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'

AREA WAGE SURVEY
l? ^ r o - 7

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Metropolitan Area
August 1974
Bulletin 1850-7




document collection

MAR 4

1975

Dayton & Montgomery Co.
Public Library
U S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
_ _ Bureau of Labor Statistics




ANNOUNCEMENT
Area Wage Survey bulletins will be issued once every 3 years.
These bulletins will contain information on establishment practices and
supplementary benefits as well as earnings. In the interim years,
supplements containing data on earnings only will be issued at no
additional cost to holders of the Area Wage bulletin. If you wish to
receive these supplements, please complete the coupons listed on
page 31 of this bulletin and mail to any of the BLS regional addresses
listed on the back cover. No further action on your part is necessary.
Each year, you will receive the supplement when it is published.

Preface
This bulletin provides results of an August 1974 survey of occupational earnings
and supplementary wage benefits in the Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Area (Canadian, Cleveland, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties). The
survey was made as part of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' annual area wage survey program.
The program is designed to yield data for individual metropolitan areas, as well as national
and regional estimates for all Standard Metropolitan Statistical A reas in the United States,
excluding Alaska and Hawaii.
A major consideration in the area wage survey program is the need to describe the
level and movement of wages in a variety of labor m arkets, through the analysis of ( 1) the
level and distribution of wages by occupation, and (2 ) the movement of wages by occupational
category and skill level. The program develops information that may be used for many
purposes, including wage and salary administration, collective bargaining, and assistance in
determining plant location. Survey results also are used by the U.S. Department of Labor to
make wage determinations under the Service Contract Act of 1965.
Currently, 79 areas are included in the program . (See list of areas on inside back
cover.) In each area, occupational earnings data are collected annually. Information on
establishment practices and supplementary wage benefits is obtained every third year.
Results of the next two annual surveys, providing earnings data only, will be issued as free
supplements to this bulletin. The supplements may be obtained from the Bureau's regional
offices.
(See back cover for addresses.)
Each year after all individual area wage surveys have been completed, two summary
bulletins are issued. The first brings together data for each metropolitan area surveyed.
The second summary bulletin presents national and regional estim ates, projected from
individual metropolitan area data.
The Oklahoma City survey was conducted by the Bureau's regional office in Dallas,
T ex ., under the general direction of Boyd B. O'Neal, Associate Assistant Regional Director
for Operations. The survey could not have been accomplished without the cooperation of the
many firm s whose wage and salary data provided the basis for the statistical information in
this bulletin. The Bureau wishes to express sincere appreciation for the cooperation received.

Note:
A current report on occupational earnings and supplementary wage provisions in the
Oklahoma City area is also available for the moving and storage industry.

AREA WAGE SURVEY

Bulletin 1850-7
January 1975

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F LA B O R , Peter J. Brennan, Secretary
B U R EA U O F LABOR S TA TIS TIC S, Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Metropolitan Area, August 1974
CONTENTS

Pag

Introduction____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2

T ables:
A.

B.

Earnings:
A - 1. Weekly earnings of office w orkers-----------------------------------------A -2 . Weekly earnings of professional and technical w o rk ers-------------A -3 . Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical w orkers, by s e x ---------------------------------------------------------A -4 . Hourly earnings of maintenance and powerplant w o rk ers__________________________________________________________________
A -5 . Hourly earnings of custodial and m aterial movement w o rk ers____________________________________________________________
A - 6 . Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, andm aterial movement w orkers, by s e x ________
A - 7.
Percent increase in average hourly earnings for selected occupational groups, adjusted for employment shifts
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
B -l.
Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and c le r k s ________________________________________________________
B -2 .
L a te-sh ift pay provisions for full-tim e manufacturing plant w o rk ers___________________________________________________
B -3 .
Scheduled weekly hours and days of fu ll-tim e first-sh ift w orkers__________________________________________________
B -4 .
Annual paid holidays for full-tim e w o rk ers_________________________________________________________________________________
B -4 a . Identification of major paid holidays for fu ll-tim e w o rk ers_______________________________________________________________
B -5 .
Paid vacation provisions for full-tim e w orkers________________________________________________________ .___________________
B - 6 . Health, insurance, and pension plan provisions for fu ll-tim e w o rk ers----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Appendix A.
Appendix B.




Scope and method of su rvey___________________________________________________________________
Occupational descriptions_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402, GPO Bookstores, or
ELS Regional Offices listed on back cover. Price 80 cents. Make checks payable to Superintendent o f Documents.

3
5
6
7
8
10
11

12
13
14
15

16
17

19
21
25

Introduction
This area is 1 of 79 in which the U.S. Department of Labor's
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings and
related benefits on an areawide basis. In this area, data were obtained
by personal visits of Bureau field economists to representative estab­
lishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transpor­
tation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major industry
groups excluded from these studies are government operations and the
construction and extractive industries. Establishments having fewer than
a prescribed number of workers are omitted because of insufficient
employment in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are provided
for each of the broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.
A -series tables
Tables A - l through A -6 provide estimates of straight-tim e
hourly or weekly earnings for workers in occupations common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupations
were selected from the following categories: (a) Office clerical, (b) pro­
fessional and technical, (c) maintenance and powerplant, and (d) custodial
and material movement. In the 31 largest survey areas, tables A -l a
through A - 6 a provide similar data for establishments employing 500
workers or m ore.
Following the occupational wage tables is table A - 7 which
provides percent changes in average earnings of office clerical work­
ers, electronic data processing workers, industrial nurses, skilled




maintenance workers, and unskilled plant workers. This measure of
wage trends eliminates changes in average earnings caused by employ­
ment shifts among establishments as well as turnover of establishments
included in survey samples. Where possible, data are presented for all
industries, manufacturing, and nonmanufacturing. Appendix A discusses
this wage trend measure.
B -se r ie s tables
The B -se r ie s tables present information on minimum entrance
salaries for office workers; late-sh ift pay provisions and practices for
plant workers in manufacturing; and data separately for plant and office
workers on scheduled weekly hours and days of first-sh ift workers; paid
holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans.
Appendixes
This bulletin has two appendixes. Appendix A describes the
methods and concepts used in the area wage survey program. It provides
information on the scope of the area survey and information on the area's
industrial composition in manufacturing. It also provides information
on labor-management agreement coverage.
Appendix B provides job
descriptions used by Bureau field economists to classify workers in
occupations for which straight-tim e earnings information is presented.

A. Earnings
Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Oklahoma City, Okla., August 1974
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Occupation and in du stry d ivision

Number
of

75

weekly
(standard)

Mean *

Median ^

Middle ranged

80

85

90

95

85

90

95

100,

8

2

8

3
3

11
11

4
4

$

$

$

$

-

2
2

N um ber of w o rk e rs r e ce iv in g stra ig h t-tim e w eekly earnings of—
*
$
$
“ $
I
$
i
$
$
$
t
$
:
100 110
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
210

220

240

260

280

220

240

260

280

300

11
11
10

10
10
10

12
12
12

15
15
15

5
5
5

and
under
80

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

14
14

41
37

10
2

34
9
25
4

10
5

22

146
25
121
7

118
25
93
18

100
43
57

210

44

61
21
40
2

67
33
34
1

77
21
56
8

37
12
25
15

27
6
21
18

14
2
12
12

7
1
6
6

19
5
14
8

31
5
26
16

5
3
2
2

5
5
-

2
2
2

_
-

1
1
1

_
-

_
-

-

12

65
8
57
10

_
~

19
7
12

16
3
13

22
10
12

10
10
-

8

25

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

24

14
3
11

10
6
4

21
11
10

27
12
15

6
5
1

7
4
3

4
4

6

1

-

-

1

3

:

-

2

1

-

-

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

1

3

4

2

-

-

-

_

_

3
3

4
4

2
2

-

_

~

1
1

~

15
6
9
4^

14
8
6
5

20
3
17
10

3
1
2
2

5
4
1

5
3
2

M N AND W M
E
O EN COMBINED

36

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ----------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

96
79

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING -----NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES

449
137
312
125

3 9 .5 1 6 4 .0 0 1 5 8 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 5 0 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 7 0 .5 0 1 6 4 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 0 4 .0 0 1 9 3 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS 8 MANUFACTURING -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------

985
190
79 5
84

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

36
34

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

O
O

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) -----------------------------------------

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

$
1 0 1 .5 0

$
9 6 .0 0

$
$
8 8 .0 0 - 1 0 4 .0 0

1 0 9 .5 0 110.00 1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0 110.00
9 9 .5 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0
1 4 2 .5 0 - 1 7 4 .5 0
1 3 6 .0 0 - 1 6 1 .5 0
1 4 5 .5 0 - 1 8 2 .5 0
1 7 3 .0 0 - 2 4 0 .0 0

1 1 3 .5 0 110.00
9 8 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0 1 1 6 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 3 0 .0 0
1 1 2 .5 0 1 0 8 .0 0
9 6 . 5 0 - 1 2 5 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0 1 3 6 .5 0 1 2 1 .5 0 - 1 5 7 .5 0

_
-

:
~

_

69
6
63

_

36
36

.

80
11
69
3

108
13
95

2
2

200
41
159
5

22
2

3 9 .5 1 0 3 .0 0
3 9 .5 101.00

9 8 .0 0
9 6 .0 0

9 4 .5 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0
9 4 .5 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0

-

“

-

17
17

267
247

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

9 7 .0 0
9 6 .5 0

9 2 .0 0
8 9 .5 0

8 6 .5 0 - 1 0 6 .0 0
8 6 .5 0 - 1 0 6 .0 0

10
10

21
21

94
94

30
27

14
9

62
56

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

197
197

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

8 5 .0 0
8 5 .0 0

8 4 .0 0
8 4 .0 0

8 0 .0 0 - 88.00
8 0 . 0 0 - 88.00

4
4

126
126

38
38

15
15

5
5

9
9

CLERKS, ORDER -----------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

216
45
171

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

122.00 112.00 9 1 .0 0 - 1 4 9 .5 0
1 3 8 .0 0 1 4 3 .0 0 1 2 4 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .5 0
1 1 7 .5 0 1 0 8 .0 0
9 0 .0 0 - 1 4 3 .5 0

-

14

7

42

-

-

14

7

42

-

37
11
26

CLERKS, PAYROLL -------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

113
51
62

3 9 .5 1 3 9 .5 0 1 3 6 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 - 1 4 9 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 4 5 .0 0 1 4 2 .5 0 1 3 1 .0 0 - 1 5 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 3 5 .5 0 1 3 2 .5 0 1 1 6 .0 0 - 1 4 3 .5 0

-

1

8

-

-

4

-

1

8

-

:

2
2

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A MANUFACTURING -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------

213
77
136
27

4 0 .0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 2 8 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 3 7 .5 0 1 3 8 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 2 6 .0 0 1 1 8 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 7 7 .0 0 1 5 3 .5 0

1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 4 4 .5 0
1 2 8 .0 0 - 1 5 0 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 3 4 .0 0
1 4 7 .5 0 - 2 1 3 .0 0

-

-

-

20

1

35

-

-

-

20

-

29

33
7
26

25
8
17
1

38
20
18
1

19
12
7
6

23
15
3
8

9
8
1
l

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING --------------------NQNM
ANUF A TURING--------------C

572
132
440

3 9 .0 1 0 8 .0 0 1 0 7 .0 0
9 6 .5 0 - 1 1 7 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 1 1 .5 0 112.00 1 0 4 .0 0 - 1 1 8 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 0 7 .0 0 1 0 5 .5 0
9 2 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .5 0

_
-

23
23

70
3
67

47
12
35

18
2
16

167
30
137

122
55
67

75
24
51

23
6
17

7

8

11

7

8

11

MESSENGERS --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------

114
91
27

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

12
9
1

22
14

14
11
5

SECRETARIES ------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------

1 ,3 9 4
558
836
186

70 ' 133
24
44
89
46

260
92
168
14

245
116
129
21

154
77
77
13

114
71
43
9

105
33
72
22

50
18
32
12

90
23
67
39

43
26
17
12

35
13
22
17

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

119
62
57

34
16
18

10
10

3
3

9
9
~

14
3
11

7
4
3

11
6
5

9
9
-

-




6

9 3 .5 0
9 2 .5 0
9 7 .0 0

88.00
8 7 .0 0
9 9 .0 0

8 0 .5 0 - 1 0 2 .0 0
8 0 .5 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0
8 5 . 0 0 - 1 0 2 .0 0

5
5
~

35
30
5

20
16
6

4
4
2

4 0 .0 1 4 5 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 4 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 7 4 .5 0

1 3 8 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0
1 7 8 .0 0

1 2 4 .0 0 - 1 6 1 .0 0
1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 5 8 .5 0
1 2 1 .0 0 - 1 6 3 .0 0
1 4 3 .0 0 - 1 9 3 .5 0

-

-

4

25

11

-

4

25

11

4 0 .0 1 6 5 .0 0 1 6 1 .0 0 1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 8 8 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 7 3 .0 0 1 6 5 .5 0 1 2 4 .5 0 - 1 9 8 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 6 .5 0 1 4 7 .0 0 1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 7 2 .5 0

7
7
7
4

6

-

-

-

-

23
20

-

3
3

2
2
-

1
-

1

3
3
-

3
3
-

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Number of w o rk e rs receivin g str a ig h t-tim e w eekly earnings of—
s

$

i

il

i

$

S

Occupation and industry division

hour-i ‘
(standard)

i*

t
^

it

$

t

80

85

90

95

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

1
170

80

Number
of

Average

85

90

95

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

-

-

—
-

7
7

-

7
7

24
24

68
16
52

27
11
16
5

26
13
13
-

23
13
10

75
Mean

i

Median

2

M iddle range ^

»

ji

ii

i

t

$

$
$
260
280

180

190

zoo

210

220

240

180

190

200

210

220

240

260

17
12
5
1

17
6
11
4

27
9
18
14

14
7
7
4

12
4
8
6

9
2
7
3

1
—
1
1

5
5
5

2
1
1
1

-

16
9
7
7

4
2
2
1

7
4
3
3

10
10
5

-

_
-

and
under
280

300

M N AND W M N COMBINED—
E
C E
CONTINUED

SEC?LTARI CS— COM INU E
D
SECRETARIES, CLASS 8 -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

286
94
192
44

$
$
3 9 .5 1 5 2 .0 0 1 4 4 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 5 9 .0 0 1 5 2 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 4 8 .5 0 1 3 3 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 9 5 .0 0 1 9 0 .0 0

$
$
1 2 4 .0 0 - 1 7 8 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0 - 1 7 8 .5 0
1 2 1 .0 0 - 1 7 7 .5 0
1 8 0 .5 0 - 2 0 6 .5 0

se c r e t a r ie s ,

CLASS C -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------N3NMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

523
291
232
58

4 0 .0 1 4 7 .0 0 1 3 8 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 4 .5 0 1 3 8 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 3 9 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 8 7 .0 0 1 8 4 .0 0

1 2 7 .0 0 - 1 6 2 .5 0
1 3 0 .0 0 - 1 5 3 .5 0
1 1 9 .5 0 - 1 8 1 .0 0
1 6 2 .0 0 - 2 0 8 .0 0

-

-

4
4

4
4
-

9
9
-

22
9
13
“

52
23
29
1

47
29
18
~

134
92
42
-

72
54
18
6

40
32
8
4

35
14
21
10

12
5
7
2

35
8
27
11

20
10
10
8

SECRETAFIES, CLASS D -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONM
ANUFAC TURING-----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

466
111
355
B3

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 3 5 .0 0 1 3 1 .0 0
1 3 1 .0 0 126.00
1 3 6 .5 0 1 3 2 .5 0
1 5 4 .5 0 1 4 8 .0 0

1 2 0 .0 0 - 1 5 0 .5 0
1 1 9 .0 0 - 1 4 7 .5 0
1 2 1 .0 0 - 1 5 1 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0 - 1 7 8 .0 0

_
-

_
-

_
-

14
14
~

2
2

38
12
26
-

57
21
36
5

I ll
31
80
14

74
13
61
16

53
10
43
7

42
17
25
5

39
4
35
11

14
3
11
6

17

-

4

_

1

-

17
14

-

4
4

“

1
1

-

-

-

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------N NMANUFACTURING-----------------------------O
PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

339
140
199
64

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

121.00 1 1 5 .0 0
121.00 1 1 4 .0 0
121.00 1 1 5 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0

1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 3 0 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0 - 1 3 1 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0 - 1 3 0 .0 0
1 2 3 .5 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0

_
-

_
-

_
“

17
3
14
~

9
9
1

61
15
46
3

101
65
36
4

62
17
45
27

43
20
23
16

29
16
13
~

2
2
2

6
4
2
2

-

2

1

6

-

-

_

-

-

“

2
2

1
l

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR -------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

284
54
230
91

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 5 5 .5 0 1 5 3 .0 0
1 5 6 .5 0 1 5 9 .0 0
1 5 5 .5 0 1 5 3 .0 0
1 6 1 .5 0 1 6 2 .0 0

1 3 3 .0 0 - 1 7 2 .0 0
1 3 1 .5 0 - 1 7 7 .5 0
1 3 4 .5 0 - 1 7 2 .0 0
1 4 1 .5 0 - 1 7 2 .0 0

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

10
10
-

22
2
20
9

26
3
23
4

31
12
19
9

44
5
39
15

37
5
32
8

32
4
28
20

35
13
22
13

17
10
7
2

5
5
-

4
4
2

13
13
1

2
2
2

6
6
6

SWITCHBCARO OPERATORS -------------------------N N ANUFACTUP. IN G -----------------------------OM

108
86

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0

1 1 3 .5 0
110.00

8 8 . 0 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0
8 7 .5 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0

4
4

7
7

19
19

4
2

3
1

10
9

16
10

6
2

20
19

7
6

4
2

4
2

1
-

_

_

-

2
2

_

-

-

-

1
1

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACIUKI N —
G
— — — —
—
NUNMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

225

3 9 .5

1 0 9 .0 0

1 0 3 .5 0

9 2 .0 0 - 1 2 1 .0 0
i " n nn
j
9 2 .0 0 - 1 2 1 .0 0

_

5

32

36

13

58

13

38

16

5

3

4

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

_

-

2

29

26

9

44

4

28

12

2

3

4

~

-

~

-

2

“

-

9

1

11

17

12

4

-

-

-

-

-

12

4

1
1
“

3

-

17

4
4

-

-

11

19
19
“

-

-

1

2
2
~

—

-

9

23
11
12

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

3
8

6
6

10
6
4

4
4

16
16

31
17
14

20
8
12

5
1
4

4
4

~

6
4
2

1
1

59
59

67

44
36

49

26

no

165

3 9 .5

1 0 9 .5 0

TRANSCRI BING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL-----------------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------------N N AN F ACTURI N G -----------------------------'U M U

106
33
73

3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .5

1 1 8 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0
9 8 . 0 0 - 1 4 0 .5 0
1 3 7 .5 0 1 4 1 .0 0 1 2 8 .0 0 - 1 4 1 .0 0
9 4 . 5 0 - 1 2 5 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0
9 9 .5 0

-

TYPISTS, CLASS A -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

111
53
58

9 9 . 5 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 1 3 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 1 6 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 0 4 .5 0 - 1 2 3 .0 0
9 2 . 0 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0
3 8 .5 1 1 0 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0

-

TYPISTSf CLASS B —
NjiirlANUr A 1U 1 N
C K O

310

*
——

—
—

See footnotes at end of tables.




—

7

1 0 2 .5 0

Q nn^.1
Q
cn
QO« UU~ Aaa PU
o q An— o 7 nn
i
Oo«UU luc*UU

cS

5
5

4

3

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

_

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

O ccupation and industry d iv isio n

Num ber o f w o rk e rs re ce iv in g stra ig h t-tim e w eekly earnings of—
1

Average

100

of
(standard]

Mean ^

Median 2

Middle ranged

ii

Ii

%

i
4

1i

i;

ii

$

$

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

►
$
:%
$
4
230
200 210 220

$

»

$

f$

$

$
$
320 340

240

250

260

280

300

250

260

280

300

320

340

-

-

-

~

~

and
under
110

210 220

230

240

360

M
EN AND W EN COMBINED
OM
$
$
$
$
1 8 8 .0 0 1 7 7 .0 0 1 6 8 .5 0 - 2 1 7 .0 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A

-------------------

42

“

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B

-------------------

4 0 .0 1 5 4 .0 0 1 5 6 .5 0 1 3 2 .5 0 - 1 7 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 6 0 .0 0 1 6 1 .0 0 1 4 4 .5 0 - 1 7 1 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 2 .0 0 1 5 6 .5 0 1 3 0 .0 0 - 1 7 0 .0 0

1
1
-

8

NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

171
47
124

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

75
59

4 0 .0 1 2 9 .5 0 1 2 6 .5 0 1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 4 8 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 8 .0 0 1 2 6 .5 0 1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 3 8 .0 0

23
20

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------------------------------

25

3 9 .5

2 5 4 .5 0 2 4 6 .0 0 2 1 1 .5 0 - 2 7 6 .0 0

CCMFUTER PROGRAMMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -------------------------------NuNMANUF ACTURING ------------------------------------------

71
47

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 9 2 .0 0 1 8 4 .0 0 1 6 7 .0 0 - 2 1 3 .5 0
1 9 1 .0 0 1 8 4 .0 0 1 6 6 .0 0 - 2 1 8 .5 0

-

-

-

-

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C ---------------------------------------------

27

4 0 .0

1 6 0 .5 0

1

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ---------------------------------------------

29

3 9 .5 3 0 8 .0 0 3 0 5 .0 0 2 9 9 .0 0 - 3 2 2 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------------

59
27

3 9 .5 2 4 8 .0 0 2 5 3 .0 0 2 3 0 .0 0 - 2 6 4 .5 0
3 9 .5 25 0. 50 2 5 3 .0 0 2 3 9 .5 0 - 2 6 1 .5 0

DRAFTERS, CLASS A ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

81
56

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 1 1 .5 0 2 1 1 .5 0 1 7 4 .0 0 - 2 4 7 .0 0
1 9 3 .0 0 1 9 3 .5 0 1 6 6 .0 0 - 2 1 1 .5 0

146 i 4 0 .0
89 4 0 .0

1 7 2 .0 0 1 6 9 .0 0 1 4 2 .5 0 ^ 1 9 7 .0 0
1 5 9 .0 0 1 5 6 .5 0 1 3 8 .0 0 - 1 7 4 .5 0

DRAFTERS, CLASS B -----*---------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------iiPACTcno
UKAr 1C K jf r i a j j L
ULAc c
—— —
—— —
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------k \ j aa ic At ti i n t n J
ik h ar i UM A
ir*
INUlNnAiVUr
lV
-— — —
—

47
^1

3 9 .5

1 5 2 .0 0 1 3 7 .0 0 - 1 9 4 .5 0

1 9 0 .5 0

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS, CLASS B-

116

4 0 .0

1 8 8 .5 0 1 9 3 .0 0 1 5 4 .5 0 - 2 0 8 .5 0

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s.




