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'A'^ea W ag e su rvey
Cleveland, Ohio, Metropolitan Area
September 1974
Bulletin 1850-17

DOCUMENT COLLECTION

APR

a1976

Dayton &

Montgomery Go.
Public Library

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
_ _ _ Bureau of Labor Statistics



M 2 ft 78
AR




ANNOUNCEM EN T
A re a W age Survey bulletins w ill be issu ed on ce e v e ry 3 y e a r s .
T h ese b u lletin s w ill contain in form ation on estab lish m en t p r a c tic e s and
su pplem en tary ben efits as w e ll as ea rn in g s. In the in te r im y e a r s ,
supplem ents containing data on earn ings only w ill be is su e d at no
additional c o s t to h old ers of the A rea W age b u lletin . If you w ish to
r e c e iv e th ese supplem ents, please c o m p le te the coupon s lis te d on
page 44 o f this bulletin and m a il to any o f the BLS r e g io n a l a d d re s se s
lis te d on the back c o v e r . No fu rther action on y ou r part is n e c e s s a r y .
E ach y e a r , you w ill r e ce iv e the supplem ent when it is publish ed.

Preface
T his bulletin p rovid es resu lts of a S ep tem b er 1974 su rvey of occu p ation al earn ings
and supplem entary w age ben efits in the C leveland , O hio, Standard M etropolitan S ta tistica l
A rea (Cuyahoga, G eauga, Lake, and M edina C ou n ties). The su rv ey w as m ade as pa rt of the
B ureau o f L a b or Statistics* annual a rea wage su rvey p r o g r a m . The p r o g r a m is d esign ed to
y ie ld data fo r individual m etropolitan a re a s , as w e ll as n ational and reg ion a l estim a te s fo r
all Standard M etropolitan Statistical A reas in the U nited S tates, ex clu din g A la sk a and H awaii.
A m a jo r con sid era tion in the area wage su rv ey p r o g r a m is the n eed to d e s c r ib e the
le v e l and m ovem en t of w ages in a v a riety of la b o r m a rk e ts , through the a n alysis of (1) the
le v e l and distribu tion o f w ages by occu pation , and (2) the m ov em en t of w ages by occu p ation al
c a te g o ry and sk ill le v e l.
The p r o g r a m develops in form a tion that m ay be u sed fo r many
p u rp o s e s , including w age and sa la ry ad m in istration , c o lle c t iv e b a rg ain in g , and a s sista n ce in
determ ining plant lo ca tio n . Survey resu lts a lso are u sed by the U .S. D epartm ent o f L a b or to
m ake w age d eterm in a tion s under the S e rv ice C on tract A ct of 1965.
C u rren tly , 82 areas are in cluded in the p r o g r a m . (See lis t o f a r e a s on in sid e back
c o v e r .) In each a rea , occupational earnings data are c o lle c t e d annually. In form ation on
estab lish m en t p r a c tic e s and supplem entary w age ben efits is obtained e v e r y th ird y e a r .
R esu lts o f the next tw o annual su rv ey s, providin g ea rn in gs data on ly, w ill b e is s u e d as fr e e
supplem ents to this bu lletin . The supplem ents m ay be obtain ed fr o m the B u re a u 's reg ion a l
o ffic e s . (See ba ck c o v e r fo r a d d re s se s .)
E ach y e a r a fter all individual area w age s u rv e y s have been c o m p le te d , tw o su m m ary
bu lletin s are issu ed . The fir st brin gs tog eth er data fo r each m etrop olita n a rea su rvey ed .
The secon d su m m ary bulletin p resen ts national and re g io n a l e s tim a te s , p r o je c te d fr o m
individual m etrop olita n a rea data.
The C leveland su rvey was condu cted by the B u re a u 's re g io n a l o ffic e in C h ica g o, 111.,
under the g en era l d ire ctio n of L ois L. O rr , A s s o c ia te A ssista n t R egion al D ir e c to r fo r
O peration s. The su rvey could not have been a c c o m p lis h e d without the c o o p e ra tio n o f the
m any fir m s w hose w age and sa la ry data p rov id ed the b a s is fo r the sta tistica l in form a tion in
this bu lletin . The B ureau w ish es to e x p re s s s in c e re a p p recia tion fo r the co o p e ra tio n r e c e iv e d .

Note:
R ep orts on occu pation al earnings and su pplem en tary w age p r o v is io n s in the C levela n d
a rea are available fo r laundry and dry clean in g (S ep tem b er 1974); departm ent s to r e s
(Septem ber 1973); auto dealer rep a ir shops (June 1973); h otels and m o te ls (June 1973);
nursing h om es (M ay 1973); m a ch in ery (F ebru ary 1973); and sp e c ia l d ie s , t o o ls , ji g s , and
fix tu res (F ebru ary 1973). A lso available are lis tin g s o f union w age rates fo r building tr a d e s ,
printing tr a d e s , lo c a l-t r a n s it operating e m p lo y e e s , lo c a l tr u c k d r iv e r s and h e lp e r s , and
g r o c e r y sto re e m p lo y e e s . F ree co p ie s of th ese are availab le fr o m the B u re a u 's reg ion a l
o ffic e s . (See back c o v e r fo r a d d re s se s .)

AREA W AGE SU RVEY

Bulletin 1860-17
May

1975

U .S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R , John T . D unlop , Secretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S , Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

Cleveland, Ohio, Metropolitan Area, September 1974
CONTENTS

Page

Int r oducti on — ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

2

Tables:
A.

B.

Earnings:
A -l.
Weekly earnings of office workers__________________________________________________________________
A -l a . Weekly earnings of office workers— large establishments__________________
A -2 .
Weekly earnings of professional and technical w o rk ers.—________________
A -2 a . Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers— large establishments_____________________________________
A -3 .
Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by se x ___________________________________
A -3 a . Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex— large establishments_________
A -4 .
Hourly earnings of maintenance and p owe rpi ant w orkers_______________________________________________________________
A -4 a . Hourly earnings of maintenance and power pi ant workers— large establishments_____________________________________
A -5 .
Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement w orkers_________________
A - 5a. Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement workers— large establishments
-------------------------------------------A -6 . Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement workers, by se x _______
A -6 a . Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement workers,
by sex— large establishments___________________________________________________________________________________________
A - 7.
Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected occupational groups,
adjusted for employment shifts_________________________________________________________________________________________
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
B -1 .
Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and cle rk s____________________________ ___________ _____________
B -2 . Late shift pay provisions for full-tim e manufacturing plant w orkers__________________________________________________
B -3 . Scheduled weekly hours and days of full-tim e first-shift workers——______________________________
B -4 .
Annual paid holidays for full-time w orkers_____________________________________________________________ ________________
B -4 a . Identification of major paid holidays for full-tim e w orkers_________________________________ - _____ - ___________________
B -5 .
Paid vacation provisions for full-tim e workers_________________________________________________________________________
B -6 .
Health, insurance, and pension plans for full-tim e workers-------------------- ------- --------------------------------------------------------------

Appendix A.
Appendix B.




Scope and method of survey_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Occupational descriptions_________________________________________________________________________________________________

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402, G P O Bookstores, or
BLS Regional Offices listed on back cover. Price $1.00. M a k e checks payable to Superintendent of Documents.

3
6
8
10
11
13
15
16
17
19
21
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
33
35
38

Introduction
This area is 1 of 82 in which the U.S. Department of Labor's
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings and
related benefits on an areawide basis. In this area, data were obtained
by personal visits of Bureau field economists to representative estab­
lishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transpor­
tation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major industry
groups excluded from these studies are government operations and the
construction and extractive industries. Establishments having fewer than
a prescribed number of workers are omitted because of insufficient
employment in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are provided
for each of the broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.
A -series tables
Tables A - l through A -6 provide estimates of straight-time
hourly or weekly earnings for workers in occupations common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupations
were selected from the following categories: (a) Office clerical, (b) pro­
fessional and technical, (c) maintenance and powerplant, and (d) custodial
and material movement. In the 31 largest survey areas, tables A - l a
through A -6 a provide similar data for establishments employing 500
workers or more.
Following the occupational wage tables is table A - 7 which
provides percent changes in average earnings of office clerical work­
e r s, electronic data processing workers, industrial nurses, skilled




maintenance workers, and unskilled plant workers. This measure of
wage trends eliminates changes in average earnings caused by employ­
ment shifts among establishments as well as turnover of establishments
included in survey samples. Where possible, data are presented for all
industries, manufacturing, and nonmanufacturing. Appendix A discusses
this wage trend measure.
B -se r ie s tables
The B -series tables present information on minimum entrance
salaries for office workers; late-shift pay provisions and practices for
plant workers in manufacturing; and data separately for plant and office
workers on scheduled weekly hours and days of first-sh ift workers; paid
holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans.
Appendixes
This bulletin has two appendixes. Appendix A describes the
methods and concepts used in the area wage survey program. It provides
information on the scope of the area survey and information on the area's
industrial composition in manufacturing. It also provides information
on labor-management agreement coverage. Appendix B provides job
descriptions used by Bureau field economists to classify workers in
occupations for which straight-time earnings information is presented.

A. Earnings
Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Cleveland, Ohio, September 1974
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings ofS

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard

S
75

Middle range*

80

90

S
100

S

no

S
120

$
130

S

$
140

150

S

S
160

170

S
180

S

S
190

200

210

1------ S
220
230

1 ------ 1 ------ 1 -----

s
240

260

280

and
under

300

and

80 — IQ -

all

s

S

100

no

120

130

140

150

160

21
20

26
19

28
14

15
5

*

19
15

12
8

5
1

16
16

12
8

•

4
4

12
12

18
9
9

14
14
—

19
15
4

170

180

190

200

210

*

•

1
1

8
8

—

*

—

m

4

16
1

3

20
9
11

17
5
12

2
2

2
1
1

46
44
2
2
-

35
21
14
9
5
-

6
4
2
2
—

220

230

240

260

280

300

OV6T

workers

BILLERS* MACHINE (BILLING
M A C H I N E ) ------------ ---- NONMANUFACTURING ------

$

123
77

BILLERS* MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) ----------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------

$

40*0 1 2 8 .5 0 1 2 6 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 3 S .0 0
40*0 1 3 0 .5 0 122.00 1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 3 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 3 2 .5 0 1 3 4 .5 0 1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 4 7 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 1 9 .5 0 1 1 8 .0 0 1 0 6 .0 0 -1 3 4 .5 0

4
-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

4
1
3
-

44
25
19
12

54
32
22
13

45
19
26
25

50
25
25
21

39
22
17
8

21
9
12
2

14
10
4
1

3
3

2
2

1
•
1
•
-

23
10
13
•
6
3
-

151
48
103
•
18
22
-

229
66
163
7
42
45
12

202
76
126
•
25
32
12

226
113
113
2
31
23
7

153
90
63
6
7
33
9

196
105
91
23
29
25
11

181
76
105
76
15
10
1

111
58
53
28
10
4
4

47
35
12
5
2
3
-

53
35
18
5
5
1
6

24
14
10
5
1
•
1

37
28
9
9
•
•
-

45
28
17
9
8
-

138
30
108
•
41
34
19
14

440
142
298
•
37
187
34
40

315
140
175
7
27
58
62
21

357
198
159
6
54
37

280
149
131
1
59
22
31
18

188
76
112
10
37
22
30
13

107
49
58
18
7

57
29
28
15
3

32
8
24
13
11

31
23
8
5
3

17
13
4
4
•

9
5
4
4
-

13
13
•
•
-

22
15
7
-

7

1
1
•

S
5
-

•
—

•
—
-

9

7

14
10

3

10
10
-

20
20
19

36
34
19

16
14
11

12

14
10
10

18
18

3
1

4
1

1
-

4
•

-

.
-

1
1

•
-

2
2

1
1

-

121
17
104
24
42

122
27
95
16
79

89
37
52
5
27

64
15
49
6

24

9

9
7

1
1

•
•

•

•
•

-

8

•

-

9

25
4
21

8

•

11
1
10

5

3
21
•

1

7

8

8

152
18
134
40
57

87
16
71

63
11
52
6
46

12

3

.

2

1

9
3

1
2

•

2

1

3

1

43
33
10

120
91
29
12

83

119
66
53
25

71

102
31
71
54

59
27
32
28

73
10
63
60

41
30
11
11

22
15

24
23
1
1

28
20

24

31

5
5

8

5
4
1
1

5
5

3 9 .0 1 4 1 .0 0
40 *0 1 4 1 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 4 0 .5 0

1 4 4 .0 0
1 4 4 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0

1 2 4 .5 0 - 1 5 5 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0 - 1 5 5 .5 0
1 1 9 .5 0 - 1 6 1 .5 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS B ------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------

280
145
135

3 9 .0 1 2 8 .5 0 1 2 6 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 9 .5 0 1 2 6 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 2 7 .5 0 1 2 8 .0 0
3 8 .5 1 2 6 .0 0 1 2 6 .5 0

1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 4 0 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 -1 4 0 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0 - 1 4 0 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0

•
•
-

4
4
-

•
.
•
•
•

•
•
•
.
-

82

63

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .0

1 6 0 .0 0
1 6 9 .0 0
1 5 1 .5 0
1 8 6 .0 0
1 5 1 .0 0
1 4 2 .0 0
1 5 5 .5 0

1 5 2 .0 0
1 6 1 .5 0
1 4 2 .5 0
1 7 8 .0 0
1 4 1 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 5 2 .0 0

1 3 1 .5 0 - 1 7 8 .0 0
1 4 0 .5 0 - 1 9 0 .0 0
1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 7 2 .5 0
1 7 1 .5 0 - 1 8 7 .5 0
1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 6 4 .0 0
1 2 3 .5 0 - 1 5 7 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0 - 1 6 9 .0 0

2*049
904
1* 1 4 5
83
286
394
250
132

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
40*0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
3 9 .0

1 2 7 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 2 2 .5 0
1 5 9 .0 0
1 2 7 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0
1 1 8 .5 0

121.00

1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 3 8 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0 - 1 4 1 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0 - 1 3 6 .0 0
1 4 7 .5 0 - 1 7 2 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0 - 1 1 9 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0 - 1 3 1 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0 - 1 3 6 .0 0

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS B MANUFACTURING ------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------PUBLIC UTILITIES --- ---WHOLESALE TRADE --------RETAIL TRADE -----------FINANCE -----------------SERVICES ----- -----------

201

142

CLERKS* FILE* CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING —
WHOLESALE TRADE FINANCE ------ ---

514
128
386
59
173

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 7 .5

CLERKS* FILE* CLASS C -----MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING --------WHOLESALE TRADE -------FINANCE -----------------

352
57
295
88
140

3 9 .0 101.00
4 0 .0 1 0 6 .5 0
3 8 .5
9 9 .5 0
4 0 .0
9 7 .0 0
3 7 .5 1 0 3 .5 0

CLERKS* ORDER ---------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------- ---NONMANUFACTURING --------WHOLESALE TRADE -------

850
477
373
258

3 9 .5 1 4 2 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 4 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 4 0 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 4 9 .5 0




75

121.00
1 0 9 .0 0

121.00
110.00

3 9 .0 1 3 3 .5 0 1 2 5 .0 0 1 1 6 .0 0 - 1 4 9 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 2 9 .5 0 1 1 9 .5 0 1 1 0 .0 0 - 1 4 4 .0 0
3 8 .0 1 2 6 .5 0 1 1 9 .0 0 1 1 2 .0 0 -1 4 1 * 5 0

CLERKS. FILE* CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING —
FINANCE ------- ~

121

1 2 6 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0
1 5 9 .5 0

1 1 5 .0 0

1 0 8 .5 0

1 2 1 .0 0 1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 3 .5 0 1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 8 .5 0 1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0 1 0 3 .0 0
9 9 .0 0

9 9 .5 0 -1 2 2 * 0 0
1 0 3 .5 0 - 1 2 3 .0 0
9 6 .0 0 -1 2 2 * 0 0
9 2 .0 0 -1 1 5 * 5 0
9 6 .0 0 - 1 0 9 .0 0
9 4 . 0 0 - 1 0 8 .0 0
9 5 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .0 0
9 1 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
9 0 .0 0 -1 0 0 * 0 0
> 9 5* 5 0-1 1 1* 0 0
1 1 6 .0 0 - 1 6 0 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 7 0 .5 0
1 2 1 .0 0 -1 6 0 * 0 0
1 3 4 .0 0 -1 6 0 * 5 0

*

7
7

109
53
56

1*76 6
851
915
188
204

1

-

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS A ------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------NONMANUFACTURING

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS A
MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING --------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----WHOLESALE TRADE --- ---FINANCE ----------------SERVICES ------ ---------

19
10

m

•
•
•
-

37
8
29
•
18

5
6

•

•

-

-

9

17

9

9

-

8

•

•

9

-

•
•
•
-

3

32
2
30

9
5

7
•

3

7

—

—

-

33
28

47
36
14

55
7

9
7

38
33
29

*

1
1

-

9
•
5

-

2

7
7

8
8

7
7

—

7

1

1

m

«
•

l
l
”

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
Number

Occupation and industry division
w
orkers

$

$
75

weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Median 2

Middle range2

$
80

S

$
90

$

S

S

S

S

S

$

S

S

S

S

S

$

i

1 ------ $
280
300

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

over

9
4
5
1

13
1
12
3

98
72
26
17

88
60
28
10

97
82
15
5

48
38
10
7

45
19
26
2

75
54
21
-

35
28
7
-

19
10
9
3

38
33
5

23
21
2

17
17
•

12
12
-

7
6
1

1
1

4
4
—

—

87
55
32
3
27

108
63
45
2
14
17

200
124
76
13
16
40

168
125
43
3
•
32

99
64
35
2
13
12

55
37
18
4
2
12

so
24
26
7
18
1

32
16
16
13
3

33
19
14
14

19
19
—

26
22
4
4

.
-

2
2
•

10
10
-

—
—

—
—

-

9
9
-

15
9
6
4
2

52
12
40
40

2
1
1
1

3
3
-

14
14
-

.
-

•
—
-

—
-

.
-

and
u nd er

and
90 _ i.0 0 -

___

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
CLERKS* PAYROLL ---- -------MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING -------RETAIL TRADE ----------

647
461
186
63

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

$
1 5 9 .0 0
1 6 4 .0 0
1 4 6 .0 0
1 2 7 .5 0

$
$
$
1 5 0 .0 0 1 3 2 .0 0 * 1 7 9 .0 0
1 5 5 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 * 1 8 7 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0 1 2 7 .0 0 * 1 6 8 .0 0
1 2 7 .5 0 1 0 7 .0 0 - 1 4 1 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS A
MANUFACTURING ----- -----NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----WHOLESALE TRADE
FINANCE ------- --------

917
603
314
62
71
141

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 4 7 .5 0
1 4 8 .5 0
1 4 5 .0 0
1 7 1 .5 0
1 4 7 .5 0
1 3 5 .5 0

1 4 0 .5 0
1 4 1 .0 0
1 3 9 .5 0
1 7 9 .0 0
1 5 2 .0 0
1 3 4 .0 0

1 3 0 .0 0 * 1 5 9 .0 0
1 3 0 .5 0 * 1 5 9 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0 - 1 6 0 .0 0
1 4 1 .5 0 - 1 9 0 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0 - 1 7 1 .5 0
1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 4 5 .5 0

-

-

-

28
23
5
2
-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS 8
MANUFACTURING ----- -----NONMANUFACTURING ---- --PUBLIC UTILITIES ----WHOLESALE TRADE ------RETAIL TRADE ---------FINANCE ----------------

1*004
357
647
163
194
71
177

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
40 •0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5

1 3 5 .5 0
1 4 0 .5 0
1 3 3 .0 0
1 6 3 .5 0
1 3 1 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 8 .5 0

1 3 0 .0 0
1 3 1 .5 0
1 2 9 .5 0
1 6 0 .5 0
1 3 1 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 4 7 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0 - 1 5 5 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0 - 1 4 6 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0 - 1 9 6 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0 - 1 4 0 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0 - 1 2 8 .0 0

3
3
3
-

20
4
16
•
6
10

35
5
30
7
8
6

142
44
98
7
33
13
40

121
58
63
9
13
32

166
48
118
18
24
12
52

144
71
73
14
32
5
21

138
25
113
29
65
4
12

59
22
37
13
17
3
1

43
18
25
15
5
4
1

38
14
24
22
-

506
210
296
82
111

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

120*50
1 2 1 .5 0
1 1 9 .5 0
1 5 2 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0

1 1 4 .5 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0
1 5 0 .5 0
1 1 0 .5 0

1 0 2 .5 0 - 1 3 7 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 3 5 .0 0
9 9 .5 0 - 1 3 7 .0 0
1 2 2 .0 0 - 1 6 9 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .0 0

•
•

40
2
38
•
6

43
4
39
23

119
63
56
•
25

101
60
41
13
14

51
16
35
11
20

44
27
17
4
12

50
24
26
12
10

7
2
5
4
1

24
5
19
19

6
2
4
3

11
2
9
9

5
2
3
3

3
3
3

1
—
1
1

—

1
1
•

-

—
—

—
—

—
—

SECRETARIES ----------------MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----WHOLESALE TRADE ------RETAIL TRAOE ---------FINANCE ---------------SERVICES ------ --------

4*791
2*613
2*178
342
294
234
1*029
279

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0

1 6 7 .0 0
1 7 2 .0 0
1 6 0 .5 0
1 9 6 .0 0
1 5 9 .0 0
1 5 3 .5 0
1 5 6 .0 0
1 4 3 .5 0

1 6 1 .0 0
1 6 7 .0 0
1 5 3 .5 0
2 0 2 .5 0
1 5 2 .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0
1 5 0 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0

1 3 9 .0 0 - 1 9 0 .0 0
1 4 3 .5 0 - 1 9 6 .5 0
1 3 3 .0 0 - 1 8 0 .0 0
1 7 0 .0 0 - 2 2 2 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0 - 1 7 2 .5 0
1 3 1 .5 0 - 1 7 5 .0 0
1 3 4 .5 0 - 1 7 1 .0 0
1 2 1 .0 0 - 1 5 7 .5 0

•
•
•
•

•
-

95
31
64
10
8
7
22
17

176
46
130
19
4
10
58
39

404
170
234
3
50
35
102
44

560
304
256
18
25
34
144
35

569
276
293
11
35
24
173
50

480
263
217
3
36
25
133
20

498
285
213
18
52
21
116
6

437
236
201
21
21
23
102
34

374
236
138
26
22
26
64
-

279
183
96
25
6
15
40
10

285
178
107
56
14
7
18
12

212
136
76
41.
9
3
18
5

140
107
33
21
2
2
8
-

115
78
37
21
1
•

-

13
2
11
3
2
6

1

87
58
29
20
3
6
-

34
10
24
10
5
9
“

21
6
15
12
1
2
-

12
8
4
4
-

SECRETARIES, CLASS A — —
MANUFACTURING ---------—
NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----

415
302
113
37

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0

2 0 6 .5 0
2 0 4 .0 0
2 1 2 .5 0
2 5 2 .5 0

2 0 1 .5 0
2 0 1 .5 0
1 9 3 .5 0
2 6 6 .0 0

1 7 9 .0 0 - 2 3 1 .0 0
1 8 2 .5 0 - 2 2 8 .0 0
1 7 5 .0 0 - 2 7 2 .5 0
2 2 0 .5 0 - 2 8 7 .5 0

-

3
3
-

•

6
•
6
-

19
6
13
-

27
27
-

37
28
9
7

50
40
10
1

42
24
18
-

41
36
5
1

26
24
2
-

38
36
2
2

43
38
5
2

26
21
5
4

19
5
14
4

15
1
14
12

8
4
4
4

SECRETARIES* CLASS 8 ---MANUFACTURING — --------NONMANUFACTURING --~
PUBLIC UTILITIES -----w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ------RETAIL TRADE — -------FINANCE — --- ---------SERVICES ------------ —

1*108
558
550
72
69
57
265
87

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 7 .5
3 8 .5

1 8 0 .5 0
1 8 7 .0 0
1 7 4 .5 0
2 0 4 .5 0
1 7 7 .0 0
1 6 5 .5 0
1 7 4 .0 0
1 5 5 .0 0

1 7 7 .0 0
1 8 4 .5 0
1 7 1 .5 0
2 3 0 .0 0
1 6 3 .0 0
1 6 5 .0 0
1 7 2 .5 0
1 4 9 .5 0

1 5 6 .5 0 - 2 0 4 .0 0
1 6 5 .5 0 - 2 0 8 .5 0
1 4 9 .5 0 - 1 9 7 .0 0
1 7 0 .0 0 - 2 4 9 .5 0
1 6 0 .0 0 - 1 7 1 .5 0
1 5 4 .0 0 - 1 7 5 .0 0
1 5 1 .0 0 - 1 9 6 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0 - 1 7 4 .0 0

73
30
43
2
7
7
26
1

130
67
63
28
13
21
1

175
71
104
7
11
13
44
29

107
67
40
3
1
3
33
-

94
63
31
4
4
22
1

78
47
31
3
3
2
16
7

62
39
23
3
1
16
1

60
46
14
3
1
2
8
-

56
28
28
16
1
10
1

31
9
22
15
2
5
-

11
1
10
6
4
—

6
5
1
1
•
-

4
4
—

257
154
103
12
16
71

219
118
101
12
4
6
74

ll

27
25
2
1
1
-

4

5

29
12
17
16
1
—
—
—

4
4
—
—
•

.
—
—
—
«
•
—

—

MESSENGERS ----- ------- ----M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----— — «
NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTILITIES —
FINANCE ------- --------

SECRETARIES* CLASS C — —
MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----WHOLESALE TRADE ------RETAIL TRADE ------ —
FINANCE — ---- --------SERVICES ---------------




1*818
894
924
159
108
115
473
69

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .0

1 6 4 .5 0 1 5 9 .0 0
1 6 9 .0 0 1 6 1 .5 0
1 6 0 .0 0 1 5 4 .0 0
1 9 7 .0 0 2 0 4 .0 0
1 5 9 .5 0 1 5 0 .0 0
1 5 3 .5 0 1 5 0 .0 0
1 5 1 .5 0 1 5 0 .5 0
1 4 3 .5 0 1 3 4 .0 0

1 4 2 .5 0 - 1 8 4 .0 0
1 4 7 .0 0 - 1 8 8 .5 0
1 3 8 .0 0 - 1 8 0 .5 0
1 9 0 .0 0 - 2 1 6 .0 0
1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 8 3 .5 0
1 3 0 .0 0 - 1 8 0 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0 - 1 6 7 .0 0
1 2 5 .0 0 - 1 5 0 .5 0

-

3
•
3
-

-

-

•

.
-

-

-

-

_
•
•
•
•
-

-

15
15
15

.
.
•
-

-

_
•
•

—

-

-

_
-

2
2

-

-

-

15
9
6
-

16
6
10
7
•
3

21
3
18
•
•
9
9

22
2
20
•
3
11
6

74
21
53
6
2
4
31
10

88
49
39
•
5
5
11
18

217
117
100
3
10
9
70
8

259
125
134
4
4
14
100
12

30
8
22

-

-

-

•
•

-

-

—

•
4
12
6

2
-

•
•

45
2
43
7
2
8
20
6

112
16
96
33
16
30
17

-

2

158
80
78
7
6
6
56
3

142
70
72
11
14
21
26
—

93
51
42
16

4
10
12
—

101
44
57
38
11
3
1

112
61
51
41

4

4

6
—
•

7
4
3
•
1

—

•

.

Weekly earnings 1
Number
Occupation and industry division

workers

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
5

$
weekly
hours 1
(standard)

75
Mean i

Median £

Middle ranged

S

80

S

$
90

100

S

S

no

120

S

$

S

130

140

150

S

160

S

170

S

S

180

190

210

$

$

S

S

200

220

230

$
240

S
260

S

280

and
under

300

and

8Q

9p

•
-

24
•
24
•
24

100

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

over

46
14
32
3
8
3
10
8

109
40
69
12
2
2
29
24

266
148
118
3
17
16
61
21

252
155
97
9
10
21
43
14

209
95
114
7
20
5
62
20

130
72
58
1
10
2
31
14

122
73
49
6
20
2
21
-

67
57
10
3
3
2
2

74
59
15
11

50
45
5
5

65
51
14
14

11
11

13
13

5
5

•

•

•

3
3
•

•
-

•
-

.
-

59
10
49
7
32

126
86
40
•
31

214
123
91
25
52

149
66
83
16
50

66
20
46
10
20

59
26
33
7
2

39
15
24
21
1

67
11
56
50
1

52
15
37
27

32
10
22
22

41
32

•

9

2

9
9

9
9

2
2

.

•
.

•
•

•
•

•
-

4

12
5
7
5

47
31
16
16

96
60
36
19

87
70
17
6

57
39
18

122
84
38

33
22
11
1

25
21

13
13

11
3
8

10
10
•

•

-

4

1

•
•

4

68
35
33
3

30
23
7

4

145
39
106
8

58
27
31

62
18

27

26
17

30
21

9

15

18
8
1
8
1

9

6
5

1
1

1
1

7
2

9
9

15
11

9
—

8
1
1

4

44

45
21
24

11
10

4
4

1

_

_

*
»
.

•
•

_
-

1
1

-

•
•

•

_
•
-

-

-

-

-

no

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
1* 4 3 3
843
590
74
90
54
263
109

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .5

$
1 4 8 .0 0
1 5 4 .0 0 1 4 5 .5 0
1 3 8 .5 0 1 3 6 .S 0
1 5 7 .5 0 1 4 7 .5 0
1 4 2 .5 0 1 4 5 .5 0
1 3 4 .0 0 1 3 1 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0 1 3 8 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0 1 2 7 .0 0

$
$
1 2 8 .0 0 - 1 6 2 .0 0
1 3 0 .0 0 - 1 7 3 .0 0
1 2 5 .0 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0
1 2 5 .5 0 - 1 9 1 .0 0
1 2 9 .0 0 - 1 6 0 .0 0
1 2 7 .0 0 - 1 3 8 .0 0
1 2 5 .0 0 - 1 4 8 .0 0
1 1 9 .0 0 - 1 4 2 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS* GENERAL ------------MANUFACTURING -------------------MONMANUFACTURING ---------------PURLIC UTILITIES -------------FINANCE ----- --- ---- --- --- --

983
427
556
205
244

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

1 3 9 .5 0
1 3 8 .0 0
1 4 0 .5 0
1 6 7 .5 0
1 1 7 .5 0

1 1 9 .5 0 - 1 5 8 .5 0
1 1 9 .5 0 - 1 5 1 .5 0
1 1 9 .5 0 - 1 6 8 .0 0
1 4 1 .5 0 - 1 8 8 .0 0
1 0 1 .0 0 - 1 3 0 .5 0

•

STENOGRAPHERS* SENIOR -------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ----------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------FINANCE ------- ----------------

771
442
329
80

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .5

1 6 5 .0 0 1 6 4 .0 0 1 4 2 .0 C -1 7 9 .0 0
1 6 3 .5 0 1 6 2 .0 0 1 4 1 .0 0 - 1 8 0 .5 0
1 6 7 .0 0 1 7 5 .0 0 1 4 7 .0 0 - 1 7 8 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 2 3 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0

.
-

.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---- — — ---------NONMANUFACTURING — — — — — —
PUBLIC UTILITIES ---- --------RETAIL TRACE -----------------F I N A N C E ---- — — — --S E R V I C E S ------ ------------ ---

451
167
284
50
52
77
87

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 4 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 9 .5

1 3 5 .5 0
1 5 2 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 7 0 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0
1 3 0 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0

1 3 1 .0 0
1 5 5 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0
1 7 0 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0
1 3 0 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0

1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 5 7 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0 - 1 7 2 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 4 3 .0 0
1 5 4 .0 0 - 1 9 0 .0 0
8 8 . 5 0 - 1 1 7 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 4 0 .0 0
9 5 . 5 0 - 1 0 9 .0 0

.

33
5
28

28
28

52

-

-

39
15
24

-

1

13

12

12
5
35

2
15
7

6
18
3

4

SWITCHBOARO OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSM A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------ — -— ~
.NONMANUFACTURING ---------------w h o l e s a l e TRADE ---- ---------F I N A N C E ------- — --- ---- -----SERVICES ------ ----------------

692
353
339
147
80
68

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 7 .5
3 8 .5

1 2 4 .5 0
1 2 5 .5 0
1 2 3 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 1 1 .5 0
1 1 7 .0 0

1 2 1 .0 0
1 2 4 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0

1 1 0 .0 0 - 1 3 3 .5 0
1 1 2 .5 0 - 1 3 6 ,0 0
1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 2 9 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0 - 1 5 5 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 1 7 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0 - 1 2 0 .5 0

.
•
-

-

128
50
78
43

147
79
68
29
12
18

90
71
19

TA8ULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS 9 ----------------------------nonmanufacturing:
PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------

O
U
)
.
o

SECRETARIES - CONTINUED
SECRETARIES* CLASS D MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING ---PUBLIC UTILITIES —
WHOLESALE TRADE --RETAIL TRADE -----FINANCE ------S E R V I C E S ------------- --- ------

1 3 1 .0 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 3 4 .5 0
1 7 5 .0 0
1 2 1 .0 0

74

3 9 .5 1 7 0 .5 0

1 5 5 .5 0 1 3 8 .5 0 - 1 8 3 .5 0

27

3 9 .5 1 8 5 .0 0

1 4 7 .5 0 - 2 2 9 .0 0

1 7 5 .0 0

-

•
-

-

3
6
44

13
31
31
10
10
10

-

•

15

16

10
10

33

4
4

56
4

-

24

-

17
7

14

153
69
84
24
38
16

-

-

-

-

-

-

243
108
135
79

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5

1 2 7 .0 0 1 2 2 .0 0 1 0 8 .0 0 -1 4 0 * 0 0
1 3 0 .0 0 1 2 7 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 4 7 .5 0
1 2 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 0 4 .0 0 - 1 3 8 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0 1 1 7 .5 0 1 0 2 .5 0 - 1 3 8 .0 0

TYPISTS* CLASS A ------------------ MANUFACTURING — ----- — --------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------ — -— ---WHOLESALE TRAOE --------------F I N A N C E ------- -------------- S E R V I C E S ------------ ----------

919
40 3
516
50
262
110

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .5

1 3 8 .0 0
1 4 1 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0
1 3 8 .5 0
1 3 3 .0 0
1 2 1 .0 0

1 3 2 .5 0 1 1 6 .5 G -1 5 3 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 1 1 8 .5 0 - 1 5 7 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 1 1 8 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0
1 4 0 .5 0 1 1 8 .5 0 - 1 5 8 .5 0
1 3 2 .0 0 1 2 2 .0 0 - 1 4 5 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0 1 0 5 .0 0 - 1 3 4 .5 0

.
•
•
-

TYPISTS* CLASS B ------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------F I N A N C E ------- ---------------S E R V I C E S ----------------------

1*8 3 4
56 5
1 *26 9
287
573
148

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 7 .5
3 9 .0

1 1 7 .5 0
1 2 2 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0

1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0
1 0 4 .5 0

.
•
•
•
•
-




-

9

•
•
•
-

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
G E N E R A L ------------ --- --- --- — --MANUFACTURING --- ---------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------F I N A N C E -----------------------~

1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 2 9 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0 - 1 3 5 .0 0
9 7 . 5 0 - 1 2 6 .5 0
9 5 .5 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0
9 6 .5 0 - 1 1 6 .0 0
9 2 . 0 0 - 1 1 7 .0 0

-

11
2

-

-

9

33
11
7

51
15
36
26

7

3

8

12

6

2

1

11
3
8
8

4

7

m

3
2

3
1
1

•
-

7
7

•
•

•
•
•

•

_
•

17

1

10

2

2

-

-

11

-

4

1

1

-

7

1

-

-

-

11

-

-

8
6
2

7
1
6

•

2
•
2

4

1

3
1

1

53
16
37

65
27
38

23

28
27
1

1

1

4

6

15
13
2

1

1

4
12

1
1

72
14
58

10
9
1

.

