll p r o c e d u r e s .
W ork
t y p ic a lly in v o lv e s s u c h ta s k s a s :
A s s i s t i n g h ig h e r l e v e l t e c h n ic i a n s b y p e r f o r m in g s u c h a c t iv it ie s as
r e p l a c i n g c o m p o n e n t s , w i r i n g c i r c u i t s , a n d t a k i n g t e s t r e a d i n g s ; r e p a i r i n g s i m p l e e l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t ;
a n d u s in g t o o l s an d c o m m o n t e s t i n s t r u m e n t s ( e . g . , m u l t i m e t e r s , a u d io s i g n a l g e n e r a t o r s , t u b e t e s t e r s ,
o s c i l l o s c o p e s ) . Is n o t r e q u ir e d t o b e f a m i l i a r w ith th e i n t e r r e l a t io n s h ip s o f c i r c u i t s .
T h is k n o w le d g e ,
h o w e v e r , m a y b e a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a s s i g n m e n t s d e s i g n e d t o i n c r e a s e c o m p e t e n c e ( in c l u d i n g c l a s s r o o m
t r a i n i n g ) s o th a t w o r k e r c a n a d v a n c e t o h i g h e r l e v e l t e c h n i c i a n .

P o s itio n s

a re

c la s s ifie d

in t o

le v e ls

o n th e

b a s is

o f th e

fo llo w in g

d e fin it io n s .

R e c e iv e s t e c h n ic a l g u id a n c e , a s r e q u ir e d , f r o m s u p e r v is o r o r h ig h e r le v e l te c h n ic ia n . W o rk
is t y p i c a l l y s p o t c h e c k e d , bu t is g iv e n d e t a ile d r e v i e w w h e n n e w o r a d v a n c e d a s s ig n m e n t s a r e in v o lv e d .

G la s s A .
A p p l i e s a d v a n c e d t e c h n i c a l k n o w l e d g e t o s o l v e u n u s u a lly c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s ( i . e . ,
t h o s e th a t t y p i c a l l y c a n n o t b e s o l v e d s o l e l y b y
r e f e r e n c e to m a n u f a c t u r e r s ' m a n u a ls o r s i m i l a r
d o c u m e n t s ) in w o r k i n g o n e l e c t r o n i c e q u i p m e n t .
E x a m p l e s o f s u c h p r o b l e m s i n c l u d e l o c a t i o n an d
d e n s ity o f c ir c u i t r y ,
e le c t r o - m a g n e t ic r a d ia t io n ,
is o la t in g m a lfu n c t io n s ,
an d f r e q u e n t e n g i n e e r i n g
ch an ges.
W o rk in v o lv e s :
A d e t a ile d u n d e r s ta n d in g o f th e in t e r r e l a t io n s h ip s o f c i r c u i t s ; e x e r c i s i n g
i n d e p e n d e n t j u d g m e n t in p e r f o r m i n g s u c h t a s k s a s m a k i n g c i r c u i t a n a l y s e s , c a l c u l a t i n g w a v e f o r m s ,
t r a c i n g r e l a t i o n s h i p s in s i g n a l f l o w ; a n d r e g u l a r l y u s in g c o m p l e x t e s t i n s t r u m e n t s ' ( e . g . , d u a l t r a c e
o s c i l l o s c o p e s , Q - m e t e r s , d e v ia t io n m e t e r s , p u ls e g e n e r a t o r s ) .
W ork
m a y b e re v ie w e d
by
c o m p lia n c e w ith
a cce p te d p r a c t ic e s .

s u p e r v is o r
( f r e q u e n t l y an e n g i n e e r o r d e s i g n e r )
M ay
p r o v id e t e c h n ic a l g u id a n ce t o lo w e r l e v e l

fo r g en era l
t e c h n ic ia n s .

N U R S E , IN D U S T R IA L (R e g is te r e d )
A r e g i s t e r e d n u r s e w h o g i v e s n u r s in g s e r v i c e u n d e r g e n e r a l m e d i c a l d ir e c t io n t o i l l o r in ju r e d
e m p l o y e e s o r o t h e r p e r s o n s w h o b e c o m e i l l o r s u f f e r an a c c i d e n t o n t h e p r e m i s e s o f a f a c t o r y o r
o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t .
D u t ie s i n v o l v e a c o m b i n a t i o n o f t h e f o l l o w i n g :
G i v i n g f i r s t a id t o t h e i l l o r
i n j u r e d ; a t t e n d in g t o s u b s e q u e n t d r e s s i n g o f e m p l o y e e s ' i n j u r i e s ; k e e p i n g r e c o r d s o f p a t ie n t s t r e a t e d ;
p r e p a r i n g a c c i d e n t r e p o r t s f o r c o m p e n s a t i o n o r o t h e r p u r p o s e s ; a s s i s t i n g in p h y s i c a l e x a m i n a t i o n s a n d
h e a l t h e v a l u a t i o n s o f a p p l i c a n t s a n d e m p l o y e e s ; a n d p la n n in g a n d c a r r y i n g o u t p r o g r a m s i n v o l v i n g h e a lt h
e d u c a t i o n , a c c i d e n t p r e v e n t i o n , e v a l u a t i o n o f p la n t e n v i r o n m e n t , o r o t h e r a c t i v i t i e s a f f e c t i n g t h e h e a lt h ,
w e lf a r e , and s a fe ty o f a ll p e r s o n n e l.
N u r s i n g s u p e r v i s o r s o r h e a d n u r s e s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g
m o r e th a n on e n u r s e a r e e x c lu d e d .

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
B O IL E R T E N D E R

H E L P E R , M A IN T E N A N C E T R A D E S

F ir e s
s t a t i o n a r y b o i l e r s t o f u r n i s h t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t in w h i c h e m p l o y e d w it h h e a t , p o w e r ,
o r stea m .
F e e d s fu e ls t o f ir e b y h a n d o r o p e r a t e s a m e c h a n ic a l s t o k e r , g a s , o r o il b u r n e r ; and
c h e ck s w a ter
and s a fe ty v a lv e s .
M ay
c le a n ,
o il,
o r a s sist
in r e p a i r i n g b o i l e r r o o m
e q u ip m e n t.