-

1 8 8 .0 0 1 7 2 .5 0 - 2 0 8 .0 0

4

6

9

1

3

3

4

11
7
4

40
12
28

13
5
8

23
5
18

1
1
“

3

8

8
6
2

2
2
-

9
6

6
6

16
16

6
2

11
5

3
3

_

3

~

6

1

1

-

1

1

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

—

-

1
1

-

3

-

3

-

“

7

-

5

2

3

1

3

3

1

4

2

6
4

1
1

4
4

-

-

16
16

10
6

11
8

3
1

10
2

5
5

1

1

1

3

4

1

“

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

7
1

2

-

1

11

9

5

3

-

8
6

6
6

12
6

16
6

4
2

-

-

“

_

_

_

-

-

8
8

10
10

3
3

6
6

4
4

9
8

13
11

~

2
~

7
3

8
2

9
1

2
~

“

“

-

4
4

26
26

15
13

7
5

21
11

9
7

14
2

15
7

12
4

8
4

6

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
16

15
10

12
6

9
9

8
3

5
3

4
3

2

-

-

-

-

35

10

19

32

22

26

17

15

3

7

4

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

35

3

6

6

19

18

13

12

~

3

1

~

“

-

-

_

4

1

“

~

-

4 0 .0

4

-

3

191

-

37
7
30

3

1 1 7 .OOf-14 2 . 50
4 0 .0 1 2 6 .0 0 1 2 2 .5 0 1 1 6 .5 0 - 1 4 0 .5 0
1OA D A IPivUU
JO t m
jyj
1to # CU .1CO AA

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS ----------------------

-

22
1
21

_

°

°

0

1

c

—

Average
(m ean 2 )

Sex, occu pation , and industry division

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

Number
of
workers

W eekly
hours 1
(standard)

W eekly
earnings1
(standard)

M
EN
$
4 0 .0 1 9 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 0 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 1 9 .0 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

113
93
73

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

54
31

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

CLERKS, ORDER -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

74
63

4 0 . 0 1 4 8 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 4 6 .5 0

MESSENGERS -----------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

64
44

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

1 4 3 .5 0
1 4 1 .0 0

9 7 .5 0
9 7 .5 0

Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

Weekly • Weekly
hours *
earnings1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS W EN— CONTINUED
OM

A verage
(m ea n 2 )

Sex, occupation, and in du stry d iv ision

Number
of
workers

W eekly
hours 1
(standard)

W eekly
earnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS W EN— CONTINUED
OM

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

571
132
439

MESSENGERS -----------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

50
47

SECRETARIES ---------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

1 ,3 9 3
558
835
186

$
3 9 .0 1 0 8 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 1 1 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 0 7 .0 0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

TYPISTS, CLASS A -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

111
53
58

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 1 3 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0
1 1 0 .5 0

8 8 .5 0 TYPISTS, CLASS B ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------88. 00|

310
287

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

9 7 .0 0
9 5 .0 0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN

4 0 .0 1 4 5 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 4 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 7 4 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A -------------

35

3 9 .5

1 8 9 .0 0

140
40
100

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 5 6 .5 0
1 5 9 .0 0
1 5 5 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

119
62
57

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 6 5 .0 0
1 7 3 .0 0
1 5 6 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

286
94
192
44

3 9 .5 1 5 2 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 5 9 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 4 8 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 9 5 .0 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

48
36

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 3 9 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0

1 0 9 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS B -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

522
291
231
58

4 0 .0 1 4 6 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 4 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 9 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 8 7 .0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

67
45

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 9 2 .0 0
1 9 0 .5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------------------------------

26

3 9 .5

3 0 9 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

51
25

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

2 4 8 .5 0
2 4 7 .5 0

DRAFTERS, CLASS A ------------- --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

81
56

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 1 1 .5 0
1 9 3 .0 0

DRAFTERS, CLASS B ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

139
89

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 7 0 .5 0
1 5 9 .0 0
1 3 0 .5 0
1 2 5 .0 0

W EN
OM
33

o
o

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) ---------------------------------------------------

Average
(m ean2 )
Number
of
workers

9 9 .5 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ----------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

96
79

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

336
117
219
52

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 5 3 .0 0
1 4 9 .0 0
1 5 5 .0 0
1 8 2 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

931
167
764
62

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

112.00
1 1 6 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

466
355
83

4 0 .0 1 3 5 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 3 1 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 3 6 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 4 .5 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

36
34

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 0 3 .0 0
101.00

CLERKS, FIL E , CLASS B -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

265
247

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

9 7 .0 0
9 6 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

339
140
199
64

4 0 .0 121.00
4 0 .0 121.00
4 0 .0 121.00
4 0 .0 1 3 8 .0 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

197
197

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

8 5 .0 0
8 5 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR -------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

283
54
229
90

4 0 .0 1 5 5 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 6 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 5 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 6 0 .5 0

DRAFTERS, CLASS C ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

67
45

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS ----------------------

191

4 0 .0

1 9 0 .5 0

CLERKS, ORDER -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

142
34
108

4 0 . 0 1 0 8 .5 0
4 0 . 0 1 3 2 .5 0
4 0 . 0 1 0 0 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

108

116

4 0 .0

1 8 8 .5 0

86

4 0 .0 1 1 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 1 5 .5 0

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS, CLASS B-

CLERKS, PAYROLL -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

98
41
57

3 9 .5 1 3 3 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 4 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 7 .0 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

221
60
161

3 9 .5 1 0 9 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 0 8 .5 0
3 9 .5 110.00

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

211
76
135

4 0 . 0 1 3 0 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 3 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 6 .0 0
4 0 . 0 1 7 7 .0 0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ---------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

106
33
73

3 8 .5 1 1 8 .0 0
3 8 .0 1 3 7 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 0 9 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B --------------

31

4 0 .0

1 4 3 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C --------------

27

4 0 .0

1 1 2 .5 0

"

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 1 1 .0 0

1 3 6 .0 0

111

NOTE: Earnings data in table A -3 relate only to w ork ers w hose sex iden tification was p ro vid e d by the establishm ent.
to all w ork ers in an occupation.
(See appendix A fo r publication c r ite r ia .)




PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - W EN
OM

Earnings data in tables A - l

and A -2 ,

on the other hand,

rela te

Hourly earnings3

$

$

$ $

Num ber of w ork ers re c e iv in g stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings of—

i

$

i

i

$

$

r

i

U n d e r3-50 3* 60 3 . 7 0 3 . 8 0 3 . 9 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 1 0 4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 . 4 0 4 .5 0
$
and
3 .5 0 under
-

O ccupation and industry div isio n

i

p

i

4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0

i

$

i

r

$-------- $--------i ------6 .2 0 6 .6 0 7 .0 0

5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 .0 0

3 . 6 0 3 .7 0 3 . 8 0 3 . 9 0 4 .0 0 4 . 1 0 4 . 2 0 4 .3 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 5 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 .0 0 6 .2 0 , 6 .6 0 7 .0 0 7 .4 0

M
EN AND W EN COMBINED
OM
$
4 .3 9

CARPENTERS* MAINTENANCE

$
4 .3 0

3 . 9 4 - 4 .7 4

ELECTRICIANS* MAINTENANCE -----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

96
79

5 .4 9
5 .5 9

5 .4 6
5 .4 5

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY ----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

49
29

5 .1 0
4 .7 0

5 .1 8
4 .5 0

4 . 0 0 - 6 .2 3
3 . 7 5 - 5 .2 3

MACHINI STS * MAINTENANCE
MANUFACTURING ------------

96
85

5 .7 2
5 .7 4

6 .1 4
6 .7 6

4 . 4 9 - 6 .7 6
4 . 3 5 - 6 .7 6

MECHANICS* AUTOMOTIVE
I MAINTENANCE)----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES --------------------------

512
79
433
393

5 .7 7
4 .4 7
6 .0 6

6 .6 1
4 .4 8
6 .8 1
6 .8 1

4 .6 2 4 .0 0 5 .1 4 5 .1 4 -

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE --------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

183
144

5 .0 2
5 .0 0

5 .4 0
4 .9 3

4 . 3 8 - 5 .5 2
4 . 2 6 - 5 .5 2

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS -----------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

127
127

6 .0 0
6 .0 0

6 .7 6
6 .7 6

5 . 1 0 - 6.88
5 . 1 0 - 6.88

2
2

4 . 3 7 - 6 .7 6
4 . 3 7 - 6 .7 6

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s.




6 .0 0

6 .8 1
4 .7 7
6 .8 1
6 .8 1

5
4

2
2

-

2
2

5
5
2
2

-

2
9
6
3
3

2

-

3

-

3

2

-

59
59

7
-

7
-

7
6
1
1

2
-

2
2

2
2
3
3
9
8

2
2
9
3
6
6
20
20

3
3

1
1
4
1

2

2

59

16
16

2
2

2
8
6
2
2

2

2
2

1
1
—
9
7

3
3

2
2

3
3

6
5
1
1

11
11
—
-

-

~
13
13

3
3
9
9

4
4

2
2

1
1
1
1

3
2

1
1

2
2

22
21
1
1

9
l
8
4

29
9
20
20

9
2

20
20

1
1

5

6
-

4
4

34
34

5

1
1

1
1

1

-

1
-

9
-

3
3

5
2

2
2

78
53

11
11

9
9

8
8

5
5

7
5
2
2

1
1

10
10

2

-

44
44

30
2
28
21

261

14
14

9

-

15
1

3
3

1
-

1
1
1

7
2

4
4

2
2

5
5

1
1

16
-

16
4

2

-

-

261
261

61
61

3
3
5
-

5
5
6
6

H
ourly earnings3

Number of w orkers receivin g stra ig h t-tim e h ourly earnings of—
$
2 .4 0

$
2 -5 0

$
2 .6 0

$
2 .8 0

i
3 .0 0

$
3 .2 0

$
3 .4 0

1
$
$
3 . 6 0 3 . 80 4 . 0 0

$
4 .2 0

(
4 .4 0

$
4.6 C

$
4 .8 0

$
5 .2 0

5 .6 0

$
6 .0 0

$
6 .4 0

2 .0 0

Occupation and industry division
w
orkers

$
1 -------- $
2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0

$

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 (i

5 .2 0

5 .6 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

-

36 7
36 7

20
20

44
44

43
22
21

13
13

20
2
18

25
3
22

13
6
7

8
3
5

15
13
2

1
1

3
3

1
1

5
5

17
17

11
11

-

—
-

—
—

—
-

3

6

3

4

1

1

5

17

11

$
1 .9 0

N ber
um
Mean2 Median2

M
iddle range 2

%

and
under
4 .2 0

M N AND W M N COMBINED
E
O E
GUARDS A D WATCHMEN-----------------------------N
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

606
87
51 9

$
2 .3 3
3 .5 3
2 .1 2

$
2 .0 0
3 .2 6
2 .0 0

$
2 .0 0 2 .4 3 2 .0 0 -

$
2 .3 5
4 .6 8
2 .2 0

GUARDS:
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

54

4 .0 3

4 .6 0

3 .0 2 -

4 .6 9

3

WATCHMEN:
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

33

2 .7 1

2 .3 5

2 .3 0 -

3 .2 5

-

-

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS -----MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

1 ,6 0 8
23 9
1 ,3 6 9
82

2 .3 9
3 .1 8
2 .2 6
2 .9 5

2 .2 5
3 .3 0
2 .2 0
2 .9 2

2 . 0 0 - 2 .5 1
2 .4 6 - 3 .9 6
2 .0 0 - 2 .3 8
2 .4 4 - 3 .4 8

29
29
-

523
11
51 2

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONM
ANUFAC TURING------------------------------

572
256
31 6

3 .3 3
3 .2 4
3 .4 0

3 .5 0
3 .1 5
3 .6 2

2 .5 0 2 .3 5 2 .7 4 -

3 .7 1
3 .7 7
3 .7 1

_
-

55
51
4

-

O D
R ER FILLERS -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------N3NMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

811
20 2
609

4 .8 2
3 .9 7
5 .1 0

5 .2 5
4 .5 5
5 .9 2

4 .0 0 2 .5 5 4 .7 9 -

5 .9 2
4 .8 8
5 .9 2

_

5

-

-

PACKERS, SHIPPING ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

23 9
110
12 9

3 .4 4
3 .4 2
3 .4 5

3 .1 5
3 .1 4
3 .2 5

2 .5 5 2 .7 5 2 .4 0 -

4 .6 5
3 .8 2
4 .6 5

_
-

RECEIVING CLERKS -----------------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

97
74

3 .7 0
3 • o9

3 .3 0
3 .2 3

2 .6 0 2 .6 0 -

4 .2 4
4 .8 2

_

SHIPPING CLERKS --------------------------------------

39

3 .5 8

3 .5 0

3 .0 2 -

4 .1 5

-

-

-

-

2

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ---------

35

3 .3 3

3 .3 5

2 .8 8 -

3 .7 5

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

30
30

8
8

24
24

36
10
26

14
14

6
6

10
10

30
10
20

-

TRUCKUhlVERS -------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONM
ANUFAC TURING - —
------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

1 ,7 6 6
361
1 ,4 0 5
735

4 .9 3
4 .1 0
5 .1 4
6 .3 9

5 . 15
4 .4 7
5 .7 0
6 .7 2

3 .6 3 - 6 .7 2
3 .7 9 - 4 .4 7
3 . 6 3 - 6 .7 2
6 .7 2 - 6 .7 2

TkUCKCRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 /2 TONS) ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

183
173

2 . 9o
2 .9 4

3 .0 2
3 .0 0

2 .5 3 2 .5 3 -

3 .2 5
3 .2 0

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM l i - 1 / 2 TO
A D INCLUDING 4 TONS) -------------------N
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

888
92
796
48 2

4 .8 6
3 .1 0
5 .0 6
6 .3 5

5 .6 0
3 .1 0
5 .6 0
6 .7 2

3 .2 0 2 .7 8 3 .7 1 5 .6 0 -

6 .7 2
3 .2 0
6 .7 2
6 .7 2

TRUCKO IV EPS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
R
TRAILER TYPE) -----------------------------------MONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

379
37 6
197

6 .0 7
6 .0 9
6 .3 9

5 .9 2
5 .9 2
6 .7 2

5 .7 0 - 6 .7 2
5 .7 0 - 6 .7 2
6 . 7 2 - 6 .7 2




9

-

-

2

~

-

-

29 5
26
269
3-

136
18
118
9

23
2
21
5

196
24
17 2
6

50
12
38
8

27
7
20
8

31
8
23
16

25
23
2
~

22
8
14
13

13
9
9
5

30
30
~

58
58
-

10
10

20
20
-

23
15
8

72
30
42

35
6
29

12
2
10

16
6
10

7
7
“

48
15
33

181
41
140

2
2
~

11
11

13
3
10

35
3
32

57
24
33

17
17
~

7
2
5

3
3

_
-

35
15
20

_
-

-

5

22
12
10

6
6
~

15
15

-

5
5

7
7

21
6
15

16
11
5

27
12
15

20
20
-

9
9

23
3
20

1
1

5
5

~

_

_

_

_

13
13

5
5

7
7

_
~

10
7

16
7

14
14

-

-

8

-

-

7

3

3

-

13

2

2

3

8

i

4

-

7

*

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

71
2
69

57
13
44

44
10
34

56
23
33

64
25
39

9
3
6
2

169
8
161
~

1
1
1

7
5
2
2

30
6
24
24

260
250
10
10

_
-

12
12
2

55
55
2

23 0
6
224
129

30
30

56 3
56 3
56 3

19
19

12
12

24
24

35
32

35
30

_

28
28

_

2

~

~

~

~

~

~

52
2
50

45
13
32

20
10
10

21
20
1

29
20
9

137
3
134
5

-

~

-

_

_

~

“

8
8

30
30

-

_
-

_

-

19

_

-

-

-

-

_
10
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

'
2
2
2

3
-

3

-

_

141
8
133

23
23

-

1
1
1

-

2

-

_

4

_

_

-

-

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

5

_

_

-

2
2

-

-

17
1
16

6
1
5

29
25
4

-

-

-

~

15
15
-

5

“

-

14
6
8

14
6
8

7
7
~

L-S
11
53

72
62
10

60
25
35

30 5
30 5

75

_

-

-

75

~

-

-

-

“

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

~

15
2
13

14

-

38
18
20

14

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

4
3

_

12
12

-

-

-

-

i

-

-

6

5
3
2
2

_ _

_

-

-

-

2
2
2
8
8

-

6
2

-

-

2

29
6
23
23

_

_

-

~

1
1
1

10
10
10

'

-

-

4

7

-

-

-

-

4
—

7
2

93
93

-

359
35 9

48
48

131
131
36

30
30

148
148
148

8
8
2

93

359
_

Num ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s traigh t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs of—

Hourly earnings3
Number

O ccupation and industry d iv isio n

of
workers

Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range 2

$
i
*
i
(
1 .9 0 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .3 0
and
under

$
$
$
%
S
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 .2 0 5 .6 0 6.00 6 .4 0

2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .3 0 2 . 4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0

5 .2 0 5 .6 0 6.00 6 .4 0 6 .8 0

M
EN AND W EN COMBINED—
OM
CONTINUED
TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT) ---------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------u A K . n L i c r u c ki
r la r> rt uniU j C n t l N

...

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




$
4 .2 3
3 .9 9
4 .6 2

$
4 .4 4
4 .4 4
5 .1 5

$
3 .3 8 3 .3 7 3 .6 0 -

142

3 .2 6
3 .2 3

2.88
2 .7 5

2 . 7 5 - 3 .5 8
2 . 7 5 - 3 .0 2

...........

NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

$
5 .1 5
4 .4 4
5 .9 2

538
337
201

_

-

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

6
6

3
3

7
I

7

40
30
10

10

27
17
10

37
20
17

12
12

10

68
68

22
16

16
16

3

22

-

“

61
21
40

36
36

9
9

_

1

19
19

-

92
92

48
36
12

19
3
16

55
38
17

14
14

2
2

22
22

43
43

4
4




Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant,
custodial, and material movement workers, by sex,
in Oklahoma City, Okla., August 1974
(m ea n ^ )
hourly
earnings;

Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN

Sex, occupation, and industry division

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE ----------------------

26

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE
MANUFACTURING ------------------

96
79

5 .4 9
5 .5 9

PACKERS, SHIPPING -------MANUFACTURING ■
NONMANUFACTURING

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY —
NONMANUFACTURING —

49
29

5 .1 0
4 .7 0

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE
MANUFACTURING --------------

96
85

5 .7 2
5 .7 4

512
79
433
393

5 .7 7
4 .4 7
6.00
6 .0 6

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE ----------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

183
144

5 .0 2
5 .0 0

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS------------------------- —
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

127
127

6.00
6.00

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN
MANUFACTURING -----NONMANUFACTURING

590
87
503

2 .3 3
3 .5 3
2 .1 3

GUARDS:
MANUFACTURING ------

54

4 .0 3

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN

WATCHMEN:
MANUFACTURING -----

33

2 .4 8
3 .2 0
2 .2 9
2.88

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING
MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING

562
246
316

3 .3 3
3 .2 4
3 .4 0

ORDER FILLERS
MANUFACTURING -----NONMANUFACTURING

714
133
581

5 .0 1
4 .0 3
5 .2 4

212
108
104

$
3 .5 8
3 .4 4
3 .7 2

RECEIVING CLERKS -----NONMANUFACTURING

96
74

3 .7 0
3 .6 9

SHIPPING CLERKS

39

3 .5 8

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS -----

34

3 .3 5

1 ,7 6 6
361
1 ,4 0 5
735

4 .9 3
4 .1 0
5 .1 4
6 .3 9

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

183
173

2 .9 6
2 .9 4

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) ---------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------

888
92
796
482

4 .8 6
3 .1 0
5 .0 6
6 .3 5

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES

379
376
197

6 .0 7
6 .0 9
6 .3 9

TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT)
MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING —

538
337
201

4 .2 3
3 .9 9
4 .6 2

WAREHOUSEMEN
NONMANUFACTURING

174
142

3 .2 6
3 .2 3

493
485

2.20
2.20

97

3 .3 9

TRUCKDRIVERS
MANUFACTURING --------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES

2 .7 1

1 ,1 1 5
231
884
66

A verage
(m ea n 2 )
hourly
earnings3

CUSTODIAL ANO MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN— CONTINUED

$
4 .3 9

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES — ---------------------

Number
of
workers

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES

NOTE: Earnings data in table A > rela te only
establishm ent.
Earnings data in tables Ai-4 and A -5 , .
(See appendix A fo r pu b lication c r ite r ia .)
See footn otes at end o f tables.

CUSTODIAL ANO MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - W EN
OM
JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------ORDER FILLERS

relate to all w ork ers in an occupation.




Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for
selected occupational groups, adjusted for employment
shifts, in Oklahoma City, Okla., for selected periods
----------TuTvTSTTTo August 1^74

Industry and occupational
group

July 1972
to
July 1973

A ll in d u stries:
O ffice c le r ic a l (men and w o m e n )----------------------------E le ctro n ic data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w om en)_____
Industrial n urses (men and w om en )________________
Skilled m aintenance trades (m e n )_____________ __
Unskilled plant w ork ers (m e n )_____________________

5.5
*
**
7.9
4.7

8.9
7.6
**
9.3
10.9

8.2
7.0
**
8.6
10.0

6.2
*
**

10.8
**
**
11.6
9.5
7.5
# !s
>
**

13-m onth
in cre a s e

M anufacturing:
O ffice c le r ic a l (men and w o m e n )__________________
E le ctro n ic data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w om en)_____
Industrial n urses (men and w om en )— ____________
Skilled m aintenance trades (m e n )__________________
U nskilled plant w ork ers (m e n )_____________________

4.1

11.7
**
**
12.6
10.3

Nonmanuf a c tur in g:
O ffice c le r ic a l (men and w o m e n )___________________
E le ctro n ic data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w om en)_____
Industrial n urses (men and wom en) _ ____________
Skilled m aintenance trades (m e n )__________________
U nskilled plant w ork ers (m e n )_____________________

5.4
*
ss
jcjt
**
4.8

8.1
**
**
**
11.2

Annual rate of
in c re a s e

10.3

* Data not available.
** Data do not m eet publication c r it e r ia .

NOTE: The p ercen t in c re a s e s p resen ted in this table are b a se d on changes in average
hourly earnings fo r establishm ents reportin g the trend jo b s in both the cu rrent and previou s
year (m atched establish m en ts). They are not affected by changes in average earnings
resulting fro m em ploym ent shifts am ong establishm ents o r tu rn over of establishm ents
included in survey s a m p le s. The percen t in c r e a s e s , h ow ever, are still affected by fa c to r s
other than wage in c r e a s e s . H irings, la y o ffs , and tu rn over m ay affect an establishm ent
average fo r an occupation when w o rk e rs are paid under plans providing a range of w age rates
fo r individual jo b s . In p e r io d s of in c re a s e d h irin g , fo r e xam ple, new em p loyees enter at the
bottom o f the-range, de p re ssin g the average without a change in wage rates.
T h ese wage tren ds are not linked to the wage indexes p re v io u s ly published fo r this
area becau se the w age indexes m easu red changes in area averages w hereas these w age trends
m easu re changes in m atched establishm ent av e ra g e s. Other c h a r a c te r is tics of these wage
trends w hich d iffer fro m the discontinued indexes include ( 1) earnings data o f o ffic e c le r ic a l
w ork ers and industrial n u rse s are co n v e rte d to an h ou rly b a s is , (2) tren d estim ates are
p rovided fo r nonm anufacturing establishm ents w here p o s s ib le , and (3) trend estim ates are
provided fo r e le ctro n ic data p r o c e s s in g jo b s .
F o r a m ore detailed d escrip tion o f the m ethod used to com pute these wage tre n d s, see
"Im proving A rea W age Survey I n d e x e s ," M onthly L a bor R ev ie w , January 1973, pp. 52-57.

B. Establishment practices and supplementary w age provisions
Other in ex p erien ced c le r ic a l w ork ers

Inexperienced typists
M anufacturing
Minim um w eekly s tra igh t-tim e s a la r y 4

Nonm anufacturing

B ased on standard w eekly h o u r s 6 o f—

All
industries

B ased on standard w eekly h o u r s 6 o f—

A ll
industries

M anufacturing

Nonmanufacturing

A ll
schedules

Establishments studied

_

_ ______

Establishments having a specified minimum—

_ _ __ —
—

----------

- ---------------- ----------$ 72.50 and under $ 75,00------$ 75.00 and under $ 77,50_________________________________
$ 77.50 and under $ 80,00_________________________________
$ 80.00 and under $ 82,50_________________________________
$ 82.50 and under $ 8 5,00____________________ ___________
$ 85.00 and under $ 8 7.50____________________ ____________
$ 87.50 and under $ 90.00 ____ ---------------------------------------—
$ 90.00 and under $ 9 2 .5 0 -------- ----------------------------------------$ 92.50 and under $ 9 5 .0 0 _ .„ _________________ __________
$ 95.00 and under $ 9 7 .5 0 _________________________________
$ 97.50 and under $ 100.00------------------------- ------------$ 100.00 and under $ 102.50________________ _______ ______
$ 102.50 and under $ 105.00______________________________
$ 105.00 and under $ 107.50------------ ---------------------------------$ 107.50 and under $ 110.00_ ____ _________ ________ —
$
$
$
$
$

110.00
115.00
120.00
125.00
130.00

and
and
and
and
and

under $ 115.00------------------------------------------ —
under $ 120.00------------- ---------------- ------ under $ 125.00------ ------ ----------------------------under $ 130.00________________ ____________
over---------------------------------------------------------------

40

A ll
schedules

150

44

XXX

106

XXX

150

44

XXX

106

XXX

37

13

12

24

21

64

20

19

44

38

_
1
1
3
1

_
1
1
3
1

.
7
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
2

1
1
16
5
5
2
7
1
5
2
4
1
1
3

_
2
1
4
4
1
1
1
1

_
2
1
4
3
1
1
1
1

1
1
14
4
5
2
3
1
1
1
4
2

_
13
4
2
2
3
1
1
1
4
2

3
2

3
1
1
"

_
2
1
-

_
2
1
-

2

3
1
1
“

33
53

7
1
1
4
3
1
4
2
3
1
2
4

-

-

_
7
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
3

1
1
2

1
1
1

1
2

2

2

2

_

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
-

1
-

1

-

-

_
1
-

"

Establishments having no specified minimum---------------------

18

6

XXX

12

XXX

Establishments which did not employ workers
in this category_____

95

25

XXX

70

XXX

See footnotes at end of tables.




A ll
schedules

40

2

1

40

All
schedules

40

2

2

13

XXX

20

XXX

11

XX X

42

XXX




( A l l f u l l - t i m e m a n u fa c tu r in g plan t w o r k e r s = 100 p e r c e n t )
A ll w o r k e r s 7

W o r k e r s on la te s h ifts

Item
S e c o n d s h ift

T h ir d s h ift

S e c o n d s h ift

T h ir d s h ift

P ercen t o f w ork ers

In e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith la te s h ift p r o v i s io n s ____

7 7 .9

5 7.5

2 0 .9

3.2

W ith n o p a y d iffe r e n t ia l f o r la te s h ift w o r k
W ith p a y d iff e r e n t ia l f o r la te s h ift w o rk __
U n ifo r m c e n t s - p e r - h o u r d i f f e r e n t i a l. ___ _
U n ifo r m p e r c e n t d i f f e r e n t i a l _________________
O th e r d i f f e r e n t i a l _______________________________

2.1
7 5.7
4 5 .8
2 7 .3
2.7

2 .1
55 .4
3 2 .9
2 2 .5
-

.5
2 0 .4
10.3
9.8
.2

_
3.2
2 .5
.7
-

13.4
9.6

14.8
10.0

13.2
9.6

15.2
10.0

U n ifo r m c e n t s - p e r - h o u r :
5 c e n t s ___________________________________________
10 c e n t s _______________ ________________________
12 c e n t s
14 c e n t s _________________________________________
15 c e n t s „ir _
r
..
_______
18 c e n t s
1 8 3/4 c e n t s ,
............ ....
18 4/§ c e n t s _ _ _
„ _
_
___
2 5 cen ts
. _ ... ir „...
.
....
_
_________ _
30 c e n t s „ ,

4 .7
16.7
2.3
3 .9
6.8
3.7
2 .4
2.1
1.6
1.6

2 .2
4 .4
4 .4
13.7
3.7
2 .4

.6
4.2
.9
.9
1.5
.3
1.2
.5

.2
2.1
.2
-

U n ifo r m p e r c e n t :
7 percen t
.............. „ T ...
10 p e r c e n t ______________________________________

3.6
2 3 .7

A v e r a g e pay d iffe r e n t ia l
U n ifo r m c e n t s - p e r - h o u r d i f f e r e n t i a l ____________
U n ifo r m p e r c e n t d iffe r e n t ia l _ .... ___
P e r c e n t o f w o r k e r s b y ty p e and
a m ou n t o f p a y d iffe r e n t ia l

O th e r d iff e r e n t ia l

S e e fo o tn o te at end o f t a b le s .

____

2 .7

-

2.1
-

-

2 2 .5

.2
.1

1.3
8 .5
.2

-

.7

O ffic e w ork ers

Plant w ork ers
Item
A ll industries

M anufacturing

P u blic utilities

A ll industries

100

100

100

100

_
6
83
83
4
4
4
2
2

_
97
97
1
1
2

M anufacturing

P u b lic u tilities

P ercen t o f w ork ers by scheduled
w eekly hours and days
A ll fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s ____________________ _______ ________
25 hours— 5 days________________________ _____________________
30 hours— 6 days______________________________________________
35 hours— 5 days______________________________________________
36V2 hours— 5 days____________________________________________
37V2 hours— 5 days___________________________________ ________
38% hours— 5 d a y s.-------- ---------------------------------- ---------------------40 h o u r s _______________________________________________________
4V2 d a y s ____________________________________________________
5 d a y s ______________________________________________________
42 h o u r s _________________ _____________________________________
5 d a y s ______________________________________________________
6 d a y s ______________________________________________________
7 d a v s ,................ .
_.
_________
42 V2 hours— 5 days____________________________________________
44 h o u r s _______________________________________________________
5 d a y s ______________________________________________________
5 V2 d a y s ____________________________________________________
6 d a y s ______________________________________________________
45 hours— 5 days _____________________________________________
48 h o u r s _______________________________________________________
5 V2 d a y s ____________________________________________________
6 d a y s ______________________________________________________
50 hours— 5 days______________________________________________
52 hours— 5V2 days____________________________________________

( 9)
1
2
1
4
1
75
75
2
2
( 9)
2
1
( 9)
1
3
6
1
5
2
1

_
( 9)
1
13
2
83
( 9)
83
(’ )
( 9)
( !)
( 9)
( 9)
-

100

_
10
90
1
89
-

100
_
99
99
1
1
-

Q

(9)

(9)
2

Average scheduled weekly hours
All weekly work schedules___________________________________

See footnote at end of tables.




40.6

40.6

40.2

39.6

39.8

40.0

Office workers

Plant workers
Item

All industries

Manufacturing

Public utilities

All industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

Public utilities

Percent of workers
All full-time workers

100

In establishments not providing
paid holidays _
In establishments providing
paid holidays

17

3

4

1

-

-

83

97

96

99

100

100

8.3

8.2

100

Average number of paid holidays
For workers in establishments
providing holidays

1

8.4

Percent of workers by number
of paid holidays provided 1
0
1 holiday. ...
...........
......
. _
2 holidays__________________________________________________
5 holidays_________________________________ ___ ____________
6 holidays_______________________ _______ __________________
6 holidays plus 2 half days
7 holidays__________________________________________________
7 holidays plus 1 half day__________________________________
7 holidays plus 4 half days
_ . . . .
8 holidays
9 holidays__________________________________________________
10 holidays_________________________________________________

_
3

_
_

_
_
-

(9)
(9)

.

_
2
12

4

5

27

8
23
6

18
1
11
_
8
41
14

1
18
_
.
8
60
4

14
27
11

12
_
_
13
47
12

83
83
81
77
50
37
37
29
6

97
97
97
92
74
63
63
54
14

96
96
96
96
91
72
72
64
4

99
98
98
98
68
54
52
38
11

100
100
100
98
86
72
72
59
12

(9)

13
-

5

1
31
1
13
2

(9)

3

_
_
7
1
21
_
_
10
61
n

Percent of workers by total paid
holiday time provided 1
1
1 day or more
2 days or more
___
_
_
5 days or m ore_
6 days or more
... __
7 days or more
71 days or more
/?
8 days or more______________ _________ ____________________
9 days or more
_
10 days_____________________________ _____________ _________

See footnotes at end of tables.




100
100
100
100
93
71
71
61

(9)

O ffic e w ork ers

Plant w ork ers
Item 1
0

A ll industries

M anufacturing

P u b lic utilities

A ll industries

M anufacturing

100

100

100

100

100

100

80
7
23
74
81
80
6
82
27
21
(9)
82
3
8
6

94
4
43
94
97
95
5
95
61
49
1
94
3
8
5
5
5

96
44
48
96
96
96
32
91
15
16
95
11
25
4
35

99
21
21
95
99
99
8
21
98
27
11
3
97

99
12
52
99
100
99
4
99
56
34
3
98

100
50
56
100
100
100
46
94
32
10
86
10
19
(9)
21

P u b lic u tilities

Percent of workers
All full-time w o rk e rs___________________________________
New Year's Day___________________________________________ __
Washington's Birthday________________________________________
Good Friday___________________________________________________
Memorial Day________________________-_________________________
Fourth of July_________________________________________________
Labor Day_____________________________________________________
Columbus Day_________________________________________________
Veterans Day_________________________________________________
Thanksgiving Day_____________________________________________
Day after Thanksgiving______________________________________
Christmas Eve_______________________________________________
Christmas Eve, half day______________________________________
Christmas Day_________________________________________________
New Year's E v e_______________________________________________
Floating holiday, 1 day 13_____________________________________
Floating holiday, 2 days 1 ________________ _____________________
3
Floating holiday, 3 days 1 _________________________ _______ ___
3
Employee's birthday__________________________________________

See footnotes at end of ta b les.




2

15

2

2

12
6
8
14

35
8
2

7

O ffice w ork ers

Plant w ork ers
Item

A ll industries

M anufacturing

P u blic utilities

A ll industries

M anufacturing

P u blic utilities

All full-tim e workers____________________________________

100

100

100

100

100

100

In establishments not providing
paid vacations________________________________________________
In establishments providing
paid vacations________________________________________________
Length-of-tim e payment____ ______________________________
Percentage paym ent___________ _________________________

3

3

97
93
4

97
89
8

100
100
■

100
99
(9)

100
99
1

100
100
"

6 months of service:
Under 1 week
,
.
1 w eek ___________________________________________________
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks______________________________

10
12
3

25
3
5

57
-

3
27
9

(9)
14
26

50
7

1 year of service:
Under 1 week
___________________ ___ __________________
1 week __ ___________________________ ____________________
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks_______________ ______________
2 w eeks__________________________________________________

2
57
3
33

5
48
3
41

17
20
64

(9)
24
1
75

1
26
74

10
12
78

2 years of service:
1 week ____________ _____________________________________
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks_____________________________
2 weeks _______________________________________________
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks_____________
_ __ ___ —
3 w eeks__________________________________________________

25
1
67
3
-

23

1
80
20
“

5
(9)
90
1
3

6
94
"

(9)
88
12
“

3 years of service:
1 week ------------------- -------- ------------------------------------2 w eeks. _______
_________ ____ — — _ ---------------- —
Over 2 and under 3 weeks _____ _
_________________
--- --------------------------------------------------------3 weeks _

12
81
3
-

10
83
3
-

80
20

3
92
1
3

5
95

88
12
-

4 years of service:
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
2 w eeks__________________________________________________
Over 2 and under 3 weeks _____________ __ -------- _ _
3 w eeks__________________________________________________

12
79
5
"

10
78
8
-

80
20
"

3
90
3
3

5
88
8
"

88
12

1
55
8
37

85
12
3

1
22
51
25

5
83
12

Percent of workers

-

-

-

-

Amount of paid vacation after: 1
4

5 years of service:
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
2 w eeks__________________________________________________
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks---------------------- -------------------3 w eeks---------------------------------------------------------------------------10 years of service:
1 week ----------------------------------- -----------------------------------------2 w eeks__________________________________________________
Over 2 and under 3 weeks _____________________________
3 w eeks_______________________________ __________________
Over 3 and under 4 weeks _____________________________
4 w eeks----------------------------------------------------------------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s.




-

71
3
"

79
5
8

5
73
8
11

72
20
8

2
76
6
16

5
34
1
52
2

5
26
3
61
-

5
76
20

3

2

1
24
6
57
1
11

5

-

'

O ffic e w o rk e rs

Plant w ork ers
Item

A ll industries

M anufacturing

P u blic utilities

A ll industries

M anufacturing

P u b lic u tilities

Am ount of paid vacation after 14— Continued
12 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 week . ...
„
___ _______________ _____ ______
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _____________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _____________________________
3 w eeks
. . . . . . .
_
_ _______
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _____________________________
4 w e e k s ___________ _______ _____ ______________________

4
1
32
_
51
5
3

2
3
22
_
60
8
2

_
5
_
76
20
-

1
(9)
16
9
59
3
11

1
(9)
15
51
8
25

5
83
12
"

15 years o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k __________________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _____________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________
3 w e e k s ______________________________________ ___________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _____________________________
4 w e e k s __________ ______________ _________________________
O ver 4 and under 5 w eeks
........
.. _ . _

4
1
27
46
3
14
2

2
3
17
48
8
19
-

2
68
11
20

1
(9)
11
58
2
26
1

1
(9)
12
39
8
40
"

5
66
17
12

20 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k _________ ____________________ _____ ______ _______
O ver 1 and under 2 w eeks
.......
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________
3 w e e k s _________________________________________________
4 w eeks ................................................. ............. .... ................... .
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s _____________________________
5 w e e k s ________________ ___ _____ _______ ________________
O ver 5 and under 6 w e e k s _____________________________

4
1
26
18
38
1
6
2

2
3
17
15
47
3
10
-

2
10
62
6
20

1
(9)
10
31
46
10
1

1
(9)
12
18
39
30
-

5
5
64
14
12

25 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ____________________________ ______ _______________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _____________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________
3 w e e k s _________________________________________________
4 w e e k s _________________________________________________
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s ____________ _______ __________
5 w e e k s _________________________________________________
O ver 5 and under 6 w e e k s _____________________________
6 w e e k s _________________________________________________

4

1
26
17
23
1
21
2
2

2
3
17
13
23
3
31
-

2
10
23
45
20
-

1
(9)
10
30
31
26
1
1

1
(9)
12
11
26
47
3

5
5
28
50
12
-

M axim um vacation available *
1 w e e k _____________________________________ _____________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _____________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________
3 w e e k s _________________________________________________
4 w e e k s _________________________________________________
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s ____________ _________________
5 w e e k s _________________________________________________
O ver 5 and under 6 w e e k s _____________________________
6 w e e k s _________________________________________________

1
26
17
22
1
20
2
3

2
10
23

1
(9)
10
30
31

1
(9)
12
11
26

5
5
28

* E stim ates o f p ro v is io n s fo r 30 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e are id e n tica l.
See footnotes at end o f tables.




4

4

2
3
17
13
20
3
30
-

8

-

45
20

-

26
1

-

-

45

50
12

-

5

O ffice w ork ers

Plant w ork ers
Item
A ll industries

Manuf actur ing

P u blic utilities

A ll industries

M anufacturing

Pu blic utilities

100

100

Percent of workers
A ll full-tim e workers _

_____

___

—

__

In establishments providing at least one
of the benefits shown below 1 _
5
_____ ___________

—

_

100

100

100

100

_ __

88

94

98

9
9

99

100

Life insurance_________ ____________________ _______________
Noncontributory plans____________
___________________

81
50

90
69

98
87

94
61

97
59

100
79

Accidental death and dismemberment insurance__________
Non contributory plans_______________ ___________________

68
39

78
57

93
87

77
47

80
43

97
79

Sickness and accident insurance or sick leave
or both 16_______________________ _____________________________

71

84

93

77

94

84

Sickness and accident insurance_________________________
Noncontributory plans_________________________________
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting p e rio d )_____________
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting p e rio d )______________

36
19
39
16

46
35
47
25

35
26
58
5

33
12
51
10

61
28
61
16

17
11
69
2

Long-term disability insurance_____________________________
Non contributory plans____________________________________

29
14

39
24

42
36

46
22

52
27

36
34

Hospitalization insurance ____________________________________
Non contributory plan s____________________________________

85

92
69

98
86

97

49

44

99
56

100
79

Surgical insurance ___________________________________________
Noncontributory plans_______________ __
____________

86
49

92
69

98
86

44

99
56

100
79

Medical insurance_____________________ *_____________________
Noncontributory plans____________________________________

84

48

92
69

98
86

97
43

97
56

100
79

Major medical insurance____________________________________
Noncontributory plans____________________________________

85
49

92
70

97
86

97
44

97
57

86
79

Dental insurance______________________________________________
Noncontributory plans--------------------------------------------------------

10
8

1
1

31
31

3
3

1
1

18
18

Retirement pension__________________________________________
Noncontributory plans____________________________________

63
48

78
71

84
69

86
64

83
71

91
72

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




98

Footnotes
A ll of these standard footnotes may not apply to this bulletin.

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-tim e salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime
at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all workers and dividing by the number of w orkers. The median
designates position— half of the employees surveyed receive m ore and half receive less than the rate shown. The middle range is defined
by two rates Of pay; a fourth of the workers earn le ss than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn m ore than the higher rate.
3 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
4 These salaries relate to form ally established minimum starting (hiring) regular straight-tim e salaries that are paid for standard
workweeks.
5 Excludes workers in subclerical jobs such as m essenger.
6 Data are presented for all standard workweeks combined, and for the m ost common standard workweeks reported.
7 Includes all plant workers in establishments currently operating late shifts, and establishments whose form al provisions cover late
shifts, even though the establishments were not currently operating late shifts.
8 L ess than 0.05 percent.
9 L ess than 0.5 percent.
10 For purposes of this study, pay for a Sunday in D ecem ber, negotiated in the automobile industry, is not treated as a paid holiday.
1 A ll combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for example, the proportion of workers receiving
1
a total of 9 days includes those with 9 full days and no half days, 8 full days and 2 half days, 7 full days and 4 half days, and so on.
Proportions then were cumulated.
12 A Christm as—New Year holiday period is an unbroken series of holidays which includes Christmas Eve, C hristm as Day, New Y e a r 's
Eve, and New Y e a r 's Day.
Such a holiday period is common in the automobile, aerospace, and farm implement industries.
1 "F lo a tin g " holidays vary from year to year according to employer or employee choice.
3
1 Includes payments other than "length of t i m e ," such as percentage of annual earnings or fla t-su m paym ents, converted to an
4
equivalent time b a sis; for exam ple, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 week's pay. Periods of service are chosen arbitrarily
and do not n ecessarily reflect individual provisions for progression; for exam ple, changes in proportions at 10 years include changes between
5 and 10 y ears. Estim ates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 weeks' pay after 10 years includes those eligible for
at least 3 weeks' pay after fewer years of service.
1 Estim ates listed after type of benefit are for all plans for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the em ployer. "Noncontributory
5
plans" include only those financed entirely by the em ployer.
Excluded are legally required plans, such as workm en's compensation, social
security, and railroad retirem ent.
Unduplicated total of workers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below. Sick leave plans are
lim ited to those which definitely establish at least the minimum number of days' pay that each employee can expect. Inform al sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.