2

•

2

•

12

9

-

-

48

42
24
18
12

34
16
18
11

28
12
16
12

13

39
29

36
21
15
13

5
•
5
5
-

30
30
12
18

98
42
56
18
38

123
66
57
20
16
21

150
70
80
3
60
1

135
55
80
2
52
11

130
52
78
10
48

57
21
36
5
18

4

4

28
-

85
18
67
24
36
7

343
37
306
101
139
62

411
149
262
86
137
34

306
98
208
37
147
8

242
93
149
16
59
5

161
57
104
12
39
21

100
41
59
8
13

56

46

33

16
30

-

-

9

1
1

4

-

•
-

1

3

-

44

20
7
13
-

-

•

_

11
3

4

_
•
-

9

20
7

9

4

3

9
4

2

23

3
3
8

9

14

-

-

_
•

•

•
•

•

2
2

2
2

1
1

_

-

•

•
•

«

•

.

Weekly amings 1
(stanc ard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workeis

75

80

90

100

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
S
S
S
$
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
$
110 120 130 140 ISO 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 260 280 300

and
under
80

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

$ '
$__
$_____
$
*
39*0 130.50 127*00 112.00* 15*>* ?0
39.5 132.50 142.00 107.50-154.00

4

3

10
7

21
5

13
2

O
©
l

19
kC
10

1A
4*>
12

7
f
4

9
3

2

-

53
35
18
14

75
48
27
•
22

69
49
20
•
8

74
60
14
2
8

70
so
20
6
8

92
65
27
17
3

142
57
85
76
3

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

i

1
Mean t

Median l

Middle range 2

$

$

S

and
200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300 over

82
38
44
28
7

40
30
10
5
2

30
15
15
5
1

19
9
10
5
3

37
28
9
9
-

26
17
9
8
-

38
36
2
2
—

30
21
9
9
—

6
4
2
2
—

—

ALL WORKERS
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS B — — — — — — — — — — — — —
NONMANUFACTURING — —
—

98
51

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS A — —
MANUFACTURING — — —
—
—
n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g —
—
—
PUBLIC UTILITIES — — — —
RETAIL TRAOE — — — — —
— —

891
562
329
174
84

39.5
39.5
39.5
40*0
39.5

172.50
173*50
171.00
189.50
140*50

170.50
164.00
178.00
178.00
130*50

142.00-190*50
140*50-196.50
146*00-182*00
176*00-191*50
120*00-157*50

•
•
•
•
•

•
*
-

1
1
1

7
7
•
4

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS » — —
MANUFACTURING — — — — — —
—
NONMANUFACTURING — — —
— — —
PUBLIC UTILITIES —
—
—
RETAIL TRAOE — —
— — — —

784
469
315
54
196

39.5
39.5
39.5
40*0
39.5

133*00
134.50
130*50
168*50
118*50

124.00
124.00
124.00
167.50
115.00

111*00-146*00
111*50-145*00
110.50-149.00
156.50-178.00
106.00-132*00

.
•
•
•
-

19
8
11
11

40
20
20
18

115
75
40
•
35

142
82
60
••
47

135
90
45
3
32

80
50
30
1
18

67
34
33
4
19

44
22
22
9
9

39
18
21
11
7

25
8
17
13

26
18
8
5

17
13
4
4

9
5
4
4

9
9
-

11
11
-

1
1
-

5
5
-

•
—
—

•
—
-

-

CLERKS* FILE* CLASS B —
—
—
m a n u f a c t u r in g — — — — —
— —
NONMANUFACTURING — — —
—

194
63
131

39.5 132*50 124.00 108*50-154.00
39.5 135*50 117.50 105.00-179.00
39.5 131*50 129.50 114.00-142.S0

•
•

3
1
2

21
10
11

27
12
15

27
11
16

39
5
34

19
3
16

6
6

4
1
3

5
5

25
4
21

9
7
2

1
1

8
8

—

-

-

-

—

•
—

-

A j a _ 14 CA
l
1 %
94.00-110*60
a*
aa C C m
*
94*50-105*50

“

5
3

41
23

9A
c#
20

ia
to
5

£
D
i
1

9
9
C

9
C
9
C

j
1

98
57

CLERKS* FILE* CLASS C •••••••••■•••
NONMANUFACTURING — — —
— — —

38.0 104*50 100.00
37.0 103*50 100.00

CLERKS* OROER —
— — — — — — — —
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — —
NONMANUFACTURING — — — — —

273
212
61

40.0 148*50 138.00 109*00-186.00
40.0 152*00 137.50 109.00-196*00
39.5 136*50 138.00 110*50-166.00

3
3

7
7

29
25
4

39
38
1

25
22
3

24
14
10

13
9
4

24
13
11

16
14
2

10
6
4

7
6
1

14
7
7

8
7
1

15
14
1

15
15
-

5
5
—

8
7
1

5
4
1

5
5
—

—

1
1
-

CLERKS* PAYROLL —
—
— — — —
MANUFACTURING — — — —
— — —
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

359
253
106

39.5 167*50 161.50 138.00-192.50
39.5 173*00 165.50 144*00-206*50
39.5 154*00 154.00 130*00-174.50

.
-

.
-

1
1

9
4
5

13
1
12

27
21
6

44
26
18

34
26
8

43
33
10

32
19
13

39
30
9

18
11
7

17
8
9

30
26
4

19
17
2

13
13
-

12
12
-

7
6
1

1
1

•
—

-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS A — — —
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — — — —
NONMANUFACTURING — — —
— — —
FINANCE —
—
— — — —

549
390
159
61

39.5
40*0
39.5
38.5

133.00-173.50
133.50-176.00
« 3 Z *a a0 M 7 c # 0 0
1
0 ^I 79 a a
« 5A A A.1Cla
C
134.00*150.60

•
-

•
-

.
-

8
3
c
9

37
33

50
30

36
24
1C
49
1
4

32
16
16

33
19
14

22
22

-

2
2

10
10

-

—

-

-

4C

35
24
11
44
5

19
19

co
f

94
72
99
cc
\
47
f

58
42
1A
40

1

113
74
97
1A
1©

3

60
23
37
14
5
17

57
14
43
22

41
14
27
13
3

43
18
25
15
4

36
14
22
22

6
6

42
2
40
40

2
1
1
1

-

-

.

—

10
6
4
4

12

j

6
2
4
3

11
2
9
9

5
2
3
3

3
3
3

1
1
1

258 251
157 156
95
101
7 26
6
11
10
20
62
53

223
160
63
21
4
8
29

225
141
84
48
14
7
13

178
115
63
38
7
3
13

————————————
m a n u f a c t u r in g — — — — — — —
NONMANUFACTURING — — — — — —

PUBLIC UTILITIES

—

——

SECRET ARIES — — — — — — —
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — —
NONM ANUF ACTURING — — —
— — —
PUBLIC UTILITIES — —
—
WHOLESALE TRAOE --- -----------RETAIL TRAOE —
— — — —
FINANCE —
— — — — — —




146.00
147*00
144.00
141.00

535
188
347
149
71
96

39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
38.5
39.0

144.50
149.00
142.50
167.50
115.00
125.00

135.00
137.00
135.00
167.50
112.00
124.00

121.00-164.00
121.50-168.00
120*00-161*00
141.00-201*50
1aa aa.1C 7 *60
Qrt
100*00— I 5 I 110*00— 161*50

266
127
139
82

39.5
39.5
39.5
40*0

131.50
126.00
137.00
152*50

123.50
119.00
127.00
150*50

110*00-144.00
106*00-138.50
115*00-168*00
122*00-169.50

2*823
1.797
1*026
210
84
164
557

39.0
39.5
39.0
40*0
40*0
39.5
38.5

177.00
178.50
174.50
212*00
183*50
154*50
164*00

172.00
173.00
170.00
209.50
183.50
153.00
160.00

149.00-201*50
150*00-204*00
147*00-199.00
196*00-225.50
145.00-209*00
136*50-172.00
144*00-179.00

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS 0 — —
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — —
NONMANUFACTURING — — — — — —
PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------- - --- -- -

MESSENGERS

154.50
156.50
150.50
143.00

-

3
*
»
6

7
1
6
-

13
2
11
f
t
1
1

49
19
30
1 J
1C

19
17v
1

96
30
66
18
19
lc
32
26
8
18
11

31
23
8
4

32
16
16
12

7
2
5
4

24
5
19
19

122
64
58
12
14
32

259
178
81
4
17
60

313
190
123
2
5
24
90

326
212
114
3
2
22
86

282
170
112
3
5
21
82

19

53
21
32

-

3
2
1

11
4
7

53
34
19

-

-

-

-

52
26
26
13

—
•

•
•
•
•

4
2
2
•
2

8
8
7
1

32
14
18
2
7
9

-

4a

4

-

—

—

3
3

14
14

-

•

-

-

•

-

—

-

-'

—

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

119
89
30
18
2
2
8

103
74
29
18
1
9

79
51
28
19
3
6

21
10
11
4
5
—
2

11
6
5
2
1
—
2

9
8
1
1
•

.

—

-

.

•

W eekly earnings 1
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e weekly earning s of—
S

$

A verage
weekly
hours 1
(standard'

75
Mean *

M edian ^

M iddle range *

s

$

S

S

S

S

s

$

S

S

S

S

S

s

$

$

S

$

S

80

90

10 0

no

12 0

130

140

150

16 0

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

90

10 0

no

12 0

130

140

150

16 0

170

18 0

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

over

”

*

1

2
9
C

7
3
7
3

18
16

17
14

18
15

24
19

26
24

29
27

39
34

19
14

11
5

5
1

5
4

-

6
2

10
y
.
H

17
13

26

56
37
19
2
2
11

13

51
37
14
3
2
8

48
28
20
13
—
5

30
9
21
14
*
5

6
5

f
9
3

79
55
24
4
4
15

48
30
18

10

76
43
33
9
3

6

"

79
54
oc
cO

80

O

42
30
99
lc
9
C

51

H

7ft i
co9

1Cft
io o
AC
OO
7C
•H

999
111

10 1
54
47
11
5
5
26

76
45
31
12
4
3
12

63
37
46
31
11
3
1

96
53
43
38
4
*
*

26
12
14
13
1
—
—

11
7
4
3

1

27
25
2
1
1
—
—

56
te
43
11

50
45
5

62
48
14

7
7

13
13

5
5

62
n
51
50
1

42
15
27
27

32
10
22
22

41
32
9
9

9

2

9
9

2
2

—
—

126
29
07
1 f

52
29
23

26
15
11

27
22
5

24
21
3

5

9
8
1
1

15
4
11
10

12
11
1
1

5
5
—

—
—
—

1

-

-

”

“

and
under
80

and

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
SEC R ETAR IES

CONTINUED

-

$

$

$

$

1 9 6 .5 0 - 2 3 4 .0 0
S E C R E T A R IE S .

C LASS B

-----------------------

640

3 9 .0

1 9 4 .5 °

1 92 .0 0

1 7 0 .0 0 - 2 1 7 .0 0

-

-

-

NUNMANUr AC 1UK 1NU * —• —**• * * • * •• * *
2 2 8 .0 0
K L 1AIU

1KAUu

2 3 7 .0 0

""""***

2 1 3 .0 0 1 5 1 .0 0 -

~

2 4 9 .5 0
1 7 5 .0 0

J
L
9

3
i

b tL K

11

A K IC b t

u J .A b ?

1
/

•*» » ••**

1 .2 7 2

"

9
C
9

C

WHOLESALE T R A D E ----------------- -----K t VA XL 1K A U t ■ L " 1
1
1

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS D -------------------MAKIIIPATTI |DTKl^ • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • •
rTMINUr A u 1U n AINO
MftMMAkll 1 *r I ID TKir.
N U N M AN U C A tT1UW INi.1 • • • • * • • * • • • • • • •
r
C l LC m n A D t o u rK b 9
b T N U o K A rn C o c.

dfm fdai

o tN c K A L

_
••••••••••••

M A N U FA C TU R IN G ----- ----------- — - — ------KinMM A Kit IF A r'TI ID I N h • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
NUlMnANUr A t I UN tklft
Dl n i t U l 1 1 T I l F C • •• • • • • • • • • • •
_____________
r U|Q| L T C IITTI 1 T Tt d
C TCkin^DN Arrltnbt b t N I U K
CCMTAD
b I t N U w ADUfTDC
k AMI ierAC •UIOINu _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
t
MANUr A/'Tl K T KID • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
kinkiy Akll IF ATTIUK T NU • • • • • • _ _ _ ____ __
■ _____ • • • • • • • • •
—
NUiNMANUr AC 1 ID 1

57

4 0 .0

1 7 1 .0 0
1 4 8 .0 0

1 75 .0 0

677

3 9 .0

Af 5
H7C
0Q 0
Cr \C

160*00

1 53 .0 0

*70 ft
J7 « 0

150*00

9 AA A ft
HO#U 0

1AA CA 1d 7 U V
10«f#D|) 1 CQ #ftft

1 3 1 .0 0 -2 0 2 * 0 0

1 3 6 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
1 J o ..v vA - i on . A n
. UO
I "W A

-

-

UA
0*T

A C A .1 H .A
C a 1 f i AA
I
lc
u
i*i7#d0 idO#U0 ID* r . D 0 — 1 7r3 .U A
1 4 4 .0 0 1 3 2 .0 0 1 2 2 .0 C - 1 6 1 .0 0
1 CO C a tc a . D Q . I 7rS.OO
ld c # d Q
i i V C A - 1 C aa
1 5 6 .0 0
1 AO C a 1 VD#Qu
l flQ a a
<0 *0 io vtd o 1 7 C Aft 1 4 7 C n _ 1o » . 0 0
►
90 ^ft 1 P f ftft 1 c 9 ftft
9
Jo # U 1 C7 *Q0 1 7 *UQ 1 1 7 .5 0 - 1 3 4 .5 0
a

323
91 Q
C17

>301
1 OA
Vo

1

*70 d
J7 # C

Aft ft
HU#0

SWITCHBOARD O P E R A T O R -R EC E P T IO N IS TS -

81
56

3 9 .5
9Q C
J7 # d

1A1 #du
H i Cft

138*00 1 3 9 .0 0

1 1 7 .0 0 - 1 5 4 .0 0

1h u #uo
Aft ft ft
i

A?
Oc

Aft ft
HU*U

1 7 a ft ft
f *t* QQ

1

| A| Cft
l O l #du

27

90 C
J 7 ib 1 8 5 .0 0

CC A
DOC

1

C1
ld l
1 7A
IC O

1A r Cft
I O 7 #dU

I M .t L A .I

1 4 9 .0 0

3 8 .0

1 3 5 .5 0

B75

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

1 27 .5 0
1 2 3 .0 0
1 3 1 .0 0
1
H1O * vU

1 2 4 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 l a .. ha
<1H W
V

D __________________

o rC

MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING ------ — --------------FINANCE

366
506
247




20
99

79

113

C3
07
7C
CD

7C
fO
7Q
30

11
A

0 f
c7

1 93
12 2
71
«1
1
4

1 l
U 71
7ft
»0

2

99
11

7
3

2

1L
k

17
13

C ll
O

Cc
OH

C3
07

94
52
42

80
CA
HO
77
Oc

40
27

c
o

17
13

OC
VO

70
3V

7A
3o

88
55

cH

9J
L
lo

C f

Oft
CO

15
9A
1ft
10
1ft
10

26
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55
40
94
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68
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oo

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48
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lo

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cO

cc
00
1 ft
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\V
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c
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k
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c l
99

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CH
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c l
9

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cV

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lo

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49
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o

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ft
V

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n
58

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—
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10
3
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.
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—

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—
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—

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1

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—

-

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-

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*

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1

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7

4
4
—

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1

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1

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45
19
26
4

i
1

1
y
.

“
—

11

9

1

“

4
4
—
“
—

11

A
o

11
9

5

99

1

O
lc

-

1 AD C a .1 4 1 AA
lO V . O O — 1 H 1 . 0 0
1 0 6 .5 C - 1 3 6 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0 - 1 4 5 .SO
1 0 3 .5 0 - 1 2 7 .0 0

3
6

c
O

9a 9
1H,J

1*
1 4»

-

19 a C a . 1 4 Q C a
1j 0»30-1OO»39

3 9 .0 1 43 .0 0
90 c
J7#d 1 45 .0 0
90 C
Aft C a
Jo # d 9

Q7
7r
94
30

12
9
7
f

| "IQ a a . 9 1 Q . C A

1 7 5 .0 0

lN 0 * d 0

4

9
C

1A 7 C A - 9 9 Q AA
l ^ r .t>0—C C ^ .U U

A A ^ liA ftft
lC c
1 3 6 .0 0 190. O O — iO U . U O
1OA ftft 191l . Aa .1 4 9C . AA
IJOtOO 1C
0 0 —I O
00
AA.
l
1CH
10 *00
1 3 7 .0 0 194 . 0 0 —I C f0 . A A
1 3 3 .0 0 1 2 3 .0 0 - 1 4 5 .5 0

300
264

c
d

70
CO

Q I .C a

no

FINANCE
r| A C C

1 A 7 #d0
IO f C a

90 c
J7#d 1 5 0 .5 0

t r a n s c r i b i n g -m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s .
U u N tK A L ••••••••••••••••••••••••••

T VD T C T C .

39*5 1AA C ft 1 4 5 .0 0 1 2 3 .0 0 - 1 6 8 .5 0
l^o#d0
194 C 0 * 1 r c AA
39 5 154#00 1 5 5 .5 0 l c o . 3 a _17 9 .o u
x OA du n 4 A A . 1 C » A A
137*50 1 j o #Cft 1 1o . u r —*“ 7 .•UU

177
133

V

V

1C 4 . A ' . 1 K 9 . 9 U
Ca
I 9 H 0*>" 1 D

MAKII IF A C 1UK 1NU * • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • •
M ANUr Al^Tl ID Tkifl _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
MAMM AMI IF A C 1U K 1 N U _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
nUNMANU* A^Tl ID TKIA

2

1 AO

3 9 .5

90 c
J7 td

^6

••••••••••••••••••

2

9Q C
1 rO d u I AC A A l 09 O
j7 # d 168*00 17ft # Cft 1H o .O C . l o t . v AA
70 F 1 AA Cft 1AA ft A
J7#d lo*f#do lOH«U0 1A1 C a _1BK AA
4L9 ft fi * 9 i » C a
*70 d 1 7*7* 0 /v 178* 00 9O c t O i M*7Q . 5 0
C 1 f J A0
j7#
l

629
328
* 9
1A

279

M AN U r A C •U K 1 N u

-

33

2
C
D
9
c

l i a C n .W L n .A A
U ^ . D O — 1 “ U»vO

Cut I tnbU A DH A rt K A «I'Nb _ •• • • • • • _ _ _ _ _
bW XTTUQ AAK U U n cnA T ftD C • _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _• • • • •
y AN U r AC 1UIDI N U _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ •
SI • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • _
M aAll iCA/'Tl K T M
KIO IulAKII IF A C 1U K iKIft • •• • • • • •• • •• • •
M
NUNMANU* Af'TI ID 1NU
d iio iu r r
_ ____
__
“ U d IC i i l t i t t t t d • •• • • • • • • • • • •
U t 11.1 1 l c c

TABULATING-M ACHINE o p e r a t o r s *
CLASS B _____ ______ ________ _ __ ___
nonmanufacturing:
Dl 1 L T C U l i l l T l t d • _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
31
r U o 1r IITII T 1T r C _ • • • • • • • • • • • •

-

4
*
♦

99
11
9
C
n

9
C

19
ft
V
9n
10

1

O

c
0

34
10
24
4

77
55
22

75
35
40

11

no
60
50
32

19

24

187
103
84
79

136
65
71
cc

171
57
114
45

96
27
69
33

CA
OO

11

41
41

29
39
13

51
cl
2o
5

40
25
15
3

•
a
J

y
7

f

80
39
A9
HI

7
r

33
16

—
-

“

"

1

1

-

-

*
*
*

2
2
—

2
2
—

—
-

*

-

-

1

*

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
um
ber
O ccupation and in d u s tr y d iv is io n
orkers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

N um b er of w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s of—
$

$
10 0
Mean L

Median i

Middle range *

S
no

12 0

S

S

$
130

140

S
150

S

S

$
16 0

170

18 0

S

$
200

220

$
240

%

S

S
260

28 0

300

340

S

$

S

$
320

360

380

$
400

and
under

420
and

110

12 0

-

-

-

_
•
-

18
10
8

130

150

16 0

170

18 0

200

22 0

240

260

28 0

300

320

340

360

380

400

420

over

-

12
5
7

11
11

6
4
2

26
20
6

48
31
17

37
21
16
2

27
15
12
2

26
13
13
7

10
6
4
4

8
2
6
6

23
1
22
22

5
1
4
4

2
-

-

-

-

-

”

-

-

18
3
15
7
7

31
15
16
7
2

45
23
22
3
12

59
22
37
15

74
37
37
1
14

112
64
48
10
12

53
23
30
22
3

23
20
3
3

ie
15
3
-

3
3

15
15

8
8

2
2

_
-

•
-

.
—

-

.

-

•

-

•

-

-

-

-

54
19
35

42
22
20

30
8
22

32
4
28

8
3
5

70
1
69

2
2

2
2

1
1

3
3

-

•

-

•

-

-

-

-

“

13
11
2
•

43
15
28
”

76
48
28
•

39
29
10
-

40
27
13
-

31
24
7
“

43
20
23
18

32
14
18
18

23
5
18
18

6
2
4
4

6
3
3
3

2
1
1

-

140

ALL WORKERS
COMPUTER OPERATORS* * CLASS A
MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---—

241
119
122
49

3 9 ,5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

$
2 1 9 .5 0
2 0 7 .0 0
2 3 2 .0 0
2 9 0 .5 0

$
$
$
2 0 7 .0 0 1 8 2 .0 0 - 2 5 1 .5 0
2 0 0 .0 0 1 8 1 .0 0 - 2 2 5 .5 0
2 3 1 .0 0 1 8 4 .5 0 - 2 9 4 .0 0
3 0 1 .5 0 2 6 6 .0 0 - 3 1 0 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS a
MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING -------WHOLESALE TRADE ----—
FINANCE ----------------

464
251
213
50
71

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 6 7 .SO
1 9 8 .5 0
1 7 4 .0 0
1 7 7 .5 0
170*50

1 8 0 .0 0
1 6 7 .5 0
1 7 5 .SO
1 8 4 .5 0
1 6 9 .5 0

1 6 1 .0 0 - 2 0 0 .0 0
1 6 8 .0 0 - 2 2 0 .0 0
1 5 9 .0 0 - 1 8 8 .0 0
1 4 2 .0 0 - 2 0 0 .0 0
1 5 6 .5 0 - 1 8 1 .5 0

.
•
-

3
1
2
2

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS C
MANUFACTURING -------- NONMANUFACTURING --------

295
78
217

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
39.(1

1 5 3 .5 0
1 5 2 .0 0
1 5 4 .0 0

1 5 0 .5 0
1 4 4 .0 0
1 5 5 .0C

1 3 3 .5 0 - 1 8 2 .0 0
1 3 3 .5 0 - 1 5 7 .5 0
1 3 4 .5 0 - 1 8 2 .0 0

3
3

30
-

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS A — ------MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----

377
198
179
80

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5

2 7 6 .0 0
2 6 4 .0 0
2 8 9 .5 0
3 5 7 .5 0

2 6 4 .5 0
2 5 5 .5 0
2 8 7 .0 0
3 4 4 .5 0

2 3 0 .0 0 - 3 1 5 .0 0
2 3 4 .5 0 - 2 9 3 .5 0
2 2 8 .5 0 - 3 3 9 .0 0
3 2 4 .5 3 - 3 8 8 .0 0

30

_

6
-

-

4
2
2
2

25
2
23
2

39
13
26
14

104
42
62
16

77
33
44
10

55
42
13
2

21
8
13
4

43
18
25

13
9
4

7
5
2

1
1

-

14
8
6

11
3
8

21
12
9

16
8
8

32
18
14

18
12
6

11
5
6

7
7

21
2
19

21
1
20

6
6

3
3

•

_

*

-

—

13
1
12

30
11
19

18
13
5
2

52
37
15
1

37
23
14

37
22
15
2

39
17
22
12

36
20
16
13

44
34
10

32
11
21
21

15
7
8
**8

25
10
15

8
2
6

5

1
1
“

-

3

•

17
17

-

1

.

•

*

1

•

.
-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

”

-

6
4
2
“

“

-

8
8

8
8

2
2

407
183
224
52

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5

2 3 3 .5 0 2 2 4 .5 0
2 3 7 .5 0 2 3 1 .5 0
230*50 2 1 7 .0 0
2 1 0 * 0 0 2 0 4 .5 0

2 0 5 .0 0 - 2 5 5 .5 0
2 1 3 .0 0 - 2 5 5 .5 0
2 0 3 .0 0 - 2 5 2 .0 0
1 9 2 .5 0 - 2 2 4 .0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS C --------MANUFACTURING -— -------NONMANUFACTURING — --- — ■

199
76
123

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

2 2 1 .5 0
2 1 0 .0 0
2 2 8 .5 0

2 1 0 .0 0
2 1 0 .5 0
2 0 7 .0 0

1 7 5 .0 0 - 2 8 4 .5 0
1 7 6 .5 0 - 2 3 0 .5 0
1 6 8 .0 0 - 2 9 8 .5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS* CLASS A --------MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING ------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----

3oS
196
169
71

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0

3 3 0 .0 0
3 3 6 .5 0
3 2 3 .0 0
3 8 1 .0 0

3 3 0 .5 0
3 3 2 .5 0
3 2 8 .0 0
3 8 6 .5 0

2 8 7 .5 0 - 3 7 9 .0 0
2 9 9 .0 0 - 3 8 0 .0 0
2 4 9 .5 0 - 3 7 5 .0 0
3 5 6 .5 0 - 4 1 0 .0 0

6

6

6

6

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS* CLASS B — ---- —
MANUFACTURING ---—
NONMANUFACTURING --------

282
94
188

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

2 8 9 .5 0
2 9 4 .5 0
2 8 7 .0 0

2 9 2 .5 0
2 9 3 .0 0
2 9 2 .5 0

2 5 0 .0 0 - 3 2 3 .0 0
2 6 5 .0 0 - 3 2 7 .0 0
2 4 5 .5 C - 3 2 0 .5 0

1

ORAFTEPS* CLASS A ---- -----MANUFACTURING -----------

650
529

40*0 2 5 0 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 4 6 .0 0

2 4 2 ,0 0
2 3 9 .5 0

2 2 4 .5 0 - 2 7 1 .0 0
2 2 3 .0 0 - 2 6 4 .5 0

ORAFTERS* CLASS B ---- -----MANUFACTURING --—
NONMANUFACTURING — --- — «
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --- — <
■

735
567
168
39

4 0 .0 2 0 4 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 0 3 .0 0
40*0 2 0 8 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 4 4 .0 0

2 0 2 .5 0
2 0 1 .5 0
2 0 5 ,5 0
2 4 5 ,5 0

1 8 1 .0 0 - 2 2 0 .5 0
1 8 2 .0 0 - 2 1 7 .5 0
1 7 2 .5 0 - 2 2 9 .0 0
2 1 8 .0 0 - 2 6 0 .5 0

* Workers were distributed as follows:
** Workers were distributed as follows:
See footnotes at end of tables.




1
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

.

3

14
2
12

35
8
27

34
9
25

32
18
14

42
14
28

46
14
32

39
14
25

1
1

.

-

-

11 at $420 to $440; and 1 at $440 to $460.
5 at $420 to $440; 2 at $440 to $460; and 1 at $460 to $480.

-

6
4
2
2

”
_

“

12

“

*
*
_
.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS B — ------MANUFACTURING --- -------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------FINANCE ------------- —

-

7
-

-

-

-

1

6
-

-

-

-

2
2

1

.

15
15

97

18 0
161

143
96

83
71

74
57

22

-

2
2

96

1

8

13
2

6
6
-

15
5
10

78
51
27

83
75
8

137
12 1
16
6

228
182
46
5

86
64
22
6

56
34
22
10

34
26
8
3

10
1
9
9

.
-

1
1
-

9

2

7
7

12
*12

_

4
4

•
-

-

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
umber

O ccu p a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n
orkere

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
S

w eekly
hours 1
(standard]

S
10 0

Mean

Median £

M iddle ranged

$

no

S

%

12 0

130

S
140

S

$
150

160

S

S
170

180

$
200

S
22 0

s

S

%

240

26 0

28 0

s

300

s
320

$

340

$

360

S
380

S
400

and
under

420

and

110

12 0

130

140

150

160

170

18 0

200

220

240

260

28 0

35
35

36
30

20
20

50
50

36
36

28
18

12
11

33
25

30
18

24
23

4
4

1

13

9

7

8

4

6

1

1

4
4

28
28

47
47

77
77

57
50

48
48

150
150

123
123

36
36

7

4

-

2

3
3

3

•

3

-

51
51

60
80

30
30

7
-

2
2

6
6

-

2

over

2
2

300

320

340

360

380

2
1

10
8

-

-

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

.

9

_

_

_

_

400

420

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
DRAFTERS* CLASS C ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------- ----- —
DRAFTERS-TRACERS

314
276

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

$
$
1 6 2 .0 0 1 5 3 .0 0
1 5 9 .5 0 1 49 .5 0

$
$
1 3 3 .5 0 - 1 8 8 .5 0
1 3 1 .0 0 - 1 8 3 .5 0

4
4

79

4 0 .0

1 31 .5 0

1 26 .5 0

1 0 7 .0 0 - 1 5 2 .0 0

29

597
578

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 8 4 .5 0
1 8 3 .5 0

1 8 4 .0 0
1 83 .0 0

1 5 7 .5 0 - 2 0 4 .0 0
1 5 7 .5 0 - 2 0 4 .0 0

4
4

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS* CLASS AM A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------- ---

179
169

4 0 .0 2 0 9 .0 0
40*0 2 0 6 .0 0

2 0 9 .5 0
2 0 9 .5 0

1 9 6 .0 0 - 2 1 3 .0 0
1 9 5 .5 0 - 2 1 3 .0 0

-

-

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS* CLASS BM A N U F A C T U R I N G ------ — ------ ----

265
256

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 8 0 .0 0
1 8 0 .0 0

1 81 .0 0
1 8 1 ,5 0

1 6 3 .0 0 - 1 9 4 .5 0
1 6 3 .0 i- 1 9 4 .5 0

-

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS* CLASS CMANUF A C T U R I N G -------------- — -

144
144

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 5 5 .0 0
1 55 .0 0

1 57 .5 0
1 57 .5 0

1 4 5 .5 0 - 1 5 7 .5 0
1 4 5 .5 0 - 1 5 7 .5 0

4
4

-

NURSES* INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) --MANUFACTURING — --- --------------

199

|40.0 217.00) 2 1 7 .0 0 2 0 0 .0 0 - 2 3 4 .5 0
4 0 .0 217.50^ 2 1 5 .0 0 2 0 0 .0 0 - 2 3 4 .0 0

•

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS --- --- ----M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ----- ------ ----

See footnotes at end of tables.




177

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

18
18

11

-

11

14
14

51
44

33

88
88

42
42

-

4
4

10
10

36
36

60
60

3
3

15
15

11
11

1
1

3

8
6

2
2

5
4

31
30

60
57

_

.