A s s i s t s o n e o r m o r e w o r k e r s in t h e s k i l l e d m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s , b y p e r f o r m i n g s p e c i f i c o r
g e n e r a l d u t i e s o f l e s s e r s k i l l , s u c h a s k e e p i n g a w o r k e r s u p p l i e d w it h m a t e r i a l s a n d t o o l s ; c l e a n i n g
w o r k in g a r e a , m a c h in e , an d e q u ip m e n t ;
a s s is t in g jo u r n e y m a n
b y h o ld in g m a t e r ia l s o r t o o l s ; and
p e r fo r m in g o th e r u n s k ille d ta s k s as d ir e c t e d b y jo u r n e y m a n .
T h e k in d o f w o r k th e h e lp e r is p e r m it t e d
to p e r fo r m v a r ie s fr o m tra d e to tr a d e :
In s o m e t r a d e s t h e h e l p e r i s c o n f i n e d t o s u p p l y i n g , l i f t i n g ,
a n d h o l d i n g m a t e r i a l s a n d t o o l s , a n d c l e a n i n g w o r k i n g a r e a s ; a n d in o t h e r s h e i s p e r m i t t e d t o p e r f o r m
s p e c ia liz e d
m a c h in e
o p e r a tio n s , o r p a rts
o f a t r a d e th a t a r e
a ls o p e r f o r m e d b y w o r k e r s on a
fu ll-t im e b a s is .

CARPENTER,

M A IN T E N A N C E

P e r f o r m s t h e c a r p e n t r y d u t i e s n e c e s s a r y t o c o n s t r u c t a n d m a in t a i n in g o o d r e p a i r b u i l d i n g
w o o d w o r k a n d e q u ip m e n t s u c h as b i n s , c r i b s , c o u n t e r s , b e n c h e s , p a r t it io n s , d o o r s , f l o o r s , s t a i r s ,
c a s i n g s , a n d t r i m m a d e o f w o o d in an e s t a b l i s h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : P la n n i n g
a n d l a y i n g o u t o f w o r k f r o m b l u e p r i n t s , d r a w i n g s , m o d e l s , o r v e r b a l i n s t r u c t i o n s ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f
c a r p e n t e r 's h a n d t o o l s , p o r t a b l e p o w e r t o o l s , a n d s t a n d a r d m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; m a k i n g s t a n d a r d
s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o d i m e n s i o n s o f w o r k ; an d s e l e c t i n g m a t e r i a l s n e c e s s a r y f o r th e w o r k .
In
g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e c a r p e n t e r r e q u ir e s r o u n d e d tr a in in g an d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a lly
a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
E L E C T R IC IA N ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c a l t r a d e fu n c t i o n s s u c h a s th e i n s t a l l a t i o n , m a i n t e n a n c e , o r
r e p a i r o f e q u i p m e n t f o r t h e g e n e r a t i o n , d i s t r i b u t i o n , o r u t i l i z a t i o n o f e l e c t r i c e n e r g y in an e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
W o r k i n v o lv e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : I n s t a llin g o r r e p a ir in g an y o f a v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t
s u c h a s g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , s w i t c h b o a r d s , c o n t r o l l e r s , c i r c u i t b r e a k e r s , m o t o r s , h e a t i n g u n it s ,
c o n d u it s y s t e m s , o r o t h e r t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k in g f r o m b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , la y o u t s , o r
o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; l o c a t i n g a n d d i a g n o s i n g t r o u b l e in t h e e l e c t r i c a l s y s t e m o r e q u i p m e n t ; w o r k i n g
s t a n d a r d c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o l o a d r e q u i r e m e n t s o f w i r i n g o r e l e c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t ; a n d u s in g a
v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c i a n 's h a n d t o o l s a n d m e a s u r i n g a n d t e s t i n g i n s t r u m e n t s .
In g e n e r a l , t h e w o r k o f th e
m a in t e n a n c e e l e c t r i c i a n r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
E N G IN E E R , S T A T IO N A R Y
O p e r a t e s a n d m a i n t a i n s a n d m a y a l s o s u p e r v i s e t h e o p e r a t i o n o f s t a t i o n a r y e n g i n e s an d
e q u i p m e n t ( m e c h a n i c a l o r e l e c t r i c a l ) t o s u p p l y t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t in w h i c h e m p l o y e d w it h p o w e r , h e a t ,
r e fr ig e r a tio n , o r
a ir -c o n d itio n in g .
W o r k in v o lv e s :
O p e r a tin g
a n d m a in t a i n in g e q u i p m e n t s u c h a s
s t e a m e n g i n e s , a i r c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o t o r s , t u r b i n e s , v e n t i l a t i n g and r e f r i g e r a t i n g e q u i p m e n t ,
s t e a m b o i l e r s a n d b o i l e r - f e d w a t e r p u m p s ; m a k i n g e q u ip m e n t r e p a i r s ; a n d k e e p in g a r e c o r d o f o p e r a t i o n
o f m a c h in e r y , t e m p e r a t u r e , and fu e l c o n s u m p tio n .
M a y a ls o s u p e r v is e t h e s e o p e r a t io n s .
H ead o r
c h i e f e n g i n e e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g m o r e th a n o n e e n g i n e e r a r e e x c l u d e d .




M A C H I N E -T O O L O P E R A T O R , T O O L R O O M
S p e c i a l i z e s in o p e r a t i n g o n e o r m o r e th a n o n e t y p e o f m a c h i n e t o o l ( e . g . , j i g b o r e r , g r i n d i n g
m a c h i n e , e n g i n e l a t h e , m i l l i n g m a c h i n e ) t o m a c h i n e m e t a l f o r u s e in m a k i n g o r m a i n t a i n i n g j i g s ,
f i x t u r e s , c u t t in g t o o l s , g a u g e s , o r m e t a l d i e s o r m o l d s u s e d in s h a p i n g o r f o r m i n g m e t a l o r n o n m e t a l l i c
m a te r ia l (e .g ., p la s t ic , p la s te r , r u b b e r , g la s s ).
W ork ty p ic a lly in v o lv e s :
P la n n in g - a n d p e r f o r m i n g
d i f f i c u l t m a c h i n i n g o p e r a t i o n s w h i c h r e q u i r e c o m p l i c a t e d s e t u p s o r a h ig h d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ; s e t t in g
u p m a c h i n e t o o l o r t o o l s ( e . g . , i n s t a l l c u t t in g t o o l s a n d a d ju s t g u i d e s , s t o p s , w o r k i n g t a b l e s , a n d o t h e r
c o n t r o l s t o h a n d le t h e s i z e o f s t o c k t o b e m a c h i n e d ; d e t e r m i n e p r o p e r f e e d s , s p e e d s , t o o l i n g , a n d
o p e r a t i o n s e q u e n c e o r s e l e c t t h o s e p r e s c r i b e d in d r a w i n g s , b l u e p r i n t s , o r l a y o u t s ) ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f
p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s d u r i n g m a c h i n i n g o p e r a t i o n t o a c h i e v e
r e q u is it e d im e n s io n s t o v e r y c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s .
M a y b e r e q u i r e d t o s e l e c t p r o p e r c o o l a n t s a n d c u t t in g
and lu b r ic a t in g o i l s , t o r e c o g n iz e w h en t o o ls n e e d d r e s s in g , an d t o d r e s s t o o ls .
In g e n e r a l , t h e w o r k
o f a m a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r , t o o l r o o m , at t h e s k i l l l e v e l c a l l e d f o r in t h i s c l a s s i f i c a t i o n r e q u i r e s
e x t e n s iv e k n o w le d g e o f m a c h in e - s h o p and t o o l r o o m p r a c t i c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d th r o u g h c o n s id e r a b le
o n - t h e - jo b tr a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s , t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n
o p e r a t o r s , t o o l r o o m , e m p l o y e d in t o o l - a n d - d i e j o b b i n g s h o p s .