Appendix A
A r e a w age and r e la te d b e n e fits data are obtained by p e rso n a l visits of B ureau fie ld r e p r e s e n t­
atives at 3 -y e a r in terv a ls . 1 In ea ch o f the intervening y e a r s , inform ation on em ploym ent and
2
occu p a tion a l earnings is c o lle c t e d by a com bin ation of p erson a l v is it and m a il qu estionnaire fr o m
establish m en ts p articipatin g in the p re v io u s su rvey.

w o rk e rs m ay advance to be tte r jo b s and be re p la c e d by new w o rk e rs at low er rates. Such shifts in
em ploym ent could d e c r e a s e an occu pation al a vera ge even though m ost establishm ents in an area
in c re a s e w ages during the y e a r .
T ren d s in earnings of occu pation al grou ps, shown in table A -7 ,
are b e tte r in d ica to rs o f w age tren ds than individual jo b s within the groups.

In ea ch o f the 7 9 2 a re a s c u r r e n tly su rveyed, data are obtained fro m re p resen tative e s ta b ­
lish m en ts within six b r o a d industry d iv isio n s : M anufacturing; transportation , com m u n ication , and other
pu b lic u tilitie s ; w h olesa le tra d e ; r e ta il tr a d e ; fin a n ce, in su ran ce, and read, estate; and s e r v ic e s . M ajor
in du stry g rou p s exclu d ed fr o m th ese studies are governm ent operations and the con stru ction and
e x tr a c tiv e in d u stries. E sta b lish m en ts having fe w e r than a p r e s c r ib e d num ber of w o rk e rs are om itted
b e c a u s e o f in su fficien t em ploym en t in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are p ro vid e d fo r
each of the b ro a d industry d iv isio n s w hich m eet publication c r ite r ia .

A v era ge earnings r e fle c t c o m p o s ite , areaw ide estim a tes. Industries and establishm ents d iffer
in pay le v e l and jo b staffing, and thus contribu te differen tly to the estim ates fo r each job .
Pay
averages m ay fa il to r e fle c t a ccu ra te ly the w age differen tia l among jo b s in individual establishm ents.

T h ese su rveys are con du cted on a sam ple b a sis. The sam pling p r o ce d u re s involve detailed
s tra tifica tion o f all esta b lish m en ts within the scop e of an individual a rea survey by industry and num ber
of e m p lo y e e s . F r o m th is s tr a tifie d u n iv e rse a probab ility sam ple is selected , with each establishm ent
having a p r e d e te r m in e d ch an ce of s e le ctio n . T o obtain optim um accu ra cy at m in im u m c o s t , a g re a te r
p r o p o r tio n of la r g e than sm a ll esta b lish m e n ts is selected . When data are com bin ed, each establishm ent
is w eighted a c co rd in g to its p ro b a b ility o f s e le ctio n , so that unbiased estim ates are generated. F o r
e x a m p le, if one out of fo u r esta b lish m en ts is s e le cte d , it is given a weight o f fou r to rep resen t its e lf
plus th ree o th e r s . An altern ate of the sam e orig in a l probab ility is chosen in the sam e in d u s tr y -s iz e
c la s s ific a t io n i f data are not available fo r the o rig in a l sam ple m e m b e r. If no suitable substitute is
ava ila b le, additional w eight is assign ed to a sam ple m em b er that is sim ilar to the m issin g unit.
O ccup ations and E arnings
O ccupations s e le cte d fo r study are com m on to a variety of m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s , and are o f the follow in g ty p e s:
(1) O ffice c le r ic a l; (2) p r o fe s sio n a l and te ch n ica l; (3)
m aintenance and pow erplant; and (4) cu sto d ia l and m a teria l m ovem ent. O ccupational c la s sific a tio n is
b a s e d on a u n iform set o f jo b d e s c r ip tio n s design ed to take account of in terestab lishm ent variation
in duties within the sam e jo b . O ccup ations s e le cte d fo r study are liste d and d e s c r ib e d in appendix B.
U nless oth erw ise in dica ted , the earn in gs data follow ing the jo b titles are fo r all in d u stries com bin ed.
E arn ings data fo r som e of the o ccu pation s lis te d and d e s c r ib e d , or fo r som e industry d ivision s within
o ccu p a tion s, are not p re s e n te d in the A - s e r ie s ta b le s , becau se eith er (1) em ploym ent in the occupation
is too sm a ll to p rovide enough data to m e r it p resentation, o r (2) th ere is p o s s ib ility of d is c lo s u r e of
individual establish m en t data. Separate m e n 's and w om en’ s earnings data are not pre se n te d when the
n um ber of w o rk e rs not id e n tifie d by sex is 20 percen t o r m o re of the men o r w om en identified in an
occu p ation . E arn ings data not shown se p a ra te ly fo r industry division s are includ ed in all indu stries
com b in ed data, w here shown. L ik e w is e , data are included in the o v e ra ll c la s sific a tio n when a sub­
c la s s ific a t io n of e le c t r o n ic s te ch n icia n s , s e c r e ta r ie s , or tr u ck d riv e rs is not shown o r in form ation to
s u b c la s s ify is not available.
O ccup ational em ploym en t and e a rn in gs data are shown fo r fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s , i .e . , th ose h ire d
to w ork a regu la r w eekly sch edu le. E arn ings data exclude prem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on
w eek en ds, h olid a y s, and late sh ifts. N onproduction bonuses are excluded, but c o s t -o f-liv in g allow ances
and incen tive bon u ses are in clu d ed. W eekly hours fo r o ffic e c le r ic a l and p r o fe s s io n a l and te ch n ica l
occu p a tion s r e fe r to the standard w ork w eek (rounded to the n earest half hour) fo r w hich e m p loyees
r e c e iv e reg u la r stra ig h t-tim e s a la r ie s (e x clu s iv e of pay fo r o v ertim e at regular a n d /o r p rem iu m ra te s).
A v era g e w eekly earnings fo r th ese o ccu pation s are rounded to the n earest half d o lla r.
T h ese su rveys m e a su re the le v e l o f occupational earnings in an area at a p a rticu la r tim e.
C o m p a ris o n s of individual occu p ation al a v e ra g e s o ve r tim e m ay not re fle ct e x p ected w age changes.
The a v era g es fo r individual jo b s are a ffe c te d by changes in w ages and em ploym ent patterns. F o r
ex a m p le, p rop ortion s o f w o r k e r s em p lo y e d by h igh- o r low -w a ge firm s m ay change, o r high-w age
1 Peisonal visits were on a 2 -y e a r c y c le before July 1972.
2 Included in the 79 areas are 9 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract. These areas are Austin, T ex . ; Binghamton, N. Y . —Pa. ; Fort
Lauderdale—H ollyw ood and West Palm Beach—Boca Raton, F la .; Lexington—Fayette, K y .; Melbourne—Titusville—C o co a , F la .; Norfolk—Virginia
Beach—Portsmouth and Newport News—Ham pton, Va. —N. C . ; Poughkeepsie—Kingston—Newburgh, N. Y . ; Raleigh—Durham, N. C . ; and Syracuse, N .Y .
In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ite d area studies in approximately 70 areas at the request o f the Employment Standards Administration of
the U. S. Department o f Labor.




A v era ge pay le v e ls fo r m en and w om en in s e le cte d occupations should not be assum ed to
r e fle c t d iffe r e n c e s in pay of the se x e s within individual establish m en ts. F a cto r s w hich m ay contribute
to d iffe r e n c e s include p r o g r e s s io n within esta b lish ed rate ran ges, sin ce only the rates paid incum bents
are c o lle c te d , and p e r fo rm a n ce of s p e c ific duties within the gen era l su rvey job descrip tion s. Job
d e s crip tio n s used to c la s s ify em p lo y e e s in these su rveys usually are m o re g en eralized than those used
in individual e stablish m en ts and allow fo r m in or d iffe r e n c e s am ong establishm ents in s p e c ific
duties p e rfo rm e d .
O ccupational em ploym ent estim a tes rep resen t the total in all establishm ents within the scope
of the study and not the num ber actually surveyed. B eca u se occupational structu res among e sta b lish ­
m ents d iffe r , estim a te s o f o ccu pation al em ploym ent obtained fro m the sam ple of establishm ents studied
se r v e only to indica te the re la tiv e im p orta n ce o f the jo b s studied. T h ese differen ces in occupational
structu re do not affect m a te ria lly the a ccu ra cy of the earnings data.
W age tren ds fo r s e le cte d occu pation al groups
The
Annual rates
span betw een
in c re a s e d at

p e rce n ts o f change in table A -7 rela te to wage changes between the indicated dates.
o f in c r e a s e , w here shown, r e fle c t the amount of in c re a s e fo r 12 m onths when the tim e
su rveys w as other than 12 m onths. Annual rates are b a sed on the assum ption that w ages
a constant rate betw een su rveys.

O ccupations u sed to com pute w age tren ds are:
O ffice c le r i c a l (men and w o m e n ):
B ook k eep in g-m a ch in e o p e r a to r s ,
c la s s B
C le r k s , accounting, c la s s e s A and B
C le r k s , file , c la s s e s A , B , and C
C le r k s , o r d e r
C le r k s , p a y r o ll
K eypunch o p e r a to r s , c la s s e s A and B
M e s s e n g e rs
S e c r e ta r ie s
S ten ograp h ers, ge n e ra l
S ten ograp h ers, sen ior
Sw itchboard o p e ra to rs
T abu latin g-m ach in e o p e r a to r s ,
c la s s B
T y p is ts , c la s s e s A and B

E le c tr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g (men
and w om en)— Continued
Com pu ter sy stem s analysts, c la s s e s A,
B , and C
Industrial n u rses (men and w om en ):
N u rses, in du stria l (reg istered )
Skilled m aintenance (m en):

E le c tr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g
(men and w om en ):

C a rp en ters
E le c tr ic ia n s
M achinists
M echanics
M ech an ics (autom otive)
P ainters
P ip efitters
T o o l and die m a k ers

C om pu ter o p e r a to r s , c la s s e s A , B , and C
C om pu ter p r o g r a m m e r s , c la s s e s A, B ,
and C

J a n itors, p o r t e r s , and clea n ers
L a b o r e r s , m a te r ia l handling

U nskilled plant (m en ):

P e rce n t changes fo r individual areas in the p r o g r a m are com puted as fo llo w s :
1. E ach occupation is a ssign ed a w eight b a s ed on its p rop ortion ate em ploym ent in the se le cte d
group of occu pation s in the ba se y e a r .
2. T h ese w eights are used to com pute group av era g es. E ach occu p ation 's average (mean)
earnings is m u ltip lied by its w eight. The p rod u cts are totaled to obtain a group average.
3. The ra tio o f group ave ra ges fo r 2 con secu tiv e y e a r s is com puted by dividing the average
fo r the cu rren t y e a r by the average fo r the e a r lie r y e a r . The resu lts— e x p r e s s e d as a percent— le s s 100
is the p e rce n t change.

Establishm ent p r a c t ic e s and supplem entary w age p r o v is io n s
The B - s e r ie s tables p ro v id e in form ation on establish m en t p r a c t ic e s and supplem entary wage
p ro v is io n s fo r fu ll-tim e plant and o ffic e w o rk e rs .
’’ Plant w o r k e r s ” includ e w orking fo re m e n and all
n on su p erv isory w o rk e rs (including leadm en and tr a in e e s ) engaged in n o n o ffice fu n ction s. C a fe te ria
w ork ers and routem en are exclu d ed fr o m m anufacturin g, but in clu d ed in nonm anufacturing in d u strie s.
"O ffic e w o r k e r s ” include w orking s u p e r v is o r s and n o n s u p e rv is o r y w o rk e rs p e rfo rm in g c le r i c a l or
rela ted functions. A d m in istra tive, e x e cu tiv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and p a r t-tim e em p lo y e e s are excluded.
P a rt-tim e em p loy ees are th ose h ir e d to w ork a schedule ca llin g r e g u la rly fo r fe w e r w eekly h ou rs than
the establish m en t's schedule fo r fu ll-tim e e m p lo y e e s in the sam e g e n e ra l type o f w ork . The
determ ination is b a sed on the e m p lo y e r 's distin ction betw een the tw o groups w hich m ay take into
account not only d iffe r e n c e s in w ork sch edu les but d iffe r e n c e s in pay and ben efits.
M inim um en trance s a la r ie s fo r o ffic e w o rk e rs re la te only to the establish m en ts v is ite d . (See
table B - l . ) B eca u se of the optim um sam pling techniques used and the pro b a b ility that la rg e
establishm ents are m o re lik ely than sm all establish m en ts to have fo rm a l entrance rates above the
s u b c le r ic a l le v e l, the table is m o r e re p resen tative o f p o lic ie s in m edium and la rge establish m en ts.
Shift d ifferen tia l data are lim ite d to fu ll-tim e plant w o rk e rs in m anufacturing in d u strie s. (See
table B -2 .) T h is in form ation is p re se n te d in te r m s o f (1) establish m en t p o lic y 3 fo r to ta l plant w o rk e r
em ploym ent, and (2) effe c tiv e p r a c tic e fo r w o rk e rs em p lo ye d on the s p e c ifie d shift at the tim e of the
survey. In establish m en ts having v a r ie d d iffe r e n tia ls , the amount applying to a m a jo rity is used. In
establishm ents having som e la te -s h ift hours paid at n o rm a l r a te s , a d iffe re n tia l is r e c o r d e d only i f it
applies to a m a jo rity of the shift h o u rs. A se co n d (evening) shift ends w ork at o r n ear m idnight. A
th ird (night) shift starts w ork at o r n ear m idnight.
The sch edu led w eekly hours and days of a m a jo rity o f the f ir s t -s h ift w o rk e rs in an e s ta b lis h ­
ment are tabulated as applying to all fu ll-tim e plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs o f that establishm ent. (See
table B -3 .) Scheduled w eekly hou rs and days are th ose w hich a m a jo rity o f fu ll-tim e em p lo y e e s are
expected to w ork fo r stra ig h t-tim e o r ove rtim e rates.
Paid h olid a ys; paid va ca tio n s; and health, in su ra n ce , and pension plans are trea ted sta tistica lly
as applying to all fu ll-tim e plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs if a m a jo rity o f such w o rk e rs are e lig ib le o r m ay
eventually qualify fo r the p r a c t ic e s lis te d . (See tables B -4 through B - 6 .) Sums o f individual item s in
tables B -2 through B -5 m ay not equal totals be ca u se o f rounding.

The sum m ary o f vacation plans is a sta tis tic a l m e a s u r e o f vacation p r o v is io n s ra th er than a
m e a su re o f the p ro p o rtio n o f fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s actually r e c e iv in g s p e c ific b e n e fits . (See table B - 5 .)
P r o v is io n s apply to all plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs in an esta b lish m en t r e g a r d le s s o f length o f s e r v ic e .
Paym en ts on other than a tim e b a s is are c o n v e r te d to a tim e p er io d ; f o r ex a m p le, 2 p e rce n t of
annual earnings are c o n s id e re d equivalent to 1 w e e k 's pay. Only b a s ic plans are in clu d ed. E stim a tes
e xclu d e vacation b on u ses, va ca tio n -sa vin gs p la n s, and "e x ten d ed ” o r " s a b b a tic a l” ben efits beyond b a s ic
plans. Such p ro v isio n s are typ ica l in the s t e e l, alum inum , and can in d u stries.
Health, in su ran ce, and pension plans fo r w hich the e m p lo y e r pays at le a s t a part of the co s t
include th ose (1) underw ritten by a c o m m e r c ia l insurance, com pany or n on p rofit organ ization , (2)
p ro v id e d through a union fund, o r (3) paid d ir e c tly by the e m p lo y e r out of c u r r e n t operating funds o r
fr o m a fund set aside fo r this pu rpose.
(See table B - 6 .) An establish m en t is c o n s id e r e d to have
such a plan if the m a jo rity o f em p loyees are c o v e r e d even though le s s than a m a jo rity p a rticip a te
under the plan b eca u se em ployees are re q u ir e d to con tribu te tow a rd the c o s t .
E xclu ded are
le g a lly requ ired plans, such as w o rk m e n 's com p en sa tion , s o c ia l s e c u r ity , and r a ilr o a d retirem en t.
Sickness and accident insurance is lim ite d to that type o f in su ran ce under w hich p r e d eterm in ed
ca sh paym ents are m ade d ire ctly to the in su red during te m p o r a r y illn e s s o r a ccid en t disa b ility.
Inform ation is presen ted fo r all such plans to w hich the e m p lo y e r con trib u tes.
H ow ever, in New
Y o r k and New J e r s e y , w hich have enacted t e m p o r a r y d isa b ility insu ran ce law s req u irin g e m p lo y e r
co n tr ib u tio n s ,4 plans are included only i f the e m p lo y e r (1) con trib u tes m o r e than is le g a lly r eq u ired ,
o r (2) p rovid es the em p loyee with benefits w hich e x c e e d the req u irem en ts o f the law. Tabulations o f
paid s ick leave plans are lim ited to fo rm a l p la n s 5 w hich p ro v id e fu ll pay o r a p r o p o r tio n of the
w o r k e r 's pay during absence fro m w ork b e c a u s e o f illn e s s . Separate tabulations are p res en ted
a cco rd in g to (1) plans w hich p rovide fu ll pay and no w aiting p e r io d , and (2) plans w hich prov id e eith er
p a rtia l pay or a wanting p e rio d . In addition to the presen ta tion of p r o p o r tio n s o f w o rk e rs p rov id ed
sick n e s s auid accident insurance o r padd s ick le a v e , aui unduplicated total is shown o f w o rk e rs who
r e c e iv e eith er o r both types of ben efits.
Long te rm disability insurance plans p ro v id e paym ents to tota lly d isa b led em p lo y e e s upon the
e xp iration o f their paid sick leave a n d /o r s ick n e s s auid a ccid en t insurauice, o r a fter a p re d e te rm in e d
p e r io d o f disability (typically 6 m onths). P aym en ts are m ade until the end o f the d is a b ility , a
m axim um age, o r e lig ib ility fo r re tirem en t b e n e fits . F u ll o r p a rtia l paym ents are alm ost always
re d u ce d by so cia l s e cu rity , w ork m en 's co m p en sa tion , auid p riv a te pen sion s b en efits payable to the
d isa b le d em ployee.

Data on paid h olid ays are lim ite d to h olid ays granted annually on a fo rm a l b a s is , w hich ( l)
are provided fo r in w ritten fo r m , o r (2) are e s ta b lish e d by cu stom .
(See table B -4 .) H olidays
ord in a rily granted are in clu d ed even though they m ay fa ll on a nonw orkday and the W orker is not
granted another day off. The fir s t part o f the paid holid ays table p re se n ts the num ber o f w hole and
half holidays actually granted. The se co n d part co m b in e s w hole and half holid ays to show total holiday
tim e. Table B -4 a re p o rts the in cid e n ce of the m o s t com m on paid h olid ays.

M a jo r m e d ica l in surance plans p r o te c t em p lo y e e s fr o m s ick n ess auid in ju ry exp en ses beyond
the c o v e r a g e of b a s ic h ospitalization, m e d ica l, auid s u r g ica l plauis. T y p ic a l fea tu res of m a jo r m e d ica l
plans are (1) a "d e d u ctib le ” (e .g ., $50) paid by the in s u re d b e fo r e b en efits begin; (2) a coin s u ra n ce
feature requiring the in su red to pay a portion (e .g ., 20 p e rce n t) o f c erta in ex p e n s e s ; auid (3) stated
d o lla r m axim um benefits (e .g ., $ 10,000 a y e a r ). M ed ica l insurauice p r o v id e s c om p lete o r p a rtia l
paym ent of d o c to r s ' fe e s . Dental insurauice usually c o v e r s f illin g s , e x tr a c tio n s , auid X - r a y s . E xcluded
are plauis which c o v e r only o ra l s u rgery o r accid en t daunage.
R etirem en t pen sion plauis p rovid e
paym ents fo r the rem ain der of the w o r k e r 's life .

3 An establishment was considered as having a p o licy if it m et either o f the follow in g conditions: (1 ) Operated late shifts at the tim e o f the
survey, or (2 ) had form al provisions covering late shifts.
A n establishment was considered as having form al provisions if it (1 ) had operated late
shifts during the 12 months before the survey, or (2 ) had provisions in written form to operate late shifts.

4 The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island do not require em ployer contributions.
® A n establishment is considered as having a form al plan if it established at least the m inim um number o f days sick lea ve available to each
em p loyee.
Such a plan need not be written; but informal sick lea ve allow ances, determ ined on an individual basis, are excluded.