_

33

51
47

14
12

16
10

9

_

-

-

_

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
Number
of
workers

O ccupation and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

S

$
10 0

weekly
(standard)

Mean 1

Median 2

M iddle ranged

S
no

%

$
12 0

130

$
140

S
150

$

S

$
160

170

18 0

S
200

S
22 0

%

S
2 40

260

$
28 0

$
300

S
320

$

$

S
340

360

380

$
400

and
under

420

and

110
ALL WORKERS

12 0

130

140

150

160

170

18 0

2 00

220

240

260

28Q

300

320

340

360

380

400

420

over

-

-

-

-

1
1

5
5

3
1
2

19
13
6

34
26
8

35
21
14
2

21
15
6
9
C

18
11
7
7
f

10
6
4

8
2
6

5
1
4

2
2
2

-

-

—
-

-

°

23
1
22
99
CC

•

l
l

•

31
14
17
19
1c

43
12
31
1
lo

50
20
9a
wU
1Z
l
l*r

50
21
Oft
C7
19
1C

28
18
1A
1U
a

23
20
J
2

18
15

3
3

15
15

8
8

2
2

-

"

—

—

“

“

12
11
1

-

“

5
3
2
1
1

15

22

30

30

18

8

70

2

2

1

3

12
12
*12

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS A ----------M ANUFACTURING--------- -------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g — - — -----------------

184
97
87

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

$
2 2 9 .5 0
2 1 3 .5 0
2 4 7 .5 0

$
2 1 4 .0 0
2 0 5 .0 0
2 4 8 .0 0

$
$
1 9 0 .0 0 - 2 6 1 .5 0
1 8 7 .0 0 - 2 3 4 .0 0
2 0 0 * 0 0 -3 0 4 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS 6 ----------MANUFACTURING ------ — ------ ------ —
NQNMANUFACTURIn G
FINANCE — —— — — — — ——

289
163
126
61

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 9 5 .5 0
2 0 9 .0 0
1 7 8 .5 0

1 8 0 .0 0
1 9 6 .5 0
1 7 7 .0 0

1 6 6 .5 0 - 2 1 9 .0 0
1 6 9 .5 0 - 2 4 3 .0 0
1 6 5 .0 0 - 1 8 6 .5 0
104*30—1 0 3 .0 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS C -----------

205

3 9 .0

1 6 2 .5 0

1 6 0 .5 0

1 4 2 .0 0 - 1 8 2 .0 0

-

4

262
129

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

2 9 6 .0 0
2 7 7 .0 0
3 1 4 .5 0

2 9 3 .0 0
2 7 8 .5 0
3 1 5 .0 0

2 4 9 .0 0 - 3 3 3 .0 0
2 3 7 .0 0 - 3 0 7 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
4
9
c

20
10
10

28
19
Q

25
15
in
1V

30
17
13

31
24
7

36
16
20
1A
kO

32
14
18
18

23
5
18
18

6
2
4
4

6
3
3
3

7
—
7
7

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS A --------------------------MANUFACTURING ---- ------------------------NONMANUr ACTURING —
— — —
— —
PU BLIC U T I L I T I E S — — — — — —

80

-

J
1

3 2 4 .3 0 —3 0 0 .0 0

^

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS R --------------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---- --------------------- —
N3NMANUFACTURTNG — — ---- — — — —

326
159
167

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

2 3 9 .0 0
2 3 9 .0 0
2 3 9 .5 0

2 2 7 .0 0
2 3 4 .0 0
2 2 7 .0 0

2 0 6 .5 0 - 2 6 5 .5 0
2 0 9 .0 0 - 2 6 8 .5 0
2 0 5 .0 0 - 2 6 4 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
4
2

4
4
-

4
2
2

4
2
2

33
13
20

80
37
43

64
22
42

47
34
13

21
8
13

36
18
18

13
9
4

7
5
2

1
1

-

2
1
1

“

4
4

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS C --------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------

168
62

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

2 3 5 .0 0
2 1 9 .5 0

2 2 4 .0 0
2 1 4 .0 0

1 9 4 .5 u - 2 8 7 .5 0
1 9 7 .0 0 - 2 3 8 .5 0

-

-

1
-

2
-

7
1

8
3

14
5

16
8

32
18

18
12

11
5

7
7

21
2

21
1

3
"

—

-

—

-

-

1
“

6

-

COMPUTER SYSTEMS AN ALYSTS,
BUSINESS* CLASS A --------------------------MANUF AC TUR ING — — —— — — —
NONMANUFACTURING
PU BLIC U T I L I T I E S -------- ------- -----

252
1 be
10 0
71

3 9 .0

3 4 9 .5 0
3 4 2 .0 0
3 6 0 .5 0
3 8 1 .0 0

3 5 5 .0 0
3 4 1 .0 0
3 6 3 .0 0
3 8 6 .5 0

3 0 9 .0 0 - 3 8 9 .5 0
4AC A n . 1 fiA .A A
30S)o00*J"U#Uw
*
■*
A n .A A fi ilA
3 2 6 .0 0 —402*5>0
3 5 6 .5 0 - 4 1 0 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

3 8 .5
3 9 .0

9
g
1

18
13
5

21
12
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

2

1

26
19
27
3

33
22
11
2

31
17
14
12

30
16
14
13

36
26
10
9

32
11
21
21

15
7
8
** 8

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS* CLASS B — —
—
—
MANUF ACTURING —
— — — —
NON**AMUr ACTUR TNG •••••• • •• • •• • ••

cc 1
86
U d

-» A C7* .0 0
q
,
3 9 .5 2 9 8 .5 0
•Jo u
J 9 .B c V 9 .3 0

C 0 7 . U U - J t r .9 0
_
*
3 0 0 .0 0 2 6 7 .3 0 —3 2 f.3 0
lA A UA 37ft .3 U —J 2 r .9 0
2 f 0 Cj>_337 tift

1

2
9
C

23
o
o
15

15
5

26
14
12

40
14
26

44
14
30

37
14
23

19
10
9

8
2
6

5
2
3

1
1

10

DRAFTERS* CLASS A ----------------------------MANUFACTURING ---- -------------------------

309
299

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 4 9 .0 0
2 4 8 .0 0

2 3 5 .5 0
2 3 5 .0 0

2 1 7 .5 0 - 2 7 8 .0 0
2 1 7 .5 0 - 2 7 7 .0 0

•

-

-

“

-

-

DRAFTERS* CLASS 8 — ----------— -----------MANUFACTURING ----------- -----------------NONMANUFACTURING:
n im
PU BLIC I1TT1L I T IC C —____ ______ ______
UTI T T f ES
— — — — —

330
283

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 1 1 .5 0
2 0 6 .5 0

2 0 5 .5 0
2 0 1 .5 0

1 8 8 .5 0 - 2 3 6 .5 0
1 8 4 .0 0 - 2 2 8 .5 0

_

_

-

1
1

.

-

4 0 .0

c 4 4 .0 Q

OAC CA C lOoQU*COU #Dif
7
7




70
69

42
40

34
34

37
35

10
8

4
2

-

17
17

1
1

-

6
6

6
5

10
10

34
34

80
73

75
68

46
39

43
3u

18
15

10
1

-

1
1

-

-

”

—

-

-

g

5

g

10

3

9

6
6

15
15

22
22

16
16

15
14

10

1f
19
19
1C

22
1A
xo

9A
CH

9
C
9
c

2

3
3

23
23

37
37

53
53

8

_

-

•

•

•

-

10
8

-

8

4
2

*
*

-

-

-

-

-

.

8
g

24
24

2
2

-

2

32

5

31
30

58
55

38
34

_

-

_

_

•

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 0 2 .0 0
2 0 0 .0 0

-

.

-

-

“

-

-

4
4

4 0 .0 2 0 3 .0 0 2 0 2 .5 0 1 9 5 .5 0 -2 1 1 * 0 0
A A A OA \ A A £ U £ .0 U 1 4 3 .3 0 —24 4 »UU

.

.

-

•

-

.

184
162

See footnotes at end of tables.

75
74

_

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (R EGISTER ED) ---MANUFACTURING ---- ---------------- -------

* Workers were distributed as follows:
** Workers were distributed as follows:

15
15

-

68
oo

—

2
2

-

-

-

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS* CLASS 8 u ak| 1 AC 1UKINC • •• • •• • •• • •• • •• • ••
I C
MANUr ATTl IDTM^

—

.

1 4 4 .0 C - 2 0 7 .5 0
1 4 4 .0 0 - 2 0 7 .5 0

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS -----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------

—

1
1

1 8 4 .5 0 - 2 1 2 .0 0
1 8 3 .5 0 -2 1 1 * 5 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

—

1
1

1 6 4 .5 0
1 6 1 .0 0

162
150

—

•

4
4

144
139

DRAFTERS * CLASS C
MANUFACTURING —

1

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 7 4 .5 0
1 7 3 .0 0
2 0 7 .5 0
2 0 5 .0 0

2 1 6 .5 0
2 1 7 .0 0

2 1 4 .0 0
2 1 0 .5 0

1 9 8 .0 0 - 2 3 4 .5 0
1 9 9 .0 0 - 2 3 4 .5 0

•

.

-

•

3

-

-

-

-

-

11 at $420 to $440; and 1 at $440 to $460.
5 at $420 to $440; 2 at $440 to $460; and 1 at $460 to $480.

8
6

2
2

4

32

99
Cj

-

a
c
.

14

16

12

10

2
1

9
9

-

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w rk
o ers

Average
(msan
2)
W
eekly
W
eekly
hours
earnings
stan ard (stan ard
d )
d )

1

1

Sex, occupation, and industry division

EN
OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - M

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS

'00

9k
IcO
*J7k
wf O
CA
D
O
1 79
Iro

192*00
^

__ _ _
___

1"RUt

CQA
414
180
DJ

9D C
J7#D
3 9.5
39.5
39.5

40 0 129 00 KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS M • • • • • • •
AA A 1 91 CA
IvlobO
"iM
ivur «v • vrtirvo-------- — —
— -------------- —
IN » ^ » V M 1U IH —
U N « N r V PU U
fit ini * UTILITIES • • • •
PUBLIC htti f TTrC ___
IQ C 191 • U
J7#5 1 *31 An
U
enULCJHLL IM UC — — -------- ----- —
M
— —
9Q^C I l 7-.cn
J7* ?
f #du
r iIN fN C —
M V.

DAD
▼ O
t
CQ7
9T

c
JY.3 147.00
3 9 .5 148.00
90 A I**S.U0
J7«U 14C AA
40.0 171.0 0
3 9 .5 147.50
90t b 11C cn
jo C IJ J.3 0

mI»UMEN
\
1 IO
1 1A
7ft
rU

f*

88
52

11

109
53
ca
30

39.0
40.0
■ lO.C
JO. 3

--t AIMfr At TlUKf1Nb _____------------- -------g l /% l
A
_________ . .
__
M ni ir A 1 ID k fl'

kiA i» AM A^TliOlKI/1 _____ • -------------k i l
NUNMAM ir AlTUWllvb • • • • • • —• • • • • • • •
Ur
WMULEJACE 1NBut —

279
1 AC
1HD
1 1A
81

39.0
-)Q.3
J7 C
ia c
JO»5

A -----------MANUr At 1UKINU —
—
— —
—
klA IUAk IP ADTI IDTM/t_ • ________• • •
K
ll
_
NUN^ANUrAC 1Uw1Mb • • • • • * • • * • •
IJU I c C A1 I TD Anc • • • • • • • • " * * • • •
A
T
WHULc^AUt IKAIIc,
r 1IN IN C
H V.
w
.

1*458
666
705
f 7C
156
190

39.0
3 9.5
•so e
JO . 3
39.5
*17-. e
Jt .3»

__
PI PDKC. APPfllIKIT TM . PI ACC g _
ft
tUuKfVbt AtwUWI JllVbf bLA
n«nur At i urim?
A A A k iC A/'Tl IDT
IA IU ll
NUNMANUrAtTUHINb _• • • _ —• • • • • • • •
• ___ • * _______
•
DllQl TP U1 1L TTTCC • • • • • • • • • • • • •
rU bL it IITII 1 1 i t b
UU pc A P IK AU t
OI
l
WnULCdALC TDAHP
OCT AT1 TOAHC • • • • •*•••• ••••• ••
K£ T A IL 1K AU t
FTKIAKirr ••*••**•*••*■*••••
r iN A N tt
•*

11971

‘lQ.n
J* . u

886
1 aUO
1 ♦ AAC
D
A'l

3 9 .5
38 • 5

254
392
247
129

4 0 .0

n O v M '1 1

clerks*

1W j) .
H
At,n 1 Nt Urt"P rnoc f

a c c o u n t in g ,

class

k/
.l1

5 EK V 1t t b




• • • • • • • • ••••• ••••• •••

10 0
1*0

rnt/ c QAVDAI 1
CLENKS* rAYKULL _______
MANUFACTURING — «•••»•«»•■
iN
Vii>m
«nur mv i vmxno — — — -----— —
— —
—
ACIAU. 1nHUU

Arrf/'C UCCUrAflUMb .
UFF l i t Ar^MDAT IAIUC

UAn^kC*CDTWr*«MArMTKiP HPPPA'roRs.
t5UUl\rNLL^1
1 IN vrfl^A
C
M
------------- ------------------- --M ufacturin g
an

9
9

132.50
129.00
90 C 1 97 CA
j7 « b i J f *90
AA A 1 C9 CA
19*3*90

„r*rw-„

wnu

38.5

kpvdiimpu U“ tKAI
pi acc
I
T
fVLYrUiM
Ln npPDATnoc. tLA^b B
141.00
!*IM U M 1UKX
Nr V
NO — —
—
— — —
141.50
NONM
ANUFACTUR ING
1*U .31)
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------DDT ATI 1KAUt
KfcTAIL TDAnC • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • •
r iinmpiuc — — — — — ■
128.50
1 3o.cn
1C7.3U
13 7 »uu i*»c.j3c.rvucw:»------------------- — ---------- — —
.An
—
125.50
MANUFACTURING
NUNM
ANUr ACTUKlNo — —
15 1.5 0
—
158.50 SECKfc 1 AN1ES — — — — — — —
kANUrAC 1UN1 klfl
|A
1&A.AA
1HO.OU
M kll IDAPTl IDTN
O
M U
AU SSII If A/'TI IDT r.
IU
1 4 7 . i; a
1*J*3U
NvNMANUrAtIUKINb • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
1 4 * . uu
DIIO TP U I1L1I1L9
I
rUWLlt IITTI TTTPC • • » • • • • • • • • • •
*“ 1 .AA
uum c c ii p IKAUt
WnULtdALt TDAnF • • • * • • • • • • • • •
DPTATI TDAnF
1 2 6 .0 0
KLlAlL 1KAUt
T1NANLL • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
1 31 .5 0
1 91 «U
X
CX AA
U
3CKV1VC.9--------------—
----

ICf

-*Q A
J7 • U 1 3 0 . U u

1 2 6 .0 0

TQ. A x i J . an
J7« U 11 i_ O U

37#5 1 2 1 .5 0
JTO V 1 18 .0 0

e c^ o c T io fc e . VUM e M _---------- ----------/ i ic
*
^LVnu 1 H
n
.73 a ----ijA kll IDA PTl IDTkl/i ••• ••••• ••••• •••••
M ANUFAt •UWINb
M U I IPA/'TI IDTK ••• ••*
AM AU
in
NUNMAWUrAt 1UK1Mb
hunt Tr
P U B LIC IITTI I T I E S — —
U T I L f TTCC

Average
(m
ean2)
W
eekly
W
eekly
ea in
rn gs
hu
o rs
d rd
(stan a ) (stan a )
d rd

1

1

••• •••••
—

—

27

*f
110
oxc
60
71
1 Al

l* l
*
1M U
JU
357
643
160
194
V1
176

71

9A1
C^J
112
131
4*778
2*609
9^ 1 kO
c l IDt
C
9QA
C 7*

9
9

233

1 * a 9A
ltQCO
970
fT

C

$
39.0 160*50
90 C
37*9 187.00
90 C
3o*9 174.50
40.0 204.00
39.0 177.00
39.5 165.50
3 7 .5 174.00
38.5 155.00

9CVKC 1ANX * LLA33 V — — —
C.3
,
—
k A ll APTl IDTktr __________ • • _ • • • •
A
M k IPAL1UKING • • • • • • • • • • __ • ___
ANUr
•
klAklii ANUr A/^ l InTk
kll
T
tD
NONMA IpACTURINO
nimi Tf* UTILITIES ____ —
_ _
PUBLIC IITTI TTTPC — — __ _ _
—
u iai
a
xi f TRAUE
WHOLESALE vnxnr — —
— — —
DCTiVI TO ADC
___
NET AIL IKADE
FINANCE —
— —
—
—

} *813
893
920
157
108
114
472
69

39.0
39.5
38.5
40.0
40.0
39.0
38.0
37.0

164.50
169.00
160*00
196*50
159*50
153.50
15 1.5 0
143.50

PPPnM.iMirp
r
v
— — — --auVnt, 1 M*X * Al xrr U — —
? 1-3
---— — —
k A ll IDAC 1 U Tkl/^________ —
i ANUr A
^Tl IDINo
______ _
Mk
K
klAklUANUr At 1UKT If; • • • • • * • • • • • • •
A |PAPTI IDIlNb
kil
K
NUNM
Q ini TP UTILII1E9 • • • • • • • • • • • • •
i
PUBLIL IITTI TTTPC
uua| PCAI P IKAUt
WnOLL9ALL TDADP • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
DPTATI TDADP
FINANCE
3C.H IVLJ
V

1 f*3 c
*>7
1 -A
Q 9
A
o*c
con
97U
74
on
7u
CA
9A9
COJ
no
1U7

1

IQ A
J 7 .0
IQ R
J » .3
lA.n
JO.V
1A R
JO.S
1 7 .C
Jr .3
Ifl.R
JO.3
IQ A
JO. 0
38.5

147 50
1 CA 00
lb *« AA
l9A^en
1JOtJU
i C7 9U
19 raCn
149 Cn
1*C«3U
1 J*oUU
1 u.rtft
1J r #00
ft
l 77 A
1po.cn
&C7«DU

9 • unvvjnRrncngf vLtttnwL M
ANUFAC 1UKI No — —
k lk ANUt AL I U 1K« • • • • • • * • * • • • • • •
lftk A k
NUNMA ll IPAPTI IDTN 3
K Ift
D I TP IITTI TTTPC
IID
PUBLIC U I1L IIIE 3
r lnAnvc,
-----

983
407
*C f
556
one
c09
244

39 0
IQ .3
Jv R
IQ A
JV.U
AA A
*H
)eU
38.0

19 t? U
U 70 .ch
1 9fi A
ft
IJOo00
140 #50
i k7 acn
ID f 90
11r •DU
H 7 CA

766
442
324
An
Oy

39.5
39.5
39.0
17.<?
j r. s

164.50
163.50
165.50
135.00

451
167
284
50
5?
77
ff
87

39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.5

1

m

39*5
C
Jr *9 104.00

603
359
OAA
1 7A
Uu

126.50
127.50
126.00
162.00

N ber
um
of
w rk
o ers

1*107
cco
99o
CAD
9*7
71
69
57
OAC
po9
87

1 1
1

CA
288
AA
D
O
135

39.5 218.00
38.5
39.0
38.5
40.9

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
132.00 SECRETARIES - CONTINUED
1 97 *50
lc r CA
JCUNt AN1C.3 * tU»35 O — —
—
A il APTI IDTMD________ * • • • • • • •
1 9k CA
M k idAL 1UK1 iM • • • • • • • • • ________•
ANUr
u
ikOobu
klD ANUr APTl IDT j
klli ll
kID
NUNMAk IPAL UKINv • • • • • • • • * • • • • *
D IQ TP U I 1 TTTPC
l I
IlC AA
PUBL1L IITTI H 1 I to • • • • • • • • • • • • •
119*00
i^ i/ re IK P TKAut ___
ta M
v*
_
1 9A CA
lcQ *90
WHOLESALE TD APC — ____ ___
***
nr*» All- tfw nr
f
. .
...
119 AA
11*3*00
NET a l INAUE
rvkiAiirp
.
... .
107.50
r INANCE

9D A
J7t0 1 Af AA
Aft A 100*90
%v • 9 1 Ak CA
90 A OD CA
J7t0
77*P0
40 • 0 07 *00
7 r .Aft
103.50

40.0 145.00

263
98
165
42

3Tin
M
/i
BILLERS* MACHINE (BQOKKEES■ 'A U
vn i inr. i
ilAklu AAllirAmiOTM/l_ _ _____ _
_ _
_
I V Nl«m;r «v 1U" I'V'i —
NM,
¥

90 A
J7* 9
39*5

1

53

9

39*0
90 C
Jo«b
90 U
JO* A

cat
9Uc

128

BILLE»S* MACHINE (HILLING
— --nwvniron -------------------------------- --- — —

1

1

1 AA
1«*U
TIC
I IT
7C
T9

40.0 186.50
40*0

/.A A
118

W
eekly
W
eekly
earnings
hours
d )
(stan ard (stan ard
d )

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS W M — CONTINUED
O EN

/A A
7a A
40*0

0

Average
(m
ean2)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS W M — CONTINUED
O EN

$
CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS
123

N ber
um
of
w
oikeis

37.5
39.5

1C1 CA
193*90
158.00
144.00
12 7.50

10

9C K V iv,ca-------------------- --- —

90. C iJS.SU
Rn
J7oD 1
STENOGRAPHERS. SENIOR -----------140*50
M
ANtlFAOTUR I Nfi
39.0 133.00
NONMANUFACTURING ---------------3 9.5 164.00
FINANCE
40.0 13 1.0 0
l i e aA
90 C 119*00
3 8.5 118 .5 0 SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS -----------MANUFACTURING------------ -------NONMANUFACTURING —
—
—
39.0 114.00
PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------39.0 116 .5 0
RETAIL TRADE —
—
•
39.0 112 .0 0
PTKiAKirr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SERVICES —
—
—
—
—
39.0 166.50
90 C 172*00 3Wi lUntJUAKU UrtKAIUK-Xtbtri XvNiST3 *
J7«3
90 C iOU*3U
JO#9 1 4 a RA
HHwurav im inw • • • • • • • • • • • •
k k AA il Af^Tl IDTA ________
in lk ANUr
ID
90 C 104 Ra
J7*D IV***30
NUNM k IPACTUNINO • • • • • • ■ • •
90 ^A
*>7«U 1 5 9 .0 0
wnuwbJMkc. 9nkuc
39*0 153*50
r iNANCE
3 8 .0 156*00
OCNVI VC3
90 A A Cft
J O * U 1*3*90

39.5

mmm
mmu
r

9

19

692
353
339
147
80

135.50
152.00
126.00
170.50
106.00
130*00
39.5 106*00
39.0 124*50
39.5 125.50
123*00
132*00
111*50

68

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 7 .5
3 8 .5

117*00

242
107
135
79

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5

127*00
129*50
1 25 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0

ir*MN3VNXBXnv*-f*MLniNt UNCNAI UN3*
409
9A A
J U
O

90. A
J7#U

3 9 .0

205*00

109

3 9 .0

210*00
9AQ AA
C*7*00

99

AA A
t U« v

**

MANUFACTURING — •••••••—
k
iAk iiu iDA A*i m 9 nr
ui
NUNMANUr ACTUHINO •■ •••••••

p1

* * ** * *
* * ** * *

Sex, occu p ation , and in du stry d iv isio n

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED

Number
of
workers

Average
(mean2)
Weekly
Weekly
hours1 earnings1
(standard) (standard)

Sex, occu pation , and in du stry div isio n

Average
(m an2)
<

Average
(mean2)
Number
of
Weekly
Weekly
workers hours1 earnings1
(standard) (standard)

Sex, o ccu p ation , and in du stry d iv isio n

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

-

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

PROFESSIONAL AN0 TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
578
CCO

$
4 0 .0 1 8 5 .0 0
AA A 1 8 3 .5 0

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS* CLASS A MANUFACTURING

7 YD
179
169

3AA AA
40 «0 cOVoOO
3 A 4 AA
AA A tUOoOU

Cl CrTOAK'TI'C TET^UklT/** AkIC. t-uAbS
C.LC-CTKUN1C3 1tC nN lvlA N 3* n ACC
klAllilPlATtinTlir
MANUFACTURING •••••••••••*••••••

C7v
c if

40 • 0 *DV*vv
AA A
•fU #U

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS* CLASS C M
ANUFAC 1UK I No

144
144

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 5 5 .0 0
1 5 5 .0 0

28

3 9 .0

2 9 2 .0 0

$
COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
403
WrlULt'iHLu

1KMl/t

"

"

*

261
SE RV IC ES ----------------------- —

--------------- *

MA I IFAPTl IPTKIA
M
NONMANUFACTURING -------— ---------- -------Un\7U .OA| r TO Hue ™
U FC
W A| C HLu n APlF
FTMAMPF
oC“ V V C
# *>
.. -

1

1

no
1*82 5
565
1*260
287
570
148

3 9 * 5 1 4 1 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0
1 3 8 .5 0
3 8 .0 1 3 3 .0 0
3 8 .5

121.00

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 7 .5
3 9 .0

1 1 7 .5 0

122.00

1 1 5 .0 0
1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 0 8 .5 0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN
COMPUTER 0rtKAIUH 5f vLAbo M •••••••
m anu facturing

NONMANUFACTURING
COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS b — —
MANUF ACTUR I NO
M * ANUr At 1uw liM
ON 1
iji
FINANCE
___ __ ___
^
COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS C — — —
MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING
COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
9USINESS* CLASS A —
—
——
m anu facturing — —
—————
NONMANUFACTUR ING
PUBLIC U TILITIES —
— —

212.00

325
147
178

1

MANUF AC UKINI?
COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*

57
79

Of A CA
c i **.qo
3 9 .0 2 1 6 .0 0
3 9 .5 2 1 3 .5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS* CLASS A » — — — —
—
MANUFACTURING — — — — —
—
—
n onm anufacturing --------------------- — —
diiqi t r iiTTi TTTrc
FUnLlv U1 X L l1i t 3 •••••••••••••

320
188
132
49

3 9 .0 3 3 2 .0 0
3 9 .5 3 3 8 .5 0
3 8 .5 3 2 3 .0 0
IQ A
07.1)

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS* CLASS 9 ------- — --------— -------MANUFACTURING —
—
—
NONMANUFACTURING —
—
—
PUBLIC U TILITIES --------------------------

234
90
144
52

7Q A
yd c
J7#3
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

O j3
CIA
3IH

AA A
h U«U

... .

3 9 .5
3 9 .5 2 0 6 .5 0
3 9 .5 2 1 9 .0 0

360
P19
141
CQ
37

IQl CA
1“ 1•DO
3 9 .5 2 0 1 .5 0 DRAFTERS* CLASS A ---------------------------------3 9 .0 1 7 6 .0 0
MANUFACTURING
<30•V 1 7 7 .0 0
DRAFTERS* CLASS
—
—
-IQ^C “ 7 .n n
4 r. U
U
MANUFACTUR ING
Art A
H •U 1 5 7 .0 0
U
NONMANUFACTURING
J 7 # U 14A.RA
. ju
PUBLIC U T lL IT lc.3

DC

OQC7 O
1A3
IOC
1 J“
11A
C
A

8

1

39 0 P7C.CA
39I 5 2 6 9 .5 0

C I O . T>v

3 8 .5 2 8 4 .5 0
Jv3«3U

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS
MANUFACTURING — —

1JO 10 C

MANUFACTUKING
kiAAiti a in ar a^ ti irt vAir
NUNMANUr ACTU«IN(j

C\jC
117
85

1A3
iO c

$
3 9 .0 2 3 3 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 4 0 .0 0
3 8 .5 2 2 8 .0 0

DRAFTERS* CLA55 C —
—
MANUFACTURING — — — —
DRAFTERS-TPACERS — —

———
— ———

——

—

—

4LQ
1
D 7i
cyq
3Jt
i 3c
YD
J7
303
coc

3A7
CH f

Or

40 •0
/A U
h U•A
39#5
40 •0

poa 30
c o o . ca
2 9 6 .5 0
2 8 3 .5 0
3 1 5 .0 0

34
4

180 0
.0

PROFESSIONAL ANO TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - W EN
OM

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS At
NONMANUFACTURINGt
rUDL v U> L lU v

1

1 11

rnMOiiTro nP P A I U oc* rt * c c o
CUMKU1tK U” t «P iT n«5 * vl.A33 H
p c i . aa
NONMANUFACTURING — —
—
—
c 3 1 .0 0
947.A A
t * 1•W
U
rOMPlITPR r ” vvn W ,nun j
ww"r u It.” PPDAR&MMPRQa
“
PA4.AA
CvH#tfV
BUSINESS* CLASS A --------------------------------3A3aCA
CVCf3U
p iltU v rriMDI ITPO rnvvrlrWrlCI'v •
C n .A A ^U"r U Cn PPHAP AMMFDC 7
D||CIMCCC.
D
CHH#VU
Dv3irlw999 p| ACC O "
"

7

1

1

9

*
)7

AA•A
rnMDi u " ppriAP ammfqc
•3U yv/nruitpp rn v/W u n n cn .
HV V
A AAA 141 A8
Ql ic TMPCC A CLA33 v,
•
OU31NC.33*, f*1 ACC r
•KloU 1 0 4 aU v

•

AA A 13A.AA NURSES* INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ----*HJ#U ico«U O
y Akll IP A T T l ID f M/l • •• ••••••■••••••»•
MANUrAt1UK1Nu

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




-----------------------—
—

E arnings data in table A - 3 re la te only to w ork ers w hose s e x
id en tifica tion was p ro vid e d by the establish m en t. Earnings data in
tables A - l and A - 2 , on the other hand* re la te to all w o rk e rs in an
o ccu p ation . (See appendix A fo r publication c r it e r ia .)

1

1 AA
UH
72

1

76.. Aft
>17. V A»HfWV
3 9 .0 1 7 1 .0 0

81

3 9 .0

2 7 5 .5 0

82

3 9 .0

2 3 4 .5 0

10. 1
;

2 3 5 .5 0

ay
OJ

10
0
I7
174
1 rp

40 #Q 2 1 7 .5 0
p l o . onn
ci a u

Average
(mean2)

Average
(mean2)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
woikeis

Weekly
Weekly
hours * earnings1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - MEN
$
2 1 1 .5 0
63

53
135
56

Sex, occupation, and industry division

131
71
60

SECRET ARIES —
— ——
— — —
4 0 .0 2 0 9 .5 0
MANUF ACTUR ING — — — — —
—
NONMANUFACTURING — — — — — —
PUBLIC UTILITIES — —
———
39*5 1 3 8 .0 0
39*0 1 3 3 .0 0
WHOLESALE TRADE

c* o J c
1*793
1*01 9
205
84
iOJ
cct

SECRETARIES* CLASS A ------------------------

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS*

n i D rc
ri

ArrmuiTT aia _ /« sec A
*
— — —— —

—

manufacturing

M . 1AIL
C

1KM
UC. — — — — — — —

tL tK ftat ACCUUN 1 XNU* ULA33 O — — —
m a n u f a c t u r in g —
— — —— —
NONMANUFACTURING — — — — — —
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s — —
— —
IK8UC — — — — — — —
tLCKPSt

1L

* 1/I.A93 o — — — — —
m a n u f a c t u r in g —
— — — — —
NUNMANUrAC 1UKXNU — — — — —
r

r.

4

n ltdu-c r ii r .f / i i c e r
r WL
~
v
NW
INHANUr AUUK1WJ —

—

—
—

—_ w —

—

—

-

CLtK»\S* UKUtn
makiii r » r T i idtma _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
nM Ur At 1U X!Nv ••••••••••••••••••
IN
r\
Cni/r
CLERKS* r\a%/nAi i
PAYROLL
IN IM B U HV. 1UK1NO —
U M IN r

—

—

—

ir evm ikiru norDATAoe
*i acc a
»'W irunvn vr&rsMiungy rVWMOO « - MMSUr AC 1UtlHO — — — —— —

— — — — — — ———
— — — — — —

nonmsnufacturing

FINANCE — —

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS B
uAMiirii'rnoriLii:
_
NUNHBNUrAC1UKI N C - -

PUBLIC UTILITIES
“ C 1 Al b
P t k i * ki/^ r
r INANtt

_

— — —

- - - - - - - - - ---------------------------- —

I K H E. ———————— ————————
U
——————————————————————




1 3 0 .5 0
1 3 2 .0 0

7AA
(0^
438
266
74

—

3 9 ,0
3 9 .5
7Q C
J7#D
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 6 2 .0 0
1 6 1 .5 0
1 6 3 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0

745
451
294
40
194

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 3 1 .0 0
1 3 3 .5 0
1 2 8 .0 0
1 6 6 .5 0
1 1 8 .0 0

182
61
121

3 9 .5 1 3 2 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 3 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 3 1 .5 0

95
57

lO fi
oOtl) 1 0 4 .0 0
3 7 .0 1 0 3 .5 0

213
7 CA

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

313
212
101

3 9 .5 1 6 0 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 6 4 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 5 2 .0 0

CA1
wl

IQ C
j7|!) 1 5 4 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 5 5 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 5 0 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 4 3 .0 0

384
157
61
531
1Q
O
lo o
343
146
71
95

1 3 2 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0

3 9 .5 1 4 5 .0 0
70

C

1 *y AA
l*A Q * 0 0

3 9 .0 1 4 2 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 6 8 .0 0
3 8 .5 1 1 5 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 2 5 .0 0

Sex, occupation, and industry division

PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------1n8U".
t c r n c t iQTrc
a cC r ---— •
5ECRETAKXES* CLASS t * “* ---------------* “
MANUr AC 1UK1NO
NUNMUNUr At 1UKINV? ■■■■■■
rUDL l v U 1 1L1 1 I t g m m
*
mm
WnULCOALC 9KA*/C, w
Kt 1AIL. 1“ Muu

^

cerDCTAOTPC. /m acc n ^
dt.vKt.1
vLAw^ U
**
MANUrAtIUKIMw
*
MAilii aA 1CAf*Tl IDT K •••••• ••••••••
ll
l/1
NUNMANUrAv1UKINU

$
7QaC 1 2 5 .0 0 TVDt c t d f nt O d A
1Tr 49 1 c . t ACC A
** •
IQ ?
is aalt Ip AC1UKINuf l ••••••____ ____________
^T| | t U ______ Q
3 7 8 C 1 2 0 .0 0
MANUF A
*
*
1 I t1 .0 0
AA
NUNMANUr At 9U“ IWv ••••••
•••
3“ 83 1 9
rINANtC •••••••••••••»••••••••
378V 1 7 7 .0 0
7Q e 1 1 0 Ca
*
3785 7 70 .9 0 IT K IS IS f tL A 5o O
nANUr At 9UK INu • •• • •• • •"
3 9 .0 1 7 4 .0 0
IMVnnAWUr M 1Un
U
...
—
2 1 1 .0 0
AA A
r INANtt
»■••••••
«MJ*0 i n j » 9cca
lo s 0
3 9 #5 1 5 4 .5 0
3083

213
176

3 9 .0 2 1 8 .5 0
3 9 .0 2 1 6 .0 0

639
7QQ
J77
240
41
54
122

3 9 .0 1 9 4 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 9 4 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 9 5 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 2 6 .0 0
3 9 .5 165*50
3 8 .0 192*00

1*267
726
539
118
57
75
QflC
cos

‘
iq.n
J7 . 170 00
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
■JQ C
9 0 .9

170*50
169*50
205 *50
1 7 1 .0 0
1 4 8 .0 0
1 6 0 .5 0

676
474
202

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

629
770
SCO
301
196
84

3 9 .5 149*50
3 9 .5 144*00
3 9 .5 156*00
4 0 .0 169*50
3 8 .0 127*00

5TENU6RAKHEKS* SE.lv 1UK
MANUrAt1UK iWo
NUNMANUr At, UKXNU

UA
9*1;

3 9 .5 167*50
3 9 .5 164*50
3 9 . 5 172*00

5 w 1TtnoOAKU UrcKA 1UNa •••• •••••••
MANUFACTURING - — — —
►
—
—

279
c f 7
1C I

S 1ENUUNAKnCKB* tftNtKHU —
—
AAAAlt IfTATTllOT A
l/S
MANUrAclUKXNU __

——

NUNMANUr At 1UK XNU

PUBLIC UTILITIES — ----------------—
F I N A N C E --------------------— --------------------

323
217

1

NUNMANUrAw1UKIWu
mini T/a UTILITIES ____________ _
PUBLIC nTfi ff f e e *

SWITCHBOARO OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUr AC 1 UR INU — — —
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
OtNCNAL

w ———

—

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED

MESSENGFRS — — — —
— — —
—
MANUF ACTURING — — — — — —
NONMANUFACTURING — — — —
—

40*0 2 0 4 .5 0
40*0 2 2 4 .5 0

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN
97
50

Weekly
Weekly
hours1 earnings1
i
(standard) (standard)

Average
(mean2)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED

39*5 1 4 1 .5 0
1 6 2 .0 0

NONMANUFACTURING -— — ------------- —

Number
of
wosken

1 6 0 .0 0
164*50
150 *00

aa
HO

81
56

3 9 . 5 138*00
3 9 .5 1 4 1 .5 0

12A
IC Q

863
366
497
? aa
CHH

3 9 .5 1 2 7 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 3 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 3 1 .0 0
11A-Art
3 8 .0 alo.WU

1 4 0 .5 0
1 3 5 .5 0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN

—

—

NUNMANUr AC 1UR INb

/ Ani iITCD U rtnA IU ngf vLAod O •••••••
^ yD
tui r U 1tK nDFOATODCa ^1 ACC ft •••••••
L AMl 1CATTl IDIKIC
i
MANUr At 1UKXNU *•••••••• ••••••••
INwnriMlTUr At 1Un 1W a ^ w
J
r

XNANCE. —

»— —

——

—

rnMDIITPD UrCnAIUndf vwAww V
tUHrU ■wN nPFDATHOC. Cl ACC C
MUlWAWvr A tlU n in v _
-

—

..
..
.

rnMDI ITFP DPOftPAMMFQQ*
tV/Flrv >Cn r ''v v "A r '"'L n 3 f
oiienircc n a c c a
BUSINESS* CLASS A — » — — — — •—
MAnur M " Un INv ■•■■■■■ ■
V
j
wvirnAnur At *u" **“»?
DlimlX t U1 XLX I 1*5
r U o TC IITTI TTIF<
"

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
Ql 1CTKircc . Cl A C C ft •
PUdiPiCwdt tUHOO w

u aA 1C AOTl IDT kl/1 _________ - — ___________ ___
ll
MANUr AC 1U 1Nb — — —
K
— _____— —
— — —
IVv»inANUr At 1U“ i»iv ■■»■■■

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*

aiic T N rcc. Cl acc t
D vPinc.opt vumoo r
MANUrAtIUnXNv •••••••*•
NUNMANUrMV1UNIWv

154
QC
*9
CQ
9*

3 9 .5
■ C
jq
J 7 .9
•7 A
Q
JJ . 0

2 1 8 .0 0
917 nn
C I S .00
ppa .SU
c a o cn

236
1L.U
1HH
92
CQ
97

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0

1 9 9 .5 0
2 1 2 .5 0
1 7 9 .0 0
177 . U
I f f ttn
U

102
63

3 9 .5 1 5 4 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 4 5 .0 0

QKQ
cOJ
110
93
50

7Q n
J7.U
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

244
ic J
121

3 9 .0 240*50
An n PA I Ca
**U.U CHX *SQ
3 8 .5 239*50

115

tU nrU 1C” vruH A Ivn^ f vWHOJ n
MANUFACTURING — —
—
—

146*50
I5a.a a
13H*UU
137*50
167*50

3 9 .5 228*00
3 9 .0 222*00
3 9 .5 232*50

Ca
jv

65
218
144

BUSINESS* CLASS A —
MANUr AC 1UK1No
N U N M A N U rM V 1UNXNU ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■
Ol IOI t r U 1 XL T T l . C
rUBLIC IIT T I 1 1 TtC S —— ~ —

3 9 .5

1 5 0 .5 0

7C
13

_Q_

C 7 3.0 0
279*50
314*00
365*50

———

49

3 9 .0 348*50
7Q e JH3*UU
7&C f A
t

J 7 .9

3 8 .5 J J J ,a u
P Q A 770 cn
J7.U J * 7.SU

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
an cT N P cc.
DUDXNCD9T

n acc n
ttA 9 9 D

■•■■■■•

MANUFACTURING — — —
57

3 9 .0
1Q.C
J 7 .9
38*5
3 8 .0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
3 9 .5
lq.c
J 7 .9
3 9 .0
A A .U
HU . A

iS l

$
1 4 3 .0 0
1 ac un
l*9*UU

561
JIM)
261
1 no

PUBLIC UTILITIES

— — — — —
—

—

—

—

173
82
91
52

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

‘in n .n n
JvU * Uv
3 0 0 .5 0
3 0 0 .0 0
3 1 5 .0 0

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

—
—
— ——

DRAFTERS* CLASS B — — —
MANUF ACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING:
PUBLIC UTILITIES —
D k AFTERS*

CLAbb

—— — — —
— — —

—
—

—
— — —

L

MANUFACTURING

Average
(mean2)

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings1
(standard) (standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

301
291

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
$
—
40.0 250*00 ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS —
MANUFACTURING — —
—
—
40*0 249*00

Ol O
J lo

A 0 u
*A • A
►

272

40*0 207*00

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
DRAFTERS* CLASS A —
MANUFACTURING —

Average
(mean2)

39
145
1jn

/.A

A

244*00

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS* CLASS
MANUFACTURING — —
—
—

Number
of
workers

Average
(mean2)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly
Weekly
hours1 earnings1
(standard) (standard)

—
B—

144
139

68

40*0 203*00

A

$
179*00

59

*JQmA
*77# U

298*00

________________

82

J7# u CJv*9Q

NURSES* INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) —
M a iM U i HI#T liD T n l v ••••••••••••••••••
" A t IIP A P •U n i A in _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 OJ
1A 1

40 •0 CtV*3V
P Il 7 * A A
C I. uu

trnuoiitcd
, U H r U 1t K

nocDATADc*
UrcKAIUKb

n L Abb
C acc

u

O

” “***“ "*•“

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
R1IC T N F C C •

PI A C C

A ________________

d

J

lO

DO
□1 |C TkJC’C C .