M A C H IN IS T ,

does

not

in c lu d e m a c h in e - t o o l

M A IN T E N A N C E

P r o d u c e s r e p l a c e m e n t p a r t s a n d n e w p a r t s in m a k i n g r e p a i r s o f m e t a l p a r t s o f m e c h a n i c a l
e q u i p m e n t o p e r a t e d in an e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f th e f o ll o w in g :
i n t e r p r e t i n g w r it t e n
i n s t r u c t i o n s a n d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; p la n n in g a n d l a y i n g o u t o f w o r k ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f m a c h i n i s t 's h a n d t o o ls
an d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; s e t t i n g u p a n d o p e r a t i n g s t a n d a r d m a c h i n e t o o l s ; s h a p i n g o f m e t a l

parts to close tolerances; m a k i n g standard shop computations relating to d i m e n s i o n s of w o r k , tooling,
feeds, and speeds of machining; k n o w l e d g e of the w o r k i n g properties of the c o m m o n metals; selecting
standard materials, parts, a n d e q u i p m e n t required for this w o rk; and fitting and as s e m b l i n g parts into
m e c h a n i c a l equipment.
In general, the machinist's w o r k n o r m a l l y requires a ro u n d e d training in
m a c h i n e - s h o p practice usually acquired through a f o r m a l apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.
MECHANIC,

Paints and redecorates walls, w o o d w o r k , and fixtures of an establishment. \\Tork involves the
following; K n o w l e d g e of surface peculiarities and types of paint required for different applications;
preparing surface for painting b y r e m o v i n g old finish or b y placing putty or filler in nail holes and
interstices; and applying paint with spray g u n or brush. M a y m i x colors, oils, white lead, and other
paint ingredients to obtain p r o p e r color or consistency.
In general, the w o r k of the m a i n t e n a n c e
painter requires r o unded training and experience usually acquired t h rough a f o r m a l apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.

A U T O M O T I V E (Maintenance)
PIPEFITTER, M A I N T E N A N C E

R e pairs automobiles, buses, m o t o rtrucks, and tractors of an establishment.
W o r k involves
m o s t of the following: E x a m i n i n g automotive e q u i p m e n t to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling
equip m e n t and p e r f o r m i n g repairs that involve the use of such handtools as w r e n c h e s , gauges, drills,
or specialized e q u i p m e n t in d i s a s sembling or fitting parts; replacing b r o k e n ojr defective parts f r o m
stock; grinding and adjusting valves; r e a s s e m b l i n g a n d installing the various as s e m b l i e s in the vehicle
and m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y adjustments; and aligning wheels, adjusting b r a k e s and lights, or tightening bo d y
bolts. In general, the w o r k of the automotive m e c h a n i c requires r o u n d e d training and experience usually
acquired through a f o r m a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

This classification does not include m e c h a n i c s w h o repair cu s t o m e r s ' vehicles in automobile
repair shops.

MECHANIC,

MAINTENANCE

Repairs m a c h i n e r y or m e c h a n i c a l e q u i p m e n t of an establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the
following; E x a m i n i n g m a c h i n e s and m e c h a n i c a l e q u i p m e n t to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling
or partly dismantling m a c h i n e s and p e r f o r m i n g repairs that m a i n l y involve the use of handtools in
scraping and fitting parts; replacing b r o k e n or defective parts with items obtained f r o m stock; ordering
the production of a r e p l a c e m e n t part b y a m a c h i n e shop or sending of the m a c h i n e to a m a c h i n e shop
for m a j o r repairs; preparing written specifications for m a j o r repairs or for the production of parts
o r dered f r o m m a c h i n e shops; r e a s s e m b l i n g m a c h i n e s ; and m a k i n g all n e c e s s a r y adjustments for
operation. In general, the w o r k of a m a i n t e n a n c e m e c h a n i c requires r o u n d e d training and experience
usually acquired through a f o r m a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. E x c l u d e d f r o m
this classification are w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y duties involve setting up or adjusting machi n e s .

MILLWRIGHT
Installs n e w m a c h i n e s or h e a v y equipment, and dismantles and installs m a c h i n e s or h e a v y
e q uipment w h e n ch a n g e s in the plant layout are required.
W o r k involves m o s t of the following;
Planning and laying out of the w o r k ; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a variety of
handtools and rigging; m a k i n g standard shop computations relating to stresses, strength of materials,
and centers of gravity; aligning and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment, and
parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in g o o d order p o w e r trans m i s s i o n e q u i p m e n t such as
drives and s peed reducers. In general, the millwright's w o r k n o r m a l l y requires a r o u n d e d training and
experience in the trade acquired through a f o r m a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and pipefittings fn an establish­
ment.
W o r k involves m o s t of the following; L a y i n g out of w o r k a n d m e a s u r i n g to locate position of
pipe f r o m drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct lengths
with chisel and h a m m e r or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting m a c h i n e s ; threading pipe with stocks and
dies; bending pipe b y hand-driven or p o w e r - d r i v e n m a c h i n e s ; a s s e m b l i n g pipe with couplings and
fastening pipe to hangers; m a k i n g standard sh o p c o mputations relating to pressures, flow, a n d size of
pipe required; and m a k i n g standard tests to d e t e r m i n e w h e t h e r finished pipes m e e t specifications. In
general, the w o r k of the m a i n t e n a n c e pipefitter requires r o u n d e d training and experience usually
acquired through a f o r m a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
W o r k e r s primarily
e n g a g e d in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating s y s t e m s are e x c l u d e d .
SHEET-METAL WORKER,