W orkers in establishm ents

Number o f establishm ents

Industry d i v i s i o n 2

Minim um
em ploym ent
in e sta b lish ­
ments in scope
o f study

Within scope of study
Within sco p e
o f study *

Studied
T o ta l4

Studied
Num ber

A ll d i v i s i o n s _______________________________
M a n u fa ctu rin g ____________________________________
N on m an u factu rin g------- ---------------------------------------T ra n sp orta tion , co m m u n ica tio n , and
other public u tilitie s 5 _____ ______________
W h olesale t r a d e _____________________________
R etail trade
F in a n ce, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e ______ —
S e r v ic e s 8 __________________________________ —

_

F u ll-tim e
plant w ork ers

P ercen t

F u ll-tim e
o ffic e w ork ers

T o ta l4

576

150

107, 122

100

6 2,616

20 ,1 6 6

59,031

50
-

142
434

44
106

36,454
7 0 ,6 6 8

34
66

24,635
37,981

5,031
15, 135

24,081
34,950

50
50
50
50
50

55
63
166
78
72

21
13
31
17
24

15,545
7 ,4 3 8
2 8 ,490
10,833
8, 362

14
7
27
10
8

7, 134
(6 )
(6)
(J)
(6 )

2 ,3 8 3
(6)
(6 )
0
(6)

11,994
2 ,459
12,782
3,986
3,729

1 The O klahom a C ity Standard M etrop olitan S tatistical A re a , as defined by the O ffice o f M anagem ent and Budget through F e b ru a ry 1974, c o n s ists o f Canadian, C levelan d, M cC lain, Oklahoma,
and Pottaw atom ie C ou n ties. The " w o r k e r s within scope o f study" estim ates shown in this table provide a reason ably a ccu ra te d e s c r ip tio n o f the size and c om p osition o f the labor fo r c e included
in the su rvey.
E stim a tes are not intended, how ever, fo r com parison with other em ploym ent indexes to m e a su re em ploym ent trends o r le v e ls sin ce (1) planning o f w age surveys req u ires
establish m en t data co m p ile d c o n s id e r a b ly in advance o f the pa y ro ll period studied, and (2) sm all establish m en ts are excluded fro m the scop e o f the su rvey.
2 The 1967 edition o f the Standard Industrial C la ssifica tio n Manual was used to c la s s ify establishm ents by industry d iv isio n .
3 Inclu des all esta b lish m en ts with total em ploym ent at o r above the m inim um lim itation. A ll outlets (within the area) o f com pan ies in in d u stries such as tra d e, fin a n ce, auto rep a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion p ictu re th ea ters are c o n s id e r e d as 1 establishm ent.
4 Inclu des e x e c u tiv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, p a rt-tim e , and other w ork ers excluded fro m the separate plant and o ffic e c a te g o r ie s .
5 A b b rev ia te d to "pu blic u t ilit ie s " in the A - and B -s e r ie s tables. T a x ica b s and s e r v ic e s inciden tal to w ater transportation w e re exclu d ed . Oklahom a C ity 's tran sit system is m unicipally
op era ted and is exclu d ed by d efin ition fro m the scope o f the study.
6 T h is d iv isio n is r e p r e s e n te d in e stim ates fo r "all in d u s tr ie s ” and "nonm anu facturing" in the A - s e r ie s ta b le s , and fo r "all in d u s tr ie s " in the B - s e r ie s ta b les. Separate presentation of
data is not m ade fo r one o r m o r e o f the follow ing r e a so n s: (1) Em ploym ent is too sm all to provide enough data to m e r it separate study, (2) the sam ple was not designed in itially to perm it
separate p resen ta tio n , (3) re s p o n s e w as in su fficien t o r inadequate to p erm it separate presen tation , and (4) th ere is p o s s ib ility o f d is c lo s u r e o f individual establishm ent data.
7 W ork ers fro m this en tire d iv isio n are re p resen ted in estim ates fo r "a ll in d u s tr ie s " and "nonm anu facturing" in the A - s e r ie s ta b les, but fro m the r e a l estate portion only in estim ates
fo r "a ll in d u s tr ie s " in the B - s e r ie s ta b le s . Separate presentation o f data is not m ade fo r one o r m o r e o f the re a so n s given in footnote 6.
8 H otels and m o te ls ; lau n dries and other person al s e r v ic e s ; business s e r v ic e s ; autom obile r e p a ir , rental, and parking; m otion p ic tu re s ; nonprofit m em b ersh ip organization s (excluding
r e lig io u s and ch a rita b le o r g a n iz a tio n s ); and engineering and arch itectu ral s e r v ic e s .

N OTE: Since the last su rve y in the Oklahoma City are a , the Standard M etropolitan Statistical A re a (SMSA) has been expanded to include M cC lain and Pottaw atom ie Counties,
O klahom a. The additional geograph y accounts fo r about 1 percent o f the w o rk e rs within scope o f the study. Within these 2 counties about h alf o f the w o rk e rs w ere in m anufacturing
e s ta b lish m en ts.
O ccupational earnings in fo rm a tio n in T ables A - l through A -6 rela te to the expanded SMSA, but wage trend in form ation in T able A -7 r e la te s to the geog ra p h ica l scope used in the
July 197 3 su rv e y . Next y e a r , all data w ill rela te to the enlarged SMSA.
Crude petroleu m and natural gas establishm ents have been excluded fro m the scope o f the survey since the last study.
fo r about 3 p e rce n t o f all w o rk e rs in the area.

Industrial co m p o sitio n in m anufacturing
O ver o n e -th ir d o f all w o r k e r s within scope o f the survey in the Oklahom a C ity area
w ere em p loyed in m anufacturin g f ir m s . The follow ing presen ts the m a jor industry groups
and s p e c ific in d u s tr ie s as a p e r c e n t o f all m anufacturing:
Industry groups

Com m unication equipment _____ 23
F a bricated structural
m etal p r o d u c t s _______________ 7
Meat p r o d u c t s ____________
6
M otor v e h icle s and
equipm ent ___________________ 6
N e w s p a p e rs ______________
5
P etroleum re fin in g ____________ 5

L a bor-m an a gem en t agreem en t cov e r a g e
The follow in g tabulation show s the p ercen t o f fu ll-tim e plant and o ffic e w ork ers
em ployed in establish m en ts in which a union con tract o r co n tra cts co v e re d a m a jority of
the w o rk e rs in the r e s p e c tiv e c a t e g o r ie s , Oklahom a C ity, O kla., August 1974:

S p e cific industries

Electrical equipment and
s u p p l i e s ________________________ 26
F ood and kindred p r o d u c t s ____ 17
M ach in ery, e xce p t e le c t r ic a l __ 10
T ra n sp orta tion equ ip m e n t_____ 10
Fabricated metal products_____ 8
P rinting and p u b lis h in g ------------ 7
P etroleu m and c o a l p r o d u c t s __ 5
R u bber and p la s tic s p ro d u cts __ 5

In the past, w o rk e rs in these establish m en ts accounted

This in form a tio n is b ased on estim a te s o f total em ploym ent derived fro m u n iverse
m a te r ia ls c o m p ile d b e fo r e actual su rv e y . P rop ortion s in v a riou s industry d iv isio n s m ay
d iffe r fro m p r o p o r tio n s b a se d on the r e s u lts o f the survey as shown in the appendix table.




Plant w o rk e rs
A ll in d u s t r ie s ____________
M anufacturin g____________
Pu blic u t ilit ie s ___________

34
50
69

O ffice w ork ers
5
39

An establishm ent is co n s id e r e d to have a con tra ct c o v e rin g all plant o r o ffic e
w o rk e rs i f a m a jo rity o f such w ork ers are c o v e r e d by a labor-m an agem en t agreem ent.
T h e re fo r e , all other plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs a re em ployed in establishm ents that eith er do
not have la bor-m an agem en t co n tra cts in e ffe c t , o r have co n tra cts that apply to few er than
half o f th eir plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs . E stim ates are not n e c e s s a r ily rep resen tative o f the
extent to w hich all w o rk e rs in the a rea m ay be c o v e r e d b y the p r o v is io n s o f labor-m an agem ent
ag re e m e n ts, becau se sm all establish m en ts a re exclu ded and the industrial scop e o f the
su rvey is lim ited.




Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions
The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and
from area to area. This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on
interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in
individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed
to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-tim e, temporary, and probationary workers.

OFFICE
BILLER, MACHINE

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING

Prepares statements, b ills, and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or electromatic
typewriter. May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work
incidental to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, machine, are classified by type of
machine, as follows:

Performs one or more accounting clerical tasks such as posting to registers and ledgers;
reconciling bank accounts; verifying the internal consistency, completeness, and mathematical accuracy
of accounting documents; assigning prescribed accounting distribution codes; examining and verifying
for clerical accuracy various types of reports, lists, calculations, posting, etc.; or preparing simple or
assisting in preparing more complicated journal vouchers. May work in either a manual or automated
accounting system.

B iller, machine (billing m achine). Uses a special billing machine (combination typing and
adding machine) to prepare bills and invoices from customers' purchase orders, internally prepared
orders, shipping memorandums, etc. Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and
shipping charges and entry of necessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing
machine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine. The operation usually involves a
large number of carbon cooies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.
B iller, machine (bookkeeping machine). Uses a bookkeeping machine (with or without a
typewriter keyboard) to prepare custom ers' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation.
Generally involves the simultaneous entry of figures on customers' ledger record. The machine
automatically accumulates figures on a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints
automatically the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from
uniform and standard types of sales and credit slips.

The work requires a knowledge of clerical methods and office practices and procedures which
relates to the clerical processing and recording of transactions and accounting information. With
experience, the worker typically becomes familiar with the bookkeeping and accounting terms and
procedures used in the assigned work, but is not required to have a knowledge of the formal principles
of bookkeeping and accounting.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Glass A. Under general supervision, performs accounting clerical operations which require
the application of experience and judgment, for example, clerically processing complicated or
nonrepetitive accounting transactions, selecting among a substantial variety of prescribed accounting
codes and classifications, or tracing transactions though previous accounting actions to determine
source of discrepancies. May be assisted by one or more class B accounting clerks.

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of
business transactions.
C l ass A . Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic bookkeeping
principles, and familiarity with the structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines
proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each phase of the work. May
prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records by hand.
C lass B. Keeps a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll,
custom ers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described under biller, machine), cost
distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

Revised occupational descriptions for switchboard operator; switchboard operator-re­
ceptionist; m achine-tool operator, toolroom; and tool and die maker are being introduced this year.
They are the result of the Bureau's policy of periodically reviewing area wage survey occupational
descriptions in order to take into account technological developments and to clarify descriptions so
that they are more readily understood and uniformly interpreted. Even though the revised
descriptions reflect basically the same occupations as previously defined, some reporting changes
may occur because of the revisions.
The new single level description for switchboard operator is the equivalent of the two
levels previously defined.




Glass B . Under close supervision, following detailed instructions and standardized procedures,
performs one or more routine accounting clerical operations, such as posting to ledgers, cards, or
worksheets where identification of items and locations of postings are clearly indicated; checking
accuracy and completeness of standardized and repetitive records or accounting documents; and coding
documents using a few prescribed accounting codes.
CLERK, FILE
F iles, classifies, and retrieves material in am established filing system. May perform
clerical and manual tasks required to maintain files. Positions are classified into levels on the basis
of the following definitions.
Glass A. Classifies and indexes file material such as correspondence, reports, technical
documents, etc., in an established filing system containing a number of varied subject matter files.
May also file this material. May keep records of various types in conjunction with the files. May
lead a small group of lower level file clerks.

Listed below are
stereotypes in the titles:

revised

occupational

titles

introduced

this

year

to

eliminate

Revised title

Form er title

Drafter
Dr after-tracer
Boiler tender

Draftsman
Draftsman-tracer
Fireman, stationary boiler

sex

SEC RET ARY— Gontinue d
C lass B . S o r ts , c o d e s , and file s u n cla s s ifie d m a te ria l by sim p le (su bject m a tte r) headings
o r partly c la s s ifie d m a te ria l by fin e r subheadings. P r e p a re s sim p le rela ted index and c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e
aids. As requ ested , lo ca te s c le a r ly id en tified m a te ria l in file s and fo rw a rd s m a te ria l. May p e r fo r m
rela ted c le r ic a l task s req u ire d to m aintain and s e r v ic e file s .
C lass C . P e r fo r m s routine filin g o f m a te ria l that has already been c la s s ifie d o r w hich is
e a s ily c la s s ifie d in a sim p le s e r ia l c la s s ific a tio n s y ste m (e .g ., alphabetical, c h r o n o lo g ic a l, o r
n u m erica l). As req u ested , lo ca te s re a d ily available m a te r ia l in file s and fo rw a rd s m a te r ia l; and m ay
fill out w ithdraw al ch a rge. May p e r fo r m sim p le c le r i c a l and manual tasks re q u ire d to m aintain and
s e r v ic e file s .
CL E R K , ORDER
R e c e iv e s c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s fo r m a te ria l o r m erch a n d ise by m a il, phone, o r p e rso n a lly .
Duties involve any com bin ation of the fo llo w in g : Quoting p r ic e s to c u s to m e rs ; m aking out an o rd e r
sheet listing the item s to m ake up the o r d e r ; checking p r ic e s and quantities o f item s on o r d e r sheet;
and distributing o r d e r sheets to r e s p e c tiv e departm ents to be fille d . M ay ch eck with cr e d it departm ent
to determ ine c r e d it rating o f c u s to m e r , acknow ledge re c e ip t of o r d e r s fr o m c u s to m e rs , fo llo w up
ord e r s to see that they have been fille d , k eep file o f o r d e r s r e c e iv e d , and ch eck shipping in v o ice s
with original o r d e r s .
CL E R K , P A Y R O L L
Com putes w ages of com pany em p lo y e e s and e n ters the n e c e s s a r y data on the p a y r o ll sheets.
Duties involve: C alculating w o r k e r s ' earnings b a s e d on tim e o r p roduction r e c o r d s ; and posting
calcu lated data on p a y r o ll sh eet, showing inform ation such as w o r k e r 's nam e, wdrking days, tim e ,
rate, deductions fo r in su ra n ce , and to ta l w ages due. M ay m ake out p aych eck s and a ssist paym aster
in making up and distributing pay e n v e lo p e s. M ay use a calcu lating m ach in e.
KEYPUNCH O PE R A T O R
O perates a keypunch m achine to r e c o r d o r v e r ify alphabetic a n d /o r n u m e ric data on tabulating
ca rd s or on tape.
P os ition s are c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the b a s is of the follow in g defin itions.
C lass A . W ork re q u ire s the application o f e x p e r ie n c e and judgm ent in selectin g p r o c e d u r e s
to be follow ed and in sea rch in g f o r , in te rp re tin g , s e le ctin g , o r coding ite m s t o be keypunched fr o m a
v a riety of so u r c e docum ents. On o c c a s io n m ay a lso p e r fo r m som e routine keypunch w ork . M ay train
in exp erien ced keypunch o p era to rs.
C la ss B . W ork is routine and re p e titiv e . U nder c lo s e su p e rvisio n o r follow in g s p e c ific
p roced u res o r in s tru ction s , w ork s fr o m v a rio u s stan dardized s o u rce docum ents w hich have been co d e d ,
and follow s s p e c ifie d p r o c e d u r e s w hich have been p r e s c r ib e d in detail and re q u ire little o r no se le ctin g ,
codin g, or in terp reting of data to be r e c o r d e d . R e fe r s to s u p e r v is o r p r o b le m s arisin g fr o m e rr o n e o u s
item s or cod es o r m is s in g in form ation .
MESSENGER

E x clu sio n s
Not all position s that are titled " s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s the above c h a r a c t e r is t ic s .
p o sitio n s which are exclu ded fr o m the defin ition are as fo llo w s :

E xam ples of

a.

P osition s w hich do not m eet the " p e r s o n a l" s e c r e ta r y con cep t d e s c r ib e d above;

b.

Stenographers not fully train ed in s e c r e ta r ia l type duties;

c . Stenographers
m a n a ge ria l p ersons;

servin g

as

o ffic e

a ssista n ts

to

a grou p

of p r o fe s s io n a l, tec h n ica l,

d. S ecretary p osition s in w hich the duties are e ith er substantially m o r e
stantially m ore com plex and resp on sible than th ose c h a r a c t e r iz e d in the defin ition;

or

routine o r sub­

e. A ssistant type position s w hich in volve m o r e d ifficu lt o r m o r e r e s p o n s ib le te c h n ica l,
adm inistrative, s u p e rv iso ry , o r s p e c ia liz e d c le r i c a l duties w hich are not ty p ic a l o f s e c r e ta r ia l
w ork .
NOTE: The te r m " c o rp o ra te o f fic e r , " used in the le v e l defin itions follow in g , r e fe r s to those
o ffic ia ls who have a significant c o r p o r a te -w id e p olicym ak in g ro le with reg a r d to m a jo r com pany
a c tiv itie s . The title " v ic e p r e s id e n t ," though n o rm a lly in d ica tive of this r o le , dops not in all c a s e s
identify such position s. V ic e presiden ts w h ose p r im a ry r e s p o n s ib ility is to act p e r s o n a lly on individual
c a s e s o r transaction s (e .g ., approve o r deny individual loan o r c r e d it a ction s; ad m in ister individual
trust accounts; d ire ctly su p ervise a c le r i c a l s ta ff) are not c o n s id e r e d to be " c o r p o r a te o f f i c e r s " fo r
p u rp o se s o f applying the follow ing le v e l d e fin ition s .
C lass A
1. S ecretary to the chairm an o f the b o a r d o r p resid en t of a com pany that e m p lo y s , in a ll,
o v e r 100 but few er than 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
2. S e cretary to a c o rp o ra te o f fic e r (oth er than the ch airm a n of the b o a r d o r p re s id e n t) o f a
com pany that em ploys, in all, ov e r 5, 000 but fe w e r than 25, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
3. S e cre ta ry to the head, im m e d ia tely b elow the c o r p o r a t e o f fic e r le v e l, o f a m a jo r segm ent
o r su bsidiary o f a com pany that em p loys, in all, o v e r 25, 000 p e r s o n s .
C lass B
1. S e cretary to the chairm an of the b o a rd or p resid en t o f a com pany that e m p lo y s ,
fe w e r than 100 p e r s o n s ; or

in all,

2. S e cretary to a c o rp o ra te o f fic e r (oth er than the ch airm a n of the b o a rd o r p re s id e n t) o f a
com pany that em ploys, in all, o v e r 100 but fe w e r than 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
3. S ecretary to the head, im m ed ia tely b elow the o f fic e r le v e l, o v e r e ith er a m a jo r c o r p o r a t e ­
w ide functional activity (e .g ., m arketin g, r e s e a r c h , op e ra tio n s , in d u stria l re la tio n s , e t c .) o r a m a jo r
ge o g ra p h ic o r organization al segm ent (e .g ., a r eg ion a l h ead qu arters; a m a jo r d iv isio n ) of a com pany
that e m p lo y s , in all, o v e r 5 ,0 0 0 but fe w e r than 2 5 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s ; or

P e r fo r m s va riou s routine duties such as running e r r a n d s , operating m in or o ffic e m achines
such as s e a le r s o r m a ile r s , opening and distributing m a il, and other m in o r c le r ic a l w ork . E xclude
position s that req u ire operation o f a m o to r v e h ic le as a sign ifican t duty.

4. S e cretary to the head of an individual plant, fa c to r y ,
o ffic ia l) that em p lo ys, in a ll, o v e r 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r

SECRETARY

5. S e cretary to the head o f a la r g e and im portant orga n iza tion a l segm ent (e .g ., a m id dle
m anagem ent su p e rviso r of an organ ization al segm ent often involving as m any as s e v e r a l hundred
p e r s o n s ) o r a com pany that e m p lo y s, in a ll, o v e r 2 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .

A ssign ed as p e rs o n a l s e c r e ta r y , n o rm a lly to one individual. M aintains a c lo s e and highly
respon sive rela tion sh ip to the d a y -to -d a y w ork o f the su p e r v is o r . W orks fa ir ly independently
receivin g a m in im um o f detailed su p e rvisio n and guidance. P e r fo r m s v a r ie d c le r ic a l and s e c r e ta r ia l
duties, usually including m os t o f the fo llo w in g :
a. R e c e iv e s telephone c a lls , p e rs o n a l c a l le r s , and incom ing m a il, answ ers routine in q u ire s,
and routes tech n ica l in q u iries to the p r o p e r p e r s o n s ;
b.

M aintains the s u p e r v is o r 's ca le n d a r and m akes appointm ents as in stru cted;

d.

R elays m e s s a g e s fr o m s u p e r v is o r to subordin ates;

C lass C
1. S ecretary to an execu tive o r m a n a g eria l p ers on w h ose r e s p o n s ib ility is not equivalent to
one o f the s p e cific le v e l situations in the d efin ition fo r c la s s B, but w hose orga n iza tion a l unit
n o rm a lly num bers at least s e v e r a l dozen e m p lo y e e s and is usually divided into org a n iza tion a l segm en ts
w hich are often, in turn, fu rth er subdivided. In so m e co m p a n ie s , this le v e l in clu d es a w ide range of
organ ization al ech elon s; in o th e rs, only one o r tw o; or

E s ta b lis h e s , m aintain s, and r e v is e s the s u p e r v is o r 's f ile s ;

c.

e tc. (o r oth er equivalent le v e l of

e. R eview s c o r re s p o n d e n c e , m em ora n d u m s, and re p o r ts p re p a re d by oth ers fo r the s u p e r­
v i s o r 's signature to a ssu re p r o c e d u r a l and typograph ic a cc u r a c y ;
f.

P e r fo r m s stenographic and typing w ork .

May a ls o p e r fo r m other c l e r i c a l and s e c r e ta r ia l tasks o f c o m p a ra b le nature and difficu lty.
The w ork typ ica lly req u ires know ledge o f o ffic e routine and understanding o f the o rgan ization , p r o g r a m s ,
and p roced u res rela ted to the w ork o f the s u p e r v is o r .