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS “ WOMEN

28

39*0 292.00

See footnotes at end of tables.




Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN— CONTINUED
$
40*0 207*50
A A A
**U • V 205*00

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*

**U• V 177*00
1«b*DU COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS A:
NONMANUFACTURING:
PUBLIC UTlLIllta

Number
of
workers

Earnings data in table A-3a relate only to workers whose sex
identification was provided by the establishment. Earnings data in
tables A-la and A-2a, on the other hand, relate to all workers in an
occupation. (See appendix A for publication criteria.)

r i ACC

R

t
lO l

Hourly earnings3

Mean 2 Median2

Middle range 2

S
3 .7 0

S
3 .8 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

.

N u m b er o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s of—
S
S
1
S
E
5
S
$
S
S
$
4 • 20 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 - .80 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 .0 0 6 .2 0
A

S
6 .4 0

S
6 .6 0

$
~s—
6 .8 0 7 .0 0

$
"5—
7 .2 0 7 .4 0
and

i

£ n d e r and

S
3 .6 0

o
o

$
3 .5 0

< *
*
»

O ccup a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

-d

o
rv
j

3 .5 0 under
3 .6 0 3 .7 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

'5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

2

5 .6 0 5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

-

-

30
30

ALL WORKERS
3 0 I L E R T E N D E R S -------- — - -------- — — —
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

155
147

$
5*28
5 .3 5

$
5 .2 2
5 .2 2

$
$
4 .5 2 - 5 .8 7
4 . 5 9 - 5 .8 7

CARPENTERS* MAINTENANCE -----------------M A N U FA C TU R IN G ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING —

318
237
84

6 .1 6
5 .7 7
7*31

5 .9 0
5 .6 9
A .ftl

5 .1 4 - 6 .8 1
5 .1 4 - 6 .4 9
4 .8 3 -

E LEC TR IC IA N S * MAINTENANCE — -----— MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

1*791
1*613
178

6 .2 6
6 .2 7
6 .1 7

6 .4 3
6 .4 3
6 .4 3

5 .5 5 - 7 .1 5
5 .5 5 - 7 .1 5
6 .2 3 - 6 .5 8

280

5 .9 9

5 .8 3

S .5 3 -

HELPERS* MAINTENANCE TRADES ------- —
MANUFACTURING -------- ------ -------- — —

510
489

5 .1 1
5 .1 3

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS* TOOLROOM —
M A N U FA C TU R IN G -----------— ------------—

836
836

M ACHINISTS* MAINTENANCE — — — — —
M A N U FA C TU R IN G ----------- ---------------—

•

18
18

9
9

6
“

-

12
12

8
8

4
4

16
16

20
20

3
3

10
10

13
13

-

4
4

-

•
-

.
-

8
6
2

1
j

-

13
12
1
A

4
2
2

36
15
2i

20
19
1
A

17
17

13
13

32
32

22
22

10
10

11
11

22
22

-

13
9
4

21
21
-

34
26
8

43
35
8

24
24
“

111
111
-

48
41
7

63
62
1

103
94
9

124
122
2

65
63
2

44
42
2

115
84
31

252
156
96

1

-

4

2

1

-

2
o
c

12
11

27
CO

31
30

51
46

36
29

28
27

25
24

5
5

40
30

25
25

26
26

8
8

36
35

51
51

13
8

53
53

98
94

61
61

24
24

27
27

-

-

-

9
9

8
8

3
3

19
19

57
57

62
62

119
119

21
21

45
45

_

6
6

20
20

60
60

118
118

28
28

71
71

26
26

24
24
-

12
10
2
•
2

28
25
3
2
-

62
6
56
41
10

38
16
22

_

-

9
9

•

—
*
*

—

-

6 .3 1
6 .3 7

-

-

5 .3 6
5 .3 6

4 . 5 3 - 5 .6 1
4 . 7 1 - 5 .6 8

10
9

6
6

6 .2 7
6 .2 7

6 .2 2
6 .2 2

5 .4 7 - 7 .1 5
5 .4 7 - 7 .1 5

-

637
634

5 .8 4
5 .8 4

5 .7 0
5 .7 0

5 .1 6 - 6 .4 9
5 . 1 6 - 6 .5 0

•

-

•

•

*

-

9
9

MECHANICS* AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) -------- -------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------- ----- ---------NONM ANUFACTURING------------- -----------P U B LIC U T I L I T I E S ---------- — ------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------

876
314
562
428
82

6 .1 8
6 .1 5
6 .2 1
6 .4 3
5 .2 4

6 .4 1
6 .1 7
6 .4 9
6 .5 4
5 .4 5

5 .6 6 5 .3 9 5 .9 6 6 .1 4 4 .0 7 -

6 .8 0
6 .9 9
6 .6 0
6 .8 0
6 .3 7

-

-

-

-

-

42
12
30
-

-

-

“

-

MECHANICS* MAINTENANCE -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONM ANUFACTURING------------------ ------

2*394
2*094
300

6 .1 2
6 .1 3
6 .0 1

6 .4 0
6 .4 0
6 .0 4

5 .4 0 - 7 .1 5
5 .3 0 - 7 .1 5
6 .0 4 - 6 .4 9

.
*

“

-

•
-

106
106
-

n iL u N n A O n 99
nMWUr ML f UnllNw

1*049
1 f 0^7

ENGINEERS*

STATIONARY ----------------------

Q
6 .9 9

m

•

240
148
92

6 .0 9
6 .2 7
6 .0 9

5 . 6 9 - 6 .9 1
5 . 6 9 - 6 .9 1
5 .7 2 - 6 .4 1

P I P E F I T T E R S , MAINTENANCE ----------------M A N U FA C TU R IN G -----— — — ----- — — —

685
685

6 .3 0
6 .3 0

6 .4 9
6 .4 9

5 .6 9 - 6 .9 9
5 .6 9 - 6 .9 9

•

SH EET-M ETA L WORKERS* MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

191
141

6 .2 3
6 .8 0

6 .9 8
6 .9 9

4 . 6 5 - 7 .0 6
6 . 9 8 - 7 .0 6

•

TOOL AND D IE MAKERS -------------------------MANUFACTURING — — -------- ----------- —

2*060
2*052

6 .2 8
6 .2 8

6 .1 6
6 .1 6

5 . 3 7 - 7 .2 7
5 . 3 7 - 7 .2 7

Workers were distributed as follows:
Workers w^re distributed as follows:




.

•

-

-

2
2

5
3
2

*35
4
31

95
95

80
79
1

259
259

292
289
3

5
1
4

9
9

4
4

14
11

14
14

4
4

15
15

5
5

-

4
4

1
1

1
1

2
2

6
6

46
46

80
80

25
25

-

5
5

256
256

41
41

40
40

5
2

51
51

67
67

S3
53

31
31

4?
42

24
24

11
11

15
15

49
10
39
30

104
50
54
49
5

27
15
12

92
2
90
90

140
63
77
69
8

74
68
6
6

36

9

36
36

9
9

•

8
—
8
•
8

9
9
—

30

12
12
-

“

-

12

110
4
106
84
7

19
19
“

26
26
-

49
47
2

173
140
33

63
63

80
64
16

71
71
“

142
141
1

162
156
6

26
16
10

175
77
98

70
50
20

330
220
110

77
74
3

81
81

348
347
1

392
392

4
4

•j
*
j>»
.
•
-

*
**

8
8

24
c**

9
9

90
90

30
30

41
41

21
21

44
44

28
28

114
114

25
25

268
268

364
364

19
19

•

2
2
-

-

7
3
4

16
16
-

2
2
-

7
5
2

50
40
10

7
5
2

21
21

26
6
20

12
1
11

2
1
1

65
65

-

19
19

19
19

12
12

13
13

35
35

32
32

65
65

21
21

44
44

22
22

60
60

28
28

143
143

162
162

50
“

4
4

-

4
4

3
3

1
1

1
1

9
9

-

-

3
3

55
55

61
61

-

-

13
13

44
44

80
80

392
392

73
73

218
218

167
159

52
52

33
33

136
136

118
118

53
53

42
42

633
633

6
6

12
-

4 AO_ 7 •AJh
L
OoHC* f u©
6 .4 2 - 7 •uO
f AM

6 .1 7
6 .2 0
6 .1 3

PAINTERS* MAINTENANCE — — -------- — —
MANUFACTURING --------------- -------- — —
NONMANUFACTURING — ----------------------

.

m

-

58
38
20

1
•
1

•

«
•

-

-

•

.

•

-

9
9

1
1

-

•

_

.

.

-

8

.
•
-

.
•

8
-

-

•

-

-

-

•

-

•

-

_

1

3
10
1
2 **10

-

_
-

1 at $7.40 to $7.60; 1 at $7.60 to $7.80; 3 at $7.80 to $8; 2 at $8 to $8.20; 1 at $9.20 to $9.40; 8 at $9.60 to $9.80; and 19 at $10.00 and over.
1 at $7.80 to $8; 1 at $8.40 to $8.60; 3 at $8.60 to $8.80; 2 at $8.80 to $9; and 3 at $9 and over.

-

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings

of
w
orkers

Occupation and industry d ivision

"5----3 ----- T ----- 1 ---S
S
S
$
S
S
S
S
$
S
$
$
S
S
s
$
S
4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 •50 4 .6 0 4 .7 0 4 .80 4 .90 5 .00 5 •20 5.40 5.60 5 .8 0 6 .0 0 6 .2 0 6 .4 0 6 .6 0 6 .8 0 7.00 7 .2 0 7 .4 0 7 .6 0 7.8 0
Mean2 Median2

Middle range 2
4 . 30

and
under

slid

4 .4 0 4 .5 0 4 *60 4.7Q 4 .8 0 4 .9 0 5 •00 5 •20 5 .40 5.60 5.8 0 6 .0 0

6.?Q 6 f 40 6 .6 0 6 .8 0 7.0 0 7*20 7 .4 0

7.6® 7 .80 over

ALL WORKERS
BOILER TENDERS ---------- -------------------MANUFACTURING------- ------------- -----

116
116

$
5,7 4
5 ,74

$
5 .3 9
5 .3 9

$
$
5 .1 2 - 7 .0 5
5 .1 2 - 7 .0 5

“

“

4
4

8
8

8
8

"

1
1

3
3

16
16

20
20

3
3

6
6

13
13

“

4
4

-

CARPENTERS* MAINTENANCE ----------------MANUFACTURING---- — — — ---- — — —
NONMANUFACTURING--------------— -----

237
181
56

6 .50
6.11
7,76

6 .1 3
5 .9 4
9.01

5 .5 4 - 6 .9 8
5 .6 7 - 6 .80
4 .8 3 -1 0 .1 0

.
"

*
“

1
1

3
3
-

1
1
*
*

1
1
•

21
21

3
3
•

8
7
1

17
17
”

5
5
“

32
32
“

22
22
”

10
10
•

11
11
-

22
22
“

ELECTRICIANS* MAINTENANCE ---- --------MANUFACTURING — — — — — — — — —

1,471
1*333

6.5 3
6.5 4

6 .5 8
6 .7 7

6 .0 7 - 7 ,1 5
5 .9 8 - 7 .1 5

•

2
2

.
•

10
10

-

20
20

3
3

43
43

13
6

39
38

67
66

100
98

53
51

42
42

107
81

ENGINEERS* STATIONARY -------------------MANUFACTURING — — — — ---- ----- —

218
195

6*08
6.1 4

5 .9 0
6 .0 0

5 .4 8 - 6 .4 2
5 .4 8 - 6 ,4 2

2
•

1

.
“

1
*

.
•

.
•

.
“

2
2

12
11

23
22

27
26

20
15

27
20

19
18

2
2

2
2

5
5

27
26

9
9

42
42

13
8

53
53

94
94

61
61

24
24

2
2

7
7

8
8

29
29

33
33

119
119

7
7

-

-

30
30

-

“

-

-

•
-

38
38
“

2
2
-

5
3
2

1
1
"

1
1
“

*33
2
31

243
152

93
93

80
79

259
259

292
289

1
1

_
-

4
-

24
24

9
9

4
4

14
11

14
14

4
4

4
4

5
5

6
6

27
27

5
5

4
4

1

-

1
1

2
2

2
2

2
2

2
2

45
45

46
46

80
80

25
25

_
-

5
5

256
256

41
41

32
32

7
7

1
1

_

6
6

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES ---------MANUFACTURING ---- — —
—
—

397
381

5*41
5*46

5 .4 3
5 .4 3

5 .0 0 - 5 ,6 8
5 .1 1 - 5 .6 8

19
9

_

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM —
— — — —
MANUFACTURING---- — —

752
752

6.3 9
6*39

6 .2 2
6 .2 2

5 .4 7 - 7 .1 5
5 .4 7 - 7 .1 5

-

“

6
6

2
2

1
1

MACHINISTS* MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING-----------—

419
416

5*96
5.96

6 .0 7
6 .0 9

5 .5 0 - 6 ,4 0
5 ,5 0 - 6 .4 0

•

.
•

-

6
6

.

“

20
20

22
22

30
30

14
14

11
11

55
55

21
21

5
2

51
51

67
67

53
53

11
11

10
10

24
24

11
11

2
2

481
239
242
194

6 .3 4
6.51
6 .1 7
6 .2 3

6 .1 7
6 .8 3
6 .1 4
6 .1 4

6 .0 0 6 .0 9 5 .6 2 6 ,0 0 -

6 .9 8
7 .0 6
6 .5 4
6 .5 4

"

“

-

-

-

•

-

2
2
-

15
12
3
2

52
6
46
41

38
16
22
*

36
1
35
30

99
50
49
49

15
15

-

-

2
2
•
”

63
63
-

68
68
-

“

67
4
63
48

15

-

-

-

15
15

9
9
9

—
— —

1*765
1*625

6 .5 2
6 .5 3

6.61
6 .8 2

6 .0 5 - 7 .1 6
6 .0 0 - 7 .1 6

1
1

2
2

2
-

15
15

.

37
37

9
9

14
14

48
48

53
53

98
98

117
111

23
16

77
77

64
50

306
196

74
74

81
81

348
347

392
392

2
2

_

•

MILLWRIGHTS ----------------- -----------------MANUFACTURING---- —
— — — — —

1*025
1*025

6 .6 4
6 .6 4

6 .9 9
6 .9 9

6 .4 4 - 7 .0 6
6 .4 4 - 7 ,0 6

.

.

.
“

-

17
17

10
10

8
8

9
9

27
27

30
30

41
41

21
21

44
44

28
28

114
114

25
25

268
268

364
364

19
19

-

-

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE ---- --------------MANUFACTURING ---- -----------------------

171
144

6 .3 3
6 .21

6 .3 7
6 .3 7

5 .6 9 - 6 .91
5 .6 9 - 6.91

1
•

.

-

-

-

4
*

3
3

16
16

2
2

5
5

36
36

7
5

6
*

6
6

2
1

2
1

65
65

1

•

2
2

3
1

PIPEFITTERS* MAINTENANCE --------------MANUFACTURING---- — — . . . — —

640
640

6.4 0
6.40

6 .6 8
6 .6 8

5 .7 5 - 7 .0 2
5 .7 5 - 7 .0 2

.

•
-

10
10

.

-

1
1

19
19

1
1

5
5

13
13

23
23

32
32

60
60

21
21

44
44

18
18

60
60

28
28

143
143

162
162

SHEET-METAL WORKERS* MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------

188
138

6 .2 5
6 .8 3

6 .9 8
6 .9 9

4 .6 5 - 7 .0 6
6 .9 8 - 7 .0 6

.

-

-

-

-

“

■

50
"

-

-

•

4
4

“

4
4

“

1
1

1
1

9
9

.
•

.
“

3
3

55
55

61
61

---- —
—

1*320
1*312

6 .6 9
6.70

7 .0 2
7 .0 2

6 .1 6 - 7 .3 2
6 .1 6 - 7 .3 2

•

.

1
1

38
38

16
16

21
21

26
26

54
54

126
118

52
52

33
33

136
136

118
118

5
5

42
42

—
—

—

MECHANICS* AUTOMOTIVE
(M AINTENANCE)---- —
— ---- —
—
MANUFACTURING------- -------- — — —
NONMANUFACTURING — ------- — —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ------------------MECHANICS* MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING---- — ----- —

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS — —
MANUFACTURING — — —

— —
— —

—

* Workers were distributed as follows:
to $ 10.60; and 7 at $ 10.60 and over.




•

-

-

“

•

.
“

•
-

4
4

.

9
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

“
10

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

1
1

-

-

-

633
633

-

“

5
5

“

at $7.80 to $8; 1 at $ 8 to $8.20; 1 at $8.60 to $8.80; 1 at $9.20 to $9.40; 8 at $9.60 to $9.80; 5 at $ 10.00 to $ 10.20; 3 at $ 10.20 to $ 10.40; 4 at $ 10.40

Hourly earnings3

N u m b e r o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t -t im e h o u rly e a rn in g s of—
S
2 .0 0

S

O ccup a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

S
2 .3 0

$
2 .4 0

$
2 .6 0

S
2 .8 0

S
3 .0 0

S
3 .2 0

S

2 .1 0

S
2 .2 0

3 .4 0

$
3 .6 0

S
S
3 .8 0 4 .0 0

S
4 .2 0

$
4 .4 0

S
4 .6 0

S
4 .8 0

S
5 .0 0

S
5 .4 0

$
5 .8 0

S
1 ---6 .2 0 6 .6 0

2*00 2 .1 0

Num ber
of
workers

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 Q

2*60 2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0 4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

6 .6 0

over

1094

351

204

24

69

1094

351

204

24

69

33
3
30
PA
CO

100
78
22
22

73
50
23
23

130
108
22
22

56
35
21
21

16
11
5
5

115
95
20
17

140
133
7
7

164
163
1
1

-

AO
HO

62
15
47
23
1c
lb

40
22
18
17

349

59
20
39
32
A
O

33
11
22
21

1090

76
7
69
16
Cl
Pi

-

O f.
i
Ck

55
3
52
50

3

7

18

14

11

8

68

39

47

35

11

95

133

163

-

11

178
157
21
17
—
3

143
121
22
7
6
9

1

134
106
28
1
2
25
—

117
101
16
3
13
—

415
405
10
—
10
*

22
22
—
—
—
—
—

S
1 .9 0
M ean2

M ed ian 2

M iddle range 2

and
under

and

ALL WORKERS

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN ------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------ -----FINANCE -------- ----------------------------<?FRVICE?

2*8 9 4
754
2*140
277
1*813

$
3*02
4*90
2*36
3*84
2 .1 2

$
2 .2 0
5 .0 1
2 .0 5
3 .7 7

$
2 .0 0 4 .3 1 2 .0 0 3 .2 1 -

$
4 .1 2
5 .4 7
2 .2 5
4 .4 6
2 .1 5

-

GUARDS*
5 .2 3
WATCHMEN*
MANUFACTURING — —

— — — — —

—

4 .3 6 — 5 .7 8

m

“

3

3«65
2#81
c* o r
2#93

3 .0 6
4 .2 1
2 .9 7
j* ©y
7 AT
J#Hf
o AC
c* o b
O #07
c t 7
2 .9 7

2 .8 1 5 iO f*
c .7 3 3 .6 9 —
3 .0 0 2 .4 0 —
o CC.
CtDD*
2 .8 1 -

3 .8 6
5 .0 9
3 .£ 6
4*55
4 .2 5
2 .6 5
2 .9 7
3 .0 6

AA

C A7
9

4# 7l
3 .9 6
7 TO
* #QA
5
5 .3 6

3 .8 0 —
3 .9 0 —
3 .6 1 cc.
J .3 5 -

456

_AO
AftOc
/ fO
* #74
►
4 .4 2
7 OA
J#TO
4 .5 1

ORDER F I L L E R S ---------- — — — ------------ —
MANUFACTURING —
— — —
—
IMUMnAMUi A t 1UK 1Nu • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
yUAI CC ALu TDAHC • •• • • • • • • • • • • •
ft
NnUtCD A p IKAUt

2*7 7 4
1*227
1*547
AQC
T«b

4 .2 0
4 .2 8
4 .1 5
3 .6 8

3 .9 5
4 .1 4
3 .9 0
3 .6 2

3 .5 2 - 4 .9 8
3 .4 2 - 4 .8 1
3 .5 2 - 5 .1 2
3 .1 3 - 3 .9 1

DAri^CDC. CUTlDO 1No • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
r A t ^ t n b t o n r r Tkl/i
“ A N U rA C •UKINU • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
NONMANUFACTURING — — — — —
—
WHOLESALE TRADE — — — — —

2* 100
1 bob
515
456

3 .9 8
4* 16
3 .4 1
3 .5 6

3 .9 8
4 .0 8
3 .4 8
3 .9 1

3 .4 5 —
3 . 86—
2 .3 C 2 .7 6 -

4 .4 8
4 .5 4
4 .2 5
4 .2 5

“

4

-

4

ACO
HDO
07 0
c fa
188
11^
11*5

4 .5 1
4 .6 8
4 .2 8
4 .0 3

4 .3 0
4 .6 7
4 .1 1
4 .0 0

3 .9 4 —
4 .0 3 3 .6 5 3 .6 5 —

5 .1 7
5 .2 2
4 .9 0
4 .3 0

295
CCJ
7?
eo
Do

AlOO
A 77
9#
4*38
A \A
• ID

a
Kt
H .O J
4 86
4 .2 3

a
l . Oad H .O J 3 .6 8 3 .6 8 -

428
OCl

4*50
A A7

4 .5 1
A aq

1 90
1T C
107

A AA
4#OQ
4*37

A Af
•ftOT
4 .6 7

3 .8 1 • QA
s
d .» U ■s
d. 7a _
1H—
3 .1 9 -

5 .0 4
A DA
*>«TO
C OA
5«o0
5 .0 0

uuni CC * (T TD AHP _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
|
WflvLCdALC. 1KAl»f. • •• • • • •• • •• • •
DCT ATI 1KAUil
Wt 1A1» TQ A nr
m1
r INADvi. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
SE R V IC E S —— — — — — — — —
1 ARDRFRC. MATFRTAI HANHI Anlw . . a • •• .
f nA yc»n 1ML nMl’lvia TNG ••• u a
A
MAKil 1CATTI IDT Kir.
MAIrUr A t 1UK 1IN • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
U
n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------- --------—
yum c c ai c t d a h c
R E T A IL TRADE —

—

— —

6*363

\CD
IOC

CCA
1. I i A
I f I lH
2*343

■ I.QQ7
J* “ »f
2*323
1*674

— — —

9

o r r c T1 YM/t Cl CDk'C
/
MAMI IC ATTl ID IMA
rlANUr A t 1UK|NO
NONMANUFACTURING — —
— — — —
yuHl CC A C IK AU t
ft
WnULCdALb TDAHC • • • • • • • • • • • • • *

nMiior Av i On a nv

NONMANUFACTURING —

—

— — —

UHAI FSAI F TRAnF

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS — —

MANI IF Av 1UK XWO • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • •
nHINUr ACTIIDTKIA
mokimamiif a t i d inir;
_ __ _ _ _
nuirnwnur A p tlUiK t Ko • •• • • • • • • • • • • • •
WHOLESALE TRADE — — — —
—

*

Workers were distributed as follows:




a

a

14

180
153
27
3
16
8

175
125
50
9
35
1
5

116
203
203

210
80
130
110
2

594
212
382
282
11

224
162
62
36
18

77
37
40
28
11

223
209
14
6
7

195
171
24
2
21

124
88
36
12
24

280
150
130
89
41

840
633
207
48
159

82
48
34

429
76
353

11
8
25
AA ft
oou

18
17
111
207

314
235
79
2
17
6
51
7
J

153
143
10
8
2

c .c o
P oo
C 7A
P . J*

AND CLEANERS —

258
227
31
1
13
5
12

1

754
50
704

4 .4 7

3 .4 1

PORTERS*

265
159
106
83
—
4
13

C

4 . 31

JANITORS*

1A
IU

5 .6 9
5 .5 2
3*99
2 .7 5 - 5 .7 6

3

61

106

60

3
”

61

105
”

60

3

*
7A
JO
PC
CD

31
8
66

*
36
12
12

31
7
24
—
—
24
“

Q
9

l ;
IP

3

13

J7
3
36

-

8

13

36

26
10
16

-

-

10

10

10
10

10
10

124
21
103
90

-

-

.

®
17
6
11

*

“
-

-

"

“

20
62
366
A
O

427 1760
29
21
406 1731
2
*
*
7
10
241
17
404
73
a c 1PQA
op iC T O

5| A
J19

•

-

-

-

-

“
”
-

4

71
48
23
8
4

34

1

-

113
59
54
54

113
6
107
107

165
124
41
41

98
71
27
27

49
34
15
15

197
24
173
92

287
61
226
199

375
84
291
237

221
170
51
51

90
57
33
32

73
73
-

169
151
18
15

114
19
95

153
50
103
59

412
158
254

54
15
39
36

65
65
-

6
6
-

25
6
19

32
13
19
10

61
41
20
17

48
36
12
12

71
60
11
11

102
88
14
14

106
51
55
55

44
36
8
8

471
392
79
79

120
95
25
25

242
139
103
103

295
295

30
30

81
80
1
1

61
30
31
31

117
117

45
45

3
3

1
1

2
1
1

21

64
29
35
21

62
32
30
24

21
17
4
2

22
20
2
2

15
11
4
*

70
49
21
6

31
17
14
*

49
37
12
6

-

21
11

40
6
34
34

5
5

7
7

19
18
1

21
21

-

9
7
2
—

7

-

91
Cl

23
23

D7
c 9
1Q
19

77
JJ
17
13

PA
Ch

A
o

60
52
8
5

28
20
8
“

27
27

8
8

20
17

18
6
6

6

8

14
12
2
2
13
12

49
25
24
21

39
21
18
17

26
24
2

37
8
29
19

"

-

_

20
16
4

m

18
18

4 .6 3
A <3
17
5
-

20
—
20
20
—

AO
*8
►
9
39
27
12

A
0
A
0

-

61

05
OJ
27
56
20
32

26

*

-

511
57
454

-

10

-

10
10

179 at $6. 60 to $7; 7 at $7 to $7.40; and 6 at $7.40 to $7.80.

-

-

-

-

32
12
20
20

25
1Q
10
7

27
Pa
c4
3

1
20
9a
cO
11
11
6

—

®
17
15
2

43
TP
JC
11
2

37
20
17
11

1

*
42
42
-

163
205
158
13
5 *192

—

-

—
20

—

20
-

Hourly earnings

of
w
orkers

Mean2 Median2

Middle range 2

$
2 .0 0

S
2 .2 0

S
2 .3 0

$
2 .4 0

S

1 ------1 ------ S
S
4 .2 0 4 .4 0
3 .8 0

2*19 2 *?0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

”

S
3 .0 0

S
3 .2 0

3 .4 0

$
3 .6 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 •80 4 .0 0

8
8
-

13
7
6
6

5
5
-

42
35
7
7

79
19
60
30

65
31
34
—
34

8
8
-

13
7
6
6

•

7
7
7

10
10
10

8
8

2*69

•
-

S
2 .8 0

1
1

S
2 .1 0

S
2 .6 0

.
o
o

Occupation and in d u s try d iv is io n

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
S
1 .9 0

$
5 .0 0

S
4 .6 0

S
4 .8 0

5*09 5 .4 0

S
5 .4 0

“I ------ S
5 .8 0 6 .2 0

and
und er

$
6 .6 o
and

5*80 6*20 6*60 o v e r

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

64
50
14
14

28
25
3
1
-

186
39
147
36
110
1

41
33
8
4
2
-

127
65
62
2
60
-

23
22
1
1
-

921
146
775
30
581
46

632
193
439
236
188

167
51
116
16
100

16
3
13
13

16
9
7
7

13
10
3
”

18
16
2
-

21
19
2
-

73
18
55
55

12
12
-

59
13
46
39

95
76
19
-

12
4
8
-

—
—
-

-

-

-

41
11
30

42
21
21

20
20
-

-

19
18
1
1

10
7
3
-

37
32
5
-

10
9
1
-

420
38
382
45

159
33
126
12

102
24
78
76

36
12
24
24

284
37
247
-

2
2

1
1
1

Aa
•*o
48

IB

-

tb
1c
12

9AA

•

74
172

19
1A
to

172

2 .0 0

lo

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
TR U C K D R IV E R S -------- — — — — — — —
MANUFACTURING — — —
— —
NONMANUFACTURING — —
— — — —
P U BLIC U T I L I T I E S ---- ---------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------- — -----R ETA IL TRADE —
— — -----—
TRUCKDRIVERS* LIG H T (UNDER
1 -1 / 2 T O N S ) -------- ------------------------MANUFACTURING — — — —
— — —
NONMANUFACTURING — —
—
—
WHOLESALE TRADE — —
— —
TRUCKDRIVERS* MEDIUM (1 -1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) ----------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------- ----R ETA IL TRADE ----------------------------TRUCKDRIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
y d A tl CD TVDP % • • • • • • • •• • •• • •• • ••
i K IL c K 1T r C 1
MANUFACTURING — — — —
—
—
KlrtklkJ AM 1CAt* 1UID INvJ • ••••* ••• • •• • •
I
N U N M A N U r A/*Tt K Tklft
DIIQI It U I I I I I D
*
r U H L l f IITTIL T T TCC • • * • •• • •• • •• •
_________
DCT ATI 1KAi Jr. _________—
K t T A I L TO A D C — — — — —— — — —
TRUCK0RIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
OTHER THAN TR AILER TYPE) ----------MANUFACTURING — — — — — —
n o n m a n u fa ctu pin g —
—
—
—
TRUCKERS* POWER (F O R K LIFT ) ------------MANUFACTURING - — - — ---- — —
n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g —
— — — — —
ULl/M fC A l r TKAUE
_______ __
WHOLESALE T D A f\ C _____ —
R ETA IL TRADE ----------------------------TRUCKERS* POWER (OTHER THAN
FO R KLIFT) —
— — — — —
MANUFACTURING —
—
—

—
— —

WAREHOUSEMEN — -------- -— ---------- — -----MANUFACTURING — — — —
— —
n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g —
— — — —
WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------R ETA IL TRADE ----------------------------

*
**
t

4 *193
825
3*368
1*425
1*172
596

$
5 .7 5
5 .1 1
5 .9 1
6 .6 ?
5 .1 7
5 .9 7

$
5 .6 2
5 .1 9
6 .2 0
6 .7 5
5 .3 4
5 .8 2

$
5 .2 5 4 .3 2 5 .3 4 6 .6 0 5 .2 5 5 .4 7 -

$
6 .6 0
5 .6 6
6 .6 0
6 .8 0
5 .4 5
6 .4 8

-

373
187
186
137

4 .7 7
4 .9 4
4 .5 9
4 .4 9

4 .7 5
4 .9 2
4 .7 5
4 .6 7

4 .3 2 4 .4 0 3 .8 5 3 .6 5 -

5 .4 7
5 .6 6
5 .3 4
5 .3 4

-

1*189
271
918
158

5 .5 9
5 .1 4
5 .7 2
5 .7 6

5 .3 5
5 .1 3
5 .4 5
5 .8 2

5 .3 4 4 .2 5 5 .3 4 5 .3 5 -

6 .4 8
5 .8 4
6 .8 0
5 .8 2

1*|554
226
1 • J<CO
J * 15Q
t
fi A C
ODD

A
4 AO

A*4fl—
oo■ ▼ y*
5 .2 9 ( C7»
s
0«5(o.ou—
c A7_

A AQ
0o07
6 .0 4
f. O V
s
O. £Q
A* f f
O 77
a £«

AOC

A# u o
o AA

A AA
OoQQ
5 .4 0
A Aa
OoOQ
A Aa
OoOU
A AA

6 13
101
512

5 .1 6
4 .4 6
5 .3 0

5 .2 6
4 .6 7
5 .2 7

5 . 2 1 - 5 .3 5
3 . 6 7 - 5 .1 9
5 . 2 3 - 5 .4 2

2*706
2*341
365
1A A
1 VO
253

5 .0 4
4 .9 8
5 .4 2
C AA
5 .5 9

5 .1 6
5 .1 4
5 .7 0
C U
b# h
5 .7 5

4 .2 6 4 .1 4 5 .1 5 cr AC—
boUb*
5 .6 8 -

ACC
HDD
1CC

C ^A
bo rO
Oo00

c 70
bo»C
c o 7o
b re

4 .1 7
3 .6 2
4 .7 5
4 .1 3
4 .4 1

3 .9 1
3 .2 5
4 .4 8
3 .9 1
4 .0 0

3 .1 2 3 .0 1 3 .9 1 3 .9 1 3 .9 0 -

Workers were distributed as follows:
Workers were distributed as follows:
Workers were at $6.60 to $7.