MAINTENANCE

Fabricates, installs, and maintains in g o o d repair the s h e e t -metal e q u i p m e n t and fixtures (such
as m a c h i n e guards, grease pans, shelves, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, m e t a l roofing)
of an establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the following; Planning and laying out all types of sheetm e t a l m a i n t e n a n c e w o r k f r o m blueprints, m o d e l s , or other specifications; setting up and operating all
available types of sheet-metal wo r k i n g m a c h i n e s ; using a variety of handtools in cutting, bending,
forming, shaping, fitting, and assembling; and installing s h e e t -metal articles as required. In general,
the w o r k of the m a i n t e n a n c e sheet-metal w o r k e r requires r o u n d e d training and experience usually
acquired through a f o r m a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R
Constructs and repairs jigs, fixtures, cutting tools, gauges, or m e t a l dies or m o l d s u s e d in
shaping or forming m e t a l or non-metallic m a terial (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass).
Work
typically involves: Planning and laying out w o r k according to m o d e l s , blueprints, drawings, or other
written or oral specifications; understanding the w o r k i n g properties of c o m m o n m e t a l s a n d alloys;
selecting appropriate materials, tools, and p r o c e s s e s required to c o m p l e t e task; m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y
shop computation; setting up and operating various m a c h i n e tools and related equipment; using various
tool and die m a k e r ' s handtools and precision m e a s u r i n g instruments; w o r k i n g to v e r y close tolerances;
heat-treating m e t a l parts and finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities; fitting and
a s s e m b l i n g parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances.
In general, tool and die m a k e r ' s w o r k
requires rounded training in m a c h i n e - s h o p and t o o l r o o m practice usually acquired th r o u g h f o r m a l
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
F o r cross-industry w a g e study purp o s e s , this classification does not include tool and die
m a k e r s w h o (1) are e m p l o y e d in tool and die jobbing shops or (2) p r o d u c e forging dies (die sinkers).

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND W A T C H M E N

LABORER,

G u a r d . P e r f o r m s routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour, maintaining order,
using, a r m s or force w h e r e necessary.
Includes g u ards w h o are stationed at gate a n d c h e c k on
identity of e m p l o y e e s and other p e r s o n s entering.

A w o r k e r e m p l o y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u f a c t u r i n g plant, store, or other establishment w h o s e
duties involve one or m o r e of the following; L o a d i n g a n d unloading various materials and m e r c h a n d i s e
on or f r o m freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving, or placing
materials or m e r c h a n d i s e in p r o p e r storage location; a n d transporting materials or m e r c h a n d i s e by
handtruck, car, or w h e e l b a r r o w . L o n g s h o r e w o r k e r s , w h o load an d unload ships are e x c l u d e d .

MATERIAL HANDLING
X

Watchman.
and illegal entry.

Makes

JANITOR,

OR CLEANER

PORTER,

rounds of p r e m i s e s periodically in protecting property against fire, theft,

Clea n s and k e eps in an orderly condition factory w o r k i n g areas and w a s h r o o m s , or p r e m i s e s
of an office, a p a r t m e n t house, or c o m m e r c i a l or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of
the following; Sweeping, m o p p i n g or scrubbing, and polishing floors; r e m o v i n g chips, trash, and other
refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing m e t a l fixtures or t r i m m i n g s ; providing
supplies and m i n o r m a i n t e n a n c e services; and cleaning lavatories, s h owers, and r e strooms. W o r k e r s
w h o specialize in w i n d o w w a s h i n g are excl u d e d .




O R D E R FILLER
Fills shipping or transfer o rders for finished g o o d s f r o m stored m e r c h a n d i s e in a c c o r d a n c e
with specifications on sales slips, c u s t o m e r s ' orders, or other instructions.
M a y , in addition to
filling orders and indicating ite m s filled or omitted, k e e p rec o r d s of outgoing orders, requisition
additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, a n d p e r f o r m other related duties
PACKER,

SHIPPING

P r e p a r e s finished products for s h i p m e n t or storage b y placing t h e m in shipping containers,
the specific operations p e r f o r m e d being d ependent up o n the type, size, and n u m b e r of units to be
packed, the type of container e m p l o y e d , a n d m e t h o d of shipment. W o r k requires the placing of items
in shipping containers and m a y involve one or m o r e of the following; K n o w l e d g e of various ite m s of

s tock
in o r d e r t o v e r i f y
co n te n t;
s e le c t io n o f a p p r o p r ia t e
ty p e and s iz e o f c o n t a in e r ; in s e r t in g
e n c l o s u r e s in c o n t a i n e r ; u s i n g e x c e l s i o r o r o t h e r m a t e r i a l t o p r e v e n t b r e a k a g e o r d a m a g e ; c l o s i n g a n d
s e a l i n g c o n t a i n e r ; a n d a p p l y in g l a b e l s o r e n t e r i n g i d e n t i f y i n g d a t a on c o n t a i n e r .
P a c k e r s w h o a ls o m a k e
w o o d e n b o x e s o r c r a t e s a re e x c lu d e d .

fo llo w s :

T
T
T
T
T

S H IP P IN G A N D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K
P r e p a r e s m e r c h a n d is e f o r s h ip m e n t , o r r e c e i v e s and is r e s p o n s ib l e f o r in c o m i n g s h ip m e n ts
o f m e r c h a n d is e o r o th e r m a t e r ia ls .
S h ip p i n g w o r k i n v o l v e s :
A k n o w l e d g e o f s h ip p i n g p r o c e d u r e s ,
p r a c t i c e s , r o u t e s , a v a ila b le m e a n s o f t r a n s p o r t a t io n , an d r a t e s ; and p r e p a r in g r e c o r d s o f th e g o o d s
s h i p p e d , m a k i n g u p b i l l s o f l a d i n g , p o s t i n g w e i g h t a n d s h ip p i n g c h a r g e s , a n d k e e p i n g a f i l e o f s h ip p i n g
record s.
M a y d i r e c t o r a s s i s t in p r e p a r i n g t h e m e r c h a n d i s e f o r s h ip m e n t . R e c e i v i n g w o r k i n v o l v e s :
V e r i f y i n g o r d i r e c t i n g o t h e r s in v e r i f y i n g t h e c o r r e c t n e s s o f s h i p m e n t s a g a i n s t b i l l s o f l a d i n g , i n v o i c e s ,
o r o th e r r e c o r d s ;
c h e c k in g fo r s h o r ta g e s and r e je c tin g d a m a g e d
g o o d s ; r o u tin g m e r c h a n d is e o r
m a t e r ia l s t o p r o p e r d e p a r t m e n t s ; an d m a in ta in in g n e c e s s a r y r e c o r d s an d f il e s .

F or

w age

stu d y p u r p o s e s ,

w ork ers

a re

c la s s ifie d

as fo llo w s :

R e c e iv in g c le r k
S h ip p i n g c l e r k
S h ip p i n g a n d r e c e i v i n g c l e r k

T R U C K D R IV E R
D r i v e s a t r u c k w it h i n a c i t y o r i n d u s t r i a l a r e a t o t r a n s p o r t m a t e r i a l s , m e r c h a n d i s e , e q u i p m e n t ,
o r w o r k e r s b e t w e e n v a r i o u s t y p e s o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s u c h a s : M a n u f a c t u r in g p l a n t s , f r e i g h t
d ep ots,
w a r e h o u s e s , w h o le s a le and r e t a il e s t a b lis h m e n t s , o r b e tw e e n r e t a il e s ta b lis h m e n t s and c u s t o m e r s '
h o u s e s o r p la c e s o f b u s in e s s .
M a y a l s o l o a d o r u n lo a d t r u c k w it h o r w it h o u t h e l p e r s , m a k e m i n o r
m e c h a n ic a l
r e p a i r s , a n d k e e p t r u c k in g o o d w o r k i n g o r d e r .
S a le s - r o u t e and o v e r - t h e - r o a d d r iv e r s
a r e e x c lu d e d .