2. S ecretary to the head of an in divid u al plant, fa c to r y , e tc . (o r oth er equivalent le v e l of
o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in a ll, fe w e r than 5. 000 p e r s o n s .
C lass D
1. Secretary to the
about 25 o r 30 p e rs o n s ); o r

s u p e rv is o r

or

head o f a s m a ll orga n iza tion a l unit

(e .g .,

fe w e r than

2. Secretary to a n o n su p e rv iso ry s ta ff s p e c ia lis t , p r o fe s s io n a l e m p lo y e e , adm in istrative
o f fic e r , o r assistant, sk ille d technician o r ex p e r t.
(NOTE: M any com pan ies a ssig n s te n o g ra p h e rs ,
rath er than s e c r e ta rie s as d e s c r ib e d above, t o this le v e l o f s u p e r v is o r y o r n o n s u p e rv is o r y w o r k e r .)

STEN OG RAPH ER

TA BU LA TIN G-M ACH IN E O PER AT O R (E le c tr ic Accounting M achine O p era tor)

P r im a r y duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to tra n scrib e the dictation. M ay also
type fr o m w ritten cop y. M ay op e ra te fr o m a stenographic pool. May o cca s io n a lly tr a n s c r ib e fr o m
v o ic e re c o rd in g s (if p r im a ry duty is tra n s crib in g fro m r e c o rd in g s, see T ran scrib in g -M a ch in e
O p era tor, G en eral).

O perates one o r a v a rie ty of m ach in es such as the tabu lator, c a lcu la to r, c o lla to r , in terp reter,
s o r t e r , reproducing punch, e tc. E xcluded fr o m this definition are w orking s u p e rv is o rs. A lso excluded
are o p e ra to rs o f e le c tr o n ic digital co m p u te rs , even though they m ay also operate EAM equipment.

N O T E : T h is jo b is d istin gu ish ed fr o m that of a s e c r e ta ry in that a s e c r e ta r y n o rm a lly w ork s
in a con fid en tial rela tion sh ip with only one m anager or execu tive and p e rfo rm s m o r e r e s p o n s ib le and
d is c r e tio n a r y task s as d e s c r ib e d in the s e c r e ta r y job definition.

G lass A. P e r fo r m s com p lete reportin g and tabulating assignm ents including devising difficult
co n tr o l panel w iring under g e n e ra l su p ervision . A ssign m en ts ty p ica lly involve a v ariety of long and
co m p le x rep orts w hich often are irr e g u la r or n on r e c u r r in g , requ irin g som e planning of the nature and
sequencing of op e ra tio n s, and the use of a v a rie ty of m ach in es. Is ty p ica lly involved in training new
o p e ra to rs in m achine operation s o r training lo w e r le v e l op e r a to r s in w iring fro m diagram s and in
the operating sequ en ces of long and c o m p lex reports-. D oes not include position s in which wiring
r e s p o n s ib ility is lim ite d to s e le ctio n and in sertion of p r e w ir e d b o a r d s .

Sten ograp h er, G en eral
D ictation in v olv e s a n o r m a l routine v o cabu lary.
o r p e r fo r m other r e la tiv e ly routine c le r i c a l task s.

May maintain

file s , keep sim p le r e c o r d s ,

S ten ograp h er, S enior
D ictation in v olv e s a v a r ie d te ch n ica l or s p e cia liz e d v ocabu lary such as in le g a l b r ie fs or
r e p o r ts on s c ie n tific r e s e a r c h . May a ls o set up and maintain file s , keep r e c o r d s , etc.
OR
P e r fo r m s sten o gra p h ic duties requ irin g significantly g re a te r independence and r e s p o n s ib ility
than s ten og ra p h er, g e n e r a l, as ev id e n ce d by the follow ing: W ork r e q u ire s a high d egree of stenographic
sp eed and a c c u r a c y ; a th orou gh w ork ing know ledge o f g en eral bu sin ess and o ffic e p ro c e d u r e ; and of
the s p e c ific b u sin ess o p e ra tio n s , o rg a n iz a tio n , p o lic ie s , p r o c e d u r e s , file s , w o rk flo w , e tc. U ses this
know ledge in p e r fo rm in g sten ogra p h ic duties and re sp o n sib le c le r ic a l tasks such as m aintaining follow u p
f ile s ; assem blin g m a te r ia l fo r r e p o r t s , m em ora n d u m s, and le tte r s ; com posin g sim p le le tte rs fro m
g e n e r a l in s tru ctio n s ; reading and routing in com in g m ail; and answ ering routine qu estion s, etc.
SW ITCHBOARD O PE R A T O R
O perates a telephone sw itch b o a rd o r co n so le used with a private bran ch exchange (P B X )
s y s te m to r e la y in c o m in g , outgoing, and in tra -s y s te m c a lls . May provide in form ation to c a lle r s ,
r e c o r d and tra n s m it m e s s a g e s , k eep r e c o r d of ca lls p laced and to ll ch arges. B e s id e s operating a
telep hone s w itch b oa rd or c o n s o le , m ay a ls o type o r p e r fo rm routine c le r ic a l w ork (typing o r routine
c l e r i c a l w ork m ay o ccu p y the m a jo r po rtio n of the w o r k e r ’ s tim e , and is usually p e r fo rm e d w hile at
the sw itch b oa rd o r c o n s o le ).
C h ief o r lead o p e ra to rs in establishm ents em ployin g m o r e than one
op e r a to r are exclu d ed . F o r an o p e r a to r who also acts as a re ce p tio n ist, see Sw itchboard O p e r a to rR ecep tion ist.
SW ITCHBOARD O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
At a s in g le -p o s itio n telep h on e sw itch board o r c o n s o le , acts both as an o p e ra to r— see Sw itch­
b oa rd O perator— and as a r e c e p tio n is t. R e c e p tio n is t's w ork involves such duties as greetin g v is it o r s ;
d eterm ining nature o f v i s it o r 's b u s in e s s and providing appropriate inform ation; re fe r r in g v is it o r to
a p p rop riate p e r s o n in the org a n iza tio n , o r contacting that p erson by telephone and arranging an
appointm ent; keeping a log of v is it o r s .

P osition s are c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the b a s is of the follow in g definitions.

G lass B . P e r fo r m s w ork a ccord in g to esta b lish ed p r o c e d u r e s and under s p e c ific instru ctions.
A ssignm ents ty p ica lly in volve co m p le te but routine and rec u r rin g r ep orts or parts of la rg er and m ore
co m p le x re p o r ts .
O perates m o r e difficu lt tabulating o r e le c t r ic a l accounting m achines such as the
tabulator and c a lcu la to r , in addition to the sim p le r m ach in es used by c la s s C op era tors. May be
re q u ire d to do som e w irin g fr o m diagram s. May train new e m p loy ees in b a s ic m achine operations.
C lass C . U nder s p e c ific in stru ction s, op era tes sim p le tabulating or e le c tr ic a l accounting
m achines such as the s o r t e r , in te rp re te r , reprodu cin g punch, c o lla t o r , etc. A ssignm ents typically
involve p ortion s of a w ork unit, fo r exam ple, individual sortin g o r collating runs, or repetitive
op era tion s. May p e r fo r m sim p le w iring fro m d ia gra m s, and do som e filing w ork.
TRANSCRIBINGrM ACHINE O P E R A T O R , G EN ER AL
P r im a r y duty is to tr a n s c r ib e dictation involving a n orm a l routine vocabu lary fro m tran s crib in g -m a ch in e r e c o r d s . M ay also type fr o m w ritten copy and do sim p le c le r ic a l w ork. W orkers
tra n s crib in g dictation involving a v a r ie d te ch n ica l or s p e c ia liz e d voca b u la ry such as legal b rie fs or
r e p o rts on s c ie n tific r e s e a r c h are not includ ed. A w ork er who takes dictation in shorthand or by
Stenotype or sim ila r m achine is c la s s ifie d as a stenographer.
TYPIST
U ses a ty p e w rite r to m ake co p ie s of va riou s m a teria ls or to m ake out b ills after calcu lations
have been m ade by another p e rso n . May includ e typing of s te n c ils , m ats, or s im ila r m aterials for
use in duplicating p r o c e s s e s . May do c le r i c a l w ork involving little s p e c ia l training, such as keeping
sim p le r e c o r d s , filin g r e c o r d s and r e p o r ts , or sorting and distributing incom ing m ail.
C lass A . P e r fo r m s one o r m o r e of the follow in g : Typing m a teria l in final fo rm when it
involves com bining m a te ria l fro m s e v e ra l s o u r c e s ; or res p o n s ib ility fo r c o r r e c t spelling, syllab ication ,
punctuation, e t c ., o f te ch n ica l o r unusual w ord s or foreig n language m a teria l; or planning layout and
typing of c o m p lica te d sta tistica l tables to m aintain u niform ity and balance in spacing. May type routine
fo r m le tt e r s , varying details to suit cir c u m s ta n c e s .
C lass B . P e r fo r m s one o r m ore of the fo llo w in g : Copy typing fro m rough or c le a r drafts;
o r routine typing o f fo r m s , insurance p o lic ie s , etc; or setting up sim p le standard tabulations; or
copying m o re co m p le x tables already set up and sp aced p ro p e r ly .

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
CO M PU TE R O PE R A T O R

CO M PU TE R O PER ATO R— Continued

M on itors and o p e ra te s the c o n tr o l co n s o le of a digital com puter to p r o c e s s data c c co r d in g to
operatin g in s tru ctio n s , usually p r e p a r e d by a p ro g ra m m e r. W ork includes m ost of the fo llo w in g :
Studies in stru ction s to d eterm in e equipm ent setup and op eration s; loads equipm ent with re q u ire d
item s (tape r e e ls , c a r d s , e t c .) ; sw itch es n e c e s s a r y auxiliary equipment into c ir c u it, and starts and
op era tes com p u ter; m akes adjustm ents to com pu ter to c o r r e c t operating p ro b le m s and m eet s p e cia l
con d ition s; r ev iew s e r r o r s m ade during operation and determ ines cause o r r e fe r s p r o b le m to
s u p e r v is o r or p r o g r a m m e r ; and m aintains operating r e c o r d s . May test and a s s is t in c o r r e c tin g
program .

C la ss B . O perates independently, or under only gen era l d irection , a com puter running
p r o g r a m s with m ost of the follow in g c h a r a c t e r is t ic s : M ost o f the p r o g r a m s are established production
runs, ty p ica lly run on a re g u la rly re c u r rin g b a s is ; there is little or no testing of new p rogram s
re q u ire d ; alternate p r o g r a m s are p ro v id ed in ca s e orig in a l p r o g r a m n eeds m a jor change or cannot be
c o r r e c t e d within a reason ably tim e . In com m on e r r o r situ ation s, diagn oses cause and takes c o r r e c tiv e
action . Th is usually in volves applying p r e v io u s ly p ro g ra m m e d c o r r e c t iv e steps, or using standard
c o r r e c t io n techniques.
OR

F o r w age study p u r p o s e s ,

co m p u te r o p e ra to rs are c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:

C la ss A . O perates independently, o r under only gen eral direction , a com pu ter running
p r o g r a m s w ith m os t o f the follow in g c h a r a c t e r is t ic s : New p rogram s are freq uently te s te d and
in trod u ced; scheduling re q u ire m e n ts are o f c r it ic a l im p ortan ce to m in im ize dow ntim e; the p ro g ra m s
are o f c o m p le x design so that id e n tifica tio n o f e r r o r so u rce often re qu ires a w orking know ledge of the
tota l p r o g r a m , and alternate p r o g r a m s m ay not be available. May give d ire ctio n and guidance to
lo w e r le v e l o p e r a to r s .




O perates under d ire ct su p e rvision a com p u ter running p rog ra m s or segm ents of program s
with the c h a r a c t e r is t ic s d e s c r ib e d fo r c la s s A. May a ssist a higher le v e l operator by independently
p e rfo rm in g le s s d ifficu lt task s assign ed, and p erform in g difficu lt tasks follow ing detailed instru ctions
and with frequent review o f operation s p e r fo rm e d .
C lass C . W orks on routine p rog ra m s under c lo s e su p ervision . Is expected to develop w orking
know ledge of the com pu ter equipm ent used and ability to detect p ro b le m s involved in running routine
p r o g r a m s . U sually has r e c e iv e d som e fo rm a l train ing in com pu ter operation. May assist higher le v e l
o p e ra to r on co m p le x p r o g r a m s .

C on verts statem ents o f b u sin e ss p r o b le m s , ty p ica lly p re p a re d by a sy ste m s analyst, into a
sequence of detailed in stru ction s w hich are re q u ire d to s o lv e the p r o b le m s by autom atic data p r o c e s s in g
equipm ent. W orking fr o m charts o r d ia g ra m s, the p r o g r a m m e r develops the p r e c is e in stru ctio n s w hich,
when en tered into the com p u te r sy ste m in co d e d language, cau se the m anipulation o f data to achieve
d e s ir e d r esu lts. W ork in volves m ost o f the fo llo w in g : A p plies know ledge o f com pu ter c a p a b ilitie s ,
m ath em atics, lo g ic em p loyed by c o m p u te r s , and p a rticu la r su b ject m atter in volved to analyze charts
and diagram s of the p r o b le m to be p ro g ra m m e d ; d evelops sequence o f p r o g r a m steps; w rite s detailed
flow charts to show o r d e r in w hich data w ill be p r o c e s s e d ; c o n v e rts th ese ch arts to c o d e d in stru ction s
fo r m achine to fo llo w ; tests and c o r r e c t s p r o g r a m s ; p re p a re s in stru ctio n s fo r operating p e rs o n n e l
during production run; an a lyze s, r e v ie w s , and alters p ro g ra m s to in c re a s e operating e ffic ie n c y o r
adapt to new req u irem en ts; m aintains r e c o r d s o f p r o g r a m developm ent and r e v is io n s . (NOTE: W o rk e rs
p erform in g both sy stem s ana lysis and p rogra m m in g should be c la s s ifie d as sy ste m s analysts if this is
the sk ill used to d eterm in e th e ir p a y .)
D oes not includ e e m p lo y e e s p r im a r ily r e s p o n s ib le fo r the m anagem ent o r su p ervision o f other
e le ctr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g e m p lo y e e s , o r p r o g r a m m e r s p r im a rily co n c e r n e d w ith s c ie n tific a n d /o r
engineering p r o b le m s .
F or w age study p u r p o s e s , p r o g r a m m e r s are c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s :
C lass A . W ork s independently o r under only ge n e ra l d ire ctio n on c o m p le x p ro b le m s w hich
requ ire com peten ce in all phases o f p ro gra m m in g con cep ts and p r a c t ic e s . W orking fro m d iagram s
and charts w hich identify the nature o f d e s ir e d r e s u lts , m a jo r p r o c e s s in g steps to be a cco m p lish e d ,
and the rela tion sh ips betw een va rio u s steps o f the p r o b le m solvin g routine; plans the full range
o f program m in g action s needed to e ffic ie n tly u tilize the com p u ter system in . achieving d e s ir e d
end p rodu cts.
At this le v e l, p rogra m m in g is d ifficu lt be ca u se com pu ter equipm ent m ust be o rga n ize d to
produ ce s e v e r a l in te rr e la te d but d iv e r s e p rod u cts fr o m n um erous and d iv e rs e data elem en ts. A w ide
va riety and exten sive n um ber o f intern al p r o c e s s in g action s m ust o c c u r . Th is re q u ire s such action s as
developm ent o f com m on op eration s w hich can be re u se d , establishm ent o f linkage points betw een
op eration s, adjustm ents to data when p r o g r a m re q u ire m e n ts e x c e e d com pu ter storage c a p a city , and
substantial m anipulation and resequ en cin g o f data elem en ts to fo r m a highly integrated p ro g ra m .
M ay p rovid e

functional d ire ctio n to lo w e r le v e l p r o g r a m m e r s who are

sy ste m s analysts are c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s :

C lass A . W orks independently o r under only g e n e ra l d ir e ctio n on c o m p le x p r o b le m s involving
all ph a ses of system analysis. P ro b le m s are c o m p le x b e ca u s e o f d iv e r s e s o u r c e s o f input data and
m u ltip le -u s e requirem en ts o f output data. (F o r e x a m p le, dev elop s an in tegrated prod u ction scheduling,
in ven tory co n tro l, c o s t a n a lysis, and s a le s an a lysis r e c o r d in w hich e v e r y ite m o f ea ch type is
autom atically p r o c e s s e d through the fu ll s y s te m o f r e c o r d s and app ropriate follow u p action s are initiated
by the com p u ter.) C on fers with p e rso n s c o n c e r n e d to d eterm in e the data p r o c e s s in g p ro b le m s and
ad vise s s u b je ct-m a tte r p erson n el on the im p lica tio n s o f new o r r e v is e d s y s te m s o f data p r o c e s s in g
op era tion s. M akes recom m en d ation s, if n eed ed , fo r a pp rova l o f m a jo r sy stem s in stallation s or changes
and fo r obtaining equipm ent.
May p rovid e functional d irection to lo w e r le v e l s y s te m s analysts who are a ssig n ed to a s s is t.
C lass B . W orks independently o r under only g e n e ra l d ir e ctio n on p r o b le m s that are re la tiv e ly
u n com plicated to analyze, plan, p ro g ra m , and op era te. P r o b le m s are o f lim ite d c o m p le x ity b eca u se
s o u r c e s o f input data are hom ogeneous and the output data are c lo s e ly rela ted . (F o r ex a m p le, d evelop s
sy ste m s for m aintaining d e p o sito r accounts in a bank, m aintaining accounts r e c e iv a b le in a r e ta il
establishm ent, or maintaining inventory accou n ts in a m anufacturing o r w h olesa le esta b lish m en t.)
C o n fe rs with p e rso n s co n ce rn e d to determ in e the data p r o c e s s in g p r o b le m s and a d vises s u b je c tm atter p erson n el on the im p lication s o f the data p r o c e s s in g sy s te m s to be applied.
OR
W orks jon a segm ent of a co m p le x data p r o c e s s in g sch em e o r s y s te m , as d e s c r ib e d fo r c la s s A.
W orks independently on routine assignm ents and r e c e iv e s in stru ction and guidance on c o m p lex
assignm ents. W ork is review ed fo r a c c u r a c y o f judgm ent, co m p lia n c e w ith in s tru ctio n s , and to in su re
p r o p e r alignm ent with the o v e r a ll system .
C lass C . W orks under im m ediate su p e r v is io n , c a r r y in g out an a lyses as a ssig n ed , usually
o f a single activity. A ssignm ents are design ed to d evelop and expand p r a c t ic a l e x p e r ie n c e in the
application of p ro ce d u re s and sk ills r e q u ire d f o r sy s tem s analysis w ork . F o r ex a m p le, m ay a s s is t a
higher le v e l system s analyst by p reparing the d etailed s p e c ific a tio n s r e q u ir e d by p r o g r a m m e r s fr o m
in form ation developed by the higher le v e l analyst.

assign ed to a s s is t.

G lass B . W orks independently o r under only gen era l d ire ctio n on re la tiv e ly Simple p r o g r a m s ,
o r on sim ple segm ents o f co m p le x p r o g r a m s . P r o g r a m s (o r se gm en ts) usually p r o c e s s in form ation to
p rodu ce data in tw o o r th ree v a r ie d se q u e n ce s o r fo rm a ts .
R ep orts and lis tin g s are p ro d u ce d by
refining, adapting, arra y in g , o r m aking m in o r additions to o r deletions fr o m input data w hich are
readily available. W hile n um erous r e c o r d s m ay be p r o c e s s e d , the data have been refin ed in p r io r
actions so that the a c c u r a c y and sequencing of data can be te s te d by using a few routine c h e ck s.
T y p ica lly , the p r o g r a m deals with routine r e c o rd -k e e p in g type operation s.
OR
W orks on c o m p le x p ro g ra m s (as d e s c r ib e d f o r c la s s A) under c lo s e d ire ctio n of a h igh er
le v e l p ro g r a m m e r o r s u p e r v is o r . May a s s is t h igh er le v e l p r o g r a m m e r b y independently p e rfo rm in g
le s s difficult tasks assign ed , and p e rfo rm in g m o r e d ifficu lt tasks under fa ir ly c lo s e d ire ctio n .
May guide o r in stru ct lo w e r le v e l p r o g r a m m e r s .
C lass C . M akes p r a c t ic a l app lication s o f p rogram m in g p r a c t ic e s and co n ce p ts usually le a rn e d
in fo rm a l train ing c o u r s e s . A ssign m en ts are designed to develop com p eten ce in the application of
standard p r o c e d u r e s to routine p r o b le m s . R e c e iv e s c lo s e su p e rvisio n on new a sp ects o f assign m en ts;
and w ork is rev iew ed to v e r ify its a c c u r a c y and co n fo rm a n ce with re q u ire d p r o c e d u r e s .
COM PU TER SYSTEMS AN A LY S T, BUSINESS
A n alyzes b u sin ess p r o b le m s to form u late p r o c e d u r e s fo r solving th em by use o f e le c t r o n ic
data p r o c e s s in g equipm ent. D evelops a co m p le te d e s crip tio n o f all sp e c ific a tio n s needed to enable
p ro g r a m m e r s to p re p a r e re q u ire d digital co m p u te r p r o g r a m s . W ork in v o lv e s m o st of the fo llo w in g :
A n alyzes s u b je c t-m a tte r operation s to be autom ated and id e n tifie s conditions and c r it e r ia r e q u ire d to
achieve s a tisfa cto ry re s u lts ; s p e c ifie s n um ber and types o f r e c o r d s , f ile s , and docum ents to be used;
outlines actions to be p e r fo r m e d by p e rs o n n e l and com p u ters in sufficien t detail fo r presen tation to
managem ent and fo r p rogra m m in g (ty p ica lly this in v o lv e s p rep aration o f w ork and data flow ch a rts );
coordin ates the developm ent o f te s t p r o b le m s and p a rticip a te s in t r ia l runs o f new and r e v is e d sy s te m s;
and recom m en d s equipm ent changes to obtain m o r e e ffe c tiv e o v e r a ll op era tion s. (NOTE: W o rk e rs
p erform in g both sy stem s analysis and p rogra m m in g should be c la s s ifie d as syste m s analysts if this is
the sk ill used to determ in e th e ir p a y .)
D oes not include em p lo y e e s p r im a rily re s p o n s ib le f o r the m anagem ent o r su p e rv isio n o f oth er
e le ctr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g e m p lo y e e s , o r sy s te m s analysts p r im a rily co n c e r n e d with s c ie n tific o r
engineering p r o b le m s .