.
-

•
-

-

-

•

—
“

“

-■
-

g

/, q o - O 07
* . 7 0 _ < .C J
c . 7 0 - e .7 0
■
.
3 / a_ 0 oo

1*350
691
659
336
159

•

5 .5 5
A AA
OoOO

5 .7 8
5 .7 8
5 .7 5
Co c b
b 9C
5 .7 5

5 .0 7
4 .1 1
5 .8 2
5 .1 5
5 .8 0

•

•

•

-

“

•

"

“

•

9

7

-

-

230 *1562
15
89
215 1473
— 1352
64
11
151
110

i o a \A OA
l a o 10c©
51
3
1AC
lO b
* r3
A AC
003
127
110

_
-

-

—
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

18
18

24
4
20

7
7
-

16
9
7

8
8

8
4
4

3
3

5
3
2

•

394
47
347

100
100

•

24
24

6
1
5

„
-

-

-

_
-

21
21
-

-

-

•
-

30
30
-

85
85
-

55
52
3
1
1

253
243
10
1
9

212
206
6
£

48
42
6
i

106
105
1

150
143
7

3
3
-

1

-

943
782
161
lu
151

13
13
-

3

393
292
101
a1
OI
20

294
2 34
60

”

100
90
10
i
9

60

-

-

4
4

-

29
1A

4

y
f
10

Ci
sl
**9

le d
123

Crf

f

cV

J 1 lie
3
112

127
74
53
53

44
39
5
5

36
9
27
27
-

24
24
-

42
38
4
3

136
23
113
84
3

33
21
12
9

72
—
72
11
44

_
-

5
5
5

•
-

18
8
10
10
-

25
25
16
9

44
32
12
12
-

97
92
5
4

179
160
19
16
2

1,516 at $6. 60 to $7; 34 at $7 to $7.40; 8 at $7.40 to $7.80; and 4 at $8.20 to $8.60.
56 at $6. 60 to $7; 4 at $7 to $7.40; and 52 at $7.40 to $7.80.

78
70
8
8

38
38
-

72
47
25
20
4

166
16
ISO
140
10

_
•
-

t l 14
-

-

-

114
•

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings

M e an

2

Median

2

Middle range

2

S
2 .4 0

S
2 .6 0

S
2 .8 0

S
3 .0 0

$
3 .2 0

s
3 .4 0

$
3 .6 0

$

s

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

2 .4 0

2 *6 ( 2 .8 0
>

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 Q

4 .0 0

5
3

17
7

10
7

46
12

23
11

26
8

O
c

of
workers

2 .3 0

*

O ccup a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

1 ------1 ------ i
S
1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0

2

13

11

11
16 0
104
56
2
3
48
45
3

$

" 1 ------ S
4 .2 0 4 .4 0

S
4 .6 0

S
4 .8 0

$

s
5 .4 0

$

5 .0 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

6 .6 0

87
70

65
42

91
69

56
35

16
11

95
75

12 0
113

164
163

-

17
f

17

23

22

21

5

1

11

8

60

31

32

35

11

75

113

163

-

165
65
10 0
83
4

139
12 0
19
1
5

144
12 0
24

93
78
15
9
1

151
130
21
17
3

88
62
26
1
25

131
112
19
4
9

10 2
97
5
3

415
40S
10

22
22

20

-

12
10
2
2

10 1
90

11

89
81
8
7

193
171
22
21

5 .8 0

1 ----- S
6 .2 0 6 .6 0

and
u nd er

and
2 .2 0

2 .3 0

314
-

178

26

-

o

2 .1 0

(VI

2 .0 0

over

ALL WORKERS
GUARDS AND WATCHMEN -------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g *

GUARDS*
MANUFACTURING

$
3 .7 1
4 .9 9

1*380
629

$

4 .0 0
5 ,2 3

$
$
2 . 10 - 5 .1 9
4 . 3 8 - 5 .8 6

-

-

18
-

-

23
3

5 68

S .0 6

5 .2 3

4 .4 2 -

5 .8 7

-

“

-

-

-

-

3

3

7

5

JANITORS* PORTERS* ANO CLEANERS —
MANUFACTURING ------------ — ------------------NONM ANUFACTURING ---------------- --— — —
P U B LIC U T I L I T I E S —
—
—
R E T A IL TRADE -----------------------------------

2 *718
1*396
1*322
142
314

3 .9 0
4 .6 2
3 .1 4
4 .2 6
2 .9 5

3 .6 9
4 .6 1
3 .0 5
3 .6 9
2 .6 0

2 .9 2 3 .9 4 2 .8 1 3 .6 9 2 .2 5 -

4 .8 7
5 .4 7
3 .3 0
4 .5 5
3 .3 6

3

22

32

34

29
7
22

55
11
44

60
5
55

336
9
327

65
38
27

-

-

52

452
10
442
2
17

LABORERS* MATERIAL HANDLING -------------MANUFACTURING — — — —
—
—
NONMANUFACTURING ------------ ------—
R E T A IL TRADE —
—
—

1*8 6 8
1*418
470
417

4 .9 9
5 .0 9
4 .6 9
4 .6 8

5 .3 4
5 .3 4
5 .3 6
5 .3 6

4 .5 0 4 .5 6 4 .0 1 4 .0 0 -

5 .7 6
5 .7 8
5 .7 6
5 .7 6

.

-

1*367
644
5 23

4 .7 1
4 .3 0
5 .3 8

4 .9 8
4 .1 0
5 .7 0

4 . 0 8 - 5 .7 0
3 .0 5 - 5 .6 3
4 . 9 8 - 5 .7 5

.

854
719
135

4 .4 1
4 .5 8
3 .5 5

4 .4 2
4 .5 6
3 .5 9

3 .9 4 - 5 .1 0
4 . 0 8 - 5 .1 4
2 .3 0 - 4 .3 7

-

-

-

187
132
55

4 .9 6
5 .0 1
4 .8 9

5 .1 0
5 .0 8
5 .2 2

4 . 3 0 - 5 .7 0
4 . 3 5 - 5 .6 6
4 .0 0 - 5 .7 0

10 2

5 .1 6

4 . 8 8 - 5 .8 6

70

C 17
09 l f

5 .1 2

157

4 .9 6

5 .1 3

4 . 1 0 - 5 .8 5

1*377
397
980
530

C 0f
b t77

C

S .4 5
6 .1 8

6.01

5 .4 0
6 .4 7
5 .8 2

5 .4 0

5 .6 2

5 .2 9 -

445
10 0

6 .1 9
5 .2 9

6 .8 0
5 .1 9

5 .8 2 - 6 .8 0
5 . 1 3 - 5 .6 4

657
129
5 28
ABC

6 .1 5
5 .7 8
6 .2 4
A AWL
L
OoQO

6 .4 4
5 .5 0
6 .4 7
6 .4 4

5 . 2 9 - 6 .6 4
5 . 4 7 - 6 .6 0

1

— —

—

—

—

— —

OROER F I L L E R S ------------—
M A N U FA C TU R IN G ------—
n o n m a n u fa ctu pin g

—
—
—
------ --—
------------ — --------------

PACKERS* SH IPPIN G — —
MANUFACTURING — — —
NONMANUFACTURING —

— --------— —
— —
—

—
—
— --------

R EC EIV IN G CLER KS —
—
—
MANUFACTURING —
— —
—
NONMANUFACTURING —
— —
SH IPPIN G CLER KS — — —
MANUr AC 1UK I No

— —

—

—

SH IPPIN G AND R EC EIV IN G CLER KS —
M ANUr A C 1 UH 1 N o * * * * * * * * *
******
TB l in /
TRUCK DR T U ff
I VERS

_ _______ ______, „ M
_
________
— —
—
—
—
—
—
—
m a n u fa c t u r in g —
—
—
—

NONMANUFACTURING —
—
—
R E T A IL TRADE ----------------------------------TRUCKORIVERS* LIG H T (UNDER
l* l/ C
1 U N 3 1 ————— ————

07
7 r

———

TRUCKORIVERS* MEOIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) — — — — —
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------TRUCKORIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
TR A ILER TYPE) ------------------ ---------- -------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------------n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g —
—
—
O
Nff ▼ A T I T O A n r
t i A I L 1KAUt
**

* Workers were distributed as follows:
See footnotes at end of tables.




A

71

C

IB

QC

a

7

q a

*

Q ftA

-

3
•

-

l

22

31

34

-

-

-

-

-

22

31

34

22

41

i
•

9
-

-

l
i

9
9

35
3
32
32

16

-

32
6
26
26

-

.

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

13

4

17
6
11

.
-

.
-

-

3

11

11

11

16

.

“

10

-

-

-

67
43
24
24

202
140
62
41

792
633
159
159

82
48
34
34

65
58
7

98
3
95

98
6
92

412
158
254

54
15
39

13
13

72
71
1

51
20
31

117
117

8

4
3
1

28
26
2

144
133
11

48
29
19

62
62

26
25
1

20
20

5
3
2

85
85

56
47
9

111
87
24

148
148

-

23
15
8

-

-

2
1
1

.
-

2
2

5
5

6
6

3
3

7
7

-

-

-

-

-

8
7
1

43
27
16

-

-

.

-

.

1

8

.

.

-

17
14

11

5

1

o
o

8

9
C

t9
1C

2 12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
4
9

-

3
3

13

25
6
19

3

-

•
—

.
-

.
-

•
-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

.

-

-

-

.

-

.

.

_

.

3

1

52
52
-

i
i

o

1
1
1

-

30
20

11

-

24
13
11

-

12
9
3

7

a
o

6

_

5

3

6

J

3

o

6

7

2

3

6

20

A
■*

O
©

so

7

9
C

6

3
3

3

2
2

BA
cO

A
V

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
1

-

3

1
-

2

g

—

-

-

—

4
3

4
3

2

1

1

-

—

-

-

—

-

—

—

—

1
1

1
1

4
4

2
2

-

-

-

-

12

-

-

—

12
•

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

480 at $6.60 to $7; and 30 at $7 to $7*40.

•
-

-

3
3

2

37

9

6

-

20
20

-

122
12 1

1

”

-

17
16
1

6
6

31
30

-

•

-

59
59

8
3
2

C AA
9«H O
.

-

27
26
1

6
4
2
2

*

5

-

73
52
21
15

5
6
6

-

16
16

-

C QA
3 fO O

7 68
5 .1 9 - 5 .7 8
5 . 4 7 - 6.60
c

-

1

17
r

15
7
-

8
1
-

6
5

1

16
13
3
-

65
65

6
6

-

-

45
45

3
3

1
1

-

-

27
13
14

38
33
5

5
5

_

-

-

36
35

8
6

27
c l

1
1

-

8
7

26
24

26

20

165
128
37

313

133
31

1

110

203
188

a

10
2
10
0

2

9
4

11

_

Ptt
cv

70
f7

19
ic

6
5

38
30

38
26

90
12

38
38

186
14
172
172

27

135 *510
3
58
132
452
130
110

—

11
16
16

3
-

132
3
129
127

245
9
259
48

211
110

Hourly earnings

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings of—

Num ber

Occupation and industry division
w o ifeers

M ean2

M e d ia n 2

M id dle range 2

1 ---------1 --------- $
“1 ----- 1 ------ $
S
1 ---- - 5
1 .9 0 2 * 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0
and
und er

$

3 .2 0

"5----- 1 ------ S
"5------ S
3 .4 o 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

S
4 .6 0

S
4 .8 0

$

$

5 .0 0

5 .4 0

1 ----- ~ I ----$
5 .8 0 6 . 2 0 6 . 6 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

and
3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

29
29

2 .0 0

S
4 .4 0

19
18
1

93
92
1

4 t gQ 4 .4 0

6 . 6 Q over

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
TRUCKDRl VERS -

CCNTINUEO

TRUCKQRIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
OTHER THAN TR A ILER TYPE) ---- ------

$

$

$

88

5*20

5 .1 9

5 . 1 9 - 5 .3 0

TRUCKERS* POWER (F O R K LIFT ) -------- ----MANUFACTURING ---- — -------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------— -------- -----R ETA IL TRADE ------ — ------------------

1*8 6 6
1*593
273
241

5*36
5 .3 2
5 .5 9
5 .6 7

5 .7 5
5 .7 8
5 .7 2
5 .7 5

5 .0 4 4 ,9 3 5 .4 4 5 .7 0 -

TRUCKERS* POWER (OTHER THAN
FO R KLIFT) --------------- — ------------------- MANUFACTURING -------- ----------------------

439
339

5 .7 6
6 .0 1

5 .7 2
5 .7 2

4 . 9 8 - 6 .6 2
5 . 4 8 - 6 .9 8

WAREHOUSEMEN --------------- -------- — ---------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUF ACTU& ING — — — — — — —
PU BLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------- — ----R ETA IL TRADE ---- ------ — -------- —

422
202
22 0
46
145

4 .4 7
4 .2 0
4 .7 3
5 .4 7
4 .5 5

4 .3 5
4 .1 3
4 .4 8
5 .2 6
4 .0 0

4 .0 0 4 .0 4 4 .0 0 5 .1 0 4 .0 0 -

*

Workers were distributed as follows:

See footnotes at end of tables.




$

8

5 .7 8
5 .7 8
5 .7 5
5 .7 8

5 .1 0
4 .7 8
5 .8 0
5 .9 6
5 .8 0

42
42
-

3

2

35
34
1

63
53
10
9

98
97
1
1

48
48

-

69

-

—

—

221
173
48
20

908
757
151
151

294
234
60
60

-

-

6

13
13

3
3

-

-

—

—

4
4

_

2

_

-

-

-

•

-

5

-

-

2

-

-

-

5
-

•
-

-

5

2

56 at $6.60 to $7; 4 at $7 to $7.40; and 52 at $7.40 to $7.80.

8
4
4

11
8
3

33
32
1

-

-

-

4

2

1

•
-

6
1
5

11
1
10

29
14

4
4

3
3

93
10

51
49

123
123

17
17

3 *112
3
112

113
60
53

37
32
5

27

21
21

19
7
12
3
9

-

-

34
6
28
25
3

61

27

34
30
4
1
3

-

-

-

-

4

10

53

5

-

-

-

-

-

61
17
44

-

-




Sex, occupation, and in d u s try d iv is io n

Number
of
woikeis

Average
(mean2 )
hourly
earnings3

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL M3VEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN
BOILER T E N O E R S ------ — — — — ------------MANUFACTURING — — — — — — — — —

155
147

$
5 .2 8
5 .3 5

MANUFACTURING — —
— —
—
NONMANUF ACTURING — — —
— — —

11 Q
J iO
237
81

A .1 0
0 . 1A
5 .7 7
7 .3 1

1 f7 l
!♦ * 701
4*019
178

A 94
OtCO
6«27
6 .1 7

E LEC TR IC IA N S*

MAINTENANCE

280
OC1
c9c

5 .9 9
Aa AA
y*Vv

MAINTENANCE TRADES -----------

510
489

5# 11
5 .1 3

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS* TOOLROOM —
UAkll 1CAPT! ID INI?
MAMUr AL 1UK TMft • •••••••• ••• • •• • •

834
634

6 .2 7
6 .2 7

n A v n lN lb l9 < MAIN 1CNANCtl.
uami ic*ACt1UK r n r
MANUr a t i id INC

637
634

5 .8 4
5 .8 4

A7A
Of o
11A

A 1A
O .l i o
08 19
6*21
C .* j
o A?
5 .2 4

HELPERS*

*
•••••••■

MECHANICS. AUTOMOTIVE
IMA 1N T t N A N t t 1 •*••••••••••••••••••
MANUFAt 1UKINo ■ •••"••••••••••*••
kinkiMAhii ip At t1vn I mw
OiUNnA'lUr a t i id im a
*
niiaiL IU l IT Ti LfITTCC* * • * * • • • • •
rU n t r U 11
'• •
wHvLb^ALb TKAUt

562
A lO
*+CO
op
o.
c

AM A a “ AIN|fcNANUC
M L tn A NI tb f MA TMTPM AM^P ••••••••••••
MANUF AC 1UK INI)
NONMANUF ACTUR I NG —
— — — — —

9 a 1Q4
C ? JTH
2*094

6 .1 2
6 .1 3
4 A1
0*U i

yT| t UDf/lUTC
M 1LL“ K I U n 19 •••••••••••••• • •••••••
nANUr Av f UK IINU

1*049
1*049

6 .6 0
6 .6 0

— —

240
148
92

4^17
O# 4 f
6 .2 0
6 .1 3

P IP E F IT T E R S * MAINTENANCE — — — — —
MANUr AC 1UR I NG — — — — — — — — —

685
AQC
003

6 .3 0
4^ 1A
o#*?u

SH EET-M ETAL WORKERS* MAINTENANCE —
WAkll |CAC 1UK f k 1 ■ ••••••••
l/
MANUF A^Tl 1C INI?

191
141

6*23
6*80

P A I N T E n S i MAINTENANCE
MANUr AC 1UK INI? ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■
n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g — —
—

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN— CONTINUED
GUARDS t
MAfcll IPATTl ID 1N\} —
nMNUr At, 1Un Tfcift

— — — —
—

CUSTOOIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN
._____ —__
/iiiAonc ANU u A T r u u r u ••••••*••••••••
UUAKL/b Akin WAlCHMtN ______ —
MA*M AC 1UKINI? ••••••••••••••••••
Ur
NUNM ANljr AC »UK I Nip •••••••••••••••
FINANCE ----------- --------------------- —
S E R V I C E S ------ — . . . . . . — —

See footnotes at end of tables.

9a A An
cM/OU
2*052

9a r l c
cf 719

7C a
9 9U
« . Q49
1 *“ Oc
276
1*644

—

WATCHMEN*
MAKll irA T T lUK4NO a a a • a a a a a e ia a• •• • ••
II7 ••• a •• • •• • •• a a a a a a
e
MANUr A C 1 ID TK
JANITORS* PORTERS* AND CLEANERS ----UAkll iP A^Tl lOTkl/* —————————_ ————.
... ———
MANUFAL1URINo

AQ

$
4 .9 9

4 .3 1

NONMANUF ACTUR ING — — — — —
ni mi t a u tlf i i l I t ri* ———— ———————
rUoLIt* U l L
ES
WHOLESALE TRADE
R E T A IL TRADE ------ --------------------r 1NANCE •••• •• • •• • •• • •• • •• • •• •
«*riMi t Art*
SE R V IC E S ——— ———————— ———— ———

3 .7 5
4 .3 9
3 .1 2
5 .1 7
3 .6 9
2 .9 3
3 .0 1
3 .0 2

1 AAnOPDC.
U 4 vV n i.n ? t MATr&TAI "FlfrUL TKIfn___ __ __
|».n lfll, UAkifM * » •••••••
*”
U AklllP SATI Ift tklA
KIDMUAUI AC 1UK tkift ••• • •• • •• • •• • ••
APTI ID I Ml?
NUNMANUT
li»
iAi D i c IK AU t
n n U Lrte iA tt TiiA ftf ••••• • •*•••••
f tE T Af l TnAAP — — — — —
R p t i IL IRAUt
—
—

2*273
1*609
869
416

4*09
4 .7 7
4 .4 8
3 .9 6
4 .7 2

—
—
ORDER F I L L E R S ------—
MAKll IPAC 1UK 4NV? ••••••• •• • •• • •• • ••
nAMUr Af'Tl IOTMA
1IAU1, till ir i/>TI ir. T llr
yuAi p c At p TDAHr
wnUuuwAtu I“ A v t
• •••••••

1*921
881
1*040
COA
900

4 .5 6
4 .7 1
4 .4 4
3 .7 7

1*452
1*253
199
191

4 .2 5
4 .3 4
3 .7 1
3 .7 6

-----------------------

447
263
104
112

4 .5 3
4 .7 0
4 .2 8
4 .0 2

MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------

276
204
72
58

4 .7 1
4 .8 3
4 .3 8
4 .1 6

405
249
156
97

4 .5 8
4 .4 4
4 .8 0
4 .5 6

4* 173
ape
OC9
9 - JHo
3* 1AO
1*405
1*172
596

5 .7 5
5 .1 1
C tU
9 * On
6 .6 2
5 .1 7
5 .9 7

A AAk’LQC
CUTDOlAir ___________ _ ___
HACIvtKS8 S n 1r r 4NI? •••••• • •• • •• • •• • •
MAMI IP AC ' UK Tklft a M. a . Ma •* * •• • •• • ••
MANUr ATTi ID INv? •••••• • a a « a a a a a a a a
MnUuAidl |PA m IO IUA
__
NUNMANUr AC 1UK IN1 *••••• * •• • •• • ••
?
u u a i r c u r vaAr\r
Dppp v i N U PI PDtfC
n t t t l TUTKJO UtuKIVj ___ _ __ _ __ _ __ _ __ _ __
—
———————
UAkn i nA t *UR INo —————————«——— ————
MANUr r T i lorki/^
klAkin kill IP APTI lf\ f kU
*
..
.
NUNMANUrACTURINo ———————————————
w h o lesale

fuTAntki/«

trade.

r r iu r

and

r e c e iv in g

MANUFACTURING — —
kiAkiii *kii ir a ^ti in tkir

clerks

—

—

— —
— — —
.

WHOLESALE t r a o e ------------- — . . .
4 .9 0
08 CO
. ...
.
6*28 Tmt^i/nntupn^ ••• • •• •.•• • •• • *• • •• • •• •
1KUCFUNIVcNb
uik||ipAPTliDTklfl
MMwur A t iu R iN o
—— —
———— ————————
M n nA iu u n c i k jlnu
n v uu M nur r ir T iuidtkir •••••• * •• • •• • ••
DIIDIL TP U l A L TTTCC —
“ U B 1t IITII I 1I t S
—————
UUAI PCAI C TD a AC — — ____ _____
9 A4
J8UO
WHOLESALE TRADE _____ — — —
O f T ATI 1KAUE ________ ____ ___ __
A«90
R E t A IL TO AAC ————
——————
——————
9 74
C8 JO
3*84
2*10

4C7
ODC

3*508
1*752
1*756
54
141
457
220
884

s h ip p in g

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ———
<
MANUr AC IUKINv?

Average
Number (mean2)
of
hourly
w
orkers earnings3

Sex, o ccup ation, and in d u s try d iv is io n




Number

Sox, occupation, a n d industry division

of
workers

A verage
(m e a n * )
hourly
earnings3

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
TRUCKDRIVERS -

(UNDER

NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

TRUCKDRIVERS* MEDIUM (1 -1 / 2 TO
a Kin IN tL i n k i b a IUN5J
ANU Tki/*i Ui UtlN r . H t a u c % ••• • •• • •• •
u AMI i r A r T l tC TKIft

klAlUiiAMl
A t 1 ID TMA
lyUNMANUr A T T IUK 1 li'J •••••• • •• • •• • ••
O C 1A IL T D A H C • • • • •• • •* • •* • •• • •
K t T A tl
I KAUt

TRUCKORIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS.
T O A f tLt-K T V D P l • • • • •• • *• • •• • •• • •*
1KA1 CD I T r t )
M A N U r A C T lIO T Kr y
H A M IlC A t 1 U n 1 f in
KiriKIkiAMI IT A t 1t'n TKIA
IMv’MMAIMUr A P T I ID XNU

••• • •• * •• • •• • ••
D u ^l L T C 1IT T 1 1 T l t d • • • • * • • • • • • •
rU a 11 U l1 L T 1 t F Q
D P T A TI

TD AH P

TDt U*KHft 1 V c K a f n t A V T I A W P K A T H N 3 f
tnUtftUK T U P D C * M P A U V | U V u ”
IUM C a
A T U C D T JA M TO A T 1 C D T v D C \
_
.
•J1n t r 1flflN I W A l L t K |T“ t»
j A ki i r A t 1 ID 1 (Ny _ • • • • • • • • « _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
n A M UIC A T T lUK TM/1 • _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ • • • • • • • •
kirtMkJ AMI i C A m ID T MSI _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
NUNM ANUi At I U K 1 N v • • • • • • • • • • • • • • *
T K n v K t K ^ f d a l ic o
I o U r K f o c * rUlltn i p n o m t p t i _ • _ _ _ _ _ _
IrUMfSUlrlJ • _ • • • • • •
kJ A Mi r A ^ 1 K TM/1 • • • • • • • • • * * _ _ _ _ _ _ _
n A W UICA t T lUID I N u _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ • • • • • • •
MAMM A N U i C A t T lUID T Ki/i. • • • • • • _ • _ • _ • _ • _
Li A Mi r A r V K i N y _ _ _ _ _ _ • _ • _ • _ • _ •
NUN
y u m FC A l P TDAHF • • • • • • * • • • * • •
fvnUttvAtt I KAUr
d p t ATI
Ktl A I L T O A H t —_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
IKAUP _ — — — — — — —

TRUCKERS. POWER (OTHER THAN
F O R K L I F T ) ---------- ---------------------- ---------------------------------MAMI IC A T 1 ID TKift
H A N U r A t T lUK 1 nlo

of
worker.

A verage
(m o a n * )
hourly
earning-.3

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

CONTINUED

TRUCKDRIVERS. LIG H T

Number

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

373
187
188
137

1 * 169
971
C fl
aao
070
1 CO
138

1 .5 5 4

■
J

04
4C O

1 .3 2 8

<
h
$
4 .7 7
4 .9 4
4 .5 9
4 .4 9

C U S T O D I A L AND MAT E R I A L MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS-WOMEN
5 .5 7
5 .1 4
c A O r i | DflC AAlH wATvnMtN ______ _
a
5 . 0 9 uUAKUb ANU U A T rU k lP k l •••••••••••••••
klAklki A All lC AU1UHINu •••••••••••••••
C. 7t
NUNMANUr AHTI ID f kid — - ---------- -- ---------------- ——
9 fO
/ *5>.
OmOH
c * CL
3 33

6 .4 8

<]4C
003
AOC
**c3

4 tQ
0«00
4 a4
O a UO

k 1o
o lJ

r
1/
3« 1 6
4 .4 6
5 .3 0

101
5 12
o - odd
c f 400
C» JC 3

363
106
c33

< 55
►
o cc
333

WARtnOUStMtN
MANUr AC 1UK INb — — —
—
— “
kiAkiy AM IP A/*T 1IDVk|A •••••• _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
I
NUNMANUrAvIUHINw _ _ _ _ _ _
y u m P C A l P IKAUt
vlnULuwALIl T D A H P
D P T A l t TDAH P _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
KIhi ATI IKAUt

C* ( A C
3 |3

<► •99
5#42
C« 0 O
3 A ft
C# 3 T
3 CD

5®76
4 AA
o#oo

JA N IT O R S . PORTERS. AND CLEANERS —
MANUr AC 1UKINU — — — — — — — —
NONM ANUFACTURIN6 — — —
— —
O fT A T I
K t l A I L T O A DC ____^
IKAUt
CI N A N L r
f kl Ak.l/*C_______ ______ ____ __—
r
e r n y T r c c _______________ _______ — -

t tc3c
1 AOlO

4C A
ODH
C 7 fi

$
A 31
H iC l

3rA8
3Q

7 43
3*07
A •f t 7
* Of
►
A 17

1 fi3
lo c
1 78

7 A3
2 #26

2 .8 5 5
3n A
300

2 .9 8

cO U
1 TF
133

Ol.t C C
cm 3 3 3

07
7 f
f CO
1 . 459

2# 87
O

3A

2* 83
3 -o o
c • AA

________
i to n o
u i I r nl t
L A D U K trKobct. n A T C c T A iL U A N U L i N vA • • • • • • •
n A kim r u
kA AMI 1C A /*T l ID Tkl/1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
M A N U r A t 1U K I N u • * * • • • • • • * • • • • • • • •
klAkiUA N U lC A t TIUID T AID. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
N U N M a All r A ^T H INI? ________________________

1 1 C • J t. J 7
3 CD
A4 J
CA
A AO
30
a c 1
0l3 I

O DC
C *7D

A O n t Q P T l 1 PD C
UKUfcK r I t t t n b ** ■ * " * " * * * * *
* * *■
AIHMAI AMI " A T 1 ID Tk id
N U N M A N UiP A t T lUKINI? • • • • • • * • • * • • • • *
u ijs\i r c i i r t d a r \ c ___ __
W H O L t b A L t T R A U t —— — 1
—
— ■
—

O C 7!
0 3 3 !
CA7 :
3 0 '

7 33
3 « CC

399

3 .5 5

HACKfcHbt CM lK K lN b _______ ___
b n TDD T Al/"*
MANUFACTURING —
—
—
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------------------

A Afo
O* O

33c
316
265

3*37
3 .5 0
3 .2 3
3 .4 1

u aD ru U c t M k i
W A R t M mUib r u ct N

118

J*

D Ar v r O C

—

— — —

—

See footnotes at end of tables.

Earnings data in table A-6 relate only to workers whose sex
identification was provided by the establishment. Earnings data in
tables A-4 and A -5, on the other hand, relate to all workers in an
occupation. (See appendix A for publication criteria.)

— —

7 AA
3***U

rO




Num ber
of
workers

S ex, occupation, and industry division

A verage
(m ean2 )
hourly
earnings3

Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

Num ber
of
workers

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN

_

$

1 * C77
1 * 9Q r
625

5 .7 4

A ve rag e
[m e an 2 )
hourly
warnings3

157

6 .5 0
6 .1 1
M AN U FACTU R IN G --- ---------- — — ----

C.CCCT K 1 C 1 A h j t n A 1 N 1 LNANvCi

6 .0 8
K t 1A 1 C
n t L r t K 5 t M A I N I t H A H v t IKAUL^ • • • • • * *
tj A Nil ap A C T lUIC I N b • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
M A t. U r * r f K T kl/i
M ACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS* TOOLROOM —
M A N U r A t 1U K l H o ■ • • • * • * • • • • • • • • • •
MACHINISTS* MAINTENANCE
MANUFACTURING — — —
MECHANICS* AUTOMOTIVE
(MAI NTEN AN CE ) — — —
MAkillFA/*TltDTkin — —
n A N U r A C 1U "

—
—
—
—
—

— —

—

—

—

—

—^

••••••••

................

MECHANICS* MAINTENANCE
kj AMI r A T 1 K l N u
M A N U IC A t T lUlDTKi/1 _ _ _ _

—

MILLWRIGHTS — — — —
MANUFACTURING - — —

—

—

3#H O

—

—

1 ADUKcKot
L AD A D C D C .

6 .3 9
6 .3 9

/.I Q
H l7
/,1 A

5 96 n o n c o

1*765
] *625

——

—

—

—

—

1T1
1r1
1 A.A
l**H

PAINITERS • MAINTENANCE
A A Kit r A T 1 K X N U
A
M A N U i r A t T lUlCTAl/1
P IP E F I T T E R S * MAINTENANCE
M A N U r A C 1U K I N o

1*025
1*025

—

— —

SH EET-M ETA L WORKERS* MAINTENANCE
A A kll »C A /'T l ID T k i f i _________ . _______^
_
MJA N U r A C 1U K iNij

—
.

640
640
188
1 *30

1*320
1*312

5*06
A « C«
4 37
3
A« 7C
4 13
3^34
e« C 3
oc
3

OAA

*

UAKirM TKIU
M A N U C lN v • • • • • • •

i roc
M AN U r A C 1 U K I NU • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
NONMANUFACTURING — —
—
— — —

p A T k 'F D C «.