F o r w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s ,
( T r a c t o r - t r a i l e r s h o u ld b e

ty p e

o f e q u ip m e n t,

as

r u c k d r iv e r (c o m b in a t io n o f s iz e s lis t e d s e p a r a t e ly )
r u c k d r i v e r , l i g h t ( u n d e r IV 2 t o n s )
r u c k d r i v e r , m e d i u m ( 1 V2 t o a n d i n c l u d i n g 4 t o n s )
r u c k d r iv e r , h ea v y (o v e r 4 to n s , t r a ile r ty p e )
r u c k d r iv e r , h e a v y ( o v e r 4 t o n s , o th e r th a n t r a i l e r t y p e )

TRUCKER,

goods

tr u c k d r iv e r s a re c la s s ifie d b y s iz e and
r a t e d on t h e b a s i s o f t r a i l e r c a p a c i t y . )

POW ER

O p e r a t e s a m a n u a lly c o n t r o l l e d g a s o l i n e - o r e l e c t r i c - p o w e r e d t r u c k o r t r a c t o r to t r a n s p o r t
a n d m a t e r i a l s o f a ll k in d s a b o u t a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c t u r in g p la n t, o r o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t .
F or w age
T ru cker,
T ru cker,

s tu d y p u r p o s e s ,

w ork ers

a re

c la s s ifie d

b y ty p e

o f tru ck ,

as

fo llo w s :

p o w e r (fo r k lift)
p o w e r ( o t h e r th a n f o r k l i f t )

W AREH OU SEM AN
A s d i r e c t e d , p e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f w a r e h o u s i n g d u t ie s w h i c h r e q u i r e an u n d e r s t a n d in g o f
t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t 's s t o r a g e p l a n .
W o r k in v o lv e s
m o s t o f th e
fo llo w in g :
V e r ify in g m a te r ia ls (o r
m e r c h a n d i s e ) a g a i n s t r e c e i v i n g d o c u m e n t s , n o t in g a n d r e p o r t i n g d i s c r e p a n c i e s a n d o b v i o u s d a m a g e s ;
r o u t in g
m a t e r ia ls
to p r e s c r ib e d sto ra g e
lo c a t i o n s ; s t o r in g , s t a c k in g , o r
p a l l e t i z i n g m a t e r i a l s in
a c c o r d a n c e w it h p r e s c r i b e d s t o r a g e m e t h o d s ; r e a r r a n g i n g a n d t a k i n g i n v e n t o r y o f s t o r e d m a t e r i a l s ;
e x a m in in g s t o r e d m a t e r ia l s and r e p o r t in g d e t e r io r a t io n and d a m a g e ; r e m o v i n g m a t e r ia l f r o m s t o r a g e
a n d p r e p a r i n g it f o r s h i p m e n t .
M a y o p e r a t e h a n d o r p o w e r t r u c k s in p e r f o r m i n g w a r e h o u s i n g d u t i e s .
E x c l u d e w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y d u t i e s i n v o l v e s h ip p i n g a n d r e c e i v i n g w o r k ( s e e s h ip p i n g a n d
r e c e i v i n g c l e r k and p a c k e r , s h ip p in g ), o r d e r fil lin g ( s e e o r d e r f i l l e r ) , o r o p e r a t in g p o w e r t r u c k s (s e e
t r u c k e r , p o w e r ).

Available On Request—
T h e fo llo w in g a r e a s a re s u r v e y e d p e r io d ic a lly fo r
a n y o f th e B L S r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s s h ow n on th e b a c k c o v e r .

u se

in

a d m in is te r in g

th e

S e r v ic e

C on tra ct A ct o f

A la s k a
A lb a n y , G a.
A lb u q u e r q u e , N . M e x .
A le x a n d r ia , L a.
A lp e n a , S ta n d is h , an d T a w a s C it y , M ic h .
A n n A r b o r , M ic h .
A s h e v i l l e , N .C .
A t l a n t i c C i t y , N .J .
A u g u s t a , G a .—S .C .
B a k e r s f ie l d , C a lif.
B a ton R o u g e , L a .
B a ttle C r e e k , M ic h .
B e a u m o n t —P o r t A r t h u r —O r a n g e , T e x .
B i l o x i —G u l f p o r t a n d P a s c a g o u l a , M i s s .
B o is e C it y , Ida h o
B r e m e r to n , W ash.
B r id g e p o r t , N o r w a lk , and S ta m fo r d , C on n .
B r u n s w ic k , G a.
B u r l i n g t o n , V t .—N .Y .
C ape C od , M a ss.
C e d a r R a p id s , Io w a
C h a m p a ig n —U r b a n a —R a n t o u l , 111.
C h a r l e s t o n , S .C .
C h a r l o t t e —G a s t o n i a , N .C .
C h eyen n e, W yo.
C l a r k s v i l l e —H o p k i n s v i l l e , T e n n .—K y .
C o lo r a d o S p r in g s , C o lo .
C o l u m b i a , S .C .
C o l u m b u s , G a .—A l a .
C o lu m b u s , M is s .
C r a n e , Ind.
D e c a t u r , 111.
D e s M o in e s , Iow a
D o th a n , A la .
D u lu th —S u p e r i o r , M in n .—W i s .
E l P a s o , T e x . , a n d A l a m o g o r d o —L a s C r u c e s , N . M e x .
E u g e n e —S p r i n g f i e l d , O r e g .
F a y e t t e v i l l e , N .C .
F i t c h b u r g —L e o m i n s t e r , M a s s .
F o r t S m it h , A 'r k .—O k l a .
F o r t W a y n e , In d.
F r e d e r i c k — a g e r s t o w n , M d .—C h a m b e r s b u r g , P a . —
H
M a r tin s b u r g , W . V a .
G a d sd e n an d A n n is t o n , A la .
G o l d s b o r o , N .C .
G r a n d I s l a n d —H a s t i n g s , N e b r .
G r e a t F a ll s , M on t.
G uam , T e r r ito r y o f
H a r r i s b u r g —L e b a n o n , P a .
H u n t in g t o n —A s h l a n d , W . V a .—K y .—O h io
K n o x v ille , T en n .
L a C r o s s e , W is.
L a red o, Tex.
L a s V e g a s , N ev.
L a w to n , O k la .
L i m a , O h io
L i t t l e R o c k —N o r t h L i t t l e R o c k , A r k .