F o r wage study p u rp o s e s ,

D RAFTER
C lass A. Plans the graphic presen tation o f c o m p le x item s having d istin ctiv e design featu res
that d iffe r significantly fro m establish ed drafting p r e c e d e n ts . W ork s in c lo s e support w ith the design
o r ig in a to r , and m ay recom m en d m in or design ch an ges. A n aly zes the e ffe c t o f ea ch change on the
details o f fo rm , function, and p osition a l rela tion sh ip s o f com pon en ts and p a rts . W orks with a
m in im um o f su p e rv iso ry assista n ce . C om pleted w ork is r ev iew ed by design o r ig in a to r fo r c o n s iste n c y
with p r io r engineering determ inations. M ay eith er p re p a r e draw in gs, o r d ir e ct th e ir p rep a ra tion by
lo w e r le v e l drafters.
C lass B . P e r fo r m s nonroutine and c o m p le x drafting assign m en ts that re q u ire the application
o f m o st o f the standardized drawing techniques r e g u la r ly used. D uties ty p ic a lly in volve such w ork as:
P r e p a re s w orking draw ings o f su b a sse m b lie s w ith ir r e g u la r s h a p es , m u ltiple fu n ction s, and p r e c is e
po sitio n a l relationships betw een com pon en ts; p r e p a r e s a rc h ite c tu r a l draw ings f o r con stru ction of a
building including detail draw ings of foundations, w a ll s e c t io n s , f lo o r pla n s, and r o o f. U ses accep ted
fo rm u la s and m anuals in m aking n e c e s s a r y com putation s to d eterm in e quantities of m a te r ia ls to be
used, lo a d c a p a citie s, strengths, s t r e s s e s , e tc . R e c e iv e s in itia l in s tru ctio n s , re q u ir e m e n ts , and
advice fr o m su p e rv iso r. C om pleted w ork is ch e c k e d fo r t e c h n ica l adequacy.
C lass C . P r e p a re s detail draw ings o f sin gle units or p a rts fo r en gin eerin g, con stru ction ,
m anufacturing, o r re p a ir p u rp o se s. T yp es o f draw in gs p r e p a r e d includ e is o m e t r ic p r o je ctio n s
(depicting three dim ension s in accu rate s c a le ) and s e c tio n a l view s to c la r if y position in g o f com ponents
and con vey needed in form ation. C o n solidates d etails fr o m a num ber o f s o u r c e s and adjusts or
tr a n s p o s e s scale as requ ired. Suggested m ethods of app roa ch , a pp licable p r e c e d e n ts , and advice on
s o u r c e m a teria ls are given with in itial assign m en ts. In stru ction s are le s s c o m p le te when assignm ents
r e c u r . W ork m ay be s p o t-ch e ck e d during p r o g r e s s .
D R A F T E R -T R A C E R
C op ies plans and draw ings p re p a re d by oth ers by p lacin g tr a c in g cloth o r p a p er o v e r draw ings
and tr a c in g with pen o r p e n cil. (D oes not in clu d e tr a c in g lim ite d to plans p r im a r ily c on s istin g of
straight lines and a la rge s ca le not requ irin g c lo s e delin ea tion .)
A N D /O R
P re p a re s sim ple o r repetitive draw ings o f e a s ily v is u a liz e d ite m s .
during p r o g r e s s .

W ork is c lo s e ly su p e r v is e d

Works on various types of electronic equipment and related devices by performing one or a
combination of the following: Installing, maintaining, repairing, overhauling, troubleshooting, modifying,
constructing, and testing. Work requires practical application of technical knowledge of electronics
principles, ability to determine malfunctions, and skill to put equipment in required operating condition.

Class_B. Applies comprehensive technical knowledge to solve complex problems (i.e., those
that. typically can be solved solely by properly interpreting manufacturers' manuals or similar
documents) in working on electronic equipment. Work involves: A familiarity with the interrelation­
ships of circuits; and judgment in determining work sequence and in selecting tools and testing
instruments, usually less complex than those used by the class A technician.

The equipment— consisting of either many different kinds of circuits or multiple repetition of
the same kind of circuit— includes, but is not limited to, the following: (a) Electronic transmitting
and receiving equipment (e.g., radar, radio, television, telephone, sonar, navigational aids), (b)
digital and analog computers, and (c) industrial and medical measuring and controlling equipment.

Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher level technician, and
work is reviewed for specific compliance with accepted practices and work assignments. May provide
technical guidance to lower level technicians.

This classification excludes repairmen of such standard electronic equipment as common office
machines and household radio and television sets; production assemblers and testers; workers whose
primary duty is servicing electronic test instruments; technicians who have administrative or
supervisory responsibility; and drafters, designers, and professional engineers.

Class C. Applies working technical knowledge to perform simple or routine tasks in working
on electronic equipment, following detailed instructions which cover virtually all procedures. Work
typically involves such tasks as: Assisting higher level technicians by performing such activities as
replacing components, wiring circuits, and taking test readings; repairing simple electronic equipment;
and using tools and common test instruments (e.g., multimeters, audio signal generators, tube testers,
oscilloscopes). Is not required to be familiar with the interrelationships of circuits. This knowledge,
however, may be acquired through assignments designed to increase competence (including classroom
training) so that worker can advance to higher level techniciam.

Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Glass A . Applies advanced technical knowledge to solve unusually complex problems (i.e.,
those that typically cannot be solved solely by reference to manufacturers1 manuals or similar
documents) in working on electronic equipment. Examples of such problems include location and
density of circuitry, electro-m agnetic radiation, isolating malfunctions, and frequent engineering
changes. Work involves: A detailed understanding of the interrelationships of circuits; exercising
independent judgment in performing such tasks as making circuit analyses, calculating wave form s,
tracing relationships in signal flow; and regularly using complex test instruments’ (e.g., dual trace
oscilloscopes, Q -m eters, deviation m eters, pulse generators).
Work may be reviewed by supervisor (frequently an engineer or designer) for general
compliance with accepted practices. May provide technical guidance to lower level technicians.

Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher level technician. Work
is typically spot checked, but is given detailed review when new or advanced assignments are involved.
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (Registered)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general medical direction to ill or injured
employees or other persons who become ill or suffer an accident on the premises of a factory or
other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid to the ill or
injured; attending to subsequent dressing of employees' injuries; keeping records of patients treated;
preparing accident reports for compensation or other purposes; assisting in physical examinations and
health evaluations of applicants and employees; and planning and carrying out programs involving health
education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment, or other activities affecting the health,
welfare, and safety of all personnel. Nursing supervisors or head nurses in establishments employing
more than one nurse are excluded.

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
BOILER TENDER

HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES

F ires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which employed with heat, power,
or steam.
Feeds fuels to fire by hand or operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; and
checks water and safety valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom equipment.

A ssists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades, by performing specific or
general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a worker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning
working area, machine, and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding materials or tools; and
performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind of work the helper is permitted
to perform varies from trade to trade: In some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting,
and holding materials and tools, and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to perform
specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are also performed by workers on a
full-time basis.

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE
Perform s the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain in good repair building
woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs,
casings, and trim made of wood in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Planning
and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal instructions; using a variety of
carpenter's hauidtools, portable power tools, atnd standard measuring instruments; making standard
shop computations relating to dimensions of work; and selecting materials necessary for the work. In
general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
Perform s a variety of electrical trade functions such as the installation, maintenance, or
repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of electrical equipment
such as generators, transform ers, switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers, m otors, heating units,
conduit system s, or other transm ission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or
other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working
standard computations relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a
variety of electrician's handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In general, the work of the
maintenance electrician requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of stationary engines and
equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the establishment in which employed with power, heat,
refrigeration, or air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment such as
steam engines, air com pressors, generators, m otors, turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipment,
steam boilers and boiler-fed water pumps; making equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation
of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May also supervise these operations. Head or
chief engineers in establishments employing more than one engineer are excluded.




MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in operating one or more than one type of machine tool (e.g., jig borer, grinding
machine, engine lathe, milling machine) to machine metcil for use in making or maintaining jigs,
fixtures, cutting tools, gauges, or metal dies or molds used in shaping or forming metal or nonmetallic
material (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work typically involves: Planning and performing
difficult machining operations which require complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; setting
up machine tool or tools (e.g., install cutting tools and adjust guides, stops, working tables, and other
controls to handle the size of stock to be machined; determine proper feeds, speeds, tooling, and
operation sequence or select those prescribed in drawings, blueprints, or layouts); using a variety of
precision measuring instruments; making necessary adjustments during machining operation to achieve
requisite dimensions to very close tolerances. May be required to select proper coolants and cutting
and lubricating oils, to recognize when tools need dressing, and to dress tools. In general, the work
of a machine-tool operator, toolroom, at the skill level called for in this classification requires
extensive knowledge of machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through considerable
on-the-job training and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not include machine-tool
operators, toolroom, employed in tool-and-die jobbing shops.
MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of metal parts of mechanical
equipment operated in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: interpreting written
instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist's handtools
and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools; shaping of metal

parts to c lo s e t o le r a n c e s ; m aking standard shop com putations relating to dim ension s o f w o rk , to o lin g ,
fe e d s , and speeds o f m achinin g; know ledge o f the w ork ing p ro p e r tie s o f the com m on m e ta ls ; selectin g
standard m a te r ia ls , p a r ts , and equipm ent re q u ire d fo r this w ork ; and fitting and assem b lin g parts into
m ech an ical equipm ent. In g e n e r a l, the m a c h in is t's w o rk n o rm a lly r e q u ire s a rounded train ing in
m a ch in e-sh op p r a c t ic e usually acq u ired through a fo r m a l app ren ticesh ip o r equivalent training
and ex p erien ce.

Paints and re d e c o r a te s w a lls , w o o d w ork , and fix tu r e s o f an establish m en t. W ork in volves the
fo llo w in g ; Knowledge of su rface p e c u lia ritie s and types of paint req u ired f o r . d ifferen t app lication s;
p rep arin g surface fo r painting by rem ovin g old fin ish o r by p lacin g putty o r f il l e r in n ail h oles and
in t e r s t ic e s ; and applying paint with spray gun o r b ru sh . M ay m ix c o lo r s , o ils , w hite le a d , and other
paint ingredients to obtaiin p ro p e r c o lo r o r co n s is te n c y . In g e n e ra l, the w ork o f the m aintenance
p ainter requires rounded training and e x p e r ie n c e usually a cq u ired through a formed, ap p ren ticesh ip or
equivadent training and ex p e rie n ce .

MECHANIC, AU TO M OTIVE (M aintenance)
P IP E F IT T E R , MAINTENANCE
R ep airs au tom ob iles, b u s e s , m o to rtr u c k s , and tr a c to r s of an establishm ent. W ork in volves
m ost of the fo llo w in g : Exam ining autom otive equipm ent to diagnose so u r c e of tro u b le ; disa sse m b lin g
equipment and p e rfo rm in g re p a ir s that involve the use of such handtools as w re n ch e s , gau g es, d r ills ,
o r s p e cia liz e d equipm ent in d isa sse m b lin g o r fitting p a rts; rep lacin g broken o r d e fe ctive parts fro m
stock; grinding and adjusting v a lv e s ; re a sse m b lin g and installing the va rio u s a s s e m b lie s in the v e h icle
and making n e c e s s a r y adjustm ents; and aligning w h e e ls, adjusting bra k e s and ligh ts, o r tightening body
bolts. In g en era l, the w ork of the autom otive m ech an ic re q u ire s rounded train ing and e x p e rie n ce usually
acquired through a fo rm a l app ren ticesh ip o r equivalent train ing and e x p e rie n ce .
This c la s s ific a tio n do e s not include m e ch a n ics who re p a ir c u s t o m e r s ' v e h ic le s in autom obile
rep a ir shops.
MECHANIC, M AINTENANCE
R ep airs m a ch in ery o r m e ch a n ica l equipm ent o f an establishm ent. W ork in volves m o st o f the
follow in g ; Exam ining m ach in es and m e ch a n ica l equipm ent to diagnose s o u rce of tro u b le ; dism antling
or partly dism antling m achines and p e rfo rm in g re p a irs that m ainly involve the use of handtools in
scraping and fitting p a rts ; rep la cin g broken o r d e fe ctiv e parts with item s obtained fro m stock; ord e rin g
the production of a rep lacem en t part by a m achine shop or sending o f the m achine to a m achine shop
f o r m a jor r e p a ir s ; p rep arin g w ritten sp e c ific a tio n s fo r m a jo r re p a ir s o r fo r the p roduction of parts
o r d ered fro m m achine shops; re a s s e m b lin g m ach in es; and m aking all n e c e s s a r y adjustm ents fo r
operation. In g e n e ra l, the w ork of a m aintenance m ech an ic re q u ire s rounded training and ex p e rie n ce
usually acqu ired through a formed, app ren ticesh ip o r equivalent train ing and e x p e rie n ce . E xcluded fro m
this c la s sific a tio n are w o rk e rs w hose p rim a ry duties in volve setting up o r adjusting m ach in es.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new m ach in es o r heavy equipm ent, and dism antles and in stalls m ach in es o r heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout are requ ired . W ork in volves m ost o f the fo llo w in g :
Planning and laying out of the w ork ; in terp reting blueprints o r other s p e c ific a tio n s ; using a v a rie ty of
handtools and rig gin g ; m aking standard shop com putations relating to s t r e s s e s , strength o f m a te r ia ls ,
apd cen ters o f gravity; aligning and balancing o f equipm ent; se lectin g .standard t o o ls , equipm ent, and
parts to be used; and installing and m aintaining in good o r d e r pow er tra n s m is s io n equipm ent such as
d riv es and speed r e d u c e r s . In g e n e ra l, the m illw r ig h t's w ork n o rm a lly re q u ire s a rounded train ing and
exp erien ce in the trad e a cqu ired through a fo rm a l app ren ticesh ip o r equivalent training and e x p e rie n ce .

Instadls o r rep a irs w ater, steam , g a s , o r oth er typ es of pipe and pipefittin gs in an es ta b lis h ­
m ent. W ork in volves m ost of the fo llo w in g ; Laying out o f w ork and m easu rin g to lo ca te position of
pipe fr o m drawings o r other w ritten s p e c ific a tio n s ; cutting v a riou s s iz e s of pipe to c o r r e c t lengths
w ith c h is e l and ham m er o r oxyacetylene t o r c h o r p ip e-cu ttin g m a ch in es; threading pipe w ith stock s and
d ie s ; bending pipe by han d-driven o r p o w e r -d r iv e n m a ch in es; assem blin g pipe with cou plin gs and
fastening pipe to h an gers; making standard shop com putation s rela tin g to p r e s s u r e s , flow , and s ize of
pipe requ ired; and making standard te s ts to d eterm in e w hether fin ish ed pipes m eet s p e c ific a tio n s . In
generad, the w ork of the m aintenance p ip e fitte r re q u ir e s rounded train ing and e x p e r ie n c e usually
acq u ired through a formatl appren ticeship o r equivalent train ing and ex p e r ie n c e . W o r k e r s p r im a rily
engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating sy stem s are e x clu d e d .
S H E E T -M E T A L W ORKER, M AINTENANCE
F a b rica te s, instadls, and m aintains in g ood r ep a ir the sh e e t-m e ta l equipm ent and fix tu res (such
as m achine guards, gre a se pans, sh e lv e s , l o c k e r s , tanks, v e n tila to r s , ch u tes, ducts, m eta l roofin g )
of an establishm ent. W ork involves m ost o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and laying out adl types of sh eetm e ta l m aintenance w ork fro m blu eprin ts, m o d e ls , o r other s p e c ific a tio n s ; setting up and operating adl
available types of sh e e t-m e ta l w orking m a ch in es; using a v a rie ty o f handtools in cutting, bending,
fo rm in g , shaping, fitting, and assem bling; and in stallin g sh e e t-m e ta l a r tic le s as req u ired . In g en era l,
the w ork of the m aintenance sh e e t-m e ta l w o rk e r r e q u ir e s rounded train ing and e x p e r ie n c e usually
acq u ired through a fo rm a l appren ticeship o r equivadent train in g and ex p e r ie n c e .
TO O L AND DIE MAKER
Constructs and rep a irs jig s , fix tu r e s , cutting t o o ls , gau g es, or m etal dies or m old s used in
shaping o r form ing metad or n o n -m e ta llic m a te r ia l (e .g ., p la s t ic ,
p la s te r , r u b b er, g la s s ). W ork
ty p ica lly in volves: Planning and laying out w ork a cco rd in g to m o d e ls , b lu ep rin ts , draw in gs, or other
w ritten o r oral s p e cifica tio n s ; under stain ding the w ork ing p r o p e r tie s of com m on m etals and a lloy s;
se le ctin g appropriate m a te ria ls , t o o ls , and p r o c e s s e s req u ir e d to co m p le te task; m aking n e c e s s a r y
shop com putation; setting up and operating v a riou s m achine t o o ls aind rela ted equipm ent; using va riou s
to o l and die m a k e r's handtools and p r e c is io n m easu rin g in stru m en ts; w ork in g to v e r y c lo s e t o le r a n c e s ;
h eat-trea tin g m etal parts and finished to o ls and dies to achieve re q u ire d q u a lities; fitting and
assem blin g parts to p r e s c r ib e d to le r a n ce s and allow a n ces. In g en era l, to o l and die m a k e r 's w ork
re q u ire s rounded training in m a ch in e -sh o p and t o o lr o o m p r a c tic e usually a cqu ired through fo rm a l
appren ticeship or equivalent training and e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s -in d u s tr y wage study p u r p o s e s , this c la s s ific a t io n does not includ e to o l and die
m a k ers who (1) are em ployed in to o l and die jobbin g shops or (2) p rod u ce forg in g dies (die s in k ers).

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND W ATCHM EN

LA B O R E R , M ATER IA L HANDLING

G uard. P e r fo r m s routine p o lic e duties, e ith er at fixe d post o r on to u r, m aintaining o r d e r ,
using arm s o r f o r c e w here n e c e s s a r y . Includes gatem en who are stationed at gate and ch eck on
identity of e m p loy ees and other p e rs o n s e n terin g.

A w ork er em ployed in a w a reh ou se, m anufacturin g plant, s to r e , or other establish m en t w hose
duties involve one o r m o re of the fo llo w in g ; Loading and unloading va riou s m a te r ia ls and m erch a n d ise
on o r fr o m freigh t c a r s , tru ck s, o r oth er tra n sp ortin g d e v ic e s ; unpacking, sh elvin g, or placin g
m a te r ia ls or m erch an dise in p ro p e r s tora ge loca tion ; and tra n sp ortin g m a te r ia ls or m erch a n d ise by
handtruck, c a r , o r w h eelb arrow . L on gsh orem en , who loa d and unload ships are e x c lu d e d .

W atchm an.
and ille g a l entry.

M akes rounds o f p r e m is e s p e r io d ic a lly in p rotectin g p ro p e rty against f ir e , theft,

JANITOR, P O R T E R , OR C LEA N E R
C leans and keeps in an o r d e r ly condition fa c to r y w orking a reas and w a s h ro o m s , o r p r e m is e s
o f an o ffic e , apartm ent h ou se, o r c o m m e r c ia l o r other establishm ent. Duties involve a com bin ation of
the follow in g; Sw eeping, m opping o r scru bbin g, and polish ing f lo o r s ; rem ovin g ch ips, tra sh , and other
refu se; dusting equipm ent, fu rn itu re , o r fix tu r e s ; polish ing m etal fix tu re s o r trim m in g s ; providing
supplies and m in or m aintenance s e r v ic e s ; and cleaning la v a to r ie s , s h o w e rs, and r e s t r o o m s . W o rk e rs
who s p e cia liz e in window w ashing are ex clu d e d .




ORDER FIL LE R
F ills shipping or tra n s fe r o r d e r s fo r fin ish ed good s fr o m stored m erch a n d ise in a c c o r d a n c e
w ith sp ecifica tion s on sales s lip s , c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s , or other in stru ction s. M ay, in addition to
fillin g ord e rs and indicating item s fille d o r om itted, k eep r e c o r d s of outgoing o r d e r s , req u isition
additional stock o r rep ort short supplies to s u p e r v is o r , and p e r fo r m other rela ted duties,
P A C K E R , SHIPPING
P rep a res finished products fo r shipm ent o r s tora g e by p lacin g them in shipping co n ta in e r s ,
the s p e c ific operations p e r fo rm e d being dependent upon the typ e, s iz e , and num ber of units to be
pack ed , the type of container e m ployed, and m ethod of shipm ent. W ork re q u ir e s the placin g of item s
in shipping containers and m ay involve one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g : K now ledge o f v a r io u s item s of

stock in o r d e r to v e r ify content; s e le ctio n o f appropriate type and s ize o f con tain er; in sertin g
e n c lo s u r e s in con ta in er; using e x c e l s i o r o r o th er m a te ria l to prevent breakage o r dam age; c lo s in g and
sealin g con ta in er; and applying la b e ls o r enterin g identifying data on con tain er. P a ck e rs who a lso m ake
w ooden b o x e s o r c r a te s are e x c lu d e d .

fo llo w s :

T r u c k d riv e r (com bin ation of s iz e s lis te d sep a ra tely )
T r u c k d r iv e r , light (under IV2 ton s)
T r u c k d r iv e r , m edium (IV2 to and including 4 ton s)
T r u c k d r iv e r , heavy (o v e r 4 to n s, t r a ile r type)
T r u c k d riv e r , heavy (o v e r 4 to n s , other than t r a ile r type)

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLE R K
P r e p a r e s m e rch a n d is e fo r shipm ent, o r r e c e iv e s and is re sp o n sib le fo r in com in g shipm ents
o f m e r ch a n d is e or oth er m a te r ia ls . Shipping w ork in v o lv e s : A know ledge of shipping p r o c e d u r e s ,
p r a c t ic e s , r o u te s , available m ean s o f tra n sp o rta tio n , and rates; and preparing r e c o r d s of the goods
sh ipped, m aking up b ills of la d in g, p osting w eight and shipping ch a r g e s , and keeping a file o f shipping
r e c o r d s . M ay d ir e ct o r a s s is t in p re p a rin g the m erch an dise fo r shipm ent. R eceiving w ork in v o lv e s :
V e r ify in g o r d irectin g oth ers in v e r ify in g the c o r r e c t n e s s of shipm ents against b ills o f lading, in v o ic e s ,
o r other r e c o r d s ; ch eck in g fo r sh o rta g e s and re je ctin g dam aged good s; routing m e rch a n d ise or
m a te r ia ls to p r o p e r depa rtm en ts; and m aintaining n e c e s s a r y re c o rd s and file s .