7
J6 i a
lO

1 9 827
1*393
434
383

C# U H
3L A A

A CO
0«3C

5 .0 9
4 .8 8
4 .8 9

—

—

”

A * AA
oh

o

6 .6 4

TRUCKDRIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
O T H E R T H A N T R A I L E R TYrE* — — —
TRUCKERS* POWER (FO R K LIFT ) — — ■
—
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — —
NONMANUFACTURING — —
— — ——
R ETA IL IKADt — — —
—
— —

C JC
39C 3
c «U O
3 AA

503

5 .4 3
A 71
4* f 1

600

4 .7 3 WAREHOUSEMEN
5 .0 4
5 .0 9
4 .9 3
C« C C
3 33
C «C O
D 3ti

C n lr D N O
AMH K C C w iV I N O
o U TD r lT klA ANU D FA FTU T K IA
MANI IFAATl IDTMA

Al FP K ’C
C C im iN p

• • • *•

1 AQ

C AC
3#U3
A
4#T tI1

i4o

07
7 r

o« ci

TRUCKDRI VERS
m A N U ir a r T * U K 1 N o • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ■ • • •
M a m i r A C ii D T K in
6 .4 0
IVviNnMIlUr M v 1 U n l»N v
"
6 .4 0
DFTATI
KtlAlL. T D A A F — — — —— — —
1 KAUC.
6 .2 5
TRUCKDRIVERS. LIG H T (UNDER
6 .8 3
6 .6 9
6 .7 0

657
1 OO
1C7
C6Q
Deo
A OC
4eD

177
125
52

—

™
*

A l rO I^ C

• w(N3 9

TRUCK0RIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
TR AILER TYPE) —
—
—
—
—
—
MANUFACTURING —
—
— — — — — —
N0NMANUF ACTUR ING — —
— —
— —
R E T A IL TRADE — — — — — — — —
—
——

DO
7C
AA
OO

—

n A I iv T MW 1 U n I r l u
KlftKJMAKII IF A P T I IDT N U
N U N M A N U r A C 1U K I Kin

lf C

A5C
4cD
100

504

1 . AA f
1 3 00 7

6«53

6 .3 3

TRUCKDRIVERS* MEDIUM ( 1 -1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) — — — — —
MANUFACTURING —
—
—
——
—

OJ4

C U T D D 1 KlA

MANUFACTURING
6 .5 1
6 .1 7
6 .2 3 p E vrtcl V T h in n » L L "k '3
nt r t v IHw V f r »q

I
T r> m
AKin U l t M a ^ p o c
1UUL A N U i m p m A?\tKD • • • » • • • • • • • • • • •
t A kll r A r I 1 T Kin
D
Mj A N U IC* A CT1UKiIMvj • • • • • • • • • » • • • • • • • •

**

fti

C U T D D T k lC

—

1K A U L

KlAIC.K1AU
M A T C D T Al

MAMI F A r 1 ID IH ^
n A lr UIr M v T iU n T MU
i i v n n w n u r m w i u r \ i 'i v

750
750

AO 1
40*
239
242
194

565

5 .4 1

4lo

——

—

H U H r lftliw r Mw • Lfn f IVV?
r U n L l v U l ill I ltd

397
*301

4*35

1 .Q IC
1 *O l D
1 _ 1 A ft
1t
666

^

■ "■ ■ ■ ■

1*357
77 7
0
3 f
960
D*30

A v e ra g e
(m e a n 2 )
hourly
earnings3

—

—

— — — —

5 .4 0

A . IC
Of ID
A o34
.
b c4
A* 0 0
0 AA

5«20
C 77
3931
C 7J
3oO 7
C CO
D« 3 7

c^ A7
3ivf

439
339

5 .7 6
6 .0 1

391
196
195
45
121

4 .5 2
4 .2 1
4 .8 3
5 .4 7
4 .6 9

— -

903
247

3 .2 4
4 .0 2

—

74

2 .2 7

—

61

3 .4 7

220
119
101

3 .5 5
3 .7 8
3 .2 7

—

P U BLIC U T I L I T I E S — — — — — —
R ETA IL TRADE ------------------------------------------------

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

JANITORS* PORTERS*
5 .9 6
C#4D
D ACC
6 .1 7
6 .0 1

— —

QQ

1 *850
1 *D 7 7
1- C f r
070
c r*
3

$
a *10
0 1A
C OQ
DiC7

OAI
C 41

TRUCKERS* POWER (OTHER THAN
P a h i /KLIFT) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - F OR i r p t »
MAKIi r A f*T K 1 M/I
M A N U IF A C 1lUID T N o * • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • •

AND CLEANERS

NONMANUFACTURING*
R E T A IL TRADE — —

— — — — —

LABORERS* MATERIAL HANDLING
132

Num ber
of
workers

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
*
7 QA T K U C K U K 1V b K o
* • OU TDiirif no viicoc _ rnAiT I N U c D
3
C U N T VAincn
4 #99

N0NMANUF ACTURING *
181

Sex, occupation, and industry division

—

PACKERS* SHIPPING — — — — — — —
liAill
M A N U iPAATlintKIP • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
r A C 1U K I N o
klAlliUft Kll IC A/«T I in tkiP
N U N M A N U f A C 1U K I N C • • • • • • • • • • * • • • •

NOTE: Earnings data in table A-6a relate only to workers whose sex identification was provided by the establishment.
on the other hand* relate to all workers in an occupation. (See appendix A for publication criteria.)

Earnings data in tables A-4a and A -5a,




Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for
selected occupational groups, adjusted for employment
shifts, in Cleveland, Ohio, for selected periods
Industry and occupational
group

September 1972
to
September 1973

All industries:
Office clerical (men and w o m e n ) _______ ________
Electronic data processing (men and w o m e n ) ____
Industrial nurses (men and women)
.
_ _
Skilled maintenance trades (men)
_________ _____
Unskilled plant workers (men)__

5.6
*
7.5
7.3
7.5

8.8
8.7
10.4
10.2
10.1

Manufacturing:
Office clerical (men and women)..
. .
Electronic data processing (men and w o m e n ) ---Industrial nurses (men and w o m e n ) ------------Skilled maintenance trades (men)_
_
— __ ~
Unskilled plant workers (men) . . . . _
_ .

5.5
*
7.3
7.2
7.8

8.5
8.4
10.7
10.5
10.6

Nonmanufacturing:
Office clerical (men and women) _
_
_
_ _ __
Electronic data processing (men and w o m e n ) ---Industrial nurses (men and w o m e n ) _________ ___
Skilled maintenance trades (men)_ __ _ ---- _
_
Unskilled plant workers (men) _
__
_

5.6
*
**
**
6.9

9.1
8.6
**
**
9.5

September 1973
to
September 1974

* Data not available.
** Data do not meet publication criteria.

N O T E : The percent increases presented in this table are based on changes in average
hourly earnings for establishments reporting the trend jobs in both the current and previous
year (matched establishments). They are not affected by changes in average earnings
resulting from employment shifts among establishments or turnover of establishments
included in survey samples. The percent increases, however, are still affected by factors
other than wage increases. Hirings, layoffs, and turnover m a y affect an establishment
average for an occupation when workers are paid under plans providing a range of wage rates
for individual jobs. In periods of increased hiring, for example, new employees enter at the
bottom of the-range, depressing the average without a change in wage rates.
These wage trends are not linked to the wage indexes previously published for this
area because the wage indexes measured changes in area averages whereas these wage trends
measure changes in matched establishment averages. Other characteristics of these wage
trends which differ from the discontinued indexes include (1) earnings data of office clerical
workers and industrial nurses are converted to an hourly basis, (2) trend estimates are
provided for nonmanufacturing establishments where possible, and (3) trend estimates are
provided for electronic data processing jobs.
For a m o r e detailed description of the method used to compute these wage trends, see
"Improving Area W a g e Survey Indexes," Monthly Labor Review, January 1973, pp. 52-57.

B. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
Table B-1. Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and clerks in Cleveland, Ohio, September 1974
Inexperiemced typists
Manufacturing
M i n i m u m weekly straight-time salary4

All
industries

40

All
schedules

Establishments studied .

303

133

XXX

170

Establishments having a specified m i n i m u m ......

101

58

51

2
5
3
2

_
_
_
1
3
2
5
3
2

4

4

5
3

$105.00
$110.00
$115.00
$120.00
$12 5.00
$130.00
$135.00
$140.00
$145.00
$150.00
$155.00
$160.00
$165.00
$170.00
$175.00
$180.00

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$110.00
$115.00
$120.00
$125.00
$130.00
$135.00
$140.00
$145.00
$150.00
$155.00
$160.00
$165.00
$170.00
$175.00
$180.00
$185.00

_

7
5
8
5
5

4

1
5

1
5

3
1
3
2
2
3
3
1
3
1
1
_
1
5

__________________________
__ ___ __
_
__________________________

-

-

4

3
1
4
1
1

3
2
3
3
1
3
1
1

-

-

4

37 V*

All
industries
40

Nonmanufacturing

Based on standard weekly hours 6 of—
All
schedules

All
schedules

40

37 Vz

40

XXX

XXX

303

133

XXX

170

XXX

XXX

43

9

26

157

81

72

76

19

45

_
1
_
2
1
2
2
9
-

_
_
_
_
1
_
1
_
2
1
1
-

_
_
_
1
1
_
2
6
_
1
2
_
-

1
1
1
4

1
1
1
3

1
1

_
2
_

2
_

4

3
2
1
2
2
4

2
3
1
-

_
1

_
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

4

2
3
_
_
_
1
_
_
_

4

7
10
18
5
13
8
12

_
_
1
_
2

2

4

4

3

2

4
4

4
4
4

5
7

1
1

4

6

5
6
15
1
9
3
5

4

4

8

6
3
3

2
3
6

5
5

4

3
1
3
2
1

2

4

2
6
10
3
1
1

4

10
7
11
9
7
6
3

_
2

4

2
1
_
_
1
6
_
2

4

5
5
6
3
2
3
2
1

3
2
3
2
1

_
1
6

_
1
6

1
3
1
1

1
1
1
2

1
2
5
3
1
1
1
1

3

_______________ ________
......
_ .
....... .
__ ..
.
.

Establishments which did not employ workers
in this category___________ _ _ _______ _ ____, ,
_ _
_

See footnotes at end of tables.

_
1

-

__________________________

Establishments having no specified m i n i m u m




_
1
2
1
2
3
13
2
9
6
4
5

Manufacturing

B ased on standard weekly hours 6 of—
All
schedules

$72.50 and under $75.00 _____
$75.00 and under $77.50 .. ... ...............
. .. .
.
$77.50 and under $80.00
.... . ........ ..
.
$80.00 and under $82.00 ______________________ _____
$82.50 and under $85.00
$85.00 and under $87.50
__
$87.50 and under $90.00 .. ................ .
.
$90.00 and under $92.50
$92.50 and under $95.00 .
$95.00 and under $97.50
$97.50 and under $100.00....... .
. ,. , „
$100.00 and under $102.50 __________________________
$102.50 and under $105.00
.. .. _
.. .

Other inexperienced clerical workers 5

Nonmanufacturing

2

2

1

-

_
_
1

1

1

_
_
_
_
_
_
1

-

1

37

19

XXX

18

XXX

XXX

91

42

XXX

49

XXX

XXX

165

56

XXX

109

XXX

XXX

55

10

XXX

45

XXX

XXX

-

_
-




All workers 7
Second shift

Workers on late shifts

Third shift

Second shift

Third shift

Percent of workers
In establishments with late shift provisions .

98.4

90.4

24.4

8.3

With no pay differential for late shift work .
With pay differential for late shift work ___
Uniform cents-per-hour differential____
Uniform percent differential___________
Other differential._____________________

2.1
96.4
61.8
31.3
3.3

2.0
88.4
54.8
28.0
5.6

.7
23.7
14.0
8.7

1.0

.3
8.0
5.5
1.9
.6

15.3
6.6

18.6
9.8

15.4
6.2

16.7
9.7

1.2
1.2
1.6
1.6
22.6
.6
1.1
.5
9.8

.3
.7
.3
3.5
1.1
2.0
.
.5
20.4
i *
A i
1

.3
.3
.2
.6
5.3
.2
.3
.1
1.4

(8)
.3
.1
.2
_
(8)
3.0

2.3
2.5
6.5
.7
.
5.1
3.0
1.5

2.2
8.1
3.3
.4
3.2
.7
5.2
1.8

.7
.5
1.7
.2
_
1.4
.
.8
.3

.2
.6
.4
.
.1
<8)
.2
.1

23.5
1.1

6.4
.1
.2
.
2.0
-

.2
.1
.1
1.3
.2

5.6

1.0

.6

Average pay differential
Uniform cents-per-hour differential___
Uniform percent differential__________
Percent of workers by type and
amount of pay differential*
Uniform cents-per-hour:
5 cents______________
6 cents______________
7, 8, or 8% cents____
9 cents_____________
10 cents ________
11 cents___ ____
12 cents____ __
12J or 13 cents .
/2
14 cents ________
15 cents ________
16 cents ________
17 or 17Vz cents .
18 cents________
20 cents ________
23 cents ________
24 cents ________
25 cents ____ ____
27 cents________
30 cents ________
Over 30 cents.

.1

_

Uniform percent:
5 percent.
6 percent.
7 percent_
7 % percent.
10 percent.
15 percent.

19.5
.5
2.0
_
9.3

Other differential.

3.3

1.0

1.5

1.0

Plant
Item

w

orkers

Office workers

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

100

100

100

100

100

Services

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

100

100

100

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

100

100

100

100

5

2

12

Percent of workers by scheduled
weekly hours and days
All full-time workers ___________

_______

__

23 hours— 5 days___________ ___________________ _____
30 hours— 5 days---------------------------------------32 hours— 4 days__________________ ____________________
_
32V2 hours— 5 days______ ______________________________
35 hours— 5 days_______ _______________ _______________
36 hours— 5 days_______________________________________
36V4 hours— 5 days------------------------------------36V3 and 36V2 hours— 5 days_____________________________
37 hours— 5 days
_ ____
_ _
_
37V4 hours— 5 days_____________________________________
37V* hours— 5 days
_
_
_
__
... ....
3 73 hours— 5 days_____________________________________
/4
38V3 hours— 5 days_____________________________________
3872 hours— 5 days ____ ______
383 hours— 5 days_____________________________________
A
40 hours_______________________________________________ _
_
___ _
....... .
4 days_
5 days__________________________ ___________________
42 h o u r s ____ __ _
_
.......
5 days_______________________________________________
6 days----------------------------------------------44 hours— 5 1 da y s ------------------------------------/2
45 ho u r s ____
_ ..
.
__
.__
.
5 d a y s ___
_
__
572 days_____________________________________________
46 hours— 6 days
_
48 hours— 6 days_______________________________________
50 hours and over __ __
.. .. . .
.. .
5 days
______
572 days--------------------------------------------6 days_______________________________________________

2

_
*
_
_
2
_
_
_
_
_
2
_
_
_
81
81
1
1
_
_
4
3
1
1
5
4
1
1
3

40.4

41.0

( )
9
1
( )
9
( >
9
2
_
_
_
( )
9
6
_
_
_
(
9>
78
( >
9
78
1
1
( )
9
3
3
1
O
4
3
( )
’
C)

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
( )
9

_
_
_
_

5

_
4
_

_
_

3
_
_

1
1
5
6
6
_

_

_
_

_
_
4
( )
9
2
( )
9

9

( )
9
19
2
( )
9
1
2
70
_
70
_

25

( )
9
_
_
( )
9
68
( )
9
68
5

_

_
_
_
62
_
62
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
1
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

-

_
-

_

-

-

40.6

40.0

38.7

39.3

_
_
89
89
_
_
_
_
10
10
_
_
_
( )
9
( )
9

_
_
100
_
100
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

5
_
_

_
_
_
8

100

_
( )
9
_
_
_

( )
9
( )
9
1
13
3
1
1
80
_
80

_

( )
9

7

7
( )
9

1
3

22

1
40

29

93

3
89

_
76

4
5
31

2
61

93

89

76

31

61

_
_
_

_
_

6
_
_

_

_

( )
9
_
_

_

-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
-

-

-

-

39.2

39.5

39.8

39.6

39.3

38.0

38.9

Average scheduled weekly hours
All weekly work schedules____________________________ ___

See footnote at end of tables.




Plant workers
Item

Office workers

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100

100

100

100

100

100

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

100

100

100

100

Percent of workers
All full-time workers — ---------- ---------------- —
In establishments not providing
paid holidays _ ____________ __ _ ------------_ In establishments providing
paid holidays_
_ _________ ______ _____________
_ ____

100

100

100

2

1

-

6

2

13

-

-

_

-

98

99

100

94

98

87

99

99

100

100

100

100

99

9.8

10.6

9.4

9.0

7.9

7.4

9.3

10.1

9.2

8.1

7.2

8.9

8.4

_
3
12
43
_
23
19
-

_
13
3
6
34
8
21
7
1
-

1
2
5
37
1
20
2
10
20
-

3
.
1
18
(9)
26
7
13
11
1
7
_
(9)
(9)

100
100
100
100
97
97
84
84
41
41
19
19

94
94
80
80
80
76
71
71
37
36
14

98
95
90
90
53
53
32
32
20
20

87
83
65
65
40
39
19

8

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

r

(9)

(9)

(9)

Average number of paid holidays
For workers in establishments
providing holidays___________ _________________ ___
_
Percent of workers by number
of paid holidays provided 1
0
holidays--------------- _----- __--- — _ ___ _____ ___
_
_________
_
_ __
holidays—
_holidays
_____________________ _________ „_____
holidays
__________ __________ _____________
Plus 1 half day or m o r e ___ __________ — _________ _____
__ __________ ____ ,_____________ ______________
7 holidays
Plus 1 half day or m o r e __________
______ __ —
8 holidays__
_
_ . - _
_
___ _____ __-_
Plus 1 half day or m o r e _________ __
_ ___
9 holidays ______ ___ _ ____
_ _
___ — --- --- _
Plus 1 half day or m o r e _____ ______________ .
10 holidays ..._______ u_
_ _ -U
I
r„ . .
, ..
_,_________r
, ______
_
Plus 2 half day8______ ___. . r
11 holidays
____ ____— .
___________ , ------- —
Plus 1 half d a y ___ ___
_
______----12 holidays _
__ ___
_ _ _ _ _ — _ ___
_
_
13 holidays
_____ _ _ ____
_
_
__ -Plus 1 half day .
. - r— -r-r -----------,
-------14 holidays
__ __—
___— _ _
—
_ -- Plus 1 half day ____ „_______ ______,______________ ,
—
____ ___________— __ _______
15 holidays ____ __

2
3
5
6

(?)
(?)
(9)
3
(9)
10
2
8
2
21
1
22
(9)
13
2
2
10
(9)
1

_
(?)
(9)
4
1
4
1
23
1
24
(9)
17
3
3
16
1

(9)
7
4
7
1
6
1
30
2
20
1
14
1
1
2
(9)
1
(9)
2

_
1
3
2
(9)
5
2
19
2
30
23
3
4
2
4

_
7
1
2
1
54
20
14
-

_
27
8
12
4
(9)
21
6
9
12
-

_
_
10
9
59
(9)
8
14
_
-

_
8
.
6
10
57
3
7
5
3
1
-

(9)
15
10
7
5
26
.
2
27
_
5
_
1
2
-

Percent of workers by total paid
holiday time provided ll
2 days or m o r e - -----_
__ ___ _ _____
6 days or m o r e ___________________________ _— -- ---6 l/ 2 days or m o r e ______ _
_
_ _
7 days or m o r e _ ___
_
_____
_
_ _____
7l/2 days or m o r e _ ____ _
_
_
___ _ _._
___
8 days or m o r e _ _ _ — _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _
8V2 days or mor<» ^ _, __ ___ . n
_
, ---- r.. r ---- .- — „ „
—
9 days or mor e
_
_ _ _
_
_
9V2 days or m o r e --- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ — _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
10 days or m o r e _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
I O V 2 days or m o r e ______
_
— .__
11 days or m o r e ------ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
______
___ _
l l l/2 days or mo r e _____
12 days or m o r e _________ _
13 days or m o r e
__ __
_
_
___
TO____ „ ____
14 days or m o r e _____ ________ ,
15 days _ _ _ _ _ _ __
_
___
_
_
—




98
97
94
94
83
83
74
74
51
50
29
28
15
15
13
11
1

99
98
98
98
94
94
90
89
66
65
41
41
24
24
20
17
1

-

-

19
8
8

1
1

Q

(?
(?
n

99
98
93
91
82
81
75
74
44
43
22
22
7
6
5

3
2

99
99
98
95
93
93
88

87
67
67
36
36
13
13
10
6
4

100
100
93
91
89
89
88
88

100
100
73
73
57
50
49
49

100
100
90
85
22
22
14
14
_
-

34
34
14
14
-

27
24
14
12
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

100
100
92
92
86
86
76
76
20
16
9
9
4
1
1
-

99
98
85
85
68
63
37
37
37
35
8
8

3
3
2
2
“

'

Plant workers
Item 1
0

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

100
97
10
60
1
2
97
97
97

6
81
1
(9)
99
98
99
(
9)
j
3
99
84
87
1
99
16
3
55
3
17
4
(9)

Office workers

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99

100

94
1
16
39
10

95

QA
<4
5

99

99

100

37
52
4
(9)
99
99
99
(9)
1C
ID
1f
17
3
99
56
40
7
99
2

18
78
3

76
83
“

11
38
11

“

100
100
100

(9)
100
100
100
“

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99

80
11
8
100
100
100

46
14
(9)
99
99
99
6
17
5
99
39
7
17
98
“
21
5

Percent of workers
All full-time w o r k e r s ___

_ _

N e w Year's Dav_
Martin Luther King's Birthday________________________
Washington's Birthdav___ _
Good Friday— _ _
_ ... _ r
...
Good Friday, half day_______ _
_
Easter Sunday_
_
Memorial Day
_
__ _
.....
....
Fourth of July , _ ..
.
Labor Day
_
Primary Election Day_
_ ..
..
Columbus Day
_
_
„
.
Veterans Day_ _
Election Day___ _
.
Thanksgiving Day
._
_
,
Day after Thanksgiving _ _
. .. r
..
Christmas Eve
.... . . .
...
Christmas Eve, half day
Christmas Day
_ .. ^
..
.
. ,
Christmas— N e w Year's holidav period 1
2
Extra day during Christmas week _
N e w Year's Eve
n_
N e w Year's Eve, half dav_
Floating holiday, 1 day 13_
..
.
.
._
.
Floating holiday, 2 days 1
3
.
Floating holiday, 3 days 1 _
4
_ ... _
Day's pay added to vacation__________ ______ _____ _______
Employee's birthday
_ .
.
Employee's anniversary —

See footnotes at end of tables.




(?)

n
2
2
98
59
61
4
98
10
2
37
4
18
5
2

30
8

16
2

71
77
j
100
100
100
3
16
100
47
26
100
7
2

12
1
8
8
95
95
QA
7*1

94
94
94
7

5
OA
o4
OJ
03
84
(9)

Q
94
27
38
16
94
18
14
27
7

'

96
2
4
•
*
97
2
•
»
29
13

(9)
87
10
19
86

c

7
18
(9)

19
18

45
6

13
78
35

37
9

Co

3
18
5
12

3

99
99
99
( )
■
5
99
83
84
99
5
3
47
3
O7
Co
8
(9)
Q
O
2

100
100
100
3
20
100
59
15
1
100
"
“
4
14
13

1

5
100
29
40
15
100
“

■

16
12
29
“

95
7
3
10
100
“
“
3
5
19
5

15

70

2

10

64
66
100
23
1
9
99
■

12

4

6
5

6

5

12

l

23

Plant workers
Item

Office workers

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

100

100

100

100

100

100

-

-

-

4

100

100

100

100

87

96
91
5
"

Retail
trade

Services

All
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

100

Percent of workers
All full-time work e r s -----------------------------In establishments not providing
paid vacations ________________________________________
In establishments providing
paid vacations _____________________ ___________________
Length-of-time payment_____ ________________________
Percentage p ayment______________ ...»--------------Other payment______________________ _______ __________

(9)
99
89

8
2

100

100

100

100

100

100

-

-

-

-

-

99
98

100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

6

7
41

_
49
14
-

5
42
3
-

29

2

2

-

59
23

62

38
62
"

52
(9)
47
“

(9)

98
-

87

3

2

96
4
■

20
2
1

19
41
-

8
11
2

1

45
17

-

17
5
-

-

1

21
2

66

5

17

7

56

4
-

43
“
(9)

1
1

1
1
2

1
1

95

2
2

“

■

“

"

(9)
99
99
-

Amount of paid vacation after:1
4

6 months

of service:
Under 1 w e e k _____________________ _______________
1 w e e k ------------------------ __ ----------- _--Over 1 and under 2 w eeks ------- ------- — --------2 weeks------------------------------------------

18
19

1

(9)

1 year

of service:
Under 1 w e e k __________ _ _
_
_ _ „ _ ,______
1 w e e k ___________ _— ----»------ ------ ----- ---Over 1 and under 2 weeks __ ____ _______ _______ _—
_
2 weeks____________ __________ ____ _______ ___ —
Over 2 and under 3 weeks____________ __ _________
3 weeks_ _______________ ___ _ __________ __ ___
_
_
Over 3 and under 4 we e k s _________________________

2 years of service:
1 week ____ ______ ______ ___ ________ ___ ___ _______
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks ----------------------- —
2 weeks ___________________ _______ __________ _—
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks ___ ___________ _______ _
3 weeks--------------------- ----- ----------- -—
_
Over 4 and under 5 w e e k s ______ ____ __ — ----____
3 years of service:
1 week ___ _____________ ___ ___ ___ ___ ______________
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ____ ______________ _
_ _
2 weeks ________________ -— — -- __ — ---- - ----—
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks ____ _ _____ _ — - _
_
3 weeks _______________ __________ __________ ________
4 weeks_ _____________ _ _ _
_
_ _ _ ________________ _—
Over 4 and under 5 w eeks _______ — ---------— __— __
4 years of service:
1 w e e k ___________________________________________
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ______ _______ — - _________
2 weeks_________________ _____ ______------- _________
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ________
_ _______---- ___
3 weeks_________ __ ____- -- ____ ------- -- - _—
4 weeks _____________ _______ — --------- -- - Over 4 and under 5 w eeks _________ __ __ — - ---_ _
-




23

9

(9)
65
5
25

61

58

74

78

25

4

25
"

19
-

3

40
-

-

24
“

5

29
7
65
-

33
65
-

36
60
-

2

1

(9)
93
3

"

-

-

(
9)
90
5
4
-

2

2

97
-

■

18
3
74
(
9)

”

“

(9)
91
5
4
(9)
"

7

2

16

(?)

1

(9)

(9)

1

1

32

8
1

1

51

35
17
41

3

4

1
1
1
1

6
9
65
16
3

1
1

2
1

8
12
51
23
4

1
1

2

2
87
7
(9)
"
-

2
91
7
(9)
■

1

7
7
83

6
12

2

6

91
7

84

16

52
24

3

4

5

8
66
1
1

1

-

(9)

-

2
1

1

1

1

1

76

2

97
-

-

-

-

1

3
(9)

1

1

80

1
2
-

2

0

1
86
2

1
(9)

86
7

6
(9)
“

90
5

85

4

7

(9)

8

(’ )

1

99

1

(9)
99

1

(9)
~

99
(9)

-

1

99
r
-

100
■
-

100
-

12
2

8

_
92
"
-

100
“

-

100
-

2
-

1

99
-

100
-

97
3
_
96
4

-

10
"

17
83
“

8

69

21
2
"

2
(9)
73

22
3
-

2
(9)

73
22

3

-

Plant workers
Item

A ll
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Office workers
Retail
trade

Services

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

Amount of paid vacation after u — Continued
5 years of service:
1 week —------------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 w eeks_____________________
2 w eeks-------------------------------------------------------------------Over 2 and tinder 3 w eeks—____ _____________
3 w eeks___ ____________ ___ ___ _________ ___
4 w eeks_____________ ______
Over 4 and tinder 5 w eeks_____
_ __ _
_

(9)
2
63
8
25
1
1

2
57
11
26
1
2

_
80
9
11
-

4
.
73
3
20
-

10 years of service:
1 w e e k ______________ ___ _
_______________ ___
2 w eeks_ _ _ _
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks__________________ ___
3 weeks ____
_
_
____^
__
Over 3 and under 4 w eeks____
4 w eeks_ _____________ ___ _________ _
_
_____
Over 4 and under 5 weeks
_ ,
_

(9)
8
4
65
16
5
1

9
6
53
25
6
2

_
93
7

4
6
1
65
1
23
-

12 years of service:
1 w e e k ______________ ____
.
2 w eeks_ ________
_
_ „
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks- _
_
_ _ __
3 weeks _ _ _ _ _ _
_
_„
Over 3 and under 4 weeks _
_
_
4 weeks _ _ ______ _ _
_
__
—
_ .
Over 4 and under 5 w eeks_____
_ _ __
__ _
5 weeks _
------------- ---------^
_
_ _
Over 5 and under 6 w eeks____ ___________ _____

(9)
4
5
64
19
6
1
(9)
1

.
3
8
52
28
6
1
_
1

93
7
_

_
1
39
13
43
3

_
69
2
22
7

(9)

(9)

15 years of service:
Over 1 and under 2 weeks _ _
_ _
_ _
_ ^
2 w eeks— ___ ___ ____ _
_______ ________ _ _ _
3 w eeks.— ______ ___ _ ____ _____ ______
_
Over 3 and under 4 w eeks____
__ _ _
4 weeks — _____ ______ ___ ___ ___ __ __ ___ ___
Over 4 and under 5 w eeks________ _____________
5 w eeks----- ------------------------------- --- ----------------------- --6 w eeks__ ______ ______
_ __ _
20 years of service:
1 week _
__ _ _ _ _ ......... .
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s __
2 w eeks_______ ___ ___ ______,.. ___ ___ ____ ___
3 w eeks. ___ ___________ ___ ______ _ _ ____
Over 3 and under 4 w eeks_____
_____
4 weeks _
___ _
, _
_ _
Over 4 and under 5 w eeks____
_ ________ _
5 weeks
.
.. . n
Over 5 and under 6 weeks _ _ _ _ _
6 w eeks__ _________ _______ T
Over 6 w e e k s ________ _____ ______ ________ _
_




(9)

1

1

_
_

(9)
(9)
1
17
2
47
4
25
1

20
2
44
6
24
2

(9)

(9)

1

(9)

_
(9)
98
_
2
_

_

_

(’ )
60
8
32
(9)

(9)
63
13
24
(9)

5
24
_
66
_
1

_
8
1
80
4
8

_
4

(9)

(9)

5
11
_
78
_
1

_
7
1
76
7
9
1
(9)

5
_
89
_
2
_
-

4
6
1
56
3
30
_
_

98
_
2
_
_

-

-

-

(9)
31
.
69

5
4
71
2
14

-

3
43
2
41
_
8
-

_
_
71
2
20

4
_
3
15
_
53
1
18

_
_

(9)

/9 \
M
2
41
8
45
2
1

_
_
64
_
36
.
-

7
(’)

(9)

(9)

4

_

6

-

(9)

9
_
51
.
40

_
_

_
_

_

_

93
1
6
.
-

86
3
12

49

31
1
68

53
21
26

-

-

-

-

30
2
61

(9)
99

11
2
81

84

6

1

5

_

l

3

76
8
12
1

95
1
1

_
2
1
71
12
13

_
3

_

(9)

“

“
1
38
13
46
2

3
91

(9)

(9)

_
_
_

85

11

u
2
79
3
5

-

’

"

-

-

19
58
3
17

(9)

89

6

(9)

~

_
_
1
10
3
60
4
21

(9)
(9)

(9)
(9)

57

1
41
2
57

_
_
3
16
2
65
2
12

5
2

_
29
2
63

“

3
49
7
40

-

9

-

95
1
(9)

-

(9)

_
5
4
45
13
26
3

51

-

19
44

(9)
9

1
17

91

26

68

81
1

4

9

23

5
1
(9)

_
_
2
1
_

1

(9)

43

_

3

3

_

7

5
2

84
1
11
3
-

46
1
49

4

Plant workers
Item

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Office workers
Retail
trade

Services

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

Amount of paid vacation after u —
—Continued
25 years of service:
1 w eek ____________________________________
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks_ ___________________ _
2 weeks__________ _ _
__ _____ ___ _
_________ ___
_ ______________________________
3 weeks_
Over 3 and under 4 w eeks___ _
_____________ __
_
4 weeks
_______
_ _ _ ______
Over 4 and under 5 w eeks_ ________ _____ _____
_
5 weeks ___ . _ .
_ _ _ _ ___________
Over 5 and under 6 w eeks____ _ _______________
6 weeks ^
. . T
.
_ _
___ _______
Over 6 weeks
__
_ _ _ _ _ ______ _

(9)
(9)
1
9
1
37
2
40
3
5
1

30 years of service:
1 week _
_ _ _ _
_ _ ______ _
_
Over 1 and under 2 weeks _ __ ____________ ___
2 weeks _ _ _ ____ ____ ________ ____ _ __ _
__
3 weeks _________ _______ _____ ________
Over 3 and under 4 w eeks__ ______ __ ____ _
4 weeks ____ ___ ___ ______ ___ ___ ______ ____ __—
Over 4 and under 5 weeks ____ _ ___ _
_____
_
— _
_ ---- -----5 weeks _ _____ ___________
_
Over 5 and under 6 weeks _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ ____ _
______
6 weeks ____ ____ __
_ _ _____ ___ ___ _
_
Over 6 w e e k s_
_ _ _ _ _ ____________ -

(9)
(9)
1
9
1
34
3
39
3
8
1

Maximum vacation available:
1 week ________ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ ----------- _ _ _
____ _
_
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks___ ____ _ ___ _— _ _ _
__
2 weeks _ _ __ _
_
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ --- ----- ---- — —
______
3 weeks___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _
_ ___
_ _ _ ------ —
Over 3 and under 4 weeks _ _ _ __ __________
_ _ _
_
---- ----- _____
4 weeks __ _____ _ — _ — _ —
Over 4 and under 5 w eeks_
_____ —
- _5 weeks --------- ----------------------------------------- -------- -----Ovftr 5 and under 6 weeks
_ -------6 weeks_ _______ ____________ ___ ________
_
Over 6 w e e k s__ ____ _
______
— ——

See footnotes at end of tables.