1965.

C o p ie s

o f p u b lic

r e le a s e s

a re

or

w ill be

a v a ila b le

at n o

cost

w h ile

s u p p lie s

fro m

L o g a n s p o r t —P e r u , I n d .
L o r a i n —E l y r i a , O h io
L o w e r E a s t e r n S h o r e , M d .—V a .—D e l .
L y n ch b u rg , V a.
M a co n , G a.
M a d is o n , W is.
M a n s f i e l d , O h io
M a r q u e t t e , E s c a n a b a , S a u lt S t e . M a r i e , M i c h .
M c A l l e n —P h a r r —E d in b u r g a n d B r o w n s v i l l e —
H a r l i n g e n —S an B e n i t o , T e x .
M e d f o r d —K la m a t h F a l l s —G r a n t s P a s s , O r e g .
M e r id ia n , M is s .
M i d d l e s e x , M o n m o u t h , a n d O c e a n C o s . , N .J .
M o b i l e a n d P e n s a c o l a , A l a . —F l a .
M o n t g o m e r y , A la .
N a s h v i l l e —D a v i d s o n , T e n n .
N e w B e r n —J a c k s o n v i l l e , N .C .
N e w L o n d o n —N o r w i c h , C o n n .—R .I .
N o r t h D a k o t a , S ta te o f
O r l a n d o , F la .
O x n a r d —S im i V a l l e y —V e n t u r a , C a l i f .
P a n a m a C i t y , F la .,
P a r k e r s b u r g —M a r i e t t a , W . V a .—O h io
P e o r i a , 111.
P h o e n ix , A r iz .
P in e B lu ff, A r k .
P o c a t e l l o —I d a h o F a l l s , I d a h o
P o r t s m o u t h , N .H .—M a in e —M a s s .
P u e b lo , C o lo .
P u e rto R ic o
R e n o , N ev.
R i c h l a n d —K e n n e w ic k —W a l la W a l la —
P e n d l e t o n , W a s h .—O r e g .
R i v e r s i d e —S an B e r n a r d i n o —O n t a r i o , C a l i f .
S a lin a , K a n s .
S a lin a s —S e a s i d e —M o n t e r e y , C a l i f .
S a n d u s k y , O h io
S a n ta B a r b a r a —S a n ta M a r i a —L o m p o c , C a l i f .
Savannah, G a.
S e lm a , A la .
S h e r m a n —D e n i s o n , T e x .
S h re v e p o rt, La.
S io u x F a l l s , S. D a k .
S p ok a n e, W ash .
S p r i n g f i e l d , 111.
S p r i n g f i e l d —C h i c o p e e —H o l y o k e , M a s s . —C o n n .
S to c k to n , C a lif.
T a c o m a , W ash .
T a m p a —S t. P e t e r s b u r g , F l a .
T op ek a , K ans.
T u c s o n , A r iz .
T u ls a , O k la .
V a l l e j o —F a i r f i e l d —N a p a , C a l i f .
W a c o a n d K i l l e e n —T e m p l e , T e x .
W a t e r l o o —C e d a r F a l l s , I o w a
W e s t T e x a s P la in s
W i l m i n g t o n , D e l .—N .J .—M d .

A n a n n u a l r e p o r t on s a la r ie s f o r a c c o u n t a n t s , a u d it o r s , c h ie f a c c o u n t a n t s , a t t o r n e y s , jo b a n a ly s t s , d ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l, b u y e r s , c h e m is t s , e n g in e e r s , e n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s ,
c le r i c a l e m p lo y e e s is a v a ila b le .
O r d e r a s B L S B u lle tin 1 8 3 7 , N a tio n a l S u r v e y o f P r o f e s s i o n a l, A d m in is t r a t iv e , T e c h n ic a l, and C le r i c a l P a y , M a r c h 1 9 7 4 , $ 1 .4 0 a c o p y , f r o m a n y o f th e B L S
o f f i c e s s h o w n o n t h e b a c k c o v e r , o r f r o m t h e S u p e r i n t e n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s , U .S . G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W a s h in g t o n , D .C . 2 0 4 0 2 .




la s t

d r a ft e r s , and
r e g io n a l s a le s

Area Wage Surveys
A list of the latest available bulletins or bulletin s u pplements is presented below.
A directory of area w a g e studies including m o r e limited studies conducted at the request of the E m p l o y m e n t
Standards Administration of the D e p a r t m e n t of L a b o r is available on request.
Bulletins m a y be p u r c h a s e d f r o m any of the B L S regional offices s h o w n on the back cover.
Bulletin supplements m a y be
obtained without cost, w h e r e indicated, f r o m B L S regional offices.