F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , tr u c k d r iv e rs are c la s s ifie d by s ize and type of equipm ent, as
( T r a c t o r - t r a ile r should be rated on the b a s is o f t r a ile r ca p a c ity .)

TR U C K E R, POW ER
goods

O perates a m anually co n tr o lle d g a s o lin e - o r e le c t r ic -p o w e r e d truck o r t r a c to r to tran sport
and m a te r ia ls o f all kinds about a w a reh ou se, m anufacturing plant, o r other establishm ent.
F o r wage study p u r p o s e s , w o rk e rs are c la s s ifie d by type of tru ck ,

as follow s:

T r u c k e r , pow er (fo r k lift)
T r u c k e r , pow er (oth er than fo rk lift)

F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , w o rk e rs are c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:
R e ceiv in g c le r k
Shipping c le r k
Shipping and re c e iv in g c le r k

W AREHOUSEMAN

TR U C K D RIV ER
D riv e s a tru ck w ithin a city o r in d u stria l area to tran sp ort m a te r ia ls , m e rch a n d ise , equipm ent,
o r m en betw een v a rio u s types o f esta b lish m en ts such as: M anufacturing plantg, freigh t d epots,
w a r e h o u s e s , w h oles a le and r e ta il es ta b lis h m e n ts , o r betw een retail establishm ents and c u s to m e r s '
h ou ses o r p la c e s of b u s in e s s . M ay a ls o lo a d o r unload truck with or without h e lp e r s , m ake m in o r
m e c h a n ic a l r e p a ir s , and k eep tru ck in g ood w orking o r d e r .
D riv e r -sa le s m e n and o v e r -th e -r o a d
d r iv e r s are exclu d ed .

As d ir e cte d , p e r fo r m s a v a rie ty of w arehousing duties w hich req u ire an understanding of
the e sta b lish m e n t's storage plan. W ork in volves m ost o f the follow in g : V erifyin g m a teria ls (or
m e rch a n d is e ) against re ce iv in g d ocum ents, noting and reportin g d is c re p a n c ie s and obvious dam ages;
routing m a te ria ls to p r e s c r ib e d storage lo ca tio n s ; s torin g, stacking, o r palletizing m a teria ls in
a cco rd a n ce with p r e s c r ib e d storage m ethods; rearran gin g and taking inventory of stored m a te ria ls ;
exam ining s to re d m a te r ia ls and reportin g deteriora tion and dam age; rem ovin g m a teria l fro m storage
and preparin g it fo r shipm ent. M ay operate hand or pow er tru ck s in p erform in g w arehousing duties.
E xclude w o rk e rs w hose p rim a ry duties involve shipping and receiv in g w ork (see shipping and
re ce iv in g c le r k and p a c k e r , shipping), o r d e r fillin g (see o r d e r f il l e r ) , or operating pow er tru ck s (see
tr u c k e r , po w e r).

A rea Wage S urvey bulletins will be issued once every 3 years. These bulletins will contain information on establishment practices and supplementary benefits as well as earnings. In the interim years, supplements containing data on
earnings only will be issued at no additional cost to holders o f the A rea Wage bulletin. I f you wish to receive these supplements, please com plete the coupons below and mail to any o f the BLS regional addresses listed on the back
cover o f this publication. N o further action on your part is necessary. Each year, you will receive the supplement when it is published.

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Please send a co p y .o f Supplement I to BLS Bulletin

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Zip Code

City and State

Zip Code

Available On Request—
The follow ing areas are s u rveyed p e r io d ic a lly fo r use in ad m inistering the S e r v ic e C on tract A ct o f ,1965.
the BLS region al o ffic e s shown on the back c o v e r .
A la m ogord o—
Las C r u c e s , N. M ex,
A laska
Albany, Ga.
A lbuquerque, N. M ex.
A lexan dria, La.
Alpena, Standish and Tawas C ity, M ich.
Ann A r b o r , M ich.
A tlantic C ity, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.—
S.C.
B a k e r s fie ld , C alif.
Baton Rouge, La.
Battle C re e k , M ich.
Beaum ont— o rt A rth u i^ O ran ge, T ex.
P
B ilo x i— ulfport and P a sca g o u la , M is s .
G
B irm in gh am , Ala.
B o is e C ity, Idaho
B re m e rto n , W ash.
B rid g e p o r t, N orw alk and S tam ford, Conn.
B ru n sw ick , Ga.
B u rlington, V t.—
N.Y.
Cape C od, M ass.
C edar R apids, Iowa
Champaign— rbana, 111.
U
C h arleston , S.C.
C harlotte— aston ia, N.C.
G
C heyenne, W yo.
C la r k s v ille , Tenn. and H opk in sville, Ky.
C o lo ra d o S p rin gs, C olo.
C olum bia, S.C.
C olum bus, Ga.—
Ala.
C olum bus, M iss.
C ran e, Ind.
D ecatu r, 111.
Des M oin es, Iowa
Dothan, Ala.
D ulu th -S uperior, Minn.— is.
W
E l P a so , T ex.
Eugene— prin gfield, O reg.
S
F a y e tte v ille , N .C.
F itchburg— e o m in s te r , M ass.
L
F o r t Sm ith, A rk.—
Okla.
F r e d e r ic k — agerstow n, M d.— h am bersbu rg,
H
C
Pa.— artin sb u rg, W. Va.
M
Gadsden—
Anniston, Ala.
G o ld s b o r o , N .C.
Grand Island— astings, N ebr.
H
G reat F a lls , Mont.
Guam
H a rrisb u rg—
Lebauion, Pa.
Huntington—
Ashland, W. Va.—
Ky.—
Ohio
K n o x v ille , Tenn.
L a re d o , T ex.
Las V e g a s, Nev.
L ittle Rock— orth L ittle R o ck , A rk.
N

C opies of public r e le a s e s are o r w ill be available at no c o s t w hile su pplies last fr o m any of
L im a, Ohio
Log an sport— e ru , Ind.
P
L orain— ly ria , Ohio
E
L ow er Eastern Shore, Md.— a.—Del.
V
Lynchburg, Va.
M acon, Ga.
M adison, W is.
M ansfield, Ohio
M arquette, Escamaba, Sault Ste. M a r ie , M ich.
M cA llen— h arr—
P
Edinburg and B row n s v ille—
Harlingen—
Sam Ben ito, T ex.
M edford—
Klaimath F a lls— rants P a s s , O reg.
G
M eridian, M iss.
M id dlesex, Monmouth, and O cean C o s ., N.J.
M obile, Ala. and P e n sa co la , F la.
M ontgom ery, Ala.
N ashville— avidson, Tenn.
D
New Bern—
Jack so n v ille , N .C.
North Dakota
N orw ich— roton—
G
New London, Conn.
Orlauido, Fla.
Oxnard—
Sim i V alley— entura, C a lif.
V
Panam a City, Fla.
P e o r ia , 111.
Phoenix, A riz,
Pine Bluff, Ark.
Portsm outh, N.H.— e.— a ss.
M
M
P u eblo, C olo.
P u erto R ico
Reno, Nev.
Richland—
Kennewick— alla W alla—
W
Pendleton, W ash.— reg.
O
R ive rsid e —
San B ernardino— ntario, C alif.
O
Salina, Kans.
Sandusky, Ohio
Santa Barbara^Santa M arie—
L om p oc, Calif.
Savannah, Ga.
Selm a, Ala.
Sherman— enison, T ex.
D
S h revep ort, La.
Sioux F a lls , S. Dak.
Spokane, Wash.
S pringfield, 111.
Springfield— h icopee— olyok e, M a ss.—
C
H
Conn.
Stockton, C alif.
T a co m a , Wash.
Tampa—
St. P e te rsb u rg , F la.
Topeka, Kans.
T u cson , A riz.
V a lle jo — a irfie ld —
F
Napa, C a lif.
W aco and K illeen— e m p le , T ex .
T
W aterloo—
Cedar F a lls , Iowa
W est Texas Plains

R ep orts fo r the follow in g su rveys conducted in the p r io r y e a r but sin ce discontinu ed are also available:
Grand F o r k s , N. Dak.
Sacram ento, C a lif*
San A n gelo, T e x * *
W ilm ington, Del.—
N.J.— d.*
M

A b ilen e, T e x .* *
B illin g s , M ont.*
C orpu s C h ris ti, T e x *
F r e s n o , C a lif.*
*
Expanded to an a rea w age su rvey in fis c a l y e a r 1975.
** Included in W est T exas P lains.

See in sid e back c o v e r .

The fourteenth a n n u a l r ep ort on s a la r ie s fo r accountants, au d itors, c h ie f accountants, attorn eys, jo b analysts, d ir e cto r s o f perso n n e l, b u y e rs, c h e m is ts , e n g in e e r s , engin eerin g te c h n icia n s , d ra ftsm en , and
c le r ic a l em p loyees is available. O rd er as BLS B ulletin 1804, N ational Survey o f P r o fe s s io n a l, A d m in istra tive, T ech n ica l, and C le r ica l Pay, M arch 1973, $ 1.05 a co p y , fr o m any of the BLS r eg ion a l s a les
o ffic e s shown on the back c o v e r , o r fr o m the Superintendent o f D ocu m en ts, U.S. G overn m en t P rintin g O ffic e , W ashington, D.C. 20402.




Area Wage Surveys
A lis t o f the la test av a ila b le b u lletin s o r bulletin supplem ents is p re se n te d below . A d ir e c t o r y o f are a w age studies including m o r e lim ited studies conducted at the request of the Em ploym ent
Standards A d m in istra tion o f the D epartm en t o f L abor is available on request. B u lletin s m ay be pu rch ased fr o m any o f the BLS r e g io n a l o ffic e s shown on the b a ck c o v e r . Bulletin supplem ents m ay be
obtained w ithout c o s t , w h ere in d ica te d , fr o m BLS region al o ffic e s .
A re a

Bulletin num ber
and p r ic e *

Akron, Ohio, Dec. 1973*________________________________________________________________ 1795-10, 65 cents
Albany-Schenectady—
Troy, N. Y. , Mar.
1974__________________________ ____ ________Suppl.
Free
Free
Albuquerque, N. M ex., M ar. 1974 2 ____________________________________________________ Suppl.
AUentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa.— .J., May 1974 2_________________________________ Suppl.
N
Free
Anaheim-Santa Ana—Garden Grove, Calif. 1 3__________________________________________
Atlanta, Ga., May 1974_________________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Austin, T e x ., Dec. 1973_________________________________________________________________Suppl.
Free
Free
Baltimore, M d., Aug. 1974------- ..-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Suppl.
Beaumont-Port Arthur—
Orange, T e x ., May 1974 2____________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Billings, Mont., July 1974*________________________________ -___________________—----------- 1850-6, 75 cents
Binghamton, N.Y —Pa., July 1974 _____________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Birmingham, A la ., M ar. 1974 2 ________________________________________________________Suppl.
Free
Boise City, Idaho, Nov. 1973 2__________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Boston, M a s s ., Aug. 1 9 7 4 ______________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Buffalo, N .Y ., Oct. 1973 ........................... .............................................. ............................ .......-— Suppl.
Free
Burlington, V t., Dec. 1973 2____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Canton, Ohio, May 1974 1 _______________________________________________________________ 1795-23, 80 cents
Charleston, W. V a ., M ar. 1974 2_______________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Charlotte, N .C ., Jan. 1974 2____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Chattanooga, Tenn.— a., Sept. 1973 ___________________________________________________ Suppl.
G
Free
Chicago, 111., May 1974 _______________________________________________________________ 1795-27, $1.10
Cincinnatti, O hio-Ky—Ind., Feb. 1974*_______________________________________________ 1795-16, 75 cents
Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1973____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1973______ _______________________________________________________Suppl.
Free
Corpus Christi, Tex., July 1 974 *______________________________________________________ 1850-3, 75 cents
D allas, T e x., Oct. 19732________________________________________________________________Suppl.
Free
Dallas—
Fort Worth, Tex. 3 ______________________________________________________________
Davenport—
Rock Island—
Moline, Iowa—
111., Feb. 1974 * ----------------------------------------------- 1795-14, 65 cents
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1973 _________,_______________________________ _______________________
Daytona Beach, F la., Aug. 19741______________________________________________________ 1850-1, 75 cents
Denver, Colo., Dec. 1973 i _____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Denver—
Boulder, Colo. 1 3------------------------------------------- .---------------------------------------------------Des M oines, Iowa, May 1974 2__________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Detroit, M ich., M ar. 1974______________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Durham, N .C ., Dec. 1973 2 _____________________________________________________________ 1795-9, 65 cents
Fort Lauderdale—
Hollywood and West Palm Beach, Fla.,
Apr. 1974 -------- -------- ------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Suppl.
Free
Fort Worth, T ex., Oct. 1973 2 __________________________________________________________Suppl.
Free
Fresno, Calif. 1 3 ________________________________________________________________________
Gainesville, Fla. 1 3______________________________________________________________________
Green Bay, W is., July 1974______________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Greensboro—
Winston-Salem—
High Point, N .C ., Aug. 1974 1 --------------------------------------- 1850-2, 80 cents
Greenville, S .C ., May 1974 ---------------------------------------Suppl.
Free
Hartford, Conn. 1 3 ______________________________________________________________________
Houston, T e x., Apr. 1974 1 _____________________________________________________________ 1795-22, 85 cents
Huntsville, A la ., Feb. 1974 1------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1795-13, 65 cents
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1973 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
Free
Jackson, M is s ., Jan. 1 9 7 4 * ____________________________________________________________ 1795-12, 65 cents
Jacksonville, F la., Dec. 1973 1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1795-8. 65 cents
Kansas City, M o .-K a n s., Sept. 1974-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
Free
Lawrence—
Haverhill, M ass.— .H ., June 1974 2 --------------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
N
Free
Lexington, Ky., Nov. 1973___________________
...S u p p l.
Freq
Little Rock-North Little Rock, A rk ., July 1973 2 -------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
Free
Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif. 3 --------------------- ----- ------------------------------------------- ----------Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa Ana—
Garden
Grove, C alif., Oct. 1973 2------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Suppl.
Free
Louisville, Ky.—
Ind., Nov. 1973----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Suppl.
Free
Lubbock, T e x., M ar. 1974 2 _____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
Free
Manchester, N .H ., July 1973 2----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
Free
* Prices are determ ined by the Government Printing O ffice and are subject to change.
1 Data on establishm ent practices and supplementary w age provisions are also presented.
2 N o longer surveyed.
3 T o be surveyed.




A rea

Bulletin num ber
and p r ic e *

M elbourne— itu s v ille — o c o a , F la ., A ug. 1974* _____________________________________ 1850-5, 75 cents
T
C
M em ph is, Tenn.— r k ., N ov. 19 7 3 *____________________________________________________ 1795-11, 65 cents
A
M ia m i, F la ., N ov. 1973 ______________________ ___
Suppl.
F re e
F ree
M idland and O d e ssa , T e x ., Jan. 1974 2________________________________________________ Suppl.
M ilw aukee, W is ., M ay 1974______________________________________________
Suppl.
F re e
M in neapolis—
St. Paul, M inn., Jan. 1974 ______________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
M uskegon— uskegon H eigh ts, M ic h ., June 1974 2_____________________________________ Suppl.
M
F ree
N assau—
Suffolk, N .Y . 1 3 ________________________________________________________________
N ew ark, N .J. 1 3________________________________________________________________________
N ew ark and J e r s e y C ity, N .J ., Jan. 1974 2_____________________________________________Suppl.
F re e
New H aven, Conn., Jan. 1974 2 ______________________________________________________...S u p p l.
F re e
New O rle a n s, L a ., Jan. 1974 *____ ____________________________________________________ 1795-15, 70 cents
New Y o rk , N .Y .-N .J . 1 3 ________________________________________________________________
F ree
New Y ork and Nassau—
Suffolk, N .Y ., A p r. 1974 2 ____________________________________ Suppl.
N orfolk— irgin ia Beach— ortsm ou th , Va.— .C . 3_____________________________________
V
P
N
N orfolk— irgin ia B e a ch -P o rts m o u th and N ewport News—
V
H am pton, V a ., Jan. 1974______________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
N ortheast Pennsylvania 1 3 ___________________________ __________________________________
Oklahom a C ity, O kla., Aug. 1974*.____________________________________________________ 1850-7, 80 cents
O m aha, N ebr.—
Iowa, Sept. 1973__________________________________________________*____ Suppl.
_
F re e
P a terson — lifton— a s s a ic , N .J ., June 1974 __________________________________________ Suppl.
C
P
F ree
P h iladelphia, P a .-N .J ., Nov. 1973 1___________________________________________________ 1795-19, 85 cents
P h oen ix, A r i z . , June 1974 2 ___________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
F ree
P ittsburgh, P a ., Jan. 1974 ____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
P ortlan d, M aine, N ov. 1973 * __________________________________________________________ 1795-6, 65 cents
P ortlan d, O reg.— ash., M ay 197 4*_______________________________________ fi___________ 1795-26, 85 cents
W
P ou gh k eepsie, N .Y . 1 3 _________________________________________________________________
Pou ghkeepsie—
Kingston—
Newburgh, N .Y ., June 1974_________________________________Suppl.
F ree
P ro v id e n c e -W a r w ic k —
Paw tucket, R .I.— a s s ., M ay 1974 1___________________________ 1795-24, 80 cents
M
R a leigh , N .C ., D e c. 1973 1 2------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1795-7, 65 cents
R a leigh — urham , N .C . 3 _______ ________________________________________________________
D
R ich m on d, V a ., M ar. 1974*------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1795-25, 80 cents
R iv e r s id e —
San B ernardino— n tario, C a lif., D ec. 1973 2_____________________________ Suppl.
O
F re e
R o c k fo r d , 111., June 1974 2_____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
F ree
St. L o u is , M o.—
111., M ar. 1974 ___________ _____________________________________________Suppl.
S acram en to, C a lif. 1 3 __________________________________________________________________
Saginaw, M ich . 1 3 ______________________________________________________________________
Salt Lake C ity, Utah, Nov. 1973 ______________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
San A n ton io, T e x ., M ay 1974 *_________________________________________________________ 1795-21, 65 cents
San D iego, C a lif., N ov. 1973___________________________________________________________Suppl.
F re e
San F r a n c is c o —
Oakland, C a lif., M a r. 1974 ___________________________________________Suppl.
F ree
F ree
San J o s e , C a lif., M ar. 1974---------------------- --------- —____________________________________ Suppl.
Savannah, G a., M ay 1974 2______________________*______________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Scranton, P a ., July 1973 * 2 ___ ________________________________________________________ 1795-3, 55 cents
Seattle— v e re tt, W ash., Jan. 1974 ____________________________________________________ 1795-17, 65 cents
E
Sioux F a lls , S. D ak., D e c. 1973 2 ______________________________________________________Suppl.
F ree
South Bend, Ind., M ar. 1974*__________________________________________________________ 1795-18, 65 cents
Spokane, W ash., June 1974 2 ___________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
S y ra cu s e , N .Y ., July 1974 *,--------------------------------------- . -------------------------------------------------- 1850-4, 80 cents
Tampa—
St. P e te r s b u r g , F la ., A ug. 1973 2 _____________________________________________Suppl.
F re e
T o le d o , Ohio— ic h ., A p r . 1974 _____________________ ____________________________ _____ Suppl.
M
F ree
T ren ton , N .J., Sept. 197 4----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
F ree
W ashington, D .C .— d.— a ., M a r. 1974 _______________________________________________ Suppl.
M
V
F ree
W aterbury, C on n., M a r. 1974 2________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
W a te rlo o , Iowa, Nov. 1973 1 2__________________________________________________________ 1795-5, 60 cents
W ichita, K ans., A p r. 1974 1 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1795-20, 65 cents
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s ., M ay 1974__________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Y o rk , P a ., F eb . 1974 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
F re e
Youngstown— arren , O hio, Nov. 1973 2_______________________________________________ Suppl.
W
F re e

POSTAGE AND FEES PAID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR S TA TIS TIC S
W A SH IN GTO N, D.C. 20212

LAB 441

O FFIC IA L BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE $300

THIRD CLASS MAH.

BUREAU OF LABOR S TA TIS TIC S REGIONAL OFFICES
Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South W acker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin

Region VI
1100 Commerce St. Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Arkansas
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahom a
Texas




New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Region III
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelpnia. Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)
Delaware
District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
W est Virginia

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)
Alabam a
Florida
G eorgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee

Regions V II and V III
Federal Office Building
911 W alnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
V II
V III
Iowa
Colorado
Kansas
Montana
Missouri
North Dakota
Nebraska
South Dakota
Utah
Wyoming

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)
IX
X
Arizona
Alaska
California
Idaho
Hawaii
Oregon
Nevada
Washington


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102