(9)
(9)
1
9
1
34
2
40
3
8

(9)
7
1
40
4
43
3
1

4
3
15
33
1
37
8
"

(9)
9
46
26
20
-

2
81
7
10
-

4
•
3
15
33
1
37
8
-

(9)
9
46
_
26
20
-

2

4
3
15
33
1
37

(’ )
9
46

-

-

1
(’ )
7
1
37
4
40
4
5
1
(9)
7
1
37
4
41
4
5
1

-

8
75
7
10

-

81
7
10

8

_

-

26
20

5
4
45
13
9
(9)
20
.
-

_
3
12
(9)
48
1
33
1
1
-

1
7
(9)
43
2
43
2
1
"

2
1
24
_
68
1
4
-

19
43
_
14
19
_
5
-

(9)
9
_
61
30
_
-

1
11
81
1
6
_
-

34
1
52
3
9
-

5
4
45
13
9
(9)
20
-

3
12
(9)
46
2
33
1
3
-

1
7
(’ )
40
4
41
2
4
-

2
1
12
80
1
4
“

_
19
43
14
17
7
-

(9)
9
61
30
-

1
11
81
1
6
-

34
1
52
3
9
-

5
4
45
13
9
(9)
20

-

1
7
(9)
40
2
43
2
4

2
1
12

19
43
14

(9)
9
61

1
11
81
1
6

34
1
52
3
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
12
(9)
46
1
34
1
3

-

-

-

-

80
1
4

17
7

30
-

Plant workers
Item

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Office workers

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

A ll
industries

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

Services

Percent of workers
A ll full-tim e w o rk e r s__________________________

100

100

100

In establishments providing at least one of the
benefits shown below 15___
__
_____________

99

99

Life insurance _________ _________ _ __
_ __________ _
_
Noncontributory plans____ ___ ___ __ ___ __„ ______

98
87

99
94

Accidental death and dismemberment in su ran ce____
____
Noncontributory plans______ _
__________________ _

79
71

Sickness and accident insurance or sick
leave or both 16 _ _

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

98

91

99

99

100

100

99

99

98

100
98

100
88

98
56

90
88

94
71

92
79

100
93

100
72

97
30

93
57

96
65

82
77

74
71

78
76

76
50

60
59

76
58

73
63

91
84

67
50

78
22

83
50

52
47

93

96

84

91

90

85

88

93

94

78

88

82

68

Sickness and accident insurance _______________ ___
Noncontributory plans ____ ___ ____ ____ __ _ __
_ __
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period)
_
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting pe rio d )_______ __

86
80
11
6

95
90
5
2

35
29
30
35

85
83
23
-

76
62
21
11

79
75
10
-

50
39
64
7

64
59
73
1

26
13
37
46

60
52
57
5

68
28
47
9

25
5
70
1

39
32
45
5

Long-term disability in su ran ce_____________________
____ _
____
Noncontributory plans _
_

29
26

39
35

18
17

22
16

3
1

13
13

50
34

59
35

38
32

38
27

13
6

56
43

30
30

Hospitalization in su ran ce____ _ __ ___ ____ _______ ___
_
Noncontributory plans _ _ _____________
___

96
86

99
95

100
94

100
88

86
51

87
76

96
65

99
78

95
83

99
57

76
27

94
47

86
36

Surgical in su ran ce___
__ _ _
_ _
Noncontributory plans____ ______ __ _____ ____ ___
_

95
84

99
94

100
94

96
85

86
51

74
63

96
66

99
77

95
83

97
55

76
27

94
53

95
45

Medical insurance ___ _______ ________ ________ _____ _
Noncontributory plans ____________________

90
82

98
93

88
82

96
85

74
50

59
48

94
65

98
77

95
83

97
55

67
27

94
53

84
35

Major medical insurance_____ ____________________ _
Noncontributory plans. _
_
_

59
50

56
52

90
82

61
53

68
36

36
34

87
56

86
58

99

86

63
34

69
20

98
59

86
52

Dental insurance _____________ ___ ______________ _
_
___
_ ....
Noncontributory plans _
_ _
_ _

10
10

5
5

27
27

2
2

28
27

3
3

6
5

8
8

7
7

4
4

12
6

4
1

_

Retirement pen sion __________ ____ ___ __________ _
Noncontributory plans _____ ______________ _____ _

88

92

84
73

74
73

93
84

81
72

59

88

86
82

88

83

84
80

74
64

95
89

85
78

See footnotes at end of tables.




80

56

-

Footnotes
A ll of these standard footnotes may not apply to this bulletin.

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which em ployees receive their regular straight-tim e sa la rie s (exclusive of pay for overtim e
at regular a n d /o r prem ium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of a ll workers and dividing by the number of w o rk ers.
The median
designates position— half of the em ployees surveyed receive m ore and half receive le ss than the rate shown. The middle range is defined
by two rates of pay; a fourth of the workers earn le ss than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn m o re than the higher rate.
3 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
4 These sa la rie s relate to form ally established minim um starting (hiring) regular straigh t-tim e sa la ries that are paid for standard
workweeks.
5 Excludes w orkers in su bclerical jobs such as m essen g er.
6 Data are presented for a ll standard workweeks combined, and for the m ost common standard workweeks reported.
7 Includes a ll plant w orkers in establishm ents currently operating late shifts, and establishments whose form al provisions cover late
shifts, even though the establishm ents were not currently operating late shifts.
8 L e ss than 0.05 percent.
9 L e ss than 0.5 percent.
10 For purposes of this study, pay for a Sunday in D ecem ber, negotiated in the automobile industry, is not treated as a paid holiday.
1 A ll combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for exam ple, the proportion of w orkers receiving
1
a total of 9 days includes those with 9 full days and no half days, 8 full days and 2 half days, 7 full days and 4 half days, and so on.
Proportions then were cumulated.
12 A C hristm as—
New Y ear holiday period is an unbroken series of holidays which includes C hristm as E ve, C hristm as Day, New Y e a r 's
Eve, and New Y e a r 's Day.
Such a holiday period is common in the automobile, aerospace, and fa rm im plem ent industries.
1 "F lo a tin g " holidays vary from year to year according to em ployer or employee choice.
3
1 Includes payments other than "length of t i m e ," such as percentage of annual earnings or fla t-s u m paym ents, converted to an
4
equivalent tim e b a s is ; for exam ple, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 w eek's pay. P eriods of serv ice a re chosen arb itrarily
and do not n ece ssa rily reflect individual provisions for p rogression ; for exam ple, changes in proportions at 10 y ea rs include changes between
5 and 10 y e a r s. E stim ates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 w eeks' pay after 10 y e a rs includes those eligible for
at least 3 w eeks' pay after fewer y ears of serv ice.
1 E stim ates listed after type of benefit are fo r all plans for which at lea st a part of the cost is borne by the em ployer. "Noncontributory
5
plan s" include only those financed entirely by the em ployer. Excluded are legally required plans, such as w orkm en's com pensation, social
security, and railroad retirem ent.
18 Unduplicated total of w orkers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below. Sick leave plans are
lim ited to those which definitely establish at lea st the minim um number of days' pay that each em ployee can expect. Inform al sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.




Appendix A
Area wage and related benefits data are obtained by personal visits of Bureau field represent­
atives at 3-year intervals
In each of the intervening years, information on employment and
occupational earnings is collected by a combination of personal visit and mail questionnaire from
establishments participating in the previous survey.

workers may advance to better jobs and be replaced by new workers at lower rates. Such shifts in
employment could decrease an occupational average even though most establishments in an area
increase wages during the year. Trends in earnings of occupational groups, shown in table A -7 ,
are better indicators of wage trends than individual jobs within the groups.

In each of the 822 areas currently surveyed, data are obtained from representative estab­
lishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation, communication, and other
public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and read estate; and services. Major
industry groups excluded from these studies are government operations and the construction and
extractive industries. Establishm ents having fewer tham a prescribed number of workers are omitted
because of insufficient employment in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are provided for
each of the broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.

Average earnings reflect composite, areawide estim ates. Industries and establishments differ
in pay level and job staffing, and thus contribute differently to the estimates for each job. Pay
averages may fail to reflect accurately the wage differential among jobs in individual establishments.

.1

These surveys are conducted on a sample basis. The sampling procedures involve detailed
stratification of adl establishments within the scope of an individual area survey by industry and number
of employees. From this stratified universe a probability sample is selected, with each establishment
having a predetermined chauice of selection. To obtain optimum accuracy at minimum cost, a greater
proportion of large than sm all establishments is selected. When data are combined, each establishment
is weighted according to its probability of selection, so that unbiased estimates are generated. For
example, if one out of four establishments is selected, it is given a weight of four to represent itself
plus three others. An alternate of the same original probability is chosen in the same industry-size
classification if data are not available for the original sample member. If no suitable substitute is
available, additional weight is assigned to a sample member that is similar to the m issing unit.
Occupations and Earnings
Occupations selected for study are common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing
industries, and are of the following types: (1) Office clerical; (2) professional and technical; (3)
maintenance and powerplant; and (4) custodial and material movement. Occupational classification is
based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job. Occupations selected for study are listed and described in appendix B.
Unless otherwise indicated, the earnings data following the job titles are for all industries combined.
Earnings data for some of the occupations listed and described, or for some industry divisions within
occupations, are not presented in the A -se r ie s tables, because either (1) employment in the occupation
is too small to provide enough data to m erit presentation, or (2) there is possibility of disclosure of
individual establishment data. Separate men's and women's earnings data are not presented when the
number of workers not identified by sex is 20 percent or more of the men or women identified in an
occupation. Earnings data not shown separately for industry divisions are included in all industries
combined data, where shown. Likew ise, data are included in the overall classification when a sub­
classification of electronics technicians, secretaries, or truckdrivers is not shown or information to
subclassify is not available.
Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for full-tim e workers, i.e ., those hired
to work a regular weekly schedule. Earnings data exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-of-living allowances
and incentive bonuses are included. Weekly hours for office clerical and professional and technical
occupations refer to the standard workweek (rounded to the nearest half hoar) for which employees
receive regular straight-tim e salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates).
Average weekly earnings for these occupations are rounded to the nearest half dollar.
These surveys m easure the level of occupational earnings in an area at a particular time.
Comparisons of individual occupational averages over time may not reflect expected wage changes.
The averages for individual jobs are affected by changes in wages and employment patterns. For
example, proportions of workers employed by high- or low-wage firms may change, or high-wage
1 P ersonal v isits w e re on a 2 - y e a r c y c le befo re July 1972.
2 In clu d ed in th e 82 areas are 9 studies con d u cted b y the Bureau under con tract. These areas are A ustin , T e x .; Bingham ton, N .Y . — P a . ; Fort
Laud erd ale—H o llyw o o d and W est P a lm B each — Boca R aton, F l a . ; Lexingto n— F ay ette, K y . ; M elbourne— T itu sv ille — C o c o a , F l a . ; N orfolk— V irgin ia
B each — Portsm outh and New port N ew s—H am p ton , V a . — N . C . ; P ou ghkeep sie— Kingston— Newburgh, N . Y . ; R ale ig h —Durham, N . C . ; and Syracuse, N . Y .
In ad d ition , the Bureau conducts m ore lim it e d area studies in ap p ro xim ate ly 70 areas at the request o f the Em ploym ent Standards A d m inistration o f
th e U . S . D e p a rtm en t o f Labor.




Average pay levels for men and women in selected occupations should not be assumed to
reflect differences in pay of the sexes within individual establishments. Factors which may contribute
to differences include progression within established rate ranges, since only the rates paid incumbents
are collected, and performance of specific duties within the general survey job descriptions. Job
descriptions used to classify employees in these surveys usually are more generalized than those used
in individual establishments and allow for minor differences among establishments in specific
duties performed.
Occupational employment estim ates represent the total in all establishments within the scope
of the study and not the number actually surveyed. Because occupational structures among establish­
ments differ, estimates of occupational employment obtained from the sample of establishments studied
serve only to indicate the relative importance of the jobs studied. These differences in occupational
structure do not affect m aterially the accuracy of the earnings data.
Wage trends for selected occupational groups
The
Annual rates
span between
increased at

percents of change in table A -7 relate to wage changes between the indicated dates.
of increase, where shown, reflect the amount of increase for 12 months when the time
surveys was other than 12 months. Annual rates are based on the assumption that wages
a constant rate between surveys.

Occupations used to compute wage trends are:
Office clerical (men and women):
Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class B
C lerks, accounting, classes A and B
C lerks, file, classes A, B, and C
C lerks, order
C lerks, payroll
Keypunch operators, classes A and B
Messengers
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Switchboard operators
Tabulating-machine operators,
class B
Typists, classes A and B

Electronic data processing (men
and women)— Continued
Computer system s analysts, classes A,
B, and C
Industrial nurses (men and women):
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Skilled maintenance (men):

Electronic data processing
(men and women):

Carpenters
Electricians
Machinists
Mechanics
Mechanics (automotive)
Painters
Pipefitters
Tool and die makers

Computer operators, classes A, B, and
Computer programm ers, classes A, B,
and C

Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Laborers, m aterial handling

Unskilled plant (men):

Percent changes for individual areas in the program are computed as follows:
1. Each occupation is assigned a weight based on its proportionate employment in the selected
group of occupations in the base year.
2. These weights are used to compute group averages. Each occupation's average (mean)
earnings is multiplied by its weight. The products are totaled to obtain a group average.
3. The ratio of group averages for 2 consecutive years is computed by dividing the average
for the current year by the average for the earlier year. The results— expressed as a percent— less 100
is the percent change.

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
The B-series tables provide information on establishment practices and supplementary wage
provisions for full-time plant and office workers. ’Plant workers" include working foremen and all
’
nonsupervisory workers (including leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Cafeteria
workers and routemen are excluded from manufacturing, but included in nonmanufacturing industries.
"Office workers" include working supervisors and nonsupervisory workers performing clerical or
related functions. Administrative, executive, professional, and part-time employees are excluded.
Part-time employees are those hired to work a schedule calling regularly for fewer weekly hours than
the establishment's schedule for full-time employees in the same general type of work. The
determination is based on the employer's distinction between the two groups which m a y take into
account not only differences in work schedules but differences in pay and benefits.

The s u m m a r y of vacation plans is a statistical measure of vacation provisions rather than a
measure of the proportion of full-time workers actually receiving specific benefits. (See table B-5.)
Provisions apply to all plant or office workers in an establishment regardless of length of service.
Payments on other than a time basis are converted to a time period; for example, 2 percent, of
annual earnings are considered equivalent to 1 week's pay. Only basic plans are included. Estimates
exclude vacation bonuses, vacation-savings plans, and "extended" or "sabbatical" benefits beyond basic
plans. Such provisions are typical in the steel, aluminum, and can industries.

Health, insurance, and pension plans for which the employer pays at least a part of the cost
include those (1) underwritten by a commercial insurance company or nonprofit organization, (2)
provided through a union fund, or (3) paid directly by the employer out of current operating funds or
from a fund set aside for this purpose. (See table B-6.) An establishment is considered to have
such a plan if the majority of employees are covered even though less than a majority participate
M i n i m u m entrance salaries for office workers relate only to the establishments visited. (See under the plan because employees are required to contribute toward the cost. Excluded are
table B-l.) Because of the optimum sampling techniques used and the probability that large legally required plans, such as workmen's compensation, social security, and railroad retirement.
establishments are m o r e likely than small establishments to have formal entrance rates above the
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of insurance under which predetermined
subclerical level, the table is m o r e representative of policies in m e d i u m and large establishments. cash payments are m a d e directly to the insured during temporary illness or accident disability.
Information is presented for all such plans to which the employer contributes. However, in N e w
Shift differential data are limited to full-time plant workers in manufacturing industries. (See York and New Jersey, which have enacted temporary disability insurance laws requiring employer
table B-2.) This information is presented in terms of (1) establishment policy 3 for toted plant worker contributions,4 plans are included only if the employer (1) contributes m o r e than is legally required,
employment, and (2) effective practice for workers employed on the specified shift at the time of the or (2) provides the employee with benefits which exceed the requirements of the law. Tabulations of
survey. In establishments having varied differentials, the amount applying to a majority is used. In paid sick leave plans are limited to formal plans5 which provide full pay or a proportion of the
establishments having some late-shift hours paid at normal rates, a differential is recorded only if it worker's pay during absence from work because of illness. Separate tabulations are presented
applies to a majority of the shift hours. A second (evening) shift ends work at or near midnight. A according to (1) plains which provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans which provide either
partial pay or a waiting period. In addition to the presentation of proportions of workers provided
third (night) shift starts work at or near midnight.
sickness and accident insurance or paid sick leave, an unduplicated total is shown of workers who
The scheduled weekly hours and days of a majority of the first-shift workers in an establish­ receive either or both types of benefits.
ment are tabulated as applying to all full-time plant or office workers of that establishment. (See
Long ferm disability insurance plans provide payments to totally disabled employees upon the
table B-3.) Scheduled weekly hours and days are those which a majority of full-time employees are expiration of their paid sick leave and/or sickness and accident insurance, or after a predetermined
expected to work for straight-time or overtime rates.
period of disability (typically 6 months). Payments are m a d e until the end of the disability, a
m a x i m u m age, or eligibility for retirement benefits. Full or partial payments are almost always
Paid holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans are treated statistically reduced by social security, workmen's compensation, and private pensions benefits payable to the
as applying to all full-time plant or office workers if a majority of such workers are eligible or m a y disabled employee.
eventually qualify for the practices listed. (See tables B-4 through B-6.) Sum s of individual items in
Major medical insurance plans protect employees from sickness and injury expenses beyond
tables B-2 through B-5 m a y not equal totals because of rounding.
the coverage of basic hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans. Typical features of major medical
Data on paid holidays are limited to holidays granted annually on a formal basis, which (1) plans are (1) a "deductible" (e.g., $50) paid by the insured before benefits begin; (2) a coinsurance
are provided for in written form, or (2) are established by custom. (See table B-4.) Holidays feature requiring the insured to pay a portion (e.g., 20 percent) of certain expenses; and (3) stated
ordinarily granted are included even though they m a y fall on a nonworkday and the Worker is not dollar m a x i m u m benefits (e.g., $ 10,000 a year). Medical insurance provides complete or partial
granted another day off. The first part of the paid holidays table presents the number of whole and payment of doctors' fees. Dental insurance usually covers fillings, extractions, and X-rays. Excluded
half holidays actually granted. The second part combines whole and half holidays to show total holiday are plans which cover only oral surgery or accident damage. Retirement pension plans provide
payments for the remainder of the worker's life.
time. Table B-4a reports the incidence of the most c o m m o n paid holidays.
} An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met either of die following conditions: (1) Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey, or (2) had formal provisions covering late shifts. An establishment was considered as having formal provisions if it (1) had operated late
shifts during the 12 months before the survey, or (2) had provisions in written form to operate late shifts.




4

The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.
* An establishment is considered as having a formal plan if it established at least the minimum number of days sick leave available to each
employee. Such a plan need not be written; but informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, are excluded.

Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied in Cleveland, Ohio,1September 1974
Number of establishments
employment
in establish­
ments in scope
of study

Industry division 2

Workers in establishments
Within scope of study

Within scope
of study *

Studied

Total4

Studied
Number

Percent

Full-time
plant workers

Full-time
office workers

Total4

All establishments
All divisions______________ ___

_______

Manuf a ctu ring_______________________________
Nonmanufacturing____________________________
Transportation, communication, and
other public utilities 5 ___________________
Wholesale trade__________________________
Retail trade______________________________
Finance, insurance, and real estate 6 _____
Services 8 --------------------------------

-

1,188

303

402,678

100

238,137

73,102

246,241

100

481
707

133
170

229, 843
172,835

57
43

153,740
84,397

34,835
38,267

141,249
104, 992

60
213

35, 774
24,720
59,412
27,664
25,265

7,485
6,730
4,301
15,873
3,878

29.422
7,619
43,513
15,631
8,807

-

100
50
50

140
192

23
34
34
33
46

50

100

102

9

6

15
7

6

15,494
12,283
42,285
(7)
12,086

Large establishments
All divisions____________________________
Manufactur ing_______________________________
Nonmanufacturing____________________________
Transportation, communication, and
other public utilities 5 ___________________
Wholesale trade__________________________
Retail trade__________________ ____________
Finance, insurance, and real estate 6 _____
Services 8 --------------------------------

-

146

117

231,719

100

143,567

42,432

210,300

500
-

93
53

69
48

143,723
87, 996

62
38

95,508
48,059

23,635
18,797

125,419
84,881

500
500
500
500
500

10
6
8

10
6
20
8

12,616
1,678
32,422

4

4

26,441
4,060
43,423
11,629
2,443

11
2

25

6,183
1, 183
3,416
7,856
159

26,441
4,060
40,308
11,629
2,443

19
5

1

-

1,343

1 T he Cleveland Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area* as defined by the Office of Management and Budget through February 1974, consists of Cuyahoga* Geauga* Lake, and Medina
Counties. The "workers within scope of study" estimates shown in this table provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey.
Estimates are not intended, however, for comparison with other employment indexes to measure employment trends or levels since (1) planning of wage surveys requires establishment data
compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) small establishments are excluded from the scope of the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual was used to classify establishments by industry division.
3 Includes all establishments with total employment at or above the m i n i m u m limitation. All outlets (within the area) of companies in industries such as trade, finance, auto repair service,
and motion picture theaters are considered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes executive, professional, part-time, and other workers excluded from the separate plant and office categories.
5 Abbreviated to "public utilities" in the A- and B-series tables. Taxicabs and services incidental to water transportation were excluded. Local-transit operations and an electric utility
(supplying less than half the electricity consumed in the Cleveland area) are municipally owned and are excluded by definition from the scope of the survey.
® Abbreviated to "finance" in the A - and B-series tables.
7 Estimate relates to real estate establishments only. Workers from the entire industry division are represented in the A-series tables, but from the real estate portion only in "all
industry" estimates in the B-series tables.
8 Hotels and motels; laundries and other personal services; business services; automobile repair* rental, and parking; motion pictures; nonprofit membership organizations (excluding
religious and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectural services.

Labor-management agreement coverage
Industrial composition in manufacturing
Over one-half of the workers within scope of the survey in the Cleveland area were
employed in manufacturing firms. The following presents the major industry groups and
specific industries as a percent of all manufacturing:
Industry group
Machinery, except electrical .. 15
..
Primary metal industries____ . 14
.
.
Transportation equipment____ . 14
.
Fabricated metal products___ . 13
Electrical equipment and
supplies____________________ . 11
.
Chemicals and allied
.
products___________________ . 7
Printing and publishing------- . 5
.

Specific industries
Motor vehicles and
equipment______________ ....
Blast furnace and basic
steel products____________
_
Metal stampings__________ ....
Metalworking machinery__ _
_

12
8
5
5

This information is based on estimates of total employment derived from universe
materials compiled before actual survey. Proportions in various industry divisions m a y
differ from proportions based on the results of the survey as shown in the appendix table.




The following tabulation shows the percent of full-time plant and office workers
employed in establishments in which a union contract or contracts covered a majority of
the workers in the respective categories, Cleveland, Ohio, September 1974:
Plant workers

Office workers

80
All industries______________
1
1
Manufactur ing______________
88
7
Public utilities______________
99
62
88
Wholesale trade____________
5
45
Retail trade_________________
1
Finance____________________
2
Services___________________
72
2
A n establishment is considered to have a contract covering all plant or office
workers if a majority of such workers are covered by a labor-management agreement.
Therefore, all other plant or office workers are employed in establishments that either do
not have labor-management contracts in effect, or have contracts that apply to fewer than
half of their plant or office workers. Estimates are not necessarily representative of the
extent to which all workers in the area m a y be covered by the provisions of labor-management
agreements, because small establishments are excluded and the industrial scope of the survey
is limited.

Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions
The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and
from area to area. This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on
interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions m a y differ significantly from those in use in
individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed
to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

OFFICE
BILLER, M A C H I N E

CLERKS, A C COUNTING

Prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or electromatic
typewriter. M a y also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work
incidental to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, machine, are classified by type of
machine, as follows:

Performs one or mor e accounting clerical tasks such as posting to registers and ledgers;
reconciling bank accounts; verifying the internal consistency, completeness, and mathematical accuracy
of accounting documents; assigning prescribed accounting distribution codes; examining and verifying
for clerical accuracy various types of reports, lists, calculations, posting, etc.; or preparing simple or
assisting in preparing more complicated journal vouchers. M a y work in either a manual or automated
accounting system.

Biller. machine (billing machine) Uses a special billing machine (combination typing and
.
adding machine) to prepare bills and invoices from customers' purchase orders, internally prepared
orders, shipping m e m o r a n d u m s , etc. Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and
shipping charges and entry of necessary extensions, which m a y or m a y not be computed on the billing
machine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine. The operation usually involves a
large number of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine). Uses a bookkeeping machine (with or without a
typewriter keyboard) to prepare customers' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation.
Generally involves the simultaneous entry of figures on customers' ledger record. The machine
automatically accumulates figures on a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints
automatically the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from
uniform and standard types of sales and credit slips.

The work requires a knowledge of clerical methods and office practices and procedures which
relates to the clerical processing and recording of transactions and accounting information. With
experience, the worker typically becomes familiar with the bookkeeping and accounting terms and
procedures used in the assigned work, but is not required to have a knowledge of the formal principles
of bookkeeping and accounting.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A. Under general supervision, performs accounting clerical operations which require
the application of experience and judgment, for example, clerically processing complicated or
nonrepetitive accounting transactions, selecting among a substantial variety of prescribed accounting
codes and classifications, or tracing transactions though previous accounting actions to determine
source of discrepancies. M a y be assisted by one or m o r e class B accounting clerks.

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OP E R A T O R
Operates a bookkeeping machine (with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of
business transactions.
Class A . Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and'experience in basic bookkeeping
principles, and familiarity with the structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines
proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each phase of the work. M a y
prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records by hand.
Class B . Keeps a record of one or m o r e phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll,
customers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described under biller, machine), cost
distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. M a y check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

Revised occupational descriptions for switchboard operator; switchboard operator-re­
ceptionist; machine-tool operator, toolroom; and tool and die mak e r are being introduced this year.
They are the result of the Bureau's policy of periodically reviewing area wage survey occupational
descriptions in order to take into account technological developments and to clarify descriptions so
that they are m o r e readily understood and uniformly interpreted. Even though the revised
descriptions reflect basically the same occupations as previously defined, some reporting changes
m a y occur because of the revisions.
The n ew single level description for switchboard operator is t «
levels previously defined.




? u v - l t t of !.b
■
»et

Class B . Under close supervision, following detailed instructions and standardized procedures,
performs one or mor e routine accounting clerical operations, such as posting to ledgers, cards, or
worksheets where identification of items and locations of postings are clearly indicated; checking
accuracy and completeness of standardized and repetitive records or accounting documents; and coding
documents using a few prescribed accounting codes.
C L E R K , FILE
Files, classifies, and retrieves material in an established filing system. M a y perform
clerical and manual tasks required to maintain files. Positions are classified into levels on the basis
of the following definitions.
Class A . Classifies and indexes file material such as correspondence, reports, technical
documents, etc., in an established filing system containing a number of varied subject matter files.
M a y also file this material. M a y keep records of various types in conjunction with the files. M a y
lead a small group of lower level file clerks.

Listed below are
stereotypes in the titles:

revised occupational titles introduced this

year to eliminate

Revised title

F o r m e r title

Drafter
Drafter-tracer
Boiler tender

Draftsman
Draftsman-tracer
Fireman, stationary boiler

sex

C laes B . Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple (subject matter) headings
or partly classified m aterial by finer subheadings. Prepares simple related index and cross-referen ce
aids. As requested, locates clearly identified m aterial in files and forwards m aterial. May perform
related cle ric a l tasks required to maintain and service files.
C lass C . Perform s routine filing of m aterial that has already been classified or which is
easily classified in a simple serial classification system (e.g., alphabetical, chronological, or
numerical). As requested, locates readily available material in files and forwards m aterial; and may
fill out withdrawal charge. May perform simple clerical and manual tasks required to maintain and
service files.
C LER K , ORDER
R eceives custom ers' orders for m aterial or merchandise by mail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the following: Quoting prices to customers; making out an order
sheet listing the items to make up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order sheet;
and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be filled. May check with credit department
to determine credit rating of customer, acknowledge receipt of orders from custom ers, follow up
orders to see that they have been filled, keep file of orders received, and check shipping invoices
with original orders.
C LER K , P A Y R O LL
Computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary data on the payroll sheets.
Duties involve: Calculating w orkers' earnings based on time or production records; and posting
calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such as worker's name, wdrking days, tim e,
rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and assist paymaster
in making up and distributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Operates a keypunch machine to record or verify alphabetic and/or numeric data on tabulating
cards or on tape.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
C lass A . Work requires the application of experience and judgment in selecting procedures
to be followed and in searching for, interpreting, selecting, or coding items to be keypunched from a
variety of source documents. On occasion may also perform some routine keypunch work. May train
inexperienced keypunch operators.
C la ss B . Work is routine and repetitive. Under close supervision or following specific
procedures or instructions, works from various standardized source documents which have been coded,
and follows specified procedures which have been prescribed in detail and require little or no selecting,
coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. Refers to supervisor problems arising from erroneous
items or codes or m issing information.
MESSENGER

Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled "secretary" possess the above characteristics.
positions which are excluded from the definition are as follows:

Examples.of

a.

Positions which do not meet the "personal" secretary concept described above;

b.

Stenographers

c. Stenographers
managerial persons;

not fully trained in secretarial type duties;
serving

as

office assistants

to a group

of professional, technical, or

d. Secretary positions in which the duties are either substantially more routine or sub­
stantially more complex and responsible than those characterized in the definition;
e. Assistant type positions which involve more difficult or more responsible technical,
administrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical duties which are not typical of secretarial
work.
NOTE: The term "corporate officer, " used in the level definitions following, refers to those
officials who have a significant corporate-wide policymaking role with regard to major company
activities.
The title "vice president," though normally indicative of this role, do^s not in all cases
identify such positions. Vice presidents whose prim ary responsibility is to act personally on individual
cases or transactions (e.g., approve or deny individual loan or credit actions; administer individual
trust accounts; directly supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be "corporate officers" for
purposes of applying the following level definitions.
C lass A
1. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that employs, in all,
over 100 but fewer than 5, 000 persons; or
2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the board or president) of a
company that employs, in all, over 5, 000 but fewer than 25, 000 persons; or
3. Secretary to the head, immediately below the corporate officer level, of a major segment
or subsidiary of a company that employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.
C lass B
1. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that employs, in all,
fewer than 100 persons; or
2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the board or president) of a
company that employs, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 persons; or
3. Secretary to the head, immediately below the officer level, over either a major corporatewide functional activity (e.g., marketing, research, operations, industrial relations, etc.) or a major
geographic or organizational segment (e.g., a regional headquarters; a major division) of a company
that employs, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000 employees; or

Perform s various routine duties such as running errands, operating minor office machines
such as sealers or m ailers, opening and distributing mail, and other minor clerical work. Exclude
positions that require operation of a motor vehicle as a significant duty.

4. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level of
official) that employs, in all, over 5,000 persons; or

SECR ETAR Y

5. Secretary to the head of a large and important organizational segment (e.g., a middle
management supervisor of an organizational segment often involving as many as several hundred
persons) or a company that employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.

Assigned as personal secretary, normally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the day-to-day work of the supervisor. Works fairly independently
receiving a minimum of detailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied clerical and secretarial
duties, usually including most of the following:
a. R eceives telephone ca lls, personal callers, and incoming mail, answers routine inquires,
and routes technical inquiries to the proper persons;
b.

Establishes, maintains, and revises the supervisor's files;

c.

Maintains the supervisor's calendar and makes appointments as instructed;

d.

Relays m essages from supervisor to subordinates;

e. Reviews correspondence, memorandums, and reports prepared by others for the super­
v is o r's signature to assure procedural and typographic accuracy;
f.

Perform s stenographic and typing work.

May also perform other cle rical and secretarial tasks of comparable nature and difficulty.
The work typically requires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization, programs,
and procedures related to the work of the supervisor.




C lass C
1. Secretary to an executive or managerial person whose responsibility is not equivalent to
one of the specific level situations in the definition for class B, but whose organizational unit
normally numbers at least several dozen employees and is usually divided into organizational segments
which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In some companies, this level includes a wide range of
organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; or
2. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level of
official) that employs, in all, fewer than 5,000 persons.
C lass D
1. Secretary to the supervisor or head of a sm all organizational unit (e.g., fewer than
about 25 or 30 persons); or
2. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional employee, administrative
officer, or assistant, skilled technician or expert. (NOTE: Many companies assign stenographers,
rather than secretaries as described above, to this level of supervisory or nonsupervisory worker.)

STENOGRAPHER

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (Electric Accounting Machine Operator)

Prim ary duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to transcribe the dictation. May also
type from written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool. May occasionally transcribe from
voice recordings (if prim ary duty is transcribing from recordings, see Transcribing-Machine
Operator, General).

Operates one or a variety of machines such as the tabulator, calculator, collator, interpreter,
sorter, reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from this definition are working supervisors. Also excluded
are operators of electronic digital computers, even though they may also operate EAM equipment.

NOTE: This job is distinguished from that of a secretary in that a secretary normally works
in a confidential relationship with only one manager or executive and performs more responsible and
discretionary tasks as described in the secretary job definition.

Class A. Performs complete reporting and tabulating assignments including devising difficult
control panel wiring under general supervision. Assignments typically involve a variety of long .and
complex reports which often are irregular or nonrecurring, requiring some planning of the nature and
sequencing of operations, and the use of a variety of machines. Is typically involved in training new
operators in machine operations or training lower level operators in wiring from diagrams and in
the operating sequences of long and complex reports-. Does not include positions in which wiring
responsibility is limited to selection and insertion of prewired boards.

Stenographer, General
Dictation involves a normal routine vocabulary.
or perform other relatively routine clerical tasks.

May maintain files, keep simple records,

Stenographer, Senior
Dictation involves a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or
reports on scientific research. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.
OR
Perform s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and responsibility
than stenographer, general, as evidenced by the following: Work requires a high degree of stenographic
speed and accuracy; a thorough working knowledge of general business and office procedure; and of
the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures, files, workflow, etc. Uses this
knowledge in performing stenographic duties and responsible clerical tasks such as maintaining followup
files; assembling m aterial for reports, memorandums, and letters; composing simple letters from
general instructions; reading and routing incoming mail; and answering routine questions, etc.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Operates a telephone switchboard or console used with a private branch exchange (PBX)
system to relay incoming, outgoing, and intra-system calls. May provide information to callers,
record and transmit m essages, keep record of calls placed and toll charges. Besides operating a
telephone switchboard or console, may also type or perform routine clerical work (typing or routine
clerical work may occupy the major portion of the w orker's time, and is usually performed while at
the switchboard or console). Chief or lead operators in establishments employing more than one
operator are excluded. For an operator who also acts as a receptionist, see Switchboard OperatorReceptionist.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
At a single-position telephone switchboard or console, acts both as an operator— see Switch­
board Operator— and as a receptionist. Receptionist's work involves such duties as greeting visitors;
determining nature of visito r's business and providing appropriate information; referring visitor to
appropriate person in the organization, or contacting that person by telephone and arranging an
appointment; keeping a log of visitors.

Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.