Area

Bulletin n u m b e r
and price*

A k r o n , O h i o , D e c . 1 9 7 4 ____________________________________________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
A lb a n y —S c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N . Y . , S e p t . 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
F ree
A l b u q u e r q u e , N . M e x . , M a r . 1 9 7 4 2 ____________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
A l l e n t o w n —B e t h l e h e m —E a s t o n , P a .—N . J . , M a y 1 9 7 4 2 _______________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
A n a h e i m —S a n t a A n a - G a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , O c t . 1 9 7 4 1 _______ ____________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 9 ,
85 cen ts
A t la n t a , G a . , M a y 1 9 7 5 1 __________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 2 5 , $ 1 .0 0
F ree
A u s t i n , T e x . , D e c . 1 9 7 4 __________________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
B a l t i m o r e , M d . , A u g . 1 9 7 4 _______________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
B e a u m o n t - P o r t A r t h u r —O r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1 9 7 4 2 ____ _____________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
B i l l i n g s , M o n t . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 _________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 6 , 65 c e n t s
B i n g h a m t o n , N . Y . —P a . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 ________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 0 , 65 c e n t s
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , M a r . 1 9 7 5 _______________________________ _________ __________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
B o s t o n , M a s s . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 1___________________________________________________________________ ____ 1 8 5 0 - 5 8 , $ 1 . 5 0
B u f f a l o , N . Y . , O c t . 1 9 7 4 ___________________________________________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
C a n t o n , O h i o , M a y 1 9 7 5 _______ __________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
C h a r l e s t o n , W . V a . , M a r . 1 9 7 4 2 _______________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
C h a r l o t t e , N . C . , J a n . 1 9 7 4 2 __________________________________________________________________ _ S u p p l.
_
F ree
C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n . - G a . , S e p t . 1 9 7 4 ____________________________________________________ _____ S u p p l.
F ree
C h i c a g o , 111., M a y 1 9 7 5 ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 3 , 85 c e n t s
C i n c i n n a t i , O h i o - K y . —I n d . , F e b . 1 9 7 5 _________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
C l e v e l a n d , O h i o , S e p t . 1 9 7 4 1 ____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 7 , $ 1 .0 0
C o l u m b u s , O h i o , O c t . 1 9 7 4 _____________________________ _____________ __ _______________________ S u p p l.
_
F ree
C o r p u s C h r i s t i , T e x . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 _________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 7 , 65 c e n t s
D a l l a s —F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , O c t . 1 9 7 4 _________________________________________________________ . S u p p l .
F ree
D a v e n p o r t - R o c k I s la n d —M o l i n e , I o w a —111., F e b . 1 9 7 5 ____________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
D a y t o n , O h i o , D e c . 1 9 7 4 1 ___________________________________________ ______________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 4 , 8 0 c e n t s
D a y t o n a B e a c h , F l a . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 __________________________________ —______—____________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 7 , 65 c e n t s
D e n v e r —B o u l d e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1 9 7 4 1 _________________________ __________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 5 , 8 5 c e n t s
D e s M o i n e s , I o w a , M a y 1 9 7 4 2 __________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
D e t r o i t , M i c h . , M a r . 1 9 7 5 __________________________________ ______________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 2 2 , 8 5 c e n t s
F o r t L a u d e r d a l e - H o lly w o o d and W e s t P a lm B e a c h —
B o c a R a t o n , F l a . , A p r . 1 9 7 5 1 _______________________________________________ _____________ ____ 1 8 5 0 - 2 6 , 8 0 c e n t s
F r e s n o , C a l i f . 1 3 ___________________________________ _____________________________ __________________
G a i n e s v i l l e , F l a . , S e p t . 1 9 7 4 1 ____________________________________________________ _____________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 1 , 7 5 c e n t s
G r e e n B a y , W i s ., J u l y 1 9 7 5 1______________________________________________________ —_______— _ 1 8 5 0 - 4 4 , 80 c e n t s
_
G r e e n s b o r o —W in s t o n - S a l e m —H ig h P o i n t , N . C . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 _______________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 9 , 65 c e n t s
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 _________________________ __________________________ —________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 2 , 65 c e n t s
H a r t f o r d , C o n n . , M a r . 1 9 7 5 1 _________________________________________ _ _____________________ _
_
_ 1 8 5 0 -2 8 , 80 ce n ts
H o u s t o n , T e x . , A p r . 1 9 7 5 . . _____________________________ ____________________ _____________________ S u p p l.
F ree
H u n t s v i l l e , A l a . , F e b . 1 9 7 5 ____________________________________ __ ______________ ______________ S u p p l.
_
F ree
I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d ., O c t . 1 9 7 4 __________________________________ __________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
J a c k s o n , M i s s . , F e b . 1 9 7 5 __________________________________________________________________ ____ S u p p l.
F ree
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , D e c . 1 9 7 4 ___________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
K a n s a s C i t y , M o .—K a n s . , S e p t . 1 9 7 5 ____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 5 , 8 0 c e n t s
L a w r e n e e - H a v e r h i l l , M a s s .—N . H ., J u n e 1 9 7 4 2 _______________________ ___________________ S u p p l.
F ree
L e x i n g t o n - F a y e t t e , K y . , N o v . 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________________ _ S u p p l.
_
F ree
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h , C a l i f . , O c t . 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
L o u i s v i l l e , K y . —I n d ., N o v . 1 9 7 4 1 _______________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 2 , 8 0 c e n t s
L u b b o c k , T e x . , M a r . 1 9 7 4 2 ______________________________________________________ _______ ________ S u p p l.
F ree
M e l b o u r n e - T i t u s v i l l e —C o c o a , F l a . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 _______________ —_________ - _________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 4 , 65 c e n t s
M e m p h i s , T e n n , - A r k . —M i s s . , N o v . 1 9 7 4 __________________________________________________ _ S u p p l.
_
F ree
M i a m i , F l a . , O c t . 1 9 7 4 __________________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree

*
1
2
3

Prices are determined by the Government Printing O ffice and are subject to change.
Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.
No longer surveyed.
T o be surveyed.