Class B . Performs work according to established procedures and under specific instructions.
Assignments typically involve complete but routine and recurring reports or parts of larger and more
complex reports. Operates more difficult tabulating or electrical accounting machines such as the
tabulator and calculator, in addition to the simpler machines used by class C operators. May be
required to do some wiring from diagrams. May train new employees in basic machine operations.
Class G. Under specific instructions, operates simple tabulating or electrical accounting
machines such as the sorter, interpreter, reproducing punch, collator, etc. Assignments typically
involve portions of a work unit, for example, individual sorting or collating runs, or repetitive
operations. May perform simple wiring from diagrams, and do some filing work.
TRANSCRIBINGrMACHINE OPERATOR, G ENERAL
Primary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal routine vocabulary from tran­
scribing-machine records. May also type from written copy and do simple cle rical work. Workers
transcribing dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal briefs or
reports on scientific research are not included. A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by
Stenotype or similar machine is classified as a stenographer.
TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies of various m aterials or to make out bills after calculations
have been made by another person. May include typing of stencils, m ats, or sim ilar m aterials for
use in duplicating processes. May do cle ric a l work involving little special training, such as keeping
simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and distributing incoming mail.
Class A. Performs one or more of the following: Typing m aterial in final form when it
involves combining material from several sources; or responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication,
punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language m aterial; or planning layout and
typing of complicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing. May type routine
form letters, varying details to suit circum stances.
Class B . Performs one or more of the following: Copy typing from rough or clear drafts;
or routine typing of forms, insurance policies, etc; or setting up simple standard tabulations; or
copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COMPUTER OPERATOR

COMPUTER OPERATOR— Continued

Monitors and operates the control console of a digital computer to process data cccording to
operating instructions, usually prepared by a programmer. Work includes most of the following:
Studies instructions to determine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
items (tape reels, cards, etc.); switches necessary auxiliary equipment into circuit, and starts and
operates computer; makes adjustments to computer to correct operating problems and meet special
conditions; reviews errors made during operation and determines cause or refers problem to
supervisor or programmer; and maintains operating records. May test and assist in correcting
program.

Class B . Operates independently, or under only general direction, a computer running
programs with most of the following characteristics: Most of the programs are established production
runs, typically run on a regularly recurring basis; there is little or no testing of new programs
required; alternate programs are provided in case original program needs major change or cannot be
corrected within a reasonably time. In common error situations, diagnoses cause and takes corrective
action. This usually involves applying previously programmed corrective steps, or using standard
correction techniques.
OR

For wage study purposes, computer operators are classified as follows:
C lass A . Operates independently, or under only general direction, a computer running
programs with most of the following characteristics: New programs are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requirements are of critical importance to minimize downtime; the programs
are of complex design so that identification of error source often requires a working knowledge of the
total program, and alternate programs may not be available. May give direction and guidance to
lower level operators.




Operates under direct supervision a computer running programs or segments of programs
with the characteristics described for cla ss A. May assist a higher level operator by independently
performing less difficult tasks assigned, and performing difficult tasks following detailed instructions
and with frequent review of operations performed.
Class C . Works on routine programs under close supervision. Is expected to develop working
knowledge of the computer equipment used and ability to detect problems involved in running routine
programs. Usually has received some form al training in computer operation. May assist higher level
operator on complex programs.

Converts statements of business problems, typically prepared by a systems analyst, into a
sequence of detailed instructions which are required to solve the problems by automatic data processing
equipment. Working from charts or diagram s, the programmer develops the precise instructions which,
when entered into the computer system in coded language, cause the manipulation of data to achieve
desired results. Work involves most of the following: Applies knowledge of computer capabilities,
m athematics, logic employed by computers, and particular subject matter involved to analyze charts
and diagrams of the problem to be programmed; develops sequence of program steps; writes detailed
flow charts to show order in which data w ill be processed; converts these charts to coded instructions
for machine to follow; tests and co rrects programs; prepares instructions for operating personnel
during production run; analyzes, review s, and alters programs to increase operating efficiency or
adapt to new requirements; maintains records of program development and revisions. (NOTE: Workers
performing both system s analysis and programming should be classified as systems analysts if this is
the skill used to determine their pay.)
Does not include employees prim arily responsible for the management or supervision of other
electronic data processing em ployees, or programmers prim arily concerned with scientific and/or
engineering problems.
For wage study purposes, programm ers are classified as follows:
C lass A . Works independently or under only general direction on complex problems which
require competence in all phases of programming concepts and practices. Working from diagrams
and charts which identify the nature of desired results, major processing steps to be accomplished,
and the relationships between various steps of the problem solving routine; plans the full range
of programming actions needed to efficiently utilize the computer system in . achieving desired
end products.
At this level, programming is difficult because computer equipment must be organized to
produce several interrelated but diverse products from numerous and diverse data elements. A wide
variety and extensive number of internal processing actions must occur. This requires such actions as
development of common operations which can be reused, establishment of linkage points between
operations, adjustments to data when program requirements exceed computer storage capacity, and
substantial manipulation and resequencing of data elements to form a highly integrated program.

For wage study purposes, system s analysts are classified as follows:
C lass A . Works independently or under only general direction on complex problems involving
all phases of system analysis. Problems are complex because of diverse sources of input data and
m ultiple-use requirements of output data. (For .example, develops an integrated production scheduling,
inventory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis record in which every item of each type is
automatically processed through the full system of records and appropriate followup actions are initiated
by the computer.) Confers with persons concerned to determine the data processing problems and
advises subject-matter personnel on the implications of new or revised system s of data processing
operations. Makes recommendations, if needed, for approval of major systems installations or changes
and for obtaining equipment.
May provide functioned direction to lower level system s analysts who are assigned to assist.
C lass B . Works independently or under only general direction on problems that are relatively
uncomplicated to analyze, plan, program, and operate. Problems are of limited complexity because
sources of input data are homogeneous and the output data are closely related. (For example, develops
system s for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank, maintaining accounts receivable in a retail
establishment, or maintaining inventory accounts in a manufacturing or wholesale establishment.)
Confers with persons concerned to determine the data processing problems and advises subjectmatter personnel on the implications of the data processing system s to be applied.
OR
Works on a segment of a complex data processing scheme or system , as described for class A.
Works independently on routine assignments and receives instruction and guidance on complex
assignments. Work is reviewed for accuracy of judgment, compliance with instructions, and to insure
proper alignment with the overall system.
Class C . Works under immediate supervision, carrying out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. Assignments are designed to develop and expand practical experience in the
application of procedures and skills required for systems analysis work. For example, may assist a
higher level systems analyst by preparing the detailed specifications required by programmers from
information developed by the higher level analyst.

May provide functional direction to lower level programmers who are assigned to assist.
C lass B . Works independently or under only general direction on relatively simple programs,
or on simple segments of complex programs. Program s (or segments) usually process information to
produce data in two or three varied sequences or formats. Reports and listings are produced by
refining, adapting, arraying, or making minor additions to or deletions from input data which are
readily available. While numerous records may be processed, the data have been refined in prior
actions so that the accuracy and sequencing of data can be tested by using a few routine checks.
Typically, the program deals with routine record-keeping type operations.
OR
Works on complex programs (as described for class A) under close direction of a higher
level programmer or supervisor. May assist higher level programmer by independently performing
less difficult tasks assigned, and performing more difficult tasks under fairly close direction.
May guide or instruct lower level programmers.
C lass C . Makes practical applications of programming practices and concepts usually learned
in form al training courses. Assignments are designed to develop competence in the application of
standard procedures to routine problems. Receives close supervision on new aspects of assignments;
and work is reviewed to verify its accuracy and conformance with required procedures.
COM PUTER SYSTEMS AN ALYST, BUSINESS
Analyzes business problems to formulate procedures for solving them by use of electronic
data processing equipment. Develops a complete description of all specifications needed to enable
programm ers to prepare required digital computer programs. Work involves most of the following:
Analyzes subject-m atter operations to be automated and identifies conditions and criteria required to
achieve satisfactory results; specifies number and types of records, files, and documents to be used;
outlines actions to be performed by personnel and computers in sufficient detail for presentation to
management and for programming (typically this involves preparation of work and data flow charts);
coordinates the development of test problems and participates in trial runs of new and revised systems;
and recpmmends equipment changes to obtain more effective overall operations; (NOTE: Workers
performing both system s analysis and programming should be classified as systems analysts if this is
the skill used to determine their pay.)
Does not include employees prim arily responsible for the management or supervision of other
electronic data processing em ployees, or system s analysts primarily concerned with scientific or
engineering problems.




D RAFTER
Class A. Plans the graphic presentation of complex items having distinctive design features
that differ significantly from established drafting precedents. Works in close support with the design
originator, and may recommend minor design changes. Analyzes the effect of each change on the
details of form, function, and positional relationships of components and parts. Works with a
minimum of supervisory assistance. Completed work is reviewed by design originator for consistency
with prior engineering determinations. May either prepare drawings, or direct their preparation by
lower level d r a f t e r s .
Class B . Perform s nonroutine and complex drafting assignments that require the application
of most of the standardized drawing techniques regularly used. Duties typically involve such work as:
Prepares working drawings of subassemblies with irregular shapes, multiple functions, and precise
positional relationships between components; prepares architectural drawings for construction of a
building including detail drawings of foundations, wall sections, floor plans, and roof. Uses accepted
formulas and manuals in making necessary computations to determine quantities of materials to be
used, load capacities, strengths, stresses, etc. Receives initial instructions, requirements, and
advice from supervisor. Completed work is checked for technical adequacy.
C lass C . Prepares detail drawings of single units or parts for engineering, construction,
manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types of drawings prepared include isometric projections
(depicting three dimensions in accurate scale) and sectioned views to clarify positioning of components
and convey needed information. Consolidates details from a number of sources and adjusts or
transposes scale as required. Suggested methods of approach, applicable precedents, and advice on
source m aterials are given with initial assignments. Instructions are less complete when assignments
recur. Work may be spot-checked during progress.
D R A FTER -TR AC ER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing cloth or paper over drawings
and tracing with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracing limited to plans primarily consisting of
straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
AND/OR
Prepares simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized items.
during progress.

Work is closely supervised

Works on various types of electronic equipment and related devices by performing one or a
combination of the following: Installing, maintaining, repairing, overhauling, troubleshooting, modifying,
constructing, and testing. Work requires practical application of technical knowledge of electronics
principles, ability to determine malfunctions, and skill to put equipment in required operating condition.

Class B . Applies comprehensive technical knowledge to solve complex problems (i.e., those
th a t. typically can be solved solely by properly interpreting manufacturers' manuals or sim ilar
documents) in working on electronic equipment. Work involves: A fam iliarity with the interrelation­
ships of circuits; and judgment in determining work sequence and in selecting tools and testing
instruments, usually less complex than those used by the class A technician.

The equipment— consisting of either many different kinds of circuits or multiple repetition of
the same kind of circuit— includes, but is not limited to, the following: (a) Electronic transmitting
and receiving equipment (e.g., radar, radio, television, telephone, sonar, navigational aids), (b)
digital and analog computers, and (c) industrial and medical measuring and controlling equipment.

Receives technical guidance, as required* from supervisor or higher level technician, and
work is reviewed for specific compliance with accepted practices and work assignments. May provide
technical guidance to lower level technicians.

This classification excludes repairmen of such standard electronic equipment as common office
machines and household radio and television sets; production assem blers and testers; workers whose
primary duty is servicing electronic test instruments; technicians who have administrative or
supervisory responsibility; and drafters, designers, and professional engineers.

Class C . Applies working technical knowledge to perform simple or routine tasks in working
on electronic equipment, following detailed instructions which cover virtually all procedures. Work
typically involves such tasks as: Assisting higher level technicians by performing such activities as
replacing components, wiring circuits, and taking test readings; repairing simple electronic equipment;
and using tools and common test instruments (e.g., m ultim eters, audio signal generators, tube testers,
oscilloscopes). Is not required to be fam iliar with the interrelationships of circuits. This knowledge,
however, may be acquired through assignments designed to increase competence (including classroom
training) so that worker can advance to higher level technician.

Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A . Applies advanced technical knowledge to solve unusually complex problems (i.e.,
those that typically cannot be solved solely by reference to manufacturers' manuals or sim ilar
documents) in working on electronic equipment. Examples of such problems include location and
density of circuitry, electro-m agnetic radiation, isolating malfunctions, and frequent engineering
changes. Work involves: A detailed understanding of the interrelationships of circuits; exercising
independent judgment in performing such tasks as making circuit analyses, calculating wave form s,
tracing relationships in signal flow; and regularly using complex test instruments* (e.g., dual trace
oscilloscopes, Q -m eters, deviation m eters, pulse generators).
Work may be reviewed by supervisor (frequently an engineer or designer) for general
compliance with accepted practices. May provide technical guidance to lower level technicians.

Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher level technician. Work
is typically spot checked, but is given detailed review when new or advanced assignments are involved.
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (Registered)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general m edical direction to ill or injured
employees or other persons who become ill or suffer an accident on the prem ises of a factory or
other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid to the ill or
injured; attending to subsequent dressing of em ployees' injuries; keeping records of patients treated;
preparing accideiit reports for compensation or other purposes; assisting in physical examinations and
health evaluations of applicants and employees; and planning and carrying out programs involving health
education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment, or other activities affecting the health,
welfare, and safety of all personnel. Nursing supervisors or head nurses in establishments employing
more than one nurse are excluded.

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
BOILER TENDER

H ELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES

F ires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which employed with heat, power,
or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; and
checks water and safety valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom equipment.

Assists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades, by performing specific or
general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a worker supplied with m aterials and tools; cleaning
working area, machine, and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding m aterials or tools; and
performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind of work the helper is permitted
to perform varies from trade to trade: In some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting,
and holding materials and tools, and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to perform
specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are also performed by workers on a
full-tim e basis.

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE
Performs the carpentry duties n ecessary to construct and maintain in good repair building
woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs,
casings, and trim made of wood in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Planning
and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal instructions; using a variety of
carpenter's handtools, portable power tools, and standard measuring instruments; making standard
shop computations relating to dimensions of work; and selecting m aterials n ecessary for the work. In
general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the installation, maintenance, or
repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of electrical equipment
such as generators, transform ers, switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units,
conduit system s, or other transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or
other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working
standard computations relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a
variety of electrician's handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In general, the work of the
maintenance electrician requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of stationary engines and
equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the establishment in which employed with power, heat,
refrigeration, or air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment such as
steam engines, air com pressors, generators, motors, turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipment,
steam boilers and boiler-fed water pumps; making equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation
of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May also supervise these operations. Head or
chief engineers in establishments employing more than one engineer are excluded.




MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in operating one or more than one type of machine tool (e.g., jig borer, grinding
machine, engine lathe, milling machine) to machine m etal for use in making or maintaining jigs,
fixtures, cutting tools, gauges, or metal dies or molds used in shaping or forming m etal or nonmetallic
m aterial (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work typically involves: Planning and performing
difficult machining operations which require complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; setting
up machine tool or tools (e.g., install cutting tools and adjust guides, stops, working tables, and other
controls to handle the size of stock to be machined; determine proper feeds, speeds, tooling, and
operation sequence or select those prescribed in drawings, blueprints, or layouts); using a variety of
precision measuring instruments; making necessary adjustments during machining operation to achieve
requisite dimensions to very close tolerances. May be required to select proper coolants and cutting
and lubricating oils, to recognize when tools need dressing, and to dress tools. In general, the work
of a machine-tool operator, toolroom, at the sk ill level called for in this classification requires
extensive knowledge of machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through considerable
on-the-job training and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not include machine-tool
operators, toolroom, employed in tool-and-die jobbing shops.
MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of metal parts of mechanical
equipment operated in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: interpreting written
instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m achinist's handtools
and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools; shaping of metal

parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling,
feeds, and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties of the common metals; selecting
standard m aterials, parts, and equipment required for this work; and fitting and assembling parts into
mechanical equipment. In general, the m achinist's work normally requires a rounded training in
machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.

Paints and redecorates w alls, woodwork, and fixtures of an establishment. Work involves the
following: Knowledge of surface peculiarities amd types of paint required for different applications;
preparing surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler in nail holes and
interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush. May mix colors, oils, white lead, and other
paint ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency. In general, the work of the maintenance
painter requires rounded trauning and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent trauning and experience.

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (Maintenance)
P IPE FITTE R , MAINTENANCE
Repairs automobiles, buses, m otortrucks, and tractors of an establishment. Work involves
most of the following: Examining automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling
equipment and performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches, gauges, d rills,
or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts from
stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassembling and installing the various assemblies in the vehicle
and making necessary adjustments; and aligning wheels, adjusting brakes and lights, or tightening body
bolts. In general, the work of the automotive mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
This classification does not include mechanics who repair customers' vehicles in automobile
repair shops.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment. Work involves most of the
following: Examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling
or partly dismantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of handtools in
scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items obtained from stock; ordering
the production of a replacement part by a machine shop or sending of the machine to a machine shop
for major repairs; preparing written specifications for major repairs or for the production of parts
ordered from machine shops; reassem bling machines; and making all necessary adjustments for
operation. In general, the work of a maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and experience
usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. Excluded from
this classification are workers whose prim ary duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dismantles and installs machines or heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout are required. Work involves most of the following:
Planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a variety of
handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations relating to stresses, strength of m aterials,
and centers of gravity; aligning and balancing of equipment; selecting .standard tools, equipment, and
parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order power transmission equipment such as
drives and speed reducers. In general, the m illwright's work normally requires a rounded training and
experience in the trade acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and pipefittings in am establish­
ment. Work involves most of the following: Laying out of work and measuring to locate position of
pipe from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct lengths
with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machines; threading pipe with stocks and
dies; bending pipe by hamd-driven or power-driven machines; assembling pipe with couplings and
fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to pressures, flow, am size of
d
pipe required; and making standard tests to determine whether finished pipes meet specifications. In
general, the work of the maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent trauning and experience. Workers primarily
engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating system s are excluded.
SH EET -M ET A L WORKER, MAINTENANCE
Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-m etal equipment am fixtures (such
d
as machine guards, grease pans, shelves, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing)
of am establishment. Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying out all types of sheetm etal maintenance work from blueprints, models, or other specifications; setting up and operating all
available types of sheet-metad working machines; using a variety of handtools in cutting, bending,
forming, shaping, fitting, and assembling; and installing sheet-m etal articles as required. In general,
the work of the maintenamce sheet-m etal worker requires rounded training am experience usuadly
d
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training amd experience.
TOO L AND DIE MAKER
Constructs and repaurs jig s , fixtures, cutting tools, gauges, or metal dies or molds used in
shaping or forming m etal or non-m etallic m aterial (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work
typically involves: Planning and laying out work according to models, blueprints, drawings, or other
written or oral specifications; understanding the working properties of common metals amd adloys;
selecting appropriate m aterials, tools, and processes required to complete task; making necessary
shop computation; setting up and operating various machine tools and related equipment; using various
tool and die m aker's handtools amd precision measuring instruments; working to very close tolerances;
heat-treating metad parts and finished tools and dies to achieve required quadities; fitting and
assembling parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances. In generad, tool and die m aker's work
requires rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through formed
apprenticeship or equivalent trauning and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not include tool and die
makers who (1) are employed in tool amd die jobbing shops or (2) produce forging dies (die sinkers).

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND WATCHMEN

LABORER, M ATERIAL HANDLING

Guard. Perform s routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour, maintaining order,
using arms or force where necessary. Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate and check on
identity of employees and other persons entering.

A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store, or other establishment whose
duties involve one or more of the following: Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise
on or from freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving, or placing
m aterials or merchandise in proper storage location; and transporting materials or merchandise by
handtruck, ca r, or wheelbarrow. Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are excluded.

Watchman.
and illegad entry.

Makes rounds of prem ises periodically in protecting property against fire, theft,

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEA N ER
Cleans and keeps in am orderly condition factory working areas and washrooms, or prem ises
of am office, apartment house, or com m ercial or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of
the following: Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips, trash, and other
refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing
supplies and minor mauntenance services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers
who specialize in window washing are excluded.




ORDER F ILL E R
F ills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored merchandise in accordance
with specifications on sales slips, custom ers' orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to
filling orders and indicating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requisition
additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other related duties.
PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them in shipping containers,
the specific operations performed being dependent upon the type, size, and number of units to be
packed, the type of container employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the placing of items
in shipping containers and may involve one or more of the following: Knowledge of various items of

stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size of container; inserting
enclosures in container; using excelsior or other m aterial to prevent breakage or damage; closing and
sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying data on container. Packers who also make
wooden boxes or crates are excluded.

follows:

Truckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under IV tons)
Tpuckdriver, medium (lVz to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, traile r type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than traile r type)

2

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is responsible for incoming shipments
of merchandise or other m aterials. Shipping work involves: A knowledge of shipping procedures,
practices, routes, available means of transportation, and rates; and preparing records of the goods
shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges, and keeping a file of shipping
records. May direct or assist in preparing the merchandise for shipment. Receiving work involves:
Verifying or directing others in verifying the correctness of shipments against bills of lading, invoices,
or other records; checking for shortages and rejecting damaged goods; routing merchandise or
m aterials to proper departments; and maintaining necessary records and files.

For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and type of equipment, as
(Tractor-trailer should be rated on the basis of traile r capacity.)

TRUCKER, POWER
Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-pow ered truck or tractor to transport
goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of truck, as follows:
Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)

For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:

WAREHOUSEMAN

Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCK DRIVER
Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport m aterials, merchandise, equipment,
or men between various types of establishments such as: Manufacturing plantq, freight depots,
warehouses, wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail establishments and customers'
houses or places of business. May also load or unload truck with or without helpers, make minor
mechanical repairs, and keep truck in good working order. D river-salesm en and over-the-road
drivers are excluded.

As directed, performs a variety of warehousing duties which require an understanding of
the establishment's storage plan. Work involves most of the following: Verifying m aterials (or
merchandise) against receiving documents, noting and reporting discrepancies and obvious damages;
routing materials to prescribed storage locations; storing, stacking, or palletizing m aterials in
accordance with prescribed storage methods; rearranging and taking inventory of stored m aterials;
examining stored materials and reporting deterioration and damage; removing m aterial from storage
and preparing it for shipment. May operate hand or power trucks in performing warehousing duties.
Exclude workers whose primary duties involve shipping and receiving work (see shipping and
receiving clerk and packer, shipping), order filling (see order filler), or operating power trucks (see
trucker, power).

Area Wage Survey bulletins will be issued once every 3 years. These bulletins will contain inform ation on establishment practices and supplementary benefits as well as earnings. In the interim years, supplements containing data on
earnings only will be issued at n o additional cost to holders o f the Area Wage bulletin. I f you wish to receive these supplements, please com plete the coupons below and mail t o any o f the BLS regional addresses listed on the back
cover o f this publication. N o further action on you r part is necessary. Each year, y ou will receive the supplement when it is published.

-

Please send a c o p y .o f Supplement I to BLS Bulletin

Please send a cop y o f Supplement II to BLS Bulletin

Name

Name

Address

Address

City and State




Zip Code

City and State

Z ip Code

Area Wage Surveys
A list of the latest available bulletins or bulletin supplements is presented below. A directory of area wage studies including m o r e limited studies conducted at the request of the Employment
Standards Administration of the Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins m a y be purchased from any of the B L S regional offices shown on the back cover. Bulletin supplements m a y be
obtained without cost, where indicated, from B L S regional offices.
Area

Bulletin number
and price*

A k r o n , O h io , D e c . 1 9 7 4 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ S u p p l.
F ree
A lb a n y — c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N. Y. , S e p t. 1 97 4 ____ . _______________________________________ S u p p l.
S
F ree
A lb u q u e r q u e , N . M e x . , M a r . 1 9 7 4 * __ ______ ________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
A l le n t o w n - B e t h le h e m - E a s t o n , P a .—N .J ., M a y 1974 2____ ________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
A n a h e im -S a n t a Ana—G a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , O c t . 1974 1 _________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 9 , 85 c e n t s
A t la n t a , G a ., M a y 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
A u s t in , T e x . , D e c . 1974 _______________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
B a l t i m o r e , M d ., A u g . 1 9 7 4 ___________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
B e a u m o n t—P o r t A rth u r—O r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1974 2________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
B i l l i n g s , M o n t ., J u ly 1974 1 __________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 , 75 c e n t s
B in g h a m t o n , N . Y ^ P a . , J u ly 1974 ___________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , M a r . 1 9 7 4 ----------------------------------------- _-----------------------------------------------------S u p p l.
F ree
B o i s e C i t y , I d a h o , N o v . 1 973 2________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
B o s t o n , M a s s . , A u g . 1974 ____________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
F ree
B u f fa lo , N . Y ., O c t . 1974 _______ _______________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
B u r lin g t o n , V t . , D e c . 1973 2___________________________________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
C a n t o n , O h io , M a y 1974 1 _____________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 - 2 3 , 80 c e n t s
C h a r l e s t o n , W . V a . , M a r . 1974 2_____________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
C h a r l o t t e , N .C ., J an. 1974 2___________________________________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n .—G a ., S e p t . 1 974 ________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
C h i c a g o , 111., M a y 1974 1 ______________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 - 2 7 , $ 1 .1 0
C i n c i n n a t i , O h i o - K y - I n d . , F e b . 1 9 7 4 * -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 7 9 5 - 1 6 , 75 c e n t s
C le v e l a n d , O h io , S e p t. 1974 1_________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 7 , $ 1 .0 0
C o l u m b u s , O h io , O c t . 1 9 7 4 ___________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
C o r p u s C h r i s t i , T e x . , J u ly 1 974 1___________________________________ — -------------------------------- 1 8 5 0 - 3 ,
75 c e n t s
F ree
D a l la s , T e x . , O c t . 1973 2______________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
D a l l a s - F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , O c t . 1 9 7 4 _______________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
D a v e n p o r t — o c k I s la n d — o l i n e , Iow a —
R
M
111., F e b . 1974 * ----------------------------------- --------------- 1 7 9 5 - 1 4 , 65 c e n t s
D a y t o n , O h io , D e c . 1974 1 _.______ . ____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 4 , 80 c e n t s
D a y to n a B e a c h , F l a . , A u g . 1 9 7 4 * ----------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- 1 8 5 0 - 1 , 75 c e n t s
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1973 2 ___________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
D e n v e r —B o u l d e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1 9 7 4 * ------------------------ ----------------------------------------------------------- 1 8 5 0 - 1 5 , 85 c e n t s
F ree
D e s M o i n e s , I o w a , M a y 1974 2------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ S u p p l.
D e t r o i t , M i c h . , M a r . 1 9 7 4 ____________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
D u r h a m . N . C . , D e c . 1973 2 ___________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 - 9 , 65 c e n t s
F o r t L a u d e r d a l e — o lly w o o d a n d W e s t P a lm B e a c h , F la .,
H
A p r . 1 974 ____......................................................... ......................................................- .......................... - ........... S u p p l.
F ree
F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , O c t . 1973 2 ________________________________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
F r e s n o , C a li f. 1 5 ----------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------G a i n e s v i l l e , F l a . , S e p t . 1974 -------------------------------- ---------------------------- --------------------------------- 1 8 5 0 -1 1 , 75 c e n t s
G r e e n B a y , W i s . , J u ly 1 9 7 4 __________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
G r e e n s b o r o — in s t o n -S a le m — ig h P o in t , N . C . , A u g . 1974 1 ------------------------------------------- 1 8 5 0 - 2 , 80 c e n t s
W
H
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M a y 1 974 __________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
H a r t f o r d , C o n n . 1 5 _____________________________ —---------------- —-------------------------------------------------H o u s t o n , T e x . , A p r . 1 9 7 4 * ___________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 - 2 2 , 85 c e n t s
H u n t s v i ll e , A l a . , F e b . 1974 1_________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 - 1 3 , 65 c e n t s
I n d i a n a p o l is , I n d ., O c t . 1 9 7 4 _________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
J a c k s o n , M i s s . , J an . 1974 1 __________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 - 1 2 , 65 c e n t s
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , D e c . 1 9 7 4 --------------------- -- ---------------- ----- ------------- ----- ------------------------------- S u p p l.
F ree
K a n s a s C i t y , M o . - K a n s . . S e p t . 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
L a w r e n c e — a v e r h i ll , M a s s .- N . H . , J une 1974 2 ----------------------------------------------------------------- S u p p l.
H
F ree
L e x in g t o n —F a y e t t e , K y . , N o v . 1974 ___________________________ ________________________ ____ S u p p l.
F ree
L it t le R o c k - N o r t h L it t le R o c k , A r k . , J u ly 1973 2 ------------------------------------------------------------- S u p p l.
F ree
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h , C a l i f . , O c t . 1974 ----------------------------------------------------------------------S u p p l.
F ree
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h a n d A n a h e im —S anta A n a —G a r d e n
G r o v e , C a l i f . , O c t . 1973 2___________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
L o u i s v i l l e , K y . - I n d . , N o v . 1 974 1 ____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 2 , 80 c e n ts
L u b b o c k , T e x . , M a r . 1974 2 __________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
M a n c h e s t e r , N .H ., J u ly 1973 2_______________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
*
1
2
3

Prices are determined by the Government Printing O ffice and are subject to change.
Data o n establishm ent practices and supplementary w age provisions are also presented.
N o lon ger surveyed.
T o be surveyed.




Area

Bulletin number
and price*

M elbourne— itu s v ille — o c o a , F la ., A ug. 1974 1 ______________________________________ 1850-5, 75 cents
T
C
M em ph is, T en n.— r k .— is s ., N ov. 1974 _____________________________________ ____ . . . Suppl.
A
M
F ree
M ia m i, F la ., O ct. 1974— _____________________ __ ______________________ ____ __ _ ____ Suppl.
_
F re e
M idland and O d e s s a , T e x ., Jan. 1974 2________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
M ilw aukee, W is., M ay 1974_____________________________________________ __.___________ Suppl.
F re e
M in neapolis—
St. Paul, M inn., Jan. 1974 ______________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
M uskegon— uskegon H eigh ts, M ic h ., June 1974 2____________________________________ Suppl.
M
F ree
N assau -S u ffolk , N .Y . 1 5 ________________________________________________________________
N ewark, N .J. 1 3_________________________________________________________________________
N ewark and J e r s e y C ity, N .J ., Jan. 1974 2________________________ __________ ________ Suppl.
F ree
New H aven, Con n., Jan. 1974 2 ________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
New O rle a n s, L a ., Jan. 1974 *___________ __________ _______________. . . . . . ___ . . . . _______ 1795-15, 70 cents
New Y o rk , N .Y .-N .J . 1 3 _____________________________ __________________________________
New Y ork and Nassau—
Suffolk, N .Y ., A p r. 1974 2 _________________________ __________ Suppl.
F re e
N orfolk—V irgin ia B e a ch -P o rts m o u th , Va.— .C . 3_____________________________________
N
N orfolk— irgin ia B e a ch -P o rts m o u th and N ew port News—
V
H am pton, V a ., Jan. 1974__________________________ _________________ _________ ________Suppl.
F ree
N ortheast P en n sylva n ia , A ug. 1974 1__________________________________________________ 1850-8, 80 cents
Oklahom a C ity, O k la ., A ug. 1 9 7 4 * ____________________________________________________ 1850-7, 80 cents
Omaha, N ebr.—
Iow a, O ct. 1974 *_______________________________________________________ 1850-10, 80 cents
Clifton— a s s a ic , N .J ., June 1974 __________________________ _______________ Suppl.
P
F ree
P a terson —
Ph iladelphia, P a.— .J ., N ov. 197 3*___________________________________________________ 1795-19, 85 cents
N
F re e
P h oen ix, A r i z ., June 1974 2 ___________________________________________________________ Suppl.
P ittsburgh, P a ., Jan. 1974 ____________ ________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
P ortlan d, M aine, N ov. 1974____________________________________________________________Suppl.
F ree
P ortlan d, O reg.— ash., M ay 197 4*___________________________________________________ 1795-26, 85 cents
W
P ou gh keepsie, N .Y . 1 3 _________________________________________________________________
P oughkeepsie— ingston—
K
Newburgh, N .Y ., June 1974_________________________________Suppl.
F ree
P ro v id e n ce — arw ick—
W
Paw tucket, R .I.— a s s ., M ay 197 4*___________________________ 1795-24, 80 cents
M
R a leigh , N .C ., D e c. 1973 1 2_______________ ___________________________________________ 1795-7, 65 cents
D
F ree
R aleigh— urham , N .C ., F eb . 1975____________ - _______________________________________ Suppl.
R ich m on d, V a ., M a r. 197 4*___________________________________________________________ 1795-25, 80 cents
R iv e r s id e —
San B ernardino— n tario, C a lif., D ec. 1973 2____________________________ Suppl.
O
F re e
R o c k fo r d , 111., June 1974 2_____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
St. L o u is , M o.—
111., M ar. 1974 _______________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
S acram en to, C a lif. 1 3 __________________________________ ________________________________
Saginaw, M ic h ., N ov. 1974*_____ -___ —__ . ___ ______ ______________________ _____ ______ 1850-16, 75 cents
Salt Lake C ity, Utah, Nov. 1974 __________________ __________________________ ___ _____ Suppl.
F ree
San An ton io, T e x ., M ay 1974 1_________________________________________________________ 1795-21, 65 cents
San D ie g o , C a lif., N ov. 1974* _____________________________________________________ ____ 1850-13, 80 cents
O
F ree
San F r a n c is c o — akland, C a lif., M a r. 1974 ___________________________________________Suppl.
San J o s e , C a lif., M ar. 1974___________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Savannah, G a., M ay 1974 2_____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
S cranton, P a ., July 1973 1 2 ____________________________________________________________ 1795-3, 55 cents
Seattle— v e re tt, W ash., Jan. 1974 ____________________________________________________ 1795-17, 65 cents
E
Sioux F a lls , S. D ak., D e c. 1973 2 ______________________________________________________Suppl.
F re e
South Bend, Ind., M a r. 197 4*__________________________________________________________ 1795-18, 65 cents
Spokane, W ash., June 1974 2 _______ ____ ______________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
S y ra cu s e , N .Y ., July 1 97 4*_________________________ __________________________________ 1850-4, 80 cents
Tam pa—
St. P e te r s b u r g , F la ., A ug. 1973 2 ____________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
T o le d o , O hio— ic h ., A p r. 1974 _____________________ . ____________________ ____________Suppl.
M
F re e
F re e
T ren ton , N .J ., Sept. 1974----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
W ashington, D .C .— d—V a ., M a r. 1974 _______________________________________________ Suppl.
M
F ree
W aterbu ry, Con n., M a r. 1974 2________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
W a te rlo o , Iow a, N ov. 1973 1 2______________________ __ ___________________________ _____ 1795-5, 60 cents
W ichita, K an s., A p r. 1 9 7 4 * ___________________________________________________________ 1795-20, 65 cents
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s ., M ay 1974—__________________ . . . . . . _________________ ___________ . . . . . Suppl.
F re e
Y o rk , P a ., F eb . 1974 ________________________ ____ ____ _______________. . . . . . . _____ ______ Suppl.
F ree
Youngstown— a rren , O hio, N ov. 1973 2_______________________________________________ Suppl.
W
F ree

POSTAGE AND PEES PAID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU O F LABOR S TA TIS TIC S
W ASHINGTON, D C. 20212

LAB 441

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE $300

THIRD C LA SS MAH.

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S
Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin

Region VI
1100 Commerce St. Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Arkansas
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas




New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Region III
P.0 Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)
Delaware
District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee

Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
VII
VIII
Iowa
Colorado
Kansas
Montana
Missouri
North Dakota
Nebraska
South Dakota
Utah
Wyoming

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)
IX
X
Arizona
Alaska
California
Idaho
Hawaii
Oregon
Nevada
Washington


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102