Area

Bulletin n u m b e r
and price*

M id la n d and O d e s s a , T e x . , J a n . 1 9 7 4 2 ______________ _________________________________________ S u p p l.
_
F ree
M i l w a u k e e , W i s . , A p r . 1 9 7 5 1 _________________________________________________________—— —---------- 1 8 5 0 - 2 1 , 8 5 c e n t s
M i n n e a p o l i s —S t. P a u l , M in n .—W i s . , J a n 1 9 7 5 1 _________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 2 0 , $ 1 .0 5
M u s k e g o n - M u s k e g o n H e i g h t s , M i c h . , J u n e 1 9 7 4 2 ___ ______________________ ________________S u p p l.
_
F ree
N a s s a u - S u f f o l k , N . Y . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 1_________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 9 , $ 1 -0 0
N e w a r k , N . J . , J a n . 1 9 7 5 1 ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 8 , $ 1 .0 0
N e w a r k and J e r s e y C i t y , N . J . . J a n . 1 9 7 4 2 _____________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
N e w H a v e n , C o n n ., J a n . 1 9 7 4 2 _____________________________________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
N e w O r l e a n s , L a . , J a n . 1 9 7 5 _ _______________________________________________ ____________________S u p p l.
_
F ree
N e w Y o r k , N . Y . - N . J . , M a y 1 9 7 5 1 _________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 5 , $ 1 .1 0
N e w Y o r k and N a s s a u - S u f f o l k , N . Y . , A p r . 1 9 7 4 2 ____________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
N o r f o l k —V i r g i n i a B e a c h —P o r t s m o u t h , V a .—N . C . , M a y 1 9 7 5 _______________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 2 9 , 6 5 c e n t s
N o r f o l k —V i r g i n i a B e a c h - P o r t s m o u t h and N e w p o r t N e w s —
H a m p t o n , V a . - N . C . , M a y 1 9 7 5 ___________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 0 , 6 5 c e n t s
N o r t h e a s t P e n n s y l v a n i a , A u g . 1 9 7 5 ________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 2 , 6 5 c e n t s
O k l a h o m a C i t y , O k l a . , A u g . 1 9 7 5 __________- _______________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 1 , 6 5 c e n t s
O m a h a , N e b r .—I o w a , O c t . 1 9 7 4 1 ___________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 0 , 8 0 c e n t s
P a t e r s o n - C l i f t o n —P a s s a i c , N . J . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 1___________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 8 , 8 0 c e n t s
P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a ^ - N . J ., N o v . 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
P h o e n i x , A r i z . , J u n e 1 9 7 4 2 ________________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
P i t t s b u r g h , P a . , J a n . 1 9 7 5 __________________________________________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
P o r t l a n d , M a i n e , N o v . 1 9 7 4 _________________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
P o r t l a n d , O r e g . —W a s h ., M a y 1 9 7 5 ___ - ___________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 0 , 7 5 c e n t s
P o u g h k e e p s i e , N . Y . 1 3 _________________________________________ _____________________________________
_
P o u g h k e e p s i e - K i n g s t o n —N e w b u r g h , N . Y . , J u n e 1 9 7 4 ___________________ ____________________S u p p l.
F ree
P r o v i d e n c e —W a r w i c k —P a w t u c k e t , R . I*—M a s s . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 _______________________ _________ 1 8 5 0 - 2 7 , 7 5 c e n t s
F ree
R a l e i g h —D u r h a m , N . C . , F e b . 1 9 7 5 ________________________________________________________________S u p p l.
R i c h m o n d , V a . , J u n e 1 9 7 5 ___________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 1 , 6 5 c e n t s
R o c k f o r d , 111., J u n e 1 9 7 4 2 __________________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
S t. L o u i s , M o .—111., M a r . 1 9 7 5 _____________ ______________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
S a c r a m e n t o , C a l i f . , D e c . 1 9 7 4 1 _ ________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 9 , 8 0 c e n t s
_
S a g in a w , M i c h . , N o v . 1 9 7 4 1_________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 6 , 7 5 cen ts#
S a lt L a k e C it y —O g d e n , U t a h , N o v . 1 9 7 4 _____ ________________________________________________ _ S u p p l.
_
F ree
S a n A n t o n i o , T e x . , M a y 1 9 7 5 _________ _________________________________________________________ ____ 1 8 5 0 - 2 3 , 6 5 c e n t s
S a n D i e g o , C a l i f . , N o v . 1 9 7 4 1 _______________________—------- --------------------- ---------------------------------------- 1 8 5 0 - 1 3 , 8 0 c e n t s
S a n F r a n c i s c o —O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , M a r . 1 9 7 5 1—______________________________ - __________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 5 , $ 1 .0 0
S a n J o s e , C a l i f . , M a r . 1 9 7 5 1 ___________________ ___________________ ____________ ___________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 6 , 8 5 c e n t s
S a v a n n a h , G a ., M a y 1 9 7 4 2 __ _____________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
_
F ree
S e a t t l e —E v e r e t t , W a s h ., J a n . 1 9 7 5 ____________ ___________________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
S o u th B e n d , I n d ., M a r . 1 9 7 5 __________________________ _____________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
S p o k a n e , W a s h ., J u n e 1 9 7 4 2 ________ _____________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
S y r a c u s e , N . Y . , J u l y 1 9 7 5 ___ _______________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 3 , 65 c e n t s
T o l e d o , O h i o - M i c h . , M a y 1 9 7 5 1 _______ ___________________________________________ _________ ____ 1 8 5 0 - 3 4 , 8 0 c e n t s
T r e n t o n , N . J . , S e p t . 1 9 7 4 _____________________ __________. . . ____________ - ____ __________________ S u p p l.
F ree
U t i c a - R o m e , N . Y . , J u ly 1 9 7 5 1 _____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 4 8 , 80 c e n t s
W a s h i n g t o n , D .C ^ - M d ^ - V a ., M a r . 1 9 7 5 1 _________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 1 , $ 1 .0 0
W a t e r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r . 1 9 7 4 2 ____ ___________________________________________
__________________S u p p l.
F ree
W e s t c h e s t e r C o u n t y , N . Y . , M a y 1 9 7 5 1__________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 5 3 , 80 c e n t s
W i c h i t a , K a n s ., A p r . 1 9 7 5 _ _______________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
_
F ree
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , M a y 1 9 7 5 1 _____ _____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 2 4 , 8 0 c e n t s
_
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1 9 7 5 1 _______________________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 3 2 , 8 0 c e n t s
Y o u n g s t o w n —W a r r e n , O h i o , N o v . 1 9 7 3 2 _____________ ________ _______________ _______________ S u p p l.
_
_
F ree

THIRD CLASS MAIL
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
P O S T A G E A N D FEES PAID

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
W A S H IN G T O N , D .C . 2 0 2 1 2

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

O F F IC IA L B U S IN E S S
P E N A L T Y F O R P R IV A T E U S E $30 0

L A B -441

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T I S T I C S R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S
Region I

Region II

1603 J F K Federal Building
G overnm ent Center
Boston, Mass. 0 2203
P h o n e:2 23-6 76 1 (A rea Code 61 7)

S u ite 34 0 0
15 1 5 B roadw ay
N e w Y o rk , N .Y . 1 0 0 3 6
P h o n e :9 7 1 -5 4 0 5 (A rea Code 21 2)

C o nnecticut
M aine
Massachusetts
N ew Ham pshire
R hode Island
V e rm o n t

N e w Jersey
N e w Y o rk
Puerto Rico
V irg in Islands

Region V
9 th Floor, 2 30 S. D e arb o rn St.
Chicago, III. 606 04
P h o n e :3 53-1 88 0 (A rea C ode 3 1 2 )
Illino is
Indiana
M ichigan
M innesota
O hio
Wisconsin




Region V I

Region I II

Region IV

P.O. Box 13 309
Ph iladelphia. Pa. 19101
Phone: 5 9 6 1 1 5 4 (A rea Code 2 1 5 )
D elaw are
D istrict o f C o lu m b ia
M aryla nd
Pennsylvania
V irgin ia
West V irg in ia

Regions V I I ano V I I I

Second F lo o r
5 5 5 G riffin Square B uilding
Dallas, T e x . 7 5 2 0 2
Phone: 7 4 9 -3 5 1 6 (A re a Code 2 1 4 )

Federal O ffic e B u ilding
911 W alnut St., 15 th Floor
Kansas C ity , M o. 6 41 0 6
P h o n e :3 7 4-2 4 8 1 (A rea Code 81 6 )

Louisiana
le w M exico
O klah o m a
T exas

V II
Io w a
Kansas
Missouri
Nebraska

V III
C o lorad o
M o n tan a
N o rth D akota
South D a ko ta
U tah
W yom ing

S u ite 54 0
1371 Peachtree St. N .E.
A tlan ta, Ga. 30 309
P h o n e :5 2 6 -5 4 1 8 (A rea Code 4 0 4 )
Alabam a
Florida
Georgia
K e n tu cky
Mississippi
N o rth Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee
Regions IX and X
45 0 G olden G ate Ave.
Box 360 1 7
San Francisco, C a lif. 9 4 1 0 2
P h o n e :5 5 6 -4 6 7 8 (A rea Code 41 5)
IX
Arizona
C alifornia
Hawaii
Nevada

X
Alaska
Idaho
Oregon
W ashington


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102